Sessional Papers - 1912

PAPERS LAID BEFORE THE LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL OF HONGKONG 1912

Table of Contents

1. Estimates for 1913

Financial Statements in Connection With the

2. Estimates of Expenditure

Abstract Showing Differences Between the Estimates for 1912 and 1913

3. Financial Minute No. 25 of 1912

Details of

4. Flushing Tanks and Iron Pipes

Report of the Public Works Committee on

5. Full Court Bill, 1912

Report of the Standing Law Committee on the

6. Jubilee Fountains

Report of the Public Works Committee on the

7. Jurors

List of, for 1912

8. Kowloon-Canton Railway

Estimate of Expenditure on Capital account During the Year 1912

9. Kowloon Market

Report of the Public Works Committee on the

10. Mong-Kok-Tsui Breakwater

Diagram Showing Progress of Stone Depositing to 30th June, 1912

11. Mong-Kok-Tsui Breakwater

Diagram Showing Progress of Stone Depositing to 31st December, 1911

12. New Territories

Report on the, for the Years 1899-1912

13. Post office Buildings

Report of the Committee appointed to Enquire into the Expenditure and Delay in Constructing the

14. Post office Buildings

Explanatory Statement of increase in Cost

15. Public House Trust

Report of the Committee appointed to Consider the Feasibility of forming a

16. Public Works Extraordinary 1913 Estimates

Report of the Public Works Committee on the

17. Quarterly Return of Excesses on Subheads Met By Savings Under Heads of Expenditure

For 1st and 2nd Quarters of 1912

18. Quarterly Return of Excesses on Subheads Met By Savings Under Heads of Expenditure

For 3rd Quarter

19. Quarterly Return of Excesses on Subheads Met By Savings Under Heads of Expenditure

For 4th Quarter

20. Typhoon Refuge

Statement of Progress to 30th June, 1912

21. Typhoon Refuge

Statement of Progress to 31st December, 1911

 

71

HONGKONG.

.

14

No. 1912

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS IN CONNECTION WITH THE ESTIMATES FOR 1913.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor, 3rd October, 1912.

Statement of Assets and Liabilities on the 31st December, 1911.

LIABILITIES.

$

2,

ASSETS.

C.

Deposits not Available,

245,552.66

Balance, Bank,...................

166,685.55

Crown Agents' Advances,

3,657,902.04

Subsidiary Coins,...........

298,424.00

Postal Agencies in China,

76,205.96

Advances,

27,895.91

House Service,

1,170.71

Railway Construction,.

5,053,279.45

Unallocated Stores,

237,041.53

Total Liabilities,

Balance,

3,979,660.66

Crown Agents' Current Account,

22,142.47

1,826,978.96

Total,......... .$ 5,806,639.62

Total,......

$5,806,639.62

72

ASSETS AND LIABILITIES ON 31ST DECEMBER, 1911, AND 31ST DECEMBER, 1912, (ESTIMATED).

1911. $7,497,231,23

7,077,177.23

1912. $8,049,153.87

7,536,350.00*

Revenue, Expenditure,

Surplus,

Balance of Assets, (1910),

Balance of Assets, (1911),

$420,054,00

1,406,924.96 Surplus (1911)

$1,826,978.96

$ 512,803.87 1,826,978.96

(1912) $2,339,782.83

* Excluding $1,538,000 for resumption of land for Railway Station (Unestimated) and other Railway purposes to be

ultimately debited to Loan.

Dr.

Inscribed Stock Issues of

1893 and 1906 at 31%

interest, to be paid off

LOAN ACCOUNT.

1911.

1912.

Cr..

1911.

1912 (Estimated).

on the 15th April, 1943, £1,485,732. 16. 5 £ 1,485,732.16. 5 Sinking Fund,

£ 117,016. 10. 2 £ 137,000. 0. 0.

WUCHANG LOAN ACCOUNT.

1911.

1912.

1911.

1912.

Repayments (Advanced

for Railway Construc- tion),

Balance due to Govern-

£ 660,000. 0.0 £ 770,000. 0. 0 Loan,

ment,

Total,

£ 1,100,000. 0. 0 £ 1,100,000. 0. 0

440,000. 0. 0

330,000. 0. 0

£ 1,100,000. 0. 0 £ 1,100,000. 0. 0

Total,

£ 1,100,000. 0. 0 £ 1,100,000. 0. 0

HONGKONG, 9th September, 1912.

A. M. THOMSON,

Treasurer.

73

No.

15 1912

HONGKONG.

ABSTRACT SHEWING DIFFERENCES BETWEEN THE ESTIMATES OF EXPENDITURE FOR 1912 AND 1913,

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor, October 3rd, 1912.

INCREASE.

DECREASE.

PERSONAL EMOLUMENTS :—

PERSONAL EMOLUMENTS :-

New Posts,..........

$ 148,411

Higher Exchange,.......

$ 52,284

Increase of Salaries,

Stipulated Increments,

Allowances,

* 10,718

Abolition of Posts,

12,782

12,400

Reductions on New Appointments,

22,565

18,289

Allowances,

2,727

Other Items,

6,911

Other Items,

6,305

Other Charges,

122,788

Other Charges,

187,297

Do.,

Special Expenditure,

42,226

Do., Special Expenditure,

$1,675

Personal Emoluments and Other Charges,—

Kowloon-Canton Railway,

Miscellaneous Services,........

20,748

55,699

Charitable Services,

C1

5

Military Contribution,

56,363

Public Works, Recurrent,.......

6,500

Public Works, Extraordinary,

545,320

Charge on Account of Public Debt,

26,060

Pensions,........

26,931

Total Increase,

$1,078,616

Total Decrease,

$ 386,388

Deduct Decrease,

386,388

NET INCREASE,

$ 692,228

* Of this amount $6,168 is for Duty Pay.

37

No.

HONGKONG.

DETAILS OF FINANCIAL MINUTE No. 25.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government, June 6th, 1912.

I.—WHARF AND GODOWN COMPANY'S PROPERTY.

A. The Government to take over the following proper-

ties at the values stated :-

(i.) K.M.L. 3,-107,781 sq. ft. at $4, ...$ 431,124.00 (i.) K.M.L. 9, total area 78,521 sq. ft.

Less Praya,

23,275 sq. ft.

55,246 sq. ft.

at $4,

(iii) Old Praya forming part of K.M.L. 9,

23,275 sq. ft. at $0.15,

(iv.) Existing Star Ferry Pier,

(v.) Compensation for removal of buildings

on K.M.L.'s 3 and 9, the removal to be carried out by the Wharf and Godown Company and the mate- rials to remain their property,

V..

(vi.) Payment by Government in lieu of filling in the Police Basin and com- pleting the sea wall across its en- trance,

B.-Wharf and Godown Company to take over from

Government :-

(i) Police Basin 71,725 sq. ft. at $4, (i.) Praya in front of same 12,240 sq. ft.

at $0.15,

Balance in favour of Wharf and Go-

down Company....

II. THE LAND RECLAMATION COMPANY'S PROPERTY.

The Government to take over the following properties at

the values stated :—

(i.) K.M.L. 74,-125,795 sq. ft. at $4, (¿¿.) K.M.L. 75,-126,459 sq. ft. at $4,

Total payable by Government to the

two Companies,

220,984.00

3,491.25 22,000.00

70,000.00

8 1912

6,000.00

$ 753,599.25

286,900.00

1,836.00

288,736.00

$ 464,863.25

...

...

503,180.00 505,836.00

1,009,016.00

..$1,473,879.25

No. 2.

29

No.

6 1912

HONGKONG.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

PUBLIC WORKS COMMITTEE

at a Meeting held on the 16th May, 1912.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government, May 23rd, 1912.

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Director of Public Works, (WILLIAM CHATHAM, C.M.G.), Chairman.

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON).

25

"2

""

Mr. WEI YUK, C.M G.

Mr. EDWARD Osborne.

Mr. CHARLES HENDERSON Ross.

Flushing Tanks and Iron Pipes-Vote No. 26, P.W.E. (C.S.O. 1113/12.)

The Chairman submitted a proposed programme of items of work which had been for- warded to Government with a view to their being carried out under the vote in this year's Estimates. The programme however entailed the expenditure of a sum of $1,000 in excess of the vote. It was as follows:

Amount of Vote

1. Relaying with C.I. Pipes a portion of Matheson

Street sewer 360 feet in length..

.$4,000

$1,000

2. Relaying with C.I. Pipes a portion of the Wong-

neichong sewer 174 feet in length

500

3. Repairing Cowper's Tank, junction of Bonham

Road and Centre Street....

1,000

4. Altering Eastern Street outfall plates and connect-

ing up heads of sewers

1,500

5. Relaying with C.I. Pipes a portion of Leighton

Hill Road sewer 260 feet in length

700

6. Altering French Street, Hillier Street and Wing

Lok Street outfall plates

300

5,000

Excess $1,000

:

30

Items 1, 2 and 5 were required on account of the roots of banyan trees or other trees of a similar class penetrating the existing stoneware sewers. Items 3 and 4 were required to complete the system of flushing tanks, recommended by Mr. CHADWICK, for the low-level sewers and to render the flushing more efficient, whilst item 6 was also required for the last-mentioned purpose and for preventing the choking of the outfalls which is liable to occur under existing arrangements.

The Committee unanimously agreed to recommend that the whole of the items (1 to 6) be proceeded with, the vote being supplemented to the required extent, namely, $1,000.

The Committee then adjourned.

Laid before the Legislative Council this 23rd day of May, 1912.

R. H. CROFTON,

Clerk of Councils.

W. CHATHAM,

Chairman.

¿

No. 1.

31

No. 1912

7

HONGKONG.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

STANDING LAW COMMITTEE

on the

FULL COURT BILL, 1912.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government,

June 6th, 1912.

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Attorney General, (C. G. ALABASTER), Chairman.

"

the Registrar General, (E. R. HALLIFAX).

"}

Sir KAI HO KAI, M.B., C.M.G.

""

Mr. H. E. POLLOCK, K.C.

Mr. MURRAY SIEWART.

""

The members of the Law Committee have considered, clause by clause, a Bill entitled an Ordinance to make provision for the reconstitution of the Full Court. The majority, consisting of the three unofficial members, concur in suggesting the amendments indicated in the print attached to this report. The two official members concur in the proposed amendments to clause 2 of the Bill, in the repeal of the preamble to Ordinance No. 3 of 1873 and in the proposed amendments to Ordinances No. 1 of 1903, No. 21 of 1903, No. 21 of 1910 and No. 31 of 1911; but they cannot without express authority from the Government concur in the other proposals of the majority. It should be noted that some of the proposed amendments to the schedule are introduced on the assumption that the Bill will not be passed until the Proclamation has been issued bringing into force the New Revised Edition of the Laws of the Colony.

C. G. ALABASTER,

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 6th day of June, 1912.

R. H. CROFTON,

Clerk of Councils.

Chairman.

32

:-

-

No. 23 [1.6.12.-4.]

**

Note.

The majority of the Law Committee suggest the deletion of the words in square brackets and the addition of the words in italics,

A BILL

[ ]

Ʌthis and in 7

J

Chambers.

ENTITLED

An Ordinance to make provision for the re-

constitution of the Full Court.

WHEREAS it is deemed expedient to amend the constitu- tion of the Supreme Court [and to make provision for the appointment of a temporary judge in cases where a suffi- cient number of permanent judges are not available] :

BE it enacted by the Governor of Hongkong, with the advice and consent of the Legislative Council thereof, as follows:

1. This Ordinance may be cited as "The Full Court Short title. Ordinance 1912 ".

2. In A all existing and future enactments the expression Interpreta- "Full Court" shall mean, subject only to the provisions of tion. whether in Court or this Ordinance, any] two or three judges sitting together, A [provided however that where more than two judges in the permanent service of the Colony are available a judge whose judgment or order is appealed from shall not be a member of a Full Court of two judges only, sitting to hear and determine the appeal.]

[ ]

Ʌwhen sitting as a member thereof

[ ]

[ ]

[ ]

[ ].

3. The Chief Justice shall [as a general rule] ^ preside Precedence. in the Full Court.

[Provided however that the Judge of His Britannic Majesty's Supreme Court for China, if his appointinent as such judge is earlier in date than the appointment of the Chief Justice as such Chief Justice, shall preside when- ever he is present in the Full Court.]

[4.-(1.) Where a Full Court consisting of three judges sits the judgment or order of any two of them shall be deemed the judgment or order of the Full Court.]

[(2.) Where a Full Court consisting of two judges only sits in appellate jurisdiction and the two judges differ then the judgment or order appealed from shall be disturbed only in so far as it may be modified or affected by any order they may make as to which they do not differ and shall be deemed to be the judgment or order of the Full Court.]

[(3.) Where a Full Court consisting of two judges only sits otherwise than in appellate jurisdiction and the two judges differ the judgment or order of the Chief Justice or in his absence of the Senior Judge shall be deemed to be the judgment or order of the Full Court subject to a right which is hereby conferred on any party aggrieved to an appeal to a Full Court consisting of three judges if applied for within fourteen days after the delivery of the judgment or order of the said Senior Judge.]

[Rule where Judges differ.]

A

4. When

[ ]

Γ 1

33

[5. Where] three judges in the permanent service of the Procedure Colony shall not be available [and also whenever the where three Governor by notification in the Gazette so directs the permanent following provisions shall apply :-

judges are not avail- able.

(1.) In all interlocutory appeals, appeals from the court in its summary jurisdiction, appeals from any Magistrate (including a Marine Magistrate), in all cases where the Full Court sits to hear and determine points reserved for its considera- tion, and in all cases where the Full Court does not sit in appellate jurisdiction] the Full Court shall consist of two judges only Ʌund the judg- ment or order of the Chief Justice or in his absence of the Senior Judge shall be deemed the judgment or order of the Full Court. [(2.) In all other cases the Full Court shall consist of three judges one of whom shall be the judge of His Britannic Majesty's Supreme Court for China (if the Principal Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs has consented to such appoint- ment) or a barrister of not less than 7 years standing temporarily appointed by the Govern- or from time to time for the purposes of this sub-section ]

5. When more than two judges in the permanent service Procedure of the Colony are available the following provisions shall where three apply:-

permanent

available.

(1.) A judge whose judgment or order is appealed judges are

from shall not be a member of a Full Court · of two judges only sitting to hear and deter- mine the appeal.

(2.) Where à Full Court consisting of two judyes only sits in appellate jurisdiction and the two judges differ then the judgment or order of any judge appealed from shall be disturbed only in so far as it may be modified or affected by any order they may make as to which they do not differ and shall be deemed to be the judgment or order of the Full Court.

(3.) Where a Full Court consisting of two jud- ges only sits otherwise than in appellate jurisdiction or sits on appeals from a Magis- trate (including a Marine Magistrate), and the two judges differ the judgment or order of the Chief Justice or in his absence of the Senior Judge shall be deemed to be the judg- ment or order of the Full Court subject to a right which is hereby conferred on any party aggrieved to an appeal to a Full Court con- sisting of three judges if applied for within fourteen days after the delivery of the judg- ment or order of the said Chief Justice or Senior Judge.

(4.) Where a Full Court consisting of three judges sits the judgment or order of any two of them shall be deemed the judgment or order of the Full Court.

Amend-

6. The enactments specified in the first column of the Schedule hereto are hereby amended in the manner specified ments. in the second column.

A first

Aday of

7. This Ordinance shall come into operation on the

A [1912.]

Commence- ment.

▲ January,

1913.

34

Enactment.

No. 1 of 1869.

SCHEDULE.

How Amended.

Ordinance In Part 2 of the Schedule by the deletion of the words "The Chief Justice, The Puisne Judge" and by the subsitation therefor of the words "The Judges ".

Ordinance No. 1 of 1871.

Ordinance No. 3 of 1873.

(ƒ)

(9)

(h)

(i)

(j)

Ordinance No. 4 of 1873.

In section 2 by the deletion of the words "the Chief Justice and the Puisne Judge" and by the substitution therefor of the words "any of the judges".

Λ

[(a.)] In the definition of "The Court” in section 2 by the deletion of the words "the Chief Justice and the Puisne Judge" and by the substitution there- for of the words "any of the judges "..

[(b.)] In section 2 by the repeal of the definition of "The Full Court".

[(c.)] In sub-section (1) of section 9 by the deletion of the words "a Puisne Judge" and by the substitution there- for of the words "one or more other judges".

[(d.) In sub-section (2) of section 9 by the insertion after the words " every Puisne Judge shall" of the words (6 save as is provided in sub-section (2) of section 5 of the Full Court Ordinance 1912 ".]

[(e.) In sub-section (3) of section 9 by the

insertion after the words "The said Judges" of the words " save as is provided in sub-section (2) of section 5 of the Full Court Ordinance 1912".]

[(f.)] In sub-section (1) of section 10 by the deletion of the words "either of the Judges of the Supreme Court " and by the substitution therefor of the words "any Judge in the per- manent service of the Colony "^.

[(g.)] In the first line of sub-section (2) of section 10 by the deletion of the word "either" and by the substitu- tion therefor of the word "any "A.

[(.)] By the addition at the end of sub- section (2) of section 10 of the words "or Julgos in the permanent service of the Colony ".

[(.)]. In section 12 by the deletion of the words "the Puisue " and by the sub- stitution therefor of the words “any other ".

[(j)] In section 22 by the deletion of the

words "either of the two

and by

the substitution therefor of the words "any of the ".

[(A.)] By the repeal of section 24.

(a.) In the definition of "The Supreme

Court and of "The Court

in

section 2 by the deletion of the words "the Puisne and by the substitution therefor of the words

A (a) By the repeal of the preamble. (b)

(c)

(d).

(e)

Aand by the insertion after the word". person" of the words "who shall be a bar- rister of not less than 7 years standing,"

and in the third line there-` of by the insertion after the · word "person" of the words ", who shall be a barrister of not less than 7 years stand- ing,”

<<

any other ".

Enactment.

How Amended.

35

Ordinance No. 2 of

1889.

[(b.) In section 2 by the repeal of the

definition of “The Full Court ".]

""

[(c.)] In section 34 by the deletion of the words "The Puisne' and by the substitution therefor of the words "A Puisne".

In section 2 by the deletion of the words "the Puisne" and by the substitution there- for of the words "

any other".

[Ordinance In section 2 by the repeal of the definition of

"The Full Court ".]

No. 3 of

1890.

Ordinance No. 3 of 1901.

Ordinance No. 1 of

1903.

[(a.)] In the definition of "The Court

""

in section 2 by the deletion of the words "the Puisne " and by the substitution therefor of the words "any other ".

[(b.) In section 2 by the repeal of the

definition of "The Full Court ".]

In section 252 by the deletion of the words "to the Puisne" and by the substitution therefor of the words "to A [the Senior or only] Puisne".

Ordinance In section 12 (b) by the deletion of the words No. 21 of to the Puisne" and by the substitution ·

1909. therefor of the words "to A [the Senior or

only] Puisne".

Ordinance No. 21 of 1910.

Ordinance No. 31 of 1911.

In section 6 (3) by the deletion of the words "to the Puisne" and by the substitution therefor of the words "to A[the Senior or only] Puisne".

(b)

[ ]

Λα

ла

ла

"

A repeal of the definition of the Full Court.

In section 39D by the ^ [deletion of the words "The Chief Justice and the Puisne Judge from the definition of "Full Court" and by the substitution therefor of the words " any two or more judges ".]

*

Objects and Reasons.

This Bill is intended to abolish the present system under which appeals from any one of the two judges are heard by them both and which gives one of them a casting vote if they differ. It necessarily changes the constitution of the Full Court. Provision is made for the rules which are to apply when three judges in the permanent service of the Colony are available and provision is also made for the temporary appointment of a third judge who must either be a judge of His Majesty's Supreme Court in China or or else a barrister of at least sufficient standing to qualify him for appointment to the County Court Bench in Eng- land.

C. G. ALABASTER, Attorney General,

7

P.V

With regard to the question of additional expenditure, the Chairman explained that the contractor had not yet agreed to the final statements prepared in connection with his con- tracts for the building and the fittings and the actual cost could not therefore be regarded as finally settled. The information, which he was able to lay before the Committee, was as follows:-

Amount of Original Estimate,

Amount of Revised Estimate arrived at by taking the amounts of the various contracts let and adding the actual cost of fore- man's wages, &c., &c.,.....

Actual cost as ascertained by measurement, &c., but not yet finally

settled,

$66,000.00

59,484.04

56,584.67

from which it will be seen that there has been no increase in cost over the estimate, but that, on the other hand, there has been a saving of about $2,900 on the revised estimate, which is fully $6,500 less than the original estimate.

The Committee however desire to point out that, owing to the Contract not being ful- filled, the Government suffered loss on account of the additional cost of foreman's wages and the fee to the arbitrator in connection with the defective construction of the roof and that there was also a loss of rent which would have been derived if the market had been opened sooner.

Jubilee Fountains.

(C.S.O. 6162/1911.)

The Chairman explained that the opinion of the Committee was desired as to whether the Jubilee Fountains, of which six were presented to the Colony in 1887 by Mr. Dorabjee Nowrojee, should be entirely removed. None of the fountains were in working order and most of them were broken or dismantled.

It was agreed to recommend that the fountain in the Chinese Recreation Ground be restored to working order and have water laid on to it and that the one in the grounds of the Sailors' Home be allowed to remain,-water not being laid on to it. The remaining fountains to be removed with the exception of the pillars which act as lamp-posts.

W. CHATHAM,

Laid before the Legislative Council this 27th day of February, 1912.

Chairman.

C. CLEMENTI,

Clerk of Councils.

3

No. 1912

2

HONGKONG.

JURORS LIST FOR 1912.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His

Excellency the Governor, March 7th, 1912.

HONGKONG

TO WIT.

NAME IN FULL.

I. SPECIAL JURORS.

OCCUPATION.

ABODE.

}

Arculli, Abdoolla Fuckeera Armstrong, Francis Harold.

• Bailey, William Seybourne Barlow, Arthur Howard Barton, John Beattie, Andrew...... Beattie, John Montgomery Beattie, Matthew Pool Bérindoague, Louis Bird, Herbert William Bisschop, Philip Johan

Roosegaarde Bolles, John Walker Bryer, Alfred

Carter, William Leonard Chau Siu Ki

Clark, Duncan

Clarke, William Edward

Denison, Albert Dickson, William Douglas, James Tory Dowley, Walter Arthur. Drew, Walter Clement Dunbar, William.............. Dyer, Robert Morton.... Ede, Charles Montague Forbes, Andrew

...

Army & Navy Coutractor,

Merchant, Reiss & Co.,

Engineer, Bailey & Co.,

Sub-Manager, HK. & S'hai Bank,

Forrest, Thomas Shaw Friesland, Gustav Adolf Georg Fuhrmann, Ernst Richard. Gibbs, Lawrence Gordon, Alexander Grant...... Gourdin, Allston O'Driscoll Graham, Frank

Griffin, Albert Edwin Grimble, Charles Frederick

George

Gubbay, Charles Sassoon

Halton, Frederick Joseph Harvey, Robert Donald.

Haskell, David

Ho Fook

Hogg, George.... Ho Kam Tong

- Hooper, Augustus Shelton......

Hough, Thomas Frederick..............

Hughes, John Owen Jack, William Charles Kadoorie, Ellis

Lafrentz, Charles Julius Lammert, George Philip Lau Chü Pak Lieb, Fritz

Logan, Malcolm Hunter Logan, William Lowe, Arthur Rylands

64 Queen's Road Central. 18 The Peak.

Highlands, Kowloon.

109, Peak.

Assistant, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Ld., | Red Hill, Peak.

Manager, Loxley & Co., Merchant, Loxley & Co., Manager, W. R. Loxley & Co., Manager, Banque de l'Indo-Chine,. Architect, Palmer & Turner,

General Agent, Java-China-Japan Lijn,.. General Manager, Standard Oil Co., Architect, Leigh & Orange,.. Manager, China & Japan Telephone Co.,

On premises.

On premises.

On premises. Chater Road. 6 The Peak.

York Building.

3 Elliott Crescent. Prince's Building. Kingsclere.

Secty., Chun On Fire Insurance Co., Ld., | 2 & 8 Queen's Road West. Storekeeper, Lane, Crawford & Co., ..... Secretary, HK., C. & M. Steamboat

Co., Ld.,

Civil Engineer, Denison, Ram & Gibbs,... Manager, Chartered Bank of I. A. & C., Marine Surveyor, Goddard & Douglas,....... General Manager, Vacuum Oil Co., Merchant, H. Wicking & Co., Merchant,

Chief Manager, Dock Co.,

Sec., Union Ince. Society of Canton, Ld., Merchant, Bradley & Co.,

Assistant, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Ld., Merchant, Melchers & Co.,

Merchant, Reuter, Bröckelmann & Co.,... Architect, Denison, Ram & Gibbs,....... Engineer, A. G. Gordon & Co., Masonic Hall, Electrical Engineer,

Civil Engineer, Leigh & Orange,

General Broker,

Merchant, E. D. Sassoon & Co..... Agent, P. M. S. S. Co.,

Merchant,

Co., Ld.,

Merchant,

.

British-American Tobacco

Compradore, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Ld., Manager, International Bank, Assistant Compradore, Jardine, Matheson

Secretary, HK. Land Investment &

Agency Co., Ld.,

Broker, & Govt. Auctioneer, Hughes &

Hough,

Merchant, Harry Wicking & Co.,

|

Tusculum, Peak.

Hongkong Hotel. Peak.

| Charter House.

Tantallon, Barker Road, Peak. Hongkong Hotel.

18 Macdonnell Road. St. George's Building. Hongkong Office.

On premises.

Eilandonan, Peak. East Point.

Queen's Building.

31 Robinson Road. The Peak.

Tor Crest, Peak.

61 Robinson Road. 4 Queen's Gardens. Prince's Building.

1 Prince's Building.

9 Macdonnell Road. 5 Conduit Road.

126 Barker Road. Elliot Crescent. Caine Road.

Cameron Villas, Peak.

Caine Road.

Rougemont, 1 Macdonnell Road.

8 Des Voeux Road. Morrison Hill.

Consulting Engineer, W. C. Jack & Co.,. 14 Des Voeux Central.

Broker, E. S. Kadoorie & Co.,........... Merchant,

Auctioneer,

Assistant, A. S. Watson & Co., Manager, Aruhold, Karberg & Co.,... Engineer, Palmer & Turner,

Manager, D. Sassoon & Co., Ld., Chartered Accountant....

Prince's Building.

6 Peak Road.

Elliot Crescent.

Queen's Road Central. Lergisland, Peak Road. On premises.

Kingsclere.

St. George's Building, Chater Road,

:

NAME IN FULL.

4

SPECIAL JURORS,-Continued.

OCCUPATION.

ABODE.

Macdonald, Frederick Clark... Mackenzie, Alexander Maitland, Francis Medhurst, George Harold Melchers, Friedrich Wilhelm... Michael, Joseph Rahamin..... Moss, Dennis Kebir Moxon, Geoffrey Charles .... Northcote, Mowbray Stafford Ormiston, Evan

Ough, Arthur Heury Pattenden, Walter Leslie

Pemberton, George William

Cyril

Pinckney, Herbert.... Ram, Edward Albert. Raymond, Albert

Rees, Jacques Francois van

Robertson, Henry Wallace Rumjahn, Ahmet

Sassoon, Moses Silas........

Sayer, George John Budds.... Schröter, Carl Christian

Hermann

Scott, William Murray Shallard, Harold Wentworth

Dillon Shellim, Edward

Shewan, Robert Siebs, Hans August Skelton, Alfred Holland Stewart, Murray........ Sutherland, Robert Templeton, David

Tomes, Charles Alexander Timmerscheidt, Richard Tisdall, Arthur Gerald Turner, Arthur

Walker, William Bradley Wendt, Friedrich August White, Henry Percy Wilford, Francis Cuming Woldringh, Conradus....... Wilks, Edward Charles.

Young, George Macdonald

Manager, Mercantile Bank of India, Merchant, Arthur & Co., Merchant, Linstead & Davis, Manager, Dodwell & Co., Ld., Merchant, Wendt & Co., Broker,

Assistant, Alex. Ross & Co., Broker, Ellis Kadoorie & Co.,

1 Morrison Hill.

Dunedin, Barker Road.

Nettlewood, 55 Robinson Road. Hazledine, Robinson Road. Strathallan, Robinson Road.

4 Century Crescent, Kennedy Road. Kowloon. Peak.

Secretary, HK. Land Reclamation Co., Ld., 5 Macdonnell Road.

Exchange Broker, Stewart Bros., Civil Engineer, Leigh & Orange, Merchant, Gilman & Co.,...

Beaconsfield Arcade. Prince's Building.

6 Stewart Terrace.

Secretary, China Fire Insurance Co., Ld., 42 Nathan Road, Kowloon. Exchange Broker,

Architect, Denison, Ram & Gibbs,. Manager, S. J. David & Co.,

Manager, Nederlandsche-Handel Maats-

chappij,

Manager, Butterfield & Swire, Merchant, H. Price & Co., Exchange Broker,

Civil Engineer,

Merchant, Garrels, Börner & Co., Sugar Refiner, Taikoo Sugar Refinery,

Chief Clerk, P. & O. S. N. Co., Merchant, D. Sassoon & Co., Ld., Merchant, Shewan, Tomes & Co., Merchant, Siemssen & Co.,

Storekeeper, Lane, Crawford & Co., Exchange Broker,

Assistant, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Ld., Sugar Refiner, Taikoo Sugar Refinery,. Merchant, Shewan, Tomes & Co., Manager, Deutsch-Asiatische Bank, Manager, Russo-Asiatic Bank, Architect, Palmer & Turner,

Asst. Gen. Manager, Standard Oil Co., Merchant, Wendt & Co.,

Merchant, Douglas, Lapraik & Co., Merchant, Lane, Crawford & Co., Manager, Neth.-India Com. Bank, Engineer,

Sub-Manager, Butterfield & Swire,

6 Stewart Terrace, Peak.

The Peak.

1 Robinson Road.

On premises.

1 Connaught Road.

12 Queen's Road.

4 Ice House Street. 19 Queen's Road Central.

Shorncliffe, Garden Road. Quarry Bay.

104A Peak.

Kurrahjeen, 7 Peak Road. St. George's Building. Lidbroke, 9 Conduit Road. Craigside, Peak.

113, Plantation Road, Peak. Peak Hotel.

Corn Hill, Quarry Bay. On premises. Clovelly, Peak Road. Creggan, Peak. Egyesford, Peak.

18 Peak Road.

6 Ice House Road.

No. 1 Douglas Street. College Chambers,

On premises.

14 Des Voeux Road Central. 1 Connaught Road.

}

NAME IN FULL.

II. COMMON JURORS.

OCCUPATION.

ABODE.

A

Abbass, Abdul Hamid Ablong, Arthur John

Abney, Evelyn Edward de

Wivelslie.

Abraham, Albert

Abraham, Ezekiel Shooker Abraham, Ezra

Abraham, Reuben Alfred Adam, Friedrich Wilhelm Her-

mann

Adolf, Carl

Librarian, Hongkong Club,...... Foreman, Green Island Cement Co.,

Assistant, Thomas Cook & Son,. Clerk, Gas Co.,

Clerk, S. J. David & Co.,

Clerk, Chartered Bank of I. A. & C., Clerk, British-American Tobacco Co., Ld.,

Manager, China Export, Import & Bank

Compagnie,. Foreman Carpenter,

Hongkong Club. On premises.

