Sessional Papers - 1907

PAPERS LAID BEFORE THE LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL OF HONGKONG 1907

Table of Contents

1. Assessment

Report on, for 1907-1908

2. Bacteriologist, Government

Report for 1906

3. Blue Book

Report on, for 1906

4. Botanical and forestry

Report for 1906

5. Census, 1906

Report on

6. Civil Servants

Correspondence on the Subject of the Salaries of European

7. Cubicle Question

Report of Committee on

8. Education

Report for 1906

9. Estimates of Expenditure

Abstract Shewing Differences Between Estimates for 1907 and 1908

10. Evening Continuation Classes

Report on

11. Finance Committee

Minutes Nos. 1 to 12

12. Financial Returns

For 1906

13. Financial Statements

In Connection With Estimates for 1908

14. Fire Brigade

Report for 1906

15. Harbour Master

Report for 1906

16. Hygiene

Report on the Study of, in Hongkong Schools

17. Jurors

List of, for 1907

18. Kowloon-Canton Railway

Estimate of Expenditure to December, 1907

19. Legislative Council

Minutes Nos. 1 to 15

20. Medical

Report for 1906

21. Observatory

Report for 1906

22. Plague

Report on Epidemic of, During 1906

23. Po Leung Kuk

Report for 1906

24. Police and Crime

Report for 1906

25. Police Magistrates' Court

Return of, for 1906

26. Post office

Report for 1906

27. Prison

Report for 1906

28. Public Health and Buildings Ordinance Commissioin

Despatch from Secretary of State Regarding

29. Public Health and Buildings Ordinance Commission

Petition of Landowners in 1902

30. Public Health and Buildings Ordinance Commission

Minute By Colonial Secretary on

31. Public Health and Buildings Ordinance Commission

Minute By Principal Civil Medical officer on

32. Public Health and Buildings Ordinance Commission

Minute By officer administering the Government on

33. Public Health and Buildings Ordinance Commission

Report of

34. Public Works

Report for 1906

35. Public Works Committee

Minutes Nos. 1 and 2

36. Queen's College

Report By Examiners of, for 1906-1907

37. Queen's College

Report for 1906

38. Registrar General

Report for 1906

39. Sanitary

Report for 1906

40. Sanitary Surveyor

Report for 1906

41. Sir M. Nathan, K.C.M.G.

Despatch from Secretary of State Regarding Services of

42. Standing Law Committee

Minutes No. 1

43. Subsidiary Coins

Correspondence on the Subject of Hongkong

44. Supreme Court

Report and Returns for 1906

45. Tung Wah Hospital

Report on, for 1906

46. Typhoon of 18th September, 1906

Report of Relief Fund Committee

47. Typhoon of 18th September, 1906

Despatch from Secretary of State Regarding Report of Committee on Warning Given

48. Typhoon of 18th September, 1906

Despatch from Secretary of State Regarding Report of Relief Fund Committee

49. Typhoon of 18th September, 1906

Report of Committee on Warning Given

50. Veterinary Surgeon, Colonial

Report for 1906

51. Volunteer Corps, Hongkong

Report for 1906-1907

52. Waterworks

Contents of Reservoirs, 1906-1907

53. Widows and Orphans' Pension Fund

Report for 1906

 

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 1.

THURSDAY, 28TH FEBRUARY, 1907.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR (Sir MATTHEW NATHAN, K.C.M.G.).

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.).

the Attorney General, (HENRY HESSY JOHNSTON GOMPERTZ).

A

51

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the Director of Public Works, (WILLIAM CHATHAM).

""

the Registrar General, (ARTHUR WINBOLT BREWIN).

""

""

the Captain Superintendent of Police, (FRANCIS Joseph BadeleY). Dr. Ho KAI, M.B., C.M., C.M.G.

A

19

Mr. WEI YUK.

Mr. EDWARD OSBORNE.

Mr. EDBERT ANSGAR HEWETT.

Mr. WILLIAM JARDINE GRESSON.

ABSENT:

His Excellency the General Officer Commanding the Troops. (Major-General ROBERT GEORGE

BROADWOOD; C.B.).

The Honourable the Colonial Treasurer, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON).

";

Mr. HENRY EDWARD POLLOCK, K.C.

The Council met pursuant to summons.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 1st November, 1906, were read and confirmed.

FINANCIAL MINUTES.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following Financial Minutes, (Nos. 1 to 13), and moved that they be referred to the Finance Committee :—

No. 9769 of 1906, C.S.O.

No. 9064 of

1908. C.S.0.,

and

M. NATHAN.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Two thousand five- hundred and fifteen Dollars ($2,515) in aid of the vote, Sanitary Department-Other Charges, Compensation for infected cattle slaughtered.

Government House, Hongkong, 25th January, 1907.

M. NATHAN.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One thousand four No. 6269 of hundred and eighty-four Dollars ($1,484) in aid of the vote,. Miscellaneous Services, Extension. Resumption of Taxlord Lots in the New Territories.

1904,

No. 6496 of 1906, C.O.D.

No. 8824 of

1:04, C.S O.

Government House, Hongkong, 28th January, 1907.

M. NATHAN.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Ninety Pounds (£90) in aid of the vote, Miscellaneous Services, Cancer Research Fund.

Government House, Hongkong, 29th January, 1907.

M. NATHAŃ.

The Governor recommends the Council to revote a sum of Two thousand Dollars ($2,000) in aid of the vote, Harbour Master's Department, Harbour Office-Special Expenditure, Purchase of 3 Fairway Lights and Buoys.

Government House, Hongkong, 31st January, 1907.

No. 6887 of 1906, C.S.O.

No. 889 of

1907.

M. NATHAN.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One thousand Dollars ($1,000) in aid of the vote, Military Expenditure, B. Volunteers-Other Charges, Purchase of 24 Barrels and 13 Rifles.

Government House, Hongkong, 31st January, 1907.

M. NATHAN.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Fifty-three thousand Dollars ($53,000) and to revote a sum of Thirty-two thousand six hundred and ninety Dollars ($32,690) in aid of the votes-Public Works Recurrent and Public Works Extraordinary for the following items:-

Public Works Recurrent.

Typhoon and Rainstorm Damages,

Public Works Extraordinary.

Insanitary Property Resumption,

.$41,000

12,000

-$33,000

Mortuary at Kowloon,

$ 5,150

New Roads in Victoria-Extension East and

West of Conduit Road,

3,290

Insanitary Property Resumption,.

12,060

Water Supply, Tai Po,

3,410

Time Ball Tower on Blackhead's Hill, Kowloon,

6,780

$32,690

No. 7608 of 1906, C.S.0.

No. 9864 of 1906, C.O.D.

No. 447 of

1903,

Government House, Hongkong, 7th February, 1907.

M. NATHAN.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One hundred and fifty-three Dollars and eighty Cents ($153.80) in aid of the vote, Judicial and Legal Departments, Land Registry Office, New Territories-Other Charges, Typhoon Expenses.

Government House, Hongkong, 18th February, 1907.

M. NATHAN.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Three thousand two hundred and sixty-three Dollars ($3,263 @ 2/- £326.6.0.) in aid of the vote, Miscellaneous Services, Grants-in-aid of Other Institutions :-Imperial Institute.

=

Government House, Hongkong, 21st February, 1907.

M. NATHAN.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One thousand and Extension. fifty Dollars ($1,050) in aid of the vote, Public Works Extraordinary, Resumption

of Private Property for Rifle Range, Kowloon.

No. 8640 of 1906, C.S.O.

Government House, Hongkong, 22nd February, 1907.

M. NATHAN.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Fifty-five Dollars ($55) in aid of the vote, Medical Departments, B.-Hospitals and Asylums, Other Charges, New Territories, Rent of Temporary Hospital.

Government House, Hongkong, 25th February, 1907.

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No. 7416 of

7

M. NATHAN.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Nine thousand three 1906, C.S.O. hundred and thirty-four Dollars ($9,334) in aid of the vote, Police and Prison

Departments, B.-Fire Brigade, Other Charges, Typhoon Damages.

No. 2694 of 1906, C.S.O.

Government House, Hongkong, 25th February, 1907.

M. NATHAN.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Five thousand Dollars, Confidential $3,439.15 being a revote, ($5,000) in aid of the vote, Miscellaneous Services, Public

Health and Buildings Ordinance Commission.

No. 9252 of

1996, C.O D.

Government House, Hongkong, 25th February, 1907.

M. NATHAN.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Six thousand two hundred and nine Dollars ($6,209) in aid of the vote, Miscellaneous Services, Connaught Reception.

Government House, Hongkong, 26th February, 1907.

The Attorney General seconded.

His Excellency the Governor addressed the Council.

Question-put and agreed to.

JURY LIST FOR 1907.-The Council then proceeded to consider the Jury List for 1907 in private.

ADJOURNMENT.--The Council then adjourned until after the meeting of the Finance

Committee.

REPORT OF THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the Report of the Finance Committee, dated the 28th February, 1907, and moved its adoption.

The Attorney General seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned sine die.

:

F. H. MAY,

Officer Administering the Government.

Read and confirmed, this 16th day of May, 1907.

A. G. M. FLETCHER,

Clerk of Councils.

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 2.

THURSDAY, 16TH MAY, 1907.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE OFFICER ADMINISTERING THE GOVERNMENT (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.).

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON).

3)

**

the Attorney General, (HENRY HESSY JOHNSTON GOMPERTZ).

the Colonial Treasurer, (CHARLES MCILVAINE MESSER).

the Director of Public Works, (WILLIAM CHATHAM).

""

""

the Registrar General, (ARTHUR WINBOLT BREWIN).

the Captain Superintendent of Police, (FRANCIS JOSEPH BADELEY). Dr. Ho KAI, M.B., C.M., C.M.G.

Mr. WEI YUK.

""

Mr. EDBERT ANSGAR HEWETT.

""

""

Mr. WILLIAM Jardine Gresson.

Mr. EDWARD OSBORNE.

ABSENT:

His Excellency the General Officer Commanding the Troops, (Major-General ROBERT GEORGE

BROADWOOD, C.B.).

The Honourable Mr. HENRY EDWARD POLLOCK, K.C.

The Council met pursuant to summons.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 28th February, 1907, were read and confirmed.

NEW MEMBER.-Mr. CHARLES MCILVAINE MESSER took the Oath assumed his seat as Member of the Council.

His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government addressed the Council.

FINANCIAL MINUTES.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government, laid on the table the following Financial Minutes, (Nos. 14 to 20), and moved that they be referred to the Finance Committce :-

No. 1297 of 1907.

No. 1946 of

1907.

M. NATHAN.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Six hundred and fifty- nine Dollars ($659) in aid of the vote, Post Office, Shanghai Postal Agency, Other Charges, Incidental Expenses.

Government House, Hongkong, 12th March, 1907.

M. NATHAN.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One hundred and sixteen Dollars and ninety-seven Cents ($116.97) in aid of the vote, Post Office, B.— Postal Agencies in China for the following items :-

Amoy,

Other Charges,

Incidental Expenses,

Swatow,

Other Charges,

Incidental Expenses,

Total,

Government House, Hongkong, 15th March, 1907.

:

.$ 54.22

62.75

$116.97

!

No. 291

19-6.

M. NATHAN.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Eight hundred Dollars Confidential ($800) in aid of the vote, Miscellaneous Services, Public Health and Buildings

Ordinance Commission.

No. 889 of

1907.

No, 2018 at 1905, C.S.O.

No. 3559 of

1907.

Government House, Hongkong, 10th April, 1907.

F. H. MAY.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Two thousand Dollars ($2,000) in aid of the vote, Public Works Extra- ordinary, Drainage, Large Flushing Tanks for Main Sewers, &c.

Government House, Hongkong, 22nd April, 1907.

F. H. MAY.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Seven hundred and fifty Dollars ($750 (@_2}- = £75.0.0.) in aid of the vote, Miscellaneous Services, Grants-in-aid of Other Institutions :-Imperial Institute.

Government House, Hongkong, 1st May, 1907.

F. H. MAY,

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of One thousand three hundred Dollars ($1,300) in aid of the vote, Police and Prison Departments, B.- Fire Brigade, Other Charges, for the following items :-

Coolie hire.....

Incidental Expenses,

Repairs to Hose and Other Plant,

Total,

$600

200

500

$1,300

No. 6269 of 1901,

Extension.

Government House, Hongkong, 7th May, 1907.

F.H. MAY.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Two thousand five hundred and eighty-one Dollars and eighty-five Cents ($2,581.85) in aid of the vote, Miscellaneous Services, Compensation for resumption of Taxlord lots in the New Territories.

Government House, Hongkong, 13th May, 1907.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

CEMETERY BYE-LAWS.-The Colonial Secretary moved an Amendment of the Cemetery Bye-laws.

The Attorney General seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

PAPERS.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Officer Adminis- tering the Government laid on the table the following papers :--

Report of the Registrar of the Supreme Court for the year 1906.

Financial Returns for the year 1906.

Report of the Typhoon Committee of Enquiry.

Report on the Widows and Orphans' Pension Fund for the Report of the Harbour Master for the year 1906.

year 1906.

Report on the Study of Hygiene in Hongkong Schools, 1906. Report on the Blue Book for 1906.

Returns of the Police Magistrates' Courts for the year 1906.

-

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Report of the Public Health and Buildings Ordinance Commission.

Minute by the Colonial Secretary on the Report of the Public Health and Build-

ings Ordinance Commission.

Reports of the Captain Superintendent of Police and of the Superintendent of Fire

Brigade, for the year 1906.

Report on the Botanical and Forestry Department for the year 1906.

Report of the Director of the Hongkong Observatory for the year 1906.

Report on Queen's College for the year 1906.

Report on the Census of the Colony for 1906.

Report of the Typhoon Relief Fund Committee.

QUESTIONS.-Mr. HEWETT, in the absence of Mr. POLLOCK, K.C., pursuant to notice, asked the following questions:—

1. (a.) When will work on the new harbour of refuge be commenced?

(b.) How long is such work likely to take?

2. (a.) What was the cost of erecting the retaining wall on the South side of the

Signal Station at Blackhead's point?

(b.) Who has ultimately to bear the cost of such retaining wall?

3. (a.) Has the Government received any report from Mr. Hallifax with reference to motor fire engines or an improved system of fire-alarms?

(b.) If the Government has received such a report, will the Government lay it

upon the table.

The Director of Public Works and the Captain Superintendent of Police replied.

SUPPLEMENTARY APPROPRIATION BILL.-The Attorney General moved the first reading of a Bill entitled An Ordinance to authorize the Appropriation of a Supplementary Sum of Four hundred and seventy-seven thousand eight hundred and forty-nine Dollars and fifty- three Cents, to defray the Charges of the Year 1906.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

SUPREME COURT VALIDATING BILL.-The Attorney General moved the first reading of a Bill entitled An Ordinance to remove doubts as to the validity of the proceedings of the Supreme Court of this Colony during the time that ALFRED GASCOYNE WISE Esquire held the office of Puisne Judge of such Court from the 25th day of June 1902 down to the pre- sent time.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

BILLS OF EXCHANGE (AMENDMENT) BILL.-The Attorney General moved the first reading of a Bill entitled An Ordinance to amend the Bills of Exchange Ordinance, 1885.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

MARRIED WOMEN'S PROPERTY (AMENDMENT) BILL.-The Attorney General moved the first reading of a Bill entitled An Ordinance to amend the Married Women's Property Ordinance, 1906.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

1.

PROBATES ORDINANCE (AMENDMENT) BILL.-The Attorney General moved the first reading of a Bill entitled An Ordinance to amend the Probates Ordinance, 1887.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

HONGKONG COLLEGE OF MEDICINE INCORPORATION BILL.-Dr. Ho KAI moved the first reading of a Bill entitled An Ordinance for the incorporation of the Hongkong College of Medicine.

Mr. WEI YUK seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government addressed the Council.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned sine die.

Read and confirmed this 23rd day of May, 1907. -

F. H. MAY,

Officer Administering the Government.

A. G. M. FLETCHER,

Clerk of Councils.

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LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 3.

THURSDAY, 23RD MAY, 1907.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE OFFICER ADMINISTERING THE GOVERNMENT

(FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.).

His Excellency the General Officer Commanding the Troops, (Major-General ROBERT GEORGE

BROADWOOD, C.B.).

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON).

>>

34

59

THE

the Attorney General, (HENRY HESSY JOHNSTON GOMPERTZ).

the Colonial Treasurer, (CHARLES MCILVAINE MESSER).

the Director of Public Works, (WILLIAM CHATHAM).

the Registrar General, (ARTHUR WINBOLT BREWIN).

the Captain Superintendent of Police, (FRANCIS JOSeph Badeley). Dr. Ho KAI, M.B., C.M., C.M.G.

""

Mr. WEI YUK.

""

>>

Mr. HENRY EDWARD POLLOCK, K.C.

Mr. EDBERT ANSGAR HEWETT.

2)

Mr. EDWARD OSBORNE.

""

Mr. HENRY KESWICK.

>>

The Council met pursuant to summons.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 16th May, 1907, were read and con- firmed.

NEW MEMBERS.-His Excellency Major-General ROBERT GEORGE BROADWOOD and Mr. HENRY KESWICK took the Oath and assumed their seats as Members of the Council.

REPORT OF THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government, laid on the table the Report of the Finance Committee, dated the 16th May, 1907, and moved its adoption.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

PAPERS.---The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Officer Adminis- tering the Government, laid on the table the following papers :—

Report of the Superintendent of Prison, for the year 1906.

Estimate of Expenditure on the Kowloon-Canton Railway up to December, 1907.

REPORT OF THE PUBLIC WORKS COMMITTEE.-The Director of Public Works, by com- mand of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government, laid on the table the Report of the Public Works Committee, dated the 16th May, 1907.

KOWLOON-CANTON RAILWAY.-The Colonial Secretary addressed the Council and moved the following Resolution and that it be referred to the Finance Committee :—

It is hereby resolved that a Sum of Two million four hundred and thirty-eight thousand Dollars ($2,438,000) be advanced out of Funds in the Custody of

the Government for the purposes of construction of the Kowloon-Canton Railway (British Section) during the year 1907.

The Colonial Treasurer econded.

Question-put and agreed to.

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*

SUPPLEMENTARY APPROPRIATION BILL.-The Attorney General moved the second read- ing of the Bill entitled An Ordinance to authorize the Appropriation of a Supplementary Sum of Four hundred and seventy-seven thousand eight hundred and forty-nine Dollars and fifty-three Cents, to defray the Charges of the Year 1906.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

The Colonial Secretary moved that the Bill be referred to the Finance Committee.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

SUPREME COURT VALIDATING BILL.-The Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill entitled An Ordinance to remove doubts as to the validity of the proceedings of the Supreme Court of this Colony during the time that ALFRED GASCOYNE WISE Esquire held the office of Puisne Judge of such Court from the 25th day of June 1902 down to the present time.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed, and Bill reported with amendments.

BILLS OF EXCHANGE (ÁMENDMENT) BILL.--The Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill entitled An Ordinance to amend the Bills of Exchange Ordinance, 1885.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question--put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

On Council resuming, the Attorney General moved that the Bill be referred to the Law Committee.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

MARRIED WOMEN'S PROPERTY (AMENDMENT) BILL.-The Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill entitled An Ordinance to amend the Married Women's Property Ordinance, 1906.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed, and Bill reported with amendments.

PROBATES ORDINANCE (AMENDMENT) BILL.-The Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill entitled An Ordinance to amend the Probates Ordinance, 1887.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council in Committee on the Bill..

Council resumed, and Bill reported without amendment.

3

The Attorney General moved that the Bill be read a third time.

The Colonial Secretary seconded. Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do

Bill passed.

pass.

HONGKONG COLLEGE OF MEDICINE INCORPORATION BILL.-Dr. Ho KAI addressed the Council and moved the second reading of the Bill entitled An Ordinance for the incorpora- tion of the Hongkong College of Medicine.

Mr. WEI YUK seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government addressed the Council.

Bill read a second time.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed, and Bill reported without amendment.

Dr. Ho KAI moved that the Bill be read a third time.

Mr. WEI YUK seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do

Bill passed.

pass.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned until Thursday, the 6th June, 1907.

F. H. MAY,

Officer Administering the Governmen t.

Read and confirmed, this 6th day of June, 1907.

A. G. M. FLETCHER,

Clerk of Councils.

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 4.

COUNCIL,

THURSDAY, 6TH JUNE, 1907.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE OFFICER ADMINISTERING THE GOVERNMENT (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.).

His Excellency the General Officer Commanding the Troops, (Major-General ROBERT GEORGE

BROADWOOD, C.B.).

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON).

the Attorney General, (HENRY HESSY JOHNSTON GOMPERTZ).

>>

the Colonial Treasurer, (CHARLES MCILVAINE MESSER).

the Director of Public Works, (WILLIAM CHATHAM).

>>

the Registrar General, (ARTHUR WINBOLT BREWIN).

77

the Captain Superintendent of Police, (FRANCIS Joseph Badeley).

}}

Dr. Ho KAI, M.B., C.M., C.M.G.

Mr. WEI YUK.

""

Mr. HENRY EDWARD POLLOCK, K.C.

Mr. EDBERT ANSGAR HEWETT.

Mr. EDWARD OSBORNE.

Mr. HENRY KESWICK.

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The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 23rd May, 1907, were read and con- firmed.

PUBLIC WORKS COMMITTEE.-His Excellency the Officer Administering the Govern- ment appointed Mr. HENRY KESWICK to fill the vacancy on the Public Works Committee caused by the departure of Mr. WILLIAM JARDINE Gresson.

REPORT OF THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government, laid on the table the Report of the Finance Committee, dated the 23rd May, 1907, and moved its adoption.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

REPORT OF THE STANDING LAW COMMITTEE.-The Attorney General, by command of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government, laid on the table the Report of the Standing Law Committee on the Bill entitled "An Ordinance to amend the Bills of Exchange Ordinance, 1885," dated the 23rd May, 1907.

PAPERS. The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Officer Adminis- tering the Government, laid on the table the following papers :-

Report on the Evening Continuation Classes.

Report on the Post Office Department, for the year 1906.

Minute by the Principal Civil Medical Officer on the Report of the Public Health

and Buildings Ordinance Commission.

INCREASE OF RATES.-The Colonial Secretary moved the following Resolution under Section 31 (1) of the Rating Ordinance, 1901, (Ordinance No. 6 of 1901)

Resolved by the Legislative Council that the precentages on the Valuation of tenements payable as rates in the undermentioned places be altered from the 1st day of July, 1907, as follows :—

Quarry Bay,...

Sham Shui Po,

To Kwa Wan,

Ma Tau Wei,

Kowloon City,..

Tai Kok Tsui,

Fuk Tsun Heung, Shaukiwan East,

Shaukiwan West,..

Shaukiwan Road,

Po Kau Wat,

Tsing Shiu Ma Tau,

Sai Wan Ho,

Whitfeild,

Tung Lo Wan,

.From 7% to 8%.

7%

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9%

39

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99

7 %

9 %.

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7% 9 %.

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7%. 9 %. 7% 9 %

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103%.

0/

103%.

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103%.

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9%

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103%

9%

103%.

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9%

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103%.

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9%

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9%

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103% 10%.

9% 103%.

9%

103 %

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9%

103%.

Hok Ün,

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

QUESTIONS.—Mr. POLLOCK, pursuant to notice, asked the following questions :-

1. (a.) Has the Government received complaints with reference to deficiencies in the

supply of rater to houses in Wanchai?

(b.) If so, has the Government taken any and what steps to remedy such

deficiencies?

2. (a.) What Government appliances exist for the extinguishing of fires at the

·Peak?

(b.) Does the Government consider that such appliances are sufficient? If not, what steps does the Government propose to take, and when, to remedy such deficiencies?

3. Will the Government consider the advisability of planting fir-trees and camphor- trees along and on the Northern slope from the road which runs at the side of the catch-water in the Shatin Valley?

4. (a.) Has the Principal Civil Medical Officer stated in writing to the Government his views with reference to the Report of the Public Health and Buildings Ordinance Commission?

(b.) If so, will the Government lay a copy of the writing containing such views

upon the table?

The Director of Public Works, the Captain Superintendent of Police, and the Colonial Secretary replied.

QUESTIONS.-Mr. OSBORNE, pursuant to notice, asked the following questions :-

1. Will the Government cause notices to be exhibited at the paying-in counters of the Treasury, Post Office, Harbour Office, Magistracy and other departments; also inserted in Chinese Newspapers, informing the Public that British Subsidiary Coins are legal tender up to $2 in silver and $1 in copper on each bill; that Government shroffs are bound to receive them up to the above amounts, and that the Public are not bound to accept more than these amounts, as change?

2. With a view to creating a demand for British Subsidiary Coins, will the Govern- ment consider the advisability of increasing the limit to which they are legal tender?

3. Will the Government say what steps have been taken towards improving the Rick-

sha service, in view of what was stated in this Council on 7th June, 1906? 4. Will the Government state how long telegraphic communication with Gap Rock

has been interrupted?

5. In view of the approaching typhoon season will the Government take steps to have

the cable repaired at an early date?

The Colonial Secretary, the Captain Superintendent of Police, and the Director of Public Works replied.

QUESTIONS.-Dr. Ho KAI gave notice that at the next meeting of the Council he would ask the following questions :-

1. What steps does the Government propose to take, and when, in regard to carrying out the recommendations of the Public Health and Buildings Ordinance Commission?

2. If the Government does not propose to carry out the recommendations of the Commission in toto, which of such recommendations does the Government propose not to carry out?

3. Will the Government make a statement of what they propose to do with regard to

the recommendations of the Commission?

BILLS OF EXCHANGE (AMENDMENT) BILL.--The Attorney General moved that Council resolve itself into a committee of the whole Council to consider the Bill entitled An Ordin- ance to amend the Bills of Exchange Ordinance, 1885.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed.

HongKong and SHANGHAI BANKING CORPORATION BILL.-The Attorney General moved the first reading of a Bill entitled An Ordinance to authorise the Hongkong and Shanghai Banking Corporation from time to time to increase the Capital of the said Corporation from the sum of Ten Millions of Dollars to a sum not exceeding the sum of Twenty Millions of Dollars; and to continue incorporated for a further term of 21 years; and to continue in force for a further period of 21 years the provisions of Section 3 of the Hongkong and Shanghai Banking Corporation Ordinance, 1899, with regard to the Excess Issue of Bills and Notes payable to bearer on demand.

The Colonial Secretary seconded. Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

SUPPLEMENTARY APPROPRIATION BILL.-The Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill entitled An Ordinance to authorize the Appropriation of a Supplementary Sum of Four hundred and seventy-seven thousand eight hundred and forty-nine Dollars and fifty- three Cents, to defray the Charges of the Year 1906.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded. .

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

SUPREME COURT VALIDATING BILL.-The Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill entitled An Ordinance to remove doubts as to the validity of the proceedings of the Supreme Court of this Colony during the time that ALFRED GASCOYNE WISE Esquire held the office of Puisne Judge of such Court from the 25th day of June 1902 down to the present time.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question--put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

MARRIED WOMEN'S PROPERTY (AMENDMENT) BILL.-The Attorney General moved the third reading of a Bill entitled An Ordinance to amend the Married Women's Property Ordinance, 1906.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned until Thursday, the 13th June, 1907.

Read and confirmed this 13th day of June, 1907.

F. H. MAY,

Officer Administering the Government.

A. G. M. FLETCHER,

Clerk of Councils.

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 5.

THURSDAY, 13TH JUNE, 1907.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE OFFICER ADMINISTERING THE GOVERNMENT (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.).

His Excellency the General Officer Commanding the Troops, (Major-General ROBERT GEORGE

BROADWOOD, C.B.).

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON).

11

14

99

1

""

""

the Attorney General, (HENRY HESSY JOHNSTON GOMPERTZ).

the Colonial Treasurer, (CHARLES MCILVAINE MESSER).

the Director of Public Works, (WILLIAM CHATHAM).

the Registrar General, (ARTHUR WINBOLT BREWIN).

the Captain Superintendent of Police, (FRANCIS JOSEPH BADELEY). Dr. Ho KAI, M.B., C.M., C.M.G.

Mr. HENRY EDWARD POLLOCK, K.C.

Mr. EDBERT ANSGAR HEWETT.

""

Mr. EDWARD OSBORNE.

72

Mr. HENRY KESWICK,

27

ABSENT:

The Honourable Mr. WEI YUK.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 6th June, 1907, were read and con- firmed.

PAPERS.---The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Officer Adminis- tering the Government, laid on the table the following papers :--

Report of the Registrar General, for the year 1906.

Petition from Land Owners with regard to Compensation under Section 185 of the

Public Health and Buildings Bill, 1902.

Recommendations of the Sanitary Commission, and Proposals of Government

thereon.

QUESTIONS.-Dr. Ho KAI, pursuant to notice, asked the following questions

1. What steps does the Government propose to take, and when, in regard to carry- ing out the recommendations of the Public Health and Buildings Ordinance Commission?

2. If the Government does not propose to carry out the recommendations of the Commission in toto, which of such recommendations does the Government propose not to carry out?

3. Will the Government make a statement of what they propose to do with regard to

the recommendations of the Commission?

The Colonial Secretary replied.

PUBLIC HEALTH AND BUILDINGS (AMENDMENT) BILL-The Attorney General moved the first reading of a Bill entitled An Ordinance to amend the Public Health and Buildings Ordinance, 1903.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government addressed the Council.

Mr. HEWETT addressed the Council.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

HONGKONG AND SHANGHAI BANKING CORPORATION BILL-Mr. KESWICK addressed the Council and moved the second reading of the Bill entitled An Ordinance to authorise the Hongkong and Shanghai Banking Corporation from time to time to increase the Capital of the said Corporation from the sum of Ten Millions of Dollars to a sum not exceeding the sum of Twenty Millions of Dollars; and to continue incorporated for a further term of 21 years; and to continue in force for a further period of 21 years the provisions of Section 3 of the Hongkong and Shanghai Banking Corporation Ordinance, 1899, with regard to the Excess Issue of Bills and Notes payable to bearer on demand.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed, and Bill reported without amendment. Mr. KESWICK moved that the Bill be read a third time.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put--that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

NEDERLANDSCH-INDISCHE HANDELSBANK BILL.-The Attorney General moved the first reading of a Bill entitled An Ordinance for giving to a Foreign Company called the Nederlandsch-Indische Handelsbank certain facilities for carrying on its business in the

Colony.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

BILLS OF EXCHANGE (ÅMENDMENT) BILL.--The Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill entitled An Ordinance to amend the Law relating to Bills of Exchange.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

ADJOURNMENT.—The Council then adjourned until Thursday, the 20th June, 1907.

4.

F. H. MAY,

Officer Administering the Government.

Read and confirmed, this 20th day of June, 1907.

A. G. M. FLETCHER,

Clerk of Councils,

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 6.

THURSDAY, 20TH JUNE, 1907.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE OFFICER ADMINISTERING THE GOVERNMENT (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.).

His Excellency the General Officer Commanding the Troops, (Major-General ROBERT GEORGE

BROADWOOD, C.B.).

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON).

"

""

3

the Attorney General, (HENRY HESSY JOHNSTON GOMPERTZ).

the Colonial Treasurer, (CHARLES MCILVAINE MESSER).

the Director of Public Works, (WILLIAM CHATHAM).

the Registrar General, (ARTHUR WINBOLT BREWIN).

the Captain Superintendent of Police, (FRANCIS JOSEPH BADELEY).

Dr. Ho KAI, M.B., C.M., C.M.G.

""

Mr. WEI YUK.

""

"1

Mr. HENRY EDWARD POLLOCK, K.C.

Mr. EDBERT ANSGAR HEWETT.

Mr. EDWARD OSBORNE.

""

Mr. HENRY KESWICK,

""

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 13th June, 1907, were read and con- firmed.

QUESTIONS.-Mr. HEWETT gave notice that he would ask the following questions at the next meeting of the Council:—

1. Will the Government stute if it is proposed to rocognise the special services rendered by certain Government officials in connection with a Commission appointed to enquire into the working of the Public Health and Buildings Ordinance?

2. If so, what, if any, special remuneration is it proposed to grant for the extra work undertaken by the following members of the Hongkong Civil Service :--Mr. Bowen Rowlands, Mr. J. Dyer Ball, and Mr. Chapman, V.D.?

3. Will this remuneration, if granted, be dealt with by a special vote in the Legisla-

tive Council?

4. If not, has the proposed amount been already included in some previous vote, if so, which vote, or will the sum granted to these officials be paid out of Miscella- neous Charges?

PUBLIC HEALTH AND BUILDINGS (AMENDMENT) BILL.-The Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill entitled An Ordinance to amend the Public Health and Build- ings Ordinance, 1903.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Mr. POLLOCK addressed the Council.

After some discussion,-

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

On Council resuming, the Attorney General moved that the Bill be read a third time.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

NEDERLANDSCH-INDISCHE HANDELSBANK BILL.-The Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill entitled An Ordinance for giving to a Foreign Company called the Nederlandsch-Indische Handelsbank certain facilities for carrying on its business in the. Colony.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed, and Bill reported without amendment.

The Attorney General moved that the Bill be read a third time.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

ADJOURNMENT.—The Council then adjourned sine die.

Read and confirmed this 27th day of June, 1907.

F. H. MAY,

Officer Administering the Government.

A. G. M. FLETCHER,

Clerk of Councits.

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 7.

THURSDAY, 27TH JUNE, 1907.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE OFFICER ADMINISTERING THE GOVERNMENT (FRAN IS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.).

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON).

the Attorney General, (HENRY HESSY JOHNSTON GOMPERTZ).

27

>"

the Colonial Treasurer, (CHARLES MCILVAINE MESSER).

the Director of Public Works, (WILLIAM CHATHAM).

""

""

the Registrar General, (ARTHUR WINBOLT BREWIN).

the Captain Superintendent of Police, (FRANCIS JOSEPH BADELEY). Dr. Ho KAI, M.B., C.M., C.M.G.

""

Mr. WEI YUK.

"}

Mr. EDBERT ANSGAR HEWETT.

""

Mr. EDWARD OSBORNE.

""

Mr. HENRY KESWICK.

"">

ABSENT:

His Excellency the General Officer Commanding the Troops, (Major-General ROBERT GEORGE

BROADWOOD, C.B.).

The Honourable Mr. HENRY EDWARD POLLOCK, K.C.

The Council met pursuant to summons.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 20th June, 1907, were read and con- firmed.

His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government addressed the Council.

FINANCIAL MINUTES.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government, laid on the table the following Financial Minutes, (No. 21 to 25), and moved that they be referred to the Finance Committee:-

No. 3533 of 1907.

No. 4568 of

1907.

No. 8036 ot 1906, C.S.O.

F. H. MAY.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Two hundred and fifty-two Dollars ($252) in aid of the vote, Judicial and Legal Departments, C.-Law Officers, Other Charges, Typewriter.

Government House, Hongkong, 17th June, 1907.

F. H. MAY.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Fifty Dollars ($50) in aid of the vote, Judicial and Legal Departments, B.- Magistracy, Other Charges, Advertisements.

Government House, Hongkong, 20th June, 1907.

F. H. MAY.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Five hundred and ten Dollars ($510) in aid of the vote, Education, A.- Department of Inspector of Schools, Victoria British School, Personal Emoluments, (Head Master, House Allowance).

Government House, Hongkong, 21st June, 1907.

:

No. 6092 of 1905, C.S.O.

F. H. MAY.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Three thousand eight hundred and forty-nine Dollars ($3,849) in aid of the vote, Public Works Extraordinary, Miscellaneous, Reconstruction of Retaining Wall at Braeside, Inland Lot No. 1523.

Government House, Hongkong, 25th June, 1907.

F. H. MAY.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Two thousand five hundred and fifty Dollars ($2,550) in aid of the vote, Public Works Extraordinary, Miscellaneous, Queen's College Latrines and Urinal.

Government House, Hongkong, 26th June, 1907.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

CUBICLES. Dr. Ho KAI addressed the Council and moved the following Resolution :----

(1.) That in the opinion of this Council a new law relating to cubicles in Chinese

dwelling houses is urgently required.

(2.) That it is desirable that such new law should include some method of dealing with the cubicle question which will be of a thorough nature and will settle the matter once for all.

(3.) That the scheme for pulling down the upper stories of every third house in the blocks of houses in China town and the provision of lateral windows in the upper stories of the adjacent houses is a desirable and effective scheme. (4.) That the principle of just compensation should be recognised in such a scheme. (5.) That a Committee consisting of three Official and three Unofficial Members oe this Council be appointed to consider on what principle compensation should be awarded andfor generally as to the manner in which the scheme should bf financed.

Mr. WEI YUK seconded.

After some discussion,

Resolutions Nos. 1 and 2 were carried unanimously and Nos. 3 and 4 declared lost,. nine Members voting against and two-Dr. Ho KAI and Mr. WEI YUK-for.

Resolution No. 5 was amended as follows and adopted unanimously:-

That a representative Committee be appointed to consider and make suggestions for

dealing with the cubicle problem generally.

His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government then intimated that the following would be invited to serve on the Committee:-

The Acting Colonial Secretary.

The Director of Public Works.

The Medical Officer of Health.

Dr. Ho KAI.

Mr. HENRY KESWICK.

Mr. WEI YUK,

Mr. E. A. RAM.

Mr. E. OSBORNE.

QUESTIONS.—Mr. HEWETT, pursuant to notice, asked the following questions:-

1. Will the Government state if it is proposed to recognise the special services rendered by certain Government Officials in connection with a Commission appointed to enquire into the working of the Public Health and Buildings Ordinance?

2. If so, what, if any, special remuneration is it proposed to grant for the extra work undertaken by the following members of the Hongkong Civil Service :— Mr. Bowen-Rowlands, Mr. J. Dyer Ball, Mr. A. Chapman, V.D.?

<

3. Will this remuneration, if granted, be dealt with by a special vote in the

Legislative Council?

4. If not, has the proposed amount been already included in the some previous vote,

if so, which vote, or will the sum granted to those officials be paid out of Miscellaneous Charges?

The Colonial Secretary replied.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned until Thursday, the 4th July, 1907.

F. H. MAY,

Officer Administering the Governmení.

Read and confirmed, this 16ht day of July, 1907.

A. G. M. FLETCHER,

Clerk of Councils.

{

1

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 8.

TUESDAY, 16TH JULY, 1907.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE OFFICER ADMINISTERING THE GOVERNMENT (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.).

His Excellency the General Officer Commanding the Troops, (Major-General ROBERT George

BROADWOOD, C.B.).

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON).

""

the Attorney General, (HENRY HESSY JOHNSTON GOMPERTZ).

""

the Colonial Treasurer, (CHARLES MCILVAINE MESSER).

""

the Director of Public Works, (WILLIAM CHATHAM).

.>

""

""

the Registrar General, (ARTHUR WINBOLT BREWIN).

the Captain Superintendent of Police, (FRANCIS JOSEPH BADELEY). Dr. Ho KAI, M.B., C.M., C.M.G.

Mr. WEI YUK.

Mr. HENRY EDWARD POLLOCK, K.C.

11

Mr. EDWARD OSBORNE.

""

Mr. HENRY KESWICK.

""

AUSENT:

The Honourable Mr. EDBERT ANSGAR HEWETT.

The Council met pursuant to summons.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 27th June, 1907, were read and con- firmed.

FINANCIAL MINUTES.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government, laid on the table the following Financial Minutes, (Nos. 26 to 30), and moved that they be referred to the Finance Committee :-

No. 9204 of 1905, C.O.D.

No. 8824 of 1904, C.S.O.

No. 5011 of

1907.

F. H. MAY.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Five thousand five hundred Dollars ($5,500) in aid of the vote, Education, Other Charges, Grants, Building Grants.

Government House, Hongkong, 3rd July, 1907.

F. H. MAY.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to revote a sum of One thousand seven hundred and sixteen Dollars ($1,716) in aid of the vote, Harbour Master's Department, Harbour Office-Special Expenditure, Purchase of 3 Fairway Lights and Buoys.

Government House, Hongkong, 6th July, 1907.

F. H. MAY.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of One thousand nine hundred Dollars ($1,900) in aid of the vote, Public Works, Recurrent, Maintenance of Lighthouses.

Government House, Hongkong, 8th July, 1907.

No. 5041 of

1907.

No. 2658 of

1907.

F. H. MAY.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Two hundred and seventy-five Dollars ($275) in aid of the vote, Judicial and Legal Departments, A.-Supreme Court, Other Charges, for the following

items:

Electric Fans and Light, Incidental Expenses,

Total,

Government House, Hongkong, 8th July, 1907.

F. H. MAY,

$ 75

200

$275 ·

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Three hundred and fifty Dollars ($350) in aid of the vote, Public Works, Recurrent, Miscellaneous, Maintenance of Public Cemetery.

Government House, Hongkong, 11th July, 1907.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

REPORT OF THE FINANCE COMMITTEE -The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government, laid on the table the Report of the Finance Committee, dated the 27th June, 1907, and moved its adoption.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

PAPERS.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Officer Adminis- tering the Government, laid on the table the following papers :-

Despatch from the Secretary of State for the Colonies with regard to Sir M.

NATIIAN'S departure.

Reports on the Health and Sanitary Condition of the Colony of Hongkong, for

year 1906.

the

Report of the Inspector of Schools, for the 1906.

Despatch from the Secretary of State for the Colonies with regard to the Report

of the Typhoon Relief Fund Committee.

Correspondence on the subject of the Salaries of European Civil Servants.

SALARIES OF EUROPEAN CIVIL SERVANTS.-The Colonial Secretary addressed the Council and moved the following Resolution :--

Resolved that the principle of the payment of salaries of European Civil Servants contained in Lord Elgin's despatch No. 122 of the 11th June, 1907, be approved.

Dr. Ho KAI addressed the Council and seconded.

The Resolution was carried unanimously, unofficial members alone voting.

FIRE AND LIFE INSURANCE COMPANIES BILL.-The Attorney General moved the First reading of a Bill entitled An Ordinance relating to Fire and Life Insurance Companies.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

NEDERLANDSCHE HANDEL-MAATSCHAPPIJ BILL.-The Attorney General moved the first reading of a Bill entitled An Ordinance for giving to a Foreign Company called the Nederlandsche Handel-Maatschappij certain facilities for carrying on its business in the Colony.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned until Tuesday, the 23rd July, 1907.

Read and confirmed this 23rd day of July, 1907.

F. H. MAY,

Officer Administering the Government.

A. G. M. FLETCHER,

Clerk of Councils.

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 9.

TUESDAY, 23RD JULY, 1907.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE OFFICER ADMINISTERING THE GOVERNMENT (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.).

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON).

the Attorney General, (HENRY HESSY JOHNSTON GOMPERTZ).

""

22

the Colonial Treasurer, (CHARLES MCILVAINE MESSER).

the Director of Public Works, (WILLIAM CHATHAM),

""

the Registrar General, (ARTHUR WINBOLT BREWIN).

""

""

the Captain Superintendent of Police, (FRANCIS JOSEPH BADELEY). Dr. Ho KAI, M.B., C.M., C.M.G.

Mr. WEI YUK.

57

Mr. EDWARD OSBORNE.

21

ABSENT:

His Excellency the General Officer Commanding the Troops, (Major-General ROBERT GEORGE

BROADWOOD, C.B.).

The Honourable Mr. HENRY EDWARD POLLOCK, K.C.

>>

">

Mr. EDBERT ANSGAR HEWETT. Mr. HENRY KESWICK.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 16th July, 1907, were read and con- firmed.

FINANCIAL MINUTES.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government, laid on the table the following Financial Minutes, (Nos. 31 and 32), and moved that they be referred to the Finance Committee :--

No. II in

7116 of 1906,

C.S.0.

No. 3389 of

1907.

F. H. MAY.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to revote a sum of One thousand one hundred and forty-five Dollars ($1,145) in aid of the vote, Sanitary Department, Other Charges, Typhoon Expenses.

Government House, Hongkong, 16th July, 1906.

F. H. MAY.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of One thousand Dollars ($1,000) in aid of the vote, Police and Prison Depart- ments, A.-Police, Other Charges, for the following items:-

Secret Service,

Subsistence of Prisoners,

Government House, Hongkong, 18th July, 1907.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

$ 700

300

$1,000

REPORT OF THE FINANCE COMMITTEE. The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government, laid on the table the Report of the Finance Committee, dated the 16th July, 1907, and moved its adoption.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

PAPERS.--The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Officer Adminis- tering the Government, laid on the table the following papers :-

1

Report on the Hongkong Volunteer Corps, for the year April 1st, 1906, to March

31st, 1907.

Correspondence on the subject of Hongkong Subsidiary Coins.

Despatch from the Secretary of State with regard to the Report of the Committee

of Enquiry in connection with the Typhoon of the 18th September, 1906.

FIRE AND LIFE INSURANCE COMPANIES BILL.--The Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill entitled An Ordinance relating to Life, Fire and Marine Insurance Com- panies.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council in Committee on the Bill..

Council resumed, and Bill reported with amendments.

NEDERLANDSCHE HANDEL-MAATSCHAPPIJ BILL.-The Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill entitled An Ordinance for giving to a Foreign Company called the Nederlandsche Handel-Maatschappij certain facilities for carrying on its business in the Colony.

The Colonial Secretary seconded,

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed, and Bill reported with verbal amendments.

The Attorney General moved that the Bill be read a third time.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do

Bill passed.

pass.

ADJOURNMENT.—The Council then adjourned until Friday, the 26th July, 1907, at

2.45 p.m.

F. H. MAY,

Officer Administering the Governmeni.

Read and confirmed, this 26th day of July, 1907.

A. G. M. FLETCHER,

Clerk of Councils.

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 10.

FRIDAY, 26TH JULY, 1907.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE OFFICER ADMINISTERING THE GOVERNMENT (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.).

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON).

21

the Attorney General, (HENRY HESSY JOHNSTON GOMPERTZ).

"}

the Colonial Treasurer, (CHARLES MCILVAINE MESSER).

""

the Director of Public Works, (WILLIAM CHATHAM, C.M.G.).

""

the Captain Superintendent of Police, (FRANCIS JOSEPH BADELEY). Dr. Ho KAI, M.B., C.M., C.M.G.

Mr. WEI YCK,

""

Mr. EDWARD Osborne.

""

ABSENT:

His Excellency the General Officer Commanding the Troops, (Major-General ROBERT GEORGE

BROADWOOD, C.B.).

The Honourable the Registrar General, (ARTHUR WINBOLT BREWIN).

Mr. HENRY EDWARD POLLOCK, K.C.

>>

Mr. EDBERT ANSGAR HEWETT.

""

Mr. HENRY KESWICK.

""

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 23rd July, 1907, were read and con- firmed.

FINANCIAL MINUTES.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government, laid on the table the following Financial Minutes, (Nos. 33 to 35), and moved that they be referred to the Finance Committee :-

No. 7340 of 1906, C.O.D.

No. 39 ot 1906, C.S.O.

No. 1749 of

1907.

F. H. MAY.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Four hundred and thirty Dollars ($430) in aid of the vote, Harbour Master's Department, G.--Lighthouses, Gap Rock Lighthouse, Other Charges, Gunpowder Charges and Tubes for Fog Signalling Guns.

Government House, Hongkong, 20th July, 1907.

F. H. MAY.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Four thousand one hundred and twelve Dollars ($4,112) in aid of the vote, Public Works Extraordinary, Communications, New Roads in Victoria, Extension East and West of Conduit Road.

Government House, Hongkong, 22nd July, 1907.

F. H. MAY.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Four hundred and sixty-seven Dollars ($467) in aid of the vote, Post Office, B.-Postal Agencies in China, Swatow, Other Charges, Incidental Expenses.

Government House, Hongkong, 23rd July, 1907.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

. Question-put and agreed to.

:

REPORT OF THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government, laid on the table the Report of the Finance Committee, dated the 23rd July, 1907, and moved its adoption.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

PAPERS.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Officer Adminis- tering the Government, laid on the table the following paper :-

Report on the Assessment for the year 1907-1908.

LIFE INSURANCE COMPANIES BILL.-The Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill entitled An Ordinance relating to Life Insurance Companies.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned sine die.

Read and confirmed this 17th day of September, 1907.

R. H. CROFTON,

Clerk of Councils.

F. D. LUGARD,

Governor.

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 11.

TUESDAY, 17TH SEPTEMBER, 1907.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(Sir FREDERICK JOHN DEALTRY LUGARD, K.C.M.G., C.B., D.S.O.).

His Excellency the General Officer Commanding the Troops, (Major-General ROBERT GEORGE

BROADWOOD, C.B.).

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.).

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM REES DAVIES).

"}

19

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON).

""

the Director of Public Works, (WILLIAM CHATHAM, C.M.G.). the Registrar General, (ARTHUR WINBOLT BREWIN):

"}

""

the Harbour Master, (BASIL REGINALD HAMILTON TAYLOR). Dr. Ho KAI, M.B., C.M., C.M.G.

29

3

Mr. WEI YUK.

Mr. EDBERT ANSGAR HEWETT,

""

Mr. EDWARD OSBORNE.

79

Mr. HENRY KESWICK.

"}

ABSENT:

The Honourable Mr. HENRY EDWARD POLLOCK, K.C.

The Council met pursuant to summons.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 26th July, 1907, were read and con- firmed.

NEW MEMBERS.-Hon. Mr. WILLIAM REES DAVIES and Commander BASIL REGINALD HAMILTON TAYLOR, R.N., took the Oath and assumed their seats as Members of the Council.

FINANCIAL MINUTES.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following Financial Minutes, (Nos. 36 to 45), and moved that they be referred to the Finance Committee:--

No. 1946 of

1907.

F. H. MAY.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Three thousand five hundred and thirty Dollars ($3,530) in aid of the vote, Post Office, for the following:

Other Charges.

A.-Hongkong Post Office,

Clothing, Shoes, &c., for Postmen, &c.,.........$ 700 Incidental Expenses,

1,200

Mail Bags and Parcel Post Receptacles,......... 1,000

B.-Postal Agencies in China,

Shanghai,

Fee of Medical Attendant, Light,

Amoy,

Rent of Sub-Agency,

Canton,

Incidental Expenses,

Government House, Hongkong, 25th July, 1907.

..$ 250 100

30

250

$3,530

No. 5041 of

1907.

No. 5617 of

1907.

F. D. LUGard.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Three hundred Dollars- ($300) in aid of the vote, Judicial and Legal Departments, A.-Supreme Court, Other Charges, Fees to Counsel for Prisoners in Capital Cases.

Government House, Hongkong, 29th July, 1907.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Seven thousand Dollars- ($7,000) in aid of the vote, Miscellaneous Services, for the following items :---

Printing and Binding:

Blue Book,

Miscellaneous Papers,

Total,

.$ 520

6,480

.$7,000

No. 4226 of

1907.

No. 5011 of 1907.

No. 5617 of 1907.

No. 7340 of 1906, C.O.D.

No. 5817 of

1907.

No. 5697 of

1907.

Government House, Hongkong, 1st August, 1907.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One thousand Dollars- ($1,000) in aid of the vote, Treasury, B.-Office of Assessor of Rates, Other Charges, House Numbering, New Territories.

Government House, Hongkong, 1st August, 1907.

F. D. LUGard.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One thousand six hundred Dollars ($1,600) in aid of the vote, Public Works, Recurrent, Maintenance of Lighthouses.

Government House, Hongkong, 6th August, 1907.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Thirteen thousand Dollars ($13,000) in aid of the vote, Miscellaneous Services, Refunds of Revenue.

Government House, Hongkong, 14th August, 1907.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Nine hundred and ninety-two Dollars ($992) in aid of the vote, Harbour Master's Department, G.- Lighthouses, Gap Rock Lighthouse, Other Charges, Gunpowder Charges and Tubes for Fog Signalling Guns.

Government House, Hongkong, 21st August, 1907.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One hundred Dollars ($100) in aid of the vote, Miscellaneous Services, Travelling Allowances in the New Territories.

Government House, Hongkong, 26th August, 1907.

F. D. LUGARÐ.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Ten thousand Dollars ($10,000) in aid of the vote, Governor, Other Charges, Furniture.

Government House, Hongkong, 3rd September, 1907.

1.

No. 6157 of

1907.

F. D. LUGARD

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Five hundred Dollars ($500) in aid of the vote, Police and Prison Departments, A.-Police, Other Charges, Secret Service.

Government House, Hongkong, 6th September, 1907.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

REPORT OF THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Colonial Secretary, by conmand of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the Report of the Finance Committee, dated the 26th July, 1907, and moved its adoption.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

PAPERS.--The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following papers:--

Details of Contents of Reservoirs, &c., arranged according to the Rain Year 1906-

1907.

Draft Estimates, for the year 1908.

Financial Statements in connection with the Estimates for 1908.

Abstract showing differences between the Estimates of Expenditure for 1907 and

1908.

REPORT OF THE PUBLIC WORKS COMMITTEE.-The Director of Public Works, by com- mand of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the Report of the Public Works Committee, dated the 8th August, 1907, and moved its adoption.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

AMENDMENT OF

""

CEMETERIES BYE-LAWS.-The Director of Public Works moved an

Amendment of the "Cemeteries " Bye-laws.

tion

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

RESOLUTION.-Mr. HEWETT addressed the Council and moved the following Resolu-

That the question of the amount of remuneration to be paid to Mr. J. Dyer Ball and Mr. A. Chapman, V.D., for special services rendered to the Public Health and Building Ordinance Commission be re-considered.

Mr. OSBORNE seconded.

The Colonial Secretary addressed the Council.

The Resolution was put to the vote and declared lost, eight Members voting against and four-Mr. HEWETT, Mr. OSBORNE, Mr. KESWICK, and Dr. Ho KAI--for.

APPROPRIATION BILL.-The Colonial Secretary moved the First reading of a Bill entitled An Ordinance to apply a sum not exceeding Four million nine hundred and ninety- two thousand nine hundred and fifty-three Dollars to the Public Service of the year 1908.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

His Excellency the Governor addressed the Council.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

PUBLIC NOTARIES BILL.--The Attorney General moved the First reading of a Bill entitled An Ordinance to provide for the appointment of Public Notaries within the Colony.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put, and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

SEDITIOUS PUBLICATIONS BILL.-The Attorney General moved the First reading of a Bill entitled An Ordinance to prevent the Publication of Seditious Matter.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

LOCAL COMMUNITIES (AMENDMENT) BILL.-The Attorney General moved the First- reading of a Bill entitled An Ordinance to amend the Local Communities Ordinance, 1899.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

STOCKS PUNISHMENT LIMITATION BILL.-The Attorney General moved the First read- ing of a Bill entitled An Ordinance to limit the imposition by public exposure in the stocks.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned until Thursday, the 3rd October, 1907.

Read and confirmed, this 3rd day of October, 1907.

A. G. M. FLETCHER,

Clerk of Councils.

F. D. LUGARD,

Governor.

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 12.

THURSDAY, 3RD OCTOBER, 1907.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(Sir FREDERICK JOHN DEALTRY LUGARD, K.C.M.G., C.B., D.S.O.). The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.).

?"

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM REES DAVIES).

the Director of Public Works, (WILLIAM CHATHAM, C.M.G.).

the Registrar General, (ARTHUR WINBOLT BREWIN).

""

27

""

the Harbour Master, (BASIL REGINALD HAMILTON TAYLOR). Dr. Ho KAI, M.B., C.M., C.M.G.

Mr. WEI YUK.

Mr. EDBERT Ansgar HEWETT. -

Mr. EDWARD Osborne.

Mr. HENRY KESWICK.

21

ABSENT:

His Excellency the General Officer Commanding the Troops, (Major-General ROBERT GEORGE

BROADWOOD, C.B.).

The Honourable the Colonial Treasurer, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON).

""

Mr. HENRY EDWARD POLLOCK, K.C.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 17th September, 1907, were read and -confirmed.

PAPERS.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following papers :-

Financial Statement in connection with the Estimates for 1908. (Corrected Copy.) Report of the Committee appointed to consider and make suggestions for dealing

with the Cubicle Question.

FINANCIAL MINUTES.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following Financial Minutes, (Nos. 46 and 47), and moved that they be referred to the Finance Committee :-

No. 3389 of 1907.

No. 1689 of 1904, C.S.O.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One thousand six hundred and eighty Dollars ($1,680) in aid of the vote, Police and Prison Depart- ments, Fire Brigade,-Special Expenditure, Despatch Boxes.

Government House, Hongkong, 16th September, 1907.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Forty thousand two hundred and thirty-two Dollars ($40,232) in aid of the vote, Public Works Extraor- dinary, Water Works, Tytam Tuk Scheme, First Section.

Government House, Hongkong, 18th September, 1907.

The Attorney General seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

REPORT OF THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the Report of the Finance Committee, dated the 17th September, 1907, and moved its adoption.

The Attorney General seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

COMPANIES (EXTRA COLONIAL REGISTERS) BILL.-The Attorney General moved the First reading of a Bill entitled An Ordinance to amend the Law relating to Companies.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question--put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

APPROPRIATION BILL.-The Colonial Secretary moved the Second reading of the Bill entitled An Ordinance to apply a sum not exceeding Four million nine hundred and ninety- two thousand nine hundred and fifty-three Dollars to the Public Service of the year 1908.

The Attorney General seconded.

Mr. HEWETT, Mr. OSBORNE, the Director of Pubic Works, the Colonial Secretary and His Excellency the Governor addressed the Council.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time and referred to the Finance Committee.

PUBLIC NOTARIES BILL.-The Attorney General moved the Second reading of the Bill entitled An Ordinance to provide for the appointment of Public Notaries within the Colony.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed, and Bill reported with amendments.

SEDITIOUS PUBLICATIONS BILL.-The Attorney General moved the Second reading of the Bill entitled An Ordinance to prevent the Publication of Seditious Matter.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

LOCAL COMMUNITIES (AMENDMENT) BILL.-The Attorney General moved the Second reading of the Bill entitled An Ordinance to amend the Local Communities Ordinance, 1899.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed, and Bill reported with verbal amendments.

The Attorney General moved that the Bill be read a third time.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

1

?

STOCKS PUNISHMENT LIMITATION BILL.-The Attorney General moved the Second reading of the Bill entitled An Ordinance to limit the imposition by public exposure in the

stocks.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

ADJOURNMENT.—The Council then adjourned until Thursday, the 10th October, 1907.

Read and confirmed this 10th day of October, 1907.

A. G. M. FLETCHER,

Clerk of Councils.

F. D. LUGARD, Governor.

--

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 13.

THURSDAY, 10TH OCTOBER, 1907.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(Sir FREDERICK JOHN DEALTRY LUGARD, K.C.M.G., C.B., D.S.O.).

His Excellency the General Officer Commanding the Troops, (Major-General ROBERT GEORGE

BROADWOOD, C.B.).

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.).

"

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM REES DAVIES).

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON).

the Director of Public Works, (WILLIAM CHATHAM, C.M.G.). the Registrar General, (ARTHUR WINBOLT BREWIN).

""

""

""

""

the Harbour Master, (BASIL REGINALD HAMILTON TAYLOR). Dr. Ho KAI, M.B., C.M., C.M.G.

Mr. WEI YUK.

77

Mr. EDBERT ANSGAR HEWETT.

""

Mr. EDWARD OSBORNE.

79

Mr. HENRY KESWICK.

ABSENT:

The Honourable Mr. HENRY EDWARD POLLOCK, K.C.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 3rd October, 1907, were read and con- firmed.

COMMITTEES.-His Excellency the Governor in accordance with the Standing Order No. 17, appointed the following Committees :-

Finance Committee.-All the Members of the Council, except the Governor, with

the Honourable the Colonial Secretary as Chairman.

Law Committee.-The Honourable the Attorney General (Chairman), The Hon- ourables Dr. Ho KAI, Mr. WEI YUK, Mr. H. E. POLLOCK, K.C., and the Honourable the Harbour Master.

Public Works Committee.-The Honourable the Director of Public Works (Chair- man), the Honourables the Colonial Treasurer, Mr. E. OSBORNE, Mr. E. A. HEWETT, and Mr. 11. KESWICK.

FINANCIAL MINUTES.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following Financial Minutes, (Nos. 48 and 49), and moved that they be referred to the Finance Committee:-

No. 1330 of 1905, C.S.O.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Three thousand Dollars ($3,000) in aid of the vote, l'ublic Works Extraordinary, Miscellaneous, Hot water apparatus and baths, Government House.

Government House, Hongkong, 2nd October, 1907.

F. D. LUGAard.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Seven thousand three hundred and thirty-six Dollars ($7,336) in aid of the vote, Education, Department of Inspector of Schools-Other Charges, Evening Continuation Classes.

Government House, Hongkong, 2nd October, 1907.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

REPORT OF THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the Report of the Finance Committee, dated the 3rd October, 1907, and moved its adoption.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

COMPANIES (EXTRA COLONIAL REGISTERS) BILL.-The Attorney General addressed the Council and moved the Second reading of the Bill entitled An Ordinance to amend the Law relating to Companies,

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

STOCKS PUNISHMENT LIMITATION BILL.-The Attorney General moved the Second reading of the Bill entitled An Ordinance to limit the imposition by public exposure in the stocks.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

After some discussion,

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed, and Bill reported with verbal amendment.

The Attorney General moved that the Bill be read a third time.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

APPROPRIATION BILL.-The Colonial Secretary moved that the Council resolve itself into a Committee of the whole Council to consider the Bill entitled An Ordinance to apply a sum not excee ling Four milion nine hundred and ninety-two thousand nine hundred and fifty-three Dollars to the Public Service of the year 1908.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed, and Bill reported without amendment.

The Colonial Secretary moved that the Bill read a third time.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

PUBLIC NOTARIES BILL.-Consideration of the Bill entitled An Ordinance to provide for the appointment of Public Notaries within the Colony was postponed.

SEDITIOUS PUBLICATIONS BILL.-The Attorney General moved that the Council resol ve itself into a Committee of the whole Council to consider the Bill entitled An Ordinance to prevent the Publication of Seditious Matter.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed, and Bill reported with amendments.

The Attorney General moved that the Bill be read a third time.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

ADJOURNMENT.—The Council then adjourned until Thursday, the 24th October, 1907.

Read and confirmed, this 28th day of November, 1907.

A. G. M. FLETCHER,

Clerk of Councils.

F. D. LUGARD,

Governor.

:

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 14.

THURSDAY, 28TH NOVEMBER, 1907.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(Sir FREDERICK JOHN DEALTRY LUGARD, K.C.M.G., C.B., D.S.O.).

The Honourable the Officer Commanding the Troops, (Colonel CHARLES HENRY DARLING,

R.E.).

the Colonial Secretary, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.).

""

21

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM REES DAVIES).

>>

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON).

15

15

"}

the Director of Public Works, (WILLIAM CHATHAM, C.M.G.). the Registrar General, (ARTHUR WINBOLT BREWIN).

the Harbour Master, (BASIL REGINALD HAMILTON TAYLOR). Dr. Ho KAI, M.B., C.M., C.M.G.

1

Mr. WEI YUK.

Mr. HENRY EDWARD POLLOCK, K.C.

""

Mr. EDBERT ANSGAR HEWETT.

""

Mr. HENRY KESWICK.

ABSENT:

The Honourable Mr. EDWARD OSBORNE.

The Council met pursuant to summons.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 10th October, 1907, were read and confirmed.

PAPERS. The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following papers :-

Report by the Examiners of Queen's College, for the year 1906-1907.

Services of the Sanitary Commissioners.

Report of the Director of Public Works, for the year 1906.

FINANCIAL MINUTES.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following Financial Minutes, (Nos. 50 to 62), and moved that they be referred to the Finance Committee :

No. 7731 of 1907.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Three hundred Dollars ($300) in aid of the vote, Sanitary Department, Sanitary Staff, Other Charges, Cemeteries Incidental Expenses.

Government House, Hongkong, 14th October, 1907.

No. 889 of

1907.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One hundred and four thousand and fifty Dollars ($104,050) in aid of the vote, Public. Works, Recur- rent, and Public Works, Extraordinary, for the following items :-

PUBLIC WORKS, RECURRENT. Buildings.

1 Maintenance of Buildings,

Communications.

4 Maintenance of Roads and Bridges in City,

5

Do.

8

Do.

do.,

Telegraphs,

Drainage.

$ 8,000

1,000

outside City,

2.500

4,500

4,500

350

10 Maintenance of Sewers, Nullahs, &c.,

13 Gas Lighting, Kowloon,

Lighting.

Miscellaneous.

16 Maintenance of Public Cemetery, 19 Miscellaneous Services,.. 20 Typhoon and Rainstorm Damages,

....

Water Works.

Lai Chi Kok,

23 Maintenance of Shaukiwan,

25

Do.

PUBLIC WORKS, EXTRAORDINARY.

400

1,000

66,800

250

400

$ 89,700

Drainage.

14 Training Nullahs,..

4,000

Miscellaneous.

22 Miscellaneous Works,

7,000

Water Works.

29 Miscellaneous Water Works,

550

Insanitary Property Resumption,

2.800

14,350

Total,

$104,050

No. 5379 of 1907.

No. 6157 of

1907.

No. 691 of

1907, and

Government House, Hongkong, 17th October, 1907.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Three hundred Dollars ($300) in aid of the vote, Medical Departments, B.-Hospitals and Asylums, Infec- tious Hospitals, Hospital Hulk Hygeia, Other Charges, Provisions, &c.

Government House, Hongkong, 23rd October, 1907.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Three hundred and forty-three Dollars ($343) in aid of the vote, Police and Prison Departments, A.- Police, Other Charges, Secret Service.

Government House, Hongkong, 28th October, 1907.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Four thousand one No. 759 of hundred and eighty-four Dollars ($4,184) in aid of the vote, Public Works, Extra- Extension ordinary, Communications, New Roads in New Territories.

1905,

Government House, Hongkong, 5th November, 1907.

ོ་

1

+

I in

No. 7416 of

1906, C.S.O.

No. 8367 of

1907.

No. 8424 of

1907.

No. 8428 of

1907.

No. 3389 of 1907.

F. D. LUGArd.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Two hundred and ninety Dollars ($290) in aid of the vote, Police and Prison Departments, B.--Fire Brigade, Other Charges, Typhoon Damages.

Government House, Hongkong, 6th November, 1907.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Twenty-five Dollars ($25) in aid of the vote, Police and Prison Departments, C.-Prison, Other Charges. Executioner's Fees, and Allowances for inflicting Corporal Punishment.

Government House, Hongkong, 6th November, 1907.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One thousand Dollars ($1,000) in aid of the vote, Botanical and Forestry Department, Other Charges, Forestry in New Territories.

Government House, Hongkong, 7th November 1907.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Two hundred and eighty Dollars ($280) in aid of the vote, Harbour Master's Department, A.-Har- bour Office, Other Charges, Electric Fans and Light.

Government House, Hongkong, 7th November, 1907.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One thousand one hundred Dollars ($1,100) in aid of the vote, Police and Prison Departments, A.- Police, Other Charges, for the following items :—

Conveyance of Police, Prisoners and Transport,......$ 850 Incidental Expenses,

Total,

250

$1,100

No. 8858 of 1907.

II in No. 3013 of 1906.

Government House, Hongkong, 18th November, 1907.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Five hundred Dollars ($500) in aid of the vote, Colonial Secretary's Department and Legislature, Other Charges, Incidental Expenses.

Government House, Hongkong, 26th November, 1907.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One thousand four hundred and eighty-two Dollars ($1,482) in aid of the vote, Medical Departments, B.-Hospitals and Asylums, Infectious Hospitals, Hospital Hulk "Hygeia", Other Charges, Provisions, &c.

Government House, Hongkong, 27th November, 1907.

སྟྭ་

·

No. 8463 of

1907.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Four hundred and fifty-six Dollars ($456) in aid of the vote, Medical Departments, A.--Staff, Other Charges, Health Officer of Port, Repairs to Launch.

Government House, Hongkong, 28th November, 1907.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

REPORT OF THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the Report of the Finance Committee, dated the 10th October, 1907, and moved its adoption.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question -put and agreed to.

AMENDMENT OF DOMESTIC CLEANLINESS AND VENTILATION BYE-LAWS.-Consideration was postponed until next meeting.

COMPANIES (EXTRA COLONIAL REGISTERS) BILL.-The Attorney General addressed the Council moved that the Council resolve itself into a Committee of the whole Council to con- sider the Bill entitled An Ordinance to amend the Law relating to Companies.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed, and Bill reported with amendments.

The Attorney General moved that the Bill be read a third time.

Mr. KESWICK seconded.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

PUBLIC NOTARIES BILL. The Attorney General informed the Council that it was not proposed to proceed with this Bill.

1907.

ADJOURNMENT.—The Council then adjourned until Thursday, the 12th December,

Read and confirmed this 19th day of December, 1907.

A. G. M. FLETCHER,

Clerk of Councils.

F. D. LUGARD,

Governor.

A

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 15.

THURSDAY, 19TH DECEMBER, 1907.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(Sir FREDERICK JOHN DEALTRY LUGARD, K.C.M.G., C.B., D.S.O.). His Excellency the General Officer Commanding the Troops, (Major-General ROBERT GEORGE

BROADWOOD, C.B.).

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.).

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM REES DAVIES).

""

""

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON).

""

the Director of Public Works, (WILLIAM CHATHAM, C.M.G.).

""

the Registrar General, (ARTHUR WINBOLT BREWIN).

"}

the Harbour Master, (Comdr. BASIL REGINALD HAMILTON TAYLOR, R.N.) Dr. Ho KAI, M.B., C.M., C.M.G.

Mr. WEI YUK.

""

""

Mr. HENRY EDWARD POLLOCK, K.C.

Mr. EDBERT ANSGAR HEWETT.

Mr. EDWARD Osborne.

""

Mr. HENRY KESWICK.

The Council met pursuant to summons.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 28th November, 1907, were read and confirmed.

FINANCIAL MINUTES.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following Financial Minutes, (Nos. 63 to 65), and moved that they be referred to the Finance Committee:-

No. 3389 of 1907.

No. 5379 of

1907.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Two hundred and forty-five Dollars ($245) in aid of the vote, Police and Prison Departments, A.--- Police, Other Charges, Secret Services.

Government House, Hongkong, 14th December, 1907.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One hundred and ninety-three Dollars ($193) in aid of the vote, Medical Departments, K.-Hospitals and Asylums for the following items :—

Other Charges.

Lunatic Asylums-Incidental Expenses,... Hospital Hulk" Hygeia "-Provisions, &c.,

Victoria Hospital for Women and Children-Provisions, .

Total,.

$ 17.60

24.18 151.22

...

$193.00

I B in No. 7416 of 1906,

Government House, Hongkong, 14th December, 1907.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One thousand eight hundred and thirty-four Dollars ($1,834) in aid of the vote, Police and Prison Departments, B.-Fire Brigade, Other Charges, Typhoon Damages.

Government House, Hongkong, 16th December, 1907.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

REPORT OF THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the Report of the Finance Committee, dated the 28th November, 1907, and moved its adoption.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

AMENDMENT OF DOMESTIC CLEANLINESS AND VENTILATION BYE-LAWS.-The Colonial Secretary moved an Amendment of the Domestic Cleanliness and Ventilation Bye-laws.

The Director of Public Works seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

QUESTIONS.—Mr. POLLOCK, pursuant to notice, asked the following questions:-

1. Will the Government state what steps it is taking in connection with the proposed

construction of an additional harbour of refuge?

2. Will the Government consider the advisability of introducing legislation, as to the proof in this Colony of the statutes of British possessions and protectorates, framed upon similar terms to the Evidence (Colonial Statutes) Act, 1907?

The Colonial Secretary replied.

FIRE BRIGADE (AMENDMENT) BILL.--The Attorney General moved the first reading of a Bill entitled An Ordinance to amend the Fire Brigade Ordinance, 1868.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned until after the meeting of the Finance

Committee.

REPORT OF THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the Report of the Finance Committee, dated the 19th December, 1907, and moved its adoption.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned sine die.

Governor.

Read and confirmed, this

day of

Clerk of Councils.

--

No. 1.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG, On the 28th February, 1907.

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.), Chairman.

the Attorney General, (HENRY HESSY JOHNSTON GOMPERTZ).

""

19

the Director of Public Works, (WILLIAM CHATHAM).

the Registrar General, (ARTHUR WINBOLT BREWIN).

the Captain Superintendent of Police, (FRANCIS JOSEPHI BADELEY).

Dr. Ho KAI, M.B., C.M., C.M.G.

""

Mr. WEI YUK.

*

Mr. EDWARD OSBORNE.

""

.

Mr. EDBERT ANSGAR HEWETT.

">

Mr. WILLIAM JARDINE GRESSON.

ABSENT:

His Excellency the General Officer Commanding the Troops, (Major-General ROBERT George

BROADWOOD, C.B.).

The Honourable the Colonial Treasurer, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON).

""

Mr. HENRY EDWARD POLLOCK, K.C.

The Committee met pursuant to summons.

Read the following Minutes under the hand of His Excellency the Governor :-

No. 9769 of 1906, C.S.O.

No. 9064 of

1906, C.S.0,

and

M. NATHAN.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Two thousand five hundred and fifteen Dollars ($2,515) in aid of the vote, Sanitary Department-Other Charges, Compensation for infected cattle slaughtered.

Government House, Hongkong, 25th January, 1907.

M. NATHAN.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One thousand four No. 6269 of hundred and eighty-four Dollars ($1,484) in aid of the vote, Miscellaneous Services, Extension. Resumption of Taxlord Lots in the New Territories.

No. 6496 of 1906, C.O.D.

No. 8824 of

1904, C.S.O.

Government House, Hongkong, 28th January, 1907.

M. NATHAN.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Ninety Pounds (£90) in aid of the vote, Miscellaneous Services, Cancer Research Fund.

Government House, Hongkong, 29th January, 1907.

M. NATHAN.

The Governor recommends the Council to revote a sum of Two thousand Dollars ($2,000) in aid of the vote, Harbour Master's Department, Harbour Office-Special Expenditure, Purchase of 3 Fairway Lights and Buoys.

Government House, Hongkong, 31st January, 1907.

No. 6887 of 1906, C.S.O.

No. 889 of

1907.

M. NATHAN.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One thousand Dollars ($1,000) in aid of the vote, Military Expenditure, B. Volunteers-Other Charges, Purchase of 24 Barrels and 13 Rifles.

Government House, Hongkong, 31st January, 1907.

M. NATHAN.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Fifty-three thousand Dollars ($53,000) and to revote a sum of Thirty-two thousand six hundred and ninety Dollars ($32,690) in aid of the votes-Public Works Recurrent and Public Works Extraordinary for the following items:-

Public Works Recurrent.

Typhoon and Rainstorm Damages,

$41,000

Public Works Extraordinary.

Insanitary Property Resumption,..

12,000

-$53,000

Mortuary at Kowloon,

New Roads in Victoria-Extension East and

$ 5,150

West of Conduit Road,.

5,290

Insanitary Property Resumption,...

12,060

Water Supply, Tai Po,

3,410

Time Ball Tower on Blackhead's Hill, Kowloon,

6,780

$32,690

No. 7E03 of 1906, C.S.0.

No. 9864 of 1906, C.O.D.

No. 447 of

1903,

Government House, Hongkong, 7th February, 1907.

M. NATHAN.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One hundred and fifty-three Dollars and eig by Cents ($153.80) in aid of the vote, Judicial and Legal Departments, Land Registry Office, New Territories-Other Charges, Typhoon Expenses.

Government House, Hongkong, 18th February, 1907.

M. NATHAN.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Three thousand two hundred and sixty-three Dollars ($3,263 @ 2-£326.6.0.) in aid of the vote, Miscellaneous Services, Grants-in-aid of Other Institutions :-Imperial Institute.

Government House, Hongkong, 21st February, 1907.

M. NATHAN.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One thousand and Extension. fifty Dollars ($1,050) in aid of the vote, Public Works Extraordinary, Resumption

of Private Property for Rifle Range, Kowloon.

No. 8640 of 1906, C.S.O.

Government House, Hongkong, 22nd February, 1907.

M. NATHAN.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Fifty-five Dollars ($55) in aid of the vote, Medical Departments, B.-Hospitals and Asylums, Other Charges, New Territories, Rent of Temporary Hospital.

Government House, Hongkong, 25th February, 1907.

I in

No. 7416 of

M. NATHAN.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Nine thousand three 1906, C.S.O. hundred and thirty-four Dollars ($9,334) in aid of the vote, Police and Prison

Departments, B.-Fire Brigade, Other Charges, Typhoon Damages.

No. 2694 of 1906, C.S.O.

Government House, Hongkong, 25th February, 1907.

M. NATHAN.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Five thousand Dollars, Confidential $3,439.15 being a revote, ($5,000) in aid of the vote, Miscellaneous Services, Public

Health and Buildings Ordinance Commission.

No. 9352 of

Government House, Hongkong, 25th February, 1907.

M. NATHAN.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Six thousand two

1906, C.O.D. hundred and nine Dollars ($6,209) in aid of the vote, Miscellaneous Services,

Connaught Reception.

Government House, Hongkong, 26th February, 1907.

The Committee unanimously agreed to recommend that the above votes be passed.

The Committee then adjourned sine die.

Laid before the Legislative Council and adopted on the 28th February, 1907.

A. G. M. FLETCHER,

Clerk of Councils.

F. H. MAY,

Chairman.

No. 2.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 16th May, 1907.

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON), Chairman.

the Attorney General, (HENRY HESSY JOHNSTON GOMPERTZ).

7.

""

the Colonial Treasurer, (CHARLES MCILVAINE MESSER).

>>

the Director of Public Works, (WILLIAM CHATHAM).

""

the Registrar General, (ARTHUR WINBOLT BREWIN)..

""

3

the Captain Superintendent of Police, (FRANCIS JOSEPH Badeley).

Dr. Ho KAI, M.B., C.M., C.M.G.

>>

Mr. WEI YUK.

""

Mr. EDBERT ANSGAR HEWETT.

""

Mr. WILLIAM JARDINE GRESSON.

99

Mr. EDWARD OSBORNE.

ABSENT:

His Excellency the General Officer Commanding the Troops, (Major-General ROBERT GEORGE

BROADWOOD, C.B.).

The Honourable Mr. HENRY EDWARD POLLOCK, K.C.

The Committee met pursuant to summons.

Read the following Minutes under the hand of His Excellency the Governor :-

No. 1297 of 1907.

No. 1946 of 1907.

M. NATHAN.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Six hundred and fifty- nine Dollars ($659) in aid of the vote, Post Office, Shanghai Postal Agency, Other Charges, Incidental Expenses.

Government House, Hongkong, 12th March, 1907.

M. NATHAN.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One hundred and sixteen Dollars and ninety-seven Cents ($116.97) in aid of the vote, Post Office, B.— Postal Agencies in China for the following items:

Amoy,

Other Charges,

Incidental Expenses,..

Swatow,

Other Charges,

Incidental Expenses,

Total,..

.....$ 54.22

Government House, Hongkong, 15th March, 1907.

62.75

$116.97

No. 2694 of 1906,

M. NATHAN.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Eight hundred Dollars Confidential. ($800) in aid of the vote, Miscellaneous Services, Public Health and Buildings

Ordinance Commission.

No. 889 of

1907.

No. 2618 et 1905, C.S.O.

No. 3389 of

1007.

Government House, Hongkong, 10th April, 1907.

F. H. MAY.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Two thousand Dollars ($2,000) in aid of the vote, Public Works Extra- ordinary, Drainage, Large Flushing Tanks for Main Sewers, &c.

Government House, Hongkong, 22nd April, 1907.

F. H. MAY.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Seven hundred and fifty Dollars ($750 @ 2/- £75.0.0.) in aid of the vote, Miscellaneous Services, Grants-in-aid of Other Institutions :--Imperial Institute.

Government House, Hongkong, 1st May, 1907.

F. H. MAY.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of One thousand three hundred Dollars ($1,300) in aid of the vote, Police and Prison Departments, B.- Fire Brigade, Other Charges, for the following items :---

Coolie hire,.......

Incidental Expenses,.

Repairs to Hose and Other Plant,

Total,

$600

200

500

$1,300

No. 6269 of

1904.

Extension.

Government House, Hongkong, 7th May, 1907.

F.H. MAY.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Two thousand five hundred and eighty-one Dollars and eighty-five Cents ($2,581.85) in aid of the vote, Miscellaneous Services, Compensation for resumption of Taxlord lots in the New Territories.

Government House, Hongkong, 13th May, 1907.

The Committee unanimously agreed to recommend that the above votes be passed.

The Committee then adjourned sine die.

Laid before the Legislative Council and adopted on the 23rd May, 1907.

A. G. M. FLETCHER,

Clerk of Councils.

A. M. THOMSON,

Chairman.

+

No. 3.

}

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 23rd May, 1907.

PRESENT:

His Excellency the General Officer Commanding the Troops, (Major-General ROBERT GEORGE

BROADWOOD, C.B.).

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON), Chairman.

">

the Attorney General, (HENRY HESSY JOHNSTON GOMPERTZ).

""

the Colonial Treasurer, (CHARLES MCILVAINE MESSER).

the Director of Public Works, (WILLIAM CHATHAM).

""

the Registrar General, (ARTHUR WINBOLT BREWIN).

>>

the Captain Superintendent of Police, (FRANCIS JOSEPH BADELEY).

""

Dr. Ho KAI, M.B., C.M., C.M.G.

Mr. WEI YUK.

دو

Mr. HENRY EDWARD POLLOCK, K.C.

Mr. EDBERT ANSGAR HEWETT.

>>

Mr. EDWARD OSBORNE.

""

Mr. HENRY KESWICK.

""

I, ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON, Chairman of the Finance Committee, do hereby certify that the Committee on the 23rd day of May, 1907, considered clause by clause a Bill entitled an Ordinance to authorize the appropriation of a Supplementary Sum of Four hundred and seventy-seven thousand eight hundred and forty-nine Dollars and fifty-three Cents, to defray the Charges for the Year 1906, and unanimously recommended that the Bill in question be dealt with by the Council in the same manner as a Bill reported on by a Committee of the whole Council.

The following Resolution was also considered together with the Statement showing the Estimated Expenditure on the Kowloon-Canton Railway up to December, 1907, and unani- mously agreed to :—

"It is hereby resolved that a Sum of Two million four hundred and thirty-eight thousand Dollars ($2,438,000) be advanced out of Funds in the Custody of the Government for the purposes of construction of the Kowloon-Canton Railway (British Section) during the year 1907."

Laid before the Legislative Council and adopted on the 6th June, 1907.

A. G. M. FLETCHER,

Clerk of Councils.

A. M. THOMSON,

Chairman,

*

No. 4.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 27th June, 1907.

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON), Chairman.

the Attorney General, (HENRY HESSY JOHNSTON GOMPERTZ).

""

*

the Colonial Treasurer, (CHARLES MCILVAINE MESSER).

the Director of Public Works, (WILLIAM CHATHAM).

""

""

the Registrar General, (ARTHUR WINBOLT BREWIN).

11

the Captain Superintendent of Police, (FRANCIS Joseph Badeley).

""

Dr. Ho KAI, M.B., C.M., C.M.G.

Mr. WEI YUK.

"1

Mr. EDBERT ANSGAR HEWETT.

""

1135

Mr. EDWARD Osborne.

Mr. HENRY KESWICK.

ABSENT:

His Excellency the General Officer Commanding the Troops, (Major-General ROBERT GEORGE

BROADWOOD, C.B.).

The Honourable Mr. HENRY EDWARD POLLOCK, K.C.

The Committee met pursuant to summons.

Read the following Minutes under the hand of Ilis Excellency the Officer Adminis- tering the Government :-

>

No. 3533 of 1907.

No. 4565 of

1907.

No. 8036 ot 1906, C.S.O.

F. H. MAY.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Two hundred and fifty-two Dollars ($252) in aid of the vote, Judicial and Legal Departments, C.-Law Officers, Other Charges, Typewriter.

Government House, Hongkong, 17th June, 1907.

F. H. MAY. .

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Fifty Dollars ($50) in aid of the vote, Judicial and Legal Departments, B.- Magistracy, Other Charges, Advertisements.

Government House, Hongkong, 20th June, 1907.

F. H. MAY.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Five hundred and ten Dollars ($510) in aid of the vote, Education, A.- Department of Inspector of Schools, Victoria British School, Personal Emoluments, (Head Master, House Allowance).

Government House, Hongkong, 21st June, 1907.

No. 6092 of 1905, C.S.O.

F. H. MAY.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Three thousand eight hundred and forty-nine Dollars ($3,849) in aid of the vote, Public Works Extraordinary, Miscellaneous, Reconstruction of Retaining Wall at Braeside, Inland Lot No. 1523.

Government House, Hongkong, 25th June, 1907.

F. H. MAY.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Two thousand five hundred and fifty Dollars ($2,550) in aid of the vote, Public Works Extraordinary, Miscellaneous, Queen's College Latrines and Urinal.

Government House, Hongkong, 26th June, 1907.

The Committee unanimously agreed to recommend that the above votes be passed.

1

The Committee then adjourned sine die.

Laid before the Legislative Council and adopted on the 16th July, 1907.

A. G. M. FLETCHER,

Clerk of Councils

A. M. THOMSON,

Chairman,

No. 5.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 16th July, 1907.

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON), Chairman.

the Attorney General, (HENRY HESSY JOHNSTON GOMPERTZ).

""

the Colonial Treasurer, (CHARLES MCILVAINE Messer).

the Director of Public Works, (WILLIAM CHATHAM).

19

the Registrar General, (ARTHUR WINBOLT BREWIN).

the Captain Superintendent of Police, (FRANCIS JOSEPH BADELEY).

Dr. Ho KAI, M.B., C.M., C.M.G.

Mr. WEI YUK.

""

Mr. HENRY EDWARD POLLOCK, K.C.

Mr. EDWARD OSBORNE.

""

Mr. HENRY KESWICK.

""

ABSENT:

His Excellency the General Officer Commanding the Troops, (Major-General ROBERT George

BROADWOOD, C.B.).

The Honourable Mr. EDBERT Ansgar HEWETT.

The Committee met pursuant to summons.

Read the following Minutes under the hand of His Excellency the Officer Adminis- tering the Government :-

No. 9204 of 1905, C.O.D.

No. 8824 of 1904, C.S.O.

No. 5011 of

1907.

F. H. MAY.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Five thousand five hundred Dollars ($5,500) in aid of the vote, Education, Other Charges, Grants, Building Grants.

Government House, Hongkong, 3rd July, 1907.

F. H. MAY.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to revote a sum of One thousand seven hundred and sixteen Dollars ($1,716) in aid of the vote, Harbour Master's Department, Harbour Office-Special Expenditure, Purchase of 3 Fairway Lights and Buoys.

Government House, Hongkong, 6th July, 1907.

F. H. MAY.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of One thousand nine hundred Dollars ($1,900) in aid of the vote, Public Works, Recurrent, Maintenance of Lighthouses.

Government House, Hongkong, 8th July, 1907.

No. 5041 of

1907.

No. 2658 of 1907.

F. H. MAY.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Two hundred and seventy-five Dollars ($275) in aid of the vote, Judicial and Legal Departments, A.-Supreme Court, Other Charges, for the following

items:

Electric Fans and Light, Incidental Expenses,

Total,

Government House, Hongkong, 8th July, 1907.

F. H. MAY.

*

$ 75

200

.$275

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Three hundred and fifty Dollars ($350) in aid of the vɔte, Public Works, Recurrent, Miscellaneous, Maintenance of Public Cemetery.

Government House, Hongkong, 11th July, 1907.

The Committee unanimously agreed to recommend that the above votes be passed.

The Committee then adjourned sine die.

Laid before the Legislative Council and adopted on the 23rd July, 1907.

A. G. M. FLETCHER,

Clerk of Councils

A. M. THOMSON,

Chairman.

2

<

T

--

No. 6.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 23rd July, 1907.

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON), Chairman.

the Attorney General, (HENRY HESSY JOHNSTON Gompertz).

1

"

the Colonial Treasurer, (CHARLES MCILVAINE MESSER).

19

the Director of Public Works, (WILLIAM CHATHAM).

""

the Registrar General, (ARTHUR WINBOLT BREWIN).

""

the Captain Superintendent of Police, (FRANCIS JOSEPH BADELEY).

Dr. Ho KAI, M.B., C.M., C.M.G.

Mr. WEI YUK.

*

""

Mr. EDWARD Osborne.

>>

ABSENT:

His Excellency the General Officer Commanding the Troops, (Major-General ROBERT GEORGE

BROADWOOD, C.B.).

The Honourable Mr. HENRY EDWARD POLLOCK, K.C.

Mr. EDBERT ANSGAR HEWETT.

Mr. HENRY KESWICK.

The Committee met pursuant to summons.

Read the following Minutes under the hand of His Excellency the Officer Adminis- tering the Government :

No. II in

7416 of 1906,

C.S.O.

No. 3389 of

1907.

F. H. MAY.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to revote a sum of One thousand one hundred and forty-five Dollars ($1,145) in aid of the vote, Sanitary Department, Other Charges, Typhoon Expenses.

Government House, Hongkong, 16th July, 1906.

F. H. MAY.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of One thousand Dollars ($1,000) in aid of the vote, Police and Prison Depart- ments, A.-Police, Other Charges, for the following items :-

Secret Service,

Subsistence of Prisoners,

$ 700

300

$1,000

Government House, Hongkong, 18th July, 1907.

The Committee unanimously agreed to recommend that the above votes be passed.

The Committee then adjourned sine die.

Laid before the Legislative Council and adopted on the 26th July, 1907.

A. G. M. FLETCHER,

Clerk of Councils

A. M. THOMSON,

Chairman.

No. 7.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG, On the 26th July, 1907.

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON), Chairman.

the Attorney General, (HENRY HESSY JOHNSTON GOMPERTZ).

">

"}

the Colonial Treasurer, (CHARLES MCILVAINE MESSER).

>>

the Director of Public Works, (WILLIAM CHATHAM, C.M.G.).

>>

the Captain Superintendent of Police, (FRANCIS JOSEPH Badeley).

>>

Dr. Ho KAI, M.B., C.M., C.M.G.

Mr. WEI YUK.

""

Mr. EDWARD OSBORNE.

"}

ABSENT:

His Excellency the General Officer Commanding the Troops, (Major-General ROBERT GEORGE

BROADWOOD, C.B.).

The Honourable the Registrar General, (ARTHUR WINBOLT BREWIN).

";

""

""

Mr. HENRY EDWARD POLLOCK, K.C.

Mr. EDBERT ANSGAR HEWETT.

Mr. HENRY KESWICK.

The Committee met pursuant to summons.

Read the following Minutes under the hand of His Excellency the Officer Adminis- tering the Government :-

No. 7340 of 1906, C.O.D.

No. 39 ot

1906, C.S.O.

No. 1749 of

1907.

F. H. MAY.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Four hundred and thirty Dollars ($430) in aid of the vote, Harbour Master's Department, G.--Lighthouses, Gap Rock Lighthouse, Other Charges, Gunpowder Charges and Tubes for Fog Signalling Guns.

Government House, Hongkong, 20th July, 1907.

F. H. MAY.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Four thousand one hundred and twelve Dollars ($4,112) in aid of the vote, Public Works Extraordinary, Communications, New Roads in Victoria, Extension East and West of Conduit Road.

Government House, Hongkong, 22nd July, 1907.

F. H. MAY.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Four hundred and sixty-seven Dollars ($467) in aid of the vote, Post Office, B.-Postal Agencies in China, Swatow, Other Charges, Incidental Expenses.

Government House, Hongkong, 23rd July, 1907.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

The Committee unanimously agreed to recommend that the above votes be passed. The Committee then adjourned sine die.

Laid before the Legislative Council and adopted on the 17th September, 1907.

F. H. MAY, Chairman.

R. H. CROFTON,

Clerk of Councils.

No. 8.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 17th September, 1907.

PRESENT:

His Excellency the General Officer Commanding the Troops, (Major-General ROBERT GEorge

BROADWOOD, C.B.).

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.), Chairman.

1

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM REES DAVIES).

99

??

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON). the Director of Public Works, (WILLIAM CHATHAM, C.M.G.).

the Registrar General, (ARTHUR WINBOLT BREWIN).

17

>>

the Harbour Master, (BASIL REGINALD HAMILTON TAYLOR). Dr. Ho KAI, M.B., C.M., C.M.G.

Mr. WEI YUK.

19

Mr. EDBERT ANSGAR HEWETT.

""

Mr. EDWARD OSBORNE.

""

Mr. HENRY KESWICK.

ABSENT:

The Honourable Mr. HENRY EDWARD POLLOCK, K.C.

The Committee met pursuant to summons.

Read the following Minutes under the hand of His Excellency the Governor :-

No. 1946 of

1907.

F. H. MAY.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Three thousand five hundred and thirty Dollars ($3,530) in aid of the vote, Post Office, for the following:-

Other Charges.

4.-Hongkong Post Office,

Clothing, Shoes, &c., for Postmen, &c...........$ 700 Incidental Expenses,

1,200

Mail Bags and Parcel Post Receptacles,......... 1,000

B.-Postal Agencies in China,

Shanghai,

Fee of Medical Attendant, Light,

Amoy,

Rent of Sub-Agency,

Canton,

Incidental Expenses,

Government House, Hongkong, 25th July, 1907.

.$ .250 100

30

250

$3,530

:

No. 5041 of

1907.

No. 5617 of

1907.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Three hundred Dollars ($300) in aid of the vote, Judicial and Legal Departments, 4.-Supreme Court, Other Charges, Fees to Counsel for Prisoners in Capital Cases.

Government House, Hongkong, 29th July, 1907.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Seven thousand Dollars ($7,000) in aid of the vote, Miscellaneous Services, for the following items :--

Printing and Binding :

Blue Book,

Miscellaneous Papers,

Total,

.$ 520

6,480

$7,000

No. 4226 of

1907.

No. 5011 of 1907.

No. 5617 of 1907.

No. 7340 of 1906, C.O.D.

No. 5617 of

1907.

No. 5697 of

1907.

Government House, Hongkong, 1st August, 1907.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One thousand Dollars ($1,000) in aid of the vote, Treasury, B.-Office of Assessor of Rates, Other Charges, House Numbering, New Territories.

Government House, Hongkong, 1st August, 1907.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One thousand six hundred Dollars ($1,600) in aid of the vote, Public Works, Recurrent, Maintenance of Lighthouses.

Government House, Hongkong, 6th August, 1907.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Thirteen thousand Dollars ($13,000) in aid of the vote, Miscellaneous Services, Refunds of Revenue.

Government House, Hongkong, 14th August, 1907.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Nine hundred and ninety-two Dollars ($992) in aid of the vote, Harbour Master's Department, G.- Lighthouses, Gap Rock Lighthouse, Other Charges, Gunpowder Charges and Tubes for Fog Signalling Guns.

Government House, Hongkong, 21st August, 1907.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One hundred Dollars ($100) in aid of the vote, Miscellaneous Services, Travelling Allowances in the New Territories.

Government House, Hongkong, 26th August, 1907.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Ten thousand Dollars ($10,000) in aid of the vote, Governor, Other Charges, Furniture.

Government House, Hongkong, 3rd September, 1907.

No. 6157 of

1907.

F. D. LUGARD

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Five hundred Dollars ($500) in aid of the vote, Police and Prison Departments, 4.-Police, Other Charges, Secret Service.

Government House, Hongkong, 6th September, 1907.

The Committee unanimously agreed to recommend that the above votes be passed.

The Committee then adjourned sine die.

Laid before the Legislative Council and adopted on the 3rd October, 1907.

A. G. M. FLETCHER,

Clerk of Councils.

F. H. MAY,

Chairman.

No. 9.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 3rd October, 1907..

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.), Chairman.

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM REES DAVIES).

""

""

the Director of Public Works, (WILLIAM CHATHAM, C.M.G.).

""

the Registrar General, (ARTHUR WINBOLT BREWIN).

1)

the Harbour Master, (BASIL REGINALD HAMILTON TAYLOR).

**

Dr. Ho KAI, M.B., C.M., C.M.G.

Mr. WEI YUK.

་་

Mr. EDBERT ANSGAR HEWETT.

""

Mr. EDWARD OSBORNE.

Mr. HENRY KESWICK.

""

ABSENT:

His Excellency the General Officer Commanding the Troops, (Major-General ROBERT GEORGE

BROADWOOD, C.B.).

The Honourable the Colonial Treasurer, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON).

""

Mr. HENRY EDWARD POLLOCK, K.C.

The Committee met pursuant to summons.

Considered clause by clause a Bill entitled An Ordinance to apply a sum not exceeding Four million nine hundred and ninety-two thousand nine hundred and fifty-three Dollars to the Public Service of the year 1908.

Read the following Minutes under the hand of His Excellency the Governor :-

No. 3389 of 1907.

No. 1689 of 1904, C.S.O.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One thousand six hundred and eighty Dollars ($1,680) in aid of the vote, Police and Prison Depart- ments, Fire Brigade,-Special Expenditure, Despatch Boxes.

Government House, Hongkong, 16th September, 1907.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Forty thousand two hundred and thirty-two Dollars ($40,232) in aid of the vote, Public Works Extraor- dinary, Water Works, Tytam Tuk Scheme, First Section.

Government House, Hongkong, 18th September, 1907.

The Committee unanimously agreed to recommend that the above votes be passed. The Committee then adjourned sine die.

Laid before the Legislative Council and adopted on the 10th October, 1907.

A. G. M. FLETCHER,

Clerk of Councils.

F. H. MAY,

Chairman.

No. 10.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG, On the 10th October, 1907.

PRESENT:

His Excellency the General Officer Commanding the Troops, (Major-General ROBERT GEORGE

BROADWOOD, C.B.).

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.), Chairman.

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM REES DAVIES).

93

37

21

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON). the Director of Public Works, (WILLIAM CHATHAM, C.M.G.). the Registrar General, (ARTHUR WINBOLT BREWIN).

35

""

""

the Harbour Master, (BASIL REGINALD HAMILTON TAYLOR). Dr. Ho KAI, M.B., C.M., C.M.G.

Mr. WEI YUK.

Mr. EDBERT ANSGAR HEWETT.

""

Mr. EDWARD Osborne.

وو

Mr. HENRY KESWICK,

""

ABSENT:

The Honourable Mr. HENRY EDWARD POLLOCK, K.C.

The Committee met pursuant to summons.

Read the following Minutes under the hand of His Excellency the Governor :-

F. D. LUGARD.

No. 1380 of 1905, C.S.O.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Three thousand Dollars ($3,000) in aid of the vote, Public Works Extraordinary, Miscellaneous, Hot water apparatus and baths, Government House.

Government House, Hongkong, 2nd October, 1907.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Seven thousand three hundred and thirty-six Dollars ($7,336) in aid of the vote, Education, Department of Inspector of Schools-Other Charges, Evening Continuation Classes.

Government House, Hongkong, 2nd October, 1907.

The Committee unanimously agreed to recommend that the above votes be passed. The Committee then adjourned sine die.

Laid before the Legislative Council and adopted on the 28th November, 1907.

A. G. M. FLETCHER,

Clerk of Councils.

F. H. MAY, Chairman.

كم

!

No. 11.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 28th November, 1907.

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Officer Commanding the Troops, (Colonel CHARLES HENRY DARLING,

R.E.).

the Colonial Secretary, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.), Chairman.

""

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM REES DAVIES).

""

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON).

the Director of Public Works, (WILLIAM CHATHAM, C.M.G.).

"1

""

the Registrar General, (ARTHUR WINBOLT BREWIN).

35

""

""

""

"}

3

the Harbour Master, (BASIL REGINALD HAMILTON TAYLOR).

Dr. Ho KAI, M.B., C.M., C.M.G.

Mr. WEI YUK.

Mr. HENRY EDWARD POLLOCK, K.C.

Mr. EDBERT ANSGAR HEWETT.

Mr. HENRY KESWICK.

ABSENT:

The Honourable Mr. Edward Osborne.

The Committee met pursuant to summons.

Read the following Minutes under the hand of His Excellency the Governor :-

F. D. LUGARD.

No. 7731 of The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Three hundred Dollars

1907.

($300) in aid of the vote, Sanitary Department, Sanitary Staff, Other Charges, Cemeteries Incidental Expenses.

Government House, Hongkong, 14th October, 1907.

No. 889 of

1907.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One hundred and four thousand and fifty Dollars ($104,050) in aid of the vote, Public Works, Recur- rent, and Public Works, Extraordinary, for the following items :-

PUBLIC WORKS, RECURRENT. Buildings.

1 Maintenance of Buildings,

Communications.

4 Maintenance of Roads and Bridges in City,

10 00

5

Do.

8

Do.

do.,

Telegraphs,

Drainage.

$ 8,000

1,000

outside City,

2,500

4,500

4,500

350

10 Maintenance of Sewers, Nullahs, &c.,

13 Gas Lighting, Kowloon,

Lighting.

Miscellaneous.

16 Maintenance of Public Cemetery,

19 Miscellaneous Services,...

20 Typhoon and Rainstorm Damages,.

400

1,000

66,800

Water Works.

250

Lai Chi Kok,

400

$ 89,700

23 Maintenance of Shaukiwan,

25

Do.

PUBLIC WORKS, EXTRAORDINARY.

Drainage.

14 Training Nullahs,...

4,000

Miscellaneous.

22 Miscellaneous Works,

7,000

Water Works.

29 Miscellaneous Water Works,

550

Insanitary Property Resumption,

2,800

14,350

Total,

$104,050

No. 5379 of

+

1907.

No. 6157 of

1907.

No. 691 of

1907, and

Government House, Hongkong, 17th October, 1907.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Three hundred Dollars ($300) in aid of the vote, Medical Departments, B.-Hospitals and Asylums, Infec- tious Hospitals, Hospital Hulk Hygeia, Other Charges, Provisions, &c.

Government House, Hongkong, 23rd October, 1907.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Three hundred and forty-three Dollars ($343) in aid of the vote, Police and Prison Departments, A.- Police, Other Charges, Secret Service.

Government House, Hongkong, 28th October, 1907.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Four thousand one No. 7079 of hundred and eighty-four Dollars ($4,184) in aid of the vote, Public Works, Extra- Extension ordinary, Communications, New Roads in New Territories.

1905,

Government House, Hongkong, 5th November, 1907.

?

I in

No. 7416 of

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Two hundred and 1906, C.S.O. ninety Dollars ($290) in aid of the vote, Police and Prison Departments, B.-Fire

Brigade, Other Charges, Typhoon Damages.

No. 8367 of

1907.

No. 8424 of

1907.

No. 8428 of

1907.

No. 3389 of

1907.

Government House, Hongkong, 6th November, 1907.

F. D. LUGard.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Twenty-five Dollars ($25) in aid of the vote, Police and Prison Departments, C.-P'rison, Other Charges. Executioner's Fees, and Allowances for inflicting Corporal Punishment.

Government House, Hongkong, 6th November, 1907.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One thousand Dollars ($1,000) in aid of the vote, Botanical and Forestry Department, Other Charges, Forestry in New Territories.

Government House, Hongkong, 7th November 1907.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Two hundred and eighty Dollars ($280) in aid of the vote, Harbour Master's Department, A.-Har- bour Office, Other Charges, Electric Fans and Light.

Government House, Hongkong, 7th November, 1907.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One thousand one hundred Dollars ($1,100) in aid of the vote, Police and Prison Departments, A.— Police, Other Charges, for the following items :-

Conveyance of Police, Prisoners and Transport,.. Incidental Expenses,

Total,

850

250

$1,100

No. 8858 of

1907.

II in No. 313 of 1906.

Government House, Hongkong, 18th November, 1907.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Five hundred Dollars ($500) in aid of the vote, Colonial Secretary's Department and Legislature, Other Charges, Incidental Expenses.

Government House, Hongkong, 26th November, 1907.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One thousand four hundred and eighty-two Dollars ($1,482) in aid of the vote, Medical Departments, B.-Hospitals and Asylums, Infectious Hospitals, Hospital Hulk Hygeia ", Other Charges, Provisions, &c.

Government House, Hongkong, 27th November, 1907.

{

No. 8463 of·

1907.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Four hundred and fifty-six Dollars ($456) in aid of the vote, Medical Departments, A.-Staff, Other Charges, Health Officer of Port, Repairs to Launch.

Government House, Hongkong, 28th November, 1907.

The Committee unanimously agreed to recommend that the above votes be passed.

The Committee then adjourned sine die.

Laid before the Legislative Council and adopted on the 19th December, 1907.

A. G. M. FLETCHER,

Clerk of Councils

F. H. MAY, Chairman.

M

36

No. 12.

digio brusod on0 do 60

beigt dan PREPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

houseą od najev J-FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 19th December, 1907.

PRESENT:

His Excellency the General Officer Commanding the Troops, (Major-General ROBERT GEORGE

BROADWOOD, C.B.).

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.), Chairman.

""

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM REES DAVIES).

""

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD Thomson).

""

the Director of Public Works, (WILLIAM CHATHAM, C.M.G.).

""

the Registrar General, (ARTHUR WINBOLT BREWIN).

"

23

""

""

the Harbour Master, (Comdr. BASIL REGINALD HAMILTON TAYLOR, R.N.). Dr. Ho KAI, M.B., C.M., C.M.G.

Mr. WEI YUK.

Mr. HENRY EDWARD POLLOCK, K.C.

Mr. EDBERT ANSGAR HEWETT.

Mr. EDWARD OSBORNE.

Mr. HENRY KESWICK.

The Committee met pursuant to summons.

Read the following Minutes under the hand of His Excellency the Governor :-

No. 3389 of

1907.

No. 5379 of 1907.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Two hundred and forty-five Dollars ($245) in aid of the vote, Police and Prison Departments, A.-— Police, Other Charges, Secret Services.

Government House, Hongkong, 14th December, 1907.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One hundred and ninety-three Dollars ($193) in aid of the vote, Medical Departments, B.-Hospitals and Asylums for the following items :-

Other Charges.

Lunatic Asylums-Incidental Expenses,... Hospital Hulk "Hygeia"-Provisions, &c.,

$ 17.60

24.18

Victoria Hospital for Women and Children-Provisions, ... 151.22

Total,.......

Government House, Hongkong, 14th December, 1907.

$193.00

I B in No.

7416 of 1906.

