Sessional Papers - 1900

PAPERS LAID BEFORE THE LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL OF HONGKONG 1900

Table of Contents

1. Assessment

Report for 1900-1901

2. Botanical and afforestation

Report for 1899

3. Coroner's Returns

For 1899

4. Criminal Statistics, &C

For 1899

5. Crown Lands - Short-Period Leases of

Despatch on

6. Education

Reports for 1899

7. Estimates for 1900

Extract from Despatch Regarding Memoranda and Protest on

8. Finance Committee

Reports of Proceedings of, for 1900

9. Financial Returns

To accompany Draft Estimates for 1901

10. Financial Returns

For 1899

11. Fire Brigade

Report for 1899

12. Gaol

Report for 1899

13. Governor's Salary

Despatch Regarding

14. Harbour Master's Report

For 1899

15. Jubilee Road

Papers and Correspondence on

16. Legislative Council

Minutes of Proceedings of, for 1900

17. Loan 1893

Statement of Expenditure of

18. Medical Department

Report for 1899

19. Memorial for Britsh Soldiers

Telegrams Respecting

20. New Territory

Report on

21. Observatory

Report for 1899

22. Plague

Report on Epidemic of

23. Po Leung Kuk

Report for 1899

24. Police

Report for 1899

25. Post office

Report for 1899

26. Probate and administration

Calendar of, for 1899

27. Public Works

Report for 1899

28. Public Works Committee

Report of Proceedings of, for 1900

29. Registrar General's Report

For 1899

30. Salaries of Government officers

Despatches Relative to

31. Sanitary

Report for 1899

32. South african War Fund

Despatch on Colony's Contribution to

33. Summoning of Chinese Ordinance, 1899

Protest against, and Colonial Secretary's Memorandum thereon

34. Volunteer Corps (Hongkong)

Report on the, for Season 1899-1900

35. Water account

Statement of, for 1899

36. Widows & Orphans' Fund

Report on the, for 1899

 

HONGKONG.

REPORT ON THE ASSESSMENT FOR 1900-1901.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of

His Excellency the Governor.

503

No. 32

1900

ASSESSOR'S OFFICE, HONGKONG, 19th July, 1900.

SIR, I have the bonour to submit my Report on the Assessment for the year 1900-1901.

2. The City of Victoria.-The result of the new Valuation is that the Rateable Value of the City of Victoria is, in the list which came into force on the 1st instant, $4,996,525 as compared with last year's (1899-1900) Assessment $4,241,919-an increase in Rateable Value of $754,606, equivalent to 17.79 per cent.

3. The Hill District-The Rateable Value of the Hill District is now $159,145 against $149,875 last year-an increase of $9,270 or 6.18 per cent.

4. Hongkong Villages.-The Rateable Value of the Hongkong Villages has been raised from $176,063 to $196,019-an increase of $19,956 or 11.33 per cent.

5. Kowloon Point.-The Rateable Value of the Kowloon Point or Tsim Tsa Tsui District has increased from $144,530 to $156,765-a difference of $12,235 equal to 8.46 per cent.

6. Kowloon Villages.-The Rateable Value of the Villages comprising the remainder of British Kowloon is now $347,937 as compared with $274,447 last year--an increase of $73,490 or 26.77 per cent,

7. The Whole Colony.-The Rateable Value of the whole Colony is now $5,856,391 as compared with last year's Assessment of $4,986,834—an increase of $869,557 or 17.43 per cent.

8. Interim Valuations.-During the period from 1st July, 1899, to 1st June, 1900, Interim Valuations have been made as follows:--

In the City of Victoria.

147 new and/or rebuilt tenements, rateable value,..

..$192,240

118 improved tenements, rateable value,...................................................... .$104,890 Replacing Assessments, amounting to......................... 66,415

38,475

230,715

53 Assessments cancelled, tenements pulled down, or being in

other respects not rateable,..

42,730

Increase in City of Victoria,

$187,985

In the rest of the Colony.

173 new and/or rebuilt tenements, rateable value,

13 improved tenements, rateable value,.

Replacing Assessments, amounting to

$ 56,905

$1,880

840

1,040

57,945

9,266

.$ 48,679

149 Assessments cancelled, tenements pulled down, or being

in other respects not rateable,

Increase in the Rest of the Colony,

The total number of tenements affected by Interim Valuations being 653.

9. Vacant Tenements.--The number of reported vacant tenements in the City of Victoria inspected under section 35 of the Rating Ordinance average I about 110 monthly against 85 last year.

1

504

10. Appeals.-Notice of Appeal under the Rating Ordinance was lodged against the Assessment of a new tenement containing lifts. The appeal was heard by His Honour Mr. Justice WISE who decided that lifts were "machinery" within the meaning of the Rating Ordinance, and therefore not rateable. The Court made an order reducing the Assessment from $17,830 to $9,180. An amending Ordinance defining "Machinery" was passed on the 6th November, 1899, under which lifts and machinery used as adjuncts to certain tenements are excluded from " Machinery" exempted from rating by sub-section 5 of section 1 of the Rating Ordinance, 1888.

11. Tabular Statements.—The usual tabular statements giving comparisons of the Valuation for 1899-1900 and the new Valuation for 1900-1901 are attached.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

The Honourable A. M. THOMSON,

Colonial Treasurer.

No.

DISTRICT NAME.

TABLE A.

THE CITY OF VICTORIA.

ARTHUR CHAPMAN,

Assessor.

VALUATION 1899-1900.

VALUATION 1900-1901.

PERCENT-

INCREASE.

AGE.

$

$

%

1

Kennedy Town,

76,445

97,770

21,325

2

Shek Tong Tsui,

159,654

214,265

54,611

3

Sai Ying Pun,

882,495

1,035,165

152,670

4

Tai Ping Shan,

363,640

436,840

73,200

5

Sheung Wan,................

537,685

617,810

80,125

6

Chung Wan,

1,755,970

1,979,340

223,370

7

Ha Wan,....

178,895

240,650

61,755

8

Wan Tsai,

165,035

211,250

46,215

9

Bowrington,

39,120

46,080

6,960

10

Soo Kon Poo,..........

82,980

117,355

34,375

$

4,241,919

4,996,525

754,606

17.79

DISTRICT.

The Hill District,..

Hongkong Villages,

TABLE B.

THE HILL DISTRICT AND HONGKONG VILLAGES.

A

VALUATION 1899-1900.

VALUATION 1900-1901.

INCREASE.

PERCENTAGE.

..

$

$

$

%

149,875

159,145

9,270

6.18

176,063

196,019

19,956

11.33

A

325,938

355,164

29,226

8.96

325

No.

1 8

1900

HONGKONG.

REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF THE BOTANICAL AND AFFORESTATION DEPARTMENT FOR 1899,

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government.

No. 14.

BOTANICAL AND AFFORESTATION DEPARTMENT,

HONGKONG, 30th March, 1900.

SIR,--I have the honour to submit my Report on the work of this department for 1899.

STAFF.

The Assistant Superintendent, Mr. TUTCHER, returned from twelve months' leave on the 17th February.

The late Head Forester, Lo QUAI, who resigned in 1898 to commence business on his own account, was re-appointed on 21st October as Foreman of Forestry Works in the New Territory.

Much sickness prevailed amongst the Chinese staff, there being an aggregate of 858 days, an excess of 478 days over the previous year. Sixty-two different men were sick, against 30 in 1898.

Changes in the staff were even greater than in the previous year, 18 men left the service, a number of these being coolies with experience who left on account of the smallness of their pay being insufficient to meet increased cost of living in Hongkong; they had to be replaced with inferior men which rendered it difficult to carry on work properly.

The Hon. F. H. MAY, C.M.G., Captain Superintendent of Police, kindly consented to a proposal I made for the Garden boys to attend the Police School in order to be taught English, and they commenced to attend in December.

REVENUE.

The receipts were in excess of those in 1898. The total receipts were :-

From Plant Sales

$626.60

Loan of Plants

223.71

""

""

Forestry Products.....

708.14

Total ..............

.$1,558.45

BOTANIC GARDENS.

PLANT HOUSES.

The collection of ferns requiring more accommodation No. 1 plant house, which was used for orchids, was demolished and the construction of a new improved and larger house was commenced. When it is finished the ferns will be transferred to it from No. 3 house, which will then be used for the orchids which were in No. 1 house.

WALKS.

Some of the old concrete which was becoming worn and broken was surfaced with decomposed granite and cement which is a great improvement. This work will be continued until all the walks which require it are finished.

EXPERIMENTS.

Exhaustive experiments were made with Jadoo fibre (and liquid) which has been highly recom- mended as a substance in which plants may be grown either entirely or mixed with the usual composts, out the results do not offer any encouragement to continue its use for any purpose whatever.

326

RHODOLEIA CHAMPIONI, HOOK.

This very rare tree was supposed until 1894 to be represented by only four trees which grew in the Happy Valley, but in that year Mr. TUTCHER found several other small trees of it on the opposite-- the southern--side of the hill on which they grew, and now he has recently discovered quite a large number, about 100 of various sizes ranging down to small seedlings, not far away from the same place. In my Annual Report for last year I mentioned that Dr. A. HENRY had found the same tree in Yunnan.

INTERCHANGE OF PLANTS AND SEEDS.

The chief donors were:

Acclimatizing Association, South California. Acclimatization Society, Queensland. Botanic Gardens, Bangalore.

3

>>

"

་་

British Guiana.

Jamaica.

Nagpur, India.

Penang. Peradeniya. Royal, Calcutta. Saharanpur.

Trinidad.

Octacamund.

Atherton, Mrs. J. M., Honolulu.

Barton, J.

Belilios. C.M.G., Hon. E. R.

The following were the principal recipients: Acclimatizing Association, Southern California. Acclimatization Society, Queensland. Agri. & Bot. Dept., Sierra Leone. Atherton, Mrs. J. B., Honolulu. Armstrong, Mrs.

Banage Garden, Cairo.

Barton, J.

Botanic Gardens, Bermuda.

29

A

">

""

""

*

A

Brisbane.

British Guiana.

Grenada. Jamaica. Nagpur. Royal, Calcutta.

Kew.

Sydney.

Bell-Irving, Mrs.

Blake, G.C.M.G., H.E. Sir Henry A. Dammann & Co., Messrs., Italy. Edwards, C. C., Amoy. Forbes, J. M.

Graham, Mrs.

Hahn, A. Henry, Dr. A. Hodgins, Capt. Humphreys, H. Jeffreys, Mrs.

May, C.M.G., Hon. F. H. Roebelin, C., Bangkok.

Veitch, Messrs. J., & Son, London.

Botanic Gardens, Tokyo.

Dammann & Co., Messrs., Italy. Dept. of Agriculture, Zanzibar. Edwards, C. C., Amoy. Gascoigne, Mrs.

Graham, Mrs.

Hance, T. A. W., Lung Chow. H.R.H. Prince Henry of Prussia. Hodgins, Captain, S.S. Haiching. May, C.M.G.. Hon. F. H. Milwaukee Public Museum. Roebelin, C., Bangkok. Romano, A. G.

State Gardens, Baroda.

The Administrator, Wei-hai-wei.

PLANT SALES.

Two thousand eight hundred and ten (2,810) plants were sold and they realized $626.60 only, a very slight reduction on the previous year's sales, although the sale of plants to places outside the Colony was discontinued. Orders for plants from the Coast Ports of China and other foreign places had increased so much that it was found necessary in the latter part of the previous year to discontinue supplying plants outside the Colony, otherwise local requirements could not have been met.

LOAN OF PLANTS.

The number of plants lent for decoration for public purposes was 4,233 for which $223.71 was received; these are slight increases on the 1898 transactions.

ZOOLOGICAL SECTION.

Since the new aviary was finished a large number of birds have been presented and purchased, which have furnished the new structure and been a great attraction to visitors.

7

327

NEW VEGETABLE GARDEN.

In consequence of the abolition of the site for building purposes of the garden which supplied the Governor's table with vegetables, it was necessary to find a place elsewhere for use, the only place available was the site of the old tennis courts at Government House; the stone of these was removed and new soil carried in which made a good garden so far as it went, but the area is very small and insufficient to allow a full supply of vegetables.

RAINFALL.

The rainfall in the gardens was 83.91 inches in comparison with 65.99 inches in the previous year. The daily returns are given in Appendix A.

HERBARIUM AND LIBRARY.

Dr. AUGUSTINE HENRY, F.L.S., has presented another fine dried collection of 1,110 species of plants for the herbarium; these were collected in Western China.

Additional work in the New Territory has prevented me from being able to devote any time. scarcely to herbarium work.

Annual Reports, Bulletins, &c. have been received from the following establishments to the chiefs of whom my thanks are due :---

Calcutta, Ceylon, Durban, Grenada, Haarlem, Jamaica, Kolonial Museum Haarlem, Mauritius, Mysore, Milwaukee, Missouri, New South Wales, Ottawa, Rio de Janeiro, Saharanpur, Straits Settlements, Sydney, Trinidad, the Agricultural Departments of Cape of Good Hope, England, Queensland, United States of America, University of California, Zanzibar, Forest Administration in Assam, Ajmere Merwara, Baluschistan, Bengal, Burma, Bombay, Central Province, Coorg, Hyderabad, Madras, North-West Province and Oudh, Punjab, Western Australia.

The following works have been added to the library :-

Purchased:-

Flora Capensis, Part II.

History of European Botanical Discoveries in China, Vols. I and II, and Maps of China. Flora of Tropical Africa, Vol. III, Parts I and III.

Gardeners' Chronicle.

Journal of Botany.

Botanical Magazine.

Presented:-

Hooker's Icones Plantarum, by Royal Gardens, Kew.

Kew Bulletin,

Do.

>

FORESTRY.

Planting to the extent of 54,582 trees has been continued in the island and Kowloon in 10 different localities and in various new and old roads where trees would thrive. There are some roads, especially in Kowloon, which are wide and treeless and which it might, without consideration, be thought might be planted, but which really, afford no promise of success, either on account of exposure, unsuitable soil, or other reasons. Statistics are given in Appendix B.

THINNING OF LANTATIONS.

This work has been carried on in 12 localities ranging over the whole Colony; 45,411 trees were 'emoved and they sold for $666.96 net. The total net revenue for forestry was $708.14.

All thinnings which have been made to date for many years past are only the smallest and worst crees to allow free growth to the better ones which remain.

Particulars are contained in Appendix C.

PROTECTIVE SERVICE.

The year has seen a further reduction in the numbers of illicit tree cutting, only 640 trees having een reported. The number of cases brought forward by forest guards was only 25, of which there ere 24 convictions.

328

FIRES.

I am not able to report so favourably of grass fires. These were very numerous and destructive. The total number of fires was 52, which destroyed 13,229 trees, compared with 27 and 3,285, re- spectively, in the previous year. The most destructive fire was on Mount Davis on March 19th; this killed 8,448 trees some of them in gullies being of good size.

Twenty (20) out of the 52 fires did no harm beyond burning grass.

The statistics are in Appendix D.

FIRE BARRIERS.

Fifty-three (53) miles of old barriers were cleaned and 61⁄2 miles of new ones were made. Low combustible vegetation having grown higher than formerly in many places I had all the barriers which were only 10 feet wide increased to 15 feet, which affords greater security in preventing fires leaping the bared lines.

NEW TERRITORY.

Soon after the New Territory was taken over I commenced a series of journeys, which were continued as occasion allowed, over the whole territory to acquire information on all points in which this department might be called upon to operate in its special functions.

It was found that tree planting was required around the various new police stations and the buildings occupied by Europeans at Táipó, and that tree planting could also be done with advantage in other places. Operations were therefore cominenced in October for planting about 80,000 trees during the ensuing year.

His Excellency the Governor when travelling in the territory came to the conclusion after seeing the sugar cane growing there that new varieties of cane might be introduced, and at His Excellency's request I have made arrangements for new varieties to be obtained from different countries, some of which have arrived and been planted near Ha Tsun.

His Excellency also obtained two Chatannooga Sugar Mills which this department had fixed in the New Territory and exhibited the working of to the sugar growers there. The advantages these mills possess over the Native mills may lead to their extended introduction.

I have also obtained improved varieties of pine-apple plants from Ceylon which will be useful introductions to the districts where pine-apples are now cultivated to a considerable extent. The best fruits from the New Territory are now brought over to Hongkong and canned at a factory at West Point.

The New Territory has features which show possibilities of considerable development in forestry. and kindred work, but these matters cannot be fittingly dealt with in an Annual Report of work done; they, however, should receive best and early attention in another way.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

Honourable F. II. MAY, C.M.G.,

Acting Colonial Secretary,

&C.,

&e..

&c.

CHARLES FORd,

Superintendent,

Botanical and Afforestation Department.

{

Appendix A.

RAINFALL OBSERVATION MADE AT THE BOTANIC GARDENS, DURING 1899.

ABOUT 300 FEET ABOVE SEA LEVEL.

329

DATE.

Jan.

Feb.

Mar.

April. May. June. July. Aug. Sept.

Oct.

Nov.

Dec.

1,

2,

3,

.07 1.20

:

:

.02

4,

5,

6,

7.

8,

9,

:

:

:

:

:

10,

11.

.03

12,

.15

.01

13,

.01

14,

.01

15,

.09

16,

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

.09

.16

.01

:

:

.08.

:

:

:

.04

2.58

.61

.05

.53

2.91

.05

:

:

.16

.26

:

.01

.13

.24

:

:

:

.27

1.20

1.60

:

:

:

...

:

:

:.

:.

:.

.06

.01

1.76

:

.09

.06

.01

.03

.05

.01

.01

:

.01

2.66

.68

.10

4.53

.73

.61

:

.01

:

.88

2.58

.01

:

:

.14

2.51

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

.01

.05

.01

.02

.02

..02

.14

.01

2.22

.08

.21

.03

.31

.81.

1.02

.41

:

:

.57

...

.59

.03

.47

5.48

.87

:

:

.04

1.09

.68

.28

.02

:

3.53

1.61

.71

.01

.06

17,

18,

19,

20,

21.

22,

23,

24,

25,

26,

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:.

.23

.69

.58

.50

.03

.02

.53

.01

.13

.41

:

:..

:

.05

.24

:

:

.01

2.63

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

.35

27,

:

:

F:

:

28:

29,

30,

31,

:

:

:

:

:

:.

Total,...... .20 2.15

:

:.

.37

Total inches for the year=83.91. Observations made at 10 a.m. ·

CHARLES FOrd,

Superintendent,

Botanical and Afforestation Department

.33

:

.07

.01

.01

.02

.01

:

1.48

.23

:

.04

.01

.20

.79

.01

.01

.03

:

:

:

.01 7.75

.02

.01

.02

.59

:

:..

:

:

:

.22

.02

1.29

:.

1.96

.46

.05

.02 2.85

.78

:

:

.24

.38

.01

.21

:

.38

.14

.02

2.63

.31

:

.04

.43

:.

:

:

:.

:

.13

.06

.01

.01

:

:

:

.01

:

3.70

8.59 19.70 10.34 25.58

8.18

.81

2.05

2.24

.84

.28

.51

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:..

:

:

:

:

:.

:

:

:

.01

*

Appendix B.

STATISTICS OF PLANTING OPERATIONS.

...

330

Grand

Total of

Trees.

Area

Erythrina. in Acres.

Albizzia

Liqui- dambar. Lebbek.

:.

...

:

:

:

Pinus

Pinus

Melaleuca

Locality.

Massoni-

ana.

Thun-

bergii.

Camphor.

Bamboo. Cassia. Bauhinia. Leuca- Eugenia. dendron.

:

:

:

:

...

128

18

...

:

:.

:

...

Aberdeen,

Aplichau,

1,908

9,034

Barker Road,

Bowen Road,

:

Causeway Bay,

Kowloon,

8,067

Lower Richmond Road,....

MacDonald Road,

Mount Davis,...

4,581

1,182

...

:

:

:

16

:

73

17

4

...

:

:

8

30

202

:

10

...

:

...

:

1/1/

1,908

7/1

9,034

128

18

20

9

61

8,130

73

26

:

:

:

:

:

4호

5,654

1,182

...

202

13

1,899

51

6,310

46

...

...

1

1,240

...

63/

8,039

84

10,638

35

...

...

20

20

:

:

:

:

:

:

226

778

69

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

7

...

:..

:.

:

:

:

:

:

...

...

:

...

:

:

Repulse Bay,

1,899

6,310

:

:

...

Richmond Road,

39

...

:.

:

:

:

Sookunpo,

1,240

:.

:

...

Tytam,

8,039

...

Wanchai Gap,

1,991

8,647

...

...

Wongneichung Gap,...

35

:

:.

Total,....

44,251

8,647

309

219

4

Mount Kellet,

Peak,

Pokfoolum,..

:

:

:

...

:.

20

20

:

...

:

...

256

:

...

:

:

:

CHARLES FORD,

Superintendent, Botanical & Afforestation Department.

778

69

20

9

433

54,582

...

...

:

Aberdeen,

Causeway Bay, Deep Water Bay,

Glenealy,

Kowloon,

Mount Davis,

Mount Parker,

New Mongkok,

North Point, Pokfulam,

Shaukiwan,

Tytam,

Tree Prunings, Brushwood,

Appendix C.

SALE OF FORESTRY PRODUCTS.

Localities.

Pine Trees.

...

...

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

...

...

:

331

Quantities.

Amount realized.

C.

1,867

36.71

4,066

64.31

141

8.73

389

8.69

4,082

126.46

15,240

161.86

7,435

97.06

538

9.46

...

5,162

54.65

5,654

76.99

490

13.43

367

8.61

45,411

666.96

71,576 catties. 27,362

32.98

8.20

"

Total Revenue for Forestry Products,

Appendix D.

STATISTICS OF GRASS FIRES.

708.14

CHARLES FOrv,

Superintendent.

Botanical & Afforestation Department.

Date.

Localities.

Number of Fire.

Number of Trees Destroyed.

Date.

Localities.

Number of Fire.

Number of Trees Destroyed.

1899.

1899.

Brought forward,

27

2,348

January

6 Magazine Gap,

1

86

"

11 | Mount Kellett,...............

1

March 19

Mount Davis,

8,448

""

16 Victoria Peak,..

99

19

Deep Water Bay,

1,240

24 Bonham Road,.

1

72

28 Aberdeen,

29

"

25

28

Tytam, Pokfulam,

1

725

30 Aplichau,.......

1

April

9 Do.,

""

28 Sai Wan Cemetery,...

1

10

Pokfulam,

1

39

""

29 Pokfulam,

2

675

59

11

Wong Ma-kok,

""

30 Tytam,.

1

11

Mount Davis,

1

90

:

""

19

30 Little Hongkong,

1

12

Do.,

February 1 Aberdeen,

Ι

13

Do.,

"

""

1 Deep Water Bay,

1

""

13 Aplichau,......

1

"

7 Causeway

1

""

15

Grazing Hill,

""

9 Stanley,

2

15

Aberdeen,

1

60

""

"

9 Shek-o,...

1

15

Mount Davis,

1

620

""

""

9 Little Hongkong,

1

16

""

Kai Lung Wa,.