Peak Hotel. Len premises.

14 College Chambers. Chatham Road, Kowloon. Woolamai, Kowloon.

3 Park Road, Kowloon Docks.

NAME IN FULL.

OCCUPATION.

ABODE.

A-Continued.

Adrain, A. Ledebver

Aitchison, Alexander. Aitken, Robert

Aitken, Samuel Robert Alexander, Charles William Allan, John Niven Rodger .... Alonço, Thiago Florencio de

Silva

Alport, Claude Mashiter Alves, Alberto Eduardo

de Selavisa ............. Alves, Alvaro Alvares Alves, Antonio Luiz Alves, Arthur Alvaro Alves, Egas Luiz de Selavisa. Alves, José Miguel

Andel, Alexander Willem vau Anderson, George William Anderson, William. Antonio, Ernesto

Aquino, Eneas Goularte... Archbutt, Geoffrey Samuel Arculli, Adul Kader el

Armstrong, John Henry

Arculli, Osman el

William

Arndt, Ernst

Assistant, Asiatic Petroleum Co., Clerk, Taikoo Dockyard, Engineer, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Wharf Manager, Holt's Wharf, Engineer, Dock Co......................... Draughtsman, Dock Co.,....

Assistant, Siemssen & Co., Assistant, Shewau, Tomes & Co.,

Clerk, Union Ince. Socty. of Canton, Ld., Assistant, Deutsch-Asiatische Bank, Clerk, Chartered Bank of I. A. & C., Assistant, Arnhold, Karberg & Co., Clerk, Union Ince. Socty. of Canton, Ld.,... Merchant,

Chief Asst., Holland-China Trading Co., Foreman, Taikoo Dockyard, Assistant, Lane, Crawford & Co., Clerk, Mercantile Bank of India, Clerk, Netherlands IndiaCommercial Bank, Assistant, China Fire Insurance Co., Ld., Merchant, Merchant,

Assistant, Butterfield & Swire,

Manager, HK. & China Shoe Factory Ld.,

14 Salisbury Avenue, Kowloon. Quarry Bay.

Quarry Bay.

Kowloon.

Kowloon Docks.

Kowloon Docks.

Queen's Building.

China Light & Power Co., Kowloon.

On premises.

8 Arbuthnot Road.

12 Arbuthnot Road.

5 Humphreys' Avenue, Kowloon. 2 Queen's Building.

9 Nathan Road, Kowloon. Hongkong Club. Quarry Bay. On premises.

19 Caine Road.

Des Voeux Road Central. 4 Morrison Hill. Leighton Hill Road.

10 & 12 Leighton Hill Road.

1 Connaught Road. Kingsclere.

Arnold, Edwin Lester Gilbert.. Clerk, Commercial Union Assce. Co., Ld., | 26 Bonham Road.

Arnold, John

Arthur, Thomas

Asger, Asadullah Ebrahim Atkins, Samuel William Atkinson, Robert Llewelyn Aucott, Ernest Frank Auffermaun, Will Frank Austin, Authony Roy Austin, David. Austin, Frank....

B

Backhouse, James Herbert Bain, Alexander.. Baist, Heinrich Reinhold Bannerman, George Henry

Maclean Baptista, Manuel Barker, Eric Johnson Barnett, Thomas

Barr, James Hunter

Barradas, Adolfo Maria.. Barradas, Arthur Oscar. Barradas, Cezario Maria Barradas, Myriel Francisco

d'Assis....

Barratt, Reginald Frank Barrett, William Curwen Barretto, Alberto Demée Barretto, Fernando Julio Barretto, Frederico Demée Barretto, Frederico Francisco Barretto, José Conde....... Barretto, Octavio Demée. Barros, Antan Vasques

Barros, Anthero Aprigio Barros, Horacio Frederico...... Barton, George Winstanley Bassford, William Faulkner... Basto, José Maria Fernandes Bateman, Thomas Bates, Floyd Lee Bathel, Walther....

Acct., HK., C. & M. Steamboat Co., Ld.,... Marine Surveyor, Goddard & Douglas, Assistant, A. Apear & Co., Assistant, Java-China-Japan Lijn, Bookseller,......

Assistant, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Assistant, Arnhold, Karberg & Co., Architect, Butterfield & Swire, Foreman, Taikoo Dockyard, Assistant, Butterfield & Swire,

Clerk, Sander, Wieler & Co., Engineer, China Sugar Refinery, Assistant, Carlowitz & Co.,.............

Electric Engineer, Electric Light Co., Assistant, Vieira & Co.,

Sub-Acct., Chartered Bank of I. A. & C., Foreman, Taikoo Dockyard, Works Foreman,

Clerk, Asiatic Petroleum Co., Ld.,. Clerk, HK. & S'hai Bank, Clerk, China Sugar Refinery,

Assistant, Dodwell & Co., Ld., Assistant, Dodwell & Co., Ld., Assistant, Butterfield & Swire, Assistant, Cruz, Basto & Co.,.......... Assistant, Standard Oil Co., Merchant, Barretto & Co., Assistant, Shewan, Tomes & Co., Assistant, Cruz, Basto & Co.,........... Assistant, Barretto & Co., Assistant, China Export, Import & Bank

Compagnie,

Clerk, HK. Rope Manufacturing Co., Ld., Asistant, W. G. Humphreys & Co., Assistant, Douglas, Lapraik & Co., Sugar Boiler, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Assistant, Cruz, Basto & Co.,........ Timekeeper, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Clerk & Stenographer, P. M. S. S. Co.,... Assistant, F. Blackhead & Co.,

3 Albany, Peak Road. St. George's Building. 46 Elgin Street. York Buildings. No. 3 Duddell Street. Kingsclere.

55 Robinson Road. 1 Connaught Road. Quarry Bay.

1 Connaught Road.

Prince's Building. East Point Refinery. 2 Praya Central.

Wanchai.

51 Elgin Terrace. | On premises.

Quarry Bay.

Gas Works.

6 Robinson Road.

4 Rednaxella Terrace. 4 Mosque Junction.

Queen's Building.

5 Beaconsfield Arcade. 1 Connaught Road. 7 Robinson Road. 4A Mosque Street.

1 Castle Road.

4 Mosque Terrace.

5 Mosque Street.

13 Robinson Road, Kowloou.

27 Mosque Street.

| 20 Water Street.

2 Punjab Buildings, Kowloon. Hongkong Club.

Quarry Bay.

2 Nathan Road, Kowloon. Quarry Bay. Baltimore Hotel.

4 Gordon Terrace.

}

.

NAME IN FULL.

OCCUPATION.

ABODE.

B-Continued.

Beath, Charles Trench Beaumont, Ellis Ackroyd Beaumont, William Beaurepaire, Herbert Nicholas Beith, Benjamin David Fleming| Bell, William Denny Bellenger, Stanley Bagg Benjamin, Joseph Bennett, Harold Sydney Bentley, John

Bentov, Philips Ernest Bernard, Dallas Gerald Mercer Bernardo, Joaquim Natividade Bevington, Francis Beyer, Hans Ludwig.. Bierling, Friedrich Albert

Bruno

Bird, George

Bird, Lennox Godfrey Blackburn, Leslie James Blackhall, Alexander Reith

Maclaggan

Blair, Thomas

Blair, David Keay Blaker, Cedrie

Block. George Bloxsidge, Frederick John Boanas, William Henry

Thomas

Boisseree, Ludwig Magnus

Hubertus

Bolden, Samuel George

Bond, Charles......

Bond, Harold Herbert

Bone, Charles William Booth, Robert.................

Botelho, Jr., Angusto Cezar...

Botelho, Braz Joaquim Heytor Botelho, Francisco Xavier.... Botelho, João Antonio Heytor Botelho, Julius Caesar Boulton, Andrew Adams Boulton, Sydney

Bowker, George Henry Boysen, Kurt Konrad...

Bradbury, Bertram Walter Bradshaw, Hugh Braun, Theodor ... Brayfield, Thomas

Accountant, Mercantile Bank of India, Clerk, Sander, Wieler & Co., Carding Master, Cotton Mills,. Clerk, Hongkong Hotel, Assistant, Jardine. Matheson & Co., Ld., Foreman, Taikoo Dockyard, Clerk, Canadian Pacific Railway Co., Clerk, E. D. Sassoon & Co., Lil., Asst. Mgr., China Japan Telephone Co.,.. Chief Clerk, Thomas Cook & Son, Assistant, HK. & S'hai Bank,

11 Queen's Road Central. Prince's Building. Causeway Bay. Hongkong Hotel.

| East Point.

Quarry Bay.

11 Humphreys' Avenue, Kowloon. 2 Hollywood Road. Kingsclere.

Lauriston, Bowen Road. On premises.

Assistant, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Ld., | East Point. Assistant, Carlowitz & Co.,... Merchant, Bradley & Co., Assistant, Reiss & Co.,

Merchant, Ferd. Bornemann & Co, Watchman, Taikoo Dockyard,. Architect, Palmer & Turner, Manager,

Assistant, HK. & S'hai Bank,....... Sugar Boiler, China Sugar Refinery, Clerk, Lowe, Bingham & Matthews, Assistant, Butterfield & Swire, Assistant, Sennet Frères,.. Clerk, Kowloon Docks,

Clerk, A. S. Watson & Co., Ld.,

Assistant, Ferd. Bornemann & Co., Assistant, Standard Oil Co.,

13 Mosque Street. On premises.

4 Stewart Terrace, Peak.

Des Voeux Road Central. Quarry Bay.

2 Cameron Villas, Peak. Gas Works, Kowloon.

On premises. Bowrington.

6 Victoria View, Kowloon. 1 Connaught Road. Queen's Road. Kowloon Docks.

Wanchai Road.

16 Des Voeux Road Central. Grand Carlton Hotel.

General Assistant, H. Price & Co., Ld.,....... 12 Queen's Road Central.

Assistant, Dodwell & Co., Ld.,

Assistant, Butterfield & Swire, Foreman, Taikoo Dockyard.

Chief Clerk, Fumigating and Disinfecting

Bureau, Ld.,

Assistant, Barretto & Co., Assistant, Carl Bodiker & Co.,

| Assistant, Barretto & Co.,

Clerk, Wendt & Co., Foreman Engineer,

Assistant, Taikoo Sugar Refinery,

Queen's Building.

1 Connaught Road. Quarry Bay.

2 Caine Road. 44 Caine Road. York Building. 44 Caine Road, 7 Mosque Street. Kowloon Docks. Quarry Bay.

Assistant, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Ld., | East Point.

Clerk, Sander, Wieler & Co.,

Butcher, Dairy Farm Co., Ldl.,

Foreman, China Sugar Refinery,

Assistant, Standard Oil Co.,

Henry

Breton, Leonard Le

Gordon

Bridger, Herbert Ben Bridger, Richard Leslie.. Brinckmann, Adolf Christian

Max.....

Brister, John Henry Fane Bristow, Richard Woodhouse Britto, Francisco Xavier Britto, José Maria Browell, William Gregson Brown, Charles Marsh Brown, George Ernest Brown, Robert John Brown, William Brown, Wilson

Browne, Christopher .

Bruhn, Franz

Brylam, Ernest Lord

Bulmer, John Herbert

Buckle, Percy.

Bumann, Friedrich Carl

Prince's Building.

2 Lower Albert Road.

5 Carnarvon Road.

4 Moreton Terrace.

Consulting Engineer, Carmichael & Clark, 124 Peak. Assistant, Alex. Ross & Co., Electrical Engineer,

Assistant, Lane, Crawford & Co.,

Assistant, Siem sen & Co., Assistant, Reiss & Co., Watchman, Taikoo Dockyard Assistant, Deutsch-Asiatische Bank, Assistant, Dodwell & Co., Ld., Head Ship Draughtsman, Dock Co., Assistant, Asiatic Petrolenin Co., Foreman, Taikoo Dockyard, Storekeeper, Dock Co.,.............

Clerk, Taikoo Dockyard,

Foreman Joiner, Dock Co.,

Oldesloe, Austin Road.

159 Praya East. Ou premises.

6 Queen's Garden.

6 Morrison Hill. Quarry Bay.

19 Belilios Terrace. Queen's Building. Kowloon Docks. Macdonnell Road.

Quarry Bay.

Kowloon Docks.

Quarry Bay.

Kowloon Docks,

Clerk, Union Ince. Socty, of Canton, Ld., 2 Queen's Building.

Assistant, Carl Bodiker & Co.,

Sub-Accountant, International Bank,

Office Gunner, P. & O. Co.,

Assistant, Standard Oil Co.,

Assistant, Melchers & Co.,

York Building.

10 Kennedy Road.

On premises.

13 Macdonnell Road.

Queen's Building.

}

*

NAME IN FULL.

7

OCCUPATION.

2

Abode.

B-Continued.

Bune, Thomas Friedrich

Andreas

Bunje, Carl

Burn, George Andrew

Bursley, Alan John

Butterfield, W. A.

Buyers, Charles Badenoch....

C

Cadman, Herbert Caldwell, George Arthur Campbell, Hugh Frank...

• Campos, Henrique Reys. Campos, José Maria Carmichael, Alexander Carmichael, Hugh Cameron Carroll, Anthony Henry Carroll, William Joseph Carter, Albert James.....

Carvalho, Beltrão Lucas de... Carvalho, Carlos Francisco de Carvalho, Duarte de Carvalho, Henrique José

Maria de

Carvalho, Julio Augusto de Castro, Bonifacio Maria

Castro, Carlos Maria Castro, Joaquim Telles

d'Almada e Champion, Major James Chan Pat..

Chapman, Ben Fletcher.. Chapman, Edward John Chapman, James Brand.. Chapple, Frederick Thomas Cheng Yuet Po

Chinchen, Sydney John Chunnutt, Frederick George... Clark, Allan McDougall. Clark, Douglas Edward Clark, Jasper

Clarke, Ernest Blears Clayson, Edward F.

Coleman, Frederick Charles ... Collaço, Vicente Alexandre de

Paulo

Colson, George Basil. Cooper, David

Coppin, Alan Griffiths

Costa, Roberto Augusto da Courmont, Edward.

Course, Arthur

Cousins, Ralph Hutchinsou

Craik, James

Crane, Arthur

Crapnell, Albert Edward

Crapnell, Frederick Harry.. Crawford, Alexander.. Crawford, Frank

Lane

Malcolm

Crawford, William Joseph Crispin, Charles....

Croucher, Rowland Hendy

Basil......

Cruickshank, John Cruickshanks, John Lowden... Cruz, Antonio Maria da Cruz, Guilherme Pedro da Cruz, José Maria da Cubey, Edwin Banfield Cumming, Kenneth Menzies...

Merchant,

Assistant, Chas. G. Gaupp & Co., Wharfinger, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Clerk, Asiatic Petroleum Co., Engineer, Asiatic Petroleum Co., Supt. Engineer, Tramway Co.,

Engineer, Asiatic Petroleum Co., Chief Clerk, Dock Co.,...................... Assistant, Shewan, Tomes & Co., Clerk, Chartered Bank of I, A. & C., Assistant, G. P. Lammert, Engineer, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Sugar Boiler, China Sugar Refinery, Assistant, Dodwell & Co., Ld., Assistant, Shewan, Tomes & Co., Accountant, British-American Tobacco

Co., Lư.,

Clerk, North China Insurance Co., Ld.,. Assistant, HK. & S'hai Bank,. Assistant, Shewan, Tomes & Co.,

Clerk, Union Ince. Socty. of Canton, Ld., Clerk, Union Ince. Socty, of Canton, Ld.,

Clerk, Yokohama Specie Bank, Ld., Assistant, Lane, Crawford & Co.,

Assistant, International Bank,....... Assistant Steward,

4 Des Voeux Road Central. Durbar House, Kowloon. Quarry Bay.

5 Lower Mosque Street. North Point. The Peak.

Tai Kok Tsui. Craigieburn, Peak.

13 Robinson Road, Kowloon. 4 Mosque Street. 51 Pottinger Street. Lyemoon Terrace. East Point. Queen's Building. On premises.

11A Conduit Road. 13 Mosque Junction. 14 Arbuthnot Road. Club Lusitano.

On premises. On premises. On premises.

On premises.

1 Lyemoou Villas, Kowloon. Hongkong Club.

Assistant, China Fire Insurance Co., Ld., 1 Mosque Terrace.

Assistant, Thomas Cook & Son....

Assistant, Linstead & Davis, Draughtsman, Taikoo Doçkyard, Assistant, W. Powell, Ld., Manager, Bismarck & Co., Manager, North China Ince. Co., Lal., Assistant, W. R. Loxley & Co., . Assistant, Harry Wicking & Co. Chief Clerk, J. D. Humphreys & Co., Chief, T. & B. Dept., Standard Oil Co.,... Assistant, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Ld., Assistant, E. D. Sassoon & Co., Ld., Electrician, Dock Co.,

Assistant, HK. & S'hai Bank,.. Electrical Engineer,

Shipbuilder, Dock Co., Assistant, Bradley & Co.,

Clerk, HK., C. & M. Steamboat Co., Ld., 1st Assistant, Messageries Maritimes Traffic Supt., Electric Tramway, Draughtsman, Taikoo Dockyard, Secretary, Hongkong Club, Engineer, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Bookkeeper, Moxon & Taylor, Assistant, Dodwell & Co., Ld., Clerk, Dock Co.,

Clerk, Lane, Crawford & Co., Assistant, Dock Co.,

Foreman Shipwright, Dock Co.,

Clerk, Ice Co.,

Jeweller, Geo. Falconer & Co. Foreman, Taikoo Dockyard............. Merchant, Cruz, Basto & Co.,........ Assistant, W. G. Humphreys & Co., Clerk, Cruz, Basto & Co., Chief Clerk, Taikoo Dockyard, Assistant, W. R. Loxley & Co.,

Blue Bungalow.

56 The Peak.

Quarry Bay.

On premises.

18 and 19 Connaught Road Central. Alexandra Building.

Parkside, Kowloon. Wyndham Hotel.

3 Stewart Terrace. 3 Queen's Garden. East Point.

5 Lochiel Terrace, Kowloon. Kowloon Docks.

I Woodlands Terrace. Electric Co.'s Works. Kowloon Docks. On premises.

| 10 Robinson Road.

10 Wyndham Street.

Power Station, Bowrington. Quarry Bay. Hongkong Club.

3 Taikoo Terrace.

38 Nathan Road, Kowloon. Queen's Building.

Kowloon Docks.

Ou premises. Kowloon Docks. Kowloon Docks.

No. 9 Wong Nei Cheong Road.

43 Robinson Road.

Quarry Bay.

7 Robinson Road,

56 Peel Street.

No. 38 Haiphong Road, Kowloon. Quarry Bay.

Braeside, 20 Macdonnell Road.

+

NAME IN FULL.

8

OCCUPATION.

ABODE.

C-Continued.

Cunha, Bernardino Maria

Cardoso da

Curreem, Abdul

Currie, Alexander Scott

Curry, George Percy

D

Daleziel, James

Dalgety, George Mackay Dauenberg, Mario José Danielsen, Friedrich Julius Danielsen, Julius Emil Danly, James Denison Darch, Oswald Wallwyn Dashwood, Arthur Paul Dauter, Erich Eduard David, Archibald David; Râmesh, Davidson, Alexander Davidson, Horace Davidson, John

Davidson, Nabob Kitchen. Davison, William Dawson, Arthur Leopold Day, Frank Oswald Day, Gilbert

Deane, Arthur Francis Dekuatel, Johannes Alides

Delaunay Paul

Delden, Eliza Jacques Henri

Van

Desebrock, Hermaun Emil..............' Detmers, Kurt Dickie, James... Dickson, Robert.... Dinning, Hugh

Diss, Arthur Charles... Diss, George Ambrose Dobbie, John Alexander Donne, Duncan James Donnelly, Denis Ewart Dorrington, Sidney Arthur Dorward, David Doughty, Harry. Douglas, John Phillips Dransfield, Albert Dreyer, Holger

• Drude, Frederick Edmond Nash Drude, Robert Alexander

Philip

Drude, William Rowland

Clarence

Drummond, Neil

Dübgen, Walther Edmund Otto Duncan, George. Durmeth, Gordon Black Dunrich, Arthur Ellis William Dutton, Sydney Hardy

E

Eberius, Gattfried Fritz

Edwards, George Richard... Edwards, Robert Campbell Eggers, Franz

Eggers, Hans Herbert Elborough, Alfred Charles

Ernest. Eldridge, William James Elliott, James. Ellis, Albert

Clerk, Union Ince. Soety. of Canton, Ld., On premises.

Assistant, Arculli & Co.,................ Assistant, Taikoo Sugar Refinery. Local Secretary, Gas Co.......

Chief Engr., Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Assistant, HK. & S'hai Bank, Assistant, Reiss & Co., Assistant, Siemssen & Co., Assistant, F. Blackhead & Co., Assistant, Butterfield & Swire.... Assistant, Asiatic Petroleum Co. Civil Engineer, Taikoo Dockyard, Assistant, Reuter, Brockelmann & Co.,... Manager, S. J. David & Co., Licensee, Kowloon Hotel,

Chief Draughtsman, Taikoo Dockyard,. Clerk, HK. Ice Co., Ld.,

Assistant Superintendent, Gas Co., Assistant, A. S. Watson & Co., Lil.. Foreman Shipwright, Dock Co., Assistant, Butterfield & Swire, Clerk, Taikoo Dockyard,

Assistant, Asiatic Petroleum Co., Assistant, Butterfield & Swire, Accountant, Nederlandsche-Handel Ma-

atschappij,

Cashier, Banque de l'Indo-Chine,

Accountant, Neth.-India Com. Bank, Assistant, Carlowitz & Co.,.... Clerk, Rädecker & Co., Assistant, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Assistant, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Assistant, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Master Tailor, Diss Bros.,

Master Tailor, Diss Bros.,

Traveller, Taikoo Dockyard,

22 Leighton Hill Road.

3 Sea View Terrace, Quarry Bay. Ou premises.

Quarry Bay. On premises. Reiss & Co.

23 Conduit Road.

No. 3 Granville Road, Kowloon.

1 Connaught Road. Peak Hotel.

Quarry Bay. Grand Hotel. Hongkong Club.

Kowloon Hotel, Kowloon. Quarry Bay. Ice House Street. West Point. North Point. Kowloon Docks.

1 Connaught Road. 10 Seymour Terrace. Peak Hotel.

1 Connaught Road.

Peak Hotel. Chater Road.

16 Peak Road. 2 Connaught Road.

5 Duddell Street.

Taikoo Terrace, Quarry Bay. Taikoo Terrace, Quarry Bay.

2 Sea View Terrace, Quarry Bay.

1 Wyndham Street.

36 Caine Road.

Quarry Bay.

Assistant, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Ld., East Point.

Merchant, Garner, Quelch & Co., Timekeeper, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Assistant, A. S. Watson & Co., Ld., Engineer, G. I. Cement Co., Ld., Engineer, G. I. Cement Co., L., Timekeeper, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Assistant, H. Skott & Co., Assistant, W. R. Loxley & Co.....

Assistant, Standard Oil Co.,

Assistant, W. R. Loxley & Co., Foreman, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Manager, H. A. Fromu, Foreman Plumber, Dock Co., Assistant, HK. & S'hai Bank, Accountant, Gas Co.,

Assistant, E. D. Sassoon & Co.,

Merchant, Eberius & Co., Assistant, Dodwell & Co.; Ld.,

Chief Accountant, HK. & S'hai Bank, Assistant, Siemssen & Co., Assistant, Jebsen & Co.,

Assistant, HK. & S'hai Bank, Storekeeper, Taikoo Dockyard, Engineer, Hongkong Hotel,

Assistant, Dodwell & Co., Ld.,

Kingsclere. Quarry Bay.

Morton Terrace.

Green Island Co.'s Works. 8 Austin Avenue.

2 Lyemoon Terrace.

6 Victoria View, Kowloon.

6 Lochiel Terrace, Kowloon.

6 Lochiel Terrace, Kowloon.

6 Lochiel Terrace, Kowloon. Quarry Bay.

4 Queen's Building. Kowloon Docks. On premises.

Gas Works.

Westly, Babington Path.

4 Macdonnell Road.

2 Victoria View, Kowloon.

On premises.

55 Robinson Road. King's Building.

On premises. Quarry Bay. Hongkong Hotel. Peak Hotel.

}

NAME IN FULL.

OCCUPATION.

ABODE.

E-Continued.

Ellis, Arthur Sassoon Ellis, Emanuel Ezekiel

Ellis, Frederick Ezekiel. Ellis, Oswald Isaac Elson, William Thomas Emberley, William Henry. Emmett, Edward Charles Engel, Gustav Christoph Esrom, Frank..... Eustace, Bert

Evans, Edward Henry Ewing, John Jessiman Ezra, Edward.

F

Farne, Francis Henry Farrell, Edward . Farrell, Peter Thomson. Ferguson, Archibald Hill Ferguson, James Carson Ferguson, John

Ferguson, Joseph Chalmers

Gillon

Ferguson, Robert Alexander... Fernandes, Menino.... Feslier, Albert Fielder, Bertie Ernest Figueiredo, Eduardo José de... Figueiredo, Henrique João

Melchiades de....... Figueiredo, Manuel Augusto... Finke, Hermann.... Fisher, Thomas James Fisher, John

Fittock, Charles, Jr. FitzGerald, George de la Poer)

Beresford..

Fleming, William Nicholson... Forbes, Alexander Rodger.......... Forbes, John Rodger..... Ford, William Falconer. Forde, Kenneth Rowley

Forrester, John

Forthergill, Archibald Franco, Viriato

Freese, Wilhelm..

Friedrichs, Carl August

Ernst Max

Frisbugen, Hauns

Fyfe, Alexander Adair

Broker,

Broker, Broker,

Clerk, E. D. Sassoon & Co.,

Assistant, Wm. Powell, Ld.,

Assistant, Whiteaway & Laidlaw,

8 Pedder's Hill.

8 Pedder's Hill.

8 Pedder's Hill.

3 Pedder's Hill.

Alexandra Building.

9 Morrison Hill Gap Road.

Assistant, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Ld., 17 Caine Road.

Merchant, Wm. Meyerink & Co., Assistant, Carl Bodiker & Co., Assistant, Lane, Crawford & Co., Watchman, Taikoo Dockyard,.... Tug Master, Taikoo Dockyard, Assistant, D. Sassoon & Co., Ld.,

Ravenshill West.

On premises.

On premises. Quarry Bay. Quarry Bay.

21 College Chambers.

Assistant, China Fire Insurance Co., Ld., | 45 Graham Street. Assistant, J. T. Shaw,.....

The Blarney Stone, Jubilee Road.

Foreman, Taikoo Dockyard,

Quarry Bay.

Sub-Acct., Chartered Bank of I. A. & C., | On premises.

Clerk, Taikoo Dockyard,

Quarry Bay.

Foreman, Taikoo Sugar Refinery,

Quarry Bay.

Assistant, HK. & S'hai Bank,............. Foreman, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Clerk, Kelly & Walsh, Ld.,.................. Assistant, Lane, Crawford & Co., Assistant, Butterfield & Swire, Assistant, Hughes & Hough,

Clerk, Carlowitz & Co., Assistant, Shewan, Tomes & Co., Assistant, Jebsen & Co., Assistant, Butterfield & Swire, Engineer, Dock Co., Superintendent, Dock Co.,

Assistant, HK. & S'hai Bank, Clerk, Taikoo Dockyard,. Sugar Boiler, China Sugar Refinery, Sugar Boiler, China Sugar Refinery, Harbour Foreman Engineer, Dock Co., Assistant, HK, & S'hai Bank.......... Sub-Acct., International Bank,

Assistant, Laichikok Oil Co.,

Bookseller's Asst., Kelly & Walsh, Ld., Assistant, Blackhead & Co.,

Assistant, Arnhold, Karberg & Co., Assistant, Carlowitz & Co...... Chartered Accountant, Perey Smith, Seth

& Fleming,

On premises. Quarry Bay.

4 Arsenal Street. On premises.

1 Connaught Road. 8 Des Voeux Road.

Kowloon.

21 Caine Road. 1 Victoria View, King's Building. 1 Connaught Road. Cosmopolitan Docks. Aberdeen Docks.

On premises. Quarry Bay. Praya East. 129 Praya East. Kowloon Docks. On premises. Hongkong Hotel. Laichikok.

Morrison Hill Road. Bonham Road.

3 Macdonnell Road, 2 Praya Central.

5 Queen's Road Central.

G

Galluzzi, Raoul

Gannay, Paul

Garcia, Francisco Maria

Assistant, D. Sassoon & Co., Ld., Chief Acct., Banque de l'Indo-Chine, Clerk, P. M. S. S. & Co.,

Gardner, William Frederick Jr. Assistant, Melchers & Co.,

Gardner, William

Gardner, John

Garraway, James Graham Ganbert, Réné

Gausden, James George

Stanley

Geddes, Francis

Gee, Archibald Daniel

Gegg, George William

Gellion, Frederick Johnson

Gill, Harold

Gittins, Henry

Engineer, HK. Rope Manufacturing Co.,

Ld.,

Foreman, Taikoo Dockyard,

Foreman Engineer,

Sub-Acet., Banque de l'Indo-Chine,

Assistant, Dodwell & Co., Ld.,

Clerk, Union Ince, Society of Canton, Ld., Assistant Manager, Hongkong Hotel, Hughes & Hough,...

Electrician, W. C. Jack & Co.,

Engineer, China Shoe Factory,

11 Conduit Road. Chater Road.

2 Rednaxela Terrace. On premises.

Villa Maria, Glenealy No. 11. Quarry Bay.

Kowloon Docks.

Chater Road.

On premises. Queen's Building. Hongkong Hotel.

Ice House Street.

14 Des Voeux Road Central.

13 MacdonneЛ Road.

Assistant, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Ld., East Point.

Glendinning, Perey Richard... Assistant, Horse Repository,

Causeway Bay.

>

NAME IN FULL.

10

OCCUPATION.

ABODE.

G-Continued.

Glendinning, Walter Scott Gloyn, John

Goggin, William George Goldenberg, Harry.. Goldschmidt, Sylvain Gomes, Francis ..... Gomes, João Eduardo Gonsalves, Verissimo Goulborn, Vernon

Gourgey, Ivor...... Gourgey, Maurice Gow, David

Graça, Francisco Maria de

Paulo

Graff, Reginald Charles. Graham, James William Grant, John

Grataniad, Daniel Marcellus.. Gray, Robert Gray, Samuel.. Greeu, George Gregersen, Christoph

Gregory, William Percy Greig, Kenneth Edward Griffin, Herbert ........ Grimshaw, Thomas Gubbay, David Sassoon.. Gubbay, Raphael Aaron Güillet, Arthur Francis.... Güusther, Hugo Adolph Guterres, Augusto Arthur. Gutierrez, Francisco Maria Gutierrez, Gregorio Maria..... Gutierrez, João Maria Gutierrez, John Joseph...