F. D. LUGARD.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One thousand eight hundred and thirty-four Dollars ($1,834) in aid of the vote, Police and Prison Departments, B.-Fire Brigade, Other Charges, Typhoon Damages.

Government House, Hongkong, 16th December, 1907.

The Committee unanimously agreed to recommend that the above votes be passed.

The Committee then adjourned sine die.

Laid before the Legislative Council and adopted on the 19th December, 1907.

A. G. M. FLETCHER,

Clerk of Councils

F. H. MAY,

Chairman.

$

No. 1.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

PUBLIC

OF THE

WORKS

COMMITTEE

at a Meeting held on the 16th May, 1907.

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Director of Public Works (WILLIAM CHATHAM), Chairman.

the Colonial Treasurer, (CHARLES MCILVAINE MESSER).

5

""

Mr. EDBERT ANSGAR HEWETT.

27

Mr. EDWARD OSBORNE.

77

Mr. WILLIAM JARDINE GRESSON.

""

Branch Post Office in Wanchai District.--(I in C.S.O. 10152/04.)

The Chairman explained that the opinion of the Committee was desired on the question of the site upon which the Branch Post Office should be erected. It was originally intended to alter No. 3 Police Station, in Queen's Road East, to adapt it for a Post Office but the building was found to be in such a defective condition that it was ordered to be pulled down. The Postmaster General had since represented that it would be preferable to locate the Post Office on the Praya and had suggested that it should be in the vicinity of No: 2 Police Station.

After discussion, it was unanimously agreed to recommend that the building should be erected on the reclamation adjoining No. 2 Police Station.

New Path from May Road to Barker Road:-(C.S.O. 3411/1907.)

The Chairman laid before the Committee a plan showing a proposed path extending from a point in May Road adjoining the Tramway to a point in Barker Road close by the Victoria Hospital and explained that it would form a much more direct route from the City to the Victoria Hospital than either of those existing at present. It would also connect up with the existing path from Barker Road to Plantation Road. The estimated cost of the work was $3,000.

It was unanimously agreed to recommend that the path be made.

The Committee then adjourned.

Laid before the Legislative Council this 23rd day of May, 1907.

:

A. G. M. FLETCHER,

Clerk of Councils.

W. CHATHAM,

Chairman.

1

No. 2.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

PUBLIC WORKS

COMMITTEE

at a Meeting held on the 8th August, 1907.

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Director of Public Works (WILLIAM CHATHAM, C.M.G.). Chairman.

Mr. EDWARD Osborne.

"}

Mr. HENRY KESWICK,

وو

ABSENT:

""

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON).

Mr. EDBERT ANSGAR HEWETT.

""

New Slaughter House and Animal Depôts for Kowloon.--(C.S.O. 3048/06.)

The Chairman submitted block plans and explained that the removal of the existing Slaughter House and Cattle Depôt adjoining Des Voeux Road, Hunghom Bay, was necessi- tated by the construction of the railway and it was proposed to construct new buildings to replace them on a site near Ma Tau Kok, where the drainage, which was of a somewhat offensive nature, could be discharged into water of considerable depth. At the same time, it was proposed to make the new slaughter house more than twice the size of the present one and to add separate sheds for the accommodation of 400 swine and 200 sheep or goats, for which no special provision existed in the present depôt. The shed for cattle would accom- modate 120 head, being of the same dimensions as the existing cattle shed, which was however utilized to a considerable extent for the housing of swine, &c. It would be quite possible to defer the construction of either the swine shed or the sheep shed until some future time as it was intended to appropriate a large area of land which would enable future extensions to be carried out.

The estimated cost of providing the accommodation stated above, including compensa- tion to some squatters who would be dislodged, the preparation of the site and its enclosure by walls and fences, an isolation shed, the necessary offices, and repairs to an existing house to render it suitable for an inspector's quarters, was $75,000.

The Committee unanimously agreed to recommed that the whole of the works included in the above estimate be proceeded with at once and that access to the new depôt be provided by a road from the Kowloon City Road.

Extension of Sai Ying Pun Anglo-Chinese School.-(C.S.O. 1723/07.)

The Chairman submitted a proposal for adding another storey to the existing school building at the junction of Pokfulam Road and High Street to provide additional accom- modation for pupils which the Inspector of Schools had represented was urgently required. The estimated cost of the work was $7,100.

The Committee unanimously approved of the plan.

The Committee then adjourned.

W. CHATHAM,

Chairman.

Laid before the Legislative Council this 17th day of September, 1907.

R. H. CROFTON,

Clerk of Councils.

No. 3.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

PUBLIC WORKS COMMITTEE

at a Meeting held on the 19th December, 1907.

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Director of Public Works (WILLIAM CHATHAM, C.M.G.), Chairman.

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALLEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON).

11

Mr. EDBERT ANSGAR HEWETT.

>>

Mr. EDWARD OSBORNE.

";

Mr. HENRY KESWICK.

Harbour of Refuge for Small Craft. (C.S.O. 9647/1903.)

The Chairinan read a report by Mr. BOULTON, dated 28th September, 1907, on the pro- posed Harbour of Refuge at Mongkoktsui and laid the plans and diagrams accompanying that report before the Committee. He also read the minutes in the above paper bearing on the report and a minute by the Harbour Master, dated 15th November, 1907, recommending that a harbour of refuge should be constructed at West Point instead of at Mongkoktsui.

The Mongkoktsui and the Harbour Master's West Point Schemes were shown on a chart which was laid before the Committee.

Mr. BOULTON's report on the Mongkoktsui Scheme stated that:-

(a.) The construction of the breakwater, 4,000 feet long, could not be carried out piecemeal so as to afford a sheltered area of moderate extent in the first instance which could afterwards be extended by adding to the break water, because the enclosed area would remain dangerously exposed from certain quarters until the whole scheme was completed.

(b.) The only way of curtailing the expenditure, consistent with the provision of a harbour which would be safe under all conditions, was to modify the scheme entirely, making it of a much less extensive nature than had hitherto been proposed and an alternative scheme was shown having a breakwater 1,940 feet long.

(c.) The cost of the scheme hitherto proposed, affording a sheltered area of 166

acres, was estimated at $1,540,000.

(d.) The cost of the modified scheme, affording a sheltered area of only 60 acres,

was estimated at $883,800.

(e.) The carrying out of the modified scheme would probably involve serious

questions with Marine Lot-owners in the vicinity.

The Chairman pointed out that, owing to the limited area of shelter afforded by the modified scheme, boats would be likely to make for it whenever storm-warnings were hoisted whereas the original scheme would afford such ample space that boat-owners could safely reckon on finding room available for their craft however late they might delay seeking shelter.

The Harbour Master's proposal was to construct two breakwaters off Kennedy Town, having a combined length of 4,250 feet and enclosing an area of about 82 acres.

The Chairman stated that the scheme would afford about 75 acres of sheltered water and would cost about $1,943,000.

Mr. KESWICK enquired what was the estimated cost of dredging out Causeway Bay.

:

The Chairman read the replies which were given to questions of a similar nature asked by the Honourable Mr. H. E. POLLOCK at a meeting of the Legislative Council on the 1st November, 1906, in which it was stated that the area of Causeway Bay was 57 acres and the estimated cost of dredging it to a depth of 9 feet at low water was about $900,000. Members expressed the opinion that 9 feet was an excessive depth and that it could safely be reduced to 6 feet, which would bring the estimate down to about $600,000.

After further discussion of the proposals submitted, it was agreed, on the suggestion of Mr. HEWETT, to circulate Mr. BOULTON's report and other documents to Members in order to give them an opportunity of studying the matter more fully and to hold another meeting after this had been done.

The Honourable the Harbour Master (Mr. B. R. H. TAYLOR) was present throughout the meeting and took part in the discussion.

The Committee then adjourned.

W. CHATHAM,

Chairman.

Laid before the Legislative Council this 23rd day of January, 1908.

A. G. M. FLETCHER,

Clerk of Councils.

No. 1.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

STANDING LAW COMMITTEE

at a Meeting held in the Attorney General's Chambers, Hongkong, on the 27th May, 1907.

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Attorney General, (HENRY HESSY JOHNSTON GOMPERTZ), Chairman.

the Captain Superintendent of Police, (FRANCIS JOSEph Badeley).

"}

""

Dr. Ho KAI, M.B., C.M., C.M.G.

Mr. WEI YUK.

>>

""

Mr. HENRY EDWARD POLLOCK, K.C.

I, HENRY HESSY JOHNSTON GOMPERTZ, Attorney General, Chairman of the Stand- ing Law Committee, do hereby certify that the Standing Law Committee on the 27th day of May, 1907, considered clause by clause a Bill entitled "An Ordinance to amend the Bills of Exchange Ordinance, 1885," and unanimously recommended that the Bill in question be reported to the Legislative Council with the following amendments, namely

:

1. That the Title of the Bill be amended by substituting for the words "Bills of Exchange Ordinance, 1885," the words "Law relating to Bills of Exchange."

2. That clause 1 of the Bill be amended by substituting for all the words in the clause after the words "cited as" in the first line the words "the Bills of Exchange (Amendment) Ordinance, 1907, and this Ordinance and the Bills of Exchange Ordinance, 1885, may be cited together as the Bills of Exchange Ordinances 1885 and 1907."

3. That clause 2 of the Bill be amended by substituting for the words "the Prin- cipal Ordinance" in the first line the words "The Bills of Exchange Ordinance, 1885," and by substituting for the word "proviso" in the third line the word "sub-section" and by substituting for the words " Provided always that a banker shall be deemed to receive" in the 4th and 5th lines the words "A banker receives."

4. That a clause be added to the Bill as follows:---

"3. Any draft or order drawn upon a banker for a sum of money pay- able to order on demand which shall, when presented for payment, purport to be indorsed by the person to whom the same shall be drawn payable, shall be a sufficient authority to such banker to pay the amount of such draft or order to the bearer thereof; and it shall not be incumbent on such banker to prove that such indorsement or any subsequent indorsement was made by or under the direction or authority of the person to whom the said draft or order was. or is made payable either by the drawer or any indorser thereof."

H. H. J. GOMPERTZ,

Chairman.

Laid before the Legislative Council, and adopted on the 6th day of June, 1907.

A. G. M. FLETCHER,

Clerk of Councils.

HONGKONG.

REPORT ON THE ASSESSMENT FOR THE YEAR 1907-1908,

No. 1907

34

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of

His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government.

ASSESSOR'S OFFICE,

HONGKONG, 13th July, 1907.

SIR, I have the honour to submit my Report on the Assessment for the year 1907- 1908.

2. By order of His Excellency the Governor-in-Council a new general valuation has been made.

The City of Victoria.

3. The Rateable Value has decreased from $9,207,595 to $8,892,205 a reduction of $315,390 or 3.42 per cent.

The Hill District.

4. The Rateable Value has increased from $252,160 to $261,070 on addition of $8,910 or 3.53 per cent.

Shaukiwan.

5. The Rateable Value has increased for $49,977 to $55,857 an addition of $5,880 or 11.76 per cent.

Hongkong Villages.

6. The Rateable Value has increased from $205,892 to $220,659 an addition of $14,767 or 7.17 per cent.

632

Kowloon Point.

7. The Rateable Value has increased from $452,060 to $470,180 an addition of $18,120 or 4.00 per cent.

Yaumati.

8. The Rateable Value has decreased from $250,770 to $236,585 a reduction of $14,185 or 5.65 per cent.

Hung Hom.

9. The Rateable Value has increased from $220,445 to. $230,715 an addition of $10,270 or 4.65 per cent.

Mongkoktsui.

10. The Rateable Value has increased from $139,475 to $140,980 an addition of $1,505 or 1.07 per cent.

Kowloon Villages.

11. The Rateable Value has decreased from $151,899 to $146,087 a reduction of $5,812: or 3.82 per cent.

The whole Colony.

12. The Rateable Value has decreased from $10,930,273 to $10,654,338 a reduction of $275,935 or 2.52 per cent.

New Kowloon.

13. The Rateable Value has increased from $38,930 to $61,835 an addition of $22,905 or 58.83 per cent.

Interim Valuations.

14. During the period from 1st July, 1906, to 1st June, 1907, Interim Valuations have been made as follows:-

In the City of Victoria.

144 New and/or rebuilt tenements, rateable value,

$292,485

31 Tenements structurally altered,

$89,925

Replacing assessments amount to,............

77,465

12,460

$304,945

55 Assessments cancelled, tenements pulled down, or being in other

respects not rateable,

..$ 77,675

Increase in the City of Victoria,....

$227,270

633

In the Rest of the Colony.

66 New and/or rebuilt tenements, rateable value,

12 Tenements structurally altered,

Replacing assessments amount to,

.$152,190

!

.$ 54,195

133,585

18,605

$ 72,800

.$ 41,208

.$ 31,592

69 Assessments cancelled, tenements pulled down, or being in other

respects not rateable,

Increase in the rest of the Colony.

In New Kowloon.

6 New and/or rebuilt tenements, rateable value,

3 Assessments cancelled, tenements pulled down, or being in other

respects not rateable,

Increase in the New Kowloon,.

The total number of tenements affected by Interim Valuations being 386.

Vacant Tenements.

.$ 16,700

380

$ 16,320

:

15. The number of reported vacant tenements in the City of Victoria inspected under section 35 of the Rating Ordinance averaged about 218 monthly, against 220 last year.

Tabular Statements.

16. The usual tabular statements giving comparisons of the valuation for 1906-1907 and 11907-1908 are attached.

· Staff.

17. Mr. DAVID WOOD acted as Assessor during my absence on leave. Mr. CHAN KWOK ON and Mr. TAI TIN SHANG have discharged their duties to my satisfaction.

The Honourable

Mr. C. McI. MESSER,

Colonial Treasurer.

I have, etc.,

ARTHUR CHAPMAN,

Assessor.

634

Table A.

CITY OF VICTORIA.

No.

District.

Valuation, Valuation, 1906-1907. 1907-1908.

Increase.

Decrease. Percentage.

$

$

$

$

CA

1 Kennedy Town,

186,540

189,470

2,930

2

Shek Tong Tsui,

419,220 516,400

97,180

3

Sai Ying Pun,

2,115,130 1,957,585

157,545

f

Tai Ping Shan,

....

705,700 624,500

81,200

5. Sheung Wan,

1,168,890 1,022,155

146,735

6 Chung Wan,

3,595,145 3,608,290

13,145

7

Ha Wan,

343,715 321,410

22,305

8

Wan Tsai,

411,005 387,620

23,385

9 Bowrington,

103,335 102,220

1,115

10

Soo Kon Poo,

158,915 162,555

3,640

$ 9,207,595 8,892,205 116,895 432,285

Deduct increase,

Total decrease,

116,895

315,390

3.42

Table B.

THE HILL DISTRICT, SHAUKIWAN AND HONGKONG VILLAGES.

District.

Valuation, Valuation, 1906-1907. 1907-1908.

Increase. Decrease. Percentage.

$

The Hill District,

252,160

261,070

$ 8,910

$

%

3.53

Shaukiwan,

Hongkong Villages,

49,977 55,857

5,880

205,892 220,659

14,767

11.76

7.17

4

...

Total,

$

508,029 537,586 29,557

5.81

+

635

Table C.

KOWLOON POINT, YAUMATI, HUNGHOM, MONGKOKTSUI AND KOWLOON VILLAGES.

District.

Valuation, Valuation,

Increase.

1906-1907.1907-1908.

Decrease. Percentage.

$

$

$

S

%

Kowloon Point,

452,060

470,180

18,120

4.00

Yaumati,

Hung Hom,

Mongkoktsui,

250,770

236,585

14,185

5.65

220,445

230,715

10,270

4.65

139,475

140,980

1,505

1.07

Kowloon Villages,

151,899

146,087

5,812

3.82

CA

1,214,649 | 1,224,547

29,895

19,997

Deduct decrease,

19,997

Total increase,

9,898

0.81

Table D.

THE COLONY OF HONGKONG.

Valuation, Valuation,

District.

Increase.

1906-1907.1907-1908.

Decrease. Percentage.

$

$

$

%

The City of Victoria,

Hill District and Hongkong

Villages.

9,207,595 8,892,205

315,390

3.42

508,029 537,586 29,557

5.81

Kowloon Point and Kowloon

Villages,

1,214,649 1,224,547 9,898

0.81

10,930,273|10,654,338

39,455

315,390

Deduct increase

39,455

Total decrease,

275,935

2.52.

3

:

District.

636

Table E.

NEW KOWLOON.

Valuation,

Valuation,

Increase. Decrease. Percentage.

1906-1907. 1907–1908.

CA

S

%

$

$

Kowloon City and Sham

Shui Po,...

38,930

61.835

22,905

Junk Bay, Nga lu Tau

and Little Kowloon,...

Total,

38,930

61,835

22,905

*

58.83

58.83

ARTHUR CHAPMAN,

Assessor.

Annexe L.

REPORT OF THE GOVERNMENT BACTERIOLOGIST.

(a.) Staff.

I-THE BACTERIOLOGICAL INSTITUTE.

(b.) Buildings.

(c.) General Statistics.

(d.) Notes on Parasitic Worms.

(e.) Rats and Rat-Fleas,

(f.) Outbreaks of Cattle Disease.

(g.) Observations on Hæmatozoa.

(h.) Bacteriological Examination of the Public Water Supplies.

(2.) Bacteriological Examination of Water Supplies from Othe! Sources. (A.) The "Bacteria of Indication" in Water.

(1.) Preparation of Vaccine Lymph.

II. THE PUBLIC. MORTUARY.

(a.) Staff.

(b.) Buildings.

(c.) General Statistics.

THE BACTERIOLOGICAL INSTITUTE.

Staff

Dr. C. M. HEANLEY, the newly appointed Assistant Bacteriologist, arrived in the Colony on 4th April, 1906. In addition to his duties at the Public Mortuary, he regularly assists me in the general routine bacteriological examinations. In addition he has carried on a certain amount of research work. Without his assistance, it would have been im- possible to have started the Laboratory as an Institute for general work and research study.

Buildings.

The Institute was opened for routine, bacteriological examinations aud research work on the 15th March, 1906. From this time onwards, the Bacteriologist confined bis atten- tion almost entirely to the fittings and equipment of the building for all kinds of research work. As these are somewhat complicated, and require considerable care and time, it was found impossible to commence thorough research work until later in the year. A full des- cription of the buildings and the accommodation provided was supplied by the Honourable the Director of Public Works in bis Annual Report for the year 1905. In my opinion, the buildings have special qualifications for carrying out bacteriological examinations and research. The laboratory accommodation is excellent, and with stables and animal houses completes a compound admitting of the most varied experimental work. Each laboratory is fully equipped with the necessary apparatus according to requirement. A micro-photo- graphic apparatus has been ordered from home, and will be fitted up in one of the rooms specially prepared for this class of work. Another room is specially reserved for conducting any experimental or other research work which may be necessary from time to time. At present, arrangements are being made to have this room fitted with electrical apparatus in order to conduct certain important experiments on the action of light on bacteria.

1

475

The complete apparatus for the manufacture of vaccine lymph, in accordance with the methods employed in the Government Laboratories in London, has been fitted up in the Serum Laboratory, and gives satisfaction.

A hot room is provided in the basement for the incubation of bacteria on a large scale as in the production of toxins used in the preparation of different sera.

The animal houses are fitted so that they may be used for animals employed in the testing and production of toxins and sera.

The smaller rooms are used for breeding purposes.

General Statistics.

Attached are the following Tables :—

Table No. I. Epimuic Plague.

""

""

??

II. Incidence of Epimuie Plague during the last five years.

III. Examination of Disinfectants.

IV. Tumours Examined.

V. Vaccine Statistics.

VI. Issues of Vaccine during1906.

VII. Incidence of Opisthorchis Sinensis.

Small Pox.-93 cases of the disease were examined during the year. In a certain number of cases, the contents of papules, vesicles, and pustules were examined for the presence of parasites. Although the most recent tinctorial methods were used, nothing was found. We could find no evidence in favour of Korté's recent researches. No structures, suggestive of parasites could be found in any of the internal organs.

Cholera.-Only 2 cases were examined during the year, both being imported, and typical pathologically and bacteriologically.

Diphtheria.-An unusually large number of cases of this disease has been found both at the Public Mortuary and on examination of swabs from the throats of patients suffering from sore throat." It was the cause of death in 8 cases examined at the Public Mortuary. Nine swabs were forwarded to the laboratory for examination, and in five a positive result was obtained.

All the cases occurred during the last quarter of the past year.

The first cases were thoroughly examined in order to establish the true nature of the disease. The micro-organism was isolated in pure culture and submitted to the usual tests, e.g., its behaviour towards Gram's method, Neisser's stain, and experimental inoculation.

Diphtheria must be considered a rare disease in Southern China, and writers on the Geographical distribution of disease make mention of the mildness in type of this disease in the tropics. Confirmation of this statment is found in the cases diagnosed in the Public Mortuary. Five of the eight cases met with were of the laryngeal type. This probably in- dicates that the disease is of a mild type in Hongkong.

Plague. A classification into the different types of the disease has not been considered necessary. In every case, the B. pestis could be demonstrated in large numbers in the blood and different organs, and bubonic swellings were found present in some region of the body.

Tables Nos. I and II are attached showing the amount of Epimnic Plague and its inci- dence during the last five years. The figures given would appear to show a marked dimi- nution in its incidence. This decrease in the amount of rat plague becomes of consider- able interest in regard to the incidence of human plague in Hongkong during the year 1907.

Beri-beri.-1 he incidence of this disease is not diminishing. in Hongkong, and as a cause of death, during the past year, it comes second only to Plague.

476

.

Dysentery.-This disease has been the subject of special investigation during the past A constant search was kept for its presence in bodies at the Public Mortuary. It was the cause of death in 41 cases. Its incidence as regards age in these is of interest.

year.

0-1 year,

1- 5 years,

5-10

""

10-20

20-30

""

Over 30

.13

5

2

3

..10

Total,

41

Therefore over 50% of the cases occurred in children under 10 years of age.

From a strictly bacteriological point of view it has been found impossible in the majority of cases to definitely state whether amoeba were present or absent. In some cases the ambæ could be seen without much difficulty, but in many others, in the absence of motility of the parasite, no definite conclusion could be drawn. Further, in other cases, amoeba were present along with bacilli which gave many of the reactions of the so-called B. dysen- teriæ. With these difficulities before us, coupled with the variance of opinion expressed by different authorities, as to what is, and what is not, a dysentery bacillus; we are at present unable to draw any definite conclusions.

The research is to be carried on during the

year 1907.

Trachoma.-Through the kindness of Dr. HARSTON, it has been possible to examine microscopically and bacteriologically many cases of this disease. Although a considerable amount of time has been devoted to the preparation and examination of the granulomatous tissue, according to the most recent tinctorial and bacteriologicol methods, nothing has been found. It is improbable that the disease is due to any of the ordinary micro-organisms.

Malta Fever-The agglutination test was done on one occasion with a negative result. Cases of the disease would not appear to originate in the Colony.

Typhoid Fever-The Widal Test has been applied in 36 cases during the year with satisfactory results. In some cases of obscure fever the paratyphoid reaction was obtained, but positive results must be accepted with reserve.

Notes on the Prevalence of Parasitic Worms in Hongkong.

1. Distoma Sinensis.---This worm is one of the commonest parasites amongst the Chinese. In the Public Mortuary, the worm is constantly met with, inhabiting the bile quets and gall bladder of cadavers brought there for examination. The number of worms which have been found in a single individual is small, and rarely exceeds 300-400. It is more prevalent in adults than in children--vide Table No. VII attached. During the past year, in no case was it considered to be a direct cause of death.

Experiments were made in order find the mode of infection. Five different varieties of snails, common in Hongkong, were kept in vessels containing the eggs of this worm. The eggs contained active embryos, and were ingested by the snails. In no case, could further development of the eggs be traced, the snails passing the eggs unhatched. These molluscs were chosen for the experiments, as the sheep fluke has a snail as its intermediate host. It may be added that the intermediate host of none of the human distomes has been discovered, although much work has been done on the subject by different observers.

No other human Trematodes have been found at the Public Mortuary.

2. Cestodes.--So far these worms have not been found in Chinese cadavers.

477

3. Filariasis.-The disease is rarely met with amongst the Chinese in Hongkong. Two cadavers, with varicose groin lymphatics, were examined during the past year. There was no history available as to previous places of residence. In each case, a few Filaria bancrofti were found in the blood.

The Filaria medinensis has not been found during the year.

4. Trichocephalus. In a fair proportion of cases the trichocephalus dispar was found. In no case could it be brought into causal relationship with disease.

5. Trichini Spiralis.-There has never been any evidence of the presence of this parasite in Chinese cadavers.

6. Ankylostoma.-These worms are found rarely, and always in small numbers. This is in spite of the fact that many coolies are brought for post-mortem examination. In one case, reported as death from ankylostomiasis, the body was brought from a ship.

7. Ascaris.-The ascaris lumbricoides is a common inhabitant of the intestines of the Chinese. About 90% of the bodies examined at the Public Mortuary show the presence of this parasite in numbers not often exceeding 20. In one case-a young child-the cause of death was attributed to the presence of these worms in large numbers.

8. Oxyuris.-These parasites would not appear to be common amongst the Chinese in Hongkong.

:

The Varieties of Rats and Rat-Fleas found in Hongkong.

The preliminary conclusions of the Indian Plague Commission tend to show that the medium of transference of Plague from rats to man is through the agency of fleas. As soon as the published work of the Commission had arrived in the Colony the Honourable the Principal Civil Medical Officer requested Dr. HEANLEY and the Colonial Veterinary Surgeon to investigate the varieties of rats and rat-fleas found in the Colony.

The main conclusions were that the rats, examined between the 15th October and the 15th December, could be roughly divided as follows:-

1. Black Rats-Mus rattus,

2. Brown Rats-Mus decumanus,

3. Mice,-Mus musculus,.

4. Musk Rats-Sorex giganteus,

12 per cent.

18

48

""

""

2

:)

5. Undetermined Rats-Size of Mus rattus,

5

21

6. Baby Rats-undetermined,

15

.32

The difference between the black and the brown rat was generally very distinct, only in a small percentage was there any difficulty in determining the species. Difficulty in classifying many rats has also been experienced by observers in India and Japan. This question is one of some importance as there is a general opinion that plague and its trans- ference to man is more generally associated with the black rat.

The fleas found on these rats were:

Ctenopsylla musculi.

Pulex cheopis. Ceratophyllus fasciatus.

Pulex serraticeps.

The Ctenopsylla musculi was commonly found on black and brown rats, and on mice.

The Pulex cheopis was found in large numbers on the black and brown rat and on the musk rats.

The Ceratophyllus fasciatus and Pulex serraticeps were only found once; the former is said to be common in many parts of the world. The latter is the dog flea.

478

Outbreaks of Cattle Disease.

During the latter part of the year, outbreaks of cattle disease occurre: at Pokfulam. Acting on the instructions of the Honourable the Principal Civil Medical Officer, the Bacteriologist associated himself with the Colonial Veterinary Surgeon in order to investigate the exact nature of the outbreaks, and their mode of propagation.

The disease proved to be the same as that described in our joint report on "Cattle Disease", in 1903.

"

It has been suggested that "biting flies convey the diseases from one animal to another. These flies appear to belong to the genus Stomoxys, the commouest variety of which is the Stomoxys calcitrans. Experiments, in fly-proof sheds, are to be made to test this theory.

Observations on Hæmatozoa in Hongkong.

In Man.

Apart from Malaria, blood parasites have not been found. The Leishman-Donovan body is not present in the spleen of Chinese in Hongkong. Cases of Spirillar Fever are met with but are always imported.

In Animals.

Frogs.-Three varieties of parasites are common in frogs in Hongkong, namely

1. Drepanidium.

2. Dactylosoma.

3. Trypanosoma.

These three parasites may be present together, as in Rana esculenta. A fourth doubt- ful parasite is the Entamoeba. This would appear to be simply a vacuole in the red blood corpuscle in which are found a varying number of rod-shaped bacteria. Stained preparations of these bodies, never show any definite protoplasmic structure containing chromatin. Drepanidium is most frequently found in the black spotted toad or rock frog (? Bufo melanostiches). Dactylosoma is commonest in the edible frog (Rana esculenta).

The two parasites would appear to be distinct. Trypanosoma rotatorium 'has been found in Rana esculenta only. It is 40-50 w. long, by 20-30 w, broad, excluding the flagellum. The latter is short and frequently contracted The body is irregular in outline, and usually has a striped appearance throughout. It shows no pointing towards either end. The nucleus and centrosoma are usually found lying close together.

Fish-Trypanosomata are the only parasites found in the blood of fish caught in the neighbourhood of the Colony. They are large in size, very maile, and granular. (T. granulosum.) They are found in eels, carp, tench, salmon, bream, and barbel.

Birds.-Proteosoma is met with in sparrows and canaries. Halteridium is, however, the commonest avian hæmatozoon in Hongkong. It is found in pigeons, doves, sparrows, parrots, paddy birds, etc. Spirillosis or Trypanosomiasis has never been found.

*

Cattle. Trypanosoma and Piroplasma are found. A spirochete was recently found in the blood of a buffalo calf by the Assistant Bacteriologist.

Dogs.-Pryplasmosis is found.

Horses.-Trypanosomata are found.

The incidence of Filariasis is noted under the heading of Intestinal Worms. A number of other animals, e.g., monkeys, bats, lizards, rabbits, guinea pigs, etc., has also been examined, but with negative results.

The Mus rattus and Mus decumanus both show the presence of Trypanosoma lewisi,

479

These notes are merely a summary of the positive results obtained up to date. No attempt has been made to give full descriptions of the parasites and their behaviour during development as up to the present it has been impossible to obtain accurate photographic pictures of them.

A considerable amount of time has been devoted to the study of the cycles of develop- ment of Halteridium and the relationship of the different parasites of the frog to each other.

Further the majority of Trypanosomata found have never been accurately described. It is hoped that, in the near future, we shall be able to furnish fuller and accurate data as to many of these hæmatozoa, the life history of which can be studied only in the tropics.

The Bacteriological Examination of the Public Water Supplies.

These examinations were commenced in the month of August. Samples are now collected monthly from the Pokfulam and Tytam supplies, from the Kowloon service, and the Cheung Sha Wan supply.

The methods, which have been adopted in all of these systematic examinatious, were directed chiefly to the number of micro-organisms per c.c. of the sample, the presence of any organisms of contamination, and the presence of any specific organisms of disease.

These periodic bacteriological examinations are of considerable value in regard to the efficient filtration of water supplies. In this connection the number of bacteria per c.c. returned in bacteriological reports is of great comparable value in forming an opinion as to pollution or as to failure of filtration. Further the cumulative experience of bacteriologists strongly supports the one criterion of efficiency of filtration, viz., the absence in the filtered water of putrefactive and disease producing micro-organisms, which can only be ascertained by regular bacteriological examinations.

The general results of the examinations of the public water supplies of Hongkong show the water to be of great bacteriological purity. This is especially so in regard to the supply from Pokfulam and Tytam reservoirs. The number of micro-organisms present in the samples has generally remained below 100 per c.c., and the filtered water supplied to Victoria contains fewer bacteria than the metropolitan water supply in London. At no time, since these examinations were commenced, has it been possible to find the slightest trace of sewage or other form of organic contamination.

The Bacteriological Examination of Water from Other Sources.

(1.) Well Water.

Several samples have been examined. In each case the water showed evidence of organic pollution, and the presence of micro-organisms indicating recent sewage con-

tamination.

(2.). Nullah Water Supply.

All the samples examined showed the presence of sewage, and were unfit for potable

purposes.

(3.) Water from dwellings in which cases of Typhoid Fever had occurred. In all the samples examined the water was good for potable purposes.

The Significance of "Bacteria of Indication" of Contamination in Water.

The chief bacterium of indication of contamination is B. coli. A considerable difference of opinion exists as to the exact significance of its presence in a sample of water.

The mere presence of B. coli, by itself, in a water is not of importance, because the organism, under ordinary conditions, is likely to be harmful, but rather because it serves as an index of sewage or surface pollution. B. coli is an organism closely related to sewage, and is of importance owing to its potential pathogenicity and similarity to the typhoid bacillus.

480

The organism may gain access to a water from sources other than sewage, but its presence in appreciable numbers in any water coupled with the general bacteriological characters of the water, is commonly considered as evidence of contamination. Most authorities agree that the higher the number of B. coli, the heavier will have been the recent sewage pollution, and the greater the probability of the presence of disease producing bacteria. Conversely, if B. coli is not present, one may presume that such disease producing bacteria as B. typhosus will also be absent, and the sample of water might be used for drinking purposes.

Water efficiently filtered ought not to contain B. coli, and when filtering polluted water, the presence of B. coli is a very delicate test of filter efficiency. Drinking water from a deep well should contain no B. coli.

In condemning or approving of a water for drinking purposes, all the findings of topo- graphy, bacteriology, and chemistry, must be considered, and too much reliance must not be placed upon any single phenomenon or reaction.

The Preparation of Vaccine, Lymph.

On the opening of the Bacteriological Institute, the Vaccine Institute, situated in Kennedy Road, was vacated and handed over to the Government.

During the year 1906, the preparation and distribution of Small Pox vaccine was efficiently maintained. Apart from the regular supply of vaccine lymph to Government Medical Officers, Chinese Hospitals, and Public. Vaccinators, a large number of tubes has been sold to the outside public. The number of tubes issued was 8.797. the value of which was $3,020.50. 4,257 tubes were paid for, the sum of $1,430.50 being paid into the

reasury.

Ί

year.

The attched Tables Nos. V and VI show the extent of the work done during the past. The method, which is still adopted for the manufacture of the lymph, is the intimate mixture of the fresh lymph and pulp with glycerine and distilled water. The chloroform method of Green, has not given good results.

Table No. I.-Epimuic Plague.

(a.) Total No. of Victoria Rats examined,

22,710

Kowloon

7,991

Total No. of Hongkong Rats examined,

....30,701

(b.) Total No. of Victoria Rats found infected,

""

Kowloon

>>

""

Total No. of Hongkong Rats found infected,

511

168

679

....

Table No. II.-Incidence of Epimuic Plague during the last five years.

Year.

No. of Rats examined.

No. of Kats found infected.

Percentage found infected.

1902,

117,839

2,015

1.7%

1903,

101,056

3,744

3.7%

1904,

21,907

993

4.5%

1905,

30,888

1,450

4.7%

30.701

679

2.2%

1906,

481

Table No. III.-Examination of Disinfectants.

Carbolic Acid Co-efficiencies.

Name of Disinfectant.

1.-McDougall's, Carbolic No. 5,

2.--Hygienol,

3.--Snowdol,

4.-Camphorine,

5.-Creocide,.

B. pestis.

B. typhosus.

B. coli.

16

11

4

10

0 0

CHOOO

1

6

0

SIGO O

9

1

6

0

0

Table No. IV.-Tumours Examined.

Source of Tumour.

1.-Intra-uterine,

Nationality.

European. Do.

Eurasian.

Nature of Growth.

Blood clot. Carcinoma.

Deciduoma.

2.-Lip,..

3. Intra-uterine,

4.-Axilla,

Chinese.

5- Do.,

Do.

6. Mammary Gland,

Do.

7.-Rectum,

European.

8.-Jaw,

Do.

9.-Nose,.

Do.

10.—Abdominal Wall,

Chinese.

Table No. V.-Vaccine Statistics.

Inflammatory.

Carcinoma. Do. Fibroid Polypus. Malignant Epulis. Myxo-fibroma. Sarcoma.

Number of Tubes issued,

8,797

Value of Tubes issued,

$ 3,020.50

Tubes issued free of charge,

4,540

Value of Tubes issued free of charge,

$ 1,590.00

Tubes paid for,

Value of Tubes paid for,

4,257 $ 1,430.50

}

Table No. VI.-Issues of Vaccine during 1906.

Vaccine paid for,

The Victoria Gaol,

The Tung Wah Hospital,.

The Civil Hospital,

The Alice Hospital,

4,257

1,050

1,840

656

482

300

112

100

Total,

8,797

The New Territories,

The Sanitary Department, The French Convent,

482

Table No. VII.-Age Incidence of Opisthorchis Sinensis in 140 Livers without selection.

AGE.

Without

With Flukes.

Flukes.

Total Examined.

Percentage.

Under 1,

0

21

21

0

15.

1

16

17

6

5--10,

1

11

12

8

10-20,

5

11

16

31

20--30,

12

18

30

40

30-40,

15

24

62

40-50,

9

2

11

81

Over 50.

8

1

9

89

Total,...........

51

89

140

THE PUBLIC MORTUARY.

Staff.

Dr. C. M. HEANLEY, Assistant Bacteriologist, took up the duties of Medical Officer in charge of the Public Mortuary on his arrival in April.

The Chinese Staff have given satisfaction. Unfortunately one of the coolies contracted Plague in the course of his duties. He was removed at once to the Government Civil Hospital and died a few days later.

Buildings.

The buildings are in a good state of repair. The brass gauze, fitted to all the doors and windows in 1903 has become brittle. Many of the strands have already broken. This gauze would not appear to be of great value in this climate owing to its limited durability. Practically no damage was done to the different blocks by the tyhoons. The whole compound has been regularly cleansed daily throughout the year.

General Statistics.

The total number of post-mortem examinations was 2,140, as against 1,381 last year; the increase is due to the greater incidence of Plague, and the deaths caused by typhoons and the disaster to the S.S. Hankow.

The number of male calavers examined greatly exceeds that of females :-

Male cadavers examined, .

Female

Sex undetermined,

Total,

Attached are the following Tables :-

Table I.-Showing the Source of Bodies during each month.

II.-Epitomy of Causes of Death during the year.

III-General Diseases.

IV.-Local Diseases.

V.-Injuries.

VI-Nationality of Bodies.

VII-Causes of Death of Bodies other than Chinese.

1,259

837

44

2,140

483

Table I.-Source of Bodies.

1906.

Found in Found in No. of Bodies. House, Mat- Street, vac. ground, etc.

Found

shed, Boat, etc.

in Harbour.

Total Per Cent.

Dumped.

January,

99

55

44

44

Februay,

105

41

64

61

March,

188

101

87

46

April,

243

140

103

42

May,

346

215

128

37

June,

190

119

70

1

36

July,

159

93

65

1

40

August...

141

88

53

38

September,

172

65

44

63

25

October,

261

112

57

92

21

November,

115

60

51

4

44

December,

121

74

46

1

38

Table II-Epitomy of Causes of Death.

I. Total General Diseases,

.1,296

II. Local Diseases :-

(a.) Of the Nervous System,

6

(b.)

Circulatory System, :...

39

(c.)

Respiratory System,

230

(d.)

Digestive System,

129

(e.)

>>

Genito-Urinary System,

9

(f.)

Other Systems,

5

418

III. Deaths from Violence,

246

IV. Decomposed Bodies,

180

Total,

.2,140

Small Pox,

Plague,

Enteric Fever,

Cholera,

Diphtheria,

Beri-beri,

Table III.--General Diseases.

Malaria,

Septicæmia,

Syphilis,

General Tuberculosis,..

Premature Birth.

*A telectasis,

Still-birth,

Injury during birth,

Marasmic conditions,

Opium Poisoning,

Potassium Cyanide Poisoning,

Poisoning by Hair Tonic,

Cellulitis,

Old Age,.

7

Pyæmia, Erysipelas,

93

498

5

2

8

145

82

22.

3

37

35

35

82

1

226

4

1

1

12

2

1

1

Total,

1,296

481

Table IV.-Local Diseases.

(a.) Of the Nervous System.

Acute Meningitis,

Cerebral Softening,.

1

Cerebral Hæmorrhage,

Cerebral Abscess,

Total,

6

(b.) Of the Circulatory System.

Acute Pericarditis,.

Aneurism of Aorta,

Fatty Heart,

Cardiac Syncope.

Hydro-pericardium,

Aortic Valvular Disease,

(c.) Of the Respiratory System.

Acute Bronchitis,

Croupous Pneumonia,

Gangrene of Lung,.. Catarrhal Pneumonia,

Pulmonary Tuberculosis. Acute Pleurisy,

Empyema,

(d.) Digestive System.

Intus-susception.

Mesenteric Tuberculosis,

Strangulated Hernia,

Acute Peritonitis,

Cancer of the Stomach,

""

""

Pylorus,

Sigmoid,

Jaundice,.

Cancrum Oris,..

Cirrhosis of Liver, Ankylostomiasis (imported), Gangrene of Large Intestine, Ascariasis,

astric Ulcer,

Suppurative' Parotitis,

Abscess of Liver,

Cancer of Liver,

Dysentery,

Diarrhoea,

Enteritis,.

8

11

17

1

1

Total,

39

69

1

99

34

6

12

Total,

230

Entero-colitis,

Complete Cleft Palate (starvation), Duodenal Ulcer, .

1

2 - 20

13

1

1

2

1

4

1

1

2

1

2

1

41

35

11

F

1

1

}

Total,......

129

>

(e.) Of the Genito-Urinary System.

Acute Nephritis,...

Rupture of Ulcerated Bladder,

Pelvic Abscess,

Placenta Prævia,

485

(F.) Of the Other Systems.

Goitre,

Acute Necrosis of Bone,.

Femoral Abscess,

Abdominal Abscess,

Gangrene of Leg,

1

1

1

Total,...........

9

1

1

1

1

1

Total,.....

5

Table V.-Injuries (Deaths from Violence).

I.-General.

Drowning,.

Suffocation,

Multiple Injuries,

Hanging,.

Strangulation,.

Privation,

Burns,

II.--Local.

Concussion, Fracture of Skull, Scalp Wound,... Laceration of Brain,

Cut Throat,...

Wound of Neck,

165

21

17

2

3

Ι

1

16

1

1

1

1

Rupture of Spleen,.

Rupture of Liver and Spleen,

2

Fracture of Spine,

1

Injury of Heart,

Hæmo-peritoneum (traumatic),

1

Fracture of Pelvis, .

1

}

Total,....

.246

Table VI.-Nationality of Bodies.

Chinese, European,

American,

Indian,

2,126

8

2

1

1

Papuan,

1

Negro,

1

Japanese,...

Total,

2,140

486

Annexe M.

REPORT ON THE PUBLIC MORTUARY, KOWLOON.

During the first 4 months of the year Dr. W. B. A. Moore was in charge of the Mortuary.

The total number of post-mortems made was 1,156, an increase of 354 over last year. The Typhoon of September was

of September was responsible for 214 of the total cases—namely 203 cases of Drowning and 11 cases of Multiple Injuries.

The number of cases of Plague, Small Pox and Malaria all show a considerable increase over last year.

In 114 out of the 119 cases of Bubonic Plague the site of the Bubo was recorded as follows:-

Rt. Femoral Bubo, Rt. Inguinal Bubo, Rt. Axillary Bubo, Double Femoral,

.=43.

.Lt. Femoral Bubo,

33

2

...Lt. Inguinal Bubo,

17.

.Lt. Axillary Bubo,

9

Double Injural,..

Cervical,

A

1

Mesenteric,

2.........Submaxillary,

1

Return of Causes of Death.

1. Total General Diseases,

2. Local Diseases,

(a.) of the Nervous

460

System,..

2

(b.)

""

(c.)

11

(d.)

""

(e.)

(f.)

3. Total Injuries

Digestive Respiratory Urinary Generative

4. Total Decomposed Bodies,

Circulatory

34

""

17

"

176

6

11

5

257

199

Total,.

1,156

Table I.-GENERAL DISEASES.

Sinall Pox,

Plague-Pneumonic,

Septic,

Bubonic,.

Diarrhoea,

42

1

31.

.119

-151

4

Dysentery-Amœbic,

Beri-beri,.

6

22

Malaria....

100

Septicamia,

1

Syphilis,

1

Acute General Tuberculosis,

15

Premature Birth,

11

Still Born,..

11

Marasmus,

79

Distomiasis,

6

Raynaud's Disease,

Caries of Spine-Tubercular,

Infantile Convulsions,

Too decomposed,

1

1

5

4

Total,..

460

487

Table II.-LOCAL DISEASES.

I.—Of the Nervous System.

Cerebral Hæmorrhage,

Embolism of Brain,

1

1

Total,......

2

II.-Of the Circulatory System.

Acute Fibrinous Pericarditis,

Septic Pericarditis,

Aneurism of Aorta,

Fatty Degeneration of Heart,.

Aortic Valvular Disease,

Mitral Valvular Disease,

12

2

1

5

8

6

Total,.....

34

III. Of the Respiratory System.

Chronic Bronchitis,.

Acute Catarrhal Pneumonia,

Acute Fibrinous Pneumonia,

2

91

42

Phthisis,

Pulmonary Tuberculosis,

Acute Pleurisy,

Empyema,

5

26

5

3

Emphysema,

Hæmoptysis,

1

1.

Total,.......

176

IV. Of the Digestive System.

Appendicitis,

Abscess of Spleen,

1

1

Strangulated Inguinal Hernia,

Acute Yellow Atrophy of Liver,

Tubercular Peritonitis,

Septic Peritonitis,

Tabes Mesenterica,' Enteritis,

1

1

3

1

3

6

Total,......................

17

V. Of the Urinary System.

Acute Parenchymatous Nephritis,..

Sub-Acute

do.,

do..

Chronic Nephritis,

Tubercular Nephritis,........

1

1

1

Total,......

VI.—Of the Generative System.

Puerperal Septicemia,

Salpingo Oophoritis,

4

1

5

1. General:~~~

Shock by lightning,

Multiple Injuries,

188

Table III.-INJURIES.

وو

";

(Typhoon),

Incised wounds-(Multiple),

CO

11

4

Suffocation:-

(a.) Submersion,

13

(Typhoon),

203

(b.) By earth,

1

(c.) By cement,

1

(d.) Strangulation,...

2

2. Local:-

1. Of the Head :--

Fracture of Vault of Skull,

Fracture of Base of Skull,

Bullet wound in Skull,

2. Of Abdomen :-

Rupture of Spleen

1

1

5

255

Table IV.-The Nationality and Cause of Death of bodies other than Chinese were as follows:-

English, Portuguese, Indian,

Drowning 2, Murder 1-

Decomposed

Asphyxia by earth

Table V.-The Monthly Number of Post-Mortems is shown :-

3

1

1

5

January 46

May

175

September

259

February

39

June

133.

October

78

March

70

July

April

92

August

71

70

November

67

December

52

HAROLD MACFARLANE, L.R.C.P., L.R.C.S., D.P.H.

Medical Officer in Charge.

>

489

Annexe N.

REPORT OF THE GOVERNMENT ANALYST FOR 1906.

CLASSIFICATION OF ANALYSES.

The number of analyses performed was 550.

The following classification shows the nature of the work done :-

I.-Chemico-legal.

No. of Articles

examined.

Toxicological (including 8 stomachs),

78

Articles for stains,

27

Articles for fire enquiries,

12

II-Potable Waters.

Public Supplies,

Wells, etc.,

48

20

III-Dangerous Goods Ordinance.

Petroleum Oil,

91

**

Liquid Fuel,

16

IV-Food and Drugs Ordinance.

Vinegar,

1

Brandy.

5

Flour,

10

Milk,

37

Whisky,.

22.

Rum,

8

Port Wine,

Beer,

Butter,

V-Building Materials.

Cement,.... Limestone, Lime,.......

12

1

2

VI-Prepared Opium Ordinance.

Liquid,

Opium Pills.

Powders,

1

3

25

VII-Mineralogical, etc.

Coins,

Metals,

Ores,

Coal,

7

21

47

3

VIII-Miscellaneous.

Disinfecting powders,.

10

Coal-tar disinfectants,

9

Oils,

Boiler deposits,.

2

3

Soft Soap,..

Indigo, Litharge, Sulphur, Rice Cake, Wash, Lime-

wash, Liquid, Tobacco, one each,

550

-490

2. Among the chemico-legal investigations conducted during the year were eight cases of suspected human poisoning, in three of which opium was detected. In another case the poison found was potassium cyanide. Pow Fa (#) or Gum Shaving was the poison used by a woman for suicidal purposes. It is a whitish tough wood, with straw- coloured longitudinal markings. When placed in water, the wood becomes semi- transparent, and yields a thick clear gum, much used by Chinese women for keeping their hair straight, ie., plastered down. The gum is soluble in either cold or hot water and the solution in China is well known as a means of ending life, producing symptoms similar to those of opium. Under the microscope the wood presents the appearance of fibres, and at intervals a double or treble row of angular or somewhat oval cells filled with a yellowish substance. This cell deposit can be dissolved out in water when these cells are rendered. much more distinct. The gum solution in water gives opalescent precipitates with basic and neutral lead acetate, ammonium oxalate, ferric chloride, silver nitrate and mercuric chloride, but nothing with alcohol or iodine. Information concerning the source of these shavings is being sought for.

WATERS.

3.. The results of the analyses of samples taken each month from the Pokfulum and Tytam Reservoirs, from the Kowloon service, and Cheung Sha Wan supply, indicate that these supplies continue to maintain their excellent qualities. During the latter half of the year the chlorine figures of Tytam and Pokfulum were higher than usual. This was due partly to diminished rainfall and partly to a typhoon in September, after which the figure was slightly increased by the sea-water blown into these two waters by the heavy gale. An enquiry has been made as to the cause of the occasional milkiness of water drawn from the public water supplies. The appearance, which disappears after the water has stood a few minutes, is due to air confined in the water under pressure in the mains. The milky appearance is caused merely by the air escaping from the drawn water in minute bubbles. Occasionally also the public supplies are slightly opalescent. This is due to a minute and harmless quantity of kaolin diffused through the water. The kaolin is principally derived from the action of rain water on recently exposed rock on the catchment area. It can be entirely removed by slow filtration.

In Tables I and II will be found particulars of the monthly analyses of the public supplies, and of other waters.

DANGEROUS GOODS ORDINANCE.

4. Of Petroleum Oil 107 samples were tested during the year. All the samples of liquid fuel flashed at temperatures exceeding 150° F.

FOODS AND Drugs OrdiNANCE.

5. The following table gives the results of 60 analyses made at the instance of the Police and the Sanitary Board :—

Beer,

Brandy,

Milk,

Port Wine,

Description.

No. of

samples.

-No. found genuine.

No. found adulterated.

10 00

8

2

1

1

28

28

12

1 X 19

2

8

12

Rum.

Whisky,...

Many other samples were examined for the public, mostly at the low fee prescribed by the Ordinance.

6. As according to English law brandy must be a spirit obtained by the distillation of wine from the grape, a prosecution was recommended in a case in which a sample contained only 8.88 grams of ethers instead of 80 the required amount. There was a conviction. As the question as to "What is Whisky" has not yet been decided it has not yet been considered advisable to recommend similar prosecutions with regard to this liquor. present therefore the quality of whisky remains the same as that required in England.

At

+

491

7. Much of the milk used here is obtained from the Buffalo. Samples on being boiled have occasionally given a deposit, which has been found to be casein. This same sub- stance has been noticed in some brands of condensed milks after such have been exposed to air. Slight acidity in the milk is the cause of the formation of this deposit.

8. Chinese Rice or Birth Cakes have been the subject of enquiry. They are composed of rice and sugar. The rice has been rendered more digestible by dry heating the washed grains, then powdering. These cakes mixed with cold water are given to new-born infants during the first week, as Chinese women do not usually have enough milk for feeding purposes for the first few days.

BUILDING MATERIALS.

9. In response to an enquiry as to the tensile strength of mortar made from red earth and shell lime, as compared with that made from sand and the same lime, an investigation has been conducted by Mr. T. L. PERKINS and Mr. EDWARDS of the Public Works Depart- ment, and myself. Ordinary good shell (mostly coral) was converted into slaked lime, 100 parts of which gave the following figures on analysis :-

Insoluble matter--grit,

Soluble silica,

Magnesia,..

Sulphuric anhydride,

Slaked lime,

Total,

.S

.7

.1

...trace.

98.4

..100.0

The lime thus prepared in the laboratory was quite free from carbonate.

Red earth has the following composition in 100 parts as determined from an analysis performed in 1903 :-

Insoluble matter-quartz,.

Soluble silica,.

Alumina,

Ferric oxide,

Water,

Magnesia,

Total,.......

51.0

12.8

.... 20.8

4.4

10.0

....trace.

99.0

From its composition, red earth should give a mortar setting under water, and from an examination of the table, it will be seen that it behaved as expected.

The sand was the To Kwa Wan variety and had been carefully sifted down to a practically uniform size.

The briquettes were, except in experiment No. 5, of one square inch section, and in the first nine experiments the ingredients were mixed with great care. In experiment No. 5 smaller briquettes were used and the results calculated to one inch section.

492

Table showing comparative strengths of Red Earth and Sand Mortars exposed to the conditions specified herein.

Description of Briquette.

1-Lime 1 volume, Red Earth 2 volumes,

2.--Lime 1 volume, Red Earth 2 volumes, but placed under

water after 24 hours in air,

3.-As (2) after 72 hours drying in air,

4.-Lime i volume, Red Earth 2 volumes, and immediately

put under water to set, *

5.—As (4),

6.-Lime 1 volume, Sand 2 volumes,

7.-

Do.,

do.,

8.-As (6) but placed under water immediately,

9.-As (6) but placed under water after 72 hours drying in

air,

After 14 days. After 28 days.

Pounds.

Pounds..

81

91

E

99

79

111

41

52

81

92

25

29

28

32

Did not set.

6

After 28 days. After 56 days.

10. As (1) mixing with ordinary care only,

11.

Do.,

do.,

44

61

57

58

* The wooden moulds used in this experiment contracted and weakened the briquettes.

The results show conclusively that red earth with good lime makes a better mortar than does sand, also that red earth mortar on account of its setting under water is far better suited to this climate than is the sand variety.

MINERALOGICAL.

10. Every variety of coal put on the Hongkong market is examined with a view of affording information to the public. Indian (Lodna) coal has the following composition in 100 parts:-

Moisture,

Volatible Combustible Matter, Fixed Carbon, Ash,

1.21

18.94

71.39

8.46

100.00

The results show that this is one of the best Eastern coals.

11. An increasing number of ores and of metals has been examined. Most of the metals were various qualities of Chinese tin, of which from 4,000 to 6,000 tons annually pass through Hongkong from Mongtze, Yunnan. The refining of this tin is now one of Hongkong's small industries. The process of purification is carefully done and is quite successful. It is hoped that, despite counter attractions in the mode of carriage from the mines, this tin may still be dealt with in Hongkong. As the trade and refining has now been carried on here for five years, there seems to be a good prospect of its continuance and increase.

12. An examination of twenty cent silver pieces from the Canton Mint shewed them to contain in 1,000 parts :-

Silver, Lead, Gold, Copper,

800.20

1.20

.19

198.41

1,000.00

3

493

13. Mineralogical work has been gradually increasing, and as in connection with it questions in economic Geology have arisen, some Geological appliances and reference mater- ials have been ordered from England.

MISCELLANEOUS.

14. A sample of tobacco leaves grown in the Shek Loong Ha District, Kwang Tung, was found to contain in 100 parts of vacuum dried material

Nicotine,

Ash,

:

.89

8.74

The vacuum dried material dried at 100° C. lost 14.5 per cent in weight.

This kind of very mild tobacco leaf is sold at $16 a picul (133lbs.). Though too weak for men, it is said to be appreciated and chiefly smoked by native women.

EXAMINATIONS FOR THE PUBLIC.

15. The public continue to take advantage of the Laboratory being open to undertake non-official analyses, and have forwarded a great variety of samples for examination. The fees paid into the Treasury during the year amounted to $3,099.50.

2

SPECIAL REPORTS.

16. Special Reports have been supplied on :—

Disinfectants.

Soft Soap.

Roof protection for petroleum tanks.

Water Gas.

Water purification.

Dangerous Goods :-Naphtha, Rackarock, Detonators, Calcium Carbide, Picric

Acid, and others.

The Prepared Opium Ordinance :----

Liquid fuel as a pulicide and culicide. Matches.

17. The value of the year's work as determined from the tariff of fees (Government Notificaton No. 664 of 1901) is $7,297.50. The amount does not include anything for the special reports mentioned above, and there is much beside for which nothing has been set down.

LIBRARY.

18. A few standard works of reference have been added.

FRANK BROWNE, Ph. Ch., F.C.S.

494

Table I.—Results of the Monthly) Analyses of Hongkong Public Water Supplies.

Results expressed in Grains per Imperial Gallon (1 in 70,000).

Total Solid

1906.

Matter

Supply.

Mouth.

dried at 100° C.

Saline Chlorine. Ammo-

nía.

Albume- Oxygen

noid absorbed in Ammo- 4 hours

nia. at 80° F.

Nitrogen Sugar Test for Nitrites. in the detection

Nitrates. of Sewage. Metals.

Poi-

sonous

Pokfulum

3.3

.6

Absent. Absent.

.007

Absent.

,012

No trace of

Absent.

Sewage indicated.

Tytam

3.0

.6

January...<

Kowloon

3.3

.6

96

.008

.008

"

""

.005

.016

"

""

"

57

Cheung

"

Sha Wan.

3.7

.6

.007

.012

وو

"

-"

""

Pokfulum

3.2

Tytam

3.3

February.

Kowloon

3.5

a b. a

.6

.5

27

.6

* A

.003

.008

""

>>

"

.010

"

Absent.

""

""

.003

.020

"

""

Cheung

Sha Wan.

4.5

H

.002

.008

Pokfulam

3.3

.6

Tytam

3.3

.6

March

Kowloon

3.0

.6

996

.007

.008

"

*

""

29

.007

.008

"

སྭ,

"

**

.008

.016

""

""

Cheung

Sha Wan.

4.2

.4

.006

.004

::

""

"

A

Pokfulum

5.2

Tytam

4.3

.6

Kowloon

5.7

.5

Go to 19

.6.

.0028

.023

.016

"

""

.0014

.012

.004

""

"

""

Absent.

.012

.00-4

27

""

Cheung

Sha Wan.

5.3

.5

.012

.004

وو

29

>>

Pokfulum.

3.7

.6

Tytam

4.3

.6

May

Kow! il

4.0

.6

999

.0014 Absent.

.017

.008

""

"

""

.012

.008

""

݂ܕ

""

.007

.008

""

""

Cheung

Sha Wan.

3.8

.5

.003

.016

"

""

""

""

Pokfulum.

5.2

Tytam

3.5

June

Kowloon.

3.3

.7

REN

.0014 .0014

.025

.008

Absent. Absent.

.014

.004

.003

.008

""

"

"1

29

"J

Cheung

.Sha Wan.

4.3

.6

Pokfulum

5.3

Tytam

3.8

.7

July

Kowloon

3.8

.7

91277

.0014 .0028

.009

.00+

>

.8

Absent. Absent.

.014

.003

.012 Absent.

19

""

.003

.012

"

Cheung

Sha Wan.

4.2

.6

Pokfulum.

4.3

Tytam

3.0

.6

August

Kowloon

3.8

.6

9/199

.007

Absent.

::

哆哆

.016

.008

*

25

""

.005

.008

"?

""

""

.005

.016

"

"

"

"

Cheung

Sha Wan.

3.9

.6

.005

.008

3

爷爷

Pokfulum

4.7

.9

Tytam

3.3

77

September

Kowloon

4.5

.5

OND

""

24

RAA

27

.012 .010 .008

"

.008

Absent.

وو

""

""

.016

11

Cheung

Sha Wan.

4.3

.5

.008

.008

::

32

Pokfulum

3.5

.9

Tytam

3.0

.7

October

Kowloon

3.5

91-8

.010

.012

19

བྷ་

""

29

91

.0014

.0014

.008

.012

"

29

.5 Absent. Absent.

.010

.016

""

Cheung

Sha Wan.

3.3

.5

.0014 .0014

.008

.008

A

""

Pokfulum

4.7

.9

Tvtam

3.5

.8

November

Kowloon

4.2

.5

bi bo to

Absent. Absent.

.010

.012

"

.0014

.008

Absent. .0014

.008

.018 .008

>>

Cheung

Sha Wan

4.0

.5

Absent.

.008

.008

""

་་

*

>>

December

Pokfulum Tytam Kowloon Cheung

Sha Wan.

4.3

3.5

.8

4.0

998

.9

>>

.6

.0014 Absent. .0014 .0014

.014

.029

"

.007

.016

"

**

"

.005

.024

>>

AAA

4.2

10

Absent. Absent.

.003

.012

:

29

77

""

3

Table II.-Results of Analyses of Waters from Various Sources.

Results expressed in Grains per Imperial Gallon (1 in 70,000).

Total

Oxygen Nitrogen

Solid

Albume-absorbed

Date.

Situation.

Depth.

Matter Chlorine.

Saline

Ammonia.

dried at

100° C.

noid in 4 Ammonia. hours at 80° F.

Nitrates Nitrites.

and

Nitrites.

Sugar Test for the Detection of Sewage.

Poisonous

Metals.

General Remarks,

Jan. 6

Water from a house in Conduit Road,

5:0

•6

Absent.

Absent.

.016

.008

Absent. No Sewage indicated.

Absent.

13

""

Water from creek at Happy Valley,

Deposit of iron oxide.

9.0

.0028

.0028

.027

.041

""

""

,,

April 20

Well at 6, Duddell Street,

16 feet.

7.2

.9

Absent.

·0014

.011

.383

May 15

23

Stream near Bay View Police Station, Water at Pokfulum Dairy Farm,

3.3

'6

.0028

⚫0028

.022

.008

59

"

3.7

.6

·0014

Absent.

.007

.008

39

July 12

Stream on the Kowloon-Canton

Railway,

4.0

.6

Absent.

*0014

.022

.004

35

S

12

Stream on the Kowloon-Canton

Railway,

4.0

•6

Absent.

.015

""

.004

27

Well at 22, Stanley Street,

46 feet.

29.0

4.9

·0028

.003

1.152

""

""

,,

Nov.

Well at 16, Gage Street, ‹

10 feet.

8:0

2.1

·0070

,,

.007

.147

"

19

Water at Au Tan,

4:0

.8

·0056

0·014

.094

.016

""

Dec.

Well at Tai Po below the Station,.

13 feet.

41.0

21:0

•0028

·0028

.021

.024

""

""

1906.

495-

496

Annexe O.

REPORT OF THE COLONIAL VETERINARY SURGEON.

GENERAL STATISTICS.

There was an increase in the numbers of cattle and swine during 1905 and a decrease in the numbers of sheep and goats. The decrease in these animals seems to be due to the importation of frozen mutton from Australia. The demand for cattle from Manila has been brisk throughout the year and the high prices the Manila dealers offer secure for the Phil- lipines the best of the cattle in the Hongkong market. Greater numbers of cattle now show evidences of handfeeding, a practice encouraged by the fact that exporters are willing to pay more per pound for such cattle.

The total number of cattle admitted to the Kennedy Town Cattle Depôt was 52,594, an increase on 1905 of 3,092. Out of these admissions 213 were rejected on arrival as unfit for food. The rejections in 1905 amounted to 672. At Hung Hom Depôt 4,962 cattle were admitted against 5,046 in 1905. The rejections at Hung Hom were 21.

DISEASES.

While investigating, along with Dr. Hunter and Dr. Heanley, a somewhat obscure sickness met with among the calves at the Bacteriological Institute, a spirochaete was discovered by Dr. Heanley in smears made from the blood and spleen pulp.

Acting on the instructions of The Honourable the Principal Civil Medical Officer, an en- quiry was made by Dr. Heanley and myself into the different breeds of rats found in Hongkong and the different varieties of fleas to which they acted as hosts. A report on the results of the enquiry was submitted to The Honourable the Principal Civil Medical Officer.

The following communicable diseases were met with in the Depôts and Slaughter Houses:--

March.

Anthrax.-Five cases occurred, one each in January, June and October, and two in All the cases occurred in cattle almost immediately after landing. They appear to have brought the disease with them.

Foot and Mouth Disease-In former reports I have mentioned that this disease as found among Chinese cattle was of an exceedingly mild type. It seems to be becoming milder as fewer cases have been met with than in former years and many are only discover- able in the slaughter house..

Tuberculosis.-One case was seen in a European cow and none among Chinese cattle. The rarity of Tuberculosis among native cattle is very remarkable.

PARASITES.

The frequent incidence of the liver fluke in cattle in Hongkong is doubtless one result of the favourite method of Chinese agriculture, namely, irrigation. A liver from an adult bullock or cow which does not either actually contain the Distoma Hepaticum or show traces of its former presence is a rarity. Many animals harbour in addition the Distoma Pancreaticum in the pancreas and the Amphistoma Conicum in the rumen.

Strongylus Contortus.-This parasite is found in the abomasum of ruminants. In Hongkong its chief host is young calves. It is a blood sucking parasite and gives rise to anæmia when, present in large numbers. So far as one is able to judge native calves seem to tolerate this worm without suffering very much, possibly because it is seldom found in very large numbers in any one animal.

The other parasites seen, have all been noted in former reports. Taken collectively these parasites form a very serious factor in stock raising in the neighbourhood of Hong- kong.

1

$

}

HONGKONG.

REPORT ON THE BLUE BOOK FOR 1906.

No. 1907

8

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of

His Excellency the Governor.

No. 68.

HONGKONG.

GOVERNMENT HOUSE, HONGKONG, 5th April, 1907.

MY LORD,

I have the honour to submit for Your Lordship's information the following general Report on the annual Blue Book for the year 1906.

year.

I-FINANCES.

The Revenue for the year, exclusive of Land Sales and an amount transferred from the Praya Reclamation Fund amounted to $6,622,070.25, or $95,926.16 more than the previous Land Sales amounted to $315,733.21, or $76,526.55 less than in 1905. The amount transferred from the Praya Reclamation Fund was $97,208.32. The total revenue from all sources was therefore $7,035,011.78, or $116,607.93 greater than in any previous year, though $312,383.22 less than the estimate. All the main sources of revenue show an excess over 1905 with the exception of Interest, Miscellaneous Receipts, Land Sales and Water Account

Light Dues, Licences, Post Office Receipts, Rent of Government Property and Interest brought in together $111,451.48 more than was estimated. The receipts under the remain- ing heads of revenue were altogether $521,043.02 less than were anticipated when the estimates were drawn up.

{

The Expenditure for the year wa $5,328,820.92 exclusive of Public Works Extra- ordinary; inclusive of that item itt $6,832,610.68, or $118,664.58 less than the total expenditure of 1905 and $224,344.32 1:ss than the estimate for 1906.

Deducting from the actual receipts for 1906 the total actual expenditure, there was a surplus of $202,401.10 on the actual working of the

year.

The Right Honourable

THE EARL OF ELGIN, K.G.,

His Majesty's Principal Secretary of State for the Colonies,

&c..

&C..

&c.

4

160

(a.)-GENERAL REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE.

The following is a brief abstract of Revenue and Expenditure for the years 1905 and 1906 :-

·Revenue.

Light Dues, ...

Licences and Internal Revenue not other-

wise specified,

Fees of Court, &c.,

Post Office,.

Rent of Government Property,

Interest,

Miscellaneous,

Water Account,

Land Sales,

Amount transferred from Praya Reclama-

tion Fund,

Total,...

Non-effective Charges, General Administration, Law and Order,

Public Health,

Public Instruction, Public Works,..

Defence,..

1905.

1906.

Increase.

Decrease.

$ 74,233.45

c.

c.

$ c.

C.

77,722,04

3,488.59.

4,725,906.25

4,765,227.78

39,321.53

417,417.37

470,151.53

52,734.16

414,838.19

420,454.04

5,615.85

672,161.82

826,699.20

154,537.38

10,073.12

8,068.42

2,004.70

121,491.65

53,747.24

67,744.41

90,022.24

90,022.24

392,259.76

315,733.21

76,526.55

97,208.32

97,208.32

6,918,403.85

7,035,011.78

352,905.83

236,297,90

Deduct Decrease,.

236,297.90

Nett Increase,

..$

116,607.93

Expenditure.

1905.

1906.

Increase.

Decrease.

$ 365,108.59

C.

C.

C.

1,226,584.57

333,823.31 1,404,287.42

31,285.28

177,702.85

846,275.69

832,919.87

13,355.82

653,420.65

659,413.66

5,993.01

162,277.58

162,973,32

695.74

2,276,646.79

2,086,655.96

189,990.83

1,420,961.39

1,352,537.14

68,424.25

Total,......

6,951,275.26

6,832,610.68

184,391.60

303,056.18

Deduct Increase,..

Nett Decrease,

184,391.60

$118,654.58

The following Table shows the total revenue and expenditure for the five years

1902-1906:-

1902.

1903.

$

C.

$ C.

Revenue, Expenditure,

4,901,073.70 5,909,548.51

5,238,857.88 5,396,669.48

Surplus,

1

Deficit..

1,008,474.81

157,811.60

1904.

C.

6,809,047.99 6,376,235.30

432,812.69

1905.

$

ር.

6,918,403.85 6,951,275.26

1906.

$ C. 7,035,011.78 6,832,610.68

202,401.10

32,871.41

161

(b.)-ASSETS AND LIABILITIES.

At the end of the year 1906, the assets of the Colony amounted to $1,665,328.59, or including arrears of revenue $1,808,589.24. The total liabilities were $1,013,092.48 so that the surplus of assets over liabilities amounted to $795,496:76.

(c.)-PUBLIC DEBT.

There is an ordinary public debt of £341,799 15s. 1d. outstanding. The original debt was incurred in connection with the Praya Reclamation, the Central Market, and Water, Drainage and Sewerage Works. Interest at 3 per cent. is payable on the loan, which is being paid off by a Sinking Fund now amounting to £42,298 Os. 10d.

Towards the close of 1905 the Government lent to the Viceroy of Wuchang a sum of £1,100,000 bearing interest at 44% for purposes connected with the Canton-Hankow Railway. To meet this expenditure a loan was raised in London in February, 1906, at an average price of £99 1s. d. per cent., bearing interest at the rate of 3%, the total cost, including expenses of issue, being £1,143,933 1s. 4d. A sum of £110,000 has been repaid by the Viceroy, and has been credited to a fund provided to defray the cost of the Kowloon-Canton Railway, now in course of construction.

II.-TRADE AND SHIPPING, INDUSTRIES, FISHERIES,

AGRICULTURE AND LAND.

(a.) TRADE AND SHIPPING.

The total Tonnage entering and clearing at Ports of the Colony during the year 1906 amounted to 32,747,268 tons, being a decrease, compared with 1905, of 1,437,823 tons. This decrease is more than accounted for by the falling off in local and foreign junk trade and in local launch and river steamer trade, due mainly to the total loss or temporary disablement of a large number of small sized vessels in the typhoon of the 18th September.

A comparison between the years 1905 and 1906 is given in the following Table :-

1905.

1906.

Increase.

Decrease.

Ships. Tonnage. Ships. Tonnage. Ships. Tonnage. Ships. Tonnage.

British Ocean-

going, Foreign Ocean-

3,995

3,845

going,

British River

7,488

Steamers,

7,672,324 3,697 | 7,189,471

5,820,785 4,287 7,093,495

5,554,022 6,461 4,842,501

298 482,853

442 1,272,710|

1,024 711,521

Foreign River

975

S'ships under 60

Steamers,....

tons (Foreign Trade),....

1,800

659,597 1,071 667,917 96 8,320

71,448 878 40,282

...

922

31,166

Junks in Foreign

Trade,

33,475 2,875,440 28,153 2,619,411

5,322| 256,029

Total,.. Steam launches plying in the Colony, Junks in Local

51,578 22,653,616 |44,550 | 22,453,077

337,913 9,169,312 333,560

538 1,281,030 7,566 |1,481,569

8,251,536

:

*

*

+

4,353 917,776

11,651 319,508

|63,267|| 2,362,163 51,616 2,042,655

Trade,

Grand Total,...| 452,758 | 34,185,091 | 429,726 | 32,747,268

538 1,281,030 23,570 2,718,853

NETT,..

|23,032 |1,437,823

* Including 32,424 Conservancy and Dust Boats of 1,176,625 tons.

† Including 23,430 Conservancy and Dust Boats of 858,746 tons.

162

For Ocean vessels under the British Flag, this Table shows a decrease of 298 ships of 482,853 tons, mainly due to the disappearance of vessels which had been attracted to these waters on account of the temporary withdrawal of Japanese ships during the Russo-Japanese War.

In British River steamers there is a decrease of 1,024 ships of 711,521 tons shown, which is due to the serious disasters that befell these vessels during the typhoon on the 18th September, and to the gutting by fire of the S.S. "Hankow" in the following month. Pending the necessary repairs of the crippled vessels, coasting steamers of small size were utilised in some instances by the different companies.

For Foreign Ocean vessels an increase of 442 ships of 1,272,710 tons is shown, due almost wholly to Japanese vessels resuming their accustomed routes. 594 Japanese ships of 1,275,640 tons entered and cleared in 1906, compared with 58 ships of 69,146 tons in 1905, an increase of 536 ships of 1,206,494 tons. Further, Corean steamers for the first time since 1901 entered the Port, and assisted in the increase by 30 ships of 61,596 tons. under the Norwegian Flag show a decrease of 135 ships of 186,093 tons.

Vessels

For Foreign River steamers an increase of 96 ships representing 8,320 tons is shown and can be ascribed to more trips being made by vessels under the French and Portuguese Flags, supplemented by vessels under the German and Japanese Flags which did not compete in this trade before.

The actual number of ships of European construction (exclusive of River steamers and Steam-launches) entering during the year was 870, being 417 British and 453 Foreign.

These 870 ships entered 4,012 times and gave a total tonnage of 7,151,328 tons. Compared with 1905, 19 less ships entered 86 more times, and gave an aggregate tonnage increased by 404,728 tons.

tons.

There were 214,556 arrivals of 16,394,508 tons, and 215,170 departures of 16,352,760

Of British Ocean-going vessels 3,595,879 tons entered, and 3,593,592 tons cleared.

Of Foreign Ocean-going vessels 3,565,449 tons entered, and 3,528,046 tons cleared.

Of British River steamers 2,424,961 tons entered, and 2,417,540 tons cleared.

Of Foreign River steamers, 334,831 tons entered, and 333,086 tons cleared.

Of Steamships under 60 tons trading to Ports outside the waters of the Colony 20,141 tons entered, and 20,141 tons cleared. These figures do not include private: Steam-launches.

Of Junks in Foreign Trade 1,307,972 tons entered, and 1,311,439 tons cleared.

Of Steamships under 60 tons plying within the waters of the Colony 4,125,768 tons entered, and 4,125,768 tons cleared. These figures are incomplete, as the "Star" Ferry Company's craft are not included, the Company stating that no record is kept of the number of trips made, or passengers carried, by their vessels.

Of Junks in Local Trade 1,019,507 tons entered, and 1,023,148 tons cleared.

Of the total tonnage that entered and cleared :--

British Ocean-going vessels represented..

21.9

10

Foreign Ocean-going vessels represented

21.6 %

British River steamers represented...

14.7 %

Foreign River steamers represented

2.3

Steamships under 60 tons, Foreign Trade represented...

0.1 %

Junks in Foreign Trade represented

8.0 %

Steamships under 60 tons, Local Trade represented... 25.2 %

Junks in Local Trade represented

6.2%

100.0

*

163

*

The following Tables show the nationality of the Steamers and Sailing Vessels that visited the port :--

Flag.

STEAMERS.

Steamers.

No. of Times entered.

Total Tonnage.

1905. | 1906. 1905. 1906. 1905. 1906.

+

British,

490 413

1,983

1,846 3,806,7923,580,508

Austrian,

10

10

26

27 88,326 100,929

Belgian,

1

1

1,794

Chinese,

14

21

165

203

214,720

251,400

Corean,

15

30,798

Danish,

7

9

18

18

24.206 40,734

Dutch,

10

18

35

64

77,205 130,864

French,

39

41

207

218

288,911 324,668

German,

163

143

887

846 1,394,2551,343,420

Italian,...

8

56

12

51,492 33,012

Japanese,.

10

68

29

298

34,573 640,715

Norwegian,

85

80

346

279

381,479 289,857

Portuguese,

5

7

69

74

11,800

13,181

Russian,

1

11

ι

13

2,903 31,129

Swedish,

2

4. 19

27

20,210

24,800

United States,.

22

28

62 57

314,101 299,079

No Flag,

178

Total,

867

858 3,904 3,998 6,712,7677,135,272

SAILING VESSELS.

Sailing No. of Times Vessels.

entered.

Total Tonnage.

Flag.

1905. 1906. ! 1905. | 1906.

1905.

1906.

British,

•German,

Norwegian,

United States,. No Flag,

16

16

6

32,258

15,371

1

1

1 2.193

1,880

1

1

1,199

...

4

6

8,183

1

8,333

472

:

Total,

22

12

22

14

43,833

26,056

164

The following Table in which the figures represént tonnage, shows the principal articles of import in the year 1906 in vessels of European construction, compared with similar returns for 1905 :-

Articles.

1905.

1906.

Increase.

Decrease.

Beans,..

2.113

3.360

1.247

1

Coal,...

1,083,987

971,365

112,622

Cotton Yarn and Cotton,

32,949

41,871

8,922

Flour,

54,508

79,635

25,127

Hemp,...

26,784

23.356

3,428

Kerosine (bulk),

43,411

· 43,932

521

(case),

74,506

28,937

45,569

Liquid Fuel,

850

5,850

5,000

Lead,

800

800

Opium,

2,983

3,286

303

Rattan,.

3.430

12.531

9,101

Rice,.

566,171

624,369.

58,198

Sandalwood,

3,386

2,561

825

Sulphur,

100

100

Sugar,

311.787

482,178

170,391

Tea,....

900

900

Timber..

66,324

52,242

14,082

General,

1,594,862

1,653,604

58,742

Total,

3,869,751

4,029,177

337,652

178,226

Transit,

3,415,418

2,878,360

537,058

Grand Total,

7,285,169

6,907,537

337,652

715,284

Nett,..

377,632

During the year 1906, 15,519 vessels of European construction of 19,793,354 tons (net register), reported having carried 9,759,648 tons of Cargo, as follows:-

Import Cargo,..

Export

Transit

19

Bunker Coal shipped,

.4,029,177 tons.

2,163,344

""

2,878,360

27

688,767

39

9,759,648 tons.

In Imports there is an increase reported of 159,426 tons.

In Exports there is a decrease reported of 232,864 tons.

In Transit Cargo there is a decrease reported of 537,058 tons.

In Bunker Coal there is an increase of 24,349 tons.

The total reported Import Trade of the Port for 1906 amounted to 22,408 vessels of 11,249,233 tons carrying 7,372,075 tons of cargo of which 4,493,715 tons were dis- charged at Hongkong. This does not include the number, tonnage, or cargo of vessels in Local Trade.

Similarly, the Export Trade from the Port was represented by 22,142 vessels of 11,203,844 tons, carrying 2,778,441 tons of cargo, and shipping 690,689 tons of bunker coal.

Seventy-six thousand seven hundred and twenty-five (76,725) emigrants left Hongkong for various places during the year. Of these 63,830 were carried by British Ships and 12,895 by Foreign Ships; 134,912 were reported as having been brought to Hongkong from places to which they had emigrated, and of these, 105,780 were brought in British Ships and 25,586 by Foreign Ships.

165

The total Revenue collected by the Harbour Department during the year was $274,008.78 as against $302,787.76 (including $2,220 collected under the Sugar Convention Ordinance) collected in the previous year, showing a decrease of $28,778.98 :—

1. Light Dues, ....

2. Licences and Internal Revenue,

3. Fees of Court and Office,

4. Miscellaneous Receipts,

$ 77,722.04

61,748.33 134,533.21 5.20

Total,.

$274,008.78

A

$

(b.) INDUSTRIES.

During 1906 the decline in the selling prices of Sugar continued as the local refineries had to face keen competition in all markets. The amount of sugar refined was also much less than in 1905.

The demand for Yarn was most unsatisfactory during the greater part of 1906, and the local Cotton Mill worked on an average only 4 days a week during the whole disappointing results.

year, with

very

There was a strong demand throughout the year for Cement, and the local factory was kept fully employed. Two more rotary kilns are now being added at the "Green Island" Company's works at Hok Ün which will bring the output up to over 400 tons a day.

The profits of the Rope Factory at Kennedy Town were slightly higher than in 1905, but the business was restricted both by the high price of raw material at Manila and the rise in exchange.

The Engineering and Shipbuilding trade remained normal during the first half of 1906, but the disastrous typhoon of the 18th September which wrought great havoc among the Shipping in harbour at the time, kept the Dockyards working at full pressure for the re- mainder of the year.

Four hundred and forty-nine (449) vessels of 1,063,454 tons and 70 launches, lighters, &c., were docked and repaired, compared with 412 vessels of 975,174 tons and 43 lighters, launches, &c., in 1905. Of the vessels damaged, sunk, or stranded in the typhoon all, with three exceptions, were repaired locally. Of the three exceptions, one was sold to Japanese owners in her damaged condition, one has been salved and is awaiting contracts for repair, while the third still remains stranded, all endeavours to get the vessel off, having, so far, failed.

Forty-two Steam-launches and other vessels with an aggregate tonnage of 7,634 were built during the year.

A new and important industry, the Hongkong Milling Company, situated at Junk Bay in the New Territories, was inaugurated at the end of the year, the premises including reclama- tion, erection of buildings and installation of machinery, having been completed in a period of less than twenty months. The mill, which is of the very latest design and is under European management, is capable of turning out 8,000 bags of flour a day. The demand for the flour is far in excess of this amount and it is contemplated to double the capacity of the mill during 1907.

(c.) FISHERIES.

A considerable proportion of the boat-population of Hongkong supports itself by deep- sea fishing, in which pursuit a large number of junks are engaged. The villages of Aberdeen, Stanley, Shaukiwan, and many others in the New Territories are largely dependent upon this industry for their prosperity. Fresh water fish is imported from Canton and the West River. There are oyster beds of considerable value in Deep Bay.

+

166

(d.) FORESTRY, BOTANICAL SCIENCE AND AGRICULTURE.

Forty-four thousand five hundred and seventy-seven (44,577) pine trees were planted in Hongkong, and 15,116 were sown in sites. In the New Territories 82,960 were planted and 73.021 sown in sites. 1,500 camphor trees were planted in the New Territories. 331 shade trees were planted in the Streets. The nucleus of a collection of Chinese economic products was formed. Progress was made with the purchase of Chinese pine plantations which are suitably placed to augment Government planting. Investigations were continued with a view to utilizing waste ground in the New Territories, and attention was in particular directed to the possibilities of Tea and of Candlenut trees for this purpose.

(e.) LAND GRANTS AND GENERAL VALUE OF Land.

The amount received from sales of Crown Land was $315,733.21, being some $76,500 less than the receipts for, the previous year. This falling off may be attributed to the general depression of business throughout the year and the consequent tightness of the money market. The principal items were for extensive pier-rights at Kowloon Point for Messrs. BUTTERFIELD & SWIRE, sites for workmen's dwellings in connection with Messrs. BUTTERFIELD & SWIRE'S Shipyard at Quarry Bay and land for extensions of the Hongkong & Whampoa Dock Co.'s Premises at Hunghom.

f

IH.-LEGISLATION.

Seventeen Ordinances were passed during 1906, two of which, the Married Women's Property Ordinance, No. 5 of 1906, and the Criminal Evidence Ordinance. No. 14 of 1906, are designed to bring the law of the Colony into line with English Statutes. The former accords to Married Women in Hongkong the like protection with regard to their property as is enjoyed by Married Women in England and other parts of the Empire. The latter introduces the amendment made in the law of England by the Imperial Enactment 61 and 62 Victoriæ Cap. 36, by which in all criminal proceedings an accused person and the wife or husband, as the case may be, of such person are made competent witnesses for the defence.

The discovery of iron ore in considerable quantities in the New Territories led to the introduction of the Prospecting and Mining Ordinance, No. 7 of 1906, under which the Government is empowered to grant licences to search for and prove minerals and to grant licences and leases of land for the purpose of working mines and minerals.

The Prepared Opium Amendment Ordinance, No. 15 of 1906, was passed to remove any doubt as to whether the provisions of the Prepared Opium Ordinance 1901 applied to Morphine and all Compounds of Opium in addition to Prepared Opium. The Ordinance at the same time makes better provision for the establishment of bonded warehouses for Morphine and Compounds of Opium.

The Merchant Shipping Amendment Ordinance, No. 16 of 1906, makes provision for the prevention of obstruction of vessels and landing places and for the better regulation of junks and similar craft.

IV.-EDUCATION.

The number of Government and Grant Schools, including Queen's College, is 85, of which 24 are Upper Grade Schools with a staff competent to give instruction in all the subjects of Standard VII, and 61 are Lower Grade Schools under purely native management. Generally speaking, the Upper Grade Schools are taught in English, and the Lower Grade Schools are taught in the Vernacular.

The total number of pupils in average attendance at Government and Grant Schoolst was 5,496 against 5,323 in 1905. Of these, 1,932 were in Government and 3,564 in Grane Schools: 3,350 pupils received instruction in English, and 2,146 in the Vernacular. Th proportion of boys to girls was 3,531 to 1,965.

167

The Revenue derived from School Fees was $46,383.25, $31,478.50 of which was received from Queen's College.

The Expenditure including that on Queen's College was $159,373, being 2.33 per cent. of the total expenditure of the Colony.

The teaching of Hygiene has again received much attention. It is a compulsory study in the 4 highest Classes in all schools where English is taught. Steps have also been taken towards the preparation of a syllabus suited to the Vernacular schools.

Progress was again tested by a competitive examination between the schools for prizes and a shield offered by His Excellency the Governor.

For the Advanced Course there were 64 competitors. composed of 36 boys from 5 schools, and 28 girls from 5 schools. The result was highly satisfactory. Taking the 3 best candidates from each school as a basis of calculation, 8 schools out of 10 obtained 80 % of full marks or over, and one of the remaining schools nearly as many. There were entered for the Elementary Course 123 competitors. Their work was not proportionately so good. Five scholars obtained over 60 %, and four over 40 %.

The following

Evening Continuation Classes were opened towards the end of the year. table shews the subjects taught and the number of students attending each class.

Engineering Section

Science Section

Subject.

Mathematics.... Applied Mechanics

Building Construction.... Machine Drawing

J Chemistry

Physics..

....

Hygiene

Book-keeping. Elementary

Do.

Advanced

Commercial Arithmetic

English. Junior

Do. Senior

Commercial

French.

Elementary.

Section

Do. Advanced

German

Japanese

Shorthand. Elementary

Do.

Advanced

No. of Students.

39

28

25

16

11

18

5

15

7

2

35

10

15

15

8

12

17

10

During the year illustrated lectures were delivered at most of the schools on facts relating to the Empire. The lectures, which, together with the slides, were provided by Mr. MACKINDER, were greatly appreciated by the scholars, whose interest in the various subjects was increased by the ocular demonstration of them. With the exception of minor matters, such as the darkening of rooms to make the lantern slides clearly visible, which was a some- what difficult matter, and the length of the lectures, which had to be given in two parts as they were too lengthy for one sitting, the teachers are full of praise for the courses of lectures supplied, and are satisfied that they have proved highly instructive to their pupils.

V.-PUBLIC WORKS.

The principal public works in progress during the year, exclusive of the Railway, dealt with in section XII of this despatch, were the Tytam Tuk Waterworks (1st Section) and the Kowloon Waterworks, both of which have been described in previous reports. The former made good progress and the latter fair. Though not completed, the Kowloon Water- works were sufficiently advanced to enable them to be utilized for the supply of the Kowloon Peninsula, the water being turned on on the 24th December. The extension of the distribu- tion system to the important villages of Sham Shui Po, Kowloon City and Taikoktsui was undertaken towards the end of the year.

$

A

168

Of the larger buildings, the Harbour Office and Western Market were completed and the New Law Courts and New Government Offices were under construction. The Gunpowder Depôt, Extension to Staff Quarters Government Civil Hospital, Taipo Quarters, Bacteriological Institute and Volunteer Headquarters were completed. A Branch Post Office in Kowloon and another in Shanghai were completed and a Public Mortuary near Yaumati and Time Ball Tower on Blackhead's Hill, Kowloon, were begun. The works of reconstruction of gullies and extension of nullah training were continued, $10,000 being spent on the former and over $16,000 on the latter. A large tank for flushing a portion of the Sewerage System of the City was constructed in Blake Garden, a rifle range for the use of the Volunteer Reserve Association was laid out at the Peak and the extensions of the Waterworks at Lai Chi Kok for the supply of the Shipping were completed.

The Mee Lun Lane Improvement Scheme was undertaken and was well advanced at the close of the year. The system of 100-foot roads in Kowloon was extended; Salisbury Road was opened as far as Robinson Road in connection with the new Star Ferry landing place; a mass of rock was removed to enable Des Voeux Road to be extended past Messrs. Blackhead's lots and a commencement was made with the removal of the hill North of Yaumati Theatre, the material being used for private reclamation work North of the Naval Coaling Depôt. Some property in Hunghom Village was resumed to admit of further extension of the system. Important extensions of Conduit Road in Easterly and Westerly directions and of the road past Kowloon City were undertaken, substantial progress being made with both works. The latter road is being further extended to join the military roads which have been constructed in this neighbourhood.

The extension and reconstruction of the Albany Filter Beds was continued, fair pro- gress being made with the work.

The work on the Rider Main System was completed in all the districts to which it is intended to apply it.

The total amount expended on Public Works Extraordinary, exclusive of Rider Mains and other Advance Accounts, was $1,463,868.66 and on works annually recurrent, $393.751.40.

VI.-GOVERNMENT INSTITUTIONS.

(a.) HOSPITALS.

Government Hospitals consist of the Civil Hospital to which is attached an isolated Maternity Hospital, the Victoria Hospital for Women and Children, the Kennedy Town Infectious Diseases Hospital, and the hulk "Hygeia" used mainly for the treatment of Small-pox.

The Civil Hospital contains 150 beds in 19 wards. 2,745 in-patients and 16,768 out- patients were treated during the year 1906. 239 cases of Malarial Fever were admitted as against 267 in 1905 and 223 in 1904. The Maternity Hospital contains 6 beds for Europeans and 4 for Asiatics. 64 confinements occurred during the year. The Victoria Hospital, at the Peak contains 41 beds. During 1906, 278 patients were under treatment. Kennedy Town Hospital contains 26 beds. In 1906, 78 cases were treated, of which 49 were Plague. On the "Hygeia" 73 cases were treated, of which 66 were Small-pox.

(b.) LUNATIC ASYLUM.

The Asylum is under the direction of the Superintendent of the Civil Hospital. European and Chinese patients are separate, the European portion containing 8 beds in separate wards and the Chinese portion 16 beds. 184 patients of all races were treated during 1906, and there were 9 deaths.

K

7

169

(c.) THE TUNG WAH HOSPITAL.

This Hospital, opened in 1872, is mainly supported by the voluntary subscriptions of Chinese, but receives an annual grant of $6,000 from the Government. Only Chinese are. treated in this institution which takes the place of a poor-house and hospital for Chinese sick and destitute, and is administered by an annually-elected body of 15 Chinese directors. Chinese as well as European methods of treatment are employed in accordance with the wishes expressed by the patients or their friends. The Hospital is managed by a Committee of Chinese gentlemen annually elected, their appointment being submitted to the Governor for confirmation.

VII.-INSTITUTIONS NOT SUPPORTED BY GOVERNMENT.

Among institutions recognised and encouraged but not to any considerable extent sup- ported by Government may be mentioned the Pó Leung Kuk, the College of Medicine for Chinese, and the City Hall.

The Pó Leung Kuk is an institution, incorporated in 1893, presided over by the Regis- trar General and an annually-elected Committee of 12 Chinese gentlemen, for the protection of women and children. The inmates of the Home receive daily instruction in elementary subjects and are allowed to earn pocket-money by needlework. During 1906, a total of 349 persons were admitted. Of these, 82 were released after enquiry, 8 were released under bond, 106 were placed in charge of their husbands, parents or relations, 3 were placed in charge of the Japanese Consul, 26 were sent to charitable institutions in China, 24 were sent to School, Convent or Refuge, 6 were adopted, 53 were married and 1 died.

The Hongkong College of Medicine was founded in 1897. The government of the College is vested in the Court, of which the Rector of the College, who has always been a Government official, is President. Ninety-six students have been enrolled up to the end of 1906, and of these 29 have become qualified licentiates and have obtained various posts under Government and elsewhere. The ition is of great value in spreading a knowledge of Western me- dical science among the ninese; and in addition to the employment of certain of the licen- tiates in the public service, the senior students have frequently been made use of for various purposes during epidemics. A Government grant-in-aid of $2,500 is made to the College,

to be used as honoraria to the lecturers.

The City Hall receives an annual grant of $1,200 from Government. It contains a Reference Library and Museum.

VIII. CRIMINAL AND POLICE.

The total of all cases reported to the Police was 11,144 being a decrease of 373 or 3.23 per cent. as compared with 1905. In the division of these cases into serious and minor offences there is an increase in the former as compared with the previous year from 2,984 to 3,333, that is of 11.69 per cent., occurring mainly in unlawful possession.

The number of serious offences reported was 408 below the average of the quinquennial period commencing with the year 1902.

The number of minor offences reported shows a decrease of 722 as compared with 1905.

The number of minor offences reported was 324 below the average of the quinquennial period.

The total number of persons committed to Victoria Gaol was 5,799, as compared with 6,227 in 1905, but of these only 2,575 were committed for criminal offences, against 2,816 in 1905. Of committals for non-criminal offences there were 199 less under the Prepared Opium Ordinance and 25 more for infringement of Sanitary Bye-laws.

170

The daily average of prisoners confined in the Gaol was 518, the highest previous average being 726 in 1904. The percentage of prisoners to population, according to the daily average of the former and the estimated number of the latter, was .161 as compared with 183, the average percentage for the last ten years. The Prison discipline was satis- factory, the average of punishments per prisoner being 1.21, as compared with 1.47 in 1905 and 1.1 in 1904.

The remunerative labour carried on in the Gaol consists of printing, book-binding, washing, carpentry, boot-making, net-making, painting and white-washing, mat-making, tailoring, oakum-picking, etc., the profit on the work done being, $37,495.56.

The total strength of the Police Force for 1906 was Europeans 133, Indians 410, Chinese 504, making a total of 1,047, as compared with 1,018 in 1905 exclusive in each case of the four Superior Officers and a staff of clerks and coolies. Of this Force an Assistant Superintendent, who also acted as Magistrate, and 19 Europeans, 85 Indians and 44 Chinese were stationed in the New Territories during the year.

The force of District Watchmen to which the Government contributes $2,000 per annum was well supported by the Chinese during the year.

IX.-VITAL STATISTICS.

(a.) POPULATIOŃ.

The population of the Colony according to the Census taken in 1901 was 283,975 while at the Census taken in 1906 it was 301,967 exclusive of New Kowloon and the Army and Navy Establishments. The estimated population at the middle of the year under review was 326,961 as follows:

Non-Chinese Civil Community,

12,174

Hongkong, Old Kowloon,

191,815

51,600

Chinese Population,

New Kowloon (approximate), Floating Population,.

...

17,790

42,550

7

Navy, (average strength),

Mercantile Marine,

Army, (average strength),

2,375

306,130

3,959

4,698

8,657

Total,.........

326,961

New Kowloon was brought under the jurisdiction of the Sanitary Board in 1903, and its estimated population has accordingly been included. The population of the remainder of the New Territories according to the Census of 1901 was 85,011 making when added to the present estimate a grand total of 411,972.

At the Census taken in 1906 the actual number of members of the Navy present in the Colony was 4,698.

*

(b.) PUBLIC HEALTH AND SANITATION.

During the year under review considerable progress has been made in rendering existing domestic buildings rat proof, as a preventive of Plague, 837 ground surfaces of houses having been made good with concrete and cement, while rat runs have been filled up with cement in 286 buildings.

1.

!

171

New buildings (domestic) to the number of 162 were erected during the year and in these the effect of the present Ordinance is seen in the increased amount of open space about the houses, which the law requires. Scavenging lanes which have to be provided in the rear of new houses also increase the open space about them and tend to reduce surface crowd- ing.

Under the Insanitary Properties Resumption Scheme twenty-one houses and a portion of one other have been resumed during the year, and these, together with thirty others which had been previously resumed were demolished. The total area covered by these buildings was 29,502 square feet.

During the year there were 842 deaths from Plague, compared with 287 in 1905 and 495 in 1904.

There were 1,634 deaths from Respiratory Diseases amongst the Chinese or 20-2 per cent of all Chinese deaths; 795 of these deaths were due to Phthisis.

Beri-beri caused 561 deaths-a high figure, but considerably lower (117 less) than that for 1905 and 174 less than in 1904.

The deaths from Malaria were 448 as against 287 in 1905, the increase being chiefly due to the prevalence of the disease among the coolies employed on the railway works. The average number of deaths from this disease has fallen from 552 in the quinquennium 1897 to 1901, to 354 in the quinquennium 1902 to 1906.

(c.) CLIMATE.

The average monthly temperature throughout the year was 71.8° F. as compared with 71-6° F. in 1905 and 720° F. during the ten preceding years. The maximum monthly temperature was attained in August, when it reached 88.8° F., and the minimum monthly tem- perature was recorded in January, when it was 54.8° F. The highest recorded temperature during the year was 93-7° F. on the 28th August, and the lowest 46.8° F. on the 2nd January.

The total rainfall for the year was 77·80 inches as compared with an average of 77.46 inches during the past ten years. The wettest month was September, with 30.60 inches, the dryest, November, with only 0.18 inch. The greatest amount of rain which fell on any one day was 5.265 inches on the 29th September, while no rain fell on 215 days of the year. The relative humidity of the atmosphere throughout the year was 78 per cent, as compared with an average of 77 per cent. during the past 10 years. The average daily amount of ́ sunshine was 5.3 hours being 47 per cent. of the possible duration.

X.-POSTAL SERVICE.

The total Receipts paid into the Treasury in 1906 by the Postal Department amounted to $557,278.26 from which sum $136,824.22 was transferred to other heads of General Revenue under which fees and duties are paid in stamps, which are now sold exclusively by the Post Office, leaving the sum of $420,454.04 as Revenue of the Postal Service. The total expenditure amounted to $359,484.08, which after deducting $420,454.04 as Revenue, leaves a profit of $60,969.96.

An arrangement for the transmission of Insured Letters direct between the Straits Settlements and Hongkong came into force on the 1st December, 1906.

A direct exchange of Money Orders with Cape Colony came into force on 1st January.

The new Post Office at Kowloon was occupied in September. The Western Branch Post Office was re-opened on 1st October.

Shanghai British Post Office was enlarged.

A Postal Agency was opened at Tientsin on 1st October.

The Pillar Box System in Hongkong was considerably extended during the year.

.

172

XI.-MILITARY FORCES AND EXPENDITURE.

(a.) REGULAR FORCES.

The following return shows the number and composition of the Forces employed in the Colony during 1906 :-

CORPS.

EUROPEANS.

INDIANS.

CHINESE.

N. C. O.'s

& Men.

TOTAL.

General Staff (Officers only)..

4

4

Garrison Staff (W. O., N. C.

Officers only),

6

::

::

6

Royal Garrison Aftillery,

19

664

683

Royal Engineers,.

11

243

65

319

2nd Royal West Kent Regt.,

419

428

Army Service Corps,

27

31

Royal Army Medical Corps,

Army Ordnance Dept. and Corps,

Army Pay Department and Corps, H. K. & S. Bù. R. G. A..

3rd Middlesex Regiment, 119th Infantry,

129th (D.C.O.) Baluchis, Indian Subordinate Medical

43

51

31

37

,

NONG

8

10

9

7

405

431

75

77

15

9

15

1919

750

774

753

777

1

4

5

Department,

TOTAL.....................

93

1,525

38

1,912'

65

3,633

(b.) COLONIAL CONTRIBUTION.

The Colony contributed $1,305,185.80 (being the statutory contribution of 20 per cent. of the Estimated revenue) towards the cost of the maintenance of the Regular Forces in the Colony and Barrack Service.

(c.) VOLUNTEER CORPS.

The total establishment of the Corps is 443 of all ranks. The strength on the 31st December, 1906, was 297 made up as follows:--Staff 6; two Garrison Artillery Companies, 211; one Engineer Company, 39; Troop 41.

The members of the Corps are now all armed with the new M.L.E. Short rifle and the latest pattern equipment.

The period for the annual Camp of Instruction was extended from 10 days to 16, it was held in October, 1906, and was very well attended.

The Mounted Troop Camp was held at Fan Ling in the New Territories.

The Camp took place during the Christmas Holidays, and was well attended. Much useful work was done.

The Hongkong Volunteer Reserve Association numbered two hundred and fifty-one members at the close of the year, an increase of 38 members, as compared with 1905.

Members of this Association, who must be over 35 years of age, are required to make themselves proficient in rifle shooting, and undertake to enrol themselves under the Volunteer Ordinance in the event of hostilities.

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A small Cadet Corps was commenced in May 1906 with boys from the Victoria British School, there are now 13 of them, instructed in squad drill and semaphore signalling. They attended Camp, and are already very efficient signallers.

The New Headquarter Building was opened in December, 1906, and is already very popular. A well equipped Gymnasium will shortly be installed, the necessary apparatus having been ordered from England.

The expenditure on the Volunteers, which is entirely borne by the Colony, was $47,351.34, compared with $58,311.12 in 1905.

XII.--GENERAL OBSERVATIONS.

year

The year 1906 is likely to be known by the present generation in Hongkong as the of the great typhoon. Between 8.30 and 11 a.m. on the 18th September a storm of narrow, diameter but great violence passed over the Colony.

In the absence of warning no prepar- ations had been made to meet it and great loss of life and property resulted. Fifteen Euro- peans were drowned including the Right Revd. Dr. JOHN CHARLES HOARE, Bishop of Vic- toria, who was on a tour of diocesan inspection. Capt. L. A. W. BARNES-LAWRENCE, R.N. the Harbour Master, died on the 2nd October as the result of exposure during and overwork after the storm. 2,385 Chinese were actually reported missing but the loss of Chinese life is believed to have been much greater than this and probably exceeded 5,000. Fifty-nine European-built merchant vessels of 72,185 aggregate tonnage foundered, grounded, or other- wise received injuries which in the case of eighteen vessels of 8,198 aggregate tonnage amounted to or resulted in total loss. In addition 80 steam launches were more or less damaged, including 32 that were sunk of which most were, however, afterwards raised." H.M.S. Phoenix, a sloop of 1,050 tons went ashore and has since been broken up; the French Torpedo Boat Destroyer Fronde though broken in two by a similar accident was con- sidered worth repairing; a number of Colonial Government vessels were damanged. 796 junks, 798 cargo boats, 275 sampans and 544 other boats making a total of 2,413 Chinese craft were reported lost or missing. All the temporary and some of the permanent piers in Victoria and Kowloon were destroyed and much injury was done to seawalls in both places and to dykes protecting cultivation in the Eastern part of the New Territories. 18 houses in Victoria, 122 in Kowloon and about 50 in the New Territories were blown down wholly or in part or rendered unsafe for habitation. Considerable injury was done to the roads in various parts of the Colony, to the telephone systems, to public buildings in progress, to the pine plantations on the Island, and to the crops on the low lying grounds on the shores. of Tide Cove and Tolo Harbour. Two days after the typhoon a Relief Fund was started of which the principal object was to enable the boating people to again carry on the work of the harbour. The sum raised amounted ultimately to $279,903 of which $127,494, mainly subscribed by European firms, residents and sympathizers was collected by the Relief Fund Committee and $152,409, subscribed by Chinese in Hongkong and elsewhere, was collected by th Committee of the Tung Wa Hospital. Of the aggregate sum $244,892 has been experd in buying, rebuilding and repairing 1,600 junks, sampans and other boats, in recovering and burying corpses, in maintaining destitutes, in relief to widows and orphans,

etc.

The great typhoon called forth expressions of sympathy from His Majesty the KING, from His Majesty's Government and from various British and foreign governments and communities in the Far East. Another bright aspect of it were the acts of heroism and duty performed in the rescue and aid of sufferers and in the clearing away of the more gruesome evidence of the catastrophe. The latter work and the putting in hand of the salvage operations in the harbour and of the heavy r pairs on shore were delayed by subsequent storms of which one on the night of the 19th to 20th September passed within 300 miles and a second on the 23rd passed just beyond this distance of the Colony. The centre of a third moving from South East to West on the 28th and 29th passed not far from Gap Rock and resulted in considerable further damage. On October 1st the typhoon. signal was hoisted for the last time in the year.

A disaster on a smaller scale than the typhoon but not less horrid in its details occurred about 3 a.m. on the morning of October 14th, when the S.S. Hankow (3,073 tons) of the Hongkong, Canton & Macao Steamboat Company within a few minutes of tying up to the Company's pier and with some 800 persons still on board burst into flames. Ninety bodies

174

including those of 52 women and 19 children were recovered of persons who had sought but failed to find safety by jumping into the water and the charred remains of 19 others were found on board while 2 persons died in hospital from injuries received.

A valuable cargo

was lost and the whole interior of the ship destroyed. The cause of the fire was not definitely ascertained but is believed to have been a coolie smoking on a heap of matting on deck.

Apart from these calamities various occurrences outside the Colony tended to make the year a bad one for trade. Piracy in the waterways leading to Canton was rife culminating in an attack on the British Steamer Sainam of 349 tons belonging to the Hongkong, Canton and Macao Steamboat Company, which took place on the evening of the 13th July near Sam Shui on the West River when the ship was on her way from Canton to Wu Chow. In this attack the master and several Indian watchmen belonging to the ship were wounded and a missionary-the Revd. R. J. J. MACDONALD, M.D.,-killed. The Chinese authorities stimulated by H.B.M. Consul-General at Canton showed some vigour in detecting and punishing the persons engaged in this outrage but the problem, in which the mercantile community of the Colony took an active interest, of how to prevent the occur- rence of similar incidents in the future had received no solution by the end of the

year.

Bad as were the effects on trade of the insecurity of the waterways far greater evils resulted from the direct action of the Canton authorities in issuing from the provincial mint vast quantities of subsidiary coins containing about 10 per cent. less silver than the dollar of which they purported to represent fractional parts. This over-issue, bringing down the value of stocks of similar coins already in the country by about 5 per cent. greatly reduced the purchasing power of the Kwang Tung consumer of foreign goods. It incidentally brought down the dollar value of the Hongkong subsidiary coins to the inconvenience of various trading concerns in the Colony and of its Government who were unable to get rid of a large stock of this coin purchased in the preceding year and had eventually to return $3,398,000 of it to England for sale as bullion. The Hongkong Government decided as a result of this lesson to eliminate from their future financial policy the idea of making profit from the supply of subsidiary coins to the two Kwang Provinces and then took steps, which since the end of the year have had some result, to impress on the Government of those Provinces the imperious necessity for checking the output from the Canton mint.