1.

"

11 Repulse Bay,

1

17

Aberdeen,

1

12 Shek-o,..

1

28

"

Deep Water Bay,

1

14 Tai Hang,

1

70

May

2 Shaukiwan,

1

""

14 Chaiwan,

1

3 Aberdeen,

I

...

""

14 Repulse Bay,

1

50

5

Do.,

1

15

""

14 | Stanley,

1

300

July

10 Stanley,

1

17 Public Gardens,

1

October 14

March

9 Repulse Bay,

1

370

December 1

Mount Davis,

Do.,

2

1

18

Aberdeen,

1

""

""

2 Kai Lung Wan,

1

400

Carried forward,

27

2,348

Total,

52

13,229

CHARLES FORD.

Superintendent,

Botanical and Afforestation Department.

No. 5.

HONGKONG.

CORONER'S RETURNS FOR 1899,

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor,

MAGISTRACY.

211

11

No. 1900

HONGKONG, 25th January, 1900.

SIR,

I have the honour to forward herewith the usual Annual Returns for the year 1899 in connection with all cases of death brought to the notice of the Police Magistrate acting as Coroner during the year.

The Honourable

THE COLONIAL SECRETARY.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

H. H. J. GOMPERTZ,

Acting Police Magistrate.

TABLE A.-RETURN OF ALL DEATHS REPORTED DURING THE YEAR 1899.

Formal Enquiries Held.

Buried without Formal Enquiries.

NATIONALITY.

Men. Women. | Boys. Girls. Total. Men. Women. Boys. Girls.

Sex not ascertainable.

Total.

Europeans and Americans, ....

CC

Chinese,

44

Indians,

1

Nationality Unknown,....

1

:

9

12

2

1

15

2

51

619

196 422 396

1,641 .

1

2

2

1

:

Total,

54

4

N

Total for 1898,..

27

3

1

1

32

22

2

62

633

198 423 396

8

1,658

433

175

379

353

25

1,365

Magistracy, Hongkong, 25th January, 1900.

H. H. J. GOMPERTZ,

Acting Police Magistrate.

212

Chinese.

TABLE B.-RETURN OF FORMAL ENQUIRIES DURING THE YEAR 1899.

FINDING.

Accidental Death,....

Acute peritonitis,

Indians.

Nationality

unknown.

Men.

Women. Men. Women. Boys.

Girls.

Men.

Europeans.

10

:

1

1

:

I

10 -

:

1

1

:

:

1

::

::

:

:

Total.

:

:.

:

:

:

:

:

:

1

1

:

:

:

I

1

:

12

21

2

10 -

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

6

1

1

1

1

:

:

:

Ι

:

:

:

:

:

:

1

:

1

Asphyxia by hanging, self-caused during unsound state

of mind,

Asphyxia by hanging which was self-inflicted,.

Asphyxia from gaseous poisons, the products of com-

bustion,

Beri-beri,

Compound fracture of skull with laceration and hœmor-

rhage of brain, the result of a fall,

Death by hanging, self-inflicted,

Death probably resulted from natural causes.

Decom-

position was too far advanced for real cause of death to be ascertained,

Deceased was found dead in the harbour and had while alive been suffering from Plague, but whether death was due to Plague or to Drowning there is no evidence to determine,...

Deceased was suffering from Plague, but his death was due to shock caused by surgical injury to bis chest the result of an accident,

Dislocation of the neck due to accidental fall from a

scaffolding,

Dislocation of the neck due to hanging in due course of

Law,

Found drowned,.

Fracture of skull accompanied by laceration of the brain. The evidence indicates that deceased fell from the verandah of Bed-room No. 2 of the Stag Hotel, Fracture of skull and hemorrhage and laceration of the brain caused by a bullet discharged by his own hand,

Fracture of skull and hemorrhage and laceration of the brain caused by a bullet discharged by one Andrew Marks,

Fracture of skull caused by collapse of a verandah on

2nd floor of 313, Queen's Road Central,.. Fracture of skull due to an accidental fall from a height,. Gunshot wound of the brain self-inflicted by the de-

ceased while temporarily insane and not responsi- ble for his actions,... Hoemorrhage caused by a ruptured spleen, there being no evidence to determine by what this was caused,. Haemorrhage of Thorax-result of injuries caused by

accidental fall into the hold of s.s. Tsinan, Heart failure brought on by general wasting due to

opium smoking, Heart failure caused by Fatty Degeneration and Pneu-

monia,.

Internal hemorrhage due to rupture of the spleen caused by an accidental blow from the head of a hammer,

Opium poisoning,

Opium poisoning-no suspicion of foul play,

Phthisis,

Shock caused by multiple injuries the effect of the ac-

cidental falling of a stone on the deceased,.

Shock due to burns,

Shock the result of extensive burns caused by the ex-

plosion of a kerosene can,..

Shot from a pistol accidentally fired by himself,

Suicide by cutting throat,

Suicide by hanging,

Suicide by opium poisoning,.

The body found in the harbour on 18th November was that of Private No. 4727, David Jordan, R.W.F, Death was due to Syncope resulting on shock caused by a fracture of the base of the skull. There is no evidence to show how this fracture was caused,

:

:

:

:

:

Brought forward,.

::

I

1

:

1

1

2

1

CO LO

:

1

::

1

:

2

1

:

7

1

42

:

F:

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

:

::

ลง

1

1

1

2

1

CO

3

2

2

1

1

59

FINDING.

RETURN OF FORMAL ENQUIRIES,—Continued.

Carried forward,..

The body found in the harbour on 21st November was that of Private No. 4888, Henry Jones, R.W.F. Death was probably due to drowning, but the cause of death cannot be determined by the medical evidence owing to the body, when recovered, being far advanced in decomposition,.

The Jury find that the deceased, Liu Fuk, met his death by a revolver shot fired by special constable Lewis Evans who was acting in the execution of his duty,

Wilful murder against six persons unknown,

Total,......

00

Europeans.

Chinese.

Indians.

Nationality

unknown.

Men. Women.

Men.

Women. Boys.

Girls. Men.

1

42.

1

44

00

10

213

Total.

1

59

2

1

1

62

H. H. J. GOMPERTZ,

Acting Police Magistrate.

Magistracy, Hongkong, 25th January, 1900.

TABLE C.--RETURN OF BURIALS WITHOUT FORMAL ENQUIRIES DURING THE YEAR 1899.

Chinese.

Indians.

Reason why no Formal Enquiry was held.

Europeans and Americans.

Men. women. Boys. Girls. Men. Women. Boys. Girls.

Men.

No suspicious circumstances,

594 190 386 358 10

No evidence and/or decomposed state of

body,

20

6 36 38

00

3

2

:

61

:

I

2

:

:

:

Post Mortem satisfactory,

Suspected persons were charged with the

murder of deceased,

:

:.

:

Sex not

ascertainable.

:

со

:

:

Total.

Found on

Known.

Found in

Land. Harbour.

Un-

known.

Known.

Un-

known.

1,513 692

645

54

152

108

1 52

1234

13

5

2

A

:

3 52

N

Total,....

619

196 422 396 12

2

2

8 1,658 698 697

59

201

H. H. J. Gompertz,

Magistracy, Hongkong, 25th January, 1900.

Acting Police Magistrate.

1

HONGKONG.

RETURNS OF THE SUPERIOR AND SUBORDINATE COURTS FOR 1899.

477

No. 30

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government.

RETURN of all SUMS RECEIVED as REVENUE in the Registry of the Supreme Court during the Year 1899,

1900

Original Jurisdiction,

Summary Jurisdiction,

Bankruptcy Jurisdiction,

Probate Jurisdiction,

Official Administrator's Commission,

Official Assignee's Commission,...

Official Trustee's Commission,

Sheriff's Fees,

Bailiff's Fees,

Fees on Distraints,

Registrar of Companies,...

Fines and Forfeitures,

Admiralty Jurisdiction,

Official Receiver in Bankruptcy,

Land Office Fees (including $183, account New Territory),

.$ 3,858.85 3,643.20

710.85

2,526.25

5,551.74

576.85

119.00

694.00

1,169.75

5,638.00

298.75

286.71

$ 25,073.45 11,988.50

$ 37,061.95

Registry, Supreme Court, Hongkong, 15th day of January, 1900.

A. SETH, Acting Registrar.

RETURN of all SUMS COLLECTED in the Registry of the Supreme Court for the Year 1899, and paid into the Treasury.

1893.

REGISTRAR-Court Fees paid by Stamps,....

.$ 12,607.16

1899.

$ 12,207.65

OFFICIAL ASSIGNEE. -5% en amounts encashed and paid into Treasury, OFFICIAL ADMINISTRATOR,

4.75

2,862.35

5.551.74

OFFICIAL TRUSTEE.--2 % on amount of Trust on taking over up to $10,000,

above $10,000 commission I %, 1% commission ou income,

99.63

576.35

BAILIFF,

856.50

694.00

SHERIFF.

109.50

119.00

REGISTRAR OF COMPANIES.

FINES AND FORFEITURES,

OFFICIAL RECEIVER IN BANKRUPTCY,

3,425.00

11.00

1,600.49

5.638.00

286.71

$ 21,576.38

Land Office FEES (including $483 arconut New Territory for 1899),...

7.973.25

$ 25,073.45

11,988.50

Registry, Supreme Court. Hongkong, 15th day of January, 1900.

$29,549.63

$ 37.061.95

A. SETH,

Acting Registrar.

Charges Cases Abandoned. Postponed.

478

RETURN of CRIMINAL CASES tried in the SUPREME COURT of HONGKONG during the Year 1899.

SENTENCE.

Number of Cases tried.

Number of Persons tried.

:་-

CRIME.

-:

Convicted.

Administering drug.

Assault occasioning bodily harm,

Attempting to obtain bribe...

Attempting to obtain goods under false pretences......

Being a member of an unlawful society,

Bribery,

Burglary,

Conspiracy to murder,

Disobedience of order of banishment,

Falsely applying a trade mark with intent to de-

ceive.

Falsification of account as a clerk..

Indecent assault,

Larceny.

Larceny from the person......

Larceny in a dwelling house,

Murder,

Obtaining goods under false pretences,

Perjury,

57

89

Rape,

Robbery,

Acquitted.

Robbery, being armed,

Robbery with violence...

Taking an unseaworthy ship to sea,

Throwing corrosive fluid wich intent to burn,

Women and Girls' Protection Ordinance, 1890,

Offences under............................

2276322BH7

77

12

:

...

-...

:

12

14

:

:

50

50

21

35

3

Of 98 Persons.

.89 were indicted.

Nine were not indicted, which are included under the heading of "Charges Abandoned,” 9

98 Persons.

a. In one case the prisoner was fined $25.

Registry, Supreme Court, Hongkong, 15th day of January, 1900.

1 1

30

9

:

A. SETH, Acting Registrar.

COMPARATIVE TABLE showing the NUMBER of OFFENCES, APPREHENSIONS, CONVICTIONS, and ACQUITTALS

for the last Four Years.

1896.

1897.

1898.

1899.

The Number of Convictions in the Superior Courts--

1. For Offences against the Person,

15

24

19

49

2. For Offences against Property,

10

10

17

18

3. For other Offences,

༣1

10

5

10

The Number of Persons acquitted –

1. In the Marine Magistrate's Court,...

2. In the Superior Courts,

Registry, Supreme Court, Hongkong, 15th day of January, 1900.

6

CO

3

17

2

32

28

15

21

A. SETHI,

Acting Registrar.

A

RETURN of CRIMINAL CASES that have been brought under the COGNIZANCE of the SUPREME COURT, during the last Ten Years.

479

Charges Abandoned.

Postponed.

Number Number

YEAR.

of Cases.

of Convicted. Acquitted. Persons.

No. of

Cases.

No. of Persons.

No. of Cases.

No. of Persous.

1890,

59

80

43

20

1891,

32

37

26

9

2

1892,

30

44

18

17

4

1893,

43

57

33

16

1894,

36

44

21

17

CAAK -T

17

4

1|ཀ ོམྦ ྂ

2

}

6

1

5

Total,......

200

262

141

79

23

42

}

5

1895,

26

39

23

1896,

64

60

27

(α) 1897,

52

67

39

1898,

36

54

396

1899,

65

98

77

Total,......

243

318

205

ོཀྶ 1 ཡཁ2 ༐སྒྱུ

9

10

5

26

4

1-6

1

17

11

11

10

4

12

8

6 91

5

9

74

32

38

1

Average of 1stĮ

40

523/

281

154

43

Period,....

Average of 2nd}

Period,.... f

483

633

41

14巷

62/

73

مترات

}

a. In one case the recognizance estreated.

b. In two cases the recognizance estreated.

Registry, Supreme Court, Hongkong, 15th day of January, 1900.

A. SETHI, Acting Registrar.

INDICTMENTS and INFORMATIONS in the SUPREME COURT of HongKong for the Year 1899.

Including Attempts and Conspiracies to commit the several offences.

Showing how the cases tried in

the Superior Courts ended.

(Each Prisoner tried counts as a separate case; where a large number of Prisoners have been convicted together, the fact is mentioned in a note.)

Manslaughter.

Attempt at Murder.

Concealment of Birth.

Murder.

12

225

Total.

Judgment for the Crown,

Judgment for the Prisoners,

Prisoner found Insane,

Cases which fell through for

want of prosecution or ab- sence of accused, and cases thrown out by the Grand

Jury (Attorney General), ...

Cases postponed,

10

98

:

:

:

:

:

00

8

:

Rape.

Unnatural Crimes.

Robbery with Violence.

Other Offences against the Person.

Offences against Property.

Miscellaneous Offences.

Abortion.

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

Q

:

Registry, Supreme Court, Hongkong, 15th day of January, 1900.

:

1

34

18 :

10

60

C+

1

:

41

21

11

A. SETH,

Acting Registrar,

!

480

RETURN of CIVIL and APPEAL CASES brought under the cognizance of the Supreme Court of Hongkong during the Year 1899.

CASES TRIED.

In

No.

Settled

Depend- of

Debt

or

Jurisdiction. ency Cases Total.

and

Withdrawn

in

in

Damages. before

1898.

1899.

Trial.

Plaintiff.

JUDGMENT.

*}}}tud}d{}

Non-Suit.

Struck Out, Dismissed,

and Lapsed

Writs.

In Dependency.

Debt and Damages Recovered.

Original,.... 58

96

154

$1,576,923.45*| B3

24

2

51

$244,973.63*

Summary.... 54

1,060 1,114

$ 162,791.86 422

380

56

144

50

$ 70,074.13

Before the Full Court,.........

Before the Court in Sum- mary Jurisdiction under The Rating Ordinance, 1888,

* Exclusive of one Case wherein the amount claimed and recovered was £1,286,9,1.

1899.

APPEALS.

APPEALS COMMENCED.

Judgment.

No. of

No. of

Cases. Appel- Respond-

lant.

Peuding.

ent.

With- drawn.

3

APPEALS TRIED.

Judgment.

!

With-

Cases. Appel- Respond- Pending drawn.

lant.

ent.

2

3

Registry. Supreme Court, Hongkong, 17th January, 1900.

A. SETU. Acting Registrar.

165

No.

6

1900

HONGKONG.

SECRETARY OF STATE'S DESPATCH ON THE SUBJECT OF SHORT-PERIOD LEASES OF CROWN LANDS.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor.

HONGKONG. No. 294.

SIR,

DOWNING STREET,

12th December, 1895.

I have the honour to acknowledge the receipt of your despatch No. 314 o the 29th of October last and to convey to you my approval of your suggestion that the Governor of Hongkong should have authority to issue leases of Crown Lands for short periods not exceeding five years, instead of granting " squatters licenses the issue of which will in future be discontinued.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient, humble Servant,

Governor

Sir W. ROBINSON, K.C.M.G.

&c.,

&C.,

&c.

J. CHAMBERLAIN.

189

No. 9

1900

HONGKONG.

REPORT OF THE HEAD MASTER OF QUEEN'S COLLEGE AND OF THE EXAMINERS APPOINTED BY THE GOVERNING BODY FOR 1899.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor.

No. 8.

QUEEN'S COLLege, HONGKONG, 19th January, 1900.

SIR, --I have the honour to present the following Report on Queen's College for the year 1899. 1. The total number on Roll was 1,344, the same figure as in 1898. The attendance, however, shows a very marked improvement, 204,021 for 230 instead of 176,867 for 235 days; after reducing attendances of 1898 pro ratâ to the same number of days 230, we find an increase in 1899 of 30,917 attendances. The highest monthly attendances 1,072, 1,070 and 1,055 actually exceed the total annual rolls of the years 1892-1896. The largest number of boys present on one day was 1,031; more than were present in 1895 throughout the whole year.

2. Hence it would appear that we are justified in considering the increased demand for admission, as of a permanent nature. This presents a remarkable contrast to the condition of affairs that existed in the early sixties, when the offer of free education, including the loan of books, was required to induce Chinese boys to come to the Central School to learn English. The natural conclusion is that the time has come when it is no longer necessary for the Government to continue to provide books, &c., for the pupils. I accordingly recommended that boys at Queen's College should, as at other schools, purchase their own school material; which recommendation on the advice of the Governing Body was approved by His Excellency the Governor (C.S.O. 1094/99). The new rule which came into force from the 1st January, 1900, will cause an additional annual expense to each boy varying from 70 cents to 6 dollars; while, on the other hand, the Government will be relieved of an annual outlay of $1,650.

3. The revenue from fees was $27.245 which is more than double the collection in 1897, and an increase of $5,652 on the amount in 1898. The total expenditure in Cash Book and Crown Agents' Account was $1,460 less than the sum provided in the Estimates. The increase of the Gross Expen- diture by $3,600 is due chiefly to the item Adjustment of Exchange in England, but partly to the increase in Expenditure referred to in para. 7 of my last report.

4. A brief survey of the financial conditions of this institution since its foundation in 1862 is presented in the Table below:

Total Expenditure.

Average

Annual

Attendance, Number of Boys.

Net

Expense

YEAR.

Fees.

Cost to each Boy.

to

Share of each dollar in cents borne by

Government.

Total.

Average.

Boys.

Goyt.

1864,

161

1869,

7.07

320

218 68%

$1,541.95

$7,465.58

17

83

1874,

6.83

528

84761

2,369.25

9,672.94

17

83

1879,

6.30

590

416 70

2,636.00

14,128.35

15

85

1884,

12.02

558 411 73

وو

4,981.00

13,378.62

27

73

1889,

15.64

919

1894,

21.21

1,048

1899,

30.72

1,344

597 65,. 545 51 887 66,,

9,338.00

15,018.30

38

62

97

11,562.00 27,245.00

25,752.00

31

69

14,262.89

66

34

Of 1864 I can find no financial details in the Gazette.

In 1894 the attendances were affected by the plague, and the remission of over $2,000 fees unduly swells the Government share of expense in that year. It will be observed that the respective costs to boys and Government, the figures of which were practically stationary for fifteen years, have been progressing steadily in an inverse ratio since my arrival in 1882.

190

5. The following comparative Table will illustrate the varying fortunes of the College during the last five years :-

YEAR.

Number of Scholars.

Number of School Days.

Monthly Attendance.

Average Daily Attendance.

Actual

School Fees.

Maximum. Minimum.

Net Expenditure.

Average Expense of each Scholar per Average Daily Attendance.

1895,

1,024

233

788

577

547

$12,667

$28,431.50

$43.61

1896,

988

235

677

489

521

9,948

27,541.15

52.86

1897,

1,212

230

961

531

825

13,460

25,623.52

31.06

1898,

1.844

235

1,014

669

753

21,593

16,303.91

21.65

1899,

1,344

230

1,072

718

887

27,245

14,262.89

16.08

6. From absence and resignation the staff has been shorthanded this year, and frequent changes have ensued. Four out of ten English masters have been absent throughout the year. The Second Master, Mr. A. J. MAY, went on leave in March. Mr. MACHELL was on leave the wliole twelve months. The services of Mr. JONES were retained at the Supreme Court. The tenth master provided on the Estimates has only just entered on his duties in June, Mr. JAMES resigned on obtaining the appoint- inent of Second Master at King's College, Bangkok. His example was followed in August by Mr. U HANG KAM, Native Mathematical Master, who left the Colony for Manila. In November Mr. WONG KWOK-U was temporarily transferred to the Supreme Court on probation. A serious loss to the College was caused at the end of December by the resignation of the Second Chinese Assistant Mr. LUK KING-FO, who is entering upon a mercantile carcer. In January, 1882, when I held my first Annual Examination Mr. LUK was proxime accessit to the Morrison Scholar, and in the following year was appointed to his late post. In his relations with masters and boys, he merited and enjoyed their highest respect and esteem. His classes invariably passed with great credit. No man has been more successful as a master in teaching English to Chinese boys; nor has any Chinese Assistant excelled him in his strenuous and persistent efforts to master fully the difficulties of the English language.

7. Mr. A. W. GRANT, B A., of Pembroke College, Cambridge, appointed to the additional master- ship mentioned in my last report, arrived at the end of August. The appointment of Mr. B. TANNER to the vacancy caused by Mr. JAMES' resignation was approved by the Secretary of State, but has only just come into effect, on the expiration of the due notice required by the terms of his late agree- ment. We were fortunate in April in securing the services of Mr. JAMES CHEONG, graduate of Melbourne University, as a substitute for Mr. JONES. Mr. NG IN, Third Chinese Assistant, has been promoted to the post vacated by Mr. LUK. A scheme for articling three additional Pupil Teachers, and for improving the salaries of the Junior Chinese Assistants is under consideration.

S. The results of the Oxford Local Examinations are as follows :-Of seven Senior candidates, six of whom were Chinese, four or 57% passed; of the Juniors all non-Chinese, only one out of seven or 14% passed. We sent in no Preliminary candidate. C. B. HAYWARD, who headed in 1898, our Junior list and was distinguished in English, occupied the same position and obtained the same distinction as a Senior, last July.

9. I am happy to report that four Free Scholars from the Government District Schools were elected last March and have worked most satisfactorily in the Fourth Class to which they were admitted.

10. The year under review has been most prolific in schemes for arousing the interest of pupils in matters not connected with scholastic routine. Mr. JAMES before his departure inaugurated the publication of a school magazine called "The Yellow Dragon" which has met with an enthusiastic reception, has been kindly welcomed by its contemporaries, and has so far proved a financial success; Messrs. BARLOW and RALPHS adopted the fatherless infant on the departure of Mr. JAMES.

