Sessional Papers - 1908

PAPERS LAID BEFORE THE LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL OF HONGKONG 1908

Table of Contents

1. Appeal Court

Correspondence Regarding Constitution of

2. Assessment

Report on, for 1908-1909

3. Bacteriologist, Government

Report for 1907

4. Blue Book

Report on, for 1907

5. Botanical and forestry

Report for 1907

6. Education

Report for 1907

7. Estimates of Expenditure

Abstract Shewing Differences Between Estimates for 1908 and 1909

8. Finance Committee

Minutes Nos. 1 to 21

9. Financial Returns

Report for 1907

10. Financial Statements

In Connection With Estimates for 1909

11. Fire Brigade

Report for 1907

12. Gaol

Report for 1907

13. Harbour Master

Report for 1907

14. Jurors

List of, for 1908

15. Kowloon-Canton Railway

Estimates of Expenditure to December, 1908

16. Kowloon-Canton Railway

Progress Report to December, 1907

17. Legislative Council

Minutes Nos. 1 to 23

18. Light Dues, increase in

Correspondence Relating to

19. Medical

Report for 1907

20. Observatory

Report for 1907

21. Po Leung Kuk

Report for 1907

22. Police and Crime

Report for 1907

23. Police Magistrates' Court

Returns of, for 1907

24. Post office

Report for 1907

25. Public Latrine

Erection of, in Chuk Hing Lane

26. Public Latrine

Erection of, in Wong Nei Chung Village

27. Public Works

Report for 1907

28. Public Works Committee

Minutes No. 1

29. Queen's College

Report for 1907

30. Registrar General

Report for 1907

31. Sanitary

Report for 1907

32. Sanitary Surveyor

Report for 1907

33. Subsidiary Coin Committee

Report of

34. Supreme Court

Report and Returns for 1907

35. Tramway

Petition against Proposed Route of New Peak

36. Tung Wah Hospital

Report on

37. Typhoon of 27th July, 1908

Report on

38. Typhoon Shelter

Correspondence Relating to

39. Veterinary Surgeon, Colonial

Report for 1907

40. Volunteer Corps, Hongkong

Report for 1907-1908

41. West River Floods

Correspondence Relating to

42. Widows and Orphans' Pension Fund

Transfer of, to Government

43. Widows and Orphans' Pension Fund

Report for 1907

 

LEGISLATIVE

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 1.

THURSDAY, 23RD JANUARY, 1908.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(Sir FREDERICK JOHN DEALTRY LUGARD, K.C.M.G., C.B., D.S.O.).

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.).

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the Colonial Treasurer, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON). the Director of Public Works, (WILLIAM CHATHAM, C.M.G.).

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the Registrar General, (ARTHUR WINBOLT BREWIN).

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the Harbour Master, (Comdr. BASIL REGINALD HAMILTON TAYLOR, R.N.). Dr. Ho KAI, M.B., C.M., C.M.G.

Mr. WEI YUK.

Mr. HENRY EDWARD POLLOCK, K.C.

Mr. EDBERT ANSGAR HEWETT.

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19

Mr. EDWARD OSBORNE.

Mr. HENRY KESWICK.

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ABSENT:

His Excellency the General Officer Commanding the Troops, (Major-General ROBERT GEORGE

BROADWOOD, C.B.).

The Honourable the Attorney General, (WILLIAM REES DAVIES).

The Council met pursuant to summons.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 19th December, 1907, were read and confirmed.

FINANCIAL MINUTES.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following Financial Minutes, (Nos. 1 and 2), and moved that they be referred to the Finance Committee :-

No. 8356 of 1907.

No. 9872 of 1906, C.S.O.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Three thousand four hundred and thirty-three Dollars ($3,433) in aid of the vote, Sanitary Department, Other Charges, Compensation for infected cargo destroyed.

Government House, Hongkong, 9th January, 1908.

F. D. LUGARÐ.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One thousand three hundred and three Dollars ($1,303) as Compensation to certain Squatters whose removal was necessitated by the sale of Kowloon Inland Lot 1203.

Government House, Hongkong, 15th January, 1908.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

PAPERS.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following papers :-

Report of the Subsidiary Coin Committee.

Estimate of Expenditure on the Kowloon-Canton Railway (British Section) up to

December, 1908.

REPORTS OF THE PUBLIC WORKS COMMITTEE.-The Director of Public Works, by com- mand of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the Reports of the Public Works Committee, dated the 19th December, 1907, and 4th January, 1908, and moved their adoption.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

:

HONGKONG-CANTON RAILWAY.-The Colonial Secretary moved that the following Re- solution he referred to the Finance Committee :-

It is hereby resolved that a sum of Four million two hundred and fifty thousand Dollars ($4,250,000) be advanced out of funds in the custody of the Govern- ment for the purpose of construction of the Hongkong-Canton Railway (British Section) during the year 1908.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question--put and agreed to.

CHINESE EMIGRATION (AMENDMENT) BILL.--The Colonial Secretary moved the First reading of a Bill entitled An Ordinance to amend the Chinese Emigration Ordinance, 1889.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

EVIDENCE (COLONIAL STATUTES) BILL.-The Colonial Secretary moved the First read- ing of a Bill entitled An Ordinance to facilitate the admission in evidence of statutes passed by the Legislatures of British possessions and British protectorates, including Cyprus.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time,

FIRE INSURANCE COMPANIES BILL.--The Colonial Secretary moved the First reading of a Bill entitled An Ordinance to authorize the removal of Fire Insurance Companies from the Register of Companies in certain cases.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

FIRE BRIGADE (AMENDMENT) BILL.-The Colonial Secretary addressed the Council and moved the Second reading of the Bill entitled An Ordinance to amend the Fire Brigade Ordinance, 1868.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question--put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

The Colonial Secretary moved that the Council resolve itself into a Committee of the whole Council to consider the Bill clause by clause.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed, and Bill reported with slight amendments.

The Colonial Secretary moved that the Bill be read a third time.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned until Thursday, the 6th February, 1908.

Read and confirmed this 6th day of February, 1908.

A. G. M. FLETCHER,

Clerk of Councils.

>

F. D. LUGARD,

Governor.

··

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 2.

THURSDAY, 6TH FEBRUARY, 1908.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(Sir FREDERICK JOHN DEALTRY LUGARD, K.C.M.G., C.B., D.S.O.). The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.).

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM REES DAVIES).

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the Colonial Treasurer, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON).

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the Director of Public Works, (WILLIAM CHATHAM, C.M.G.).'

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the Registrar General, (ARTHUR WINBOLT BREWIN).

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the Harbour Master, (Comdr. BASIL REGINALD HAMILTON TAYLOR, R.N.). Dr. Ho KAI, M.B., C.M., C.M.G.

Mr. WEI YUK.

Mr. HENRY EDWARD POLLOCK, K.C.

Mr. EDBERT ANSGAR HEWETT.

Mr. EDWARD OSBORNE.

Mr. HENRY KESWICK,

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་----

ABSENT:

His Excellency the General Officer Commanding the Troops. (Major-General ROBERT GEORGE

BROADWOOD, C.B.).

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 23rd January, 1908, were read and confirmed.

PORTUGAL'S CALAMITY.-His Excellency the Governor addressed the Council and moved the following resolution :—

"That the Legislative Council of Hongkong, on behalf of the community, records its abhorrence of the crime committed upon the persons of the late King and Crown Prince of Portugal, and express heartfelt sympathy with Her Majesty the Queen of Portugal in her bereavement, and with the Portuguese nation on their calamity.

"

Dr. Ho KAI addressed the Council and seconded.

The motion was carried unanimously.

FINANCIAL MINUTES.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following Financial Minutes, (Nos. 3 to 5), and moved that they be referred to the Finance Committee:--

No. 652 of 1908.

F. D. LUGARÐ.

The Governor recommends the Council to re-vote a sum of Seven thousand one hundred and sixty-one Dollars ($7,161) in aid of the vote, Public Works Extraor- dinary, for the following items :-

Hot Water Apparatus and Baths, Government House, Queen's College Latrines and Urinals,

Resuming and filling in Fish Pond at Tai Po, Time Ball Tower on Blackhead's Hill, Kowloon,.....

Total,.....

S 406

810

5,900

45

.$ 7,161

Government House, Hongkong, 24th January, 1908.

C.S.O. No.

1915 of 1901.

No. 8036 of 1906, C.S.O.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Nine thousand three hundred and thirty-four Dollars ($9,334) in aid of the vote, Public Works Extra- ordinary, Refund of part of Premium for the Pier opposite M. L. 198.

Government House, Hongkong, 28th January, 1908.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Seven hundred and twenty Dollars ($720) in aid of the vote, Education, Victoria British School, Per- sonal Emoluments, Head Master, House Allowance.

Government House, Hongkong, 30th January, 1908.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

REPORT OF THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Colonial Secretary, by coinmand of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the Report of the Finance Committee, dated the 23rd January, 1908, and moved its adoption.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

ADDITIONAL CATTLE BYE-LAW.-The Colonial Secretary moved the following additional Bye-law under Section 16 of the Public Health and Buildings Ordinance, 1903 :—

"DEPOT FOR CATTLE, PIGS, SHEEP AND GOATS.

C.-General.

8. The drenching of any animal with any substance whatever in a Govern- ment Depôt, except with the permission of the Colonial Veterinary Surgeon or of the Inspector on duty, is prohibited.”

The Director of Public Works seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

QUESTIONS. Mr. OSBORNE, pursuant to notice, asked the following questions

(1.) Will the Government cause to be published, a report concerning the Canton-

Kowloon Railway (British Sectum) covering the period from the inception of the scheme to 31st December, 1907, giving the original and amended estimates of cost and such other details of finance, oue, control, &c., e., as may with propriety be made public?

The Colonial Secretary replied.

His Excellency the Governor addressed the Council.

(2.) Will the Government state whether the Contractors for the Law Courts and Post Office are free to push on with the work as they please; or are they instructed to ke p within the limit of expenditure rotel in the Estimates? (3.) Will the Government state (a.) The terms of Sang Lee's tenancy of the ground used as a builder's yart adjoining the statue of His Majesty the King? (b.) Is this yard used in connec in with work on public buildings? (c.) Will the Government cause this land to be laid out as a public garden as soon as Sang Lee's occupation of it can be determined?

The Director of Public Works replied.

QUESTION.—Mr. POLLOCK, pursuant to notice, asked the following question :—

Will the Government lay upon the table all the papers connected with the proposals

which have been made with a view to improve the system of enforcing judg ments of the Supreme Court of this Colony in China and Macao?

The Colonial Secretary replied.

F

CHINESE EMIGRATION (AMENDMENT) BILL.-The Attorney General addressed the Council and moved the Second reading of the Bill entitled An Ordinance to amend the Chinese Emigration Ordinance, 1889.

The Colonial Secretary seconded. Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council resolved itself into a Committee of the whole Council to consider the Bill clause by clause.

On Council resuming, the Attorney General reported that the Bill had passed through Committee with amendments.

EVIDENCE (COLONIAL STATUTES) BILL.-The Attorney General addressed the Council and moved the Second reading of the Bill entitled An Ordinance to facilitate the admission in evidence of statutes passed by the Legislatures of British possessions and British protector- ates, including Cyprus.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council resolved itself into a Committee of the whole Council to consider the Bill clause by clause.

On Council resuming, the Attorney General reported that the Bill had passed through Committee with verbal amendments.

The Attorney General then moved that the Bill be read a third time.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

FIRE INSURANCE COMPANIES BILL.--The Attorney General addressed the Council and moved the Second reading of the Bill entitled An Ordinance to authorize the removal of Fire Insurance Companies from the Register of Companies in certain cases.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council resolved itself into a Committee of the whole Council to consider the Bill clause by clause.

On Council resuming, the Attorney General reported that the Bill had passed through Committee with verbal amendments.

The Attorney General then moved that the Bill be read a third time.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned until Thursday, the 20th February, 1908.

Read and confirmed, this 27th day of February, 1908.

A. G. M. FLETCHER,

Clerk of Councils.

F. D. LUGARD,

Governor.

:

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 3. COUNCIL, No. 3.

THURSDAY, 27TH FEBRUARY, 1908.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(Sir FREDERICK JOHN DEALTRY Lugard, K.C.M.G., C.B., D.S.O.). The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.).

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM REES DAVIES).

>>

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON).

*

the Director of Public Works, (WILLIAM CHATHAM, C.M.G.).

2

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the Registrar General, (ARTHUR WINBOLT BREWIN).

the Harbour Master, (Comdr. BASIL REGINALD HAMILTON TAYLOR, R.N.). Dr. Ho KAI, M.B., C.M., C.M.G.

Mr. WEI YUK.

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Mr. HENRY EDWARD POLLOCK, K.C.

Mr. EDBERT ANSGAR HEWETT.

"3

Mr. EDWARD ÖSBORNE.

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AESENT:

His Excellency the General Officer Commanding the Troops, (Major-General ROBERT George

BROADWOOD, C.B.).

The Honourable Mr. HENRY KESWICK.

The Council met pursuant to summons.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 6th February, 1908, were read and confirmed.

PORTUGAL'S CALAMITY.-His Excellency the Governor read a letter from the Governor of Macao in connection with the Resolution regarding the crime committed in Portugal, which was passed by Council on the 6th February.

PAPERS.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following papers :-

Report on the Widows' and Orphans' Fund for the year 1907.

Progress Report on the construction of British Section of the Hongkong-Canton

Railway up to 31st December, 1907.

FINANCIAL MINUTES.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following Financial Minutes, (Nos. 6 and 7), and moved that they be referred to the Finance Committee :—-

No. 9543 of 1907.

No. 5377 of 1907.

F. D. LUGARÐ.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One thousand three hundred Dollars ($1.300) in aid of the vote, Public Works Extraordinary, Buildings, No. 5 Station--Alterations to Quarters.

Government House, Hongkong, 17th February, 1908.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One hundred and fifty- six Dollars ($156) in aid of the vote, Public Works Extraordinary, Miscellaneous, Queen's College Latrines and Urinal.

Government House, Hongkong, 19th February, 1908.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

REPORT OF THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the Report of the Finance Committee, dated the 6th February, 1908, and moved its adoption.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

SUMMONING OF CHINESE ORDINANCE 1899.--The Attorney General moved the follow- ing Resolutions :-

Whereas by section 5 of the Summoning of Chinese Ordinance, 1899, (No. 12 of

1899), it was enacted that the said Ordinance should only continue in operation for a period of two years from the coming into operation of the said Ordinance and for such further period or periods as might from time to time, be determined by resolution of the Legislative Council.

And whereas it is desirable that the said Ordinance should remain in force until its

operation is determined by a further resolution.

It is hereby resolved by this Council that The Summoning of Chinese Ordinance,. 1899, shall be and hereby is continued in force until its operation is determined by a further resolution of this Council.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

IMPORTATION AND INSPECTION OF ANIMALS BYE-LAWS.-The Colonial Secretary moved an Amendment of the Importation and Inspection of Animals Bye-laws under Section 16 of the Public Health and Buildings Ordinance, 1963.

The Director of Public Works seconded.

Question-put and agreed to. ·

CHINESE EMIGRATION (AMENDMENT) BILL.-The Attorney General moved that the Council resolve itself into a Committee of the whole Council to consider the Bill entitled An Ordinance to amend the Chinese Emigration Ordinance, 1899.

The Colonial Secretary seconded. Question--put and agreed to.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

ADJOURNMENT.—The Council then adjourned until after the meeting of the Finance

Committee.

JURY LIST FOR 1908.-On Council resuming the Jury List for 1908 was considered in private.

ADJOURNMENT.—The Council then adjourned until Thursday, the 5th March, 1908.

Read and confirmed this 5th day of March, 1908.

A. G. M. FLETCHER,

Clerk of Councils.

F. D. LUGARD,

Governor.

ï

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 4.

THURSDAY, 5TH MARCH, 1908.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(Sir FREDERICK JOHN DEALTRY LUGARD, K.C.M.G., C.B., D.S.0.). The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.).

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM REES DAVIES ),

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15

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON).

the Director of Public Works, (WILLIAM CHATHAM, C.M.G.).

the Registrar General; (ARTHUR WINBOLT BREWIN).

the Harbour Master, (Comdr. BASIL REGINALD HAMILTON TAYLOR, R.N.).

Dr. Ho KAL, M.B., C.M., C.M.G.

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Mr. WEI YUK.

17

77

Mr. HENRY EDWARD POLLOCK, K.C.

Mr. EDWARD OSBORNE.

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ABSENT:

His Excellency the General Officer Commanding the Troops, (Major-General ROBERT GEORGE

BROADWOOD, C.B.).

The Honourable Mr. EDBERT ANSGAR HEWETT.

""

Mr. HENRY KESWICK.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 27th February, 1908, were read and confirmed.

PAPER.---The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following paper :---

Jurors List for 1908.

FINANCIAL MINUTES.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table Financial Minute, (No. 8), and moved that it be referred to the Finance Committee:---

No. 652 of

1903.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Twenty-two thousand one hundred Dollars ($22,100) in aid of the vote, Public Works Recurrent, Miscel- laneous, Typhoon and Rainstorm Damages.

Government House, Hongkong, 24th February, 1908.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

REPORT OF THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the Report of the Finance Committee, dated the 27th February, 1908, and moved its adoption.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

PUBLIC HEALTH AND BUILDINGS AMENDMENT BILL.-The Attorney General moved the First reading of a Bill entitled An Ordinance to amend the Public Health and Buildings Ordinance, 1903, and The Public Health and Buildings Amendment Ordinance, 1903.

The Director of Public Works seconded.

His Excellency the Governor addressed the Council.

Dr. Ho KAI addressed the Council and asked that the Second reading of the Bill be postponed for at least a month.

Mr. WEI YUK seconded.

His Excellency the Governor replied.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

CHINESE EMIGRATION (AMENDMENT) BILL.-The Attorney General moved the Third reading of the Bill entitled An Ordinance to amend the Chinese Emigration Ordinance,

1889.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned until Thursday, the 19th March, 1908.

Read and confirmed, this 2nd day of April, 1908.

C. CLEMENTI,

Clerk of Councils,

F. D. LUGARD,

Governor.

i

i

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 5.

THURSDAY, 2ND APRIL, 1908.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(Sir FREDERICK JOHN DEALTRY LUGARD, K.C.M.G., C.B., D.S.O.).

His Excellency the Officer Commanding the Troops, (Colonel CHARLES HENRY DARLING,

R.E.).

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.).

"}

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM REES DAVIES).

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON).

""

the Director of Public Works, (WILLIAM CHATHAM, C.M.G.).

";

the Registrar General, (ARTHUR WINBOLT BREWIN).

the Harbour Master, (Comdr. BASIL REGINALD HAMILTON TAYLOR, R.N.). Dr. Ho KAI, M.B., C.M., C.M.G.

""

Mr. WEI YUK.

Mr. HENRY EDWARD POLLOCK, K.C.

""

Mr. EDWARD Osborne.

""

Mr. HENRY KESWICK,

ABSENT:

The Honourable Mr. MURRAY STEWART.

The Council met pursuant to summons.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 5th March, 1908, were read and confirmed.

PAPER.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following paper :-

Report of the Harbour Master for the year 1907.

FINANCIAL MINUTES.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following Financial Minutes, (Nos. 9 to 13), and moved that they be referred to the Finance Committee:-

No. 1660 of 1908.

No. 2747 of 1907.

No. 1655 of 1008.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One hundred Dollars ($100) in aid of the vote, Treasury, B.-Office of Assessor of Rates, Other Charges, Typewriter.

Government House, Hongkong, 4th March, 1908.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One hundred and twelve Dollars and fifty Cents ($112.50) in aid of the vote, Treasury, Treasurer's Office, Other Charges, Security Allowances for nine months to one 4th Grade and one 5th Grade Shroff.

Government House, Hongkong, 16th March, 1908.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Four thousand four hundred Dollars ($4,400) in aid of the vote, Public Works Extraordinary, Installation of Electric Fans at Government House.

Government House, Hongkong, 20th March, 1908.

3

No. 2831 of

1906.

No. 2031 of

1908.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Six thousand five hundred Dollars ($6,500) in aid of the vote, l'ublic Works, Public Works, Recurrent, Buildings, Maintenance of Lighthouses.

Government House, Hongkong, 19th March, 1908.

F. D. LUGARD. ·

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Two hundred and thirty-four Dollars ($234) in aid of the vote, Harbour Master's Department, 4. Harbour Office, Other Charges, Oil and Sundry Stores.

Government House, Hongkong, 19th March, 1908.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

REPORT OF THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the Report of the Finance Committee, dated the 5th March, 1908, and moved its adoption.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

HONGKONG CANTON RAILWAY.-The Colonial Secretary addressed the Council and moved the following Resolution :-

It is hereby resolved that a sum of Four million and twenty thousand Dollars ($4,020,000) be advanced out of funds in the custody of the Government for the purpose of construction of the Hongkong-Canton Railway (British Sec- tion) during the year 1908.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

FOREIGN CORPORATIONS BILL.-The Attorney General moved the First reading of a Bill entitled An Ordinance to enable Foreign Corporations to acquire and hold land in the Colony.

The Colonial Secretary seconded. Question--put and agreed to.

HONGKONG & KOWLOON WHARF & GODOWN COMPANY'S BILL.-The Attorney General moved the First reading of a Bill entitled An Ordinance to authorize the making of Bye-laws by The Hongkong and Kowloon Wharf and Godown Company Limited.

Mr. H. KESWICK seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

l'UBLIC HEALTH AND BUILDINGS AMENDMENT BILL.-The Attorney General moved the Second reading of the Bill entitled An Ordinance to amend the Public Health and Buildings Ordinance, 1903, and The Public Health and Buildings Amendment Ordinance, 1903.

Dr. Ho KAI addressed the Council and asked that the Second reading of the Bill be postponed for three weeks.

Mr. H. KESWICK seconded.

His Excellency the Governor replied.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned until Thursday, the 23rd April, 1908.

Read and confirmed this 16th day of April, 1908.

C. CLEMENTI,

Clerk of Councils.

F. D. LUGARD,

Governor.

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LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 6.

THURSDAY, 16TH APRIL, 1908.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(Sir FREDERICK JOHN DEALTRY LUGARD, K.C.M.G., C.B., D.S.O.).

His Excellency the Officer Commanding the Troops, (Colonel CHARLES HENRY DARLING,

R.E.).

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.).

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM REES DAVIES).

};

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON).

the Director of Public Works, (WILLIAM CHATHAM, C.M.G.).

**

the Registrar General, (EDWARD ALEXANDER IRVING).

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the Harbour Master, (Comdr. BASIL REGINALD HAMILTON TAYLOR, R.N.). Dr. Ho KAI, M.B., C.M., C.M.G.

Mr. WEI YUK.

Mr. HENRY EDWARD POLLOCK, K.C.

79

Mr. EDWARD OSBORNE.

99

Mr. HENRY KESWICK.

"7

Mr. MURRAY STEWART.

The Council met pursuant to summons.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 2nd April, 1908, were read and con- firmed.

NEW MEMBER.-The Honourable Mr. MURRAY STEWART took the Oath and assumed his seat as a Member of the Council.

PAPERS.---The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following papers :--

Report on Queen's College for the year 1907.

Financial Returns for the year 1907.

Reports of the Captain Superintendent of Police and of the Superintendent of Fire

Brigade for the year 1907.

Report of the Director of the Hongkong Observatory for the year 1907.

Returns of the Police Magistrates' Courts for the year 1907.

Report of the Registrar of the Supreme Court for the year 1907.

FINANCIAL MINUTES.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following Financial Minutes, (Nos. 14 and 15), and moved that they be referred to the Finance Committee:—

No. 4721 of 1904.

No. 1723 of 1907.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Three thousand three hundred Dollars ($3,300) in aid of the vote, Police and Prison Departments, Fire Brigade, Special Expenditure, Street Fire Alarms.

Government House, Hongkong, 3rd April, 1908.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Eight hundred Dollars ($800) in aid of the vote Education, 4.-Inspector of Schools, Other Charges, Saiyingpun Anglo-Chinese School, Rent of Temporary Quarters.

Government House, Hongkong, 6th April, 1908.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

.

}

REPORT OF THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the Report of the Finance Committee, dated the 2nd April, 1908, and moved its adoption.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

CHINESE EXTRADITION (AMENDMENT) BILL.-The Attorney General moved the First reading of a Bill entitled An Ordinance to amend the Chinese Extradition Ordinance 1889.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

His Excellency the Governor addressed the Council.

Question-put and agreed to.

The Attorney General moved the suspension of the Standing Orders in order to pass the Bill through the subsequent stages..

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

The Attorney General moved that the Bill be read a second time.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed, and Bill reported without amendment.

The Attorney General moved that the Bill be read a third time.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

FOREIGN CORPORATIONS BILL.--The Attorney General addressed the Council and moved the Second reading of the Bill entitled An Ordinance to enable Foreign Corporations to acquire and hold land in the Colony.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed, and Bill reported with amendments.

HONGKONG & KOWLOON WHARF & GODOWN COMPANY'S BILL.-The Attorney General addressed the Council and moved the Second reading of the Bill entitled An Ordinance to authorize the making of Bye-laws by The Hongkong and Kowloon Wharf and Godown Company Limited.

Mr. H. KESWICK seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed, and Bill reported with amendment.

The Attorney General then moved that the Bill be read a third time.

Mr. H. KESWICK seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned until Thursday, the 30th April, 1908.

Read and confirmed, this 30th day of April, 1908.

C. CLEMENTI,

Clerk of Councils.

1

F. D. LUGARD,

Governor.

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 7.

EGIS

THURSDAY, 30TH APRIL, 1908.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(Sir FREDERICK JOHN DEALTRY LUGARD, K.C.M.G., C.B., D.S.O.).

His Excellency the Officer Commanding the Troops, (Colonel CHARLES HENRY DARLING,

R.E.).

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.).

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM REES DAVIES).

""

??

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALEXANDER Macdonald THOMSON).

""

the Director of Public Works, (WILLIAM CHATHAM, C.M.G.).

""

the Registrar General, (EDWARD ALEXANDER IRVING).

?}

""

the Harbour Master, (Comdr. BASIL REGINALD HAMILTON TAYLOR, R.N.). Dr. Ho KAI, M.B., C.M., C.M.G.

Mr. WEI YUK.

""

Mr. HENRY EDWARD POLLOCK, K.C.

""

Mr. EDWARD OSBORNE.

Mr. HENRY KESWICK.

>>

Mr. MURRAY STEWART.

17

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 16th April, 1908, were read and confirmed.

PAPERS.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following paper :-

Report of the Registrar General for the year 1907.

FINANCIAL MINUTES.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following Financial Minutes, (Nos. 16 to 18), and moved that they be referred to the Finance Committee:—

No. 163 of 1908.

No. 2956 of 1908.

No. 2275 of 1908.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Thirty-nine Dollars ($39) in aid of the vote. Medical Departments, B.-Hospitals and Asylums, Civil Hospital, Other Charges, Uniform for Indian Constable.

Government House, Hongkong, 13th April, 1908.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One thousand Dollars ($1,000) in aid of the vote, Police and Prison Departments, A.—Police, Other Charges, Secret Service.

Government House, Hongkong, 22nd April, 1908.

F. D. LUGARD,

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One thousand one hundred and twenty Dollars ($1,120) in aid of the vote, Colonial Secretary's Depart- ment and Legislature, Personal Emoluments, Temporary 1st Grade Clerk.

Government House, Hongkong, 25th April, 1908.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

S

{

REPORT OF THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the Report of the Finance Committee, dated the 16th April, 1908, and moved its adoption.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

PUBLIC HEALTH AND BUILDINGS AMENDMENT BILL.-The Director of Public Works addressed the Council and moved the Second reading of the Bill entitled An Ordinance to amend The Public Health and Buildings Ordinance, 1903, and The Public Health and Buildings Amendment Ordinance, 1903.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Mr. E. OSBORNE, Dr. Ho KAI, Mr. H. E. POLLOCK, the Colonial Secretary and His Excellency the Governor addressed the Council.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

FOREIGN CORPORATIONS BILL.The Attorney General addressed the Council and moved the Third reading of the Bill entitled An Ordinance to enable Foreign Corporations to acquire and hold land in the Colony.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question--put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned until Thursday, the 14th May, 1908.

Read and confirmed this 14th day of May, 1908.

C. CLEMENTI,

Clerk of Councils.

F. D. LUGARD,

Governor.

:

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. S.

THURSDAY, 14TH MAY, 1908.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(Sir FREDERICK JOHN DEALTRY LUGARD, K.C.M.G., C.B., D.S.0.).

His Excellency the Officer Commanding the Troops, (Colonel CHARLES HENRY DARLING,

R.E.).

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.).

>>

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM REES DAVIES).

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON).

""

the Director of Publie Works, (WILLIAM CHATHAM, C.M.G.).

11

the Registrar General, (EDWARD ALEXANDER IRVING).

""

13

the Harbour Master, (Comdr. BASIL REGINALD HAMILTON TAYLOR, R.N.). Dr. Ho KAI, M.B., C.M., C.M.G.

17

79

* * * *

Mr. WEI YUK.

Mr. MURRAY STEWART.

Sir HENRY SPENCER BEKRELEY, Kt., K.C.

Mr. HENRY ADOLPHUS WARRE SLADE.

ABSENT:

The Honourable Mr. HENRY EDWARD POLLOCK, K.C.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 30th April, 1908, were read and con- firmed.

NEW MEMBERS.-The Honourable Sir HENRY SPENCER BEKERLEY, Knight, K.C., and the Honourable Mr. HENRY ADOLPHUS WARRE SLADE took the Oath and assumed their seats as Members of the Council.

PAPERS.---The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following paper :--

Report of the Superintendent of Prison, for the year 1907.

FINANCIAL MINUTES.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following Financial Minutes, (Nos. 19 to 23), and moved that they be referred to the Finance Committee:--

No. 1660 of 1908.

No. 5096 of 1905, C.S.O.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Eleven thousand seven hundred and ninety-one Dollars ($11,791) in aid of the vote, Miscellaneous Services, Other Miscellaneous Services.

Government House, Hongkong, 28th April, 1908.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Two thousand three hundred and ninety-six Dollars ($2,396) in aid of the vote, Registrar General's Department, for the following items :-

Personal Emoluments.

Emigration Sergeant, at £160 p. a. for 9 months

£120 @ 1/10 =

3rd Grade Interpreter, at $960 p. a. for 8 months = Interpreter, at $144 p. a. for 8 months =

=

.$ 1,280

640

96

2 District Watchmen, 1 at $180 & 1 at $150 p. a. for

8 months

220

Other Charges.

Photography of Rejected Emigrants,

Total,

Government House, Hongkong, 5th May, 1908.

160

..$2,396

¿

Nc. 2567 of

1904.

No. 619 of

1908.

F. D. LUGARD

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Three thousand Dollars ($3,000) in aid of the vote, Miscellaneous Services, Purchase of Transvaal Emigra- tion Depôt for Quarantine Station.

Government House, Hongkong, 7th May, 1908.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Six hundred and thirty Dollars ($630) in aid of the vote, Police and Prison Departments, 4.-Police, for the following items :-

Other Charges.

Language Bonus,

Language Study Allowance (Punjabi) to Assistant

Superintendent,

Total, ..........

$450

180

.$630

No. 5337 of

1905.

Government House, Hongkong, 8th May, 1908.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Ninety Dollars ($90) in aid of the vote, Education, Department of Inspector of Schools, Saiyingpun Anglo- Chinese School, Other Charges, Language Study Allowance (Chinese) to Head

Master.

Government House, Hongkong, 9th May, 1908.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

REPORT OF THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the Report of the Finance Committee, dated the 30th April, 1908, and moved its adoption.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question--put and agreed to.

BASEMENT BYE-LAWS.-The Colonial Secretary moved the adoption of the Bye-laws made by the Sanitary Board under Section 16 of the Public Health and Buildings Ordinance, 1903, (Ordinance No. 1 of 1903), on the 17th day of March, 1908, in substitution for the Basement Bye-laws 1 and 2 contained in Schedule B of the aforesaid Ordinance.

The Attorney General seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

QUESTIONS.—Mr. STEWART, pursuant to notice, asked the following questions :—

1. Is it true that is Majesty's Government has announced in the House of Com- mons an intention of issuing immediately to the Government of this Colony orders to close all opium houses forthwith?

2. Did the Imperial Government communicate this intention to the Colonial Govern-

ment before making the announcement; if so, how long before; and why was · information of such capital importance to the Colony withheld from members of this Council?

3. Has the Government now any explanation to offer, or any information to impart,

on this subject?

His Excellency the Governor replied.

LIQUOR LICENSES EXTENSION BILL.-The Attorney General moved the First reading of a Bill entitled An Ordinance to extend the provisions of The Liquor Licenses Ordinance 1898 and to provide for the grant of brewery licenses.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

EVIDENCE ORDINANCE AMENDMENT BILL.-The Attorney General moved the First reading of a Bill entitled An Ordinance to amend The Evidence Ordinance 1889.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

PREPARED OPIUM AMENDMENT BILL.-The Attorney General moved the First reading of a Bill entitled An Ordinance to prohibit the Exportation of Prepared Opium to China.

His Excellency the Governor addressed the Council.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

PHARMACY BILL.-The Attorney General moved the First reading of a Bill entitled An Ordinance to provide for the registration of Chemists and Druggists and to regulate the Sale of Poisons.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

ADJOURNMENT.—The Council then adjourned until Thursday, the 28th May, 1908.

Read and confirmed, this 28th day of May, 1908.

C. CLEMENTI,

Clerk of Councils.

F. D. LUGARD,

Governor.

*

:

:

LEGISLATIV

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 9.

THURSDAY, 28TH MAY, 1908.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(Sir FREDERICK JOHN DEALTRY LUGARD, K.C.M.G., C.B., D.S.O.).

His Excellency the General Officer Commanding the Troops, (Major-General ROBERT GEORGE

BROADWOOD, C.B.).

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.).

""

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM REES DAVIES).

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON).

>>

the Director of Public Works, (WILLIAM CHATHAM, C.M.G.).

""

the Registrar General, (EDWARD ALEXANDER IRVING).

""

""

the Harbour Master, (Comdr. BASIL REGINALD HAMILTON TAYLOR, R.N.). Dr. Ho KAI, M.B., C.M., C.M.G.

Mr. WEI YUK.

Mr. HENRY EDWARD POLLOCK, K.C.

Mr. MURRAY STEWART.

Sir HENRY SPENCER BERKELEY, Kt., K.C.

Mr. HENRY ADOLPHUS WARRE SLADE,

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 14th May, 1908, were read and confirmed.

REPORT OF THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the Report of the Finance Committee, dated the 14th May, 1908, and moved its adoption.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

ADDITIONAL CATTLE BYE-LAW.-The Colonial Secretary moved the adoption of the following Additional Bye-law made by the Sanitary Board under Section 16 of the Public Health and Buildings Ordinance, 1903, (Ordinance No. 1 of 1903), on the 28th day of April, 1908-

DEPÔTS FOR CATTLE, PIGS, SHEep and Goats.

C.-GENERAL.

9. The administration of salt to cattle in depôts in any form whatever is prohibited,

except with the permission of the Colonial Veterinary Surgeon.

The Director of Public Works seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

RESOLUTION.—Mr. STEWART addressed the Council and moved the following Resolu-

tion:-

That the Members of this Council view with concern the action of His Majesty's Secretary of State for the Colonies in issuing an order affecting the revenue of Hongkong without having previously given sufficient notice to the Colonial Government to admit of the matter being referred to this Council; and desire to record a protest against any steps being taken to carry out the order announced in Parliament on the 6th instant, until His Majesty's Government shall have been fully informed of the prospective financial effect and before this Council shall have been called upon to consider the methods by which it is proposed to re-adjust the burden of taxation.

Dr. Ho KAI addressed the Council and seconded.

Mr. POLLOCK, His Excellency the Governor and Sir HENRY BERKELEY addressed the Council.

The Resolution was put to the vote and declared lost, eight members voting against and five-Mr. STEWART, Dr. Ho KAI, and Messrs. POLLOCK, SLADE and WEI YUK-for the resolution.

·

!

SUPPLEMENTARY APPROPRIATION BILL.-The Colonial Secretary addressed the Council and moved the First reading of a Bill entitled An Ordinance to authorize the Appropriation of a Supplementary Sum of One hundred and sixty-six thousand seven hundred and thirty- five Dollars and eighty-five Cents, to defray the Charges of the Year 1907.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

MAN MO TEMPLE BILL.-The Attorney General moved the First reading of a Bill entitled An Ordinance for the transfer of the properties of the Man Mo Temple to the Tung Wa Hospital.

Dr. Ho KAI seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

LIQUOR LICENSES EXTENSION BILL.-The Attorney General addressed the Council and moved the Second reading of the Bill entitled An Ordinance to extend the provisions of The Liquor Licenses Ordinance 1898 and to provide for the grant of brewery licenses.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question--put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed, and Bill reported with amendments.

The Attorney General moved that the Bill be read a third time.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

EVIDENCE ORDINANCE AMENDMENT BILL.-The Attorney General moved the Second reading of the Bill entitled An Ordinance to amend The Evidence Ordinance 1889.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed, and Bill reported without amendment.

The Attorney General moved that the Bill be read a third time.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

PREPARED OPIUM AMENDMENT BILL.-The Attorney General moved the Second read- ing of the Bill entitled An Ordinance to prohibit the Exportation of Prepared Opium to China.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

1

PHARMACY BILL.-The Attorney General addressed the Council and moved the Second reading of the Bill entitled An Ordinance to provide for the registration of Chemists and Druggists and to regulate the Sale of Poisons.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

PUBLIC HEALTH AND BUILDINGS AMENDMENT BILL.-The Attorney General moved that the Council resolve itself into a Committee of the whole Council to consider clause by clause the Bill entitled An Ordinance to amend The Public Health and Buildings Ordinance, 1903, and The Public Health and Buildings Amendment Ordinance, 1903.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned until Thursday, the 4th June, 1908.

Read and confirmed this 4th day of June, 1908.

C. CLEMENTI,

Clerk of Councils.

F. D. LUGARD,

Governor.

!

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 10.

THURSDAY, 4TH JUNE, 1908.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(Sir FREDERICK JOHN DEALTRY LUGARD, K.C.M.G., C.B., D.S.0.). The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.).

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM REES DAVIES, K.C.).

""

""

2

"}

3

""

""

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON).

the Director of Public Works, (WILLIAM CHATHAM, C.M.G.).

the Registrar General, (EDWARD ALEXANDER IRVING).

the Harbour Master, (Comdr. BASIL REGINALD HAMILTON TAYLOR, R.N.). Dr. Ho KAI, M.B., C.M., C.M.G.

""

Mr. WEI YUK.

""

""

A

"}

15

Mr. HENRY EDWARD POLLOCK, K.C.

Mr. MURRAY STEWART.

Sir HENRY SPENCER BEKRELEY, Kt., K.C.

Mr. HENRY ADOLPHUS WARRE SLADE.

"}

ABSENT:

His Excellency the General Officer Commanding the Troops, (Major-General ROBERT GEORGE

BROADWOOD, C.B.).

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 28th May, 1908, were read and con- firmed.

FINANCIAL MINUTE.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following Financial Minute, (No. 24), and moved that it be referred to the Finance Committee :-

No. 6560 of

1905.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Six thousand Dollars Extension, ($6,000) in aid of the vote, Public Works Extraordinary, Buildings, Land Office at

Tai Po.

Government House, Hongkong, 29th May, 1908.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

SUPPLEMENTARY APPROPRIATION BILL.-The Colonial Secretary moved the Second reading of the Bill entitled An Ordinance to authorize the Appropriation of a Supplementary Sum of One hundred and sixty-six thousand seven hundred and thirty-five Dollars and eighty-five Cents, to defray the Charges of the Year 1907.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

The Colonial Secretary moved that the Bill be referred to the Finance Committee.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

MAN MO TEMPLE BILL.-The Attorney General addressed the Council and moved the Second reading of the Bill entitled An Ordinance for the transfer of the properties of the Man Mo Temple to the Tung Wa Hospital.

Dr. Ho KAI seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed, and Bill reported with amendments.

The Attorney General moved that the Bill be read a third time.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

PHARMACY BILL.-The Attorney General moved that the Council resolve itself into a Committee of the whole Council to consider clause by clause the Bill entitled An Ordinance to provide for the registration of Chemists and Druggists and to regulate the Sale of Poisons.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

PUBLIC HEALTH AND BUILDINGS AMENDMENT BILL.-The Attorney General moved that the Committee stage on the Bill entitled An Ordinance to amend the Public Health and Buildings Ordinance, 1903, and The Public Health and Buildings Amendment Ordinance, 1903, be resumed.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

ADJOURNMENT.—The Council then adjourned until Thursday, the 11th June, 1908.

Read and confirmed, this 11th day of June, 1908.

C. CLEMENTI,

Clerk of Councils.

F. D. LUGARD,

Governor.

1

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 11.

THURSDAY, 11TH JUNE, 1908.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(Sir FREDERICK JOHN DEALTRY LUGARD, K.C.M.G., C.B., D.S.O.).

His Excellency the General Officer Commanding the Troops, (Major-General ROBERT GEORGE

BROADWOOD, C.B.).

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.).

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM REES DAVIES, K.C.).

""

>>

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON).

33

the Director of Public Works, (WILLIAM CHATHAM, C.M.G.).

""

the Registrar General, (EDWARD ALEXANDER IRVING).

""

""

the Harbour Master, (Comdr. BASIL REGINALD HAMILTON TAYLOR, R.N.). Dr. Ho KAI, M.B., C.M., C.M.G.

""

Mr. WEI YUK.

Mr. HENRY EDWARD POLLOCK, K.C.

Mr. MURRAY STEWART.

Sir HENRY SPENCER BERKELEY, Kt., K.C.

Mr. HENRY ADOLPHUS WARRE SLADE.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 4th June, 1908, were read and con- firmed.

REPORT OF THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the Report of the Finance Committee, dated the 4th June, 1908, and moved its adoption.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

THE AMERICAN FLEET.-His Excellency the Governor read telegraphic correspondence respecting the invitation to the American Fleet to visit Hongkong.

SUPPLEMENTARY APPROPRIATION BILL.-The Colonial Secretary moved that the Council resolve itself into a Committee of the whole Council to consider the Bill entitled An Ordinance to authorize the Appropriation of a Supplementary Sum of One hundred and sixty-six thousand seven hundred and thirty-five Dollars and eighty-five Cents, to defray the Charges of the Year 1907.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

PHARMACY BILL.-The Committee stage on the Bill entitled An Ordinance to provide for the registration of Chemists and Druggists and to regulate the Sale of Poisons was post- poned until next meeting.

PUBLIC HEALTH AND BUILDINGS AMENDMENT BILL.-The Committee stage on the Bill entitled An Ordinance to amend The Public Health and Buildings Ordinance, 1903, and The Public Health and Buildings Amendment Ordinance, 1903, was resumed.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned until Thursday, the 18th June, 1908.

Read and confirmed this 18th day of June, 1908.

C. CLEMENTI,

Clerk of Councils.

F. D. LUGARD,

Governor.

TIVE

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 12.

THURSDAY, 18TH JUNE, 1908.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(Sir FREDERICK JOHN DEALTRY LUGARD, K.C.M.G., C.B., D.S.O.).

His Excellency the General Officer Commanding the Troops, (Major-General ROBERT GEORGE

Broadwood, C.B.).

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.).

""

**

""

""

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM REES DAVIES, K.C.).

the Colonial Treasurer, (LEWIS AUDLEY MARSH JOHNSTON). the Director of Public Works, (WILLIAM CHATHAM, C.M.G.).

the Registrar General, (EDWARD ALEXANDER IRVING).

the Harbour Master, (Comdr. BASIL REGINALD HAMILTON TAYLOR, R.N.). Dr. Ho KAI, M.B., C.M., C.M.G.

Mr. WEI YUK.

Mr. HENRY EDWARD POLLOCK, K.C.

13

Mr. MURRAY STEWART,

11

15

""

Sir HENRY SPENCER BERKELEY, Kt., K.C.

Mr. HENRY ADOLPHUS WARRE SLADE.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 11th June, 1908, were read and con- firmed.

PAPERS.---The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following paper :---

Correspondence relating to the proposed erection of a Public Latrine on the

site now occupied by No. 1 Chuk Hing Lane.

FINANCIAL MINUTES.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following Financial Minutes, (Nos. 25 to 28), and moved that they be referred to the Finance Committee:--

1907.

F. D. LUGARD.

No. 1723 of The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Six thousand seven hundred Dollars ($6,700) in aid of the vote, Public Works Extraordinary, Saiying- pun Anglo-Chinese School Extension.

No. 8036 of

1906.

No. 652 of

1998.

Government House, Hongkong, 11th June, 1908.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One thousand seven hundred Dollars ($1,700) in aid of the vote, Public Works Extraordinary, 11 Vic- toria British School-Additional Storey to Quarters.

Government House, Hongkong, 12th June, 1908.

F. D. LUGARÐ.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Six thousand five hundred Dollars ($6,500) in aid of the vote, Public Works Recurrent, Maintenance of Kowloon Water Works.

Government House, Hongkong, 16th June, 1908.

No. 576 of

1908.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Eight thousand five hundred Dollars ($8,500) in aid of the vote, Public Works Extraordinary, Miscel- laneous Water Works.

Government House, Hongkong, 17th June, 1908.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

RESOLUTION. The Colonial Secretary addressed the Council and moved the following Resolution:-

Whereas application has been duly made by the Sanitary Board to the Governor under Section 167 of the Public Health and Buildings Ordinance 1903 for the erection of a Public Latrine on the site now occupied by No. 1 Chuk Hing Lane; And Whereas such application having been approved by the Governor and a notification of the intention to erect a Public Latrine

upon such site having been duly published in three successive numbers of the Gazette, certain owners of property in the immediate vicinity of such site have objected to such erection; And Whereas the objections so made have been considered by this Council;

It is hereby resolved by this Council that the above mentioned site and the erection

thereon of a Public Latrine be approved.

The Director of Public Works seconded.

After discussion the Resolution was put to the vote and carried, eleven members voting for and two-Dr. Ho KAI and Mr. WEI YUK-against the motion.

SUPPLEMENTARY APPROPRIATION BILL.-The Colonial Secretary moved the Third read- ing of the Bill entitled An Ordinance to authorize the Appropriation of a Supplementary Sum of One hundred and sixty-six thousand seven hundred and thirty-five Dollars and eighty-five Cents, to defray the Charges of the Year 1907.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

PHARMACY BILL.-The Attorney General moved that the Council resolve itself into a Committee of the whole Council to consider the Bill entitled An Ordinance to provide for the registration of Chemists and Druggists and to regulate the Sale of Poisons.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed, and Bill reported with amendments.

PUBLIC HEALTH AND BUILDINGS AMENDMENT BILL.-The Committee stage on the Bill entitled An Ordinance to amend the Public Health and Buildings Ordinance, 1903, and The Public Health and Buildings Amendment Ordinance, 1903, was postponed until the next meeting.

ADJOURNMENT.—The Council then adjourned until Thursday, the 25th June, 1908.

Read and confirmed, this 25th day of June, 1908.

F. D. LUGARD,

Governor.

C. CLEMENTI,

Clerk of Councils.

EGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 13.

THURSDAY, 25TH JUNE, 1908.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(Sir FREDERICK JOHN DEALTRY LUGARD, K.C.M.G., C.B., D.S.O.).

His Excellency the General Officer Commanding the Troops, (Major-General ROBERT GEORGE

BROADWOOD, C.B.).

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.).

""

""

2

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM REES DAVIES, K.C.).

the Colonial Treasurer, (LEWIS AUDLEY MARSH JOHNSTON),

the Director of Public Works, (WILLIAM CHATHAM, C.M.G.).

the Registrar General, (EDWARD ALEXANDER IRVING).

the Harbour Master, (Comdr. BASIL REGINALD HAMILTON TAYLOR, R.N.). Dr. Ho KAI, M.B., C.M., C.M.G.

Mr. WEI YUK.

""

""

Mr. HENRY EDWARD POLLOCK, K.C.

Mr. MURRAY STEWART.

""

>>

Sir HENRY SPENCER BERKELEY, Kt., K.C.

ABSENT:

The Honourable Mr. HENRY ADOLPHUS WARRE SLADE.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 18th June, 1908, were read and con- firmed.

PAPERS.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following papers :-

Report on the Hongkong Volunteer Corps, for the year April 1st, 1907, to March

31st, 1908.

Report on the Blue Book for 1907.

FINANCIAL MINUTES.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following Financial Minutes, (Nos. 29 and 30), and moved that they be referred to the Finance Committee :---

No. 1225 of 1908.

No. 4452 of

1908.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One hundred Dollars ($100) in aid of the vote Colonial Secretary's Department and Legislature, Other Charges, Hansard Reports.

Government House, Hongkong, 22nd June, 1908.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Seven hundred and forty-five Dollars ($745) in aid of the vote, Übservatory, Personal Emoluments, for the following items :—

5th Grade Computer, ($480 to $660 by $60 annually),...$505 Allowances for night duty to 2 5th Grade Computers,

Total,

240

$745

Government House, Hongkong, 22nd June, 1908.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

REPORT OF THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the Report of the Finance Committee, dated the 18th June, 1908, and moved its adoption.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

PUBLIC HEALTH AND BUILDINGS AMENDMENT BILL.-The Committee stage on the Bill entitled An Ordinance to amend The Public Health and Buildings Ordinance, 1903, and The Public Health and Buildings Amendment Ordinance, 1903, was resumed.

PHARMACY BILL.-The Attorney General moved the Third reading of the Bill entitled An Ordinance to provide for the registration of Chemists and Druggists and to regulate the Sale of Poisons.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

ADJOURNMENT.—The Council then adjourned until Thursday, the 2nd July, 1908.

Read and confirmed this 2nd day of July, 1908.

C. CLEMENTI,

Clerk of Councils.

F. D. LUGARD,

Governor.

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 14.

THURSDAY, 2ND JULY, 1908.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(Sir FREDERICK JOHN DEALTRY LUGARD, K.C.M.G., C.B., D.S.0.).

His Excellency the General Officer Commanding the Troops, ( Major-General ROBERT GEORGE

BROADWOOD, C.B.).

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.).

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM REES DAVIES, K.C.).

29

>>

the Colonial Treasurer, (LEWIS AUDLEY MARSH Johnston).

17

the Director of Public Works, (WILLIAM CHATHAM, C.M.G.).

19

the Registrar General, (EDWARD ALEXANDER IRVING).

3

17

the Harbour Master, (Comdr. BASIL REGINALD HAMILTON TAYLOR, R.N.). Dr. Ho KAI, M.B., C.M., C.M.G.

>"

Mr. WEI YUK, C.M.G.

"

Mr. HENRY EDWARD POLLOCK, K.0.

""

Mr. MURRAY STEWART.

>>

ABSENT:

The Honourable Sir HENRY SPENCER BERKELEY, Kt., K.C.

17

Mr. HENRY ADOLPHUS WARRE SLADE.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 25th June, 1908, were read and con- firmed.

PAPERS. The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following paper :--

Correspondence relating to the transfer to the Government of the Widows' and

Orphans' Pension Fund.

FINANCIAL MINUTES.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following Financial Minutes, (Nos. 31 and 32), and moved that they be referred to the Finance Committee :-

No. 9124 of

1905, C.S.O.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Two thousand two hundred and twenty-one Dollars ($2,221) in aid of the vote, Harbour Master's Department, for the following items :-

A. HARBOUR OFFICE.

Personal Emoluments.

* Allowances for Painting Numbers on Junks to:--

3rd Grade Clerk, at $30,

2 5th Grade Clerks and Shroffs, at $36 each,

Inspector of Junks and Cargo Boats, at $180, Assistant Inspector of Junks and Cargo Boats, at

$120,

公洽品

.S 15

36

90

+

60

3rd Grade Assistant Inspector of Junks and Cargo

Boats, at $90,........

45

11 Police Officers, in charge of Outstations, 4 at $180, 4 at $120, and 3 at $60 each,.

690

3 Police Constables at Outstations, 2 at $90 each,

and 1 at $60,

120

3 Seamen, at $24 each,.

36

34 Boatmen, 10 at $24, 12 at $18, and 12 at $12

each,

300

20 Police Boatmen at Outstations, 13 at $24, and

7 at $18 each,.......

219

Painter, at $48,

24

$1,635

Other Charges.

Paints, Brushes, &c., for Painting Numbers on Junks, . 550

E.-STEAM-LAUNCHES.

Steam-Launch Daisy.

Personal Emoluments.

* Allowances for Painting Numbers on Junks to:-

Engineer, at $24,

2 Seamen, at $24 each,

Total,

$ 12 24

36

S 2.221

No. 4676 of

1908.

For 6 months from 1st July to 31st December, 1908.

Government House, Hongkong, 23rd June, 1908.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Thirty thousand Dollars ($30,000) in aid of the vote, Charitable Services, Other Charitable Allowances.

Government House, longkong, 30th June, 1908.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

REPORT OF THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the Report of the Finance Committee, dated the 25th June, 1908, and moved its adoption.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

FLOODS IN SOUTH CHINA.-His Excellency the Governor addressed the Council and moved the following Resolution :—

"That the Legislative Council of Hongkong desires on behalf of the community, to convey to the Governor-General of the two Kuang provinces, their deep sympathy in the appalling calamity which has overtaken a large part of the population of Kuang Tung and Kuany Si.

It is further resolved that a sum of Thirty thousand Dollars be disbursed from the General Revenue of the Colony as a donation from the Colony of Hongkong to the Fund for the relief of the sufferers from the recent floods in the Kuang Tung und Kuang Si Provinces."

Dr. Ho KAI addressed the Council and seconded.

The motion was carried unanimously.

WIDOWS' AND ORPHANS' PENSION BILL.-The Colonial Secretary addressed the Council and moved the First reading of a Bill entitled An Ordinance to provide for the Transfer to the Government of Hongkong of the Widows' and Orphans' Pension Fund and of the Management and Control of the Pensions of Widows and Orphans and to consolidate the laws in relation thereto.

The Attorney General seconded. Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

PREPARED OPIUM AMENDMENT BILL.-The Attorney General moved that the Council resolve itself into a Committee of the whole Council to consider the Bill entitled An Ordin- ance to prohibit the Exportation of Prepared Opium to China and to French Indo-China.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed, and Bill reported with amendments.

The Attorney General moved that the Bill be read a third time.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

PUBLIC HEALTH AND BUILDINGS AMENDMENT BILL.-The Attorney General moved that the Bill entitled An Ordinance to amend the Public Health and Buildings Ordinance, 1903, and The Public Health and Buildings Amendment Ordinance, 1903, and to make better provision for the preservation of the Public Health, be re-committed.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed, and Bill reported with amendments.

The Attorney General moved that the Bill be read a third time.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Mr. STEWART and His Excellency the Governor addressed the Council.

Question-put and agreed to,

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

ADJOURNMENT.—The Council then adjourned until Thursday, the 9th July, 1908.

Read and confirmed, this 23rd day of July, 1908.

C. CLEMENTI,

Clerk of Councils.

F. D. LUGARD,

?

Governor.

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 15.

THURSDAY, 23RD JULY, 1908.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(Sir FREDERICK JOHN DEALTRY LUGARD, K.C.M.G., C.B., D.S.O.).

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.).

the Colonial Treasurer, (LEWIS AUDLEY MARSH JOHNSTON).

""

""

the Registrar General, (EDWARD ALEXANDER IRVING).

""

the Harbour Master, (Comdr. BASIL REGINALD HAMILTON TAYLOR, R.N.).

"7

Dr. Ho KAI, M.B., C.M., C.M.G.

Mr. WEI YUK, C.M.G.

99

Mr. HENRY EDWARD POLLOCK, K.C.

""

Mr. MURRAY STEWART.

""

Sir HENRY SPENCER BERKELEY, Kt., K.C.

ABSENT:

His Excellency the General Officer Commanding the Troops, (Major-General ROBERT GEORGE

BROADWOOD, C.B.).

The Honourable the Attorney General, (WILLIAM REES DAVIES, K.C.).

the Director of Public Works, (WILLIAM CHATHAM, C.M.G.).

Mr. HENRY ADOLPHUS WARRE SLADE.

The Council met pursuant to summons.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 2nd July, 1908, were read and con- firmed.

FLOODS IN SOUTH CHINA.-His Excellency the Governor read a despatch from H.B.M.'s Acting Consul-General at Canton conveying the thanks of the Governor-General of the two Kuang provinces for the donation voted by the Council for the relief of the sufferers from the recent floods in the Kuang Tung and Kuang Si Provinces.

Papers.—The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following papers :-

Report of the Inspector of Schools for the

year 1907.

Reports on the Health and Sanitary Condition of the Colony of Hongkong for the

year 1907.

Correspondence relating to the West River Floods.

FINANCIAL MINUTES.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following Financial Minutes, (Nos. 33-38 and 40), and moved that they be referred to the Finance Committee:-

No. 2831 of 1906, C.5.0.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Four thousand six hundred and seventy Dollars ($4,670) in aid of the vote, Public Works, Recurrent, Maintenance of Lighthouses.

Government House, Hongkong, 3rd July, 1908.

No. 4869 of

1908.

I in

No. 3013 of

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Three hundred Dollars ($300) in aid of the vote, Colonial Secretary's Department and Legislature, Other Charges, Incidental Expenses.

Government House, Hongkong, 3rd July, 1908.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Eight thousand five 1906. hundred Dollars ($8,500) in aid of the vote, Public Works Extraordinary, Quaran-

tine Station.

No. 652 of

190S.

No. 5158 of

1908.

No. 5238 of

1908.

Government House, Hongkong, 4th July, 1908.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Fifteen thousand Dollars ($15,000) in aid of the vote, Public Works, Extraordinary, Public Health and Build- ings Ordinance, 1903, Compensation.

Government House, Hongkong, 14th July, 1908.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Two thousand Dollars ($2,000) in aid of the vote, Botanical and Forestry Department, Other Charges, Forestry in New Territories.

Government House, Hongkong, 20th July, 1908.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Five hundred Dollars ($500) in aid of the vote, Medical Departments, B.--Hospital and Asylums, Infec- tious Hospitals, Hospital Hulk Hygeia, for the following items :-

Personal Emoluments.

Temporary Staff,

.$200

Other Charges.

Provisions, &c.,

300

Total,

$500

No. 3832 of 1908.

Government House, Hongkong, 21st July, 1908.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One hundred and eighty-six thousand five hundred Dollars ($186,500) in aid of the vote, Public Works Extraordinary, Mongkoktsui Breakwater-Typhoon Refuge for Small Craft.

Government House, Hongkong, 22nd July, 1908.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Mr. POLLOCK, the Colonial Secretary and His Excellency the Governor addressed the Council in connection with the last minute.

Question-put and agreed to.

REPORT OF THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the Report of the Finance Committee, dated the 2nd July, 1908, and moved its adoption.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

QUESTIONS.-Mr. POLLOCK, pursuant to notice, asked the following question :-

With reference to the statement in paragraph 5 of the Despatch of the Officer Administering the Government to the Secretary of State, dated the 24th June, 1907, to the effect that "the great majority of the contributors, and all the directors, except the Chairman, were opposed to the transfer of the Fund", will the Government state whether any, and, if so, how many of the contri- butors, who were then opposed to the transfer of the fund, have given notice to the Government of any alteration of their views on the subject?

The Colonial Secretary replied.

Mr. STEWART Considered the reply to the above question to also answer his and conse- quently withdrew the following question standing in his name :—

Have the Government taken steps, to ascertain the individual wishes of contributors to the Widows' and Orphans' Fund, with regard to the Government's proposal to take over that Fund; and, if so, will the Government inform the members of this Council how many subscribers are for and how many against that proposal?

EVIDENCE (COLONIAL STATUTES) AMENDMENT BILL.-The Colonial Secretary, in the absence of the Attorney General, moved the First reading of a Bill entitled An Ordinance to amend The Evidence (Colonial Statutes) Ordinance 1908.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

WIDOWS' AND ORPHANS' PENSION BILL.-The Colonial Secretary addressed the Council and moved the Second reading of the Bill entitled An Ordinance to provide for the Transfer to the Government of Hongkong of the Widows' and Orphans' Pension Fund and of the Management and Control of the Pensions of Widows and Orphans and to consolidate the

laws in relation thereto.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Mr. STEWART, Mr. POLLOCK, the Colonial Secretary and His Excellency the Governor addressed the Council.

Question--put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

ADJOURNMENT. The Council then adjourned until Thursday, the 30th July, 1908.

Read and confirmed this 30th day of July, 1908.

F. D. LUGARD,

Governor.

C. CLEMENTI,

Clerk of Councils.

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 16.

THURSDAY, 30TH JULY, 1908.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(Sir FREDERICK JOHN DEALTRY LUGARD, K.C.M.G., C.B., D.S.O.).

His Excellency the General Officer Commanding the Troops, (Major-General ROBERT GEORGE

BROADWOOD, C.B.).

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.).

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM REES DAVIES, K.C.).

"1

"

the Colonial Treasurer, (LEWIS 'AUDLEY MARSH JOHNSTON).

"J

the Director of Public Works, (WILLIAM CHATHAM, C.M.G.).

))

the Registrar General, (EDWARD ALEXANDER IRVING).

""

""

the Harbour Master, (Comdr. BASIL REGINALD HAMILTON TAYLOR, R.N.). Dr. Ho KAI, M.B., C.M., C.M.G.

Mr. WEI YUK, C.M.G.

""

Mr. WILLIAM JARDINE GRESSON.

11

Mr. MURRAY STEWART.

Mr. HENRY ADOLPHUS WARRE SLADE.

ABSENT:

The Honourable Mr. HENRY EDWARD POLLOCK, K.C.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 23rd July, 1908, were read and con- firmed.

Mr. GRESSON resumed his seat as a Member of the Council.

FINANCIAL MINUTES.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following Financial Minutes, (Nos. 39 and 41), and moved that they be referred to the Finance Committee :---

No. 667 of 1908.

No. 7258 of

1907.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Two thousand Dollars ($2,000) in aid of the vote, Public Works Extraordinary, Staff Quarters, Tai Po.

Government House, Hongkong, 21st July, 1908.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Four thousand one hundred and fifteen Dollars and forty-six cents ($4,115.46) in aid of the vote, Public Works Department, Personal Emoluments, for the following items :-

For 6 months from 1st July to 31st December, 1908.

1 Drainage Surveyor,

$1,650.00

Do..

Exchange Compensation, 1,050.00

1 Foreman,..

420.00

Do., Exchange Compensation,

305.46

1 Clerk,

270.00

1 Clerk and Draughtsman,

240.00

2 Foremen,

180.00

Total,

$4,115.46

Government House, Hongkong, 23rd July, 1908.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

.

REPORT OF THE FINANCE COMMITTEE. The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the Report of the Finance Committee, dated the 23rd July, 1908, and moved its adoption.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Mr. SLADE and the Director of Public Works addressed the Council in connection with the vote of $186,500 (Financial Minute No. 40) in aid of the vote, Public Works Extra- ordinary, Mongkoktsui Breakwater-Typhoon Refuge for Small Craft.

Question-put and agreed to.

TYPHOON.-His Excellency the Governor and the Harbour Master addressed the Council with reference to the Typhoon of the 28th July, 1908.

EVIDENCE (COLONIAL STATUTES) AMENDMENT BILL.-The Attorney General addressed the Council and asked that the Bill entitled An Ordinance to amend The Evidence (Colonial Statutes) Ordinance 1908, be withdrawn.

The Colonial Secretary seconded. Question-put and agreed to.

WIDOWS' AND ORPHANS' PENSION BILL.-The Attorney General moved that the Council resolve itself into a Committee of the whole Council to consider the Bill entitled An Ordin- ance to provide for the Transfer to the Government of Hongkong of the Widows' and Orphans' Pension Fund and of the Management and Control of the Pensions of Widows and Orphans and to consolidate the laws in relation thereto.

The Colonial Secretary seconded. Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed, and Bill reported with amendments.

The Colonial Secretary moved that the Bill be read a third time.

The Attorney General seconded.

Mr. STEWART addressed the Council.

Question-put and agreed to, Mr. STEWART alone dissenting.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned until Thursday, the 6th August, 1908.

Read and confirmed, this 6th day of August, 1908.

F. D. LUGARD,

Governor.

C. CLEMENTI,

Clerk of Councils.

X

:

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 17.

THURSDAY, 67 AUGUST, 1908.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(Sir FREDERICK JOHN DEALTRY LUGARD, K.C.M.G., C.B., D.S.O.).

His Excellency the General Officer Commanding the Troops, ( Major-General ROBERT George

BROADWOOD, C.B.).

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.).

"2

=

99

*

""

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM REES DAVIES, K.C.).

the Colonial Treasurer, (LEWIS AUDLEY MARSH JOHNSTON). the Director of Public Works, (WILLIAM CHATHAM, C.M.G.). the Registrar General, (EDWARD ALEXANDER IRVING).

the Harbour Master, (Comdr. BASIL REGINALD HAMILTON TAYLOR, R.N.).

Dr. Ho KAI, M.B., C.M.G.

Mr. WEI YUK, C.M.G.

""

Mr. WILLIAM JARDINE GRESSON.

""

Mr. MURRAY STEWART.

""

Mr. HENRY ADOLPHUS WARRE SLADE.

99

ABSENT:

!

The Honourable Mr. HENRY EDWARD POLLOCK, K.C.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 30th July, 1908, were read and con- firmed.

FINANCIAL MINUTES.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following Financial Minutes, (Nos. 42 and 43), and moved that they be referred to the Finance Committee :----

No. 7714 of 1907.

No. 2511 of

1908.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One thousand three hundred and sixty-eight Dollars ($1,368) in aid of the vote, Public Works, Extra- ordinary, Miscellaneous, Compensation for the Resumption of Lots Nos. 212 and 711 situated in Demarcation District No. 6.

Government House, Hongkong, 31st July, 1908.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One hundred and eighty- nine Dollars ($189) in aid of the vote, Post Office, A.-Hongkong Post Office, Other Charges, Repairs to Steam-Launch.

Government House, Hongkong, 1st August, 1908.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

REPORT OF THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the Report of the Finance Committee, dated the 30th July, 1908, and moved its adoption.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

PAPERS.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following papers :— ·

Report on the Botanical and Forestry Department, for the year 1907.

Correspondence regarding the Typhoon Shelter at Mongkoktsui and the proposed

temporary increase in Light Dues.

TYPHOON.-His Excellency the Governor read a telegram of sympathy from the Secre- tary of State with reference to the Typhoon of the 28th July, 1908, and addressed the Council regarding arrangements made with Vice-Admiral Sir HEDWORTH LAMBTON for obtaining meteorological information.

TYPHOON SHELTER AT MONGKOKTSUI AND INCREASE IN LIGHT DUES.-His Excellency the Governor addressed the Council and moved the following Resolution :--

Resolved that on and from the 1st January, 1909, the Owner, Agent or Master of

every ship, which enters the Waters of the Colony, shall

pay the following Dues to such Officer as the Governor may, from time to time, appoint:

(1.) For all River Steamers, which enter the Waters of the Colony by

day or by night:

Five sixths of a cent per ton register.

(2.) All other ships, which enter the Waters of the Colony :-

Two cents per ton register.

Exemptions:-

British and Foreign Ships of War.

The Attorney General seconded.

Mr. STEWART addressed the Council and proposed the following Amendment:

That the debate shall be adjourned pending deliberations upon the Shipping Com-

panies' protest.

Mr. GRESSON addressed the Council and seconded.

Dr. Ho KAI, Mr. WEI YUK and His Excellency the Governor addressed the Council.

Council divided on the Amendment which was declared lost, seven members voting against and five-Mr. STEWART, Mr. GRESSON, Dr. Ho KAI, Mr. WEI YUK and Mr. SLADE for the Amendment.

Council then divided on the Resolution which was carried, Messrs. GRESSON and STEWART alone dissenting.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned sine die.

Read and confirmed this 24th day of September, 1908.

F. D. LUGARD,

Governor.

C. CLEMENTI,

Clerk of Councils.

1

I

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 18.

THURSDAY, 24TH SEPTEMBER, 1908.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(Sir FREDERICK JOHN DEALTRY LUGARD, K.C.M.G., C.B., D.S.O.).

His Excellency the Officer Commanding the Troops, (Colonel CHARLES HENRY DArling,

R.E.).

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.).

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM REES DAVIES, K.C.).

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON).

""

"">

the Director of Public Works, (WILLIAM CHATHAM, C.M.G.).

"}

the Registrar General, (EDWARD ALEXANDER IRVING).

the Captain Superintendent of Police, (FRANCIS JOSEPH BADELEY). Dr. Ho KAI, M.B., C.M.G.

Mr. WEI YUK, C.M.G.

Mr. WILLIAM JARDINE GRESSON.

Mr. MURRAY STEWART.

??

Mr. HENRY ADOLPHUS WARRE SLADE.

"

ABSENT:

The Honourable Mr. HENRY EDWARD POLLOCK, K.C.

The Council met pursuant to summons.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 6th August, 1908, were read and con- firmed.

FINANCIAL MINUTES.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following Financial Minutes, (Nos. 44 to 56), and moved that they be referred to the Finance Committee:

No. 5312 of 1908.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Five hundred and twenty-five Dollars ($525) in aid of the vote, Sanitary Department, Other Charges, for the following items :-

Language Study Allowances, Head Stones,

Total,

$ 75

450

$525

No. 5719 of

1908.

No. 2031 of 1908.

Government House, Hongkong, 5th August, 1908.

F. D. LUGARD. '

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Three thousand six hundred and sixty-three Dollars ($3,663) in aid of the vote, Education, Other Charges, Grants, Principal Grants under Grant Code.

Government House, Hongkong, 12th August, 1908.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Three thousand Dollars ($3,000) in aid of the vote, Harbour Master's Department, E.-Steam- launches, Other Charges, Repairs.

Government House, Hongkong, 19th September, 1908.

No. 3158 of

1908.

No. 2956 of

1908.

No. 4452 of

1908.

1:05.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One hundred and fifty Dollars ($150) in aid of the vote, Botanical and Forestry Department, Other Charges, Library.

Government House, Hongkong, 15th August, 1908.

F. D. LUGARD.

*

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Five hundred Dollars ($500) in aid of the vote, Police and Prison Departments, B.-Fire Brigade, Other Charges, Repairs to Engines and Plant.

Government House, Hongkong, 19th August, 1908.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One hundred Dollars ($100) in aid of the vote, Observatory, Other Charges, Laboratory Expenses.

Government House, Hongkong, 21st August, 1908.

F. D. LUGARD.

No. 7820 of The Governor recommends' the Council to vote a sum of Six hundred and thirty-four Dollars ($634) in aid of the vote, Public Works Extraordinary, Miscellaneous. Compensation for the resumption of certain Lots in Demarcation District No. 183.

No. 8128 of 1966.

No. 1660 of 1908.

No. 1696 of 190s.

V in

No. 54:1 of

1905.

Government House, Hongkong, 27th August, 1908.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Five hundred and ninety-four Dollars ($594) in aid of the vote, Harbour Master's Department, A.-Harbour Office, Other Charges, Life Saving Apparatus.

Government House, Hongkong, 4th September, 1908.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Eight thousand Dollars ($8,000) in aid of the vote, Miscellaneous Services, Printing and Binding.

Government House, Hongkong, 8th September, 1908.

F. D. LUGard.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Three hundred and two Dollars ($302) in aid of the vote, Public Works Extraordinary, Miscellaneous, Compensation for resumption of Lot No. 3,212 in Survey District IV, New Territories.

Government House, Hongkong, 11th September, 1908.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One hundred Dollars ($100) in aid of the vote, Medical Departments A.--Staff, Other Charges, Health Officer of Port, Repairs to Launch.

Government House, Hongkong, 14th September, 1908.

13

2

No. 652 of 1908.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Six thousand eight hundred Dollars ($6,800) in aid of the vote, Public Works, Recurrent, for the following items:-

No. 4869 of

1908.

Buildings.

Maintenance of Buildings,

Communications.

Maintenance of Telegraphs,

Maintenance of Telegraphs in New Territories,

Total,

Government House, Hongkong, 19th September, 1908.

F. D. LUGard.

.$3,000

3,000

800

$6,800

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One hundred dollars ($100) in aid of the vote, Colonial Secretary's Department and Legislature, Other Charges, Newspapers, Periodicals, &c.

Government House, Hongkong, 21st September, 1908.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

REPORT OF THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the Report of the Finance Committee, dated the 6th August, 1908, and moved its adoption.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded. Question-put and agreed to.

PAPERS.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following papers :--

tions

Draft Estimates of Revenue and Expenditure for the Report on the Assessment for the year 1908-1909.

year 1909.

Abstract shewing Differences between the Estimates of Expenditure for 1908 and

1909.

Financial Statements in connection with the Estimates for 1909.

Report on the Typhoon of 27th-28th July, 1908.

Report of the Director of Public Works for the year 1907.

RESOLUTIONS.-Mr. STEWART addressed the Council and moved the following Resolu-

1. That in the opinion of this Council the reasons given in the House of Commons on 28th July, by the Under Secretary of State for the Colonies, in explanation of the peremptory nature of the order issued to Your Excellency on the 6th May are unsatisfactory.

Mr. WEI YUK seconded.

His Excellency the Governor addressed the Council.

Council divided on the Resolution which was declared lost, seven members voting against and five-Dr. Ho KAI, Mr. WEI YUK, Mr. GRESSON, Mr. STEWART and Mr. SLADE- for the Resolution.

2. That the members of this Council regret the recent action of the Building Authority in instituting on a large scale criminal proceedings against property owners for failure to comply with the requirements of the law under circumstances which, in the majority of cases, rendered compliance impracticable.

Mr. SLADE seconded.

The Director of Public Works and Mr. GRESSON addressed the Council.

Council divided on the Resolution which was declared lost, seven members voting against and five-Dr. Ho Kai, Mr. WEI YUK, Mr. GRESSON, Mr. STEWART and Mr. SLADE — for the Resolution.

فيلم

QUESTION. Mr. STEWART, pursuant to notice, asked the following question:-

With reference to reports which have appeared in the local Press concerning the alleged unsatisfactory state of some of the stone railway bridges under con- struction in Kowloon and the New Territory, have the Government any information to impart?

The Colonial Secretary replied.

APPROPRIATION BILL.-The Colonial Secretary moved the First reading of a Bill entitled An Ordinance to apply a sum not exceeding Five million five hundred and seventy thousand four hundred and twenty-seven Dollars to the Public Service of the year 1909.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

His Excellency the Governor addressed the Council.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

EVIDENCE (COLONIAL STATUTES) ACT 1907 INTERPRETATION BILL.-The Attorney General moved the First reading of a Bill entitled An Ordinance to extend a certain defini- tion in the Imperial Act styled the Evidence (Colonial Statutes) Act 1907.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

THEATRES AND PUBLIC PERFORMANCES REGULATION BILL.-The Attorney General moved the First reading of a Bill entitled An Ordinance for regulating Theatres and other- places of public resort.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned until Thursday, the 8th October, 1908.

Read and confirmed, this 8th day of October, 1908.

C. CLEMENTI,

Clerk of Councils.

F. D. LUGARD,

Governor.

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 19.

THURSDAY, 8TH OCTOBER, 1908.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(Sir FREDERICK JOHN DEALTRY LUGARD, K.C.M.G., C.B., D.S.O.).

His Excellency the Officer Commanding the Troops, (Colonel CHARLES HENRY Darling,

R.E.):

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.).

"}

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM REES DAVIES, K.C.).

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALEXANder Macdonald THOMSON).

the Director of Public Works, (WILLIAM CHATHAM, C.M.G.).

""

""

the Registrar General, (EDWARD ALEXANDER IRVing).

>>

19

3

the Captain Superintendent of Police, (FRANCIS JOSEPH BADELEY). Dr. Ho KAI, M.B., C.M.G.

Mr. WEI YUK, C.M.G.

Mr. WILLIAM JARDINE GRESSON.

Mr. MURRAY STEWART.

"}

Mr. HENRY ADOLPHUS WARRE SLADE.

ABSENT:

The Honourable Mr. HENRY EDWARD POLLOCK, K.C..

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 24th September, 1908, were read and confirmed.

FINANCIAL MINUTES.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following Financial Minutes, (Nos. 57 to 59), and moved that they be referred to the Finance Committee:-

No. 1330 of 1905.

No. 5351 of 1907.

No. 6719 of

1908.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Five thousand two hundred and eighty-one Dollars ($5,281) in aid of the vote, Education, Department of Inspector Schools, Other Charges, Evening Continuation Classes.

Government House, Hongkong, 2nd October, 1908.

F. D. LUGard.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Two thousand Dollars ($2,000) in aid of the vote, Charitable Services, Tung Wah Hospital..

Government House, Hongkong, 2nd October, 1908.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Two hundred and seventy Dollars ($270) in aid of the vote, Treasury, B.-Office of Assessor of Rates, Other Charges, for the following items :-

Furniture,

Typewriter,..

Total,

Government House, Hongkong, 5th October, 1908.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

$ 35

235

$270

REPORT OF THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the Report of the Finance Committee, dated the 24th September, 1908, and moved its adoption.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

APPROPRIATION BILL.-The Colonial Secretary moved the Second reading of the Bill entitled An Ordinance to apply a sum not exceeding Five million five hundred and seventy thousand four hundred and twenty-seven Dollars to the Public Service of the year 1909.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Mr. STEWART, Mr. GRESSON, the Colonial Secretary, the Director of Public Works, His Excellency the Governor and Mr. SLADE addressed the Council.

Question--put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

The Colonial Secretary moved that the Bill be referred to the Finance Committee. The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question -put and agreed to.

EVIDENCE (COLONIAL STATUTES) ACT 1907 INTERPRETATION BILL.-The Attorney General moved the Second reading of the Bill entitled An Ordinance to extend a certain definition in the Imperial Act styled the Evidence (Colonial Statutes) Act 1907.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed, and Bill reported without amendment.

The Attorney General moved that the Bill be read a third time.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

THEATRES AND PUBLIC PERFORMANCES REGULATION BILL.-The Attorney General addressed the Council and moved the Second reading of the Bill entitled An Ordinance for regulating Theatres and other places of public resort.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed, and Bill reported with amendments.

ADJOURNMENT.—The Council then adjourned until Thursday, the 15th October, 1908.

Read and confirmed this 15th day of October, 1908.

C. CLEMENTI,

Clerk of Councils.

F. D. LUGARD,

Governor.

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 20.

THURSDAY, 15TH OCTOBER, 1908.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(Sir FREDERICK JOHN DEALTRY LUGARD, K.C.M.G., C.B., D.S.O.).

His Excellency the Officer Commanding the Troops, (Colonel CHARLES HENRY DARLING,

R.E.).

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.).

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM REES DAVIES, K.C.).

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALEXANDER Macdonald THOMSON).

the Director of Public Works, (WILLIAM CHATHAM, C.M.G.).

""

77

the Registrar General, (EDWARD ALEXANDER IRVING).

11

the Captain Superintendent of Police, (FRANCIS JOSEPH BADELEY). Dr. Ho KAI, M.B., C.M.G.

Mr. WEI YUK, C.M.G.

Mr. WILLIAM JARDINE GRESSON.

Mr. HENRY ADOLPHUS WARRE SLADE.

ABSENT:

The Honourable Mr. HENRY EDWARD POLLOCK, K.C.

""

Mr. EDBERT ANSGAR HEWETT.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 8th October, 1908, were read and con- firmed.

FINANCIAL MINUTE.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table Financial Minute No. 60, and moved that it be referred to the Finance Committee:-

No. 2106 of

1908.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Four hundred and eighty- nine Dollars and forty-seven Cents ($489.47) in aid of the vote, Judicial and Legal Departments, D.-Land Registry Office, Personal Emoluments, for the following items:

New Territories.

Allowance to Passed Cadet acting as Assistant Land

Officer, (from 3rd April to 1st July, 1908),

Exchange Compensation,

Total,

.$296.55

192.92

.$489.47

i

Government House, Hongkong, 10th October, 1908.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

REPORT OF THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the Report of the Finance Committee, dated the 8th October, 1908, and moved its adoption.

In connection with the Report he also laid on the table a certificate to the effect that the Appropriation Bill for 1909 was considered clause by clause in the presence of all the members of the Finance Committee and that in the opinion of the Committee the Bill may be dealt with by the Council in the same manner as a Bill reported on by a Committee of the whole Council.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

?

APPROPRIATION BILL.-The Colonial Secretary moved the Third reading of the Bill entitled An Ordinance to apply a sum not exceeding Five million five hundred and seventy thousand four hundred and twenty-seven Dollars to the Public Service of the

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

year 1909.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

THEATRES AND PUBLIC PERFORMANCES REGULATION BILL.-The Attorney General moved the Third reading of the Bill entitled An Ordinance for regulating Theatres and other places of public resort.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

COMMITTEES. His Excellency the Governor in accordance with the Standing Order No. 47, appointed the following Committees :-

Finance Committee.-All the Members of the Council, except the Governor, with

the Honourable the Colonial Secretary as Chairman.

Law Committee.-The Honourable the Attorney General (Chairman), the Hon- ourables the Captain Superintendent of l'olice, Dr. Ho KAI, Mr. WEI YUK, and Mr. H. E. POLLOCK, K.C.

Public Works Committee.-The Honourable the Director of Public Works (Chair- man), the Honourables the Colonial Treasurer, Mr. E. A. HEWETT, Mr. W. J. GRESSON, and Mr. H. A. W. SLADE.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned sine die.

Read and confirmed, this 3rd day of December, 1908.

C. CLEMENTI,

Clerk of Councils.

F. D. LUGARD,

Governor.

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 21.

THURSDAY, 3RD DECEMBER, 1908.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(Sir FREDERICK JOHN DEALTRY LUGARD, K.C.M.G., C.B., D.S.O.). The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.).

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM REES DAVIES, K.C.).

""

"

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON).

""

the Director of Public Works, (WILLIAM CHATHAM, C.M.G.).

""

the Registrar General, (EDWARD ALEXANDER IRVING).

the Captain Superintendent of Police, (FRANCIS JOSEPH BADELEY). Dr. Ho KAI, M.B., C.M.G.

Mr. WEI YUK, C.M.G.

>>

""

Mr. HENRY EDWARD POLLOCK, K.C.

Mr. EDBERT ANSGAR HEWETT.

"

Mr. WILLIAM JARDINE GRESSON.

"1

Mr. HENRY ADOLPHUS WARRE SLADE.

""

ABSENT:

His Excellency the Officer Commanding the Troops, (Colonel CHARLES HENRY DARLING,

R.E.).

The Council met pursuant to summons.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 15th October, 1908, were read and confirmed.

CHINA'S NATIONAL BEREAVEMENT.-His Excellency the Governor addressed the Council and moved the following Resolution :-

"That the Legislative Council of Hongkong at this, its first meeting since the news of the death of the Emperor and Dowager Empress of China was received, desires to record its sympathy with the Government of China on the luss it has sustained by the death of its rulers, and to express its hope that the reign of the new Emperor may be successful and prosperous."

Dr. Ho KAI addressed the Council and seconded.

The Resolution was carried unanimously.

17

TYPHOON INFORMATION.-His Excellency the Governor informed the Council of the reply from the Governor-General of the Philippine Islands relative to the establishment of a wireless telegraph station at Santo Domingo de Basca.

PAPERS.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following papers :—-

Objection to the site selected for the erection of a public latrine in the Wong Nei

Chung Village.

Correspondence regarding the Constitution of the Appeal Court.

FINANCIAL MINUTES.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following Financial Minutes, (Nos. 61 to 68), and moved that they be referred to the Finance Committee :

No. 6983 of 1:06, C.S..

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Five thousand Dollars ($5,000) in aid of the vote, Public Works Extraordinary, Miscellaneous, Blake Pier Shelter.

Government House, Hongkong, 14th October, 1908.

No. 1660 of

1905.

No. 1660 of

1905.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One thousand seven hundred Dollars ($1,700) in aid of the vote, Miscellaneous Services, Stationery.

Government House, Hongkong, 20th October, 1908.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Eighty-six thousand five hundred and forty-seven Dollars and sixty cents ($86,547.60) in aid of the vote, Miscellaneous Services, for the following items :-

Indian Police Remittances,

Cancer Research Fund,

Tropical Diseases Research Fund,

Department of Chinese in London University,.

Imperial Institute.

Redemption of Subsidiary Coin,

Total,

$ 7,600.00

35.60

118.65

35.60

237.30

78,520.45

$86,547.60

No 632 of

1908.

No. 3158 of 1908.

Government House, Hongkong, 21st October, 1908.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One thousand four hundred Dollars ($1,400) in aid of the vote, Public Works, Recurrent, Mis- cellaneous Services.

Government House, Hongkong, 27th October, 1908.

F. D. LUGard.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Nine hundred Dollars ($900) in aid of the vote, Botanical and Forestry Department, Other Charges, for the following items :-

Forestry in New Territories, Tree planting,....

Total,

$400

500

.$900

No. 8628 of

1904.

No. 8433 of

1906.

XI in No. 5431 of

1908.

Government House, Hongkong, 4th November, 1908.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Two hundred Dollars ($200) in aid of the vote, Education, Other Charges, Belilios Public School, Anglo- Chinese Side, Language Bonus.

Government House, Hongkong, 12th November, 1908.

F. D. LUGARD,

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Two hundred and eighty-five Dollars ($285) in aid of the vote, Police and Prison Departments, A.- Police, Personal Emoluments, Captain Superintendent, House Allowance.

Government House, Hongkong, 18th November, 1908.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Sixty-one thousand Dollars ($61,000) in aid of the vote, Public Works, Recurrent, Miscellaneous, Typhoon and Rainstorm Damages.

Government House, Hongkong, 26th November, 1908.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

REPORT OF THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the Report of the Finance Committee, dated the 15th October, 1908, and moved its adoption.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

RESOLUTION. The Colonial Secretary addressed the Council and moved the following Resolution :-

Whereas application has been duly made by the Sanitary Board to the Governor under Section 167 of the Public Health and Buildings Ordinance 1903 for the erection of a Public Latrine in the Wong Nei Chung village immediately to the South of it and near House No. 113; And Whereas such application having been approved by the Governor and a notification of the intention to erect a public latrine upon such site having been duly published in three successive numbers of the Gazette, certain inhabitants of the above village have objected to such erection; And Whereas the objections so made have been considered by this Council;

It is hereby resolved by this Council that the above mentioned site and the erection

thereon of a Public Latrine be approved.

The Director of Public Works seconded.

The Resolution was carried unanimously.

SANITARY BYE-LAWS.-The Colonial Secretary moved the approval of the following

Bye-laws made by the Sanitary Board under Section 16 of the Public Health and Buildings

Ordinance, 1903, with the exception of (a.), (d.) and (h.), the consideration of which was postponed :-

tion:

(a.) Bake-houses.

(b.) Cattle-sheds, Pig-sties, etc.

(c.) Cemeteries.

(d.) Dairy.

(e.) Depôts for Cattle, Pigs, Sheep and Goats.

(f.) Disinfection of Infected Premises.

(g.) Domestic Cleanliness and Ventilation.

(h.) Importation and Inspection of Animals..

(i.) Latrines.

(j.) Laundry.

(k.) Prevention and Mitigation of Epidemic, Endemic, Contagious or Infectious

Disease.

(7.) Prevention of the breeding of Mosquitoes.

(m.) Removal of Ceiling and Stair Linings.

(n.) Removal of Patients.

The Director of Public Works seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

BUILDING COLLAPSE.-Dr. Ho KAI, pursuant to notice, asked the following Ques-

Will the Honourable the Attorney General state whether he has any objection to give the reasons which governed him in not filing an indictment for manslaughter at the last Sessions in the Portland Street Building Collapse Case?

The Attorney General replied.

NEW TERRITORIES SMALL DEBTS COURT BILL.-The Attorney General moved the First reading of a Bill entitled An Ordinance to empower a Magistrate to hold a Small Debt Court in the New Territories and to regulate the proceedings in relation thereto.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

MAGISTRATES AND CRIMINAL LAW AMENDMENT BILL.-The Attorney General moved the First reading of a Bill entitled An Ordinance to amend The Magistrates Ordinance 1890 and to effect certain other amendments in the Criminal Law.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

FIRE INSURANCE AMENDMENT BILL. The Attorney General moved the First reading of a Bill entitled An Ordinance to amend The Fire Insurance Companies Ordinance, 1908.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

INTERPRETATION AMENDMENT BILL.-The Attorney General moved the First reading of a Bill entitled An Ordinance to amend The Interpretation Ordinance 1897 and to remove an ambiguity in the construction of the same.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question--put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

COMPANIES AMENDMENT BILL.-The Attorney General moved the First reading of a Bill entitled An Ordinance further to amend The Companies Ordinance 1865.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

TRAMWAY BILL.-The consideration of this Bill in Committee was postponed.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned until Thursday, the 10th December, 1908.

Read and confirmed this 10th day of December, 1908.

F. D. LUGARD,

Governor.

C. CLEMENTI,

Clerk of Councils.

2

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 22.

THURSDAY, 10TH DECEMBER, 1908.

.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(Sir FREDERICK JOHN DEALTRY LUGARD, K.C.M.G., C.B., D.S.O.).

His Excellency the General Officer Commanding the Troops, (Major-General ROBERT GEORGE

BROADWOOD, C.B.).

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.).

""

"}

29

19

.

13

* * *

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM REES DAVIES, K.C.).

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON).

the Director of Public Works, (WILLIAM CHATHAM, C.M.G.).

the Registrar General, (EDWARD ALEXANDER IRVING).

the Captain Superintendent of Police, (FRANCIS JOSEPH Badeley). Dr. Ho KAI, M.B., C.M.G.

Mr. WEI YUK, C.M.G.

Mr. EDBERT ANSGAR HEWETT.

Mr. WILLIAM JARDINE GRESSON.

Mr. HENRY ADOLPHUS WARRE SLADE.

ABSENT:

The Honourable Mr. HENRY EDWARD POLLOCK, K.C.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 3rd December, 1908, were read and con- firmed.

FINANCIAL MINUTE.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table Financial Minute No. 69, and moved that it be referred to the Finance Committee :-

No. 8480 of

1908.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of. Eight thousand seven hundred and ten Dollars ($8,710) in aid of the vote, Post Office, for the following items:-

Hongkong Post Office, Other Charges.

Carriage of Mails, Share of Mail Subsidy, .........$7,665 Compensation for Damaged Parcels, etc.,.

Incidental Expenses,

Postal Agencies in China.

30

450

Other Charges, Shanghai.

Rates and Taxes,

Total,

565

$8,710

Government House, Hongkong, 4th December, 1908.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

REPORT OF THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the Report of the Finance Committee, dated the 3rd December, 1908, and moved its adoption.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to,

NEW TERRITORIES SMALL DEBTS COURT BILL.-The Attorney General addressed the Council and moved the Second reading of the Bill entitled An Ordinance to empower a Magistrate to hold a Small Debt Court in the New Territories and to regulate the proceedings in relation thereto.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed, and Bill reported with amendment.

MAGISTRATES AND CRIMINAL LAW AMENDMENT BILL.-The Attorney General addressed the Council and moved the Second reading of the Bill entitled An Ordinance to amend The Magistrates Ordinance 1890 and to effect certain other amendments in the Criminal Law.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Several members addressed the Council.

Dr. Ho KAI moved that the Second reading of the Bill be postponed for twelve months. Mr. WEI YUK seconded.

Council then divided on the Amendment which was declared lost, eight members voting against and four-Dr. Ho KAI, Mr. WEI YUK, Mr. SLADE and Mr. GRESSON-for the Amendment.

Bill read a second time.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

FIRE INSURANCE AMENDMENT BILL.-The Attorney General addressed the Council and moved the Second reading of the Bill entitled An Ordinance to amend the The Fire Insurance Companies Ordinance, 1908.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed, and Bill reported without amendment.

The Attorney General moved that the Bill be read a third time.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

INTERPRETATION AMENDMENT BILL.-The Attorney General addressed the Council and moved the Second reading of the Bill entitled An Ordinance to amend The Interpretation Ordinance 1897 and to remove an ambiguity in the construction of the same.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed, and Bill reported with one amendment.

The Attorney General moved that the Bill be read a third time.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

COMPANIES AMENDMENT BILL.-The Attorney General addressed the Council and moved the Second reading of the Bill entitled An Ordinance further to amend The Com- panies Ordinance 1865.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed, and Bill reported with one amendment.

The Attorney General moved that the Bill be read a third time.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do

Bill passed.

pass.

TRAMWAY BILL.-The consideration of this Bill in Committee was postponed.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned until Thursday, the 17th December, 1908.

Read and confirmed, this 17th day of December, 1908.

C. CLEMENTI,

Clerk of Councils.

!

F. D. LUGARD,

Governor.

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 23.

THURSDAY, 17TH DECEMBER, 1908.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(Sir FREDERICK JOHN DEALTRY LUGARD, K.C.M.G., C.B., D.S.O.).

His Excellency the General Officer Commanding the Troops, (Major-General ROBERT GEORGE

Broadwood, C.B.).

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.).

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM REES DAVIES, K.C.).

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON).

>>

""

the Director of Public Works, (WILLIAM CHATHAM, C.M.G.).

#

""

the Registrar General, (EDWARD ALEXANDER IRVING).

99

17

the Captain Superintendent of Police, (FRANCIS JOSEPH BADELEY). Dr. Ho KAI, M.B., C.M.G.

">

Mr. WEI YUK, C.M.G.

Mr. HENRY EDWARD POLLOCK, K.C.

""

Mr. EDBERT ANSGAR HEWETT.

""

Mr. WILLIAM JARDINE GRESSON,

Mr. HENRY ADOLPHUS WArre Slade.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 10th December, 1908, were read and -confirmed.

FINANCIAL MINUTE.-The Colonial Secretary laid on the table Financial Minute No. 70, and moved that it be referred to the Finance Committee :-

No. 70.-Medical Departments,..........$5,275.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

REPORT OF THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Colonial Secretary laid on the table the Report of the Finance Committee, dated the 10th December, 1908, and moved its adoption.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

SANITARY BYE-LAWS.-The Colonial Secretary moved the approval of the following. Bye-laws made by the Sanitary Board under Section 16 of the Public Health and Buildings Ordinance, 1903 :—

(a.) Bake-houses.

(b.) Dairy.

(c.) Importation and Inspection of Animals.

The Director of Public Works seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

KING'S BIRTHDAY.-His Excellency the Governor read the telegram sent on behalf of the Colony on the occasion of His Majesty the King's Birthday and the reply of the Secretary of State.

PAPER.-The Colonial Secretary laid on the table the following paper :-

Petition against the proposed route of the New Peak Tramway.

TRAMWAY BILL.-The Attorney General moved that the Council resolve itself into a Committee of the whole Council to consider the Bill entitled An Ordinance for authorizing the Construction of a Tramway with the Colony of Hongkong.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

The petition signed by the Vicar Apostolic of Hongkong, on behalf of the Roman Catholic community, against the proposed route of the projected tramway was read.

Sir HENRY BERKELEY, K.C., and Mr. A. DENISON appeared in support of the petition. The petitioner and Mr. A. DENISON were then cross-examined.

His Excellency the Governor addressed the Council.

The debate on the Attorney General's motion was adjourned.

NEW TERRITORIES SMALL DEBTS COURT BILL.-The Attorney General moved the Third reading of the Bill entitled An Ordinance to empower a Magistrate to hold a Small Debts Court in the New Territories and to regulate the proceedings in relation thereto.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question--put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

MAGISTRATES AND CRIMINAL LAW AMENDMENT BILL.-The Attorney General addressed the Council and moved that the Council resolve itself into a Committee of the whole Council to consider the Bill entitled An Ordinance to amend The Magistrates Ordinance 1890 and to effect certain other amendments in the Criminal Law.

The Colonial Secretary seconded. Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed, and Bill reported with amendments.

h

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned sine die.

Governor.

Read and confirmed this

day of

190

Clerk of Councils.

:

No. 1.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 23rd January, 1908.

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.), Chairman.

99

"}

2

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD HOMSON).

the Director of Public Works, (WILLIAM CHATHAM, C.M.G.).

the Registrar General, (ARTHUR WINBOLT BREWIN).

the Harbour Master, (Comdr. BASIL REGINALD HAMILTON TAYLOR, R.N.).

Dr. Ho KAI, M.B., C.M., C.M.G.

""

Mr. WEI YUK.

""

Mr. HENRY EDWARD POLLOCK, K.C.

Mr. EDBERT ANSGAR HEWETT.

""

Mr. EDWARD Osborne.

9

Mr. HENRY KESWICK.

""

ABSENT:

His Excellency the General Officer Commanding the Troops, (Major-General ROBERT George

BROADWOOD, C.B.).

The Honourable the Attorney General, (WILLIAM REES DAVIES).

The Committee met pursuant to summons.

Read the following Minutes under the hand of His Excellency the Governor :-

F. D. LUGARD.

No. 8356 of 1907.

No. 9872 of 1906, C.S.O.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Three thousand four hundred and thirty-three Dollars ($3,433) in aid of the vote, Sanitary Department, Other Charges, Compensation for infected cargo destroyed.

Government House, Hongkong, 9th January, 1908.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One thousand three hundred and three Dollars ($1,303) as Compensation to certain Squatters whose removal was necessitated by the sale of Kowloon Inland Lot 1203.

Government House, Hongkong, 15th January, 1908.

The Committee unanimously agreed to recommend that the above votes be passed.

The following Resolution was considered together with the Statement showing the Estimated Expenditure on the Hongkong-Canton Railway up to December, 1908:-

It is hereby resolved that a sum of Four million two hundred and fifty thousand Dollars ($4,250,000) be advanced out of funds in the custody of the Govern- ment for the purpose of construction of the Hongkong-Canton Railway (British Section) during the year 1908.

After some discussion it was decided to await the preparation of a detailed statement of the Railway expenditure.

The Committee then adjourned sine die.

Laid before the Legislative Council and adopted on the 6th February, 1908.

A. G. M. FLetcher,

Clerk of Councils.

F. H. MAY, Chairman.

No. 2.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 6th February, 1908.

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.), Chairman.

"2

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM REES DAVIES).

""

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON).

""

the Director of Public Works, (WILLIAM CHATHAM, C.M.G.).

""

the Registrar General, (ARTHUR WINBOLT BREWIN).

the Harbour Master, (Comdr. BASIL REGINALD HAMILTON TAYLOR, R.N.).

Dr. Ho KA1, M.B., C.M., C.M.G.

Mr. WEI YUK.

Mr. HENRY EDWARD POLLOCK, K.C.

""

Mr. EDBERT ANSGAR HEWETT.

""

Mr. EDWARD OSBORNE.

"

Mr. HENRY KESWICK.

""

ABSENT:

His Excellency the General Officer Commanding the Troops, (Major-General ROBERT GEORGE

BROADWOOD, C.B.).

The Committee met pursuant to summons.

Read the following Minutes under the hand of His Excellency the Governor :-

No. 652 of 1908.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to re-vote a sum of Seven thousand one hundred and sixty-one Dollars ($7,161) in aid of the vote, Public Works Extraor- dinary, for the following items :-

Hot Water Apparatus and Baths, Government House, ....$ 406 Queen's College Latrines and Urinals,

Resuming and filling in Fish Pond at Tai Po, Time Ball Tower on Blackhead's Hill, Kowloon,..

Total,.....

810

5,900 45

$ 7,161

Government House, Hongkong, 24th January, 1908.

C.S.O. No.

1915 of 1901.

No. 8038 of 1906, C.S.0.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Nine thousand three- hundred and thirty-four Dollars ($9,334) in aid of the vote, Public Works Extra- ordinary, Refund of part of Premium for the Pier opposite M. L. 198.

Government House, Hongkong, 28th January, 1908.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Seven hundred and twenty Dollars ($720) in aid of the vote, Education, Victoria British School, Per- sonal Emoluments, Head Master, House Allowance.

Government House, Hongkong, 30th January, 1908.

The Committee unanimously agreed to recommend that the above votes be passed. The Committee then adjourned sine die.

Laid before the Legislative Council and adopted on the 27th February, 1908.

A. G. M. FLETCHER,

Clerk of Councils.

F. H. MAY,

Chairman,

No. 3.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 27th February, 1908.

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.), Chairman.

11

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM REES DAVIES).

""

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON).

:

39

the Director of Public Works, (WILLIAM CHATHAM, C.M.G.).

""

""

the Registrar General, (ARTHUR WINBOLT BREWIN).

the Harbour Master, (Comdr. BASIL REGINALD HAMILTON TAYLOR, R.N.). Dr. Ho KAI, M.B., C.M., C.M.G.

Mr. WEI YUK.

་་

""

Mr. HENRY EDWARD POLLOCK, K.C.

27

Mr. EDBERT ANSGAR HEWETT.

Mr. EDWARD Osborne.

ABSENT:

His Excellency the General Officer Commanding the Troops, (Major-General ROBERT GEORGE

BROADWOOD, C.B.).

The Honourable Mr. HENRY KESWICK.

The Committee met pursuant to summons.

Read the following Minutes under the hand of His Excellency the Governor :—

No. 9543 of

1907.

No. 5377 of 1907.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One thousand three hundred Dollars ($1,300) in aid of the vote, Public Works Extraordinary, Buildings, No. 5 Station--Alterations to Quarters.

Government House, Hongkong, 17th February, 1908.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One hundred and fifty- six Dollars ($156) in aid of the vote, Public Works Extraordinary, Miscellaneous, Queen's College Latrines and Urinal.

Government House, Hongkong, 19th February, 1908.

The Committee unanimously agreed to recommend that the above votes be passed. The Committee then adjourned sine die.

Laid before the Legislative Council and adopted on the 5th March, 1908.

7

A. G. M. FLETCHER,

Clerk of Councils.

F. H. MAY,

Chairman.

¿

No. 4.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 5th March, 1908.

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.), Chairman.

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM REES DAVIES).

""

""

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON).

**

the Director of Public Works, (WILLIAM CHATHAM, C.M.G.).

""

the Registrar General, (ARTHUR WINBOLT BREWIN).

:)

19

the Harbour Master, (Comdr. BASIL REGINALD HAMILTON TAYLOR, R.N.). Dr. Ho KAI, M.B., C.M., C.M.G.

Mr. WEI YUK.

Mr. HENRY EDWARD POLLOCK, K.C.

""

Mr. EDWARD OSBORNE.

""

ABSENT:

His Excellency the General Officer Commanding the Troops, (Major-General ROBERT George

BROADWOOD, C.B.).

The Honourable Mr. EDBERT ANSGAR HEWETT.

Mr. HENRY KESWICK.

The Committee met pursuant to summons.

RAILWAY CONSTRUCTION.-The Colonial Secretary brought forward the following Reso- lution regarding expenditure on railway construction for the current year :—

It is hereby resolved that a sum of Four million two hundred and fifty thousand Dollars ($4,250,000) be advanced out of funds in the custody of the Government for the purpose of construction of the Hongkong-Canton Railway (British Section) during the year 1908.

He explained that the amount stated in the Resolution might now be reduced to $4,020,000 in view of the omission of the item for Workshops as explained by His Excel- lency the Governor in his address to the Council on the subject of the Railway.

The Council recommended the adoption of the Resolution as amended.

Read the following Minute under the hand of His Excellency the Governor :—

F. D. LUGARD.

No. 652 of 1908.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Twenty-two thousand one hundred Dollars ($22,100) in aid of the vote, Public Works Recurrent, Miscel- laneous, Typhoon and Rainstorm Damages.

Government House, Hongkong, 24th February, 1908.

The Committee unanimously agreed to recommend that the above vote be passed. The Committee then adjourned sine die.

Laid before the Legislative Council and adopted on the 2nd April, 1908.

C. CLEMENTI,

Clerk of Councils.

F. H. MAY,

Chairman.

2

:

No. 5.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 2nd April, 1908.

PRESENT:

His Excellency the Officer Commanding the Troops, (Colonel CHARLES HENRY DARLING,

R.E.).

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.), Chairman.

"}

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM REES DAVIES).

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON).

""

3

"1

""

135

17

13

the Director of Public Works, (WILLIAM CHATHAM, C.M.G.).

the Registrar General, (ARTHUR WINBOLT BREWIN).

the Harbour Master, (Comdr. BASIL REGINALD HAMILTON TAYLOR, R.N.).

Dr. Ho Kai, M.B., C.M., C.M.G.

Mr. WEI YUK.

Mr. HENRY EDWARD POLLOCK, K.C.

Mr. HENRY KESWICK.

Mr. EDWARD Osborne.

The Honourable Mr. MURRAY STEWRAT.

ABSENT:

The Committee met pursuant to summons.

Read the following Minutes under the hand of His Excellency the Governor :-

No. 1660 of 1908.

No. 2747 of 1907.

No. 1655 of 1908.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One hundred Dollars ($100) in aid of the vote, Treasury, B.-Office of Assessor of Rates, Other Charges, Typewriter.