Other matters outside the Colony adversely affecting its prosperity were the failure due to floods of the first rice crop in the neighbouring provinces of China and the continued appreciation of silver.

In the China trade of Hongkong and as regards imports very heavy losses had to be faced at the end of the year owing to the large stocks of Indian yarn which were held at prices above their true value. Neither in Manchester, fancy or woollen goods was business satisfactory and in metals it was dull. Importations of Australian flour continued to in- crease largely. Exports did not do so badly. There was

There was a good yield of silk and fair demand for it and native dealers were satisfied with the results of the year as regards inger and soy.

The rise in the Sterling value of the dollar which has been going on since early in 1903- continued in 1906, the range of variation in the year being slightly greater than in 1905. At the commencement of January the dollar stood at 2017. It fell to 2s. Oftd. for a short time at the end of that month and again at the end of February, rose irregularly to 2s. 31d. in the middle of November and was worth 2s. 3d. at the end of the year. The maximum of the year was the highest value that had been attained since the end of 1893. The rise is said to have involved some withdrawal of capital from the Colony for investment in gold using countries and consequent depreciation in the value of local stocks.

Certainly those stocks dealt with in the Colony which give the best indication of the state of its business decreased considerably in value during the year. The shares of four land companies went down on an average over 10 % while those of the Hongkong and Whampoa Dock Company, Limited, in spite of business brought by the typhoon, fell nearly 12 % and of the Hongkong and Kowloon Wharf and Godown Company 13 %. The shares in nearly every industrial undertaking, including the two sugar refineries, the Cement Com- pany and the Rope Manufacturing Company shrunk in value...

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175

The depreciation in the value of land and buildings evidenced by the fall in the shares of the land companies was attributed by some to the manner in which the provisions of the Public Health and Buildings Ordinance of 1903 were being enforced by the officials of the Sanitary and Public Works Departments. Complaints in the local newspapers and at the meetings of the Sanitary Board that the Ordinance was not being properly or reasonably administered were so numerous in the early part of the year that it appeared to the Govern- ment advisable to institute an enquiry into them and also into certain suggestions as to corruption that had made themselves heard. A committee consisting of the unofficial mem- bers of the Sanitary Board were appointed on the 28th April to carry out this enquiry under the Chairmanship of the Honourable Mr. H. E. POLLOCK, K.C. As however it presently seemed necessary that there should be power to enforce the attendance of witnesses, compel the production of documents, etc., the Committee was converted into a Commission on the 10th May. Mr. POLLOCK's resignation of the Chairmanship shortly afterwards required an amended Commission dated the 26th May appointing the Honourable Mr. E. A. HEWETT to the post. The Commission were directed to enquire into and report:

(1.) Whether the administration of the Sanitary and Building Regulations enacted by the Public Health and Buildings Ordinance, 1903, as now carried out is satisfactory, and, if not, what improvements can be made.

(2.) Whether any irregularity or corruption exists or has existed among the officials

charged with the administration of the aforesaid regulations.

The Commission had not reported by the end of the year but had brought to the notice of the Government several cases of corrupt practices which were dealt with by the Executive Council of the Colony.

In the early part of the year also numerous petitions were presented by elders in the New Territories through the Registrar General on the subject of Crown Rent for agricultural lands and buildings. These resulted in the Government after full consideration declining to reduce but promising not to increase for the 75 years term of lease the rents in question and in their making several minor concessions. This result appears to have given satisfaction and the former difficulties in collecting rent have nearly disappeared.

In other respects the Territories were quiet and apparently prosperous during the year. Crops were good except for the typhoon damage to which reference has already been made.

Mining operations there remained in the prospecting stage, but the discovery of iron ore, which competent engineers report to be present in large quantities, led the promoters to apply for the mining lease of a square mile of territory in the Sha Tin District. This was granted by the Government to Sir PAUL CHATER. Kt., C.M.G., on the 21st January, 1907. Analysis shows that the ore is composed of Magnetite Iron ranging from 53% to 60% metal, entirely free from phosphorus or sulphur, and therefore the very best ore for the manufacture of steel. Japanese buyers are in treaty for the purchase of the ore but the Company recently formed by Sir PAUL CHATER desire if possible to establish smelting works in the Colony, and are now negotiating with English Iron Masters on the subject.

Railway matters continued to be of special interest and made some progress in 1906.

The attempts of H.B.M. Consul at Canton and Minister at Peking and of the Hong- kong Government to get the Chinese authorities to open negotiations for the conclusion of a Final Loan Agreement for the Chinese section of the Canton-Kowloon Railway and of an agreement for the joint working of that with the British section resulted in four meetings being held at Canton in March and April between representatives of the Viceroy there and of the British and Chinese Corporation, in the Viceroy recognizing the Preliminary Agreement made by the Corporation with the Chinese Government on the 28th March, 1899, and in his proposing arrangements which, though they differed materially from those of the prelimin- ary loan agreement and included none for joint working, were accepted as the basis for the further negotiations. These, after many delays, were carried on at Peking between T'ANG SHAO-YI, the Chinese Director General of Railways, two representatives of the Canton Viceroy and Mr. J. O. P. BLAND representing the Corporation. Ten meetings were held between the 23rd August and the 7th November and on the 10th of the latter month a Final Loan Agreement was signed by T'ANG SHAO-YI and Mr. BLAND. It provides for the Corporation issuing a 5 per cent. loan of £1,500,000 for the construction and equipment of the Chinese etion of the railway. A first mortgage on the railway is to be the security of the loan

176

the duration of which is to be 30 years. The construction is to be under the direction of a Chinese Managing Director with whom are to be associated a British Engineer-in-Chief and a British Chief Accountant. The agreement provides that a further one for the joint working of the British and Chinese sections of the railway should be arranged between the Viceroy of Canton and the Governor of Hongkong. Negotiations for this further agreement were not started before the end of the year.

The Final Loan Agreement for the Canton-Kowloon Railway also lays down that "it is understood that the Chinese Government will not build another line competing with this railway to its detriment." In this connection it may be mentioned that a proposal of the Chinese authorities to build a line towards Amoy which for some 40 miles must have followed approximately the same course as the Canton-Kowloon Railway called forth con- siderable opposition from Hongkong where it was held that the construction of such a line was contrary to the preliminary agreement of March 1899.

On

While the survey work on the British section of the Canton-Kowloon Railway was being completed in the early part of the year construction was proceeding on the line between Tai Po and Lo Fu ferry under the Public Works Department and by the end of April about 21 miles of bank had been formed not including, however, any bridge or heavy earthwork. the 23rd March Mr. W. G. EVES who had been appointed by the Consulting Engineers-Sir JOHN WOLFE BARRY & Co., to be Chief Resident Engineer, arrived in the Colony and took charge of the work being assisted by an engineering staff of one executive and four assistant engineers who arrived subsequently. During the Summer sickness among staff and workmen and some difficulties with labour delayed the progress of the work which consisted at first in preparing for the piercing of the tunnel through the Kowloon Hills. By the end of the year quarters for staff and labourers and work-shops were completed on the South but were still under construction on the North side of the tunnel. A store yard, with arrangements for landing plant and material, had been formed at Tai Kok Tsui and connected by about 3,000 yards of temporary metre gauge railway with the South face while a service road some 1,500 yards long formed with part of the existing Public Works Department road a communication to the North face from a temporary landing place at Lok Lo Ha in Tide Cove. As regards permanent work, by the end of the year a heading had been started from the open at either end of the tunnel but in neither case had advanced more than a few feet inside what will be the ultimate tun- nel face. A shaft 90 feet deep had been sunk 330 feet inside this face at the South end and headings commenced in both directions from it. Another shaft to be 268 feet deep, 5,100 feet from the first, and 1,350 feet inside the North face, had been decided on but not yet started. At the end of the year work was. also proceeding on 4 bridges outh of the tunnel and on 2 North of it in the Shatin Valley. A considerale portion of the earthwork for about a mile on either side of the tunnel and about of that between Tai Po and the Lo Fu ferry had been completed. The reclamation for the station site in Hung Hom Bay had been put in hand. The total expenditure that had actually been incurred by the 31st December was $599,546.

:

Turning to the minor incidents of the year and reverting to commercial matters it may be mentioned that with a view to making Hongkong products better known in England and also to assisting the general trade of the Colony collections of specimens of its manufac- tures and also of the various articles which are included in its export trade, have been sent to England to constitute a permanent exhibition in the Imperial Institute buildings at South Kensington.

""

In the Colony itself two exhibitions were held which it is hoped will be repeated annually. On the 1st and 2nd February the new Horticultural Society, revived on the lines of the old Society which organised annual flower shows from 1873 to 1883, successfully held its first show in the Botanical Gardens. On the 1st, 2nd and 3rd November an "Arts and Crafts exhibition collected in the City Hall some good specimens of local photography, needlework, book printing and binding, and domestic furniture and some fine pieces of pottery and other works of art lent by European and Chinese Residents.

An interesting event in the early part of the year was the visit of the mission with H.R.H. Prince ARTHUR Of CONNAUGHT at its head, which was conveying the Garter to H. I. M. the Emperor of Japan. The mission was in Hongkong from the 9th to the 13th February. In March advantage was taken of the presence of a Japanese squadron to return some of the hospitality that had been shown in the previous Summer to the. British fleet in Japanese

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waters and of the visit of the French squadron of the Far East to bear witness to the cordial understanding between England and France. In September a Joint Naval and Military Committee under the presidency of Sir JOHN OWEN, K.C.B., visited the Colony for the con- sideration of certain matters connected with its defence.

Changes during the year in personnel outside the Colony but closely affecting it were the substitution of CHOU FU formerly Acting Governor-General Liang Kiang for TS'EN CH'UN-HSÜAN as Governor General Liang Kuang, and the appointments in May of Sir JOHN N. JORDAN, K.C.M.G., to replace Sir ERNEST SATOW, G.C.M.G., as Minister at Peking and in April of Mr. R. W. MANSFIELD, C.M.G., to replace Mr. J. SCOTT as Consul-General at Canton. During the year the British Naval and Military Commanders were both changed. Vice- Admiral Sir ARTHUR W. MOORE, K.C.B., K.C.V.O., C.M.G., succeeding Admiral Sir GERARD H. U. NOEL, K.C.B., K.C.M.G., as Commander-in-Chief of the China Station in March and Major-General R. G. BROADWOOD, C.B., following Major-General V. HATTON, C.B., in command of the Troops in South China in December.

Reference has already been made to the lamented deaths of Bishop HOARE and Capt. BARNES-LAWRENCE. The latter has been succeeded as Harbour Master by Commander B.R.H. TAYLOR, R.N. On the 31st October, Sir HENRY S. BERKELEY, Kt., K.C., retired from the office of Attorney General, Mr. W. REES DAVIES, who did not arrive in the Colony before the end of the year, being appointed to succeed him. In the Legislative Council Mr. E. A. HEWETT on the 30th April succeeded Mr. R. SHEWAN as elected representative of the Chamber of Commerce and on the 1st June, Mr. W. J. GRESSON of Messrs. Jardine, Matheson & Co. took the place of Mr. C. W. DICKSON of the same firm as a nominated member. Mr. E. OSBORNE temporarily relieved Mr. G. STEWART in a similar position when the latter went on leave early in the year.

On the 15th December, Mr. F. H. MAY, C.M.G., who had arrived from England a week previously took over the administration of the Colony on my having to proceed on short leave to Java for the recovery of health. Mr. SERCOMBE SMITH who had been acting as Colonial Secretary during the whole period of Mr. MAY's absence from the Colony served in the same capacity on the latter assuming the charge of the Government.

I have the honour to be,

My Lord,

Your Lordship's most obedient, humble Servant,

M. NATHAN.

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HONGKONG.

No. 13

• 1907

REPORT ON THE BOTANICAL AND FORESTRY DEPARTMENT, FOR THE YEAR 1906.

Comma

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of

His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government.

GARDENS AND GROUNDS.

Garden Notes. To make up for the losses and disappointments caused by the weather, the year was characterized by a quite unusual influx of useful additions to the herbaceous collections. From Mr. W. H. WALLACE, whose garden at Amoy is one of the most beautiful in the coast ports, came two of the best acquisitions, viz., a large variety of Hemerocallis aurantiaca and Cusmos "Eldorado", both of which are doubtless destined to play an important part in Hongkong gardens. No less important from the point of view of their probable wide cultivation in the Colony are the greatly improved varieties of Canna which Mr. J. BARTON, after importing and successfully growing them for a year, most courteously placed at my disposal. There is no plant that contributes more bountifully to our local gardens than the Canna and these finer sorts should soon be widely known. For the same reason but in a less degree Alpinia malaccensis collected by Mr. E. H. WILSON in Yunnan in 1899 and presented to the Gardens may replace our common but less beautiful Alpinia nutans. Besides these Verbena venosa, received from the Superintendent of Parks and Open Spaces at Shanghai is sure to become a favourite, as it is a vigorous and showy summer annual. By sending seeds of Gomphocarpus physocarpus Lady BLAKE has added one more to the list of interesting novelties for which the Hongkong Gardens are indebted to her. Among the numerous useful and ornamental plants introduced through the kindness of our Chief Justice, Sir FRANCIS PIGGOTT, from Mauritius during the year must be mentioned Ipomoea coccinea an important addition to our October flowering plants. It is remarkable that one of the most showy plants in the gardens during that month was Artemisia lactiflora, the whole of our stock of which was raised from a single plant which appeared casually in the gardens in 1905.

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Flower Show. The staff of the Department was busy during the beginning of the year in organizing a Horticultural Society at His Excellency the Governor's request and making arrangements for its first show. The Flower Show took place on the 1st and 2nd of February and was a great success. Permission was obtained to enclose the two terraces of the Old Garden for the purpose. The exhibits were arranged in temporary sheds on the upper terrace and included an interesting collection of economic products of Mauritius, obtained for the occasion by Sir FRANCIS PIGGOTT, and a representative group of our local forestry productions, a descriptive catalogue of both of these being appended to the exhibition guide. Full accounts of the Show and of the work of the Society have been published elsewhere.

The marked interest taken by all sections of the community in the Exhibition and the excellence of the exhibits fully justified its revival and proves that the Colony has now emerged from that condition of horticultural apathy under which 18 years ago the annual Exhibitions ceased.

Year's Weather. From the wet foggy spring of 1906 until the stormy autumn the year was one of the most unfavourable on record for gardening operations. The show of spring-flowering annuals so conspicuous in most years was entirely spoiled by the con- tinuous rain of March and April and, as the planting out of the summer annuals could not be done at the usual time for the same reason, the appearance of the grounds suffered greatly during the early part of the year. On no less than six occasions from May onwards was it necessary to carry all moveable plants into shelter in consequence of typhoon warnings. On the memorable 18th of September the gardens were wrecked by the sudden typhoon that caused such terrible havoc throughout the Colony on that date. There is no previous record of any such destruction of trees and garden stock. The actual repairable damage was very great and was not made good much before the end of the year, but more serious must be considered the temporary disfigurement of the gardens, the previous beauty of which ten years will hardly restore. Unfortunately also the total loss of several trees of scientific or economic interest has to be reported. Perhaps the most regrettable losses were those of the large tree of Aleurites cordata, the only full grown example in the Colony of this important wood oil tree, and of the interesting Bauhinia still unnamed, our only tree of which stood at the corner of the deer-pen. Many fallen trees re-erected after the typhoon of the 18th might have survived by virtue of the unbroken half of their roots, had it not been for the second typhoon which blew them down in the opposite direction thus completely severing them from the ground.

The year's rainfall is recorded in Table I.

Repairs. All the paths and channels throughout the Botanic Gardens were put into thorough repair during the year and the plant houses received a good deal of attention which had become urgently needed in consequence of the attacks of white ants on their woodwork.

New Rules. Some amendments to the garden rules were approved by Governor- in-Council in September whereby children can be. provided with a playing ground on one or other of the grass plots in the Gardens.

The chief recipients of plants and seeds were :---

Dr. J. M. ATKINSON, Messrs. A. BABINGTON, J. BARTON; Sir HENRY BERKELEY, Lady BLAKE; Botanic Gardens, Jamaica and Mauritius; Bureau of Agricul- ture, Manila; Mr. CHAO LUP CHEE; Cheung Chau Police Station; Commissioner of Customs, Amoy; French Convent; Messrs. F. A. HAZELAND, F. HOWELL, H. HUMPHREYS ; Sergeant KERR, Dr. KоCH, Messrs. LAU CHU PAK, FELIX LEVIEUX (Mauritius), LI PAK; Professor MATSUMURA (Tokyo), Mr. C. McI. MESSER; Parks and Open Spaces, Shanghai; No. 5 Police Station; Sir FRANCIS T. PIGGOTT, Mrs. A. H. RENNIE, Mrs. RowE; San Tin Police Station; Lady FRANCES TURNER, Messrs. VILMORIN-ANDRIEUX (Paris), Lady VOULES, Messrs. W. H. WALLACE (Amoy), W. M. WATSON and J. XAVIER.

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A fine collection of living economic and decorative plants was sent by the Acting Director of Forests and Gardens in Mauritius with the approval of His Excellency the Governor of that Colony and in co-operation with the Mauritius Chamber of Agriculture. The thanks of the Hongkong Government have already been conveyed for this gift.

The other donors of plants and seeds were :-

Mr. J. D. D'ABBADIE; Agricultural Society, Madras; ARNOLD ARBORETUM; Messrs. A. BABINGTON, J. BARTON, BOEHMER & Co., Lady BLAKE, (Ceylon ); Botanic Garden, Calcutta, Jamaica, Mauritius, Singapore, Sydney, Trinidad ; Rev. G. BUNBURY; Bureau of Agriculture, Manila; Mr. CHAO LUP CHEE; Captain HODGING; Mr. F. HOWELL; Imperial Department of Agriculture, West Indies; Inspector General of Forests, India; Messrs. C. D. MELBOURNE, MUIR (Honolulu); Parks and Open Spaces, Shanghai; Sir FRANCIS T. PIGGOTT Public Gardens, Capetown; Mr. Rowe, Professor SARGENT; Messrs. SMITH and MENZEL (South Australia); Mr. F. P. de SOARES; Southern California Acclimatizing Association; United States Department of Agriculture and Mr. W. H. WALLACE.

The chief donors of animals were :-

Sergeant KERR, Messrs. J. M. E. MACHADO and H. A. SIEBS.

Government House Grounds.-The walks were again repaired this year and part of the lawn was returfed. The destruction of turf by caterpillars was much worse than that referred to in my last report, Jeyes' Fluid having to be applied not less than four times during the year. At these times the lawns were visited by large flocks of magpies and it was hoped that a natural enemy of the caterpillars had been found; and so indeed it had, but the excavations made by the birds in extracting the caterpillars from among the roots where they feed were quite as deleterious as the ravages of the insects.

Mountain Lodge.-All the walks were taken in hand this year and put into proper order. A large number of new shrubs were planted in the grounds and the tennis ground was relevelled. For the first time it has been necessary to take steps to keep down the large earth-worms which have proved so troublesome on lawns in the lower town.

Protestant Cemetery.-An unusually large number of trees and shrubs have been lost from various causes during the year. A much needed protection from wild deer was effected by the erection along the south side of a barbed wire fence, and the damage reported last year from their inroads should not occur again.

Blake Garden.-Progress was made during the spring with the planting of trees and shrubs. A small tool house has been erected at the west end of the garden.

An

Peak Garden.-The turfing of this small garden was finished in the spring and creepers and other shrubs were planted at the foot of the walls and on the banks. experiment was made by transplanting a medium sized banian tree from Pokfulam and its success in this situation should encourage futher importations of this valuable shade tree to the now all but shadeless Peak district. With its own water supply from a well and a small brick tool-house which was erected during the year the garden is now complete. It was opened to the public in July.

Sokunpo Nursery continued to perform its multifarious functions in the supply of garden, forestry and agricultural stock during the year. A large part of it was enclosed by a barbed wire fence in July and it is hoped that the inroads of cattle and wild deer which have proved troublesome of late years will thereby be stopped. Another improvement has been the construction of surface channels on the hillsides above the terraces, whereby the washing down of sand on to the growing stock during the rains will be prevented.

Albany Nursery has been utilized in its lower part as a nursery for Cannas and other plants from which to obtain cut flowers for public purposes, instead of drawing on the Botanic Gardens as heretofore. The upper portion, which contains small trials of economic plants, has not been much extended.

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West End Park.-Work on this open space has been confined to periodical weeding, chiefly to keep down Mimosa, and to the prevention of its use as a shooting ground for builders rubbish, for which it seems to offer irresistible attraction. The park is little used.

Government Offices Grounds. These have been kept in a neat condition during the year. An improvement has been effected by extending the blue grass to cover more of the bare ground under the trees where turf will not grow.

Roadside Rockeries and Banks.-A list of these plots together with the larger grounds under the care of this department is appended in Table II. They have all been cared for in due course.

The new rockery constructed by this department on the North side. of the Cathedral and at the expense of the Church Body is a great improvement to the neighbourhood.

Public Decorations -The chief decorations undertaken during the year were those in honour of H.R.H. PRINCE ARTHUR OF CONNAUGHT's visit in February.

HERBARIUM.

The Fokien collection and Mr. WILSON'S collection referred to in last year's report were mounted and laid in during the year. The department took a large share in the collection of local products asked for by the Director of the Imperial Institute of London in order to complete as far as possible the Hongkong Court of that establishment. The Herbarium was enriched by specimens of all the vegetable economic products thus collected by this and other departments.

There is no museum of economic products in the Colony, and duplicates of the actual articles sent to London could not therefore be preserved: they can, however, be obtained when required without much difficulty. The specimens retained for reference are merely herbarium vouchers for the botanical origin of the economic products sent, which were classified and registered under their botanical names. The various items in all amounted to about 500 and their collection, botanical identification, and the compiling of notes as to their origin, manufacture, uses, etc., has of course absorbed a large amount of time, but it is hoped that this will be justified by the extended information concerning South China products placed at the disposal of the Imperial Institute staff and also by the basis which is now formed for a future economic botanical museum in the Colony. Now that attention has been turned to this side of the Herbarium it is hoped that time will be found to accumulate a fairly complete set of Chinese economic plants.

The principal collection of wild plants added was that made by the Superintendent in Korea in September. Though the numbers are small (about 400) they are nearly all new to the Colonial Herbarium, a number are additions to the Korean collections already at Kew, to which duplicates will be sent, while not a few are fresh records for the country or species

new to science.

Fleet-Surgeon C. G. MATTHEW, R.N., whose welcome return to the East on H.M.S. Monmouth occurred during the year, has determined the ferns of the Fokien and Korean collections and has very kindly got together a series of new specimens of local ferns for the herbarium. These are not only much better dried than the old ones but are also more complete and representative.

This is an appropriate occasion on which to thank Captain HODGINS of the S. S. Haiching for the trouble and expense which he has incurred in making several collections of economic products and plants at Foochow for our herbarium and gardens.

The chief donors of Herbarium specimens other than the above were:-

Comte DE BOISSIEU, Mr. E. MERRILL and Sir ERNEST SATOW.

BOTANICAL INVESTIGATIONS.

Water Chestnut.-An enquiry was received from the Reporter on Economic Products to the Government of India regarding the botanical identity of Singapuri Kysun with Eleocharis tuberosus, the water chestnut of China. It was ascertained that the latter is

217

?

of two kinds, viz., Ma Tai and Kwai Lam Ma Tai

馬蹄

the second being

merely an older state of the first, both being the tubers of the above named rush. The Singapuri Kysur of the Calcutta market, according to the specimens sent, is identical with the Chinese tuber.

Lo Fou Shan.-Mr. KERSHAW informs me that he has explored this mountain recently and finds no sign at the present time of the " primeval" and "virgin" forest described by

Bourne.

Kwa Under this name 11 different vegetables are distinguished in the local markets. In collecting specimens with flowers and leaves for the herbarium the following facts were ascertained :-

Sai Kwa,, is the Water Melon (Citrullus vulgaris).

Fu Kwa, A, is the fruit of Momordica Charantia, and is like a short cucumber with a corrugated surface.

Ching Kwa, A, Pak Kwa, É, and Wong Kwa, A, are varieties of the Cucumber (Cucumis sativus).

Fan Kwa, A, and Tung Kwa,, are varieties of the Pumpkin (Cucurbita Pepo).

Chit Kwa,, is Benincasa cerifera, like a cucumber but having a hairy surface. Heung Kwa, A, is a cucumber-like vegetable but fluted longitudinally (Luffu acutangula).

Nam Kwa, , and Kam Kwa, M, are not obtainable locally but their seeds are largely used by the Chinese.

Shui Kwa,

M, and Hok Kwa, M, are not, like the above, used as vegetables but are employed as sponges and water-vessels respectively, viz.: Luffa cylindrica and Lagenaria vulgaris. All the above belong to the natural order Cucurbitaceae.

The Papaw, of an allied orderiis also called locally Muk Kwa, O.

Tau, E.-A similar investigation was vegetables known to the local Chinese as tau. Tau,, are the black, red and white races of the glabrous podded variety of Phaseolus Mungo, while Luk Tau, E, and Pak Tau, E, are the green and white races of the hairy-podded variety of the same species. Wong Tau, E, is the Soy Bean, Glycine hispida; To Tau, E, the Sword Bean, Canavalia gladiata. Sut Tau, E, the Lima Bean, Phaseolus lunatus. Pin Tau, E, is Dolichos Lablab; while Pat Yuet Tau Kok, AE, is the Long Bean, Vigna sinensis. By calling the Ground Nut Ti Tau, the Chinese recognize it as a bean which it really is.

made into the botanical identity of the various Hak Tau, 黑豆, Hung Tau,紅豆,and Mi

E,

Mui, M.-It has long been assumed that Mui,, Li,, and To,, represent the Plum, Apricot and Peach respectively. But in 1903 Sir ERNEST SATOW sent two specimens of Ching Mui,, for identification, saying that they were not really plums at all. They had pitted stones somewhat like those of the peach, which fruit they were then thought to be. Last

Last year, however, on examining fresh fruits of Mui from the Hongkong Market it was evident that they were neither plums nor peaches but the fruit of Prunus Mume. This is known as a Japanese fruit (Mume) and it is interesting to find that one of our commonest local fruits belongs to a species that was not known to be cultivated at all by the Chinese or indeed to exist so far South as this province. The Japanese character for Mume is identical with the Chinese Mui.

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ADDITIONS TO THE HONGKONG FLORA.

Illicium Griffithii, Hook. et Thoms. ? Five or six bushes 10 to 12 feet high, of what is apparently this species, were found growing at the top of a very steep ravine on Mount Nicholson. The plants were thriving in the crevices of rocks and on the steep hillside. When found in December, 1906, they were in fruit and bud. An interesting addition to the Flora. Previously known only from India and from the province of Yunnan in China.

Xylosma racemosum, Miq. Several small bushes were discovered on Mount Victoria on the hills to the East of the Mountain Lodge Grounds, flowering in July. Found in Japan and previously recorded from Amoy and Canton.

Sagina Linnai, Presl. ? A small weed not uncommon in China and widely spread in North temperate parts of the world.

Eurya sp.-Detected on a sheet in the Herbarium with Eurya Macartneyi, Champ., from which it differs by having united styles. The label attached to the sheet reads:-Mt. Gough, 2nd April, 1880.

Callitriche sp.-A weed found growing with Sagina Linnæi in damp shady places.

Hydrocotyle Wilfordi.-Maxim. Not uncommon in damp ground in the neighbour- hood of Sokunpo. Recorded from Korea, Japan and Formosa.

Psychotria sp.—A shrub growing in the Happy Valley woods and flowering in June. The species has the habit of Psychotria elliptica, Ker, but the shape of the corolla is quite different and the leaves are distinct. Only two species of this large genus are recorded from China, both of them natives of Hongkong.

Lysimachia candida, Lindl. This makes the third species of the genus found in the Island. The present plant was discovered in swampy ground at Sokunpo. It is a common plant in central and North China.

Jasminum undulatum, Ker, var. elegans, Hemsl.? This is a plant which has apparently escaped from gardens, although it is now found halfway up Mt. Victoria amongst indigenous vegetation.

Phlomis rugosa, Benth. Discovered on Mt. Parker. Previously found in the provinces of Szechuen and Kwangtung and in India, Malaya and the Philippine Islands.

Litsea sp-A small tree in the Happy Valley woods, about 15 feet high, and not matched in our Herbarium.

Pilea pepluides, Hook. et Arn. A weed found in damp, shady places and recorded from various islands in the China Sea.

Quercus sp. A single tree, of what is apparently an additional species to the flora, was found growing in the Happy Valley woods.

Castanopsis sp. A tree about 15 feet high on the North side of Mt. Kellet. The fruits are very much like those of Castanopsis armata, Spach, ovoid in shape 21" long and 11" across at the base. The leaves however are more like those of Castanopsis Lamontii, Hance.

Calamus sp.-A fifth species of this genus 'was discovered in the Happy Valley woods in April. Only three plants were seen. The leaves are 4 or 5 feet long with tail-like appendages. The habit is that of Calamus Margarita, Hance, which is however quite distinct.

Adiantum sp.-Found on Mt. Gough by Fleet Surgeon C. G. MATTHEW, R.N., in November.

Nephrodium proliaum, Baker.-Several plants were detected growing on the bank of the stream to the East of Mountain Lodge. A native of India, Ceylon and Mauritius.

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Oleandra Cumingii, J. Sm.-Discovered by Fleet Surgeon MATTHEW under a boulder on the north side of Mt. Parker. Previously recorded from Canton.

Polypodium parasiticum, Mett.-In a ravine above Taihang village. Found by Fleet Surgeon MATTHEW. A native of the Neilgherries and Ceylon.

Polypodium normale, Don.-Found by Fleet Surgeon MATTHEW on the hillside to the East of the Wongneicheung-Tytam road. A widely

A widely dispersed fern, being found in South China, North India, Malaya and South Africa.

Nephrodium tectum, Bedd.-Discovered by Fleet Surgeon MATTHEW in June.

J

FORESTRY.

Programme. The authorized programme for the annual planting and sowing of Pine trees in 1905 to 1906 was as follows::

New Territories-A commencement of a band of plantations between the 200 and 400 feet contour lines and extending both ways from the plantations already formed on the Taipo Road near Cheung Sha Wan. As amplified in the latter part of the

As amplified in the latter part of the year this scheme provides (to speak generally) for a continuous band of plantations round the North side of the harbour from Lyemun to Lai Chi Kok. Hongkong: replanting the barer parts of the hillside above the town of Victoria, and a continuation of the planting of the basins of the Tytam and Pokfulam reservoirs.

There was more than the usual difficulty in getting the necessary work for this programme done by the Chinese contractors and, in the end, the sowing of seed sites was so much delayed that about 50% failed. The loss thus sustained by the contractors has doubtless contributed to the uniform rise in the tenders for the same contract this year. It is probable therefore that the refusal of these tenders and the transfer of all the forestry work from the contractors to the department staff, as has now been done, will be an improvement both in efficiency and economy.

The above programme was finished by July, site-sowing being used in all places where shelter existed and the remainder of the pits being planted. The numbers of pits planted and sown respectively in each locality are shown in Tables III, IV and V.

Purchase of Chinese Plantations.-In pursuance of the New Territories planting programme detailed above, some progress has been made with the purchase of the Chinese plantations already growing on the Northern shores of the harbour. Thus 14,580 small pine trees near the village of Shek Li Pui were measured and purchased in December, while at the end of the year preparations were in progress for the assessment of the plantations to the North-east of Kowloon City.

East Point Nursery.-It was necessary towards the end of the year to form a nursery for the raising of 300,000 pine seedlings for the planting programme of 1907/8 and choice was made of the flat marshy ground at the South of Victoria School, East Point, and of the adjacent hillsides. The draining and clearing of this ground for the purpose has constituted · a great improvement to the neighbourhood. This is the first large forestry work undertaken by the department without the help of contractors and, in spite of the expenses of draining and terracing, considerable economy will, we have reason to hope, be secured when compared with the usual contract price of pine seedlings.

New Forestry Store.--The old Vaccine Institute was transferred to this department in June and converted into a Forestry Store, for which it is well suited.

With the large increase in forestry work the old store has become overcrowded and the transfer of the greater part of the stores to the new quarters is a great improvement.

Nanmu,.-An attempt was made in 1903 to obtain seeds of this valuable timber tree (Machilus Nanmu) both for our own plantations and for the

for the Cape Forestry Department. Finding that no seed could be obtained locally, the old tree in the Botanic Gardens was layered in the hope of getting rooted cuttings. Many had been obtained in this way before, but this time no success followed our efforts, probably because the tree is too old. Last year in response to a renewed request from the Cape, the Govern- ment officially addressed H. M. Consuls General at Yunnan Fu and Ching Kiang and the Commissioner of the C.I.M. Customs at Mengtze, with a view to obtaining seeds if possible from the regions in which the tree is wild.

220

Rotation. The fact, pointed out in my last annual report, that the plantations on the Island consist principally of trees which fall off in growth after 20 years and die during the subsequent decade, has been quickly proved to be only too true by the alarming number of trees reported as dead (besides those killed by the typhoon) during the year (see Table VI); every year indeed makes it more evident that the short rotation, recommended by me and so much criticized in 1904, is quite long enough for the present local conditions. There are certain situations in the Island, such as the Happy Valley, where forest soil and forest conditions still persist and in them the pine trees live to a much greater age: and it is to be hoped that even in less favoured situations the gradual accumulation of humus under successive crops of pine trees will eventually provide the necessary depth of soil for similar fine woods.

Protection.-89 persons were arrested by the Forest Guards for various minor forestry offences and brought before the Police Magistrates. Two were dismissed with a caution and the remainder received small fines varying from $1 to $25 or 3 to 14 days' imprisonment : the fines were usually preferred. The number and positions of trees thus lost are given in Table VII.

New Forest Ride.The cutting of a new ride, four feet wide, to open up the most picturesque parts of our one patch of virgin forest, viz., at Little Hongkong, was authorized in 1905 and completed in June of last year. This woodland path turns off from the road connecting Wongneichong Gap with Little Hongkong Village at about half way between these two points, descends by a wide detour through the woods, coming back into the same road near its lower end. "The Ride" is indicated by a notice on the main road at each end.

Street Planting.-The year's programme provided for the formation of complete avenues of Candle Nut trees (Aleurites triloba) in Gascoigne Road (Kowloon) from the sea to the fork of the road, thence along S. Gascoigne Road to its junction with Robinson Road and along the latter from that point up to the beginning of the existing Banian avenue, 234 trees in all. These were planted and enclosed in tree guards before the end of May. With the exception of a few killed in the typhoon all have done well.

Ninety-seven Heteropanax trees were planted in Des Voeux Road (Hongkong) to complete the planting begun there in 1904. A number of these were damaged by sea water, which flooded this lowlying road during the typhoon. During the latter part of the sum- mer 152 clumps of bamboo were planted along Mount Gough Road, Aberdeen Road and Mount Kellet Road at the Peak.

A return was made in April of all street trees to which wires were fastened as supports to telephone and other poles. Many of the trees had long been so used and had become badly damaged in consequence. A request was issued to all companies and departments concerned to remove their wires and by the end of the year nearly all had been properly fixed to the ground or to other unobjectionable supports. A notification, which has now been published, that any further wires found fastened to trees will be detached by this department, should put an end to this unnecessary menace to our shade trees.

In consequence of the widening of Robinson Road, Kowloon, it has been necessary dur- ing the year to lower a row of large Banians on the East side of the road by about 6 feet. Although some of the trees weighed 3 or 4 tons the process was successfully accomplished without special machinery and by judiciously lopping the trees and turning the more shady side towards the road an actual improvement has been effected.

Typhoon of September 18th.-Immediately after the storm a gang of 80 to 100, men was got together and employed in clearing the wreckage of the trees off the main streets of the town and Kowloon. By the next day the roads were open and attention could be paid to the numerous trees lying in such positions that they could be saved by re-erection.

As a matter of fact very few of the street trees were actually lost, though a large proportion were much broken and disfigured. The small trees were pulled up first by hand and then the heavier ones by means of powerful blocks and chains. The last was raised three weeks after the typhoon and by that time all the debris in the streets, amounting in all to 222 tons had been disposed of, the wood by sale and the leaves and twigs by removal to the nearest woods. Broken branches overhanging thoroughfares were carefully looked for and removed as soon as possible after the storm, but it was more than a month before all the broken limbs were trimmed off. Two parties of foresters had already been sent off to attend to the damage to Government trees in various parts of the New Territories and they succeeded in raising and

*

221

saving several hundred small trees recently planted round the Police Stations. Two other parties were meanwhile counting and measuring the pine trees blown down in Government. plantations in Hongkong and Kowloon, prior to their removal by the Government Contractors. These removals had nearly been completed by the end of the year. The total numbers of pine trees thus sold in each block are given in Table VIII. Besides these a large number of wild trees were disposed of in the same way, while four hundred uprooted Tristania trees were recovered and stored for use in the Government Store.

Forestry Licences.--In issuing Forestry Licences in the New Territories, notice has hitherto been given to the villagers of each neighbourhood so that all might be aware, if they took the trouble to attend to their business, what trees were being licensed and to whom. In spite of this, there have been quarrels in several cases between members of the same village in consequence of individual rights not being respected by the selected licensee. To obviate a recurrence of these disagreements a system of Village Forestry Licences was instituted, each village being apportioned as much pine plantation as was necessary to supply fuel for the use of the villagers, and trustworthy village representatives being chosen to draw and administer the licence. The whole issue of 421 Village Forestry Licences for 1906 was carried out by the Assistant Land Officer of the Northern District on behalf of this department. What plantations remained over and above those wanted for local use were, under this scheme, open to be let on Private Forestry Licences to any private individuals who could substantiate their claim to them. Eleven of these were issued during the year. The revenue accruing from these issues is stated in Table IX.

AGRICULTURAL AND OTHER INDUSTRIES.

Tea.--Tea is cultivated in several places in the New Territories, e.g., in the Shing Mun valley and at the villages lying in the higher mountain valleys about Tate's Cairn and Buffalo Hill. The bushes are grown in lines on narrow steps or terraces cut in the rich soil of recently felled woods or along the dividing banks of sheltered vegetable fields, in either case only in fairly elevated situations. There is a tradition that tea growing was once a thriving industry here and terraces similar to the above are pointed out on the mountain sides in all parts of the district, which are said to have been made by tea planters. Whether the cultivation has diminished through extortionate taxing previous to the British occupation or in consequence of the destruction of the woods and with them the suitable soil, it is hard to say, but the latter would alone account for it.

With the object of ascertaining whether the local tea had any commercial value, a sample was obtained from the village of Tiu Tso Ngam, lying in a valley behind Shatin at an altitude. of about 1,000 feet. The sample was submitted to Professor DUNSTAN, Director of the Imperial Institute, who kindly furnished the following report upon it:-

Imperial Institute.

(South Kensington, London, S. W.)

Report on a sample of tea from Hongkong by Professor W. R. DUNSTAN, M.A.,

F.R.S., Director.

This sample of tea was forwarded to the Imperial Institute for examination by Mr. S. T. DUNN, Botanical and Forestry Department, Hongkong, with a letter dated the 14th December, 1905, stating that the product was from the Chinese in the village of Tiu Tso Ngam in the New Territory of Hongkong, at an elevation of 1,000 feet above the sea, and enclosing a photograph to illustrate the method of planting.

The sample has been examined in the Scientific and Technical Department of the Imperial Institute and has been submitted to commercial experts for valuation. The results of the investigation are given below.

Description of Sample.

The sample consisted of about 101⁄2 ounces of leaves enclosed in a hermetically sealed tin. The leaves were dry and brittle, did not appear to have been rolled, and varied in colour from greenish-yellow to nearly black. A small proportion of hard, dry greenish brown flower buds was present among the leaves. The tea possessed a peculiar, sweet, but not altogether pleasant aroma and did not seem to have undergone the process of ferment- ation. A careful examination of the sample showed that no leaves other than those of genuine tea were present.

222

Results of Examination.

The results of the chemical examination of this tea are given in the following table and are compared with the results yielded by eight samples of Black China tea previously examined in the Scientific and Technical Dept. by the modification of Lowenthal's method. The amount of soluble extract was determined by infusing the tea in 100 times its weight of boiling water, allowing it to stand for 10 minutes and afterwards evaporating the liquid to dryness and weighing the residue.

8 samples of Black China Tea.

TEA FROM HONGKONG.

Moisture, per cent.,

* Ash, per cent.,

Caffeine, per cent.,

Tannin, per cent.,...

Soluble extract, per cent.,

Average

Maximun

results.

results.

Minimum results.

8.4

8.2

9.2

7.1

5.6

6.8

8.2

6.0

2.6

3.0

3.7

2.57

11.0

5.1

93

3.3

30.2

24.3

27.2

19.0

Those figures show that the percentages of moisture, mineral constituents (ash), and caffeine in the Hongkong tea are about normal. The amounts of soluble extract and tannin, however, are both above the average and this is probably due to the fact that the leaves had not undergone fermentation.

Commercial Valuation.

The Commercial experts reported that the tea apparently had not been subjected to the ordinary processes of manufacture and was therefore unsuitable for the English market. The leaves appeared to have been merely dried without having been submitted to any fermentation. As no rolling had been done the tea had a very rough appearance, the leaves being open and irregular. The infusion was found to posses fair pungency but was of somewhat coarse flavour and very pale colour. It was stated that as the tea is unsuited to the market it was difficult to place any value on it but the opinion was expressed that it might perhaps realise 1d. or 24. per pound, although if properly manufactured it would, of course, be of considerably greater value.

Conclusions and Recommendations.

It is evident from the results of this enquiry that the tea is of satisfactory growth but it is of little value in the English market owing to its not having been subjected to the usual manufacturing processes. There seems however no reason to doubt that if the tea were properly prepared it would be of commercial value and it seeins advisable that the services of some skilled Chinese from the tea districts should be secured for this purpose.

(sd.) WYNDHAM R. DUNSTAN.

15th March, 1906.

As a result of this report it was determined to endeavour to introduce the cultivation of Ceylon and Indian Tea into the Territories and in due course to obtain experts from one of the recognized tea growing districts to teach the proper methods of manufacture.

In pursuance of this plan 50 lbs. of tea seed were obtained from Ceylon and 50 lbs. from Assam and were distributed to a few selected farmers who were granted land under favourable conditions for the purpose of forming small plantations.

* Calculated on dry tea.

-

--

.

223

Cotton.--The cotton trials of 1905 were inconclusive on account of the damage to the crop by gales and rain, and another experiment was made in 1906 with 5 varieties of Indian Cotton. The seeds were sown in April in the richest ground obtainable and every precaution was taken to secure a successful crop. Germination, however, was so poor that only a few plants resulted. A check experiment in the Botanic Gardens under the best conditions had the same result. It must therefore be presumed that the seeds, for some unknown cause, were bad. I have since learned that all the cotton trials on the Castle Peak Estate have been failures. Being most reluctant to finally abandon these important experiments, still another consignment of seed has been asked for from India, this time from the Inspector-General of Agriculture.

Rice.-On making enquiries about Rice cultivation in the Colony for the information of the Imperial Institute it was found that 19 different kinds are recognized by the farmers, who consider it of the highest importance to use the right sort for each season and for each class of locality. Thus Ham Man Kuk is used only in brackish fields and only for the 2nd crop, no other variety is supposed do so well under these conditions. Each has its special use and, where more than one variety is suitable for the sowing of a given field, choice is guided by the market demand. Many of the different kinds are easily distinguished in seed either husked or entire but the greater number cannot be separated apart even by the farmers when compared in seed.

The seed rice from each field and each seasonal crop in that field is said to be carefully preserved for the sowing of the same field next year. The names are as follows:-

CHINESE

CHINESE

No.

FIRST CROP.

No.

SECOND CROP.

NAME.

NAME.

1

(Tso) No Kuk.

早糯谷

8

Chuk Chim No Kuk.

竹粘糯谷

2

Fa Lo Pak Kuk.

花羅白谷

9

Tai No Kuk.

大糯谷

3

Tso Wo Kuk.

早禾谷

10

Sz Miu Chim Kuk.

絲苗

4

Ngau Tsui Mo Kuk.

牛咀毛谷

11

Chim Chai Kuk.

5

(Shang Shing Chim)

12

Ham Man Kuk.

粘仔

咸間谷

Kuk.

省城粘谷

13

San Chung Kuk.

新種谷

~~ ~

6

No Kan Kuk.

糯間谷

14

Ma Pau Kam Kuk.

麻包錦谷

7

Ma Pau Kam.

麻包錦

15

Ngai Chai Chek Kuk. 矮仔赤谷

16

Wu No Kuk.

烏糯谷

17

Pun Tin Wan Kuk.

半天雲谷

18

Pat Ut Pak Kuk.

八月白谷

19

Pat Kuk.

白谷

The kinds usually grown here are Nos. 7, 10, 11, 13, 14 and 19 of which 7, 10 and 14 command the highest prices. No Kuk is the kind generally used for making the glutinous rice required for the Chinese Dragon Boat Festival.

.

Agricultural Assessments.-Several small farms were resumed by the Government in New Kowloon during the year in connection with the Kowloon-Canton Railway. The assessment of the value of the garden and other stock upon them was undertaken by this department. The matter proved most troublesome in consequence of the absence of all trustworthy evidence as to the real local value of the plants. The safest basis to work upon in these cases is the initial cost of stocking similar farms.

Rattan.--An enquiry was received in May from the Director of the Imperial Institute for the wholesale prices of stripped canes (rattans) of small diameter. Quotations were invited through the Government Gazette and individual inquiries were made of 122 rattan dealers in Victoria and outlying villages. Besides such manufacturers as may have written to London independently, 15 tenders were forwarded to the Imperial Institute by this department. The opportunity was taken of obtaining some details of the manufacture of the canes and sending them, with a specimen of the primitive machine used, for the Imperial Institute Museum.

224

Ricksha Wheels.-A similar service was undertaken for the District Commissioner of S. Nigeria with regard to the wholesale purchase of ricksha wheels.

Wood Oil.-Small samples of two kinds of wood-oil nuts were submitted for examin- ation to Professor DUNSTAN, Director of the Imperial Institute, in April. The reports on these are subjoined..

Imperial Institute.

(South Kensington, London, S.W.)

Report on the seeds of Aleurites triloba (candle-nuts) from Hongkong by Professor W.R. DUNSTAN, M.A., F.R.S., Director.

A sample of the seeds of Aleurites triloba was forwarded for examination to the Imperial Institute by the Superintendent, Botanical and Forestry Department, Hongkong, with a letter dated the 6th April, 1906, in which it was stated that Aleurites triloba is one of the best shade trees in Hongkong, where it grows very quickly.

The seeds of this tree are commercially known as "candle nuts" and the kernels are already exported from Fiji, New Zealand and Australia. The oil which they contain is used. for soap-making, both in this country and on the Continent.

Description of Sample.

The sample consisted of four pounds of the seeds, the kernels of which were nearly white and free from discolouration.

Examination of the Oil.

The oil was extracted by means of light petroleum and the kernels were found to contain 60.8

per cent. of oil, which is equivalent to a yield of 19.8 per cent. from the unshelled seeds.

The oil appears to be particularly suitable for making soft soap and could also be used as a substitute for linseed oil in varnishes and paints.

Commerical Valuation of the Seeds.

The seeds were submitted to brokers who reported that unshelled seeds would be unsaleable here but that the kernels would realise from £12 to £13 per ton. It would there- fore be necessary to remove the shells from the nuts in Hongkong and to export the kernels only. No doubt this operation could be performed by hand, but, if desired, one of of the nut-cracking machines recently introduced could be adapted for the purpose.

If Aleurites triloba is sufficiently abundant in Hongkong to furnish commercial consign- ments of the kernels, it would be desirable to forward a trial shipment of a few tons for sale in London.

(sd.) W. R. Dunstan.

Imperial Institute.

(South Kensington, London, S. W.)

Report on the Seeds of Aleurites Fordii from Hongkong by Professor WYNDHAM R. DUNSTAN, M.A., F.R.S., Director.

A sample of the seeds of a species of Aleurites, which has since been identified at Kew as Aleurites Fordii Hemsl., was forwarded for examination to the Imperial Institute by the Superintendent of the Botanical and Forestry Department, Hongkong, with a letter dated the 5th April, 1906.

4

:

225

It was stated that this species of Aleurites is one of the trees grown in China for the production of Chinese wood-oil (Tung oil) and that it occurs in Fokien Province intermixed with Aleurites cordata, which was formerly considered to be the sole source of wood-oil. It was thought therefore that it would be of interest to have an examination made of the oil from the seeds of the new species in order to determine its quality in comparison with that of the Tung oil of commerce, which appears to be prepared indiscriminately from the seeds,

of Aleurites cordata or Aleurites Fordii.

t

Description of Sample.

The sample consisted of two bags of nuts weighing 500 grams. The kernels of the nuts were fresh and in good condition on arrival.

Examination of the Oil.

On extraction with light petroleum the kernels were found to contain 58.3 per cent. of oil, which is equivalent to a yield of 36 4 per cent. from the entire nuts.

The oil was light in colour, and on exposure to air in a thin layer it dried in a day at the ordinary temperature, giving a varnish-like residue. On heating in a water-oven at 100 c. the oil dried and formed a resin-like solid.

The constants" of the oil were determined and found to agree well with those recorded for commercial samples of Tung oil.

The examination has shown that the oil extracted from these seeds of Aleurites Fordii is very similar in composition to the Tung oil of commerce. It is however lighter in colour and produces a lighter-coloured varnish on drying, so that it is probably a purer product.

It is impossible, with the small amount of material available, to determine whether the oil of Aleurites Fordii, if prepared on a large scale by a commercial process, would be superior in quality and value to the mixed wood-oil of commerce derived from the two species. Technical trials would be necessary in order to determine this point, and for such trials about two gallons of the oil or one hundredweight of the seeds would be required.

It is suggested that this quantity of the oil should be forwarded if possible for further experiments, or, if the pure oil is not readily obtainable, a larger consignment of the seeds should be sent. It could then be determined whether there would be any advantage in preparing Tung oil from the seeds of Aleurites Fordii alone in preference to obtaining it from the mixed seeds of Aleurites Fordii and Aleurites cordata as at present.

(sd. W. R. Dunstan.

18th October, 1906.

Rubber. In response to enquiries made in 1905 as to the suitability of Para Rubber for Hongkong, a request was addressed to Singapore for a small quantity of plants for trial. The Straits Government courteously responded and in July, 1905, a wardian case of plants and seeds was received. The plants, 100 in all, were immediately transferred to Sokunpo Nursery and planted in a sheltered position. The seeds failed to germinate. As all the young Rubber trees except 11 died during the subsequent winter it must be reluctantly admitted that this valuable tree,is unsuited to our climate.

Edgeworthia.-1,000 cuttings of this Japanese paper plant were obtained from Japan in December, 800 being planted at Kanghau and 200 in the Upper Albany Nursery. They remained in good condition up to July, but gradually succumbed to the continued tropical conditions, until by September only one or two per cent. survived. These few are being carefully perserved in the hope of getting a stock of acclimatized cuttings.

226

Chinese Ropes.-Perhaps one of the most striking features of the collections of Chinese vegetable product sent to the Imperial Institute was the number of different plants which are made up into ropes. The specimens sent were as follows: four specimens of ropes from Foochow, made from mat grass (Cyperus tegetiformis) from " to 12" in diameter: a specimen of rope made from split palm-leaf stalks (Livistona chinensis) from Sun Wui: specimens of 3 & 4-strand coir rope (Trachycarpus excelsus) from 4" to 4" in diameter from Foochow. The so called Hemp-skin ropes are made from the rough bark or skin of Corchorus capsularis, wong ma ropes from the prepared bast of the same plant. Bamboo ropes were exemplified by 7 examples varying from " to 4" in diameter: they are made from narrow strips of split bamboo plaited singly or in pairs in the finest ropes, but in the commoner sorts twisted in 2 or 3 strands. Besides these species large lianes, the long hanging stems of local climbing plants, such as Derris, are used for the cables of junks, while for temporary agricultural purposes numerous other tough and pliable stems are ingeniously utilized.

Livistona chinensis.-The Fan Palm. This is one of the most useful plants in South China and, although as its name implies, it is chiefly known as the source of palm-leaf fans there are numerous other uses quite as important or even more so than this. Mr. HELMS of Messrs. ARNOLD, KARBERG & Co., whose knowledge of the industries of the Can- ton Delta is probably unrivalled, most kindly placed at my disposal, for the purpose of the Imperial Institute collections, a series of photographs, notes and specimens, obtained during his visits to Sun Wui. The different parts of the tree are used as follows: the best leaves are made into fans, the waste leaves into rain coats and matshed covers, the edges of the leaf- ribs are pared off and made into brushes, the leaf stalks are peeled and the core cut into thin strips for rope-making, while the skin is used as a substitute for split rattan: the fibrous leaf sheaths are made into brooms.

Kanghau Nursery.-In consequence of the Kowloon-Canton Railway works at the North face of the tunnel it has been necessary to abandon a large part of the experimental nursery and transplant such stock as could be moved to a safe distance. The old matshed was, for the same reason, transferred to the Railway Department, while a new one was constructed further to the West. The new experiment ground was enclosed in a barbed wire fence. The experimental plots of Aleurites cordata (Wood oil), Camellia Sasanqua Tea oil), Agare sisalana (Sisal Hemp), Furcræa gigantea (Mauritius Hemp), and Crotalaria juncea (Sunn Hemp), have made satisfactory progress.

Castle Peak Estate.-The manager of this estate informs me that the developement of the fruit farm has made good progress during the year, while a profitable business has been done in vegetables and sugar cane. Figs, Peaches, Oranges, Apricots, Lemons, Grapes, Passion Fruit and Avocado Pears were produced of good quality but, as yet, in small quantity. The vegetables are much the same as reported in 1903. An experiment with nitroculture on green peas gave this important result, that some sugar canes between rows of which they were planted benefited greatly from their proximity and yielded a higher percentage of sugar. No doubt the nitrogen, brought into the ground by the nitroculture bacteria, was assimilated by the canes. The latter could not benefit directly from inoculation which only affects leguminous crops, but in this way canes or any other non-leguminous crop can be benefited.

LIBRARY.

The following periodicals and other works have been purchased :-

Botanical Magazine, 1906.

Botanisches Centralblatt, 1906.

Christensen, Index Filicum.

Engler Pflanzenreich, 5 parts.

Gardeners' Chronicle, 1906.

Index Kewensis, Supplement 1, part IV.

**

""

""

2, 2 parts.

Journal of Botany, 1906.

227

Journal of the Geographical Society, 1906.

KERSHAW, J. C., Butterflies of Hongkong & S. E. China.

Philippine Journal of Science, 1906.

Trimen, Flora of Ceylon, Vols. I, II & III.

TUTCHER, W. J., Gardening for Hongkong.

Periodicals were presented by the following establishments :--

Agricultural Department of West Australia, West Indies, University of California, United States, Cape of Good Hope, Calcutta, Victoria, Transvaal, Dominica, Grenada, Tortola and Jamaica.

Botanic Gardens of Gold Coast, Jamaica, Pietermaritzburg, Federated Malay States, Singapore, Penang, Mysore, St. Vincent, Saharanpur, Mussoorie, Monsterrat, Chicago, Natal & Ceylon.

Forest Reports of Baluchestan, British India, Philippine Islands, Manila, Adjer- memara, United Province, Punjab, Bengal, Burma, Bombay Presidency, Hawaii and Dehra Dun.

The Horticultural Society has conferred a considerable boon on Hongkong by the publication of Mr. TUTCHER'S "Gardening for Hongkong." The seasonal conditions of Hongkong are peculiar if not unique and horticultural methods which succeed in most parts of the world may be useless here. The book should do for Hongkong what Firminger's Manual has done for India.

One of the most valuable gifts ever made to the department library was received during the year from the Indian Government, viz., 8 volumes of the Annals of the Calcutta Botanic Gardens. This fine work contains many hundred quarto illustrations of Indian and Chinese plants. Its acquisition for scientific reference, though very desirable, has long been delayed on account of its cost (about £31) and the courteous action of the Indian Government is highly appreciated.

One of the drawbacks to botanical work in Hongkong has always been the delay entailed when any information from a fuller botanical library was required. This is now to some extent removed by the establishment by the United States Government of a fine scientific library in connection with the Bureau of Science, Manila; and, by the courtesy of the Government Botanist Mr. E. MERRILL, extracts from works not possessed by this department have been written out on more than one occasion for our information.

REVENUE.

The details of revenue are given in Table IX.

STAFF.

By the introduction of the grading system all the Chinese officers of the department drawing $240 per annum or over have been placed on the definite grades of pay used in the rest of the Government service. The unification of the responsible posts is a great improvement.

The Superintendent was absent on vacation leave for 1 month and 17 days in February and March and for 23 days in September on both of which occasions the Assistant Superintendent act as Superintendent.

S. T. DUNN,

Superintendent, Botanical and Forestry Department.

4th March, 1907.

:

228

Table I.

1906 RAINFALL.-BOTANIC GARDENS.

Jan.

Feb. Mar. April. May, June. July. Aug. Sep.

Oct. Νον. Dec.

Date

in.

in.

in.

in. in.

in.

in. in.

in.

in.

in.

in.

1,

2,

.19

.68

.01

.07

3,

.03

4,

.15

5,

6,

7,

.01

8,

.03

9,

.40

10,

.02

11,

.02

.90

.02

12,

.02

.04

24

13,

.21

14,

*04

.40

.11 1.24

15,

.09 .11

16,

.08

.02

.03

2.30

17,

.11

,64 .06

⠀⠀

18885 : 188 82228

58

.67

.14 .11

1.70

.56

.15 .20

.01

.13

.55

.02

.03

1.12

.01

.15

.07

3.44

.78

.28

1.38

.06

.58

1.88

.04 .03

.41

.62

.04

.22

.01

.01

.11

.04

: : : : 88:

.་

.02

.03

.08

2.93

.51

.01

.01

.05

.26

.18

1.30

18,

20,

19,

21,

.G1

2.64 .77

1.32

.01 .03 .08

1.33

.28

.08

.29

.13

.24 .09

22,

.01

.14

1.65

23,

.02

.21

.95

24,

25,

26.

27,

28,

31,

29,

30,

.40

::ཙ:;-8 སྤྱ

.01

.27 .30

.19

.46

.01

.25

1.24

.14

.32

.04

.16

2.06

1.42

1.32

.03

.20 .78 1.41

.02

.72

.04

.29

.10

.85

.07

.18

.62 .01

.51

.03 .03 1.53

22::: ོབ་སྤྱི:: ི

4.03

...

1.19

.01

.32

.03

.06

.30

.32

.32

.03

.04

.08

5.59

.01

2.82

3.62

1.61

.02

.02

.34

.19

.11

Total,

1.26

3.35

2.63

.73

Total Inches for the year, 81.77.

Observations made at 10 A.M.

Elevation, 300 feet.

10.98 11.71 5.80 8.54 2.92 31.92 1.72 .21

Table II.

LAND UNDER COMPLETE OR PARTIAL MANAGEMENT OF

BOTANICAL AND FORESTRY DEPARTMENT.

1. Botanic Gardens.

2. Blake Garden.

3. Peak Garden.

4. King's Park, Kowloon.

5. West End Park.

1

6. Government Ilouse Grounds.

7. Mountain Lodge Grounds.

8. Government Offices Grounds.

9. Colonial Cemetery.

10. Sookunpo Government Nursery.

11. Kang Hau Forest Nursery.

12. Sookunpo Bamboo Nursery.

13. North Point Tree Nursery.

14. Loan Plant Compound, Garden Road.

15. Albany Nursery.

16. Rockery in Garden Road.

229

17.

Do. (upper) in Albert Road.

18.

Do. (lower) do.

19.

Do.

(upper) in Peak Road.

20.

Do.

(lower) do.

21.

Do.

(upper) at St. Joseph's Church.

22.

23.

Do. (lower)

Do. in Glenealy Road, below Robinson Road.

do.

24.

Do.

do.

below first bend.

25.

Do.

do.

below second bend.

26.

Do.

do.

below third bend.

27.

Do.

do.

below Cathedral.

28.

Do.

do.

lower part, W.

29.

Do.

do.

do., E.

30.

Do. at junction of Seymour and Robinson Roads.

31. Plot over Garden tank at junction of Bowen and Garden Roads.

32. Do. above Garden Cottages.

33. Do. in front of St. Joseph's Church, Garden Road.

34. Bank in Bridges St.

35. Do. opposite main entrance to Government House Grounds.

36. Do. between Garden Road and Albert Road.

37. Do. between Upper and Lower Albert Roads.

38. Do. South of Lower Albert Road, opposite Government Offices.

39. Do. South of Volunteer Parade Ground.

40. Do. Lower Albert Road, opposite Volunteer Parade Ground.

41. Do. between Albany Road and Upper Albert Road.

42. Do. on North boundary of New Garden, Caine Road.

43. Do. between Wyndham Street and Lower Albert Road.

230

44. Bank on North side of Government House Gounds.

45. Do. between Lower Albert Road and Ice House Street.

46. Do. on South side of Battery Path.

47. Do. on North side of Battery Path.

48. Do. East of Garden Road Nullah, between Kennedy Rd. & Macdonnell Rd.

49. Do. East of Garden Road Nullah, between Macdonnell Rd. and Bowen Rd.

30. Do. above Bowen Road at junction of Bowen and Garden Roads.

51. Do. West of Glenealy Nullah below Robinson Road Bridge.

52. Do. West of Garden Road Nullah between Garden Cottage and Bowen Road Bridge. 53. Do. between Tramway and Garden Road Nullah, below Kennedy Road.

54. Rockery in Robinson Road, S.W. of West End Park.

55. Little Hongkong Pine-tree Nursery.

56. East Point Pine-tree Nursery.

57. Government Forestry Store, Kennedy Road.

Table III.

TREES PLANTED IN 1906.

DATE.

PLACE.

Jan. to Mar....

Kang Hau

May

Pokfulam

""

11

June

Victoria Tytam

Robinson Road, Kowloon

Gascoigne Road,

Cheung Sha Wan

Kowloon Tsai

July

Des Voeux Road

A

TREE

NUMBER.

Camphor Pine

1,500

11,143

18,965

22

""

14,469

Aleurites

73

161

77

$1,989

Camphor Heteropanax

971

97

Total,.........

129,368

""

Pine

Table IV.

SITES SOWN WITH PINE SEEDS IN 1906.

DATE.

PLACE.

May,

Pokfulam, Blocks A. & B.,

May to July,

Cheung Sha Wan,.

July,

Victoria, Block G.,

Kowloon Tong,

"}

NUMBER.

14,889

70,981

227 2,040

Total,.

$8,137

231

Table V.

BLOCKS PLANTED WITH PINE, 1906.

BLOCK.

TOTAL

No.

FOREST DIVISION.

NUMBER.

A

B

C

D

E

F

G

H

123410 CON ∞ a

Victoria, Wongneichong,

Shaukiwan,..

Tytam, Stanley, Aberdeen, Pokfulam, Kowloon,.

New Territories,

18,965

:

18,965

14,469

14,469

:

7,429 3,714

11,143

81,989

Total,................

126,566

Table VI.

DEAD PINE TREES SOLD IN 1906.

BLOCK.

FOREST No.

FOREST DIVISION.

Α B

C

D

E

F

G

TOTAL NUMBER.

1

Victoria,

...

2

Wongneichong,

7 205

255

12

21

21

58

579

3

Shaukiwan,

18

10

57

13

15

113

...

4

Tytam,.

39

352

13

16

133

553

5

Stanley,

271

34

24

17

59

405

6

Aberdeen,

46

24

181

251

...

7

Pokfulam,

39

44

32

35

690

155

995

Kowloon,

45

77

41

183

154

500

Table VII.

PINE TREES STOLEN IN 1906.

Total...

3,396

BLOCK.

FOREST No.

FOREST DIVISION.

TOTAL NUMBER.

A

B

C

D

E

F

G

123 410 CON∞

2

Victoria,. Wongneichong,

Shaukiwan,

4

Tytam,....

5

Stanley,

6

Aberdeen,

7

8

Pokfulam,

New Territories,

7

4

H

58

8

10

5

76

4

15

170

...

...

...

7

232 13

87

15

1,375

Total...

1,729

232

Table VIII.

PINE TREES BLOWN DOWN BY TYPHOON OF 18TH SEPTEMBER, 1906.

BLOCK.

No. FOREST DIVISION.

TOTAL NUMBER.

A

B

CD.

E

F

G

IEICO ± 10 CON∞o

1

Victoria,

260 723

328

80

101

114

132

1,738

2

Wongneichong,

219

78

53

24

16

16

175

3

Shaukiwan,

336

359

164

102

111

92

581 1,164

4

Tytam,

128

153

47

108

34

81

551

...

5

Stanley,

465

55

132

106

73

183

1,014

6

Aberdeen,

200

466

45

190

93

390

1,384

7

Pokfulam,

84 143 439

439

177

377

1,659

8

Kowloon,

345

194

164 184

47

934

Total,.

9,025

Table IX.

REVENUE FOR 1906.

Sale of Forestry Products

.$1,369.81

Sale of Plants

569.30

Loan of Plants

326.94

Forestry Licences in New Territories

4,388.15

$6,654.20

*

HONGKONG.

REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF THE COLONY FOR 1906.

16

No. 1907

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government.

A partial census of the Colony was taken on the night of Tuesday, 20th November, 1906. The Census was confined to the original Colony of Hongkong and to that part of the New Territories, called New Kowloon, which lies to the South of the Kowloon Range of hills. The total civil population enumerated was 319,803. The portion of the New Terri- tories North of the Kowloon Range and not included in this Census was found at the Census of 1901 to possess a population of 85,011. The date of the Census was originally fixed for the 30th June, but was subsequently changed, on account of the prevalence of plague at that time of the year.

I was appointed Census Officer, and was able to directly control the operations of the Police, as well as those of the enumerators and clerks employed by the Registrar General's Department. This arrangement proved a success, though my own share of the work was of -course very largely increased.

2. Preliminary Returns were published on the 5th December, 1906. The figures were taken from the enumerators' books. There was an error of about 2,800 persons in the Chinese Boat Population, owing to certain totals having been carried forward from one book to another by the Water Police, and another of about 2,000 in the Chinese Land Population. The latter was due to faulty addition on the part of some of the Chinese enumerators.

3. The Census of the Chinese residing in the City of Victoria was taken, as on previous occasions, by a staff of specially engaged enumerators, with the exception of certain areas which were done by the Police. The Chinese Boat Population of the Harbour was taken by the Water Police, while the Harbour Department enumerated the persons on board th British and Foreign merchant vessels.

2

!

4. I adhered to the "double-block" system, which was so successful in 1901, for the Census of the City of Victoria. Each block was worked by two Chinese enumerators accom- panied by a District Watchman in uniform. As I pointed out in 1901, this is a better plan than making the enumerators work singly. It was necessary to make a few alterations in the blocks into which the City was divided in the previous Census, and 7 new ones were added, making a total of 60. All those which contained 3,000 persons and upwards in 1901 were reduced in size so as to allow for the probable increase of population in 5 years, while some of the smaller ones were enlarged. They were designed, as usual, to contain about 3,000 persons, but it is not an easy matter to do this with any degree of accuracy, owing to the changes which take place in the course of 5 years. Structural alterations in some of the older houses, the resumption of insanitary areas, the erection of new buildings, and the en- forcement of Legislative measures such as the Public Health and Buildings Ordinance of 1903, all tend to affect the density of the population in any given area. On the whole, how- ever, the Census blocks were of a suitable size, and the largest one only contained 4,800 people. The population of most of them had been over-estimated, and they will therefore require little alteration on the occasion of the next Census.

5. 120 Chinese enumerators were engaged by me to enumerate the Chinese population of the City of Victoria. Some of them had had previous experience, and they were all of a good class. The supply of candidates was largely in excess of the demand. 200 could have been obtained without difficulty. In 1901, the number employed was 107. Great care was taken that the enumerators were thoroughly acquainted with their sections and between the 3rd and 10th November, they were given their books properly filled up and were shown round the blocks by the District Watchman in charge of each. The distribution of schedules com- menced on the 17th November, and they were returned to the Census Office by the 25th, with the exception of a few which did not come in until the 26th and 27th. I consider that this was a very creditable performance.

6. 10 European Police Sergeants, 3 European and 13 Chinese Constables enumerated those portions of Victoria, which are inhabited chiefly by Non-Chinese. The Central Police District was divided into 7 sections, and the Eastern and Western into 3 each.

Each was worked by a European Constable or Sergeant accompanied by a Chinese Constable or detective. The work of distribution *commenced on the 16th November, and the schedules were all collected and returned by the 28th. The European Police Officers were provided with special rough books in which to enter the numbers of the schedules left at each house, and the pro- per enumerators' books were only used when the schedules were being collected. supplied a want that had been felt in 1901, and the work was greatly facilitated. The num- ber of persons dealt with by the Police enumerators in the City of Victoria was 7,688 Non- Chinese and 19,892 Chinese. The number of men employed was adequate for the purpose.

This

7. The Census of the Kowloon Peninsula, the Peak and the Hongkong villages of Aber- deen, Stanley, Pokfulam and Shaukiwan was also taken by the Police.

tors.

8. In Old Kowloon the Police were assisted by 10 specially engaged Chinese enumera- The Sections were the same as those used in 1901. In New Kowloon which comprises the Police districts of Sham Shui Po and Kowloon City, 5 Chinese enumerators were employed in addition to the Police. The present is the first detailed Census which has been taken of this portion of the Colony. In 1901 a house to house visitation only was made by the Police, and the people were not required to fill up schedules. The distribution of schedules in Kowloon was commenced on the 16th November, and they were collected and returned by the 30th. The work was very heavy, and many of the sections will have to be reduced in size at the next Census. One block in Hung Hom contained as many as 7,126 persons, which is far too great a number for two enumerators to deal with. A large number of schedules had, as usual, to be filled up by the enumerators, owing to the people on whom they were served, being unable to read or write. Inconvenience was also caused, though not to the same extent as in 1901, by people taking away their papers to be filled up elsewhere by petition writers and school masters, and not having them ready at hand when called for.

9. The Census of the Hill District was taken by Inspector MCHARDY, one European "able, one hired interpreter, and a Chinese Constable.

}

259 ±

10. Inspector ROBERTSON, assisted by 3 European and 3 Chinese Constables, enumerated the inhabitants of the Shaukiwan District. An Indian Sergeant with one Chinese constable took the Census of the village of Tsat Tsz Mui. The enumerators commenced distributing schedules on the 15th November, and returned them to the Census Office on the 28th. Ou the 19th November, the small craft in Shaukiwan harbour were anchored in rows, and the Inspector with 2 European Constables and the Harbour Department boatmen enumerated the Boat population. They completed the work in one day. At Aberdeen the Census was taken by Inspector DYMOND, with 2 European Constables, the Chinese Sergeant Interpreter and 2 Chinese (onstables. The distribution of schedules was commenced on the 13th November and the papers were collected and returned by the 27th. On the 19th and 20th November, the Boat Population was enumerated. Two boats were employed all night on the 19th, blocking the entrances to the harbour. Great assistance was given to the Police by the village schoolmaster, who helped to fill up the schedules for those persons who were unable to write. The Stanley District was enumerated by Sergeant MCKAY, assisted by the Chinese Sergeant Interpreter and one Chinese Constable. They commenced work on the 16th November, and the schedules were returned to the Census Office on the 26th. The Census of the Boat population was taken on the 20th November by the Sergeant and the Harbour Department boatmen, and was finished in one day. There were fewer boats to deal with than usual The village of Pokfulam was enumerated by the Indian Sergeant in charge, assisted by one Chinese Constable. The work was performed most creditably.

11. The brunt of the work of a Census in this Colony falls on the Police, and all the men employed did exceedingly well. The arrangements made by the Officer in charge of the var

s Districts and Out-stations were very good, and they took great pains to see that they were properly carried out. The work is specially heavy in the Aberdeen and Shauki- wan districts, where a large floating population has to be dealt with in addition to the land The l'olice in the Kowloon Peninsula had perhaps the inost difficult task of all, owing to the large increase in the population there. I refer to the work of the Water Police in another paragraph.

one.

12. Officers, appointed for that purpose by the Commodore-in-charge and the General Officer Commanding the Troops, took the Census of the Naval and Military Establishments.

13. The Census of the British and Foreign Mercantile Marine was taken by Messrs. McIVER and MEUGENS of the Harbour Department. These officers were greatly hindered in their work by the attitude of many of the masters of vessels, who refused to give the enumerators any assistance, and seemed to look upon the Census as a joke.

One steamer left her buoy at West Point during the night of the 20th November with the schedules on board, and anchored at Quarry Bay, where she remained the whole of the next day. No notice of the change was given to Mr. McIVER who only found the vessel again after some trouble. Another steamer left the Port without enumerating her Chinese crew, and schedules for that purpose had to be sent to Canton. Several visits had to be made by the enumerators on the British barque Arrow. Eventually, just as she was on the point of sailing, a second set of schedules had to be filled up by the master, as the mate had sent the original ones ashore in charge of a sampan man, who did not deliver them until the next day. Two vessels had to be refused clearances until their schedules were produced. At the next Census, it would be desirable for the Harbour Master to issue a notice to the mas- ters of vessels, ordering them to give every assistance to the enumerators, and making vessels which leave port in the early morning on the day following the distribution of schedules, responsible for the safe delivery of the papers at the Harbour Office.

14. Following so closely on the disastrous typhoon of the 18th September, great in- terest was taken in the Census of the Boat Population of the Harbour, which was in charge of the Water Police. The same sections were employed as in 1901. 9 Launches and 8 rowing boats were engaged, each in charge of a European Sergeant or Constable accompanied by an interpreter. Owing to losses in the typhoon the Water Police had only 2 of their own launches available, and had therefore no difficulty in finding men for the seven laun- ches hired from Chinese. Work was commenced on the evening of the 19th November, when a start was made by enumerating the craft in Causeway Bay, which at that time was always full at night. These were all disposed of before they dispersed in the morning. The rest of the boats in the Harbour were dealt with during the day time on the 20th and 21st November. The bulk of the work was finished by the evening of the 20th, but a

}

260

certain number of launches and boats was employed until the afternoon of the 21st, when no boats could be found that had not been enumerated. Two launches guarded the exits from the Harbour on the night of the 20th November, and took all unrecorded craft which were in the act of leaving. With this exception, no work was done after dark, except in Cause- way Bay. No difficulties were met with by the Police, and the work of the enumerators was accomplished with great rapidity, and without a hitch. I was very much struck by the ready way in which the Chinese boat people gave the information required of them, and by the prompt obedience to a signal to come alongside the enumerating launch or boat. They gave their ages without any hesitation, often volunteering those of the members of the crew who happened to be ashore at the time. It was evident that most of them remembered the previous Census and knew exactly what was required of them. The greatest credit is due to Inspector LANGLEY, who was in charge, and to all ranks of the Water Police, who per- formed what is always an arduous task in a most efficient manner.

15. The European and American resident civil population (exclusive of Portuguese) numbers 5,061, as compared with 3,860 in 1901. The increase over 1901 is 1,201. The l'ortuguese have increased from 1,948 persons in 1901 to 2,307 at the present Census. Their numbers have hitherto shown a tendency to decrease. The British resident civil population numbers 3,709 as compared with 2,708 in 1901. Between 1897 and 1901 the increase was 495. There are no special reasons to be assigned for this increase beyond the steady ex- pansion of the Colony during the last 5 years. The Americans have increased from 198 in 1901 to 297, the Austrians from 26 to 54, the Dutch from 15 to 37, and the Russians from 10 to 22. There is an increase of 32 in the number of French. The Germans number 359 as compared with 337 in 1901. They show a very large increase in the Mercantile Marine. The number of Danes remains the same, while the Norwegians, Italians and Spaniards have slightly decreased.

16. Of the British population of 4,097 (inclusive of those on board the shipping in the Harbour) 2,683 are returned as English, 671 as Scotch, 339 as Irish and 47 as Welsh. In the Bish resident civil population the percentage of adult females to males is about 56.5, taking all those over 15 years of age as adults. The percentage in 1901 was 54, and in 1897, 48. The number of British children under the age of 15 years is 949, as compared with 752 in 1901. These figures taken with the larger percentage of adult females to males, all go to prove that family life is still increasing. This is also the case with the rest of the American and European population, but not to so great an extent.

17. The Non-Chinese races, other than Europeans and Americans, number 3,595 as compared with 2,607 in 1901. Of this number, 857 are Japanese and 2,068 Indians. The latter show the very considerable increase of 615, whilst the former only numbered 484 at the last Census. The increase in the number of Indians is to a certain extent due to the employment of a number of coolies on the Kowloon-Canton Railway works, and at the time the Census was taken there was also a considerable number of men on the way to and from America. The bulk of the Indian population consists of Punjabis, principally Sikhs. There is still a great demand for these men as watchmen. The mercantile class, which forms the minority, consists chiefly of Parsees. The Malays number 147, and the Philippine Islanders 198, as compared with 66 and 266 respectively in 1901. 227 persons returned themselves as Eurasians. As the result of previous experience I made no special endeavour to ascertain the number of Eurasians in the Colony. As I remarked in my Report on the 1901 Census, the great majority of Eurasians are returned as Chinese. I have included them with the rest of the Non-Chinese races of Asiatic and African origin in the Tables, instead of dealing with them separately as in 1901 and 1897.

18. The total Chinese land population of the Colony (excluding the New Territories North of the Kowloon Hills and, for the moment, New Kowloon) is 244,300 as compared with 233,263 in 1901 and 200,005 in 1897. The number of males above the age of 15 years is 156,975 and of females 49,592. These figures show a decrease since 1901, of 780 adult males and an increase of 6,855 adult females. The number of Chinese children under the age of 15 years is 37,733 as compared with 32,771 in 1901. The number of families in the City of Victoria is returned as 25,974 as compared with 25,123 in 1901. These figures may be regarded as satisfactory evidence that family life among the Chinese continues to increase, taking the Colony as a whole. The decrease in population in the City of Victoria consists almost entirely of adult males, while the number of women and children has increased. In Old Kowloon where the population shows a very large increase, there are 32,209 adult males

1

L

261

The percentage

10,844 adult adult females, with 9,278 children under the age of 15 years. of adult Chinese females to adult males in the Colony is approximately as follows :

City of Victoria

Villages of Aberdeen, Stanley, Shaukiwan and Pokfulam. Old Kowloon

In 1901 the percentages were :

City of Victoria.

Hongkong villages

Old Kowloon

31%

31%

33.5%

28%

30%

24%

:-

The number of Chinese in New Kowloon is 17,836. In 1901 the result of the house to house visitation by the Police gave the number as 17,243. The latter included however about 1,100 inhabitants of 7 villages, which are now in the Sai Kung district of the New Territories, and which were therefore not enumerated at the present Census. For the pur- poses of comparison the increase over 1901 is about 1,700. In New Kowloon the bulk of the population is rural and the percentage of adult females to adult males is about 45.7.

19. Table IX shows the distribution of the Chinese population of the City of Victoria according to Registration Districts, and Table X the population of the ten Health Districts. In Kennedy Town and Shektongtsui there is a decrease of 1,820. An increase over the 1901 figures was hardly to be expected as between that year and 1897 the population had risen from 3,581 to 11,032. When the present Census was taken, there were still many large blocks of new buildings unoccupied, designed principally to accommodate the people who have been forced to leave Possession Street, Lower Lascar Row and Wa Lane, owing to the closing up of the disorderly houses in that locality. Most of the large Chinese Restaurants in the latter neighbourhood have also removed to Shektongtsui. There is a further increase of 4,521 in the population of Saiyingpun. That of Taipingshan remains practically stationary. This is partially accounted for by the changes in Possession Street and the neighbourhood, to which I have alluded above. There are 2,067 fewer Chinese in Sheung Wan than there were in 1901. This is due probably to dullness of business, as there are a good many empty houses there. The population of the Chung Wan District, which showed an increase of 15,047 in 1901, has decreased since the latter year by 2,652. This decrease is all the more marked because the new 4 storey buildings in Connaught Road have all been completed and occupied since 1901, while many Chinese shops have set up in Queen's Road Central in the place of European Firms, which have moved into new premises on the Reclamation between the new Post Office site and the Hongkong Club. It must be remembered however that extensive resumptions of insanitary properties have been carried out by the Government during the past 3 years, and the Public Health and Buildings Ordinance of 1903 increased the floor area per head from 30 to 50 square feet. Districts Nos. VII & VIII (Ha Wan and Wanchai) contain 25,892 inhabitants, an increase of 2,405. This is probably due to the Naval Yard Extension, as the Chinese like to live close to their work. In Bowrington and Sokonpo there is a decrease of 4,332. The total decrease in the ten Registration Districts is actually 3.199, but in 1901 the whole Chinese population of Victoria was included, while on the present occasion I have left out 1,432 Chinese living in places within the City limits which do not fall within any of the Registration Districts. For the the purposes of com- parison, therefore, the decrease since 1901 is 1,767 for the whole City.

}

20. The European and American population of Victoria (excluding Portuguese) is 3,244 as compared with 2,738 in 1901. The Portuguese numbers remain stationary, while there is small increase of 150 in the number of Indians. There is no change worth recording in the numbers of the rest of the Non-Chinese races (including Eurasians). These now num- ber 1,284 persons.

The increase in the European and American community in Victoria is 506 since 1901. Between 1897 and 1901 the increase was 298. A number of new houses have been completed on the higher levels of the City, principally in Conduit and MacDonnell Roads. Europeans continue to be displaced by Chinese and others in the residential quarters in the neighbour- hood of Robinson Road and Caine Road, and move either into the higher levels or Kowloon.

21. There are 574 Europeans and Americans living on the Peak, as compared with 413 in 1901, and 376 in 1897. There is little room for further expansion as nearly all the available sites have been built upon. The children below the age of 15 years now number 136, an increase of 31 since the last Census. The Chinese number 1,648, most of whom are domestic servants.

262

22. The European and American inhabitants of the Hongkong villages number 224, being an increase of 47 over 1901. A portion of the crews of two steamers were included in the Aberdeen and Shaukiwan totals in the last Census, so the real increase is about 60.

23. The Chinese population of the Shaukiwan District has risen to 11,391, over 2,000 more than in 1901. A large number of men continue to be employed at Messrs. Butterfield and Swire's Shipyard.

24. There is an increase of 812 Chinese in Aberdeen, the present population being 3,654. The number of Chinese in the Stanley District is 1,276, as compared with 805 in 1901, an increase of over 50%. This is principally due to the number of coolies employed at the Tytam Reservoir Extension works. There are 711 Chinese in the village of Pokfulam. The number in 1901 was 602.

25. The growth of Old Kowloon is again, as in 1901, the most remarkable feature of the Census. The Europeans and Americans number 997, and the Portuguese 470, the increase over 1901 being 455 and 344 respectively which is equivalent to about 83% and 273%. The number of Indian civilians is 581, as compared with 211 in 1901. The Chinese have increased from 42,976 to 52,331. The percentage of adult females to males is higher than in any other part of the Colony, except New Kowloon. In 1901 this percentage was not quite 23, while it is now 33. There is every reason to believe that the rapid expansion of Old Kowloon will continue. On the Peak and in Victoria, most of the ground available for sites has already been built over, while in Kowloon there are still considerable areas available for building purposes. One of the principal reasons for the popularity of Kowloon as a residential quarter is that a number of small houses have been built there, which meet the requirements of a large section of the European population which is unable to afford the high rents obtaining on the Peak and the upper levels of the City of Victoria. The number of European, American & Portuguese children below the age of 15 years is 452, as compared with only 161 in 1901. The Chinese children below that age number 9,278, the increase over 1901 being 4,152, representing about 80%.

26. The Non-Chinese population of New Kowloon is 47. The Chinese number 17,836.

27. The Europeans and Americans on board the Foreign Shipping in the Harbour number 1,027, and the rest of the Non-Chinese races 425. The numbers in 1901 were 646 and 355 respectively. Of the European and Americans, 388 are British, 379 Germans, 40 Americans, 70 Austrians and 51 Norwegians. In the 1901 Census the Germans only num- bered 108, while the British numbers were 299. The Japanese number 261 and the Indians, who are nearly all employed in British vessels, 92.

The crews of steamers lying at Aberdeen and Shaukiwan are included in the above totals.

28. The number of the Chinese Boat Population for the whole Colony is returned as 42,744. This represents an increase of 2,644 over the 1901 figures, in spite of the loss of life in the typhoon. Of the above total 26,611 are males and 16,133 females. I believe that these figures are as nearly as possible accurate, as the task of enumeration was carried out by the Police with great thoroughness. The boats were divided into the same classes as in 1901, except that Lighters are shown separately from Cargo Boats. The total number of boats in 1906 and 1901 is as follows:-

Passenger Boats Carge Boats

1906.

1901.

..1,358

1,442

.1,401

1,424

Lighters.....

50

Trading Junks

264

236

Harbour Boats

691

495

Fishing Boats and Junks...

2,480

2,039

Steam Launches

215

200

6,459

5,836

263

The following is the number of boats reported sunk or wrecked during the typhoon :-

Sunk.

Wrecked.

Total.

Passenger Boats.......

71

83

154

+

Cargo Boats

209

491

700

Trading Junks

49

181

230

Harbour Boats

28

92

120

Fishing Boats and Junks

16

467

483

373

1,314

1,687

Steam Launches (sunk or wrecked )

34

The number of persons reported to the Police and Harbour Department as missing was 1,347. It is to be feared that the latter figure is very much below the mark. Boats which were lost with all hands, as a very large number were, are not likely to have been reported. Also the greatest loss of life was among the crews of the small craft, which are classified as Passenger and Harbour Boats, yet the total number of lives reported lost in vessels of this description was only 139. The total loss of life in the Boat l'opulation of the Colony at the lowest estimate was probably at least 5,000. It is safe to assume that nearly all the boats returned as "wrecked were total losses, and did not appear among the craft enumerated at the present Census. On the other hand a great many launches and lighters had been raised again by the 20th November and figure in the Census returns. The latter include a number of new boats of every description, but especially Cargo Boats, which were brought in from places outside the Colony to make good some of the typhoon losses.

71

29. The Boat population found along the Southern Shore of the Harbour numbered 12,260, composed of 7,651 males and 4,609 females. Along the Northern Shore the numbers were 8,502 males and 5,134 females, total 13,636. In the rest of the Harbour the numbers enumerated were 3,067 males and 1,143 females, total 4,210. The total Boat Population of the Harbour (excluding Shaukiwan) is therefore 19,220 males and 10,886 females,

king a total of 30,106. In 901 the number was 28,529.

1

30. The Boat Population of the Hong Kong Villages is as follows:-

Shaukiwan, Aberdeen, Stanley,

1906.

1901.

.6,306

5,439

.5,637

5,251

695

881

12,638

11,571

The total number of boats of all classes at Shaukiwan is 781, at Aberdeen 965 and at Stanley 95. In 1901 the number of boats enumerated at Aberdeen was 947 and at Stanley 119. The Shaukiwan boats appear to have been included in the totals for the Harbour. A number of boats belonging to these three villages were lost in the typhoon. They would be included in the totals given in paragraph 28.

31. The number of European, American and other Non-Chinese children between the of 6 and 15 years (inclusive) is 1,363 and of Chinese 31,573. Of the latter total 16,860 are males and 14,693 females.

ages

32. The total number of Police engaged in the taking of the Census was 95, in addition to 49 Water Police seamen and 9 Chinese Engineers, Coxswains and Stokers. The number of each rank employed was as follows:--

8 Inspectors

8 Sergeants

14 Lance Sergeants

21 European Constables.

2 Indian Sergeants 2 Indian Lance Sergeants

6 Sergeant Interpreters

1 Assistant Interpreter

3 Chinese Sergeants 30 Chinese Constables.

264

Sixteen Harbour Department boatmen assisted in enumerating the Boat Population of Aberdeen, Stanley and Shaukiwan.

Messrs. ROCHA and FRANCO of the Harbour Department with 8 boatmen took part in the taking of the Census of the Boat Population of Victoria Harbour, and performed their duty to my entire satisfaction. 2 Chinese enumerators were engaged by Inspector Cameron for the Census of the Kowloon City District, and 5 by Inspector MCDONALD for work in that portion of New Kowloon which is included in the Yaumati Police District.

A private interpreter, who was paid $10 for the work, was engaged to assist Inspector MCHARDY in enumerating the inhabitants of the Peak District

33. The

pay of the Police engaged, was as follows:-

Inspectors,

Sergeants,...

Lance Sergeants, European Contables,

Indian Sergeants,... Indian Lance Sergeants, Sergeant Interpreters,

Assistant Interpreter,

Chinese Sergeants,

Chinese Constables,

Water Police Boatmen and Stokers,

Water Police Engineers and Coxswains,

.$20

15

10

7

6

5

7

5

5

4

1.50

2.50

༥ ༤

Water Police boatmen, who acted as Interpreters, were given an extra $1.

34. The Harbour Department boatmen were paid $1.50 each, except in a few cases where they received extra pay for work on land. Mr. MEUGENS and Mr. McIVER were paid $20, es and Messrs. ROCHA and FRANCO $7.

35. The Chinese enumerators were paid at the rate of $8 a man. For this amount a large number of men were found willing to undertake the work, and they performed their task most satisfactorily. For the Census of Kowloon, local men were engaged as far as possible, though several enumerators had to be sent there from Hongkong.

36. For the clerical work of the Census one clerk was engaged at $40 a month from 1st October to 1st February, 3 clerks at $35 a month from 26th November to 1st February, 18 clerks at $25 a month from 26th November,to 1st February and one office messenger at $8 a month from 21st November to 1st February. Mr. CHENG KAM-FAI supervised the Chinese staff, and was invaluable. I have much pleasure in testifying to the great assistance which he rendered to me throughout. The clerical staff was engaged by the month, with the exception of a very short period on piece work. At the next Census I recommend that all the clerks be employed on piece work at a moderate rate. If this is not done, it is very difficult to ensure that they get through a proper amount of work, unless the Census Officer can spend the whole of his time supervising them. This would only be possi- ble if he was relieved of his other duties while engaged on the Census. On the present occasion I cannot say that I was entirely satisfied with the work of the clerical staff, with the exception of Mr. CHENG KAMAI. At the end of December, 6 clerks had to be summarily removed for failing to get through what I considered to be an exceedingly moderate daily task. The whole of the staff had to be continually driven.

37. The Eastern verandah on the ground floor of the Registrar General's Office was again used as a Census Office. The space was sufficient as there were not so many clerks employed as in 1901.

38. I am glad to be able to report, that, as in 1901, the enumerators met with no opposition or obstruction on the part of the Chinese population aud the work progressed exceedingly smoothly. What little trouble there was, was given, I regret to say, by the Non-Chinese community. The Police had great difficulty in inducing some people to fill up the schedules, and were often unnecessarily kept waiting. A few persens refused to state their ages, until pressure was brought to bear, while others gave frivolous answers to the questions on the schedules. There were no prosecutions under the Penal Clause of the Ordinance.

1

265

The total cost of the Census was $4,385.20 including the honorarium of $500 to the Census Officer.

Tables IV, V, VIII, X, XI, XIX, XXI, XXIII and XXIV shown in the 1901 Census Report are omitted. The following Tables are appended to this Report:—

ich,

I. The Total Civil Population of the Colony.

II. A Comparision between the Population in the years 1901 and 1906. III. The European and American Population according to Race.

IV. The Non-Chinese Population other than Europeans and Americans.

V. The Ages of the European, American and other Non-Chinese Resident

Civil Population.

VI. The Ages of the Chinese Resident Population.

VII. Chinese Population of the Villages of Hongkong.

VIII. Chinese Population of Old Kowloon.

IX. Chinese Population of the Registration Districts of Victoria.

X. Population of Victoria according to Health Districts.

XI. Chinese Population of the Health Districts of Kowloon.

*

XII. The number of Chinese Families in Victoria in the years 1901 and 1906. XIII. The number and description of Boats and Junks in the waters of the Colony (except the New Territories) and the number of persons on each Class of Boat.

XIV. The number of European, American and other Non-Chinese children

between the ages of 6 and 15 years (inclusive).

XV. The number of Chinese children (Land Population) between the ages of 6

and 15 years (inclusive).

XVI. The Naval and Military Establishments.

XVII. The Chinese Population of New Kowloon.

P. P. J. WODEHOUSE,

Census Officer.

i

Table I.

TOTAL CIVIL POPULATION of the COLONY.

NON-CHINESE.

Females.

CHINESE.

TOTAL.

Europeans and Americans other than

Portuguese.

Indians.

Races other than the before mentioned.

Total.

LOCALITY.

Portuguese.

Total.

266

19,220 10,886 30,106 19,220 10,886 3,840 2,466 6,306 3,840 2,466

30,106

6,306

23,060

13,352

36,412

23,060 13,352

36,412

3,131

420

2,506 5,637

275

695

3,131

420

2,506

275

5,637

695

26,611

16,133 42,744

26,611 16,133

42,744

216,240

91,148 307,388 224,236 95,567 | 319,803

Land Population.

Victoria,

Penk,..

Hongkong Villages,. Old Kowloon, ....

330

1,9441,800

244

155

3,244

574

69 224

835 1,000 1,835 1,025

300 1,325

687

597|1,284|4,491|3,197

7,688

124,995

48,294

173,289

129,486

2

2

12

2

129

567 430

997 222 248 470 506

14

1 130

75 581

3

8

2

2

134

11 345 256 601 4 286 72 358 87 221 1,429 840 2,269

1,524

124

1,648

12,236

4,796

17,032

36,765

15,566

Total,....

|

2,996 2,043 5,039 1,057 1,250 2,307 1,672

|

378 2,050

826

694 1,520 6,551 4,365 10,916 175,520

New Kowloon, .

Total,...

Mercantile Marine,

14

8 22

18

18

3

3,010 2,051 5,061 1,057 1,250 2,307 1,690

378 2,068

829

984 40 | 1,024

3

3

92

...

92 331

2

4 7 35 47 11,601 698 1,527 6,586 | 4,377 |10,963|187,121

333|1,410 42 1,452

12

2,508

1,869 12,522 4,868. 17,390 52,331 38,194 16,406 54,600 68,780 | 244,300 182,071 73,145 255,216 6,235 17,836 11,636 6,247 17,883 75,015 262,136 193,707 79,392 | 273,099 2,508

51,491

380

180,977

2,249

3,918

42

3,960

Females.

Males.

Boat Population.

Harbour,

Shaukiwan,

Total,....

Aberdeen,

Stanley,

:

:

::

:

...

:

:

::

::

:

:

::

:

T:

::

:

:

:

:

Note:The portion of the New Territories not included in this Census possessed a population of 85,011 in 1901.

:

:

:

:

F

:

:

::

:

T

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

Total,...

Grand Total,....

...

:

:

...

Table II.

COMPARISON between the VIL POPULATION in the years 1901 and 1906.

1901.

1906.

FEMALES.

MALES.

MALES.

FEMALES.

LOCALITY.

TOTAL.

TOTAL.

Under

Under

Under

Under

Over 15. Total.

Over 15. Total.

Over 15.

Total.

Over 15.

Total.

15.

15.

15.

15.

Victoria,

612

1,821

2,433

662

1,435

2,097

4,530

724

2,055

2,779

692

1,608

2,300

5,079

Peak,

47

189

236

58

128

186

422

63

267

330

73

173

246

576

Hongkong Villages,

15

124

139

14

24

38

177

26

129

155

23

46

69

224

Old Kowloon,

86

308

394

75

187

262

656

213

576

789

239

439

678

1,467

European and American Civil Population,

Total,

760

2,442

3,202

809

1,774

2,583

1,026

5,785

3,027

4,053

1,027

2,266

3,293

7,346

1

13

14

3

8

22

New Kowloon,

Total,

760

2,442

3.202

809

1,774

2,583

1,027

5,785

3,040

4,067

1,030

2,271

3,301

7,368

Mercantile Marine,..........

--639-

639

7

7

646

987

987

40

40

1,027

Y

Total,

760

3,081

3,841

809

1,781

2,500

6,431

1,027

4,027

5,054

1,030

2,311

3,341

8,895

267

220

1,492

1,712

252

645

897

2,609

Victoria,

Peak,

15

15

3

7

10

25

Races other than European, American and Chinese,

Hongkong Villages,

285

1,356

1,641

288

647

935

2,576

129

131

59

581

640

54

ཚོ༤༤

3

3

134

108

162

802

Old Kowloon,....

21

21

4

25

...

New Kowloon,

Mercantile Marine,....

353

353

2

2

355

423

423

2

425

...

Total,

285

1,709

1,994

288

649

937

2,931

281

2,661

2,942

309

769

1,078

4,020

Total Civil Population other than Chinese,..... 1,045

4,790

5,835

1,097

2,430

3,527

9,362

1,308

6,688

7,996

1,339

3,080

4,419

12,415

:

LOCALITY.

COMPARISON between the CivIL POPULATION in the years 1901 and 1906,—Continued.

MALES.

1901.

FEMALES.

MALES.

1908.

FEMALES.

TOTAL.

TOTAL.

Under

Over 15. Total.

15.

Under

15.

Over 15. Total.

Under

15.

Over 15. Total.

Under

15.

Over 15. Total.

Brought forward,

1,045

4,790 5,835

1,097

2,430 3,527

9,362

1,308

6,683

7,996

1,339

3,080

4,419 12,415

Victoria,

12,725

116,671 129,396

12,730

32,930 45,660 175,056

12,496

112,499 | 124,995

13,131

35,163

48,294 178,289

Shaukiwan,

709 6,199

6,908

598

1,678. -2,276 9,181

---$19-

7,340

8,259

831

2,301 3,132

11,391

Stanley,

87

375

462

84

259

343

805

91

815

936

75

265

340

1,276

Aberdeen,

292

1,702

1,994

249

599

848

2,842

388

2,177

2,565

340

749

1,089

3,65 t

Chinese

Pokfulam,

55

386

441

47

114

161

602

71

402

476

85

150

235

711

Land Population,

Old Kowloon,

2,067

30,793

32,860

3,059

7,057

10,116

42,976

4,556

32,209

36,765

4,722

10,844

15,566

52,331

New Kowloon,

...

2,054

9,547

11,601

1,866

4,369

6,235

17,836

Peak,

21 1,503 1,524

4

120

124

1,613

Mercantile Marine,.

1,175 1,180

1,180

2,508 2,508

2,508

Not included in the above,

55

Total,

1,629 1,684

15,995 158,930 174,925

14

100

114

1,798

16,781

42,737

59,518 | 234,443

20,599 |169,030 |189,629

21,051 53,961

75,015 264,614

Harbour,

Shaukiwan,.

Floating Population,

6,122 12,810 18,932

4,076

5,521

1,241 1,769

3,010

915

1,514

Stanley,...

Aberdeen,

Total,

Total Chinese,

GRAND TOTAL,

134

386

520

112

149

997 1,943 2,940

843

1,568

9,597 28,529 2,429 5,439 361 881 2,311 5,251

984

261

2,147

4,635 14,585 19,220 1,010 2,830 3,840 159

4,361

6,522

899

1,567

10,886 30,106

2,466

6,306

420

111

164

3,131

956

1,550

275

2,306

695

5,637

8,491 16,908 25,402

5.946

8,752

14,698

24,489175,838 200

27

51,489

40,100

74,216 | 274,543

6,788

19,823 26,611

6,330

9,803 | 16,133

27,387 188,853 |216,240 | 27,384

42,744

63,764 91,148 307,388

25,534 180,628 |206

53,919

77,743 283,905

28,695 | 195,541 | 224,236 | 28,723

66,841

95,567 319,803

268

269

Table III.

EUROPEAN and AMERICAN POPULATION ACCORDING to RACE.

Resident Population.

Mercantile Marine.

Total.

Races.

Males.

Fe- males.

Total. Males.

Fe- males.

Total. Males.

Fe- males.

Total.

English,.

1,454 1,038 2,492

180 11

191 1,634 1.049 2.683

Scotel,

379 188

567 102

104 481 190 671

Irish,

188

125

313

26

26 214 125

339

;

Welsh,

31

12

43

4

4

35

12

47

Other Natives of the British Isles

173

121 294

62

63

235 122

357

not defined,

Total,

2,225 1,484 3,709

374

14

388

2,599 1.498 4,097

American,.

144 153 297

39

10

183

154

337

Armenian,

13

2

15

3

16

Austrian,

Belgian,.

Brazilian,

31

23

1

70

100

24

2 +

18

124

4

1

Ι

5

5

13

20

:

13

7

20

Bulgarian,

1

1

1

Chilian,

1

1

1

1

3

Danish,

18

3

21

I

1

19

3

22

Dutch,

23

14

37

30

39

53

23

76

French,

81

54

135

13

15

94

56

150

German,

237

122

359

370

379

607

131

738

Greek

3

2

:

2

2

3

5

Hungarian,

5

1

6

1

6

Italian,

20

32

52

Jewish,

88

67

155

Norwegian,

13

1

14

47

817

28

32

60

1

89

156

51

60

5

65

Peruvian,

1

8

9

1

8

9

Portuguese,

Roumanian,

Russian,.

1,057

1,250 2,307

|

རབ

...

31,060

1,060 1,250

2,310

6

6

12

6

6

12

10

12

22

7

7

17

12

29

Spanish, Swedish,

Swiss,

Total,....

64

7

5

887

48 112

64

48

112

14

8

'16 2

16

23

7

30

2

7

3

10

4,067 3,301 7,368 987 40

1,027 5,054|3,341 | 8,395

Table IV.

NON-CHINESE RACES other than EUROPEANS and AMERICANS.

Resident Population. Mercantile Marine.

Total.

Races.

Males.

Fe- males.

Total. Males.

Fe- males.

Total. Males.

Fe- males.

Total.

Afghans,

45

45

15

45

Africans,

9

12

3

9

12

Annamites,

6

6

6

Arabians,

1

8

7

Asiatics (not defined),

12

3

13

S

9

12

Burmese,

1

1

Egyptians,

1

1

1

Indians,

1,690

378 2,068

Japanese,

478 379 857

259

Javanese,

Malays,

76

71 147

Persians,

2

2

4

Philippine Islanders,

110

198

Siamese,

...

:

Turks,

1.

West Indians,

1 2

2

24

3

ཚེ::

92

92

1,782

378 2,160

2

261

737.

381 1,118

17

17

17

17

37

37

113

71

184

2

2

4

14

14

124

88

212

1

1

1

1

2

2

4

24

3

4

Total,.....

2,425

943 3,368 | 422

2

424

2,847

9453,792

Eurasians, ...

94 133 227

1

1

95

133

228

Grand Total,

2,519 1,076 3,595 | 423

2

425

2,942 1,078 | 4,020

Table V.

THE AGES of the EUROPEAN, AMERICAN and the other NON-CHINESE RESIDENT CIVIL POPULATION.

British.

Americans and other

Indians.

The Rest of the Non-Chinese.

- 270-

Europeans except

Portuguese.

Total

Portuguese.

Age.

Males.

Fe-

males.

Fe-

Fe-

Fe-

Total. Males.

Total.

males.

Males.

Total. Males.

Total.

males.

males.

Males.

Fe-

Fe-

Total.

males.

Males.

Total.

males.

Under 1 year,

63 44

107

10

19

30

32

62

14

13

27

10

6

16

126 105

231

1 and under 5 years,.

170 194

364

36

48

84

129

125

254

52

52

104

35

37

72

422

456

878

5

10

167 144 311

56

49

105

141 134

275

51

57

108

42

49

91

457

433

890

""

""

10

15

64

103

167

40

36

76

122

111

233

39

72

38

62

100

303

345

648

""

""

15

20

52

74

126

33

36

69

100

106

206

·64

28

92

119

77

196

368

321

689

""

""

20

25

229

124

· 353

88

60

148

111

120

231

362

44

406

134

190

324

924

538

1,462

"3

25

30

379

228

607

161

96

257

111

120

231

449

39

488

135

114

249

1,235

597 1,832

多多

30

35

373

221

594

106

86

192

80

125

205

297

32

329

107

64

171

963

528

1,491

2

""

"

35

40

249

155

404

87

61

148

76

76

152

157

24

181

78

33

111

647

349

996

40

45

192

95

287

56

22

78

40

71

111

78

16

94

48

18

66

414

222

636

""

""

45

50

116

40

156

"

33

23

56

43

51

94

45

6

51

25

11

36

262

131

393

50

55

52

24

76

31

16

47

19

53

72

26

39

25

14

39

153

120

273

""

"}

55

60

22

9+

31

16

7

23

20

38

58

20

28

10

18

86

72

158

""

60

65

21

13

34

14

16

13

41

54

15

19

12

18

75

66

141

""

"}

65

70

7

1.

8

8

11

12

18

30

3

8

5

37

27

64

99

""

70

75

2

4

17

21

1

2

15

26

41

""

75

80

1

1

3

10

13

1

1

5

11

16

"

53

...

80

1

1

2

3

2

N

6

8

""

85

90

""

,,

90

95

>>

95 and over,

Age not stated,

...

61.

13

74

9

9

18

2

:::

::

...

...

1

1

1

...

1

10

15

5

1

6

87

28

115

Total,.

2,225 | 1,484

3,709

785 567 1,352 1,057 1,250

2,307

1,690

378 2,068

829

698 1,527

6,586 4,377 10,963

Table VI.

The AGES of the CHINESE POPULATION.

271

Victoria.

Peak.

Hongkong Villages.

Old Kowloon.

New Kowloon.

Floating Population.

Total.

Ages.

Males.

Fe-

males.

Total. Males.

Fe-

males.

Total. Males.

Fe-

males.

Total. Males.

Fe-

males.

Total. Males.

Fe-

males.

Total.

Males.

Fe-

males.

Total. Males.

Fe-

males.

Total.

""

Under 1 year,.

1 year and under 5 years,

5

336

300

636

14

24

38

...

