Sessional Papers - 1921

PAPERS LAID BEFORE THE LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL OF HONGKONG 1921

Table of Contents

1. Building Facilities

Report of the Committee appointed for the Purpose of Considering What Measures Can Be Best Taken

2. Census, 1921

Report on the

3. Census, 1921

Preliminary Report on the

4. Estimates for 1922

Financial Statements in Connection With the

5. Estimates of Expenditure

Abstract Showing the Differences Between the approved Estimates for 1921 and the Estimates for 1922

6. Fire Brigade

Report on, and Proposals for increasing Its Efficiency

7. Industrial Employment of Children

Report of the Commission appointed to Enquire into the Conditions of the, and the Desirability and Feasibility of Legislation for the Regulation of Such Employment

8. Jurors

List for 1921

9. Quarterly Return of Excesses on Sub-Heads Met By Savings Under Heads of Expenditure

For the 2nd Quarter of 1921

10. Quarterly Return of Excesses on Sub-Heads Met By Savings Under Heads of Expenditure

For the 4th Quarter of 1920

11. Quarterly Return of Excesses on Sub-Heads Met By Savings Under Heads of Expenditure

For the 1st Quarter of 1921

12. Quarterly Return of Excesses on Sub-Heads Met By Savings Under Heads of Expenditure

For the 3rd Quarter of 1921

13. Rents amendment Bill, 1921

Report of the Standing Law Committee on the

14. Sea-Bathing

Report of the Committee of the Legislative Council on the Provision of Facilities for

15. Water Carriage

Report of a Committee appointed to Consider the Feasibility of Extending the System of, By Pumping Up Salt-Water from the Harbour and the Provision of Suitable Pipes therefor

 

145

C.S.O. 16 in 1414/21.

HONGKONG.

No. 1921

13

Report of the Committee appointed by His Excellency the Governor, at the Meeting of the Legislative Council, held on Thursday, the 1st September, 1921, for the purpose of considering what measures can be best taken :-

(i.) To facilitate the prompt acquisition by applicants of

sites which they require:

(ii.) To facilitate the prompt passing of building plans.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor, 14th November, 1921.

Note:The following abbreviations are used in this Report:-

G. in C.-for His Excellency the Governor in Council. D. P. W.-for the Honourable Director of Public Works. B. A. -for Building Authority.

A.D.P.W.-for Assistant Director of Public Works.

P. W. D.-for Public Works Department.

P. L. S.-for the Principal Land Surveyor.

L. S.

O.-for the Land Survey Office.

O. C.

B. O.

-for the Officer in charge of the Building Ordinance Office. O.-for the Building Ordinance Office.

H. S.

D.-for the Head of the Sanitary Department.

As regards the first point referred to the Committee, namely the facilitating of the prompt acquisition by applicants of sites which they require, Messrs. Bird and Pollock have been much assisted by interviews which they held jointly with the P. L. S., on the 15th and 30th September.

As a result, we are satisfied that delay is due to the following causes :

1. Considerably increased land development in the Colony, coupled with the

fact that some of the newly developed areas are far afield.

2. Insufficiency of staff.

(a.) We find, as regards the European Staff, that Mr. Anderson was transferred from the L.S.O. to Praya East Reclamation Work in the middle of last year, and Mr. Pegg, who was engaged on Survey work in the New Territories last year, was transferred from the L.S.O. to the Engineering staff, for Roads work, in January of this

year.

(b.) Insufficient number of Chinese Surveyors. At least six more are

required in our opinion.

(e.) Insufficient number of Chinese draughtsmen. It would appear that

two more are required.

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146

(d.) The P.L.S. recommends the appointment of an European Clerk (a new post) in the Clerical Office, to take charge of that office and of the filing and indexing of records.

3. Lack of office accommodation and of facilities for filing records. With regard to the above causes of delay, we recommend

(i.) That one additional European Survey Officer be now engaged for the L.S.O., as Mr. Douglas reports that he can carry on the work of the Ordnance Survey Office without another European Assistant, and as the European Clerk proposed in (iv) will lighten the duties of the European Surveyors.

(ii.) That at least six additional Chinese Surveyors be engaged.

(iii:) That at least two more Chinese draughtsmen be engaged.

(iv.) That an European Clerk, to take charge of the Clerical Office, be

engaged.

(v.) That the Building of the additional quarters for the staff of the P. W. D.

be commenced at the earliest possible date.

As regards the second point referred to the Committee, Mr. Pollock interviewed Mr. White about the middle of September and Messrs. Bird and Pollock had a joint interview with Mr. White on the 30th September.

We are satisfied that delay in the passing of building plans have been due to consi- derable recent increase of work in the B. O. O. and to the following causes :-

1. Shortage in indoor staff of the B. O. 0.

2. The absence of a Clerk of Works, a new post recommended by the O. C.

Such Clerk of Works would have power to deal with (inter alia) applica- tions for permits; levels; scavenging lanes; cemeteries and drainage propo- sals, and would thus relieve the O. C. and his two assistants in the B. O. 0. of some work; in addition to relieving the present Drainage Foreman to a certain extent.

3. Numerous appeals to the G. in C. under section 265 of Ordinance 1 of 1903.

4. Insufficient filling in, in some cases, by persons sending in plans, of the form

in Schedule K to Ordinance No. 1 of 1903.

5. The absence in Schedule K of any forms asking for-

(a.) Modifications, and

(b.) Exemptions.

6. Insufficient accommodation and means for filing Records in the B.0.0.

To obviate the above causes of delay, we recommend :-

(i.) (a.) That one extra European Assistant be engaged for the indoor staff

as soon as possible, to meet the increase of work.

(b.) That one extra draughtsman be engaged.

(c.) That a stenographer-typist be engaged, as the O. C. is clear that the engagement of such an assistant would be of much use to him.

(d.) See also (ii) infra.

(ii.) That a Clerk of Works be engaged, with duties as above defined. (iii.) That all plans asking for exemptions or modifications, under those sections of Ordinance 1 of 1903, which are at present included in section 264 (b) and also in sections 135-8, and 151, 153, 154, 162, 175, 176, 180, 185, 188, and 216 of 1 of 1903 be dealt with, as follows (making of course, the necessary amendments in the above sections and also in sections 264 (b) and 265) :-

(a.) That the applicant state, clearly, on the above proposed new and enlarged form K, what applications or exemptions he requires and under what sections respectively.

:

1

147

(b.) That such plans and applications be sent in direct to the B.A. (c.) That such plans be immediately inspected on arrival to see whether

any application for modification or exemption is being asked for. (d.) That the B.A. decide, as soon as possible, whether to grant or refuse

such exemptions or modifications as asked for.

(e.) That, in the event of the B.A. deciding not to grant them, they may be immediately referred to the Committee of five hereinafter referred to, to be dealt with by them finally, in the place of the G. in C. (f.) That such Committee of five consist of the following members :-

The D.P.W. as Chairman,

not.

Two Unofficial Members of the Legislative Council (One

European and One Chinese) and

Two Architects.

The Committee to meet once a week, for the purpose of decid- ing whether such modifications or exemptions should be granted or Two architects are necessary as it would be troublesome to have an architect appointed just for the day in the event of one of the two architects on the Committee being an interested party, and, therefore, disqualified from sitting on it.

As regards the composition of that Committee the D.P.W. states that he would prefer one architect and one outside expert in Naval or Military employment in place of Two architects, but Messrs. Bird and Pollock consider two architects preferable, as such an outside architect as is suggested would not be conversant with the rather complicated provisions of and the working of Ordinance 1 of 1903 or with local conditions.

(g.) That the architect concerned be at liberty to appear before such

Committee.

(iv) We think that applicants should be warned to fill in fully Schedule K and also the addition which we recommend to Schedule K containing applications for modifications or exemptions.

(v) We also recommend that increased accommodation be given to the

B.O.O. in the new temporary building to be erected.

(vi) We also agree with a recommendation of the O.C. that many classes of nuisance hitherto dealt with by the B. A. should be referred to the H.S.D. instead, as we consider that such work would be more appro- priately dealt with by the Sanitary Department than by the B.0.0. e.g., complaints re missing gratings; defective rain water pipes; defective waste pipes; choked drains; defective floor surfaces; and defective wall surfaces.

T. L. PERKINS.

H. E. POLLOCK.

H. W. BIRD.

:

2

41

HONGKONG.

PRELIMINARY REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF HONGKONG, 1921.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor, 23rd June, 1921.

No.

5

1921

The Census of the Colony was taken in the City of Victoria, Shaukiwan and the Kowloon Peninsula (except Kowloon City) on April 24th; in the New Territories and Hongkong Villages between March 24th and April 24th; in the Harbour from April 23rd to April 26th.

2. The figures given in the annexed tables were gathered from the totals given in the enumerators' books, the casting of which has been carefully checked.

3. The taking of the Census gave rise to an abundant crop of puerile rumours, which gained wide currency and caused no little alarm especially among the families of lower and middle class Chinese; a discussion of overcrowding by the Sanitary Board shortly before the date of the Census without doubt gravely affected the accuracy of the returns made by householders in the congested areas.

4. The date fixed for the Census proved to be very unfortunate :----

(a.) In the New Territories the majority of the inhabitants were found to be absent from their houses the whole day long, being busily engaged in preparations for planting the first crop of paddy, and the enumerators experienced considerable difficulty in obtaining the requisite information. (b.) In the Island of Hongkong and the Mainland, large numbers of the Chinese adult male population were absent in their native villages, the date being the middle of the Ching Ming Festival; thus in several middle class residential sections the females were found to equal or exceed the males. The enumerators also reported difficulty in many cases, where all the adult males in a family were absent, in obtaining the necessary informa- tion from the females left behind.

5. The Ching Ming Festival also caused great difficulties in holding together a sufficient number of enumerators, many enumerators who had been appointed and care- fully trained resigned or left the Colony without notice just as the schedules were ready for distribution, and others had to be found and receive hasty instructions at the last moment.

6. The factors mentioned in paragraphs 3 and 4 undoubtedly reduced the numbers reported in the case of the land population, but it is as yet impossible to form any estimate of what percentage should be aded to the figures reported to arrive at the true total of the normal population of the Colony.

I consider however that the figures found for the floating population are very near the truth, and give an accurate idea of the normal average floating population, which at times is abnormally increased for short periods by the presence of the deep sea fishing fleet, for which the Colony cannot be said to be the home port: this fleet was absent at the time the Census was taken.

J. D. LLOYD,

Census Officer.

CENSUS OFFICE,

12th May, 1921.

.

:

42

Census of Hongkong, 1921.

Preliminary Figures of the Population.

I. ISLAND OF HONGKONG.

MALES.

FEMALES. TOTAL.

(a.)-City of Victoria by Health Districts.

North Point

2,353

759

3,112

District No. 1.

Causeway Bay, Bowrington and Wongneichong

District No. 1a & 2a.

Wanchai

District No. 2.

Wanchai

District No. 3.

Upper Levels

District No. 4.

Central

District No. 5.

Central

District No. 6.

9,739

7,647

17,386

:

16,080

10.473 26,553

16,405

:

10,806 27,211

8,401

6,625

15,026

27.937-

15,699

43,636

19,314

10,157 29,471

Sheungwan & Taipingshan

19,811

8,218

28,029

:

District No. 7.

Sheungwan & Taipingshan

18,982

9,118:

28,100

District No. 8.

Saiyingpun-North of Government Civil Hospital

19,739

6,908

26,647

District No. 9.

Saiyingpun...

26,929

15,691

42,620

District No. 10.

Hill

West Point

(b.)-Pokfulam

(e)-Aberdeen and Aplichau

(d.)--Other Villages...

(e.)-Shaukiwan and Quarry Boy

(J.)-Stonecutters Island ..

15,978

11,705

27,683

:

1,954

671

2,625

1,174

615

1,789

:

:

1,901

994

2,895

995

473

1,468

11,733

5,325

17,058

31

20

51

TOTAL

219,456

121,904

341,360

+

A

43

II. KOWLOON PENINSULA (by Health Districts).

District No. 11, Kowloon Point

多多

وو

lla, Hunghom

""

12, Yaumati

35

22

13, Mongkok

""

14, Taikoktsui and Shamshuipo

"

15, Hunghom Villages and Kowloon City

Total...

¿

-North.

:

:

:.

MALES.

FEMALES.

TOTAL.

7,584

4,360

11,944

9,568

5,240

14,808

18,526

13,115

31,641

17,363

11,651

29,014

10,143

5,633

15,776

11,501

7,442

18,943

74,685 47,441 122,126

III-NEW TERRITORIES (by Police Districts.)

Pingshan...

Autau

Lokmachow (Santin)

Shataukok

Sheungshui

Taipo

Shatin

Saikung

:

:

:

:

:

:

4:

:

:

:

:

:

:

MALES. FEMALES. TOTAL.

5,990

5,449

11,439

6,081

5,738

11,819

1,889

1.717

3,606

3,529

4,714

8,243

3,707

3,858

7,565

4,459

4,554

9,013

1,926

2,235

4.161

4,531

5,315

9.846

TOTAL...

32,112 33,580

65.692

MALES.

FEMALES. TOTAL.

.

7.-South.

Tsunwan...

2,447

2,193

4,640

Kowloon City (also included in H. D. 15)

5,568

1,584

10,152

Lantao Island...

3,048

2,796

5,844

Cheungchow Island

2,976

2,059

5.035

Lamma Island

669

587

1.256

:

TOTAL...

14,708

12,219

26,927

Victoria Harbour

Shaukiwan Harbour

Stanley Harbour

Aberdeen...

Cheungchow Harbour

Tai O Harbour

Tsunwan

New Territories, North....

Mercantile Marine ...

44

T

IV.-FLOATING POPULATION.

TOTAL....

:

:

:

:

:

COMPARATIVE TABLE.

1921.

MALES.

FEMALES.

TOTAL.

23,942 14,628

38,570

3,763

2.948

6,711

159

116

275

4,493

3,373

7,866

2,061

1,489

3,550

2,000

1,894

3,891

74

61

135

A

2.600

1.307

3,907

5,888

5,888

44,980 25,816

70,796

1911.

INCREASE.

MALES.

FEMALES. TOTAL

MALES.

FEMALES.

TOTAL.

Island of Hongkong.....

Kowloon Peninsula ..

219,456

74,085

121,904 341,360 169,208

75,115

244,323

97,037

47,441

122,126

43,849

23,648

67,497

54,629

(Decrease)

New Territories North

New Territories South

Floating Population.......

32,112

14,708 12,219

44,980 25,816

33,580

65,692

32,747

33,393

66,140 448

448)

26,927

11,916

9,872 21,788

5,139

70,796 40,056 20,892 60,948

9,848

Less Kowloon City

385,941

5,568

240,960 626,901

4,584 10,152

297,776 162,920

4,051

3,255

460,696

166,205

7,306

2,846

380,373

236,376 616,749

293,725 159,665

453,390

163,359

Add Unclassified

2,426

923

(Decrease) 3,349 | 3,349 )

TOTAL INCREASE

296,151 160,588 456,739 160,010

160,010

151

-

HONGKONG.

REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF THE COLONY FOR 1921.

No. 15

1921

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor, 15th December, 1921.

1. The decennial Census of the Civil population of the Colony was taken in the Island of Hongkong and Kowloon on the night of April 24th, and in the New Territories between March 24th and April 24th, the Floating Population being enumerated between April 23rd and 26th. These dates were selected so as to appoximate as nearly as possible to the date originally appointed for the Census of the United Kingdom.

2. The total population was found to be 625,166, an increase of 168,427 or 36.87 per cent on the figures for 1911, the greatest relative increase ever recorded for the Colony. The bulk of the increase has taken place in the City of Victoria and Kowloon; the Northern District of. the New Territories shows a very slight decrease, while the Southern District shows a slight increase.

3. The work of preparation was commenced on January 20th and the final schedule was approved on March 3rd. This left a very short time to prepare the necessary trans- lations in Chinese, and get the work of printing executed in time to commence work in the New Territories on March 24th.

4. The schedule adopted was simpler than in 1911, questions as to language, religion and infirmities being omitted. Proposed columns for "race" and "industry were excised from the final draft, hence it was impossible to classify the cosmopolitan. non-Chinese population except by nationality, thus Javanese, Malays and Annamites had to be included with Europeans from their respective Countries. The omission of the column for industry in which employed' has rendered the compilation of the table of occupations extremely laborious and the result not very satisfactory, because the Home classification, which presupposes such a column, was ordered to be used for the first time in the Colony.

5. The Census of the City of Victoria, Shaukeiwan and Kowloou was taken under my direct supervision, the outlying districts of Hongkong and Kowloon, the New Territories and the Floating Population by the Police under the supervision of Mr. C. G. Perdue, Assistant Superintendent of Police, who was temporarily detached for this duty. The aim kept in view with reference to the part of the work undertaken by the Police, was to relieve them of all work other than supervision. The District Watchmen's Committee kindly placed the bulk of their men at my disposal, and they proved of considerable assistance. Each Chinese Watchman engaged was in charge of two sections: they helped to clear up misunderstandings and keep a check on the enumerators. The Naval and Military authorities kindly co-operated in the distribution and collection of schedules for civilians living in quarters under their control.

6. The majority of the schedules were collected and returned to the office within 10 days, and the preliminary report was ready by May 12th. The schedules as a whole were filled up carefully, and contained very few errors even in the poorer parts of the Colony, and these mostly of a trifling nature. The column for occupation was however in very many cases filled up without sufficient preciseness.

152

7. Advance copies of the English and Chinese schedules were forwarded to all Government and Grant-in-Aid Schools and the largest of the Chinese Private Vernacular Schools, and the co-operation of the masters was solicited in explaining to their pupils the objects of the Census and the correct methods of completing the schedules. Advance copies were also forwarded to all the newspapers, and during the week immediately preceding the Census, general instructions were widely advertised in the English and Chinese Press.

8. The City of Victoria was divided into 97 sections, based on the Health District boundaries, two enumerators being detailed as a rule to each section. Most of the sections adopted in 1911 were reduced in size, but many were found in practice to be still too large for two enumerators to handle properly and speedily. Shaukeiwan and Quarry Bay were divided into 5 sections and the Kowloon Peninsula into 35 sections, of which many proved too large. Each enumerator received a card of appointment in English and Chinese, and a set of instructions in Chinese; the boundaries of his section were endorsed on the back of the card in Chinese, but though I personally took all the enumerators round their sections and explained to them on the spot exactly what ground they were to cover, it was found difficult to convince some of them that their section included every building within the boundaries mentioned on their card.

9. For tabulation the slip system was again used, but before the next census it will be necessary to consider whether the use of tabulating machinery would be justified, if the population increases at anything like the present rate: otherwise a large number of clerks will be required, who will need a large amount of office accommodation, and may be difficult to recruit at a reasonable wage if employment happens to be good at the time.

10. A room on the top floor of the Courts of Justice was used as the General Office, and after experiment was found capable of accommodating 22 clerks and a supervisor, to which figure the original staff engaged was reduced. With more office room available the time required could have been reduced, but it is preferable and more economical to employ a smaller staff and take a longer time to complete the work, as it requires some little while for the tabulating clerks to become proficient. The piece work system adopted in 1911 was not used as it is apt to result in the work being done carelessly and hurriedly in order to earn a larger bonus. Overtime was worked during October in order to complete the report before the end of the year, and the bulk of the staff were discharged on October 31st.

Section I.-Distribution of the Population.

(Tables I & II).

1. The population of the Colony is composed of four distinct sections (a) that of the New Territories, Northern District, which is purely agricultural, living in about 600 small villages and hamlets, only a few of which have a population exceeding 500, (b) that of the New Territories, Southern District, which is mainly dependent on fishing, the Tsun Wan district partly depending on the cultivation of pineapples, (c) that of Hongkong and the Kowloon Peninsula, which chiefly depends on general commerce and shipbuilding, (d) that of the Floating Population living on junks and small boats, which in Victoria Harbour depends on service rendered to shipping, and in Cheungchow and Tai-O in the New Territories South, Shaukeiwan and Aberdeen on the Island of Hongkong, on fishing.

2. New Territories.-In the New Territories North the population is stationary: in the Southern district a large increase is shown for Cheungchow and Tsun Wan, Tsun Wan being 4,903 against 2,982, Cheungchow 5,037 against 3,964: the Island of Lantao shows a decrease from 6,710 to 5,958. The population of the whole of the New Territories comprises roughly one seventh of the total land population.

3. Of the remaining six-sevenths the great majority are an urban population, massed round the shores of Hongkong Harbour, the majority at present residing on the northern slope of the Island of Hongkong.

4. City of Victoria.-The City of Victoria, a term hardly known to ordinary re-

153

sidents, and rarely heard or seen except in maps and official reports, has now a popula- tion of 323,273, an increase of 41.88 per cent :--

(a) Eastern District. The eastern District, i.e. from North Point to the Naval Yard, shows an increase of 38,215, being more than double the figure for 1911. This is due largely to the conversion of some large godowns, Fenwick's Engineering Yard and the French Convent into streets of re- sidential property, also to the rebuilding of a number of small two-storied houses. In 1911 this district contained a number of vacant tenements, while now every house is full, and the second most densely populated area is found here between Anton Street and Wanchai Road where the

density is 1,410 per acre. This district has become a popular place of residence for clerks and others on small salaries, and the traffic between the business section of the City and Wanchai has greatly increased. This traffic passes across the route taken by Europeans to their residences on the higher levels and has given an exaggerated impression of the growth of the population. This district will be profoundly affected in the future by the large scheme for the Reclamation of the Bay which is about to begin.

(b.) Upper Levels.-The increase in the Upper Levels is 7,185, due largely to the replacement of Europeans by wealthy Chinese; in houses where ten years ago a European family of four with four Chinese servants resided, there are now found Chinese families of often at least treble that number. Comparatively little building has been carried on in this section.

(c.) Hill District. The Hill District shows an increase of 101 in the non- Chinese population and 195 in the Chinese population in spite of the fact that a large Boarding House was temporarily closed at the date of the Census, and that the number of houses ready for occupation remain- ed about the same as in 1911. Since the Census a number of houses have been built or projected.

(d.) Central District. The Central District i.e. from Pedder Street and Glenea- ly to the Tung Wah Hospital and Wing Lok Street, has increased by 31,187. No new sites have been opened up for building in this district, which has long been fully occupied, while along Des Voeux Road Central and the Praya many houses formerly used as emigrant lodging houses or family houses, have been turned into large department stores, which have all congregated here. The increase is therefore in a district, which was adequately filled before, and where rebuilding often means a sacrifice of accommodation owing to the more stringent Building and Sanitary regulations in force at the present time.

(e.) Sai Ying Pun.-Sai Ying Pun, i.e. from the Tung Wah Hospital to Pok- fulam Road, only shows the small increase of 889. This district contains a number of old two-storied houses of poor construction, whose service is nearly done, and which will have to be rebuilt very soon, when the number of stories will doubtless be largely increased. This district contains the densest populated area i.e., that bounded by Third, Eastern and Western Streets and Des Voeux Road West, the density being approxi- mately 1,600 per acre.

(f.) West Point.-West Point, i.e. from Pokfulam Road to Jubilee Road at the foot of Mount Davis, has increased by 10,929: this increase is mostly between Pokfulam and Hill Roads where there has been considerable

building activity. West of Hill Road however a large number of houses have been demolished to make room for palatial Chinese re- staurants and large godowns.

In Victoria future expansion north of Kennedy, Caine and Bonham Roads is now impossible, all the available-ground being already fully occupied. But in the Upper Levels before the next Census the substitution of blocks of Chinese flats for European style houses standing in their own grounds will have rendered accommodation available there for large numbers of middle class Chinese, while the wealthier Chinese now in occupation may be expected to build themselves country homes on the south side of the Island, now rendered accessible by good motor roads.

154

5. Shaukeiwan.--The Shaukeiwan District i.e., from North Point to Lyeemoon, has increased by 6,442, and much building was in progress when the Census was taken. The population bere largely relies for its livelihood on the Taikoo Dockyard and Sugar Refinery, which were fully employed. A large scheme of reclamation is now about to commence at North Point, and before long the City of Victoria will undoubtedly extend in an unbroken line from West Point to Lyeemoon Pass, a distance of 10 miles.

6. Aberdeen. The Aberdeen district has increased by 644; there is considerable building activity here, especially on the reclamation recently completed, while across the harbour at Aplichau a large scheme of reclamation is in hand. This district depends largely on junk building and the fishing industry which of recent years has not been

very prosperous.

7. Pokfulam. The Pokfulam district, i.e., that part of the South Side of the Island extending from Mount Davis to Aberdeen, has increased by 951; the population is largely dependent on the Dairy Farm, but an increasing number of European style houses are being erected in this district.

8. Kowloon Peninsula.-The Kowloon Peninsula shows an increase of 55,951 or 82.96 per cent, a phenomenal increase in a district which in 1881 only numbered 9,021 inhabitants:-

(a.) Kowloon Point.-That part of the Kowloon Peninsula south of King's Park

shows an increase in the non-Chinese population of 1,048, chiefly owing to the migration of Portuguese from Hongkong. A large number of European flats have been recently erected in the district. The Chinese population has increased by 4,642.

(b.) Hunghom.-The District of Hunghom has increased by 8,759; this is due chiefly to the fact that in 1911 work at the Kowloon Docks and Cement Works, on which the population chiefly relies, was exceptionally slack. The Dock Co. and the Electric Light Co. have erected new blocks of quarters for their staffs at Tai Wan, but apart from this there has been little building in the district. There is plenty of land available for building purposes along the Kowloon City Road, but while the abomin- able and largely preventable dust nuisance caused by the Cement Works is allowed to continue, residence in this district will be unpopular except for the lower classes of labour employed by the Cement Works and Dock Co., and the developement of a large part of the Peninsula will be effectually prevented.

(c.) Yaumati.--Yaumati i.e., the district between the Indian Barracks and the Police Station, has increased by 8,914. There were a very large number of houses in course of erection at the time of the Census, and I estimate that by the beginning of next year accommodation will have been pro- vided for 10,000 additional persons in this district. The reclamation in front of the Police Station completed a few years ago has not yet been built upon, and forms one of the few remaining vacant areas in this district.

(d.) Mongkok.-Mongkok i.e., the district extending from the Yaumati Police Station to Mongkok Village, has increased by 14,533. Great building activity has been apparent in recent years and all available land has now been occupied except in the immediate vicinity of Mongkok Village itself. A large amount of swampy ground has been filled in and is now being built upon; there will be room however for extension between Mongkok and Yaumati Railway Station as soon as the necessary work of filling in the low-lying ground has been taken in hand.

(e.) Taikoktsui and Shamshuipo.-Taikoktsui and Shamshuipo have increased by 6,372 in spite of the fact that a large number of matsheds and huts formerly occupied as dwellings at Sz Wo T'ong and Cheung Sha Wan have been removed. The old village of Shamshuipo composed of narrow winding alleyways and one-storied stone hovels has been completely swept away and in its place a modern suburb is rapidly rising with wide streets and three-storied houses, on land reclaimed from the sea; at the date of the Census a large number of houses were in course of erection. The whole area is being laid out on a systematic plan drawn up some years

155

ago, and Shamshuipo bids fair to become a popular residential and industrial district. Large schemes of reclamation are now well under way both at Cheung Sha Wan, Taikoktsui and Kowloon Tong. In the near future from the Kowloon Ferry a thickly populated district will extend for 4 miles to Laichikok. In 1897 this portion i.e., the Western side of the Peninsula only contained 11,500 inhabitants.

(f.) Kowloon City. For the purposes of the Census, Kowloon City has been included in the Kowloon Peninsula, though for certain purposes it is still considered a part of the Southern District of the New Territories. An increase is shown of 2,181, but this is partly accounted for by the presence of workmen engaged on the various works of improvement now in progress. A large scheme for reclaiming the shallow part of the bay in front of the city has been under way for some years, and is still pro- gressing though very slowly. A beginning has already been made with the erection of modern houses on the reclamation; a broad road is being constructed to join Kowloon City to Yaumati and Mongkok, and it will not be long before the old Chinese houses and narrow lanes composing what is known to Europeans as the City, but to the inhabitants as the lower suburb, have been replaced by modern improvements. Such rapid progress is not however to be expected here as on the Western side of the Peninsula, which seems for some reason to be greatly preferred by the Chinese population.

Normal Population.

9. Factors affecting.--With an urban population so subject to sudden changes and forming the greater part of the whole, it is important to consider how far the results of the Census present a true account of the normal population. On the credit side are to be placed civil commotion and famine in the neighbouring province, activity of trade. and emigration in the Colony, and on the debit side festivals held in China, epidemic disease, trade stagnation and dear rice in the Colony. Examining the factors mentioned in order, it is found that comparative peace and prosperity reigned in Kwong Tung, which was about to celebrate the installation of a New President, whereas the year 1911 was a time of civil commotion causing the inundation of the Colony with thousands of refugees from Canton. On the other hand, an unprecedented stagnation of trade had prevailed in the Colony for over 12 months, the present world-wide depression having manifested itself earlier in the Far East than in Europe. The Trade Returns of the Colony for the 2nd Quarter 1921 showed a decrease of 52-61 per cent while the tremen- dous slump in the values of the raw products of Malaya had greatly restricted the tide. of emigrants, for whom Hongkong serves as the collecting centre, especially in the spring. On the other side of the account, the Colony was remarkably free from epidemic disease, and the price of rice, the staple food, was normal. But the most disturbing factor for Census purposes was the occurrence of the Tsing Ming festival. The date of the Census i.e. April 24th, was the 17th day of the third moon of the Chinese calendar, and during the third moon it is the duty of every adult male Chinese, if he can, to return to his native village to worship at his ancestral tombs. The third moon has become for Hongkong somewhat like the month of August in England, except that the whole family does not participate, though often baby boys are taken home in charge of their mothers to be presented to the male relations assembled for the festival. In the case of domestic servants, police and those in similar employ, the period of absence is generally about 10 days, while in the case of Chinese business men it is often longer, as business during this month gives way to duty.

Enquiries made show that the traffic both in and out was exceptionally heavy by river steamers, junks and railway, being 51 per cent above the average month, and that the number of Chinese employees and domestic servants on leave was high, in the case of domestic servants probably 15 to 20 per cent. It is difficult to form other than a rough estimate from all the figures kindly supplied to me from various sources, but that a large number of males were absent is confirmed by the fact that in the City of Victoria and Kowloon 11 sections showed an excess of females over males, while in 10 other sections the proportion was about equal, an unusual position in a place like Hongkong where males so greatly exceed the females.

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Accuracy.-Careful instructions were given to the enumerators to serve a schedule on every cubicle in separate occupation; whole families would probably be omitted if this instruction were not complied with, since the tenant of the whole flat would not bother about getting the details from the subtenants of the separate cubicles. In the majority of cases this instruction was carried out properly, but there must have been some leakage in cases where the instruction was not obeyed. A discussion held by the Sanitary Board shortly before the Census on the question of overcrowding undoubtedly tended to give rise in the congested areas to a conviction that it would be highly injudicious to record all the inmates in some crowded tenements; while the prevalence of a widespread belief amongst Chinese women of the middle and lower classes in the alleged inhuman designs of the Public Works Department on infantile life undoubtedly affected the number of children of both sexes recorded between the ages of 4 and 10. The rumour referred to is in short that the Government intended to build a huge bridge across the harbour to Kowloon resting on 99 piers, and that a certain number of young children of both sexes were required to be buried alive under the foundations of each pier in order to ensure its stability. The numbers increased as the rumours grew, and the highest number which came to my notice was 300 of each sex, while the final embellishment to the tale was the addition of an unfixed number of pregnant women. In the perverted. view of the frightened mothers the very object of the Census was to enable the Govern- ment to make a suitable choice of its victims. Enquiries made showed that the story had gained wide credence and caused no little alarm throughout Hongkong and Kowloon, but did not affect the floating population. In the Central District it was reported to me that middleclass mothers went personally in the middle of the morning to rescue their younger children from school, while in Wanchai and Shaukeiwan children were locked up for days and not allowed to go out of doors. The rumour however quickly vanished under the outspoken comments of the enlightened Chinese Press, and the enumerators found no difficulty in collecting the schedules. However the following figures are suggestive that many young children were not recorded; increase over 1911 for children under 10- 65 13 per cent, increase over 1911 for all women between 20 and 45, 75'05 per cent, the increase of children being less than that of women of child-bearing age.

Estimate of normal population. I estimate that the normal population of the Colony is greater than the figures of the Census by the following numbers:---

Absent on holiday,.

Unemployed returned to the country temporarily,

Absence of business men from China,

Decrease of emigrants,

Absence of family visitors,

Loss due to omissions from various causes,

10,000

2,000

4,000

2,000

2,000

10,000

30,000

Thus the normal population would be in the neighbourhood of 660,000, and as soon as business becomes brisk again this figure must be somewhat increased. This figure approximates to the estimate of the Sanitary Department which was 648,000. But at no time were there any grounds for holding the opinion that the population was in the neighbourhood of one million, as was at one time alleged. The number of floors in Hongkong and Kowloon occupied by Chinese has increased in the last 10 years by 7,117 which at 15 persons per floor, a fairly high average, affords accommodation for 106,755 out of a total increase of 157,398 in the Chinese Urban population, thus leaving a large portion of the increase to find accommodation in houses already fully occupied in 1911.

Section II.-The Non-Chinese Population.

(Tables III to VIII.)

1. The number of non-Chinese excluding the Mercantile Marine has increased from 11,225 to 12,856. In 1911 the non-Chinese were classified by race, while the correspond- ing classification in the present Census is by nationality. A comparison is therefore some- what difficult. Japanese have increased from 958 to 1,585, citizens of the U.S.A. from 295 to 470, Portuguese (including British subjects) from 2,558 to 2,609, British nationals⠀⠀ born in India from 1,414 to 1,474, British nationals born in Europe, America and Australia from 2,236 to 3,110.

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2. I estimate the population of pure European descent to be rather over 5,000, of Indian or mixed Indian descent at 2,000. The remainder include Eurasians, Filipinos, and natives of British, Dutch and French colonies.

3. BRITISH (a.) Europeans.-I estimate the number of British nationals of European race at 4,300. On referring to the age table it will be noticed that after age 7 the number of children declines, the reason being all who can afford it send their children home for education at that age: these rarely return, since before their education is complete the parents have generally left the Colony. The average attendance of children during 1920 at British schools was 163. I estimate that the total number of British children of European race of all ages to be about 500.

Most males reach the Colony between the ages of 21 and 25, and few remain after 55. In the case of females it is common for the mothers to leave the Colony often for good when their children reach school age, in order to be with them during their education in England; hence at age 40 the number of married women rapidly declines.

Owing to various reasons a comparison of the Health rate with that for a normal population settled in Europe is rather fallacious. However the death rate for 1920 for British Nationals of European race works out at 12 per thousand, an extremely low rate compared with some other colonies, and well demonstrates the success of modern science in a Colony which 50 years ago was regarded as a veritable death trap for Europeans. The birth rate works out at 22 per thousand, an exceptionally high rate for Hongkong, due to the unusually large number of young married women at present resident in the Colony.

The actual number of British firms has not increased since 1911, and there is at present a marked tendency to amalgamation especially in the case of companies. Trade depression in the Far East showed itself early in 1920 before business in England had had time to settle down after the completion of demobilisation: hence the expected post- war increase in British firms in the Colony did not eventuate and at the present time it does not appear likely that any increase in the British population of European race is likely to take place in the near future.

(b.) Indians.-The number of natives of India remains about the same. Their number depends almost entirely on the demand for Indian Police and Watchmen, about 85 per cent of adult males being employed as Police or Watchmen or in various Govern- ment departments. The birthplace of the majority is the Punjaub and the North West Province. The commercial importance of the Indian community has greatly decreased since the abolition of the trade in Indian opium in which they were chiefly interested, and since the large increase in the manufacture of cotton yarn and piece goods in Japan and North China. Indians are chiefly interested in retail drapery, silk and curio stores, and cotton yarn. Besides those born in India there are 287 males and 341 females born outside India mostly in Hongkong, a large number of whom are of mixed race, for it is fairly common for Indians to marry Chinese especially as secondary wives; these Indians of mixed race are mostly employed as clerks. The Indian watchmen are all Sikhs, and are mostly professional money lenders as a side line. A few Indians are now employed as chauffeurs. Very few Parsee firms now remain, and the Parsee community once so important is now fast disappearing from the Colony.

Occupations. It should be remarked with regard to agriculture that the number shown as farmers is composed of Indians passing through the Colony. The number of British ships' officers and crew shown is much higher than usual, and is due to a large number of the smaller tramp coasting steamers being laid up owing to the prevailing shipping depression. It is to be noticed that of all non-Chinese engaged in religious work in the Colony only 13'4 per cent are of British nationality.

4. ALIENS.-The place of the Germans seems to have been filled by the increased number of Japanese, American and Dutch firms. Americans have in- creased from 295 to 470. A number of American firms opened during and after the close of the war, several for the purpose of managing U. S. Shipping Board ships, but

158

indications go to show that the permanent increase of the American business community will not be great. The French business community who were never very important, have slightly increased, but most of the French nationals are engaged in religious work. Natives of Indo-China have been included under French. Italians and Spanish of European descent are almost all engaged in religious work; under Spanish are classed a few who more strictly speaking are Portuguese or Filipino, but who claim Spanish nationality.

Japanese have increased from 958 to 1,585, and are now to be found in nearly every kind of trade, in the professions, crafts and domestic service. Numbers of them have now brought their families to the Colony, and the number of married women and children is largely increased. Ten years ago the number of married women was very small, but there are now 293 married women. Japanese have largely displaced Europeans in the last ten years in the middle levels between Kennedy and May Roads, while most of the artisans and small shopkeepers are to be found along the Praya in Wanchai between Arsenal Street and Morrison Hill.

The race known throughout the Far East as Portuguese must not be confused with the Portuguese of Europe. They are the descendants of the Portuguese pioneers of Western civilisation who reached China at the beginning of the 16th century, and, after many vicissitudes, finally in the middle of that century established a permanent settlement on the barren rocky peninsula subsequently known as Macau. It is recorded that the first settlers married natives of Malacca and Japan, and during the early years of the settlement they do not appear to have intermarried with Chinese, as has been the case of more recent years. At no time in the history of Macau does the number of females born in Europe seem to have been worthy of note. By 1834 Macau had become a colony in the true sense, the majority of the free inhabitants of non-Chinese race having been born there. At that date out of a population of 3,693 free non-Chinese inhabitants, only 75 males and 2 females were born in Portugal, and these were mostly officials, soldiers or ecclesiastics.

It was not till the prosperity of Macau began to decline with the rise of Hongkong that the Portuguese began from 1855 onwards to migrate to Hongkong and thence to every port in the Far East, till at the present time a numerous Portuguese community exists wherever foreign trade is carried on. The total is probably about 15,000; they form a separate community everywhere, at the present day rarely marrying outside, and speaking their own particular dialect, which portrays in its admixture of Hindustani, Malay, Japanese and Chinese words the history of the race.

Among the surnames of Hongkong Portuguese are found several of non-Portuguese origin. The explanation probably is that children of other European races brought up as Roman Catholics intermarried and became merged in the Portuguese community.

Sexes.-Between the ages of 20 and 25 there are 87 males to 110 females, this disparity grows till between 45 and 50 there are 38 males to 61 females. ́This disproportion has always been a feature of the race in every Census, and is partly accounted for by the enigration of males as soon as they leave school, and later on in life, when their further prospects of advancement here are small. During the war a number of males left the Colony for Shanghai and North China. The preponderance of females in the present Census is 56 to 44, while in 1834 in Macau the figures were 62 to 38.

Of the 1810 Portuguese born in the Colony only 552 claimed British nationality. Since the abolition of the monarchy there has been marked revival of national feeling amongst this community.

For

Duration of Life.-They are on the whole a comparatively short-lived race. females between the ages of 20 and 60, there is a loss of 59 per cent against a loss of 34 per cent in England and Wales; for males the loss is far greater, but is partly accounted for by emigration.

For 1920 the birth rate was 27.2 per thousand, the death rate 21 per thousand. Many cases of large families of 8 and over were noticed.

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159

5. Migratory character of the population. A comparison of the Directories for 1911 and 1921 showed that of European adult males, exclusive of Government servants, resident here in 1911, only 197 were still in the Colony at the time of the Census; these were British 187, aliens 10; of the British 43 were in the employ of the Dock Companies. Of these many had had a tour of duty elsewhere in the meantime in various parts of the Far East. If the year 1914 is taken, the figures are British 270, aliens 16. In the case of adult females the figures would be still lower. Except for a few professional men, employees of the Dock Companies and Civil servants, the European population almost completely changes every 5 years. Most of the employees of the various firms only complete one tour of duty here, and then after the expiration of their home leave are transferred elsewhere. These facts fully explain the allegations of the lack of public spirit in the Colony.

6. Alteration of location.-In 1911 the upper levels west of Peel Street, and south of Caine and Bonham Roads, part of the European reservation so called, were occupied almost entirely by non-Chinese mostly Europeans; in this Census the figures are non- Chinese 463, Chinese 4,658, and of the non-Chinese few are Europeans except within and near the University. East of Garden Road and south of the Military Reservation, a district formerly occupied entirely by Europeans with the exception of 3 Boarding Houses, very few Europeans are now found, most of the houses being occupied by Japanese of the merchant class.

The Portuguese have largely moved to Kowloon, where a new Garden City has been formed at Ho Mun Tin near the Yaumati Railway Station, and another large scheme at Kowloon Tong is under consideration for their accommodation. They have suffered more acutely than any other part of the community from the rapacity of absentee landlords and lessees who were enabled to raise their rents enormously owing to the influx of rich Chinese refugees from Canton during the last ten years seeking temporary house accommodation at any price.

The Europeans displaced from the upper levels have partly removed to flats in Kowloon, partly to the Hill District, the non-Chinese population of which increased by 17 per cent in spite of the fact that a large Boarding House was temporarily closed and that the number of houses remained about the same as in 1911. At the time of the Census a number of European houses were in course of erection or projected in the Hill District.

A beginning has been made with the developement for residential purposes of the south side of the Island, rendered accessible by the construction of good motor roads, the pioneers being the Hongkong Hotel Co., who have erected a palatial hotel at Repulse Bay.

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Section III.-New Territories.

(Tables IX to XVIII).

1. The Census of the New Territories was begun on March 24th and completed in about three weeks. The work was supervised by the Police Officer in charge of each district, who had under him a head enumerator and a sufficient number of assistants selected from the inhabitants of the district. All enumerators were carefully instructed beforehand, and I visited personally all the districts on the mainland and examined them as to their knowledge of their duties before they commenced work. The enumerators obtained the required information direct from the heads of each household and themselves entered it in specially prepared books of convenient size. The Census of 1911 was taken by the European Police Officers themselves accompanied by interpreters, the time taken was over three months and the work very arduous especially during the hot weather. The

460-

system adopted this time proved very successful, and while relieving the European Police of a very laborious task, interested a number of the better educated inhabitants directly in the Census. In future by increasing the number of enumerators it will be possible to curtail considerably the time required, but the use of schedules will remain impossible, partly owing to the general lack of education, and partly owing to the distribution of the population which is scattered through 600 villages and hamlets, few of which contain 500 inhabitants.

Outlying islands and inaccessible fishing villages and huts were enumerated by the crews of the Police patrol launches.

The work of the enumerators were somewhat hindered by the absence of most of the able-bodied population all day long in the fields, every one being busy with the prepara- tions for planting the first spring crops. This difficulty was partly surmounted by send- ing Chinese constables a day in advance of the enumerators, and warning the heads of the household to be at home to meet the enumerator.

The work appears to have been done very thoroughly, for which great credit is due to Divisional Inspector Boulger and his Chinese interpreter Mr. Kwok, who were indefati- gable in the preliminary preparations and subsequent general supervision. The Police Officers in charge of the Districts also took a keen interest in the success of the undertaking.

2. Alteration of Boundaries.-Since 1911 the District of Tsun Wan has been trans- ferred from the Northern to the Southern District: while Shamshuipo and Kowloon City, which for some purposes are still included in the Southern District, have for Census pur- poses been included under Kowloon Peninsula in recognition of the fact that they are ra- pidly becoming urban districts, and that municipal services have been extended to them.

3. Northern District. The population of the Northern District - shows a slight decrease, which would have been greater had not the Tsing Ming festival brought back many males to their native villages. The opening of the Railway seems, contrary to expectations, to have produced little change; market supplies for Hongkong still come from the Canton Delta as before, and paddy still remains the predominant crop. Very few houses for European accommodation have been erected, and those few, mostly erected shortly after the opening of the Railway, have not proved popular, and have had many changes of tenants. The truth is that land worth cultivating is very limited, and that there are no suitable building sites available which are accessible to Hongkong and which might induce Europeans and Chinese of the richer classes to create country homes in the New Territories to the north of the Kowloon Hills, as was anticipated at the opening of the Railway

༣ .

A European Reservation has been created on Cheungchow Island as a summer resort for missionaries and others from the interior. The summer visitors had not arrived at the date of the Census.

4. Sexes. The number of females in the Northern District exceeds that of males by 256, the excess in 1911 being 2,345. The difference is probably a good criterion of the number of males who returned for the Tsing Ming festival.

In the Southern District on the other hand males exceed the females by 2,271, against 3,427 in 1911, Tsing Ming here also probably accounts for the reduced number of males, the population of the Southern District containing a large number who were born elsewhere and would naturally return home at this season.

5. Families.-The number of children in a family is small; this is due partly to early marriage, the daughters, leaving home, young, partly to the young boys leaving to seek employment and partly to the emigration of young girls as muitsai' or 'sanpotsai'. It must also be remembered that a certain number of males who have emigrated only marry when they return late in life. Extremely few large families were noticed.

:

6. Ages. The age tables have been adjusted to the European method of reckoning; this was not done in the report for 1911 when the total number of children under 1 for the whole of the New Territories was recorded as 111. For the first 4 years the number of > males and females is fairly equal, but thereafter the males greatly exceed the females. This difference cannot be accounted for by immigration, since the number of child immigrants of either sex is about level, but reference to the table of ages of 'muitsai' in

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Hongkong may afford some clue, the number of 'muitsai "increasing from 6 upwards. But if this is an partial explanation, the migration must be to China since very few muitsai' were recorded as born in the New Territories Another possible explanation is that many very young girls are sent into China assanpotsaior prospective brides to be brought up in the family of their prospective: husband: till they reach the age for marriage. This custom is very prevalent in the San On District to which the New Territories once belonged, especially among the Hakkas, and it was noticed that a far larger number of married women were born outside the New Territories than married men, so obviously there must be an exchange of females to adjust the difference but of a different age. It must however be remembered that far greater care is taken of boys, and the probability is that the death rate for girls is somewhat higher.

7. Marriage Age. The commonest age for marriage seems to be for males 18 to 20, for females: 16 to 20. At 17 the married females begin to exceed the unmarried, while in the case of males this point is not reached till between 20 and 25. After 25 the number of unmarried females becomes infinitesimal, while that of unmarried males remains considerable till: 45.

8. Duration of Life. At the present time the population of the Northern District can be taken as typical of rural China, there being comparatively few immigrants except from the San On District of which it was formerly a part; most of the males who leave emigrate before 25, while the majority of the immigrants are over 25. The following comparison therefore of the wastage between 25 and 60 may be instructive:—

2

*

*

Between 25 & 50 years. Between 50 & 60 years.

England and Wales,

New Territories North,

Males. Females.

Males. Females.

23·4%

20%

22.8%

18.4%

€43.7%

29·9%

35.8%

29.8%

The number alive at 60 proportionate to the number born compares thus:-

England and Wales,

New Territories North,

Males.

Females.

10:9%

47.3%

19.4%

24·7%

9. Birthrate.-The expectation of life in England at 60 is for males 12.93 years, for females 1412, but in the New Territories North it must be taken as about half these figures.

There is no system for birth registration in the New Territories, but from a calcula- tion based on the Census returns and the death rate for infants for the area of the Colony under the control of the Sanitary Department, I estimate the birthrate to be about 35 -per thousand.

10. Widows. The large number of widows recorded, 5,500, shows that the prejudice against remarriage remains as strong as ever, while the number of widowers is compara- tively high, which probably is due to poverty, the man not being able to afford the expense of a second marriage.

11. Nationality and Birthplace. No question as to nationality was asked, but it was assigned in accordance with the birthplace. For the Northern District 60,254 are record- ed as born in the New Territories, i.e., by far the greater portion of the inhabitants, thus

Ex

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Percentage is based on a comparison between the number of persons living at the respective ages mentioned.

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constituting the only stable portion of the population of the Colony, who can be said to be domiciled in the strict sense of the term. 3,497 are shown as born in the neighbouring district of San On against 1,779, the increase is mostly amongst males and is undoubted- ly to be ascribed to the Tsing Ming festival: those born in Hongkong are 1,434 against 2,393 in 1911, the decrease being entirely among females. A considerable number of wives come from San On and Hongkong. The numbers of natives of other districts in China remain practically unchanged.

12. Education.-Males able to read and write have increased by 3,449, females by 439. The female part of the population still remains almost wholly uneducated, only 674 being educated. The effect of the increase in the number of vernacular schools is just becoming apparent in the case of the males. The Northern District is a far more pro- mising field for elementary education than Hongkong owing to the far greater stability of the population. In Hongkong itself very few of the children born ever remain to marry and settle down permanently.

13. Occupations. With the exception of a few small shopkeepers and the fishermen, the whole of the permanent part of the population is engaged in agriculture, children going to work in the fields as soon as they can walk. Though comparatively few women are returned as farmers, it must be understood that in their spare time they perform the same work in the fields as the men.

The majority of males given in other categories than agriculture are probably those who have returned to their native villages for the Tsing Ming festival.

A large number of females are reported as engaged in needlework, but this occupa- tion should in most cases be interpreted as domestic duties, and as denoting those who do not as a rule take any part in agriculture.

Several attempts have been made to open mines in the Northern district, but none with any success, and so far I am aware, none are being worked at present.

14. Child Labour.--No attempt has been made to catalogue the occupations of children. But the employment of children in the many light tasks which agriculture affords is universal from a very tender age. Children of both sexes also perform a large amount of work on fishing craft and sampans, often supplying the sole motive power, when the wind fails, the mother being at the tiller.

15. Muitsai-Muitsai number only 158 in all. Poverty and the common practice of purchasing a small girl (sanpotsai) as prospective bride to be brought up in the family of the future husband, render the demand for their services very small. Moreover the early marriage of her sons provides the New Territories mother with an effective and submissive substitute in the form of her daughter-in-law, who as a general rule resides with the husband's parents for many years after marriage.

Section IV.-Urban Population.

(Tables XIX to XXIII).

1: Ages: Birthrate.-The age tables have been adjusted to the European method of reckoning, but it is probable that some Chinese gave the age of children of one year according to the English method; this would make the adjusted figures for under one year slightly too high, and those for under two slightly too low. After taking various factors into consideration, I calculate the birthrate to be about 23 per thousand, a high figure considering that males outnumber females by 63 to 37. Based on the figures given for infantile mortality in the report of the Medical Officer of Health for 1920, the death rate of infants under one year works out at 296 per thousand births, a figure which almost agrees with the loss shown in the age table which works out at 298.. In the above calculations it is taken for granted that for all practical purposes emigra- tion is balanced by immigration. But during 1920 only 2,113 Chinese births were- actually registered, two males being registered to every one female. The use of such figures as these apart from the context in comparison with those for infantile deaths has. led to grossly exaggerated statements about infantile mortality in the Colony.

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2. Duration of Life.-After 40 there is a very marked decrease and a still greater fall between 50 and 55. In comparison with the settled Chinese population of the Northern district of the New Territories such decrease seem to be normal, though in the urban districts till very recent years many Chinese, as soon as they had amassed a com- petency according to their station, returned to their native villages. This is only so in a minor degree at present, for although wages are higher, the cost of living has rise greatly, as well as the standard of living, and a considerably longer period of work is vossary before a man can retire to the country. The number of persons of 50 and above has in- creased 65 13 per cent as compared with 1911, against a total increase in the population of 51 per cent, a figure which also affords a clear proof of the greatly increased stability of the population.

3. Sexes. Up to the age of five the numbers of males and females are practically equal; from six to twelve females exceed the males; this is due partly to the custom of sending boys at the age of seven back to the country or Canton to receive their Chinese education, partly to the import of muitsai nearly all of whom come from outside the Colony. From the age of fourteen upwards males largely exceed females, since at this age boys come to the Colony for higher education or to be apprenticed in various trades or to find work.

4. Married State.---Marriage before 18 is comparatively uncommon and during the last 10 years there has been an increasing tendency for the marriage age to rise. By 25 most of the females are married, the unmarried residue being probably mostly prostitutes or ex-prostitutes, while in the case of the males it is not until the age of 35 that the majority are married.

In 1911 there were 69 males to 31 females, in the present Census 63 males to 37 females, but only 33 married females to 67 married miles, the figures for 1911 being 28 to 72; the difference is due to the large number of widows, which show an in rease over 1911 of 159 per cent, while the widowers only show an increase of 19 per cent. The continued residence of widows in the Colony after the death of their husban ls shows a very remarkable change in the customs of the population in ten years. Formerly on the death of the husband the widow returned to the country; now she evidently remains in Hongkong where she can if necessary find work in the various industries which are beginning to spring up.

Concubines show a very large increase from 1,200 in 1911 to 2,974. There were in addition 79 concubines whose status was irregular. This great increase in concubinage is due to the wealthier classes bringing their families to the Colony; in several families five or more were found, but the wealthy who possess a large number generally accommodate them in more than one house, therefore no large establishments were noticed. This great increase in concubinage of 136 per cent is remarkable in view of the vastly im- prov. d status of women as a whole in the Colony and the increase in the feeling against the custom among the enlightened classes. But at least among the new comers the custom seems as popular as ever, and large numbers of youthful concubines were found. The number of married women including concubines has increased by 76 per cent.

5. Nationality.--Out of 45,924 persons born in the British Empire only 15,645 claimed British nationality, which can be interpreted that only so many may be consi- dered permanently domiciled in the Colony. Out of 1,647 born in Macau only 251 claimed Portuguese nationality.

6. Birthplace. As in 1911 the bulk of the population are immigrants from the Delta districts of the neighbouring province of Kwongtung. There is an increase in the natives of other provinces from 3,729 to 6,037. The number born in Hongkong is 43,275 against about 23,000 in 1911 and 1,523 in 1897; however the figures for these two years are not quite reliable for the purposes of comparison. The number born in the New Territories is 2,241. This is apparently a reduction on 1911 figures which were about 3,000, after making certain deductions; the reduction in the males would be accounted for by their return to their birthplaces for the Tsing Ming festival. The people of the Northern District of the New Territories seem to have very little inclination to migrate to the city to earn their livelihood.

7. Education. The proportion of males able to read and write is 65 35 against 7443 in 1911, females 11:55 against 17.91 in 1911, a distinct retrograde movement, which well demonstrates the difficulty of dealing with a constantly shifting population like that of Hongkong from the educational stand point.

164

8. Migratory nature of the Population. The population still remains to a large extent migratory, a large proportion of it going backwards and forwards between the Colony and China. In 1920 about 1,300,000 arrived from China and 120,000 from places overseas, 1,350,000 left for China, and about 100,000 for places overseas. The number of persons born in Hongkong is only 43,275, well distributed among all ages up to 50, and much rarer after that age. In 1897 the number of women of child bearing age was 28,423; this figure increased to 53,326 in 1911, and to 89,044 in 1921. Thus during this period of 24 years alone, the number of children born and successfully reared in the Colony must have been at least four times the number of all ages of Hongkong- born found still living in the Colony at the present Census. The number who claim British nationality, 15,645, is probably the best criterion by which to estimate the per- manently settled portion of the population. However the increase in the number of children, married women and widows shows that family life is increasing which makes for greater stability. It would be instructive in the next Census to ask for the length of residence in the Colony.

9. Occupation. The system on which occupations have been classified is far more elaborate than that used in 1911, and is based on the method of classification as revised for the 1921 Census of the United Kingdom. The number of separate entries has been increased from 146 to 475. Though in the instructions printed on the back of the schedule a special warning was given against inaccurate and vague descriptions of occupation, a large number contented themselves with describing their occupation as

>> (4

35 66

13.66

79.66

97 66

work business manager shop-assistant coolie "" artisan apprentice " etc.

The greatest increases are among the trades connected with metals being largely due to the activity of the two large shipyards. A large increase is also shown under the manufacture of clothes, but the large number of women returned as engaged in needlework is too high, and this term was probably used in very many cases as denoting simply household duties. The manufacture of hosiery and knitted goods especially in Yaumati has greatly increased of recent years, the employees being chiefly women.

A large number of women are also employed in cigarette making at Wanchai. The rattan furniture trade shows a greatly increased number of hands.

Seamen appear in very large numbers, this being due to the shipping slump which has especially affected the smaller tramp coasting steamers, of which a considerable number were laid up in this port at the date of the Census. The bulk of the population still depends on general commerce for their livelihood, but manufactures are gradually increasing, and Chinese seem more willing to embark their capital in industrial ventures than formerly. The chief manufacturing industries at present are ship-building, sugar- refining, manufacture of cigars and cigarettes; rope, paper, hosiery and knitted goods, preserved ginger and rattan furniture. Most of the other manufactures mentioned in the table are carried on on a small scale in shops employing less than 20 hands. Amongst the professions teachers have more than doubled.

The only note-worthy decrease is under the sale of opium from 139 to 60, due to stricter control over the sale of the drug.

10. Child Labour. Table XXIII, Part II.-In view of the interest aroused lately in the employment of young children, a special table has been devoted to the occupations of children under 14 (English reckoning). It will be seen that except in domestic work very few under 12 are employed. Children employed carrying building material are included under Orders XIII and XXII, which also include such occupations as painting, paint-scraping, scaffold-erecting, stone breaking and other miscellaneous light work. The large number of girls classified under "Manufacture of Clothing" is accounted for by the great tendency displayed to record females who had no other occupation than helping in the home as engaged in needlework. It is unlikely that more than half the young girls so recorded actually earn wages by needlework. Few male apprentices under 12 are recorded, the age when apprenticeship generally begins being 13 to 16. The chief manufactures in which child labour can be usefully employed are those of cigarettes and hosiery, recent introductions on the factory scale. At present factories properly so called are very rare, and most of the child labour engaged in manufacture is employed in small shops or at home. The large number of boys employed in domestic duties, i.e., in private houses, or as cooks in shops, is noteworthy, contrasted with the small number of free girls so employed. Considering the absence of any legal restraint on the employment of child labour, the numbers of

165

www

children actually employed in other than domestic work in proportion to the total number of children in the Colony appear very small; under 12 the number employed is 6,677 of whom 5,100 are employed in domestic duties mostly as "muitsai".

11. Muitsai.-Special steps were taken to ascertain the number of young girls engaged without remuneration in domestic service, known more commonly as "muitsai". a term which covers all young girls whose parents have assigned their rights of guardianship to other families for a monetary consideration, and whose labour is at the free disposal of the new guardian till the age for marriage. The numbers of those under 14 will be found classified according to age in Table XXIII, Part II, those of 14 and over in Table XXIII. The numbers are for New Territories North 119, New Territories South 39, Island of Hongkong 7,891, Kowloon 600, Floating Population 4; a total of 8,653, of which there are 5,959, under 14 and 2,532, of 14 and over. Of these 2,532, I estimate that 30 per cent are under 15, 25 per cent under 16, 20 per cent under 17, 12 per cent under 18, 8 per cent under 19, 5 per cent 19 and above. The majority were found in the City of Victoria between Eastern Street and Glenealy and on the Upper Levels. Under the age of 5 there are very few; between the ages of 10 and 14 the numbers are very equal for each age. The eldest noticed was aged 35, several were returned as married, and a few as widows, these evidently had found the homes of their old masters more comfortable than those of their husbands. The majority are uneducated, but in the Upper Levels where the better classes live, and the greatest proportion of muitsai are found, those able to read and write formed 9 per cent of the total. I estimate that above the age of 19 there are only about 150. The general age for marriage seems to be between 17 and 19, most being married at 18 or before. Very few were recorded as born in British Territory, or in the provinces of China outside Kwongtung. No effort was made to classify the birthplaces since in the large majority of cases this is really unknown, and Canton is entered instead, that being the place whence the sellers of the girls came. very few cases was the surname the same as that of the master or mistress, showing they did not come from the same clan. In many cases no surname was given at all, which was probably correct, the surnames being quite unknown, though later on they would doubtless be known under the surname of the family to whom they belonged. Kwongsai and South West Kwongtung, which used to supply a large number of 'muitsai', did not figure largely among the birthplaces, but the sources of supply are apt to vary according to the state of prosperity and order in the various districts. No "muitsai" as such were recorded in the families of the Portuguese and Indian population, but some young Chinese girls were found described as servants or adopted daughters, whose real status probably approximated to that of the 'muitsai' in a Chinese family. I am informed that formerly 'muitsai' were common in most Portuguese families of standing. Very few young girls are employed as hired domestic servants, the "Chu Lin (Nin) Mui" or girl hired by the year, who has been suggested as a substitute for the 'muitsai', does not appear to be popular, but there are on the other hand a large number of boys between the ages of 12 and 14 employed in domestic work in Chinese households. 122 young girls were described as "Yuk Nui" a term which in most cases denotes the same status.

In

Section V. Floating Population.

(Tables XXVIII to XXXIV.)

1. The floating population at Shaukeiwan, Aberdeen, Tai-O and Cheungchow was taken by enumerators under the supervision of the police officers in charge of each station. The main task, that of Victoria Harbour, was in the hands of the Water Police under Inspector Angus. A large force of enumerators was engaged.

Each craft was boarded and the required particulars obtained from the person in charge and entered directly in specially prepared books. As soon as each vessel was taken, a cross in white or black was painted on a conspicuous part. One European officer was assign- ed to each section of the Harbour and placed in charge of a launch and a group of sampans carrying two enumerators each. The work commenced at 7 a.m. on Saturday April 23rd in the Harbours of Refuge and along the sea front, harbour craft only being

166

dealt with on this day. On Sunday the 24th the whole force was mobilised consisting of (9 enumerators, 31 sampans, 9 Government launches, and 2 Naval Yard launches kindly placed at my disposal by the Naval Authorities; motor boats were also used for inspec- tion work at various times, which worked from 7 a m. to 7 p.m. On Monday a reduced force was used, while by Tuesday little remained undone and the number of enumerators was much reduced. On Wednesday only 3 enumerators were placed on the Police patrol launches in case any stragglers had been missed; these proved to be very few indeed. The Census of the harbour was thus taken in 4 days instea 1 of 7 as in 1911, and I am convinced that if a sufficient number of enumerators and sanpans are employed under efficient supervision, the work can be completed in 3 days. The enumerators assembled at the Water Police Station at 6.45 a m. every day and returned about 7 p.m. to report; they had previously been carefully instructed in their duties. Their work was well done on the whole, but they were rather dilatory on the first day, partly because the supervision was inefficient; this was chiefly owing to the European Police officer in charge of each section being unable from his launch to keep his sampans in sight, because they carried no distinguishing flag; this important point should not be omitted in the next Census. Uniform marking of each kind of craft when dealt with is also very important. A good deal of time was wasted because enumerators could not tell at a glance if a particular vessel had been enumerated. All European and Chinese members of the Water Police engaged worked extremely well in spite of the long hours

necessary.

2. To avoid delay and inconvenience arrangements were made with the Ferry, Dock, Godown, Water Boat and Sugar Refinery Companies, whereby the crews of their harbour craft were enumerated by their own staffs.

3. The issue of Sunday cargo working permits to vessels loading and unloading in the stream was restricted as much as possible, as it is impossible to take the Census pro- perly when many craft are moving about the harbour, or clustered round a ship working

cargo.

4. The number enumerated in Victoria harbour i.e., from Green Island to Quarry Bay was 38,854, an increase of 301 per cent on the figures for 1911. The figures for 1911 showed only a small increase over 1901 due to the terrible typhoon of September, 1906 when 11,000 lives were lost in the IIarbour: the figures for this year show that the natural increase has again begun, and that the losses of the great disaster have been fully repaired. Had it not been for the great slump in Shipping and Trade which pre- vailed and caused many of the floating population to seek means of livelihood for the time being elsewhere, the figures would have been considerably higher. Aberdeen and Stanley show a decrease of 773, Shaukeiwan an increase of 374; the lowness of these figures is accounted for partly by a succession of bad fishing seasons, and partly by the good weather prevailing at the time of the Census which enabled the smaller fishing craft to remain outside the harbours; for there are a large number of small fishing sampans which in fine weather put out quite long distances from Shaukeiwan and Aberdeen, and remain out some days.

5. The deep sea fishing fleet and their attendant salt junks were mostly absent, while the number of trading junks present in the harbour was rather smaller than usual.

6. No attempt was made to enumerate the persons on board sea going ships in the harbour. As Hongkong is only a port of call for a large number, their stay in port is short, and the addition of the crews and passengers to the figures gives a purely fictitious addition to the population, while the expense and difficulty of boarding each individual ship on the Sunday afternoon throughout this extensive harbour make the task not worth while attempting, when the figures for the crews can be obtained from the Harbour Office records without any trouble and expense. Chinese crews show a large decrease while non-Chinese crews show a large increase chiefly due to Indian guards on local steamers, Japanese and Americans. There has been a marked tendency recently to increase the number of non-Asiatics carried by the larger ships, especially the liners on the run to Europe and America.

7. 10,410 small craft in all of various classes were enumerated. The numbers enumerated in the Harbours of Hongkong, Aberdeen and Shaukeiwan, 8,918, show the completeness of the Census in the Home waters, the total number of licences issued in 1920 being 9,848; after making due allowances for absence at sea, and loss during the

167

year from various causes, this leaves very few unaccounted for. The figures for the New Territories are not so satisfactory, but here it must be remembered that at Tai O and Cheungchow a large proportion of the fishing fleet is at sea at any given time, while a certain number of licensed boats are only used occasionally and not as dwellings, and it is impossible to encounter all the sampans, which are always on the move, during a cruise in a launch along the much indented coast line of the New Territories.