Inspector, Hongkong Tramway Co., Ld., Sugar Boiler, China Sugar Refinery, ...... Assistant, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Ld., Assistant, Gibb, Livingston & Co., Assistant, Ullmann & Co., Clerk, Nippon Yusen Kaisha, Assistant, Douglas, Lapraik & Co., Assistant, D. Sassoon & Co., Ld., Assistant Engineer, HK. Rope Manu-

facturing Co., Ld., Clerk, Moxon & Taylor,

Assistant, D. Sassoon & Co., Ld., Clerk, Dock Co.,

Assistaut, China Sugar Refinery, Assistant, P. & O. Co.,...... Supt. Shipbuilder, Dock Co., Barman, King Edward Hotel,

Asst., Nederlansche-Handel Maatschappij, Foreman, Taikoo Dockyard, Foreman Turner,

Butcher, Dairy Farm Co., Ld.,

Assistant, Jebsen & Co.,

Printer, Kelly & Walsh, Ld.,

Power Station. East Point,

23 Belilios Terrace. On premises.

Co. J. Ullmann & Co. 15 Seymour Road.

29 Caine Road.

13 Salisbury Avenue, Kowloon.

Hongkong Hotel.

The Deer, Robinson Road. 21 Belilios Terrace. Kowloon Docks.

58 Peel Street.

11 Mountain View, Peak. Kowloon Docks.

On premises.

On premises.

Quarry Bay.

Kowloon Docks.

King George Hotel.

King's Building.

3 Carnarvon Road, Kowloon.

Manager, Engine Works, Taikoo D'yard., Quarry Bay.

Assistant, Butterfield & Swire, Foreman, Taikoo Dockyard, Clerk, E. D. Sassoon & Co., Broker,

Clerk, A. R. Marty & Co.,

Assistant, MacEwen, Frickel & Co., Clerk, International Bank, Assistant, Shewan, Tomes & Co., Clerk, HK. & S'hai Bank, Assistant, F. Blackhead & Co., Bookkeeper, Bank Line Ld.,

1 Connaught Road. Quarry Bay.

9 Macdonnell Road.

4 Ice House Street.

15 Queen's Road Central.

4 Austin Avenue, Kowloon.

12 Belilios Terrace.

6 Conduit Road.

On premises.

1 Mosque Street. 11 Mosque Street.

}

H

Haasemanu, Theodor Welhelm

Erich

Hacking, John Emmott

William

Hackman, Albert Julius Haesloop, Conrad

Haigh, Fred. Dunwell Haines, Hereward Francis Hamet, Abdool Hoosen. Hamilton, Alexander......... Hamilton, Charles Norman

Maclean

Hamilton, John Campbell......] Hannibal, Walter Albert Hansen, Christian Rude.. Hansen, Theodor Friedrich

Hansen, Wallace John Hanson, James Ernest Hardwick, William

Harker, Bernard Brotherton... Harrington, John Joseph Harris, Charles

Harris, Richard Vittorio

Harrison, Tom Lloyd.... Harron, Henry Love.... Hartig, Gottlieb Ernst Louis... Harvey, Charles Ernest Harvey, David

Haskell, Ernest David Hasse, Jacobus Hatt, Charles

Haxton, George Kay. Haynes, Harry

Hazeland, Ernest Manning Heath, Henry Thomas

Merchant, Burne & Reif,..

Foreman, Taikoo Dockyard,

Assistant, Arnhold, Karberg & Co., ... Assistant, F. Blackhead & Co., Assistant, Kelly & Walsh, Ld., Brakesman,

Assistaut, Garner, Quelch & Co., Foreman, Taikoo Dockyard,

4 Ormsby Villas.

Quarry Bay.

55 Robinson Road, 13 Magazine Gap.

10A Conduit Read.

31 Saw Wa Fong, Wanchai. 39 Morrison Hill Road. Quarry Bay.

Engineer, China Light & Power Co.,...... Kowloon.

Clerk, P. M. S. S. Co.,

Clerk, Wendt & Co.,

Hongkong Hotel.

36 Nathan Road.

Shipping Clerk, Hamburg Amerika Linie, 3 Austin Avenue, Kowloon,

Assistant, F. Blackhead & Co.,

Assistant, H. Skott & Co., Foreman, Taikoo Dockyard, Employee, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Architect,

Clerk, Taikoo Dockyard, Shipwright, Kowloon Docks, Assistant, P. & O. S. N. Co.,........ Assistant, Staudard Oil Co., Pansman, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Assistant, Kruse & Co., Manager, Bank Line Ld.,

Marine Engineer, Dodwell & Co., L., Merchant, D. Haskell & Co.,

Marine Supt., Java-China-Japan Lijn, Inspector, C. & J. Telephone Co., Manager, HK. Jee Co., Ld., Manager, King Edward Hotel, Architect,

Foreman, Taikoo Sugar Refinery,

5 Caine Road.

2 Ormsby Villas.

Quarry Bay. Quarry Bay.

2 Pedder's Street.

Quarry Bay.

Kowloon Docks.

11 Mountain View, Peak. Hotel Mansions.

1 Lyemoon Terrace. Hotel Mansions. Peak Hotel Annex. Carnarvon Road, Kowloon. 23 Robinson Road. On premises.

No. 2 Duddell Street.

Ice House, East Point. On premises.

2 Park View.

Quarry Bay.

Y

+

NAME IN FULL.

11

OCCUPATION.

ABODE.

H-Continued.

Hedley, William........ Heckscher, Robert

Heermann, Carl Friederich Heermann, Wilhelm Hegarty, Herbert George Heldt, Franz

Hell, Paul Edward Heinrich

Wilhelm

Henderson, Alexander Henderson, Archibald Kerr Henderson, James Henderson, John Mentiplay Henderson, Robert.... Hendrich, Max Heinrich Herbst, Carl Emil Peter Herdman, Andrew Elliot Hermeling, Peter August

Hubert...

Hesse, Franz

Hewett, Arthur Stanley Hewitt, Alfred Herbert.. Hickling, Clement Chinery Hickman, Harry Frank.. Hidden, Stanley Hildebrandt, Johannes Carl...

Hill, Thomas

Hill, Walter Joseph Hinde, Walter Butterfield Hoffman, Harry Edward Hoggard, Frederick Hollands, Henry Ethelbert Holt, Harold Osborn Holyoak, Percy Hobson Horbacz, Jacob Bernhard Howell, Charles Lloyd

Howie, Neil McDonald

Hoy, William

Humphreys, Cecil

Hunter, Hugh...

Hunter, James

Timekeeper. Dock Co.,.......... Assistant, Kruse & Co., Merchant, Gaupp & Co., Assistant, Java-China-Japan Lijn, Assistant, HK. & S'hai Bank, Assistant, Carl Bodiker & Co.,

Merchant, Kruse & Co.,

Foreman, Taikoo Dockyard,

Kowloon Docks. On premises. Deacon's Bungalow. On premises.

On premises. York Building.

Hotel Mansions.

Quarry Bay.

Asst. Engineer, HK. Tramway Co., Ld.... 159 Praya East.

Engineer, Bailey & Co.,

Boilermaker, Dock Co.,

Assistant, Shewan, Tomes & Co.; Assistaut, Siemssen & Co., Clerk, Holt's Wharf, Assistant, Butterfield & Swire,

Superintendent Engineer, Nord. Lloyd,....... Merchant, Burne & Reif,

Accountant, Chartered Bank of I. A. & C., Chief Engineer, G. I. Cement Co., Ld.,... Assistant, Butterfield & Swire,

Assistant, China Fire Insurance Co., Ld., Assistant, Whiteaway & Laidlaw, Assistant, China Export, Import and

Bank Compagnie, Foreman, Taikoo Dockyard, Engineer, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Assistant, Thomas Cook & Son,.... Chief Clerk, Oriental Brewery, Ld., Foreman, G. I. Cement Co., Ld., Assistant, Lane, Crawford & Co., Book-keeper, Wm. Powell, Ld., Salesman and Assistant, Reiss & Co., Assistant, Holland China Trading Co., Assistant, Standard Oil Co., Draughtsman, Taikoo Dockyard, Draughtsman, Taikoo Dockyard, Assistant, W. G. Humphreys & Co.,

Humphreys, William Meyrick Clerk, W. G. Humphreys & Co.,.............

Hunter, James Adam

Hunter, Robert Hunter, Tobias Hüpeden, Ferdinand Hans Hurley, Frederick Mason Hyndman, Alberto Herculano. Hyndman, Francisco Henrique Hyndman, Henrique, Jr.

}

Ievers, Thomas Patriek.. Innes, Robert

Irving, John Mark Mardhaugh. Ismail, Sheek Ebrahim

Clerk, Union Ince. Socty. of Canton, Ld., Assistant Fitter,

Foreman, Taikoo Dockyard, Engineer, Macdonald & Co.,

Assistant, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Ld., Assistant, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Ld., Assistant, Hughes & Hough, Assistant, HK. & S'hai Bank, Assistant, Standard Oil Co., Clerk, Bailey & Co................

Assistant, Vacuum Oil Co.,.......... Assistant, Butterfield & Swire, Eugineer, IIK. Ice Co., Ld.,..

|

Austin Avenue, Kowloon. Kowloon Docks.

4 Great George Street. Queen's Building.

4 Seymour Terrace. 1 Connaught Road.

Intramuros, Caine Road.

3 Canton Villas, Kowloon. On premises. Green Island.

1 Connaught Road.

The Retreat, Mount Kellet, Wong Nei Cheong Road.

Station Hotel, Kowloon. Quarry Bay.

Taikoo Terrace, Quarry Bay. Lauriston, Bowen Road. Kingsclere.

Deep Water Bay Works. Ou premises.

Alexandra Building. Westley, Babbington Path. On premises.

17 Chater Road, West Point. Quarry Bay. Quarry Bay.

2 Peak Road.

9 Stewart Terrace, Peak. On premises.

Gas Works. Quarry Bay.

2 Victoria View, Kowloon.

4 Humphreys' Avenue, Kowloon. 44 Robinson Road.

1 Meirion, Peak.

Salisbury Avenue, Kowloon. Salisbury Avenue, Kowloon. Salisbury Avenue, Kowloon,

56 Nathan Road. 1 Connaught Road. East Point.

Assistant, Holland-China Trading Co.,... 5 Yee Woo Street.

J

Jack, James

Jacobs, Edward

Jahrand, Alfred

Jasse, Carl George Heinrich Jesus, Albino Alberto da Jesus, José Vicente Paulo de. Joass, Henry Crawford Johnson, John

Johnson, William Murray. Johnstone, James Jolly, William

Jones, Hugh Ivor

Book-keeper, Dairy Farm Co., Ld., Assistant, Standard Oil Co., Assistant, Jebsen & Co., Clerk, Rädecker & Co.,

Clerk, Canadian' Pacific Railway Co., Assistant, Gordon & Co.,...... Assistant, HK. & S'hai Bank, Storekeeper, Taikoo Dockyard, Timekeeper, Dock Co.,

Marine Engineer, Dodwell & Co., Ld., Secretary, Dock Co.,

Assistant, China Fire Insurance Co., Ld.,

9 Pedder's Street.

33 Wong Nei Cheong Road.

No. 5 Queen's Garden. 5 Duddell Street.

18 Morrison Hill Road. 12 Morrison Hill Road. On premises. Quarry Bay. Kowloon Docks. Queen's Building. Kowloon Docks. 76a Peak.

>

NAME IN FULL.

12

OCCUPATION.

ABODE.

J-Continued.

Jones, Samuel Richard

Jorge, Francisco José Vicente,

Jr.,

Joseph, Felix Alexander Joseph, Raymond Menasse Joseph, Silas Haiem Judah, James Jacob Judah, Raphael Solomon

K

Kabel, Everardus Simon Kahn, Ormand. Kalır, Albert Kaily, William

Kedward, Thomas Agor Keith, Allan

Keith, David

Kellinghusen, Franz Otto

Hermann Kelly, Harry

Kendall, Frederick Carr Kennedy, David

Kennedy, James John Stodart. Kennett, Henry William

Balmer...

Kennett, Herbert Sydney Kerr, William...............

Kew, Charles Herbert Whiteley Kew, Joseph Whiteley Kharas, Diushaw Kavasji. Kim, Charles Henry Kinghorn, John Richard Kinnaird, John Daniel Kuap, William Bruce Knell, Friedrich

Knight, Charles Crosby. Knox, Lefferts

Koch, Hermann.. Kraft, William Dana

Kuhu, Arthur

Kunze, Paul Adolf Adalbert...

Kwong King In ...

Laing, Alfred

L

Lakin, George Mason.. Lambert, John

Lambert, William Osborne...... Lambden, Alfred Lammert, Frank.. Lammert, Herbert Alexander Lamperski, Albert Wilhelm .. Lander, John William Lang, Archibald Orr.......... Lang, William Edwin Langstein, Ludwig Victor.. Laurel, Felix Cyprian. Laurenz, Georg. Rudelf Lauritsen, Martin

Lawder, Cecil..... Lawrence, John Henry Lawson, George Thomson Lay, Kenneth Fortescue Leask, William Laughton Lee, George

Lee, Jesse Rees

Clerk, Taikoo Dockyard,.

Merchant, Jorge & Co., Cashier, Russo Asiatic Bank, Assistant, D. Sassoon & Co., Ld., Clerk, E. D. Sassoon & Co., Clerk, E. D. Sassoon & Co., Assistant, D. Sassoon & Co., Lil.,

Assistant, Java-China-Japan Lijn, Manager, Ullmann & Co., Runner, Thomas Cook & Son,. Assistant, Standard Oil Co.. Ship Draughtsman, Taikoo Dockyard, Assistant, Shewan, Tomes & Co., Foreman Carpenter,

Assistant, Siemssen & Co.,

Assistant, Grand Hotel,

Assistant, HK. & S'hai Bank,

Manager, Horse Repository,

Quarry Bay.

21 Old Bailey. On premises.

Devonia, Peak Road. 43 Robinson Road. 11 College Chambers. 11 Seymour Road.

On premises.

5 Caine Road.

Royal George Hotel, Kowloon. Laichikok.

Quarry Bay.

Penk Hotel.

Kowloon Docks.

Queen's Building,

Queen's Road Central. On premises. Causeway Bay.

Genl. Manager, Electric Traction Co., Ld., 1 Morrison Hill.

Assistant, China Borneo Co., Ld., Assistant, Butterfield & Swire, Foreman, Taikoo Dockyard..........

4 Knutsford Terrace, Kowloon.

1 Comanght Road.

Quarry Bay.

Clerk, HK. & K. W. & Godown Co., Ld., 27 Seymour Road.

Engineer,

P. & O). Co.,

Clerk, Green Island Cement Co., Assistant, Butterfield & Swire, Sugar Boiler, China Sugar Refinery, Assistant, Standard Oil Co., Engineer, Ulderup & Schlüter, Assistant, Butterfield & Swire, Manager, China Mutual Insurance Co., Sub-Manager, Deutsch-Asiatische Bank, Assistant Manager & Attorney, Standard

Oil Co.,

Principal, Kuhn & Komor, Mercantile Representative, Shewan,

Tomes & Co., Clerk, Bismarck & Co.,

Assistant, Butterfield & Swire, Assistant, Gibb, Livingston & Co.,. Lloyds' Surveyor,..

Draughtsman, Dock Co., Assistant, Leigh & Orange

14 Des Voeux Road Central. 14 College Chambers.

21 Peel Street.

1 Connaught Road. East Point.

Hotel Mansions.

21 Connaught Road Central.

1 Connaught Road.

On premises. Ön premises.

1 Bowen Road. Queen's Road Central.

2 Lyemoon Villas, Kowloon. Connaught Road Central.

1 Connaught Road. St. George's Building. Alexandra Building. Kowloon Docks. 36 Caine Road.

Assistant, Caldbeck, MacGregor & Co.,... 1 Seymour Terrace.

Assistant, G. P. Lammert, Assistant, Melchers & Co., Timekeeper, Dock Co.,................

Mercantile Asst., Gibb, Livingston & Co., Sub-Acct., Chartered Bank of I. A. & C., Assistant, Arnhold, Karberg & Co., Assistant, P. M. S. S Co.,

Merchant, Carlowitz & Co.,..

Engineer, Oriental Brewery, Ld.,

|

Cotton Mills, East Point. On premises.

Kowloon Docks.

St. George's Building.

Queen's Road.

3 Queen's Garden.

16 & 18 Bridges Street.

2 Connaught Road. Laichikok.

Assistant, China Mutual Life Ince. Co.,... Elgin Street.

Clerk, Dock Co.,

Foreman, Taikoo Dockyard, Bank Clerk, International Bank,. Civil Engineer, Leigh & Orange, Assistant, Asiatic Petroleum Co., Commission Agent,.....

Lemarchand, William Rowland Assistant, P. & O. S. N. Co.,

Lemm, John

Lenhard, Wilhelm.

Architect,

Sub-Acct., Deutsch-Asiatische Bank.

Kowloon Docks. Quarry Bay.

9 Wong Nei Cheong Road. On premises.

31 Pokfulam Road.

64 Haiphong Road, Kowloon. Mountain View, Peak.

66 Queen's Road Central. On premises.

}

}

A.

NAME IN FULL.

13

OCCUPATION.

Abode.

L—Continued.

Lennox, John..... Lenz, Harold Rudolf Leon, Arthur

Leon, Manuel Valantin Leong, Ernest....... Lester, Hugh William Leung Fee Cooke Levy, Isaac Simeon Levy, Silas Simon Liebach, Gerrith Hanns Julius. Little, John Hargraves Long, Edwin Arthur Elliott...] Long, Reginald Frederick...... Lopes, Arthur dos Anjos . Lopes, Carlos Augusto

Lopes, Dellano Pedro Jesus Lossius, Jacob Johan Loureiro, Eduardo José da

Silva

Lugebil, Vladimir

Lübring, Edward

Lurpsen, Hermann

Lyle, David

Lynam, Charles Edward

Lysaught, John Joseph.....

M

Maas, Martin Mortimore Macarthur, Neil

Macaskill, Kennett Roderick

Macauby, James Duncan

MacCrae, Donald

Macdonald, Alexander

Macdonald, Andrew

Macdonald, Donald

Macdougall, Robert Ernest Macgregor, Robert.... Macintyre, Henry Arthur Mackay, William Chase Mackenzie, Alexander

Mackenzie, David Roderick Mackie, Charles Gordon

Stewart

Mackintosh, Frederick

Alexander

Maher, Antonio Sebastião. Mahomed, Moosa Makeham, Charles. Makin, Henry Reginald... Manhoff, Charles Norman Mann, Frederick Randall Manners, John Manuk, Malcolm

Marshall, Walter Basil Martens, Robert. Martin, Friedrich

Martin, Frederick Eliott

Armstrong

Martin, James Mauricio, Evaristo.

Maxfield, Walter,

May, Ernest Alfred George May, George Howard

Mayes, Stanley Maurice McCaig, John

McCallum, Audrew Imrie.........

McCormack, John

McCorquodale, John

McCubbin, Jobn

McCubbin, John

McCullagh, William Douglas... McCulloch, William

Supdt. Engineer, Butterfield & Swire, Clerk, Sander, Wieler & Co., Foreman, Taikoo Dockyard.. Clerk, Vieira & Co...... Cashier, Oriental Brewery, La., Assistant, Dodwell & Co., Ld., Coal Merchant, &c.,. Clerk, S. J. David & Co., Clerk, E. D. Sassoon & Co., Assistant, Meyerink & Co.... Assistant, Butterfield & Swire, Stenographer, Standard Oil Co.,. Electrical Engineer, Clerk, Bank Line Ld., Clerk, P. M. S. S. Co., Clerk, Arnhold, Karberg & Co.,

On premises. Prince's Building. Quarry Bay.

25 Mosque Street. 30 Caine Road. On premises.

53 Connaught Road.

48 David's Buildings, Kowloon. 7 Barrow Terrace.

On premises.

1 Connaught Road.

4 Lyeemoon Villas, Kowloon. Electric Co.'s Works, Wanchai. 6 Barrow Terrace, Kowloon, 6 Barrow Terrace, Kowloon. 43 Elgin Street.

Assistant Superintendent, P. M. S. S. Co., St. George's House.

Chief Clerk, Rope Works,

Banker, Russo-Asiatic Bank,

Assistant, Sander, Wieler & Co...... Assistant, Melchers & Co., Foreman, Taikoo Dockyard,

Clerk & Stenographer, P. M. S. S. Co.,... Engineer, John Lysangbt & Son,

Assistant, Asiatic Petroleumn Co., Foreman, Taikoo Dockyard, Clerk, Dock Co.,

Chemist, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Engineer, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Clerk, Taikoo Dockyard,.....

Asst. Engineer, HK. Tramway Co. Ld., Engineer,

Assistant, Jardine Matheson & Co., Assistant, Butterfield & Swire,

Assistant, HK. & S'hai Bank,...

Assistant, Standard Oil Co., Assistant, Standard Oil Co.,

4 Belilios Terrace.

On premises.

Prince's Building.

On premises. Quarry Bay.

11 Humphreys' Avenue, 139 Wanchai Road.

Peak Hotel. Quarry Bay.

Kowloon Dock.

Quarry Bay.

Quarry Bay. Quarry Bay. 153 Wanchai Road, Braeside.

East Point.

1 Connaught Road.

On premises.

5 Carnarvon Road. 3 Rippon Terrace.

Assistant, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Ld., East Point.

Manager, Gibb, Livingston & Co.,

Assistant, Lane, Crawford & Co.,

Assistant, Sander, Wieler & Co.,

On premises.

On premises. Prince's Building.

Shipping Clerk, Douglas, Lapraik & Co., 16 Yee Woo Street.

Dairyman, Dairy Farm Co., Ld.,.. Assistant, Butterfield & Swire,

Accountant, Oriental Brewery, Ld., Assistant, P. & O. Co., Assistaut, Siemssen & Co., Accountant, Dairy Farm Co., Ld., Assistant, Butterfield & Swire,

Marine Supdt., Hamburg-Amerika Linie, Assistant, Carlowitz & Co.,.............

Storekeeper, Kowloon Docks, Draughtsman, Dock Co.,

Assistant, Wm. Powell, Ld.,

Merchant, MacEwen, Frickel & Co., Assistant, Dodwell & Co., Ld., Bookseller, Kelly & Walsh, Ld.,

Asst., British-American Tobacco Co., Ld., Assistant, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Ld., Foreman, Taikoo Dockyard, Clerk, Taikoo Dockyard,.... Sugar-Boiler, China Sugar Refinery, Employee, Taikoo Sugar Refinery,... Resident Engineer,

Assistant, HK. & S'hai Bank,

Pokfulam.

1 Connaught Road.

Grand Hotel.

11 Mountain View, Peak. On premises.

6 Morton Terrace.

1 Connaught Road. Queen's Building.

2 Connaught Road Central.

62 Haiphong Road. Kowloon Docks. Alexandra Building. 4 Des Voeux Road. On premises. Station Hotel.

11A Conduit Road.

On premises.

|

Quarry Bay.

Quarry Bay. East Point. Quarry Bay. Gas Works.

On premises.

Sub-Acct., Chartered Bank of I. A. & C., Queen's Road.

}

NAME IN FULL.

14

OCCUPATION.

ABODE.

M-Continued.

McDougall, Alexander ... McHugh, Frank Edward McHutchon, James Maitland McIntosh, Alexander Forsyth. McIntyre, John McIntyre, Wilson

McKay, Charles

McKay, William

MeKindy, Archibald

McLeod, John

McNeill, Duncan

McNeillie, David

MeNulty, Edmund Joseph Mead, James Henry Meester, Titus de

Mehta, Byramjee Kaikhusbroo Mellis, George Meyer, Carl

Meyer, Carl Martin Meyer, Oscar

Michael, Sassoon Hai Mickle, Danby Minor Middletou, George Simpson Millar, Andrew William Millar, Edmund Reid...... Millard, William Harold Miller, George Alexander Miller, John Findlay.... Miller, Robert Kennedy Milroy, Anthony Alex. Heron Miskin, Geoffrey Mistry, Kursbedjee Dbanjee-

bhoy....

Mitchelmorl, Ernest Vernon... Monk, Albert Victor

Moodie, Frederick Archibald Moon, Henry William Mooney, Charles

Mooney, William Glover

Morrison, Kenneth Sinclair Morse, Herbert John .... Muhle, Heinrich Ludwig Muir, John Greig

Mulder, Jan Dirk Frederik Müller, Carl Otto Muller, George Murdoch, Arthur

Murphy, Charles Henry Murphy, Thomas Murray, James Smith

Murray, Malcolm Mclean Murray, Patrick Henry Musso, Salvador...

N

Mercantile Assistant, H. Skott & Co., Chief Accountant, Standard Oil Co., Assistant, Butterfield & Swire, Foreman, Taikoo Dockyard, Foreman, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Assistant, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Timekeeper, Taikoo Dockyard, Loftman, Taikoo Dockyard,.... Assistant, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Foreman, Taikoo Dockyard, Boiler Maker, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Foreman, Taikoo Dockyard, Assistant, Arnhold, Karberg & Co., Bookseller, Kelly & Walsh, Ld................ Assistant, Java-China-Japan Lijn,.. | Clerk, E. D. Sassoon & Co.,

Jeweller, Geo. Falconer & Co., Ld., Assistant, Heuser Eberius & Co., Assistant, Deutsch-Asiatische Bank, Assistant, Melchers & Co., Merchaut, J. R. Michael & Co., Assistant, Standard Oil Co., Sub.-Acct., International Bank, Timekeeper, Taikoo Dockyard, Assistant, A. S. Watson & Co., Tuner, Robinson Piano Co., Foreman, Taikoo Dockyard, Engineer, Bradley & Co., Sugar Boiler, China Sugar Refinery, Superintendent, Sailors' Home, Assistant, Gilman & Co.,......

Naninga, Pieter Willem Leonard Neave, Thomas Neidt, Arthur Carl Wilhelm... Neilson, Donald McLaren

Nellner, Hartwig

Nelson, Charles Cowley

Nicholls, Willia

Nicholsou, William

Nicol, Alexander

Nielson, Jens

Assistant, Arndt & Co., Manager, Whiteway & Laidlaw, Assistant, Butterfield & Swire, Clerk, Taikoo Dockyard,.

h

10 Des Voeux Road. 1 Bowen Road. 1 Connaught Road. Quarry Bay.

Quarry Bay.

3 Sea View Terrace, Quarry Bay. Quarry Bay.

Quarry Bay.

Quarry Bay.

Quarry Bay. Quarry Bay. Quarry Bay. Kingsclere.

3 Carnarvon Road, Kowloon. York Building.

41 Wyndham Street. 10 Kennedy Road. German Club.

9 Garden Road. Queen's Building. 1 Prince's Building. Hotel Mansions. 151 Magazine Gap. Quarry Bay.

1 Gomes Villas, Kowloon.

Wyndham Hotel.

Quarry Bay.

On premises.

East Point.

Ou premises.

Des Voeux Road Central.

34 Queen's Road Central.

Hongkong Hotel,

1 Connaught Road. Quarry Bay.

Assistant, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Ld., East Point.

Secretary, HK. Hotel,

Clerk, Palmer & Turner, Assistant, Bradley & Co.,

Chief Accountant, Standard Oil Co., Assistant, Siemssen & Co.,

Assistant, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Book-keeper, MacEwen, Frickel & Co.,... Assistant, Carlowitz & Co.,..... Assistant, Java-China-Japan Lijn,... Assistant, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Ld., Foreman, Taikoo Dockyard, Assistant, Holt's Wharf.

Engineer, G. I. Cement Co., Ld., Hok-ün

Cement Works,

Assistant, Butterfield & Swire,

4 Lower Mosque Terrace.

On premises.

On premises.

Hotel Mansions.

Queen's Building.

Quarry Bay.

48 Nathan Road, Kowloon.

15 Knutsford Terrace, Kowloon. On premises. East Point. Quarry Bay.

Holt's Wharf, Kowloon

On premises.

1 Connaught Road.

Marine Engineer, Asiatic Petroleum Co., Shankiwan Road. Marine Engineer, Bradley & Co.,

Asst., Neth.-India Commercial Bank, Superintendent Engineer, Dock Co., Assistant, Wm. Meyerink & Co., Foreman Boiler Maker, Dock Co., Merchant, Garrels, Börner & Co., Foreman, Taikoo Dockyard, Clerk, Dock Co.,

Assistant, Butterfield & Swire, Engineer, Taikoo Sugar Refinery,

Assistant Supdt., Norddeutscher Lloyd,...

Northcombe, Francis Daniel... Assistant, Butterfield & Swire,

Ou premises.

On premises. Kowloon Docks. On premises. Kowloon Docks. 8 Queen's Garden. Quarry Bay. Kowloon Docks.

1 Connaught Road. Quarry Bay.

3 Patell Vilias.

1 Connaught Road.

}

O

Obrembski, Marion von.

O'Brien, Morris

Oliphant, Tom

Oliver, Peter

Chemist, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Timekeeper, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Assistant, Dairy Farm Co., Ld.,.... Moulder, Kowloon Docks,

Quarry Bay. Quarry Bay.

Pokfulam.

Kowloon Docks.

2

NAME IN FULL.

15

OCCUPATION.

ABODE.

●~Continued.

Olson, Charles William Olson, John

Oram-Sheppard, John

Orchard, Ernest Frank Gordon Ormston, Francis Raymond Osborne, John......

Osmund, Arthur Frederick Osmund, Cesar Henry Osmund, Ernest Edgar Osmund, George Vincent Osmund, James Daniel Owen, James Colin Owen, Owen Elias..... Oxberry, James Henry Ozorio, Eurico Maria... Ozorio, José Graça

...

Ozorio, Leopoldo Augusto......

P

Page, Harry William.......

Paine, Albert E..... Palmer, Henry Paterson, John...

Paysen, Wilhelm Peacock, John Pearce, Harold

Pearce, Thomas Ernest.. Pearson, John Henry... Peel, Charles Alfred Peet, James William Pereira, Carlos José Maria Perrie, Robert Peters, William. Petley, Harold Wallace... Phillips, Reginald Philip Piens, Charles...... Piercy, Richard Smailes Pintos, Cecilio Paulo...

Plage, Philip

Pol, Gerrit Hendrik van den Polley, John David

Pollock, Archibald Bar

Prestage, John Thomas..

Prien, Peter Georg Friedrich Pringle, William Jr.

Pryce, Charles

·

Pumfrett, Arthur John Powys Purcell, William Harris.... Purvis, David Aitchison Pye, Edmund Burns

Assistant, Thoresen & Co.,

Nathan Road,

Kowloon.

Building Contractor, C. E. Warren & Co., 30 Des Voeux Road Central. Assistant, P. M. S. S. Co.,

| Assistant, Lane, Crawford & Co.,

Assistant, HK. & S'hai Bank, Engine Driver, Tramway Co.,...