Mr. DEALY, Acting Second Master, started a Reading Club which now numbers 80 members among the Upper School boys; they subscribe for some school-boy papers, as well as the Pall Mall and Daily Graphic; the Weekly Times and Public Opinion have been added at the request of the Chinese Assistants. To Mr. DEALY too we are indebted for a couple of dozen fine photogravure plates, views of London, which give an excellent idea of the magnificent buildings and crowded thoroughfares of our great metropolis. These pictures adorn the walls of our First Class, and should excite intelligent interest and provide food for reflection. Mr. WOODCOCK has been very energetic and successful in organising various cricket clubs for boys, past and present, including Chinese. Picnics and excursions chiefly for non-Chinese boys have been personally conductel by Messrs. RALPHS and BARLOW.

11. We hail with delight the cleansing of the Augeau stables which renders un necessary a repetition of the piteous plaints of the past, about the immorality of the neighbourhoo 1.

A

191

12. The following is my report on the Lower and l'reparatory Schools, the examination of which has been entrusted to the Head Master by a standing order of the Governing Body

Lower School, Preparatory School,

...385 exd. 313 or 81% passed.

.221

"}

216 or 98%

""

Total,.......................

...606

""

529 or 87%

;)

Compared with last year, 56 more boys were examined, and 72 more boys passed. The work in the Lower School shows considerable improvement, though the standard in Arithmetic and Grammar is still too low. The Preparatory School maintains its usual high average.

The percentage Table X. below provides sufficient details :-

CLASS.

Total Number Examined.

Total Percent- age Passed.

C. to E.

E. to C.

IVA., B.,

C.,

VA..

51

92

94

78

94

33

79

79

64

94

34

85

97

68

94

51

69

80

84

93

B.,

50

88

90

84

100

C.,

34

100

94

100

100

VIA.,

52

61

87

74

96

B.,

46

87

96

94

100

C.,

34

576

93

80

91

VIIA.,

54

96

98

73

94

B.,

31

100.

100

94

100

C.,

30

97

100

86

97

VIIIA.,

48

98

94

81

96

B.,

28

100

100

96 100

C.,

30

97

62

93

87

5985

Reading.

:::: 88884828 Conversation.

Dictation.

65

84

63

73

80

73

76

42

42

61

62

44

29

77

47

51

$5

36

78

88

70

62

100

74

77

68

45

42

33

46

68

39

37

67

43

32

56

35

78

90

77

60

83

70

Arithmetic.

PANERUD Grammar.

I CAN Geography.

Writing Composition.

...

៩៩ន | Max.

90

88 100

85

100

77

94

96

91

88

89

95

91

77

96

100

89

87

80

100

100

100

...

13. 119 boys from this College obtained various situations in the Colony and elsewhere. Of these 21 were employed by Her Majesty's Government, and 35 by local professional and mercantile firms.

14. I desire once again to express our warmest thanks to donors of prizes, without whose generosity only half of our deserving boys would have their exertions recognised. In this long list Sir THOMAS JACKSON, Mr. ROMANO, Mr. MODY, Mr. WHILEY and the Tung Wa Hospital Committee; and amongst old scholars Messrs. FUNG WA CHUN, HO TUNG, HO FUK, SIN TAK-FAN, LEUNG YAN-PÓ, TÁM TSZ-KONG, TROI CHEE-BEE, and NG KWOK-CHING are representative names.

15. The usual Tables of Attendances and Statistics are attached.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

The Honourable J. H. STEWART LOCKHART, C.M.G.,

Colonial Secretary.

GEO. H. BATESON WRIGHT, D.D. (OXON),

(Oxon),

Head Master.

192

January,

February,

March,

April,..

May,

June,

July,

August,

1899.

QUEEN'S COLLEGE.

Month.

Number of Scholars.

Number of Attendances.

Number of School Days.

Average Daily Attendance.

September,

October,

November,

December,

·

Total,.......

791 718

18,609

25

744.36

2,119

3

706.33

1,055

21,934

22

997.00

1,070

14,248

14

1,017.71

1,072

23,591

24

982.96

985

21,414

25

856.56

866

17,092

22

776.90

774

3,713

5

742.60

998

15,954

17

938.47

991

23,154

25

926.16

964

23,237

26

893.73

921

18,956

22

861.63

204,021

230

Total Number of ATTENDANCES during 1899,

.204,021

Number of SCHOOL DAYS during 1899,

230

Average DAILY ATTENDANCE during 1899,

887

Total Number of SCHOLARS at this School during 1899,

1,344

AVERAGE EXPENSE OF EACH SCHOLAR AT QUEEN'S COLLEGE DURING 1899.

Expenditure,—

Cash Book,

Do., Exchange Compensation,

Crown Agents,

Do.,

Adjustment of Exchange,

Deduct,-

School Fees,

Sale of Books,

Total Expense of College,...

Average Expense of each Scholar,-

Per Number on Roll,...... Per Average Daily Attendance,

19th January, 1900.

$ 29,243.74

4,781.86

4,659.73

2,940.07

$ 41,625.40

.$127,245.00

117.51

$ 27,362.51

.$ 14,262.89

10.61

$ 16.08

Remarks.

GEO. H. BATESON WRIGHT, D.D., Oxon.,

Head Master.

T

193

HONGKONG, 20th January, 1900.

SIR,-We have the honour to present, for the information of the Governing Body, our report on the Upper School of Queen's College.

We examined 237 boys, of whom 186 or 79% passed.

We were much struck by the high average of intelligence displayed by the boys, Chinese and non-Chinese, in both oral and written examination.

The neatness of the papers, and the good quality of the handwriting are also worthy of special

mention.

We are not in a position to compare the present result with previous performances, but have no hesitation in pronouncing the work of a large proportion of the boys excellent; while the bulk of each class has done creditably in the various subjects offered, which are so many as sixteen in the first class, and a dozen in the other classes.

The high quality of the teaching imparted by the various masters is thus amply attested, and we are pleased to note that the work of classes 2 (B) and 3 (B) under Chinese assistants compares quite favourably with that of the Senior sections of the same classes under English Masters.

We were particularly pleased with the work of 2 (A), which maintained a high standard throughout the class in all subjects.

We abstain from commenting on the manifest weakness of boys at the bottom of all classes, as we believe this to be a natural condition and an almost universal experience.

The papers set were quite as long as those in the Oxford Local Examinations, and in matter bore a strong resemblance to them. With the exception of two questions eliminated, one in Algebraic Factorisation in Class 1, and the other on Railways in Class 2, Geography, all the questions were successfully tackled by one or more boys.

Reading.-Generally high marks were awarded, phrasing and enunciation being careful and good. Conversation. Most boys responded well to questions designedly set to test their intelligent knowledge of English idiom.

Grammar.-Accidence, Parsing and Analysis were distinctly good, 3 (A) and (B) particularly so. Composition. In writing stories from memory after dictation, many independent idioms and phrases were successfully employed, and in some cases imagination was exerted with good effect. The Essay in the Senior Chinese and non-Chinese classes was good as regards composition, but poor in failing to adhere to the required point.

History. Generally excellent, specially high marks were obtained in this subject.

15

Geography.-Good, but the Map-drawing from memory was not a success, especially was this the * case in the attempts at Italy and the South Eastern counties of England in Classes 2 and 3.

Shakespeare. On the whole well done by the few boys that offered it. The ortion of the play had been carefully studied and by many intelligently understood.

Mathematics.--The standard attained here is not high. There is too large a proportion of work hopelessly bungled, giving evidence of mental confusion, which it is the chief object of these sciences to remove. There is special need of improvement here, on the part of non-Chinese boys, who confess their weakness by offering as their highest standard the work of Class 2 and their failing wholesale in Algebra and Euclid.

A very common failing was the absence of attempt to draw diagrams at all representing the facts as when a line that is equal to another by "construction" is drawn less than half its proper size-or when the production of a straight line forms an obtuse angle with the original section. Careless work of this kind naturally leaves room for gross errors in subsequent proof.

Bookkeeping.-Good. No boy in 1 (A) obtained full marks, the chief errors being ignorance of how to deal with Trade and Personal Expenses. The elementary paper of 2 (A) was well done. Mensuration.—The general remarks on Mathematics apply here. A few boys did very well. Physiology and Natural Science.-Offered by 1 (C) were highly satisfactory showing careful instruction in elementary work.

Shorthand.—Mr. BARLOW, the class master of 1 (C) reports that the Senior section of this non- Chinese class showed a high standard of attainment, while the Junior section was unsatisfactory.

Dictation.This subject is specially difficult to Chinese, who easily multiply errors by the omission or insertion cf -s, -ed, &c., &c. A large number of Chinese boys, however, obtained over 80% and a few full marks. The Junior section of the first class were unable to cope with an unseen

selection.

!

194

Translations.-1. Chinese to English.-Of five questions in each paper, one was a simple unseen piece of Chinese. This was fairly attempted by many, but correctly translated by few.

In some instances there was manifested surprising ignorance of the Chinese language: as when the verb ts'ai was taken for the name of a State or surname, contrary to context: or when the simple phrase edge of the forest" was transliterated as a man's name. The memoriter work was well done, and should supply good material for employment in composition.

2. English to Chinese.-These were corrected and marked by the Acting Second Master, Mr. DEALY, and the Senior Chinese Assistant, Mr. CHIU CHI-TSUNG, who report a fairly high average of good work done, several boys getting over 90% marks and a good many full marks.

We append the usual tables of marks.

We have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servants,

The Hon. A. M. THOMSON,

Hon. Secretary to the Governing Body of Queen's College.

GEO. H. BATESON WRIGHT,

SUIRDALE,

Examiners.

PERCENTAGES OF PASSES IN EACH SUBJECT IN EACH CLASS.

88855

I A.,

6

100 | 100 | 100 | 100 | 100

I B.,

il

55

55

II A.,

40

93

II B.,

22 73

III A.,

55 76

III B.,

50

68

91 100 64 18 37 78 65 100 73 59 95 85 81 95 72 72

80 45 70 59 41 27 67 49 60

N. 1,

100

N. 2,

63

N. 3,

12 100

22 87

N. 4, Acting P.T., 3 67 33100

83 83100| 83 |100| 83

64

94 48 70 50

100 100 100 88 100 98 63 38 100 100 100 42 100 69 78 37 67 33

28100

73 54 63 46

86

98 70 82 73 87 47 75 64 85 60 86 48 40 58 75 75 100| 75 88 38100| 12 75 92 100|67 82 64 78 67

100

63 12

67

50

50

28

37

98

88

80 88

:: 90: ****: *

⠀⠀⠀ENDO****

48

25

⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀⠀⠀

...

73100100 100 75 75 38

25

...

53

83 33

100

37 9

....

37

CLASS.

Total No.

Examined.

Percentage

of Passes.

Chinese-Eng.

English-Chin.

Reading.

Conversation.

Dictation.

Arithmetic.

Grammar.

Geography.

Composition.

History.

Algebra.

Euclid.

Shakespeare.

Book-keeping.

Mensuration.

Shorthand.

Physiology.

Science.

HONGKONG.

REPORT OF THE INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS FOR 1899.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of

His Excellency the Governor.

EDUCATION Department,

489

No. 31

1900

HONGKONG, 12th April, 1900.

SIR, I have the honour to submit the following report on the schools under my supervision during the year 1899.

2. GENERAL STATISTICS.-Table No. V shews the changes which have taken place in the number and class of schools and in the number of scholars during the last ten years, and enables a comparison to be made with the years 1869 and 1879.

3. A reduction in the number of Government Schools was commenced in the year 1892. In that year there were 6 English and 28 Chinese Schools compared with 5 English and 7 Chinese in 1899. The number cannot be reduced any further at present unless the school at Pokfulam, which last year had an average attendance of only 11 scholars, should be closed. I am loth to recommend the closing of an old school; but unless there should appear to be a prospect of an increase to the Chinese population in the neighbourhood, this school ought not to be kept up. Of the 22 schools closed during the last seven years 11 have been replaced by Grant-in-Aid Schools. At one time or another seven other Grant-in-Aid Schools were started with the intention of replacing Government Schools, but five of them are no longer in existence, and two are closed for the time being. Nine of the schools. therefore remain unreplaced, and it is much to be regretted that five of them were ever closed. Education by means of Grant-in-Aid Schools is cheaper than education by Government Schools, but it is subject to frequent interruptions owing to difficulties with teachers and landlords, and I believe that if the Government Schools referred to had remained open, the attendance at them would by now have more than justified their existence. The remaining schools, four in number, were in small isolated hamlets and should never have been opened.

4. The decrease in the Grant-in-Aid Schools dates from 1895 when there were 83 Chinese Schools open as against 73 in 1899. I am afraid that in the near future the number will be still further reduced by the closing of schools in Victoria unless circumstances change very much. The general increase in rents is pressing severely on some of the schools and certain movements of population are also adversely affecting the schools in the Western Districts.

5. The total number of children on the rolls for the year under review is the largest on record. The number of scholars learning English continues to increase and the number of girls on the rolls is only four less than in the year 1893 in which the highest number occurs.

6. I have inserted in Table V a column which perhaps does not properly belong to it but which is certainly of interest. It shews the ratio which the expenditure on education bears to the general revenue of the Colony. It has now sunk to a very low figure. This is, of course, due in some part to the increase in the attendance and in the fees charged at Queen's College during the last ten years. The fees last year amounted to over $27,000 and it is only natural to wish that some portion at any rate of this large sum could be diverted to Education and not be lost altogether in the general revenue of the Colony. The net expenditure on Education is now only 1.66 per cent of the revenue.

6. The following Tables enable a more detailed comparison to be drawn between the years 1893 -the last normal year, as the statistics for every year since have been affected by the plague-and 1899.

1893.

Government und Grant-in-Aid Schools.

CHINESE.

ENGLISH.

PORTUGUESE.

TOTAL.

Schools. Scholars. Schools. Scholars. Schools. Scholars. Schools. Scholars.

Victoria,

68

4,034

20

3,014

Villages of Hongkong,...

10

273

114

Kowloon,

21

932

1

53*

186

92

7.234

12

387

22

726

985

Total,..

99

5,239

23

3,181

4

186.

126

8,606

490

1899.

Government and Grant-in-Aid Schools.

CHINESE.

ENGLISH.

PORTUGUESE.

TOTAL.

Schools. Scholars. Schools. Scholars.

Schools. Scholars. Schools. Scholars.

Victoria,

53

3,337

21

3,079

5

153

79

6,569

Villages of Hongkong,...

12

406

1

80

13

486

Kowloon,

15

627

1

78

:

:

16

705

Total,..

80

4,370

23

3,237

10

153

108

7,760

I am much afraid that unless schools in Victoria are given an increased grant to compensate for the higher rents which landlords now demand, the loss of 15 Chinese Schools and 700 scholars will never be made up. There is a noticeable loss in Kowloon of 6 schools and 280 scholars.

7. The unaided schools for Chinese (ie., Kaifong schools) number 100 with an attendance of 2,195 scholars. One of the schools is a girls school and seven are English schools. The fees vary according to the locality. In Chung Wan (the Central District) the average school fee is fifteen dollars a year whilst in the villages it is as low as three dollars. It may be said that the average school fee in a school in which Chinese is taught is nine dollars and in one in which English is taught

seventeen.

8. School FeeS.-All the Chinese Grant-in-Aid Schools are free, but with one exception the English Schools charge fees varying from $30 a year to $6. In the English Division of the Belilios Public School a fee of $6 a year is charged, but education in the other Government Schools which are under the Inspectorate is free. It is almost time, in my opinion, to raise the fee at the Belilios Public School to $12 a year, and it is worth considering whether a small fee-say, $3 a year-should not be charged in the Chinese Division which is now very well attended.

9. SCHOOL ATTENDANCE -The Average Daily Attendance in 1899 was 4,418. That in the Grant- in-Aid Schools alone was 3,683. The corresponding figures for 1898 are 4,281 and 3,581. The ratio of the average daily attendance to the average monthly enrolment in 1898 was 81 per cent. and in 1899, 83 per cent. In the Grant-in-Aid Schools the highest average attendance-4,170—was in April ; in July the average attendance had dropped to 3,165, or 24 per cent. This decrease was, no doubt, largely due to the plague. In the Chinese Division of the Belilios Public School where the attendance is naturally very quickly affected by epidemics the average attendance dropped from 181 in May to 64 in June and in July stood at 70.

the

10. In the Chinese Schools in the villages the attendance falls off most remarkably at the end of year. After the beginning of the eleventh moon-which, in 1899, fell on the 3rd December-any excuse is good enough to stay away from school and at that time of the year to recommence attending school would be out of the question. It could only be thought of after the New Year. How the attendance is affected during the last three months of the year will be seen from the subjoined Table which shews the ratio that the average daily attendance in November and in December bears to that in October.

Chinese Schools, Villages,

"

21

Victoria,

English Schools,.

October.

.......100

.........100

......100

November.

December.

75

52

89

79

100

92

The three classes of schools are arranged in the order in which they are examined. After the annual examination there is a temptation in all schools for boys and masters to take things easily; but in the English schools fees are charged and the education given is a special one having a distinct money value; whilst in the Chinese Schools, which boys usually leave unable to read or write anything beyond single words, the money value of the education given is not apparent and parents are naturally laxer in insisting on regular attendance.

11. RESULTS OF THE ANNUAL EXAMINATIONS.-I reported fully on the results of the examina- tions of the Government District Schools in my letter No. 23 of the 28th February. The results of the examinations of the Grant-in-Aid Schools will be found in Tables VI, VII and VIII, in which the actual number of passes and failures in each standard and the percentage for each school will be found.

¡

491

12. In paragraph 13 of my report for the year 1897 I said that the standard required in class III was somewhat higher than the one to which these schools had been accustomed. From the subjoined Tables an exact comparison inay be drawn between the year 1895 and the year 1899 :-

Table shewing the Grants earned by the three Classes of Grant-in-Aid Schools in the Years 1895 and 1899, and the Average Grant per Scholar examined.

Examination Examination

Average Grant per

CLASS.

Grant earned in

1895.

Grant earned in 1899.

Number of Scholars examined

Number of Scholars

Average Graut per

examined

Scholar

Scholar

in

in

examined in

examined in

1895.

1899.

1895.

1899.

I.,

$12,466.66 $10,966.43

2,490

2,081

$ 5.00

$3.27

II.,

1,047.32

1,093.39

126

127

8.31

8.60

III.,

10,735.66 11,584.55

938

1,179

11.44

9.82

Total,.....

$24,249.64 $23,644.37

3,554

3,387

$ 6.82

$6.98

:

III.,-Ordinary Subjects,.

:

III., Special Subjects,

$9,651.66 $11,003.35

$1,084.00 $581.00

938

1,179

$10.29

$9.33

545

231

$1.98

$2.51

Table shewing the Number of Boys examined and the Percentage of Passes in each standard in Schools in Class III in the Years 1895 and 1899.

ORDINARY SUBJECTS.

SPECIAL SUBJECTS.

Standard.

I.

II.

III.

IV. V. VI.

VII. Total. IV. V. VI. VII. Total.

Number examined,..

316 181

134

104

86

85

41

1895.

Percentage of Passes,...

94

98

93

77

92

87 100

93 90 84 78 80

947 125 162 | 169 85 541

81

Standard.

1.

II. III.

IV.

V.

VI.

VII. Total. IV. V. VI. VII.Total.

1899.

Percentage of Passes,...

Number examined,...... 413 250

96

224

126

82

42

311,166

95

87

75

80

81

71

93

18 23

85 116

72 59 65 70

125

761 87 364

66

:

In each standard the percentage of passes is less than it was in 1895 and the difference is particularly noticeable in the seventh standard in ordinary subjects and throughout all the standards in special subjects. Despite the larger number of scholars examined, the number taking up special subjects is less than half what it was in 1895. This is a natural consequence of the increased difficulty in obtain- ing a pass, and is not altogether to be regretted. But it is very unsatisfactory to find that whilst in 1895 there were 212 scholars examined in the three highest standards, in 1899 there were only 155. This falling-off is the more noticeable as the total number of scholars examined has risen from 947 to 1,166.

13. BELILIOS. PUBLIC SCHOOL.--Since Mrs. BATEMAN's departure from the Colony on leave, Mrs. TUTCHER has acted as Headmistress. A decrease in the number of scholars on the rolls in the English School is compensated for by an increase in the average attendance. In the Chinese School there is little difference to note between the last two years. The plague affected the attendance in both divisions in the summer, but in the English School the effect was not so noticeable and the recovery more complete than in the Chinese School. The annual examination was held in July. There were 99 scholars present in the English School, as against 93 in 1898. Of these, 50 were in the Upper School and 49 in the Infant School. The corresponding figures for 1898 were 55 and 38. The number examined in the Chinese School was 87 compared with 113 in the previous year. Out of 156 scholars on the register of the English School at the end of the year 50 were Chinese. Of these, 20 studied their own language in the Chinese School for an hour-and-a-half in the afternoons. There is no change to report in the curriculum of either school, but steps have been taken to introduce more modern text-books into the English School and to systematize the education given in the Chinese.

492

14. GOVERNMENT DISTRICT SCHOOLS.-The number of the Government District Schools was reduced by threc at the end of 1898 in the manner stated in my report for that year. The villagers of Stanley, though they were encouraged by me to do so, failed to start a Grant-in-Aid School for the study of Chinese; but the Female Education Society which has maintained a Chinese Girls School at Stanley for the last sixteen years, took up the work and turned their school into a Mixed school, engaging a qualified man to teach the boys. The school has been well attended and two-thirds of the scholars are boys. The average attendance which in 1898 was 21 rose to 41 in 1899, and as the average attendance at the Government School in 1898 was only 24, it is clear that no injury to education has been caused by the withdrawal of the Government.

15. Although Chinese is no longer taught in the Government School at Wongnaichung, no Chinese School has been opened in the village.

16. The average attendance at the four schools which teach English shews an increase of 14 per cent. It has reached the limit of accommodation, and in the case of the two schools at Saiyingpoon and Wantsai, has passed a little beyond the point beyond which the teaching can remain as effective as is desirable.

17. Teu boys competed for the Free Scholarships at Queen's College in March, and four scholar- ships were awarded. Two of the successful boys had been educated at the Saiyingpoon school, one at Wantsai and one at Wongnaichung. There were no competitors from the Yaumati school.

18. No change has been made in the curriculum of the English Schools beyond the introduction of translation in the Fourth Standard and the substitution of the elements of grammar for geography in the second.

19. Some slight progress, though not so great as I had expected, has been made in the substitu- tion in the Chinese Schools of a system of teaching Chinese adapted to elementary schools in place of the time-honoured system in force in China.

20. The boys are indebted for their prizes to the generosity of Chinese.

21. The post of Master of the Yaumati School falling vacant in April was filled by the appoint- ment of Mr. NG FUNG-CHAU at a salary of $300 a year rising by annual increments of $24 to $540. A sum of $60 has also been provided out of which an Examination Grant is made to the teacher at the end of the year, the amount of the grant varying with the report of the Inspector of Schools on the examination and on the general conduct of the school. As occasion arises it is proposed to extend this system of partial payment by results to other schools. The Yaumati School is the only school in the Kowloon Peninsula in which English is taught and it is attended by boys from Hunghom, Shamshuipó, and Kau-lung-t'ong. It occupies hired premises next to a Chinese machinery shop, but the future of the school is assured and permanent quarters ought to be provided on the site which was reserved for this purpose many years ago.