8. Sexes.-The proportion of females show little change, and is still much below that of the males being 41 28 to 58.72. One reason for this is the presence of junks from places in China whose crews leave their families at home; and another that the crews of launches, ferryboats, etc., have their families living ashore.

9. Birthplaces.-68 per cent were born within British waters, of the remainder nearly half were born in the neighbourhood of Canton, where there is a huge floating population; the other districts bordering on the Canton Delta account for most of the remainder. The number of immigrants is far higher on the occasion of this Census as the great losses of 1906 have been replaced largely by immigration. There are a num- ber of Hakka males from the Waichow district, and of Hoklos from the Swatow district. These are quite distinct from the remainder of the floating population; unlike the majority who speak a patois of Cantonese, they speak their own languages, and in the case of the Hoklos their vessels are of a different build and they rarely take their families to sea with them. Those born in British Waters, the Canton Delta, and Macau are all akin and represent according to some anthorities the remnant of the indigenous population of South China, the ancient Kingdom of Yuet, which was gradually displaced by Chinese invaders from the North. They differ in features and physique from the Cantonese land population, the difference being especially marked in the case of females. They are regarded as outcasts by the remainder of the population, with whom they very rarely intermarry. They form the oldest portion of the inhabitants. of the Colony, their intercourse with foreigners being more intimate owing to their attendance on shipping in the Canton River. They were the first to follow the foreign trading fleet when it took refuge in Hongkong Harbour, before the desolate and barren Island became British.

-

10. Nationality.-Nationality was assigned in accordance with the birthplace given, no questions being asked by the enumerators on this point, since such a question would puzzle extremely the ignorant women of the floating population, who would do all the talking when the enumerator visited their floating home.

11. Education.-The figures given for education are not very reliable as in some cases the enumerators failed to carry out their instructions properly and the opinion of the women from whom much of the information had to be obtained was of little value. The number of women who can read and write I consider fairly correct, but the number of males is much too high; probably only 20 per cent at most of the males can read and write. The children have little opportunity to learn as their floating home is always on the move.

Excepting those employed on launches and foreign owned lighters, there are extremely few of the true floating population, who could write a simple letter in Chinese; figures and a few easy characters are all that most of those who claim to be able to read and write would be able to write if actually put to the test. Among the fishing population at Shaukeiwan and Aberdeen there are very few who can read and write.

12. Ages.--Up to the age of 7 females exceed males by 22; after that age males exceed females, moderately up to 13, but thereafter at a greatly increasing rate till at 18 males are twice as numerous. After 7 there is a marked falling off in the numbers of females, possibly partly accounted for by recruiting for brothels, very large numbers of whose inmates are drawn from the floating population. Compared with the urban po- pulation there is far greater proportionate loss shown after 40 and again after 55, while the numbers of old people of 60 and above are proportionately higher, being 3.3 per cent against 2-4 per cent for the urban population, the reason being that the aged in the case of the floating population have no village in the country to which to retire to spend their declining days. But the general effect of the table is to show that the duration of life amongst the floating is somewhat shorter than that of the urban population. It is noteworthy that by 25 nearly all the females are married, most being married before 20, the average age for marriage being apparently lower than for the urban population. Married males under 30 exceed the unmarried by about twice, while for the urban po- pulation the excess is three times; the average age of marriage for males therefore appears to be higher than in the case of the urban population.

}

168

Section VI.-Staff and Cost.

(Tables XXXV to XXXVII.)

1. Enumerators-Hongkong and Kowloon.-The number of enumerators employed. was 526 in all. Enumerators for Hongkong and Kowloon were recruited directly by me. I dealt with over 500 applicants, of whom about 400 were found qualified after an examination in Chinese writing. No special recruiting steps were required, and I was. unable to use all who passed the test, but it was necessary to keep a large number in reserve, as no fewer than 97 who had been appointed to sections failed to present themelves when called up to receive their final instructions. This was mostly due to the Tsing Ming Festival causing men to return home just before the date when their services were required. Some failed to present themselves at the very last moment, and in several cases only one of the pair of enumerators attended to receive his schedules, and sub- sequently after beginning the distribution came back and reported that his colleague had gone off to the country, asking for a substitute. Thus a large amount of the care and trouble devoted to the previous instruction was wasted, and untrained men had to be launched forth, as it was impossible at the very last moment carefully to instruct the substitutes, when every second of my time was fully occupied. Some of the enumerators after distributing their schedules returned home for the Festival, and thus commenced the collection a few days late. In one case the enumerator collected his schedules, locked them up in his cubicle and returned to his native village for Tsing Ming before handing in his schedules. Had it not been for the enumerators of two sections, the preliminary report would have been ready nearly a week earlier. With the exception of six sections all the schedules had been handed in by May 3rd. The work on the whole was surprisingly well done considering the difficulties caused by the Tsing Ming Festival, but I must acknowledge that the defection of so many trained enumerators at the very last moment caused me grave anxiety for the ultimate success of the under- taking. The classes of enumerators found most suitable were office boys, boys employed in clubs, and shop foki's; the work did not commend itself to the junior clerk class, and very few of the numerous applicants for clerical posts could be induced to help as enumerators. Portuguese enumerators were employed for the first time for the non- Chinese portion of Tsimshatsui, but one left his work only just begun without reporting, thus causing great confusion on the very day before the Census, when his absence from the Colony was discovered, and necessitating the redistribution among the others. Enumerators were paid $10 each and in certain cases, owing to the distance of their section from their homes or the Census Office, sums varying from $1 to $3 as travelling expenses. In most cases I was able to select a sufficient number of enumerators, who lived close to their sections.

2. New Territories.-Enumerators for the New Territories were selected by the Police officers in charge of each district, special care being taken to select men from different parts of the district, so that they should not have to waste time going to and fro from their homes: they were paid $15, and in a few cases various sums for travelling expenses, when they had to spend a night away from their homes in the more inaccessible parts of the Territory; the Head enumerator in each district received $40. They all took great interest in their work which they carried out very satisfactorily and expeditiously. No difficulty was experienced in obtaining in each district sufficient suitable candidates. In two small districts the Police Sergeant Interpreter acted as Head Enumerator receiving a small gratuity for the extra work involved.

3. Harbour.-Enumerators for the Harbour were selected partly by me from my general list, men accustomed to harbour work being preferred, and partly by the Water Police. They were paid $3 per day and 50 cents for travelling expenses and food. They reported each day at the Water Police Station at 6.45 a.m. and rarely returned ashore till 7 p.m.; the work was very arduous and in many cases unpleasant, and most of them well earned the comparatively high pay given. Small gratuities were given to the Chinese crews of the Government launches employed, in recognition of the great assistance which they rendered.

4. PoliceThis year in accordance with the conditions of the new scale of pay no individual allowances were made to the European Police officers engaged, but donations were made to the Headquarters Water Police and New Territories Canteens.

169

5. District Watchmen.-Allowances to the district watchmen engaged in the Census were paid at the rate of $7 for Head watchmen, and $4 for watchmen. The Head watchmen were not called on to do any preliminary work this year.

6. Clerks. One supervisor and 29 Chinese clerks were originally engaged, of these two were dismissed very early for incompetency, three were discharged to reduce the overcrowing of the office, three resigned, and four were subsequently taken on of whom one resigned almost at once. The supervisor who had served as clerk and interpreter in the last Census received $120 per month, the chief clerk for the non-Chinese section $60 and his assistant $40, the other clerks who only required to know Chinese $30. One clerk assisted at a Census for the 4th time. Owing largely to the stagnation of trade, I had a very large number of applicants to select from, and as care and industry were the chief requisites, it was not difficult to get together in the end a fairly adequate staff. As usual the non-Chinese section proved the weakest, and I had personally to do a very large proportion of the work in this section myself, as well as preparing most of the tables, and classifying the occupations of both sections according to the new classification used in a Hongkong census for the first time. It is very difficult to find temporary Chinese clerks of good character and ability with sufficient experience and knowledge of English for the posts of supervisor and chief clerk of the non-Chinese section, and I strongly recommend that for the next Census two clerks of the permanent service, one 2nd grade and one 4th grade, be temporarily detached for Census duty. Such an arrangement would have saved me a good deal of trouble and anxiety and would probably have considerably expedited the work. Both my senior clerks proved to be men of feeble health, and were absent through sickness for considerable periods, one finally having to resign when the work was half completed, and they were also lacking in the requisite experience.

The attendance of the junior clerks was rather irregular especially in the last half of the time, in spite of the fact that they received no pay for days of absence. In all over 150 working days were lost through absence.

7. Cost. The cost of the Census was $22,146.87 of which $9,307.76 was for print- ing, which had to be executed this year by the Government printers, because the work could not be undertaken at Victoria Gaol as in former years. The cost in 1911 was $9,115 which did not include any printing. The cost for the present Census, considering the great increase in the numbers dealt with and the rise in wages throughout the Colony, and the shorter time required for the Census of the New Territories and Harbour, compares very favourably with that of 1911.

Hongkong, 10th November, 1921.

J. D. LLOYD,

Census Officer.

171

SECTION I.

GENERAL SUMMARY.

Table 1.-Statement of the Population by Districts.

Table 2.-Comparison with the Census of 1911.

172

Table I.

CENSUS OF HONGKONG, 1921.

FINAL FIGURES OF THE POPULATION.

(a.) CITY OF VICTORIA BY

1.- ISLAND OF HONGKONG.

NON-CHINESE.

CHINESE.

Males. Females. Total. Males. Females. Total.

TOTAL.

HEALTH DISTRICTS.

North Point.....

53

28 81 2,251

776

3,027

3,108

District No. 1, Causeway

Bay, Bowrington &

Wongneichong

414

379 793

9,563

7,783 17,346

18,139

District No. 1A & 2A,

Wanchai,

840

District No. 2, Wanchai

643

764 1,604 448 1,091

15,803 15,648

9,549 25,352 26,956 10,908 26,556 27,647

District No. 3, Upper

Levels

1,707

1,499 3,206

|

6,609

District No. 4, Central... District No. 5, Central...

587

303 890

27,521

5,463

12,072 15,278 15,425 42,946 43,836

32

19

51

18,864

11,150

30,014 30,065

District No. 6, Sheung-

wan & Taipingshan,... District No. 7, Sheung-

25

34

59

20,078

8,334 28,412 28,471

B

wan & Taipingshan... District No. 8, Saiying- pun,-North of Go- vernment Civil Hos-

⚫ pital

32

26

58

19,150 9,452 28,602 28,660

132

35

167

19,616 7,068 26,684 26,851

District No. 9, Saiying-

pun

70

33

103

26,922 16,234

43,156 43,259

District No. 10, West

Point.

108

Hill District (The Peak)

384

73 181 305 689

|

35

9

(c.) ABERDEEN & APLICHAU.. 11

4

(d.) HONGKONG

VILLAGES

(Other)

(e.) SHAUKEIWAN,

31 235 137 372

19

12,122 28,221 28,402 302 1,912 2,601

TOTAL-City of Victoria.. 5,027 3,946 8,973 199,734 114,566 314,300 323,273

(b.) POKFULAM

643 1,740 1,784 1,365 3,902 3,917

1,023 1,073 16,982 17,354

TOTAL--Island of Hongkong 5,339 4,115 9,454 215,746 122,201 337,947 347,401

| | |

16,099 1,610

44

1,097

15

2,537

50

753 11,625

270

5,357

A

A

:

173

FINAL FIGURES OF THE POPULATION.

II. KOWLOON PENINSULA (by Health Districts).

NON-CHINESE.

CHINESE.

Total.

Males. Females. Total. Males. Females.

Total.

District No. 11, Kowloon

Point

1,270 1,153|2,423

6,479 3,353

9.832

12,255

District No. 11A, Hunghom.. District No. 12. Yaumati District No. 13, Mongkok

19 179 127

10

29

9,440 5,277

14.717

14,746

306

18,543

13,523

32,066

32,372

116

90

206

17,519

11,689 29,208

29,414

District No. 14. Taikoktsui

and Shamshuipo

79

51

130

10,471

5,920 16,391

16,521

District No. 15, Hunghom

Villages

48

15

Kowloon City

21

8

88889

63

3,173 5,417

8.590 8,653

29

5,097

4,361 9,458 9,487

Total-Kowloon Peninsula... 1,7321,454 3,186 72.966

47,296 120,262123,448

III. NEW TERRITORIES (by Police Districts).

NON-CHINESE.

CHINESE.

Males. Females. Total. Males. Females. Total.

Total.

(a) North-

Pingshan

16

10

5

21

Autau

8

8

6,128 5,749

6,083 5,349 11,432

11,453

11,877

11,885

Lokmachow.

9

9

1,830 1,787

3,617

3,626

Shataukok

18

1

19

3,606 4,732

8,338

8,357

Sheungshui

30

11

41

3,738 3,870

7,608

7,649

Taipo

26

14

40

4,479 4,617

9,096

9,136

Shatin

5

5

1,916 2,235 4,151

4,156

Saikung

7

7

4,546 5,299

9,845 9,852

Total-New Territories

North

119

31

150

32,326 33,638 65,964 66,114

(b.) South :-

Tsunwan

10

Kowloon City

10 2,572 2.321 see Kowloon Peninsula.

4,893

4,903

Lantau.....

10

...

10 3,115 2,833

5,948

5.958

Cheungchow

23

17

40

2,955

2,042

4,997 5,037

Lamma Island..

6

6

631

514 1,145 1,151

Total-New Territories 168

48

216

41,599 41,348

82,947 83,163

=་

174

FINAL FIGURES OF THE POPULATION.

IV. FLOATING POPULATION.

NON-CHINESE.

CHINESE.

TOTAL.

Victoria Harbour. Shaukeiwan

Stanley

Males. Females. Total. Males. Females. Total.

9

924,227 14,618 38,845

38,854

3,766 2,948' 6,714

>

6,714

163 112 275

275

Aberdeen

4,543 3,381 | 7,924

7,924

Cheungchow

Tai-O

2,056 1,496 3,552 2,000 1,894 3,894

3,552

3,894

Tsunwan

New Territories North

74 61 2,574 1,337 3,911

135

135

3,911

Mercantile Marine

1,933

1,933 3,962

3,962

5,895

TOTAL-Floating Population 1,942

1,942 43,365 25,847 69,212

71,154

Table II.

COMPARATIVE TABLE.

1921.

1911.

INCREASE.

Island of Hongkong Kowloon Peninsula.... New Territories, North New Territories, South Floating Population

Add Unclassified......

TOTAL......

Males. Females. Total. Males. Females. Total.

221,085 126,316 347,401 169,208 75,115 244,323 74,698 48,750 123,448 43,849 23,648 67,497 32,445 33,669 66,114 32,747 33,393 66,140 9,322 7,727 17,049 7,865 6,617 14,482 45,307 25,847 71,154 40,056 20,892 60,948

293,725 159,665 453,390 2.426 923 3,349

Decrease

26

103.078 55,951

}

2,567 10,206

171.776

Decrease 3,349

|382,357 242,309 625,166 296,151 160,588 456,739

168,427

Total Increase 168,427

175

S

SECTION II.

NON-CHINESE POPULATION.

Table 3.-Age.

4.Married state.

23

":

5.-Nationality.

6.- - Birthplace.

7.--Education.

8.-Occupation.

British Portuguese Others Japanese..

BRITISH.

AGES.

176

Table III.

AGES OF THE NON-CHINESE POPULATION.

BY NATIONALITIES.

PORTUGUESE.

JAPANESE.

OTHERS.

under

94

18

19

5

6

12

13

100

93

22

30

14

16

15

5

76

83

23

20

14

9

11

6

76

69

16

26

11

17

11

10

81

86

24

22

18

9

11

75

68

27

18

7

11

77

75

16

19

13

14

73

16

26

9

7

9

52

69

22

23

10

61

73

31

25

11

61

'53

22

28

487

12

58

51

21

23

13

53

47

21

27

6

20

14

48

59

27

32

11

15

63

57

28

23

14

16

40

46

15

24

11

17

44

56

27

1

26

5

15

13

18

56

43

17

26

13

11

9

8

19

49

12 51

16

1

14

14

6

7

8

20

52

7

34

17

3

21

21

4

6

10

2

25

45 427

171 123

8

79

31

79

2

114 51

62

11

76 35

27

30

176 441

275 91

34

41

58

28 41

159

77

92

40 55

51

29

35 389 286 40 354 183

315

50 42

13

28 94

64

60 23

50 39

43

19

285

38

42 11

14

100 22

47 12

56

30

44

21

45 342 113

171

18

45

8

52

15 44

7

36 2

48

21

34

21

50

241 /46 113 16

35

3

12 36

2

24

41 15

23

20

55

161 30

88

12

32

34

13

26

16

1

17

13

13

60

94 10

32

10

10

3

29

16 12

6

16

3

65

42

27

2 21

7

32

10

70

14

15

1 10

3

25

5

75

18

11

1 13

21

80

7

85

90

95

100

Table IV.

MARRIED STATE OF THE NON-CHINESE POPULATION

BY NATIONALITIES.

Widowers.

Married

Males.

Unmarried

*so[B]

Total.

Widows.

Married

Females.

106 1,783

27 13

2,819

274

597

4,708 898

151

152 1,389 1,642 3,183. 302 706 1,159

285 447 745 357 550 915

227

38

352 617 35 293 342 670

Total......

154 2,699 4,413 7,266

376 2,211 3,042 5,629

Unmarried

Females.

Total.

Females.

I

177

Table V..

NATIONALITIES OF THE NON-CHINESE POPULATION.

British Belgian

Danish

...

...

...

...

...

...

Dutch French German Greek Hungarian Italian Latvian Norwegian Portuguese Polish Roumanian Russian... Swedish... Spanish Swiss

...

...

...

...

....

...

...

...

Arabiau... Japanese Persian. Filipino Siamese... Turkish...

...

...

...

Argentine Brazilian

Cuban

Chilian

...

Mexican...

Panamian Peruvian

Europe.

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

....

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

Asia.

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

America.

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

United States of America

...

...

Males.

Females.

Total.

4,706

3,183

7,889

...

...

3

3

26

...

10

36

...

...

68

36

104

108

...

100

208

3

3

3

3

1

1

17

...

39

56

3

1

4

16

...

7

23

898

1,159

2,057

5

1

6

1

1

20

...

16

36

3

2

5

30

...

29

59

20

3

23

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

1

1

915

670

1,585

1.

...

1

120

...

112

232

...

2

5

10

10

6

4

1

NN + CO

13

4

4

8

3

4

...

1

1

...

12

37

270

200

49 470

...

1

K

178

Table VI.

BIRTH PLACES OF THE NON-CHINESE POPULATION BY NATIONALITIES.

BIRTHPLACE.

BRITISH. PORTUGUESE. OTHERS.

JAPANESE.

British Empire.

Male. Female. Male. Female. Male. Female. Male. Female.

England

1,199

825

...

Scotland

389

186

10 OF

Wales

16

9

Ireland -

104

49

5

10

2

1

...

3

1

...

...

Channel Isles

1

...

Gibraltar

11

4

Malta

10

3

British North Borneo

1

1

...

...

...

Ceylon

23

5

1

...

...

...

Hongkong

1,305

1,454

579

679

65

89

46

India

1,280

194

2

Malaya

85

40

رون

1

1

3

3

3

...

49

1

Mauritius

4

2

...

...

Australia

67

86

2

1

...

...

Fiji -

2

...

Tasmania

1

2

...

New Zealand

10

9

...

Canada -

30

26

دن

...

Newfoundland-

1

...

...

West Indies

11

18

...

...

...

South Africa

6

8

...

:

Europe.

Belgium

Denmark

France

1

5

CO 2

Germany

Greece

Holland-

Hungary

Italy- Latvia

-

Norway- Poland - Portugal Roumania

Russia

Spain Sweden Switzerland

22

2

1

...

...

...

3

72

...

67

3

...

1

51

20

...

1

2

14

34

...

...

3

..

17

5

...

4

1

CO

...

6

11

1

1

...

2

1

21

14

...

11

12

1

2

1

18

22

...

Asia.

Arabia

1

...

China

76

Formosa

145 1

32

55

20

30

1

4

1

French Indo-China

4

7

1

Goa -

5

...

Japan

13

19

5

117

33

13

7

7

6

863

613

Korea

2

...

...

Macao

13

26 261 386

1

5

...

...

BRITISH.

BIRTHPLACE.

179

BIRTH PLACES OF THE NON-CHINESE, &c.-Continued.

BRITISH. PORTUGUESE.

OTHERS.

JAPANESE.

Siam

Timor

Turkey

Asia,--Continued.

Netherlands East Indies-

Persia

Philippines-

Male. Female. Male. Female. Male. Female. Male. Female.

Go to 10

CO

3

6

4

5

9

6

2

1

4

13

6

1

8

128

109

2

2

3

...

...

CO

3

4

...

...

10 N ∞

America.

Argentina

...

...

Brazil

1

Chili

4

3

Cuba

1

...

Honolulu

2

5

...

Mexico

Panama-

2

5

1

Peru

2

9

22

United States of America

11

24

1

191

137

2

Africa.

Egypt

:

:

2

...

Table VII.

EDUCATION OF THE NON-CHINESE POPULATION BY NATIONALITIES.

ABLE TO READ

AND WRITE.

Married

Males.

Unmarried

Males.

Married

Females.

Unmarried

Females.

Married

Males.

PORTUGUESE.

OTHERS.

Unmarried

Females.

Married

Males.

Unmarried

Males.

JAPANESE.

1,682 1,811 1,272 939 296 430 392 5031 288 359 253

277 353

456 279

219

89% 64% 83% 57% 98% 72% 87% 71% 97% 80% 95% 79% 97% 83% 83% 64%

Married

Females.

Unmarried

Females.

VII

180

Table VIII.

COLONY OF HONGKONG.

OCCUPATIONS OF THE NON-CHINESE POPULATION BY NATIONALITIES

JAPANESE. PORTUGUESE. OTHERS.

Order.

Sub-order.

BRITISH.

Males.

Fe- males.

Males.

Fe- males.

Males.

Fe- males.

Males.

Fe- males.

11

AGRICULTURE.

Dairy Farming

7

Farming

14

Planting

III

MINING AND QUARRYING.

1

Mining...

Quarrying

Cement

IV

MANUFACTURE OF BRICKS.

1

V

MANUFACTURE OF NON-MINERAL

OILS.

VI

MANUFACTURE OF METALS, CON-

VEYANCES AND JEWELRY,

Shipbuilding and Repairing.

Blacksmiths

Boatswains (Dock)..... Boiler-Makers... Coppersmiths...

Draughtsmen

4A73

Fitters

*

Founders...

4

Joiners

7

Metal Workers

54

Engineers

97

Foremen

18

Office Staff

Storemen...

Time-Keepers...

6

5

14

9

Gunsmith

10

Goldsmiths...

Jewellers

Watchmakers

TEXTILES AND TEXTILE Goods.

Matting-making...

6

10 CO

5

Dyeing

VIII

1

TANNING

IX

MANUFACTURE OF CLOTHING.

1

Embroidering

Needlework

Shoemaking

Tailoring, etc.

X

MANUFACTURE OF FOOD, DRINK

AND TOBACCO.

1

Confectionery

Sugar

2

Aerated Water

Ice

GO

3

Cigars...

XI

WOODWORKING.

Blackwood Furniture

Carpentry

Rattan Ware

1

1

127

44

3

i

1

1

10

1

3

CO

رات

1

1

1

16

14

10 24

3

2

33

2

3

LO

1

25

2

6

1.

Order.

XII

XIII

XIV

Sub-order.

3

181

OCCUPATIONS OF THE NON-CHINESE, &c.,—Continued.

JAPANESE. PORTUGUESE.

PRINTING, BOOK-BINDING AND

BRITISH.

OTHERS.

Fe-

Fe-

Males.

Males.

Males.

males.

males.

Fe- males.

Males.

Fe- males.

PHOTOGRAPHY.

Compositor...

Lithographing

Engraving...

Printing Photography

BUILDING

OTHER MANUFACTURING INDUS-

TRIES.

Optical Goods

Organ Building...

Tortoise Shell Goods...

18

21

XV

GAS, WATER AND ELECTRICITY.

Gas Works... Electricity Supply

TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATION.

3

37

XVI

1

Railway

Road

Chauffeurs

Gara ges

Water:-

Co

7

2

16

aa

6

NN

2

GO 00

N

3

LO

5

3

1

10

5

1

Ferry Services

9

Ships' Crews ...

1

2

3

26

Engineers

89

9

15

14

Officers

72

8

Shipping Office

69

29

24

Pilot

Tugs and Lighters... Divers

3

Docks and Wharves:

Stevedores

LO

5

Wharfingers

6

Wharf Managers

Wharf Engineer

1

Sworn Measurer

Storage:-

Godownkeepers

7

1

Messengers:

Telegraphs

15

Wireless

Telephones

557

XVII

COMMERCE AND FINANCE.

1

Dealing in :-

Bicycles

Books and Stationery

Coal...

Curios

Drapery

Fancy Goods

Fruit

Furniture

Grocery

Jewellery...

Leather

18

INWW

18

8

6

1

2

1

15

1 38

8

00

2

Order.

Sub-Order.

XVII

182

OCCUPATIONS OF THE NON-CHINESE, &c.,-Continued.

JAPANESE. PORTUGUESE.

COMMERCE AND FINANCE,-Contd.

BRITISH.

OTHERS.

Fe-

Fe-

Males.

Males.

Males.

males.

males.

Fe- males.

Fe-

Males.

males.

Dealing in:-

Mattresses

Medicine and Chemicals

20

Milk...

2

Paper

1

Petroleum Products

16

Piece Goods

1

Porcelain...

Sandalwood

Ship Chandlery

Silk ...

Timber

Tobacco, etc.

Wines and Spirits...

Brokers:

Estate

Exchange

11

2

1

16

GOL-

N

12

Flour

Share

Ship...

General

15

Metal

51

13

7

1 1

Yarn

3

General:

Banking ...

78

16

56

35

Bookkeepers and Cashiers

72

7

15

1

39

Clerks

297

12

205

2

205

12

ON

2

13

24

Commercial Travellers...

7

9

Commission Agents

24

20

CO

8

28

Estate Agent

Financiers

1

General Managers

32

14

Hawkers...

2

1

Insurance

24

Merchants (General)

109

1

36

N

60 LO

13

1

Mercantile Assistants

75

21

2

Salesmen...

24

1

18

Shop Assistants

20

2

Tallymen...

23

Typists & Stenographers

20

80

2

1

Warehousemen

26

4

254

50

7

XVIII

PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION AND

DEFENCE.

Defence:-

Army

Navy

388

30

4

86

1

1

Civil Government :-

Police Department...

598

Prison Department...

121

Sanitary Department

35

Other Departments

161

2

16

XIX

PROFESSIONS.

Accountancy

14

Architecture and Civil

Engineering

48

w

Art

1

Co

3

12

6

Auctioneering

4

Dentistry

Education

Interpretation

45

60 401

4

1

6

10

15

·

Order.

Sub-order.

183

OCCUPATIONS OF THE NON-CHINESE, &c.,-Continued.

JAPANESE. PORTUGUESE.

BRITISH.

OTHERS.

Fe-

Fe-

Males.

Males.

Males.

males.

måles.

Fe- males.

Males.

Fe- males.

XIX

PROFESSIONS, Contd.

Law

Massage

Medicine

Midwifery

41

01

:

27

3

CO —

Nursing

27

Religion

11

11

N

3

5

1

3

7

4

8

1

15

51

73

XX

ENTERTAINMENTS ETC.

Dancing

Music

Race Course

4 1

00 10

N

Theatre

12

2

2

28

1

Ι

1

Prostitutes

139

XXI

PERSONAL SERVICE.

Clubs

ون

2

Hotels and Boarding Houses 14

9

21

4

1 1

Laundries

1

5

1

Restaurants...

1

9

7

Cooks...

22

6

10

1

Governesses and Nurses

43

13

10

17

Hairdressers

ลง

2

1

25

1

Servants

8

23

57

2

Watchmen

381

1

2

*

XXII

OTHER INDUSTRIES.

Service of Foreign Govern-

meuts Undertakers

12

N

ུ་

22

1

:

- 185

SECTION III

NEW TERRITORIES-CHINESE POPULATION.

Table 9.-Age.

"

North

10.-Nationality and Married state.

>>

23

11.-Birthplace.

12.-Education.

""

>>

22

13.-Villages over 500 population.

14.-Age.

South

15. Nationality and Married state."

16.-Birthplace.

17.-Education.

North and South

18.-Occupation.

186

Table IX.

NEW TERRITORIES, NORTH

THE AGES OF THE CHINESE POPULATION.

Under.

Unmarried Married Total Males. Males. Males.

Unmarried Married Total

Females. Females. Females.

J

937

937

931

931

2

892

892

874

874

3

859

859

837

837

4

891

891

886

886

5

827

827

769

769

6

764

764

737

737

7

847

847

742

742

8

798

798

693

693

9

892

892

765

765

10

836

836

701

701

11

878

878

728

728

12

861

861

726

726

13

725

725

700

700

14

818

24

842

684

12

696

15

804

36

840

596

44

630

16

673

43

716

438

120

558

17

629

79

708

450

218

668

18

555

114

669

313

322

635

19

541

195

736

289

439

728

20

358

290

648

280

521

801

25

1,337

1,652

2,989

115

2,680

2,795

30

‣ 609

2,090

2,699

26

2,590

2,616

35

305

2,165

2,470

14

2,434

2,448

40

134

2,286

2,420

10

2,494

2,504

45

82 1,912

1,994

14

2,156

2,170

50

51

1,641

1,692

11

1,960

1,971

55

18

1,308

1,326

1,504

1,509

60

65

70

121900

30

1,055

1,085

1,378

1,383

774

879

981

982

469

477

778

780

75

80

NO CO

281

284

1

469

470

147

149

274

274

85

58

58

119

119

90

20

20

11

42

90 and over

5

5

9

i

+

187

Table X.

NEW TERRITORIES, NORTH.

NATIONALITY AND MARRIED STATE.

Married Unmarried

Males.

Total.

Males.

Married Unmarried Females. Females.

Total.

British

14,144

16,602

30,746

18,264

12,619

30,883

Chinese

2,503

1,470

3,973

3,343

743

4,086

Japanese

1

1

Portuguese

8

8

French

1

72

7

2

731

2

Italian

1

American

Mexican Others

...

5

215

2

215

Total

* 16,658

18,072

34,730

* 21,624

13,362 34,986

* Widowers included-1,767.

* Widows included-5,500.

Table XI.

NEW TERRITORIES, NORTH.

BIRTHPLACES OF THE CHINESE POPULATION.

Un-

Un-

Married Males.

Married

married Total.

Males.

married Total.

Females.

Females.

Asia.

New Territories

14,041

16,478

30,519

17,228

12,507

Hongkong

101

125

226

962

246

29,735 1,208

Macao

16

9

25

14

2

16

Straits Settlement

2

2

Siam

2

2

Annam

India

1

Japan

1

Į

British Borneo

1

1

France

Europe.

Italy

1

1

1

188

Table XI,-Continued.

NEW TERRITORIES, NORTH.

BIRTHPLACES OF THE CHINESE POPULATION.

America.

U. S. A.

Mexico

China.

Un-

Un-

Married Males.

Married

married Total.

Males.

Females.

married Females.

Total.

(Kwong Tung Province.)

1

T~

2

1

21

1. Canton Delta Districts :—

Po On (San On)

797

416

1,213

2,089

195

2,284

Tung Kwun.

227

158

385

205

91

296

Pun U

86

39

125

73

46

119

Nam Hoi

Sam Shui

111

61

172

162

44

206

S

3

11

12

3

15

Ko Ming

1

2

3

3

3

Hoi Ping

15

3

18

12

1

13

Hok Shan

13

12

25

9

10

19

Yan Ping

15

13

28

7

5

12

San Wui

112

59

171

54

28

82

San Ning

64

41

105

65

36

101

Heung Shan

57

20

77

73

21

94

Shun Tak ...

58

31

89

43

23

66

11. East River Districts :-

Kwai Shin...

207

116

323

182

46

Pok Lo

11

4

15

+

Tam Shui

58

37

95

33

12

Tsang Shing

32

23

55

18

Wai Chow...

341

238

579

174

63

Other...

3

1

4

5

422732

228

6

45

25

237

7

III. North River Districts:

Ching Un...

68

27

95

Fa Un

78

64

142

Sz Wui

2

1

Other...

2

CO +

3

8818

28

10

38

78

22

100

4

4

4

IV. West River Districts:-

San Hing

Shiu Hing...

V. S. W. Kwongtung

4

1

N

6

6

53

36

89

23

22

22

2

2

5

8

45

10

:

VI. Swatow Districts

189

Table XI,-Continued.

NEW TERRITORIES, NORTH.

BIRTHPLACES OF THE CHINESE POPULATION.

Un-

Un-

Married

Married

married Total.

married

Total.

Males.

Females.

Males.

Females.

Hoi Fung

22

Chịu Chau...

3

16

44

Ka Ying Chau

40

28

8983

26

19

4

Hii N

2

1

68

21

13

34

VII. Unspecified

1

1

2

1

94

25

China.

(Other Provinces.)

Chehkiang:..

Fukien

Kiangsi

North China

2

1

1

1

3

3

1

1

Table XII.

NEW TERRITORIES, NORTH.

EDUCATION OF THE CHINESE POPULATION.

Married Males.

Un- married Total.

Males.

Un-

Married Females.

married Total. Females.

Able to read and write

11,371 6,240 17,611

326

348

674

:

Table XIII.

NEW

TERRITORIES, NORTH.

VILLAGES OR AGGREGATIONS OF VILLAGES OVER 500 POPULATION.

Villages.

Fanling

Lin Fa Tei

Saikung

Population.

849

875

606

San Tin

Sheungshui

Sheungtsun Shek Kong

2,195

1,400

1,058

662

Shun Wan

1,392

Taipo

1,371

Ting Kok

878

Tam Shui Hang

654

Toi Shan...

591

Un Long.. Wang Chau Kat O Island

1,854

979

656

190

S

Table XIV.

NEW TERRITORIES, SOUTH.

AGES OF THE CHINESE POPULATION.

Under.

Unmarried Married

Males. Males.

Total Unmarried Married Total Males. Females. Females. Females.

CY A CO to H

1

296

296

301

301

2

311

311

293

293

314

314

261

261

4

302

302

266

266

5

287

287

223

223

6

268

268

207

207

7

312

312

279

279

8

300

300

244

244

9

314

314

261

261

10

309

309

238

238

11

307

307

230

230

12

294

294

242

242

13

273

273

232

232

14

287

10

297

234

7

241

15

292

20

312

228

19

247

16

231

24

255

184

26

210

17

274

30

304

188

58

246

18

253

41

294

139

82

221

19

264

103

367

123

140

263

20

186

137

323

48

167

215

25

729

736

1,465

104

869

973

30

381

894

1,275

50

987

1,037

35

240

979

1,219

16

926

942

40

134

1,031

1,165

7

935

942

45

74

825

899

9

719

728

50

38

697

735

673

681

55

18

531

549

510

517

60

13

381

394

452

453

65

4

274

278

323

323

70

1

171

172

75

93

93

TO CO

237

240

173

175

80

34

34

89

89

85

14

14

37

37

90

1

1

9

9

90 and over

|

6

6.

191

Table XV.

NEW TERRITORIES, SOUTH.

NATIONALITY AND MARRIED STATE OF THE CHINESE POPULATION.

Married Unmarried

Males.

Total.

Males.

Married Unmarried Females. Females.

Total.

British

3,593

5,343

8,936

5,288

3,999

9.287

Chinese

3,432

1,961

5,393

2,129

629

2,758

Annamite

2

2

1

1

French

6

6

Portuguese

American...

Q1 00

2

N CO

2

6

6

8

12

12

Total

7,037

7,304 14,341

7,442

4,628

12,070

Widowers--608.

Widows-1,952.

Table XVI.

NEW TERRITORIES, SOUTH.

BIRTHPLACES OF THE CHINESE POPULATION.

Un-

Married

Married

Males.

married Total.

Males.

Females.

Un- married Females.

Total.

Asia.

New Territory

3,456

5,082

8,538

4,913 3,730

8,643

Hongkong..

Macao

122

255

377

368

269

637

84

58

142

69

69

Annam

Singapore Manila

ลงคว

}

NON

2

9

9

...

1

America.

U. S. A.

China.

(Kwong Tung Province)

I. Canton Delta Districts:-

8

12

12

Po On (San On)

Tung Kun...

Pun U

368

181

549

336

76

336

180

516

267

62

72

56

128

57

Nam Hoi

Sam Shui

Ko Ming

Hoi Ping Hok Shan

298

149

447

222

20

3

23

17

8

8

16

1

31

19

50

11

38

5

43

7

Yan Ping

7

9

2

San Wui

183

95

San Ning

49

40

Shun Tak ...

125

1529

278

107

89

62

187

888

28

68

9948111-928

412

329

17

104

314

17

1

6

17

7

3

149

40

33

101

192

Table XVI,-Continued.

NEW TERRITORIES, SOUTH.

BIRTHPLACES OF THE CHINESE POPULATION,-Continueă.

II. East River Districts:

Pok Lo

Wai Chow...

Tsang Shing

Kwai Shin...

Other

111. North River Districts :

Ching Un...

Fa Un

Sz Wui

Other

IV. West River Districts :—

Un-

Un-

Married

Married

married Total.

married

Total.

Males.

Females.

Males.

Females.

1

1

6

752

436

1,188

428

46

38

84

43

40

19

59

17

3

3

1000101

6

78

506

2

45

5

22

88

105

8888

53

141

52

193

91

19

4

23

2

11

12

23

.98E

10

62

36

127

2

11

18

San Hing

Shiu Hing...

Other

1890

4

4

1

30

44

74

13

16

LO

5

21

1

1001

1

21

V. S. W. Kwong Tung

11

11

9

1

10

VI. Swatow Districts:-

Hoi Fung

296

151

447

50

18

Ka Ying Chau

93

41

124

20

8

Chịu Chau...

104

60

164

29

4

33

88888888

68

28

1

1

VII. Hai Nan...

China, Other Provinces.

Cheh Kiang

Kiangsi

Fukien

Hunan

Kiang Si,-Su

Kwangsi

2

Table XVII.

850011

2

1

3

1

10

16

NEW TERRITORIES, SOUTH.

EDUCATION OF THE CHINESE POPULATION.

1

2

1

1

|

10

2

18

Married Males.

Unmarried Males.

Total.

Married Females.

Unmarried Females.

Total.

Able to read and

Write

4,536

2,903

7,439

136

241

377

:

1

Order.

Sub-order.

· 193

Table XVIII.

NEW TERRITORIES.

OCCUPATION OF THE CHINESE POPULATION.

I

II

FISHING.

Fishing

Oyster Dredging

AGRICULTURE.

Duck Rearing... Farming Gardening

Grass Cutting... Herb Gathering Herdsmen

Manure Collecting Market Gardening Poultry Farming Pig Rearing

Planting

...

...

NORTH.

SOUTH.

Males.

Fe- males.

Fe-

Males.

males.

2,863 536 979 223

405 10

12

1

2

1

...

24,781 8,489 7,505

928

46

11

22

2

28

200

9

30

1

289

49

34

9

1

81

212

189

78

1

1

7

25

52

4

00 0

8

7

3

III

MINING AND QUARRYING.

1

Mining and Quarrying :

Mining

1

13

Salt Pans

7

8

Stone Quarrying

48

13 445

.13

2

Treatment of Quarry Products:—

Lime Burning

16

183

3

Cement Works

1

IV

V

MANUFACTURE OF BRICKS, POTTERY,

GLASS, ETC.

Manufacture of Bricks

...

68

4

Earthen Ware

...

2

""

""

>>

Glass Pottery Tiles

...

...

...

103

10

13

MANUFACTURE OF CHEMICALS, NON-

MINERAL OILS.

1

Drugs:-

Medicine

3

Paints and Varnish:

Resin Refining

Vermilion

...

...

...

Non-mineral Oils, Grease, etc. :-

Vegetable Oil

4

Soap

...

...

1.

....

3

WN

188

80

60

4.

co on

1

Order.

VII

VI

194

OCCUPATION OF THE CHINESE POPULATION,--Continued.

Sub-order.

4

MANUFACTURE OF METALS, MACHINES,

JEWELRY.

Engineering (not marine or electric):-

Engineering Fitting..

6

Vehicles :-

Motor Car Repairing

...

NORTH.

SOUTH.

Fe-

Fe-

Males.

Males.

males.

males.

...

...

23 14

77 6

1

7

Ship Building :-

Junk Building

Ship Yard Workmen

...

40

100

2

1

8

Cutlery and Small Tools:-

Fish Hook Making...

2

1

Scissors Grinding

1

9

Other Metal Industries (Not Metal):

Black Smith

41

66

Boiler Maker

1

10

Copper Smith Iron Pan Making Lamp Making Lock Smith'.

Tin Smith Zinc Smith ...

Jewelry:

Gold Smith

1

...

1

1

1

3

1

1

Silver Smith

14

6

22

37

2

6

4

1

Watch Making

MANUFACTURE OF TEXTILES AND TEXTILE

GOODS (NOT DRESS).

Cotton:-

Cotton Carding

Cotton Quilt

Spinning

Weaving

4

Flax, Hemp:

Hemp Weaving

Rope Making

5

Sail Making

Miscellaneous Products:-

Fishing Net Weaving

Stocking Weaving

Mat Weaving

6

Textile Dyeing

Dyeing

...

...

1

45

8

11

35

111

1

1

22

11

10

3

3

64

3

1

4

1

45

Order.

VIII

XI

IX

195

OCCUPATION OF THE CHINESE POPULATION,-Continued.

Sub-order.

X

1

1

2

PREPARATION OF SKIN AND LEATHER.

1

Tanning

Tanning

...

...

NORTH.

SOUTH.

Fe-

Fe-

Males.

Males.

males.

males.

9

1

1

1

16

4

1

9

1

13

10

9

1

...

167

6

38

29

31,421

772

61

223

...

35

108

MANUFACTURE OF CLOTHING.

Manufacture of Clogs...

""

Clothes Embroidery

...

Leather Shoes Shoes (Cloth)

Machine Sewing Needle Work

Tailoring

...

*

...

...

MANUFACTURE OF FOOD, DRINK, TOBACCO

Food:-

Bean Curd ...

Bean Stick

Cakes

Fish Curing...

...

Preserved Meat and Vegetables

Flour

Rice Milling

...

Tea Sorting...

Drink:-

Native Spirits

Tobacco :-

Cigarettes

...

37

13

it colo

3

15

1

1

5

...

1 27

1

15

1

45

5

...

Tobacco

...

WOOD WORK: MANUFACTURE OF RATTAN

WARE AND FURNITURE.

Wood Working, Basket and Bomboo

Ware:-

Bamboo Ware

Basket Repairing

Carpentry

Cork Making

11

18

Į

7

2

49

1

1

...

...

245

...

...

CO

6

171

3

1

...

...

25

45

10

5

1

...

20

2

1

...

1

Firewood Cutting

Oar Making...

Saw Mill

Wood Box Making...

Furniture:-

2

Rattan Ware

11

1

Order.

196

OCCUPATION OF THE CHINESE POPULATION,--Continued.

Snb-order.

XII

MANUFACTURE OF PAPER: PHOTOGRAPHY.

2 Paper Goods :-

Fancy Paper Ware...

Photography:

XIII

XIV

XV

XVI

1

3

Photography

BUILDING, DECORATING, STONE CUTTING

AND CONTRACTING.

Building Contractors...

Mason's Labourers

Foreman

Masons...

Painters

Scaffold Builders

Stone Cutters ...

OTHER MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES.

Manufacture of Idols ...

>>

""

Joss Paper

Joss Sticks

""

""

""

""

""

Perfumery

Straw Coats... Umbrellas

GAS WATER ELECTRICITY.

Electrical Engineers.

Electric Light...

Water Works...

TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATION..

NORTH.

SOUTH.

Fe-

Fe-

Males.

Males.

males.

males.

3

23

3

1

1

15

130

27

201

19

50

11

166

ON

2

134

1

1

4

3

11

33

8

57

10

5

2

1

Ι

CO

3

1

1.

مام من

4

3

10

Railways:-

Station Master

Railway Workmen...

53

ပတ

18

3

Road:-

Coolies

407

19

288

36

Garage Owner

1

Grooms

Motor Car Driver

27

2

7

Rickshaw Coolies

15

Road Workmen

23

Sedan Chair Coolie

Truck Owner

1

Water:

Boatmen

Bum Boats

Cargo Boats

Coal Boats

Coxswains (Launch and Steamer).

Firemen

1

1

111

16

6

78

7

198

62

1.00

5

"}

:

.

Order.

XVI

197

OCCUPATION OF THE CHINESE POPULATION,—Continued.

Co

Sub-orde.

NORTH.

SOUTH.

Fe-

Fe-

Males.

Males.

males.

males.

3

TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATION,---Contd.

Water-Continued.

Firewood Boats

5

1

Fish Carriers

1

4

Fish Hawker Boats

10

Junk Masters

176

36

43

Launch Assistants

1

Lime Boats ...

Passenger Boats

2

Rice Boats

40

∞ pod LO

Sailors (Native Ships)

Ship's Accountant

Sailors (Foreign Ships) Sampans

468

344

25

94

17

1

Ship's Cook...

1

...

Ship's Steward

1

...

Stone Boat

15

3

...

Water Boats

4

Docks, &c. :-

Stevedore's Foremen

6

Storage:-

Godown Keepers

7

Messengers

...

Other Transport & Communication

...

Telephone Operators

...

...

XVII

COMMERCE AND FINANCE.

1

Dealing in Food:-

Beans

Bean Curd

19

1

1

1

1

4

1

Cattle

Congee

Dogs...

Fish ...

Food...

Fruit

Grocery

3

1

1

183

6

144

23

6

3

5

16

4

5

391

21

541

17

Marine Delicacies

3

I

Meat...

...

67

3

24

3

...

Milk...

2

1

...

...

...

Noodles

2

7

Oil ...

24

16

Pastry

Pigs...

4

1

Poultry

1

Rice....

84

23

Salt

12

66

1

Salt Fish

41

85

21

Sauce

3

41

1

Order.

198

OCCUPATION OF THE CHINESE POPULATION,-Continued.

Sub-order.

XVII.

COMMERCE AND FINANCE,-Continued.

1 Dealing in Food:-Continued.

4

00

3

2

Tea.. Vegetable

Wine and Rice

Dealing in Clothing and Article of

Personal Use:-

Cigarettes

Clothing

Drapery

Foreign Goods

Jewelry

Medicine

Opium

Cloth Hawkers

Piece Goods

ilk...

Straw Coats

Tobacco

Dealing in Furniture and Household

Supplies:-

Bamboo Ware

Coal...

Firewood

Kerosene Oil

Glass

Paper

...

Pottery

...

Second Hand Goods

Dealing in Other Goods :-

Canvas

...

Fishing Hooks

...

...

...

...

Grass

...

Lead...

...

...

Lime

...

Leather

...

...

...

Sea Grass

...

...

Timber

...

5

Brokers:-

Co

6

Insurance Broker

Sugar Broker

Banking and Finance:

Money Changer Pawn Broker Property Owner

Rent Collector

Travelling Trader

...

...

...

...

NORTH.

SOUTH.

Fe-

Fe-

Males.

Males.

males.

males.

11

2

1

7

6

13

1

21

12

4

1

28

1

25

1

30

1

10

57

4

20

42

4

626

4

001

3

2

3

16

1

ลง

1

1

3.

22

1

14

11

2

1

11

بسماحكم

1

4

1

1

1

1

4

8

1

15

5

24

2

4

GYD

3

1

1

1

1

1

6

2

...

5

20

2

1

--

Order.

XVII

XVIII

1

XIX

XX

· 199

J

OCCUPATION OF THE CHINESE POPULATION,-Continued.

Sub-order.

COMMERCE AND FINANCE,--Continued.

7 General Mercantile Employment :-

NORTH.

SOUTH.

Fe-

· Fe-

Males.

Males.

males.

males.

Apprentice

1

Buyer

18

Clerk

10

..

Compradore

Export Firms

1

1

Hawkers

396

97

435

Merchants

12

Miscellaneous Work

45

Office Assistants

Salesmen

8

10

Shop Accountants

193

1

128

I

Shop Assistants

137

12

253

Shop Masters

5

Weighers

9

PUPLIC ADMINISTRATION AND DEFENCE.

Defence:-

Army

Navy

8

Ι 2

2

Civil Government :-

Education Department

1

Police Department.......

28

20

Sanitary Department

23

Other Departments

30

288

PROFESSIONS.

Architects' Apprentices Artists...

1

1

Dentists

3

Doctors (Chinese)

62

27

Doctors (Western)

1

Hospital Attendants

Ι

1

Interpreters and Translators

Law

Midwife

Religion

Teacher

Veterinary Surgeon

ENTERTAINMENTS ETC.

CO

6

1

1

31

104

14

71

192

13

62

10

1

Actors

Fortune Tellers

Caddies

Geomancers

Musicians

Prostitutes

Wizards

6

2

34

6

2

1 CO

3

1.00

31

I

:

Order.

Sub-order.

200

OCCUPATION OF THE CHINESE POPULATION,-Continued.

NORTH.

SOUTH.

Fe-

Fe-

Males.

Males.

males.

males.

XXI

PERSONAL SERVICE.

Amahs ...

21

49

Barbers

53

73

Boarding House Keepers

3

1

3

Butler and House Keepers

1

1

2

Charitable Institution Keeper

1

Cooks (Chinese)

236

141

153

14

Cooks (Foreign)

30

9

Domestic Servant

138

26

Eating Houses...

6

10

Hair Dressing

35

1

...

House Boys

House Coolies Laundry

Mui Tsai

Punkah Coolies

Temple Keepers

12

60

10

6

2

77

2

119

|

39

Restaurants

Tea Shops

Undertakers

Watchmen

Water Carriers

XXII

OTHER INDUSTRIES.

Government, Foreign...

2

2

7

31

41

20 01

107

39

NICO

3.

30

14

2

2

3

13

7

201

SECTION IV.

HONGKONG AND KOWLOON PENINSULA

CHINESE POPULATION.

Table 19.-Age.

Table 20.-Nationality.

Table 20A.-Married State.

Table 21.-Birthplace.

Table 22.-Education.

Table 23. Occupation.

202

Table XIX.

AGES.

Married

Unmarried

Under.

Total.

Males.

Males.

Married Unmarried Females. Females.

Total.

∞ ~ a CCA 3 N Jamond

1

4,803

4,803

...

4,832

4,832

2

3,391

3,391

3,388

3,388

3,228

3,228

3,211

3,211

3,212

3.212

2,646

2,646

5

3,000

3,000

2,927

2,927

6

2,691

2,691

3,138

3,138

7

3,117

3,117

3,443

3,443

8

2,865

2,865

3,177

3,177

9

2,967

2,967

3,464

3,464

10

2,827

2,827

3,563

3,563

11

3,059

3,059

3,831

3,831

12

3,260

3,260

3,824

3,824

13

18

3,590

3,608

...

3,534

3,534

14

31

5,029

5,060

14

3,513

3,527

15

178

6,068

6,246

120

3,430

3,550

16

305

6,206

6.511

272

2,793

3,065

17

678

7,745

8,423

645

2,518

3,163

18

932

6,761

7,693

975

1,724

2.699

19

1,964

7,513

9,477

1,891

1.684

3 575

20

3.277

5,344

8,621

2,412

1,025

3.437

25

20,182

20,670

40,852

13,073

3,718

16,791

30

27,459

9,887

37,346

16,193

1,799

17,992

35

26,796

3,835

30,631

14,188

800

14,988

40

25,880

2,595

28,475

14,035

543

14,578

45

17,945

1,403

19,348

8,513

243

8,756

50

14,269

905

15,174

7,392

173

7.565

55

8,601

422

9,023

4,270

98

4,368

60

5,745

262

6,007

3,741

62

3,803

65

2,753

80

2,833

2,022

15

2,037

70

2,851

27

2,878

1,273

16

1,289

75

597

6

603

741

1

742

80

216

1

217

363

364

85

69

69

134

134

90

19

19

46

46

90 and

14

14

17

17

over

!

...

Chinese British

Portuguese

French

203

Table XX.

...

...

NATIONALITY.

Males.

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

Dutch Japanese Korean Siamese Filippino

...

...

...

...

American (U.S.A.)

Peruvian Cuban

Panama

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

Single

Married

...

Widowed

:

...

...

...

...

...

...

:

...

...

...

...

...

: : :

Females.

265,997

163,312

8,461

7,184

76

175

51

29

15

31

6

13

1

...

2

7

156

95

1

4

10

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

5

1

274,802

170,820

Table XX (a).

MARRIED STATE.

...

...

...

...

:

:

Males.

Females.

...

131,787

70,704

154,688

78,854

2,459

17,538

204

Table XXI.

BIRTHPLACES.

(a.) China.

I-KWONG TUNG PROVINCE.

1. Canton Delta Districts :-

Po On ...

...

Tung Kwun... Pun U... Nam Hoi Sam Shui

...

...

...

...

Ko Ming Hoi Ping Hok Shan Yan Ping San Wui San Ning Heung Shan

Shun Tak

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

Total

...

...

...

2. East River Districts :-

Tsang Shing Waichow Other

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

....

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

:

...

A

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

:

Total

...

3. North River Districts :-

Ching Un Fa Un... Sz Wui... Other

...

...

Total

...

4. West River Districts

San Hing

Shiu Hing

...

...

...

...

...

Wan Fau (Tung On)... Other

...

...

...

Total

5. South West Kwong Tung

6. Hai Nan...

....

...

7. Swatow Districts :--

Hoi Luk Fung Chiu Chau Ka Ying Chau

...

Total

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

Males.

Females.

12,725

6,051

...

28,960

18,482

...

21,110

14,600

...

45,475

33,563

10,219

4,290

763

187

6,250

2,745

...

5,357

2.036

2,609

889

...

26,132

10,873

...

10,576

3,617

...

15,996

10,899

13,287

10,433

198,559

118,665

...

...

1,895 15,376 710

1,140

5,454

...

...

346

17,981

6,940

6,030

: :

2,276

...

4,918

2,149

3,051

669

...

568

187

:

14,567

5,311

1,813

254

8,406

2,817

1,532

527

1,029

180

:

12,780

3,778

681

528

...

355

88

Grand Total for Kwong Tung Province

2,659

294

6,957

1,076

3,572

468

...

13,188

1,838

258,111

137,148

205

BIRTHPLACES,-Continued.

(a) China,-Continued.

II.--OTHER PROVINCES.

...

:

:

...

...

...

Males.

Females.

174

75

528

423

1,409

655

442

362

444

426

271

64

...

...

479

184

:

3,848

2,189

22,302

1,237

20,973 1.004

45

54

109

98

64

38

23,757

22.167

...

...

:

Yunnan.. Kwong Sai Fukien... Chekiang

...

...

...

...

Kiangsi, Kiangsu

Hunan, Hupeh, Kwaichow..

North China

Hongkong

...

Total

...

...

...

(b.) British Empire.

New Territories

Australia

Malaya...

...

Other British Colonies

Formosa Indo-China Japan Korea

Macau

...

...

...

...

...

Netherlands Indies Philippines Siam

...

...

Total

...

...

(c.) Asia.

...

...

...

*

P

:

:

:

: :

...

Chili Cuba

...

...

Panama Peru

...

Total

...

(d.) America.

...

U. S. A. (including Hawaii)

Total

...

...

(e.) Other.

Egypt

Italy

...

...

...

...

...

16

10

93

94

45

33

2

3

534

1.113

18

10

16

S

11

6

735

1.277

60 10 10 N

3

3

7

9

5

1

2

6

...

163

132

180

151

!

:

:..

...

...

Total

Table XXII.

EDUCATION.

Able to read and write

1

I

N

Males.

Females.

...

195,287

19,979

Order.

I

Sub-Order.

FISHING

206

P

Table XXIII,-Part I.

OCCUPATIONS OF ADULTS.

...

II

AGRICULTURE.

Dairy Farming...

...

...

Farming and Cattle Rearing Grass Cutting Market Gardening Pig Rearing

...

...

MINING AND QUARRYING.

Mining

III

1

2

Cement

Concrete

Lime Kilns

Stone Quarries

...

...

...

A

...

...

...

...

...

...

IV

V

...

·,

...

MANUFACTURE OF BRICKS, POTTERY & GLASS.

Bricks and Tiles

China and Earthen Ware

444

Glass

MANUFACTURE OF CHEMICAL PAINTS AND

NON-MINERAL OILS.

Males.

Females.

388

36

130

...

1,200

777

80

13

573

222

144

373

7

245

3.

422

2

...

ஸ்லம்

5.

4

36

33

329

2

1

Medicine, (Chinese)

558

113

3

Logwood Extract

...

22

Red and White Lead, Vermilion

82

1

Colours

5

Varnish

30

Candles

...

...

40

1

Soap...

...

79

...

172

1

...

1

1

VI

2

LO

Vegetable Oil

Wood Oil... Camphor Gum

Resin

Toilet Articles ...

...

MANUFACTURE OF MEtals.

Antimony Refining Tin Refining

...

Galvanising and Tinning... Iron and Steel Foundries Type Foundries

Electrical Fittings

Contracting

...

1

...

...

...

...

37 CO

9

63.

3

...

145

3.

19

...

203

2

7

...

44 8

VII

Order.

Sub-Order.

207

OCCUPATIONS OF ADULTS,—Continued.

VI

MANUFACTURE OF METALS, -Continued.

6

Vehicles :-

Rickshaws

Sedan Chairs

Trucks

4 & 7

Blacksmiths

Boiler Makers

10

4

5

CC

a

7

Brass and Copper Smiths

Engineers...

Fitters

...

...

Lathe Workers...

Mechanics...

Moulders

...

Shipbuilding:

Foreign

Native

Boats and Launches...

Caulkers

...

Paint Scrapers

Fish Hooks

Knife and Scissors Grinding

Other Metal Industries :-

Gunsmith...

Hollow Ware, Iron

Males.

Females.

63

12

16

...

2,381

...

3,281

1

1,239

6

4,146

23

...

...

2,477 26 126

69

...

229

...

92

6

...

...

504

...

133

302

...

18

1

27

...

1

...

46

...

...

Tin

...

...

538

...

Zinc & Galvanised Iron

77

""

Lamps

...

...

10

Lead Lining for Tea Boxes

27

Locks

Safes...

...

46

30

Stamps and Dies

Tinkers

Precious Metals, Jewellery, etc. :-

Gold Leaf...

Goldsmiths

...

...

Jewellery and Jadestone

Silversmiths

Watchmakers

...

8

...

...

...

14

3

451

3

929

...

298

4

322

1

Miscellaneous

MANUFACTURE OF TEXTILES AND TEXTILE

Goods.

Flax and Hemp

Miscellaneous Products

Canvas Goods

Fishing Nets

10

6

148

5

1

...

13

4

...

...

433

1,453

Hair and Bristles

...

Hosiery and Knitted Goods

Ι

:

X

Order.

Sub-Order.

208

OCCUPATIONS OF AUDLTS,-Continued.

MANUFACTURE OF TEXTILES AND TEXTILE

GOODS,-Continued.

Miscellaneous Products,-Continued.

Matting

Rope

...

Sack Making and Repairing

Miscellaneous

...

...

6

Dyeing

...

VIII

PREPARATION OF SKIN AND LEATHER.

1

Fellmonger

...

Tanning

...

IX

Leather Goods ...

""

Trunks

...

MANUFACTURE OF CLOTHING.

Boots and Shoes

Males.

Females.

240

1

197

10

745

318

...

2

2

302

2

16

94

4

1

43

Clogs...

Clothes Mending

Embroidery

Flags...

Foreign Clothes

...

Hats...

Machine Sewing

Needlework

...

...

...

...

...

Straw and Grass Sandals...

Tailoring

...

...

...

...

...

2,658 150

217

3

534

50

...

3

....

...

287

1

...

279 1,232

26

279

63

12,086

...

4

50

3,025

1,337

MANUFACTURE OF FOOD, DRINK & TOBACCO.

Food:-

Bean Curd

...

Bread and Flour Confectionery

Egg Preserving

Fishing Curing and Preserving

Fruit and Ginger Preserving

Lard...

Rice Cleaning and Grading

173

528

1 43

59

...

47

49

72

...

...

31

Paste Goods, Vermicelli, etc.

...

183

1

288

12

19

347

1

6

...

118

4

...

147

66

...

...

334

41

47

93

...

...

...

185

1

128

8

""

Polishing...

Roast and Preserved Meat

Salt Refining

Soy and Sauce

...

...

Sugar Confectionery

""

Refining

Tea Sorting

Butchers

...

...

...

...

...

Miscellaneous Food Processes...

:

;

Order.

XI

XII

1

N

3

Sub-Order.

2

ลง

2

209

OCCUPATIONS OF ADULTS,-Continued.

MANUFACTURE OF FOOD, DRINK &

TOBACCO,-Continued.

Drink:-

Aerated Water...

Distilling Chinese Spirits

Ice

3

Tobacco :-

Cigars and Cigarettes Tobacco (Native)

Opium

...

...

...

:.

1

WOOD WORKING, MANUFACTURE OF FURNI-

TURE AND RATTAN WARE.

Basket Ware

Carpentry...

Cooperages

Battan Splitting, etc.

...

Ware

";

Sandal Wood

...

Timber Sawyer (Hand) Trunks (Camphor Wood) Wood Boxes and Cases

""

Ware

Furniture, etc. :-

Bamboo Ware

...

...

Bedding Coffins Furniture

""

Mirrors

...

...

...

...

(Blackwood)

...

Oars

...

Picture Frames

...

...

...

Males. Females.

64 119

5

93

245

1,239 63

24

84

4

8,161

24

225

...

533

213

2.823

133

...

175

2

53

128

372

3

...

258

185

20

98

4

7

...

586

80

1

...

83

...

...

13

...

24

Weighing Poles

Wood Carving & Signboard Making

PAPER MAKING, PRINTING AND PHOTOGRAPHY.

Paper Making

...

Paper Goods :-

Cardboard Boxes

...

Envelopes and Stationery Fancy Paper Ware

...

Printing and Photography

Book Binding

Compositors Lithography

...

...

...

Newspaper Production

...

...

...

15 199

...

...

225

12

176

129

189

22

78

10

27

151

69

...

49

...

76

Order.

XIII

XIV

XV

XVI

1

Sub-Order.

210

OCCUPATIONS OF ADULTS,-Continued.

PAPER MAKING, PRINTING AND PHOTOGRAPHY,-Continued.

Printing and Photography,-Continued.

Paper Cutting

...

Printing

Ruling

Photography

...

...

...

...

BUILDING, DECORATING AND STONE DRESSING.

Contractors

...

Contractors Foremen

Glaziers

Lime Washing..

Masons

Masons Labourers

Matshed & Scaffolding Builders

Painters

Pile Drivers

Plumbers

...

Stone Cutters

Stone Breakers...

...

Males.

Females.

19 1,136 3

170

705

577

34

4

19

61

2,045

110

1,124

1,301

418

...

2,401

9

16

OTHER MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES, MISCEL-

LANEOUS MANUFACTURES.

Birds Feathers

Brushes & Brooms

Charcoal Making

Fire Crackers

Ivory Carving

Joss Sticks

Lanterns (Chinese)

...

...

Opium & Tobacco Pipes

...

Piano Repairing & Musical Instruments

Spectacles

...

Umbrellas...

...

...

4 1,033 271

...

216

17

14

20

69

27

30

14

21

...

187

6

11

14

7

73

14

24

56

1,099

309

Miscellaneous

Apprentices (Unspecified Trades) Artisaus (Unspecified Trades)

GAS, WATER & ELECTRICITY.

...

Gas Water Electricity...

...

131

120

...

1,118

TRANSPORT & COMMUNICATION.

Railways

...

77

X

Order.

XVI

4

Sub-Order.

2

211

OCCUPATIONS OF ADULTS,-Continued.

TRANSPORT & COMMUNICATION,-Continued.

Road :--

Bicycle Hiring

Chair Bearers

Chauffeurs

Coolies

Garages

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

Rickshaw Pullers

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

Tram Drivers Tram Employees

Trucks

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

3

Water: ---

Lighters

Motor Boats

Pilots...

Seamen

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

:

Males.

Females.

3

...

1,185

248 27,429

55

2,504 163

76

83

Ship's Carpenters

...

Ship's Compradores..

Ship's Employees

Ship's Engineers Ship's Firemen...

Ship's Greasers...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

Ship's Officers (Including Junk

...

...

...

Masters) Ships Stewards...

Ships Tallymen

Shipping Management

Passenger Sampans

Salvage Divers...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

Steam Launch Coxswains Steam Launch Deck Hands

Docks, &c.--

Ash Collecting... Cargo Coolies

Coal Coolies

Stevedores...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

:

6

Storage:

7

33

21

55

7,352

...

...

1,937

...

...

...

...

...

6

...

51

217

...

87

...

811

21

...

161

26

150

2

414

262

2

20

2

...

...

38

...

3

...

1

64

701

50

1

Godowns

...

...

...

...

...

1,427

2

...

Other Transport & Communication :--

Forwarding Agents Letter Carriers... Messengers Telegraphs

Telegraphs, Wireless Telephones

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

19

...

4

...

...

97

...

104

...

1

1

...

153

7

8

}

3

Order.

Sub-Order.

212.

M

OCCUPATIONS OF ADULTS,-Continued.

XVII

1

COMMERCE.

Food: Dealing in:--·

Bean Curd

Beef and Mutton Butter

...

Cakes and Pastry

Congee Fresh Eggs Preserved Eggs. Fish-Fresh Fish-Salt ... Flour...

...

Fruit-Fresh

...

...

...

...

...

...

..

...

Fruit-Preserved

Grocery

Ground-nuts

Lard...

...

Macaroni, &c. Marine Delicacies

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

2

Males.

Females.

...

...

...

...

...

27 264

5

28

23

46

77 1,093

...

...

1

1

15

18

211

5

13

2

...

386

24

5

...

761

27

...

34

6

28 211

80

...

...

Milk

...

...

...

...

Oil

78

...

...

...

Pork... Poultry Rice

533

...

138

...

...

587

...

Roast and Preserved Meat Salt

113

...

55

...

...

...