Government House, Hongkong, 4th March, 1908.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One hundred and twelve Dollars and fifty Cents ($112.50) in aid of the vote, Treasury, Treasurer's Office, Other Charges, Security Allowances for nine months to one 4th Grade and one 5th Grade Shroff.

Government House, Hongkong, 16th March, 1908.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Four thousand four hundred Dollars ($4,400) in aid of the vote, Public Works Extraordinary, Installation of Electric Fans at Government House.

Government House, Hongkong, 20th March. 1908.

܀

.

¡

No. 2831 of

1906.

No. 2031 of

1008.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Six thousand five hundred Dollars ($6,500) in aid of the vote, Public Works, Public Works, Recurrent, Buildings, Maintenance of Lighthouses.

Government House, Hongkong, 19th March, 1908.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Two hundred and thirty-four Dollars ($234) in aid of the vote, Harbour Master's Department, A.-Harbour Office, Other Charges, Oil and Sundry Stores.

Government House, Hongkong, 19th March, 1908.

The Committee unanimously agreed to recommend that the above votes be passed. The Committee then adjourned sine die.

Laid before the Legislative Council and adopted on the 16th April, 1908.

C. CLEMENTI,

Clerk of Counciis

F. H. MAY, Chairman.

No. 6.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 16th April, 1908.

PRESENT:

His Excellency the Officer Commanding the Troops, (Colonel CHARLES HENRY Darling,

R.E.).

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.), Chairman.

29

29

35

""

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM REES DAVIES).

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALEXANDER MACDONald Thomson).

""

the Director of Public Works, (WILLIAM CHATHAM, C.M.G.).

the Registrar General, (EDWARD ALEXANDER IRVING).

the Harbour Master, (Comdr. BASIL REGINALD HAMILTON TAYLOR, R.N.). Dr. Ho KAI, M.B., C.M., C.M.G.

Mr. WEI YUK.

Mr. HENRY EDWARD POLLOCK, K.C.

Mr. EDWARD OSBORNE.

11

Mr. HENRY KESWICK.

""

Mr. MURRAY STEWRAT.

The Committee met pursuant to summons.

Read the following Minutes under the hand of His Excellency the Governor :-

No. 4721 of 1904.

No. 1723 of 1907.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Three thousand three hundred Dollars ($3,300) in aid of the vote, Police and Prison Departments, Fire Brigade, Special Expenditure, Street Fire Alarms.

Government House, Hongkong, 3rd April, 1908.

F. D. LUGARD,

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Eight hundred Dollars ($800) in aid of the vote Education, 4-Inspector of Schools, Other Charges, Saiyingpun Anglo-Chinese School, Rent of Temporary Quarters.

Government House, Hongkong, 6th April, 1908.

The Committee unanimously agreed to recommend that the above votes be passed. The Committee then adjourned sine die.

Laid before the Legislative Council and adopted on the 30th April, 1908.

C. CLEMENTI,

Clerk of Councils.

F. H. MAY,

Chairman.

No. 7.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 30th April, 1908.

¿

PRESENT:

His Excellency the Officer Commanding the Troops, (Colonel CHARLES HENRY Darling,

R.E.).

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.), Chairman.

::

17

*

""

""

10

15

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM REES DAVIES).

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON).

the Director of Public Works, (WILLIAM CHATHAM, C.M.G.).

the Registrar General, (EDWARD ALEXANDER IRVING).

the Harbour Master, (Comdr. BASIL REGINALD HAMILTON TAYLOR, R.N.). Dr. Ho KAI, M.B., C.M. C.M.G.

Mr. WEI YUK.

""

29

Mr. HENRY EDWARD POLLOCK, K.C.

""

Mr. EDWARD OSBORNE.

""

Mr. HENRY KESWICK.

Mr. MURRAY STEWART.

The Committee met pursuant to summons.

Read the following Minutes under the hand of His Excellency the Governor :—

F. D. LUGARD.

No. 163 of 1908.

No. 2956 of 1908.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Thirty-nine Dollars ($39) in aid of the vote, Medical Departments, B.-Hospitals and Asylums, Civil Hospital, Other Charges, Uniform for Indian Constable.

Government House, Hongkong, 13th April, 1908.

F. D. LUGard.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One thousand Dollars ($1,000) in aid of the vote, Police and Prison Departments, A.-Police, Other Charges, Secret Service.

Government House, Hongkong, 22nd April, 1908.

No. 1275 of

1908.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One thousand one hundred and twenty Dollars ($1,120) in aid of the vote, Colonial Secretary's Depart- ment and Legislature, Personal Emoluments, Temporary 1st Grade Clerk.

Government House, Hongkong, 25th April, 1908.

The Committee unanimously agreed to recommend that the above votes be passed.

The Committee then adjourned sine die.

Laid before the Legislative Council and adopted on the 14th May, 1908.

C. CLEMENTI,

Clerk of Councils.

F. H. MAY,

Chairman,

}

No. 8.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 14th May, 1908.

PRESENT:

His Excellency the Officer Commanding the Troops, (Colonel CHARLES HENRY DARLING,

R.E.).

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.), Chairman.

"J

33

* * * *

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM REES DAVIES).

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON). the Director of Public Works, (WILLIAM CHATHAM, C.M.G.).

the Registrar General, (EDWARD ALEXANDER IRVING).

the Harbour Master, (Comdr. BASIL REGINALD HAMILTON TAYLOR, R.N.). Dr. Ho Kai, M.B., C.M., C.M.G.

Mr. WEI YUK.

""

Mr. MURRAY STEWART,

""

""

Sir HENRY SPENCER BERKELEY, Kt., K.C.

Mr. HENRY ADOLPHUS WARRE SLADE.

دو

ABSENT:

The Honourable Mr. HENRY EDWARD POLLOCK, K.C.

The Committee met pursuant to summons.

Read the following Minutes under the hand of His Excellency the Governor :-

No. 1660 of

1908.

No. 5096 of 1905, C.S.O.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Eleven thousand seven hundred and ninety-one Dollars ($11,791) in aid of the vote, Miscellaneous Services, Other Miscellaneous Services.

Government House, Hongkong, 28th April, 1908.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Two thousand three hundred and ninety-six Dollars ($2,396) in aid of the vote, Registrar General's Department, for the following items :-

Personal Emoluments.

Emigration Sergeant, at £160 p. a. for 9 months

£120 @ 1/10

..$1,280

3rd Grade Interpreter, at $960 p. a. for 8 months Interpreter, at $144 p. a. for 8 months =

640

96

2 District Watchmen, 1 at $180 & 1 at $150 p. a. for

8 months

220

Other Charges.

Photography of Rejected Emigrants,

Total,

160

$ 2,396

Government House, Hongkong, 5th May, 1908.

No 2537 of

1904

No. 619 of

1908.

F. D. LUGARD

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Three thousand Dollars ($3,000) in aid of the vote, Miscellaneous Services, Purchase of Transvaal Emigra- tion Depôt for Quarantine Station.

Government House, Hongkong, 7th May, 1908.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Six hundred and thirty Dollars ($630) in aid of the vote, Police and Prison Departments, 4.-Police, for the following items :-

Other Charges.

Language Bonus,

....

Language Study Allowance (Punjabi) to Assistant

Superintendent,

Total,

$450

180

.$630

No. 5337 of 1905.

Government House, Hongkong, 8th May, 1908.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Ninety Dollars ($90) in aid of the vote, Education, Department of Inspector of Schools, Saiyingpun Anglo- Chinese School, Other Charges, Language Study Allowance (Chinese) to Head Master.

Government House, Hongkong, 9th May, 1908.

The Committee unanimously agreed to recommend that the above votes be passed.

The Committee then adjourned sine die.

Laid before the Legislative Council and adopted on the 28th May, 1908.

C. CLEMENTI,

Clerk of Councils.

F. H. MAY, Chairman.

}

1

No. 9.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 4th June, 1908.

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.), Chairman.

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM REES DAVIES, K.C.).

""

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALEXANDER MACDONALld Thomson).

>>

the Director of Public Works, (WILLIAM CHATHAM, C.M.G.).

""

the Registrar General, (EDWARD ALEXANDER IRVING).

""

A

the Harbour Master, (Comdr. BASIL REGINALD HAMILTON TAYLOR, R.N.). Dr. Ho KAI, M.B., C.M., C.M.G.

Mr. WEI YUK.

Mr. HENRY EDWARD POLLOCK, K.C.

>>

Mr. MURRAY STEWART.

""

5

Sir HENRY SPENCER BERKELEY, Kt., K.C.

Mr. HENRY ADOLPHUS WARRE SLADE.

ABSENT:

His Excellency the General Officer Commanding the Troops, (Major-General ROBErt George

BROADWOOD, C.B.).

1905.

The Committee met pursuant to summons.

Read the following Minute under the hand of His Excellency the Governor :-

F. D. LUGARD,

No. 6560 of The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Six thousand Dollars Extension. ($6,000) in aid of the vote, Public Works Extraordinary, Buildings, Land Office at

Tai Po.

Government House, Hongkong, 29th May, 1908.

The Committee unanimously agreed to recommend that the above vote be passed.

The Committee considered the items contained in the Supplementary Appropriation Bill and unanimously agreed to recommend that they be voted.

The Committee then adjourned sine die.

Laid before the Legislative Council and adopted on the 11th June, 1908.

C. CLEMENTI,

Clerk of Councils.

F. H. MAY, Chairman.

No. 10.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 18th June, 1908.

PRESENT:

His Excellency the General Officer Commanding the Troops, (Major-General ROBERT George

BROADWOOD, C.B.).

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.), Chairman.

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM REES DAVIES, K.C.).

the Colonial Treasurer, (LEWIS AUDLEY MARSH Johnston).

11

the Director of Public Works, (WILLIAM CHATHAM, C.M.G.).

A

>>

the Registrar General, (EDWARD ALEXANDER IRVING).

the Harbour Master, (Comdr. BASIL REGINALD HAMILTON TAYLOR, R.N.).

Dr. Ho KAI, M.B., C.M., C.M.G.

""

Mr. WEI YUK.

12

Mr. HENRY EDWARD POLLOCK, K.C.

"

Mr. MURRAY STEWART.

""

Sir HENRY SPENCER BERKELEY, Kt., K.C.

27

Mr. HENRY ADOLPHUS WARRE SLADE,

""

The Committee met pursuant to summons.

Read the following Minutes under the hand of His Excellency the Governor :-

No. 1723 of

1907.

No. 8086 of

1906.

No. 652 of 1908.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Six thousand seven hundred Dollars ($6,700) in aid of the vote, Public Works Extraordinary, Saiying- pun Anglo-Chinese School Extension.

Government House, Hongkong, 11th June, 1908.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One thousand seven hundred Dollars ($1,700) in aid of the vote, Public Works Extraordinary, 11 Vic- toria British School-Additional Storey to Quarters.

Government House, Hongkong, 12th June, 1908.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Six thousand five hundred Dollars ($6,500) in aid of the vote, Public Works Recurrent, Maintenance of Kowloon Water Works.

Government House, Hongkong, 16th June, 1908.

No. 576 of

1908.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Eight thousand five hundred Dollars ($8,500) in aid of the vote, Public Works Extraordinary, Miscel laneous Water Works.

Government House, Hongkong, 17th June, 1908.

The Committee unanimously agreed to recommend that the above votes be passed.

The Committee then adjourned sine die.

Laid before the Legislative Council and adopted on the 25th June, 1908.

C. CLEMENTI,

Clerk of Councils.

F. H. MAY,

Chairman,

No. 11.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 25th June, 1908.

PRESENT:

His Excellency the General Officer Commanding the Troops, (Major-General ROBERT GEORGE

Broadwood, C.B.).

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.), Chairman,

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM REES DAVIES, K.C.).

the Colonial Treasurer, (LEWIS AUDLEY MARSH JOHNSTON).

29

19

the Director of Public Works, (WILLIAM CHATHAM, C.M.G.).

"

the Registrar General, (EDWARD ALEXANDER IRVING).

""

""

the Harbour Master, (Comdr. BASIL REGINALD HAMILTON TAYLOR, R.N.). Dr. Ho KAI, M.B., C.M., C.M.G.

Mr. WEI YUK.

"

Mr. HENRY EDWARD POLLOCK, K.C.

22

A

""

Mr. MURRAY STEWART.

Sir HENRY SPENCER BERKELEY, Kt., K.C.

ABSENT:

The Honourable Mr. HENRY ADOLPHUS WARRE SLADE.

The Committee met pursuant to summons.

Read the following Minutes under the hand of His Excellency the Governor :-

No. 1225 of 1908.

No. 4452 of

1908.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One hundred Dollars ($100) in aid of the vote Colonial Secretary's Department and Legislature, Other Charges, Hansard Reports.

Government House, Hongkong, 22nd June, 1908.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Seven hundred and forty-five Dollars ($745) in aid of the vote, Observatory, Personal Emoluments, for the following items :-

5th Grade Computer, ($480 to $660 by $60 annually),...$505 Allowances for night duty to 2 5th Grade Computers,

Total,

240

$745

Government House, Hongkong, 22nd June, 1908.

The Committee unanimously agreed to recommend that the above votes be passed.

The Committee then adjourned sine die.

Laid before the Legislative Council and adopted on the 2nd July, 1908.

C. CLEMENTI,

Clerk of Councils.

F. H. MAY,

Chairman,

No. 12.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 2nd July, 1908.

PRESENT:

His Excellency the General Officer Commanding the Troops, (Major-General ROBERT GEORGE

BROADWOOD, C.B.).

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.), Chairman.

""

A

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM REES DAVIES, K.C.).

the Colonial Treasurer, (LEWIS AUDLEY MARSH JOHNSTON).

19

14

the Director of Public Works, (WILLIAM CHATHAM, C.M.G.).

""

the Registrar General, (EDWARD ALEXANDER IRVING).

ני

A

the larbour Master,. (Comdr. BASIL REGINALD HAMILTON TAYLOR, R.N.) Dr. Ho KAI, M.B.. C.M., C.M.G.

Mr. WEI YUK, C.M.G.

"

Mr. HENRY EDWARD POLLOCK, K.C.

27

Mr. MURRAY STEWART.

""

ABSENT:

The Honourable Sir HENRY SPENCER BERKELEY, Kt., K.C.

,,

Mr. HENRY ADOLPHUS WARRE SLADE.

The Committee met pursuant to summons.

Read the following Minutes under the hand of His Excellency the Governor :-

FINANCIAL MINUTES.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following Financial Minutes, (Nos. 31 and 32), and moved that they be referred to the Finance Committee:—

No. 9124 of 1905, C.S.O.

F. D. LUGard.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Two thousand two hundred and twenty-one Dollars ($2,221) in aid of the vote, Harbour Master's Department, for the following items :-

A. HARBOUR OFFICE.

Personal Emoluments.

* Allowances for Painting Numbers on Junks to:--

3rd Grade Clerk, at $30,

2 5th Grade Clerks and Shroffs, at $36 each,

Inspector of Junks and Cargo Boats, at $180, Assistant Inspector of Junks and Cargo Boats, at

$120,

$ 15

36

90

9.985

60

3rd Grade Assistant Inspector of Junks and Cargo

Boats, at $90,.............

45

11 Police Officers, in charge of Outstations, 4 at $180, 4 at $120, and 3 at $60 each,

690

3 Police Constables at Outstations, 2 at $90 each,

and 1 at $60,

120

3 Seamen, at $24 each,.

36

34 Boatmen, 10 at $24, 12 at $18, and 12 at $12

each,

300

20 Police Boatmen at Outstations, 13 at $24, and

7 at $18 each,.

219

Painter, at $48,

24

$1,635

!

Other Charges.

Paints, Brushes, &c., for Painting Numbers on Junks, .

E.-STEAM-LAUNCHES.

Steam-Launch Daisy.

Personal Emoluments.

* Allowances for Painting Numbers on Junks to:-

Engineer, at $24,

2 Seamen, at $24 each,

Total,

550

...$ 12 24

36

.$ 2,221

No. 4676 of

1938.

*

For 6 months from 1st July to 31st December, 1908.

Government House, Hongkong, 23rd June, 1908.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Thirty thousand Dollars ($30,000) in aid of the vote, Charitable Services, Other Charitable Allowances.

Government House, Hongkong, 30th June, 1908.

The Committee unanimously agreed to recommend that the above votes be passed.

The Committee then adjourned sine die.

Laid before the Legislative Council and adopted on the 23rd July, 1908.

C. CLEMENTI,

Clerk of Councils.

F. H. MAY, Chairman.

T

No. 13.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 23rd July, 1908.

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.), Chairman.

""

}

})

"

the Colonial Treasurer, (LEWIS AUDLEY MARSH JOHNSTON).

the Registrar General, (EDWARD ALEXANDER IRVING).

the Harbour Master, (Comdr. BASIL REGINALD HAMILTON TAYLOR, R.N.)

Dr. Ho KA1, M.B., C.M., C.M.G.

Mr. WEI YUK, C.M.G.

Mr. HENRY EDWARD POLLOCK, K.C.

Mr. MURRAY STEWART.

""

Sir HENRY SPENCER BERKELEY, Kt., K.C.

ABSENT:

His Excellency the General Officer Commanding the Troops, (Major-General ROBERT GEORGE

. BROADWOOD, C.B.).

The Honourable the Attorney General, (WILLIAM REES DAVIES, K.C.).

""

the Director of Public Works, (WILLIAM CHATHAM, C.M.G.).

Mr. HENRY ADOLPHUS WARRE SLADE.

The Committee met pursuant to summons.

Read the following Minutes under the hand of His Excellency the Governor :-

No. 28:1 of 1906, C.S.O.

No. 4869 of 1908.

I in

No. 3013 of

1906.

No. 652 of

1908.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Four thousand six hundred and seventy Dollars ($4,670) in aid of the vote, Public Works, Recurrent, Maintenance of Lighthouses.

Government House, Hongkong, 3rd July, 1908.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Three hundred Dollars ($300) in aid of the vote, Colonial Secretary's Department and Legislature, Other Charges, Incidental Expenses.

Government House, Hongkong, 3rd July, 1908.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Eight thousand five hundred Dollars ($8,500) in aid of the vote, Public Works Extraordinary, Quaran- tine Station.

Government House, Hongkong, 4th July, 1908.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Fifteen thousand Dollars $15,000) in aid of the vote, Public Works, Extraordinary, Public Health and Build- ings Ordinance, 1903, Compensation.

Government House, Hongkong, 14th July, 1908.

t

No. 5158 of

1908.

No. 322- of

WS

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Two thousand Dollars ($2,000) in aid of the vote, Botanical and Forestry Department, Other Charges, Forestry in New Territories.

Government House, Hongkong, 20th July, 1908.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Five hundred Dollars ($500) in aid of the vote, Medical Departments, B.-Hospital and Asylums, Infec- tious Hospitals, Hospital Hulk Hygeia, for the following items :-

Personal Emoluments.

Temporary Staff,

Other Charges.

Provisions, &c.,

Total,

$200

300

$ 500

No. 3832 of

1908.

Government House, Hongkong, 21st July, 1908.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One hundred and eighty-six thousand five hundred Dollars ($186,500) in aid of the vote, Public Works Extraordinary, Mongkoktsui Breakwater-Typhoon Refuge for Small Craft.

Government House, Hongkong, 22nd July, 1908.

The Chairman addressed the Committee in explanation of the last vote and after some discussion the Committee unanimously recommended that the above votes be passed.

The Committee then adjourned sine die.

Laid before the Legislative Council and adopted on the 30th July, 1908.

C. CLEMENTI,

Clerk of Councils.

F. H. MAY,

Chairman.

No. 14.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 30th July, 1908.

PRESENT:

His Excellency the General Officer Commanding the Troops, (Major-General ROBERT GEORGE

BROADWOOD, C.B.),

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.), Chairman.

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM REES DAVIES, K.C.).

""

""

the Colonial Treasurer, (LEWIS AUDLEY MARSH JOHNSTON).

""

the Director of Public Works, (WILLIAM CHATHAM, C.M.G.).

""

the Registrar General, (EDWARD ALEXANDER IRVING).

>>

A

the Harbour Master, (Comdr. BASIL REGINALD HAMILTON TAYLOR, R.N.) Dr. Ho KAI, M.B., C.M., C.M.G.

17

པ ུ

Mr. WEI YUK, C.M.G.

Mr. WILLIAM JARDINE GRESSON.

Mr. MURRAY STEWART.

Mr. HENRY ADOLPHUS Warre Slade,

ABSENT:

The Honourable Mr. HENRY EDWARD POLLOCK, K.C.

The Committee met pursuant to summons.

Read the following Minutes under the hand of His Excellency the Governor :-

No. 667 of 1908.

No. 7258 of

1907.

F. D. LUGARÐ.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Two thousand Dollars ($2,000) in aid of the vote, Public Works Extraordinary, Staff Quarters, Tai Po.

Government House, Hongkong, 21st July, 1908.

F. D. LUGARÐ,

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Four thousand one hundred and fifteen Dollars and forty-six cents ($4,115.46) in aid of the vote, Public Works Department, Personal Emoluments, for the following items :- For 6 months from 1st July to 31st December, 1908.

1 Drainage Surveyor,

.$1,650.00

Do..

Exchange Compensation, 1,050.00

1 Foreman,

420.00

Do., Exchange Compensation,

305.46

1 Clerk,

270.00

1 Clerk and Draughtsman,

240.00

2 Foremen,

180.00

Total,.

$4,115.46

Government House, Hongkong, 23rd July, 1908.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

The Committee unanimously agreed to recommend that the above votes be passed.

The Committee then adjourned sine die.

Laid before the Legislative Council and adopted on the 6th August, 1908.

C. CLEMENTI,

Clerk of Councils.

F. H. MAY,

Chairman.

No. 15.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 6th August, 1908.

PRESENT:

His Excellency the General Officer Commanding the Troops, (Major-General ROBERT GEORGE

BROADWOOD, C.B.).

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.), Chairman.

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM REES DAVIES, K.C.).

>>

""

the Colonial Treasurer, (LEWIS AUDLEY MARSH JOHNSTON).

the Director of Public Works, (WILLIAM CHATHAM, C.M.G.).

"}

""

the Registrar General, (EDWARD ALEXANDER IRVING).

the Harbour Master, (Comdr. BASIL REGINALD HAMILTON TAYLOR, R.N.) Dr. Ho KAI, M.B., C.M.G.

""

Mr. WEI YUK, C.M.G.

Mr. WILLIAM JARDINE GRESSON.

Mr. MURRAY STEWART.

"

Mr. HENRY ADOLPHUS WARRE SLADE.

""

ABSENT:

The Honourable Mr. HENRY EDWARD POLLOCK, K.C.

The Committee met pursuant to summons.

Read the following Minutes under the hand of His Excellency the Governor :-

F. D. LUGARD.

No. 7714 of 1907.

No. 2511 of

1908,

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One thousand three hundred and sixty-eight Dollars ($1,368) in aid of the vote, Public Works, Extra- ordinary, Miscellaneous, Compensation for the Resumption of Lots Nos. 212 and 711 situated in Demarcation District No. 6.

Government House, Hongkong, 31st July, 1908.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One hundred and eighty- nine Dollars ($189) in aid of the vote, Post Office, A.-Hongkong Post Office, Other Charges, Repairs to Steam-Launch.

Government House, Hongkong, 1st August, 1908.

The Committee unanimously agreed to recommend that the above votes be passed. The Committee then adjourned sine die.

Laid before the Legislative Council and adopted on the 24th September, 1908.

F. H. MAY,

Chairman.

C. CLEMENTI,

Clerk of Councils.

No. 16.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 24th September, 1908.

PRESENT:

His Excellency the Officer Commanding the Troops, (Colonel CHARLES HENRY DARLING,

R.E.).

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.), Chairman.

29

""

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM REES DAVIES, K.C.).

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON).

the Director of Public Works, (WILLIAM CHATHAM, C.M.G.).

the Registrar General, (EDWARD ALEXANDER IRVING).

the Captain Superintendent of Police, (FRANCIS JOSEPH BADELEY). Dr. Ho KAI, M.B., C.M.G.

Mr. WEI YUK, C.M.G.

Mr. WILLIAM JARDINE GRESSON.

Mr. MURRAY STEWART.

>>

Mr. HENRY ADOLPHUS WArre Slade,

""

ABSENT:

The Honourable Mr. HENRY EDWARD POLLOCK, K.C.

The Committee met pursuant to summons.

Read the following Minutes under the hand of His Excellency the Governor :—

No. 5312 of 1908.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Five hundred and twenty-five Dollars ($525) in aid of the vote, Sanitary Department, Other Charges, for the following items :-

Language Study Allowances,

Head Stones,

...

Total,

$ 75

450

$525

No. 5719 of 1908.

No. 2031 of 1908.

Government House, Hongkong, 5th August, 1908.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Three thousand six hundred and sixty-three Dollars ($3,663) in aid of the vote, Education, Other Charges, Grants, Principal Grants under Grant Code.

Government House, Hongkong, 12th August, 1908.

'F. D. LUGard.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Three thousand Dollars ($3,000) in aid of the vote, Harbour Master's Department, E.-Steam- launches, Other Charges, Repairs.

Government House, Hongkong, 19th September, 1908.

No. 3158 of

1908.

No. 2956 of

1908.

No. 4452 of

1998.

No. 7620 of

1905.

No. 8128 of 1966.

No. 1660 of

1908.

No. 1096 of 1908.

Vin

No. 5431 of

1905.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One hundred and fifty Dollars ($150) in aid of the vote, Botanical and Fores try Department, Other Charges, Library.

Government House, Hongkong, 15th August, 1908.

F. D. LUGard.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Five hundred Dollars ($500) in aid of the vote, Police and Prison Departments, B.-Fire Brigade, Other Charges, Repairs to Engines and Plant.

Government House, Hongkong, 19th August, 1908.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One hundred Dollars ($100) in aid of the vote, Observatory, Other Charges, Laboratory Expenses.

Government House, Hongkong, 21st August, 1908.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Six hundred and thirty-four Dollars ($634) in aid of the vote, Public Works Extraordinary, Miscellaneous, Compensation for the resumption of certain Lots in Demarcation District No. 183.

Government House, Hongkong, 27th August, 1908.

F. D. LUGard.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Five hundred and ninety-four Dollars ($594) in aid of the vote, Harbour Master's Department, A. Harbour Office, Other Charges, Life Saving Apparatus.

Government House, Hongkong, 4th September, 1908.

F. D. LUGard.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Eight thousand Dollars ($8,000) in aid of the vote, Miscellaneous Services, Printing and Binding.

Government House, Hongkong, 8th September, 1908.

F. D. LUGard.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Three hundred and two Dollars ($302) in aid of the vote, Public Works Extraordinary, Miscellaneous, Compensation for resumption of Lot No. 3,212 in Survey District IV, New Territories.

Government House, Hongkong, 11th September, 1908.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One hundred Dollars ($100) in aid of the vote, Medical Departments, A.-Staff, Other Charges, Health Officer of Port, Repairs to Launch.

Government House, Hongkong, 14th September, 1908.

No. 652 of

1908.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Six thousand eight hundred Dollars ($6,800) in aid of the vote, Public Works, Recurrent, for the following items :-

Buildings.

Maintenance of Buildings,

.$3,000

Communications.

Maintenance of Telegraphs,

Maintenance of Telegraphs in New Territories,

3,000 800

....

Total,

No. 4869 of

1908.

Government House, Hongkong, 19th September, 1908.

F. D. LUGARD.

$6,800

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One hundred dollars ($100) in aid of the vote, Colonial Secretary's Department and Legislature, Other Charges, Newspapers, Periodicals, &c.

Government House, Hongkong, 21st September, 1908.

The Committee unanimously agreed to recommend that the above votes be passed. The Committee then adjourned sine die.

Laid before the Legislative Council and adopted on the 8th October, 1908.

C. CLEMENTI,

Clerk of Councils.

F. H. MAY, Chairman.

Nc. 17.

!

}

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 8th October, 1908.

PRESENT:

His Excellency the Officer Commanding the Troops, (Colonel CHARLES HENRY DARLING,

R.E.).

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.), Chairman.

""

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM REES DAVIES, K.C.).

""

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON).

;;

the Director of Public Works, (WILLIAM CHATHAM, C.M.G.). the Registrar General, (EDWARD ALEXANDER IRVING).

the Captain Superintendent of Police, (FRANCIS Joseph Badeley). Dr. Ho Kai, M.B., C.M.G.

Mr. WEI YUK, C.M.G.

"?

Mr. WILLIAM JARDINE GRESSON.

"J

Mr. MURRAY STEWART.

""

Mr. HENRY ADOLPHUS WARRE SLADE.

""

ABSENT:

The Honourable Mr. HENRY EDWARD POLLOCK, K.C.

The Committee met pursuant to summons.

Considered clause by clause a Bill entitled An Ordinance to apply a sum not exceeding Five million five hundred and seventy thousand four hundred and twenty-seven Dollars to the Public Service of the year 1909: and advised that the bill be reported without amend- ment.

Read the following Minutes under the hand of His Excellency the Governor :-

No. 1330 of 1905.

No. 5351 of 1907.

No. 6719 of

1908.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Five thousand two hundred and eighty-one Dollars ($5,281) in aid of the vote, Education, Department of Inspector Schools, Other Charges, Evening Continuation Classes.

Government House, Hongkong, 2nd October, 1908.

F. D. LUGard.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Two thousand Dollars ($2,000) in aid of the vote, Charitable Services, Tung Wah Hospital.

Government House, Hongkong, 2nd October, 1908.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Two hundred and seventy Dollars ($270) in aid of the vote, Treasury, B.-Office of Assessor of Rates, Other Charges, for the following items :-

Furniture,

Typewriter,..

Total,

Government House, Hongkong, 5th October, 1908.

$ 35

235

$270

The Committee unanimously agreed to recommend that the above votes be passed. The Committee then adjourned sine die.

Laid before the Legislative Council and adopted on the 15th October, 1908.

C. CLEMENTI,

Clerk of Councils.

F. H. MAY,

Chairman.

No. 18.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 15th October, 1908.

PRESENT:

His Excellency the Officer Commanding the Troops, (Colonel CHARLES HENRY DARLING,

R.E.).

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.), Chairman.

,,

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM REES DAVIES, K.C.).

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALEXANDER MacDonald THOMSON).

the Director of Public Works, (WILLIAM CHATHAM, C.M.G.).

the Registrar General, (EDWARD ALEXANDER IRVING).

the Captain Superintendent of Police, (FRANCIS JOSEPH BADELEY).

19

Dr. Ho KAI, M.B., C.M.G.

"}

""

Mr. WEI YUK, C.M.G.

Mr. WILLIAM JARDINE GRESSON.

Mr. HENRY ADOLPHUS WARRE SLADE.

ABSENT:

The Honourable Mr. HENRY EDWARD POLLOCK, K.C.

""

Mr. EDBERT ANSGAR HEWETT.

The Committee met pursuant to summons.

Read the following Minute under the hand of His Excellency the Governor :—

No. 2106 of

1908.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Four hundred and eighty- nine Dollars and forty-seven Cents ($489.47) in aid of the vote, Judicial and Legal Departments, D.-Land Registry Office, Personal Emoluments, for the following

items :-

New Territories.

Allowance to Passed Cadet acting as Assistant Land

Officer, (from 3rd April to 1st July, 1908),

Exchange Compensation,

Total,.

$296.55

192.92

$489.47

Government House, Hongkong, 10th October, 1908.

The Committee unanimously agreed to recommend that the above vote be passed.

The Committee then adjourned sine die.

Laid before the Legislative Council and adopted on the 3rd December, 1908.

C. CLEMENTI,

Clerk of Councils.

F. H. MAY,

Chairman.

N. 19.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 3rd December, 1908.

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.), Chairman.

17

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM REES DAVIES, K.C.).

""

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON).

29

the Director of Public Works, (WILLIAM CHATHAM, C.M.G.).

the Registrar General, (EDWARD ALEXANDER IRVING).

""

the Captain Superintendent of Police, (FRANCIS JOSEPH BADELEY). Dr. Ho KAI, M.B., C.M.G.

">

Mr. WEI YUK, C.M.G.

Mr. HENRY EDWARD POLLOCK, K.C.

27

Mr. EDBERT ANSGAR HEWETT.

Mr. WILLIAM JARDINE GResson.

"}

Mr. HENRY ADOLPHUS WARRE SLADE.

ABSENT:

His Excellency the Officer Commanding the Troops, (Colonel CHARLES HENRY DARLING,

R.E.).

The Committee met pursuant to summons.

Read the following Minutes under the hand of His Excellency the Governor :--

No. 6933 of 1906, C.S.O.

No. 1660 of 1905.

No. 1660 of 1908.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Five thousand Dollars ($5,000) in aid of the vote, Public Works Extraordinary, Miscellaneous, Blake Pier Shelter.

Government House, Hongkong, 14th October, 1908.

F. D. LUGard.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One thousand seven hundred Dollars ($1,700) in aid of the vote, Miscellaneous Services, Stationery.

Government House, Hongkong, 20th October, 1908.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Eighty-six thousand five hundred and forty-seven Dollars and sixty cents ($86,547.60) in aid of the vote, Miscellaneous Services, for the following items :-

Indian Police Remittances,

Cancer Research Fund,

Tropical Diseases Research Fund,

Department of Chinese in London University, Imperial Institute.

Redemption of Subsidiary Coin,

Total,

$ 7,600.00

35.60

118.65

35.60

237.30

78,520.45

.$86,547.60

Government House, Hongkong, 21st October, 1908.

·

1908.

F. D. LUGARD.

No. 652 of The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One thousand four hundred Dollars ($1,400) in aid of the vote, Public Works, Recurrent, Mis- cellaneous Services.

No. 3158 of 1908.

Government House, Hongkong, 27th October, 1908.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Nine hundred Dollars ($900) in aid of the vote, Botanical and Forestry Department, Other Charges, for the following items :-

Forestry in New Territories,

Tree planting,.....

Total,

.$400

500

.$900

No. 8628 of

1904.

No. 8433 of

1906.

XI in No. 541 of

1908.

Government House, Hongkong, 4th November, 1908.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Two hundred Dollars ($200) in aid of the vote, Education, Other Charges, Belilios Public School, Anglo- Chinese Side, Language Bonus.

Government House, Hongkong, 12th November, 1908.

F. D. LUGard.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Two hundred and eighty-five Dollars ($285) in aid of the vote, Police and Prison Departments, A.— Police, Personal Emoluments, Captain Superintendent, House Allowance.

Government House, Hongkong, 18th November, 1908.

F. D. LUGard.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Sixty-one thousand Dollars ($61,000) in aid of the vote, Public Works, Recurrent, Miscellaneous, Typhoon and Rainstorm Damages.

Government House, Hongkong, 26th November, 1908.

The Committee unanimously agreed to recommend that the above votes be passed.

The Committee then adjourned sine die.

Laid before the Legislative Council and adopted on the 10th December, 1908.

C. CLEMENTI,

Clerk of Councils.

F. H. MAY,

Chairman.

No. 20.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 10th December, 1908.

PRESENT:

His Excellency the General Officer Commanding the Troops, (Major-General ROBERT GEORGE

BROADWOOD, C.B.).

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.), Chairman.

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM REES DAVIES, K.C.).

39

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALEXANDER MacDonald THOMSON).

""

the Registrar General, (EDWARD Alexander Irving).

the Director of Public Works, (WILLIAM CHATHAM, C.M.G.).

the Captain Superintendent of Police, (FRANCIS JOSEPH BADELEY). Dr. Ho KAI, M.B., C.M.G.

J

Mr. WEI YUK, C.M.G.

""

Mr. EDBERT ANSGAR HEWETT.

""

Mr. WILLIAM JARDINE GRESSON."

""

3

3

Mr. HENRY ADOLPHUS WARRE SLADE.

ABSENT:

The Honourable Mr. HENRY EDWARD POLLOCK, K.C.

The Committee met pursuant to summons.

Read the following Minute under the hand of His Excellency the Governor :

No. 8480 of 1908.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Eight thousand seven hundred and ten Dollars ($8,710) in aid of the vote, Post Office, for the following items:

Hongkong Post Office, Other Charges. Carriage of Mails, Share of Mail Subsidy, Compensation for Damaged Parcels, etc.,.

$7,665

30

Incidental Expenses,

450

Postal Agencies in China.

Other Charges, Shanghai,

Rates and Taxes,

565

Total,

$8,710

Government House, Hongkong, 4th December, '1908.

The Committee unanimously agreed to recommend that the above vote be passed.

The Committee then adjourned sine die.

Laid before the Legislative Council and adopted on the 17th December, 1908.

F. H. MAY,

Chairman.

C. CLEMENTI,

Clerk of Councils.

į

No. 21.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 17th December, 1908.

PRESENT:

His Excellency the General Officer Commanding the Troops, (Major-General ROBERT GEORGE

BROADWOOD, C.B.).

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.), Chairman.

19

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM REES DAVIES, K.C.).

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON).

""

the Registrar General, (EDWARD ALEXANDER IRVING).

the Director of Public Works, (WILLIAM CHATHAM, C.M.G.).

the Captain Superintendent of Police, (FRANCIS JOSEPH BADELEY). Dr. Ho KAI, M.B., C.M.G.

""

""

Mr. WEI YUK, C.M.G.

Mr. HENRY EDWARD POLLOCK, K.C.

""

Mr. EDBERT ANSGAR HEWETT.

17

Mr. WILLIAM JARDINE GRESSON.

""

Mr. HENRY ADOLPHUS WARRE SLADE.

The Committee met pursuant to summons.

Read the following Minute under the hand of His Excellency the Governor:-

No. 70.-Medical Departments,......$5,275.

The Committee unanimously agreed to recommend that the above vote be passed. The Committee then adjourned sine die.

Laid before the Legislative Council and adopted on the

190

Clerk of Councils.

Chairman.

No. 1.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

PUBLIC

OF THE

WORKS

COMMITTEE

at a Meeting held on the 4th January, 1908.

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Director of Public Works (WILLIAM CHATHAM, C.M.G.), Chairman.

"}

Mr. EDWARD OSBORNE.

Mr. HENRY KESWICK.

ABSENT:

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON).

Mr. EDBERT ANSGAR HEWETT.

Ilarbour of Refuge for Small Craft. (C.S.O. 9647/1903.)

The Chairman read the report of the last meeting (held on the 19th December, 1907,) and a minute by His Excellency the Governor, dated the 20th November, 1907, with reference to the question of dredging or partly dredging and partly reclaiming Causeway Bay. In accordance with the decision come to at the last meeting, the following papers had been circulated to Members :-

(i.) Mr. BOULTON's report of 28th September, 1907, on the Mongkoktsui Scheme (i.) Comparative Statement of Areas, Cost, &c., of Mongkoktsui and Kennedy

Town Schemes.

(iii.) Estimated cost of Dredging Causeway Bay.

(iv.) Plan accompanying Mr. BOULTON's report.

(v.) Chart No. 3280 with Mongkoktsui and Kennedy Town Schemes shown on it

The minutes by Members on the general question of improving the existing Harbour of Refuge and providing a new one were then read. The following is a brief abstract of them :-

Mr. KESWICK.

Existing Harbour. Causeway Bay should be immediately deepened. A depth of 9 feet all over, as proposed in the Public Works Department estimate, would be superfluous and it would suffice if the entire area were divided into three equal parts having depths of 9, 6 and 3 feet respectively.

New Harbour. A harbour at Cheung Sha Wan would be preferable to one opposite Mongkoktsui on the grounds of economy. The Kennedy Town proposal would be a luxury and the minor Mongkoktsui Scheme an absolute waste of money.

Mr. OSBORNE.

Existing Harbour. Causeway Bay should be deepened so as to afford 10 feet depth along the North side, diminishing to 2 feet along the South side, but, as the area of the bay is insufficient, additional accommodation must be provided.

New Harbour. A sheltered area of 100 acres is required. The Kennedy Town Scheme would be too costly and too small and, in a strong North-East wind, boats would be driven past it or wrecked on the break water. A breakwater at Cheung Sha Wan would be more sheltered than one at Mongkoktsui and would therefore be less costly and for that and other minor reasons it was to be preferred.

Mr. HEWETT.

Existing Harbour. Causeway Bay should be dredged as proposed by Mr.

KESWICK.

New Harbour. This should be either at Mongkoktsui or Cheung Sha Wan,—

preferably the latter.

Mr. THOMSON.

Existing Harbour. The dredging of Causeway Bay should, if carried out, be an

additional work.

New Harbour. Kennedy Town Scheme is out of the question. No estimate

has been given of the Cheung Sha Wan Scheme.

A report by Mr. BOULTON, dated 3rd January, 1908, reviewing the points raised in the foregoing minutes was then read. It contained the following statements:-

Causeway Bay. A comparison of old and new charts showed that no appreciable advance of the foreshore had occurred since the establishment of the Colony. Of the 3 nullahs discharging into the bay, only one drains bare hills which are likely to yield detritus and so produce silting; but this is counteracted by frequent dredging. The large dredgers in the Colony which might possibly be hired were unsuitable for the work suggested as it would be necessary, in order to provide flotation for them, to dredge to a depth far in excess of that specified. Special plant would have to be purchased to carry out the deepening suggested and, assuming that it were disposed of on completion of the work, the cost would probably amount to about $500,000. The removal of all material above the level of low water of Ordinary Spring Tides could be done by manual labour and was estimated to cost about $70,000.

}

New Harbour. The cost of a breakwater at Cheung Sha Wan, enclosing an area of 166 acres, was estimated roughly at $1,420,000 and, if the shallow areas opposite the ends of the breakwater had not been reclaimed by the time it was carried out, temporary groins would be required to restrict the width of the entrances. The scheme was as shown on a tracing dated 25.7.04 in C.S.O. 9647/1903. A modified scheme to enclose an area of 100 acres at Cheung Sha Wan could be carried out at a cost estimated approximately at $1,200,000. The objection to both these proposals was that they would prevent the carrying out of an extensive reclamation scheme for which the bay was well adapted.

The proposed breakwater at Mongkoktsui was strengthened by the introduction of concrete blocks to a small extent, but otherwise it was of such a type as would be required at Cheung Sha Wan or elsewhere. Mongkoktsui was nearer the centre of the harbour than Cheung Sha Wan, a very important consideration in the case of a sudden storm.

The Chairman read the report of a Public Works Committee meeting held on the 25th October, 1906, at which the various possible sites for a harbour of refuge were considered, the result being that the Mongkok tsui site was unanimously recommended to Government.

After full discussion, the Members present agreed to the following recommendations:—

(a.) In view of the proposed reclamation scheme at Cheung Sha Wan, the Mong- koktsui scheme should be adopted and a condition should be made that the existing trading anchorage off Yaumati is not to be interfered with after the completion of the scheme.

(b.) In view of the great expense involved in carrying out any extensive scheme of dredging at Causeway Bay, which is really unnecessary for the require- ments of the craft seeking refuge there, steps should be taken to provide a shallow depth of water over the area which at present dries at Low Water. This work should be regarded as an urgent one.

The Committee understand that the work recommended in (b.) can be done by

hand at a moderate cost.

Pedestal for Duke of Connaught's Statue. (C.O.D. 264/02.)

The Chairman explained that it was intended to locate the statue of the Duke of Connaught permanently in the position which it now occupies opposite Blake Pier and that, as the pedestal on which it stands is not considered a suitable one, it had been proposed to provide a new one. He submitted three designs, marked A, B & C.

Members unanimously agreed to recommend that the design marked C be adopted.

Nullah Training, 1908. (C.S.O. 9409/1907.)

The Chairman submitted a general plan of the City of Victoria showing the training work which had already been accomplished and the various extensions, &c., proposed to be carried out during the current year under the Vote "Training Nullahs", for which a sum of $20,000 was provided in the Estimates.

The following is a statement of the proposed works :—

(i.) Extension of trained nullah in Stone Nullah Lane, Wanchai,

to above Kennedy Road (C.S.O. 1436/1906).

ii.) Branch nullah at Tai Hang Village (C.S.O. 5928/1906). (in.) Extensions of trained nullahs forming branches of Albany Nullah (iv.) Improvement of Wongneichong Valley drainage and extension

of trained nullah in the rear of the Dharma Sala (C.S.O. 5438/1907) $6,500-$1,500 subscribed by Jockey Club...

$4,400

2,000

7,700

5,000

$19,100

The Committee unanimously agreed to recommend that the works specified in the fore- going statement be carried out.

The Committee then adjourned.

W. CHATHAM, Chairman.

Laid before the Legislative Council this 23rd day of January, 1908.

A. G. M. FLETCHER,

Clerk of Councils.

:

HONGKONG,

No. 1908

31

CORRESPONDENCE REGARDING THE CONSTITUTION OF THE APPEAL COURT.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor, December 3rd, 1908.

CHAMBERS, SUPREME COURT, HONGKONG, 25th September, 1908.

SIR,-I have read the remarks which Your Excellency made in Council on Thursday last on the subject of the third Judge with surprise and regret; and I must enter a very respectful but emphatic protest against Your Excellency's view as reported in the newspapers, that "the existing Appeal Court must necessarily be a farce", and that this view is supported by the Chief Justice. The public expression of such a view is calculated to do the gravest harm to the prestige of the Supreme Court in the eyes not only of Europeans but also of the

Chinese.

2. That the constitution of the Appeal Court is extraordinary in so wealthy a Colony as Hongkong is a fact which I have always admitted: that it is anomalous, that it deserves the strongest hostile criticism, may also be conceded. But that is a very different thing from saying that it is a farce; for this implies that the Chief Justice is obstinately tenacious of his own opinions, and that he will never change them whatever new arguments may be advanced on the appeal. Such an idea is contrary to the high-and they are very high-traditions of the British Bench to which I have the honour to belong.

3. I know that the idea to which Your Excellency gave expression was current in the Colony, and I took occasion some time ago in Court to say that the constitution of the Appeal Court being what it was I conceived it to be my duty to make the best of it, and I assured the profession that I came to the hearing of an appeal with a mind absolutely free and treated it so far as possible as a new case. Only recently I said with the same object in view that a Judge is always assumed to have the honesty necessary to reverse his own deci- sion if, on further argument, it is shown to be wrong. A second argument often puts things in a new light, and points often occur to one which did not present themselves on the first. A second argument and a second judgment upholding the first may lead to a clearer appre- ciation of the law, and prevent an appeal to the Privy Council. Although it has not happened up to the present that I have had occasion to reverse a judgment I have given, on minor points I have frequently had occasion to change my views, and I can quite conceive the possibility of my doing so on a crucial issue.

.

614

4. I am at the present time engaged in preparing a judgment on an important appeal; it took many days to argue in the Full Court; the writing of the judgment will probably take 10 full mornings' work, of at least four hours a day, and though I am now half way through I have not the remotest idea what the ultimate judgment will be. It is not impossible that this judgment may prevent the case going to the Privy Council. Your Excellency will agree that when so much care is given to appeals the word "farce" is hardly applicable; and it is the more unfortunate that such an expression of opinion should have fallen from Your Excellency while a judgment in an appeal case is pending. I must confess that I should not like to deliver a judgment even on a small matter which was deemed to be given in far-. cial conditions. I think therefore that Your Excellency will not hesitate to remove the impression which must have been caused by the remark at some future sitting of Council. •

5. The report of Your Excellency's speech also says that you have like Your Excellency's predecessor, found the general opinion to be that except for the purposes of an Appeal Court, a third Judge is not immediately required. I think it my duty to point out to Your Excel- lency that I know no one who is familiar with the working of the Court who is of that opinion. The fact is that the pressure of the last few months has been so great that we had arrived almost at breaking point, and this is by no means the first time. If I had been laid up for even 2 days with influenza, the whole work of the Court would have been dislocated to the great inconvenience of suitors. I can only add that I was in hopes that the Government would show some slight consideration for myself.

His Excellency

Sir FREDERICK LUGARD, K.C.M.G., Governor of Hongkong.

I have, &c.,

F. T. PIGGOTT,

Chief Justice.

+

8837/1906.

GOVERNMENT HOUSE,

HONGKONG, 26th September, 1908.

SIR,-In reply to your letter of yesterday's date I have the honour to inform you that I did not use the word "farce" in connection with the existing Appeal Court of this Colony. I spoke deliberately and I am correctly reported by the South China Morning Post as having used the word "unsatisfactory". I was so anxious to make it plain to the Council that I intended no reflection whatever upon the Court, but only criticised its Constitution,—in the way you have yourself criticised it, that I added further explanatory words (which have been omitted by the Reporters) to the following effect: "It is no less unsatisfactory to the "Chief Justice himself than to litigants for if he reverses his former decision after hearing "fuller evidence,-more especially if this should occur more than once-he may lay himself "open to the innuendo that he does not know his own mind, or that he is influenced by his "Junior. If on the other hand he confirms his former decisions it may be alleged that the

Appeal is a farce."

16

These as near as I can recollect are the precise words used by me in this connection. I think Your Honour will agree with me that it would be difficult to select words which would more completely dispose of the interpretation conveyed in your second paragraph.

The only authentic report, the Colonial Hansard, has already been revised in this sense.

I regret to note from the last sentence of Your Honour's letter that you still remain under the erroneous impression which I have so frequently and with such apparent ill success, endeavoured to remove, that the Government is disposed to show no consideration towards yourself.

His Honour

THE CHIEF JUSTICE.

I have, &c.,

F. D. LUGARD,

Governor, &c.

1

615

CHAMBERS, SUPREME COURT, HONGKONG, 29th September, 1908.

SIR,—I am much obliged for the courteous information conveyed in Your Excellency's letter of the 26th instant informing me of the actual words used by Your Excellency in your speech in Council on the subject of the constitution of the Full Court. The China Mail and the Daily Press reported it in the way in which I referred to it in my letter; and it seems to me probable that the reporters jumped from the beginning of Your Excellency's emarks to the end, seizing on the words "the appeal is a farce" as making good copy. I much regret to inform Your Excellency that the words actually used in your speech are open to the same objection that I have already expressed to Your Excellency, and are entirely at variance with the traditions of the Bench. No one who is familiar with the work of a Judge could suggest that if after hearing fuller evidence in a case or in several cases, the Chief Justice reversed his former decision he did not know his own mind, because it may be precisely this fuller information (which on appeal is fuller argument, and rarely fuller evidence) which has made the case plainer than it was on the first hearing when this information was not forthcoming. Nor could there be any "innuendo " to the effect that he has been influenced by his Junior. The Chief Justice is only primus inter pares. The Full Court as at present constituted enables the Chief Justice to have the assistance of the Puisne Judge; discussion on abstruse legal questions often makes points clearer than they were when first dealt with by one Judge. And for the reasons given in my former letter the fact that the Chief Justice with the assistance of the Puisne Judge confirms his former decision cannot in any circumstances render the appeal a farce.

2. The defects of the present system are patent; but with much respect, they are not those which Your Excellency has pointed out. And the emphasis which has been laid upon them by Your Excellency cannot fail to be very detrimental to the prestige of the Court among both Europeans and Chinese, which it has been my constant aim to maintain at the highest level.

3. With reference to the last paragraph of the letter under reply Your Excellency is always very good in assuring me that my opinion is not well-founded when I say that the Government shows no consideration to the Chief Justice. I can only say that 3 years experi- ence does not bear out Your Excellency's courteous intentions. The question is one which I have very much at heart, and so long as I am Chief Justice of the Colony I shall continue to do so. Let me put to Your Excellency two instances which will explain my meaning.

For 3 years I have pointed out that the Chief Justice has to do the work of two Judges. Acting on information which was never submitted to me Sir M. Nathan practically informed the Secretary of State that this was not a fact. I have at last through Your Excellency's courtesy been shewn this information, and have pointed out that it was inaccurate from beginning to end. I have received no answer, so that I must assume that my opinion is disregarded. Even the carefully drawn-up Tables which I had prepared and which support my statement have elicited no comment. Even as one Judge doing the work of two at certain periods of the year I have to work "double tides" to get through the work. One of such periods which has covered the last 3 or 4 months is just over and yet Your Excellency has informed the Council in spite of my re-iterated opinion that there is no immediate necessity for a third Judge. The effect of this on my mind can only be that the opinion of the Government is that I only want a third Judge appointed to save myself work. Surely Your Excellency will agree that this is a case of want of consideration for the Chief Justice.

Let me take another case. There was a suggestion in one of Your Excellency's letters that an Appeal Court could be formed with the assistance of the Judge of Shanghai. I learn from Your Excellency's speech in Council that the suggestion has been forwarded to the Secretary of State in the concrete form that the Judge of Shanghai should come to Hongkong to sit as an Appeal Judge twice a year.

Appeal Judge twice a year. If Your Excellency had asked my opinion before sending this suggestion forward, I should have pointed out the difficulties in the way of making the scheme effective, and the inconveniences which must result from it: that changes must be made in the law and Code of Procedure: and that it can only work by most seriously hampering the other business of the Court. This quite apart from the inherent objections to the scheme.

616

But the scheme has apparently been approved at home, and I shall have work it. As in the case of the third Judge, the opinion of people who knew little or nothing of the matter was held of more weight than mine, so here: when, as is inevitable, I point out the unworkable nature of the scheme as sent from home, I shall probably be told that others think differently.

Your Excellency will I think agree with me that I have some cause for the view I have so frequently expressed that little consideration is paid to the Chief Justice's opinion in. matters relating to the administration of justice.

His Excellency

Sir FREDERICK LUGARD, K.C.M.G.,

Governor of Hongkong.

8837/1906.

I have, &c.,

F. T. PIGGOTT, *

Chief Justice.

i

GOVERNMENT HOUSE,

HONGKONG, 6th October, 1908.

SIR, I regret to learn from your letter of September 29th, that my explanation of the actual words used by me in reference to the Court of Appeal and which I had believed would entirely dispose of Your Honour's cause of protest have not had that result.

2. Your Honour contends that "no one who is familiar with the work of a Judge " could attribute to him any but the highest motives when hearing an Appeal, whatever his decision might be. But the words used by me ("innuendo" and "alleged" &c.) made it I had hoped amply clear that I was not referring to well informed persons but to disappointed litigants and irresponsible critics. I expressed in fact only the views which I have under- stood yourself and Mr. Justice Wise to have affirmed. The words of the latter in this connection (forwarded to me as an enclosure in Your Honour's letter of the 29th February,• 1908,) were:-"As at present constituted the Appeal Court consists of the Chief Justice "and the Pusine Judge, from one of whom the appeal necessarily lies, and the Chief Justice "has a casting vote. The result is that anyone who has the money will appeal against the "decision of the Puisne Judge (in consequence of the casting vote) but that no one will appeal against a decision of the Chief Justice unless he intends to carry the case to the "Privy Council ".

(C

3. In reply to your third paragraph I can only repeat the statement made by me in my observations on the Estimates after giving due prominence to the fact that Your Honour held the view that a Third Judge was necessary to cope with the work of the Supreme Court, viz. :—that after consulting those best qualified to advise me I considered the weight of opinion was in favour of the view that a Third Judge was not immediately necessary, but I hoped

but I hoped that when the new Courts were finished the Colony would be in a position to incur the expense involved. Your Honour was as you cordially admit informed of the arguments which had been adduced in this connection and had an opportunity of fully disposing of them. Your letters were forwarded to the Secretary of State and you were so informed, and I am therefore at a loss to know what further reply you expected, the absence of which leads you to the conclusion that your opinion is disregarded. So soon as the reply of the Secretary of State is received it will of course be communicated to you, but in the meantime I presume from the telegram (which I at once sent to you on receipt) that after a perusal of the correspondence he has adhered to his former view that the appointment of a Third Judge can be temporarily deferred. In this matter which you select as a flagrant instance that the local Government "shows no consideration to the Chief Justice", I can find no possible grounds for such a conclusion.

We are all agreed that the appointment of a Third Judge would be inost desirable,- but it is my duty to examine the comparative urgency of a number of extremely desirable requirements in relation to the finances of the Colony-and I have come to the conclusion so far as my personal view is concerned (the final decision resting with Secretary of State after perusing Your Honour's arguments and the Tables to which you refer) that in the coming year the Colony cannot afford a Third Judge. Provision has, however, been made for a Deputy Official Receiver on Your Honour's recommendation.

617

4. As regards the second case cited, I did make the suggestion regarding the Shanghai Judge in my letter to Your Honour of 8th February last. I did not go into it in detail until I should hear from the Secretary of State as to whether the idea was possible since Your Honour had stated that you considered it to be out of the question for a Foreign Office Judge to come here unless there were reciprocity, which was impossible. At your desire I have cabled to the Secretary of State to inform him that you would wish to express an opinion regarding the working of the scheme before its details are decided.

5. I have replied at some length to the concrete instances brought forward by Your Honour in support of your view that "little consideration is paid to the opinion of the Chief Justice in matters affecting the administration of justice" but I fear that it is beyond my power to remove what appears to have become an idée fixe in you mind.

His Honour

THE CHIEF JUSTICE.

I have, &c.,

F. D. LUGARD,

Governor, &c.

-

CHAMBERS, SUPREME COURT,

HONGKONG, 28th October, 1908.

SIR, I much regret to find on perusing Your Excellency's speech on the second reading of the Appropriation Ordinance on Thursday 8th October that Your Excellency did not take the opportunity of correcting the impression left on the readers of some of the reports of Your Excellency's speech, that in your view appeals to the Full Court as at present constituted were a farce. I had hoped that for the reasons, and with the materials which I had supplied to Your Excellency in my letters on subject, some allusion would have been made to the subject.

2. Your Excellency's remarks, as published in the papers, are as I have already pointed out in my letter of 29th September calculated to undo the work which I have done in promoting confidence in the Full Court in spite of its admittedly unsatisfactory constitution. Very shortly the Full Court will have to deliver important judgments in a case on appeal from my decision at nisi prius, which has been argued before it at great length. It may be that I shall differ from the Puisne Judge; it may be that I shall maintain my former opinion; but as to both of these questions the matter is still under consideration. But should these things happen the suggestion engendered in the popular mind by the report of Your Excellency's speech, and especially in that of the disappointed litigant, will inevitably be that the appeal has been a farce. I should therefore be obliged if Your Excellency would lay the correspondence on the Table of Council. It is of the first necessity that the appeal to the Full Court should be considered by all, whether well or ill informed people, as a serious matter, and not as a farce.

3. I note what Your Excellency says on the subject in paragraph 2 of your letter of the 6th October: but I regret that I cannot agree with it. I do not think that the remarks actually made by Your Excellency are at all calculated to promote confidence in the Court, for they suggest criticisms of the decisions of the Chief Justice's judgments which would not otherwise occur to litigants or even ill-informed people. But the actual words used by Your Excellency are not before the public, as no one except members of Councils see the local Hansard.

His Excellency

Sir FREDERICK LUGARD, K.C.M.G.,

Governor of Hongkong.

I have, &c.,

F. T. PIGGOTT, Chief Justice.

1

!

*

618

GOVERNMENT HOUSE,

HONGKONG, 2nd November, 1908.

SIR.I have the honour to acknowledge your letter of October 28th having reference to the words used by me in a speech regarding the constitution of the Full Court. I am anxious to meet Your Honour's wishes as far as seems to me practicable, but since as you point out the members of the Council already have the corrected version of what I said before them in the Hansard there seems no object in laying it before them in a separate paper. Your Honour is anxious as I understand that it should be made known that I did not use the words. attributed to me in the Local Press that the appeal to the Full Court is a farce, and I will if you so desire cause a letter to be written to the Press quoting the words in Hansard. Sessional Papers consist of the annual reports from Departments and other permanent records of the Colony and I do not think that the correspondence in question is of a nature to be included with them.

2. With reference to the question of a Third Judge I have the honour to enclose in original for your perusal and favour of return a private letter* I have just received from Sir H. de Sausmarez together with a copy of the despatch* from the Secretary of State dated 18th September, 1908. I personally agree with the view expressed by Sir H. de Sausmarez.

His Honour

THE CHIEF JUSTICE.

I have, &c.,

F. D. LUGARD, Governor, &c.

:

2.

CHAMBERS, SUPREME COURT,

HONGKONG, 4th November, 1908.

SIR,--I have the honour to acknowledge Your Excellency's letter of 2nd November, on the subject of Your Excellency's remarks in Council on the present constitution of the Full Court.

2. I fear that the publication in the newspapers of the remarks actually used by Your Excellency would do more harm than good; for whereas the words as reported might have been looked upon as an unfortunate slip, had the impression created by them been corrected at a subsequent sitting of the Council, the publication of the remarks actually made by Your Excellency unaccompanied by my own observations, would seem to indicate that they embody, as I fear they do, Your Excellency's opinion on the question.

3. With regard to laying the correspondence on the Table of the Council, Your Excellency forgets that one of the principal objects of the practice is to make the papers so laid public. I have had a long experience of procedure in Legislative Council, and I think that correspondence which has passed between the Chief Justice and the Governor relative to remarks made by the Governor in the Council prejudicial to the administration of justice may fittingly be laid upon the Table.

4. I propose to deal with the matter referred to in the second paragraph of the letter under reply in a separate letter.

I have, &c.,

His Excellency

Sir FREDERICK LUGARD, K.C.M.G.,

Governor of Hongkong.

* Not printed.

F. T. PIGGOTT,

Chief Justice.

/

619 ·

GOVERNMENT HOUSE,

HONGKONG, 16th November, 1908.

SIR,I have the honour to acknowledge receipt of your letter of November 4th in which you inform me that my proposal to cause the actual words used by me when address- ing the Council on the subject of the Appeal Court to be published in the Local Press will not meet your views.

In deference to your opinion as Chief Justice that the remarks made by me inay be prejudicial to the administration of justice I have directed that this correspondence shall be laid on the table of the Legislative Council as you desire. But I do not propose to include the enclosure to the Secretary of State's despatch or the private letter to me from Sir H. de Sausmarez which raise a separate issue.

I have, &c.,

His Honour

THE CHIEF JUSTICE.

F. D. LUGARD, Governor, &c.

HONGKONG.

REPORT ON THE ASSESSMENT FOR THE YEAR 1908-1909.

No.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of

His Excellency the Governor,

25

'. 1908

ASSESSOR'S OFFICE, HONGKONG, 21st July, 1908.

1. His Excellency the Governor-in-Council under Section 8 of the Rating Ordinance No. 6 of 1901, ordered the existing valuation for 1907-1908 to be adopted as the valuation for 1908-1909. During the past year no general assessment has been made, the difference in Rateable Value being the result of Interim-Assessments and Appeals.

The City of Victoria.

2. The Rateable Value has increased from $8,892,205 to $8,987,125 an addition of $94,920 or 1.06 per cent.

The Hill District,

3. The Rateable Value has increased from $261,070 to $263,265 an addition of $2,195 or 0.84 per cent.

2.39

Shaukiwan

4. The Rateable Value has increased from $55,857 to $57,197 an addition of $1,340 or per cent.

Hongkong Villages.

5. The Rateable Value has increased from $220,655 to $223,599 an addition of $2,940 or 1.33 per cent.

524

Kowloon Point.

6. The Rateable Value has decreased from $470,180 to $464,460 a reduction of $5,720 or 1.21 per cent.

Yaumati.

7. The Rateable Value has decreased from $236,585 to $233,145 a reduction of $3,440 or 1.45 per cent.

Mongkoktsui.

8. The Rateable Value has increased from $140,980 to $144,565 an addition of $3,585 or 2.54 per cent.

New Kowloon.

9. The Rateable Value has increased from $61,835 to $62,315 an addition of $480 or 0.77 per cent.

Kowloon Villages.

10. The Rateable Value has increased from $146,087 to $150,367 an addition of $4,280 or 2.92 per cent.

The Whole Colony.

11. The Rateable Value has increased from $10,716,173 to $10,816,753 an addition of $100,580 or 0.93 per cent.

Interim Valuations.

12. During the Period from 1st July 1907 to 1st June 1908, Interim Valuations have been made as follows:-

In the City of Victoria.

115 New and/or rebuilt tenements, rateable value,

13 tenements structurally altered,

Replacing assessments, amounting to,

$134,140

$228,265

212,935

15,330

$149,470

24 Assessments cancelled, tenements pulled down, or being in other

respects not rateable,

Increase in the City of Victoria,

26,910

$122,560

525

In the rest of the Colony.

40 New and/or rebuilt tenements, rateable value,

10 tenements structurally altered,

Replacing assessments, amounting to,..............

.......$ 11,980

.$ 54,130

47,335

6,795

$ 18,775

5,965

$ 12,810

27 Assessments cancelled, tenements pulled down, or being in other

respects not rateable,

Increase in the rest of the Colony,

The total number of tenements affected by Interim Valuations being 229.

Appeals.

13. Notices of Appeal were given against the Assessments of 249 tenements with an aggregate Rateable Value of $452,180.

Appeals against 110 tenements of a Rateable Value of $214,365 were withdrawn.

By Order of the Court reductions amounting to $36,195 were made.

Vacant Tenements.

14. The number of reported vacant tenements in the City of Victoria inspected under Section 35 of the Rating Ordinance averaged about 180 monthly, against 218 last year.

Tabular Statements.

15. The tabular statements giving comparisons of the valuation for 1907-1908 and 1908-1909, are attached.

Staff.

16. Mr. Chan Kwok On and Mr. Tai Tin Shang have discharged their duties to my satisfaction.

ARTHUR CHAPMAN,

Assessor.

526

Table A.

CITY OF VICTORIA.

No.

District.

Valuation, Valuation, 1907-1908. 1908-1909.

Increase.

Decrease. Percentage.

$

$

$

1

Kennedy Town,

189,470

220,420

30,950

: es

%

2

Shek Tong Tsui,

516,400

517,895

1,495

...

CO

3

Sai Ying Pun,

1,957,585 1,963,315

5,730

...

4

Tai Ping Shan,

624,500 627,480

2,980

5

Sheung Wan,

1,022,155 | 1,040,495

18,340

...

6

Chung Wan,

3,608,290 3,627,670

19,380

7

Ha Wan,

321,410 327,890

6,480

8

Wan Tsai,

387,620

397,185

9,565

9 Bowrington,

102,220 102,220

10

Soo Kon Poo,

162,555 162,555

$ 8,892,205 | 8,987,125

94,920

1.06

...

Table B.

THE HILL DISTRICT, SHAUKIWAN AND HONGKONG VILLAGES.

District.

Valuation, Valuation,

1907-1908.1908-1909.

Increase. Decrease. Percentage.

$

$

%

The Hill District,

261,070

263,265

2,195

0.84

Shaukiwan,

Hongkong Villages,..

55,857 57.197

1,340

2.39

220,659

223,599

2,940

1.33

Total,

537,586 544,061

6,475

1.20

-527

Table C.

KOWLOON POINT, YAUMATI, HUNGHOM, MONGKOKTSUI, NEW KOWLOON

AND KOWLOON VILLAGES.

District.

Valuation, Valuation,

1907-1908.1908-1909.

Increase. Decrease. Percentage.

Kowloon Point,

$ 470,180

$

464,460

Yaumati,

Hunghom,

236,585

233,145

5,720

1.21

3,440

1.45

230,715 230,715

...

Mongkoktsui,

140,980 144,565

3,585

New Kowloon,

61,835

62,315

480

Kowloon Villages,

146,087

150,367

4,280

2.54

0.77

2.92

S 1,286,382 | 1,285,567

8,345

9,160

Deduct Increase,

8,345

Total Decrease,

S

815

0.06

Table D.

THE COLONY OF HONGKONG.

District.

Valuation, Valuation, 1907-1908. 1908-1909.

Increase. Decrease. Percentage.

$

$

$

EA

%

The City of Victoria,

8,892,205 8,987,125

94,920

1.06

Hill District and Hongkong

Villages,

537,586 544,061

6,475

1.20

Kowloon Point, &c., and

Kowloon Villages,

1,286,382 | 1,285,567

815

0.06

$10,716,173 10,816,753 101,395

815

Deduct Decrease,

815

Total Increase,

100,580

0.93

ARTHUR CHAPMAN,

Assessor.

Annexe K.

P.472

REPORT OF THE GOVERNMENT BACTERIOLOGIST.

I. THE BACTERIOLOGICAL INSTITUTE.

STAFF.

Dr. HUNTER, the Bacteriologist, has been on long leave during the last 3 months of the year.

The Chinese Staff have given satisfaction. They have had no serious disease result- ing from the nature of their work. Early in the year, however, one man was bitten by a rabid guinea pig, he was at once sent to Shanghai for Pasteur's treatment and has remained free from the disease.

BUILDINGS.

The buildings have been maintained in good repair.

THE PREPARATION OF VACCINE LYMPH.

The steadily increasing importance of this work is shown in Table No. I. There is an increase over any previous year of 4,864 tubes issued and of $978 in the Revenue from tubes sold. Table II shows the free issues of vaccine during 1907. The quality of the lymph has been maintained at a very high standard. The maintenance of a highly active vaccine lymph is the tropics is a matter of great importance and is more difficult than at home. It is stated in books on tropical medicine that the protection against Small-pox produced by vaccination lasts for a comparative short time in the tropics-this is with very little doubt due to the poor quality of the lymph formerly used, vaccine lymph rapidly deteriorates in the tropics if passed through a series of calves. The method of reinforcing its strength by passage through rabbits originally recommended by the French Vaccine Commission of 1903 and used with good results in India and elsewhere has been used here and has given very good results in my hands.

In the early autumn a complaint was made by some Chinese operators that the vaccine supplied to them was not active, and a question was asked in the Sanitary Board about the inatter. Results which came to hand later from other vaccinators using the same lymph were quite satisfactory showing that the bad results must have been due either to the operators keeping the lyinph carelessly or to faults in their techuique.

THE BACTERIOLOGICAL EXAMINATION OF WATER SUPPLIES.

The routine examination of the Tytam. Pokfulam and Kowloon services which was started in August, 1906, has been continued regularly each month throughout this year. The water has been at all times of great bacteriological purity. It has been very rare to find more that 50 organisms per cubic centimeter of water. In striking contrast with this is the filthy well water of the Colony. It is an accepted principle in Public Health that when a water service is established all irregular sources of supply should be closed whenever possible. Table III is a good example of the reason why. It is compiled from work done during the

year.

Three samples of water from outside the Colony were examined for Cholera, in no case was the organism found.

THE EXAMINATION OF PATHOLOGICAL MATERIAL SENT FOR THE DIAGNOSIS OF

INFECTIOUS DISEASES OF MAN.

Table IV shows the work done. There has been an increase in this work compared with what has been done in previous years.

473

THE EXAMINATION OF PATHOLOGICAL MATERIAL SENT FOR THE DIAGNOSIS OF

INFECTIOUS DISEASES OF ANIMALS.

Table V shows the work done. The rats examined for Plague are shown in Table VI.

TUMOURS AND OTHER MATERIAL SENT FOR EXAMINATION.

Table VII shows the tumours examined, there has been a large increase of work under this head, there being 36 examinations compared with 10 last year. Previous to this exact records were not kept. Four disinfectants have been tested for their carbolic acid coefficient

eleven other reports have been issued on various materials sent for diagnosis.

and e

RESEARCH.

This is contained in special reports which are sent at six-monthly intervals to the Secretary of State. A report was sent in April and another in October.

Table I.-Vaccine Statistics.

Year.

Tubes issued.

Tubes issued free.

Revenue from tubes sold.

1902.

4,616

3,972

$ 315

1903,

5,361

2,876

899

1904,

6,893

4,709

773

1905,

7,639

3,246

1,485

1906,

8,797

4,540

1,430

1907,

13,665

5,975

2,463

Table II.-Free. Issues of Vaccine during 1907.

Tubes.

The Victoria Gaol,

1,450

The Tung Wah Hospital,.

1,345

The Civil Hospital,..

550

The Alice Memorial Hospital,

288

The New Territories,

400

The Sanitary Department,

234

The Berlin Foundling House,

50

The Victoria Hospital,

11

The Nethersole Hospital,

336

C. P. Disp. Hunghom,

50

Do. Kowloon,....

144

Do.

Yaumati,.

275

Do. Central,

265

Do.

Eastern,.

292

Do.

Western,

285

5,975 Value $2,587.

!

Source of Water.

Tytam Service,

474

Table III.-Water Examination.

Number of Organisms per cubic centimeter.

About 19 (mean of 12 examinations).

Pokfulam

Kowloon

""

A Garden Well, East Point,

A Well at 5 Lower Rutter Street, A Well at 6 Lower Rutter Street,. A Well at 7 Lower Rutter Street, A Well at 8 Lower Rutter Street, A Well at 12 Lower Rutter Street, A Tank,

Do.

A Well in Fuk Hing Lane,

A Spring near the Slaughter House,.

""

21 (

12

""

"

).

55 (

14

17

""

.).

"

2,000.

Between 40,000 and 50,000. About 10,000.

50,000.

>>

29

500,000.

Between 150,000 and 200,000.

400 and 500.

""

500 and 1,000.

"

About 5,000.

800.

Note. It is laid down by experts that a really good water should contain less than 100 organisms per cubic centimeter. That anything less than 500 is fairly good, 1,000 suspicious and more than 1,000 very suspicious.

Table IV.-Material examined for infectious diseases of man.

Examinations for Typhoid Fever,

Examinations for Diphtheria,

Examinations for Cholera,

Examinations for Tuberculosis,

Table V.-Examinations for infectious diseases of animals.

For Anthrax and other diseases of Cattle,

For Rabies of Dogs,

For Glanders of the Horse,

For Chicken Cholera,

Milk,

Table VI.-Examinations for Rat Plague.

(a.) Total number of Victoria Rats examined,

Total number of Kowloon Rats examined,

(b.) Total number of Victoria Rats found infected,

Total number of Kowloon Rats found infected,

(c.) Species of Rats found infected :-

58

37

1

16

38

2

1

9

1

25,265

13,255

38,520

16

12

28

Mus Rattus,

Mus Decumanus,

Mus Musculus,

Undetermined,

20

4

1

3

Note.-Mus Decumanus has been obtained for examination more frequently than Mus Rattus the proportion being about 3 to 2.

Source of Tumour.

475

Table VII. - Tumours Examined.

Nationality.

Nature of Growth.

13. Lip,

14. Lip......

15. Bladder,

16. Parotid Gland,.

17. Uterus,

23. Parotid Gland,

9. Upper Eyelid,

10. Uterus,

11. Penis,

12. Anus,

18. Axilla,

19. Groin.

20. Breast,

21. Uterus,

22. Breast,

24.

?

25. Lip........

26. Lower Eyelid,

Do. European. Chinese.

Lipoma.

Rodent Ulcer.

Doubtful.

Squamous Carcinoma.

Intussusception.

Squamous Carcinoma.

Do. Blood Clot.

Do.

Myxo-fibro Adenoma.

Ovam.

Tubercular.

Round-celled Sarcoma.

Spheroidal-celled ‹ arcinoma.

Remains of Ovum.

Myxo-Fibroma.

Round-celled Sare ma.

Granulation issue.

1. Intra Uterine,

European.

2. Broad ligament,

Do.

Chronic Glandular Endometritis. Tubal Pregnancy.

3. Liver,

Chinese.

Hanôt's Cirrhosis.

4. Breast,

Do.

Spheroidal Carcinoma.

5. Scalp,

European.

Squamous Carcinoma.

6. Uterus (Cervix),

Chinese.

Squamons Carcinoma.

7. Retro-peritoneal,

European.

8. Ovarian,

Chinese.

Multilocular Adenomatous Cyst.

Do. European.

Chinese.

?

Chinese.

European.

?

Chinese. European.

Chinese.

Fibro Adenoma.

Do.

?

Chinese.

Do.

Fibroma.

27. Penis,

Do.

Squamous Carcinoma.

28. Pharynx,

29. Orbit,

European. Chinese.

Fibro Sarcoma.

30. Parotid Gland,

Do.

31.

Do.

Do.

32. Back,

Do.

Do. Do.

Myxo-fibro-adenoma. Fibro-Adenoma.

Fibro-Sarcoma.

33. Lip,

Do.

Squamous Carcinoma.

34. Neck,

35. Rectum, 36. Uterus,

Do.

Mvxo-fibro-chondro-adenoma.

European.

Do.

Collumnar Carcinoma. Chronic Endometritis.

C. M. HEANLEY, Bacteriologist.

!

476

II. THE PUBLIC MORTUARY.

Staff.

The Chinese Staff at the Mortuary have given satisfaction.

The four members of the Staff have been free from any serious disease resulting from the nature of their work, but all have been in Hospital with Malaria. The Mortuary is situated at the outskirts of the Town near a large untrained nullah which is the cause of the Malaria.

Buildings.

The buildings have been maintained in good repair.

Male bodies examined,....

Female

"

Sex undetermined,

Report on Post Mortems.

1907. 1906.

993

1,259

749

837

9

44

Total,

1,751

2,140

Claimed bodies sent from Hospitals, houses, matsheds, convents,

harbour, etc................

Unclaimed bodies mostly dumped in the streets,.

Table I.- Epitome of Causes of Death.

963

788

1,751

I. Total General Diseases,

914

II. Local Diseases :-

(a.) Of the Nervous System,

7

(b.)

Circulatory System,

24

(c.)

Respiratory S stem,

348

(d.)

""

Digestive System,

68

(e.).

"}

Genito-Urinary System,...

10

457

III. Deaths from Violence,

113

IV. Decomposed Bodies,

Total,

267

1,751

Table I (a).-General Diseases.

Small-pox,

Plague,

Typhoid Fever,

Cholera (imported on a ship),

Diphtheria,

Beri-beri,.

Malaria,

Septicæmia,..

l'ernicious Anæmia,

Syphilis,

Generalised Tuberculosis,

Prematurity,

Atelectasis Pulmonun,

Still-birth,.....

Marasmic conditions,

Cellulitis,

Pyæmia,

Convulsions,

Tetanus,

Banti's Disease,

Measles,

Abscess,

184

69

3

9

16

83

44

31

1

2

61

58

29

70

238

8

1

1

1

1

1

Acute Necrosis of Bone,.....

1

914

477

Table I (b).—Local Diseases.

(a.) Of the Nervous System.

Epilepsy,

Meningitis,

Middle-ear Discase..

Cerebral Hæmorrhage,

•(b.) Of the Circulatory System.

Aortic Valve Disease, Aneurism of Aorta,

Heart Disease,

Fatty Heart, Pericarditis,

+

(c.) Of the Respiratory System.

Broncho-pneumonia and Bronchitis,

Pneumonia,

Empyema,

Pleurisy,

Tuberculosis of the Lungs,

Deformity of the Diaphragm,

(d.) Of the Digestive System.

Intestinal Strangulation, Acute Pharyngitis,. Dysentery,

Diarrhoea,

Cancer of the Liver,

Intussusception,

Gall Stones...

Duodenal Ulcer,

Gastric Ulcer,

Peritonitis,

Tubercular Peritonitis,

Appendicitis,

Cirrhosis of the Liver,

Suppurative Cholangitis,

Gastro Enteritis,

Round Worm Infection,.

Intestinal Obstruction,

Strangulated Hernia,

3

}

Total.....

7

6

1

2

11

Total,...

24

4:

25-1

46

19

3

25

1

Total,..

348

Over-distension of the Stomach with King Tze,

-(e.) Of the Genito-Urinary System.

Nephritis,

Child Birth,

Eclampsia,

Total....

2

1

30

8

1

1

1

1

1

1

3

Ι

1

1

5

68

i

1

:

1

Total,...

10

(a.)-General,

478

Table I (c).-Injuries (Deaths from Violence).

Drowning,

Suffocation,

Multiple Injuries,

Hanging,

Burns,

Electrocution,

Scalds...

Asphyxia (diving accident),

(b.)—Local.

Concussion of Brain,

Fractured Skull,

Abdominal Injuries,

Ruptured Spleen,

...

Ruptured Liver,

Shot Wound of the Head,

Injury of Head,

Wound of Neck,

Wound of Throat,

Stab Wound of Heart,

Fractured Pelvis,

Multiple Incised Wounds,

Injury to Chest,

Opium Poisoning,

Fractured Spine,..

Stabbing,..

Fractured Humerus,

Gelsemium Poisoning,

Chinese,

Indian,

European,

Japanese,

Portuguese,

American,

45

6

8

6

1

9

1

Total,

70

5

13

2

4

1

1

1

1

1

·

1

1

2

5

1

I

1

Total,....

Table II-Nationality of Bodies.

Total,.

43

1,732

6

9

2

1

1

.1,751

Chinese,

Other Races,

Table III-Cancer at Autopsies.

Female Autopsies. Male Autopsies.

749 0

974 19

Cases of Cancer. 1 Male aged 48.

Nil.

The cancer was a primary spheroidal-celled Carcinoma of the Liver. This Table is inserted by command, it should be read in conjunction with Table VII of the report on the Bacteriological Institute or it will give an erroneous idea of the prevalence of cancer in Chinese.

The Chinese afflicted with incurable cancer probably goes home to his country.

Table IV.—Attendances at the Courts.

Supreme Court,..... Coroner's Court,

9 on 6 cases

14

14 **

Note.-A large amount of medico-legal work is done on cases which ultimately do not go to Court.

C. M. HEANLEY, Bacteriologist.

P

-

479

Annexe L.

REPORT ON THE PUBLIC MORTUARY, KOWLOON.

The new permanent buildings consisting of Mortuary with 14 tables, Coolie Quarters and Laboratory were completed by the Public Works Department on the 19th September, 1907, and have proved to be most satisfactory. The placing of the mosquito gauze inside instead of outside of the windows has apparently had the desired effect of preserving it and so rendering the place flyproof.

The total number of Post Mortem examinations made during the year amounted to 838 as compared with 1,156 for 1906. The decrease is largely accounted for by the absence of any large typhoon during the year and the smallness of the epidemic of Plague.

269 bodies were removed from houses and 569 were found abandone.l.

The percentage of“ Abandoned Bodies" from all sources is therefore approximately 68 per cent.

Out of a total of 53 cases of Plague, 12 were dumped giving a percentage for Plague cases of 22-6 dumped. The percentage of Plague cases dumped to cases of all kinds dumped is only about one-fifth.

Table I.

Return of Causes of Death.

1. Total General Diseases, .

... 374

2. Local Diseases :--

(a.) of the Nervous

System,....

(b.)

Circulatory

24

(c.)

Respiratory

179

(d.)

Digestive

་སྭ

(e.)

Urinary

(f)

Generative

(g.)

Hæmopactic

3

1

2

3. Total Injuries,

39

1.

Decomposed Bodies.

205

All Causes,.

838

:

480

Table I (a).

General Diseases.

Small-pox,

Plague: Bubonic-49 Septic 4

59

www.

53

Enteric, Septicæmia,

3

Diarrhoea,

I

Dysentery,

Beri-beri,

19

Malaria,

98

Syphilis,

10

Acute General Tuberculosis,

10

Prematurity,

14

Still-born,

28

Marasmus,

62

Infantile Convulsions,.

Atelectasis,

Distomiasis,

Opium Smoking,

Skeleton.

I

1

1.-Of the Nervous System.

Cerebral Abscess.

Cerebral Hæmorrhage,

Meningitis Tubercular,

11-Of the Circulatory System.

Septic Pericarditis,.

Acute Pericarditis,

Total.....

Table I (b).

Local Diseases.

Chronic Pericarditis,

Fatty Degeneration of Heart,

Valvular Disease of Heart,

Embolism of Coronary Artery,·

111-Of the Respiratory System.

Chronic Bronchitis,

Broncho 'neumonia,

Lobar Pneumonia,

Septic Pneumonia,

Pulmonary Hæmoptosis, Pulmonary Tuberculosis, Empyema,

Acute Pleurisy,

374

1

3

10

1

24

93

42

1

3

33

2

2

179

IV-Of the Digestive System.

Abscess of Liver,

Hanôt's Biliary Cirrhosis, Acute Intestinal Obstruction, Cirrhosis of Liver,

-Of the Urinary System.

Acute Nephritis,..

Vi.Of the Generative System.

Placenta Prævia,

VII. Of the Hamopactic System.

Acute Lymphatic Lukæmia, Multiple Abscess of Spleen,

481

Table I (c).

Injuries.

1. General.

Shock,

Incised Wounds,.

Asphyxia:-

By earth,...

By strangulation, By submersion,

2. Local.

1. Of the head:----

Fracture of Skull,

2. Of the Abdomen

Rupture of Spleen......

·

Table II.

:

1

4

I

3.

1

}

1

2

23

6

39

The Nationalities and Causes of Death of cases other than Chinese are shown as follows:-

English, (f) Strangulation (murder),

Indian, Cerebral Abscess 1; Cut-throat (murder) 1 ;

Pericarditis 1:

Japanese, Decomposed,

Malaria 1;

Total...

1

4

I

6

HAROLD MACFARLANE.

10

452

Annexe M.

REPORT OF THE GOVERNMENT ANALYST FOR 1907.

The number of analyses performed was 436 (550 in 1906).

The following classification shows the nature of the work done: --

1.-Chemico-legal.

Toxicological, (including 9 stomachs),

No. of Articles examined.

41

70..*

Articles for stains,

II-Potable Waters.

Public Supplies,

Wells, etc.,

42 22

III.--Dangerous Goods Ordinance.

Petroleum Oil,

Liquid Fuel,

.54

5

IV-Food and Drugs Ordinance.

Sugar,

Gin,

Brandy,

Flour,

Milk,

Whisky,

3

5

12

.54

8

3

Stout,

Port Wine,

Beer, Tea, Margarine,

....

4

7

∞ - NN

Cement,

Substance, Opium Pills,

V-Building Materials.

VI-Prepared Opium Ordinance.

Powders,

Lozenges,

Wine,

Coins,

Metals.

Ores,

1

1

2

3

1

VII.-Mineralogical, etc.

3

..14

.30

VIII-Miscellaneous.

Aerated Waters,

Coal-tar Disinfectants,

Rat Destroyers,

Soils,

Soft Soap,

Medicinal Plants,

Bird Lime,

Wheat,

Camphor,

Public Gas Supply,

Chinese Wines,

Boiler Deposit, Engine Oil. Coating, Paint. Beverage, one each.

4.

5

4

5

436

483

2. Among the chemico-legal investigations conducted during the year were eight cases of suspected humnan poisoning, in six of which opium was detected. In another case one- sixth of a grain of Gelseminine-the active principle of Gelsemium e'e rans-was isolated from a stomach. A decoction of the green plant had been administered with some harmless Chinese medicines to a man who died a few hours afterwards with symptoms resembling strychnine poisoning. The woman also took some of the medicine and was ill for several hours after which she completely recovered. Gelseminine was separated without difficulty from her urine. In a case of a collapse it was suspected that a man hal been given poison, Previous to taking food, he drank four ounces of castor oil. This quantity of medicine acted so severely that he collapsed from exhaustion. After a day or two the patient re- covered and confirmed the absence of foul play with regard to his sickness. Strychnine was found in the stomach of a dog, which had died so suddenly and with such symptoms as to excite suspicion.

WATERS.

3. The results of the analyses of samples taken each month from the Pokfulum and Tytam Reservoirs, from the Kowloon Service, and Cheung Sha Wan supply, indicate that these supplies continue to maintain their excellent qualities. As the whole of Kowloon was being supplied from the Cheung Sha Wan source, one sample insteal of two from that district was taken mouthly after June last.

DANGEROUS GOODS ORDINANCE.

4. Of Petroleum Oil 59 samples were tested during the year. All the samples of liquid fuel flashed at temperatures exceeding 150° F. Most of the oil that now arrives here, is already covered by certificates so that there has been a large decrease in recent years in the number of oil examinations.

FOOD AND DRUGS ORDINANCE.

5. The following table gives the results of 53 analyses made at the instance of the Police and the Sanitary Board :—

Beer, Brandy,

Gin,

Description.

Milk,

Port Wine,

Whisky,

No. of Samples.

No. found Genuine.

No. found Adulterated.

6

6

4

4

3

3

29

29

3

3

8

8

Many other samples were examined for the public, mostly at the low fee prescribed by the Ordinance.

6. Two samples of Margarine yielded on analysis

Ash (salt),

Curd, Water,

Fat,

:

In 100 parts.

I..

II.

3.68

4.28

1.02

1.46

9.62

9.86

...85.68

84.40

100.00

100.00

484

Preservatives-Borax, Boric, Salicylic, and Benzoic Acids, Fluoborate, Fluosilicates, Fluorides, Sulphites, Formalin, Asaprol, Saltpetre,..

Artificial Colouring Matter,....

{

Absent.

1 in 25,000 of methyl- orange.

Absent.

1 in 25,000

of methyl-

orange.

The results showed the samples to be of very good quality, free from preservative, and containing only a minute harmless quantity of the colouring matter methyl-orange..

7. In a trade-mark case a sample of tea was found to be adulterated with :-

(1) Wo Sum-foreign leaves.

(2) Ching Shui-exhausted leaves stiffened with starch.

(3) Mut Chu-dust tea made into small pieces about the size of a pea by means

of starch.

The tea was deficient in extract, caffeine, and in soluble ash.

3. A good deal of care is taken by retailers that the quality of their liquors answers the legal requirements. A large quantity of brandy being deficient in ethers, was returned to the shippers. As the question as to "What is Whisky" has not yet been decided it has not been considered advisable to recommend any prosecutions with regard to this liquor. At present therefore the quality of whisky remains the same as that required in England.

9. The analysis of locally made beer has shown it to be possible to brew here a beverage of high quality, which will keep sufficiently long without the use of any preservative.

BUILDING MATERIALS.

10. During past years a large number of samples of cement have been sent for analysis, but the works on which it was used having been completed, only one sample was examined during the year. Analyses continued during a number of years have shown that Hong- kong-made cement is remarkably uniform in character, and equal in every respect to any other good brand of Portland Cement.

MINERALOGICAL.

11. A number of ores and metals have been examined. There was a heavy fall in the price of tin during the year, so that the amount handled here seems to have diminished.

12. An examination of a counterfeit twenty cent silver piece shewed it to contain in 1,000 parts:-

Silver,

Lead,...

Gold,.

Tin,

Copper,

...770.5

.4

.27

1.6

.226.3.

999.07

485

Of silver 800 parts is the usual amount in genuine coins, so that this coin being but little deficient had been somewhat of a puzzle to experienced shroffs.

13. An examination of English and Chinese cent pieces gave the following results :—

Copper, Tin,

Zinc,

Iron,

MISCELLANEOUS.

English.

Chinese.

(Kwangtung—10 cash.)

.94.82

96.39

4.16

1.27

.97

2.51

.13

.07

100.08

100.24

14. Five samples of powdered camphor were found to be mixed with salt. Enquiry seemed to point to the admixture having been performed on board ship.

15. Gas examinations.-A series of monthly examinations of the Public Gas Supply for the proportion of Carburetted Water Gas was commenced in July.

EXAMINATIONS FOR THE PUBLIC.

16. The public continue to take advantage of the Laboratory and have forwarded a great variety of samples for examination on payment.

The fees paid into the Treasury during the year amounted to $2,422.50 as against $3,099 in 1906.

SPECIAL REPORTS.

17. Special reports have been supplied on :-

A Pharmacy Bill.

The Opium Habit.

The Preservation of Books.

Naphtha.

Liebig's Meat and Malt Wine.

Methylated Spirit.

The Prepared Opium Ordinance.

18. The value of the year's work as determined from the tariff of fees (Government Notification No. 285 of 1907) is $6,160 ($7,297 in 1906). The amount does not include anything for the special reports mentioned above, and there is much beside for which nothing has been set down.

LIBRARY.

19. A few standard works of reference have been added and some new editions obtained.

STAFF.

20. Mr. A. C. FRANKLIN, F.I.C., Assistant Analyst, was on leave from February 20th.

FRANK BROWNE, Ph. Ch., F.I.C., F.C.S.

486

Annexe N.

REPORT OF THE COLONIAL VETERINARY SURGEON.

GENERAL STATISTICS.

There is a general increase in the numbers of animals passing through the Depôts and Slaughter Houses.

The total number of cattle admitted to Kennedy Town was 55,819 against 52,594 in 1906. The number rejected as unfit for slaughter was 180 against 213 in 1906. At the Hung Hom Depôt 4,180 cattle were admitted in the Dpôt a rainst 5,962 in the previous year. The rejections amounted to 8 against 21 the previous year.

DISEASES IN DEPÔTS AND SLAUGHTER HOUSES.

Nothing very noteworthy occurred. The principal diseases met with were:--

Anthrax.-seven cases were met with. There was one case in July, two in August, one in September, two in October and one in November. In each case the premises to lead were thoroughly cleansed and disinfected. So far as could be ascertained there was nothing to the supposition that one case had carried on the infection to the next.

Trypanosomiasis.-One case of this was found in a Chinese bullock.

Piroplasmosis. This was found as the cause of death in a native bullock.

Hæmorrhagic Septicemia.-This disease appeared in the Depôts at Kennedy Town in the last third of the year and occasional cases have occurred since then. It occasione! a good deal of extra work and some loss to some of the dealers. At the present time the disease has ceased.

Foot and Mouth Disease.-During the spring there were some cases at Kennedy Town and a few fresh cases appeared occasionally during the summer. In the latter part of the year the disease entirely disappeare 1. As mentioned in for ner reports this disease is always

mild type in native cattle.

of a very

Rabies. In March one case of this disease was found in a dog. The dog was an imported one and had been sent to me by the owner to treat. I suspected it to be a case of Rabies and place the dog under observation. He died showing marked symptoms of the paralytic form of the disease. The diagnosis was confirmed by experiment at the Bacterio- logical Institute. Two dogs with which the sick dog had been in contact were destroyed

and there were no more cases.

BUILDINGS.

Owing to the Hung Hom Slaughter House being in the way of the Canton-Kowloon Railway alterations have become necessary. The old Slaughter House and the Depôt are to be pulled down and to take the place of these a new Depôt and Slaughter House is being erected at Ma Tau Kok and will shortly be completed.

A new Dogs' Quarantine Station has been erected at Kennedy Town to replace the old one at Hung Hon taken over by the Canton-Kowloon Railway.

CATTLE CREMATORIUM.

The work done by the Crematorium for the year was :—

Carcases :-

Cattle,

Calves,

Sheep and Goats,..

Swine,

Condemned Meat (less rat bait),

Miscellaneous :-

Tinned Preserves,

Hams,

Coal used,...

118

22

170

272

5,740 lbs.

32 cases. 25

.330,624 lbs.

The average cost for fuel on the same basis as last year is 38.09 cents per head.

HONGKONG.

REPORT ON THE BLUE BOOK FOR 1907.

No. 18

1908

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor, June 25th, 1908.

No. 169.

HONGKONG.

GOVERNMENT House,

HONGKONG, 24th June, 1908.

MY LORD,

I have the honour to submit for Your Lordship's information the following general Report on the annual Blue Book for the year 1907.

I.-FINANCES.

The Revenue for the year, exclusive of Land Sales amounted to $6,442,529 or $179,540 less than the previous year. Land Sales amounted to $159,750 or $155,982 less than in 1906. The total revenue from all sources was therefore $6,602,280 or $432,731 less than in the previous year. All the main sources of revenue show an excess over 1906 with the exception of Licences, Rent of Government Property, Interest and Land Sales.

Light Dues, Licences, Fees of Court, Post Office Receipts, and Rent of Government Property brought in together $300,504 more than was estimated. The receipts under the remaining heads of revenue were altogether $146,249 less than were anticipated when the estimates were drawn up.

The Expenditure for the year was $5,028,553 exclusive of Public Works Extra- ordinary ; inclusive of that item it was $5,757,203 or $1,075,407 less than the total expenditure of 1906.

Deducting from the actual receipts for 1907 the total actual expenditure, there was a surplus of $845,076 on the actual working of the year.

The Right Honourable

THE EARL OF CREWE,

Ilis Majesty's Principal Secretary of State for the Colonies,

&c.,

&c.,

&c.

282

J

(a.)-GENERAL REVENUE AND Expenditure.

The following is a brief abstract of Revenue and Expenditure for the years 1906 and 1907 :-

Revenue.

1906.

1907.

Increase.

Decrease.

$

$

$

C.

$

C.

Light Dues,

wise specified,

77,722.04

80,389.00

2,666.96

Licences and Internal Revenue not other-

4,765,227.78

4,530,468.75

234,759.03

Fees of Court, &c.,

470,151.53

498,621.05

28,469.52

Post Office,

420,454.04

445,420.92

24,966.88

Rent of Government Property,

826,699.20

809,647.90

17,051.30

Interest,

8,068.42

8,068,42

Miscellaneous,

53,747.24

77,982.34

24,235.10

Water Account,

Land Sales,

315,733.21

159,750.29

155,982.92

Amount transferred from Praya Reclama-

tion Fund,....

97,208.32

97,208.32

Total,

7,035,011.78

6,602,280.25

80,338.46

513,069.99

Deduct Increase,.

80,338.46

Nett Decrease,........

.$

432,731.53

Non-effective Charges,.... General Administration, Law and Order,..............

Public Health,

Public Instruction,

Public Works, Defence,

Expenditure.

1906.

1907.

Increase.

$

C.

$

C.

333,823.31

313,658.67

Decrease.

C.

$ C.

20,164.64

1,404,287.42

1,034,695.00

369,592.42

832,919.87

847,418.62

14,498.75

659,413.66

648,951.51

10,462.15

162,973.32

184,028.19

21,054.87

2,086,655.96

1,466,857.48

617,798.48

1,352,537.14

1,259,594.00

92,943.14

Total,......

6,832,610.68

5,757,203.47

35,553.62

1,110,960.83

Deduct Increase,.......

Nett Decrease,..

35,553.62

1,075,407.21

The following Table shows the total revenue and expenditure for the five years 1903-1907 :-

Revenue, Expenditure,.

Surplus,

Deficit,

1903.

1904.

1905.

1906.

1907.

$

C.

5,238,857.88 5,396,669.48

$ e. 6,809,047.99 6,376,235.30

$5

6,918,403.85 6,951,275.26

$ c. 7,035,011.78 6,832,610.68

$

C.

6,602,280.25 5,757,203.47

432,812.69

*

202,401.10

845,076.78

157,811.60

32,871.41

From which it will be seen that both Revenue and Expenditure for the year were lower. than at any time since 1903.

283

(b.)-ASSETS AND LIABILITIES.

At the end of the year 1907, the assets of the Colony amounted to $2,650,733.99, or including arrears of revenue $2,739,712.32. The total liabilities were $1,205,995.13 so that the surplus of assets over liabilities amounted to $1,583,717.19.

(c.)-PUBLIC DEBT.

Inscribed Stock at 3% interest. £341,799. 15s. 1d. incurred for Praya Re- clamation; Central Market; Water, Drainage and Sewerage Works, &c., to be paid off on 15th April, 1943.

Inscribed Stock at 31% interest (Loan of £1,100,000 at 43% to Viceroy of Wuchang) £1,143,933. 1s. 4d. (Amount repaid by Viceroy placed to credit of Special Account £220,000, which has been advanced therefrom for Railway Construction.) Sinking fund

commences in 1911.

The amount paid into the Joint Sinking Fund with accrued interest reached £61,813. 4s. 4d.* on the 31st of December, 1907.

II-TRADE AND SHIPPING, INDUSTRIES, FISHERIES,

AGRICULTURE AND LAND.

(a.) TRADE AND SHIPPING.

The total of the Shipping entering and clearing at Ports in the Colony during the year 1907 shows an increase of 77,908 vessels of 3,281,042 tons when compared with the corresponding figures for 1906, in which year there was a decrease of 1,137,23 tons due to loss of local vessels in the Typhoon. The greater part of this is due to internal traffic-- steamships not exceeding 60 tons plying within the waters of the Colony". If local trade be eliminated, it is found that the remaining figures show the respectable increase of 3,110 vessels of 579,814 tons.

66

This increase is distributed as follows:-

British Ocean-going vessels 59 ships of 26,698 tons.

Foreign Ocean-going vessels 334 ships of 627,380 tons.

British River steamers 364 ships with a decrease in tonnage of 212,137 tons.

Foreign River steamers 239 ships of 76,075 tons.

Steamships not exceeding 60 tons 703 ships of 29,789 tons.

Junks in foreign trade, 1,411 vessels of 32,059 tons.

The actual figures of arrivals and departures are as follows :—

Of British Ocean-going...

Of Foreign Ocean-going,

FOREIGN TRADE.

Of British River steamers,........

Of Foreign River steamers,

Of Steamships not exceeding 60 tons,

Of Junks in Foreign Trade,

Total Foreign Trade,

of 3,605,941 tous.

3,610,228 3,861,570 ""

1,876 arrivals 1.880 departures,, 2,306 arrivals 2,315 departures 3,412 arrivals 3,416 departures,,

655 arrivals 655 departures

""

སྭ་

""

**

3,859,305 2,316,889 2,313,475

11

""

23

51

371,996 371,996

""

791 arrivals

27

3,015

**

790 departures 14,782 arrivals

11

3,006

};

">

1,320,892

""

14,7

23,822 arrivals

,782 departures

1,330,578

55

23,838 departures

""

11,512,303 11,520,588

and

>>

*Note. This includes the sum of £14,352. 8s. 1d. surplus of Interest paid by the Viceroy in the loan of £1,100,000.

284

LOCAL TRADE.

Of Steamships not exceeding 60 tons, 209,601 arrivals of 5,608,266 tons.

Of Junks in Local Trade,

Total Local Trade.

209,601 departures

""

20,820 arrivals

19,952 departures

*)

5,608,266 892,818 586,069

"

230,421 arrivals

>>

6,501,084

27

229,553 departures 6,494,335

>>

""

Grand Total Local and Foreign,......254,243 arrivals 18,013,387 253,391 departures,, 18,014,923

Thus in Foreign Trade :-

British Ocean-going vessels represented, Foreign Ocean-going vessels represented,.

31.4%

33.5%

British River steamers represented,

20.1%

Foreign River steamers represented,

3.2%

Steamships not exceeding 60 tons represented, Junks represented,...

0.3%

11.5%

100.0%

While in Local Trade :--

Steamships not exceeding 60 tons represented, Junks represented,

86.3%

13.7%

100.0%

7

and

The movements of the "Star" Co.'s ferry launches, of private Steam-launches and of Fishing Junks do not appear in the above figures.

Eight thousand two hundred and thirty-nine (8,239) steamers. 10 sailing ships and 791 steamships not exceeding 60 tons, in foreign trade, entered during the year, giving an average daily entry of 24.77 European constructed foreign-going ships, as compared with

22.5 in 1906.

The average tonnage of Ocean-going vessels entered has increased slightly, from 1,784.9 to 1,785.6 tons, while that of River steamers has declined from 734 to 661 tons. The British Ocean average has decreased from 1,945 to 1,921 tons. The Foreign Ocean average has increased from 1,654 to 1,670 tons. The British River steamer average has declined from 749 to 678 tons and the Foreign River steamer average has declined from 623 to 567 tons.

A comparison between the years 1906 and 1907 shows:-

For Ocean vessels under the British flag, an increase of 59 ships of 26,698 tons.

In British River steamers an increase of 364 ships with a decreased tonnage of 212,137 tons, which is mainly due to the withdrawal of the large sized steamer Hankow and the addition of the two small Macao steamers Sui Tai and Sui An.

For Foreign Ocean vessels an increase of 334 ships of 627,380 tons is shown, which is wholly due to the Japanese firms increasing their carrying trade. Under this flag, an increase of 455 ships of 976,450 tons is found, with a general falling off under other flags.

For Foreign River steamers an increase of 238 ships of 76,075 tons is shown, which can be accounted for, by vessels under the German, Chinese and Portuguese flags making more trips in 1907 than in 1906. ·

For Junks in foreign trade, an increase of 1,411 vessels of 32,059 tons.

285

A decrease in local Junk trade, 10,844 vessels of 263,768 tons which may be ascribed to the cessation of the Naval extension work and to the falling off in Conservancy boats.

The actual number of individual Ocean-going ships of European construction enter- ing during the year was 800, being 362 British and 438 Foreign.

These 800 ships aggregated 1,860,245 tons. They entered 4,182 times and gave a collective tonnage of 7,467,511 tons. Thus compared with 1906, 70 less ships of 73,514 less tons, entered 170 more times and gave a collective tonnage increased by 306,183 tons.

The 800 vessels were divided as follows between the several nationalities:—

355 British Steamers entered....

.1,867 times. Total tonnage 3,586,510 tous.

9 Austrian

1 Belgian

20 Chinese

2 Corean

>>

30

1

""

་་

106,523

*

""

9 Danish

18 Dutch

">

27

33 French

137 German

214

14

21

2,903 267,789

་་

1

39

21,298

41,122

57

27

69

**

"

142,100

*

202

3

,.

790

>>

3 Italian

12

27

99

111 Japanese

534

294,461 1,246,023

31,704 1,126,517

>>

27

""

59 Norwegian

290

29

^>

265,728

2 Portuguese

59

19,128

>>

""

19

10 Russian

13

30,912

>>

>>

31

3 Swedish

11

12,970

>>

2

20 United States,,

7 British Sailing Ships 1 United States

Total 800 Vessels entered

45

251,590

21

**

9

19,431

*

>

**

72

17

"

4,182 times. Total toumage 7.467,511 tons.

The figures relating to the Import and Export Trade of the Port, given in previous years, have, as pointed out annually, been based upon information which can only be characterised as unsatisfactory and the results as erroneus and misleading. As it is obvious that such returns have no value, they are discontinued in the form they have hitherto taken, but the aggregates of the reports received are shown, for purposes of comparison, in round numbers. These include imports of Sugar and imports and exports of Opium, of which accurate returns are rendered

The aggregates show an increase of about 360,000 tons in Imports, of about 191,000 tons in Exports and of about 518,000 tons in Transit Cargo.