Assistant, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Ld., Assistant, Shewan, Tomes & Co., Assistant, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Ld., Assistant, Deutsch-Asiatische Bank, Clerk, China Sugar Refinery, . Assistant, Dock Co.,

Proprietor, Grand Carlton Hotel, General Assistant, H. Price & Co., Ltd.,.] Clerk, Chartered Bank of I. A. & C., Clerk, Percy Smith, Seth & Fleming, Clerk, HK. & S'hai Bank,

Assistant, Dairy Farm Co., Ld.,

Manager, Moutrie & Co., Ld.,... Spinning Master, Cotton Mills, Layton & Co.,

Assistant, Reuter, Brokelmann & Co.,.............. Assistant, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Assistant, Reiss & Co.,

Merchant, J. D. Hutchison & Co.,.... Manager, Robinson Piano Co., Ld., Mercantile Assistant, Dodwell & Co.,... Assistant, Horse Repository,

Clerk, Caldbeck, MacGregor & Co., Assistant, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Timekeeper, ..... Electrical Engineer,

Assistant, A. S. Watson & Co., Ld., Assistaut, Siemssen & Co.,

Assistant, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Ld.,. Assistant, Holland China Trading Co., Sugar Boiler, China Sugar Refinery, Assistant, Holland China Trading Co., Foreman, Taikoo Dockyard,

Sub-Acct., Chartered Bank of I. A. & C., Clerk, HK. & S'hai Bank, Merchant,

Assistant, Asiatic Petroleum Co., Clerk, Canadian Pacific Railway Co., Assistant, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Ld., Accountant, Kelly & Walsh, Ld., Foreman Engineer,

Assistant, Butterfield & Swire,

2 Queen's Garden, Peak Road.

On premises.

On premises.

38 Queen's Road East. 16 Belilios Terrace. 15 Belilios Terrace. 16 Belilios Terrace

7 Queen's Road Central.

6 Rednaxella Terrace. Kowloon Docks.

On premises.

12 Queen's Road Central.

5 Rednaxella Terrace.

58 Peel Street.

On premises.

Dairy Farm Depôt, 10 Nathan Road.

Kowloon.

Moutrie & Co. On premises.

1 Prince's Building. Chatham Road.

3 Lyemoon Terrace, Quarry Bay. Reiss & Co.

8 Queen's Road, Central. Hongkong Hotel.

Eden Hall, Lyttleton Road West. Causeway Bay.

50 Peel Street.

1 Lyemoon Terrace, Quarry Bay. Kowloon Dock.

Electric Light Works Mess. Hongkong Dispensary.

13 Nathan Road, Kowloon. Diocesan School.

20 Elgin Street. Bowrington. Observatory Villas. Quarry Bay. Queen's Road.

On premises.

Hongkong Hotel Buildings. Kowloon Hotal.

5 Park View.

East Point.

Sharp Building, Kowloon, Kowloon Docks.

On premises.

Q

Quinn, John

Steward, Hongkong Club,

On premises.

R

Rafeck, Mahomed

Railton, Normau.

Ram, Harry

Ramsay, Joseph Marshall. Ramsay, Thomas

Rapp, Fritz....

Rapp, Gustav..

Rapp, Herman Rass, David Maclean Raven, Arthur Robert Fenton. Ray, Edward Henry Raymond, Edward Benjamin. Raymoud, Ellis Benjamin... Razack, Moosa Abdool

Clerk, Osaka Shosen Kaisha, Harbour Runner, Oriental Brewery Ld., Assistant, John Lemm, Architect, Foreman Shipbuilder, Dock Co.,.............. Ship Draughtsman, Bailey & Co., Assistant, A. S. Watson & Co., Ld., Clerk, J. D. Humphreys & Son, Assistant, A. S. Watson & Co., Ld., Assistant, HK. & S'hai Bank. Architect, Weaser & Raven, Broker, St. George's Building, Clerk, E. D. Sassoon & Co., Clerk, E. D. Sassoon & Co., General Broker,

On premises.

Carnarvon Villas.

3 Wa In Foag Street. Kowloon Docks. Ormsby Villas, Kowloon. Alexandra Building.

4 East Avenue, Kowloon. On premises.

On premises. 53 Robinson Road. Hongkong Hotel.

5 Victoria View, Kowloon. 5 Victoria View, Kowloon. 18A Stanley Street.

NAME IN FULL.

16

OCCUPATION.

ABODE.

R-Continued.

Reeves, Henry Reichmann, Frederick Reid, James

Reid, John Findlay Reis, Archibald Herbert Relton, Trevor Lyons Remedios, Carlos Augusto dos. Remedios, Carlos Bartholomeo

dos.

Remedios, Carlos Eugenio dos. Remedios, Carlos Maria Placé

dos

Remedios, Hermillo Hermi-

gildo dos

Remedios, Jorge Maria Ozorio

dos

Remedios, José Julita dos Remedios, José Maria

Vanderberg

Remedios, Maximiano

Antonio dos

Remedios, Paulo Maria Remedios, Romualdo Jacob dos Remedios, Vasco Luiz dos......] Ribeiro, Carlos de Monte

Carmelo Vieira. Ribeiro, Fernando Alfredo

Vieira.

Ribeiro, Francisco Xavier

Vieira

Ribeiro, Francisco Xavier

Vieira, Jr.

Ribeiro, João Chrysostomo

Vieira

Assistant, Lane, Crawford & Co., Proprietor, Grand Hotel,... General Manager, Taikoo Dockyard, Marine Engineer, W. C. Jack& Co., Assistant, HK. & S'hai Bank,. Assistant, Butterfield & Swire, Assistant, Lane, Crawford & Co.,

Assistant, Garrels, Börner & Co., Head Clerk, Russo-Asiatic Bank,

Clerk, Netherlands Trading Society,

Clerk, Russo-Asiatic Bank,.............

Clerk, Mercantile Bank of India, Clerk, HK. & S'hai Bank,

Assistant, Dock Co.,

On premises.

Queen's Road Central. Quarry Bay. Alexandra Buildings. On premises.

1 Connaught Road. On premises.

Club Lusitano. Prince's Building.

Queen's Road.

Prince's Building.

65 Caine Road. On premises.

4 Belilios Terrace.

Queen's Building.

12 Humphreys' Avenue. 2 Woodland Terrace.

Assistant, Melchers & Co., Bookkeeper, Bume & Reif, Clerk, Mercantile Bank of India, Clerk, Union Ince. Socty. of Canton, Ld., On premises.

Assistant, Standard Oil Co.,

Assistant, Norddeutscher Lloyd,.

Clerk, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Ld.,

Clerk, HK. & S'hai Bank,

Clerk, HK. & S'hai Bank,

Ribeiro, Jorge Alberto Vieira... Ribeiro, José Antonio da

Assistant, Melchers & Co.,

Assistant, Melchers & Co.,

Costa Vieira

Ribeiro, Julio da Costa Vieira Ribeiro, Oscar Francisco

Ribeiro, Venceslau Francisco

Vieira

....

Assistant, D. Sassoon & Co., Ld.. Assistant, China Export, Import & Bank

Compagnie,

Assistant, W. G. Humphreys & Co.,

Richardson, Hedley Thomas... Superintendent Engineer, Canadian Paci-

Riecken, Julius

Riegen, Johannes von Ritchie, Alfred Alexander Ritchie, Archibald........

Roberts, Charles........ Roberts, John Cookman Robertson, John Robinson, William

Robson, John James

Robson, Thomas Ernest

Stanley

Roby, Ernest

Rocha, Alvaro Gustavo da

Rocha, Antonio José da Cruz Rocha, Isaias da...... Rocha, João Maria da

Rocha, Vicente Caetano da Rodger, John

Rodger, Robert Kerr Rodrigues, Carlos Augusto Rodrigues, Louis Gonzales Roker, George William Rose, Christian

Heinrich

Georg

Rose, Guy Septimus

Rose, Louis Augustus

Rosemann, Carl

Ross, John

fic Railway Co.,

Merchant, Jebsen & Co.,

Supt. Engineer, Norddeutscher Lloyd, Sub.-Acct., Chartered Bank of I. A. & C., Supt., United Asbestos Oriental Agency

Ld.,

Foreman, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Assistant, HK. & S'hai Bank,.

Accountant, Dock Co.,

Assistant, P. & O. Co.,

Engineer, Dock Co.,...

Assistant Dockyard Manager, Assistant, Taikoo Sugar Refinery,

Assistant, Caldbeck, MacGregor & Co.,... Assistant, Siemssen & Co., Clerk, Bradley & Co.,.. Clerk, Wm. Meyerink & Co., Clerk, Carlowitz & Co.,

Sugar Boiler, China Sugar Refinery, Assistant, Butterfield & Swire, Assistant, HK. & S'hai Bank,.. Clerk, Russo-Asiatic Bank, Foreman, Taikoo Dockyard,

Assistant, Melchers & Co., Foreman, Taikoo Dockyard, Architect, Engineer, Bume & Reif, Engineer, Bailey & Co.,

4 Chancery Lane.

Mosque Street.

Des Voeux Road.

On premises.

12 Mosque Street. Queen's Building.

Queen's Building.

4 Chancery Lane.

45 Wyndham Street.

Queen's Road Central.

3 Canton Villas, Kowloon. No. 7 Queen's Garden.

1 Bay View House, Kowloon. Queen's Road.

Craigieburn, Peak. Quarry Bay.

On premises.

Kowloon Docks.

Ashley Road, Kowloon. Kowloon Docks.

Quarry Bay.

Quarry Bay.

7 Belilios Terrace.

On premises.

4 Queen's Building.

Prince's Building.

25 Caine Road. 129 Praya East. 1 Connaught Road. 10 Arbuthnot Road. Prince's Building. Quarry Bay.

Queen's Building. Quarry Bay.

37 Queen's Road Central.

4 Ormsby Villas.

63 Kowloon City Road.

1

}

NAME IN FULL.

17

OCCUPATION.

Abode.

R-Continued.

Ross, Walter

Rouse, Athol Bernard

Rowan, Robert Thomas Rowe, Oswald Stanhope

Benbow

Rowoldt, Bernhard Auton

Freidrich. Roylance, George

Roza, Calixto Baptista da.. Roza, Daniel da

Roza, Edmundo Duarte da Roza, Fernando Lima da Roza, Gregorio Francisco da... Rozario, Alvaro Francisco

Bellundo

Rozario, Eduardo Maria Rozario, Orlando Francisco Rudow, George Rumjahn, Dawood

Ruttonjee, Jehangir Hormusjee

S

Samy, Arthur Poonoo Sargon, Ellis

Saunders, William Henry Sayce, Kelly

Schafer, Otto

Schlüter, Carl........

Schmidt, Heinrich Gerhard

Johann Schoenberr, Hans Schultz, Johann Anton. Scott, Harry Hodge Scott, John Byron... Scott, Thomas Liddell Scriven, Henry Ernest

Seath, William Petrie Seidel, Arthur....

Sequeira, Gumelsindo Jesus Sequeira, Fedro Nolasco Seth, Enos......

Seth, Harold

Seth, John Hennessey

Shand, Thomas Shaw, James Totten Shepherd, Edgar Bruce.....

Shewan, William Thomson Shields, Andrew Lusk Shorey, Arthur Carlton.... Shroff, Framroze Pestonjee Sibley, James Clarence Silas, Charles David Silas, David Hai....... Silva, Arnaldo Heitor da Silva, Arthur Emilio da Silva, Arthur Luiz.... Silva, Augusto Cesar da Silva, Francisco Britto da.. Silva, Francisco Filomeno

Eça da

Silva, Heurique Mario Silva, Mario Emilio da Silva, Porphyrio Maria

Nolasco da

Silva-Netto, Antonio Ferreira

Batalha

Simpson, Andrew

Simpson, James

Assistant, HK. & S'hai Bank,

On premises.

Asst., Union Ince. Socty. of Cauton, Ld., On premises. Tailor's Cutter,

Assistant, Shewan, Tomes & Co.,

Clerk, Wendt & Co.,

Brakeman, Peak Tramway Co., Clerk, Chartered Bank of I. A. & C., Assistant, HK. & S'hai Bank,.... Clerk, Chamber of Commerce, Clerk, Wm. Meyerink & Co., Clerk, Chartered Bank of I. A. & C.,

Clerk, Chartered Bank of I. A. & C., Assistant, Asiatic Petroleum Co., Assistant, Deutsch-Asiatische Bank, Runner, Hongkong Hotel, Clerk,

Merchant, H. Ruttonjee & Son,

Architect, John Lemm,

Assistant, D. Sassoon & Co., Ld., Foreman, Taikoo Dockyard, Tobacconist,

Merchant, Ulderup & Schlüter, Merchant, Ulderup & Schlüter,

Assistant, Hamburg-Amerika Linie, Assistant, Carlowitz & Co., . Assistant, Garrels, Börner & Co., Draughtsman, Dock Co.,

Assistant, A. S. Watson & Co., Ld., Foreman, Taikoo Dockyard,

Furnishing Salesman, Lane, Crawford

& Co.,

Foreman, Taikoo Sugar Refinery,

Assistant, Siemssen & Co.,

Manager, A. R. Marty,... Assistant, Standard Oil Co.,

Secretary, Humphreys Estate & Finance

Co., Ld..

Commission Agent,

Acct., &c., Percy Smith, Seth & Fleming, Engineer, Taikoo Sugar Refinery,

Tailor,

Asst., HK. Land Investment & Agency

Co., Lử.,

Merchant,

Assistant, Shewan, Tomes & Co., Sub-Acct., International Bauk, Clerk, S. J. David & Co.,

Assistant, Asiatic Petroleum Co., Assistant, Dock Co.,

Assistant, D. Sassoon & Co., Ld., Clerk, Linstead & Davis,. Clerk, Cruz, Basto & Co.,

Clerk, Chartered Bank of I. A. & C.,

Clerk, North China Insurance Co., Ld.,... Clerk, HK. & S'hai Bank,

Clerk, D. Sassoon & Co., Ld.,

Clerk, Chartered Bank of I. A. & C., Assistant, Deutsch-Asiatische Bank,

Printer, Guedes & Co.,......................

Manager, Jorge & Co., Shipbuilder, Dock Co., Foreman, Taikoo Dockyard,

...

Lane, Crawford & Co.

Peak Road.

25 Conduit Road. Peak Station.

72 Caine Road.

9 Granville Road, Kowloon. 16 Belilios Terrace.

On premises.

72 Caine Road.

5 Rednaxella Terrace. 17 Mosque Street. 17 Mosque Street. Hongkong Hotel.

Co. H. Price & Co., Ld. Queen's Road Central.

28 Bonham Road. 13 College Chambers. Quarry Bay.

14 Beaconsfield Arcade. 21 Connaught Road.

21 Connaught Road Central.

On premises.

2 Praya Central.

Kimberley Road, Kowloon. Kowloon Docks. Glenthorne, Kowloon. Quarry Bay.

On premises. Quarry Bay.

Station Hotel, Kowloon. 6 Mosque Terrace. 9 Salisbury Avenue.

Norman Cottage, Peak Road. Norman Cottage, Peak Road. Norman Cottage, Peak Road. Quarry Bay.

11A Conduit Road.

26 Nathan Road, Kowloon. 4 Robinson Road.

Kingsclere.

10 Kennedy Road.

11 Humphreys' Avenue, Kowloon. Hongkong Hotel.

College Chambers.

Edgehill, 64 The Peak.

38 Caine Road.

38 Caine Road.

8 Punjab Building, Kowloon.

15 Mosque Junction.

1 Victoria View, Kowloon.

23 Belilios Terrace.

15 Belilios Terrace. 25 Caine Road.

4 Seymour Terrace.

53 Wyndham Street. Kowloon Docks. Quarry Bay.

NAME IN FULL.

18

OCCUPATION.

ABODE.

S-Continued.

Sinclair, Angus

Skött, Christian

Skött, Hans

Sloan, James :.

Smirke, James Frederic..... Smith, Alexander McTurk Smith, Andrew

Smith, Arthur William Smith, Eric Grant.

Smith, Francis Harland.

Smith, George Morton

Smith, Horace Percy Smith, James

Smyth, Frank..

Soares, Adão Maria de

Lourdes

Engineer, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Ld., Peak Hotel. Assistant, Skött & Co.,

Merchant, Skött & Co.,

Foreman, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Brakesman, Peak Tramway Co., Draughtsman, Taikoo Dockyard,. Storeman, Taikoo Dockyard, Assistant, Alex. Ross & Co., Assistant, Dodwell & Co., Ld., Clerk, Dock Co.,

Assistant, Dodwell & Co., Ld.,

Chtd. Acet., Percy Smith, Seth & Fleming, Clerk, Dock Co.,

Broker, Vernon & Smyth,

Merchant, Soares & Co.,

Soares, Carlos Marcus Salette Assistant, Barretto & Co.,

Soares, Francisco

Soares, Francisco Paulo de

Vasconcellos

Soares, Vicente Ferrer Soffietti, Paul

Solomon, Herbert Henry Somekh, Solomon David Soonderam, Ramasamy Sorby, Vincent Dare Sorensen, Aone Schon Soutar, Francis

Souza, Duarte Eleuterio

Maria de

Souza, Francisco Maria

Xavier de

Souza, José Thomas de...... Souza, Viriato Bonifacio de Spittles, Benjamin James Squair, Alexander Cook Stanford, Bernard Arthur Stark, Charles Crawford Steele, John

Stein, Alexis Low

Steinhoff, Ferdinand Julius Stevenson, Allan Stewart, Charles Stewart, George Edward Stewart, John Wemyss Stewart, Robert Dougherty... Stewart, William

Stewart, William Herbert. Stone, Paul Emil Fredrick Störmer, Willy Bruno Storrie, Alexander Potter Strafford, Cecil

Stubbings, John James... Stubbs, Robert Isaac.. Stujfbergen, Petrus Suffiad, Abdul Gaffoor Suffiad, Abdul Majid. Sullivan, Charles Daniel Summers, Edwin Henry Spark

Sutherland, Percy Duffus Sutherland, William Munro

T

Taggart, James Harper... Tang Chee

Tarrant, John Arthur Tata, Eruch Kaikaoos

Tata, Fariborze Kaikaoos Tavares, José Maria Placé Taylor, Henry Herbert Taylor, John

Assistant, HK. & S'hai Bank,...

Clerk, P. & O. S. N. Co., Clerk, Reuter, Bröckelmann & Co., Commission Agent, Soffietti & Co., Chief Clerk, P. M. S. S. Co., Assistant, D. Sassoon & Co., Ld., Counter Clerk, Hongkong Hotel,

10 Des Voeux Road. 10 Des Vœux Road. Quarry Bay.

Peak Tramway Station. Quarry Bay. Quarry Bay. Alexandra Building. On premises.

Kowloon Docks.

On premises.

The Summer House, 67 The Peak. Kowloon Docks. Hongkong Club.

Bemfica, Robinson Road. 21 Belilios Terrace.

51 Haiphong Road, Kowloon.

Caine Road. Mosque Junction.

14 Des Voeux Road Central. Hongkong Hotel. Lock Hing Buildings. On premises.

Electrical Engineer, HK. Electric Co., Ld.. Electric Co.'s Works, Wanchai.

Manager, Thoresen & Co.,

Clerk, Taikoo Dockyard,.

Assistant, Dodwell & Co., Ld.,

Book-keeper, Messageries Maritimes,.. Clerk, Reuter, Bröckelmann & Co.,.... Assistant, Wm. Meyerink & Co.,................ Assistant, A. S. Watson & Co., Ld., Assistant, Dock Co.,..................... Assistant, Lane, Crawford & Co.,. Accountant, Vacuum Oil Co.,..... Foreman, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Manager, Sun Life Assce. Co. of Canada, Assistant, Melchers & Co., Assistant Manager, Dairy Farm Co., Ld., Sub-Acct., International Bank, Assistant, Butterfield & Swire......... Chief Clerk, China Sugar Refinery,. Sub-Manager, Bank Line Ld.... Foreman Sawver,

Assistant, HK. & S'hai Bank, Clerk, Dock Co.,

Assistant, Melchers & Co., Assistant, Wm. Powell, Ld., Foreman, Taikoo Dockyard, Electrical Engineer, HK. Electric Co., Ld., Storekeeper, Dock Co.,

Assistant, Holland China Trading Co.,.... Clerk, Chartered Bank of I. A. & C.,............. Clerk, Chartered Bank of I. A. & C.,.............. Assistant, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Storekeeper, HK. & K. W. & Godown

Co., Lử.,

Assistant, Canadian Pacific Railway Co., Assistant, HK. & S'hai Bank,

Manager, Hongkong Hotel, Commission Agent,

Secretary, A. S. Watson & Co., Ld., Assistant, F. K. Tata, Commission Agent,

Assistant, Alex. Ross & Co.,

Assistant, Shewan, Tomes & Co., Manager, China Express Co.,

126 Peak.

Quarry Bay.

Queen's Building.

Queen's Building.

5 Punjab Building, Kowloon. 3 Barrow Terrace, Kowloon. Hongkong Hotel. Kowloon Docks. Ou premises. King's Building. Quarry Bay. On premises. Queen's Building. Pokfulam.

151 Magazine Gap. 1 Connaught Road. East Point. Kingsclere. Kowloon Docks. On premises. Kowloon Docks. Queen's Building. On premises. Quarry Bay.

Tesla, HK. Electric Co., Ld. Kowloon Docks. On premises.

14 Leighton Hill Road. 14 Leighton Hill Road. Quarry Bay.

6 Ashley Road, Kowloon. 4 The Albany. On premises.

On premises.

14 Des Voeux Road Central.

1 Canton Villas, Kowloon.

4 Queen's Building.

4 Queen's Building.

4 Caine Road.

1 Humphreys' Avenue, Kowloon.

6 Queen's Garden.

1

:

A

NAME IN FULL.

19

OCCUPATION.

ABODE.

T-Continued.

Taylor, John Kennedy Taylor, John William Taylor, William

Taylor, William

Tebb, Lewthwaite Dewar Temperley, Alfred

Tennent, Thomas Bertram

Greig

Thiel, Eugene Heinrich. Thom, William.......... Thomas, Francis Henry Thomas, John........ Thomas, Harry Philip Thomas, Paul.... Thompson, Frank

Thompson, Walter Hayton

Thomson, John Brendon Thursfield, Reginald Proud Tibbs, William Evan Tollan, Duncan

Toppin, Junies

Townend, Lawrence Francis...

Towns, George Ernest.... Tucker, Alfred

Tulip, Wilfred

Tully, John

Turner, Isaac

Foreman, Taikoo Dockyard, Broker, Moxon & Taylor,

Chemist, China Sugar Refinery,

Pattern Maker,

Quarry Bay. Hongkong Club. East Point.

Kowloon Docks.

Assistant, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Ld., 13 Macdonnell Road. Assistant, Shewau, Tomes & Co.,

20 Nathan Road, Kowloon.

Assistant, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Ld., 17 Belilios Terrace. Assistant, F. Blackhead & Co.,

Assistant, Denison, Ram & Gibbs,

Clerk, HK. & S'bai Bank,

Foreman, Taikoo Dockyard,

25 Conduit Road.

3 Duddell Street,

On premises. Quarry Bay.

Assistant, Canadian Pacific Railway Co., Room 11, Hotel Mansions.

Agent, Messageries Maritimes, Barman, Hongkong Hotel,

Assistant, British American Tobacco Co.,

Ld.,

Engineer, Carmichael & Clarke, Assistant, HK. & S'hai Bank,. Assistant, Thos. Cook & Son,..

Electrical Engineer, China and Japan

Telephone Co.,

Assistant, Shewan, Tomes & Co.,

Peak Hotel.

On premises.

40 Hollywood Road. Braeside.

On premises.

54 Nathan Road, Kowloon.

7 Morrison Hill Gap Road.

7 Lochiel Terrace, Kowloon.

On premises.

Clerk, Union Ince. Society of Canton, Ld., Queen's Building. Assistant, HK. & S'hai Bank, Brakesman, Peak Tramway Co.,. Draughtsman, Dock Co., Engineer, Macdonald & Co., Head Watchman, Dock Co.,

12 Queen's Road East. Kowloon Docks. 3 Kimberley Villas. Kowloon Docks.

U

Ufford, Charles Francis Jean

Quarles van.. Uldall, Sofus Vilhelm August Ulderup, Johannes Umrigar, Hormosji Bursetji... Underwood, Joseph Harry Uschmann, Alberct Robert

V

Vandenberg, Francisco Valeriano.....

Veenendaal, Everardus

Johannes....

Victor, John Thomé Vieira, José Maria........

Vierich, Gustav Julius Adolf

Arthur....

Vollbrecht, Ernst Oscar

Rudolph

W

Waddell, Charles Hugh Wagner, Otto... Waldron, James

Walker, Charles Nigel Gordon Walker, Frederick Glover........ Walker, James

Walkinshaw, Arthur William

Wellesley Wanlers, Heinrich Ward, Arthur Victor. Warnes, Charles Aspinall Warren, Charles Edward Wasserfall, Heinrich Waterhouse, Wilfred Waterman, Emil Joseph

Watson, Howell Lake Weall, Thomas Graham.

Assistant, Java-China-Japan Lijn, Manager, G. 1. Cement Co., Ld., Engineer,

Clerk, S. J. David & Co., Chemist, China Sugar Refinery, Godown Keeper, Norddeutscher Lloyd,

Assistant, Reiss & Co.,

Assistant, Netherlandsche Handel

Maatschappij,..........

Assistant, HK. & S’hai Bank, Merchant, Vieira & Co.,

Assistant, Melchers & Co.,

Merchant, MacEwen, Frickel & Co.,

Accountant, Mercantile Bank of India, Watchmaker, Gaupp & Co., Clerk, Taikoo Dockyard, Clerk, Gilman & Co., Assistant, HK. & S'hai Bank, Manager, Dairy Farm Co., Ld.,

Assistant, HK. & S'hai Bank, Asst. Inspector, Norddeutscher Lloyd, Clerk, W. C. Jack & Co., Id., Assistant, Lane, Crawford & Co., Contractor, &c., C. E. Warren & Co.,.............. Assistant, Deutsch-Asiatische Bank, Assistant, Dodwell & Co., Ld., Receiver and Manager, Oriental Brewery

Co., Ld.,

Manager, Asiatic Petroleum Co., Assistant, Dodwell & Co., Ld.g

York Building. Hok Ün.

21 Connaught Road. 51 Pottinger Street. 18B Macdonnell Road. Station Hotel.

23 Caine Road.

King Edward Hotel. 175 Wanchai Road. 9 Mosque Terrace.

2 Queen's Building.

4 Des Voeux Road.

4 Morison Hill, Magazine Gap. Quarry Bay. Peak Hotel. On premises.

Sassoon's Villa, Pokfulam.

On premises.

3 Ormsby Terrace. 2 Naval Terrace. On premises.

30 Des Voeux Road Central, 9 Garden Road. On premises.

Hongkong Hotel, 108A The Peak. On premises.

NAME IN FULL.

20

OCCUPATION.

ABODE.

W-Continued.

Wenser, William Lionel Wreford Architect, Weaser and Raven,

Webb, Bertram

Webb, Henry Montague

Wedgewood, O.

Weill, Albert

Weir, John

Weir,

Walter

Wells, Michael John West, Peter Joseph Westerburger, Charles Adol-

phe Henri Westphal, Hans Julius White, Edmund William White, Harry l'Hommedien White, Hedley Graham...... Whiteley, William ... Whyte, Lionel Mountstuart Wiesinger, Otto Christoph

Georg Carl

Wilkie, John

Wilkie, Percival William Aldred............................

Wilkinson, William James Williams, Ernest Alfred

Mountfort

Williams, Stanley Wilson, George Leopold Wilson, Gordon Harold.... Wilson, John

Wilton, Richard James Winter, Adalbert Christian

Elimar

Wolf, George Morton Dudley

David

Wong, John Chun Wong, Joseph Mowlam.. Wong, Tape Benjamin..... Wontinan, Martinus Hendrik Wood, Gerald George Wood. Robert Bryden Woon, Harry Vernon.. Worcester, William Gilbert

Gray

Worth, Thomas George.. Worth, William Henry Wotherspoon, William

Wynne, Hugh Smith Wynyard, Frederick William

X

Xavier, Antonio Francisco de. Xavier, Francisco Miguel...... Xavier, José Maria do Rosario Xavier, José Paulino..... Xavier, Pedro Nolasco

Y

Yeadell, Stanley Preston Yost, Emil Hugo Young, Charles Nichols Young, David

Young, David Hill

Young, Jesse Ashton...... Yvanovich, Jr., Guilherme

Antonio

Assistant, Arnhold, Karberg & Co., Assistant, Butterfield & Swire,

Asst. Engineer, Green Island Cement Co., Manager, Levy Hermanos, Draughtsman, Taikoo Dockyard, Clerk, Taikoo Dockyard, Clerk, Taikoo Dockyard,... Piano Tuner, S. Moutrie & Co.,

Assistant, Arnhold, Karberg & Co., Assistant, Arnhold, Karberg & Co., Assistant, Win. Powell, Ld., Head Book-keeper, P. M. S. S. Co., Manager, Connell Bros., Clerk, Dock Co.,

Sub-Accountant, International Bank,.............

Asst., China Export, Import & Bank Cie., Engineer & Contractor, Macdonald & Co.,

Assistant, Butterfield & Swire, Overseer, HK. Land Invest. Co., Ld.,

Accountant, Lowe, Bingham & Matthews, Accountant, International Bauk,........ Architect, Palmer and Turner, Managing Partner, Robertson & Wilson, Assistant, F. Blackhead & Co., Chief Assistant, Hongkong Tramway Co.,

Assistant, Melchers & Co.,

Assistant, Asiatic Petroleum Co., Assistant, A. S. Watson & Co., Clerk, J. D. Humphreys and Son, Agent, China Mutual Life Ince. Co., Ld., Netherlands Trading Society, Civil Engineer, Leigh and Orange,. Manager, Steam Laundry Co.,. Storekeeper, Taikoo Dockyard,

Broker, Prince's Building, Foreman, Taikoo Dockyard, Foreman, Taikoo Dockyard, Clerk, Taikoo Dockyard,.... Foreman Carpenter, Dock Co., Watchman, Taikoo Dockyard,

Clerk, Goddard & Douglas, Assistant, Arnhold, Karberg & Co., Clerk, Kuhn & Komor,

Clerk, Chartered Bank of I. A. & C.,.............. Clerk, IK. Rope Manufacturing Co., Ld.,

Assistant, W. R. Loxley & Co., Book-keeper, Harry Wicking & Co., Storekeeper, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Foreman, Taikoo Dockyard, Assistant, Shewan, Tomes & Co., Assistant, Shewan Tomes & Co.,

Clerk, A. R. Marty,..

Ormsby Villas. Kingsclere.

1 Connaught Road. On premises. Queen's Road. Quarry Bay. Quarry Bay. Quarry Bay.

25 Belilios Terrace.

Hongkong Club.

6 Observatory Road. On premises. Hongkong Hotel. 127 Peak. Cosmopolitan Docks. Kingsclere.

Station Hotel, Kowloon.

1 Observatory Villas, Kowloon.

1 Connaught Road. Blue Buildings, Praya East.

127 Barker Road. 184 Barker Road. Craigieburn, Peak. 8 Hanoi Road. Kingsclere. Kimberley Villas.

Queen's Building.

8 Gordon Terrace.

Kowloon Dispensary.

35 Des Voeux Road Central. | Alexandra Building.

Queen's Road.

Prince's Building.

On premises. Quarry Bay.

59 The Peak. Quarry Bay.

Quarry Bay.

Quarry Bay. Kowloon Docks.

Quarry Bay.

St. George's Building.

4 Lower Mosque Terrace. 8 Morrison Hill Road. 12 Belilios Terrace. - 35 St. Francis Street.

Loxley & Co. Station Hotel. Quarry Bay. Quarry Bay. Peak Hotel.