14

...

...

...

...

86

...

...

...

6

...

...

221

583

...

...

Soy and Sauce Sugar... Sweets Tea

Vegetables

...

Cattle and Sheep

Pigs

...

Drink, Tobacco, &c.--

...

...

...

...

...

...

20

...

71

...

....

Aerated Water and Fancy Drinks Cigarettes & Cigars

Opium Tobacco

Wines & Spirits

Clothing, &c.--

Boots and Shoes Clogs...

Cloth...

...

...

...

Clothes (Second Hand) Drapery Furs Grass Cloth Hosiery Jewellery, &c.

...

Piece Goods

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

10

260

60

43

88

...

...

...

اسم ہے

1

4

1

3

1 50

84

5

10 6 2

138

4

34

246

136

...

1

3

...

...

3

...

22

...

1

...

421

...

Order.

Sub-Order.

213

P

OCCUPATIONS OF ADULTS,- Continued.

Males.

Females.

49

7

9

...

13

..

...

...

***

4

...

...

5

39

285

1

4

1

64

1

362

6

676

12

81

...

...

...

1

35

...

69

14

13

...

...

...

15

1

1.

10

...

68

87

41

...

...

23

...

:

:

3

-

5

COMMERCE,--Continued.

Clothing, &c.,-Continued.

Silk

...

Toilet Articles Umbrellas... Watches, &c. Woollens

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

Household Goods, Furniture, &c.--

Bamboo Ware and Baskets Books and Stationery Coal Coffins

...

...

...

...

China and Earthenware Fancy Goods

...

Firewood and Charcoal Foreign Goods ... Flowers

...

Furniture ... Hardware

Joss Sticks Kerosene

...

Mats and Matting Mirrors and Pictures

Newspapers

Sandal Wood

...

...

...

Second Hand Goods... Miscellaneous

...

...

Wholesale and Miscellaneous:-

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

Building Materials Cotton Yarn Curios Glass...

Gunny Bags Iron .. Leather

...

...

...

Manure-Artificial Marine Stores Marine Hawker... Mat Bags Metals

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

Medicine Oils and Colours Ores Paper Rattan Sesamum

...

...

Ship Chandlery

Stone...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

Timber

Tin

...

...

...

...

...

...

GO

20

52

85

...

20

...

106

...

30

...

...

19

...

6

...

8

128

1

...

...

109

987 17

...

12

...

...

19

...

16

1

1

...

3

...

8

...

...

49

...

...

1

1

Order.

Sub-Order.

214

www

OCCUPATIONS OF ADULTS,-Continued.

COMMERCE,-Continued.

Wholesale and Miscellaneous,Continued.

Birds...

Fish Lines Jade ..

...

...

Musical Instruments Rags... Spectacles... Miscellaneous

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

....

...

...

...

...

...

XVII

6

BROKERS.

Males.

7

4

4

1

6

3

Females.

...

...

...

13

...

General Coal... Exchange...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

Food, Miscellaneous... Flour...

...

Foreign Firms Foreign Goods. Grocery

...

Hardware ... Insurance

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

1,479

9

...

25

...

16

...

...

...

11

...

15

...

...

18

...

20

...

...

...

6

...

...

...

...

...

Jewelry and Precious Stones

Medicine Metals

...

...

Miscellaneous Articles

Ores

...

Piece Goods Property Rice Shares Shipping

Sugar

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

Timber and Firewood Yarn...

...

...

COMMISSION AGENTS.

General

Dealing Chiefly With:-

...

America (Kam Shan Chong)

Annam Formosa

Hankow Hoihow Honan Japan

...

...

...

Kwong Sai .

...

...

...

...

...

Manila Malay Peninsula

...

...

...

...

...

...

40

...

9

...

...

...

...

64 20

...

44

20

149

...

92

100

...

8

...

...

51

30

...

...

16

...

...

30

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

:

98

:

...

365

...

4

...

1

1

...

10

...

2

...

...

7

...

...

1

...

...

27

...

16

...

7

5

1

Order.

Sub-Order.

Co

XVII

101

215

OCCUPATIONS OF ADULTS,-Continued.

COMMISSION AGENTS,—Continued.

Dealing Chiefly With :--Continued.

Netherlands India

Pakhoi Shanghai Shantung Siam... Swatow Szechuen Tientsin Yunnan

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

Travelling Traders (Shui Hak)

BANKING AND FINANCE.

Banking

...

...

Bullion Dealers Insurance... Money Changers Money Lender... Pawn Brokers Property Owners

...

...

...

...

...

Remittance Agents (Wui Tui)

GENERAL COMMERCE.

Export

General Merchants

Import

Import and Export

Nam Pak Hong

Hawkers

EMPLOYEES, ETC.

Accountants

...

...

Buyers and Salesmen Canvassers

Checkers Clerks

...

Compradores

...

...

...

...

...

...

Foreign Firm Employees... Office Boys and Coolies Shop Assistants

Shop Boys Shop Coolies

...

...

...

...

Shop Owners and Managers

Shop Walkers Shroffs

Rent Collectors Typists

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

Males.

10

1

Females.

1

16

1

...

...

-NO - CO

3

1

389

22

649

7

80

185

...

1

130

179

14

100

126 1,979

...

10

...

...

59

20

7,015

$12

6,885

22

3,054

27

...

231

4.046

21

253

120

1,392

15,827

OX

...

1,242

...

...

...

5,596

...

6,210

25

...

74

3,255

54

173

8

...

...

3

I

Order.

XVIII

Sub-Order.

216

OCCUPATIONS OF ADULTS,--Continued.

PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION.

1

Defence:-

Army

Navy...

2

...

Civil Government :-

Police (including Employees).. Post Office

Sanitary Services

Other Departments

::

...

Males.

153 350

1,298

249

600

335

Females.

...

XIX

PROFESSIONS.

Architecture and Civil Engineering

195

Auctioneers

...

...

...

10

...

...

7

...

...

...

163

...

XX

Chemists

Drawing and Painting Dentists

Doctors (Chinese Practice) Doctors (Western Practice) Hospital Attendants

Law

Letter Writers... Midwifery... Mineralogy Nurses (Trained) Occulists Opticians Religion Surveying... Teachers

་་

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

Translating and Interpreting Veterinary Practice... Vaccinator

ENTERTAINMENTS ETC.

Acrobats

Actors Actors Servants

Boxing Teachers

Brothel Employees

...

...

Brothel Keepers Cinemas Dog Boys... Fortune Telling Geomancers Grooms Jugglers

Marionette Shows Musicians... Prostitutes

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

81

...

171

870

10

20

27

...

162

73

7

12

59

1

61

...

4

5

...

52

67

90

324

1,090 105

1

1

...

13

110

3

97

24

...

2

...

35

90

249

...

...

11

5

230

7

...

4

146

...

...

2 13

1

...

...

436

2

2,680

7

+

}

XXI

Order.

Sub-Order.

217

OCCUPATIONS OF ADULTS,—Continued.

ENTERTAINMENTS AND SPORT,--Continued.

Males.

Females.

Singing

Story Tellers

Theatre Proprietors.......

Theatre Employees.

...

Wizards

Yacht Boy

PERSONAL SERVICE.

Bar Attendants... Barbers

Club Employees

Cooks (Chinese)

Cooks (Foreign)

Domestic Servants

...

Eating-House Keepers

Eating-House Employees...

Gardeners...

Hall Porters

...

House Boys (In service of Non-Chinese) House and Shop Boys (Chinese Service)

House Coolies

...

...

Hotel and Lodging House Keepers.....

20

115

3

...

6

76

146

1

1

68 1,979

2

508

36

...

...

8,313

4.196

1,543

4

10,104

87

1

225

425

2

49

13.

3,387

2,464

4.478

122

Hotel and Lodging House Employees

660

Laundry Work...

732

1.191

...

Lift Attendants

43

Punkah Coolies

Restaurant Employees

Tea House Keepers

Mui Tsai (14 years and over).....

Nurses (Children's)...

Religious and Charitable Institutions

Restaurant Keepers...

Servants (Chinese)

Tea House Employees Watchmen

2,532 501

...

75

GI

2

+1

...

657

...

...

24

36

99

1.023 548

3

XXII

OTHER OCCUPATIONS.

Bottle Cleaning

Chinese Government Service

Grasshopper Catching

Grave Keepers..

...

...

...

Opium Dross Collecting

Sandwichman

Searchers ...

Snake Catching

Undertakers

...

...

Undertakers Furnishings. Miscellaneous

...

...

...

...

89 3

13

2

3

1

...

2

10

17

...

17

22

Order.

Sub-order.

218

Table XXIII,-Part II.

OCCUPATIONS OF CHILDREN UNDER 14 BY AGES.

II

Agriculture

UNDER.

14 13 12 11

10 9

6

J Male

6

Female 17

Manufactures.

mil ∞

13

6

9

5. 10

ون

4 3

6

10

5 4

VI

9 Metal Working

.Male

222 143

48

29

10

Jewellery, &c..

48

5

4

ོ་

31

CO

1

VII

5 Hosiery

J Male

5

2

1

3

Female

119

57

47

31 15

11

Male

89

36

29

13 23

6

1

Clothing

Female 227

238

188

138 136

96

46

f Male

65 33

6

4

1

Shoes

Female 6 12

7

12

5

3

[ Male

20

13

6

1

X

1 Food, &c.

Female 15

Male

3 Cigars & Cigarettes...

Female

Male

ΧΙ

1 Wood Ware

1 Female

2 Rattan Furniture

f Male

Female Male

4082182

14

7

2

6

5

3

1

53

42

11

70

32

2157

3

1

21

3

58

21

6

21

18

18

25 9

5

XII 2, 3 Paper Ware & Printing

Female 8 4

(Male

84

30

14

12

XIII

Building & Decorating

Miscellaneous Manu-

XIV

facture

Female 27

20 Male 11 14 Female 9 11

12 17

6

5

627274O

IN

13

1

UNWN WJ

4

1

5

XVI

Communication

.Male

7

9

3

XVII

Commerce.

Apprentices

.Male f Male

326

114 71

71 56

Hawking

Female 9

433

31

Employed in offices and

shops

.Male 406

179

73

(Male

4

4

3

Entertainments.....

Female

13

2

Male

889 493

209

ΧΧΙ

Domestic Work.............

Mui Tsai

Female

59

76

30

991

XXII

Labour unskilled

Local & co

19

CO

6

17

3

2

18 11 5

5

4 1

1

3

15

38 21

24

18 9

5

.Female 929 993

961 660 619 328 260 120 72 26 f Male 116 89

37 48 25 5 15 7 Female 16 11 6

1

61

13222

3

Total Male

Total Female

2,590 1,334 596 311 191

1,530 1,525 1,367 1,291 894 784 435 330 156 81 32

73 61 35 27 10

3

Grand Total.

!

Males

Females

5,231

8,425

*

Y

219

SECTION V.

FLOATING POPULATION.

NEW TERRITORIES, South.

Table 24.-Age.

Table 25.-Nationality and Married state. Table 26.-Birthplace.

Table 27.-Education.

Table 28.-Occupation.

HONGKONG, SHAUKEIWAN AND Aberdeen.

Table 29.-Age.

Table 30.-Nationality and Married state. Table 31.-Birthplace.

Table 32.-Education.

Table 33.-Occupation.

MERCANTILE Marine.

Table 34.-Nationality.

Table 34a.-Small craft enumerated.

220

Table XXIV.

NEW TERRITORIES SOUTH (FLOATING POPULATION).

AGES OF THE CHINESE POPULATION.

Under.

Unmarried Males.

Married Males.

Total Males.

Unmarried. Married

Females. Females.

Total Females.

{

1

103

103

137

...

137

2

106

106

120

120

...

3

101

101

100

100

4

85

85

109

109

...

5

105

105

92

92

...

6

96

96

77

77

...

7

93

93

91

91

8

95

95

83

83

...

9

86

86

99

99

10

87

87

93

93

...

11

90

90

101

101

12

73

73

76

76

...

13

70

70

66

66

14

78

1

79

87

1

88

15

90

90

82

82

16

66

1

67

60

11

71

17

90

3

93

55

16

71

18

71

3

74

47

16

63

19

81

4

85

33

13

46

20

44

37

81

56

46

102

25

232

209

441

21

249

270

30

122

287

409

35

58

328

386

72

7

260

267

2

233

235

+

40

27

307

334

202

202

45

5

234

239

1

159

160

50

2

177

179

157

157

55

137

137

98

98

60

::

102

102

83

83

65

1

62

63

61

61

70

37

37

...

40

40

75

21

21

30

...

...

30

828

80

19

19

14

14

85

10

10

10

...

90

1

1

1

...

...

10 1

Table XXV.

NEW TERRITORIES SOUTH (FLOATING POPULATION).

NATIONALITY & MARRIED STATE OF THE CHINESE POPULATION.

Un-

Un-

*

Married

+Married

married Total.

married

Total.

Males.

Females.

Males.

Females.

British

1,436

1,583

3,019

1,398

1,378

2,776

Chinese.

533

518

1,051

295

318

613

Portuguese

60

60

61

61

*Widowers included-212.

Widows included-343.

221

Table XXVI.

NEW TERRITORIES SOUTH (FLOATING POPULATION).

BIRTHPLACES OF THE CHINESE POPULATION.

Un-

Un-

Married

Married

Males.

married Total.

Males.

Females.

married Total. Females.

Asia.

New Territories

1,287

1,416

2,703

1,314

Hongkong

151

167

318

84

1,246 152

2,560

216

Macao

126

126

63

63

Kwong Tung Province.

I. Canton Delta Districts:-

Po On (San On).

103

82

185

40

36

76

Tung Kun

23

22

45

7

7

14

Pan U

54

60

114

42

27

69

Nam Hoi

Sam Shui...

San Wui

8

9

17

9

2

11

6

5

11

2

8

10

9

3

12

8.

4

12

San Ning.

Heung Shan...

Shun Tak.....

Other

89

227

316

92

107

199

50

145

195

66

109

175

21

15

36

4

8

12

25

25

II. East River Districts :-

Waichow..

III. North River Districts:-

Fa Un Other

IV. West River Districts:-

4

...

3

4

1

7

1

1

...

...

4

...

Shiu Hing

4

1

Other...

2

1

LO 30

5

...

3

1

1

...

V. S. W. Kwongtung

5

5

10

16

1

17

VI. Swatow Districts:-

Hoi Fung

45

Chiu Châu

7.

39

94

5

7

10

5

10

...

...

Table XXVII.

NEW TERRITORIES SOUTH (FLOATING POPULATION).

EDUCATION OF THE CHINESE POPULATION.

Married Unmarried

Males. Males.

Total.

Married Unmarried Females. Females.

Total.

Able to read and write...

938

514

1,452

55

21

67

222

Table XXVIII.

NEW TERRITORIES SOUTH (FLOATING POPULATION).

OCCUPATIONS OF THE CHINESE POPULATION.

Order Sub-order.

I

Fishing

II

VII

4

IX

IX

XIII

:

:-

1

Agriculture:--

Farming

Manufacture of Flax and Hemp

Hemp Weaving... Net Making

Rope Making

...

...

...

Manufacture of Clothing :--

Needle Work

Wood Working

Carpenter Saw Mill

...

Building, Decorating

Painting

...

...

Scaffolding Building...

...

Transport and Communication :--

Road:--

XVI

1

Coolies

3

Water :--

Males.

Females.

3,174

896

2

...

4

57

10

2

33

~

1

2

...

...

2

37

...

:

352

54

I

2

229

52

18

1

...

6

3

+

13

5

1

...

6

3

14

6

...

6

...

18

2

75

280

...

39

1

5

4

...

14

16

9=

10

11

Boat Crews

Boat Cleaning

...

Boat and Junk Owners and Masters

Cargo Boats

...

...

...

...

...

...

Coolie Boats Coxswains... Diver... Earth Boats Engineers (Ship) Family Boats Firemen

Hawker's Boats... Lime Boats

...

Passenger Boats Sailors Salt Boats ... Ship's Cooks Towing Boats Water Boats

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

:

...

223

OCCUPATIONS OF THE CHINESE POPULATION,--Continued.

Order.

Sub-order.

XVII

Commerce :--

1

XIX

XXI.

2

Males. Females.

31

11

...

11

1

...

3

...

23

6

1

...

Dealing in Fish, Fresh and Salt

Grocery

Paper...

...

General Commerce :--

Hawker Weigher

Professions:-- Religion

...

...

Personal Service :--

Barber

...

Cook (Chinese)..... Domestic Servants. Tea Shops... Temple Keepers... Watchmen... Washing Clothes Water Carrier

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

5

10 21

2

1

...

10

+ 3 2

11 16

4

3

1

2

13

2

224

Table XXIX.

HONGKONG AND KOWLOON PENINSULA.

AGES.

Ages Under.

Males.

Unmarried Married

Males.

Total.

Unmarried Married Females. Females.

Total.

1

771

771

766

766

2

673

673

668

668

3

613

613

622

622

...

4

571.

571

610

610

618

618

582

582

6

560

560

585

585

7

605

605

600

600

8

515

515

456

456

9

609

609

530

530

10

560

560

...

470

47.0

11

597

597

514

514

12

507

507

477

477

13

497

497

430

430

14

589

589

455

455

15

737

737

483

26

509

16

580

32

612

361

41

402

17

773

44

817

464

77

541

18

545

69

614

294

104

398

19

911

197

1,108

345

273

618

20

615

305

920

155

291

146

25

2,227

1,811

4,038

350

1,429

1,779

30

1,138

2,436

3,574

84

1,600

1,684

35

540

2,704

3.244

28

1,439

1,467

40

363

3,293

3,656

1,353

1,353

45

171

1,580

1,751

940

...

940

>

50

113

1,404

1,517

927

927

55

49

1,226

1.275

653

653

60

34

646

680

588

588

...

65

397

397

870

...

370

70

228

228

...

...

245

245

75

125

125

183

183

80

44

44

106

106

80 and above

24

24

55

55

Table XXX.

HONGKONG AND KOWLOON PENINSULA.

NATIONALITY AND MARRIED STATE.

MALES.

FEMALES.

Single. Married. Widower.

Total.

Single. Married. Widow.

Total.

British...

Chinese

11,446 7,641

5,403 6,626

12,509 1,680 1,875

399 19,486 8,563 7,034 1,113

480

16,710

284

3,839

Portuguese...

331

282

80

693

105

74

325

504

American

11

11

6

6

Total...

17,180 14,549

970 32,699 10,348 8,983

1,728

21,059

225

Table XXXI.

HONGKONG AND KOWLOON PENINSULA.

Birthplaces.

New Territories

Asia.

Hongkong

Malaya

Annam

Macao

...

...

Kwongtung Province.

I. CANTON DELTA DISTRICTS :-

Po On (San On)

...

Tung Kun

Pun U

Nam Hoi Sam Shui San Wui San Ning Heung Shan Shun Tak

...

...

...

II-EAST RIVER DISTRICTS:-

Tsang Shing

Waichow

III. NORTH RIVER DISTRICTS :

Ching Un Fa Un

Sze Wui Other

...

...

...

BIRTHPLACES.

Males.

Females.

Total.

......

1,524 18,292

2

13

1,053

1,130 15,716

2,654 33,678

2

...

13

594

1,647

723

81

804

972

288

1,260

3,113

1,182

4,295

1,633

758

2,391

70

16

86

271

79

350

26

20

46

1,094

432

1,526

1,161

445

1,606

31

1

1,279

112

32 1,391

81

16

97

58

7

65

32

7

39

...

40

14

54

...

IV. WEST RIVER DISTRICTS:----

Shiu Hing

Other

V.--SOUTH WEST DISTRICTS:-

Kwongtung.

VI.--SWATOW DISTRICTS:-

Hoi Fung Chiu Chow

...

261

99

360

74

74

...

88

...

7

95

488

52

540

11,495

3,616

15,111

TOTAL-Kwongtung Province

Kwongsai...

Fukien Kiangsu Chekiang Hunan

...

Other Provinces.

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

4

216

2

6

216

...

1 CO NO

2

...

3

3

1

1

...

Able to read and write

Order.

I

Sub-Order.

226

Table XXXII.

HONGKONG AND KOWLOON PENINSULA.

EDUCATION.

Table XXXIII.

Males.

Females.

14,402

764

HONGKONG AND KOWLOON PENINSULA,

FISHING

SHRIMPING

OCCUPATIONS.

:

Males.

Females.

10,969

5,632

...

212

133

1

14

...

1

VI

7

BOILERMAKER

IX

X

XVI

NEEDLEWORK

1 SUGAR REFINING...

TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATION.

ون

3

Water:

Bumboats

...

Cargoboats, junks and lighters

Cement lighters

...

Coal and Charcoal junks

Coffin junks

Coolie junks

Coxswains (launch and lighter)

Earthboats

Earthenware junks

Family boats

Ferry boats...

Ferry launches

370 7,844

163

3,111

15

4

581

262

...

...

123

54.

630

...

...

253

134

9

...

1,178

1,870

...

...

30

7

...

51

"}

11

(ticket collectors)...

11

دار

Order.

Sub-Order.

227

OCCUPATIONS,—Continued.

TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATION,-Continued.

Water:--Continued.

Males.

Females.

Fire Brigade boat.....

2

Firewood boats

...

123

43

Fish-curing boats...

104

40

19

"?

...

Launches (steam) employees

Laundry boats Lime boats

Marine hawkers

Marriage boats Motor boats Passenger boats Pig boats Pilots

...

Pleasure boats (Chinese)

Preaching boats

Rice junks...

64

4

cooks and boys

80

firemen

307

..

31

* co

4

3

...

...

2

...

20

14

...

46

...

...

1,787

3,949

10

...

19

1

11

...

2

190

189

...

Sailors

Salt boats

...

961

...

218

7

13

Sampans

...

Sand boats...

Ships' Compradores

""

Cooks Stewards

Stone boats

Timber boats

Water boats

Junk Accountant ...

1,731

6

119

14

...

5

...

1

...

111

89

...

45

174

102

1

Clerk Shroffs

1

XVIII

1

NAVY

3

CONSERVANCY BOATS

XXI

MUITSAI

...

...

3

...

120

...

4

:

228

Table XXXIV.

MERCANTILE MARINE.

NATIONALITY.

Chinese

British...

...

British Indians

...

...

United States of America (Americans)

Italians

...

4..

Japanese

...

...

Russians

Dutch ... Siamese

...

...

...

Norwegians... Danes ... Swede... French Finn

...

Portuguese... Filipino

Total

Class.

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

:

:.

...

:

...

:

:

...

:

:

...

3,962

...

436

240

259

108

764

27

13

65

...

...

Table XXXIVa.

...

...

7

5

1

...

1

1

5

1

SMALL CRAFT ENUMERATED.

5,895

S

Hongkong

New Territories.

Shaukeiwan

TOTAL.

and Aberdeen.

North

South.

Cargo Boats... Fishing Boats

1,887

84

33

2,004

2,333

456

672

3,461

Launches

250

1

1

252

Lighters Motor Boats

Sampans Yachts

218

1

219

67

1

68

4,159

7

236

4,402

4

4

Total

8,918

548

944

10,410

:

229

SECTION VI.

MISCELLANEOUS.

Table 35.-Staff.

Table 36.-Stationery.

Table 37.-Cost of the Census.

:

230

Table XXXV.

STAFF.

Office Staff: 1 Supervisor.

22 Abstracting Clerks (Chinese Section).

2 Abstracting Clerks (Non-Chinese Section).

ENUMERATORS EMPLOYED.

...

...

...

...

187

...

...

...

...

10

1

...

ISLAND OF HONGKONG :-

City of Victoria

Shaukeiwan

Pokfulam... Aberdeen... Stanley

...

...

...

**

...

...

...

...

...

...

KOWLOON PENINSULA :

Tsimshatsui

Yaumati

...

Mongkok...

Taikoktsui

...

...

...

...

...

!

4

1

203 Enumerators.

6

...

16

16

2

...

...

...

...

Hunghom

Hunghom Villages...

Shamshuipo

Kowloon City...

NEW TERRITORIES, NORTH :-

...

.4.

...

***

...

10 2

14 6

8 Head Enumerators.

50 Enumerators.

NEW TERRITORIES, SOUTH:

3 Head Enumerators.

11 Enumerators

Date.

FLOATING POPULATION.

VICTORIA HARBOUR.

Enumerators.

72 Enumerators.

Launches.

Sampans

Saturday, Sunday,

23rd April

69

6

...

24th

69

11

**

...

Monday, 25th Tuesday, 26th Wednesday, 27th

Aberdeen

...

Shaukeiwan...

40

وو

14

...

""

3

10 00 OT

5

2

"

...

:

: :

::

...

4. Enumerators.

6 Enumerators.

28

31

95

༢ལ ུ ༦i

}

231

Table XXXVI.

STATIONERY USED IN THE CENSUS OF HONGKONG, 1921.

Schedules issued and distributed, according to Districts.

Chinese Chinese English Schedules Schedules Schedules

Issued.

Used.

Issued.

English Schedules

· Used.

City of Victoria.

North Point

...

Health District No. 1

...

800

400

30

21

4,850

3,262

245

245

1A and 2A

...

5,690

3,528

302

239

2

99

"}

...

6,400

4,812

351

256

3

>>

3,700

3,180

670

515

""

4

...

...

11,400

7,805

290

179

5

""

""

...

8,100

4,951

23

22

6

19

27

...

...

7,400

4,420

15

14

7

"1

39

7,700

4,707

20

18

8

:>

35.

...

...

5,900

4,740

10

2

9

""

""

...

8,450

6,902

78

66

99

10

""

...

...

...

6,300

5,494

54

51

Hill District

...

...

...

...

300

192

200

164

Pokfulam

...

...

...

...

...

Shaukeiwan

200

184

30

16

...

...

...

5,400

2,724

137

137

Kowloon Peninsula.

Health District No. 11

...

...

...

11 A

...

12

...

""

""

13

...

...

21

>>

14

""

19

...

15

""

59

Central Police Station

Total...

:

1,200

1,200

100

100

2,900

2,600

18

17

...

8,100

6,047

60

50

6,900

5,720

141

114

3,850

2,820

24

21

200

144

200

200

800

700

100

100

106,540

76,532

3,098

2,547

232

CENSUS BOOKS, USED.

North:-

Pingshan

Autau Lokmachow Shataukok... Sheungshui Taipo... Shatin Saikung

South:-

Tsunwan

...

New Territories.

Kowloon City

Lantau

Cheungchow Lamma

Stanley

...

...

...

...

Aberdeen and Aplichau

Shaukeiwan

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

....

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

::

...

...

...

...

...

:

:

Hongkong and Kowloon Outlying Districts

Hongkong Harbour ...

...

...

Enumerators' Wages... Allowances and Donations Incidentals...

Hire of Sampans

Travelling Expenses Advertising

Clerks' Salaries

...

Stationery --Printing

...

:

...

Miscellaneous

Furniture

...

Total...

Land.

Water.

10

...

30

...

...

...

29

...

...

...

11

...

24

25

...

27

13

...

...

24

...

...

...

16

29

19

10

10 7

...

3

...

3

1

7

15

3

12

...

6

120

279

175

Table XXXVII.

COST OF THE CENSUS.

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...$ 4,961.90

...

812.50 223.10

...

...

...

Total Cost of the Census

:

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

222.92

28.80

139.16

...

6,388.38

...

...

6,332.18

...

9,307.76 45.24

...

9,353.00

73.31

...

...$ 22,146.87

;

117

No. 1921

10

HONGKONG.

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS IN CONNECTION WITH THE ESTIMATES FOR 1922.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor, 27th October, 1921.

Statement of Assets and Liabilities on the 31st December, 1920.

LIABILITIES.

C.

ASSETS.

C.

Deposits not Available,

907,860.72

Crown Agents' Advances,

164,970.96

Subsidiary Coins,...... Advances,

662,327.99

445,032.30

Postal Agencies,

9,751.29

Building Loans,

296,500.00

Shipping Control Account,

2,231,204.11

Imprest,....

13,933.24

Suspense Account,

15.00

House Service Account,

6,680.09

Unallocated Stores, (P.W.D.),

298,721.29

Unallocated Stores, (Railway),

230,279.63

Coal Account,

339,830.74

Investment Account,

Total Liabilities, Balance,.....

3,313,802.08

Balance Bank,

4,490,265.31

Total.............$ 7,804,068.39

Crown Agents' Current Account,

4,932,833.56*

575,074.03 2,855.52

Total,......

$ 7,804,068.39

* Invested as follows :-

Value of Stock.

Hongkong 6% War Loan, 1921-28, ..$120,000.00

4% Funding Loan, 1960-1990, ......£1,055,000 Os. Od.

Actual Cost.

$120,000.00

£847,398 15s. Od. (68)

Market Value.

$120,000.00

£722,675 Os. Od.

[P.T.O.]

X

Dr.

118

ASSETS AND LIABILITIES ON 31ST DECEMBER, 1920, AND 31ST DECEMBER, 1921,

(ESTIMATED).

1920.

Revenue,

Expenditure,

..$14,689,671.93 14,489,593.52

Revenue,... Expenditure,

Surplus,.....$

Balance of Assets, (1919),

200,078.41 4,290,187.90

Surplus,........

Balance of Assets, (1920),

Balance of Assets, (1920), $ 4,490,266.31

Balance of Assets, (1921),

War Loan Stock Issue

of 1916 at 6%.

In-

terest to be paid off

on the 1st Decem- ber, 1928,

Inscribed Stock Issues of 1893 and 1906 at

3%. Interest to be paid off on the 15th April, 1943,

LOAN ACCOUNT.

1920.

1921.

1921.

$ 16,590,519.00 16,111,990.00

$ 478,529.00 4,490,266.00

4,968,795.00

1920.

1921.

Cr.

$3,000,000

$3,000,000

Sinking Fund,

$438,203 and

£84,751 Stg.

$664,500 and

£89,040 Stg.

£1,485,732. 16. 5 £1,485,732. 16. 5 Sinking Fund,.! £338,658. 0. 0.

£383,580. 0. 0.

HONGKONG, 21st October, 1921.

C. McI. MESSER,

Treasurer.

7

་ སྐ་

95

No. 9

1921

HONGKONG.

ABSTRACT SHOWING THE DIFFERENCES BETWEEN THE APPROVED ESTIMATES OF

EXPENDITURE FOR 1921 AND THE ESTIMATES OF EXPENDITURE FOR 1922.

Increase.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor, 27th October, 1921.

CLASS I.

GENERAL ADMINISTRATION.

1.-Governor.

Decrease.

Personal Emoluments.

Lower Exchange

$

8,970 Good Conduct Allowances

96-

$

8,970

$

96

Other Charges.

Electric Light and Fans

600

Coal

150

:

Incidental Expenses...

1,000

$

1,600

$

150

Total Increase

$

10,570

Deduct Decrease

246

Total Decrease.

$

246

Net Increase

$

10,324

Lower Exchange and Stipulated In-

crements...

Net Increase

1

2. The Cadet Service.

Personal Emoluments.

..$

42,731

$ 42,731

1

1

Increase.

96

3. Colonial Secretary's Department and Legislature.

Decrease.

Personal Emoluments,

Rent Allowance

4,663

3,886

1,920

25

300

$

10,794

Lower Exchange and Stipulated

Increments

Revised Clerical Salaries..

New Posts

Good Conduct Allowances

Shorthand Allowance

Electric Fans and Light Shorthand Tuition Fees

CA

Other Charges.

150

:

$

en

24

24

300

$

450

Total Increase

$

11,244.

Deduct Decrease

24

Total Decrease

$

24

Net Increase

11,220

Special Expenditure.

Document Presses

50

Typewriters

676

Net Increase

726

4.--Secretariat for Chinese Affajs.

Personal Emoluments.

Revised Clerical Salaries...

4,213 Posts Abolished...

New Posts ...

1,700

Good Conduct Allowances

13

$

5,926

5,280

}

$

5,280

Other Charges.

Incidental Expenses...

$

100

Furniture

.$

50

$

100

$

50

Total Increase

$

6,026

Deduct Decrease

5,330

Total Decrease

...$

5,330

:

Net Increase

$

696

}

:

:

Increase.

Lower Exchange and Stipulated

Increments

Revised Clerical Salaries

New Posts ...

Good Conduct Allowances

97

.

5.-Audit Department.

Personal Emoluments.

.$

3,567

1,604

1,275

10

$

6,456

Decrease.

*:

.

Other Charges.

Share of Home Expenditure

$

1,382

Transport and Travelling

100

Total Increase

7,838

Deduct Decrease...

100

Total Decrease

..$

100

4

Net Increase

$

7,738

6.--Treasury.

Personal Emoluments.

Lower Exchange

$

Revised Clerical Salaries

1,560 12,148

Posts Abolished

$

360

New Posts ...

2,095

Good Conduct Allowances House Allowances

31

36

15,870

1

$

360

Incidentals... Stamps, etc.

Other Charges.

50

1,000

$

1,050

Total Increase

$

16,920

Deduct Decrease

360

Total Decrease

$3

360

Net Increase

16,560

Special Expenditure.

Typewriter...

260

Furniture

200

Total Increase

$

260

Deduct Decrease

200

Total Decrease

$

200

Net Increase

$

60

Increase.

98

7.-Harbour Master's Department.

Decrease.

Personal Emoluments.

Lower Exchange and Stipulated

New Appointments ...

3,308

Increments

6,480

Allowances Abolished

378

New Posts...

4,128

Good Conduct Allowances

75

Revised Clerical Salaries...

4,859

Overestimated 1921

285-

Good Conduct Allowances

Rent Allowances

Personal Allowances...

Other Allowances

Error 1921 Estimate

218

24

102

948

100

:

$

16,859

4,046

Other Charges.

Coal and Oil Fuel for Launches

$

14,500

Examination Fees

1,000

Acetylene Gas, etc. Guncotton Charges, etc.

110

2,000-

Slip atYaumati

300

Moorings

200

Oil and Sundry Stores

900

Repairs and Stores for Launches

4,150

Steam Launch Hire ...

250

Uniforms

730

$

22,030

$

-CA

Total Increase

$

38,889

Deduct Decrease

6,156

Total Decrease

SA

2,110

6,156

Net Increase

$

32,733

Special Expenditure.

New Launch

.$

13,000

New Motor Boat

6,000

Conversion of Green Island Light

New Hull for "H. D. 3. "

6,000

into Aga system

5,200

Conversion of Gap Rock and Waglan

Lights into Hood Burner system ...

4,680

Total Increase

$

22.880

Deduct Decrease

12,000

Total Decrease

12,000

Net Increase

$

10,880

སྟྭ་

Increase.

99

8.-Imports and Exports Department.

Personal Emoluments.

Decrease.

Lower Exchange and Stipulated In-

New Appointments

$

454

crements...

.$

2,536

Posts Abolished...

6,725

Revised Clerical Salaries...

14,196

Allowances Abolished

4,920

New l'osts ...

14,457

Good Conduct Allowances

60

Good Conduct Allowances

381

$

31,570

$

12,159

Other Charges.

Candles and Batteries

90

Advertisements...

$

CA

50

Conveyance Allowance to Revenue

Electric Fans and Light

200

Officers

360

Furniture

400

Launch:-Fuel...

2,000

Kerosine Oil

50

Liquor Labels

4,000

Launch :-

Motor Truck, Running Expenses

1,200

Coal

4,000

Opium :-

Repairs

1,000

Incidental Expenses

50

Stores

500

Rent of Chinese Revenue Officers

Office Cleaning Materials...

50

Quarters

24

Opium :-

Uniforms for Revenue Officers and

Electric Fans and Light

200

Messengers

1,000

Fuel.

3,000-

Upkeep of Adding Machines

100

Purchase of Raw Opium, etc.

150,000

Repairs and Renewals

400

Secret Service

2,000

Stationery, etc.

50

Transport

100

Triennial inspection of Launch

Boilers

300

$ 162,300

$

8,824

Total Increase

...$

40,394

Total Decrease Deduct Increase.....

$ 174.459

40,394

Net Decrease

$ 134,065

}

9.-Royal Observatory.

Personal Emoluments.

Lower Exchange and Stipulated

Allowances Abolished

$

7

120

Increments...

$

Revised Clerical Salaries

2.414 1,986

Good Conduct Allowance...

6

$

4,406

$

120

Other Charges.

Laboratory Expenses

150

Meteorological Telegrams

:

50

Transport

50

-09

$

200

Total Increase

$

4,606

Deduct Decrease

170

$

50

Total Decrease

...$

170

Net Increase

4,436

Dermatype outfit

$

Printing Memoir on Winds

Special Expenditure.

450

Seismograph

600 W/T apparatus...

Total Increase

$

1,050

...$

1,500

600

Total Decrease

.$

2,100

Deduct Increase.....

1,050

Net Decrease

$

1,050

:

Increase.

100

10.-Miscellaneous Services.

Decrease.

Bathing Places:

North Point, Kennedy Town and

Grants in aid of other Institutions :-

University of Hongkong

$

14,000

Stonecutter's Island

...$

1,300

Language Study Allowances

1,500

Bonuses for Interpreters and Trans-

Other Miscellaneous Services

10,000

lators

50

Rent Allowances

5,000

Grants in aid of Scientific Institu-

Special Allowances on Salaries

100,000

tions

1,410

Grants in aid of other Institu-

tions:-

Imperial Institute

School of Oriental Studies

Society of Comparative Legisla-

tion ...

250

60

2

Yunnan Scholarship at the Uni-

versity

2,000

Language Bonuses

600

Motor Cars, Running Expenses

5,000

Printing and Binding

150

Telegraphic Services

Rent of Public Telephones

Upkeep of Typewriters

3,320

312

50

Total Increase

14,504

Total Decrease Total Increase

$ 130,500 14,504

Net Decrease

$ 115,996

Special Expenditure.

Census Expenses

$

15,000

Net Decrease

. $

15,000

:

4

2

1.

L

Increase.

D

Lower Exchange

Revised Clerical Salaries... Good Conduct Allowances

101

CLASS II.

LAW AND ORDER.

1.--Judicial and Legal Departments.

A. SUPREME COURT.

Personal Emoluments.

9,020

Good Conduct Allowances

6,366

20

$

15,406

$

Decrease.

8

Co

8

Other Charges.

Incidental Expenses .....

50

Transferred to Other Departments...$

100

|

50

$

100

Total Increase

$

15,456

Deduct Decrease

108

Total Decrease

$

108

Net Increase

$

15,348

Lower Exchange and Stipulated

Increments

Revised Clerical Salaries ..

New Posts

Personal Allowance

Good Conduct Allowances

B. MAGISTRACY.

Personal Emoluments.

730

3.075

1,600

60

15

$

5,480

Other Charges.

Electric Fans and Light

Incidental Expenses...

Uniform for Messengers

50

Fees for Interpretation

200

50

30

$

130

200

Total Increase

$

5,610

Deduct Decrease

200

Total Decrease

200

Net Increase

$35

5,410

*

י

:

”.

.

Increase.

102

C.-DISTRICT OFFICES.

Personal Emoluments.

Decrease.

Lower Exchange and Stipulated

Increments

Revised Clerical Salaries Good Conduct Allowance Personal Allowances... Language Allowance...

...

$

1,331

Good Conduct Allowances New Appointment

12

4,731

Personal Allowance

36

222

72

12

100

60

$

6,234

$

120

Other Charges.

Local Public Works ...

500

Afforestation

$

300

Conveyance Allowances

804

Transport

800

$

500

$

1,904

Total Increase

$

6,734

Deduct Decrease

2.024

Total Decrease

...$

2,024

Net Increase

...$

4,710

Special Expenditure.

Furniture

...$

180

Total Decrease

180

Lower Exchange

Revised Clerical Salaries.. New Post

Good Conduct Allowances

D.-ATTORNEY GENERAL.

Personal Emoluments.

2.340

660

132

4

Rent Allowances

24

Total Increase

...$

3,160

E-OFFICE OF CROWN SOLICITOR AND LAND REGISTRY.

Personal Emoluments.

Lower Exchange and Stipulated

Good Conduct Allowances

24

Increments

$

5,308

Revised Clerical Salaries...

2,969

8,277

$

24

Other Charges.

Incidental Expenses...

$

25

Total Increase

$

Deduct Decrease

8,302 24

Total Decrease

...$

24

Net Increase

8,278

י

-1

Increase.

Lower Exchange and Stipulated

Increments

Revised Clerical Salaries..

Language Allowances

New Posts

Revised Rates

Rent Allowances

Good Conduct Allowances

103

2.-Police.

Decrease.

Personal Emoluments.

Posts Abolished...

4,716

80,662

Allowances Abolished

430

9,722

Transferred to Cadet Service

13,910

8,197

443

4,294

1,092

244

$ 104,654

$

19,056

Other Charges.

Clothing Conveyance Coolie hire... Incidentals...

28,000

Ammunition

2,500

180

Cleansing Materials

600

200

Conveyance

132

1,500

Disinfectants

1.200

Launches Coal

:

10,000

Furniture

1,500

Repairs

2,500

Photography

500

Inspection of Boilers

400

Rewards

300

Stores ...

1,700

Passages

21,000

Rations for Indians

500

Rent of Stations

200

Repairs to Cars

:

1,000

$

67,180

$

6,732

Total Increase Deduct Decrease

$ 171,834 25,788

Total Decrease

...$

25,788

Net Increase

$ 146,046

2 Motor Cycles and Side Cars...

$

2,600

4 Typewriters

900

1 Motor Car for Kowloon...

2 Generators and Search Lights

8,000

5 Aldis Lamps

75.

Special Expenditure.

3,000

Motor Ambulance

4 Motor Cycles

1 Patrol Wagon... Furniture

Iron Bunks

2 New Launches

50,000

3 Typewriters

7,000

2,400

7,000

9,450

3,650

375

Total Increase

$

64,575

Deduct Decrease

29,875

Total Decrease

$

29,875

Net Increase

$

34,700

;

!

Increase.

104

3. Fire Brigade.

Decrease.

Personal Emoluments.

Lower Exchange and Stipulated

Increments

657

Posts Abolished New Appointments

1,224 495

...

New Posts ...

25,634

Good Conduct Allowances

12

$

26,303

$

1,719

Other Charges.

Clothing

$

2,000

Coal and Oil Fuel

6,000

Light and Fans...

300

Repairs to Engines

5,500

$

13,800

Total Increase

$

40,103

Deduct Decrease

1,719

Net Increase

$

38,384

Total Decrease

1,719

Special Expenditure.

Motor Pump for Kowloon

.$

18.000

Fire-Float

Turntable Ladder

35,000

Motor Pump

Searchlight, Fire-Float

4,000

Extension Ladder

$

1.500

8.400

1,320

Total Increase

.$

57,000

Deduct Decrease

11,220

Net Increase

.$

45,780

Total Decrease

$

11,220

X

4.-Prison.

Personal Emoluments.

Lower Exchange and Stipulated

Posts Abolished...

Increments

$

20.926

New Appointments

::

291

77

Revised Rates

1,911

New Posts ...

5,157

Good Conduct Allowances

1,297

$

29,291

$

368

Other Charges.

Clothing and Shoes for Staff

.$

1,000

Fuel

Clothing and Shoes for Prisoners

1,000

Materials for Repairs and Renewals

3,000 300

Gratuities to Prisoners

100

Light...

700

Rations for Indian Warders.

2,300

$

5,100

Total Increase

$

34,391

Deduct Decrease

3,668

$

3,300

Total Decrease

3,668

Net Increase

30,723

Special Expenditure.

Steam Launch

30,000 Fire Hose

800

Total Increase

$

Deduct Decrease

30,000 800

Net Increase

29,200

Total Decrease

...$

800

-

T

*

Increase.

Lower Exchange and Stipulated

Increments

Revised Rates

New Posts ...

Revised Clerical Salaries

Good Conduct Allowances

Rent Allowances

Other Allowances

105

CLASS III.

PUBLIC HEALTH.

1. Medical Department.

Decrease.

Personal Emoluments.

$

19,222

Posts Abolished...

12,603

5,680

Allowances Abolished

1,200

11,917

New Appointments

1.072

2,006

Good Conduct Allowances

239

216

Rent Allowances

12

72.

Personal Allowances

24

60

Other Allowances

108

$

39,173

$

15,258

Other Charges.

B.-Hospitals and Asylums:—

Civil Hospital:-

Bedding and Clothing

2.400

Cleansing Materials ...

200

Fuel and Light...

500

A.-Staff:-

Conveyance Allowances

B. Hospitals and Asylums:-

Civil Hospital :

Medical Comforts

60

300

.:

Furniture, etc.

400

C.-Office of Health Officer of Port :-

Provisions for Patients

2,500

Launch :-

Surgical Instruments

1,500

Coal...

4,500

Upkeep of Piano

10

Repairs

2,000

Upkeep of X-Ray Apparatus

300

Stores

350

Civil Hospital, Out-Patients Depart-

Rent

320

ment:

E-Government Laboratory

Fuel and Light

200

Conveyance Allowances.

240

Incidental Expenses

50

Medicines and Surgical Appli-

ances

3,000

Lunatic Asylum :

Bedding and Clothing

300

Incidental Expenses...

100

Provisions for Patients

Victoria Hospital :-

Bedding and Clothing Fuel and Light ...

500

300

800

Incidental Expenses...

Provisions for Patients

New Territories .

Medicines

100

400

600

C.--Office of Health Officer of Port:-

Incidental Expenses...

75

D.-Institutes :-

Apparatus and Chemicals

100

E-Government Laboratory :--

Preparation of Viri, etc.

Apparatus and Chemicals

250

500

$ 15,085

Total Increase Deduct Decrease

$ 54,258

23,028

$

7,770

Total Decrease

...$

23,028

Net Increase

$

31,230

Special Expenditure.

B.--Hospitals and Asylums:

Equipment of Out-Patients De-

partment, Civil Hospital

D.-Institutes:

Microscope...

$

11,450

400

Total Increase

$ 11,850

Increase.

106

2. Sanitary Department.

Personal Emoluments.

Lower Exchange and Stipulated

New Appointments

Increments...

$ 21,432

Allowances Abolished

New Posts

15,922

Posts Abolished...

Revised Clerical Salaries...

9,308

Good Conduct Allowances

Revised Rates

3,224

Rent Allowances

Good Conduct Allowances

51

Other Allowances

Rent Allowances

1,332

Other Allowances

360

Transferred from Other Departments

540

$

52,169

Decrease.

SA

36-

$

:

171

120*

264

155

24

60%

794

X

Other Charges.

Sanitary Staff.

Conveyance Allowances

300

Bath-Houses:

Coolie Labour

1,050

Fuel

*A-

2,500

Light, Western Market

500

Incidental Expenses

70

Light...

25

Rent of Quarters for Scavenging

Coolies

1,100-

Disinfectants...

2,500

Disinfecting and Cleansing Ap-

paratus

1,000

Dust and Water Carts.

1,300

General Cleansing, Chinese New Year

50

Launches, Steam Barges & Lighters :-

Coal

6,000

Repairs

2,000

Stores...

1,700

Light:

Bullock Stables at Victoria and

Kowloon.....

50

Disinfecting Stations, etc.

800

Public Latrines...

200

Smaller Markets

500

Purchase & Maintenance of Bullocks

850

Rat Poison, Rat Traps, etc. .....

1,200

•.

Refund of Fees for Sanitary Institute

Examinations

100

Rent of Quarters for Inspector and

Sanitary Officers

20*

Scavenging Gear, Kowloon

300

Transport

400

Uniform for Staff

1,250

Veterinary Staff.

Animal Depôts & Slaughter Houses :-

Incidental Expenses...

200

Light

100

Motor Meat Van, Running Cost

2,000

$ 25,115

$

2,950*

Total Increase

$

Deduct Decrease

77,284 3,744

Total Decrease

...

.$

3,744

Net Increase

73,540

:

3-

:

Increase.

-

107

2.-Sanitary Department,-Continued.

Decrease.

Special Expenditure.

Exhumation, Various Cemeteries

$

6,000

Strawshed at Kennedy Town Cattle

4 4-wheeled Dust Carts

1,400

Depôt

2,000

:

3 4-wheeled Dust Carts

1 Dust Cart (Hand)

10 Bullocks

2,400

Exhumation :-

180

Kai Lung Wan Cemetery

2,250

700

Sha O Shek

600

1 Steam Launch

45,000

Kowloon Tong

750

1 Pig Weighing Machine...

250

1 2-wheeled Bullock Cart

250

2 Refuse Junks...

5,600

1 4-wheeled Bullock Cart

350

4 2-wheeled Hand Carts

750

2 4-wheeled Water Carts...

1,700

1 Refuse Barge ...

15,000

2 Motor Tractors

20,000

10 Trucks ...

15,000

Total Increase

Deduct Decrease

Net Increase

$

61,530 58,650

2,880

Total Decrease

.$

58,650

...

3. Botanical and Forestry Department.

Personal Emoluments.

Lower Exchange and Stipulated

New Appointments

102

Increments

...$

New Posts

1,581 3,284

Allowances Abolished

168

Revised Clerical Salaries...

476

Revised Rates

106

Good Conduct Allowances

96

Rent Allowances

60

$

5,603

$

270

Other Charges.

Brush Wood Clearing

2,500

Field Allowances to Foresters...

400

Improvements to Fanling Golf

Course

...$

1,000

Forestry, Hongkong

750

Hire of Motor Car

100

$

1,000

Incidental Expenses

100

Maintenance of Gardens and Grounds

750

Transport

100

Travelling Allowance to Supervisor

540

$

5,240

Total Increase

Deduct Decrease

10,843 1,270

Total Decrease

.$

1,270

Net Increase

..$

9,573

Increase.

108

Decrease.

CLASS IV.

EDUCATION.

A.-DEPARTMENT OF DIRECTOR OF EDUCATION.

Lower Exchange and Stipulated In-

crements...

Personal Allowances...

New Posts ...

Revised Rates

Good Conduct Allowances

House and Rent Allowances.

$

45,483

Personal Emoluments.

Posts Abolished...

Allowances Abolished

858

Overestimated 1921

:

$

12,250 96

3,140

18,210

7,482

89

:

1,860

$ 73,982

15,486

Other Charges.

Books ...

382

Capitation Grants

$

18,687

Conveyance Allowances

240

Examination Grants.

482

Cookery

60

Transferred to Other Departments...

750

Fans and Light...

330

University Examination fees

1,300

Incidental Expenses

943

Piano Hire ...

Prizes...

Rent

School Subsidies

Students in Training

180

100

2,602

62,837

11,487

$

79,161

$

21,219

Total Increase

Deduct Increase

$ 153,143 36,705

Total Decrease

$

36,705

Net Increase

$ 116,438

Special Expenditure.

Equipment of Schools Typewriters

.$

1,800

Building Grants

..$

60,000

695

Other items as shown

1,080

Total Decrease

$

61,080

Total Increase

2,495

Deduct Increase...

2,495

Net Decrease

$

58,585

B.-TECHNICAL INSTITUTE.

Personal Emoluments.

Allowances Abolished

Net Decrease

CA

*

150

150

1

:

Increase.

Contribution

Government

to Imperial

Lower Exchange

Revised Rates

Good Conduct Allowances

109

CLASS V.

DEFENCE.

1. Military Expenditure.

A.--MILITARY CONTRIBUTION.

$ 359,330.

$ 359,330

B.-VOLUNTEER DEFENCE CORPS.

Personal Emoluments.

468

Posts Abolished:..

290

33

$

791

Other Charges.

Books, Stationery and Printing

500

Mounted Infantry Section

1,800

Camp Expenses Furniture

Total Increase

$

Decrease.

156

$

156

6,000

100

Incidentals...

100

Transport

1,300

$

CD:

7,500

2,300

3,091

Total Decrease Deduct Increase.......

..$

7.656

3,091

Net Decrease

4,565

110

Increase.

Decrease.

CLASS VI.

PUBLIC WORKS.

A.-PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT.

Personal Emoluments.

Lower Exchange and Stipulated

Posts Abolished...

...$

4.173

Increments

53,805

New Appointments

782-

Revised Rates

95,775

Transferred to Other Departments.....

612

New Posts ...

45,216

Allowances Abolished

180

Revised Clerical Salaries...

12,007

20% Allowance on Salaries of Eur-

Good Conduct Allowances

333

opean Officers

67,000-

Personal Allowances...

406

Good Conduct Allowances

27

Rent Allowances

Other Allowances

348

Rent Allowances

960

9,984

Other Allowances

1,200-

$ 217,874

$

74,934

Other Charges.

Conveyance Allowances

780

Furniture

.8

500*

Incidental Expenses :-

General

1,000

Quarry Stores

10,000

Land Survey Contingencies

50

Surveying Instruments

750

Transport and Travelling Expenses

1,000

Uniform for Lift Attendants, Post

Office and Supreme Court

250

Upkeep of Quarry Plant ...

12,000

$

25,830

$

500 ·

Total Increase Deduct Decrease

Net Increase

$ 243,704

Total Decrease

$

75,434

$

75.434

$ 168,270

Typewriters

Special Expenditure.

$

900

!

}

Increase.

111

Decrease.

3

B.-PUBLIC WORKS, RECURRENT,

Hongkong.

Maintenance of Roads and Bridges...$

5,000

Drainage

1,000

Lighting

3,500

Maintenance of Praya Wall and Piers

2,000

Dredging Foreshores

3,000

Maintenance of Water Works

22,200

Kowloon.

Maintenance of and Improvements to

Buildings

2,500

Maintenance of Roads and Bridges...

5,000

Gas Lighting

500

Maintenance of Praya Wall and Piers

1,000

Water Account (Meters, etc.)

5,000

New Territories.

Maintenance of and Improvements to

Buildings

2,500

Maintenance of Roads and Bridges...

5,000

Electric Lighting, Shamshuipo

250

Maintenance of Fanling Water Works

500

Total Increase

58,950

C.-PUBLIC WORKS, EXTRAORDINARY.

Total Increase

...$ 1,643,900

*

4

Increase.

112

CLASS VII.

UNDERTAKINGS OF GOVERNMENT.

1.-Post Office.

Personal Emoluments.

Lower Exchange and Stipulated

Increments

4,753

Good Conduct Allowances Allowances Abolished

$

CA-

Revised Clerical Salaries...

28,441

New Posts (D'Aguilar Station)

16,500

Good Conduct Allowances

54

Other Allowances

530

$

50,278

$

X

Decrease.

44

1,275

1,319

Other Charges.

Carriage of Mails :-

Share of Mail Subsidy

20,146

Transit charges

20,000

Furniture Launch: Coal

:

200

550

Coolie Hire

50

Incidental Expenses

Post Office

Transport:-

Post Office

200

500

$

40,896

750

Total Increase

$

91,174

Deduct Decrease

2,069

Total Decrease

$

2,069

Net Increase

$

89,105

2.-Kowloon-Canton Railway.

Personal Emoluments.

Lower Exchange and Stipulated

Increments

Posts Abolished...

681

9,254

New Appointments

724

New Posts...

8.317

Good Conduct Allowances

619

Revised rates

107

Other Allowances.

526

Revised Clerical Salaries..

4,552

Good Conduct Allowances

35

Rent Allowances

156

Other Allowances

230

22.651

$

2,550

f

x

Increase.

113

2.--Kowloon-Canton Railway,--Continued.

Decrease.

General Staff:-

Coal for Offices and Stores

Electric Fans and Light

Transport

Maintenance of Way, Works, and

Stations:

Other Charges.

:

General Staff:-

80

Furniture

650

25

Stations:

Ballast

Maintenance of Way, Works, and

Bridges and Tunnels

...$

100

500

2,500

Fencing

500

Fastenings...

750

Locomotive, Carriage and Wagon

Maintenance of Signals

50

Department:

Coal

22,950

Staff Quarters

Loading Coal

150

Repairs :-

Station Buildings

4,300

4.300

Rent of Quarters for Chinese

Roads and Crossings

6.50

Fitters

240

Sleepers

19,000

Running Stores :-

Uniforms

10

Locomotives, Oil

1,500

Do., Miscellaneous...

1,500

Carriages and Wagons, Oil

500

Do.,

Miscellaneous

1,000

newals

Traffic Department :---

Locomotive, Carriage and Wagon

Department:-

Materials for Repairs and Re-

Carriages

2,000

Maintenance of Telegraph and

Power ...

600

Telephones

1,700

Traffic Department :-

Fanling Branch Line:-

Nightsoil Disposal...

84

Coal...

183

Rent of Quarters for Chinese

Staff

12

Fanling Branch Line :-

Repairs :--

Bridges

Station Building

Sleepers ...

$ 30,978

Total Increase Deduct Decrease

$

53.629

38,206

50

250

500

$

35,656

Total Decrease

...$

38,206

Net Increase

15,423

Special Expenditure.

Asphalting Platforms and Concourse

Kowloon Station ..........

Typewriter for Accounts Office

$

160

$

16,300

Bottom Ballast in Mile 15 Cutting

750

Boundary Wall and Shelter, Parkside Camera

3,200

Bridge No. 7

7,000

150

Bridge No. 37

2,500

Extension to Carriage Shed, Hung-

Drain at Mile 15

3,600

hom...

32,160

Extension to Fanling Station

3,000

Installation of Water Closets in

A and B Railway Quarters New Loco Sheds, Fanling Branch

Line

Extension to Workshops ...

5,000

5,700

Installation of Electric Power

6,500

Installation of Clock

1.000

2,200

Latrine at Yaumati

300

New Sidings and Station at Sheung

Loco Yard at Lowu

25.000

Shui

23,340

Metric System, Introduction of

8,000

New Carpenters Shop at Hunghom...

15,000

New Sidings-Kowloon...

8,600

Rail Anchors

2,500

Loco Yard, Hunghom

5,100

Additional Machines for Workshops

7,000

Platform Awnings

2,200

Spares for Locomotivés

30,000

Produce Shelter, Taipo Market

750

Furniture for Quarters

2,250

Reinforced Concrete Wharf

at

Artificial Foot

240

Kowloon Terminus

10,000

Re-railing Tunnel No. 2

40,500

7 Carriages ..

121,195

Fire Hose, etc.

900

Iron Safe

150

Motion Plates and Cylinders for

Locomotives

4,800

Total Decrease

$ 257,005

Total Increase ...

$5 140,040

Deduct Increase..

140,040

:

Net Decrease

$ 116,965

:

:

Increase.

Lower Exchange

114

CLASS VIII.

NON-EFFECTIVE AND CHARITABLE SERVICES.

1.-Charge on Account of Public Debt.

$ 134,031

Total Increase

$ 134,031

X

Decrease.

2.-Pensions.

Sterling Pensions granted

$ 50,446.36

Dollar Pensions ceased

...$10,394.47

Dollar Pensions granted

13,277.54

Temporary Increases of Pensions

15,839.09

Equalisation of Exchange

4,919.66

Special Allowance of 25% on Widows

and Orphans' Pensions

5,746.88

Estimated Amount to cover Pensions

to be granted and refunds ...

375.94

Total Increase

Deduct Decrease

Net Increase

$90,605.47

10,394.47

$80.211.00

Total Increase

...$ 10,394.47

3.-Charitable Services.

Charitable Allowances granted

Lower Exchange

210 Charitable Allowances ceased... 711

$

9

Total Increase

.$

921

Deduct Decrease

9

Total Decrease

$

9

Net Increase

912

X

܂

Increase.

115

RECAPITULATION.

Total Estimate for 1921

Total Estimate for 1922

Total Increase

:

$17,349,150

20,198,980

$ 2,849,830

Decrease.

!

Personal Emoluments :-

Personal Emoluments :-

Lower Exchange and Stipulated

Reductions on New Appointments $

7,197

Increments...

$ 349,893

Abolition of Posts...

48,723

Revised Rates of Salaries

115,018

Transferred to Other Departments

14,522

Revised Clerical Salaries

127,205

Allowances Abolished ...

9,037

New Posts

185,661

Rent Allowances

1,020

Transferred from Other Depart-

ments ...

540

Other Allowances

3,373

Rent Allowances

4,968

Other Charges...

254,341

Other Allowances

Other Charges

21,523

Special Expenditure...

448,110

347,026*

Miscellaneous Services

115,996

Special Expenditure..

393,306

Withdrawal of 20% Allowance on

Salaries of European Officers

Military Contribution

359,330

(Public Works Department)

67,000

Public Works Recurrent ...

58,950

Overestimated 1921

3,425

Public Works Extraordinary...

1,643,900

Charge on Account of Public Debt....

134,031

Pensions

80,211

Charitable Services

912

Error 1921 Estimates

100

Total Increase

Deduct Decrease

$ 3,822,574

972,744

Total Decrease

...S 972,744

Net Increase

..$ 2,849,830

;

:

47

HONGKONG.

REPORT ON HONGKONG FIRE BRIGADE AND PROPOSALS FOR INCREASING ITS EFFICIENCY.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor, 18th July, 1921.

No.

7 1921

*

Various criticisms have been levelled at the Hongkong Fire Brigade from time to time and more so recently as a result of an unusually large crop of fires which have had to be dealt with within the past 6 months.

I

propose to deal with the whole question of the Fire service under the following

heads:-

(I) The Personnel of the Brigade.

(II) The Equipment (a) on land and (b) on the water. (c) Fire Stations.

(III) The Water Supply and Water Pressure, which is the concern of the Water Authority but which very materially enters into the question of fire protection.

(IV) The Cost of the Brigade.

(I.) The Personnel.

The Fire Brigade consists at present of:-

1 Superintendent, C.S.P.,

1 Assistant Superintendent, Chief Inspector,

1 Engineer, The Assistant Marine Surveyor, H.O.,

1 Assistant Engineer and Station Officer, a Professional Fireman from the

London Fire Brigade,

1 Assistant Station Officer, a Professional Fireman from the London Fire

Brigade,

a number of Motor Drivers, Fitters, Blacksmith, Carpenter, etc., as enumerated in Appendix A.

6 Foremen--4 European: 2 Chinese.

78 Firemen--37 European: 41 Chinese.

4 Interpreters-Chinese.

The Floating Engines, 2 in number, have in addition 14 men in all not included in the above total, e.g., 2 Foremen (European), Engineers, Stokers and Seamen (Chinese). The Officers of the Brigade include two professional firemen both drawn from the London Fire Brigade, and 2 Foremen and 41 Firemen are Chinese professional firemen locally trained by the Assistant Engineer and Station Officer. The remaining 4 Foremen and 37 Firemen are drawn from the European Section of the Hongkong Police as are also the Superintendent and the Assistant Superintendent. The Engineer who is in the Government Marine Surveyor's Sub-Department acts chiefly in the capacity of Consulting Engineer to the Fire Brigade. The A.S.P. Water Police (usually the Assistant Harbour Master) is in charge of the Fire Floats. The Superintendent of the Brigade and the Assistant Superintendent (Fire Floats) receive no remuneration for their services. The duties of the Superintendent are mainly administrative.

48

2. Criticism of the personnel has been mainly directed against the performance of Fire Brigade duties by Police Officers who in the ordinary course of their duties have plenty to do, and it is argued that they cannot efficiently perform the two functions of Police and Firemen. This is true and particularly so when there is a large crop of fires as has occurred during the past 6 months. It may also be said with equal truth that with the development of the Colony, particularly the City of Victoria and the Kowloon Peninsula, the present arrangements are likely to lead to more marked in- efficiency in the Brigade in the future. The work of the Brigade is increasing year by year and the question must now be considered whether it should not be reconstituted by eliminating the Police Volunteers and substituting therefor a purely professional Fire Brigade consisting of a small number of professional European firemen with a locally trained Chinese Staff of firemen.

3. The arguments in favour of the present system are mainly that the European Police Firemen though not highly trained have more initiative, are more daring and work harder and more efficiently than the average Chinese Fireman, particularly at the commencement of operations when steadiness and initiative may mean the saving of lives and much valuable property. From my own personal experience at fires, I must admit that the Chinese Firemen as a whole do not at present show either any great initiative or any over great zeal in the performance of their duties. I cannot help thinking, however, that this is mainly due to the fact that they lack the necessary opportunity to display the qualities required of a good fireman. At present they do what I may call the coolie work of the Brigade only, such as running out and coupling up hose and generally assisting the European Firemen, who hold all positions of responsibility. When the outbreak is got under they stand by and make up the hose which again is only the manual labour of the Brigade. Properly and regularly drilled and working together under professional guidance, I am satisfied that they would become thoroughly efficient and by reason of the experience gained in working together at fires, they should in time become quite capable of dealing successfully with outbreaks of fire.

4. One obvious drawback of the present system is the division of the Brigade into European and Chinese sections. Most of the European Firemen do not speak Chinese and confusion is apt to arise from the failure of the one to understand the other. In this connection it will be essential in any reorganization of the Brigade that the Europeans in Charge should be sufficiently acquainted with Chinese to make themselves understood. Again the control exercised over the European Firemen (who are first and foremost policemen) by the professional European Staff is not as satisfactory as it would be were all the men under their entire control. The arrangements necessary under present conditions, which at times place a Senior Police Officer under the orders of a junior professional fireman or even a junior Police Officer, who has become a foreman in the Brigade by reason of his outstanding merit, obviously lead to friction at times. Needless to say, such an arrangement is avoided as far as possible but cannot be entirely elimi- nated in the Brigade as at present constituted.

5. By having all the members of the Brigade entirely under his control, by giving all the members an equal share in all the work of the Brigade and by having the same men always working together at fires, the Officer in charge should be able in time to bring the Chinese firemen up to a level of efficiency even greater than that attained at present under the mixed Brigade system. The matter of equipment will of course also enter very largely into the question of the efficiency of the Brigade, but first and foremost the personnel must be thoroughly trained in the performance of its duties so that each man knows the precise nature of his particular work on each occasion, and all mixing up of sections and duties which is unavoidable where the same men are not always available may be entirely eliminated. With firemen drawn from the Police, only those available i.c., off Police duty at the time of the outbreak can be made use of, and they necessarily differ from day to day. It is thus but rarely possible to get the same men working together and efficiency must suffer in consequence.

6. My recommendations, as far as the personnel of the Brigade is concerned, are set forth in detail in Appendix B. The following table shows the principal changes proposed :-

EXISTING BRIGADE. Superintendent, C.S.P.

1 Engineer.

1 Assistant Superintendent.

PROPOSED BRIGADE.

Chief Officer (Administrative), C.S.P,

1 Superintendent, (New).

1 Engineer.

49

EXISTING BRIGADE.