The total reported Import and Transit trade of the Port for 1907 amounted to 23,819 vessels of 11,512,223 tons carrying about 8,237,000 tons of Cargo of which about 4,841,000 tons were discharged at Hongkong.

Similarly, the Export trade of the Port was represented by 23,841 vessels of 11,520,668 tons, carrying about 3,049,000 tons of Cargo, and shipping about 729,000 tons. of Bunker Coal.

During the year 1907, 16,515 vessels of European and American construction of 20,311,400 tons (net register), reported having carried about 10,842,000 tons of Cargo, as follows:-

Import Cargo,

Export Cargo,

4,366,000 tons. 2,355,000

Transit Cargo,

Bunker Coal shipped,

"}

3,396,000

"

725,000

17

10,842,000 tons.

266

One hundred and five thousand nine hundred and sixty-seven (105,967) emigrants left Hongkong for various places, during the year, of these 78,576 were carried in British ships and 27,391 in Foreign ships. The year 1907 has proved to be the record year in the history of the Colony for the numbers of emigrants shipped.

One hundred and forty-five thousand eight hundred and twenty-two (145,822) immigrants were reported as having been brought to Hongkong from the several places to which they had emigrated, either from this Colony or from Coast Ports. This includes 905 returning from South Africa. Of the total number 112,742 arrived in British ships and 33,080 in Foreign ships.

The total Revenue collected by the Harbour Department during the year was $348,300 (including $24,098 previously collected by the Registrar General's Department for Boat Licences, the issuing of which was transferred to this Department from the 1st Janaary, 1907), as against $298,106 collected in the previous year, showing au increase of $50,193 :-

1. Light Dues,

2. Licences and Internal Revenue, 3. Fees of Court and Office,

4. Miscellaneous Receipts,.

...S 80,389.00

116,122.40

151.746.30

42.40

Total,..

$348,300.10

(b.) INDUSTRIES.

During 1907 the price of refined Sugars in the East still further declined, principally as a result of the lower cost of Raw Sugar, but also owing to the determined competition of Japanese Refineries seeking to capture the local Refineries' old established Chinese connec- tions. The quantity of Sugar refined in Hongkong was however larger than for years past, and was disposed of in China and other markets, although at a loss in some instances, and on very small margins of profit in others. By the end of 1907 the strenuous competi- tion from Japanese quarters had however, exhausted itself, and it is confidently expected by those best able to form an opinion that local industries will be able to maintain and improve their position.

The demand for Yarn during 1907 was even more unsatisfactory than during the previous year, which was undoubtedly due to the failure of almost every Yarn Shop in the Colony. These failures threw a quantity of Yarn on the market which had to be disposed of at a reduction of $20/25 per bale on the contract price. Owing to the large stocks on hand it was found necessary to decrease the output of the local Cotton Mill by reducing the number of spindles running, and during the last three months of the year "short time"

was also resorted to.

Both exchange and the price of raw material have been in favour of the Rope Factory, enabling them to reduce their selling price to their customers to a lower limit than for some years. On the other hand the lower price induced a greater demand and the Factory's turnover accordingly showed a fair increase.

No further additions have been made to the plant of the Cement Company, which with a good demand for Cement has been kept continuously employed throughout the year.

The Flour Mills at Junk Bay were kept running continuously night and day, including many Sundays.

Four hundred and twenty-two (422) vessels of 1,001,001 tons and 112 launches, lighters, &c., were docked and repaired, compared with 449 vessels of 1,063,454 tons and 79 launches, lighters, &c., in 1906. One hundred and eleven (111) steam-launches and other vessels with an aggregate tonnage of 6,311 were built during the year.

{

287

A small new industry has recently been established in this Colony, i.e., that pursued by the Wai San Knitting Co., Ld., but the Company is still in its infancy.

Another recently established industry is carried on by the Imperial Brewing Co., Ld. Large quantities of their products are being exported to the various ports in China. The capacity of the plant is 2,750,000 gallons per annum.

(c.) FISHERIES.

A considerable proportion of the boat-population of Hongkong supports itself by deep- sea fishing, in which pursuit a large number of junks are engaged. The villages of Aberdeen, Stanley, Shaukiwan, and many others in the New Territories are largely dependent upon this industry for their prosperity. Fresh water fish is imported from Canton and the West

There are oyster beds of considerable value in Deep Bay.

River.

(.) FORESTRY, BOTANICAL SCIENCE AND AGRICULTURE.

In Hongkong fifty-four thousand two hundred and ninety-five (54,295) pits were dug and sown with pine seeds by the departmental staff. Thirty thousand pits were sown by contract with no result in the majority of cases. In the New Territories 111,156 pits were dug by contract and sown by the department; while 24,557 were planted by the department, and 8,000 by contract. One hundred and fifty-two shade trees were planted in streets in Kowloon, and 45 in streets in Hongkong; while 265 trees were planted along the newly formed banks of May Road and Conduit Road. Six hundred and ninety-six bamboos were planted along roads at the Peak and elsewhere, while 92 Hydrangeas and 102 Azaleas were planted out on Crown land in various parts of the Peak.

(e.) LAND GRANTS AND GENERAL VALUE OF LAnd.

The amount received from sales of Crown Land was $161,459, being $154,274 less than the receipts for the previous year. This falling off may be attributed to the continued depression of business throughout the year and, to general tightness of the money market. The principal items were for sites for a Cigar Factory in Kowloon and for a Brewery at Lai Chi Kok in the New Territories, a lot at North Point and land for an extension of the Standard Oil Company's new premises at Lai Chi Kok.

III.-LEGISLATION.

Sixteen Ordinances were passed during 1907 two of which No. 9 of 1907 and No. 10 of 1907 afford facilities to certain foreign companies for carrying on their business in the Colony in the same manner as if they had been incorporated under the law of the Colony ; whilst another No. 6 of 1907 continued the incorporation granted under the Ordinance of 1866 of the leading local banking concern for a further period of 21 years and empowered it to increase its capital subject to certain conditions.

A Life Insurance Companies Ordinance (No. 11 of 1907) was passed in accordance with Imperial precedent to secure the solvency and permanency of companies carrying on the business of Life Insurance in the Colony.

A Seditious Publications Ordinance (No. 15 of 1907) was enacted in order to prohibit the publication in the Colony of matter calculated to excite disorder, or to incite to crime, in China.

A Companies (Local Registers) Ordinance (No. 16 of 1907) was passed based on the Imperial Act of 1883 and makes provision for companies registered in the Colony but carrying on business elsewhere to keep local registers of members.

288

IV. EDUCATION.

The number of Government and Grant Schools, including Queen's College, is 79 of which 25 are Upper Grade Schools with a staff competent to give instruction in all the sub- jects of Standard VII and 54 are Lower Grade Schools under purely native management. Generally speaking, the Upper Grade Schools are taught in English, and the Lower Grade Schools are taught in the Vernacular.

The total number of pupils in average attendance at Government and Grant Schools was 5,924 against 5,496 in 1906. Of these, 2,144 were in Government and 3,780 in Grant Schools: 3,569 pupils received instruction in English, and 2,355 in the Vernacular. The proportion of boys to girls was 3,761 to 2,163.

The Revenue derived from School Fees was $49,223, $30,442 of which was received from Queen's College.

The Expenditure including that on Queen's College was $184,028, being 3.19 per cent. of the total expenditure of the Colony.

Hygiene has now become one of the regular subjects of study in all Government and Grant Schools, English and Vernacular.

The Manual on Hygiene issued to the English Schools has been translated into Chinese and is in use in all the Vernacular Grant Schools.

The annual competition for the Challenge Shield presented by Sir MATTHEW NATHAN, K.C.M.G., took place in December. Seven teams entered for the competition. There was no competition in the Advanced Course this year.

Evening Continuation Classes opened in October, 1906, and were continued until the end of May, 1907, when they closed for the Summer. Examinations were held at the end of the Session, and Certificates were granted to successful students.

In May a Committee was appointed to inquire into the subject of instruction at the Evening Classes. A Report was published in September with the result that the Classes were re-organised and, under the title of the Hongkong Technical Institute, re-opened in October.

The object of the Institute is to afford facilities for a commercial and scientific training to students generally, and to enable those who have left school to continue their studies.

The following Table shows the subjects taught at the Technical Institute, and the number of Students who entered for each subject.

Subject.

No. of Students.

Building Construction,

Field Surveying,..

Machine Drawing,

Engineering Section.

Steam,

Mechanics: Elementary,

28

21

21

23

18

Do. Advanced,

12

Mathematics: Elementary,

Do. Advanced,

9

10

English: Junior,

11

Commerce

Do. Senior, French: Junior,

Do. Senior,

25.

23

9

German: Junior,.

5

Section.

Do. Senior,

6

Shorthand: Elementary,..

35

Do. Advanced,

9

Book-keeping,

19

Science Section.

289

14

12

10

Chemistry: Theoretical, Do. Practical,

Physics Elementary,

Do. Advanced,

Total,

355

The Total Expenditure, during the First Session of the Technical Institute was $4.412; Total Receipts (Students' Fees) were $1,377.

The Classes were attended for the most part by Chinese, but a considerable number of Europeans also attended. The Students take a deep interest in their work and generally have made very great progress in their studies.

There is a well equipped Chemical Laboratory. The lecturers are for the most part officers belonging to the Public Works, Education and Medical Departments and Queen's College who receive fees for their lectures.

Visual Instruction.-Arrangements have now been made by which regular courses of lectures are delivered during the cool weather at the prominent Government and Grant Schools in the Colony illustrated by the lanterns which were purchased in 1905.

Many schools which had no opportunity of taking the course when the lanterns first arrived took the course for the first time this year and to them the sets of slides were quite new, but in the case of several schools the lectures covered the same ground as last year. It will be necessary to vary these lectures, which have again been full of interest to all con- cerned, next year by the addition of some new sets of slides and the suggestion that they should illustrate emigrant life in Canada, Australia and other parts of the Empire appears a very happy one.

V.-PUBLIC WORKS.

The principal public works in progress during the year, exclusive of the Railway, were the Tytam Tuk Waterworks (1st Section) and the Kowloon Waterworks, both of which have been described in previous reports. The former were practically completed and fair progress was made with the latter, which are now in such a forward state as to be fully capable of supplying the whole Peninsula with water. The extension of the distribution system to the important villages of Sham Shui Po, Kowloon City and Taikoktsui was completed and the substitution of mains of larger diameter for those originally laid at Kowloon Point was in progress to ensure an efficient supply of water for fire extinction purposes, the erection of large godowns being in progress there.

The New Law Courts and New Government Offices were still under construction, whilst the Public Mortuary near Yaumati and the Time Ball Tower on Blackhead's Hill, Kowloon, were completed. A new building to accommodate the Land Office at Tai Po, which had hitherto been housed in a temporary matshed structure, was in progress: a new market at Sai-Wan-Ho, near Shaukiwan, was practically completed: an extension of the Staff Quarters at the Government Civil Hospital was undertaken to afford accommodation for the nurses hitherto supported by the Nursing Institute; and a jinricksha shelter was erected close to the Star Ferry pier in Salisbury Road, Kowloon. As the construction of the Railway involved the demolition of the Slaughter House and Cattle Depôt at Hunghom. the erection of New Slaughter Houses and Depôts was begun at Ma Tau Kok. Provision is made in the new establishments for considerable development beyond present requirements. The works of reconstruction of gullies and extension of nullah training were continued, $10,000 being spent on the former and over $23,500 on the latter. A large tank for flushing a portion of the Sewerage System of the City was constructed at the junction of Water Street and Queen's Road West; the rifle ranges for the use of the Volunteer Reserve Association at the Peak and King's Park, Kowloon, were extended; a new service reservoir at West Point for supply- ing the High Levels of the City was begun; a new Cable Reserve was established at North Point and the cables were transferred to it; an obelisk in memory of the French sailors lost in the Typhoon of the 18th September, 1906, was erected; and the construction of a retaining wall behind Inland Lot 1,523 to obviate the risk of landslips which threatened to endanger the conduit conveying the water from Tytam to the City was completed.

290

The Mee Lun Lane Improvement Scheme was completed. Another section of Robinson Road, Kowloon, extending from Market Street to Waterloo Road was undertaken and the removal of the hill North of Yaumati Theatre was continued, the material being used for private reclamation work North of the Naval Coaling Depôt. The extensions of Conduit Road in Easterly and Westerly directions and of the road past Kowloon City mentioned last year were completed, and a further section of the latter road extending to its junction with the Chiu Lan Chu Road was undertaken. A new path, connecting Barker Road with May Road, as the extension of Conduit Road in an Easterly direction has been designated, was completed. The extension and reconstruction of the Albany Filter Beds was continued, fair pro- gress being made with the work.

The total amount expended on Public Works Extraordinary, exclusive of Advance Accounts and Deposits not Available, was $784,320 and on Works Annually Recurrent, $538,041. By the transfer of the item "Typhoon and Rainstorm Damage" from the former head to the latter, the first-mentioned sum has been diminished by $106,659 whilst that last-mentioned has been correspondingly increased.

Good progress was made on the British Section of the Hongkong-Canton Railway the cost of which is being defrayed by a Loan.

During the year 1907 the re-alignment consequent on the detailed survey by the Construction Engineers was completed and work commenced over the whole length. The reclamation for a site for Kowloon Station Yard was started in June. The actual heading driving in Beacon Hill Tunnel may be said to have started on January 1st, 1907. During the year two thousand one hundred feet of heading was driven from both ends and from the shafts sunk at both the North and South sides and four hundred and sixty-five feet of tunnel fully lined. About two-thirds of the compressor plant was in working order, the headings not being far enough advanced to necessitate special ventilating plant. There was difficulty experienced at first in obtaining sufficient labour for work underground but towards the end of the year on the rates being raised slightly a large number of skilled mining coolies returned from South Africa flocked to the work.

Bridge building progressed steadily all through the year as well as Earthwork and the minor tunnels, there being no very great difficulties to contend with except in one of the latter. A temporary metre gauge line was laid from the sea front at Lokloha to the North face, the shaft (278') was completed and a considerable number of houses for Staff erected. The systematic issue of quinine to all rail employés resulted in a diminution of malarial fever.

The expenditure on the work during the year amounted to $2,314,915.

:

VI.-GOVERNMENT INSTITUTIONS.

(a.) HOSPITALS.

Government Hospitals consist of the Civil Hospital to which is attached an isolated Maternity Hospital, the Victoria Hospital for Women and Children, the Kennedy Town Infectious Diseases Hospital, and the hulk "Hygeia" used mainly for the treatment of Small-pox.

The Civil Hospital contains 150 beds in 19 wards. 2,711 in-patients and 17,302 out- patients were treated during the year 1907. 243 cases of Malarial Fever were admitted as against 239 in 1906 and 267 in 1905. The Maternity Hospital contains 6 beds for Europeans and 4 for Asiatics. 87 confinements occurred during the year. The Victoria Hospital at the Peak contains 41 beds. During 1907, 211 patients were under treatment. Kennedy Town Hospital contains 26 beds. In 1907, 63 cases were treated, of which 16 were Plague. On the "Hygeia" 167 cases were treated, of which 96 were Small-pox.

(b.) LUNATIC ASYLUM.

The Asylum is under the direction of the Superintendent of the Civil Hospital. European and Chinese patients are separate, the European portion containing 8 beds in separate wards and the Chinese portion 16 beds. 222 patients of all races were treated during 1907, and there were 13 deaths.

.

291

(c.) THE TUNG WAH HOSPITAL.

This Hospital, opened in 1872, is mainly supported by the voluntary subscriptions of Chinese, but receives an annual grant of $8,000 from the Government. Only Chinese are treated in this institution which takes the place of a poor-house and hospital for Chinese sick and destitute. Various other services not appertaining to a Hospital are performed by the Institution such as the free burial of the poor, the repatriation of destitutes, and the organisation of charitable relief in emergencies. Chinese as well as European methods of treatment are employed in accordance with the wishes expressed by the patients or their friends. About half the number are now treated by Western methods and the number is steadily increasing. The Hospital is managed by a Committee of Chinese gentlemen annually elected, their appointment being submitted to the Governor for confirmation; is under the direct charge of a Chinese Resident Surgeon, paid by the Government; and is under the supervision of a Visiting Physician who is a member of the Medical Department.

VII.--INSTITUTIONS NOT SUPPORTED BY GOVERNMENT.

Among institutions recognised and encouraged but not to any considerable extent sup- ported by Government may be mentioned the Pó Leung Kuk, the College of Medicine for Chinese, and the City Hall.

The Pó Leung Kuk is an institution, incorporated in 1893, presided over by the Registrar General and an annually-elected Committee of 12 Chinese gentlemen, for the protection of women and children. The inmates of the Home receive daily instruction in elementary subjects and are allowed to earn pocket-money by needlework. During 1907, a total of 345 persons were admitted. Of these, 85 were released after enquiry, 5 were released under bond, 131 were placed in charge of their husbands, parents or relations, 1 was placed in charge of the Japanese Consul, 1 in charge of the French Consul, 22 were sent to charitable institutions in China, 16 were sent to School, Convent or Refuge, 12 were adopted and 38 were married. Thirty-four persons remained in charge of the Society at the end of the year.

The Hongkong College of Medicine was founded in 1887. The government of the College is vested in the Court, of which the Rector of the College, who has always been a Government official, is President. 102 students have been enrolled up to the end of 1907, and of these 33 have become qualified licentiates and have obtained various posts under Government and elsewhere. The institution is of great value in spreading a knowledge of Western medical science among the Chinese; and in addition to the employment of certain of the licentiates in the public service, and in the Chinese Dispensaries the senior students have frequently been made use of for various purposes during epidemics. A Government grant-in-aid of $2,500 is made to the College, to be used as honoraria to the lecturers, who are

either Government officials or Medical practitioners in local practice. Steps are at present being taken for the provision of adequate buildings for the purposes of the College, which has hitherto carried on its work in various lecture-rooms and labor- atories placed at its disposal by hospitals and other institutions in different parts of the City.

The City Hall receives an annual grant of $1,200 from Government. It contains a Reference and Circulating Library and Museum.

VIII.-CRIMINAL AND POLICE.

The total of all cases reported to the Police was 11,540 being an increase of 396 or 3.55 per cent. as compared with 1906. In the division of these cases into serious and minor offences there is a decrease in the former as compared with the previous year of 27 cases or .81 per cent.

The number of serious offences reported was 297 below the average of the quinquennial period commencing with the year 1903.

292

1906.

The number of minor offences reported shows an increase of 423 as compared with

The number of minor offences reported was 385 above the average of the quinquennial period.

The total number of persons committed to Victoria Gaol was 5,877, as compared with 5,799 in 1906, but of these only 2,460 were committed for criminal offences. against 2,575 in 1906. Of committals for non-criminal offences there were 84 less under the Prepared Opium Ordinance and 44 less for infringement of Sanitary Bye-laws.

The daily average of prisoners confined in the Gaol was 502, the average for 1906 being 518 and the highest previous average being 726 in 1904. The percentage of pri- soners to population, according to the daily average of the former and the estimated number of the latter, was .144 as compared with .161, the average percentage for the last ten years. The Prison discipline was satisfactory, the average of punishments per prisoner being 1.50, as compared with 1.21 in 1906 and 1.47 in 1905.

The remunerative labour carried on in the Gaol consists of printing, book-binding, washing, carpentry, boot-making, net-making, painting and white-washing, mat-making, tailoring, oakum-picking, etc., the profit on the work done being, $37,434 as against $34,495 in 1906.

The total strength of the Police Force for 1907 was Europeans 135, Indians 410, Chinese 503, making a total of 1,048, as compared with 1,047 in 1906 exclusive in each case of the five Superior Officers and a staff of clerks and coolies. These figures include Police paid for by the Railway, Private Firms, and other Government Departments. Of this Force the District Officer and 13 Europeans, 101 Indians and 45 Chinese were stationed in the New Territories during the year.

The force of District Watchmen to which the Government contributes $2,000 per anuum was well supported by the Chinese during the year. These watchmen patrol the streets in the Chinese quarter of the City. They are placed on Police beats and are supervised by the European Police on section patrol.

IX.-VITAL STATISTICS.

(a.) POPULATION.

The population of the Colony according to the Census taken in 1901 was 283,975 while at the Census taken in 1906 it was 301,967 exclusive of the New Territories, New Kowloon and the Army and Navy Establishments. The estimated population at the middle of the year under review was 414, 308 as follows:-

Non-Chinese Civil Community,

12,700

Chinese Population,

Hongkong, Kowloon....

192,400

71,950

Floating Population, Mercantile Marine,

43,530

2,700

310,580

Army, (average strength),

3,920

Navy, (average strength),.

2,157

6,077

New Territories (exclusive of Kowloon),.

85,011

Total,...

414,368

At the Census taken in 1906 the average strength of the Navy present in the Colony was 4,698.

293

(b.) PUBLIC HEALTH AND SANITATION.

During the year under review considerable progress has been made in rendering existing domestic buildings rat proof as a preventive of Plague, 370 ground surfaces of houses have been repaired, and 1,201 buildings have had rat-runs filled up with cement. addition 44 basements illegally inhabited have been vacated.

In

New buildings (domestic) to the number of 142 were erected during the year and in these the effect of the present Ordinance is seen in the increased amount of open space about the houses, which the law requires. Scavenging lanes which have to be provided in the rear of new houses also increase the open space about them and tend to reduce surface crowding.

During the year there were 198 deaths from Plague, compared with 842 in 1906 and

287 in 1905.

There were 1,825 deaths from Respiratory Diseases amongst the Chinese; 655 of these deaths were due to Phthisis, a percentage of 9.6 of the total deaths amongst that community.

Beri-beri caused 562 deaths-a high figure.

The deaths from Malaria were 579 as against 448 in 1906, and 287 in 1905, an increase which it is hoped will only be temporary. The average number of deaths from this disease has fallen from 526 in the quinquennium 1898 to 1902 to 383 in the quinquennium 1903- 1907. Military returns of admissions to Hospital for Malaria show a marked reduction in the incidence of this disease, as will be seen from the subjoined Table :-

Admission for Malaria: European Troops.

Year.

Strength. Admissions. Deaths.

Ratio per 1,000.

1898

1.569

595

10

379.3

1899

1,643

829

5

504.6

1900

1,484

629

t

423.8

1901

1,673

1,010

4

603.7

1902

1,381

1,523

1903

1,220

937

1904

1,426

390

1905

1,370

348

1906

1,525

480

1907

1,461

287

6210+0

1,102.8

768.0

C

273.5

254.0

314.75

196.00

(c) CLIMATE.

The average monthly temperature throughout the year was 72.2° F. as compared with 71-8° F. in 1906 and 72.0° F. during the ten preceding years. The maximum monthly temperature was attained in July, when it reached 87 1° F., and the minimum monthly tem- perature was recorded in February, when it was 55-2° F. The highest recorded temperature during the year was 91.6° F. on the 29th August, and the lowest 450° F. on the 31st January.

The total rainfall for the year was 93.54 inches as compared with an average of 77·96 inches during the past ten years. The wettest month was September, with 19:46 inches, the dryest, February, with only 0.16 inch. The greatest amount of rain which fell on any one day was 5530 inches on the 15th September, while no rain fell on 215 days of the year. The relative humidity of the atmosphere throughout the year was 77 per cent., as compared with an average of 77 per cent. during the past 10 years. The average daily amount of sunshine was 5.2 hours being 46 per cent. of the possible duration.

294

X.-POSTAL SERVICE.

The total Receipts paid into the Treasury in 1907 by the Postal Department amounted to $586,875 from which sum $140,954 was transferred to other heads of General Revenue under which fees and duties are paid in stamps, which are now sold exclusively by the Post Office, leaving the sum of $445,420 as Revenue of the Postal Service. The total expenditure amounted to $366,452, which being deducted from the Revenue of $445,420 leaves a profit of $78,968.

A direct exchange of Money Orders with Kiaochau came into force on 1st July.

A new Parcel Post arrangement with Japan came into operation on 1st October.

The Postal Convention of Rome which was signed on 26th May, 1906, came into opera- tion on 1st October, 1907; the principal changes introduced being the raising of the unit of weight of letters from oz. to 1 oz. in the case of letters posted in Hongkong and Liu Kung Tau and from oz. (14.17325 grammes) to 20 grammes at the other agencies-and the exchange of International Reply Coupons with the principal countries included in the Postal Union.

The Tientsin Agency availed of the opportunity to send direct mails to Europe overland via Harbin from 17th October.

CORPS.

XI-MILITARY FORCES AND EXPENDITURE.

(a.) REGULAR FORCES.

The following return shows the average number and composition of the Forces employed in the Colony during 1907 :-

EUROPEANS.

Officers.

INDIANS.

CHINESE.

TOTAL.

N. C. O.'s

& Men.

General Staff (Officers only), Garrison Staff (W. O., Ñ. C.

Officers only),

10

5

10

5

5

5

Royal Garrison Artillery,

27

633

660

Royal Engineers,

12

259

55

...

326

Army Service Corps,

28

32

Royal Army Medical Corps,

43

51

Army Ordnance Dept. and Corps,

30

36

Army Pay Department and Corps,

8

11

H. K. & S. Bn. R. G. A.,

11

7

435

460

...

3rd Middlesex Regiment,

16.

425

441

...

119th Infantry,

10

15

748

773

129th (D.C.O.) Baluchis,

11

14

734

759

...

Indian Subordinate Medical

1

4

Department,

5

TOTAL,

113

1,438

37

1,921

55

3,564

(b.) COLONIAL CONTRIBUTION.

The Colony contributed $1,214,340.05 (being the statutory contribution of 20 per cent. of the Revenue) towards the cost of the maintenance of the Regular Forces in the Colony including Barrack Service and Defence Works.

295

() VOLUNTEER CORPS.

The total establishment of the Corps is 443 of all ranks. The strength on the 31st December, 1907, was 289 made up as follows:-Staff 7; two Garrison Artillery Companies, 199; one Engineer Company, 45; Troop 38.

The members of the Corps are now all armed with the new M.L.E. short rifle and the latest pattern equipment.

The period for the annual Camp of Instruction was again 16 days, it was held in -October, 1907, and was well attended.

The Mounted Troop Camp was held at Fan Ling in the New Territories. The Camp took place during the Christmas Holidays. Much useful work was done.

The Hongkong Volunteer Reserve Association numbered two hundred and twenty-eight members at the close of the year, a decrease of 23 members, as compared with 1906.

Members of this Association, who must be over 35 years of age, are afforded opportunity to make themselves proficient in rifle shooting, and undertake to enrol themselves under the Volunteer Ordinance in the event of hostilities.

A small Cadet Corps was commenced in May, 1906, with boys from the Victoria British School, there are now 18 in the school and 4 others. The Cadets are instructed in squad drill and semaphore signalling. They attended Camp, and many are already very efficient signallers.

The New Headquarter Building was opened in December, 1906, and is already very popular. A well equipped Gymnasium has been installed, and classes are held regularly. The cost of the building has been entirely defrayed and no debt remains.

The expenditure on the Volunteers, which is entirely borne by the Colony, was $45,253, compared with $47,351 in 1906.

XII-GENERAL OBSERVATIONS.

The year was characterised by continued severe depression in trade.

The Colony appears to have recovered from the over-speculation indulged in in antici- pation of the conclusion of the War between Russia and Japan, and her trade has resumed a healthier condition, though the volume is still restricted. The large stocks accumúlated during the speculative period have taken a long time to work off, and fresh imports have been small; because for various reasons, one of which was caution induced by previous over- speculation, China has imported a smaller quantity of merchandise.

The assessment made in July for the year 1907-1908 showed that the rateable value for the whole Colony had decreased by 2.52%. In the Hill District, Shaukiwan, the Hongkong villages, and in Kowloon except in the important District of Yaumati, the assess- ment showed an increase ranging from 1.07% to 11.76%. But in the City of Victoria a decrease of 3.42% and in Yaumati a decrease of 5.65% were shown. In New Kowloon a remarkable increase from a rateable value of $38,930 to one of $61,835 or an increase of 58.83% was shown.

In the New Territories continued progress has been observable in the making of several roads by the private enterprise of villagers, and by the erection of new houses. The Crown Rent (Land Tax) was paid with an alacrity that was almost inconvenient; and there was a marked decrease in crime in spite of the large numbers of coolies employed on the Railway Works.

The loss and inconvenience caused by the depreciation of the subsidiary currency by the over-issue of small coins by the Mint in Canton continued.

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The Hongkong Government adopted the expedient of withdrawing from circulation all its subsidiary coin received as revenue, and succeeded in inducing the Authorities at Canton to temporarily suspend the coining of small coins at the Mint at Canton. A Committee was appointed to consider the causes of the depreciation of the subsidiary coinage of the Colony and to advise what steps could be taken to rehabilitate it. As a result of the enquiry the Government addressed strong representations through the proper channels to the Chinese Authorities both at Peking and Canton urging the suspension of the coinage of small coins at the Canton Mint until the coins had again reached par. No definite reply had been received to these representations at the close of the year.

.

The Committee appointed in 1906 to collect funds and administer relief to the sufferers by the disastrous Typhoon of 18th September, 1906, completed their labours early in the year and reported that they had collected $279,903, all but $11,000 of which was contributed by residents in the Colony, and by firms doing business with it. Of this sum $198,002 were spent in replacing or repairing 1,601 Cargo Boats, Junks and other craft lost or damaged, while $46,668 were spent on the relief of destitutes (including 205 women and children) and the recovery and burial of dead. The balance of $33,768 has been placed in the custody of the Government as a fund for relief in similar circumstances. Thirty thousand Dollars were also contributed by the Chinese Government to the Tung Wa Hospital and have been set apart by that institution to serve as a similar fund. A further sum of $106,659 was spent during the year out of Revenue in repairs to Government Works and Buildings caused by the Typhoon of 18th September, 1906. In September a very heavy rain storm caused considerable damage to the Kowloon Catchwater and to other Government Works.

The Commission which had been appointed in the previous year to enquire into the administration of the sanitary laws and the existence of corruption in the Sanitary Department issued their report in April. The Commissioners found that widespread corruption existed among the subordinate Sanitary Staff, and on the evidence furnished by the Commissioners several Sanitary Inspectors were tried by the Executive Council suspend- ed and dismissed. Much of the dissatisfaction with the administration of the Public Health Ordinance was removed by the amendment of a section dealing with open spaces in the rear of existing houses, and by a free use of the power of exemption from the provisions of the law relating to cubicles in Chinese tenement houses. A Committee was appointed to enquire into this latter subject and their recommendations with several suggestions made by the Com- missioners and others are being embodied in amendments of the Public Health Ordinance. In the result it is anticipated that thanks to the ungrudging labours of the Commissioners the Sanitary Department will in future be more honestly served while many improvements will be effected in the Sanitary Law and the method of its application.

In consequence of the high rate of exchange which reached more than 2/3 to the Dollar, the Secretary of State for the Colonies, with the concurrence of un-official members of the Legislative Council, allowed the sterling salaries of Civil Servants to be paid at the rate of 2/- to the Dollar when the rate of exchange is above that figure and at the rate of the day when it is below it.

-

During the year the claim for compensation on account of the lives lost in the Piracy of the S.S. Sainam, referred to in the Report of last year, was settled; and the Provincial Authorities have now adopted measures which it is hoped will be effective in the suppression. of piracy in the Delta and on the West River.

Mr. F. GROVE, Chief Resident Engineer, and a considerable Staff were at work on the Chinese Section of the Hongkong-Canton Railway during the year. The Survey was com- pleted and steps were taken for beginning construction early in the current year.

His Excellency CHENG YAN-TSUN succeeded His Excellency CHAU FUK as Governor- General of the Two Kwang Provinces.

Mr. H. H. J. GOMPERTZ acted as Attorney General until the arrival of Mr. W. REES DAVIES in July.

Mr. E. OSBORNE was appointed a member of the Legislative Council vice Mr. G. STEWART Who left the Colony, and Mr. H. KESWICK took the place of Mr. W. J. GRESSON absent on leave.

297

H. R. H. the Duke of CONNAUGHT accompanied by H. R. H. the Duchess of CONNAaught and the Princess PATRICIA of CONNAUGHT visited the Colony early in the

His Royal year. Highness unveiled statues of His Majesty the King-Emperor and of H. R. H. the Prince of Wales which had been presented to the Colony by Sir PAUL CHATER, C.M.G. and Mr. J. J. BELL-IRVING respectively.

Their Royal Highnesses attended an entertainment given in their honour by the Chinese community at the Ko Shing Theatre.

Sir MATTHEW NATHAN, K.C.M.G., Governor, left the Colony on the 20th April to take up the governorship of Natal, and the Colonial Secretary (Mr. F. H. MAY, C.M.G.) administered the Government until my arrival on the 29th July, 1907.

I have the honour to be,

My Lord,

Your Lordship's most obedient,

humble servant,

F. D. LUGARD, Governor, &c.

L

1

HONGKONG,

No. 23

1908

REPORT ON THE BOTANICAL AND FORESTRY DEPARTMENT, FOR THE YEAR 1907,

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor, August 6th, 1908,

GARDENS AND GROUNDS.

Botanic Gardens.-The year has been marked by several noteworthy additions to the horticulture of the Colony. The search for a variety of Wallflower suitable for our climate has, at last, been rewarded and a successful batch of this favourite annual obtained for the first time. It will doubtless become one of the stock plants of Hongkong gardens. In this land of flowering shrubs it is not often that we find anything from outside that is worth introducing into our gardens; an exception has occurred recently, however, when shrubs of Dombeya Burgessia, seed of which had been received from Durban, flowered for the first time and proved a valuable addition to our winter-flowering shrubs. Among other plants with fine Howers added to our herbaceous list during the year may be mentioned Gladiolus gandavensis and the Gladiolus-like Watsonia Ardernei. There was a magnificent show of Lycoris aurea in the Old Garden in October from bulbs planted in the grass in 1904.

The Annual Flower Show was held by the Hongkong Horticultural Society in the Old Garden on the 26th and 27th of February. It was a better exhibition and was better attended than in the previous year. The experiment of holding a Chrysanthemum Show on the 14th of November was not encouraging. The exhibits were good but the attendance most meagre. One of the features of our Flower Shows is always a collection of dwarf trees and as enquiries are often received as to the peculiar methods used in the production of these curious plants I am glad to have the opportunity of appending (Appendix A) part of the instructions issued by the Yokohama Nursery Company for their management. The weather throughout the year was exceptionally favourable for gardening. Table I shows the daily rainfall in Botanic

Gardens.

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502

Houses, walks and fences have been repaired and kept in order as usual.

The decorative resources of the Department were fully developed at the time of the visit of T.R.H. the Duke and Duchess of Connaught when 1,100 palms were used for lining the roadway and for other purposes.

I am glad to observe the appreciation shown by Horticulturists for Mr. TUTCHER'S "Notes on Gardening" not only in Hongkong but also in neighbouring ports.

Birds. With a view to encouraging the increase of singing birds which have been so charming a feature of the Botanic Gardens and surrounding portions of Hongkong of recent years the Government consulted Mr. KERSHAW of Macao, whose works on local natural history are well known, as to the desirability of keeping down the numbers of (a) Magpies, (b) Bromley Kites, (c) Civet cats in the Island, and secondly of the possibility of importing more singing birds. He replied as follows:-.

"(A.) Magpies are no doubt too numerous here, and destroy eggs and nestlings, though they do a certain amount of good by scavenging. Would suggest shooting, not poison. Destroying Magpies' eggs and fledglings from February to May (a few begin laying in January) inclusive would be effective, though of course there will be some amount of immigration from the mainland.

(B.) This Kite (Milvus melanotes), called "Bromley Kite" in Hongkong, rarely if ever kills adult birds and probably very seldom destroys nestlings. Their ordinary food is snakes, lizards, rats and mice (I have often taken freshly killed rats from stomachs of these kites), dead fish and other offal. Small birds take no notice of a kite settling on the tree they are in, but if a hawk comes anywhere near they drop like stones to the undergrowth. The kite here is decidedly useful.

C.) It seems a pity to exterminate an indigenous mammal like the Civet. In a

small island like Hongkong, this would soon be done if a reward was offered for the carcase. They destroy some birds, no doubt, but chiefly feed (as observed in comment) on rats, mice and other small mammals. If they are destroyed, poaching domestic cats should certainly be killed, as they are worse than any other animal as regards destruction of small birds and game chicks; and nearly all cats in houses on outskirts of wood are poachers. But in any case I would deprecate the use of poison.

No doubt the Hwamei (Trochalopterum canorum) is increasing in Hong- kong, as his singing is most noticeable. This bird commands a good price with Chinese as a cagebird, and its increase might perhaps be best maintained by stopping the taking of the nestlings."

With reference to singing birds he wrote:-

"Singing birds from South and West China and from India should do well in Hongkong. I have no books on Indian birds by me, but you may have Oates', Blandford's or Jerdon's in the Club Library. At Hongkong I think Indian birds could be got from Calcutta, but expect it would be troublesome to get Chinese birds, unless the birdshop people in Hongkong would import them. The Hwamei is native here, and as long as it has enough undergrowth (for it is very shy and seldom seen even when singing loudly quite close to one) and the nests are not taken, it should increase. It sings delightfully and practically all the year round, but you probably know it well as a cagebird with Chinese. Also the little black and white Copsychus saularis or Magpie- Robin, Pexing-Robin or China Robin, as it is variously termed. In the spring it sings beautifully and is common and native; also useful in keeping down grasshoppers, snails, etc., as also is the Hame. Most of the other birds here do not shine as songsters, though the Whistling Thrush (Myiophoneus) sings sweetly in breeding season. Many Flycatchers stay a short time in Hong- kong on migration in spring and autumn, which sing well, but they are silent during their stay here.

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-503

As you know, there are several very beautiful birds native to Hongkong which ought to be preserved for beauty alone, in fact in my humble opinion there are no birds in Hongkong at present which might not be encouraged, except Magpies. Even the Sparrow is very useful when there is an afternoon or evening swarm of winged Termites.

There is a native Lark here which sings nicely soaring much like the English Skylark, but I doubt if you have any large grassy plain on Hongkong Island. No doubt it occurs in Kowloon, or could be established there.'

.. The chief donors of animals were :---

Mr. ALVES and Mr. CHAN FOON NG.

The chief donors of plants and seeds were:-

;

ANDERSON, Mr. O. M.; Arnold Arboretum, Boston, U.S.A.; BALD, Messrs. C., Lebong Tea Co., Tukvar Division, Dajeeling; BARTON. Mr. J.; Botanical De- partment, Trinidad; BOWLE-EVANS, Dr. G., N.W. Province, India; BREWIN, Hon. Mr. A. W.; Mrs. BREWIN; BROWN, THOS. W., La Société D'Hort. Commercial, Cairo; Bureau of Agriculture, Manila; Mr. CHAO LEEP CHEE; Commissioner of Agriculture and Forestry, Hawaii; DEALY, Mr. T. K.; Deputy Conservator of Forests, Jannsar Division, India; DoMBROWSKI, Rev. MARCUS A.; ELIOT, Mr. R. H., Norwood, Ceylon; GAMMIE, Mr. G. A. HANBURY, Sir T., Ventimiglia, Italy; Captain HODGINS; Mrs. HODGINS; HOUGHS, Mr. DAVID, Hawaii; HOWELL, Mr. F.; Imperial Department of Agriculture, W.I.; JACK, Mr. W. C.; Lroxs, Mr. WM. S., Manila; Mrs. RowE; Royal Botanic Gardens of Calcutta, Ceylon, Durban, Kew, Singapore, Sydney; SHEWAN, Mr. R.; SIEMSSEN, Mr. G., Foochow; STEPHENS, Mr. M. J. D.; Mrs. STEPHENS; TAYLOR, Captain BASIL; VORETZSCH. Dr. E. A.; WALLACE, Mr. W. H., Amoy; WATSON, Mr. A. W. A., S.S.; and WILLIS, Mr. J. C.

Mountain Lodge Grounds.-Some planting and the annual repairs were carried out during the year.

Protestant Cemetery.-The gardening in the Cemetery has been particularly successful during the year. The deer-fence referred to in my last report has proved at any rate par- tially successful in keeping wild deer away from the flower beds and the recent addition of a Chinese deer-hound to the Cemetery gardening staff will probably put an end to their in- roads altogether.

Blake Garden The Garden is more and more appreciated by the Chinese but some damage has been done by youngsters running about sinong the shrubs. The stone walks and steps have all been consolidated with comment.

Peak Garden.—This has been open now for 18 months and is beginning to be frequent- ed by children and nurses. The shade trees are making slow progress.

Sokunpo Nursery.-A barbed wire fence has been erected round part of this nursery for the double purpose of keeping out the wild deer and preventing the petty but too fre- quent theft of vegetables that have occurred there.

Albany Nursery. This new nursery has been protected by a neat iron fence down the side bordered by Garden Road. It is gradually being planted with shrubs and flowering plants.

year.

West End Park. This

Trouble has again been rubbish along the roadsides. the l'olice for some time past. in Table II.

so-called park has been kept in a creditable condition during the experienced in preventing contractors from shooting building Similarly, the Glenealy rockeries have given much trouble to Other land under the charge of the department is detailed

502 (2)

504

HERBARIUM.

There has been no large collection made by the department during 1907 but the work was continued upon the 1905 Fokien Collection. A large number of specimens from this and other collections, whose identification could not be completed in Hongkong, was taken to England by the Superintendent and worked out in the Herbarium of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew. More than 40 of the Fokien specimens proved to be new to science. The collection is an important contribution to the knowledge of the Chinese Flora and the enter- prise of the Hongkong Government in sending the expedition to Central Fokien will be much appreciated by botanists. Among the other novelties described and named at Kew were two wild Plumns recently collected in this neighbourhood Prunus marginata, Dunn, and Prunus fordiana, Dunn. Two new Hongkong trees Beilschmeidia Fordii, Dunn, collected 25 years ago by Mr. FORD in Wongneichong Village and Eleamus Tutcheri, Dunn, collected near Cape D'Aguilar by Mr. TurCHER; a new Saussurea from the Superintendent's Korean collection mentioned in last year's Report and a beautiful Loxostigma collected many years ago by Mr. FORD on the N.W. River. All these are described in the Journal of Botany 1907, pp. 402-4. Another plant of the same family as the last named, collected by Dr. A. HENRY iu Yunnan, was described in the Kew Balletin (1908 p. 19) as Oreocharis aurea, Dunn. The publication of the above species, in addition to the usual routine comprised the Herbarium work of the year. Descriptions and illustrations of several plants from the Hongkong Herbarium have also been published by Mr. HEMSLEY, Keeper of the Kew Herba- rium. in Hooker's Icones Plantarum Vol. IX. pt. II, viz., Sycopsis Putcheri, Hemsl., from near Mountain Lodge, Hongkong, and the following four from Fokien: Distylium myricoides, Hemsl., Dysfilium strictum, Hemsl., Sycopsis Dunnii, Hemsl., Altingia gracilipes, Hemsl.

Two more boxes of specimens of the economic products of South China were despatched to the Imperial Institute in April and were received in good condition. The Superintendent had the pleasure of calling upon Prof. DUNSTAN, the Director of that establishment, during the summer and of seeing the collections partially arranged in the Hongkong Court. This forms one of the series of exhibition galleries devoted to the smaller colonies. It is a spacious, well lighted room and, although not yet completely arranged, promises to provide a particularly attractive feature in the Colonial collections. On the walls are excellent maps and photographs of Hongkong while the various economic and other specimens including fruits, oils, spices, bamboo-ware, fabrics, etc., are arranged in show cases at the sides and down the centre of the room.

The trouble taken by the Government of Hongkong and the various private firms that have contributed exhibits is duly appreciated by the Staff of the Institute. The capital exhibition now provided should do much to interest visitors in Hongkong matters as well as to advertise the commercial productions of our Colony.

During the year all the Balsam specimens in our Herbarium were sent, at his request, to Sir JOSEPH HOOKER for examination. They were received back before the end of the year, with determination attached. The careful drawings and dissections which had been made on most of the sheets gave welcome evidence of that veteran botanist's continued vig- Ten out of the seventeen species submitted proved to be new, their names are however withheld pending publication. The named specimens form a valuable addition to the Colo-

our.

nial Herbarium.

Mr. TUTCHER's list of additions to the Flora of Hongkong and the New Territories forms Appendix B.

It is not often that the botanical work of residents in the Colony outside of this depart- ment finds mention in this report. It is with special pleasure, therefore, that I put on re- cord the careful work which has been accomplished during the year by Mrs. L. GIBBS and the numerous additions made by her to the Herbarium as mentioned in Appendix B.

The chief donors of Herbarium Specimens were :--

Fleet Surgeon C. G. MATTHEW, R.N.; Mrs. GIBBS; Jardin Imperial de Botanique,

St. Petersburg; MERRILL, Mr. E.

BOTANICAL INVESTIGATION.

The only collecting done from the department was by a Chinese collector who was kind- ly taken by Fleet Surgeon C. G. MATTHEW, R.N., on his expedition to Lienchow.

!

1

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505

FORESTRY.

A commencement was made during the year with a scheme for taking over the large forestry operations previously done by contract. This has been necessitated by the increasing difficulty of getting the work efficiently done by contractors. As a result it has frequently resulted that the short planting season was occupied by vain efforts to get the work through, the plantations were poor and irregular and the year's forestry programme spoiled.

The forestry year (1906/7) under review was a transition year, the part of the forestry programme carried out by contractors largely failed while that done by the department was most satisfactory. The programine included the continuation of the belt on the north of the harbour from the South Tunnel Face near Kowloon Tsai as far as the Rifle Butts (9 B 1-20), the extension of the catchment plantings at Tytam and Pokfulam reservoir catchments (4 G 10, 11, 15-21 and 7A 1-5). As the crop of pine seedlings grown by contract at Little Hong- kong failed, nearly the whole of the above area was sown with pine seeds in pits, 8.000 of the pine seedlings saved being planted by the department on the bare sandy parts of the Kowloon Tsai plantations, while the remainder were used by the contractor for planting at Tytam and Kowloon. Repairing of the failures of last season was carried out by foresters at Cheung Sha Wan, Pokfulam, and Aberdeen.

Details of planting will be found in Tables III-VI.

Resumption of existing Plantations.-In anticipation of the extension of the harbour belt towards Lycemun in 1908-9 the villagers of Ngau Chi Wan and Kak Hang were given gratuities representing their respective interests in the existing pine plantations on and near Hammer Hill, which would be encompassed by the extension of Government planting.

All plantations in the catchment of the new Kowloon Reservoir were resumed for the same reason and the villagers of Shek Li Pui treated similarly.

East Point Nursery.-This is, as stated in my last report, the first pine tree nursery made by the department. In previous years seedlings have been raised by contract an I sold to the Government at about $9.50 per 1,000. The site chosen was a flat marshy piece of ground at the south of Victoria School, East Point, and the hillside adjoining. The flat ground was drained, the hillside terraced and the whole laid out in about 500 numbered rectangular beds with service paths between. The whole was dug over and sown before Feb- ruary.

Nga Iu Tau Nursery.—The second pine tree nursery-it is necessary to have two, as they are sown alternately each being in use for two seasons was formed at the above village near Diamond Hill.

As this is the neighbourhood of the planting authorized for 1907-9 a large inatshed was erected for the accommodation of the staff of diggers and planters who would be engaged on the work as well as for the nursery staff. The land had to be rented from the villagers but the expenditure on rent was amply compensated by the saving of labour in digging and levelling.

Demarcation.-Correct forestry maps have now been prepared on the 8" survey sheets for the part of the authorized belt from Lai Chi Kok to Customs Pass, riz., No. 9 Forest, Blocks A & B and the planting sections marked on the ground and on the maps. These blocks contain together 786 acres and are divided into 74 sections averaging about 10 acres each. The section numbers are plainly painted in white on the rocks at the boundaries of

the sections thus and have already proved of value in enabling foresters and forest

9B 2-3

guards to give an accurate reference to the localities r ferred to in their reports.

In Hongkong accurate maps being unobtainable for the purpose of forestry demarcation recourse has been had to photography. The blocks and planting sections in part of Tytam and Pokfulam Forests are now shown on 2 series of photographs, viz., 4 (Tytam) Č1-5, G 1-30, H 1-16, I 1-9; 7 (Pokfulam) A 1-5, B 6-8; the marking of these on the ground is not yet completed.

'+

3

}

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506

Fire Barriers.-New fire barriers 8,476 feet long were made to protect the new planta- tions in 9 A & B while all the old ones were cleaned a total length of 176,323 feet. This work was done for the first time by our own men at a cost slightly less than the contract price.

Protection. The most serious case of unauthorized cutting occurred near Pokfulam where the occupier of Farm Lot 29 felled several hundred pine trees on his lot although they are expressly reserved to the Government in the lease. The matter was settled after Police Court proceedings by the payment of $1,000 to the Crown and forfeiture of the felled timber.

The prevention of grass cutting in plantations, or on ground where natural regeneration was expected, gave rise to several petitions from grass cutters during the year.

In propor- tion as the population of the Island has increased so has the demand for cut grass which is necessary for certain purposes such as the breaming of junks and the feeding of cattle. The best grass grows naturally on the upper parts of the hills, the lower parts especially at Kow- loon having been to a large extent denuded by over-cutting. Now however that the pine- plantations established by the Government have grown up, the grass is again growing among them and the Chinese grass cutters go there to get it and incidentally gather a great deal of pine fuel besides, cutting down moreover the pine tree seedlings concealed in the grass. This abuse has become more and more prevalent until it has been found necessary to exclude the grass cutters altogether from the plantations. The majority have now become accustomed to cut their grass from the uplands as before, but these petitions show that a certain amount of dissatisfaction still remains. In all cases in which I have been able to meet the petitioners. the matter has been explained and the most convenient cutting ground for their needs point- ed out to them.

in

Notices were posted in the Hongkong villages notifying that the cutting of grass plantations was prohibited, and in the case of Little Hongkong village a permit was issued to cut grass on certain hilltops at a convenient distance from the village.

Preservation of Natural Forest.-It is evident to the most casual observer that primeval · forest has almost ceased to exist in this part of China. There can be little doubt that our valleys and probably the greater part of our mountains were once plentifully clothed with luxuriant virgin forest. Patches of such forest can still be seen at Little Hongkong, in this island and in the more inaccessible parts of the New Territories. The Committee appointed to report on the forestry possibilities of the New Territories in 1904 recommended that certain of these areas should be reserved and protected by Government. During 1905 the areas of natural forest in the greater part of the New Territories were carefully examined and mapped by this department. The total extent of that

The total extent of that mapped is about 4,000 acres. The creation of Government Forestry reserves would however probably involve consider- able expenditure in the acquisition of the trees, and in watching and preserving the reserves. Hitherto funds have not been available to meet this expenditure.

Felling. Authority had been obtained in 1906 to fell trees on the south slopes of Mount Kellet on the shelterwood strip system but the tenders for the purchase of standing pine trees received from timber contractors were so low that no felling was commenced until the beginning of 1907 and then only as an experiment with a staff of men felling, splitting and carrying under the direct control of the department. This was practically a test of the genuineness of the low tenders above mentioned. With the greatest care and economy how- ever it was not possible to obtain a profit on the wood sales in this way, and before the end of the year a return had been made to the former system. The failure of this experiment was due partly to the low price obtainable for split firewood delivered in Hongkong. The heaviest felling during the year was at Kai Lung Wan where the opening of a new Chinese Cemetery of 53 acres necessitated the clearing of some 10,000 pine and other trees.

نه

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507

Planting for shade or ornament outside the Gardens.

Celtis sinensis,.

"

22

Heteropanax fragrans,

Aleurites triloba,.

""

Pine tree,

""

Hydrangea hortensis,

37

Rhododendron indicum, Bambusa tuldoides,.

19

""

";

55 Des Vœux Road, Hongkong. 22 Conduit Road,

91 Gascoigne Road, Kowloon. 37 Robinson Road,

38 Conduit Road,

252 Conduit Road, 33 Barker Road, 45 Mountain Lodge, 51 Mountain Lodge, 337 Conduit Road,

Hongkong.

131 Plantation Road, 105 Mount Kellet Road,

67 Barker Road, 56 Mount Gough Road,

57

77

""

>>

"}

""

27

Total, 1,320

The planting of flowering shrubs and trees on Crown Land has not proved a success in the past, in consequence of the destruction of a large proportion by coolies for the sale of their flowers. It is hoped, with the improved Forest Guard service, that this may be pre- vented and the planting resumed on a larger scale.

Oaks. An experiment was made with a small number of plants of Quercus fissa raised from seeds in pots and planted out in spring like pine seedlings on open ground in Pokfulam valley. They have proved quite unsuitable for this use.

Nanmu.-To the official request addressed as stated in my last Annual Report to British Consuls and others in China for seeds of the Chinese Coffin Wood or Nanmu tree, Mr. Fox, Acting Consul General at Chengtu, has most courteously responded by having sixteen pounds of seeds collected and sent to Hongkong. The seeds were enclosed in eight tins. Two were opened but I regret to say that, though carefully packed, and free from external injury, the whole contents were in a very unpromising condition, whether from the gathering having been premature or from what other cause it is difficult to say. The unopened tins were for- warded at once to South Africa on the chance of a few living seeds being found. The con- tents of the two that were opened were sown but all failed to germinate.

FORESTRY LICENCES.

The total number of forestry lots in the New Territories is 465, with an acreage of 52,094 acres and bringing in revenue of $4,805.80.

$ .

924.73

Private Forestry Licences, 38 Village Forestry Licences, 399........

Acres. 9.233.30

38,810-70

3,881.07

Private Forestry Licence, 1 Village Forestry Licences, 27

20.00

Unrenewed.

4,030·00

52,094.00

$4,805.80

An additional area of 9,213.5 acres came under the licensing system during the year while 4,050 acres formerly licensed were omitted for various reasons from this year's area. Out of 27 Village Licences unrenewed, 10 of the licensed areas proved to be bare of trees and therefore inadmissible to the scheme, 2 are applying for alteration of area, the remain- ing 15 being now under investigation.

:

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In Government Notification 222 of 1907 the Forestry Licence Rules were published under the New Territories Ordinances. The rule prohibiting sale of timber from Village Licence was afterwards repealed in Government Notification 262 of 1907. As amended they are reprinted in Appendix C.

It is satisfactory to hear from Government Officers whose work takes them to the various- parts of the Territories that a general improvement in the state of the Chinese Pine Plant- ations has been observable during the last few years. This improvement is coincident with the introduction of the Forestry Licence system.

AGRICULTURAL AND OTHER INDUSTRIES.

Cotton. After three years' trials under various conditions and with seeds from different countries it has to be admitted that cotton in this climate is a failure, and I hope it will be the last time that this department is called upon to try to introduce crops of this kind among the Chinese. The ground capable of growing crops is very scarce in the New Territories and is already almost completely occupied with food crops necessary for the villages. It is prob- ably now generally understood that only crops suitable to very poor soil or crops of excep- tionally high value are worth experiment here with a view to introduction into the agriculture of the New Territories.

Sugar.-During the last 5 years this department has imported and cultivated several kinds of improved varieties of sugar cane and has distributed them to the farmers in the New Territories. Although they have proved in the few cases of which details could be obtained to yield much superior crops to those usually grown, there has been a curious failure on the part of the Chinese to understand the advantage of substituting them, or perhaps a lack of energy to grasp the opportunity offered. So far as I am aware all the stock issued by this department has been allowed to die out, with the exception of that grown on the Castle Peak Farm.

Camphor. Attention is being turned in many tropical countries to the possible profits of camphor tree cultivation. Large quantities of seeds have been collected and supplied to British Colonics as well as to foreign merchants during the

year.

Castle Peak Estate.-Mr. Kim the manager of this farm tells me that the young fruit trees imported and laid down at various time since the commencement of his business are doing particularly well.

Wood Oil.—It was formerly thought that Aleurites cordata was the sole source of Chinese Wood Oil. Mr. HEMSLEY from an examination of the evidence available at Kew arrived at the contrary conclusion that not only was it not cultivated in China, but that it did not occur there at all. It was therefore interesting, as mentioned in my last report, to record its cultivation at Yenping in Fokien Province and another locality can now be added as Mr. KERSHAW has brought specimens from the hills behind the Tin Wa Temple near How Lik, 18 miles above Sam Shui.

Fodder.-- A quantity of an Australian fodder grass, supposed to have good drought resisting powers was introduced and sown in the Government Nursery at Sookanpo in 1906. It grew well and was tried in February of this year by the Colonial Veterinary Surgeon on bullocks at Kennedy Town. Although a good deal withered the cattle ate it greedily and Mr. GIBSON asked for some plants to try side by side with Guinea Grass the usual winter fodder in use here. Plants were sent and I now have a report that it has grown well though it is not comparable either in bulk or quickness of increase with Guinea Grass. Further trials however will be made.

LIBRARY.

The following periodicals and other works have been purchased:-

Acta Horti Petropolitani, II, VI & VIII.

A Text Book of Fungi, G. Massie.

Botanical Magazine, 1907.

Botanisches Centralblatt, 1907.

A

502 (7)

509

Bulletin de l'Herbier Boissier, 1902, 1903, 1904, 1905 & 1906.

Bulletin de la Société Botanique de France, Tome IV, 1904.

Bulletin of the Imperial Institute, Vol. IV, No. 4, 1906, & Vol. V, No. 1. 1907.

Butterflies of Hongkong and South China, Kershaw, Part VI.

Gardeners' Chronicle, 1907.

Journal of Botany, 1907.

Journal of the Royal Geographical Society, 1907.

Leaflets on Philippine Botany, Elmer, 1907.

Memoires de L'Academie de St. Petersburg, 7 Series, X, XI & XVI.

Pflanzenreich, Engler.-Myrsinacea and Primulaceæ.

Philippine Journal of Science, 1907.

Periodicals were presented by the following establishments :—

Agricultural Departments of Cape of Good Hope, Gold Coast, Kingston, Monte-

video, Transvaal, United States, Victoria, West Indies, Western Australia. Botanic Gardens of British Guiana, Bruxelles, Calcutta, Ceylon, Gold Coast, Haarlem, Kew, Manila, Missourie, Mysore, Natal, Port Rico, Rio de Janeiro, Saharanpur, Straits Settlements, Sydney, Trinidad.

Forestry Departments of Ajmer-meswara, Andamans, Assam, Bengal, Burma,

Central Provinces, Coorg, Punjab and United Provinces.

The following works were also presented :-

A Critical Revision of the genus Eucalyptus, Parts VIII & IX, J. H. MAIDEN, by

the Author.

A Note on Gentiana coronata, Royle, I. H. BURKILL, by the Author.

A Note on Swertia tongluensis and on a new variety of Swertia purpuracens, I. H.

BURKILL, by the Author.

Dictionary of German and English Forest-Terms by Mr. HERR HASS.

Schlich's Manual of Forestry, Vol. VI, by Colonial Office.

Agricultural Ledger No. 4, by the Government of India.

Journal of the Board of Agriculture, by the President.

Museum Report of the London Pharmaceutical Society, E. M. HOLMES, by the

Author.

New Species of Formosan Plants, B. HAYATA, by the Author.

Notes on the Pollination of Flowers in India, Note No. 4 for Cotton, I. H. BURKILL,

by the Author.

Supplements to the Enumeratio Plantarum Formosanum, B. HAYATA, by the Author. Tylostomeæ of U.S.A., C. G. LLOYD, by the Author.

REVENUE.

The details of revenue are given in Table IX.

STAFF.

As it was not possible to secure the services of a trained Indian Forester whose salary at the rate of 2nd Grade clerkship had been deducted from the New Territories Forestry Vote in the Estimates for 1907, steps were taken to fill the post as efficiently as possible for the time being by the appointment of a Chinese 4th Grade Head Forester, while the Captain Superintendent of Police kindly allowed certain Police Officers to render occasional service in the way of inspections of outlying forestry depôts in return for small allowances.

The Superintendent was absent on leave on urgent private affairs from April 30th until November 25th, the Assistant Superintendent acting as Superintendent during that period.

502 (8)

516

*

My attention has been drawn to the fact that the honour conferred on Mr. CHARLES FORD, the last head of this department when he was made a Companion of the Imperial

Service Order in 1904 has not been mentioned before in this series of Annual Reports. I' hasten to repair the omission. No one can appreciate more than his successor how well that distinction was merited.

8th May, 1908.

Date.

S. T. DUNN,

Superintendent, Botanical and Forestry Department.

Table I.

RAINFALL, BOTANIC GARDENS.

1907.

Jan. Feb. Mar. April. May. June. July. Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec.

Inches. Inches. Inches. Inches. Inches. Inches. Inches. Inches. Inches. Inches. Inches. Inches.

1,

2,

3.

4,

5,

6,

7.

:

8,

9.

.01 .06 .80

10,

.13

:

11, 12,

13,

:

14,

15,

16.

.57

.03

.04

.54

.02

17,

.01 .49 .69 .21

.02 .38 .12 .08

18,

:

19.

20,

21,

22,

23.

24,

25.

26,

27.

28,

29 30 31

3.73

: : : : : : : : :

.03

.01 3.19

.01

1.83

.35

.14

.04 1.72

5.79

.01 .16 .05

2.80

:

.01

.56

1.21

1.79

...

.62

.01

.20

:::, སཾདྡྷི། :::

1.17

.64

.06

1.38

3.15 .40

.01 3.81 1.63

3.58

.01

.96 .05 .86

...

.73

.70

.14

7.03

.23

.74

9.17

2.21

.73

.35

.75

.01

.01

1.08

.46

.09

2.14

.12

2.03 .66 .83

.03

.08

.05

.01

.16

.15

.13 3.16

.02

.01

.08

.12

.39

.08

.01

.90

1.22

.04

.01 .39

...

.67

.01 .46

.18

.28

.02

2.93

.01

.20

.7.1

.54

.04

កុំ : : : : : :

.21

.55

...

.15

.05

.04

.17

.06

.07

.07

.29 1.58

.04

.03

1.46

.10

.15

2.29 .02

.02

.14

.36

.43

1.18

.32

:

.24

.03

.07

.35

.03

.02 .90 .66

.02 3.12

2.81 .08

...

..04

Total,

4.86

.20 .39 12.94 11.79 17.05

7.35 17.40 24.23 12.31

1.41 1.76

502 (9)

511

Table II.

LAND UNDER COMPLETE OR PARTIAL MANAGEMENT OF

BOTANICAL AND FORESTRY DEPARTMENT.

1. Botanic.Gardens.

2. Blake Garden.

3. Peak Garden.

4. King's Park, Kowloon.

5. West End Park.

6. Government House Grounds.

7. Mountain Lodge Grounds.

8. Government Offices Grounds.

9. Colonial Cemetery.

10. Sookunpo Government Nursery.

11. Kang Hau Forest Nursery.

12. Sookunpo Bamboo Nursery.

13. North Point Tree Nursery.

14. Loan Plant Compound, Garden Road.

15. Albany Nursery.

16. Rockery in Garden Road.

17.

Do. (upper) in Albert Road.

18. Do.

(lower) do.

19. Do. (upper) in Peak Road.

}

do.

(upper) at St. Joseph's Church.

· do.

in Glenealy Road, below Robinson Road.

20. Do.

(lower)

21. Do.

22.

Do.

(lower)

23.

Do.

24.

Do.

do.

below first bend.

25.

Do.

do.

below second bend.

26.

Do.

do.

below third bend.

27.

Do.

do.

below Cathedral.

28. Do.

do.

lower part W.

29. Do.

do.

do.

E.

30. Do. at junction of Seymour and Robinson Roads.

31. Plot over Garden tank at junction of Bowen and Garden Roads.

-

502 (10)

512

32. Plot above Garden Cottages.

33. Do. in front of St. Joseph's Church, Garden Road.

34. Bank in Bridges St.

35. Do. opposite main entrance to Government House Grounds.

36. Do. between Garden Road and Albert Road.

37. Do. between Upper and Lower Albert Roads.

38.

39.

Do. south of Lower Albert Road, opposite Government Offices.

Do. south of Volunteer Parade Ground.

40. Do. Lower Albert Road, opposite Volunteer Parade Ground.

41. Do. between Albany Road and Upper Albert Road.

42.

Do. on north boundary of New Garden, Caine Road.

43. Do. between Wyndham Street and Lower Albert Road.

44. Do. on north side of Government House Grounds.

45.

Do. between Lower Albert Road and Ice House Street.

46. Do. on south side of Battery Path.

17 .

Do. on north side of Battery Path.

48. Do. cast of Garden Road Nullah, between Kennedy Road and Macdonnell Road.

49.

Do. cast of Garden Road Nullah, between Macdonnell Road and Bowen Road.

50. Do. above Bowen Road at junction of Bowen and Garden Roads.

51. Do. west of Glenealy Nullah below Robinson Road Bridge.

52. Do. west of Garden Road Nullah between Garden Cottage and Bowen Road Bridge.

53.

Do. between Tramway and Garden Road Nullah, below Kennedy Road.

54. Rockery in Robinson Road, S.W. of West End Park.

55. Little Hongkong Pine-tree Nursery.

56. East Point Pine-tree Nursery.

57. Government Forestry Store, Kennedy Road.

58. Nga Iu Tau Pine-tree Nursery.

i

Date.

502 (11)

513

Table III.

TREES PLANTED IN 1907.

Place.

Tree.

Number.

March,

April,

Des Voeux Road,

Celtis,.

45

Robinson Road, Kowloon,

Aleurites,

37

Conduit Road,

Pine,

252

Aleurites,

38

>>

""

Celtis...

22

27

Bamboo,

338

Plantation Road, Peak,

Bamboo,

117

""

Sharp's Hospital, Peak,

Bamboo,

105

May,

Tytam,

Barker Road, Peak,.....

""

>>

Pine,..

11.000

Hydrangea,

33

Bamboo,

67

.

Gascoigne Road, Yaumati, Mountain Lodge,

Hetropanax,

91

Hydrangea,

45

"J

Rhododendron,

51

12

11

Bamboo,

1

""

""

""

Peak,

Bamboo,

56

"2

June,

Harbour Belt,.

Pine,

45,607

Date.

Table IV.

Total,.

57.905

SITES SOWN WITH PINE SEEDS IN 1907.

Place.

Number.

February, March,

Pokfulam, Tytam,

41,090

15,426

11

Cheung Sha Wan,

110,774

Aberdeen,

10.690

""

Kowloon Tsai,

381

>>

Total,

178,361

No. FOREST DIVISION.

3

4

1 2 30 HIRON∞ a

Victoria, Wongneicheong, Shaukiwan,.. Tytam,

Stanley, Aberdeen,

7 Pokfulam,

502 (12)

514

Table V.

BLOCKS PLANTED WITH PINE IN 1907.

BLOCKS.

Number.

A

B

C

D

E

F

G

11,000

11,000

8

Yaumati, Harbour Belt,

45,607

..

45,607

Total trees,

56,607

Table VI.

BLOCKS SOWN WITH SEEDS IN SITES, 1907.

No.

FOREST.

A

B

འའ

1 Victoria, 2 Wongneicheong,

3 Shaukiwan,

4 Tytam,

5 Stanley, 6 Aberdeen, 7 Pokfulam,

8 Yaumati,

9

Harbour Belt,

10 K'loon Reservoir,

41,090

!

110,774

BLOCKS.

Total

sites.

C

D

E

F

G

H

...

...

...

15,426

15,426

41,090

110,774

Total sites,

167,290

502 (13)

515

Table VII.

DISTRIBUTION OF FORESTRY OFFENCES IN 1907.

No.

FOREST.

A

B

C

تح

14

BLOCKS.

TOTAL.

D

E

F

G

09 10

2

1

17

3

21

10

17

1 Victoria.

2 Wongneicheong,

3 Shaukiwan,

4 Tytam,

5 Stanley,

6 Aberdeen,.

7 Pokfulam,

8 Yaumati,

1

6

Harbour Belt,

3

10

Kowloon Reservoir...

Table VIII.

B3

15

11

12

Total, ....

106

POLICE COURT RESULTS, IN 1907.

Punishment.

5-7 days imprisonment,

8-14 days imprisonment,

15-31 days imprisonment,

50 cents to $1 fine,

$2 fiue,

$3 fine,

$4 to $5 fine,

$10 to $25 fine,

Discharged,..

Number.

17

16

5

7

31

12

10

3

16

Total,...

117

Table IX.

REVENUE FOR 1907.

Sale of Forestry Products,

.$2,310.55

Sale of Plants,

632.54

Loan of Plants,

341,70

Sale of old tools,

.57

Forestry Licences in New Territories,

4,445.16

$7,730.52

502 (14)

516

Appendix A.

MANAGEMENT OF DWARF TREES.

Extract from directions circulated by the Yokohama Nursery Company.

Pruning.--To maintain dwarfness in the trees, pinch back the young growth, this we usually do from April to middle of June and always with the finger and thumb, a practice followed by the late Mr. THOMAS RIVERS of Sawbridgeworth, England, when preparing his dwarfed fruit trees for fruiting in pots. In Thuja obtusa we pinch out the points of the young growth all over the plant to maintain the form, this practice we also apply to Crypto- meria and all other Conifers except Pinus. In Pinus we pinch out the points of the irregular growth simply to maintain the shape of the plant. Pomegranate, Lagerstræmia, indica, Flowering Peach, Flowering Cherry, etc. we pinch back the non-flowering shoots either before or after blooming: Wistaria in July and August we pinch back all the young growth leaving only 4 or 5 leaves on each shoot. Maple and other deciduous trees are pinched back at same time as Thuja obtusa leaving 2 to 4 leaves as may be necessary to maintain the desired shape of the plants. Should a second growth be made the same rule is followed of pinching out the points.

Manuring.---When the trees commence growing in spring we give manure twice a month say March, April, May and June, again September and October, in the hot days of July and August, we give no manure and the same in winter and early spring, the plant then being at rest, the best manure is finely powdered oil cake or bone meal, to a jardinier 1 foot in diameter we give 3 or 4 large teaspoonfuls not heaped of this dry manure spread evenly round the edge of the jardinier, a larger or smaller jardinier will require more or less, a small jardinier say 3 inches by 6 inches, half a teaspoonful will be ample each time.

1

Repotting. This is done by us once in 2 or 3 years as follows:-lift the plant out of the jardinier and with a sharp pointed stick remove about of the old soil around the edges and bottom, cutting away a portion of the old fine roots but none of the strong roots, then replace the plant in the same jardinier first looking to the drainage, for a small shallow jardinier we use a flat piece of tile or a flat crock over each hole, over this spread some rich fresh soil, neatly balance the plant and fill up with the same rich fresh soil to within an inch of the rims, this holds the water and prevents the manure being washed over the sides of the jardinier to prevent the escape of water, it being of the first importance that the entire ball of soil around the plant be moistened at each watering; should the watering of the plant at any time be neglected and the soil become quite dry put the jardinier in a tub of water for 10 or 15 minutes, not longer, and if the injury is not too serious the plant will re- cover. In the case of large plants we use hollow crocks for drainage, the same as those used by growers of specimen plants. After several repottings, the plant having increased in size, shift into a larger pot, but as dwarfness is the thing aimed at the smaller the shift the better. Repotting should be done in February or March, just before spring growth commences.

We advise when it is possible to get the above work done by a good gardener who has been accustomed to the handling of Heaths, New Holland plants, etc.

In the case of very shallow jardiniers we find it desirable annually to replace a portion of the old soil to main- tain a healthy growth.

Appendix B.

ADDITIONS TO THE FLORA OF HONGKONG AND THE NEW TERRITORIES.

Clematis crassifolia, Benth.-Found by Fleet-Surgeon C. G. MATTHEW, R.N., on Tai Mo Shan. Only previously collected in Hongkong.

Kadsura roxburghiana, Arn.-Found in the Happy Valley woods. A native of the sub-tropical forests of Sikkim, Assam Silhet, but not previously recorded from China.

Stauntonia obovata, Hemsl.-A new species which has been confused with Stauntonia chinensis, DC. Common in the island but not known out of it.

- 502 (15)

517

Gossypium sp.-Mrs. L. GIBBS found a specimen belonging to this genus on the sea- shore at Repulse Bay.

Dodonær viscosa, Linn.-Found by Mrs. L. GIBBS at Castle Peak. The first record for the New Territories.

Indigofera decora, Lindl.—Although this plant is recorded in the Flora Hongkongensis as having been found in the island by Colonel EYRE more than 50 years ago, no Hongkong specimens were known to exist until the plant was discovered on Mt. Kellet during the last summer. It was, however, known from specimens obtained at Amoy.

Millettia cinerea, Benth.-This should be the name of the plant recorded as Millettia pachycarpa, Benth., in the 1904 Report.

Millettia sp.-A handsome flowering tree discovered near Aberdeen. Fruiting specimens had previously been collected at Little Hongkong and near Sheko. The only arborescent species recorded from China.

Casalpinia Minaa, Hance.-An interesting find by Mrs. A. TURNER near Castle Peak. Only previously recorded from the North River.

Cæsalpinia sepiaria, Roxb.ommon in Tropical Asia but not recorded from the New Territories until found by Mrs. L. GIBBS.

Prunus marginata, Dunn.-A new species found for the first time in Lantao at an altitude of 1,500 feet.

Sycopsis Tulcheri, Hemsl.-In the Report for 1905 a new species of Syropsis, was re- corded from the Mountain Lodge Grounds. It has been named as above. Not known out of the island.

Illigera platyandra, Dunn.--A new species for Hongkong, Cochin-China and Philippine Islands. The plant was first found by the late Superintendent of this department.

Cornus hongkongensis, Hemsl.-This exceedingly rare shrub was found in Lantao a year or two ago and has been re-discovered in Hongkong after a lapse of about sixty years. Only one plant, however, was found and this was on the western spur of Mt. Parker.

Randia acutidens, Hemsl. and Wils., var. laxiflora, Dunn.-Found for the first time in Hongkong in the wood on the east side of the Race Course. Only known from China.

Vernonia saligna, DC.-Rather plentiful on the south of Mt Parker. Also recorded from the Lo Fau Mountains and from Eastern India and Burma.

Aster Fordii, Hemsl.-Rather common on the south side of Mt. Kellet flowering during the summer. Also found in Kwangtung Province and in the neighbourhood of Ichung.

Ebretia longiflora, Champ.-First recorded by Mrs. L. GIBBS from the New Territories. It was found by her at Lantao. Only previously known from Hongkong.

Lettsomia strigosa, Roxb.-Found by Mrs. L. GIBBS along the Kowloon Catchwater. Not found in the New Territories before. A native of Bengal and Assam.

Ipomoea Hardwickii, Hemsl.-Found in Blake Garden. It is undoubtedly the same as Ipomoea sinensis, Chois.

Convolvulus sp.-A white flowered creeper found on the northwest side of Mt. Davis near the sca.

• Utricularia Harlandii, Oliver.-This diminutive species was re-discovered after a lapse of 50 years in a swamp above the east end of Bowen Road.

Chiriti sinensis, Lindl., var. angustifolia, Duun.-A new variety found in the crevices of damp rocks on the northern precipices of Ma On Shan, New Territories.

#

!

502 (16)

518

Cullicarpa macrophylla, Vapl.-Discovered for the first time in the New Territories by Mrs. L. GIBBS. A native of Hongkong and other parts of China; also widely spread in India.

Aristolochia fordiana, Hemsl.-A creeper found towards the summit of the western spur of Mt. Parker. Previously recorded from Tai Mo Shan in the New Territories and from the Province of Fokien.

Beilschmiedia Fordi, Dunn.-A large tree belonging to the Laurel family and found for the first time several years ago by the late Superintendent of the Department in the .Happy Valley woods. It is not uncommon in certain parts of the woods but is not known out of

the island.

Cinnamomum pedunculatum, Nees.-A small tree, several specimens of which were found on the northern slopes of Mt. Parker. Recorded previously from the Province of Kwangtung, Luchu Archipelago and Japan.

Elæagnus Tutcheri, Dunn.-A new species not uncommon at Cape D'Aguilar; also found near Mountain Lodge but not known out of the island.

Sarcococca pruniformis, Lindl., var.----A small undershrub growing on the north side of big boulders on the western spur of Mt. Parker. The species is a native of India, China and Sumatra.

Jatropha glandulifera, Roxb.-Found by Mrs. L. GIBBS below the Victoria Road, be- tween Pokfulam and the sea. A native of India, Ceylon and Africa but not previously recorded from China although it was in cultivation in the Gardens at one time.

Alchornea trewinides, Muell. Found by Mrs. L. GIBBS in the New Territories. Previ- ously recorded from Hongkong and Ningpo.

Quercus sp.

-A tree 25 to 30 feet high growing at the upper end of the Glenealy ravine and unmatched in our Herbarium.

Quercus sp.—A small tree or large shrub found growing below the Wongneicheong- Tytam Catchwater and apparently different from any other Hongkong species.

Castanopsis tribuloides, A. DC.-The species of Castanopsis mentioned in last year's Report as having been found on Mt. Kellet has been determined as above.

Veratrum nigrum, Linn., var. japonicum?—Not uncommon on the western spur of Mt.

Parker.

Asplenium zeylanicum, Hook.?-Found growing on the boundary bank of the New Garden on the south side of Caine Road. Only previously known from Ceylon, if the species is determined correctly.

Nephrodium leuseanum, Hook.-Should be the name of the Fern recorded in the Re- port for 1903 under the name of Polypodium difforme, Bl. Plants with fertile fronds were found by Fleet-Surgeon C. G. MATTHEW, R.N.

Nephrodium aridum, Baker.-Found by Fleet-Surgeon C. G. MATTHEW, R.N., on Mt. Parker. Also recorded from northern India, the Malay Peninsula and the Philippines.

The following plants have become naturalized in the island :-

Aralia papyrifera, Hook.-In the neighbourhood of Glenealy.

Mikania Guaco, Humb. et Bonpl.-In the upper part of Glenealy ravine and adjacent hillsides.

Tithonia diversifolia, A. Gray.-In various parts of the island, including the Peak.

Alsophila tomentosa, Hook. In the Glenealy ravine and neighbourhood.

Davallia hirta, Kaulf.--On banks near Glenealy.

-

502 (17) -

519

It may be of interest to point out that the following plants mentioned by Seemann in his "Botany of the Voyage of the Herald" as being cultivated in Hongkong in 1850 hàve long since become naturalized :—

Mimosa pudica, Linn.

Rubus rosafolius, Sm.

Lawsonia alba, Lam..

Passiflora foetida, Linn.

Argyreia speciosa, Sweet.

Thunbergia alata, Boj.

Lantana [Camara, L.]

Plumbago zeylanica, Linn.

Zephyranthes rosea, Lindl.

One of the most striking plants of the island which in common towards the east of the Bowen Road, and known as Camellia reticulata. Lindl., has just been discovered to be not a Camellia at all but the type of a new Genus. This is interesting as the Hongkong plant was supposed to be the wild form of the cultivated plant known as Camellia reticulata.

Appendix C.

Government Notification 222 of 1907, amended as in Government Notification

202 of 1907.

FORESTRY LICENCES.

1. The Superintendent, Botanical and Forestry Department, on the recommendation of an Assistant Land Officer may issue and re-issue Private or Village Forestry Licences to private persons or to villages to cultivate pine trees on unoccupied Crown Land in the New Territories. Cultivation of pine trees shall mean resowing whenever trees are felled and sowing trees on land where none have previously been grown.

2. Upon receipt of an application for a Forestry Licence the area applied for shall be marked out and notice shall be posted in an approved form and mauner at least 14 days be- fore the licence is issued stating that application for the area defined by marks has been made.

3. After licences have been issued the Licensees shall mark out the land in respect of which they are granted licences clearly at each corner with a board or stone bearing the licence number and shall maintain such marks during the term of their licences.

4. Such licences shall not confer upon the Licensees ownership of the ground nor of its natural products.

5. The licensees shall not desecrate any existing grave on the land in respect of which they hold licences nor interfere with future burials, and they shall leave a clear space of grass one Cheung in width round every grave on their lots.

!

502 (18)

520

6. The holder of a Private Licence shall not interfere with the cutting of grass on the land in respect of which he holds a licence. The holders of a Village Licence are at liberty to cut grass on the land in respect of which they hold a licence but the grass on a Village Forestry Lot shall not be cut by people of other villages without the permission of the Licensees of that lot.

7. Licensees shall not interfere with persons in pursuit of their lawful avocations - passing over the land in respect of which they hold licences.

8. For each licence a fee at the rate of 10 cents per acre per annum shall be charged. The fee shall be paid in advance and the minimum fee will be $1.

At the end of the first year the licences may be renewed at the reduced rate of 2 cents. per acre per annum if it is found on inspection that the plantation is in good order, with the trees on each acre of about the same size and with their branches nearly touching, the lower living branches not removed and the ground not denuded. Such plantations shall be called "A Plantations". If the plantation is not in a satisfactory condition the renewal will be at the original rate. Such plantations shall be called "B Plantations ".

9. Licensees may fell pine trees in their plantations, but not more than one-fourth of the trees in a lot may be felled in any one year and no Licensee shall fell any wild trees. If in the opinion of the Superintendent of the Botanical and Forestry Department more than one-fourth of the trees in any lot is felled in any one year, the Superintendent may refuse to re-issue the licence for such plantation.

10 & 11. Cancelled by Government Notification 262 of 1907.

12. The Government reserves the right to withdraw the licence at any time upon pay- ment for the planted trees and of the outstanding part of the fee.

13. The Government shall have the first offer of trees on A Plantations" when the Licensee wishes to dispose of them.

14. Payments for timber may be made in cash at the current rates or in the equivalent in mature timber from Government plantations at the option of the Licensee.

יו

HONGKONG.

REPORT OF THE INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS FOR THE YEAR 1907.

No.

20

1908

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor, July 23rd, 1908.

STAFF.

1. Appointment.-Mr. S. R. MOORE, 2nd Assistant Master of the Yaumati School, from 1st October, 1907.

2. Leave. Mr. E. A. IRVING, Inspector of Schools, from the 4th April, 1907.

Mr. B. JAMES, Head Master of the Kowloon British School, from 11th April, 1907.

Mr. W. CURWEN, Head Master of the Yaumati School, from 30th October, 1907.

3. Acting. Mr. E. D. C. WOLFE, Inspector of Schools, from the 4th April, 1907.

Mrs. M. E. MAIN, Head Mistress of the Kowloon British School, from 11th April, 1907.

Mr. S. R. MOORE, Assistant Master of the Yaumati School, headmaster from 30th October, 1907.

4. Resignation. Mrs. E. MURRAY, Assistant Mistress of the Kowloon British School, from 10th October, 1907.

Mr. J. C. PARKIN, Assistant Master of the Yaumati School, from 1st October, 1907.

5. There have also been several changes in the Chinese Staff of the District Schools.

t

ľ

316

REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE.

6. The revenue collected by the Department amounts to $18,780.50 an increase of $4,000 on last year's figures. The District Schools are again the chief contributors, Saiyingpun School alone shewing an increase of $2,500. The Belilios Public School which shewed a decrease in fees last year has now exceeded the 1905 tctal by over $200. The fees at the English Schools and the Lower Grade Anglo-Chinese Schools have with one exception decreased. A comparative statement of the revenue collected during the last 6 years is given in Table II.

7. The expenditure on Education including Queen's College was $184,028.00 or 3.19% o the total expenditure of the Colony. Table III gives the proportion of the total expenditure of the Colony devoted to Education during the past 12 years.

NUMBER AND CLASSIFICATION OF SCHOOLS AND PUPILS.

8. The number of Government and Grant Schools in the Colony in the year under review is 79 as compared with 85 in 1906. The decrease is accounted for by the closing of 4 inefficient Vernacular Grant Schools by the Government, i.e., Nos. 16, 65, 67 and 71 and the voluntary closing of 2 schools, the Cathedral School No. 10 and the Sacred Heart School No. 23 by the Roman Catholic Mission. The Cathedral School pupils now form the greater portion of the Chinese division at St. Joseph's College. The average attendance was 5,924 as against 5,496, a substantial increase in both Government and Grant Schools.

The Berlin Foundling House No. 17 and the Training Home for Girls No. 20 are again Upper Grade Schools. The Anglo-Indian (Government) School remains in the Lower Grade as before.

Table IV gives the number of Schools, Government and Grant, and the number of pupils attending at each. It also shows the Grade to which they belong.

9. Table V shews the fluctuations in the average attendance from 1895 up to the present time. As in past years the figures in the case of private schools represent the maximum monthly enrolment, it being quite impossible to obtain correct figures shewing the average attendance. It will be seen, however, that there is an upward trend in the numbers under instruction in the Colony. At the Government and Grant English Schools the attendance has risen from 3,350 to 3,569 and at the Vernacular Schools from 2,146 in 1906 to 2,355. The private English Schools shew an increase of 500 pupils and the private Vernacular Schools an increase of 441. At all the Vernacular Privat Schools modern text books compiled on the lines of the Japanese school books are now in use.

The pupils attending Private English Day Schools have decreased by 86, those attending Night Schools have increased from 494 to 826 almost double last year's number. There are now 32 night schools as compared with 26 in 1906.

10. Table VI gives the proportion of girls to boys under instruction during the year.

:

GOVERNMENT SCHOOLS.

11. Table I gives details of the nature of the Government Schools and of the attendance thereat as compared with the same statistics in 1906. Reports on the work of each School appear in Appendix A.

12. The average attendance of pupils in Government Schools (excluding Queen's College) is 1,153 this year as compared with 927 in 1906. There are 761 boys and 292 girls in attendance at Government Schools and of these 1,036 are in the Upper Grade and 117 in the Lower Grade. The Upper Grade shews an increase of 33% on last year and the Lower Grade a decrease of 22 %.

3

*

317

13. The cost of each pupil to Government during the past year ranges from $6.66 at the Belilios Public School, Vernacular Side, to $126.32 at Uen Long and $124.12 at Victoria British School. The average cost to Government of the 3 District Schools is $18.70 as compared with $30.81 at Queen's College. The proportionately larger cost of each pupil at Yaumati School is accounted for by the fact that there are two European masters at that school as against one at Saiyingpun.

New Schools, and Schools Closed.

14. No new schools have been opened during the past year. The cost of Uen Long School has increased to such an extent owing to the poor attendance that its immediate closure has been recommended.

Kowloon British School.

15. The average attendance dropped from 55 in 1906 to 47 this year, chiefly through the withdrawal of a number of children, whose fathers belong to the military establishment, on the opening of the New Garrison English School in June last. The fees also decreased from $2,101.50 in 1906 to $1,493.00 for the same reason. The maximum enrolment however exceeded that of the previous year by 10. The withdrawal of several children whose parents were returning to England assisted in still further reducing the numbers.

16. During the absence on home leave of Mr. R. JAMES, the head-master, the school was under the charge of the headmistress Mrs. MAIN and its efficiency has been well maintained.

Victoria British School.

17. At Victoria School the average attendance remains at the same figure (44) as in 1906 in spite of a somewhat longer vacation in the summer. The attendance has always been so poor in the hot months that it was considered advisable to increase the summer holidays this year from 6 weeks to 2 months and to curtail the Christmas holidays pro- portionately. The new plan seems to work well and the school has not lost in efficiency through its adoption.

18. The draining of the swampy land around the school has now been completed and it has been decided to convert the bamboo plantation immediately below the school into a play-ground. The headmaster's quarters are being enlarged by the addition of two new rooms above the present quarters. A few months more should suffice to rid Victoria School entirely of its bad reputation from a sanitary point of view.

19. The Cadet Corps now numbers 16 in all. 10 Members attended camp where their stay however was very short as the school had only just re-opened after a lengthy summer vacation when the Volunteers went into camp. Signalling remains the important work of the Corps. Next year it is hoped to start a Bugle Band if the numbers continue to increase.

20. Candidates for the Preliminary Oxford Local Examination were presented for the first time in the history of the School in July and all of thein, 4 in number, passed.

Belilios Public School, Anglo-Chinese Side.

21. There is a marked increase in the average attendance for the year. The figures are 108 as compared with 82 in 1906. The fees have also increased by $400. The increase in numbers is chiefly due to the larger attendance of Non-Chinese girls.

22. The school has up to the present time been divided into two sections, one Non- Chinese and the other Chinese. At the annual inspection it was found that the work of the Chinese section was not up to the required standard. Objection was also taken to several matters of discipline and organization in the Chinese section and as a result it was decided to remodel the school, retaining the old class divisions as far as possible. Under the new arrangement the headmistress takes the first and second classes only and supervises the rest of the school more thoroughly, the 1st Assistant Mistress takes Classes III, IV and V, English and Chinese divisions, and the 3 Junior Assistant teachers are in charge of Classes VI, VII and VIII respectively under the direct supervision of the head-

:

318

mistress. It is to be hoped that the re-arrangement of the classes will lead to a fairer distribution of work among the teachers and to a consequent increase in efficiency, especially in the Chinese section. In addition all Chinese pupils are to devote a certain amount of time to Chinese as at the Boys Schools.

THE DISTRICT SCHOOLS, UPPER GRADE.

23. The attendance at Saiyingpun and Wantsai Schools rose during the year to over 200. The average attendance at Yaumati School also shows a slight increase.

24. There was a marked increase in the number of boys admitted to the District Schools on failing to pass the entrance examination to Queen's College. The number of boys who obtained admittance to Queen's College from the upper forms of the three District Schools was 29, a substantial increase on former years and one which tends to show that the linking up of the schools in Hongkong is gradually becoming an accomplished fact. The actual uumber admitted is still very small as compared with the total number of scholars at Queen's College, it is however likely to become an important factor when these schools reach their inaximum of 400 pubils each, with a proportinate number in Class IV, the highest Class at the District Schools. In addition to the 29 boys already mentioned 4 free scholars selected by competitive examination among the 3 schools were also admitted to Queen's College.

Saiyingpun Anglo-Chinese School.

25. An extraordinary increase in the number of pupils has taken place during the past year and the average attendance has risen from 94 in 1906 to the large total of 204.

In spite of this abnormal increase in numbers and the inadequacy of the staff in the early part of the year the efficiency of the school work has been well maintained throughout the year.

26. The large increase in numbers has necessitated the addition of a new storey to the school building. This work is now well in hand and the school has been temporarily removed to another locality owing to lack of suitable accommodation in the immediate neighbourhood. The attendance shows no signs of falling off at present on this account. When the new storey is completed the building will accommodate 400 boys. The work should be finished by August.

27. The staff will shortly be strengthened by the appointment of an Assistant English Master as at Yaumati School. The average cost to the Government per pupil, which is very low this year, (i.e., $10.52) will necessarily rise in consequence of this appointment.

Yaumati Anglo-Chinese School.

28. The School has been practically full the whole year and though the average attendance shews but a slight increase the maximum enrolment has gone up considerably. The average attendance was 171 in 1906. It is now 185. Satisfactory progress has been made by the pupils in their studies during the year and the selection from this school of three out of 4 free scholars from the District Schools for admission to Queen's College speaks well for the work of the staff.

29. Mr. PARKIN the assistant master, left the Government service in October and his place was taken by Mr. S. R. MOORE who is temporarily undertaking the duties of headmaster during the absence on home leave of Mr. CURWEN.

30. The gradually increasing interest taken by people on the mainland in this District School will probably ere long necessitate its enlargement. It is at present the only Govern- ment Anglo-Chinese institution on the mainland of Kowloon.

Wantsai Anglo-Chinese School.

31. The average attendance at this school which was 140 in 1906 is now 210 and the numbers may be expected to rise still further when the two new school-rooms which are now being added are completed. A portion of the increase will be due to the absorption of Tanglungchau School but the majority of the new-comers will in all probability be boys who have been refused admission owing to lack of accommodation.

E

319

*

32. The entrance examination which all candidates for admission to the District Schools have to pass appears to have been made somewhat too easy. In future a fair knowledge of Chinese will be insisted on before boys are admitted.

33. One of the four fre: scholars admitted to Queen's College was selected on the results of the inter District Schools Competitive Examination from this school.

34. A small gymnasium has been started which the boys appear to appreciate very much. It is to be hoped that the services of a qualified gymnastic instructor may be obtained to give a course of instruction in gymnastics and physical drill.

THE DISTRICT SCHOOLS, LOWER GRADE.

35. Excluding the Vernacular School (.e., the Belilios Public School, Chinese Side) and Tai Po School there has been a decrease in the average attendance. In the case of Len Long the falling off has been so marked that it has been decided to close the school. It is curious that in some of the outlying districts where Government Schools exist the people fail to appreciate the advantages to be derived from them, whereas in others they are clamouring for new schools and are even prepared to offer ancestral halls as school premises.

There are at

36. It is proposed to open a new Anglo-Chinese School at Shaukiwan. present no English Schools in this district which is increasing in population year by year and which is in close touch with the City of Victoria. It is anticipated that the attendance will repay the Government for the outlay incurred in opening this school.

Anglo-Indian School.

37. The sudden death of the headmaster Mr. JEHANGIR KHAN accounts for the slight falling off in the attendance. Under the new headmaster who is well qualified for the post it is to be hoped the numbers will rise to at least 40.

38. The present school premises are most unsuitable. They are badly lighted and very noisy.

Anglo-Chinese Schools, Lower Grade.

39. There are five of these schools. Tanglungchau which is closely connected with Wantsai School, Aberdeen on the south side of the island and Tai Po, Ping Shan and Uen Long in the New Territory. The average attendance has decreased everywhere except at Tai Po and the popularity of these schools which was never very great shews no signs of increasing. At Uen Long School to which reference has already been made the average attendance for the year was only 10 and the cost to the Government per pupil was $126.32.— Uen Long and Ping Shan Schools are within a mile and a half of each other, it is therefore just possible that the attendance at Ping Shan will improve now that Uen Long School is to be closed. Tai Po is increasing in population owing to its proximity to the new Kowloon- Canton Railway. The attendance has slightly improved and will probably continue do so year by year.

VERNACULAR SCHOOLS.

Belilios Public School, Chinese Side.

40. This Girls school which is the only Vernacular Government School in the Colony is very rapidly increasing in numbers. This year the average attendance has risen from 187 to 237 but the main idea that it should be a feeder for the English Division appears to be lost sight of by the parents. Their one object is to give their children a good Vernacular education and then to withdraw them and make them useful in their homes rather than to allow them to continue their education and learn English. The latter study parents apparently consider serves no very useful purpose.

GRANT SCHOOLS.

41. A detailed report on the work done in each school is given in Appendix B. The Annual Grant List shewing the number of standards, the average attendance and grant earned by each school together with further information is given in Table VII.

320

English Schools (Non-Chinese.)

The

42. There are 10 schools in this class with a total average attendance of 1.059. three largest schools are the Diocesan School for Boys, the Italian Convent and St. Joseph's College. Since the closing of the Cathedral School the latter now contains also a Chinese division. The numbers at St. Joseph's have increased considerably during the year chiefly owing to the formation of the Chinese Division. All these schools were returned as thoroughly efficient, St. Joseph's for the 2nd time in succession; it thus earns the full grant, for the first time.

Anglo-Chinese Schools.

43. The Ellis Kadoorie School is still the most important of the Upper Grade Schools which number 3 in all. It has increased in numbers and the average attendance now stands at 397 as compared with 319 in 1906. The Government contribution of $7,000 towards the extension of the school building was paid in June. Of the two remaining schools of this class Fairlea School which was

which was not a great success has now been voluntarily closed by

the management.

44. The Lower Grade Schools are now reduced to 2. One of the original 3, ¿.e., No. 15 has been closed as it has been inefficient for two years in succession.

Vernacular Schools.

45. The Training Home for Girls and the Berlin Foundling House are again Upper Grade Schools as Europeans are now in charge of them as in 1905.

46. The number of these schools has decreased during the year as stated in paragraph 6 but the total number of attendances has increased from 1,947 to 2,118.

47. The "A" Class Vernacular Schools, i.e., those earning a grant of at least $7.00 and with 25% in the case of boys schools and 20% in the case of girls schools in Standard III and above is smaller than it was in 1906. 4 Boys Schools and 3 Girls Schools are in the "A" Class as compared with 6 Boys Schools and 3 Girls Schools in 1906. The general standard of work in nearly all schools is however rapidly improving and there now remain only very few inefficient "C" Class Schools, on the Grant list. The progress is. greatly due to the increased interest taken by managers in the schools under their charge and the formation of School Committees whose duties consist in improving the standard of work in the schools over which they have control.

48. A building grant of $1,500 was paid to the Roman Catholic Mission as the Government share of the cost of rebuilding Grant School No. 28 at Aberdeen.

49. Free scholarships to Government Schools for 4 years if satisfactory progress is shewn year by year have again been offered to the Grant Schools in the "A" Class. The work of the 6 pupils selected for these scholarships from Boys Schools in 1906 has been very satisfactory and all have been continued.. In the case of the Girls Schools one has been continued and one has been discontinued as the pupil has left school. (Three were offered in 1906 to Grant Girls School but 2 only were accepted.)

GENERAL.

Scholarships.

50. Table VIII contains a list of all the Government free scholars at present at the Government Schools. The table also shews the date at which the various scholarships were granted and the position of the scholars in the case of those who have held scholarships for one or more years already at the Annual Examination. The final column shews whether the scholarship is to be continued or not. New scholars appear at the end of each list.

51. The Government now offers annually not more the 6 free scholarships to Boys Vernacular Grant Schools and 3 to Girls Schools to be held for 4 years at the District Schools in the case of boys and at the Belilios Public School in the case of girls.

free scholarships 5 in all are also offered annually by the Government, one to each of the two top boys at Tanglungchau and Aberdeen Lower Grade Government Schools (at the latter school only one if the average attendance is less than 40 for the year) and one to the top boy of the three New Territory Lower Grade Schools in competition, to be held at the Upper Grade

321

District Schools for 4 years if satisfactory progress is shewn in their studies by the scholars. 4 free scholarships to be held at Queen's College for 3 years each are offered annually to candidates selected from the 3 District Schools, Saiyingpun, Yaumati, and Wantsai.

Five free scholarships tenable for 4 years each but only offered as vacancies occur are given to lower class pupils at the Belilios Public School, English Side, to encourage young girls to remain longer at school.

52. The system of scholarships appears to be working well in the Boys Schools where the competition for them is getting very keen, especially so in the case of Queen's College. Girls, however, appreciate the efforts of the Government in this respect very much less than the boys and show no great desire to obtain the scholarships. Even the offer of scholar- ships for years does not appear to check to any appreciable extent the tendency on the part of parents to withdraw their daughters from school as soon as they have obtained a fair vernacular education to which allusion has already been made in paragraph 40.

Visual Instruction.

53. Series of lectures in this subject have been given during the year at all large English Schools in the Colony. At several of these no lectures had previously been delivered owing to the late arrival of the lanterns. The slides and the subject matter were therefore in these cases quite new to the pupils. At other schools however the course has been taken once. It thus appears a matter of necessity to supplement existing slides with -one or two new series for next year's course.

54. The arrangements for the lectures, all of which have been well attended, were slightly modified as a course was given at Queen's College this year for the first time. The heads of the District Schools are now anxious to take courses at their respective schools. also, it will therefore be necessary in the coming year either to shorten the time during which the lanterns and slides are at the disposal of individual schools or to arrange for a course to be held, as was originally suggested, either at Queen's College or the City Hall at which pupils from several schools may attend together.

Hongkong Technical Institute.

(Formerly Evening Continuation Classes).

55. These classes which started in October 1906 were carried on until the end of May when the first year of instruction came to a close. The attendance which averaged 256 in October 1906 dwindled down to 197 in January chiefly owing to the non-attend- ance of those who had originally only joined the classes out of curiosity and ceased. to attend as soon as they were called upon to settle down to solid work. In March 1907 the average attendance showed a further slight drop to 178 and in May the last month of the session the average attendance was 162 a very small decrease as compared with the heavy drop in January. An examination was held at the end of the May Session and certificates were granted to those who were successful in the various subjects of study.

56. At the close of the New Year session in May a Committee was appointed by His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government to enquire into the working of the classes and submit proposals for the future. The Committee collected evidence and reported to the Government in August. Its proposals, practically all of which were eventually adopted, were to put the classes under the management of a Director, personally respons- ible to the Inspector of Schools, and to have an Advisory Committee which was to be consulted if any changes in the subjects and courses of study were contemplated. Subjects which had failed to attract students were given up and on the evidence collected it was deemed advisable to introduce several new ones such as steam and light. The subjects of study were definitely laid down as also the length of the course in each subject. Matters such as the fees chargeable and the remuneration to be paid to lecturers were also dealt with. Under the name of the Hongkong Technical Institute the classes were re-opened in October for one year to begin with. A marked improvement was noticeable in the attendance and a greater tendency was shown to take lectures in subjects which went together and formed part of a systematic course, rather than as was the case when the classes started, to pick out the subjects at random. The attendance was well maintained and only began to drop off as it invariably does elsewhere towards the end of the Chinese Year. The average attendance is likely to remain at roughly 200, which figure shews clearly the necessity for the establishment of these classes. A detailed report of the year's work will be found in Appendix C.

322

Sp

Hygiene.

57. This subject now forms a part of the course of study at all Government schools in the Colony and the annual inspection on which the grant to Aided Schools depends will em- brace an examination in the subject. The Challenge Shield presented by Sir MATTHEW NATHAN the late Governor two years ago was again competed for in December by Govern- ment and Grant Schools but on this occasion no individual prizes were offered and the competition in the Advanced Course was dropped. A separate report on this subject will be found in Appendix D.

EDUCATION DEPARTMENT, 2nd April, 1908.

Tables.

A. D. C. WOLFE.

Inspector of Schools.

I. Government Schools: Statistics.

II. Revenue of the Department during recent years.

III. Expenditure of the Department during recent years.

IV. Numbers of Schools and Pupils in Upper and Lower Grades compared.

V. Chart shewing attendances and number of pupils in Hongkong Schools during recent

years.

VI. The proportion of boys to girls in the Schools.

VII. Annual Grant List.

VIII. Scholarships.

Appendices.

A. Detailed Reports on Government Schools.

B. Detailed Reports on Grant Schools.

C. Detailed Report on The Hongkong Technical Institute (Evening Continuation Classes).

D. Detailed Report on Hygiene.

SCHOOL STATISTICS.

Table I.-GOVERNMENT SCHOOLS.-[The figures in Red are those for last year.]

DESCRIPTION.

323

No.

Name and Nature.

Number of

Standards,

Classes or

Forms.

Number Maximum | Average At-

of School Monthly

Rate of

Fees.

Gross Cost.

Days.

Enrolment.tendance.

Fees

Collected.

Ditto for Net Cost each unit to Govern-in average ment. attendance.

REMARKS.

C.

C.

6

198

78

55

6,723.21

2,101.50 4,621.77

84.03

1

Kowloon British School.-Children of European British Parentage. Boys under thirteen and Girls,

6

186

88

47

$2 to 5

6,925.43

1,493.00 5,432.43

115.58

and Infans Class.

6

1941

54

44

5,826.17

1,439.00

4,387.17

99.70

2

Victoria British School.-Children of European British Parentage. Girls under thirteen and Boys,

6

177

71

44

$2 to 5

6,628.84

1,167.50

5,461.34

124.12

and Infant Class.

6

192

101

82

8,076.34

1,098.50

6,977.84

85.09

3

Belilios Public School.-English and Anglo-Chinese Side. Boys under twelve and Girls,

6

197

204

108

50c. to$1.50|

7,606.62

1.479.00 6,127.62

56.73

(No pupils in

class III).

5

186/1

119

92

4,795.81

1,907.00 2,888,81

31.40

Saiyingpun Anglo-Chinese School (Boys),

10

1913

383

204

$2.00

6,642.95

4,496.00 2,146.95

10.52

5

Yaumati

do.,

do.,

ગમ

189

218

171

196

213

185

231

185

146

6

Wantsai

do.,

do.,

230

290

210

$2.00

$2.00

8,729.78 3,555.00 5,174,78 10,499.08 4,079.00 6,420.08

30.26

34.70

5,593.62

3,022.00 2,571,62

17.61

6,455.56

4,176.00 2,279,56

10.85

1883

54

39

1,432.96

572.50

960.46

22.06

7 | Anglo-Indian School (Boys),

4

206

50

34

50c. to$1.50

1,637.61

504.00

1,133.61

33.34

Aberdeen Anglo-Chinese School (Boys),

NO 10

1861

27

23

680.02

112.00

568.02

24.69

216

23

21

9

Tanglungchau

do.,

do.

10

Venlong

do.,

do.

11 Taipo

do.,

do.,

12

Ping Shan

do.,

do.,

N N

- 2

- 2

188

41

33

191

55

1921

25

202

23

152

19

202

39

108

29

16

2 30 1610 24 6

50 cents.

776.06

99.50

676.56

32.21

792.55

331.00

461.55

13.98

$1.00

810.52

325.00

485.52

16.18

1,832.30

91.50

1,240.80

77.85

50 cents.

1,322.25

59.00

1,263.25

126.32 Closed at end of

January, 1908.

614.82

53.00

561.32

46.77

50 cents.

693.57

87.00

606.57

46.66

306 40

58.00

248 40

15.52

209

13

9

50 cents.

615.19

52.00

563.19

62.57

;

230

268

187

2.079.21

564.00

1,515.21

810

13

Belilios Public School,-Vernacular Side, (Girls),

7

243

470

237

25 cents.