22. GRANT-IN-AID SCHOOLS.-The number of grant-in-aid schools on the roll is 96 compared with 100 on the roll in 1898. One new school, a mixed Chinese school under the management of the Roman Catholic Mission, has been opened at Aberdeen, where there was previously no school for girls, and the following five schools have been closed :-

The Basel Mission School at Matan-ch'ung.

The Berlin Ladies Mission Queen's Road West School.

The Roman Catholic St. Theresa School.

The Roman Catholic Cathedral School, Division II.

and The Wesleyan Mission Kennedytown School.

23. The school at Matau-ch'ung, though only now removed from the roll, has been closed for three years. It is a Hakka school, but there is another school for Hakkas in the village of To'kwa- wan, distant half-a-mile. The average attendance in these two schools in 1896 was 43, whilst the average attendance at To-kwa-wan alone last year was 67.

24. The Santa Theresa School was a girls school situated in Hollywood Road, and its scholars will be divided between two girls schools in the vicinity.

25. No school has taken the place of the Berlin Ladies Mission School in Queen's Road West, the Second Division of the Cathedral School and the Wesleyan Mission Kennedytown School, all of which were Chinese schools for boys. It is much to be regretted that no new schools take the place of the schools which have been closed. As I pointed out above there has been a loss of fifteen Chinese schools in Victoria alone during the last six years.

26. Out of the 96 schools on the roll only 87 we dispersed owing to the house in which they were located

an adjacent house, and were excused examination, the grantz three preceding years. One school had to leave the premises oce few of the scholars attended a school in the vicinity under the same the year and were examined there. Four schools are closed pending The teachers of two schools died during the year.

493

schools were temporarily afe by the demolition of n the results of the n a month's notice; a nt for the remainder of engagement of teachers.

27. The life of Chinese Grant-in-Aid Schools in Hongkong is precarious in the few exceptions they occupy hired rooms. Suitable premises are hard to find, and only by the month the schools are liable to have to remove at very short notice. There teacher to each school and his death or protracted illness ruins the school for the year, teachers with the requisite qualifications are not easily met with.

28. Through the kindness of the Committee I was again enabled to hold the written examina- tion of the four highest standards of the English Grant-in-Aid Schools in the City Hall. This course was adopted last year on the advice of my predecessor, Dr. EITEL, and I have every reason to be satisfied with the result.

29. Another case of fraud in which two Masters were implicated was detected at the annual examination of a Chinese school and was punished in the usual way by making a deduction from the grant and by disqualifying the teachers from teaching in Grant-in-Aid School in future. I gather from one of the Indian Education Reports that in such cases the teachers are prosecuted and I am of opinion that this should be done in future in Hongkong.

30. Mr. J. G. DA ROCHA was appointed assistant examiner in Portuguese.

31. Two years ago I pointed out that 99 per cent. of the boys and 93 per cent. of the girls in Chinese Grant-in-Aid Schools were in the three lowest standards. I have tabulated below the returns made by each school at the time of examination, and it appears from them that with the exception of Girls Schools in Class III more than half the scholars spend not more than a year in any particular school. A small percentage may have attended other Grant-in-Aid Schools in previous years, but the number cannot be large. In considering the educational problems of Hongkong these two facts are worth bearing in mind.

Table shewing the Percentage of Scholars who entered the Grant-in-Aid Schools in which they were

examined before 1897, in 1897 and after, and before and in 1899.

Class.

Victoria,

I.

Boys,

Villages,

Before 1897.

In 1897 and after.

Before 1899.

In 1899.

2

98

28

72

97

24

76

Victoria,

9

91

44

56

Girls,

Villages,

5

95

43

57

III.

Boys,

Girls,

15

85

46

55

40

60

77

23

32. THE KOWLOON SCHOOL.-It has been decided to open a Government School in Kowloon for the teaching of English. A school house and teacher's quarters are to be presented to the Colony by Mr. Ho TUNG, and the buildings are in course of erection.

33. STAFF.-From the 16th March to the 7th July I was acting as Registrar General, and from the 19th July to the 30th September I was absent from the Colony on vacation leave and the Revd. T. W. PEARCE acted as Inspector of Schools.

34. Mrs. BATEMAN the Headmistress of the Belilios Public School, was granted leave on the 14th March and Mrs. TUTCHER, who had returned from leave on the 18th February, has since acted as Head- mistress. Miss LEY KUM, who was appointed Temporary Assistant Teacher in March, 1898, resigned on the 17th February, 1899. On Mrs. BATEMAN's departure Miss ELLA KING was appointed Tem- porary Assistant Teacher.

-

:

494

35. Mr. TANG TSUNG-MUN, Assistant Teacher in the Saiyingpoon School, resigned on the 28th February, 1899. On the 1st April, Mr. LI TAK-YUNG was transferred to the post from the Wantsai School and Mr. LAU TSUN-KWAI was transferred to Wantsai from Yaumati. Mr. NG FUNG-CHAU was appointed on the same date to be Master of the Yaumati School.

36. STATISTICS.---The Tables attached to this Report are not arranged in the same form as those attached to the Report for 1898.

Table I. which is a Summary of Statistics relating to all schools under the Inspectorate of Schools, gives the Totals of the old Tables II. and III.

Table II. which gives Statistics regarding attendance at Government Schools and the cost of each School, and Table III., which gives the corresponding statistics relating to the Grant-in-Aid Schools, contain the statistics to be found in the old Tables II, IV, V, VI, VIII and IX. The following particulars which there appeared to be no need to place on record are omitted :---Maximum Daily Attendance (Monthly Average), Minimum Daily Attendance (Monthly Average), and Average Monthly Enrolment.

Table IV. corresponds to old Table III.

Table V. is a summary shewing the number of schools under the Inspectorate and the number of scholars attending them during the last eleven years and in the years 1869 and 1879. It is substituted for old Table VII.

Table VI. is the same as old Table X except that the total figures for all the schools and for each class of school is given.

Table VII. shews the percentage of passes in each standard in each class of school.

Table VIII. gives the particulars fomerly contained in old Tables XI. and XII., but no comparison is drawn between the results of the year under review and of the preceding year.

There is no Table corresponding to old Table I. which merely repeated details contained in old Tables 11. and VIII.

Formerly Composition and Dictation were given under one heading, and it was impossible to discover from the Table what was the result of the Examination in Composition alone. Dictation and Composition now appear in separate columns and the percentage of passes in each subject can be ascertained.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

The Honourable F. H. MAY, C.M.G.,

Acting Colonial Secretary.

A. W. BREWIN,

Inspector of Schools.

TABLE I.—Summary of Statistics relating to all Schools under the Inspectorate of Schools in the Year 1899.

495

NUMBER OF SCHOLARS

Number of

ATTENDING SCHOOLS.

Amount

Expenses. of

Schools.

Grant.

Average Maximum

Maximum Minimum Daily Monthly Monthly Attendance. Enrolment. Enrolment.

Boys. Girls. Total.

Government Schools,

C.

C.

1

English,.

5

631

255

886

5,481.33

Chinese,

222

336

558

1,945.17

484.9

654

428

249.9

414

241

Total,...... 12

853

591

1,444

7,426.50

734.8

1,068

669

Grant-in-Aid Schools,

English,

18

1,832

519

2,351

51,618.09 10,850.95

1,320.0

1,744

1,115

Portuguese,

5

11

143

154

Chinese,

73

1,806 2,005 3,811

1,145.23

20,066.84 | 12,059.87

733.55

92.6

133

87

2,270.4

3,368

1,724

Total,..... 96

3,649

2,667 6,316

72,830.16 23,644.37

3,683.0

5,245

2,926

Grand Total,.. 108

4,502

3,258 7,760

80,256.66 | 23,644.37

4,417.8

6,313

3,595

TABLE II.—Statistics regarding Attendance at Government Schools during the Year 1899,

und the Cost of each School.

NUMBER OF SCHOLARS ATTENDING SCHOOLS.

Maxi-

Name of School.

Expenses.

Amount of Grant.

Boys.

Girls.

Number Average

of Daily School Attend-

Days.

mum

Monthly Enrol-

Minimum Monthly

Enrol-

ance.

ment.

Total.

ment.

C.

Aplichau School (Chinese),

Belilios Public School (English),

31

:

31

168.00

249

5.0

26

5

255

255

2,530.37

:

243

98.0

171

128

19

(Chinese),

:

336

336

946.40

239

64.4

234

133

Pokfulam (Chinese),...........

13

13

132.00

245

8.1

13

10

Saiying pún (English),..........

190

190

1,007.21

238

86.7

147

100

""

(Chinese),...

44

44

Shek-ó (Chinese),.

Tanglungchau (Chinese),.

Wantsai (English),

28

58

283

19

(Chinese),

48

Wongnaichung (English),

· 80

Yaumati (English),

78

:

:

:

:

:

196.00

238

17.5

38

22

28

120.00

234

22.0

27

22

58

130.00

245

15.7

31

17

283

1,113.82

233

106.0

218

136

48

252.77

241

28.1

45

32

80

427.73

239

32.0

62

36

78

402.20

Total,..

853

591

1,444

7,426.50

:

:

236

24.2

56

28

734.8

1,068

669

496

TABLE III-STATISTICS regarding Attendance at GRANT-IN-AID SCHOOLS during 1899, and the cost of each School.

Number of Scholars Attending Schools.

Name of Schools.

Ex- penses.

Boys, Girls. Total.

Amount of Grant.

Number Average

of Daily School Attend-

Days. ance.

Maxi- Mini-

mum

mum

Monthly Monthly Enrol- Enrol-

ment. ment.

American Board Mission, Bridges Street...

68

68

$ 250.00 $ 191.05

228

52.1

68

49

"

Queen's Road West *. Háwan

169.00

19

19

198.00

79.22

229

13.5

19

"

Chungwan

85 $5

292.00

245.23

251

38.5

72

28

*

"

Tsat-tszmui*.

...

Mongkoktsui

55

55

149.00

68.52 202

32.0

43

>>

,.

i

*:

97

,,

Third Street.

""

Yaumati *

""

1

Hunghom

";

Quarry Bay

""

Basel Mission, Shamshuipo

C.M.S., St. Stephen's Chinese School

Pottinger Street

Saiyingpun

St. Stephen's Baxter Memorial

Lyndhurst Terrace

74

74

321.79

307.13

210

62.8

7+

38

Shaukiwan

Tokwawan

No. 2 School

62

62

291.47

280.19

222

49.9

62

39

85

85

184.45

294.13

204

67.3

83

55

136

→136

364.60

288.64

252

81.8

122

52

81

81

413.42

105.92

261

36.4

60

30

87

87

367.49

169,52

252

38.6

59

32

65

65

385.11

142.55

262

30.1

49

23

101

101

255.19

80.32 256

35.1

81

24

"?

ད་

+

11

":

"

44

??

19

19

"7

II.

19

Hunghòm

"

Hospital Chapel

"1

""

>>

19

??

<4

11

No. 2

17

Square Street

Taikoktsui

严量

Aberdeen School...

Aplichau

F.E.S., Bonham Road, Chinese Division..

High Street

Queen's Road West †

Saiyingpun, Praya

Pottinger Street

Stanley School

Shaukiwan

Tokwawan

Yaumati

L.M.S., Square Street *

Wantsai Chapel

Yaumati

Shektong-tsui

Saiyingpun, I. Division

دو

Shektong-tsui

Saiyingpun, Second Street, I. Division

Ui-hing Lane, I. Division

II.

Tanglungchau No. 1

II.

106

*£****2058

::

:

⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀9 ¦ ¦ ¦ ¦ E59388£ ¦ ¦§ : :8*

52

52

344.33

194.70

247

28.4

49

17

35

35

208.95

112.20

254

19.4

30

21

122.59

33

33

205.49

108.56

241

22.1

30

21

18

156.80

51.95

269

8.9

16

.8

30

139.51

47.02

284

16.0

30

12

25

140 64

37.42

245

9.9

16

2

70

366.47

360.04

226

41.6

55

39

50

211.74

62.41

228

11.8

27

4

48

149.05

275

22.1

35

17

23

235.65

170.99

243

10.0

22

7

46

245.06

98.26

260

17.5

32

11

62

233.08

87.02

234

41.0

57

44

50

256.42

189.93

248

26.9

39

19

37

116.50

144.78

239

30.6

36

18

39

225.96

112,54

237

19.6

39

11

77

410.34

311.29 227

51.6

68

51

61

376.58

245.87

227

50.7

61

38

40

355.86

144.36

241

28.2

40

25

61

398.62

231.13

229

37.3

61

38

63

324.30

136.13

245

34.8

57

21

28

319.85

49.51

226

17.0

24

7

73

372.60

176.22

230

42.9

68

29

16

16

259.63

44.00

246

9.6

16

70

70

236.91

206.73

226

37.9

58

29

-106

337.89

275.82

235

44.1

93

17

72

72

283.35

346.97

232

59.9

69

62

33

33

352 11

63.58

221

23.1

33

20.

62

394.25

297.76

252

55.0

62

24

48

153.82

139.72

228

26.9

44

15

93

*

-99

19

"

梦梦

??

17

**

Yaumati

Matauwai

Shaukiwan

: Third Street

D'Aguilar Street

Kau-ü-fong *

Tanglungchau

Aberdeen Street

Wantsai Chapel

Staunton Street

R.C.M., Bridges Street, Chinese Division..

Aberdeen School

Holy Infancy

Shaukiwan

Hunghom

Italian Convent, Chinese School...

Sacred Heart School, Chinese Division

Wesleyan Mission, Spring Gardens

Wellington Street

::།

30

ཆཚེ :

93

329.28

162.74

212

34.9

80

37

30

299.75

94.89

199

21.8

30

24

234.27

44.63

33

333.31

167.69

212

26.9

33

17

44

296.91

118.34

214

27.2

41

24

34

34

276.13

174.81

211

21.7

31

9

31

31

194.00

130 55

248

226

29

14

42

42

392.38

110.73

240

16.9

34

89 89

327.00

396.90

255

57.3

77

46

46

277.19

161.05

252

28.1

39

38 38

130.00

129.66

269

22.8

37

32

32

118.00

94.50

263

22.0

31

35

35

45

80

296.65

337.71

255

64.5

75

66

66

260.00

195.27

261

36.6

57

35

35

190.57

148.33

260

27.7

31

57

57

280.00

136.29

274

32.6

50

78

78

469.96

396.97

271

70.0

73

29

113.00

95.39

254

17.8

26

60

60

259.00

274.08 237

52.1

60

Lower Lascar Row

*9

19

**

"

ེ:ཚེ

133

-133

306.00

260.55

168

57.6

106

30

213.00

158,57

180

33.0

59

69

267.00

207.82 222

47.7

62

*82-2*****=****

13

39

20

16

21

31

25

15

30

69

11

40

43

24

33

...

Wantsai School *

144.00

Graham Street...

104 104

301.00

269.69 214

49.9

86

34

""

St. Stephen's, English

Morrison

"

Diocesan School

*

Basel Mission, High Street......

Berlin Foundling House School

C.M.S., Victoria Home and Orphanage, Chinese Division

Victoria Home and Orphanage, English Division..

Wesleyan Mission, Lyndhurst Terrace, English...

St. Paul's College School..

F.E.S., Bonham Road. English Division.

L.M.S., Taipingshan, English..

East Point

R.C.M.. Cathedral School, I. Division,

St. Joseph's College School,...

90

90

733.04

487.82

258

50.4

88

56

25

25

1.128.20

229.55

256

24.0

25

25

48

48

321.33

376.02

224

41.4

46

36

ཏྲྰཾ7 1:;ཨེཎྜཊྛཱ

276

>276

1,103.35

1,302.97 225

188.9

248

170

81

81

1,389.74

112.83

203

30.9

56

3+

18

18

124 42

100.44

213

10.9

15

11

71

71

606.00

189.76

212

31.8

49

29

263

263

2,384.23

1,212.18

234 146.2

197

93

252

252

20,064.30

1.809.52

215 148.6

190

124

3)

50

742.38

514.40 217

40.9

50

39

71

71

739.33

448.26

210

60.3

74

53

20

20

241.25

84.95 220

12.9

18

10

167

167 1,055,25

336

> 336 14,055.00

692.02 1,579.08

243

78.0

113

27

237 192.0

218

196

Carried forward,

* Temporarily closed.

3,343 2,074 5,417 |$62,572.09 |$20,106.28

† Grant included in the Grant made to the F. E. S., Praya West School.

Attendance Registers lost.

3,211.5

4,596

2,510

TABLE III-STATISTICS regarding Attendance at GRANT-IN-AID SCHOOLS,—Continued.

497

Number of Scholars Attending Schools.

Name of Schools.

Ex- penses.

Boys. Girls. Total.

Amount of Grant.

Number Average

of Daily School Atteud-

Days. ance.

Maxi- Mini-

mum

mum.

Monthly Monthly Enrol- Enrol- ment. ment.

Brought forward,

|3,343 |2,074 |5,117 $62,572.09 [$20,106.28

3,211.5 4,596

2,510

*

""

"

Nova Escola Portugueza

R.C.M., Italian Convent, English Division

19

Portuguese Division Bridges Street, English Division

91

Sacred Heart School, English Division

281 281

2,150.51

1,398.44

219 183.5

225

198

52

52

394.57

209.55

219

30.6

44

36

31

31

108.09

180.63

265

17.7

27

16

Portuguese Division

44

44

301.77

296.81

265

25.8

41

19

13

13

163.48

59.22

219

9.3

12

9

35

35

339.15

91.94

232

25.5

33

24

"

St. Francis, Portuguese Division,

English Division

27

85.41

83.24 230

13.8

20

14

159.62

222.76

230

30.3

37

33

Victoria Portuguese School, Portuguese Division

11

17

84.73

235

13.2

16

9

"

"

多多

Engligh Division

498.23

17

10

27

93.77

242

13.8

18

11

Victoria English School

278

278

616.13

254

79.1

136

31

"

49

19

49

6,057.24

""

Į 200.87

250

28.9

40

16

Total,

| 3,649 |2,667 |6,316 $72,830.16 $23,644.37

3,683.0 5,245

2,926

TABLE IV.-Average Expense of each Scholar at Government Schools under the Inspectorate of Schools and at the Grant-in-Aid Schools during the Year 1899.*

1.-DIRECT EXPENDITURE ON GOVERNMENT SCHOOLS.

Cost of working the Schools irrespective of cost of erection or repairs of Buildings.)

1.-BELILIOS PUBLIC SCHOOLS,-

Expenditure,

Deduct School Fees,

$3,302.87 772.50

$ 2,530.37

$ 4,896.13

$22,245.59

2.-OTHER DEPARTMENTAL SCHOOLS,-

Cost to Government, in 1899,

II.-EXPENDITURE ON THE GRANT-IN-AID SCHOOLS.

Total Cost to Government, in 1899,

III. AVERAGE COST OF EACH SCHOLAR.

(Calculated by Enrolment.)

Average Cost, to Government of each Scholar,—

1. At Belilios Public School,.

2. At Other Departmental Schools, 3. At Grant-in-Aid Schools,

9.92

4.11

3.52

IV.—AVERAGE COST OF EACH SCHOLAR.

(Calculated by the Average Daily Attendance.)

Average Cost, to Government of each Scholar,-

1. At Belilios Public School,

2. At Other Departmental Schools,

3. At Grant-in-Aid Schools,

20.14

8.03

4.72

*The above expenditure does not include the cost of Direction, Inspection or Repairs to buildings, nor, in the case of Grant-in-Aid Schools, Building Grants.

TABLE V.-Summary shewing the Number of Schools under the Inspectorate, and the Number of Scholars attending them during the last Eleven Years and in the Years 1869 and 1879.

SCHOOLS.

SCHOLARS.

Government.

YEARS.

Total.

English.

Chinese.

Chinese.

Grant-ln-Aid.

Government.

English &

Portugnese.

Grand

Total.

Total.

English.

Chinese.

Grant-in-Aid.

Total.

English.

Portuguese.

Chinese.

Grand

Total.

Total. Boys. Girls.

Percentage of Expen- diture on Education

to

Revenue.

1869

1879.

1889

1890.

1891

1892.

046776

18

18

18

27

31

3

28

34

14

35

15

35

16

34

19

1893.

23

1894.

19

1895.

1896.

1897.

1898.

15

175に誘ったに

16

19

50 222

622 .622 1.231 1.453

55

69

103 503

871

113 255 1,374 1,146

1,049

61

76

111 577

862

65

116 623

809

95

129 678

882

81

109

132 731

99

613 118 710 572

106

104

77

1899.

12

23

73

96

121 696 412 119 755 380 100 115 798 467 TOU 115 891 554 108 886 558

211 1,439 | 1,055 116 1.432 | 1,135 184 1,660 1,259 186 1,344 1,477 186 1,282 1,529 201 1,10 1,527 209 1,135 1,553 244 1,265| 1,532 193 1,445 1,869 190 1,444 2.353 153

622 519 103 1.4172,870 2,260 610 3,457 4,814 6,188 4,072| 2,116 3.485 4,656| 6,095 | 3,771 | 2.324 3.803 5,132 | 6,564 | 3,773| 2,791 4.210 5,655 7,215 4.228 | 2,987 4,587 6,250| 7,599| 4,332| 3.262 4,234 5,964 7,246 | 4,131 | 3,115 3,948 5,684 6,792 | 3.819 | 2,973 3.381 5.178 6.313 | 3,613 | 2,700 3.797 5.522 | 6.787 3,752 | 3,035

1.05

3.14

2.72

2.80

3.26

3.29 3.22

2.07

2.37

2.52

2.18

3.823| 5.882 | 7,327 | 4,219 3.108

1.66

3,810 6,816| 7,760 4,502) 3,258

1.24.

498

TABLE VII.-Percentage of Passes in each Standard in each Class of School, at the Annual Examination

of the Grant-in-Aid Schools in 1899.

ORDINARY SUBJECTS.

SPECIAL SUBJECTS.

NEEDLEWORK.

Standard.

I.

II. III. IV. V. VI. VII. Total.

I.

II. | III. | IV.| V. | VI. VII. Total. Failed. Fair. Good.

Very Good.

92

81

78

79 73 84 94 100 80 3.2

23.0 51.0 22.8

:

100100 100 100

3.0

37.1

60.0

1

Class I.........

89 89 87 94 €9 94

100

12265

Class 11,

100 100

94 100

88 100

80

96

97

Class III,

35

96

33

9

95

87 75

80 81

71

1383

93

3

.

:

:

:

:

72 59 65 70

66

1.5 52.1

46.4

TABLE VIII.--Percentage of Passes in the various subjects in which the Graní-in-Aid Schools

were examined in 1899.