1 Asst. Engineer & Station Officer. 1 Assistant Station Officer.

4 Engine Drivers.

5 Fire Brigade Chauffeurs.

10 Motor Drivers.

PROPOSED BRIGADE.

1 Asst. Engineer & Station Officer. 1 Station Officer (Kowloon).

4 Engine Drivers.

20 Motor Drivers.

1 Fitter.

1 Blacksmith.

1 Carpenter.

1 Painter.

1 Sailmaker.

5 Stokers.

2 Overseers of Water Works.

1 Inspector of Dangerous Goods.

1 Motor Mechanic.

3 Fitters.

1 Carpenter.

1 Painter.

1 Sailmaker.

+ Stokers.

2 Overseers of Water Works.

1 Inspector of Dangerous Goods.

6 Foremen.

78 Firemen.

4 Interpreters.

3 Motor Ambulance Coolies (See

Estimate 1921 P. 47).

1 Head Foreman.

3 Foremen. SO Firemen.

3 Interpreters. 6 Telephone Clerks.

6 Motor Attendants.

FLOATING ENGINES. ·

2 Engineers

I Engineer in Charge.

1 1st Class.

2 European Foremen & Engine

Drivers.

1 Engineer.

2 Engine Drivers.

2 Coxswains.

3 Stokers.

1 2nd Class Coxswain.

3 Seamen.

1 Caretaker (Aberdeen).

1 2nd Class.

3 Engine Drivers.

3 Coxswains

3 Stokers.

4 Seamen.

1 @ $360-S400. 12 @@ $300-8360.

1 Caretaker (Aberdeen).

7. The main changes proposed consist in abolishing the European Firemen includ- ing the Assistant Superintendent and substituting therefor Chinese Firemen with three professional European Firemen in charge instead of 2 as at present. It is proposed 19 retain the European Foremen and Motor Drivers who are members of the Police Force until such time as the Chinese are sufficiently trained to carry on by themselves. The Chief Executive Officer of the Brigade, it is proposed, shall be an officer of the rank and experience of a Superintendent in the London Fire Brigade In the London Fire Brigade such an officer now draws a salary of £475-£575 with quarters. proposed to offer this officer a salary of £600-£900 by £25 annually so as to get a really efficient man. The Captain Superintendent of Police will remain in administrative charge of the Fire Brigade as Chief Officer. The number of firemen will be increased by 2 only but it must be remembered that instead of having 78 firemen many of whom are not always available, there will now be 80 men whose entire services are at the d sposal of the Superintendent. This number is exclusive of all special services, such als Motor Drivers, mechanics, fitters, carpenters, etc., and the staff required to run the two Fire Floats. It must also be borne in mind that the Brigade has only recently been strengthened by the addition of 1 professional European Assistant Station Officer and 17 firemen. The number proposed should therefore suffice for the present, but it may be necessary to supplement this number when additional fire fighting apparatus is acquired. Minor changes include the addition of Drivers. and Attendants for the two

ཡི

50

new Ambulances which are on order and which are now included in the Fire Service. It is considered that the Motor Ambulance service can most profitably be attached to the Fire Brigade as it is in London.. A Motor Mechanic is also added and allowance is made for an Engineer with the requisite technical knowledge who will be attached to the Brigade. Further it is essential that a proper staff of Interpreters and Telephone Clerks should now be provided. Each European officer is therefore provided with an Intex preter as in the Sanitary Department. These Interpreters will also do the clerical work of the Brigade. The Telephone Clerks will provide an uninterrupted telephone service to answer calls at both stations, c.g., Headquarters and Kowloon.

Drivers.-There are 15 at present of whom 5 are professional chauffeurs and 10 European Policemen. It is proposed to provide two drivers for each machine. There will be before the end of 1921 :-

2 Motor Tenders.

5 Motor Pumps.

requiring 20 drivers in all ......

3 Motor Ambulances. 10 1st Class at $480-$600 p.a. 10 2nd Class at $360-$420 p.a.

Good drivers cannot be got under $40 p.m. but the Brigade can train its own men · as has been done in the past and thus obtain new men at a cheaper rate than outside.

8. It will be necessary to retain the steam engine drivers and stokers as they are required to man :-

(a) Steam Fire float at Aberdeen.

(6)

(e)

(d)

engine at Kowloon required as a stand by or for small fires.

Shaukiwan.

""

""

">

Un Long, New Territories.

""

These engines though small are still quite serviceable for the protection of outlying places. The floating engines will be taken over by the Superintendent of the Brigade and both floats will have full crews and be kept under banked fires, one float will be stationed on the Victoria and the other on the Kowloon side of the harbour. This arrangement will make it possible for one float to attend land fires near the shore with the least possible delay, and both will be available for ship fires. The Estimate of personnel allows for this new arrangement.

(II.)—Equipment.

Recent comments have laid stress on the inadequate equipment of the Fire Brigade, particularly afloat. I propose to deal with equipment :-

A. on land

B. afloat

C. Fire Stations.

A.-EQUIPMENT ON LAND.

The land equipment of the Brigade consists at present of:-

Motor Tender 1 (Victoria) with portable extension ladder 50 feet. Motor Pumps 3 (Victoria 2, Kowloon 1).

The Kowloon Motor Pump carries a portable Extension ladder 45 feet. Steain Fire Engines:-4

Kowloon

Shaukiwan

Aberdeen (float)

1 1

Un Long, New Territories. 1

Hosereels 4 (Kowloon and Victoria) these will gradually be done

away with.

Hose 27,770 feet (Victoria and Kowloon).

Hose Despatch Boxes, 41 for outlying districts and for incipient

outbreaks of fire.

ř

51

Standpipes, Nozzles, 58 standpipes and 69 nozzles.

Each Machine carries -No. 1. Machine 2,000 feet of hose.

No. 2.

1,400

"

No. 3. No. 4.

800

""

>>

800

"2

The plant required to deal successfully with large outbreaks of fire or with two or more simultaneous outbreaks, such as have occurred on several occasions recently is as follows:-

(a) 2 Motor Tenders

(b) 6 Motor Pumps 4 with extension ladders

VICTORIA. KOWLOON.

1

1

4

2

2

(c) 2 Turntable Ladders (85 feet Extension ladders)...

(d) 3 Way heads for connecting suction direct to mains (one per pump). (e) Hose, Standpipes, etc., in proportion to number of appliances.

(f) Nozzles. New nozzles with sprays and control as required. (g) Couplings.

(h) Hose Reels and Hose Despatch Boxes-Nil.

(j) Searchlights and Electric Torches :-as required.

(k) Street Fire Alarms. (Victoria only at present: at important points. (1) Smoke Helmets.

Taking the items in their order :---

(a) Motor Tenders,-No: 2.

One tender is old but still quite serviceable (Victoria). It carries a 50 feet ladder which will require renewal shortly as it is nearly worn out. Provision for this exists in the 1921 Estimates.

A tender is being provided in Kowloon by remodelling a large touring car recently acquired.

(6) Motor Pumps (Turbine), -No : 6.

3 are already in use. 2 of them are almost new. 2 are on order from England (Dennis pattern) and provision for these has been made in the 1921 Estimates. A supplementary vote will be required ($16,600) to cover increased prices and difference in rate of Exchange. 1 further pump is required and should be provided for in- the 1922 Estimates. This will give 4 pumps for Victoria and 2 for Kowloon which should be ample.

(e) Turntable Ladders,----No : 2.

These ladders are necessary to increase the efficiency of the Brigade in dealing with outbreaks in large buildings. The Brigade has none at present. They are worked electrically from a turntable on the chassis and are fitted with a nozzle which is fixed to the top rung of the ladder. The hose is connected to the nozzle and the fireman takes his place on the ladder before it is extended. The fireman works from the top of the ladder which is not placed against a wall and thus saves the running of hose through adjoining buildings and consequent damage by water. The ladder can be used as an escape in the usual manner. The length of the ladders used by the London Fire Brigade when fully extended is 85 feet. The Public Health and Buildings Ordinance provides for the supply of adequate escapes in large premises and these must necessarily be the direct means of escape in all buildings exceeding 4 stories as fire escapes cannot be effectively used for the upper stories of such buildings. Fixed escapes should be provided on the verandahs of the buildings where such exist. They should take the form of iron or re-inforced concrete staircases from floor to floor. Vertical ladders are dangerous,

52

NOTE. (See Description under Heading Turntable Ladders in Appendix C attached). The cost of each machine used by the London Fire Brigade was £2,300 (pre-war prices). Owing to the great cost of these machines it would be advisable to purchase I only for the present (1922 Estimates) and if successful, a second one could be purchased later. They would be for use in Victoria only.

(d) 3 Way Collecting heads:

It is proposed to carry one of these on each Motor Pump so as to pump direct from the mains thereby making use of the pressure in the mains to help the pump. This system is in general use in England where the mains are sufficiently large. In Hongkong the pumps have always been worked from a dam in the past. The use of the dam means a certain waste of water and loss of pressure in the mains, but it must be remembered that Motor pumps cannot be worked direct off small mains as the draw off is too great and they are liable to empty the mains.

(e) Hose and Standpipes:

These will be augmented in proportion to the increase in the number of fire appliances.

(f) Nozzles.

It is proposed to purchase a number of new nozzles fitted with controls and also sprays. The former are of great assistance to firemen wishing to change their position, as they can turn off the jet of water at the nozzle without having to signal to the Driver at the pump. All pumps in use or on order for Hongkong are built on models which make the use of the control possible without running the risk of bursting the hose. The sprays are useful to protect firemen who have to work very close to the fire or to play on smoul- dering ruins.

(g) Couplings.

The couplings in use in the Brigade are 23" with a machined round thread of 3" pitch similar to the London Fire Brigade. It has been suggested that automatic couplings are better and should be introduced. In this connection I beg to draw attention to the final paragraph of Appendix C in which the Chief Officer of the London Fire Brigade expresses his disagreement with this view except for the large hose used on floats. The same opinion was given to me by other Fire Officials who state that the springs in the automatic couplings give a great deal of trouble. I have personally never experienced any difficulty in connection with the couplings at present in use in the Brigade excepting the large sized hose.

In my recommendations concerning the floats I am asking for automatic couplings for the 4" hose.

(h) (a) Hose Reels, and (b) Hose Despatch Boxes.

The introduction of motor traction has rendered (a) unnecessary. They are therefore being done away with. (b) A number of despatch boxes which contain hose, standpipes and nozzles are still retained at all Fire Stations and Police Stations so that an outbreak adjacent to the Station can be tackled by the use of the street hydrants while the Motor Pumps are getting into position. The Despatch Boxes can also be taken by short routes to the scene of an outbreak along roads im- passable to Motor Pumps. In outlying districts where there is a good water supply, Despatch Boxes are also maintained for the same reason. They are handled by the Police and make it possible to get to work at once on an outbreak before the arrival of the Brigade,

:

·

58

() Searchlights & Electric Torches.

It is proposed to introduce these for use at fires to supplement the kerosine flares at present in use.

(k) Street Fire Alarms.

There are 12 in all and they cover the principal points in the City. It is proposed to fit them up with telephones so that they may be used for Police purposes as well, but the new system must remain in abeyance until sufficient cable is received to secure an efficient service. It has been found in practice that they are very little used by the public, who prefer to use the ordinary public telephone when a fire occurs. It is not proposed to extend the system outside the City unless a greater use is made of the existing alarms in the future.

(7) Smoke Helmets:

A satisfactory pattern of smoke helmet has not yet been procured for local use but experiments are in progress.

B.-Equipment A float.

The Floating equipment of the Fire Brigade consists of two Fire Floats :-

I powerful steam float with monitor capable of discharging 3,000 gallons per minute or in the alternative 8 ordinary 23" deliveries and four 4" deliveries.

1 small steam float with 6 deliveries (2-4′′ and 4-23′′).

1 land steamer mounted on a pontoon (Aberdeen).

4.

One float is always kept under banked fires ready to steam off to a fire on short notice. The second float is usually in reserve but is used to stand by at all Matshed Theatres situated near the water. This work also includes attendance at Matshed Theatres at places as far away as Aberdeen and Cheung Chau.

The land steamer mounted on a pontoon is used for fire protection at Aberdeen and Aplichau, this being the most satisfactory arrangement to safeguard these two villages, which are separated by Aberdeen Harbour.

It is not in my opinion necessary to supplement existing fire appliances afloat by any further motor or steam fire floats at present. Fires on ships in the harbour are fortunately of comparatively rare occurrence and in the circumstances, the very large outlay on a new motor fire float is not warranted by the work required、 The two Fire Floats are quite capable of dealing with ordinary fires on ships in the harbour, and should necessity arise, they can be supplemented by the large tugs employed by the Hongkong Whampoa Dock Co. and Tai Koo Dqck Co. both of which and particularly the former have very powerful fire pumps on board. \In this connection I recommend that an agreement be entered into with the Companies concerned to place their tugs fitted with fire fighting appliances at the disposal of the Fire Brigade in cases of emergency and if available at the time. With this addition I am satisfied that the shipping in the harbour will be adequately protected against fire.

The bulk of the work of the floats is in connection with fires on land and, owing to the peculiar situation of the City of Victoria and Kowloon, the floats are of very great service either in fighting the flames direct or in supplying the motor pumps with water, thereby also saving fresh water which is a matter of importance in the dry season. As the City and Kowloon both stretch out along the harbour for a great distance, the advisability of keeping both floats instead of one only under banked fires in future and providing a full crew for the No. 2 float has been considered, and full crews are recom- mended for both. One float would then do duty in Hongkong and one in Kowloon. The possibility of delay in getting across the harbour should thus be entirely eliminated Certain improvements on the floats are undoubtedly desirable. The re-arrangement of the hose lockers is receiving attention now, and will be taken in hand as soon as a satisfactory arrangement has been devised.

1

54

An electric light plant on No. 1 Fire Float has been approved and will be supplied forthwith. The float will be lighted up and clusters of lights worked from the float or in the alternative a searchlight. A portable searchlight should be carried on No. 2 float. A certain number of powerful oil lamps and also electric hand torches should be carried on board as has been suggested. A coffee machine and a supply of provisions for firemen should also be carried on each float. The hose couplings of the 4" hose should be discarded and automatic couplings provided. I further recommend that the Naval Authorities be approached in the matter of lending assistance when required, particularly at fires on board ships. Their general training and familiarity with ships make them particularly well fitted to fight an outbreak of fire on board ship. They are also supplied with smoke helmets. It would, I think, be advisable to have a definite arrangement with the Naval Authorities, for the supply of men and smoke helmets when required, provided they agree. Naval parties at present attend all large fires and are most useful but their services would be invaluable at ship fires.

C.---Fire Stations,

Exclusive of two small Fire Stations at Shaukiwan and Ün Long each containing a steam fire engine, the Fire Stations consist of:--

1 3-storied old building in Queen's Road Central, Victoria.

1 New Fire Station at Kowloon, Tsim Sha Tsui.

The present Fire Brigade Headquarters are quite unsuitable for Fire Brigade work. They consist of a number of tenement houses converted into what must have been intended as temporary Fire Brigade premises only. The building is too small, has no yard or drill ground of any kind and obstructs the footpath. It is also situated on a narrow street which hampers the movement of the fire appliances, and the street is completely obstructed when the Brigade turns out. The premises are too small to house the number of fire appliances on order or the personnel. The turntable ladders could not be housed there owing to their size. Plans for a new Station opposite the Central Market have been prepared and work will it is hoped, be commenced on the new Fire Brigade Headquarters this year. This building meets all the latest requirements of an up to date Station and will be an invaluable asset to the Brigade when completed; It contains accommodation for 8 motor appliances, quarters for 100 firemen, married quarters for Chinese Foremen, mechanics and others who must necessarily live on the premises, and married quarters also for the Superintendent and the Station Officer (European). A hose tower, drill tower and an ample yard are also provided. Rapid access to the ground floor from the firemen's quarters will be provided by means of brass poles. Doors opening automatically will also be fitted. Drying rooms and machine shops are also included. (See Appendix C.) This building can, however, hardly be completed under 2 to 3 years, as it forms one side of a large block of buildings covering the whole site opposite the Central Market in Des Voeux Road. It will therefore te necessary to house the Brigade or some part of it in temporary premises to supplement bhe present premises in Queen's Road Central. Such premises can be erected on the temporary reclamation near No. 2 Police Station, Wanchai., According to the present scheme it is not proposed to have Sub-Stations in Victoria but to concentrate the entire Brigade at Headquarters, but should it be found advisable, the question of Sub-Stations ean be considered in connection with new District Police Stations in Wanchai and Sai Ying Pun Districts. It might be well to station one Motor pump with extension ladder in each of these districts, but no doubt the experience gained by opening the temporary Sub-Station in Wanchai will make it possible to come to definite conclusions on this subject. The temporary premises should be large enough to take two machines and 20 firemen. They should be ready in time to take one or more of the new machines on order from home which will arrive in the autumn. This arrangement appears to be the best solution of the housing problem of the Brigade in Victoria, during the erection of the new Headquarters.

The new premises in Kowloon are adequate for the equipment of the Brigade, but it will be necessary shortly to erect quarters for the firemen on the premises. They are at present housed at the Water Police Station adjoining, where the accommodation is inadequate. Owing to the excellent situation of the Fire Station on a broad thoroughfare giving easy access to all parts of Kowloon, it is considered that this Station will suffice for the needs of the peninsula for some time to come.

55

(III.)-Water Supply and Water Pressure.

Generally speaking the water supply for fire purposes is good. It is controlled by the Water Authority, a Sub-Department of the P.W.D. The pressure in Victoria is good though it varies considerably in different districts at different hours. Group Hydrants have been supplied throughout the City as shown in Appendix D. The group hydrants consist of groups of three hydrants at important points. The motor pumps are worked off a dam which is kept filled by the 3 hydrants which are close together, one hydrant being insufficient for the purpose as the draw off by the pump is too great. Before the introduction of group hydrants much time was lost in connecting up two or three hydrants situated some distance apart to feed the dam. 'It is further proposed to pump direct from the mains when possible by means of 3 way collecti heads fitted direct to the suction of the pump, thus avoiding the me fa dam, as the atter entails a good deal of waste of water and loss of pressure in the mains. The only difficulty which still exists as regards water pressure in the City is on the upper levels. These cannot be reached by the Motor Pumps, as there is no motor road to such levels as Queen's Gardens, May Road and Conduit Road. The danger of serious conflagrations on these levels is however slight as the houses are detached or semi-detached. The pressure in the mains is sufficient to confine an outbreak to the premises it starts in. The same remarks apply to the Peak where the fire appliances are confined to Despatch Boxes containing hose and standpipes and nozzles which are worked direct off the mains.

In Kowloon group hydrants have been provided as shown in Appendix D). The pressure is very good indeed in Sham Shui Po (Sai Kok) which is now connected up by a 10" main to the 12" principal feed main. This main is also available in Shanghai Street up to Waterloo Road. Tsim Sha Tsui is as yet not getting the benefit of the 15" main in Coronation Road as this main cannot be connected to the 18" main in Taipo Road until the Nathan end of Coronation Road is driven through the hill. It is anticipated that this connection will be through in about a year. Hunghom is supplied by an 8" main. The principal buildings at Tsim Sha Tsui, e.g., The Kowloon Wharf & Godown Co.'s premises and Holt's Wharf are served by the Fire Floats as are also the Hongkong & Whampoa Dock Co.'s premises. Outlying shipyards are mainly protected by the Fire Floats. Such premises however should have and mostly do have their own fire appliances to supplement the Government Fire Brigade. The owners of premises where there are furnaces, blacksmith's shops and matsheds cannot expect the entire fire protection of their premises to be undertaken by the Fire Brigade. They should have their own fire service as is the case already on all such premises as H.M. Naval Yard, The Kowloon & Whampoa Docks and the Tai Koo Docks.

(IV.)-—Estimate of Cost of Fire Brigade.

The upkeep of the Fire service at present costs $77,243 p.a. made up as follows:-

Personal Emoluments

Other Charges

Total

Special expenditure on new appliances for the year

1921 is estimated at

...

To which $16,600 must be added owing to loss in

exchange and higher prices prevailing now

Total..

$ 40,543 36,700

$ 77,243

$ 11,220

16,600

$ 27,820

The proposed expenditure entailed by the re-organization of the Brigade which includes all changes except Buildings is as follows:--

Personal Emoluments

Other Charges

Total

$ 59,102 49,500

$108,602

56

Special Expenditure in 1922 is estimated at:---

1 new Motor Pump

1 Turntable Ladder

Alteration and addition to Floats Searchlights on Floats

Total

$ 18,000

35,000

2,500

6,000

$ 61,500

Appendix B gives full details of the expenditure proposed. In conclusion I have no hesitation in saying that if the main proposals as to staff and equipment in this report are adopted, there is every reason to believe that the Hongkong Fire Brigade will be capable of performing any duties which it can reasonably be expected to perform and its efficiency should leave no room for adverse comment of any kind.

List of Appendices.

A.-Fire Brigade Estimates 1921.

B.-Estimate of Cost, including Proposals in Report.

C.-Letter from Chief Officer, London Fire Brigade.

J (1) Victoria.

D.—List of Group Hydrants.....(2) Kowloon.

:

22nd June, 1921.

હું

E. D. C. WOLFE, Superintendent, Fire Brigade.

t

:

.

57

ESTIMATES, 1921.

APPENDIX (A).

FIRE BRIGADE.

Approved Estimate. 1920.

Estimate, 1921.

PERSONAL EMOLUMENTS.

1 Assistant Superintendent, at $360

720

360 (1)

1 Engineer

720 (2)

1 Assistant Engineer and Station Officer, (£250 to

£450 by £10 annually)...

2,724

4,815

1 Assistant Station Officer, (£320 to £360 by £10

annually)

(3) (4)

2,514

3,531

4 Engine Drivers, (Chinese), $300 to $360 by $12

annually)

864

1,380 (5)

5 Fire Brigade Chauffeurs, (4 at $360 to $420 and 1

at $420 to $480 by $12 annually)

1,800

:

Do..

Do..

Personal Allowance to 1..

60

2,055 (3) (4)

120 (2)

Language Allowances to 2

36

60

5 1st Class, at $300 each ...

1,500

10 Motor Drivers,

(Europeans)

1,500

(6)

2nd Class, at $240 each ...

1,200

1,200

1 Fitter, ($360 to $420 by $12 annually)

360

420 (3) (4)

1 Blacksmith, ($360 to $420 by $12 annually).

360

363

1 Carpenter, ($360 to $420 by $12 annually)

288

363

(83) (4)

1 Painter, ($360 to $420 by $12 annually)

288

363

1 Sailmaker, ($360 to $420 by $12 annually)

5 Stokers, at $192 each...

288

363

960

960

Do..

Good Conduct Allowances to 5 at $36 each .

180

(8) (7)

Do.,

Rent Allowances, at $12 each

60

2 Overseers of Water Works, at $60 each

1 Inspector of Dangerous Goods

120.

120

120

120 · (6)

24

(8)

I Assistant to Inspector of Dangerous Goods

C Foremen, 1 Chinese at $444, 1 Chinese Assistant Foreman, ($264 to $324 by $12 annually), and 4 Europeans, at $300 each...

1.260

1.948 (9)

Carried forward

(1) Allowance to 1 Chief Inspector of Police acting as Assistant Superintendent retained. Assistant Harbour Master acting as Assistant Superintendent abolished. Considered necessary,

(3) Revised Rates.

4) Free quarters, fuel, and light.

(5) One new post.

6) European members of Police Force.

15,480

21,001

(7) Free single quarters. (8) Not required. (9) One European Foreman at $300. 12 Europeau Firemen at $180 each, 1 Chinese Assistant Foreman, and I] Chinese Firemen required on completion of new Fire Brigade Station at Kowloon in addition to previous staff. The Europeans are members of the Police Force,

58

ESTIMATES, 1921,-Continued.

FIRE BRIGADE,--Continued.

Approved Estimate, 1920.

Estimate, 1921.

$

$

PERSONAL EMOLUMENTS,-Continued.

Brought forward

15,486

21,001

78 Firemen, 37 at $180 each, 9 at $264 each, 29 at

$204 each, and 3 at $30 each

9,168

15,042 (1)

4 Interpreters, at $48 each

192

192

Free Rations to 2 Indian Drivers

173 (2)

Floating Engines.

2 European Foremen and Engine Drivers, at $300

each...

600

600 (3)

1 Engineer, ($540 to $600 by $12 annually)

420

543

2 Engine Drivers, ($360 to $400 by $12 annually)

600

728

2 Coxswains, (1 at $360 to $400 by $12 annually,

and 1 at $300 to $360 by $12 annually) ...

564

668 (4) (5)

3 Stokers, at $192 each ...

576

576

Do.,

Good Conduct Allowances, at $24 each

72

Do.,

Rent Allowances, at $12 each

36

1 2nd Coxswain, at $168

168

Do.,

Good Conduct Allowance

· Do.,

Rent Allowance

24 (6)

12

3 Seamen, at $144 each ...

624

432

Do.,

Good Conduct Allowances, at $24 each

72

Do..

Rent Allowances, at $12 each

36

Do.,

Allowance to 1 for qualifying as Coxswain..

30

(6)

1 Caretaker at Aberdeen, at $144...

144

Do.,

Good Conduct Allowance

Do.,

Rent Allowance

12

(7)

12

Fire Despatch Boxes.

Allowances to Police in charge ..

80

(8)

Total Personal Emoluments...

(1) One European Foreman at $300, 12 European Firemen at $180 each, 1 Chinese Assistant Foreman, and 11 Chinese Firemen required on completion of new Fire Brigade Station at Kowloon in addition to previous staff. The Europeans are members of the Police Force. (2) Entitled to free rations under revised pay scheme. (3) European Member of Police Force.

(4) Revised Rates.

28,340

(5) Free quarters, fuel, and light.

40,543

(6) Title of 1 Seainan altered to 2nd Coxswain on revised

salary.

(7) Required for Fire Float, Aberdeen, (8) Not required.

=

59

ESTIMATES, 1921,—Continued.

FIRE BRIGADE,-Continued.

Approved Estimate, 1920.

Estimate, 1921.

$

-€

$

$

OTHER CHARGES.

Clothing

1,000

3,000 (1)

Do. Volunteer Fire Brigade

200

(2)

Coal and Oil Fuel

6,000

Coolie Hire

Incidental Expenses

:

:

9,000 | (3)

100

100

400

400

Do.

Volunteer Fire Brigade

150

(2)

Light and Electric Fans

700

1,200

Repairs to Land Engines and Plant ...

4,500

5,500

1} (3

·(4)

Repairs to Floating Engines

4,000

5,500 (5)

Stores

8,200

12,000 (6)

Total Other Charges

Total Fire Brigade

SPECIAL EXPENDITURE.

Fire Float for Cheung Chau

1 Motor Pump ..

1 Extension Ladder...

Total Special Expenditure

(1) New boots and serge required.

(2) Not required.

(3) Increased cost and additional machines. (4) New Station at Kowloon.

:

25,250

36,700

53,590

77,243

1,500

8,400

(7)

1,320

(5) Additional Floats at Aberdeen and Cheung Chau.

(6) Additional hose required.

(7) Considered necessary.

11,220

No.

1

60

APPENDIX (B).

ESTIMATE OF COST OF FIRE BRIGADE (BASED ON PRESENT PROPOSALS).

RANK.

PERSONAL EMOLUMENTS.

PAY.

TOTAL.

Chief Officer

Superintendent

£600-£900 by £25

£600

$ 6,000

1.

Engineer

1,200

1

Assistant Engineer & Station

Officer...

£360-£450 by £10

£360

3,600

1.

Station Officer

£320-£360 by £10

£340

3,400

1

Head Foreman

$120-$480

420

3

Foremen

@ $360 p.a. each.......

1,080

20

60

"

"

3

Interpreters

Firemen, 1st Class

2nd

@ $264 p.a. ($22 p.m.)

@ $204 p.a. ($17 p.m.)

1 Grade V $900 to $1,150 by $50.p.a.

VI $450 to $ 850

5,280

12,240

900

6

Telephone Clerks...

ป2

33

1

V $900 to $1,150

"

"

15

VI $450 to $ 850.

900

900

2,250

20

6

Engine Drivers

4

Stokers

1

Motor Mechanic

3

Fitters

1

Carpenter.

1

Painter

1

Sailmaker

Overseers of Water Works

Motor Drivers (F.B. 14-2 per

machine. Motor Ambul- ance 6)

Ambulance Attendants (2 per

machine if trained in 1st Aid)

10

$240 p.a. each

10 Drivers @ $480-$600 p.a. each by $60

(a $360-S420

4,800

多多

27

3,600

1,440

Inspector of Dangerous Goods

Floating Engines.

Engineer in Charge...

2

Engineers...

3

Engine Drivers

3

Coxswains...

3

Stokers, 1st Class

نا

Seamen

1 Caretaker (Aberdeen)

$300-$360 p.a. each by $12 $264 each

$600-$720 by $12

1 @ $480-$600 by $12

2 @ $360-$480 by $12

( $360-$420 by $12.

@ $60 each @ $120...

@ $540-$600 by $12...

I 1st Class @ $384-$456 by $12) 1 2nd (a. $240-8300 by $12. @ $360-$400 by $12... 1@ $360-$400 by $12 }

12 @ $300-$360 by $12 J

@ $240-$300 p.a. each

2 $156 p.a.

4 @ $144 p.a.

( 2 @ $24 p.a.

G.C. Allowance

14 (a 824 p.a.

House Allowance 6 @ $12 p.a. each....... @ $144 pa. G.C. $24.

G.C. 824. R.A. $12...

1.428

1,056

600

480

768

372

372

""

"5

372

>>

"

120

120

552

:

724

1,101

981

756

312

576

48

96

72

180

$ 59,102

Clothing

Coal and Oil Fuel, 10 Machines, (900) Coolie Hire

Incidental Expenses

Light and Electric Fans, (300)

Repairs to Motors, Engines and Plant

Repairs to Floating Engines

Stores -

OTHER CHARGES.

:

4,000

15,000

100

100

1,500

10,000

6,500

12,000

49,500

!

j

- 61

OTHER CHARGES,Continued.

Present Total (1921) P.E. ... ...S

O.C....

40,543 36,700

Proposed Total P.E.

O.C.

59,102 49,500

>>

$

77,243

108,602 Recurrent.

SPECIAL EXPENDITURE.

Estimates 1921 2 Motor Pumps with Extension Ladder

1 Tender Kowloon

21

23

1922 1 Turntable Ladder

"

>

1 Motor Pump (Kowloon)

Provided. ...$15,400 1,500

Sup. Vote.

$16,600

35,000

18,000

Smaller items such as 3 way collecting heads, nozzles with control, electric torches, etc., etc., are included under the head "Stores".

Alterations on Floats are included under the head "Other Charges ".

SPECIAL ITEMS.

1 Searchlight with dynamo and cluster of lights for No. 1 Fire Float

$6,000

A special P.W.D. Supplementary Vote will be required to fit up temporary Fire Brigade premises in Wanchai.

APPENDIX (C).

E. D. C. WOLFE,

Superintendent, Fire Brigade.

LONDON COUNTY

COUNTY COUNCIL.

London Fire Brigade, Headquarters,

Southwark Bridge Road,

London, S.E. I.

15th February, 1921.

E. D. C. WOLFE, Esq.,

Superintendent,

Hongkong Fire Brigade,

Central Police Station,

Hongkong,

China.

DEAR SIR,

Replying to your letter of the 4th February, 1921, I have pleasure in subjoining the information you ask for :--

Turntable Ladders.

The last two actual ladders were purchased in 1914 just prior to the War, direct from Messrs. Magirus, of Ulm-Danube, these being complete with electric elevating gear, etc. The cost was £600 each. The work of mounting the ladders on the chassis was carried out in our own workshops. The chassis (supplied by Messrs. Tilling Stevens of Maidstone, Kent) was a petrol-electric but some alterations were carried out at our direction to make the chassis suitable. For instance the height of the chassis frame had

I

62

to be reduced to not more than 2 feet 6 inches above ground level, which in turn meant special wheels and springs, etc., then again we found that with the engine throttled right down, the generator gave a voltage of 365 which had to be reduced to 65 volts by the aid of a solenoid in order not to overload the elevating Motor.

Generally speaking however this combination has proved quite a success.

The combined cost of ladders and chassis was roughly £2,300.

Since the War Messrs. Magirus have developed the design of their ladders further and the three operations of raising, extension and turning is actuated from one position only (and not three as at present) and moreover the use of electric motors and current is dispensed with, as the whole thing is operated from the propeller shaft of an ordinary petrol chassis. I have had no experience with these myself, but the mechanical features appear commendable.

The length of our ladders when fully extended is 85 feet.

Hook Ladders.

These are made of carefully selected ash, well seasoned, straight grained, and free from knots, the wood-work being made up in our own workshops.

The hook, which is a chrome nickel steel stamping is purchased from Messrs. Vickers, River Don Works, Sheffield, but is milled and finished here. The shroud into which the hook houses is of nickel steel.

The standard length is 13 feet 4 inches, and the weight approximately 26 lbs.

The cost as specially made by us is at present £10 each.

I do not think there would be any difficulty about your purchasing one if you feel so disposed.

Hose Drying Tower.

These are usually triangular in shape, of skeleton design and of a height not less than 60 feet, and can be used as a drill tower.

The hose is raised and lowered by means of a pulley blocks with ropes (called hose whips)―rove through.

No artificial heat is used.

Brass Fireman's Poles.

These are used somewhat extensively here, and are of material assistance to those riders above ground floor, in effecting a smart "turn out."

Our system is “ one pole-one floor," and they are not dangerous if the openings are properly protected. Cost about £60 each floor.

Automatic Station Doors.

Out doors are generally 11 feet wide by 11 feet 6 inches high.

The door is a four fold door with the upper panels glazed, and the lower solid. The hanging leaves are 2 inches thick, and the folding leaves 2 inches.

77

The hinges used for the hanging leaves are "Collins 2 feet 3 inches long and ordinary butts for the folding leaves.

The automatic arrangement is supplied by Messrs. Thomas Try & Co., Ltd., of 37, Great Pulteney Street, London, W. 1.

Out total cost is about £180.

(C

63

Automatic Hose Couplings.

These we very seldom use, in fact only with 3" hose on the floats. The type is the Surelock."

Our ordinary hose couplings are of 23" with a machined round thread of " pitch, which are quite satisfactory for our use.

They are absolutely fool-proof, and have neither springs, catches or other acces- sories, which accumulate defects.

Messrs. Shand Mason & Company, of Upper Ground Street, Blackfriars Road, London, S.E. 1, would no doubt supply you with a sample pair.

No.

SIZE OF MAIN.

8

9

20722

Inches

1

5

12

10.

2340 61-∞∞

12

12

12

12

12

*10

10

"

11

8

12

6

""

13

7

14

.6

15

16

8

17

10

18

6

..19.

10

20

21

22

23

18

со сл

20th May, 1921.

Yours faithfully,

(Sd.) A. R. Dyer,

Chief Officer, L.F.B.

APPENDIX (D).

GROUP HYDRANTS, HONGKONG.

POSITION.

Junction of Wellington Street, Lyndhurst Terrace and Pottinger Street in Pottinger

Street.

Junction of Hollywood Road and Lyndhurst Terrace.

>"

and Aberdeen Street.

In Ladder Street between Square Street and Hollywood Road. Junction of Arbuthnot Road and Caine Road.

Caine Road and Sing Wong Street.

Opposite University Hydraulic Laboratory in Bonham Road.

In Bonham Road close to main gate of University.

Junction of Bonham Road and Pokfulam Road corner of University Road.

""

J

""

Hollywood Road and Tung Street.

and Pound Lane.

and Queen's Road.

Des Voeux Road West and Queen's Street.

Queen's Road and Morrison Street.

Wing Lok Street and Hillier Street.

and Bonham Strand East.

In Des Voeux Road, East of Wardley Street.

In Queen's Road Central opposite City Hall, entrance at corner of Wardley Street. Junction of Ice House Street and Des Vœux Road.

"

"

1

and Chater Road.

Chater Road and Des Voeux Road.

Pedder Street and Queen's Road.

In Wongneichong Road opposite Jockey Club main pony entrance at bend of road.

* Will be fixed within a fortnight.

R. M. HENDERSON,

for Water Authority.

SIZE OF

64

GROUP HYDRANTS, KOWLOON.

POSITION.

Junction of Laichikok Road and Kweilin Street.

and Peiho Street.

"

Yenchow and Yee Kuk Streets.

"

""

and Ki Lung Streets.

Nam Chang and Yee Kuk Streets. and Ki Lung Streets. Kweilin and Apliu Streets. Tungchow and Peiho Streets. Shanghai and Fife Streets.

and Shan Tung Streets. and Cheung Sha Streets.

and Hamilton Streets.

Street and Waterloo Road, by Sincere's Stores.

and Pakhoi Streets.

Street and Jordon Road.

Coronation Road and Argyle Street.

No.

MAIN.

Inches.

1

10

2

10

6

29

"

6

6

"

6

"

6

""

8

6

9

12

""

10

12

"

19

11

12

>>

12

12

"

13

12

"

""

14

7

and Kansu Streets.

"

15

7

"

"

16

7

15

>>

17

15

""

18

15

"

19

15

20

12

"J

"

21

12

""

22

12

""

23

10

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

31

32

33

34

35

36

37

38

39

PENNENDE∞ ∞ ∞ ∞ ∞ ∞ ∞ & co

7

7

7

7

""

7

""

7

7

7

"

"

8

>

""

40

6

"2

""

and Soy Street.

and Pitt Street.

and Man Ming Lane.

by Yaumati School, Public Square Street. Nathan and Gascoigne Roads opposite Chinese Theatre.

Road and Cheong Lok Street.

Austin Road by Canton Road corner.

Canton Road, 100 yards North of Navy Street.

by Navy Street.

100 yards North of Haiphong Road.

at corner of Haiphong Road.

midway between Haiphong and Peking Roads.

Junction of Canton and Peking Roads in Canton Road.

and Salisbury Roads.

Nathan and Haiphong Roads.

and Peking Roads.

Salisbury Road opposite No. 1 Godown, corner of Middle Street, Chatham Road. Junction of Chatham Road and Cooke Street.

""

Bulkeley Street and Gillies Avenue.

and Taku Streets.

Kowloon City Road South East of Hung Hom Police Station.

"

J

29

100 yards North of Green Island Cement Co.'s Entrance. junction with Tokwawan Road.

20th May, 1921.

DISTRICT.

SIZE OF MAINS.

ROAD.

R. M. HENDERSON,

for Water Authority.

Shanghai Street far south as Waterloo Road.

from Waterloo Road to Jordon Road.

(a):

Yaumati.

(b)

Tsim Sha Tsui.

Canton Road.

Salisbury Road.

Chatham Road.

39

13

49

""

Nathan Road.

Peking Road.

Haiphong Road.

Hankow Road from Haiphong Road to Peking Road.

SIZE OF MAIN.

Inches.

12

7

7746O DO GO THES

DISTRICT.

65

—1

SIZE OF MAINS, -Continued.

ROAD.

(b) Contd.

Tsimha Tsui.

Middle Road, western portion of road.

Mody Road.

13

Carnarvon Road.

Cameron Road.

19

Granville Road.

12

(c)

Nathan Road.

(d)

Hung Hom.

"}

??

20th May, 1921.

Nathan Road from Waterloo Road to Gascoigne Road.

"

"

15

Chatham Road.

Gascoigne Road to Austin Road. Austin Road to Salisbury Road.

Bulkley Street to Taku Street.

14

Wuhu Street.

from Taku Street to Dock.

Kowloon City Road to Green Island Cement Co.'s gate.

to K. M. L. 53.

R. M. HENDERSON,

for Water Authority.

SIZE OF MAIN

Inches.

4

4.

4

3

12

10

J

:

119

HONGKONG.

No. 11

1921

REPORT OF THE COMMISSION APPOINTED TO ENQUIRE INTO THE CONDITIONS OF

THE INDUSTRIAL EMPLOYMENT OF CHILDREN IN HONGKONG, AND THE

DESIRABILITY AND FEASIBILITY OF LEGISLATION FOR THE

REGULATION OF SUCH EMPLOYMENT.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency

the Governor, 27th October, 1921.

120

PROCLAMATION

LSR. E. STUBBS,

B

Governor.

Y His Excellency Sir REGINALD EDWARD STUBBS, Knight Commander of the Most Distinguished Order of Saint Michael and Saint George, Governor and Commander-in-Chief of the Colony of Hongkong and its Dependencies and Vice-Admiral of the same.

Whereas by the second section of the Commissioners Powers Ordinance, 1886, it is enacted that the Governor in Council shall have power to nominate and appoint Commissioners under the public seal for the purpose of instituting, making, and conducting any enquiry that may be deemed advisable and for reporting

thereon:

And whereas the Governor-in-Council has deemed it advisable that an enquiry should be instituted, made, and conducted into the conditions of the industrial employment of children in Hongkong, and the desirability and feasibility of legislation for the regulation of such employment.

Now, I, Sir Reginald Edward Stubbs, Knight Commander of the Most distin- guished Order of Saint Michael and Saint George, Governor and Commander-in- Chief of the Colony of Hongkong and its Dependencies, and Vice-Admiral of the same, with the advice and consent of the Executive Council, hereby appoint you:-

The Honourable Mr. Stewart Buckle Carne Ross.

Mr. Chow Shou Son.

Mr. Li Ping.

Dr. Charles William McKenny, M.D., B.CH., B.A.0. Miss Ada Mary Pitts.

The Rev. Herbert Richmond Wells.

to be Commissioners for the purpose of instituting, making, and conducting such enquiry:

And I do also appoint you, the said Mr. Stewart Buckle Carne Ross, to be Chairman of the said Commissioners:

And I do also order and direct that for all or any of the purposes of the said enquiry four Commissioners inclusive of the Chairman shall be and constitute a

quorum:

And I do further, with the advice and consent of the Executive Council, order and direct that the said Commissioners shall have all the powers, rights, and privileges set out in the third section of the said Ordinance:

And I do further require you, the said Commissioners, to report to me your findings in the matter of the said enquiry and your recommendations, at as early a date as possible.

Given under my hand and the Public Seal of the Colony at Victoria, Hong- kong, this 24th day of March, 1921.

By Command,

Sd. CLAUD SEVERN,

Colonial Secretary.

GOD SAVE THE KING.

121

HONGKONG, 24th October, 1921.

SIR,-We, the Undersigned, appointed by virtue of the above proclamation, have the honour to submit the results of our enquiries into the industrial. employ- ment of children in Hongkong, and our recommendations for the regulation of such employment.

1. At the first meeting held on April 6th the following resolutions were adopted

(1) That the meetings of the Commission be held in private.

(2) That before any factories were inspected, managers should be summoned to give evidence as to actual conditions of child labour in their factories (3) That a child should be understood to be a person below the age of

sixteen (16) years, according to the Chinese method of calculation. Reckoned according to the English system, this age is equivalent to fourteen and a half (14) years. [Throughout this report references to ages are, unless otherwise specified, to be taken as calculated on the Chinese system.]

(4) That as the scope of our enquiry covered industrial and factory labour only, we were not expected to make any enquiry with regard either to agricultural or to domestic labour.

PART 1.

Child Labour in Factories.

2. At three subsequent meetings, evidence was taken from representatives of the following factories:-

The M. Y. San, Biscuit Factory,

Causeway Bay.

The Nan Yang Tobacco Company, Causeway Bay.

The Orient Tobacco Factory, Yaumati.

The Kwong Sang Hong Perfumery Factory,

Praya East, Wanchai.

The Kam Hing Knitting Factory, Tsim Sha Tsui.

The Chinese Foreign Knitting Factory, Yaumati.

The Tung Ah Knitting Factory, 600 Shanghai Street, Yaumati.

The Lei Man Hing Knitting Factory, 15 Sai Kung Street, Tsim Sha Tsui.

The Ching Wo Wa Yeong Knitting Factory, 482 Canton Road, Yaumati.

:

122

The Kowloon Dock,

Mr. Chan Pak Pang, Sub-contractor for Ship-building.

The San Shing Lung Ginger Factory, Mong Kok Tsui.

3. Findings. As a result of these interviews it was possible to form certain general conclusions with regard to the conditions of child labour in factories. :-

(1) The extent of the employment of children.—The number of children employed varied according to the nature of the industry. For instance, in some factories, they are largely used because in such work as pack- ing their small and nimble fingers give them a decided advantage over adults. Not only is their out-put greater than that of adults, but when working on time rates, as they do in some factories, they receive smaller wages.

Apart from the question of economic advantage, children are also in some cases employed in factories as an act of grace. Some mothers who work in factories are said to be unable to find homes for their children during their hours of work, and are compelled to take them to the factories. In such cases odd-job work is given to the children, who work near to their mothers, and enter and leave the factories at the same hours.

Employment of this nature is therefore, more a result of social conditions than of factory necessities.

(2) The necessity for child labour.—It is significant that some of the witnesses, including some large employers of children, professed indifference to the presence of children in their factories, and stated that their removal would not cause them more than a temporary inconvenience. Many of them said that they continued to employ young children more in deference to the wishes of parents, than from any decided motive of economic advantage.

(3) Hours of labour.-These appear to be universally excessive, and in few cases amounted to less than seventy (70) a week. One witness stated quite definitely that girls were working thirteen and three quarter (133) hours per day for thirteen (13) days consecutively, after which they had a day's rest. In other words they were working 964 hours and 82 hours in alternate weeks.

With regard to overtime the position is obscure. That overtime is frequently worked in factories is undoubted, but some witnesses seemed desirous of conveying the impression that the attendance of children. during these hours was optional. In theory this may be correct, but in practice the business necessities of the factories and the pressure of needy parents must be such as to leave the children little or no choice. Children are also regularly employed on evening and night shifts. The hours of children employed on night shifts are similar to those worked by them during the daytime, and arrangements are also in force by which they may be changed from one shift to another. (4) Wages.-The most important point in connection with the wages of children is that they are paid almost entirely by piece rates. The few exceptions to this rule that were found were the Docks, certain Glass Factories and the Orient Tobacco Manufactory where the children are paid by time rates. In the last named factory the few children employed were paid at a rate of twelve (12) cents for a working day of nine (9) hours. The piece rates paid vary in different factories, though by working longer hours a child appears to be able in some cases to earn as much as thirty (30) cents a day. One girl was found who appeared to make as much as $15 a month.

...

X

་་

1

123

In view of the Chinese family system, whereby children generally hand over their earnings to their parents or guardians, the actual rates paid are not in themselves of great importance. It is when they are considered in comparison with the wages paid to adults, and as a means of depressing the general standard of remuneration, that the rates become important. As the terms of reference do not include a con- sideration of adult wages, we do not propose to enter into detail on this question, except to note that the low wages paid to children must depress the rates of wages paid to adults for similar work.

In some factories deductions are made from wages on account of bad conduct. Information on this question was not easy to obtain, and the general impression gained was that factory discipline was left largely in the hands of foremen and subordinates.

In the M. Y. San Biscuit Factory, where personal cleanliness in workers is most desirable, special regulations have been introduced to deal with hairdressing and manicuring.

Offences against these regulations are punishable according to a fixed schedule of fines. In view of the special circumstances of this factory the practice seems to be necessary and unobjectionable, but it should be subject to oversight by Inspectors.

(5) Apprenticeship.-In the course of the interviews few indications of any general system of apprenticeship were noticed. When children reach the age of sixteen (16) or thereabouts and the deftness which justified their original employment has begun to disappear, their places must be taken by those younger in years. Satisfactory evidence as to the fate of those displaced was difficult to obtain, and the general conclusion drawn was that conditions in this respect varied in different factories. In some cases the older children may be discharged and in others they may be given different work in the same factory. Girls are not in the same position as boys, in view both of the possibility of marriage, and of the definite demand in some factories for female. workers between the ages of sixteen (16) and twenty. (20). Many girls are doubtless able to change from one factory to another with little or no inconvenience; but the same opportunities are not open to all, and no evidence was forthcoming of any general organisation for assisting the flow of labour from one industry to another. The difficulties in this connection are aggravated by the keen competition for places in factories. Many of them have waiting lists and it is not reasonable to suppose that workers of sixteen (16) or seventeen (17), whose health may have suffered from long hours of work in confined spaces, would be preferred for work which can only be satisfactorily done by able- bodied adults.

In the docks and ship-building yards boys are extensively employed, especially on the work of boiler chipping. One of the witnesses stated that boys were absolutely necessary for this work as men were unable to enter the man-holes of the boilers. It was admitted that the work was hard and that many of the boys were not physically fitted for it, but at the same time those who were able to stand it were sometimes able to qualify for more skilled employment.

(6) Factory Amenities. No provision seems to have been made in factories for rest rooms, eating rooms, and wash houses, and the arrangements for medical attention in case of accidents are of the scantiest. In few cases were work people allowed to eat their midday meal in any part of the factory building, and much inconvenience appears to be caused them in this respect. An exception to this state of things is Mr. Li Ping's factory at Shamshuipo, where a school is provided for small children during the working hours of their mothers.

:

:

:

i

124

4. The evidence obtained at the interviews mentioned in section 2 left no doubt as to the necessity for legislation. It was felt that further interviews would only result in the accumulation of information of the same type, and that the next step should be to visit the factories, and test the accuracy of the knowledge already gained.

The following factories or works in the Causeway Bay district were visited by the Commission as a whole :-

The Nan Yang Tobacco Factory.

The M. Y. San Glass Factory.

The Kwong Sang Hong Glass Factory.

The Hing Wah Paste Manufactory.

The Kwong Kei Engineering Works.

The Meh Wah Knitting and Dyeing Factory.

The following factories or works were also visited by in lividual members of the Commission.

The M. Y. San Biscuit Factory, Wanchai.

The Kwong Sang Hong Perfumery Factory, Wanchai.

The Kowloon Docks.

The Taikoo Docks.

The Lei Man Hing Knitting Factory.

The Tung Ah Knitting Factory, Yaumati.

The Oi Kwan Cloth Factory, Shamshuipo.

5. As a result of these visits the following additional findings were made:-

(1) That the information supplied to the Commission was not in all cases accurate, and that there had been a tendency of witnesses to under- estimate the number of children employed. In view of the casual nature of much of the child labour of the Colony it cannot be easy to obtain an accurate estimate of its extent.

(2) That in glass factories the labour conditions were unsatisfactory. The work was done mostly by boys, whose daily tasks including three or four short intervals for meals, last from 6 a.m. to 11 p.m., and who are paid at the rate of $1.00 per head per month in addition to their food. The sanitary conditions of these factories are unhealthy, the temperature is raised by the heat of the furnaces to an injuriously high level, the air is vitiated by gases and filled with floating particles of glass, and the physique of the workers is con- sequently poor. In explanation of these conditions it is stated that the boys are apprentices, who are only paid a nominal wage as they have the privilege of learning a trade, and that they are provided with free board and lodging. It is difficult to believe that the boys in these factories are in reality apprentices, for they greatly outnumbered the men, who appeared rather to fill the role of foremen workers. From the general appearance of the boys it seemed unlikely that they would all live long enough or be healthy enough to take men's work. The provision of lodging in and around the factory precincts cannot be considered as other than a doubtful advantage. When all allowances are made, we are of opinion that the labour conditions in these factories are thoroughly bad.

(3) That in engineering works the boys employed fall into two classes.—

Those boys employed in the shops are genuine apprentices, whf serve for definite periods, and who have every chance of becoming skilled workmen. All are directly employed by the Companies, are of good physique and work reasonable hours. Labour of this kind is not very objectionable.

In the rougher and unskilled classes of work, the conditions are entirely different, for the labour is not employed directly by the Companies, but is provided by a system of sub-contracting. At the

*

-

:

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interview mentioned in Section 3 (5) it was stated that boys were absolutely necessary for much of this unskilled labour. In the work of boilerchipping, for example, we were given to understand that boiler man-holes were so small that they could only be entered by boys.

After seeing the work in progress we are not convinced of the validity of this argument. We have reason to believe that in British ship-building yards adults are employed on this work, and we can see no reason other than cheapness why boys should be employed in Hongkong. It is only fair to say that the physique of the boy's seen by some of us was good, but on the other hand such work could not be done by weaklings, and in the words of one of the employers-" It either makes them, or breaks them.". It is probable that the law of the survival of the fittest operates with unusual severity in this work, but owing to the almost inexhaustible supply of labour the necessary standard of physical fitness can be maintained.

The strain on the undeveloped boy under sixteen (16) (English 14) is too great, and it should not be continued. Chinese boys at sixteen (16) years of age are generally small.

(4) That the system of sub-contracting was prevalent in all classes of

unskilled labour.

The system appears to be a potent influence in depressing the standard of living, for the sub-contractor is usually concerned with both work and labour, and is compelled to make up by reductions in wages the cuts in prices due to successive transferences of the contract. Every addition to the chain of sub-contractors tends to react unfavourably on the earnings of labour. While the system continues, the Colony's labour cannot be expected to be in a satisfactory condition, but as it affects adults even more widely than children, we would exceed the terms of our reference if we made any recommendations in regard to it.

(5) That many children now employed in factories have been brought into

the Colony from the country specially for work of this kind.

In the course of the inspections this question was repeatedly asked, and in many cases it was found that the children had been brought from the country by some relative, who was then working in the factory, and that they had been in the Colony for periods varying from a few months to a few years. This indicates the existence of considerable financial inducements to workers in Hongkong to find posts for their relatives from the interior of China, and is of importance in regard to the popular argument that any measure of social reform in Hongkong would only result in an influx of needy people from the country eager to take advantage of the new conditions. If social reform meant money for nothing, some such result would probably take place; but if the right kind of economic inducement is held out to the people in the interior, a more desirable type of labourer could be secured.

6. As a result of the interviews with factory managers, and the visits to factories previously described, we are of opinion that legislation should be introduc- ed to give effect to the following recommendations :-

(1) That all employers of children be compelled to register then. This recommendation is meant to apply not only to factories and workshops but when practicable to employers of casual labour.

(2) That no child under the age of eleven (11) (Chinese) years be employed in any factory, or in any form of casual labour, and that in any case arising under this legislation, the onus of proving the age of the child be upon the employer.

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One of the Commissioners, the Rev. Mr. Wells, wishes the age to be thirteen (13) and not eleven (11) as above, and wishes the age of labour to be increased by one year every succeeding year, or as soon as possible, until child labour is entirely abolished.

This recommendation does not apply to children engaged in genuine domestic work, but it does apply to children employed in carrying paraphernalia in Chinese processions.

(3) That the hours of work for children do not exceed fifty-four (54) per week, that children be prohibited from working at any time more than five (5) hours consecutively, and that they be ensured one day's rest in every seven (7) days.

(4) That children be not employed between the hours of 7 p.m. and 6 a.m. No question of overtime or night shifts should be allowed to override this ruling, and the rulings laid down in sub-section (3).

We think that half time work should be encouraged and that children should be educated during the other half time if possible. Even if children have not been working during the day they should not be employed between the hours of 7 p.m. and 6 a.m. The intermit- tent sleep, which is the usual lot of workers on night shifts, is especially harmful to the physique of children.

One of the Commissioners, Mr. Chow Shou Son, is of the opinion that children over fourteen (14) should be permitted to work between the hours of 7 p.m. and 9 p.m. provided that they have done no work during the day.

(5) That for the reasons given in Section 5 (2) children be not employed

in glass factories.

(6) That for the reasons given in Section 5 (3) children be not employed

in engineering works on the work of boiler chipping.

One of the Commissioners, Mr. Chow Shou Son, thinks that boys over fourteen (14) should be permitted to work at boiler chipping if their physical condition satisfies the Inspectors.

(7) That children be not employed in dangerous trades.

(8) That employers be compelled to provide accommodation, which can be used by workers during meal hours, and as a rest house for children taken to factories by their mothers; and further that they be compelled to provide suitable dressings and first aid appliances, which can be used in cases of accident, and to equip their factories with approved sanitary conveniences.

(9) That Inspectors be appointed for all classes of child labour, as the regulations proposed are obviously dependent on a system of inspection. Our intention is to avoid introducing a series of factory regulations which will merely lead on the one hand to "squeeze," and on the other to Police Court prosecutions; and it is, therefore, essential that Inspectors should be persons of standing. Unless knowledge, tact and sympathy are employed in the work of inspection, the system of regulation may degenerate into a number of irritating prosecutions that will do little good, and that will tend to the estrangement of the various sections of the community. We are convinced that the larger and more reputable factory owners will do their best to make effective any suggestions which the Government may make; and the efforts of the Inspectors should be directed to co-operating with them in making the regulations known in the lesser factories. Only by educative co- operation can the best results be obtained from these proposals.

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We think that the ranks of the Inspectors should include Chinese representatives as well as British, women as well as men, and voluntary workers as well as Government servants. We do not propose to draw up the details of this organisation, as we are not sufficiently well in- formed of the work of the various Government Departments, and suggest therefore, that this is a matter with which the Government is more fitted to deal.

7. We feel that an explanation is needed of the serious responsibility that we have taken upon ourselves in recommending for children, a scale of hours of labour considerably in excess of that of male adult workers in Europe. Our proposals are indeed a compromise between the present "laissez-faire ” `attitude,✔ and the more drastic method of removing children immediately from the factories. Of these two extremes the former is unthinkable, and we are not prepared to recommend the latter without also recommending some extensive scheme of social reform. As the data necessary for such a scheme could only be obtained after a searching enquiry into industrial conditions as a whole and into the financial resources of the Colony, a more moderate proposal of regulation appears to be preferable as a temporary measure. It will be pointed out that although the proposals reduce the working hours of children by periods varying from 25% to 40% on the old levels, yet as children are paid by piece rates they will suffer a corresponding reduction in wages. It will also be stated that the children them-✔ selves like the work, and that to reduce their hours of labour will cause unnecessary hardship in families dependent on their earnings. All these arguments can be paralleled from the history of the Factory Acts controversy in England in the forties of last century, and the reply is that the question is essentially moral and not only economic. A child is not a correct judge of its own welfare.

8. The feasibility of compulsory education has been examined, but owing to the difference of opinion on the question it has not been found possible to come to any unanimous conclusion. A memorandum on compulsory education was submitted by the Rev. H. R. Wells and at a meeting held on May 23rd the Director of Education stated the difficulties of carrying out these suggestions- such as those of providing accommodation, of registering children, and of arranging for the staffing and inspection of the schools. These difficulties are real, but at the same time the opinion may be hazarded that they are inherent in every scheme of compulsory education, and that as they have been overcome in other countries, they could, if the community had the will to do so, be overcome in Hongkong. Mr. Wells' memorandum and the statement of the Director of Education are printed in Appendix 2.

We do not agree with the frequently expressed opinion that an extension of educational facilities in Hongkong would be followed by a rush of people from the interior to take advantage of them. It is a common experience of countries that have adopted compulsory education that opposition may be expected from those for whose benefit the scheme is intended. There is no reason to suppose that the experience of Hongkong would be different, and on this ground the tendency would rather be towards an exodus of present inhabitants than to an influx of newcomers, and it would have the effect of stopping the immigration of child labourers which is very large.

One of the Commissioners Mr. Chow Shou Son however, does not share this view, as evidenced by the attached extracts from a Memorandum by him which forms Appendix 4.

In view of the fact that many children must earn their living by manual labour, it is suggested that steps be taken to provide an education for them suited to their special needs.

Such an education would least a "primary education." and the bearing of intellect on

comprise training in manual work in addition to at The dignity of manual labour should be emphasized manual work explained.

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In the course of time we hope that adult labour will replace that of children in factories, so that the Government should be asked either to undertake the necessary industrial training or to encourage private enterprise in this direction. Meanwhile schools for "half timers," such as those which have been successfully started in India, might be tried.

In Shanghai a Chinese lady has had good results with such methods. In hes "Industrial Home" the children do four (4) hours manual work and four (4) hourr study, while the remainder of the day is devoted to recreation.

Such or similar methods might be attempted in Hongkong.

PART II.

Children Employed in Casual Labour.

9. The employment of children outside factories in casual and unskilled work, and especially in burden bearing, is the most difficult problem which we have had to face. Reliable information is extremely difficult to procure, the work is done by the poorest members of the community, who have often no fixed place of abode, and the place of work is constantly being changed. The

The eyes of European inhabitants are naturally drawn to those who carry bricks and other materials to the Peak and Hill Districts, but the same kind of labour is carried on all over the Colony. Children are freely employed in this work; and investigation has shown. that even those as young as seven (7) or eight (8) years are not exempted. The physical condition of many of the women who have been long engaged in this work is even worse than that of the children, and judging from this we are driven to the conclusion that no form of work exercises such a degrading effect upon the workers as labour of this kind. We are unable to suggest any regula- tions which will suffice to alter this state of things, and in our opinion the real solution of the question lies in Mechanical Transport. As far as the Peak is concerned the approaching completion of the motor road should bring this method of transport within the range of possibility. A recent answer to a question in the Legislative Council indicates that considerable economy in the speed and cost of the transport of all articles to the Peak could be effected by the introduction of motor transport, and that the present system of manual transport is slow, cumbrous and wasteful.

10. As the development indicated in the last section will take time, we propose as a temporary measure, that all building and engineering contracts entered into in the Colony should contain clauses prohibiting the employment of children under the age of thirteen (13) years, and regulating the weights carried by child workers. We do not pretend that this proposal covers the whole ground, or that it will provide the remedy needed; but we think that it will do good in causing contractors to realise their responsibilities to labour, in fostering co-operation between them and Inspectors, and in gathering information about a section of the community of whom little is known. As a scale of weights suitable for children over the age of thirteen (13) and below that of sixteen (16), it is suggested that twenty (20) catties is a suitable minimum, and that no load should exceed forty (40) catties. For purposes of comparison it may be added that one small brick is roughly equivalent to 23 catties, so that the number of bricks that a child may carry should vary from eight to sixteen (8 to 16). Between these limits the load would be adjusted to the age and physical fitness of the child. It is most desirable that this standard should not be interpreted too literally. The figures are not in any sense final, and are only meant to afford a rough indication of the carrying capacity of children of different ages. What must at all costs be avoided is the harrying of labourers by petty officials. These suggestions can only result in good if Inspectors and contractors work in close co-operation. In this connec- tion we are greatly indebted to Mr. Li Ping, the result of whose investigations is to be found in Appendix 3 (A).

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11. In brief our recommendations are as follows:-

(1) That all employers of children be compelled to register them, and that for this purpose a child be considered as a person below the age of sixteen (16) years (Chinese), and that when possible this should be applied to employers of casual labour.

(2) That no child under the age of eleven (11) be employed in any factory, nor should any child under thirteen (13) be employed in any form of casual labour, and that the onus of proving the age of a child be on the employer. One of the Commissioners Rev. Mr. Wells is not in

entire agreement, (vide Section 6 (2) ).

(3) That the hours of work for children do not exceed fifty-four (54) per week; that children do not at any time work more than five (5) hours consecutively; that they be ensured one day's rest in every seven (7) days; and that where and when possible some form of half time labour be encouraged.

(4) That children be not employed during the hours between 7 p.m. and 6 a.m. One of the Commissioner Mr. Chow Shou Son is not in entire agreement, (vide Section 6 (4)).

(5) That children be not employed in glass factories.

(6) That children be not employed in the work of boiler chipping. One of the Commissioners Mr. Chow Shou Son is not in entire agreement, (vide Section 6 (6) ).

(7) That children be not employed in dangerous trades.

(8) The employers be compelled to provide rest rooms and suitable sanitary conveniences for workers and to make due provision for medical aid in case of accidents.

(9) That Inspectors be appointed for all classes of child labour.

(10) That in building and engineering contracts articles be inserted

regulating the weights to be carried by children.

We do not intend that the above series of recommendations be regarded as hard and fast rules which admit of no deviation. They represent no more than a beginning, of which the ultimate object must be the entire removal of children rfom factories. The speed with which this object is accomplished will depend upon the spirit in which factory legislation, if approved, is administered.

12. In conclusion we wish to express our best thanks to all who have helped us in our investigations.

13. The following four (4) Appendices are provided:-

Minutes of evidence taken on April 13th and 20th and on May 4th. Statement of working conditions in the Kowloon Dock.

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(2) Memorandum on compulsory education by Rev. H. R. Wells, and

statement by the Director of Education, at the meeting on May 23rd.

(3) (A.) Memorandum by Mr. Li Ping on the casual employment of

children.

(B.) Memorandum by Rev. H. R. Wells on the same subject.

(4) Extract from a Memorandum by Mr. Chow Shou Son.

We have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your obedient servants,

S. B. C. ROSS,

CHOW SHOU SON,

LI PING,

C. W. McKENNY,

A. M. PITTS,

H. R. WELLS.

THE HONOURABLE,

THE COLONIAL SECRETARY,

HONGKONG.

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Appendix 1.

Evidence taken on 13th and 20th April, 1921.

TSU HOO CHUEN, ASST. SECRETARY OF M.Y. SAN'S BISCUIT FACTORY.

We employ about 600 hands altogether. We have 30 boys and 20 girls. Most of these are from 14 to 16; we do not take children under 14. During week- days men start at 7 a.m.--boys work from 9-12.30 and 1.30-5. Girls are day workers and get from 10 cents to 15 cents a day. Boys are paid from $2 to $10 a month, and also get board and lodging. The girls are engaged in pasting labels and picking out bad biscuits, while the boys clean up the work rooms.

The pay of a woman is from 15 cents to 30 cents a day. We have no apprentices. Children do not work on Sundays. Children do not work overtime. We have a private school for the boys, in which the hours are from 7 to 9 in the evening, except on Saturday and Sunday. Children of the employees are also allowed to attend this school. It would not affect us much if children were not allowed to work.

We keep a register of workers. We have 3 female and 2 male overseers to look after the women and girls. Smoking and spitting in the factory is punishable by a fine of 1 cent for each offence. After three fines a person is liable to be dismissed. We have a manicuring department, and if any girl does not go there and is found with dirty nails she is liable to a fine of 1 cent. All men workers have quarters at the factory.

*

FUNG WAI SING-MANAGER, KWONG SANG HONG PERFUMERY FACTORY.

We employ about 300 people, all of whom are women. We only employ girls over 17-we employ no children in the scent factory. In our glass factory we employ :-

2 boys of 13

6

10

8

years

14 17

>>

15

100 men are employed.