2,342.58

763.50

1,579.08

6.66

14

Sheko Vernacular School (Boys),

240

13

11

150.00

150 00

13.63

Closed, 1906.

1,231

927

47,182.75 14,995.00 82,227.75

31.76

1,922

1,153

*52,956.26 18,780.50

|

34,175.76

29.66

Note -The schools it-licised are Lower Grade, the rest

uner Grude Schools

324

W

Table II.

REVENUE OF THE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT.

(SCHOOL FEES) 1902-1907.

Name of School.

1902.

1903. 1904.

1905.

1906.

1907.

1. Kowloon School,.

2. Victoria School.

3. Belilios Public School (English), 4. Saiyingpun Anglo-Chinese School, 5. Yaumati Anglo-Chinese School, 6. Wantsai Anglo-Chinese School,. 7. Anglo-Indian School,

$ c. $ c. $ C. $ C. 924.00 1,849.50 1,952.50 1,979.00 2,101.50 769.50 1,439.00 1,452.50 1,604.00 1,278.50 1,248 00 1,098.50

118.50 587.50 934.00 745.00 1,907.00 |

3.50 308.00 1,219.50 | 1,832,00 | 3,555.00 34.00 612.00 1,591.50 2,349.00 3,022.00 |

$

¿.

1,493.00

...

1,167.50

1,479.00

4,496.00

4,079.00

1,176.00

201.50

485.00

572.50

504.00

8. Aberdeen Anglo-Chinese School, 9. Tanglunchau Anglo-Chinese School,... 10. Taipo Anglo-Chinese School,...... 11. Uenlong Anglo-Chinese School, 12. Pingshan Anglo-Chinese School,

123.00

112.00

99.50

163.00

331.00:

325.00

53.00

87.00

90.00

91.50

59.00

58.00

52.00

564.00

763.50

13. Belilios Public School, (Chinese),

Total.......$2,532.50 4,961.00 7,177.50 9,783.50 14,905.00 18,780.50

Table III.

PROPORTION OF THE TOTAL EXPENDITURE OF THE COLONY DEVOTED TO EDUCATION.

(Includes Queen's College,)

Year.

Expenditure of Expenditure on

the Colony.

Education.

Per cent.

1896...

2,474,910

76,511

3.09

1897.

2,641,410

72,984

2.76

1898.

2,841,805

72,420

2.54

1899.

3,162,792

75,152

2.37

1900..

3,628,447

79,994

2.20

1901..

4,111,722

86,946

2.11

1902..

5,909,546

92,356

1.56

.903....

5.896.669

130,620

2.42

1904..

6,531.349

151,589

2.32

1905.

6,951,275

158,678

2.28

1906

6,832,610

159,373

2.33

1907.

5,757,203

184,028

3.19

Number of

Pupils (Average

Attendance).

4,000

3.900.

3,800

3.700

3.600

3,500

3.400

3,300

3,200

3,100

3,000

2,900

2,800

2,700

2,600

2,500

2,400

2,300

2,200

2,100

2,000

1,900

1,800

1,700

1,600

1,500

1,400

1,300

1,200

1,100

1.000

900

800

700

600

500

400

300

200

100

RED Line

3

i

Table V.

CHART.

1895. 1896. 1897. 1898. | 1899. 1900. 1901. 1902. 1903. | 1904. 1905. | 1906. | 1907.

BLACK Line

DOTTED RED Line

DOTTED BLACK Line

=

Government and Grant Schools, English (with Queen's College). -Government and Grant Schools, Vernacular.

Private Schools, English (Max. monthly enrolmeut).

Private Schools, Vernacular (Max. monthly enrolment.)

1

2355

7856

3721

3569

i

325

Table IV.

TOTAL OF GOVERNMENT AND GRANT SCHOOLS (UPPER AND LOWER GRADES.)

UPPER GRADE. LOWER GRADE.

TOTAL.

MANAGING Body.

Schools. Pupils. Schools. Pupils. Schools. Pupils.

Queen's College,...

Education Department,

991

1

991

1,036

6

117

13

1,153

Roman Catholic Mission,

770

315

15

1,085

Secular,

397

42

2

489

Church of England,

289

289

Church Missionary Society,

132

14

635

17

767

Rhenish Mission,

18

1

75

93

London Missionary Society, Basel Mission,

Wesleyan Mission,.. American Board Mission, Berlin Foundling House,

38

18

643

19

681

245

245

70

70

71

1

71

40

40

Total,...

25

3,711

54

2,213

79

5,924

1

326

Table VI.

IN GRANT

TOTAL.

SCHOOLS.

Girls,

Proportion of Girls to Boys.

A

IN GOVERMENT SCHOOLS, INCLUDING QUEEN'S COLLEGE.

392

1,771

2,163

Boys,

1,752

2,009

3,761

2,144

3,780

5,924

:

Girls,

Boys,

B

IN LOWER GRADE

IN UPPER GRADE VERNACULAR SCHOOLS.

VERNACULAR

TOTAL.

SCHOOLS.

427

1,051

1,478

877

877

427

1,928

2,355

PTION.

No.

tre.

Mission.

St. Joseph's Col

Italian Couvent,

French Convent, Victoria Anglo-J Bridges Street, (' Sacred Heart, (G Diocesan Girls,

Do. School (

St. Mary's, (G.)

13

St. Francis, (M.)

10

123

73

"

Ellis Kadoorie Se Fairlea School, (( Bonham Road, (G

School, (M.)

*

14

St. Stephen's, (B.) *

15

No. 146, Hollywood Road, (B.) * *

17

18

Fairlea School, (G.)

Berlin Foundling House, (G.)

**

**

19

Victoria Home and Orphanage, (G.)

20

Training Home for Girls, (G.)

*

**

1

Tab

ANNUAL G

SCHOOL STATISTICS.

Standards.

Number of

Number

Maximum

of

School days.

Monthly Enrolment.

Attendance.

Average

ENGLISE

Upper Grade

Non

R. C. M.

215

379

298.90

204

244

207.21

195

59

43.91

2115

76

58.50

207

35

24.94

2021

35

27.00

C. of E.

206!

76

62.01

239

262

226.57

R. C. M.

2031

118

84.32

207

34

25.37

**

1,318

1,058.73

Secular. C. M. S.

R. M.

C. M. S.

>>

134

10 00

Angl

231

564

397.03

199

28

20.18

262

23

18.40

615

Lower Grade

Angl

217

1845

211

142.15

41

25.62

252

167.77

VERNACUL

Upper Grade

Ber. M.

254

44

40.19

C. M. S.

214

64

54.53

213

65

57.34

"

L. M. S.

209

42

38.01

215

190.07

།ཉྭ /་ !

1

ده

Lower Grade

79

71.66

"

{

ΡΤΙΟΝ.

327

Table VII.

ANNUAL GRANT LIST.

SCHOOL STATISTICS.

GRANT.

PRINCIPAL GRANT,

Grant in

Total

Number

Maximum

of

ire.

Mission.

School

Monthly Enrolment.

Rate

days.

£

d.

School, (M.)

*

*

*********

Road, (B.)

}

use,

(G.)

**

Orphanage, (G.) Girls, (G.)*

**

$

ENGLISH

SCHOOLS.

Upper Grade (Code Sec. 34 ii.) Non-Chinese.

aid of Rent.

R. C. M.

215

379

204

244

י

195

59

30/-

298.90 35- 523 1 6 207.21 43.91

4,782

362 12 4

3,315

4,782 3,315

65 17

602

602

2114

76

38.50 35-

102

936

360

1,296

207

35

24.94 30-

37

342

342

2023

35

27.00

40

10

19

870

370

C. of E.

2061

76

62.01

93

850

320

1,170

239

262

226.57

35/

396

77

3,695

3,695

R. C. M.

203

118

84.32

30/-

126 9

1,156

1,156

207

34

$5.37

38

23

348

348

1,318

1,058.73

16,396

680

17,076

Anglo-Chinese.

397.03 | 30- 595 10 10 5,145

Secular. C. M. S.

231

564

6

199

28

20.18

R. M.

262

23

18.40

615

C'. M. S.

وه

|

30.01

30 5

27 12

Lower Grade (Code Sec. 34 i.)

Anglo-Chinese.

217 184

211

41

142.15 25.62

7

5

252

167.77

5,445

282

282

252

252

5.979

5.979

995

995

† 128

192

320

1,123

192

1,315

VERNACULAR

SCHOOLS.

Upper Grade (Code Sec. 35 ii.)

Ber. M. C. M. S.

L. M. S.

7777

254

44

15- 40.19

30 2 ΤΟ

281

214

281

64

54.53

17/6

4

7

14

445

445

213

65

57.34

50

3

468

209

468

42

38.01

20-

38

354

354

215

190.07

1,548

1,548

Lower Grade (Code Sec 35 i.)

-1 66

}

509

502

13

10

PTION.

No.

ire.

Mission.

St. Joseph's Col

Italian Convent,

3

School, (M.) *

French Convent, Victoria Anglo-I Bridges Street, (' Sacred Heart, (G Diocesan Girls,

Do. School ( St. Mary's, (G.) St. Francis, (M,)

}

Table

327

ANNUAL GR

SCHOOL STATISTICS.

Standards.

Number of

Number

Maxim m

of School days.

Monthly Enrolment.

Attendance.

Average

Ra

ENGLISH

Upper Grade (Cod Non-Chi

R. C. M.

215

379

298.90 | 35

204

244

207.21

195

59

43.91

A

2115

76

58.50

35

207

35

24.94 30

ིདྨེ་ཚ་

30/

""

2021

35

27.00

C. of E.

2061

76

62.01

239

262

226.57

35

>>

R. C. M.

1

6 203

118

84.32 30-

207

34

$5.37

>>

1,318

1,058.73

11

12

73

123

Ellis Kadoorie Se

Fairlea School, (( Bonham Road, (G

Secular. C. M. S. R. M.

H

St. Stephen's, (B.)

*****

15

No. 146, ITollywood Road, (B.) '

10

C. M. S.

**

17

Berlin Foundling House, (G.)

**

18

Fairlea School, (G.) **

19

20

Victoria Home and Orphanage, (G.) Training Home for Girls, (G.)

****

4

**

10 00

Anglo-Ch

134

231

564

6

199

28

262

23

397.03 30,

20.18 18.40

Y

""

615

Lower Grade (Code

Anglo-Chi

217 1843

211

142.15

7

41

25.62

5

252

167.77

VERNACULAI

Upper Grade (Code

40.19 15-

Ber. M.

254

44

C. M. S.

214

64

54.53 17/6

213

65

57.34

L. M. S.

209

42

38.01 20,-

215

190.07

Lower Grade (Code

21 1

Halian Convent, (G.)

12 (

V

079

79

71.66

17

2

61

17

Berlin Foundling House, (G.)

**

18

Fairlea School, (G.) **

19

Victoria Home and Orphanage, (G.) *

**

20

Training Home for Girls, (G.)

**

VERNACUI

Upper Grade

Ber. M.

254

44

40.

C. M. S.

214

64

54.

213

65

57.

23

L. M. S.

209

42

38

215

190

Lower Gr:

Macdonell Road, (G)

35

36

87

-38

No. 380 Queen's Road West, (G.) * No. 199 Queen's Road East, (G.)

No. 121 Station Street (S.) Yaumati (B.) No. 28 d'Aguilar Street, (G.)

Wantsai Chapel, (B.) *...

Hospital Chapel, (B.)*

21

Italian Convent, (G.)

***

R. C. M.

22

Bridges Street, (G.) *

23

Closed.

24

Holy Ipfanex, (M)*)

25

Hunghom, (G.)*

26

Yaumati, (G.)

27

Shankiwan, (6.) *.

28

Aberdeen, (M.) *

29

Second Street, (B.)

30

Taipingshan, (G.) *

31

No.

5 Clarence Terrace, (B.)

32

33

:34

>>

44 .

272

2501/

SE

79

7

70

253

62

252

50

2:

252

51

A

251

56

254

51

L. M. S.

204

79

222

53

*

235

31

>>

269

29

*

219

62

*

201

36

3 3 3 3

230

39

213

85

205

75

""

224

33

"

39

Hunghom, (B.)

203

28

""

40

No. 343 Queen's Road West, (B.)

*

213

69

"

41

Shaukiwan, (B.) **

203

32

42

43

44

45

46

17

48

Shamshuipo, (M.) * *

49

30

51

Tanglungchau Chapelį (B.) * * No. 180 Mongkok, (B.)

**

No. 20A Aberdeen Street, (G.) Tanglungehau Chapel (G.)

Wantsai Chapel, (G.) Bridges Street, (B.) *

Shaukiwan, (B.) * *

*

Tokwawan, (B.) High Street, (G.) * *)

215

45

212

30

2

* *

212

46

"

**

223

61

**

210

78

A. B. M.

206

53

B. M.

218

120

215

67

32

209

2455

69

,,

52

Closed.

53

No. 218 Hollywood Road, (B.) *

C. M. S.

4

211

66

54

Hunghom, (G.) **

3

233

>>

55

56-

No. 36 Lyndhurst Trace, (G.) *.* No. 6 Hollywood-Rzil, (G.) **

4

250

"

4

257

45

>

57

58

No. 219 Des Voeux Road West, (G.) Yaumati, (B)

**

**

4

248

>>

209

246328 00

86

79

76

59

Yaumati, (G.)* *

259

41

60

No. 232 Hollywood Road, (G.)

**

218

62

1

61

No. 22 Pokfulam Road, (G.)

**

250

47

62

Shaukiwan, (G.)

256

37

"}

63

Stanley, (M.) **

2291

48

64

No. 263 Queen's Road West, (B.)

**

Rh. M.

2091

95

65

Closed.

66

Do.,

67

Do.,

68

No. 5 Elgin Street, (G.) * *

W. M.

217

41

69

70

No. 35 Pottinger Street, (G.) Kowloon City, (G.) **

**

222

50

""

72

Station Street, Mougkok, (B.))

*

C. M. S. Secular.

253

28

6

203

94

2,615

46

5,015

65

Total Number of Schools.

NOTE.-R. C. M.Roman Catholic Mission.

C. of E. Church of England.

C. M. S.=Church Missionary Society. Ber. M. Berlin Mission.

L. M. S. London Missionary Society.

A. B. M.≈American Board Mission. Rh. M. S.Rhenish Missionary Society.

famose bave be

lling House, (G.)

sol, (G.)

**

**

**

ne and Orphanage, (G.)* me for Girls, (G.)

**

VERNACULAR SCHOOLS.

Upper Grade (Code Sec. 35 ii.)

Ber. M.

254

44

40.19

30 15-

2

10

C. M. S.

· 214

64

54.53 17/6

7

14

213

65

57.34

L. M. S.

209

42

38.01

20-

كورد

310 N

281 445

468

354

215

190.07

1,548

Lower Grade (Code Sec 35 i.)

apel, (B.)*

rent, (G.) et, (G.)

Y. (M)

**

G.)*. :.) *

(G.) *. M.) * 24, (B.) * , (G.)

rence Terrace, (B.)

en's Road West, (G.) een's Road East, (G.)

tion Street (S.) Yaumati (B.) guilar Street, (G.) *

apel, (B.):*

**

R. C. M.

"}

44

272

79

71.66

7

502

4

250

70

19.52

7

347

4

253

62

48.69

8

390

3

252

50

44.32

8

355

3

252

51

35.34

247

""

251

56

32.35

226

27

254

51

32.81

230

L. M. S.

2044

79

55.46

499

80

222

53

32.90

197

136

*

235

31

17.64

123

120

*

269

29

14.03

70

112

*

219

62

48.32

435

136

"

201

36

18.43

92

64

230

39

31.59

190

138

213

85

56.64

340

205

75

60.34

302

oad, (G)

224

33

19.47

117

92

B.)

203

28

16.16

97

en's Road West, (B.) * *

213

69

51.21

358

176

:>

(B.)

**

203

32

25.58

† 153

64

"

iu Chapel, (B.)

ngkok, (B.)

erdeen Street, (G.)

au Chapel, (G.)

**

215

45

37.15

223

**

212

30

20.77

104

80

ܐܐ܂

**

**

212

46

33.04

231

160

""

223

61

43.33

260

ipel, (G.) **

et, (B..) *

210

78

60.92

426

27

A. B. M.

206

53

70.78

425

* *

:)

**

(M.)** (B.) ** (B.) **

(G.)

lywood Road, (B.)

3.) * *

thurst Trace, (G.) *.* wood-R1, (G.) * *

Voeux Road West, (G.)

.)

**

**

**

lywood Road, (G.) ** fulam Road, (G.)

(G.)

**

....

en's Road West, (B.)

Street, (G.) * *

nger Street, (G.)

y, (G.) ***

**

t, Mongkok, (B.) *

B. M.

218

120

8886

622

215

67

53.23

373

22

**

209

86

58.37

409

245/

69

44.84

314

**

C. M. S.

211

66

55.92

391

244

3

233

34

20.33

102

72

""

250

79

64.73

388

300

"

257

45

31.65

† 158

176

"

**

248

47

32.64

6

196

128

27

5

209

76

58.93

413

وو

259

41

28.08

197

27

218

62

46.18

277

250

47

34.33

256

37

29.04

>>

2291

48

37.46

**

Rh. M.

10

2091

95

74.62

6667

206

112

174

68

225

522

259

W. M.

""

C. M. S. Secular.

4046

217

41

30.44

152

171

222

50

39.61

277

200

2531

28

28.08

168

90

203

94

41.91

293

61

2,615

1,927.70

12,796

3,242

16

5,015

3,779.88

37,812

4,114

41.

al Number of Schools.

C. M.Roman Catholic Mission.

of E.=Church of England.

M. S. Church Missionary Society.

M. Berlin Mission.

M. S.London Missionary Society. 3. M. American Board Mission. M. S.=Rhenish Missionary Society.

Note.—The amounts indicated wish...

1

B. M. Basel Mission.

W. M.-Wesleyan Mission.

B.

=Boys.

G.

=Girls.

M.

=Mixed.

*

=School year ends 30th June, 1907.

=School

ends 31st December, reir

1907

Leon donlored inefficient

R SCHOOLS.

Sec. 35 ii.)

30 2 10

281

281

Last year classed as Lower Grade.

14

445

445

38

3

468

468

354

354

"Thoroughly efficient." Last year classed as Lowe

[Grade

1,548

1,548

de Sec 35 i.)

~~

7

502

502

7

347

347

: 00001-1-1-061-18 30 10 10 10 10

390

390

Last year's Grant at $7.00.

355

355

Last year's Grant at $7.00.

"Thoroughly efficient.” Thoroughly efficient.”

247

247

226

226

230

230

499

80

579

197

136

333

7

123

120

243

70

112

182

435

136

571

66

92

64

156

Last year's Grant at $7.00. "Thoroughly efficient." [2 years running.

Rent Grant exceeds Principal Grant.

Thoroughly efficient." 4 years running. "Inefficient."

6

190

138

328

6

340

340

5

302

302

"Inefficient."

117

92

209

97

97 "Inefficient."

358

176

534

† 153

64

217

"Inefficient." 2 years running.

223

223

104

80

184

231

160

391

260

260

426

426

425

425

"Inefficient."

622

622

"Thoroughly efficient."

373

373

409

409

314

314

391

244

635

5

102

72

174

6

388

300

688

5

† 158

176

334

"

"Thoroughly efficient."

Last year's Grant at $6.00.

'Inefficient. 2 years running. Rent Grant

6

196

128

324*

[exceeds Principal Grant.

7

413

413

Last year's Grant at $6.00.

197

197

Last year's Grant at $6.00.

66661–

277

277

206

112

318

174

68

242

225

225

522

259

781

Last year's Grant at $9.00.

...

...

152

171

323

*

277

200

477

Rent Grant exceeds Principal Grant.

Thoroughly efficient."

168

90

258

293

64

357

12,796

3,242

16,038

37,812

4,114

41,956

B. M.-Basel M ssion.

W. M. Wesleyan Mission.

B.

=Boys.

G.

=Girls.

M.

Mixed.

*

=School year ends 31st December, 1907.

School year ends 30th June, 1907.

1cole in encertin have been declared incfficient for two years running.

Grants (when in Sterling) paid at the rate of 2s. 13d.

Grants (when in Sterling) paid at the rate of 2s. 24d.

!

Lower Grade

21

Italian Convent, (G.)

*

R. C. M.

272

79

71.66

22

23

24.

25

26

27

28

*

29

30

31

82

33

34

35

36

37

Hospital Chapel, (B.)*

38

39

Bridges Street, (G.)

Closed.

Holy Infancy. (M)*L

Hunghom, (G.)*.

Yaumati, (G.) *

Shankiwan, (G.) *.. Aberdeen, (M.) Second Street, (B.)

Taipingshan, (G.) *

*

No. 5 Clarence Terrace, (B.)

No. 380 Queen's Road West, (G.)

No. 199 Queen's Road East, (G.)

No. 121 Station Street (S.) Yaumati (B.) No. 28 d'Aguilar Street, (G.)

Wantsai Chapel, (B.)

Macdonell Road, (G) *

Hunghom, (B.) *

2504

70

19.52

253

62

48.69

""

L. M. S.

་་

14 JA 00 10 30 20

3

252

50

44.32

252

51

35.34

251

56

32.35

254

51

32.81

204

79

55.46

222

53

82.90

***

235

31

17.64

*

269

29

14.03

219

62

48.32

***

201

36

18.43

*

*

10 10

230

39

31.59

213

85

56.64

205

75

60.34

224

33

19.47

203

28

16.16

"

40

41

No. 343 Queen's Road West, (B.) * * Shaukiwan, (B.) * *

213

69

51.21

203

32

25.58

"

42

43

44

45

46

47

Tanglungchau Chapel, (B.) * * No. 180 Mongkok, (B.)

No. 20A Aberdeen Street, (G)

Tanglungchau Chapel, (G.) **

Wantsai Chapel, (G.)* *

Bridges Street, (B..) *

215

45

37.15

""

**

212

30

20.77

""

**

212

46

33.04

223

61

43.33

210

78

60.92

17

A. B. M.

206

53

70.78

-48

Shamshuipo, (M.) '

**

B. M.

218

120

88.86

-49

Shaukiwan, (B.) * *

215

22

50

Tokwawan, (B.)

**

209

>>

51

High Street, (G.) * *

245/

588

67

53.23

86

58.37

44.84

""

52

Closed.

53

No. 218 Hollywood Road, (B.) * *

C. M. S.

54

Bunghom, (G.) **

55

56-

57

58

No. 36 Lyndhurst Tace, (G.) *.*

No. 6- Hollywood-R, (G.) *

No. 219 Des Voeux Road West, (G.) * * Yaumati, (B) * ......

**

>>

">

43++

211

66

55.92

233

34

20.33

250

79

64.73

257.

45

31.65

27

59

Yaumati, (G.)

>>

60

No. 232 Hollywood Road, (G.)

**

61

No. 22 Pokfulam Road, (G.)

* *

62

Shaukiwan, (G.) **

**

63

64

Stanley, (M.)

No. 263 Queen's Road West, (B.)

呼呼

"

27

**

Rh. M.

TH LO

10

248

47

32.64

209

76

58.93

259

41

28.08

218

62

46.18

250

17

34.33

256

37

29.04

229

209

-2-2

48

37.46

95

74.62

65

Closed.

66

Do.,

67

Do.,

68

No. 5 Elgin Street, (G.) * *.

W. M.

217

41

30.44

69

70

No. 35 Pottinger Street, (G.) Kowloon City, (G.) *

**

222

50

39.61

55

C. M. S.

253

28

28.09

72

Station Street, Mongkok, (B.)

*

Secular.

203

94

41.91

2,615

1,927.70

16

!

5,015

3,779.88

65

Total Number of Schools.

NOTE.-R. C. M.Roman Catholic Mission.

C. of E.

=

C. M. S.

Ber. M.

Church of England.

Church Missionary Society. Berlin Mission.

L. M. S.=London Missionary Society. A. B. M.=American Board Mission. Rh. M. S. Rhenish Missionary Society.

Note.--The amounts indicated with a red cross have been deducted

Lower Grade (Code Sec 35 i,)

C. M.

272

79

71.66

7

502

502

250

70

49.52

7

347

347

>>

4

253

62

48.69

390

390

Last year's Grant at $7.00.

**

00

3

252

50

44.32

355

355

"Tho Last year's Grant at $7.00. “Tho

252

51

35.34

247

247

251

56

32.35

226

226

254

51

32.81

230

230

M. S.

2045

79

55.46

499

80

579

Last year's Grant at $7.00.

“Tho

222

53

32.90

197

136

333

AAAAAAAAAAAAAAA

235

31

17.64

123

120

243

269

29

14.03

70

112

182

Rent Grant exceeds Principal Gra

219

62

48.32

435

136

571

201

36

18.43

92

64

156

*

"Thoroughly efficient." 4 years r "Inefficient."

230

39

31.59

190

138

328

213

85

56.64

340

340

205

75

60.34

302

302

"Inefficient.”

224

33

19.47

117

92

209

203

28

16.16

97

97

"Inefficient."

213

69

51.21

358

176

534

203

32

25.58

215

45

37.15

212

30

20.77

212

46

33.04

223

61

43.33

210

78

60.92

??

3. M.

206

53

70.78

M.

218

120

88.86

215

67

53.23

>>

">

**

209

2455

8888

86

58.37

69

44.84

TO CO 1 1 ONONN=1= 1−

† 153

64

217

"Inefficient." 2 years running.

223

223

...

104

80

184

231

160

391

260

260

426

426

425

425

"Inefficient."

622

.622

"Thoroughly efficient."

373

373

409

409

314

314

M. S.

4

211

66

55.92

233

34

20.33

250

79

64.73

יי

4

257

45

31.65

ગોત્ર:

391

244

635

102

72

174

388

300

688

† 158

176

334

"Inefficient."

4

248

47

32.64

196

128

324

"Thoroughly efficient." Last year's Grant at $6.00.

2 years running.

[exceeds Prir

...

209

76

58.93

413

413

Last year's Grant at $6.00.

259

41

28.08

197

197

Last year's Grant at $6.00.

218

62

46.18

6

277

277

250

47

34.33

6

206

112

318

256

37

29.04

6

174

68

242

2291

48

37.46

225

225

>>

. M.

209

95

74.62

522

259

781

Last year's Grant at $9.00.

...

+

...

...

...

M.

217

41

30.44

222

50

39.61

1. S. nlar.

2531/

28

28.08

6

203

94

41.91

2,615

1,927.70

5,015

3,779.88

152

171

323

277

200

477

Rent Grant exceeds Principal Gran "Thoroughly efficient."

168

90

258

293

61

357

12,796

3,242

16,038

37,842

4,114

41,956

B. M. Basel Mission.

W. M. Wesleyan Mission.

=Boys.

Girls.

B.

G.

M.

-Mixed.

#

**

=School year ends 30th June, 1907.

School year ends 31st December, 1907.

Grants (when in Sterling) paid at the Grants (when in Sterling) paid at the

icated with a red cross have been deducted as the schools in question have been declared inefficient for two years running.

:

་་ ་*

e (Code Sec 35 i,)

502

502

347

347

8

390

2

8

355

390 355

Last year's Grant at $7.00. Last year's Grant at $7.00.

66

"Thoroughly efficient.” "Thoroughly efficient.”

4

247

247

226

226

230

230

:

499

80

579

197

136

333

123

120

243

70

112

182

Rent Grant exceeds Principal Grant.

435

136

66 571

}

92

64

156

Last year's Grant at $7.00. "Thoroughly efficient." [2 years running..

Thoroughly efficient. 4 years running,

"Inefficient."

190

138

328

340

340

302

302 "Inefficient.”

117

92

209

97

97 "Inefficient."

358

176

534

† 153

64

217

"Inefficient." 2 years running.

223

223

104

80

184

231

160

391

260

260

426

426

425

425

"Inefficient."

622

622

"Thoroughly efficient."

373

373

409

409

314

314

391

244

635

102

72

174

6

388

300

688

5

† 158

176

334

"Thoroughly efficient."

Last year's Grant at $6.00.

"Inefficient." 2 years running. Rent Graut

6

196

128

324

[exceeds Principal Grant.

413

413

Last year's Grant at $6.00.

197

197

Last year's Grant at $6.00,

6

277

277

6

206

112

318

6

174

68

242

6

225

225

7

522

259

781

Last year's Grant at $9.00.

...

:

***

...

...

152

171

323

277

200

477

168

90

258

293

64

357

12,796

3,242

16,038

37,812

4,114

41,956

B. M. Basel Mission,

=

W. M. Wesleyan Mission.

B.

G.

=Boys. -Girls.

M.

=Mixed.

Rent Grant exceeds Principal Grant. "Thoroughly efficient.”

*

=School year ends 30th June, 1907.

=School year ends 31st December, 1907.

Grants (when in Sterling) paid at the rate of 2s. 24d. Grants (when in Sterling) paid at the rate of 2s. låd.

the schools in question have been declared inefficient for two years running.

From.

Managing

Body.

To

P'eriod.

Table VIII.

FREE SCHOLARSHIPS.

"A" Boys.

Position in

Class at

Won by.

Date.

Date.

Annual

Recommendation. To be continued.'

Remarks.

Cost to Government,

Examination.

329 -

Saiyingpun, D. S. |

Three Years.

Li Hiu Chủ...

1905. 28th in Class VI.

Expires July 1908. Given as a

1907.

re-

$2.00 p.m. for 10 ms.=

$20.00

ward for long and faithful ser-

vice in Govern-

ment employ of

Father Li Shing

Fat.

| Govt. D. S. Queen's College.

3 years if satisfactory

Tang Po Cho,

1906.

5th

IV A.,

1907.

Continued 1907.

Third year.

2.00

annually

24.00

To be

1908.

*

progrecs shewn,

Do.

Do.

Do.

To Mui Shang,

Do.

23rd

IV A.

Do.

Do.

Do.

2.00

24,00

#

:་

Do.

Do.

Do.

Pan Fung I,

1907.

Excellent II A.

Do.

Continued 1908.

Second year.

3.50

42.06

·

Do.

Do.

Do.

Yeung Kin Chan,

Do.

Very good II B.

Do.

Do.

Do.

3.50

42.00

Do.

Do.

Do.

Lo Kwong Fuk,

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

8.50

42.00

"

Do.

Do.

Do.

Young Ki Shan,

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

3.50

42.00

፡፡

Aberdeen,

Do..

Tanglungchau,

Do.,

Govt.

Saiyingpun, D. S.

4 years if satisfactory

Lin Fuk On,

Do.

31st in Class VI.

Do.

Do.

Do.

2.00

for 10 ms.

20.00

progress shewn.

Do.

Wantsai. D. S.

Do.

Iu Yung Ching,

Do.

11th

VI.

Do.

Do.

Do.

2.00

20.00

"

"

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Ho Shiu Lau,

Do.

(Discontinued boy

left.)

Do.

Ling Man Lai,

Do.

7th

VI

Do.

Continued 1908.

Do.

2.00

20.00

"

Uen Long, Grant School No. 64.

Do.

Yaumati, D. S.

Do.

Chin Hi Wo,

Do.

2nd

V.

Do.

Do.

Do.

2.00

20.00

"

R. *.

Saiyingpun, D. S

] 0.

Pun Kwai,

Do.

13th

VIL

Do.

Do.

Do.

2.00

20.00

"

Do..

No. 29.

Do.,

No. 40.

Do:

Do

Do.,

No. 72.

No. 48.

No. 50.

L. M. S.

Do.

Secular.

Do.

Do.

Chan Ki Ching,

Do.

17th

*VIII.

Do.

Do.

Do.

2.00

20.00

Do.

Do.

Fun U Chiu,

Do.

16th

VIII.

Do.

Po.

Do.

2.00

20.00

!།

Yaumati, D. S.

Do.

Hung King Po,

Do.

4th

VIII B.

Do.

Do.

Do.

2.00

20.00

B. M.

Do.

Do.

Sum Loi On.

Do.

3rd

VIII B.

Do.

Do.

Do.

2.00

20.00

P

#

Do.

Do.

Do.

Chu Tam Shing.

Do.

7th

VIII B.

Do.

Do.

Do.

2.00

20.00

;;

First year.

2.00

::

annually

24.00

Yaumati, D. S.

Govt.

Queen's College.

Wantsai, D. S.

Do.

Yaumati, D. S.

Do.

Do.

Do.

3 years if satisfactory progress shown. Do.

William Wong,

1908.

Do.

2.00

24.00

"

Ip Kam Cheung,

Do.

Do.

2.00

24.00

"}

}}

Do.

Leung Kwok Tsoi,

Do.

Do.

2.00

24.00

1

Yaumati, D. S.

Po.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Aberdeen,

Saiyingpun, D. S.

4 years if satisfactory

Tang Yuk Tin, Chan Pok Tin,.......

Do.

Do.

2.00

for 10 ms.

20.00

Do.

Tanlungchau,

Do..

Do.

Wantsai, D. S.

progress shown. Do.

Do.

2.00

20.00

Tsoi Kam Tat,

Do.

Do.

2.00

20.00

"

>>

Do.

Do.

Do.

Lai Kwan,

Do.

Do.

2.00

20.00

Uen Long, Taipo and Ping- Shan in Competition,

Do.

Yaumati, D. S.

Do.

*Mak Lam Mun.

Do.

Do.

2.00

20.00

"

Grant School No. 64.

R. M.

Saiyingpun, D, S.

Do.

Tsang Yui Meng,

Do.

Do.

2.00

20.00

"}

Do.,

Do

No. 72.

Secular.

Yaumati, D. S.

Do.

Ng Sui Ying,

Do.

Do.

2.00

20.00

15

No. 19.

B. M.

Do.

Do.

Cheung Chung Fat,

Do.

$62.00

$672,00

*From Taipo School.

:

Managing

To.

Period.

From.

Body.

Table VIII,-Continued.

"B" Girls.

Position in

Class at

Won by.

Date.

Date.

Annual

Recommendation. "To be continued.'

Remark.

"}

Annual Cost to Government. ((in loss of Revenue.)

Examination.

330

Belilios

School-Lower

Govt.

Classes,

Belilios School, Upper Classes.

Do.,

Do.

Do.

4 years if satisfactory progress is shewn, One year.

Lo Lai Wa,

1907.

Sissie Johannsen,

Do.

4th in Class V. B.

1907.

Left in November previous to Exam. Not renewed.

Do.,

Do.

Do.

One year.

Leung A Lin,

Do. 17th

V.B.

Do.

Do.

Work unsatis-

factory.

Do.

Do.,

Do.

Do.

One year.

Ng Ngai Sin,

Do.

3rd

VI.B.

Do.

Renewed for one

2nd year.

$1.50 p.m. for 10 ms.:

$ 15.00

"}

year.

Do.,

Do.

Do.

Three years.

Chan So,

Do.

Ist

VII. B.

Do.

Three years.

Do.

1.50

15.00

}}

}}

Grant School No. 33,

L. M. S.

Do.

Do.

No. 69,

W. M.

Do.

4 years if satisfactory progress is shewn. Do.

Shin Tak Hing,

Do.

Very good.

Do.

Continued 1908.

Do.

1.50

15.00

"

Im A Chu,

Do.

3rd in Class

Do.

Left.

Do.

VIII. B.

1st year.

1.30

15.00

"}

}}

Belilios

School Lower

Govt.

Do.

4 years if satisfactory progress is shewn.

Chan A Yuk,

1908.

Do.

1.50

15.00

}}

Classes,

Do.,

Do.

Do.

One year.

Chan Pik Mi,

Do..

Do.

1.50

15.00

"}

"}

Do.,

Do.

Do.

One year.

Wong Sai Mui,

Do.

Do.

1.50

15.00

>>

Grant School No. 33,

L. M. S.

Do.

4 years if satisfactory

Leung I Tak,

Do.

Do.

No. 51,

B. M.

Do.

progress is shown. Do.

Do.

1.50

15.00

}}

Cheung Fuk To,

Do.

Do.

1.50

"}

"

15.00

Do.

No. 69,

W. M.

Do.

Do.

Wong Yuk Lau,

Do.

:

$13.50

$135.00

331

Appendix A.

No. 1.-Kowloon British School.

Staff.-Mr. B. JAMES, M.A. (on leave), Mrs. MAIN, Headmistress, Mrs. DRUMMOND, Mrs. ROBERTSOx (temporary), Miss RODGER.

Discipline and Organization.--Very good. The school has suffered in numbers owing to the establishment of a Garrison English School in Kowloon and the consequent withdrawal of children whose fathers belong to the military establishment.

Sanitation.-Very satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 230 pupils.

Apparatus.-Very satisfactory.

English-Reading.--Very good.

Handwriting.—Very good throughout.

Composition.--Gool, but in the upper forms the essays were very short

and the subject matter was by no means fully treated.

Dictation.-Good.

Grammar.-Good. It should be noted however, that when definitions are given they should always be illustrated by examples. Mere definitions are useless.

Geography. Good except in Form IV which might have been better. The map drawing in Forms V and VI was excellent and good in Form IV.

History-Fair in Form IV where the important dates were not well known and distinctly good in Forms V and VI.

Arithmetic.-Good. In Form IV as the working of the sums was not shown marks were deducted. Forms V and VI very good.

French. This subject is taught in Forms V and VI. The unseen translation French into English and vice versa was good and the prepared work was very good.

Dictation.-Good.

Grammar.-Good..

Drawing and Painting.-Good especially in the upper forms.

Singing and Musical Drill.-Very good indeed.

Recitation.-Very good,

Hygiene.-The upper forms did well. The paper set was not very difficult.

Needlework. This suject appears to be somewhat neglected. What there was was good but it was very simple.

Scripture.-The Rev. C. H. HICKLING examined the whole school. In the lowest forms the work was good, Form IV did fairly well and Forms V and VI very well. The Rev. HICKLING Concludes his report as follows:-"Regarding the whole school the impressiou I brought away was of conscientious and thorough teaching resulting in a good standard of attainment with marked advance among the seniors."

General. The general knowledge of the pupils in the upper standards is weak and possibly acounts for the paucity of ideas in such subjects as composition. It might be well to substitute General Modern History for Greek and Roman History as the former appears more useful in a school where pupils do not remain long enough to receive instruction in both subjects.

332

INFANT SCHOOL.

The work in this division has been satisfactory throughout the year.

No. 2.-Victoria British School.

Staff-W. H. WILLIAMS, F.R.G.S.. Mrs. WILKINSON and Mrs. L. MORRIS.

Discipline and Organization.-Discipline very good with the exception of Class III where it appeared somewhat lax. The organization is good; there are now no girls in the Upper School.

Sanitation. The school is gradually improving is this respect. The drainage works in the immediate neighbourhood have been completed and it has now been decided to convert the bamboo plantation immediately below the school, which has been a dumping ground for all kinds of rubbish, into a playground. It will be filled in and levelled and turfed as funds allow. When the playground is completed there should be no further complaints about the insanitary state of the school. Two new rooms are being added to the Headmaster's quarters which up to the present have consisted of two rooms only.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 182 pupils.

Apparatus.--Very satisfactory.

English.―Reading.--Good on the whole. One or two boys in the highest class might

read better.

Handwriting.-Good.

Recitation.-Better in the lower classes than in the apper ones.

Dictation.-Fair. There is room for improvement.

Composition-Good on the whole.

Grammar.-Fair to poor except Class VI which was good.

English Literature. This subject is only studied in the Upper School. The results were rather disappointing. One boy in Class VI did very well. Class V did badly as a whole.

Geography.-Fair in the lower school. Class II did not offer enough for one year's work. Class V did badly and VI was poor. I am at a loss to account for the poor results in this subject as compared with last year.

History. —Classes V and VI fair.

Mathematics.-Arithmetic.-Good in the lower school. Poor in Class V and fair in VI. The standard of the paper in the highest class is below the average in other schools of the same type in the Colony.

Algebra. Very fair.

Hygiene.-Class VI (only) good. Class V should be examined in this subject next year.

Drawing.-(Freehand and model.) Very fair.

Geometrical Drawing.—Very good.

Singing-Distinctly good especially the scales.

Musical Drill.- (Lower School.) Very good.

333

INFANT SCHOOL.

Useful work has been done during the year.

General. Geography and Grammar will have to improve in the new year. Class V as a whole is not as good as it should be, but the poor results at the annual examination are due to the fact that the school year has been altered to bring this school into line with the other Government Schools and that the boys have not had a full year in this class.

OXFORD LOCAL EXAMINATION.

For the first time in the history of the School candidates from Victoria School entered for the Preliminary Oxford Local Examination in July last.

The results were very satisfactory indeed. 4 boys entered and all passed; 3 in the First Division and 1 in the second division.

No. 3.-Belilios Public School, English and Anglo-Chinese Side.

Staff.-Mrs. TuTCHER, Miss BATEMAN, three Junior Assistants and 1 Needlework

Teacher.

Discipline and Organization.-Discipline. Good on the whole. Girls however still persist in not speaking up especially so in the Anglo-Chinese Division where some pupils absolutely declined to give audible answers. Matters improved somewhat when it came to recitation possibly as prizes are offered by the Belilios Trust No. II for the best recitations. The refusal to take my advice and speak up was so marked however that I decided not to apply to the Trustees for any prizes for elocution this year and hope that pupils will bear in mind that these prizes will not be awarded until they make some real effort to speak up, not only when reciting, but when answering any questions put to them. The discipline in Class VIIIB must improve. There was too much talking during my examination.

Organization.--The new arrangemet of classes indroduced in 1906 entails rather too much class work on the part of the headmistress at the expense of supervision, most of which is required in the Anglo-Chinese division. It also tends to throw the teaching of the largest classes on the youngest and most inexperienced teachers. It will therefore be necessary to modify the present arrangement of the classes to some extent in the new year.

Sanitation.-Very satisfactory. The school building has been put in thorough repair and has been repainted and colourwashed throughout.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 500 pupils.

Apparatus. Very satisfactory.

A. THE ENGLISH DIVISION. CLASSES I & II (III NO PUPILS) IV, VA, VIA, VIIA & VIII A.

Reading.-Very good except in VII A & VIII A the two lowest classes.

Colloquial. Very good in Classes I and II, good in IV and V A, very fair in VI A, very limited in VIIA and VIII A.

Dictation.-Good.

Composition. Good on the whole, but many of the essays in Classes I and II (on the subject of exercise) read more like hygiene papers. Each paragraph was also numbered. There should be no numbering, no firstly and secondly in an essay. The reproductions of stories in the lower classes were quite good. In some essays especially in IV and V the spelling was poor.

Grammar.-Practically none is taught. The parts of speech should be learnt and parsing should be done.

331

Geography.-Good in Classes I, IV and V; fair in II which would have been better had the questions been more carefully studied. The lower classes were fair. Class VIII should do the geography of the school and neighbourhood.

History.-Good in I, IV and V, fair to poor in II. In all classes especially in II marks were lost through not answering the questions set and through wasting time on details which were not asked for.

Arithmetic. Good in Class I, poor in II, good in the lower classes; Class VI A however had not got as far as division. The standard of this subject is a good deal below that of other schools in the Colony and will have to receive more attention.

Hygiene. Good in I and II, poor in IV and V.

B. ANGLO-CHINESE DIVISION.

CLASSES VB, VIB, VIIB & VIIIB.

The results were disappointing throughout this division and I can only infer that they were due to the lack of proper supervision of the classes. The headmistress who under pre- sent conditions has to take 5 classes herself will have to be relieved of part of her present work to enable her to supervise the whole school more thoroughly.

Reading.-Fair.

Colloquial.-Poor except in VIIB.

Object Lessons.-- Fair.

Recitation-Good on the whole.

Dictation. Very fair.

Grammar.-None taught.

Composition.-Poor throughout. The essays were very ungrammatical, the spelling was poor and in VIIB the work was also untidy.

Geography.--Fair to poor.

There is room for improvement in this subject.

History.-VB only. Poor.

Good in VB. The remarks on Arithmetic in the English

Arithmetic.-Very fair. Good in VB.

Division apply here also.

Hygiene.-Poor. This subject has evidently not received much attention. Physiology which has been taught should be given up and more time devoted to this subject.

Needlework.-Needlework throughout the school was good.

General. Prizes were again very kindly offered by Mr. BELILIOS for composition in the spring and some very good essays were sent in.

No. 4.-Saiyingpun District School.

Staff.-A. MORRIS and 6 Chinese Assistant Masters.

Discipline and Organization.-The discipline in very good and the organization very satisfactory. The staff has been increased by the addition of two Chinese Assistant Masters and an European Assistant Master is provided for in the 1908 Estimates. To further improve the Chinese work the system of separate Chinese classes is being introduced on the same lines as at Queen's College.

Sanitation.-Very satisfactory.

335

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 187 pupils. This is to be increased by the addition of a second storey to the school.

Apparatus. Very satisfactory.

English-Colloquial.-Good in Classes IV and V, Fair in VI, VII and VIII. Class VI

will have to practise colloquial to a greater extent.

Reading. Very good in Class V, good in IV, VII and VIII and fair in VI. Writing.—Good in the upper forms but bad in the lower.

Composition.-Good on the whole in Classes IV, V and VII but poor in VI

and VIII.

Dictation. Should be better in the upper classes.

Grammar.-Good with the possible exception of Class VII.

Geography. Very good in Class IV, good in the remaining classes. the Kwangtung Province was not well known.

In Class VII

Arithmetic.-Mental.-This subject has evidently received more attention and has very

much improved.

Written.-Fair in Class IV (the highest Class) very good in Vand-

good in VI, VII and VIII.

Drawing and Brushwork.-These two subjects continue to arouse interest. Some excellent brushwork was done.

Chinese. Reading.-Good.

Composition.-Very good in Classes V and VII, good in VI and VIII. Translation.-Chinese into English.-Poor. The piece set was possibly a

little difficult.

Hygiene. Very good.

No. 5.-Yaumati District School.

Staff-W. CURWEN, S. R. MOORE and 6 Chinese Assistant Masters.

Discipline and Organization.—The school is practically full now.

Differences in the

standards of attainment are very marked in all classes. The discipline is very good.

Sanitation.-Very satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 268 pupils.

Apparatus. Very satisfactory.

English-Colloquial.-Distinctly good in all classes excepting VI. This appears to be the weak class in English in all the District Schools. Lessons devoted entirely to practice in colloquial would probably im- prove the standard.

Reading. Good in the upper classes, fair in VII and VIII.

Composition. Fair to good except in VIII which was weak. matter in Class IV was not well thought out. their ideas down as they occurred to them.

Dictation.-Poor in Class V, good in VI and VII, fair in VIII.

The subject

Boys wrote

Writing.-Good.

336

Grammar.—Good throughout.

Geography. Very good in the two upper classes, good in VI and VIII, weak in VII.

Arithmetic. Still continues weak with the exception of Class IV where the test paper was very well done and Class VIII which did well. The comments in last year's report have only been noted in part. Classes V, VI and VII will have to improve materially in the new year.

Hygiene.-Very good.

Chinese-Reading.-Fair in Classes IV and VIII but poor in the remainder.

Composition.-Poor in Class IV, very fair in the other classes. It is to be- hoped that the re-arrangement of the Chinese classes will lead to a marked improvement in this suject.

Translation. The results were poor in a somewhat difficult paper.

No. 6.-Wantsai District School.

Staff.-YOUNG HEE and 7 Chinese Assistant Masters.

Discipline and Organization.-Discipline very good except in VIIIB where there was too much talking. In the lowest class there are quite a number of boys who could not have passed the regular test examination in Chinese. This rule must be more strictly adhered to.

Sanitation.-Satisfactory. A portion of the covered play-ground has been converted into a temporary school-room. The additions to the school are to be begun shortly.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 241 pupils.

Apparatus. Very satisfactory. More dual desks are on order.

English.--Colloquial.-Weak except Class VII. This subject shows a falling off since

last year.

Reading. -Good.

Writing.-Very neat in the upper classes but very untidy in VII and VIII.

Dictation.-Good except in Class VII.

Composition.-Good on the whole in Classes IV and V, very fair in VI and.

VIII and poor in VII. Ideas seemed scarce in the essays of Class IV.

Grammar.-Fair to good.

Geography.-Very good in Classes IV and V, good in VII but poor in VI and VIII.

Arithmetic. Two very good papers were shown up in Class IV but the average was brought down by 2 failures. V and VI weak. VII and VIII good. The working was in

all cases neat.

Hygiene.-Fair.

Drawing.-Good.

Chinese. Reading.-Very good in the highest classes, good in the lower ones.

Composition.-Good in IV and V, poor in VI, VII and VIII.

Translation.-Weak: the paper was by no means easy.

No. 7.--Anglo-Indian School.

337

Staff.--MOHAMED AKBAR and 1 Assistant Master.

Discipline and Organization.-Discipline; good in the upper classes but not so good in VII and VIII where there is always too much talking. The headmaster should give these classes more personal attention.

Organization.-Owing to the death of the late headmaster Mr. JEHANGIR KHAN and the unavoidable delay in the appointment of his successor the school work suffered and the results are not as good as they should otherwise have been. It is to be hoped that now that the new headmaster has had time to become thoroughly acquainted with the school work the results next year will show a very marked and necessary improvement. Class V should remain the highest class for another year as the boys in that class ar: not far enough advanced for promotion to Class IV.

Sanitation.--The present school premises are very unsatisfactory as they are too dark and too noisy. On the expiration of the present lease it is to be hoped that more suitable school premises may be acquired.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 120 pupils.

Apparatus. More maps are required.

English.-Reading. --Good except in VIII.

Colloquial.-Fair in Classes V and VII, good in Class VI and poor in VIII.

Composition.--Weak. The boys have no facility in expressing their idens

on paper.

Grammar.-Weak throughout the school.

Geography.-Good in Class V but poor in the remaining classes. In the lower classes definitions were learnt by heart without their meaning being understood.

Classes VII and VIII should follow the Model Course.

Arithmetic.-Mental.Good.

Written.-Good on the whole in V and VI but the working of sums was in many cases inaccurate. Poor in VII and VIII. In Class VII only 1 boy had the multiplication sum right and none the division sum. In Class VIII numeration was bad.

Recitation.--Good.

Hygiene.-Good. This subject is only studied in Classes V and VI.

Grdu. --Fair.

The

General Composition and Grammar throughout the school and Arithmetic and Geography in the lower classes will have to receive more attention in the new year. written work of the lower school is untidy and must improve. Boys must be made to hold their slates straight and not at an angle when writing. They must also speak more distinctly.

No. 8.-Aberdeen Anglo-Chinese School.

Staff.-LEE KING SHỤM.

Discipline and Organization.-The work of Class VIII is not as thorough as it should be. The number of pupils attending the school is very small considering the size of the place.

Sanitation.-Very satisfactory.

¡

338

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 41 pupils.

Apparatus. Satisfactory.

English.-Reading.-Weak in Class VIII and good in VII.

Colloquial.-Fair in VIII and good in VII.

Grammar.-Poor; requires attention.

Handwritting.---Fair.

Composition. Poor throughout.

Dictation.-Good.

Arithmetic-Mental.Good.

Written. Poor in Class VIII where multiplication was not known at all. Gool in Class VII except the problem. Problems should be practised.

Geography.Good.

Chinese.-Reading.--Gool on the whole but Class VIII will have to offer very much

more next year.

Composition.-Very fair, too much "Tsuk Wa".

General. The pupils especially in Class VIII should be more attentive and alert. I had great difficulty in eliciting answers to my test questions in the early part of my examination. Marters improved however as the examination progressed.

No. 9.-Tang Lung Chau School.

Staff-KwOR KING SHAN.

Discipline and Organization.-Discipline good. The headmaster does not appear to take a very lively interest in his work.

Sanitation.-Satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 51 pupils.

Apparatus.-Satisfactory.

English-Coloquial.-Very little.

Composition. Fair.

Grammar.-Very fair.

Dictation.- Poor throughout. This subject requires serious attention.

Arithmetic.-Poor. In Class VII the problem was not attempted.

Geography.-Fair.

Chinese.-Reading.-Fair to poor.

Composition.-Fair.

339

No. 10.-Uen Long School.

Staff-PUN U SAM.

Discipline and Organization.-Discipline fair. The school room should not be used by the master for his meals. The school has lost ground as far as attendances are concerned, the average attendance not exceeding 10 at any time during the year. It has also not improved materially in any other respect and does not warrant the expenditure incurred on it by Government. I have therefore recommended that it be closed.

Sanitation.-Fairly satisfactory.

Apparatus.-Satisfactory.

English-Colloquial.-Very fair.

Reading. Very fair. The pronunciation in Class VII is faulty.

Dictation.-Very fair.

Handwriting-Good.

Grammar,-Good.

Composition.-Poor in Class VIII and fair in VII.

Geography.--None is taught in Class VIII. This is not in order. Class VII very fair.

Arithmetic.- Mental.—Good.

Written.-Fair.

Chinese.—Reading.--Class VII should be much further on: only very easy work was

offered. Class VIII good.

Composition-Good to fair.

No. 11.-Taipo School.

Staff.-CHU WING TO. (MAK PING FUI was transferred to Ping Shan after the sum- mer holidays).

Discipline and Organization.--Good on the whole. Boys should be taught to speak only when addressed.

Sanitation. The school building is not at all suitable as it adjoins a tea shop which is wery noisy especially on market days. No other building is at present available. It is to be hoped however that one of the new houses in course of erection in a quieter locality may be leased shortly. The present school premises are also very hot and stuffy.

Apparatus.-Satisfactory.

English.-Reading.--Good.

Colloquial.-Very fair.

Dictation.-Fair.

Writing.-Fair.

Grammar.-Good.

Composition.-Good. The reproduction of a short story in Class VII was well done on the whole though the grammar was in several cases faulty.

340

Geography-Good in Class VIII but fair in Class VII.

Grithmetic.-Mental.—Good.

Written.--Good.

Chinese. Reading.-Good as far as it went but too little was offere I for one year's work.

Composition.Good. There is rather a tendency to write "TSUK WA"

(Colloquial Chinese).

No. 12.-Pingshan School.

Staff.—MAK PING FUI (exchanged with CHE WING To at midsummer).

Discipline and Organization.Good. The numbers have gone down considerably since the school first started but as this school is better patronized than Uen Long School it may improve as regards attendance now that the latter school has been closed.

Sanitation. The portion of the ancestral hall used as a school should be partitioned off. Apparatus.-Satisfactory.

English.―Reading.—Good.

Colloquial. Very fair.

Very fair. 3 beginners rather brought down the average of

Class VIII.

Writing. Good.

Dictation.-Very fair.

Composition.--Distinctly good especially in Class VII.

Grammar.-Fair in Class VIII and good in VII

Geography. Very fair.

Arithmetic.Good.

Chinese.-Reading. -Good.

Composition.-Good. Chinese pens should always be used for composition.

No. 13.--Belilios Public School. Vernacular Sidə.

Staff--SUNG HOK PANG, 5 Assistant Teachers, one Needlework Teacher and 2 Pupil

Teachers.

Discipline and Organization.-Discipline very good except in Standard I where there was too much talking. A further unsatisfactory feature in this class was the manner in which pupils conducted themselves at examination. They read in a great hurry, explained the sentences in a sing song and refused to be stopped. They paid no attention to my remarks and declined to listen even to their own teachers. More supervision will have to be exercized by the headmaster to remedy these weak points in the lowest class to some of which attention was called last year.

Organization:-very good. At future examinations pupils will not be allowed to make rough copies of their essays in the first instance as the true test of good composition lies in expressing one's thoughts clearly on paper without any hesitation whatever.

Sanitation.-Very satisfactory.

Apparatus.Very satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 432 pupils.

341

Chinese-Reading.-Very good in all classes. Standard VII were studying a very advanced book on etiquette, and appeared to understand it thoroughly. Standard VI did Mencius and from V to I different volumes of the National Reader were studied.

In

Class VI there was a slight tendency to get confused over the identity of the different persons speaking. The explanation of the text in Standards V to I was good throughout.

Composition.--Very good in Standards VII, VI and V, good in IV, II and I but fair only in III. The latter class was at sea when called upon to do sentence building and did not excel at converting colloquial into written Chinese.

Arithmetic. Mental-Good.

Written.-Fair in Standards VII and VI; very good indeed in V and IV good in II and I; Standard III was fair only. The work in this class was also badly written. In Standard VII simple interest was not understood, in VI the working of fractions was inaccurate and in proportion only the answers were shown.

Geography.-Very good throughout the school.

Physical--Standards VII and VI only. Good.

Needlework.--Embroidery very good. Plain sewing still appears to be neglected.

342

Appendix B.

DETAILED REPORTS ON GRANT SCHOOLS.

NOTE.- The reports of the schools marked with an asterisk are upon the work of the year ending 30th June.

*No. 1.-St. Joseph's College.

Staff-BROTHER SYLVESTER (Director) 11 Assistant Masters and 1 Chinese Assistant

Teacher.

Discipline and Organization.-Very good.

Sanitation.-Very satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 522 pupils.

Apparatus. A great deal of attention is given to the apparatus which is excellent. English-Colloquial.-Good throughout the School especially so in the highest standards where explanations of difficult passages were given with fluency and accuracy.

Reading.―Good. The pupils all understand the subject matter. Comopsition.-Distinctly good in the upper and fair in the lower stendards.

Handwriting.--Good throughout the school including the Chinese division.

The punctuation has improved.

Literature. Is taught in Standards VII and VI: Standard VII Senior did well in a Shakespeare paper and VII Junior very fairly well except in quoting where none of the boys seemed to feel the rythm of the lines. Standard VI were examined in the "Talisman" and did very well.

Grammar.-Very fair. However in some cases the questions had not been

carefully read and the answers were not to the point.

Geography.-Standard VII might have done better in the physical geography paper; one question was not answered correctly by any one. All the other standards except III did well. Standard III was poor.

History. Standards VII, VI and IV did well. standard V was not so good. The subject matter was generally well known but the dates were very inaccurate in many cases.

Mathematics.-Arithmetic. --For some unknown reason the working of sums was not always shown and it was quite impossible to tell how the answers had been obtained. The work in Standard VII disappointing. It was fair in the other standards except in III where it was distinctly good. The papers were very neat indeed and it is a pity the results fell short of last year's work.

was rather

Algebra.-VII Senior did some excellent work, VII Junior were not so good. VI and V did well, IV fairly well only. I am inclined to believe that in Class IV some boys copied the answers as out of 11 correct answers to a division sum only 1 shewed no mistake in the working, and 6 were so hopelessly wrong that it is impossible to come to any other conclusion.

Geometry.-Standard VII very good.

Geometrical Drawing.-VI very good. Some definitions were gather

weak.

Euclid.-Standard V good.

Book-keeping.-Very good and very neat.

343

Hygiene. In the advanced course a boy from this school was bracketed first. No team was entered for the Team Competition.

Chinese Division.-Since last year it has been found more convenient to create a Chinese division to which only Chinese pupils are admitted. It is divided into 3 Standards. I ex- amined them in the usual subjects, details of which are given below, and am of opinion that the classes are a distinct success.

English.-Reading.--Good throughout. The explanation of the subject matter had

been well taught.

Handwriting. Good.

Composition and Dictation.--Good.

Grammar. Very fair.

Chinese.--Reading. Good.

Composition.-Fair in Standards III and II, good in I. The upper standards

should do better.

Geography.-Good on the whole. In Standard II the physical geography was well

known.

Arithmetic.-Very good throughout, but here again the full working of the sums was not always shown.

General.-In some papers the spelling was rather faulty and in a few cases information was given in part and the rest left to my imagination by the addition of the word "etc.” This is not permissible in examination papers.

Grant.-I recommend a grant at the rate of 35/- (the full grant), and report that the school is again "thoroughly efficient ".

* No. 2.-Italian Convent.

Staff.--7 Sisters of Charity.

Discipline and Organization.-Very good. In some subjects many marks were lost by pupils not answering the questions set. Again such expressions as "ete" leaving the remainder of the information required to the imagination of the examiner are not allowed. Some curious similarities in the mistakes in several history and geography papers lead me to think that in these cases the questions were not answered unaided. Great care should be taken to prevent collaboration, as was pointed out in last year's report.

Sanitation.--Very satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 430 pupils.

Apparatus.-Satisfactory.

English.--Reading.-Good throughout the school.

Colloquial.-Good in the two highest standards, very fair in V, IV and III,

poor in II and I.

Composition. A little disappointing in Standard VII, distinctly good in V, and good in VI and IV. In the lower standards the spelling was very weak and the punctuation was poor.

Grammar.--Good throughout. The papers were very neat and well written.

Geography. Good in Standards VI and III, very fair in VII and V and poor in the remaining standards. In standard V there appears to have been collaboration..

.

344

History. Poor in Standard VII; only 3 questions were attempted though all the questions set were within the syllabus. In this standard as in Standard V the answers seem to have been learnt by heart. This mode of learning history should be discouraged. Standard VI fair, Standards V and IV good.

Arithmetic.-Good in the two highest standards. Many pupils however seem unable to discriminate between discount and interest. In standard V fractions were not properly understood. Standard IV did very badly indeed. Standard III did well but in the simple rules only; they should be more advanced. The lowest standards did fairly well.

Hygiene.--Very good. In the elementary course the team of this School took the 2nd place, good marks were also obtained in the Advanced Course.

Needlework. Very good.

Grant. The school is again "thoroughly efficient.” I recommend a grant at the rate of 351-.

* No. 3.-French Convent.

Staff-2 European Sisters of Charity and 1 Assistant Teacher.

Discipline and Organization.-Discipline good. The study of Arithmetic in the higher standards is still very poor and must receive early attention or the grant will have to be reduced. There is no VI Standard this year. The present staff is too small.

Sanitation.-Very satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 138 pupils.

Apparatus.-Very satisfactory.

English.-Colloquial. } Good in Standards V, IV and II, very fair in III and I.

Reading.

Composition.-Good in Standard V, fair in IV and III.

Dictation.-Very fair in Standard II but poor in I.

Grammar.-Good in Standard V, very fair in IV and poor in III.

Geography.—Good in Standard V but poor in the rest of the School. Standard I had not begun the subject.

Arithmetic.-Mental.-Very fair.

Written.-Bad in Standards V and IV, very poor in III, good in II and

very fair in I.

History. This subject is only learnt in Standards IV and V and was not well known. Dates were almost unknown.

Hygiene. The result of the annual examination was disappointing.

Needlework.-Good.

Grant.-I recommend a grant at the rate of 30/-.

No. 4.-Victoria Anglo-Portuguese School.

Staff.--Mrs. CORDEIRO and one Assistant.

Discipline and Organizatian.-The organization is very good. Discipline is good on the whole though the lower standards are a little noisy over their work.

345

Sanitation.-Very satisfactory.

Floor Space.--Sufficient for 86 pupils.

Apparatus.-Very satisfactory.

English-Colloquial. Very good throughout the school.

Reading.

Composition-Good.

Geography-Good.

Arithmetic.-Very good in all standards except III which was only fair in written arithmetic though good in mental.

History.-Fair. It was good in Standards II, III and IV except for the dates, but poor in Standard V. Dates must be known.

Hygien-Very good.

Grammar-Good throughout the school.

General.--When Arithmetic is done on paper the full working of sums should be shown. In the subject of composition the spelling is somewhat faulty and should receive special attention. No sentence should begin with "and".

Grant. I report that the school is "thoroughly efficient" and recommend a grant at the rate of 35/-.

* No. 5.-Bridges Street.

Staff.-Two Sisters of Mercy.

Discipline and Organization.-Very good. There are now 4 pupils in Standard III who are very well up in their work.

Sanitation.-Very satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 102 pupils.

Apparatus.-Very satisfactory.

English-Colloquial.-Good.

Reading. Very good.

Composition.-Standard III only: very fair.

Dictation.-Very good.

Geography.--Good.

Arithmetic.-Mental.Good.

Written.-Very good.

Needlework.Good.

Grant.--I recommend a grant at the rate of 30/-.

!

.

346

* No. 6.-Sacred Heart.

Staff Two European Sisters of Charity.

Discipline and Organization.-Good. There are only 3 Standards.

Sanitation.-Very satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 88 pupils.

Apparatus. Very satisfactory.

English-Colloquial.-Good.

Reading. Very good.

Composition.-Good.

Geography-Fair. This subject has not been taught in Standard I; it should be taught. Standard II was good, Standard III poor.

Arithmetic-Mental.-Very good.

Written. Very good.

Standard I might do better in mental arithmetic.

Grant.--I recommend a grant at the rate of 30/-.

* No. 7.-Diocesan Girls School.

Staff-Miss SKIPTON, Miss HAWKER and 2 Assistants.

Discipline and Organization.-Discipline good. Some confusion is caused by the fact that the school year and the grant year do not coincide. At my annual examination only six months work in the school year had been done and as it is only fair to other schools that a whole year's work should be offered, I would suggest that if possible the school year be made to correspond with the grant year in which case no difficulties should again arise. The 3 highest standards are still taught together. This practice should be discontinued.

Sanitation.-Very satisfactory.

Floor Space.--Sufficient for 64 pupils. Apparatus.-Satisfactory.

English.--Reading.-Good. The explantation of the text was fair and leaves room

for improvement.

Composition and Dictation.-Standard VII was distinctly good. The style, treatment of the subject, spelling and punctuation were all carefully studied. Standard VI was disappointing the more so as the piece selected for reproduction was very easy. Standards V, IV and III were poor, spelling was faulty and the punctuation bad. Standard II did better than Standards III and IV.

the

Grammar.-This subject is very weak and it appears as though the elementary ideas of it were not taught properly in the lower classes. Standard VII did better than last year but the pupils seem to dislike the subject. This dislike was shown in examples such as; "Grammar taxes my patience," "I dislike grammar" and others in equally bad taste.

Geography-Very

-Very good in Standards VI and VII. The sketch maps were very neat and accurate. Good in Standards IV and III and very fair in Standards V and II. Standard I should be taught this subject.

347

History.--Good except in Standard V where the work was poor. Dates were well known on the whole.

Arithmetic.-Very weak indeed. Standard V broke down completely on a paper originally set for Standard IV, and in a very easy paper Standard IV only did fairly well. This subject will have to be taken seriously in hand as it is distinctly below the average.

Hygiene. This subject shews a falling off both as regards the advanced and the elementary courses.

Needlework, Good.

Grant.-I recommend a grant at rate of 30/-. The grammar and arithmetic especially will have to improve if the school is to maintain its present position on the grant list.

No. 8.-Diocesan School, Boys.

Staff-Headmaster, G. PIERCY, 8 Assistant European Masters and Mistresses and 2 Chinese Masters.

Discipline and Organization.-Good. The work of the school continues to be very efficient on the whole but more attention will have to be paid to Arithmetic and Grammar in certain classes and Chinese throughout.

Sanitation.-Very satisfactory.

Apparatus.-Very satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 470 pupils.

English.--Colloquial. This subject is distinctly good in the upper standards but I and

ÎI are weak.

Reading.-Good throughout.

Writing-All papers shown up were neat and showed that this subject had

received attention.

Composition.-Very good in Standard VII. The subject matter was well thought out and the essays were written in good style, but the first person and such terms as firstly, secondly should be avoided in an essay. In Standards VI and V there were numerous grammatical errors and mistakes in spelling which brought down the standard of the essays. Standard V reproduced a story which only 2 boys failed to understand. The 4 lower standards were fair. Their chief weaknesses were mistakes in grammar.

Dictation. In the lower standards was good.

Grammar.-Good on the whole. The parsing in Standard IV was poor.

Standard VII was distinctly good.

Geography.-Good. The papers were neat. he paper was very easy. tonfined to definitions.

Standard VI might have done better as The work in III and II is rather too general being chiefly II offered very little for examination.

History.-Standard VII did very well indeed. Their work was well above the usual school standard and showed careful teaching. In this connection the paper shown up by Chiu Yau Tsz deserves special mention. Standard VI

very fair.

Standard V good.

*

348

Mathematic. Arithmetic.-Good in the lower standards, poor in IV, V and VI and good in Standard VII. This subject will have to receive more attention in the new year.

Geometry.-Good. If a proposition is continued on a new page the figure should be drawn again to facilitate the proof being checked. Geometrical Drawing-Standard VI good, VII very good. The inking

in of the drawings is a great improvement.

Algebra.-Standard V very fair. The average was brought down by several complete failures. Standard VI fair only. Standard VII distinctly good and a great advance on the two lower standards.

Book-keeping. This subject is taken in Standard VII only. The work was fairly accurate and the commercial terms were well known.

Latin.—The upper classes VI and VII suffered as this subject had to be dropped during preparation of pupils for the Oxford Local Examinations. Class V where the study was not interrupted did well.

the

Chinese. Reading and Composition were done in Standards I to III only, and transla- tion from and into Chinese in Standards V. VI and VII. Standard IV appears to be omitted. Reading and composition should be contin- ued up to Standard V at least.

Reading.-Standard I fair to poor. boys were quite unable to read. requires more attention.

Standard II good on the whole but 5 III fair to poor. Reading certainly

Composition.-Very fair, but each class had a tail consisting of boys who

knew nothing.

Translation from Chinese into English.-Standard VI very fair, Standard VII good, but only 4 boys in all showed up papers in these two standards. In V 8 boys did translation. Two did well, the remainder badly and among them 3 wrote nonsense.

English into Chinese.---Standard VI did well as did Standard VII but in the former some boys did not know the Chinese title for the Registrar-General ! In the same standard one boy did not knew the form in which a Chinese petition should be written.

It might

Chinese seems to be somewhat neglected and should receive more attention. be well to class the boys in Chinese according to their attainments and not according to the English Class they are in. The present system tends to keep good boys back.

Grant.-I again return the school as "thoroughly efficient" and recommend a grant at the rate of 35/-.

* No. 9.-St. Mary's, Kowloon.

Stoff-Four Sisters of Mercy and one Assistant Teacher.

Discipline and Organization.-Good.

Sanitation.-Very satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 152 pupils.

Apparatus.-Satisfactory.

English.-Reading.-Good in all standards except I. The pupils read too fast and somewhat inaccurately in the upper standards. The subject matter of the reading is fairly well understood.

Colloquial.-Fair except in Standards IV and I where it was distinctly poor.

·

349

Composition. Should be better in Standard VI. Good in Standard V where however the handwriting was bad. In Standard IV the spelling was very faulty. Dictation in Standards II and I was good.

Geography.-Good in the three upper Standards VI, V and IV and poor in the lower standards. Both in Standards VI and V there was a somewhat suspicious similarity in many of the papers, the same mistakes appearing and the same expressions being made use of. A proper syllabus of work should be drawn up for the three lower standards. They should have learnt very much more than they presented for examination.

History.-Poor on the whole. Fair in Standard VI but I have doubts as to whether the work was done unaided by each pupil. Standard V was very weak; many of the questions were not even attempted. In Standard IV the proportion of bad papers shown up very much exceeded the good ones.

Arithmetic.-Bad in Standards V and VI. Fractions are apparently not understood. IV fair, weak in problems, III. II and I good but Standard III should be more advanced.

Hygiene. The school did not do very well either in the elementary or in the advanced courses, but this is hardly surprizing as the subject has only recently been taken up.

Needlework.-Good,

Grant. I recommend a grant at the rate of 30/-. Arithmetic and History will have to receive greater attention if the position of the school on the grant list is to remain what it is at present.

}

*No. 11.-Ellis Kadoorie School.

Staff.-Mr. BRAIDWOOD, 3 Assistant English masters and 11 Chinese masters.

Discipline and Organization.--Good on the whole. The school now number over 500 boys. The roll is called in a very short time considering the number of boys. Discipline is well maintained by the English masters but the same does not appear to be the case with the Chinese masters. On one occasion while I was exa-nining boys on the 1st floor of the new building a great deal of noise was going on on the 2nd floor where Chinese inasters were teaching. Discipline and obedience to orders should be strictly enforced by all in authority.

Sanitation.-Very satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 1076 pupils.

Apparatus. Very satisfactory.

English-Colloquial.-Fair except in Class IV where it was distinctly poor.

Reading-Good throughout the school.

Composition.-Fair. The style it faulty especially so in letter writing.

The junior boys appeared to take much more interest in this branch of their work than the seniors. In Classes I and II it was very difficult to get an answer even to the simplest question.

ques-

In

Grammar.-There was a great lack of uniformity in the analysis of sentences. Many mistakes were due to carelessness, and it was obvious the tions had not been studied properly before the answers were given. this subject as in several others the answers were very similar and appeared to have been learnt by heart.

Geography.--Good except in Class VII. Class I was distinctly good, Class II did well except in map drawing. The maps of the course of the Yang Tse Kiang indicating the important towns on its banks were failures in almost all cases.

.

350

History.-Good on the whole. The subject chosen was extremely difficult ie., the history of the ancient Egyptians, Chaldaeans and Assyrians and had been learnt by heart. I very much doubt if the subject was well understood. A knowledge of the history of China or of the nations with whom China has dealings would appear to me a more profitable subject of study and one which would be very much easier to acquire.

Mathematics.-Arithmetic.-Weak in Classes I and II and good throughout the rest of

the school.

Algebra-Fair.

Euclid.-Fair in Classes I and II and good in Class III. The figures were in many cases very badly drawn and in this as well as in other subjects there was an absence of neatness and method.

Mensuration. --Very good. This subject is only studied in Class I.

Science-Good. The textbook is rather old fashioned and should be changed. In classes II and III the answers to the questions appear to have been learnt by heart. As in the grammar and history papers when one paper has been read through the contents of all the remaining papers are known. The teaching of this subject should be of a more practical nature and boys should be discouraged from using the exact words of the textbook. To quote some instances of the similarity of papers the word capacity appears in almost all cases as "capicity, and fire" as "fires Sentences begin in the words of the book: "An astonishing fact may here be mentioned". These have obviously been learnt by heart.

Chinese.-There are 12 Chinese classes in all. The reading in six of them was good as was the explanation of the text, in the remainder fair only. The composition also varied from very good in the upper classes to fair in the lower ones.

Chinese Translation.-Very fair on the whole, but the boys use sentences and expres- sions which are so alike that it is very difficult to believe that they have not copied from each others papers. Such expressions as "fallen in bankruptey" occur in nearly every "Herewith a copy In one piece of translation every boy left out the final sentence.

paper.

of the Account for goods supplied". The English was in some cases very bad. Greater care must also be taken to translate the full text and not to omit sentences or parts of

sentences.

Hygiene.Good in the advanced course. Poor in the elementary course.

General. The new wing was opened about one year ago, but even with this additional accommodation the congestion in the old building is still great. Some of the classes are almost too big for one master to supervise properly.

The boys throughout the school should be encouraged to speak louder and more distinctly as at present their answers are often quite inaudible especially if they happen to be seated at the back of one of the large class rooms.

Grant.--I recommend a grant at the rate of 30/- and consider that very satisfactory progress has been made during the past twelve months.

No. 12.-Fairléa.-English School.

Staff-Miss HAZELAND and Miss S. V. FLETCHER.

Discipline and Organization.-Discipline fair. Some of the girls prompted each other and in at least one instance a girl copied from another girl's papers. The teachers should be very particular to check this practice and punish any offenders.

Organization. The organization does not appear to be satisfactory at present. There are only three Standards I, III and VI and there seems some doubt as to whether Standard III should be called III or IV. The school apparently lacks a nucleus of permanent scholars who pass from class to class each year. An attempt should be made to fill the vacant classes in the new year and a more definite programme of studies for each standard should be drawn up.

Sanitation.-Very satisfactory.

Apparatus.-Satisfactory.

Floor Space-Sufficient for 44 pupils.

351

English.-Reading.-Very fair. In many cases the meaning of what was read was

not understood.

Composition. Good in Standard VI, fair in III and bad in I.

Grammar.-Fair in Standard VI and poor in III.

Geography-Poor except Standard VI which was good.

Arithmetic.—Mental.-Poor.

Written. Very fair.

Needlework.-Very good.

History. Fair. Many of the papers were suspiciously alike.

Grant. I recommend a grant at the rate of 30/- which will have to be reduced next year unless the scholars are more evenly distributed in the different standards.

* No. 13.-St. Francis,

Staff-One European Sister of Charity and 2 Assistant Mistresses.

Discipline and Organization.-Good.

Sanitation.--Very satisfactory.

Floor Space.--Sufficient for 147 pupils.

Apparatus.--Very satisfactory.

English.---Colloquial.-Very fair.

Reading.-Good.

Composition.-Very fair.

Reading & Dictation.-Infant Class: very fair.

Grammar.-Standard III only. Poor.

Geography. Standard I knew very little and the Infant Class had not been taught the subject. Standard II poor. Standard III good. More attention should be paid to this subject in the lower standards.

Arithmetic.-Mental.-Good.

Written. Very fair.

Needlework.--Fair.

General. There was only one pupil in Standard III, there were 13 in Standard II and

I and 18 in the Infant Class.

Grant. I recommend a grant at the rate of 30/-.

352

No. 14.-St. Stephen's Anglo-Chinese School.

Staff-TANG CHI KUN and 5 Assistant Masters.

Discipline and Organization.-Discipline might be better.

There is too much talking

and boys are constantly leaving the room. This is quite unnecessary. Boys should be taught to speak up and should be punished when detected prompting.

I had reason to complain of boys prompting each other.

At my examination

Sanitation.-Fairly satisfactory. The rooms require colour washing. They might be kept cleaner.

Apparatus.-Good.

Floor Space.Sufficient for 233 pupils.

English.-Reading.-Fair in the lower standards and good in III, IV and V.

Grammar.-Fair throughout.

Colloquial.-Poor in I and II, very fair in III, IV and V.

Dictation.-I good, II fair.

Composition. Good in III and IV. Fair in V. Boys should think out their subject before writing anything down. Many essays consisted of a

nass of meaningless sentences.

Geography.-Weak in Standard I and II where definitions were learnt by heart without being understood. Standard III fair. Here too much was attempted. Standard IV good on the whole but several boys at the bottom of the class knew nothing.

V fair.

Arithmetic.Mental.-Good.

Written.-Good with the exception of Standard V which was a little below

the average.

Hygiene.-Poor. The boys have not grasped this subject properly yet.

Chinese-Reading.-Very fair to good except in Class I where it was impossible to

hear what was said. The boys absolutely declined to speak up.

Composition.-Good throughout the school.

General.--Class I is too big; it contains 62 boys. It is quite impossible to teach so large a number whose attainments vary considerably together. It should be divided into IA and IB.

There are 85 boys in Standards I and II compared with 38 in III, IV and V, a rather large proportion in the lower standards.

Grant.-I recommend a grant at the rate of $7.

No. 15.-146 Hollywood Road. Anglo-Chinese School.

Staff-WONG TSZ TSUM.

Discipline and Organization.-Discipline. There is too much talking. Boys must be taught to speak up especially in schools which are situated in a noisy locality.

Sanitation.-Fairly satisfactory. The rooms should be colourwashed.

Apparatus. Satisfactory.

Floor Space-Sufficient for 53 pupils.

353

English.-Reading.-Poor in Standard I, good in II and III. In Standards I and II boys could only explain the meanings of words in Chinese. Colloquial: nil

in I and II, very fair in III which is very much ahead of the other two classes.

Composition.-Poor throughout the school.

Geography.-Fair to poor. Definitions were known by heart without being understood.

Arithmetic.-Mental.-Fair.

Written. Poor.

Chinese. Reading.-Poor in Standards I and II, good in III. 3 boys did not do composition.

Grant.--I recommend a grant at the rate of $5. I must again report this school as "inefficient" on the grounds that the instruction is defective, and also that too many boys are in the lower standards.

No. 17.-Berlin Foundling House.

Staff-PASTOR MÜLLER, Mrs. LAI WONG SHI and I Assistant.

Discipline and Organization.-Discipline very good. The remark made in last year's report that the children were pushed on too rapidly appli s more strongly this year and as regards the upper classes the pupils are not up to the work of the standards they are in.

Sanitation.-Very satisfactory.

Apparatus.Very satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 102 pupils.

Chinese. Reading.-The children should be taught to speak up and explain their

reading sentence by sentence. Very fair on the whole.

Composition.-Poor. The writing is also bad in some cases.

Geography.Good in Standards I, III and VII and fair in the remainder.

Arithmetic.-Mental.- Poor.

Written.-Fair on the whole. Standard IV good. Standard VI bad.

Needlework. Very good especially the drawn work.

Grant.—I recommend a grant at the rate of 17/6. The school will have to improve to earn the same graut next year,

No. 18.-Fairlea. Vernacular School.

Stuff-Miss H. S. FLETCHER, WONG NGAN HING and 4 Assistant Teachers.

Discipline and Organization.-There is too much talking otherwise the discipline is good. The Assistant teachers prompt the pupils. This practice should be put a stop

to at once.

Sanitation.-Very satisfactory.

Apparatus.-Satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 136 pupils.

:

354

Chinese-Reading.-Good except in Standard VII where the Mencius was not well known or understood. The pupils should read very much more slowly. Composition.Fair in the three upper standards, good in I and II and

poor in III and IV. Several pupils in III collaborated.

Geography.-Very fair. The physical geography was not well known in Standards V, VI and VII.

Arithmetic-Mental.-Weak.

Needlework.

Written.-Very good.

Very good.

Grant. I recommend a grant at the rate of 17/6d.

No. 19. Victoria Home and Orphanage.

Staff.-Miss HOLLIS and two Assistant Mistresses.

Discipline and Organization. -Discipline very good. There are no pupils in Standard VI this year. There are 2 in Standard VII. The children should be male to speak up and to explain sentences in their own words.

Sanitation.-Very satisfactory.

Apparatus.-Satisfactory.

A new map of Kwang Tung Province is required.

Floor Space-Sufficient for 145 pupils.

Chinese.-Reading. --Good. The explanation of Mencius in Standard VII was

very good.

Composition.-Fair on the whole. It should be better.

Geography.Good except the physical geography.

Arithmetic.-Mental.-Poor throughout.

Written.-Good except in Standard VII which was only fair.

Needlework.-Very good.

Physical Grill.-Very good.

Grant.--I recommend a grant at the rate of 17/68.

J

No. 20.-L.M.S. Traning Home for Girls.

Staff-Miss DAVIES, Miss WONG, Mr. CHIN SHIU U and 3 Assistant Teachers.

Discipline and Organization.- Very good indeed. The supervision is all that could

be desired and all the teachers are thoroughly competent.

Sanitation.-Very satisfactory.

Apparatus. Very satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 45 pupils.

Chinese. Reading.-Very good.

Composition.-Very good. Standard VII very good indeed.

355

Geography.--Very good except the physical geography in Standards V, VI and VII.

Arithmetic.-Mental.Good.

Written.-Very good.

Needlework.-Very good.

Grant.-I recommend the full grant at the rate of 20/-. The school is again "thoroughly efficient".

* No. 21.-Italian Convent.

Staff-Italian Sisters of Charity.

Discipline and Organization.-Good. Some of the pupils still continue to reply to questions in an inaudible voice. One of the teachers prompted a pupil whom I was examining; this must not occur again.

Sanitation.--Satisfactory.

Apparatus. Very satisfactory.

Floor Space. -Sufficient for 127 pupils.

Chinese. Reading.-Good.

Composition.-Good.

Geography.-Very fair. Standard I, lower half, had learnt nothing at all.

Arithmetic. Mental.Weak.

Written.-Fair. More attention must be paid to this subject.

Needlework.-Very good.

Grant.-I recommend a Grant at the rate of $7.

* No. 22.-Bridges Street.

Staff.-Italian Sisters of Charity.

Discipline and Organization.-Good. The Attendance Register should be marked up as the roll is called and not afterwards.

Sanitation.-Good.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 91 pupils.

·Apparatus.-Very satisfactory.

Chinese.-Reading.-Good.

Composition.-Good.

Geography.-Good excepting Standard I lower half.

Arithmetic.-Mental.Good.

Written.Good.

Needlework.-Very good.

Grant. I recommed a grant at the rate of $7.

356

* No. 24.-Holy Infancy.

Staff-Two Chinese Sisters of Mercy.

Discipline and Organization.-Very good. No attempt was made by the teachers to prompt the pupils as on previous occasions.

Sanitation. Very satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 92 pupils.

Apparatus.-Very good indeed.

Chinese.-Reading.-Good.

Composition.-Good. More attention should be paid to the explanation of the lessons which seem to be learnt off by heart at present without necessarily being understood.

Geography.-Upper Standards good. Standards I and II fair,

Arithmetic.-Mental.-Good.

Written. Very good except Standard II whose subtraction was weak.

Needlework.-Very good.

Grant. I recommend a grant at the rate of $8 and return the school as "throughly efficient."

* No. 25.-Hunghom.

Staff.-Two Chinese Sisters of Mercy.

Discipline and Organization.-Excellent. The roll is called at the proper time, the pupils attend very regularly and the records are well kept.

Sanitation.-Very good.

Floor Space.--Sufficient for 72 pupils.

Apparatus. Very satisfactory.

Chinese. Reading.-Very good.

Chinese.-Reading.

Composition.Good.

Geography. Very good.

Arithmetic.-Mental.-Very good.

Written.-Very good.

Needlework.-Good.

Grant.-I recommend a grant at the rate of $8, and report the school as thoroughly efficient".

General.-There are 30 pupils in Standard IB and 20 in Standards IA, II and III. It is a pity there are no pupils in Standard IV. The pupils in all standards know more than is required of them by the Code.

357

* No. 26.-Yaumati.

Staff.-Two Chinese Sisters of Charity.

Discipline and Organization.-Good. There should be no talking while examination or instruction is going on.

Sanitation.-Very satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 81 pupils.

Apparatus. Very satisfactory.

Chinese-Reading.-Good.

Composition.—Good.

The pupils should read slowly and explain each sentence in an intelligent manner not as though they had learnt it off by heart.

Geography.-Good except in Standard III which was weak last year also.

}

Arithmetic.-Mental. Both good except in Standard I which is very weak especially

Written. in written arithmetic.

Needlework.Good.

Grant. I recommend a grant at the rate of $7.

* No. 27.-Shaukiwan.

Staff.-Two Chinese Sisters of Charity.

Discipline and Organization.-Good though there are still too many pupils in the lower Standards. There are 52 pupils in all only 5 of whom are in Standard II. There is no Standard III.

Sanitation.-Quite satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 118 pupils..

Apparatus.-Very satisfactory.

Chinese.-Reading.--Good.

Composition.-Good.

Geography.-Very good.

Arithmetic.-Mental-Good.

Written.-Good in Standard II, poor in Standard I.

Needl work.-Good.

Grant.- recommend a grant at the rate of $7.

* No. 28.-Aberdeen.

Staff-Two Chinese Sisters of Charity.

Discipline and Organization.-Good.

Sanitation.-Very satisfactory.

Floor Space.--Sufficient for 116 pupils.

Apparatus.-Satisfactory.

358

Chinese.-Reading.—Good.

Composition.-Good except in Standard III which was fair.

Geography.-Good in Standards I and II, fair in III.

Arithmetic-Mental.-Good except in Standard III which was poor.

Written.-Standard III should be able to do all the 4 rules. they do no division. Standard I fair, Standard II good.

Needlework.—Very good.

At present

Grant. I recommend a grant at the rate of $7. The work in Standard III must improve.

* No. 29.-109 Second Street.

Staff-LAI FUK-CHI.

Discipline and Organization.-Very good indeed. The teacher follows the Model Course strictly.

Sanitation.-Very satisfactory.

Floor Space.--Sufficient for 74 pupils.

Apparatus.-Very satisfactory.

Chinese.-leading.-Very good.

Composition.-Good. Standard IV might be better.

Geography.—Very good.

Arithmetic.-Mental.-Very good.

Written.Good.

General. This school is very well managed. Last year there was a Vth Standard, it is a pity that there is none this year.

Grant.-I report that the school is again "thoroughly efficient" and recommend the full grant of $9.

* No. 30.-22 Taipingshan Street.

Stoff-Ho NG-SHI.

Discipline and Organization.-Good.

Sanitation.-Very satisfactory.

Etoor Space.-Sufficient for 39 pupils.

Apparatus.-Satisfactory.

Chinese.-Reading —Good.

Composition.—Good except in Standard IV which is only fair.

*

359

Geography-Fair in the upper Standards, poor in the lower Standards. The names of the Government Officials are not known.

Arithmetic-Mental.-Very fair.

Written.-Very good. This subject has improved, especially the written.

work.

Needlework.-Good.

Grant.-1 recommend a grant at the rate of $5. Should the work of this school continue to improve the grant might be increased next year; the numbers in the upper standards must also be increased still further.

* No. 31.-5 Clarence Terrace.

Staff-CHAN CHAK-LAM.

Discipline and Organization.Good.

Sanitation.-- Very satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 40 pupils.

Apparatus. Very satisfactory.

Chinese.--Reading.--Good.

Composition.-Very fair. Composition is weak in the upper Standards.

Geography.-Fair. This subject shows a falling off. Standards II and III were very weak; in Standard IV the routes to Europe were well known but not so the geography of China.

Arithmetic.-Mental.-Good.

Written.-The written arithmetic was good in Standards I and IV : Standards II and III were weak and failed completely in subtraction.

Grant. I recommend a grant at the rate of $7.

* No. 32.-380 Queen's Road West.

Staff-FONG CHUNG-SHI.

Discipline and Orginazation.-Not at all good. I repeatedly had to speak to the pupils for talking while my examination was going on. The organization is bad. As regards reading most standards were using the text books of the standard above theirs and did not know the text books they were required to know, the same applied to geography. The teacher was absent and I presume the loose discipline and bad organization are due to the fact that she is constantly absent.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 44 pupils.

Sanitation.- Fair. The premises might be cleaner.

Apparatus.-There was no map of Hongkong island. There were no flags.

Chinese.-Reading. — Fair.

Composition. Poor. In Standard III one pupil refused to read saying that she had not studied the Chinese Reader No. 3 and only knew No. 4. Written Chinese is apparently not taught only the colloquial writing (tsuk wa).

360

Geography.---Very fair.

Arithmetic.-Mental.-Good.

Written.-Very fair. In Standard II subtraction was a failure.

Needlework.--Fair.

Grant.—I recommend a grant at the rate of $5. I should have entered the school as inefficient only for the fact that it had unavoidably to be closed last year an it may have been found difficult to start it again.

* No. 33.-Queen's Road East.

Staff-SIN NG-SHI.

Discipline and Organization.-Very good.

Sanitation.-Very satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 52 pupils.

Apparatus.-Very satisfactory.

Chinese.-Reading.--Good.

Composition.Good.

Geography.-Very good in Standards II and III, good in the other standards. The geography of Europe was well known in Standard VI but not the physical geography.

Arithmetic. Mental.-Good in Standards I to III very good in Standards IV to VI.

Written.-Good. Problems have been done but the knowledge of the

pupils is limited.

Needlework. Very good.

Grant.-I recommend the maximum grant at the rate of $9. The school is again "thoroughly efficient".

* No. 34.-Yaumati.-46 Station Street South.

Staff-FONG TSE-NAM.

Discipline and Organization.-Discipline good. The change of teachers has certainly not benefitted this school.

Sanitation. The premises are rather dirty. They should be kept cleaner.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 39 pupils.

Apparatus.-A proper chart showing the flags of different nationalities should be

provided.

Chinese.-Reading.-Fair.

Composition.-Very poor.

Geography.-Bad.

Arihmetic-Mental.-Very fair.

Written.-Bad.

361

General. The master from this school was sent to Shaukiwan, and the one from Shaukiwan took charge of this school about 2 months ago. The new master is certainly a failure and I am inclined to think he takes no trouble with the school. He should be replaced by a more satisfactory teacher.

Grant.—I recommend a grant at the rate of $5 and return the school as "inefficient".

* No. 35.-D'Aguilar Street.

Staff.-YEUNG Sin Shi.

Discipline and Organization.-Fair. The school has removed to a very noisy neigh- bourhood where it is almost impossible to carry on school work properly. More suitable premises should be rented. The weakness in geography throughout the school to which attention was drawn last year still continues and must be taken in hand to prevent the school being returned as inefficient next year.

Sanitation.Satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 40 pupils.

Apparatus.-Satisfactory.

Chinese. Reading.-Good.

Composition.-Good on the whole.

Geography.-Poor. Only one pupil really knew something about this subject.

Arithmetic.-Mental.Good.

Written-Bad, except the one pupil in Standard V.

Needlework.-Fair.

General. The poor results in some subjects are due to the fact that the teacher has tried to push on some of the pupils too fast so as not to have too many in the lower stand- ards. There are at present 26 pupils in Standar ls I and II an i one each in III, IV and V. It is useless to try and push on pupils too rapidly as it lowers the standard of work throughout the school.

Grant. I recommend a grant at the rate of $6 on the distinct understanding that it be reduced next year if more attention is not paid to geography, written arithmetic and needlework.

* No. 36.-Wantsai Chapel.

Staff-KWAN KING CHUNG.

Discipline and Organization.-Good. The numbers in the upper standards have in-

There are now 4 pupils in Standard V.

creased.

Sanitation.-Satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 96 pupils.

Apparatus. Satisfactory. The new map of the Island has not yet been purchased. It should be got at once.

Chinese. Reading.-Very good.

Composition.-Very good.

Geography.-Good. The names of the Government Departments are not known. Phy- sical geography was very fair in Standard V.

362

Arithmetic.-Mental-Mental Arithmetic was good throughout the school.

Written.-Written Arithmetic was poor. The Model Course has not been followed, Standard I knew nothing, II was weak in multiplica- tion, III in division and multiplication. IV weak in division; in V fractions were hardly known at all.

Grant. I recommend à grant at the rate of $6.

be.

* No. 37.-L.M.S. Hospital Chapel.

Staff.-Ho Ho-ÛHAI.

Discipline and Organizaton.-Discipline good. The organization is not what it should Several standards are doing the work of the standard below them, and not that laid down in the Model Course. This was especially noticeable in Arithmetic and Geography. Standard I would do better if it were sub-divided into. IA and IB.

Sanitation.-Satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 71 pupils.

Apparatus.-Satisfactory.

Chinese.-Reading. Very fair except in Standard II where one boy only was good and

the rest poor. The lessons are not explained properly.

Composition.-Good.

Arithmetic.-Mental.-Poor except in Standard IV which was very fair.

Written. Very fair except Standard I which was bad. followed.

Geography.-Bad, except in Standard I where it was fair.

The Model Course is not

Grant. The school has certainly not done any better than last year in fact it has done badly again I therefore recommend the reduced grant of $5 and return the school as "inefficient".

* No. 38.-84 Macdonell Road.

Staff.-LEUNG HO-SHI.

Discipline and Organization.-Good. The Model Course should be followed more strictly.

Sanitation.-Satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 37 pupils.

Apparatus. Satisfactory.

Chinese.-Reading.- Very good.

Composition.-Good.

Geography-Fair. This subject does not receive proper attention yet. Standard I and III have improved but Standard V is poor.

Arithmetic.-Mental.-Good.

Written.-Fair. The written arithmetic should receive more attention

throughout the school.

1

363

Needlework.-Good.

General. There should be some pupils in Standard IV next year.

Grant.-1 recommend a Grant at the rate of $6.

* No. 39.-Hung Hom.

Staff TSE CHUN-SAN.

Discipline and Organization.-Fair. The pupils paid very little attention to remarks addressed to them, and in one instance a boy in Standard III wandered off to examine a map while being examined in some other subject. The organization is not good. The Model Course is not followed especially in geography.

Sanitation-Fair.

The floor was rather dirty in places.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 50 pupils.

Apparatus.-Good.

Chinese.—Reading.-Fair, but had apparently been learnt by heart. The meaning of

what was read was not understood throughout the school.

Composition. Fair except in Standard III which was poor.

Geography. Poor. The Model Course was not followed.

Arithmetic.-Mental.-Fair.

Written.-Fair. Subtraction was not well done in Standard II.

Grant. I recommend a grant at the rate of $6 and return the school as "inefficient." A marked improvement will have to be shown if the school is to remain on the Grant List.

No. 40.-343 Queen's Road West.

Staff-Pun Chi Tung and 1 Assistant Teacher.

Discipline and Organization.-Good. There are 41 pupils in Standards I and II (29 in Standard I) as compared with 10 in III, TV and V. The proportion of pupils in the lower Standards is getting too large.

Sanitation.-Satisfactory.

Apparatus. Satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 78 pupils.

Chinese.-Reading.-Good.

Composition.-Good in Standards I and II, very bad in III where several

boys copied, and poor in IV and V.

Geography.-Fair in the lower and very good in the upper standards.

Arithmetic-Mental.—Good.

Written. Good except in Standard IV.

Grant.-1 recommend a grant at the rate of $7.

364

-

given.

No. 41.-Shaukiwan.

Staff-SIU KING-CHUNG.

Discipline and Organization.-Discipline fair. Too little attention is paid to orders

Sanitation. The sanitary condition of the school is not very good. The building is in need of extensive repairs.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 54 pupils.

Apparatus.—Satisfactory.

Chinese.-Reading.-Fair except Standard IV which was poor.

Composition.-Standards II and III good, I and IV poor.

Standard IV should anwer questions at greater length.

The boys in

Geography.-Poor in IB and II. Fair in IA, III and IV.

Arithmetic.-Mental.---Poor in I and II, good in III and IV.

Written.-l'oor except in Standard II. Boys in Standard IV could only

do the 4 rules. They should do fractions and decimals.

Grant.-I recommend a great at the rate of $6. I again return the school as

• inefficient on the ground that too small a proportion of the pupils are in the third and higher standards.

Note.--I propose to recommend that the grant be continued for another 12 months to give the school a final opportunity of becoming efficient.

No. 42.-Tanglungchau Chapel.

Staff-WONG WUN HING.

Discipline and Organization.-Very fair. There was too much noise in the teacher's private quarters which are immediately above the school. The boys should be taught to take immediate notice of remarks addressed to them by the teacher or the Inspector of Schools.

Sanitation.-Satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 65 pupils. Only 26 present.

Apparatus. Should be better, especially the wall maps. New maps of (i) Kwang Tung province (ii) China and (iii) Asia are urgently required. The remarks on this subject in last year's report have not received attention.

J

Reading Chinese.-Good. The explanation of the text is learnt by heart. The

boys should be able to explain it in their own words.

Composition.-Fair in Standard I, good in Standard II, III and V and

bad in IV. Two boys in Standard IV copied from each others slates.

Geography.-Good in Standards I, II and IV and fair only in III and V. The names of Government Officials were unknown.

Arithmetic.-Mental.-Poor throughout the school. This subject must not be neglected.

Written.-Good.

Grant.-1 recommend a grant at the rate of $6.

365

No. 43.-Mongkok.

Staff-LI KWAn Ping.

Discipline and Organization.-The drill is good as far as it goes but the boys are constantly running about the room. There is also too much talking. The attendance register should be kept better.

Sanitation. The school room might be kept cleaner.

Apparatus.—Satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 55 pupils.

Chinese. Reading.-Fair in I and III, good in IV.

There is no Standard II.

Composition. Very fair except Standard I which was poor.

Geography. Very poor indeed.

Arithmetic.-Mental.-Fair only.

Written.-Poor except Standard IV which was very fair.

Grant. I recommend a grant at the rate of $5. This school will have to improve very considerably to avoid being returned as inefficient next year.

No. 44.-20a Aberdeen Street.

Staff-WONG PAK LIN.

Discipline and Organization.-Good. Pupils must be taught to answer questions in a clear audible voice. Many girls refused to open their mouths when reading, and it was impossible to hear whether they were reading correctly or not.

Sanitation.-Very satisfactory.

Apparatus. Very satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 59 pupils.

Chinese.-Reading.-Fair in Classes IV and III good in II and I.

Composition. Good in all standards except IV. The latter was fair only. Geography.-Very good in Standard IV, good in II and I and fair only in III.

Arithmetic.--- Mental.--Very fair.

Written.-Very good in the two upper and good in the two lower

standards.

Needlework.Good.

Grant.-I recommend a grant at the rate of $7.

No. 45.-Tanglungchau Chapel.

Staff-LI LO SHI.

Discipline and Organization.-Fair. There is too much talking among the pupils. Standard I should be split up. very much ahead of the rest. the school are somewhat noisy.

There were 18 in this standard of whom at least 5 were The teacher's private quarters which are immediately over

366

Sanitation.Good.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 45 pupils.

Apparatus. Very satisfactory.

Chinese. -Reading.-Fair. Explanation weak.

Composition.-Poor in Standard I, fair in II and good in III. The composi- tion is too short. Pupils should answer the questions at greater length.

Geography.—Good in Standards I and II, fair in III. The titles of Officials were quite

unknown.

Arithmetic.-Mental.-

Written.-

Needlework.—Fair.

Poor in Standard I, fair in II and good in III.

General. The pupils especially in Standard I should be taught to read louder, more distinctly and not so fast.

Grant. I recommend a grant at the rate of $6.

No. 46. Wantsai Chapel.

Staff-KWAN CHAN SHI and one Assistant.

Discipline and Organization.-The discipline is very lax. Silence is quite unknown. It is a great pity that a school otherwise well organized should absolutely fail in this essen-

Organization good on the whole.

tial.

Sanitation.-Very satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 81 pupils.

Apparatus. Very satisfactory.

Chinese. Reading.-Good. The explanation of the text was also quite good.

Composition.-Good.

Geography.-Very good.

Arithmetic.--Mental.-Good.

Written.-Good.

Needlework. - Good.

Grant. I recommend a grant at the rate of $7 on the distinct understanding that the discipline improves materially during the new school year.

* No. 47.-4 Bridges Street.

Staff-CHENG SAI-KWONG and one Assistant.

Discipline and Organization-Discipline good. Organization: There are 63 boys in Standards I and II as compared with 12 only in the upper Standards III and V. There is no IVth Standard. The number in the lower standards is therefore quite out of proportion to the number in the upper standards.

367

Sanitation.-Very satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 79 pupils.

Apparatus.-Satisfactory..

Chinese. Reading.-Good.

Composition.-Good.

Geography.-Good except the physical geography in Standard V which is weak.

• Arithmetic.-Mental.-Good in the upper standards, fair in Standard II and weak in

Standard I.

Written. Good in the upper standards, weak in the lower standards.

Addition and subtraction should be taught in Standard I.

Grant. I recommend a grant at the rate of $6 but must return the school as "'inefficient

as there are too many pupils in the lower standards.

No. 48.--Shamshuipo.-Basel Mission.

Staff-CHAN KING YAN and 1 Assistant.

Discipline and Organization.-Discipline good. There is a IVth Standard again this year and the work shows a steady improvement. There are two divisions one for boys and one for girls.

Sanitation. Not altogether satisfactory. The door near the lavatory should be kept closed and in the lavatory itself disinfectants should be used.

Apparatus.-Satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 139 pupils.

Chinese.-Reading.-Very good.

Composition.-Good on the whole. Some standards have a weak tail.

Geography. Very good except for the titles of Officials which where not known in Standard III.

Arithmetic.-Mental.—Good.

Written.-Very good.

Needlework.--Good.

Grant. I recommend a grant at the rate of $7 and return the school as "thorough- ly efficient". It should not earn the full grant next year unless an even larger proportion of pupils are in the upper standards.

No. 49.-Shaukiwan.

Staff. CHEUNG TAK-HING.

Discipline and Organization.-Very good. The school has very much improved since last year.

All the standards with the exception of VI did well on the whole. Geography is rather weak in the upper standards.

Sanitation.-Satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 87 pupils.

Apparatus.-Satisfactory.

368

Chinese.-Reading.--Very good. The explanation of the text was good except in

Standard VI.

Composition.-Good in Standards I and II, but fair only in III, IV, V and

VI. This subject should receive more attention.

Geography.--Good in the lower standards but fair to poor physical geography was not well known.

Arithmetic.-Mental.-Very fair.

in the upper

standards. The

Written.-Fair in the lower standards and in the upper excepting VI.

Grant.-I recommend a grant at the rate of $7. in the different standards. If the improvement is earn the full grant.

The boys are fairly well distributed maintained this school should soon

No. 50.-Tokwawan.

Staff-CHAN WING WO.

Discipline and Organization-Discipline poor. There was too much talking. The boys also copied from one another's slates in the most bare-faced manner.

Sanitation. Very satisfactory. The boys should be made to keep themselves cleaner

Apparatus.-Very satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 127 pupils.

Chinese.-Reading.--Good.

Composition. Good in I and V, fair in III and poor in II and VI.

There are no boys in Standard IV.

Geography.-Good except the physical geography in the upper standards.

Arithmetic.--Mental.-Good.

Written.-Good in the lower standards but weak in Standards V and VI.

Grant.-Considering that this is a village school the work was satisfactory. However all collaboration on the part of pupils must be put a stop to before the full grant can be earned. I recommend a grant at the rate of $7.

No. 51.-High Street.

Staff.—Rev. J. VOMEL, CHAU PING CHING and 1 Assistant.

Discipline and Organization.-Good on the whole. The standards, 7 in number, varied very much in their achievements. Some were distinctly good others were very poor. Standards III and VI were not at all good and should improve. The pupils should be taught to speak up.

Sanitation.—Satisfactory.

Apparatus. Satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 167 pupils.

Chinese.-Reading.-Fair in Standards I to IV, good in VI and VII. There were

three pupils in Standard II who could not read at all.

Composition. This subject varied very much. It was good in IB and II, fair in VII, poor in IA and III and bad in IV and VI. There were no pupils in Standard V.