53 90 143 33 32

3,046 3,374 6,420

3

10

3,983 4,667 8,650

2

2

4 512

""

""

10

15

5,131 4,790 | 9,921

17

1

""

""

15

20

16,081 4,201 20,282

186

186

398 388

491

18. 548 428 1,032 396

786

1,283 1,504 2,787

569 593

1,003

1,591| 1,773 | 3,364

781 666

976 1,629 1,355 2,984

671

575

""

20

25

20,711 5,773 26,484

327

334 2,008 455

1,428 3,927 1,126 5,053 1,044 2,463 6,102 1,585 7,687 1,630

545

540

25

30

""

:>

19,215 5,216 24,431

308

10

318 2,046 488

2,534 6,074| 1,763| 7,837 | 1,633

552

30

17,125 5,370 22,495

243

26

269 1,795 451

2,246 5,428| 1,731| 7,159| 1,568

551

99

35

40

50

40

>>

"2

>>

12,872 3,843 16,715

210

15

225

1,332 368

1,700 3,820 1,210 5,030 1,127

437

1,564 1,976

""

9,988 3,458 13,446

106

24

130

936 338

1,274 2,644 1,014 3,658

849

382

1,231 | 1,791

7,808 14,980 9,846 | 19,278 9,175 19,411 7,981 | 33,079

65 429 18 447 1,162 1,874 1,948 3,822 7,172 1,447 2,563 2,247 4,810 9,432 1,246 2,240 2,026 4,266 10,236 1,589 2,828 1,713 4,541 25,098 2,170 3,598; 1,667 5,265 34,376 10,027 | 44,403 | 2,185 3,109 1,359 4,468 32,385 9,388 | 41,773 2,119 2,917 1,295 4,212 29,076 9,424 | 38,500 812 2,788 21,337 6,685 28,022 813 2,604 16,314 6,029|22,343

865 .461 1,329

A

6,114 2,054 8,168

58

12

70

635 236

871 1,614

636 2,250 561

248

809

971

371 1,342 9,953

3,557 | 13,510

""

"3

وو

4,893 2,167 7,060

28

13

41

401 216

617 1,179

564 1,743

403

278

681 964

596

1,560 7,868 3,834 | 11,702

55

60

2,631 1,171 3,802

24

32

272 183

455

676

417 1,093

317 257

574

501

339

840 4,421

2,375| 6,796

""

""

60

"3

✓ ✓

65

1,724| 1,053| 2,777

9

14

157 175

332

455

377

832

190-

228

418

432

433

865 2,967

2,271

5,238

65

70

644

389 1,033

""

""

3

3

96 79

175

151

192 343

133

154

287

159

183

342 1,186

997

2,183

70

75

284

253

537

27

51

78

85

103

188

50

105

155

124

175

299

570

687

1,257

""

""

75

80

83

109

192

""

""

Ι

1

15

16

31

24

47

71

20

46

66

47

66

113

190

284

474

80

85

72

62

134

10

17

16

27

43

18

30

48

19

49

68

135

175

310

""

99

85

90

20.

21

41

2

7

7

6

13

10

6

12

18

37

52

89

""

90

95

24

14

38

45

49

7

10

33

72

105

...

""

""

"

95 and over, Age not stated,

18

27

1

1

1

4

2

1

1

21

14

35

60

63

60

3

63

:

:

Total,

124,995 48,294 173,289 1,524 | 124

|26,611

1,648 12,236 4,796 17,032 36,765 15,566 52,331 11,601 6,235 17,836 26,611 16,133 42,744 218,78291,148 304 880 |

218,78291

272

Table VII.

CHINESE POPULATION of the VILLAGES of HONGKONG.

Villages.

Males.

Females.

Total.

476

235

711

Aberdeen,

1.100

430

1,530

Tin Tsz Tong,

7

9

16

Tin Wan,

81

38

119

Aberdeen Garden,

37

6

43

Aplichau,

958

422

1.380

Fu Hiu....

4

4

8

Wong Chuk Hang,

85

33

118

Little Hongkong, Old Village,

98

103

201

New Village,

110

44

154

Brick Works,

85

85

Total,

2,565

1,089

3,654

To Li Wan,

28

28

Stanley,... Wongmakok,. Taitam, Taitamtuk... Hok-tsuiwan,

Deep Water Bay,.

Tong Po,.

Lan Lai Wan,

241

207

448

22

13

35

21

34

55

554

19

603

19

32

51

7

7

10

10

16

5

21

Chung Hon Bay,

6

6

Ma Kong,

12

12

Total.

936

340

1,276

Shek-O,

126

103

229

Chai-wan,

A Kung Ngam,

56

58

114

4

183

68

251

Shaukiwan,

Futau Fat,...

Kau Kan Uk, Ma Shan Ha, Chun Lung, Tsin Shui Matan, Sai Wan Ho,. Quarry Bay, Tsat Tsz Mui,

3,227

1,720

4,947

71

51

122

10

13

23

231

142

373

392

239

631

88

78

166

532

236

768

2.941

278

3,219

320

137

457

Sam Ka Tsün,

82

9

91

Total,...

8,259

3,132

11,391

Grand Total,.

12,236

4,796

17,032

>

273

Table VIII.

CHINESE POPULATION of BRITISH KOWLOON..

Villages.

Males.

Fe- males.

Fe-

Total.

Villages.

Males.

Total.

males.

Kan Pui Shek,..

12

4

16

Brought forward,..... 23,412 (10,741 | 34,153 -

Ma Taú Wai,

153

179

332

Ma Taú Chung,

58

42

100

Unchaú,

164 106

270

Ma Taú Kok,

43

30

73

Wong Nai Ü,

201

83

284

Haú Pui Ling,

18 151

169

Fo Pang,.

81

61

142

San Shan,

123

77

200

Mati,

93

63

156

To Ka Wan,

849

373 1,222

Mong Kok Tsui,

5,517 2,333

7,850

Shek Shan.

161

107 268

Tai Shek Ku,

22

4

26

Hok Un,

1,212

523

1,735

Ho Man Tin,

337

120

457

Tai Wan,

42

30

72

Mong Kok,

225

173

398

Lo Lung Hang,

194

68 262

Tai Kok Tsui,

2,371

705

3,076

Hunghom,

Tso Pui Tsai,

Yaumati,

8,792 2,973 11,765 Fuk Ts'ün Heung,

76

51 127) Ho Pu 11,679 6,133 17,812 Tsimtsatsúi,

742

191

933

82

24

106

3,518

962

4,480

Carried forward, ... 23,412 10,741 34,153

Total,...

36,765 15,566 | 52,331

Table IX,

CHINESE POPULATION of the REGISTRATION DISTRICTS of VICTORIA.

Districts.

Males.

Females.

Total.

No. I Kennedy Town,

895

721

1.616

II Shektongtsui,

4,398

3.198

7,596

""

III Saiyingpun,

37,254

11.989

49,243

**

IV Taipingshan,.

13,968

7.454

21.422

V Sheung Wan,

10,095

1.135

11,230

VI Chung Wan,.

34,572

14.019

48,591

VII Ha Wan,

7.239

2,886

10,125

VIII Wanchai,

11.094

4,673

15.767

"

IX Bowrington,

940

370

1,310

X

""

Sokonpo,

3,522

1,435

4.957

Total,..

123,977

47,880

171,857

274

Table X.

POPULATION of VICTORIA ACCORDING to HEALTH DISTRICTS.

Europeans, Americans and Races other than Chinese.

Districts.

Males.

Females.

Total.

Eastern Police District,

1,269

963

2.232

Central

"",

Western

">

2,894

2,043

4,937

328

191

519

Total,...

4,491

3,197

7,688

Chinese.

Health Districts.

Total.

Males.

Females.

No. I,

II,

III.

IV,

8,180

. 4,184

12,364

14,909

5,115

20.024

6,991

1,989

8,980

15,905

7,490

23,395

AAA

AAAA

V,

VI,

VII, VIII,

IX,

12,514

5,079

17,593

11,977

3,685

15,662

13,589

4.887

18,476

14.365

3,782

18.147

17,773

7,097

24,870

X,

8,792

4.986

13,778

Total,.....

124,995

48,294

173,289

Table XI.

CHINESE POPULATION of the HEALTH SUB-DISTRICTS of KOWLOON.

Health Sub-Districts.

No. I.

II,

""

III,

IV.

Males.

Females.

Total.

989

160

1,149

2,645

817

3,462

11,807

6,592

18,399

6,267

2,473

8,740

>>

V.

VI,

VII

VIII.

3,516

1,260

4,776

8,677

2,690

11,367

6,114

3,853

9.967

5,450

2.419

7,869

25

IX,

2,901

1,537

4,438

Total,.......

48,366

21.801

70,167

275

Table XII.

NUMBER of CHINESE FAMILIES in the TEN REGISTRATION DISTRICTS of VICTORIA.

In 1901,

In 1906,

Table XIII.

25,123

25,974

CHINESE FLOATING POPULATION.

NUMBER and DESCRIPTION of BOATS and JUNKS in the WATERS of the COLONY, and the

NUMBER OF PERSONS on each CLASS of BOAT,

Description of Vessels.

Aberdeen.

Stanley.

Shaukiwan.

Shore.

Northern

Shore.

Southern

Rest of

Harbour,

Total.

Population.

Males.

Fe- males.

Total.

Passenger Boats,

113

7

685

491

62

Cargo Boats,..

1

504

713

179

1,401

1,358 3,522 ¦ 3,244 6,766 7,355 4,326 11,681.

Steam Launches,

88

71

51

215

1,798 17 1,815

Lighters,

3

25

17

5

Harbour Boats,

58

236

156

198 43

50 478 691 1,977 1,629

55

533 3,606

Total...

173

1.

253

1,458 1,490 340

3,715 15,130 9,271 24,401

Fishing Boats,

789

94

496

Trading Junks,

3

32

752 246 103 72 124 33

2,480 9,361 6,478 15,839

264 2.120 384 2,504

Grand total.

965

95

781

2,282 1,860 462

6,459 26,611 16,133 42,744

Table XIV.

The NUMBER of EUROPEAN, AMERICAN and other NON-CHINESE CHILDREN between the AGES of 6 and 15 YEARS (Inclusive).

Hongkong

Villages.

Victoria.

British

Peak.

Total.

Kowloon.

6 Years,

7

9

**

33

10

>>

11

""

12

>>

13

""

14

Ι

15

NANNTW

10 14 00 00 14

Males.

Females.

Total.

Males.

Females.

Total.

Males.

Females.

Total.

Males.

Females.

Total.

Males.

Females.

Total.

44662

60 52

112

6255

117

52 58

72

110 52 124

476

4

6

10 23 18 41 87 76 163 11 21 12 33 90

==

71

161

3 9 10 14

75

143

:

4

12 27 39

83

167

5460 114

44 45

89

N -

2

12 17 29

80

148

7

11

18

56

108

61 52

113

:

3

3 11

25

72 69

141

45

95

16

58

119

-

N

54 44 4336

95

1

79

::

Total,..

16

15 31 547 501 1,048

1,048 20

1 6 10 16

13 9 22 56 45 101

24 44 131 140 271 698 |665 1,363

60 52 112

*

6 Years,

7

8

9

10

""

""

وو

"

11

""

12

""

13

""

14

15

י

276

Table XV.

The NUMBER of CHINESE CHILDREN (LAND POPULATION) between the AGES of 6 and 15 YEARS (Inclusive).

Males.

Females.

Total.

1,383

1,570

2.953

1.364

1,531

2,895

1,374

1,598

2.972

1,301

1.421

2,722

1,234

1,395

2,629

1,175

1,294

2,469

1,677

1.691

3,368

1,682

1,430

3,112

2,228

1.312

3,540

3,442

1,451

4,893

Total,......

16.860

14,693

31,553

44

Navy, Army,

Table XVI.

NAVAL and MILITARY ESTABLISHMENTS.

Total,

Table XVII.

CHINESE POPULATION of NEW KOWLOON.

Males.

4,298

.... 4,537

8,835

Females.

Total.

Kowloon City,

3,075

2,319

5,394

Other Villages in Kowloon City District,

2.939

1,488

4,427

Sham Shui Po,...

1,984

837

2,821

Kip Shek Haú,.

15

9

24

Kip Shek Hủi,

52

27

79

Kau Lung Tong,

372

331

703

Kaú Lung Tong West,

78

11

119

Kaú Lung Tsai,

586

175

761

Cheung Sha Wan,

760

71

831

Other Villages,

1,740

937

2,677

Total.........

11,601

6,235

17,836

HONGKONG.

No. 1907

30

CORRESPONDENCE ON THE SUBJECT OF THE SALARIES OF EUROPEAN CIVIL SERVANTS.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government.

18, BANK BUILDINGS,

12th May, 1906.

THE CLERK OF COUNCILS.

SIR,-I beg to give notice that I shall put the following question at the next meeting of the Legislative Council:-

Will the Government consider the advisability of granting to those Civil Servants who are drawing their pay on a Sterling basis the privilege of drawing half of their pay at the rate of 1/8 to the dollar or will the Government grant some other relief by way of compensation to such Civil Servants?

I have, etc.,

H. E. POLLOCK.

ANSWER TO QUESTION OF 12TH MAY, 1906.

His Excellency the Governor has communicated with the Secretary of State on the

matter.

14th May, 1906.

FROM GOVERNOR, HONGKONG, TO SECRETARY OF STATE.

I

The constant rise in silver is seriously affecting sterling salaries and the Legislative Council are pressing for action by the Government. I think some relief is necessary. propose as a temporary measure to pay the sterling salaries for the remainder of the year from the 1st May half at the current rate and half at the 1 shilling and 8 penny rate provided in the Estimates.

I likewise propose to pay the dollar salaries carrying exchange compensation as if the Exchange was the mean between current rate and 1 shilling and 8 pence. Kindly telegraph

sanction.

19th May, 1906.

FROM SECRETARY OF STATE TO GOVERNOR, HONGKONG.

Your telegram of 14th May. You can submit for consideration pr relief to prison warders, subordinate police officers and persons of similar but I am not prepared to consider any allowance to officers more highly pai

grant

status,

168

HONGKONG.

Confidential.

GOVERNMENT HOUSE, HONGKONG, 13th July, 1906.

MY LORD,-Referring to my telegram of the 14th and to Your Lordship's of the 19th May on the subject of relief to Government servants on account of the rise in silver seriously affecting sterling salaries, of which telegrams I enclose copies for convenience of reference, I have the honour to point out that prison warders, subordinate police officers and persons of similar salary and status with regard to whose relief Your Lordship is prepared to consider proposals are not the persons most affected by the present state of affairs. They are provided with Government quarters, fuel and light; whereas rent is a very heavy item of local expenditure on the part of persons for whom no such provision is made and a great proportion are also unmarried and live in messes, an arrangement which greatly reduces the necessary cost of living. It is the class above these such as schoolmasters and the junior European officers in the various departments that are most affected by the reduction in income result- ing from the fall of the dollar, though senior married officers with families and no private means also suffer, and of course all officers drawing sterling or exchange compensation salaries are affected to the extent of the proportion of their income expended locally.

2. In June, 1902. when the Sterling Salary Scheme now generally in force was approv- ed by Mr. CHAMBERLAIN the value of the dollar was 1/8. In June, 1906, salaries were paid at a rate of 2/14 the dollar. The dollar value of the sterling and exchange compensation salaries has thus fallen in 4 years to or to just over ths of its former value.

83

3. It is true that in some instances salaries have been raised beyond the amount approved in Mr. CHAMBERLAIN's despatch No. 171 of the 13th June, 1902, but this has been on account of increased work or responsibility and not on account of decline in the local value of the sterling salary or exchange compensation. It is also true that the value of so much of the salary as is sent home by officers on account of insurance policies, maintenance of relatives or education of children in England, or purchase of goods from England has not fallen in value, but it is equally true that if in 1902 it, was possible for an officer to devote th of his salary to these purposes and to make provision for the future it is not possible for him to so devote any sum at the present time except by a curtailment of local expenditure which becomes less and less possible as local prices rise. I would add that, though if trade were flourishing and the chances of successful competition with the European retail merchants enhanced this should bring about a fall in the price of European goods purchased locally, no such fall has practically taken place at present.

4. The strongest argument against payment of sterling or exchange compensation salaries at any rate other than the current one is that by the agreements which officers have expressly or impliedly entered into they have no legal claim to any other rate. Against this however must be set the fact that it is impossible to expect a satisfied Civil Service in which the spending power of officers' salaries is constantly being reduced through no fault of their own and that with a dissatisfied Civil Service the work of the Colony is not likely to be efficiently performed, whlie new recruits of the desired stamp will be deterred from joining by the complaints of those who are constantly realizing with greater resentment the unfavourable conditions under which they are now serving. The fact that the Colony raises its revenue and frames its estimate of expenditure in dollars and so apparently saves at the expense of its servants when the dollar goes above the rate of exchange at which the annual estimates are made adds to the dissatisfaction arising from the present condition of affairs.

5. The suggestion embodied in my telegram of the 14th May was based on a conviction that some action in the matter was necessary. The practical effect of the suggestion if it had been carried out was to make half the sterling salaries and half exchange compensation payable at a fixed rate rather lower than that current at the date of the Secretary of State's despatch of the 20th June, 1902—178 instead of 1/83-and half at the average rate of the preceding month. In other words sterling salaries and exchange compensation become half a dollar and half a sterling emolument. By the permanent adoption of the arrangement when the dollar was above 1/8 the Government's gain and officers' loss, and when it was below that amount the officers' gain and Government's loss, would be one half what it is with existing arrangements.

a fluctu

30 year

$4,250

a concrete case of a salary of £500 and assuming possible in the future he gold value of the dollar to be about as much as it has been in the last een 4/- and 1/6, the fluctuation of the salary in dollars would be from or about half its lowest amount.

569

6. Another scheme would be to fix a range within which sterling salaries and exchange compensation would be paid at the average rate of exchange of the preceding month and beyond which they would be paid at the rate of the limits of the range.

Thus if the range

was 1/8 to 2/- and the dollar was above 2/- they would be paid at 2/- and if the dollar was below 1/8 at 1/8. The objection to this system is that if the range is small, as it would be with the above limits, the scheme would practically be the same as converting all sterling salaries into dollar salaries for local payments and if large say 1/6 to 2/2 would not remove the present difficulties.

Taking the same concrete instance as before the salary in dollars would be liable to fluctuate from $5,000 to $6,000 or 1th cf its lowest amount with the smaller range suggested or from $4,616 to $6,660 or 4th of its lowest amount with the wider range.

7. A third scheme would be to fix upon some rate and if the dollar goes above it to pay the dollar equivalent at that rate and if it goes below it to pay at the average rate of the preceding month. If for instance a 2/- rate is fixed upon then when the dollar is above 2 officers drawing sterling salaries would receive 10 dollars to the £ and if below 2/- some greater number according to the exchange of the previous month. 2/- would be an arbitary but convenient rate to fix. It is considerably higher than the rate current at the time of the fixing of the sterling salaries by Mr. CHAMBERLAIN's despatch of the 13th June, 1906, but since that date officers have on the whole gained by the low exchange and they would again profit if the gold value of silver fell, while they would not lose if it rose. The practical effect of this scheme, if carried out, would be to convert sterling salaries into dollar salaries for local payments if the dollar value rose above 2/-.

The disadvantage of this scheme is the loss that would fall on the Treasury with a very low dollar; but a low dollar is generally good for trade and consequently when the dollar falls the revenue tends to rise and to be in a position to meet the additional expenditure dne to increase in the number of dollars paid on account of sterling salaries and home payments.

Taking the same concrete instance as before the salary in dollars would be liable to fluctuate from $5,000 to $6,666 or one third of its lower amount.

S. A fourth scheme would be to revert to dollar salaries entirely, fixing a rate for conver- sion of sterling with dollar salaries. Such a rate might for the reasons already given be 2/-. The advantage of this scheme would be to do away with all fluctuations in the local values of salaries. The objection to this scheme would be that if the dollar fell to say 1/6 or less the whole question first of exchange compensation and then of sterling salaries would come up

de noro.

9. Other schemes will doubtless suggest themselves to anyone considering this intricate subject, but they will probably only be variations of those I have set forth as possible means of solving this problem. On the whole I am now disposed to consider the third scheme by which, if the dollar goes above 2/-, payments will be made at that rate and if it goes below at the average rate of the preceding month is the one which offers the most permanent and equitable solution.

10. Your Lordship's telegram of the 19th May debars me from making any recom- mendation in this matter but I have nevertheless thought it advisable to write fully with regard to it, and I shall be greatly obliged if I could be furnished with an expression of Your Lordship's views that I can put before the Legislative Council of the Colony. I would add that the subject was brought before the meeting of the Executive Council on the 10th of May last, when Sir PAUL CHATER, the Senior Unofficial Member, asked me to appoint a Committee to enquire into it, a course which did not appear to me to be advisable. a question as to whether the Government would consider the advisability of granting relief to those Civil Servants who were drawing their pay on a sterling basis, put by Mr. H. E. POLLOCK, K.C., representative of the rate-payers in the Legislative Council, at their meeting

To

570

on the 17th May, I replied that I had communicated with Your Lordship in the matter. Mr. E. A. HEWETT, the member representing the Chamber of Commerce, has also asked questions on the subject which he has intimated to me he proposes to bring up again when the Estimates are under consideration in September next.

The Right Honourable

THE EARL OF ELGIN, K.G.,

&c., &C...

HONGKONG.

Confidential.

&c.

I have, etc.,

M. NATHAN.

DOWNING STREET,

24th August, 1906.

SIR,-I have the honour to acknowledge the receipt of your confidential despatch of the 13th ultimo in which you offer various suggestions for meeting the effect of the rise in silver on the sterling salaries of Government servants.

2. I have carefully considered your observations, and I regret that I am unable to satisfy myself that measures of relief are necessary or justifiable at the present time. In the matter of remittances to this country the Government servants in question are no longer affected by the rate of exchange, and a reduction in the dollar value of imported articles must presumably be only a matter of time if exchange continues to rule high. Moreover I would remind you of the statement in your despatch No. 72 of the 29th March that "house rent is the chief, if not the only, expense of living which is not lower in this Colony than in most others, where customs duties are levied and where wages are higher". I am bound to add that in my opinion the scale of pay of Government servants in Hongkong compares favourably with that obtaining in most other parts of the Empire.

3. I would observe, with reference to the suggestions made in your despatch under reply, that sterling salaries were introduced in order to get rid of the system of making payments in dollars at fictitious rates of exchange, and, even if I were convinced of the necessity of taking steps in the direction which you advocate, I could not agree to any arrangements whereby that system would be revived.

4. In answer to the 10th paragraph of your despatch I have to say that I have no ob- jection to your communicating the present despatch to the Unofficial Members of the Legislative Council.

Governor

SIR M. NATHAN, K.C.M.G.,

&c., So, &c.

I have, &c.,

ELGIN.

Paragraph 12 of Despatch of 5th October, 1906, to the Secretary of State.

12. There are two other matters which were discussed in the meeting of Council held on 27th September to which I may here briefly refer. The Hon. Mr. HEWETT in the course of some remarks on the subject suggested that I should appoint a small Committee to consi- der the whole question of the salaries of Civil Servants. I informed the Council that I was not prepared to adopt this suggestion but that I would place the Hon. Member's remarks before Your Lordship.

A

+

י

T

,

571

Paragraph 4 of Despatch of 26th November, 1906, from Secretary of State.

4. In paragraph 12 of your despatch you allude to a suggestion made in the Legislative Council by Mr. HEWETT that a Committee should be appointed to consider the question of the salaries paid to Civil Servants in Hongkong. I have already expressed my views on the question of salaries in the despatch of which the substance has been communicated to the Council and I regret that I am unable to reconsider my decision. In any case the fact that it spite of economy in Public Works the estimated revenue for 1907 barely covers the estim- ated expenditure is sufficient reason against any general increase of salaries. In these cir- cumstances I am of opinion that no useful purpose would be served by the adoption of Mr. HEWETT's suggestion.

HONGKONG.

No. 37.

GOVERNMENT HOUSE. HONGKONG, 8th March, 1907.

MY LORD,-In accordance with paragraph No. 222 of the Rules and Regula- tions of H. M.'s Colonial Service, I have the honour to transmit copies of two memorials on the subject of the salaries of officers of this Government in relation to the exchange value of the gold or gold equivalent in which they are paid. The first memorial, addressed to me for transmission to Your Lordship is signed by Sir Enclosure 1. F. T. PIGGOTT, Chief Justice, by Sir H. S. BERKELEY, who has since resigned from the Colonial Service, and by Mr. S. T. DUNN, Superintendent of the Botanical and Forestry Department. It purports also to present the views of Mr. H. R. PHELIPS, the Local Auditor, and of the late Harbour Master. The second memorial, also Enclosure 2, addressed to me for similar transmission in the event of my being satisfied of the general correctness of the figures it contains, is signed by the remaining heads of departments with the exception of the Colonial Secretary and of the Director of the Observatory, who is about to retire from the Service; it is also signed by the assistant heads in some of the principal offices. In forwarding it Mr. H. Ĥ. J. GOMPERTZ, Acting Attorney General, stated that no names of officers in posts below the 2nd class had been appended to it because it was thought undesirable to multiply signatures but that the signatories claimed to speak for all ranks of the Government Service.

*

3.

I also forward in duplicate a letter on the same subject addressed to Your Enclosure Lordship by Mr. A. G. WISE, Puisne Judge, who gives his reasons for not signing either of the memorials referred to above.

I further transmit a copy of a petition addressed to me through the Colonial Enclosure 4. Secretary which, with minor alterations to make it applicable to different depart- ments, has been signed by practically all the European Officers of the Medical, Sanitary and Public Works Departments. Slightly different petitions of which Enclosures copies are annexed have been submitted by the Masters of Queen's College, by the 56 6. 7 European members of the Harbour and Prison Departments and by the European contingent of the Police Force.

and S.

Two letters, one dated the 24th December and the other the 26th February, * Enclosures both forwarded at the request of Sir FRANCIS PIGGOTT form the last enclosures to 9 and 10. this despatch.

2. It will be seen that except in the Post Office and in the Education Depart- ment, whose members have recently received increases in salary, the complaint of the insufficiency of emoluments in the existing circumstance of exchange is universal throughout the European officers of the Hongkong Government.

3. The first of the memorials referred to above embodies some inaccuracies. Experience has not shown that "the dollar has risen more than 6d. in 18 months" nor that "the utmost concession a few tradesmen have made is a reduction of 5 per cent. in their prices". The sterling equivalent of the dollar has not been below

بود

Not printed.

572

1/10 since the 11th October, 1904, and has never risen to 2/4. Several important firms have reduced their prices between 10 and 20 per cent. since that late. The statement that "so far as European tradesmen are concerned the price of goods has for long been at the rate of one dollar to one shilling charged in. England" is not applicable to all goods nor is it correct to lay down that customs duties in other Colonies "at most add 10 per cent. to the price." Though $200 a month may be the mean rent of houses on the Peak for officials in the position of the signatories of the first memorial (of whom one however is provided with Government quarters) it is certainly not the average rent of houses occupied by Government officers. The statement that "landlords do not find house property a profitable investment" put forward to show that "it is hardly possible to anticipate any reduction of rent is incredible; I am informed also that there has during the last year been a tendency of rents of houses in the Peak and Upper Levels of Victoria to fall slightly. The statement that servants' wages are "roughly no less than $100 a month, including 4 chair coolies" does certainly not apply, as it is said to do, to "all classes of officers". Subordinate officers do not keep 4 chair coolies and conveyance allowance of $15 to $40 is given to officers whose duties require them to make use of rickshas or chairs.

In spite of these inaccuracies which it has been my duty to point out there is much in the memorial worthy of Your Lordship's consideration and I would draw special attention to its 11th paragraph.

4. The second memorial puts the case of officers on the whole moderately and correctly, except that in my opinion Table A which is intended to show that a head of a junior department requires to live reasonably $9,924 or, say at $9 to the £, £1,100 per annum and a junior officer $4,290 or say £475 per annum does, as secins to have been anticipated by the memorialists in para. 8 of the document, prove some- what too much. But I am satisfied as to the general accuracy of the statements and figures in Tables B and C and that it is not overstating the case to say that the cost in dollars of those items of living which are paid for on a silver basis has gone up at least 20 per cent. since 1902 when the Sterling Salary Scheme was intro- duced and during which year the average gold value of the dollar was 1/8. factor which has undoubtedly contributed to this rise is the increasing wealth of the community, as evidenced by the growth in the revenue of the Colony, from $4,901,074 in 1902 to an amount estimated at $6,448,025 for 1907, no fresh taxation having been imposed to account for this increase of about 30 per cent.

A

5. The remaining petitions call for little comment. That submitted by the Medical Department does not gain force by being signed by the entire staff of nursing sisters to whom much that is contained in it does not apply. Though the Police are undoubtedly prejudicially affected by receiving a smaller number of dollars now than they did formerly it must be borne in mind that they get considerable extra silver allowances and free quarters, fuel, light, uniform and passages home and out again for themselves and families; they are thus better off than other European public officers in the Colony.

6. From a consideration of the memorials and petitions and of such other information bearing on the matter as I have been able to collect I have come to the conclusion that the case for the memorialists and petitioners can succinctly and fairly be put in the following terms:-

In the last five years the number of dollars received on account of sterling and exchange compensation salaries has been reduced 25 per cent.

In the same time dollar payments which make up about 3rds the expenditure of senior and some- what more of that of junior officers have increased by rise of prices at least 20 per cent. while sterling payments which account for 3rd or less of the total have decreased by not more than 10 per cent.

7. The purchasing power of an official's sterling salary according to the above statement is in 1907 :— (3 × + 1 × }}) or 67.5% of what it was in 1902.

1

:-

Neglecting rise in prices for local produce and labour as being probably independent in its cause of the alteration in the gold value of the dollar the proportion of purchasing power of sterling salaries in 1907 to what it was in 1902 resulting solely from this alteration is (+ 1.) or 77.5 %.

..

573

On similar lines the proportion of the purchasing power of sterling salaries in March 1907 to what it was in November 1905 due solely to the alteration in the value of the dollar from th to 4th of a £ is less than (+× } }) or 93 %.

8. From whatever point of view these figures are considered it cannot be questioned that there has been a heavy fall in the purchasing power of sterling salaries in the last few years and it could scarcely be expected that this fall should be without its effect on the efficiency of the Service generally. Apart from general dissatisfaction several cases have already occurred in which good men have been lost to the Colony by the unattractiveness of the present outlook.

9. Since the memorials above discussed were submitted, I have received despatch No. 236 of the 26th November, 1906, in the 4th paragraph of which Your Lord- ship regrets being unable to reconsider the decision that measures of relief were unjustifiable and unnecessary at the present time and goes on to state that "in any case the fact that in spite of economy of Public Works the estimated revenue for 1907 barely covers the estimated expenditure is sufficient reason against any general increase in salaries." In this connection I would point out that the Estimates were drawn up on the basis of a 2/- dollar and that the current rate is now over 28. 2d. so that unless this rate falls appreciably or compensation is given for its high level, the amount that will be expended on sterling salaries in the year will fall considerably short of the estimate.

10. Subsequent to the above quoted despatch I understand that Your Lord- ship on the 8th January last asked of the Governor of the Straits Settlements what solution of the salaries question would be applicable to Hongkong as well as to the Straits Settlements and Federated Malay States. Sir JOHN ANDERSON has been good enough to favour me with a copy of the despatch he wrote in reply-- No. 60 dated the 31st January, 1907,-the 11th paragraph of which suggests that salaries in Hongkong should be paid at the rate of the day so long as it does not exceed 2/2 and that if the rate exceeds 2/2 the salary should have a percentage added to it equivalent to 1/48th of the excess of the rate over 2/-.

For simplicity it is suggested that in place of the above an additional cent should be given on every dollar for every. that the dollar rises above 2/-. With nine dollars to the pound sterling, or the dollar at rather more than 2/24d. as at present, Sir JoHN ANDERSON's scheme would mean an immediate addition of 5% to salaries. This would not remove present grounds of complaint.

11. A more acceptable scheme would be if an additional cent were given on evrey dollar for every 4d. that the dollar rises above 2/-. With the dollar at 2/2 the addition would then be 10%. If it went to 2/6 the addition would be 24% which might be laid down as a maximum instead of the 12% suggested by Sir JOHN ANDERSON. The actual effect of the scheme is practically to pay salaries at a fictitious rate of 2/- the dollar. On the whole the scheme suggested in paragraph 7 of my confidential despatch of the 13th July, 1906, appears simpler.

12. I regret the delay, due to my recent illness and absence and to the compli- cated nature of the question, in forwarding the memorials and petitions submitted to me in October and November of last year, and I would urge on Your Lordship the necessity for some early action being taken in the matter with which they deal.

I have, etc.,

M. NATHAN.

The Right Honourable

THE EARL OF ELGIN, K.G.,

&c.,

&c.,

&c.

To His Excellency

Sir MATTHEW NATHAN, K.C.M.G.

571

Enclosure 1.

We the undersigned Heads of Departments who are paid on a sterling basis beg respect- fully to submit to Your Excellency the following remarks on the subject of Exchange Com- pensation and the question of salaries generally and to beg Your Excellency to forward the same to the Right Honourable the Secretary of State for the Colonies, with a request that he may be pleased to re-consider his decision to take no action in the matter.

2. In 1898, a meeting of Heads and Assistant Heads of Departments was held to make representations to the Secretary of State on the subject of salaries generally on account of the fall of Exchange. We have adopted

We have adopted a similar course on the present occasion in order to make representations on a subject which not only affects ourselves and our wives and families, but also the junior officials in our several Departments.

3. We deeply regret the Secretary of State's decision to take no action in the matter, as we anticipated that he would sympathise on a subject which affects nearly all the Civil Servants of the Colony, reducing their salaries by a considerable proportion while there is a probability of a still larger reduction in the future. We confidently believe that on con- sidering the facts which we have the honour to lay before Your Excellency, the Secretary of State will recognize the justice of our appeal.

4. The first point on which we desire to lay stress is the following:-

The position of officers paid on a silver or on a sterling basis is identical so far as salaries are concerned: both suffer alike from the rise in silver. Both the silver and sterling systems of payment are based on a fictitious value of the dollar; with the result that the amounts paid for nearly two years as salaries have been reduced, though no change whatever in the price of commodities or in the cost of living has taken place.

a. The principle on which exchange compensation is granted to officers on a silver basis is that they are paid the difference between the average rate of exchange for the month and a 3/~ dollar.

The conversion from a silver to a sterling basis was effected by turning the dollar salary into sterling at the rate of 3/- to the dollar: small odd sums being omitted.

The annexed Table (4) shows that in the case of the officers therein mentioned the monthly payments under the old and new systems are practically identical.

b. The dollar had remained at the rate 4/2 till 1874, after which date it steadily declined, as shewn on the annexed Table (B). The relief which has been granted to Civil Servants at different times in conse- quence of the decline in value of the local currency is as follows:—

I. In 1882, family remittances were granted to the extent of half the officer's salary, the dollar having fallen to 3/7.

II. In 1890, salaries were re-adjusted. At this period the value of the dollar was, for 1887-1888, 3/1; for 1889, 3/2 : 1890, 3/5 ; and for 1891, 3/1.

III. In 1894, Exchange Compensation was granted on half salary, the dollar having fallen to 2/-. One year's arrears were also granted.

IV. In 1901, Exchange Compensation was extended to the whole salary: the dollar shewing a tendency to decline further, coming down to 1/11 in 1897, 1898 and 1899.

c. Exchange Compensation was calculated on the basis of a 3/- dollar. The reasons for the adoption of this rate instead of 4/2 must we presume have been, first, that in the opinion of the experts a return of the dollar to 4/2 was improbable: secondly, that from 1885 to 1891 (i.e., about the time when the question of re-adjustment of salaries was

+

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675

under consideration) its value seems to have settled in the neighbour- hood of 31-: thirdly, that the opinion of the experts probably was that, there being still a marked downward tendency in the silver market, it was hardly likely that the dollar would recover beyond this figure. d. Sterling salaries were adopted in 1904 on the basis of the 3/- dollar. It was optional for existing officers, but the general condition being decidedly unfavourable, not more than 3 or 4 officers accepted them. The dollar continued to fall, reaching the lowest point of 1/63 on 1st

December, 1902. The lowest yearly average was reached in the 1902 and 1903, when it was 1/8.

years

e. Meanwhile it was inevitable that the price of commodities and the cost of living should rise. It is an undoubted fact that the rate of wages, rent, and of all household goods rose as the dollar fell, and were deter- mined on the basis of a 1/8 dollar. This rate has been practically maintained up to the present day.

-

Attached to the Memorial addressed to the Secretary of State by the Heads and Assistant Heads of Departments in (or about) 1898, will be found a comparative statement of the prices ruling for rents and commodities between that time and the time when the dollar was at 4/2. The experience of those who have long been resident in the Colony is that there has been a further rise in prices consequent on the continued fall of the dollar to 1/8.

. It therefore appears that the conversion from silver to sterling on a 3/- dollar basis was made at a time when a 3/- dollar had become a thing of the past when experience had shewn that a 1/8 dollar was possible and even probable, and when the price of commodities had adjusted itself to this low rate:-The sterling salaries therefore, as well as the adjustment of the silver salaries, are based on a value of the dollar, which has no longer any place in commercial transactions: and they have therefore no longer any recognised relation to the cost of living.

5. The Secretary of State in his despatch says that "a reduction in the dollar value, of imported articles must presumably be only a matter of time if exchange continues to rule high". We venture with great respect to point out that, although in the opinion of the experts it is probable that the dollar may rise to 2/6, there is no certainty of the continuance of this high rate. The price of silver is affected by so many considerations which it is im- possible to foresce, that no business transactions could be with safety based on the assump- tion of a continued high rate. In the meantime the present high prices of commodities must still prevail and the hardship from which officers are suffering will be continued indefinitely. Looking at the question from the point of view of the tradesman the presump- tion, we venture to think, cannot be supported. For in the first place no change could be expected in the price of goods until the stocks in hand, paid for when the dollar was low, has been exhausted. Secondly, the fluctuations in exchange have been so violent, the recent rise in the dollar has been so sudden, that there is no security against an equally sudden fall, and tradesmen would be bound, in order to protect themselves against a fall, to fix their prices for new goods on the low dollar basis. The uncertainty of com- mercial dealings, caused by the rapid fluctuations of the dollar, can best be tested by a simple illustration.

Case 1. If a tradesman order £100 worth of goods when the exchange is at 2/6,

and sends a draft with the order he will pay $800.

If he pays by Bill of Exchange drawn on him at sight and the dollar has meanwhile fallen to 2/-, he will pay $1,000.

Case 2. If for the same goods the rate is 2/6 at the date of payment he will pay $800. If he proposes to make $200 profit he will ultimately receive $1,000. But if before he sells the goods the rate has fallen to 2/-, if he maintains his prices, the $1,000 will only represent £100, and his intended profit will be lost.

Experience shows that although the dollar has risen more than 6d. in 18 months, the utmost concession that a few tradesmen have made is a reduction of 5% on their prices.

376

The Government itself acts on this principle in the matter of advances to Civil Servants made by the Secretary of State. Repayment is made by monthly instalments calculated at the rate current at the time the advance is made, irrespective of any subsequent rise in exchange.

M

6. Your Excellency has said that "house rent is the chief if not the only expense of living which is not lower in this Colony than in most others, where customs duties are levied and where wages are higher "-and the Secretary of State has added that "the scale of pay of Government Servants in Hongkong compares favourably with that obtaining in most other parts of the Empire with great respect we submit that is is not possible to compare either the price of goods or the amount of salary in a Colony where the currency fluctuates in value with the price of goods or amount of salary in other Colonies where there are no exchange fluctuations. For even if the comparison were favourable when the dollar is at 1/8, it has ceased to be favourable when the dollar is at 2/25. We submit that the only way of stating the case is that the price paid for goods to-day in Hongkong does not compare favourably with the price paid for goods 2 years ago; because the purchasing value of the salaries paid to Civil Servants to-day compares very unfavourably with the value of those paid 2 years ago. But even taking the dollar at 1/8 both rent and the price of commodities in Hongkong are considerably higher than that in other Colonies, of which some of us have had experience. Hongkong is, probably, the dearest Crown Colony in the Empire, and this even with the dollar at 1/8. There are many things which tend to make it so:-the expenses of living are far higher than in any other Colony and they are enormously increased by many causes: the chief of which is the rapid deterioration owing to the climate of clothes, books and stores. So far as European tradesmen are concerned the price of goods has for long been at the rate of one dollar to one shilling charged in England, and there is no sign of any alteration being made in this respect. This excessive scale of profit is accounted for in part by high rents and rapid deterioration of goods. It compares unfavourably with prices in other Colonies within our experience: even where customs duties are charged, which at most add 10% to the price. High rent is the keynote of the situation, and it is certain that if rents are high everything else will be high in proportion. The considerable rise in wages paid to Chinese servants is in fact partly due to the enhanced rents which they themselves have to pay for their families.

It is we think advisable that the Secretary of State should realize what rents are paid in the Colony. Rents for medium-sized houses, decently situated, vary between $180 to $250 a month. Considering this from the point of view of sterling, with the dollar at 1/8: taking a mean rent of $200 a month (apart from rates), the rent is £16.13.4 a month or £200 per annum. With the dollar at 2/24 (the rate at which salaries were paid this month) the rent is £22.1 8 a month or £265 per annum. Considering the question from the silver point of view with the dollar at 1/8, the mean salary including exchange compensation of first class appointments may be put at $1,000 a month; but with the dollar at 2/23 such a salary is reduced to $755 a month.

It will thus be seen that rents in Hongkong are higher than those paid in England ; and far exceed the recognised proportion which rent should bear to income.

But putting this on one side, whichever way it is looked at, either the increasing sterling rent, or the diminishing currency salary, the question of house rent is not merely the principal item of expenditure affected by the exchange, but is such an important one that even if it stood alone it would, we respectfully submit, be sufficient warrant for the relief which we seek. In the case of second class appointments, the item for rent can hardly be diminished, and it therefore bears a disastrous proportion to the officers' salaries. It is hardly possible to anticipate any reduction of rent, for the cost of building and of continuous repairs is such that even at the present high rents landlords do not find house property a profitable invest- Similarly with regard to the rates: the monthly rate for a house rented at $200 is

ment.

$26-

this at 1/8 in sterling is £2 3s. 4d.

at 2/2 it is £2 17s. 5d.

The Government has not reduced the dollar value of the rates in consequence of the high rate of exchange, nor would it be possible for it to do so. There are a number of smaller items the charges in respect of which always remain constant, and are not affected by the rate of the dollar; such as doctors' charges, servants' wages, coolie hire, gas, tram ticket, chair hire. In all these, and some others of a simllar nature, the actual cost as expressed in £ s.

d. has risen owing to the rise in the dollar, e.g., the quarterly tram ticket on

!

577

the tram line is $30: this at 1/8 is in sterling £2.10s. at 2/23 it is £3 6s. 3d.: or to take so domestic a matter as the price of coals (as important an item in housekeeping as it is in England) the coolie hire alone for carrying up a ton of coals to the Peak is $4-this, at 1/8, is in sterling 6s. 8d., at 2/24 is 8s. 10d.

The wages of a Chinese Boy less than 10 years ago was $12 a month at the rate of exchange then ruling, this represented in sterling at 2/-, £1.4s. The wages now are $16 a month, or at 2/24, £1.158.4d.

All other wages have risen in proportion.

Further, the tendency in every item in which the Chinese are concerned is to rise in price irrespective of the value of the dollar. The Chinese servants are perpetually struggling for an advance of wages, and in the too frequent case of change of servants it is only with the greatest difficulty that new servants can be engaged at the rate paid to their predecessors. Wages are an important item being roughly not less than $100 a month, including 4 chair coolies, for all classes of officers. There can be little doubt that the smaller items alluded to above together make a monthly total equivalent in amount to the rent.

7. The statements which we have made as to the cost of living will we are confident be borne out by the Unofficial Members of the Council, and also by any of the numerous old residents of Hongkong now in England, should the Secretary of State be pleased to consult thein.

8. The Secretary of State has pointed out that in the matter of remittances the Civil Servants are no longer affected by the rate of exchange. This is undoubtedly true; but on the other hand we would point out, first, that there are many officers who are permanent residents of the Colony, whose remittances home are necessarily far more limited than those whose home is in England: and secondly, that with regard to all officers. the large reduction in salaries has considerably reduced the amount available for remittances: or, to take the converse case, where the amount remitted is, as it often must be, a constant quantity, the amount available for living in the Colony is in its turn constantly diminishing.

9. In urging the Secretary of State to re-consider his decision we greatly rely on the action which the Colonial Office has sanctioned in the past to redress similar hardships. On four separate occasions owing to the fluctuation of the dollar the Secretary of State has sanctioned the grant of relief by the Government to its officers. The change from silver to sterling was made with a similar object in view. We submit with respect and confidence that in doing this the Secretary of State has recognised that it is the duty of a Government to mitigate the hardships caused by the uncertain course of exchange, and to do what it can to eliminate the element of uncertainty from its officers' salaries, which is so prejudicial from every point of view. The hardship from which civil servants are now suffering is as acute as on any previous occasion when measures of redress have been adopted. But it differs in its nature from that which existed on the previous occasions in one important particular, and, owing to the facts which have been dwelt on in the preceding paragraphs, needs, we submit, different treatment.

The consequences of a fall in the value of the currency may be in part redressed by the grant of family remittances at its assumed normal value: it may also be partially redressed by exchange compensation based on the principle of bringing the dollar back to this value. But neither of these remedies is fitted to meet satisfactorily the converse case of a hardship created by a rise in the value of the currency. The case has this special feature that measures of relief occasion no extra cost to the Colony, for the annual estimates are necessarily based on the lowest probable rate of exchange, and the rise in the dollar saves the Colony so much on the Estimates, and this moreover at a time when the Government is profiting by the higher rate in respect of remittances to England.

We submit that salaries must bear some definite relation to the cost of living in the Colony in which they are paid, and that they should not be subject to fluctuation:-in the same way pensions to officers in a gold country should be paid in gold, or they also will be subject to fluctuation. What the proper system of payment of salaries to civil servants should be in order to satisfy these two essential conditions, it is not for us at the present moment to suggest, but we submit that the defects in the existing system which the recent fluctuations in silver have revealed are so serious that they can only be met satisfactorily by a revision of the scheme of salaries,

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578

The hardship from which the Civil Service is suffering is acute, and we are confident that the Government will act now as it has acted in the past, and take the necessary ineasures to meet the loss which has already been suffered, and to restore equilibrium for the future. We cannot regard a further rise in silver, and consequent further depreciation of salaries with any feelings but those of grave anxiety.

10. In justification of the statement made in the foregoing paragraphs that the basis of all expenditure in the Colony is a 1/8 dollar, we venture to draw attention to the fact that the Estimates for the years 1904, 1905 and 1906 were framed on this rate. The result has been

that the Government has made large savings out of the salaries of its servants.

In 1905 this saving amounted to about $260,000, and for this year it will probably amount to $350,000.

11. It is often said that the question of salary is a mere matter of contract: and that having accepted it, the rough as well as the smooth must be taken without complaint. We submit that there is nothing in the remotest degree resembling a free contract in the case of an officer in the Colonial Service who is offered promotion. The true relation between an officer in the Colonial Civil Service and the Secretary of State as representing the Crown seems to us with respect to be rather this:-The officer gives his whole time and energies to the Service. The Secretary of State is justified in insisting on this to the utmost, and when the officer is no longer capable, through age or ill health, of rendering these services, he must go. On the other hand the officer relies on the Secretary of State to see that the salary is sufficient for the needs of the office; and as circumstances arise over which the officer has no control which create violent fluctuations in the salary, he is justified in looking to the Secretary of State to re-adjust it, and put it upon a more stable footing. It may be said that there is no such condition in the contract: the numerous cases in which adjustments have been inade, we submit, fully warrant its being considered as incorporated therein. Looking at the matter from a different point of view, it cannot be for the good of the public service that its servants should be subjected to the inconvenience, and in many cases, the grievous hardship of having their monthly stipend considerably reduced.

12. In conclusion we submit with respect and confidence that the time has arrived when the whole question of the salaries in Hongkong should again be revised as in 1890. Such a revision is we submit inevitable owing to the rapid and violent fluctuations of exchange which were not foreseen when the present scale of salaries was fixed and owing to many other circumstances, all tending to an increase in the cost of living: and further because the scale is based on a rate of exchange which has never since been approached, and which is now out of proportion to the rate by which all expenses in the Colony are governed.

We believe that a new scale which would be acceptable to the Secretary of State could be arrived at by a Commission composed entirely of unofficials, or on which the unofficials were in a majority. We should leave our case with complete confidence in their hands be- cause they are familiar with the conditions of life in the Colony and also with what is done by commercial firms under like circumstances.

F. T. PIGGOTT,

Chief Justice.

HENRY S. BERKELEY,

Attorney General.

S. T. Dunn,

Superintendent, Botanical and Forestry Department.

Mr. H. R. PHELIPS, Local Auditor, at present absent from the Colony, has authorised me to say that he joins in this memorial."

4

F. T. PIGGOTT.

The late Captain BARNES-LAWRENCE, R.N., Harbour Master, participated in the drafting of this memorial.

Hongkong, 30th October, 1906.

F. T. PIGGOTT.

579

Table A.

Sterling Salary.

@ 1s. 8d. @@ 2s. Od. (a 28. 2d.

@@ 2s. 6d.

Chief Justice

£2,000

$24,000

$20,000

$18,461.54

$16,000

Colonial Secretary.

1,600

19,200

16,000

14,769.23

12,800

Puisne Judge (next ap-

pointment)

1,300

15,600

13,000

12,000.00

10,400

Harbour Master

900

10,800

9,000

8,307.69 :

7.200

Dollar Salary.

Ex. Comp. @ 18.

Total.

Ex. Comp.

@ 2;-.

Total.

Ex. Comp. @ 22.

Total.

Ex. Comp. @ 216.

Total.

Chief Justice

$ 13.500 $10.800

$ 24,300

$ 6,750

Colonial Secretary

10.800

8,640

19,440

5,400

$ 20,250

16,200

$ 5.192.37

4,153.89 14.958.99

$18,692.37

$ 2,700

$ 16,200

2,160

12.960

Puisne Judge

8,400

6.720

15,120

4.200

12,600

3.230.SI

11,630.81

1,689

10,080

Harbour Master

6,000

4.800

10,800

8.000

9,000

2.307.72

8,307.72

1.200

7,200

Table B.

Average rates of Exchange, demand on London :--

1874,

.4/1

1890,

3/5

1875,.....

.4/-

1891,.

3/1

1876,

4/2

1892,..

2/9

1877,...

3/11

1893,...

2/3

1878,

.3/10

1894..

.2/-

1879.

.3/10

1895,..

2/1

1880....

3/8

1896,..

1881

.3/9

1897

+

"

1882,

..3/7

1898.

1883..

..3/9

1899,.

1884,

.3/7

1900,.

1885,..

.3/4

1901,.

*

1886,:

.3/4

1902,.

2/1

1/11

1/11

1/11 2-

1/11

1/8

1887

..3/1

1903,

1/8

1888,

.3/1

1904..

1/10

1889,

.3/2

1905,.

1/11

Enclosure 2.

Minute of 7th November, 1906. from Mr. Gompertz.

I have been asked by the signatories thereof to forward to you the accompanying Memorial with Tables annexed, and to request that you will be good enough to lay it before His Excellency the Governor for his favourable consideration. I may state that no names of officers in posts below the 2nd Class have been obtained because we thought it undesir- able to multiply signatures.

Wǝ claim however to speak for all ranks of the Government Service.

580

YOUR EXCELLENCY.

HONGKONG, November, 1906.

With reference to the reply of the Secretary of State to your Despatch on the subject of salaries of Public Servants, we the undersigned Heads and Assistant Heads of Departments, have the honour to lay certain figures before you, in support of our contention that our present remuneration is inadequate. We ask that Your Excellency will scrutinize these figures (whether by the aid of a Commission composed of the unofficial Members of Council, or as otherwise may seem best to you) and that then, if satisfied as to their general correct- ness, you will forward them, together with such comment as may suggest itself to you, to the Secretary of State.

すっ

2. While we believe that the facts and figures given in the Tables attached will speak for themselves, some general explanation of our present position is necessary, as well as of the principle upon which our facts were selected.

3. We submit that in the Public Service, there can be but one just standard by which to determine what is or what is not an adequate recompense for the services performed. This standard is based upon the cost of the manner of living proper to the class of persons who render those services, and is calculated to maintain them in a reasonable degree of comfort. Our contention is, that our remuneration falls below this standard, and that it should therefore be increased.

4. The justice of this argument, that our salaries must be suited to the cost of living of the day, has on several occasions been recognized by the Secretary of State. To mention two only, in 1894 what was known as "half compensation", and in 1901 "double com- pensation", were given to us. On both these occasions the ostensible reason for the measure of relief was that the value of the dollar had fallen. But the true reason can only be, that the falling dollar had disturbed the conditions of living to our detriment. Had it been otherwise, had we been unable to shew, not only that the circumstances had changed but also that the change had been prejudicial to us, we should have been totally unable to establish a case.

5. Our present position is no less serious; while the fact that it is attended by a rising instead of a falling dollar seems to prove, not that our difficulties are imaginary, but that the price of silver is not sole factor to be considered in calculating the cost of living.

6. To determine the cost of living of so heterogeneous a body as the Hongkong Civil Service, and thence to deduce a fair rate of emolument, would be a task of great difficulty. It might be done thoroughly by a Commission with unlimited time at its disposal: any such thorough treatment is impossible for us. But as we feel that facts alone and not theories can prove our case, we have endeavoured to select two typical instances, and to deal with them in a concrete way. If our arguments hold good for them, it will follow naturally that pro- portionate readjustments should be general throughout the Service.

7. In making our selection of typical cases we were impressed by the fact, that the additional cost of a married life is far heavier, in proportion to that of a single man, here than at home. It is unnecessary to labour this point-house rent and steamer fares alone would prove it.

prove it. It seems inevitable therefore that our typical cases should be married men. It follows that they should also be men whose marriage could not have been considered by the Government as an act of imprudence, for the consequences of which they were them- selves alone to blame. Further, our examples had to be chosen from different grades of the Service. Again, as the up-bringing of children is an ordinary consequence of marriage, we took for our typical cases officers on their highest increment, on the supposition that they had married on first reaching their present appointments; and we have supposed that they have each a family of three young children, the increasing cost of whose later education may be left to the future and subsequent promotion. The types selected by us to answer all these conditions were (A) the Head of a Junior Department on a salary of $5,400 with compensation, and (B) a subordinate officer on a salary of £345.

8. Table A gives what we consider to be a reasonable rate of living for these two Officers, together with explanatory notes. It also gives the salaries drawn by them at the present rate of exchange. And if it is alleged in reply that we have endeavoured to prove too much that were the difference between the necessary and the actual as great as we represent, open crises must have occurred as they have not done to that we reply, they have been staved off, but in many cases by the most unsatisfactory devices: wives and

ד.

*

581

children have been sent home, with no prospect of return: many of us have given up our houses and sold our belongings, and are living in hotels and boarding-houses and messes like neither married men nor bachelors, and some of us have been compelled to abandon our policies on our lives, as we can prove to Your Excellency.

9. Were there any real hope for an early change for the better we might have continued to endure in silence, as we have done for the past several years. But we know only too well that the cost of living is on the increase, and that the higher dollar has brought us no relief. We give in Table B some comparative figures to prove that we do not exaggerate.

10. The Secretary of State has informed Your Excellency that we are better paid than the Public Servants of most other Colonies-a statement that we are not in a position to controvert, as we have not the information at our disposal that might enable us to do so. Our contention is less ambitious, namely to prove that out pay is insufficient. There are however certain items in our expenses which are peculiar to the Colony, as compared with others in the tropics, which are:-coal, excessive house-rent and the great cost of clothing due both to the need of providing against very hot and very cold weather, and also to the destruction caused by the damp. Steamer fares too are higher from here to England that from almost every other Crown Colony.

11. Table C shews that the enormous rents charged, so far from falling with the rise of silver, have greatly increased when reckoned in that metal, and enormously increased when reckoned in sterling.

12. We have laid great stress on the increasing dollar prices, because therein lies the key to our position. Under no possible circumstances could we gain by the rise of the dollar, since being paid in sterling it takes the same proportion of our salaries to make our gold purchases, whether silver is high or low. At the best, if silver prices at once and automatically adjusted themselves to the different exchanges we should be as well though no better off. But as we have shewn, silver prices so far from shewing a tendency to so adjust themselves, even slowly, are steadily on the rise.

13. Table D shews the average rate of exchange during recent years.

14. In the full confidence that we shall have Your Excellency's sympathy and assistance,

We have the honour to be,

Your Excellency's most obedient servants,

H. H. J. GOMPERTZ, Attorney General.

*

A. M. THOMSON, Colonial Treasurer.

W. CHATHAM, Director of Public Works.

J. M. ATKINSON, Principal Civil Medical Officer.

A. W. BREWIN, Registrar General.

F. J. BADELEY, Captain Superintendent of Police.

L. A. M. JOHNSTON, Postmaster General.

A. SETH, Registrar, Supreme Court.

G. H. WAKEMAN, Land Officer.

EDWARD A. IRVING, Inspector of Schools.

F. A. HAZELAND, Police Magistrate.

G. H. BATESON WRIGHT, Headmaster, Queen's College.

A. G. M. FLETCHER, Asst. Colonial Secretary.

P. N. H. JONES, Assistant Director of Public Works.

582

Table A.

Estimated necessary income at present prices of (A) a Head of a Junior Department (Salary $5,400 per annum with double compensation @ 2/3=$600 per mensem) and (B) a Junior Officer on a salary of £345 per annum (at 2/3=$255.56 per mensem).

EXPENSES PER MENSEM.

A

B

Percentage of Total.

Percentage

of Total.

(1.) Saving on account of passages home and. back, $ 60

7.3

$ 35

9.8

(2.) Insurance,

90

20

(3.) Rent and taxes,

150

18.1

75

21.1

(4.) Depreciation and upkeep of furniture,

20

5

(5.) Doctor,

10

(6.) Dentist,

10

5

(7.) Chemist,.

7

(8.) Transport (trams, chairs and riekshas),.

20

10

(9.) Compradore,.

135 }

85

20.5

23.9

(10.) Fresh milk,

35-

11.) Clothes and boots,

90

40

(12.) Light and fuel,.

20

10

(13.) Governess or school fees,

25

12

(14.) Servants,

85

25

(15.) Washing,

5

5

(16.) Wines, ærated waters, ice and tobacco,.

15

8

(17.) Recreation and charities,

25

10

(18.) Petty cash,.

25

10

827

355

These figures are based on a conservative estimate and allow no margin for entertainment.

REMARKS.

(1.) Estimated at 4th of cost of return passages. the cost of 2 establishments must be incurred.

(2.) Includes Widow and Orphans' subscription.

(3.) A.

If families are not brought back,

The average rent at the Peak (without taxes) is $130; but the cheapest houses are too small for a man with a family.

B. A 4-roomed cottage at Kowloon or Hongkong.

(4.) 1% per mensem on (A) $2,000 and (B) $500.

(5.) B. Free medical attendance and medicine.

(6.) Teeth "go" very badly in Hongkong and dentists' bills are very high.

(8.) Includes (A) Peak Tramway (B) Electric tram or the Ferry.

(9.) Includes all stores and tinned provisions.

(13.) B. includes school material.

(14.) A-Boy $14; cook $14; Amah $14; wash amah $13; house coolie $10; market coolie $9; bathroom coolie $2.

B-Boy $10; cook $10.

(15.) A. & B. Wash-amah included with servants.

(17.) A. Includes Hongkong Club $7, and Peak Club $5.

B. Includes Cricket and Civil Service Clubs.

583

Table B.

Shewing prices of commodities, wages and expenses of living generally other than rents and taxes in 1902 when the dollar was worth 1/8 and in October, 1906, when the dollar is worth 2/3.

Commodity.

I.

COMMODITIES.

1902.

1906.

JA

S

£. s. d.

$

£. s. d.

1. Beef (lb). 2. Bread (lb),

3. Butter (tin), 4. Coals (ton),

5. Eggs (doz.),

.14

2.8

.20

5.4

.05

1

.06

1.6

.50

10

.70

1.6.9

9.50

15.10

15.00

1.13.9

.18

3.6

.20

5.4

6. Flour,

.05

1

.06

1.6

7. Milk, fresh (pt.),

.16

3.2

.24

6.5

8.

**

tinned (tin),

23

4.6

.24

6.5

9. Mutton (lb),

.20

.26

7.8

10. Stout (same brand),

.38

7.6

45

1.0.1

II.

Other items cannot be stated so exactly.

Servants.-The market rate of wages paid in dollars has increased at least 20 per cent. We can give individually figures in support.

Transport.-The Star Ferry have increased their rate for a single trip from 10 cents to 15 cents since 1902.

The Peak Tram and rickshas are the same in dollars as in 1902.

Table C.

A comparison of the dollar and sterling rents of houses in 1902 and 1906.

(N.B.—This return deals with the houses and those only which were in existence in

1902.)

No. of Houses.

Average Rental per mensem.

1902 @ 1/8.

Average Rental per mensem. 1906 @ 2/3.

S

£ S. d.

$

£

Lower Levels,

135

!1

5

0

160 (nearly). 18 (nearly).

(48 houses).

Peak,

120

10

0 0

130 (over). 14 (over).

(90 houses).

Thus the average dollar rental of European houses has increased at the lower levels by $25. or over 18%; and the average sterling rental has increased by £6.15, or 60%. The percentage of increases for houses at the Peak are 8.3% and 40% respectively.

584

Table D.

Average rates of Exchange, demand on London :-

1874,..

4/1

1890,

3/5

1875..

.4/-

1891,

3/1

1876,

4/2

1892,

2/9

1877,...

3/11

1893,..

2/3

1878......

.3/10

1894,.

2/-

1879,.....

.3/10

1895,.....

2/1

1880,....

.3/S

1896,

.2/1

1881....

.3/9

1897

1/11

1882

.3/7

.1898,..........

1/11

1883..

.3/9

1899.

1/11

1884.....

.3/7

1900,.......

.2/-

1885,

3/4

1901,

1/11

1886,.

.3/4

1

1902,.

1/8

1887...

.3/1

1903,

1/8

1888,.

.3/1

1904,

1/10

1889,

.3/2

1905,...

1/11

Enclosure 4.

CIVIL MEDICAL DEPARTMENT, HONGKONG, 24th November, 1906. SIR,-We the undersigned officers of the Civil Medical Department of Hongkong respectfully forward for the consideration of His Excellency the Governor this petition, and trust that His Excellency will give it his earnest recommendation, and cable it to the Secre- tary of State for the Colonies.

We are aware that a petition from the Heads and Sub-heads of all Departments, stating our grievances, has already been submitted; since that one was prepared, however, the purchasing power of our salaries has again diminished, and we would urge that it is now vital that some immediate steps should be taken to relieve a situation which has become almost unbearable.

We do not wish to suggest what form the relief should take; we only desire to emphasize strongly the conditions which are proved to exist in the petition referred to.

We do not consider it necessary, in view of the above-mentioned petition, to bring for- ward any figures to prove what everyone in the Colony eier in or outside the Government Service is aware of, viz., that whilst the bulk of the professional men in the Service have to resort to unseemly economies to make their expenditure meet their income, it has become practically impossible for the lower paid officials to do even this.

Some of us, professional married men, have to live in a single room in a hotel, and practise the most rigid economy; other members of the staff have to live as best as they can, and are unable to save anything towards home passages or for possible sickness.

Members of commercial firms and corporations, whose assistants are not professional men, are paid generously; and have, moreover, in many instances received compensation.

4

+

585

We therefore earnestly pray that the Government may give early consideration to this petition; and afford the relief to which we trust it will be recognised we are entitled.

We have, etc.,

W. HUNTER.

J. C. THOMSON.

M. GOURLEY.

M. LEE.

C. M. HEANLEY.

W. V. M. KOCH.

JEU HAWK.

M. E. MOIR.

Z. YOUNG.

L. W. JACOBS.

W. B. A. MoORE.

A. ALLAWAY.

*

J. W. HARTLEY.

C. BARROW.

FRANK BROWNE.

H. MACFARLANE. A. C. FRANKLIN.

R. CHAPMAN.

S. E. BARKER.

A. M. T. MILINGTON.

E. MAKER.

A. G. GORHAM.

A. RICHARDS.

W. E. COOKE.

T. S. EGERTON.

C. H. SHARMAN.

J. O'REGAN.

J. ARMSTRONG.

A. RICHARDS.

C. H. BARROW.

R. P. STOLLARD.

The Honourable,

THE COLONIAL SECRETARY.

Enclosure 4 a.

SANITARY DEPARTMENT, HONGKONG, November 24th, 1906.

SIR,-We the undersigned officers of the Sanitary Department of Hongkong respectfully forward for the consideration of His Excellency the Governor this petition and trust that His Excellency will give it his earnest recommendation and cable it to the Secretary of State for the Colonies.

We are aware that a petition from the Heads and Sub-heads of all Departments, stating our grievances, has already been submitted; since that one was prepared however the pur- chasing power of our salaries' has again diminished and we would urge that it is now vital- that some immediate steps should be taken to relieve a situation which has become almost unbearable.

We do not wish to suggest what form the relief should take; we only desire to emphasise strongly the conditions which are proved to exist in the petition referred to.

We do not even consider it necessary to bring forward any figures to prove what every- one in the Colony either in or outside the Government Service is aware of, riz., that whilst the bulk of the professional men in the Service have to resort to unseemly economies to make their expenditure meet their income it has become impossible for the lower paid officials to do even this.

Professional married men have to live in one room in a hotel and practise the most rigid economy.

Senior married overseers have to live as best they can, neither putting money by for passage home or for possible sickness.

Commercial firms and corporations, whose assistants are not even professional men, are paid generously and have moreover in many instances received compensation.

586

We therefore earnestly pray that the Government will give immediate consideration to this petition and afford the relief to which we are sure they will see we are entitled on due consideration of our statements.

We have, &c.,

PHILIP T. LAMBLE.

HORACE J. KNIGHT.

FRED. O. AMY.

T. P. CONOLLY.

F. ALLEN.

S. KELLY,

L. BRETT.

W. FINCHER.

J. BULLIN.

E. W. DAWSON.

FRED. FISHER.

R. HUDSON.

R. MCEWEN.

C. E. FIRTH.

D. O'HALLORAN.

J. LEE.

J. J. BRYAN.

R. DUNCAN.

W. F. CULLEN.

A. SMALL.

JAMES A. LYON.

D. MCKENZIE.

T. ABLEY.

A. BROWN.

SYDNEY MAURICE GIDLEY.

J. PEARSON.

The Honourable

THE COLONIAL SECRETARY.

MINUTE OF 26TH NOVEMBER, 1906, FROM Mr. CHATHAM.

The position has become so acute on account of the continued rise in the value of the dollar, without any corresponding reduction in the cost of living, that some immediate relief is felt to be necessary. Of the 43 signatories, 23 are married men. I trust that the necessity of making some immediate improvement in the conditions of officers will be strongly repre- sented to the Secretary of State.

Enclosure 4 b.

PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT,

HONGKONG, 24th November, 1906.

SIR,-We the undersigned officers of the Public Works Department of Hongkong respectfully forward for the consideration of His Excellency the Governor this petition and trust that His Excellency will give it his earnest recommendation and cable it to the Secretary of State for the Colonies.

We are aware that a petition from the Heads and Sub-heads of all Departments, stating our grievances, has already been submitted; since that one was prepared however the pur- chasing power of our salaries has again diminished and we would urge that it is now vital that some immediate steps should be taken to relieve a situation which has become almost unbearable.

We do not wish to suggest what form the relief should take; we only desire to emphasise strongly the conditions which are proved to exist in the petition referred to.

We do not even consider it necessary to bring forward any figures to prove what everyone in the Colony either in or outside the Government Service is aware of, viz., that whilst the bulk of the professional men in the Service have to resort to unseemly economies to make their expenditure meet their income it has become impossible for the lower paid officials to do even this.

Professional married men have to live in one room in a hotel and practise the most rigid economy.

Senior married overseers have to live as best they can, neither putting money by for passages home nor for possible sickness.

A

-

587

Commercial firms and corporations, whose assistants are not even professional men, are paid generously and have moreover in many instances received compensation.

We therefore earnestly pray that the Government will give immediate consideration to this petition and afford the relief to which we are sure they will see we are entitled on due consideration of our statements.

II. TOOKER. C. H. GALE.

DAVID WOOD.

A. HOLLINGSWORTH.

H. G. FISHER.

H. T. JACKMAN.

T. L. PERKINS.

D. JAFFE. ISIDORE XAVIER. A. E. WRIGHT.

W. S. BISSELL.

J. C. LITTLE.

F. ALAN BIDEN. A. T. WALKER.

H. E. HAGGARD. A. J. DARBY,

E. B. REED.

L. BOLTON.

J. LONGSTAFF.

F. H. DILLON.

P. JULYAN.

H. A. MORRIS.

We have, &c.,

G. E. THOMAS. W. DOBBS. J. HUTCHINGS.

A. V. PARKER. W. T. EDWARDS. JAS. EDWARDS.

R. A. MUGFORD.

ALBERT H. NIMMO. A. R. BONE. T. OLSEN. J. Ross. G. M. GIBBS. G. W. KYNOCH. SYDNEY LEWIS.

J. A. HIRST.

H. J. HUDSON.

J. H. BARRINGTON.

1. A. WHEAL.

S. R. BOYD.

A. W. SIMMONS.

H. W. WOLFE.

The Honourable

THE COLONIAL SECRETARY.

Enclosure 5.

QUEEN'S COLLEGE,

HONGKONG, 27th November, 1906.

The Honourable

THE COLONIAL SECRETARY.

SIR,-We the undersigned respectfully present this urgent petition for the favourable consideration of His Excellency the Governor and beg him to cable it to the Secretary of State for the Colonies.

The almost daily increase in the exchange rate of the dollar makes it incumbent on us to bring before you the decrease in our salaries.

When the dollar was at 1/7 a Civil Servant at £270 a year received about $273 a month. When the dollar was at 1/10 he received about $236 a month. Now that the dollar is at 2/3 he receives about $188 a month (after 4% Widows and Orphans). This is a loss of nearly $100 a month.

We submit that this loss is not due to the mere business fluctuations of Exchange but is a growing increase in the value of silver and therefore that the loss due to contracts made by the Government in gold should not be borne by the Civil Servants but should be borne as a tax on the Colony.

-

588

The Hotels, Boarding Houses, &c., in the Colony have given up the sterling basis and thus the prices of living have increased. The Government, too, draws Crown Rents, taxes, hospital fees, and postal charges in dollars. Thus every month our salaries are being steadily decreased while other charges are being increased, even down to a 10e. richsha ride which little more than three years ago was less than two pence but is now more than two pence-halfpenny.

We submit that a bachelor Government Servant cannot live and hope to save anything for his passage home under $300 a month, while a married Civil Servant of necessity requires much more. As it is a Junior Assistant is receiving less than $200 a month. Thus not only is an unfair har put upon marriage but the Civil Servants have to eke out the means of livelihood from private sources. Most of the large Hougs and business firms in the Colony have made allowance in the shape of bonus, compensation, or some form of immediate relief for circumstances which are entirely exceptional and which if unrelieved will become intolerable.

To His Excellency

We have, &c.,

T. K. DEALY.

E. RALPHS.

A. W. GRANT.

A. H. COOK.

R. J. BIRBECK.

G. P. DE MARTIN,

R. E. O. BIRD.

H. L. GARRETT.

Enclosure 6 a.

HONGKONG, 26th November, 1906.

Sir MATTHEW NATHAN, K.C.M.G.,

Governor and Commander-in-Chief of the Colony of Hongkong, &c.

The humble petition of the undersigned European members of the Staff of the Harbour Department praying for immediate relief in the matter of their personal emoluments sheweth :

:

That in January, 1903, when the Sterling Salaries Scheme generally came into force, the average rate of exchange for that month was 1s. 7d. to the dollar as against 2s. 3d. for this month in January 1903, £10 equalled $126.32 and $100 plus exchange compensation totalled $189.47, whereas at the present time £10 equals only $87.27 and $100 plus ex- change compensation totals only $130.90 meaning a decrease or reduction of over 44% in either case.

That whilst in consequence of the continued rise in exchange, petitioners' monthly income from the Government is thus considerably less month by month, their house-rent and the cost of most of the necessaries of life, such as eggs, beef, &c., &c., are not reduced.

That having been placed in such a situation and having no means of pecuniary assist- ance petitioners venture with due respect to solicit His Excellency to give this, petitioners' prayer, early consideration and to take such steps as to His Excellency seem reasonable at an early date.

And petitioners as in duty bound will ever pray.

E. JONES.

E. J. MEUGENS.

WILLIAM A. CRAKE.

WILLIAM RUSSELL.

JAMES MACDONALD.

MURDOCK MCIVER.

589

Enclosure 6 b.

HARBOUR DEPARTMENT,

November 30th, 1906.

To His Excellency

Sir MATTHEW NATHAN, K.C.M.G.,

Governor and Commander-in-Chief of the Colony of Hongkong, Sc.

The humble petition of the undersigned European Lighthouse Keepers on the Staff of the Harbour Department praying for immediate relief in the matter of their personal emolu- ments sheweth :-.

That in January, 1903, when the Sterling Salaries Scheme generally came into force, the average rate of exchange for that month was 1/7 the Dollar as against 2/3 for this month. In January, 1903, £10 equalled $123.32 and $100 plus exchange compensation tɔtalled $189.47, whereas at the present time £10 equals only $87.27 and $100 plus exchange com- pensation totals only $130.90.

That whilst in consequence of the continued rise in exchange Petitioners' monthly in- come from the Government is thus considerably less month by month, yet their house rent and cost of most of the necessaries of life are not reduced.

That having been placed in such a position and having no means of pecuniary assistance, Petitioners venture with due respect to solicit His Excellency to give this, Petitioners' pray- er, early consideration and to take such steps as to His Excellency seem reasonable at an eraly date and Petitioners as in duty bound will ever pray.

C. E. NICHOLAS.

J. MITCHELL.

W. F. HAST.

W. McKay.

E. A. JOHNSON.

J. W. BEATTIE.

Enclosure 7.

PRISON DEPARTMENT, HONGKONG, 26th November, 1906.

To The Honourable

THE COLONIAL SECRETARY.

SIR,--We, the undersigned, of the Prison Department of Hongkong respectfully forward for the consideration of His Excellency the Governor this Petition, and trust that His Excellency will give it his earnest re-consideration and cable it to the Right Honourable the Secretary of State for the Colonies.

We have previously petitioned and are also aware that a petition from Heads and Sub- heads of Departments stating our grievances has already been submitted; since these were prepared, however, the purchasing power of our salaries has again diminished, and we urge that it is now vital that some immediate steps should be taken to relieve a situation, which daily becomes more unbearable.

We do not wish to suggest what form the relief should take, neither do we consider it necessary to bring forward any figures to prove what everyone in the Colony, either in or outside the Government Service is aware of, viz., that the higher the value of the Dollar, the more we have to pay for the actual necessaries of life: to prove this we beg to call attention to the Market List, published weekly, in our local papers, as compared with that of from 6 to 10 years ago, for example, a perusal of the Market List, "China Mail" 18th

*

*

590

September, 1897, with that published 23rd November this year, will show that the price of commodities to-day show an increase varying from 50% to 109%, the dollar on the former date being 1/103.

E. J. PIERPOINT.

H. J. WATSON.

W. DRISCOLL.

F. T. ROBIN.

A. G. PASSMORE.

G. H. DELL.

W. J. WILKINSON.

T. JEFFREY.

J. SINNOTT.

G. STREET.

JAS. MCLEOD.

W. J. J. GAST.

R. CUTHBERT.

F. J. ELMS.

H. BROWN.

C. WILKES.

D. WILLIS.

A. WILLIAMS.

G. SAVAGE.

T. PEHEMON.

A. RATCLIFFE.

A. CLEASE.

F. A. PIESSE.

D. DOYLE.

C. MCKENZIE.

J. C. WEST.

Enclosure 8.

The Honourable

THE CAPTAIN SUPERINTENDENT OF POLICE.

POLICE DEPARTMENT, HONGKONG, 30th November, 1906.

SIR,-We, the undersigned Members of the Police Force, most respectfully beg to submit for the consideration of His Excellency the Governor the inadequacy of our salaries at the rates of exchange that have now existed for a considerable time. We have suffered in silence for nearly two years, hoping that redress might be spontaneously forthcoming on the recommendation of the Local Government which must understand our position.

The reply of the Right Honourable the Secretary of State has however shewn us that the position of affairs here is not quite understood at home.

We therefore wish to lodge our complaint and respectful protest.

We do not see the necessity for going into detail. Our position is clear. A reference to the Estimates for the last two years and the forthcoming one, and to the local Price Lists will provide all that is necessary by way of argument. Prices have not as yet re-adjusted themselves as suggested by the Right Honourable the Secretary of State. We consider therefore that we should receive some compensation in respect of the last two years, and in future until exchange is better, or prices adjust themselves as is suggested.

We have, &c.,

H. W. BAKER.

E. DOWNIE.

W. KENT.

*

R. M. DONALD.

J. SMITH.

W. G. WARNOCK.

D. BRENNAN.

G. W. COCKLE.

D. D. CUTHBERT. J. J. WATT.

D. M. DONALD, WM. MURRISON.

A. TERRETT. GEORGE WATT. M. P. SULLIVAN.

J. W. HANSON.

2

L

591

A. G. DYMOND. GEORGE SIM.

A. W. Ross.

J. H. WOOLDRIDGE. PETER GRANT.

T. JEYNES WILSON.

E. W. G. ANDREWS.

E. S. BOND.

C. F. ARIS E. M. EVANS.

G. C. SHEPHERI). D. GOURLAY.

W. A. RITCHIE.

G. FOWLER. A. GORDON. ROBERT FENTON.

THOMAS CASHMAN.

J. GRANT.

D. MCHARDY.

W. R. SUTTON. DAVID BERRIE.

H. G. CLARKE. E. ROBY.

ALEX. K. TAYLOR.

L. H. T. APEL.

D. FOLEY.

E. MONTAGUE.

P. F. BOULGER. W. J. UNWIN.

W. F. BLACKMAN. M. G. ATLEE. GEO. JACKSON.

W. N. EDWARDS. A. E. FINAMAN.

F. HOWARD.

J. MUNDAY.

M. EARUR.

A. WILSON.

R. ADLINGTON.

J. LENAGHAN.

S. J. TAYLOR. A. COUNSELL.

J. WITCHELL.

T. HEDGE. R. H. MACRE.

W. G. CAYGILL. A. LANGLEY.

E. Fox.

JOHN OGG.

TIM MURPHY.

JOSEPH LENAGHAN.

MICHAEL WALTERS.

H. G. GARROD.

H. V. PARR.

W. KENDALL.

ROBT. H. WILLS. J. HERR.

F. APPLETON.

F. W. WINYARD.

H. A. MILLS.

P. RUTLEDGE.

L. A. LANGLEY. J. C. WILDIN. FRANK V. WINTER. SAMUEL J. Burchell.

A. F. PURDEN.

T. MULLIFORD.

J. E. BAKER.

J. A. MCKAY.

C. O'SULLIVAN,

WM. ROBERTSON. W. CAMERON.

JAMES F. LEE.

THOMAS SUTHERLAND.

E. J. HEDGE.

J. R. F. TETSTALL.

W. PINCOTT.

J. INGHAM. J. SPENCER.

S. MCLENNAN. W. W. COOper. C. R. MELLINS. ROBT. LANIGAN. THOMAS HYNES.

P. ANGUS. S. J. CLARKE.

A. LANE.

G. BOOLE. W. DAVITT. P. BRAZIL. PAUL CONLAN. G. ATTEWELL. T. JONES. G..T. BIRD. H. J. DAVIS. D. MCKENZIE. A. ROBERTSON. T. GLENDINNING. JOHN DEVNEY. J. W. LANDer.

J. MACKAY.

W. G. GERRARD.

ALEXANDER Grant.

N. LAMONT.

A. LLOYD.

G. WILLIS.

W. G. KERR.

HONGKONG.

No. 57.

î

592

DOWNING STREET,

28th March, 1907.

SIR,- With reference to paragraph 4 of my despatch No. 236 of November 26th last, I have the honour to inform you that I have now given further consideration to the question of the effect of the increased exchange value of the dollar on the emoluments of those officers of the Government service, whose salaries are fixed in sterling or, being paid at the rate of 3/- to the dollar, are practically on a sterling basis.

2. As you are aware, I have previously not seen my way to allow any concession on this account, mainly on the ground that, if exchange continues to rule high a reduction in local prices must presumably be only a matter of time.

I understand, however, that the adjustment of prices, which might be expected, has not yet taken place and, in the circumstances, I am willing to modify my previous opinion and to consent to some additional payment, as a temporary measure to officers paid on a sterling basis, who under present conditions find it difficult to live with fair comfort on their salaries.

3. I would, therefore, propose that, if you and the Legislative Council agree, a local allowance should be paid to these officers (within the limitations mentioned hereafter) for three years from January 1st, 1907, subject to the following conditions:-

The allowance will be at the rate of 5% per annum on the officer's salary, so long as the exchange value of the dollar is 2/2d. or more.

If the dollar rises to 2/4d. or more the allowance will be at the rate of 10%. If the dollar falls below 2/2d. no allowance will be paid.

These allowances will not be pensionable and will not be paid while an officer is on leave of absence.

4. As at present advised, I am not satisfied that there are sufficient grounds for granting these allowances to officers whose salaries exceed £1,000 a year. It can scarcely be argued that such officers find it difficult to live with fair comfort on their salaries and it must be remembered that their local expenditure (which alone is affected by the rise in the exchange value of the dollar) is less in proportion to their income than that of less highly paid officers. If, however, you take a different view I shall be glad to receive and consider your observa- tions on the point and in the meantime I will defer coming to a final decision upon it. I may add that, if the limit of £1,000 is finally adopted, in the case of officers, whose salaries are nominally fixed in dollars, payable at 3/-, the salary should be regarded as exceeding £1,000 if the sterling salary attached to the post is more than that sum.

5. Shortly before the end of the period of three years, to which I have proposed to limit the grant of the allowance, I shall expect to receive a full report on the cost of living and on market prices in Hongkong shewing how far local prices have adjusted themselves to the enhanced sterling value of the dollar, supposing the rate of exchange still to be high. On the receipt of this report, the question of continuing the local allowance will be recon- sidered, but it must be understood that it will not be renewed unless the step can be justified by reference to the local conditions obtaining at the time.

4

C

Governor

Sir M. NATHAN, K.C.M.G., :

St.,

St.,

Sr.

I have, &c.,

ELGIN.

2.

593

1st March, 1907.

OFFICER ADMINISTERING THE GOVERNMENT TO SECRETARY OF STATE. Your despatch No. 57 of 28th March. The allowance offered would not satisfy the Service and I propose to suspend action until I shall have received a reply to Sir M. NATHAN'S despatch No. 37 of the 8th March.

HONGKONG.

No. 72.

DOWNING STREET,

16th April, 1907.

+

SIR,-I have the honour to, acknowledge the receipt of your despatch No. 37 of the 8th of March forwarding memorials of Government officers with regard to the salaries of the Hongkong Service as affected by the high exchange value of the dollar.

2. I propose to defer replying to your despatch until I have had the opportunity of discussing the matter with you on your arrival here.

Governor

Sir M. NATHAN, K.C.M.G.,

Sc.,

&'c.,

HONGKONG.

No. 122.

fc.

I have, &c.,

ELGIN.

DOWNING STREET,

11th June, 1907.

SIR, I have the honour to acknowledge the receipt of your telegram of the 1st of May, in which you informed me that the proposals made in my despatch No. 57 of the 28th of March for the grant of a local allowance would not satisfy the service, and added that you proposed to defer action in anticipation of my reply to the Governor's despatch No. 37 of the 8th of March. I had already replied to that despatch to the effect that I would discuss the matter with Sir M. NATHAN on his arrival in this country.

2. I have now ascertained Sir M. NATHAN's views, and, subject to the consent of the Legislative Council, I am prepared to approve the following arrangement:--

Officers drawing sterling salaries, or dollar salaries with double exchange compen- sation, will be paid their salaries, when in the Colony, at the rate of 2/- to the dollar, so long as the exchange value of the dollar is at or above that figure. When the exchange value of the dollar is below 2/- these salaries will be paid, as at present, at a rate of exchange fixed monthly by the Government and based on the average exchange value of the dollar during the preceding month. Officers whose salaries are fixed in sterling will draw leave pay and pension on the

basis of the fixed sterling salary.

Officers drawing double exchange compensation will continue to draw leave pay and pension on the basis of their nominal dollar salaries at the privileged rates of exchange to which they are entitled.

3. I have, therefore, to request that you will place these proposals before the Legislative Council. If the Council approves the suggested arrangement, you are authorised to put it in force at once with effect from the 1st of January last.

I have, &c.,

The Officer Administering the Government of

HONGKONG.

ELGIN.

HONGKONG.

No.

38

190

REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE APPOINTED TO CONSIDER AND MAKE SUGGESTIONS FOR DEALING WITH THE CUBICLE QUESTION.

LETTER TO THE SANITARY BOARD ON THE SAME SUBJECT.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor,

REPORT.

Recommendations agreed to by the Committee appointed by His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government to enquire into and report upon the Cubicle question generally.

1. Cubicles must be permitted in houses.

2. As regards construction of cubicles, wood, metal or other material approved by the Building Authority should be laid down as the rule, subject to such being painted, white- washed or otherwise kept clean to the satisfaction of the Sanitary Board.

3. As regards dimensions of such, the present limits prescribed by Section 154 should be adhered to, with the discretion presently existing and exercised by the Sanitary Board but without the necessity for the consent of the Governor in Council.

4. The conditions of the construction and maintenance of cubicles in existing houses should be left to the discretion of the Sanitary Board, without reference to the Governor in Council.

·

In the above connection the Board, is recommended to exercise to the full extent its discretion provided for in the proviso to Section 154 of the Principal Ordinance in the direction of permitting as many cubicles as is expedient on all floors including the ground floor after inspection of the premises by competent officers.

The number of cubicles allowed on each floor should be painted up conspicuously on such floor.

5. An addition should be made to the law in the shape of a proviso to Section 46, viz.:~~ Any room not containing a cubicle may be inhabited to the extent of one adult person to every 30 square feet of floor space and 330 cubic feet of air space.

Sub-section 153 (6) 3 should be amended to permit the occupation of an accountant's office in a shop by not more than two persons at night.

i

644

6. In regard to re-erected houses, cubicles should be allowed in the same manner and to the same extent as in existing houses.

The words "or re-erected" should be struck out of Section 153 sub-section (a) and the following added:-" on any site which is now vacant or which is now occupied by domestic buildings of a European type or by any non-domestic building".

This will permit cubicles in re-erected houses of the tenement class, but will prohibit them in new houses on sites hitherto unoccupied by tenement houses of the ordinary Chinese type.

7. The Building Authority should have power by law to require that, in the case of domestic buildings erected on these sites, if intended for Chinese tenements, provision be made for the sub-division of each storey above the ground storey into rooms of a suitable area, the idea being to insist upon a proper provision of window spaces in such houses either laterally, or in such other manner as the Architects may be able to devise.

8. No question of compensation arises in connection with any of the foregoing recom- mendations.

9. Government should undertake the demolition of the upper floors of every third house in blocks of Chinese tenements, repayment of the expenditure incurred being made by the owners of the adjoining houses in respect of the improvements to their property by means of annual instalments extended over a period of years and calculated at such rate of interest as to ultimately recoup the Government for all its outlay.

The houses left standing will, if paragraph 5 is acted upon, legally house the persons- displaced from the buildings so demolished.

Provided that any other scheme recommended by the Sanitary Board may be carried out in lieu of the above.

A. M. THOMSON,

Colonial Treasurer.

W. CHATHAM,

Director of Public Works.

EDWARD A. RAM.

EDWARD OSBORNE.

HENRY KESWICK.

HO KAI.

FRANCIS CLARK,

Medical Officer of Health.

WEI YUK.

10th August, 1907.

With regard to para. 9 I am unable to agree with the Report. My personal experience in carrying out works upon old Chinese buildings leads me to believe that it will be, in a great majority of cases, impractibale-for structural reasons-or only practicable at the expense of what would almost amount to re-building.

These costly works, however provided for, must lead to a considerable increase of rentals -to be paid for out of the meagre earnings of the coolie and artizan class-and I am not satisfied that the community, and especially the poorer Chinese section of it, will profit pro- portionately by this further increase in the cost of living here.

EDWARD A. RAM.

645

Ι agree to the recommendations as a means of improving the housing of the working classes but I do not agree that they, of themselves, are sufficient to eradicate Plague which in my opinion can only be effected by more frequent and thorough cleansing and by the destruction of rats and vermin.

EDWARD OSBORNE..

I am in accord with Messrs. RAM and OSBORNE, and sign the recommendation in the hope that it may bring some improvement in the future. I consider however that § 154 of the Public Health and Buildings Ordinance No. 1 of 1903 (as amended by Ordinances 20 and 23 of 1903) with its proviso would have properly met the case, assuming of course that the Sanitary Department carried out its duties in an intelligent manner.

In the past, however, the Sanitary Board by sticking closely to the letter of the law, and without taking the responsibility of exercising its judgment, has harassed the Chinese into all manner of expedients to obtain a certain amount of privacy and decency for them- selves, such expedients being far worse than the evils with which the Ordinance was intended to deal,

In support of my opinion I quote the following official reply dated 25th July, 1907, to my enquiry as to how often the terms of the proviso had been availed of :-

"The number of cases in which the Sanitary Board have recommended to the Governor in Council modifications of or exemption from the requirements of § 154 of the Public Health and Buildings Ordinance, 1903, is as follows:-

1903,

1904,

1905,

1906,

1907,

4 Applications.

4

"?

none.

3

,,

24

"

There are well over 5,000 Chinese tenement houses in which cubicles are used. It would be absurd to suggest that one hard and fast rule could be usefully made applicable to them all; much more so to endeavour to enforce it.

HENRY KESWICK.

COLONIAL SECRETARY'S OFFICE.

HONGKONG, 3rd May, 1907.

SIR, I am directed to invite the attention of the Sanitary Board to the proviso con- tained in Section 154 of the Public Health and Buildings Ordinance which to judge from representations recently made to Government does not appear to have been availed of by the Board to deal with the cubicle question. I am now to suggest as a practical means for giving as much latitude in the use of the cubicles as is compatible with reasonable sanitary requirements to the poorer classes of Chinese inhabiting tenement houses, that the Board by means of some of its officers institute a house to house inspection and decide what number of cubicles might reasonably be allowed to be erected and maintained in each floor, and thereafter make recommendations accordingly for modification or exemption by the Governor- in-Council.

I am, etc.,

A. M. THOMSON,

Colonial Secretary.

The Secretary,

SANITARY BOARD.

:

HONGKONG.

REPORT OF THE INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS, FOR THE YEAR 1906.

No.

28 1907

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government.

STAFF.

1. Appointments.-Mrs. MORRIS, 2nd Mistress of the Victoria School, from 1st. February, 1906.

Mr. PARKIN, 2nd Master of the Yaumati Anglo-Chinese School, from 1st March, 1906.

Mrs. MURRAY, 2nd Mistress of the Kowloon School, from 1st October, 1906.

2. Promotions. Mrs. TUTCHER, to be Head Mistress of the Belilios Public School, rom 20th May, 1906.

Miss BATEMAN, to be 2nd Mistress of the Belilios Public School, from 20th May, 1906

3. Retirement.-Mrs. BATEMAN, Head Mistress of the Belilios Public School, from 19th May, 1905.

4. Resignation.--Mrs. DRUMMOND, 2nd Mistress of the Kowloon School, from 1st. October, 1906.

5. There have also been several changes in the Chinese Staff of the District Schools.

NUMBER AND CLASSIFICATION OF SCHOOLS AND PUPILS.

6. Table IV shews the number of schools (Government and Grant) to be 85, au increase of 2, as compared with last year. The average attendance was 5,496 as against 5.323, the increase being nearly equally divided between the Upper and Lower Grade shools. The Anglo-Indian School has this year been considered as in the Lower Grade, as has also the Berlin Foundling House, since neither of these schools have had any European teachers.

506

7. Table V shews the fluctuations in the average attendance during recent years, There has been for several years a steady increase in the numbers of pupils attending the Government and Grant English schools. The Private English schools also seem to be increasingly well attended. It is to be noted that the figures for the Private schools are based upon the maximum monthly enrolment, as the average attendances are not obtainable. The figures are at best an approximation; but as they have been arrived at in the same way for several years, the error is probably constant. The majority of the Private English schools give a very elementary education in English. The figures do not include the night schools, of which there are 26, with an enrolment of 494 pupils. The number of pupils at the Government and Grant Vernacular schools is 2,146, to a unit the same as last year. the other hand the numbers in the Private Vernacular schools continue to increase rapidly. According to a return made by the Attendance Officer, in 1905 out of 118 of these schools only 15 employed modern methods of imparting instruction. This year, he reckons that the proportion is 45 out of 128. The least that can be said of these figures is that they are evidence of a general tendency towards the improvement of Vernacular education.

Un

8. Table VI shews the proportion of girls to boys to be as about 2,000 to 3,500, or as 4 to 7. This ratio is not even as satisfactory as it appears at first sight, because, as Table VI B shews, the greater part of the girls are in the Lower Grade Vernacular schools.

GOVERNMENT SCHOOLS.

9. Table I gives details of the nature of the Government schools, and of the attend- ance thereat, as compared with the same statistics for 1905. Details of the work done in each school are given in Appendix A.

10. The total number of Upper Grade pupils is 777, a satisfactory increase upon the preceding year of over 11%. The number of pupils studying in Lower Grade schools shews an increase of over 50%.

11. The cost of each pupil to Government is an important point in connection with the value of the schools. It ranges from $99.09 at the Victoria School to $8.10 at the Belilios School, Vernacular Side. The average cost to Government of the 3 District schools of Saiyingpun, Yaumati and Wantsai is $26.42, as compared with $24.48 at Queen's College. The cost of Uenlong School, $77.55, is very high when the elementary nature of the work is considered.

New Schools, and Schools Closed.

12. Lower Grade Anglo-Chinese schools were opened at Pingshan in August and at- Taipo in May.

13. It has been decided to close the little Vernacular school at Sheko from the end of the year.

It was the last of the Government schools that gave an education to boys in the Chinese language.

Kowloon British School.

14. The maximum monthly enrolment and the total of fees collected again surpassed all previous "records", being 78 and $2,101.50 as against 68 and $1,979 for last year.

But the average attendance shews for the first time in the history of the school a slight falling off, from 57 to 55. Mr. JAMES accounts for this by "the unusual heat of last summer, and the consequent withdrawal during the hot months of many of the smaller children". As soon as this state of affairs was realised, punkahs for pupils were forthwith provided.

15. A playground is badly needed.

Victoria British School.

16. The average attendance was 44, which compared with the figure for the previous year shews an increase of 8.

507

17. The unhealthy nature of the surroundings of the school caused some anxiety. The expenditure of a large sum of money has been sanctioned, with the object of draining the swampy land near the school, and of clearing the grounds of brushwood. It may therefore be hoped that before long the school will be as healthy as it is pleasantly situated. The concrete flooring has given a great deal of trouble, and has made it impossible for the school to be kept as clean as it should be. This defect also is being remedied.

18. The boys of the Upper School were at the beginning of the year formed into a Cadet Corps attached to the Hongkong Volunteer Corps, with the Headmaster as their Officer. They went into camp at Stonecutter's Island in ctober. Mr. WILLIAMS reports that "the results achieved in signalling have quite justified the formation of the Corps". Provision for Morris tubes, ammunition and a miniature rifle range behind the school will be made in the Estimates for 1908.

Belilios Public School, Anglo-Chinese Side.

19. I regret to report that the School again shews a falling off in numbers. the average attendance for the year being 82, as against 93 last year.

The fees likewise are the lowest that have been collected for many years. The Vernacular Side of the School, which now gives such a good education through the medium of the Chinese language, has taken a good many pupils who otherwise might have attended the Anglo-Chinese Side. Nor are things quite as bad as they appear; because l'have in the last 2 years disallowed the attendance of a number of boys who had intruded and climbed into the fold. I do not expect to see any further decline in numbers. The teaching and work of the school is very satisfactory, and worthy of a stronger support by the public.

THE DISTRICT SCHOOLS, UPPER GRADE.

20. In pursuance of the policy of making the District Schools feeders to Queen's College, their Classes were reduced from 7 or 6 to 5 in number, and are now called by names corresponding with those of the Lower and Preparatory Schools at the College, though there the lowest Class, Class VIII, has been abolished.

21. Only a very few boys applied for admission to the District Schools after failing to pass the entrance examination into the College, under the scheme described in last year's Report; but it is too early to be despondent about the success of the scheme. An unusually large number of boys entered the College at Midsummer from Wantsai, and incidentally lowered the average results at the Wantsai Christmas Examinations.

22. The analogous process of linking these schools with the Lower Grade District Schools was continued. Two free scholars are yearly admitted from Aberdeen into Saiying- pun School, and from Tanglungchau into Wantsai School. And this year a free scholar- ship into Yaumati has been given to the senior pupil of Uenlong School. This last is a step towards bringing education in the New Territories into touch with the Hongkong system. A further development of the linking of schools by scholarships is described in paragraph 41 below.

Saiyingpun Anglo-Chinese School.

23. The average attendance has more than doubled in the year, and there is every sign of a further increase. If that takes place additions to the building will be urgently needed.

24. The school excursions included visits to Taitam, the Electric Light Station, the Works at Deep Water Bay and many other places of interest, including the Arts and Crafts Exhibition, at which there was a large attendance from several Government schools. Many of the boys of Saiyingpun were taught swimming by the Headmaster in the summer. They, like those of the other 2 schools, are keen members of the football league, and play with a doggedness that deserves, but has hitherto failed to command, success. I lay some stress on these points, because it is to such methods that I attribute the really remarkable change noticeable in the intelligence of the senior pupils in the last few years. Before then, an idea seemed almost universally prevalent, that they came to school to learn as much com- mercial arithmetic and to read and write as much English as would get them a situation: all else was vanity and vexation of spirit.

503

Yaumati Anglo-Chinese School.

25. The new school buildings, which have proved most satisfactory, were designed to accommodate 200 pupils. That number has been surpassed by the maximum monthly enol- ment of 6 out of 9 working months in which the buildings have been occupied. The ques- tion therefore of building an additional storey becomes imminent. Meanwhile, room for another 40 or 50 pupils can be found without very serious overcrowding. English master was engaged early in the year, Mr. PARKIN.

A second

26. Excursions are conducted as at Saiyingpun. The Headmaster reports that the boys "correspond regularly with a large London school, namely, the Virginia Road Council School, and great interest is shown by the correspondents."

27. His Excellency the Governor offered a prize for English composition, to be competed for by the Senior Classes of the 3 District Schools. This was somewhat easily won by Yaumati, the winner being Yeung King-Chau.

Wantsai Anglo-Chinese School.

The school is however

28. The average attendance shews only a very slight increase. overcrowded from a pedagogic. though not from a hygienic standpoint. It has been decided to house the Tanglungchau School in the Wantsai building, as soon as certain additions to the latter, already sanctioned, can be completed. This will probably be towards the end of

1907.

29. The Normal Class continued to be held at Wantsai School on Saturday mornings. The junior Chinese masters gain considerable advantage from these lessons in teaching.

Hygiene was the subject to which most attention was given. Proper methods of teach- ing Geography and English are now well understood. I have suggested to the Headmasters that the next course might be on the teaching of Arithmetic, which has hitherto followed rather old-fashioned and cumbrous lines.

THE DISTRICT SCHOOLS, LOWER GRADE.

Anglo-Indian School.

30. The school has continued to develop though not very rapidly, not so rapidly as it did when there was an English teacher. After the summer holidays it was moved to Praya

Last.

Anglo-Chinese School, Lower Grade.

31. Except the school at Tanglungchau, which is closely connected with Wantsai School, the Lower Grade Anglo-Chinese schools are in outlying parts of the Colony and the New Territories, at Aberdeen, Pingshan, Uenlong and Taipo. They are each under a sole Chinese master, and they attempt to give a 3 years' course of study. It can not be said that they are very popular; the average attendance at them is only 17. Whether this is because the country folk and fisher people do not see any great advantage to be gained from a study of English, or whether because without the stimulus of an English master the teachers in these inaccessible places refrain from exerting themselves to the uttermost, is hard to say.

VERNACULAR SCHOOLS.

Belilios Public School, Chinese Side.

32. In spite of the fact that a small fee has for the first time been charged, the attend- ance shews no falling off. The headmaster is evinced that the fee might be doubled, without seriously affecting the attendance: but in my opinion, no increase had better be made for at least a year.

The school gives a souzad education, and a fair proportion of the girls are in the 3 highest Standards.

509

Sheko School.

33. This small Vernacular School, now closed, was the last representative of a numbe. of village schools opened by the Hongkong Government in its first attempt to give a system of education to the Colony. Most of them have long since been taken over by the Mission- ary Bodies, and are represented by the Vernacular Grant Schools of the present day.

7

GRANT SCHOOLS.

34. A detailed report on the work done in each school is given in Appendix B. The Annual Grant List, shewing the number of Standards, the average attendance and the Grant earned by each school, together with other information, is given in Table VII.

English Schools, Non-Chinese.

35. There are 10 schools in this class with a total average attendance of 940. The largest of these, the Diocesan School for Boys, St. Joseph's College and the Italian Convent, each of which have an attendance of over 200, have been returned as thoroughly efficient. There is only a slight increase in the numbers of the schools of this class.

Anglo-Chinese Schools.

36. Of these, 3 are in the Upper Grade; but only one, the Ellis Kadoorie School, is of much educational importance. It has an average attendance of over 300. Additions to the school buildings were completed in the course of the year, towards the cost of which the Government will contribute $7,000. The Cathedral School was voluntarily closed in the middle of the year.

37. There were 4 Lower Grade schools of this type; but one of them, number 71, was, closed by the management in the early part of the year. Two others have been adversely reported on. Their average attendance has fallen from S5 last year to 44. The remaining school in this class continues to do very useful work.

Vernacular Schools.

38. Owing to absences in the European Staff, two of the Upper Grade Schools, the Training Home and the Berlin Foundling House, had this year to be reckoned as Lower Grade Schools. The high rate of exchange makes the money loss a small one; and when the weakest. Lower Grade Schools have been weeded out in the manner foreshadowed below, it will probably be possible to drop the distinction of Upper and Lower Grade in the Vernacular Schools.

39. As stated above, while Vernacular education in Private Schools continues to increase and improve, in Grant schools though it improves it does not increase numerically. Since the ground of the Vernacular education of the Colony is less than half covered by the Grant Schools, a position which they shew no signs of being able to extend, the justification of their existence must rather be sought in their claim to be model schools than a mechanism. for supplying free education to the poor.

40. The progress of the best Vernacular Schools has during the year under review been rapid. The course of study and time-table printed as an appendix to my Report for last year have been voluntarily adopted and carefully followed by them. The appointments of the Sub-Inspectors of Needlework and of Vernacular Schools have also proved most stimulat- ing. On the other hand, there are several schools, which seem unable to reach such a point of efficiency as would make them worth studying by private school masters anxious to learn all that the Government has to teach. And they are inefficient in another respect: they have only a very few pupils above the second Standard. Now although the course of study is intended to meet the cases of children, who are likely to stay at school only for a few years, still 2 years is too short a time in which to accomplish any lasting results, either moral or mental. I have therefore not hesitated to return some schools as inefficient, for the sole reason that the education they are giving is too limited in time to make it worth paying a Grant for.

510

ut while the weakest of the schools have thus been warned, encouragement has en given to the better, by offering free scholarships for 4 years from them into either the Delilios School or one of the District Schools. The schools thus selected as worthy of encouragement are given in Table VIII. These scholarships are eagerly competed for, and the system promises well.

GENERAL.

Scholarships.

42. In Table VIII is given a list of scholarships, with the names of the winners at the end of 1906 or the beginning of 1907. If the system alluded to in the last paragraph, the linking of the Vernacular Schools with the District Schools, could be made general, the latter would no doubt reap a considerable benefit. It will be remembered that before a boy can enter them an entrance examination in written Chinese has to be passed. If this preliminary knowledge were acquired in schools under the control of the Department, not only would it fit better with the pupils' further studies in Chinese at the District Schools, but also they would come to school with a good grounding in Arithmetic and Geography, and would be able to concentrate their attention almost exclusively during the next 2 years on the acquisition of English. The Hongkong system of education has rightly made English the medium of instruction. The Hongkong boys are tacitly agreed to spend not more than 5 years in English schools. If then, any good use is to be made of the English acquired for the advancement of other studies, there must be no time lost in acquiring it. All studies in the first 3 years should be subordinated thereto; and if some of them can be taken during a preliminary education at the Vernacular Schools, then so much the better. It is however to be feared, that the class of boys who attend the free Vernacular Schools under the Grant Code is not one that can afford even a 5 years English education.

Visual Instruction.

43. In the year 1905, the Government of Hongkong on the initiative of the Home Government subscribed the large sum of $3,000 towards a scheme for promoting a better knowledge of the Mother Country among the schools of the Empire. With this sum 2 lanterns and sets of lantern slides have been purchased and supplied, and a course of interest- ing lectures to accompany them. These arrived in the Colony at the beginning of the under review, and steps were at once taken to put them to the best use.

year.

44. There was a considerable difficulty in arranging the lectures to the best advantage,. owing to the great distances separating the schools. The Diocesan Home and Orphanage and the Victoria School are more than 3 miles apart as the crow flies, while the Kowlcon School is 2 miles from either, with the harbour between. Moreover, the weather and the seasons put a limit to the time in which lectures can conveniently be given. The long- days of summer call for artificial darkening of the lecture room, and that necessitates closed windows. To submit a closely packed roomful of children, at the end of their day's work, to such conditions, with the thermometer between 80 and 90 and the air full of acetylene- gas, is clearly impossible. The authorities of the Italian Convent wrote, as early as the beginning of May, "Having to close all the doors and windows, the room became so hot- that more than one girl felt giddy. I am afraid we can not avail ourselves of it during this hot weather....We can not have the day scholars here when it is dark now, that is after 7 o'clock p.m."