22

"J

16

""

27

""

These boys are apprentices--they learn for three years-they get $1 a month as well as board and lodging-they are glass blowers. Men are paid from $8 to $18 with food and lodging. Boys work 10 hours a day, and also on Sundays. Women in the scent factory work from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

MR. SELLING, MANAGER, ORIENT TOBACCO FACTORY--MONG KOK TSUI.

We employ from 500 to 600 hands, of whom 24 are children. girls and 6 boys. The ages are as follows:-

1 of 12 years

9 from 12 to 14 years

14

14 to 16

31

There are 18

The children are day workers, they earn about 12 cents a day. They work 9 hours a day for 6 days a week. The children are factory. I prefer children as we can train them. Sunday work. They work from 7-12 and 1-5.

the children of adults in our There is no overtime and no Most of our old hands came

to us as girls and were trained by us. We have wages lists and could send re- turns. The pay of an adult is from 50 cents to $1 a day.

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The ages

CHAN PUI SHING, MANAGER, NAN YANG TOBACCO FACTORY. We have two factories, (1) 199 Wan Tsai Road, (2) Caroline Road, So Kun Po. We employ about 244 female children, but no male children. are as follows:-

4 girls of 11 years

12

12

21

37

13

>>

29

39

79

14

12

""

>>

112

15

27

19

They work from 8 to 9 hours a day. From 7-12 and 1-4 or 5 o'clock. From 20 to 30 cents a day is the average pay of both a child and an adult. The children are employed in packing. Every 15th day and 30th is a holiday. Apart from applying for holidays they work for 7 days a week. Children work the same hours as adults. Overtime can be worked from 7-9 p.m. From 4-8 cents is the overtime pay. There is plenty of labour. Wage sheets are kept and signed by the girls, deductions are recorded, and the wage sheets are open to inspection. There is a waiting list of over a hundred. We will not take children under 10 years

of age.

CHENG HING YIN-MANAGER OF KAM HING KNITTING FACTORY. We employ 110 girls and 48 boys, and 900 adults.

The ages are as follows:-

21 girls from 11 to 12

39

12 to 14

})

50

14 to 16

""

>>

to 6.15 p.in.

They have every other Sunday Girls do light work. Girls can

The children work from 6.45 a.m. to 11.30 a.m. and 12 noon to 6.15 and on night work from 6.45 p.m. to 9.30 p.m. Children and adults work the same hours. make about 40 cents a day if over 16, and under 16 about 20 cents. There is no night work on Wednesday or Sunday, or from 4th to 7th moon.

off

Wages are paid

twice monthly. Children are paid direct. Women have their midday meals in the factory.

Evidence taken at Meeting on 4th May, 1921.

CHAN KWOK WA YEUNG OR THE CHINESE FOREIGN KNITTING FACTORY AT 484, CANTON ROAD, YAUMATI. CHEUNG TAI MING: SECRETARY.

We employ about two hundred hands with about half a dozen children. They come with their mothers and do odd jobs. They are paid by the job and work six days a week. They work for eleven and a half hours a day. There is no night work or work on Sunday. Our work would not be hindered if we did not employ children.

>

CHAN PAK PANG, KOWLOON DOCK, SUB-CONTRACTOR FOR SHIPBUILDING.

I employ from 100 to 300 men, depending on the amount of work. I employ from 50 to 60 women coolies--I employ boys for chip ing, sometimes I employ from 40 to 50 boys, the youngest of whom are about eleven years, and the rest eleven years and upwards. They work from 7-12 and 1-5, and the wages are from 30 to 40 cents a day. Double overtime is paid for night

Double overtime is paid for night work and Sunday work. The night shift lasts for 12 hours and wages are paid at double rates. Boys are also employed at painting, carpentering, boiler-making, and as copper- smiths. There are 33 under 16 and 147 over 16 working as copper-smiths. I have no apprentices.

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Tung A Knitting Factory, 6 ShanGHAI STREET, Mong Kok Tsui.

KỌ CHUNG TONG: MANAGER.

We employ 220 persons: About 35 males, 190 women, and 12 girls, all over 12 years, make up that total.

We employ no boys. They work from 6.30-12 and 1-6. We do night work four or five times a week. We sometimes work on Sundays. The women and children are paid by the piece. Women get about 40 cents a day. It would not affect our work if we had no children; they come with their mothers and beg for work. We pay half overtime for night work to persons paid by the day. I think 80 p.c. would like to work on Sunday. About 50 p.c. would like to do night work. No one is forced to do night work.

LI MAN HING Kwok, SaikunG STREET, YAUMATI, KNITTING FACTORY FOR HOSIERY. SIU YAM WING: ASSISTANT MANAGER.

We employ about 300 persons-51 men, 280 women, and 27 children of whom none are under 13 years of age. They work from 6-12 and 1-7. There is no Sunday work and no night work. The girls make cardboard boxes, do knitting and other light work. All hands work the same hours. We pay by the piece and by the day. The pay is from 15 cents per day upwards. The children get from 15 cents to 30 cents a day. The children are brought by the mothers. It would not affect us if there were no children working.

SAN SHING LUNG GINGER FACTORY, 255 RECLAMATION STREET,

MONGKOK. LI SHAI WING: MANAGer.

We employ 32 men and 60 women. We have no girls under 18 or 19 years of age. The hours are from 6-12 and 1-6. There is very seldom any night work except at Christmas and such times, when. they work from 7-11 p.m. The pay of a woman is about $5.40 a month without food, and a man from $6 to $10 a month besides his food.

134

STATEMENT OF WORKING CONDITIONS IN THE

KOWLOON DOCK.

Regulations of working hours and wages of employees of Mr. Chan Pak Pang, sub-contractor for shipbuilding in the Kowloon Dock.

Translation.

Girl workers-none.

Boy workers-about 30 or 40.

Ages of boy workers-about 3 to 5 boys are over 13 years of age.

No girls and boys working together.

1. Working hours for boys-each day from 7 a.m. to 12 noon, and from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m.-9 hours in all.

2. The wages for boys are about 30 cents a day, which are paid to them directly.

3. The boys work under the professional men-workers, looking after the instruments and the burning of the rivets.

4. The boys are paid according to the number of days they work.

5. The wages for boy workers are about 30 cents a day, and for men workers $2.60 to $2.70 a day.

6. Men and boy workers all work for the same number of hours.

7. Boys working at night and on Sundays are paid double pay.

8. Boys working on Saturdays are paid a full day's wage.

9. Boys working over the limit of 9 hours are paid an extra wage in pro- portion to the extra hours they work.

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Appendix 2.

The Education of Chinese Children in Hongkong.

In this Colony there is an Education Department well fitted to deal with the education of all classes of children. Schools are provided for many classes, and though from time to time complaints may have arisen about individual schools, the general work of the schools under Government direction is satisfactory.

From the reports of the Director of Education it is evident that during the past decade there has been very considerable advance in many directions, and a larger number of children have come under the scheme of education arranged for by the Department.

All schools in Victoria and Kowloon are registered, and thus it becomes in- creasingly possible for the Director of Education to control this branch of the Colony's industry.

The Committee of enquiry into the economic resources of the Colony does not seem to have taken up the theory that child life is potentially one of the principal economic resources. An educated people will progress, an uneducated people will deteriorate.

It is very evident that there is not yet adequate provision for the education of all children, because children swarm in our streets, even at times when they ought to be in school, and the question of the education of these children is one that is constantly in the minds of some people.

An examination into the state of affairs in regard to the children, reveals the fact that child labour is being exploited far beyond what should be allowed in a modern city. In factory and workshop, business house and office, on steamers and launches, in domestic service and such casual labour as burden bearing, there are multitudes of children employed, and besides these many may be seen playing in the streets, often gambling, or going about in bands, birdnesting, or insect hunting, or for other purposes, and incidentally many of them are probably developing into the future criminal classes, and the inmates of our prisons. Already they have a keen eye for the police and the detective.

It is therefore, evident that the Education Department should be further ex- tended, and larger powers should be given to the Director of Education to compel the attendance of children in schools provided under Government supervision. At the discretion of the Director of Education, perhaps in conjunction with the Secretary for Chinese Affairs, certain children in special cases might be exempted from full attendance at school, but, in such cases, guarantees should be secured that such children are not allowed to work so many hours a day that they would be too tired to benefit from classes of instruction, which they should be compelled to attend.

If all children were immediately withdrawn from their present employment. it might be a hardship to the employers, the children and their parents, but these cases could be met by the permission of the Director of Education.

A question that will naturally arise is that of the cost of such education to the Colony, and that no doubt is an important one, but the financial problem is not impossible of solution. In all probability the result to the Colony in its developed resources would far outweigh the small amount spent on this most important project.

The Education Department at present spends large sums on English and Anglo-Chinese education, but these would not enter, at least for the present, into the calculation, as the education required now is elementary Chinese education. It appears from the report for 1918 that the amount spent per head on this type of education was less than ten dollars, and if the number of children of school age

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who are not yet in school should be about 30,000, the cost of educating them on the same basis would be not more than $300,000 per annum, including presumably the cost of supervision.

In order to be able to carry out this work successfully, it might be necessary to find trustworthy bodies willing to undertake the work under the control of the department. A further need would be normal classes for the purpose of training the teachers on proper lines in suitable centres.

Taking the number of scholars as 30,000, and the average number of scholars taught by one teacher as thirty, it would mean that one thousand teachers must be found. This would involve a great task in the way of training, before the teachers were up to what may be regarded as Government standards, but with patience and perseverance the task could be accomplished. The work need not wait on this account, as teachers could be trained as they are at present, while doing their work, perhaps in evening classes.

Compulsory education is not yet un fait accompli in Canton or elsewhere in China, but it is in the minds of many, and Hongkong cannot afford to be behind- hand in such a matter. It has been pointed out that this Colony has been a pioneer in education, and it should retain that position, being a leader rather than a follower. As mentioned above, there is a strong body of people in Canton and in the province generally whose aim is to introduce compulsory education. They see that a country cannot advance much without education, and so are awake to the need for this.

The present is a very good time for starting such a system in this Colony many Chinese are ready for such a movement, and the Census has just been taken and from the results of that, it will be possible to get a fairly accurate estimate of the number of children of school age in the Colony. It would be easy to fix ages for the purpose of education as all Chinese ages are changed at the Chinese New Year. Chinese 8-16 would approximate to English 6-14 years of age.

It would be possible to inform all people coming to the Colony hereafter that they must make provision for the education of their children. There might be difficulties in the matter, but they would not be unsurmountable.

By means of such a system, children who were bad could be tried out in different schools, and dealt with so that they might not be a menace to the peace of the Colony.

It is not likely that many children would be brought to the Colony in order to secure the benefit of such primary education as is mentioned here, and the condition that might be imposed on new arrivals, to provide for the education of their children, would be an effective barrier.

These remarks are offered as a preliminary statement for discussion in con- nection with the problems of the child life of Hongkong.

(Sgd.) H. R. WELLS.

Hongkong, 10th May, 1921.

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Meeting held on the 23rd May, 1921.

THE HON. MR. E. A. IRVING, DIRECTOR OF EDUCATION,

ATTENDED AND GAVE EVIDENCE.

Mr. Iriving: I am not quite clear as to what particular point I am asked to make a statement on. The most striking point of this document is the suggestion that we should have compulsory education here. Well, Sir, if it were suggested to make education here compulsory to-morrow or next year the following main points would have to be considered. In the first place we should have to know how many children were not in attendance at our schools, which information we shall get as soon as the census report is published. It has been suggested by Mr. Wells, I do not know whether his guess is correct or not, that the number of school-less children is 30,000, and if we take this high figure it will mean that we shall have to have something like 1,000 more schools, allowing 30 children to a school.

The

The first point to be considered is the money. I have been working at some figures as to what the cost of the Government's assistance should be to schools- I say assistance', for I recognise that a certain amount should under existing cir- cumstances be raised from fees, but if education is going to be made compulsory, I do not see how fees can be charged. However, taking my figure on the basis of children subscribing something, I would put the cost of teaching these 30.000 children at $10.00 each a year, and that to begin with is $300,000 a year. next point to be considered is the question of housing these schools. It would need 1,000 flats. That would trench somewhat severely on the housing accom- modation of the Colony, and this seems to me in the present shortage a very serious point. However, that is not a point in which I as Director of Education, au very much interested. Now, to come to more technical points, is the question of staff. At present I find the chief obstacle to vernacular education is the shortage of teachers. I have long impressed this view on the Government, and that is why two normal schools were opened, one for girls, which I hope by the end of next year will be turning out something like 40 teachers annually. That however, would be quite insufficient to deal with a sudden demand for a thousand teachers, and we should have to depend upon teachers without any experience or training whatever, many of whom would no doubt be worse than the worst in the existing schools, and this is saying a great deal. I do say that unless you can supply teachers reasonably trained, the pupils in your new schools will profit very little. A further point is the question of inspection, and this is a very serious point indeed. I have at present two excellent inspectors, one happens to be a Chinese, a graduate of Cambridge, but English or Chinese, men with the necessary qualifica- tions are not easy to get. They must have a good education, a knowledge of the theory of teaching, and before they are of any particular use, a very thorough knowledge of Hongkong Schools; I mean they must know what can be expected of such schools, which they can only learn by visiting hundreds of them, and they must, personally know the actual teachers in the various schools. Before I heard anything about this Commission I wrote to Government that we were in a precarious state, because I had only two Inspectors to cope with the great increase both here and in the New Territories, and in the event of a breakdown of either of them we should be in great difficulties, and I have asked the Government to provide next year for one additional man or possibly two. But my real difficulty is to get such men, and if it was a question of doubling or trebling the work in Hongkong (and compulsory education would mean more than doubling and trebling), I have simply not got the men and I do not know where I could get them. These are the principal difficulties I should have to face when introducing compulsory education in Hongkong. In the first place there is the money to be provided, in the second place there is a lack of schools, teachers and inspectors.

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:

;

5

:

:

138

Appendix 3 (A).

Investigation with regard to Child Labour.

In my recent investigations with regard to Child Labour, I observed that the work taken up by Children in the Colony, on the whole, is quite moderate, except that it appears to me, the work in glass factories is not at all good for children. In manufacturing glass, children are engaged in doing the work of "blowing," which is very unsuitable for them, especially as they are working almost the whole day long. They work in front of a hot fire; and so have not enough fresh air. Such work is very unhygienic for children and naturally affects their health. Therefore, the employment of children in this kind of work should be strictly prohibited.

As stated in my previous report, the number of children engaged in carrying building materials is approximately 1,000 of whom the majority, as I have observed, carry over-loads. This over-load work can easily be stopped, but it is not advisable to stop children entirely from doing the work of carrying. When any contractor enters into a contract with the Public Works Department and the War Department, or with the Civil Engineers, Architects and Surveyors in private practice on certain building construction, it should be mentioned in such contract that the Contractor should not employ any children under 11 years of age (Chinese). Similarly, it should be mentioned in permits issued by the Building Authority and the Secretary for Chinese Affairs; but children whose ages are over 11 (Chinese) should be allowed to carry loads in accordance with the following scale:-

Children 11 years of age can carry loads of not more than 22 catties.

12

24

""

"

19

"2

13

26

""

""

59

"

"1

14-15

40

""

"

""

""

In speaking of the introduction of compulsory Education in the Colony, I do appreciate the ideas of Rev. Mr. Wells.

Personally I would say it is an excellent scheme, but I am afraid it cannot be so easily adopted, because first of all it requires a tremendous sum of money to run the scheme, and secondly it is rather difficult to find sufficient school accommodation. I would therefore propose to open free night schools.

At present I can think of 7 day schools which are quite suitable for this purpose.

(1) The Saiyingpun School, (2) Queen's College, (3) Belilios School (4) Ellis Kadoorie School, (5) Wanchai School, (6) Yaumati School, and (7) Belilios Reformatory.

Both Chinese and English to be taught for 3 hours nightly from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. except Sunday night. Children between 8 and 11 years of age are admitted to Chinese classes and those between 12 and 15 are admitted to English classes. These schools can accommodate about, 2,400 children. For every 40, 1 teacher is required or 60 teachers altogether, of whom 30 are engaged to teach English and 30 to teach Chinese.

The expenditure for these night schools is roughly estimated as follows:-

30 teachers (teaching Chinese), salary per year at $300

""

""

30 14 servants

English),

>;

""

Books, etc. for 2,400 students

"?

Electric light expenses per year for 7 schools

Sundry expenses

7

Roughly say $30,000.

400-

"3

$ 9,000. 12,000.

150-

2,100.

2.

4,800.

150-

1,050.

120--

840.

"}

The Government is requested to contribute this amount.

$29,790.

*

"

139

These Schools are to be looked after by the Committee of this Commission under the control of the Director of Education. Meantime, I suggest that these be started first, whereas Compulsory Education is to be carefully considered later.

It is said that there are about 30,000 children who need education, and if this number is correct and Compulsory Education is introduced, a sum of about two million dollars is needed.

To pay rent for 1 flat per year

To pay salary for 1 teacher per year

To pay salary for 1 servant per year.. To pay books, etc. for 30 students at $1

pay for Boarding for 30 students at $36..

Το

$360.00

360.00

120.00

30.00

1,080.00

$1,950.00

1,000 schools

..$1,950,000.00

Per year.

When Compulsory Education is actually introduced we must also pay for the boarding of the children, because they cannot spare time to work and earn their living. Even if this item, the amount to be paid for their boarding is not included, a sum of at least $870,000 a year would be required.

(Sgd.) LI PING.

27th May, 1921.

.

:

.

.

!

!

140

Appendix 3 (B).

A member of the Commission Rev. Mr. Wells made a visit of inspection to one of the halts where people carrying loads to the Peak were resting.

He reports as follows:-

"Having heard that children were carrying loads to the Peak, I made a visit to one of their halts. A number of women and children were sitting down, and my attention was first called to a boy who seemed to be very weak, if not ill. He was eating a cake, but seemed to have little appetite for it, the time was about 9.30 a.m. His mother was sitting beside him, evidently somewhat anxious about him, I asked his age, and she said about nine or ten (Chinese reckoning). On being asked which burden the boy was carrying, she pointed to many loads and said "that one," adding "there are many more, ask them." I looked about and saw a very small boy, he was eight years of age, (English reckoning, say about 6 years), he was with his mother, and she said that he must work, or he would not have food to eat. The mother was a widow and came to Hongkong to get work, and finding that the boy could also get work, had set him to earn what he could. He had two loads of twenty two catties (29 lbs. each), these loads he took one by one, carrying each a short distance, and then returning for the other. Further enquiry elicited information to the effect that he had his breakfast at 5 a.m., and began to carry at a place near the central market, on the sea front, at six a.un., and had got so far, his work would be finished at about five p.m. He could earn eight cents for a day's work, carrying fifty eight pounds (forty four catties) weight of coal to the Peak. It was stated that he could only work about ten days a month, and that women could only work about twenty days. The child earned eight cents a day, or eighty cents a month, but he had to get some lunch, and it was said that this might cost three cents a day, so that his clear earn- ings would only be about fifty cents a month. This sum seems hardly sufficient to pay for medicine for him, if, as seems probable, he should have occasional sicknesses. It seems to be a wicked way to use the time and energy of such a child.

Other boys and girls of ten, eleven and twelve years of age were in the neigh- bourhood at work, it was said that a twelve year old girl could earn twelve cents a day. A general conversation with men and women was held, and it transpired that they get eighteen cents for a load of one hundred catties (133 lbs.), and that a man could carry two loads, and a women about 150 catties, the man would earn thirty-six (36) cents a day, and a women in good health about twenty-seven (27)

cents.

The problem of the formulation of a plan for the protection of these children is a difficult one to solve. It seems as if the small load system might be stopped at the starting point, contractors and employers should not be allowed to make up child burdens. The lowest load might be fixed at fifty catties, and they might be informed that only strong children of full age should be allowed to carry the materials or goods. If necessary the system might be attacked gradually, and the weight and age limit be reached by slower steps.

If young children can earn so little, they would be much better employed in schools where they could learn a little about books, and what they teach, and if it were possible to give them some industrial training as part of their school train- ing so much the better. It might be possible to teach a little about the cultivation of flowers and plants, the manufacture of small toys, or even elementary work that would be useful for their future life as artisans, and even perhaps enable them to earn a few cents a day after a short time."

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141

Appendix 4.

General.

I should like, in conclusion, to make a few general observations in elaboration of those contained in the draft report. At the outset, let me say that I am as anxious as anyone else in this Colony to see the hard lot of some of the poor children in this Colony improved, and I am sure that all the Chinese here will do everything possible towards that end. But we must take facts as they exist, and not allow our sentiments to affect our considered judgement. Owing to its proximity to the Kwongtung Province, there is a constant flow of Chinese of all classes into this Colony, most of whom come here in order to find work to keep themselves from starvation. The present conditions of the two Kwongs further aggravates the situation. The children who are earning wages are essential to the "scheme of things" in the daily life of the poor, and without them it would mean so much less income to feed the family. One would like to cut down as much as possible the working hours of these children, but unfortunately there is a limit beyond which one cannot go without doing more harm than good. As a rule these children do piece-work: they are paid according to the amount of hours of work they put in. If, for instance, you halve their working hours of, say, 70 hours a week, you would reduce their income by 50%; and where there is more than one child earning such wages it may mean the loss of the wherewithal to pay

rent.

There has been a great deal of talk about "sweated labour" in Hongkong. Except a few isolated cases which one may come across here and there, the work which the children in the Colony are doing cannot be so described. The work is hard no doubt, but where it constitutes the alternative to starvation, it should be allowed, if greater harm is not to be wrought. The struggle for existence in China is intense, and the children who work in the interior are mostly worse off than those earning wages in Hongkong. That is why the Commission do not recommend the total prohibition of child labour, but rather suggest its regulation.

This brings me to the question of compulsory education in the Colony. The idea is very attractive, but a little consideration will show that it cannot be worked. Situated, geographically, as Hongkong is, with its door ever open to the teeming millions from China, the problem of accommodation alone will be found to be most difficult of solution. Then there would be the question of expense which would be enormous, and the difficulty of training the large number of teachers that would be required. Even if all these difficulties could be surmounted, then there would be the question of feeding and clothing the thousands of children who would have to give up their work, upon which they at present depend for their mainten- ance, in order to attend school. I should like, however, to see every child receive some education, if possible; but such should be achieved not by legislation but by voluntary attendance at Continuation Classes in the evening or on Sundays.

(Signed) CHOW SHOU SON.

"

HONGKONG.

JURORS LIST FOR 1921.

No. 1921

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor, 3rd March, 1921.

HONGKONG

TO WIT.

}

NAME IN FULL.

I. SPECIAL JURORS.

OCCUPATION.

ADDRESS.

Adams, Francis Robert John .. Civil Engineer, Little, Adams & Wood,

Arnold, John

Arthur, Thomas

Bailey, William Seybourne Barlow, Arthur Howard Barton, George Winstanley Bell, William Henry Bennett, Harold Sydney

Berindoague, Louis Bernard, Dallas Gerald

Mercer...... Bird, Herbert William Bird, Lennox Godfrey Brown, William Samuel Cameron, Duncan Haywood Chapman, Edward John Chan Siu-ki....................

Chow Shou-son

Compton, Albert Henry Coppin, Alan Griffiths

Cousland, Alexander Stark

Dalglish Curry, George Percy David, Archibald,

Dodwell, George Melville...... Douglas, James Tory Dowley, Walter Arthur.. Dyer, Robert Morton...... Ede, Charles Montague.....

Edkins, George Thomas

Money....

Ellis, Oswald Isaac Ferguson, Archibald Hill

Forbes, Andrew

Fuller,

Denman

Gibbs, Lawrence.

Goggin, William George Graham, Frank

Graham, James William Griffin, Albert Edwin Grimble, Charles Frederick

George Gubbay, Aaron Sessoon

Secretary, HK., C. & M. Steamboat Co.,

Ld.,

Marine Surveyor, Goddard and Douglas, Managing Director, W. S. Bailey & Co., Ld., Manager, HK. & S'hai Bank, Merchant, Douglas, Lapraik & Co., Assistant, Asiatic Petroleum Co., Ld., Manager, China & Japan Telephone &

Electric Co., L.d., .................

Manager, Banque de l'Indo-Chine,.

The Peak Hotel.

Hongkong Hotel.

9 The Peak.

5 Kowloon City Road. Queen's Road Central. 20 Des Voeux Road Central. 34 The Peak.

41 The Peak. Prince's Building.

Merchant, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Ld., East Point. Architect, Palmer & Turner,

Architect, Palmer & Turner,

Secretary, HK.& K'loon W. & G. Co., Ld.,. Assistant Manager, Standard Oil Co., Partner, Linstead & Davis,...

...

Manager, Chun On Fire Ince. Co., Ld., Merchant, Bank of East Asia, Ld................ Manager, D. Sassoon & Co., Ld.,... Manager for Hongkong & South China,

Nestlé & Anglo-Swiss Milk Co.,

Merchant, Alex. Ross & Co., Secretary, Gas Co.,

Merchant, S. J. David & Co., Director, Dodwell & Co., Ld................ Marine Surveyor, Goddard & Douglas, Exchange Broker,

Chief Manager, Dock Co.,

General Manager, Union Ince. Socty. of

Canton, Ld.,

Manager, Butterfield & Swire, Manager, S. J. David.& Co., Ld.,

Sub-Manager, Chartered Bank of I. A. &

China,

Merchant, Harry Wicking & Co., Organist,

Civil Engineer, Denison, Ram & Gibbs,. Manager, Bank Line, Ld., Manager, HK. Electric Co., Ld.,. Works Manager, Dock Co.,..... Civil Engineer, Leigh & Orange,

Ship Broker, 1 Prince's Building, Merchant, E. D. Sassoon & Co.,

Hongkong Club.

111 The Peak.

1 Chatham Road, Kowloon. 18 Peak Road.

Alexandra Building.

2-8 Queen's Road West. 7 Excelsior Terrace.

122 The Peak.

Kingsclere, Kennedy Road.

5 Tregunter Mansions.

2 Aimai Villas, Kowloon. On premises.

Queen's Building.

Peak Hotel.

Room 6 Post Office Building. Kowloon Docks,

Hongkong Hotel.

112 The Peak.

6 Peak Road.

Queen's Road Central. Prince's Building. Hongkong Hotel.

Tai Po.

4 Queen's Garden.

Dunottar, 81 The Peak. Kowloon Docks.

147 The Peak.

Luginsland, West, 78 Peak Road. 10 Macdonnell Road.

NAME IN FULL.

2

OCCUPATION.

A EODE.

Gubbay, Charles Sassoon

Hancock, Harry Cyril Rider... Hancock, Herbert Richard

Budd

Hay, Charles Herbert

Philpott

Ho Kom-tong

Hogg, George...

Hughes, John Owen Humphreys, Henry

Kotewall, Robert Hormus.. Lammert, George Philip Lammert, Herbert Alexander Lang, Archibald Orr....... Lauder, Paul

Leask, William Laughtou.. Little, Colborne.. Logan, William

Lowe, Arthur Rylands

Mackenzie, Alexander Maitland, Francis Ng Hon-tsz... Nicholson, William Ormiston, Evan Pang Siu-hang

Pattenden, Walter Leslie Pearce, Thomas Ernest... Plummer, John Archibald.. Roberts, William Ewart Rodgers, Robert Russell, Donald Oscar Sassoon, Moses Silas Seth, John Hennessey

Silva-Netto, Antonio Pereira

Batalha

Sinclair, Walter Smith, George Morton Smith, Horace Percy.

Smyth, Frank.... Sutherland, Robert Taggart, James Harper. Templeton, David Tester, Percy

Walker, William Bradley Wallace, James Hislop

Watson, Nowell Lake

White, Henry Percy Williams, Ernest Alfred

Mountfort

Young, George Macdonald

Merchant, E. D. Sassoon & Co.,

10 Macdonnell Road.

Bill & Bullion Broker, A. S. Hancock & Co., Prince's Building.

Broker, Benjamin & Potts,

Deputy General Manager, Union Ince.

Socty. of Canton, Ld.,

Banker,

Manager, International Banking Corpora-

tion,

Merchant, Harry Wicking & Co., Partner, J. D. Humphreys & Son, HK. Mercantile Co., Ld., Auctioneer, Lammert Bros.,. Auctioneer,

Merchant, Gibb, Livingston & Co.,

Asst., Union Ince. Socty, of Canton, Ld.,. Civil Engineer, Leigh & Orange, Architect,

Broker, W. Logan & Co.,..

Chartered Accountant, Lowe, Bingham &

Matthews,

Manager, Arthur & Co., Partner, Linstead & Davis, Merchant,

Assistant, Butterfield & Swire,

Bill & Bullion Broker, Stewart Bros., Managing Director, Gande, Price & Co.,

Ld..

Manager, W. R. Loxley & Co., Merchant, J. D. Hutchison & Co., . Merchant, Bradley & Co., Ld., Secretary, HK. Tramway Co., Ld., Manager, Russo-Asiatic Bank, Partner, W. R. Loxley & Co., Exchange Broker,......

Incorporated Accountant, Percy Smith,

Seth & Fleming,

Merchant, Silva-Netto & Co., Sub-Manager, Reiss & Co., Sub-Manager, Dodwell & Co., Ld.,

Chartered Accountant, Perey Smith, Seth

& Fleming, ....

Broker, Vernon & Smyth,

Assistant, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Ld., Secretary & Manager, Hongkong Hotel, . Manager, Taikoo Sugar Refinery. Share Broker, Wright & Hornby, General Manager, Standard Oil Co., General Agent, Canadian Pacific Ocean

Services, Ld.,

General Manager, Asiatic Petroleum Co.,

Ld.,

Merchant, Douglas, Lapraik & Co.,

Incorporated Accountant, Lowe, Bingham

& Matthews, ..... Sub-Manager, Butterfield & Swire,

Cheltondale, 97 The Peak.

Queen's Building.

7 Caine Road.

131 The Peak. Prince's Building.

1 Tregunter Mansions. Queen's Road Central. Duddell Street.

78 The Peak.

St. George's Building. Queen's Building.

121 The Peak.

14 Humphreys Building, Kowloon.. 10 Ice House Street.

65 The Peak.

154 The Peak. Alexander Building. Houtze & Co., Ltd. 111 The Peak. 8 The Peak.

6 Queen's Road.

Mountain View, The Peak. 106 The Peak. 164 The Peak. Peak Hotel.

137 The Peak. 131 The Peak.

10 Ice House Street.

2 Peak Road.

63 Robinson Road.

72 The Peak. On premises.

67 The Peak.

5 Queens' Road Central, | 129 The Peak. On premises.

Cornhill, Quarry Bay. 95 The Peak. 148 The Peak,

Eggesford, 124 The Peak.

134 The Peak. 3 Morrison Hill.

Kingsclere, Kennedy Road. 75 The Peak.

NAME IN FULL.

3

II.-COMMON JURORS.

OCCUPATION.

ADDRESS.

A

Aalders, Hendrick Gerrit

Abbas, Abbib

Abbas, Abdul Hamid

Abbas, Abdule Rahim Abbey, Douglas....

Abdoolrahim, Abdoolhoosen Abesser, Peter

Abuey, Evelyn Edward de

Wivelslie...

Abraham, Albert Abraham, Edgar Shooker... Abraham, Ezra

Abraham, John Nacalio Abraham, Reuben

Acheson, Archibald Brabayor

Sparrow

Adams, Charles Gafton.. Agassiz, James Schato Ainslie, Ernest James Aitken, Samuel Robert Alabaster, James Wilfred.. Alarakia, Ismail Mohamed Alderson, Edward William Alison, David Albert Goldhill Allan, David Joseph ... Allan, John Niven Rodger Allen, Henry Alexander Allison, Alfred

Allgood, Henry Patrick.... Almeida, Antonio Amadeo d'.

Almeida, Apolinario Antonio d'

Almeida, Julio Hyndman d' Alvares, Alvaro Antonio Alves, Alberto Eduardo de

Selavisa

Alves, Alvaro Alvares Alves, Antonio Louis Alves, Arthur Alvaro Alves, Carlos Francisco Xavier Alves, José Lourenço...... Amery, Samuel Chant Paddon Andel, Alexander William Van Anderson, Charles Graham Anderson, Charles W.

Anderson, Elmer Edwin

Auderson, George Anderson, John Edgar Anderson, Johu Fraser

Anderson, William. Andrade, Francisco Antonio, Ernesto Antonio, Francisco Ezechiel... Aquino, Eneas Goulart d'..............]

Aquino, José Goulart d' Archbutt, Geoffrey Samuel Archer, Charles Percival Arculli, Abdul Kader el.. Arculli, Ebrahim el Arculli, Omar el.... Armstrong, John Henry

William.

Secretary, Java-China-Japan-Lijn,.........

13. Macdonnell Road.

Assistant, Lowe, Bingham and Matthews, 3 Queen's Road Central. 'Acting Secretary, Hongkong Club, 137 Queen's Road East.

Asst., HK. & K'loon W. & G. Co., Ld., | 4 Morrison Hill Road. Chartered Acct., Butterfield & Swire,...... Architect,

Assistant, Transmarina Trading Co.,.....

Agent, Thos. Cook & Sou, Chief Clerk, Gas Co.,

Manager, S. J. David & Co., Ld., Broker, Wright & Hornby, ... Storekeeper, Brossard, Mopin & Co., Merchant, N. S. Moses & Co.,

Hongkong Club,

34 Queen's Road Central. 5 Shelley Street.

On premises.

Gas Works, Hongkong. Kingsclere Lodge.

4 Aimai Villas, Kowloon. King's Building,

8 Torres Buildings, Kowloon.

On premises.

Director, British American Tobacco Co... Hongkong Club. Assistant, HK. & S'hai Bauk, Cashier, Russo Asiatic Bank, Assistant, Lane, Crawford & Co., Wharf Manager, Holt's Wharf,

Asst., Union Ince. Socty. o! Canton, Ld., Clerk, Chartered Bank of I. A. & C.,........... Lane, Crawford & Co.,....... Timekeeper, Taikoo Dockyard, Storekeeper, Dock Co., Draughtsman, Dock Co., Clerk, Hongkong Hotel, Clerk, HK. Electric Co., Ld., Wharfinger, Holt's Wharf,

Assistant, Netherlands India Commercial

Bank,

Assistant, Fumigating & Disinfecting

Bureau, L.,

Assistant, Standard Oil Co., Assistant, Soares & Co.,

I Peace Avenue, Ho Mun Tin. 56A Nathan Road, Kowloon. Knutsford Hotel, Kowloon. On premises.

21 Cochrane Street.

10B Orient Buildings, Kowloon. Quarry Bay.

Kowloon Docks, Kowloon Docks.

5 Morton Terrace.

22 Shaukiwan Road. Holt's Wharf, Kowloon.

Des Voeux Road Central.

2 Caine Road.

11 Humphreys Avenue, Kowloon, 14 Lochiel Terrace, Kowloon.

Clerk, Union Ince. Socty. of Cauton, Ld., . On premises. Freight and General Broker,

Merchant, 5 Queen's Road Central,

Scarteen, 11 Macdonnell Road. 41 Granville Road, Kowloon.

On premises.

8 Mosque Junction. Quarry Bay,

Asst., Union Ince. Socty, of Canton, Ld., Queen's Building. Clerk, HK. & S'hai Bank, Assistant, Bradley & Co., Foreman, Taikoo Dockyard, Manager, Holland China Trading Co., Assistant, Union Trading Co., Ed., Purch sing Agent, Canadian

Ocean Services, Ld.,

Pacific

Chief Clerk, The Admiral Line Pacific

Steamship Co.,

Port Captain Pacific Mail S.S. Co., Assistant, Anderson Music Co., Ld., Supt. of Works, HK. Steel Foundry

Co., Ltd.,

Manager, Anderson Music Co., Ld., Engineer, China Vegetable Oil Co., Clerk, Mercantile Bank of India, Clerk, Banque de l'Indo-Chine, Assistant, Netherlands-India Commercial

Bank,

.... Assistant, C. E. Warren & Co.,

Asst., Union Ince. Socty, of Canton, Ld., Asst., HK. & K'loon W. & G. Co., Ld.,... A, K. Arculli

Merchant, Arculli Bros., Merchant, Arculli Bros.,

Assistant, Butterfield & Swire,

11 Chatham Road, Kowloon, 5 College View.

Hongkong Hotel.

6 Knutsford Terrace, Kowloon, On premises.

14 Knutsford Terrace, Kowloon.

St. George's Building.

18 Broadwood Road, Happy Valley. 119 Belchers Street, Kennedy Town. 14 Mosque Street. Prince's Building.

Des Voeux Road Central.

2 Victoria View, Kowloon. Queen's Building. 60 Hollywood Road. 16 Kennedy Road. 20 Leighton Hill Road. 20 Leighton Hill Road.

94 The Peak.

NAME IN FULL.

4

OCCUPATION.

ADDRESS.

A-Continued.

Arnott, Thomas.....

Arthur, George Duncan

MacPherson

Ashcroft, John Atkinson, Clarke

Atwell, Richard Erskine Aucott, Ernest Frank Austin, David ..................

Austin, Noel John

Austin, Reginald Mein Avenell, George, William Azedo, José Dias

Azevedo, Alexandre

Antonio d'

Works Manager, Green Island Cement

Co., L.,

flok Un Works.

Asst., Union Ince. Socty. of Canton, Ld., On premises. Foreman, Taikoo Dockyard, Shipwright, Dock Co.,

Accountant, Asiatic Petroleum Co., Ld.,... Assistant, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Ld., . Foreman, Taikoo Dockyard,

Sub-Acct., Chartered Bank of I. A. & C., . Assistant, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Ld.,. Assistant, Lane, Crawford & Co., Assistant, Dock Co.,

Assistant, Netherlands Trading Society,

Azevedo, Mario Amaro Jesus d' Clerk, HK. & S'hai Bank, Azevedo, Victor Felix d'

B

Backhouse, James Herbert..... Bainbrigge, Anthony John Bagram, John Theophilus...... Baker, Samuel

Banker, George

Banner, Douglas Habbard..... Bannerman, George Henry

Maclean

Baptista, Augusto Antonio Baptista, Cezar Octaviano... Baptista, Duarte Cezario Baptista, Joaquim

Baptista, Rodolfo Deogenes Barclay, S. H.

Barker, Edward Pierpoint................. Barker, William Leander Lee Barr, James

Barr, John Hunter.... Barradas, Arthur Oscar.. Barradas, Duarte Augusto... Barradas, Fernando Augusto... Barradas, José Augusto.... Barradas, Myriel Francisco

d'Assis.....

Barradas, Vasco Maria Barretto, Alberto Demée Barretto, Frederico Francisco. Barretto, José Conde.... Barretto, Octavio Demée Barros, Antão Vasques... Barros, Horacio Frederico. Barrow, John Edward Bartholomew, John Barton, Lancelot Alexander Basa, Ricardo ........

Baskett, Powell Evelyn...... Bassford, William Faulkner Basto, Bernardino

Basto, Charles Henrique Basto, Joao José

Bateman, Thomas

Bates, Lewis Stanway

Baxter, Harry Gordon

Baxter, William.......

Baylis, Phillip N.

Beacham, Roland Richard...... Beaufort, Jean de

Asst., Canadian Pacific Ocean Services, Ld.,

Director, Manners & Backhouse, Ld., Holland Pacific Trading Co., Assistant, Benjamin & Potts, Chief Engineer, China Sugar Refining

Co., Ld.,

Merchant, Banker & Co., Ltd., Assistant, Butterfield & Swire,

Installation and Power Engineer, Electric

Co., Ld.,

Asst., Netherlands-IndiaCommercial Bank, Clerk, HK. & S'hai Bank, Assistant, Reiss & Co.,......,

Assistant, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Ld., Clerk, HK. & S'hai Bank,

Tanner, W. G. Humphreys & Co....... Foreman, Taikoo Dockyard....... Assistant, Standard Oil Co.,

Quarry Bay. Kowloon Docks. King's Building. 9 Queen's Gardens. Quarry Bay.

Chartered Bank Mess. East Point Mess. On premises. Kowloon Docks.

Queen's Road Central. On premises.

11 Belilios Terrace.

5 Queen's Road Central. Orient Buildings, Yaumati. Marble Hall, Conduit Road.

On premises.

11 Hankow Road, Kowloon. On premises.

Hongkong Hotel.

Des Voeux Road Central. On premises.

5 Lyeemoon Villas, Kowloon. 51 Elgin Street. On premises. Mataukok Taniery. Quarry Bay.

St. George's House.

Mining Engineer, W. R. Loxley & Co.,...] Hongkong Hotel. Foreman, Gas Co.,

Clerk, HK. & S'hai Bank,

Assistant, Asiatic Petroleum Co., Ltd., Assistant, Asiatic Petroleum Co., Ld., Asst., Union Ince. Socty. of Canton, Ld.,

Assistant, Dodwell & Co., Ld.,

Gas Works, Hongkong. On premises.

8 Robinson Road.

6 Upper Mosque Terrace. Queen's Building.

Queen's Building.

18 Chatham Road, Kowloon. 21 Belilios Terrace. 19 Belilios Terrace.

Asst., Netherlands-India Commercial Bank, Des Voeux Road Central. Merchant, J. M. da Rocha & Co., Assistant, Shewan, Tomes & Co., Assistant, Union Trading Co., La., Assistant, Botelho Bros...... Bookkeeper, Bradley & Co., Ld., Clerk, W. G. Humphreys & Co.,..... Shift Engineer, HK. Engineer Co., Ltd., Assistant, Reiss & Co.......

Asst. Manager, W. G. Humphreys & Co., Merchant, R. Basa,

Assistant, A. S. Watson & Co., Ltd.,......... Sugar Boiler, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Broker, Basto & Co.,

Architect, Little, Adams & Wood, Asst., Union Ince. Socty. of Canton, Ld., Storekeeper, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Assistant, Mackintosh & Co., Ld.,................. Sub-Acct., Chartered Bank of I.A. & C., Engineer, Dock Co.,.............

Bookkeeper, W. G. Humphreys & Co., ... Assistant, Butterfield & Swire, Accountant, Banque Industrielle de Chine,

33 Granville Road, Kowloon. 27 Mosque Street.

3 Punjab Buildings, Kowloon. 1 Moreton Terrace. 72 The Peak.

13 Chatham Road, Kowloon. 7 Caine Road.

Aerated Water Factory, North Point. Quarry Bay.

4 Hankow Road, Kowloon. Bay View, Kowloon.

On premises.

Quarry Bay.

Empress Lodge, Kowloon. Chartered Bank Mess. Kowloon Docks. Mataukok Tannery. 8 Mody Road, Kowloon. 2 Peak Road.

:

NAME IN FULL.

5

OCCUPATION.

ADDRESS.

?

B-Continued.

Beaurepaire, Herbert Nicholas Beck, Ernest

Bell, Eager Charles Bell, Michael Robson Bell, William Denny Beltrão, Manuel Roza Benjamin, Vivian Benson, Charles Henry.. Bentley, John

Berentson, John Schumann Berg, Sverre

Bernardo, Joaquim Natividade Best, Henry Cadogan.. Bevan, Temple Percy

Molesworth

Bevington, Francis...... Beyer, Erling Theodor

Bion, Cyril Walter Madge.. Bird, George Birkett, Henry Bitting, Samuel Telden Blackburn, Leslie James Blacking, Leslie Reed Blair, David Keay Blake, Martin

Blaker, Brian Oscar Blaker, Cedric

Blason, Charles Henry

Blenkiron, Duncan.... Bliss, Arthur William Boereboom, Theodorus

Everardus Antonius

Bois, Adrein Rene Lambelet du Boissevain, Gustaaf Adolf

Lucas...

Boisson, Felix

Bolton, Andrew

Bond, Charles l'ond, Charles

Bone, David Boyd McKenzie. Booten, Herbert de Vere

Campell

Botelho, Alvaro Alberto Botelho, Augusto Cezar

Botelho, Julio Cecilio Botelho, Noe Ulysses

Botelho, Pedro Vicente Heitor.. Bouliol, Francis

Boulton, Sydney

Boyd, James

Boyes, José Antonio

Boysen, Andries.... Brackenridge, Wilfred Bradbury, Bertram Walter

Braga, José Pedro

Brameid, Thomas

Branch, Benjamino Roper Braun, Theodor

Brayfield, Thomas Henry

Gordon

Brewer, Charles D.

Brewer, Noel Instone

Bridger, Herbert Ben

Bridger, Richard Leslie......

Sub-Manager, Hongkong Hotel,.. Assistant, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Engineer, Asiatic Petroleum Co., Ld., Dranghtsman, Dock Co., Foreman, Taikoo Dockyard, Clerk, Messageries Maritimes, Manager, J. R. Michael & Co., Manager, American Express Co., Asst., Union Ince. Socty. of Canton, Ld., Assistant, Thoresen & Co, Dept.-Manager, Thoresen & Co.,...... Assistant, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Ld., Union Engineering Co.,

2

Merchant, Asiatic Petroleum Co., Ld., Merchant, Bradley & Co., Ld.,

Asst., Canadian Pacific Ocean Services, Ld., Draughtsman, Dock Co., Watchman, Taikoo Dockyard,. Broker, Moxou & Taylor,

Sub-Accountant, International Bank, Manager, Gas Co., Kowloon Works, Asst. Acet., Mercantile Bank of India, Accountant, Lowe, Bingham & Matthews, Storekeeper, Taikoo Dockyard, Patuer, Gilman & Co.,...... Director, Gilman & Co.,

Chartered Accountant, Butterfield &

Swire,

Assistant, Dock Co..........

Assistant, Dock Co.,.....

Chief Accountant, Netherlands Trading

Socty.,

Accountant, Russo-Asiatic Bank,

Assistant, Java-China-Japan-Lijn, Assistant, Dodwell & Co., Ld., Engineer, Dock Co.,

Manager, Gande, Price & Co., Ld., Assistant, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Draughtsman, Taikoo Dockyard,

North-West Trading Co., Ld., Assistant, Shewan, Tomes & Co.,

Assistant, Fumigating and Disinfecting

Bureau, Ld.,

Clerk, Botelho Bros., Assistant, Standard Oil Co.,.. Merchant, Botelho Bros., Cashier, Bank Industrielle de Chine, Foreman of Works, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Sub-Acct., Chartered Bank of I. A. & C..... Assistant, China Provident Loan &

Mortgage Co., Ld.,....... Bookkeeper, Netherlands Trading Socty., Assistant, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Ld.,. Superintendent, Dairy Farm I. & C. S.

Co., Ltd.,

Printer,

Architect, Little. Adams & Wood,.

Official Measurer,

Hongkong Hotel. Quarry Bay.

18 Broadwood Road. Kowloon Docks. Quarry Bay.

25 Cameron Road, Kowloon. 1 Prince's Building. Hongkong Hotel. Queen's Building. Station Hotel, Kowloon. 12 Conduit Road. 17 Robinson Road. 14 Cuduit Road.

10 Queen's Gardens. 44 The Peak.

22 Ashley Road, Kowloon. Kowloon Docks. Quarry Bay.

10 Ice House Street. Kingsclere, Kennedy Road. Gas Works, Kowloon. Craigieburn, The Peak. 3 Queen's Road Central. Quarry Bay.

St. George's House. On premises.

140 The Peak. Kowloon Docks, Kowloon Docks.

5 Queen's Road Central. 22 Humphreys Buildings.

2 Aimai Villas, Kowloon. On premises. Kowloon Docks.

6 Queen's Road Central. Quarry Bay.

Quarry Bay.

29A Kennedy Road.

11 Humphreys Avenue, Kowloon.

2 Caine Road.

5 On Hing Terrace.

6 Chancery Lane.

35 Granville Road, Kowloon. Wyndham Hotel.

Quarry Bay. Chartered Bank Mess.

27 Shelley Street. Queen's Road Central. Ewo Junior Mess.

8 Broadwood Terrace.

37 Robinson Road.

12 Chatham Road, Kowloon.

Foreman, China Sugar Refining Co., Ld., | On premises.

Consulting Engineer, Carmichael & Clarke,

Ld., ..

Representative Staff, W. R. Grace & Co., Bookseller, Brewer & Co.,

Assistant Manager, Electric Co., Ld., Partner, Lane, Crawford & Co.,

Bristow, Richard Woodhouse... Manager, Seamen's Institute,

Tai Po.

Carlton Hotel, Hongkong. 13 Beacons field Arcade.

19 The Peak. Stewart Terrace. Praya East.

6

NAME IN FULL.

OCCUPATION.

ADDRESS.

B-Continued.

Broc, Pierre Michel Joseph

Jacques de Brockman, Allen Clark Brook, Joshua

Brooke, Charles Albert

Bannerman

Browell, William Gregson. Brown, Alexander Forsyth

Brown, Charles Bernard Brown, Charles Marsh Brown, Charles William Brown, Edric Ellsworth Brown, George Ernest Brown, James Walter Brown, John Brown, William Brown, Wilson

Bruce, Robert....

Buchanan, Gilbert

Accountant, Banque de l'Indo-Chine,.. Sub-Accountant, International Bank,............. Marine Representative, Vacuum Oil Co.,

Partner, Pentreath & Co.,

Chief Ship Draughtsman, Dock Co., Sugar Boiler, China Sugar Refining Co.,

Ld.,

Chartered Accountant, Linstead & Davis, Merchant, Asiatic Petroleum Co, Ld., Assistant Manager, Taikoo Dockyard, Assistant, Robert Dollar Co., Foreman, Taikoo Dockyard, Assistant, H. Skott & Co.,

Boilermaker, Dock Co.,

Clerk, Taikoo Dockyard,

Joiner, Dock Co.,

Assistant, HK. & S'hai Bank,..

Asst. Supt. E'neer, Butterfield & Swire,...

Buckberrough, William Ross... Passenger Agent, Canadian Pacific Ocean

Budge, William Bunje, Emil Theodore

Hieronymus

Bunje, Henry Ferdinand Burdin, Roy Cornelius Burleigh, Harry Samuel Burn, Andrew.... Bursley, Allan John Burton, Arthur Louis Lovelace

Burton, Edmund Merceron Button, Aaron

Bux, Noor Mahomed Bux, Sheik Omar

C

Camidge, Reginald Albert......

Campos, Henrique Maria

Canney, Joseph

Carmichael, Alexander

Carroll, Anthony Henry Carroll, William Joseph Carvalho, Artur Homem de .. Carvalho, Beltraō Lucas de Carvalho, Carlos Francisco de Carvalho, Duarte Euterio de...] Carvalho, Fernao Henrique de Carvalho, Guilherme Augusto

de Carvalho, Gustavo Adolpho Carvalho, Luiz Gonzaga

Homen de

Carvalho, Marcus Antonio Carvalho, Octavio Arthur de Cassel, Louis .................

Castricum, Jan Maurits Elias

van

Castro, Alfred Bonaparte

Hendrickson

Castro, Antonio Piu

Castro, Bonifacio Maria.

Castro, Carlos Maria Castro, Egydio Maria

Henrickson

Castro, Henrique Armando

Services, Ld.,

Assistant, Butterfield & Swire,

Assistant, H. M. H. Nemazee, Assistant, Asiatic Petroleum Co., Ld., Manager, Thomas W. Simmons & Co., Foreman, Taikoo Dockyard, Wharfinger, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Assistant, Asiatic Petroleum Co., Ld., Wharfinger, HK. & K'loon W. & G. Co.,

Ld.,

Assistant, Butterfield & Swire, Manager, HK. Steel Foundry Co., Ld., Assistant, Kelly & Walsh, Ld.,. Clerk, HK. Electric Co., Ld.,.

Sub-Accountant, Chartered Bank of I. A.

and C.,........

Clerk, Chartered Bank of I. A. & C., Assistant, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Engineer, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Broker, Carroll Bros., Broker, Carroll Bros., Assistant, H. A. Castro & Co., Assistant, Eastern Asbestos Co., Assistant, HK. & S'bai Bank,.... Assistant, Shewan, Tomes & Co., Assistant, Andersen, Meyer & Co.,..

Assistant, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Ld, Assistant, Reiss & Co.,

Clerk, China Vegetable Oil Co.,. Clerk, Botelho Bros.,

Clerk, HK. & S'hai Bank, Mining Agent,

Prince's Building.

2 Queen's Gardens. 14 Shaukiwan Road.

2 Tregunter Mansions, May Road. Kowloon Docks.

1 Great George Street. Alexandra Building. Hongkong Club. Quarry Bay.

21 Humphreys Building, Kowloon. Quarry Bay.

King Edward Hotel. Kowloon Docks.

Quarry Bay. Kowloon Docks.

On premises.

St. George's House.

6 Knutsford Terrace, Kowloon. King Edward Hotel.

Victoria View, Kowloon. 44B Nathan Road.

7 Humphreys Building, Kowloon. Quarry Bay, Quarry Bay.

17 Shelley Street.

6 Aimai Villas, Kowloon. 47 Robinson Road.

Burnbank Villa, Tsat Tze Mui. 124 Wanchai Road.

55 Jardine's Bazaar 1st Floor.

Chartered Bank.

10 Salisbury Avenne, Kowloon, Quarry Bay. Quarry Bay.

4 Lyeemoon Villas, Kowloon. 49 Conduit Road.

Peace Avenue, Ho Mun Tin. 5 Salisbury Avenue, Kowloon. On premises.

2 Patell Villas, Kowloon. 19 Ashley Road, Kowloon.

7 Austin Avenue, Kowloon. 17 Belilios Terrace.

Catchick Street. 17 Belilios Terrace.

On premises. 109 The Peak.

Signs per pro. Java-China-Japan-Lijn, ... 87 The Peak.

Assistant, Dock Co.,.....

Assistant, Standard Oil Co.,

Assistant, Yokohama Specie Bank, Ld.,... Assistant, Lane, Crawford & Co.,

Assistant, HK. Rope Factory,. Merchant, H. A. Castro & Co.,

Kowloon Docks.

46A Bonham Road. On premises.

5 Mosque Street.

2A High Street.

3 Seymour Terrace.

*

7

NAME IN FULL.

OCCUPATION.

ADDRESS.

?

C-Continued.

Castro, Joaquim Telles

d'Almada e

Castro, José Francisco

Clerk, International Banking Corporation, Assistant, Asiatic Petroleum Co., Ld.,

Castro, José Maria d'Almada e Assistant, Reiss & Co.,....................

Cave, Charles Percy

Caville, George Frederick.. Chaloner, Robert Minta.... Chan, George David Chan Harr

Chan, James Robert Chan Kwan Sheung

Chan, Owen

Chan Shiu Tsun... Chan Shu-ming Chan Wing-cheung

Chandler, Paul Dillingham Chapman, James Brand..... Chappell, Richard Hope Chassels, Thomas Rae Chatham, Geoffrey Keith Chatterton, Reginald.. Chaves, Carlos Henrique Chenalloy, Allan Augustus Cheng Huan

Cheng Kwong.

Cheung Tat-chiu Cheung U Pui

Chilman, George Lewis.. Choa Po Min

Choa Po-sit n Chopard, Fritz Albert Chow Ngan-ting Chow Sui-lam Chow U-ting Christensen, Engelhardt.. Chun Wing Sen Chung Kam Tong

Church, Alfred David Church, Basil Hamkden Church, Samuel Shriver Churn, Samuel Macomber.. Clair, Verne

Clansen, Peter George Clark, Douglas Edward.. Clark, Frank

Clark, Frederick William

George..

Clark, John Auton.. Clark, John Caer

Clayson, Edward Frederick Clemo, Frederick Charles Coates, Alfred Edward

...

Cobb, Arthur Henry Kingston Cobbs, Thomas Flenroy Coburn, Clarence A. Cochrane, John

Cockram, William

Coleman, Frederick Charles Collaço, Francis Cecilio...... Collaço, Tito Antonio Collison, Benjamin Noel Colson, George Basil Columbine, Sidney Bennett. Comrie, Richard Conrad Conant, Harold Abbott Rand Conceição, Valeriano Conrad, A. C.......... Cook, Walter Ernest Coole, William

Assistant, Asiatic Petroleum Co., Ld., Assistant, Arnold Bros. & Co., Ld., Assistant, Butterfield & Swire, Employee, Java-China-Japan-Lijn, General Manager, Sincere Co., Ld., Employee, Java-China-Japan Lijn, Chief Draughtsman, A. R. Fenton Raven,

Architect,

Clerk, Snowman & Co.,

Assistant, Shewan, Tomes & Co., Secretary, I On Insurance Co.,

Clerk, HK. Steel Foundry Co., Ld.,

Agent, Struthers & Dixon,

Draughtsman, Taikoo Dockyard, Assistant, HK. & S'hai Bank, Assistant, Butterfield & Swire,

1 Lyeemoon Villas, Kowloon. 12 Belilios Terrace.

1 Lyeemoon Villas, Kowloon. 29 Pine Street, Tai Kok Tsui. Peak Hotel.

26 Mountain View, The Peak, 59 High Street.

Des Voeux Road Central. 1 Ashley Terrace, Kowloon.

6 Des Voeux Road Central. 2 Lower Mosque Terrace. 63 Des Vœux Road Central. Bonham Strand.

9 Staunton Street. Hongkong Hotel. Quarry Bay.

On premises. 171 The Peak.

Assistant, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Ld., | 8 Queen's Gardeus.

Electrician, Dock Co.,

Clerk, Messageries Maritimes,

Employee, Java-China-Japan Lijn,

General Manager, Pacific Trading Co., Asstant, Prince Line, Furness (Far

East), Ld., ....

Assistant, W. R. Loxley & Co.,

...

Engineer, Asiatic Petroleum Co., Ld.,.............. Assistant, Butterfield & Swire,

Asst. Compradore, China Sugar Refining

Co., Ld.,

Compradore, China Sugar Refining Co., Ld. Hotel Proprietor, Astor House Hotel, Asst. Compradore, Russo-Asiatic Bank, Compradore, Bank of Tai Wan, Assistant, Mow Fung & Co., Assistant, Chas. E. Richardson, Secretary, Pacific Trading Co.,

Traffic Manager, China Oversea Trading

Co. Power Engineer, HK. Tramway Co., Ld., Daughtsman, Dock Co.,

Sub-Accountant, International Bank, Merchant, Union Trading Co., Asia Banking Coporation.

Salesma", Alex Ross & Co., Partner, J. D. Humphreys & Son, Foreman, Taikoo Dockyard,

Manager, Machinery Dept, Alex Ross &

Co.,

Assistant, HK. & S'hai Bank,.

Architect,

Assistant, E. D. Sassoou & Co., Ld., Engr.. China Light & Power Co., Ld., Clerk, HK. Tramway Co., Ld.,

Asst. Union Ince. Socty. of Canton, Ld., Director, British American Tobacco Co., Engineer,

Assistant, Union Insce. Socty. of Canton,]

Ld.,

Draughtsman, Dock Co., Electrician, Dock Co., Clerk, HK. & S'hai Bank, Salesman, Alex. Ross & Co.,

Accountant, HK. & China Gas Co., Ld., Station Supdt., HK. Electric Co., Ld., Assistant, HK. & S'hai Bank, Assistant, Standard Oil Co., Assistant, Standard Oil Co.,

Assistant, Transmarina Trading Co.,.

Manager, Connell Bros. Co.

Assistant, Cosmopolitan Dock, Cutter, J. T. Shaw,

Kowloon Docks.

33 Peking Road, Kowloon.

4 Prospect Place, Bonham Road,

38B Bonham Road.

60 Staunton Street. 29 Gage Street. 5 Chancery Lane. On premises.

On premises.

On premises.

On premises.

On premises.

On premises. 89 High Street. Kowloon.

33 Robinson Road.

54 D'Aguilar Street. 2 Broadwood Terrace. Kowloon Docks.

2 Queen's Gardens. Prince's Building. Repulse Bay Hotel. Knutsford Hotel, Kowloon. 7 Tregunter Mansions. Quarry Bay.

21 Broadwood Road. On premises.

Lauriston, Bowen Road. 20 Wellington Street. Kowloon.

1 Broadwood Road. On premises.

Repulse Bay Hotel.

20 Humphreys Building, Kowloon.

On premises. Kowloon Docks. Kowloon Docks. On premises. 25 Praya East.

Gas Works, Hongkong. Quarters, North Point. On premises.

Peak Hotel.

Kingsclere, Kennedy Road.

2 Ashley Road, Kowloon.

10 Humphreys Building, Kowloon. On premises.

2 Nathan Road, Kowloon.

NAME IN FULL.

8

OCCUPATION.

ADDRESS.

C-Continued.

Coolhass, Johan Herman Cooper, Hugh Glen Coote, Robert Henry Cordeiro, Estanislau Maria Cordeiro, Luiz Gonzaga Cordeiro, Procopio Antonio Cornaby, William Basil.... Cornell, William Arthur Cornley, John..... Corveth, Ignacio P. Cossart, Louis Auguste Costa, Antonio Fidelis da

Costa, Isidoro Maria da......

Costa, José Souza da Costa, Lourenço Antonio Cotton, John Thomas

Courcy, William Robert de Course, Arthur

Courtney, Frank McDougall... Cousins, Ralph Hutchison Cox, William Mitchell

Crapnell, Albert Edward Crapnell, Frederick Harry Crary, Louis Merson

Crawford, Frank Malcolm Crawford, William Joseph Cresswell, Charles Johnson Crispin, Charles Crockatt, James Laird Crocker, William Ewart Cronin, Daniel Joseph Franklyn Crookdake, Jonathan Croucher, Noel Victor Amor... Crowley, Bernard Crush, F. C.

Cruz, Florencio Maria da

Cruz, Guilherme Pedro da Cubey, Edwin Banfield

Culhane, Thomas Bernard.. Cullen, Fred

Cunha, Bernardino Maria

Cardoso da

Curreem, Abdul

Curreem, Vahab

Cuthill, Douglas James

Cuthill, George Hamilton

D

Dalziel, James Danby, James Denison Danenberg, Emilio.... Davidson, Alexander. Davies, Arthur Reginald

Prothero .... Davies, Leonard John Davis, Alfred Edward William Davis, Harry Davison, William Day, Harold

Dearing, Henry Hinckley.. Des Voeux, Edward Alfred Dick, Harry William Dick, James Gold Dick, Norman Ross Dickens, Charles ......

Capt. Supt, Java-China-Japan Lijn, Shipbuilder, Dock Co.,............. Timekeeper, Taikoo Dockyard,

Clerk, Struthers & Dixon, Clerk, HK. & S'hai Bank,

Clerk, Palmer & Turner,

91 The Peak.

Kowloon Docks.

Quarry Bay.

16 Morrison Hill Road. On premises.

127 Praya East.

Assistant, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Ld., | 3 Queen's Garden.

Architect, Palmer & Turner,

Assistant, Wm. Powell, Ld.,

Assistant, Arnold Bros. Co., Ld.,.

Accountant, Asiatic Petroleum Co., Ld., Clerk, Liverpool & London & Globe

Insurance Co., Ld.,

Assistant, Dodwell & Co., La.,

Hongkong Club. Powell's Building. Mosque Street. Hongkong Club.

12 Granville Road, Kowloon. Queen's Building.

Asst., Union Ince. Socty. of Canton, Ld., Queen's Building. Assistant, Standard Oil Co., Barman, HK. Hotel Co., Ld.,

Asst., Union Ince. Socty. of Canton, Ld., Traffic Supt., HK. Tramway Co., Ld., Accountant, International Bank,... Asst.-Manager, Taikoo Dockyard, Sub-Accountant, Chartered Bank of I. A.

and C.,........

Partner, Lane, Crawford & Co., Assistant, HK. & K'loon W. & G. Co., Ld., Bldg. Inspector, Asiatic Petroleum Co.,

Ld.,

Partuer, Lane, Crawford & Co., Assistant, Dock Co.,

Assistant, W. R. Loxley & Co., Shipwright, Dock Co.,

Manager, Chartered Bank of I. A. & C., Acting Manager, Gande, Price & Co., Ld., Asst. Engineer, HK. Elect ic Co., Ld., ... Engineer, Dock, Co.,

Sharebroker, Benjamin & Potts, Assistant, Butterfield & Swire, Bookkeeper, W. G. Humphreys & Co., Assistant, China Vegetable Oil Co., Assistant, Alex. Ross & Co.,

Clerk, Taikoo Dockyard,

27 Cameron Road, Kowloon. Hongkong Hotel.

On premises.

1 Russell Street. 60 The Peak. Quarry Bay.

Chartered Bank Mess. 161 The Peak.

13 Humphreys Building, Kowloon.

609 Shanghai Street. 167 The Peak. Kowloon Docks.

14 Macdonell Road. Kowloon Docks.

Charter House, The Peak. On premises. 98c Wanchai Road. Kowloon Docks. Hongkong Hotel. Peak Hotel.

50 Nathan Road, Kowloon. 15 Belilios Terrace.

27 Shelley Street.

Quarry Bay.

Engineer, Andersen, Meyer & Co., Ld.,... King Edward Hotel.

Storekeeper, Dock Co.,

Kowloon Docks.

Clerk, Union Ince. Socty, of Canton, Ld., On premises.

Assistant, Arculli Bros.,

Merchant, Arculli Bros.,

Assistant, Butterfield & Swire,

Head Watchman, Dock Co.,

Chief Engr., Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Manager, Kino Brothers,... Professor of Music, Draughtsman, Taikoo Dockyard,.

Assistant, Wm. Powell, Ld., Assistant, Gibb, Livingston & Co., Assistant, Hughes & Hough,

Chemist, Green Island Cement Co., Ld.,. Superintendent Shipwright, Dock Co., Asst. Meter Supt., HK. Electric Co., Ld., Sub-Accountant, International Bank,. Secretary, Hongkong Club,....

Authorized Clerk, Vernon & Smyth, Sawmiller, Dock Co..

Assistant, Butterfield & Swire, Foreman, Taikoo Dockyard,

22 Leighton Hill Road.

22 Leighton Hill Road. Peak Hotel.

Kowloon Docks.

Quarry Bay. On premises.

1 The Albany, Garden Road. Quarry Bay.

Powell's Building. St. George's Building.

8 Des Voeux Road Central. 40A Nathan Road, Kowloon. Kowloon Docks.

St. George's House, Kennedy Road. 5 Knutsford Terrace, Kowloon. Hongkong Club.