369

Geography.-Poor in Standards II and VI, fair in IV and good in I, III and VII. III the names of Officials were not well known.

Arithmetic.-Mental.-Fair.

Written.-Fair to good on the whole ; poor in Standard III.

Needlework.-Good.

Grant.-I recommend a grant at the rate of $7.

In

No. 53.-218 Hollywood Road.

Staff-SHAM KWAI HING and one Assistant.

Discipline and Organization.—Very good indeed. The boys are very attentive and the school is very efficient but more boys should be in the upper standards. (ie., 40 in Standard I, 16 in the remaining 4 standards).

Sanitation.Good.

Apparatus.-Good.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 66 boys.

Chinese.-Reading.-Good. The boys should explain the text in their own words.

Composition.-Good in Standards I and IV, very good in Standards II

and III.

Geography.-Good except Standard II which was poor.

Arithmetic.-Mental.-Good.

Written.-Fair only in Standard I, very good in II and III and good in IV.

Grant.-I recommend a grant at the rate of $7. With the good material at his disposal the headmaster should succeed in filling the upper forms next year. The school is

thoroughly efficient".

No. 54.-24 Bulkeley Street, Hunghom.

Stuff.-YEUNG Ng Shi.

1

Discipline and Organizatim.-Poor. The teacher apparently does not know how to conduct the school. The premises are untily, so are the children and the work is very poor. It is a girl's school but I found 3 boys there. There were 19 children present all but two of whom were in Standards I and II.

Sanitation.-Very untidy and rather dirty.

Apparatus. A new map of Kwang Tung is required,

Flor Space.-Sufficient for 40 pupils.

Chinese.-Reading.-Fair Standards I and III, poor in II.

Composition.-Fair except Standard III which was poor. Two boys in

this standard did not do their work unaided.

370

Geography.-Poor in IA and II, good in IB and III. In III the names of Officials were not known.

Arithmetic.-Mental.-Poor.

Written. Poor in I, fair in II, good in III.

Needlework.--Poor.

Grant. I recommend a grant at the rate of $5 and return the school as "inefficient" on the ground that too many pupils are in the lower standards.

No. 55-36 Lyndhurst Terrace.

Staff-NG KONG SH1 and 1 Assistant Teacher.

There

Discipline and Organization.-Discipline good. There are far too many pupils in the lower standards. Out of 66 present 44 were in Standard IB and 57 in I and II. were 5 in III and 4 in IV only.

Smitation. Very satisfactory.

Apparatus.--Very satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 97 pupils.

Chinese.-Reading.-Fair in I, good in II and very good in III and IV.

Composition.-Good except Standard IV which was poor.

Geography-Fair. The European countries were not well known in Standard IV.

Arithmetic-Mental.-Fair.

Written.-Very good.

Needlework.-Very good.

Grant.-I recommend a grant at the rate of $6. It cannot be increased until the number of pupils in the higher standards rises.

No. 56.-6 Hollywood Road.

Stuff-So LI SHI.

Discipline and Organization.-The discipline is good. The organization is still defective judging by the poor results. The pupils are very careless in arithmetic, the geography is poor and Chinese is not good.

Sanitation.-Satisfactory. The room is rather crowded and might be tidier.

Apparatus. Satisfactory.

Floor Space-Sufficient for 32 pupils.

(There were 33 present and 36 on the roll.)

Chinese.-Reading.-Good in Standards IV and III, fair in II and poor in I. The explanation of the text was very inaccurate throughout.

Composition.-Bad except in Standards IV and III, fair in II and I.

Arithmetic.- Mental.—Fair to poor.

Written.-Poor in I and II, fair in III and IV. The working of sums was

carelessly done.

371

Needlework.-Fair.

Grant.-The school has not improved during the past year but is still in a generally unsatisfactory condition. I recommend a grant at the rate of $5 and again report the school as "inefficient".

No. 57-219 Des Voeux Road West.

Staff.-CHU CHAN SHI.

•Discipline and Organization. -Discipline good. The pupils are distributed among the different standards.

now more evenly

Sanitation.-Fair. The room might be cleaner. It should be colourwashed.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 49 pupils.

Apparatus. Satisfactory.

Chinese.-Reading.--Good in the lower standards, very good in III and IV.

Composition.-Good in Standards IA and IV; poor in the remainder.

Geography.-Good in Standards II and III. Fair only in I and IV.

Arithmetic.- Mental.--Fair in Standards I and III, poor in II and good in IV.

Written.-Poor in I, fair in II and III, good in IV. The multiplication

tables were not well known.

General. The school is situated in a very noisy neighbourhood. If possible a floor in some house in Western Street opposite the Sailor Home should be selected. It would be very much quieter and just as central as the present premises.

Grant recommend a grant at the rate of $6; a further improvement will be necessary before the grant can be increased.

No. 58.-Boys School. C.M.S. Chapel, Yaumati.

Staff.--WONG SHUN KIN and one Assistant Teacher.

Discipline and Organization.-Discipline good. The Model Course should be more strictly followed.

Sanitation.-Satisfactory.

Apparatus.—Good.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 59 pupils.

Chinese.-Reading-Poor in Standard I, good in II, III and IV and very good in

Standard V. The explanation of the text could be better.

Composition.-Good throughout.

Geography.-Poor. This subject should receive more attention and the syllabus should be more closely followed. The routes to England and the names of Officials were not known at all.

Arithmetic.-Mental.-Good.

Written.-Very good in Standards I and III, good in II and IV but poor

in V.

Grant.-I recommend a grant at the increased rate of $7.

372

V

No. 59.-Girls School. C.M.S. Chapel, Yaumati.

Staff-Ho LI SHI and one Assistant.

Discipline and Organization-Very good. The method of instruction has very much improved during the past twelve months.

Sanitation.-Very satisfactory.

Apparatus.-Satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 64 pupils.

Chinese-Reading.—Good.

Composition. Good except in Standard II. The composition should contain the ideas of the pupils and not quotations from the readers, very often not to the point.

Geography.-Good in Standard I and very good in the remaining standards.

Arithmetic.—Mental.-Very fair.

Written.-Very good.

Needlework.-Good.

Grant.-I recommend a grant at the increased rate of $7.

No. 60.-232 Hollywood Road.

Staff-Lo CHAN SHI and 1 Assistant.

Discipline and Organization.-There should be less talking.

Answers are all given in

a sing song. The pupils should be encouraged to speak in a natural voice.

Sanitation.-Satisfactory.

Floor Space-Sufficient for 62 pupils.

Apparatus.-Very satisfactory.

Chinese-Reading.-Good. The explanation of the text is fair.

Composition.-Good except Standard III which was very fair.

Geography.-Very poor. Distinctly weak throughout the school.

Arithmetic.-Ment l.-Poor except Standard IV which was good. The multiplication

tables were not well known.

Written. Poor. Standard III could not do multiplication.

Needlework.Fair.

Grant.—I recommend a grant at the rate of $6 owing to the distinct falling off in Arithmetic and Geography.

No. 61.-No. 22 Pokfulam Road.

Staff-WAT SZE HAP.

Discipline and Organization.-The discipline is fair. my arrival all the pupils were droning out their lessons. discontinued at once as it is useless and has not even the up when they are being examined.

There is too much talking. On This method of learning should be merit of making the pupils speak.

373

Sanitation.-Satisfactory. The room is very hot.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 39 pupils.

Apparatus.-New maps of (1) Kwang Tung (2) the world are required.

Chinese.-Reading.-Fair in Standards I, II and III, good in IV. In the lower standards the lessons had been learnt off by heart but their meaning was not understood.

Composition. Fair in Standards I and III, good in II and poor in IV.

The pupils in II and III should do their work unaided.

Geography.-Very good in I, good in 111, fair in II and bad in IV. Arithmetic.--Mental.-Very fair.

Written.-Subtraction was not well done in I. II and III were good, IV

very good.

Needlework.-Good.

Grant.-I recommend a grant at the rate of $6. This school should earu an increased grant next year.

No. 62.-Shaukiwan.

Staff-TAM WONG SHI.

Discipline and Organization.-Fair. The roll must be called at the proper time. Attention was drawn to this last year. The pupils are inclined to be noisy.

Sanitation. Satisfactory. The floor might be cleaner. The portion of the school used as living quarters should be divided off from the school room.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 41 pupils.

Apparatus.-The map of the Kwang Tung Province has been bought. A proper map of China is required for Standard IV. Text books were scarce in Standard I.

Chinese.--Reading.--Good. Explanation of text: fair except in Standard I where it

was poor.

Compostion.--Fair to poor.

Must improve.

Geography-Good in Standards IV and III, II and I were not far enough advanced. II knew the map of Victoria but not of the island, I was poor.

Arithmetic.-Mental.-Good.

Written. Good in IV and III, fair in II and poor in I.

Needlework.-Fair.

General. There is no copy of the Model Course at this school. Hence the non- compliance with its requirements. The managers should see that every school is supplied with this book.

Grant..—I recommend a grant at the rate of $6.

No. 63.-Stanley.

Staff.—CHU MAN KIN and 1 Assistant Teacher.

Discipline and Organization. The discipline is fairly good. Collaboration appears to be the order of the day in the lower forms where the pupils have apparently not been checked in the practice. Composition and geography are weak.

:

Sanitation.-Very satisfactory.

Apparatus. Satisfactory.

Floor Space. Sufficient for 89 puptils.

374

Chinese.-Reading.-Good. Explanation of text good.

M

Composition. Good in Standard II only, fair in IV, poor in III and I. In

IA and B pupils collaborated.

Geography.—Fair in IV and poor in the remaining standards.

Arithmetic.-Mental.-Good in Standards IV and III, poor in II and fair in I.

Written. Very fair except Standard II which was good. The figures

were written very badly and should receive attention.

Grant.-I recommend a grant at the rate of $6. This rate should however be cut down again next year unless the weak points referred to receive immediate attention.

No. 64.-263 Queen's Road, West.

Staff-NG TAK MUN.

Discipline and Organ 'z ition.-The discipline is good. There are far too many boys for one master to teach thoroughly. There were 67 present but there are actually 87 on the roll. This is a larger number than any one master, however clever, can possibly instruet.

Sanitation.-Satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 62 pupils.

Apparatus. Very satisfactory.

Chinese.-Reading.-Fair only throughout the school.

Composition.-Good in Standards I and III, fair in IV, poor in II and V. In

II several boys copied and in V not one boy wrote to the point.

Geography.-Fair in Standards I to IV; V very poor; no physical geography ha been taught.

Arithmetic.-Mental.-Fair except IB and II which were very good.

Written.-I and II good, III very good, IV and V poor. Fractions, decimals and Chinese money should be taught in Class IV and above.

Grant. I recommend a grant at the rate of $7. It is impossible for so large school to be "thoroughly efficient" with such a hopelessly inadequate staff and I regret to say that it is not in fact.

No. 68.-No. 5 Elgin Street.

Staff.-LAU SHAM KU.

1

Discipline and rganization. -Discipline good on the whole, but there is too much talking. The pupils especially in Standard II should be taught to speak up.

Sanitation.-Satisfactory.

Apparatus. Satisfactory.

Flour Space.-Sufficient for 42 pupils.

375

Chinese. Reading.-Good in the lower, very good in the upper standards. (There

are 5 standards in all).

Composition.-Poor. It was quite obvious that in many cases those who could not write copied from their more fortunate neighbours. The pupils in IA, III and IV were the chief offenders.

Geography.-Good,

Arithmetic.-Mental.-Fair. It might be better.

Written.-Fair.

Needlework.-Good.

Standard IV should be able to do division at least.

Grant.-I recommend a grant at the rate $5. The grant would have been increased but for the extensive collaboration in composition which was evidently not checked in any way by the teacher.

No. 69.-35 Pottinger Street.

Staff-CHAU WAN SHI and 1 Assistant Teacher.

Discipline and Organization.-Very good.

Sanitation.-Very satisfactory.

Apparatus. Very good. One blackboard requires renewing.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 42 pupils.

Chinese. Reading.-Good. The girls in Standard I should speak up. The explana-

tion of the text might be better in some cases.

Composition.--Good throughout the school.

Arithmetic.-Mental.Good.

Written.-Very good.

Geography.-Fair in I and II, good in III and IV and poor in V. Standard V should

receive more attention.

Needlework.Very good.

Grant. I recommend a grant at rate of $7 and return the school, the work of which is highly satisfactory, as "thoroughly efficient."

* No. 70.-Kowloon City.

Staff-NG PANG SHI.

Discipline and Orginazation.-Good.

Sanitation.-Very satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 67 pupils.

Apparatus.Satisfactory.

Chinese. Reading.-Good except in Standard IV.

Composition.Fair in Standards I and II, very good in III and poor in IV.

376

Geography.-Very fair in Standard I, good in II and III, poor in Standard IV.

Arithmetic.-Mental.-Poor except Standard IV which was fair.

Written. Multiplication was weak in Standard II; III and IV very

good, I fair.

Needlework.-Good.

Grant. I recommend a grant at the rate of $6. This report is compiled from inspection reports made during the year, as the school closed without authority for the summer holidays before my annual inspection.

* No. 72.-11 Station Street, Mong Kok Tsui.

Staff-KwOK NAI-MING.

Discipline and Organization.-Discipline very good. There are now,6 Standards. The Model Course is being followed except in arithmetic where each standard is a little backward.

Sanitation.-Very satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 78 pupils.

Apparatus.-A new large size map of Kwang Tung and a large map of the New Territory are required.

Chinese.-Reading.--Very good.

Composition.--Good.

Geography. This subject was good in Standards V and VI except for the physical geography, poor in Standards III and IV, fair in I and II.

Arithmetic-Mental.-Good.

Written.--Fair. Standard II is weak in multiplication, Standard III in

division, Standards IV and V in decimals and VI in fractions.

Grant.-I recommend a grant at the rate of $7. The geography and written arithmetic will have to improve before this school can become thoroughly efficient.

* No. 73.-Bonham Road.

Staff-Mrs. GENÄHR.

Discipline and Organization. The discipline is very good. The organization is very fair but the Code should be more strictly adhered to.

Sanitation.-Very satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 56 pupils.

Apparatus.—Satisfactory.

English-Reading.-Good throughout.

Dictation.-Good. Grammar, fair.

Composition.-Standard IV good. Sentence] building in lower standards

good.

377

Arithmetic.- Mental.—Good in the lower standards and poor in III and IV.

Written.-Good on the whole. The pupils in Standard IV receive no instruction in this subject at present. This should be given. Standard I should be able to do easy addition and subtraction, II addition, subtraction, multiplication, division and compound rules and IV up to fractions.

Geography.—None taught in Standard I. The first standard should learn the geography of Hongkong. Standard II fair, III poor and IV good.

Chinese.— Reading.--Fair. The pupils should study the readers thoroughly before

going on to the Classics.

Composition.-Very fair.

Needlework.-Good.

Grant. I recommend a grant at the rate of 30/-. The school has done good work during the past year. A definite syllabus of work should now be drawn up for the new school year.

378

Appendix C.

HONGKONG TECHNICAL INSTITUTE.

(EVENING CONTINUATION CLASSES).

Director's Report, 1908.

A.-EVENING CONTINUATION CLASSES.

The Evening Continuation Classes opened in May 1906 were continued until May 31st 1907, when they closed for the Summer Vacation.

2. Examinations conducted by the lecturers were held at the end of the session, and certificates were granted to successful students as shewn in Table I. This Table shews that though only a comparatively small number presented themselves for examination the work done by these Students was of a very satisfactory nature.

A prize was presented in each Class to the most successful student. For these prizes our thanks are due to the gentlemen who contributed to the Prize Fund. The names of the Subscribers appear in Table II.

3. An Examination in Shorthand was held in May under the auspices of the Pitman Institute, London. The results of the Examination are set forth in Table III.

The collapse in the Speed Class may be attributed to the fact that, while the Regulations required that only 60 words per minute should be dictated the rate was actually over 70 words per minute.

4. In May a Committee was appointed by His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government to enquire generally into the working of the Evening Continuation Classes and submit proposals for the future organization of such Classes.

The Committee was constituted as follows:-

The Honourable Mr. A. W. BREWIN.

The Honourable Dr. Ho KAI, M.B., C.M.. C.M.G.

Dr. G. H. BATESON WRIGHT, D.d. (Oxos.)

E. D. C. WOLFE, Esq., B.A. (CANTAB.)

J. F. BOULTON, Esq., A.M.İ.C.E.

F. BROWNE, Esq., F.C.S.

Rev. T. W. PEARCE.

The Committee after a thorough investigation of the subject published a Report in August. Their proposals, most of which were eventually adopted by the Government, may be summarized thus:-

I. The Evening Continuation Classes to be styled in future "The Hongkong Technical Institute.

II. The Government of the Institute to consist of-

(a.) The Director.

(b.) The Inspector of Schools.

(c.) The Advisory Committee.

The Technical Institute to be a Sub-Department of the Education Department; the Director to be the official head of the Sub-Department, and to be responsible for the con- duct of the Classes.

The Institute to be subject to regular inspection by the Inspector of Schools, who will furnish an Annual Report to the Government. The Members of the Committee of Inquiry were constituted the Advisory Committee, the Inspector of Schools being ex officio a Mem- ber and the Secretary.

1

379

The Committee is empowered to make changes in certain Regulations and recommend to Government changes in others.

III. The Subjects of Instruction to be as detailed in Table VI.

The following subjects to be no longer taught :-

1. Advanced Book-keeping.

2. Commercial Arithmetic.

3. Commercial Geography.

4. Hygiene.

5. Japanese.

The following subjects to be introduced :-

Steam.

Field Surveying.

Electricity.

Type-writing (in connexion with Shorthand.)

IV. The Length of the Course of Study, was fixed as follows:--

(a.) Engineering Course

..3 years.

(b.) Commerce Section All subjects......... 2 years.

(c.) Science Chemistry & Physics

....3 years.

V. Examinations.

An Annual Examination to test the progress of the students to be arranged by the Director, and conducted jointly by him and by the Lecturers.

Arrangements for Examinations for Certificates (and for Diplomas, if granted) to be made by the Inspector of Schools, and the Examinations conducted by Examiners un- connected with the Classes.

VI. Fees.

A uniform fee of Four Dollars per Session to be charged for each Class, and to be paid in advance.

VII. Sessions.

Two Sessions in the year; the first commencing in the first week of October, and closing two weeks before Chinese New Year, the second commencing two weeks after Chinese New Year and closing in the last week of June.

VII. The Conditions of Admission, the engagement and payment of lecturers and other minor matters were also outlined by the Committee.

B.-HONGKONG TECHNICAL INSTITUTE.

The First Session of the newly-organized Institute opened on October 10th, 1997, and closed on January 24th, 1908.

Table V gives details of Staff and Subjects taught during the year, including the Second Session of the Evening Continuation, Classes, when many changes in the personnel of the Staff took place. During the First Session of the Institute there were no changes in the Staff.

2. Table VI shews the Number of Lectures, Duration of each Lecture, Total Number of Attendances, and Average Attendance at each Class for the Session...

Table VII shews the Average Attendance each month.

380

There was a serious falling off in attendance towards the end of the Session. The matter was investigated thoroughly and in nearly every case the reason given for irregular attendance was the great press of work at the end of the year in December, and again in January at the approach of the Chinese New Year. In connection with the subject of attend- ance, the question of Diplomas may be mentioned. It is important that Regulations for Diplomas be published as early as possible: it is certain that when Students have in view some definite object--such as the acquisition of a Diploma in Civil or Mechanical Engineer- ing, in Commerce or in Chemistry-a much greater effort will be made to attend the Lectures regularly. The subject is under the consideration of the Governinent.

3. Table VIII shews where the Students received their previous education. 80 per cent. were educated in Hongkong, and of these over 55 per cent. or 44 per cent. of the whole, were educated at Queen's College. Curiously, Canton does not figure in the list, but it may safely be assumed that many students received their early education in that City before entering a Hongkong School.

4. Electricity. A Class in this subject was sanctioned, but as only 1 student presented himself, the Class could not be formed. The members of the Physics Class will probably next Session take up Electricity, for which their work in Physics will prove a very useful preparation. Some lessons in Magnetism and Electricity were included in the Second Year's Course in Physics.

5. Laboratory. The Laboratory is now in a very satisfactory condition as a result of the attention devoted to it by Messrs. BROWNE and CROOK. If the work in science is to be developed it will be necessary to purchase more apparatus from time to time, especially in connexion with the Physics Department, which is at present inadequately equipped. Arrangements have been made whereby the College of Medicine for Chinese is entitled to the use of the Laboratory, in return for an annual payment. The sum received is utilised in the payment of a trained laboratory coolie, and in defraying the general laboratory expenses. The arrangement will unquestionably prove beneficial both to the College of

Medecine and the Technical Institute.

6. Building Construction and Field Surveying.

The Members of these Classes, accompanied by the Director and Mr. T. L. PERKINS, visited works in progress, notably the Naval Yard Extension and the Tunnels in course of construction on the Kowloon-Canton Railway. Explanations were given to the Students by Mr. PERKINS and also by Engineers connected with the various works. These visits are undoubtedly of great educational value to the Students and it is hoped that in future they will take place at regular intervals and become a recognised part of the Class work.

The Field Surveying Class was very successful, and the members were very anxious that the course should be continued. It is to be regretted that in consequence of lack of

funds, this is not possible at present.

7. Shorthand.

This is a very popular Class, proficiency in Shorthand having an im nediate money value.

During the Session Mr. BAINS delivered several lectures without receiving payment therefor, in order that backward students might have an opportunity of reaching the standard of the rest of the Class.

8. Type-writing.

The Institute has received from various Government Departinents five Type-writing Machines which can be utilised for key-board practice. These Machines reached the Institute too late to be of service during the Session. It has, however, been arranged that two Lectures on Type-writing shall be given next Session, in connexion with the Shorthand Class, and that facilities for practising upon the machines shall be afforded.

381

9. The following Tables are appended :-

I.

List of Certificates granted. May, 1907.

II.

Subscribers to Prize Fund.

III.

Shorthand Examination Results.

IV.

Number of Students in each Subject May, 1907.

V.

VI.

Staff and Subjects Taught during 1907.

Lectures and Attendances, for Session ending January 24th, 1908.

VII. Average Attendance.

VIII. Previous Education of Students.

IX., Nationality of Students.

X.

Nationality in each Class.

XI. Occupations of Students.

XII. Expenditure and Revenue.

XIII. Time Table.

Table I.

Subject.

CERTIFICATES GRANTED.

Building Construction I, ..

Machine Drawing I,

May, 1907.

Regular Attendance.

Passed

222

Passed

Examination. with Credit.

17

6

12

1

11

Mechanics 1,

Mathematics I.

Do. II,.

English I,

Do. II,

12

3

6

ما

5

5

25

7

6

18

5

5

9

3

3

French 1,

Do. II,

German I, Shorthand I.

1

10

15

2

6

9

4

4

16

5

5

Do.

II,

7

7

Book-keeping I,

10

5

Chemistry I, ..

7

1

Physics I,

8

2

w co ik

4

3

3

Hygiene 1,.

3

1

* Total,....

168

58

77

382

Table II.

SUBSCRIBERS TO PRIZE FUND.

Hon. Sir PAUL CHATER, C.M.G. Hon. Mr. A. W. BREWIN.

Mr. R. SHEWAN.

Mr. CHUN KING-YUE.

Mr. HIU SHUN-CHUN.

Mr. Ho FOOK.

Mr. Ho NgOK-LAU.

Mr. Họ TUNG,

Mr. LAU CHU-PAK. Mr. LEUNG PUI-CHI. Mr. LI TSZ-MING. Mr. NG LI-HING.

Mr. TAM Tsz-KONG. Mr. TONG LAI-CHUN.

Table III.

Results of Shorthand Examination held under the auspices of the Pitman Institute.

London, May, 1907.

SPEED CERTIFICATE, OR FIRST CLASS.

Passed, Failed,

.0 Candidates. .....5

THEORY CERTIFICATE, OR SECOND Class.

Passed.

ELEMENTARY CERTIFICATE, OR THIRD CLASS.

Failed,

Passed,

Failed,

2 Candidates.

"

....9 Candidates. .......1 Candidate.

Table IV.

Subject.

NUMBER OF STUDENTS IN EACH SUBJECT.

Session ending May 31st, 1907.

Stage. January. March.

April.

May.

Building Constrution,.

I

24

26

24

22

Machine Drawing,

I

13

15

15

13

Applied Mechanics,

I

22

17

15

13

Mathematics,

A & B

34

34

30

27

English,

I

27

24

22

21

·

do., French, do.. German, Shorthand,

do., Book-keeping,

do.,

II

10

12

13

13

A

18

·16

20

17

B.

11

10

10

7

I

10

10

12

11

I

18

23

23

24

II

9

10

8

8

I

14

12

13

10

II

6

4

4

3

Chemistry,

I

9

13

11

10

Physics,

I

18

12

11

9

Japanese,

I

Commercial Arithmetic,

I

Hygiene,

Ι

740

4

0

0

44

3

0

0

3

Total,

258

248

233

211

Actual No. of Students, ...

137

140

134

123

Commerce.

Engineering.

Subject.

383

Table V.

STAFF AND SUBJECTS TAUGHT.

Year ending January, 24th 1908.

Stage.

Lecturer.

Remarks.

Do.,

Mathematics,

Do..

(English,...

Do., French,

II

Do.,

II

Do.,

Madame Ribot.............

Building Construction,.

Ι

Field Surveying,

I

Mr. T. L. Perkins, Assoc. M. Inst. C. E....

Do.,

From Oct. 10.

Machine Drawing,

I

Mr. W. Tulip, Assoc. M. Iust. M. E.

Steam,

I

Do.,

From Oct.

10.

Applied Mechanies,

I

Mr. W. H. Williams. F. C. S ; F. R. G. S.

Do., Do.,

I

Mr. A. R. Sutherland. M. A.

Do.,

Mr. R. E. O. Bird. M. A. Mr. H. L. O. Garrett. B. A. Mr. G. P. de Martin. B. A. Mr. B. Tanner. F. R. G. S. Mr. P. d'Agostini,

Until May 31.

From March 27.

From Oct. Until May

10.

2.

From Oct. 10.

From Oct. 10.

German, Do.,

Japanese,

Shorthand,

Do..

I

Revd. Pastor Muller,

Do.,

Mr. K. Taguchi,

I

Mr. A. O. Brawn,

(Mr. T. Swaby,

II

Mr. J. W. Bains,

Book-keeping,

I

Mr. A. O. Brawn,

Mr. A. E. Crapnell,.

Do..

II

Mr. A. O. Brawn,

Commercial Arithmetic,

I

Mr. W. H. Williams,

[Chemistry. Theor.

I

Do.. Pract.

I

Physics, Do..

(Mr. E. Ralphs. F. C. S; F. E. I. S.

Mr. F. Browne. F. C. S ; F. I. C.

;

Mr. A. H. Crook. M. A ; F. R. G. S.

Do.,

Until May 31. From Oct. 10.

From Oct. 10. Discontinued in

March.

Until May 31. From Oct. 10.

Until March 15, From March 15. Discontinued in

April.

Until May 17. From March 17.

Science.

Hygiene

Mr. E. Ralphs. Mr. H. Sykes,

Until March 17.

From March 17.

384

Table VI.

LECTURES AND ATTENDANCES.

1st Session of Technical Institute, October 10th, 1907 to January 24th, 1908 (Chinese New Year.)

Subject.

Stage.

Number of Lectures.

Duration.

Total Attendances.

Average Attendance.

Building Construction

I

30

Field Surveying...

I

6

Machine Drawing.

I

22

Steam...

I

18

122 -

11⁄2 hours.

500

16.6-

2

73

12.1

22

295

13.4

1

hour.

241

13.3

Applied Mechanics...

I

28

1.

359

12.8

"

Do.

II

40

1

296

7.4

"

Mathematics

I

29

1

148

5.1

>>

Do.

II

29

1

143

4.9

English Do.

French..

Do. German

Do. Shorthand

I

58

1

1453

25.0

II

44

1

518

11.7

....

""

I

28

1

391

13.9

II

27

143

5.2

""

I

25

1

66

2.6

II

28

1

135

4.8

"

I

31

554

17.8

Do.

II

31

1

196

6.3

Book-keeping

I

14

2 hours.

183

13.0

Chemistry Theor..

I

29

1 hour.

286

9.8

Do. Pract..

I

14

2 hours.

125

8.9

Physics

I

29

1 hour.

183

6.3

Ďo.

II

29

1

105

3.6

Subject.

Table VII.

AVERAGE ATTENDANCE.

Session ending January 24th, 1908.

Lecturer.

Average Average Average Average

Attendance Attendance Attendance Attendance October. November. December. January.

Building Cons. I

Mr. Perkins,

22.0

19.9

13.7

10.4

Field Surveying I

Do..

13.0

12.6

11.0

Machine Drawing I

Mr. Tulip,

15.4

16.2

12.6

10.1

Steam I

Do.,

15.0

16.1

13.7

8.8

Mechanics I

Mr. Williams,

14.5

15.6

12.0

9.3

Do. II

Do.,

6.7

8.6

7.6

6.2

Mathematics I

Mr. Sutherland,

7.8

6.4

3.3

3.6

Do.

Do..

5.0

7.1

4.2

3.0

English I

Mr. de Martin,

32.2

31.4

23.7

18.8

Do.

Mr. Garrett,

29.0

27.2

19.8

14.6

Do.

Mr. Tanner,

31.0

English II

Do..

16.7

16.2

11.5

8.3

Do.

Mr. Garrett,

16.3

11.2

7.7

6.1

Do.

Mr. de Martin..

16.5

12.6

11.6

8.0

French I.

Mr. P. d'Agostini,.

14.5

15.2

15.0

11.3

Do. II

German I

Madame Ribot,

5.0

6.5

5.0

4.1

Pastor Muller,

1.8

2.8

3.2

2.6

Do. II

Do.,

5.0

5.2

4.7

4.1

Shorthand I

Mr. Bains,.

25.1

20.1

16.1

12.3

Do. II

Do.,

7.8

7.3

5.6

5.7

Book-keeping I Chemistry Theor.

Mr. Brawn,

16.2

15.7

9.0

10.3

Mr. Browne,

10.6

10.2

8.7

10.0

Do. Pract.

Do.,

9.6

10.2

8.2

7.3

Physics I

Mr. Crook,

7.8

6.5

5.4

6.1

Do. II

Do.,

3.1

4.5

2.8

4.0

Where Educated.

385

Table VIII.

PREVIOUS, EDUCATION OF STUDENTS.

Session ending January 24th, 1908.

No.

Where Educated.

No.

Hongkong.

Queen's College, Diocesan School,.

England,

94

India....

19

Manila,

St. Joseph's College,

15

Macao,

Ellis Kadoorie School,

7

Australia,

Victoria British School,

77

Singapore,

St. Stephen's College,...

5

Honolulu,

Italian Convent,

4

Japan,

Belilios Public School,

Private Tutors,

Wantsai Government School,.

Tsingtau,

St. Paul's College,

2

Tientsin,

Various,.

12

U. S. A.,

Canada,

Total,

170

Table IX.

16

5

3

3

3

10 10 10 10 00 0s as ox 5.

Total,

42

NATIONALITY OF STUDENTS ON ROLL.

I.-During Session Ending May 31st, 1907.

Chinese,

Non-Chinese,

128

125

Total,

253

II-During Session Ending January 24th, 1908.

Chinese,

Non-Chinese,

118

94

Total,

212

1

}

1

Science.

Commerce.

Engineering.

386

TABLE X.

NUMBER OF CHINESE AND NON-CHINESE IN EACH CLASS.

Session ending January 24th, 1908.

Class.

Chinese. Non-Chinese.

(Building Construction I

25

Machine Drawing I

17

Steam I

17

7

11

9

8

6

34613235

Mechanics I

Do. II

Mathematics I

Do.

II

Field Surveying

English I

Do. II

French I

Do. II

German I

Do. II

Shorthand I

Do. II Book-keeping I

Chemistry Theor.

Do. Pract....

Physics I

Do. II

TABLE XI.

OCCUPATIONS OF STUDENTS.

Session ending January 24th, 1908.

32

15

10

~HONNO550 50

9

10

14

9

3

1

10

27

9

12

O u、 ༣༥ ཤ

SNDH

5

5

2

Occupation.

Number.

Occupation.

Number.

Clerks and Typists

93

Book-keepers

Students

29

Store-keepers.

Merchants & Assistants

20

Engineers and Engineer Apprentices...

15

Military (R.A.M.C.) Stenographers

Draughtsmen

14

Teachers

14

Contractors

Interpreters

Shroffs

Telepraph Operators

Compradores

Police Sergeants Naval Lieutenants

Total...

198

212

14

10 30 00

3

1

1

1

1

1

1

3

Science.

January 1st to May 31st..... September 1st to December 31st

387

TABLE XII

EXPENDITURE.

Personal Emoluments.

$ 2934.60 2841.00

$ 5775.60

TOTAL....

January 1st to May 31st.

REVENUE.

Other Charges. Crown Agents.

$ 435.27)

1100.36

443.98 f

$ 879.25

1100.36

$ 7755.21

Class Fees

$ 757.00

Registration Fees Received

Do.

Refunded

Balance

$ 495.00 444.50

$ 50.50

50.50

October 1st to December 31st.

Class Fees

Total

1377.00

$2184.50

Section.

Engineering.

Table XIII.

HONGKONG TECHNICAL INSTITUTE.

TIME TABLE OF CLASSES.

>

Subject.

Day.

Time.

Room.

Building Construction, Machine Drawing,

Steam,...

Tuesday; Friday.

6-7.30 p.m. Basement.

Monday; Friday. Friday.

6-7

"

7-8

Magnetism & Electricity,

Wednesday.

6-7

Applied Mechanics, El....

Wednesday.

7-8

Thursday.

6-7

1 3

Q. Coll. Lab.

No. 22.

"

Tuesday.

6-7

"

Adv.

Wednesday.

6-7

Thursday.

7-8

Practical Mathematics,

El....

Tuesday; Friday.

7-8

No. 14.

Adv.

Monday; Wednesday.

7-8

J

Field Surveying,.

By arrangement.

Monday; Tuesday.

6-7

No. 9.

English. Junior,

Thursday.

6-7

";

Friday.

7-8

Monday.

7-9

No. 7.

Senior,

Wednesday.

7-8

**

*

Friday.

9-10

*

French. Junior,

Monday; Wednesday.

6-7

No. 8.

"

Senior,

German. Junior,

Senior,

Monday; Wednesday.

7-8

:)

Tuesday; Friday.

6-7

No. 7.

"1

Tuesday; Friday,

7-8

*

*1

Shorthand. Junior,

Senior,

*

Book-keeping. Junior,..

Wednesday; Friday. Wednesday; Friday. Thursday.

6-7

No. 15.

:)

7-8

6-8

21

Chemistry,

Monday; Friday.

Tuesday.

9-10

( Govt. Civil

Lab.

6-8

,་

Q. Coll. Lab.

Physics. Junior,

Monday Thursday.

6-7

"

Senior,

Monday Thursday.

7-8

11

Commerce.

E. RALPHS,

Director.

388

Appendix D.

HYGIENE.

Report on the Study of Hygiene in Hongkong Schools 1907.

EXAMINATIONS FOR MASTERS.

Instruction in hygiene has been continued during the past year and this subject now figures in every school syllabus. Both masters and pupils have again offered themselves for examination in the subject though not to such an extent as in 1906. Eleven masters, 3 Europeans and 8 Chinese from the District Schools entered for the examination in hygiene held under the auspices of the local branch of the Royal Sanitary Institute in April last and four Messrs CURWEN, PARKIN, MORRIS and YOUNG HEE obtained certificates.

NEW PUBLICATIONS.

During the past year Dr. PEARSE's Manual on Hygiene has been translated into Chinese and is now in use in all the Vernacular Grant-in-Aid School.

STUDY OF THE SUBJECT IN SCHOOLS.

The subject is now being taught in all English and Anglo-Chinese Schools without exception. It is also a subject of study in all the Vernacular Grant Schools from Standard IV upwards. Test papers will be set at the next Annual Examination of the Vernacular Grant Schools for the first time. Table I shews the total number of pupils in English and Anglo-Chinese Schools under instruction in hygiene.

EXAMINATION OF SCHOOLS.

Early in the year Sir MATTHEW NATHAN who very generously provided the individual prizes for the Advanced and Elementary Courses in hygiene for two years, left the Colony. and it was decided to discontinue the competition in the Advanced Course. The individual prizes in the Team Competition for elementary hygiene were also given up at the same time. The shield however remained to be competed for. 7 teams only 6 from Boys' Schools and 1 from a Girls' School as compared with 14 in 1906 entered for the competition held in December 1907, and the shield was again won by the Diocesan Boys School. Table I gives the schools in order of merit with an analysis of the number of marks obtained. Several of the schools whose school year ends in June failed to enter this year on the ground that the schools which promoted at Christmas had their pupils under instruction in Standard V for a whole year before the competition and thus gained a very material advantage over them; others had possibly lost interest in the competition as the individual prizes were no longer offered. Before the next competition it is proposed to re-draft the rules governing the eligibility of candidates for the Team Competition and it is to be hoped that greater interest in the Competition will be shown. Government and Grant Schools which enter teams for the Competition are under certain conditions exempt from any further examination in hygiene during the ensuing twelve months.

Examinations in hygiene will in future be conducted at the time of the Annual Inspec- tion at all schools which enter no team for the Shield Competition or which fail to obtain 40 per cent. of marks in this Competition.

20th March, 1908.

1

E. D. C. WOLFE.

Inspector of Schools.

389

TABLE I.

Numbers Instructed in Hygiene in 1907.

School.

Queen's College,

St. Joseph's College,..

Diocesan Boys',

Saiyingpun,

Yaumati,

Ellis Kadoorie, Wantsai,

Italian Convent, Diocesan Girls',

,

St. Stephen's.... Belilios School,

French Convent,

St. Mary's,

Kowloon School, Fairlea,

Victoria School, Anglo-Portuguese School,

Total,..

School.

TABLE II.

A Elementary Course.

B Advanced Course.

Total.

720

250

970

140

40

180

140

32

172

170

170

...

85

85

...

72

74

2 :

12

84

74

53

20

73.

45

6

51

50

50

12

11 17

20

20

6

17

17

...

10

10

6

10

6

6

5

5

1,594

400

1,994

Results of Examination, December 1907.

ELEMENTARY COURSE.

Sum of Marks of Candidates.

Max. 100.

Total Max.

700

Question

I

II

III IV

V

VI

VII

Diocesan Boys',

520 10

54

77

77

69

Saiyingpun,

37

62

693

74

78

459 10

69

64

78

Yaumati,

64

Ellis Kadoories,

**

SO

43

68

62

722

Wantsai,

52

70

66

8 9

51

50 60

Diocesan Girls',

48

56 27

89

Queen's College,

33 59

60 35

* * 3 3 3 4

69

08

54

58

459 10

75

60

425

65

76

51

411

62

53

48

53

354

34 49

318

9 9 9 9

10

74.28 13

65.57 173 174

65.57 17

60.71 14

95

95

78

10

58 71

16

66

10

50.57 13

35

10 45.42 17

120

The figures in Red are over 60 % of full marks; those in Black type under 40 %.

Remarks.

HONGKONG.

No. 26

1908

ABSTRACT SHEWING DIFFERENCES BETWEEN THE ESTIMATES OF EXPENDITURE FOR 1908 AND 1909.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor, September 17th, 1908.

INCREASE.

DECREASE.

PERSONAL EMOLUMENTS :-

PERSONAL EMOLUMENTS :—

Lower Exchange,

$ 156,278

Abolition of Posts,

$ 52,225

New Posts,.........、

65,354

Reductions on New Appointments,.

2,641

Stipulated Increments,

25,121

Allowances,

4,386

Increase of Salaries,

Allowances,

Other Items,

Other Charges,

6,389

Other Items,

2,371

8,674

Other Charges,

69,695

5,511

Special Expenditure,..

52,000

65,127

Miscellaneous Services,

7,586

Special Expenditure,..

4,050

Public Works, Recurrent,.....

4,500

Military Contribution,

25,161

Charge on account of Public Debt,

178,083

Pensions,

35,000

Charitable Services,

3,591

Total Increase exclusive of P. W. Extra-

ordinary,...

Public Works, Extraordinary,....

Deduct Decrease,

TOTAL INCREASE inclusive of P. W.

Extraordinary,

$ 578,339

Total Decrease,

$ 195,404

219,700

$.798,039

195,404

$ 602,635

Receipts.

HONGKONG.

FINANCIAL RETURNS FOR THE YEAR 1907.

No. 1908

7

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor,

Statement showing the Total Receipts and Expenditure in the Year 1907.

Amount

Estimated.

Actual

Receipts.

More than Less than Estimated.

Estimated.

Payments.

TREASU

Amount

Estimated.

Actual

Payments.

More than

Estimated.

I

E

Balance, 1st January, 1907,

HEADS OF REVENUE.

$

$

C.

101,218.38

$

C.

*

*

C.

Balance (overpaid) 1st Jan., 1907,

C.

1. Light Dues, .............

77,000.00

80,389.00

C.

ረ.

3,389.00

C.

HEADS OF EXPENDITURE.

C.

$ C.

$

ن

Charge on account of Public Debt,. Pensions,

192,680.00

130,179.81

214,600.00

183,478.86

2. Licences and Internal Revenue, not otherwise specified,

3. Fees of Court or Office, Payments for specific purposes and Reimbur- sements in aid,

4. Post Office,

5. Rent of Government Property, Land and Houses,

4,320,970.00| 4,530,468.75 209,198.75

486,655.00 498,621.05 11,966.05

Governor,

74,512.00

78,238.69

3,726.69

Colonial Secretary's Department and Legislature,

66,577.00 58,910.10

Registrar General's Department, Audit Departinent,

38,332.00 35,630.88

Treasury,

14,783.00 19,757.66 57,152.00 57,291.61

4,974.66

139.61

418,200.00 445,420.92

27,220.92

Post Office,

Harbour Master's Departinent, Observatory,

6. Interest,

7. Miscellaneous Receipts,

TOTAL, Ordinary,

773,800.00

6,000.00

65,400.00

809,647.90 35,847.90

6,000.00 Medical Departments,

Sanitary Department,..

77,982.34

6,148,025.00 | 6,442,529.96

12,582.34

300,504.96

Transport,

200 000 00

150 730 20.

140 240 71

Judicial and Legal Departments, Police and Prison 'Departments,..

Botanical and Forestry Department, Education,

6,000.00 Ecclesiastical and Charitable Services,

Miscellaneous Services

365,452.47

163,234.00 160,389.48

418,798.00

20,530.00

20,110.53

196,720.00

185,456.88

698,690.00 661,961.74

235,175.00

216,842.49

454,229.00

387,977.88

46,751,00

44,131.14

181,484.00

184,028.19

17,925.00

10,000.00

143 712 (N

2,544.19

15,623.21

6,357.33

215 903 01

*9 101 04!

Receipts.

:

HONGKONG.

FINANCIAL RETURNS FOR THE YEAR 1907.

No.

1908

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor,

Statement showing the Total Receipts and Expenditure in the Year 1907.

Amount

Estimated.

Actual

Receipts.

More than Less than

Estimated.

Estimated.

Payments.

Amount

Estimated.

Actual

Payments.

TREASURY.

More than

Estimated.

Less than

Estimated.

$

2, 1st January, 1907,

C.

C.

101,218.38

*

C.

C.

Balance (overpaid) 1st Jan., 1907,

HEADS OF REVENUE.

C.

C.

ht Dues,

77,000.00

80,389.00

3,389.00

enees and Internal Revenue, not herwise specified,

4,320,970.00| 4,530,468.75

209,498.75

s of Court or Office, Payments r specific purposes and Reimbur- ments in aid,

st Office,

$

C.

€9

C.

HEADS OF EXPENDITURE.

C.

C.

C.

$

Charge on account of Public Debt, .

192,680.00

130,179.81

Pensions,

214,600.00

183,478.86

62,500.19

31,121.14

Governor,

74,512.00

78,238.69

3,726.69

Colonial Secretary's Department and

Legislature,

66,577.00

58,940.10

7,636.90

Registrar General's Department,

38,332.00

35,630.88

2,701 12

nt of Government Property, Land id Houses,

486,655.00 498,621.05 11,966.05 418,200.00 445,420.92 27,220.92

Audit Departinent,

14,783.00

19,757.66

Treasury,..

57,152.00 57,291.61

4,974.66

139.61

Post Office,

418,798.00

365,452.47

Harbour Master's Department,

163,234.00

160,389.48

Observatory,

20,530.00

20,110.53

52,345.53

2,844.52

419.47

crest,

scellaneous Receipts, ..

OTAL, Ordinary,

773,800.00

6,000.00

65,400.00 77,982.34 6,148,025.00| 6,442,529.96

809,647.90

35,847.90

Judicial and Legal Departments,

196,720.00

185,456.88

11,263.12

Police and Prison Departments,...

698,690.00

661,961.74

36,728.26

6,000.00 Medical Departments,

235,175.00

216,842.19

18,332.51

Sanitary Department,...

454,229.00

387,977.88

66,251.12

12,582.34

300,504.96

Botanical and Forestry Department, . Education,

46,751.00

44,131.14

2,619.86

181,484.00

184,028.19

2,544.19

6,000.00❘ Ecclesiastical and Charitable Services,

17,925.00

15,623.21

2,301.79

Transport

10.000.00

6.357,33

3.642.67

Deposits Available,

550.000.00

Total Expenditure,

$ 6,431,740.00| 5,757,203.47

166,735,85

Deposits Available, (Subsidiary Coins),

274,022.00

Deposits Not Available,

2,385,306.23

Less than Estimated,

Crown Agents' Account, ....

757,992.16

Crown Agents' Advance,

281,546.29

Crown Agents' Deposits,.

1,302,768.74

Deposits Available,

Deposits Available, (Subsidiary Coins), No. 2,.

382,459.75

400,000.00

1

Bills on Crown Agents Outstanding,.

395,876.29

Deposits Not Available,

2,674,313.51

Crown Agents,

384,823.16

Advance Account,

4,152,581.71

Crown Agents' Advance,

291,084.33

Crown Agents' Deposits,

Family Remittances, ...

61,384.11

Bills on Crown Agents in transit,

Subsidiary Coins,

46,316.97

Subsidiary Coins, No. 2,

382,459.75

Money Order Account,

36,690.18

Suspense Account,.......

Suspense House Service,

Exchange,

· 31,030.12

31,549.50

Total Receipts,..

17,341,804.30

Advance Account,

Family Remittances, Subsidiary Coins,... Subsidiary Coins, No. 2, Money Order Account, Suspense Account, Suspense House Service,

Total Payments,... 17,076,985.01

Total Payments, with opening Balance,

1,095,520.08

395,876.29

4,002,997.65

69,871.85

274,600.73

382,459.75

74,918.90

868,271.40

36,584,13

Total Receipts, with opening Balance,

17,443,022.68

Balance 31st Dec., 1907,

17,076,983.01

393,541.38

Crown Agents Balance (overpaid), 31st Dec., 1907....]

27,503.71

Total,

$17,470,526.39

Total,

$ 17,470,526.39

146,249.71

Public Works Recurrent,

More than Estimated,

154,255.25

437,500.00 520,659.66 83,159.66

Total,

5,221,040.00 5,028,553.26 166,735.85 369,222.59

Public Works Extraordinary,

1,210,700.00 728,650.21

482,049.79

is Available,

550.000.00

Total Expenditure,

ts Available, (Subsidiary Coins),

274,022.00

is Not Available,

2,385,306.23

Less than Estimated,

6,431,740.00 | 5,757,203.47 166,735.85 841,272.88

166,735.85

674,536.53

Agents' Account,

757,992.16

Agents' Advance,

281,546.29

Agents' Deposits,..

1,302,768.74

Deposits Available,

400,000.00

Deposits Available, (Subsidiary Coins), No. 2,..

382,459.75

Crown Agents Outstanding,.

395,876.29

Deposits Not Available,

2,674,313.51

Crown Agents,

384,823.16

e Account,

4,152,581.71

Crown Agents' Advance,

291,084.33

Crown Agents' Deposits,

Remittances,

61,384.11

Bills on Crown Agents in transit,

ary Coins,

46,316.97

Advance Account,

Family Remittances,

Subsidiary Coins,.....

ary Coins, No. 2,

382,459.75

Subsidiary Coins, No. 2,

Money Order Account,

Order Account,

86,690.18

-e Account,.

e House Service,

ge,

31,030.12

31,549.50

Total Receipts,

17,341,804.30

eceipts, with opening Balance,

17,443,022.68

Agents Balance (overpaid), 31st Dec., 1907....

27,508.71

Total,

$17,470,526.39

Balance 31st Dec., 1907,

Suspense Account, Suspense House Service,

Total Payments,...$ 17,076,985.01

Total Payments, with opening Balance,

17,076,985.01

393,541.38

1,095,520.08

395,876.29

4,002,997.65

69,871.85

274,600.73

382,459.75

74,918.90

863,271.40

36,584.13

+

Total,

$ 17,470,526.39 |

67

Statement of Assets and Liabilities, on the 31st December, 1907.

LIABILITIES.

C.

ASSETS.

C.

Bills on Crown Agents in trausit,

395,876.29

Balance, Bank,

393,541.38

Deposits not Available,

656,505.90

Refund of Rates,

6,300.00

Advances, ....

168,501.50

Officers' Remittances,.

Money Order Remittances,

Military Contribution,

Civil Peusions,

1,253.69

16,217.80

Crown Agents' Deposit,

569,897.96

64,590.66

18,400.00

Subsidiary Coins, .....

645,521.75

Police Pensions,

12,000.00

Public Works,

6,146.03

Profit, Money Order Office.................

10,000.00

Suspense House Service,

1,201.05

Balance overdrawn, Crown Agents,

27,503.71

Suspense Account,

863,271.40

Total Liabilities,

1,205,995.13

Balance,

1,444,738.86

Total,...$ 2,650,733.99

Total Assets,*

$2,650,723.99

* Not including Arrears of Revenue amounting to §88,978.33.

Statement of Funded Public Debt or Loans borrowed for Fixed Periods outstanding on the 31st December, 1907, and of the Accumulated Sinking Funds at the same date.

Designation of Debt or Loan.

Legal Authority.

Amount Outstanding.

Hongkong 81% In- Ordinances Nos. £1.485 732.16.5

scribed Stock.

1 & 2 of 1893 & No. 11 of 1905.

Sterling.

JOINT SINKING FUNDS.

Amount of Stock, &c.

Cost Price.

Market Valne.

£

Brit. Guiana.

Stock.

Cape of G. Hope, Gold Coast,

**

s. d.

2,000. 0, 0 2,000. 0. 0 5.000. 0. 0

£

£

s. d.

200. 0. 0 2,000. 0, 0

оо

17

2,000. 0, 0

11

33010

9.2

21

Natal.

New Zealand,

Queensland,

Sierra Leone,

3

South Australia, 3

South Nigeria

4,000. 0, 0 | 1,200. 0. 0 |

5,000. 0. 0

s. d.

1,932.17. 3 ( 85 ) 1.700, 0. 0 1,941. 1. 0 83 ) 1,660, 0, 0 4,480.11. 6 ( 85 ) 4,250, 0. 0 189.19. 5 ( 82 ) 164. 0. 0 1,921. S. 8 ( 86 ) 1,720. 0. 0 1,948. 5.10 ( 85 )1,700. 0. 0 3,879.19. 2 ( 98 ) 3,920, 0. 0 1,293.16. 5 ( 992) 1,194. 0.0

9.735. 8. 7 ( 98 ) 9,800, 0. 0 14.291. 8. 5 98 )14.896. 0. 0 4.082.12. 0 (103 ) 4,120. 0. 0 4,746.15. 0 ( 85 ) 4.250, 0. 0 4.734. 8. 6 ( 98 ) 4,900, 0, 0 2.010. 2.10 ( 86 ) 1,806. 0. 0

4,624. 9. 9

(Lagos)

31

};

Strait Settlements 34°/

Trinidad,

4

11

10,000. 0. 0 15,200. 0, 0 4,000. 0. 0

Do..

3

Victoria,

30%

>>

Western A'tralia, 3 % Gold Coast Govt.

11

Loan,

5,000. 0. 0 2,100. 0. 0

4,624. 9. 9

1,624. 9. 9

£ 64,324. 9. 9

61,813. 4. 4 !

*

60,701. 9. 9

Note.-Amount repaid by Viceroy of Wuchang at credit of Special Account £220,000 which has been advanced therefrom for Rail-

way Construction.

*This includes the sum of £14,352.8.1 surplus of Interest paid by the Viceroy in the loan of £1,100,000.

Railway Loan Account.

To Repayments by Viceroy of Wuchang, £220,000,...$2,037,551.02

Balance to be repaid from Railway Account,.

883,271.40

By Advances on account of Railway Construction

£220,000. By Advances from funds in custody of Government,.

..$2,037.551.02

883,271.40

Total,...

$2,020,822.42

Total,..

$2.020,822.42

68

Summary of Advances and Repayments of Advances for the Year ended 31st December, 1907.

Balances

on

Names.

1st January, 1907.

Advances during the

year.

Total.

Repayments of Advances during the year.

Balances

on

31st Dec., 1907.

$

Money Orders,

893.02{

207,409.43 (1)1,797.65

210,100.10

210,100.10

Western Money Orders,

Cr. 2,473.09

18,867.14

18,867.14 j 19,175.08

Cr.

457.12

(1) 149.18

Singapore Government,

522.12

5,010.22

5,532,34

2,788.96

Mauritius Government,

278.02

734.36

1,012.38

Ceylon Government,

45.63 (2)

1.02

Transvaal Government,

1,536.50

3,063.00

Treasury,

500.00

500.00

Public Works Department,

7,000.00

7,000.00

46.65 4,599.50

863.50

46.65 3,795.03

500.00 7,000.00

2,743.38 148.88

804.47

Crown Solicitor,

24.60

Colonial Secretary's Department,

Sanitary Department,.

Post Office-Money Order,

Postmaster General,

Private Street Improvement,

1,603.32

200.00 25.00 500.00 43,872.18 500.00 1,092.70

224.60

183.50

41.10

25.00

25.00

500.00

500.00

43,872.18 500.00 2,696.02

43,872.18

500.00

2,813.31

Rider Main Scheme,

111,361.21

985.96

112,347.17

121,615.01

Captain Superintendent of Police,.

825.00

825.00

800.00

Cr. 117.29

Cr. 9,267.84

25.00

Botanical Department,

1,167.26

1,167.26

1,167.26

Compensation to Squatters K.I.L. 1203.

10,940.00

10,940.00

10,940.00

Passage of Mrs. Aris,

320.00

320.00

210.00

110.00

G. W. Eves, Afe. Kowloou-Canton

Railway,

122,119.82

Metallic Circuit,.

14,486.73

1,970,000.00 |2,092,119 822,044,704.54

11,490.58 25,977,31

47,415.28

25,977.31

British Guiana...

Praya East Reclamation,

Supreme Court,

Magistracy,

Medical Department-Institute,

Ada Robertsou,

J. Wildey,

M. Hood,

A. Dixon,...

F. Gidley,

316.89 57,315.39

1,228.22

1,545.11

1,244.39

57,315.39

300.72 57,315.39

100.00

411.50

511.50

511.50

100.00

100.00

200.00

200.00

200.00

200.00

200.00

163.78

40.95

211.39

252.34

(2) 58.53

30.03

247.62

61.91

371.16

433.07

61.90

(3) 123.55

45.04

11.26

61.90

73.16

(4) 16.86

11.26

249.00

62.25

313.41

375.66

(5) 85.83

40.83

178.19

53.46

196.17

249.63

ì (6) 53.62

17.82

239.84

M. Moore,

119.93

829.82

419.75

59.96

(7) 149.95

B. Lawrence,

650.59

650.59

487.92

162.67

H. B. M. Consul, Shanghai,

120.00

120.00

120.00

II. B. Lethbridge,

{

159.96

160.17

150.17

} (3)

.21

H. H. J. Gompertz,..

145.93

145.93

145.93

Sergeant Baker,

131.85

131.85

131.85

Furniture for Government Pavilion,

200.00

200.00

200.00

F. A. Coleman,

181.13

181.13

181.13

L. S. Clarke,

43.03

48.03

43.03

Fiji Government, P. C. Finaman, R. G. McEwen, L. S. Blackman,

4.716.03

128.03 54.16

280.15

4,716.03! 128.03 54.16 230.15

3,793.25

1,012.78

128.03 54.16

230.15

Local Auditor,

1,477.78

627.14

900.00

1,527.14

(8) 49.36

Passage to Mrs. Culliford,

158.23

158.23

158.23

A. W. Grant,

H. G. C. Fisher,

216 93 113.85

216.93

216.93

113.85

113.85

Leeward Island Government,

332.16

332.16

260.82

Special Fund,

J. J. Bullin,

3,068.14 1,529,858.70 1,532,926.84 Cr. 30.81

1,506,599.86

89.13

89.13

100.17

71.34 26,326.98 Cr. 11.04

Carried forward,......

317,176.58 3,825,726.85 4,142,903.13 3,989,368.12

163,388.60

69

Summary of Advances and Repayments of Advances for the Year ended 31st December, 1907.-Continued.

Balances

on

Names.

1st January, 1907.

Advances during the

year.

Total.

Repayments of Advances during the year.

Balances

on

31st Dec.,

1907.

r

$9

$

$

Brought forward,

317,176.58 3,825,726.85 4,142,903.43 3,989,368.12 || 163,388.60

A. Chapman,

1,107.69

1,107.69

1,107.69

Passage to Mrs. Pitt,

305.45

305.45

305.45

1

E. C. Lewis,..

352.29

352.29

852.29

Collision between U.S.S. Alexander

and Junk,.

(4) 42.30

42.30

42.80

R. C. Witchell,

Compensation for damage to Fishing

Nets in Mirs Bay,

E. D. C. Wolfe,

177.78

177.78

177.78

500.00

500.00

500.00

450.00

450.00

450.00

L. C. Rees,

311.11

311.11

31111

88.88

U. A. Farrell,

MC. R. Bedford,

J. C.

Kaye,

S. B. C. Ross,

C. F. W. B. Rowlands,

T. C. Lofthouse,

Comptroller, Indian Treasury,

Umpire Fee re Resumption of K.F.L. 4

88.89

88.89

.01

50.00

50.00

50.00

215.32

215.32

192.00

23.32

583.18

583.18

583.18

358.87

358.87

320.00

38.87

123.36

123.86

123.36

140,559.96

149,559.96

140,559.96

1,575.00

200.00

W. F. Hast,

J. Abern,

1,375.00

201.09

1,575.00

201.09

[ (6)

1.09

205.23

204.75

Tsang Keng,

Reconstruction of the retaining wall

at Braeside, I. L. 1523,

20,000.00

203.23

20,000.00

1 (9)

.48 8,500.00

11,500.00

7,692.45

(7)

4.18

7,696.63

7,696.63

A. Watson,.....

G. C. Melutosh,

$76.47

$76.47

376.47

188.24

188.24

120.00

68.24

B. W. Grey..........

Incidental Expenses, N. T.,

W. R. Davis,

A. C. Little,....

E. J. Mitchell,................

B. Tanner,

376.47

376.47

240.00

136.47

25.00

25.00

25.00

1,412.01

1,412.01

775.00

637.01

274.29

274.29

90.00

184.29

382.84

229.40

382.84

71.40

(10) 82.04

640.00

640.00

280.00

360.00

F. T. Keyt,

Passage of Mrs. Counsell,

P. N. H. Jones,

365.71

365.71

160.00

205.71

402.29

402.29

160.00

242.29

543.40

543.40

120.00

423.40

D. Wood,

E. A. Johnson,

C. W. Beckwith,

391.83

391.83

40.00

351.83

200.00

200.00

200.00

400.00

400.00

100.00

318,942.01 4,004,844.12 | 4,323,786.13 | 4,155,284.63

178,354.79

Less Credits,

9,853.29

168,501.50

(1) Profit in Exchange $1,797.65

(1) Loss in Exch nge $ 149.18

"

1.02 21

(2)

58.53

..

27

(8)

123.55

42.30

་་

*

16.86

.01

85.83

53

"J

1.09

53.62

""

4.18

$1,846.46

149.95

97

49.36

"

(9) (10)

.18

82.04

769.40

70

Summary of Deposits and Refunds of Deposits for the Year ended 31st December, 1907.

Names.

Balances on

Deposits

1st January, received dur-

1907.

ing the year.

Total.

Deposits Balances on repaid during 31st Decem-

the year.

ber, 1907.

Tender Deposits,...

Sikh Passage Fund,

Police Fine Fund,

Suitors' Fund,

5,960.00 265.00 420.79

15,492.00

21,452.00 265.00

14,327.00

1,014.22

1,435.01

9.00 999.83

7,125.00 256.00

Praya Reclamation Fund,

31,971.83

31,971.83

2,460.72

163,837.70

254,335.23

Widows and Orphans' Fund,

418,172.93 198,493.24

435.18 29,511.11 219,769.69

272,960.20

53,278.74

326.238.94

7,517.47

Chinese Recreation Ground,

318,721.47

6,323.56

1,336.77

7,660.33

1,251.77

6,408.56

Custom Duties on Parcels,

1,794.30

2,704.01

4,498.31

2,856.70

1,641.61

Sale of Land Deposits,

300.00

600.00

900.00

800.00

100.00

Hongkong Volunteer Corps Fund,

6,846.63

26.427.91

33,274.54

29,530.51

Sugar Convention,

3,714.00

250.00

1,840.00

2,090.00

Miscellaneous Deposits,

2,090.00

2,836.85

3,824.00

6,660.85

1,337.13

House Service Deposits,.

5,323.72

1,727.00

928.00

2,655.00

1,238.00

Board of Trade,

1,417.00

3,630.92

3,630.92

2,811.25

819.67

Gaol Library,

103.90

103.90

103.90

Post Office Fine Fund,

268.23

32.74

300.97

300.97

Medical Department Fine Fund,

392.57

91.92

484.19

50.00

434.49

Sanitary Department Fine Fund,

104.87

72.10

176.97

176.97

Clerkship Examination Fees,...

70.00

10.00

80.00

10.00

70.00

Fees for Boundary Stones, N.T.,

53.85

757.00

810.85

470.49

340.36-

Intestate Estates,

1,795.89

121.08

1,916.97

Estate of Deceased Policemen,

1,916.97

197.42

Market Caretakers' Securities,

20.00

197.42 20.00

197.42

20.00

Salved Merchandize,

J. Harkin,

Kowloon-Canton Railway,

Compounds of Opium,.

Student Registration Fees,..

Quarters for Nursing Sisters,

Kowloon Cattle Depôt and Slaughter

House,....

Typhoon Relief Fund,

Balance of distrain not claimed,.

446,133.41

1,941,137.19 2,387,270.60

2,387,224.78

925.00

825.00

1,750.00

45.82 j 925.00

3,770.05

3,770.05

825.00 3,770.05

1,872.00

1,872.00

444.50

1,427.50

14.88

14.88

14.88

17,385.97

17,385.97

2,160.27

15,225.70

18,000.00

18,000.00

17,380.94

619.06

35,804.05

35,804.05

35,804.05

45

.45

.45

12th March, 1908.

ff

945,559.00 2,885,306.233,330,865.232,674,359.33

* Profit in Exchange $45.82.

A. M. THOMSON,

Treasurer.

656,505.90

HONGKONG.

No. 27

• 1908

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS IN CONNECTION WITH THE ESTIMATES FOR 1909.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor, September 17th, 1908.

* Corrected Statement of Assets and Liabilities, on the 31st December, 1907.

LIABILITIES.

C.

ASSETS.

C.

Bills in transit,

395,876.29 Balance, Bank,.

393,541.38

Deposits not Available,

656,505.90

Advances,

168,501.50

Officers' Remittances,..

1,253.69

Crown Agents' Deposit,

569,897.96

Money Order Remittances,

16,217.80

Subsidiary Coins,

645,521.75

Suspense House Service,

1,201.05 Suspense Account (Railway Construc-

Balance overdrawn, Crown Agents,

27,503.71

tion),

863,271.40

Total,

Balance,

1,098,558.44

1,542,175.55

Total,................. ..$2,640,733.99

Total,.....

$2,640,733.99

* All items of Revenue and Expenditure omitted.

Treasury, Hongkong, 27th August, 1908.

A. M. THOMSON,

Treasurer.

[P.T.O.]

532

ESTIMATED BALANCE OF ASSETS AND LIABILITIES ON 31ST DECEMBER, 1908.

Revised Estimate of Revenue, 1908,.......

"

""

Expenditure, 1908,

Dr. Balance,.....

.$6,075,755,00

6,656,804.00

Balance of Assets, 1907,...........

་་་

Dr.

Estimated Balance of Assets, 1908,...

Inscribed Stock Loans of 1893 and 1906 at 34% interest, to be paid off on the 15th April, 1943,

LOAN ACCOUNT 1907.

Sinking Fund,

...£1,485,732.16. 5

ESTIMATED LOAN ACCOUNT 1908.

Inscribed Stock Loans of 1893 and 1906 at 3% interest, to be paid off on the 15th April, 1943,

Repayments by Viceroy, Balance due to Government,.

Sinking Fund,

..£1,485,732.16. 5

* Includes surplus interest paid by Viceroy on 1906 Loan. WUCHANG LOAN ACCOUNT 1907.

.£220,000. 0. 0

880,000. 0. 0

Loan,

Total,..

£1,100,000. 0. 0

ESTIMATED WUCHANG LOAN ACCOUNT 1908.

Repayments by Viceroy,

..£ 330,000. 0. 0

Balance due to Government,

770,000, 0. 0 Loan,

Total,

...£1,100,000. 0. 0

RAILWAY ACCOUNT

1907.

581,049.00

1,542,175.55

$ 961,126.35

Cr.

£ 60,704. 9. 9

.*£ 73,780. 0. 0

.£1,100,000. 0. 0

Total,.......

.£1,100,000. 0. 0

.£1,100,000. 0. 0

Total,...

£1,100,000. 0. 0

Advances from Loan Fund,

Total,

£220,000. 0. 0-$2,037,551.02 Other Advances (Suspense Account),.......... 863,271.40

$2,900,822.42

Amount expended on Railway Construc-

tion,.....

$2,900,822.42

Total,...

$2,900,822.42

ESTIMATED RAILWAY ACCOUNT 1908.

Total,

Advances from Loan Fund, ......£330,000 $3,265,458.00 Other Advances (Suspense Account),

3,022,617.00

.$6,288,075.00

Amount expended on Railway Construc-

tion,......

$6,288,075.00

Total,............ $6,288,075.00

Treasury, Hongkong, 26th August, 1908.

A. M. THOMSON,

Treasurer.

131

REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF FIRE BRIGADE

FOR THE YEAR 1907.

There were 39 Fires and 76 Incipient Fires during the year as against 30 and 67 in 1906. Details with regard to these Fires are given in Tables I and II.

The estimated damage caused by Fires was $214,710.65 and by Incipient Fires $1,541.90.

The Brigade turned out 56 times during the year.

2. There was constant supply of water in the Fire Mains throughout the year.

3. One Fire occurred in the harbour during the year.

4. I attach a list of places where Fire Despatch Boxes and Fire Alarms are stationed and of private telephones to which the Police have access in the event of a Fire (Appendix A). I also enclose a copy of a report by the Engineer on the state of Fire Engines (Appendix B).

5. The conduct of the Brigade has been good.

F. W. LYONS,

13th February, 1908.

Superintendent of Fire Brigade.

Appendix A.

List of Places where Fire Brigade Despatch Boxes are kept.

1 Box. Kennedy's Stable Leighton Hill Road. 1 Box. Gough Hill Police Station. 2 Boxes. Engine House at No. 2 Police

Station.

1 Box. Naval Dockyard, Queen's Road.

Clock Tower.

1

1

1

1

""

>>

1

12

1

1

"

1

1

1

"3

1

""

1

Government Offices.

Government House.

No. 10, Queen's Garden, Registrar

General's House.

Central Police Station.

tion.

Bonham Strand West, at West

End.

|

1

"

Engine House No. 7 Police Sta-

1

11

1

1

19

1

31

17

Wellington Street at Lyndhurst 1

Terrace.

Government Civil Hospital.

Staunton Street, at Sing Wong

Street.

Water Lane, at Queen's Road

Central.

1

3 Boxes.

1 Box.

1

1

""

>>

+

Robinson Road corner of Seymour 1

Terrace.

No. 6 Police Station, Peak.

No. 11, Mountain View, Peak.

1

1

35

1

Botanical Department, Garden Road. 1

2 Boxes. Tsim Tsa Tsui Police Station.

>>

1

Gas House, West Point.

Fat Hing Street, at Queen's Road

West.

Ko Shing Theatre.

Government Lunatic Asylum.

Nam Pak Hong Insurance Office. Man Mo Temple.

No. 5 Police Station.

Kennedy Town Hospital.

Collinson Street West.

No. 552, Connaught Road West.

Pumping Station, Yau-ma-ti. Yau-ma-ti Police Station.

Hung Hom

Mong Kok Tsui Market.

Government Observatory, Kowloon.

Sham Shui Po Police Station.

Tai Kok Tsui Market.

132

List of Telephones to which the Police can have access to communicate with

Central Station in the event of a Fire breaking out.

Hongkong and China Gas Company, East and | Hongkong Hotel, Des Voeux Road Central.

West Points, from 7 A.M. to 9 P.M. Tung Wah Hospital, Po Yan Street. Man On Insurance Office, Queen's Road West.

Clock Tower.

Royal Naval Yard, Queen's Road East. Mr. J. KENNEDY's, Causeway Bay.

| Electric Light Company, Queen's Road East.

FIRE ALARMS.

Old Harbour Master's Office at Wing Lok Street. Hollywood Road at Queen's Road West.

Wilmer Street at Des Voeux Road West.

* Blake Pier at Pedder Street.

*

*

Lyndhurst Terrace at Wellington Street End. Central Market at Des Vœux Road.

* Staunton Street at Sing Wong Street.

* Canton Wharf at Hillier Street.

* Man Mo Temple at Ladder Street.

* Jervois Street at Hillier Street.

* Tung Wah Hospital at Po Yan Street.

* Bonham Strand West, at West End.

Appendix B.

HONGKONG, 10th February, 1908.

SIR,-I have the honour to forward the Annual Report on the condition of the Government Fire Engines for the year ending 31st December, 1907.

STEAMER No. 1.

Floating Fire Engine by Shand, Mason & Co.

The New Hull was completed on the 10th September and after a satisfactory trial of both pumping and propelling Machinery the vessels was placed on her station for duty and has been regularly used at Drill for Drivers and Fires.

The Hull, Boiler and Machinery are all in good working order.

STEAMER No. 2.

Land Engine by Shand, Mason & Co.

The Boiler of this Engine is 10 years old. It has been regularly used and tested at monthly drill for Drivers and Fires, and is now in good working order.

STEAMER No. 3.

Land Engine by Shand, Mason & Co.

This Engine was thoroughly overhauled in November and a new outer shell fitted to Boiler, after completion of repairs it was tested under steam and found to be in good working order.

* In course of Construction.

183

STEAMER No. 4.

Land Engine by Shand, Mason & Co.

It was regularly tested

This Engine has been overhauled as required during the year. at Drills for Drivers and used at Fires, and is now in good working order.

STEAMER No. 5.

Land Engine by Shand, Mason & Co.

A new Boiler supplied by Shand, Mason & Co. was fitted to the Engine in August and the Machinery thoroughly overhauled, it has been tested and use i at Drills for Drivers and Fires, and is now in good working order.

MANUAL ENGINES & Gear.

All the Manual Engines and Gear, Hose, Reels, Ladders and Supply Carts have been kept in repair and are now in good working order.

Captain F. W. LYONS,

Superintendent, Fire Brigade.

I have, &c.,

Appendix C.

D. MACDONALD, Engineer, Fire Brigade.

STRENGTH OF THE FIRE BRIGADE.

Europeans. Chinese.

Superintendent,.

Deputy Superintendent,

1

1

Assistant Superintendent,

1

Engineer,

1

Assistant Engineer and Station Officer,

1

Clerk,

1

Engine Drivers,

4

2

Assistant Engine Drivers,.

3

Fitter,

1

Blacksmith,

1

Carpenter,

1

Sailmaker,

1

Stokers,

7

Overseer of Water Works,

Inspector of Dangerous Goods,

Assistant

Foremen,

""

"2

Assistant Foremen,

1

4

Firemen,

Interpreters,

2286

1

1

- 11000

28

3

Floating Engine.

Foreman and Engine Driver,

Engine Driver,

1

1

Coxswain,

Stoker,

1

I

Seamen,

2

Total,.

45

51

No.

DATE.

TIME.

SITUATION OF FIRE.

Table I.

FIRES DURING THE YEAR 1907.

NO. OF BUILDINGS DESTROYED.

Wholly. Partly.

1

January

2

1.30 a.m.

Wooden Huts at Ho Man Tin,....

wooden

huts 5

2

2

AT

2.10

House No. 45, Kowloon City Road,.

1

""

2.15 p.m.

A small matshed at Au Pui Leung, Railway Depôt, Tai Kok Tsui,..............

3

3

1.30

""

"}

4

>>

DAMAGE.

CAUSE.

REMARKS.

$

500.00

Unknown,

13,000.00

Sparks from the kitchen

stove,

I

5.00

Unknown,

1

50,000.00

Sparks from the Engine Room,

1

3,000.00

Unknown,

1

">

1,500.00

4,000.00

";

3,000.00

Spontaneous Combustion,

1

1,200.00

Unknown,

1

200.00

10

18

4.20

House No. 38, Ship Street,..

""

A

>>

6

21

2.00 a.m.

House No. 72, Jervois Street,.

"

7 February

1

8.40 p.m.

Matsheds at Ho Man Tin,

matshed

2

2

5.00 a.m.

House No. 3, Tung Loi Lane,

>>

9

3

9.40

On board S.S. Monmouthshire ou the high seas.

}}

"}

10

5

8.20

"

""

House No. 21, Hing Lung Street,

=

11

11

8.45

House No. 2, Bullock Lane,

"

1

12

17

4.00 p.m.

Matsheds used as a Hospital on the Rail- matsheds

"}

way Works, Sha Tin,

2

1,000.00

Carried forward,

77,405.00

Sparks from the 1st floor cook-house falling down and igniting rattan on the ground floor,

Sparks from cook-house falling on the roof of a matshed,

Nine persons were burnt to death.

- 134

FIRES DURING THE YEAR 1907,-Continued.

NO. OF BUILDINGS DESTROYED.

No.

DATE.

TIME.

SITUATION OF FIRE.

PAMAGE.

CAUSE.

REMARKS.

Wholly. Partly.

Brought forward,

$ 77,405.00

ས་

13

February 28

1.25 p.in.

A matshed at the Race Course,

maished

Unknown,

1

14

28

10.20 a.m.

House No. 68, Connaught Road Central,

1

22,000.00

>>

· 15

March

1

3.18

House No. 20, New Market Street,

2

20,000.00

>>

}}

16

J

7.25

House No. 226, Des Voeux Road Central,

240.00

Lighted joss sticks,

""

17.

18

"}

14

3.50

House No. 4, Sai On Lane,

5,000.00

Unknown,

"}

>>

28

12.15 p.m.

House No. 6, Lee Yuen Street East,

1

5,000.00

>>

19

April

10

3.5 a.m.

House No. 70, Queen's Road Central,

4,500.00

Upsetting of an Oil Lamp by a dog or cat,..

109 10

20

13

"}

11.30 pm.

A grass stack at Hang Hau, Sai Kung,

90.00

Unknown,

21

June

16

1.10 a.m.

House No. 74, Reclamation Street,

1

11,600.00

"

22

23

232

July

23

8.30 p.m.

House No. 3, Mason's Lane,...

1

15,000.00

77

August

9

1.00 a.m.

House No. 21, Praya East,

700.00

24

14

י,

9.30 p.m.

House No. 164, Des Voeux Road Central,

3,700.00

2006

25

13

7.45

"

A small storehouse at Tai Po belonging to Mr. Last of Land Office,

150,00

26

19

10.00 a.m.

Matsheds at New Naval Yard Extention,

matsheds

600.00

2

Match dropped on the Kerosine,...

A drying frame became ig- nited by red hot charcoal used for drying tobacco, Unknown,

A spark from a passing launch, or some person smoking carelessly,

Carried forward, $ 167,985.00

135

J

FIRES DURING THE YEAR 1907,—Continued.

NO. OF BUILDINGS DESTROYED.

No.

DATE.

TIME.

SITUATION OF FIRE.

DAMAGE.

CAUSE.

REMARKS.

Wholly. Partly.

Brought forward,

$167,985.00

21 18 19

27

August 25 10.45 p.m.

A.S.P. matshed at Tai Po,

28

"

29

30

27

September 15

20

1.30

Matsheds at Wong Kok Tsui,

matshed

1

matsheds

6,500.00

Unknown,

800.00

12.30 a.m.

2.15 p.m.

House No. 180, Wing Lok Street, Royal Dutch Petroleum Co.'s Works, North Point,

1

16,000.00

2

1,000.00

Å

Explosion of a Kerosine Oil Lamp;

stud from cylinder cover of engine being blown out, throwing the kerosine oil on to the boiler,

Unknown,

Spontaneous Combustion, Unknown,

6,221.25

matshed

114.40

""

1

1,000.00

1,969.00

31

· October

7

1.30

33

32

17

5.50

""

On board Cargo-boat No. 1490 in Victoria Har- bour alongside S.S. Sultan van Langkat, Matshed at Queen's Statue Wharf,

33

18

"3

31

November I

10.00 a.m.

1.00 a.m.

Blackhead's Point,....

House No. 58, Reclamation Street,

35

11

2.00

33

Boiler and Blacksmith's Shop of the Cosmo- politan Dock of the Hongkong and Whampoa Dock Company,

36

3

14

>>

8.30 p.m.

House No. 77, Cheong Po village, Pat Neung Valley, An Tau, N.T.

5,000.00

400.00

214,710.65

;}

A lighted lamp being ac- cidently knocked over and setting fire to kero- sine oil in a tin, Unknown,

Lighted candle left burn- ing on a bag of sugar,....... A 5 years old girl throw- ing lighted match on to a mosquito curtain,................]

37

December

1

10.00 a.m.

Matsheds at Sai Wan Ho,

matsheds

700.00

6

38

4

1.00

House No. 298, Des Vœux Road Central,

39

21

7.00

A matshed at Telegraph Bay,

matsheds

6,000.00

1,030.00

}}

وو

6

Total,

- 136

No.

DATE.

TIME.

Table II.

INCIPIENT FIRES DURING THE YEAR 1907.

SITUATION OF FIRE.

DAMAGE.

CAUSE.

REMARKS.

H2X12 C1-30 →

January

>>

>>

>>

""

""

""