At the best, from the beginning of May to the end of September, the lanterns- can not be used.

45. Had it been otherwise desirable, it would'no doubt have been convenient to bring the pupils of the different schools into some central place, such as the City Hall, and there- deliver the lectures to them all together. But in practice, there seem to be many objections- to such a course. Besides others having relation to the discipline of the different schools. and the difficulty of getting the pupils to attend, it was pointed out, and with much reason, that children are much more likely to assimilate lectures given by their own teacher, who will rehearse the main points on the next day, than if they had merely listened to a lecture from a stranger, who was quite unacquainted with the amount of knowledge his audience already possessed.

1.

J

{

511

46. Table IX gives the approximate dates during which the lanterns were in use, and the schools that used them. They comprise all the important schools with exception of Queen's College and the District Schools. I may say that as regards the District Schools, I was willing to forego the privilege on their behalf, because I then believed that the pupils would have an opportunity to hear the lectures by going to Queen's College in after years.

47. In Table IX B is given the arrangement under which, judging from present ex- perience, the use of the lanterns can most fairly be apportioned.

48. The lanterns and slides are all that could be desired, and the lectures contain very much valuable information. It is generally agreed that they are too long for pupils who have not been Home, and for whom hardly anything can be taken as known. It is no criticism on the printed lectures to say, that the less slavishly they were adhered to, the better were the results. The lecturer at the Diocesan School gives an account of the interesting variation he made. Mr. GARRETT, who kindly undertook to give the course at the Kowloon School, and whose knowledge of London is extensive, gave a course which was quite original, and which proved inost interesting to the pupils and also to their parents, who attended in considerable numbers. A very good course was given at St. Joseph's College.

49. The cost of maintenance and expenses of an incidental nature have together amounted in the year to $49.20.

50. In Appendix C are given extracts from reports kindly furnished by Messrs. GARRETT and BRAWN, together with some interesting remarks by the Headmistress of the Belilios. School. In Appendix D are examination papers set at the request of the Trustees of Belilios Trust II, who gave prizes of the value of $10 for the best paper done by the pupils of each of the following schools:-Diocesan School, Boys; Diocesan School, Girls; Fairlea; Victoria School; Kowloon School. In Appendix E are some of the answers to these questions. They have been selected, not on account of their intrinsic merit, but as shewing the assistance which the lectures may give to pupils by helping them to realise the real nature of places which they have never seen, and the beauty and dignity of England.

League of Empire.

51. I have been in regular communication with the Central Office throughout the year. I hope to be present at the Conference which is to be held in London next May.

52. The importance of Empire Day was again impressed on the pupils of Kowloon and Victoria Schools by an invitation to Government House.

53. The following schools are members of the League, and are linked in correspondence with schools at Home:-Kowloon School, Victoria School, the Diocesan Schools, (Boys and Girls), and St. Joseph's College.

Evening Continuation Classes.

54. These were started in the Autumn, and have proved a great success. They are managed by a Committee, under the Chairmanship of the Registrar General, who is sending to Government a Report on the subject.

Hygiene.

55. The teaching of this subject received full attention during the year. I have reported separately on the progress made, and on the results of the examination for the prizes offered by His Excellency the Governor, by which that progress was tested.

Education Department,

28th February, 1907.

*

EDWARD A. IRVING,

Inspector of Schools.

I. Government Schools: Statistics.

512

Tables.

II. Revenue of the Department during recent years.

III. Expenditure of the Department during recent years.

IV. Numbers of Schools and Pupils in Upper and Lower Grades compared.

V. Chart shewing attendances and number of pupils in Hongkong Schools during

recent years.

*

VI. The proportion of boys to girls in the Schools.

VII. Annual Grant List.

VIII. Scholarships given.

IX. Dates of Visual Instruction Lectures.

Appendices.

A. Detailed Reports on Government Schools.

B. Detailed Reports on Grant Schools.

C. Reports on Visual Instruction.

D. Examination Papers on Visual Instruction.

E. Answers to Examination Papers on Visual Instruction.

;

;

DESCRIPTION.

Table I.-GOVERNMENT SCHOOLS.—[The figures in Red are those for last

year.]

SCHOOL STATISTICS.

· 513 --

Name and Nature.

Number of

Standards,

Classes or

Forms.

Number Maximum | Average of School Monthly At- Days. Enrolment. tendance.

Fees

Rate of

Fees.

Net Cost

to Govern-

Ditto for

each unit inl

REMARKS,

Gross Cost. Collected.

ment.

average

attendance.

$

C.

C.

196

68

7,149.25

1,979.00

5,170.25

90.70

1

Kowloon British School.--Children of European British Parentage. Boys under thirteen and Girls,

6

198

78

55

$2 to $5

6,723.21

- 2,101.50

4,621.77

84.03

and Infant Class.

2

Victoria British School.-Children of European British Parentage. Girls under thirteen and Boys,

1584

48

36

7,291.59

769.50

6,522.09

181.17

194

51

44

$2 to $5

5,826.17

14,339.00

4,387.17

99.70

Belilios Public School.-English and Anglo-Chinese Side. Boys under twelve and Girls,.

195

113

98

192

101

82

1,248.00 50c.to$1.50 8,076.34 1,098.50

11,008.01

9,760.01 104.94

6,977.84

85.09

7

1954

61

44

3,499.37

745.00

2,754.37

62.59

Salyingpun Anglo-Chinese School (Boys),

186

119

92

$1 to $2

4,795.81

1,907.09

2.888.81

31.40

Yanmati

do..

do.

COLO

192

125

189

218

6

Wantsai

do.,

do.,

7 Anglo-Indian School (Boys),

Aberdeen Anglo-Chinese School (Boys),.

らぶ

نے میں

228

162

231

195

192

188

170

1863

9

Tanglungchau

do.,

do..

10

Venlong

do.,

do.

do.

donn

11

Taipo

12

Ping Shan

do.,

do.

13

Belilios Public School,-Vernacular Side, (Girls),

14

Sheko Vernacular School (Boys),.

1754

1883

1944

1923

152

ཁྐྲོམ ོའ འ 3 ལྷུང སྤྲུམ ོ

98

8,119.26

1,832.00 6,287.26

64.15

171

140

146

$1 to $2

$1 to $2

8,729.78

3,555.00

5,174.78

30 26

4,015.39

2,349.00

1,666.39

11.90

5,593.62

3,022.00

2,571.62

17.61

33

758.71

485.00

273.71

8.29

39

50c. to $1.50 1,432.96

572.50

860.46

22.06

24

613.32

123.00

490.32

20.43

23

50 cents.

680.02

112.00

568.02

24.69

36

770.00

163.00

607.00

17.37

33

50c. to $1

792.55

331.00

461.55

13.98

18

1,316.95

90.00

1,226.95 68.16

16

50 cents.

1,332.30

91.50

1,240.80

77.55

12

50 cents.

614.32

53.00

561.32

46.77

Opened in May, 1906.

1

108

29

16

50 cents.

306.40

58.00

248.40

15.52

Opened in Aug., 1906.

212

267

189

kyeo.

230

263

187

25 cents.

1,232.96

2,079.21

1,282.86

6.52

554.00

1,515.21

8.10

219

19

ذا

108.00

108.00

7.20

4

240

13

11

150.00

150.00

13.63

1,001

782

45,882.71

9,783.50 26,099,21

46.17

1,231

927

47,132.75 14,905.00 - 32,227.75

34.76

Note. The schools italicised are Lower Grade, the rest Upper Grade Schools.

514

Table II.

REVENUE OF THE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT.

(SCHOOL FEES) 1901-1906.

Name of School.

1. Kowloon School....

2. Victoria School..

3. Belilios Public School (English).

4. Saiyingpun Anglo-Chinese School. 5. Yaumati Anglo-Chinese School............. 6. Wantsai Anglo-Chinese School... 7. Anglo-Indian School...

8. Aberdeen Anglo-Chinese School...... 9. Tanglunchau Anglo-Chinese School... 10. Taipo Anglo-Chinese School..... 11. Ueulong Anglo-Chinese School..... 12. Pingshan Anglo-Chinese School. 13. Belilios Public School (Chinese)..

924.00 1,849.50 1,952.50 . 1,979.00

1,132.50 1,452.50|1,604.00|1,278.50 1,248.00

1901. 1902. 1903. 1904. 1905.

1906.

$

C. $3 C.

$

$

C.

2,101.50

769.50

1,439.00

1,098.50

1,90700.

3,555.00

3022.00

572.50

123.001 112.00

163.00

331.00

33.00

90.00

91.50

58.00

564.00

118.50 587.50 934.00 745.00 3.50 308.00 1,219.50 1,832.00 34.00 612.00 1,591.50 - 2,349.00 201.50 485.00

Total, $1,132.50|2,532.50 4,961.00 7,177.50. 9,783.59 14,905.00

Table III.

PROPORTION OF THE TOTAL EXPENDITURE OF THE COLONY DEVOTED TO EDUCATION,

(Includes Queen's College.)

Year.

Expenditure of Expenditure on

the Colony.

Per cent.

Education.

1896....

2,474,910 |

76,511

3.09

1897.

2,641,410

72,984

2.76

1898.

2,841,805

72,420

2.54

1899..

3,162,792

75,152

2.37

1900..

3,628,447

79,994

2.20

1901.

4,111,722

86,946

2.11

1902.

5,909,546

92,356

1.56

1903..

5,396,669

130,620

2.42

1904.

6,531,349

151,589

2.32

1905..

6,951,275

158,678

2.28

1906...

6,832,610

159,373

2.33

2

515

-

Table IV.

TOTAL OF GOVERNMENT AND GRANT SCHOOLS (UPPER AND LOWER Grades).

UPPER GRADE. LOWER GRADE.

TOTAL.

MANAGING BODY.

Schools. Pupils. Schools. Pupils. Schools. Pupils.

Queen's College,

1

1.005

1

...

1,005

Education Department,

7

777

7

150

14

927

Roman Catholic Mission,

9

755

8

376

17

1,131

Secular,

1

319

1

39

2

358

Church of England,

2

275

2

275

Church Missionary Society,

3

120

15

541

18

661

Rhenish Mission,

London Missionary Society, Basel Mission, Wesleyan Mission, American Board Mission, Berlin Foundling House,

1

18

1

· 60

2

78

19

650

19

650

:

4

187

4

187

...

109

4

109

1

75

1

75

1

40

1

40

Total,

24*

3,269

61

2,227

85

5,496

-

1

Girls,

Boys,

Girls,

Boys,

516

Table VI.

Proportion of Girls to Boys.

A

IN GOVERNMENT SCHOOLS, INCLUDING QUEEN'S COLLEGE.

IN GRANT SCHOOLS.

r

TOTAL

324

1,641

1.965

1,608

1,923

3,531

1.932

3,564

5,496

B

IN UPPER GRADE VERNACULAR SCHOOLS.

IN LOWER GRADE VERNACULAR

TOTAL.

SCHOOLS.

278

1,046

1,324

622

822

278

1,868

2.146

3.

:

Number of Fupils (Average

Attendance).

4,000

3,900:

3,800

Table V.

CHART.

1895 |

1896. 1897. 1898 1899. 1900. 1901. 1902. 1903. 1904 1905. 1906.

· 3,700

3,600

3,500

3,400

3,300

3,200

3350

3280

3,100

3,000

2,900

2,800

2,700

2,600

2,500

2,400

2,300

2,200

2,100

2146

2,000

1,900

1,800

1,700

1,600

1,500

1,400

1,300

1356

$1,200

1,100

1,000

900

800

700

600

500

400

300

200

100

RED Line

1

BLACK Line

DOTTED RED Line

DOTTED BLACK Line

=Government and Grant Schools, English (with Quecu's College),

Government and Grant Schools, Vernacular.

Private Schools, English (Max. monthly enrolment).

Private Schools, Vernacular (Max. monthly enrolment.)

FROM

521

Table VIII.

FREE SCHOLARSHIPS.

"A" Boys.

MANAGING BODY.

To

PERIOD.

WON BY

Grant School No. 64.

R. M. Saiyingpun, D. S. 4 Years if satisfactory

Pun Kwai.

progress shewn,

29.

L. M.

Do.,

Do.,

Chan Ki Chung.

""

40.

Do.,

Do.,

Do.,

Pun U Chiu.

""

>>

72.

S.

Yaumati, D. S.

Do.,

Hom Keng Po.

""

48.

B. M.

Do.,

Do.,

Hiu Iu Kui.

2

"}

"

50.

Do.,

Do.,

Do.,

Chu Tam Shiu.

>>

"}

35

Aberdeen,

G.

Saiyingpur, D. S.

Do.,

Liu Fuk On.

Do.,

Do.,

Do.,

Do.,

Yin Yung Cheng.

Tanglungchau,

Do.,

Wantsai, D. S.

Do.,

Ho Shiu Lan.

Do.,

Do.,

Do.,

Do.,

Ling Man Lai.

Uenlong,

Do.,

Yaumati, D. S.

Do.,

Saiyingpun, Yaumati

and Wantsai in

Competition,

Do.,

Queen's College. 3 Years if satisfac-

tory progress shewn.

66 B" Girls.

Belilios School, Lower

G.

Belilios School, Upper C.

4 Years if satisfac- toryprogress shewn.

Lo Lai Wa.

Classes.

Do..

Sissie Johannsen.

Do.,

Do.,

Do.,

Do.,

Leung A Liu.

Do.,

Do.,

Do.,

Do.,

Ng Ngai Sin.

Do.,

Do.,

Do.,

Chan So.

Do.,

Do.,

Do.,

Do.,

Do..

Shiu Tak Hing.

Grant School No. 33.

L. M.

Do.,

Im A Chü.

Do.,

Do.,

69.

W. M.

Do.,

Lantern I.

522

Table IX.

"A"

DATES OF LECTURES IN 1906.

St. Joseph's College, Mid. Feb. to end April.

Italian and French Convents, 1st May-

not finished.

Victoria and Belilios Schools, 1st Novem-

ber to Mid. February.

Lantern II.

Queen's College, Mid. February (Not used). Ellis Kadoorie School, Mid. April to Mid.

June.

Diocesan and Fairlea Schools, 1st October to

December.

Kowloon School, Mid. December to end of

February.

Lantern I.

"B"

ÅRRANGEMENT PROPOSED FOR THE FUTURE.

Diocesan and Fairlea Schools. Victoria and Belilios Schools. St. Joseph's College.

October 1st to Dec. 15th Dec. 16th to February 28th March 1st to April 30th

Lantern II.

Ellis Kadoorie School. Kowloon School and St. Mary's. Italian and French Convents.

523

Appendix A.

No. 1.-Kowloon British School.

Staff.—B. JAMES, M., Mrs MAIN, Mrs. MURRAY and Miss HOLMES,

Discipline and Organization.-Very good. Form II, the lowest but one in the Upper School, has been very weak numerically. On the other hand the 3 highest Forms were stronger than usual, numbering 15 pupils.

Sanitation.-Very satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 230 pupils. Apparatus:-Very sitisfactory.

English-Reading.--Good. Writing. Handwriting has considerably improved in the lower Forms. The con positions of the senior pupils are very neat, and in most respects satisfactory. The style is however in some instances rather childish and I wish that the number of school lessons and examina ions would permit the reading of standard authors in school. If this is imposible, the for nation of a school library would, I feel sure, do much good.

Geography.—Good. Some very good papers were written at examination in the Upper School.

*

History. The lowe Forms of the Upper School do not seem to have got on as well as usual with this subject. The 3 highest Forms are working together.

together. They are mainly taught from notes. It would be well if standard works of reference were purchased, and the pupils encouraged to turn to these for further information.

Arithmetic. Very food in the Upper School. The Lower School appear to me to be somewhat backward, an! I noticed a distinct weakness in mental arithmetic.

French. The foll wing extracts with which I concur are from a report made by Mr. M. D.'AGOSTINI. The host advanced pupils had been studing for only 16 months :-

"Considering the time they have studied I found the result " Satisfactory." Their pronunciation is very acurate, and I much admired the uniformity of the knowledge, as the one knows nearly as much as the other. I related in French two little subjects of composition. A short try and the subject of a voyage. The students understood a great deal of what I said,nd I knew they did by their answers in cross-questioning. Some words which were new to the students were translated by their teacher. Most of the questions taken from Lebon's Reader and the two subjects of composition were answered rather well. The stud ints are rather weak in composition. I think the method by which they are learning isery good and the books well selected, but I submit a few slight suggestions. It would perhaps be a good thing if the teacher spoke only French to the Senior class and as mich as possible to the Junior one. When the students do not under- stand the new words ad sentences, they might be explained by means of a picture book made for the purpose and by other words already known and by association of ideas. Also to devote a part of each lesson to some practical work not connected with the books in use. For instance to elate simple short stories in French and ask the pupils to write them in addition to their home work, then when the compositions are corrected to ask them to find out the rules from which they have deviated. These compositions could be used as a subject of conversation by the teacher. I would also ask the students to compose a few sentences at home, lear them by heart whether right or wrong and repeat them to the teacher, who would correct them afterwards, increasing the number of these sentences gradually. Hossfeld's French Grammar contains a lot of stories which could be used by the teacher.'

Drawing-Improved. This subject should be tested next year by some one better qualified to judge it than myself.

Singing.-Excell int.

Needlework. The Sub-Inspector of Needlework reports that while otherwise good, the sewing in the Uppe School seems to lack variety. The hemming done by some very small children is good.

524

Scripture. The following extracts are from the report of the Reverend.F. T. Jons-

SON :-

"On Tuesday, February 5th, 1907, I visited the Kowloon British School and examined, the children in Holy Scripture. For the purposes of the examination the school was divide 1 into three Classes, the highest of which alone was examined by a written paper, the other two being examined viva voce. In the highest class, of ten girls, the answering was good and on the whole very even, one girl, whose papers were distinctly better than those of any other, obtained the creditable percentage of 89% while the lowest percentage obtained was 63%. The only criticism that I wish to make is that the children seemed to find it a labour to transfer their

thoughts to paper...... Twelve questions were set and though in my opinion ample time was given for the answering of them all, I found it advisable to offer full marks for the correct answering of any ten. In the second division the answering was very good indeed. except in the case of one or two children who have not been long at the School. As regards their repetition they were practically word-perfect, and they displayed a thorough familiarity with the principal stories from the Books of Joshua and Judges. I was particularly pleased with the intelligent and thoughtful answering of some of the children. in this Division. In the lowest Class the repetition was excellent and the children appear- ed to have a thorough grasp of what they had been taught from Genesis and of the main events of Our Lord's life. To sum up: I am extremely pleased with the results of the examination, they reflect great credit upon both teachers and children, and it is impossible- to be sufficiently thankful for the excellent grounding in the text of Holy Scripture given to the children in this School."

No. 2.-Victoria British School.

Staff.-W. H. WILLIAMS, F.R.G.S., Mrs. E. WILKINSON and Mrs. L. MORRIS.

Discipline and Organization. The discipline is very good. The organization is also satisfactory with this exception, that the work of the Upper School (which is taught by Mr. WILLAMS) is hampered by the presence of two girls who are an obstacle to the proper working of the syllabus. Girls should not in future be allowed in the Upper School.

Sanitation.The dust caused by the cement floor which has become pulverised makes it very difficult to keep the place clean. Wooden floors are badly wanted. The insanitary surroundings of the School have been a cause of sickness. These disadvantages are being remedied.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 182 pupils.

Apparatus.-Very satisfactory,

English.-Reading. Good. The elocution and pronunciation of the younger pupils is quite satisfactory. Writing.-Handwriting in the Lower Classes is very good. It has improved in the Upper School, where however, it is still by no means all it should be. Much still remains to be done in making the pupils shew up neat work. The matter of the compositions is good: spelling however is still rather weak.

Geography.Good. The strongest subject in the Upper School.

History.-None is taught in the Lower School. It appears to me that it would be desirable to give those Classes some insight into Greek and Roman History by means of short biographies in the way that has so successfully been followed at Kowloon School. In the Upper School a manual of Constitutional History is read. This does not seem a profitable study for pupils who do not bring to it any previously acquired knowledge of the subject. The school sent in essays for the Empire Day Challenge Cup and Prize inter-all Primary Schools of the Empire," and received honourable mention. The subject was the growth of the British Empire.

Mathematics.—Arithmetic.-Good progress is being made throughout the Lower School : the top Class did very well. The work in the Upper School is very weak, and very untidy. Approximate methods are very well in their place; but at examination nearly the whole Upper School worked out a Compound Multiplication sum on the assumption that odd pounds and shillings in a large total were inconsiderable trifles.

525

Algebra--A fair beginning has been made.

Hygiene.--Besides the Government Course, one in physiology has been taken, sup- plemented by lessons in "First Aid."

Drawing.-Is being taught with some success.

Singing-Simple singing in unison is taught.

Shorthand. The theory has been well taught. The Headmaster expects to work the Upper School up to a speed of not less than 60 words a minute by Easter next.

Kindergarten.-Good.

No. 3.-Belilios Public School, English and Anglo-Chinese Side.

Staff.-Mrs. TuTCHER, Miss BATEMAN, and three Junior Assistant Teachers.

Discipline and Organization.-The nomenclature and arrangement of the Classes has been changed, in order to bring the school into line with the other Government Anglo-Chinese Schools of the Colony. The Upper School now consists of 3 Classes, the highest being Class I; and the Classes in the Lower School are subdivided into Divisions, the A and B Divisions being for pupils who speak English fluently, and the C and D Divisions for those who do not. It is not however intended to convey the idea that it has already been necessary to form all these Divisions in all the Classes of the Lower School.

Discipline is very good throughout the school. More Class-teaching is still necessary in the Lower School. Perhaps the methods of some of the Junior Assistant Mistresses require more supervision by the Headmistress.

Sanitation.-Satisfactory. But the school needs repainting and colour washing.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 500 pupils.

Apparatus. Very satisfactory.

English.The syllabus in the Chinese Divisions of Classes in the Lower School is now approximately the same as that followed in the Government Anglo-Chinese Boys' Schools. Colloquial Most of the pupils still appear to think that modesty compels them to speak in a whisper. The teachers are apt to fall in with this convention, and instruct each pupil, as it were privately, in turn.

The Belilios Trust II has offered prizes for the encouragement of elocution. Reading. Very good in the Upper School. Writing.-Very neat throughout the school. The compositions of the senior pupils were severely tested at midsummer in an examination for certain prizes, kindly offered by Mr. BELILIOS. The results were excellent.

The same may also be said of much of the work of the Chinese Girls in the Lower School. Class VI would probably have reproduced better a story told them if they had been more accustomed to replying and therefore to listening carefully to what is said to them.

Geography.-Good.

History-Very good.

Arithmetic-Mental-Good.

Written. The work is on the whole very neat and

accurate. The numbers of sums are occasionally omitted.

Needlework.-Chinese embroidery is tastefully done. Plain sewing should not be

©

neglected.

526

No. 4.-Saiyingpun District School.

Staff.-A. MORRIS and 4 Chinese Assistant Masters.

Discipline and Organization.-The Discipline is very good, and the organization as satisfactory as can be expected in view of the weakness of the Chinese Staff. The Head- master has to take 2 Classes and has thus little time for supervision. Class VII, in charge of a probationer, and Class VIII, in charge of a junior master are in consequence rather below the mark.

Sanitation.-Very satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 187 pupils.

Apparatus. Very satisfactory.

English.-Colloquial.-Fair in Class VIII, where the master's English is by no means good, and weak in Class VII. Very good in the highest Classes. Reading.-Poor in Class VII. Writing.-Very good. The compositions in Class V reach a high standard..

Grography-Weak in Class VII. Classes VI to IV have been skilfully taught. In Class VI there is much ignorance as to the railways of China. Classes Vand IV have done very well, though the school maps drawn at examination might be improved. Current topics are evidently not forgotten.

Arithemetic-Mental.-This subject requires more attention. Written-Not taught very intelligently in Class VII. Class IV did excellently at examination, and Class V did well. The expression ascending order was generally misunderstood.

Drawing.-Includes free hand, free satisfactory, especially in the last named.

Chinese.-Fair.

arm and brush work. The progress is very The subject has proved to be very popular.

No. 5.-Yaumati District School.

Staff-W. CURWEN, J. C. PARKIN and 5 Chinese Assistant Masters.

-

Discipline and Organization. The school is now nearly full and will probably be quite, full next term. Care should then be taken to give preference to the younger and more intelligent candidates. Many of the boys in the lower Classes are now too old to be likely to turn their English studies to a profitable account. The masters of the lower Classes do not seem to follow the syllabus very exactly. Perhaps rather more supervision should be given to them. The discipline is very good.

Sanitation.-Very satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 268 pupils.

Apparatus.-Very satisfactory.

English-Colloquial.-The pronunciation of the masters and consequently of the pupils of the lower Classes is not distinct enough. I have again to point out that they attempt to speak too fast. Good on the whole in the 2 lowest Classes, and very good in the rest. Reading.-Very good. Writing. The reproduction of a short story at ex- amination by Class VI was not up to the average. Handwriting has much improved. Composition is a strong subject in the 2 highest Classes where it is very good. Serious grammatical blunders are rare.

Geography. The local geography is well taught. Classes VI and V did but poorly at examination, in the latter it seems there are a good many boys who are not up to the work. Sketch maps are very bad. Class IV have done

very well.

!

-

527

Arithemetic. Mental Arithmetic needs more attention. Written.-There is a lack of common-sense observable. Few boys can see at a glance that 12/6 is of £1. De- cimals are weak. Questions are not always numbered, and in some cases it is impossible to see how answers are arrived at. Class IV are fair; and Class V distinctly weak.

Chinese.-Weak. Requires attention.

No. 6.-Wantsai District School.

Staff.-YOUNG HEE and 7 Chinese Assistant Masters.

Discipline and Organization.-Very good. It seems that some check should be kept on the numbers of the lowest Class. Boys 17 and 18 years of age should not be admitted to it.

Sanitation.-Fairly satisfactory. Class room VIII is overcrowded. Owing to lack of accommodation Classes VII and VI have unfortunately to be taken together in one room, as also Classes V and IV.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 241 pupils.

Apparatus.-Very satisfactory. The new desks are a great improvement; more are

wanted.

English.-Colloquial.-Very good, though the methods of Class VIII would bear improve- ment. Class VII have done excellently. Reading. Very good. Writing.-Very good in Classes VII and VIII. The work in the higher Classes is tidy, and well written. Com- positions are very correct so far as they go; but they err on the side of extreme brevity.

Geography.The local geography is very well taught. The higher Classes have done fairly. The syllabus of Class VI seems to be too ambitious.

Arithmetic.-Mental.-Requires more attention. Classes VIII are weak in knowledge of Multiplication Table. Written.-The lowest Classes are good. In the upper Classes the work is neat. But the processes should be shewn more fully, and in the proper sequence, wherever the calculation is one which can not be performed mentally.

Drawing. A good beginning has been made with brush-work.

makage

Chinese.--Good.

No. 7.—Anglo-Indian School.

Staff.-JAHANGIR KHAN and 1 Chinese Assistant Master.

Discipline and Organization.—The discipline is good. The organization requires atten- tion. Pupils are promoted too quickly. Departmental orders have not always been obeyed.

Sanitation. The school is not kept sufficiently clean. In particular the Masters' desk was on 2 occasions at least in a very disorderly and untidy condition.

Floor Space.--Sufficient for 40 pupils.

Apparatus.-Satisfactory.

English.-Colloquial.-Good. Reading.-The pronunciation is fair. The subject matter is not sufficiently understood. Writing-Bad. Very great pains must be taken with it.

Geography. The subject was neglected in the earlier part of the year, as there was a delay in procuring the necessary maps. It requires much attention.

Arithmetic.-Mental. Requires more attention. Writing.-Has improved considerably.

Urdu. Has been taught.

528

No. 8.-Aberdeen Anglo-Chinese School.

Staff.-LEE KAng-sham.

Discipline and Organization.-Good. The pupils are attentive and polite. The amount of work got through in the year is rather small.

Sanitation.-Very satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 41 pupils.

Apparatus.-More maps are needed.

English.-Colloquial.-Very good.

Recitation should be taught. Reading.--Very.

satisfactory. Writing.-Handwriting is poor. Composition.-Fair. Exercises should be dated and more carefully corrected.

Geography.-Fair.

Arithmetic.-Mental-Good.

Written.-Good on the whole.

No. 9.-Tanglungchau Anglo-Chinese School.

Staff-Kwok KING-SHAN.

Discipline and Organization.-Good. So far as possible, the syllabus of the District Schools has been followed.

Sanitation.Satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 51 pupils.

Apparatus.-Requires supplementing.

English-Colloquial-Good in Class VII. Fair in Class VIII. Reading.—Very good. Writing. Good in Class VII. Fair in Class VIII.

Geography.-Fair.

Arithmetic.-Poor in Class VIII.

Chinese.-Reading.-Good. Composition.-Fair.

No. 10.-Uenlong School.

Staff-PUN Ü-SAM.

Discipline and Organization.—I am not satisfied with the way this school has been conducted during the past year. The master seems to require more supervision than can conveniently be given to him.

Sanitation. Not satisfactory. Hens and cigarettes are out of place in a school room.

Apparatus.-The furniture is of a very rudimentary order. It. will be renewed

next year.

English.-Colloquial.-Poor. Reading.-Fair. Writing.-Handwriting is good. Com- position poor. My remarks last year on the teaching of Grammar have received no atten- tion. An unauthorised and perfectly useless work on English Grammar is being studied.

Geography.-Bad.

Arithmetic. Very good. A boy in Class VI correctly measured and found the area. of a rice-field in my presence.

Chinese.-Fair.

1

1

529

No. 11. Taipo.

Staff-MAK PING-FUI.

*Discipline and Organization.-A very good start seems to have been nade.

Sanitation.--The situation of the school is very noisy. The roof needs a ventilating

shutter.

Apparatus.--Satisfactory.

English.-Very good progress has been made during the few months the school has been open. The master is teaching in the proper way. Colloquial.-Very good. Reading.- Good. Writing.-Very good.

Arithmetic.- Good.

No. 12.--Ping Shan.

Staff-CHU WING-TO.

Discipline and Organizatim.-Gool. It is questionable whether a private ancestral hall is a proper place for a Government School. I do not think that pupils of other clans will readily find admittance.

Sanitation.-Very satisfactory.

Apparatus.--Satisfactory.

English.-Good progress has been made in the 5 months the school has been open.

Arithmetic.-Fair.

No. 13.-Belilios Public School.

Vernacular Side.

Staff-SUNG HOK-PANG, 3 Assistant Teachers, one Needlework Teacher and two Pupil Teachers.

Discipline and Organization.-Very good. speech. Standard I is weakest in all subjects.

Sanitation.-Satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 432 pupils.

Apparatus.-Very satisfactory.

The girls are remarkable for their audible Very young children should not be admitted.

Chinese.-Reading.-Good. Composition.-Good. The writing is rather slow. The work of the highest girls appeared to me to be excellent. Another year it would be as well to take a more weighty opinion on the subject.

Geography.—Good, except in Standard I. It is natural that the study: phenomena of day and night, the seasons, &c., being a new subject should be at least well understood and

known.

Arithmetic. The weakest subject. Mental.-Good in the most Standards. Written.- Poor in the 4 lowest Standards. Good in Standards V and VI.

Hygiene.-The subject has been studied attentively, and the pupils take an interest in it.

Drawing.- -Some pretty pictures in the Chinese style are produced. The girls enjoy doing them, and acquire soine neatness and observation in the process.

Singing.—Continues to be taught.

Needlework. Very pretty silk embroidery is done, somewhat to the neglect of plain sewing, which should be insisted on, for the beginners at any rate.

530

Appendix B.

DETAILED REPORTS ON GRANT SCHOOLS.

NOTE.-The reports of the schools marked with an asterisk are upon the work of the year ending 30th June.

No. 1.-St. Joseph's College.

Staff. Bro. SYLVESTER (Director) and 9 Assistant Masters.

Discipline and Organization.-Very good.

Sanitation.-Very satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 522 pupils.

Apparatus. Very satisfactory. There is a steady renewal of worn out and old fashioned apparatus.

English-Colloquial.-Great pains are taken to improve the speech of the junior Standards. There is a noticeable improvement in this respect. Reading.-Good.-Several sets of readers are in use, the subject matter of which is explained in an interesting and stimulating manner. Writing. Greatly improved. Compositions are neat and handwriting is generally very good. Standard VII, which is much stronger numerically than last year, still shewed up some rather sketchy work and the punctuation was very faulty. Sentences are often too long and involved, though two papers were excellent. Standard V which did badly last year, is now well up to the mark.

Geography.-Standard III failed rather badly in an examination on the Canton Province. It is curious that facts of local interest seem so often to be those least studied. As usual boys know more about the Grand Canal than about the Canton-Hankow railway: and in this respect the Chinese boys were the worst offenders.

Standard V have done on the whole very well in a long syllabus. The history of the countries studied might have been better known. Answers should be given in complete sentences, and the article and verb should not be omitted as is often done.

The highest Standards were examined on England, with the object of eliciting how far the Course of Visual Instruction has given them a clearer insight into the real nature of the country. The course had to be somewhat hurried; and on the whole I am encouraged by the measure of success attained. But it is clear that there are immense difficulties to over- come before home-keeping youths can acquire a lively conception of surroundings so far removed from their vision. The following descriptions of the Thames valley are typical :-

"The valley of the Thames is very beautiful, especially in the evening, when the dust of London is blown up. The sun shines on it and makes it appear to be of different colours and continually changing, which is called the sunset of the Thames.'

"

"The scenery of the Thames is covered with bridges and towers all along and some beautiful lighthouses."

History. The subject is very well taught, and Standard V have noticeably improved. The Upper Standards are very well acquainted with their facts, though they do not always express them well.

Mathematics.—Arithmetic.-Very good in the lower Standards. The written work shewn up by the higher Standards in this as in the two following subjects is exceedingly good both in accuracy and neatness. Algebra.-Excellent. Euclid.-The work is thor- oughly understood. The propositions are well written and the riders are accurately solved.

Hygiene. Very good.

Drawing. The subject is being well taught, according to the requirements of the Oxford Local.

Grant.-I recommend a Grant at the rate of 30/- and report the school to be "thoroughly efficient ".

531

No. 2.-Italian Convent.

Staff.-Seven European Sisters of Charity.

Discipline and Organization.-Very good. In Standard IV note books might be kept more systematically. In some of the lower Standards the pupils collaborated at examination without any attempt at concealment. I have no objection to their working together at other times, if the teachers desire: but they should be taught also to treat test examinations with respect.

Sanitation.-Very satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 430 pupils.

Apparatus. Some of the maps should be replaced by new ones: otherwise satisfactory.

The

English.-Reading-Good. Writing.- Spelling requires attention in Standards II and III. Handwriting is good throughout the school, and the work shewn up is neat. formation of some of the capital letters is unusual. Foreign idioms occur in the composi- tions of the higher Standards, which have nevertheless improved considerably. The papers shewed a considerable knowledge of current topics.

Geography. The work is taught too much by rote in the lower Standards. Standard III were distinctly weak. At examination Standard IV did less well than Standard VI, who shewed up some very good work. Map drawing to illustrate answers is a subject that seems much neglected.

History.--Very good. The work done gives evidence of a thorough grasp of the subject, particularly of the parts relating to constitutional matters.

Hygiene.-Very good. Great pains have been taken and good results secured. One girl in Standard IV knows the whole Elementary Course by heart: but the teacher is not responsible for this.

Arithmetic.-Mental.-Good. Writing.-Excellent results were obtained at examina- tion in the 3 highest Standards, who got 86% in a by no means easy paper. In the lower Standards a number of mistakes at examination were probably attributable to

nervousness.

Needlework.-Very good.

Grant. The school continues to be thoroughly efficient. I recommend a Grant at the rate of 35/-.

*No. 3.-French Convent.

Staff-Four European Sisters of Charity, and one Assistant Teacher.

Discipline and Organization.-Discipline, very good. The routine work of the Upper Standards suffers considerably owing to the demands among the pupils for instruction in subjects outside the ordinary syllabus, as well as from the fact that these Standards do their work together in one room. In the lower Standards the organization is good.

Sanitation.-Very satisfactory.

Floor Space-Sufficient for 138 pupils.

Apparatus. Very satisfactory.

English-Colloquial.-The lower Standards are very well taught. Reading.-Good. Writing. The work of Standard VI is marred by many bad mistakes in spelling. The handwriting in Standard IV and below is good. Grammar requires attention throughout the school.

Geography. Some very good papers were written at examination. graphy is somewhat neglected in the lowest Standards.

%

The local geo-

532

History. The subject shews some improvement since last year. Questions at exa- mination should be more fully auswered, and a few principal dates should be given, whether expressly asked for or not.

Arithmetic. The Arithmetic in Standard IV was exceedingly poor and inaccurate. Standards V & VI did well on a very easy paper. It is a weak subject in the lower Standards.

Hygiene. Well taught. Willoughby's book is however not being studied, on the ground that it is too difficult.

Needlework. Very good.

Grant.-I recommend a Grant at the rate of 31

* No. 4.—Victoria Anglo-Portuguese School.

Staff Mrs. CORDEIRO and one Assistant.

Discipline and Organization.—The school has hitherto been known as the Victoria English School.

The organization is very good. Disicipline is good. At inspection orders to the pupils might be given rather less excitedly.

Sanitation.--Yery satisfactory, so long as the inner room is not use:l as a class room, for which it is too dark.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 49 pupils.

Apparatus.-Very satisfactory.

English-Colloquial and Reading. Very good. Writing-Handwriting is very good. Composition is very good in the lower Standards. Standards IV and V did fairly

at examination.

Geography. The lower Standards were rather weak in knowledge of the facts which lie nearest. Standard II did not seem to know where Macao is. The trade routes were not very well known.

well known. Still a great deal has been taught and learned.

History.-Good.

Hygiene. The Elementary Course has been carefully taught. More simple experi- ments should be shewn.

Arithmetic.-Very good.

Grant. The school shews a steady improvement. I recommend a Grant at the rate of 30/-, and report that it is "thoroughly efficient ".

*No. 5.-Bridges Street.

Staff-Two Europeans Sisters of Charity.

Discipline and Organization.--Very good. With one exception, all pupils are in the 2 lowest Standards.

Sanitation.-Very satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 102 pupils.

Apparatus.-Very satisfactory.

English-Colloquial.-Greatly improved.

Reading.-Good.

Composition.-Very

good the spelling in Standard I is a weak point.

:

533

Geography. Very good.

Arithmetic.-Very good.

•Needlework.-Good. Patching and mending should be taught.

Grant.-I recommend a Grant at the rate of 30/-.

* No. 6.-Sacred Heart.

Staff-Two European Sisters of Charity.

Discipline and Organization.-Good. The drill might be made smarter. Further attention should be paid to my remarks under this heading last year.

Sanitation.-Very satisfactory.

Floor Space-Sufficient for 88 pupils.

Apparatus. Very satisfactory.

English.-Colloquial.-Gocd. Reading.-Fair. There is a tendency to read too fast,

Writing.-Good:

Geography.-Fair.

Arithmetic.-Mental.-Fair.

Written.-Fair. Problems are not well done.

Grant.-I recommend a Grant at the rate of 30/-.

No. 7.-Diocesan School, Girls.

Staff-Miss SKIPTON, Miss HAWKER and 2 Assistants.

Discipline and Organization.-Discipline is good. There seeins a need of a mixed and better graded syllabus in several subjects, especially in Geography. The Standards are taught together, which cannot but be disadvantageous for all of them.

Sanitation.-Very satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 64 pupils. Apparatus.--Satisfactory.

ghest

English.-Reading.-Very good. Standard III might read more fluently. In the lower Standards the subject matter is well understood. Writing.-Spelling is very weak throughout the school, with the exception of Standard VII where soine very good com- position is done; it should receive more attention. The construction of sentences in the Upper Standards requires attentiɔn. In the written work shewn up at examination as many as 12 or 15 lines appear without a full stop, and many of the sentences are incomplete and faulty through the omission of auxiliary verbs and of articles. Handwriting is good, and the work is neat..

Geography. In Standard II the map is not made enough use of, and the work is learned too much by heart. Standard IV on the contrary are being very well instructed.

The Upper Classes were at examination set papers from their note books, as

as the por- tions of text books offered for examination-seven or eight pages in the case of Standards V and VI-were too brief to enable me to form a definite opinion. The notes given the pupils were very good as regards matter, though they might have been better arranged. On the whole, questions upon them were well answered.

History.-Some very good work was shewn up in Standards VII and VI. Standard V did poorly, making great confusion between certain famous personages.

534

Hygiene.-Good. Although at the Team Competition spelling and grammar were not taken into consideration, still inability to express their meaning on paper seems to have lost the pupils many marks.

Arithmetic.A A fair beginning has been made in the lowest Standards. Elsewhere the work continues to be extreinely poor and a long way below the average.

Needlework.-The syllabus is carefully graded, and the work well done. The Inspec- tor of Needlework comments on the fact that girls use thimbles which are too big, and remedy the matter by stuffing them with paper.

Grant. -I recommend a Grant at the rate of 30/-.

* No. 8.-Diocesan School, Boys.

Staff-Headmaster, G. PIERCY, 8 Assistant European Masters and Mistresses, and 2 Chinese Masters.

Discipline and Organization.-The discipline continues to be all that could be desired. The plan of separating the Chinese from the English speaking boys in parallel Divisions of the lowest Classes, appears to be working well. The master of the lowest Chinese Division. is inexperienced and requires some advice upon the method of teaching. I am strongly of opinion that some boys in the higher Standards have been promoted too quickly, especially in Standard V.

Sanitation. Very satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 470 pupils.

Apparatus.-Very satisfactory.

English.--Colloquial.-The method of teaching Colloquial on the Chinese Side of the Lower School has improved. Reading.-Good.-Writing.-I have again to draw attention, and more emphatically, to the weakness in English composition especially in the highest Standard. It is below the mark, and requires serious attention. Thirteen boys shewed up essay at the last examination of whom one, J. R. CROLIUS, did very well. His essay was the rt t of ordered thinking and not merely a series of vague sentences committed to paper he order in which they happened to simmer out of the author's brain; it was well written, grammatical, correctly spelled and neat. None of the other pupils did really well and nearly half the Class were very weak, their work being untidy, illogical and full of gross grammatical blunders.

The composition in Standard V has considerably improved, and is on the whole very satisfactory. It would be better if shorter compositions were shewn up-three-quarters of a page is enough for Standard V,—and more attention paid to correctness of grammar.

Analysis and Parsing are rather weak, and a number of mistakes are made in "Parts of Speech."

Grammar. The work is fairly good.

Geography.-Good on the whole. I retain my opinion that "Asia and Africa with fuller particulars of China" is too much for a year's work in Standard V.

History. The papers set at examination were on the whole better done than last year. Standard V did fairly on the whole, and a few boys very well. Standard VI did well and the work of Standard VII may be considered to be very good.

Mathematics.-Arithmetic.-Good. Geometry.-The difference in the attainments of the pupils of Standard V in Geometry, as in most other subjects, is very remarkable. Fi- gures should be neatly drawn and lettered with capitals. The propositions should not be written out like a piece of composition, but after the style adopted in modern text books. Standards VI and VII are good. Riders are well done. Geometrical Drawing.-The problems set seem to have been too hard for Standard VI. The work in Standard VII is good on the whole, and fairly neatly worked. Solutions should be worked in ink not pen- cil. All the working should be shewn ; no erasures should be made. Algebra.—Standard VII with the exception of 3 boys have done very well indeed. Standard VI were also good but there is a great difference between the work of the two Standards.

*

--

535

Bookkeeping.-A long and difficult paper was excellently done by Standard VII, in a way much above the average as regards accuracy, neatness and grasp of the subject. Standard VI also did well.

Shorthand—is still in the theoretical stage. I think that no boy can yet write as fast as he can with long band. The subject has been taught for 3 years.

Latin. The subject was started in the year under review. I have had personal ex- perience of teaching the text book used (Sonnenschein's Ora Martitima), and I can only express disappointment at the results achieved. The ability to translate from English into Latin at the end of a year is practically nil. The teaching of this very valuable subject requires reconsideration. I suggest that if is taught, more time must be given to it; which time might be gained by teaching the Non-Chinese boys Latin Grammar in the place. of English Gramınar.

Chinese. Reading.-Good. Composition.-Fair. It would be an assistance to the Inspector if compositions were done in exercise books, and dated.

Chinese pens and paper should be used.

Grant.—I recommend a Grant at the highest rate of 35/- and report that the school is thoroughly efficient. The main points that seen to me to require attention are English Composition in the two highest Standards, and the danger of too rapid promotions.

* No. 9.-St. Mary's.

Staff-Four European Sisters of Charity, and one Assistant Teacher.

Discipline and Organization.-The discipline has considerably improved. It is still hard to extract answers from the Upper Standards, where the teaching can not be considered to be altogether satisfactory.

Sanitation.-Very satisfactory.

Floor Space-Sufficient for 152 pupils.

Apparatus.-Satisfactory.

English.-Reading.-Good. Writing.-Dictation is good in the lowest Standards. Composition is very good in Standards III & IV and good in Standards V & VI; and there is generally a considerable improvoment in spelling and neatness.

Geography.-The

-The lower Standards are doing well. Standard V profess to have learned Asia and begun Africa during the year. But their ignorance of Asia at examination shews that the treatment has been very superficial.

History. The method of teaching this subject requires a radical amendment in Standards IV & V. I am far from wishing the work to degenerate into learning strings of dates; but when (as happened when Standard IV were questioned on their period) the almost unanimous opinion placed Magna Carta in the XIX century, some change of system is surely called for. Standard VI were correct in their facts, though their replies were curt and stereotyped: but they should have a text book. At present they learn by means of questions and answers dictated to them.

Hygiene. The time devoted to the subject is only hour a week. Willoughby's Hygiene is not used as a book of reference by the Senior Classes. The simple facts of the Elementary Course appear to have been grasped.

Arithmetic.-The theory of expressing numbers by figures is not well taught in Standard 111: in Standard IV fractions are never reduced to the lowest terms. The work of the higher Standards has greatly improved in neatness and accuracy, and is now very good.

Needlework.-Good.

Grant.--I recommend a Grant at the rate of 30/-.

* No. 10.-Cathedral School.

536

Staff-Two European and 4 Chinese Masters.

Discipline and Organization.-The school under new management shewed a very marked improvement during the latter half of the school year. I regret to report that the Manager has decided to close it, as the building is required for another purpose.

Sanitation.-Very satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 446 pupils.

Apparatus.--Satisfactory.

English.-Colloquial.--Very much improved. The Chinese masters have been trained to teach the subject and have profited considerably. Reading.-Good. Writing.-Compo- sition is still weak in the Upper Standards. There is a great improvement in the Lower School.

Geography-Weak in the higher Standards. Elsewhere good.

Hygiene.-Standard IV has improved since the Team examination. The Upper Stand- ards are little better than Standard IV.

Arithmetic.--Good.

Chinese.-Fair. Weakest in the lower Classes.

Grant. I recommend a Grant at the rate of 30/-.

* No. 11.--Ellis Kadoorie School.

Staff-Mr. W. BRAIDWOOD, one English and 11 Chinese Assistant Masters.

Discipline and Organization.-Discipline, very good. The weakness of the European Staff was accentuated towards the end of the school year, by the retirement of one of the Assistant English Masters whose place has not yet been filled, as well as by the greatly in- creased number of pupils. The increased numbers are partly due to the facilities offered for free education, there being at present about 100 boys in the school who pay no fees. In these circumstances, the junior Chinese Masters do not receive the supervision they so such need, as the Headmaster must find his time almost entirely occupied with the highest Classes, which give evidence of assiduous attention on his part.

It would be well if the Classes were uninformly designated by numbers, and the Divi- sions of classes by letters.

Sanitation.-The new buildings, towards the cost of which the Government is sub- scribing $7,000, are nearly finished. Meanwhile the school is overcrowded; while the noise and disturbance caused by the new construction are inevitable hindrances to the lessons.

Apparatus.-Very satisfactory.

English-Colloquial.-The teaching in the lower Classes has improved, notably in Class: VI D. Much however remains to be done. Reading.-In Class VI C there has been introduced the barbarous, old Hongkong system of teaching reading; the Class master con- fines himself to the pronunciation of the words, and subsequently a Chinese master "ex- plains" the meaning by giving a word for word Chinese translation. Writing.-Handwriting is good throughout. The composition in the two highest Classes is quite unusually good, and reaches the highest standard that can reasonably be expected of Chinese boys, namely that they should make no mistakes worse than awkward expressions and the use of foreign sounding idioms. It should be needless to add that they have not arrived at this point without also being able to speak English very well. The use of such abbreviations as "can't" and "don't" is to be deprecated in essay writing. Hygiene should not be dragged unnecessarily into alien subjects.

T

F

537

Geography.-Some of the junior masters have little idea of how the subject should be taught. But the senior Classes under the Headmaster have improved greatly in the year. The written work is fuller, contains the sort of facts that ought to be remembered, is accurate in the main, and neat. Map drawing from memory has much improved.

The course of Visual Instruction was given in the evenings, as there are at present no means of darkening a class room. I regret to say that the attendance was poor, averaging only about 50 pupils. It is a pity that it was not made compulsory.

Tag

History. The Course of General History recommended by the Committee on History and Geography is being followed; but as it has been in force for little more than a year, the three highest Classes are studying practically the same part of it. The results as shewn at examination are very satisfactory, and indicate that the subject is being taught as it should be. The more intelligent pupils at any rate have a useful and clear knowledge of the main outlines of the early civilizations.

Hygiene. The subject is being properly taught. I suggest that experiments in "science" should in the first instance be confined to the illustration of the prescribed course in hygiene, as otherwise they may become somewhat discursive. There is a sufficient apparatus.

Mathematics.--Arithmetic.-Good. Algebra. A new subject. The syllabus is of a very elementary character. The work done is fairly good. Euclid. Also a new subject. Probably some modern book on geometrical drawing might with advantage he used as an introduction to Euclid. The results are fairly good. Riders should be taught. Letter- ing should be consistent, and the recognized abbreviations be used.

Chinese.-Reading.-Good, except in Class V. Composition.-Good. The formation of antithetical couplets might be dropped.

Grant. I recommend a Grant at the rate of 30/-. The very good work done in the upper Classes cannot wholly compensate for the comparative weakness of the Lower School.

No. 12.-Fairlea.

Staff-Miss HAZELAND and Miss FLETCHER.

Discipline and Organization.-Discipline, good. The school log-book has not been kept as required by section 16. (b) of the Code. The teaching of the lower Standards re- quires more supervision from the Headmistress.

Sanitation.-Very satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 44 pupils.

Apparatus. Very satisfactory.

English.-Colloquial.--Not sufficiently practised in the lower Standards. The elder pupils have made very good progress. Reading.-In the lower Standards the teaching of this subject is not altogether satisfactory. The pupils do not seem to understand what they read. This may be partly due to the old fashioned readers in use. Writing. The lower Standards are rather weak. Standard V have done excellently.

Geography.- -Weak in the lower Standards, where the subject is taught in too theoreti- cal a manner. The senior pupils have done very well.

History-An intelligent knowledge of General History is shewn in the top Standard.

Arithmetic.-Shorter methods are required; and Mental Arithmetic should receive more

attention.

Sewing.-Very Good.

Grant. I recommend a Grant at the rate of 30/-.

538

——

3:

No. 13.-St. Francis'.

Staff-One European Sister of Charity and 2 Assistant Mistresses.

Discipline and Organization.—Fair.

Sanitation.-Very satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 147 pupils.

Apparatus. Very satisfactory.

English-Colloquial.--Attention has been paid to my suggestions under this heading last year. There is still room for considerable improvement. Reading.-Fair.-Composi tion.-Fair.

Geography.-Good.

Arithmetic. Mental.-Fair.- Written.-Very good; a great improvement on last year. Needlework.-Fair. The older girls should be taught darning and patching.

Grant. I recommend a Grant at the rate of 30/-.

No. 14.-St. Stephen's.

Staff -TANG CHI-KUN and 5 Assistant, Masters.

Discipline and Organization.-Very good. Orders are smartly given, and in English. Criticisms in my Report of last year have received full attention.

Sanitation. The school is naturally rather dark, and the windows might be kept cleaner. Otherwise satisfactory.

Floor Space-Sufficient for 233 pupils.

Apparatus. Very satisfactory.

English-Colloquial. The junior masters do not speak distinctly enough. Also they speak too fast. The standard reached is a high one considering that the Staff is entirely Chinese. Reading.-Good. The subject is taught in the proper manner. Distinctness accuracy of pronunciation must be aimed at, Standard I shewed a very good knowledge of the meaning of their reader. Composition.-Good.

and

Geography.—Local Geography requires more attention in the lower Standards. The upper Standards have been taught very painstakingly and the result is good.

Arithmetic. The working is quick and accurate. Simple Decimals, illustrated by the

pupils' knowledge of a Decimal Coinage, might well precede vulgar fractions.

Chinese. Reading.-The methods of explanation used in the higher Standards might be improved on. Good on the whole. Composition.-Good except in the lowest Standard.

Grant. I recommend a Grant at the rate of $7, and report that the school is "thoroughly efficient".

No. 15.-No. 146 Hollywood Road.

Staff-Lo YUEN FONG.

Discipline and Organization.-Discipline, good. Organization, unsatisfactory.

Sanitation.-Satisfactory. The desks should be turned round so that the light falls on the left of the pupils.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 53 pupils.

539

Apparatus.-Satisfactory.

English.-Colloquial.-Quite neglected. The reading sheets are very badly taught. Reading. Pronunciation bad. Writing.-Handwriting, bad. Composition of sentences, fair.

Geography.-Not taught in Standard I. The requirements of the Code have been completely disregarded. What is taught is taught very badly.

Arithmetic.—Mental.-Poor. Written.-Good.

Chinese.-Reading.-Good. Composition.--Good.

Grant. I recommend a Grant at the rate of $5. I have to report that this school is "inefficient".

No. 16.-West Point. No. 3 Western Street.

Staff-SHAM WAI-CHING.

appears

Discipline and Organization. The organization is unsatisfactory. The teacher entirely unacquainted with the Code, and informed me that he had not seen my last annual report on his school.

All the pupils except 4 or 5 are in Standard I. The discipline is good.

Sanitation.-Very satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 66 pupils.

Apparatus.-Local maps are still required.

English-Colloquial.-The master seems to have tried hard, but his own English is faulty. The results are not satisfactory. Reading.-Pronunciation is fair, but the pupils have not been taught to reply in English to questions on what they read. Writing.-Stand-

ard I did well at examination.

Geography.-Not taught at all to Standard I in contravention of paragraph 26 (b.) Note (1) of the Code. Standard III begin with the World which is taught in the way which I have during the 5 years vainly endeavoured to eradicate. The following answer put to a question asked by the master at examination to a Class of beginners satisfied him and illustrates the method employed.

Q.- -What is Skager Rack?

A.-A sea of inlets.

Arithmetic.-Improved,

-Improved, Attention is being paid to simple problems. Sums on English money should, as I have said so often, be taught to Chinese boys after Chinese money.

Chinese-Fair.

Grant.- I recommend a Grant at the rate of $5, and in view of the general weakness - of the school and its small numbers, I have to report that it is "inefficient."

No. 17.-Berlin Foundling House.

Staff-Mrs. LAI WONG-SHI and 1 Assistant Teacher.

Discipline and Organization.-Very good on the whole. The children are very young and they appear to be promoted too early. The log-book should be more regularly written up.

Sanitation.-Very satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 102 pupils.

Apparatus.-Very satisfactory.

540

Chinese.-Reading and Composition.-Fair.

Geography.--Good, especially the lower Standards. Standard IV is the weakest, and requires attention. Physical Geography is well taught in the higher Standards.

Arithmetic.-Mental.-Fair.

Written.Good.

Needlework-Very good, especially in drawn work.

Grant.-As there has not been regular instruction by a European teacher this year, the school is classed as Lower Grade. I recommend a Grant at the rate of $7.

* No. 18.-Fairlea.

Staff-Miss M. JOHNSTONE.

Discipline and Organization.-Very good.

Sanitation. Very satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 136 pupils.

Apparatus.-Satisfactory.

Chinese. Reading and Composition.-Good.

Geography. Not enough has been studied, though the work has on the whole improved considerably.

History.-Fair.

Arithmetic.-Mental.-Fair. Written.-Good.

Needlework. Very good. The older pupils are taught to cut out their own clothes.

Grant.-I recommend a Grant at the rate of 17/6.

good.

No. 19.-Victoria Home and Orphanage.

Staff Miss A. K. STONE and two Assistant Teachers.

Discipline and Organization.-The organization has much improved. Discipline, very

Sanitation.-Very satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 145 pupils.

Apparatus. Very satisfactory.

Chinese.—Reading.-Good. Composition.-Fair. The method of instruction might be

improved.

Geography. There is still room for considerable improvement, especially in Standard III. Standards I and II have done well. The higher Standards are still weak.

Arithmetic.-Mentul.-Very weak throughout the school. Written.-Very good in Standards III to V.

Needlework. Very good.

Grant.—I recommend a Grant at the rate of 17/6.

1

541

No. 20. Training Home for Girls.

Staff.-KWAN TSUNG-WO, and 3 Assistant Mistresses. *Discipline and Organization.-Excellent.

Sanitation.-Very satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 45 pupils.

Apparatus.-Very satisfactory.

Chinese.-Reading.-Good throughout. Composition.--Very good.

Geography.--General.-Good. Physical-Very good.

History.-Fair.

Arithmetic.-Mental.-Lower Standards weak. Written.Good.

Needlework.-Very good.

Grant.-I again recommend a Grant at the rate of $9. The school continues to be thoroughly efficient.

* No. 21.-Italian Convent.

Staff-Three Chinese Sisters of Charity.

Discipline and Organization.-Very good. It is very difficult to get the pupils to reply to questions in an audible voice.

Sanitation.-Very satisfactory.

Floor Spare.-Sufficient for 127 puplis.

Apparatus.-Very satisfactory.

Chinese.-Reading--Good. The National Readers should be introduced. Composi- tion.-Fair. Letter writing is now taught in Standard IV, where some of the work is very good but some of the pupils do not seem up to the work required of them.

Geography.Standards III and IV did badly.

Arithmetic.-Mental.-Good.

Needlework. Very good.

Written.-Good. Standard III are weak.

Grant. I recommend a Grant at the rate of $7.

* No. 22.-Bridges Street.

Staff-Two Chinese Sisters of Charity.

Discipline and Organization.-Good. The Code hours are not always kept strictly.

Sanitation.-Surprise visits revealed that the school is not always kept as clean as it should be.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 91 pupils.

Apparatus. Very satisfactory.

Chinese —Reading.-Fair. Composition.—Fair.

Geography.-Fair. More attention should be paid to China in Standard IV.

K

542

Arithmetic.—Mental.-Very good. Written.-Good: but I do not know why the pupils in some Standards used a dash (-) for a nought.

Needlework-Very good.

Grant.-I recommend a Grant at the rate of $7.

* No. 23.-Sacred Heart.

Staff-2 Chinese Sisters of Charity.

Discipline and Organization.-The teachers are too fond of interfering with their pupils during examination.

Sanitation.-Very satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 78 pupils.

Apparatus.—Satisfactory,

Chinese. Reading and Composition.-Fair.

Geography.--Poor.

Arithmetic.-Mental.—Fair.

Written.-Fair.

Needlework. Very good. Both the Furopean and the Chinese stitches are taught.

Grant. I recommend a Grant at the rate of $7.

* No. 24.-Holy Infancy.

Staff-Two Chinese Sisters of Charity.

Discipline and Organization.-It is a very great pity that a school otherwise so well conducted should be one where common honesty is not inculcated. The teacher deliberately prompted her pupils at examination. (See also my Report of last year.)

Sanitation -Very satisfactory.

Floor Space-Sufficient for 92 pupils.

Apparatus.-Very satisfactory.

Chinese.-Reading.-Fair. Composition.-Fair. Standard IV have done well it should be more practised in the lower Standards.

Geography.-Very good.

Arithmetic.-Mental.-Good.

accurate.

Needlework.Good.

Written.—Good. Standard IV

are very quick and

Grant. I recommend a Grant at the rate of $7. But for the weakness of the discipline, I should have returned the school as "thoroughly efficient."

* No. 25.- Hunghom.

Staff-Two Chinese Sisters of Charity.

Discipline and Organization.-Not altogether satisfactory. The records are badly kept, and the roll has not been called at the proper time.

L

543

Sanitation.-Very satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 72 pupils.

Apparatus.-Very satisfactory.

Chinese.-Reading.-Fair. Composition.—Fair.

Geography-Good.

Arithmetic.-Mental.-Fair and improving.

blems. Otherwise very good.

Needlework.-Good, especially in canvas work.

Grant. I recommend a Grant at the rate of $7.

*

No. 26.-Yaumati.

Written.-Standard III are weak at pro-

Staff-Two Chinese Sisters of Charity.

Discipline and Organization.--My Report for last year had apparently not been seen by the Staff. The roll is not called at the proper time.

Sanitation.-Very satifactory.

Floor Space-Sufficient for 81 pupils.

Apparatus.-Satisfactory.

Chinese.—Reading.-Fair. Composition.- -Fair.

Geography-Good. Standard III are rather weak.

Arithmetic.-Mental.--Fair.

Written.-Good, especially Standard II.

Needlework.-Good. New stitches should first, be taught on waste material; but when they have been learned, the knowledge should be put to some useful purpose.

Grant. I recommend a Grant at the rate of $7,

* No. 27.-Shaukiwan.

Staff-2 Chinese Sisters of Charity.

Discipline and Organization.—There are only 3 pupils out of 50 above Standard 1.

Sanitation. Satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 118 pupils.

Apparatus.-Satisfactory.

Chinese.-Reading.-Fair. Composition.-Considerably improved towards the end of

the year, and good.

Geography. Very good.

Arithmetic.-Mental.--Good.

Written.-Fair.

Needlework. Very good considering the class of pupils.

Grant.-I recommend a Grant at the rate of $7.

544

*No. 28.-Aberdeen.

Staff-2 Chinese Sisters of Charity.

Discipline and Organization.Good.

Sanitation.-The school has recently been moved into the new building which is all that can be desired.

Floor Space-Sufficient for 116 pupils.

Apparatus.-Satisfactory.

Chinese. Reading and Writing.-Good.

Geography.Good.

Arithmetic.-Mental. The multiplication table is not so well known as it might be..

Written.-Good.

Needlework.-Good. Canvas work is well done.

Grant. I recommend a Grant at the rate of $7. The school shews considerable improvement.

* No. 29.-109 Second Street.

Staff-LAI FUK-CHI.

Discipline and Organization.-Very good. The lower Starlards perhaps require

rather more attention.

Sanitation.-Very satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 74 pupils.

Apparatus. Very satisfactory.

·Chinese.--Reading.-Very good in the higher standards. Composition.--Good.

Geography.-Standard IV have done excellently. Standard II is rather weak.

Arithmetic.—Mental and Written.-Very good.

Grant. I recommend a Grant at the rate of $7, and report that the school is "thoroughly efficient."

27

* No. 30.-22 Taipingshan Street.

Staff-HO NG-SHI.

Discipline and Organization.-Good on the whole. The time table is not strictly

adhered to.

Sanitation.-Satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 39 pupils.

Apparatus.-Satisfactory.

Chinese-Reading.-Fair. Composition.--Fair.

Geography-Fair and improving.

Arithmetic.-Mental.-Poor. The multiplication is not known. Written-Standard I

have done well. The rest poor.

545

Needlework.-A good beginning has been made.

Grant.-I recommend a Grant at the rate of $6.

?

*

No. 31.-5 Clarence Street.

Staff-CHAN CHAK-LAM.

Discipline and Organization.--Good..

Sanitation.-Very satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 40 pupils.

Apparatus. Satisfactory.

Chinese.-Reading.-Fair. Composition.-Poor.

Geography.-Very good.

Arithmetic.-Mental.-Good.

Written.-Fair.

Grant.-I recommend a Grant at the rate of $7.

* No. 32.-330 Queen's Road West.

The teacher was attacked with Plague in April, and the school had to be closed for a fortnight, after which it was not found possible to get the pupils together again. I recom- mend a Grant at the rate of $6 for 10 months.

* No. 33.-Queen's Road East.

Staff-SIN NG-SHI.

Discipline and Organization.-Very good.

Sanitation.-Satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 52 pupils.

Apparatus.-Very satisfactory.

Chinese.--Reading.-Good. Composition.-Very good in the lower, and good in the

upper Standards.

Geography.-Very good.

Arithmetic.-Mental.-The multiplication table is not as well known as it should have been in the lower standards. Written.-Very good. Problems have been studied with satisfactory results. The placing of the decimal point is not understood by some girls in Standard V.

Needlework.-Good. There has been careful teaching.

Grant. I recommend a Grant at the rate of $9. The school is again thoroughly efficient

No. 34.-Yaumati, 121 Station Street South.

Staff.—Suu KING-CHUNG.

Discipline and Organization.-Good. Standard I seem to have been somewhat neglected.

546

Sanitation.-Satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 51 pupils.

Apparatus. Satisfactory.

Chinese-Reading and Composition-Good. Standard I require much more attention. Standard III have done excellent work.

Geography-Fair. The subject seems to have been given insufficient attention.

Arithmetic.-Mental and Written: Fair. Very good, except in Standard I.

Needlework.-Only knitting is taught, and this is good.

Grunt.-I recommend a Grant at the rate of $6. The school has improved.

* No. 35.-D'Aguilar Street.

Staff.-YEUNG SIN-SHI.

Discipline and Organization.-Fair The teacher does not seem to take much interest in the teaching of needlework and Geography.

Sanitation.-Satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 43 pupils.

Apparatus.-Satisfactory.

Chinese.-Reading and Composition.-Greatly improved towards the end of the year, and now very good.

Geography-Standard IV have done fairly. The lower Standards have been

neglected.

Arithmetic.-Mentai and Writ:en.-Fair.

Needlework.-Poor.

Grant. The school has improved. I recommend a Grant at the rate of $6.

*

* No. 36.Wanchai Chapel. Staff-KWAN KING-CHUNG.

Discipline and Organization.-The master was changed towards the end of last year. His successor has done better; but one master is not enough for a school of this size. Discipline, fair. More attention should be paid to Geography and Arithmetic.

Sanitation.-Fair.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 96 pupils.

Apparatus.-Satisfactory. A fuller map of the Island is needed.

Chinese.—Reading.-Good. Composition.—Good.

Geography.—The subject was not begun, until the close of the school year was approaching. Some progress has been made since.

Arithmetic.-Mental.-Fair. Witten.-Poor.

Grunt. I recommend a Grant at the rate of $6.

4

547

* No. 37.-Hospital Chapel.

Staff-Ho Ho-CHAI.

Discipline and Organization. The Annual Reports are not properly kept for reference. Boys are still admitted to Standard III who are very ignorant of Arithmetic (see last year's Report). The conduct of the pupils has improved.

Sanitation.-Satisfactory.

Floor Space-Sufficient for 71 pupils.

Apparatus.-No map of the Island was forthcoming at the last inspection.

Chinese. Reading. --Fair. Composition.—Fair.

Geography.-Poor. Standard II have done fairly well.

Arithmetic.-Bad.

Grant. I recommend a Grant at the same rate as last year, $6: but the school will have to do better, or the Grant should be reduced next year.

* No. 38.-84 MacDonnell Road.

Staff-LEUNG HO-SHI.

Discipline and Organization—It appears to me that the teacher is inclined to leave too much of the work to her daughter:

Sanitation.-Satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 37 pupils.

Apparatus. Satisfactory.

Chinese-Reading.-Very good. Composition.-Good except in Standard IV.

Georg-aphy.-Fair. Standard III have not been at all well instructed on the Chinese Empire. Standard I also do not seem to have learned much.

Arithmetic.--Mental.-Fair. The pupils are slow at the multiplication table. Writ- ten.--Standard IV have done well: there is a great lack of accuracy throughout the other Standards.

Needlework.-Fair.

Grant. I recommend a Grant at the rate of $6.

No. 40.-343 Queen's Road West.

Staff-'UN CI-TUNG and 1 Assistant Teacher.

Discipline and Organizati n.-Very good. There are 5 Standards.

Sanitation.-Very satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Suffici nt for 78 pupils.

Apparatus. Very satisfactory.

Chinese-Reading.-Fair. Composition. The subject requires more attention. Geography. Very good.

Arithmetic.-Mental.-Good. Written.-Good. Very good in Standard V.

Grant.-I recommend a Grant at the rate of $7, and report the school to be thoroughly efficient".

548

No. 41.-Shaukiwan

Staff-FONG TZe-nam.

Discipline and Organization.-The roll is not totalled regularly. Discipline fair.. Orders should not be repeated aloud by the pupils.

Sanitation. This school is situated in not very sanitary surroundings. Masters and pupils have a dirty habit of spitting on the floor.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 54 pupils.

Apparatus.-Satisfactory.

Chinese-Reading.-Standards I and II fair. Composition.-Poor.

Geography.-Standard IV did badly at examination. Otherwise fair.

Arithmetic.-Mental.-Fair.

Written.-Poor.

19

Grant. I recommend a Grant at the rate of $6, and return the school as "inefficient' on the ground that too small a proportion of the pupils is in the third and higher Standards.

No. 42.-Tanglungchau Chapel.

Staff-WONG WOON-HING.

Discipline and Organzation.-Good.

Sanitation.--Satisfactory. In fine weather the windows should not be shut.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 65 pupils.

Apparatus. Satisfactory. Better maps are wanted.

Chinese.-Reading.--Good on the whole. Composition.—Bad.

Geography.-Poor in the higher Standards.

Arithmetic.-Mental.-Fair. Very good in Standard I. Written.-Good. Problems are not sufficiently studied.

Grant. I recommend a Grant at the rate of $6.

No. 43.-No. 35a Wellington Street.

Staff-LI KA-LAI.

Discipline and Organization.-Discipline, good. The pupils are bright and attentive.

Sanitation.-The room is airy and bright but the pupils have a dirty habit of spitting on the floor.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 47 pupils.

Apparatus.-Not altogether satisfactory.

Chinese.-Reading and Composition.-Standard I are very weak. But the work im- proves in the higher Standards. The letter writing in Standard IV is very good.

Geography.-Very unsatisfactory.—The subject seems quite neglected.

Arithmetic.- Mental.-Poor.

Standards.

Written.-Poor in the lower, good in the higher

ih

Grant-I recommend a Grant at the rate of $5, and return the school as "inefficient" on the ground that too small a proportion of the pupils is in the third and higher Standards.

1

549

No. 44.-No. 20a Aberdeen Street.

Staff-WONG PAK-LIN.

Discipline and Organizatian.--Very good. There is again a fourth Standard.

Sanitation.-Very satisfactory.

Floor Space-Sufficient for 59 pupils.

Apparatus. Very satisfactory. .

Chinese-Reading and Composition.-Good. Composition book should be used in Standard IV.

Geography. Fair.

Arithmetic.-Mental.-Weak in the upper Standards.

are now much better done.

Needlework.--Good.

Written-Good. Problems

It would be better if the pupils were given something useful,

instead of scraps of calico, to work at.

Grant.-I recommend a Grant at the rate of $7.

No. 45.-Tanglungchau Chapel.

Staff-LI LO-SHI.

Discipline and Organization.-Fair.

Sanitation.-Satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 45 pupils.

Apparatus.-Very satisfactory.

Chinese.-Reading.-Fair. Composition.-Fair.

Geography.-Poor.

Arithmetic.-Mental.-Fair.

Written.-Good.

Needlework.-Good. The pupils make their own clothes after they have been cut out by the teacher.

Grant.-I recommend a Grant at the rate of $6.

No. 46.-Wantsai Chapel.

Staff-KWAN CHAN-SHI.

Discipline and Organization.-Discipline, good and improved.

Sanitation.--Satisfactory and improved.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 81 pupils.

Apparatus.-Very satisfactory.

Chinese-Reading.-Fair. Composition.-Fair.

Geography.-Very good.

Arithmetic.-Mental.-Good.

Written.-Fair.

Needlework.--More useful work should be done.

Grant.-I recommend a Grant at the rate of $6. This school should do better next

year.

:

* No. 47-5 Bridges Street.

550

Staff-CHENG SAI-KWONG and 1 Assistant.

Discipline and Organization.-The manners of the Assistant Master leave much to be desired; he does not seem well qualified for his position. The senior master is rather too free with his cane. Otherwise the discipline is satisfactory. Ninety per cent. of the pupils. are in the two lowest standards.

Sanitation.-Very satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 79 pupils.

Apparatus. Satisfactory.

Chinese.-Reading.-Good. Composition.-Good, except in Standard I.

Geography.--Fair. Standard IV have done well. Standard I have not been properly

taught.

Arithmetic.-Mental and Written.-Standard I did badly, the rest well.

Grant.-I again recommend a Grant at the rate of $6. A thoroughly competent Assistant Master should be engaged at once.

No. 48.-Shamshuipo.

Staff

-CHAN KING-YAN and 1 Assistant Teacher.

Discipline and Organization.-The roll is called irregularly. The 4th Standard has been abolished. Discipline good,

Sanitation.-Very satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 139 pupils.

Apparatus.-Satisfactory,

Chinese.-Reading.-Good. Composition.-Fair.

Geography-Good.

Arithmetic.-Mental and Written.— Good.

Needlework.-Peor.

Grant. I recomend a Grant at the rate of $7.

No. 49.—Shaukiwan.

Staff-CHEUNG TAK-HING.

Discipline and Organization.-The Drill is good, but the discipline rather loose. The pupils copy from each other at examination. The roll is kept very irregularly.

Sanitation.-Satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Satisfactory.

Apparatus.-Satisfactory, but another blackboard is needed.

Chinese-Reading.-Poor. Composition.—Poor.

Geography.-Poor.

Arithmetic.-Mental.-Fair to good. Written.-Poor on the whole.

-

Grant recommend a Grant at the rate of $6. The school has not fulfilled the promise shewn last year, and will have to improve considerably if the same Grant is to be earned next year.

·

- 551

No. 50.-Tokwawan.

Staff-CHAN WING-WO.

Discipline and Organization.-Irregularity in keeping the roll and in respect of Departmental instructions were noticed in the course of the year.

Sanitation.-Very satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 127 pupils.

Apparatus. Very satisfactory.

Chinese-Reading.-Fair. Composition.-Poor.

Geography.-N

-More attention should be paid in the higher Standards to the commercial importance of sea-ports. Fair on the whole.

Arithmetic.-~Mental.—Good.

Written.-Very good.

Grant. I recommend a Grant at the rate of $7. Improvement will have to be shewn before this vote can again be recommended.

No. 51.-High Street.

Staff.-CHAU PING-CHING and 1 Assistant Teacher.

Discipline and Organization.-Good on the whole. The teaching in the lower Stan- dards needs more supervision. It is intended to employ a European teacher next year.

Sanitation.-Satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 167 pupils.

Apparatus. Satisfactory.

Chinese.-Reading.-Good. The Mencius in Standard VII was very well known. Composition.-Good.

Geography. Good throughout.

Arithmetic.-Mental.-Very weak.

the rest are backward and inaccurate.

Written.-Standards V to VII did very well but

Needlework.-Fair. Plain sewing is taught.

·Grant.-I recommend a Grant at the rate of $7.

No. 53.-218 Hollywood Road.

Staff.-SHUM KWAN HING, and 1 Assistant Teacher.

Discipline and Organization.-Very good.

Sanitation.-Satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 66 pupils.

Apparatus. Very satisfactory.

Chinese.-Reading.-Good. Composition.-Very good.

Geography-The Kwangtung province is not taught very intelligently to Standard III. Otherwise good.

Arithmetic.-Mental.-Very good. Written.-Very good.

Grant.-1 recommend a Grant at the rate of $7.

552

No. 54.-Hunghom.

Staff-MOK LEUNG-SHI.

Discipline and Organization.-Fair.

Sanitation. --Satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 40 pupils.

Apparatus.-Satisfactory.

Chinese-Reading.-Fair. Improved. Composition.-Bad.

Geography.Good.

Arithmetic.-Mental and Written.-Fair.

Needlework-Fair.

Grant.--I recommend a Grant at the rate of $6. The average attendance of this school is very small. Unless it improves next year, it is questionable whether the school will be worth supporting.

No. 55.--36 Lyndhurst Terrace.

Staff-NG KONG SHI and 1 Assistant Teacher.

Discipline and Organization.-Good. The girls are clean and tidy.

Sanitation.-Very satisfactory.

Floor Space-Sufficient for 49 pupils.

Apparatus. A map of the island is needed. Otherwise satisfactory.

Chinese.-Reading.-Good. Composition.-Standard II are weak. Fair on the whole, Geography.-Poor, especially in Standards III and IV.

Arithmetic.-Mental.-Very slow throughout. Written.-Very good in Standard IV. Standard I are very backward.

Needlework. The work is clean and good and above the average.

Grant. I recommend a Grant at the rate of $6. This school made 94 attendances short of the prescribed number, owing to the death by Plague of the teacher.

No. 56.-6 Hollywood Road.

Staff-So LI-SHI.

Discipline and Organization.-Unsatisfactory. This is the 3rd year running that it has been so reported.

Sanitation.-Satisfactory.

Floor Space-Sufficient for 32 pupils.

Apparatus. Satisfactory.

Chinese-Reading.-Fair. Composition.-Poor.

Geography.-Bad.

Arithmetic.-Mental.-Poor in Standard III. Written.-Fair.

Needlework.-Good.

Grant.-I recommend a Grant at the rate of $5 and report that the school is "inefficient on account of the generally unsatisfactory condition of the school, as well as because too small a proportion of the pupils is in the third and higher Standards.

553

No. 57.-351 Des Voeux Road West.

Staff-CHU CHAN SHI.

Discipline and Organization.-Not altogether satisfactory. The roll is not kept in accordance with the requirements of the Code.

Sanitation.—Satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 49 pupils.

Apparatus. Satisfactory.

Chinese-Reading.-Poor. Composition.-Somewhat neglected. The pupils write a

good hand.

Geography.-Rather poor.

Arithmetic.-Mental.Good. Written.-The working is careless.

much attention.

Standard II require

Needlework.-If more useful work were set the girls, it is probable that they would take more interest in the subject.

Grant.-I recommend a Grant at the rate of $6, and return the school as inefficient " on the ground that too small a proportion of the pupils is in the third or higher Standards.

No. 58.-Yaumati.

Staff-WONG SHUN-KIN, and 1 Assistant Teacher.

Discipline and Origanization.-Organization, poor. Little attention is paid to the regulations issued by the Education Department.

Sanitation. The school-room is bright and airy. Spitting on the floor is apparently habitual among the pupils.

Apparatus.-Satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 59 pupils..

Chinese.-Reading.-Poor in higher Standards. Composition.-Good.

Geography. The subject requires more attention.

Arithmetic.-Mental.-Good.

Written.-Very good except Standard I.

Grant.-I recommend a Grant at the rate of $6.

No. 59.-Yaumati.

Staff-Ho LI-SHI.

Discipline and Organization.-Discipline, fair. The teaching fails to be successful in so much as it relies on cultivating the memory rather than the intelligence. Roll is not called in accordance with requirements of the Code.

Sanitation.-Very satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 64 pupils.

Apparatus. Satisfactory.

Chinese. Reading.-Fair. The reader used in Standard 1 is unsuitable. Com- position.-Fair.

Geography.-Fair.

551

,

Arithmetic.-Mental and Written.-Poor.

Ndlework.-The hemming has much improved. Fair.

Grant. I recommend a Grant at the rate of $6.

No. 60.-232 Hollywood Road.

Staff-Lo CHAN SHI and 1 Assistant Teacher.

Discipline and Organization.-Very good. The Model Course is being followed, and considerable progress made.

Sanitation.-Satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 62 pupils.

Apparatus.-Very satisfactory.

Chinese. Reading.—Good. Composition.-Fair.

Geography.- Fair.

Arithmetic.-Mental.-Considerable improvement has been made during the year. Written.-Very good except in the Standard IV where the work is carelessly done.

Needlework.Good.

Gant. I recommend a Grant at the rate of $7.

No. 61.-22 Pokfulam Road.

Staff-WAT SZE-HOP.

Discipline and Organization.-The afternoon roll is not called in accordance with the demands of the Code. The Government regulations are not ready to hand for inspection. The work of the school suffered through its having to be closed on account of the prevalence of Plague.

Sanitation.-Satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 39 pupils.

Apparatus.-Satisfactory.

Chinese. Reading.-Fair. Composition.-Fair with the exception of the letter writing in Standard IV, which is good.

Geography.--Poor. Standard I however have done moderately. The teacher's know- ledge of the subject appears but slight.

Arithmetic.-Mental.-Fair.

Written.-Fair.

Needlework.-Fair. Specimens of the work done must be kept for inspection at the

school.

noon.

Grant.I recommend a Grant at the rate of $6.

No. 62.-Shaukiwan.

Staff-TAM WONG-SHI.

Discipline and Organization.--Good. The roll is however called too late in the after-

B

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555

poor.

Sanitation.—Satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 41 pupils.

Apparatus.-A larger map of the Canton Province is needed. Otherwise satisfactory.

Chinese-Reading and Composition.-Standard IV do fairly well, all the rest are rather

Geography.-Poor except perhaps in Standard I. The local map is not really

understood.

Arithmetic.-Mental and Written.-Very good, except in Standard 1.

Needlework.-Improving.

Grant.-I recommend a Grant at the rate of $6. It will have to be reduced in future unless the school shews considerable improvement.

No. 63.-Stanley.

Staff-CHU MAN-KIN and 1 Assistant Teacher.

Discipline and Organization.--Discipline good. The pupils are of a very ignorant class, and allowance should be made for their dulness. A new teacher has been appointed since last year, who seems to have tried hard to get something into the heads of his pupils.

Samitation.-Very satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 89 pupils.

Apparatus.--Satisfactory. A larger map of the Canton province would be better.

Chinese.-Reading.-Fair. Composition.—Poor.

Geography.-Good.

Arithmetic.--Mental and Written.--Bad.

Grant.-I recommend a Grant at the rate of $5. I think that the school can not be considered as doing other than useful work among a population where the need of education is very great.

No. 64.-263 Queen's Road West.

Staff-NG TAK-MUN.

Discipline and Organization.-Satisfactory. The teacher must be careful about the punishments he uses and not be too ready with his cane.

Sanitation.-Very satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 62 pupils.

Apparatus. Very satisfactory.

Chinese.-Reading.-Fair. Composition.—Good. Geography.—Good.

#2

Arithmetic.—Mental.-Very good. Written.-Very good. Except in Standards I

and V which require more attention.

44

Grant. I recommend a Grant at the rate of $9 and again report the school to be 'thoroughly efficient ".

556

No. 65.-170 Hollywood Road.

Staff-WONG PAK-MO.

Discipline and Organization.-The master is exceedingly careless in marking the register. The Discipline is good.

Sanitation.-Satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 50 pupils..

Apparatus.-Satisfactory.

Chinese-Reading.-Good. Composition.—Fair.

Geography.-Still very bad.

Arithmetic.-Mental.Good.

Written.-Fair.

I recommend

Grant. The school has improved: but with only 3 Standards, and few pupils in the highest, I do not think that it can be considered either efficient or necessary. that a Grant of $5 be paid, and that it be struck off the Annual Grant List.

No. 66.-13 Peel Street.

The teacher died of Plague in the middle of the year and the school has not since been re-opened. As it is in a neighbourhood where there are many Grant Schools I recommend that it be struck off the Grant List.

No Grant has been earned.

Staff.

No. 67.-82 Queen's Road East.

Staff-LI HON-FAN.

Discipline and Organization.- Unsatisfactory. There have been many changes in the

Sanitation.-Improved.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 32 pupils.

Apparatus.-Satisfactory.

Chinese-Reading.-Fair. Composition.-Poor. The subject seems to have received

little attention.

Geography.-Fair except in the highest Standard, Standard III.

Arithmetic.-Mental.Good.

Written.-Good.

Grant. This school was reported as inefficient last year, and I consider it still to be so and recommend its closure. As I do not think that a Grant should be entirely withheld in other than flagrant cases, I recommend a reduced Grant of $4 under para. 30 of the Code.

No. 68.-17 Elgin Street.

Staff-LAU SHAM-KU and 1 Assistant Teacher.

Discipline and Organization.-Not altogether satisfactory, though a general improve- ment was shewn as the time approached for assessing the amount of the Grant.

Sanitation. A very bright room, which however is not always kept clean.

»

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 42 pupils.

Apparatus.--Very satisfactory.

557

Chinese.-Reading.--Fair. Composition.-Improved.

Geography.-Poor. Very little attention was paid to the subject during the greater part of the year. Latterly an improvement was shewn.

Arithmetic.-Mental.-Fair.

Written.-Poor.

Needlework. The girls are doing fancy work with intelligence and with evident in-

terest.

Grant.--I recommend a Grant at the rate of $5, and return the school as "inefficient" on the ground that too small a proportion of the pupils is in the third and higher Standards.

No. 69.-35 Pottinger Street.

Staff-CHOU WAN-SHI and 1 Assistant Teacher.

Discipline and Organization.-Good.

Sanitation.-Very satisfactory.

Floor Space-Sufficient for 42 pupils.

Apparatus.-Satisfactory.

Chinese.-Reading.-Fair. Composition.-Fair and improving. Compositions should be corrected regularly by the teacher.

Geography.-Poor.

Arithmetic.— Mental.-Fair. Written.--Very good.

Needlework.-Good.

Grant.-I recommend a Grant at the rate of $7.

No. 70.-Kowloon City.

Staff-NG PANG-SHI.

Discipline and Organization.-Good.

Sanitation.-Very satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 67 pupils.

Apparatus.-Satisfactory.

Chinese.—Reading.—Fair. Composition.-Good. Standard I have made a very good

beginning.

Geography-Fair. Standard III are weak.

Arithmetic-Mental.-Good, except in Standard I. Written.-Good; except Standard

I who are very poor.

Needlework.-Fair.

Grant.—This is the first report on this School. I recommend a Grant at the rate of $6.

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558

No. 71.-63 Macdonnell Road, Yaumati.

This school, which was admitted to the Annual Grant List only a year ago, prospered till the end of the year, and then was ruined by the development of the Anglo-Chinese District School at Yaumati, and was closed at the end of February.

I recommend a Grant at the rate of $5 for 8 months.

* No. 72.-47 Station Street, Mong Kok Tsui.

Staff -KWOK NAI-MING.

Discipline and Organization.-This is the first Report on the school. Discipline is very good. There are 5 Standards. A good course of instruction is being followed.

Sanitation.-Very satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 78 pupils.

Apparatus.—Satisfactory.

Chinese.--Reading.-Good. Composition.-Fair.

Geography.-Standard IV broke down at examination. Otherwise good.

Arithmetic.-Mental and Written.-Very good in the higher standards: but Standards I and II need much attention, and seem to have learned very little.

Grant.-I recommend a Grant at the rate of $7. The weakness in Arithmetic of Standards I and II alone prevents me from returning the school as "thoroughly efficient ".

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559

Appendix C.

I-REPORT BY MR. H. L. GARRETT, B. A., ON THE VISUAL INSTRUCTION

COURSE GIVEN AT KOWLOON SCHOOL.

During the past 7 weeks I have delivered lectures as out-lined in the Handbook supplied. The apparatus has on the whole worked well. The attendance has been mainly confined to the senior scholars, though a limited number of friends have been present.

At the conclusion of the course I held an examination of the senior students-14 in number,—with the following results. Eight students passed, and six were failures, though the papers of the latter were not altogether without merit. I also held an oral examination among the junior students who attended, and was much pleased with their answers, which shewed intelligence and interest in the subject.

As a general criticism of the written examination I may state that there was a general tendency to rambling answers, not directly related to the questions.

From the results obtained in the examination and from general observations made in the course of delivering the lectures, I am confident that Visual Instruction of this nature, is likely to form a most valuable means of education. I would submit however two points which seem worthy of consideration.

1. The difficulty of assembling children at a suitable hour. It is impossible to darken the room during the day time sufficiently for the purpose of using a lantern; and in the case of children living at a distance, the earliest time at which it was possible to commence the lectures, viz., 6.15, involves no small inconvenience.

2. The difficulty of taking any notes during the lectures. In the case of my lectures, they were purely extempore, as I merely used the book as a guide to the slides. Con- sequently many of the students missed valuable points, which would not have been the case had they been able to take notes. Viewing these facts, I should venture to suggest that some form of shaded lamp be provided, which without lessening the effect of the lantern would be sufficiently clear to see to write by.

II. REPORT BY MR. A: O. BRAWN ON THE COURSE GIVEN TO THE

DIOCESAN SCHOOLS AND FAIRLEA.

I have given 13 lectures to the above schools, and am satisfied that the pupils' interest in the Home Land has been aroused and their knowledge of it has considerably increased. These I take it are the objects of the Lantern Lectures. My satisfaction is based upon the letters I have received and the eagerness with which the children looked forward to the Lectures. I have a few comments to make upon the Slides, Arrangement of Lectures, Exercises for the pupils, and the Working of the Lantern.

1. Slides are splendid but a view of Hongkong harbour would advertise its shipping importance better than Queen's Road. A picture of the Black Country at night would be impressive, and a view of a canal would reveal another aspect of English life.

2. Arrangement seems nearly perfect though it requires two lectures to each section, and two successive lectures on English scenery followed by two on historic centres are rather tedious to children. So important and interesting a river as the Thames deserves a lecture to itself. So after two lectures voyaging to England and two in seeing the sights of London, I took the children up the Thames to its source, thereby using in addition to the slides on the Thames in Section III some from Section IV relating to Windsor, Eton and Oxford, some from Section V relating to the Cotswolds, and one from Section VI relating to Huntley and Palmers, Reading.

560

In addition to giving the scholars a good impression of the Thames, I was thus enabled to reduce the number of lectures on scenery and historic centres to one each. My lectures were therefore grouped thus:-

1. Hongkong to Egypt.

2. Egypt to London.

3. London.

4. London.

5. Thames.

6. Scenery.

7. Historic centres.

8. Country, town and village life.

9. Agriculture.

10. Mining and manufactures.

1. Navy.

12. Army.

13. Resumé.

As a means of Recapitulation and of adding vividness to the Lectures, I found it an excellent practice to direct the pupils to write letters, addressed from the stopping place of the previous lecture, describing to me their infaginary travels. I thus received letters addressed from Shepherds' Hotel, Cairo, Hotel Cecil, Cock Inn, Chipping, Campden, etc. In working the lantern special note should be taken that the cells are not more than half filled with Carbide to allow for its swelling, and that there is not a speck of dust in the Burners.

III-REPORT BY MRS. TUTCHER ON THE COURSE GIVEN TO THE

VICTORIA AND BELILIOS SCHOOLS.

The Course comprised some 11 or 12 lectures. Fortunately the weather was fine, except on one occasion when in consequence of combined rain and thunder the cars stopped run- ning, and everyone had to get out and walk the last mile of the journey. But so interested were the children, that they preferred to go on rather than return, when given the choice.

For this method of teaching, especially for girls who have few, if any, facilities for travelling, I have nothing but praise. It is as much superior to mere picture lessons, as they again are to ordinary reading lessons. Not only are the lantern pictures larger and clearer than anything the scholars have seen before, but the. very act of throwing them on the screen arrests the attention, and stimulates the imagination; so that the subject matter read in connection with each picture has a much better chance of being remembered. I made it a rule to revise the lectures in Class, and in most cases the answers given were surprisingly accurate, especially from Class I girls, whose wider reading and study had better fitted them to profit, when the subject matter was history or geography. I find there is quite a new zest when anything crops up in the ordinary class work of the school which has any bearing on what the pupils have seen illustrated. And this applies not only to history and geography, but to natural history as well, as also to industries, commerce, and manner of living in different parts of the world.

But there were drawbacks.

The time at our disposal was so limited that the reading matter arranged for each picture had, in most cases, to suffice, even when, as was often the case, the picture supplied material for quite a long and interesting lecture when taken by itself. It made me quite sorry to lose so many golden opportunities of leading from the seen to the unseen, and of drawing attention to details which had a bearing on something the pupils had already learned. Also it would have been a very great improvement if each of the pupils could have had the use of a text book for revisal or preparation. This would have formed at

:

561

valuable aid to Geography; and each lesson could have been more thoroughly prepared and explained, than was the case when the teacher's text-book was the only one available. It was found impossible to take notes in the darkened room, and as a result of this and the absence of text-books there was occasionally some confusion in the girls' minds regarding the pictures. When it is taken into account that the pictures numbered between three and four hundred, this occasional mixing-up is not to be wondered at.

But on the whole, the course was a great success, and the views were, I am sure, enjoyed as much by the teachers as by the children.

Appendix D.

Examination Papers.

Paper 1. (Set to Diocesan Schools and Fairlea.)

1. Make a sketch showing the comparative sizes of Hongkong and London.

What are the populations of each ?

2. What is Cleopatra's Needle ? Where did it come from? Where is it now? Will it last as long in an English climate as it would have in Egypt? If not, why not?

3. Describe a London street scene, and mention points of difference (a) in the way the houses are built, and (b) in the clothing of the people, as compared with Hongkong.

4. Where is Dartmoor?

Compare the scenery with that of the Lake District.

5. What do you know about Stonehenge and the Roman Wall? Give rough sketches of thein.

6. How do farming in England and China differ? What fruits are grown in England in the open air?

7. Write a short account of a day's work of a miner in a coal mine-or, if you are girl, of the day's work of the miner's wife at home.

Paper 2. (Set to Victoria School and Belilios School.)

1. What do you mean by the expressions Greater Loudon and the City of London ?

Explain why the population of the latter is much greater on week days than on

Sundays.

2. Give a short account of the following places, with any historical facts associated with them that you can remember: The Tower, Crystal Palace. Westminster Hall, Stonehenge, St. Paul's Cathedral, Trafalgar Square, Bath, Hatfield, Oxford, and Stratford-on-Avon.

3. The visual instruction course of lantern pictures has probably made you

under- stand some things about England of which you bad before a mistaken idea. Give some examples to shew in what ways the course has helped you to understand how things really

are.

4. Explain why a strong navy is so very important for England. What part does Hongkong play in the naval defence of the Empire ?

562

Paper 3. (Set to Kowloon School.)

1. Describe briefly the various points touched at on the voyage from Hongkong to

London.

2. What did you learn from the pictures about the irrigation of Egypt ?

3. How was the size of London impressed upon you in the diagrams?

4. What did you learn from the slides about Somerset House, Westminster Hall, St. James Palace, St. Paul's Cathedral, The Crystal Palace ?

5. Give some description of the Sea Coast shown in the slides and mention any points that struck you.

6. What impression did you gather of the valley of the Thames and the Country Side? How did this compare with the Scotch Scenery?

7. What is the proper shape of a Church? How did the architecture of the churches alter from the earliest to the latest shown you?

8. Give a description of the University buildings and views that you saw,

9. What was the general plan of a village or small country town?

do you expect to, find there? and what are their uses?

What buildings

10. Give some account of the fruits, plants etc., which you saw and which you do not find in Hongkong.

11. You were shown a series of pictures of a coal mine. Construct from these a description of a coal mine. Mention any special points which struck you.

12. What points did you notice with regard to a Steam-hammer, Railway Postal Van, Making an Armour Plate?

13. Why is a Strong Navy necessary to our Empire? Prove your answer by refer- ence to the map which you were shown.

14. What differences did you notice between the old and the new style of fighting

(a) in the Army,

(6) in the Navy?

Appendix E.

Answers to Questions in Appendix D.

Paper 1. Q. 1. (By a Portuguese boy.) London streets are the richest and the poorest, grandest and dirtiest, clean and filthy.

As the population is divided into two parts, same with the streets into two classes. There are beautiful roads, broad busy streets with undescribable numbers of different carts, hackney, coaches, omnibuses, busy men and idle men, all thronged the streets.

The streets in London are quiet, quiet as death from early dawn, but towards inorning carts start to rattle along the paths carrying vegetables from the country into the market, later on at 9 a.m. the streets again are as crowded as the previous day: men go the offices, ladies throng the shops, boys going to schools and all seemed bright and full of life.

Towards noon-Lunch. The Restaurants are flocked, cafés are crowded with men and women of all sizes, differences in visages and in language.

the

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Paper 2. Q. 3. (By a Chinese girl.) It has made me understand many things about England of which I had be fore a mistaken idea. For example--I thought that the Universi- ties of Cambridge, Oxford and London were three very large buildings with gardens round them, and the lower rooms used as schoolrooms and the rooms above as sleeping rooms. Instead they are streets of houses with hundreds of students living in each of the houses.

By looking at the pictures I should think that if these three universities are built together they would form a town of considerable size.

I thought that a railway station was just like our peak tram stations in Hongkong.

Instead, it is such a big one with booking offices, and so many trains can get in at the same time.

Paper 3. Q. 9. (By an English girl.) In a small village or country town we generally find the church, and next to it the village school, the squire's house and a few cottages. The squire is the leading man in the village and possesses most of the land. The village church is used for the villagers to come and worship. The schools, usually under the control of the vicar, is used for the children of the villagers to be educated.

T

I

HONGKONG.

No.

37 1907

ABSTRACT SHEWING DIFFERENCES BETWEEN THE ESTIMATES OF EXPENDITURE FOR 1907 AND 1908.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor.

INCREASE.

DECREASE.

PERSONAL EMOLUMENTS :-

New Posts,.....

Stipulated Increments,

Increase of Salaries,

Exchange Compensation,

Allowances,

Other Items,

PERSONAL EMOLUMENTS :-

CA

37,762

Abolition of Posts,

$ 25,913

27,852

Reductions on New Appointments,..

13,278

6,557

Exchange Compensation,

2,561

2,665

Allowances,

2,390

8,477

Other Items,

675

1,478

Other Charges,

46,377

Other Charges,

35,805

Special Expenditure,.

4,100

Specal Expenditure,

42,800

Military Contribution,

44,027

Miscellaneous Services.

50,943

Pensions,

18,600

Charge on account of Public Debt,

82,333

Charitable Services.

4,160

Total Increase,

$ 296,672

Total Decrease exclusive of P. W. Extra-

ordinary........

Public Works, Extraordinary,.........

$ 162,081

387,800

$ 549,881

296,672

Deduct Increase,

TOTAL DECREASE inclusive of P. W.

Extraordinary,

$ 253,209

HONGKONG.

REPORT ON THE EVENING CONTINUATION CLASSES.

No. 20

• 1907

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government.

The first term of the Evening Continuation Classes commenced on the 3rd October, 1906. The objects of the classes were described in the Syllabus as to afford facilities for a commer- cial and scientific training to students generally, and to enable those who have left school to continue their studies. They are under the direction of a small Supervisory Committee, and consisted at the close of the first term, of nineteen classes under three Sections: Commerce, Engineering and Science. The teaching Staff numbers fourteen (Table I.). The number of students on the class registers on the 1st November, 1906, and 31st January, 1907, respectively was:—

Commerce Section,

Engineering Section,

Science Section,

Total,

1st November, 1906.

31st January,

1907.

187

149

70

121

32

34

289

304

2. It may be at once said that the classes have justified their existence and that there is no reason to doubt their permanence if their development keeps pace with the needs of the Colony. Not only the classes which may seem to the students to offer some immediate re- turn for their time and money-such as the Shorthand, Building Construction and Machine Drawing classes—have been regularly attended, but the attendance at other classes which do not come under this category, have also been well maintained, and students who know by expe- rience the time taken to acquire English are found commencing the study of French, Ger- man and Japanese, whilst most satisfactory of all there is an average attendance of 31 in the English classes.

306

3. The classes started under considerable disadvantages. It was impossible to say whether they would prove a success or not, and no preliminary expenditure on apparatus was sanctioned. The Chemistry and Physics classes were therefore put at the beginning, under serious disabilities, and the teachers deserve great credit for having done what they have done with the odds and ends of apparatus which could be placed at their disposal, and for having maintained so well the interest of their students in the subjects taught. All classes alike suffered also from a lack of suitable text books, and the maintenance of the attendance. in the face of all discouragement is further evidence if any were needed, of the necessity for classes of this nature.

4. The percentage and averages given in the Attendance Returns (Table V.) are not a very good index to the actual attendance at each class. In some cases the number on the roll decreased between the 1st November and the 30th January, and in others the number actually increased, and allowance must be made for this. The actual attendance at each class during the term is given in Table VI. During the first month there was the usual unavoidable shifting of students from one class to another and a revision of the time-table in December gave rise to a certain number of changes.

5. The subjects taught in the Commerce Section are:-Shorthand, Book-keeping, Commercial Arithmetic, English, French, German and Japanese. The largest attendance is in the English classes. The attendance at these classes has suffered somewhat from two causes. It has fallen off through the disappearance of students who were incapable of following a course in Advanced English, whilst on the other hand there is reason to believe that a certain number of young men have been deterred from joining from fear of the high standard that would be required on admission.

6. The number of students though smaller than was hoped by me would be the case, is good, considering that these are advanced classes, and that the senior class consists of students who have already done very well at school. It is still hard to persuade Chinese scholars what a good business investment every additional year spent on the study of English is, but it is satisfactory to see that this is beginning to be recognised by Chinese parents who have themselves received their education in Hongkong.

7. Teachers of other classes complain of the difficulty some of their pupils experience in following the lesson owing to their ignorance of English, and it may be advisable to insist on backward pupils attending an English class if their ignorance of English impedes the work of their class. The average attendance at the French class was 28, at the German 11 and at the Japanese 9. The popularity of the French class is not explicable at first sight. It does not seem probable that the relative utility of these three languages in Hongkong and in places in the Far East to which Hongkong boys go, corresponds to the average attendance at the classes. The Japanese class commenced with an enrolment of three. decision of the Committee to maintain classes for one term even though the enrolment did not reach five-the minimun prescribed in the syllabus-has been justified in this case, as the term closes with an enrolment of eleven. In all three classes the students have the advantage of native teachers.

The

8. Shorthand cannot fail to be a popular class. Proficiency in the subject has an immediate money value. The attendance has been well kept up--the average attendance being 23, and at the close of the term an examination was held at which there were ten candidates for Pitman's Elementary Certificate and seven for the Theory Certificate.

9. It is gratifying to find 7 students already capable of taking an advanced course in Book-keeping. It remains to be seen whether the 11 students on the roll of the Elementary Class will persevere in their studies long enough to enter the Advanced Class.

10. The Commercial Arithmetic Class is small in number but keen. It will never I think be a very popular class.

11. The Engineering Section consists of five classes in Geometry, Applied Mechanics, Practical Mathematics, Building Construction and Machine Drawing. The two last classes were started on the 7th December. There is no doubt that the need for these classes has

r

2

307

⚫been urgent and that all expenditure on them will prove of the greatest benefit to the Colony. Of the 90 students on the roll on the 30th November, 55 per cent. were employed in engineering works or with building contractors, and the other students all hope to put their knowledge to some practical use. The teacher of the Building Construction Class speaks in the highest terms of the aptitude of some of his pupils. The advanced class in Practical Mathematics was closed in January. The attendance gradually fell off as the students per- ceived no immediate advantage to be gained from the course.

12. The Science Section consists of three classes in Chemistry, Physics and Hygiene. The class in Hygiene is small, and with hygiene now being taught regularly in school it is questionable whether it will be permanent. The class is principally attended by school- teachers, and the hygiene taught is school hygiene. It is to be hoped School Managers are aware of the benefits teachers would derive from attending this class.

13. I have little doubt about the future of the Chemistry and Physics classes in which the average attendance was 10 and 15 respectively. The two subjects form part of the New Learning, and apart from their prospective usefulness are attractive to all young Chinese who have studied English. But the majority of the students hope to put their knowledge to some practical use.

14. Mr. RALPHS and Mr. CROOK are to be congratulated on the state of the laboratory. It presents a very different aspect to what it did when the classes started. At very little cost but with the expenditure of a great deal of time and trouble everything which could possibly be utilised has been repaired and put in a serviceable condition.

15. It is not premature to regard these classes as having now passed beyond the experi- mental stage; and to secure the progress already made and to prepare for future develop- ment, it will now be necessary to determine the organization under which they can best be permanently conducted.

16. The following Tables are appended

I.

II.

III.

Names of Supervisory Committee and Staff. Time Table.

Enrolment, Attendances, etc.

IV., Revenue and Expenditure for 1906.

V.

Attendance Returns.

VI. Detailed Record of Attendance.

VII. Nationality of Students.

VIII. Occupations of Students.

26th February, 1907.

t

A. W. BREWIN,

Registrar General,

Chairman,

Supervisory Committee.

308

Table I.

EVENING CONTINUATION CLASSES.

Supervisory Committee:

Mr. A. W. BREWIN.

Dr. G. H. BATESON WRIGHT, D.D.

Mr. E. A. IRVING.

Mr. P. N. H. JONES, Assoc. M. Inst. C.E.

Organizing Secretary :

Mr. W. H.

WILLIAMS.

Name.

Mr. P. F. D'AGOSTINI, Mr. R. E. O. BIRD,.

Mr. A. O. BRAWN,

Mr. A. E. CRAPNELL, Mr. A. H. CROOK, Mr. H. L. GARRETT, Mr. G. P. DE MARTIN, Mr. T. L. PERKINS, Mr. K. POLStorff,

Mr. RALPHS,

Mr. T. SWABY, Mr. K. T. TAGuchi, Mr. W. TULIP,...................

Mr. W. H. WILLIAMS,

STAFF.

Class.

French. English.

Book-keeping (Elementary).

Shorthand (Elementary).

Physics.

Book-keeping (Advanced).

English.

English.

Building Construction. German.

f Chemistry.

Hygiene.

Shorthand (Advanced). Japanese.

Machine Drawing. Applied Mechanics.

Commercial Arithmetic. Geometry.

1

ปี

*

Table II.