Blue Bungalow, Peak Road.

1 Rose Terrace, Kowloon.

1

Z

Zackay, Ellis David

Assistant, D. Sassoon & Co., Ld.,

Registry, Supreme Court, Hongkong, 28th February, 1912.

College Chambers.

HUGH A. NISBET,

Registrar.

1-

J

- 77 -

HONGKONG.

KOWLOON-CANTON RAILWAY. (BRITISH SECTION.)

No.

17 1912

ESTIMATE OF EXPENDITURE ON. CAPITAL ACCOUNT DURING THE YEAR 1912.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor, October 24th, 1912.

Main Head.

I-Preliminary Expenditure, Survey,

Sub-Head.

Revised Estimate for 1910.

KOWLOON-CAN”.

(British

Expenditure Proposed

to 31.12.11.

Expen-

diture 1912.

C.

$

C.

42,277.65

42,277.65

$

1,195,879.20 778,974.45 1,473,880

II.-Land,

III.-Formation,....

Land,

(a.) Earthwork,.

2,587,580,00 2,551,554,45

7,913

(b.) Tunnels,

(c.) Roads,

3,811,145.19 3,808,582.63 120,200.00 118,363.64

IV.-Bridges,

(a.) Major,....

816,495.41 829,047.22

(b.) Minor,. (c.) Culverts,

350,126.47

359,491.49

72,546.09

71,567.78

V.-Fencing,

(a.) Boundaries,

39,999.45

36.469.67

7,000

(b.) Sigus,.....

400.00

640.31

VI.-Telegraph,....

VII.-Track,

Telegraph,

(a.) Ballast,

(b.) Permanent Way,

30,032.17 36,790.24

132,066.54 158,634.97 732,192.71 754,961.29

5,000

3,000

VIII. Stations & Buildings, ......! (a.) Buildings and Fixtures,

310,000,00

176,772.33

36,000

(b.) Station Machinery,

40,000.00

32,143.12

(c.) Furniture, ....

5,000.00 11,293.28

(d.) Workshops,

60,000.00

77,293.75

10,000

IX.-Plant,........

(a.) Construction,....

101,884.53

185,535.58

(b.) Loco Tools and Plant,

50,000.00

65,307,87 4,100

(c.) C. & W. Tools and Plant,..

10,000.00

(d.) Engineering,

25.00 10.00

...

(e.) Loco Rolling Stock,

88,000.00

117,069.09

85,000

(f.) C. & W. Rolling Stock,......

309,540.00

291,587.91 107,000

X.-General Charges,

(a.) (1) Salaries & Allowances,.

399,720.43

433,482.25

(2) Quarters and Offices,

68,495.13

63,335.54

2,000 42,000

(3) Instruments,

11,639.61

10,654.03

...

(4) Office Expenses,

32,710.93

33,455.53

200

(5) Medical,

22,319.43

23,071.90

(6) Home Charges,

124,478.29 134,329.92

(7) Interest,

713,922.67

701,705.62

(8) Exchange,

200,000.00

110,997.29

...

(b.) Accounts,

42,843,53

41,222.35

(ss.) Store in Suspense,

185,769.20

Bricks,..

1,080.00

Anticipated

Credit by

J. MORRIS,

Chief Accountant.

HONGKONG, 2nd September, 1912.

Stores Sales,

|

Total,..............$ 12,521,495.46 12,021,502.77 1,783,093

SUMMAR

Proposed Expenditure during 1912,

444444

Less amount voted, ride Financial Minute No. 25 of 29th May

Amount to be voted this year,....

ad.

Revised Estimate for 1910.

KOWLOON-CANTON RAILWAY.

(British Section.)

Expenditure Proposed

to 31.12.11.

Estimate

to

Expen- diture 1912. Complete.

$ C.

42,277.65

C.

42,277.65

1,195,879.20 778,974.45 1,473,880

2,587,580.00 2,551,554.45 | 7,913

3,811,145.19 3,808,582.65

120,200.00 118,363.64

*

REMARKS.

...

Estimated amount for completion of Cuttings and their Drainage.

6,655 Re-formation of Salisbury Road, etc.

816,495.41

829,047.22

350,126.47

359,491.49

72,546.09

71,567.78

39,999.45

36,469.67

7,000

:

400.00

640.31

30,032.17 36,790.24

ay,

132,066.54 158,634.97 732,192.71 754,961.29

5,000

3,000

5,954 28,075

Do.

do.

1 Fixtures,

310,000,00 176,772.33 36,000

218,128

inery,

40,000.00

32,143.12

5,000.00 11,293.28

60,000.00

77,293.75 10,000

18,981 6,000 5,000

101,884.53

185,535.58

nd Plant,

50,000.00

65,307.87

4,100

s and Plant,...

10,000.00

25.00

10.00

Stock,

88,000.00

117,069.09

85,000

55,000

4,000

Estimated amount of rebuilding boundary wall Holts' Wharf and remov

viously included in Estimate.

This amount includes cable through Beacon Hill Tunnel and also equipme

new station.

For New Station Yard, Kowloon.

Estimated amount to be spent on raising the Praya Wall, preparing site,

building the new station, and the building of temporary offices, Kowld and permanent station, Taipo Market.

Signalling, water and fire appliances, weigh-bridges, weighing machines, Lavatories, buffet and kitchen arrangements and office furniture for new s Estimated expenditure on the extension of Locomotive Shed.

5,875 For the completion of the Workshops.

$85,000 for purchase of two main line Locomotives and $55,000 for one m

line Engine.

ng Stock,......

309,540,00

291,587.91 107,000

18,512

For Rolling Stock sanctioned in 1911 paid for during 1912.

Allowances,. 399,720.43 433,482.25

2,000

and Offices,

68,495.13 63,335.54

42,000

10,477 11,500

Architects' fees, clerks of works and timekeepers for new station. Manager's house and quarters for station staff at Kowloon.

its,

11,639.61 10,654.03

penses,

32,710.93

33,455.53

200

802

22,319.43

23,071.90

arges,

124,478.29

134,329.92

713,922.67

701,705.62

200,000.00

110,997.29

...

42,843.53

ense,

41,222.35 185,769.20 1,080.00

...

...

Credit by

les,

50,000

..$ 12,521,495.46 12,021,502.77 1,783,093 344,959

SUMMARY.

oposed Expenditure during 1912,

ss amount voted, vide Financial Minute No. 25 of 29th May, 1912,.

nount to be voted this year,..................

..$ 1,783,093.00 1,473,879.25

$ 309,213.75

II. P.

M

KOWLOON-CANTON RAILWAY.

(British Section.)

Expenditure Proposed

to 31.12.11.

Estimate

Expen-

to

diture 1912. Complete.

C.

42,277.65

778,974.45| 1,473,880

2,551,554,45

7,913

3,808,582.63

118,363.64

829,047.22

...

:

REMARKS.

...

Estimated amount for completion of Cuttings and their Drainage.

6,655 Re-formation of Salisbury Road, etc.

359,491.49

71,567.78

:

...

36,469.67

7,000

640.31

36,790.24

158,634.97 754,961.29

176,772.33

5,000 3,000

36,000

28,075

Do.

do.

32,143.12

18,981

11,293.28

77,293.75

10,000

185,535.58

65,307.87

4,100

25.00 10.00 117,069.09

85,000

55,000

291,587.91 107,000

18,512

For Rolling Stock sanctioned in 1911 paid for during 1912.

Estimated amount of rebuilding boundary wall Holts' Wharf and removal of building, not pre-

viously included in Estimate.

4,000 This amount includes cable through Beacon Hill Tunnel and also equipment and instruments for

new station.

5,954 For New Station Yard, Kowloon.

218,128 Estimated amount to be spent on raising the Praya Wall, preparing site, collecting materials for building the new station, and the building of temporary offices, Kowloon, also for gang huts and permanent station, Taipo Market.

Signalling, water and fire appliances, weigh-bridges, weighing machines, etc.

6,000 Lavatories, buffet and kitchen arrangements and office furniture for new station. 5,000 Estimated expenditure on the extension of Locomotive Shed.

5,875 For the completion of the Workshops.

...

$85,000 for purchase of two main line Locomotives and $55,000 for one main line and one branch

line Engine.

433,482.25

63,335.54

2,000 42,000

10,477 11,500

Architects' fees, clerks of works and timekeepers for new station. Manager's house and quarters for station staff at Kowloon.

10,654.03

...

33,455.53

200

802

23,071.90

134,329.92

701,705.62

110,997.29

41,222.35

185,769.20 1,080.00

...

(2,021,502.77 | 1,783,093

50,000

344,959

SUMMARY.

12,

al Minute No. 25 of 29th May, 1912,.

.$ 1,783,093.00 1,473,879.25

309,213.75

H. P. WINSLOW,

Manager.

No. 1.

HONGKONG.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

PUBLIC WORKS

WORKS COMMITTEE

at a Meeting held on the 24th January, 1912.

No. 1912

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor, February 27th, 1912.

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Director of Public Works, (WILLIAM CHATHAM, C.M.G.), Chairman.

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON).

""

??

Mr. WEI YUK, C.M.G.

Mr. EDWARD OSBORNE.

""

""

Mr. CHARLES HENDERSON Ross.

Kowloon Market. (C.S.O. 1746/1907.)

The Committee continued their consideration of the questions referred to them which were contained in the following minute by the Colonial Secretary

at:

"You (Director of Public Works) are requested to submit to the Public Works Committee the question of apportioning the responsibility for the delay which has occurred in the erection of the Tsim Sha Tsui Market and for the additional expenditure which has been incurred in connection with it.'

11

On the question of the responsibility for the delay, the following decisions were arrived

(1.) The Committee are of opinion that the time allowed for the completion of the Contract for the erection of the building, namely, 12 months, was inade- quate and they consider that 18 months would have been a more reasonable time to specify. They recommend that, in future, contractors, when ten- dering, should be required to state within what period they are prepared to complete the work to which their tenders relate.

(2.) The Committee consider that a serious error was made in failing to despatch the indent for steelwork until 9 months after the letting of the Contract for the erection of the building.

(3.) Taking all the circumstances into account, the Committee consider that the Crown Agents and other parties concerned with the execution of the indent were responsible for a part of the delay.

(4.) For the remainder of the delay which occurred, the Committee consider that

the Contractor is solely responsible.

>

With regard to the question of additional expenditure, the Chairman explained that the contractor had not yet agreed to the final statements prepared in connection with his con- tracts for the building and the fittings and the actual cost could not therefore be regarded as finally settled. The information, which he was able to lay before the Committee, was as

follows:

Amount of Original Estimate,

Amount of Revised Estimate arrived at by taking the amounts of

the various contracts let and adding the actual cost of fore- man's wages, &c., &c.,...

Actual cost as ascertained by measurement, &c., but not yet finally

settled,

$66,000.00

59,484.04

56,584.67

from which it will be seen that there has been no increase in cost over the estimate, but that, on the other hand, there has been a saving of about $2,900 on the revised estimate, which is fully $6,500 less than the original estimate.

The Committee however desire to point out that, owing to the Contract not being ful- filled, the Government suffered loss on account of the additional cost of foreman's wages and the fee to the arbitrator in connection with the defective construction of the roof and that there was also a loss of rent which would have been derived if the market had been opened sooner.

Jubilee Fountains. (C.S.O. 6162/1911.)

The Chairman explained that the opinion of the Committee was desired as to whether the Jubilee Fountains, of which six were presented to the Colony in 1887 by Mr. Dorabjee Nowrojee, should be entirely removed. None of the fountains were in working order and most of them were broken or dismantled.

It was agreed to recommend that the fountain in the Chinese Recreation Ground be restored to working order and have water laid on to it and that the one in the grounds of the Sailors' Home be allowed to remain, -water not being laid on to it. The remaining fountains to be removed with the exception of the pillars which act as lamp-posts.

W. CHATHAM,

Laid before the Legislative Council this 27th day of February, 1912.

Chairman.

C. CLEMENTI,

Clerk of Councils.

*.

1

ہے

7

HONGKONG.

DIAGRAM OF THE MONG-KOK-TSUI BREAKWATER SHOWING PROGRESS

OF STONE DEPOSITING TO 31ST DECEMBER, 1911.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government, April 15th, 1912.

HIGH WATER ORDINARY SPRING TIDES

LOW WATER ORDINARY SPRING TIDES

MUD LEVEL

13th January, 1912.

8' 0'

No.

1912

HIGH WATER ORDINARY SPRING TIDES

LOW WATER ORDINARY SPRING TIDES

AVERAGE HEIGHT OF STONE DEPOSITED TO 31st DECEMBER, 1911.

AVERAGE

LEVEL

OF

BOTTOM

OF

DREDGED

TRENCH

192' 0"

„0,8

Ft. 10 6 0

10 20

SCALE 1 INCH-20 FEET 30 40 50

69

20 100 Ft.

Total Area of Average Cross Section of Breakwater shewn above 4,790 Sq. Ft. Area of Stone Deposited to 31st December, 1911, =1,424

>>

Proportion of Stone Area to Total Area of Cross Section 29%

MUD LEVEL

W. CHATHAM, Director of Public Works.

· 27.

K

HONGKONG.

DIAGRAM OF THE MONG-KOK-TSUI BREAKWATER SHOWING PROGRESS

OF STONE DEPOSITING TO 30TH JUNE, 1912.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor, August 22nd, 1912.

HIGH WATER ORDINARY SPRING TIDES

LOW WATER ORDINARY SPRING TIDES

MUD LEVEL

15th July, 1912.

12' 3"

No.10

No. 1912

HIGH WATER ORDINARY SPRING TIDES

LOW WATER ORDINARY SPRING TIDES

AVERAGE HEIGHT OF STONE DEPOSITED TO 30th JUNE, 1912.

AVERAGE

LEVEL

OF BOTTOM

OF DREDGED

192′ 0′′

TRENCH

12' 3"

SCALE 1 INCH=20 FEET

Ft. 10

20

30 40

69

100 Ft.

Total Area of Average Cross Section of Breakwater shewn above 4,790 Sq. Ft. Area of Stone Deposited to 30th June, 1912,

-2,089

"

"1

Proportion of Stone Area to Total Area of Cross Section=

43% %

MUD LEVEL

W. CHATHAM, Director of Public Works,

41

43

HONGKONG.

REPORT ON THE NEW TERRITORIES, 1899-1912.

No. 1912

11

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor, August 22nd, 1912.

A.

1.-GENERAL.

1. On June 9th, 1898, a convention was signed at Peking between Great Britain and China, by which the latter leased to the former for 99 years a portion of the province of San On adjoining the Colony. The lease of the so-called New Territories, more popularly known as the New Territory or simply The Territory, was to begin on July 1st, 1898, but it was not until April of the following year that they were taken over. Some resistance was experienced from discontented factions in and out of the Territories, but this was soon put down without any loss on our side.

2. The district consists of the peninsula running out towards Hongkong between the Canton estuary on the West and Mirs Bay on the East, together with the islands adjacent. It formerly belonged to the district of San On in the Kwangtung Province, and was administered from Nam Tau.

3. On the North the boundary follows the North bank of the Sham Chun river and then a line, marked by boundary stones, which crosses a pass to the S. W. of the lofty mountain, Ng Tung Shan, and descends to Mirs Bay at a point half a mile to the West of Sha Tau Kok Market. Then it proceeds Eastwards round the North coast of Mirs Bay to Mirs Point, and thence South to a point in Latitude 22° 9′ and Longitude 114° 30', thence due West to Longitude 113° 52', whence it runs Northwards, skirting the West point of Lantao Island, to the South point of the peninsula running down into Deep Bay: thence round the North shore of Deep Bay to the North Bank of the Sham Chun River. The full definition of the waters of the Colony under the Laws of Hongkong will be found in Appendix A.

4. The total area of the New Territories is 356 square miles, of which about one quarter consists of islands. The territory is of a bed description, and its outstanding feature is a chain of mountains running along de co st line from East to West-one large spur of which runs down to the South Westrom the e with the smaller ones surroundin it. On the antre, and forms the larger island of Lantao East side the range breaks into several spurs, the chief being the Kowloon Rage-runni look Peak. North of these his there run North and South from Ma On Shan to Kon everal valleys East an! West. On the extreme North West is swampy grond adjoining Deep Bay and the Sham Chun River on the borders of the Territory, and low barren ills run along the borders more to the East.

5. In a country of the kind, the are 67 square miles out of 35 were claimed b

over.

Kow-

available for cultivation is small; in fact only y private owners when the territory was taken The proportion a cultivated to uncultivated areas remains still approximately the same certain portions have since been tal

ken up, chiefly for pineapple-growing, and much land difficult of access has since been abandoned, as it has become cheaper to buy food in Hong or as labour has been diverter by the prospect of higher wages.

61

102,25

stimate of the population of the New Territories in 1901 gave the number as

figures given in the census for 1911 are:-

Land Population,..

Floating Population,

Total

94,246

9,855

4,101

44

<

""

Of the land population nearly all are either Puntis, i.e., people speaking the Cantonese dialect, or Hakkas, i.e., "stranger folk. Of these the Puntis were the older inhab- itants, and they are found in possession of the inland plains: the Hakka came later and occupied all the habitable portions of the coast, and many fertile valleys on the sea side of the hills. They are more hardy and simple folk than the Puntis, and many fertile hill- slopes bear testimony to their skill and industry.

"1

Before the New Territory was taken over, many Puntis villages were living on their capital, on squeezes" from their neighbours, and on pay received from the Government for collecting taxes. Under British rule these sources of revenue soon failed and the older families became impoverished: but their frugal neighbours, and especially the Hakkas, released from these former exactions, thenceforward increased rapidly in numbers and riches at their

expense.

6. The respective number of Puntis and Hakkas was given by Mr. Lockhart in 1898 as 64,140 and 36,070.: no account of dialects was taken in 1901, but in 1911 the respec- tive numbers are 47,990 and 44,375. The difference in the relative numbers between 1898 and 1911 is remarkable, but the figures on the former occasion cannot be considered as accurate, and we must wait until the next census to ascertain to what extent, if at all, the Hakka population is still displacing the Puntis.

8. The Hoklos, who are a kind of sea-gipsy, only form a very small section of the land population, some 1,500 in all, but much of the fishing is in their hands.

Of the junk population the large majority are Puntis, and of the remainder some Hakka and some

Hoklo.

9. The majority of the people live in small villages, of which there are some 800 in the New Territory with an average population of little over 100 in each. Nearly all are surrounded by small groves of trees, which are carefully preserved, and, outside of these, by stretches of cultivation which present a very bare appearance as they are usually devoid of any trees, or hedges or grass land to give variety to the view. During the last twelve years these general characteristics have altered little except for the extension of the urban districts of Yaumati on the West of Kowloon along the coast into Sham Shui Po.

II.-GENERAL ADMINISTRATION.

10. The headquarters of the administration of the New Territories were from the beginning fixed at Taipo, and here Mr. Lockhart remained in charge from May to July 1899. Mr. Hallifax was then appointed Police Magistrate and Mr. Messer, Assistant Land Officer, while Mr. Kemp assisted in land registration work at Pingshan. The organisa- tion of the policing of the whole of the New Territories both on land and water was entrusted to Mr. (now Sir) F. H. May. Police were immediately stationed at convenient /points through the Territory, and increased as soon as arrangements for accommodation could be made the whole force throughout the Territories was at first controlled directly from Hongkong, but at the end of 1899, it was decided to appoint Mr. Hallifax an Assistant Superintendent of Police for the New Territorie addition to his other duties.

l

11. The portion of the New Territories ving Soh of Kowl: n Hills and including the islands continued to be controlled from Hongkong, cept for land work, which was vunder the charge of the Land Office in Hongkot The work of land settlement is dealt with under a separate heading. On January 1st, 1905, Mi J. R. Wood was appointed Assistant Land Officer in charge of land in the Southern Disrict of the New Territories. With the completion of the Crown Lease Schedules in the same year the collection of Crown frent from the Territories became more feasible, and the Assistant Land Officer in the South District and the Assistant Superintendent of Police in the Noth, became collectors of

revenue in addition to their other duties.

12. There was now at Hongkong and Taip proper machinery for doing with criminal cases in the New Territories, but the Supreme Court in Hongkong remed the only resort for all civil claims, and it was at once expensive and inconvenien the ✔Northern District, which is further removed from Hongkong, it was usually poble for the

Magistrate to enforce his decision in civil cases, but the want of proper power

for the hearing of small debes continued to be a difficulty. In 1906iment was tried of sending an Assiserintendent of Police on occasional

islands but it was not a

September, 1907, the Assistant St

the

nt of

45

Police and Assistant Land Officer in the North District became District Officer and Assist- ant District Officer,-the two officers in charge now sharing the same powers and duties. In 1908 the District Officer in the North District, and the Assistant Land Officer in the South, were empowered to hold a civil court to try small debt cases in the New Territories, involving sums not exceeding $200. In September, 1910, the Assistant Land Officer (South) was given the title of Assistant District Officer, and made a Police Magistrate for his district in April, 1911, he was also appointed an Assistant Superintendent of Police for the Southern District. ¡

13. The powers and duties of the Assistant District Officer (South) have thus been almost entirely assimilated to those of the District Officer and Assistant District Officer (North), except for New Kowloon at the back of the Kowloon Peninsula, which because it was, or was expected to be, almost a suburb of Hongkong, remained subject to the ordinary laws and regulations of Hongkong. In the Western portion of New Kowloon, these early expectations are in process of being realised, but Kowloon East still remains a rural district, in which it may yet be found advisable to utilise the simple forms of Government common to the more distant parts of the New Territories.

14. The administration of the New Territories is now wholly in the hands of the District Officer, and the Assistant District Officer (South), subject only to the higher authority of the Captain Superintendent of Police in Police matters, and of the Supreme Court in civil cases with over $200 at stake: but only very few cases do find their way to the Supreme Court. The survey of the Territories is in the hands of the Public Works Department.

15. Reference should also be made to the waning influence of the village elders throughout the Territories. It was the intention of Sir Henry Blake that "existing village organisations should be maintained and utilised", and that the village tribunals should continue to decide local cases. But it soon became clear that the authority of the village elders was of no account, with the stronger authority of the Magistrates so easily accessible, and the idea of local tribunals had perforce to be dropped. Under Chinese rule, the remote- ness, the danger and the expense of the central courts had left much authority to local elders, and especially to those entrusted with powers of collecting taxes: under British rule this authority naturally decayed, though they have continued sometimes to be the medium of dealings with the villagers. But their moral influence has often been of great assistance to the officials in the maintenance of the public peace, and their knowledge in the decision of questions concerning local customs, disputed successions, fungshui and such like.

III. LAND SURVEY AND SETTLEMENT.

16. The most important work to be accomplished after taking over the New Territo- ries was the allocation and registration of all privately owned land. As a preliminary to this. it was necessary to have a survey made of the whole country, and this was carried out by Messrs. Tate and Newland, who with a trained staff were lent by the Indian Government. They began work in November, 1899 in July, 1900, Mr. Tate returned to India and the survey on a scale of 32" to the mile was completed under Mr. Newland's charge by May, 1903. In the meantime the registration of claims was being carried on steadily from July, 1899, by Mr. Messer Taipo, Mr. Kemp at Pingshan, and in the Land Office in Hongkong. In the following year all the registration work was taken over by the Land Court, first under Mr. Pollock, and then under Mr. Gompertz. The work of registering claims was necessarily carried on hand in hand with that of the survey and demarcation, and disputed. claims were then submitted to the Land Court. The latter work began early in 1901 with the sitting of the Court in the Islands and New Kowloon but it soon became clear that the decision of all disputed claims through the Territories would be too large an undertaking for the undivided court to achieve. Accordingly Messrs. Messer, Wood and Clementi were appointed Members of the Land Court, and from March, 1904, until the end of the year, worked in different parts of the New Territories. finally determining all land claims, and making up the Crown Lease Schedules and Rent Rolls. Agricultural land was classified as 1st, 2nd or 3rd class, and Crown rent was assessed at $3, $2 or $1 per acre accordingly, except in New Kowloon where it is $5, $3 and $1.50. Building land was charged $50 an acre (or 50 cents per annum for a small house) and $100 an acre in the case of the more thriving villages. These rates were fixed by a proclamation of July, 1906, and an undertaking was given that they should not be raised, Claimants to lots rst given "chi-tsai" or small slips of paper, bearing on their face the Lot number and on the back the name of the owner and description of the land in Chinese. After the

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determination of claims, these chi-tsai still remained in the owner's hands as the only visible sign of ownership, but they were easily lost and easily transferred. It was accord- ingly decided to issue to each land owner a chap-chiu or certified extract of his holdings, and from May, 1905, to September, 1906, Mr. Clementi was engaged in the issue of these to all holders in the Northern District; and incidentally he was enabled to make many necessary corrections and additions to the original Schedules attached to the Crown Leases. A similar work was done for the Southern District during the winter of 1910- 1911: the holders in New Kowloon were however not given chap chiu as their lands are usually well known to them, and reference to the Registers in Hongkong is for them a simple matter.

17. Land throughout the New Territories is now held on a lease from the Crown for 75 years from July 1st, 1898, subject to renewal for a further 24 years. By the New Territories Land Ordinance of 1903, which was merged in the New Territories Consolidation Ordinance of 1910, machinery for registering land transfers and settling disputes was provided, and care was taken to make all processes as simple as possible. The District Officers, who act in New Territory land matters as deputies for the Land Officer in Hong- kong, are given very wide powers in the appointment of trustees and in settlement of land disputes, and no lawyers are allowed to appear in land cases without their express per- mission.

18. Crown Land is sold by auction at upset prices of one cent per square foot for build- ing land, and from 3 to 4 cent per square foot for agricultural land, with Crown rent on the scale before mentioned. Lots not exceeding 1,000 square feet may however be sold by private treaty in districts away from railways or main roads when competition is out of the question: and agricultural land is often let by the Crown on annual or quinquennial leases without premium.

19. It is too much to expect that all mistakes should have been eliminated from the records of land tenure throughout the Territories, but the work of the Land Offices is now fairly straightforward, and the surviving errors are gradually brought to light. The chief of these are errors in the original survey; for instance, in the island of Cheung Chau the maps and the rent roll are so incorrect that nothing less than an entirely new survey will serve to set things right.

20. On the whole, the work of land settlement and the machinery provided for subse- quent land administration have been eminently successful, and the people have shown a growing readiness to make use of it. A minimum of legal formality and a maximum of simplicity and elasticity have tended to inspire confidence and to wean the land owners to our matter-of-fact system. But, as has been stated, the closer relations of the New Ter- ritories with Hongkong have not tended to increase the demand for land, but rather to draw the people away from it; and the only visible results to the land are the better build- ings which improved means have enabled the villagers to erect thereon.

21. Under the same heading two important pieces of work must be mentioned :—

(1.) Taxlord compensation.

(2.) Land resumption for roads and railways.

(1.) The former is thus explained in Mr. Clementi's report on his work in the New Territories in 1905-6-on the recommendation of the Land Court, the Governor decided that 14 elders of the Northern District should be compensated for certain taxlord" rights claimed by them to have existed before the Con- vention, but not compatible with the principles of British administration, by the grant of 252.33 acres of Crown Land in the Northern District, to be selected by each "taxlord" in proportion to the value of the right claimed by him.")

(2.)

The taxlords however continued to nurse their grievances, and were only induced with difficulty to choose the requisite amount of land: the complete settlement of the question was further delayed by the want of a surveyor to carry the work through, so that the Taxlord Schedules were not completed until August, 1909.

The execution of Public Works in the New Territories has from time to time necessitated the resumption of private lands. Chief of these have been the Taipo Road, and the Kowloon-Canton Railway. Compensation in New has been from 1 cent to 3 cents per square foot for waste or agricult and in the North District from 4 cent to 1 cent according to the quality

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It has been a striking testimony to the good sense of the people and to the good feeling existing between them and the Government that these resumptions have been put through without any disputes. In some cases in the country districts "fungshui" has been responsible for objections to the proposed route. of the road or the railway: but it is characteristic of the Chinese folk that their superstitious fears have always yielded ultimately to the needs of a progressive age. More serious are the occasional objections of the more sophisticated residents in New Kowloon, who are beginning to look for means of making. money out of the Government needs and as they rapidly become more knowing these difficulties are likely to increase.

IV. PUBLIC WORKS.

22. After the taking over of the New Territories in April, 1899, the immediate exigencies of the Government were met by the construction of temporary matsheds for the use of the Police at Taipo, Au Tau, Sha Tin and Fu Ti Au, on the border between Chinese and British Territory.

23. Telephone lines were constructed connecting Kowloon City, Sha Tin, Tai Po, Fu Ti Au, Sheung Shui and Pingshan with Old Kowloon.

24. The road to Hunghom was continued to Kowloon City and that to Yaumati was carried on by the end of the year some two miles in the direction of Taipo.

25. The erection of permanent Police Stations was taken in hand: that at Taipo was completed in 1899, and those at Au Tau and Pingshan were finished in the following year (1900). The stations at Sai Kung and Sha Tau Kok were begun and nearly completed in 1900, which year also saw the total length of the Tai Po road carried to 11 miles

26. The need for more Police Stations was economically met by the adaptation of old Chinese Customs Stations to the purpose; and in this way further stations were soon ready at Kowloon City, Sham Shui Po, and the island of Cheung Chau; on Lantao Island the old Yamens were used for the purpose at Tai O and Tung Chung. At San Tin village a native house was converted into a Police Station and a blockhouse was prepared in the same way on the pass leading to Sha Tin.

27. In 1902, permanent stations were completed at Sheung Shui, and at Tai O and the same year saw the completion of the road to Tai Po,-18 miles in length.

28. Of the Police Stations thus available some such as Taipo, Sha Tau Kok, Sai Kung, Au Tau, Tai O and Pingshan were built on hillsides at a distance from Chinese habitations others such as Sheung Shui, Cheung Chau, Sham Shui Po, San Tin, Sha Tin, Tung Chung and Yung Shu Wan in or close to Chinese villages. It is worthy of remark in itself, and for guidance in future works, that the latter have always been healthy stations, and that four of the former six have been notably unhealthy at one time or another, Au Tau and Sai Kung being distinctly the worst. At Sai Kung during construction there was much sick- ness among the workmen-but it was not credited at the time that this would be due to the site; at Au Tau the neighbouring Chinese declared that the position was not good "Fung- shui", and it turned out that they were right. Pingshan and Tai O have been healthy stations, especially the former.

29. The lessons to be drawn from this are that virgin soil has to be chosen with great discrimination for building purposes. But, failing this, it is preferable to use land which has long been cleared for building or cultivation.

30. Of the roads, that to Taipo was justified by administrative and military needs and was of great use in facilitating the import of cattle from across the border, and from the outskirts of the Territory. The extension to Kowloon City on the other side was necessary to bring Kowloon City and its populous neighbourhood into connection with Kowloon.

31. The programme of most necessary public works for the New Territories was now complete, but other works were carried out as opportunity offered. The Officers in charge of the Territories were housed in a matshed buikding until in 1906 a new and handsome building was completed on an island connected with Taipo by a causeway which forms a portion of the main road. The Land Office and its valuable records were also precariously housed in a matshed building until this was replaced by a solid structure completed in 1908.