?

~~~ 20 10 10 10 NO

3

p.m.

4

South of Wong Chuk Hang near Little Hongkong, Government Pavilion, Mount Kellet,

Grass on fire,

Put out by Police and Coolies.

300.00

Overheating of a chimney,

Hired Coolies.

9.15 a.m.

Hillside at Harlech Road,

Grass on fire,

9.40 p.m.

House No. 57, Wanchai Road,

1.00

Unknown,

2

""

Hillside between Stanley and Wong Ma Kok,

Grass on fire,

8

House No. 87, Aplichau,

...

Unknown,.

""

}}

"}

}}

>>

>>

23

>>

"

}}

11

""

60, Mosque Street,

Chimney on fire,

3

""

8.15 a.m.

""

10

11

12.30

Hillside above the reservoir, Pokfulam,.

A small wooden house on the roof of house

No. 32, Hollywood Road,

House No. 70, Queen's Road West,.

Grass on fire,

5.00

Trifling.

Sparks from cook-house chimney, Accident,

"

>>

Firemen.

>>

Occupants.

Hired Coolies.

Inmates.

Police and Hired Coolies.

Occupants.

""

>>

}}

11

11

2.45

116, Wellington Street,

.10

>>

""

"}

>>

12

11

3.45

48, Gage Street,

Chimney on fire,....

""

"9

,1

77

13

12

77

4 p.m.

34, Bridges Street,....

>>

19

>>

>>

14

20

9.40

25

""

>>

101, Queen's Road West,.

5.00

Accident,

"}

15

23 4.20

6, Kennedy Street, Yaumati,

""

"}

""

""

""

16

February 3

7

11, Wing Kut Street,

Upsetting of a kerosine lamp,

}}

35

17

13

1.34 a.m.

>>

"7

20, Lyndhurst Terrace,

Lighted joss paper setting fire to wooden partition,

>>

Occupants.

Police and Occupants. Occupants.

Police and Occupants.

18

13

3.15

>>

>>

""

227, Queen's Road Central,

19

13

>>

7.30 p.m.

41, Nullah Lane,

60.00

}}

Fire Crackers setting fire to mattings,.. Unknown,

"?

""

>>

""

>>

20

18

11.35

>>

""

""

35, Connaught Road Central,

>>

>>

21

19

1.15 a.m.

7, Un Fuk Lane,

50.00

Overheating of an oven,

99

">

""

22

24

7.30

"}

""

63, Wing Lok Street,

...

Unknown,

23

25

"}

1.25 p.m.

24

28

>>

3.35 a.m.

25

March

3

11.45

""

26

7

>>

27

6.30

5

""

爷爷

77

28

13

وو

12.30 p.m.

}}

29

23

2.24

"

"}

Hillside above Wong Nei Chung Road,

H ouse No. 26, Bonham Road,

""

near No. 3 Bridge, Pokfulam Road. House No. 68, Lower Lascar Row,

318, Queen's Road Central,....

2, Pokfulam Road, 67, Queen's Road Central,.

...

...

Grass on fire,

"}

50.00

Overheating of cook-house flue,

>>

לי

Grass on fire,

""

Sparks from cook-house fire,

"}

""

Brigade.

Police and Occupants.

Firemen.

Occupants.

Coolies.

Occupants.

Unknown,

""

"

""

10,00

Lighted cigarette setting fire to some papers, Chimney on fire,...

"}

Brigade.

"}

";

30

24

12.45

Hillside near Aberdeen Cemetery,

Grass on fire,

Police.

}}

Carried forward,..

..$

481.40

-·137

INCIPIENT FIRES DURING THE YEAR 1907,—Continued.

No.

DATE.

TIME.

SITUATION OF FIRE.

DAMAGE.

CAUSE.

REMARKS.

C.

Brought forward...........$

481.40

31

April

4 p.m.

Hillside at Mount Davis,

Grass on fire,

82

3

7.14

House No. 7, Lau Kwai Fong,

">

33

4

12 noon.

Hillside at Mount Davis,

>>

34

. 15

12.40 p.m.

House No. 224, Hollywood Road,

35

""

""

19

8

Dairy Farm Office, Glenealy,.

86

22

4.20

""

"}

House No. 54, Stanley Street,

37

May

6

9.44

44, Wing Lok Street,

Chimney on fire,....

Chimney on fire,...

לי

38

14

5.30

19, Pokfulam Road,.

""

}}

"

39

19

9.20

6, Mountain View,

50.00

350.00

Attempted Arson,

Children playing with joss sticks, Exploding of a kerosine lamp,

Bursting of a kerosine lamp,.. Grass on fire,

Unknown,

Put out by Police and Coolies.

Brigade.

Police and Hired Coolies.

Occupants and Police. Police and Employees.

Occupants.

"}

גי

2

>>

>>

""

97

Brigade.

""

""

40

22

4.30 a.m.

On board Steam-launch Hoi How in Victoria

""

Harbour,

Overheating of boiler,

>>

41

June

11

3.15

House No. 31, Queen's Road East,

5.00

Accident,.

})}

42

14

2.30

Room No. 41, Central Barracks,

5.00

,;

>>

""

""

43

15

}}

1.30 p.m.

44

22

House No. 161, Reclamation Street, Yaumati, 284, Des Vœux Road West,

Chimney on fire,....

"}

Police.

Occupants.

the Crew.

Police and Occupants.

Police.

Occupants.

7.00

23

>>

>>

45

28

8.30

123, Queen's Road West,

"

""

>"

46

July

2

1 a.m.

48, Bonham Strand East, .

Trifling.

.....

Overheating of a drying pan, Upsetting of a kerosine lamp, Unknown,

Police and Occupants.

75

""

77

""

}}

""

47

12.45

35

}

48

16

2.45

A small store at the back of Orduance

Department,

House No. 174, Des Voeux Road Central,

"

30.00

Upsetting of a lamp,

""

""

49

29

12.15 a.m.

A house in Wing Sing Street,

Chimney on fire,...

"}

50

31

12.50

"}

>>

51

August

28

3.30 p.m.

House No. 31, Elgin Street,

104, The Peak,...

.50

Accident,.

""

>>

""

""

50.00

>>

Sparks from a stove,

52

28

6.10

"}

""

53

28

7.15

87, First Strect, Hotel Mansions, 2nd floor,

Chimney on fire,

Brigade.

Police and Occupants.

""

Occupants.

""

Watchmen and Servants.

Police and Inmates.

40.00

Overheating of a kerosine stove,

Police.

>>

""

"}

54

28

11

House No. 92, Queen's Road East,

Accident,

Police and Inmates.

""

"1

""

دة

56

57

58

59

39 533

""

3

September 6

6

3.30 a.m.

344,

Central,

30.00

Falling of a charcoal from drying stove,

""

Firemen and Occupants.

"1

"}

11 p.m.

On board a motor yacht belonging to Mr. Musso|

on the Southern Fairway off West Point,.

150.00

12.03 a.m.

House No. 20, Queen's Road Central,,

100.00

>>

14

1

140,

"

"

">

}}

East,....

20.00

29

"}

1.54 p.m.

A temporary bamboo mat roof over the roof of House No. 15, Queen's Road Central,...

50.00

Careless use of matches,

Overheating of a drying stove,.....

Flames from the chimney igniting the beams,

A spark from some adjoining buildings,

""

""

""

Police and Firemen.

Firemen,

Occupants.

aud Brigade.

Carried forward,.

1,378.90

138

INCIPIENT FIRES DURING THE YEAR 1907,—Continued.

No.

DATE.

TIME.

SITUATION OF FIRE.

DAMAGE.

CAUSE.

REMARKS.

139

C.

Brought forward,..

.$ 1,378,90

60

61

62

63

64

65

66

67

68

69

ZEF ENFJ82988 22823

October 11

""

25

November 1

9

8.45 a.m.

10.53 p.m.

4.15

8.30

Roof of Blake Pier,

Trifling.

A spark from the Fire Float,

House No. 270, Queen's Road Central,

Chimney on fire,......

17

""

House No. 19, High Street,

Accident,......

""

""

27, Hollywood Road,

Chimney on fire,

"}

9 2.30

79, Aberdeen,

Slight.

"}

};

11

9.30

""

>>

23

12.05

}}

>>

December 3

12 midnight!

5

""

14

11

8.30 a.m.

""

AAAA

354, Queen's Road West,

Some charcoal got ignited from the heat of a furnace,.

Chimney on fire,.....

"}

22

"

11, Wellington Street,

>>

"}

124, Stanley,

10.00

5, Temple Street,

A heap of straw accidentally set on fire, Careless use of matches,

>>

"9

223, Station Street, Mong Kok,

50.00

Put out by Firemen from the Fire Float.

Occupants.

Police and Inmates.

Occupants.

Police, Boatmen and Occupants.

and Occupants.

Occupants.

Police.

Brigade.

and Occupants.

>>

70

19

12.15

352, Queen's Road Central,

43.00

""

"}

"3

71

20

""

6 p.m.

26, Graham Street,

30.00

Bed curtain caught fire,.

15

72

21

5.15 a.m.

2, Bullock Lane,...

40.00

>>

""

21

7.30

"

}}

""

22, Hollywood Road,

Trifling.

Overheating of some basket of tea,

Sparks from chimuey igniting some chairs,... Carelessness with joss paper,

"

""

}}

74

""

75

">

76

22228

24

3.30 p.m.

135, Queen's Road Central,.

...

Chimney on fire,.......

""

24

7.15

32, Stanley Street,

Upsetting of a lamp,

>>

29

1.15 a.m.

""

"

46, Aplichau,

Trifling.

Overheating of stove fluc,

>;

""

Police and Occupants.

>>

>>

Mr. Laue, Chinese Firemen

and Occupants.

Police and Occupants.

Occupants.

TOTAL,..

1,541.90

HONGKONG.

No. 14

1908

REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF PRISON, FOR THE YEAR 1907.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of

His Excellency the Governor, May 14th, 1908.

1. The number of prisoners received into prison during the year and the corresponding numbers for the year 1906 were as follows:

Convicted by Ordinary Courts,

Convicted by Courts Martial,

Convicted by the Land Courts,

1907.

1906.

5,027 9

5,049

19

1

Convicted by the Sanitary Commission,..........

1

Convicted by the Captain Superintendent of Police,..

6

2

Convicted by the Commodore, R.N.,

1

Supreme Court for China and Corea,..

6

3

Debtors,

94

71

On remand or in default of finding surety,

733

653

5,877

5,799

There was thus an increase of 78 on the total number of admissions as compared with the year 1906. There was also an increase of prisoners convicted for Larceny during the year under review the numbers being 963 against 808 for the previous year.

226

""

2. The number of prisoners admitted to prison for offences not of a criminal nature was 3,417 made up as follows:-

Convicted by Courts Martial,.

the Land Courts,

9

1

""

;}

""

Captain Superintendent of Police, Commodore, R.N.,.

6

1

Debtors,

Convicted under the Opium Ordinance,

94

1,024

""

""

Gambling Ordinance,

440

99

Market Ordinance,

482

""

"1

Arms Ordinance,

12

""

""

Vehicle Ordinance,

52

Sanitary Bye-laws,

182

""

**

Harbour Regulations,

88

29

for Drunkenness,

35

51

Trespassing,

63

""

**

Disorderly Conduct,

287

$9

,, Vagrancy,

13

""

""

Contempt of Court,

4

37

""

>>

,, Assault,

Obstruction,

169

106

>>

""

Cutting trees,

44

>>

>>

Fighting,..

34

**

2)

Mendicancy,

19

under the Post Office Ordinance,.

5

"

for Rogue and Vagabond,

222

under the Women and Girls' Protection

י:

Ordinance,

25

Total,...

3.417

The above figures show that 66% of the total admissions to prison were for non-crimi- nal offences.

3. The following Table shows the number of prisoners committed to prison without the option of fine and in default of payment of fine :-

In default of payment of fine.

Without option of fine.

Total.

Served the imprisonment.

Paid full fine.

Paid part fine.

1,599

1.936

856

658

5,049

4. There were 106 juveniles admitted into prison 31 of whom were sentenced to be whipped in addition to various terms of imprisonment varying from twenty-four hours' detention to one month's imprisonment with hard labour. There was an increase of 25 juveniles convicted during the year 1907, as compared with the year 1906.

5. The percentage of convicted prisoners admitted to prison with previous convie tions recorded against them was 15·00 as compared with 13:00 for 1906.

6. There were 141 prisoners admitted who were convicted by the Magistrates' Courts in the New Territories against 152 for the previous year.

227

7. The following Table shows the number of convicts confined in Victoria Gaol on the 31st December for the past ten years, and the percentage borne by this number to the estimated population :-

Year.

No. of Convicts.

Percentage to Estimated Population.

Year.

No. of Convicts.

Percentage to Estimated Population.

1898,

55

.021

1903,

245

.059

1899,

96

.027

1904,

· 243

.054

1900.

141

.040

1905,

216

.046

1901,

180

.046

1906,

156

.037

1902.

215

.054

1907,

146

.035

8. The following Table shows the daily average number of prisoners undergoing im- prisonment during the past ten years and the percentage borne by this number to the estimated population of the Colony of Hongkong

Year.

Daily Average number

Estimated Population.

of Prisoners.

Percentage.

1898,....

1899,

1900,.

1901,.

1902,

1903,.

1904,

1905,.. 1906,

1907,

254,400

511

.200

344,323

432

.125

347,689

486

.139

385,671

199

.129

396,835

576

.145

410,642

653

.159

446,217

726

.162

462,861

697

.150

414.049

518

.125

414.415

502

.121

9. There were 755 punishments awarded for breach of prison discipline, being an average of 1.50 per prisoner as compared with 627 with an average per prisoner of 1.21 for the pre- ceding year. There were 4 cases in which corporal punishment was awarded during the Three of which were with the birch sentenced by the Assistant Superintendent alone and one with the cat-o'-nine-tails sentenced by the same Officer in conjunction with a Justice of the Peace.

year.

10. There were no escapes or attempt to escape.

11. In the month of January a Chinese prisoner employed in the Coir-matting Shop assaulted a fellow prisoner with a mat-making knife for which he was subsequently sentenced to a further period of 2 years' imprisonment.

12. There were 14 deaths from natural causes, 3 executions and 1 birth. Eleven prisoners were released on medical grounds.

13. Owing to the low number of prisoners in custody and the extra accommodation afforded by the Branch Prison it has again been possible to strictly carry out the Prison Rules as regards the complete separation of Remands, Juveniles and Debtors from convicted pri- soners, also to keep apart first convicted prisoners from habitual criminals thereby bringing our prison system into line with the English Prison Service.

14. Prisoners employed at Industrial Labour were fully employed during the year and the out-put was quite satisfactory.

15. There were 4,169,624 forms printed and issued to the various Government Depart- ments and 22,342 books bound and repaired during the year under review.

:

out.

228

16. The rules and regulations for the government of the prison have been duly carried

17. The sanitary condition of the prison is good.

18. All minor repairs to the Gaol have been carried out by prison labour.

19. Mr. F. J. BADELEY handed over his duties as Superintendent to me on proceeding to England on 12 months' leave of absence on the 5th September.

20. The conduct of the Staff has been good.

21. The usual Returns are appended.

14th January, 1908.

F. W. LYONS,

Superintendent.

..

Table I.

Return of Offences punished by Flogging in the year 1907.

Number of Floggings awarded.

Number of Strokes awarded in each case.

Daily

By Prison Authorities.

By Courts.

Date.

Total.

Average.

By the Assistant

18

12

10

6

By the Assistant Superintendent Superintendent.

and a Justice of the Peace.

By Judge.

By

Magistrate.

Total.

229

10

10

10

10

2

2

2

4

4

4

7

5

N

7

13

13

13

13

13

13

11

1

1

· 13

11

11

9

2

11

6

1

6

11

11

4

.....

4

4

4

6

7

11

4

1.

4

4

3

7

1

88

92

Ι

81

9

1

92

11

4

January,

495

February,

486

March,

458

1

April,.

498

May,

539

June,

558

July,

567

August,

499

. 1

I

September,

478

October,.....

473

November,...

494

!

December,..

484

1

Total,

230

Table II.

Return of Offences reported of prisoners fighting with or assaulting each other or Officers, for the years 1903, 1904, 1905, 1906 and 1907.

Months.

1903.

number

1904.

number

1905.

number

1906.

number

1907.

Daily average Daily average Daily average Daily average Daily average

number

in Prison, 653. in Prison, 725. in Prison, 697. in Prison, 518. in Prison, 502.

January,

1

3

February,

12

March,

2

3

4

1

1

1

April,

5

May,

4

June,

11

:

:

:

5

2

N

2

July,

2

1

4

2

August,

4

4

1

4

2

September,

N

8

10

5

5

October,

6

4

6

N

November,

December,

3

2

1

3

10

3

1

1

Total,..

56

24

22

32

18

Table III.

Return of Offences of prisoners having Tobacco, for the years 1903, 1904, 1905, 1906 and 1907.

Months.

1903.

1904.

1905.

1906.

1907.

Daily average Daily average Daily average Daily average Daily average

number

number number

number

number in Prison, 653.in Prison, 725. in Prison, 697. in Prison, 518. in Prison, 502.

January,

2

2

February,

1

March,.....

1

3

5

2

3

April,

May,

June,

1

:

1Q

6

1

July,

1

1

1

August,

4

6

September,

లు

1

October,

3

4

5

1

November,

1

N

2

20

:

December,

2

1

1

2

Total,

12

24

17

29

19

231

Months.

1903. Daily average number

in Prison, 653.

Daily average number in Prison, 725.

Table IV.

Return of Reports for talking, idling, short oakum picking, etc., for the years 1903, 1904, 1905, 1906 and 1907.

1904.

1906.

1907. Daily average

number in Prison, 502.

1905. Daily average number in Prison, 697.

Daily average number in Prison, 518.

January,

89

49

80

38

39

February,

80

38

60

42

46

March,..

103

61

59

35

61

April,

$7

33

88

63

54

May,

82

56

100

34

68

June,

77

12

102

44

69

July,

100

44

82

56

84

August,

88

40

84

39

65

September,

108

44

97

October,

163

48

88

66

November,

142

30

70

68

333

43

58

/

54

60

December,

161

55

80

38

60

Total,......

1,280

540

990

566

718

Table V.

Return showing the Expenditure and Income for the year 1907.

Expenditure.

Amount.

Jucome.

Amount.

$

C.

Pay and Allowance of Officers includ-

ing uniforms, &c.,.

Victualling of prisoners,

Fuel, light, soap and dry earth,

Earnings of prisoners,

$

37,434.05

C.

65,516.49

13,577.66

Paid by Military for subsistence of

Military prisoners,

282.60

8.029.76

Paid by Navy for subsistence of Naval

prisoners,.

102.30

Clothing of prisoners, bedding, furni-

ture, &c.,

2,587.48 Debtors' subsistence,....

998.25

Wei-hai-wei prisoners' subsistence,

684.60

Shanghai prisoners' subsistence,

143.10

Vagrants' subsistence,..

60.00

Waste food sold,

75.00

Actual cost of prisoners' maintenance,

49,631.49

Total,.

.$ 89,711.39

Total,.............$ 89,711.39

Average annual cost per prisoner, $98.86.

Table VI.

Return showing value of Industrial Labour for the year 1907.

1

2

3

Nature of Industry.

Value of stock on hand

January 1st,

1907.

Value of

Material

purchased.

Total Dr.

..

4

Value of articles Value of articles

manufactured

or work done for payment.

6

Value of stock

7

manufactured

on hand

Total Cr.

or work done for Gaol or other

December 31st,

1907.

Departments.

8

Value of

Earnings

(Difference

between columns 3 and 7.)

$

$

3,642.88

532.56

355.56

$ C.

3,998.44

C.

C.

C.

C.

C.

1,368.81

2,191.01

2,723.57

3,055.77

9.90

311.11

2,875.76

4,254.47

256.03

1,411.81

4,778.69

2,055.12

8.26

27.34

35.60

376.56

3.46

380.02

344.42

90.80

1,445.01

1,535.81

102.67

1,887.48

228.90

2,219.05

683.24

12.87

51.35

64.22

46.10

130.37

12.87

189.34

125.12

1.89

21.60

23.49

3.73

150.87

3.50

158.10

134.61

498.84

603.00

1,101.84

309.85

333.97

604.93

1,248.75

146.91

3.15

82.19

3,170.36

3.15

3.252.55

1.28

5.04

.36

6.68

3.53

232.15

3,493.33

150.27

3,875.75

623.20

.40

781.37

5,021.40

9,804.19

781.77

14,825.59

4,802.31

9.97

4,812.28

4,030.51

267.42

39,128.40

4,461.13

43,856.95

29,031.36

Total,

9,892.09

18,453.94

28,346.03

5,764.34

50,252.78

9,762.96

65,780.08

37,434.05

Oakum,

Coir,

Net-making,

Tailoring,

Rattan,

Tin-smithing,

Carpentering,

Grass-matting,

Shoe-making,

Laundry,

Printing and Book-binding,

232

233

Table VII.

Return showing value of articles manufactured or work done for which payment has been received or for which accounts have been rendered during the year 1907.

Department.

Description of Articles.

4

Amount.

Total.

$

C.

$ C.

Oakum,

By 15,209 lbs. Oakum at 9 cents per lb.,

1,368.81

1,368.81

Coir,................

"

14,068 lbs. matting and brusher at 20 cents.

per lb..

""

761 lbs. mats and matting at 22 cents per lb., 11 lbs. lettered mats at 25 cents per lb., Repairs and Extras,

2,813.60 167.42

2.75

72.00

3,055.77

Net-making,

23

29 Tennis nets at av. $5.13 each,

148.92

10 Boundary nets 7,068 sq. ft. at 2 cents,

194.33

>>

3 Boundary nets 2,064 sq. ft. at 14 cents, ...

32.56

Repairs,

.75

370.50

Tailoring,.

59

Articles made and repairs for Gaol Officers,

102.67

102.67

Rattan,

87 Chairs rattaned,

Various,

43.50 2.60

46.10

Carpentering,

Articles made,

repaired,

303.55 6.30

309.85

Tin-smithing,

""

39

Articles made,.

repaired,

3.52

.21

3.73

Grass-matting,

10 lbs. mats and matting at 12 cents per lb.,

1.28

1.28

Shoe-making,

9 pairs leather boots at av. $5.00 per pair,

45.00

8

""

3

33

23

12

""

>>

""

""

shoes canvas boots shoes childrens' boots,,

"

$3.60 $2.70

29.00

"

.8.10

$2.45

29.40

$2.59

10.00

>>

4

shoes

"5

""

,

$2.00

8.00

35

>>

6 slippers

66 cents

4.00

**

**

Repairs,

98.65

232.15

Printing and Book-

binding,

""

Printing Book-binding,

82.77 184.65

267.42

Paid into Bank during 1907 which sum includes

$129.54 for work executed in 1906,

Value of work executed during 1907 for which

payment was deferred to 1908, .

5.764.34

5,790.78

103.10

334

Table VIII.

Return showing the value of articles manufactured or work done on account of the Gaol and other Departments during the year 1907.

Industry.

Department.

Value.

CA

Remarks.

C.

5.40 4.50

34.56 Mats, matting and brusher at 20 cents per lb.

1,290.28 Clothing, repairs and bedding at fixed scale.

Oakum,

Gaol,

Sanitary,

Coir,.....

Gaol,

Police,

39.20

Harbour,

41.40

Sanitary,

33.35

Hongkong Volunteer Corps,

132.60

Medical,..

30.00

Tailoring,....

Gaol,

Police,

63.10

Supreme Court,

13.40

Hongkong Volunteer Corps,

94.00

Colonial Secretary,

22.60

Government House,

374.05

Treasury,

3.00

General Post Office,

27.05

Rattan-work,

Gaol,

Police,

Supreme Court,

Tin-smithing, .

Gaol,

Public Works,

Sanitary,

Carpentering,

Gaol,

182.78

Police,

7.25

Government House,

119.94

Supreme Court,

24.00

Grass-matting,

Gaol,

Shoe-making, ...

Gaol,

713.82

Police,

5.45

Colonial Secretary,

29.00

Sanitary,

2.745.06

Laundry,

Gaol,

Gaol,

Police,

Printing and

Book-binding,

See Table IX,

Total,

$ 50,252.78

Do.

122.97 Cost of material plus percentage.

1.40

6.00

Do.

125.87 Articles made and repaired at fixed scale.

24.60

.40

Articles made and repaired partly fixed scale

or cost of material plus percentage.

5.04 Fixed scale,,

Do.

1,940.37 Officers' washing-64,679 pieces at 3 cents.

2,197.56

664.38 39,128.40

Prisoners'

Police

""

--73,252 -22,146

""

235

Table IX.

Department.

No. of forms No. of books Printing.

printed. bound.

Book- binding.

Total.

$

C.

$

$

Government House,

Colonial Secretary's Office, Registrar General's Office,..

4,252

12

53.75

10.00

63.75

50,444

171

766.70

53.05

819.75

178.220

886

1,800.90

214.30

2,015.20

Public Works Department,

274,114

1,271

2.509.61

291.05

2.800.66

Harbour Department,

272,819 !

1,132

2,868.65

302.55

3,171.20

Treasury,.

154,619

950

1,585.00

208.10 1.793.10

Sanitary Board.

830,973

6,174

7,688.85

$21.75

8.510.60

General Post Office,

1,139,387

2.389

7,640.95

144.20

8.085.15

Police Department,

655,790

7,267

1,057.84

383.45

4.441.29

Magistracy,

81.345

95

836.25

40.20

876.45

Government Civil Hospital,

125.224

51.1

1,380.15

164.70

1.544.85

Supreme Court,

39,836

90

498.25

118.55

616.80

Land Court,

40,390

182

418.00

68.50

486.50

Land Office,

37,448

376

373.75

86.70

460.45

Botanical and Forestry Department,

27,980

116

325.75

20.90

346.65

Prison Department,

38,070

130

563.50

52.15

615.65

Queen's College,

2,082

12

43.25

9.35

52.60

Education Department,.

20,760

34

295.50

14.05

309.55

Audit Department,..

1,300

1

25.75

7.50

33.25

Stamp Office,..

65,450

19

547.25

4.50

551.75

Assessor's Office,

2,980

6

34.50

9.45

43.95

Magistracy, Tai Po,..

50,150

380

442.50

90.65

533.15

Land Office, Tai Po,.

10.650

26

142.25

8.95

151.20

Observatory,

27.460

26

245.75

2.70

248.45

Attorney General's Office,.

2,808

+

60.75

5.50

66,25

Crown Solicitor's Office,

13,000

6

124.25

6.80

131.05

Hongkong Volunteer Corps,..

9,169

18

131.60

10.05

141.65

Bacteriological Department,

7,794

25

133.50

29.75

163.25

Health Officer's Office,

5,100

54.25

54.25

Total,

4,169,624

22,342 35,649.00

3,479.40 39,128.40

236

Table X.

Return showing the Employment of Prisoners and the Value of their Labour,

during the year 1907.

Daily Average number

of Prisoners.

Description of Employment.

Value of Prison Labour.

Males. Females. Totals.

Ր.

SUNDAYS, CHRISTMAS DAY AND GOOD FRIDAY:—

Cooking,

11

11

71.28

Cleaning,....

24

1

25

135.00

Non-productive,

449

17

466

Totals,......

484

18

502

OTHER DAYS:—

Debtors, Remands, On punishment, Sick,

48

Crank, Shot, Shot and Stone,

46

:

:

48

46

In Manufactories :--

Book-binding,

33

33

2,052.60

Printing,

41

41

2,550.20

Printing labourers,

18

:

:

18

559.80

Oakum picking,

136

7

143

889.46

Coir-matting,

32

32

1.492.80

Shoe-making,

13

13

808.60

:

Tailoring,

11

13

606.45

Net-making, String-making, and Ships"

fender-making,

24

24

746.40

In Building

Carpentering and Fitting,

11

11

681.20:

In Service of the Prison :

Laundry,

33

11

1,912.65

Cooking,

11

11

410.52

Cleaning,

24

1

25

777.50

White-washing,

3

93.30

Totals,...

484

18

502

$13,790.76

237

Table XI.

Return showing the Basis upon which the Value of Earnings of Prisoners in calculated.

In Manufactories:

Book-binding,

RATE.

20 cents

per

diem.

Printing,

20

>>

Printing Labourers,

10

>>

Oakum-picking,

2

"

Coir-matting,.

15

*

Shoe-making,

20

55

Tailoring,

15

Net-making, string and fender-making,

10

In Building:

Bricklaying,

Carpentering and Fitting,

Painting,

In Service of the Prison:

15

20

**

10

>>

Laundry,

Cooking,,

15

12

Cleaning,

10

33

White-washing,..

10

>

Table XII.

Return showing the Changes in the Gaol Staff *, during the year 1907.

Europeans,

Indians,

34

7

Nil.

Nil.

Nil.

2

3

12

65

14

1

Nil.

3

18

* This does not include the Superintendent, Assistant Superintendent or Clerical Staff.

HONGKONG.

REPORT OF THE HARBOUR MASTER FOR THE YEAR 1907.

No.

8

1908

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of

His Excellency the Governor,

-------

1. Shipping.

2. Trade.

3. Revenue and Expenditure.

4. Steam-launches.

5. Emigration and Immigration. 6. Registry of Shipping.

7. Marine Magistrate's Court. 8. Marine Court.

TABLE OF CONTENTS.

REPORT.

9. Examination of Masters, Mates and

Engineers.

10. Examination of Pilots.

11. Sunday Working Cargo.

12. New Territories.

13. Commercial Intelligence, Board of

Trade. 14. General.

TABLES.

I. Number, Tonnage and Crews of Vessels entered.

II. Number, Tonnage and Crews of Vessels cleared.

III. Number, Tonnage and Crews of Vessels entered at cach Port.

IV. Number, Tonnage and Crews of Vessels cleared at each Port.

}

72

V. Number, Tonnage and Crews of Vessels of each Nation entered. VI. Number, Tonnage and Crews of Vessels of each Nation cleared. VII. Junks entered from China and Macao.

VIII. Junks cleared for China and Macao.

IX. Total number of Junks entered at each Port.

X. Total number of Junks cleared at each Port.

XI. Junks (local trade) entered.

XII. Junks (local trade) cleared.

XIII. Summary of arrivals and departures of all vessels.

XIV. Statement of Revenue.

XV. Licensed Steam-launches entered.

XVI. Licensed Steam-launches cleared.

XVII. Number of Boat Licences issued.

XVIII. Chinese Passenger Ships cleared by the Emigration Officer, (Summary).

XIX. Return of Emigration for twenty years.

XX. Vessels bringing Chinese Passengers to Hongkong from places out of China,

(Summary).

XXI. Return of Immigration for twenty years.

XXII. Vessels registered.

XXIII. Vessels struck off the Register.

XXIV. Marine Magistrate's Court.

XXV. Diagram of Tonnage of Vessels entered.

APPENDICES.

4. Report on Mercantile Marine Office. B. Report on Import and Export Office. C. Report on Marine Surveyor's Office. D. Report on Gunpowder Depôt. E. Report on Lighthouses.

1.-Shipping.

1. The total of the Shipping entering and clearing at Ports in the Colony during the year 1907 shows an increase of 77,908 vessels of 3,281,042 tons when compared with the corresponding figures for 1906. The greater part of this is due to internal traffic-" steam- ships not exceeding 60 tons plying within the waters of the Colony". If local trade be eliminated, it is found that the remaining figures show the respectable increase of 3,110 vessels of 579,814 tons.

This increase is distributed as follows:—

British Ocean-going vessels 59 ships of 26,698 tons.

Foreign Ocean-going vessels 334 ships of 627,380 tons.

British River steamers 364 ships with a decrease in tonnage of 212,137 tons.

Foreign River steamers 239 ships of 76,075 tons.

Steamships not exceeding 60 tons 703 ships of 29,739 tons.

Junks in foreign trade, 1,411 vessels of 32,059 tons.

73

The actual figures of aurivals and departures are as follows :—

Of British Ocean-going,

Of Foreign Ocean-going,

FOREIGN TRADE.

1,876 arrivals of 3,605,941 tons.

1.880 departures

""

2,306 arrivals

*7

3,610,228 3,861,570

"

2,315 departures',,

3,859,305

>>

Of British River steamers,.....

3,412 arrivals

2,316,8-9

}

3,416 departures

་་

2,313,475 19

"

Of Foreign River steamers,

Of Steamships not exceeding 60 tons,

655 arrivals

>>

371,996

"

655 departures

371,996

*"

791 arrivals

""

3,015

>>

Of Junks in Foreign Trade,

790 departures „, 14,782 arrivals 14,782 departures

3,006

,,

""

1,320,892

Making a total in Foreign Trade of, 23,822 arrivals

*

23,838 departures

;"

1,330,578 11,512,303 11,520,588

and

,,

LOCAL TRADE.

Of Steamships not exceeding 60 tons, 209,601 arrivals

of 5,608,266 tons.

5,608,266

209,601 departures,,

>>

Of Junks in Local Trade,

20,820 arrivals 19,952 departures

892,818

""

""

586,069

Making a total in Local Trade of,...230,421 arrivals

12

6,501,084

39

or a grand total of,

229,553 departures 6,494,335 .254,243 arrivals

""

18,013,387

and

"}

253,391 departures 18,014,923

""

Thus in Foreign Trade :—

British Ocean-going vessels represented,

31.4%

Foreign Ocean-going vessels represented,

33.5%

British River steamers represented,

20.1%

Foreign River steamers represented,

3.2%

Steamships not exceeding 60 tons represented, Junks, represented,

0.3%

11.5%

100.0%

While in Local Trade :-

Steamships not exceeding 60 tons represented, Junks represented,...

86.3%

13.7%

100.0%

The movements of the "Star" Co.'s vessels, of private Steam-launches and of Fishing Junks do not appear in the above figures.

2. Eight thousand two hundred and thirty-nine (8,239) steamers, 10 sailing ships and 791 steamships not exceeding 60 tons, in foreign trade, entered during the year, giving an average daily entry of 24.77 European constructed foreign-going ships, as compared with

22.5 in 1906.

3. The average tonnage of Ocean-going vessels entered has increased slightly, from 1,784.9 to 1,785.6 tons, while that of River steamers has declined from 734 to 661 tons. The British Ocean average has decreased from 1,945 to 1,921 tons. The Foreign Ocean average has increased from 1,654 to 1,670 tons. The British River steamer average has declined from 749 to 678 tons and the Foreign River steamer average has declined from 623

to 567 tons.

4. A comparison between the years 1906 and 1907 is given in the following table :—

1906.

1907.

Increase.

Decrease.

Ships. Tonnage. Ships. Tonnage. Ships. Tonnage. Ships. Tonnage.

British Ocean-

going. Foreign Ocean-

going, British River

Steamers, Foreign River

3,697 7,189 471 8,756 7,216,169 59 26,698

4,287 7,093,495 | 4,621 7,720,875 334 627,380

6.461 4,842,501 | 6,828 4,630,364 364

1,071

667,917 1,310 743,992 239

212,137

76,075

Steamers,

Steamships un-

der 60tons(Fo-{}

878

reign Trade).

Junks in Foreign 28,153

Trade,

40,282 | 1,581 70,021 703 29,739

2,619,411 |29,504 | 2,651,470 | 1,411 32,059

:

Total,..

Steam-launches

plying in waters

Junks in Local)

Trade,

!*

+

of the Colony, T

8,251,536 419,202 11,216,532 85,642 2,961,996

|51,616 | 2,042,655 40,772 || 1,778,887

Grand Total.......... 429,726 32,747,268) 507,634 | 36,028,310 88,752 3,756,947 10,844 475,905

44.550 | 22,453,077 17,660 23,032,891 | 3,110| 791,951

333,560

212,137

|----

10,814 263,768

NETT,

77,908 3,281,042

* Including 23,430 Conservancy and Dust Boats of 858,746 tons.

† Including 18,090 Conservancy and Dust Boats of $20,958 tons.

5. For Ocean vessels under the British flag, this table shows an increase of 59 ships of 26,698 tons.

In British River steamers there is an increase of 364 ships with a decreased tonnage of 212,137 tons, which is mainly due to the withdrawal of the large sized steamer Hankow and the addition of the two small Macao steamers Sui Tai and Sui An.

For Foreign Ocean vessels an increase of 334 ships of 627,380 tons is shown, which is wholly due to the Japanese firms increasing their carrying trade.

Under this flag, an increase of 455 ships of 976,450 tons is found, with a general falling off under other flags.

For Foreign River steamers an increase of 238 ships of 76,075 tons is shown, which can be accounted for, by vessels under the German, Chinese and Portuguese flags making more trips in 1907 than in 1906.

Junks in foreign trade show a legitimate increase of 1,111 vessels of 32,059 tons.

The decrease in local Junk trade, 10,844 vessels of 263,768 tons may be ascribed to the cessation of the Naval extension work and to the falling off in Conservancy boats.

6. The actual number of individual Ocean-going ships of European construction enter- ing during the year was 800, being 362 British and 438 Foreign.

75

These 800 ships aggregated 1,860,245 tons. They entered 4,182 times and gave a collective tonnage of 7,467,511 tons. Thus, compared with 1906, 70 less ships of 73,514 less tons, entered 170 more times and gave a collective tonnage increased by 306,183 tons.

Steamers.

No. of Times entered.

Total Tonnage.

Flag.

1906. 1907.

1906. 1907.

1906. 1907.

British,

413

3551,846

1,867 3,580,5083,586,510

Austrian,

10

9

27

30

100,929 106,523

Belgian,

1

1

2,903

...

Chinese,

21

20

203

214

251,400 267,789

Corean,

2

2

15

14

30,798 21,298

Danish,

9

18

21

40,734

41,122

Dutch,.

18

18

64

69

130,864 142,100

French,

41

33

218

202

324,668 294.461

German,

143

137

846

790 1,343,420|1,246.053

Italian,..

3

12

12

33,012

31,704

Japanese,..

111

298

534

640,715 1,126,517

Norwegian,

80

59

279

290

289,857 265,728

Portuguese,

7

2

74

59

13,181

19,128

Russian,

11

10

13

13

31,129

30,912

Swedish,

4

3

27

11

24.800

12.970

United States,.

28

20

57

45

299,079

251,590

No Flag,

1

1

178

Total,

858

792 3,998 4,172 7,135,2727,448,008

British,

German,

Sailing No. of Times Vessels.

entered.

Total Tonnage.

Flag.

1906. 1907. 1906. | 1907.

1906.

1907.

United States,..

No Flag,

4

Total,

12

6

9

15,371

19,431

1

1,880

1

6

1

8,333

72

1

472

со

8

14

10 26,056

19,503

76

ww

OCEAN SHIPPING 1907: 1ST JANUARY TO 31ST DECEMBER.

1

*

No. of En-

British.

Foreign.

Total.

tries. No.

Voyages.

Tons. Total Tous. No. Voyages.

Tons. Total Tons. No.

Voyages.

Tons.

Total Tons.

1

98

98

2

77

154

272,856 222,384

3

50

150

156,968

272,856 119 119 444,768 81 162 470,904 32

228,744

198,370

96

75,044

19

76

62,331

249.324 49 196

171,126

228,744 217 217

501,600 396,740 158 316 420,754 841,508 225,132 82 246 232,012 696,036 684,504 68 272 233,457 933,828

501,600

5

60

26,772

133,860 28 140

80,687

403,435 40 200

107,459 537,295

9

64

20,746

124,476 22 132

52,419

314,514 31 186

73,165

438,990

15 105

26,394

184,758 11

77

19,147

134,029 26 182

45,541 318,787

४ 14

112

24,418

195,344 13 104

24,969

199,752 27 216

9

16

144

37.958

341,622 15

135

20,207

181,863 31

49,387 395,096 279 58,165 523,485

10

6

60

9,821

98,210 12

120

12,547

125,470 18

180

22,368 223,680

11

44

5,954

65,494 16

176

16,563

182,193 20

220

12

60

6,125

73,500 3

36

3,364

40.368

22,517 247,687 96 9,489 113,868

13

13

1,424

18,512

1

13

997

12,961

26

2,421 31,473

14

14

1,562

21,868

56

5,077

71,078

70

6,639

92,916

15

30 2,163

32,445

30

2,163

32,445

16

96

6.811

108,976

3

48

2,560

40,960

144

9,371

149,936

17

17

838

14,246

17

838

14,246

18

18

1,044

18,792

18

999

17,982

2

36

2,043

36,774

19

19 1,047

19,893

57

2,250

42,750

76

3,297

62,643

20

20

1,143

22,860

40

2,097

41,940

60

3,240

64,800

21

21

891

18,711

21

891

18,711

23

2

46

1,588

36,524

2

46

1,588

36,524

24

24

1,199

28,776

3

72

2,374

56,976

96

3,573

85,752

25

25 1,350

33,750 3

75

1,864

46,600

100

3,214

80,350

26

156

8,021

208,546 2

52

1,441

37,466

208

9,462

246,012

27

54

2,471

66,717 1

27

1,090

29,430

81

3,561

96,147

28

1

29

2283

739 20.692

28

739

20,692

29

377

10,933

1

29

377

10,933

32

64

2,780

88,960

:

33

66

2,450

80,850

2 2

64

2,780

88,960

66

...

2,450

80,850

34

34 1,428 48,552

34

36

36

37

1,307 47,052 3,170

117,290

72

217 2,807

7,378

2

68

1,645 55,930

101,052

3

108

4,114 148,104

111

3,170 117,290

38

38

1,177 44,726

38

1,177 44,726

39 1,536 59,904

39 1,536 59,904

39

355 1,867 909,934 | 3,586,510 437 2,305 936,269 3,861,498 7924,172 1,816,203 7,448,008

10 61

5

8,509 8,509

1

5,461 10,922

9

13,970 19,431

SAILING VESSELS.

72

72

2

6 8,581 4 5,461

8.581 10,922

72

72

10 14,042

19,503

Total, 3621,876 | 923,9043,605,941 438 |2,306 | 936,341 | 3,861,570 800 4,182 1,860,245 (7,467,511

7. The 362 British vessels carried 3,244 British Officers and 14 Foreign Officers, as follows:

British,

.3.244

Danish,

2

Dutch,

2

Norwegian,.

4

United States,

6

Total,

3,258

77

Thus, the proportion of Foreign Officers serving in British vessels was 0.44%, com- prising 4 nationalities. A decrease of 0.41 % with a decrease in number of Officers and ships.

The 438 Foreign vessels carried 3,304 Officers, of whom 152 were British, as follows :

In Chinese vessels,

Dutch

11

French

11

German

??

"

,, Japanese

12

United States vessels,

""

Total,

64

6

3

3

58

18

.152

CARA MACHO

Thus, 4.6% of the Officers serving in Foreign vessels visiting the Port were of British nationality. A decrease of 0.43% with a decrease in number of ships and of Officers therein.

8. The 362 British vessels carried, as Crews, 22,976 British, 638 other Europeans and Americans and 115,308 Asiatics; while the 438 Foreign vessels carried 1,699 British, 29,721 other Europeans and Americans and 115,474 Asiatics.

Hence in Britsh vessels :-

16.5% of the crews were British.

0.5% of the crews were Other

Europeans.

83.0% of the crews were Asiatics.

And in Foreign vessels :-

1.2% of the crews were British.

20.2% of the crews were Other

Europeans.

78.6% of the crews were Asiatics.

2.-Trade.

9. The figures given in previous years under this heading have, as pointed out annually been based upon information which can only be characterised as unsatisfactory and the result as erroneus and misleading. As it is obvious that such returns have no value, it has been decided to discontinue them in the form they have hitherto taken, but the aggregates of the reports received are shown, for purposes of comparison, in round numbers. These include imports of Sugar and imports and exports of Opium, of which accurate returns are rendered under the heading "linport and Export Office".

10. The returns in this form show increase of bout 360,000 tons in Imports, of about 191,000 tons in Exports and of about 518,000 tons . Transit Cargo.

78

11. The total reported Import and Transit trade of the Port for 1907 amounted to- 23,819 vessels of 11,512,223 tons carrying about 8,237,000 tons of Cargo of which about 4,841,000 tons were discharged at Hongkong.

ی و

CARGO.

COUNTRY.

SHIPS. TONS.

IMPORT.

TRANSIT.

CLASS I.

Canada,

22

67,311

10,000

3,000

Continent of Europe,

163

551,819

113,000

548,000

Great Britain,

185

630,855

225,000

746,000

Mauritius,....

2,120

2,000

North America,.

8,239

South Africa,

5,841

...

South America,

9

23,226

United States of America,

160

667,441

1,000 250,000

234,000

552

1,956,852

601,000 1,531,000

CLASS II.

Australia and New Zealand, .

81

173,471

128,000

40,000

India and Straits Settlements,

216

547,750

366,000 415,000

Japan,

588

1,572,162

934,000

664,000

Java and Indian Archipelago,

129

215,906

192,000

138,000

North Pacific,

Russia-in-Asia,.

769 16.617

6,000

9,000

1,023 | 2,526,675

1,626,000 | 1,266.000

CLASS III.

North Borneo,

Coast of China,

38 1,212

55,492

89,000

3.000

1,568,197

292,000

437.000

Cochin-China,

298

351,040

539,000

58,000

Formosa,

86

78,473

21,000

7,000

Philippine Islands,

215

271,824

104,000

4,000

Hainan and Gulf of Tonkin,

391

333,054

307,000

75,000

Siam,.

251

267,198

419,000

3,000

Kwong-chow-wan,

65

24,315

4,000

Macao, .....

33

16,030

1,000

Port Arthur,

15

15,614

9,000

12,000

Tsingtau,

3

2,747

2,000

CLASS IV.

2,607 2,983,984 1,787,000

599,000

River Steamers,

4,067 2,688,885 352,000

CLASS V.

Steamships under 60 tons,

788

34,935

2,000

CLASS VI.

Junks,

TOTAL,

14,782 1,320,892

23,819 11,512,223

473,000

4,841,000 3,396,000

79

12. Similarly, the Export trade of the Port was represented by 23,841 vessels of 11,520,668 tons, carrying about 3,049,000 tons of Cargo, and shipping about 729,000 tons of Bunker Coal.

CARGO.

COUNTRY.

SHIPS.

TONS.

Export. Bunker Coal.

CLASS I.

Canada,

37

115,961

21,000

1,000

Continent of Europe,

99

484,078

44,000

26,000

Great Britain,

104

330,852

66,000

3,000

Mauritius,

2

1,943

1,000

2,000

North America,

South Africa,

9

18,856

4,000

1,000

South America,

10

19,386

9,000

1,000

United States of America,

75 360,355

102,000

1,000

336

1,331,431

247,000

38,000

CLASS II.

Australia and New Zealand,. India and Straits Settlements,

61 168,166

19,000

15,000 -

402

524,356

220,000

46.000

Japan.......

321

819,227

179,000

35,000

Java and Indian Archipelago,

81

172,020

29,000

27,000

North Pacific,

Russia-in-Asia,

16,844

5,000

1,000

South Pacific,

873

1,700,613

452,000

124,000

CLASS III.

Kwong-chow-wan,

122

54,003

15,000

18,000

North Borneo,

30

44,368

4,000

6,000

Coast of China,.....

1,706

2,861,527

996,000

264,000

Cochin-China,

357

457,881

51,000

84,000

Formosa,

24

71,686

22,000

3,000

Hainan and Gulf of Tonkin,..

435

421,705

80,000

57,000

Kiaochow,..

Macao,

9

4,109

1,000

1,000

Philippine Islands,

227

340,410

153,000

54,000

Siam,

74

76,182

27,000

22,000

Weihaiwei,

Port Arthur,

2

5,618

1,000

2.986 4,337,489 1,349,000

510,000

CLASS IV.

River Steamers,

CLASS V. Steamships under 60 tons,

CLASS VI.

Junks,

4,071 2,685,471 307,000

793 35,086 63,000

14,782 1,430,578 691,000

53,000

4,000

...

TOTAL,...

23,841 11,520,668 3,049,000

729,000

13. During the year 1907, 16,515 vessels of European and American construction of 20,311,400 tons (net register), reported having carried about 10,842,000 tons of Cargo, as follows:-

Import Cargo,

Export Cargo,

Transit Cargo,

Bunker Coal shipped,

*

4,366,000 tons. 2,355,000

""

3,396,000

J

725,000

??

10,842,000 tons.

T

80

14. The number and tonnage of European and American constructed vessels importing cargo as tabulated and in transit compared with the previous year was as follows :—

1906.

1907.

Increase.

Decrease.

No. Tonnage. No.

Tonnage. No. Tonnage. No. Tonnage.

Steamers,

3,998 7,135,272 4,172 7,448,008 174 312,736

River Steamers,...... 3,774 2,759,792 4,067 | 2,688,885

Sailing Vessels, ...... 14 26,056 10 19,503

293

:

70,907

4

6,553

Total,...... 7,786 9,921,1208,249 10,156,396

467 312,736

77,460

Nett,

463

235,276

Imported tons,

4,029,177

4,366,000

15. The number and tonnage of European and American constructed vessels exporting cargo as shown and Bunker Coal compared with the previous year was as follows:-

1906.

1907.

Increase.

Decrease.

No. Tonnage. No. Tonnage.

No.

Tonnage. No. Tonnage.

Steamers,

3,961,101,179 4,183 7,444,856

River Steamers,. 3,761 2,750,6264,071 | 2,685,471

222 310

343,677

65,155

Sailing Vessels.......

11

20,459

12 24,677

4,218

Total, ...... 7,733 9,872,264 8,266 10,155,004 533

347,895

65,155

Nett,...

533

282,740

Exported tons,

2,163,344

3,355,000

Strs.

Bunker Coal.

Strs.

Bunker

Coal.

Strs.

Bunker Coal,

Bunker

Strs.

Coal.

Steamers,

3,961

635,6114,183

River Steamers,

3,761

53,156 | 4,071

672,000 222 36,389

53,000 310

156

Total,.

7,722

688,767 |8,254

725,000 532

36,389

156

Nett,....

532

36,233

81

16. The River trade in Imports, Exports and Passengers compared with the previous year was as follows

1906,

Year.

Imports.

Exports.

Passengers.

284,890

223,070

2,561,972

351,000

370,000

2,225,982

1907,

17. The following shows the Junk trade of the Colony for the year :--

Foreign Trade,

Local Trade,

Total,

IMPORTS.

14,782 junks measuring 20,820

22

""

.1,320,892 tons.

892,818

??

..35,602

29

.2,213,710

""

Imported,

...........665,000 tons.

EXPORTS.

Foreign Trade,

14,782 junks measuring

Local Trade,

19,952

23

>>

.1,330,578 tons.

886,069

"

Total,

34,734

93

多少

...2,216,647

11

Exported,

.897,000 tons.

18. The All Classes Passenger and Emigrant returns show the figures as below which are compared with those of the previous year :—

PASSENGERS.

1906.

1907. Increase. Decrease.

Do.,

British Vessels, arrivals

departures,.

169,889

171,374

1,485

100,701 96,887

3,814

Do.,

emigrants,

63,830 78,576

14,746

Total................... 334,420 346,837

16,231

3,814

Nett,

12,417

Foreign Vessels, arrivals,... 102,738 104,769

2,031

Do.,

departures,. 100,811

102,443

1,632

Do.,

emigrants,

12,895 ,27,391

14,496

Total,...... 216,444

234,603

18,159

Nett,

18,159

River Steamers, arrivals,... 1,281,365 1,119,056

162,309

Do.,

departures,. 1,280,607 1,106,926

173,681

Total,...... 2,561,972 2,225,982

335,990

Nett,

335,990

1

1

82

PASSENGERS,—Continued.

1906.

1907.

Increase. Decrease.

Junks, Foreign Trade,

arrivals,...

38,725 55,199

16,474

Do.,

departures,.

36,482 48,634

12,152

Total.......

75,207 103,833

28,626

Nett,

28,626

Total Arrivals,

1,592,717 1,450,398

142,319

99

Departures,....

1,518,601 1,354,890

163,711

3,111,318 2,805,288

306,030

Emigrants,

76,725 105,967

29,242

Total, 3,188,043 2,911,255

|

29,242

306,030

Nett,.......

276,788

Diff. of Arrivals and Dep.,

74,116

95,508

Emigrants,........

76,725

105,967

Remainder+or

2,609

10,459

Nett,...

Junks, Local Trade,

Do.,

:

56,119

64,071

7,952

arrivals,...

departures,...! 61,004 62,103

1,099

Total,...

117,123 126,174

9,051

Nett.......

9,051

19. The following table summarises the foregoing information with regard to the trade of the Ports of Hongkong for the year 1907 :-

TONS.

Passengers.

No. of Ships.

Emi-

Dis- charged.

Shipped.

In Transit.

Banker Coal shipped.

Total.

Registered Tonnage.

grants.

Arrived.

Departed.

British Ocean-going,

3,756 | 1,764,000 1,154,000

Foreign Ocean-going,

4,621

2,250,000

1.839.000 894,000 1,557,000

British River Steamers,

6,828

259,000

222,000

Foreign River Steamers,....

1,310

93,000

$5,000

Total..

16,515 | 4,366,000 | 2,355,000 | 3,396,000

42,000 528.000 11,000 189,000

725,000 110,842,000

250,000 5,007.000 7,216.169 171,371 422,000 5,123,000 7,720.875 104.769 4,630,364 1,031,118

96,887

78,576

102,443

27,391

1,017,553

743,092

20,811,400

87.938

1,325,199

89,373

1,306,256 | 105,967-

Steam-ships under 60

tons, Foreign Trade,

Junks, Foreign Trade,

1,581

2,000

3,000

+,000

9,000

70,921

11.477

11.432

29,564 473,000 691,000

1,164,000 2,651,470

55,199

18,634

47,660 4,841,000 3,049,000 3,396,000

729,000 12,015,000 | 23,032,891 1.461.875 1,366,322 105,967

Total Foreign Trade,

Steam-Launches, Local

Trade,

Junks, Local Trade,..

*

419,202

1,000

30,000

10,772 192,000 206,000

Total Local Trade,

459,971 192,000 207,000

31.000 11.216,532 4.531,923 3,871,318

398,000 1,778,887 64.071 62,103

30,000 429,000 12,995.419

4.595.994 3,933,421

Grand Total,..

507,634 5,033,000 3,256,000 3,396,000

759,000 12,444,000 | 36,028,310

6,057,869

5,299,743 105,967

* Not including "Star Ferry" Company's Craft.

}

#

83

-Revenue and Expenditure.

20. The total Revenue collected by the Harbour Department during the year was $348,300.10 as against $298,106.88 (including $24,098.10 collected by the Registrar General's Department for Boat Licences, the issuing of which was transferred to this Depart- ment from the 1st Janaary, 1907), collected in the previous year, showing an increase of $50,193.22:-

1. Light Dues,

2. Licences and Internal Revenue, 3. Fees of Court and Office,

4. Miscellaneous Receipts,

Total,.......

$ 8,389.00

116.122.40

151,746.30

42.40

$348,300.10

The principal increases are under Junk Licences, $18,704.12; Boat Licences, $9,407.60; Sunday Cargo-working Permits, $2,852.50; Medical examination of emigrants, $7,323.00; Light Dues, $2,666.96; Fines, $1,980 50; Survey of Steamships, $1,947.01; Steam- launch Licences, &c., $662.75; Survey of Steam-launches, $525.00; Fees for Storage of Gunpowder, &c., $499.53; and Chinese Passenger Ships Licences, $345.00. The falling off in Revenue comes under the headings: Fishing Stake and Station Licences, $719.00; Engagement and Discharge of Seamen, $328.20; Sale of Printed Forms. $-73.25; and Pilots' Licences, $105.00. Fees for Cargo-boat Certificates amounting to $2,951.00 in 1906 have been merged in Fees for Cargo-boat Licences since 1st January, 1907.

21. The expenditure of the Harbour Department for 1907 was $160,383.08 including $3,715.60 specially expended on Fairway Buoys and Lghts but not including Crown Agents' December Account paid this year.

4.-Steam-launches.

22. On the 31st December, there were 285 Steam-launches employed in the Harbour, of these, 137 were licensed for conveyance of passengers, &c., 129 were privately owned, 15 were the property of the Government and 4 belonged to the Imperial Government in charge of Military Authorities.

Fourteen Master's Certificates were suspended, I for 6 months, 2 for 3 months, 5 for 2 months, 5 for 1 month and 1 for 2 weeks; 2 Certificates were cancelled, 1 Master and 1 Engineer; 1 Master was cautioned and 5 discharged.

Five hundred and seventy-four (574) engagements and four hundred and sixty-one (461) discharges of Masters and Engineers were made from 1st January to 31st December.

Seven (7) Steam-launches were permitted to carry Arms, &c., for their protection against pirates, of these 6 were previously permitted and one during the year.

5.-Emigration and Immigration.

23. One hundred and five thousand nine hundred and sixty-seven (105,967) emigrants left Hongkong for various places, during the year, of these 78,576 were carried in British ships and 27,391 in Foreign ships. The year 1907 has been proved to be the record year in the history of Colony for the numbers of emigrants shipped, as the annexed table shows.

One hundred and forty-five thousand eight hundred and twenty-two (145,822) immigrants were reported as having been brought to Hongkong from the several places to which they had emigrated, either from this Colony or from Coast Ports. This includes 905 returning from South Africa. Of the total number 112,742 arrived in British ships and 33,080 in Foreign ships.

6.-Registry, &c., of Shipping.

24. During the year, 36 ships were registered under the provisions of the Imperial Merchant Shipping Act, and 12 Certificates of Registry were cancelled.

81

!

+

The documents, &c., dealt with in connection with the Imperial Shipping Act were as follows:-

Number of Certificates of Registry granted,... Number of Certificates of Registry cancelled, Number of copies from Register Book,...... Number of Declarations of Ownership,...

36

12

2

36

Number of Mortgages recorded,

Number of Discharge of Mortgages recorded,

Number of endorsements on Register of change in Rig or Tonnage, Number of Sales of ships recorded,

Number of Desertions certified,.

Number of endorsements on Certificates of Registry of change of

Owners,

Number of endorsements on Certificates of Registry of change of

Masters,

68

2

5

4

2

5

Number of inspections of Registry,

86 13

271

Total Number of Documents, &c.,

The fees collected on these Documents, &c., amounted to $1,309.

7-Marine Magistrate's Court.

25. One hundred and forty-five (145) cases were heard in the Marine Magistrate's Court, breach of Harbour Regulations, Disobeying lawful orders of the Harbour Master, Neglecting to exhibit lights, Using steam-whistles for other purposes than that of navigation and Carrying excess of passengers were the principal offences.

8.--Marine Court.

(Under Section 19 of Ordinance No. 10 of 1899.)

26. The following Court has been held during the year :

On the 8th and 10th July, inquiry into the circumstances attending the Collision between the British Steamship Heung Shan, Official No. 95,855 of Hongkong, REGINALD' DOWSETT THOMAS, number of whose Certificate of Competency is 1,010, Master, and the Licensed Steam-launch Fook On, LI MUK, Certificate No. 1,758, Master. The Officers of the Heung Shan were acquitted from all blame and the Master of the Fook On was found guilty of an error of judgment.

9.-Examination of Masters, Mates, and Engineers.

27. The following Tables show number of Candidates examined for Certificates of Competency, distinguishing those who were successful and those who failed:--

(Under Section 4 of Ordinance No. 10 of 1899.)

Grade..

Passed.

Failed.

Master,

18

6

Master, River Steamer,...

First Mate,

13

1

Only Mate,

:

Second Mate,

Total,

38

14

First Class Engineer,....

33

7

47

9

Second Class Engineer,..

Total,

80

16

85

L

Under Section 37 s.s. (7) of Ordinance No. 10 of 1899.)

Candidates.

For Master,...

For Engineer,

Total,

Passed.

Failed.

55

9

76

6

131

15

10.-Examination of Pilots.

(Under Ordinance No. 3 of 1904.)

28. No examinations for Pilots' Certificates were held during the year.

No Pilots' Licences were issued, 16 Licences were renewed.

11.-Sunday Cargo Working.

(Ordinance No. 1 of 1891.)

29. During the year, 348 permits were issued, under the provisions of the Ordinance. Of these, 106 were not availed of owing to its being found unnecessary for the ship to work cargo on Sunday and the fee paid for the permit was refunded in each case.

The Revenue cellected each year since the Ordinance came into force is as follows:-

1892.

1893,

1894,

1895,

1896,

1897,

1898,

1899,

1900,

1901,

1902,

1903,

1904,

1905,

1906,

1907,

$ 4,800

7,900

13,375

11,600

7,575

11,850

25,925

21,825

43,550

44,800

44,175

34,800

37,625

43,475

31,397.50 41.250

12.-New Territories.

(Ninth year of British Administration.)

30. The Station at the Island of Cheung Chau was opened in September, the one at Tai O in the Island of Lantau, in October of 1899, that at Tai Po in Mirs Bay, on board the Police steam-launch, in January 1900, that in Deep Bay, on board the Police steam- launch, in November, 1901, that at Sai Kung in April, 1902, and that at Long Ket, on board the Police steam-launch, in April 1905.

From 1st January to 31st December, 1907, 7,200 Licences, Port Clearances, Permits, &c., were issued at Cheung Chau, 3,622 at Tai 0, 6,365 at Tai Po, 5,255 at Deep Bay, 2,413 at Sai Kung and 4,101 at Long Ket.

The Revenue collected by this Department from the New Territories during 1907, was $20,910.00 or $1,965.75 more than in 1906.

86

13.-Commercial Intelligence, Board of Trade.

31. Fifty-two (52) letters were received during the year fom firms, principally in Great Britain, requesting information upon various points connected with their respective businesses, asking to be placed in communication with local firms, or submitting samples or price lists. The replies to the several queries have been as full as the information, &c., at my disposal permitted, and, wherever necessary, the name of the firm concerned, and the particular branch of trade indicated, have been published, from time to time, in the Govern- ment Gazette.

HARBOUR OFFICE,

18th February, 1908.

BASIL TAYLOR, Commander, R.N., Harbour Master, &c.

87

Table I.

NUMBER, TONNAGE and CREWS of Vessels ENTERED at Ports in the Colony of Hongkong from each Coun

BRITISH.

COUNTRIES WHENCE ARRIVED.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOES.

FOREIGN.

IN BALLAST.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tons.

Crews. Vessels.

Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tons. Crew:

Australia and New Zealand,

british North Borneo...................

Canada,

Coast of China,...

49 105,505 2,971

49

15

25,613 1,090|

15

22

67,311 4,595

105,505 2,971 32 67,986 2,796) 25,613 1,090 231 29,879 1,141] 67,311 4,595

Mauritius,

North America,

Philippine Islands,

North and South Pacific,

Ports in Hainan and Gulf of Tonquin,

Port Arthur......................

Russia in Asia,........................

Siam,

South America,

South Africa,

Isintau,

Cochin-China,

Continent of Europe,

Formosa,

Great Britain,

India and traits Settlements,

Japan,....

Java and other Islands in the Indian Archipelago,.

Kwang-chau-wan,

Macao,

167 566,203 11,388]

184 501,205 13,883

50

2,942 2,272,605 127,812

211

277,113 12,672 3,153 2,549,718 140,514 10,004 1,450.173 131,218 5,623

123

17

2

156,889 7,496) 56,696 1,516

5,371

123

156,889 7,496| 169 190,608 6,623

17

56,696) 1,516]

140 494,996 16,402)

81

5,371 8-1

791

67,364 4.869)

698.783 72.72

8,543 127

20

5,738

167

566,203 11,338)

17

154 402,966 17,917

154

402,966| 17,917

26,739 570

195

527.944 14,453

64,004 1,785 61 143,788 3,753 3881,035,070 31.066

648

1,046

9.148

90,545 2,609Į

50

90,545 2,609.

61

1,007 795,885 44,107] 2

79 125,301 3,992 22,589 2,451

4

1.7261 15

280

5,760

186

51 1,009

3

796,165 44,158

619

79.086 10,939

2,120

474

55,014 6,18

68

...

5,760 186

6

2.179 15

769

189 250,258| 13,320|

1,974

67

82,392 4,219)

128 191 67

252,232 13,448

14

12.472 588 10

7,120

29

82,392 4,219

$16

243,727 11,880 8

6,935

41

:

14

12,460) 449

3,154

71

13,490 437

3,127

2,369 127 5,573 141

2,369 127

249

264.829 12,997

11,435 223 5,841 122

17,008 364

3,824 132

2,394)

United States of America,

58 201,159 3,937

5,113 146 61

5,841 122

206,302 4,083

9851 58

1,762

99 461,139 14,098

TOTAL.....

5,050 5,588,545 257,192 238

334,285 14,0985,288 5,922,880 271,290 12,575 4,785,880 260,727 6,156| 803,513 81,12

Table II.

NUMBER, TONNAGE and CREWS of Vessels CLEARED in the Colony of Hongkong for each Country f

BRITISH.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOES.

FOREIGN.

IN BALLAST.

COUNTRIES TO WHICH DEPARTED.

Vessels.

Tons.

rews. Vessels.

Tons.

Crews. Wessels.

Tons. Crews Vessels.

Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tons. Crew:

Australia & New Zealand,.

British North Borneo,

Canada.....

Coast of China,

Cochin-China,

Continent of Europe,

Formosa,

Great Britain,..

19

79,402 1,643 17 $1 9,864 559 281 84,929 5,414 3,1943,101,963 209,783

45,835 1,342 41 6,632 175

SC

125,237 2,985

101

28

16,496 734 84,929 5,414

17 12

25,404 1,256| 18,416 868 9 31,032 1,601

8

17,525

9,456 21

41

6,616 2,212

55

82,588 3,036|

64

85,316 3,801)

3,235 3,108,279 211,995 10,746 2.810,196 273,167 5,276

119 167,904 6,837) 761 94,681 3,079)

162

474,037 56,00 195,346 6,14

6

16,590 290

6

16,590 290

93 467,488 12,439)

Port Arthur,

Russia in Asia,

Siam,.......

South America,

South Pacific,

India and Straits Settlements,

Japan,

Java and other Islands in the Indian Archipelago,

Kwang-chau-wall,

Macao,

Mauritius,

North America,

Philippine Islands,

Ports in Hainan and Gulf of Tonquin,

1,008 795,904 53,486

199 272,212 14,121|

1

5 18,385 340 66 260,708 6,671 278 354,447| 13,656) 102 294,753 6,854 6 10,136 461 1,143 39

i

1,216 69

GE

19,601 409 66 260,708 6,671

17 50,087 1,858

1,998

38

22

55,807 1,002) 295 410,254 14,658|

86!

24

18

49,420 1,066 53,121 1,003

126 344,173 7,920||

24

70,144 2,011, 82,690 5.348 143 353,787; 11,038Į

21

31,412

52 121,267 2,80

63,257 1,464]

24

1,143 39

116

52,740 1,536 49,633 4.235|

33

56,023, 1,3

5

3,227

1,008

795,904 53,486)

881

100,735; 15,093)

215

27,540 2,9

2

1,943 106

50

56,106 3,042

34

12,146 324 45,111 2,091

2

5,618)

951

4,061

981

2,369 138

2,865 30

15.823 490

18,258 468

United States of America,

231

66,428 1,025,

3

8,151

142

26

Wei-hai-wei,

TOTAL,

:

56.052 2,042ļ 247 190,430 8.788

12.783! 51,803 2,537 3,563 184 598 70

49 285,776 8,658

5,055,5,535,097 321,419|| 241 388,606 13,547 5,296 5,923,703) 334,966) 12,6424,509,931) 355,702 5,903 1,087,034 75,7

205 284,358 14,445)

84 101.217

22

5,133 5,618) 95

:

4,061 98

286

5.234 168

104 130,058 4,0

18

19,145

15,823 490

18,258] 468 74,579 1,167

87

Table I.

'ERED at Ports in the Colony of Hongkong from each Country for the Year ending 31st December, 1907.

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOES.

FOREIGN.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST,

TOTAL.

Crews, vessels.

Tons. Crews. Vessels. Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tons. Crews. Vessels. Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tous.

Crews. Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

49

105,505 2,971 32

15

22

67,966 2,796| 25,613 1,090 23 29,879 1,141 67.311 4,595

321 23

67,966| 2.796| 81 29,879 1,141, 38

178,471 5,767

81

178,471 5,767

65.492 2,281) 67,814,595|

38

55,492 2.231

22 67311 4.565

123

17

56,696 1,516|

2

5,371 8-1

79

12,672 3,158 2,549,718 140,514 10,004 1,450.173 131,218 5,623

156,889 7,496| 169 190,608) 6,623

140 494,996 16,402

67,864 4,869

698,783 72.720 15,627 2.148.956 206,938 12,946 3,722.778 2+2,060 5,834

975,896 85,392

18.780 4,698,074 347,452

3,548

265

127

78

175 194,161] 6.893 292 146 495,123) 16,475

347,497) 14.124Į

3,543 2067

5,788

225

84

167

566.203: 11,338)

17 64,004 1,785

648

154

402.966 17,917

61 143,788 3,753

1,046

570 195

527.944 14,453

388|1,035,070 31,066)

9,148

33 232

50

90,545 2,609.

79 125,301 3,992]

61

22,589 2,451

51 1,009

796,165 44,158

619

79,086 10,989

474

1.720 154 55,014 6,189 1093

2

2,120

68

2,120

73,102 5,094| 18 64.652 1816| 62 144,784 8,786) 393 1,044,218, 31,-98) 79 125,86 3.992 65 24,315 2,605| 184,100 17,128

68

157

81 72,785 4,958 184 650,207 13.123 215) 646.704 21,670 672,1,586,270|44,949;

129 215,906 6,601|| 61 22,589 2.451 1,626| 874,971|55,046||

2,120 08

651,692 17,918

127

78

5

6.738

225

298 351,040, 14.389 163) 551.819 17,991

86 78,478 5.178

I

648

31

185 630,865. 13.154

16

1.046 35,887

33

802

216 547,750; 21,703 588 1,572,162, 45.75!

129 215.906) 6,601

4761

1,726 154 55,294 6,240

651 21.315 2,605

2,102 930,265, 61,286

2'

2

2.120 68

186

3

5,760 186

6

2.479 154

2,479

154

9

769 39

1

769

39

1

128

191

252,232 13,448

14

12.472 588 10.

7,120

298

24

19,592 $86

203

67

82,692 4,219

316

243,727 11,880

6,935

418

324

250,662 12,298|

383

262,730 13,908 326,119 16,099||

8.239 340

769 9,094 426

9

8.2391 840

39

}

769 39

215 271,824 14,834

6,985

418

391

333,054 16,517

14

12,460 449

3,154 42

15

15,614 491

14

12.460

449

3.1541

15

15,614 491

7

13,490 437

3,127 86

16,617 528

18,400 487

3.127

861

8

16.617 528

2,369j 127

249

264.829 12,997,

223

17,008 364

1 3,824 132

2,394 101

249 3

264,829) 12,997)

251 267.198| 13,124|

251

267.198 18,124

6,218 238

9,397 273

13,829

324

23,226 597

122

5,841 122

985

88

1,762 73

3)

146

206,302 4,083, 99 461,139 14,098|

99

985 38

157 662,298 18,035||

5,143 146 160 G67,441 18,181

4,098 5,288 5,922,880 271,290 12,375 4,785,880 260,727 6,156 803,513 81,133 18,531 5,689,393 341,860 17,425 10,374,425 517,919 6,391 1,137,798 95,231 23,819 11,512,223 613,150

2.747 1 1 1)

I

461,139 14,098

223

5,841

12:

5.841 122

1,762

73

3

2.747

111

Table II.

!

› CLEARED in the Colony of Hongkong for each Country for the Year ending 31st December, 1907.

TOTAL.

FOREIGN.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

ews. Vessels.

Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tons. Crews Vessels.

Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tons. Crews. Vessels. Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

,342 175

SC

1,801

125,237 2,985 17 25,404 1,256| 8 17.525 213 10 16,496 734 121 18,416 868 8 9,456 262 28 84,929 5,414 9 31,032 1,601 212 3.2353,108,279 211,995 10,746 2,810,196 273,167 5,276 119 167,904 0,887 761 94,631 8,079) 162

25 20

290

6 16,590 2901

93 467,488 12,439|

93 467,488, 12,439|

69

G 19,601 409

17: 50,087 1,358|

1

66 260,708 6,671

38

,002

295 410,254 14,658 86

70,144 2,011; 82,690 5.348

21

1,998 501

31,412 789

,066

126) 344,173 7,920

143 353,787|11,038|

52

121,267 2,866j|

,003

24 63,257 1,464

324

1,091

30

:

468

} 1,143 39

1,008 795,004| 53,480||

205 284,358 14,445

84 101,217 5,133]

5,618) 95 4,061

58 5.234 168 15,823 490 18,258

24 116 881 100,735 15,093 2 1,943 106

52,740 1,536] 49,638) 4,235|

33

56,023 1,387

ة

215

3.227 175 27,540 2,945

18 52,085 1,408 38 70,144 2,011 107 114.102 6,187, 195 475,054 13,904| 57 108,703 2,925 121 52,800 4.410 1,096 128.275 18,038 1,948 106

42,929 1,469 36 104.806 2,899 23 47,872 1,180! 18 28.280 1,427 12 9 31.032 1,601 37 115,961 7,015) 474,037 56,007 16,022 3,284,233 239,174 13,940 5.912,159 472,950 5,317 195,346 6,146|| 238 289,977 9,225 181 177,219 6,115 226

98 467,488 12,439 22

68,472) 1,698 104 330,852 8,682 359 437,137 19,004

648,540 17,892|| 62.876 1,999 50,776 4,274| 896,639 68,579 1,943 106

63.360 1,555 16,088 437

G

431

245

30 117 1,889

142

26 74,579 1,167

22 56,052 2,042) 247 190,430 8,788

12,783 286 53 51,808 2,537 3 3,563 181 2

598 70 49 285,776 8,668

104 130,058 4,077

22 56,052 2,042) 351 320.488. 12,865)

221

297

828,264| 16,163| 246,536| 11,830|

5,518) 95

6 12,783 286

81

16,844 384

61 186,166 4.434 SC 44.308 1,864 37 115,961 7.015 480,353 58,219 19,2576,392,512 581,169 280,662 9,917 357 457,881 16,062

16.590 290

99 481,078 12,729 3,214 119

24 71,686 1.817 104 330,852) 8,682 402 524,356| 20,795 321 819,227 21.824 81 172.020 4,389 54.003 4,449 924.179. 71,524 1,943 106

87.219 1.791 76 170,687 3.932 51 109.144 2,390;

215

3,227 175 122 27,540 2,945 2,104

12,146 324 138 175,169 6,168)

2

227 340,410 16,487 435 421,705, 17,998

5.618 95

81 16,844 384

18 19,145 871

71

70.948 3,408

55

54,172 2,675

19, 22,010 901

711

76,182 3,576

3:

6,503 1841

10

2

598 70

9 18.856

19.386 674

5381

10

19.386 674

49 285,776 8,658

72 352,204 9,683]

8.151

142

9 18,856 588

75 360,355 9,825

:

:

***

,547 5,2965,923,703 334,966 12,6424,509,931 355,702 5,9031,087,034 75,788 18,545 5,596,965 431,490 17,697 10,045,028 677,121 6,144 1,475,040 89,335 23,841 11,520,668 766,456

BRITISH.

NAMES

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

88

Table III.

TOTAL NUMBER, TONNAGE AND CREWS OF VESSELS ENTERED AT EACH PORT IN

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOES.

FOREIGN.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

OF PORTS.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Aberdeen,

Cheung Chau,

Deep Bay,

Hunghòm,

:

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

:

Vessels.

Tons.

Crews.

Vessels.

Tons.

Crews.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Vessels.

Tons.

50

1.853

4091

224

12

54

2,077|

251

728

126

65

11

28

793

:

27

1.175

222

451

61

31

1,926

Long Ket,

Sai Kung.

Sham Shui-po,.

Shaukiwán,

7:

206

+5

7

20%

413:

41.245

4.572

227

IS,901 2,397|

670

60,146

88

2,60+

691

25]

906 173 113)

Stanley,

Tai 0,

Tai Po. Victoria,

24

151

3,510 24

27

1,537

130

247

25

331

1,834,

5,050 5,538,545 257,192

Total,

5,050 5,588.545 257,192

238.

238 334.28514.098 5,288 5,922,830 271,290, 12,375 4.785,880; 260,727 6,156

334,285 14,098 5,288 5.922,830) 271,290 11,704,736,158 254.517 5,884

782.719 78.421 18.5885,518,877

803,513 81,133′ 18,531 5,589,303

Aberdeen,.

Cheung Chaú,

Deep Bay,

Hunghom, Long Ket, Sai Kung. Sham Shui-po, Shaukiwán, Stanley, Tai 0,

Tai Po. Victoria,

Total,

NAMES

OF PORTS.

Vessels.

Table IV.

TOTAL NUMBER, TONNAGE AND CREWS OF VESSELS CLEARED AT EACH PORT IN

WITH CARGOES

BRITISH.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

FOREIGN.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

Tons. Crews.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews

Vessels.

:

Tons.

Crews.

Vessels.

Tons.

Crews.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

151

25

16

4041 106

176

431

13

493

76

28

1.942

257

16

682

132

111

31

G

198

37

255

20,695

2,626)

4521

42.129 5,000!

117

6,121

1,188

65

2,325 514

18

110

313

29

21

989 120

5,055 5,535,097 321,419 241 388,60613,547 5,296 5,923,705| 334,966||12,189:4,480,404° 351,192 5,3131,039,810, 69,799

5,055 5,535,097 321,419| 241 388,60613,547 5,296 5,923,70 334,966; 12,642|4,509,931| 355,702 5,903 1.087,034| 75,788;

88

-

Table III.

VESSELS ENTERED AT EACH PORT IN THE COLONY OF HONGKONG, IN THE YEAR 1907.

ITH CARGOES.

FOREIGN.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOES.

TOTAL.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Tons.

Crews.

Vessels.

Tons.

Crews.

Vessels.

Tons.

Chews.

1.853)

409

224

12

54

2,077

451

728

126

65

11:

28

793

187

Vessels.

293

Tons.

Crews.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Vessels.

Tons.

Crews.

1,853,

400

224

42.

51

2,077

451

251

723

126

G5

11

28

793

137

1.175

222

151

64

34

1,926

286

27

1,475

2221

451

64

31

1,926

286

:

206

45

7

203

45

205

45

7

2001

45

41.245)

4,572

227

18,901 2,397

670

60,146

6,969

443

41,245

4,572

227

18,901

2.397

670

CO,146

6,969

2,604

691

25

906 173

113

3,510

864

88!

2.604

691

23

906

173

113

3,510

86-4

24

15

1,537

130

6

247

25

331

24 1,834

15

24

15

21

15

155

27

1,587

130

247

25

33

1,834

155

782.719 78.421 18.5885,518,877 382,938

4,736,158, 254.517 5,884

4.785,880; 260,727 6,156 803,513 81,133 18,531 5,589,303 341,860

17,425 10,374,425 517,910 6,394 1,137,798 95,231 23,819 11,512,223|| 613,150

16,75 10.324,703 511.709. 6,122

1,117,004

92.519

22.876|| 11,441,707 601,228

Table IV.

VESSELS CLEARED AT EACH PORT IN THE COLONY OF HONGKONG, IN THE YEAR 1907.

TAL.

.3.

Crews.

WITH CARGOES.

Vessels.

!

Tons. Crews.

FOREIGN.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Vessels.

WITH CARGOES.

Tons.

Crews.

TOTAL.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Vessels.

Tons.

Crews.

151

25

S

176

43

ات نت

16

40-41 106

18

555

131

1511

25

16

404;

100

18

131

13

493

76]

21

669

119

176

43

13

493

76

21

669

119

28

1.942 257

16

682!

132

11

2,621

389

28

1,942

257

16:

GS2 132

11

2,624

389

111

31

198

37

11

309

68

5

111

31

198: 37

309

68

255 20,095 2,626! 452 117 6,121 1,188 65

42.129 5,000|

707

62.824

7,626

255

20,695

2,626|

452

42. 29 5.000

707

62,824

7,626

2,325 514

212

8,446

1,702 147

6,121

1,188

6.5

2,325 514 212

8,416

1,702

D

18 313

11 29

4

989 120

22 261 1.302

15 149

18

11

4

221

15

5

313

29

211

989 120 26

1,302

149

70

334.966|| 12,1894,480,404 351,192, 5.3131,039,810 69,799 7,502 5,520,214 421,291 17.244 10,015,501 672 911 334.96512,6424,509,931 353,702 5,903 1.087,034 75,788=48,545 5,596,965,431,490 17,697 10,015,028 677,121

5,551,428,416; 83.346| 22.798 11,443,917 756,257

6,144 1,475,640, 89,335| 23,841 11,520,668 766,456

d

89

Table V.

NUMBER, TONNAGE and CREWS of Vessels of each Nation ENTERED at Ports in the Colony of Hongkong, in the Year 1907.

ENTERED.

NATIONALITY

OF

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

VESSELS.

Vessels. Tons.

Crews. Vessels.

Tons. Crews. Vessels. Tous.

Crews.

British,

5,050

5,588,545

257,192

238

American,

12

248,668

7,798

4

334,285 2,194

14,098

5,288 | 5,922,830271,290

138

46

251,662

7,936

Austrian,

30

106,523

1,814

30

106,523

1,814

Belgian,

1

2,903

51

1

2,903

51

Corean

13

21,189

519

1

809

29

14

21,998

548

Chinese,

337

275,731

18,299

28

24,583

1,534

365

300,314 19,833

Chinese Junks,

9,536

786,906 104,463

5,246

533,986

63,880

14,782

1,320,892: 168,343

Danish,

16

40,397

644

5

726

175

21

41,122

819

Dutch,

58

129,895

3,881

11

12,205

387

69

142,100 4,268

French,

489

583,748 22,309

10

8,010

441

499

591,758

22,750

German,

785

1,190,575

47,544

77

75,782

3,032

862

1,266,357

50,576

Italian,

12

31,704

1,155

12

31,704

1,155

...

Japanese,

496

1,083,545

35,688

38

42,972

1,725

534

1,126,517

37,413

Norwegian,

223

215,041

7,662

67

50,687

1,878

290

265,728

9,540

Portuguese,

56

18,224

2,273

138

22,774

1,609

194

49,998

3,882

Russian,

10

22,760

587

3

8,152

163

13

30,912

750

Swedish,

11

12,970

320

11

12,970

320

No Flag,

Steam-ships

under 60 tons

trading to

260

15,101 5,720

528

19,834

6,142

788

34,935 11,862

Ports ontside

the Colony,

TOTAL, 17,425 10,374,425 517,919

6,394 1,137,798

95,213

23,819 11,512,223 613,150

Table VI.

NUMBER, TONNAGE and CREWS of Vessels of each Nation CLEARED at Ports in the Colony of Hongkong, in the Year 1907.

CLEARED.

NATIONALITY

OF

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

VESSELS.

Vessels. Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tons. Crews. Vessels. Tons.

Crews.

British,

5,055

5,535,097 321,419

241

388,606

13,547

5,296

5,923,703 334,966

American,

39

248,571 7,853

4

3,632

176

43

252,203

8,029

Austrian,

30

104,136

1,662

30

104,136

1,662

Belgian,.

1

2,903

59

31

2,903

59

Corean,

3

3,761

105

11

18.237

469

14

21,998

574

Chinese,..

341

277,420 15,521

20

5,722

339

361

283,142

15,860

Chinese Junks,

9,682

998,260 227,528

5,100

442,318

52,197

14,782

1,430,578

279,725

Danish,

17

35,003

358

4

580

311

21

35,583

669

Dutch,

57

127,355 3,792

12

19,198

567

69

146,553

4,359

French,

German,

483 630 1,075,252

361,644 14,490

19

17,083

144

502

578,727

14,634

35,921

235

274,852

10,145

865

1,350,104

46,066

Italian,

12

Japanese,

429

31,704 799,249

1,225

12

31,704

1,225

27,504

Ꭵ06

150,924

5,794

535

950,173

33,298

Norwegian,

185 174,127 6,909

106

91,743

2,910

291

265,870

9,819

Portuguese,

60 20,043 1,173

134

42,647

1,236

194

62,690

2,409

Russian,

10

23,304

603

3

5,786

144

13

29,090

747

Swedish,

8

10,294

254

5

4,663

147

13

14,957

401

No Flag,

1,468

44

1,468

44

Steam-ships

under 60 tons

trading to

656

29,808 10,804

137

5,278 1,106

793

35,086 11,910

Ports outside

the Colony,

TOTAL, 17,697 10,045,028 677,121

|

6,144 1,475,640 89,335 23,841 11,520,668 766,456

90

Table VII.

Total Number, Tonnage, Crews and Passengers of Junks ENTERED at Ports in the Colony of Hongkong from Ports on the Coast of China and Macao, during the Year ending 31st December, 1907.

CARGO.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Ves- sels.

Tons. Crews.

682 42,570 5,788

l'assen- Ves- gers. sels.

36 95 4,524 981

Tons. Crews.

Passen- Ves-

gers.

sels.

Tons. Crews.

l'assen- gers.

77747,094 6,769

36

East Coast,.

San On District,

West River, &c., 8,399 681,844 93,185 14,283 4,757 497,784 57,848 40.846 13,1561,179,628 151,033 55,129

West Coast,

113

7,043 908

29

69 4,758 800

Macao,

342

55,449 4,582

325 25,930 4,251

182 12,791 1,708

667 81,379 8,833

32

2

Total,... 9,536 786,906 104,463 14,348 5,246 533,986 63,880 40,851 14,782 1,320,892 168.343

55,199

Table VIII.

Total Number, Tonnage, Crews and Passengers of Junks CLEARED at Ports in the Colony of Hongkong

for Ports on the Coast of China and Macao, during the Year ending 31st December, 1907.

CARGO.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Ves- sels.

Tons. Crews.

Passen- Ves- gers. sels

Tons. Crews.

Passen- Ves- gers. sels.

Tons. Crews.

Passen-

gers.

514

27,066 4,278|

16 401

33,116 4,294

23

914 60,182 8,567

39

West River, &c., 8,395 849,860 113,452 24,076| 4,694 334,260 46,160 24,355 13,089 1,184,120 139,612 48,431

East Coast,.

San On District,

West Coast,

Macao,.....

64

5,022 709

8

71

566

71,810 7,716

2

4,409 606

78 5,035 890

143

11

135 9,431 1,315

644 76,845 8,606

151

13

Total,... 9,539 953,758 126,150|| 24,102 | 5,243|| 376,820 51,950 24,532|14,782|1,330,578 178,100 48,634

Table IX.

Total Number, Tonnage, Crews and Passengers of Junks ENTERED at each Port in the Colony of Hongkong (exclusive of Local Trade), during the Year ending 31st December, 1907.

CARGO.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Ves- sels.

Tons. Crews.

l'assen- Yes-

gers.

sels.

Tons. Crews.

Yes- Crews. Passen-

Tons. Crews.

gers. sels.

l'assen-

gers.

Aberdeen, Cheung Chow,

25

50. 1,853 409 728 126

224

42

65

5+ 2.077 451 28

793 137

Deep Bay,

:

Hunghom,

27

1,475 222

7

451

64

5

Long Ket,

:

Sai Kung,

7.

206

45

7

Sham Shui-po,

443

41,245 4,572

227

18,901

2,397

Shaukiwán,

88

2,604 691

40

25

906 173

670 113

34 1,926 2861

206 60,146 6,969

45

3,510 864

40

Stanley,

Tai O,

27

24 1,587|

15

130

17

247

25

33

24 1,854 155

15

17

Tai Po,

Victoria,

8,865 737,184 98,253 14,291

4,974 513,192 61,168 40,851 13,839 1,250,376|159,421

55,142

Total,.. 9,536 786,906 104,463 14,348 5,246 | 533,986 | 63,880 40,851 14,782 1,320,892 168,343 55,199

+

:

91

Table X.

Total Number, Tonnage, Crews and Passengers of Junks CLEARED at each Port in the Colony of

Hongkong (exclusive of Local Trade), during the Year ending 31st December, 1907.

CARGO.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Ves- sels.

Tons. Crews. Passen-

Ves- gers. sels.

Tons. Crews.

Passen- Ves- gers. sels.

Tons. Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Aberdeen,

Cheung Chow,

01:00

151

25

16

404

1061

18

555 131

176

43

13

493

76

21

669 119.

Deep Bay

Hunghom,.

28

1,942

257

16

682

132

75

44

2,624 389

76

Long Ket,..

Sai Kung

5

111

31

6

198

37

11

Sham Shui-po,.

255

20,695 2,626

452

42,129 5,000|

707

309 62,824 7,626

68

Shaukiwan,

147

6,121 1,188

65

2,325

514

23

212

8,446

1,702

23

Stanley,.

18

11

4

22

15

Tai O,

313

29

21

989 120

7

261 1.302

149

79

Tai Po, Victoria,

9,086 924,231121,940 24,096

4,653 329,596. 45,961| 24,360 13,739 1,253,827 167,901 48,456

Total,.

9,539 953,758 126,150 24,102

5,243 | 376,820 51,950 24,53214,782|1,330,578 178,100 48,634

Table XI.

Return of Junks (Local Trade) ENTERED at each Port in the Colony of Hongkong, during the Year ending 31st December, 1907.

CARGO.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Ves- sels.

Tons. Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Ves- sels.

Tons. Crews. Passen-

Ves-

Tous. Crews.

gers.

sels.

Passen-

gers.

Aberdeen

61 1,505 405

10

400

85

71

1,905

490

Cheung Chow,..

28

705

164

2

56

13

30

761 177

Deep Bay,...

Hunghom,.

25

16

22

1,079

191

27

1,104

207:

Long Ket,..

;

Sai Kung,

12

330

68

10

187

58

517 126

Sham Shui-po,

49

4,099

822

28

3,087

454

Shaukiwan,

123

5,209

988

46

2,328

424

Stanley,.

Tai O, Tai Po, Victoria,

5

310

36

4

132

27

152

32

275

42

4

48

36 7,038 267,407 63,480 15,529 13,356 605,484 103,308 48,502 20,394 872,891 166,788 64,031

25

34

77

7,186 1,276

169

7,537 1,412

9

442

63

8

152

32

13

323

67

Total.....

7,338 280,017 66,053 15,535 13,482 612,801 104,585 48,536 20,820 892,818 170,638 €4,071

Table XII.

Return of Junks (Local Trade) CLEARED at each Port in the Colony of Hongkong, during the Year ending 31st December, 1907.

CARGO.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Ves-

sels.

Tous. Crews. Passen- Ves- sels.

Tons. Crews.

gers.

Passen- Ves-

gers. sels.

Tons. Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Aberdeen,

26

744

179

81

2,680 621

107

3,424 800

Cheung Chow,

8

211

34

29

663 162

37

879 196

Deep Bay,..

Hunghom,

i0

256

54

7

150

50

20

17

406

104

20

Long Ket,

Sai Kung,

10

246

48

8

175

45

18

421

93

...

Sham Shui-po,

16

1,738

258

24

3,816

381

4,554 639

Shaukiwan,

33

1,212

201

40

37

1,390

281:

ΤΟ

2,602 572

40

Stanley,

3

220

25

6

165

38

9

385

63

Tai 0,

8

266

36

7

91

28

9

15

357

64

9

Tai Po, Victoria,

10

224

58

32

3

99

19

13

323

77

32

7,912 358,555 77,766 60,035 11,714 514,163 87,264

1,962 19,626

872,718 165.030 61,997

Total,

8,036 363,672 78,749 60,107 11,916 522,397 88,889

1,996 19,952 886,069 167,638 62,103

FOREIGN TRADE.

92

Table XIII.

SUMMARY.

No. OF VESSELS.

Toxs.

CREWS.

British Ships entered with Cargoes,

5,050

5,588,545

257,192

Do.

do. in Ballast,.....

238

334.285

14,098

Total,....

5,288

5,922,830

271,290

British Ships cleared with Cargoes,

5,084

5,525,952

323,278

Do.

do. in Ballast,

212

397,751

11,688

Tota!......................

5.296

5,923,703

334,966

Foreign Ships entered with Cargoes,

2,579

3,983,173

150,544

Do.

do.

in Ballast,..

382

249,693

11,111

Total,.......

2,961

4,233,566

161,655

Foreign Ships cleared with Cargoes,

2,304

3,481,863

117,560

Do.

do. in Ballast,

666

649,438

22,295

Total,...

2,970

4,131,301

139,855

Steamships under 60 tons entered with Cargoes,

260

15,101

5,720

Do.

do.

do. in Ballast,

528

19,834

6,142

Total,....

788

31,935

11,862

⚫do.

Steamships under 60 tons cleared with Cargoes,

Do.

656

29,808

10,804

do. in Ballast,

137

5,278

1,106

Total,....

793

35,086

11.910

Junks entered with Cargoes,

9,536

786,906

104,463

Do.

do. in Ballast,

5,246

533,986

63,880

Total,...

14,782

1,320,892

168,343

Junks cleared with Cargoes,

9,617

1,058,793

228,665

Do.

do. in Ballast,..

5,165

371,785

51,060

Total,.....

14,782 1,430,578

279,725

Total of all Vessels entered,

Total of all Vessels cleared,

Total of all Vessels in Foreign Trade, entered and cleared,

23,819 23,841 11,520,658

11,512,223

613,150

766,456

47,660 23,032,891

1.379,606

LOCAL TRADE,

Total Junks entered,

20,820

892,818

170,638

Do.

cleared,

19,952

$86,069

167,638

Total Local Trade entered and cleared,....

40,772

1,778,887

338,276

Total Foreign Trade, entered and cleared,..

47,660

23,032,891 1,379,606

Total Local Trade, entered and cleared,

40,772 1,778,887

338,276

Graud Total,....

88,432 24,811,778 1,717,882

93

Table XIV.

STATEMENT of REVENUE collected in the Horbour Department during the Year 1907.

1. Light Dues, Ordinance 10 of 1889,

Head of Receipts. •

Amount.

$

cts.

80,389.00

2. Licences and Internal Revenue not otherwise specified :--

Boat Licences, ..

33,505.70

Chinese Passenger Ship Licences, Ordinance 1 of 1889,

1,395.00

Emigration Brokers' Licences, Ordinance 1 of 1889,

Fines,

1.000.00

2,814.50

Fishing Stake and Station Licences, Ordinance 10 of 1899,

177.00

Fishing Stake and Station Licences, from the New Territories, Ord. 10 of 1899,..............

2,606,50

Junk Licences, &c., Ordinance 10 of 1899,

52,342.20

Junk Licences, &c., from the New Territories, Ordinance 10 of 1899,

18,303.50

Pilots' Licences, Ordinance 3 of 1904,

80.00

Steam-launch Licences, &c., Ordinance 10 of 1899,

3,898.00

3. Fees of Court or Office, Payments for specific purposes and Reimbursements-in-Aid :-

Engagement and Discharge of Seamen, Ordinance 10 of 1899,..........

Engagement of Masters and Engineers of Steam-launches, Ordinance 10 of 1899,...

Examination of Masters, &c., Ordinance 10 of 1899,

24,446.40

287.00

2,900.00

Gunpowder, Storage of-Ordinance 10 of 1899,.......

11,661.76

Medical Examination of Emigrants, Ordinance 1 of 1889,.

31,675.00

Printed Forms, Sale of,

Private Moorings and Buoys, Rent for-Ordinance 10 of 1899,

Registry Fees (Merchant Shipping Act), Ordinance 10 of 1899,

Steam-lunches, Surveyor's Certificates, Ordinance 10 of 1899,

Sugar Convention, Ordinance 14 of 1904,

58.75

3,630.00

1,309.00

3,405.00

1,350.00

Survey of Steamships, &c., Ordinance 10 of 1899,

29.770.39

Sunday Cargo Working Permits, Ordinance 1 of 1891,.

7. Miscellaneous Receipts-Message Fees for notifying ships,.....

41,250.00

42.40

TOTAL,

348,300.10

NOT TOWING.

Table XV.

RETURN of LICENSED STEAM-LAUNCHES Entered in the COLONY of HONGKONG during the Year ending 31st December, 1907.

TOWING.

TOTAL.

:

:

:

Vessels. Tonnage.] Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Vessels. Tonnage. Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Vessels. Tonnage. Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Within the Waters of the Colony, *

120,970 2,872,228 981,578

5,045

88,631 2,736,038 786,156 4,526,878 209,601 5,608,266 1,767,7344,531,923

Total,..

120,970 2,872,228) 981,578

5,045

88,631 2,736,038 786,156 4,526,878 209,601 5,608,2661,767,734 4,531,923

PLACES.

:

:

94-

}

271

271

102

4,219

885

260 15,101] 5,720 395 14,675 5,073 9,598 497

1,879,

260

15,101 5,720 1,879 18,894 5,958 9,598

103

4,246|

892

:

655 29,776 10,793 11,477 758

34,022 11,685 11,477

121,073 2,876,474) 982,470

5,045

2,765,814 2881,779 89,286 2,765,814 796,949 4,538,355 210,359 5,642,288 1,779,4194,543,400

* The figures under the heading "Steam-launches plying within the Waters of the Colony" are incomplete: the "Star Ferry" Company stating that since 1901, "owing to the amount of work entailed they have had to discontinue keeping a record of the passengers carried by their launches, and also number of trips.

Outside the Waters of the Colony

Samshui,

Kongmun,

Kamchuk,

Wuchow,...

Macao,..

Other Places,

Total,.....

Grand Total,....

+

Table XVI.

RETURN of LICENSED STEAM-LAUNCHES Cleared in the COLONY of HONGKONG during the year ending 31st December, 1907.

Within the Waters of the Colony,

PLACES.

TOWING.

NOT TOWING.

TOTAL.

Vessels. Tonnage. Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Vessels. Tonnage. Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Passer

Vessels. [Tonnage. Crews.

gers.

122,777 2,876,149 983,770 4,965 86,824 2,732,117 783,9643,866,353 209,601 5,608,266 1,767,7343,871,318

86,824 2,732,117 783,964,3,866,353 209,601 5,608,266 1,767,734 3,871,318

122,777 2,876,149 983,770 4,965

Total,......

Outside the Waters of the Colony :-

Samshui,

Kongmun,

Kamchuk,

Wuchow,

Macao,..

Other Places,

Total,..

:

:

95

1

27

1

27

71

102

4,219

885

260

395

15,101 5,720 1,905 14,675 5,073 9,527

260 15,101 5,720 497 18,894 5,958 9,527

1,905

103

4,246

892

655 29,776, 10,793] 11,432

758 34,022 11,685

11,432

80,395 984,662 122,880 2,880,395 984,662 4,965

2,761

9,419|3 87,479 2,761,893 794,7573,877,785 201,3595,642,288 1,779,419 3,882,750

* The figures under the heading "Steam-launches plying within the Waters of the Colony" are incomplete: the "Star Ferry" Company stating that since 1901, "owing to the amount of work entailed they have had to discontinue keeping a record of the passengers carried by their launches, and also number of trips.

9

Grand Total,.

96

Table XVII.

NUMBER OF BOAT LICENCES ISSUED DURING THE YEAR 1907.

(Under Table U., Section 40, of Ordinance No. 10 of 1899.)

DESCRIPTION.'

LICENCE.

DUPLICATE.

FEES.

Passenger Boats, Class A.,.

640

Passenger Boats, Class B.,

853

10,246.00

Passenger Village Boats,

1,558

Cargo Boats,

1,762

2

Lighters.

175

22,101.00

Water Boats,

83

Other Boats,

933

Cinder, Bum, Hawker and Marine Dealers' Boats, .

376

1

680.70

Fish Drying Hulks,

73

478.00

Total,.....

6,453

14

$33,505.70

Table XVIII.

SUMMARY OF CHINESE EMIGRATION from HONGKONG to Ports other than in China,

during the Year ending 31st December, 1907.

WHITHER BOUND.

To Banka,

Billiton,

BRITISH VESSELS.

FOREIGN VESSELS.

GRAND TOTAL.

Adults.

Children.

Adults. Children.

Adults,

Children.

Total.

Total.

Total.

M.

F.

M.

F.

J. F M. F.

M.

F.

J.

F.

369 1,046

:

369 369

369

1,046 1,046

1,046

1,781

52

1,836 852

12

867 2,633

64

2,703

13

13

45

46

296 20 170

303 309

316

22

20

22

181

215

227

67 468

67

67

67

29 45

1 543 468

29

45

543

46

2,668 | 2,209

28

16

651 3,026

28|123

5|

11

2,237 4,831 3,192| 3,659

12

74

4,905

40 139

3,843

11

12

|52,452|| 9,158 2,276 932 64,818 15,992 (1,666 | 421|151 18,230|68,444 10,824 2,697 : 1,083

83,048

107

157 38

7,314 1,230

203

109 107

109.

7.157

9

1

213 1,395

157 47

7,314

1,443

lands,

Callao, Peru,

Honolulu, Sandwich Is-

Iquique, Chili,

,, Japan Ports,

Java,

دو

Mauritius,

Mexico,

2,622

San Francisco, U.S.A.,

633

Seattle, U.S.A....

""

Straits Settlements,

Tacoma, U.S.A.,.

>

Vancouver, British Co-

lumbia,

7,157

27

Victoria, British Columbia. 1,192

TOTAL PASSENGERS,... 65,895 9,163 2,586 932 78,576 24,836 1,741 653 | 161 27,391 90,731 10,904| 3,239 1,093 105,967

Total Passengers by British Vessels,

Total Passengers by Foreign Vessels,

Excess of Passengers by British Vessels,

65,895 9,163 2,586 932 78.076

24,830 1,741 653 161: 27,891

41,059 7,422 1,933 771 51,185.

97

Table XIX.

RETURN OF EMIGRTION FROM HONGKONG to Ports other than in China, for 20 Years,

from 1888 to 1907, inclusive.

Month.

1888.

1889.

1890.

1891.

1892.

1893.

1894.

1895.

1896.

1897.

January.

6.751

3,83

1, 63

8,352

2,79

6,141

4.723

2,934

5,26

3,530

February

3,169

1,878

2,355

809

1,846

2.217

1.405

4.919

1.501

1,800

March.

11.558

6.975

5.139

3.485

6,154

10,583

9.334

10.532

4.242

6.887

April,

12,820

6.:61

5.46

6.362

7.271

1994

9.961

9,645

9.559

8.83

May,

17.5 3

5.745

5,074

6.400

6,312

10.884

4.831

8,320

*9.927

7,572

June,...

11,000

4. 81

3.142

4.268

4.408

8,629

28

5.430

6.250

6,365

July.

8.80:

3,424

4.556

8.872

4.121

6,093

5.452

5.719

5.441

August,

7.078

3.358

2.579

2,662

8,802

3.928

157

1,853

4.211

4.498

September.

3.895

3.0 +

3,543

3572

3741

4,976

2,086

5,621

7.050

5.611

October,

4.814

3,785

2,884

4.570

3.75

4, 20

6.91

5,391

5.344

4.903

November,

4,586

2,927

2,57

2.297

4.723

4,361

6,028

5.097

3.807

3.616

December,

4,179

3,500

3,494

8.305

4.398

4.710

4.284

4,944

8.906

4,423

Total,...

96,195

47.849

42,066

45,162

52.143

$2.336

49,023

73.138

66.822

62.831

Month.

1898.

1899.

1900.

1901.

1902.

1903

1904.

1905.

1906.

1907.

January.

1.963

5.756

6.383

7.247

4,634

4.120

5,867

4.325

2.831

7.936

February.

3,893

2.312

3,570

1.469

1.509

6.063

2,239

1588

3.786

1.242

March,

5.915

6.846

18,373

8.690

8,216

11,150

9,691

7.726

10.418

14.065

April.

7,401

10.379

14.451

11.857

11,927

11,717

11,707

8.695

9.002

13.714

May.

4.676

9.314

11.979

10.499

8.887

18.751

12.695

9.170

8,480

15.488

June,

5.019

1,360

2.279

976

1.966

4.146

5.859

5.187

4.600

7.874

July.

7.673

1,197

1,056

565

3.936

1,068

4,331

3,711

4.810

8,213

*August.......

1.754

1,510

2.038

3.147

4,589

1.891

8.470

+407

6.766

8.383

September.

4,48

889

5,776

6.860

6.478

8,037

5,55 ›

4,779

5.909

8.516

October,

5.079

5,012

5.919

7.012

7.985

8.509

5.96

5,627

7.083

5.683

November,

4,847

9.119

6.400

6,175

5.897

7.847

4.862

5.108

7.044

6.494

December,

5,134

7.381

5.399

5,277

6.747

5.590

4,846

4,018

5.996

5.859

Total,....

€0,432

61,075

83,643

69.774

71,711

83,384

76,304

64,341

76,725

105.967

RETURN OF MALE AND FEMALE EMIGRANTS FROM HongkongG to Ports other than in China,

for 10 Years, from 1898 to 1907,

inclusive.

Whither bound.

1898. 1899. 1900. 1901. 1902.

1903. 1904.

1905.

1906.

1907.

Straits Settlements, Males, Straits Settlements, Females,

Total,

40.730 38,577

6,803 4,930

45,380 45,666 69,213 56.903

61,057 8.156

48,782 49,260 53.759 8.174 8,408 9,628

57,668 63,387

53.131 9596

62 727

45,948 51,589

71.141

9.026 8.781

11,907

54,974 | 60,320

83.048

Other Ports. Males, Other Ports, Females,

Total

14,712 340

15,052

15,277 14,850 80 132

12,758 113

13,967 76

19,915 82

13.499 78

9.308 59

16.348 57

22.829 90

15,409

14,430

12,871 14.043

19,997

18.577

9.367

16.405

22,919

Grand Total,

60,432 61,075 83,643

€9.774

71,711

$3,384 76,304 64,341

76,725 105,967

انا

98

Table XX.

SUMMARY OF CHINESE IMMIGRATION to HONGKONG from Ports other than in China,

during the Year ending 31st December, 1997.

BRITISH VESSELS.

FOREIGN VESSELS.

GRAND TOTAL.

WHERE FROM

Adults.

Children.

Adults.

Children.

Adults.

Children.

Total.

Total.

Total.

M. F.

M. P.

J. F. AL P.

M.

F

M. F

Honolulu. Sandwich

From Bangkok. Siam,

2.809

Callao, Peru.

457

Durban, British South

Africa.

905

905

Islands.

19

Java & Sumatra..

22

Japan Ports.

3291

330

74%

Melbourne,

8701

870 362

New South Wales.

312

312 100

Queensland Ports.....

408

408 187

San Francisco. U.S.A..

U.S.A..

790

13

826 4.047 24

Seattle. U.S.A..

1,317

South Australian Ports.

71

781

Straits Settlements,

101.841 2,6

*

Tacoma, U.S.A....

408

Vancouver, British

Columbia,

3,347 20

2.819 2.809

8

2

457

2,819 457

:

905

:

905

27

19

5

3

27

22 3.842

3.842

3.864

3.864

742

1,071

++

1,078

362

1.232

1,232

100

412

412

187

595

595

4.104

1.837

32

4,930

1,317 1317

1,317

71

73

353 104.75819,533

4 19,580121,374 2,046 561 357

124,338

408

3,367

408

:

408

:

3,347

20

26

:.

3.367

TOTAL PASSENGERS.... 109,760 2,041

109,760

572369 112,74232,958

Total Passengers by British Vessels,

:

33

€9

32

2133,080 142,718 2,110

604 390 145,822

109,760 2,041

32,958 69

76,802 1,972

572 369 112,742

32 21 33,080

540 348 79,662

Total Passengers by Foreign Vessels,

Excess of Passengers by British Vessels, .

Table XXI.

RETURN OF IMMIGRATION to HONGKONG from Ports other than in China, for 20 Yeurs

from 1888 to 1907, inclusive.

-

Month.

1888.

1889.

1890.

1891.

1892.

1893.

1894.

1895.

1896.

1897.

January.

9,863

9.241

6,889

11,015

7,455

8,357

9,727

7,521

11,133

9.745

February..

4.112

6,114

8,855

3,854

6,879

4.685

4,663

8,474

6.356

6.447

March,

11.184

7.055

8,485

10,949

9,010

9,048

12,582

8,925

11.558

9.815

April.

7,658

?

10.162

8,209

7,863

7,179

8.548

7.683

8,432

9.967

10,392

May.

7.681

8,749

7,743

8,897

8,733

9,713

9.600

10,397

9.257

9.658

June....

6,926

7,422

7,716

8,377

8.307

9,513

5.520

9.202

9.910

9.281

July.

7.069

8.740

8,076

7,328

6,945

10,044

4,415

8.356

9.104

9.590

August..

7.729

7.432

8,005

8,052

7,417

8.997

6.225

9.166

8.852

8,909

September,

8,587

7.601

7.174

9,039

8,011

9,565

7.876

9.836

9.985

10.167

October,

9.763

10.353

11,472

9,804

8,896

10,215

8,010

11,139

10.123

10,030

November,

9,366

8386

7,344

10,314

9,108

9,190 10,055

10.096

12.423

9,885

December.

8.862

8,057

8,566

9,707 10,001

10,769

9.734

11.141

10.800

11.288

Total,

98,800 99,315

98.534 105,199

97,971

108.644

96,095 112,685

119.468

115,207

Month.

1898.

1899.

1900.

1901.

1902:

1903.

1904.

1905.

1906.

1907.

January,

7.415

10,274

8.994

February.

6,036

5,020

5,923

11.995 7,649

March,

9,304

9.165

12,994

10,712

11,276 10,896 7,535 8,860 12.036 12,229

12,342

15,139

10.793

17.329

8,270

8.762

9.778

6,246

16,350

11.935

12,433

12.758

A pril,

9,489

$.539

8,259

9,807

May,

8,065

9,582

9.348

10,137

8.655 11,039

10,615

12.191

8,153

10,581

11.195

10,31!

10,558

113

10.189

12.908

June..

9.227

8,686 10,712

8,542

8.817

10,724 11,419

11,354

10.724

8.843

July,

6,260

8,648

11,633

9,478

9,498

11,248

11,167

11.686

13,221

18.127

August,

9,610

7,015

7,313

10,815

8,794

10.555 12,035

12,122

9,633

11,767

September,

8,090

8,461

10,094

10,244

October.

9.714

11.694

November,

10.888

9,823

December,

11,343 13,541

11,352 11.934 9,554 13,595 13,989 12,523 10.619 13,984 12,816 15.466 15.879 12,072 14,005 14.991

11,995

11.528

10,275

10,277

15,130 11,695

12.018

12.573

14,212 13,652 13,526

11,338

11.874

13,314

13,934

16,925

Total.... 105,441 110,448 121,322 129,030

129,812 140,551 149,195 140,483 134,912 145,822

A

''

RETURN of MALE an

99

EMALE IMMIGRANTS to HONGKONG from Ports other than in China, for 10 years, from 1898 to 1907, inclusive.

Where from.

1898.

1899. 1900.

1901. 1902.

1903. 1904. 1905. 1906.

1907.

Straits Settlements, Males, Straits Settlements, Females,

88,580 90.191

3.760

4,671

98.782 106,923 108,362 4.586 4,943 3.891

116,705 | 123,542 114.653 110.525

6.778 4.842

4.043 6.210

121.925

2.403

Total,

92,340

94,862 | 103,368 111,866112,253 122.483 | 128,384 | 120.863 114,568 124,338

Other Ports, Males,

Other Ports. Females,

12,839 262

15,316 270

17,661 293

16.870 17,826

294

233

17.826 212

20,447 364

19.291 320

19,848 496

21,387 97

Total,

13.101 15.586

17.954 17,164 17.559

18.063

20.811 19.620 20,344

21,484

Grand Total.

105,441 | 110,448 121.322129,030 129,812 140,551|149,195 | 140.483134,912 | 145,822

Table XXII.

RETURN of VESSELS REGISTERED at the Port of Hongkong, during the Year 1907.

Name of Vessel.

Official Number.

Registered

Tonnage.

Horse

Fower.

Rig.

Built.

of.

Where built and when.

Remarks.

Tai Sze,

Tai Loong,.

Sui An,

120,995 120,996

205.61 205.01

Nil

Steel Shanghai,

1906.

.1906.

(Str.): 120,997: 1,005.46

120

.1899.

Sui Tai,

Fati, Cormorant,

120,098 1,005.46

120

.1899.

Motor. 120.999

9.00 24

Amsterdam.

.1906.

(Str.) | 121,000

59.89

24

Wood Hongkong,

1890.

Yat Ho,

123,071

188.33

1896.

་་

Yee Ho,

Tarang,

123,072

188.33

1897.

Luk Ho....

123,073

241.79

123,074

86.76

Crane...

(Str.) | 123.075

Evening Star,

123.076

Morning Star,

123,077

22.02 16 50.65 235

I.H.P. 50.65 235

Steel Schooner Wood San Francisco.

Nil

Hongkong,

1899.

1903. Foreign name Tarang. 1906.

1904.

...1900.

I.H.P.

Northern Star,

123,078 :

50.05

235

...1901.

1.H.P.

Polar Star,.......

123.079

50.65

235

.1902.

!!

I.H.P.

Southern Star,

123.080

50.65

235

.1900.

I.H.P.

Chan Po,

Ng Ho, Heron,

Penguin..

Stork,

Auster,

Brynhilde.

123,081. 129.92 28 123.082 156.93 (Str) 123.083

1901. Foreign name Chan Po.

Steel Shanghai.

1896.

17.71 16 123,084 27.26

Wood Hongkong.

1897.

1900.

123,085

1651

1898.

120.971

222.71

Steel

1897. Cut down. 1967,

123,086

11.27

Kowloon,

(Str.) | 123,087

34.20

Cutter Nil

Wood

1994.

1886.

Sam Sap Yat,

123,088

45.99

Steel

1896.

Tsat Ho...

123,089

115.88

1895.

Syren..

Pat Sap,..

Pat Yat..

72.851

50.67

123,090

55.01

Schooner Wood Shanghai,

Nil

1896. Transferred from Shanghai.

Hongkong.

.1906.

123,091 55.01

.1906.

Pat Yee,.

123,092

55.01

.1906.

Pat Sam,

123,093 55.01

1906.

Pat Sze,

123,094

55.01

.1906.

Pat Ng,

123,095

55.01

.1906.

Kau Sap Sam,

123,096

55.01

1901.

Kathleen,

Motor. 123,097

28 50

30

1906.

Albatross,

(Str.) 123,098

39.83

16)

1907.

F

W

100

Table XXIII.

RETURN OF REGISTRIES of VESSELS cancelled at the Port of Hongko

Name of Vessel.

Official Number.

Registered

Tonnage.

Registry. Date of

Horse Fower.

F

during the Year 1907.

Rig.

Built of.

Where and when built.

Reason of Cancellation.

W. Cores de

:

Vries,

(Str.)

Sual,

71.561 672.45 1883 64,100 781.61 1886

52 Schooner Iron 60

**

Sabine

Rickmers,

107,024

Wing Chai....

109,871

690.38 | 1898 547,89| 1903

104 $8

Steel

Nil

Wood

Fyenoord. Rotterdam,1865 Sold to Foreigners. Hongkong

1873 [haven, 1894 Grestemund, Bremer- Hongkong,

Sold to Foreigners.

Sold to Foreigners.

1902. Lost at Hongkong.

Robert Cooke,

109,875 - 217,95| 1903 125

Steel

Hongkong,

1902

Lost in the vicinity of Cape

Hong Kong.

109,864 413.30 1901 40

Wood Hongkong,

1901

Lost at Hongkong.

[Varella,

Kukuburia for-

merly "Dorothy“, 116,037 41.74 1904

Lorcha

Hongkong.

1901

Sold by Public Auction. Regis-

Africus.

116,055 173.33 1904

Loongwo.

Hoi Ning,

Auster. Albatross. ...(Str.) | 120,973, 8279 1905 24 120,989 2,386.06 1906 600 120,994 80.84 1906 18

120,971 404.08 1904

Nil

Schooner Nil

Steel Hongkong, Hongkong. Wood Hongkong. Steel Hongkong. Wood Hongkong.

1899

Lost at Hongkong.

1897

try no longer required.

Registered anew.

1904 Lost outside Hongkong. 1906 | Transferred to London.

1963 Converted into a launch. Re-

gistry no longer required.

Table XXIV.

RETURN of MARINE CASES tried at the MARINE MAGISTRATE's Court,

during the

year 1907.

Defendants how disposed of.

NATURE OF CHARGE.

No. of Cases.

No. of Defendants.

Imprisonment with Hard Labour.

Imprisonment with

Hard Labour and forfeiture of pay,

Imprisonment with-

out Hard Labcur.

Imprisonment in 'default of fine.

Fined.

Forfeiture of

Reprimanded. Pay.

Sent back to

duty,

Dismissed.

Amount of Fines.

Absent without Leave,

Arrival without reporting,

Assault,

Breach of Conditions of Licence, (Launches,

&c.).

Desertion,

Disobeying the lawful orders of the Harbour

Master, (Junks, &c.),...

1 -- ཡ

12

212

1

1

**

13

15 22

5

84

12

22

Engagements of Masters or Engineers of

Steam-launches, Neglecting to register, Harbour Regulations, Breach of, (Junks, &c.), | 33 Leaving a Port without a Clearance,

Lights, Neglecting to exhibit, (Launches, &c.), 17 Passengors, Carrying excess of, (Launches, &c.), 11 Plying without certificated Master or Engineer,

(Launches),

Plying without a Licence, (Boats, &c.), Refusal of Duty,

Rubbish, Throwing in Harbour,

Rules of the Road, Failure to observe,

(Steam-launches),

Steam-whistle, Using for other purpose than

of navigation, ....

4262

4262

5

10

5

13 18

:

:

2

::ལ:

:

:

:

25.00

11

}

1163.00

21

1 336.00

40.00 8.901.50

300.00

21

1

212.00

367.00-

2

100.00

35.00

1

25.00

I

70.00

12

:

:

1

240.00 ·

Total,

145 217 1

1 180

1

16 $2,814.50

...

103

Appendix A.

MERCANTILE MARINE OFFICE.

Twenty thousand nine hundred and ninety (20,990) Seamen were shipped and nineteen thousand five hundred and twenty-nine (19,529) discharged at the Mercantile Marine Office and on board ships during the year.

+

One hundred and sixteen (116) Distressed Seamen were received during the year, of whom 30 were sent to the United Kingdom, 3 to Calcutta, 1 to Colombo, 1 to Singapore, I to Melbourne, and I to Sydney; 1s were sent as passengers to Canton, 4 to Foochow, 1 to Hoihow and 2 to London; 3 were taken charge of by the Japanese Consul, 2 joined the Chinese Customs, 1 obtained employment on shore, 35 were shipped, 5 died at the Government Civil Hospital, 3 remained in the Government.Civil Hospital and 5 at the Sailors' Home.

$2,920.11 were expended by the Harbour Master on behalf of the Board of Trade in the relief of these Distressed Seamen.

1.

Appendix B.

IMPORTS AND EXFORTS OFFICE.

2. The return shows that during the year the amount of Opium reported was as follows:

Imported,

1906.

1907.

Increase. Decrease.

Chests.

Chests.

Chests.

Chests.

47,566

40,842

6,724

Exported, ...

47,575

42,702

4,873

Through Cargo reported

but not landed,

9,712

8,938

7741

The return shows that during the year the amount of Opium skin reported was as follows:-

1906.

1907.

Increase. Decrease.

Imported,

Pels. Cat. Tls. Pels. Cat. Tls.| Pels. Cat. Tls.

318. $2. 0. j 433. 6. 2. 81. 24. 2.

Exported,

340.

85.

434. 44. 5. 93. 59.

4.

Eighteen thousand and thirty-four (18,034) Permits were issued from this Office during the year being an increase of 554 as compared with 1906.

X

104

A daily memo. of exports to Chinese Ports was, during the year, supplied to the Commissioner of Imperial Maritimes Customs and a daily memo. of exports to Macao was supplied to the Superintendent of Raw Opium Department of Macao.

Surprise visits were paid to 94 godowns during the year.

The return shows that during the year the amount of Morphia and Compound of Opium reported was as follows:-

COMPOUND OF OPIUM.

1906.

1907.

Increase. Decrease.

Taels.

Taels.

Tuels.

Imported,

129,682.9.0 |184,602.8.2 54,919.9.2

Exported,

77,082.0.0 113,450.5.0 36,368.5.0

Local Comsumption,

52,600.9.0 67,759.3.2 15,158.4.2

MORPHIA.

1906. *

1907.

Increase.

Decrease.

Cases.

lbs. Cases: lbs.

Imported,

444

415 9,694.10

Cases.

Exported,

359

398 9,469.0 17

:

Cases. lbs.

29

Return of Sugar imported into the Colony of Hongkong, by vessels of different nationalities during the year 1907.

Tons. Cret. Qr.

lbs.

American Steamers..

2,177

2

9

Austrian

415

3

2

7

British

161,788

8

2

Dutch

""

43,601

12

1

French

2,860

19

2

26

German

55,721

11

1

6

Japanese

2,907

5

1

6

>>

Norwegian

16,278

5

2

11

Portuguese

11

18

9

Swedish

5,897

15

13

"}

By Junks.

867

8

Total,

292,527

8

1

9 months only.

?

105

Return of Sugar imported into the Colony of Hongkong during the year 1907.

From

Tons.

Cret.

Qr.

lbs.

Austria

223

18

2

1

China

7,089

12

1

Cochin China

5,808

5

15

Germany

584

4

:|

16

Java

215,486

4

London

20

11

2

18

Mauritius

2,721

18

1

25

New Territories

73

3

2

14

Philippine Islands

58,978

18

19

Straits Settlements..

1,540

12

نا

Total,

292.527

1

7

Two hundred and forty (240) Certificates of Origin for Exportation of Sugar were issued from this Office during the year 1907.

Thirty (30) Permits for Delivery of Sugar arrived at the Colony without Certificate of Origin were issued from this Office during the year 1907.

IMPORTS.

The return shows that during the year the amount of Sugar reported was as follows :—

1906.

Tons. Cut. Qr. lbs. Imported... 483,119 13

19

1907.

Tous. Cwt. Qr. Ths. 292,527 8 1 7

Decrease.

Tons. Cut. Qr. lbs. 190,592 5 0 12

IMPORTS AND EXPORTS OF OPIUM.

IMPORTS.

MALWA.

PATNA.

BENARES. PERSIAN.

TURKISH.

chests.

chests.

chests.

chests.

chests.

CHINESE. chests.

TOTAL.

chests.

1906,

4,9751

24,963

13,115

2,646

987

880

47,5663

1907,

5,119

23,220

10,232

2,217

50

40,842

Increase....

144

144

Decrease, .