EVENING CONTINUATION CLASSES.

309

TIME.

MONDAY.

TUESDAY.

Shorthand, Class I ...

WEDNESDAY.

THURSDAY.

..(15) | Book-keeping, (Elem.)...(15)

...(15) Commercial Arithmetic (4) Shorthand Class I

Shorthand, Classes II & III ...( 4

6 P.M.

to

Building Construction .......... (22)

Machine Drawing.

7 P.M.

Hygiene

(Lab.)

Physics

French, Class A.

.(9)

|

Shorthand Classes II & III ...(4) Book-keeping, (Adv.) ...( 4 )

(22) | Building Construction ......(22) Machine Drawing .......(22) Building Construction ..........(22) (Lab.) Physics..

..(Lab.)

FRIDAY.

|

..(Lab.) | Chemistry

(Lab.) Chemistry

French, Class A (9)

Book-keeping, (Elem.)...(15)

Book-keeping, (Adv.) ...(4) |

7 P.M.

to

8. P.M.

Japanese....

French, Class B

...( 4 ) | German

.(15)

French, Class B

German

.(9)

..(15) Japanese

(4)

.(9)

English, (Junior)

.( 8)| English, (Junior).........( 8 ) | English, (Junior) .......................... English, (Senior).........(9) English, (Senior) ............ ..( 9 )

....( 8 ) | English, (Junior) .........................( 8 ) | English, (Junior)

.....( 8 )

|

English, (Senior) ........................................( 9 )

| | Practical Mathematics, Class A (22) | Applied Mechanics......(22) Practical Mathematics, Class A (22) Applied Mechanics.......(22) Practical Mathematics, Class A (22) Practical Mathematics, Class B ( 7 )

Practical Mathematics, Class B (7)

Practical Mathematics, Class B (7)

|

+

310

Table III.

Enrolment, Attendance, etc.

October. November. December. January. The Term.

Number on register,

161

180

191

196

Number of evenings the classes were open, Average nightly attendance,

20

21

17

22

80

64

106

111

85

91

:

Table IV.

REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE,

Expenditure.

Personal Emoluments,....

$2,165.00

Other Charges,......

565.68

Total,

$2,730.68

Revenue.

Fees,

$645.00

t

311

Table V.

EVENING CONTINUATION CLASSES.

Attendance Returns: November 1st, 1906, to January 30th, 1907.

Number on Number on

CLASS.

Register Nov. 1st,

Register

Total Number of

Number of Class

Average

Attendance.

Jan. 30th,

1906.

1907.

Attendances Meetings.

Percentage of Average At- tendance to Enrolment on Jan. 30th, 1907.

Shorthand (Elem.),

20

223

22

325

22

14.8

74

(Adv.),...........

9

11

177

23

7.7

86

Book-keeping (Elem.),

18

11

153

13

11.8

66

>>

(Adv.),

7

7

63

13

1.9

70

English (Junior),

36

27

928

41

22.6

63

(Senior),

19

10

244

28

8.7

46

Arithmetic,

6

7

54

9

6.0

100

French, A,.....

24

19

386

23

16.7

70

B,.

17

13

271

23

11.8

69

German,...

19

11

238

21

113

59

Japanese,

12

11

138

16

8.6

72

Geometry, ...

(2)

19

28 (Dec. 6th)

263

11

24.0

86

Applied Mechanics,

24

24

498

23

21.7

90

Practical Mathematics,

11

32

779

34

23.0

72

16

0

220

28

7.8

Building Construction,

Commenced

23

357

18

19.8

83

Machine Drawing,...

Dec. 6th

14.

160

13

12.3

88

Chemistry,

12

11

259

26

10.0

91

Physics,

18

18

343

23

14.9

83

Hygiene....

Note: This Class was closed on this date.

5

42

12

3.5

70

312

Table. VI.

EVENING CONTINUATION CLASSES.

ATTENDANCE RETURNS.

October 4th, 1906-January 30th, 1907.

I. Numbers present at each lecture.

OCTOBER.

NOVEMBER.

DECEMBER.

JANUARY.

33, 33, 33, 29, 26, 26, 22, 25.

24, 24, 22, 23, 23, 27, 27, 23, 24, 28, 22,

30, 28, 34, 31,

18, 23, 22, 26, 19,

53

Commercial Section.

English (Junior),

English (Senior),

French, A,

32, 34, 36, 36, 35, 37, 30.

French, B,

German,

Japanese,

Shorthand, I,

Shorthand, II & III,

Book-keeping, (Elem.),

Book-keeping, (Adv.),

Commercial Arithmetic,.

Engineering Section.

Geometry,

Building Construction,

Machine Drawing,

Applied Mechanics,

33, 32, 29, 26.

19, 27, 23, 18, 17. 18. 14, 12.

10, 18, 13, 10, 12, 9, 6, 7, 8, 8, 8. 7,9. 7. 8, 9, 9, 6, 7, 7,

8, 8.

"

10, 11, 7. 18, 22, 26, 24, 19, 24, 16, 20, 21. 14, 16, 17, 18, 18, 18, 16, 16, 17. 7, 9, 11, 11, 12, 16, 15, 15, 17, 13,

12, 13.

15, 9, 10, 11. 5, 6, 6, 6, 6, 7, 7. 9, 9, 11, 10, 9, 9, 9, 9, 10, 5, 9, 7, 6. 5, 6, 8, 6, 5, 4, 3.

18, 19, 20, 17, 12, 11, 11, 15, 11, 12,

11, 16.

11, 11. 13, 12, 10, 9, 10, 7, 9, 10, 8, 6, 7, 6..

7,7. 12, 10, 12, 11.

"

9, 8, 9.

13, 13, 19, 11, 11. 18, 19, 19, 16, 14,

17, 16, 17.

$

9, 7, 8, 9, 9, 10,

10. 10.

17, 16, 17, 14, 14, 13, 11, 12, 15, 17,

15.

14, 14.

5, 9, 10, 16, 11.9, 8, 9, 9, 8, 8, 8, 8, 9, 10, 9, 7, 5.

8, 8, 7, 7, 5, 7, 6, 7,

8.

7.

11, 12, 12, 10.

7, 13, 13, 15.

15, 12, S.

18, 19, 20, 16.

7, 5, 6, 6.

6, 10, 5.

15, 9, 12, 10.

:

7, 7, 8, 6, 6.

5, 3, 6, 4.

5, 7, 7.

4, 4, 5, 3, 5.

4, 4, 4. 4.

17, 16, 19, 17, 17, 20, 23, 25, 24, 25, | 26, 22.

17.

25, 25, 23, 25.

Practical Mathematics, A,...... 25, 27, 29, 26. 26, 26, 26, 26, 18, 16, 15, 14.

...

23, 22, 20, 22, 22, 24, 26, 24, 26, 24,

22.

24, 24, 22. 16, 14, 14, 16, 10,

10, 9, 10, 10, 10, 10, 9, 10. 11, 14, 16, 15, 23, 23, 22, 21, 21, 23, 22, 21, 22.

Practical Mathematics, B,...... 9, 9, 11, 11.

22, 22, 26, 26, 22, 20, 24, 19, 18, 21,

18.

20, 17, 18, 13. 15, 19, 17.

17, 13, 14, 15, 8. 11, 11, 13, 11, 12,

8, 13, 14.

24, 24, 25, 24, 23, 18, 20, 20, 18, 15,

24, 20.

15, 17, 17. 10, 10, 7, 6, 5, 6. 2, 4, 3, 2, 2, 10.

5, 5, 5.

24, 21, 25, 30, 26, 26, 28, 30, 32. 21.

23, 24, 22, 25, 22,

25, 24, 27, 24, 23, 23.

Science Section.

Physics.

8, 11.

Chemistry,

Hygiene,

16, 15, 18, 16, 17, 15, 16, 15, 14. 10, 9, 10, 10, 10, 11, 11, 11, 10, 10,

10.

8, 11, 12, 11. No class. 2, 2, 2, 2.

16, 17, 15, 15, 17, 13, 16, 14, 14, 15,.

17. 12, 12, 11, 10, 10,

13, 13, 6. 10, 10, 9, 9. 8, 9,

10, 9, 10.

5, 8,

9.

5,5,

5, 5, 5.

5, 4, 5, 1,

4.

OCTOBER. NOVEMBER. DECEMBER. JANUARY.

TERM.

II. Average nightly attendance,

64

106

111

85

91

III. Number on admission register,..

161

180

191

196

"

313

Table VII.

Nationality of Students on the register on 31st January, 1907.

Chinese.. Non-Chinese

95

..101

196

Note:-Most of the Students in the Engineering and Science Sections are Chinese ; most of those studying French and German are Non-Chinese.

Table VIII.

Occupations of Students on the various class registers on the 30th November, 1906.

Number Clerks Day Scholars

Merchants

Engineers

on

roll.

and Typists.

and Teachers.

and

Assistants.

and Artisans.

Others.

Shorthand,

31

26

5

0

0

0

Book-keeping,

27

25

1

1

0

English,

54

45

6

3

French.

38

27

6

5

0

0

German,

17

13

1

Japanese,

12

9

0

0

Mathematics,

36

13

3

17

0

Mechanics,

27

7

0

16.

0

Geometry,

27

+

16

0

Chemistry,

14

6

1

Physics,

18

6

5

3

1

Hygiene,

2

N

0

Total on roll of all classes, 303

184

41

24

52

'

Receipts.

HONGKONG.

FINANCIAL RETURNS FOR THE YEAR 1906,

Laid before the Legislative Council by Comma

His Excellency the Governor.

Statement showing the total Receipts and Expenditure in the

Amount Estimated.

Actual Receipts.

More than Less than Estimated.

Estimated.

C.

$

C.

C.

C.

35,462.15

Payments.

ye

Balance, 1st January, 1906,

HEADS OF REVENUE.

C.

C.

C.

1. Light Dues,

76,000.00

77,722.04

1,722.04

2. Licences and Internal Revenue, not

otherwise specified,

3. Fees of Court or Office, Payments for specific purposes and Reimbur- sements in aid,

4,758,820.00 4,765,227.78

6,407.78

Post Office,

519,275.00 470,151.53

410,000.00 420,454.04

49,123.47

10,454.04

Rent of Government Property, Land Hand Houses,

6. Interest,

7. Miscellaneous Receipts,

735,900.00 $26,699.20 90,799.20

6,000.00

2,068.42 8,063.42

192,400.00 53,747.24

138,652.76

TOTAL, Ordinary,

8. Land Sales,

6,698,395.00 | 6,622,070.25

111,451.48

187,776.23

400,000.00

315,733.21

9. Widows and Orphans' Pension Fund,

249,000.00

نو

Nett Balance (overpaid) 1st Jan., 1

HEADS OF EXPENDITURE.

Charge on account of Publie Del Pensions,

Governor,

Colonial Secretary's Department

Legislature,

Registrar General's Department, Audit Department,

Treasury,..

Post Office,

Harbour Master's Department, Observatory,

Judicial and Legal Departments, Police and Prison Departments,.... Medical Departments,

Sanitary Department,..

Botanical and Forestry Departme Education,

Ecclesiastical,

Charitable Allowances,

$4,266.79 Transport,

Miscellaneous Services,

249,000.00 Military Expenditure,

7,347,395.00|6,937,803.46

10. Amount transferred from Praya

Reclamation Fund,

Total Revenue,..

7,847,395.00 7,035,011.78

111,451.48

97,208.32 97,208.32

208,659.80

521,043.02

Public Works Department, Public Works Recurrent,

521,043.02

Total.

Public Works Extraordinary,

Deposits Available,

Deposits Available, (Subsidiary Coins),

4,137,647.00

Deposits Not Available,

1,458,363.90

Crown Agents' Account,

Crown Agents' Advance,

3,829,135.46

336,066.88

3,031,642 99

Total Expendium:

HONGKONG.

NANCIAL RETURNS FOR THE YEAR: 1906.

No.

3

1907

"e the Legislative Council by Command of

His Excellency the Governor.

wing the total Receipts and Expenditure in the year 1906.

More than Less than

Estimated.

Estimated.

$

ሰ.

JA

Payments.

TREASURY.

Amount Estimated.

Actual Payments.

More than Less than Estimated.

Estimated.

C.

Nett Balance (overpaid) 1st Jan., 1906,

C.

2,796,665.48

JA

C.

1,722.04

ifs

$3

C.

HEADS OF EXPENDITURE.

C.

$ C.

C.

3

C.

Charge on account of Public Debt,.

185,000.00

140,160.84

44,839.16

Pensions,

236,294.00

193,662.47

42,631.53

Governor,

87,074.00

69,424.50

17,649.50

6,107.78

Colonial Secretary's Department and

Legislature,

73,056.00

58,439.62

14,616.38

Registrar General's Department,

46,363.00 37,745.02

8,617.98

49,123.47

Audit Department,

16,298.00

14,664.20

1,633.80

Treasury,.

60,271.00

51,876.93

8,394.07

10,454.04

Post Office,

417,118.00

359,484.08

57,633.92

Harbour Master's Department,

185,322.00

160,899 99

24,422.01

Observatory,

23,344,00

. 19,995.17

3,348.83

90,799.20

Judicial and Legal Departments,

214,715.00

192,728.04

21,986.96

Police and Prison Departments,..

731,895.00

640,191.83

91,703.17

2,068.42

Medical Departments,

247,357.00

215,880.01

31,476.99

Sanitary Department,.

491,645.00

396,737.46

94,907.54

138,652.76 Botanical and Forestry Department,

47,677.00

46,796.19

880.81

Education,

188,851.00

159,873.32

111,451.48

187,776.28 Ecclesiastical,

3,800.00

3,600.00

29,477.68

200.00

Charitable Allowances,

5,420.00

3,474.41

1,945.59

$4,266.79 Transport,

249,000.00

111,451.48 521,043.02

97.208.32

208,659.80 521,043.02

Miscellaneous Services, Military Expenditure, Public Works Department, Public Works Recurrent,

10,000.00

8,142.97

1,857.03

142,291.00 620,140.53

477,849.53

1,389,142.00 1,352,537.14

36,604.86

293,022.00 203,068.43

409,200.00 379,797.77

79,953.57

29,402.23

Public Works Extraordinary,

Total,

5,495,155.00 | 5,328,820.92

477,849.53

644,183.61

1,561,800.00 1,503,789.76

58,010.24

7,056,955.00| 6,832,610,68

477,849.53 702,198.85

Total Expenditure,

$ 6,832,610.68

DAURUON

1900.

HEADS OF REVENUE.

1. Light Dues,

2. Licences and Internal Revenue, not

otherwise specified,

3. Fees of Court or Office, Payments

for specific purposes and Reimbur- sements in aid,

C.

C.

eb

76,000.00

77.722.01

1.722.01

4,758,820.00 4,765,227.78

6,107.78

Post Office,

410,000.00

519,275.03 470,151.53

420,154.04

10,454.04

Rent of Government Property, Land

and Houses,

6. Interest,

7. Miscellaneous Receipts,

TOTAL, Ordinary,

735,900.00 826,699.20 90,799.20

6,000.00 8,063.42 2,068.42

192,400,00 58,747.24

6,698,395.00 6,622,070.25

Nett balance (overpaid) 1st Ja

HEADS OF EXPENDITUI

Charge on account of Public Pensions,

Governor,

Colonial Secretary's Departm

Legislature,

Registrar General's Departme

49,123.47 Andit Department,

Treasury,.

Post Office,

Harbour Master's Departmen Observatory,

Judicial and Legal Departme Police and Prison Department Medical Departments,

Sanitary Department,..

138,652.76 Botanical and Forestry Depar

Education,

111,451.48

187,776.23| Ecclesiastical,

Charitable Allowances,

8. Land Sales,

400,000.00 315,733.21

$4,266.79 Transport,

Miscellaneous Services,

9. Widows and Orphans' Pension Fund,

249,000.00

7,347,395.00 6,937,803.46

111,451.48

521,043.02

249,000.00 | Military Expenditure,

Public Works Department, Public Works Recurrent,

10. Amount transferred from Praya

Reclamation Fund,

97,208.32

Total Revenue,..

7,347,395.00 7,035,011.78

97,208.32

208,659.80

521,043.02

Το

Deposits Available,

Deposits Available, (Subsidiary Coins),

4,137,647.00

Deposits Not Available,

1,458,363.90

Crown Agents' Account,

3,329,135.46

Crown Agents' Advance,

Crown Agents' Deposit,

Account,

unttances,

Public Works Extraordinary,

336,066.88

3,051,642.29

1,198,387.94

26,069.67

35,961.19

142,699.13

11,268,480.00

Total Expendi

Deposits Available,

Deposits Available, (Subsidiar Deposits Not Available,....... Crown Agents' Account,. Crown Agents' Advance, Crown Agents' Deposit, ....... Crown Agents' Bills in transit Advance Account, Family Remittances, Subsidiary Coins... Money Order Account, Suspense Account, Suspense House Service, Suspense Interest,

51,326.18

diary Coins,

3,462,244.59

Money Order Account,

118,662.21

Suspense Account,.....

Suspense House Service,

Exchange,

Suspense Interest,

Viceroy of Wuchang,...

Total Receipts,..

35,651,608.22

Total Receipts, with opening Balance,

35,687,070.37

Total,...$ 35,687,070.37

Total Payments, with open

Balance 31st Dec., 1906,

'I

15

Nett Bainee (overpaid) 1st 9alk, 19700,

C.

C.

HEADS OF EXPENDITURE,

C.

*

C.

C.

.01

1,722.04

Charge on account of Public Debt,.

185,000,00

140,160.84

41,839.16

Pensions,

236,294.00 |

193,662.47

42,631.53

Governor,

87,074.00

69,424.50

17,649.50

.78

6,107.78

Colonial Secretary's Department and

Legislature,

73,056.00

58,439.62

14,616.38

Registrar General's Department,

46,363.00

87,745.02

8,617.98

.53

49,123.47

Andit Department,

16,298.00

14,664.20

1,633.80

Treasury,.

60.271.00

51,876.93

8,394.07

1.04

10,45-4.04

Post Office,

417,118.00

359,484.08

57,633.92

Harbour Master's Department;

185,322.00

160,899 99

24,422.01

Observatory,

23,344,00

19,995.17

3,348.83

1.20

90,799.20

Judicial and Legal Departments,

214,715.00

192,728.04|

21,986.96

Police and Prison Departments,.

731,895.00

640,191.83

91,703.17

3.42

2,068.42

Medical Departments,

247,357.00

215,880.01

31,476.99

Sanitary Department,.

491,645.00

396,737.46

94,907.54

1.24

138,652.76

Botanical and Forestry Department,

47,677.00

46,796.19

Education,

188,851.00

159,373.32

1.25

111,451.48

187,776.23

Ecclesiastical,

3,800.00

3,600.00

880.81 29,477.68 200.00

Charitable Allowances,

5,420.00

3,474.41

3.21

$4,266.79 Transport,

249,000.00 Military Expenditure,

Public Works Department, Public Works Recurrent,

1,945.59

10,000.00

8,142.97

1,857.03

Miscellaneous Services,

142,291.00

620,140.53

477,849.53

1,389,142.00 1,352,537.14

36,604.86

283,022.00 203,068.43

79,953.57

409,200.00 379,797.77

29,402.23

3.46

3.32

1.78

111,451.48

97,208.32

208,659.80

521,043.02

521,043.02

Total,

5,495,155.00 5,328,820.92

477,849.53

641,183.61

Public Works Extraordinary,

1,561,800.00 1,503,789.76

58,010.24

7.00

7,056,955.00 6,832,610.68

477,849.53

702,193.85

3.90

5.46

Total Expenditure,

$ 6,832,610.68

56.88

2.29

$7.94

Deposits Available,

Deposits Available, (Subsidiary Coins),

Deposits Not Available,

6.18

Crown Agents' Account,.

Crown Agents' Advance,

1.59

Crown Agents' Deposit,

Crown Agents' Bills in transit,

150,000.00

1:1,215.00

1,157,469.32

3,865,273.72

11,605,398.51

3,828,788.91

330,000.00

12.21

Advance Account,

Family Remittances,

Subsidiary Coins,.....

Money Order Account,

39.67

Suspense Account,

51.19

Suspense House Service, Suspense Interest,

1,303,791.28

50,880.18 3,828,847.69 128,690.41

22,388.26 73, 32.55

99.13

30.00

08.22

70.37

Balance 31st Dec., 1906,

Total Payments,...$ 32,789,186.51

Total Payments, with opening Balance,

35,585,851.99

101,218.38

70.37

Total,

$35,687,070.37

43

Statement of Assets and Liabilities, on the 31st December, 1906.

LIABILITIES.

$$

C.

ASSETS."

..

Deposits not available,

945,559.00 Balance, Bank,...

231,532.55

Refund of Rates,

-9,300.00

Balance, Crown Agents,.

19,685.83

Officers' Remittances,......

741.43

Advances,

316,438.11

Money Order Remittances,

3,174.33

Crown Agents' Deposit,

777,146.62

Civil Pensions,

17,700.00

Subsidiary Coins,....

308,525,48

Police Pensions,

14,000.00

Profit, Money Order Office,......

12,000.00

Public Works,

13,862.66

Suspense House Service,

6.755.00

Total Liabilities,

1,013,092.48

Balance,

652,236.11

Total,...$1,665,328.59

Total Assets,*

$1,665.828.59

* Not including Arrears of Revenue and Over-payment amounting to $143,260.65.

Statement of Funded Public Debt or Loans borrowed for Fixed Periods outstanding on the 31st December, 1906, and of the Accumulated Sinking Funds at the same date.

Designation of Debt or Loan.

Legal

Amount Authority. Outstanding.

SINKING FUNDS.

Amount of Stock, &c.

Cost Price.

Market Value.

£

s. d.

£ s. d.

Hongkong 31% In- Ordinances 1&2 £341,799,15,1

scribed Stock.

of 1893.

Brit. Guiana,

Stock.

Sterling.

Cape of G. Hope, 3 % Gold Coast,

""

3 %

27

Natal.

3 %

19

New Zealand,

놀이

Do..

3

"

Queensland,

3

>>

Sierra Leone,

310

"

South Australia, 31%

2,000. 0. 0 2,000. 0. 0 4,000. 0. 0 1,200. 0. 0

*

South Nigeria

(Lagos),

33%

Trinidad,

4%

Do.,

3 %

Victoria,

310%

Western A'tralia, 3

* * * * *

2,000. 0. 0 2,000. 0. 5,000. 0. 0

200. 0. 0 1,000. 0. 0

8,300. 0. 0 4,000. 0. 0 5,000. 0. 0 5,000. 0. 0 2,100. 0. 0

£ s. d.

1,932.17. 3 (87 ) 1,740. 0. 0 1,941. 1. O (87 ) 1,740. 0. 0 4,480.11. 6 (87) 4,350, 0. 0 189.19. 5 (85) 170.0. 0 1,037. 0. 8 (101) 1,010, 0, 0 1,921. S. 8 (891) 1,790. 0. 0 1,948. 5.10 (87 ) 1,740. 0. 0 3,879.19. 2 (991) 3,980. 0. 0 1,293.16. 5 (100) 1,200. 0. 0

8,099. 2. 7(100)8,341.10. 0 4.082.12.0 (104) 4,160. 0. 0 4,746.15. 0 (87) 4,350. 0. 0 4,734. 8. 6 (99) 4,950). 0. 0 2,010. 2.10 (88) 1,848. 0. 0

£ 43,800. 0.0 £12,298. 0.10~

£ £1,369.10. 0

£1,143.933.1.4 Nos. 1 of 1893| Sterling.

Do.

Ordinances

& 11 of 1905.

Amount repaid by Viceroy of Wuchang and placed to credit of Special Fund.

£110,000.

44

Summary of Advances and Repayments of Advances for the Year ended 31st December, 1906.

Names.

Balances

on

1st January, 1906.

Advances during the

year.

Total.

Repayments of Advances during the year.

Balances

on

31st Dec.,

1906.

$3

Money Order,

251.73 238,613.49

238,865.22

į 236,214.64 |

893.02

(1)1,757.56{

Do.

Transvaal

2,473.09 Cr. 2,473.09

Singapore Government,

363.14

2,244.61

2,607.75

2,085.63

522.12

872.63

Mauritius Government,

475.45

1,355,03

1 (1)

1,077.01

278.02

6.95

293.55

Ceylon Government,

78.15

267.78

345.93

45.63

((2) 6.75

British Guiana......

316.89

316.89

316.89

Praya East Reclamation,

57,130.57

184.82

57,815.39

57,315.39

3,066.50

Transvaal Government,

2,265.00

(2) 30.92

|

5,362.42

3,825.92

1,536.50

Colonial Secretary,

25.00

25.00

25.00

G. N. Orme,..

250.00

250.00

250.00

Treasury,

500.00

500.00

500.00

Public Works Department,

7,000.00

7,000.00

7,000.00

Supreme Court,

100.00

100.00

100.00

Crown Solicitor,

1,061.85

Sanitary Department,

200.00 2,000.00

1,261.85

1,237.25

24.60

2,000,00

2,000.00

Post Office-Money Order,

25,000.00

25,000.00

25,000.00

Postmaster General,

Magistracy,

500.00 100.00

500.00 100.00

Private Street Improvement,

1,953.39

1,953.39

Rider Main Scheme,

119,250.73

89,604.92

208,855.65

350.07 97,494.44

500.00

100.00 1,603.32 111,361.21

Captain Superintendent of Police,..........

25.00

800.00

825.00

825.00

163.80

Ada Robertson,

54.60

231.10

285.70

40.95

(3) 80.95

247.63

J. Wildey,

82.54

322.43

401.97

61.91

(4) 95.43

45.04

M. Hood,

22.52

64.26

86.78

11.26

(5) 30.48

f 249.00

A. Dixon,.....

83.00

351.55

434.55

62.25

Expenses for taking Cipher to H. B.

M.'s Consul, Hanoi

{ (3)

115.20

(6) 123.30

118.45

118.45

3.25

F. Gidley,.

213.84

71.24

278.15

349.39

(7) 82.09

*53.46

239.84

M. Moore,

119.93

342.43

462.36

119.93

(8) 102.59

Resumption of Land, N. T.,

4,000.00

26,000.00

30,000.00

30,000.00

J. Seymour

4.06

4.06

4.06

D. McKenzie,

286.75

286.75

286.75

Passage of Miss Aris,

323.40

323.40

323.40

Furniture for Government Pavilion,

200.00

200.00

200.00

F. A. Coleman,

181.13

181.13

181.13

Sir F. Piggott,....

725.78

725.78

725.78

Inspector Fisher,.

42.00

42.00

42.00

L. S. Clarke,

343.03

343.03

300.00

43.03

P. C. Finaman,

R. G. McEwen,

J. G. T. Buckle

368.03

368.03

240.00

128.03

540.16

540.16

486.00

54.16

452.80

(4)

2.36

455.16

455.16

68.03

W. Orchar,

L. S. Blackman,

Botanical Department,

68.77

68.77

(5)

.74

406.15

406.15

176.00

230.15

M. Earner

Bacteriological Institute,

Local Auditor,

H. B. Lethbridge...................

Passage to Mrs. Culliford, ....

H. J. Knight, ...

35.40

35.40

35.40

200,00

200.00

200.00

700.00

700.00

700.00

1,427.14

1,427.14

800.00

627.14

159.96

159.96 {

{ (9)

159.78

433.23 158.35

433.23

158.35

.18 275.00 158.35

158.23

Carried forward,..........

213,721,46

380,018.76 593,740.22

419,319.98 176,893.33

45

Summary of Advances and Repayments of Advances for the Year ended 31st December, 1906, Continued.

Balances

on

Names.

1st January,

1906.

Advances during the

year.

Total.

Repayments of Advances during the year.

Balances

on

31st Dec.,

1906.

€A

Brought forward........

213,721.46

380,018.76

593,740.22

419,319.98

176,893.33

A. W. Grant,

276.93

276.93

60.00

H. St. J. Sasse,

239.47

239.47

239.47

H. G. C. Fisher,

393.85

393.85

280.00

216.93

113.85

G. W. Eves, A/c. Kowloon-Cauton

Railway,

578,114,37

578,114.37,

455,994.55

122,119.82

Special Fund,

E. W. Carpenter,

320,530.67

320,530.67

317,462.53

500.00

Metalic Circuit, .

J. J. Bullin,

15,468.64

500.00 15,468.64

......

500.00

981.91

3,068.11

14,486.73

30.81

H. H. J. Gompertz,

Cr. 30.81

385.93

385.93

240.00

145.93

Interest on Crown Ageuts' Advances,&c.

3,179.58

3,179.58

3,179.58

Sergeant Baker,

331.85.

331.85

Collision between U.S.S. Alexander

and Chinese Juuk 461,

972.65

972.65

(

200.00

930.20

131,85

(10) 42.45

R. F. Johnston,.

36.53

39.10

39.10

A. Chapman,

(11) 2.57

Deposit of 10% on the value of Goods

1,107.69

1,107.69

1,107.69

per Ghazee,

1,518.27

1,518.27

Passage to Mrs. Pitt,

305.45

805.45/

{(12) 16.97

1,511.30

305.45

Registrar General,

100.00

100.00

100.00

E. C. Lewis,.....

352.29

352.29

352.29

$ 213,721.46 1,303,835,50 1,517,556.96 1,201,118.85 318,942.01

(1) Profit in Exchange ...$ 6.95 (2)

Loss in Exchange $1,757.56

30.92

"

6.75

3.25

80.95

22

2.36

95.43

0.74

30.48

MA

"

123.30

$41.22

$2.09

11

(8)

102.59

""

0.18

"

(10)

42.45

"

(1)

2.57

•"

(12)

6.97

$2,331.32

Less Credits,

€*

.

2,503.90

316,438.11

46

Summary of Deposits and Refunds of Deposits for the Year ended 31st December, 1906.

Names.

Balances on

Deposits

1st January, received dur- 1906. ing the year.

Total.

Deposits Balances on repaid during 31st Decem-

the year.

ber, 1906.

Tender Deposits,...

Police Fine Fund,

4,925.00

40,345.00

Sikh Passage Fund,

295.00 460.42

45,270,00 295.00

39,310.00

30.00

5,960.00 265.00

1,053.52

1,513.94

1,093.15

Praya Reclamation Fund,

124,756.62

69.924.73

194,681.35

162,709.52

420.79 31,971.83

Suitors' Fund,

234,193.02

286,601.35

520,794.37

356,956.67

163,837.70

Kowloon-Canton Railway,

Chinese Recreation Ground,

Widows and Orphans' Fund,..

5,949.96

1,290.17

7,240.13

916.57

6,323.56

960,000.00

960,000.00,

513,866.59

446,133.41

233,013.67

47, 57.50

280,471.17

7,510.97

272,960.20

Custom Duties on Parcels,

1,489.70

3,355.17

4,844.87

3,050.57

Sale of Land Deposits, ...

250.00

975.00

1,225.00

925.00

1,794.30 300,00

House Service Deposits,.

394.00

1,895.00

2,289.00

562.00

1,727.00

Post Office Fine Fund,

227.27

40.96

268.23

268.23

Medical Department Fine Fund,

312.72

79.85

392.57

392.57

Sanitary Department Fine Fund,

73.42

31.45

104.87

104.87

Hongkong Volunteer Corps Fund,

16,429.21

30,083.30

46,512.51

39,665.88

6,846.63

Clerkship's Examination Fees,

80.00

80.00

10.00

70.00

Intestate Estate, ....

1,760.82

35.07

1,795.89

1,795.89

Estate of Deceased Policemen,

197.42

197.12

197.42

Sugar Convention,

2,830.00

2,830.00

2,580.00

250.00

Market Caretakers' Securities,

20.00

20.00

20.00

Miscellaneous,

19,817.22

7,260.00

27,077.22

24,240.37

2,836.85

Board of Trade,

28.84

3,960.99

3,989.83

3,956.04

33.79

Gaol Library,

103.90

103.90

103.90.

Compounds of Opium,..

925.00

925.00

925.00

Fees for Boundary Stones, N.T.,

139.84

139.84

85.99

53.85

12th March, 1907.

644,698.21 1,458,363.90 2,103,062.11 1,157,503.11 945,559.00

*Profit in Exchange $33.79.

A. M. THOMSON,

Treasurer.

M.

CORRECTED COPY.

HONGKONG.

No. 1907

38

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS IN CONNECTION WITH ESTIMATES FOR 1908.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor.

Statement of Assets and Liabilities, on the 31st December, 1906.

LIABILITIES.

C.

ASSETS.

Deposits not Available,

945,559.00

Balance, Bank,...

231,532.55

Refund of Rates,

9,300.00

Balance, Crown Agents....

19,685.83

Officers' Remittances,.

7418

Advances, ...

316,438.11

Money Order Remittances,

3,174.33

Crown Agents' Deposit,

777,146.62

Civil Pensions,

17,700.00

Subsidiary Coins,

308,525.48

Police Pensions,

14,000.00

Profit, Money Order Office,.....

12,000.00

Public Works,

15,862.66

*

Suspense House Service,

6,755.06

Total Liabilities,

1,013,092.48

Balance,

652,236.11

Total,$ 1,665,328.59

|

Total Assets,*

$1,665,328.59

* Not including Arrears of Revenue and Over-payment amounting to $143.260.65.

A. M. THOMSON,

Treasurer.

Treasury, Hongkong, 27th August, 1907.

[P. T. 0.]

!

640

ESTIMATED BALANCE OF ASSETS AND LIABILITIES ON 31ST DECEMBER, 1907.

Ordinary Revenue, 1907,

Land Sales,

Ordinary Expenditure including liability for Military Contribution, 1907,

Public Works, Extraordin.

Balance of Assets, 1906,

Credit Balance,

$6,351,258.00

300,000.00

.$ 5,125,467.00

Balance of Assets on 31st December, 1907,

*Not.including Estimated Arrears of Revenue 1907 amounting to $104,000.

Treasury, Hongkong, 27th August, 1907.

Dr.

To Inscribed Stock Loans 1893 and 1906 at 3% interest, to be paid off on the 15th April, 1943,

LOAN ACCOUNT 1906.

By Sinking Fund,

.....£1,485,732.16. 5

742,682.00

-$6,651,258.00

-$5,868,149.00

.$ 783,109.00

652,236.11

.*$1,435,345.11

A. M. THOMSON, Treasurer.

Note-Contributions to the Sinking Fund on account of 1906 Loan do not commence till 1911.

ESTIMATED LOAN ACCOUNT 1907.

To Inscribed Stock Loans of 1893 and 1906 at 3% interest, to be paid off on the 15th April, 1943,

By Sinking Fund,

.£1,485,732.16. 5

Note.-Contributions to the Sinking Fund on account of 1906 Loan do not commence till 1911.

RAILWAY LOAN ACCOUNT.

Cr.

...£ 42,298. 0.10

£ 47,036. 4. 8

To repayments by Viceroy, Wuchang, of

1905 Loan,

.£ 220,000. 0. 0

By Advances on account of Railway Cou-

struction,

.£220,000. 0. 0

Treasury, Hongkong, 24th September, 1907.

A. M. THOMSON,

Treasurer.

:

205

REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF FIRE BRIGADE

FOR THE YEAR 1906.

There were 30 Fires and 67 Incipient Fires during the year, as against 32 and 77 in 1905. Details with regard to these Fires are given in Tables I and II.

The estimated damage caused by Fires was $658,970.00 and by Incipient Fires $21,748.00.

The Brigade turned out 44 times during the year.

2. There was an intermittent supply of water in the mains from 15th March to 18th April during which period sea water was used as much as possible in order to save the fresh

water.

3. Two Fires occurred in the harbour during the year.

4. There was one prosecution for Arson in connection with the Fire at No. 147 Wing Lok Street. Four men were arrested and charged and committed for trial.

The Attorney General did not proceed with the case.

5. I attach a list of places where Fire Despatch Boxes are kept and of private telephones to which the Police have access in the event of a Fire (Appendix A) I also enclose a copy of a report by the Engineer on the state of Fire Engines (Appendix B).

6. The conduct of the Brigade has been gool.

*

25th February 1907.

F. J. BADELEY, Superintendent, Fire Brigade.

Appendix A.

List of Places where Fire Brigade Despatch Boxes are kept.

1 Box. Kennedy's Stable Leighton Hill Road. | 1 Box.

2 Boxes. Engine House at No. 2 Police Sta- 2 Boxes.

1 Box.

""

1

1

1

1

""

9 9

""

tion.

Naval Dock Yard, Queen's Road.

No. 7, Queen's Garden, Royal Engi-

1 Box.

2

Clock Tower.

""

Government Offices.

1

Government House.

1

22

neers' Mess.

1

Central Police Station.

1

""

1

Wellington Street

at Lyndhurst 1

29

Terrace.

1

1

3 Boxes.

""

1

""

Staunton Street, at Sing

Wong

1 Box.

1

""

1

1

""

1

21

1

""

""

""

1

I

""

""

Government Civil Hospital.

Street.

Water Lane, at Queen's Road

Central.

Robinson Road corner of Seymour

Terrace.

No. 6 Police Station, Peak.

*

Mount Gough Police Station. Engine House No. 7 Police Sta-

tion.

Bonham Strand West, at West

End.

Gas House, West Point.

Fat Hing Street, at Queen's Road

West.

Ko Shing Theatre.

Government Lunatic Asylum.

Nam Pak Hong Insurance Office. Man Mo Temple.

No. 5 Police Station.

Kennedy Town Hospital. Collinson Street West.

No. 552 Connaught Road West. Pumping Station, Yau-ma-ti. Yau-ma-ti Police Station.

Hung Hom

""

Mong Kok Tsui Market.

206

List of Telephones to which the Police can have access to communicate with

Central Station in the event of a Fire breaking out.

Hongkong and China Gas Company, East and Hongkong Hotel, Des Voeux Road Central.

West Point, from 7 A.M. to 9 P.M. Tung Wá Hospital, l'o Yan Street.

Man On Insurance Office, Queen's Road West.

Clock Tower.

Royal Naval Yard, Queen's Road East. Mr. J. KENNEDY's, Causeway Bay.

Electric Light Company, Queen's Road East.

Fire Alarms.

Harbour Master's Office at Wing Lok Street. Hollywood Road at Queen's Road West. Wilmer Street at Des Voeux Road West. Public Exchange Telephone.

Appendix B.

HONGKONG, 22nd February, 1907.

SIR,-I have the honour to forward the Annual Report on the state of the Government Fire Engines for the year ending 31st December, 1906.

STEAMER No. 1. Floating Fire Engine.

This Engine was sunk during the typhoon on 18th September, 1906, near the Western entrance to Causeway Bay. On being raised the Hull of the Launch was found to be so badly damaged that it was decided to build a new Hull. The pumps, propelling engine, and boiler, which suffered slight damage, have now been thoroughly overhauled and repaired, and await the completion of the new Hull.

STEAMER No. 2.

Land Engine by Shand and Mason.

This engine has been 28 years in service (Boiler 9 years old). It has been regularly used and tested at monthly drill for drivers and fires, was overhauled during the year, and is now in good working order.

This engine has been

STEAMER No. 3.

Land Engine by Shand and Mason.

years in service (Boiler retubed in May, 1904). It was regularly used and tested at monthly drill for drivers, overhauled at regular intervals during the

year, and is now in good working order.

STEAMER No. 4.

Land Engine by Shand and Mason.

This engine has been 25 years in service (new firebox fitted to boiler in April 1904). It has been thoroughly overhauled during the year and used regularly at drills for drivers and fires, and is now in good working order.

STEAMER No. 5.

Land Engine by Shand and Mason.

This engine, which has been 20 years in service, is at present out of commission, owing to the boiler tubes giving out during a monthly drill. The firebox of this boiler was previously reported to be in a weakened condition. A new firebox has been ordered from the makers and this engine should be in working order again at an early date.

All the Manual Engines and Gear, Hose, Reels, Ladders, and supply carts have been kept in repair, and are now in good order and condition.

I have, &c.,

D. MACDONALD, Engineer, Fire Brigade.

The Honourable

Mr. F. J. BADELEY,

Superintendent, Fire Brigade.

1

Table I.

FIRES DURING THE YEAR 1906.

No. of BUILDINGS DESTROYED.

- 207 -

No.

DATE.

TIME.

SITUATION OF FIRE.

DAMAGE.

CAUSE.

REMARKS.

Wholly Partly.

1

January

5.00 a.m.

House No. 252, Sheung Shui,

2

2

9.30

3

6

3.00 ""

A matshed at Sham Shui Po, House No. 7, Wing Shing Street,

1

200

Unknown,

matshed

I

60

5,000

Accident,..

25

""

9.20 p.m.

On the piece of ground between Ko Shing Street and Des Voeux Road West among scaffolding materials and bas- kets of salt fish,

600

Unknown,

29

8.30

A matshed covering a stack of coal in a coal yard near Yau Ma Ti Station,

matshed

1

50

6

31

1.40 a.m.

House No. 46, Tung Man Laue,

2,600

Accident,..

""

7

February

12

6.45

On board Cargo Boat No. 135 in Victoria Harbour,

5,600

Unknown,

12

""

2.30 p.m.

House No. 88, Macdonnell Road, Tsim Sha Tsui,

1

1,200

Accident,.....

9

March

8

12.55 a.m.

House No. 147, Wing Lok Street,

12,000

10

11

11

13

7.30 p.m.

12.30 a.m.

House No. 150, Wing Lok Street,

Cement Works, Hung Hom,........................

1

6,000

Suspected arson,...

Accident..

Four men were arrested and charged with arson and committed for trial. The Attorney General did not proceed with the case.

N

4,500 Unknown,

12

April

4

2.30

184, Des Voeux Road West,

~

12,000

Accident,.....

"

""

13

21

"3

7.55 p.m.

""

65, Wanchai Road,....

500

""

14

26

6.00 ""

A house in Tam Shui village, Sha Tau Kok,.

1

50

One woman was burnt to death.

""

Carried forward,

$

50,360

1

FIRES DURING THE YEAR 1906,-Continued.

208

No.

DATE.

TIME.

SITUATION OF FIRE,

NO. OF BUILDINGS DESTROYED.

DAMAGE.

CAUSE.

REMARKS.

Wholly. Partly.

$

Brought forward,

50,360

15 April

16

May

888888

30

7.00 a.m.

23

7.00

House No. 208, Winglok Street,

A house in Shau Tsui Village, Sha Tan Kok,

1

5,000

Unknown,

450

Accident,....

""

17

July

1

8.50

p.m.

House No. 218, Queen's Road West,

1

2,500

Unknown,

matshed

18

August

3.45 a.m..

A matshed near Quarry Bay,

5

5,000

""

19

September 18

11.00

House No. 48, Connaught Road,

T

3,000

Accident,

""

20

TO NO TO NO NO NO NO 2 N

October

14 3.00

On board S.S. Hankow in Victoria Harbour,

1

550,000

""

""

One hundred and eleven persons lost their lives.

21.

November

211.15 p.m.

Saw Mills at Mong Kok,

1

200

"

22

4 1,55 a.m.

House No. 9, Pedder's Street,

1

29,000

Fusing of electric wires,......

23

9

10.15

345

""

"1

317, Queen's Road Central,

1

8,000

Unknown,

24

10

11.50

35, Hollywood Road,

1

3,000

""

""

25

15 3.30

35

""

20, Tung Chung Village,

1

100

26

25 3.30

:

""

""

1, Chui Lung Lane,

300

Accident,....

matshed

27

27

2.25

Cement Works, Hung Hom,..............

1

1,200

29

28

December

2.00 p.m.

30

29

2220

"

Η

31

6.30 p.m.

11.00 p.m.

House No. 7, Shan Pin Terrace, Shan Ki

Wa

Van,

A matshed on Blackhead's Hill,

at Kun Chung,

1

matshed

1

matshed

1

Total,..

330* Unknown,

280

99

A

250

658,970

"}

No.

DATE.

TIME.

Table II.

INCIPIENT FIRES DURING THE YEAR 1906.

SITUATION OF FIRE.

DAMAGE.

CAUSE.

REMARKS.

- 209

123 41001-000

January

10

2.15 a.m.

10

"

4.45 p.m.

19, Water Street,

17 3.20

17

,,

5.00

",

39

17

10.00

* ,

""

20 8.35

">

>>

House No. 13, Queen Victoria Street,

24, Bonham Strand Central

54 and 56, Lyndhurst Terrace,

Out house at Nga Tsin Long village, Kowloon,

House No. 9, Chancery Lane,

Unknown,

· 100

35

}}

80

Trifling.

21

1.45

步步

24, Wellington Street,

24

""

Chimney on fire,......

Bed curtain caught fire.....

""

23

4.57

30, Boubam Strand Central,

Chimney on fire,..

9

24

5.30 a.m.

10 February 4

1.10

""

99

House No. 37, Circular Pathway, 41, Robinson Road,.......

1

Accident,

100

Throwing a lighted match on carpet,

11

9

9.30 p.m.

106, Des Vœux Road West,

10

Exploding of a kerosine lamp,

>>

12

9

11.45

44, Queen's Road Central,

Trifling.

Lighted candle falling on joss papers,

**

13

14

11.26

40, Elgin Street,

Joss sticks setting fire to some cotton wool,..

>>

14

22

9.00

11, Bird Street,

Trifling.

Accident,...

+3

77

15

27

5.30

,,

>>

16

March

4.

12.30

.17

6

9,15

39

Premises of Hongkong Cotton Mill,

Hillside at Mount Kellet near Cameron Villas,

25, Temple Street, Yaumati,

Unknown,

""

""

· 19

20

21

23

25

** ******

18

17

6.00 a.n.

House No. 146, Des Voeux Road Central,

20

""

9.30 p.m.

,,

1, Tsui Lung Lane, Wanchai, Hip Loong Bakery,

22

9.24 a.m.

8, Tit Hong Lanc,..

"}

April

9

2.10 p.m.

50, West Street.............

""

22 *

10

8.00

""

28, Queen's Road West,

24

12.40 a.m.

""

24

27

,,

7.00 p.m.

May

ة

8.00

99

26

27

23

1-8

7

7.15

""

7.49

">

Mr. Jorge's House, Kennedy Road,..

House No. 94, Reclamation Street, Yaumati,...

Fuse of an electric wire at the junction of Queen's Road and Ice House Street caught fire,

....

A tree in Battery Path,..

House No. 15D, Wellington Street,.

Trifing.

30

40

Overheating of flue,

""

Grass on fire,

Lighted match dropping on some papers,

Overheating of the oven,

Chimney on fire,...

99

Unknown,

Put out by occupants.

Police.

Brigade.

Villagers.

Occupants and Police.

Brigade.

Occupants.

""

Occupants and Police. Police.

Occupants and Police. Neighbours.

Firemen and Police.

Police and occupants.

Servant boys in the employ of

surrounding houses. Occupants and Police.

Bakers.

Extinguished by occupants.

""

""

步步

""

"!

Police and occupants.

,,

15

وو

59

""

""

"

""

""

Mill Staff.

לי

""

99

Carried forward,

...

385

Unknown,

Short circuit of electric wires, Chimney on fire,.......

Put out by Police and occupants.

Extinguished by Firemen.

Put out by Brigade.

INCIPIENT FIRES DURING THE YEAR 1905,-Continued.

No.

DATE.

TIME.

SITUATION OF FIRE.

DAMAGE.

CAUSE.

REMARKS.

Brought forward, ......$

385

28

8885

June

7

1.30 a.m.

House No. 6, East Road, Kowloou,..

Trifling.

Unknown,

29

· 11

39

7.30 p.m.

3, Pak Chi Lane,

Accident,...

Put out by occupants and neighbours.

Occupants.

""

30

11

9.40

12, Nullah Lane,....

Upsetting of a kerosine lamp,

""

31

18

""

8.30 a.m.

P. & O. Co., inclosure at Des Voeux Road, Central,

Trifling.

32

19

}}

F

co ci as e che ci

33

""

34

24

""

35

29

36

July

2 2287

4.45 p.m.

On board S.S. Doric in Victoria Harbour,

10.45 p.m.

3.20 a.m.

A matshed at the Cement work at Hung Hom, Nil. House No. 227, To Kwa Wan,.

Unknown,

"

9.50 p.m.

5.30

8, Cross Street,

Unknown,

A spark from the fumigation apparatus iguiting some matting in the hold,

Upsetting of a kerosine lamp, ....

"J

""

Police and occupants.

Police and coolies.

""

""

Brigade.

Coolies.

Occupants and Police.

A matshed at Kowloon,.

25

""

A spark from the Ferry Launch "Northern Star"

,,

Crew of the Launch.

33

37

00

8.30

On board S.S. Taming in Victoria harbour, ...jabt. 20,000

38

12

9.10 a.m.

Bamboo wharf of the Royal Dutch Petroleum Company at Causeway Bay,......

60

39

August

2.20

""

House No. 6, Tai Wo Street,

}

40

7

1.00

""

41

20

12.15

109, Connaught Road Contral, 83, To Kwa Wan,

50

""

""

42

October 22

1.00 p.m.

Hill side below Bowen Road,

Sparks from a blacksmith's forge,

The Company in order to clean and point one of their large tanks discharged the oil into the Harbour which caught fire, Upsetting of a lamp,

Exploding of a kerosine lamp,

Unknown,

Grass on fire,

Brigade.

""

Brigade.

""

99

43

22

1.50

""

""

44

23

2.00

>>

""

45

24

7.00

>>

46

24

7.30

ܕܕ ܂

""

47

26

""

11.00 a.m.

48

26

11.00

}}

""

>>

49

50

52

8888

26

5.17

"

p.m.

November 3

7.25

"5

"

51

3

9.40

""

""

9

10.15

at Kai Lung Wan Cemetery,

between Stanley and Wong Ma Kok,

#

On board Motor Pinnace at Blake Pier, House No. 251, Sheung Shui Village,.. Hill side at Kai Lung Wan,

between No. 6, Bridge Pokfulam and Peak,

House No. 178, Des Voeux Road Central, 164, Station Street, Mong Kok, On board a Motor in Victoria Harbour, House No. 481, Queen's Road West,

Unknown,

>>

??

Trifling.

Exploding of a lamp,.

Grass on fire,

Chimney on fire,........

50

Upsetting of kerosine lamp, Unknown,

20

Bursting of a kerosine lamp,.

""

""

"

""

""

""

Occupants and Police. Brigade.

Occupants.

Police and coolies.

Police,

Police and villagers.

The crew and Police.

Police and villagers.

Police and hired coolies.

""

""

Occupants and Firemen,

Police.

The crew.

Police and occupants.

??

Carried forward,

20,596

210 -

INCIPIENT FIRES DURING THE YEAR 1906,—Continued.

No.

DATE.

TIME.

SITUATION OF FIRE.

Carried forward,..

DAMAGE.

$20,596

53

November 14

6.20 p.m.

54

15

6.40

""

55

17

9.00

11

11

56

20

12.30

""

27

"

78, Tung Tau Kowloon City,

57

21

7.45 a.m.

""

58

26

59

22

9.45 p.m.

27

60

27

12.30

4.00

">

"3

""

61

December 4 5.37

}

""

A small matshed at Blackhead's Point,

House No. 101, Second Street,

233, Hollywood Road, .....

Basement floor of General Post Office,

Ko Shing Theatre,

Hill side above Shallow Water Bay, Stanley,... House No. 165, Queen's Road Central,

11, Old Bailey,

62.

4

11.30

28, Nullah Lane,...............

">

""

>>

63

11

3.20 a.m.

261, Queen's Road West,

>>

64

14

"}

7.30 p.m.

65

15

1.00

""

""

66

27

6.30

"5

>>

. 67

31

12.30

>>

12, Hollywood Road,

A house in Sha Ti Un, Kowloon,

House No. 46, Gage Street,

51, First Street,

*

""

>>

""

TOTAL.

CAUSE.

REMARKS.

...

:

20

Unknown,

Upsetting of a kerosine lamp,

2

50

Carelessness with Joss papers,

Unknown,

Setting fire to waste paper,

A lamp caught fire,

Grass on fire,

1,000

Throwing lighted match on the floor,

Upsetting of a kerosine lamp,

Put out by Police.

+3

">

">

>>

Occupants.

Occupants and Police. Police and Villagers.

Post Office employees and fire-

men from Clock Tower.

Police.

Police and hired coolies.

Firemen and occupants.

Occupants.

Attempted arsou,

>>

Occupants.

Overheating of a flue,

""

Chimney on fire,...........

""

Brigade and occupants. Occupants.

89

Igniting of some dry grass from boiler fire,.

""

Villagers and Police.

Chimney on fire....

Inmates and Police.

""

Unknown,

Police.

""

21,748

-211

E

No. 6

1907

HONGKONG.

REPORT OF THE HARBOUR MASTER FOR THE YEAR 1906.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of

His Excellency the Governor. Į

TABLE OF CONTENTS.

REPORT.

1. Shipping. 2. Trade.

3. Revenue.

4. Steam-launches.

5. Emigration.

7. Marine Magistrate's Court.

6. Registry of Shipping.

TABLES.

8. Marine Court.

9. Examination of Masters, Mates and

Engineers.

10. Examination of Pilots.

11. Sunday Working Cargo.

12. New Territories.

13. General.

I. Number, Tonnage, Crews and Cargoes of Vessels entered.

II. Number, Tonnage, Crews and Cargoes of Vessels cleared. III. Number, Tonnage, Crews and Cargoes of Vessels entered at each Port. IV. Number, Tonnage, Crews and Cargoes of Vessels cleared at each Port.

114

V. Number, Tonnage and Crews of Vessels of each Nation entered. VI. Number, Tonnage and Crews of Vessels of each Nation cleared. VII. Junks entered from China and Macao.

VIII. Junks cleared for China and Macao.

IX. Total number of Junks entered at each Port.

X. Total number of Junks cleared at each Port.

XI. Junks (local trade) entered.

XII. Junks (local trade) cleared.

XIII. Summary of arrivals and departures of all vessels.

XIV. Statement of Revenue collected.

XV. Licensed Steam-launches entered.

XVI. Licensed Steam-launches cleared.

XVII. Chinese Passenger Ships cleared by the Emigration Officer, (Summary). XVIII. Vessels bringing Chinese Passengers to Hongkong from places out of China,

(Summary).

XIX. Vessels registered.

XX. Vessels struck off the Register.

XXI. Marine Magistrate's Court.

XXII. Diagram of Tonnage of Vessels entered.

APPENDICES.

4. Report on Mercantile Marine Office. B. Report on Import and Export Office. C. Report on Marine Surveyor's Office. D. Report on Gunpowder Depôt. E. Report on Lighthouses.

1.-Shipping.

The total Tonnage entering and clearing at Ports of the Colony during the year 1906 amounted to 32,747,268 tons, being a decrease, compared with 1905, of 1,437,823 tons; but in combining Ocean and Steam-river Trade, a Tonnage amounting to 19,793,384 is shown, an increase of 86,656 tons over 1905 and the highest yet recorded. In putting aside River Trade, a substantial increase in Ocean Trade appears, amounting to 789,857 tons.

There were 214,556 arrivals of 16,394,508 tons, and 215,170 departures of 16,352,760

tons.

Of British Ocean-going vessels 3,595,879 tons entered, and 3,593,592 tons cleared.

Of Foreign Ocean-going vessels 3,565,449 tons entered, and 3,528,046 tons cleared.

Of British River steamers 2,424,961 tons entered, and 2,417,540 tons cleared.

Of Foreign River steamers, 334,831 tons entered, and 333,086 tons cleared.

Of Steamships under 60 tons trading to Ports outside the waters of the Colony 20,141 tons entered, and 20,141 tons cleared. These figures do not include private Steam-launches.

Of Junks in Foreign Trade 1,307,972 tons entered, and 1,311,439 tons cleared.

Of Steamships under 60 tons plying within the waters of the Colony 4,125,768 tons ed, and 4,125,768 tons cleared. These figures are incomplete, as the "Star" Ferry any's craft are not included, the Company stating that no record is kept of the number

made, or passengers carried, by their vessels.

115

Of Junks in Local Trade 1,019,507 tons entered, and 1,023,148 tons cleared.

Thus :-

British Ocean-going vessels represented...

Foreign Ocean-going vessels represented

British River steamers represented.......

Foreign River steamers represented

Steamships under 60 tons, Foreign Trade represented

Junks in Foreign Trade represented

Steamships under 60 tons, Local Trade represented

Junks in Local Trade represented

21.9 %

21.6 %

14.7 %

2.3%

0.1 %

8.0 %

25.2 %

6.2%

100.0

2. Seven thousand seven hundred and seventy-two (7,772) steamers, 14 sailing vessels, and 439 steamships under 60 tons in foreign trade, entered during the year, giving a daily average entry of 22.5, as compared with 24.81 in 1905. If the figures for foreign trade Junks are added, the daily average would be 61.4, as against 70.5 in 1905.

3. A comparison between the years 1905 and 1906 is given in the following table :—

1905.

1906.

Increase.

Decrease.

Ships. Tonnage. Ships. Tonnage. Ships. Tonnage. Ships. Tonnage.

----

British Ocean-

going, Foreign Ocean-

3,995 | 7,672,324 3,697

3,845 | 5,820,785 | 4,287 | 7,093,495

7,189,471

298 482,853

442 1,272,710|

975

going,

British River

Steamers, Foreign River

Steamers, S'ships under 60

7,488 | 5,551,022| 6,464| 4,842,501

1,024 711,521

659,597 | 1,071 667,917 96 8,320

tons (Foreign

Trade).......

1,800

71,448 878 40,282

922 31.166

Junks in Foreign 33,475 2,875,440 |28,153 | 2,619,411

Trade,

Total, Steam launches plying in the Colony, Junks in Local

Trade,

51,578 | 22,653,61644.550 | 22,453,077

337,913 9,169,312 333,500 | 8,251,536

:

5,322 256,029

538 1,281,030 7,566 |1,481,569

4,353 917,776

11,651 319,508

*

*

-

|63,267 || 2,362,163 |51,616|| 2,042,655

538 1,281,030 23,570 2.718,853

Grand Total,... 452,758 34,185,001 | 429,726 | 32,747,268

NETT,

23,032 |1,437,823

* Including 32,424 Conservancy and Dust Boats of 1.176.625 tons. Including 23,430 Conservancy and Dust Boats of 858,746 tons.

4. For Ocean vessels under the British Flag, this Table shows a decrease of 298 ships of 482,853 tons. This decrease is mainly due to vessels under the Japanese Flag returning to their various routes at the conclusion of the late war, thereby supplanting several British vessels which had been chartered in their stead, and partly to the disappearance of tramp steamers which carried stores for the opposing fleets; and eliminating the 893,890 tons ascrib- ed in last year's Return as an abnormal increase, practically due to the state of war existing, a legitimate increase to the British Flag is shown, amounting to 411,037 tons.

In British River steamers there is a decrease of 1,024 ships of 711,521 tons shown, which is due to the serious disasters that befell these steamers during the typhoon on the memorable 18th of September, and to the gutting by fire of the Hankow in the following month. During the necessary repairs of the crippled vessels, coasting steamers of small size were utilised in some instances by the different companies.

116

For Foreign Ocean vessels an increase of 442 ships of 1,272,710 tons is shown, which is almost wholly due to the Japanese vessels taking up their respective routes in place of the British vessels temporarily chartered, amounting to 594 ships of 1,275,640 tons in 1906, against 58 ships of 69,146 tons in 1905, an increase of 536 ships of 1,206,494 tons. Additionally, Corean steamers for the first time since 1901 entered the Port, and assisted in the increase by 30 ships of 61,596 tons. Vessels under Norwegian Flag show a decrease of 135 ships of 186,093 tons.

For Foreign River steamers an increase of 96 ships representing 8,320 tons is shown and can be ascribed to more trips being made by vessels under the French and Portuguese Flags, supplemented by vessels under the German and Japanese Flags which did not compete in this trade before.

The other increases and decreases are of small importance, excepting Junk and Steam- launch Trade within and outside the waters of the Colony. These vessels in many cases suffered disastrously in the typhoon already mentioned, and can be applied to the abnormal decrease shown, assisted by a gradual falling off in Junk Trade throughout the year.

5. The actual number of ships of European construction (exclusive of River steamers and Steam-launches) entering during the year was 870, being 417 British and 453 Foreign.

These 870 ships entered 4,012 times and gave a total tonnage of 7,151,328 tons. Thus, compared with 1905, 19 less ships entered 86 more times, and gave an aggregate tonnage increased by 404,728 tons.

Steamers.

No. of Times entered.

Total Tonnage.

Flag.

1905. 1906. 1905. 1906.

1905. 1906.

10

10

British, Austrian,

490 413 1,983 1,846 3,806,7923,580,508 27 88,326 100,929

26

Belgian,

1.

1

Chinese,

14

21

165

203

1.794 214,720

Corean,

2

15

251,400 30,798

Danish,

7

9

18

18

24,206 40,734

Dutch,..

10

18

35

64

77,205 130,864

French,

39

41

207

218

288,911 324,668

German,

163

143

887

846 1,394,255|1,343,420

Italian...

8

2

56

12 51,492 33.012

Japanese,.

10

68

29

298

34,573 640,715

Norwegian,

85

346

279

381,479 289,857

Portuguese,

7

69

74

11,800 13,181

Russian,

1

11

1

13

2,903

31.129

Swedish,

2

4

19

27

20,210

24.800

United States,.

22

28

62

57

314.101

299.079

No Flag,

1

178

:

Total,

867

858 3,904 3,998 6.712,7677,135,272

British,

German,

Flag.

Sailing No. of Times Total Tonnage.

Vessels.

entered.

1905. | 1906. ! 1905. | 1906. 1905. 1906.

16

4

16

G 32,258

15,371

1

1

1

1 2,193

1,880

1

Ι

1,199

4

6

4

6

8,183

8.333

:

472

:

Norwegian,

United States,. No Flag,

Total,

22

12

22

14 43,833

26,056

·

་ ་

117

6. The 417 British Vessels carried 3,604 British Officers and 31 Foreign Officers as follows:-

British,

Danish,

Dutch,

Norwegian,

United States,

Total,......

3,604

2

2

25

.3,635

Thus, the proportion of Foreign Officers serving in British Vessels was 0.85%, com- prising nationalities. A decrease of 0.14%, with a decrease in number of Officers and Ships.

The 453 Foreign Vessels carried 3,377 Officers, of whom 170 were British as follows:-

In Chinese Vessels,

French

"

German

Japanese

Russian

United States Vessels,

Total,

84

2

2

47

3

32

170

Thus, 5.03% of the Officers serving in Foreign Vessels visiting the Port were of British Nationality. An increase of 0.92% with an increase in number of ships and of Officers therein.

7. The 417 British Vessels carried, as crews, 30,694 British, 1,837 other Europeans, and 108,032 Asiatics; while the 453 Foreign Vessels carried 1,594 British, 37,166 other Europeans, and 97,018 Asiatics.

Hence, in British Vessels:-

21.7% of the crews were British.

1.3% 77.0%

""

"

>>

And in Foreign Vessels:--

Other Europeans. Asiatics.

1.2% of the crews were British. 27.4%

71.4%

Other Europeans. Asiatics.

-

1

2.-Trade.

8. Only an approximation of detailed Cargo, Measurement, Weight, &c. is given under. this heading, in many cases, enumerated cargo, which should be so shown (as expressed in Table under Imports) is reported as General except Sugar and Opium, these being mani- fested at this Office can be taken as reliable.

9. Under Imports there appears an increase of 159,426 tons, or 4.1%, principally due to Sugar, General, Rice and Flour, respectively. In Sugar 170,391 tons or 54.6%, is shown.

In Rice, 58,198 tons, or 10.3%, is recorded. This increase would have been consider- ably enhanced were it not for the scarcity of Cargo Boats, following the typhoon in September, many of the vessels departed with full cargoes as Transit, which otherwise would have been reported as Imports.

In Flour, 25,127 tons, which points somewhat to a cessation of the boycott of this commodity from the United States, although some small shipments have been reported from Australia at the early part of the year.

118

10. Among the decreases, Coal is prominent, amounting to 112,622 tons, which may be explained to some extent in the same manner as reported.in 1905, a cessation of Maritime Warfare and an overstocked Market.

Case Oil follows with a further falling off of 45,569 tons, this reduction may be ascribed to the large stock accumulated in the Colony on account of the boycott and to shipments that passed through the Harbour as Transit for other Ports, which hitherto, in some in stances, were landed and reshipped at this Port.

11. A decrease is reported of 537,058 tons in Transit Cargo, which may be explained by the falling off of Transport Service at the conclusion of the late war and to a reported general slackness of Trade existing for some time past.

12. The report also shows a decrease of 232,864 tons in Export Cargo.

13. The total reported Import trade of the Port for 1906 amounted to 22,408 vessels of 11.249,233 tons carrying 7.372,075 tons of cargo of which 4,493,715 tons were dis- charged at Hongkong.

CARGO.

COUNTRY.

SHIPS.

TONS.

IMPORT.

TRANSIT.

CLASS I.

Canada.

25

74,323

7,979

Continent of Europe,

155

509,919

119;550

119 354,592

Great Britain,

185

627,206

206,629

639,535

Mauritins,.

3

3,133

4,822

North America,

5

12,527

2,408

6,000

South Africa,

5

16,245

10

South America,

5

12,405

2,600

United States of America,

130

574,708

239,510

800 214,365

513

1,830,466

583,508 1,215,611

CLASS II.

Australia and New Zealand,.

79 170,141

146,507

18,659

India and Straits Settlements,

247 628,271

522,546

293,266

Japan,

535

1,411,394

863,229

524,360

Java and Indian Archipelago,

145

231,666

239,729

150,797

North Pacific,

2

Russia-in-Asia,.

23

1,392 50,857

ΤΟ 11,290

1,675

1,031 | 2,493,721 1,783,371

988.757

CLASS III.

North Borneo,

Coast of China,

36 1,304 | 1,712,065

59,041

86,422

3,919

332,930

602,607

Cochin-China,

111

189.004

186,670

27,277

Formosa,

84

71,381

18,980

Philippine Islands,

229

275,943

59,188

Hainan and Gulf of Tonkin,

297

230,746

188,538

1,825 36,484

Siam,....

287

310,069

495,296

Kwong-chow-wan,

72

23,950

5,901

Weihaiwei,

Macao,

47

1,418 13,524

250 3,233

200 1,600

80

2,468 2,837,141 1,377,408

673,992

CLASS IV.

River Steamers,

3,774 2,759,792 284,890

CLASS V.

Steam-ships under 60 tons,

439

20,141

23,219

CLASS VI.

Junks,

14,183 1,307,972 441,319

TOTAL,

22,408 11,249,233 4,493,715 2,878,360

119

14. Similarly, the Export trade of the Port was represented by 22,142 vessels of 11,203,844 tons, carrying 2,778,441 tons of cargo and shipping 690,689 tons of Bunker Coal.

CARGO.

COUNTRY.

SHIPS. TONS.

Export.

Bunker Coal.

CLASS I.

Canada,

36

108,600

26,039

238

Continent of Europe,

119,813

11,784

7,360

Great Britain,

117,682

25,105

150

Mauritius,

1,650

700

950

North America,

12,295

1,500

3,700

South Africa,

...

South America,

19,346

8,570

6,770

United States of America,

50

322,868

69,512

10,250

169

702,254

143,210

29,418

CLASS II.

Australia and New Zealand,.

45

106,238

6,650

12,780

India and Straits Settlements,

373

1,002,751

270,440

67,103

Java,

93

192,629

14,140

21,375

Japau & Indian Archipelago,

320

767,034

238,350

54,904

North Pacific,

Russia-in-Asia,..

16

37,889

7,900

4,353

South Pacific,,

11

19,244

3,590

8,200

858

2,125,785

541,070 168,715

CLASS III.

Kwong-chow-wan,

129

46,446

10,846

9,926

North Borneo,

40

76,362

9,810

9,320

Coast of China,

1,839 | 2,969,537

937,352

224,809

Cochin-China,

189

215,634

40,498

58,249

Formosa,

21

63,384

25,229

2,935

Hainan and Gulf of Tonkin,..

322

4

358,503

62,128

43,134

Kiaochow,

Macao, ......

25

⚫ 9,133

2,120

537

Philippine Islands,

235

366,543

130,346

46,480

Siam,

142

183,330

33,645

41,743

Weihaiwei,

3

4,727

4,020

345

2,945 4,293,599 | 1,255,994

437,478

CLASS IV.

River Steamers,

3,761 2,750,626 223,070

53,156

CLASS V. Steam-ships under 60 tons, .......

439

20,141

8,253

1,922

CLASS VI.

Junks,

13,970 1,311,439 606,844

TOTAL,.

22,142 11,203,844 | 2,778,441 690,689

:

15. During the year 1906, 15,519 vessels of European construction of 19,793,354 tons (net register), reported having carried 9,759,648 tons of Cargo, as follows:-

Import Cargo,

Export

Transit

27

Bunker Coal shipped,

..4,029,177 tons.

.2,163,344

""

.2,878,360

""

688,767

""

3

9,759,648 teas.

120

The total number of tons carried was therefore 19.31% of the total net register tonnage, (or 64.40% exclusive of River steamers), and was apportioned as follows :—

Imports--

British Ocean-going ships,.

Foreign

>>

British River steamers,

""

1,893,234

1,851,053

222.256

Foreign

62,634

4,029,177

Exports-

British Ocean-going ships,

.1,092,842

Foreign

77

British River steamers, Foreign

847,432 173,483.

49,587

>>

2,163,344

Transit-

British Ocean-going ships,.. Foreign

.1,668,276

1,210,084

""

2,878,360

Bunker Coal-

British Ocean-going ships,..

248,581

Foreign

27

387,030

British River steamers,

43,350

Foreign

.806

688,767

Grand Total,..

.9,759,648

16. The number and tonnage of European constructed vessels importing cargo as tabulated and in transit compared with the previous year was as follows:

1905.

1906.

Increase.

Decrease.

No.

Tonnage. No. Tonnage. No. Tonnage. No. Tonnage.

Steamers,

3,904

River Steamers,.... 4,229

Sailing Vessels,

22

6,712,767 3,998|| 7,135,272

3,106,7253,774 2,759,792

43,833

.94

422,505

26,056

455 346,933

17,777

Total,...... 8,155 | 9,863,325 |7,786

9,863,325 7,786 9,921,120 94 422,505 463

364,710

Nett,

57,795 369

Imported tons,

3,869,751

4,029,177

121

As follows:-

Articles.

1905.

1906.

Increase.

Decrease.

Beans,....

2.113

3,360

1,247

Coal,

1,083,987

971,365

112,622

Cotton Yarn and Cotton,

32,949

41,871

8,922

Flour,

54,508

79,635

25,127

Hemp,..

26,784

23,356

3,428

;

Kerosine (bulk),

43,411

43,932

521

(case),

74.506

28,937

45,569

"

Liquid Fuel,

850

5,850

5,000

Lead,

800

800

Opium,

2,983

3,286

303

Rattan,

3,430

12,531

9,101

Rice,

566.171

624,369

58,198

Sandalwood,.

3,386

2,561

825

Sulphur,

100

100

Sugar,...

311.787

482,178

170,391

Tea.....

900

900

Timber...

66.324

52,242

14,082

General,.

1,594,862

1,653,604

58,742

Total,

3,869,751

4,029,177

337,652

178,226

Transit,

3,415,418

2,878,360

537,058

Grand Total, ...

7,285,169

6,907,537

337,652

715,284

Nett,....

377,632

17. The number and tonnage of European constructed vessels exporting cargo as shown and Bunker Coal compared with the previous year was as follows:-

Steamers,

River Steamers,. Sailing Vessels,......

Fotal,

1905.

No.

Tonnage. No.

1906.

Increase.

Decrease.

Tonnage. No. Tonnage. No. Tonnage.

3,893 6,694,479 3,961 7,101,179 68 406,700 4,234 | 3,106,894 | 3,761 2,750,626 20,459

21

42,030 11

406,700

483

473 356,268 10 21,571

377,839

68' 8,148 9,843,403 7,733 9,872,264

Exported tous,

Steamers,

Nett,.........

28,861 415

2,343,701

2,163,344

Strs.

Bunker Coal.

Strs.

Bunker

Coal.

Strs.

Bunker Coal.

Strs.

Bunker Coal.

3,893

591,534 3,961

4,234

57,535 3,761

635,611 53,156

68 44,077

473

4,379

649,069 7,722 688,767 68 44,077

473

4,379

River Steamers,.

Total,.....8,127

Nett,..

39,698

405

122

18. The River trade in Imports, Exports and Passengers compared with the previous year was as follows:-

1905,.

1906,

Year.

Imports.

Exports.

Passengers.

294,425

212,649

2,673,202

284,890

223,070

2,561,972

19. The following shows the Junk trade of the Colony for the year :-

Foreign Trade, Local Trade,

Total,

IMPORTS.

.14,183 junks measuring......1,307,972 tons. .25,368

...39,551

"S

""

.. 1,019,507

................2,327,479

"2

y

Imported 756,942 tous as under :-

Tea,

Fire Crackers,

Oil, Vegetable,

Rice,......

Castle, (2,634),

Swine, (18,299),

Earth and Stones, General,

*

2,162 tons. 3,546

27

1,287

"

7

97

645

29

1,084 252,431 495,780

د,

*

Total,

756,942

EXPORTS.

Foreign Trade, Local Trade,

13,970 junks measuring

26,248

"

">

1,311,439 tons. 1,023,148

כל

Total,

40,218

,

99

......2,334,587

Exported 680,516 tons as under:-

Kerosine, (485,190 cases),

Rice and Paddy,

Earth and Stones,

General,

17,328 tons. 197,853 114,571 350,764

"

>>

Total,..

680,516

وو

سلام

123

20. The Passenger and Emigrant returns show the figures as below which are compared with those of the previous year.

PASSENGERS.

1905.

1906.

Increase. Decrease.

British Vessels, arrivals

189,381 169,889

19,492

Do.,

departures,.

103,281

100,701

2,580

Do.,

emigrants,

48,289

63,830

15,541

Total,......

340,951 334,420

15,541

22,072

Nett,

6,531

Foreign Vessels, arrivals,...

Do.,

emigrants,

100,874

Do., departures,. 84,996 100,811

16,052 12,895

102,738

1,864

15,815

3,157

Total,...... 201,922 216,444

17,679

3,157

Nett,

14,522

River Steamers, arrivals,... 1,349,665 1,281,365

68,300.

Do.,

departures,. 1,323,537 1,280,607

Total,... 2,673,202 2,561,972

Nett,

Junks, Foreign Trade,

41,867 38,725

arrivals,...

Do.,

departures,. 45,934 36,482

:

:

42,930

111,230

111,230

3,142

9,452

12,594

Total....... 87,801

75,207

Nett,

12,594

Total Arrivals,

1,689,045 1,592,717

96,328

""

Departures,

1,565,909 1,518,601

47,308

3,254,954 3,111,318

143,636

""

Emigrants,

64,341 76,725 12,384

Total,.

3,319,295 3,188,043

12,384

143,636

Nett,....

131,252

:

:

124

PASSENGERS,

-Continued.

1905.

1906.

Increase. Decrease.

Diff. of Arrivals and Dept, 124,136

74,116

Emigrants,

64,341

76,725

C

Remainder+or-

+ 59,795

2,609

Nett,..

Junks, Local Trade,

65,274 56,119

arrivals,... J

Do.,

departures,...

71,986

61,004

Total,....

137,260

117,123

Nett,....

:

:

:

9,155

10,982

20,187

20,137

*

i

21. The Number, Tonnage, Cargo, and Tassengers Carried, and Bunker Coal Shipped, by Ships of different Nationalities, during the year 1906 was as follows:-

125

OCEAN VESSELS,

RIVER STEAMERS.

TOTAL.*

NATIONALITY,

Fassengers.

l'assengers.

Passer gers.

No. of Register Ships. Tennage.

Imports. Exports. Transit.

Bunker

Coal.

No. of Register Ships. Tonnage.

Transit.

Imports. Experts.

Bunker

Coal.

No. of Register Ships. | Tonnage.

Imports. Exports. Transit.

Bunker

Coal.

Arrived.

* Depart-

ed.

Arrived.

* Depart-

eti.

*

Arrived.

Depart-

ed.

British,

3,697 | 7,189,471 1,893,234 1,092,812 1,665,276

218,581

109,899

100,701

6,464 | 4,842,501

222,756

173,483

43,350

1 192 843 1,197,616

10,16112,031,972 | 2,115,490 1,206,325 1,6€8,276

291,931

1,362,732 | 1,296,317

Austrian,

51

201.858

53,760. 22,882 64,229

8,801

8,26%

71

Corean,

30

61.596

49.514

100

3.9 0

9

16

54

20

201,858

3,760

61.596

49.514

22,882

100

C4 220

8,8 1

3,268

74.

3,910

9

16

Chinese,

405

501, 84

41.390

Danish,

35

81,823

5,784

74980

10.275

#1965

12,775

10, 01

8,972

217 47,313

12,800

13,157

2,452

35

28

622

518.97

54190

$8,137

51:965

18,297

10,239

9,600

35,120

600

3:

33

35

$1.323

5,734

10,275

25.420

C00

31

33

Dutch,

125

269,136

13 023

. 49 970

02.897

4553

2,459

6x2

125

259,136

98,023

49,750

92,397

4,553

2.459

682

French,

435

649.518

100,129

51,275

117. 51

52,202

15,783

German,.

1,682 | 2,674,1-9

$16.777

309,385

516 82%

186,2-5

46,073

8.30

63,624

C31

531,531 23,424 80,837

6,229

84.796

69 45,183

7,710

1,743

687

3,458

82,127

2,620

964

1,1849

123, 53

$5,112 117,651

58,431

100,781

91,083

1,781

2,719,372

824,487

314,128

526,822

196, 72

49,571

56,241

Italian,

Japanese,

25

€6,57X

42,071

11,450

200

11.199

1 673

172

25

:

66,578

42,071

11,950

300

11,199

1,673

172

594 1,275,640

294 179

192,409

104.026

38,645

11,809

19,601

6

3,714

200

$50

51

193

216

600

1,079,354

294,379

183,259

194,026

$8,696

12,002

19,217

Norwegian,

552

#71,872

264 622

60.817

88,165

41.851

1,214

2,699

#52

571,-72 284,622

60,817

88,165

44.551

1,214

2,699

Portuguese,

148 26,470

5,363

6.497

160

3.154

288

870

218

40,170

18,500

387

394

66,646

23,863

6,497

160

8,541

288

670

Russian,..

Swedish,

United States,

No Flag,

25 G01,953 #3 48,611 22,$11 1:9 613,115 11,480

5 1,032

120

1,18

1.877

1.30

3,505

3,565

25

€0,593

150

1,219

8 677

1.520

3,503

3,505

6.704

4 913

5.3 2

56,149

25 329

,175

219

6,176

37

53

48,611

22.911

6,714

4,943

3.322

2,490

119

28

5

615,115

1,052

41,130

56,149

25,3:0

5,175

249

6,176

37

2,490

28

Total Foreign,

*

4,2877,093,495 | 1,851,053

847,132 | 1,210,084

€87,030 102,723

100,211

1,071 €67,917

02,631

49,587

9,801:

88,522

84,091

5,3:8 7,761,412 | 1,913,687

897,019 | 1,210,084

300,836

191,260

185,802

Total,

7,984 | 14,282,966 3,711,287 1,940,274 | 2,578,360

635,011

272,617 201,512

7,535 | 5,510,418

284,890 223,070

53,166 | 1,281,335 | 1,280,007 15,519 | 19,793,384 4,029,177 2,103,541 2,878,360

688,707 1,553,992 | 1,482 119

* Not including emigrauts.

126*

22. The following table summarises the foregoing information with regard to the trade of the Ports of Hongkong for the Year 1906.

TONS.

Passengers.

No. of Ships.

Dis- charged.

Shipped.

In Transit.

British Ocean-going, Foreign Ocean-going. British River Steamers, Foreign River Steamers,..

Total,.......

Steam-ships under 60

tons Foreign Trade,... §

Junks Foreign Trade.

3,697 1,893,234 1,092.842 4,287 1,851,053 6,464 222.256 1,071 62,634

1.668.276 847.482 1,210,084 173,483 49,587

Bunker Coal shipped.

248,581 4,902.933 387.030 4,295,599

Total.

Registered Tonnage.

Emi- grants.

Arrived.

Departed.

7,189,471 169,889 100,701 63,830

7,093,495

102,738

100,811 12,895

43,350 439,089

9,806

122,027

15,519 | 4,029,177 | 2.163,314 | 2,878,360

1,842,501 $67,917

688,767 9,759,648 | 19,793,384

1,192,843 $8.522

1,195,616

$4,991

1,553,992

1,482,119 76,725

878 › 23,219

8,253

1,922

33,39-

10,282

5,889

6,211

28,153 441,319 606,844

1,048,163 2.619.411

38,725

36,482

Total Foreign Trade.

44.550 4,493,715 | 2,778,401 2,878,360

690,689 (10,841,205 | 22,453,077 1,598,606 1,524,842

76,725

Steam-Launches Local

Trade.

Junks, Local Trade,..

Total Local Traile,

*333,560

51,616 315,623

385,176 315,623

*23,023 *23,023 | *8,251,538 | *3,792,605 | *3,076,294

73,672

73,672

389,295 2,042,655

23,023 412,318 10,294,191 3,848,721

56,119

61,004

3,137,298

Grand Total...

429,726 | 4,809,338 | 2,852,113 | 2,878,360

713,712 11,253,523 32.747.268 5,447,330 4,662,140 76,725

*Not including "Star" Ferry Company's Craft.

3. Revenue.

23. The total Revenue collected by the Harbour Department during the year was $274,008.78 as against $302,787.76 (including $2,220 collected under the Sugar Convention Ordinance) collected in the previous year, showing a decrease of $28,778.98 :-

1. Light Dues,

2. Licences and Internal Revenue,

3. Fees of Court and Office,

4. Miscellaneous Receipts,.

$77,722.04

61,748.33

134,533.21

5.20

Total,

$274,008.78

For purposes of comparison, the amount of decrease, $28,778.98, may properly be reduced by $12,219.58, being amount of Storage fees paid in November 1905 by owners of War materials, which had been seized and ultimately restored by this Government, an item of Revenue not to be expected again leaving a net decrease of $16,559.40 to be accounted for. The principal falling off in Revenue comes under the heading: Junk Fees, $1,457; Engage- ment and Discharge of Seaman, $1,528; Storage of Gunpowder, yet another sum of $4,769; Sunday Cargo-working Permits, $12,007; and Survey of Steam-ships, $3,815. The prin- cipal increases are under Light Dues, $3,488; Fishing Stake and Net Licences, $1,115 and Medical Examination of Emigrants, $,3,582.

4. Steam-Launches.

24. On the 31st December, there were 291 Steam-launches employed in the Harbour, of these, 138 were licensed for the conveyance of passengers, &c., 138 were privately owned, 15 were the property of the Government and 5 belonged to the Imperial Government in charge of Military Authorities.

127

Thirteen Master's Certificates were suspended, 2 for 6 months, 1 for 4 months, 2 for 3 months, 2 for 2 months, 1 for 1 month, 1 for 6 weeks and 1 for 2 weeks; 1 cancelled and 2 Masters were cautioned and discharged, respectively.

Three hundred and thirty-four (334) engagements and three hundred and sixty-four (364) discharges of Masters and Engineers were made from 1st January to 31st December.

Twelve (12) Steam-launches were permitted to carry Arms, &c. for their protection against pirates, of these 11 were previously permitted and one during this year.

5.-Emigration.

25. Seventy-six thousand seven hundred and twenty-five (76,725) emigrants left Hongkong for various places during the year, of these, 63,830 were carried by British Ships and 12,895 by Foreign Ships; 134,912 were reported as having been brought to Hongkong from places to which they have emigrated, and of these, 105,780 were brought in British Ships and 25,586 by Foreign Ships.

6. Registry, &c., of Shipping.

26. During the year, 9 ships were registered under the provisions of the Imperial Merchant Shipping Act, and 12 Certificates of Registry were cancelled.

were

The documents, &c., dealt with in connection with the Imperial Merchant Shipping Act

as follows:

Number of Certificates of Registry granted,

9

Number of Certificates of Registry cancelled,

12

Number of copies from Register Book,

2

Number of Declarations of Ownership,

11

Number of endorsements on Certificates of Registry of

change of Masters,

55

Number of endorsements on Certificates of Registry of

change of Owners,.....

1

Number of Certificates of Sale recorded,..

Number of Mortgages recorded,

5

Number of Discharge of Mortgages recorded,.

2

Number of endorsements on Register of change i

ig or

Tonnage,

2

Number of Sales of ships recorded,.

4

Number of Desertions certified,

293

Number of inspections of Registry,..

15

Total Number of Documents, &c., 412

The fees collected on these Documents, &c., amounted to $1,201.

7.-Marine Magistrate's Court.

27. Twenty-seven (27) cases were heard in the Marine Magistrate's Court, breach

of Harbour Regulations were the principal offences.

t

128

8.-Marine Court.

(Under Section 19 of Ordinance No. 10 of 1899.)

28. The following Courts have been held during the year :-

(1.) On the 14th May, inquiry into the circumstances connected with the foundering of the British Steam-ship Chu Kong, Official No. 109,865 of Hongkong, off Swatow on the morning of the 28th April. Mr. WILLIAM BRIGHT was Master, the number of whose Certificate of Competency as Master was 022,528. The vessel carried a crew of 28 all told, but only 14 were saved, all Chinese, with exception of the Chief Engineer, Mr. Rutter.

(2.) On the 6th November, inquiry into the circumstances attending the burning of the British Steamship Hankow, Official No. 68,528 of London, in the Harbour of Victoria, Hongkong, on the morning of the 14th October. The Master's (Benjamin Roper BRANCH) Certificate of Competency was returned to him.

(3.) On the 16th November, inquiry into the circumstances attending the stranding of the British Steam-ship Kinshan, Official No. 109,872 of Hongkong, inside Brothers' Point,. during the Typhoon of the 18th September. The Master's (JACOB JOHAN LOSSIUS) Certificate of Competency was returned to him.

(4.) On the 27th November, inquiry into the circumstances attending the stranding of the British Steam-ship Heung Shan, Official No. 95,855 of Hongkong, on the South end of Saw Chau, luring the Typhoon of the 18th September. The Master's (GEORGE FREDERICK MORRISON) Certificate of Competency was returned to him.

9.-Examination of Masters, Mates and Engineers.

29. The following Tables show number of Candidates examined for Certificates of Competency, distinguishing those who were successful and those who failed:-

(Under Section 4 of Ordinance No. 10 of 1899.)

Grade.

Passed.

Failed.

Master,

18

2

Master, River Steamer,...

:

First Mate,

13

3

Only Mate,

Second Mate,

12

21

Total,

43

7

First Class Engineer,......

21

1

Second Class Engineer,.....

45

10

Total,

66

14

(Under Section 37 s.s. (7) of Ordinance No. 10 of 1899.)

Candidates.

Passed.

Failed.

J

For Master,.....

For Engineer,

129

11

82

6

Total,

211

17

129

10.-Examination of Pilots.

(Under Ordinance No. 3 of 1904.)

30. Four (4) examinations for Pilots' Certificates were held during the year, with the following results:-

European,

Chinese,

Candidates.

Passed.

Failed.

Total,

4

Four (4) Pilots' Licences were issued to holders of Certificates, 13 Licences were renewed and one Licence previously issued was cancelled at the request of the licensee.

+

:

11. Sunday Cargo Working. (Ordinance No. 1 of 1891.)

31. During the year, 399 permits were issued, under the provisions of the Ordinance. Of these, 126 were not availed of owing to its being found unnecessary for the ship to work cargo on Sunday and the fee paid for the permit was refunded in each case.

The Revenue collected each year since the Ordinance came into force is as follows:-

1892, 1893,...

1894,

>

1895..

1896,...

1897...

1898,...

1899,...

1900,

1901,.......

1902,. 1903...

1904,....

.$.4,800

7,900

13,375

11,600

7,575

11,850

25,925

21,825

43,550

44,800

44,175

34,800

.... 37,625

1905,..

1906..

43,475 31,397.50

The months of September and October accounted for $2,427.50 of the decrease; in the former month after the typhoon of the 18th September, Vessels were allowed to work cargo on Sundays without paying fees and in the latter month only one-tenth of the pre- scribed fees were charged on Permits, the remainder of the decrease being shown by the other months of the year.

12.-New Territories.

(Eighth Year of British Administration.)

32. The Station at the Island of Cheung Chau was opened in September, the one at Tai O in the Island of Lantau, in October of 1899, that at Tai Po in Mirs Bay, on board the Police steam-launch, in January 1900, that in Deep Bay, on board the Police steam-launch, in November 1901, that at Sai Kung in April 1902, and that at Long Ket, on board the Police steam-launch, in April 1905.

130

From 1st January to 31st December, 1906, 9,198 Licences, Clearances, Permits, &c., were issued at Cheung Chau, 4,081 at Tai O, 5,953 at Tai Po, 3,156 at Deep Bay, 2,632 at Sai Kung and 3,909 at Long Ket.

The Revenue collected by this Department from the New Territories during 1906, was $18,944.25 or $780.55 more than in 1905.

13.-General.

33. During the year under review, some important changes have taken place, notably : the vacating of the old Harbour Office for the present commodious new building, which has alleviated matters considerably for the better working of the Department.

The telegraph service from the outlying lighthouses, viz.: Gap Rock, Waglan and Green Island, has been installed and worked from this building. Additionally, shipping firms have been apprised of the passing of their vessels inward which hitherto was done by the Eastern Extension Telegraph Co.'s office.

The deplorable loss of life and damage done, due to the typhoon of the 18th September, will be indelibly, marked in the Annals of the Colony. 59 merchant vessels of European construction suffered in the waters of the Colony, 5 of 1,812 tons foundered, 22 of 22,478 tons stranded. 5 of 1,344 tons broken against sea wall, 13 of 21,420 tons badly damaged, and 14 of 25,131 tons slightly damaged. There were in addition 16 lighters of European construction sunk, and badly damaged, 34 launches sunk, 50 damaged and approximately 1.796 native craft sunk, and in the majority of cases totally lost. It can be safely said that all craft suffered in the harbour, more or less damaged during the blow. The loss of life, I regret to say, must have been excessively high, amounting to approximately 5,000 though there are no positive records to show the actual number that perished.

It behoves me to add with deep regret, the demise of a valued, courteous and upright public Officer Captain L. A. W. BARNES-LAWRENCE, R.N., Harbour Master who fell a victim of duty through illness contracted at the time of the devastation alluded to above.

1

CHARLES WILLIAM BECKWITH, Lieut. R.N.,

Harbour Master, &c.

HARBOUR OFFICE,

18th February, 1907.

NUMBER, TONNAGE, CREWS, and CARGOES of Vessels ENTER:

WITH CARGOES.

BRITISH,

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

COUNTRIES WHENCE ARRIVED.

Cargoes.

Cargoes.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews

Vessels. Tons.

Vessels.

Dis-

Tons. Crews.

charged Trausit.

Dis- charged Transit.

Ve

Australia and New Zealand,

British North Borneo,......

Canada,

hina.....

Coast of

Cochin-China,

Continent of Europe,

Formosa.

Great Britain,

India and Straits Settlements,

Japan....

Java and other Islands in the Indian Archipelago,.

Kwang-chau-wan,

Macao.

Mauritius..

Noth merica,

North Pacific,

Philippine Islands,

Ports in Hainan and Gulf of Tonquin,

Russia in Asla..................

Siam,

South Africa,

South America,

Tsintau,

United States of America,

Wei-ha:-wei,

53 112,759 3,092 128,004, 10,635) 18 34,301 1.117, 58,824 3,9-9 25 74,823 4.815 7,979 119 2,997 2,568,878 182,431

426,624 861,605) 60 80,98 3,179 101.170

22.175 2,316 172 677,245 11.873–197. 55–596,643 197 501,077 21,002; 438.3:6–203,081| 190|| 520,136, 12108 346,966 229.755

62 105,38) 3.425 123.061

1

2.657 51

53 112.759 3.092 128.004 10,635 19. $6,958 168 55,824 8,915. 25 74.82% 4,815 7.979 119

298,886 14.000. 3,235 2,862,261 14,431 425,642 361,5405, 20

61 82,023 3,226 101,170) 21.887

25.083 628 11,814 11,410

5 7.570 254 1.800

62

174, 581867 11.977 197.155 576,613 202 5:2980 21.359 438.366 205.081 194 530.487 14.298 346.966 229 755 105.368 425 125,961| 57,116

777; 611.247 38,177; 984 61 12.527 3831

21.887

1.042

47

4E

11.314 1,800

11410

2.908

7

ǎ 254

210

7,622

104

11.903

10 85!

267 190

57,446

611,247 38,177

22 256

984 6,590 198

61

1.500

2,408

6,000

183| 287,232 13,064

47.051

917

12 16,972 679:

31,235

:

22 256

1.500

5.937 180

2.408

6,000

4,409, 159

186 241,641 14223

47,031

947

12

16,972, 679

31,235

3,386 107

3.886 107]

12.962. 612) 23,770

101

13342 3261

10,245 400

2 3.859 121

2,000

500;

4.722 104

8,581

10 225 2,000

800

TOTAL...

167,716 3,271 147,847 160,429

1418

2501 1.600

4.819|5,6 15,937) 230,07: 2, 15,490 1.668,276

2482

49 160.158 3,811 147,847 100.429

1,418: 63

250 1,600

271 874.908 15.875|| 5,9906,120,840| 265,950/2,115,499 1,068,276–12.

12 12,962j 612 25,770

2.903

NUMBER, TONNAGE, CREWS, and CARGOES of Vessels CLEA

WITH CARGOES.

BRITISH.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

WITH CAL

COUNTRIES TO WHICH DEPARTED.

Shipped.

Shipped.

Bunker

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Cargors.

Auker Vessels.

Coal.

Tons. Crews.' Cal Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Cargoes.'

Buer Vessels. Tons. Grews.

Col.

Australia & New Zealand,

7

British North sorneo,

9

Canada,

251

539 15,574 16,807 1,695 72,268 4.492

2.950

1.150

70.720, 1.085

1,250,

8,040

24.447

19.216)

Coast of China,

3,384 3,448,067 159,872

518 720

Cochin-thina,

44

61,722 2,871

21,186

63 82.796 2,887

459.. 1.800 28 $1,008 1.136 36.075 1,800|

8.210 1,250)

175

$1 86.294. 1,624 2.930 19 41.254 2,154 1.250 26. 74.81 4.520, 19 216

9.860

16. 4690 238

8.

9017 16,096 29.095 1028

10:

34.469 1,610

2,199. 8,4978,479,158 161, 08–548.720) 84.995| 10,107 2,247,022 193,4 2

6.690

:א;)

21,156 97,797, 3.677:

11,977

46

36,118 4.389

Continent of Europe,

3

110,232 3.462.

Formosa......

Great Britain,

India and Singapore,

Japan,

Java and other Islands in the

In an Archipelago.

Kwang-chan-wan,

Macao,

26 90.910 2,652 199 480,184| 19 656| 195.182 140 356,659 8,995| 107,383

7

24.589 695

7.550

805

21.030

150

26,031,

91,417 1.770

22.282

*778 614,410, 38,309

15,419 371 1,750)

1,500

1,400

141

Mauritius.

North America.

Phlippine Islands,.

190

5 989 199. 297,238; 13,876||| 119,284

300 2,500

89,000

6,919 120

92,213 1,657 11,615)

19

2.482, 90 4.261 16

24589 695 7.550 201

21.030 90,919 2652 240′ 57:,601 21,426 195,182 144 863.578 6.124 107,883

805

12

86,8 9

130

26.772 79:

34667

22629

45 107,632 2,028

779. 61-4.551; 38,328.

1.750

13.046

15

128

1.500

1.400. 930

8,471. 289

300

190 301 490 14.038 119,234

3700 59.980

26.

Ports in Hainan'and Gulf of

Tonquin,.......

8:

9.618 524 7,453

1.440

12:

17.109. 528

Russia in Asia..

B

5.287. 171 2,600

630

6 19,443,

1062 2,200,

26,727 1.017

7.458

9502.

229

21682 698

2 600

G

Siam,

24,283, 654 3145 1.860,

12,024 309

1,590.

20

86,307 948.

3,145

G6

108, 384.763, 11 335 116 394,161 9,383;

31.469

46031 2

456 307.080. 1,99€

2

1 650

3.821

87,01: 2,867:

183 184 7,709

10.010

70,119 8,016,

102

222

South America,

19 346

8,570

6,770

16346 542. 8,570円

South Pacific,.

2

5,806 162 3,550

United States of America,

82.074 635 23,188

0,100

Wei-hai-wei,

3

4.727 156! 4.020

845

5.806 162 32.074 635

4.727

3.550 23,183

7,870.

174

186, 4.020

100 $15

86 287,576 8011

TOTAL,

4,870 5,600,925 256,519 1,099,742 – 208 552

i

201 410,207 5,090, 45.029' 5,071|0,011,182 265,689 1,099.742 248581|11,4

4,212,91 H 256,094.

131

Table I.

NAGE, CHEWS, and CARGOES of Vessels ENTERED at Ports in the Colony of Hongkong from each Country for the Year ending 31st Decembe

RITISH.

FOREIGN.

: BALLAST.

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOES,

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Cargoes.

Cargnes.

Cargoes.

Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tons. Crews Dis-

Vessels.

Tous. Crews.!

charged Transit.

53

2657 51

25

17

1.042

47

61

2.908

55!

5 254

210 7,622 104 11.903 267 10 351

190

197.155|| 56,643 438.346' 205,081 346,966) 229 755 125.981

11

57,846

112.759 3.092 128.004 10,635 19. 86,958. 168 55,824

3,915. 25 74.323 4,815 7.979

119 298,888 14.000 3.235 2,862.261 11,431 421,642 301,405, 10,861:1,582,:71114,261, 678478 241,002; 5,203) 721,201 71,608, 15,584 2,306.87 218.872

82,023 3,226 101,170 21.887 199 56 800 1,934. 25.083 628 11,814 11410 137: 467.59815 208

7870 254 1.800 174 581 867 11.977 202 6:2980 21.859. 194) 580.487 12.298 621 103,368 8425

Dis- charged Transit

56,843) 2.863) 18.503 8,024 22,083; 907 $2,598)

Vessels. Tons. Crews, Vessela,

Tons.

Dis-

Ton

char ed | Transit.

539

20 67,382 240

17 22.08. 907

18.603 82,598)

8.021

85 500

108 236 62.107, 43'5 17,180, 42.3 1,220 9.474 44 114.245 8,112, 84180 33: 860.444 26.775; 516,263 291,605

5 890 318,182,

1

1.INT

60 56.981 195%

1

17883 1.74

148 48484

5.741

79

63 8:1

4.396

42.892

11

42.83

1 221

88 185.

1.6

45

115.91

24.

31

880,907 17.1.

821 121,744 3,842; 115,768

93.351-

1.557

126,298 3.899

69

22,919) 2,484. 5.901

200

28.950 2,52%

115 70% 5.901

8. 85 291605 93.351

200

C3.478) 241.902 13,338155 85.500 5.390 100 136

103236 383182

17 10 9474

ST180 5128

12,692

5.937

185

984 12.527

777. 611247 38,177 GI 353

22 250

161

30.241 2.664

8.283

80

33,612

2.033

1.500)

2

2.149.

90.

3..22

90'

2.408

6,000

1

4.409.

3.886

159

186 241,641 19.223.

16,972.

3 386:

679) 107

17,051 31,255,

947

24

12.962.

512; 28.770

407 20.197, 867 201,853 9,588) 157.808 16.108. 400 11.290 297.107, 18,56, 471,25-

50

70

12 137:

878. 86,481 1.675

19.

asa 14. 05

43

8,911

111

82,360

811

1 392 31,302

12.137) 285) 213.771 9.979 157,803 47.471 1.334 14.290 273. 297,197 13,561) 471,526,

88 1.202

237

133:2 326

4.722 10:

16.245 100

8,581

10 2,000

800

1

8.824 127

CHO

3482

80 412,197, 12,371 91,668 51,136

2,013

3824 127

600

41151

91663

250

1,600

70 49. 160.198 3,31 147,847 160.429

1 1.08

371,903. 15.875 5,090 6,020.810| 235,35-42,115,490 1,668,276 12.034|4,397,593 246,149 2,378,225 1,210,084 5,284 830,800,

Table II.

7890) 17,5185,228,343 34,919|2.878,225|1,210,081| 16,8)

TONNAGE, CREWS, and CARCIDES of Vessels CLEARED in the Colony of Hongkong for each Country for the Year ending 31st December, 196

FOREIGN.

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOES,

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Shipped.

Shipped.

Shipped

Punker

Tons. Crews."

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Car_oes.

Cl.

XI 86.294 1.624 2.950 9860) ४ 16,096 907. 19 41.204 2,154. 1.250; 4690 16 29.095 1.028

74.181 4.520

Car_oes.

Biser Coni.

: Vessels,

Tous.

Crews Coul Vessels.

Tous. Crews.,

Fessels.

Tous.

ar_oes. Comi.

8.700 2.750 8.6

3.648

29

8.890

6.013 156

288

[0

21,156

14977

46- 36,118 6389

31

107 8,479,158 161, 08.

G8

97,797 8,677

19 216!

548,720' 81.995: 10,107 2,247,022-193,4 2,

$20,657, 182.082 5,280 512,033 52.10:

19.542 26256

81,713 2591

9,581 265

34.469 1.645!

6 823

670' 1,39

40.8771

110.232 8462

1.74

7

24589 692

26 90,910 2652

7,550 21.03

'305:

12

86.8 9 808

17.779

6.960. 2.450,

4001

119 813

10.941 976 21

1.18! 16 34469 1 CES 7 2.7 9.75 215,853 12

* { : : 8.727

8.700 3.420 8300

1,780 G8 3

31 67 26 159 RA 106,787

920.657

19.342

BB 67%

172.909 18,191 5,655,9%,

50 97.8.

11781

7.880

1

1.0212

2,476

GD

180

38.793

967

17.779

2 0.0

19

EL CROS

150

26772 79.

144

240 571,601 21,920 195,182.

33.578 9,124 107.38: 9.622

15. 167,632 2028 1.750

34567

108, 388,763. 11

4.075 78.258

21,772

795 4,075

38

1 70

25

14,387

116 304.161 9,363)

20.983

GO

99, 95

LI S

1,667 2829 11.290

431154

2.418

176

408 459 12, NI

75.258 136.967

807

زارش

15

31.005 $52 12.890

128

46 031 2 227

10.8161

779, 614 551 88.328-

1,500

450

807.080

1,990 806 642

1.670 9.920 22,400'

33

58.588 412 1.132

1.190 6.660

א!

$1.997

12 8:44

30

139

129

HARG

2.237

8 330 1924

2016,898 12

128

106

481

3082 2

1650 102

8.171 2691

BOD

199

301 190 TL03€ 119,31

3700 89.030

{ 3.821

700

12W

950.

16:04 22: 123492443 40.2

102

}

127

26

67.11 2,867

11.112

1920

10

7.988 CCD 1.650

2670

700 1,200 110012

354.3

20:

9: 21682 59

24,727 1.017 7.458 9502 26-0 2.830

2091

6

20

86.307 948 8,1450

8450

66

183 181 7.709;

10010 222 70,119 3,016j

54 675 5,80 30.500

27.035 1.12.3 23 6.9

73

68.592 1,599 13,597

281 774 1UA0N

54673 10.632 2371728

1

#.199 101

400

323 63300 15231

دان

76,804 2,276

14.661

122

1

153M

512 8.570)

677

5.292 30.500. 38.2.

5.806

102: 3,550

32.074 C35. 23,183 100

1.727 166. 4020

7870. 96 287,576 8

40

4450

5.568

#

46.829

3

3,2.8

200794

207 8076

46,829

8.200 5,150

$6

i

5,071 8,071,352 vr5,6m 1,699.742) 9.712

248.58111, B 1,212,911: 256,021|1,678 690 322,15) 6.610 979,798, 66,305 119,654 17,071 5,192,

322,353 1,678,699

412,IGNE 16,50

Country for the Year ending 31st December, 1906.

5.901

22 949 2434

5.991

TOTAL.

ITH CARGOES,

ΤΟΤΑΙ.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Cargoes.

Cargoes.

Cargoes.

ssels.

Tons. Crew:

rews.

Dis- char.ed

Dis-

Tous. Crews.Vessels. Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

201 57,882 2401 18.503 17 22.08. 907 32,598

charged Transit

8,021 78′′ 169.402 5,455 146,507 18.659. 66.58 2,024 86.422 8.919. 74.828 4,518 7,979

Dis- charged

Transit.

85.500

148

791

484.84 5.741 63.8:1 4,89

103.236

79: 170.141 5,403, 146.507 36 59.041 2.075 86.422 3.919 25 74.823 4.815 7,979

119

5,564 2,306.37 218,872 633.478 241.002|| 18,358 4,145.5 44 276,695 1.030,102|| 602,607, 5.441].,023,091 88,608|18,799 5,168,636 345.503 1.060.102. 602,007

50 56,981) 1933.

5.390 109 186.78 5.10 186 670 27,77

2,228 69 11 189.004 5.179 186.670. 27 277 343.182

1-3 489 678 15,781, 1:9,550| 354592

155. 509,919 16,372, 119.550 354.592 61,428 4.859) 18 980

84 71881, 4650 185 247: 628,271 21.504

11! 42.88 122 ); 45 115,291 292 311| 880,907 -7,157

1710 9.474 81 180

42,892 88. 85

510.263 294 605 98.351

200!

83; 126,298 3,899, 115 768 721 23.950 2,528

183, 619 58T 13.099. 206,629 639.585 2-1 615,322 21,204 522 516| 293.266 722 1,480,530 38,88;; 863.229 521360 11. 280,109 7.267) 289,7.9) 150.797,

69

1

18850

1 2,657

119

12 20 241 591 6.958. 201 7,622 10-1 12.949 800

18.980

627.206 18.197

206,629

639,535

522.546

293.266

80,814 572

5251,411,394 39 455

863.229

524.860

1.557

231.666: 7.824,

239.729

150 797

200

1001.

23 950

2.528

5.901

200

171

33,612 2.933.