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32. Four six-foot paths were constructed chiefly with local labour, connecting outlying villages to the main road at Tai Po-about 10 miles altogether at the cost of about $2,600. With the approaching completion of the railway in 1909, the survey of a road running through the Territory from Castlepeak Bay vid Au Tau, San Tin, Fan Ling, and Sha Tau Kok was in hand; the total length of this is 23.69 miles, of which about 18 were completed and in use at the end of 1911. The width of the road is 6 feet from Castlepeak to Pingshan, thenceforward 8 feet. This road traverses the North of the New Territories from East to West, crossing the railway at Fan Ling, and along the Eastern Section a light railway was constructed in the latter part of 1911, which if it proves successful may later be extended Westwards along the whole route. The usefulness and importance of the road in facilitating traffic and administration cannot be over-estimated.

33. When the works now in progress are completed, the New Territories on the main- land will be linked by serviceable roads which can be easily patrolled in all weathers, and much impetus should be given to trade and traffic thereby. The want of telephone com- munications with the islands, which has been too large an undertaking to consider hitherto, is still felt from an administrative point of view: but fortunately their inhabitants are of peaceful and law-abiding nature, and serious crimes are very rare.

34. A further Police Station at Tsun Wan which had long been contemplated was commenced in 1910, and opened for use in July 1911.

35. Reference should be made to the construction of a Reservoir in a basin in the Kow- loon Hills, between the 5th and 6th milestone on the Tai Po Road, to provide an adequate water supply for Kowloon. The total capacity of this reservoir-one of the most import- ant and necessary factors in the development of the Kowloon Peninsula-is 374 million gallons it was completed in 1910.

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36. But the New Territories are still for the most part dependent upon their own public works, and most traffic passes along the numerous paths which intersect the hills and plains. The construction of most of these is of the simplest; and the most pretentious consist of granite slabs laid on raised pathways about three or four feet wide.

Some new bridges have been constructed by various villages; and two notable old granite bridges, one of ten spans at Taipo, and the other of three spans a mile further up the valley, con- tinue to do good service. Good wells are found at all villages throughout the Territories, and a solid reservoir on a small scale has recently been built near Tai O, in Lantao, with some assistance from Government.

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V.-POLICE AND CRIME.

37. The most serious tasks which confronted the Police in the New Territories were the suppression of piracies at sea, and the establishment of peace and good order near the frontier. Two steam-launches were employed by the Police (until vessels could be built for them) to patrol the eastern and western waters of the New Territories, while a steam pinnace was acquired for the patrol of Mirs Bay from Tai Po. Piracy in the waters adja- cent to Hongkong had long been a remunerative pursuit, and in the first year of British rule in the New Territories, it continued to be rife: no less than five piracies on sten launches in British waters being reported during 1900. In consequence an Ordinance was passed compelling launch owners to take adequate steps for the protection of crews and passengers, and especially to prevent armed robbers from embarking under the guise of ordinary passengers. This measure proved successful, and serious piracies have from that time been of rare occurrence in British waters. Incursions of robbers from across the Nor- thern frontier continued to occupy the attention of the Police for several years, and despite the friendly assistance of the Chinese authorities, they were not effectually checked until a blockhouse was established at Ta Ku Ling, close to the border, in January, 1905.

38. Gang robberies were frequent in the early years of the administration, and their) prevention has always been rendered difficult, firstly by the reluctance of their victims to give evidence or tell the Police what they know of the matter, secondly by the timidity of the villagers who neither themselves resist nor venture to go to their neighbours' assistance.. and lastly by the convenient vicinity of Chinese territory. Of these difficulties the first is inseparable from British methods of law and justice, and neither magistrate, judge nor jury quite learn to appreciate how hard it is for the simple rustic to tell a plain unvarnished tale of such an exciting event as a robbery.

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39. These more serious crimes are almost entirely engineered from Hongkong, or from Chinese territory; for the people of the New Territories are peaceful and law-abiding. Strenuous efforts were necessary to rid the newly acquired territory of members of the Triad Society, resident in China, who terrorised certain sections of the population and extorted much money from them. Since the pacification of the country, the commonest offences have been those against the Opium Ordinance, which cannot be regarded seriously it was natural for the inhabitants to resent the enormous tax on opium, which practically put it beyond their means, and drove them into smuggling the cheaper stuff from across the border. Latterly, however, the tax on opium has been increased in Chinese territory, and the smuggling of opium into our territory has now ceased.

40. The much more moderate taxes on liquors introduced in 1910 were quite favourably received, and breaches of the Liquors Ordinance have been rare.

41. Gambling is a vice or a recreation to which the Chinese are particularly prone, but owing to the efforts of the Police, gambling houses have almost disappeared from the New Territories, and only maintain a precarious existence in some fishing villages more remote from Police supervision, such as Ma Wan, Peng Chau and Hang Hau, in the Southern District.

42. The greatest uumber of Police stationed in the New Territories was 187 in 1900 : consisting of 31 European, 122 Indian and 34 Chinese Police. The number in December 1911 was 164, viz., 13 Europeans, 106 Indians and 45 Chinese, distributed among 17 stations: besides these, 6 Europeans are attached to the three Police Launches which patrol the whole of the waters from Mirs Bay on the East to Deep Bay on the West.

As can be seen from the table attached (Appendix C), the tendency has been to increase the Chinese force, and to decrease the European to the minimum required for the charge of the various stations. It is obviously desirable to encourage the use of Chinese constables, but their proneness to accept squeezes from gamblers and other law-breakers, and natural incapacity for discipline and authority, still militate against their employment for active duty. So all the patrol work in the Territory is still performed by Indian Police alone, under the supervision of Europeans; and of the Chinese, the senior and more able men are employed in detective work, the junior only in station duty.

43. In addition to their ordinary Police work, the Police perform all the Harbour Office work for the coasts and waters of the New Territories, and assist in the collection of Crown rent and other revenue, The Police launches in particular collect licence fees from junks, sampans and fishing nets.

VI.-REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE.

44. The collection of revenue from the New Territories was no easy matter in the early days of our administration. The Chinese Government had not bequeathed to us any scheme of collection at all consistent with our principles, and it was necessary to proceed very slowly with the collection of land taxes until the rent roll was made out. It was not until 1905 that this was done, and collection began in earnest. The villagers, with the Chinese horror of new methods, were reluctant to pay their rents at first, but in 1906 a whole year's rent was collected with some arrears, and after that collection became more easy and rapid in each successive year. Now it is paid as fast as the money can be taken in throughout the whole Territory, except in New Kowloon, whose more enlightened inhabitants are apt to put off the evil day as long as they can.

45. 1910 was the first year of the Liquors Ordinance which came into force in the New Territories on January 1st: and on account both of the amount realised and of the readiness with which it was paid, the liquor tax must be considered to have been a great success.

46. The total revenue actually obtained from the New Territories for 1900 was $17,530.75; for 1910 the direct revenue was $255,470.95 in which the chief items were:

Crown Rent,

Liquor Duties,

Harbour Dues and Licence Fees,

$ 115,448.08 54,056.43 27,098.30

It is not possible to calculate accurately what proportion of the revenue derived from the Opium Farm is attributable to consumption in the New Territories. It was probably not less than $50,000 for the year 1910.

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47. The expenditure (recurrent) on the Territories may be reckoned at about $200,000, of which some $90,000 is spent on Police, $50,000 on the General Administration and Land Work, and $50,000 on Public Works.

VII.-HEALTH.

48. In the early days of the New Territories, the Police suffered severely from Malarial Fever in 1900 154 were admitted to hospital on that account, and 99 in 1901. This prevalence of fever was probably due, in the first place, to the temporary nature of many stations, and secondly to the turning up of soil for building. Efforts were made without delay to diminish the sickness. It was not possible to do much in reducing the breeding places of mosquitoes owing to the enormous expense involved, and prophylactic measures were therefore relied upon. The use of mosquito nets was insisted upon and quinine was administered daily in small doses to all New Territory Police. Owing to these measures and to the improved condition of their quarters, the returns for fever sank thenceforward to a very moderate figure, and the average of admissions to hospital for Malarial Fever was less than 33 annually from 1902 to 1910. The work on the railway from 1906 to 1909 was often attended with much fever, and special arrangements had to be made to cope with it.

49. At Taipo a dispensary was opened in 1901 and put under the charge of a Chinese licenciate, who also made tours of the Territory, and attended on any occasions when his assistance was required. A Doctor was appointed in 1906 to look after the railway em- ployés, and early in 1907 a small cottage hospital was fitted up in Taipo, chiefly for the purpose of taking cases from the Railway Works: there were 32 patients in 1907, 51 in 1908, and 35 in 1909. The Railway Medical Officer has now, after the completion of the Railway, become Medical Officer to the New Territories, in addition to duties in Kowloon. He resides in Kowloon.

50. At present the New Territory Stations, with one or two exceptions, may be con- sidered to be quite healthy, and the health of the Police is as good there as in Hongkong.

VIII.-FORESTRY.

51. Considering the hilly character of the New Territories, there is a remarkable, absence of natural forests: the hills are almost entirely covered with grass and brushwood, and out of about 300 square miles of hilly country, the areas of natural forest only total some 5,200 acres or a little over 8 square miles. These have survived either on inaccessible or specially well-watered parts of the hills, or in the neighbourhood of villages, which respect them from superstitious motives: elsewhere the growth has long failed to keep pace with the depredations of the inhabitants. The absence of trees from the plains is no doubt partly due to the fact that they harbour birds which are destructive to the crops, and for that reason alone the farmers would object to trees round their fields.

52. After the Territory was taken over, the Forestry Department commenced the planting of trees, chiefly pine-trees, in the neighbourhood of Police Stations, and along the main road to Taipo: in 1993 and the following years extensive planting was continued along the Southern slopes of the Kowloon Hills, and latterly trees have been planted along the road running through the New Territory from Castlepeak to Sha Tau Kok : but few of these bave survived the attentions of the cattle. The total area of pine-trees planted by the Government is about 4,000 acres, and although the villagers have been unable to preserve the natural forests, they have in many parts succeeded in keeping up pine- plantations.

53. On 15th March, 1904, a scheme was submitted for the afforestation of the New Territories, and a committee formed to report on the subject. The issue of forestry licences was recommended, and put in the hands of the Superintendent of the Botanical and Forestry Department. Difficulties however arose as the question was largely one of land settlement, and the reissue of new licences was placed in the hands of the Assistant Land Officer from 1st January, 1906. The object was not to raise revenue but to define the rights of the villages and private individuals to such pine plantations as then existed. It was hoped that more economical methods of cultivation might be introduced and that the rights of the Government over unclaimed areas would be defined. In 1908 the control of pine plantations was handed over to the local District Officers.

54. The charge for forestry licences is $1.00 for every 10 acres, and the land for which licences are now issued amounts to about 59,000 acres. The licences are given only for the right to grow and cut pine-trees, and the rights over wild trees are expressly

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reserved to the Crown. Nevertheless it has proved impossible to prevent the cutting of wild trees, which is encouraged by the high value of wood as fuel, and it is probable that in most areas the amount of wild trees has diminished since the Territories were taken over.

B.

I.-CROPS.

55. The population of the New Territories is for the most part agricultural, and rice forms the chief crop and the staple article of food. It is grown wherever sufficient water can be obtained, and the fields are laid out and irrigation channels constructed with extra- ordinary care and skill to utilise to the full the available supply of water. The rice is usually sown in March, and two crops obtained before November when the dry weather sets in, except in the case of rice grown in brackish water, of which only one crop is obtain- ed. There are three main qualities of rice, the best being grown on somewhat raised and therefore easily drained soil it is sent to Hongkong for export, as it fetches a higher price abroad than the Chinese will pay here. The 2nd and 3rd classes of rice are consumed locally or exported according to the state of the market; but the inhabitants of the New Territories now depend largely on foreign rice, which is cheaper and rather preferred to the local product.

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56. The next crop in importance to rice is sugar-cane which is grown extensively in the North of the Territory. The cane grows to a height of from 8 to 10 feet and is cut down when ripe and the long stalks crushed in a mill, composed of two large, rough, round millstones revolving inwards, and worked usually by four oxen, two at each end of a large beam in the form of a yoke, the centre of which descends into the mill and makes it re- volve-the oxen working this like a capstan: the sugar falls into a vat beneath, and the squeezed cane is sold to make torches, and as fuel. Some years ago, an up-to-date sugar- mill was supplied by Government to farmers in the New Territory in order to encourage the industry but it was rejected for the characteristic reason that it squeezed the cane too dry and thus spoiled it for further use.

57. Peanuts are grown in fields where there is insufficient water for rice, and fetch a fair price, chiefly for making oil. Barley is grown in small quantities and used in the manufacture of Chinese spirits: sweet potatoes are grown as a winter-crop on the rice fields, and also put in sometimes in place of peanuts when the latter fail.

58. Pineapples are grown on sheltered hillsides, almost entirely in the valley stretching up from Tsun Wan to Shing Mun, and on the island of Tsing I, opposite to Tsun Wan. This industry was taken up vigorously in the first few years of our administration, and there seemed reason to believe that a good demand for canning the fruit would spring up. But this has not been realised and the demand from the canning firms in Hongkong and Macao has fallen off a good deal: while some of the land taken up has since been abandoned owing to the poorness of the soil. The area under cultivation for 1911 was about 340 acres compared with 450 in 1908.

59. Fruit-growing in the New Territories has not hitherto been successful or remunerative. The only business venture in this direction has been the experimental farm at Castlepeak, which was started by Mr. Li Pak soon after the New Territory was taken over. He im- ported a large stock of fruit trees from California,-apples, pears, lemons, peaches, etc., and spared no expense in putting the farm in order: but at no time during its career has it been a financial success, and the imported fruits have failed most of all. But the reason for this is perhaps not so much unsuitability of soil or climate as slack management and unskilled labour. The completion of the railway through the Territory has given an inducement to Hongkong capitalists to invest money in fruit growing round Fanling, and about 100 acres are now (May 1912) being planted with lichees, oranges, peaches and other fruit-trees.

60. There are besides a number of fruit trees, chiefly lichee trees, planted in and round many of the villages, which yield fruit of rather uncertain quantity and quality : besides lichees, there are a few oranges, limes, pumeloes, bananas, and mangoes. But these have suffered in nearly all cases from want of attention, and no serious attempt seem to have been made by the natives, previous to those mentioned above, to cultivate fruit with a view to supplying the Hongkong market.

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II. ANIMAL LIFE.

(a.)~Wild.

61. The commonest of the wild animals in the New Territories is the deer, which abounds in all the hilly districts. All are of the small species known as hog-deer, and do not possess horns. As they are very destructive to the crops, and as their flesh is much esteemed and fetches a good price, they are hunted vigorously by the villagers, both with dogs and with traps: they are not shot, as it is important to keep them alive to send into market.

Foxes also abound in the hilly parts of the New Territories, and they too are very des- tructive not only to the crops, but also to game and poultry. They are not easily caught by the villagers, nor are they much desired as an article of diet.

Wild cats on the other hand fetch a good price in the market, and are often caught in traps they do much damage to stocks of poultry and ducks.

A few small wolves still survive among the hills occasionally descending to commit de- predations in the farm yards.

There are well authenticated cases in which tigers have visited portions of the New Territories and even the island of Hongkong. Two tigers were killed by Chinese in a cave in the hills near Sham Shui Po. Cattle have been killed in large numbers, especially in Lantao, where some 60 or 70 were killed, apparently by some beast with claws and tracks similar to a tiger or a panther, during 1911. It was reported by one native living in a hut on Lantao that a tiger was seen by him dragging a chain, and it is not impossible that the beast in question might be a tiger escaped from a local menagerie. It would live mostly on deer, but occa- sionally pounce on isolated herds of cattle; nor is there any reason to doubt that it could swim over from one island to another. In one case in May, 1911, a number of cattle had been killed in the South of Lantao, and the remainder of the herd. thirty in number was sent over for safety to a small island a mile away; but within 2 days, 16 of these had been killed or badly wounded. An expedition went out three days later, but by that time. the beast had probably returned to the thick cover afforded by the Lantao hills. It is said to have been seen again early this year (1912), both on Hongkong Island and on Lantao.

Game is not abundant; but snipe are fairly plentiful in certain districts in the autumn; and a good many quail with occasional partridge, woodcock, and wild duck can be obtained in the winter season.

(b.)-Domestic.

62. No Chinese village in the Territory is complete without its complement of pigs, poultry, and-in low-lying parts-also ducks; all of which cost nothing to keep, do the sca- venging, and fetch a good price in the Hongkong Market.

Horses and cattle are not bred in the New Territories but imported from the Chinese side of the border; a big horse and cattle market is held at Kunlong, a few miles beyond Sham Chun. There are in fact very few horses in the district, and these are small and of poor quality; but cattle are employed everywhere for ploughing. The strongest and most valued are the water buffaloes, which are especially suited for hard work in low-lying parts. They are a variety of the wild buffalo, and come originally from India, whence they spread both eastwards over China,and westwards as far as Greece and Italy. They have long horns, thick smooth brown hides and big feet, and are very tame in the hands of the native, but shy and sensitive to strange sights and smells-a fact which renders them somewhat alarming to the foreigner.

The other variety of cattle is the short-horned cow, usually of a brown or reddish colour, which is in common use throughout the whole district.

63. Bees are kept economically throughout the Territory, and especially in the Taipo district. Their hives are made, as a rule, out of cylindrical rattan baskets, which can often be seen suspended over the doorways, out of the way of vermin, ants and cockroaches. The bees swarm about April when the lichee and other trees are in blossom, and the honey is sold almost entirely to the local chemists, by whom it is utilised as medicine.

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III.-INDUSTRIES.

(a.)-Fishing.

64. Of all sections of the Chinese, the most interesting and the least known to foreigners is the fishing population: and of all they have been least affected by foreign influence. Their life and their methods and their materials are now much the same as they were several hundred years ago; and there is no better locality for the study of their life and ways than the archipelago of the Canton River Delta.

65. The bulk of the fishing is carried on by large junks, which trawl in pairs, with a long net some 250 feet in length. It is very wide in the middle and tapers to two narrow ends where it is attached to the two junks. Such junks will go to sea for any time up to 10 days, and to a distance of 100 miles or more from land; they carry a large supply of salt, in which each catch of fish is thoroughly salted and stowed away. The fish is dried on board or on shore and sold to the shops in the nearest port, which act as agencies for the big salt fish firms in Hongkong: the average price of salt fish is $11.00 per picul, equivalent to two pence a lb. The season for this fishing extends from about October to May: during the other months the winds are unreliable and typhoons are feared. The chief home of large junks in still Macao, where there is a convenient and extensive anchorage, good fishing ground, and cheaper living than near Hongkong: their chief resorts in our territory are Aberdeen, Shaukiwan and Cheung Chau. The large bulk of the fish trade is in salt-fish, which is exported from Hongkong in all directions: but in the immediate neighbourhood of Hongkong much of the fish can be delivered fresh. This is caught during the night and sent in by launches to reach the market before dawn. The price fluctuates considerably, according as weather, wind and tide have allowed of a good or a poor night's fishing. Sometimes there may be a big catch in the Western waters and a scanty haul on the East, and the Shaukiwan fish dealers may then be offering $20.00 per picul for fish which is at the same time fetching only $15 at Aberdeen: indeed junk masters arriving at Aberdeen. with a big catch, and finding low prices there, have been known to hire a launch to tow them round to Shaukiwan, and where they may be in time still to put their fish on the local market at a good figure.

66. Indeed life on a junk is altogether one of gambling and speculation, and therefore dear to the heart of the Chinese. A junk may return from a cruise with fish to the value of $2,000 or $3,000, or almost empty; and in either case all on board share in the fortunes of the junk. Living such a life, junkmen are naturally open-handed and free with their money, good customers for the shops, which will give them credit for many years in bad times, in the hope of a good season coming at last. They are honest and dependable, and give little trouble to the Police or the Magistrate; their domestic life is harmonious and free from the bickerings which are such a feature of life on shore. On the other hand they are simple folk, and their education and their standards fall somewhat short of those of the land. population. They are very superstitious and the numerous shrines and temples along the coast bear witness to their piety: on this account also they readily fall victims to the wiles of the fortune-tellers and averters of evil spirits.

67. Below the large junks in size come a variety of small craft of schooner or cutter rig, which fish in the more protected waters of the estuary. As a rule they work singly with smaller trawl nets, but sometimes go out in pairs, as in the Wong Fa season in November and December. Lastly come the innumerable small craft which swarm in every sheltered cove and emerge to fish either with small nets or with lines: the most noticeable of these are the Hoklo boats of whom many have settled in our waters, and many more come down, chiefly from Ping Hoi, some 40 miles away up the coast, to fish for shrimps during the summer months in the waters round Lantao. About April or May hundreds of these craft, some 20 feet long, with high bows and sterns and very shallow draught, take advan- tage of a fair East wind and descend upon these coasts. Three man each boat, of whom when fishing, one rows and the other two work the net. The Hoklos are for the greater part connected with shops and fish dealers in Hongkong, and surrounding ports, but many also come down as free-lances. When fishing is bad the latter may become a menace to the more peaceful craft, whom they suprise and rob at sea on dark nights, rowing away in their light craft to some sheltered spot to divide their booty. They occupy matsheds at various con- venient spots near good sandy beaches, where they can draw up their boats and dry or mend their nets.

54-

68. Fish are also caught in the large stake-nets which are a familiar feature of the surrounding coasts: these are of two kinds, the off-shore nets worked from a sort of crow's nest fixed on four piles driven into the sea-bed, often as much as 2 or 3 miles from the land, and the in-shore nets worked usually from a similar structure on the rocks, or the shore. Both nets are of similar construction, being large and square with rather a small mesh, to catch everything, and with a pocket in the centre, out of which the fish is taken from underneath. The net is fastened to four bamboo poles fixed into sockets, and is worked up and down by means of a windlass. The chief season for these nets is from June. to September. They have not shared in the prosperity of the fishing trade during the last two or three years, and have often been worked at a loss.

69. It has been said that the large junks trawl for every kind of fish, and in fact no craft or stake-net disdains any of the dwellers in the sea-except the porpoise which is nei- ther caught nor eaten, and the turtle which the Chinese as a rule refuses to catch or eat, though they sell and eat their eggs, which are found in abundance on beaches round the coast during the summer months.

70. But there are certain seasons and certain methods for catching various fish which deserve mention.

Whales have occasionally visited the waters of Mirs Bay, and in July, 1905, one was struck by a passing steamer, and the carcase washed ashore at the top of Tolo Harbour, 10 miles from Taipo: none appear to have seen during the last five years.

Sharks come into the neighbourhood and are fished for occasionally about June in the vicinity of Ling Ting Island, to the South-West of Hongkong. A line one or two miles long is laid down in the evening attached to floats, and fastened down by anchors at each end to this are attached large hooks at intervals of every 10 yards or so, baited with attractive morsels of fish or meat. If a shark catches one of the hooks he wears himself out with pulling at the line, which is taken up in the morning: as many as a dozen sharks have been caught on one line.

Wong Fa are caught in large quantities during November and December at the mouth of the Canton River near Tai O: they come in with the tide in immense shoals and all the craft from the neighbourhood sally out to catch them. They go out in pairs with large nets having sinkers at one end and floaters at the other: the men detect the presence of the fish by keeping their ears at the side of the junk, and throw in the net when they hear them coming.

Chu Yu--a kind of herring with a slight taste of mackerel is caught in January, February and March by nets. of the same kind as the above; but their coming is detected by their movements along the surface on dark nights.

Hak Chong Yu (black pomfret) is caught during the summer months by means of decoy fish, made of sandalwood and painted white, which are dragged through the water and followed by these fish, which are then easily caught or boards painted white are laid out on the side of the boat, and the fish leap on to these and fall into the boat.

71. Torches are much used at night in sheltered waters for catching fish. Curiously enough, in some cases, as with the Cheng Lun Yu (a sort of small herring) they are used, in conjunction with the noise of wooden clappers on the side of the boat, to frighten the fish into a net spread in front; in other cases they are used to decoy fish towards the boat, when they are speared or scooped up in baskets.

72. Shrimps are caught by means of a close-woven trawl net during the summer months, and about 1,000 boats are employed in this business during the summer months in the waters round Lantao. The shrimps are all made into a paste which is potted and sent to Hongkong, whence it is exported in large quantities.

73. Shell-fish are highly esteemed by the Chinese: they are caught by means of a long line let down with hundreds of empty shells attached: the fish occupy these and when the line is pulled up, they are removed and the line again let down in some parts also they are picked up by means of bamboo forks some 20 feet long with iron prongs, with which the men feel along the bottom and thus pick up the fish.

74. Crabs and Lobsters are caught by means of a long narrow net let down to the sea-bed, or in bamboo trap baskets, with bait inside.

:

55

75. There are large oyster-beds in the shallow waters of Deep Bay: these oysters are pickled and sent in to Hongkong.

76. Most of the large junks employed in fishing round these shores come from Macao and Canton; but there is a good business in the building of junks and boats at various places in the New Territories. The chief business is carried on along the shores at Sham- shuipo and Cheung Sha Wan in the North-West of the Kowloon Peninsula, where the bulk of the boat-building of Hongkong is carried on; Cheung Chau, Tai O, Peng Chau and Hang Hau in the South District, and Kat 0, Tapmun and Saikung in the North also have boat-building sheds, whence a few junks and a large number of small craft are turned

out.

77. Nets are made entirely by the fishermen and their families, the string being twisted out of a fibrous grass found on the hillsides.

(b.)-Other Industries.

71. Salt Pans for the manufacture of salt by evaporation from salt water are found in the New Territories at Tai O in Lantao,-37 acres; at Castlepeak, 32 acres, at Shin Wan near Taipo, 12 acres, and at Sha Tau Kok, less than one acre. During the early years of British administration the price of salt rose considerably in 1900 it was only 30 cents a picul; in 1908 it reached $1.20 a picul, and salt-makers came in for large profits. Since then however the price has fallen to about 70 cents a picul, chiefly owing to imports from the Northern coasts.

79. The New Territories are very rich in granite which appears chiefly in the form of granite boulders on the hillsides. By far the most important quarries are those which stretch Eastward along the North of Kowloon Bay as far as Lyeemun. They extend over about 100 acres and are leased to contractors for an average annual Crown Rent of $15,000: from these is supplied most of the granite now used in Hongkong. There are two other quarries, one on Chu Lu Kok to the North of Lantao, and the other near Lung Ku Tan between Castlepeak and Deep Bay: these sell their stone to Canton and the West River, mostly for paving stones. The quarry-men are nearly all Hakkas from Kweishin, who settle at the quarries until they have made some money and then return home.

80. Blue bricks are made in various parts of the Territory for local use, and in addition there is a growing export trade from works in the North of the Territory which send bricks by junk to Hongkong and Canton. Very few tiles were made in the Territory ten years ago but now there is a large and successful business in them: the two chief brickworks are at Muk Fu, near Sheung Shui on the Sham Chun river: each puts out about 75,000 bricks a month.

81. A more ambitious undertaking was started at Castlepeak about 1896 by a Hong- kong Company; it changed hands several times and about 1902 was fitted with expensive machinery, and increased its output to some 10,000 bricks a day: however these proved to be of inferior quality and no market could be found for them: about 1905 the works were closed and the place is now deserted.

82. Lime has long been made out of shells and rough coral throughout the whole Territory. The largest and most up to date kilns are on the island of Peng Chow near Lantao, but of late years the business at Peng Chow has fallen off, since the lime is not considered of good enough quality for Hongkong buildings. The small kilns, in which rough coral is burned into lime over pine or brushwood fires, are familiar features of the seashore everywhere. Unfortunately no limestone has been found in the Territories, and so the best lime has to be imported.

83. The only Potteries are at Wun Iu, near Taipo, about 400,000 pots, rice bowls and plates are here turned out every year, of an average value of 6 cash each; most of them are exported to Tam Shui in Chinese Territory; some also to Hongkong.

84. The manufacture of bean-stick, chiefly in Tsun Wan, dates back more than 50 years, but has developed and increased especially during the last two or three years. The beans are imported from the North, and the bean-stick is made from the skin formed when they are boiled in pans: a large quantity is now shipped to America and elsewhere, and the local product seems now to be preferred to that manufactured in Canton and Singapore.

56

85. Distilleries for the making of native liquor are numerous in all parts of the New Territories. The liquor is distilled by fermentation, either of rice or of molasses, of which the latter is gradually becoming the more generally used.

IV.-LIFE OF THE PEOPLE-CUSTOMS, HABITS AND RELIGION.

86. China is not a country, nor the Chinese a people, easily accessible to outside influence, and to this rule the New Territories are no exception.

87.A visitor to the Territory of 1899, upon returning in 1912, would find changes to remark in the outward appearance of the country, but he would not find the life or character of its inhabitants greatly altered. Roads and railways have indeed been made through the centre of the Northern district: and country folk who used to require a full day to reach Hongkong can now go in and out and do their shopping in the day. More and more of the young men from the country have been tempted into Hongkong or abroad in quest of higher wages, and many have returned with their savings to their native villages: money has been brought into the country to purchase land required for roads and railways, and with all this added wealth, many more substantial houses have been built all over the Territory a taste has sprung up for many foreign luxuries, and ærated waters, cigarettes, clothes, caps, towels and kerosene oil are now common objects of sale in the small market towns throughout the Territory. Contact with foreign ways has rendered the average villager less superstitious than of yore: not many years ago the cutting off of the cock's head was an almost infallible test of the truth of a country witness' statement: but now it is seldom that a witness cannot reconcile his conscience to a small mis-statement: he is no longer so simple as to believe that "as the cock's head is cut off, so will his line be cut off, if he does not speak the truth",

88. It is not yet time to estimate the change made in the New Territories by the political events of 1911, but it is certain that it has not been confined to the cutting of the queue and the donning of the foreign cap. The suddenness and the unanimity which marked this step throughout the Territory were remarkable, and Puntis, Hakkas and Hoklos all showed thereby that they had long been ready to join the party of progress, as soon as they were given a lead.

89. There is another feature in the history of the New Territories under British rule that the economic mind of the villager appreciates to the full, namely, the rise in the cost of living. The following is a comparative list of the average prices throughout the New Terri- tory in 1900 and in 1911:

Rice (best) per picul.

(inferior)

27

**

Eggs per dozen

per picul

Pork,

Firewood

Potatoes

2:

Salt

Fresh Fish

(at fishing villages)

22

1900.

1911.

$ 4.00 3.50 10

$ 8.00

6.50

15.00

25.00

30

65

40

90

30

70

10.00

20.00

1

It can be seen from this table that the price of food has about doubled in the last 10 years, and wages have about doubled too: and as money has come into the Territory, so the standard of living has risen continually. Three meals a day are considered necessary to support the day labourer, who never dreamt of a midday meal a few years ago: and decent clothes, caps, and shoes, formerly luxuries, are now among the necessities of existence. House-building, and therefore house-rent, are much dearer, and the Crown rent is much higher than it was under Chinese rule-or is in the neighbouring Chinese Territory. The latter, though obviously much less prosperous, has still the great advantage of cheaper food and cheaper living, and an advantage, which we may scorn, in a lower standard of living. And the one great merit of Chinese rule is its tolerance: it moves with the feelings of the people, and does not force itself upon them: taxes are obtained from those who can pay, whereas many poor people across the border go on occupying their houses and plots of land for years without payment of rent: again, if they go to law, they are squeezed, but the large majority who avoid the courts are not troubled, and see far less of the law and the authorities than the average Westerner.

i

*

57

90. The Chinese villager does not set great store by cleanliness, or better housing; he finds himself entirely unable to understand our aims and ideas, and our dismal condi- tion of unrest: he frankly dislikes our iconoclastic spirit, our want of imagination, and our blindness to all the forces of nature: he fears the inquisitions of the Police, and dreads the thought of the Sanitary Board; but he does recognise some solid advantages from British rule-chiefly in the security of life and property, and the greater prosperity which has accrued from restrictions placed on gambling and opium smoking.