5 Queen's Road Central. Kowloon Docks.

47 Robinson Road.

Quarry Bay.

܃

NAME IN FULL.

9

OCCUPATION.

ADDRESS.

:

j

D—Continued.

Dickie, Frederick John Dijkstra, Rients .... Dingman, Edward Colton Dinnen, Hugh...... Dinsdale, Felix Amyas.. Dinsdale, Robin Dirrelk, Benjamin Diss, Arthur Charles.. Dixon, Philip Albert. Dixon, Robert James... Dodd. John Valentine Doe, James John Donnelly, Denis Ewart Donnithorne, James Henry Dorkins, George Maurice

Wingrove

Dorton, Robert Earle.... Douglas, Robert H. Douglas, William Ewart Dowbiggin, Hugh Blackwell

Layard.....

Doyle, Thomas Wilfred. Drake, Edward Ott

Drake, William Stanley.. Dransfield, Albert Dreyer, Halger

Drude, Robert Alexander Drummond, Neil Dryden, David Duncan Duckworth, Ferdinand Farrant Dunbar, Lambert Duncan, George Duncan, Robert Kirkwood Dunlevy, Robert J. Dunn, Samuel........ Dunnett, Gordon Black..... Dutton, Sydney Hardy

E

Eastman, Alfred William Eça, Adolpho José d’..... Eça, José Maria d' Eddie, David Silas.... Edgcumbe, Clifford Edwards, Archibald Edward, George Richarp

Edwards, William James Eldridge, William James Ellams, George Ernest Elias, Isaac Ezekiel Elías, J. M.

Elliot, George Herbert

Ellis, Arthur Sassoon Ellis, Emanuel Ezekiel Ellis, Frederick

Ellis, Nathaniel Solomon Elson, William Thomas.. Embry, John Augustus Eustace, William Albert Evans, Gwilym Herbert Evans, James

Eveleigh, Grahame Tom Eyre, Harry Ezra, Edward

Assistant, Dodwell & Co., Ld., Assistant, Transmarina Trading Co., Merchant, North-West Trading Co., Assistant, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Assistant, Butterfield & Swire, Assistant, HK. & Shanghai Bank, Boilermaker, Dock Co., Tailor, Diss Bros.,.

Merchant, T. E. Griffith, Ld., Boilermaker, Dock Co., Clerk, Taikoo Dockyard,

Foreman, China Sugar Refining Co., Ld., Wine Merchant, Dounelly & Whyte,. ...... Engineer, China Light & Power Co.,...

Merchant, Asiatic Petroleum Co., L‹, Asst., Cashier, American Express Co., Marine Surveyor, Goddard & Douglas, Engineer, Asiatic Petroleum Co., Ld.,

Bill & Bullion Broker, Stewart Bros., Assistant, HK. & S'hai Bank, Employee, British American Tobacco

Co., Ld., .....

Assistant, Wm. Powell, Ld., Storekeeper, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Manager, Andersen, Meyer & Co. Assistant, Standard Oil Co.,

Sugar Boiler, Taikoo Sugar Refinery Assistant, Butterfield & Swire, Assistant Station Supt., Electric Co., Ld., Flour Broker, Dunbar, Bros. Co., Ld., Coppersmith, Dock Co.,

Foreman, Taikoo Dockyard, Timekeeper, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Assistant, Sennett Frères,

Assistant, HK. & Shanghai Bank, Merchant, E. D. Sassoon & Co., Ld.,

Assistant, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Ld., Clerk, HK., C. & M. Steamboat Co., Ld., Assistant, HK. & S'hai Bank,..................... Assistant, E. D. Sassoon & Co., Ld.,.. Partner, Snowman & Co., Engineer, Asiatic Petroleum Co., Ld., Secretary, United Asbestos Oriental

Agency Co., Ltd.,

Assistant, W. S. Bailey & Co., Ld., Storekeeper, Taikoo Dockyard,

Asst., HK., C. & M. Steamboat Co., Ld., Assistant, E. D. Sassoon & Co., Ld., Asst., Java-China-Japan Lijn,

Queen's Building,

13 Hankow Road, Kowloon. Kingsclere, Kennedy Road. Quarry Bay. Ou premises. On premises.

Kowloon Docks.

18B Nathan Road, Kowloon. 9 Broadwood Road. Kowloon Docks. Quarry Bay.

| 20 Yee Wo Street.

Kingsclere, Kennedy Road. Kowloon.

Lauriston, Bowen Road. Knutsford Hotel, Kowloon. Peak Hotel or Hongkong Club. 28A Narban Road, Kowloon.

168 The Peak. On premises.

100 The Peak. Powell's Building. Quarry Bay.

98 The Peak.

12 Humphreys Avenue, Kowloon. Quarry Bay. Peak Hotel.

Quarters Wing Fung Street, Wanchai. 12 Tregunter Mansions. Kowloon Docks.

Quarry Bay. Quarry Bay.

14 Seymour Terrace.

On premises.

11 Humphreys Building, Kowloon..

47 Robinson Road.

4 Lochiel Terrace, Kowloon. On premises.

4 Chancery Lane.

5 Tregunter Mansions, May Road. A. P. Co.'s Installation, North Point.

24 Humphreys Building, Kowloon. On premises. Quarry Bay.

| Peak Hotel.

6 Chancery Lane. On premises.

Manager, Com'cial Union Assce. Co., Ld., 9 Tregunter Mansions.

Broker,

Broker,

Broker,

Accountant, Asiatic Petroleum Co., Ld.,

Assistant, A. S. Watson & Co., Ld., Teller, American Express Co.,

Partner, Lane, Crawford & Co.,

Merchant, Carter & Co., Ld.,

6 Broadwood Terrace.

6 Broadwood Terrace.

14 Des Voeux Road Central. Peak Hotel.

14 Knutsford Terrace, Kowloon, Queen's Garden.

King Edward Hotel.

44A Nathan Road, Kowloon,

Station Foreman, HK. Electric Co., Ld., . 9 Ying Wah Terrace, West Point.

Architect, Leigh & Orange,

Acting Manager, Wm. Powell, Ld.,

Sub-Manager, D. Sassoon & Co., Ld.,.

Burnside, Robinson Road. Des Voeux Road Central. 1 Hart Avenue, Kowloon.

10

NAME IN FULL.

OCCUPATION.

ADDRESS.

F

Falconer, Percy James Farias, Anito Miguel Paulo Farmer, Alfred Victor Farmer, Hugh

Farmer, John Eric............ Farmer, William Roland Farne, Francis Henry Farrant, Roydon.... Farrell, Albert Edward,, Farrell, Peter Thomson

Fauvelle, Gerald..................... Fawcett, Herbert Feen, Herman Cornelius Graham van der.... Fenton, Sydney George.. Fereira, Alberto Ferguson, James Carson Ferguson, John ........ Ferguson, Victor Sinclair Fernandez, Menino........ Fetterly, Kenneth Melford Fielder, Bert Ernest

Figueiredo, Eduardo José de.....

Figueiredo, Henrique João

Melchiades de.....

Finch, John Colin

Findlay, David M.

Fisher, Fred.

Fisher, John

Fisher, Joseph

Flatow, Walter Ralph Fleming, William Nicholson Floquet, René

Fonseca, José Maria

Forbes, Alexander Rodger... Ford, Edward Stephen Ford, Herbert William Ford, William Edward Ford, Jr., William Falconer Forder, George Forsyth, William

Fortune, James Alexander

Fothergill, Archibald

Foulds, John Gibson Patrick... Fowler, George

Fox, William

Franco, Carlos Alberto

Franco, Luiz Eduardo

Broker, Ray & Falconer,

Assistant, J. M. da Rocha & Co., Assistant, Brunner, Mond & Co., Ld., Assistant, Carter & Co., Ld., Assistant, J. D. Hutchison & Co., Assistant, Butterfield & Swire, Asst., Union Ince. Socty. of Canton, Ld., Mercantile Asst., Shewan, Tomes & Co., . Assistant, Butterfield & Swire, Manager, Machinery Department W. G.

Humphreys & Co.,

Assistant, Andersen, Meyer & Co., Ld.,.. Clerk, Leigh & Orange,

Teller, American Express Co., Assistant, Butterfield & Swire,

Alexandra Building.

6 Hart Avenue, Kowloon. Peak Hotel. Wyndham Hotel. Peak Hotel.

1 Canton Villas, Kowloon. Queen's Building. 121 The Peak.

3 Fairview, Kowloon.

King Edward Hotel. 3 Rednaxela Terrace.

14B Nathan Road, Kowloon.

13 Humphreys Building, Kowloon. 81 The Peak.

Station Foreman, HK. Electric Co., Ld.,. 126 Praya East, 3rd floor.

Clerk, Taikoo Dockyard,.................... Foreman, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Engineer, Asiatic Petroleum Co., Ld., Liquidator, HK. Mercantile Co., Ld.,................ Assistant Agent, Struthers & Dixon, Assistant, Butterfield & Swire, Partner, Hughes & Hough,..

Quarry Bay. Quarry Bay. On premises.

4 Broadwood Road.

10 Humphreys Building, Kowloon. 4 The Albany.

8 Des Voeux Road Central.

Assistant, Arnhold Bros. & Co., Ld.,.............. 3 Liberty Avenue, Kowloon.

Assistant, Wm. Powell, Ld.,, Asia Banking Corporation, Overseer, C. E. Warren & Co., Ld., Engineer, Dock Co.,...................

Clerk, HK. Steel Foundry Co., Ld., Representative, W. R. Grace & Co., Assistant, Shewan, Tomes & Co., Partner, Floquet & Knoth, Assistant, Standand Oil Co.,

Sugar Boiler,China Sugar Refining Co.,Ld., Asst., HK. & K'loon W. & G. Co., Ld., Architect, Butterfield & Swire, Assistant, Floquet & Knoth, Assistant, Dock Co.,...... Assistant, Whiteaway, Laidlaw & Co., Engineer, Dock Co.,.

Acting Supervising Engineer, Pacific

Mail S.S. Co.,....

Assistant, Standard Oil Co., Clerk, Taikoo Dockyard,.

Foreman, China Sugar Refining Co., Ld.,. Assistant, A. Abdoolrahim,... Assistant, W. G. Humphreys & Co.,

Franco, Francisco Maria, Jr... Clerk, Messageries Maritimes,

Franco, Viriato Agostinho Franklin, Arthur Cawte Fraser, Archibald Dick

Fraser,

William

Fritz, Chester

Fung Fuk-tin...

Asst., Union Ince. Socty. of Canton, Ld.,. Assistant, Kelly & Walsh, Ld., Metallurgist and Analyst,

Foreman, Taikoo Dockyard,

Accountant, Electric Light Co., Ld.,. Principal, Chas. E. Richardson, Manager, Kwong Saug Hong,

Powell's Building.

22 Ashley Road, Kowloon. 169 Wanchai Road. Kowloon Docks.

22 Morrison Hill Road.

12A Empress Lodge, Kowloon. 36B Nathan Road, Kowloon. 19 Chatham Road, Kowloon.

6 Rednaxela Terrace. China Sugar Refinery.

5 Ashley Road, Kowloon. King Edward Hotel.

2A Mody Road, Kowloon. Hongkong Office. Wyndham Hotel, Kowloon Docks.

On premises.

King Edward Hotel. Quarry Bay.

20 Yee Wo Street.

34 Queen's Road Central. 45 Haiphong Road, Kowloon. Gunpowder Depôt (Green Island). Queen's Building.

177 Wanchai Road. 1A Percival Street. Quarry Bay. 27 The Peak. Hongkong Club. On premises.

G

Gein, Louis Charles Galluzzi, Ugo Cesare.... Gamble, Raymond Edward

Garcia, Alexander

Garcia, Francisco Maria Garcia, Rufino Francisco

Gardner, Joseph.......

Manager, Brossard, Mopin & Co., ..... Ship Broker, Geo. Grimble & Co., . Assistant Passenger Agent, Pacific Mail

S.S. Co.,

Freight Clerk, Pacific Mail S.S. Co.,... Bookkeeper, China Mail S.S. Co., Ld., Freight Clerk, The Admiral Line Pacific

Steamship Co.,

King's Building.

9 Mountain View, The Peak.

On premises. On premises.

23 Granville Road, Kowloon.

5A Coronation Road, Kowloon.

Clerk, Union Ince. Socty. of Canton, Ld.,. Queen's Building.

14

NAME IN FULL.

11

OCCUPATION.

ADDRESS.

G-Continued.

Gardner, Louis Gardner, William

Gardner, William Frederick

Garraway, James Graham Geare, Iltyd Henry Gee, Archibald Daniel Geoffrey, Robert....... Gerin, Henri Guilleume Gerken, Charles John Germann, Alexander.... Gerrard, George..... Gibbison, John Joseph Gibson, Adna Wallace Gibson, Gordon Hugh Gill, William H. Gibbins, Frederick William

Gittins, Henry Gittins, William.. Glendinning, Percy Richard... Glendinning, Walter Scott Glover, Alfred Ernest Gloyn, John Wakeham

Goldenberg, Isaac Levy. Goldenberg, William Goldschmidt, Sylvain Gomes, Antonio dos Santos Gomes, Augusto Conceição

Gomes, Francis

Asst., Union Ince. Socty. of Canton, Ld.,. Queen's Building. Assistant, HK. Rope Factory,

Assistant, Union Ince. Socty. of Canton,

Ld.,

Engineer, Dock Co.,......

Gen. Manager, Vacuum Oil Co.,... Manager, Steam Laundry Co., Ld...... Assistant, Bank Industrielle de Chine, Manager, Gerin, Drevard & Co., Assistant, Dodwell & Co., Ld., Clerk, Astor House Hotel,

Clerk, Taikoo Dockyard,..........

Villa Maria, 11 Glenealy.

Queen's Buikling. Kowloon Docks. 7 The Peak. Yaumati.

l'alace Hotel.

148 Barker Road. St. Paul's College. Queen's Road Central. Quarry Bay.

Asst., Canadian Pacific Ocean Services, Ld., 3 Torres Building, Kowloon.

Assistant, Standard Oil Co.,

Assistant, Butterfield & Swire, Engineer, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Manager: Wilkinson, Heywood &

Clark, Ld.,

Assistant, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Ld., Station Assistant, HK. Electric Co., Ld., Chief Inspector, HK. Tramway Co., Ld., Outside Overseer, HK. Tramway Co., Ld., Bookseller, Kelly & Walsh, Ld.,

Chief Foreman, China Sugar Refining

Co.. Ld.,

Assistant, Standard Oil Co., Merchant, N. S. Moses & Co.,...

Manager, J. Ullmann & Co.,

Clerk, HK. & S'hai Bank,

Assistant, D. Sassoon & Co., Assistant, Nippon Yusen Kaisha,

Gomes, Francisco Timotheo... Store Assistant, Dock Co.,

Gomes, José

Gomes, José Hipoly to Gomes, Luiz Braz Gomes, Luiz Maria............. Gomes, Maximiano Antonio... Gonsalves, Julio Augusto...... Gonella, Ugo

Gonsalves, Verissimo..... Goodall, Donald McGregor ... Goodban, Joseph Hammett

Cutcliffe

Goodman, Frederick Charles Goodman, Reginald James

Goodwin, David Alexander

Gordon, James Miller

Gordon, John Henry

Clerk, Wm. Powell, Ld., Assistant, Dock Co.,................

Asst., General Electric Co. of China,. Foreman, HK. Electric Co., Ld., Assistant, Shewan, Tomes & Co., Clerk, Botelho Bros., Architect, Brossard, Mopin & Co., Assistant, D. Sassoon & Co., Ld., Manager, Wiseman, Ld.,

Assistant, Dodwell & Co., Ld., Engineer, Dock Co., Supt. Storekeeper, Dock Co., Assistant, W. S. Bailey & Co., Ld., Assistant, Shewan, Tomes & Co., Assistant, Gibb, Livingston & Co.....

Gosano, Julio Jesus dos Passos Clerk, HK. & S'hai Bank,

Goulborn, Vernon

Gourdin, Frederick O'Dricoll...

Gow, David

Graça, Francisco Maria

Paulo de

Graça, José Athanasio

Maria de

Graham, Duncan Matheson Grant, Peter Strachan Gray, Adam

Gray, John

Gray, Robert Gray, Samuel..

Grayburn, Vandeleur Molyneux Green, Alexander Harvey.... Green, George Green, Robert Anthony.. Greenhill, Leslie Solbé Greenfield, Samuel..

Greensitt, Arthur

Greenwood, Harry.

Engineer, HK. Rope Factory, Merchant, Bradley & Co., Chief Clerk, Dock Co.,.......

Assistant, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Ld.,

Assistant, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Ld.,

Manager, Alex. Ross & Co.,

Assistant, Butterfield & Swire, Foreman, Taikoo Dockyard,

Chief Assistant, Snowman & Co., Foreman, Taikoo Dockyard, Engineer, Dock Co., ..

Chief Accountant, HK. & S'hai Bank, Marine Supt., Moller & Co.,

Butcher, Dairy Farm I. & C. S. Co., Ld., Assistant, HK. & S'hai Bank,..... Accountant, HK, Land I. & A. Co., Ld., Chair Manufacturer and Registered

Money-lender,

Inspector, China & Japan Telephone Co.,

Ld., Assistant, Linstead & Davis,

|

Woodbury, Pokfulum, Edencourt, Kowloon. On premises.

Alexandra Building.

14 Ashley Road, Kowloon, 19 Caine Road.

21 Leighton Hill Road. 48 Morrison Hill Road. 7 Broadwood Terrace.

210 Praya East.

1 Victoria View, Kowloon.

1 Victoria View, Kowloon.

6 Arbuthnot Road.

On premises.

4 Granville Road, Kowloon.

6 Moreton Terrace.

Kowloon Docks.

Powell's Building. Kowloon Docks.

4 Granville Road, Kowloon. 6 Salisbury Avenue, Kowloon. 6 Ashley Road, Kowloon. 17 Granville Road, Kowloon. King's Building.

8 Granville Road, Kowloon. 2 Basilea, Lyttelton Road.

Queen's Building. Kowloon Docks. Kowloon Docks.

2 Torres Building, Kowloon. 81 The Peak.

St. George's Building.

Op premises.

Hotel Mansions.

24A Nathan Road, Kowloon. Kowloon Docks.

9 Garden Road.

12 Lochiel Terrace.

King Edward Hotel.

Hongkong Club. Quarry Bay. Hongkong Club. Quarry Bay. Kowloon Docks.

On premises.

6 Torres Building, Kowloon. 8 Broadwood Terrace. On premises. Hongkong Club.

27 Des Voeux Road.

Palace Hotel, Kowloon. Alexandra Building.

.

NAME IN FULL.

12

CCCUPATION.

ADDRESS.

G-Continued.

Gregory, Tigran Matthews Greig, Kenneth Edward Greig, William

Grimble, Eric George Norton Grimshaw, John....... Grimshaw, Thomas Grimstone, Sydney Ernest ... Groot, Adrianus Theodorus ... Groskamp, William Hendrik... Grott, George........ Grout, Herbert Lawrence Grunsell, Stewart

Gubbay, David Sassoon. Guimaraes, Egas Guimaraes, Guilherme Alberto Gunn, Ray Edgar Guterres, Augusto Arthur...... Guterres, Luiz Esperança Gutierrez, Gregorio Maria... Gutierrez, João Baptista Gutierrez, Joao Maria Gutierrez, João Purificação Gutierrez, John Joseph...........

Haig, David

H

Hale, William Eric

Halgreen, Edmund Hansen Hall, David.....

Hall, Frederick Charles. Hall, Robert John Hall, William

Ham, Charles Rutherford Chun Hambier, Maurice Thomas Hamid, Sheik Abdool Hamilton, Alexander.. Hamilton, James Baxter Hammes, Constantine John Hancox, Mowbray Arthur Hannibal, Walter Albert Hansen, James Ernest Harper, Noel Adair Harriman, Gilbert A. Harrington, John Joseph Harris, John Walter Harrison, Cyril George Harrison, Frank Seymour

Harteam, Hasim.

Hartley, Thomas William.. Harvey, David

Haskell, David

Haslam, Gordon Faliao....... Haslett, William Benjamin Hassan, Dollah Hatt, Charles

Hatt, William Raymond Haverkamp, Jan Pieter. Hawker, Walter John Hawthorne, Frank Ernest... Haynes, Leslie Ernest Hayward, Harold Emile..

Hazeland, Ernest Manning Hedley, William. Hee Tai Chan....

Merchant, T. M. Gregory & Co., ....... Acting D'yard Manager, T'koo Dockyard, Shipwright, Dock Co.,

Ship Broker, Geo, Grimble & Co, Apprentice Draughtsman, Taikoo D'yard, Foreman, Taikoo Dockyard, Assistant, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Ld.,. Sub-Acct., Netherlands Trading Society,. Agent, Netherlands Trading Society, Draughtsman, Taikoo Dockyard, Accountant, Thoresen & Co., Assistant Wharf Manager, Holt's Wharf,

Assistant, E. D. Sassoon & Co Clerk, Chartered Bank of I. A. & C.,........ Assistant, Dodwell & Co., Ltd., Manager, Robert Dollar Co., Manager, Hongkong Cigar Store, Assistant, Shewan, Tomes & Co., Clerk, HK. & S'hai Bank, Clerk, W. A. Hannibal & Co., Bookkeeper, H. M. H. Nemazee,. Clerk, W. A. Hannibal & Co.............. Bookkeeper, Bank Line, Ld.g

Foreman, Taikoo Dockyard, Acting Local Manager, Liverpool & London & Globe Ince. Co., Ld., Accounting Clerk, Pacific Mail S.S. Co.,. Assistant, Butterfield & Swire, Assistant, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Ld.,.| Merchant, T. E. Griffith, Ld.......... Civil Engineer, Abdoolrahim & Co., Ar-

chitect

Assistant, Moler & Co,

Assistant, Anderson Music Co., Ld., Assistant, Admiral Line Pacific S.S. Co, Foreman, Taikoo Dockyard, Draughtsman, Dock Co., Salesman, Shewan, Tomes & Co., Wharfinger, Holt's Wharf,

Merchant, W. A. Hannibal & Co., Foreman, Taikoo Dockyard, Assistant, HK, & S'hai Bank, Assistant, Donnelly & Whyte, Clerk, Taikoo Dockyard,.. Storekeeper, Dock Co.,... Assistant, S. Moùtrie & Co., Insurance Manager, South British

Insurance Co., Ll.,

Clerk, International Banking Corporation,. Engineer, Dock Co.,...............

Asst. Superintendent, United Asbestos

Oriental Agency,

Merchant, D. Haskell & Co., Manager, Brunner, Mond & Co., Ld., Draughtsman, W. S. Bailey & Co., Ld.,... Clerk, Harry Wicking & Co.,... Inspector, Telephone Co.,

Freight Agent, Pacific Mail S.S. Co., Assistant, Transmarina Trading Co.,.. Chartered Secretary, Shewan, Tomes & Co., Assistant Barman, HK. Hotel Co., Ld.,... Merchaut, Mustard & Co.,

Chief Assistant, Canadian Pacific Ocean

Services, Ld.,......

Architect,

Assistant, Dock Co.,

Cashier, Pacific Trading Co.,

King Edward Hotel. Quarry Bay. Cosmopolitan Dock.

Luginsland, West, 18 Peak Road, Quarry Bay. Quarry Bay. Ewo Mess.

Queen's Road Central.

5 Queens's Road Central. Quarry Bay.

5 Victory Avenue, Ho Mun Tin. Winds Lodge, Kimberley Road,

Kowloon.

The Den, Castle Steps.

6 Caine Road.

Queen's Building.

21 Humphreys Building, Kowloon. 4 Hankow Road, Kowloon.

7 Ashley Road, Kowloon. On premises.

1 Mosque Street. I Mosque Street. 13 Mosque Street. 17 Robinson Road,

Quarry Bay.

On premises. On premises. Peak Hotel. Hillside, 110 The Peak. 168 The Peak.

7 Robinson Road.

19 Gough Street.

16 Des Voeux Road.

3 Bowrington Canal Road, East. Quarry Bay.

Kowloon Docks.

23 Hanoi Road, Kowloon. Holt's Wharf, Kowloon. Hongkong Hotel. Quarry Bay.

On premises.

Kingsclere, Kennedy Road. Quarry Bay.

Kowloon Docks.

Victoria View, Kowloon.

77 The Peak.

13 Fung Wong Terrace. Kowloon Docks.

Station Hotel, Kowloon. Ice House Street. 12A The Peak,

6 Victoria View, Kowloon. 4 Percival Street.

2 Ashley Terrace, Kowloon. On premises.

13 Hankow Road, Kowloon. 38A Nathan Road, Kowloon. Hongkong Hotel.

King Edward Hotel.

Hotel Mansions.

33 Queen's Road Central. Kowloon Docks.

19 Bonham Road.

-

NAME IN FULL.

13

OCCUPATION.

ADDRESS.

H-Continued.

Hellstrom, C. J. Bertil

Henderson, Archibald Kerr Henderson, George Henderson, James Henderson, John

Henderson, Maurice James Henderson, Robert... Herbst, Emil

Herdman, Andrew Elliot Heron, Arthur William

Herridge, Frank Gordon Hervy, Ambroise Raymond Hessing, Albert Daniel Hewer, Sydney Herbert Hewlitt, Arthur George Hickling, Clement Chinery Hidden, Stanley...

Assistant, Gilman & Co., Ld.,...

Chief Asst. Engr., HK. Tramway Co., Ld., Shipwright, Dock Co.,.......

Engr., Green Island Cement Co., Ld., Lane, Crawford & Co.,................

... Assistant, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Ld.,

Assistant, Shewan, Tomes & Co., Assistant, Holt's Wharf, Assistant, Butterfield & Swire, Wharfinger, HK. & K'loon W. & G.

Higgins, Frederick Charles Hill, Thomas William Hill, Walter Joseph Hillier, Percival Adrian Alexis Hills, Herbert Stuart..... Hoare, Robert Edward Hoather, E.........

Ho Chung Chow

Ho Iu

Ho Kwong

Ho Leung

Ho Shai-wa

Ho Wing.....

Ho Wing-cheun

Ho Yue-ming

Hobbs, Frank... Hodge, Lewis Edwin Sotheron, Hodgkins, Norris Lowell Hodgson, Paul Mary Hoggard, Frederick

Holland, Adam Morrison Hollands, Henry Ethelbert Holt, Harold Osborne Hong Sling Honkey, Chas.

Hoog, Josephus Johannes

Wierink de

Hooper, Joseph Hope, Stewart Hope, William James Hosie, Edward Lumsden Howard, Edward Howell, Charles Lloyd Hoy, Alfred William

Hoyle, William Frederick...... Hudson, Eric Carew Hughes, George V. Humphreys, Alfred David... Humphreys, Ernest Humphreys, John David Humphreys, Sydney

Hung Hing-fat

Hunt, Herbert James Hunter, Henry James Hunter, James

Hunter, Reginald Cyril Hunter, Robert

Hurle, Bertram Robert Hurley, Frederick

Mason

Hutchison, Frederick

Huxley, John..... Hyde, James

Charles

Co., Ld.,

Assistant, W. R. Loxley & Co., . Chief Acct., Banque de l'Indo-Chine,. Cashier, Netherlands I. Com'cial Bank,... Lane, Crawford & Co.,......... Architect,

Assistant, Butterfield & Swire, Secretary, H. Stephens & Co., Ld., Tailor Cutter, J. T. Shaw, Merchant, Bradley & Co., Engineer, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Assistant, HK. & S'hai Bank, Broker, Layton & Co., Engineer, Dock Co.,..... Assistant, Moutrie & Co., Clerk, International Bank,

Compradore, Mercantile Bank of India,Ld., Compradore, E. D. Sassoon & Co., Compradore, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Ld., Assistant, HK. Mercantile Co., Ld., Compradore, HK. & S'hai Bank, Compradore, Banque de L'Indo-Chine, ... Agent, for the Hanyang Iron Works, Asst., Prince Line, Furness (Far East), Ld., Manager, Hasting, Hodge & Co., Sub-Accountant, International Bank Asst., Union Ince. Soety. of Canton, Ld., Foreman, Green Island Cement Co., Ld., Foreman, Taikoo Dockyard,

Assistant, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Ld., Manager, Wm. Powell, Ld.,........... Compradore, Pacific Mail S.S. Co., Merchant, Union Trading Co., Ld.,

Employee, Holland China Trading Co.,... Acct., HK. & K'loon W. & G. Co., Ld.,. Draughtsman, Taikoo Dockyard, Assistant, HK. & Shanghai Bank, Acting Secretary, Dock Co., Exchange Broker,....

Assistant, Dock Co.,. Engineer, Holt's Wharf,

Storekeeper, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Asst., Union Ince. Socty, of Canton, Ld., Accountant, W. R. Loxley & Co., Partner, W. G. Humphreys & Co., Partner, W. G. Humphreys & Co., Assistant, J. D. Humphreys & Son, Manager Tannery, W. G. Humphreys

& Co.,

Asst. Compradore, HK. & K'loon W. & G.

Co.. Li..

Engineer, Green Island Cement Co., Ld.,... Engineer, Bradley & Co., Ld., Fittings Superintendent, Gas Co., Lane, Crawford & Co.,........ Engineer, Macdonald & Co., Clerk, Asiatic Petroleum Co., Ld,

Partner, Hughes & Hough,. Tanner, W. G. Humphreys & Co., Assistant, Manners & Backhouse, Ld., Clerk, HK. & K'loon W. & G. Co., Ld.,.

|

St. George's House.

Tramway Co.'s Office, 1 Russell St. Kowloon Docks.

Fair View, 3 Nathan Road, Kowloou. On premises.

1 Knutsford Terrace, Kowloon. HK. Tramway Quarters, Bowrington. 14 Coronation Road. Hongkong Club.

Chater's Bungalow, Kowloon. 53B Nathan Road, Kowloon. Prince's Building.

Des Voeux Road Central.

9 Beaconsfield Arcade, 2nd floor. 9 Peace Avenue, Ho Mun Tin.

5 Morrison Hill.

15 Broadwood Road.

49 Conduit Road. 103 The Peak. Quarry Bay. On premises. Prince's Building. Kowloon Docks. Palace Hotel, Kowloon. 6 Staunton Street. 6 Macdonnell Road. 7 Macdonnell Road. 15 Kennedy Road. 7 Lower Castle Road. 62 Boulam Road. On premises. On premises. Haiphong Road, Kowloon. Prince's Building. 2 Queen's Garden. Queen's Building. Deep Water Bay. Quarry Bay.

Ewo Junior Mess. Powell's Building.

19 Sands Street.

4 Rednaxela Terrace.

Palace Hotel, Kowloon. 20A Nathan Road, Kowloon. Quarry Bay. On premises. Kowloon Docks.

20 The Peak.

Kowloon Docks.

Windsor Lodge, Kimberley Road,

Kowloon.

Quarry Bay. On premises.

Nathan Road, Kowloon. 14 Peak Road.

14 Peak Road,

7 Tregunter Mansions.

8 Queen's Garden.

2 Prospect Place, Bonham Road. 3 Broadwood Road.

58 Nathan Road, Kowloon. Gas Works, Hongkong.

10B Orient Buildings, Kowloon. 12 Humphreys Building, Kowloon. 8B Orient Buildings, Kowloon.

8 Des Voeux Road Central. Man Tau Kok Tannery.

5 Queen's Road Central. 5 Torres Building, Kowloon.

*

NAME IN FULL.

14

OCCUPATION.

ADDRESS.

H-Continued.

Hyder, Goolam Hyndman, Alberto Herculous.. Hyndman, Edgar Oscar Peter Hyndman, Edward.... Hyndman, Henrique Antonio... Hyndman, Henry Hyndman, Luiz S. Hyndman, Raphael Emanuel...

Interpreter, Thos. Cook & Son, Clerk, W. S. Bailey & Co., Ld., Clerk, Lowe, Bingham & Matthews, Assistant, Dock Co., Clerk, Mercantile Bank, Clerk, HK. & S'hai Bank, Assistant, W. S. Bailey & Co., Ld., Assistant, Dodwell & Co., Ld.,

Des Voeux Road Central. 14 Barrow Terrace, Kowloon. Queen's Road Central. Hongkong Office.

5 Punjab Buildings, Kowloon. On premises.

1 Punjab Buildings, Kowloon. Queen's Building.

Ildefonso, Lucio R. Iles, William Edward Ireland, William.... Irving, John Bell Ismail, Sheik Ebrahim Ismail, Sheik Hassan...

Ismail, Sheik Ramjaho. Iu Ku-yuen...

In Tak-chung.........

Clerk, American Express Co., Assistant, Lane, Crawford & Co., Pausman, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Merchant, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Ld.,. Merch't, HK. Import & China Produce Co., Clerk, International Bank,

Clerk, HK. & K'loon W. & G. Co., Ld.,... Compradore, International Banking

Corporation,

Civil Engineer, J. Caer Clark,

3 Saifee Terrace, Kowloon. Palace Hotel, Kowloon. Quarry Bay. On premises.

41 Wongneichong Road, 12 Leighton Hill Road. 12 Leighton Hill Road,

On premises.

1 Lung On Street.

J

Jack, James McKenzie Jack, James Marshall Jan Ke Choy

Jay, John William.

Jemchoojiu, Boris Jenkins, Anthony

Jenner, Frederick James Henry Jenning, Thomas Jennings, Percival John Jessop, Herbert

Jex, Starling

Joanilho, Faustino Anastasio

Tome Johnson, John Johnson, John Johnson, Leicester Grafton

Sinclair

Johnson, Marcus Theodore. Johnston, William Murray.. Johnstone, Alan Colville Jobustone, James

Jolly, John Keith

Jones, Harold Arthur

Jordain, Samuel Johnson Jorge, Jr., Francisco José

Vicente,

Jorge, Gustavo Christopher,... Jorge, Heitor Telles Joseph, Edward Menashih Joseph, Felix Alexander Joseph, Joseph Edgar Joseph, Silas Hayeem Joseph, Walter Gordon,. Judah, James Jacob Judah, Raphael Solomon. Juman, Sheik Jun Kee-choy

June, James Kim Fook Juster, Andrew William

Engineer, W. C. Jack & Co., Ld.,. Account., Dairy Farm 1. & C. S. Co., Ld., Vice-President, Industrial & Commercial

Bank,

Employee, British American Tobacco

Co., Ld.,

Shift Engineer, HK. Electric Co., Ld., Sales Manager, Vacuum Oil Co., Yard Boatswain, Dock Co., North West Trading Co., Ld................ Clerk, Taikoo Dockyard,

....

Engineer, Green Island Cement Co., Ld., Assistant, Union Trading Co., Ld.,

Accountant, Robert Dollar Co., Alfred Holt & Co.,

Storekeeper, Taikoo Dockyard,

Assistant, South British Ince. Co., La.,... Assistant, Mackinnon, Mackenzie & Co., Head Timekeeper, Dock Co....

Assistant, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Ld., Mercantile Asst., Dodwell & Co., Ld., Assistant, Butterfield & Swire, Manager, S. Moutrie & Co., Ld., Lane, Crawford & Co

Merchant, J. V. Jorge & Co.,...... Assistant, Reiss & Co., Assistant, Union Trading Co., Ld., Merchant, Joseph Brothers, Broker, F. A. Joseph, Broker, 1 Prince's Building, Assistant, E. D. Sassoon & Co., La., Manager, J. R. Michael & Co., Assistant, D. S. Gubbay,

Assistant, Mackinnon, Mackenzie & Co., Assistant, HK. & K'loon W. & G. Co., Ld., Vice-President, Industrial & Commercial

Bank, Ld.,

1 Canton Villas, Kowloon. Palace Hotel, Kowloon.

32A Caine Road.

1 Bowen Road.

4 Wilddell Buildings, Wanchai. Kings Building.

Kowloon Docks. 26A Kennedy Road. Quarry Bay. Hok Un Works. 6 Mosque Street.

129 Wanchai Road.

Quarry Bay.

Kingsclere, Kennedy Road. 22 Des Voeux Road Central. Kowloon Docks.

Cheriton, Minden Row, Kowloon. Queen's Building.

Peak Hotel.

38A Nathan Road, Kowloon. 13 Chater Road, Kowloon.

6 Leung Fee Terrace.

8 Humphreys Avenue, Kowloon.

2 Saifee Terrace, Kowloon.

Hongkong Hotel.

39 Conduit Road.

39 Conduit Road.

19 Ice House Street.

1 Prince's Building. Hongkong Hotel.

22 Des Voeux Road Central. 43 Sharp Street.

15 Shelley Street.

Assistant, HK. & K'loon W. & G. Co., Ld., 2 & 3 Ashley Road, Kowloon. Clerk, Taikoo Dockyard,

Quarry Bay.

'

8

NAME IN FULL.

15

OCCUPATION.

ADDRESS.

K

Kailey, William

Kan Tung-po

Kant, Pieter Julius de

Kay, George Albert Lloyd

Kay, Ronald Grimshaw Sellers Keating, Thomas Francis Keith, David

Keith, James Smith Kemp, George Henry Kennedy, Frederick Kennett, Alfred Charles Kennett, Henry William Bul-

mer

Kent, Herbert Wade Kerr, William...............

Ketel, Bernardus Hendricus

van

Kew, Arthur Jimmy Kew, Charles Herbert Whiteley Kew, Joseph Whiteley ..... Kewley, Rigby Henry Parry...

Khan, Juman

Kim, Charles Henry King, Charles

Kinghorn, John Richard Kinnaird, John Daniel Kinross, Andrew Robert Knight, Perey Lister... Kuight, Thomas Leonard Knoth, Jean Koch, Harry J.

Kochler, Charles Edward Komor, Henry Solan Komor, Henry Solan

Komor, Siegsrid......

Koukoleosky, Andrey

Alexandrovitch

Krull, Henry Thomas

Kwok Hin-wang

Assistant, Standard Oil Co., Manager, Bank of East Asia, Ld., Asst., Netherlands Commerical Bank, Wharfinger, HK, & K'loon W. & G. Co.,

Ld.,

Merchant, Asiatic Petroleum Co., Ld., Assistant, Standard Oil Co., Shipwright, Dock Co.,............ Carpenter, Dock Co., Assistant, Thos. Cook & Son,. Clerk, Russo-Asiatic Bank,. Assistant, HK. & Shanghai Bank,

Asst., British Borneo Timber, Co., Ld.,... Assistant, Butterfield & Swire, Foreman, Taikoo Dockyard,....

Acct., Netherlands India Com'l Bauk, Assistant, Andersen, Meyer & Co., Ld.,... Manager, Rudolf Wolff & Kew, Engineer,

Insurance Manager, Liverpool & London

& Globe Insurance Co., Ld. Assistant, HK. & K. W. & G. Co., Ld.,... Foreman, Green Island Cement Co., Ld., Manager, Robert Dollar Co.,

Asst. Supt. Engr., Butterfield & Swire, Foreman, China Sugar Refining Co., Ld., Shipbuilder, Dock Co.,.....

Chief Asst., Mackinnon, Mackenzie & Co., Clerk, American Express Co.,................ Partner, Floquet & Knoth, Asia Banking Corporation,

Civil Engr., Swedish Trading Co., Ld.,... Manager, Komor & Komor

Manager, Service Station, Dragon Car Co., Merchant, Komor & Komor,

Agent, Russian Volunteer Fleet,..

Krimpen, Cornelis Rocland van Assistant, Transmarina Trading Co.,

Kwok Siu-lau

Kwong, Fred Norman

Kylling, William Henry

L

Labrum, Victor Charles.. Labussiere, Herve Lafleur, Franciscus Hubertus

Joseph Alphonsus ...

Laing, John

Lake, Maurice Barthram

Cassap

Lakin, George Mason.. Lam Chi-lok

...

Lam Chun Shang Lam, George Theodore Lam, James Alexander Lam Kwong Sik...................... Lamb, Francis Robert Lamb, Harry James Lambert, Bernard Cattley. Lammert, Frank.... Lammert, Lionel Eugene Lamplugh, Alfred Gilmer Landolt, Joseph Savage.... Langston, Arthur Golden ......

Lapicque, Paul Auguste Lapsley, Robert .

Agent, Admiral Line Pacific S.S. Co., Compradore, Liverpool & London & Globe

Insurance Co., Ld.,

Merchant, ...

Assistant, Dock Co.,...

Assistant, Asiatic Petroleum Co., Ld.,

Printer, Kelly & Walsh Ld.. Clerk, Messageries Maritimes,

Assistant, Holland China Trading Co., ... Foreman, Taikoo Dockyard,

Asst., Union Ince. Socty, of Canton, Ld., Assistant, Gibb, Livingston & Co.,.. Assistant, Donnelly & Whyte, Salesman, Alex. Ross & Co., Employee, Java-China-Japan, Lijn, Employee, Java-China-Japan Lijn, Clerk, Mackinnon, Mackenzie & Co., Assistant, Butterfield & Swire, Manager, Arthur & Co.,

Assistant, HK. & Shanghai Bank, Auctioneer, Lammert Bros., Auctioneer, Lammert Bros.,.

Asst., Union Ince. Socty. of Canton, Ld.,... Assistant, Chas. E. Richardson, Assistant Station Supt., HK. Electric

Co., Ld.,

Merchant, P. A. Lapicque & Co., Assistant, Dock Co.,......................

Laichikok Installation. On premises.

Des Voeux Road Central.

40A Nathan Road, Kowloon. Peak Hotel.

Laichikok Installation. Kowloon Docks.

Kowloon Docks.

Des Voeux Road Central. 38 Wyndham Street. On premises.

St. George's Building. 76 The Peak. Quarry Bay.

Des Voeux Road Central. S Lower Castle Road. 8 Castle Road. ·

13 Wongneichong Road.

Hongkong Hotel.

3 Shanghai Street, Yaumati.

1 Kowloon City Road, 2nd floor. 21 Humphreys Building, Kowloon. King Edward Hotel. 212 Praya East. Kowloon Docks.

22 Des Voeux Road Central. Homeville, Wanchai.

7 Torres Building, Kowloon. 22 Ashley Road, Kowloon. 40 Morrison Hill Road. Glentorne, Kimberley Rd., Kowloon. 6 Kimberly Road, Kowloon. Glentorne, Kimberley Rd., Kowloon.

Peak Hotel.

14 Seymour Terrace: Station Hotel, Kowloon.

36 Peel Street. Robinson Road.

Kowloon Docks.

192 Portland Street, Yaumati.

22A Nathan Road, Kowloon. King Edward Hotel.

1 Saifee Terrace, Kowloon. Quarry Bay.

Queen's Building.

St. George's Building. 2 Gutzlaff Street.

17 Landall Street.

2 Ho Mun Tin, Yaumati. 124 Nathan Road, Kowloon. On premises.

On premises. St. George's House. On premises. Broadwood Ridge. Broadwood Ridge. Queen's Building.

2 Moreton Terrace, Causeway Bay.

Quarters, Wing Fung Street. Blarney Stone, Pokfulam Road. Kowloon Docks.

NAME IN FULL.

16

OCCUPATION.

ADDRESS.

L—Continued.

Larcina, Angelo Maria Larkins, Douglas Molyneux Larson, Charles Martin Lau Hew Cho Laugier, Louis

Laurel, Francisco Paulo.. Lauritsen, Christen Law, John Baptist Lawrence, Frank Edward Lawrence, John Henry Lawson, William Graham.. Lay, Alexander Hyde

Layton, Geoffrey Bendyshe Leach, Arthur

Lee, Chinfen Lee, George

Lee, James

Lee-James, Reignald Wynne.

Lee, Joseph William Lee, Ralph William

Lee, Rodney Lee Yat-choi

Leggatt, Alexander Caldwell . Lei Ping alias Lei Sui-kam ... Leitch, Thomas Martin.... Leith, Alister Cameron Leon, Arthur

Leon, Cezar Angusto

Leong, Ernest.....

Leung Kam-lun

'Leung Pui Yim

Levy, Silas Simon

Lewis, Archibald Harry Lewis, Edward Weston. Li Hoi Tung

Li Koon-chun

Li Tse-fong Li Tung

Liang Shutung

Lightburn, Walter Bolton......

Lima, Luiz Gonzaga Linennen, Frederick Lloyd, Joseph Ralph Lo Chung-wan Lo Kai Hong Lobel, Frank Logan, Donald Clements Longfield, Stuart Look Poon-shan...... Lopes, Arthur dos Anjos Lopes, Carlos Augusto Lopes, Dellano Pedro Jesus Lopes, José Maria Jesus Lopes, Lucas Lindouro Lopes, Secondino Antonio.. Lo Tsun-wing Loney Po Sang Loureiro, Eduardo José da

Silva

Loureiro. Francisco Alpoin

Silva

Loureiro, Francisco José da

Silva

Lowry, Charles Leroy Luby, James Francis

Manager, P. A. Xavier & Co., Assistant, Reiss & Co., Assistant, Standard Oil Co.,................... Assistant, Union Trading Co., Ld., Assistant, Floquet & Knoth,

8 Ashley Road, Kowloon. 171 The Peak.

Laichikok Installation. 7 Canton Road, Kowloon. 21 Lieghton Hill Road.

Assistant, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Ld.,.] 5 Blue Building. Proprietor, Dragon Motor Car Co., Clerk, Lloyd's Register,

Assistant, A. S. Watson & Co., Ld, Storekeeper, Dock Co...................... Assistant, Standard Oil Co.,

Manager, Import Dept., W. G. Hum-

phreys & Co.,

Broker, Layton & Co.,..

Chief Accountant, Vacuum Oil Co.,

Hongkong Hotel.

4 Shelley Street.

16 Conduit Road. Kowloon Docks.

C/o. Godowns, West Point,

159 The Peak.

1 Prince's Building.

..... Empress Lodge, Kowloon.

Assistant, HK. & K’loon W. & G. Co., Ld., | 1 Carnarvon Road, Kowloon. Assistant, Asiatic Petroleum Co., Ld., ... 1 Ashley Road, Kowloon. Assistant Bookkeeper, Admiral Line

Pacific S.S. Co.,

Assistant, China Provident Loan &

Mortgage Co., Ld......................... Employee, Java-China-Japan Lijn, Sugar Boiler, China Sugar Refining Co.,

Ld.,

Assistant, Asiatic Petroleum Co., Ld., Chief Asst., S. C. Lay & Co., Storekeeper, Taikoo Dockyard, Wing Tai, Contractor, 10 High Street, Assistant, HK. & S'hai Bank, Assistant, HK. & S'hai Bank, Foreman, Taikoo Dockyard.. Clerk, HK. & S'hai Bank,

Clerk, International Banking Corporation, Assistant Compradore, HK. & K'loon W.

& G. Co., Ld......................

Clerk, China Oversea Trading Co...... Assistant, E. D. Sassoon & Co., Ld.,. Assistant, Butterfield & Swire.

35A Queen's Road East.

Peak Hotel.

1 Shelley Street, 2nd floor.

4 Great George Street.

5 Gordon Terrace, Kowloon. 12 St. Francis Yard.

Quarry Bay.

68 Bonham Road. On premises. On premises. Quarry Bay. On premises.

2 Breezy Terrace.

9 Ashley Road, Kowloon. 173 Queen's Road East. 296 Kennedy Road.

15a Orient Buildings, Kowloon.

Asst. Mains Supt., HK. Electric Co., Ld., | 1 Moreton Terrace. Merchant, Banker & Co.,....

Director, Bank of East Asia, Ld., Assist. Manager, Bank of East Asia, Ld., Asst, Union Ince. Socty. of Canton, Ld..... Treasurer, Pacific Trading Co., Engineer, Asiatic Petroleum Co., North

Point,

Clerk, HK. & Shanghai Bank,

75 Caine Road.

On premises. On premises. Queen's Building.

On premises.

On premises.

St. George's House. On premises.

40 Peel Street, 2nd floor. Prince's Building. Kingslere, Kennedy Road. Basilea, Lyttleton Road. Des Voeux Road Central. 7 Liberty Avenue, Kowloon. 7 Hankow Road, Kowloon.

Assistant, Dairy Farm I. & C. S. Co., Ld., Sailors Home, West Point. Cashier, American Express Co.,. Compradore, Netherlands Trading Society, Cashier, HK., C. & M. Steamboat Co., Ld.,. Assistant, Harry Wicking & Co., Assistant, Reiss & Co...... Meter Supt., Electric Co., Ld., Chief Manager, Bank of Canton, Ld.,...... Shipping Clerk, Bank Line, Ld.,. Clerk, China Mail S. S. Co., Ld., Clerk, P. M. N. da Silva, Broker, Assistant, Standard Oil Co., Clerk, Electric Co., Ld., Clerk, HK. Tramway Co., Ld., Compradore, Gerin, Drevard & Co., Compradore, Struthers & Dixon,.

Accountant, Hongkong Hotel,.....

Clerk, HK, & S'hai Bank,

Accountant, HK, Steel Foundry Co., Ld., Assistant, S. J. David & Co.,

Asst., Canadian Pacific Ocean Services,

Lu.

44 Elgin Street.

7 Hankow Road, Kowloon.

5 Ashley Terrace, Kowloon. 23 Belilios Terrace.

4 Po Wah Street.

287 Des Voeux Road Central.

2 Victoria View, Kowloon.

On premises.

| 2 Victoria View, Kowloon.

Zetland House.

22 Ashley Road, Kowloon.

.

$

;

NAME IN FULL.

17

OCCUPATION.

!

ADDRESS.

L-Continued.

Lucas, Hubert William Ludin, Gunnar Luhrs, Jan Hendriksen

Gennep

Lunny, James Francis Luz, Alvaro Augusto da Luz, Eduardo Guilherme da... Luz, Francisco José da ....... Luz, Henrique Francisco da ... Luz, José Maria de Lourdes da Ly J. Usang

Lyle, David.........

Manager, Moller & Co., Manager, A. B. Swedish Trading Co., Managing Director, Holland Pacific

Trading Co.,

Shift Engineer, HK. Electric Co., Ld., Assistant, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Ld., Asst., Union Ince. Socty. of Canton, Ld., Assistant, Union Trading Co., Ld........... Assistant, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Ld.,. Clerk, Green Island Cement Co., Ld., Vice-President, Industrial & Commercial

Bank,

Foreman, Taikoo Dockyard,

|

1 Peace Avenue, Ho Mun Tin. Hongkong Hotel.

The Farm, 139 The Peak,

1 Moreton Terrace.

128 Nathan Road, Yaumati. Queen's Building.

6 Peace Villa, Ho Mun Tin. 424 Nathan Road, Kowloon. 4 Saifee Terrace, Kowloon.

32A Caine Road. Quarry Bay.

M

Ma Shui Tsun.............. Maas, Martin Mortimore MacArthur, Neil........ Macaskill, Kenneth Roderick MacCrae, Donald Macdonald, E. J. Macdonald, Michael Macdougall, Robert Ernest Macfarlane, Alexander Macfarlane, William MacGregor, Robert Mackay, Charles

Mackay, David Murray. Mackenzie, Alexander Mackenzie, Allan

Mackenzie, Colin

Mackenzie, Donald

Mackenzie, John

Mackichan, Alexander

Somerled......

Mackintosh, Frederick Alex-

ander Maclachlan, James

Maclean, Alexander Thomas...

Macnaughton, Ernest Brander.

MacReynolds, Thomas

Naughton

Madden, Robert Murray

Maher, Antonio

Maher, Antonio Paulo Mahomed, Moosa Mak Kam Yuk Makeham, Charles... Maltby, Cyril Fort.... Man, Maximilian Albert

Nothenius de

Manners, John

Manning, Ernest... Manning, Warne.. Mansfield, William Robert de

Courcy Stanley Manuk, Malcolm Marçal, Henrique Oscar...

Marcel, Charles Patrick.................. Markar, Cassim Gaful Marks, Pieter

Marques, Carlos Evaristo Marques, Francisco Luiz Marques, José Daniel Marshall, Walter Leonard Marsot, Charles Victor

Martin, Alfred Edgecumbe

Asst. Mgr., China Overseas Trading Co., Merchant, Asiatic Petroleum Co., Ld., Foreman, Taikoo Dockyard, Assistant, Dock Co.,...

Engineer, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Office Manager, Connell Bros. Co.,........... Shift Engineer, HK. Electric Co., Ld., Assistant, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Ld., Engineer, Dairy Farm I. & C. S. Co., Ld., Engineer, Dairy Farm I. & C. S. Co., Ld., Secretary, Taikoo Dockyard, Timekeeper, Taikoo Dockyard, Foreman, Taikoo Dockyard, Assistant, Standard Oil Co....

Clerk, Dairy Farm I. & C. S. Co., Ld., Assistant, Andersen, Meyer & Co., Ld.,... Shipbuilder, Dock Co................... Clerk, Benjamin & Potts,

Engineer, Leigh & Orange,...

Merchant, Mackintosh & Co., Ld., Foreman, Taikoo Dockyard, Clerk, Canadian Pacific Ocean Services,

Ld.,

Director, British-American Tobacco Co.,

Ld.,

Accountant, Asiatic Petroleum Co., Ld.,.. Assistant Branch Manager, General

Electric Co. of China, Storekeeper, Dock Co.,

Station Assistant, HIK. Electric Co., L., Assistant, Douglas, Lapraik & Co., Clerk, International Bank,

Supt., Dairy Farm I. & C. S. Co., Ld.,..............] Acct., Chartered Bank of I. A. &. C., Assistant, Netherlands-India Commercial

Bank,

Director, Manners & Backhouse, Ld., Assistant, Shewan, Tomes & Co., Merchant, Asiatic Petroleum Co., Ld.,

Asst., Union Ince. Socty. of Canton, Ld., Secretary, Dairy Farm I. & C. S. Co., Ld., Assistant, Netherlands-India Commercial

Bank,

Assistant, Signs p. pro. Pentreath & Co., Assistant, Holland-China Trading Co., Manager, Netherlands-India Commercial

Bank,

Assistant, Standard Oil Co.,

64 Caine Road. 36 The Peak. Quarry Bay. Kowloon Docks. Quarry Bay.

Station Hotel, Kowloon. 98c Wanchai Road. 74 The Peak. Laichikok Ice Works. Ice Works, Laichikok. 58 The Peak. Quarry Bay. Quarry Bay.

13 Broadwood Road.

52 Praya East, 1st floor.

6 Humphreys Avenue, Kowloon. Kowloon Docks.

30 Queen's Road East.

51 The Peak.

93 The Peak.. Quarry Bay.

Empress Lodge, Kowloon.

1 May Road.

Peak Hotel.

St. George's House, 9 Kennedy Road. Kowloon Docks.

13 Sau Wa Fong.

28 Leighton Hill Road.

29 Second Street, Top floor. Dairy Farm, Pokfulam. On premises.

Des Voeux Road Central. 5 Queen's Road Central, 23 Bonham Road. 85 The Peak.

Queen's Building. King Edward Hotel.

Des Voeux Road Central. Peak Hotel.

177 Praya East.

Des Voeux Road Central. 16 Askley Road, Kowloon.

Asst., Union Ince. Socty. of Canton, Ld.,... On premises. Assistant, Dock Co.,

Assistant, Standard Oil Co.,

Acting Manager, Banque de l'Indo-Chine, Assistant, Mackinnon, Mackenzie & Co.,

Kowloon Docks.

4 Minden Villas, Kowloon. Prince's Building.

22 Des Voeux Road Central.

NAME IN FULL,

18

OCCUPATION.

ADDRESS.

:

M-Continued,

Martin, Alfred John James Martin, John

Martin, Thomas Archdale........... Mason, Valentine Atherton Matchin, William James Matheson, Herbert... Mathias, Alfonso Crescencio... Mathias, Claudio Matthews, Charles Buchand... Matthews, Thomas Maurin, Louis Joseph Maxwell, Hamilton Maxwell, John Jex

May, Ernest Alfred George May, George Thomas McCann, John Smith..... McCarty, Albert Edward McCormack, John ....... McCorquodale, John

Campbell...

McCubbin, John McCubbin, John

McDonald, Allister

Ken

McFarland, Arthur McGrath, Edmund Marshal McGregor, John...... McGregor, Robert McHutchon, James Maitland... MeIntosh, James Stuart McIntyre, John

McIntyre, Robert Williams McKellar, Robert

McKenzie, William Walker McKerns, Frederick William McKirdy, Archibald McLaggan, James Ormiston... McLeod, George..... McLeod, William

McMurray, David

McNeill, Duncan McNeillie, David McNicoll, Leslie Douglas McNicoll, Leslie Douglas McPhail, James Wyllie

Robertson McPherson, J. L.

McTavish, Hector MacEwen.

Mearr, John William Mecklenburgh, Horace Leslie.

Meek, Thomas Meffan, Harry..

Meffan, Norman Dunn Mehal, Wali Mohammed

Mellis, George

Mendes, Antonio

Mendes, Francisco Xavier..

Mendoza, Fontinetto Gonzales. Meyer, Clarence Earle

Meyer, Reginald Victor... Michael, Sidney.... Millard, Cyril Edwin

Miller, David Charleton.. Miller, Francis Claude Miller, John Finlay Milne, George Willox Milne, William John Minney, Maurice

Accountant, Lowe, Bingham & Matthews, 3 Queen's Road, Central.

Sub-Manager, International Banking

Corporation,

Assistant, Lowe, Bingham & Matthews,. Assistant, HK. & S'hai Bank,. Engineer, Dock Co........

Acct., Chartered Bank of I. A. & C., Assistant, Admiral Line Pacific S.S. Co., Foreman, China Sugar Refining Co., Ld., Draughtsman, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Asst. Wharfinger, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Manager, Lapicque & Co., Assistant, W. R. Loxley & Co., Asst., HK. & K'loon W. & G. Co., Ld.,... Assistant, Dodwell & Co., Ld., Clerk, Asiatic Petroleum Co., Ld.,....... Assistant, Mackinnon, Mackenzie & Co., Diver, Taikoo Dockyard,

Clerk, Taikoo Dockyard,.

Hongkong Hotel.

3 Queen's Road Central, On premises. Kowloon Docks. Chartered Bank. 5 Praya East. 100c Wanchai Road. Quarry Bay. Quarry Bay.

Blarney Stone, Lower Jubilee Road. 1 Basilea Terrace.

1 Ashley Road, Kowloon. Queen's Building. Kennedy Road.

22 Des Vœux Road Central. Quarry Bay.

Quarry Bay.

Foreman, China Sugar Refining Co., Ld., 2 Great George Street.

Assistant, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Engineer, Gas Co.,

Assistant, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Ld.,. Asst., C'dian Pacific Ocean Services, Ld., Turner, W. G. Humphreys & Co., Engineer, Dock Co.,.... Assistant, Butterfield & Swire, Assistant, Butterfield & Swire, Draughtsman, Dock Co., . Assistant, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Assistant, Butterfield & Swire, Sugar Boiler, China Sugar Refining

Co., Ld..

Salesman, Alex. Ross & Co., Assistant, Mackintosh & Co., Assistant, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Draughtsman, Dock Co., Foreman, Taikoo Dockyard Assistant, J. D. Hutchison & Co., Supt. Engr., Jardine, Matheson & Co., Ld., Boilermaker, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Foreman, Taikoo Dockyard,

9

Representative, Lever Bros. (China), Ld., Manager, H. Wicking & Co.,

Assistant. HK. & S'hai Bank, General Secretary, Young Men's Christian

Association,

Asst. Chemist, China Sugar Refining

Con Lư,

Asia Banking Corporation, Employee, British-American Tobacco

Co., Ld.,

Jeweller, Geo. Falconer & Co., Ld., Foreman, Taikoo Dockyard, Foreman, Taikoo Dockyard, Clerk, Banque de l'Indo-Chine, Jeweller, Geo. Falconer & Co., Ld., Assistant, Dock Co.,

Office Assistant, Dock Co.,

Quarry Bay.

Gas Works, Hongkong. 24в Nathau Road, Kowloou. 12 Nathan Road, Kowloon. Mau Tau Kok Tannery. Kowloon Docks. 59 The Peak 154 The Peak. Kowloon Docks. Quarry Bay. On premises.

209 Praya East. St. George's House.

10 Knutsford Terrace, Kowloon. Quarry Bay.

Kowloon Docks.

Quarry Bay.

co. J. Simpson, Taikoo Dock. Hongkong Hotel.

Quarry Bay. Quarry Bay. Prince's Building. Kingsclere, Kennedy Road.

On premises.

Des Voeux Road Central.

On premises.

17 Chatham Road, Kowloon.

Peak Hotel.

11 Beaconsfield Arcade. Quarry Bay.

Quarry Bay. Prince's Building. 80 The Peak. Kowloon Docks. Cosmopolitan Dock.

Accounting Clerk, Pacific Mail S.S. o.,. On premises.

Assistant, Standard Oil Co., Optician, N. Lazarus & Co.,

Merchant, J. R. Michael & Co., Storekeeper, Dock Co.,

Asst., C'dian Pacific Ocean Services, Ld., Assistant, Caldbeck Macgregor & Co.,

Supt., Eastern Asbestos Co., Ld., Foreman, Taikoo Dockyard,

4 Tregunter Mansions. 28 Queen's Road Central.

I Prince's Building.

Kowloon Docks.

12 Nathan Road, Kowloon.

15 Queen's Road.

Queen's Building. Quarry Bay.

Assistant, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Ld., Peak Hotel.

Assistant, E. D. Sassoon & Co.,

4 Hart Avenue, Kowloon.

J

NAME IN FULL.

19

OCCUPATION.

Address.

M-Continued.

Miskin, Geoffrey Mistry, Kharshidgi Dhunjibhoy Mitchell, Eric John Roderick. Mitchell, John

Mitchell, Robert Hay Berry... Mody, Jehangir Hormisji

Naorogi

Mok Kon-sang

Montargis, Maurice

Director, Gilman & Co., Ld., Secretary, Hogg, Karanjia & Co., Assistant, Bradley & Co., Ld., Foreman, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Assistant, Dock Co.,

Bill & Exchange Broker, Compradore, Butterfield & Swire,

Manager, Banque Industrielle de Chine,...

Moore, Brinsley John de Heez.. Clerk, Asiatic Petroleum Co., Ld.,

Moore, Edward

Moosdeen, Emam Ali Moraes, Joe.....

Morgan, Bernard Donald

Crawford

Morgan, William Alfred Morley, Walter Morrison, David Taylor. Morrison, George Morrison, Hugh Alexander Morrison, Kenneth Sinclair Morrison, William James Morton, Adam George Sinclair Morton, Richard Charles Moses, Naptali Steinberg Mow Fung, Frederick Charles Muir, David

Muir, John Greig Muirhead, John

Mulder, Jan Dirk Frederik

Munton, Douglas William...... Murdoch, Arthur Murphy, Albert Edward Murphy, Duncan Joseph Murphy, Edward Aaron Murray, Malcolm McLean Murray, Robert Dolman Musitano, Archibald Gaetano. Muskett, William Herbert Basil Musso, Salvador........

Naef, Walter

N

Nagel, Lee Orlando

Nazarin, Razee

Neal, William.........

Neave, Etienne Hugh

Neave, Thomas

Neeson, William Patrick

Neilson, Donald

Nelson, Charles Cowley

Nelson, George Philip

Nelson, Luther

Nemazee, Mohamed

Neves, Florindo José..

Newcomb, Dudley De Burgh... Newman, Percy Ingham Ng Keng Tsin

Ng Pak King

Ng Sze-kwong

Nicholls, Henry John

Nicholls, Robert Edward

Nicholson, Alfred

Nicol, Alexander

Nicoll, David Gordon

Nicoll, Ernest Ferguson

Nicoll, Thomas Soutar Bisset. Nicolson, John Swanson Normington, Fred.

Foreman, Taikoo Dockyard, Bookkeeper, Wiseman Ld., Merchant, Joe Moraes & Co.,

Assistant, E. D. Sassoon & Co.,.... Assistant, Dock Co.,

Assistant, A. S. Watson & Co., Ld.,. Foreman, Taikoo Dockyard,.. Foreman, Taikoo Dockyard, Coal Overseer, Butterfield & Swire, Merchant, Bradley & Co., Ld., Sub.-Acct., Chartered Bank of I. A. & C., Mining Engineer, HK. & China Mining Co., General Agent, Pacific Mail S.S. Co., Merchant, Moses & Co., Merchant, Mow Fung & Co., Assistant, Gas Co., Fitting Dept., Sugar Boiler, Taikoo Sugar. Refinery, Foreman, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Manager of Foreign Exchange, Bank of

Canton, Ld.,

Engineer, Shewan, Tomes & Co., Assistant, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Ld.,. Shift Engineer, HK. Electric Co., Ld.,. Assistant, Arnhold Bros & Co., Ld., Clerk, C'dian Pacific Ocean Services, Ld., Asst. Eng. Supt., Butterfield & Swire, Sub-Acct., Chartered Bank of I. A. & C. Assistant, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Ld., Assistant, C. E. Richardson & Co., Assistant, Eastern Asbestos Co.,

...

Bookkeeper, Holland Pacific Trading Co.,. Accountant, J. T. Shaw & Co., Bookkeeper, Harry Wicking & Co., Timekeeper, Dock Co.,

Wharfinger, HK. & K'loon W.&G. Co., Ltd., Superintendent Engineer, Dock Co.,

Asst. Agent, Pacific Mail S.S. Co., Boilermaker, Dock Co.,

Asst.-Engineer, Taikoo Dockyard,..... Assistant, Dock Co.,

Sub-Acet., International Bank, Merchant, H. M. H. Nemazee,

Asst., Canadian Pacific Ocean Services, Ld., Sub-Acct., Chartered Bank of I. A. & C., Lane, Crawford & Co.,...... Compradore, Connell Bros. Co.,

Clerk, South British Insurance Co., Ld.,. Assistant, Man Hing Cheung,. Cutter, Wm. Powell, Ld.,

Mine Superintendent, China Light &

Power Co., Ld.,

Superintendent, Dock Co., Engineer, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Assistant, HK. Rope Factory,. Mercantile Assistant, Dodwell & Co., Ld., Assistant, HK. & Shanghai Bank,... Manager, Central Agency Co., Ld., Supt.-Engineer, HK. Electric Co., Ld.,

On premises.

2 Chater Road.

6 Tregunter Mansions, May Road. Quarry Bay.

Kowloon Docks.