3.233

641.498, 40,841;

25,489

80

10-

8,866

269

144 839.41.110

25.489

80

2,149

8,322

3,133 1511

4.822

B. 33

151

4.822

6,590 198

2,408

6,000

5.937

185

.2 527

383

2,408

6,000

2

1392

70

407 50

70

985

38

1 392

$8

70

13

34,302 1.202 12.137

878

207

285 218.771 9979–157,303

47.47 1,334 11.290

275 297,197 13,561) 471,526)

86,484 287

1,675

287

257 429, 13.921, 22,805 10.217, 188,538 15.108 490 11,290 $10.0501..78) 496 20

59 188

1,825

22,

18,614

594

229

275943 14,515

59.188

1,825

36.484

10

8,94 411

297

280,746 10.558. 188,583

36484

1,675

12

35.749

23

287

50.837 1441 810 069 11,178)

11 290 495,296

1 675

2903 80!

10:

1 3.824 127

600

21 13:1

7,688 24 2,600

570/13 15,612 239.510 214.565

1.41

GA

250

1,600

16.245' 406 12,405 352: 2,600

150–574,708, 15.734|| 239,510| 214,565

14.8

250

1,600

81 411516 12,393 91.668

7,918|5,228,393 3.4,019|2.378,225|1,210,084) 10.833; 10 043,530) 490,221| 1.493,715)2 878,360) 5 555 1.205.703′ 93 745 22,408 11,249 233 589.96: 1,493,715 2.878.860

800.

13.342 826 4.722 101

10

800

4,495

92

for the Year ending 31st December, 1905.

TOTAL.

WITH ARGOES,

TOTAL.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Shipy ed

Shipped.

Shipped.

uns. Crews

9,941 976 35,108 1.18! 34469, 1 CA

9.055 245.-5.

Car_des.

Funker Vessels.

Cual.

8,700 3,420 15 85:0 4,780 256

Tous. Crews.

Cargoes.

Bunker Vessels.

Co.u.

Tons. Crews.

Funker Coal.

Vessels.

Tons. C ws.

;

Car, oes.

Bunker Coul

68 3

920.657

17,587 89%.

19.312

90

#1

38,795

#4,772

31 150

2415 3.455 12, 9A

17.779 2650

4,075

130.9967

19.

38

35 17. .909 18,491 5,695,067 854,8211,469,377) 2-4,828 5,303

48.672

97,849 8,760

40498 33,143 93 19.818 3.727 11784 7.860

1:0 232 8462

11.781 6.9602 60 90s: 1593 26.829 2,755 1.7,982 3.447: 26.105

31 670 1.446 6,650 8900 45 9.2 2723 9.810 6.480 106.787 6,87 26.089

63

74.568 1,141

8.880

15

394460. 615

1868 513,126: 53.237 117.794

2.890

175

4

9581 2.476

400 186

4. 106,288 2,000) 6,650

12.780 40 76,362 333S, 9.8.0 9.820 86 108,600 6 165

26 039

288 48,076, 18,794 6,288,2 3 40,561,1,469,877-257,904 25.06 189 215631 12,667 40.198 68,219 35 U19,817 8.727 11.781 7.800

21

#3

83.038

807 866.9.7 80.991 270,440) 64.406 32.282. 256 660.820 18358 238.5.0 43,267,

63.88T 1.662 117,682 3.447

26,229

2,935

25,105

150

GA

66 1:7904 2,883, 106,214. 2.958

12.098

373;1,002,751 81874

270.440

67.403

11,639

820, 767,684 2.316 278,350

54,904

982 2 2.1.9

14.997) 2.01: 12.390 16,446 2.25, JO,SIG 300,662

8.3301 9926 128

14.140 8,070,

145,801 2,847,

18305.

93 192 629 4070 14.110

21.875

10,846 9.926

22.815 1.28

1.650

700

968

3.624

35,044, 26o

1.200 11,02

808,162)

700 1.500

22.44499.

412 1,273

30

11

129 1.240

46 446 2207 10846 922 763-40.457 Box 162

9.926

22.620

970

1.650 102

709

950

6500

130,346

2.300 48.920

2.81

90

13

81 776, 19,40s

18.209

46.823

54 675.

10.682 6.300. 15235 30,500, 88.2.3

62 128

28 475

83

7.000

1,763

7

91402 3.650

33.645 25.480

03

85,701 3,422) 2:642

620 88,828, 2,5851

1.4007 2,500

14 659 2.600 16,251

12.295 416

235) 266,543 16 712

1.500 130316

8,700

46,480

322 858 303 11.055 16 37.889 916 142 183,336

62.428

43.134

7.900

4.358

19.3 5

13.438 237

90,791 807a

40 8.200 46,829,

5,150

315

8,666)

156

8.5701 6.770

B.590 4,450 69,512 10,250 4.020 345

5.568 128 3.750

33 19316 542 19.244 459

33.645

41 748

8,570

6.770

8,590.

8 200

3.218

4A

50; 822 80s, 8711

B 4.727 156

69512

10,250

815

92,714) 822.: 93 1,678,699, 412,168 16,30

844 526,

5,81

1,390 005) 75,395) 164,683 22.142 11,203,841 588,035 2,778,44

690,689

TOTAL NUMBER, TONNAGE, CREWS, AND CARGO

NAMES

OF PORTS.

Aberdeen,

“Cheung Chaú,.

Deep Bay,

[unghòm,

Long Ket,

Sai Kung.

Sham Shui po,

Shaukiwán,.

Stanley,

WITH CARGOES.

BRITISH.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL..

WITH CAI

Cargoes.

Cargoes.

Vls.

Tons. Crews.

Vis.

Tons. Crews. Vls. Tons. Crews.

VIs. Tons. Crews.

Dis- charged.

Transit.

Dis- changed.

Transit.

12:1 6,737 1,053

284

3,552 1,463

660

10,348 3,111

40

856 234

Tai 0,

Tai Po,

Victoria,

4,8195,645,937|250.075|2,115,490 1.668,276

271 374,903′ 15.875 5,000 6,020.840)

Total....... 4,819′5,645,987/250.075/2,115 490 1,668,276)

271

1,097 110,274' 8,317 392 8,120 2,770 722 157 57 1,553 510

22.

2115 490 1,668,276|||9 3524,255,431 228,54:

974 903) 15 875 5,090/8,020,840′215 970|2.) 15.49001,668,276|12,034,4.397.593 246,14:

TOTAL NUMBER, TONNAGE, CREWS, AND CAR

WITH CARGOES.

BRITISH.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

I

NAMES

OF PORTS.

Shipped.

Shipped.

Vis.

Tons. Crews.

Vis.

Tons.

Cargoes.

Bunker Coal.

Bunker Coal.

Vis. Tons.

rews.

VIs. Tons

Cargoes.

Bunker Coal.

31

Aberdeen, Cheung Chat,.

Deep Bay, Hughòm,

Long Ket,

30

454

3

Sai Kung,

Shankiwán,.

691

Sham Shui-po,

Stanley,.

Tai 0,

Tai Po, . Victoria,

277

23;

18.

4,8705 600.925256,5491,099 742) 203,552

410,207 0,00

45,020 5,071 6,811, 32 2:5,629 1.099 742 248,581 9.898 4,131,

Total,

4.8705.600.925,266,549|1,099,742 2083,552

410.2 7 9,697

45.0229) 5,071'ko

285.589|1.09) 742|| 248,581[11,481 4.212.

132

Table III.

L NUMBER, TONNAGE, CREWS, AND CARGOES OF VESSELS ENTERED AT EACH PORT IN THE COLONY OF HON

FOREIGN.

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Cargoes.

Cargoes.

Cargoes.

Is.

Tons.

Crews.

i

VIS.

Tons. Crews.

Vis.

Dis- cha god.

Transit.

Dis- charged.

Tons. Crews. VIs. Tous. Crews.

VIs.

Tous

Transit.

120

284

6,737 1,053 4,122 3,552 1,463

87 3.897

2,281

19

811 216' 413 106 303

GGO

10,348 3,11]

7,5371

129!

Dis- charged.

10,634 1,864| 4,1221 3,965 1,569 2,281

4,588 783 789 14,936 3,894

Transit.

129)

2841

7,537

660.

10

...

40

856 234

389

1,097 110,274 8,317

392 8,120 2,770)

72,973

726

4,942

74

22

722 157

633

10

671 1,553 510

646

20

921 32

948 266 45,259 4,35% 1,823 155,533|12,669| 2,449 579: 401 10,569 3,349

252 125

974 282 1,6:4 530

401

389 72,973 4,942

40

097

110

392

8

633

22

61

646

57

1417 0,001

=,090 6,020,840/245,v56|2,115 490 1,668,276|||9 3524.255,431 228,513 2,284.702 1,210,084 4,193 778,799 71,062 19,5825,029,230 299,596 2,284,702 1.210,984

Logula,020,840 9:15 950|2. ' 15.490h1,668,276) 12,034,4.397.593′246,149 2.778, 2251.210,084

5.248′ 839,8 77,87 | 17.31×15.228.593324 019′2.378,225′1,210.084

Table IV.

16,853 10.04

AL NUMBER, TONNAGE, CREWS, AND CARGOES OF VESSELS CLEARED AT EACH PORT IN THE COLONY OF in

FOREIGN.

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

ΤΟΤΑΙ.

Shipped.

Shipped.

Shipped.

Eunker!

Coal.

Vls.

Tons.

rews.

VIS.

Tons. Crews.

Vis.

Tons.

Crews.

Cargoes.

Bunker Coal.

Cargoes.

Bunker Coal.

Bunker Coal.

Vls. Tons Crews.

Cargoes.

Funke: Coal.

31 1,603 282 36

G03

644 200

391

114: 1,434 263

145

3,374 1,293

299

6,037 1,248 4,018 1,48

603

391

454 13,416 2,692 10,697

361

5,220 1,573

815

18,636 4,835

10,697

801 19

36

691 55,540 4,700,

51,432

277

8,96: 2,398

23;

7081 212

18

400 151

4,437

630! 247

83 1.160 112,541|| 9,493)

265

570 185

30

656 204

36

1,851

5,020 1,687

33

30 944 306

168,087: 14,193 51.432. 642

13,988 4,035: 4,437 29 873 251 51 1,344 457

580

247

1.039 742 248,581 9.8984.131,506 245,4871,610,326 322,454 3,405

45,029) 5,071 ko

45,029 5,07) 6,011,132/2015.

285,689|1.091 742| 248,581|11,431 4.212.914|256,0911.678,499 322,454 5,640 979,798'66,305| 119.654 17.0715.192.714322396′1,678,690)

847,578 50,658; 119,054 13,303 4,970,081 206,095 1,610,326

419 Ti

E COLONY OF HONGKONG, IN THE YEAR 1906.

WITH CARGOES.

TOTAL.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

rgoes.

Cargoes.

Cargoes.

Vls.

Tons. Crews.

Vis

Transit.

Dis-

Tons. Crews.

Vis.

Tons.

Crews.

1.

Transit.

charged.

Dis- alarged.

Transit.

22

129

6,737 1,053

4,12

87

3,897

811

216

10,634! 1,884

4,122

311

284

3,552 1,463

2,281

19

413

100

303

3,965 1,569

2,281

37

660.

10.348

3,111

7,537

129

4588

783

789

14,036!

3,894

7,537

30

$50

234

389

6.

92

32

46

948

266

380

73

1097

110,274!

8,317

72,978

720

5,259円

4,352

1,823

155,533

12,669

72,973

42

392

8,120

2,770

4,942

74

2,449

679

466

10,569

3,349

4,942

131

22

792

157

$33

10:

252

125

321

974

46

52

1,050

510

646

51

20

61

1,604

282 5301

633

646

921.210384 14,172 9,901,368 478,000 4,400,192 2,878,300)

251,210.084

16,853) 10.043,580) 496,224) 4.403.715 2,878,300

7,148,702 86,937

5.555 1,205,708 93.7451

18,672 11,050,070 565,546 4.400,192 2,878,360

22,403 11,249.253 580,969 4,493,7152,878,360

THE COLONY OF HONGKONG, IN THE YEAR 1906..

ΤΟΤΑΙ..

WITH CARGOES.

TOTAL.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Shipped.

Shipped.

IS.

7

Crews,

Vls. Tons.

Crews..

Tis. Tons.

Crews

¡Cargoes.

lunker Coal.

· Cargoes.

Banker Coal.

Buuker Coal.

VIS.

Tons. Crews.

Cargoes. Coal.

Shipped.

Bunker

037

1,218

603.

,013 1,4)8.

301

SI 1,600; 982 36

644 200

C03 391

114 4,434 966

145

6.037 1,248

603

203.

3,374 1,298

900

4,018 1,498

391

,630. 4,235 10,097

13.410 2,092

10,679

361.

5,220 1,073.

812

18,630 4,365 10,697

656 2041

36

,087: 14,193

51.432.

,988 4,(35 4,437

601 277

80 55,540, 4,700

19.

8.962 2,398

26 01,432 4,437

873

251

530

23

,344. 457

247

18

7631 212 4001 161

5301 247

33

576 1.160 112,641, 9,493

2651

5,026 1,687 110 39 944 300

457

4081296(951,610,320 442,10814,708,9,752,431501,986 2,710,0 526,000 3,6061.257,780 59,748 164.683, 18,374 10.990,211 361,734 2,710,008 690,689 .714822396′1,678.600) 442.10816,807 7813 sank12.c40'2.778,441! 506 0oC) 5,8411 390,00575,295|| 164,683 22.14211,203,844|588,035|2.778,441 690,089

185

36

656 304

$6

1,851

108,087 14,193 51,432

542 20

13,98el 4,085

4,437

873 251

530

51

1,344

247

Y

:

:

133

Table V.

NUMBER, TONNAGE and CREWS of Vessels of each Nation ENTERED at Ports in the Colony of Hongkong, in the Year 1906.

ENTERED.

NATIONALITY

OF

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

L

VESSELS.

Vessels. Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tons. Crews. Vessels. Tous. Crews.

British, American,

4,819 | 5,645,937 |250,075

271

44

290,482 8,743

19

374,903 16,930

15,875 123

5,090 | 6,020,840 |265,950

63

Austrian,

27

100,929

1,607

27

307,412 100,929 1,607

9,166

Belgian,

Corean

15

30,798

746

15

30,798

746

Chinese,

287

254,311

17,196

24

20.642

1,218

311 (

274,953 18,414

Chinese Junks,"

9,238

770,821

104,486,

4,945

537,151

66,993

14,183

1,307,972. 171,479

Danish,

16

38,362

703

2

2,372

60

18

40,734

763

Dutch,

55

119,607

3,459

9

11,257

356

64

130,864

3.815

French,

471

575,955 22,511

13

14,979

545

484

590,934

23,056

German,

774

1,226,324

45,351

108

142,043

4,769

882

1,368,367

50,120

Italian,

12

33,012

1,220

12

33,012

1,220

Japanese,

292

630,399

22,747

9

12,173

440

301

642,572

23,187

Norwegian,

228

244,855

7,098

51

45,002

1,482

279

289,857

8,580

Portuguese,

191

32,117

3,845

1,152

237

198

33,269

4,082

Russian,

5

9,430

180

21,699

505

13

31,129

685

Swedish,

24

22,406

817

2,394

93

27

24,800

910

K

No Flag,

1

472

13

178

2

650

17

Steam-ships

under 60 tous

trading to

354

17,313 5,427

85

2,828

745

439

20,141

6,172

Ports outsidel

the Colony,

TOTAL, 16,853 10,043,530 496,224

|

5,555 | 1,205,703

93,745

22,408 11,249,233 589,969

Table VI.

NUMBER, TONNAGE! and CREWs of Vessels of each Nation CLEARED at Ports in the Colony of Hongkong, in the Year 1906.

CLEARED.

NATIONALITY

OF

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

VESSELS.

Vessels. Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tous. Crews. Vessels.

Tons. | Crews.

British,

4,870 | 5,600,925 |256,519

201

410,207

9,090

5,071 | 6,011,132 | 265,639

American,

48

Austrian,

24

299,726 92,804

9,015

8

5,977

253

56

305,703

9,268

1,451

3

8,125

84

27

100,929

1,535

Belgian,...

Corean,

2

2,939

54

13

27.839

743

15

30,798

*797

Chinese,....

307

271,035 16,902

4

2,909

178

311

273,944 17,080

Chinese Junks,

8,896

936,121 123,79%

5,074

375,318

49,350

13,970 | 1,311,439 | 173,143

Danish,

14

33,760

758

3

6,829

158

17

Dutch,

53

116,285 3,158

S

11,987

328

61

40,589 128,272 3,486

916

French,

462

569,022 21,669

20

21,093

852

482

590,115 | 22,521

German,

622

1,082,680 41,793

247

268,325

7,564

869

1,351,005 49,357

Italian,

13

Japanese,

264

33,566 562,253

.

1,271

13

33,566 1,271

21,226

35

74,529

1,770

299

636,782

22,996

Norwegian,

161

134,123

4,974

112

147,892

3,286

273

282,015

8,260

Portuguese,

194

32,648

3,998

4

729

72

198

33,377

4,070

Russian,

8

20,480

338

4

9,344

313

12

29,824

651

Swedish,

8,159

264

17

15,652

568

26

23,811

832

3

402

41

3

402

41

No Flag,

Steam-ships

under 60 tons

trading to.

354

17,313

5,427

85

2,828

745

439

20,141

6,172

Ports outside

the Colony,

TOTAL..... 16,301 9,813,839 512,640

| |

5,841

1,390,005 75,395

22,142 11,203,844 588,035 ·

I

:

134

Table VII.

Total Number, Tonnage, Crews, Passengers and Cargo of Junks ENTERED at Ports in the Colony of Hongkong,

from Ports on the Coast of China, and Macao, during the Year ending 31st December, 1906.

CARGO.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Ves- sels.

Tons. Crews.

l'assen- Cargo Ves-

Discharged. geis.

Tons. sels.

Tons. Crews.

East Coast,.. San On Dis- trict, West

2,009

122

63,176 448 27,866 3,974

River, &c., West Coast,

95,193 12,335

6,618 615,209 84,884 16,666 334,952 3,976 468,262 56,686 21,929 | 10,5941,083,471 141,570

270

10,372 219 16,422 1,705

38,595 334,952

Passen- Ves- gers. sels.

5 2,457 123,059 16,309

Tous. Crews.

Crews.

l'assen-

gers.

Cargo Discharged. Tons.

127 63,176

Macao,

341

15,468 2,131

44,951 5,136

489 31,890 3,836

10,372

1

32,819

302 24,601 4,628)

2

643 69,552 9,764

3

32,819

Total,... 9,288 770,821104,486 16,789 441,319 4,945 637,151 66,993 21,936 |14,1831,307,972 171,479||| 38,725 441,819

Table VIII.

ه

Total Number, Tonnage, Crews, Passengers and Cargo of Junks CLEARED at Ports in the Colony of Hongkong,

for Ports on the Coast of China, and Macao, during the Year ending 31st December, 1906.

CARGO.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Ves- sels.

Tons. Crews.

gers.

Passen- Cargo Ves-

Shipped.

Tons. sels

Tons. Crews.

Passen- Ves- gers. sels.

Tons. Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Cargo Shipped. Tons.

East Coast,. San On Dis-

1,040

45,619 6,862

65

trict, West

7,215

36,518 1,677 107,059 12,611|

826,581 107,665 21,879 536,844 3,072 243,883 33,824 14,472

6

2,717

River, &c.,

West Coast,

Macao,

207

434

14,882 1,824

49,089 7,442

1 12,862 179 9,793 1,353

152,678 19,473

10,287|1,070,464141,489

386 24,625 3,177

36,351! 536,844

71

36,518

50

20,620 146 14,583 1,562

10 12,862

580 63,672 9,004

50 20,620

Total,... 8,896 936,121123,793 21,995 606,844 5,074 375,318 49,350 14,48713,970 1,311,439 173,143 36,482 606,844

Table IX.

Total Number, Tonnage, Crews, Passengers and Cargo of Junks ENTERED at each Port in the Colony of Hongkong,

(exclusive of Local Trade), during the Year ending 31st December, 1906.

CARGO.

BALLAST,

TOTAL.

Ves-

Tons. Crews.]

sels.

Passen- Cargo

Discharged. gers.

Tons.

Ves- sels.

Tous. Crews.

Passen- Ves-

sels. gers.

Tons. Crews.

: Passen-

gers.

Cargo Discharged. Tons.

Aberdeen...... Cheung Cháu,

129 6,737 1,053 284 3,552 1,463

4,122 87 3,897 811

216

10,634 1,864.

4,122

2,281

19

413

106

303

3,965 1,569

2,281

Long Ket, ...

Deep Bay,...! Hunghom,......

Sai Kung,

Sham Shui-po, 1,097 110,274| 8,317|

660 10,348 3,111]

46

7,537

129 4,588

783

789

14,936 3,894

46

7,537

40,

856 234

339 72,973

6

92

32

46

948 266

389

726

45,259 4,352

1,823

155,533 12,669

72,973

Shaukiwán,

Stanley,

Tai 0,

Tai Po,

Victoria,

392 8,120 2,770

50

4,912

74

2,449 579

466

10,569 8,349

55

4,942

22

722 157

48

633

10

252

125

32

974

282

48

633

57

1,553 510

646

41

51

20

611 1,604

530

646.

6,557 628,659 86,871 16,645 347,796 3,890 || 480,150 60,185 21,931

10,447|1,108,809;147,056 38,576 | 347,796

Total,.. 9,238 770,821 104,486 16,789 441,819 4,945 | 537,151 66,993| 21,936 |14,183 1,307,972 171,479 38,725441,319

135

Table X.

Total Number, Tonnage, Crews, Passengers and Cargo of Junks CLEARED at each Port in the Colony of Hongkony,

(exclusive of Local Trade), during the Year ending 31st December, 1906.

CARGO.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Ves-! sels.

Tous. Crews Passen- Shipped.

gers.

Cargo Ves- Tons. sels.

Tons. Crews.

Passen- Ves- gers. sels.

Tons. Crews.

Passen- Cargo

Shipped. gers. Tons.

Aberdeen,.. Cheung (háu,

31

1,603 282

36

644 200

603 391

114

4,434 966

145

6,037 1,248

263

3,374 1,298

299

4,018 1,498

603 391

Deep Bay,...

...

Hunghom,.

454

13,410 2,692

17

10,697 361

5,220 1,673

815

18,630 4,365

22

1.0,697

Long Ket,

Sai Kung

3

Sham Shui-po,

691

80 55,546 4,700

19

36 33

576 185

361

656 204

36

51,432 1,160

112,541 9,493]

1,851

168,087 14,193

51,432

Shaukiwán,

277

8,962 2,398

50

Stanley,

23

763 212

48

Tai 0,

18

400 151

4,487 265

530 247 33

5,026 1,687

542

13,988 4,085

52

4,437

6

110

39 944 306

29

873 251

48

530

10

51

1,344

4571

10

247

Tai Po,

Victoria,

7,363 854,713113,139 21,880

538,471 2,839

243,093 33,703||| 14,470 10,2021,097,806146,842| 36,350 | 538,471

Total,... 8,896 936,121|123,793 21,995 600,844 5,074

375,318 49,350 14,487 13,970 1,311,439 173,143 36,482 606,844

Table XI.

Return of Junks (Local Trade) ENTERED at each Port in the Colony of Hongkong,

during the Year ending 31st December, 1906.

CARGO.

BALLAST.

TOTAL

Ves- sels.

Tous. Crews.

Passen- Cargo Ves-

Discharged. gers.. Tons. sels.

Tons. Crews.

Passen- Ves Tous.

gers. sels.

Crews.

Passen- gers.

Cargo Discharged. Tons.

Aberdeen,.

49 1,712

378

1,022 35

1,820

345

84 3,532 723

Cheung Châu,

31

781

246

429

14

226

731

45

1,007 319

Deep Bay,.....!

Hunghom,....

122

1,318

499

823

123

6,399

1,1791

245

7,717 1,678

1,022 429

...

823

Long Ket,

Sai Kung,

23

287

1091

89

15

237

891

38

524

198

89

Sham Shui-po,

115

10,873

1,762

7,385

99

9,011

821

214

19,884 2,583

7,385

Shaukiwán,

125

4,586

1,027

1,850

81

2,540

6391

206

7,126 1,666

1,850

Stanley,.

13

13

5

102

36

7

115

42

13

Tai O,

14

164

69

112

1

28

3

15

192

72

112

Tai Po,

49

650

249

40

320

20

258

94

13

69

Victoria,

9,497 379,298 (104,123

Total,... 10,027 399,682 108,468

9,526 303,580 | 14,948 599,204 129,976| 46,540 24,445

9,566 315,623 15,341 619,825 133,255 46,553 25,368 1,019,507 241,723 56,119 315,623

908 3431 978,502'234,099 56,066 | 303,580

53

320

Table XII.

1

Return of Junks (Local Trade) CLEARED at each Port in the Colony of Hongkong, during the Year ending 31st December, 1906.

CARGO,

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Ves- sels.

Tous. Crews.

Cargo rows. Passen-

gers.

Ves- Shipped.

Tons. sels.

Tons. Crews

Passen- Ves-

gers. sels.

Tous. Crews. Passen-

Cargo

Shipped.

gers.

Tons.

Aberdeen,

Cheung Cháu,

Deep Bay,

Hunghom, .....

85

52: 2,238 422 18 303 103

2,215 583

867 103 5,890 917

160

31

651

215

155 49

8,128 1,339

867

954 318

160

10

1,189

119

1,314

499

204

3,529 1,082

10

1,189

Long Ket,

Sai Kung,

25

Sham Shui-po,

488 136 58 4,993 418

227 4,625

23

328

124

48

816: 260

227

128

8,831

641

186

13,824 1,059

4,625

Shaukiwán, Stanley,.

70

1,789

479

825

60

1,923

415

130

3,712 894

86

301

122

6

136

43

10

222

73

825 122

Tai 0,

11

282

79!

51

15

231

77

3

26

513 156

3

51

Tai Po,

43

617

235

27

277

30

356 130

36

73

973 365

63

277

Victoria,

6,615 272,258 |75,203| 58,989

65,329 18,752 | 718,219 153,979

1,939 25,367

990,477 229.182 60,928

65,329

Total,.. 6,981 285,269 77,688 59,026

73,672 19,267 737,879 157,040

1,978 26,2181,023,148 234,728 61,004

73,672

FOREIGN TRADE.

136

Table XIII.

SUMMARY.

NO. OF VESSELS.

Tons.

CREWS.

British Ships entered with Cargoes,

Do.

do.

in Ballast,

4,819 271

5,645,937

250,075

374,903

15,875

Total,.......

5,090

6,020,840

265,950

British Ships cleared with Cargoes,

4,870

5,600,925

256,549

Do.

do. in Ballast,....

201

410,207

9,090

Total,....

5,071

6,011,132

265,639

Foreign Ships entered with Cargoes,.

2,442

3,609,459

136,236

Do.

do. in Ballast,

254

290.821

10,132

Total,.

2,696

3,900,280

146,368

Foreign Ships cleared with Cargoes,.

Do.

do. in Ballast,

2,181 481

3,259,480

126,871

601,652

16,210

Total,....

2,662

3,861,132

143,081

Steamships under 60 tons entered with Cargoes,

354

17,313

5,427

Do.

do.

do.

in Ballast,

Total,....

85

2,828

745

439

20,141

6,172

do.

Steamships under 60 tous cleared with Cargoes,.

Do.

254

17,313

5,427

do..

in Ballast,

Total,...

85

2,828

745

439

20,141

6,172

Junks entered with Cargoes,

Do. do. in Ballast,

9,238

770,821

104,486

4,945

537,151

66,993

Total,.

14,183

1,307,972

171,479

Junks cleared with Cargoes,

8,896

936,121

123,793

Do. do. in Ballast,

5,074

375,318

49,350

Total,...

13,970

1,311,439

173,143

Total of all Vessels entered,

22,408

11,249,233

589,969

Total of all Vessels cleared,

22,142

11,203,844

588,035

Total of all Vessels in Foreign Trade, entered and cleared,

44,550

22,453,077 1,178,004

LOCAL TRADE.

Total Junks entered,

25,368

1,019,507

241,723

Do.

cleared,

26,248

1,023,148

234,728

Total Local Trade, entered and cleared,

51,616

2,042,655

476,451

Total Foreign Trade, entered and cleared,

44,550

22,453,077 1,178,004

Total Local Trade, entered and cleared,

51,616

2,042,655

476,451

Grand Total,..

96,166

24,495,732 1,654,455

137

Table XIV.

STATEMENT of REVENUE collected in the Harbour Department during the Year 1906.

Head of Receipts.

Amount.

1. Light Dues, Ordinance 10 of 1899,

2. Licences and Interual Revenue not otherwise specified

Chinese Passenger Ships Licences, Ordinance 1 of 1889,.

Emigration Brokers Licences, Ordinance 1 of 1889,

$3 77,722.04

cts.

1,050.00

1,000.00

Fines,

834.00

Fishing Stake and Station Licences, Ordinance 10 of 1899,.

305.00

Fishing Stake and Station Licences, from the New Territories, Ordinance 10 of 1899,

3,197.50.

Junk Licences, &c., Ordinance 10 of 1899,

36,194.83

Junk Licences, &c,, from the New Territories, Ordinance 10 of 1899,

15,746.75

Pilots Licences, Ordinance 3 of 1904,..

185.00

Steam-launch Licences, &c., Ordinance 10 of 1899,

3,235.25

3. Fees of Court or Office, Payments for specific purposes and Reimbursements-in-Aid :-

Cargo Boat Certificates, Ordinance 10 of 1899,.

2,951.00

Engagement and Discharge of Seamen, Ordinance 10 of 1899,

24,774.60

Engagement of Masters and Engineers of Steam-launches, Ordinance 10 of 1899,

166.50

Examination of Masters, &c., Ordinance 10 of 1899,

2,780.00

Gunpowder, Storage of-Ordinance 10 of 1899,

11,165.23

Medical Examination of Emigrants, Ordinance. 1 of 1889,

24,352.00

}

Printed Forms, Sale of,....

332.00

Private Moorings and Buoys, Rent for-Ordinance 10 of 1899,

3,450.00

Registry Fees (Merchant Shipping Act), Ordinance 10 of 1899,..

1,201.00

Steam-launches, Surveyor's Certificates, Ordinance 10 of 1899,

2,880.00

Sugar Convention, Ordinance 14 of 1904,

1,260.00

Survey of Steam-ships &c., Ordinance 10 of 1899,

27,823.38

Sunday Cargo Working Permits, Ordinance 1 of 1891,

7. Miscellaneous Receipts-Message Fees for notifying ships,

31,397.50

5.20

TOTAL,

274,008.78

7

NOT TOWING.

Table XV.

RETURN of LICENSED STEAM-LAUNCHES Entered in the COLONY of HONGKONG during the Year ending 31st December, 1906.

ΤΟΤΑΙ.

:

:

PLACES.

Cargo

Cargo

Vessels. Tonnage.] Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Discharged Vessels. Tonnage. Crews. in tous.

Passen-

gers.

Discharged Vessels. Tonnage. Crews.

Passen-

gers.

in tous.

Cargo

Discharged in tons.

Within the Waters of the Colony, *

89,252 2,104,202 634,526

77,528 2,021,566 556,438 13,792,605

Total,....

89,252 2,104,202 634,526

2,021,

77,528 2,021,566 556,438 3,792,605

166,780 4,125,768 1,190,964 3,792,605

166,780 4,125,768 1,190,9643,792,605)

TOWING.

:

...

:

138

308

561

...

207

11,575

4,140

2,055

23,219

207

11,575

4,140

147

5,738 1,287 3,834

2,055

23,219

225

·8,258

1,976 3,884

354 17,313 5,427 5,889 23,219

439

20,141

6,172 5,889

23,219

77,882 2,038,47

77,882 2,038,879 561,865 3,798,494) 23,219 167,219 1,145,9091,197,13:

:

:

,798,494 23,219

*The figures under the heading "Steam-launches plying within the Waters of the Colony " are incomplete: the "Star" Ferry Company stating that since 1901, "owing to the amount of work entailed" they have had to discontinue keeping a record of the passengers by their launches, and also number of trips.

Outside the Waters of the Colony :—

Wuchow,.....

Macao

Other Places,

Total,..

7

308,

56

78

2,520

689

85

2,828

745

Grand Total,.

89,337 2,107,030 635,271

07,030

Samshui,

Kongman,

Kamchuk,

:

NOT TOWING.

TOTAL.

23,023 166,780 4,125,7681,190,964 3,076,294

23,023

3,076,294

23,023

23,023 166,780 4,125,768 1,190,964,3,076,294

Table XVI.

RETURN of LICENSED STEAM-LAUNCHES Cleared in the COLONY of HongKong during the year ending 31st December, 1906.

PLACES.

('argo

Vessels. Tonnage. Crews.

Passen- Shipped Vessels.Tonnage. Crews. gers. in tons.

Passen-

gers.

Cargo Bunker Shipped Coal in tons. in tons.

Vessels. Tonnage. Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Cargo Bunker Shipped Coal in tons, in tons.

TOWING.

Within the Waters of the Colony,

*

89,252 2,104,202 634,526

Total,.....

89,252 2,104,202 634,526|

77,528 2,021,566 556,4383,076,291

77,528 2,021,566 556,4385,076,294|

:

:

:

:..

:

:

::..

139

102.

308

661

102

207 11,575

147

4,140 2,322 8,253 448 5,738 1,287 3,919

1,372

207 11,575 225 8,258

4,140 2,322 8,253] 1,976 3,919

448

1,372

354 17,813 5,127 6,241 8,253 1,922

439

20,14!

6,172)

6,241 8,253 1,922

8,25324,945

:

...

*

2,038,879 082,535 77,882 2,038,879 561,865 3,082,535 8,253 24,945 167,2194,145,9091,197,136,3,082,535 8,253 24,945

The figures under the heading "Steam-launchy's plying within the waters of the Colony" are incomplete: the "Star" Ferry Company stating that since 1901, "owing to the amount of work entailed" they have had to discontinue keeping a record of the passengers carried by their launches, and also number of trips.

Outside the Waters of the Colony :

Samshui,

Kongmun,

Kamelink,

Wuchow,

Macao,...

:

1-

:

:

:

308'

56

78

2,520

6891

Total,..

85

2,828

745

Grand Total,.

2,107,0

89,337 2,107,030, 635,271

Other Places,

140

Table XVII.

SUMMARY OF CHINESE EMIGRATION from HONGKONG to Ports other than in China,

during the Year ending 31st December, 1906.

BRITISH VESSELS.

FOREIGN VESSELS.

GRAND TOTAL.

WHITHER BOUND,

Adults.

Children.

Adults. Children.

Adults.

Children.

Total.

Total.

Total.

M.

F.

M.

F.

J. F. M. F.

M. F.

M.

F.

To Batavia.

107

107 107

Callao, Pern,

2,821

73

2,898

452

15

473 3,273

10

88

97

Honolulu, Sandwich Islands,

39

41

121

1

127 160

"2

Japan Ports,

138

133

213

215

346

??

Liverpool, England.

44

44

44

""

Mauritius,

595

Mexico,

2,906

10

55

2,972

::

28

:~

646

595

22

2,906 10

Reunion Island.

23

23

23

""

888888

:

107

3,371

169

348

44

28

G46

2,972

23

""

San Francisco, U.S.A.,

382

16

400 2,211

6 54

32,274 2.593

70

2,674

Straits Settlements,

وو

Tacoma, U.S.A.,

Vancouver, British Columbia,

,, Victoria, British Columbia,

42,070| 7,022|| 1,502 776 51,370| 7,821|849|196

19

848,950 49,89|| 7,871| 1,698

860

60,320

27

29

27

29

4,919 966

35 32

4,974 998

14

141 4.933

4,988

36

36| 1,002

32

1,034

TOTAL PASSENGERS,

154,280√ 7,038 | 1,7835|777|63,830 11.620'885 | 302

881 2.895 65,900| 7,923 2,037

865

76,725

Total Passengers by British Vessels,

54,280 7,038. 1,735

777

63,830

Total Passengers by Foreign Vessels,

11,620 885 302

88

12,895

Excess of Passengers by British Vessels,

42,660 6,153 1,433

689

50,935

Table XVIII.

SUMMARY OF CHINESE IMMIGRATION to HONGKONG from Ports other than in China,

during the Year ending 31st December, 1906.

BRITISH VESSELS.

FOREIGN VESSELS.

GRAND TOTAL.

WHERE FROM.

Adults.

Children.

Adults. Children.

Adults.

Children.

Total.

Total.

Total.

M. I.

M.

F.

J. P

From Bangkok, Siam,

61

Callao. Pern,

233

61 3,919 180 233

M. 7.

15 4,125

M.

F.

V. F.

"

Durban, British South Africa,

1,253

1,253

"?

""

Honolulu, Sandwich Islands,

27

28 49

Java & Sumatra, -

2001

200 1,539

49 1,539

3.980 233 1,253 76

180

11 15

4,186 233 1,253

77

1.739

1,739

"

**

Japan Ports,

$31

83

252

252

335

335

Mauritius,..

34

34

261

261

295

295

Melbourne,

:

1,424

1,424

67

67

1,491

1.491

New South Wales.

1,445 221

37

1,764

285

235

1,680

221

61 37

1,999

New Zealand Ports.

25

25

25

25

**

Queensland Ports,...

San Francisco, U.S.A.,

Seattle, U.S.A.,

113

116 36

547

00

555 4,770 20

+73

17

36 13 4,820

149

152

5.317

28

13

5,375

473

**

South Australian Ports,

"

Straits Settlements,

"

Tacoma, U.S.A......

145

21

Vancouver. British Columbia,

2,490

""

Victoria, British Columbia....

65

9

9

473 9

:

173

:

92,122 3,417 1,170 584 97,29317,220

36 13

145 2,492 65

6 17,275 || 109,342 3,453 |1,183 590

145 2,490 65

114,568

145 2,492 65

TOTAL PASSENGERS,

100.276 3,648 1,235 621 105,780;28,821 | 236 41

Total Passengers by British Vessels,.

Total Passengers by Foreign Vessels,

34 26,132 129,097 3,88± 1,276 655 134,912

100,270 3,648 1.235 621 105,780

28.821 236 41 31

29,132

Excess of Passengers by British Vessels,

71,455 |3,412 |1,194 | $87

76,648

Name of Vessel.

141

Table XIX,

RETURN of VESSELS REGISTERED at the Port of Hangkong, during the Year 1906.

Official Number.

Registered

Tonnage.

Horse

Power.

Built

Rig.

Where built and when.

Remarks.

of.

Hoi Cheong,

St. Enoch,

Minerva,...

Loongwo, Edith,

Yangtse, Hoi Sang. Hoi Tin. Hoi Ning,

**:

""

.(Str.) | 120,986

120,987 274.67 Motor. 120,988 14.28 24 .(Str.) | 120,989 | 2,386.06 600 120.990 43.27 60 120.991 179.83 40 120,992284.08 40 120,993 155.12 40 120,994 80.84 18

Smack

358.68 33 Schooner Wood Hongkong,

120

Steel Renfrew,

.1905. Broken up on 18th Sept., 1906. .1894.

Yawl

Wood Hongkong,.

.1906.

Nil

Steel Hongkong,.

.1906.

Nil

Do. Hongkong..

Schooner Wood Hongkong,

Nil

Do.

Hongkong..

Schooner

Nil

Do. Do.

Clyde Bauk,

Hongkong,......

1905.

.1906. Transferred to Shanghai.. .1906.

..1877. | Formerly H.M.S. Firebrand. ..1903.

Table XX.

RETURN of REGISTRIES of VESSELS cancelled at the Port of Hongkong, during the Year 1906,

Name of Vessel.

Official Number.

Registered

Tonnage.

Date of

Registry.

Horse Tower.

Rig.

Built oť.

Where and when built.

Reason of Cancellation.

Thales...

Pak Kong, ...(Str.)| 107,020| 294.64 1897

Stanfield,

Taganac.

Tencar.

Chu Kong,

Kong Nam... Hoi Ning,

Canada,

City of Birm-

ingham,

Hoi Cheong,. Yangise,

"

::

107,027 67.05 1898

Composite Whampoa, Schooner Wood Hongkong

Nil

1869 Lost at Hongkong.

1888 Lost at Hongkong. [Tambisan.

1898 Lost opposite the Island of

Steel Nagasaki, Japan.......1899 | Lost near Breaker Point, China

.(Str.)

52,608 819.89 1883 63,533 560.31 1896

དྭེསཨོ ཙ

200 Brig

Barque

Iron Dumbarton,. Wood Sunderland,

.1864 Sold to Foreigners.

Nil

...1890 Sold to Foreigners.

Hunghom, Bh. Kow'n.1898 | Lost at Hongkong.

Hongkong,

1900 Sold to Foreigners.

Do.

Hongkong,

.1902 Lost at Hongkong.

Do.

Steel

Govan, Glasgow,

1898 Sold to Foreigners.

Do.

Wood

Hongkong,

Do.

Do.

Hongkong,

:

::

109,865 286.09 1901 97,979 1,596.48 1903 107,028 402.16| 1904 120,972 $9.58 1905 120,974 $1.20 1905

109.531 91.57 1905 120,986 358.68 1906 120,991 179.83

1906

450 Schooner Steel Greenock,

Nil Wood Schooner Do.

Do.

1905 Lost at Hongkong. ..1996 Transferred to Shanghai.

[Sca.

{

142

Table XXI.

RETURN of MARINE CASES tried at the MARINE MAGISTRATE'S COURT, during the year 1906,

Defendants how disposed of.

NATURE OF CHARGE.-

No. of Cases.

No. of Defendants.

Imprisonment with Hard Labour.

Imprisonment with Hard Labour and forfeiture of pay.

Imprisonment with- out Hard Labcur.

Imprisonment in default of fine.

Fined.

Forfeiture of

Pay.

Reprimanded.

Sent back to

duty.

Dismissed.

Amount of Fines.

Arrival without reporting, (Junk),

I

Breach of conditions of Licence, (Launch),.................. I

Disobeying the lawful orders of the Harbour

Master,

Failing to enter in the Log-book of the ship the

fact of the death of a Chinese Passenger,...`

Harbour Regulations, Breach of, (by Junks, &c.), 2 15

Plying without a Licence, (Launch),

1 1

Rules of the Road. Failed to observe, (Steam-

launches),

3 3

Wilfully using the steam-whistles other than

;

for the purpose of Navigation, (Steam- launches),

14. 14

Total,

27 44

N

1-

1

:

13

1

:

:

:

:

:.

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

3

13

:

:

10

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

40

1

$3

6

:

96

50

557

10

20

9.5

3 $834

1

Table XXII.

ɩtered at Hongkong, from 1867 to 1906 inclusive.

"itish Shipping Tonnage only.

Foreign Shipping Tonnage only.

› British and Foreign Shipping Tonnage.

its Junk Tonnage only, excluding Local Trade.

s Steam-launch Tonnage only, excluding Local Trade.

epresents entire Trade in

#

British and Foreign Ships, Junks and Steam-launches.

1879.

1880.

1881.

1882.

1883.

1884.

1885.

1886.

1887.

1888.

1889.

1890.

1891.

1892.

1893.

1894.

.1895.

1896.

-1897.

1898.

1899.

1900.

1901.

1902.

1903.

1904.

1905.

1906.

Toxs.

|11,300,000

11,200,000

11,000,000

10,000,000

9,900,000

9,800,000

9,700,000

9,600,000

9,500,000

9,400,000

9,300,000

9,200,000

9,100,000

9,000,000

..8,900,000

8,800,000

8,700,000

?

9,700,000

9,600,000

9,500,000

9,400,000

9,300,000

9,200,000

9,100,000

9,000,000.

...8,900,000

.8,800,000

8,700,000

..8,300,000

8,200,000

8,100,000

8,000,000

7,900,000

7,800,000

7,700,000

7,600,000

7,500,000

7,400,000

7,300,000

7,200,000

7,100,000

7,000,000

6,900,000

6,800,000

6,700,000

6,600,000

6,500,000

6,400,000

6,300,000

6,200,000

6,100,000

6,000,0co

6,000,000

5,900,000

5,800,000

--5,700,000

5,600,000

5,500,000

5,400,000

5,300,0ca

---5,200,000.

5,100,000

5,000,000

4,900,000

4,800,000

4,700,000

4,600,000

4,500,000

4,400,000

4,300,000

4,200,000.

4,100,000

4,000,000

3,900,000

3,800,000-

3,700,000-

3,600,000

3,500,000

3,400,000.

3,300,000

3,200,000-|

3,100,000

3,000,000

2,900,000

2,800,000

2,700,000.

.__.2,600,000

2,500,000

2,400,000

"

2,400,000

2.300 000

1.600,000

1,500,000

1,400.000

1,300,000

1,200,000

..1,100,000

1,000,000

.900,000

800,000

*

700,000

600,000

500,000

400,000

300,000

200,000

100,000-

90,000

80,000

50,000

40,000

30,000

20,000

---

¡ TONS.

11,300,000

11,200,000

11,000,000

10,000,000

9,900,000

9,800,000

9,700,000

9,600,000

9,500,000.

9,400,000

9,300,000

9,200,000

9,100,000

9,000,000

8,900,000

8,800,000

8,700,000

1867.

1868.

1869.

1870.

1871.

1872.

1873

1874. i

1875.

1876.

KÁVU KODUNE

Table XXII.

DIARAM of Tonnage entered at Hongkong, from 1867 to 1906 inclus RED LINE represents British Shipping Tonnage only.

BLUE LINE represents Foreign Shipping Tonnage only.

GREEN LINE represents British and Foreign Shipping Tonnage. YELLOW LINE

represents Junk Tonnage only, excluding Local Trade.

VIOLET LINE represents Steam-launch Tonnage only, excluding Local Trade. THICK BLACK LINE represents entire Trade in British and Foreign Ships,

1877.

1878.

1879.

1880.

1881.

1882. 1883.

1884.

1885.

1886.

1887.

*8381

1889.

1890.

1891.

1892.

1893.

7,800,0

7,700,000

7,600,000

_7,500,000

7,400,000

7,300,000

7,200,000

7,100,000

Y

7,000,000

6,900,000

6,800,000

6,700,000

6,600,000

6,500,000

6,470,000

6,300,000

6,200,000

6,100,000

6,000,000

5,900,000

5,800,000

5,700,000

5,600,000.

5,500,000

5,400,000

5,100,000

5,000,000

4,900,000

5,000,000

4,900,000

4,800,000

4,700,000

4,600,000

4,500,000

4,400,000

4,300,000

4,200,000

4,100,000

4,000,000

3,900,000

3,800,000

3,700,000

3,600,000

3,500,000

3,400,000

...3,300,00

3,200,000

3,100,000

3,000,000

2,900,000

2,800,000

2,700,000

BLACK

2,600,000

2,500,000

2,400,000

2,300,000

^^

1,000,000

1,500,000

1,400,000

YELLOW

1,300,000

GREEN

1,200,000

1,100,000

2,300,000

1,000,000

1,500,000

1,400,000

YELLOW

1,300,000.

GREEN

1,200,000

1,100,000

1,000,000

900,000

RED

800,000

700,000

600,000

BLUE

500,000

400,000

300,000

200,000

100,000

90,000

VIOLET

80,coo

50,000

40,000

30,000

20,000

;

145

Appendix A.

MERCANTILE MARINE OFFICE.

Twenty thousand seven hundred and sixty-six Seamen were shipped and 19,458 discharged at the Mercantile Marine Office and on board Ships during the year.

One hundred and fifty-eight Distressed Seamen were received during the year,

of these, 36 were sent home, 5 to Melbourne, 1 to Rangoon, 3 to Calcutta, 2 to Port Said, 1 to Van- couver, 6 to Bombay, 4 to Singapore, 1 to Japan. 1 taken charge of by U. S. Consul, 24 passengers to Canton, 5 to Shanghai, 1 to Calcutta, 1 to Iloilo, 3 to Manila, 1 to United Kingdom, 1 to Ningpo, 3 died at Government Civil Hospital, 1 disappeared, 1 joined Lappa Customs, 1 employed on shore, 5 remained at Government Civil Hospital and 51 obtained employment.

$3,179.29 were expended by the Harbour Master on behalf of the Board of Trade in the relief of these distressed Seamen.

Appendix B.

IMPORTS AND EXPORTS OFFICE.

2. The return shows that during the year the amount of Opium reported was as

follows:-

1905.

1906.

Increase.

Decrease.

Chests.

Imported,

Chests.

43,9281 47,566

Chests.

3,638

Chests.

Exported,..

42,067

47,575

5,508

Through Cargo reported

but not landed, ........................

9,746

9,712

:

34

The return shows that during the year the amount of Opium Skin reported was as

follows:-

1906.

Piculs.

Imported,

34,882

Exported,

34,085.1

Seventeen thousand four hundred and eighty (17,480) Permits were issued from this Office during the year, being a decrease of 534 as compared with 1905.

A daily memo. of exports to Chinese ports was, during the year, supplied to the Com- missioner of Imperial Maritime Customs and a daily memo. of exports to Macao was supplied to the Superintendent of Raw Opium Department of Macao.

Surprise visits were paid to 93 godowns during the year.

146

The return shows that during the year the amount of Morphia and Compounds of Opium reported was as follows:--

COMPOUNDS OF OPIUM.

Imported,

Exported,

Local Consumption,

Imported,

Exported,

MORPHIA. *

1906.

Taels.

129,682.9

77,082

52,600.9

1906.

Cases.

444

351

Return of Sugar imported into the Colony of Hongkong by Vessels of different Nation- alities during the year 1906.

Nationality.

Tons.

Cwt.

Qr.

lb.

American Steamers,..

1,745

13

2

11

Austrian

504

13

10

:>

British

301,807

1

$

Danish

16

11

24

Dutch

33,605

10

:

27

French

6,255

3

26

German

60,470

1.

M

13

Italian

295

A

14

2

Japanese

463

10

5

Norwegian

69,002

15

1

11

""

Portuguese

335

4

14

""

Swedish

7.675

18

2

8

By Junks,

941

7

2

18

483,119

13

1

19

* This return deals with the last nine months of the year only.

7

147

Return of Sugar imported into the Colony of Hongkong during the year 1906.

From

Tons.

Cwt.

Qr.

lb.

Austria,

120

19

9

Belgium,

426

11

1

China,

17,262

18

3

13

Cochin China,

3,214

2

22

...

Germany,

10,567

7

2

25

Java,

314,673

19

6

Japan,

223

10

3

21

London,

334

00

10

Mauritius,

24,832

20

Philippine Islands,

75,986

17

Straits Settlements,

5,322

17

20

New Territories,

154

10

2

23

483,119

13

19

One hundred and eighty-seven (187) Certificates of Origin for exportation of Sugar were issued from this Office during the year 1906.

Sixty-five (65) Permits for delivery of Sugar arrived at the Colony without Certificate of Origin were issued from this Office during the year 1906.

IMPORTS AND EXPORTS OF OPIUM.

IMPORTS.

MALWA.

chests.

PATNA.

BENARES.

PERSIAN.

chests.

chests.

chests.

TURKISH. chests.

CHINESE.

TOTAL.

chests.

chests.

1905,

1906,

6,763

23.779

10,218

2,922

35

211

43,928

...... 4,975

24,963

13,115

2,646

987

880

47,566

Increase,... Decrease,

1,184

2,897

952

669

5,702

1,788

276

2,064

EXPORTS.

MALWA. chests.

PATNA.

BENARES. PERSIAN.

TURKISH.

CHINESE.

TOTAL.

chests.

chests.

chests.

chests

chests.

chests.

1905,.

... 5,888

22,906

9,917

3,140

47

169

42,067

1906,.

5,8614

25,177

13,192

1,706

985

654

47,575

Increase,.. Decrease, .

2,271

3,275

938

485

6,969

261

1,434

1,461

Through Cargo reported in Manifests but not landed

1905,

1906,...

9,746 chests. 9,712

Decrease,

34 chests.

**

*

148

NUMBER OF PERMITS, &c., ISSUED.

Landing Permits, .......(Opium),..

Removal Permits, ...(

),.......

Export Permits, ....( ).....

""

Landing Permits,...(Opium Skin),............

Removal Permits,...(

),........

Export Permits, ....(

""

).........

Memo. of Exports to the Commissioner of Chinese Customs,... Memo. of Exports to the Superintendent of Raw Opium

Department, Macao,......

1905.

1906.

Increase. Decrease.

341

365

24

$,692

8,244

448

8,981

8,611

370

109

10

141

...

536

544

8

293

293

:

SUMMARY OF EXPORTS, 1906.

Malwa. Patna. Benares. Persian. Turkish. Chinese. Total. chests. chests. chests. chests. chests. chests. chests.

Total in Piculs.

By Steamers to Amoy, Bagdad,

28

2,619

267

1

2

2,915 2

Bandar Abas.

23

23

3,445.47.5 2.05.0 23.57.5

Bushire,..

85

85

87.12.5

Canton,

7884

7,109

1,558

7

30

9,492

11,226.07.5

Changsha via Shanghai,

2

64

Foochow,

919

1,000

519

574

66 3,012

78.80.0

3,330.15.0

Haiphong,

1

1

1.02.5

Hankow via Shanghai, .

34

39

46.80.0

Herbertshoke,

1

1.20.0

...

Hohow,

247

72

319

382.80.0

Hoihow,

748

117

865

1,038.00.0

Kwong Chau Wan,

424

424

508.80.0

Londoù,

42

42

43.05.0

Масно,

3,895

4

3,899

4,678.80.0

Merida,

1

I

1.20.0

Namtao,

48

11

59

70.80.0

New York,

11

14

26

26.27.5

Pakhoi,..

71

90

161

193.20.0

Panama,

7

8.40.0

Paris,.....

1

1

1.00.0

Philippine Islands,

4

312

432

47

1

796

945.97.5

...

Sandakan,

I

9

7

15

10

42

45.57.5

Shanghai,

2,272

9,022

4,722

12

1

Straits Settlements,

84

19

16,029 103

18,778.60.0

Suez,....

2

2

Swatow,

1,433

1,477

899

20

3,829

120.27.5 2.05.0

4,304.70.0

Tamatave,

}

1.20.0

Tansui,

2,000

485

960

621

4,066

4,478.12.5

Tientsin,

1

1

1.20.0

Vancouver,

30

30

36.00.0

Victoria, B. C.,...

248

248

297.60.0

Weihaiwei,

2

4

11

17

20.00.0

Wuchow,

17

12

29

34.80.0

By

Steam-launches

and

Junks to various ad-

407

408

28

:

8435

930.70.0

jacent Ports in China,

Total,

5,858 25,177 13,191 1,612

985

654

47,477 55,191.40.0

The information in Column 8 above is on the following assumption :—-

Patna and Benares, per chest,

Malwa, Turkish and Chinese, per chest,.......

Persian, per chest,.......

1.20.0 piculs.

1.00.0

1.02.5

149

Appendix C.

MARINE SURVEYOR'S OFFICE.

3. During the year, the total number of vessels surveyed for Passenger Certificate and Bottom Inspection were 197 of 439,238 gross register tons, an increase of 9 vessels and 17,717 tons, as compared with the previous year.

The nationalities and tonnage of these vessels were as follows:—

British-121 vessels of 301,679 tons.

German-45 vessels of 104,976 tons. French-9 vessels of 11,334 tons.

Norwegian-7 vessels of 10,821 tons. Chinese vessels of 10,428 tons.

Emigration surveys were held on 81 vessels, 40 of which were British and 41 Foreign. The number of boilers built under inspection, viz. :-14, is much below the average. As most of these boilers are intended for passenger launches licensed to run locally, this will give some idea of the poor state of trade in the launch building, small engineering and boiler making establishments.

RETURN OF WORK performed by the GOVERNMENT MARINE SURVEYOR'S DEPARTMENT.

Years.

Passenger

Certificate and

Inspection of

Bottom.

Emigration.

Tonnage for Registration.

British Tonnage ` Certificate for

Foreign Vessels.

Inspection of

Lights and

Markings.

Crew Space,

Minor Inspec- tions.

Survey of Licen-

Steam-launches. sed Passenger

Boilers under Construction.

Survey of

Inspection of

Government

1897,

158

79

24

1898, 164

83

10

1899,

144

61

10

1900,

151

83

1901,

157

92

1902,

175

93

1903, 190

111

1904,

196

125

1905,

188

93

1906,

197

81

HIONOO#N~~~

50 00.00 220 1-6140 - →

*$Di[0[]]}*[

Examination

of Engineers.

Examination of

Chinese Engi- neers for Steam- launches.

Number of Visits in

confection with fore- |

Estimated Total

going Inspections.

1

109

41

35

51

1,631

121

61

26

48

1,729

134

62

27

78

1,602

187

73

17

99

124

1,834

217

36

102

88

118

2,031

210

25

126

109

76

1,768

184

30

126

85

72

2,107

203

45

126

82

104

2,140

༧་

193

23

172

77

81

1,989

190

14

15

80

84 2,063

Appendix D.

GUNPOWDER DEPOT.

4. During the year 1906, there has been stored in the Government Gunpowder DEPOT, Green Island:-

No.

Approxi-

mate

of cases. weight.

Gunpowder, privately owned,

Do. Government owned,

Cartridges, privately owned,...

Do. Government owned,

5,013 710

lb. 106,560

38,747

1,736

355,725

78

7,750

Explosive Compounds, privately owned,...

609

38.578.

Do.,

Government owned,

1,178

47,703

Non-explosives, privately owned,

Do.,

Government owned,

8 903

2,925

74,950

Total,

10,235

672,938

150

During the same period there has been delivered out of the Depôt :

Approxi-

No. of cases.

mate

weight.

lb.

For Sale in the Colony:

Gunpowder, privately owned,

1,482

30,765

Cartridges, privately owned,

119

37,775

Explosive Compounds, privately owned,

105

7,050

Nou-explosives, privately owned,

2,025

For Export:-

Gunpowder, privately owned,

1,401

28,025

Cartridges, privately owned,....

317

80,600

Explosive Compounds, privately owned, Non-explosives, privately owned,

175

11,800

4.

900

i

Total,

3,607

198,940

On the 31st December, 1906, there remained as follows:-

No. of cases. weight.

Approxi-

mate

lb.

Gunpowder, privately owned,

2,130

47,770

Do. Government owned,

1

20

Cartridges, privately owned,

1,300

237,850

Do. Government owned,

30

3,000

Explosive Compounds, privately owned....

329

19,728

Do.

Government-owned,

36

35

Non-explosives, privately owned,

Do.*

Government owned,

238

23,800

Total,

4,064 331,70-4

Appendix E.

LIGHTHOUSES.

The amount of Light Dues collected was as follows:—

Class of Vessels.

Rate. No. of per ton. Ships.

Tonnage.

Total Fees collected.

$

ር.

Ocean Vessels,

Steam-launches,

River Steamers, (Night Boats), } River Launches, (Night Boats), River Steamers, (Day Boats),. River Launches, (Day Boats), Free.

Total,

Free.

1

1 cent 4,077 7,208,467 72,084.67

| 246

9,185 2.354 1,659,969

""

63 3,528 1,420 1,099,823

91.85 5,533.74

11.78

...

130

7,428

8,290 9,958,400 77,722.04

151

GAP ROCK.

Owing to heavy weather conditions at this station the telegraph cable was broken close to the Rock on the 6th of April; an attempt was made some time later to effect a joining, which however proved abortive. On the 1st of August a temporary repair was made, and communication restored, the line in all respects worked well until the 18th of September when, owing to the collapse of the land lines in the Colony communication was cut off until the 24th of September. The cable was again parted by the typhoon of the 28th of September, and up to the 'present is still in that state; at that time other serious damage was done to lantern windows, lense, magazine, out-houses, derrick, &c., and owing to circumstances mentioned, the lamp could not be lit until the night of the 29th of September; meanwhile the light-keepers from the time of damage until the lamp was relit, strenuously did all that was possible in effecting the necessary repairs.

Owing to break-down in the cable, only 188 vessels have been reported as passing Gap Rock, in addition, 81 messages were sent, and 1,111 received, including the weather reports to the Observatory.

Six hundred and thirty-nine hours and forty minutes of fog were reported from this station during the year, and the fog signal gun was fired 3,954 times.

On one occasion the fortnightly relief could not be carried out owing to the rough sea

WAGLAN ISLAND.

In December this station was placed in telegraphic communication with the Harbour Office, and with the exception of a few days of interrupted service, the line has worked fairly satisfactorily.

&

During the year 482 vessels were reported as passing Waglan, in addition, 66 telephone messages were received and 46 sent, also 1,412 vessels were not reported owing to interrup- tions embodying 263 days.

There were five hundred and forty hours and twelve minutes of fog reported from this station during the year, and the fog signal gun was fired 5,576 times.

On one occasion the fortnightly relief was not carried out owing to rough sea.

GREEN ISLAND.

J

Telephonic communication with this station was abolished on the 30th of August from which date telegraphy has been substituted, and has worked satisfactorily.

HONGKONG.

No. 1907

7.

REPORT ON THE STUDY OF HYGIENE IN HONGKONG SCHOOLS, 1906.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of

His Excellency the Governor.

EXAMINATIONS FOR MASTERS.

The teaching of Hygiene has been steadily pursued in the schools of the Colony during the year under review. A general improvement is apparent, not only in the pupils, but also in the ability to teach the subject shewn by the teachers. This is especially true of the Chinese masters of the 3 District Schools, whose knowledge of hygiene was two years ago a negligeable quantity. During the earlier part of the year they received regular instruction from the English masters of these schools; and the result was tested when they went in for the South Kensington Examination, Stage I, in May last. Table I gives the results in detail. Thirteen passed out of 19, including (as was to have been expected) all the English masters. Four of the Chinese masters obtained a First Class, and of those of them that passed, none less than a Second Class. Again, in October and after further preparation, the majority of the same inasters entered their names for the examination of the Royal Sanitary Institute, held locally. The results have not yet been published; but it may be doubted whether junior Chinese masters have so thorough a knowledge of English, as would enable them to express themselves with the necessary clearness and exactitude on matters involving the use of unwonted and technical terms.

NEW PUBLICATIONS.

There is a standing difficulty in some of the less advanced of our schools in persuad- ing the teachers to confront their pupils with the facts of everyday life, and to use their own observation. I have seen an object lesson on the bamboo illustrated by a picture out of a reading book. This distaste to come face to face with realities has found some excuse

154

in the case of the teaching of hygiene, where the presumed necessity of providing a costly and elaborate apparatus has been a deterrent from the supply of any. But after all, every- day things are those best suited to illustrate the arguments of hygiene in their bearing on everyday life. With this idea, Mr. WILLIAMS of the Victoria School has published a number of "Experiments in

Experiments in Hygiene to accompany Dr. PEARSE'S Manual; and the work has proved of use.

9

said

The study of hygiene has been included in the "Model Course of Instruction for Vernacular Schools given in Appendix C of my Annual Report for 1905; and as this Course is adopted by all the Vernacular Schools that are worth anything, it may that the subject will soon be taught in Standards IV and above in all Government and Grant Vernacular Schools. Unfortunately, two attempts to render the Manual into Chinese have not satisfied the critical spirit of the Registrar General's Office: a third translation, very kindly made by the Hon. Dr. Họ KAI, C.M.G., has now been completed; the book is in the press, and will be in the hands of the masters of the Vernacular Schools immediately after China New Year.

STUDY OF THE SUBJECT IN SCHOOLS.

The subject continues to be taught in all the English and Anglo-Chinese Government and Grant Schools of the Colony, with a few unimportant exceptions. The total numbers under instruction are given in Table II. They shew a reduction as compared with last year, 1,439 to 1,524. This reduction, which has not in fact any great importance, is due partly to the closing of the Cathedral School and partly to a change in the method of class- ification. In some schools, where the pupils in Standard III are very young, it is hard to say whether they are or are not under instruction in hygiene. They are present at the lectures or at some of them; but they are quite incapable of deriving advantage from a great part of the lessons in the subject. The increase of pupils under instruction in Standards VI and VII, from 307 to 334, is on the contrary significant of a real progress.

EXAMINATION OF SCHOOLS.

Progress was again tested by a competitive examination for prizes and a challenge shield, kindly of red by His Excellency the Governor. It was held on December 3rd, in the way described in my Report for last year, except that the competitors for the shield, that is the Teams from the junior Standards, were examined at Queen's College (if boys), or at the Belilios School (if girls), and not at their own schools. The examiners were as before the Principal Civil Medical Officer and the Medical Officer of Health.

The number of competitors in the Advanced Examination was 64, composed of 36 boys from 5 schools, and 28 girls from 5 schools.

there were 79 competitors from 12

The results were as follows:

Last year,

schools.

Place.

Name.

First,

Lau Iu-Chung,..

equal,

Third,

equal,

Carlos Sequeira,

Wan Shuk-ching,...

...Chan Chiu-Yau,

School.

Prize.

Ellis Kadoorie School .....

...$60

....St. Joseph's College,

..$60

.Belilios School,

.$20

Diocesan School, Boys,

....$20

The French Convent did not send in any candidates for the Advanced Course this year; and Saiyingpun School could not, as it no longer takes its pupils above the equiva- lent of Standard V. The Cathedral School is also absent from the list, it having been closed. St. Mary's competed for the first time.

In view of the steady preparation throughout the year and the great efforts made by many of the schools, the examination papers, given in Appendix A., must be considered to be too easy completely to test the ability of the competitors. In Table III. is given an analysis of the marks obtained by the first 3 competitors from each school. Eight out of 10 schools get 80% or over, and one more nearly as many. The first 4 schools are separated by less than a mark. Only one question received less than half marks in any of the schools. Questions III and VII were well answered by every school: the answers to Questions I and V, dealing with the amount of carbonic acid gas in the air, and requiring a certain neatness in drawing respectively, were the worst done. Similar questions proved stumbling-blocks- last year.

155

J

Fourteen Teams entered for the Elementary Course, numbering altogether 123 com- petitors, as compared with 10 Teams and 98 competitors last year.

The results were as follows:-

First. Diocesan School, Boys. Winners of the Shield. The best paper done for the winning Team was that of MANUEL LEITAO to whom was therefore awarded the prize of $20. But the winning school was run so close by 2 others, the Italian Convent and the Belilios School, that His Excellency decided to give special prizes of $20 for the best papers in their Teams. These fell to ALICE BRANDT of the Italian Convent and to FLORA ROSARIO of the Belilios School. The marks obtained and other details are given in Table JV. The 3 best Teams get over 70%, a figure which was not reached by any school last year. On the other hand, the last 5 schools did badly, so far as the figures shew. But of these, Fairlea could hardly be expected to shine in a test of this severe nature. Wantsai's fall from the high place it took last year is lamentable. It should however be said that a great many boys left that school for Queen's College at the end of the sunimer term, with the result that what was practically a new Team had to be got together. The positions held by the Ellis Kadoorie School in the Advanced and Elementary Examinations reflect the comparative weakness of the lower Classes, as I have pointed out in my Annual Report on that school. Yaumati has risen from the last of the 3 District Schools to the first. The schools which, when the smallness of their fields of selection are considered in conjunction with the immaturity of their pupils, have in my opinion most distinguished them- selves, are the Belilios School, the Anglo-Portuguese School (a new com- petitor) and St. Stephen's School, also a new competitor and one where the whole of the Staff is Chinese. In the case of the latter school I stretched point, and did not insist on a full Team of 10 being sent in, even though there were boys under instruction available to fill it. In all other cases a shortage of pupils alone was accepted as a reason for sending a Team ɔf less than the prescribed numerical strength.

Disregarding the performances of the last 5 schools, it can not said that any question was generally much better or worse done thin the rest. The par set is given in Appendix A.

SUGGESTIONS FOR NEXT YEAR'S EXAMINATION.

The present system seems to work very well. The only suggestions I have to offer, are that the paper set for the Advanced Course should another year contain more questions calculated to test a knowledge of the books of reference read to supplement the Manual and that in the case of the Advanced competition no school should be allowed to send in more than 3 candidates. Each school should hold a preliminary examination for the purpose of selecting them, unless the teacher can do so by his knowledge of the qualifica- tions of his pupils. If this is done, the examiners will be saved the necessity of wading through a number of papers, which are not nearly good enough to have any chance of winning a prize.

One important school was not represented in the Team competition, apparently as a protest against a decision that schools that promote their pupils at midsummer should not be given some compensating advantage. It is obvious that an advantage is gained by those schools which, promoting at Christmas, have their pupils in Standard V for a whole year prior to the examination. But no remedy suggested itself which was not overcum- brous, or likely to introduce further anomalies. That no overwhelming hardship is caused by the present system is proved by the fact that under it the Italian Convent and the Anglo-Portugese School came out so well.

EDWARD A. IRVING,

Inspector of Schools.

156

Table I.

BOARD OF EDUCATION, SOUTH KENSINGTON, LONDON, S.W.

RESULTS OF THE EXAMINATIONS IN SCIENCE, 1906.

For communication to the Teachers and Candidates.

Name of Centre: Hongkong.

Subject XXV: Hygiene

Result.

Names.

Saiyingpun School.

Appointment.

Annual Salary.

Remarks.

A. Morris,

1

Head Master,...

£270

Chan Chiu-un,

1

1st Assistant Master,

$840

Ng Ut-chi,

Un Chun-wa,

| N

2nd

$480

3rd

$180

""

Yaumati School.

W. Curwen,

1

Head Master,

£360

J. C. Parkin,

2

English Assistant Master,

£270

Ng Fung-chau, Leung Shin-on, Li Tat-cheung, Un Kwong,...

1st

$960

2nd

$720

"

3rd

$480

""

2

4th

$480

"9

Wantsai School.

Young Hee,

Kwok King-shan,

Kung Hon,...

Lo Yuk-lun,

Li Mun-kwong,

Anglo-Indian School.

Jahangir Khan,

2

Ho Yan-tak,

Master,

2nd Master,

Aberdeen School.

Li King-shum,

Master,

Tanglungchau School.

Wan Hang-un,

2

Master,

Head Master,

£240

1st Assistaut Master,

$780

2nd

""

$480

3rd

""

$480

4th

$180

$180

$480

$600

$600

1. means 1st Class; 2. means 2nd Class; P. means Pass; a dash means Failure.

Table II.

NUMBERS INSTRUCTED IN HYGIENE IN 1906.

SCHOOL.

STANDARDS. STANDARDS.

TOTAL.

III to V.

VI & VII.

Queen's College, St. Joseph's, Diocesan Boys',

576

176

752

121

F8

159

63

33

96

Yaumati,

69

69

Ellis Kadoorie,

32

28

60

Saiyingpun,

49

49

Italian Convent,

30

14

44

Wantsai,

43

43

Diocesan Girls',

33

4

37

St. Stephen's,..

26

26

French Couvent,

21

4

25

St. Mary's,

16

6

22

Belilios School,

12.

8

20

Kowloon School,

12

12

Victoria School,

11

11

Anglo-Portuguese School,..

7

7

Fairlea,

7

Total,

1,105

331

1,439

Note. These are the numbers who have received instruction during the year. They

were not necessarily all under instruction at the time of the examination.

}

$

School.

157

Table III.

RESULTS OF EXAMINATION, DECEMBER 1906.

ADVANCED COURSE.

SUM OF MARKS OF 3 BEST

CANDIDATES.

Max. 30.

Total. Average

Max.

Marks

210.

%

of Candidates.

Selection.

Average Age

Field of

REMARKS.

QUESTION

Ellis Kadoorie,

25

St. Joseph's,

Diocesan School,

Kowloon School,.........

Italian Convent,.

Belilios Public School,

20

Victoria School,

Diocesan Girls',

Queen's College,..

St. Mary's,

16

13

HAANOR 23 200

24 28 30

II. III. IV. V.

21 23 30 22

VI. VII.

30

22

23

178

84.76

16

28

29 25

23

177

84.28

14 38

2226 27 25

27

24

176

83.80

15

33

25

28

25 25

25

24

17

W ND OH OK

24

22

176

83 80

15

12

80 26

24

23

174

82.85

15 14

29

24

28

173

82.33 13 8

30

29

20

20 24

170

80.95 13 11

20 16

16 16 16

112

$0.00 14 4 2 Candidates.

27

24

25

28

25

164

78.09 17 90

28

18

16

17

23

132

62.85 15

6

The figures in Red are over 70% of full marks; those in black type under 50%.

School.

Table IV.

RESULTS OF EXAMINATION, DECEMBER 1906.

ELEMENTARY COURSE.

SUM OF MARKS OF CANDIDATES.

Max. 100.

Total.

Max.

700.

No. of

Candidates.

Average

Marks

%

alo

of Candidates.

Selection. Field of

Average Age

QUESTION

II. III. IV. V. VI. VII.

Diocesan Boys',

69

71

65 17W

168

500

Italian Convent,

83

64

72

66

99

10

71.49

131 63

Belilios Public School,

42

Anglo Portuguese,

45

35

52

Yaumati,

63.

59

Queen's College,.

64

Ellis Kadoorie,

Diocesan Girls',

Saiyingpun,

St. Stephen's,

Fairlea,

3750

53

45

39 27

529 26 29

· 56 57 56 40 55 62 48 43 47 45 40

55 59 46 46 53

33 40

40

Wantsai,

French Convent,. St. Mary's,

28 32 23 42 28 34 9 19 15 19 23 12 22 16 2927 34 40 33 32 31 38 33 34 35 32|22| 30 28 27 26 33 25 26

498 10 71.04 14 30 279 5 79.71 13 8 337

68.77 7

14 7 445 10

68.57 15 39 383 10 356 10 50.85 12 18 313 10 44.71 16 31 210 7 42.85 19 7 240 10 34.28 15

32 119 5 34.00 17 211 9 33.49 17 21 225 10 32.14 12 11 195 10 27.85 13

16

54.71 17 120

The figures in Red are over 60% of full marks; those in black type under 40%.

REMARKS.

158

Appendix A.

HYGIENE COMPETITION.

ADVANCED COURSE.

Time allowed-Two hours and a half.

1. What is the maximum amount of CO2 that should be permitted in the air of a room which is occupied by human beings? Explain how soon this limit is reached, and how to prevent the limit being exceeded.

2. What are the causes of hardness of a water; and how can a hard water be softened? 3. For what purposes is food required? How much of each class of food is required. daily by a man doing hard work?

4. What infectious and contagious diseases are likely to be spread by second-hand bedding and clothing?

5. What is the damp-course in a building? Where is it placed; and what purpose does it serve?

sewer.

6. Make a rough drawing of a drain for carrying off the slops from a kitchen to the

Show the drain trap, and explain its use.

7. A case of Small-pox occurs in a private house, protect the other inmates of the house from infection. of Small-pox?

Explain what ought to be done to What is the usual incubation period

:

ELEMENTARY COURSE.

Time allowed :-Two hours.

1. What percentage of Carbonic Acid Gas is there in the atmosphere? In what ways

is this amount increased? Is there any way in which it is reduced?

2. How is water collected and supplied to the houses in Hongkong? What are the different ways in which it can become contaminated?

3. Food for man must contain starch, fat, albumen and salts. Name the principal articles of your daily diet, and state which of the above ingredients are contained in each of them.

4. What are the special advantages of woollen clothing?

5. What are the reasons for putting concrete on the ground surface of a house? Why are ceilings not desirable in the houses in the city of Victoria?

6. Why is every house in the City provided with a drain? What is the best way to prevent these drains getting choked ?

7. How do persons get Malarial Fever; and what are the best things to do to prevent this disease spreading ?

:

i

:

2

HONGKONG.

JURORS LIST FOR 1907.

No. 1507

1

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor,

HONGKONG

TO WIT.

I. SPECIAL JURORS.

NAME IN FULL.

Anton, Charles Edward.

Arculli, Abdoolla Fuckeera Arima, Tadaichi.................... Babington, Anthony Barton, John

Beattie, Andrew...... Becker, Arthur Wilhelm

Arthur.....

Bérindoagne, Louis Bird, Herbert William Bolles, John Walker Bryer, Alfred.

Butterworth, Harold Thornton Carter, William Leonard Chan A Fook........

Chau Siu Ki

Clark, Duncan

Cochrane, Thomas Park Craddock, Douglas William

Cruickshank, William Arthur

Carruthers Dann, George Harry David, Abraham Jacob Davis, William Herbert Tren-

chard

Denison, Albert Douglas, James Tory

OCCUPATION.

Merchant, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Army & Navy Contractor, Maunger, Osaka Shosen Kaisha,. Merchant, Shewan, Tomes & Co., Assistant, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Manager, W. R. Loxley & Co.,

Merchant, Sander, Wieler & Co., Manager, Banque de l'Indo-Chine, Architect, Palmer & Turner, General Manager, Standard Oil Co., Architect, Leigh & Orange,....... Merchant, Butterfield & Swire, Manager, China & Japan Telephone Co., Director, Watkins, Ltd.,

Secty., Chun On Fire Insur. Co., Ld., Storekeeper, Lane, Crawford & Co., .... Manager, Chartered Bank of I. A. & C., General Traffic Agent, Canadian Pacific

Railway Co.,

Merchant, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Merchaut, H. Wicking & Co.,............... Merchant, . J. David & Co.,

Manager, Commercial Union Assurance

Co., Lủ.,

Civil Engineer, Denison, Ram & Gibbs,... Marine Surveyor, Goddard & Douglas,

ABODE.

Red Hill, Peak. 20 Yee Wo Street.

On premises.

63 Robinson Road.

Red Hill, Peak.

Stoke's Bungalow West, Peak.

The Peak.

Queen's Building, Des Voeux Road.

2 Peakside, The Peak.

3 Elliott Crescent, Robinson Rd.

1 Des Voeux Road.

76 Mount Kellett Road. Hongkong Hotel. Queen's Road.

12 Po Hing Lane. Tusculum, Barker Road, Peak. Charter House.

10 Stewart Terrace, Peak.

East Point.

*

St. George's Building, Des Voeux 2 & 3 Gough Hill.

[Road.

Wolverton, Peak. Ebordale, Peak.

Tantallon, Barker Road, Peak.

!

NAME IN FULL.

Dowley, Walter Arthur... Ehmer, Hermann Forbes, Andrew Freyvogel, Ernest Fuchs, Friedrich

Arnold......

Fung Wa Chün

Hernianu

Gaskell, William Henry Gibbs, Lawrence, Göetz, Ernst

Gordon, Alexander Grant.... Gourdin, Allston O'Driscoll... Grace, Charles Henry Graham, Walter Douglas Gubbay, Charles Sassoon Hancock, Sidney Haskell, David Haupt, Armin Emil

Hinds, Edward Harvey. Ho Fook

Hooper, Augustus Shelton...

Ho Tung.

Hough, Thomas Frederick.

Howard, Albert Hughes, Edward Jones...

Humphreys, Henry Jessen, Johann Heinrich Kiene, Ferdinand Lammert, George Philip Lan Chü Pak Lauts, Johann Theodor Law, Donaldson Riddelt, Layton, Bendyshe,... Leiria, João Joaquim. Lenzmann, Carl Robert.. Lowe, Arthur Rylands Mackenzie, Alexander Maitland, Francis Marten, Richard............. May, Charles William Medhurst, George Harold Melchers, Friedrich Wilhelm... Michael, Joseph Rahamin... Mihara, Andrew Shigekichi... Mitchell, Robert........ Moxon, Geoffrey Charles Northcote, Mowbray Stafford

Orange, James

Ormistou, Evan Ough, Arthur Henry Parlane, William Pemberton, George William

Cyril

Peter, Jolin Charles Pinckney, Herbert.... Ram, Edward Albert... Raymond, Abraham Jacob Rennie, Alfred Ilerbert.. Rodger, Alexander Rose, Thoinas Isaac, Ross, Charles Henderson Rumjahu, Ahmet

Sassoon, Moses Silas.... Saunders, William Joshua

Scott, Charles Robert Scott, John Gray Scott, William Murray Shellim, Edward Silverstone, Sholom Skelton, Alfred Holland

Slade, Henry Adolphus Warre

2

SPECIAL JURORS,-Continued.

OCCUPATION.

General Manager, Vacuum Oil Co., Merchant, Grossmann & Co., Merchant, Bradley & Co., Manager, Russo-Chinese Bank,

Merebant, Siemssen & Co., Compradore, Shewan, Tomes & Co., Accountant and Auditor

Architect, Denison, Ram & Gibbs,. Merchant, Arnhold, Karberg & Co., Engineer, A. G. Gordon & Co., Assistant Secretary, Hongkong Club, Secretary, Hongkong Club....... Commission Agent and General Importer, Merchant, E.. D. Sassoon & Co.,... Exchange Broker,...

Merchant,

Merchant, Melchers & Co., Agent, Glen Line of Steamers, Compradore, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Secretary, Hongkong Land Investment &

Agency Co., Ld., Merchant,

Broker, & Govt. Auctioneer, Hughes &

Hough,

Merchant, D. Sassoon & Co., Lıl., Broker, & Govt. Auctioneer, Hughes &

Hough,

Merchant, J. D. Humphreys & Son, Merchant, Jebsen & Co., Auctioneer, Auctioneer,

Assistant, A. S. Watson & Co., Merchant, Lants, Wegener & Co., Merchant, Butterfield & Swire,. Exchange Broker,

Merchant, J. J. dos Remedios & Co., Merchant, Carlowitz & Co.,... Chartered Accountant,. Merchant, Arthur & Co., Merchant, Linstead & Davis, Merchant, Rädecker & Co., Chief-Acet., H.K. & S'hai Bank, Manager, Dodwell & Co., Ld., Merchant, Wendt & Co., Broker,

Manager, Nippon Yusen Kaisha, Naval Architect, Dock Co.,.............. Banker,

Secretary, Hongkong Land Reclamation

Co., Lu.,

Civil Engineer, Leigh & Orange, Banker,

Civil Engineer, Leigh & Orange, Manager, Hongkong Ice Co., Ld.,

Assistant, China Fire Insurance Company,

Limited,

Sub-Manager, HK. & S'hai Bank,....... Exchange Broker,

Architect, Denison, Ram & Gibbs,. Merchant, E. D. Sassoon & Co.,..... Merchant, A. H. Rennie & Co.,

Sugar Refiner, China Sugar Refinery, Secretary, Dock Co.,...................

...

Merchant, Jardine, Matheson & Co., . Merchant, Rumjahn & Co.,

Exchange Broker,

Secretary, Union Insurance Society

Canton, Limited,

of

Manager, International Bankg. Corp., Manager, Tramway Co.,

Sugar Refiner, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Merchant, D. Sassoon & Co., Ld., Agent, P. M. S.S. Co.,

Storekeeper, Lane, Crawford & Co., Merchant, Gilman & Co.,

ABODE.

Hongkong Hotel.

Fair View, 1 Robinson Road. Eilandonan, Peak. On premises.

Cragside, 130, Peak. On premises.

4, Des Voeux Road Central. 107, Peak. Luginsland, Peak Road. Tor Crest, Peak. 61 Robinson Road. Morrison Hill. Haytor, 108, Peak.

9 Macdonnell Road.

10 Queen's Gardens, Peak Road. Des Voeux Road Central. On premises. Dunnottar, Peak. Caine Road.

Rougemont, 1 Macdonnell Road. Caine Road.

8 Des Voeux Road. Kurrahjeen, 7 Peak Road.

Meirion, Peak.

Abertholwyn, Peak Road. King's Building.

1 Humphreys' Avenue, Kowloon. Elliott Crescent.

Queen's Road Central.

21 Conduit Road.

On premises.

1 Prince's Building, Des Voeux Road Duart, 15 Arbutbuot Road.

2 Connaught Road.

St. George's Building, Chater Road. Dunedin, Barker Road.

Nettlewood, Robinson Road. 5 Duddell Street.

On premises.

Hazledene, Upper Richmond Road. Strathallan, Robinson Road.

4 Century Crescent, Kennedy Road. Stonehenge, 5 Robinson Road. Peak Hotel.

41 Plantation Road, Peak.

5 Macdonnell Road.

Red Hill East, Peak.

6 Queen's Gardens, Peak Road. Prince's Building. East Point.

8 Stewart Terrace, Peak.

St. John's Place.

6 Stewart Terrace, Peak.

Lyeemun, Barker Road, Peak. Devonia, 11 Peak Road.

2 Chater Road.

East Point.

Goolistan, Conduit Road. East Point.

64 Queen's Road Central.

3 Beaconsfield Arcade.

Kellett Crest, Peak.

1 Cameron Villas, Peak.

Clovelly, Peak Road. Quarry Bay,

Kurrahjeen, 7 Peak Road. King Edward Hotel.

Craigends, Barker Road, Peak. Taiping, Mount Gough, Peak.

?

NAME IN FULL.

Stewart, Murray. Stokes, Arthur George Suter, Hugo

Tam Tsz Kong,

Tomkins, Herbert Edmund Tomlin, George Lomer..... Turner, Arthur

Vanburen, Joseph Sheffield ... Walker, William Bradley Watson, William Malcolm.. Wendt, Friedrich August White, Henry Percy Whittall, James Bowyer Kid-

man

Wickham, William Henry. Wilford, Francis Cumming Williams, Arthur John Wilson, William..

3

SPECIAL JURORS,—Continued.

OCCUPATION.

Exchange Broker, Broker,

Manager, Deutsch Asiatische Bank, General Manager, Chai On Marine Ins.

Co., Ltd.,

Merchant, Reiss & Co.,

Secretary, China Fire Insurance Co.,.......... Architect, &c., Palmer & Turner, Merchant,

Asst. Gen. Manager, Standard Oil Co., Merchant, John D. Hutchison & Co., Merchant, Wendt & Co., Merchant, Douglas, Lapraik & Co.,

Secretary, China Traders' Ins. Co., Manager, Electric Light Co., Storekeeper, Lane, Crawford & Co., Eugineer, Punchard, Lowther & Co., Acting Chief Manager, Dock Co.,

II. COMMON JURORS.

ABODE.

113, Plantation Road, Peak. Prince's Building. Hatherleigh, Conduit Road.

42 Bonham Strand West. Queen's Building. Earnsfoot, 30 Robinson Road. Eggesford, Penk.

St. Andrews', Barker Road, Peak. 21 Robinson Road.

Abergeldie, Plantation Road, Peak. 2 Hillside, Peak. 1 Douglas Street.

Red Hill, Peak. 23 Conduit Road.

College Chambers, Wyndham Street. Hongkong Club. Kowloon Docks.

NAME IN FULL.

OCCUPATION.

ABODE.

A

Aagaard, Bjarne.....

Steamship Agent, Aagaard Thoreson & Co., 1 Austin Avenue, Kowloou.

Abdoolrahim, Abdoolhoosen .. | Architect,

Abraham, Albert

Abraham, Ezekiel

Abraham, Ezra

Abraham, Joseph Abraham, Reuben Adams, Francis Robert John. Ahmed, Sheik Aboo

Ahrendt, Carl Max Heinrich... Aitken, Robert Akamatsu, Iliyoichi Allen, Frank Stanley Allen, William Stanley Alvares, Luiz Maria Jacques Alves, Autouio Luiz Alves, José Maria Amerudeen, Ismail II.

Anderson, Janics David Smith Anderson, John William Anderson, Lionel John Crossley Anderson, Willi»mg. Andrew, John Ingram Andrews, David Alexander Autia, Naorojec Kersaspjec Apear, Arratoon Vertannes Arculli, Adul Kader el Arculli, Osman el Armstrong, John Henry

William

Arnold, Charles

Arnold, Join

Argott, Thomas

Artoon, Carapict Manaser Asger, Asadu!!

Ebrahim

Asger, Mehdi Ebrahim

Ancott, Ernest Frank

Auld, James Durran Austin, Authony Roy Austin, Frank

B

Backhouse. James Herbert Bailey, William Seybourne Bain, Alexander.

Baker, James

|

Clerk, Gas Co.,

Clerk, S. J. David & Co.,

Clerk, Chartered Bank of I. A. & C., Clerk, W. Shewan & Co.,

Clerk, Chartered Bank of I. A. & C., Civil Engineer, Quarry Bay Shipyard, Assistant, HK. Milling Co., Ltd., Assistant, Melchers & Co., Engineer, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Merchaut,

Banker, Chartered Bank of I. A. & C., Manager, Sperry Flour Company, Merchant, L. M. Alvares & Co.,........... Clerk, Chartered Bank of I. A. & C., Merchant, L. M. Alvares & Co.,........... Manager, C. A. Camroodin,

Inspector, China & Japan Telephone Co., Mechanical Engineer, Fenwick & Co.,.... Assistant, HK. & S'hai Bank,............... Assistant, Lane, Crawford & Co., Geo. Fenwick & Co.,

... Civil Engineer, Quarry Bay Shipyard,.

Merchant, Tata & Co.,....

Merchant, A. V. Apcar & Co., Merchant,

Army & Navy Contractor,

Assistant, Butterfield & Swire, Foreman,

73 Wellington Street. 26 Staunton Street. College Chambers.

3 Ripon Terrace.

3 Ripon Terrace, Caine Road. 3 Ripon Terrace. Craigieburn, Peak.

1 Lower Ladder Street Terrace. On premises.

Quarry Bay.

3 Century Crescent Terrace.

3 Queen's Road.

6 Conduit Road.

Selbourne Villa East, 10 Kennedy Rd. 40 High Street.

24 Robinson Road.

21 Cochrane Street, Ice House Street. 12 Praya East. On premises. On premises. 157 Praya East. Quarry Bay Shipyard. 49 Hollywood Road. 45 Wyndham Street. 20 Yee Wo Street.

20 Yee Wo Street.

2 Elliott Crescent, 27 Robinson Road.

16 Shaukiwen Road,

Accountant,IIK.C.&M.Steamboat Co., Ld., 9 Humphreys' Avenue, Kowloon.

Engineer, G. I. Cement Co., Ld., Assistant, A. H. Rennie & Co.,.

Asst., HK. Land 'Investment & Agency

Co., Lt.,

Assistant, Shewan, Tomes & Co., Assistant, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Assistant, Dodwell & Co., Ld., Architect,

Mercantile Asst., Butterfield & Swire,.

Asst., Lütgens Einstmann & Co., Bailey & Co.,

Engineer, China Sugar Refinery,. Foreman, Punchard, Lowther & Co........

Hok-in, Kowloou.

2 Chater Road.

49 Wyndham Street.

49 Wyndham Street.

Glenshiel, Plantation Road, Peak. Dodwell & Co.'s premises.,

6 Observatory Villas, Kowloo 1 Connaught Road.

2 Pedder Street.

Hongkong Hotel Bowrington. 10 Gage Street.

NAME IN FULL.

4

OCCUPATION.

ABODE.

B-Continued.

Baker, Wm. Alfred Curtis

Russell.....

Ballock, Gideon

Banker, George

Barrett, Edgar George

Barretto, Alberto Demée Barretto, Frederico Demée

Barretto, Frederico Francisco.] Barretto, Octavio Demée..... Barton, Robert H.

Marine Engineer,

Merchant, Gilman & Co., Merchant, Dang Chee Son & Co., Sub-Mgr., Dodwell & Co., Ld., Clerk, Cruz, Basto & Co., Merchant, Barretto & Co., Assistant, Shewan, Tomes & Co., Assistant, Barretto & Co., Stenographer,

Bassford, William Faulkner ... Assistant, Taikoo Sugar Refinery,

Baxter, Robert Hall

Beason, Charles Henry Beattie, Matthew Pool Benjamin, Joseph Berblinger, Albrecht August

Carl..

Bernheim, Eugene

Beuzeville, James

Bevan, Herbert Staton Bevington, Francis Bird, Lennox Godfrey Bisschop, Philip John Roose-

garde

Blackburn, Leslie James Blackledge, Harold

Blair, David Keny

Blair, Thomas.....

Blake, Anthony Robert.. Blake, John

Bliefernicht, Heinrich Blood, Guy...

Blunt, Harold Ernest.. Boetje, Johan.... Boge, Otto Emil Hugo Bolton, Andrew Adams.... Bonnar, Johu Whyte Cooper. Bosch, Hendrik Joan van den. Boulton, Sydney

Bovet, Frederick Francis Boyce, William Bensley Boyes, John Ridley Bradley, Frederic Broughton... Brandes, Karl................... Bridger, Herbert Ben Brooks, Robert

Brown, Frederick Archibald... Brown, Neilage Sharp Brown, William Samuel Browne, Percy Edward.. Bryson, Alexander. Buchan, John..........

Buckle, Percv.

Bulmer, J. Herbert,

Bune, Thos. Friedrich Andreas Bunje, Emil Theodor................ Burjor, Dhunjeebhoy Sorabjee

Dady.... Burke, Harry Austin.. Burn, George Andrew Buyers, Charles Badenoch......

Clerk, Dock Co.,

Chtd. Acct., Butterfield & Swire, Merchant, W. R. Loxley & Co., Clerk, E. D. Sassoon & Co.,

Assistant, F. Blackhead & Co., Merchant, Ullmann & Co., Bookkeeper, Dang Chee Sou & Co., Piano Tuner, Lane, Crawford & Co., Mercantile Assistant,

Architect, &c., Palmer & Turner,

Genl. Agt., Java-China-Japan Lijn, Gas Engineer,

Storekeeper, Dock Co., Accountant,

Sugar Boiler, China Sugar Refinery, Draughtsman, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Engineer, Taikoo Sugar Refinery,

Foreman Carpenter, Dock Co., Architect, &c., Palmer & Turner, Assistant, HK. & S'hai Bank, Manager, Neth. India Commercial Bank, Clerk, North German Lloyd Office, Engineer, Fenwick & Co., Ld., Assistant, Gibb, Livingston & Co.,. Assistant, Java-China-Japan Lijn,. Assistant, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Assistant, Arnhold, Karberg & Co., .. Acct., Punchard, Lowther & Co., Assistant, HK. & S'hai Bank, Merchant, The Savoy Ld., Assistant, Grossmann & Co., Electrical Engineer,

Foreman Boiler-maker, Dock Co., Wharfinger, HK. & K. W. & Godown Co., Assistant, Butterfield & Swire,

Clerk, HK. & K. W. & Godown Co., Ld., Piano Tuner, Lane, Crawford & Co., Accountant, Bradley & Co.,

Foreman Mason, B. & S.'s Shipyard,. Assistant, P. & O. Co., Stenographer, Standard Oil Co., Ship Broker, ...

Manager, Royal Dutch Petroleum Co.,

Merchant and Commission Agent, Acct., Pacific Mail S. S. Co., Assistant, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Supt. Engineer, Tramway Co.,

!

14 Sau Wa Fong, Wanchai. Taiping, Mount Gough, Peak. 25 Des Voeux Road.

3 Park View, Lyttleton Road. Larkspur, Robinson Road. 1 Castle Road.

18 Wyndham Street. 44 Caine Road.

1 Queen's Road East. Quarry Bay. Kowloon Dock. Ou premises. Ou premises. 54 Peel Street.

Bisnee Villa, Pokfulum. 34 Queen's Road Central. 25 Des Voeux Road Central. Lane, Crawford & Co.'s premises. Hongkong Club.

2 Cameron Villas, Peak.

York Building.

Gas Work, Kowloon. Kowloon Docks.

Peak Hotel.

1 Leighton Hill Road.

Quarry Bay.

Quarry Bay.

Kowloon Docks.

4 Cameron Villas, Peak.

On premises. Hongkong Club.

155 Wanchai Road. On premises.

St. George's Building.

5 Stewart Terrace, Peak. Quarry Bay.

Tai-kok-tsui, Kowloon.

1 Carnavon Road, Kowloon. On premises.

3 Moreton Terrace.

1 Garden Road, Kowloon.

1 Moreton Terrace, Causeway Bay.. Kowloon Docks.

5 Victoria View, Kowloon. 1 Connaught Road.

3 Stewart Terrace, Peak. On premises.

Gilston, Robinson Road. Quarry Bay.

2 Pedder's Hill. Hongkong Hotel.

Smith Villas, Magazine Gap. Shaukiwan Road.

60 Des Voeux Road.

Hotel Baltimore, Wyndham Street. Shaukiwan Road.

Peak.

с

Caldwell, Daniel Augustus ... Estate and Mortgage Broker,

Caldwell, George Arthur

Campbell ancis

Campbh Frank..

Ca

Carn.

Carrol

Cassidy

Castro, Jo

d'Alma

air F.

letcher

phi

Chief Clerk, Dock Co.,................... Crane Driver, Butterfield & Swire, Assistant, Shewan, Tomes & Co., Assistant, Shewan, Tomes & Co.,

Godown Keeper, Chiua Sugar Refinery, Consulting Engineer,

Assistant, Shewan, Tomes & Co..

Locomotive Driver, Butterfield & Swire,...

Queen's Road Central. On premises. Quarry Bay. Greencroft, Kowloon. Hotel Mansions. On premises.

10 Mountain View,

3 Pedder's Hill. Quarry Bay.

Assistant, International Banking Corp.,... 1 East Terrace, Kowloon.

5

NAME IN FULL.

C-Continued.

OCCUPATION.

Catchick, Gregorius George... Clerk, E. D. Sassoon & Co.,

Chalmers, James Hynd Chan Houkey Chan Pat

Chapman, Edward John Chapple, Frederick Chard, Henry Frank

Chater, Chater Paul

Christiani, George Albrecht

Max Theodor. Chunyut, Frederick George Chunyut, Oscar Rowan Clark, Ernest Sidney. Clark, Jasper Clark, Milton Ona Clarke, Frank Stanley Clarke, Thomas William Clarke, Wm. Edward

Clarke, Wm. Gray....... Clasen, Heury Christian Clelland, Joseph.......... Clemann, Ernest, Cobden, Alfred Sydney. Cobley, Augustus Otto

Fresenius

Colahan, Henry James Collett, Charles

Collins, James

Connor, Joseph Leo Cooke, Charles Johu Cooper, Rustomjee Burjorjee... Coppin, Alan Griffiths ... Cordeiro, Albano Antonio Cornell, Francis Heawood......

Costigan, Charles Telford. Coughtrie, Roger

Coulthart, John

Course, Arthur

...

Courtney, Gerald Newman Cousland, Alexander Stark

Dalglish

Craddock, Heury Edwin

Craik, James Crapnell, Albert Edward Crawford, Frank Malcolm

Lane

Crawford, William Joseph Crispin, Charles.......... Crosbie, James

Cruickshank, Geo. Seymour

Cruickshank, John............. Curreein, Valab..... Currie, Alexander Scott Curry, George Percy

*

Assistant, Butterfield & Swire, Manager, Ip On Co.,

Clerk, China Fire Insurance Co., Clerk, Linstead and Davis, Assistant, W. Powell Ld.,

Sub-Acct., Chartered Bank of I. A.

China,.

Secretary, HK, Iron Mining Co., Ld

Exchange Broker,....

Assistant, W. R. Loxley & Co., Assistant, W. R. Loxley & Co., Assistant, Lane, Crawford & Co., Assistant, Standard Oil Company, Assistant, Standard Oil Co., Banker, International Baukg. Corpu..... Engineer, Standard Oil Co.,

&

Secretary, HK. C. & M. Steamboat

Co., Ld.,

Engineer,

Book-keeper, Grossmann & Co...... Shipwright, Dock Co.,

Assistant, Ullmann & Co.,

ABODE.

4 Morrison Hill Road. Peak Hotel.

19 Aberdeen Street.

1 Lower Mosque Terrace. Nettlewood, Robinson Road. 28 Queen's Road.

On premises.

Conduit Road.

Hongkong Club. 38 Caine Road. 38 Caine Road. Ou premises.

I Mountain View, Peak. Hotel Mansions. Hongkong Club. Hongkong Hotel.

Durnford, Peak.

Robinson Road.

6 Mountain View, Peak. Kowloon Docks.

34 Queen's Road Central.

Chartered Accountant, Butterfield & Swire, On premises.

Civil Engineer,

Cashier, Russo-Chinese Bank,.

Manager, Wallem & Co.,..

Foreman Mechanic, Punchard, Lowther

& Co.,

Quarry Bay. Hongkong Hotel.

Hongkong Club Annexe.

Naval Yard Extension,

Barker Road, Peak.

Assistant Accountant, Standard Oil Co., Hongkong Hotel. Draughtsman, Dock Co.,.... Assistant, N. Mody & Co., Assistant, Bradley & Co., Assistant, Shewan, Tomes & Co., Electrician, Wilks & Jack,

Accountant, Mercantile Bank,. Assistant, Dodwell & Co., Ld., Assistant, Shewan, Tomes & Co., Traffic Supt., Electric Tramway, Clerk, Butterfield & Swire,.

Assistant, Ross & Co.,.............

Sanitary Superintendent, HK. & K. W.

& Godown Co.,

Assistant Steward, Hongkong Club, Book-keeper, Lane, Crawford & Co.,

Clerk, Lane, Crawford & Co., Clerk,.....

Foreman Shipwright, Dock Co.,. Sugar Boiler, Taikoo Sugar Refinery,. Mechanical Engineer,

Jeweller, Falconer & Co... Merchant,

Sugar Boiler,..

Local Secretary, Gas Co......

54 & 56 Queen's Road Central. Richmond House, Barker Road, Peak. 4 Rose Terrace, Robinson Road. 9 Punjab Buildings, Granville Road,

Kowloon.

11 Queen's Road Central.

On premises.

Hotel Mansions.

35 Wong-nei-chong Road. Mount Kellett, Peak.

6 Des Voeux. Villas, Mount Kellett,

Peak.

33 Praya East. Hongkong Club.

On premises.

On premises.

Kowloon Docks.

Kowloon Docks.

Quarry Bay.

The Summer House, Mt. Kellett,

Peak.

Hotel Baltimore.

22 Leighton Hill Road. Quarry Bay.

Westbourne Villa, N.

D

Daniel, Walter Danielsen, Julius Emil

Darton, Thomas Harwood. David, Ramésh Davidson, Horace Davidson, Peter

Davies, Arthur Frederick Davison, William Day, Frank Oswald Demée, Alfred Bonaparte

Constance

Dermer, Harold Whitelock

...

Civil Engineer, Punchard, Lowther & Co., Hongkong Club.

Assistant, F. Blackhead & Co., Chtd. Acct., Butterfield & Swire, Assistant Manager, Kowloon Hotel, Assistant, Butterfield & Swire,

Sub. Acct., National Bank of China, Ld., Assistant Manager, HK. Hotel, Foreman Shipwright, Dock Co., Clerk, Butterfield & Swire,

Clerk, Messageries Maritimes,.... Assistant, Dodwell & Co., L.,

St. George's Building. 1 Connaught Road. On premises.

Lycemoon Terrace, Quarry Bay. | Y.M.C.A., Alexandra Building.

On premises.

Kowloon Docks.

5 Ripon Terrace.

108 Macdonnell Road, Kowloon. 6 Park View, Lyttleton Road.

r

NAME IN FULL.

6

OCCUPATION.

ABODE.

D-Continued.

Desebrock, Hermann Emil Dickie, James.. Dickson, David Dickson, Robert........ Diercks, Alfred Chihli Dinning, Hugh Diss, Arthur Charles.. Diss, George Ambrose Ditch, George Benjamin Dixon, Arthur Wesley. Dixon, Fred. Harvey.. Dixon, Walter Edward Doolittle, Francis Henry Douglas, John Phillips.. Dowbiggin, Hugh Blackwell

Layard

Downing, Thomas Charles Drew, Walter Clement Drude, Fritz

Duncan, George

Duncan, George Leopold Dunlop, Gustaaf Abram Dunrich, Arthur Ellis

William

Durrance, Wm. Henry

• Dutton, Sydney Hardy

Eadie, James

E

Eberius, Gottfried Fritz Edwards, George Richard...... Edwards, Gilbert Hamilton Einstmann, John William. Ellis, Albert

Ellis, David Ezekiel Ellis, Ezekiel İsanc

Ellis, Frederick

Ellis, Jack Ezekiel Ellis, Obadiah Isaac Elly, Albert

Engel, Gustav Christoph Engel, Lambertus

Esrom, Frank.

Eustace, Bert

Evans, Llewellyn Evans, William

Evans, William Henry Eyre, Harry

Ezekiel, Reuben Marcus Ezra, Edward

Ezra, Reuben

F

Fairnie, Robert Falconer, Percy James Fenton, Sydney George.. Ferguson, Ernest George...... Ferguson, Robert Alexander... Ferry, Wallace Vincent.... Fischer, Rudolf Fisher, John

Fittock, Charles, Jr. Fletcher, Harold Lewthwaite.

Foeke, Julius Forbes, Donald

Forbes, John Rodger...... Forbes, Ninian Stewart.. Ford, Edward Stephen Ford, William Falconer.. Forman, Eliot Buxton

Assistant, Carlowitz & Co....... Assistant, Taikoo Sugar Refinery,. Assistant, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Assistant, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Clerk, W. R. Loxley & Co., Assistant, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Master Tailor, Diss Bros., Master Tailor, Diss Bros.,

Foreman, Punchard, Lowther & Co., Superintendent, West River Br. S. S. Co., Cashier, Sun Life Assurance Co. of Canada, Engineer, Dock Co.,........ Merchant, Savoy Limited, Engr., G. I. Cement Co., Ltd.,

Banker, Mercantile Bank, Acct., Chartered Bank of I., A. & C., Merchant, H. Wicking & Co., Office Assistant,

Foreman Plumber, Dock Co., Assistant, MacEwen, Frickel & Co., Accountant, Neth.-India Com. Bank,

Accountant, Gas Co., Foreman,

Manager, Piece Goods Department, S. J.

David & Co.,

Engineer, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Assistant, Meyer & Co., Assistant, Dodwell & Co., Ld.. Assistant, Butterfield & Swire,

Merchant, Lütgens, Eiustmann & Co., Assistant, Dodwell & Co., Ld., Merchant,

Clerk, E. D. Sassoon & Co., Broker,

Assistant, Wm. Shewan & Co., Assistant, S. J. David & Co., Assistant, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Merchant, Wm. Meyerink & Co., Agent, Netherlands Trading Society,

Book-keeper, East Asjatic Trading Co.,...] Assistant, Lane, Crawford & Co., Clerk, HK. & S'hai Bank, Assistant, Lane, Crawford & Co., Tailor's Cutter, Lane, Crawford & Co., Manager, W. Powell, Ld., Broker, Erich Georg & Co., Assistant, D. Sassoon & Co., Ld., Assistant, D. Sassoon & Co., Ld.,

Banker, Chartered Bank of I. A. & C., . Clerk, Butterfield & Swire, Assistant, Butterfield & Swire, Clerk, HK. & S'hai Bank,

Sugar Boiler, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Clerk, Waverley Hotel, Merchant,

Engineer, Dock Co., Foreman Shipwright, Dock Co., Consulting Engineer, Merchant, Lauts, Wegeuer & Co., Clerk, HK. & S'hai Bank, Sugar-boiler, China Sugar Refinery, Assistant, Shewan, Tomes & Co., Clerk, Wharf & Godown Co....... Harbour Foreman Engineer, Dock Co., Assistant, P. & O. Co.,

2 Connaught Road. Taikoo Terrace, Quarry Bay. Sea View Terrace, Quarry Bay. Taikoo Terrace, Quarry Bay. 86 Macdonnell Road, Kowloon, Taikoo Terrace, Quarry Bay. Carlton House, Ice House 36 Caine Road. [Street. Naval Yard Extension. 57 Robinson Road.