91 The domestic life of the villager does not differ much from that of Chinese in other parts of China, nor has it altered much during the few years of British occupation : if anything, it falls rather behind the general standard of freedom and enlightenment in the Canton province. For this South corner of the San On District, which is now the New Territory, was a remote and rugged country, far from the seat of government and learning in Canton, and (before the cession of Hongkong) little touched by external influence and even now the customs and habits of the people are probably little changed from what they were a hundred years ago.

92. A Chinese community like that of the New Territories is by its structure and its long habit of decentralised government very easy to administer. But its old established customs and institutions must not be lightly changed or affronted, and necessary innovations have to be introduced with the greatest delicacy.

In the New Territories as elsewhere continuous descent in the male line is the para- mount object in the life of the Chinese, and the necessity for this is the foundation for many of their habits and customs: respect for age and experience is their second characteristic. The father of the family is the supreme head, and his sons come next in position and estima- tion: the mother of the family reigns supreme, by virtue of her years and her share in the continuance of the family, over the feminine establishment, and often proves a tyrant to her daughter-in-law. It is the object of every living male to provide himself with an heir; if he dies before marriage or has no male issue, he must be provided with an heir by adoption.

93. As a rule in the Territory, the villager has only one wife, with a concubine occasion- ally added owing to the barrenness of the first wife: but there are a few rich residents who can afford larger establishments. Marriages are arranged by the parents of the two parties, and a certain money consideration passes to the father or relations of the bride: the average ages of marriage are about 19 and 17 for man and wife respectively but among the poorer Hakka population the practice of infant betrothals is common. The girl in such case is regarded as belonging to her destined husband's family, but continues to reside. with her parents, until she is of an age to cohabit with her husband: unless her parents die first, when she enters the house of her future husband as an "expectant" wife. The large proportion of seagoing folk among the population leads to a number of betrothals not being carried through, and it has become usual to fix seven years as the limit of time that a girl é; she can then give six months notice to the relations of the latter, and if nothi

eard of him, she can arrange a marriage with someone else. The greatest trouble to administration has come from runaway wives. The loosening of the bonds of custom and the dermining of male authority which are inevitable results of our rule, have left the injured husband in a difficult position. By the Ordinances providing penalties for harbouring married women, he has obtained some redress, but the evil has not been remedied.

must v

94. The Chinese point of view which regards the woman as a chattel, and recognises the right of a husband to sell or mortgage his concubine and a father his daughter, is one that may appear repulsive to the Western conscience: but both steps are according to Chinese ideas fully justified on grounds of infidelity and of poverty respectively; and it is likely to be long before the social position of women enables them entirely to escape this fate. But hereditary slavery, equivalent to our old " villeinage", has been abolished in China by Imperial Edict on several occasions and is now practically extinct, so far as the New Territories are concerned. The abandonment or poisoning of young children is still not unknown in some parts; it is sometimes due to the disease or deformity of the infant, but more often to jealousy between the wives of the establishment.

95. The desire for posterity already mentioned is connected with that ancestor worship which is the first religious duty of the Chinese; and it is the chief duty of the male heir to provide for this; in the 3rd moon, and sometimes in the 9th, he visits the ancestral grave and worship there; presenting copious supplies of rice and pork and other delicacies which the ancestor consumes in the spirit only, and he and his relations then devour in the flesh.

ཉ་

58

96. But this worship of the spirits of the departed is in fact only a part of a general worship of spirits of all kinds and forms. The former are nearest to the worshippers and naturally demand their first attention, but there are other spirits of little less importance ; in particular there are dragon spirits on land, especially in the hills, and on sea; there are spirits peculiar to special hills, and in many wild trees and shrubs, which are duly wor- shipped and presented with gifts of food by the neighbouring folk. There are too certain reigning spirits which are the chief objects of Chinese worship, notably in the New Territo- ries, Tin Hau, the Queen of Heaven, who is the special guardian of sailors, and Kwan Tai, the god of war. The former has a fine temple at Cheung Chau, the chief resort of the fish- ing folk.

97. The general religious beliefs as to the relations of the spirits with the land are em- 97 T braced under the name "Fungshui", meaning "wind and water"-the two great moving elements in nature. The whole earth, with all that grows out of it, is full of spirits good and bad, which have their own prejudices about the use and occupation of their haunts, and require proper attention from the human beings in their neighbourhood; so it clearly behoves anyone intending to build a house or a grave, a road or a railway, to ascertain on the best authority what site or direction he should choose. In its origins, fungshui can undoubtedly claim to be based on feelings and ideas natural to human nature, and there is much wisdom in it, which even our modern science cannot entirely ignore. Thus "fung- shui" forbids the overlooking of other houses or places, and the setting of one grave just above another for such an action would show a spirit of arrogance and presumption. It sets great store by wild trees, which are for this reason carefully preserved and even worshipped near the villages; and certain large or ancient trees are objects of special veneration.

When a site is duly chosen, and afterwards found to be unhealthy, it is discredited; and thus in time fungshui is modified or built up by a kind of case law; and in fact the popular opinion of

good fungshui" is very seldom mistaken. It is not surprising that in course of time the ideas of "fungshui" have been complicated and overlaid with numberless small observances and superstitions, employed by necromancers and geomancers and the whole host of fungshui professors in order to increase their own repute and mystify the people: but in its general principles it is a sane and simple idea, and is readily adapted by the common sense of its votaries, in accordance with the teaching of experience, and the needs of the time.

in

stern ideas. d spirits are still The old ceremonies

98. During the British administration of the New Territories, railways and roads have been cut ruthlessly through and over the hills, sometimes in places known to be the haunts of dragons and other spirits, and houses have been built for private occupation on the tops of the hills. For these and other purposes the graves also have been summarily removed from the hillsides,-not, it must be said, without compensation being given. But such acts, which no Chinese would have ventured to perform himself, were soon regarded as inevitable and acquiesced in by the people almost without a murmur: and now as time goes on, the old ideas of fungshui are being modified so far as they prove incompatible with our laws and customs, and to some extent too by the direct influe But spirit worship continues to flourish in other respects, and the g the objects of the whole-hearted veneration and belief of the pe are requisitioned for calling down rain, or averting illness; and the New Territory resident, however enlightened, would not choose a grave-site or a house-site without calling in the assistance of a professor of fungshui: or neglect the proper offerings to his local temple. Naturally the professors of fungshui are not averse to playing on the fears and superstitions of the common people, and many hard-earned dollars are paid in order to avert calamities foretold by these cunning gentry; to these impositions the fishing folk are specially subject, and several dollars may be paid by a poor fisherman for the drawing of a black devil in the correct attitude for warning off the approach of its real counterpart.

99. A little better than the professors of fungshui, are their brothers in the medical profession; in both callings there are some honest men, but the doctors also play upon the weaknesses of their, fellows, and it is probable that faith forms a large ingredient in most cures. However, in medicine, as in fungshui, the physician and his patient have learned much from experience, and many of the native remedies are both simple and efficacious. Western science was at first regarded with suspicion, and even now the majority of the people prefer to adhere to their old methods and medicines; but some simple Western medicines were very soon accepted, and continue to increase in popularity.

Education.

100 For the destruction of these old superstitions and prejudices minds of the natives, we must look chiefly to education and to travel.

which still clog the The New Territory

1

1

2

59

Chinese are great travellers, and among the male population are many seamen and firemen on ships, and many returned emigrants from America and other countries, whose wide experience acts as a continual solvent on the narrow ignorance of their fellow countrymen. Education of any kind has always appealed powerfully to Chinese, and they are probably more ready than any other people to defer to the voice of learning. In every village appeal is made to the lettered man to settle points of dispute, and he receives the place of honour in all local gatherings. It must be admitted that this respect was formerly due not only to his intrinsic merits and his superior knowledge, but to the advantages that he possessed in being able to write and thus to draw up petitions in proper form and present the cases of litigants to the courts. With the coming of British rule these advantages have largely disappeared, except that it is still usual for a litigant or other petitioner to submit his petition in due form."

101. But the demand for education, mostly on the old fashioned lines, has been rather stimulated than otherwise, and there is practically no family which cannot obtain elementary education for the sons of the family, at a cost of from $3 to $6 per annum for each boy. Government schools on a small scale have been opened at centres in the New Territories providing an elementary instruction in English; the fee for these is 50 cents per month. There is not however a great demand for this instruction of a more modern type in most of the districts, for the people still cling to the old-fashioned learning and particularly dislike giving up their control over the teacher. In the ordinary Chinese school if the teacher does not gain the approval of the parents, his wages are curtailed or he is dismissed; and the hours and the curriculum are in their discretion. Those too who cannot pay their full fees, may make small gifts of food instead. In fact they feel the same objection to this as to other Government institutions that it is too rigid and this dislike is sufficient to counteract the desire to acquire a knowledge of English.

knowledge of English. The number of Government Schools in the New Territories outside New Kowloon is only three with an average attendance of some 20 each out of a total of 224 schools in the Territories with an average attendance of 16 each. (Appendix G.) According to the Census of 1911, out of 37,331 male inhabitants questioned, 21,168 or about 57 per cent. stated that they characters", i.e., could read and write the simple characters. Girls are seldom taught such accomplishments and at the same census out of 33,890 females questioned, only 466 or some i per cent. were entered as thus equipped.

"knew

102. There is no need to fear for the educational future of the New Territories, and it can safely be predicted that as money comes into the country and new ideas spread, there will be an increased demand for learning both ancient and modern. The railway will bring European residents with their customs and institutions into the New Territory, and the Territory into closer contact with Hongkong and Western ideas. The only fear is that this intercourse may spread that veneer of Western civilisation which is such an unhappy feature of the half-educated Chinese in Hongkong. For it is a sad fact that natives of all countries colonised from the West, when introduced to the luxuries and excitements of our modern competitive life, have been apt to lose their simple old-fashioned virtues, and fall easy victims to the novel temptations besetting them. Hitherto it has been the policy of the Government in the New Territories to restrain the popular weakness for gambling, which was admitted by the better conscience of the people to be a serious obstacle to their peace and prosperity: but to abstain scrupulously from radical innovations, or from interference with local customs and institutions. In them our superior knowledge may find much that is absurd or even degraded, but their improvement will not spring from legislation or coercion, but only from the growing enlightenment of the people."

9th June, 1912.

:

G. N. ORME,

District Officer.

!

60

Appendix A.

Section 39b of Ordinance 31 of 1911.

means all waters, whether

"The Waters of the Colony" or "Colonial Waters " navigable or not, included within the area bounded as follows:-

On the South, by the parallel of latitude 22° 9' North between the points where it is intersected by the meridians of longitude 113° 52′ East and 114° 30′ East of Greenwich ;

On the North, by a line drawn from the point where the meridian of longitude 113° 52′ East of Greenwich intersects the parallel of latitude touching the extreme south-west point of the shore of Deep Bay to the said south-west point of the shore of Deep Bay, and thence along the high water mark upon the shore of Deep Bay to the estuary of the Sham Chun River. Thence by a line drawn as described in the agreement delimiting the northern frontier of the New Territories signed by James Haldane Stewart Lockhart and Wong Ts'ün-shin at Hongkong on 19th March, 1899, and follows the high water mark in Mirs Bay to the point where the meridian of longitude 114° 30′ East of Greenwich intersects the mainland ; On the East, by the meridian of longitude 114° 30′ East of Greenwich between the points where it intersects the mainland and the parallel of latitude 22° 9' North;

On the West, by the meridian of longitude 113° 52′ East of Greenwich between the points where it intersects the parallel of latitude touching the extreme south-west point of the shore of Deep Bay and the parallel of latitude 22° 9' North; and between the points on the north and south coast of Lantau where the meridian of 113° 52′ East of Greenwich intersects the island the boundary follows the western coast-line of Lantau and includes the waters appertaining thereto.

Appendix B.

Summary of the chief Public Works in the New Territories.

Description.

When completed.

I-Police Stations.

(a.) Permament

buildings newly

Cost.

erected.

$

C.

Tai Po

1899

11,585.36

Au Táu

1900

13,286.83

Ping Shán

1900

13,514.15

Sai Kung

1901

14,048.35

Sheung Shui

1902

20.627.46

Sha Tau Kok

1901

10,239.15

Tại Ò

1902

15,108.00

Tsun Wàn

1911

13,062.17

(b) Customs

Stations,Chinese

Yamens and

houses converted

into

Stations.

Police

Kowloon City

Sham Shui Pò

Cheung Chau

Tung Chúng

San T'in

Sha T'in

1901-2

about $20,000.00

Yung Shu Wàn

and

Blockhouses at Ta

Ku Ling and Sha

T'in.

1.

61

Description.

Date.

Cost.

II.-Quarters and Offices.

$

c.

Island Quarters, Tai Po.

1906

31,552.59

Staff Quarters,

Tai Po.

1910

29,196.96

Land Office, Tai Po.

1907

16,167.98

III.-Roads and Paths.

(a.) 14 foot Roads.

Yaumati to Tai Po (16 miles).

1902

194,929.35

Hunghom to Kowloon City

(1 miles).

1900

19,620.06

(b.) 6 foot paths.

Kowloon City Road extension

to Ngai Chi Wan and Customs Pass.

1907

27,174.87

Kowloon City Road extension

to Sha Tin Gap (9 feet

wide).

1908

18,915.08

Tai Po to Sheung Shui to

Shun Wan to Ma Wat.

1905

2,590.22

(c.) 6 foot to 8 foot.

Castle Peak to Sha Tau Kok (18 miles completed at end of 1911).

IV.-Telephones.

124,183.86

(No record of cost.)

...

V-Water Works.

Kowloon Reservoir.

1910

622,499.48

Kowloon Catchwaters, Filter

Beds, Service Reser- voirs, etc.

VI.-Reclamation of Tai Po

Fishpond.

Appendix C.

452,182.55

1908

8,843.60

Police in the New Territories.

Year.

Europeans.

Indians. Chinese.

Total.

1899

32

89

27

148

1900

31

122

34

187

1901

22

114

33

169

1902

15

97

31

143

1903

15

86

34

135

1904

15

90

33

138

1905

15

88.

34

137

1906

15

88

37

140

1907

15

91

37

143

1908

15

90

37

142

1909

15

89

38

142

1910

14

98

1911

13

106

45

忠告:

40

152

164

62

Appendix D.

Serious Crime in the New Territories.

Year.

Gang Robberies.

Highway Robberies.

Boat and Junk

Robberies.

1899

25

12

1900

20

1901

23

·4

1902

li

1903

18

1904

19

3

5

3

1905

16

4

1906

9

1

1907

3

1

1908

11

3

1909

13

1910

25

1911

19

101 2

5

LO LO CO CD ∞ ∞ 1 10 2 2 +

274 CD 10 GO

5

5

8

3

6

6

7

5

4

5

14 13

Appendix E.

Money Societies.

In a country of small village communities like the New Territory, with no large indus- tries and no capitalists, it is not surprising that the people should have endeavoured to devise schemes for raising money among themselves. The means adopted is so original and dis- tinctive that it deserves to be given in detail. Supposing that A wishes to raise $100, he goes among his friends and endeavours to form a "Wui", or (money) association. He will

a

perhaps find 19 other men willing to subscribe $5.00 each making a Wui of 20 men, with à capital of $100. A himself being the "head" or Wui Tau. They meet together and put in their subscriptions, and at the intervals arranged they meet for subsequent drawings, the whole pool going on each occasion to the man who bids most, i.e., is ready to take the least contribution from the members for the use of the money, he will be, of course, the man most in need of the money at the time. Thus if B bids 50 cents at the 2nd drawing he gets $5.00 back from A but only $4.50 from each of the others-total $86.00. On the 3rd drawing perhaps 2 or 3 are very much pressed for money and are willing to bid up to $1.00. Then C will get $10.00 from A and B and only $68.00 for the rest, making $78.00

Thus :-

A is Wui Tau and takes $100.00 at first drawing.

B bids 50 cents and takes $5.00 from A and $4.50 each from the rest, making

$86.00.

C bids $1.00 and takes $10.00 from A and B and $4.00 each from the rest, making

$78.00.

and so on until all the members have had their turns.

But such a complicated transaction is only too apt to break down owing to the insol- vency of one or more of the members, and to provide a sad tangle for the Magistrate to unravel,

63

Appendix F.

Chinese Medicines.

The inhabitants of the New Territory are not greatly addicted to the use of drugs and medicines, and little has been done by doctors or dealers to produce them on Western lines. The poorer people, especially the Hakkas, rarely call in doctors: but are accustomed, in case of sickness, to go up to the hillsides and gather herbs and leaves of certain kinds, which they boil in water to bathe in.

The following are the chief native medicines sold in the New Territory markets :-

Edible Seaweed for fever.

Shang Ti (root)

stimulating appetite.

Wai shan (root)

White lily root

""

coughs.

Almonds

""

""

Orange peel

"1

lung complaints.

Honeysuckle as aperients and together for fever.

Also lotus nuts, sweets of various sorts, pepper, etc.

Appendix G.

School Census, New Territories. April, 1912.

District.

No. of Schools.

Average Attendance.

Average fee per month per head.

Punti.

Hakka.

Hoklo.

A.-Northern District.

Au Tau (with San Tin)

34

15

47 cts.

26

8

...

...

Ping Shan

28

12-

461

24

...

Sheung Shui

13

13

58

10

3

Tai Po.....

27

13

60

19

Sha T'in

Tsun Wan

8

14

621

3

5

...

.12

Sai Kung......

Sha Tau Kok

227

17

47

1

11

23

16

36

10.

13

...

21

19

40

1

20

B.-Southern District.

Kowloon City.

14

34

40

Sham Shui Po

15

22

50

8

NN

71

7

Tai O

8

21

33

8

Cheung Chai Lamma

Po Toi......

10

20

38

6

....

1

13

40

1

: ܗ:

2

...

1/1/

...

...

Hang Hau Peninsula

7

19

45

Ma Wan

Ching Yi......................

21

2

20

42

13

3

1

4

1

...

1

16

40

1

...

Total,... 224

16

46 cts. 117

105

11/

Mean Average.

1

67

HONGKONG.

No. 1912

13

REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE APPOINTED TO ENQUIRE INTO THE EXPENDITURE AND DELAY IN CONSTRUCTING THE POST OFFICE BUILDINGS.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor, October 3rd, 1912.

1. The Committee appointed to enquire into the causes which have led (1) to an expen- diture on the new l'ost Office in excess of what was anticipated and (2) to delay in their completion, and (3) whether both results were unavoidable, or (4) were due to the methods employed in carrying out the work, have the honour to report as follows :—

2. The cost of building the Post Office, as originally designed, was estimated, in the first instance, at $525,000. This amount was increased to $603,750, in consequence of Government deciding in July 1903 to add another storey to the building. The first esti nate did not include the cost of the foundations. These a contractor, in November 1903, under- took to lay for $134,000, but as the work proceeded it was found necessary to put in piles of greater length than had been contracted for, and to lay down a concrete and asphalt basement, whereby the estimate for the foundations was raise to $168,000. Not un'il January 1906 was the work of laying the foundations complete. Meantime, Government had decided that all the mouldings to the level of the top parapet should be of granite, and had authorised the Architects to use steel instead of wood where it was considered to be advantageous, and otherwise to allow for wood of the best kind. Accordingly the Archi- tects prepared a revised and more detailed estimate, based upon these modifications of the original proposals, and including the cost of heating, lighting, and various other necessary fittings. These modifications account for the estimate of the cost of the superstructure being increased by $44,200 to $647,950, and the total cost, inclusive of the foun iations, to $855,100. That was in May 1905, nearly two years after the original plans had been accepted. Tenders for the superstructure were then called for. The lowest receiv·1, and the one accepted, was $13,900 in excess of the revised estimate. Two suggestions have been made to account for this increase. The first was that contractors almost invariably tender higher for Government work than for work to be executed by private architects. The second was that the building trade was then active wages were high: materials were dear: consequently contractors fearing a continuance, or even an intensifi ation of the situa- tion thus created, did not deem it advisable to calculate as closely as the architects ha I done.

This

3. By this increase the total estimated cost was raised to $372,000. Subsequently a decision to erect a clock tower on the building brought the figure up to $929,250. sum is short of the actual expenditure, up to date, by $110,750, that is to say, the builling, still unfinished (inasmuch as the clock tower remains to be erecte 1) has cost $1,040,000.

4. The largest item in this further increase of $110,750, is $51,195. It is statel by the Director of Public Works to be due to the inadequacy of the quantities in the "Bill of Quantities" furnished by the Architects. When asked for an explanation Mr. Rum stated that it was the first he had heard of it, and that in the absence of particulars he could not say whether his Bill of Quantities was inadequate or not. To some extent it was pre-

68

sumably due to the changes in the roof plan, which entailed the heightening of the interior walls. The remaining $59,555 covers the cost of alterations and additions made in working out the plans, the principal itens being $14,567 for encasing the iron columns and girders. in concrete. $11.000 for the substitution of iron for timber purlins in the roof, $6.075 for sanitary fittings, and $5,638 for the provision of letter boxes for boxholders. The balance is distributed over numerous small requirements not originally provided for. In view of these facts the Committee finds that the excess of actual over anticipated expenditure has been chiefly caused by numerous alterations of, and additions to, the original plans, the necessity for which in many cases should have been foreseen. Foresight in anticipating requirements would have reduced the discrepancy between actual and estimated expenditure but, except as regards the clock tower, it has not been demonstrated that there has been excessive expenditure on the work done.

5. As regards the clock tower the Committee finds that avoidable expenditure was incurred. The tower was first of all built up to the level of the third storey in granite, and carried up in brick to the level of the top parapet. Not until then did the Public Works De- partment go into the question of the adequacy of a tower built partly of brick, to stand the weight of the proposed superstructure above the level of the roof. The question being then gone into, without reference to the Architects, it was decided to pull down that portion of the walls built of brick and to substitute granite. The expense of building up these brick walls, and of pulling them down again, might clearly have been avoided by an earlier study of this most important question.

6. Summarising the main facts appearing in evidence furnished by the witnesses examined, viz., Mr. Chatham, Director of Public Works, Mr. Fisher, Executive Engineer, and Mr. Ram of Messrs. Denison, Ram and Gibbs, the Consulting Architects, the Committee finds that:-

(1.) Increase of cost was due (inter alia) to conditions of the labour market,. additions and alterations to plans and specifications which were approved by. Government including various alterations on account of the clock tower, and to quantities being in excess of the original calculations. The total cost was not on the whole excessive having in view the style of construction. This leaves out of consideration loss of interest, of rent of old Post Office building. &c., entailed by the delay and any further claim which may yet be established by the Contractor arising out of the same cause.

(2.) The delay could have been avoided. The chief causes were as follows:-

(7.) Detention by the Director of Public Works of the roof plans for a period of

over two years, after which they were rejected.

(b.) Differences of opinion between the Architects and the Executive Engineer as to what drawings were required and also as to certain constructional requirements.

(c.) The strained relations that existed between the Architects and Mr. Fisher, the Executive Engineer in charge of the work for most of the time.

7. There were employed on the work (a) a firm of Consulting Architects who state that they were hardly ever consulted about changes in the plans and who also complain about the attitude of certain of the Public Works Department employees: (b) The Director of Public Works whose time was more than occupied on other matters and who therefore was unable to supervise the work with promptitude and (c) the Executive Engineer who complains of defectiveness in the plans furnished by the Architects on the one hand and of indifference on the part of the Director of Public Works on the other, he himself having no real executive power, while his criticisms were ignored and he was furnished with insufficient assistance in carrying out the work.

8. (

Mr. Fisher stated that he had to do a large amount of work in the way of drawings, &c., which formed no part of his proper duty; (b) Mr. Fisher received instruc- tions from the Director of Public Works which were liable to misconstruction, and as to the carrying out of which, the Director of Public Works never subsequently made any enquiry; (e) The position thus created was not conducive either to the efficient, or expeditious, carrying out of the. work. If it had been entrusted either to an efficient Executive Engineer, or to the Architects who designed the building, no delay need have occurred.

69

9. At various times during the period of construction of the Post Office, Mr. Fisher was employed on other work, viz.:—

Courts of Justice. Harbour Office.

Western Market.

Quarters for District Officer, Tai Po.

Yaumati School.

Stable and Approach at Tai Po.

Volunteer Headquarters.

Mortuary, &c., Kowloon.

Time Ball Tower, Blackhead's Hill.

Underground Urinal, Peak Road. Obelisk in Kowloon.

Land Office. Tai Po. Bungalow at Tai Po.

Roof over Blake Pier.

Market, Kowloon Point.

Staircase to Ball Room, Government House.

Removing and refixing Statue of His Majesty the King.

He had for a portion of the time so employed, two qualified Engineers assisting him. It would have been preferable to have relieved Mr. Fisher of some of these works: in fact, to have divided them up among the Staff of three, each one being responsible for his own share.

10. The Committee finds in effect that a small part of the extra expense and almost the entire delay was attributable to a bad system being worked in such a manner as to aggravate its worst features.

11. Accordingly the Committee makes the following recommendations :—

(a.) The Director of Public Works should be relieved of the less important routine work of his Department, such matter being distributed among his Assist- ants; he would then be able to inspect works in progress frequently and generally to give prompt and effective supervision to all branches. (b.) The works undertaken by the Department should be under the direct super- vision of Engineers who should have sufficient power to ensure the details of the works being carried out properly, without undue reference to higher authority; each should have only such works in his charge as he can superintend effectually and he should be directly responsible for the proper execution of those works, under the general control of the Director of Public Works.

(c.) Before beginning any work a detailed estimate should be compiled and for the

larger works accurate bills of quantities made and guaranteed as correct.

Such estimates are absolutely necessary for ascertaining the cost of works and it is of great advantage to have such from the point of view of the contractor, the public and of the Government.

(d.) For the larger contracts there should be an Estimating and Measuring Branch in the Public Works Department, composed of experts trained in that line; in addition to dealing with the bigger works, the members of this branch could assist generally, thus relieving other members of the staff of duties to which they are unaccustomed.

These Surveyors could also be employed in making occasional check measurements of work, previously measured by the subordinate staff; this would tend to prevent collusion in over-measuring between subordinates and com ractors.

It is desired to emphasize the necessity for the appointment of only trained experts for this branch.

70

1

(e.) The forms of Contract used by the Department should be so worded as to throw the onus of making out bills for payment on the Contractor; all bills should, of course, be checked and certified in the usual way by the responsible officials.

(f.) The form used for payments on account should include the amounts of the Contract and retention moneys, the estimated values of work executed and materials allowed for, previous payments and any other such items as are necessary to show the state of the service at the date of payment.

A. M. THOMSON,

Chairman.

C. W. R. ST. JOHN, Colonel.

HONGKONG, 28th June, 1912.

C. H. ROSS.

M. STEWART.

81

HONGKONG.

NEW POST OFFICE.

EXPLANATORY STATEMENT OF INCREASE IN COST.

No. 19

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor, December 19th, 1912.

1912

1. The proposal to construct a new building to accommodate the Post Office, Treasury, &c., was first dealt with by a Committee appointed in September 1894, who recommended inter alia that competitive designs should be invited for such a building (vide Sessional Paper 31/1896).

2. After prolonged correspondence and discussions, chiefly concerning the site on which the building should be erected (vide Sessional Papers 2/1898 and 16/1902 and Legislative Council Minutes 28.2.98), it was finally decided in 1902 to purchase the recently reclaimed area belonging to Sir Robert Jardine, on the west side of Pedder Street, at an outlay of $508,280 (vide Sessional Paper 16/1902). This decision was confirmed by resolution of the Legislative Council on the 10th April 1902. The sanction of the Secretary of State to inviting competitive designs, as suggested by the Committee above mentioned, was obtained. and the Conditions of Competition were published in December 1902, one of such conditions being that the total cost of the building, exclusive of Architects' commission, was not to exceed $500,000. The Architects' commission on this sum would have amounted to about $25,000, thus making the total cost $525,000. The building was specified to be 3 stories in height, with a basement underneath for storage purposes, &c..

3. The design submitted by Messrs. Denison, Ram & Gibbs was selected on the 13th July 1903, the firm being officially notified on the 17th July. In the report which accom- panied their design, the following statement was made with regard to the cost :-

"With regard to the question of cost it is believed that the buildings can be built "as shown on plans for the sum named in the conditions, viz., $500,000 : "but the extent to which stone could be used, and steel construction and "the better classes of wood made use of, would have to depend in great measure upon the local conditions of building prices at the time when "tenders are invited. According to present information the estimate is "made up as follows:--

"Estimated cost of foundations including drainage,.

Superstructure and fittings, Lighting, Heating & Ventilation,.

"Contingencies,

17

77

66

"

27

.$122,000 353,000

...

21,000

4,000

Total,

$500,000"

4. The Public Works Committee, to whom the designs had been submitted in the beginning of May, recommended in their report of the 13th July 1903 that a fourth storey should be added to the building and their recommendation was approved by Government. The question of the extra cost involved in this proposal was referred to Messrs. Denison, Ram & Gibbs on the 23rd July, who replied on the 27th July 1903 that they estimated the cost of the additional storey at $75,000. Adding Architects' commission (say $3,750) to this sum, the total estimated cost became $603,750.

4

82

5. Before preparing the Contract Drawings for the Superstructure, Messrs. Denison, Ram & Gibbs enquired what the wishes of the Government were as to the use of stone in the facades, adding that they would much like to have all the cornices, &c., and dressings throughout executed in granite but they feared that this would be out of the question if the cost was to be strictly limited to the sum of $500,000. They further stated that the same remark applied, though in a less degree, to the use of steel and the better classes of wood. They enquired whether they were to regard the sum mentioned as more or less binding or whether, in a building of such a character, materials of a more lasting character than those generally employed should be used.

6. His Excellency Sir Henry Blake, to whom, as Governor, the matter was referred, considered that a very important public building such as this should be of the best and Messrs. Denison, Ram & Gibbs were accordingly instructed that they might provide in the first instance for the use of first-class materials and of granite where they deemed it desirable to introduce it on the principal fronts. Should the tenders prove to be much in excess of the estimated cost, it would afterwards be considered what modifications, if any, should be made in the materials to be used. It was thought that the sum of $500,000 should cover the cost of first-class materials and permit of a fairly handsome exterior.

7. Up to the 31st December 1909, when their engagement as Architects was terminated by mutual consent, Messrs. Denison, Ram & Gibbs prepared the drawings, specifications and bills of quantities for the work and the requisitions for materials required from England.