Class of

Schools.

I.

Name of Schools.

American Board Mission, Bridges Street (Boys),

Total.

Reading.

Dicta-

tion.

Arith-

metic.

Gram-

mar.

Geogra-

phy.

Elemen-

tary

Science.

History.

93.61

11

19

"

>>

Queen's Rd. West (Boys), Háwan (Girls)......

29

"

Chungwan (Girls),

95.74 93.61

100.00 100.00 100.00

93.18 100.00 93.18 95.24

100.00 100.00

:

20.00

100.00

100.00

100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00

**

"

Tsat-tsz-mui (Boys),

...

*

"

Mongkok-tsui (Boys),

""

19

"

*

19

11

""

St. Stephen's Baxter Memorial (Girls),

Basel Mission, Shamshuipo (Boys),

Shaukiwán (Boys), Tokwawan (Boys),

C.M.S., St. Stephen's Chinese School (Boys),

**

No. 2 (Boys).

Pottinger Street (Boys),

Saiyingpun (Boys),

Lyndhurst Terrace (Girls),

66.66 88.88 100.00 100.00 | 160.00

84.61 100.00 79.41 90.76 98.46 93.84 96.07 89.09 98.18 90.90 87.50 100.00 100.00

96.29 100.00 | 96.29

53.84

100.00

100.00

100.00 100.00

100.00

100.00 95.45

33.33 50.00

100.00

94.28

100.00 100.00

86.11

100.00 100.00

70.37

29.62

100.00 88.88

93.10

100.00

96.42 100.00 96.42 86.36 34.78 86.95 30.43 53.84

100.00 100.00

100.00

95.65 100.00

96.66 100.00 96.66 80.00

100.00

96.66 100.00

19

Third Street (Girls),

100.00 100.00 94.73 100.00

100.00

100.00 100.00

??

Yaumati (Boys),

...

...

Hunghòm (Girls),

80.76 100.00

80.76

100.00

100.00 100.00

"

Quarry Bay (Girls),

77.77 100,00 77.77 83.33

100.00

100.00 100.00

""

Aberdeen School (Boys),

60.00 93.33 66.66

Aplichau (Girls),

77.77 100.00 88.88

"

High Street (Girls),

11

:>

""

13

++

יי

""

Stanley School (Girls),

""

"

21.

11

**

"1

11

11

19

F.E.S., Bonham Road, Chinese Division (Girls),

Queen's Road West (Girls),

Saiyingpun Praya, (Girls),

Pottinger Street (Girls),

Shaukiwan (Girls),

Tokwawan (Girls),

Yaumati (Girls),

L.M.S., Square Street (Boys),

Wantsai Chapel (Boys),

Yaumati (Boys),

Shektongtsui (Boys),

97.29 100.00 97.29

97.29

100.00

100.00 100.00 90.90 | 100.00

100.00

100.00 100.00 100.00 86.20 100.00 100.00 100.00 86.66 23.06 64.10 11.86 5.12 100.00 100.00 100.00

100.00

100.00

83.33

100.00

96.42 100.00 96.42 100.00 100.00 100.00

100.00

100.00 100.00 88.88 100,00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00

100.00 100.00

100.00 66.66

100.00 89.74 37.50

100.00 100.00 100.00 | 85.71

90.00

...

...

...

...

...

....

6.25

...

90.00

100.00 100.00

...

100.00 100.00 | 100.00 95.74 96.29 100.00 98.14 90.00

100.00

100.00 100.00

...

100.00

100.00 92.85 | 100,00

96.29 100.00 96.29 84.00

100.00

100.00 100.00

50.00

11

Saiyingpun, 1. Division (Boys),

II.

"

J

19

(Boys),

19

"

Hunghòm (Boys).

"

Hospital Chapel (Boys),

91.48 87.87 91.48 59.45 84.24 96.96 87.27 80.00 53.84 84.61 61.53 100.00 87.80 92.68 95.12 82.60

97.87 100.00

100.00

100.00 100.00 100.00

92.30 100.00

100.00 88.88

""

Shektongtsui (Girls),

100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00

100.00

100.00 100.00

11

"

99

19

39

Saiyingpun, Second Street, I. Div. (Girls),...

II. (Boys),..

"

Ui-hing Lane, I. Division (Girls),

II.

"

19

91

(Girls),

*

11

Tanglungchau No. 1 (Boys),

>>

19

No. 2 (Boys),

19

Square Street (Girls),

":

Taikoktsui (Boys),

70.21 100.00 74.46 65.71 90.19 80.39 90.19

68.18 92.18 96.87 93.75 96.87 68.42 89.47 73.68 12.50 92.72 100.00 94.44 93.61 90.00 100.00 96.65 84.00 93.54 100.00 93.54 89.47 60,00 92.00 64.00 47.82

100.00

100.00 83.33| 100.00

100.00

100.00

100.00

...

75.00

...

"

"

Matauwai (Boys),.

81.25 87.50 93.75

15.38

""

""

19

99

Shaukiwan (Boys),

Third Street (Boys),

D'Aguilar Street (Girls),....

93.79 100.00 96.55

96.29

74.07 96.29 77.77

65.00

96.55 100,00 96.55

72.00

100.00

96.19 95.83 100.00 100.00 Failed

...

89.47 100.00 100.00 100.00 14.28

96.66 88.88 100.00 80.00 100.00 85.71 100.00 75.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00

...

66.66

41.66

...

""

99

Kau-ü-fong (Girls),

***

*

Tanglungchau (Girls),..

100.00 100.00 100.00 83.33

100.00

100.00 100.00

29

Aberdeen Street (Girls),..

90.00 100.00

90.00 | 100,00

80.00

100.00 66.66

""

""

Wantsai Chapel (Girls),

86.95 97.10

89.85

92.85

100.00

100.00 100.00

39

Staunton Street (Girls),

100.00

100.00 | 100.00.

100.00

100.00 100.00

R.C.M., Bridges Street, Chinese Division (Girls),

95.45 100.00 95.45 89.47

100.00

100.00 100.00

"

"

Aberdeen School (Girls),

100.00 100.00 | 100.00| 100.00

100.00 100.00

""

"

Holy Infancy School (Mixed),

79.66 100.00

71.18

92.85

100.00

100.00 100.00 | 100.00

*1

""

Yaumati (Girls),

91.66 97.22 91.66

82.60

100.00

100.00 100.00

"

Shaukiwan (Girls),

100.00 100 00 | 100,00

93.75

100.00

100.00 100.00

14

"1

Hunghòm (Girls),

92.30

100.00

88.46

93.33

100.00

""

Italian Convent, Chinese School (Girls),

83.33

96.29

75.92

85.45

"

"

"

19

"

19

19

Sacred Heart Sch., Chinese Division (Girls),.

Wesleyan Mission, Spring Gardens (Boys), .

Wellington Street (Boys).

(Girls),

Lower Lascar Row (Boys), Wantsai School (Boys), Graham Street (Girls),

83.33 | 100.00

77.77

91.44

100.00

94.33

96,22 98.11 69.44

...

93.61 97.87 93.61

100.00 87.50 | Failed 100.00 91,17| 100.00 100.00 66.66 100.00 95,83

...

100.00 100.00

...

...

78.43 90.19 78.43 57.57

100.00

100.00 92.85

:

NAME OF SCHOOLS.

TABLE VI.--RESULTS of the EXAMINATION of the GRANT-IN-AID SCHOOLS in 1899, una

NCA

NUMBER OF SCHOLARS WHO PASSED.

Class of School.

No. of Scholars Presented.

No. of Scholars Examined.

Stand. I.

Stand. II.

Stand. III.

Stand. IV.

Stand. V.

Stand. VI.

Stand. VII.

Stand. I.

Stand. II.

Stand. III.

Stand. IV.

Stand. V.

Stand. VI.

Stand. VII.

Ordinary Subjects.

Special Subjects.

Ordinary Sal

Stand. I.

Stand. II.

Stand. III.

Stand. IV.

1.- American Board Mission, Bridges Street, (Boys),

2.-

3.-

"

4.-

5.-

55

6.-

"

Queen's Road West, (Boys) Háwan, (Girls).

15

Chungwan, (Girls),

47

8.-

9.-

"

**

15

Tsat-tszmui, (Boys),

7. Basel Mission, Shamshuipo, (Boys),

Shaukiwan, (Boys),.. Tokwawan, (Boys),.

10.-C. M. S., St. Stephen's Chinese School, (Boys),

Mongkoktsui, (Boys),

63

11.-

53

No. 2, (Boys),

28

12.- 13.-

"}

Pottinger Street, (Boys),

33

29

}}

Saiyingpun, (Boys),

14.-

91

St. Stephen's Baxter Memorial, (Girls),

23

15.

"

Lyndhurst Terrace, (Girls),.

33

16.-

"

Third Street, (Girls),

21

17.

15

Yaumati, (Boys),.

18.

Hunghom, (Girls),

26

19.- 20.-

Quarry Bay, (Girls),

10

"

Aberdeen School, (Boys),

15

21.- +

Aplichau, (Girls),..

22.-F. E. S., Bonham Road, Chinese Division, (Girls),

38

23.-

24.-

25.

26.

"

27.

"

28.

"

29.--. 13

30. —

High Street, (Girls),

13

Queen's Road West, (Girls), .

Saiyingpun Praya, (Girls),.

29

"

Pottinger Street, (Girls),

Stanley School, (Girls),

Shaukiwán, (Girls),

Tokwawan, (Girls),.

Yaumati, (Girls),

31. -L. M. S., Square Street, (Boys),

Wantsai Chapel, (Boys),

Yaumati, (Boys),

Shektongtsui, (Boys),

Saiyingpun I. Division, (Boys),

II.

18

47

32

28

23

56

37.

·49.-

+

32.

"

33.-

"

34.-

"+

35.

""

36.

>

(Boys),

1

Hunghòm, (Boys),

38.-

Hospital Chapel, (Boys),

39.-

་་

Shektongtsui, (Girls),.

40.

"

41.

42.

31

43.

54

44.

45.

46.

47.-

11

48.

"

55

50.

51.- 52.- 53.- 54.-

55

"

"5

Aberdeen Street, (Girls),

55.-

"

Wantsai Chapel, (Girls),

56.-

55

Staunton Street, (Girls),

58.-

11

Aberdeen School, (Girls),

59.

11

Holy Infancy School, (Mixed),.

60.-

"

Yaumati, (Girls), . .

61.

55

Shaukiwan, (Girls),

62.

15

Hunghòm, (Girls),

63.

多多

Italian Convent, Chinese School, (Girls),.

64.-

"

66.-

"

"

67.

11

(Girls),.

68.

"

"

Lower Lascar Row (Boys),

69.-

35

35

70.-

13

15

Graham Street, (Girls),

Total,

55

47

33

14

I

"

(Girls),

Saiyingpun, Second Street, I. Division, (Girls),..

Ui-hing Lane, I. Division (Girls),

II.

"

Tanglungchau, No. 1 (Boys),

"

No. 2 (Boys),

Square Street, (Girls),

Taikoktsui, (Boys),

Matauwai, (Girls),

Shaukiwan, (Boys), Third Street, (Boys), D'Aguilar Street, (Girls), Kau-ü-fong, (Girls), Tanglungchau, (Girls),

II. 55 (Boys),.

57.-R. C. M., Bridges Street, Chinese Division, (Girls),

Sacred Heart School Chinese Div., (Girls),.

65.-Wesleyan Mission, Spring Gardens, (Boys)...

Wellington Street, (Boys),.

91

Wantsai School, (Boys),.

9:54:08OTKORAON : :****** :*30*26****RER :370ANASARAB8:19 18

47 23

14 7 3 44 23 10

15

6

.

3

24

34 10 3

9

65

26 19

55

10

63

28

54 12 23 17

1222

11

21

11

25

10

NWNNW:

3

25

17

21

7

33

22

9

27 5 6

2

33 14 11

18

28 9 11

23 2 3

3

30

12

9

10 9

5

4

26

6

10

9

15 3

2

9

4

37

1

5

11

3

1

28

18 11

11

30 2

32 7 16

28 11

23

13

18

54 10 21

19

26

14

54

30 10

10

18

6

27

9

7

8

13

5

47

11 15

17

7

4

33

13 11

17

3

13

2

6

45

41

16

+

18

8

2

1

50

51

27

19

33

18

29

29

23

21

21

20

26

56

53

*O*2885RERNA IKADONADORA***

13

A

17

15

10

11

7 $

3

28

18

16

12

6

6

1

1

15 16 13

22

30 9 10 8

18

31 14 7

B

6

16 5

11

10

27

10

2

29

10.

6

20

69 21 14

2

28

10 10

-

:::::

22 8

19 14 2

12

59 18 11

2

18

36

29

15 11 16 9

13

26 15 2

54 14

11 16

18 G

53 15 12 23

7

18

49

54

17 12 22

51

14

10

3 17 €

3

14

5

::

:::

::

::

6

5

2,1572,063 637 505 418 114

42 19 5.561 317 143

47

11 15

1

89

03 62

8

71.- Basel Mission, High Street, (Girls),

72.--Berlin Foundling House School, (Girls),

73.-C. M. S., Victoria Home and Orphanage, Chi. Div., (Girls), II

===

59

58 13 18

25

43

85

20

4

43

15

002111

10

7 5

643

926

3

1

3

.~~

756

2

2

Total,.

127

121 32 27

17 13

7

18

fin

4

74.-C. M. S., St. Stephen's Anglo-Chinese, (Boys),

III

173

164 111

75.- 76.-

51

Morrison English School, (Boys),.

Victoria Home and Orphange, Eng. Div., (Girls),

III

16

24 14 11 2

16

$

III

11

11 4 5 1

77.-Wesleyan Mission, Lyndhurst Terrace, Eng. Sch., (Boys),.

III

25

23

11 10

1

::::

78.-St. Paul's College School (Boys),.

III

135

135

58

29

28

9

79.—Diocesan School, (Boys),

III

138

136 26 17

25 21

on: : : : :

:::

:

::

:

:::

:

:::

:

:::

1

: ai

2

41

::::

:::

:

:~:

:::

:::::5

:::

1

2

81-

80.-F. E. S., Bonham Road, English Division, (Girls), 31.-1. M. S., Taipingshan, English School, (Boys),

82.-

East Point, English School, (Boys).

93.-R. C. M., Cathedral School, I. Division, (Boys),

St. Joseph's College School, (Boys),

ΕΠΙ

44

43 6 10 11 7

3

III

66

61 37

11

III

11

11 8 3

III

3༽

87

27

20 15

11

III

147

142

17 26 31 14 15

:::2:

10

22

85.- 86.-

>>

Italian Convent, English Division, (Girls),..

III

114

112 22 22

16 19 15

55

"

Portuguese Division, (Girls),

III

10

19

S 4

7

87.

*

Bridges Street, English Division, (Girls),

HI

21

21 11 8 2

88.

"

Portuguese Division, (Girls),.

32

32 7 11

12

69.

55

Nova Escola Portugueza, (Girls),

III

7

7

4

1

90.-

"

91.

ور

Sacred Heart School English Division, (Girls), St. Francis, Portuguese Division, (Girls),

III

12

12

5

III

9

9 2

92.-

14

English

>>

(Girls).

III

25

21 10

93.

"

94.-

་་

++

Victoria Port. School, Port. Division, (Mixed),.

Eng. Division, (Mixed),

III

12

10 5

III

11

9

4 3

95.-Victoria English School, (Boys);

III

III

20

73 1 64 6 12 20

96.-

11

>

(Girls),.

Total,

3 2

1,2111,166 398 239 196

95

66

34 22

Grand Total,.

3,495 3,350 1,067 771 631 222 115

71

$1 31 561 817 143 109

$::::::

2

62 69

61 49

15

11

28

69

61 101 74 | 91

3

1. Cant nominally earned

GRANT-IN-AID SCHOOLS in 1899, under the provisions of the Scheme of 19th August, 1893.

Ars who Passed.

Special Subjects.

NUMBER OF SCHOLARS WHO FAILED.

Ordinary Subjects.

TOTALS.

Needle Work.

Special Subjects.

[Ordinary Special

Subjects. Subjects.!

Stand. I.

Stand. II.

Stand. III.

Stand. IV.

Stand. V.

Stand. VI.

Stand. VII.

Stand. I.

Stand. II.

Stand. III.

Stand. IV.

Stand. V.

Stand. VI.

Stand. VII.

Stand. I.

Stand. II.

Stand. III.

Stand. IV.

Stand. V.

Stand. VI.

Stand. VII.

Passed.

Failed.

Passed.

21

12

3

25

21

33

22

18

ai nxi nei::::

4

18

26

14

18

6

13

17

3

6

18

2

1

17

11

7

12

22

11

18

3

5

10

12

18

3

13

6

11

18

3

14

5

2

561 317 143

47

::

:::

:::

:

:

62

88

1561 817 143 109

10

:::

:

Failed.

Failed.

Fair.

Good.

Very Good.

Average Daily Attendance

during the year.

Examination Grant.

Capitation Grant.

30 | Total Grant earned in 1899.

191.05

$

44

3

::

1-4

1

41

AN

2

41

22

4

13

59

49

49

35

63

33

52

2

31

5

1.

8

18

9

8 19

:::::::::

52.10

165.00

26.05

13.15

20

8

38.46

72.50 6.72 226.00

19.23

79.22 245.23

32.08

106.75! 16.04

• 122.79

62.76

275.75) #138

307.13

19.86

255.25 24.93

280.18

67.26

260.50 33.63 201.13

81.79

247.75 40.89

288.64

36.35

87.75 18.17

105.92

33

27 2

38.55

150.25 19.27

169.52

97 1 19

3

30.11

127.50 15.05

142.55

3

15 7

6

35.15

62.75 17,57

$0.32

29

16

4

28.41

180.50 14.20

194.70

19

16

11

19.41

102.50 9.70

112.20

22.13

97.50

11.06

108.56

.

.

8.91

47.50

4 15

51.95

16.01

39.00.

8.02

47.02

8.91

32.50

4.92

37.42

36

41.58

339 25

20.79

3601.01

11

2

11.83

56.50]

5.91

62.41

22.10

8

1:00 :::

::

28

26

15

9.99

166.00 4.99

170.00

18

9

17.53

89.50 8.76

98.26

9 30

3

41.05

66.50 20.52

87.02

32

15

7

15

26.85

176.50)

13.43

189,23

::

27

30.56

129.50 15.28

141.78

23

9

19.59 102.75 9.79

112.51

:

:::::::::::::::

8-8222:

54

45

2

51.58 285.50

25.79

#11.29

52 2 27

3

21

1 21

50.74 28.22 130.25!

220.50

25.37

245.87

14.11

144.36

43

4

22 15

37.26

212.50 18.63

231.13

5

20 5

34.77

118.75

17.38

136,18

7

6

17.02

41.60

8.51

19.61

36

5 19

42.95

154.75

21.47

176:22

8

3

9.51

39.25

4.75

14,00

33

14 23 12

18

37.96

187.75!

18.98

206.73

46 5

30

14

41.14

253.75

22.07

275.82

59

31

59.94

317.00

29.97

#46.97

::

13

6

5

23 16

52.00 11.58

63,58

51

44

55.02

270.25 27.51

297.76

27

21

29

17

2

15

10

11 12

13

3

3 12

28 1

26

:::::

26.94

126.25

13.-17

139.72

18 5

34.99

145.25

17.49

162.74

21.78

84.00 10.89

9189

59.50

+ 59.50

:::::

26.89 154.25 13.44

167.69

2:1

13

28

1

13

10

5

18

27.19 104.75 13.50 21.63

10.81 161.00,

118.31

1741

15

8

12

22.61

119.25 11.30

130.55

18

2

16

2

16

16.97

102,25

8.18

110.73

:::::

60 9 39

23

32

57.39

368.25 28.65

396.20

28

12

28.10

147.00

11.05

161.05

21

17

1

10

22 83

118.25 11.41

129.66

19

12

5

22.00

83.50 11.00

91.50

47 12 39

3

17 26

33 3 19

.4

2

19

64.43 36.55 177.00

305.50 32.21

337.71

18.27

195.27

29

15

27.67 134.50 13.83

118.33

24

2 14

45

9

47

32.58 120,00 69.9.1 362.00

16.29

136.29

31.97

396,97

15 3 17

8

17.70

50

3 25

11

52.16

$6.50 248.00

8 89

95.39

26.04

274.08

:::

44

11

1

5

· 10:

2

:

:::

ex

1 5

2

:::

:

1

15 1 89 63

:

5

0

62 8 14|

1

3

1 128 88 34

18

m:註:

:::

::::

57.60

232.77 27.78

$260,55

33.00

142,66 15.91

$158,57

17.65

181.00 23.82

207.82

40 ii 19

14 G 20 23

49.88

244.75 24.94 260.63

-

1

1

2

:

:::

:

:::

:::

:

:

:::

:::

:::

1,866 239 1,100 280

21 185 409 183 2,154.57 10,004,871,030.75 11,035.62

57

: : 00

3 19 19 50.43

6

16

14 28

24.07 41.36

450.00 37.82 487.82

18.05 211.50 315,00 31.02

223.55 376.02

3

39 63

115.86 1,006,50 86.89

1,098.39

:::::

38

30

10

:::::

201

41

2

:::

:00:

:::

118 3

میں

:

: : : : : :

13

:::::::

: : : : : : : : : : : :::::::

:

:

1159

le

188.97 1,114.00 188.97 1,302.97

13

1

30.83

82.00

30.83 112,83

10

1

10.91

$9.50

10.94 i

100.41

22

31.76

158.00

31.76

189.76

181

4

146.18

1,060.00 146.18

1.212.18

9

11 126

10 130

148.52 1,661.00 148.52

1,809,52

41

2

16

26

55

6

1!

73

14

10 6

12

116

26 52 52

40.90 60.26 12.95 78.02 614.00 192.08

478.50 388.00 60.26

40.90

514.40

418.26

72.00 12.95

81.95

78.02

692.02

1,387.00 192.08

1,579.08

[103

9 9 1

40

183.44

1,215.00 183,41

1,393 41

19

8 30.55

179.00 30,55

209.55

21

6 17.63

163.0 17.68

180.63

30

N.

2

10

25.81 271.00 25.81

296.81

7

9.22

50.00 9.22

59.22

25.44

66.50 25.41

91.94

13.74

69.50 13.74

83 24

30.26

192.50 30.26

222.76

13.23

71.50 13.23

84.78

9 2

43 21

13 7

13.77

80.00 13.77

93.77

79.13

537,00 79.13 616.13

6

25.87

172.00 28.87 200.87

4

69

49

61

15

11

28 31

16

!

9 | 10

3

7 23

47

27

26 1,050 118 211

143

$1

69

61 101

91 39 31

'1 138

91

41 41 51

28

26 3,034 360 1,319|123

4 135 115 1,412.50 10,172.00 1,412.50 11,584,50

24 19 583 361 3,682.9 |21,183.37|2,530.14 23,713,51

TOTAL,...