1,743

2,883

429

983

830

6,868

EXPORTS.

MALWA.

chests.

PATNA.

chests.

chests.

BENARES. PERSIAN.

chests.

1906, 1907,

5,861

25,177

13,192

1,706

TURKISH.

chests.

985

CHINESE. chests.

TOTAL.

chests.

654

47,575

5,700

22,404

10,621

3,846

25

106

42,702

Increase,.........

2,140

2,140

Decrease, . 1611

2,773

2,571

-

960

548

7.013

Through Cargo reported in Manifests but not landed 1906,.

§

9.7123 chests.

8.938

*

Decrease,

7743 chests.

NUMBER OF PERMITS, &c., ISSUED.

1906.

1907.

Increase.

Decrease.

Landing Permits, ...(Opium),..

365

377

12

...

Removal Permits,.......(

""

8,244

8,542

298

Export Permits, ....(

8,611

8,784

173

Landing Permits,...(Opium Skin)

109

153

14

Removal Permits,.......(

10

11

}

Export Permits, ...(

).....

141

167

26

Memo. of Exports to the Commissioner of Chinese Customs,... Memo. of Exports to the Superintendent of Raw Opium

541

581

40

Department, Macao,.

293

2x9

106

SUMMARY OF EXPORTS, 1907.

Malwa. Patna. Benares. Persian. Turkish. Chinese. chests. chests. chests. chests. chests. chests.

Total. chests.

Total

in Piculs.

By Steamers to

Amoy,

15

225

2,467

5193

Bushire,..

16

3,226 16

3,777.88.8

16.40.0

Canton,

831

6,714

1,132

28

56

8,761

10,330.90.0

7

Changsha ria Shanghai,

1

28

2

31

Chefoo.

کی۔

1

2

37.00.0

2.40.0

Foochow,

1,0223

662

349

8373

2,872

3,095.13.7

Hankow via Shanghai,

5

2

7

8.40.0

Hohow,

206

35

241

289.20.0

Hoihow,

869

69

938

1,125.60.0

Kwong Chau Wan,

158

20

50

228

263.60.0

Kuchinatzu,

1

1

1.20.0

London,

778

17

795

814.45.0

Macao,

3,462

3,463

4.155.60.0

Macassar,

1.20.0

Matupi,

1.20.0

Merida,

1.02.5

Namtao,

43

47

56.40.0-

Nanking via Shanghai,

100

141

161.00.0

Newchwang,

1

1.20.0

New York,

7

7.35.0

:

Pakhoi,

182

38

220

264.00.0

Paname,

8

8

9.60.0

Philippine Islands,

307

428

149

Shanghai,

1,563

6,869

3,959

884 12,391

Sunyrua,

10

Straits Settlements,

120

5

120

1,034.72.5 14,556.60.0 5.00.0

123.00.0

Swatow,

1,762

1.339

718

11

3,825!

4,236.17.5

Tamatave,

1

1

1.20.0

Tausu,

223

1,348

1,209

2,780

3,124.42.5

Tientsin,

2

2

2.00.0

Vancouver,

101

101

121.20.0

Victoria, B. C................

491

Weihaiwei,

2

3333

2

32

493

591.60.0

34

40.80.0

Wuchow,

6

7

8.40.0

By

Steam-launches and

Junks to various ad-

464 .399

15

:

878

960.80.0-

jacent Ports in China,

Total,

5,700 22,404

10,620 3,675

25

106

42,530

49.226.67.5

The information in Column 8 above is on the following assumption :---

Patna and Benares, per chest,

Malwa, Turkish and Chinese, per chest,. Persian, per chest,....

1.20.0 piculs, 1.00.0 1.02.5

.་

24

OPIUM IMPORTED.

MALWA.

PATNA.

BENARES.

YEAR.

Chests.

Chests.

Chests.

1889.

26,445

25,612

14,074

PERSIAN. Chests. 5,205

TURKISH. CHINESE. Chests. Chests.

TOTAL

Chests.

176

71,513

1889..

17,460

27,211

16,865

5,7981

96

67,4303

1890..

13,684

25,233

16,384

7,1021

613

62,4611

1891.

12,420

24,520

15,435

5,925

119

58,4193

1892.

13,118

23,041

13,431

7,171

103

56,8643

1893.

9,803

17,933

6,674

4,684

2

39,098

1894.

10,910

18,314

7,252

5,092

10

41,578

1895.

10,494,

15,892

6,491

3,717

15

36,6091

1896.

7,576

17,883

5,008

3,687

54

34,208

1897

6,167

18,517

7,555

5,134

8

327

37,708

1898.

7,483

19,63 i

7,819

4,894

31

34

39,3924

1899.

9,028

17,866

8,739

5,966

51

39

41,690

1900..

10,218

19,351

8,045

5.184

418

40

43,256

1901

6,666

21,140

9,254

5,252

2

42,3145

1902..

7,7813

23,207

8,723

4,062

8

43,7815

1903

8,679

22,253

8,468

6,521

19

94

46,0345

1904.

8,051

22,761

9,894

5,070

34

126

45,936!

1905

6,763

23,779

10,218

2,922

35

211

43,928

1906.

4,975

24,963

13,115

2,646

987

880

47,566

1907..

5,119

23,220

10,232

2,217

4

50

40,842

107

OPIUM EXPORTED.

MALWA.

Philip

Year.

China, Formosa. Straits. pines

N. & C.

Total America. Canada. Egypt. London. Other Ports. Chests-

1888

27,090

2

27,092

1889.

16,702

1

16,703

1890.

13,404

3

13,409

1891.

11,826

11,830

1892

11,936

1893

10,692

1894.

10.132

53

10

1895...

10,337

1

2

1896.

7.464

12

1000 1000 i

3

11,948

4

10,696

2

10,197

10,348

7,476

1897

5,956

6

1

I

5,964

1898...

6,896

6,896

1899..

8,999

17

9,017

1900.

9,391

1

9,392

1901..

7,424

2

7,427

1902.

7,812

1

7,314

1903.

7,999

1

8,004

1904.

8,253

15

12

1

8,281

1905.

5,878

6

2

2

5,888

1906..

5,853

1

1

1

5,859

1907...

5,700

5,700

PATNA.

Philip- N. & C.

Total

Year.

China. Formosi. Straits. pines.

America. Canada. Egypt. London. Other Ports. Chests.

1888.

23,951

17

465

437

24,878

1889..

23,040

40

379

443

23,902

1890.

22,775

250

260

908

24,193

1891

23,075

315

203

844

24,440

1892.

18.410

410

174

954

19,948

1893.

16,675

429

301

787

4

18,196

1894.

16,758

16

41

330

R

5

167

3

17,320

1895.

15,033

245

307

20

13,608

1896.

15,783

265

334

16,387

1897

16,721

6

360

6

410

6

17,509

1898

17,297

1

444

37

457

18,236

1899.

17.285

432

32

61

2

17,812

1900.

15,892

100

618

17

2

1

16,630

1901

18,328

150

160

1,073

22

19,733

1902..

21,482

300

163

323

22,274

1903.

21,843

309

34

507

80

22,787

1904.

20,152

120

520

4

105

2

20,903

1905.

22,193

602

13

93

5

22,906

1906.

24,569

312

278

10

25,177

1907

21,271

223

307

9

592

2

22,404

J

BENARES.

Philip- N. & C.

Totul

Year.

China, Formosa.

Straits.

pines. America. Canada. Egypt. London. Other Ports. Chests,

1888.....

13,390

658

86

35

14,176

1889.

14,625

330

37

29

874

16,095

1890.

14,011

560

109

38

46

14,764

1891.

15,112

399

24

109

10

13,654

1892..

12,309

157

332

79

1

4

12,882

1893.

7,418

124

256

92

4

7,894

1894.

6,569

179

26

70

13

6,857

1895.

6,209

96

214

139

6,658

1996.

5,185

34

30

129

5,378

1897.

6,747

302

157

10

7,216

1898...

7,316

387

17

7,721

1899..

8,263

330

4

8.597

1900...

7,104

300

543

1

7,948

1901.

7.297

360

42

1,099

6

8.804

1902.

7,606

500

10

565

8,671

1903.

7.394

566

3

753

8,717

1904.

7,775

1,120

9

578

9,482

1905.

8,396

880

22

615

4

9,917

1906.

10,667

2,000

84

432

18,191

1907.

8,840 1,348

428

10,620

108

PERSIAN.

Philip-

N. & C.

Total

Year.

China. Formosa. Straits. pines. America. Canada. Egypt. London. Other Ports. Chests.

1888.

1889.

1,389 3,414 1,463 3,429

87

2

4,892

64

14

6

5

4,982

1890.

1,102

4,328

31

2

73

18

5,554

1891.

1,282

4,637

9

10

41

5,979

1892.

3,161

4,296

210

67

7,737

1893.

2,555

3,795

286

18

6,661

1894.

1,057

3,321

156

22

4,556

1895.

967

2,556

69

15

3,607

1896.

2,811

991

187

97

5

4,091

1897.

2,584 2,035

114

3

32

22

4,790

1898.

1,805 2,771

262

17

9

11

4,905

1899..

900

3,502

572

17

43

5,034

1900..

521

2,729

1,123

26

92

4,497

1901...

466

2,160

1,237

I

7

11

90

135

4,107

1902.

2,376

1,348

999

90

9

2

264

1

5,089

1903..

3.774

762

2,104

265

15

1

7

6,928

1904...

2,974

1,500

333

333

8

1

5,151

1905..

1,543

1,060

234

206

11

35

52

3,141

1906..

881

485

19

47

121

42

15

1,612

1907..

1,396

1,209

120

149

778

16

3,675

TURKISH.

Year.

Philip N. & C.

Total

China. Formosa. Straits. pines. America. Canada. Egypt. London. Other Ports. Chests.

1888.

92

9

103

1889..

126

2

128

1890..

105

105

1891.

97

97

1892.

111

111

1893...

25

2

46

73

1894.

5

44

49

1895....

20

20

1896..

22

32

54

1897.

1898.

10

1899.

1900....

17

1901.

1902.

1903..

10

1904...

NOOD NO7

2

2

2

15

7

3

37

6

20

27

120

18

6

94

255

I

5

178

189

2

2

1

9

20

a

1

8

· 1905.

10

2

2

29

1

47

1906.... 1907....

1

960

14

10

985

3

17

5

25

CHINESE.

Philip

N. & C.

Total

Year.

China. Formosa. Straits.

pines. America. Canada. Egypt. Londom. Other Ports. Chests.

1888.

1889..

1890.

1891

1892.

· 1893..

I

1

1894.

1895..

1896.

1897

327

1898.

1899..

34 37

327

34

37

1900..

1901

1902.

1903..

94

94

1904.

34

34

1905..

169

169

1906.

31

621

1

654

1907...

106

106

109

Appendix C.

MARINE SURVEYOR'S OFFICE.

3. During the year, the total number of vessels surveyed for Passenger Certificate and Bottom Inspection were 192 of 431,705 gross register tons, a decrease of 5 vessels and 7,533 tons, as compared with the previous year.

The nationalities and tonnage of these vessels were as follows :-

British German

127 vessels of 319,571 tons.

French

Norwegian

49

"

of 85,886

5

of

6,922

:)

7

of 11,245

"

>>

4

of

11

8,081

12

Chinese

Emigration surveys were held on 115 vessels, 45 of which were British and 70 Foreign. The number of boilers built under inspection were 16, an increase of 2 as compared with last year.

RETURN OF WORK performed by the GOVERNMENT MARINE SURVEYOR'S DEPARTMENT.

Years.

Passenger

Certificate and

Inspection of

Bottom.

Emigration.

Tonnage for Registration.

British Tonnage

Foreign Vessels.

Certificate for

Inspection of Crew Space, Lights and

Markings.

Minor Inspec- tions.

Survey of Licen-

sed Passenger Steam-launches.

Survey of Boilers under Construction.

Inspection of Government

Launches.

Examination of Engineers.

Examination of

Chinese Engin- eers for Steam- launches.

connection with fore-j

Estimated Total

Number of Visits in

going Inspections.

1898,

161

83

10

1899, 144

10

1900,

151

83

1901, 157

92

1902, 175

93

1903, 190

111

1904,

196

125

35

1905, 188

93

1906,

197

81

1907,

192

115

36

IO NOONN-20

como ∞ 1 2 10 HO-

121

134

187

282

61

26

72

48

1,729

62

27

57

78

1,602

73

47

99

124

1,834

217

36

102

88

118

2,031

210

25

126

109

76

1,768

184

30

126

85

72

2,107

203

45

126

82

104

2,140

193

23

172

77

81

1,989

190

14

145

80

84

2.063

227

16

81

99

81

1,764

Appendix D.

GUNPOWDER DEPOT.

4. During the year 1907, there has been stored in the Government Gunpowder Depôt, Green Island :--

No.

Approxi-

mate

of Cases. Weight.

lbs.

Gunpowder, privately owned,

Do. Government owned,

Cartridges, privately owned,

Do. Government owned,

5,208 102

121,495

9,470

1,855

321,300

200

18,300

Explosive Compounds, privately owned,....

866

55,153

Do.

Government owned,

76

1,996

Non-explosives, privately owned,

23

2,225

Do.

Government owned,

239

23,850

Total,

8,569

553,789

1

}

110

During the same period there has been delivered out of the Depôt

:

Approxi-

No. of Cases. Weight.

mate

Ibs.

For Sale in the Colony :

Gunpowder, privately owned,

Cartridges, privately owned,

985

20,725

149

40,625

Explosive Compounds, privately owned,

100

8,825

Non-explosives, privately owned,

:

For Export:-

Gunpowder, privately owned, .....

2,492

61,675

Cartridges, privately owned,.

359

43,875

Explosive Compounds, privately owned,

413

21,350

Non-explosives, privately owned,

18

1,875

Total,

4,516

198.950

On the 31st December, 1907, there remained as follows:--

No.

Approxi-

mate

of Cases. Weight.

lbs.

Gunpowder, privately owned,

Do. Government owned,.

Cartridges, privately owned,.....

Do. Government owned,

Explosive Compounds, privately owned,..

Do.,

Non-explosives, privately owned,

1,731

39,095

31

3,002.

1,347

236,800

17

1,700

353

24,978

Government owned,

34

1.614

5

350

Do.,

Government owned,

10

Total,

3,519

307,549

Appendix E.

5. The amount of Light Dues collected was as follows :-

Class of Vessels.

Rate. No. of perton. Ships.

Tonnage.

Total Fees collected.

Ocean Vessels.

Steam-launches,

1

River Steamers, (Night Boats), River Launches, (Night Boats), River Steamers, (Day Boats).. River Launches, (Day Boats),

Free.

1 cent 4,255 7,495,290 524 20,577 2,378 1,564,686 73 4.234 1.689 1,124,199

"'.

$ 74.952.90

205.77 5.216.18

14.15

Free.

191

10,124

Total.

9,110 10,219,110 | 80,389,00

CAPE COLLINSON.

The New Occulting Light at this Station was inaugurated on the 1st October, it is working satisfactorily and is found to be a great improvement.

GAP ROCK.

Owing to telegraphic communication being interrupted, no vessels were reported during the year as passing Gap Rock.

111

The Typhoon of the 13th September did serious damage to the Lantern, Glazing, Lenses, Derrick, etc., and owing to the above circumstances, the Lamp could not be lit until the night of the 15th September.

The Fog Signal Gun was fired three times and Blue Lights burnt on the night of the 14th September to warn a steamer approaching the Rock.

The New Fog Signal Apparatus was fixed in position in September.

Vessels signalled passing the Station: 1,122.

One hundred and thirty-five hours and ten minutes Fog were reported from this Station during the year and the Fog Signal Guns were fired 838 times.

On three occasions the fortnightly relief could not be carried out owing to the rough sea and bad weather prevailing.

WAGLAN ISLAND.

During the year, one thousand seven hundred and seventy (1,770) vessels were reported as passing this Station. Five hundred and thirty (530) messages were received and one thousand one hundred and sixty (1,160) sent, also 236 vessels were not reported owing to telegraphic interruption, embodying forty-four days.

There were two hundred and five hours Fog reported from this Station during the year and the Fog Signal Gun was fired 2,128 times.

The above messages sent include weather observations to the Observatory.

On no occasion was the relief delayed during the year.

HONGKONG.

JURORS LIST FOR 1908.

No. 1908

5

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of

His Excellency the Governor,

HONGKONG

TO WIT.

NAME IN FULL.

I. SPECIAL JURORS.

OCCUPATION.

A BODE.

Anton, Charles Edward..

Arculli, Abdoolla Fuckecra

Arima, Tadaichi.......... Armstrong, John

Babington, Anthony Barrett, Edgar George Barton, John Beattie, Andrew.

Becker, Arthur Wilhelm

Arthur.......

Bérindoagne, Louis Bird, Herbert William Bolles, John Walker Bonnar, John Whyte Cooper. Bryer, Alfred

Carter, William Leonard Chan A Fook.

Chau Siu Ki

Clark, Duncan

Cousland, Alexander Stark

Dalglish

Craddock, Douglas William

Cruickshank, William Arthur

Carruthers

Cumming, Alexander..

Merchant, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Army & Navy Contractor, Manager, Osaka Shosen Kaisha, Bank Manager,.

Merchant, Shewan, Tomes & Co., Sub-Mgr., Dodwell & Co., Ld., Assistant, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Manager, W. R. Loxley & Co.,

Merchant, Sander, Wieler & Co., Manager, Banque de l'Indo-Chine,.. Architect, Palmer & Turner, General Manager, Standard Oil Co., Assistant, Gibb, Livingston & Co.,....... Architect, Leigh & Orange,.... Manager, China & Japan Telephone Co., Director, Watkins, Ltd.,

Secty,, Chun On Fire Insur. Co., Ld., Storekeeper, Lane, Crawford & Co., ....

Manager, Ross & Co.,

General Traffic Agent, Canadian Pacific

Railway Co.,

Merchant, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Merchant, Butterfield & Swire,

Red Hill, Peak.

20 Yee Wo Street.

On premises.

Charter House, Queen's Gardens. 63 Robinson Road.

3 Park View, Lyttleton Road. Red Hill, Peak.

Stoke's Bungalow West, Peak.

The Peak.

Chater Road.

No. 6 The Peak. Hongkong Club. St. George's Building. Tanderagee, 119в Peak. Hongkong Hotel. Queen's Road.

2 & 8 Queen's Road West. On premises.

Dunedin, Barker Road, Peak.

10 Stewart Terrace, Peak.

East Point.

1 Connaught Road.

!

NAME IN FULL.

42

SPECIAL JURORS,-Continued.

OCCUPATION.

ABODE.

Daun, George Harry David, Abraham Jacob

Davis, William Herbert Tren-

chard

Denison, Albert Douglas, James Tory Dowley, Walter Arthur. Ede, Charles Montague Ehmer, Hermann

Forbes, Andrew

Fung Wa Chün

Gibbs, Lawrence Göetz, Ernst

Gok, Carl Gottfried Gordon, Alexander Grant.......... Gourdin, Allston O'Driscoll... Grace, Charles Henry Graham, Walter Douglas Gubbay, Charles Sassoon Hancock, Sidney Haskell, David

Hinds, Edward Harvey. Ho Fook

Hooper, Augustus Shelton.

Họ Tung...

Hough, Thomas Frederick.......

Howard, Albert

Hughes, Edward Jones.

Humphreys, Henry Jessen, Johann Heinrich Jupp, John Ambrose........

Lafrentz, Charles Julius Lammert, George Philip Lan Chu Pak Lauts, Johann Theodor Law, Donaldson Riddell, Layton, Bendyshe,... Leiria, João Joaquim... Lenzmann, Carl Robert. Lowe, Arthur Rylands Mackay, Edward Fairbairn Mackenzie, Alexander Maitland, Francis Marten, Richard..........

May, Charles William Medhurst, George Harold

Melchers, Friedrich Wilhelm. Michael, Joseph Rahamin.. Mitchell, Robert.............

Moxon, Geoffrey Charles Northcote, Mowbray Stafford.

Orange, James

Ormiston, Evan Ongh, Arthur Henry

Pemberton, George William

Cyril

Peter, John Charles Pinckney, Herbert..... Ram, Edward Albert.. Raymond, Abraham Jacob Reunie, Alfred Herbert. Rodger, Alexander Rose, Thomas Isaac,

Ross, Charles Henderson Rumjan, Ahmet

Sassoon, Moses Silas.. Scott, John Gray Scott, William Murray

Merchant, H. Wicking & Co....... Merchant, S. J. David & Co., .

Manager, Commercial Union Assurance

Co., Ld.,

Civil Engineer, Denison, Ram & Gibbs,... Marine Surveyor, Goddard & Douglas,... General Manager, Vacuum Oil Co., Underwriter,

Merchant, Grossmann & Co., Merchant, Bradley & Co., Compradore, Shewan, Tomes & Co., Architect, Denison, Ram & Gibbs, Merchant, Arnhold, Karberg & Co., Manager, Hamburg Amerika Linie, Engineer, A. G. Gordon & Co., Assistant Secretary, Hongkong Club, Secretary, Hongkong Club,..... Manager, Wilkinson, Heywood&Clark, Ld., Merchant, E. D. Sassoon & Co.,..... Exchange Broker,... Merchant,

Agent, Glen Line of Steamers, Compradore, Jardine, Matheson & Co.,... Secretary, Hongkong Land Investment &

Agency Co., Ld., Merchant,

Broker, & Govt. Auctioneer, Hughes &

Hough,

Merchant, D. Sassoon & Co., Ld., Broker, & Govt. Auctioneer, Hughes &

Hough,

Merchant, J. D. Humphreys & Son, Merchant, Jebsen & Co.,

General Manager & Agent, Accountant,

J. D. Humphreys & Son,

Merchant, Auctioneer,

Assistant, A. S. Watson & Co., Merchant, Lauts, Wegener & Co., Merchant, Butterfield & Swire, Exchange Broker;

Merchant, J. J. dos Remedios & Co., Merchant, Carlowitz & Co.,.............. Chartered Accountant,. Merchant, Butterfield & Swire, Merchant, Arthur & Co.,

Merchant, Linstead & Davis,

Merchant, Rädecker & Co., Chief-Acct., HK. & S'hai Bank, Manager, Dodwell & Co., Ld., Merchant, Wendt & Co., Broker,

Naval Architect, Dock Co.,.............. Banker,

Secretary, Hongkong Land Reclamation

Co., Ld.,

Civil Engineer, Leigh & Orange,

Banker,

Civil Engineer, Leigh & Orange,

Assistant, China Fire Insurance Co., Ld., Sub-Manager, HK. & S'hai Bank,.. Exchange Broker,

Architect,. Denison, Ram & Gibbs, Merchant, E. D. Sassoon & Co.,........... Merchant, A. H. Rennie & Co., Sugar Refiner, China Sugar Refinery, Secretary, Dock Co.,.....

Merchant, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Merchant, Rumjahn & Co., Exchange Broker,

Manager, Tramway Co.,

Sugar Refiner, Taikoo Sugar Refinery,

:

104 Peak.

2 & 3 Gough Hill.

Wolverton, Peak. Craigieburn Hotel.

Tantallon, Barker Road, Peak. Hongkong Hotel. King Edward Hotel.

Glenshiel Bungalow, Peak Road. Eilandonan, Peak. On premises.

107 Peak.

Luginsland, Peak Road, Ian Mor, Peak Road. Tor Crest, Peak. 61 Robinson Road. Hongkong Club. Alexandra Building. 9 Macdonnell Road.

10 Queen's Gardens, Peak Road. Des Voeux Road Central. Dunnottar, Peak, Caine Road.

Rougemont, 1 Macdonnell Road. Caine Road.

8 Des Voeux Road. David Sassoon & Co., Ld.

Meirion, Peak. Abertholwyn, Peak Road. King's Building.

Ian Mor, Peak Road. 6 Peak Road. Elliott Crescent. Queen's Road Central. 21 Conduit Road.

I Connaught Road.

1 Prince's Building, Des Voeux Road.

Duart, 15 Arbuthnot Road.

2 Connaught Road.

St. George's Building, Chater Road.

1. Connaught Road.

Dunedin, Barker Road.

Nettlewood, 55 Robinson Road.

Peak Hotel.

On premises.

Hazledine, Robinson Road.

Strathallan, Robinson Road.

4 Century Crescent, Kennedy Road. Peak Hotel.

Hongkong.

5 Macdonnell Road.

Red Hill East, Peak.

6 Queen's Gardens, Peak Road. Prince's Building.

57 The Peak.

St. John's Place.

6 Stewart Terrace, Peak. Lycemun, Barker Road, Peak. Devonia, 11 Peak Road. The Firs, Bowen Road. East Point.

Goolistan, Conduit Road. East Point.

64 Queen's Road Central. 4 Des Voeux Road. Clovelly, Peak Road. Quarry Bay.

NAME IN FULL,

43

SPECIAL JURORS,—Continued.

OCCUPATION.

ABODE.

Shellim, Edward Shewan, Robert Silverstone, Sholom Skelton, Alfred Holland Slade, Henry Warre Smith, Alexander Findlay Stewart, Murray.. Tam Tsz Kong,

Tomkins, Herbert Edmund Tomlin, George Lomer Turner, Arthur

Walker, William Bradley Watson, William Malcolm.... Wendt, Friedrich August White, Henry Percy Whittall, James Bowyer Kid-

man

Wickham, William Henry Wilford, Francis Cumming Williams, Arthur John Wilson, William...........

Merchant, D. Sassoon & Co., Ld., Merchant, Shewan, Tomes & Co., Agent, P. M. S. S. Co.,.... Storekeeper, Lane, Crawford & Co., Merchant, Gilman & Co., Merchant,

Exchange Broker,

General Manager, Hip On Insurance

Exchange and Loan Co., Ld., Merchant, Reiss & Co., Secretary, China Fire Insurance Co.,. Architect, &c., Palmer & Turner, Asst. Gen. Manager, Standard Oil Co., Merchant, John D. Hutchison & Co., Merchant, Wendt & Co., Merchant, Douglas, Lapraik & Co.,

Secretary, China Traders' Ins. Co., Manager, Electric Light Co., Storekeeper, Lane, Crawford & Co., Engineer, Punchard, Lowther & Co., Acting Chief Manager, Dock Co.,

Kurrahjeen, 7 Peak Road. St. George's Building. King Edward Hotel. Craigends, Barker Road, Peak. Taiping, Mount Gough, Peak. Peak Hotel.

113, Plantation Road, Peak.

6, 7 & 8 Wa In Fong East. Queen's Building.

Earnsfoot, 30 Robinson Road. Eggesford, Penk.

21 Robinson Road.

Abergeldie, Plantation Road, Peak. 2 Hillside, Peak. 32 Robinson Road.

Red Hill, Peak. 23 Conduit Road. On premises. Hongkong Club. Kowloon Docks.

NAME IN FULL.

IL-COMMON JURORS.

OCCUPATION.

ABODE.

A

Aagaard, Bjarne...

Abraham, Albert

Abraham, Ezekiel Stooker

Abraham, Ezra

Abraham, Reuben Abraham, Saul D.

Adams, Francis Robert John Aftalian, Aaron Lemtoff, Ahmed, Aboo........

Ahrendt, Carl Max Heinrich.. Aitken, Robert

Allen, Frank Stanley Allen, William Stanley Alvares, Luiz Maria Jacques Alves, Antonio Luiz Alves, José Miguel Andel, Alexander Willem van Anderson, William................... Anderson, William Marshall... Andrew, John Ingram Angelbeck, Ernst

Apear, Arratoon Vertannes Arculli, Adul Kader el Arculli, Osman el Armstrong, John Henry

William

Arnold, Charles Edward Arnold, John

Arnott, Thomas

Asger, Asadullah Ebrahim

Asger, Mehdi Ebrahim Aucott, Ernest Frank Audap, Roger...... Auld, James Durran Austin, Authony Roy Austin, Frank....

Steamship Agent, Aagaard Thoreson & Co., 1 Austin Avenue, Kowloon.

Clerk, Gas Co.,

Clerk, S. J. David & Co.,

Clerk, Chartered Bank of I. A. & C., Clerk, Chartered Bank of 1. A. & C., Foreman, Hongkong Electric Co., Ld., Civil Engineer, Quarry Bay Shipyard, Assistant, Levy Hermanos,

Assistant, HK. Milling Co., Ld.,.................... Assistant, Melchers & Co., Engineer, Taikoo Sugar Refinery,

26 Staunton Street. Hotel Mansions. 3 Ripon Terrace.

3 Ripon Terrace. 12 Elgin Street. Craigieburn, Peak. Hongkong Hotel.

1 Lower Ladder Street Terrace. On premises. Quarry Bay.

Sub-Acet., Chartered Bank of I. A. & C., On premises.

Manager, Sperry Flour Company, Merchant, L. M. Alvares & Co.,..... Clerk, Chartered Bank of I. A. & C., Merchant, L. M. Alvares & Co.,................. Assistant, Holland China Trading Co., Pianoforte Tuner, Lane, Crawford & Co., Banker, International Banking Corp., Engineer, Geo. Fenwick & Co., Assistant, Grossmann & Co., Merchant, A. V. Apear & Co., Merchant,

Army & Navy Contractor,

Assistant, Butterfield & Swire, Foreman,

6 Conduit Road.

Selbourne Villa East, 10 Kennedy Rd.

40 High Street.

24 Robinson Road.

On premises. On premises. On premises. 4 The Albany.

2 Conduit Road.

45 Wyndham Street.

20 Yee Wo Street.

20 Yee Wo Street.

1 Counaught Road.

16 Shaukiwan Road.

Acct., HK., C. & M. Steamboat Co., Ld.,....... 3 Albany, Peak Road. Engineer, G. I. Cement Co., Ld.,

Asst., HK. Land Investment & Agency

Co., Ltd.,

Assistant, Shewan, Tomes & Co., Assistant, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Chief Accountant, Banque de l'Indo-Chine, Assistant, Dodwell & Co., Ld., Assistant, Butterfield & Swire,

Assistant, Butterfield & Swire,

3 Canton Villas, Kowloon.

46 Elgin Street.

49 Wyndham Street. Glenshiel, Plantation Road, Peak. On premises.

Craigmin West, Magazine Gap. 1 Connaught Road.

1 Connaught Road.

1

1

NAME IN FULL.

44

OCCUPATION.

ABODE.

:

B

Bailey, William Seybourne

Bain, Alexander........

Barbey, Henri..................

Barnett, Thomas

Barretto, Alberto Demée. Barretto, Frederico Demée Barretto, Frederico Francisco. Barretto, Octavio Demée.. Bassford, William Faulkner ... Batalha, Joe Xavier

Baxter, Robert Hall Beattie, Matthew Poole Beck, George..... Benjamin, Joseph

Bent, Henry Aubrey Walsh Berblinger, Albrecht Berry, Francis James Beuzeville, James Bevan, Herbert Staton Bevington, Francis Bird, Cyril Frederick.. Bird, Lennox Godfrey Bisschop, Philip John Blackburn, Leslie James Blackledge, Harold Blake, Anthony Robert. Blake, John

Blason, Chas. Henry

Bliefernicht, Heinrich

Block, Kurt Diedrich Carl Blood, Guy... Boetje, Johan

Bolden, Samuel George Boolsen, George....

Borner, Hermann Frederich

Georg

Bosch, Hendrik Joan van den. Botelho, Augusto Cezar

Boyce, William Bensley

Boulton, Sydney

Boyes, John Ridley

Bramley, Harry

Brandes, Karl.

Brayfield, Thomas

Henry

Gordon

Brewer, Walter Fred..

Bridger, Herbert Ben

Bridger, Richard Leslie.. Brodersen, Harold Carl Heiu-

rich

Brooke, Charles Albert

Bannerman

Brooks, Robert George

Brown, Frederick Archibald...

Brown, Neilafe Sharp Brown, Theodore

Brown, William Samuel Brown, Wilson

Browne, Percy Edward. Bryson, Alexander.... Buchanan, John.. Buckle, Percy Bumann, Johannes..

Bune, Thos. Friedrich Andreas Bunje, Emil Theodour Burjor, Dhunjibboy Sorabjee

Dady Burn, Andrew

Bussierre, Jean Saint Clair

Renonard de Buyers, Charles Badenoch......

Engineer, Bailey & Co., Engineer, China Sugar Refinery,

Clerk, Overseer,

Clerk, Cruz, Basto & Co., Merchant, Barretto & Co., Assistant, Shewan, Tomes & Co., Assistant, Barretto & Co., Sugar Boiler, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Corresponding Clerk, Yokohama Specie

Bank,

Clerk, Dock Co.,

Merchant, W. R. Loxley & Co.,

Foreman Boilermaker,

Clerk, E. D. Sassoon & Co., Banker,

Merchant,

Brewery Manager,

Manager, Cottam & Co..

Assistant, Lane, Crawford & Co., Mercantile Assistant,

Assistant, Butterfield & Swire, Architect, &c., Palmer & Turner,

Genl. Agt., Java-China-Japan Lijn, Gas Engineer,

Storekeeper, Dock Co.,

20 Connaught Road.

East Point Refinery.

No. 13 Robinson Road, Kowloon, 8 Cross Street, Wanchai.

Larkspur, Robinson Road.

1 Castle Road.

18 Wyndham Street. 44 Caine Road. Quarry Bay.

17 Mosque Junction. Kowloon Docks. On premises. Kowloon Docks. 54 Peel Street.

8 Queen's Road.

Hongkong Hotel.

Connaught Hotel.

6 Humphreys' Avenue, Kowloon.

1 Leighton Hill Road.

Kingsclere.

1 Connaught Road.

2 Cameron Villas, Peak.

York Building,

Gas Works, Kowloon. Kowloon Docks.

Quarry Bay.

Engineer, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Engineer, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Chartered Accountant, Butterfield

Quarry Bay.

&

Swire,

Foreman Carpenter, Dock Co..

Assistant, Sander, Wieler & Co., Architect, &c., Palmer & Turner, Manager, Neth. India Commercial Bank, Assistant, Standard Oil Co., Assistant, Hamburg Amerika Linie,

Merchant, Meyer & Co.,

Sub-manager, Java-China-Japan Lijn, Assistant, Fumigating and Disinfecting

Bureau, Ltd.,

Assistant, Taikoo Sugar Refinery,

Assistant, Butterfield & Swire,

Assistant, HK. & S'hai Bank,

Chief Assistant, Thomas Cook & Son, Assistant, Grossmann & Co.,

Consulting Engineer, Bookseller...

Electrical Engineer,

Grocer, Lane Crawford & Co.,

Assistant, Meyer & Co.,

Assistant, Vacuum Oil Co., Clerk, Dock Co.,

Berthing-master, HK. & K. W. & Godown

Co., L

Assistant, Butterfield & Swire, Sugar Foreman,

1 Connaught Road. Kowloon Docks.

29 Conduit Road. On premises.

16 Des Voeux Road Central. Carlton House, Ice House Street. Victoria Lodge, Peak Road.

Derrington, Peak Road. 5 Stewart Terrace, Peak.

10 Belilios Terrace. Quarry Bay.

1 Commught Road. On premises.

King Edward Hotel. 9 Robinson Road.

Hongkong Hotel. Braeside.

13 Caine Road.

On premises.

Okements, 25 Conduit Road.

Hotel Mansions.

Aberdeen Docks.

5 Victoria View, Kowloon.

1 Connaught Road.

142 Praya East.

Clerk, HK. & K. W. & Godown Co., Ld., 3 Stewart Terrace, Peak.

Foreman Joiner,

Assistant, Lane, Crawford & Co., Assistant, Bradley & Co.,

Foreman Mason, B. & S.'s Shipyard, Assistant, P. & O. Co., Merchant, Ship Broker,

Manager, Asiatic Petroleum Co.,....

Merchant and Commission Agent, Assistant, Taikoo Sugar Refinery,

Assistant, Messagaries Maritimes, Supt. Engineer, Tramway Co.,

4 Kowloon Docks,

On premises.

6 Park View, West Point.

3 Stanley Terrace, Quarry Bay. Craig Ryrie, Peak.

7 Caine Road.

3 Conduit Road. Shaukiwan Road.

28 Des Voeux Road. 3 Quarry Point.

Carlton House. Peak.

.

·

NAME IN FULL.

45

OCCUPATION.

ABODE.

C

Caine, Charles Henry Caldwell, George Arthur ...... Callaço, Vicente Alexandre de

Paulo

Campbell, Francis Campbell, Hugh Frank.. Campbell, John Sidney

Denison

Campbell, La Clair Fusilier Carmichael, Hugh Cameron ... Carroll, Francis George..... Carroll, William Joseph

Clerk.

Chief Clerk, Dock Co.,.......

Bank Assistant,.......

Crane Driver, Butterfield & Swire, Assistant, Shewan, Tomes & Co.,

Accountant,

Assistant, Shewan, Tomes & Co., Consulting Engineer, Banker's Clerk,

Assistant, Shewan, Tomes & Co.,

Carvalho, Charles Francisco de Assistant, HK. S'hai Bank................

Castro, Bonifacio Maria Castro, Joaquim Telles

d'Almada e

Catchick, Gregorius George.... Chalmers, James Hynd Chapman, Edward John Chapple, Frederick Thomas Chard, Henry Frank Chater, Chater Paul Chinchen, Sydney John... Choy Sek Chuen Christiani, George Max

Albrecht Theodor Chunnutt, Frederick George..... Chunnutt, Oscar Rowan Clark, Ernest Sidney..

Clark, Jasper....

Clark, Milton Ona..

Clarke, Wm. Edward

Clarke, Wm. Gray,

Claxton, Archibald Arthur

Clelland, Joseph..... Cobden, Alfred Sydney Cobley, Augustus Otto

Fresenius Cochrane, John

Colahan, Henry James Collett, Charles

Collins. James

Comar, Alexander Condon, Harry Lestro Cooke, Charles John

Cooper, Albert George Warner

Inerd

Coppin, Alan Griffiths Cordeiro, Albano Autonio Corse, Grey Heury.

Coughtrie, Roger

Coulthart, John

Course, Arthur

Craddock, Henry Edwin

Craik, James

Crapnell, Albert Edward Crawford, Alexander............ Crawford, Frank Malcolm

Lane

Crawford, William Joseph Crispin, Charles Robert Crosbie, James

Cruickshank, Geo. Seymour....... Cruickshank, Jolin............... Curreem, Vahab........ Currie, Alexander Scott Curry, George Percy

:

Clerk,

Assistant. International Banking Corp., Clerk, E. D. Sassoon & Co., Assistant, Butterfield & Swire, Clerk, Linstead and Davis, Assistant, W. Powell, Ld., Assistant Manager, IK. Milling Co., Ld. Secretary, HK. Iron Mining Co., Ld Marine Insurance Assistant, Secretary, China Commercial S.S. Co.,

Exchange Broker..

Assistant, W. R. Loxley & Co., Assistant, W. R. Loxley & Co., Assistant, Lane, Crawford & Co., Assistant, Standard Oil Co.,

Assistant, Standard Oil Co.,

Secretary, HK., C. & M. Steamboat

Co., L

Engineer,

Assistant,

Shipwright, Dock Co.,.

37 Caine Road. Craigieburn, Peak,

1 Woodlands Terrace.

7 Stanley Terrace, Quarry Bay. Hongkong.

Arnhold, Karberg & Co. Hongkong.

China Sugar Refinery. Cloudlands, The Peak. 3 Pedder's Hill.

14 Arbuthnot Roul.

1 Barrow Terrace, Kowloon.

8 East Terrace, Kowloon.

6 Moreton Terrace.

1 Connaught Road.

C/o. Linstead & Davis. 28 Quecu's Road Central. Kingsclere, Kounedy Road. Conduit Road, Kingsclere,

7 Wing Lok Street.

Hongkong Club.

24 Bonham Road. 24 Bonham Road.

On premises. Peak Hotel.

21 Robinson Road.

Duraford, Peak.

Hongkong Club.

Beauregard, Bonham Read. Cosmopolitan Docks.

Chartered Accountant, Butterfield & Swire, 1 Connaught Road.

Civil Engineer,

Assistant, Butterfield & Swire,

Cashier, Russo-Chinese Bank,. Manager, Wallem & Co.,

Foreman Mechanic, Punchard, Lowther

& Co.,

Clerk,..

Stenographer and File Clerk, Draughtsman, Dock Co.,....

Civil Engineer, Butterfield & Swire, Assistant, Bradley & Co., Assistant, Shewan, Tomes & Co., Assistant, Pacific Mail S.S. Co.,... Assistant, Dodwell & Co., Ld., Assistant, Shewan, Tomes & Co., Traffic Supt., Electric Tramway, Sanitary Overseer, HK. & K. W. &

Godown Co.,

Assistant Steward, Hongkong Club, Book-keeper, Lane, Crawford & Co., Clerk,.

Clerk, Lane, Crawford & Co., Clerk,.......

Foreman Shipwright, Dock Co., Assistant, Taikco Sugar Refinery, Mechanical Engineer, Jeweller, Falconer & Co.,.......... Merchant,

Assistant,

Local Secretary, Gas Co.,.

Butterfield & Swire.

1 Connaught Road.

155 Rock View, Wanchai Road. Hongkong Club Aunexe.

Naval Yard Extension. 65 Des Voeux Road. 2 Kennedy Road. Barker Road, Peak.

On premises. On premises.

4 Rose Terrace, Robinson Road. King Edward Hotel.

Un premises.

Westley, 6 Babington Path. 12 Queen's Road Central.

33 Praya East. Hongkong Club. Royal Buildings.

2 Stanley Terrace, Quarry Bay.

On premises.

Kowloon Do ks.

Kowloon Docks.

Quarry Bay. Kingsclere. Hotel Baltimore.

22 Leighton Hill Road.

3 Sea View Terrace, Quarry Bay. On premises.

D

Daniel, Walter

Civil Engineer, Punchard, Lowther & Co., Chater's Bungalow, Kowloon.

Danielsen, Friederich Julius ... Assistant, Siemssen & Co., ..

Ou premises.

:

NAME IN FULL.

46

OCCUPATION.

ABODE.

D-Continued.

Danielsen, Julius Emil Dansfield, Albert Darton, Thomas Harwood David, Evelyn David, Ramésh

Davidson, Henry Bertram Davidson, Horace Davidson, Peter

Davies, Arthur Frederick Davison, William Day, Frank Oswald Desebrock, Hermann Dickie, James....... Dickie, John Dickson, David Dickson, Robert.. Diercks, Alfred Chihli Dinning, Hugh

Diss, Arthur Charles.. Diss, George Ambrose Dixon, Walter Edward Dizon, Arsenio

Dizon, Francisco Santos Dodd, John Valentine, Douglas, John Phillips Drew, Walter Clement Drude, Fritz Dumerin, Pierre

Duncan, George

Duncan, George Leopold Dunlop, Gustaaf Abram Dunne, Michael

Assistant, F. Blackhead & Co., Assistant, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Assistant, Butterfield & Swire, Assistant,

Assistant Manager, Kowloon Hotel, Shipping Clerk,

Assistant, Butterfield & Swire,

St. George's Building. Joss House, Quarry Bay. 1 Connaught Road, 104 Pesk.

On premises.

Y. M. C. A., Alex. Building. Quarry Bay.

Sub. Acct., National Bank of China, Ld., 6 Mountain View, Peak.

Manager, HK. Hotel,

Foreman Shipwright, Dock Co., Clerk, Butterfield & Swire, Assistant, Carlowitz & Co...... Assistant, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Sugar Boiler,................

Assistant, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Assistant, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Clerk, W. R. Loxley & Co., Assistant, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Master Tailor, Diss Bros., Master Tailor, Diss Bros., Engineer, Dock Co.,.... Assistant,

Commission Agent, Clerk,....

Engr., G. I. Cement Co., Ld., Merchant, H. Wicking & Co., Office Assistant,

Cashier, Banque de l'Indo-Chine, Foreman Plumber, Dock Co., Assistant, MacEwen, Friekel & Co., Accountaut, Neth.-India Com. Bank, Diver,...

Duurich, Arthur Ellis Willian | Clerk, Gas Co.,. Dutton, Sydney Hardy

Salesman,

On premises.

Kowloon Docks.

Tang Yuen, Macdonnell Road. 2 Connaught Road,

Taikoo Terrace, Quarry Bay. Bowrington Refinery.

Sea Fiew Terrace, Quarry Bay. Taikoo Terrace, Quarry Bay. Hotel Mansions.

2 Sea View Terrace, Quarry Bay. Oriental Hotel.

36 Caine Road.

Kowloon Docks.

5 Ashley Roul, Kowloon,

5 Ashley Road, Kowloou.

40 Elgin Street.

3 Austin Avenue, Kowloon.

St. George's Building.

4 Humphreys' Avenue, Kowloon. On premises.

Kowloon Docks.

3 Duddell Street.

16 Des Voeux Road Central.

Quarry Bay Shipyard.

5 Arsenal Street.

Westley, Babington Path.

E

East, Edward Charles Claytor Edger, John Andrew

Clerk, HK. & S'hai Bank, Clerk,

Edwards, George Richard.. Edwards, Gilbert Hamilton Eggert, Otto Karl Friederich, Eldridge, William James, Ellis, Albert

Ellis, Emmanuel Ezekie',

Ellis, Ezekiel Isaac

Ellis, Frederick

Ellis, Obadiah Isaac

Engel, Gustav Christoph Esrom, Frank.....

Eyre, larry

Ezekiel, Reuben Marcus Ezra, Edward.

Ezra, Reuben

Assistant, Dodwell & Co., Ial., Assistant, Butterfield & Swire, Assistant, Carlowitz & Co.,........ Storekeeper, ....

Assistant, Dodwell & Co., Ld., Assistant,

Clerk, E. D. Sassoon & Co., Broker,

Merchant,

Merchant, Wm. Meyerink & Co.,

On premises.

6 Hill-ide Terrace.

2 Victoria View, Kowloon.

5 Lreemoon Villas, Kowloon.

2 Connaught Road,

7 Stanley Terrace, Quarry Bay. Peak Hotel.

8 Pedder's Hill.

8 Pedder's Hill.

4 Queen's Road Central.

1 Pedder's Hill.

Ou premises.

Book-keeper, East Asiatic Trading Co.,... Connaught Hotel.

Manager, W. Powell, Ld., Broker,

Assistant, D. Sassoon & Co., Ld., Assistant, D. Sassoon & Co., Ld.,

Conuanght Hotel.

Connaught Hotel. 14 Robinson Road. College Chambers.

F

Fairnie, Robert Falconer, Percy James Farrell. Peter Thomson Farwell, Judge Lorraine Fenton, Sydney George... Ferguson, Robert Alexander... Ferry, Wallace Vincent... Figueiredo, Francisco Maria

Xavier de Finke, Hermann..... Fischer, Rudolf

Fisher, John

Fittock, Charles, Jr.

Fletcher, Harold Lewthwaite. Forbes, Jolin

Forbes, Joseph Malcolm

Banker, Chartered Bank of I. A. & C., ... On premises.

Assistant, Butterfield & Swire, Engineer,

Accountant,

Assistant, Butterfield & Swire, Assistant, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Clerk, Waverley Hotel,

Clerk, Vernon & Smyth,

Assistant, Jebsen & Co., Merchant,

Engineer, Dock Co.,

Foreman Shipwright, Dock Co., Consulting Engineer,

Sugar-boiler, China Sugar Refinery, Pianoforte Timer,

1 Connaught Road.

3 Taikoo Te race, Quarry Bay.

1 East Avenue, Kowloon.

I Connaught Road.

2 Taikoo Terrace, Quarry Bay. Carlton House.

9 Caine Road.

King's Building. 3 Duddell Street. Cosmopolitan Docks. Aberdeen Docks. Glenshiel, Barker Road. 159 Praya East. 161 Wanchai Road.

NAME IN FULL,

47

OCCUPATION.

ABODE.

F-Continued.

Ford, Edward Stephen Ford, William Falconer.. Forde, Frank Herbert Forrest, Thomas Shaw Forsyth, George Grauville

Sutherland

Franklin, George Gould Fraser, Alan Stuart Frerichs, Charles Edward Freund, Karl

G

Galloway, Alfred Douglas...... Galloway, Robert Dryden Gardner, William

Gaster, Ernest

Gätjens, Walther Emil Gee, Archibald Gegg, George William Georg, Friederich Erich Carl... Gibson, Ivie Sloan... Gibson, Joe Ernest Gibson, William Charles Ernest! Ginkel, Alexander van Gittius, Arthur Gittins, Henry

Glendinning, Walter Scott Glover, Campbell

Gloyn, John Wakeham Goggin, William George Gomes, Francis

Gomes, João Eduardo

Gordon, Alexander George

Grant,

Gorrell, Oscar..

Gow, David

Gow, John Cowper Graff, Reginald Charles.. Graham, Frank

Graham, James William Grant, John Kintrea,.. Gray, Thomas Charles Greenhill, Leslie Solbé Gregory, Alfred

Gregory, Tigran Matthews Grey, Cosby French Griffin, Albert Edwin Grimble, Charles Frederick

George Grimshaw, Thomas Groskamp, Willem Hendrik Gubbay, Aaron Sassoon Gubbay, David Sassoon..

Gubbay, Joseph Sassoon

Gubbay, Raphael Aaron

Guimarães, Marcellino da Silva Gutierrez, Augusto Aureliano. Gug, James

H

Haigh, Fred. Dunwell

Hall. Frederick Charles..

Hall, Jonathan

Hall, Thomas Philip Halton, Frederick Joseph Hamet, Abdool Hoosen.... Hance, Cyril Eugene Agathon Hancock, Herbert Richard

Budd

Hand, John...... Hansen, James Ernest Hansen, Theodor Friedrich

Clerk, HK. & K. W. & Godown Co.,.............. Harbour Foreman Engineer, Dock Co., Sub-Acct., International Banking Corp., . Merchant, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Ld.,

Clerk, HK. & S'hai Bank, Marine Insurance Assistant, Clerk, HK. & S'hai Bank, Manager, Oriental Hotel,... Assistant, Arnhold, Karberg & Co.,

Assistant, Butterfield & Swire, Asst., Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Engineer, HK. Rope Manufacturing Co.,

Ld.,

Asst., China Fire Insurance Co., Ld.,.... Clerk, Siemssen & Co., Asst., W. Powell, Ld.,. Manager, Horse Repository, Broker, Erich Georg & Co., Storekeeper, B. & S.'s Shipyard,. Hotel Agent,.

43 Caine Road.

House 32, Kowloon Docks. 2 Century Crescent, Kennedy Road. | East Point.

On premises.

1 Morrison Hill. Cloudlands, The Peak. 34 Queen's Road Central. Kingsclere, Kennedy Road.

1 Connaught Road. Quarry Bay.

Villa Maria, Glenealy No. 11. Kingsclere.

On premises.

C/o. W. Powell, Ld. Causeway Bay.

3 Goolistan, Conduit Road. Stanley Terrace, Quarry Bay. King Edward Hotel. Hongkong Cub.

Accountant, Chartered Bank, Book-keeper, Holland China Trading Co. On premises. Clerk, E. D. Sassoon & Co., Accountant, Cotton Mills,

Chief Inspector, Electric Traction Co., Acct., Punchard, Lowther & Co., Assistant, China Sugar Refinery,... Assistant, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Clerk, Nippon Yusen Kaisha, Clerk, Douglas, Lapraik & Co.,

Engineer, A. G. Gordon & Co., Asst. Accountant, Standard Oil Co., Clerk,.

Foreman Blacksmith, Dock Co., Assistant, P. & O. Co.,... Electrical Engineer,

Supt. Shipbuilder, Dock Co., Clerk, HK. & S'hui Bank,

Assistant, Reiss & Co.,

Assistant, Butterfield & Swire,

Merion, The Peak. Cotton Mills.. On premises. Hongkong Club.

4 George Street, East Point. 3 Belilios Terrace.

27 Des Voeux Road Central. 29 Caine Road.

Tor Crest, Peak.

Room 29, Hotel Mansions. Kowloon Docks.

22 Terrace, Kowloon Docks. 11 Mountain View, Peak.

17 College Chambers, Wyndham St. Kowloon Docks.

On premises.

On premises.

1 Connaught Road.

Assistant, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Ld.,.! Mount Kellett, Peak.

Assistant, A. V. Apear & Co., Storekeeper, Dock Co.,

Civil Engineer, Butterfield & Swire,

General Broker,

Asst. Chief Foreman, B. & S.'s Shipyard, Assistant, Neth. Trading Society, Broker, E. D. Sassoon & Co., Clerk, E. D. Sassoon & Co., Assistant, D. Sassoon & Co., Ld., Stock Broker, Gubbay & Michael, Asst. Book-keeper, Aruhold,Karberg &Co., Clerk,....

Foreman Engineer,

Assistant, Kelly & Walsh, L·l.,

45 Wyndham Street. Kowloon Docks.

129 Barker Road, Peak.

Bisnee Villa, Pokfulum.

8 Stanicy Terrace, Quarry Bay. 77 Mount Kellett Road, Peak. 7 Queen's Road Central.

9 Macdonnell Rond.

9 Macdonnell Road.

Ravenshill.

2 Rose Terrace, Kowloon. 14 Mosque Street. Kowloon Decks.

Pelham House, Wyndham Street.

Assistant, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Ld., | East Point.

Assistant, Butterfield & Swire, Marine Surveyor, Chief Clerk, P. M. S. S. Co., Assistant, H. Price & Co., Clerk, Macdonald & Co., ....

Merchant,

Superintendent, Dock Co., Engineer, Dock Co.,................... Assistant, F. Blackhead & Co.,

1 Connaught Road.

2 Connaught Road.

6 Macdonnell Road.

10 Leighton Hill Road. 7 Seymour Terrace.

Chettondule, The Peak. Kowloon Docks.

Cosmopolitan Docks. St. George's Building,

NAME IN FULL.

48

OCCUPATION.

Abode.

H-Continued.

Hansen, Wallace John .... Hardwick, William Harms, Nicolaus Friedrich

Seigfried.... Harrison, Alfred..

Harrison, Tom Lloyd, Harron, Henry Love Harrop, Charles Edward

Vincent

Harvey, David Harvie, John

Haskell, Ernest David Hassan, Hosiu.... Haxton, George Kay... Hayes, George Vincent... Hayward, Charles Burdon...... Hayward, Ernest Malcolm Hazeland, Ernest Manning ... Hechtel, Otto Peter

Heermann, Paul Emil Heldt, Franz Max John Hell, Paul Edward Heinrich

Wilhelm

Helmers, Johann Christian Helms, Wilhelm

...

Hemmings, Robert Edwin...... Henderson, John Mentiplay Henderson, Robert... Hendry, Hugh Stevenson Hendy, Harold Edward. Hermann, Carl Friedrich Hertslet, Henry Reginald Herzog, René Hewitt, Alfred Herbert. Heyde, Oscar Von der Hickie, Sidney Donglas.... Hickling, Clement Chinery Hickman, Harry Frank.. Hill, Ebenezur Erskine Hill, Walter Joseph Hintze, Hans

Hobbs, William James

Hoggard, Fred.

Ho Kam Tong

Hollings, Alfred Edward

..

Holmes, Herbert Skertitte.............. Holyoak, Percy Hobsoù

Hooper, Joseph

Hope, Greig

Hoskins, Jolin Thomas

Hottrich, Paul

Ho U-ming

Houten, Jan Lubertus van Howard, Edward

Howarth, Henry... Hughes, Ernest Leonard Hughes, John Owen Humphreys, Cecil Humphreys, Ernest

Humphreys, William Meyrick Hunter, George Hunter, Robert Hunter, Tobias

...

Hüpeden, Hans Ferdinand Huiley, Frederick Charles...... Hurley, Robert Crisp.. Hutchison, William Hynd, Robert Robertson Hyndman, Alberto Herculano Hyndman, Francisco Henrique Hyues, Arthur Cecil ....

Assistant, H. Skott & Co., Storekeeper,

Assistant, Carlowitz & Co.....

Actg. Depôt Manager, British-American

Tobacco Co.,

Asst., Standard Oil Co., Assistant, Taikoo Sugar Refinery,

Assistant, Butterfield & Swire, Marine Engineer, Dodwell & Co., Engineer, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Assistant, E. S. Kadoorie & Co., Clerk, H. Price & Co.,

Asst. Manager, HK. Ice Co., Ld., Manager, Sperry Flour Co.,.... Assistant, Shewan, Tomes & Co., Book-keeper, Lane, Crawford & Co., Civil Engineer,

Assistant, Wendt & Co.,

Jeweiler, Gaupp & Co., Assistant, East Asiatic Trading Co.,

Merchant, Kruse & Co.,

Insurance Clerk, Siemssen & Co., Assistant, Arnhold, Karberg & Co., Assistant, Leigh & Orange,. Boilermaker, Dock Co.,

Assistant, Shewan, Tomes & Co., Engineer,

Assistant Engiucer, Flour Mills, Assistant,

Mercantile Assistant,

Clerk,

Civil Engineer, G. I. Cement Co., Ld., Broker,

Merchant, China Express Co.,

Assistant, Butterfield & Swire,

....

151 Magazine Gap.

1 Lycemoon Terrace, Quarry Bay.

2 Connaught Road.

20 Macdonnell Road.

Room 17, Hotel Mansions.

3 Lycemoon Terrace, Quarry Bay.

1 Connaught Road. 13 Austin Avenue. Quarry Bay.

2 Seymour Terrace. Ou premises.

Ice House, East Point. Room 4, Hotel Mansions.

7 Kuntsford Terrace, Kowloon. 7 Knutsford Terrace, Kowloon. Coombe, 152 Magazine Gap. 3 Ormsby Villas, Granville Road,

Kowloon.

Smith Villas, Magazine Gap. 11 Knutsford Terrace, Kowloon.

Hotel Mansions.

On premises.

On premises.

29 Wyndham Street. Kowloon Docks,

6 Observatory Villas, Kowloon. 3 Stanley Terrace, Quarry Bay. Connaught Hotel.

Smith Villas, Magazine Gap. 1 Fark View, West Point.

13 Robinson Road, Kowloon. Hok-ün, Kowloon.

52 Peak.

26 Belilios Terrace.

1 Connaught Road.

Assistant, China Fire Insurance Co., Ld., 1 Des Voeux Villas, The Peak.

Assistant, Butterfield & Swire, Engineer, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Assistant, Jebsen & Co.,

Clerk, B. & S.'s Shipyard,

Overseer, B. & S.'s Shipyard,.

Assistant Compradore, Jardine, Matheson

& Co.,

Accountant,

Merchant, H. S. Holmes & Co., Salesman and Assistant, Reiss & Co.,

Clerk, K. & K. W. & Godown Co., Ld., Assistant, Butterfield & Swire,

Chief Foreman, Quarry Bay Shipyard, Clerk,

Merchant,

Manager, Netherlands Trading Society,... Broker, E. S. Kadoorie & Co.,........ Storekeeper, C. P. Railway Co.,. Clerk, Percy Smith & Seth, Merchant, Harry Wicking & Co., Assistant, W. G. Humphreys & Co., Assistant, Butterfield & Swire, Clerk, W. G. Humphreys & Co................ Assistant, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Engineer,

Assistant, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Assistant, Siemssen & Co., Assistant, Hughes & Hough, Accountant, Foreman, Dock Co.,.. Assistant, HK. & S'hai Bank, Clerk, HK. & S'hai Bank, Book-keeper, King Edward Hotel,. Assistant, HK. & S'hai Bank,

1 Connaught Road.

Taikoo Terrace, Quarry Bay. King's Building.

1 Ormsby Villas, Granville Rd.,

Kowloon.

2 Stanley Terrace, Quarry Bay.

Caine Road.

1 Ice House Road.

Rochvale, Kowloon. Queen's Building.

| 3 Stewart Terrace, Peak.

1 Connaught Koad.

1 Stanley Terrace, Quarry Bay.

Co. Arnhold, Karberg & Co. 81 Queen's Road Central. 65 Mt. Kellett Road.

Hotel Mansions.

6 Arsenal Street.

5 Queen's Road Central.

St. George's Building.

4 Queen's Gardens.

1 Connaught Road,

No. 6 Room, 4th floor, Alex. B'ding.

4 Humphreys' Avenue, Kowloon.

4 Victoria Fiew, Kowloon.

4 Humphreys Avenue, Kowloon. On premises.

1 Meirion, Peak.

5 Beaconsfield Arcade.

26 Kowloon Docks.

On premises.

Kowloon Docks.

8 Granville Road, Kowloon.

On premises.

*

1

NAME IN FULL.

49

OCCUPATION.

ABODE.

Ilmer, Paul

Innes, Robert

Ironside, William

Irving, John Mark..

Ismail, Sheik Ramjahım

J

Jack, William Charles Jabrand, Alfred

Jameson, Philip Sutherland

Jebsen, Jacob......

Jebsen, Michael....

Jenkins, Anthony

Jenking, John Ventris

Jephson, David Solomon

Jertrum, Hans Peter....

Jesnitzer, Alexander Albrecht

Erdmann

Jesus,

Franciso

Xavier

Montalto

Jillings, Harry

Frederick

Bannet..

Johnson, John

Johnston, Benjamin Charles

Maturin

Jonckheer, Philippus

Hendrikus Jacobus Gerard Jordan, Ernest Granville Jorge, Francisco José Vicente Joseph, Ezra Solomon Joseph, Joseph Edgar Joseph, Raymond Menasseh Judah, James Jacob Judah, Raphael Solomon

K

Kadoorie, Eleazer Silas... Kadoorie, Ellis

Kaily, William Charles, Kapteyn, Barend Dirk Kellinghusen, Franz Otto

Hermann

Kendall, Frederick Carr Kennedy, Edward Arnold... Kennett, Henry William

Bulmer...

Kent, Herbert Wade Kenny, Herbert William

Kew, Charles Herbert Whiteley

King, Walter

Kinnaird, John Daniel

Kitazawat, Naona

Kitzmantl, John Charles

Klimanek, Philipp Harding Knott, Thomas Macfarlane Knox, Lefferts

Knyvett, Paul Karl

Koch, Carl Sudwig George Korten, Hanns Leonhard

Werner

Köster, Ernst August

Kraentler, Albert

Kraft, William Dana

Krauss, Edward Leo

Kullmann, John

Assistant, Deutsch Asiatische Bank, Marine Supt,, China Navigation Co.,. Assistant, Butterfield & Swire, Engineer, Hongkong Ice Co., Ld., Clerk,

Consulting Engineer, Wilks & Jack, Assistant, Jebsen & Co.,

Assistant, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Ld., Merchant, Jebsen & Co., Assistant, Jebsen & Co., Book-keeper, Hongkong Hotel, Timekeeper, Clerk, Tobacconist,

Assistant, Melchers & Co., ...

Book-keeper,

Assistant, W. Powell, Ld., Engineer,

Clerk, HK. & S'hai Bank,

Assistant, Java-Japan-China Lijn, Secretary, Phoenix Club, Wyndham Street, Merchant, Jorge & Co., Broker,

Exchange Broker,..

Assistant, D. Sassoon & Co., Ld., Clerk, E. D. Sassoon & Co., Assistant, D. Sassoon & Co., Ld.,

Broker, E. S. Kadoorie & Co...... Broker, E. S. Kadoorie & Co.,.. Assistant, Standard Oil Co., Asst., Holland China Trading Co.,....

Assistant, Siemssen & Co., Clerk, HK. & S'hai Bank, Timekeeper,

Manager, China Borneo Co., Ld., Assistant, Butterfield & Swire, Bunker,

Deutsch Asiatische Bank,

1 Connaught Road.

1 Connaught Road. East Point.

12 Leighton Hill Road.

4 Kimberley Villas, Kowloon. 11 Knutsford Terrace, Kowloon. East Point.

King's Building. King's Building. Hotel Mansions. Hotel Mansions.

3 Beaconsfield Arcade.

5 Caine Road,

Ou premises.

3 Chico Terrace.

Alexandra Building. Quarry Bay.

On premises.

37 Robinson Road.

2 Wyndham Street.

Villa D'Alva, Kennedy Road. Hotel Mansions. King Edward Hotel, Hotel Mansions. Zetland House. College Chambers.

Modreenagh, Peak. Modreenagh, Peak. Lai-chi-kok. Alexandra Building.

Queen's Building.

11 Mountain Ficw, Peak. Kowloon Docks.

2 Kimberley Villas, Kowloon.

1 Connaught Road.

2 Century Crescent, Kennedy Road.

1 Magdalen Terrace, (149 The Peak).

Clerk, HK. & K. W. & Godown Co., Ld., 43 Caine Road. Bookseller, Kelly & Walsh, Ld., Panman, China Sugar Refinery, Clerk,

Merchant, Grossmanu & Co.,

Assistant, Holland China Trading Co., Clerk, HK. & S'hai Bank,

District Manager, China Mutual Insurance

C

Local Manager, Vacuum Oil Co.,

Ship Broker, Lamke & Rogge,

Assistant, Melchers & Co.,

Assistant, Siemssen & Co.........

Accountant, Russo Chinese Bank,

Assistant Manager & Attorney, Standard

Oil Co.,

Marine Insurance Agent,.

Banker,

Kunze, Paul Adolf Adalbert... Mercantile Representative,

159 Praya East.

C/o. Ataka & Co.

Exmoor, 15 Conduit Road.

On premises. On premises.

Villa Lucia, Pokfulum Road. Mercantile Bank of India. 2 Connaught Road.

On premises.

Queen's Building.

13 Macdonnell Road.

Hotel Mansions.

A 6 Hongkong Club Annexe. Club Germania.

6 Victoria View, Kowloon.

Lambert, Jobn

L

Surveyer to Lloyd's Register,

Lambert, John James Bain... Civil Engineer, Wm. Danby & Co.,.....

7. J

Alexandra Building.

4 Ormsby Villas, Kowloon.

F

NAME IN FULL.

50

OCCUPATION.

A BODE.

L—Continued.

Lammert, Frank................

Lammert, Herbert Alexander. Lammert, Lionel Eugene Lamperski, Albert Wilhelm Lane, Edward Courtenay Langborg, Hugo Wilhelm Langstein, Ludwig Victor... Langtry, William Lapsley, Robert Laurenz, Rudolf.

Lau Wan Kai..

Leask, William Loughton Le Breton, André Lee, Corinth Henry Leefe, Lawrence Noël Leebam, James Lehmann, Hans Lemm, John Lester, Hugh William Leung Fee Cooke Lenz, Rudolph Harold Levy, Silas Simon Lieb, Fritz

Lightfoot, Sidney Little, James

Li Wai Lam Lochead, James Logan, James Douglas Logan, William Clements Long, Edward Arthur Longuet, Carl Wilhelm.. Losseus, Jacob Johan Loureiro, Edward José da

Silva

Loureiro, Peter

Wine Merchant, Caldbeck, MacGregor &

Co.,

Assistant, G. P. Lammert, Auctioneer, Assistant, G. P. Lammert, Assistant, Melchers & Co., Asst., Union Ince. Society of Canton, Chief Accountant, Vacuum Oil Co., Assistant, Arnhold, Karberg & Co., Foreman Erector,

Clerk, Dock Co.,

Ld.,

Assistant, Carlowitz & Co.,..... Assistant Secty., Tung On Fire Insurance

Co., Ld.,

Civil Engineer, Leigh & Orange, First Assistant, Messageries Maritimes, Office Assistant,

Assistant, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Ld.,. Foreman,

Assistant, Schuldt & Co., Architect,

Asst., Dodwell & Co., Ld.,

Coal Merchant, &c.,

Clerk, Sander, Wieler & Co.,

Book-keeper, E. D. Sassoon & Co.,

Asst., Arnhold, Karberg & Co., Electrician, Dock Co.,

1 Seymour Terrace.

1 Seymour Terrace.

1 Seymour Terrace.

On premises.

3 Des Voeux Road, Peak. 6 Mountain View, The Peak. On premises.

Stanley Terrace, Quarry Bay. Kowloon Docks.

2 Connaught Road.

2 Bonham Strand West. On premises.

13A Macdonnell Road.

80 Staunton Street.

117 Plantation Road, Peak. Quarry Bay Shipyard.

Club Germania.

7 Humphreys' Avenue, Kowloon.

1 Park View, Lyttleton Road. 53 Connaught Road.

Prince's Building.

7 Barrow Terrace, Kowloon. On premises. Kowloon Docks.

Furnishing Asst., Lane, Crawford & Co.,...] On premises.

Chief Clerk, Flour Mills,.....

Asst., Taikoo Sugar Refinery,

Acct., D. Sassoon & Co., Ld....................

Foreman Boiler Maker, Dock Co.,

Stenographer, Standard Oil Co.,........ Merchant, Kruse & Co.,

67 Wyndham Street. Quarry Bay.

Kowloon Docks.

Hongkong Hotel.

1 West End Terrace. Hotel Mansions.

Assistant Superintendent, P. M. S.S. Co., 3 Leighton Hill Road.

Chief Clerk, Rope Works,

Acct., National Bank of China, Ld.,

Lüders, Eduard Carl Ferdinand Accountant, Arnhold, Karberg & Co.,

Lübring, Edward

Lysaught, John

Lyson, Cecil Hynes

M

Assistant, Sander, Wieler & Co......... Engineer, W. Lysanght & Son, Clerk,..

4 Belilios Terrace.

2 The Albany.

Windsor Lodge, Kingsclere Road,

Kowloon.

9 Kennedy Road. 131 Wanchai Road.

6 Shelley Street.

MacAskill, Kenneth Roderick.. Macdonald, Donald Macfarlane, Alexander Macgowan, Robert John Mackenzie, Alexander Mackintosh, Frederick

Alexander

Maclennan,Kenneth Mackenzie Macqueen, Alexander Rees Maguire, Thomas Bernard Makeham, Charles Makin, Henry Reginald.. Malden, George Fletcher Manners, John Manuk, Malcolm Marcenaro, Ettore Tomaso

Michell Marshall, George Marston, Lionel Martin, James

Mast, Edward....

Matsda, Kichita Maucher, Felix

May, Ernest Alfred George McBryde, William Gray McCorquodale, John McCubbin, John

McDougall, Alex.

McGillivray, James Paterson...

Clerk, Butterfield & Swire, Engineer,

Engineer,

6 Stanley Terrace, Quarry Bay. Braeside.

Stanley Terrace, Quarry Bay.

Clerk, HK. & K. W. & Godown Co., Ld., 68 Mount Kellett, Peak. Clerk,....

Outfitter, Lane, Crawford & Co.,

Clerk, HK. & S'hai Bank,

3 Rippon Terrace.

On premises. Cloudlands, Peak.

Sub-Acct., Chartered Bank of I. A. & C., | On premises.

Butcher,..

Asst., Dairy Farm Co.,..........

Assistant, Butterfield & Swire,

Engineer, Electric Traction Co.,.......... Asst., Siemssen & Co........... Acct., Dairy Farm Co., Ld.,

Asst., Carlowitz & Co.,

Exchange Bank Accountant,

Belle View Hotel. Pokfulum.

1 Connaught Road.

On premises. On premises.

6 Moreton Terrace.

2 Connaught Road.

Mercantile Bank of India.

Manager, China Light & Power Co., Ld..... Kingsclere.

Draughtsman, Dock Co.,

Clerk, C. P. Railway Co.,

Manager, Toyo Kisen Kaisha, Merchant,

Assistant, Dodwell & Co., Ld., Draughtsman, Dock Co.,

Sugar Boiler, China Sugar Refinery, Engineer, Gas Co., Mercantile Assistant, Assistant, HK. & S'hai Bank,

Hongkong & Whampoa Dock Co. Peak Hotel.

York Building, Chater Road. 13 Macdonnell Road.

1 Park View, Lyttleton Road. Hongkong & Whampoa Dock Co. 2 Great George St., East Point. Gas Works, West Point. 3 Arbuthnot Road.

On premises.

NAME IN FULL.

51

OCCUPATION.

ABODE.

=

M—Continued.

McGlashan, James..... McHugh, Francis Edwards McHutchon, James Maitland. McIlraith, George Duncan McIntyre, John McIntyre, Wilson McKirdy, Archibald

McNeill, Duncan

McRobie, Frank...

Mead, James Henry Meek, Thomas

Mehta, Byramjee Kaikhusbroo

Melvin, James Dewar Menzies, John Mercado, Atilano Metzenthin, Hermann Carl

Adolf

Meyer, Carl Martin

Meyer, Constantin Adolf Ed-

ward......

Meyer, Harry Albert... Meyer, Johannes Emil Meyer, Oscar

Michael, Sassoon Hai

Michael, Solomon Jacob Millar, Andrew William Miller, John Finlay Miller, Robert... Millet, Jean

Milroy, Anthony Alex. Heron Mistry, Khurshedji Dhunjibhoy Mitchell, John Moffatt, George Moir, Alexander..

Möller, Johannes

Heinrich

Joachim

Molson, William Ernest

Monk. Albert Victor

Moon, Herbert Ernest Mooney, John Mortimer Moosa, Omar Cassam More, Charles Andrew Morfey, Alau Morphew, George Morrison, John Dugal Moses, Elias Joseph Moss, Dennis Kebir

Moulder, Augustus Bourno-

ville........

Muhle, Heinrich Ludwig Muir, John Greig

Munro, Roland George

Murphy, Edward Owen..

Murray, Douglas Bennett......

Murray, James Smith

Murray, Malcolm Alexander Musso, Ferdinando............... Musso, Luigi

Musso, Salvadore.

N

Nakagawa, Yorimoto..... Naumann, Carl Wilhelm Lud-

wig Quintus Walter Neave, Elvine Hugh.... Neave, Thomas

Neidt, Arthur Carl Wilhelm... Neilson, Donald McLaren...... Neville, Samuel Arthur..

Shipwright, Dock Co.,

Chief Accountant, Standard Oil Co., Assistant, Butterfield & Swire, Insurance Assistant, Reiss & Co., Sugar Boiler, Taikoo Sugar Refinery,... Asst., Taikoo Sugar Refinery,.... Asst., Taikoo Sugar Refinery,.... Boiler Maker, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Engineer, B. & S.'s Shipyard,. Bookseller, Kelly & Walsh, Ld.,....... Jeweller,

Clerk, E. D. Sassoon & Co.,

Assistant, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Shipbuilder, Dock Co.,...... Clerk,

Inspector of Hamburg Amerika Linie, Assistant, Deutsch Asiatische Bank,

Assistant, Meyer & Co., Clerk, E. D. Sassoon & Co., Assistant, Meyer & Co., Assistant, Melchers & Co., Stock Broker,

Stock Broker, Gubbay & Michael, Timekeeper, Dock Co., Engincer, Bradley & Co., Sugar Boiler,....

Agent, Messageries Maritimes Superintendent, Sailors' Home, Assistant, S. J. David & Co........ Assistant, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Assistant, Shewan, Tomes & Co., Manager, Peak Hotel,

Clerk, Carlowitz & Co., Wharfinger,

Assistant, Butterfield & Swire, Assistant, HK. & S'hai Bank, Assistant, Oriental Hotel, Merchant,

Chief Clerk, China Sugar Refiuery,

Assistant, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Ld., Foreman, Butterfield & Swire,

Harbour Engineer,

Broker, J. R. Michael & Co.,

Assistant, Ross & Co........

Merchant,

Assistant, Siemssen & Co.,

Assistant, Taikoo Sugar Refinery,

Cosmopolitan Docks. Hotel Mansions. 1 Connaught Road. Queen's Building.

2 Taikoo Terrace, Quarry Bay. 3 Sea View Terrace, Quarry Bay. Quarry Bay. Quarry Bay. Quarry Bay.

6 Lyeemoon Villas, Kowloon. 6 Beaconsfield Arcade.

Room No. 11, College Chambers,

Wyndham Street.

1 Lyeemoon Terrace, Quarry Bay. Kowloon Docks.

5 Ashley Road, Kowloon.

Hongkong Hotel. Club Germania.

3 Queen's Gardens. The Den, Castle Steps. King's Building. Queen's Building. 1 Prince's Building. 2 Chancery Lane. Cosmopolitan Docks.

Stoke's Bungalow West, Peak. 2 Great George Street. Hongkong Club. On premises.

Prince's Building.

Taikoo Terrace, Quarry Bay. 4 Queen's Gardens.

On promises.

2 Connaught Road.

72 Praya East.

1 Connaught Road.

On premises.

177 Wanchai Road,

1 and 3 D'Aguilar Street.

3 Morrison Hill.

| East Point.

Quarry Bay.

Kowloon Dock.

Belilios Terrace.

3 Alexandra Building.

King Edward Hotel.

On premises.

Quarry Bay.

Assistant, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Ld.,.| East Point.

Engineer, W. S. Bailey & Co.,

Assistant, Union Insurance Society of

Canton, Ld.,

Engineer, G. I. Cement Co., Hok-ün

Cement Works,

Clerk, HK. & S'hai Bank, Merchant,

Merchant,

Marine Engineer,

Highlands, Kimberley Road,

Kowloon.

4 Cameron Villas, Peak.

On premises.

Cloudlands, Peak.

12 Bonham Road.

Stowford, 12 Bonham Road. 46 Morrison Hill Road.

Accountant, Osaka Soshen Kaisha,

17 Kennedy Road.

9 Robinson Road.

Mercantile Assistant,

Assistant, HK. & K. W. & Godown Co., 11 Robinson Road, K'loon.

Dock Co., Merchant,

.......

Foreman Boiler Maker, Dock Co., Assistant, Taikoo Sugar Refinery,

Kowloon Docks.

C/o. Wm. Meyerink & Co. Cosmopolitan Docks.

Quarry Bay,

:

NAME IN FULL.

52

OCCUPATION.

ABODE.

N-Continued.

Newman, Kenneth Charles

Horton.....

Newson, Clement Charles........

Nicholls, William

Nicholson, Philip Forster

Nicholson, Reginald Nicholson, Robert Alfred Nicholson, William....... Nilsson, Arthur Gustav

Vilhelm

Nye, Percival Herbert

Electrical Engineer, HK. Electric Co.,

Ld., Accountant,

Clerk, Dock Co.,

Manager, Taikoo Dockyard & Engineer-

ing Co.,

Assistant, HK. & S'hai Bank, Engineer,

Assistant, Butterfield & Swire,

Chemist, Taikoo Sugar Refinery,... Electrical Engineer,

Wanchai HK. Electric Co., Ld., Wan-- King Edward Hotel. 2 Kowloon Docks.

Peak Hotel. Cloudlands, Peak. Cosmopolitan Docks. 1 Connaught Road.

2 Quarry Point, Quarry Bay. 14 Robinson Road, Kowloon.

[chai.

Obrembski, Marian.... Ogihie, Alexander Ohme. Alfred ...... Cison, Gustaf Olsson. Olson, John

Ortlepp, Heinrich Friedrich. Osborne, Cyrus Clarke Osborne, John.....

Osmund, James Daniel

Otten, Gerhardus Owen, Edward

Owen, Owen Elias..

P

Packham, Ralph

Page, Harry William....

Paine, Albert Edward Palmer, Henry Thomas.. Parker, Albert Ernest Paterson, John

Paterson, Reginald Alexander

Elliot

Pattenden, Walter Leshe, Peacock, John

Chemist, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Piano Tuner,,

Clerk, Sander, Wieler & Co., Assistant,

Building Contractor, C. E. Warren & Co., Assistant, Reuter, Brockelmanu & Co.,... Assistant, Standard Oil Co., Engine Driver, Tramway Co.,........ Clerk, China Sugar Refinery, Book-keeper, Java-China-Japan Lijn.. Broker,

Proprieter, Kowloon Hotel,..

Cargo Supt., HK. & K. W. & Godown

Co., L.,

Assistant, Dairy Farm Co., Ld.,

Manager, S Moutrie & Co., Ld.,... Spinning Master,

Manager, Singer Machine Co., Exchange Broker,

Chartered Accountant, Assistant, Gilman & Co.,

Assistant, Taikoo Sugar Refinery,

Pearce, Edward John Thomas Submarine Engineer,

Pearce, Thomas Ernest..

Pearson,

James

Pearson, John Henry.

Peche, Ivanhoe

Peel, Charles Alfred

Penster, Paul Oshar,

Pereira, Alfredo Maria Roza

Perrie, Robert

Perry, Isaac Samuel

Pettey, Harold Wallace...

Pestonji, Rustom

Pickering, George

Piens, Charles...... Piercy, Richard Smalles

Piper, Johann Christian Rudolf Plage, Philip

Plummer, John Archibald.. Plummer, Lewis Polley, John David Potts, Patrick Cumming Priedemann, Herrmann Georg Prien, Peter George Friedrich Pugh, Alfred John Pumfrett, Arthur John Powys Puncheon, James Purcell, William Harris... Purves, David Aitkinson........... Putley, Arthur Charles

Assistant, J. D. Hutchison & Co.,.......... Iron Moulder, Dock Co.,

Manager, Robinson Piano Co., Ld., Timekeeper, B. & S.'s Shipyard, Mercantile Assistant, Hotel Agent,.. ..

Supt., China Commercial S. S. Co., Ld., Assistant, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Assistant, D. Sassoon & Co., Ld., Stenographer, International Bankg. Corp., Electrical Engineer, ..... Foreman, China Sugar Refinery,

Clerk, HK. & K. W. & Godown Co., Ld., Assistant, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Ld.,. Clerk, Sander, Wieler & Co., Foreman, China Sugar Refinery, Assistant, Bradley & Co.,.... Chief Clerk, P. & O. Co., Gunner, P. & O. Co., Broker, E. S. Kadoorie & Co., Merchant, Hamburg Amerika Linie, Assistant, F. Blackhead & Co., Assistant, Denison, Ram & Gibbs,. Assistant, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Ld.,. Iron Shipbuilder, Dock Co.,.... Accountant, Kelly & Walsh, Ld., Foreman Engineer,

Clerk, HK. & S'hai Bank,

Quarry Bay.

2 Pedder's Hill. Club Germania.

110 Macdonnell Road, K'loon. 30 Des Voeux Road Central.

6 Morrison Hill.

21 Robinson Road.

30 Queen's Road East.

6 Rednaxella Terrace, Peel Street. 2 Babington Path. Hongkong Club. On premises.

Wharf Co.'s Office, Kowloon. Dairy Farm Depôt, 10 Robinson Road,

Kowloon,

7 Robinson Road. Cotton Mills.

74 Caine Road.

1, Prince's Building.

Kingsclere.

4 Cameron Villas, Peak.

3 Lycemoon Terrace, Quarry Bay. Punchard, Lowther & Co., Naval

Yard Extension.

Beauregard, Bonham Road. Kowloon Docks.

Parkside, Robinson Road, Kowloon. Quarry Bay.

Eden Hall, Lyttleton Road West. 66 Caine Road.

Garden Road, Kowloon.

1 Lyeemoon Terrace, Quarry Bay. Des Voeux Road.

5 Seymour Terrace. Electric Light Works Mess. On premises.

13 Robinson Road, Kowloon. Diocesan School. On premises. Bowrington.

2 Ormsby Villas, Kowloon. 11 Mountain View, Peak. 3 Duddell Street. Kingsclere, Kennedy Road. 132 Magazine Gap. F. Blackhead & Co. Hongkong Hotel. East Point.

Kowloon Docks.

149 Magazine Gap, The Peak. Kowloon Docks.

On premises.

NAME IN FULL.

53

OCCUPATION.

ABODE.

Quinn, John

R

Radburu, William David Rahfeek, Mahomed Ram, Harry

Ramsay, James

Ramsay, Joseph Marshall...

Ramsay, Thomas

Rapp, Fritz....

Rapp, Gustav.

Rapp, Herman

Rattey, William James

Raven, Arthur Robert Fenton.| Ray, Edward Henry Raymond, Albert..

Raymond, Edward Benjamin . Raymond, Edward Maurice Raymond, Ellis

Razack, Moosa Abdool

Reeves, Henry

Reich, Charles

Reiners, Walter Edward

Reutter, Robert Henry

Emanuel

Richards, Thomas James Richardson, Hedley Thomas... Riecken, Julius

Ritchie, Archibald.. Ritchie, Archibald..

Steward, Hongkong Club,

Diver,.

Clerk, Osaka Soshen Kaisha, Assistant, Johu Lemm, Architect, Foreman Turuer, Dock Co.,................. Foreman Shipbuilder, Dock Co., Ship Draughtsman,

Asst., A. S. Watson & Co., Ld.,. Clerk, J. D. Humphreys & Son,.. Assistant, A. S. Watson & Co., Ld., Clerk, Dock Co., Architect, Broker,

Assistant, S. J. David & Co., Clerk, E. D. Sassoon & Co., Assistant,

Clerk, E. D. Sassoon & Co., General Broker,

Assistant, Lane, Crawford & Co., Assistant, Robinson Piano Co., Ld.,. Clerk, P. M. S. S. Co.,

Assistant, ...

Assistant, Brick Works,

Supt. Engineer, C. P. Railway Co., Assistant, Jebsen & Co., Merchant,

Supt., United Asbestos Oriental Agency

Li.,

Roberts, Arthur Griffith...... Civil Engineer, Punchard, Lowther & Co., Robertson, Arthur Walter

Lennox

Robertson, John

Assistant. Butterfield & Swire, Clerk, HK. & K. W. Godown Co., Ld.,... Robertson, Thomas Watson ... Supt. Engineer, HK. & K. W. Godown

Robinson, Albert Edward

Robson, John James

Roby, Ernest,.

Rodger, John

Rogers, Charles

Rombach, Josef Albert

Rosario, José Maria da Silva Rose, Louis Augustus Rose, William Edward

Ross, William Walker Gibson Rouse, Athol Bernard

Rowan, Robert Thomas

Rumjahn, Dawood

Rutter, Robert Vart

Ruttonjee, Hormusjee Ruttonjee, Jehangir Hornsjee,

S

Samy, Arthur Poonoo Sandford, Henry Chamberlain. Saunders, George Haward Sayer, George John Budds.... Sayer, Heury William Sayle, Robert Theophilus

Dalton

Schellhass, Albrecht Wilhelm. Schierenberg, Hermann Wil-

hem

Schindewolf, Friedrich

Wilhelm Max

Schlüter, Carl..... Schlüter, Hakon Axel Schmidt, Carl Julius

Co., Ld..

Manager, H. Price & Co., Engineer, Dock Co.,

Assistant, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Sugar Boiler, China Sugar Refinery, Assistant, Butterfield & Swire, Merchant,

Assistant, Bradley & Co.,

Assistant, E. M. Hazeland, Architect. Asst., China Mutual Life Ince. Co., Ld.,..... Assistant, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Assistant, Union Insurance Society of

Canton, Ld., Tailor's Cutter, Cashier,

Foreman, Dock Co.,

Storekeeper, H. Raitonjee & Co., Merchant, H. Ruttonjce & Co.,

Architect, John Lemm, Clerk, HK. & S'hai Bank, Clerk, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Civil Engineer,

Draughtsman, Civil Engineer's Office,

Asst., HK. & K. W. & Godown Co., Ld.,. Exchange Broker,

Assistant, Ferd. Bornemann,

Acet., Deutsch Asiatische Bank, Merchant,

Assistant, Reuter, Bröckelmann & Co., ... Asst., China Export Import & Bank Cie.,

Hongkong Club.

9 Arsenal Street. 118 Hollywood Road. 3 Shing Wong Street. Cosmopolitan Docks. Kowloon Docks. Highlands, Kowloon. Alexandra Building.

4 East Avenue, Kowloon. A. S. Watson & Co., Ld. Cosmopolitan Docks. Junk Bay.

St. George's Building. 56 Caine Road.

5 Victoria View, Kowloon. 56 Caine Road.

5 Victoria View, Kowloon.

18A Stanley Street.

On premises.

2 Belilios Terrace,

11 Morrison Hill Road.

3 Ormsby Villas, Kowloon. Deep Water Bay.

3 Observatory Villas, Kowloon. 6 Morrison Hill.

236 Mongkok Nori.

Holyrood, Kowloo,

Deacon's Bungalow, Pokfulum.

1 Connaught Road. Missionary Bungalow, Peak.

Kimberley Villas, Kowloon.

2 Century Crescent, Kennedy Road. Kowloon Docks.

2 Lycemoon Terrace, Quarry Bay. 159 Praya East.

I Connaught Road Club Germania. 17 Mosque Street. 10 Robinson Road. 42 Elgin Street. East Point.

4 Cameron Villas, Peak. Lane, Crawford & Co. H. Price & Co., Lil. Kowloon Docks. 5 D'Aguilar Street. 5 D'Aguilar Street.

28 Bonham Road.

On premises.

3 Taikoo Terrace, Quarry Bay. Tang Yuen, 18 Macdonnell Road. Butterfield & Swire.

3 Stewart Terrace, Peak. 21 Conduit Road.

16 Des Voeux Road.

13c Macdonnell Road.

21 Connaught Road Central. 7 Queen's Gardens. 2 Connaught Road.

:.

1

!

NAME IN FULL.

5+

OCCUPATION.

ABODE.

S-Continued.

Schmidt, Wilhelm

Schoenemann, Andreas Flein-

rich A Tai,

Schröter, Carl Christiau

Hermann

Schwandes, Ernest Hermann

Bernhard

Schwarzkopf, Frederick

John Rudolph..

Scriven, Henry Ernest

Seggie, Thomas

Sequeira, Pedro Nolasco,

Seth, Enos................

Seth, John Hennessey Seth, Seth Arathoon

Seydler, Richard Albert Beuno

Curt

Shand, Thomas

Sharpin, Harry Douglas

Shaw, Alfred

Shaw, Ernest

Shaw, James Totten

Shea, James Jerry

Sheffield, Alfred...

Shennan, Herbert Bromfield... Shepherd, Edgar Bruce ...........

Sheppard, John Oram, Shewan, William Thomson Shroff, Framroze Pestonji Sibbit, John James Siebler, Hugo Oskar

Siebs, Haus August

Silas, Charles David

Silas, David Hai..... Silbermann, Isydor................ Silva, Francisco Filomeno

Eça da

Silva, Porphyrio Maria

Nolasco da Simcock, Philip Simms, Heury George Sinclair, Augus Skinner, Thomas

Skött, Christian Skött, Hans

Slade, Thomas

Slaney, Albert. Edward Smith, Arthur William Smith, Eric Grant

Smith, Francis Harland. Smith, George Morton Smith, Horace Percy, Smith, Samuel

Smyth, Frank.

Soares, Adão Maria de Lourdes Soares, Alfredo Francisco de

Jesus

Soares, Francisco Paulo de

Vasconcellos Sorby, Vincent Sonza, Miguel Angelo Antonio Spafford, Thomas Spalckhaver, Wilhelm Otto

Christian

Squair, Alexander Cook Stalmann, Robert Johannes

Ludwig

Stebbing, William Thomas Steel, David Thomson

Stein, Alexis Low

Steinhoff, Ferdinand Julius,. Stevens, Harry Jabez

Clerk, Jebsen & Co.,

Assistant, F. Blackhead & Co.,

Merchant, Meyer & Co.,

Assistant, Deutsch Asiatische Bank

......

Storekeeper, F. Blackhead & Co., Furnishing Salesman, Lane, Crawford

& Co.,

Bank Clerk,

Ass!., Standard Oil Co.,

Secretary, Humphreys Estate & Finance

Co., Ltd.,

Acct., &c., Percy Smith & Seth,. Secretary, Dairy Farm Co., Ld.,.

On premises.

F. Blackhead & Co.

Shorncliffe, Garden Road.

Magdalene Terrace, 150 Magazine

Smith Villas, Magazine Gap.

On premises.

[Gap.

Tang Yuen, 18 Macdonnell Road. 7 Mosque Terrace.

Norman Cottage, Peak Road.

Norman Cottage, Peak Road.

Norman Cottage, Peak Road.

Manager, China Export Import & Bk. Cie.,, 1 Queen's Gardens.

Engineer, Taikoo Sugar Refinery,

Asst., HK. & S'hai Bank,

Manager, Cotton Mills,

Assistant, Cotton Mills, Cutter,

Assistant, Standard Oil Cò.,-

Assistant Supt., Fitting Dept., Gas Co., Clerk, Butterfield & Swire,

Assistant, Hongkong Land Investment &

Agency Co., Ld.,

Clerk, Merchant,

Clerk, S. J. David & Co., Head Timekeeper, Dock Co., Manager, Soap Works,... Assistant, Siemssen & Co., Assistant, Dock Co., Assistant, D. Sassoon & Co., Ld., Hotel Keeper, "Globe Hotel",

Clerk, D. Sassoon & Co., Ld.,

Printer, Guedes & Co...... Engineer, G. I. Cement Co., Lt., Ins. Agent, North China Ins. Co., Engineer, Indo-China S. N. Co.,................ Consulting Engineer, Dodwell & Co., Ld., Assistant, Skött & Co., Merchant, Skött & Co.,

Foreman, B. & S.'s Shipyard,.

Overseer, Punchard, Lowther & Co. Assistant, Alex. Ross & Co., Assistant, Dodwell & Co., Ld.,

Clerk, Butterfield & Swire, Assistant, Dodwell & Co., Ld., Chartered Acct., Percy Smith & Seth,. Boatswain,.......

Broker, Vernon & Smyth, Merchant,

Merchant,

Assistant, P. & O. Co.,

Electrical Engineer, HK. Electric Co., Ld.. Secretary, Campbell, Moore & Co... Storekeeper, Punchard, Lowther & Co.,...

Assistant, Siemssen & Co., Book-keeper & Cashier, Dock Co.,

Asst., Ferd. Bornemanu, Printer, Kelly & Walsh, L., Assistant,

Quarry Bay. Ou premises. East Point. Cotton Mills. 71 Peak. Hongkong Hotel.

1 Bonham Road.

Ou premises.

14 Knutsford Terrace.

Albany Terrace, Caine Road. 8A Des Voeux Road. 57 Queen's Road. On premises. Shaukiwan Road. On premises. College Chambers. College Chambers. Queen's Road Central.

3 Robinson Road, Kowloon.

4 Seymour Terrace. On premises.

2 Lyeemoon Villas, Kowloon. Peak Hotel.

2 Canton Villas, Kowloon. Hongkong Club.

10 Des Voeux Road. Quarry Bay.

Naval Yard Extension.

127 Barker Road, The Peak. Craigieburn, Peak.

3 Pedder's Hill.

4 Queen's Gardens,

The Summer House, Mount Kellett. Kowloon Docks.

Victoria Building, 5 Queen's Road. 24 Robinson Road..

24 Robinson Road.

6 Caine Road.

UK. Electric Co., Ld., Wanchai. 4A Upper Mosque Terrace. 12 Sau Wa Fong.

On premises.

7 Ormsby Terrace, Kowloon.

6 Queen's Road Central. Hongkong Hotel. Fernside, Peak.

Manager, Sun Life Asce. Co. of Canada, 6 Alexandra Building.

Asst., Melchers & Co.,..........

Assistant,

A

On premises.

6 Mountain View, The Peak.

.

NAME IN FULL.

55

OCCUPATION.

ABODE.

S--Continued.

Stevenson, Allan

Stockhausen, Curt Gottlob

Gustav...

Stoltz, Olav

Stone, Paul Emil Frederic Stoneham, Herbert Frederick. Stopani, John Andrew

Stoppa, William Christain Paul Stubbings, John James....... Sullivan, Charles Daniel Summers, Edwin Henry Spark

Sutherland, Percy Duffus

Sutherland, Robert

Sutton, Arthur Leslic

Assistant Manager, Dairy Farm Co., Ld., Pokfulum.

Assistant, F. Blackhead & Co., Ship Broker.

Assistant, Standard Oil Co., (Shipping)... Sub-Acct., International Banking Corp., Assistant Superintendent, Rope Manufac-

turing Co.,

- Broker,

Electrical Engineer, HK. Electric Co., Ld., Assistant, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Storekeeper, HK. & K. W. & Godown

Co., L.,

Assistant, C. P. Railway Co., Assistant, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Engineer,

Swan, William Frederick Foote Mercantile Assistant, Swart, Schelto

Partner, Schuldt & Co.,

2 Bay View, East Road, Kowloon. 3 Victoria View, Kowloon. Kowloon Hotel.

Tang Yuen, 18в Macdonnell Road.

Peak Hotel.

7 & 8 Hotel Mansions, Tesla, HK. Electric Co., Ld. Joss House, Quarry Bay.

6 Ashley Road, Kowloon. 21 Robinson Road. 106 Peak.

11 Robinson Road, Kowloon. Kowloon Hotel.

2 Victoria Lodge, Peak.

T

Taggart, James Harper..

Tata, Fariborze Kaikaocs

Tatam, Johu

Tayler, Henry Herbert Taylor, Alexander Taylor, Joseph William. Taylor, William Taylor, William Templeton, David

Terry, Edgar William Tester, Perey

Thiel, Carl Heinrich Thiel, Eugene II. Thiessen, Adolf Johannes

Martin

Thomas, Francis Henry Thomas, George Haroldi Thomas, Harry Philip Thompson, Myron Lewis, Thomson, John Dick Wylie Thorne, Stanley Moritz.....

Thun, Carl Heinrich Johannes Tiefenbecher, Haus Tillmann, Henry.

Tohdow, Daizo

Tong Tze-sau....

Toppin, James

Towne, Dana Winters

Tricker, Charles Henry. Tulip, Wilfred

Tully, John

Turnbull, Thomas Guthrie Turner, Richard Rennie Turner, William Cecil Dutton Tuxford, Alfred Stanley

U

Uldall, Sofus Vilhelm August Ulderuy, Johannes P.

Underwood, Joseph Harry Unsworth, Richard

V

Vollbrecht, Ernst Oscar Rudolf Voort, Reinhard Theodoor

Frederik van der

Vorster, Julius Otto

Sub-Manager, Hongkong Hotel, Commission Agent,

Butcher, Dairy Farm Co., Ld., Assistant, Shewan, Tomes & Co., Engineer,

Assistant, Butterfield & Swire, Chemist, China Sugar Refinery, Pattern Maker,

Sugar Refiner, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Engineer, Gas Co.,

Assistant, Commercial Union Assurance

Co,. Ld.,

Merchant, Reuter, Brockelmann & Co., Assistant, F. Blackhead & Co.,

Assistant, F. Blackhead & Co., Clerk, HK. & S'hai Bank, Clerk, W. S. Bailey & Co., Assistant, C. P. Railway Co.,.

Supt. of Construction, Standard Oil Co., Engineer,

Sab-Accountant, Chartered Bank of

I. A. & C.,

Merchant,

Merchant, Wm. Meyerink & Co., Foreman,

Manager, Bank of Taiwan,

Secretary, Tung On Fire In'ce Co., Ld.,

Assistant, Showan, Tomes & Co.,

Assistant, C. P. Railway Co.,

On premises.

4 Queen's Building.

166 Queen's Road East.

5 Ripon Terrace.

1 Stanley Terrace, Quarry Bay. 1 Connaught Road

East Point.

15 The Terrace, Kowloon Docks. Corn Hill, Quarry Bay. Gas Works, West Point.

53 The Peak.

31 Robinson Road. St. George's Building.

St. George's Building .

On premises.

56B Peel Street. 21 Robinson Road. Hongkong Hotel.

13 Praya East.

3 Queen's Road Central. Rombach & Co.

On premises.

20 Shankiwan Road. Prince's Building.

2 Bouham Strand West.

7 Lochiel Terrace, Kowloon. Clairmount, 2 Kennely Road.

Actg. Supt. Engineer, Butterfield & Swire, 1 Connaught Road.

Draughtsman, Dock Co., Engineer, Dock Co.,

Assistant, C. P. Railway Co., Clerk, Shewan, Tomes & Co., Assistant, HK. & S'hai Bank, Opthalmic Optician,...

Manager, G. I. Cement Co., Ld., Engineer,

Chemist, China Sugar Refinery, Berthing Master, HK. & K. W. &

Godown Co., Ld.,

Assistant, F. Blackhead & Co.,....

Book-keeper, Java-China-Japan Lijn, Assistant, Meyer & Co.,

1 Knutsford Terrace, Kowloon. Kowloon Docks. Alexandra Building. Kowloon.

On premises. 74 Caine Road.

Kowloon City Road, Kowloon. 21 Connaught Road,

156 Praya East.

3 Victoria View, Kowloon.

9 Kennedy Road.

37 Robinson Road.

King's Building.

f

***

NAME IN FULL.

56

OCCUPATION.

ABODE.

W

Walker, James

Walker, Richard Corker Ward, Arthur Jacob Ward, John Edward Wardigan, Arthur William Warnes, Charles Aspinall Warnsloh, Hugo Peter Gerald Warrack, Alexander Fehrsen. Warre, Felix Walter Warren, Charles Edward Waterhouse, Wilfrid Watson, Ernest George Watt, Albert William Jack Watt, Robert Downie Weall, Thomas Graham Weaser, William Lionel Wreford] Webb, George Stanley Webber, William James Weill, Albert

Weinberg, Samnel

Weis, Adam F. Welter Emil

West, Johannes Jacobus van Westerburger, Charles Adolphe

Henri

Westhoff, Adolft Jean

Philip Hubert Désiré...... Weston, William MacGregor .. Wheeley, John Thomas Martin White, Edmund William White, George White, Hedley G.

Wiesinger, Otto

Wilkie, John

Wilkinson, Harrie Vaughan Wilson, William Webb Winter, Frank Vernor Witchell, Job

Wolf, Erich Theodor Reinhold

Wolff, Philip Robert

Wong, Nathaniel

Wong Po Chun

Wood, Gerald George

Wood, Robert Bryden

Worby, George

Worcester, William Gilbert

Gray

Wright, James Francis Wright, John Laird

Wynne, Hugh Smith

Foreman, Dairy Farm Co., Ld., Assistant, Shewan, Tomes & Co., Electrical Engineer, Dock Co., Assistant, P. M. S. S. Co., Ganger,

Asst., Lane, Crawford & Co., Assistant, Melchers & Co., Clerk, HK. & S'hai Bank, Assistant, Gilman & Co.,.. Architect, &c., C. E. Warren & Co., Assistant, Dodwell & Co., Ld., Engine-driver, Peak Tramway, Clerk, HK. & S'hai Bank,. Marine Engineer,

Assistant, Dodwell & Co., Ld., Architect,

Chief Storekeeper, Dock Co.,.. Diver,....

Manager, Lery Hermanos,

Godown Supt., Standard Oil Co., Chemist, Imperial Brewery Co., Ld., Manager,

Assistant, Neth. Trading Society,

Assistant, Arnhold, Karberg & Co.,

Asst., Java-China-Japan Lijn,.. Clerk, HK. S'hai Bank, Manager, China Borneo Co., Ltd., Assistant, W. Powell, Ld., Builder and Diver, Dock Co., Representative for Suter Hartmann & Rahtjen's Composition Co., Ld., Asst., China Export Import & Bank Cie., Engineer and Contractor,.

Assistant, P. & O. Co., Merchant,

Steward,

Supt. Brick Works,

Asst., Arnhold, Karberg & Co., Clerk, Dock Co.,

Accountant,

Sussoon's Villa, Pokfulum. Kowloon.

Kowloon Docks.

6 Macdonnell Road.

4 Stanley Terrace, Quarry Bay. Wong-nei-chong Road.

On premises.

On premises.

4 Cameron Villa, Penk.

30 Des Vœux Road Central.

Park View, West Point. Engine House, Peak. On premises. Quarry Bay.

6 Park View.

Alexandra Building. Kowloon Docks.

7 Stanley Terrace, Quarry Bay. 13 Seymour Road.

34 Morrison Hill Road.

9 & 11 Wong-nei-chong Road. Pelham House.

Ou premises.

33 Conduit Road.

2 Babington Path, Peak. On premises.

23 Conduit Road.

On premises.

31 Kowloon Docks.

Hongkong Hotel.

1 Queen's Gardens.

I Observatory Villas, Kowloon.

11 Mountain View, Peak.

6 Humphreys' Road, Kowloon. King Edward Hotel.

Deep Water Bay.

9 Robinson Road.

3 Stewart Terrace, Peak. Mutual Stores.

Agent, China Mutual Life Insurance Co., Alexandra Building.

Civil Engineer,

Manager, Steam Laundry Co.,.............. Clerk, British American Tobacco Co.,

Assistant, P. & O. Co.,................. Broker,

Engineer,

Foreman Shipwright, Dock Co.........................

Hongkong Hotel. On premises.

4 Kennedy Road.

11 Mountain View, The Peak.

4 Stewart Terrace, Peak.

1 Observatory Villas, Kowloon. Kowloon Docks.

Yamada, Noriaki Yamada, Teizo Young, Alexander

Young, Charles Henry Young, David..

Young, James Traill Young, Jesse Ashton.

Yuetpo, Cheng

Chief Clerk, Toyo Kisen Kaisha, Clerk..................

Bar Manager,

York Building, Chater Road. Ataka & Co.

King Edward Hotel.

Asst, China Commercial S.S. Co., Ld.,... 7 Chiu Loong Street.

Overseer,

Foreman, B. & S.'s Shipyard,.

Assistant, Shewan, Tomes & Co., Manager, Bismarck & Co.,

4 Stanley Terrace, Quarry Bay.

6 Stanley Terrace, Quarry Bay.

4 Queen's Gardens.

19 Stanley Street, 2nd floor.

Z

Zuylen, Hendrik van.....................

Superintendent, Java-China-Japan Liju, .| 37 Robinson Road.

ARATHOON SETH, -

Registrar.

Registry, Supreme Court, Hongkong,

30th January, 1908.

}

HONGKONG.

KOWLOON-CANTON RAILWAY.

(BRITISH SECTION.)

ESTIMATE OF EXPENDITURE UP TO DECEMBER, 1908.

CLASSIFIED UNDER MAIN HEADS AND SUB-HEADS.

No.

2 1908

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of

His Excellency the Governor,

26

Main Head.

Sub-Head.

Estimated Total Expen- diture to end of 1907.

Approximate

Actual Total Total during Expenditure

to end of

the year

1908.

I-Preliminary Expenses, Survey,

Grand Total.

=

1907.

$

C.

$

C.

$

$

C.

43,854.79

42,267.65

42,267.65

II-Land,

III-Formation,

Land,

113,721.45 146,538.02 1,250,000.00 1,396,538.02

(a) Earthwork,

709,482.04

532,452.15 900,000.00 1,432,452.15

(b) Tunnels,

(c) Roads,

701,779.09

20,000.00

900,756.09 900,000.00 1,800,756.09

..

IV-Bridge Work,..........

(a) Major Bridges,

304,891.35

(b) Minor Bridges,

314,448.16

(c) Culverts,

V-Fencing,

(a) Boundaries,

346.45

50,000.00 50,000.00

243,858.47 320,000.00 563,858.47

106,251.06 300,000.00 406,251.06

56,377.78 33,468.14 30,000.00 63,468.14

346.45

6,000.00

6,346.45

(b) Signs,

VI-Telegraph,

Telegraph,

VII-Track,

(a) Ballast,

4,413.83

100,429.00

3,565.74

3,565.74

(b) Permanent Way,...........

17,923.94 150,000.00 167,923.94

107,192.71

107,192.71

VIII-Stations and Buildings, (a) Buildings & Fixtures,

(1) Station Machinery,...

150,000.00 150,000.00

...

20,000.00 20,000.00

(c) Furniture,

(d) Workshops & Stores,

30,000.00

30,000.00

..

IX-Plant,

Plant,....

200,148.79

376,264.79

20,000.00 396,264.79

X-General Charges,

(a i) Salaries,

99,455.82 !

129,724.84

(a ii) Quarters,

39,173.72

80,000.00 209,724.84

62,545.34 10,000.00 72,545.34

(a iii) Instruments,

15,019.54 10,164.14

10,164.1†

(a iv) Office Expenses,

(a v) Medical,

(a vi) Home Charges,....

(a vii) Typhoon Damages,

26,715.36

11,607.64 16,974.16 8,000.00 24,974.16

5,067.30 10,825.90 6,000.00 16,825.90

22,150.51 30,099.80 20,000.00 50,099.80

43,242.37

43,242.37

Stores-China,

100,000.00

100,000.00

100,000.00

Stores China Bricks,

5,000.00

HONGKONG, 9th January, 1908.

Total,..

$2,894,082.62 2,914,461.76 4,250,000.00 7,164,461.76

G. W. EVES,

Chief Resident Engineer.

:

HONGKONG.

4 No. 1908

PROGRESS REPORT ON CONSTRUCTION OF BRITISH SECTION OF THE HONGKONG-CANTON RAILWAY TO 31ST DECEMBER, 1907.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of

His Excellency the Governor.

Description of Alignment.

In Kow-

At Chain

The present alignment is slightly different from that set out by Mr. BRUCE. loon Station Yard, the line has been kept further West nearer Des Voeux Road. 3.800 Des Vœux and Gascoigne Roads are carried over the line by a very large Bridge.

After passing this Bridge, the grade rises at 1 in 150 to Chain $600, near which the line passes over a proposed 100' road by a 60′ Girder Bridge, with 2 side spans of 10 feet Arches for the Pathways.

At Chain 9-700 another 100' road (Argyle Street) is crossed by a 60′ Girder Bridge. As close as possible to this Road, I propose to put a Station for Yaumati.

Passing through a short tunnel, the line crosses another 100' road by a 60' Span Girder. This is the third Bridge which the Public Works Department have asked the Rail- way to build, for which there is at present no road except such as is marked on a Map as "Proposed".

After crossing this road, the grade rises at 1 in 100 towards the hills and at Chain 17.500 enters Beacon Hill Tunnel. There is a short length of level in the centre of the tunnel, Chain 20-700 to 21:300, and the line falls at 1 in 400 to the North Portal at Chain 24.700 where the grade changes to 1 in 100. Near this point, the line crosses the valley on a bridge consisting of three 40' Girders, and runs down the North side to Tai Wai Village where there is a bridge of four 30' Arches over the Shing Mun River.

From this river, the alignment has been completely altered. Instead of continuing on and keeping to the sea side of the road, the line curves to the East and crosses the Taipo Road by a level crossing at Chain 33:600. Shatin Station is placed at Chain 35-000 and at a reduced level of 21400 which ought to keep the formation dry during typhoons at this point.

Beyond Shatin Station, the coastline gets very rugged and indented with deep bays. It was found impossible to get a line at a low level here without having either very deep cuttings through the spurs or else running the line too far into the sea. For this reason, the grade rises at 1 in 500 and 1 in 1,000 till a height of 23000 is reached.

Between Chain 43.200 and 44.200, the Taipo Road is diverted to the sea side of the line, as the Railway is too high above the road for level crossings. At Chain 45.300 the road passes under the Railway. Shortly after this, the road rises rapidly and between Chains 45·850 & 46·200 and 46·950 & 47-200 is diverted and kept on the West side of the line by being scarped out of the cutting above the Railway.

Between Chains 48.100 and 48:450 is a short tunnel, the road going round the spur is carried over the tunnel Portals at both sides.

32

At Chain 49.500 on Mr. BRUCE's alignment, there was marked a viaduct of 20 spans of 20 feet in rather deep water. In order to avoid this, the new line goes more inland and passes in rather deep cutting through the West side of a hill at Chain 50·400. The line comes out on to the coastline again and is in heavy scarp cutting for some time, with a short tunnel between Chains 51·475 and 51.625.

The grade runs down then past the village of Cheung Sui Tan and rises again approach- ing the Taipo tunnel. This tunnel between Chains 62.625 and 63-475 avoids a sharp curve round a very exposed spur to the South of Taipo Station Yard. Going through the spur, instead of round it, allows the line to cross the next bay much nearer the shore and avoids a good deal of bridging in deep water.

Taipo Station Yard is in the same position as Mr. BRUCE placed it, but I have raised the level 2 feet to 220.00.

Beyond Taipo, the line deviates very much from Mr. BRUCE's alignment for the first few miles.

The

The original alignment was very far out in the sea enclosing large tidal areas. bridges necessary for letting the water out would all have to be founded on wells which would have been very costly requiring a large amount of plant. The new alignment runs right inland after leaving Taipo Station, passing to the West of Taipo Market. The line then gets back on the old alignment for a few chains and then leaves it again to avoid a 6° curve on a 1 in 100 grade.

Fan Ling Station is reached at Chain 96·000 and the frontier at Chain 113-000.

Note. The various levels quoted are referred to a datum 200 feet below Ordnance Datum.

Survey.

All expenditure under this heading has been completed. The difference between the Actual and Estimated Expenditure represents a saving on the Total Estimate.

Land.

Outside Kowloon all the land has been bought with the exception of some lots near the site of Shatin Station.

Formation Earthwork.

Any quantities and amounts I might give to show progress under this sub-head would be very deceptive. The total expenditure up to the end of 1907 was under of the total estimate for the line but about of the total quantity of earthwork has been done. This is owing to the fact that the commencement of all earthwork cuttings, &c., is generally the easiest and the quickest done because the material is soft and therefore more cheaply exca- vated while the interior is generally composed of rock which besides being harder to excavate has to be led out a longer distance before it is in its final position in the bank.

The Departmental System of carrying out works does not lend itself to easily estimating the future expenditure to complete the work because all work is done by petty contracts on a schedule of rates. The rates are graduated to suit the varying nature of the work and unless costly borings were taken which would also take some considerable time it would be impossible to make anything like an estimate of the amount of money required to complete the earthwork on the line. These borings if taken would not assist the Engineers in any way in carrying out work under this Departmental System.

The Estimate of Expenditure during 1908 must therefore be regarded as approximate only but it should be sufficient to complete all Earthwork Banks and Cuttings with the ex- ception of the Reclamation in Kowloon Station Yard, a big bank in Shatin Valley and also another near Taipo. If all goes as at present I think there may be a saving of about 10% or say $250,000.00 uuder this sub-head.

*

33

Formation Tunnels.

The progress of the work under this sub-head is not quite as much as was expected. This is due to the unexpected difficulties met with in the nature of the material through which the long tunnel under Beacon Hill is being driven and also to the fact that great delays were experienced at home in getting delivery of the Plant required for working the tunnel owing to the workshops generally being very full up of orders.

There are five tunnels on the line but four of these can be neglected as far as expend- iture and progress during 1907 is concerned.

On a large tunnel as compared with earthwork the reverse is the case as regards expenditure and progress during the first year of construction. In the case of a long tunnel a very large amount of material and plant has to be collected and erected before a proper start can be made. This increases the expenditure per lineal foot of tunnel during the first and it would not be right to multiply out the completion of the tunnel at the same rates as the first lengths.

Up to the end of 1907 the following had been done at Beacon Hill Tunnel :—

South Side.

year

The heading had been driven 1,075 feet from the face, and a shaft sunk about 90 ft. deep. This shaft is now thrown out of use but its construction added greatly to the length of heading driven. 345 ft. of heading had been widened and fully lined.

North Side.

The heading from the open was driven 952 ft. during the year. It was started during the first week in January 1907. A shaft was also sunk 270 ft. between January 3rd and October 24th and 115 ft. of heading driven towards the South and 100 ft. towards the North. These headings are in extremely hard compact rock which I hope will not require any lining of brickwork. On 31st December there was 120 ft. of lining completed.

The Plant at both sides is similar. There has been erected a complete double set of Electric Lighting Dynamos and also a double set of air compressors for driving the rock drills. These compressors are at present used for ventilating as well as driving the drills, a triplicate set of compressors are on order for ventilating when the headings get further into the hill. A great part of the expenditure up to date on the tunnel has been for the erection of this Plant and the housing of the staff which will not I hope occur this year.

Hardly of the heading has been completed and the cost per lineal foot is slightly in excess of the estimate and about of the widening has been exccuted. This widening is costing considerably more than the estimate and may result in an excess of $300,000 being required. This is due to the large amount of explosives required and the cost of the labour generally being under-estimated in the first instance through unforeseen difficulties.

One

As regards Brick-lining it is difficult to say how the estimate will work out. thousand feet was estimated as requiring to be fully lined at each end. This will be exceed- ed at the South side as the decomposed granite is extending much deeper into the hill at this side than was expected. At the North side the rock got harder and compact much more quickly and the distance estimated to be fully lined will not be exceeded. The balance of the tunnel was estimated as requiring only an arch overhead to keep chips of stone from shaking out and falling on passing trains. Parts of the tunnel will not require even this so there may be a saving in the lining.

A very large amount of material is at site in the shape of bricks and timber which makes the figures for expenditure look large compared with the progress and makes diagrams and figures very deceptive.

The minor tunnels will all be built within the estimate. The expenditure during the past year chiefly consisted of the cost of materials at the site of works.

¡

Formation Roads.

No expenditure was undertaken under this sub-head.

34

Bridges Major.

About the estimated expenditure has been expended on the large Bridges. Of these 18 Bridges work has started on all except about 3 as regards at least collecting of material. Four are complete with the exception of the Ironwork and 3 Arched Bridges are practically keyed in and about 3 are about half finished. The rest are well in hand. I would consider there will be saving of about $50,000 under this head but it is difficult to say as all the foundations are not in as yet.

Bridges Minor.

About of the estimated expenditure on this sub-head has been incurred and I consider a good deal more than of the work has been finished. Rather a larger number of Minor Bridges have to be built than was at first expected. Owing to the complicated systems of irrigation in the New Territories the water could not be collected and run through one opening but had to be split up into several Minor Bridges and Culverts. There will be over 30 Minor Bridges when the Railway is complete and of these seven have been absolutely completed with a saving of about 10% on the estimate. Work is well in hand on the other Bridges and there is no reason why the saving on these should not be at least 10% or about $50,000.00.

Bridges Culverts.

The expenditure on these are keeping well within the estimate though the number is rather in excess of that estimated for. These culverts are as a rule made only for single line owing to there being no difficulty in lengthening them when the line requires doubling.

The decrease in expenditure during 1907 in the Main Head of Bridges was owing to the fact that the Survey took rather longer than was expected and as there was no reason for picking up lost time, no extra rates were given to hurry up the work.

Track Ballast.

Not much work was done under this heading during 1907 owing to the high rates asked by the Chinese Contractors. As there was no object in collecting ballast at this early stage no large contracts were let. A large amount has been put down for 1908 but it is hoped this amount will not be required. The rates are falling gradually and it is probable that this will be done for the estimated amount.

Track Permanent Way.

The unforeseen expenditure during 1907 under this sub-head was for rails and sleepers for the reclamation of Kowloon Station Yard. It was decided to use the permanent rails and sleepers for this work as the use of narrow guage rails and sleepers similar to what is in use at the Tunnel would flood the Colony with such a large amount of this material that it would be difficult to get rid of at the completion of the work. This expenditure was for material only.

Plant.

Under this heading the increase of expenditure was owing to Broad-guage Engines, &c., being required for the reclamation in Kowloon Station Yard. These Engines will form part of the permanent equipment of the line. No permanent increase is foreseen.

General Charges.

The increase here is due to a large original under-estimate and to the difficulties of the line rendering it necessary to increase the superior grade of the Supervising Staff.

!

35

General Progress.

There are two large works on which depend the final completion of the line:--

(a.) Beacon Hill Tunnel.

(b.) Excavation of Cutting No. 1 which is to form the reclamation for Kowloon

Station Yard.

Beacon Hill Tunnel has always been considered the ruling factor as regards the final opening of the line for traffic. At the end of December the heading going North from the South side and that going South from the shaft at the North side were 4,914 feet apart which would meet at the end of November 1909 if the present average can be kept up. Six or seven months at least would be required to widen out and lay the rails ready for opening for traffic say the end of May 1910.

The reclamation of Kowloon Station Yard with material taken from Cutting No. 1 is however taking longer than might be expected and I trust that the completion of the whole line may not be delayed by any failure on the part of the Contractors to finish their Contract within the specified time, viz., December, 1909.

Estimates.

I append detailed statement of the original, revised and supplementary Estimates together with statement of expenditure to end of 1907 and estimated expenditure during 1908 and to complete the work.

$

4th February, 1908.

G. W. EVES, Chief Resident Engineer.

36

(1)

(2)

Main Head.

Sub-Head.

(*) Total of Mr. Bruce's & Mr. Chatham's

(+)

C. R. E.'s Revised

(5)

C. R. E.'s

Supple-

Estimate

Estimate.

of June 1907.

mentary Estimate.

'37.642.00

45,000.00

2,732.35

I-Survey,

II-Land,

III-Formation,.

(a) Earthwork,

10,500.00 139,700.001,056,838.02

1,530,997.00 2,400,504.70 140,504.70

(b) Tunnels,

1,924,860.00 2,203,415.00 300,000.00

(e) Road,

82,500.00

IV-Bridges,

(a) Major,

[ 585,911.57

22,053.10

(b) Minor,

412,650.00

422,718.11

16,467.05

(c) Culverts,

68,882.00

5,413.86

V-Fencing,

VI-Telegraph,

VII-Track,

(b) Signs,

(a) Boundaries,

31,813.00

396.00

26,864.00

(a) Ballast.

154,110,00 13,813.94

716,625.00

(b) Permanent Way,

747,032.00

1,000.00

VIII-Stations and Buildings,... (a) Buildings,

223.396.25 226,603.75

(b) Station Machinery,.

315,000.00

35,970.00

(c) Furniture,

3,410.00

(d) Workshops,

IX--Plant,

(a) Construction,

(b) Loco., Tools and Plant,

(c) C. & W. Plant,

(d) Engineering Plant,

(e) Loco. Rolling Stock,

*

234,067.00

67.00

X--General Charges,

(ƒ) C. & W. Rolling Stock,

(1) Salaries,

140,000.00

340,000.00

(ii) Quarters and Offices,

7388,148.20 78,423.36

38.970.80 33,574.54

(iii) Furniture,

10,956.00

791.86

105,000.00

(iv) Office Expenses,.

13,068.00 21,906.16

(v) Medical,

20,020.00

2,805.90

(vi) Home Charges,

123,200.00 53,100.20

(vii) Typhoon Damages,

43,242.37

Total,...

$5,053,274.00 |8,000,052.63 1,860,231.20

EXPLANATION OF ESTIMATE TABLE.

Columns 1 and 2 are the Main and Sub-Heads of the Estimate respectively.

Column 3 represents Mr. BRUCE'S Estimate for the line combined with the Honourable Director of Public Works' Estimate for the reclamation. Mr. BRUCE'S Estimate was only in round figures with a percentage for contingencies added to the total. This percentage I have spread over each Main and Sub-Head as far as possible and accounts for mistakes in the odd dollars at the end of the total.

37

REMARKS.

Excess of 4 over 3 due to realignments. Actual cost $42,267.65.

Excess of 4 over 3 due to resumption of Glass Works (I. L. 652), Slaughter House & F. L. No. 4. Land in 5 is

for Blackhead's Lot and certain other prospective resumptions.

$110,000 is for the extension of Sea Wall to Blackhead's Lot but there will be a probable saving as shewn in italics.

Estimate (4) for tunnels will most probably be exceeded but the excess will probably be covered by savings under

Earthwork and Bridges.

Not estimated for by Mr. Bruce.

Bridges generally are being done cheaper than the Estimate but their number is greatly increased. It is anticipated

that there will however be a saving in the total as represented by the figures in italics.

Not estimated for by Mr. Bruce.

""

Ballast may perhaps be exceeded.

The amount in Column 5 is to provide for a permanent Terminal Passenger Station and other requirements which

are under consideration.

No decision possible at present on this subject.

The $234,067 represents Plant left on hands at the end of works available for sale, the depreciation having been

written off against Works. Workshops not estimated for.

""

12

53

About 3 of the total for British and Chinese Sections combined. Not estimated by Mr. Bruce.

Saving due to all the subordinate outdoor staff being charged to Works.

Under-estimated owing to increase of Engineers.

Under-estimated owing to increase of Engineers.

Home Charges not so high lately as all the Ironwork has been designed.

Not estimated by Mr. Bruce. Met from 10% allowed for Contingencies.

Column 4 is for the sanctioned Estimate and does not include the extension of the sea wall from the Storm Water outfall towards Blackheads as the question of making this a deep sea wall was under consideration at the time and it was not thought advisable to hold up the Estimates for this item.

There are also certain other items omitted from the Estimate which are entered in Column 5 such as a Station Building for Kowloon.

Column 5 represents partly unsanctioned Estimate for certain items at present under consideration. Provision may have to be added for Workshops and Goods Sheds.

Figures in Italics in Column 5 are Credit sums and represent anticipated savings on the Estimates.

1

38

Expenditure.

Estimated.

Main-Head.

Sub-Head.

1906.

Grand Total.

1907.

1908.

To Complete.

Survey,

33,854.79

8,412.86

42,267.65

Land....

13,721.45 132,816.57 1,050,000.00

1,196,538.02

Formation,

Earthwork,

Tunnels,

109,482.04 422,970.11

101,779.09 798,977.00

900,000.00

827,547.85 2,260,000.00

900,000.00

702,658.912,503,415.00

Roads,

50,000.00

32,500.00 82,500.00

Bridges,......... Major,

4,891.35 238,967.12

320,000.00

563,858.47

Minor,

14.448.16

91,802.90

300,000.00

406,251.06

Culverts,

6,377.78

27.090.36 30,000.00

63,468.14

Fencing,

Boundaries,

346.45

6,000.00

25,466.55

31,813.00

Signs,

Telegraphs,

Track,

Ballast,

2,413.83

429.00

1,151.91

396.00

23,298.26 26,864.00

396.00

Permanent Way,

17,494.94 150,000.00

107,192.71

167,923.94

640,839.29 748,032.00

Stations,

Buildings,

Machinery,

150,000.00

20,000.00

300,000.00 450,000.00

Furniture,

15,970.00 35,970.00

3,410.00 3,410.00

Plant,...

Workshops and Stores,

Construction,