Prince's Building.

On premises.

7 Peak Road.

5B Orient Buildings, Kowloon. Quarry Bay.

5 Chi Shing Lane, Bowrington. 1 College View.

Peak Hotel. Kowloon Docks.

Humphreys Building, Kowloon. Quarry Bay. Quarry Bay.

3 Fairview, Kowloon. 149 The Peak. Chartered Bank.

11 Ice House Street. Ou premises.

27 Wongneichong Road. 82 Sai Tau, Kowloon City. Gas Works, Hongkong. Quarry Bay. Quarry Bay.

Des Voeux Road Central. 121 The Peak. 40 The Peak.

10 Morrison Gap Road. 44A Nathan Road, Kowloom. Empress Lodge, Kowloon. 160 The Peak. Chartered Bank. Ewo Junior Mess. 153 Wanchai Road.

46 Morrison Hill Road.

16 Nathan Road, Kowloon. 32 Morrison Hill Road. 13 Matheson Street. Kowloon Docks.

4 Fairview Villas, Kowloon. Kowloon Docks. On premises. Kowloon Docks. Quarry Bay. Kowloon Docks.

Knutsford Hotel, Kowloon. 3 Conduit Road.

25 Cameron Road, Kowloon. Chartered Bank.

153 Wanchai Road. 12 Chancery Lane. 39 Centre Street.

8 Queen's Road Central. Powell's Building.

Kowloon.

Cosmopolitan Docks. Quarry Bay.

4 Basilea, Lyttelton Road. On premises.

On premises. Hongkong Hotel.

5 Wood Road 1st Floor.

NAME IN FULL.

20

OCCUPATION.

ADDRESS.

N-Continued.

Noronha, José Maria

Noronha, Libanio Joaquim North, Robert Herbert Norton, Herbert J. B..

O

Obombski, Marian O'Brien, Maurice Odell, Harry O.. O'Farrell, Edward Henry

Ridgett.

Ogden, Henry Gouverneur Ogilvie, Alexander...... Ogilvie, Arthur George Wright Ogley, Wilfred Clarence O'Hoy, Sheow Louey O'Hoy, Suey Louey Oliphant, Thomas

Oliveira, Oscar Mirandolino

dos Santos

Oliver, Peter

Olson, Charles William Olson, John

Omar, Usuff Mahomed

Omar, Rumjahn Mohomed O'Neill, P. J.

Onslow, Charles

Ormiston, James Ormiston James

Osborne, Alfred Richard Osborne, John O'Shea, Stephen John Osmund, Alberto José Osmund, Arthur Frederick Osmund, Ernest Edgar Osmund, George Vincent Osmund, James Daniel Osmund, Luiz Augusto... Oswald, William Robert Otten, Gerhardus Overy, Hubert Owen, James Colin Oxberry, James Henry Ozorio, Duarte Deniz.. Ozorio, Eurico Maria.

Ozorio, Fausto Maria.....

Ozorio, José Graça

Ozorio, Leopoldo Augusto....

P

Packe, Cyril Leslie Packham, Ralph.....

Page, Harry William.......

Page, Howrad Charles Palmer, Alfred James Palmer, Henry Thomas.. Pals, Jemke

Pang Kok-sui.

Pang Man-shiu

Pang Shiu-ming...

Panizzi, Joseph Vincent ...... Paravicini, Percy Gerald de Parker, James Norman Parker, Philo Woodworth......

Secretary, Crédit Foncier d'Extrême-

Orient,..

Assistant, Gibb, Livingston & Co.......... Sugar Boiler,China Sugar Refining Co.,Ld., Asst.-Manager, Wiseman, Ld.,

Chemist, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Timekeeper, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Acting Manager, Getz Bros., La.,

Asst., HK, & 'K'loon W. & G. Co., Ld..... Assistant, Butterfield & Swire, Storekeeper, Dock Co.,...... Architect, Palmer & Turner, Lane, Crawford & Co......

Manager, China Overseas Trading Co., Accountant, Struthers & Dixon,................. Assistant Dairy Farm I. & C. S. Co., Ld.,

Clerk, Green Island Cement Co, Moulder, Dock Co.,

Ld.,

Dept. Manager, Thoresen & Co., Director, C. E. Warren & Co., Ld.,.. Clerk, Hongkong Hotel Co., Ld., Clerk, Moxon & Taylor, Brokers, Mine Assistant, Chas. E. Richardson, Representative Staff, W. R. Grace & Co., Anglo-Chinese Engineers Assn. Ld., Assistant, Macdonald & Co., Timekeeper, Taikoo Dockyard, Watchman, Dock Co.,

15 Ashley Road, Kowloon. St. George's Building. 4 Great George Street. Wyndham Hotel.

Quarry Bay. Quarry Bay.

16 Conduit Road.

13 Humphreys Buildings, Kowloon. King Edward Hotel. Kowloon City. Hongkong Club.

211 Temple Street.

39 Sands Street, Kennedy Town. 39 Sands Street, Kennedy Town. | Pokfulum.

17 Barrow Terrace, Kowloon. Kowloon Docks.

98A Wanchai Road,

98A Wanchai Road.

3 Bowrington, Canal Road East. 16 Ice House Street. On premises.

76 Connaught Road.

40в Nathan Road, Kowloon. 40B Nathan Road, Kowloon. Quarry Bay. Kowloon Docks.

Engineer, China Light & Power Co., Ld. Kowloon. Assistant, Standard Oil Co.,

Assistant, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Ld., Assistant, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Ld., Assistant, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Ld.,.| Assistant, China Sugar Refining Co., Ld., Asst., Union Ince. Socty. of Canton, Ld.,... Draughtsman, Taikoo Dockyard, Manager, Java-China-Japan Lijn, Assistant, Wm. Powell, Ld., Assistant, Dock Co.,

Proprietor, Palace Hotel, Kowloon, Assistant, Reiss & Co........

Clerk, Chartered Bank of I. A. & C., Assistant, Asiatic Petroleum Co., Ld., Assistant, Dock Co.,...................

Clerk, HK. Electric Co., Ld.,..

6 Rednaxela Terrace,

1 Liberty Avenue, Kowloon. 16 Belilios Terrace. 16 Belilios Terrace. 6 Rednaxela Terrace. Queen's Building. Quarry Bay. 38 The Peak. Powell's Building. Kowloon Docks. Ou premises. 19 Shelley Street. 2 Belilios Terrace. 14 Belilios Terrace. Kowloon Docks. 19 Shelley Street.

Asst.-Engineer, HK. Electric Co., Ld.,... St. George's House, Kennedy Road. Cargo Supt., HK. & K'loon W. & G.

Co., Ld.,

4 Kimberley Villas, Kowloon, Supt., Dairy Farm I. & C. S. Co., Ld.,... Dairy Farm Depôt, 38 Nathan Road,

Assistant, Standard Oil Co.,

Asst., Union Ince. Socty. of Canton, Ld., Foreman, China Sugar Refining Co., Ld., Supt.-Engineer, Java-China-Japan Lijn,... Shipbroker, Geo. Grimble & Co., Salesman, General Electric Co., of China

Ld.,

Compradore, Gilman & Co., Ld.,..... Asst., Whiteaway, Laidlaw & Co., Ld.,... Asst., Union Ince. Socty. of Canton, Ld., Manager, Davis & Co., Ld.,...... Attorney, Standard Oil Co.,

Kowloon. Woodbury, Pokfulum. Queen's Building. 21 Leighton Hill Road. King Edward Hotel. 5 Wongneichong Road.

2 Landale Street. 96 Bonham Strand. Wyndham Hotel. On premises. Hongkong Hotel.

18 Peak Road.

*

21

NAME IN FULL.

OCCUPATION.

ABODE.

5

P-Continued.

Parkes, John

Parren, Joseph Lee Pasco, Boris

Paterson, Robert Jardine Paterson, Thomas Garner Paton, James Wilson... Patton, William

Peel, Charles Albert

Penny, Henry...

Pentreath, George Artis

Pentycross, Frederic Hazel... Peoples, David Percy, Thomas R.

Pereira, Carlos José Maria Pereira, Fermino Maria...... Pereira, Frederico Felix Ricci Pereira, Henrique Bruno ...... Pereira, Joao Maria Roza Pereira, João Patricio

Pereira, Jovita Duarte Pereira, Thomas Maria Perrie, Robert

Perrin, Norman James Perry, Silas Shalome.. Pestonji, Rustom Peters, William .................. Peterson, Robert Jardine Pethick, Harry Hathaway Petley, Harold Wallace.... Pettitt, Albert Victor... Philips, Alexander Roy

Henderson Phillips, Douglas Churchill Pidgeon, John Henry Piercy, Arthur

Piercy, George Harold Piguet, Xavier Paul Armand.] Pike, Herbert Twyncham Pilger, Gerard Jacobus

Gezienus

Pinguet, Ernest

Shipbuilder, Dock Co.,...... Assistant, HK. & Shanghai Bank, Merchant & Bookseller. Brewer & Co., Ld., Assistant, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Ld., Consulting Engineer, Carmichael & Clarke, Asst. D'yard Manager, Taikoo Dockyard, Shipwright, Dock Co.,...... Mercantile Assistant, Dodwell & Co., Ld., Assistant, Kelly & Walsh, Ld., Merchant, Pentreath & Co.,... Sub-Acct., HK. & Shanghai Bank, Foreman, Taikoo Dockyard, General Agent, Passenger Dept., Cana-

dian Pacific Ocean Services, Ld.,... Clerk, Caldbeck, MacGregor & Co., Assistant, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Ld., | Clerk, Chartered Bank of I. A. & C.,................ Assistant, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Ld.,. Clerk, International Bank, Mercantile Assistant, Shewan, Tomes

& Co.,

Assistant, Netherlands Trading Society, Clerk, International Banking Corporation, Sugar Boiler, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Assistant, Thos. Cook & Son,...... Acting Manager, D. Sassoon & Co., Ld., Share Broker, Benjamin & Potts, Timekeeper, Dock Co.,

Assistant, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Ld., Asst., Standard Oil Co.,

Asst. Mains Supt., HK. Electric Co., Ld., Employee, B. A. Tobacco Co., Ld., .......

Chemist, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Engineer, Green Islan! Cement Co., Ld., Broker, Carroll Brothers,..... Assistant, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Ld., Assistant, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Ld., Sub-Acct., Banque de l'Indo-Chine, Asst., Union Ince. Socty. of Canton, Ld.,

Accountant, Java-China-Japan Lijn, ..... Assistant, Reiss & Co.,

Pinna, Sebastião Francisco de. Merchant Assistant, Harry Wicking & Co.,

Pintos, Cecilio Paulo.... Piper, William

Pittendrigh, William McKenzie Placé, Abelardo Antonio Polley, John David .... Pollock, Frederick Arthur.. Pomeroy, Henry William Pomeroy, John Baptiste Pomroy, Harold Collins..... Poon Icho

Potter, Edward Sydney Potts, Alex. Hutton Potts, Patrick Cumming Prata, Pedro Fernando de Cruz Pritchard, William John Prockter, Norman Henry Pryce, Charles

Pullen, Norman Douglas Puncheon, James Purves, David John

Pyne, Edward

Assistant, Holland-China Trading Co., Engineer, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Director, U. Rumjahn & Co., Storekeeper, Dock Co.,................. Foreman, Taikoo Dockyard,

......

Assistant, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Ld., Clerk, Percy Smith, Seth & Fleming, Clerk, Joseph Bros.,.....

Shift Engineer, HK. Electric Co., Ld., Assistant, Shewan, Tomes & Co., Assistant, Arnold Bros. & Co., Ld., Assistant, Benjamin & Potts, Share Broker, Benjamin & Potts, Clerk, Green Island Cement Co., Ld., Assistant, Central Agency, Ld., Assistant, HK. & Shanghai Bank, Acting Chief Assistant, Canadian Pacific

Ocean Services, Ld.,

Kowloon Docks. On premises. Wyndham Hotel. On premises. St. George's House. Quarry Bay. Kowloon Docks. Queen's Building.

15 Orient Buildings, Kowloon. Alexandra Building. On premises. Quarry Bay.

Hotel Mansions. 15 Queen's Road. 32 Ice House Street. On premises.

4 Moreton Terrace, Causeway Bay. 7 Gordon Terrace, Kowloon.

1 Rednaxela Terrace. Queen's Road Central. Belilios Terrace. Quarry Bay. On premises.

Hongkong Hotel Room 361. 8 Humphreys Building, Kowloon. Kowloon Docks.

On premises.

11 Middle Road, Kowloon. St. George's House. Hongkong Hotel,

Quarry Bay.

Durbar Villas, Kowloon. 5 Lyttelton Road. 129A The Peak. 86 Bonham Road. Prince's Building. On premises.

Station Hotel.

Zetland House, Queen's Road. 24 Belilios Terrace.

5 Salisbury Avenue, Kowloon. Quarry Bay.

161 The Peak. Kowloon Docks. Quarry Bay. Ewo Junior Mess. 19 Mosque Street. 19 Mosque Street.

9 Leighton Hill Road. 10 Praya East.

44A Nathan Road, Kowloou. The Tower, Queen's Building. The Tower, Queen's Building. 37 Granville Road, Kowloon. 12 Knutsford Terrace, Kowloon. On premises.

2 Basilea, Lyttelton Road.

Chemist, China Mining & Engr. Co., Ld., | 16 Queen's Road Central. Shipbuilder, Dock Co.,

Asst., Jardine, Matheson & Co., Ld.,..............]

Assistant, Floquet & Knoth,

Kowloon Docks.

2 Torres Building Kimberley Road,

Kowloon.

2 Morrison Hill Road.

NAME IN FULL.

22

OCCUPATION.

ADDRESS.

Quan Kai

Quan Shun John

Quarles van Ufford, Charles

François Jean.......

R

Raat, Johannes de.. Radford, John Arundel Rafeek, Mahomed Rahim, Abdulsahim Rahman, Abdool Karrim Rahumed, Abdul Kadir Railton, Manning Leonard Railton, Norman Leslie

Howard Ralph, Dallas Lush Ramos, Adolpho Accacio Ramsay, Allan Barrie Ramsay, John Harris........... Ramsay, Joseph Marshall Ramsay, Peter Walter

Robertson Ramsay, Robert Albert Ramsay, Thomas

Ramsey, Alfred William

Leonard

Randall, Benjamin Cutter Randall, Robert Wells Ranger, Frederick Ernest Kapley, Lavès Stephen.... Rapp, Christian Frederick Rapp, Gustav George Rattey, William James

Raven, Arthur Robert Fenton Raven, Oscar Bouttbee Raworth, Arthur Basil

Ray, Edward Henry Ray, Herbert Wallace Raymond, Edward Benjamin Raymond, Edward Maurice Razack, Moosa Abdool Reenen, Jacob van..

Reid, Alexander Napier

Reid, Douglas....

Reid, James

Reis, José Manuel.

Reis, Pedro Antonio Remedios, Alfredo Frederico

dos Remedios, Alvaro Antonio Remedios, Carlos Augusto dos Remedios, Carlos Eugenio dos Remedios, Carlos Savard Remedios, Fernando Eduardo

d'Almada

Remedios, Francisco Xavier dos Remedios, Francisco Xavier dos Remedios, Francisco Xavier

d'Almada

Remedios, Hector Santiago dos Remedios, Hermillo Hermi-

gildo dos Remedios, João Joaquim

Vandenberg dos.... Remedios, Jorge Maria Ozorio. Remedios, José Candido dos... Remedios, José Julita dos

....

Compradore, Getz Bros & Co., Ld., Accountant, Bank of Canton Ld.,

254 Des Voeux Road. Des Voeux Road Central.

Asst. Manager, Java-China-Japan Lijn,... York Building.

Cashier, Netherlands Trading Socty., Assistant, HK. & Shanghai Bank,. Clerk, Osaka Shosen Kaisha, Clerk, Asiatic Petroleum Co., Ld., Clerk, King Edward Hotel,. Clerk, Electric Co., Ld.,

Assistant, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Ld.,

Assistant, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Ld., Assistant, Butterfield & Swire, Assistant, Arnold Bros. & Co., Ld., Foreman, Taikoo Dockyard, Assistant, HK. & S'hai Bank, Supt. Shipbuilder, Dock Co.,

Foreman, Taikoo Dockyard, Engineer, Dock Co.,....... Assistant Director, W. S. Bailey & Co., Ld.,

Assistant, Asiatic Petroleum Co., Ld., Clerk, Benjamin & Potts,......... Lane, Crawford & Co.,........ Assistant, D. Sassoon & Co., Ld., Sales Manager, J. T. Shaw & Co., Accounting Clerk, Pacific Mail S.S. Co.,. Assistant, J. D. Humphreys & Son, Assistant, Dock Co.,.......

| Architect,

Architect, A.. R. F. Raven,.

Branch Manager General Electric Co.,

of China,

Broker, Ray & Falconer,

Cinema Proprietor, Coronet Theatre, Merchant, E. D. Sassoon & Co., Ld., Share Broker, Benjamin & Potts, General Broker,

Acct., Java-China-Japan Lijn, Assistant, Lever Bros. (China), Ld., Sub-Acct., Chartered Bank of I. A. & C., Dockyard Manager, Taikoo Dockyard, Clerk, HK. & S'hai Bank, Assistant, Lane, Crawford & Co.,

Clerk, HK. & S'hai Bank, Clerk, HK. & China Gas Co., Ld ‚....... Assistant, Holland-China Trading Co., Clerk, Russo-Asiatic Bank,

Assistant, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Ld.,.|

Queen's Road Central. On premises.

118 Hollywood Road. 139 Wanchai Road. On premises.

8 Lamont Lane 1st floor.

| 2 Carnarvon Villas, Kowloon.

4 Kimberley Vilas, Kowloon. Hongkong Club.

St. Francis Yard, Wanchai. Quarry Bay. On premises. Kowloon Docks.

Quarry Bay.

Kowloon Docks.

9 Humphreys Building, Kowloon.

3 Aimai Villas, Kowloon.

1 Prospect Place, Bonham Road.

1 Prospect Place, Robinson Road. 56 The Peak.

16 Arbuthnot Road,

On premises.

11 Babington Path. Kowloon Docks.

45 Conduit Road.

9 Peace Avenue, Ho Mun Tin.

11 The Peak.

Hongkong Hotel.

3 Duddell Street.

11 Humphreys Building, Kowloon 4 Macdonnell Road.

32 Leighton Hill Road. King Edward Hotel, Prince's Building. Bank Mess. Quarry Bay.

On premises.

On premises.

On premises.

On premises.

22 Robinson Road.

The Hut, Castle Road. 7 Belilios Terrace.

Managing Director, De Sousa & Co., Ld.,.7 Peace Avenue, Ho Mun Tin. Clerk, HK. & Shanghai Bank,

On premises. Assistant, Caldbeck, MacGregor & Co.,... 15 Queen's Road.

Assistant, Union Trading Co., Ld..... Clerk, Banque de l'Indo-Chine,

Clerk, Russo-Asiatic Bank,..........

Clerk, International Banking Corporation, Clerk, Mercantile Bank of India, Ld.,.............. Clerk, HK. & S'hai Bank, Clerk, HK. & S'hai Bank,

.6 Peace Villa, Ho Mun Tin,

On premises.

The Hut, Castle Road.

The Hut, Upper Castle Road. 5 Rednaxela Terrace. On premises.

On premises.

NAME IN FULL.

23

OCCUPATION.

ADDRESS.

R-Continued.

Remedios, José Maria

Vandenberg..... Remedios, Luiz Augusto Lopes Remedios, Luiz Eugenio Remedios, Luiz Gonzaga ..... "Remedios, Maximiano Antonio

dos

Remedios, Paulo Maria Remedios, Romualdo Jacob Remedios, Vasco Luiz dos............ Remington, Harold Robert

Rennett, Thomas Robert Resker, Herbert Charles Rew, Joseph

Rew, Tommy James Rhodes, Ernest Lyon..... Ribeiro, Angelo Cecilio Vieira Ribeiro, Augusto Henrique Ribeiro, Augusto José Vieira Ribeiro, Carlos Alberto de

Jesus Vieira

Ribeiro, Constantino Filomeno

Vieira ....

Ribeiro, Fernando José Ribeiro, Francisco Gorge Vieira Ribeiro, Francisco Raul..... Ribeiro, Francisco Vicente Ribeiro, Francisco Xavier

Vieira

Ribeiro, Frederico F. Ribeiro, João Chrisostomo

Vieira

Ribeiro, Jorge Alberto Vieira Ribeiro, Jorge Alberto Vieira

Jr.

Ribeiro, José Maria Vieira Ribeiro, Julio Carmo Vieira Ribeiro, Luiz Antonio Vieira...

Ribeiro, Luiz Gonzaga.. Ribeiro, Oscar Francisco Ribeiro, Venceslau Francisco

Vieira

Ribeiro, Vicente Rogerio Vieira Richardson, Charles Edward... Riggs, Charles Butler Ringnalda, Gerben... Roberts, Arthur William Roberts, George Eric. Robertson, John.....

Robertson, Thomas Watson Robertson, William Robins, Charles Frederick. Robinson, George Arthur Robinson, John Lancaster. Robson, John

Robson, William Henry Carr. Rocha, Alvaro Gustavo da Rocha, Antonio José da Cruz Rocha, Claudio

Rocha, Epiphanio Maria da ...

Rocha, Ignacio Loyola

Rocha, Isaias da.. Rocha, João Maria da Rocha, José Maria da

Rocha, Vicente Caetano da Rodenfuser, Raoul Rodger, George Sinclair

Assistant, Dock Co.,

Assistant, Arratoon V. Apcar & Co.,...... Assistant, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Ld.,. Assistant, Standard Oil Co.,

Merchant, Maxim & Co., ..... Assistaut, B. Reif,

Chief Clerk, Mercantile Bank of India, Ld., Clerk, Union Ince. Socty. of Canton, Ld., Assistant, Anglo-Chinese Engineers'

Association, Ld.,

Assistant, Lane, Crawford & Co., Sub-Manager, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Assistant, Dairy Farm I. & C. S. Co., Ld., Clerk, Mercantile Bank,

Merchant, Asiatic Petroleum Co., Ld., ... Assistant, Asiatic Petroleum Co., Ld., Assistant, Lane, Crawford & Co., Assistant, Gibb, Livingston & Co.,

Assistant, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Ld,

Clerk, W. Logan & Co., Clerk, HK. & S'hai Bank, Assistant, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Ld., File Clerk, Pacific Mail S.S. Co., Asst., Union Ince. Socty, of Cantón, Ld.,...

Clerk, HK. & S'hai Bank, Asia Banking Corporation,

Clerk, HK. & S'hai Bank, Merchant, Maxim & Co..................

Clerk, Maxim & Co., Assistant, Alex. Ross & Co., Merchant, Maxim & Co.,....... Clerk, Nestlé & Anglo-Swiss Condensed

Milk Co......

Assistant, J. M. da Rocha & Co., Accountant, Floquet & Knott,..

Merchant, Ribeiro, Son & Co........

Kowloon Docks.

45 Wyndham Street. 22 Belilios Terrace. 98D Wanchai Road.

21 Wyndham Street.

14 Belilios Terrace, Robinson Road, 981 Wanchai Road. On premises.

9 Queen's Garden.

10в Orient Buildings, Kowloon. Quarry Bay.

23 Wong Nei Chong Road. 89 Praya East. Kingsclere, Kennedy Road. 3 Mosque Street. 24 Robinson Road. St. George's Building.

11 Morrison Gap Road.

8 Morrison Gap Road. Ou premises.

11 Morrison Gap Road. On premises. Queen's Building.

On premises.

55 Wyndham Street.

On premises.

2 Hankow Road, Kowloon.

2 Hankow Road, Kowloon. 23 Praya East, Top floor. 8 Belilios Terrace.

7 Morrison Gap.

55 Wyndham Street.

115 Praya East.

Old Supreme Court Building.

Clerk, Union Ince. Soety, of Canton, Ld., Queen's Building. Merchant, Chas. E. Richardson, Wharf Manager, Holt's Wharf, Merchant, Asiatic Petroleum Co., Ld., Assistant, Lane, Crawford & Co., Asst., Union Ince. Socty. of Canton, Ld.,... Merchant, W. A. Hannibal & Co....... Supt. Engr., HK.&K'loon W. & G. Co.,Ld., Timekeeper, Taikoo Dockyard, Engineer, Asiatic Petroleum Co., Ld., Assistant, Butterfield & Swire, Assistant, Bradley & Co., Ld., Engineer, Dock Co.......................... Draughtsman, Dock Co., Auctioneer,

King Edward Hotel.

Highlands, Kimberley Road, Kioon. Station Hotel, Kowloon.

10B Orient Buildings, Kowloon. Queen's Building.

Assistant, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Ld., Assistant, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Ld., Mercantile Assistant, Shewan, Tomes

& Co.,

Employee, British American Tobacco

Co., Ld.,

Assistant, A. B. Swedish Trading Co., Merchant, J. M. da Rocha & Co., Assistant, British-American Tobacco Co.,

Ld.,

Kingsclere, Kennedy Road. 3 Kimberley Villas, Kowloon, Quarry Bay. Hongkong Club.

8 Tregunter Mansions. Peak Hotel.

Kowloon Docks. Kowloon Docks.

29 Mosque Street. 10 Shing Hong Street. 32 Ice House Street.

100в Wanchai Road.

47 Wyndham Street, 2 Mosque Street. Fairview, Robinson Road.

47 Wyndham Street.

Asst., Union Ince. Socty, of Canton, Ld., On premises.

Manager, Messageries Maritimes,

Draughtsman, Taikoo Dockyard,

49 The Peak.

Quarry Bay.

>

NAME IN FULL.

24

OCCUPATION.

ADDRESS.

R-Continued.

Rodger, John Rodger, John

Rodrigues, Antonio José Maria Rodrigues, Carlos Augusto

de Carvalho......

Rodrigues, José Simon Rodrigues, Louis Gonzales Roger, Hugh Wood Rogers, Thomas Bligh Rosa, Crispino Ignacio da... Rosario, Emerico do Rosario, Fernando Antonio

Maria

Rosario, Polycarpo Antonio .... Rose, Louis Augustus Ross, Cecil Philip Ross, John Black

Rosser, Alexander James

Weekes

Routh, W. M.

Roza, Alfred William da Roza, Antonio Ambrosio Senna da................ Roza, Carlos Augusto da

Roza, Edmundo Duarte da .... Roza, Gregorio Francisco Rozario, Antonio Manuel da

Silva

Rozario, Arthur Cornelio do... Rozario, Daniel Anthero Rozario, Eduardo José

Maria do

Rozario, José Maria da Silva

Rozario, Julio Cezar do....... Rull, Marcellino José.... Rumjahn, Abdul Hamid Rumjahn, Dawood. Kumjahn, Usuf Rus, Emil Russell, John

Ruttonjee, Jehangir Hormusjee Ryan, Lionel Ernest Notwood

Asst.-Mgr., China Sugar Refining Co., Ld., Assistant, Central Agency, Ld., Assistant, Asiatic Petroleum Co., Ld.,

Clerk, HK. & S'hai Bank,

212 Praya East. 212 Praya East. 4 Mosque Street.

On premises.

Accounting Clerk, Pacific Mail S.S. Co., On premises. Clerk, Russo-Asiatic Bank,

Assistant, Butterfield & Swire, Accountant, Pacific Mail S.S. Co.,. Assistant, Dodwell & Co., Ld., Clerk, HK. & Shanghai Bank,

Employee, Hollaud China Trading Co.,... Asst., Union Ince. Socty, of Canton, Ld.,... Architect, 62 Queen's Road Central, Assistant, Mackinnon, Mackenzie & Co., Acct., Mercantile Bank of India, Ld.

......

5 roadwood Terrace. Peak Hotel,

On premises. Queen's Building. On premises.

20 Ashley Road, Kowloon. On premises.

48 Queen's Road Central, 22 Des Voeux Road Central. 1 Queen's Garden.

Assistant, Mackinnon, Mackenzie & Co., | 22 Des Voeux Road Central. Manager, Connell Bros. Co., Manager, Carvalho & Co.,

Clerk, HK. & Shangbai Bank, Incorporated Accountant, & Exchange

Broker,...

Accountant, Lowe, Bingham & Matthews, Clerk, Chartered Bank of I. A. & C.,

Assistant, J. M. da Rocha & Co., Clerk, International Banking Corporation, Clerk, Botelbo Bros.,

Assistant, Asiatic Petroleum Co., Ld., Accountant, Bradley & Co., Ld.,

Assistant, Dodwell & Co., Ld.,

Assistant, D. Sassoon & Co.,

Clerk, U. Rumjahn & Co.,

Book-keeper, Gande, Price & Co., Ld., Director, U. Rumjahn & Co., ... Assistant, Thoresen & Co., Foreman, Taikoo Dockyard,.. Merchant, H. Ruttonjee & Son, Assistant, Canadian Pacific Ocean

Services, Ld.,

7 Torres Building, Kowloon. 2 Minden Villas, Kowloon.

Ou premises.

2 Minden Villas, Kowloon. 3 Queen's Road Central. 72 Caine Road.

4 Austin Avenue, Kowloon. 25 Shelley Street. 53 Elgin Street.

...25 Shelley Street.

12 Austin Avenue, Kowloon. 21 Wongneichong Road.

28 Granville Road, Kowloon. 58 Peel Street.

On premises.

58 Peel Street.

Station Hotel, Kowloon. Quarry Bay.

1 Wyndham Street.

Hongkong Hotel.

S

Sadick, Ramjee ..... Samways, Frederick George...

Samy, Arthur Poonoo Samy, Atta Mahomed Sandberg, Marius Diederick

Christoph

Sandes, Charles Launcelot Sandstrom. Clarence Edwin ... Sauh, Joseph Antoine Sargent, Ivan Herbert Savege, Oliver Frederick

Sawyer, Harold Algernon... Sayce, Kelly Schou-Sorensen, Arne Scott, Arthur Ernest.

Scott, Douglas Stewart.... Scott, Ernest Hansen Scott, Harry Hodge Scott, Holman

Scott, John Hannay Scriven, Henry Ernest Seath, William Petrie

Mercantile Assistant, Alex. Ross & Co.,. Sugar Boiler, China Sugar Refining

Co., Ld., Architect,

Foreman, HK. Electric Co., Ld.,

Employee, Java-China-Japan Lijn, Manager, Mercantile Bank of India, Ld.,... Asst., Standard Oil Co., Assistant, N. S. Moses & Co., Accountant, Asiatic l'etroleum Co., Ld.,... Architect, Little, Adams & Wood, Asst., Union Ince. Socty. of Canton, Ld.,... Book-seller, Sayce & Co., Manager, Thoresen & Co.,

Chartered Accountant, Lowe, Bingham &

Matthews,

Engineer Salesman, Alex. Ross & Co., Assistant, Skott & Co.,

Draughtsman, Dock Co.,

Assistant, Standard Oil Co.,

Merchant, Mustard & Co.,

Assistant, Lane, Crawford & Co.,

Sugar Boiler, Taikoo Sugar Refinery,

175 Praya East, Top floor.

1 Great George Street.

88 Bonham Road,

1-3 Warren Street, Top floor.

10 The Peak. On premises. Peak Hotel.

5 Saifee Terrace, Kowloon. 6 Queen's Garden, May Road. Hongkong Club. Queen's Building.

14 Beaconsfield Arcade. Bicton, 127 The Peak.

3 Queen's Road Central.

8 Aimai Villas, Kowloon.

4 Minden Row, Kowloon.

Kowloon Docks.

Woodbury, Pokfulum. Hongkong Club.

48A Nathan Road, Kowloon. Quarry Bay.

*

-

25

NAME IN FULL.

OCCUPATION.

ADDRESS.

S—Continued.

Sepher, Sheik Abdool Sequeira, Augusto Dario Sequeira, Caetano Antonio Sequeira, Carlos Maria Sequeira, Francisco Paulo...... Sequeira, Henrique Remijio ... Sequeira, Pedro Nolasco Seth, Harold Sewell, Gechm.

Shand, Thomas

Shaw, George Morison

Shaw, James Kerr

Shaw, James Totten Shaw, John Archibald

Sherman, Thomas Fothergill,

Jr.

Sherry, John Patrick

Shi Yu-man

Shiner, Walter Charles Shroff, Framroz Pestonjee Shrubsole, Henry Christopher

Silkstone, Albert Edward Silva, Alberto Augusto da Silva, Antonio Francisco da Silva, Armando Maria da Silva, Arnaldo Heitor da Silva, Arthur Luiz............. Silva, Carlos Germano da Silva, Daniel Oliver de

Silva, Francisco Britto Perez.. Silva, Francisco Filomeno

Eça da

Silva, Francisco Maria Silva, Francisco Xavier.. Silva, Francisco Xavier

Maria da

Silva, Frederico Norberto Silva, George Honorio da Silva, Henrique José...... Silva, Henrique Mario da Silva, John M.

Silva, Jorge Alberto Britto Silva, Lucas Leonardo da Silva, Marciano Antonio da Silva, Porphyrio Maria

Nolasco da Silva, Reginaldo Maria

Gomes da

Sim, Edwin Lionel.... Simoes, Joao Augusto Simoes, Manuel Augusto Simpson, Andrew Simpson, James

Simpson, William Gordon. Simpson, William Philip Singer, Eugene Theodore Slark, Allen McDougall. Sloan, James

Sloan, John......

Smirke, James Frederick Smith, Albert Woodall Smith, Alexander Sutherland

Gair.... Smith, Andrew Smith, Arthur William

Smith, Aubrey Maurice Bowes Smith, Dennis George .........

Asst., HK. & K'loon W, & G. Co., Ld.,... 3 Bowrington Canal East.

Assistant, Standard Oil Co., Foreman, HK. Electric Co., Ld., Assistant, Standard Oil Co., Clerk, Harry Wicking & Co., . Clerk, International Banking Corporation Assistant, Standard Oil Co., Commission Agent,

Manager, Robertson, Wilson & Co., Engineer, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Manager, China Sugar Refining Co., Ld., Assistant, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Ld., Tailor, J. T. Shaw,

Assistant, Standard Oil Co.,

Assistant, Liverpool & London & Globe

Ince. Co., Ld.,

Asst. Manager, China & Japan Telephone

Co., Ld.,

Assistant, Benjanim & Potts, Superintendent, United Abestos Co., Ld., Assistant, S. J. David & Co., Ld., ... Asst., Nestlé Anglo Swiss Condensed

Milk Co........

Manager, Moutrie & Co.,................. Asst., Union Ince. Socty. of Canton, Ld..... Clerk, General Electric Co. of China, Ld., Assistant, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Ld., Assistant, Linstead & Davis, Clerk, Chartered Bank of I. A. & C., Clerk, HK. Electric Co., Ld., Representative, Sun Life Assurance Co.

of Canada,

Clerk, HK. & S'hai Bank,

Assistant, D. Sassoon & Co., Ld., Assistant, Union Trading Co., Asst., Union Ince. Socty. of Canton, Ld.,...

Asia Banking Corporation, Storekeeper, Dock Co.,

Station Foreman, Electric Light Co., Ld., Mercantile Asst., Dodwell & Co.. Ld., Clerk, Chartered Bank of I. A. & C., Asia Banking Corporation,

Assistant, E. D. Sassoon & Co., Ld., Clerk, HK. & Shanghai Bank, Assistant, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Ld.,..

Broker, P. M. N. da Silva,

Clerk, Joseph Bros.,.......... Exchange Broker, A. S. Hancock,. Clerk, Chartered Bank of I. A. & C.,. Assistant, Standard Oil Co., Shipbuilder, Dock Co., Foreman, Taikoo Dockyard, Foreman, W. S. Bailey & Co., Ld., Tailor, Diss Bros.,

Assistant, Standard Oil Co., Merchant, Harry Wicking & Co., Assistant, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Assistant, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Ticket Inspector, Peak Tramway Co., Assistant, A. S. Watson & Co., Ld.,

Assistant, HK. & S'hai Bank,.. Storekeeper, Taikoo Doekyard, Merchant, Alex. Ross & Co.,

|

6 Mosque Terrace. 15 Queen's Road East, 17 Mosque Street, 20 Belilios Terrace.. 1 Rednaxela Terrace. 20 Belilios Terrace. 2 Peak Road. Beaconsfield Arcade.. Quarry Bay. On premises.

China Sugar Refinery. 18 Conduit Road.

10 Tregunter Mansions.

14A Northern Road, Kowloon.

42 The Peak.

5 Seymour Terrace. 89 The Peak.

3 Hart Avenue, Kowloon.

Hongkong Club.

Gas Works, Kowloon. Queen's Building.

7 Salisbury Avenue, Kowloon.

7 Mosque Junction. Alexandra Building.

13 Salisbury Avenue, Kowloon. 8 Ashley Road, Kowloon.

3 Rose Terrace, Kowloon. On premises.

5 Liberty Avenue, Ho Mun Tin. 3 Duddell Street. Queen's Building.

10 Belilios Terrace. Kowloon Docks. Punjab Buildings. Queen's Building.

15 Belilios Terrace.

9 Belilios Terrace, Robinson Road. 16 Granville Road, Kowloon. On premises.

5 Ashley Road, Kowloon.

Shorncliffe, 7 Garden Road.

7 Middle Road, Kowloon. Prince's Building.

4 Saifee Terrace, Kowloon. 4 Saifee Terrace, Kowloon. Kowloon Docks.

Quarry Bay.

Jordan Road, Kowloon.

58B Nathan Road, Kowloon. 148 Barker Road, The Peak. Prince's Building.

Quarry Bay.

Quarry Bay.

Peak Tramway.

Aërated Water Factory, North Point.

On premises.

Quarry Bay.

4 Carnarvon Villas, Kowloon.

Acting Mgr., David Sasson & Co., Ld.,... 16 Conduit Road. Bookseller, Brewer & Co., Ld.,

Wyndham Hotel.

26

NAME IN FULL.

OCCUPATION.

ADDRESS.

S-Continued.

Smith, Eric Grant.. Smith, Francis Harland. Smith, George John Smith, James

Smith, John Sandercon..

Smith, Joseph Charles Henry

Lawrence

Smith, Octavius Arthur.. Smith, Robert Melville Smyth, James Mathie Smyth, Vivian Geoffry Snape, Frederick Edwin Snowman, Albert Washington Soares, Adão Maria de Lourdes Soares, Charles Maria

Soares, Francisco Paolo de

Vasconcellos.

Soares, Francisco Xavier Soares, Joaquim Roque... Soares, José Maria.... Solomon, Phillip Joseph Sommerville, Alexander

McDougal Soonderam, Ramasamy Sorby, Vincent Dare Sorensen, Arne Schou Sousa, Casimiro Marcelino Soutar, Francis Southerton, Robert Gruidley... Souza, Alfred de

Souza, Antonio José Mattos... Souza, Augusto Simeaō... Souza, Duarte Eleuterio de Souza, Euzebio

Souza, Jorge Carlos Souza, José Francisco de Souza, José Thomas de ... Souza, Luiz Carlos do Rozario Souza, Marcus Antonio Rozario Souza, Wilhehmino Inno José Speirs, James Bell...... Spicer, Henry ... Spittles, Benjamin James. Spradbery, Joseph James...... Stackhouse, John Walker...... Stainfield, Harry Stalker, Archibald Stalker, John

Star, Aart Willem van der Stark, Charles Crawford Stark, George

Starkey, Charles Francis

Starling, Robert Archibald Steel, David Steer, James Stephens, Herbert

Stephens, Walter Alfred

Stevenson, Allan Stewart, George Edward Stewart, James

Stewart, John Howat

Stewart, Sutherland

Stewart, William Stock, Robert ..........

Stone, Frederick John Howe.. Stone, Paul Emil Fredric Stone, William Forbes Stoneham, Herbert Frederick..

|

Assistant, Dodwell & Co., Ld., Merchant, Smith & Co., Watchman, Taikoo Dockyard, Assistant, W. R. Loxley & Co.,.. Jeweller, G. Falconer & Co., Ld.,

Assistant, Carroll Bros.,

Manager, Whiteaway, Laidlaw & Co., Assistant, Dodwell & Co., Ld., Blacksmith, Dock Co.,...................... Assistant, Butterfield & Swire, Anglo-Chinese Engineers Assn., Ld., Partner, Snowman & Co., Merchant, Soares & Co., Acct., Percy Smith, Seth & Fleming,

Assistant, De Sousa & Co., Ld., Clerk, HK. & S'hai Bank, Assistant, Dodwell & Co., Ld., Passenger Clerk, Pacific Mail S.S. Co.,...] Asst. Lighter Overseer, Holt's Wharf,

Asst. Marine Supt., Butterfield & Swire, Clerk, Hongkong Hotel,

Mains Supdt., HK. Electric Co., Ld.,. General Manager, Thoresen & Co., Clerk, Chartered Bank of I, A. & C. Clerk, Taikoo Dockyard, Employee, British-American Tobacco Co., Assistant, HK. Import & China Produce. Freight Clerk, Pacific Mail S.S. Co.,...... Clerk, HK. & Shanghai Bank, Assistant, Dodwell & Co., Ld., Timekeeper, Dock Co.,................... Clerk, HK. & S'hai Bank, Assistant, Shewan, Tomes & Co., Assistant, S. J. David & Co., . Clerk, HK. & S'hai Bank,

·"

On premises.

29 Leighton Hill Road. Quarry Bay.

22A Nathan Road, Kowloon. Station Hotel, Kowloon.

5 Basilea, Lyttelton Road. 16в Nathan Road, Kowloon. Queen's Building. Kowloon Docks.

3 Tregunter Mansions. St. George's House. Queen's Building. 12 Peak Road. 21 Shelley Street.

Ho Mun Tin, Yaumati.

On premises. Queen's Building. On premises.

213 Temple Street, 1st floor.

McDonnell Road,

3 Loong On Street, Wanchai. Quarters, North Point. 127 The Peak.

4 Ashley Terrace, Kowloon. Quarry Bay.

Canton Villas, Kowloon. 14A Des Voeux Road Central. On premises. On premises. Queen's Building. Kowloon Docks. On premises.

34 Ice House Street.

2 Hart Avenue, Kowloon. On premises.

Clerk, Union Ince. Socty. of Canton, Ld., Queen's Building.

Foreman, HK. Electric Co., Ld.,

Clerk, Taikoo Dockyard,

Assistant, Butterfield & Swire, Assistant, A. S. Watson & Co., Ld., Assistant, Dock Co.,

23 Praya East, Ground Floor. Quarry Bay.

Peak Hotel.

30B Nathan Road, Kowloon. Kowloon Docks,

Manager, New Zealand Insurance Co., Ld., Hongkong Hotel.

Engineer, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Clerk, Taikoo Dockyard, Sub-Manager, Bank Line, Ld., Manager, Transmarina Trading Co., Local Manager, Vacuum Oil Co., Engineer, China Light & Power Co., Ld., Mining Engineer, Manager, China Metal

& Mining Co.,

Assistant, HK. Electric Co., Ld., Shipwright, Dock Co.,.. Watchmaker,

Managing Director, H. Stephens &

Co., Lin,

Assistant, Nestlé Anglo-Swiss Condensed

Milk Co.,

Manager, Dairy Farm I. & C. S. Co., Ld.,. Assistant, Butterfield & Swire, Clerk, Taikoo Dockyard, Surveyor, Lloyd's Register, Assistant, Taikoo Sugar Refinery,

Timber Merchant, Wm. Stewar & Co., Salesman, Alex, Ross & Co., ...t.. Clerk, HK. Electric Co., Ld., Assistant, Dock Co.,

Clerk, C. E. Warren & Co., Ld., Assistant, Dock Co.,..............

Quarry Bay. Quarry Bay.

16A Nathan Road, Kowloon.

5 Mountain View.

57 The Peak. Hung Hom.

16 Queen's Road Central. 13 Beaconsfield Arcade. Kowloon Docks.

9 Ice House Street.

Carlton Hotel.

16 Humphreys Building, Kowloon. Dairy Farm, Pokfulum. 139 The Peak.

Quarry Bay.

8 Queen's Garden.

Quarry Bay.

Queen's Road Central.

Hongkong Club Chambers. Quarters, Kowloon Docks. Kowloon Docks.

19 Broadwood Road. Kowloon Docks,

:

NAME IN FULL.

27

OCCUPATION.

ADDRESS.

S-Continued.

Stopani, William Alexander...

Stuart, Charles

Suffiad, Abdul Gaffoor ... Sullivan, Charles Des Voeux.. Summers, Charles Henry Summers, Edwin Henry Spark

Summers, Vernon Herbert Sun, Harry

Sun T. Ying

Sung Ying Hsueh

Surridge, Clarence Thurston,.. Sutherland, Percy Duffus

Swan, George.....

Swan, Thomas

Symes, Glascott Henry

T

Tai Ming-tak.... Tait, James Henry

Tam Wing-kwong Tam, Joseph Charles Tape, Benjamin Wong Tavares, Alfredo Augusto.. Tavares, Augusto Maria Tarrant, John Arthur Tavares, Alvaro Mario Tavares, Carlos Engenio Tavares, Fernando José Tavares, José Filippe Tavares, José Maria Placé Tayler, Henry Herbert

Taylor, Fred

Taylor, Percy.

Taylor, Robert

Taylor, William

Terry, Authur Leslie..

Tetzel, Charles

Thom, William

Assistant, China Provident Loan &

St. George's House.

Mortgage Co., Ld.,

Assistant, Wm. Powell, Ld.,

Powell's Building, Des Voeux Road

Central.

Asst., British-American Tobacco Co., Ld., 3 Moreton Terrace. Assistant, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Clerk, Taikoo Dockyard,

Craft Supt., HK. & K'loon W. & G.

Co., Ld.,

Clerk, Asiatic Petroleum Co., Ld.,. Assistant, Adoolrahim & Co., Clerk, William C. Jack & Co., Ld., President, Industrial & Commercial Bank, Acting Mgr., China Mail S.S. Co., Ld.,... Passenger Agent, Canadian Pacific Ocean

Services, Ld.,.

Draughtsman, W. S. Bailey & Co., Ld.,... Foreman, Taikoo Dockyard, Assistant, Gilman & Co., Ld.

"

Quarry Bay. Quarry Bay.

7 Aimai Villas, Kowloon.

7 Aimai Villas, Kowloon. 34 Queen's Road Central. 14 Des Voeux Road Central. 32a Caine Road.

2 Observatory Villa, Kowloon,

Hongkong Club.

6 Victoria View, Kowloon. Quarry Bay.

174 The Peak.

Compradore, Bank Industrielle de Chine, | On premises. Inspector, China & Japan Telephone Co.,

Ld.,

Manager, Ip Tak & Co.,

Assistant, H. A. Castro & Co.,

Mgr., China Mutual Life Ince. Co., Ld., Assistant, Netherlands Trading Society,.. Assistant, Bradley & Co., Ld., Secretary, A. S. Watson & Co., Ld., Assistant, Bradley & Co., Ld., Assistant, Russian Volunteer Fleet, Assistant, Shewan, Tomes & Co., Assistant, Reiss & Co.,

Accountaut, Alexander Ross & Co., Manager, China Provident Loan & Mort-

gage Co., Ld.,...............

Assistant, Manners & Backhouse Ld., Engineer, Dairy Farm I. & C. S. Co., Ld., Engineer, Green Island Cement Co., Ld.,. Patternmaker, Dock Co.,....... Accountant, China Japan Telephone

Co., Ld,...

Clerk, International Banking Corporation, Architect, Palmer & Turner,

Thompson, Frederick George. Clerk, Dairy Farm I. & C. S. Co., Ld.....

Thompson, Harry Thompson, James

Thompson, John Brendon.. Thomson, Fraser Syme

Tienmu, K. Lin...........

Tillery, William Campbell...

Tobin, Russ L. ....

Tobias, Lewis Albert...

Todd, Francis Charles

Todt, Arthur Lovejoy

Tollan, Duncan

Tong Tsung-po

Tong Tze-sau

Tong Yat-chuen..

Tonkin, Mathew MacNair Toppiu, James ...

Townend, Lawrence Francis... Towns, George Ernest Towns, John Irevor Troup, Ian

Tse Tsan-tai

Tso, A.

Tsoi, William Kai Tsu Wa-ying

Tully, John

Turner, William Cecil Dutton Tyrrell, Reginald Albert.

Representative Staff,. W. R. Grace & Co.. Clerk, Dairy Farm I. & C. S. Co., Ld.,... Consulting Engineer, Carmichael & Clarke, Assistant, Dodwell & Co., Ld., Secretary, Industrial & Commercial Bank, Engineer, Dock Co.,................... Engineer, Alex Ross & Co., Optician, Lazarus & Co.,

Assistant, A. S. Watson & Co., Ld., Assistant, Standard Oil Co.,

Electrical Engineer, Telephone Co., Cashier, Thos. Cook & Son,

Secretary, Tung On Fire Insurance Co..... San Fat Co.,..................

Manager, Export Dept., Thoresen & Co., Assistant, Shewan, Tomes & Co., Asst., Union Ince. Socty. of Canton Ld.,. Assistant, HK. & S'hai Bank, Assistant, Butterfield & Swire, Butcher, Dairy Farm I. & C. S. Co.. Ld.,. Asst. Compradore, Shewan Tomes & Co., Clerk, Getz Bros. & Co, Clerk, American Express Co.,.... Compradore, General Electric Co., of

China, Ld.,

Engineer, Asiatic Petroleum Co., Ld., Sub-Manager, HK. & S'hai Bank,... Clerk, China Light & Power Co., Ld.,

Palace Hotel, Kowloon. On premises.

96 Nathan Road, Kowloon. Alexandra Building.

5 Queen's Road Central. 4 Caine Road.

8 Aimai Villas, Kowloon.

4 Caine Road.

6 Caine Road.

I Woodland Terrace.

6 Caine Road.

4 Caine Road.

12 Conduit Road.

5 Queen's Road Central. East Point Ice Works. 10A Mody Road, Kowloon.

Kowloon Docks.

St. George's House. 8 Shing Wong Street. 13 Hankow Road, Kowloon. 29 Leighton Hill Road.

12A Empress Lodge, Kowloon. 7B Orient Buildings, Kowloon. 3 Queen's Building. Queen's Building. 32A Caine Road. Kowloon Docks. Palace Hotel, Kowloou. 28 Queen's Road Central. 14 Kuutsford Terrace, Kowloon. 4 Minden Villas, Kowloon. 19 Wongneichong Road. Des Voeux Road Central. On premises.

16 Bonham Strand East. Causeway Bay

7 Peace Avenue, Kowloon. Queen's Building. On premises. Hongkong Club. Wyndham Hotel. On premises.

228 Queen's Road Central.

6 Pokfulam Road.

22 Tung Street.

8 Broadwood Road. On premises. Kowloon.

NAME IN FULL.

U

28

OCCUPATION.

ADDRESS.

U Siutao......

Translator & Interpreter, Asiatic

Petroleum Co., Ld.,

Ubthias, Alfonso Crescencio...] Clerk, A. G. da Rocha, Un Chan-fai

Underwood, Joseph Harry Un Wui-kong

Translator, Asiatic Petroleum Co., Ld.,... Chemist, China Sugar Refining Co., Ld.,. Clerk, China Mining & Metal Co., Ld.,...

5 Old Bailey, 1st floor. 5 Blue Building.

16 Yiu Wa Street 2nd floor. King Edward Hotel. 5 Tze Mee Alley.

V

Valentine, Robert Keith Vandenberg, Francisco

Valeriano.. Vas, George

Vaz, Marçal Antonio... Vega, Albert

Vernon, Robert Oscar Victor, João Thomé Victor, José Maria........... Vieira, Bernardino Senna Vieira, Bomfilho Maria Vieira, José Maria Vieira, José Maria Eleuterio... Vincenot, Louis Paul Vis, Willem Cornelis

Constant van Komoudt...

W

Wai Fi-wat.... Waid, John....

Wakeham, William Ernest Waldron, James .. Walker, James

Wallace, Alexander Munro

Duncan

Wallace, Charles

Wallace, Robert Cooper

Wallis, Francis Guy Marsden Walsh, Walter Bernard

Walter, John Brittan.. Ward, Arthur Victor..... Warren, Charles Edward Waters, Albert L. Watkins, Harry Wattie, John Way, John Roy

Weaser, William Lionel Wreford Webb, Bertram Monteith Weill, Albert Weir, Walter Weller, Franklin Maximilian...

Wells, Francis Arthur Wells, Michael John .... Westra, August Herman Wetton, George Ernest Weyman, AlfredJohn McKenzie Weymouth, Ralph Wells Wheeler, Allan Wheeler, Frank Thomas

Whiley, William John Grainger White, Edmund William White, George Charles Patrick White, Herman John Henry... White, Howell Bernard White, William Audley Jr. Whiteford, Robert Hamilton...

434

Mercantile Assistant, Dodwell & Co., Ld., | Queen's Building.

Assistant, Reiss & Co., Clerk, Russo-Asiatic Bank,. Clerk, Astor House Hotel,

Assistant, Transmarina Trading Co.,.. Traffic Agent, Pacific Mail S.S. Co.,. Clerk, HK. & S'hai Bank, Assistant, Standard Oil Co., Assistant, United Asbestos Co., Ld.,.. Clerk, Kelly & Walsh, Ld.,.... Assistant. Cooper & Co., Assistant, Cooper & Co., Manager, Walter Ford & Co.,

Employee, Java-China-Japan Lijn,

47 Wyndham Street. 4 Mosque Street.

4 Mosque Street. 14 Seymour Terrace. On premises. On premises.

25 Leighton Hill Road. 10 Ashley Road, Kowloon. 32 Ice House Street.

9 Upper Mosque Terrace.

9 Upper Mosque Terrace. 17 Ashley Road, Kowloon.

12 Nathan Road, Kowloon.

Clerk, South British Insurance Co., Ld.,.] 15 Wing Wa Lane 1st floor. Assistant, Taikoo Sugar Refinery,

Assistant Measurer,

Clerk, Taikoo Dockyard,

Quarry Bay.

40 Connaught Road Central. Quarry Bay.

On premises.

Manager, Dairy Farm I. & C. S. Co., Ld., Sassoon's Villa, Pokfulam.

Assistant, HK. & S'hai Bank,

Acting Agent, Central Agency Co., Ld., 12 Knutsford Terrace, Kowloon. Foreman, Taikoo Dockyard,

| Accountaut, Alex. Ross & Co.,

Ticket Agent, Admiral Line Pacific Mail

S.S. Co.,......

Assistant, HK. & S'hai Bank, Assistant, Lowe, Bingham & Matthews, Director, C. E. Warren & Co., Ld., Mining Supt., Chas. E. Richardson, Architect, Asiatic Petroleum Co., Ld., Salesman, Alex. Ross & Co., Clerk, HK. Electric Co., Ld., Architect and Surveyor,

Director, Arnold Bros. & Co., Ld.,. Proprietor, Sennet Frères, Clerk, Taikoo Dockyard,.. Manager, Sun Life Assurance Co. of

Canada,

Assistant, Butterfield & Swire, Clerk, Taikoo Dockyard,... Employee, Java-China-Japan Lijn, Manager, H. Scott & Co., Draughtsman, Dock Co., Principal, Ralph W. Weymouth, Timekeeper, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Marine Supt., Jardine, Matheson & Co.,

Ld.,...

Attorney, Standard Oil Co.,. Assistant, Wm. Powell, Ld., Foreman, Taikoo Dockyard,

Quarry Bay.

4 Minden Villas, Kowloon.

10 Humphreys Building, Kowloon. Ou premises.

Queen's Road Central. 20 Broadwood Road. On premises.

Station Hotel, Kowloon. Station Hotel, Kowloon. Kingsclere, Kennedy Road. 24 Des Voeux Road Ceutral. Mount Davis, Pokfulum Road. 13 St. Stephen's Lane. Quarry Bay.

Peak Hotel.

139 The Peak.

Quarry Bay.

12 Broadwood Road. King Edward Hoted. Kowloon Docks.

Kingsclere, Kennedy Road. Quarry Bay.

3 Canton Villas, Kowloon. Hongkong Club.

Powell's Building. Quarry Bay.

Resident Manager, HK. Hotel Co., Ld.,... Repulse Bay Hotel. Steward, Hongkong Hotel, Assistant, Vacuum Oil Co.,..............、

Sugar Boiler, China Sugar Refining Co.,Ld.,

27 Belilios Terrace, Conduit Road. Kingsclere, Kennedy Road. 209 Praya Crest.

$

ģ

1

NAME IN FULL.

29

OCCUPATION.

ADDRESS.

W-Continued.

Whiteley, William Henry Whyte, James............. Whyte, Lionel Mountstuart Wichers, Johan Victor

Christiaan Wilcox, Alan Cyril Wilken, Eric

Wilkic, Percival William Aldred Wilkinson, Ernest Grabam Wilkinson, Robert Andrew Williams, Ernest Arthur Williams, William George.... Williamson, Stuart Taylor Wilson, Archibald Alfred..... Wilson, Charles Robert.... Wilson, Charles Maurice Wilson, Edgar Milestandish Wilson, Ernest Wilson, George

Wilson, Gordon Harold.. Wilson, Herbert ..... Wilson, Norval Charles.........

Wilson, Walter Dunbar Fiddes Wilton, Richard James Wiltson, John Henri Witchell, George Bernard... Witchell, Job....... Wodehouse, Richard Lancelot

Deane

Wolff, Philip Robert Wong, Joseph Mowlam. Wong Kam-fuk

Wong Kwong-tin

Wong, J. M., alias Wong

Mau-lam

Wong, James Nicolas

Wong, Mathew

Wong Min

Wong, Peter

Wong Pik-tsun

Wong Ping-shun.

Wong Sik-kay

Wong Tak-kwong,.

Thomas

Wong, Wong Tsz-shun`................. Wong Un-fong Wong, Walter Lam Wong, William Wong Wing-fong Woo Yuk-lun

Wood, Gerald George Wood, Marshall

Woods, Thomas Percival

Lindsay

Woolley, William John Wotherspoon, William Woudenberg, Gérardus Wright, Willis

Assistant, A. S. Watson & Co., Ld.,.... Timekeeper, Taikoo Dockyard, Wine Merchant, Donnelly & Whyte,

Signs per pro. Java-China-Japan Lijn,. Assistant, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Ld., Assistant, HK. & S'hai Bank, Assistant, Butterfield & Swire,

Soda Water Factory, North Point. Quarry Bay. Kellett Crest.

92 The Peak.

Empress Lodge, Mody Road, K'loon. On premises.

Palace Hotel, Kowloon.

King Edward Hotel. York Buildings,

Des Voeux Road Central. Hongkong Hotel.

Assistant, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Ld.,. Ewo Junior Mess. Assistant, Butterfield & Swire, Clerk, W. R. Loxley & Co., Assistant, Thos. Cook & Son,... Director, Moller & Co., Assistant, Dragon Motor Car Co., Shift Engineer, HK. Electric Co., L.,... Assistant, Reiss & Co........... Accountant, Pacific Mail S.S. Co.,. Clerk, Taikoo Dockyard,... Assistant, N. S. Moses & Co., Merchant, Robertson, Wilson & Co., Timekeeper, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Acting Manager, Mercantile Bank of

India Ld.,

Assistant, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Ld., Chief Engineer, HK. Tramway Co., Ld., Asst. Supt. Engr., Java-China-Japan Lijn, Engineer, W. S. Bailey & Co., Ld., Manager, King Edward Hotel,

9 Wild Dell, Wanchai Road. 3 Broadwood Road. Craigieburne, The Peak. On premises. Quarry Bay. 8 Park Road.

Woodbury, Pokfulum. Quarry Bay.

Kenlis, 77 The Peak, Ewo Junior Mess. 4 Broadwood Road. King Edward Hotel.

10 Knutsford Terrace, Kowloon. On premises.

Queen's Building.

Asst., Union Ince. Socty. of Canton, Ld.,... Chief Clerk, HK. & K. W. & G. Co., Ld., 1 Louren Villas, Kowloon. Assistant, A. S. Watson & Co., Ld., | 30 Caine Road. Compradore, HK, & K. W. & G. Co., Ld., 11 Arbuthnot Road. Secretary, Kai Tak Land Investment Co.,

Ld.,

Compradore, A. S. Watson & Co., Ld., Employee, Java-China-Japan Liju, Assistant, Dock Co.,

Clerk, China Light & Power Co., Ld.,... Assistant, A. S. Watson & Co., Ld., Sub-Manager, The Bank of Canton, Ld.,.. Compradore, Mackinnon, Mackenzie & Co., Compradore, Andersen, Meyer & Co., Manager, Fung Tang,

Assistant, W. R. Loxley & Co........ Asst. Compradore, American Express Co., Clerk, Mackinnon, Mackenzie & Co.,.. Employee, Java-China-Japan Liju, Assistaut, A. S. Watson & Co., Lal., Clerk, Mackinnon, Mackenzie & Co., ...... Clerk, Harry Wicking & Co., Civil Engineer, Leigh & Orange, Architect, Little, Adams & Wood,

Assistant, Banker & Co.,

Asst., Lowe, Biugham & Matthews, Clerk, Taikoo Dockyard,

Employee, Holland China Trading Co.,... Assistant, Fumigating & Disinfecting Co.,

26 Des Vœux Road Central.

9 King Wo Terrace. 41 Elgin Street. Kowloon Docks. Kowloon.

38A Bonham Road, Des Voeux Road Central. 22 Des Voeux Road Central. 10 Staunton Street.

6 Queen's Road Central. 21 Old Bailey.

15 Po Hing Fong. On premises.

1 Shelley Street, 2nd floor.

30 Whitfield, North Point, On premises.

22 Graham Street.

Tai Po.

Peak Hotel.

1 Middle Road, Kowloon. 3 Queen's Road Central. Quarry Bay.

12 Nathan Road, Kowloon. Orient Buildings, Kowloon.

X

Xavier, Antonio Francisco. Xavier, Elias Maria

Xavier, Epiphanio Maria

Xavier, Faustino Antonio.... Xavier, Gregorio Maria ....... Xavier, Hermenegildo

Innocencio

Clerk, Goddard & Douglas, Lighter Overseer, Holt's Wharf,. Clerk, Banque de l'Indo-Chine, Merchant, Xavier Bros. Ld., Clerk, Gas Co.,

C/o. Goddard & Douglas. 51 Haiphong Road, Top floor. Prince's Building.

16 Macdonnell Road.

Gas Works, Hongkong.

Asst., Union Ince, Socty, of Canton, Ld., On premises.

30

NAME IN FULL.

OCCUPATION.

ADDRESS.

X-Continued.

Xavier, Hermenegildo Maria. Clerk, HK. Tramway Co., Ld.,

Xavier, José Maria

Xavier, José Maria

Xavier, José Paulino.......... Xavier, Lisbello Xavier, Luiz Gonzaga Xavier, Michael Antony Xavier, Paulo Maria Xavier, Pedro Nolasco

Y

Yap Keng Ti................... Yates, Gordon

Yates, Leonard

Yeung No

Yeung Wing-cheung Yip Wai-sun Yip Wei-man Young, Alfred Young, Benjamin Young, Charles Young, David...

Young, Joseph

Young, Thomas

Ypey, Koert Jan

Yung Tsz-Ming

Yvanovich, Jr., Guilherme

Antonio

Yvanovich, José Antonio ......

Merchant, HK. Import & China Produce

Export Co.,.....

Merchant, British China Trading Co., Clerk, Chartered Bank of I. A. & C.,.............. Assistant, Transmarina Trading Co., Clerk, Banque de l'Indo-Chine, Articled, L. A. Rose, Architect,... Clerk, P. A. Xavier & Co., ... Assistant, HK. Rope Factory,

38 St. Francis Yard.

113 Des Voeux Road Central. 6 Des Voeux Road Central. 6 Cameron Road, Kowloon, 11 Ashley Road, Kowloon. Prince's Building.

16 Macdonnell Road. 11 Ashley Road, Kowloon. 21 Mosque Junction.

Clerk, Mercantile Bank of India Ld........ Chinese Y.M.C.A., Bridges Street. Director, Prince Line, Furness (Far

East), Ld.,

Chairman, Prince Line, Furness (Far

East), Ld.,

Assistant, Gilman & Co., Ld., Clerk, Frank Smith & Co., Broker, Frank Smith & Co., Assistant, Shewan, Tomes & Co., Assistant, Dock Co.,

Assistant, J. M. Alves & Co., Assistant, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Storekeeper, Taikoo Dockyard, Accountant, Percy Smith, Seth & Fleming, Foreman, Taikoo Dockyard,

Engineer, Asiatic Petroleum Co., Ld., Compradore, Chartered Bank of India,

Australia & China,......

Shipping Clerk, P. A. Lapicque & Co.,...

Asst., Union Ince. Socty. of Canton, Ld..... Yvanovich, Philippe Antonio.. Assistant, J. D. Hutchison & Co., Yvanovich, Vicente Autonio... Broker,

173 The Peak.

173 The Peak.

2 Po Wah Street.

6 Des Voeux Road Central. Jubilee Street.

30 Elgin Street.

Kowloon Docks.

116 Des Voeux Road West. Quarry Bay.

Quarry Bay.

23 Staunton Street. Quarry Bay.

17 Broadwood Road.

On premises.

2 Lochiel Terrace, Cameron Road,

Kowloon,

Queen's Building.

9 Hankow Road, Kowloon, Queen's Building.

2

Zeveryn, Carel Cornelis

Assistant, Java-China-Japan Lijn,

12A Nathan Road,

Registry, Supreme Court, Hongkong, 18th February, 1921.

H. A. NISBET,

Registrar.

*

!

31

94/12 C.S.O.

No.

2 1921

HONGKONG.

QUARTERLY RETURN OF EXCESSES ON SUB-HEADS MET BY

SAVINGS UNDER HEADS OF EXPENDITURE.

(For the 4th Quarter of 1920.)

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor, 3rd March, 1921.

Head and Sub-head of Service.

Amount.

Explanation.

Public Works Establishment, Other Charges,

Conveyance Allowance.

Military Expenditure, Hongkong Volunteer Defence Corps, Other Charges, Books, Stationery and Printing.

Post Office, Radio-Telegraph Station, Trans-

port.

Public Works Establishment, Other Charges,

Conveyance Allowance.