.$23,644.37.

499

NAME OF SCHOOLS.

Shektongtsui, (Girls),.

Saiyingpun, Second Street, I. Division, (Girls),.

Ui-hing Lane, I. Division (Girls),

#

II.

Tanglungchau, No. 1 (Boys),

33.-

"

34.- 35.- 36. 37.- 38. 39.- 40.-- 41.-

"

*

(Boys),

"

Hunghom, (Boys),

Hospital Chapel, (Boys),

"1

19

#

"

II.

42.-

"

43.-

" (Girls),

44.-

45.-

J

46.-

""

47.-

"

48.

"

·49.-

>>

50.--

"

31.-

52.-

"

53.

>>

54.-

"

55.—

56.-

No. 2 (Boys),

Square Street, (Girls),

Taikoktsui, (Boys),

Matauwai, (Girls),

Shaukiwan, (Boys),

Third Street, (Boys),

D'Aguilar Street, (Girls), Kan-ii-fong, (Girls), Tanglungchau, (Girls), Aberdeen Street, (Girls),

Wantsai Chapel, (Girls),

Staunton Street, (Girls),

55

(Boys),..

57.-R. C. M., Bridges Street, Chinese Division, (Girls),

Aberdeen School, (Girls),

Holy Infancy School, (Mixed),

Tsat-tszmui, (Boys),

1.- American Board Mission, Bridges Street, (Boys),

47

23

15 6

2.- 3.- 4.-.

+

+

5.- 6.-

8.-

9.-

"

Queen's Road West, (Boys) Háwan, (Girls),

I

14

7

3

1

19

Chungwan, (Girls), .

14 23 10

3

}}

Mongkoktsui, (Boys),

34

10 3

65 26 19

Shaukiwan, (Boys),. Tokwawan, (Boys),..

55 10 21

63 28 25

54 12

23

6

7.-Basel Mission, Shamshuipo, (Boys),

"

1

10.-C. M. S., St. Stephen's Chinese School, (Boys),

او

11.-

12.

13

13.- 14.-- 15.- 16.--

}}

"

17.-

"

18.-

19.-

20.-

55

21.-

"

No. 2, (Boys),

Pottinger Street, (Boys),

Saiyingpun, (Boys),

St. Stephen's Baxter Memorial, (Girls),

Lyndhurst Terrace, (Girls),.

Third Street, (Girls),

Yaumati, (Boys),

Hunghom. (Girls),

Quarry Bay, (Girls),

Aberdeen School, (Boys),

Aplichau, (Girls),...

22.-F. E. S., Bonham Road, Chinese Division, (Girls),

23.

"

24.- 25. 26.-

"

>>

"

27.

""

28.

5+

29.--

30.

وو

High Street, (Girls),

Queen's Road West, (Girls),

Saiyingpun Praya, (Girls),..

Pottinger Street, (Girls),

Stanley School, (Girls),

Shaukiwán, (Girls),

Tokwawan, (Girls),

Yaumati, (Girls),

31.-L. M. S., Square Street, (Boys),

32.-

:

Wantsai Chapel, (Boys),

Yaumati, (Boys),

Shektongtsui, (Boys),

Sairingpun 1. Division, (Boys),

II.

I

9:35:865*2****35:2242** 18DEMAR :BB2-4-35UNDBAR-ACR :RECANA88858°¤::$

com.

cn co.

Class of School.

No. of Scholars Preser

No. of Scholars Exami

Stand. I.

Stand. II.

Stand. III.

Stand, IV.

Stand. V.

Stand. VI.

Ordinary Subjects.

Special Subjects.

Ordinary Subjects

Stand. VII.

Stand. I.

Stand. II.

Stand. III.

Stand. IV.

Stand. V.

Stand, VI.

Stand. VII.

Stand. I.

Stand. II.

Stand. III.

Stand. IV.

Stand. V.

:

:::

21

12

3

33

27 5

33 14 11 28 9 11

23 2 3

31 | 14

25

3

16 5

20

11

ܗ܂

30 12 9

50 -

19 9

5

26

6 1

10

15

9

4

37

2

11

28

18

11

30

2

32 7 16

28 11

23 13

18

54 10

26

51 30 10

10

18

27

8

13

47 11 15

17

33 13 11

3

17

13

76

41 13

18

8

2

1

47

13

5 17

51 15

10

64 28

18

19 6

6

55

15 16

30

6

10

22

18

11

6

10

16128

11 7

16 12

.00

11

3

27

30

29

21

20

69 24

14

3

28 10 10

22 8

10

19 14 2

59 18 11

12

18

14

36

29

15 11 16 9

3

10

13

26

26 15 54 14

6

6

11

16

18 6

5

7 4

53

15 12 23

7

18

58.

59.- 60.- 61.- 62.- 63.-

"

3)

3

"}

Yaumati, (Girls), . .

Shaukiwan, (Girls),

Hanghom, (Girls),

૫. ન

39

61.-

>>

66.-

21

Italian Convent, Chinese School, (Girls),. Sacred Heart School Chinese Div., (Girls),.

65.-Wesleyan Mission, Spring Gardens, (Boys),..

Wellington Street, (Boys),.

67.- 68.- 69.- 70.-

JA

91

"

(Girls),.

47 12 22 10

3

Lower Lascar Row (Boys),

"

Wantsai School, (Boys),..

"

15

Graham Street, (Girls),

54

Total,

51 14 3 17 6

2,157 2,063 637 505 418 114

14

5

42 19

5 561 317 143

47

71.- Basel Mission, High Street, (Girls),

II

59

58

13 18 10

72.--Berlin Foundling House School, (Girls), 73.-C. M. S., Victoria Home and Orphanage, Chi. Div., (Girls), II

II

25

20

4

43

43 15

121

ONS

2

5

344

3

—♡

1

3

756

11

15

1

89 63 62

8

141

1

22

:::

Total,..

127

121 32 27 17 13 7

18

4

74.-C. M. S., St. Stephen's Anglo-Chinese, (Boys),

III

173

164 111

75.- 76.-

Morrison English School, (Boys),..

III

16

14 11

24 2

16

S

"

Victoria Home and Orphange, Eng. Div., (Girls), III 77.-Wesleyan Mission, Lyndhurst Terrace, Eng. Sch., (Boys),.

11

11 4 5

III

25

23 10 11 1

78.—St. Paul's College School (Boys),..

[11

135

135 58 29 28

79.-Diocesan School, (Boys),

III

138

186 26 17 25

80.-F. E. S., Bonham Road, English Division, (Girls), 81.-L. M. S., Taipingshan, English School, (Boys),

III

44

43 6 10 11

III

66

61 37

11

82.-

East Point, English School, (Boys),

III

11

11 8

3

::::::

::

:::

:

:::

:

:::

:::

:

::

:::

:::

cr

5 2

:

:::

:

~ ::

1

2

16

00

38

30

21

3

84.-

85.-

"

83.-R. C. M., Cathedral School, I. Division, (Boys),

St. Joseph's College School, (Boys),

Italian Convent, English Division, (Girls),.

III

99

87

27

20

15 11

10

III

147

142 17 26 31

14

15

19

III 114

112 22 22 16 19 15

6

2

2

10

6

4

86.

+

"

Portuguese Division, (Girls),

III

19

19 4 8 7

87.

*

Bridges Street, Englisli Division, (Girls),

III

21

21

11 8 2

88.-

15

Portuguese Division, (Girls),.

III

32 |

32 7 11

12

89.-

55

Nova Escola Portugueza, (Girls),

III

7

7 1 2 1

90.

55

91.

وو

Sacred Heart School English Division, (Girls), St. Francis, Portuguese Division, (Girls),

III

12

12 5

::

III

9

9

2

92.-

English

13

(Girls),

III

25

21 10

93.

94.-

Victoria Port. School, Port. Division, (Mixed),. Eng. Division, (Mixed),.

III

12

10 5 5

III

11

9 4 3

95.-Victoria English School, (Boys),..

965.-

*

53

(Girls),.

III 73 III 20

64 6 12 20 3 2 3

Total,

1,2111,166 398 239 196

95 66 34

22

:::

30 2

62

69

49 61 15

11 | 28

Grand Total,.

| 3,4953,350 1,067 771 631 222 115

71

31 561 817 143 109

$1 69

61 101

31 16

71 91 39 31

Education Department, Hongkong, 12th February. 1900.

* Under C.S.O. 297 of 1900, a deduction was made from the Grant nominally earned ard the

† Under C.S.O. 297 of 1900, the Teacher's share ($14.87) is forfeited.

No Examination held. Grant assessed under C.S.O, 2732 of 1899.

:::

16

18

12

N

6

· 30

Special Subjects.

Ordinary Sabjects.

}

Special Subjects.

Ordinary Special

Subjects. Subjects.

: w:::

3

:

Stand. II.

Stand. III.

Stand. IV,

Stand. V.

Stand. VI.

Stand. VII.

Stand. I.

Stand. II.

Stand. III.

Stand. IV.

Stand, V.

Stand. VI.

Stand. VII.

Stand. I.

Stand. II.

Stand. III.

Stand. IV.

Stand. V.

Stand. VI.

Stand. VII.

Passed.

*

3

6

5

317 143

47 11

15

1 89 63 62

141

1 128 88 34 18

1

I

:

::::

:::

*

:10:

::

1

30

:::: 15:

::::::::

41 38

10

2:

er

5

2

5681 : : : 19:::::

~

:::

1

1

1

2

10

1

4

::::::::::::::::::::

:::

::

Failed.

Passed.

Failed.

Failed.

Fair.

Good.

Very Good.

Average Daily Attend. during the year.

Examination Grant,

Capitation Grant.

Total Grant earned in

$

44

14

41

22

59

19

63

52

18

oui aasisi w

52.10

165.00

2

13.15

41

20

8

38.46

72.50 226.00 19.23

26.05 191.05

6.72

79.22 245.23

13

9

32.08

106.75/ 16.04

* 122.79

49

62.76

275,75 31.88

307.13

35

19.86

255.25 21.93

280.18

33

$7,26

260.50 33.63

291.13

31

81.79

247.7 40.89

288.64

36.35

87.75 18.17

105.92

33

27

38.55

150.25

19.27

169.52

27

19

30.11

127.50 15.05

142.55

8 15

35.15

62.75) 17.57

>0.32

29

16

28.41

180.50 14.20

194.70

19

19.41

102.50 9.70

112.20

21

22.13

97.50 11.06

108,56

8.91

47.50 445

51.95

16.01

39.00

8.02

17.02

8.91

32.50

4.92

37.42

36

24

11.58

339 25)

20.79

360.01

11.83

56.50!

5.91

62.41

22.10

28

9.89

166.00 4.99

170.99

18

13

17.53

89.50 8,76

98.26

9

11.05

66.50

20.52

87.02

32

15

26.84

176.56

13.43

189.93

27

30.56

129.50

15.28

144.78

23

6

19.59

102.75 9.79

112.51

54

45

51.58

52

27

26

21

43

4 22 15

285.50 25.79 50.74

220.50 25.37 245.87 28.22 130.25 14.11 37.26

212.50 18.63

211.29

144.36

231.13

28

20 5

34.77

118.75 17.38

136.13

7

6

17.02

41.600

8.51

19,51

36

5

10 4

42.95

154.75

21.47

176:22

8

3

9.51

39.25

4.75

14.00

33 14 23 12

18

37.96

187.75

18.98

206.73

46

RQ 14

41.14

253.75

22.07

275.82

59 5 31

42

59.94

317.00

29.97

246.97

13

27

10

6429

1

23 16

52.00

11.58

63.58

44

3

53.02

270.25

27.51

297.76

21

26.94 126.25

13.47

139.72

17

18

34.99

1.45.25 17.49

162.74

11 12

21.78

.3 12

84.001 10.89 59.50

9189

† 59.50

26 1

26.89 154.25 13.44

167,69

13

27.19 104.75 13.59

118.31

13

5

21.63 161.00, 10.81

17181

:

15

22.61 119.25 11.30

130.55

18

16

16.97 102.25 8.18

110.73

60

9

39

57.89 368.25 28.65

396.90

28

28.10

147.00 14.05

161.05

21

17

22 83

118.25

11.41

129.66

19

12

5

22.00

83.50 11.00

94.50

17 12

39

26

64.43

305.50 32.21

837.71

33

3

19

36.55

177.00] 18.27

195.27

29

15

27.67 134.50 13.83

148.33

24

45

15 50

2833

14

32.58

120.00) 16.29

136.29

47

6

69.94

362.00 34.97

396.97

17 25

17.79

86.50 8 89 248.00 26.03

95.39

44 3

52.16

274.08 57.60 232.77 27.78 $260.55

33.00 142.66 15,91 $158.57 47.65 184.00 23.82 207,82

G 20 23 2 49.88 244.75 24.94 269.69

40 11 19 14

:

:::

:

:::

:

:::

:::

::::

::

1,866 239 1,100 280

21

57 1

201

41 2

:00:

8

3 19 19 50.43

6 16 14 28

185 409 183 2,154.57 10,004.87 1,030.75 11,035.62

450.00 37.82 487.82 24.07 211.50! 18.05 229.55 41.36 315.00 31.02

376.02

118 3 $

3

39 63

115.86 1,006.50 86.89

1,093.39

159

5

188.97

1,114.00 188.97

1,302.97

13

30.83

82.00 30.83

112.83

10

10.91

89.50 10.94

100.44

22

31.76

158.00 31.76

189.76

131

4

146.18

1,086.00 146.18 1,212.18

11 126

10 (130

42

41

2

148,52 26 40.00

55 6

1!

73

14 10

20

12

11 116

28 52

2

103

6

19

21

6 17.63 163.0V 17,63

30

2

7

418.26

81.95

692.02

1,579.08

40

183.44 1,215.00 183,44 #0.55 179.00 30,55

1,398 44

209.55

180.63

25.81

271.00 25.81

i

296.81

9.22

50.00 9.22

59.22

25.44

66.50] 23.41

91.94

13.74

69.50 13.74

83 24

30.26

192.50 30.26

222.76

13.23

71.50)

13.23

84.78

13.77

80.00

13.77 i

93.77

79.13 537,00

79.13

616.13

1,661.00 148.52 1,809.52 478.50 40.90 514.40 60.26 388.00 60.26 12.95

72.00 12.95 78.02 614.00 78.02 192.08 1,387.00 192.08

23

10

2

ה 30

10

شنا

3

43

21

6

4 13 7

17

:

62

69

49

61 15 11 28 31 16

9 | 10

3

7 23 47 27

26 1,050 118 241 143

1 B17 143 [109

$1 G9 GI OL 71 91 39 31

'1 138 91 41 41 51 28 25 3,031 360 1,319 423

ion was made from the Grant nominally earned ard the

her's share ($14.87) is forfeited.

ssed under C.S.O, 2732 of 1899.

r's share forfeited.

:

6 28.87 172.00 28.87 200.ST

4 135 115 1,412.50 10,172.00 1,412.50 11,584.50

24 192 583 361 3,682,9 21,183.37 2,530.14 23,713,51

TOTAL,.

A. W. BREWIN,

Inspretor of Schools,

.$23,644.37.

:

!

:

TABLE VIII.-Percentage of Passes,-Continued.

501

""

·99

"

29

19

>>

""

Class of

Schools.

II.

Name of Schools.

Basel Mission, High Street (Girls),

Berlin Foundling House School (Girls).

C.M.S., Vict. Home & Orphanage Chi. Div. (Girls),.

St. Stephen's English (Boys),

III.

""

:)

""

"

"2

""

""

Morrison English (Boys),

Vict. Home & Orphanage Eng. Div. (Girls),. Wesleyan Mission, Lyndhurst Ter. Eng. Sch. (Boys),. St. Paul's College School (Boys),.. Diocesan School (Boys), .

F.E.S., Bonham Road, English Division (Girls), L.M.S., Taipingshan, English School (Boys),.

East Point

(Boys),

R.C.M., Cathedral School, I. Division (Boys),.

St. Joseph's College School (Boys), Italian Convent, English Division (Girls),... Portuguese Division (Girls), Bridges Street, English Division (Girls),

Total.

History.

Repeti.

tion.

(Chinese.)

Expla.

nation.

(Chinese.)

Compo.

sition.

98.27 98.27 89.65 98.27 100.00 100.00 80.00 95.00 95,34 100.00 81.39 93.00 96.95 97.56 98.17 92.85 92.85 85.71

100.00

100.00

100.00

100.00

100.00

100.00

100.00

92.30

100.00 | 100.00 | 66.66 33.33

90.90 100.00

98.17 100.00 100.00 |100.00 | 100.00 90.90 100.00 100.00 100.00 | 50.00

98.07

95.65 95.65

95.65

$6.95 100.00 100.00

97.03

97.77

99.21

97.03 100.00

100.00

100.00

92.64

97.79

87.63

91.71 90.62

93.93 75.00 100.00

97.44

95.34, 100.00

97.14

83.72 100.00

73.33 100.00 100.00

100.00

90.16 98.36

96.72

95.08 |100.00

81.81

91.07

100.00 100.00 | 100,00| 100.00

83.90 93.10 52.87 81.69

99.01 87.50 98.21

100.00

88.50 77.77

78.30

91.67

77.46 84.53 85.60 $0.00 88.23 90.17 91.17 97.77 60.00 | 75.00

68.42

78.56

100.00

89.47

100.00

94.73 100.00 | 100.00

100.00

95.23

76.19

90.47 100.00

90.00

>>

"J

Portuguese Division (Girls).. Nova Escola Portugueza (Girls),

93.75

100.00

90.47

90.47 100.00

95.83

100.00

100.00

100.00

85.71 100.00 | 100.00

"

11

""

59

!!

97

";

Sacred Heart School, English Div. (Girls),... St. Francis, Portuguese Division (Girls),

English Division (Girls),

Victoria Portuguese Sch., Port. Div. (Mixed), Eng. Div. (Mixed),

71

"

Victoria English School (Boys),

(Girls),............

66.66

83.33

70.00

75.00 25.00 | 100.00

50.00

100.00

77.77 100.00

88.88

77.77 100.00

66.66

وو

95.83 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 81.81 100.00 100.00 67.18 98.43 75.00 65.00 100.00 100.00

91.66

75.00 100.00

95.83

90.00

100.00

...

90.90 66.66 68.75 81.25 70.00 73.33

66.66

Failed

67.18 Failed.

66.66

95.00

52.94 Failed.

42.85

100.00

229

13

No. 1900

HONGKONG.

EXTRACTS FROM DESPATCH No. 50 OF 16TH FEBRUARY, 1900, FROM THE SECRETARY OF STATE FOR THE COLONIES REGARDING THE MEMORANDA FROM UN-OFFICIAL MEMBERS OF COUNCIL AND THE PROTEST OF THE HONOURABLE T. H. WHITEHEAD

ON THE SUBJECT OF THE ESTIMATES FOR 1900.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government.

"16. I desire moreover to point out that I do not think it desirable that the whole of the small available balances of the Colony should be immediately swallowed up in the execution of Extraordinary Public Works as proposed by the Unofficial Members of the Legislative Council, as I consider it very desirable that the Colony should possess considerable reserve funds, to meet the possibility of an unexpected and unavoidable diminution in the Colony's Revenues. The present Hongkong balances are comparatively trifling in amount.

17. I concur in the view expressed in paragraph 4 of your despatch under acknowledgment that the proceeds of Land Sales are properly applicable only to works of permanent utility. This view has been frequently expressed in despatches from my predecessors, and it is in accordance with this principle that it was laid down in paragraph 26 of the Instructions for the preparation of Colonial Estimates referred to above that in the Abstract of Expenditure the head for works not annually recurrent should be kept distinct from the total Expenditure on other services which should not, as a rule, exceed the total estimate of Revenue exclusive of Land Sales. It is not, however, necessary to re-establish the Special Land Sales Fund which formerly existed in Hongkong out of which special votes outside the Estimates were taken for Extraordinary Public Works, since it is desirable to maintain the practice of placing all the Expenditure on the Annual Estimates. I would add that in recent years, although the special Land Sales Fund has been abolished, the Expenditure on Extraordinary Public Works has as a matter of fact on the average more or less balanced the Revenue derived from Land Sales.

18. I have carefully considered the memoranda from some of the Unofficial Members of Cound enclosed in your despatch under acknowledgment, and also the protest from Mr. T. H. WHITEHEAD, M.L.C., forwarded in your despatch No. 346 of the 1st December last, and the above remarks deal with most of the points raised by them.

19. I would only add that fully concur in their views, which are shared by yourself as to pressing on Sanitary improvements in the Colony as fast as the finances admit : but I adhere to the opinion that it is not necessary or desirable to raise a Loan for meeting any special Expenditure in the New Territory since the revenue from the New Territory appears likely before long to be sufficient to meet such Expenditure, and moreover the Public Works contemplated in that Territory are not of sufficient magnitude or of such a character as to render necessary or to justify the raising of a Loan."

No. 1,

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 15th February, 1900.

59

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.), Chairman. His Excellency Major-General WILLIAM JULIUS GASCOIGNE, C.M.G., General Officer Commanding. The Honourable the Acting Attorney General, (HENRY EDWARD POLLOCK).

>>

"?

the Harbour Master, (ROBERT MURRAY RUMSEY, R.N.).

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON).

the Director of Public Works, (Robert Daly Ormsby). ARTHUR WIMBOLT BREWIN, (Inspector of Schools). CATCHICK PAUL CHATER, C.M.G.

99

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS, C.M.G.

""

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

C.S.O.

WEI YUK.

The Committee met at the request of the Colonial Secretary.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 21st December, 1899, were read and confirmed. Read the following Minutes under the hand of His Excellency the Governor :—

190 of 1900.

C.S.O.

13 of 1900.

HENRY A. BLAKE.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Four thousand and Three hundred Dollars ($4,300) to meet the expenditure for the erection of a Chair Shelter at the Peak.

Government House, Hongkong, 18th January, 1900.

HENRY A. BLAKE.

The Governor recommends the Council to re-vote the sum of Eighteen thousand Five hundred (Extension.) and Twenty-five Dollars and Fifty-two Cents ($18,525.52) to cover the expenses incurred by the Public Works Department in connection with the works, &c. in the New Territory.

C.S.O.

202 of 1900.

Government House, Hongkong, 26th January, 1900.

Note.-The above is the unexpended balance of the sum previously voted.

HENRY A. BLAKE.

The Governor recommends the Council to re-vote the following sums being unexpended balances of the Votes for 1899 under the heading "Extraordinary Public Works

1. Public Works Department Store,

2. Disinfector Station, &c.,

3. Public Latrines,.

.....

4. City of Victoria, Water Works, &c.,

5. Quarters for Gaol Staff,..

....

...............................$ 4,064.86

1,597.84

5,000.00

.....