8. To facilitate the erection of the building, it was arranged that a contract for the Foundations should be let separately and Messrs. Denison, Ram & Gibbs prepared plans accordingly. The proposals which they originally submitted for the foundations were con- sidered to be in excess of requirements and they were materially reduced at the instance of the Director of Public Works with a view to keeping within the estimate. The number of piles was reduced, the width of the concrete foundations curtailed and brick footings were substituted for stone.

9. Tenders for the modified proposals were called for in September 1903 and the amount of the lowest received, after correction of arithmetical errors, was $174,170.86. In view of the large excess over their estimate ($122,000, including drainage), the matter was referred to Messrs. Denison, Ram & Gibbs, who obtained a tender amounting to $134,001.04 from a Contractor who had not previously tendered and whom they recommended as being capable of carrying out the work. This tender was accepted in November 1903.

10. In February 1905, Messrs. Denison, Ram & Gibbs forwarded the drawings, specifica- tions, &c. for the Superstructure and they were then requested to furnish an estimate of the cost of the building based upon the documents submitted. Their estimate, dated 17th April 1905, was as follows:-

Contract for Superstructure as planned with additional storey

and with all mouldings to level of top parapet in granite, . $620,000 Heating to Public Hall and Treasurer's Clerks' Office,

Electric Bells (3 Entrances and living rooms on Second Floor),

750

Electric Lighting including plain fittings and lamps,

10,000

250

Lightning Conductors,

950

Lifts including fixing,

8,500

Drainage,..

500

Sanitary fittings,

4,000

Water Supply,

500

Post Office fittings and Contingencies,

2,500

$647,950

to which had to be added :-

Contract for Foundations,

134,000

Extras on same,

greater length of piles,

13,000

concrete and asphalt floor of basement,

21,000

Total, exclusive of Architects' fees,

$815,950

83.

11. The extras on the foundations arose out of the necessity of using piles of greater length than had been estimated for and of ensuring that mails stored in the basement should not be damaged by water penetrating through the floor, &c.: hence the item "concrete and asphalt floor of basement".

12. The foregoing amended estimate was submitted to Government in May 1905 and it was decided that tenders should be called for without modification of the drawings and specification.

13. The lowest tender received, which was accepted, amounted to $633,912.24 or fully $13,900 in excess of Messrs. Denison, Ram & Gibbs' estimate, so that the estimate then. became :-

As above,

Excess on tender for superstructure,.

Architects' fees,

Total,

.$815,950

13,900

42,150

.$872,000

14. This sum appeared in the Estimates for 1906.

15. The tender for the Superstructure was accepted on the 26th July 1905, but, as the foundations were not completed until the 23rd January 1906, the Contractors were not let into possession of the site until that date.

16. In the meanwhile His Excellency Sir Matthew Nathan proposed that a Clock Tower should be added to the building and Messrs. Denison, Ram & Gibbs were instructed to prepare some sketch designs for such a tower. After one of their designs had been selected, they were asked to furnish an estimate of the extra cost involved and their estimate, dated 16.10.05, was $32,000. The addition of the tower having been sanctioned, Messrs. Denison, Ram & Gibbs' estimate was revised by the Public Works Department and, as it was con- sidered inadequate, a further sum of $23,150 was added to it. "Architects' fees had again to be allowed for and a further sum of $2,100 was added to cover these, thus bringing the total estimated cost up to $929,250, or, as it appeared in the estimates for 1907 and succeeding years, $930,000.

17. The further increases which have occurred are set forth in considerable detail in the accompanying statement and it appears unnecessary to allude to them here further than to state that, owing to the large expenditure involved in the case of this building, it was deemed advisable to partly insure it against fire during construction and a sum of $3,672 was expended on this service. This is a new departure and, in accordance with the practice of the Government, the insurance has been discontinued since the building was completed. In Messrs. Denison, Ram & Gibbs' design, no protection was shown for the iron columns and girders, on which considerable portions of the building are supported and, as the conse- quences of a fire would doubtless have been most serious under such conditions, it was decided that all such columns and girders should be encased in cement concrete and an expenditure of $14,567 was incurred in carrying this out.

9th November, 1911.

W. CHATHAM, Director of Public Works.

84

POST OFFICE.

APPROXIMATE FINAL STATEMENT OF COST, 9TH NOVEMBER, 1911.

I.

Estimate of cost of building contained in Director of Public Works' letter of 22nd May, 1905.

(Vide para. 10 of Explanatory Statement of Increase of Cost.)

Foundations :-Contract,

Extra depth of piling, &c.,

Concrete and asphalt floor of basement,

Superstructure,-Messrs. D. R. & G.'s Estimate,.

$

$

134,000

13,000

...

21,000

168,000

620,000

750

Heating Apparatus,—

do.

do.,

....

Electric Lighting,-

do.

do.,

Electric Bells,--

do.

do.,

Lightning Conductors,

do.

do.,

do.

do.,

Lifts,

Drainage,-

do.

do.,

Sanitary Fittings,

do.

do.,

Water Supply,-

do.

do.,

Post Office Fittings & Con-

tingecies,—

do.

do..

II.

Amounts subsequently added.

Superstructure,Excess of accepted tender (26.7.05) over

10,000 250

· 950

8,500

500 4,000 500

2,500

815,950

Messrs. D. R. & G.'s Estimate,

13,900

Clock Tower,-Messrs. D. R. & G.'s Estimate of 16.10.05,

32,000

Do., Revised Estimate by P.W.D.,-Excess over

Messrs. D. R. & G.'s Estimate,

23,150

Architects' Commission,

44,250

Miscellaneous,

750

114,050

Amount appearing in Estimates for 1907 and subsequent

years,

930,000

III.

Further Amounts found necessary to complete building.

$

Foundations,-actual cost,

168,840*

Deduct amount in I,

168,000

840

Superstructure,-actual cost,.

685,095

Deduct amounts in I & II, ($620,000+ $13,900), .

633,900

51,195

Heating Apparatus,-revised estimate,.

3,300

Deduct amount in 1,

750

2,550

Electric Lighting,-actual cost,

15,260

Deduct amount in I,

10,000

5,260

Lightning Conductors,-actual cost,.

2,435

Deduct amount in I,

950

1,485

Lifts (3 installed instead of 2 as originally estimated

for),--actual cost,

Deduct amount in I,

Carried forward,

17,000

8,500

8,500

$ 69,830 $930,000-

*

Includes a sum of $3,388 for alterations necessitated by the addition of a Clock Tower.

Drainage, actual cost,

85

CA

$

$

$

Brought forward,

69,830 930,000

1,124 500

624

6,075

4,000

2,075

815

500

315

2,650

2,500

150

72,994

Deduct amount in I,

Sanitary Fittings,-actual cost,..

Deduct amount in I,

Water Supply,-actual cost,

Deduct amount in I,

Post Office Fittings,-actual cost,.

Deduct amount in I,

IV.

Additional Items ordered.

Encasing iron columns and girders with concrete as a

precaution against fire,

Actual cost.

$

14,567

Letter boxes for boxholders,

5,638

Ordinary letter boxes,

356

Trucks for letters,

140

Adapting entrance to basement for mail trucks,

250

Alteration of steps at entrance to Postal Hall,..

819

Partition in Postal Hall,.

77

Fitting up portion of basement for Chinese postal work,...

1,897

Gas Supply to mail rooms,...

257

Alterations of lighting to Post Office,

(estimated)

352

Counters in Treasury Hall and Stamp Office,

809

Brass grilles to counter in Treasury,

320

Window in Stamp Office,

250

Cupboards for Treasury,

1,692

Furniture for Sanitary Department,

(estimated)

163

Furniture for Southern District Office,.

234

Removal of furniture from old office,

199

Additional glass roofing over Emigration Yard,

1,800

Partitions in Registrar General's Office adjoining Emigra-

tion Yard,

160

Making new openings and closing old openings in walls

of basement and ground floor,

1,086

Granolithic floor of basement,

1,953

Pointing walls of basement,

425

Gas fires in tower rooms (3),

242

Strong room in tower at roof level,

588

Dormer windows in roof,

476

Substitution of iron for timber purlins, &c., in roof,

11,000

Laying flat roofs with "Pabco" roofing,

1,575

Alterations to roof trusses,

175

Alterations to girders,

482

Fire escape ladder,

1,197

Fitting up Chinese Lavatory on 2nd floor,

Sundry alterations to suit requirements of departments

housed in building,

Sundry alterations to top storey,

Relaying of channels around building,

287

(estimated) 3,000

(do.)

400

279

Formation of private lane on west side,

Telephones,

Sundry small accounts,

99

1,634

962

Insurance against fire during construction,

3,672

59,512

Carried forward,

$1,062,506

86

V.

Deductions.

CA

$

$

Brought forward,

1,062,506

Clock Tower,-amounts in II, ($32,000 + $23,150),

55,150

Deduct amount already expended,

34,612

20,538

Electric Bells, amount in I,......

250

Deduct amount expended,

147

103

Architects' Commission,-amount in II,

44,250

Deduct amount expended,

42,385

1,865

22,506

$1,040,000

:

9th November, 1911.

W. CHATHAM,

Director of Public Works.

!

NOTE. A sum of $23,600 (Financial Minute No. 34 dated 6th July, 1912) has been paid to the Con- tractors for the Superstructure in settlement of certain claims made by them, since the above statement was prepared.

:

-

21

No. 1912

3

HONGKONG.

REPORT BY A COMMITTEE APPOINTED TO CONSIDER THE FEASIBILITY OF

FORMING A PUBLIC HOUSE TRUST AND THE PRELIMINARY

STEPS NECESSARY IN THAT EVENT.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor, March 7th, 1912,

Terms of reference:

To formulate (without going into details which admit of being deferred) an ad interim policy for the consideration of Government, having as its aim the eventual creation of a "Public House Trust" (if the Committee should find themselves in favour of its creation) and the avoidance in the meantime of any action on the part of the Licensing Board which would prejudice that object or create new liabilities. The objects in view and the general nature of the Trust Scheme can be seen from papers which will be submitted to the Com- mittee.

F. D LUGARD.

5th May, 1911.

1. It appears from the minutes and correspondence before the Committee that the Government has, in the projected creation of a public house trust, several ends in view :—

(a.) To withdraw from the public as far as possible any incentive to excessive

drinking and to secure the supply of liquors of good quality.

(b.) To secure for the community generally the profits arising from the sale of

liquors to the public.

(c.) To secure a better class of Public House Manager.

(d.) To provide, as alternatives for intoxicating liquors, refreshments such as tea,

coffee, etc., and

(e.) To provide for social intercourse and reasonable recreation by means of billiards and other games and by a supply of apriate literature so that the premises may not be drinking places pure and simple.

.

2. The Committee concur that the scheme is a sound one and they submit the following general recommendations regarding the carrying of it into effect:-

(a.) It is essential that the sale of liquors to the public should be entirely controlled by the Trust. To this end notice should forthwith be given to all holders of publicans' licences that their licences will not be renewed after the year 1915. (6.) The Trust should not come into operation until the month of December, 1915, when all existing licences should be simultaneously withdrawn. In the meantime the necessary preparations should be made for putting the Trust into operation.

(c.) The requisite capital should be obtained from the public by the issue of deben- tures, on which the Government should guarantee interest at the rate of 4 per cent per annum. The debenture holders should be entitled to elect two trustees to safeguard their interests.

(d.) The control of the Trust should be in the hands of a body of Directors, which should, it is suggested, be composed as follows:-Two to be nominated by the Governor, one by the Legislative Council, and two by the debenture holders' trustees.

22

(e.) Sites for the houses of the Trust should be selected. The following are tenta- tively suggested:-A house in the neighbourhood of the Sailors' Home. One in the neighbourhood of the Sei Foo Row and Oriental Hotels. Two on the premises of the Hongkong and King Edward Hotels, or in the imme- diate neighbourhood if the existing bars cannot be leased. One in Praya • East. One in Tsim-Sha-Tsui.

(f.) Arrangement should be made to obtain managers for these houses through the Agency of the People's Refreshment House Association. A general manager thoroughly conversant with the liquor trade should also be engaged. The managers should be partly remunerated by a percentage of the profits on games and non-intoxicating liquors.

3. The Committee consider it to be impracticable, if the Trust is to succeed financially, that any public houses should be allowed to remain in competition. It would seem that a public bar is not a necessary adjunct of a hotel qua hotel ; although a hotel should be per- mitted to sell liquors to bona fide guests.

A considerable amount.

4. The question of compensation is one of some difficulty. of capital has been invested by the holders of publicans' licences in the reasonable anticipation that such capital would eventually be recoverable, and it would seem equitable that some compensation should be given. The amount should not be large and it should be in the form of Trust debentures. It would be necessary to treat each case separately, and the matter should be referred in the first instance to the Directors of the Trust. No compensation should be given in the case of a house which has been transferred after notice of termination of the licence.

5. It is considered inexpedient that the Trust should take over any licences, which may be surrendered prior to December, 1915. It is probable that houses so taken over would be run at a loss in competition with licensed houses, and in so far as the existing sites are undesirable it would in any event be necessary to close a house so taken when the Trust came into general operation.

6. In the opinion of the Committee it is uncertain whether sufficient capital would be forthcoming if no rate of interest were guaranteed. If, as there is every reason to suppose, the Trust will be worked at a considerable profit, the Government may safely guarantee interest at 4 per cent, and such guarantee would at once render available any sum of money that might be required. It would seem to be unnecessary at the present time to specify the amount of capital that will eventually be needed, as money can be obtained as required by the issue of debentures from time to time. It is recommended that profits in excess of the rate of 4 per cent should in the first place be applied to the payment to the Government of a sum equal to the amount of the existing licence fees, and that any balance should be divided between the Government and the debenture holders: Provided that the total amount to be received by the debenture holders shall not exceed a sum equal to 7% per annum on the amount of the debentures.

7. The Directors should have full control of the Trust and should be paid fees approx. imating to the fees paid to the directors of public companies. The policy of the Govern ment should be safeguarded under the prospectus and the Articles of Association of the Trust.

8. With regard to the sites of the Trust's houses the Committee are of the opinion that there should be no bars in Queen's Road. It is suggested that there should be three houses on or near the water front for the convenience of the shipping, and two houses in the Central district should be sufficient for the needs of the general public. The site of a house in Kowloon is immaterial. Arrangements might be made with the Station Hotel, or the Humphreys Estate Company might be prepared to lease part of their premises in Nathan Road.

9. If all publicans' licences are withdrawn the only competition to which the Trust will be subjected will be that of Canteens, Institutes, and Clubs. It is understood that the hours during which Military Canteens sell liquors are restricted, and the Committee are of the opinion that similar restrictions should be placed on all Canteens and Institutes, as for instance the Police Canteen and the Sailors' Home, which sell intoxicating liquors. With regard to Clubs it is suggested that licences should be issued in respect of the sale of liquors

23

to members. These licences should be issued at a nominal fee by the Governor-in-Council, who should have power to grant or refuse any application and to make rules separately in each case as to hours of sale and similar matters. Any Club requiring an extension of time of sale on a particular occasion should be granted a special licence by the Colonial Treasurer in the same manner as special licences are now granted. The Committee believe that if the conditions of the licence were made to suit each case all trouble from sporting Clubs and drinking Clubs would cease.

10. The Committee consider that a draft prospectus of the Trust should be drawn up at an early date; but this is not possible until the general lines on which the Trust is to be conducted are definitely settled. In the meantime, as large interests will be involved, it might be advisable for the Government to outline the proposed scheme by publication in the Gazette. Early publication of the prospectus of the scheme is desirable in order that all parties interested may have ample opportunity of discussing and commenting thereon,

February, 1912.

A. M. THOMSON.

H. E. POLLOCK.

C. MONTAGUE EDE. M. STEWART.

A. G. M. FLETCHER.

t.

4

No. 3.

75

No. 16

1912

HONGKONG.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

PUBLIC

OF THE

WORKS

COMMITTEE

at a Meeting held on the 11th October, 1912.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor, October 24th, 1912.

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Director of Public Works, (WILLIAM CHATHAM, C.M.G.), Chairman.

Mr. WEI YUK, C.M.G.

29

Mr. EDWARD OSBORNE.

""

Mr. CHARLES HENDERSON Ross.

"

ABSENT:

>>

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON).

1913 Estimates-Public Works Extraordinary. (C.S.O. 22 in 98B/12.)

The Chairman submitted the whole of the new items appearing in the Estimates for 1913 and furnished such explanations as were necessary.

The Committee unanimously agreed to make the following recommendations :—

Item No. 10, Hongkong-Quarters for Subordinate Officers.-The Officers whom it is proposed to accommodate should be consulted with regard to the selec- tion of the sites for such quarters.

Mag

Item No. 11, Hongkong-Wireless Telegraphy Station. As the site of the proposed station is to be near Cape D'Aguilar, care should be taken to establish efficient communication between it and the City of Victoria, telegraphic ccmmunication being considered preferable for this purpose.

Item No. 40, Kowloon-Extensions of Lighting.-With a view to removing objec- tions which are known to exist among the Chinese to living in Kowloon, partly on account of insufficient lighting, the lighting of such portions of Kowicon as are already provided with lamps should be improved and, where lighting does not already extend to areas containing houses, the necessary extensions should be made.

Item No. 50, New Territories-Roads.-In constructing main roads in the New Territories, such roads should be of sufficient width to accommodate motor traffic as well as a light railway, if such a railway be contemplated, and the Committee consider that the existing road from Fan Ling to Shataukok should be widened accordingly.

The Committee then adjourned.

W. CHATHAM, Chairman.

Laid before the Legislative Council this 24th day of October, 1912.

R. H. CROFTON,

Clerk of Councils.

65

12

NO. 1912

HONGKONG.

QUARTERLY RETURN OF EXCESSES ON SUBHEADS MET BY SAVINGS UNDER HEADS OF EXPENDITURE.

(For 1st and 2nd Quarters of 1912.)

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor, August 22nd, 1912.

Head and Subhead of Service.

Amount.

Explanation.

Education, A.-Department of Director of Education, Other Charges, Pelilios Public School, Vernacular Side, Rent.

$ 150.00

C.

Rent increased.

Colonial Secretary's Department and Legisla- ture, Other Charges, Hansard Reports.

95.00

Education, 4.- Department of Director of Education, Other Charges, Queen's College, Language Study Allowance (Chinese) to Junior Assistani Master.

Harbour Master's Department, Special Expendi- ture, 4.--Harbour Office, Buoy, etc., to mark submerged rock in Cheung Sha Wan Bay.

Harbour Master's Department, C.-Imports and Exports Office, Other Charges, Conveyance Allowance to Supernumerary Superintend-

ent.

Medical Departments, B.-Hospitals and Asy- luins, Other Charges, Civil Hospital, Guarantee Bond for 2nd Grade Clerk.

120.00

250.00

360.00

26.00

More meetings held than

expected.

Allowance granted to Mr. A. R. Cavalier under General Order 134.

Commander C. W. Beckwith, R.N., was required to per- form a portion of the duties of Superintendent of Im- ports and Exports while Mr. R. O. Hutchison was tem- porarily attached to the Police.

For new holder of the post.

Police and Prison Departments, A.-Police, Other Charges, Language Study Allowance (Chinese) to Probationer.

177.58

Education, Special Expenditure, A.-Depart- ment of Director of Education. Yaunati English School, Furniture.

800.00

Colonial Secretary's Department and Legisla- ture, Other Charges, Language Study Allowance (Hakka) to Passed Cadet.

120.00

Public Works, Extraordinary, Drainage, Train-| 4,000.00

ing Nullahs, E.-General Works.

Allowance granted to new Probationer under General Order 134.

Desks, etc., required for the additional storey which has been added to the School.

Allowance granted to Mr. S. B. B. McElderry under General Order 45 (7).

No provision having been made for general works it has been found necessary to appropriate this amount from savings on the other subheads under Training Nullahs.

Head and Subhead of Service.

66

Amount.

Explanation.

Medical Departments, B.-Hospitals and Asy- lums, Other Charges, Civil Hospital, Up- keep of X Ray Apparatus.

Treasury, A.-Treasurer's Office, Other Char- ges, Conveyance Allowance for Sergeant for protection of revenue.

Harbouraster's Department, A.- Harbour Office, Other Charges, Oil and Sundry Stores.

Medical Departments, B.-Hospitals and Asy- lums, Other Charges, Civil Hospital, Typewriter.

$ 90.00

C.

60.00

Under-estimated. Vote re- stored to original amount, $240.

New post.

160.00

Iron forges for branding

numbers on junks.

192.15

Required to replace unser-

viceable machine.

Education, 4.-Department of Director of Education, Other Charges, Pingshan Eng- lish School, Rent.

84.00

Harbour Master's Department, C.-Imports and Exports Office, Other Charges, Rent of Telephone Exchange.

17.00

Locality of former premises, which were rent free, found unsuitable. Present pre- mises rented in Un Long.

Under-estimated.

Treasury, A.- Treasurer's Office, Other Charges,

Security Allowance.

48.00

Allowance for security to

newly appointed shroff.

Miscellaneous Services.-Government Launches,

480.00

Baskets, Scales, Shovels, etc.

Additional gear required for coaling Government Laun- ches.

Judicial and Legal Departments, A.-Supreme

Court, Other Charges, Library.

750.00

Under-estimated. Vote re-

stored to original amount.

Medical Departments, B.-Hospitals and Asy- lums, Other Charges, Civil Hospital, Ana- lytical Apparatus, etc.

120.00

Registrar General's Department, Other Char- ges, Emigration Sub-Department, Inci- dental Expenses.

60.00

More chemicals, etc., required on account of increase in analytical work.

Increase in transport expenses consequent upon the ex- amination of emigrants at the Harbour Office instead of at the Registrar General's Office.

Medical Departments, C.-Institute, Other

Charges:

Apparatus and Books in connection with

mosquito investigation.

Books.

Medical Departments, B.-Hospital and Asy- lums, Other Charges, Civil Hospital, Furniture.

250.00

50.00

Purchase of Report of Royal Commission on Human and Animal Tuberculosis.

700.00

Furniture required for the extension to the Maternity Hospital.

Medical Departments, A.-Staff. Other Charges, Rent of Office for Medical Officer, Kowloon.

130.00

Rent raised.

16th August, 1912.

CLAUD SEVERn,

Colonial Secretary.

>

A

·

79

HONGKONG.

QUARTERLY RETURN OF EXCESSES ON SUBHEADS MET BY SAVINGS UNDER HEADS OF EXPENDITURE.

(For the 3rd Quarter of 1912.)

No. 18

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor, October 24th, 1912.

1912

Head and Subhead of Service.

Amount.

Explanation.

$ C.

Public Works, Extraordinary, Miscellaneous,

S.S. Stanley, Electric Light.

113.50

Cost of

new

installation

under-estimated.

700.00

Prevalence

of

infectious

Sanitary Department, Other Charges, Sanitary Staff, Burial of Infected Bodies, $350, Head Stones, $350.

Judicial and Legal Departments, A.-Supreme Court, Other Charges, Rent of Telephone. Exchange.

Harbour Master's Department, A.-Harbour Office, Other Charges, Paint and Brushes.

50.00

diseases especially Plague and Small-pox.

Under-estimated.

475.00

Police and Prison Departments, A.-Police, 2,000.00

Other Charges, Secret Service.

Judicial and Legal Departments, B.-Magis- tracy, Other Charges, Incidental Expenses.

150.00

Medical Departments, B.-Hospitals and Asy- luins, Other Charges, Civil Hospital, In- cidental Expenses.

222.82

Harbour Master's Department, C.-Imports and Exports Office, Other Charges, Inci- dental Expenses.

Police and Prison Departments, C.-Prison, Other Charges, Gratuities to Prisoners for Incidental Labour.

250.00

283.00

Under Ordinance No. 48 of 1911, Section 39 (6), the painting of the licence num- ber on the sails of Fishing Junks is now necessary. The allowance for painting has therefore been increased from 15% to 22 % of the fees charged.

Rewards to informers in lot- tery, arms and opium divan

cases.

Heavier bills for electricity

owing to extra work.

Refund of tuition fees paid by Dr. W. B. A. Moore to the London School of Tro- pical Medicine while on leave in England.

Hydrometers ordered in 1911 but not charged for till 1912. Solicitors' fees in connection with the cases in which Revenue Officers were charged with assault and for unlawful arrest.

More prisoners discharged

than expected.

Head and Subhead of Service.

80

Amount.

Explanation.

Sanitary Department, Other Charges, Sanitary

Staff, Rent of Quarters for Scavenging Coolies.

$ c.

8.00

Rent increased.

Post Office, Other Charges, Carriage of Mails, | 6,075.00

Gratuities to Shipmasters, $6,000, Stores, etc., for Steam Launch, $75.

Medical Departments, B.--Hospitals and Asy- lums, Other Charges, Victoria Hospital, Furniture.

Harbour Master's Department, G.-Light- houses, Other Charges, Kap Sing Island Lighthouse, Incidental Expenses.

70.00

23.50

Education, A.-Department of Director of Education, Other Charges, Victoria British School, Furniture.

25.00

For Siberian mails carried by non-contract vessels and for mails sent from other countries via Hongkong. New rope for Launch.

New weighing machine in

place of one condemned.

to

Fresh water supplied

Lighthouse Keepers pend- ing completion of well.

For elder girls' class which has recently been instituted.

21st October, 1912.

CLAUD SEVERN,

Colonial Secretary.

8.7

HONGKONG.

QUARTERLY RETURN OF EXCESSES ON SUBHEADS MET BY SAVINGS UNDER HEADS OF EXPENDITURE.

(For major portion of 4th Quarter of 1912.)

No. 20

1912

.

:

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His

Excellency the Governor, December 19th, 1912.

Head and Subhead of Service.

Amount.

C.

Public Works, Extraordinary, Communications, 5,000.00

Kowloon Roads and Streets :-(b) General Works.

Treasury, A.-Treasurer's Office, Other Char-

ges, Incidental Expenses.

Colonial Secretary's Department and Legislature, Other Charges, Language Study Allowances (Chinese) to Unpassed Cadets.

120.00

Public Works, Extraordinary, Training Nullahs,

(b) May Road District.

110.70

Public Works Department, Other Charges, Electric Fans and Light, $350, and Land Survey Contingencies, $500.

850.00

Police and Prison Departments, A.-Police, Other Charges, Language Study Allowance to Probationer.

Explanation.

100.00

30.00

For kerbing and channelling a portion of Fifth Street where houses have been built and for other works when required.

Conveyance Allowance to Ser- geant charged with protec- tion of Stamp Revenue and desk for Examining Branch.

Increase of $10 a month in fee charged by Chinese teacher.

More filling in pockets and

hollows in rocks.

Increased number of fans and overtime work; camp equipment for surveyors in outlying districts and additional allowances to coolies in attendance.

Increase of $10 a month in fee charged by Chinese teacher.

·

Treasury, Special Expenditure, A.-Treasurer's

Office, Calculating Machine.

315.00

To economise labour in calcu-

lations.

Judicial and Legal Departments, Special Expen- diture, E-Land Registry Office, New Furniture.

Under-estimated.

Police and Prison Departments, C.-Prison, Other Charges, Clothing for Prisoners.

900.00

Increased number of prisoners.

-

Head and Subhead of Service.

88

Amount.

Explanation.

$ c.

Public Works, Extraordinary, Drainage, Mis- 1,250.00

cellaneous Drainage Works, (f) General Works.

Public Works Department, Special Expenditure,

Typewriter.

292.68

Harbour Master's Department, A.-Harbour

Office, Other Charges, Paint and Brushes.

200.00

Public Works, Extraordinary, Drainage, Mis- cellaneous Drainage Works, (f) General Works.

180.00

650.00

Extension of sewer to Inland Lot 1911, Wongneichong Road, where houses have been built.

Purchase allowed this year

instead of next.

Under-estimated.

Extension of sewer to Kow- loon Inland Lot 936 and

Rural Building Lot 70 where houses have been built.

Judicial and Legal Departments, D.-Law Officers, Other Charges, Crown Solicitor's Office, Books, $18.80, and Incidental Ex- penses, $60.

78.80

Medical Departments, B.-Hospitals and Asy- 1,240.00

lums, Other Charges, Civil Hospital, Pro- visions for patients, $1,000, Washing $200 and Victoria Hospital, Incidental Expenses, $40.

Education, A.-Department of Director of Education, Other Charges, Victoria British. School, Incidental Expenses.

Books estimated for last year but not charged till this year and stationery bought locally for urgent use.

Under-estimated.

15.00

Under-estimated.

....

Police and Prison Departments, C.-Prison, Other Charges, Clothing and Shoes for Staff.

50.00

Increase of staff.

13th December, 1912.

A. M. THOMSON,

Colonial Secretary.

25

HONGKONG.

TYPHOON REFUGE.

STATEMENT TO 31ST DECEMBER, 1911,

(vide pages 10 and 11 of Hansard, 23rd February, 1911).

No.

4

1912

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor, March 7th, 1912,

Contract time for completion-5 years from the 27th October, 1910.

Contract price,..

Cost of Contractor's extras other than those for

which provision is made in the Contract,......

Total amount of Contract and Extras,

$2,018,002

Nil.

Divided into 60 months,.

14 months at $33,633,

...$2.018,002

33,633 per month.

$ 470,862

Amount earned by Contractor on work actually accomplished including sum retained under the provisions of the Contract in the hands of the Government,.......

.$ 337,198

13th January, 1912.

W. CHATHAM, Director of Public Works.

Date.

EXPENDITURE ON THE HARBOUR OF REFUGE.

ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENT FOR THE YEAR ENDING 31st DECEMBER, 1911.

Rendered in accordance with His Excellency the Governor's Minutes of 13th June and 18th July, 1911, in 5 in C.S.O. 9647,1903.

S. H. 1.

S. H. 2.

Preliminary and

Incidental Expenses.

Supervision

Expenses.

$

S. II. 3.

Consulting

Engincer.

S. II. 4.

Dredger.

C.

S. H. 5.

Departmental

Expenses.

S. H. 6.

Total.

Contract.

C.

C.

6,530.83

1,964.14

200,198.35

208,693.32

3,192.77

2,233.60

64,102.84

69,529.21

2,494.12

2,449.91

22,933.75

508.99

28,386.77

901.77

9,900.83

6,599.49

6,734.12

312,358,65

† 335,494,86

1908,

1909,

1910,

1911,

Expenditure incurred to 31st December, 1911,.

13,119.49

12,350.74

4,197.74

293,834.43

5,784.12

312,867.64

642,104.16

Government Grab Dredger.

† Includes a sum of $15,170.00 for work done subsequent to 15th December, 1911, which was paid in January, 1912.

W. CHATHAM, Director of Public Works.

26th February, 1912.

26

39

HONGKONG.

TYPHOON REFUGE.

STATEMENT TO 30TH JUNE, 1912,

(vide pages 10 and 11 of Hansard, 23rd February, 1911).

No. 1913

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor, August 22nd, 1912.

Contract time for completion-5 years from the 27th October, 1910. -

Contract price,

.$2,018,002

Cost of Contractor's extras other than those for

which provision is made in the Contract,

Nil.

Total amount of Contract and Extras, ...$2,018,002

Divided into 60 months,

20 months at $33,633,.

Amount earned by Contractor on work actually accomplished including sum retained under the provisions of the Contract in the hands of the Government,

15th July, 1912.

$ 33,633

33,633 per month.

$ 672,660

$ 558,833

W. CHATHAM, Director of Public Works.