Medical Department, Health Officer of the Port,

Other Charges, Launch Repairs.

Kowloon-Canton Railway, Traffic Expenses,

Other Charges, Clothing.

C.

5.91 Extra conveyance allowance to Mr. Fernandez.

500.00 Under-estimated. 500.00

6,315.00 Transport of officers and stores to and from Cape D'Aguilar Wireless Station.

90.00 To Mr. Clarke, Temporary

Electrician.

100.00 Considered necessary.

500.00 Under-estimated.

Treasury, Other Charges, Incidental Expenses.

180.00

Do.

Assessor's Office, Incidental Expenses.

40.00

Do.

Harbour Master's Department, D. :-

Steam Launches, Stores.

800.00

Do.

Marine Superintendent's Office:

Incidental Expenses.

60.00

Do.

Launch Stores.

80.00

Do.

Police, Other Charges, Launch and Boat

Repairs.

Sanitary Department, Other Charges, Scaveng- ing City, Villages, and Hill District.

2,950.00 Considered necessary.

200.00 Under-estimated.

Head and Sub-head of Service.

Kowloon-Canton Railway:

32

Amount.

C.

Explanation.

General Charges:

Electric Fans and Light.

180.00 Under-estimated.

Traffic Expenses :--

Electric Fans and Light.

230.00

Do.

Medical Department, Civil Hospital, Other

Charges:-

Fuel and Light.

2,000.00

Do.

Washing.

800.00

Do.

Medical Department, Victoria Hospital, Other

800.00

Do.

Charges, Provisions.

Botanical and Forestry Department, Other

100.00

Do.

Charges, Transport.

Magistracy, Other Charges

Electric Fans and Light.

25.00

Do.

Incidental Expenses.

150.00

Do.

Uniform for Messengers.

14.00

Do.

Vehicle Hire for Summons.

15.00

Do. *

Imports and Exports Department, Other

Charges:--

Launch, Coal.

1,200.00

Do.

Uniform for Revenue Officers and

Messengers.

300.00

Do.

Medical Department, Victoria Hospital, Other

Charges, Fuel and Light.

200.00

Do.

130.00 Increased consumption of

coal.

Kowloon-Canton Railway, Locomotive, Car- riage, and Wagon Expenses, Loading Coal.

Post Office, Other Charges:-

Transit Charges.

Cleansing Materials.

Coolie Hire.

Incidental Expenses.

Transport.

Uniform and Equipment.

12,000.00 Under-estimated.

130.00

Do.

150.00

Do.

100.00

Do.

500.00

Do.

1,000.00

Do.

Public Works Establishment, Other Charges,

Conveyance Allowance.

Imports and Exports Department, Other Charges, Rent of Temporary Offices,

Sanitary Department, Other Charges, Street

Watering.

30.00! To Mr. Taylor, newly

appointed Inspector Stores.

100.00 To meet increased rent.

350.00 Under-estimated.

of

2.

Head and Sub-head of Service.

33

Amount.

Explanation.

Public Works Establishment, Other Charges,

Conveyance Allowance.

Secretariat for Chinese Affairs, Other Charges,

Incidental Expenses.

Harbour Department, A.-Other Charges:

Uniform for Boarding Officers and Boat-

$ c.

15.00 Increased conveyance allow-

ance to Mr. Brown.

200.00 Under-estimated.

275.00

Do.

men.

Mercantile Marine Office, Other Charges:

Uniform for Messengers.

.90

Do.

Steam Launches, Stores.

431.00

Do.

Gunpowder Depôt, Incidental Ex-

20.00

Do.

penses.

Marine Surveyor's Office :-

Launch Stores.

Launch Hire.

65.00

Do.

45.00

Do.

Colonial Secretary's Office, Other Charges :-

Electric Fans and Light.

35.00

Do.

Incidental Expenses.

25.00

Do.

Newspapers and Periodicals.

12.00

Do.

Hansard Reports.

3.00

Do.

Police, A.-Other Charges, Furniture, Re-

pairs and Renewals.

757.00

Do.

Hongkong Volunteer Defence Corps, Other Charges, Books, Stationery and Printing.

400.00

Do.

Public Works Extraordinay, Other Charges,

Conveyance Allowance.

30.00

Do.

District Officer, Other Charges, Small Public

Works.

500.00

Do.

Police, A.-Other Charges, Arms.

810.00

Do.

Imports and Exports Department, Other Charges, Uniform for Revenue Officers, Messengers, &c.

100.00

Do.

Prison Department, Other Charges :-

Cleansing and Sanitary Materials.

200.00

Do.

Executioner's Fees.

25.00

Do.

Fuel.

1,600.00

Do.

Light.

1,000.00

Do.

Materials for Remunerative Indus-

1,000.00

Do.

tries.

.

Head and Sub-head of Service.

34

Medical Department, Health Officer of Port,

Other Charges, Launch, Repairs.

Harbour Department, Other Charges:-

Amount.

Explanation.

$ c.

250.00 | Under-estimated.

Examination Fees.

15.00

Do.

Government Marine Surveyor's Office,

5.00

Do.

Launch, Stores.

D.-Steam Launches, Stores.

35.00

Do.

F.-Lights, Upkeep of Aga Lights for Fairway Buoys, Harbour of

10.00

Do.

Refuge.

Education, Other Charges

Furniture.

217.49

Do.

Incidental Expenses.

226.35

Do.

Transport.

859.91

Do.

Grant in aid of Rent.

264.00

Do.

Medical Department, Upkeep of X-Ray Ap-

paratus.

3.85

Do.

Lunatic Asylum, Provisions.

14.96

Do.

Magistracy, Other Charges, Electric Fans and

Light.

3.99

Do.

Miscellaneous Services, Printing and Binding.

3,904.00

Do.

Sanitary Department, Other Charges:

Disinfecting and Cleansing Appar-

16.43

Do.

atus.

Fuel for Blacksmith's Forges.

22.00

Do.

Launch, Steam Barges, Stores.

15.44

Do.

Light, Bullock Stables.

71.38

Do.

Scavenging City, &c.

10.14

Do.

Transport.

62.38

Do.

Uniform for Staff.

2.80

Do.

Animal Depôts and Slaughter-houses,

130.47

Do.

Incidental Expenses.

18th February, 1921.

CLAUD SEVERN,

Colonial Secretary.

*

+

39

94/12 C.S.O.

No.

4 1921

HONGKONG.

QUARTERLY RETURN OF EXCESSES ON SUB-HEADS MET BY

SAVINGS UNDER HEADS OF EXPENDITURE.

(For the 1st Quarter of 1921.)

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor, 23rd June, 1921.

Head and Sub-head of Service.

Amount.

Explanation.

Military Expenditure, B.-Volunteer Defence Corps, Other Charges, Grant to Mounted Infantry Section.

Police, A.-Other Charges :-

Conveyance Allowance.

Village Scouts.

Typewriters.

Kowloon-Canton Railway, Other Charges,

Typewriter.

Public Works Establishment, Other Charges,

Conveyance Allowance.

Sanitary Department, Special Expenditure, Ex- humation at Kailung Wan and Kowloon Tong.

Miscellaneous Services, Language Study

Allowance.

Public Works Establishment, Other Charges,

Conveyance Allowance.

Miscellaneous Services, Other Miscellaneous

Services.

Education, Other Charges, Piano Hire (British

and Peak Schools).

Botanical and Forestry Department, Other

Charges, Field Allowance.

Miscellaneous Services, Other Miscellaneous

Services.

CA

C.

1,800.00 Re-organisation.

60.00

60.00

143.75 Considered necessary.

84.00

Do.

180.00 Pony allowance

to Mr.

Bowen, watchman, Tytam Reservoir.

2,554.73 Exhumations.

360.00 Mr. L. H. V. Booth, new

appointment.

23.61 Extra conveyance allowance

to Mr. Grimes.

100.00 Honorarium to

R. S. Institute.

Secretary,

150.00 Hire of piano for Kowloon British School.

400.00 Field allowance to Foresters.

450.00 Fees to attendants of Scott and Heath, insane persons to England..

Head and Sub-head of Service.

40

Amount.

Explanation.

$ c.

Miscellaneous Services, Other Miscellaneous

Services.

Do.

Post Office, Radio-Telegraph Staff.

Medical Department, Other Charges, Furni-

ture.

Post Office, Other Charges, Compensation for

damaged goods.

Miscellaneous Services, Other Miscellaneous

Services.

Magistracy, Incidental Expenses.

212.43 Cost of passage to Mr. Wilks

to Sydney.

300.00 Fees to attendants in charge

of Mr. Wilks.

100.00 Appointment of a Coolie-

cook.

|

100.00 Furniture bought for the

Government Laboratory.

55.30 Compensation for letter lost

at Taipo.

200.00 Conveyance allowance to Mr.

Schofield.

73.22 Transport of Mr. Orme's effects from Taipo to Hongkong.

28th April, 1921.

E. D. C. WOLFE,

Colonial Secretary,

*

A

45

94/12 C.S.O.

No.

1921

HONGKONG.

QUARTERLY RETURN OF EXCESSES ON SUB-HEADS MET BY

SAVINGS UNDER HEADS OF EXPENDITURE.

(For the 2nd Quarter of 1921.)

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor, 21st July, 1921.

Head and Sub-head of Service.

Amount.

Explanation.

T

Botanical and Forestry Department, Other

Charges, Expenses of Collection.

Harbour Master, Other Charges, Incidental

Expenses.

Police, A.-Other Charges, Incidental Ex-

penses.

Military Expenditure, B.-Volunteer Defence Corps, Other Charges, Books, Stationery and Printing.

Sanitary Department, Other Charges, Coolie

Labour.

Imports and Exports Department, Other Charges, Chinese Revenue Officers' Quarters at Yaumati.

Public Works Establishment, Other Charges,

Conveyance Allowance.

Do.

Supreme Court, Other Charges, Fees to Coun- cil and Solicitors for Prisoners in Capital

cases.

$ c.

400.00 Subscription towards the salary and expenses. of a collector for the Hainan collection undertaken by the Canton Christian College.

200.00 Purchase of the old books of the late Mr. J. MacDonald for use of the Government Marine Surveyor's Office.

200.00 Payment for a Roneo Dup-

licator.

500.00 Increased cost.

550.00 Increase of salaries.

18.00 Increase of rent.

118.55 Conveyance allowance to Mr.

P. C. Yung.

108.00 Increased conveyance allow- ance to two House Service Inspectors.

500.00 Under-estimated.

Head and Sub-head of Service.

46

Amount.

Explanation.

District Office, Northern District, Other

Charges.

Sanitary Department, Other Charges, Sani-

tary Staff:-

Disinfecting Stations; District Sani- tary Offices, and Matsheds.

Rat Poison, Rat Traps, etc.

Scavenging Gear.

Sanitary Department, Other Charges, Veteri- nary Staff, Animal Depôts and Slaughter Houses, Incidental Expenses.

Imports and Exports Department, Other

Charges, Office Cleaning Materials.

Medical Department, Office of Health Officer of Port, Other Charges, Incidental Ex-

penses.

$ c.

350.00 Re-binding

Re-binding Crown Lease Schedules, Index Books, Rent Rolls, etc.

300.00 Running expenses of Geyser.

Under-estimated.

1,000.00

1,500.00

Increased cost.

1,320.00 Running expenses for the

new motor meat vans.

50.00 Under-estimated.

100.00 Running expenses of the new office, and uniform for a new office attendant.

2

7th July, 1921.

CLAUD SEVERN,

Colonial Secretary.

T

149

A

C.S.O. 94/12. C.S.O.

:

No. 1921

14

HONGKONG.

QUARTERLY RETURN OF EXCESSES ON SUB-HEADS MET BY SAVINGS UNDER HEADS OF EXPENDITURE.

(For the 3rd Quarter of 1921.)

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor, 8th December, 1921.

Head and Sub-head of Service.

Amount.

Explanation.

Public Works, Establishment, Other Charges,

Conveyance Allowance.

Imports and Exports Department, Other

Charges, Conveyance Allowance.

Police, A.-Other Charges, Launches and

Boats, Repairs.

Medical Department, Other Charges:--

Bacteriological Institute, Preparation of

Viri Vaccines and Sera.

Lunatic Asylum, Incidental Expenses. Victoria Hospital, Incidental Expenses.

$ c.

45.00 Conveyance allowance to Mr.

Staple.

133.87 Conveyance allowances to

Messrs. Bass & Brown.

980.00 Payment of Premium on Insurance of S.L. "Shun Lee".

400.00 Under-estimatėd.

90.00

Do.

90.00

Do.

Prison Department, Other Charges, Incidental

Expenses.

500.00

Do.

Public Works, Establishment, Other Charges,

Conveyance Allowance.

25.00 Increase of Pony allowance

to Mr. Bowen.

:

Kowloon-Canton Railway, Other Charges,

Rent of Quarters for Chinese Staff.

128.00

Under-estimated.

Imports and Exports Department, Other

Charges, Launch Repairs.

700.00

Do.

Harbour Master's Department, Other Charges, 1,200.00

Coal, Parafin and Stores for Lighthouses.

Do.

Kowloon-Canton Railway, General Charges, Other Charges, Electric Fans and Light.

310.00

Do.

¥

Kowloon-Canton Railway, Traffic Expenses,

Electric Fans and Light.

125.00

Do:

Head and Sub-head of Service.

150

Amount.

Explanation.

C.

Treasury, Other Charges, Transport.

Post Office, Other Charges, Travelling Allow-

ance.

Medical Department, Other Charges, Upkeep

of X-Ray Apparatus.

Imports and Exports Department, Other

Charges:

Candles and Batteries for searching pur-

poses.

50.00

240.00

Under-estimated. ·

For Supt. Wireless Telegra- phy (New Appointment).

250.00 Under-estimated.

60.00

Do.

Opium, Incidental Expenses.

40.00

Do.

Education, Other Charges, Fee for Students in Training and Maintenance for Students in Training.

887.00

Do.

Medical Department, Other Charges, Surgical

Instruments.

1,250.00

Do.

27th November 1921.

CLAUD SEVERN,

Colonial Secretary.

J

*

No. 1.

143

No. 1921

12

HONGKONG.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

STANDING LAW COMMITTEE,

on the

RENTS AMENDMENT BILL, 1921.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor, 3rd November, 1921.

PRESENT :

The Honourable the Attorney General, (JOSEPH HORSFORD KEMP, K.C., C.B.E.) the Colonial Treasurer, (CHARLES MOILVAINE MESSER, O.B.E.).

""

""

Mr. HENRY EDWARD POLLOCK, K.C.

Mr. LAU CHÜ-PAK.

""

ABSENT:

""

Mr. PERCY HOBSON HOLYOAK.

RENTS AMENDMENT BILL.-The Committee considered the bill intituled An Ordi- nance to amend the Rents Ordinance, 1921. They also considered certain suggestions forwarded by the Hongkong Law Society to the Attorney General under cover of letter dated the 27th October, 1921, certain criticisms put forward on behalf of the landlords, a suggestion to provide for the case of bankruptcy, and three additional draft clauses submitted by the Attorney General.

The Committee unanimously agreed to recommend that clauses 7, 8, 9 and 10 of the bill should be omitted, and that the three draft clauses submitted by the Attorney General should be inserted in the bill.

The three clauses in question are as follows:

Notice to quit to bind sub-lessees in certain

cases.

7. Notwithstanding anything contained in the principal Ordinance or in this Ordinance, any bona fide notice to quit duly given by a lessor to a lessee in reliance on the provisions of paragraph (f) of subsec- tion (1) of section 4 of the principal Ordinance, as amended by section 2 of this Ordinance, or in reliance on such provisions and on the provisions of section 8 of this Ordinance, and given in accordance with the provisions of the said paragraph, so amended, shall operate so as to bind all sub-lessees deriving title directly or indirectly from the lessee to whom such notice shall have been given.

Notice to quit given by vendor to enure for benefit of purchaser in certain cases.

Ordinance

No. 1 of 1903.

Bankruptcy of lessee.

144

8. If the owner of any domestic tenement agrees to sell such domestic tenement to a purchaser who bona fide intends forthwith to pull down such domestic tenement or to reconstruct such domestic tenement to such an extent as to make such domestic tenement a new building within the meaning of the Public Health and Buildings Ordinance, 1903, and if such owner agrees with such purchaser to give the necessary notices to quit, any notice to quit given by such owner in pursuance of such agreement shall enure for the benefit of such purchaser as if such purchaser had been the owner at the time when such notice to quit was given and had given such notice to quit, provided that nothing in this section shall relieve such owner from the obligation to state in writing at the time of giving such notice to quit whether such purchaser intends to pull down such domestic tenement or to reconstruct such domestic tenement, and in the latter case to state the exact nature of the reconstruction intended, and provided also that notwithstanding anything in this section the lessee shall have, in addition to any remedies which he may have against such owner, such remedies against such purchaser as he would have had if such notice to quit had been given by such purchaser.

9. If the lessee of any domestic tenement is adjudged bankrupt neither the said lessee nor his trustee in bankruptcy shall be entitled to claim any right or benefit under section 4 of the principal Ordi- nance in respect of the said domestic tenement by virtue of the tenancy, whether contractual or statutory, under which the said lessee held immediately before the making of the adjudication order.

The Committee then adjourned sine die.

J. H. KEMP,

Chairman.

Laid before the Legislative Council this 3rd day of November, 1921.

S. B. B. McELDERRY,

Clerk of Councils.

35

No.

3

1921

HONGKONG.

REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE OF THE LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL ON THE PROVISION OF FACILITIES FOR SEA-BATHING IN THE COLONY.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor, 7th April, 1921.

We have considered the questions referred to us, which were as follows:

(1.) The feasibility of providing adequate public facilities for sea-bathing for

the residents of:---

(a.) The Island of Hongkong.

(b.) Kowloon.

The possibility of supplying cheap and easy means of transport to the

public in connection with such sea-bathing.

2. Some persons who wish to indulge in sea-bathing in the Colony do so by means of private launches and yachts, and in the case of societies and schools by hiring craft of all kinds for the season or by the trip at a small cost per head. There are, however, many who are unable to make use of any of these facilities and they have hitherto depended on using the beaches at Kennedy Town and North. Point.

3. In view of the fact that reclamations for industrial purposes threaten in the near future to remove the beaches hitherto used we have had to consider how they can be replaced, and in doing so we have adopted as a maximum figure for the cost of transport to, and use of, a bathing beach the sum of 40 cents per head. With this limit we find that it is feasible to provide public facilities for sea-bathing both for the residents of the Island of Hongkong and Kowloon.

4. In the Island of Hongkong we recommend that the Government should undertake the preparation and upkeep for public bathing of two places in Victoria :-

(a.) The first place is a beach 230 feet in length lying between Marine Lot 290, the premises of the Royal Hongkong Yacht Club, and Marine Lot 321, the premises of the Hongkong Electric Company. We are advised that this beach can be developed satisfactorily so as to be available for bathing at practically all states of the tide. It is proposed to reclaim this beach for a depth of 30 feet from the existing road channel by means of a pitched rubble slope, the sea-ward line being built to a level of ten feet above Ordnance Datum. The reclaimed area would be surfaced in lime and cement concrete and matshed accommodation would be erected on it, and a fresh water shower bath. A bamboo pier with diving places would be constructed along the South-west boundary of Marine Lot 321 and the bath area enclosed by a hardwood boom of suit- able depth to prevent floating debris passing underneath and fitted with a splash board to prevent oil being thrown over into the bathing area by the motion of the water. The boom will also provide a safeguard against accident.

36

(b.) The second place is at Kennedy Town. For the present year and possibly for a few years hence the portion of beach hitherto used will be avail- able, and we do not recommend any change in the arrangements existing. It is, however, possible that a reclamation of a moderate length may be constructed in the near future, which will include the whole or a part of the beach now in use. In that case we recommend

that a portion of beach more to the westward be developed in much the same manner as the beach dealt with under (a).

5. For residents of Kowloon we have been able to arrange with the Naval and Military Authorities for a portion of the beach on the north side of Stonecutter's Island to be reserved. We recommend the construction by the Government of a fence enclosing an area above high water mark, a bamboo pier, a diving platform, matshed dressing-rooms, and a matshed for refreshments. We also recommend the construction of a short bamboo pier at the end of Jordan Road, Kowloon. The Kau-Lung Sze-Yeuk Kai Fong Ferry Company which operates the ferries on the west of the harbour, has offered to provide a launch to carry bathers between the pier suggested and Stonecutter's Island and back at a low fare, the exact amount of which has not yet been fixed. The launch would leave Jordan Road about 4.45 p.m. and 5.45 p.m. every afternoon, and return from Stonecutter's about 5.15

and 7 p.m. No other launches should be allowed to use the p.m., 6.15 Government beach and we recommend that a sum of ten cents be charged for each bather. By this means provision would be made for about 300 bathers a day.

p.m.

6. The cost to the Government of providing the bathing facilities is estimated to amount to about $8,000 details of which are given in the Appendix.. A sum of $2,700 is provided in the Estimates for the current year, and this would have to be supplemented.

7. We desire to record our appreciation of the assistance rendered to us by Mr. E. W. Carpenter of the Public Works Department in the preparation of plans and estimates, and in making suggestions.

4th April, 1921.

CLAUD SEVERN,

H. E. POLLOCK,

LAU CHU-PAK.

APPENDIX.

Estimate of cost of providing bathing facilities in Hongkong and Kowloon.

(a.) At North Point to the South-West of Marine Lot 321.

PERMANENT WORK:--

Reclamation of Foreshore...

Provide H. W. Boom...

ANNUAL EXPENDITURE :

Matsheds

Preparation of beach and shower baths

$ 2,000.00 1,400.00

900.00

50.00

...

Notice-boards, tickets, upkeep of boat, stores, etc...

200.00

Attendants ...

600.00

TOTAL

$ 5,150.00

1

.

37

(b.) At Kennedy Town.

ANNUAL EXPENDITURE

Matsheds

Preparation of beach...

Upkeep of boat, stores, etc. Attendants

(c.) At Stonecutter's Island.

ANNUAL EXPENDITURE:-

CA

350.00

50.00

150.00

250.00

TOTAL

800.00

Matsheds, fences, raft, etc.

700.00

Preparation of beach and pier

159.00

New Notice-boards, boat, stores, uniforms, etc.

300.00

Attendants

400.00

Pier at Jordan Road, Kowloon...

150.00

TOTAL

S 1,700.00

:

GRAND TOTAL SAY

...$8,000.00

67

C.S.O. 2800/14.

HONGKONG.

No.

8

1921

REPORT OF A COMMITTEE APPOINTED TO CONSIDER THE FEASIBILITY OF

EXTENDING THE SYSTEM OF WATER CARRIAGE IN THE COLONY BY

PUMPING UP SALT WATER FROM THE HARBOUR AND THE

PROVISION OF SUITABLE PIPES THEREFOR.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor, 1st September, 1921.

The Committee held six meetings and received the following reports from the undermentioned gentlemen, copies of which are appended :--

1. Head of Sanitary Department, on the question of the Night Soil Contract.·

2, 3, & 4.

Į Mr. R. M. HENDERSON, on the cost of installing Salt Water Supply

Systems.

5, 6, 7, 8, 9, ) Mr. E. NEWHOUSE, on the question of the alterations required to & 10.

sewers to deal with an extension of the Water Carriage System.

11, 12, 13,

14, 15, & 16.

Mr. L. GIBBS, on the cost of providing Salt Water, and on the cost and the present and ultimate capacity of the City of Victoria and Hill District and of the Kowloon Water Works.

17. Extracts from previous reports on the question.

2. The Committee found it desirable to divide the populous parts of the Colony into the following districts :--

(1.) The Peak..

(2.) The Middle Levels, say 400′ to 700′ contour.

(3.) The City below 400′ contour.

(4.) Kowloon Point South of Gascoigne and Jordan Roads and the area between the Railway and Coronation Road as far North as the New Boundary Road, including Ho Mun Tin.

(5). Remainder of Kowloon District.

3. The Committee decided that districts (3) and (5) (Chinese Quarters of Hongkong and Kowloon) need not be considered, until the Water Carriage System, if it were decided to extend it, had been tried in the other areas. Their decision was based on the

following reasons:---

(a.) That the areas in question were mainly taken up by Chinese tenement houses

whose occupants would not be likely to appreciate it.

(b.) That drains and closets in these districts would be liable to become blocked. (c.) That the collection of fæcal matter from these districts is the most valuable and the least expensive, most of the present revenue being obtained from them.

4

68

4. The Committee have arrived at the following conclusions :---

To pump Salt Water for an extension of the Water Carriage System to any of the 3 districts,--Peak, Middle Levels and Kowloon Point,-is feasible and would be an advantage from a sanitary point of view. It would not however be economical to do so while fresh water can be spared and can be supplied at a less cost.

5. The cost per 1,000 gallons, including interest on capital and the cost of pumping where necessary, but not including depreciation and general maintenance charges which would be about the same in all cases--is approximately as follows:---

Salt Water pumped to--

The Peak

Middle Levels

Kowloon Point ...

Fresh Water supplied to-

$3.33

1.25 See Mr. GIBBS's report --Annexe 11. 0.36

The Peak

Middle Levels

Kowloon Point...

$0.76

0.53 See Mr. GIBBS's reports--Annexes 12 and 13. 0.17)

(N.B.---An addition for pumping from the City has been made in the case of the Peak and Middle

Levels.)

5%

Hongkong.

(a.)- Water Supply.

6. The City and Peak Water Supply has about reached the limit of its capacity, i.e., if such a dry period as that experienced during 1894-1896 were to recur there would be scarcity. The present supply (1920) is fully 7 million gallons a day. The water required for the proposed Water Carriage Services to the Peak and Middle Levels amounts to 5 and 22 million gallous a year, respectively. One inch of water on an acre amounts to 22,000 gallons. In the driest recorded year at least 20 inches of rain can be collected in Hongkong, so that the above amounts can be collected respectively from 12 and 50 acres.

The present gathering ground of the City and Hill District Water Works amounts to 2,561 acres. There is however an area of about 2,600 acres in the neigh- bourhood of Taitam which is available for catchwatering and which may be reckoned on to increase the supply (without further reservoirs) from its present figure of 7 millions to 10 millions a day. A catchwater to intercept the water from about 300 acres of the above 2,600 acres at a cost of $70,000 is now in contemplation; this will provide an additional supply of at least 130 million gallons a year and will take no longer to carry out than the works necessary for supplying at a much greater cost ($417,000) 27 million gallons of Salt Water a year.

(b.)-Peak District.

The sanitary advantage to the Peak owing to its scattered location and the long carry for fæcal matter, is so great and the amount of water required is so small that a Public Water Carriage System using fresh water might with advantage be adopted there as soon as the necessary additions to the Peak pumping plant, now on order, are installed.

(c.)-Middle Levels.

In the Middle Levels the amount of water required is a more serious matter and the sanitary advantage less, and it seems that a Public Water Carriage System using fresh water should remain in abeyance there till an adequate extension of the Taitam gathering ground has been put in hand.

7. The Kowloon Works will produce-1.7 million gallons a day in the driest recorded year and can be considerably extended at a comparatively small_cost.

The present supply is about 13 million gallons a day. The Water Supply in Kowloon is therefore still fairly ahead of present requirements, but in view of the rapid growth of the district a Water Carriage System using fresh water should not be installed until extensions of the present Water Works are put in hand.

X

- 69

General.

8. The time may come when the limit of the fresh water resources of the Colony has been so nearly reached that it will be more economical to obtain a supply of Salt Water than to obtain an equal additional supply of fresh water, but it does not appear that that time has yet arrived, and no works which may be carried out now for the use of fresh water will in any way interfere with the use of Salt Water when its use is found to be more economical.

9. Some alterations to the sewerage system in each of the three districts will he desirable. After perusing the six reports (Annexes 5-10) received from Mr. NEWHOUSE. we have come to the following conclusions :—

(a.) The drainage of the Peak District should be diverted to an outfall on the

South side of the Island.

(b.) The drainage of the Middle Lovels should be diverted to an outfall in the

Sulphur Channel.

(c.) All sewage on the Western side of Kowloon Peninsula should be diverted to

outfalls at Kowloon Point and North of the Cosmopolitan Dock.

It is suggested that the cost of this should be met by an additional rate in the districts concerned, each district being first given the option to decide by vote whether or no it will adopt a Water Carriage System with a Public Water Supply.

10. As our recommendations do not involve the supply of Salt Water, the question of "the provision of suitable pipes" does not arise.

T. L. PERKINS, Chairman. L. GIBBS.

R. M. HENDERSON.

C. E. WARREN.

9th July, 1921.

Annexe 1.

HEAD OF SANITARY DEPARTMENT,

Can you please supply, for the information of the Committee recently appointed by Government to consider the feasibility of extending the system of Water Carriage in the Colony by pumping up sea-water from the Harbour, the following information :—~

(1) the annual revenue for the last 10 years derived from the sale of night soil. (2) the probable effect on such revenue, if the areas comprising the Peak down to the 400 feet contour, and Kowloon Point, South of Gascoigne and Jordan Roads, were to be eliminated from such contract.

(3) whether there is likely to be increasing difficulty in the disposal of night soil

in the future.

(4) a return showing the total number of Water Closets now existing, including therein the Naval and Military Establishments, (a) in Hongkong and (b) in Kowloon, which discharge into the Harbour.

(5) a return showing the total number of houses in the areas referred to in

paragraph (2) hereof.

2. The Committee would be glad if the return asked for could be furnished early, please.

14th March, 1921.

T. L. PERKINS, Director of Public Works.

Hon. DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC WORKS,

In reply to your questions :--

70

Annexe 1.

(1). I attach figures shewing the actual sums paid by the Conservancy Contractors for City of Victoria, Kowloon Peninsula, Shaukiwan, combined. These figures are likely to give a wrong impression as the big drop in 1917 was due to the fact that the five-yearly contracts for Victoria and Kowloon happened to expire just at a time when conditions in Kwangtung were very unsettled and, in consequence, there was no great competition for the contract. The contract expires again in six months from now. The tenders may be of interest.

(2.) The elimination of the Hill District will, curiously enough, have a bene- ficial effect on the contract price. At present, under clause 7 of his contract, the contractor has to supply a minimum of three foremen and 40 coolies to remove excreta from the district. At $8 a month per man this costs him $4,000 a year. I am also informed that the practice common among Peak residents of adding a little disinfectant fluid to the excreta makes the stuff valueless to the contractor who naturally tenders accordingly.

The elimination of Kowloon Point or rather European houses in Kowloon Point will probably not affect tenders very much.

*

*

*

*.

(3.) I see no reason to anticipate any increasing difficulty. There has always been. a demand for this form of fertilizer in Kwangtung and presumably there always will be. I believe it is used for Mulberries which feed silkworms which in turn produce silk!

1.) I attach a return.

5.) Above 400 feet contour (Bowen Road) approximately 200.

South of Jordan and Gascoigne Roads 359 European, 1,160 Chinese.

*

*

*

*

G. R. SAYER,

Head of the Sanitary Department.

17th March, 1921.

Revenue collected for the last 10 years from the Conservancy Contracts.

1911

1912

1913

1914

1915

1916

1917

1918

1919 1920

$55,893.00

76,860.00

73,820.00

60,303,00

54,576.00

49,335.00

28,404.00

18,887.90

15,234.00

14,848.95

List of Water Closets, Trough Closets and Urinals.

No. oF WATER CLOSETS.

List sanctioned before 1st January, 1914

in 1914...

974 (K. 39)

42

No. OF TROUGH CLOSETS.

173 (K. 16)

NO. OF URINALS.

531 (K. 55)

in 1915...

68 (K. 31)

2

21

in 1916...

88 (K. 39)

4 (K. 2)!

27 (K. 7)

in 1917...

57 (K. 3)

16

"

in 1918...

27

13

17

23

in 1919...

in 1920...

up to 15th March, 1921

107 (K. 30) 199 (K. 104)

22

32

1 (K. 1)

18 (K. 2)

1

Total

1,584 (K. 246)

209 (K, 19)

652 (K.64)

Y

*

*

71

Annexe 2.

Mr. HENDERSON,

Will

you please supply for the information of the Water Carriage Extension Committee the following information:-

(1.) Au estimate of the cost of pumping water from the sea to the Peak and distributing the same to all houses on the Peak down to Barker Road. For the purpose of such estimate, the following assumptions can be made :

3 Water Closets to each house.

A 2-gallon flush.

20 Bushes per house per day.

The water is to be taken to the nearest point on the Public Road or Path, from

whence house-holders must make their own connections.

Sth April, 1921.

Annexe 2.

T. L. PERKINS, Director of Public Works.

Hon. DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC WORKS,

Salt Water Supply to Peak District.

66

Herewith as requested an Estimate of the cost of pumping water from the sea to the Peak, and distributing the same to all houses on the Peak down to Barker Road."

"The water is to be taken to the nearest point on the Public Road or Path, from whence house-holders must make their own connections."

The following assumptions to be taken:

"3 Water Closets to each house."

"A 2-gallon flush."

"20 flushes per house per day."

Existing houses and those under construction number about 200.

Water required 200 x 20 x 2 =

To allow for increase in houses, and loss in system. and tanks, the figure allowed for in this Esti- mate is...

Cost of supplying and laying mains

8,000 gallons per day.

...15,000 gallons per day.

...S 50,000

(12,000 L.F. of 3′′ W.I. pipe and 25,000 L.F. of 2" W.I. pipe and

short lengths of smaller subsidiary mains).

Reservoirs

(One 20,000 gallon tank and three 8,000 gallon tanks).

Pumps...

(Two sets Electric Driven).

27.000

105,000

Total estimated cost

*

$182,000

72

The above figures include the cost of buildings but not land.

The cost of pumping would be about $1.00 per 1,000 gallons, exclusive of sinking fund, depreciation, interest ou capital and general administration charges..

The estimate is based for convenience on the existing Peak Distribution System which consists of W.I. pipes which are not so suitable as C.I. pipes for salt water.

14th April, 1921.

Annexe 3.

R. M. HENDERSON.

Mr. HENDERSON,

Would you kindly supply for the information of the Water Carriage Extension Committee an estimate of the cost of pumping and distributing salt-water in the area from the 100′ to the 750′ contour, making the same assumptions as were made in preparing your report dated 14th April, 1921.

20th April, 1921.

Annexe 3.

T. L. PERKINS, Director of Public Works.

Hon. DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC WORKS,

Salt Water Supply to Middle Levels.

Herewith as requested a rough estimate of the cost of installing Salt Water Pumping and Distributing System for the area bounded by the 400 feet and 750 feet contours.

"The water to be taken to the nearest point on the Public Road or Path from whence householders must make their own connections.

"3 Water Closets to each house."

"A 2-gallon flush.

"20 flushes per house per day.

"3

Meters in existing Waterworks High Level District 700 (approx.).

Take for purposes of estimate 1,000 houses.

Water required 1,000 × 20 × 2...

Add for leakage in system and contingencies

Total daily pumping

40,000 gallons .20,000

..60,000

19

Estimate.

Pumping Plant (2-25 H.P. sets).

Engine House and Rising Main

C.I. Mains (6′′, 4′′ and 3′′) and laying

Reservoirs (1-80,000 gallons and 2-10,000 gallons)

Total cost

SH10,000.00

95,000.00

30,000.00

$235,000.00

Cost of Pumping about 50 cents per 1,000 gallons exclusive of sinking fund, depreciation, interest on capital and general administration charges.

29th April, 1921.

R. M. HENDERSON.

73

Annexe 4.

Mr. HENDERSON.

Will you please supply for the information of the Water Carriage Extension Com- mittee an estimate of the cost of pumping and distributing salt water in area No. 4 as extended at the last Meeting of the Committee making the same assumptions as were made in preparing your previous reports.

4th May, 1921.

Annexe 4.

T. L. PERKINS, Director of Public Works

Hon. DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC WORKS,

Estimate of Cost of Installing a Salt Water Supply System for Water Closet and flushing purposes for that portion of the Kowloon Peninsula lying:-

(a.) South of Gascoigne and Jordan Roads.

(b.) North of Gascoigne and Jordan Roads as far as the Old Kowloon Boundary and between Coronation Road and the Kowloon-Canton Railway and including Ho Mun Tin.

The water to be taken to the nearest point on the Public Road or Path from whence House Holders must make their own connections.

The following assumptions are taken :---

3 Water Closets to each house.

60 gallons per house per day.

60 gallons per house per day has been taken in this case as against 10 gallons per house per day in the case of the Peak and Middle levels, as in my opinion the houses in Kowloon have a greater number of persons occupying them than in the other two Districts mentioned.

There are over 600 separate houses some of which are divided up into four flats, and two hotels with a third large hotel projected. I have therefore taken 1,800 as the number of flats or houses.

Water required 1,800 × 60 =...

Water required by Private Companies, Military, Clubs,

etc., say

say

108,000 gallons.

26,000

""

134,000 140,000

A very large proportion of the area included in this estimate is not now built upon though eminently suited for European houses, so I think that to allow for leakage in system and future expansion the above figure of 140,000 gallons should be doubled.

The scheme should therefore be capable of dealing with 280,000 gallons per day.

Service Reservoir at King's Park.

Intake at Chatham or Jordan Roads.

1

~

74

Estimate.

S", 6", 5′′, 4′′, & 3′′ C.I. mains and laying

Reservoir

$147,000 ...say 30,000

Pumping Plant (2 units), Pumping Station, Coolie Quarters, etc. 50,000

The dollar is taken as 2/6.

$227,000

Cost of Pumping about 20 cents per 1,000 gallons exclusive of sinking fund, depre- ciation, interest on Capital and general administration charges.

18th May, 1921.

Annexe 5.

R. M. HENDERSON.

Mr. NEWHOUSE,

Water Carriage Extension Committee.

Would you kindly supply for the information of the above Committee:

(1) A plan showing the present sewer outfalls.

(2.) A report as to what portion of the drainage from and including the Peak down to the 400 feet contour at present discharges on the South side of the island, and what additional drainage could be so discharged if desired.

14th March, 1921.

Annexe 5.

T. L. PERKINS, Director of Public Works.

Hon. DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC WORKS,

1. I attach herewith 1,400' =1" key plans of the City of Victoria and Kowloon Peninsula in duplicate showing the present sewer outfalls.

(a.) The whole of Mount Kellett and that portion of the Peak South-West of a line drawn roughly through Mountain View, Cloudlands, and Stewart Terrace is drained by the Mount Kellett sewer, the outfall of which is at Kellett Bay. (b.) That portion of the Peak South-East of a line drawn roughly through Stewart Terrace, Cloudlands, Tanderagee and Victoria Hospital and which lies between Barker Road and Craigmin Road together with the Magazine and Wanchai Gap districts, is drained by sewers in Craigmin, Barker and Coombe Roads to a point South of Wanchai Gap where the sewage is treated by septic tanks and the effluent discharged down the stream-course into the catchment area of Aberdeen Reservoir. A sum of $13,000 is included in this year's estimates P.W.E. 19 (d) for connecting this sewer with the city system at Wanchai, but if Mount Cameron is to be developed, I would suggest that, instead of carrying out the work already provided for, an alternative route be adopted from Wanchai Gap to a disposal point in the Valley east of Bennetts Hill on such a line as will deal with the drainage of all houses that might be built on the southern and western slopes of Mount Cameron. I attach 8′′-1 mile contour plan in duplicate, which shows this proposal.

?

75

(c.) That portion of the Peak which lies between Barker Road and Plautation Road from the Cottage to Victoria Hospital is drained by a sewer which follows the line of Chatham Path and is connected with the City System at May Road.

(d.) The drainage of the remainder of the Peak District, i.e.-Plunkett's Gap, Victoria Gap and Victoria Peak is connected to the City System by a sewer in Peak Road.

(e.) I attach 1,400'-1" key plan of the City of Victoria in duplicate showing what additional drainage could be dealt with by a dry weather flow intercepting sewer from Robinson Road to Kennedy Town with an outfall invert at mean sea-level in Sulphur Channel 2,400 feet West of Cadogan Street, which could be extended if found necessary. The drainage from those Peak districts mentioned in items C and D could also be dealt with by the introduction of an inverted syphon through Glenealy between Peak Road and St. Joseph's College and Robinson Road, and a short connection at May Road from the Barker Road sewer to the existing sewer in May Road.

1. All existing sewers below the level of such an intercepting sewer would be retain- ed and would automatically come into use directly the dry weather flow, or whatever additional small proportion of storm-water it was decided to admit, was exceeded.

E... NEWHOUSE.

30th March, 1921.

Annexe 6.

Mr. NEWHOUSE,

1. Can you please supply for the information of the Water Carriage Extension Com- mittee the following information :-

(1.) An estimate of the cost of construction and re-construction of sewers required to take all drainage above the Barker Road level to the South side of the Island cutting out the present discharge into the Aberdeen Reservoir Watershed.

(2.) A report as to whether the existing sewers above Barker Road would be sufficient for a Water Carriage System, and, if not, an estimate of the cost involved in making them so.

(3.) Additional information as to, and the estimated cost of, the suggested sewer

with outfall near Bennetts Hill.

2. As the next meeting of the Committee is to be held on the 15th instant, I should be glad if you could supply the above information early, please.

7th April, 1921.

Annexe 6.

T. L. PERKINS, Director of Public Works.

Hon. DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC WORKS,

1. So far as public sewers are concerned no reconstruction is necessary, except a few alterations of a minor nature and the relaying of a short length of sewer in Coombe Road opposite R.B.L. 49 estimated to cost $500. Additional sewers will be required as follows:--

(.) A sewer from the existing Peak Road sewer at the North West corner of the Upper Tramway Terminus, through Crown Land parellel to and North of the tramway to a point south of R.B.L. 108 where it should cross the tramway and follow the line of Barker Road to the existing sewer opposite the Cottage in Barker Road.

The estimated cost of this work is $4,500.

76

(b.) A short length of sewer in Barker Road from Victoria Hospital to Lyeemun.

The estimated cost of this work is $1,000.

(c.) A sewer laid from the present outfall at Wanchai Gap to a point in the Valley east of Bennetts Hill about 600 feet North of the main road to. Deep Water Bay.

The estimated cost of this sewer is $24,000.

2. The existing sewers are in good condition and are of sufficient capacity to deal with a Water Carriage System extended to the whole of the Peak District. The present maximum daily consumption of water in the Peak is

...133,000 gallons

and I estimate the additional consumption, if water closets are installed in the whole of the Peak area west of Wanchai Gap, exclusive of Mount Nicholson, which does not affect the existing sewers, at about Allowing for future increase in this area say

17,000

... 50,000

200,000

""

66,000

.134,000

of which about 1/3 is drained by the Mount Kellett sewer

say

leaving a dry weather flow of

to be disposed of by the Peak, Barker, Craigmin and Coombe Road sewers, which are capable of dealing with more than 6 times the D.W.F. to which each would be subject before the overflows came into operation.

3. This sewer might be laid on the lines mentioned in 1 (b) of my minute to you dated 30th March, 1921. In addition, it would also be capable of dealing with the drainage of any houses built on the Northern slopes of Mounts Nicholson, and Cameron, above the level of Wanchai Gap. With the increased volume of sewage involved by taking in additional Peak areas I would suggest that the sewer be continued along the Deep Water Bay Road to a point of outfall where there is a strong current in deep water about 400 yards West of the Aberdeen Paper Mills. I estimate the cost of this work at $25,000 and the sum total of the whole scheme at $55,000.

14th April, 1921.

Annexe 7.

E. NEWHOUSE.

Mr. NEWHOUSE,

Will you please supply for the information of the Water Carriage Extension Committee:-

(1) an estimate of the cost of construction and reconstruction of sewers required to deal with all drainage between the 400' and 750′ contours on the lines suggested in your report dated 30th March, 1921.

(2) whether the existing sewers are sufficient to deal with a water carriage system in this area, and, if not, what additional cost would have to be incurred.

1

20th April, 1921.

T. L. PERKINS,

Director of Public Works.

X

X

77

Annexe 7.

Hon. DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC WORKS,

As requested I have gone into the question of finding the best possible line for an intercepting sewer to deal with the drainage between the 400' and 750′ contours and can locate nothing better than that generally indicated on the plan which accompanied my minute to you dated 30th March, 1921. Such a line obviates any costly severance of property as would be involved by adopting a line of less gradient nearer the 100' contour. It is also less costly in construction per occupied area served, and possesses the added advantage of dealing with a considerably larger occupied area. With good design and the proper use of existing sewers as overflows, there can be no question of such a sewer ever coming under pressure and creating a nuisance either by flooding or sewer gas. I estimate the cost at $110,000 approximately. This amount does not include for the inverted syphon, &c., through Glenealy, which was shown on the plan accompanying my report dated 30th March, 1921, in order to meet the requirements then laid down (400' to 750' contour). The cost of this additional syphon and short sewer, (vide paragraph 1 (c) of my report dated 30th March, 1921) which would link up the drainage from the areas South of May Road and of Magazine Gap Road, where a sewer is to be extended this year to Inland Lots 2308-2310 is $8,000 approximately. If it is decided that these areas are to be included in the scheme, then there is no necessity to carry out the work mentioned in paragraph 1 (a) of my minute dated 14th April, 1921.

2. The existing sewers are of sufficient capacity to deal with a water carriage system extended to the whole area dealt with in this report.

29th April, 1921.

E. NEWHOUSE.

Annexe 8.

Mr. NEWHOUSE,

Will you kindly supply for the information of the Water Carriage Extension Committee an estimate of the cost of construction and re-construction of sewers required. to deal with all drainage in an area comprising Kowloon Point to the rear of the houses on the West side of Coronation Road as far North as the new boundary road and bounded. on the East by the Railway including Ho Mun Tin, all sewage to be taken to an outfall at Kowloon Point.

4th May, 1921.

Annexe 8.

T. L. PERKINS, Director of Public Works.

Hon. DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC WORKS,

I have gone into the question of drainage of the area laid down in your minute of 4th May, 1921, and find that an efficient self cleansing gravitation scheme cannot be carried out by methods usually adopted owing to the low level of the areas to be drained in relation to tidal range, necessitating flat gradients and a large sectional area of sewer, with consequent failure to cleanse when discharging the dry weather flow.

I have also considered the possibilities of a pumping scheme to serve the area men- tioned, having an ejector station in Canton Road. Such a scheme is feasible, but possesses the following drawbacks :-

(1.) It is not in my opinion sufficiently wide in its scope of area served.

78

(2.) The scheme would not deal with one of the most important points, i.e., the elimination of sewage, which at present enters the Harbour of Refuge by existing drainage.

(3.) It involves the laying of considerable lengths of C.I. sewer through sea water logged ground at depths varying from 0-15 feet approximately below Ordnance Datum.

(4.) The laying of the sewer at such a low level might endanger the stability of

old Chinese property which has been built on reclaimed areas.

(5.) The cost of construction due to item (3) would be very heavy and the possi-

bilities of damage due to (4) could not be ignored.

(6.) The maintenance supervision would absorb most of the time of an additional

overseer and would require a permanent Chinese Staff.

(7.) The annual cost of pumping would be fairly considerable.

A pumping scheme therefore is not to be recommended if a solution of the problem can be found on other lines, broader in scope, more flexible in character and less costly in construction and maintenance.

What I have in mind is a scheme the operation of which is based on utilizing flood tides as a motive power for flushing and operating the system. It is a problem of providing, if possible, a self-cleansing sea water conduit and the main principle hinges upon tidal range at its worst phase, which governs the efficiency of any such scheme at that period.

I am now working on these lines, but owing to pressure of other work, the result of storm damage, I have been unable to obtain all the required information, but will report as early as possible.

In addition to preparing the necessary sections to ascertain how such a scheme would fit in with the existing storm water drainage system of Kowloon, a considerable amount of work is also involved in obtaining the necessary data from tide graphs, as to yearly tides and the periods of time which can be safely reckoned upon for charging and discharging, consistent with obtaining the necessary self-cleausing velocity.

13th May, 1921.

Annexe 9.

E. NEWHOUSE.

Hon. DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC WORKS,

(a.) I now beg to forward plan of a scheme of drainage of the Western portion of Kowloon Peninsula on the lines suggested in my minute of 13th May, 1921. The proposal consists of two 42" low pressure intercepting tank sewers charged at flood tides from suitable existing storm-water culverts and nullahs along their lines of route and flushed on the ebb tide by sea water impounded in the Waterloo Road Nullah.

(b.) The attached table (1) of tidal ranges (high tide followed by the next succeeding low tide) for 1921, which vary only very slightly from those of other years, shows in italics the tides below 35 feet range when a velocity of less than 24 feet per second is obtained.

(c.) Accepting 24 feet per second as a safe cleansing velocity for sewers of this size it will be seen that only on 76 days in the year does the velocity fall short of the standard, and, as such days are well distributed with alternate periods of very high tides and consequent high velocity of discharge, I consider that no fear need be enter- tained as to the system being self cleansing. It might be argued that tides, affected by wind are unreliable, but it would appear, that wind adversely affecting a flood tide would generally act beneficially on the ebb.

- 79

(d.) The chief points about the scheme are :-

(1.) The whole of the drainage in the natural drainage area to the East and West

of the line of intercepting sewers is dealt with.

(2.) It intercepts all drainage at present entering the Harbour of Refuge by

existing sewers.

(3.) The total discharging capacity of both combined sewers running slightly less than full is 22'6 million gallons per day and, after allowing 14 hours per day for charging and flushing leaves a discharging capacity of 94 million gallons per day, which makes ample provision for any future develop- ment in this part of the peninsula.

(4.) Instantaneous flushing at low tide would improve the condition of the existing

tide locked sewers and reduce the amount of cleansing required.

(5.) Practically no reconstruction of the existing sewers or storm-water drains is

required and no difficulties should be encountered in carrying out the work. (6.) A staff of 1 Chinese foreman and 2 coolies could work the scheme with little

supervision by an European Overseer.

7.) The cost of maintenance would be light.

(8.) The estimated cost of construction is:-

(a.) Southern section from Waterloo Road to Kowloon Point $100,000.-

(b.) Northern section from Waterloo Road to Fuk Tsum Heung $72,000.

(c.) I attach table (2) of velocities, discharges, and periods of time for discharging under various tidal heads. By plotting graphs from hourly readings over ranges from the minimum and maximum, it has been found that there is no appreciable difference in level at any time from one hour before to one hour after low tide.

(f) This report has been hurriedly prepared this morning owing to the date of the meeting of the Water Carriage Extension Committee having been changed from the 3rd to the 1st June.

1st June, 1921.

E. NEWHOUSE.

80

1921.

TABLE 1..

DATE.

JAN. FEB.

MAR.

APR.

MAY. JUNE. JULY. AUG. SEPT.

OCT.

Nov. DEC.

1st

3.4

0.9.

2.9

3.3

3.1 1.8 3.5

6.0

6.6

4.9

:

6.1 6.8

2nd

2.6

3.2

3.1

0.2

0.9

3.0

4.8

7.0

$ 6.5

4.6

6.3

6.6

3rd

2.6

3.8

0.1

3.4

3.0

4.3

5.9

7.5

6.0 5.2

6.1

6.2

4th

3.4

4.5

3.5

3.7

3.1

5.5

7.0

7.6

5.3 5.4

5.8

5.6

X

5th

4.3

5.2

4.0

4.0

3.7

6.6

7.8

7.2

4.2

5.4

5.2

1.9

6th

5.0

5.6

4.5

4.1

4.7

7.4

8.1

6.6

4.2 5.0

4.6

4.2

7th

5.7

5.9

4.9

4.3

5.7

7.9

8.0

5.5

3.9

4.5

3.9

3.5

8th

5.2 6.0

5.2

4.5

6.5

7.9

7.4

4.2

3.6

4.0

3.4

2.8

9th

6.5

6.0

5.3

5.2

7.0

7.4

6.3

2.8

3.3

3.5

3.0

2.3

10th

6.5

5.7

5.2

5.5

7.0

6.7

5.1 2.6

3.3

3.4

2.8

1.9

11th

6.5

5.2

5.0

5.7

6.8

5.6

3.7

2.8

3.5

3.4

2.8

2.8

12th

6.2 4.5

4.1

5.6

6.3

4.5

2.6.

3.2

3.9

3.5

2.7 4.0

13th

5.5

3.6

4.1

5.3

5.5 3.4

1.7

3.9

4.3

3.6

3.6. 5.1

14th

4.9 2.8

4.1.

5.0

4.7

2.7

3.1 4.4 £.5 3.7

4.6

6.2

15th

4.0

3.0

4.0

4.7

4.1 2.9

4.1

4.9

4.7

3.7

5.5

7.2

16th

3.1 3.6

4.0

4.5

3.6

3.9

4.8

5.4

4.8

3.8

6.4

7.8

17th

2.2

0.6

4.3

0.9

2.5

4.8

5.4

5.6 4.7

4.6

7.0

8.0

18th

3.2 4.6

0.4

4.5

3.5

5.6

5.9

5.7 4.5 5.2

7.2

7.8

19th

0.9

5,5

4.7

4.5

4.5

6.1

6.2

5.7 4.1

5.7

7.2

7.1

20th

4.4

6.3

5.1

4.3

5.3 6.4

6.3 5.4 4.2

6.0

6.7 6.1

21st

5.7

6.7

:

5.5 4.7

5.9

6.6

6.3 4.9

4.4

6.0

6.0 4.9

22nd

6.8

6.9

5.7

5.3

6.2

6.4 5.9

4.1

4.4

5.7

5.1 3.7

23rd

7.5

6.7

5.6 5.5

6.4

6.0 5.4

3.3

4.3

5.3

2.8

24th

7.8 6.1

5.1

5.8

6.2

5.5 4.7

2.8 4.3 4.9

3.7

2.1

25th

7.7 5.2

5.6

5.8

4.8 3.9

2.8 4.7 4.6

3.8

26th

7.2 4.1

4.8

5.1

5.2

4.1 3.1. 3.0 4.5

4.3

3.5

4.8

27th

6.3 3.2

4.6

4.6

3.6 3.3 2.1

3.5

4.8 4.3

4.5

5.7

28th

5.1 3.0

4.3 4.1

4.0 2.6 1.9

4.2

5.1

4.1

5.5

6.2

29th

3.8

3.8

4.6

3.3

2.0

2.7

5.0

5.3

3.8

6.1

6.6

30th

2.6

3.4

3.2

2.8

2.2

3.8

5.8

5.3

4.8

6.6

6.7

31st

2.6

3.2

2.5

4.9

6.3

5.7

6.7

81

TABLE 2.

VELOCITIES DUE TO DIFFERENT TIDAL RANGES WHEN EBB TIDES

ARE AT OR ABOVE 1.25 O.D.

TIDAL RANGE.

7.00 feet

6.50

12

6.00

5.50

,,

5.00

4.50

"

4.00

3.50

"

3.00

22

VELOCITY.

3.5 feet per sec.

3.5

3.2

3.1

2.9

19

2.8

2.6

**

2.4

"}

2.3

CAPACITY OF NULLAH AT DIFFERENT HEIGHTS OF TIDE (ON THE ASSUMPTION

THAT THE WATER IS DRAINED DOWN TO 3.50 O.D.)

HEIGHT OF TIDE.

CAPACITY OF NULLAH.

7.50 0.D.

7.00

6.50

>

6.00

"

5.50

""

5.00

4.50

4.00

15

36,120 cubic feet.

29,730

23.890

>>

18,560

13,785

>>

9,530

*

5,820 2,640

19

12

TIME TAKEN TO DISCHARGE LARGE (SOUTHERN) SEWER AND STORAGE

TANK, AT DIFFERENT VELOCITIES AND HEIGHTS OF TIDE.

VELOCITY.

3.3 feet per sec.

3.1

""

2.8

2.4

HEIGHT OF TIDE.

7.0 O.D.

6.0

"

5.0

4.0

7.0

6.0

5.0

33

"

""

TIME TO DISCHARGE

SEWER AND TANK.

65 mins. 59

52

47

71

63

56

52

*

"

""

4.0

"

7.0

79

3.

6.0.

70

5.0

63

4.0 7.0

57

"

90

"

6.0

80

""

5.0

71

""

4.0

65

15

"

Annexe 10.

Hon. DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC WORKS,

Further to my minute of 1st June, 1921, I have now been able to go more deeply into the details of the scheme of drainage which I propose for the Western portion of Kowloon Peninsula and find that with further refinements in syphonage and anti- syphonage which will not affect the cost of the scheme, a very high efficiency can be obtained.

82

With reference to paragraph (c) of my minute of 1st June, 1921, I find that out of the 76 days when there is a velocity of less than 2-4 feet per second, there are 33 days when a velocity of 2.25 per second or more corresponding to a tidal range of 3 feet or more, is obtained.

I would however point out that a higher standard of efficiency can, if desired, be · provided by increasing the diameters of the sewers and other minor alterations provided the main principles as laid down, are adopted.

Although this system of drainage has not been adopted or suggested elsewhere so far as I can ascertain from any book of reference or record of drainage works completed, I am confident of the success of any such scheme, where conditions are such as obtain in the Kowloon Peninsula, and, in view of the low cost of construction and upkeep and its efficiency compared with any other scheme, I strongly recommend its adoption.

6th June, 1921.

E. NEWHOUSE.

Annexes 11 to 17 inclusive submitted by Mr. L. Gibbs.

Annexe 11.

Cost of Providing Salt Water.

Peak Estimated cost of works to pump 15,000 gallons a day $182,000 at 7% $ 12,740 a year.

15,000 gallons a day

5,475,000 gallons a year.

12,740

$2.33

5,475 add

}}

1:00 pumping

$3.33 per 1,000 gallons.

Middle Levels.-Estimated cost of works to pump 60,000 gallons a day $235,000 at

$16,450 a year.

7%

60,000 gallons a day

-.

21,900,000 a year.

1,645,000

0.75

21,900

add

0.50 pumping

$1.25 per 1,000 gallons.

Kowloon Point.—Estimated cost of works to pump 280,000 gallons a day $227,000

$15,890 a year.

at 7%

280,000 gallons a day

102,200,000 a year.

1,589,000

0.16

102,200

add

0.20 pumping

30th May, 1921.

$0.36 per 1,000 gallons.

L. GIBBS,

}

83

Annexe 12.

T

City of Victoria and Hill District Water Works.

TOTAL COST.

10" Main to Pokfulam and Distributing Works

Pokfulam Reservoir, &c. ...

Taitam Scheme...

1863

1871

Blue Pool and Mint Dam.......

1877

Pokfulam Conduit

1889

1890

West Point Filter Beds

1892

Distribution Works ...

1891

Peak Supply

Water Account...

...§ 170,000 223,270

2,667

62,090

1,257,474

37,431

164,023

32,585

29,297

1897-1904 City and Hill District Water Works included Reservoir and Catchwater Wong Nei Chong Gap, Taitam Catchwater, Bowen Road Filter Bed and Service Reservoir New Main in City and Mains to Wong Nei Chong and North Point

1895-1898 Raising Taitam Dam and Mount Parker Catchwater

330,127

65,588

1901-1904 Taitam Byewash

118,794

1902-1908 Taitam Tuk Scheme Intermediate Reservoir, Road,

Pumping Station and Pipe Line

1,040,058

1904-1910 Albany Filter Bed Extension ...

182,165

1893-1910 Distribution (part included in other items)

195,502

1911-1919 West Point Filter Beds and Service Reservoir

395,565

1911-1919 Miscellaneous

79,663

1912-1919 Taitam Tuk

2,372,646

1912-1919

Pokfulam Road Pumping Station

74,673

1919

Eastern Filter Beds ...

723

:

$6,834,341

Total cost to 1919

..$6,834,341, say $7,000,000.

This sum provides 67 million gallons a day or 2,445 million a year.

At 7% it equals $490,000 a year.

49,000,000

2,445,000

add for pumping

0.20 cents per 1,000 gallons.

half from Taitam 0.06 cents.

Tuk.

30th May, 1921.

0.26 cents.

L. GIBBS.

84

Annexe 13.

Kowloon Water Works Cost.

1892-1898

Original Pumping Scheme

1901-1910

Gravitation Scheme

· 1911

Do.

1914-1919

Miscellaneous

1916-1917 New Filter Bed...

This sum provides 17 million gallons a day or 620 million a year,

At 7% it equals $105,294 a year.

125,612 1,268,000

56,118

24,287

30,201

$1,504,218

10,529,400

620,000

17 cents per 1,000 gallons.

L. GIBBS.

30th May, 1921.

Annexe 14.

City of Victoria and Hill District Water Works.

CAPACITY OF PRESENT WORKS.

DATA.

Present Catchment area

2,561 acres.

1 inch rain on 2,561 acres

2,561 × 22,700

Present Storage capacity

58 million gallons.

...2,166 million gallons.

Consumption 1919 (Public Works Report).

January..

February

180 million gallons.

150

do.

March

180

do.

180

do.

April May

June

July August September October... November

December

210

do.

230

do.

:

230

do.

:

:

230

do.

230

do.

230

do.

200

do.

:

190

do.

2,440 million gallons.

?

;

RAINFALL

INCHES.

85

Dry Period.

November, 1894–May, 1896.

INCHES ASSUMED

COLLECTABLE

INCLUDING FLOW OF

STREAMS.

1894. November

December

1895. January

03

...

76

41

6.03

33% of Rainfall.

February

*83

March ...

1.39

I

April

2.61

1

May

5.64

2

June

497

3

35.61

57%

Do.

July

...18.87

il

August

... 6·13

September ...

3.96

2

October

*50

November

*32

December

*20

1896. January

1.73

1

19.36

33%

Do.

February

7.95

3

March ...

1:45

April

2:10

1

May

1.15

86

Balance Sheet.

Assumed dry period as November, 1894—May, 1896. Assumed consumption as 1919.

2,166 million gallons.

1894. 1 November

use November

200 (Reservoirs assumed full).

1,966

use December

190

1,776

1895. use January

180

1,596

use February

150

1,446

collect March

58

1,504

use March

180

1,324

collect April,

58

1,382

use April

180

1,202

collect May...

116

1,318

use May

210

1,108

collect June

174

1,282

use June

230

1,052

collect July...

638

1,690

use July

230

collect August

Carried forward

...

1,460

232

1,692

X

R

$

1895.

87

Brought forward

1,692

use August...

collect September

..

230

1,462

116

1,578

use September

230

1,348

use October

230

1,118

use November

200

918

use December

190

728

1896. collect January

58

786

use January

180

606

collect February...

164

770

use February

150

}

620

use March

180

440

collect April

58

498

use April

180

318

use May

210

108

1894

51 collected on Conduits

1895

165

1896

37

do.

do.

30th May, 1921.

100 Estimated overflow early in November, 1894.

461 million gallons or about 2 months supply in

store at end of dry season.

L. GIBBS.

88

Annexe 15.

DATA.

City of Victoria and Hill District Water Works.

ULTIMATE CAPACITY OF WORKS ON THE HONGKONG ISLAND.

Catchment area

1 inch rain on 5,167 acres

Storage capacity.....

Assumed consumption average

January

February

5,167 acres.

117 million gallons.

""

10 million a day.

2,166

March ...

April

May

June

July

August

September October November

December

:

Balance Sheet.

270

230

270

270.

320

340

340

340

340

340

320

280

3,660 million gallons.

Assumed dry period as November, 1894–May, 1896. Assumed consumption average 10 million gallons a day.

1891. 1 November

2,166 (Reservoirs assumed full.s

November use

320

1,846

December use

280

1,566

1895. January use

270

1,296

February use

230

1,066

117

March collect

Carried forward

...

1,183

X

:

89

Brought forward

1,183

1895. March use

270

913

April collect

117

1,030

April use

270

760

May collect...

234

994

May use

320

674

June collect

351

1.025

June use

340

685

July collect

...

1,287

1,972

July use

340

1,632

Angust collect

468

2,100

Angust use...

340

1,760

September collect

234

1,994

September use

340

1,654

October use

340

1,314

November use

320

994

December use

280

Carried forward

714

90

Brought forward

714

1896. January collect

117

831

January use

270

561

February collect......

351

912

February use

·230

682

March use

270

412

April collect

117

529

April use

270

259

May use

320

61

200 Estimated collection from Conduits.

100

overflow early in November 1894.

239 million gallons or about 3 weeks' supply.

30th May. 1921.

L. GIBBS.

Annexe 16.

DATA.

Present Catchment area 1 inch rain on 866 acres Present storage capacity Assumed consumption.

January.. February

Kowloon Water Works:

CAPACITY OF PRESENT WORKS.

866 acres.

19-6 million gallous.

374

""

45 million gallons.

38

March

45

April

47

*

May

57

June

57

July

57

August

57

Carried forward,...

403

!

91

Brought forward...

403 million gallons.

September October... November December

57

59

57

25

57

46

Balance Sheet.

620 million gallons

or 17 million gallons a day.

Assumed period as November, 1894-May, 1896.

Assumed consumption average 1·7 million gallons a day.

1894. 1 November

374 m.g.

(Reservoir assumed full.)

November use

57

317

December use

46

271

1895. January use

45

226

February use

38

188

March collect

20

208

March use

45

163

April collect

20

183

April use

47

136

May collect

39

175

May use

57

118

June collect

59

Carried forward

177

92

Brought forward

177

1895. June use

57

120

July collect

216

336

July use

57

279

August collect

78

357

August use...

57

300

September collect

39

339

September use

57

282

October use

57

225

November use

57

168

December use

46

122

1896. January collect

20

142

January use

45

97

February collect

59

156

February use

38

118

March use

45

73

April collect

20

Carried forward

93

93

Brought forward

93

9

1896. April use

47

46

Estimated

overflow

November 1st year...

29

75

May use

57

18

30th May, 1921.

Annexe 17.

L. GIBBS.

The question of pumping salt water for Sanitary

Purposes has been dealt with before :--

1. In Mr. COOPER'S Water Supply Report of 1896 (19/96). Without going into much detail Mr. COOPER formed the opinion that "the cost of such a project would not compare favourably with those gravitation projects put forward" and concluded that no such project should be entertained so long as a supply of fresh water sufficient for all purposes can be obtained at a reasonable cost by gravitation.”

66

2. In 1900 Mr. J. R. CROOK of the Public Works Department reported to the Government "on the proposal to use sea water for Fire and Sanitary purposes and concluded that "there can be no doubt that such a scheme should only be introduced. after all other sources of supply have been utilized.