19,637.26

4,000.00

685.50 3,768.74

Total,...........

$38,754.20

Government House, Hongkong, 30th January, 1900.

6. Electric Lighting Government House,......

7. Pokfulum Conduit Road,

60

C.S.O.

2895 of 1899.

C.S.O.

138 of 1900.

HENRY A. BLAKE.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Eight thousand and Two hundred Dollars ($8,200) to meet the expenditure for extending the large storm-water nullah at Yau- mati, north of the Pumping Station.

Government House, Hongkong, 6th February, 1900.

HENRY A. BLAKE.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Seven thousand Dollars ($7,000) (Extension.) to cover expenses incurred in the New Territory for the current year.

Government House, Hongkong, 9th February, 1900.

The Committee unanimously agreed to recominend that the above votes be passed.

The Committee then adjourned.

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 5th March, 1900.

Read and confirmed on the 5th March, 1900.

R. F. JOHNSTON, Acting Clerk of Councils.

F. H. MAY,

Chairman.

No. 2

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 5th March, 1900.

61

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.), Chairman. His Excellency Major-General WILLIAM JULIUS GASCOIGNE, C.M.G., General Officer Commanding. The Honourable the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

22

""

the Harbour Master, (ROBERT MURRAY RUMSEY, R.N.).

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON).

the Director of Public Works, (ROBERT DALY ORMSBY).

ARTHUR WIMBOLT BREWIN.

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER, C.M.G.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS, C.M.G.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

*;

WEI YUK.

""

The Committee met at the request of the Acting Colonial Secretary.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 15th February, 1900, were read and confirmed. Read the following Minutes under the hand of His Excellency the Governor :—

C.S.O.

42 of 1900.

HENRY A. BLAKE.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Three thousand Six hundred and Sixty Dollars ($3,660) being compensation to the Dairy Farm Company, Limited, for the loss of certain cattle at "Sassoon's Villa.'

Government House, Hongkong, 13th February, 1900.

HENRY A. BLAKE.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One thousand Dollars ($1,000) (Extension.) to meet the expenditure for extending the Telephone line in the New Territory.

Government House, Hongkong, 24th February, 1900.

The Committee unanimously agreed to recommend that the above votes be passed. The Committee then adjourned.

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 8th March, 1900.

Read and confirmed on the 8th March, 1900.

R. F. JOHNSTON, Acting Clerk of Councils.

F. H. MAY,

Chairman.

No. 4.

REPORT OF

OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 22nd March, 1900.

63

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.), Chairman. His Excellency Major-General WILLIAM JULIUS GASCOIGNE, C.M.G., General Officer Commanding. The Honourable the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

99

97

>>

>>

""

""

37

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON).

the Director of Public Works, (ROBERT DALY ORMSBY).

ARTHUR WIMBOLT BREWIN.

HILGROVE CLEMENT NICOLLE.

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER, C.M.G.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS, C.M.G. JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

WEI YUK.

The Committee met at the request of the Acting Colonial Secretary.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 15th March, 1900, were read and confirmed. Read the following Minutes under the hand of His Excellency the Governor :-

The Committee unanimously agreed to recommend that the above votes be passed.

C.S.O. 56 of 1900.

HENRY A. BLAKE.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Fifty thousand Dollars ($50,000), (Extension.) in aid of the vote "Taipo Road" (Public Works Extraordinary).

C.S.O.

62 of 1900.

Government House, Hongkong, 13th March, 1900.

HENRY A. BLAKE.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One thousand and Fifty Dollars (Extension.) ($1,050) for the Maintenance of Roads in New Territory.

Government House, Hongkong, 16th March, 1900.

C. O. Desp. 28 of 1900.

HENRY A. BLAKE.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Three thousand Three hundred and Eighty Dollars ($3,380) in aid of the following votes in the Sanitary Department:—

Salary for 2 Inspectors at $100 per mensem each for 9 months,

Rent Allowance for same at $30 per mensem each for 9 months,. Approximate Incidental Conveyance Expenses,

Uniforms for Inspectors,..

Salary for 1 additional Clerk at $40 a month for 91⁄2 months,

Government House, Hongkong, 17th March, 1900.

1.

The Committee then adjourned.

$1,900.00

570.00

320.00

210.00

380.00

Total,.....

$3,380.00

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 29th March, 1900.

Read and confirmed on the 29th, 1900.

R. F. JOHNSTON,

Acting Clerk of Councils.

F. H. MAY,

Chairman.

No. 5

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 29th March, 1900.

65

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.), Chairman. The Honourable the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

""

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON).

19

the Director of Public Works, (ROBERT DALY ORMSBY).

""

وو

19

ARTHUR WINBOLT BREWIN.

HILGROVE CLEMENT NICOLLE.

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER, C.M.G.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

"}

WEI YUK.

99

ABSENT:

His Excellency Major-General WILLIAM JULIUS GASCOIGNE, C. M. G., General Officer Commanding. The Honourable EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS, C.M.G.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

The Committee met at the request of the Acting Colonial Secretary.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 22nd March, 1900, were read and confirmed. Read the following Minutes under the hand of His Excellency the Governor :-

C. O. Desp. 280 of 1699,

HENRY A. BLAKE.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Twenty-six thousand One hundred and Eighty-nine Dollars ($26,189), to defray during the current year the increases in salaries of Government Officials sanctioned in the Secretary of State's Despatch No. 280 of 8th Decem- ber, 1899.

Government House, Hongkong, 3rd March, 1900.

HENRY A. BLAKE.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Thirteen thousand Dollars ($13,000) to cover the cost of increases on salaries for Chinese employees of the Government, sanctioned by the telegram from the Secretary of State of the 24th February, 1900.

Government House, Hongkong, 26th March, 1900.

The Committee unanimously agreed to recommend that the above votes be passed. The Committee then adjourned.

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 5th April, 1900.

Read and confirmed on the 5th April, 1900.

R. F. JOHNSTON,

Acting Clerk of Councils.

F. H. MAY,

Chairman.

T

No. 6.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 5th April, 1900.

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.), Chairman. The Honourable the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

""

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON).

""

the Director of Public Works, (Robert Daly ORMSBY).

""

19

}}

ARTHUR WINBolt Brewin.

HILGROVE CLEMENT NICOLLE.

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER, C.M.G.

Ho KAI, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS, C.M.G.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

WEI YUK.

67

The Committee met at the request of the Acting Colonial Secretary.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 29th March, 1900, were read and confirmed. Read the following Minute under the hand of His Excellency the Governor :-

C. O. Desp. 36 of 1900.

HENRY A. BLAKE.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Two hundred and forty Dollars ($240), being an allowance granted to Inspector JOHN LEE of the Registrar General's Depart-

ment.

Government House, Hongkong, 28th March, 1900.

The Committee unanimously agreed to recommend that the above vote be passed.

The Committee then adjourned.

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 11th April, 1900.

Read and confirmed on the 7th May, 1900.

R. F. JOHNSTON,

Acting Clerk of Councils.

F. H. MAY,

Chairman.

To. 7

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 7th May, 1900.

69

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.), Chairman. The Honourable the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

* * * R

>>

""

""

""

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON).

the Director of Public Works, (ROBERT DALY ORMSBY).

ARTHUR WINBOLT BREWIN.

HILGROVE CLEMENT NICOlle.

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER, C.M.G.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

WEI YUK.

RODERICK MACKENZIE GRAY.

HERBERT SMITH.

The Committee met at the request of the Acting Colonial Secretary.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 5th April, 1900, were read and confirmed.

Read the following Minutes under the hand of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government:-

C.S.O. 537 of 1900.

C.S.O.

2159 of 1899.

C.S.O.

465 of 1900.

C.S.O.

464 of 1900.

HENRY A. BLAKE.

The Governor recomiends the Council to vote a sum of Five hundred and fifty Dollars ($550) to defray the cost of an addition of $20 per mensem to the pay of the Corps Quarter Master Sergeant in the Hongkong Volunteer Corps on his appointment as Corps Sergeant Major, and of the pay of an Orderly Room Clerk.

Government House, Hongkong, 3rd April, 1900.

WILLIAM J. GASCOIGNE.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Three thousand Two hundred and One Dollars and Forty Cents ($3,201.40) for the provision of a Rifle Range for the Hongkong Volunteer Corps in the Sokompoo Valley.

Government House, Hongkong, 5th April, 1900.

WILLIAM J. GASCOIGNE.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Four hundred and Twenty Dollars ($420) to cover the salary of a Temporary Clerk at the Colonial Secretary's Office for the current year at $35 per mensem.

Government House, Hongkong, 6th April, 1900.

WILLIAM J. GASCOIGNE.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Five hundred and Forty-four Dollars ($544) to cover certain expenses of a Survey for Rent Roll purposes in the New Territory during four months of the current year.

Government House, Hongkong, 7th April, 1900.

70

C. O. Desp.

41 of 1900.

C.S.O. 1095 of 1900.

WILLIAM J. GASCOIGNE.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Six hundred and Ninety Dollars ($690) to defray, during the current year, the increase in salary of Mr. CHARLES FORD, Superintendent of the Botanical and Afforestation Department, sanctioned in the Secretary of State's Despatch No. 41 of 12th February, 1900.

Government House, Hongkong, 24th April, 1900.

WILLIAM J. GASCOIGNE.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote the following sums for further Public Works Extraordinary to be undertaken in the year 1900:-

1. Road from Upper Tram Station to High West,

2. Completion of improvements Wongneichong Recreation Ground, 3. No. 7, Police Station, Vote on account of Estimate for $45,000,

$ 6,050,00

15,897.00

8,000.00

$29,947.00

C.S.O.

1042 of 1900.

Government House, Hongkong, 2nd May, 1900.

WILLIAM J. GASCOIGNE.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Three thousand Dollars ($3,000) for the erection of a Public Latrine in Gough Street.

Government House, Hongkong, 2nd May, 1900.

The Committee unanimously agreed to recommend that the above votes be passed.

The Committee then adjourned.

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 14th May, 1900.

Read and confirmed on the 14th May, 1900.

R. F. JOHNSTON, Acting Clerk of Councils.

F. H. MAY,

Chairman.

No. 8.

1

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 14th May, 1900.

71

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.), Chairman. The Honourable the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

""

""

""

22

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON).

the Director of Public Works, (ROBERT DALY ORMSBY).

HILGROVE CLEMENT NICOLLE.

ARTHUR WINBOLT BREWIN.

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER, C.M.G.

Ho KAI, M.B., C.M.

WEI YUK.

HERBERT SMITH.

ABSENT:

The Honourable JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

">

RODERICK MACKENZIE GRAY.

The Committee met at the request of the Acting Colonial Secretary.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 7th May, 1900, were read and confirmed.

Read the following Minutes under the hand of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government:-

C.S.O.

87 of 1900.

WILLIAM J. GASCOIGNE.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of (Extension.) Five thousand Dollars ($5,000) in aid of the following votes in connection with the New

Territory:-

Balance of expenditure on Tàipò Police Station,.

...$ 500.00

1,215.00

200.00

700.00

2,385.00

Wages of caretakers employed at Old Customs Station, Temporary

Draftsman, &c., for 9 months at $135 per month, Sundry stores required in connection with above, Travelling allowances to Officers, launch hire, &c., Incidental works,

Total,.............. .$5,000.00

C.S.O.

1112 of 1900.

C.5.0.

32 of 1899.

Government House, Hongkong, 4th May, 1900.

WILLIAM J. GASCOIGNE.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Two hundred Dollars ($200) in aid of the vote "Incidental Expenses,' Nursing Institute."

Government House, Hongkong, 7th May, 1900.

WILLIAM J. GASCOIGNE.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of One (Extension.) thousand and Six hundred Dollars ($1,600) in aid of the vote for the construction of the

Steam Tender Stanley for the New Territory.

Government House, Hongkong, 10th May, 1900.

92

C.S.O. Confidential

WILLIAM J. GASCOIGNE.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of 18 of 1900. Three thousand Two Hundred and Ninety-two Dollars and Eighty-eight Cents ($3,292.88)

for the construction of a Public Latrine at the Sookunpoo Market.

Government House, Hongkong, 14th May, 1900.

The Committee unanimously agreed to recommend that the above votes be passed.

The Committee then adjourned.

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 28th May, 1900.

Read and confirmed on the 28th May, 1900.

R. F. JOHNSTON, Acting Clerk of Councils.

F. H. MAY,

Chairman.

!

V.9.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 28th May, 1900.

73

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.), Chairman.

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

-

""

""

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON).

the Director of Public Works, (ROBERT DALY ORMSBY).

HILGROVE CLEMENT NICOLLE.

ARTHUR WINBOLT BREWIN

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER, C.M.G.

Ho KAI, M.B., C.M.

WEI YUK.

""

"}

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

The Honourable HERBERT SMITH.

"}

ABSENT:

RODERICK MACKENZIE GRAY,

The Committee met at the request of the Acting Colonial Secretary..

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 14th May, 1900, were read and confirmned. Read the following Minute under the hand of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government:-

C. O. Tele- gram, 19th

May, 1900.

WILLIAM J. GASCOIGNE.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote the following sums for expenses, during the seven months, 1st June to 31st December, 1900, connected with a Land Court under The Land Court (New Territories) Ordinance, 1900:-

Salaries,

Travelling Allowances,

Incidental Expenses,

$10,500.00

1,000.00

2,300.00

$13,800.00

Government House, Hongkong, 28th May, 1900.

The Committee unanimously agreed to recommend that the above vote be passed.

The Committee then adjourned.

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 11th June, 1900.

Read and confirmed on the 11th June, 1900.

R. F. JOHNSTON, Acting Clerk of Councils.

F. H. MAY,

Chairman.

No. 10.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 11th June, 1900.

75

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.), Chairman.

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

37

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON).

the Director of Public Works, (ROBERT DALY ORMSBY).

ARTHUR WINBOLT BREWIN.

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER, C.M.G.

>

>>

>>

>>

Ho KAI, M.B., C.M.

WEI YUK.

2

The Honourable JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

11

ABSENT:

RODERICK MACKENZIE GRAY.

The Committee met at the request of the Acting Colonial Secretary.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 28th May, 1900, were read and confirmed. Read the following Minutes under the hand of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government :-

C.8.0.

788 of 1900.

C.S.0.

WILLIAM J. GASCOIGNE.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of One thousand Seven hundred and Seventy-two Dollars and Sixty-six Cents ($1,772.66) to cover the cost of printing the Draft Code of Civil Procedure for the Supreme Court of Hong- kong.

Government House, Hongkong, 30th May, 1900.

The Committee unanimously agreed to recommend that the vote be passed.

1331 of 1900.

WILLIAM J. GASCOIGNE.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Two thousand and Three hundred Dollars ($2,300) in aid of the vote "Contribution towards Defence Works."

Government House, Hongkong, 5th June, 1900.

The Honourable Ho KAI addressed the Committee, and the consideration of the vote was postponed.

C.O.D.

Secret of

WILLIAM J. GASCOIGNE.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of 26th August, Sixteen thousand Five hundred and Twenty-eight Dollars ($16,528) to defray the cost of the

purchase of arms and other stores for the Police.

Government House, Hongkong, 5th June, 1900.

The Committee unanimously agreed to recommend that the vote be passed.

The Committee then adjourned.

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 25th June, 1900.

Read and confirmed on the 25th June, 1900.

R. F. JOHNSTON,

Acting Clerk of Councils.

F. H. MAY,

Chairman.

A

No. 11.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 25th June, 1900.

Keiry

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.), Chairman.

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

**

>>

""

""

"}

""

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALEXander MacDONALD THOMSON).

the Director of Public Works, (ROBERT DALY ORmsby).

ARTHUR WINBOLT BREWIN.

BASIL TAYLOR, (Acting Harbour Master).

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER, C.M.G.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

WEI YUK.

RODERICK MACKENZIE GRAY.

"}

JOHN THURBurn.

""

The Committee met at the request of the Acting Colonial Secretary.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 11th June, 1900, were read and confirmed.

The Committee resumed consideration of the minute recommending the Council to vote a sum of $2,300 in aid of the vote "Contribution towards Defence Works," which had been postponed from the last meeting.

The Chairman having addressed the Committee, it was unanimously agreed to recommend that the vote be passed.

Read the following Minutes under the hand of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government:-

C.S.O.

1375 of 1900.

C. O. Desp. 115 of 1900.

C. O. Desp. 138 of 1900.

WILLIAM J. GASCOIGNE.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Six thousand Dollars ($6,000) in aid of the vote "Water Account, (Meters, &c.)".

Government House, Hongkong, 9th June, 1900.

WILLIAM J. GASCOIGNE.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Eight hundred Dollars ($800) being increase to the salary of the Local Auditor for the current year.

Government House, Hongkong, 12th June, 1900.

WILLIAM J. GASCOIGNE.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Eighteen hundred Dollars ($1,800) to cover the cost of increases of salaries of Messrs. CHAPMAN, Assessor of Rates, DIXON, Government Marine Surveyor, and MACDONALD, Assistant Govern- ment Marine Surveyor, during the current year.

Government House, Hongkong, 14th June, 1900.

7

198

C.S.O.

1435 of 1900,

C.S.O.

1466 of 1900.

WILLIAM J. GASCOIGNE.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Seven thousand Dollars ($7,000) in aid of the vote "Maintenance of Waterworks, City and Hill District."

Government House, Hongkong, 18th June, 1900.

WILLIAM J. GASCOIGNE.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Six hundred and Fifty Dollars ($650) for the Salary of an additional Clerk at the Shanghai Branch Post Office.

Government House, Hongkong, 21st June, 1900.

The Committee unanimously agreed to recommend that the above votes be passed.

The Committee then adjourned.

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 9th July, 1900.

Read and confirmed on the 9th July, 1900.

R. F. JOHNSTON, Acting Clerk of Councils.

F. H. MAY,

Chairman.

A

;

1

No. 12.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 9th July, 1900.

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.), Chairman.

"}

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON).

the Director of Public Works, (ROBERT DALY Ormsby).

ARTHUR WINBOLT BREWIN.

;;

>>

BASIL TAYLOR, (Acting Harbour Master).

79

>>

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER, C.M.G.

Ho KAI, M.B., C.M.

WEI YUK.

RODERICK MACKENZIE GRAY.

JOHN THURburn.

ABSENT:

The Honourable the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

""

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

The Committee met at the request of the Acting Colonial Secretary.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 25th June, 1900, were read and confirmed. Read the following Minute under the hand of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government :-

C.S.O. 1118 of 1898.

WILLIAM J. GASCOIGNE.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Twenty-nine thousand, Four hundred and Fifty-three Dollars and Eighty-eight Cents ($29,453.88), being amount of compensation awarded to Madame LUCIA V. Musso in respect of the Praya Reclamation in front of Marine Lots 188 and 189.

Government House, Hongkong, 29th June, 1900.

The Committee unanimously agreed to recommend that the above vote be passed.

The Chairman addressed the Committee with reference to the vote for the building of the Governor's residence at the Peak.

The Honourable C. P. CHATER addressed the Committee.

The Colonial Treasurer addressed the Committee.

It was agreed that the matter be referred to the Public Works Committee in the first instance. The Committee then adjourned.

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 16th July, 1900.

Read and confirmed on the 16th July, 1900.

R. F. JOHNSTON, Acting Clerk of Councils.

F. H. MAY,

Chairman.

A

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 16th July, 1900.

81

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.), Chairman.

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

11

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON).

**

the Director of Public Works, (ROBERT DALY ORMSBY).

ARTHUR WINBOLT BREWIN.

;)

BASIL TAYLOR, (Acting Harbour Master).

>>

27

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER, C.M.G.

Ho KAI, M.B., C.M.

WEI YUK.

RODERICK MACKENZIE GRAY.

17

JOHN THURBURN.

>>

ABSENT:

C.S.O.

The Honourable JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

The Committee met at the request of the Acting Colonial Secretary.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 9th July, 1900, were read and confirmed. Read the following Minute under the hand of His Excellency the Governor :—

1544 of 1900.

HENRY A. BLAKE.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Que hundred and Twenty-nine Dollars ($129) for the salary of a Temporary Assistant Junk Inspector from 9th July to 31st December, inclusive.

Government House, Hongkong, 12th July, 1900.

The Committee unanimously agreed to recommend that the above vote be passed.

Bill entitled An Ordinance to authorise the Appropriation of a Supplementary Sum of Four hundred and Eighty-one thousand Three hundred and Thirty-five Dollars and Thirty-five Cents, to defray the Charges of the Year 1899.

The Committee unanimously agreed to recommend that the several items be passed.

The Committee then adjourned.

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 23rd July, 1900.

Read and confirmed on the 23rd July, 1900.

R. F. JOHNSTON, Acting Clerk of Councils.

F. H. MAY,

Chairman.

14.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 23rd July, 1900.

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.), Chairman.

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

""

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON).

the Director of Public Works, (ROBERT DALY ORMSBY).

ARTHUR WINBOLT BREWIN.

步步

})

>:

BASIL TAYLOR, (Acting Harbour Master).

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER, C.M.G.

Ho KAI, M.B., C.M.

WEI YUK.

RODERICK MACKENZIE GRAY.

59

>>

1)

JOHN THURBURN.

**

ABSENT:

83

The Honourable JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

The Committee met at the request of the Acting Colonial Secretary.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 16th July, 1900, were read and confirmed. Read the following Minutes under the hand of His Excellency the Governor :-

C. D. Desp. Nos. 165, 170

1900.

HENRY A. BLAKE.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Two thousand and Seven and 13 of hundred Dollars ($2,700) to cover, during the current year, the cost of increases of salaries of His Honour Sir JOHN W. CARRINGTON, Knight, C.M.G., Chief Justice, Mr. E. C. Lewis, Assistant Postmaster General, and Messrs. C. H. GALE and A. H. HOLLINGSWORTH, Assistant Engineers in the Public Works Department.

C.S.0. 1647 of 1900.

C.S.0. 1458 of 1900.

Government House, Hongkong, 13th July, 1900.

HENRY A. BLAKE.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Four thousand and One hundred Dollars ($4,100) to meet certain expenses of the Victoria Gaol during the current year.

Government House, Hongkong, 17th July, 1900.

HENRY A. BLAKE.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Five thousand Dollars ($5,000) to cover the cost of repairs to roads, etc. caused by the rainstorm of the 14th to 15th June.

Government House, Hongkong, 20th July, 1900.

The Committee unanimously agreed to recommend that the above votes be passed.

The Committee then adjourned.

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 8th August, 1900.

Read and confirmed on the 8th August, 1900.

R. F. JOHNSTON, Acting Clerk of Councils.

F. H. MAY,

Chairman.

No. 15.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

ATA MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 8th August, 1900.

85

}

C.S.0.

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.), Chairman.

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON).

??

the Director of Public Works, (ROBERT DALY ORMSBY).

"

">

""

"}

3

BASIL TAYLOR, (Acting Harbour Master).