Loco., Tools and Plant,

C. & W. Plant,

Engineering Plant,

50,148.79

326,116.00

20,000.00

162,264.79 234,000.00

Rolling Stock Loco.,...

140,000.00 140,000.00

Rolling Stock C. & W.,

340,000.00 340,000.00

General Charges, Salaries,

Furniture,.........(iii),

..............( i ), 49,455.82

Quarters & Offices,( ¿¿ ), 19,173.72

7,019.54

80,269.02 80,000.00 100,000.00

43,371.62 10,000.00

309,724.84

72,545.34

Office Expenses, (iv),

Medical,

.. ( v ),

Home Charges,...(vi),

6,607.64

2,067.30

7,150.51

3,144.60

10,366.52

8.758.60

22,949.29 20,000.00

10,164.14

8,000.00 10,000.00

6,000.00 6,000.00

34,974.16

22,825.90

20,000.00 70,099.80

Typhoon Damages,(vii), 26,715.36

16,527.01

43,242.37

Stores China, ...!

(138,989.23 138,989.23

100,000.00

100,000.00

Stores Bricks,

4,474.60

4,474.60

......

599,546.45 2,314,915.51 4,020,000.00 2,925,822.07 9,860,283.83

Figures in Italics represent Credit sums.

1

39

REMARKS.

Saving in C. R. E.'s Estimate of June 1907 of $2,732.55.

Includes $110,000 for extension of Sea Wall towards Blackheads but a saving of $140,504 is anticipated in the

final expenditure.

Saving in C. R. E.'s Estimate of June 1907 of $22,053.

**

55

16,477.

">

· 5,413.

There may be an excess over Estimate of June 1907.

Allows for Kowloon Station Building not included in C. R. E.'s Estimate of June 1907.

Workshops not estimated for.

Workshops not estimated for.

}

"

""

**

About of total required for British and Chinese Sections combined.

F

HONGKONG.

3

24

No. 1908

CORRESPONDENCE REGARDING THE TYPHOON SHELTER AT MONGKOKTSUI AND THE PROPOSED TEMPORARY INCREASE IN LIGHT DUES.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor, Auyust 6th, 1908.

COLONIAL SECRETARY'S OFFICE,

HONGKONG, 15th June, 1904.

SIR, I am directed to inform you that the question of additional shelter for cargo boats and sampans during the Typhoon Season has been lately engaging the attention of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government and I am now to forward to you for the consideration of your Chamber a tracing on which a proposed breakwater and harbour of refuge at Mong Kok Tsui is shewn in red. If this scheme were carried out a breakwater 4,000 feet in length would be constructed which would give a well sheltered area of 166 acres at a cost roughly estimated at $600,000.

I am to ask you to be good enough to furnish me with any comments on the above scheme which your Committee may desire to make, and I may add that other schemes have been considered, but the one now suggested appears to be least open to objection.

I have, &c.,

The Secretary, HONGKONG GENERAL CHAMBER OF COMMERCE.

A. M. THOMSON,

Colonial Secretary.

HONGKONG GENERAL CHAMBER OF COMMERCE, HONGKONG, 16th July, 1904.

SIR,—I am directed to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 15th ultimo informing this Chamber that the Government have under consideration the question of additional shelter for cargo boats and sampans during the typhoon season and inquiring whether the Committee would furnish any comments regarding the particular scheme referred to in your letter by which a harbour of refuge 166 acres in area could be constructed at Mong Kok Tsui at a cost of about $600,000.

3

1

*

504

1. The Committee are glad to learn that His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government is interesting himself in this question and they note with pleasure that the Government appear prepared to undertake the construction of such a long felt want as a larger and more conveniently placed typhoon shelter.

2. It will be within His Excellency's recollection that in 1898 this Chamber favoured the construction of such a harbour at a point West of the Slaughter House, giving a sheltered area of about 80 acres at an estimated cost of $100,000, but the then Governor was unable to recommend to the Secretary of State for the Colonies that the undertaking should be entered into owing to the heavy expendi ure which the work would involve. Even at that time, nearly six years ago, the inadequacy of the present Causeway Bay refuge was strongly urged, as well as the fact that on account of its situation at the East end of the Harbour, from which direction the prevailing storms come, it was necessary for the Craft using it to seek refuge at the earliest approach of bad weather or employ steam launches to tow them against the head wind. Since that time the further increase in the number of steam launches, cargo boats and sampans has accentuated the want of sufficient and easily accessible refuge in the harbour during bad weather. The Mong Kok Tsui scheme now proposed by the Gov- ernment suffers from no objections on the ground of either inaccessibility or restricted area, and His Excellency may feel assured that its construction will be welcomed by this Chamber and still more so by the large Chinese population living on small craft in the Harbour.

3. The allusion in your letter that other schemes have been considered, but have been open to more objection, rather confines the ground on which comments are invited to the advantages, or disadvantages, arising from transference of the typhoon harbour from Cause- way Bay to Kowl on. Although this is not inferred in your letter, the Committee recognise that additional building land is required on the Hongkong side and the reclamation of Causeway Bay will be necessary to meet this want in the near futuro. The inconvenience of the Causeway Bay refuge has already been enlarged upon, an, as the Mong Kok Tsui site would not only enable small craft to reach it under sail, which in the present case is often impossible, the Committee welcome the change of locality. The fact that the new scheme would provide nearly three times as much space as the present refuge does for small craft to take refuge in is another point in its favour.

4. It has, however, occurred to my Committee that the rapid development of the Kowloon Peninsula will, in all probability, exceed in the next few years that already made in the past, and this will especially be so when the projected railway to Canton is actually commenced. The Mong Kok Tsui site appears likely therefore to be a too valuable one for the purpose of a typhoon harbour, as regulations would in all probability be put into force forbidding its waters being used during fine weather by craft engaged in loading or discharging cargo into godowns which may be built on the adjoining land.

5. In view of the fact that the other alternate schemes to which you refer have not been explained to my Committee it is rather difficult to suggest a better site, as the overnment may enjoy more exact information, which, if in possession of the Committee, would probably oblige them to take a similar view of the matter as the Government has done, but it would appear that a larger and better sheltered typhoon harbour might be readily constructed in Cheung Sha Wan Bay, which possesses equally deep water as that at Mong Kok Tsui. A breakwater could be made straight across the Bay from Lai Chi Kok to Samshuipo (about 6,000 feet apart) or a smaller area could be enclosed by a breakwater running directly South from the village of Cheung Sha Wan (3,500 feet) meeting at right angles a similar wall carried due West from Sam Shui Po for 1,500 feet.

6. Such a harbour would be directly under the shelter of the Kowloon hills on the North and the spurs running South along the Kowloon Peninsula. Stonecutters' Island would act as a great protective on the South West side. This appears, therefore, a more sheltered site than that at Mong Kok Tsui, which is open to the full force of a South-westerly gale sweeping across three miles of open harbour from the direction of Green Island, as did the typhoon on November, 1900, when it recurved and piled up steam launches, sampans, and junks as hopeless wreckage on the Yaumati shore.

7. It has already been pointed out in Paragraph 2 that the direction from which the prevailing storms come is from the East, and in l'aragraph 3 that the inability of small craft to reach Causeway Bay shelter in such occasions under their own sail does not apply to the Mong Kok Tsui site. The Cheung Sha Wan site being in the same direction, and the nearer

!

505

to it the craft get the more pretection they would receive from the surrounding land, the fact of it being a mile further on would not, in the opinion of my Committee, be a serious objec- tion, especially as the distance to Cheung Sha Wan from the Central Fairway is little, if any, more than to the present shelter at Causeway Bay.

8. The Committee have no means of estimating the area of the available site at Cheung Sha Wan, but, from a glance at the Chart, it would appear to offer greater possibilities in that direction than Mong Kok Tsui and might be large enough to allow enough room to shelter the junks which in bad weather now invariably run for shelter into Chin Wan Bay.

9. I am to mention that a further advantage possessed by the Cheung Sha Wan shelter would be the alternate route afforded to craft finding it necessary to sail round the West shore of Stonecutters' Island to reach the typhoon harbour under the shelter of the Kowloon hills, though it is only fair to say that this advantage would apply in a minor degree to the Mong Kok Tsui site.

10. Another point which was brought to the notice of the Government in the corre- spondence regarding Storm Warnings bears on this question somewhat. At present the inadequacy of the Causeway Bay shelter obliges native craft to run under cover as soon as the red storm symbols are hoisted in order to obviate the possibility of not finding room behind the breakwater at a later stage. This constitutes a serious inconvenience to the shipping in the harbour, and the construction of a larger and more accessible refuge will undoubtedly remove this to a great extent. A typhoon does not usually progress at a rapid rate, and the fact of its centre being over 300 miles distant from the Colony should not necessitate small craft taking shelter, but, for the reason above stated, the owners cannot be blamed for not taking any risk, though they do not fail to take advantage of this to deman 1 higher pay for working whilst the red signals are hoisted. My Committee therefore trust that on completion of the larger harbour the Government will abolish the red symbols and regard the hoisting of the black symbols only as a sufficient warning to small craft of the proximity of a typhoon.

Hon. A. M. THOMSON,

Colonial Secretary.

I have, &c.,

A. R. LOWE,

Secretary.

COLONIAL SECRETARY'S OFFICE,

HONGKONG, 26th July, 1904.

SIR,-I am directed to acknowledge with thanks the receipt of your letter of the 16th July in connection with the proposal for an additional shelter for sampans, etc., during the typhoon season and to state that your suggestions will receive the consideration of the Gov-

ernment.

I have, &c.,

F. H. MAY, Colonial Secretary.

The Secretary, HONGKONG GENERAL CHAMBER OF COMMERCE.

COLONIAL SECRETAY'S OFFICE,

HONGKONG, 9th August, 1904.

SIR, With reference to my letter of 26th July and to the previous correspondence in connection with the proposal to construct an additional harbour of refuge for sampaus and junks, I am directed to inform you that the Government realising that it would be useless to incur expenditure on a small refuge, has with regret come to the conclusion that the amount required to construct a suitable typhoon anchorage is too heavy to admit of the work being carried out in the immediate future.

I have, &c.,

The Secretary, HONGKONG GENERAL CHAMBER OF COMMERCE.

F. H. MAY, Colonial Secretary.

*

506

COLONIAL SECRETARY'S OFFICE,

HONGKONG, 18th December, 1906.

SIR,—I am directed to transmit to you for the consideration of the Members of the Typhoon Relief Committee the enclosed copy of a Report* (with copy of Chart referred to therein to be returned) on the subject of a second shelter for native craft, and to ask you to be good enough to furnish this Government with the views of the Committee on the merits of the several proposals made by Mr. BOULTON.

ટી.

Sir C. P. CHATER, Kt., C.M.G.,

I have. &e..

Chairman, Typhoon Relief Committee.

F. H. MAY, Colonial Secretary.

HONGKONG, 25th March, 1907.

Sin, I have to acknowledge receipt of your letter of 18th December last (No. 9647 of 1903, C.S O.) in which you ask that the Government be furnished with the views of the Typhoon Relief Committee on the subject of a second shelter to be erected for small craft.

The accompanying chart and memorandum have been submitted to the Committee and I beg to state for the information of His Excellency that after full discussion the Committee were unanimously of opinion that the best scheme put forward was that providing a shelter at Mong Kok Tsui.

On behalf of the Committee I beg to thank His Excellency for giving us an opportunity for considering this proposal and for the honour he has done us in consulting us in the

matter.

The chart is as requested returned herewith.

I have, &c.,

C. P. CHATER,

Chairman,

The Honourable

Mr. F. H. MAY, C.M.G.,

P.S.-26/3/07.

Colonial Secretary.

Since writing the above I have to acknowledge your further letter on this subject dated 23rd instant No. 9647/1903.

COLONIAL SECRETARY'S OFFICE,

HONGKONG, 11th March, 1908.

SIR,-It will be within the recollection of the Chamber of Commerce that in 1904 this Government referred to them the proposal to construct a new Typhoon Refuge at Mong-kok- tsui, and that the Chamber in reply advocated that the Refuge should be situated at Cheung-

sha-wan.

2. Since the typhoon of 18th September, 1906, the question has been again before the Government and the Typhoon Relief Committee, the Chinese stevedores and the Public Works Committee having declared themselves in favour of a Refuge at Mong-kok-tsui, a detailed estimate of the cost of the latter has been prepared.

The former estimate was only a rough calculation at a given price per foot run to enable a comparison to be made between the cost of several breakwaters at different sites. that had been suggested, and it is estimated that making provision for increased solidity due to the experience of the typhoon of 1906 and for considerable advance in prices, a breakwater at Mong-kok-tsui to enclose 166 acres of sheltered water will cost $1,540,000.

* Not printed.

.

507

3. This scheme has been considered by the Public Works Committee whose report thereon is enclosed.* It will be observed that they recommend the scheme and further sug- gest that pending its construction the accommodation in the Causeway Bay shelter be in- creased by deepening the area therein which dries at low water.

This latter work will be undertaken forthwith at an estimated cost of $70,000.

4. The total estimated cost of these improvements is $1,610,000 and inasmuch as they will largely benefit the shipping which frequents the Port by affording greater protection to all classes of cargo-boats and lighters and by obviating the delays which, as pointed out in your predecessor's letter of the 16th July, 1904, are occasioned by the unnecessarily early cessation from work of cargo-boats and lighters which on the first warning of a typhoon have to seek shelter lest they be shut out of the inadequate refuge at Causeway Bay, the Governor deems it reasonable that portion of the cost should be recovered from a special tax on shipping.

5. In these circumstances the Governor, with the advice of the Executive Council, has decided to ask the sanction of the Secretary of State for the Colonies to defray half the cost out of the Colony's reserves, and at the same time His Excellency proposes to tem- porarily increase Light Dues on ocean going vessels to 2 cents per ton and on river steamers to 5/6ths of a cent per ton for each entry by day or by night as from the 1st of June next, such increased rates to be maintained until the receipts from the addition of 13 cents imposed in the one case and of cent per ton for each entry by day or by night in the other, aggre- gate the sum of half the cost of the improvements detailed above.

It would have perhaps been more logical to call the increases by the new Harbour Dues, but it is considered more desirable and convenient to make no change in nomenclature although the service for which the additional dues are imposed is not connected with the lighting of the Harbour.

6. His Excellency trusts that your Chamber will recognise the reasonableness of the procedure which he proposes to adopt in order to enable a large work to be undertaken which will facilitate the uninterrupted loading and discharging of vessels in this Port, and will safeguard the lives of thousands of men upon whose labour such work depends.

I have, &c.,

The Secretary, HONGKONG GENERAL CHAMBER OF COMMERCE.

F. H. MAY, Colonial Secretary.

HONGKONG GENERAL CHAMBER OF COMMERCE, HONGKONG, 12th March, 1908.

SIR, I am directed to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of even date regarding the New Typhoon Refuge for small crafts which it is proposed to construct at Mongkoktsui, and to say that the matter is receiving the attention of my Committee.

I have, &c.,

E. A. M. WILLIAMS,

Secretary.

Hon. F. H. MAY, C.M.G.,

Colonial Secretary.

* Not printed.

:

508

COLONIAL SECRETARY'S OFFICE,

HONGKONG, 14th April, 1908.

SIR,—I am directed to invite your attention to my letter No. 9266/1907 of the 11th ultimo regarding the New Typhoon Refuge for small craft which it is proposed to construct at Mongkoktsui, and to inquire whether your Chamber concurs in the proposals made by His Excellency the Governor.

I have, &c.,

The Secretary, HONGKONG GENERAL CHAMBER OF COMMERCE.

F. H. MAY,'

Colonial Secretary.

HONGKONG GENERAL CHAMBER OF COMMERCE, HONGKONG, 15th April, 1908.

SI,-I have to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of date regarding the New Harbour of Refuge at Mongkoktsui.

My Committee are giving this matter their earnest consideration and hope to be soon in the position to forward a reply to the proposals made by His Excellency the Governor.

Hon, F. H. MAY, C.M.G.,

Colonial Secretary.

I have, &c.,

E. A. M. WILLIAMS,

Secretary.

HONGKONG GENERAL CHAMBER OF COMMERCE, HONGKONG, 1st May, 1908.

SIR, I am directed to forward you a copy of a joint letter from Agents, and Represent- atives of British Lines and owners of vessels visiting this port, addressed to this Chamber and having reference to the proposals of His Excellency the Governor regarding the Ty- phoon Refuge to be constructed at Mongkoktsui.

I am to state that my Committee endorse the opinion of the Signatories that the proposal of His Excellency to increase the Light Dues on: Ocean going vessels by 13 cents per ton and on River Steamers by cent per ton should be, in equity, modified and the number of years over which it may become necessary to spread this taxation thereby increased.

My Committee consider that the cent per ton increase on Ocean going vessels suggested by the Agents and Representatives a more equitable arrangement than that proposed by His Excellency. By this means the burden is lightened to Shipowners, and it may reasonably be assumed that the payment for the Refuge, which will be equally in the interests of those to come, is thereby rendered more general.

It would also appear that the proposed increase of cent per ton for River Steamers is likely to prove a heavy tax in view of the numerous entries of these boats.

My Committee concur in the views expressed by the Signatories to the enclosed letter as to the apparently excessive cost of the proposed Refuge, and I am to state that my Committee would greatly appreciate an opportunity of viewing the plans and estimates for the scheme. They would then be in a better position to give an intelligent opinion on the subject.

509

Reference is made in the enclosed letter to an amendment to Merchant Shipping Consoli- dation Ordinance, 1899, under Notification No. 169 whereby License fees for cargo junks and lighters were increased 100 per cent.

My Committee would beg you to supply them with the information necessary for the reply to the query.

I am to request you to be good enough to thank His Excellency for the opportunity accorded to my Committee for commenting on this subject.

Hon. F. H. MAY, C.M.G.,

Colonial Secretary.

I am, &c.,

E. A. M. WILLIAMS,

Secretary.

Copy.

HONGKONG, 23rd April, 1908.

SIR,- We, the undersigned, agents and representatives of British Lines and owners of vessels visiting this port, beg to bring to your notice that we consider the scheme as set forth in the Colonial Secretary's letter of the 11th March, addressed to the Chamber of Commerce, which has recently been published, distinctly prejudicial to the interests of shipping, which is the mainstay and livelihood of the whole Colony. So much has been said in past years by your Chamber on this particular point that we think that it is hardly necessary for us to particularise once more the many arguments against the taxation of shipping.

In view of the fact that the proposed refuge is to be erected to protect lighters and native cargo boats in case of a typhoon, it appears to us that there are many concerns closely allied to shipping on which we think some part of the cost of the proposed work might fall. As an instance, we consider that Underwriters are as much concerned as ship owners, inasmuch as it is of great value for them to know that craft will have a place of refuge in the event of a severe storm. We therefore consider that the contribution towards the expenses should be made more general and that the onus should not fall too much on the shoulders of the shipping trade.

As however the shelter is in the interests of the welfare of the Colony, and the shipping trade generally has a certain interest at stake, we think that a temporary increase in the light dues would be agreed to by ship owners without opposition provided it were based on a somewhat modified arrangement as regards payment.

During 1907 the registered tonnage of shipping visiting this port is put down at roughly 10,300,000 tons, we therefore think that if the tonnage dues are increased by cent per ton and the cost of the work spread over a longer term of years (than that suggested) it would be more equitable and the distribution of the payment would be mach better divided.

We would point out that of late years the tonnage of steamers has materially increased, it however does not follow that more cargo is being brought in or taken away from the Colony. On the other hand the dues, owing to the size of the vessels, are considerably increased.

We have made no mention regarding the proposed site of the shelter as we consider that this is best left to practical local experts with whom you are no doubt consulting. We however venture to think that the cost of the works as mentioned in the Colonial Secretary's letter is somewhat extravagant and trust that before the scheme is finally sanctioned a more economical and at the same time an equally efficient refuge can be evolved. You are so fully tognizant of the depressed state that shipping is in at the present time that it is hardly necessary for us to draw your attention to this fact, but as such is the case we trust that money will not be spent unnecessarily, as the times seem to call for

as the times seem to call for economy in expenditure in every direction.

510

We would also draw your attention to the fact that under Notification No. 169 Schedule to Merchant Shipping Consolidation Ordinance, 1899, passed on the 4th February last, the License Fees for cargo boats and lighters has been increased 100 per cent.

We should feel

obliged if you would kindly enlighten us as to why this tax has been increased and to what purpose the Government intend to devote the revenue derived therefrom.

We shall be obliged if your Committee will give their attention to the points we have raised before replying to the letter addressed to your Chamber by the Colonial Secretary.

(Signed) F. J. Abbott,

39

27

""

""

We are, &c.,

Acting Superintendent-P. & O. Steam Navigation Co., Butterfield & Swire,

Agents, Ocean Steamship Co., Ltd.,

China Mutual Steam Navigation Co., Ltd., China Navigation Co., Ltd.,

Jardine Matheson & Co., Ltd.,

General Managers, Indo-China S. N. Co., Ltd.,

Agents,

Dodwell & Co., Ltd.,

W. E. Clarke,

Indra Line,

Secretary, Hongkong, Canton & Macao Steamboat Co., Ltd., J. W. Craddock,

General Traffic Agent, Canadian Pacific Railway,

Douglas Lapraik & Co.,

General Managers, Douglas Steamship Co., Ltd.,

Gibb Livingston & Co.,

Agents, Eastern & Australasian Steamship Co., Ltd.,

"Ben" Line of Steamers,

Shewan Tomes & Co.,

General Managers, General Agents, Agents,

McGregor Bros. & Gow,

China & Manila S.S. Co., Ltd., American Asiatic S.S. Co.,

Shire Line of Steamers Ltd.,

General Managers, Glen Line of Steamers.

The Chairman, HONGKONG GENERAL CHAMBER OF COMMERCE.

COLONIAL SECRETARY'S OFFICE,

HONGKONG, 20th May, 1908.

SIR, I am directed to acknowledge.receipt of your letter of 1st May on the subject of Light dues, with its enclosure.

His Excellency is anxious that your Chamber should be in full possession of the reasons which have led him to the conclusions he has formed, and he has therefore desired me to enclose a Memorandum which he has prepared on the subject for your information.

I enclose the plans and estimates for the scheme, which, as you are aware, from the official reports in the Gazette of the proceedings of the Legislative Council, have already been submitted to the Public Works Committee of that body. The subject of the cost of the shelter is dealt with in His Excellency's Memorandum.

With regard to the question asked in the ante-penultimate paragraph of your letter, I am to state that the revenue derived from the increased fees on cargo boats, lighters and water- boats was made in the interest of General Revenue since it was considered that the fees were low. The increase based on last year's receipts will amount to $18,000 per annum.

* Not printed.

511

With regard to the suggestion put forward in the second paragraph of the enclosure to your letter, I am to state that the Government is at a loss to understand how such tax could be properly distributed seeing that much of the underwriting is done outside the Colony, and I am to enquire how your Committee would propose to give effect to their suggestion.

I have, &c.,

F. H. MAY,

Colonial Secretary.

The Secretary, HONGKONG GENERAL CHAMBER OF COMMERCE.

MEMORANDUM FOR CHAMBER OF COMMERCE RE LIGHT DUES.

Reasons for undertaking Typhoon shelter.

The vital necessity and urgency of this work has been pressed repeatedly upon Govern- ment by the Un-official Members of Council, and my predecessor gave a pledge that Government would undertake it without delay, and would contribute a sun equal to that subscribed by the Community towards the Typhoon Relief Fund, vis. :-$279,903. The balance of this fund was handed over to Government. It amounted to $35,804 and has been earmarked as a fund for relief in similar circumstances in the future. On my arrival in the Colony it devolved upon me to make good Sir MATTHEW NATHAN'S pledge, and when the estimates were discussed in September last Messrs. OSBORNE, and HEWETT again very strongly urged the necessity for the shelter and blamed Government for delay. From what I can gather they voiced the wishes of the Community.

Reasons for delay.

This delay had arisen in the first place owing to a protracted discussion as to the com- parative merits of different sites, and in the second place to the time required for making a reliable estimate, and in endeavouring to find an alternative and cheaper scheme.

Cost.

When the project was first broached a rough calculation for foot run was made merely for the purpose of contrasting the comparative cost of the different sites proposed, and the one at Mong Kok Tsui was on this basis of calculation put down at $600,000. When this site had finally been decided upon, a detailed estimate was prepared by Mr. BOULTON, than whom there is probably no one bette, qualified for the task.

It was received last Autumn, and communicated by me to the Council in my speech when introducing the estimates. The amount was $1,400,000, and the great increase was stated to be partly due to a rise in prices of materials, and partly to the fact that the typhoon of September 1906 had shown that a much higher and more substantial sea-wall would be required than had been contemplated, before the experience gained by that disastrous gale. This sum appeared to me to be beyond our present resources, and I referred it back to Mr. BOULTON with a view to the preparation of a less costly scheme which would if possible give partial protection, and be capable of later development as funds permitted. The result was that after careful revision his estimate was increased to $1,540,000 instead of decreased, and that he reported that no partial or progressive scheme was possible. The alternative was to decrease the area of the shelter from 166 acres to 57 acres at a cost of $883,800. The Engineer's report and estimates were referred to the Public Works Com- mittee of the Legislative Council of which the Chairman of the Chamber of Commerce is a member and they unanimously recommended the larger scheme at Mong Kok Tsui.

Method of meeting cost.

After a most careful investigation of the liabilities of the Government and the available Revenue which I need not detail at length in this Memorandum but which on fitting oppor- tunity I shall fully explain, I satisfied myself that I had no alternative but to raise the Light Dues temporarily in the way which has been described to the Chamber of Commerce.

..

512

mmmm.com

The following are among the reasons which led me to this conclusion

a. On the last occasion when an increase of Revenue was found to be necessary (in 1902) practically all licenses were largely increased but no additional contribu- tion was asked from shipping. Its ability to contribute was recognised, but it was reserved for the next occasion which might arise.

b. This liability was recognised in December 1896 when the Un-official Members with one exception unanimously recommended that the imposition of a permanent tonnage Due of 13 cents in addition to the 1 cent Light Dues on the grounds that shipping should pay its fair proportion to the Revenue.

e. It arises from the fact that shipping benefits directly both in respect of capital expenditure on works, and in respect of increased efficiency in administrative machinery. In 1842 the Colony could offer nothing but a harbour infested by pirates and ships watered from a waterfall near Aberdeen. There is now efficient police protection, hospitals, markets, better and cheaper water supply, various useful institutions like the Sailors Home, good wharfs and piers for landing and discharging cargo, and a well organized Harbour Department which regulates

native craft.

4. The principle that shipping should contribute to General Revenue is recognised by the United States of America, which assigned shipping dues to National debt charges, defence, and General Revenue. In reply to a petition from the shipping interest in 1897 Mr. CHAMBERLAIN replied: If at any time hereafter urgent necessity should arise for increasing the General Revenue I should be prepared to consider any proposal for again raising the shipping dues", and again in 1902 he gave it as his view that a special tax should be levied to cover any harbour improvement.

e. In my view the typhoon shelter is a great "harbour improvement" which more- over directly benefits Ocean shipping in that lighters and small craft which now bolt for the inadequate refuge at Causeway Bay on the first indication of a typhoon and so leave the Ocean Steamers sometimes I believe for several days unable to load or discharge, and thus subject them to much delay and expense, will when the new typhoon refuge is built be able to remain to the last moment secure in the knowledge that they can gain an entrance however late.

If however this direct benefit to Ocean shipping should be disputed, the principles put forward in (c) and (d) show that shipping is liable for con- tribution to any harbour improvement and even to purposes of General Revenue.

f. It has been argued that the imposition of any dues beyond the amount actually spent on lights and buoys would mean that Hongkong would no longer be a Free Port. A "Free Port" is one in which no Customs dues are charged. Copenhagen, a free port, charges the equivalent of sixpence a Shanghai charges the equivalent of 1-1 cents per ton.

ton, while

Others have urged that the Proclamation of 1842 made exemption of all dues, and an increase would violate that pledge. The Proclamation was not in the nature of a treaty or pledge to third parties but was merely a statement of the policy of the day, viz. :-to attract commerce to a new and undeveloped port. The policy of to-day is to charge a very moderate rate for improvements effected on behalf of shipping.

g. It has been urged that the Colony owes its prosperity to shipping which would avoid the Port if dues are levied. There are those who maintain that shipping which would avoid the Port for dues is so small as these, were better away. The dues were raised to 2 cents between April 1890 and October 1897 to pay for the Gap Rock Lighthouse, and between these dates the tonnage increased from 4,893,733 tons to 6,063,640 tons. The inducement of ships to come to this port is not that they have nothing to pay, but in order to earn freights and proportionately as Hongkong becomes an industrial centre her shipping will Our geographical position is equally advantageous to us as an industrial centre, as it is as a Port of Call.

513-

h. The Chamber of Commerce appear to contend that the amount imposed upon shipping is too great, and that other interests should contribute a portion. Only a half of the cost is asked from the shipping, and though I am not at present able to forecast the financial requirements of next year and shall not be in a position to do so till the draft estimates are before me, I fear that the shipping interest is by no means likely to be the only one which will have to submit to increased taxation, looking to the large increase of Revenue necessary for pay- ment of interest on Railway expenditure, the fall in exchange, the prospect of decline in opium revenue, and the continued loss due to discount on subsidiary

coins.

i. The Chamber of Commerce urge that the sum to be raised should be spread over a longer term of years, with a proportionate decrease in the extra dues. There is no point which has been more strongly emphasized by the respresentatives of the Community in Council than that the construction of the Refuge should be pushed on with the utmost rapidity, and should not be allowed to occupy so long a time as the Post Office and Law Courts are doing. A period of 5 years has been estimated for the work, but if it should take longer than that time, it may be possible to spread the contribution for the last year or two over a longer period. Government however is not able to supply the capital for the commencement of the work, and to rely on gradually recouping itself over a long series of years, nor, in view of the existing Loans which amount to above one tenth of Revenue, am I able to recommend to the Secretary of State, nor would he agree to a proposal for a Loan for such a purpose. I do not enter into this matter in detail in this Memorandum however, since it has already extended to consider- able length.

8th May, 1998.

(Sd.). F. D. LUGARD,

HONGKONG GENERAL CHAMBER OF COMMERCE,

HONGKONG, 23rd May, 1908.

SIR,-I beg to acknowledge with thanks the receipt of your letter of yesterday's (?) date forwarding the copy of a memorandum by His Excellency the Governor with plans and estimates of the proposed New Harbour of Refuge to be constructed at Mongkokisui.

I have placed these before my Committee and hope soon to be in a position to reply.

Hon. F. H. May. Č.M.G.,

Colonial Secretary.

I have, &c.,

E. A. M. WILLIAMS, Secretary.

COLONIAL SECRETARY'S OFFICE,

HONGKONG, 17th June, 1908.

SIR,-I am directed to acknowledge the recept of your letter of the 23rd ultimo and to inquire whether your Committee is now in a position to reply to my letter No. 9266 of 1907 of the 20th ultimo.

I have, &c.,

The Secretary, HONGKONG GENERAL CHAMBER OF COMMERCE.

F. H. MAY,

Colonial Secretary.

1

514

HONGKONG GENERAL CHAMBER OF COMMERCE,

HONGKONG, 19th June, 1908.

SIR,In reply to your letter of yesterday's date having reference to the proposed New Harbour of Refuge to be constructed at Mongkoktsui, I beg to inform you that the matter is having the careful consideration of my Committee, and a reply will be forwarded to you in a few days.

I have, &c.,

E. A. M. WILLIAMS,

Secretary.

COLONIAL SECRETARY'S OFFICE,

HONGKONG, 3rd July, 1908.

SIR,-With reference to your letter No. 9266/07 of the 19th ultimo, I am directed to point out to you that no reply has yet been sent by your Committee to my letter of the 20th of last May.

I have, &c.,

The Secretary, HONGKONG GENERAL CHAMBER OF COMMERCE.

F. H. MAY,

Colonial Secretary.

HONGKONG GENERAL CHAMBER OF COMMERCE, HONGKONG, 3rd July, 1908.

SIR,I am directed to reply to your letter of 20th May, 1908, (No. 9266/1907) on the subject of the proposed Harbour of Refuge at Mongkoktsui, and the imposition of additional Light Dues to defray half the cost thereof.

My Committee have submitted the plans and estimates to the general body of British Shipping Companies; or their Agents, for their consideration, and the expression of their further views on this important subject.

I am to enclose for His Excellency's perusal, a copy of a letter since received from them, together with their memoranda mentioned in paragraph two of such letter.

I am to state that my Committee wish to associate themselves with the views of the Shipping Companies, as contained in their letter to this Chamber and the accompanying memoranda, and would ask His Excellency to accept such letter and Memoranda as an expression of opinion by the Chamber of Commerce.

I return with this the plans and estimates and am directed to request you to express the thanks of my Committee to His Excellency for the opportunity accorded them of examining. the scheme and commenting thereon.

Hon. F. H. May, C.M.G.,

Colonial Secretary.

I have, &c.,

E. A. M. WILLIAMS.

Secretary.

515

HONGKONG, 23rd June, 1908.

SIR-We beg to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 29th ultimo enclosing copies of the Government's reply to your Chamber's letter regarding the proposed Typhoon Harbour of Refuge at Mongkoktsui and Memoranda by His Excellency and the Hon. the Director of Public Works, * for which we have to thank you.

For the sake of brevity we attach memoranda we have drawn up regarding the proposed refuge, and our notes on some of the points affecting the shipping trade and taxation of Hongkong, dealing with the comments made by His Excellency.

We are strongly of opinion that immediate steps should be taken to improve the refuge at Causeway Bay, half of which at the present time is practically useless owing to silt. We think that, on this being done, it will provide shelter for the greater part, if not the whole, of the smaller craft employed in the Harbour.

Should the Government, however, be definitely committed to the Mongkoktsui scheme we rely on your Chamber to advocate that they adopt a scheme on the lines laid down in our memorandum, by which the cost but not necessarily the work-is spread over a term of years, and will thus fall less heavily on those who have to contribute to the cost of the works, a policy which is usually adopted by port trusts and cities borrowing money for permanent improvements.

With reference to the Colonial Secretary's reply to our enquiry regarding the increased fees on cargo boats, lighters and water boats, we are surprised to learn that the increase was made in the interest of General Revenue, on the ground that such fees were considered to be low. We are of the opinion that fees derived from such a source should be devoted to the up-keep of the various branches of the Harbour Department; and that any surplus should be applied to works such as the dredging of Causeway Bay or the erection of a typhoon shelter. We would point out that, from past records, Mr. CHAMBERLAIN mentioned the revenue derived from native Shipping was to be applied to the Harbour Master's Department, as apart from what may be termed the General Budget of the Colony.

(Signed,) F. J. Abbott,

We are, &c.,

Acting Superintendent-P. & O. Steam Navigation Co., Butterfield & Swire,

Agents, Ocean Steamship Co., Ltd.,

3

12

*

22

""

""

China Mutual Steam Navigation Co., Ltd., China Navigation Co., Ltd.,

Jardine Matheson & Co., Ltd.,

General Managers, Indo-China S. N. Co., Ltd., Agents,

Dodwell & Co., Ltd.,

Indra Line Ltd.,

Edgar G. Barrett, Manager.,

Canadian Pacific Railway Co.,

J. W. Craddock, General Traffic Agent,

Douglas Lapraik & Co.,

General Managers, Douglas Steamship Co., Ltd., Gibb Livingston & Co.,

Agents, "Ben" Line of Steamers,

*7

E. & A. S. S. Co., Ltd.,

Shewan Tomes & Co.,

General Managers, China Manila S. S. Co., Ltd.,

General Agents,

Agents,

America Asiatic S. S. Co., Ltd.,

Shire Line of Steamers, Ltd.,

McGregor Bros. & Gow.,

General Managers, "Glen" Line of Steamers,

Hongkong, Canton & Macao Steamboat Co., Ltd.,

W. E. Clarke, Secretary,

David Sassoon & Co., Ltd.,

Agents. Apcar Line.

* Not printed.

[

Copy.

516

MEMORANDUM FROM THE BRITISH SHIPPING LINES TO THE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE re LIGHT DUES.

A

Typhoon Shelter.-If the Government has not definitely decided to build the new Harbour of Refuge at Mongkoktsui there are various reasons against the site:---

1. Too big.-Contemplated size not required at present-unwise to build as intended

when the necessity is not apparent.

2. Cost.-Prohibitive in Colony's present financial condition.

3. Accessibility. It is no more accessible than the present refuge.

These reasons are all in favour of first improving the present site at Causeway Bay (which is in a disgraceful state), and watching the result. In favour of this it is contended that:-

1. Cost of dredging is not excessive.

2. Accessibility is equal to new site proposed.

3. Area is large enough for all practical purposes. Lighters and large junks can ride at anchor as they have always done, and small craft can be well accommodated at Causeway Bay in ordinary typhoons.

4. Safety of Craft. For a typhoon unsigualled, as in 1906, norefuge of any size or

description or situation would be of any avail.

Mongkoktsui Shelter. Suggested method of mreting Cost.--If the Government is definite- ly committed to the Mongkoktsui scheme there is nothing further to be said except for the shipping to present their views as to financing the work. They would repeat that this should be arranged to extend over a longer period than that proposed by the Government and that the extra tax on shipping should not exceed cent per ton net register. The financial arrangements should be separate and distinct from the General Finances of the Colony. This can be done if necessary without the Government contracting a special loan. Any of the local Banks will be glad to lend the money as an ordinary overdraft at 6 per cent if guaranteed by the Government, the Shipping Companies guaranteeing to pay the extra cent per net register ton until the cost is finally paid off, the account to be reduced by the payment monthly into the Bank providing the money, of the total realised by the extra cent, together with an equal amount representing the Government's half share of the cost. By this means the urgency of the work suffers no delay.

REFERS TO GOVERNMENT MEMORANDUM.

a. Owing to the increased size of steamers heavier dues have to be paid than heretofore. In most instances steamers have not brought or taken away more cargo than formerly, but the cost of calling has been increased. The Colony has consequently benefited.

b., d. and h.-In reply to the petition in 1897, Mr. CHAMBERLAIN also stated:-"I concur in your views that moderate dues may probably be levied in Hongkong provided the proceeds do not in ordinary times exceed the total expenditure of the Harbour Department including Light Houses, Water Police, &c."

Lord Selbourne at the same time and with the same proviso regarding the expenditure of the Habour Department wrote that Mr. Chamberlain had under his consideration to adopt one of the two following alternatives, viz., "(1) a uniform charge of two cents (instead of 2 cents) per ton on all shipping or (2) a charge on a graduated scale such as is levied at Gibraltar beginning at 24 cents per ton on smaller vessels and rising to a maximum charge of (say) $30 to $40 on ships of (say) 1,800 tons and over”.

517

A

From these extracts it can be only concluded that it was not the wish or intention of the Home Government to levy a heavy tax on steamers. On the existing scale many steamers are paying heavier dues than Mr. Chamberlain (2) contemplated.

In 1896-1897 a fair average Ocean steamer was 3,000 tons register tonnage dues at 1 cent $28 at 2 cents $70.

To-day Ocean steamers are often 5,000 tons register tonnage dues at 1 cent $50 at 24 cents $125.

c.-Harbour Police should be, and we believe is, paid out of light dues.

Hospitals. Markets.

Water supply. S

Services under this heading are paid for by Shipping Companies at market rates to the financial benefit of the Colony-there is no favour the obligation is mutual.

Sailors' Home pays for itself we believe, and it would be interesting to learn what share the Government pays for any advantages derived therefrom by the Shipping.

Wharves and Piers.-Government have charged Shipping Companies very highly for Crown Rent, &c., and piers and wharves are erected by private enterprise. Shipping pays directly for every service rendered.

Cost of Harbour Department is more than paid for out of Light Dues.

19

f-Free Port-Shipping Companies do not protest against extra taxation altogether on their own account; they can always "even up on rates so that ultimately all additional taxation is met by consumers, but the Government should tread cautiously in the direction of increasing the burdens on shipping, for if taxation is increased beyond reason, owners will have to protect themselves by increasing rates to the disadvantage of Hongkong vis d vis other ports.

The difference of even half a cent per picul might mean that transhipment of thousands of tons of cargo would be diverted from Hongkong and delivered direct to Manila, Shanghai, Canton and elsewhere. The Shipping Companies can view such a transfer of trade with equanimity, because they can deliver and collect cargo in Manila or Shanghai or elsewhere with equal facility, but the Hongkongovernment would realise, when perhaps it was too late, that they had driven trade into the hands of a competing port, willing and anxious to secure the trade.

In the Philippines the American Government has lately spent large sums in improving their harbours, and the ports are absolutely free-no tonnage dues or light dues-and as a consequence railway material and other home cargo which used to come via Hongkong is now carried direct to the Philippines, while hemp and other exports which previously were transhipped at this port, are increasingly shipped direct from Manila.

Shanghai are similarly improving the Whangpoo, not at the expense of shipping, but in order to attract it. Shanghai is not a free port and does not claim to be, but how is the 14 cents per ton made up? China charges tonnage dues at the rate of 4 mace per net register ton: 61 mexican cents for 4 months. For this levy steamers have the privilege of calling at any and all China Ports as many times as they like for a period of 4 months without extra charge of any kind, and should steamers be laid up during the period an extension is granted. Contrast the services rendered by the Chinese Government with that by the Hongkong Government. There is no comparison. The China Coast is one of the best lighted in the world and the service second to none. On some of the regular coasting lines the charge of 4 mace every 4 months actually works out less than the Hongkong dues of 1 cent per net register ton levied every time a steamer calls.

9.—If it is correct that the Colony does not owe its prosperity to Shipping it will not be disputed we presume that it is the trade which attracts it here. If that trade is driven else- where by excessive taxation either direct or indirect it will be lost to the Colony but not to the Shipping which can readily follow it. How easily Shipping followed the trade to Manchester when the Canal was opened, how quickly it left Macao for Hongkong and Chefoo for Tsingtau, when lack of attention to its approaches in the one case and railway development in the other carried the produce of the hinterlands to the neighbouring ports.

!

518

Hongkong of itself is not naturally an industrial centre. It has risen to be one by the freedom and cheapness of the port-that is the one advantage that has enabled the Colony to rise above natural disadvantages, and if we are to continue to prosper this advantage must not be interfered with; if it is, just as surely as taxation is increased and cost of production levelled up to other places will the port decay.

COLONIAL SECRETARY'S OFFICE.

HONGKONG, 25th July, 1908.,

SIR,--I am directed to acknowledge receipt of your letter of 3rd instant with its en- closures, relative to the construction of a Typhoon Shelter and the means of raising funds for the work.

2. Your Committee urge that a new Shelter is unnecessary and that Causeway Bay is sufficient for all purposes. The Government is somewhat at a loss to understand this change of opinion on the part of the Committee of the Chamber in view of their letter of the 16th of July, 1904, in which the provision of an additional Shelter either at Mong Kok Tsui or Cheung Sha Wan was strongly advocated. A copy of the letter in question is appended for convenience of reference together with copy of a letter from the Typhoon Relief Committee dated the 25th of March, 1907, in which that Committee endorsed the proposal for a Shelter at Mong Kok Tsui. I append a list of the names of the Committee in question on which the Chamber of Commerce was strongly represented. It is to be noticed that Mr. W. J. Gresson and Mr. D. R. Law representing two of the largest Shipping Firms, which now dissent from the proposal, were on the Committee. To make the record complete I am also to append the reports of the Public Works Committee who considered and reported on this question in 1906 and 1907.

*

3. Judging by the speeches of Un-official Members of Council in September last, and by other expressions of public opinion it would seem that the view now put forward by the Chamber is not shared by the community outside the shipping interests. His Excellency on the occasion referred to endorsed the pledge given by his predecessor that Government would undertake the provision of an additional Shelter without delay, and the regrettable delay which has already occurred is due to circumstances, as will be explained, over which the Government has had little or no control.

4. Assuming therefore that the large majority of the Community of Hongkong consider that the provision of an additional Typhoon Shelter is an urgent and paramount necessity, the first matter to be settled was its location and cost Prolonged investigation into these two questions has been responsible for the greater part of the delay which has taken place, and finality was at last reached on the report of the Public Works Committee of the Legis- lative Council (No. 1 of 1958).* It was then decided on the reports of experts that the best site was at Mong ok Tsui, and that the scheme proposed by Mr. BOULTON at an estimated cost of 1 million dollars should be undertaken His Excellency does not propose to re-open this discussion, which would merely result in further delay.

5. Adverting now to your remarks regarding the deepening of Causeway Bay, I am to inform you that a tender has already been accepted for deepening the Southern portion of the Causeway Bay Shelter to a depth of 1 foot below low water of ordinary Spring Tides and work will commence on this at once.

6. The next question at issue is the means by which the funds required for the new Typhoon Shelter are to be raised. In this connection I am to point out that the quotation. given in your letter under reply from a Despatch received from Mr. Chamberlain when Secretary of State for the Colonies does not convey an accurate idea of the views expressed by him. In the last paragraph of the Despatch referred to he wrote:-

"I desire to add, that if at any time hereafter urgent necessity should arise for in- creasing the general revenue, I should be prepared to consider any proposal for again raising the shipping dues, as I have no reason to think that the present charge has borne very hardly on the shipping interests".

* Not printed.

519

7. In all the circumstances the Governor with the advice of the Executive Council de- cided that the proposed temporary increase in Light Dues was a reasonable one for the purpose proposed, and that past experience showed that it would not injuriously affect the Port.

His Excellency has, however, read with interest the facts you adduce to show that the conditions. of the present day are not identical with those of the past and that in your view the exper- ience of the past may prove to some extent fallacious when applied to the conditions of to- day. He proposes therefore to limit the temporary increase to 2 cents instead of 2 cents per ton, and to exclude the cost of deepening Causeway Bay from the special fund towards which the additional dues are to be devoted.

8. His Excellency is not prepared to raise a loan for this work in view of the fact that inclusive of the Loan of 1902 the Colony has already raised a sum of £1,485,733 for Rail- way Construction and other purposes. The interests and sinking funds on these Loans will probably reach 10 per centum of the Colonial Revenue and in these circumstances no addi- tional Loan is feasible, nor would it meet with the concurrence of the Secretary of State. The proposal of your Committee to borrow from a local Bank at 6 per centum as an over- draft whatever funds are required to meet the excess of expenditure over the annual amount raised by the addition of a half cent Light Dues and an equivalent sum from Government Funds would, on the assumption that the total cost amounted to $1,500,000 and was equally ex- pended each year during a period of 5 years, result in a debt to Bank by the shipping interest of a sum of $657,285; (assuming that the half cent extra due would produce a sum of $40,000 per annum) to cancel this debt with continued payments of $40,000 per annum would involve the continuance of the extra half cent for a further period of 73 years. His Excellency proposes in lieu of this that advances should be made by the Crown Agents or from the Colony's reserves at 4 per centum to meet the yearly deficits. With the proposed increase of the Light Dues to 2 cents, the amount paid by the shipping interest would be $80,000 and the debt remaining to be extinguished by the shipping interest at the end of the 5 years con- struction period would be $394,308 which at the same rate of 2 cents would be extinguished in about 5 years.

It is therefore calculated that the temporary increase in the Light Dues would extend over a total period of eleven years. His Excellency concurs in your view that the funds for the construction of the Shelter should be kept separate entirely from current Revenue and has recommended to the Secretary of State in this sense.

His Excellency is at the same time prepared to give the assurance that the Government has no intention of continuing the proposed increase to Light Dues after the cost of the Typhoon Refuge has been met, and that this cost will be shared equally by the Funds of the Colony and the produce of the additional cent Light Dues. It must, however, be clearly understood that His Excellency cannot bind himself or his successors in office not to again increase Light Dues should urgent occasion arise, but in such a case a new Resolution would be proposed to the Legislative Council and the matter would be considered on its own

merits.

I am, &c.,

F. H. MAY, Colonial Secretary.

The Secretary, HONGKONG GENERAL CHAMBER OF COMMERCE.

Typhoon Relief Fund Committee.

Sir Paul Chater, Kt., C.M.G., (Chairman). H. E. R. Hunter, Esq., (Hon. Treasurer). Hon. Mr. E. A. Hewett, (Hon. Secretary).

Hon. Mr. W. J. Gresson.

Hon. Mr. A. W. Brewin.

Hon. Dr. Ho Kai, M.B., C.M., C.M.G. Hon. Mr. Wei Yuk.

520

Hon. Capt. L. A. W. Barnes-Lawrence.

E. A. Irving, Esq.

Fung Wa Chun, Esq.

Lau Chu Pak, Esq. Tang Chi Ngong, Esq. Ho Kom Tong, Esq. Francisco Tse Yat, Esq. D. R. Law, Esq. A. G. Wood, Esq.

D. Nissim, Esq. A. J. Raymond, Esq. H. N. Mody, Esq.

A. Haupt, Esq.

N. A. Siebs, Esq.

E. Goetz, Esq.

A. Babington, Esq.

HONGKONG, 5th August, 1908.

SIR, -With reference to our letters of 23rd April and 23rd June last addressed to the Hongkong General Chamber of Commerce on the subject of the proposed typhoon harbour of refuge at Mong Kok Tsui, copies of which were forwarded by them to the Government, and to the last of which we have not yet officially received a copy of the Government's reply, although we notice a copy of same in this morning's Daily Press, we beg to state that, we most emphatically protest against the resolution to be proposed in the Legislative Council on the 6th inst. to raise the Light Dues leviable on steamers entering this port from 1 cent to 2 cents per net register ton, for the purpose of partly financing the scheme to build a harbour of refuge at Mong Kok Tsui at a cost of $1,500,000.

From the copy in the Daily Press of your letter to the Hongkong General Chamber of Commerce replying to our communication of 23rd June last, we notice that the Government have made some capital out of the fact that two members of the 1906 Typhoon Relief Committee, whose firms represent large shipping interests here and who are signatories to our letters of 23rd April and 23rd June last, acquiesced in the recommendation made by that Committee to the Government that the harbour of refuge at Mong Kok Tsui should be proceeded with at once.

While this statement is correct in as far as it goes, we would direct the attention of the Government to the fact that the question of financing the proposed harbour of refuge at Mong Kok Tsui was never discussed by that Committee who understood that it was to be paid for by the Government out of the funds promised by them to the Relief Fund, but which were not required for that purpose.

Further, we should like to state that the present proposals by the Government to spend $1,500,000 on a Harbour of Refuge at Mong Kok Tsui-half of which has to be provided by the Shipping Companies-is quite another matter, and had such proposals been made by the 1906 Typhoon Relief Committee, it is safe to assume that both the gentlemen mentioned in your letter of 25th July last to the Hongkong General Chamber of Commerce would have strongly protested against the proposal.

But putting that matter on one side, it has been again clearly demonstrated to us in the recent unfortunate typhoon of the 27th/28th July that there is no necessity for the con- struction of so large and costly a harbour of refuge as that proposed by the Government.

521

With only 5 hours' notice from the Observatory of the approach of the typhoon within the 300 miles radius, comparatively little damage was done to small craft, and the loss that did occur might have been greatly reduced had the Observatory been able to ascertain the near proximity of the storm, which they were apparently unable to do, judging from the fact that the black signals were not hoisted until 6 p.m. and that the guns were fired about 11 p.m. when the typhoon was actually upon the port.

Further we beg to state that we are prepared to prove :—

(1.) That Causeway Bay refuge was not by any means fully occupied by craft on the night of the late typhoon and that there was room for many more boats.

(2.) That the Government's theory that there is always sufficient water at Causeway Bay in a typhoon is misleading, for while this may be the case in the height of a typhoon we are prepared to prove that there was great congestion on the afternoon of the 27th July at the entrance to the refuge after the typhoon was signalled outside 300 miles-boats desiring to enter being prevented by the inability of those already in from moving further inshore owing to the shallowness of the refuge.

It has been hinted that it is the intention of the Government to fill in Causeway Bay refuge when the proposed Mong Kok Tsui scheme is completed, and we should be glad to have the Government's assurance that this is not so. If, however, such should be the case we suggest that the money eventually obtained by the sale of that ground should be ear-marked to reimburse the cost of the Mong Kok Tsui scheme if the Government are determined to proceed with the work.

We are, however, so convinced that the Government's proposal to spend $1,500,000 on a Harbour of Refuge at Mong Kok Tsui is unnecessary and unwise that we would again urge His Excellency to reconsider the whole question before finally committing the Colony to the expenditure of so large an amount of public and private money.

We are sending a copy of this letter to the Chamber of Commerce, also to the Cham- ber's representative on the Legislative Council and to the Press.

(Signed)

F. J. Abbott,

"

33

:2

**

* ,

2

>>

We are, &c.,

Acting Superintendent-P. & O. Steam Navigation Co., Butterfield & Swire,

Agents, Ocean Steamship Co., Ltd.,

12

"1

China Mutual Steam Navigation Co., Ltd., China Navigation Co., Ltd.,

Jardine Matheson & Co., Ltd.,

General Managers, Indo-China S. N. Co., Ltd., Agents,

22

Indra Line Ltd..

British India S. N. Co.,

Hongkong, Canton & Macao Steamboat Co., Ltd.,

W. E. Clarke, Secretary,

Canadian Pacific Railway Co.,

J. W. Craddock, General Traffic Agent, Dodwell & Co., Ltd.,

Edgar G. Barrett, Manager,

Shewan Tomes & Co.,

Per Pro McGregor Bros. & Gow,

E. H. Hinds,

General Managers, "Glen" Line,

Gibb Livingston & Co.,

Agents, "Ben"

"Ben" Line,

E. & A. S. S. Co., Ltd.,

David Sassoon & Co., Ltd.,

E. Shellim, Manager,

Agents, Apcar Line.

Douglas Lapraik & Co,

General Managers, Douglas Steamship Co., Ltd.

The Hon. Mr. F. H. MAY, C.M.G.,

Colonial Secretary,

&C.,

&c.,

&c.

9266/1907.

522

COLONIAL SECRETARY'S OFFICE,.

HONGKONG, 6th August, 1908.

GENTLEMEN, I am directed to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 5th instant protesting against the resolution to be considered today by the Legislative Council to raise the Light Dues from 1 cent to 2 cents per net register ton for the purpose of defraying half the cost of the proposed Typhoon Shelter at Mongkoktsui.

Your letter of the 23rd of June to which reference is made was received under cover of a letter from the Chamber of Commerce dated the 3rd ultimo.

A reply was sent to the Chamber on the 25th ultimo and in the circumstances the Government did not conceive that a separate answer to your letter of the 23rd of June was

necessary.

2. With regard to the 2nd and 3rd paragraphs of your letter under reply, I am to point out that you have misunderstood the nature of the reference made to the Typhoon Relief Committee in my letter of the 18th of December, 1906. That letter covered a report by

Mr. J. F. BoULTON in which several schemes for a second boat shelter were discussed and the opinion the Typhoon Relief Committee on the merits of the several proposals was invited. The Committee pronounced in favour of Mongkoktsui.

3. Your contention now is that so large and costly a shelter is not necessary, and you aver that on the night of the typhoon of the 27th July the shelter at Causeway Bay was by no means full and that on the afternoon of the same day there was congestion owing to the inability of the craft already in the refuge to get further in and make room for others.

It is possible that on the afternoon in question owing to low tide some congestion did occur, but with the rising tide the shelter was filled with boats; and that it was not adequate to accommodate all the craft that would have sought shelter if shelter had been available is proved by the fact that in the Harbour no less than 6 steam-launches, 1 motor- boat, 10 European lighters, and 66 junks, cargo-boats and sampans were wrecked, with a loss of 45 lives, on the night in question. Large numbers of craft of various descriptions took shelter behind Stonecutters' Island and along the Yaumati shore and it was solely due to the fact that at no time did the typhoon blow from the westward that these did not suffer great loss and damage.

4. It is within your knowledge that steps are being taken to deepen that portion of Causeway Bay which becomes exposed at low tide for which Shipping will not be charged. There is no present intention to fill in Causeway Bay on the provision of a second shelter. The Causeway Bay shelter is regarded as a useful harbour of refuge especially for the numerous boats that frequent the eastern portion of the Harbour.

of the Harbour. But it has its limita- tions, one of which is its inadequate size and the other its inaccessibility for lighters and other craft using the western and north-western portions of the Harbour.

I am to remind you that the question of the provision of a second Typhoon Shelter has now been under consideration for 4 years during which period the Government has been urged in the Public Press and in the Legislative Council to prosecute the. work with expedition in response to the loudly declared desire of the community. The location of the shelter at Mongkok tsui has been approved by various representative Committees and procrastination now on the part of the Government would justly merit censure.

5. For these and other reasons fully set out in the printed correspondence of which a copy is enclosed, His Excellency is not prepared to re-open the question of the provision of a second shelter, of its location or of the method of financing its construction, matters which have received the very earnest consideration of the Government, its expert advisers and the Public Works Committee of the Legislative Council for many months past.

ì

The Acting Superintendent,

I am, &c.,

(Signed) F. H. MAY,

Colonial Secretary.

Peninsular and Oriental Steam Navigation Company, and others.

395

GENERAL REPORT OF THE PRINCIPAL CIVIL MEDICAL OFFICER

AND THE MEDICAL OFFICER OF HEALTH,

FOR THE YEAR 1907.

AREA.

The Sanitary Board's jurisdiction extends to the Islan of Hongkong, which has an area of 29 square miles, and to that portion of territory on the mainland between the shore and the first range of the Kowloon Hills extending from the village of Tseung Kwan O in Junk Bay, on the East, to the village of Kau Pa Hang on the West-with a sea frontage of about thirteen miles and an area of about sixteen square miles. Old Kow- loon, with an area of about 23 square miles, has been in British occupation since 1861, but New Kowl on was leased to this Government in 1898 only, as part of what is known as the New Territories. The remainder of the New Territories is not under the jurisdiction of the Sanitary Board.

The City of Victoria, built on the Northern shore of the Island of Hongkong, has a frontage to the sea of nearly five miles and is separated from the opposite mainland of Kowloon by the Harbour, which is rather less than a mile and a third wide opposite the centre of the City and widens out to somewhat over three miles at its widest part, con- tracting again at Lyemun Pass on the East to little more than a quarter of a mile in width.

The domestic buildings of the City of Victoria number 9,672 exclusive of Barracks and Police Stations, of which 976 are Non-Chinese dwellings, while there are also 162 European dwellings in the Hill District. The number of new houses completed during the year was as follows:-City of Victoria 90, Kowloon 28, Outlying districts 21, and Peak 3, making a total of 142.

In addition to the above there were erected miscellaneous buildings such as oflices, godowns, etc., to the number of 70.

GENERAL SANITARY CONDITION.

In connection with anti-plague measures to render as far as possible houses rat-proof, 370 ground surfaces in houses have been repaired and 1,201 buildings have had rat-runs filled up with cement. In addition 44 basements illegally inhabitel have been vacated, while permits for the use of 58 basements and for 147 basement kitchens have been issued and 9 basements have been altered to fulfil legal requirements.

Open spaces in the rear have been provided to 16 existing houses, while modifications in regard to such open spaces or backyards have been allowel in the case of 20 houses and small obstructions therein allowed in 112 others. Exemption from the provision of a yard has been granted in the case of 19 houses, and obstructions have been removed from backyards, under notice, in 181 houses.

In addition to the above improvements carried out under the supervision of the Sanitary Department varions other permanent improvements have been effected by the Public Works Department. These include the training of nullahs to the extent of 4,346 feet, the build- ing of a public latrine in the Old Western Market, and the resumption and demolition of one house and of portions of two others.

A considerable improvement is always taking place in the matter of scavenging lanes but the full effect of the Ordinance in this respect will not be noticeable for a considerable number of

Nevertheless the total area of lanes obtained for scavenging purposes during the years. year has been 13,771 sq. ft., the length being 2,629' 5".

During the year three wells, the water of which was unsatisfactory, were closel by order of the Sanitary Board, while one Government well was also closed on account of pollution of the water.

year:

396

METEOROLOGICAL RETURN.

The following Table records the meteorological conditions which prevailed during the

Month.

Barometer

at M.S.L.

TEMPERATURE.

HUMIDITY.

Max. Mean. Min.

Rel.

Abs.

Cloudiness.

Sunshine.

WIND.

Rain.

Dir.

Vel.

ins.

p. c.

ins.

p. c.

hours. ins.

Points.

miles p. h.

January,

February,

30.16 66.3 61.4

57.0

69

0.38

44

195.8 3.445

E by N

12.4

30.14 61.8

58.7

55.2

75

0.38

80

96.5 0.165

E by N

15.3

March...... 30.08 68.4

63.8

59.7

80

0.50

80

86.8 0.335

E by N

12.8

April,

29.96 72.9 69.2

65.7 84

0.61

86

78.3 11.755

E

13.5

May,

29.85

80.6

76.2

73.0

82

0.74

77

164.0 11.280

E by S

13.9

June,

29.75

84.3 79.9

76.4

80

0.82

72

181.0 13.170

SE by E

11.6

July,

29.74 87.1

82.5

79.1

80

0.88

August,

29.70 86.7 81.9

78.3

81

0.88

September, 29.81 85.1 80.6

76.6

78

0.82

October,

29.96 83.4 79.0

75.4

80

0.79

November, 30.08 76.0 71.5

Mean or Total, 29.95

Total

73

December, 30.19 67.0 61.9 57.2 63 0.35 59

76.6 72.2 68.4 77 0.64 69

67.5

73

0.57

2 8 8 8 N

72

210.5 7.385

S by E

10.3

62

222.5 14.855 E by S

11.7

59

187.9 19.465

E

11.3

66

191.2 8.965

E

13.6

122.9 1.265 NE by E

12.0

165.5| 1.460| NE by E

1902.9 93.545| D

12.4

12.6

The average annual rainfall during the ten years ending 1897 was 92.6 inches, while for the decade ending 1907 it has fallen to 77-3 inches. The rainfall for last year therefore (93.5 inches) is well above the average of recent years.

POPULATION.

The population of the Colony exclusive of the New Territories at the Census taken on November 20th, 1906, was as follows:-

Non-Chinese Civil Community,

Chinese:

City of Victoria (including Peak and Stonecutters' Island),......174,937

Villages of Hongkong,

Old Kowloon,

New Kowloon,.....

Floating population,

Mercantile Marine,

Total Chinese Population,.

Army,

Navy,

12,415

17,032

52,331

17,836

42.744

2,508

307,388

4,537

4,298

328,638

Total Population of the Colony, exclusive of New Territories

(except New Kowloon) in 1906,

At the Census taken in 1901 the Civil population of the Colony, exclusive of the New Territories, was 283,975, so that the increase in the Civil population during this period has been 17,992 exclusive of New Kowloon and the rest of the New Territories.

I

397

The estimated population to the middle of 1907 is as follows:-

Non-Chinese Civil Community,...

Chinese :-

City of Victoria (including Peak and Stonecutters' Island).

12,700

..175,740

Villages of Hongkong,

16,660

Kowloon,

71,950

Floating population...

43,530

Mercantile Marine,

2,700

Total Chinese Civil Population,

310,580

Army (average strength),

3,920

Navy (average strength),

2,157

Total Population of the Colony in 1907 exclusive of the New Territories (except New Kowloon),

329,357

The Chinese population of the New Territories (exclusive of New Kowloon) was 85,011 at the Census taken in 1901 but there are no data as yet on which to base an estimate of the increase in population (if any) in this portion of the Colony since that date.

The average strength of the troops in Garrison during 1907 was 98 British Officers and 1,461 British N. C. O.s and men with 36 Indian Officers and 1,833 Indian N. C. O.s and men, and 54 Chinese attached to the Royal Engineers. There was also 370 British women and children, and 68 Indian women and children, making a total of 438.

The average strength of the British fleet was as follows:-Europeans permanently in the Colony 130, Europeans occasionally in the Colony 5.59, Chinese permanently in the Colony 130, Chinese occasionally in the Colony 130-making a total of 5,950. For the purpose of estimating the population it is consid rel a fair average to include one-third only of those "occasionally" resident in the Colony; this gives 2,157 and of these 173 are Chinese.

The Chinese boat population (exclusive of the New Territories), is estimated for 1907 as 43,530 and the number of boats belonging to the Port and the villages of Hongkong, is as follows:-

Passenger boats, Cargo boats,.

Steam-launches,

Lighters,

Harbour boats,..

Fishing boats,

Trading junks,

2,555

1,764

266

186

1,415

6,935

2,666

15,787

The number enumerated at the Census taken in November 1906 was 6,459 but this was only a month after the great Typhoon by which many of these boats were destroyed. There are in addition 9,119 boats in the New Territories.

The population of the Colony is primarily divided into Chinese and Non-Chinese. The Non-Chinese comprised at the Census of 1906 a white population of 12,925 of whom 6,085 were civilians while 4,429 belonged to the Navy and 2,411 to the Army. The coloured races (Non-Chinese) numbered 8,500 and included East Indians, Asiatic Portuguese, Japanese, Filipinos, Malays, Africans, Persians and a few others. The Table on page 12 shows a similar classification of the Non-Chinese population for the year 1907 and from this it will be seen that the total Non-Chinese population for 1907-inclusive of Army and Navy is estimated at 18,550 while the total Chinese population-inclusive of Army and Navy is estimated at 310,807.

-----

398

The Civil population consists chiefly of male adults. At the last Census (1906) the population of males was 701 per cent. of the total civil population; at the 1901 Census the proportion was 72.6 per cent, so there has been an increase in the proportion of females (which means an increase in family life among the Chinese) during the past few years.

Of the Chinese population in 1906 70.3 per cent. were males, and over half the civil population (56.9 per cent. of the Chinese and 52.6 per cent. of the Non-Chinese) were between the ages of 20 and 45 years.

The City of Victoria is divided into ten health districts with a Sanitary Inspector in charge of each district. During the year under review these ten districts were grouped into five larger districts of two each and a Senior Inspector hat general supervision and control of the sanitary work in each of such groups.

Similarly Kowloon had one Senior Inspector with two District Inspectors under his supervision.

At the end of the year it was decided to abolish the special functions of the Senior Inspectors and to make each District Inspector directly answerable to the Me lical Oficer of Health or to one of the Assistant Medical Officers of Health. It is propose to have a third Inspector for Kowloon. This will enable the staff of Inspectors to be somewhat reduced in number.

There are also four Plague Inspectors in the City of Victoria, two of whom have charge of three districts each, and there is one Plague Inspector for Kowloon.

The supervision of the sanitary work in the villages of Hongkong and in Kowloon City and Sham Shui Po is done by the Police Inspectors in their respective districts.

The following Table shows the number of Chinese houses and floors and the inmates per house and per floor in the City of Victoria as estimated for the year 1907.

City of One Two Three Four Five Total Victoria. storey storey storey storey storey Dwell- Health Dwell- Dwell- Dwell- Dwell- Dwell- ings. District. ings. ings. ings. ings. ings.

Average Total No. of Floors. Floors per Dwelling.

Number of

Number of

persons per Dwelling.

persons per Floor.

1

161 425 214

32 Nil.

832

1,781

2.1

14.8

6.9

2

3 351

573

82

Nil.

1,009

2,752

2.7

20.1

7.4

Most of the Chinese of

འའ

Nil.

11

18

Nil.

Nil.

29

76

2.6

this district live in quarters

attached to offices.

t

49

566 430

9 1,062

3,569

3.3

22.1

6.6

5

2 132

463 321

46 964

3,169

3.3

18.2

5.5

6

46

48

437 369

25 925

3,054

3.3

16.9

5.1

7

23

49

445

337

24 918

3,084

3.4

20.2

6.0

8

6 83 616

302

31,010

3,243

3.2

18.0

5.6

9

10

888

28 470 504

96 Nil. 1,098

2,864

2.6

22.9

8.7

69

362 338 80

Nil. 849 2,127

2.5

16.6

6.6

Total and

Averages -346 1,9804,174 2,049

1078,696 25,719

2.8

20.0

6.8

1907 ...

Total and

Averages 1906

3011,905 4,143 2,050

104 8,503 25,296

2.9

20.4

6.9

E

399

The following Table shows the acreage of the City Health Districts with the houses and population in each such district as estimated for the year 1907.

Health. Districts.

Total Acreage.

Acres.

Built-over Chinese

Areas in Dwellings Chinese Population. Chinese Dwellings.

Non-

Chinese

Non-

Person

per Acre Population. (built-over).

1......

531

134

832

159

12,364

975

99

243

140

1,009

73

20,195 {

1.594

169

1.929 troops

232

137

29

422

8,980

2,695

85

56

53

1,062

163

23,454

1,120

466

5..

29

27

964

62

17,580

380

665

6......

30

27

925

15

15.662

330

592

7.....

36

31

918

7

18.520

100

606

8.......

49

47

1,010

18,200

230

393

9........

44

44

1,098

16

25,000

140

576

10......

252

106

849

54

14,130

310

144

Total 1907...

1,502

746

8,696

976

174,085

9,803

246

1906...

"

1,523

746

8,503

982

173.289

9.507

245

The number of Chinese living at the Peak and Stonecutters' Island is estimated at 1,655.

The following Table shows the distribution of the Chinese population of Kowloon according to Houses and Floors in the different sub-districts

divided:-

Kowloon sub-

1

districts.

2.

3........

4

One storey Two storey Three storey Four storey

Dwellings Dwellings Dwellings

Dwellings

Chinese.

:

:

Non-Chinese.

Chinese.

:

:

:

into

Average Number of Floors per Chinese Dwelling.

Chinese Population.

:

:

00

2:

CO

184

376 2.0 1,149

Non-Chinese.

Chinese.

Non-Chinese.

Chinese.

Non-Chinese.

Total Dwellings.

Total Floors.

:

319

65

176

17

70

2 371

1 319

155 13 13

163

389

69292

73

91

t-

22

5.......

20

6.

49

:

7

595

446

10

5

8.......

940

219

:

9

636

48 2

:

which Kowloon is

Number of Persons. per

Chinese Dwelling.

Number of Persons per

Chinese floor.

Area in Acres.

108

6

166 560 3.4 3,510

24.5

6.9

126

791 2,127

:

:

2.7 18,680 23.6

8.8

193

394 1.119

2.8 8,872 22.5

7.9

163

201 395

1.9 4,849 25.8

13.1

319

595 1,477

2.5 11,560 21.9

8.6 323

6.9 2,758

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

4

:

1,050 1,509 1.4 10,350 9.9

1,159 1,378 1.4 8,290 7.1 6.0 2,068

.686 736 1.1 4.690 6.8 6.4 732

Total 1907..' 2,250

1,415 285 1,069

1906.. 2,248

1,407 285 1,067

8 193

00 00

8

193

6

5,226 9,677 1.8 71,950 14.6 7.9 6,795 ,5,214 9,653 1.8 70,167 14.3 7.8 6,795

!

400

Sub-districts 7 and 8 are in New Kowloon, the remainder comprise the whole of Old Kowloon. The Non-Chinese population of Old Kowloon at the 1906 Census was 2,269 civilians and 2.215 troops, most of whom reside in sub-districts 1 and 2, while the Non- Chinese population of New Kowloon was 47.

BIRTHS.

The births registered during the year were as follows:--

Males.

Females.

Total.

Chinese, Non-Chinese,

...736

388

1,124

.161

135

296

Total 1907.....

..897

523

1,420

1906......

.845

476

1,321

>>

1

This gives a general birth-rate of 4:31 per 1,000 as compared with 4:04 per 1,000 in 1906 and 3:41 per 1,000 in 1905.

The birth-rate amongst the Non-Chinese community was 15.95 per 1,000 as compared with 14:06 per 1,000 in 1906 and 17:03 in 1905.

The nationalities of the Non-Chinese parents were as follows:-British 122, Indian 40, German 11, French 1, American 1, Portuguese 79, Filipino and Malay 20, Japanese 1, Jewish 6, Dutch 3, Parsee 4, Swedish 2, Roumanian 2, Brazilian 2, Swiss 1 and Dane 1.

The number of Chinese births registered does not give an accurate record of the num- ber of births which have occurred. Owing to the custom of the Chinese of not registering births unless the child has survived for a month and often in the case of female children not at all, it is probable that the majority if not all of the infants which are sickly at birth or die before they have lived I month have not had their births registered. It is customary, therefore, to assume that all children of 1 month old and under who are admitted to the various convents (being brought there sick by poor people) and all children found dead in the streets, harbour, hillsides, etc., by the police, have been born in the Colony but not registered. By adding the number of such children to the number of the registered births a somewhat more correct number of births is obtained and from this is calculated a corrected birth-rate.

The number of such children in 1907 was 510 males and 873 females, total 1,383, which being added to the registered births, makes a total of 2,803 as compared with 1,904 in 1906. The corrected birth-rate is therefore 8:51 while amongst the Chinese community alone the rate becomes 8.06 instead of 3.62 per 1,000.

The preponderance of male over female registered births is very marked amongst the Chinese, there being 189 males to 100 females; in 1906 the proportion was 199 males to 100 females. With the 1,383 above mentioned unregistered births however the proportion

falls to 99 males to 100 females.

In the Non-Chinese community the proportion of male births to female births for 1907 was 119 to 100 as compared with 122 to 100 in 1906, 103 to 100 in 1905, 83 to 100 in 1904 and 111 to 100 in 1903 and 1902 respectively.

DEATHS.

The deaths registered during the year numbered 7,286. The death-rate was therefore 22-12 per 1,000. These deaths include 198 from Plague.

The following Table gives the death-rates during the past five Census years:

Non-Chinese.

Chinese.

1881

18.22

24.45

1891

18.20

....

24.18

1896

19.91

24.75

1901

20.50

23.77

1906

14.02

26.41

101

The total number of deaths amongst the Chinese community was 6,999 which gives a death-rate of 22.52 per 1,000.

The deaths registered amongst the Non-Chinese community numbered 287 of which 255 were from the Civil population, 24 from the Army and 8 from the Navy.

This gives a death-rate for the Non-Chinese community of 15:46 per 1,000.

The nationalities of the deceased were as follows:-British 73, Indian 85, Portuguese 58,., German 12, Japanese 17, American 6, Malay 10, French 4, Italian 4, Spanish 2, Austrian 3, Swedish 3, Danish 3, African 2, Norwegian, Dutch, Brazilian, Javanese and

Jew 1 each.

The following Table gives the causes of the 25 deaths registered during the year as having occurred among the Troops :—

British Troops.

Indian Troops.

Enteric Fever,

3

Plague,

1

Influenza,

1

Dysentery,

I

Tonsillitis,

1

Malarial Fever,

3

Heart Disease,.

1

Sprue,

3

Hepatitis,

1

Anæmia,

2

Acute Nephritis,

1

Apoplexy,

2

Fracture of Skull,

Hæmorrhage-Wound of Neck,.. 1

Drowning,

1

13

10

Indian Women and Children.

Nil.

British Women and Children.

Chinese Troops.

Eclampsia Neonatorum,......... 1

Phthisis,

1

1

1

The 8 deaths occurring in the China Squadron which were registered in the Colony were as follows:

Enteric Fever,

Heat Apoplexy,

Cervical Abscess-Septicemia,

2

1

1

1

1

1

Undefined (body decomposed when discovered)

1

Drowning,

Otitis Media,

Fracture of Skull,

402

The deaths of persons employed in the Mercantile Marine or in Foreign Navies which were registered in the Colony were 31 and their causes as follows:---

Enteric Fever,

5

Rupture of Urethra,

1

Dysentery,

2

Alcoholism,

Small-pox

1

Phthisis,

2

Diarrhoea,

1.

Pneumonia,

2

Malaria,

1

Empуæma,

2

Heart Disease,.

3

Gangrene of Foot,

1

Cancer of Stomach,

1

Beri-beri,

2

Cancer of Tonsil,

1

Tetanus,

1

Bright's Disease,

2

General Paralysis of the Insane,

1

.

Fracture of Skull,

The total number of deaths therefore which occurred amongst the Non-Chinese resident civil population was 224 and allowing 1,500 for the Non-Chinese floating population this gives a death-rate of 20.00 per 1,000 for the resident Non-Chinese civil population.

Table I shows the number and causes of deaths registered during the year.

The following Table of population, births and deaths is given for the purpose of ready comparison with similar tables given in the reports from other Colonies:-

Europeans and Whites.

Chinese

Africans.

East Indians.

and Malays.

Mixed and Coloured.

TOTAL.

Number of Inhabitants in 1907

10,025

13

4,102 311,057

4,160

329,357

of Births

in

152

""

44

1,144

80

1,420

of Deaths

in

114

2

وو

85

7,009

76

7,286

of Immigrants in

**

""

of Emigrants in

...

:

:.

145,822

105,967

""

of Inhabitants in 1906

(Census Report) 12,525

13

4,229

Increase,

307,701

3.356

4,170

328,638

719

07

Decrease,.

2,500

127

10

The figures for 1906 given in last year's Report showed an excess of 400 over the figures shown above, due to an error in the preliminary Census report which was subsequently

corrected.

The decrease in the number of Europeans and Whites is due to the fact that when the Census was taken there were two British regiments in the Colony and a number of ships of the China Squadron were in the Harbour. The figures for 1907 give the estimated average number of inhabitants of the Colony.

The small decrease in the number of East Indians is similarly due to a reduction in the number of the Indian troops resident in the Colony.

403

AGE DISTRIBUTION OF DEATHS.

The number of deaths of infants under one year of age was 1,606 or 22:9 per cent. of the total deaths, as compared with 194 per cent. in 1906 and 23.3 per cent. in 1905.

The Infant Mortality amongst the Non-Chinese community during the year was 87 per 1,000 as compared with 157 per 1,000 in 1906 and 119 per 1,000 in 1905.

Among the Chinese population the known deaths of infants numbered 1,580, while only 1,124 Chinese births were registered. Taking the corrected birth figure to be 2,803 this gives an infant mortality of 564 per thousand. The Census return for 1906 showed 1.329 Chinese infants under one year of age, and 14,980 Chinese children between the ages of one year and five years, it is very evident therefore that the majority of these children are not born in the Colony but are brought here from the mainland of China.

DISEASES.

Respiratory Diseases.

The total number of deaths from these diseases for the year was 1,825 of which 34 were among the Non-Chinese community leaving 1,791 among the Chinese population ; 365 out of this total occurred in infants under one year

of age.

Phthisis alone accounts for 669 deaths of which 655 were Chinese. 689 deaths of which 680 were Chinese.

Pneumonia cause l

The death-rate among the Chinese from Respiratory Diseases was 5.8 per 1,000 as compared with 51 per 1,000 in the previous year and 44 per 1,000 in 1905; that for Phthisis alone was 2:1 per 1,000 as compared with 2·6 per 1,000 in 1906. The heavy death- rate from Pneumonia suggests that possibly some of them may have been occasioned by the Plague bacillus.

The deaths from Phthisis amongst the Chinese were 9'6 per cent. of the total deaths amongst that community.

Nervous Diseases.

The number of deaths under this heading for the year 1907 was 522 of which 424 were of Chinese children under 5 years of age, 290 of these being infants of one year old or less. These deaths of Chinese infants comprise 207 deaths from Tetanus, Trismus and Con- vulsions, 82 deaths from Meningitis and one from Hydrocephalus. The figures compare very favourably with those of the previous year, when the total deaths under this healing amounted to 746.

Malarial Fever.

The total number of deaths from Malarial Fever during the year was 579 of which 18 were Non-Chinese, 14 being from the civil population, one from the Mercantile Marine and 3 from the Troops.

In the City the districts in which there has been most Malaria are Health Districts 2 and 9 with 25 and 34 deaths respectively, the total number for the whole City being 138.

In the whole of Kowloon there were 191 deaths, while in the villages of Hongkong there were 203 deaths from this disease.

"werd

Anti-malarial measures were first inaugurated in this Colony in 1899 although the work proceeded very slowly for the first year or two.

YEAR.

Admissions.

404

The following Table shows the admissions for Malaria to our two largest Hospitals during the past ten years :-

Admissions to Hospital for Malaria.

Deaths.

Admissions.

Government Civil.

Tung Wa

Case-mortal-

Totals.

Hospital.

Hospital.

ity per cent.

Deaths.

Admissions.

Deaths.

Govt. Civil

Hospital.

Tung Wa

Hospital.

1898,

344

4 521 122 865 126 1.2 23.4

I

1899,.

475

5

305

58 780

63

1.0 19.0

Average admis-

1900.

679

4

541

159 1,220

163

0.6

29.4

Average deaths

sions 982.

122.

1901,

787

10

507

122 1,294

132

1.3

24.1

1902,

349

9

403

119 752

128

2.6

29.5

1903,

347

221

61 568

63

0.6

27.6

1904,

221

212

56

433

58

0.9

26.4

1905,

266

6

153

48

419

54

2.2

31.4

Average admis-

sions 490.

Average deaths

74.

1906.

233

7

248

96 481

103

3.0

38.7

:

1907, ...

247

305

87 552

95 3.2

28.5

The Police admissions to Hospital for Malaria are shown in the following Table :---

Police Admisions to Hospital for Malaria.

From the City.the Colony.

From rest of

Total.

Average strength of Police Force.

Percentage of strength.

1898.

121

630

19

1899,

239

770

31

1900,

167

223

390

929

42

1901,

243

164

407

920

14

1902,

121

55

176

919

19

1903,

83

84

167

921

18

1904,

40

67

107

993

11

1905,

42

85

127

1,018

12

1906,

37

37

74

1,047

7

1907,

40

65

105

1,049

10

Average

9.II

Average

31

405

The next Table shows the total deaths in the Colony from Malaria during each of the past ten years, and from this it will be seen that the average number of deaths has fallen from 526 in the quinquennium 1898 to 1902 to 383 in the quinquennium 1903 to 1907, in spite of the fact that during the same time the population of the Colony has increased from 254,400 to 329,357.

Total Deaths from Malaria.

Deaths in the

Total

YEAR.

City (Chinese

Deaths.

only).

1898,

280

530

1899,

218

546

1900,

242

555

1901,

281

574

1902,

189

425

1903,

152

300

1904,

90

301

1905,

87

287

1906,

134

448

1907,

138

579

Average

Average

383

526

Rainfall in

inches.

Total number of wet days.

57.0

152

72.7

128

73.7

155

55.8

152

97.5

142

93.6

142

80.4

144

70.9

156

77.8

159

93.5

161

The deaths of Chinese in the City of Victoria are shown separately in the foregoing Table, which also includes a statement of the rainfall and of the number of wet days in each year, and some relation to the incidence of Malaria may be traced by a comparison of the

two statements.

The increase visible in the last two years has certainly been due in part to the cases sent in from the Railway works in the New Territories to the various City Hospitals, but as will be seen from Dr. HARTLEY's report the incidence of Malarial Fever cases amongst the Railway employees has very much diminished since the daily prophylactic use of 5 grains of quinine was instituted in July last.

In the following Table is shown the seasonal incidence of the deaths from Malaria and it will be seen that the largest average number of deaths belongs to the months of October and November, while during the early months of the year the death-rate is lightest. The rainy season here extends from April to September, but there are occasional showers during the autumn, and it must be remembered that the heaviest death-incidence would naturally be later, by a month or two at least, than the heaviest case-incidence of the disease.

406

Seasonal Incidence of Deaths from Malaria.

|

1898. 1899. 1900. 1901. 1902. 1903. 1904. 1905. 1906. 1907. Averages

January,

40

28

37

37

30 30

February,

41

36

34

46

20

March,.

46

33

43

34. 20

April,.

20

44

41

36

19

NO NO C

24

10

24

38

29

18

10

כי

16

22

25

20

23

14

11

33

27

27

17

26

13

29

27

May,

June,

July,

45

August,

28

26

73

26

52

34

69

17

38

27

32

30

58

34

50

43

September,

58

47

52

October,...

65

45

222 22

55

2 8 2 39 19

34

21

16

29

32

19

10

31

28

14

27

49

23

55

30

34

28

70

82

40

35

32

N NO 10 &

35

21

25

26

a = 0 to 10

27

37

34

}

25

45

32

31

45

58

66

5 3 3 19

31

66

45

56

46

65

54

November,.

48 60

95

62

48

27

28

36

44

53

December,..

49 50

58

59

75

32

31

26

48

55

5

48

Totals,

530 546

555

574

425

300

301 287 148

579

An examination of the subjoined statistics of deaths occurring in each Health Distric for the past four years will reveal the localities in which further measures of prevention are desirable:

Deaths of Chinese from Malaria classified into Health Districts.

City of Victoria.

1

61

3

On

5

6

7

00

9

10

Unknown.

Harbour including Kowloon boat population.

Peak.

Kowloon.

Villages.

1904,

12 15 5

10

9

8

2 7

7 13 7

00

1905,

24 12 2 8

6

2

33

3

4 14

8

5 10

0

63 129

1 102 83

!

1906,

22 19

10 8

13

9 10 8 24 11

7 15

0 176 103

1907,

14 25

3

12

9

9 10

8

34 7

7 28

1 191 203

To make the above figures tally with the Table of total deaths 12 deaths of Non-Chinese must be added for 1904, 4 such deaths for 1905, 13 such deaths for 1906, and 18 such deaths for 1907.

These figures show that there is still work to be done within the City, especially in Districts 2 and 9, while the work that has already been done needs constant supervision. Kowloon and the outlying villages are necessarily so scattered that is will take some years to produce as marked a reduction in the Malaria mortality there as we have already obtained

407

within the City limits; the large increase in Kowloon for 1906 and 1907 is almost entirely accounted for by the Kowloon-Canton Railway Works. The deaths in the Harbour (boat population) are no doubt the result of infection contracted ashore and almost all of them. occurred in boats which lie habitually along the Kowloon shore of the Harbour.

The fact must also not be overlooked that the malarial infection is not in all cases contracted locally, for the Chinese population is constantly receiving additions from the mainland of China, and the resident Chinese pay somewhat frequent visits to their native land, but for the purposes of comparison the figures given are fairly reliable as an indica- tion of the districts which yet need attention.

The Military return of admissions to hospital for Malaria also shows a markel re luction in the incidence of this disease, as will be seen from the subjoined Table:-

Admissions for Malaria: European Troops.

Year.

Strength.

Admissions. Deaths. Invalids.

Ratio

per 1,000.

1898,

1,569

595

10

18.

379.3

1899,

1,643

829

5

2.5

504.6

1900,

1,484

629

4

16

423.8

1901,

1,673

1,010

4

15

603.7

1902,

1,381

1,523

6

24

1102.8

1903,

1,220

937

GI

6

768.0

1904,

1,426

390

1

9

273.5

1905,

1,370

348

0

1

254.0

1906,

1,525

480

4

15

314.7

1907,

1,461

287

0

12

196.0

Hygiene is taught systematically in all the Schools in the Colony and special attention is paid to the teaching of the mode of conveyance of the infection of Malaria by the mosquito, and the manner in which the mosquito breeds.

Beri-Beri.

There were 562 deaths (561 in 1906) from this disease during the year, of which 3 only were among the Non-Chinese community; one of them was a German stoker employed on S.M.S. Luchs, the second was an Indian employed as a "greaser" on a merchant steamer and the third was a Japanese infant about two months old whose death was registered as due to "Beri-beri Neonatorum". The various theories as to the aetiology of this disease are being carefully studied in this Colony with a view to arriving at some means of diminishing the heavy toll which it levies yearly upon the native population.

Trachoma.

A Committee was appointed by Government to consider the prevalence of Trachoma amongst the children attending the Schools of the Colony and regulations were drawn up to control this disease.

408

INFECTIOUS DISEASES.

The total number of cases of infectious disease notified during the year was 775 (1,179 in 1906) of which 240 were of Plague. The following Table shows the nature and distribution of these diseases: -

CITY OF VICTORIA HEALTH DISTRICTS.

1 2

.3

4

5

6 7 8 9 10

Plague,

1 13

1

~

Typhoid,...

16

4

Cholera,

33

Small Pox, 16 73

Diphtheria,

Puerperal

Fever,

Scarlet

Fever,

:

:

16

cr

5

3

:

:

7

10

5

11

:

:

1214

1

27

:

:

:

LO

5

:

Peak.

Kowloon.

Harbour.

New

Territories.

Villages

of

104

7 34

2

2

8

12 3

2

11 3 10 15 18

66

3 1 56

24 10

1

1 2

2 3

3

2

3

10

1

:

:

:

Hongkong.

ON

Address.

Imported.

Totals

1907.

Totals

1906.

4 5 240 893

:

18 73

66

74 2

74

7

11341 192

1

...

:

43

13

3

13

:

:

1

Table II (page 36) shows the number of cases of notifiable disease recorded in each month of the year.

Plague.

There was a small outbreak of Plague during the year, the total number of cases registered being 240. A few of these however eventually proved not to be cases of Plague, while several entries in the register are duplicates, the result of the same case being reported from the Tung Wa Hospital or perhaps from Kowloon and then from one of the Kennedy Town Hospitals. Where no information is obtainable beyond the fact that the patient is a Chinese male (or female, as the case may be), name and address unknown, it is extremely difficult to avoid duplicate entries of such cases in the register. The Non-Chinese cases comprised 4 Indians and 2 Asiatic Portuguese.

The deaths registered numbered 198 and there were only 7 recoveries so that the actual total number of cases discovered must have been 205 with a mortality of 96 per cent.

The deaths were returned as follows:

Bodies sent to the Public Mortuary, Kennedy Town,...

";

Kowloon,...

Patients dying in the Tung Wa Plague Hospital,

"

Government Plague Hospital (including 4 Non-

Chinese),

69

30

53

10

31

Government Civil Hospital (Non-Chinese), . their own homes and coffined there,

1

35

Total,

198

The death-rate among Non-Chinese was therefore 83 per cent., while it was 97 per cent.

among

the Chinese

During the year 25,265 rats were caught or found dead in the City of Victoria and 13,255 in Kowloon. These were all examined by Dr. HEANLEY at the Public Mortuary with the result that sixteen of those from the City and twelve of those from Kowloon were found to be infected with Plague.

4-

409

Typhoid Fever.

The number of cases of this disease during the year was 73 as compared with 66 during 1906 and 90 in 1905; eighteen of the cases were imported.

The European cases numbered 48, while the Chinese cases numbered 12, and 13 cases occurred amongst the other races in the Colony. Twelve of the European cases, one of the "other Non-Chinese" cases and all the Chinese cases died. The case mortality among the European cases was therefore 25 per cent.

In most of the cases of Typhoid Fever that occur in this Colony the infection is probably contracted by eating salads of raw vegetables, which have been grown in Chinese market-gardens, where it is customary to water and manure the plants with diluted human excreta-both urine and night-soil. Residents in the Far East should carefully avoid such articles of food as water-cress, lettuce, etc., in view of this danger of contracting Typhoid Fever, Cholera or Intestinal Parasites, all of which diseases may be conveyed in this manner.

It will be seen from the above figures that this disease is much less prevalent among the Chinese than among Europeans in this Colony, the ratio of cases to population being in the case of Europeans 478 per 1,000 and in the case of Chinese 0.038 per 1,000.

Cholera.

Seventy-four cases of Cholera were imported into the Colony on board one steamer during the autumn; one of the cases was a European, 72 were Chinese and the remaining one belonged to the class "other Non-Chinese". Thirty-two of the Chinese cases died. The great need of a quarantine station was demonstrated anew by this outbreak and steps have since been taken to meet this want. They will be referred to in the Report for 1908.

Small Pox.

During the year 341 cases of Small Pox were certified, of which 14 were European, 314 were Chinese and 13 were of other races; eleven of the cases were imported. One of the European cases, four of the "other Non-Chinese" cases and 270 of the Chinese cases died.

The number of vaccinations for the year was 6,799 (7,450 in 1906).

Diphtheria.

Forty-three cases of Diphtheria were notified throughout the year. Sixteen of these were Europeans and four were "other Non-Chinese" leaving twenty-three Chinese cases. Most of the cases of Diphtheria occurred during the earlier months of the year, and follow- ed an outbreak during the last three months of 1906. Diphtheria has been comparatively rare in this Colony and it is somewhat significant that so extensive an outbreak should follow the great Typhoon of September 18th, 1906, with its consequent wholesale pollution of the atmosphere by the dead bodies of men and animals.

All of the Chinese cases died, and one European child also died.

Puerperal Fever.

Only three cases of this disease were certified throughout the year, all of these in Chinese. The average number of known deaths from this disease for the decade ending 1904 was eleven.

The scheme inaugurated in 1905 for supplying trained Chinese midwives to attend the poor in their own houses has proved most successful, largely owing to the supervision exercised over these women by Dr. ALICE SIBKEE, who is engaged in medical missionary work in the Colony. Three of these midwives were employed at the beginning of the year, and in March the number was increased to six. They have attended 578 confinements dur- ing the year as compared with 188 during 1906, and they exercise a general supervision over

410

etc.

the infants during the first year of life, advising the mothers as to the manner of feeding, Fifteen of these infants have been taken out of the Colony while two have been placed in the Convents. Of the remainder, twenty-two were either still-born or died immediately after birth, and twenty-five others have died from convulsions and other infantile ailments, while one was overlaid and one was a twin which was weakly from birth; the remainder are alive and well. Two only of the mothers have died, one from Bright's Disease and the other from Phthisis. These midwives consult Dr. SIBREE in all complications, and she was called to 28 of the above cases.

=

Scarlet Fever.

Scarlet Fever is practically unknown in this Colony, but one ease was reporte l'in January, the patient being a young European girl of 18 years, who hat livel in the Colony all her life and was employed as a type-writer, she recovered.

INTERMENTS.

The following number of interments in the various cemeteries of the Colony have been. recorded during the year :-

Non-Chinese Cemeteries.-Colonial Cemetery,

Roman Catholic Cemetery,

Mahommedan Cemetery,

Jewish Cemetery,

Parsee Cemetery,

133

1,018

57

0

2

1,210

Chinese Cemeteries.-Mount Caroline Cemetery,

Kai Lung Wan

528

194

Tung Wa Hospital

2,716

>>

Infectious Diseases

"

Cheung Sha Wan,

507

">

Kennedy Town,

4

Protestant

Shaukiwan

";

Aberdeen

""

Stanley

43

307

191

26

Shek O

Ma Tau Wai

2

""

944

3

Shai Yu Shek

221

""

Sham Shui Po

218

""

Christian

""

Kowloon City

22

Eurasian

2

Chung Ling Tin

5

""

*

5,930

411

There were in addition sixteen cremations of bodies during