6 Observatory Villas, Kowloon. Kowloon Docks. Hongkong Hotel.

3 Austin Avenue, Kowloon.

11 Queen's Road Central. Hongkong Hotel. St. George's Building. Tarawera, 61 Robinson Road. Kowloon Docks.

Duddell Street. Hongkong Hotel.

44 Elgin Street. 130 Wanchai Road.

Westley, Robinson Road.

Taiko › Te race, Quarry Bay. 3 Queen's Gardens.

2 Victoria Fiew, Kowloon,

5 Lyeemoon Villas, Kowloon. On premises. Hongkong Club,

25 Wong-nei-chung Road. 8 Pedder's Hill.

8 Pedder's Hill.

8 Pedder's Hill.

1 Pedder's Hill.

Lyeemoon Terrace.

On premises.

Stolzenfuls, 26 Plantation Road,

Peak.

Club Germania. On premises. On premises.

On premises. On premises. Connaught Hotel. Connaught House. 14 Robinson Road. College Chambers.

On premises. On premises.

On premises.

On premises.

Taikoo Terrace, Quarry Bay.

On premises.

Hotel Mansions. Cosmopolitan Dock. Kowloon Docks.

Hongkong Hotel. Prince's Building. On premises. 159 Praya East. 13 Macdonnell Road. 43 Caine Road. Kowloon Docks.

Hongkong Club.

NAME IN FULL.

7

OCCUPATION.

ABODE.

F-Continued,

Forrest, Thomas Shaw

Forsyth, George Granville

Sutherland

Fox, Frederic Reginald. Fraser, Alan Stuart

Frerichs, Charles Edward... Freund, Kari

Friedrich, Hans Albert

Jardine, Matheson Co.,

Clerk, HK. & S'hai Bank,

Acct., HK. Steam Water Boat Co., Ld., Clerk, HK. & S'hai Bank, Asst. Manager, Weismann, Ld., Asst., Arnhold, Karberg & Co., Cashier, Deutsch Asiatische Bank,

Friesland, Gustav Adolf Georg Assistant, Melchers & Co.,

Fuike, Hermann...

Mercantile Assistant,

East Point.

On premises.

Hotel Mansions. On premises.

34 Queen's Road Central. Summer House, 67 Peak.

Windsor Lodge, Kimberley Road,

Kowloon.

On premises.

2 Queen's Gardens.

G

Gaddie, James Gaddie, Willis H.

Galloway, Alfred Douglas. Galloway, Robert Dryden Gambleu, Ernest Gange, Leonard Gardner, William Frederick

Gaster, Ernest

Gätjens, Walther Emil Gee, Archibald Gegg, George William Georg, Carl Wilhelm..... Georg, Friederich Erich Carl... Gibson, Ivie Sloan... Gibson, Joe Ernest Gittins, Arthur

Gittins, Gerard

Gittins, Henry Gledioning, Walter Gliman, Ludwig Paul Glover, Campbell Gloyn, Jori Wakeham. Goggin, William George Goldenberg, Harry..... Goldschmidt, Sylvain. Gomes, Francis

Goodwin, Arthur Pearson. Goos, Rudolf

Gorham, Charles Leary

Gow, John Cowper Gower, Henry Graham, Frank

raham, James William

Graut, George.. Gray, Herbert Castell

Gray, Samuel Herbert Gray, Thomas Charles Greeufeld, Samuel Billings Greenhill, Leslie Solbé Gregory, Alfred... Gregory, Tigran Matthews Gresson, John Edward Grey, Coosby French..... Griffin, Albert Edwin Grimble, Charles Frederick

George

Grimshaw, Thomas

Miller, Miller,

Assistant, Butterfield & Swire, Asst., Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Wharfinger, HK. & K. W. & Godown Co., Clerk, HK. & S'hai Bank,

Engineer, HK. Rope Manufacturing Co.,

Ld.,

Asst., China Fire Insurance Co., Ld.,

Clerk,

Asst., W. Powell & Co., Manager, Horse Repository, Broker, Erich Gearg & Co., Broker, Erich Georg & Co., Storekeeper, B. & S.'s Shipyard,. Runner,

Clerk, E. D. Sassoon & Co., Assistant, Butterfield & Swire, Accountant, Cotton Mills, Chief-Inspector, Tramway Co., Assistant, Carlowitz & Co................... Acct., Puuchard, Lowther & Co., Assistant, China Sugar Refinery,.... ... Assistant, Jardine, Matheson & Co.,

Groscamp, William Hendrick.. Gubbay, Aaron Sassoon Gubbay, David Sassoon..

Gubbay, Joseph Sassoon Gubbay, Raphael Aaron

Guimarães, Marcellino da Silva

Günther, François Guy, James..........

Clerk,

L

Assistant, Ullmaun & Co., Clerk, Nippon Yusen Kaisha, Manager, Cottam & Co., Ld., Clerk, Rädecker & Co.,

General Manager, Fumigating & Disin-

fecting Bureau,

Foreman Blacksmith, Dock Co.,........ Yard Foreman, Dock Co., Electrical Engineer,.

Supt. Shipbuilder, Dock Co., Foreman Engineer,

Junk Bay. Junk Bay.

1 Connaught Road. Quarry Bay.

Savoy Chambers, Elgin Rd., Kowloon. On premises.

Villa Maria, Glenealy.

Eden Hall, Babington Path, West

Point.

25 Belilios Terrace.

2 Patell Villas, Kowloon. Causeway Bay. Braeside.

3 Goolistan, Conduit Road. Stanley Terrace, Quarry Bay. King Edward Hotel.

Greencroft, Robinson Road, K'loon. I Connaught Road. East Point.

Kennedy's Stables.

5 Ripon Terrace, Bonham Road. Hongkong Club.

4 George Street, East Point.

3 Belilios Terrace.

44 Morrison Hill Road.

34 Queen's Road Central.

Thomas' Hotel, Queen's Rd. Central.. Alexandra Building.

5 Duddell Street.

Alexandra Building. Kowloon Docks.

Kowloon Docks.

17 College Chambers, Wyndham St. Kowloon Docks.

4 Kimberley Villas, Kowloon.

Asst., Union Ince. Socty, of Canton, Ld. Meirion, 9 Peak.

Assistant, P. M. S. S. Co.,

Assistant, Reiss & Co.,

Manager, Harris, Keeney & Co., Assistant, Butterfield & Swire, Assistant, Jardine Matheson & Co., Assistant, A. V. Apear & Co., Assistant, Jardine Matheson & Co., Storekeeper, Dock Co.,

Civil Engineer, Butterfield & Swire,

General Broker,

Asst. Chief Foreman, B. & S.'s Shipyard, Assistant, Neth. Trading Society, Broker, E. D. Sassoon & Co., Clerk, E. D. Sassoon & Co., Assistant, D. Sassoon & Co., Ld., Stock Broker, Gubbay & Michael, Assistant Bookkeeper, Arnhold, Karberg

& Co.,

Steward,

Engineer, Dock Co.,.....

Cliftonia, 13c Macdonnell Road. Hongkong Hotel.

14 Shankiwan Road.

Peak Hotel.

Peak Hotel.

45 Wyndham Street. East Point.

Kowloon Docks.

Martinhoe, Barket Road, Peak.

Bisnee Villa, Pokfulum.

8 Stanley Terrace, Quarry Bay. 77 Mount Kellett Road, Peak. 7 Queen's Road Central.

9 Macdonnell Road.

9 Macdonnell Road. Ravenshill.

2 Lochiel Terrace, Cameron Road,

Kowloon.

King Edward Hotel.

Kowloon Docks.

NAME IN FULL.

8

OCCUPATION.

ABODE.

H

Haesloop, Conrad Theodore

Bernhard

Haines, Hereward Francis.. Hales, George Lister

Hall, Frederick Charles..

Jonathan

Hall,

Hall, Thomas Philip Halton, Frederick Joseph Hamet, Abdool Hoosen.... Hance, Cyril Eugene Agathon Hancock, Harris Edmund

Digby

Hand, John.............

Hankey, Eric Norman Alers... Hansen, James Ernest Hardwick, William Harkin, Francis

Harling, Georg Wilhelm

Gustav

Harms, Nicolaus Friedrich

Seigfried.....

Harpham, Theodore Jackson Harrison, Alfred ............

Harrison, Tom Lloyd, Harron, Henry Love Harvey, David

Harvie, John Napier... Haskell, Ernest David Hassan, Hosin.......... Haughwont, Warrin Beech, Haxton, George Kay. Haynes, Harry Hayward, Charles

Hayward, Charles Burdon..... Hayward, Ernest Malcolm Hazeland, Ernest Manning Hechtel, Otto Peter Heermann, Paul Emil Heggie, James Carmichael Heldt, Franz

Hell, Pan Edward Heinrich

William

Helmers, Johann Christian Helms, Wilhelm

Hemmings, Robert Edward Henderson, John Mentiplay... Henderson, Robert ........ Hendley, Hugh Stevenson Hendy, Harold Edward ................ Herbst, Carl Emil Peter Hesse, Franz

Heubel, Herinann Hewitt, Alfred Herbert Heyde, Oscar Von der Hickie, Sidney Douglas... Hickling, Clement Climery Hickman, Harry Frank Hill, Walter Joseph Hobbs, William James Hoggard, Fred Hohl, Wilhelm Ho Kam Tong

Holmes, Herbert Skerritte...... Holyoak, Percy Hobson.

Hooper, Joseph

Hoskins, John Thomas

Ho U-ming.

Howard, Edward

Howarth, Heury.

Hughes, Ernest Leonard

Hughes, John Owen

Humphrey, Harold Spicer... Humphreys, Cecil

Assistant, Lütgens, Einstmann & Co., Brakesman, Peak Tramway, Engineer, China Light & Power Co.,...... Assistant, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Assistant, Butterfield & Swire, Marine Surveyor,

Chief Clerk, P. M. S. S. Co., Assistant, H. Price & Co., Clerk, Macdonald & Co.,

Clerk, H.K. & S'hai Bank, Superintendent, Dock Co., Assistant, Dodwell & Co., Ld., Engineer, Dock Co.,........ Storekeeper, Foreman,

General Manager, East Asiatic Trading

Company,

Assistant, Carlowitz & Co.,............. Timber Merchant,

Actg. Depôt Manager, British-American

Tobacco Co.,...................

Clerk, Carlton Honse,

Assistant, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Marine Engineer, Dodwell & Co., Engineer, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Assistant, E. S. Kadoorie & Co., Clerk, Rumjabu & Co.,

Manager, N. Y. Import & Export Co., Engineer, Dock Co.,...................

Manager, Hongkong Hotel, Brakesman, Peak Tramway, Assistant, Shewan, Tomes & Co., Bookkeper, Lane, Crawford & Co.,.... Civil Engineer, ..... Assistant, Wendt & Co., Jeweller, Gaupp & Co., Engineer, Quarry Bay Shipyard, Assistant, East Asiatic Trading Co.,

Merchant, Kruse & Co.,

Insurance Clerk, Siemssen & Co., Assistant, Arnhold, Karberg & Co., Assistant, Leigh & Orange,. Boilermaker, Dock Co., Assistant, Shewan, Tomes & Co., Engineer,

Assistant Engineer, Flour Mills, Assistant, Lütgens, Einstmanu & Co., Merchant, c/o. Gibb, Livingston & Co., Clerk, Rädecker & Co.,

Civil Engineer, G. I. Cement Co., Ld., Broker,

Assistant, MacEwen, Frickel & Co., Assistant, Butterfield & Swire, Assistant, China Fire Insurance Co., Engineer, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Accountant, B. & S.'s Shipyard,.. Foreman, B. & S.'s Shipyard,... Assistant, Hamburg Amerika Linie, Assistant Compradore, Jardine, Matheson

& Co.,

Merchant, H. S. Holmes & Co., Salesman and Assistant, Reiss & Co., Clerk, HK. & K. W. & Godown Co., Ld., Chief Foreman, Quarry Bay Shipyard, Merchant,

Broker, E. S. Kadoorie & Co.,........... Storekeeper, C. P. Railway Co.,.............. Clerk, Percy Smith & Seth, Merchant, Harry Wicking & Co., Banker,

Assistant, W. G. Humphreys & Co.,

14 Des Voeux Road. 33 Queen's Road East.' St. George's Building. East Point. Ou premises.

2, Connaught Road.

6 Macdonnell Road.

Queen's Road Central.

7 Seymour Terrace.

On premises.

Aberdeen Dock.

Deacon's Bungalow, Pokfulum. Cosmopolitan Dock.

3 Lyeemoon Terrace, Quarry Bay 14 Shaukiwan Road.

Victoria Lodge, Peak Road.

2 Connaught Road.

2 Ice House Road.

20 Macdonnell Road.

Ice House Road.

Lyeemoon Terrace, Quarry Bay. 13 Austin Avenue.

Quarry Bay.

2 Seymour Terrace.

2 Pedder Street.

16 Queen's Road Central. Kowloon Docks.

On premises.

Engine House, Peak.

7 Kuutsford Terrace, Kowloon. 7 Knutsford Terrace, Kowloon," Coombe, Magazine Gap.

2 Austin Avenue, Kowloop. Smith Villas, Magazine Gap. Quarry Bay.

11 Knutsford Terrace, Kowloon.

Hotel Mansions. 25 Belilios Terrade. 31 Robinson Road.

!

58 Elgin Road, Kowloon. Kowloon Docks.

Glendavual, 13 Macdonnell Road. 4 Stanley Terrace, Quarry Bay. Junk Bay.

Greenwood, Caine Road. Uncertain.

5 Duddell Street. Hok-ün, Kowloon. 52, Peak.

Rocklands, Robinson Road. On premises.

3 Stewart Terrace, Peak. Taikoo Terrace, Quarry Bay.

1 Patell Villas, Garden Rd., Kowloon.. 2 Stanley Terrace, Quarry Bay. 25 Conduit Road.

Caine Road.

Rochvale, Kowloon. Queen's Buildings.

| Cliftonia, 13c Macdonnell Road.

1 Stanley Terrace, Quarry Bay. 81 Queen's Road Central. Kurrahjeen, Peak Road.

5 Arsenal Street.

3 Knutsford Terrace, Kimberley Road,

St. George's Building.

1 Cameron Villas, Peak.

4 Queen's Road Central.

[Kowloon.

i

NAME IN FULL.

9

OCCUPATION.

ABODE.

H—Continued.

Humphreys, Ernest

Humphreys, William Meyrick Hunter, George Hunter, Tobias

Hurley, Frederick Charles.. Hurley, Robert Crisp... Hutchison, William

Hynd, Robert Robertson

Hyndman, Henrique (Jr.).. Hynes, Arthur Cecil

Assistant, Butterfield & Swire. Clerk, W. G. Humphreys & Co.,..... Assistant, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Assistant, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Assistant, Hughes & Hough, Accountant,

Engineer, Dock Co.,............. Assistant, HK., & S'hai Bank, Clerk, Dock Co.,

Assistant, HK. & S'hai Bank,

On premises.

14 Austin Avenue, Kowloon. 4 Humphreys' Avenue, Kowloon. 4 Humphreys' Avenue, Kowloon. King Edward Hotel.

5 Beaconsfield Arcade. Kowloon Docks. On premises.

8 Humphreys' Avenue, Kowloon. On premises.

?

Ilmer, Paul Eugene Gotthelf.. Assistant, Dentsch Asiatische Bank,

Innes, Robert

Ironside, William

Irving, John Mark.

J

Jack, William Charles

Jaffer, Allymahomed

Jabrand, Alfred

Jameson, Philip Sutherland Japs, Heinrich

Jay, John William...

Jebsen Jacob Friedrich Chris-

tian Jebsen, Michael.

Jenkins, Anthony Jenkins, John Ventris Jertrum, Friedrich Curt Jertrum, Hans Peter

Jillings, Harry Frederick Johnson, Henry Johnson, John

Johnston, Benjamin Charles

Maturin Johnston, John .... Jonckheer, Philippus

Hendrikus. Jacobus Gerard Jones, James Mowbray. Jones, Samuel

Jordan, Ernest Granville Jorge, Francisco José Vicente Joseph, Ezra Solomon Joseph, Joseph Edgar Joseph, Raymond Menasseh... Judali, James Jacob Judah, Raphael Solomon Jupp, John Ambrose....

K

Kadoorie, Eleazer Silas... Kadoorie, Ellis

Kaily, William Charles, Kanga, Framarz Jemshedji Kapteyn, Barend Dirk Katsch, Edgar Albert Keating, David Francis Keith, David

Kellinghusen, Franz Otto

Hermana Kendall, Frederick Carr Kendall, Herbert Moorhouse...| Kennedy, Edward Arnold Kennett, Henry William Bulmer Kent, Herbert Wade

Kew, Charles Herbert Whiteley Kew, Joseph Whiteley

Kien, Willem ....

Kikuchi, Yasuyoshi

King, Robert Henry

Marine Supt., Butterfield & Swire,.......... Assistant, Butterfield & Swire, Engineer, Hougkong Ice Co., Ld.,

Consulting Engineer, Wilks & Jack, Chief Clerk, E. Pabaney,.. Assistant, Lauts, Wegener & Co., Assistant, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Assistant, Hamburg Amerika Linie, Accountant, Br. Amer. Tobacco Co.,

Merchant, Jebsen & Co., Assistant, Jebsen & Co., Bookkeeper, Hongkong Hotel, Clerk, Waverley Hotel,... Marine Supt., Nordd. Lloyd, Tobacconist,

Assistant, W. Powell Ld.,. Foreman,

Clerk,

Clerk, HK. & S'hai Bank, Engineer, Taikoo Sugar Refinery,

Assistant, Java-Japan-China Lijn, Assistant, H. Price & Co., Publican, Praya East Hotel, Manager, Hotel Baltimore, Merchant, Jorge & Co., Broker, .... Exchange Broker,...... Assistant, D. Sassoon & Co., Ld., Clerk, E. D. Sassoon & Co., Assistant, D. Sassoon & Co., Ld., Merchant, J. D. Humphreys & Son,.

Broker, E. S. Kadoorie & Co.,.......... Broker, E. S. Kadoorie & Co.,..... Inspector of Works, Standard Oil Co.,. Manager, H. N. Cooper & Co., Asst., Holland China Trading Co., Assistant. P. M. S. S. Co., Stenographer, Standard Oil Co., Foreman Shipwright, Dock Co.,

Assistant, Siemssen & Co., Clerk, H'kong & S'hai Bank Asst., P. & O. Co., Foreman,

Ld.,

Assistant, China Borneo Co., Ld., Assistant, Butterfield & Swire, Clerk, HK. & K. W. & Godown Co., Manager, Hongkong Steam Water Boat

Co., Ld.,

Merchant, Holland China Trading Co., Actg. Manager, Bank of Taiwan,

...

Glenshiel, 125 Barker Road, Peak. Hongkong Hotel. On premises.

East Point.

4 Kimberley Villas, Kowloon. On premises.

11 Knutsford Terrace, Kowloon. East Point.

Quarndon, 2 Peak Road. On premises.

King's Building.

2 Conduit Road.

36, Caine Road.

On premises.

Intra Muros, 76 Caine Road. 5 Caine Road.

On premises.

Quarry Bay Shipyard.

3 Stanley Terrace, Quarry Bay.

On premises. Quarry Bay.

37 Robinson Road. 14 Macdonnell Road.

40 & 41, Praya East.

2 Wyndham Street.

Villa D'Alva, Kennedy Road. Peak Hotel. Connaught Hotel. Kurrahjeen, 7 Peak Road. The Den, Castle Steps. 6 East Avenue, Kowloon. Ian Mor, Peak Road.

Modreenagh, Peak. Prince's Building. Lai-chi-kok.

3A Wyndham Street. Alexandra Building. 127 Barker Road, Peak. Hotel Baltimore.

Kowloon Docks.

Queen's Building. On premises.

11 Mountain View, Peak. Quarry Bay Shipyard.

1 Lyeemoon Villas, Kowloon. On premises.

43 Caine Road.

43 Caine Road. Alexandra Building.

11 Macdonnell Road.

Civil Engineer, Punchard, Lowther & Co., 82, Peak.

?

NAME IN FULL.

10

OCCUPATION.

ABODE.

K-Continued.

King, Walter Kinnaird, John Daniel Kirchloff, Fritz Kistowsky, Fritz von. Kitzmanti, John Charles Klein, Arthur........... Klinck, Charles

Klinnanek, Philipp Harding... Knight, Charles Crosby.. Knox, Lefferts

Knyvett, Paul Karl Kong Kim Fung

König, Carl Heinrich Ratje Köster, Ernst August Kracutler, Albert

Krebs, Hugo Karl Julius

Kruse, Bernhard Anton... Kullmann, John George Willy Kyles, John

Lambert, John

L

Lambert, John James Bain Lammert, -Alexander Herbert Lammert, Frank.....

Lammert, Lionel Eugene Lamperski, Albert Wilhelm Lane, Edward Courtenay Lang, Archibald Orr Langley, Albert Perey Langstein, Ludwig Vietor. Lapsley, Robert. Laurenz, Rudolph

Lau Wan Kai....

Lau Yau-pan

Leask, William Loughtou

Lee, Corinth Heury

Lee, James..

Lehrs, Paul..

Lemm, John

Lester, Hugh William

Leung Fee Cooke

Leuz, Rudolph Levy, Isaac Simon.

Levy, Silas Simon

Libeaud, Carl Ernest.. Lieb, Fritz

Lightfoot, Sidney Little, James

Li Wai Lam

Lochead, James Logan, James Douglas Logan, William Clements Long, Edward Arthur Longuet, Carl Wilhelm.

Lorria, Felix

Loureiro, Peter

Bookseller, Kelly & Walsh, Ld..................... Sugar Boiler, China Sugar Refinery, Merchant,

Godown Manager, Nordd. Lloyd., Merchant, Grossmanu & Co., Assistant, Lants, Wegener & Co., Manager, HK. Rope ManufacturingCo.,

Ld.,

Assistant, Holland China Trading Co., ... Clerk, Butterfield & Swire,

District Manager, China Mutual Insurance,

Co.,

Local Manager, Vacuum Oil Co., Assistant, A Chee & Co., Assistant, Melchers & Co., Assistant, Siemssen & Co., Acconutant, Russo Chinese Bank, Marine Supt., Nordd. Lloyd,

Asst., Deutsch Asiatische Bank,.. Banker,

Engineer, Dock Co.,

Surveyer to Lloyd's Register, Civil Engineer,

Assistant, G. P. Lammert, Auctioneer, Wine Merchant, Caldbeck, MacGregor &

Co.,

Assistant, G. P. Lammert, Assistant, Melchers & Co.,

Asst., Union Ince. Society of Canton, Ld., Assistant, Gibb, Livingston & Co.,.......... Clerk, Dock Co.,

Assistant, Arnhold, Karberg & Co., Clerk, Dock Co.,

Assistant, Carlowitz & Co

Assistant Secty., The Tung On Fire Ince.

Co., La.,.......

Paper Manufacturer,

Civil Engineer, Leigh & Orange,

Office Assistant,

Sugar Boiler, China Sugar Refinery,

Clerk, Sander, Wieler & Co.,

Architect,

Asst., Dodwell & Co., Ld.,

Coal Merchant, &c.,

Clerk, Sander, Wieler & Co.,

Clerk, S. J. David & Co.,

Bookkeeper, E. D. Sassoon & Co.,. Asst., Dodwell & Co., Ld.,

Asst., Arnhold, Karberg & Co., Electrician, Dock Co.,

3 Knutsford Terrace, Kowloon, East Point.

Quarndon, 2, Peak.

Coombe Villas, 152 Magazine Gap. Exmoor, 15 Conduit Road.

On premises.

10 Arbuthnot Road. On premises. On premises.

Alexandra Building. King's Building.

17a Queen's Road Central. On premises.

Queen's Building.

3 Lyeemoon Villas, Kowloon.

1 Austin Villas, Des Voeux Road,

Kowloon.

Club Germania. Club Germania. Kowloon Docks.

4 Ormsby Villas, Kowloon. 4 Ormsby Villas, Kowloon. Duddell Street.

Benfica, Robinson Road. Duddell Street. On premises.

7 Mountain View, Peak. St. George's Building. Aberdeen Dock.

9 Kennedy Road.

Kowloon Docks.

2 Connaught Road.

2 Bonham Strand West.

1 Aberdeen.

On premises.

80 Staunton Street.

Bowrington.

Prince's Building.

7 Humphreys' Avenue, Kowloon.

6 Park View, Lyttleton Road. 53 Connaught Koad.

Prince's Building.

8 Barrow Terrace, Kowloon.

7 Barrow Terrace, Kowloon.

2 Ormsby Villas, Kowloou. Strathallan, 31 Robinson Road. Kowloon Docks.

Furnishing Salesman, Lane, Crawford &Co., On premises.

Chief Clerk, Flour Mills,.

Asst., Taikoo Sugar Refinery,. Foreman Boiler Maker, Dock Co., Acct., D. Sassoon & Co., Ld., Stenographer, Standard Oil Co.,.... Merchant, Kruse & Co., Mechanical Engineer,

Acct., National Bank of China, Ld.,

Lüders, Eduard Carl Ferdinand Assistant, Arnhold, Karberg & Co., Lysanght, John

Engineer, W. Lysanght & Son,

Junk Bay. Quarry Bay. Kowloon Docks. Hongkong Hotel.

1 West End Terrace. Hotel Mansions.

Villa Lucia, Pokfulum.

2 The Albany.

67 Mount Kellett, Peak. 131 Wanchai Road.

M

MacAskill, Kenneth Roderick.. Macdonald, Donald Macdonald, Donald MacGillivray, James Paterson Macgowau, Robert John Mackie, Charles Gordon

Stewart

Clerk, Butterfield & Swire,

Civil Engineer, B. & S.'s Shipyard, Engineer and Surveyor, Clerk, HK, & S'hai Bank, Clerk, HK. & K. W. & Godown Co.,

Assistant, Gibb, Livingston & Co.,

Stanley Terrace, Quarry Bay.

1 Clifton Gardens, Conduit Road. Seymour Terrace.

On premises. Ld., 68, Mount Kellett, Peak.

Queen's Building.

"

i

NAME IN FULL.

11

OCCUPATION.

ABODE.

M-Continued.

Mackintosh, Frederick

Alexander

Madar, Hussian Pillay Makeham, Charles Malden, George Fletcher Manners, John

Manuk, Malcolm

Marcenaro, Ettore Tomaso

Michell

Assistant, Lane, Crawford & Co., Clerk, King Edward Hotel,........ Asst., Dairy Farm Co.,.... Engineer, Tramway Co., Asst., Siemssen & Co.,.............. Acct., Dairy Farm Co., Ld.,

Asst., Carlowitz & Co.,

Marney, Victor Emile Toreaude Assistant, Dodwell & Co., Lal.,

Marston, Lionel

Martin, James

Mast, Edward.

Matsda, Kichita

Matsuk, Teisaburo Matsushima, Tetsuo

Matthews, John Frederick May, Ernest Alfred George May, George Howard McBryde, William Gray McCorquodale, Jobn McCubbin, John

McCubbin, John...

McDonagh, William J.

Supt., China Light & Power Co., Ld., Draughtsman, Dock Co.,

Clerk, C. P. Railway Co., Manager, Toyo Kisen Kaisha,

Merchant. Mitsu Bishi Goshi Kwaisha, Clerk,

Diver, B. & S.'s Shipyard,

Assistant, Dod well & Co., Ld., Bookseller, Kelly & Walsh, Ld.,. Draughtsman, Dock Co.,

Sugar Boiler, China Sugar Refinery, Engineer, Gas Co.,

Assistant, Butterfield & Swire, Assistant, P. M. S. S. Co.,

McDougall, Alex. Marcellino .. Mercantile Assistant,

McGlashan, James...

McGrew, John P.

McHugh, Francis Edwards

Mellutchon, James Maitland

McIntyre, John

McIntyre, Wilson

McKirdy, Archibald

McNeill, Duncan

McRobie, Frank..

Mead, James Henry

Meek, John......

Shipwright, Dock Co., Millwright, Flour Mills,

Chief Accountant, Standard Oil Co., Assistant, Butterfield & Swire, Asst., Taikoo Sugar Refinery,. Asst., Taikoo Sugar Refinery,. Asst., Taikoo Sugar Refinery,. Boiler Maker, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Engineer, B. & S.'s Shipyard,.. Bookseller, Kelly & Walsh, Ld... Jeweller, G. Falconer & Co.,

Mehta, Byramjee Kaikhusbroo | Clerk, E. D. Sassoon & Co.,

Melvin, James Dewar

Menzies, John

Messner, Karl Franz

Meyer, August Johann

Hermann

Meyer, Johannes Emil Meyer, Harry Albert.. Meyer, Oscar

Michael, Sassoon Hai Michael, Solomon Jacob Millar, Andrew William Millar, Edmund Reid..

Millar, John

Miller, John Finlay Miller, Joseph Oswald Miller, Robert.........

Milroy, Anthony Alex. Heron Minami, Shunji Mistry, Kharsbedji Dhanjibhoy Mitchell, John

Mittell, Carl Joseph Franz Miyasaki, Kingo.... Mody, Bezonjec Kawasjee Mody, Kaikhusroo

Nusserwanjee

Moffatt, George Moir, Alexander.. Möller, Johammes Montjamont, R. de... Moore, Sydney Moosa, Omar Cassam More, Chas. Andrew

Morfey, Alan

Mori, Benjiro

Morphew, George

Morrison, James Robertson

Morrison, John Dongal

Assistaut, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Shipbuilder, Dock Co......

Cargo Official, North German Lloyd,.

Bookkeeper, Melchers & Co., Assistant, Meyer & Co., Clerk, E. D. Sassoon & Co.,

Assistant, China Export Import & Bank

Cie......

Stock Broker,

Stock Broker, Gubbay & Michael, Timekeeper, Dock Co.,

Assistant. A. S. Watson & Co., Assistant, A. S. Watson & Co., Engineer, Bradley & Co., Assistant, Lane, Crawford & Co., Banker,

Superintendent, Sailors' Home, Manager, Ataka & Co., Assistant, S. J. David & Co.,... Assistant, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Merchant, W. Meyerink & Co., Assistant, Mitsu Bishi Goshi Kwaisha, Bookkeeper, Weismann Ld.,

Clerk, King Edward Hotel,............. Assistant, Shewan Tomes & Co., Manager, Peak Hotel, Clerk,

Chief Assistant, Messageries Maritimes,... Assistant, Shewan, Tomes & Co., Merchant,

.......

Chief Clerk, China Sugar Refinery, Assistant, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Asst. Manager, Nipon Yusen Kaisha, Foreman, Butterfield & Swire,

On premises.

20 Yee Wo Street. Pokfulun.

On premises.

1 Lochill Terrace, Kowloon.

4 Morrison Hill Road.

2 Connaught Road.

3 Park View.

Hung Hom.

1 Knutsford Terrace, Kowloon. 13 Macdonnell Road.

6 Macdonnell Road.

4 Macdonnell Road. 3 Conduit Road.

Stanley Terrace, Quarry Bay. 6 Park View, Lyttleton Road. Carlton House.

1 Kimberley Villas.

3 Great George St., East Point. Gas Works, West Point.

Sea View Terrace, Quarry Bay. Hotel Baltimore.

45 Elgin Street. Cosmopolitan Dock. Junk Bay.

Hotel Mansions.

On premises.

Taikoo Terrace, Quarry Bay. Sea View Terrace, Quarry Bay. Quarry Bay.

Quarry Bay. Quarry Bay.

Beryl, Garden Road, Kowloon. Hotel Mansions.

Room No. 11, College Chambers,

Wyndham Street.

1 Lyeemoon Terrace, Quarry Bay. Kowloon Docks.

6 East Terrace, Kowloon.

On premises.

King's Building, 4 Connaught Road. The Den, Castle Steps.

1 Queen's Gardens, Peak Road. 2 Century Crescent, Kennedy Road. 2 Chancery Lane. Cosmopolitan Dock. Alexandra Building. A. S. Watson & Co. Peak Hotel.

On premises.

11 Queen's Road Central. On premises.

3 Conduit Road.

60 Hollywood Road.

Taikoo Terrace, Quarry Bay. Alpha Villa, East Avenue, Kowloon. 4 Garden Road, Kowloon.

Humphrey's Avenue, Kowloon.

Ou premises.

Greencroft, Robinson Road, Kowloon. On premises.

2 Connaught Road.

Queen's Building.

Hotel Mansions.

1 and 3 D'Aguilar Street.

3 Morrison Hill,

East Point.

Stonehenge, 5 Robinson Road.

7 Stanley Terrace, Quarry Bay.

Sub. Acct., Chartered Bank of I. A. & C., Ou premises. Engineer, Dock Co.,..

Kowloon Docks.

12

NAME IN FULL.

M-Continued.

Moses, Elias Joseph Moses, Sassoon Ezra Moses, William Byren Moss, Dennis Kebir Moulder, Angustus Moutrie, Sidney Edward Muat, William Francis Muhle, Heinrich Ludwig Muir, John Greig Mullan, Thomas John Munro, Roland George Murphy, Edward Owen... Murphy, Lewis Newton... Murray, Douglas Bennett.....

Murray, James Smith. Musso, Luigi A.

Musso, Salvadore.

N

OCCUPATION.

Broker, J. R. Michael & Co., Assistant, D. Sassoon & Co., Ld., Manager, Connaught House Hotel, Assistant, Ross & Co.,..... Merchaut,

Mercantile Assistant. Engineer, Electric Light Company, Assistant, Siemssen & Co., Assistant, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Civil Engineer, B. & S.'s Shipyard, Assistant, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Engineer, W. S. Bailey & Co., Clerk, HK. & S'hai Bank,

Assistant, Union Insurance Society of

Canton, Ld.,

Engineer,

Merchant,

Marine Engineer,

ABODE.

Belilios Terrace. 4 Peak Road, On premises. Peak Hotel.

14 Austin Avenue, Kowloon. Kowloon.

Electric Works, Wanchai. On premises.

Sea View Terrace, Quarry Bay. Quarry Bay.

East Point,

Highlands, Kimberley Road, On premises.

[Kowloon.

4 Cameron Villas, Peak. 63 Kowloon City Road. Stowford, 12 Bonham Road. 46 Morrison Hill Road.

Nakayama, Hyoma..

Naudin, Vincent Alphonse Neave, Elvine Hugh Neave, Thomas

Neidt, Arthur Carl Wilhelm Neilsen, Donald McLaren.. Neville, Samuel Arthur................. Newall, Stuart George

Newman, Kenneth Charles

Horton...

Nicholls, William Nicholson, Reginald Nicholson, William Nicolai, Friedrich Nielsen, Jens Peter Nietert, Harry Nilsson, Arthur Gustaf

Vilhelm

Norrie, Thomas Brydie Nye, Percival Herbert

Oates, Thomas

O

Obrembski, Marian..

Ogilvie, Alexander

Olime, Alfred

Oldenberg, Hermann Adolf

Lorenz

Olliffe, Orris Charles.

Olson, John

O'Neill, Charles Augustine... Ortlepp, Heinrich Friedrich Osborne, James William

Osborne, Johu..............................

Osmund, Arthur Frederick Osmund, James Daniel Otten, Gerhardus

...

Otto, Walter Adolph Henry... Owen, Edward

Owen, Mackertich Cyril

Thaddeus Arathoon Owen, Owen Elias.......

P

Packham, Ralph

Page, Harry William... Palmer, Henry Thomas... Parker, Albert Eruest Parker, William Edward

Manager, Mitsui Bussan Kaisha,

Diver,

15 Macdonnell Road. 111 Queen's Road East.

Assistant, HK. & K. W. & Godown Co., 6 Cameron Terrace, Kowloon.

Dock Co.,

Merchant,

Foreman Boiler Maker, Dock Co., Assistant Wharfinger, Taikoo Sugar Refy., Manager, South British Fire and Marine

Insurance Company,

Electrical Engineer, Hongkong Electric

Co., Lử.,

Clerk, Dock Co.,

Assistant, HK. & S'hai Bank, Assistant, Butterfield & Swire, Merchant,

Assistant Supt. Engineer, Nordd. Lloyd,.....] Stenographer, Pacific Mail S. S. Co.,

Chemist, Taikoo Sugar Refinery,..... Acct., International Banking Corp., Electrical Engineer,

Foreman Joiner, Dock Co.,.. Chemist, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Tuner, Robinson Piano Co., Ld., Clerk, Sander, Wieler & Co.,

Assistant, Meyer & Co., Assistant, Commercial Union Assurance

Co., Ltd.,

Building Contractor, C, E. Warren & Co., Assistant, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Assistant, Reuter Brockelmann & Co., Proprietor, Kowloon Hotel,.... Engine Driver, Tramway Co.,.. Clerk, Lauts, Wegener & Co.,.. Clerk, China Sugar Refinery, Bookkeeper, Java-China-Japan Liju,. Assistant, Kruse & Co., Broker,

Assistant, A. H. Rennie & Co., Manager, Occidental Hotel,...

Cargo Supt., HK. & K. W & Godown

Co., L.,

Assistant, Dairy Farm Co., Ld., Assistant, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Manager, Singer Machine Co., Timekeeper, Dock Co.,

Kowloon Docks.

Alpha, East Avenue, Kowloon. Cosmopolitan Dock. Quarry Bay.

4 Cameron Villas, Peak.

Testa, Wing Fung Street, Wanchai. Kowloon Docks. On premises. Hongkong Club. Quarndon, 2, Peak.

6 East Terrace, Kowloon. Queen's Building.

Quarry Bay.

1 Cameron Villas, Peak. 14 Robinson Road, Kowloon.

Kowloon Docks. Quarry Bay. Des Voeux Road, Club Germania.

On premises.

Des Voeux Road.

30 Des Voeux Road Central.

Quarry Bay.

Prince's Building.

On premises.

30 Queen's Road East.

3 Reduaxella Terrace, Peel Street. 6 Reduaxella Terrace, Peel Street. St. George's House, Kennedy Road. Hotel Mansions.

Hongkong Club.

2 Chater Road. On premises.

5 Victoria View, Kowloon.

Dairy Farm Depôt, Robinson Road,. Quarry Bay.

[Kowloon

IA Wyndham Street. Kowloon Docks.

NAME IN FULL.

13

OCCUPATION.

ABODE.

P-Continued.

Parr, Edward Victor David Paterson, John

Peacock, John

Pearce, Thomas Ernest. Pearson, James

Pearson, John Henry....

Pearson, Richard William...

Peche, Ivanhoe

Pedersen, Charles

Assistant, P. & O. Co., Exchange Broker,

Assistant, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Assistant, J. D. Hutchison & Co.,........ Iron Moulder, Dock Co.,

Manager, Robinson Piano Co., Ld.,

Chief Storekeeper, Punchard Lowther &

Co.,

Timekeeper, B. & S.'s Shipyard, Brakesman, Peak Tramway,

Pentycross, Frederick Hazel... Clerk, HK. & S'hai Bank,

Perrie, Robert

Perry, Isaac Samuel

Pestonji, Rustom

Petigura, Dinshah Jamsetjee, Philpot, Leonard Daniel Pickering, George Piens, Charles....

Pigott, Chetwynd Botry

Pigrum, William Tertius Vale Piper, Christian

Plage, Philip

Plummer, John Archibald

Temple

Plummer, Lewis Polley, John David Potten, Stanley E. G. Potts, Patrick Cumming .... Priedsmann, Herrmann Georg Prien, Peter George Friedrich Pritchard, Harry Fitzpatrick Pugh, Alfred John Puncheon, James

Purcell, William Harris..

Putley, Arthur Charles Pye, Edmund Burns

Assistant, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Assistant, D. Sassoon & Co., Ld., Stenographer, International Bankg. Corp., Manager, R. S. Woonwalla & Co., Architect,

Foreman, China Sugar Refinery,. Clerk, HK. & K. W. & Godown Co., Ld., Representative, Vacuum Oil Co.,

| Bookkeeper, Standard Oil Company,

Clerk, Sander, Wieler & Co., Foreman, China Sugar Refinery,.

Assistant, Bradley & Co.,..... Chief Clerk, P. & O. Co., Gunner, P. & O. Co., Assistant, W. Powell Ld., Broker, E. S. Kadoorie & Co., Merchant, Hamburg-Amerika Line, Assistant, F. Blackhead & Co., Assistant, Vacuum Oil Co.,... Assistant, Denison, Ram & Gibbs,. Foreman Plater, Dock Co., Accountant, Kelly & Walsh, Lid., Clerk, HK. & S'hai Bank, Chartered Accountant,

Swire,

Butterfield

&

11 Mountain View, Peak.

1, Prince's Building.

Quarry Bay.

London Mission, 2 Bonham Road. Kowloon Docks.

7 Caine Road.

Carlton House, Ice House Street. Quarry Bay.

15 St. Francis Street, Wanchai. On premises. Quarry Bay.

Des Voeux Road. 5 Seymour Terrace. 2 Hollywood Road. Hotel Mansions. East Point.

8 East Terrace, Kowloon. Hongkong Hotel.

4 Chater Street, Kennedy Town. On premises. Bowrington.

2 Ormsby Villas, Kowloon. 11 Mountain View, Peak. 5 Cameron Terrace, Kowloon. 28 Queen's Road Central. Kingsclere, Kennedy Road. York Building.

4 East Terrace, Kowloon. Hongkong Hotel.

17 Beaconsfield Arcade. Kowloon Docks.

3 Knutsford Terrace, Kowloon. On premises.

1 Connaught Road.

Q

Quinn, John

R

Steward, Hongkong Club,

Hongkong Club.

Rahfeek, Mahomed

Ram, Harry

Ramsay, James

Ramsay, Joseph Marshall..

Ramsay, William

Rapp, Fritz...

Raven, Arthur Robert Fenton.|

Rapp, Gustav..

Rapp, Herman

Raptis, John Hadrian

Rattey, William James

Ray, Edward Henry

Raymond, Albert

Raymond, Ellis

Razack, Moosa Abdool

Reeves, Henry

Reiners, Walter Edward

Reynolds, Frank Oswald

Clerk, Osaka Soshen Kaisha, Assistant, John Lemm, Architect, Foreman Turner, Dock Co.,................... Foreman Shipbuilder, Dock Co., Supt. Engineer, Butterfield & Swire, Asst., A. S. Watson & Co., L‹l.......... Clerk, J. D. Humphreys & Son,.... Assistant, A. S. Watson & Co., Ld., Assistant, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Clerk, Dock Co., Architect,

Broker,

Assistant, S. J. David & Co.,

Raymond, Edward Benjamin . Clerk, E. D. Sassoon & Co.,

Richards, Thomas James

Richardson, Hedley Thomas... Riegen, Johannes von Ritchie, Archibald..... Ritchie, Archibald....

Ritchie, James Reidford Ritchie, John Cameron Roberts, Arthur Griffith Robertson, John .... Robertson, Thomas Watson

Clerk, E. D. Sassoon & Co., Publican,

Assistant, Lane, Crawford & Co., Clerk, P. M. S. S. Co.,

Civil Engineer, Assistant, Brick Works,

Supt., Engineer, C. P. Railway Co., Suptg. Engineer, Nordd. Lloyd, Merchant,

Supt., United Asbestos Uriental Agency

Ld.,

Foreman Mason, B. & S.'s Shipyard, Mason, Punchard, Lowther & Co., Civil Engineer, Punchard, Lowther & Co., Clerk,...

Mechanical Engineer, H.K. & K. W. &

Godown Co., Ld.,

118 Hollywood Road. 3 Shing Wong Street. Cosmopolitan Dock, Kowloon Docks.

5 Morrison Hill. Alexandra Building.

4 East Avenue, Kowloon. A. S. Watson & Co., Ld. Nullah Terrace, Quarry Bay. Cosmopolitan Dock. Alexandra Building.

8 Macdonnell Road.

56 Caine Road.

8 Barrow Terrace, Kowloon.

8 Barrow Terrace, Kowloon.

18A Stanley Street. On premises.

61 Robinson Road.

The Haystack, Peak.

Deep Water Bay.

3 Canton Villas, Kowloon. Woollomay, Des Voeux Rd., K'loon. 236 Mongkok, North.

Holyrood, Kowloon. Quarry Bay.

68 Caine Road.

The Haystock, Peak. California, Macdonnell Road.

Kimberley Villas, Kowloon.

NAME IN FULL.

14

OCCUPATION,

ABODE.

R-Continued.

Robinson, Albert Edward

Robinson, Walter Vaughan

Robson, John James

Rodger, John ....

Rogers, Charles

Rogge, Carl Heinrich

Rombach, Joseph Albert Romero, Elado Gregorio Rose, Louis Augustus Rose, William Edward

...

Ross, William Walker Gibsou Rouse, Athol Bernard

Rowoldt, Berulard Royer, Henri

Rutherford, Norman Hubert... Rutter, Robert Vart Ruttonjee, Iormusjee Ruttonjee, Jehangir Horniusjee,

S

Saint-Pierre, René Samy, Arthur Poonoo Sandford, Henry Chamberlain. Sasaki, Osamu

...

Saunders. George Haward Sayer, George John Budds.... Sayle, Robert Theophilus

Dalton

Schellhass, Albrecht Wilhelm. Schierenberg, Hermanu Wil-

hem

Schlüter, Hakou Axel Schmidt, Carl Julius

Schmidt, Wilhelm

Schmidtborn, Albert

Schneider, Otto Hugo

Schönfelder, Heinrich August

Adolf,

Schröder, Alfred.. Schröter, Carl Christian

Hermann.............

Schröter, Johann Georg

Ludwig .

Schueen, Rudolph Julius

Christian.... Schullenbach, Carl...... Schumacher, Carl Bernhard

Hellmut

Schwandes, Ernest Hermanu

Bernhard Schwarzkopft, Friderich

Johanu Rudolph... Scott, Colin Cunningham Scriven, Henry Ernest

Seggie, Thomas

Seth, Enos...

Seth, John Hennessey

Seth, Seth Arathoon

Seydler, Richard Albert Benno

Curt

Shand, Thomas

Shaw, Alfred

Shaw, Ernest

Shaw, James Toller

Shea, James Jerry

Sheffield, Alfred....

Shennan, Herbert Bromfield Shepherd, Edgar Bruce......

Shewan, William Thomson

Manager, H. Price & Co.,

2 Century Crescent, Kennedy Road.

General Manager, W. Robinson & Co., Ld., ] 7 Caine Road.

Engineer, Dock Co.,.....

Assistant, China Sugar Refinery, Assistant, Butterfield & Swire,. Shipbroker, etc.,

Merchant, Merchant,

Assistant, E. M. Hazeland, Architect, Asst., China Mutual Life Ince, Co., Ld...........

| Assistant, Jardine, Matheson & Co.,

Assistant, Union Insurance Society of

Canton, Ld.,

Assistant, Sander, Wieler & Co., Clerk, A. R. Marty,. Assistant, Shewan, Tomes & Co., Forger, Dock Co., Merchant, H. Ruttonjee & Co., Merchant, H. Ruttonjee & Co.,

Cashier, Banque de l' Indo-Chine, Architect, John Lemm, Clerk, HK. & S'hai Bank,

Assistant, Mitsu Bishi Goshi Kwaisha,.. Builder, Taikoo Sugar Refinery,. Civil Engineer,

Assistant, Dock Co.,...... Exchange Broker,

Assistant, Ferd. Bornemann,

Assistant, Reuter, Bröckelmann & Co., Asst., China Export Import & Bank Cie., Clerk, Jebsen & Co.,

Assistant, Deutsch-Asiatische Bank, Clerk, Jebsen & Co.,

Chemist, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Clerk, Jebsen & Co.,

Merchant, Meyer & Co.,

Merchant,

Assistant, Arnhold, Karberg & Co., Assistant, Taikoo Sugar Refinery,

Merchant, Ferd. Bornemann,

Assistant, Deutsch Asiatische Bank

Manager, F. Blackhead & Co., Assistant, Butterfield & Swire, Furnishing Salesman, Lane, Crawford

& Co.,

Banker,

Secretary, Humphreys Estate & Finance

Co., Ld.,

Acet., &c., Percy Smith & Seth,. Secretary, Dairy Farm Co., Ld.,.

Kowloon Docks.

East Point.

On premises. Hongkong Club.

2 Ray View, Kowloon. 9 Lower Castle Road.

11 Morrison Hill, Gap Road. 46 Elgin Street. East Point.

4 Cameron Villas, Peak. Hotel Mansions.

Des Voeux Road Central. Chater's Bungalow, Kowloon. Kowloon Docks.

39 Elgin Road, Kowloon. 39 Elgin Road, Kowloon.

Hongkong Club.

28 Bonham Road. On premises.

4 Macdonnell Road. Quarry Bay.

Tang Yuen, 18 Macdonnell Road.

3 Stewart Terrace, Peak. 21 Conduit Road.

3 Observatory Villas, Kowloon. Kowloon.

1 Queen's Garden, Peak Road, On premises.

Hansa Villa, Peak.

3 Observatory Villas, Kowloon.

Quarry Bay. On premises.

Shorncliffe, Garden Road,

Derrington, Peak Road.

Hotel Mansions.

Sea View Terrace, Quarry Bay.

6 Queen's Road Central.

Magdalene Terrace, 149 Magazine

St. George's Building. On premises.

On premises. Hongkong Club.

Norman Cottage, Peak Road.

Norman Cottage, Peak Road.

Norman Cottage, Peak Road.

Manager, China Export Import & Bk. Cie., On premises.

Engineer, Taikoo Sugar Refinery,

Manager, Cotton Mills,

Assistant, Cotton Mills,

Tailor,

Assistant, Standard Oil Co.,..

Assistant Supt., Fitting Dept., Gas Co.,

Clerk, Butterfield & Swire,

Assistant, Hongkong Land Investment &

Agency Co., Ld.,

Merchant, ................

Quarry Bay.

East Point.

East Point.

35 Conduit Road. Hongkong Hotel.

1 Bonham Road. Ou premises.

Hongkong Hotel.

4 Robinson Road.

[Gap.

i

15

NAME IN FULL.

OCCUPATION.

ABODE.

?

S-Continued.

Shibuya, Yonetaro Shipley, Lionel Henry

Shroff, Framroze Pestonji. Sibbit, John James Siebler, Hugo Oscar

Siebs, Hans August

Silas, Charles David

Silas, David Hai...... Silbermann, Isydor....... Silva, Francisco Filomeno

Eça da

Silva, Porphyrio Maria

Nolasco da

Simcock, Philip

Simmonds, John Frederick

Norris

Simms, Henry George

Sinclair, Angus

Skinner, Thomas

Skött, Christian

Skött, Hans

Slade, Thomas

Slaney, Albert Edward Smith, Alfred Brooke Smith, Arthur William Smith, Eric Grant Smith, George Smith, George Morton Smith, Horace Percy, Smyth, Frank..... Snowman, Albert Washington Soares, Adão. Maria de Lourdes Soares, Alfredo Francisco de

Jesus

Soares, Francisco Paulo de

Vasconcellos

Soolemanjee, Essoofally Soonderam, Rammisamy Sorby, Vincent

Souza, Miguel Angelo Antonio Spafford, Thomas Spalekhaver, Wilhelm Otto

Christian

Spens, Reginald. Norman Squair, Alexander Cook Staeger, Oscar.... Stalmann, Robert

Stebbing, William Thomas Steel, David Thomson Stein, Alexis Low

Steiner, Charles,

Stephens, Herbert

Stevenson, Allan

Stevenson, Robert

Stewart, John Wemyss. Stewart, Walter Mertou Stewart, William Stewart, William Stockhausen, Curt Gottlob

Gustav.. Stoltz, Olav

Stone, Paul Emil Frederic Stopani, John Andrew Stoppa, William Christain

Paul

Stoucham, Herbert F. Stubbings, John James.... Sullivan, Charles Daniel Summers, Edwin Henry Spark Sutherland, Percy Duffus Sutherland, Robert Swart, Schelto

Assistant, Mitsu Bishi Goshi Kwaisha,... 4 Garden Road, Kowloon.

Assistant, C. P. Railway Co., Clerk, S. J. David & Co., Head Timekeeper, Dock Co., Manager, Soap Works,.. Assistant, Siemssen & Co., Assistant, Dock Co., Merchant,

Hotel Keeper, "Globe Hotel ",

Clerk, D. Sassoon & Co., Ld.,

Printer, Guedes & Co.......

Assistant Engineer, G. I. Cement Co.,

Ld.,

Clerk, Dock Co.,

Ins. Agent, North China Ins. Co.,

Marine Superintendent, Indo-China S. N.

Co.,

Marine Surveyor, Dodwell & Co., Ld., Assistant, Skött & Co., Merchant, Skött & Co.,

Foreman, B. & S.'s Shipyard,...... Foreman, Punchard, Lowther & Co. Assistant, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Assistant, Alex. Ross & Co., Assistant, Dodwell & Co., Ld., Foreman Carpenter, Dock Co., Assistant, Dodwell & Co., Ld., Chartered Acct., Percy Smith & Seth,. Broker, Vernon & Smyth, Asst., East Asiatic Trading Co.,...... Merchant,

Merchant,

Assistant, P. & O. Co., Merchant,

Clerk, Hongkong Hotel,

Electrical Engineer, HK. Electric Co., Ld.. Manager, Campbell, Moore & Co.. Storekeeper, Punchard, Lowther & Co.,...

Assistant, Siemssen & Co.,

Assistant, Butterfield & Swire, Bookkeeper & Cashier, Dock Co., Accountant, Russo-Chinese Bank, Assistant, Ferd. Bornemann, Printer, Kelly & Walsh, Ld., Bookkeeper,

13 Macdonnell Road.

4 Ashley Road, Kowloon. Ou premises. Shaukiwan Road.

Victoria Lodge, Peak Road. College Chambers. College Chambers.

Queen's Road Central.

3 Robinson Road, Kowloon.

4 Seymour Terrace.

On premises.

Kowloon Docks.

2 Lyeemoon Villas, Kowloon.

Peak Hotel.

2 Canton Villas, Kowloon. Hotel Mansions.

10 Des Voeux Road. Quarry Bay.

Naval Yard Extension.

East Point.

35 Conduit Road.

Craigieburn, Peak. Kowloon Docks.

Hazledene, Robinson Road. 5 Queen's Road.

Victoria Building, 5, Queen's Road. 10 Seymour Terrace.

24 Robinson Road.

24 Robinson Road.

6 Caine Road.

23 and 25 Gage Street. Hongkong Hotel.

Yesla, Wing Fung Street, Wanchai. 4A Upper Mosque Terrace. 12 Sau Wa Fong.

2 Bay View, Kowloon.

Deacon's Bungalow, Pokfulum. 4 Ormsby Villas, Kowloon. On premises.

6 Queen's Road Central. Connaught House.

35 Conduit Road.

Manager, Sun Life Asce. Co. of Canada,. Roseneath, 2 Garden Road, Kowloon. Chief Engineer, Flour Mills, Merchant..

Assistant Manager, Dairy Farm Co., L., Civil Engineer, Punchard, Lowther & Co., Assistant, China Sugar Refinery, Manager, W. H. Boyd & Co.,............. Foreman, B. & S.'s Shipyard, Saw Mill Manager, Dock Co.,

Assistant, F. Blackhead & Co., Ship Broker.

Assistant, Standard Oil Co., Engineer, Rope Maunfacturing Co.,

Broker,

Junk Bay.

50 Queen's Road Central. Pokfulum.

Carlton House, Ice House Street. 2 Great George Street, East Point. Hongkong Hotel.

Quarry Bay.

Kowloon Docks.

12 Bay View, East Road, Kowloon.

3 Victoria View, Kowloon.

14 Knutsford Terrace, Kowloon. 2 Kimberley Villas, Kowloon.

7 & 8 Hotel Mansions. .... On premises.

Banker, International Bankg. Corp., Electrical Engineer, HK. Electric Co., Ld., Assistant, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Storekeeper, HK. & K. W. & Godown Co., Assistant, C. P. Railway Co.,.... Assistant, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Manager, East Asiatic Trading Co.,.................|

Fesla, Wing Fung Street, Wanchai. Joss House, Quarry Bay. 6 Ashley Road, Kowloon. Hongkong Hotel. 106, Peak.

Exmoor, Conduit Road.

i

NAME IN FULL.

16

OCCUPATION.

ABODE.

Tang Chee

T

Taraporewala, Bejanjce

Ardeshir

Tarrant, Ernest Norsworthy... Tarrant, John Arthur

Tata, Fariborze Kaikavos Tatam, John

Tayler, Henry Herbert Taylor, Alexander Taylor, Frank Harold Taylor, William Taylor, William

Tegner, Ludvig Ferdinand

Templeton, David.... Terrill, William James Terry, Edgar William Terry, Wallace

Tester, Perey

Thiel, Carl Heinrich

Thiessen, Adolf Johannes

Martin

Thomas, Christopher Boswood] Thomas, Harry Philip Thomas, Francis Henry Thomas, John Alexander

Griffith

Thompson, Myron Lewis, Thorne, Stanley Moritz....

Merchant, Dang Chec Sou & Co.,

Clerk, Tata & Co.,

Assistant, A. S. Watson & Co., Ld., Acting Secretary, A. S. Watson & Co.,

Ld.,

Commission Agent,

Butcher, Dairy Farm Co., Ld., Assistant, Shewan, Tomes & Co., Engineer,

Barman, King Edward Hotel,.......... Chemist, China Sugar Refinery, Pattern-maker, Dock Co., Sub-Accountant, International Banking

Corporation,

Sugar Refiner, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Clerk, Punchard, Lowther & Co., Engineer, Gas Co.,

Assistant, W. Powell Ld., Assistant, Commercial Union Assurance,

Co., Ld.,

Merchant, Reuter, Brockelmann & Co.,...

Assistant, F. Blackhead & Co., Architect, W. Danby, Assistant, C. P. Railway Co., Clerk, HK. & S'hai Bauk,

Clerk, W. R. Loxley & Co.,

Supt. of Construction, Standard Oil Co., Sub-Accountant, Chartered Bank of

I. A. & C.,.......................

Tibbey, Henry Macpherson ... Shipping Agent, MacGregor Bros.

Tiefenbacher, Hans Max

Y

Tillmann, Henry

Tohdow, Daizo

Tollan, Duncan

Tong Tze-san

Toppin, James

& Gow,

Merchant, Wm. Meyerink & Co., Foreman,

Manager, Bank of Taiwan,

Electrician, China & Japan Telephone Co., Secretary, Tung On Fire In'ce Co., Ld., Assistant, Shewan, Tomes & Co,

Torrence, Robert McAllister... Tuner, Robinson Piano Co., Ld.,

Tulip, Wilfred

Tully, John

Turnbull, Thomas Guthrie Turner, Isaac

Turner, Richard Rennie

Turner, William Cecil Dutton Tuxford, Alfred Stanley Tyack, Arthur Heury

Ü Cheukman

U

Uldall, Sofus Vilhelm August

Underwood, Joseph Harry Unsworth, Richard

Urban, Federico .

Draughtsman, Dock Co., Engineer, Dock Co.,.... Assistant, C. P. R'way Co., Head Watchman, Dock Co., Clerk, Shewan, Tomes & Co, Assistant, HK. & S'hai Bank,.. Opthalmic Optician,....

3 Carnarvon Road, Kowloon.

43 Hollywood Road. Alexandra Building.

1 Canton Villas, Kowloon.

4 Queen's Building.

28 Morrison Hill Road. Summerville, 157 Wanchai Road. 1 Stanley Terrace, Quarry Bay. On premises.

East Point.

Kowloon Docks.

Hok-ün Cement Works. Corn Hill, Quarry Bay. 14 Morrison Hill, Gap Road. Gas Works, West Point. Alexandra Building.

Hongkong Club Annexe. Prince's Building.

3 Queen's Gardens.

5 Queen's Garden, Peak Road.

Hotel Mansions.

On premises.

73 Praya East.

. Hongkong Hotel.

3 Queen's Road Central.

On premises.

On premises.

20 Shaukiwan Road.

11. Macdonnell Road.

Ice House Street.

2 Bonham Strand.

35 Elgin Road, Kowloon. 157 Wanchai Road.

1 Knutsford Terrace. Kowloon Docks. Alexandra Building. Kowloon Docks. 13 Macdonnell Road.

On premises. 74 Caine Road.

Civil Engineer, Panchard, Lowther & Co., Hongkong Club.

Chief Clerk, I On Marine and Fire

Insurance Co., Ld.,

Manager, G. I. Cement Co., Ld., Chemist, China Sugar Refinery, Berthing Master, HK. & K. W. &

Godown Co., Ld.,

Clerk, Siemssen & Co.,........

24 & 26 Bonham Strand West. Kowloon City Road, Kowloon. 165 Praya East.

3 Victoria View, Kowloon.

2 Knutsford Terrace.

V.

Vernon, Frederic Lewis.....

Vincenot, Louis

Vivian, James.....

Foreman,

Merchant,

Foreman, Punchard, Lowther & Co.,

Vollbrecht, Ernst Oscar Rudolf | Manager, F. Blackhead & Co.,

Voort, Reinbard Theodoor

Frederik Von der

Vorster, Julius Otto

Bookkeeper, Java-China-Japan Lijn,...... Assistant, Meyer & Co.,

21 Saukiwan Road.

50 Queen's Road Central. Naval Yard Extension.

3 Queen's Gardens, Peak Road.

37 Robinson Road.

On premises.

W

Wadekind, Bruno Waldemar... Assistant, Melchers & Co.,

W

agner,

Otto.

Walker, James

Ward, Arthur Jacob

Watchmaker, Gaupp & Co.,.... Manager, Dairy Farm Co., Ld., Electrical Engineer, Dock Co.,

On premises.

Forebank W., 143 Magazine Gap.- Sassoon's Villa, Pokfulum. Kowloon Docks.

i

NAME IN FULL.

17

OCCUPATION.

ABODE.

W-Continued.

Ward, John Edward Warnes, Charles Aspinall Warnsloh, Hugo Peter Gerald Warrack, Alexander Fehrsen. Warre, Felix Walter Warren, Charles Edward Watson, Albert John Watson, Ernest George... Watson, Henry Archibald Watson, James Johnston Watson, Vietor, ..............

Watt, Albert William Jack Watts, Sam Tackaberry Weall, Thomas Graham.. Wenser, William Lionel Wreford Webb, Arthur William Webb, George Stanley Webb, Harry Montague Weill, Albert Weinberg, Samuel Wells, John

West, Johannes Jacobus van West, William Edward Westerburger, Charles Adolphs

Henri

Weston, William MacGregor.. Wheeley, John Thomas Martin Whiley, William John Granger White, Edmund William White, Francis William.. White, George Whyte, James Fleming

Marshall

Whyte, John Whyte, Robert Wilkie, John

Wilkinson, Harrie Vaughan... ilks, Edward Charles......... Williams, Cecil Stanley Norbury Williams, Charles Marion Williams, Ernest Alfred

Mountford

Williams, Garland Winter, Julius Rudolf Witchell, Job ........... Wolff, Philip Robert... Wong, Joseph Mowlam. Wong Pa Chun

Wood, Gerald George Wood, Henry George Wood, Robert Bryden. Wotherspoon, William Woude, Wopke Van der Wright, James Francis Wynne, Hugh Smith

Y

Yamada, Noriaki Yamaguchi, Takuo..... Yamashita, Hikogoro... Young, James Young, Jesse Ashton

Z

|

Stenographer, P. M. S. S. Co., Sorter, Dock Co.,

Assistant, Melchers & Co., Clerk, HK. & S’hai Bank, Assistant, Gilman & Co...... Architect, &c., C. E. Warren & Co., Brakeman, Peak Tramway, Engine-driver, Peak Tramway, Engineer,

Sugar Boiler, China Sugar Refinery, Assistant Engineer, Flour Mills, Clerk, HK. & S'hai Bank, Stenographer, P. M. S. S. Co., Assistant, Dodwell & Co., Ld., Architect,

Engineer, North Point Iron Works, Storekeeper's Assistant, Dock Co.,... Insurance Clerk, Butterfield & Swire, Manager, Sennet Frères,

Godown Supt., Standard Oil Co., Foreman, B. & S.'s Shipyard, Assistant, Neth. Trading Society, Account, Vacuum Oil Co.,

Assistant, Arubold, Karberg & Co., Clerk, HK. S'hai Bauk, Manager, China Borneo Co., Secretary, Sun Life Assurance Co., Assistant, W. Powell Ld.,

Clerk, Caldbeck MacGregor & Co., Builder and Diver, Dock Co.,

Tailor's Cutter, Lane, Crawford & Co., Clerk, W. Shewan & Co., Coppersmith, Dock Co., Engineer and Surveyor,

Assistant, P. & O. Co., Consulting Engineer, Assistant, Gibb, Livingston & Co.,. Foreman, B. & S.'s Shipyard,

Assistant, W. Powell Ld., Assistant, Butterfield & Swire,

Mercantile Assistant,

Manager, Brick Works,

Clerk, Dock Co.,

Clerk, J. D. Humphreys & Son................ Agent, China Mutual Life Insurance Co., Civil Engineer,. Foreman,

Manager, Steam Laundry Co.,................... Head Timekeeper, B. & S.'s Shipyard, Accountant, Neth. Trading Society, Broker, E. S. Kadoorie & Co., Foreman Shipwright, Dock Co.,................

Accountant,oyo Kisen Kaisha, Assistant, Mitsu Bishi Goshi Kwaisha,.. Assistant, Mitsu Bishi Goshi Kwaisha,. Foreman, B. & S.'s Shipyard,... Assistant, Shewan, Tomes & Co.,

Baltimore Hotel.

6 Ashley Road, Kowloon. On premises. On premises.

4 Cameron Villa, Peak.

30 Des Vœux Road Central. Engine House, Peak. Engine House, Peak.

66 Des Voeux Road Central.

2 Great George Street, East Point. Junk Bay.

On premises. Hotel Baltimore.

6 Park View.

Alexandra Building. Wanchai.

Kowloon Docks. On premises.

11 Seymour Road.

34 Morrison Hill Road. 22 Shan Ki Wan Road. Peak Hotel.

6 Park View.

33 Conduit Road. On premises. On premises.

6 & 8 Alexandra Building. 2 Patell Villas, Kowloon. 33 Seymour Road. Kowloon Docks.

On premises.

131 Wanchai Road.

Kowloon Docks.

1 Observatory Villas, Observatory

Road, Kowloon.

11 Mountain View, Peak.

3 Kimberley Villas, Kowloon. 127 Barker Road, Peak. Stanley Terrace, Quarry Bay.

Alexandra Building. King Edward Hotel. 8 Wyndham Street. Deep Water Bay.

3 Stewart Terrace, Peak. New Territory, Kowloon. Alexandra Building. Hongkong Hotel.

2 Shaukiwan Road.

139 Station Street, Yaumati.

6 Stanley Terrace, Quarry Bay. 1 Des Voeux Villas, Peak. 4 Stewart Terrace, Peak. Kowloon Docks.

6 Macdonnell Road. 4 Garden Road, Kowloon, 4 Garden Road, Kowloon. Quarry Bay.

St. George Building,

Zehrmann, Franz Curt

Clerk, Jebsen & Co.,

Registry, Supreme Court, Hongkong,

30th January, 1907.

*

Braeside, Macdonnell Road.

ARATHOON SETH,

Registrar.

+

HONGKONG.

KOWLOON-CANTON RAILWAY.

(BRITISH SECTION.)

ESTIMATE OF EXPENDITURE UP TO DECEMBER, 1907.

CLASSIFIED UNDER MAIN HEADS AND SUB-HEADS.

No. 19

1907

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government.

MAIN HEAD.

SUB-HEAD.

304

ww

TOTAL

BROUGHT

FORWARD FROM 1906.

STORE DEBITS.

TOTAL

DURING

GRAND

THE YEAR

TOTAL.

1907.

(c) Culverts, ....

V-Fencing,

(a) Boundaries,

C. $

..

(.

I-Preliminary Expenses, (a) Survey Expenses,

33,854.79

10,000.00

43,854.79

II-Land,

13,721.45

100,000.00

113,721.45

III-Formation,

(a) Earthwork,

109,482.04

(b) Tunnels,

101,779.09

(c) Roads,

IV-Bridgework,

(a) Major Bridges,

4,891.35

() Minor Bridges,............ 14,448.16

6,377.78

345.45

:

:

:

:

:

600,000.00 709,482.04

600,000.00 701,779.09

20,000.00 20,000.00

300,000.00

304,891.35

300,000.00

314,448.16

50,000.00 56,377.78.

346.45

VI-Electric Telegraph,.

VII-Track,

(a) Ballast,..

2,413.83

429.00

2,000.00

4,413.83

100,000.00 100,429.00

IX-Plant,

(a) Construction,

50,148.79

150,000.00

200,148.79

X-General Charges, ....... (ai) Engineering,

49,455.82

:

50.000.00

99,455.82

(a ii),

19,173.72

20,000.00

39,173.72

(a iii),

7,019.54

8,000.00 15,019.54

(a iv),

6,607.64

5,000.00

11,607.64

(a v),

2,067.30

3,000.00

5,067.30

(a vi),

7,150.51

15,000.00

22,150.51

(vii),....

26,715.36

26,715.36

Stores-China,

Stores-China: Bricks,

HONGKONG, 15th March, 1907.

TOTAL,

138,989.23 138,989.23 | 100,000.00 100,000.00

• 5,000.00

4,474.60 4,474.60

5,000.00

.$ 599,546.45 143,463.83 2,438,000.00 2,894,082.62

G. W. EVES,

Chief Resident Engineer.

387

GENERAL REPORT OF THE PRINCIPAL CIVIL MEDICAL OFFICER

AND THE MEDICAL OFFICER OF HEALTH,

FOR THE YEAR 1906.

AREA.

The Sanitary Board's jurisdiction extends to the Island of Hongkong, which has an are of 29 square miles, and to that portion of territory on the mainland between the shore and the first range of the Kowloon Hills extending from the village of Tseung Kwan O in Junk Bay, on the East, to the village of Kau Pa Hang on the West-with a sea frontage of about thirteen miles and an area of about sixteen square miles. Old Kow- loon, with an area of about 23 square miles, has been in British occupation since 1861, but New Kowloon was leased to this Government in 1898 only, as part of what is known as the New Territories. The remainder of the New Territories is not under the jurisdiction of the Sanitary Board.

The City of Victoria, built on the Northern shore of the Island of Hongkong, has a frontage to the sea of nearly five miles and is separated from the opposite mainland of Kowloon by the Harbour, which is rather less than a mile and a third wide opposite the centre of the City and widens out to somewhat over three miles at its widest part, con- tracting again at Lyemun Pass on the East to little more than a quarter of a mile in width.

The domestic buildings of the City of Victoria number 9,485 exclusive of Barracks and Police Stations, of which some 982 are Non-Chinese dwellings, while there are also some 155 European dwellings in the Hill District. The number of new houses completed. during the year was as follows:-City of Victoria 100, Kowloon 34, Outlying districts 19, and Peak 9, making a total of 162.

In addition to the above there were erected miscellaneous buildings such as offices, godowns, etc., to the number of 51.

GENERAL SANITARY CONDITION.

Twenty-one houses and a portion of one other were resumed in Gough Street, Mee Lun Lane, Shin Hing Lane and Hollywood Road, in the City of Victoria and these, together with thirty others, were demolished with a view to reducing surface crowding-the total area covered by these buildings was 29,502 sq. ft.

In connection with anti-plague measures to render houses rat-proof if possible, 837 ground surfaces in houses have been repaired and 286 buildings have had rat-runs filled up with cement. In addition 29 basements illegally inhabited have been vacated, while per- mits for the use of 38 basements have been issued and 166 houses have been set back from their original frontage or projecting eaves have been removed so as to obtain increased air spaces in front.

Open spaces in the rear have been provided to 125 existing houses.

In addition to the above improvements carried out under the supervision of the Sanitary Department various other permanent improvements have been effected by the Public Works Department.

These include the training of nullahs to the extent of 2,877 feet and the building of public latrines and urinals as follows:-one latrine in Second Street, one in Tsim-tsa-tsui and one public urinal in Salisbury Road, Kowloon,

A considerable improvement is always taking place in the matter of scavenging lanes but the full effect of the Ordinance in this respect will not be noticeable for a considerable number of years. Nevertheless the total area of lanes obtained for scavenging purposes during the year has been 18,178 sq. ft.

During the year three wells, the water of which was unsatisfactory, were closed by ord of the Sanitary Board.

year:

388

METEOROLOGICAL RETURN.

The following Table records the meteorological conditions which prevailed during the

Month.

Barometer

at M.S.L.

TEMPERATURE.

HUMIDITY.

Max. Mean. Min. Rel. Abs.

Cloudiness.

Sunshine.

WIND.

Rain.

Dir.

Vel.

ins.

p. c.

ins.

P. c.

hours.

ins.

Points.

miles

p. h.

January,

30.18 62.5 58.4

54.8 80 0.40

February,

30.01

64.0 60.4

56.6 87

0.47

March,......

30.12

65.9

61.6

58.1 79

0.45

April,

29.94

72.5 69.0

66.1 88.

0.63

May,

29.80

80.6

.76.5

73.2 86

0.78

June,

29.79

87.2

82.4

78.979.

0.88

July,

29.67

87.7

82.9

79.5 80 0.91

August,

29.79

88.8

83.2

79.1 79 0.89

September,

October,

November,

29.77

29.98 81.0 75.6

30.12 73.4 67.4

85.3 81.0

77.0 80 0.85

71.162 0.56

8 8 6 8 2 3 2 2 2 3

80

86.8

1.985

E by N

12.7

91

41.3

2.250

E

17.0

87

71.0

2.630

E by N

16.1

89

53.3

9.790

E

17 4

79 137.6

11.580

E

13.3

65

246.5

5.895

S by W

10.3

73

215.2

6.945

SSW

11.8

53

281.2

3.970

SW by S

6.7

70 171.2. 30.595

E

16.7

45

233.4

1.320

NE by E

11.5

•December,

62.4 62 0.42 49 *204.4

30.15 689 63.5 59.6 70 0.42 49 194.4

0.175

NE by E

10.8

0.660

E by N

11.8

POPULATION.

The population of the Colony exclusive of the New Territories at the Census taken on November 20th, 1906, was as follows:---

Non-Chinese Civil Community,

Chinese :-

City of Victoria (including Peak and Stonecutters' Island), ......174,937

Villages of Hongkong,

Old Kowloon,

New Kowloon,

Floating population,

Mercantile Marine,

Total Chinese Population,

Army, Navy,

.....

12,415

17,032

52.331

17,836

42,744

2,508

307,388

4,537

4,698

329,038

Total Population of the Colony,

At the Census taken in 1901 the Civil population of the Colony, exclusive of the New Territories, was 283,975, so that the increase in the Civil population during this period has been 17,992 exclusive of New Kowloon and the rest of the New Territories. The figures for the City of Victoria are interesting: at the 1901 Census the Chinese population of the City was 175,056 while at the Census taken in 1906 the Chinese population of the City is shown as 173,289, excluding the Peak in both cases. This shows a reduction in the population of the City of 1,767 and this is no doubt fully accounted for by the new regulations for the prevention of overcrowding introduced in 1903, by migrations to Kowloon in search of work, especially on the large Railway works now in progress, (Old Kowloon alone shows an increase in its Chinese population of 9,355), and by the extensive resumptions and demolition of in- anitary property, which has been carried out by the Government during the past three years. other interesting feature in connection with the population of the City of Victória is the se in the number of Chinese women, in spite of the more stringent regulations in regard

389

At

to cubicles which were introduced by the Public Health and Buildings Ordinance, 1903. the 1901 Census the proportion of Chinese females to males in the City was 35.3 to 100, whereas at the 1906 Census the figures show a proportion of 38-6 females to every 100 males.

The population of the Colony has been overestimated during the past few years, owing to the fact that it was impossible to accurately guage the influence of the circumstances mentioned above in restraining the rapid growth which was so marked a feature of the inter-censal period 1896-1901; the usual rule was therefore followed of calculating the estimated population from the figures obtained at the two most recent censuses. The addition however of 15,010 persons to the Chinese population and of 2,982 to the Non- Chinese civil population (exclusive of the New Territories) within a period of less than six years (January 1901 to November 1906), is sufficient evidence of the continued progress. of the Colony.

The estimated population to the middle of 1906 is as follows:-

Non-Chinese Civil Community,...

Chinese :-

City of Victoria (including Peak and Stonecutters' Island), Villages of Hongkong,

Old Kowloon,

12,174

...

175,070

16,745

51,600

New Kowloon,

17,790

Floating population,

42,550

Mercantile Marine,

2,375

Total Chinese Population,.

306,130

Army (average strength),

3,959

Navy (census figure),

4,698

Total Population of the Colony

(exclusive of New Territories), f

326,961

The Chinese population of the New Territories is estimated at 85,011.

The average strength of troops in Garrison during 1906 was 95 British Officers and 1,525 British N. C. O.s and men with 37 Indian Officers and 1,912 Indian N. C. O.s and men, and 65 men of the Chinese Royal Engineers. There were also 267 British women and children, and 58 Indian women and children, making a total of 325.

The average strength of the British fleet was as follows:-Europeans permanently in the Colony 200, Europeans temporarily in the Colony 5,000, Chinese permanently in the Colony 150, Chinese temporarily in the Colony 120-making a total of 5,470.

The Chinese boat population (exclusive of the New Territories), is estimated for 1906 ́as 42,550 and the number of boats belonging to the Port enumerated at the Census taken in November, 1906, is as follows:

Passenger boats,. Cargo boats, Steam-launches,.

Lighters,

.

Harbour boats, Fishing boats, Trading junks,

1,358

1,401

215

50

691

.2,480

264

6,459

The population of the Colony is primarily divided into Chinese and Non-Chinese. The Non-Chinese comprised at the Census a white population of 12,925 of whom 6,085 are civil- ians while 4,429 belong to the Navy and 2,411 to the Army. The coloured races (Non- Chinese) number 8,500 and include East Indians, Asiatic Portuguese, Japanese, Filipinos, Malays, Africans, Persians and a few others.

The Civil population is essentially a male adult one. At the last census (1906) the proportion of males was 701 per cent. of the total civil population; at the 1901 Census the proportion was 72.6 per cent., so there has been an increase in the proportion of females during the past few years.

390

Of the Chinese population 70.3 per cent. were males, and over half the civil population (56.9 per cent. of the Chinese and 52.6 per cent. of the Non-Chinese) were between the ages of 20 and 45 years.

The City of Victoria is divided into ten health districts with a Sanitary Inspector in charge of each district. These ten districts are grouped into five larger districts of two each and a Senior Inspector has general supervision and control of the Sanitary work in each of such groups.

Kowloon has one Senior Inspector with two District Inspectors under his supervision.

There are also four Plague Inspectors in the City of Victoria, two of these Inspectors having charge of three districts each, and there is one Plague Inspector for Kowloon.

The supervision of the sanitary work in the villages of Hongkong and in Kowloon City and Sham Shui Po is done by the Police Inspectors in their respective districts.

The following Table shows the number of Chinese houses and floors and their inmates per house and per floor in the City of Victoria as shown by the Census taken in November, 1906.

City of Victoria. Health District.

One Two Three Four Five Total storey storey storey storey storey Dwell- Dwell- Dwell-Dwell- Dwell- Dwellings.

ings. ings. ings. ings.ings.

Total Floors.

Average No. of Floors per Dwelling.

Number of

persons per Dwelling.

Number of

persons per Floor.

1

161

425 214

32

Nil. 832

1,781

2.1

14.8

6.9

2

3

341

551

82

Nil. 977

2,666

2.7

20.5

7.5

Most of the Chinese of

*

3

Nil.

6

19

2

Nil.

27

77

2.8

this district live in quarters

attached to offices.

4

10 30 17 00 0

5

6 2

57

564

412

61,045

3,526

3.4

22.4

6.6

132

464

321

46 965

3,172

L

3.3

18.2

5.5

6

16

48 437

369

25 925

3,054

3.3

16.9

5.1

17

38

445 377

24 901

3,056

3.4

20.5

6.0

8

6

83

616

294

31,002

3,211

3.2

18.1

5.6

9

24

464 496

89

Nil. 1,073

2,796

2.6

23.2

8.9

10

36

311 337

72

Nil. 756

1,957

2.6

18.2

7:0

Totals and Averages.

301 1,905 4,143 | 2,050 1048,503

25,296

2.9

20.4

6.9

The following Table shows the acreage of the City Health Districts with the houses and population in each such district as shown by the Census taken in November 1906.

Health Districts.

Total Acreage.

Built-over Areas in Acres.

Chinese Dwellings.

Non- Chinese Dwellings.

Person

Chinese Non-Chinese

Eppulation. Population.

per Acre

(built-over).

531

134

832

159

12,364

961

99

:

2

234

140

977

72

20,024

1,566

1,809 troops.

167

3.

232

137

27

422

8,980

2,613

85

4

56

53

333

1,045

165

23,395

1,111

462

f

5........

29

27

965

62

17,593

366

665

6........

30

27

925

15

15,662

327

592

36

31

901

5

18,476

72

598

8

49

47

1,002

18,147

202

390

9.

44

44

1,073

19

24,870

140

568

10.

252

106

756

60

13,778

310

133

1,523

746

8,503

982

173,289

9,507

245

The Census showed 1,648 Chinese living at the Peak.

Kowloon Sub- districts.

One

storey

Dwellings

:

:

Chinese.

Non-Chinese.

Two

storey

Dwellings

Three

storey

Dwellings.

391

The following Table shows the distribution at the time of the Census (1906) of the Chinese population of Kowloon according to Houses and Floors in the different sub-districts into which Kowloon is divided:--

Chinese.

Non-Chinese.

Chinese.

Non-Chinese.

cc

:

Chinese.

Four

storey

:

Non-Chinese.

Dwellings.

Total Dwellings.

Total Floors.

Average Number of Floors per Chinese Dwelling.

Chinese Population.

Number of Persons per Chinese Dwelling,

Number of Persons per

Chinese Floor.

1

2

176

:

17

70

·184

376 2.0

1,149

108

73

6

166

560

3:4

3,462

242

6.9

126

3.......

8

4.

:

5.

6.

7

23885

:

:

:

:

:

595

319

2 371

57 1 319

155. 13 11

163 69 292

446

5

91

7

22

8....... 940

219

9... 636

...

48

19

:

:

:

:

:

:.

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:.

:

:

791 2,127

2.7

18,399

23.3

8་;

198

384 1,101 2.9

8,740 22.8

7.9

163

199 389

1.9

4,776 24.2 12.5

319

595 1,477

2.5

11,367 21.6

8.5

323

1,050 | 1,509

1.4

9,967 9.5

· 6.6

2,758

:

1,159 1,378

14

7,859 6.8

4.9

2,063

686 786

1.1

4,438

6.5

6.1

732

2.248 |1,407|285 |1,067 8

193

65,214 9,653 1.8

70,167 14:3

7.8

6,795

Sub-districts 7 and 8 are in New Kowloon, the remainder comprise the whole of Old Kowloon. The Non-Chinese population of Old Kowloon at the 1996 Census was 2,269 civilians and 2,215 troops, most of whom reside in sub-districts 1 and 2, while the Non- Chinese population of New Kowloon was 47.

Chinese,

Non-Chinese, ..........

The births registered during the year were as follows:-

}

BIRTHS.

Males.

Females.

Total.

684

344

1,028

.161

132

293

845

476

1,321

This gives a general birth-rate of 404 per 1,000 as compared with 3:41 per 1,000 in 1905 and 3-3 per 1,000 in 1904.

The birth-rate amongst the Non-Chinese community was 14:06 per 1,000 as compared with 17.03 per 1,000 in 1905 and 139 in 1904.

The nationalities of the Non-Chinese parents were as follows:-British 117, Indian 43, German 17, French 3, American 3, Portuguese 78, Filipino and Malay 18, Japanese 3, Jewish 5, Dutch 2, Parsee 2, Arabian 1 and Swedish 1.

The number of Chinese births registered does not give an accurate record of the num- ber of births which have occurred. Owing to the custom of the Chinese in not registering births unless the child has survived for a month and often in the case of female children not at all, it is probable that the majority if not all of the infants which are sickly at birth or die before they have lived 1 month have not had their births registered. It is customary, therefore, to assume that all children of 1 month old and under who die in the various

Area in

Acres.

- 392

convents (being brought there sick by poor people) and all children found dead in the streets, harbour, hillsides, etc., by the police, have been born in the Colony but not registered. By adding the number of such children to the number of the registered births a corrected number of births is obtained and from this is calculated a corrected birth-rate.

The number of such children in 1906 was 267 males and 316 females, total 583, which being added to the registered births, makes a total of 1,904. The corrected birth-rate is therefore 5.82 while amongst the Chinese community alone the rate becomes 5.26 instead of 3.35 per 1,000.

The preponderance of male over female registered births is very marked amongst the Chinese there being 199 males to 100 females. Even with the 583 above mentioned unregis- tered births the proportion is 144 males to 100 females.

In the Non-Chinese community the proportion of male births to female births for 1906 is 122 to 100 as compared with 103 males to 100 females in 1905, 83 males to 100 females in 1904 and 111 males to 100 females in 1903 and 1902.

DEATHS.

The deaths registered during the year numbered 8,379. The death-rate was therefore 25.06 per 1,000 These deaths include 842 from Plague, and the death-rate has also been largely augmented by the Typhoon of September 18th, 1906, and by the burning of the steamship Hankow.

The following Table gives the death-rates during the past five census years :-

1881 1891....

1896...

1901 ...

1906 ..

Non-Chinese.

18.22

18.20.

19.91

20.50

14.02

Chinese.

24.45

24.18

24.75

23.77

26.41

The total number of deaths amongst the Chinese community was 8,087 which gives a death-rate of 26.41 per 1,000.

The deaths registered amongst the Non-Chinese community numbered 292 of which 267 were from the Civil population, 17 from the Army and 8 from the Navy.

This gives a death-rate for the Non-Chinese community of 14.02 per 1,000.

The nationalities of the deceased were as follows:-British 77, Indian 61, Portuguese 59, German 13, Japanese 24, American 9, Malay 19. French 4, Italian 2, Norwegian, Swedish and Danish 5, African 5, South American, Eurasian and Jew 2 each, Parsee 3, Russian, Turkish, and Bavarian 1 each and of unknown nationality 2.

The following Table gives the causes of the 17 deaths among the Troops

British Troops,

Indian Troops.

Malaria,

Plague,..

Hæmorrhage,

Heart Disease,

Abscess of Liver,.

1

Sprue,. Pemphigus,

1

1

1

Phthisis,

1

1.

1

3

8

Indian Women and Children.

British Women and Children.

Dysentery,

Inanition,

Heart Disease,

1

Cyanosis,

1

1

1

Dysentery,

1

Diarrhoea,..

1

393

-These deaths are classified in the Military Returns as follows:--

CORPS.

:

4

:

:

Officers.

W. O., N. C. Officers & Men.

Women.

Children.

Officers.

W. O., N. C.

Officers & Men.

Native Officers.

W. O., N. C.

Officers & Men.

Women.

Children.

Native

Officers.

W. O., N. C. Officers & Men.

N. C. Officers

and

Men.

Women.

Children.

EUROPEAN

TROOPS.

Average Strength.

Average

CHINESE

INDIAN TROOPS.

Strength.

TROOPS.

Average Strength.

General Staff (Officers only),

Garrison Staff (W. O., N. C. Officers & Men), .

Royal Garrison Artillery, ...

Royal Engineers,

40th Co. Royal Engineers

(Chinese),

2nd Royal West Kent,

3rd Middlesex Regiment,

Army Service Corps,........

Royal Army Medical Corps,

Army Ordnance Dept., and

Corps,

Army Pay Dept., and Corps,

H. K. & S. Bn. R. G. A.,...

119th Infantry,

129th Baluchis,

Indian Medical Service,

Indian Subordinate Medi- }

cal Dept.,

TOTAL,....

:

...

:

:

:

:

...

:

:

:

:

H

:

:

:

1

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

• :

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

CO

6

19664

11

243

H

:

:

1

9419

2

75

27

8 43

6 31

:

:

N

1

10

:

:

...

:

:

65

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:.

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:..

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

8

...

9

9

:

:

:

:

Q

:

:

1

...

9 1 2 95 1,525

1

:

2

19

:

N

3

7405

15 750

15753

:

:

:

:

:

3

37 1,912

3

65

N.B.-This return shows one death among the British Troops which occurred at the end of December, 1906, but was not registered until January, 1907, and so does not appear in our returns for 1906. It also shows three deaths among the Chinese Company of the Royal Engineers.

The 8 deaths occurring in the Chinese Squadron which were registered in the Colony were as follows:

Pneumonia,. Heat apoplexy, Abscess of liver, Drowning,. * Aneurism,.....

2

2

1

2

1

1

394

The deaths of persons employed in the Mercantile Marine or in Foreign Navies which were registered in the Colony were 23 and their causes as follows:-

Dysentery,..

.......

Small-pox,..

Heart disease,

Cancer of stomach,

Bright's disease,

Drowning,

Fracture of skull,

Rupture of urethra,

2

1

Phthisis, Pneumonia,

NNNN

2

2

Apoplexy, Embolism,

2

Tuberculosis,

2

Beri-beri,

1

Syphilis,

1

3

2

1

1

1

1

The total number of deaths therefore which occurred amongst the Non-Chinese resident civil population was 244 and allowing 1,452 for the Non-Chinese floating population this gives a death-rate of 22.76 per 1,000 for the resident Non-Chinese civil population.

Sixteen deaths from Plague occurred amongst the Non-Chinese community comprising one British Soldier and fifteen civilians of the following nationalities:-Indian 6, Portuguese 3, Malay 2, Japanese 2, Eurasian 1 and British 1.

Table I shows the number and causes of deaths registered during the year.

The following Table of population, births and deaths is given for the purpose of ready comparison with similar tables given in the reports from other Colonies:-

Europeans and Whites.

Africans.

East Indians.

Chinese and Malays.

Mixed and Coloured

TOTAL.

Number of Inhabitants at 1906 Census

12,925

13

4,229

307,701

4,170 329,038

of Births

in

143

45

""

1,046

87

1,321

of Deaths in

of Immigrants in

113

64

"y

8,106

91

8,379

134,912

:

of Emigrants in

""

:

76,725

"9

of Inhabitants in 1905,

(Estimated),

Inercase,

07

Decrease.

10,835

20

3,907 360,228

2,860

377,850

2,090

:

322

1,310

52,527

48,812

UNCERTIFIED DEATHS.

During the year the bodies of 355 persons in the City of Victoria and of 510 persons in Kowloon, who had died without having been attended by a medical man, were inspected by the Sanitary staff, and enquiries made from the relatives as to the probable cause of death, the bodies being sent to the Mortuary whenever there was any reason to suspect that the deaths were due to infectious disease.

AGE DISTRIBUTION OF DEATHS.

The number of deaths of infants under one year of age was 1,623 or 19.4 per cent. of the total deaths, as compared with 23.3 per cent. during 1905.

The Infant Mortality amongst the Non Chinese community during the year was 157 per 1,000 as compared with 119 per 1,000 in 1905.

395

Among the Chinese population the deaths of infants numbered 1,577, while only 1,028 Chinese births were registered. Taking the corrected birth figure to be 1,611 this gives an infant mortality of 979 per.thousand, which proves conclusively that a large proportion of the Chinese births must escape registration. The census return for 1906 showed 1,329 Chinese infants under one year of age, and 14,980 Chinese children between the ages of one year and five years.

DISEASES.

Respiratory Diseases.

The total number of deaths from these diseases for the year was 1,632 of which 55 were among the Non-Chinese community leaving 1,577 among the Chinese population.

Phthisis alone accounts for 817 deaths of which 795 were Chinese. Pneumonia caused 469 deaths of which 442 were Chinese, and Bronchitis caused 266 deaths, 263 of which were Chinese.

The death-rate among the Chinese from Respiratory Diseases was 51 per 1,000 as compared with 44 per 1,000 in the previous year and that for Phthisis alone was 2.6 per 1,000 as compared with 1.9 per 1,000 in 1905. No doubt a number of these deaths were a sequel to the exposure experienced during the Typhoon as the deaths from drowning alone certainly do not represent the entire toll levied by that disaster.

The deaths from Phthisis amongst the Chinese were 9.8 per cent. of the total deaths amongst that community.

i

+

Nervous Diseases.

The number of deaths under this heading for the year 1906 is 746, of which 635 were of Chinese children under 5 years of ages 449 of these being infants of one year old or less. These deaths of Chinese infants comprise 329 deaths from Tetanus, Trismus and Convulsions and 116 deaths from Meningitis.

Malarial Fever.

The total number of deaths from Malarial Fever during the year was 448, of which 13 were Non-Chinese, 9 being from the civil population and 4 from the Troops.

In the City the districts in which there has been most Malaria are Health Districts 1, 2 and 9 with 22, 19 and 24 deaths respectively. The number for the whole City being 134.

In the whole of Kowloon there were 176 deaths.

In Shaukiwan and Aberdeen there were respectively 37 and 64 deaths from Malaria.

Since the year 1899 the attention of the Medical and Sanitary Departments has been specially directed towards the prevention of the formation of breeding pools for mosquitoes, and although the work proceeded very slowly for a year or two, yet much has been done by the fumigation of the basements of European houses (with the consent of the occupants), by the training of nullahs, by the filling in of pools, by the subsoil drainage of swampy ground, and by the resumption here and there of a padi-field which approached too closely to a Police Station or other European dwelling, to considerably lessen the facilities for the breeding of mosquitoes.

One of the results of this work will be seen in the following Table of the number of admissions for Malaria, to our two largest Hospitals, during each of the past ten years. It will be seen that the average has fallen from 1,036 in the five years 1897 to 1901 to 531 in the quinquennium 1902-19. The year 1906 has been an unfavourable one in regard to Malaria, as both cases and eaths show an increase over the past few years, while the type has been unusually malignant." This increase in numbers is partly accounted for by the large number of cases occurring among the employees in the new Railway works in Kowloon.

:

YEAR.

Civil. Hospital.

Admissions.

Deaths.

Government.

Admissions.

396

Admissions to Hospital for Malaria.

Deaths.

Tung Wa

Case-mortal-

Totals.

Hospital.

ity per cent.

Admissions.

Deaths.

Govt. Civil

Hospital.

Tung Wa

Hospital.

1897.

450

CO

6

571

1911,021

197

1.3

33.4

1893,

344

521

122 865

126

1.2

23.4

1899,

475

5

305

58 780

63

1.0 19.0

Average admissions

1,036. Average deaths 136.

1900,

679

4

541

159|1,220

163

0.6 29.4

1901,

787

10

507

1221,294

132

1.3 24.1

1902,

349

9. 403

119 752

128

2.6

29.5

1903,

347

221

61 568

63

0.6 27.6

1904,

221

212

56

58

0.9

26.4

Average admissions 531. Average deaths 81.

1905,

266

6

158

48

419

51

2.2

31.4

*

1905,

233

7

248

96 481 103

3.0 38.7

One remarkable feature which is brought out by this Table is the discrepancy between the case-mortality in the two Hospitals. The Tung Wa Hospital is a purely Chinese institution, maintained by, voluntary contributions. and supervised only by a Government. medical officer. The reasou however for the high case-mortality at this Hospital does not lie altogether in the treatment of the patients, but in the fact that the Hospital is regarded by the Chinese more as a "home for the dying" than as an institution for the treatment of the sick. Consequently, the great majority of the cases of Malaria that are admitted thereto are in a moribund condition, and so near to death that even the hypodermic administration of Quinine is of no avail. Could we educate the Chinese to seek medical aid on the first onset of the symptoms of Fever, and could we at the same time educate the many Chinese herbalists and native doctors who ply their calling in this Colony, in the efficacy of Quinine, many lives would undoubtedly be saved which are now sacrificed to ignorance and indifference.

The figures showing Police Admissions to Hospital are even more striking than the foregoing, for these admissions have fallen from an average of 32 per cent. of the strength for the five years 1897-1901 to an average of 13 per cent. of the strength for the past five years, and to an average of 10 per cent. of the strength during the past three years.

It must, however, be borne in mind that during the first years of the occupation of the New Territories (April, 1899 to December, 1901), Malaria was extremely pervalent among the Police stationed there. Since 1902 the disease has been much less frequent due partly to the more regular use of Quinine as a prophylactic.

397

Police Admissions to Hospital for Malaria.

From the City.

From rest of the Colony.

Total.

Average strength of Police force.

Percentage of strength.

1897,

160

630

25

1898,

121

630

19

1899,

239

770

31

1900,

167

223

390

929

42

1901,

243

164

407

.920

44

1902,

121

55

176

919

19

1903,

83

84

167

921

18

1904,

40

67

107

993

11

1905,

42

85

127

1,018

12

1906,

37

37

74

1,017

Average

13

Average

32

The next Table shows the total deaths in the Colony from Malaria during each of the past ten years, and from this it will be seen that the average number of deaths has fallen from 552 in the quinquennium 1897 to 1901 to 354 in the quinquennium 1902 to 1906, in spite of the fact tha during the same time the population of the Colony has increased from 239,419 to 329, 38.

}

Total Deaths from Malaria.

YEAR.

Deaths in the City (Chinese

only).

Total Deaths.

1897,

302

554

1898,

280

530

1899,

218

546

1900,

242

555

1901,

281

574

1902,

189

425

1903,

152

300

1904,

90

301

1905,

87

287

1906,

13F

448

Average

Average

354

552

Rainfall in inches.

Total number

of wet days.

100.0

172

57.0

152

72.7

128

73.7

155

-55.8

152

97.5

142

93.6

142

80.4

144

70.9

156

77.8

159

398

The deaths of Chinese in the City of Victoria are shown separately in the foregoing Table, which also includes a statement of the rainfall and of the number of wet days in each year, and although the actual rainfall does not appear to have any appreciable influence upon the death-rate from Malaria, yet the influence of the number of wet days is quite pro- nounced during the first quinquennium, if we regard the deaths in the City only-outside the City the opportunities for the breeding of mosquitoes were so numerous, and the popula tion comparatively so sparsely scattered, that the number of wet days could have but little influence upou the incidence of the disease. Within the City, however, conditions were somewhat different for many of the ravines had not then been trained, swamps such as those at Kennedy Town had not then been drained, and little or no attention had been paid to the breeding of mosquitoes. Thus we find that in 1899 which had the smallest number of wet days in this quinquennium, there was the smallest number of deaths from Malaria, while the year 1897 which had the greatest number of wet days shows also the greatest number of deaths and last year, which must be regarded as a bad year so far as Malaria is concerned had the next greatest number of wet days during the past ten years. The rapid fall in the number of deaths from Malaria. within the City during the second quinquennium received a check in 1906, which it is hoped is only temporary, for it is naturally here that most of anti-malarial work has been carried out, though something has also been done in the out- lying villages and even in the New Territories.

In the following Table is shown the seasonal incidence of the deaths from Malaria and it will be seen that the largest average number of deaths belongs to the months of October and November, while during the early months of the year the death-rate is lightest. Our rainy season extends from April to September, so that the malarial season corresponds roughly to the wet season of the year.

Seasonal Incidence of Deaths from Malaria.

1897. 1898. 1899. 1900. 1901. 1902. 1903. 1904. 1905. 1906. Averages.

January,

23

40

28

317

37

30

333

30

24

10

24

28

February,

March,

288

30

41

36 341 46

23

46

33

34

22 20

20

18

10

00

16

26

20

23

14

11

27

April,

May,

110

20

20

44

41

36

44

26

73

266

52

June,

49

34

69

117

38

July,

56

45

=

27

32

30

August,.

50

A

58*

34

50

43

19. 42

888995

27

17

26

34

21

16

29

27

32

19

10

31

19 20 2

13

26

35

25

32

28

14

27

35

31

32

49

23

55

21

58

14

September,

October,

$9

61

58

47

52

55

65

45

70

88888

55

30

34

28

25

66

46

82

40

35

32

26

85

53

November,

73

48

60

95

December,

70

49

50

58

13

62

1:

48

59

75

90 19

27

28

36

44

52

31

26

50

Totals,..

551

530 546 555

425

300

301

287

448

Breaches of Bye-laws

Bake-houses,

419

Table III.-List of Prosecutions dur

Offence.

Basements,

Dairies.......

Dirty Premises,

Laundries,

Offensive trades, Opium Divans,

Dumping rubbish in harbour, Depositing nightsoil in drains,

Failing to provide a dust-bin,

proper fire-places,

cleanse and limewash,

cement rendered kitchen walls,

"

J

11

21

"

,.

""

repair concrete.

provide hoods and flues,

provide window area. ...........

·

repair waste-pipes, ....

"

glaze windows,

!!

"

"

"

19

14

21

""

"

11

cleanse lavatory,

roof gutters,

provide open space,

kitchens,

notify infectious disease,......

Illegal cubicles,

:

occupation of building,

latrines,

partitions,

.

matsbeds,

show-case,

"

cock-lofts,

Nuisance in Public Streets,

Neglecting to carry out the terms of Scavenging

Contract,

Overcrowding common lodging-houses.

"}

tenenent houses,

opium divans,

Obstructing verandahs,..

"

"

windows,

open space,

Selling vegetables without a licence,

pork fruit

"

unwholesome provisions,

21

92

Verandahs, using for cooking purposes,

discharging sullage water from,

Total,

Sum-

Con- Penaltics.

monses.victions.

100

the year 1906.

Remarks.

210

170

cutioned.

cautioned, I withdrawn.

30

50

5 absconded.

70

40

1 withdrawn.

33

550

15

3

26

761

1 ordered to do work, 5 withdrawn, 4 dismissed.

5

15

4

20

5 ordered to do work, I cautioned, I withdrawn. 1 ordered to do the work.

151

51

21 ordered to provide, 2 cautioned, 1 withdrawn. + ordered to do work, 3 withdrawn.

1 ordered to do work, 1 discharged, 1 withdrawn.

1

1

3

60

2 ordered to provide, 1 withdrawn.

-f

70

1 ordered to do the work.

64

71

44

393

14 ordered to remove, 2 cautioned. 6 dismissed,

122

5

2010 420 W W 10 a

5

100

2 ordered to remove.

15

I ordered to remove.

75

1 dismissed.

29

474

411

Õཌ་

26

631

3 absconded.

1,968

62 absconded, I cautioned.

162

1 absconded, 1 cautioned.

3 ordered to abate.

2 withdrawn, 3 absconded.

I ordered, to do the work.

1 dismissed, 1 ordered to abate, 1 withdrawn.

1 cautioned.

10 to co w ak -

35

130

50

.15

50

880

706

6,190

:

January

February

March

April

May

June

July

August

September

October

November

December....

420

Annexe A.

REPORT ON PLAGUE IN 1906.

CASES PER MONTH.

!

4

28

68

165

402

176

40

883

8

0

1

0

10

893

The number of cases from January to July, 1905, was 272, and for whole year 304.,

NATIONALITY AND SEX.

Cases.

Males.

Females.

Total.

Deaths.

Europeans Chinese

3

2

5

2

536

334

870

826

Eurasians

1

()

L

Ι

Indians

9

9

6

Japanese

2

2

Malays

1

0

1

i

Portuguese

1

2

3

3

Parsees

1

1

Filipinos

1

1

1

Totals...

555

338

893

842

Bubonic.

817

Bubonic

Septic

Pneumonic

TYPES OF THE DISEASE.

Septic. 65

Expressed as Fercentages.

.91.5

7.3

1.2

Pneumonic.

11

HONGKONG.

No. 14

1907

REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE HONGKONG OBSERVATORY, FOR THE YEAR 1906.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government.

The comparison of weather-forecasts, issued daily about 11 a.m., with the weather subsequently experienced, has been conducted on the same system as heretofore (compare Annual Report for 1896 § 5). The results are as follows:--

Success 56 per cent., partial success 34 per cent., failure 1 per cent., partial failure 9 per cent.

Following the method used in meteorological offices and taking the sum of total and partial success as a measure of success, and the sum of total and partial failure as a measure of failure, it follows that 90 per cent. of the weather forecasts were successful in 1906.

2. The China Coast Meteorological Register was printed every morning at the Obser- vatory. From 1st August this work was undertaken by the Government Printers, improved machinery ordered from home being used for the purpose. The printing has therefore been much improved and the issue of the register somewhat accelerated.

3. In addition to the cable which connects the Observatory with the Cable Offices in Hong- kong, we have now another cable connecting us with the Harbour Office. Since July the observations made at Gap Rock and Victoria Peak are transmitted to the Observatory through the Harbour Office, which Department now also undertakes the distribution of meteorological information on the other side of the harbour, with the exception of the China Coast Meteorological Register, distributed by the Government Printers, and a return sent at 4 p.m. cach day to the newspapers, which is taken by one of our coolies.

234

4. Information regarding storms telegraphed to Hongkong was regularly exhibited on notice boards. This happened on 110 days in 1906. The Red Drum alone was hoisted twice, the Red South Cone and Red Drum 5 times, the Red South Cone alone once, the Black North Cone and Black Drum twice, the Black Drum alone 4 times, the Black South Cone and Black Drum 4 times, the Black South Cone alone 3 times, the Black South Cone and Black Ball 3 times, and the Black Ball alone once. The typhoon gun was fired on four occasions.

5. It should be remembered that this Government supports only the Observatory, and one other meteorological station (Gap Rock). All the other meteorological returns printed in the daily weather report are supplied free of cost by observers in surrounding countries, who are not in the service of the British Government, and of course, not subject to any regula- tions made by the British authorities. Several stations furnish reliable information, while the returns from others