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER, C.M.G.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

WEI YUK.

RODERICK MACKENZIE GRAY.

JOHN THURBURN.

The Honourable ARTHUR WINBOLT BREWIN

ABSENT:

The Committee met at the request of the Acting Colonial Secretary.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 23rd July, 1900, were read and confirmed. Read the following Minutes under the hand of His Excellency the Governor :-

1785 of 1900.

C.S.O. 1786 of 1900.

C. O. Desp. 202 of 1900,

C.S.O.

1809 of 1900.

C.5.0.

901 of 1900,

HENRY A. BLAKE.

19

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Five hundred Dollars ($500) in aid of the vote "Government House: Repairs to furniture and incidental expenses.'

Government House, Hongkong, 27th July, 1900.

HENRY A. BLAKE.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Two thousand and Five hundred Dollars ($2,500) in aid of the vote "Arms and Ammunition for Police."

Government House, Hongkong, 28th July, 1900.

HENRY A. BLAKE.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Three hundred Dollars ($300) being increase authorised by the Secretary of State for the Colonies to the salary of the Colonial Veterinary Surgeon.

Government House, Hongkong, 2nd August, 1900.

HENRY A. BLAKE.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Four hundred and Fifty Dollars ($450) to cover the salary of the Assistant Government Marine Surveyor for four-and-a-half months of the current year.

Government House, Hongkong, 4th August, 1900.

HENRY A. BLAKE.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One thousand and Thirty-five Dollars ($1,035) for additional fittings to two Police Launches.

Government House, Hongkong, 4th August, 1900.

86

C.S.O.

1232 of 1900.

HENRY A. BLAKE.

The Governor recommends the Council. to vote a sum of Eighty-one Dollars ($81) to defray the wages for 4 months of an oiler for the new steam tender.

Government House, Hongkong, 7th August, 1900.

The Committee unanimously agreed to recommend that the above votes be passed.

The Committee then adjourned.

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 1st October, 1900.

Read and confirmed on the 1st October, 1900.

R. F. JOHNSTON, Acting Clerk of Councils.

J. H. STEWART LOCKHART,

Chairman.

:

1

No. 16.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 1st October, 1900.

87

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART LOCKHART, C.M.G.), Chairman.

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

>>

"2

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON).

""

the Director of Public Works, (ROBERT DALY Ormsby).

"

>>

the Captain Superintendent of Police, (FRANCIS HENRY May, C.M.G.). BASIL TAYLOR, (Acting Harbour Master).

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER, C.M.G.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

WEI YUK.

59

"J

11

JOHN THURBURN.

>>

RODERICK MACKENZIE GRAY.

ABSENT:

The Honourable JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

The Committee met at the request of the Colonial Secretary.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 8th August, 1900, were read and confirmed. Read the following Minutes under the hand of His Excellency the Governor :-

C.S.0. 1813 of 1900.

HENRY A. BLAKE.

}

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Forty-seven thousand Three hundred and Eighty-eight Dollars and Fifty-eight Cents ($47,388.58), in aid of the following votes (Public Works Extraordinary) :-

Sai Kung Police Station,

Starling Inlet Police Station,

City of Victoria and Hill District Water Works,

Survey of New Territory,

Rifle Range, Tai Hang,

Gaol Extension,

$ 6,500.00

5,471.98 15,000.00 15,000.00 416.60 5,000.00

Total,.......

$47,388.58

C.5.0.

133 of 1900

Government House, Hongkong, 23rd August, 1900.

HENRY A. BLAKE.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Eight thousand One hundred Extension, and Thirteen Dollars and Ninety Cents ($8,113.90) to cover the cost of the re-construction of C. O. Tel., the Pier at Sham Shui Po.

and

30th August,

1900.

C.S.O.

2091 of 1900.

C.S.O.

165 of 1900,

Government House, Hongkong, 6th September, 1900.

HENRY A. BLAKE.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One thousand Dollars ($1,000) in aid of the vote "Maintenance of Telegraphs."

Government House, Hongkong, 6th September, 1900.

HENRY A. BLAKE.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Seventy thousand Nine hundred Extension and Eighty Dollars ($70,980) to cover the cost of construction and chartering of Steam-

launches, &c., for the use of the New Territory.

Government House, Hongkong, 8th September, 1900.

88

C.S.O.

1966 of 1900.

.C.S.O. 2136 of 1900.

HENRY A. BLAKE.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sun of Three hundred Dollars ($300) in aid of the vote "Incidental Expenses in the Supreme Court.'

Government House, Hongkong, 8th September, 1900.

HENRY A. BLAKE.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Eight thousand and Nine hundred Dollars ($8,900) in aid of the following votes:-

Provisions,

Government Civil Hospital.

Medical Comforts,

Fuel and Light,

Washing,...

Incidental Expenses, Furniture, &c.,

Medicines,

New Territory.

$6,900.00

350.00

500.00

400.00

250.00

500.00

Total,........

.$8,900.00

C.S.O. 2143 of 1900.

C.S.O.

1356 of 1900.

Government House, Hongkong, 12th September, 1900.

HENRY A. BLAKE.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Four thousand and Five hundred Dollars ($4,500) in aid of the vote "Maintenance of Waterworks, Kowloon."

Government House, Hongkong, 17th September, 1900.

HENRY A. BLAKE.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Two hundred Dollars ($200) to defray the salary of a Clerk during the current year in connection with the Census of 1901.

Government House, Hongkong, 25th September, 1900.

The Committee unanimously agreed to recommend that the above votes be passed.

The Committee then adjourned.

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 15th October, 1900.

Read and confirmed on the 15th October, 1900.

R. F. JOHNSTON, Acting Clerk of Councils.

J. H. STEWART LOCKHART,

Chairman.

!

No. 17.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 15th October, 1900.

89

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART LOCKHART, C.M.G.), Chairman.

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN, Q.C.).

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON).

""

the Director of Public Works, (ROBERT DALY ORMSBY).

";

""

""

BASIL TAYLOR, (Acting Harbour Master).

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER, C.M.G.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

RODERICK MACKENZIE GRAY.

WEI YUK.

""

""

JOHN THURBURN.

""

ABSENT:

The Honourable the Captain Superintendent of Police, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.).

C.S.O.

The Committee met at the request of the Colonial Secretary.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 1st October, 1900, were read and confirmed. Read the following Minutes under the hand of His Excellency the Governor :-

151 of 1900.

HENRY A. BLAKE.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Nine hundred and Forty-four (Extension.) Dollars and Four Cents ($944.04) to cover the cost of establishing telephone communication

with the Police Station at Santin.

C.S.O.

32 of 1899.

Government House, Hongkong, 9th October, 1900.

HENRY A. BLAKE,

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Three hundred and Eighty-one (Extension.) Dollars and Seventy-five Cents ($381.75) to defray the cost of various articles required for

the Government Steam Lighthouse Tender Stanley.

:

Government House, Hongkong, 9th October, 1900.

The Committee unanimously agreed to recommend that the above votes be passed.

Bill entitled An Ordinance to apply a sum not exceeding Three Million Three hundred and Eighty thousand One hundred and Thirty-four Dollars and Twenty-nine Cents to the Public Service of the Year 1901.

The Honourable HO KAI pointed out that the proposed Yaumati School, which had been approved by the Public Works Committee, had been omitted from the list of Public Works Extraordinary, and that in the opinion of the Unofficial Members it was desirable that the work should be undertaken without delay. The Colonial Secretary stated that the view of the Unofficial Members would be recorded in the minutes.

It was subsequently agreed to recommend all the items in the Bill.

The Committee then adjourned.

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 22nd October, 1900.

Read and confirmed on the 5th November, 1900.

R. F. JOHNSTton,

Acting Clerk of Councils.

J. H. STEWART LOCKHART,

Chairman,

1

No. 18.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 5th November, 1900.

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART LOCKHART, C.M.G.), Chairman.

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN, Q.C.).

""

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON).

""

the Director of Public Works, (ROBERT DALY ORMSBY).

29

>>

the Captain Superintendent of Police, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.). BASIL TAYLOR, (Acting Harbour Master).

""

""

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

WEI YUK.

RODERICK MACKENZIE GRAY.

JOHN THURBURN.

ABSENT:

The Honourable CATCHICK PAUL CHATER, C.M.G.

C.B.0.

>>

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

The Committee met at the request of the Colonial Secretary.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 15th October, 1900, were read and confirmed. Read the following Minutes under the hand of His Excellency the Governor :-

HENRY A. BLAKE.

2403 of 1900.

C.S.O. 2117 of 1900.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One hundred Dollars ($100) in aid of the vote "Furniture and Incidental Expenses," Registrar General's Department.

Government House, Hongkong, 17th October, 1900.

HENRY A. BLAKE.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One thousand and Three hundred Dollars ($1,300) in aid of the following votes in the Sanitary Department:-

C.S.O. 2438 of 1900.

Market Expenses,

Watering Streets,

Allowance for knowledge of Chinese,

$ 200.00

800.00

300.00

Total,...........

$1,300.00

Government House, Hongkong, 19th October, 1900.

HENRY A. BLAKE.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Two thousand and Forty-five Dollars ($2,045) in aid of the following votes:-

Victoria Gaol.

91

Provisions for Prisoners,

Rent for Warders' Quarters,

Materials for Remunerative Industry,.

Incidental Expenses,

Government House, Hongkong, 30th October, 1900.

$ 1,000.00

145.00

500.00

400,00

Total,.....

.$ 2,045.00

The Committee unanimously agreed to recommend that the above votes be passed.

The Committee then adjourned.

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 10th December, 1900.

Read and confirmed on the 10th December, 1900.

C. CLEMENTI,

Acting Clerk of Councils.

J. H. STEWART LOCKHART,

Chairman.

:

:

No. 19.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 10th December, 1900.

93

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART LOCKHART, C.M.G.), Chairman.

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN, Q.C.).

*

i 29

1:

""

**

>:

+

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON).

the Director of Public Works, (ROBERT DALY ORMSBY).

the Captain Superintendent of Police, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.). BASIL TAYLOR, (Acting Harbour Master).

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER, C.M.G.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK. WEI YUK.

JOHN THURBURN.

The Honourable RODERICK MACKENZIE GRAY.

ABSENT:

The Committee met at the request of the Colonial Secretary.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 5th November, 1900, were read and confirmed. Read the following Minutes under the hand of His Excellency the Governor :-

C.S.O. 2424 of 1900.

C.S.O. 2047 of 1900.

C.S.O. 2577 of 1900.

HENRY A. BLAKE.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Six hundred and Eighty-six Dollars and Twenty-five Cents ($686.25) to cover the cost of certain sundry utensils, &c., required for the Government Steam Lighthouse Tender Stanley.

Government Ilouse, Hongkong, 3rd November, 1900.

HENRY A. BLAKE.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Six hundred Dollars ($600) to cover the cost of repairing the boiler and machinery of the Disinfecting Engine.

Government House, Hongkong, 3rd November, 1900.

HENRY A. BLAKE.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Six thousand and Five hundred Dollars ($6,500) in aid of the following votes:-

Public Works, Annually Recurrent Expenditure.

Maintenance of Sewers, Maintenance of Waterworks, City and Hill District,

$ 2,000.00 4,500.00

Total,..

.$ 6,500.00

Government House, Hongkong, 13th November, 1900. HENRY A. BLAKE.

C.S.O.

2564 of 1900.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Two thousand and Two hundred Dollars ($2,200) in aid of the following votes in the Sanitary Department:-

Electric Lighting of Central Market,

Incidental Expenses,

Government House, Hongkong, 13th November, 1900.

$1,300.00 900.00

Total,.......

.$2,200.00

:

94

C.5.0.

222 of 1930.

HENRY A. BLAKE.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One thousand Dollars ($1,000) (Extension.) to cover the cost of New Territory Public Works Miscellaneous.

C.S.O.

224 of 1000.

Government House, Hongkong, 19th November, 1900.

HENRY A. BLAKE,

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Three hundred and Fifty Dollars (Extension.) ($350) for the purchase of a Boat, one Iron Safe and Office Furniture for the Harbour Master's

Station at Sai Kung.

C.S.O.

2514 of 1900.

C.S.O..

2672 of 1900.

C.S.O.

2117 of 1900.

C.S.O. 2569 of 1900.

C.S.O.

1831 of 1900.

Government House, Hongkong, 19th November, 1900.

HENRY A. BLAKE.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Six hundred and Twenty Dollars ($620) for the construction of an Armoury for the Police.

Government House, Hongkong, 23rd November, 1900.

HENRY A. BLAKE.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Eight hundred Dollars ($800) to cover the cost of repairing the Government Marine Surveyor's Launch Hilda.

Government House, Hongkong, 23rd November, 1900.

HENRY A. BLAKE.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Six hundred Dollars ($600) in aid of the vote "Watering Streets", Sanitary Department.

Government House, Hongkong, 30th November, 1900.

HENRY A. BLAKE.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Two hundred and Fifteen Dollars ($215) to defray the cost of purchasing a new Typewriter for the use of the Attorney General's

Office.

Government House, Hongkong, 30th November, 1900.

HENRY A. BLAKE.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Two thousand and Five hundred Dollars ($2,500) in aid of the vote "Contribution towards Defence Works."

Government House, Hongkong, 30th November, 1900.

The Committee unanimously agreed to recommend that the above votes be passed.

The Committee then adjourned.

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 17th December, 1900.

Read and confirmed on the 17th December, 1900.

C. CLEMENTI,

Acting Clerk of Councils.

J. H. STEWART LOCKHART,

Chairman.

1

ད- ཝད་མ..-་

No. 20.

95

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 17th December, 1900.

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART LOCKHART, C.M.G.), Chairman.

-7

""

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN, Q.C.).

11

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON).

the Director of Public Works, (ROBERT DALY ORMSBY).

>>

>>

the Captain Superintendent of Police, (FRANCIS Henry May, C.M.G}). BASIL TAYLOR, (Acting Harbour Master).

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER, C.M.G.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

WEI YUK.

JOHN THURBURN.

ABSENT:

His Excellency Major-General WILLIAM JULIUS GASCOIGNE, C.M.G., General Officer Commanding. The Honourable RODERICK MACKENZIE GRAY.

The Committee met at the request of the Colonial Secretary.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 10th December, 1900, were read and confirmed. Read the following Minute under the hand of His Excellency the Governor :-

C.S.O.

HENRY A. BLAKE.

301 of 1900.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Six thousand Nine hundred and Fifty-four Dollars and Forty Cents ($6,954.40) to cover the cost of the erection of a Signal Station at Green Island.

Government House, Hongkong, 7th December, 1900.

The Committee unanimously agreed to recommend that the above vote be passed.

The Committee then adjourned.

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 31st January, 1901.

Read and confirmed on the 31st January, 1901.

R. F. JOHNSTON, Acting Clerk of Councils.

J. H. STEWART LOCKHART,

Chairman.

}

HONGKONG.

FINANCIAL RETURNS FOR THE YEAR 1899.

317

No. 17

1900

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government.

No. 37.

SIR,

TREASURY, 25th April, 1900.

I have the honour to transmit the following returns:-

1. Revenue and Expenditure for the year 1899.

2. Comparative Statement of Revenue and Expenditure for 1898 and 1899.

3. Return of Deposits not available.

4. Return of Advances Outstanding.

5. Return of Public Works Extraordinary chargeable against the Loan.

6. Statement of Expenditure from the Praya Reclamation Fund.

7. Statement of Assets and Liabilities.

The Honourable

THE ACTING COLONIAL SECRETARY.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your obedient Servant,

A. M. THOMSON, Treasurer.

COLONY OF HONGKONG.

RETURN OF REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE DURING THE YEAR ENDED 31ST DECEMBER, 1899.

Total More than Less than Revenue. Estimated. Estimated,

EXPENDITURE.

REVENUE.

Amount

Estimated.

LIGHT DUES,

LICENCES AND INTERNAL REVENUE NOT OTHERWISE SPE-

$

(.

51,000

52,106.93

C. $ C. 1,406.93

CIFIED:-

Arms Ordinance,

Assessed Taxes,

430

Auctioneers' Licences,

486,000

381.00

519,184.42

49.00

33,184.42

Billiard Tables and Bowling Alleys Licences,

1,500

1,500.00

...

850

Boarding-house Licences,

1,100.00

250.00

Boat Licences,...

3,000

2,143.75

856.25

Cargo Boat Licences,

6,500

10,053.30

3,558.30

11,800

Carriage, Chair, &c., Licences,..

11,471.20

328.80

Chinese Passenger Ships Licences,

43,000

46,225.40

3,225,40

Chinese Undertakers' Licences,

350

275.00

75.00

200

Dog Licences,

Fines,

140.00

60.00

Emigration Brokers' Licences...............

2,500

2,709.00

209.00

1,000

$00.00

200.00

Forfeitures,

40,100

35,030.67

5,069.33

Hawkers' Licences,

5,720

14,045.60

8,325.60

Education,

Junk Licences,

6,700

9,537.50

2,837.50

Kerosene Oil Licences,

28,000

36,924,00

8,924.00

560

Magistracy,

Charge on Account of Public Debt,

Pensions,

Governor and Legislature.

Colonial Secretary's Department,

Audit Department,.

Treasury,

Public Works Department,.

Post Office,

Registrar General's Department,

Harbour Master's Department,

Lighthouses,

Observatory,

Stamp Office,

Botanical and Afforestation Department,

Legal Departments,

Ecclesiastical,

Medical Departments,

Marine Store Dealers' Licences,

625.00

65.00

5.400

Police,

Marriage Licences,...

5,805.00

.405.00

Gaols,

365

Money Changers' Licences,

670.00

305.00

545

Fire Brigade,

Opium Monopoly,

485.00

60.00

Opium Divan,

372,000

372,000.00

1.100

Pawnbrokers' Licences,.

1,750.00

350.00

39.000

Shooting Licences,

41,100.00

2,100.00

100

Special Fruit Licences,

Spirit Licences,

520.00

315.00

420.00

315.00

68,600

Stamps,.

82,504.50

13,904,50

Steam-Launch Licences,

300,000

Sanitary Department,

Charitable Allowances, Transport,

Special Service,

Miscellaneous Services, Military Expenditure, Public Works, Recurrent,

360,999.15

60,999.15

800

FEES OF COURT OR OFFICE, PAYMENTS FOR SPECIFIC PUR-

1,093.50

293.50

POSES, AND REIMBURSEMENTS IN AID :---

Bills of Health,

Births and Deaths, Registration of..............

2,200

2,640.00

440.00

165

Cargo Boat Certificates,

330.50

165.50

Cemetery Burials,

1,900

2,046.00

146.00

700

Cemetery Fees from Public Cemeteries for Chinese,

1,128.25

428.25

Chinese Gazette, Sale of

1,200

1,175.00

25.00

27

Companies, Registration of

34.00

7.00

Convict Labour and other items,

1,500

5,638.00

4,138.00

Certificate to Chinese entering America,

14,000.

4,567,41

9,432.59

Deeds, Registration of

· 15,000

17,175.00 2,175.00

Engagement and Discharge of Seamen, .

4,500

9,968.50 5,468.50

Examination of Masters, &c.,

22,200

21,$77.80

2,100

Fees of Court,

0857.50

Fees en Grant of Legosya

Fees for testing Petroleum,

Gunpowder, Storage of......

litary Departmelits, Seamen and Debtors,.

Gaol Expenses,-Recovery from Diplomatic, Naval

2,385.70

13,0

276.41

1,276.41

1,270

1,877,50

Householders, Registration of

7,420

9,113.55

607.50

1,693,55

...

Post Office, Contribution from

1,045

1,026,92 !

...

18.08

751.25

.....

Amount

Total More than

Estimated. Expenditure. Estimated.

$

160,808.00

ገ.

$ (.

"'.

158,819.38

162,000,00

170,646.26

8,646.26

42,303.00

48,889.22

6,586.22

30,927.00

32,187.34

1,260.34

10,000.00

9,518.72

22,735.00

22,381.83

92,990.00

93,909.77

919.77

236,567.00

237,902.76

1,335.76

13,171.00

14,148.22

1,277.22

63,586.00

62,933.00

15,770.00

11,864.44

13,436 00

13,068.32

3,692.00

3,689.97

18,103.50

18,293.87

190.37

73,462.00

83.711.52

10,249,52

2,200.00

1,810.00

82,000.00

75,152.57

112,609.00

113,663.19

1,054.19

19,588.00

21,353.58

1,765.58

...

307,648.30

339,657.27 | 32,008.97 ;

113,007.00

122,605.05

9,598.05

5,260.00

4,101.64

3,000.00

9,636.96

6,636.96

14,000.00

176,336.00

513,033.54 | 336,697,54

561,573.00

649,388.53

87,815.53

207,000.00

198,461.65

COLONY OF HONGKONG.

RETURN OF REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE DURING THE YEAR ENDED 31sT DECEMBER, 1899.

REVENUE.

Amount Total Estimated. Revenue.

More than Less than

Estimated. Estimated.

EXPENDITURE.

Amount Total More than Less than Estimated. Expenditure. Estimated. Estimated.

DUES.

$

51,000

$

C.

52,406.93

ES AND INTERNAL REVENUE NOT OTHERWISE SPE-

1,406.93

IFIED:-

Charge on Account of Public Debt, Pensions,

$

160,808.00

$

158,819.38 |

$

1,988.62

C.

ns Ordinance.......

430

381.00

essed Taxes,

49.00

486,000

tioneers' Licences,

519,184.42

33,184.42

Governor and Legislature.

Colonial Secretary's Department,

162,000.00

170,646.26

8,646.26

42,303.00

48,889.22

6,586.22

1,500

Audit Department,..

30,927.00

32,187.34

1,260.34

....

liard Tables and Bowling Alleys Licences,

1,500.00

850

Treasury,

10,000.00

9,518.72

481.28.

1,100.00

250.00

ording-house Licences, .

Public Works Department,.

22,735.00

22,381.83

353.17

3,000

2,143.75

856.25

92,990.00

it Licences......

Post Office,

93,909.77

919.77

6,500

go Boat Licences, .

10,053.30 3,553.30

11,800

Registrar General's Department,

236,567.00

237,902.76

1,335.76

11,471.20

328.80

riage, Chair, &e., Licences,..

£3,000

Harbour Master's Department,

13,171.00

14,448.22

1,277.22

46,225.40

3,225.10

63,586.00

nese Passenger Ships Licences,

350

Lighthouses,

62,933.00

275.00

75.00

nese Undertakers' Licences,

Observatory,

15,770,00

11,864.44

200

140.00

60.00

: Licences,

2,500

Stamp Office,

13,436 00

13,068.32

653.00

3,905.56

367.68

2,709.00

209.00

igration Brokers' Licences,.

1,000

800.00

200.00

Cs,

40,100

Legal Departments,

Botanical and Afforestation Department.

3.692.00

3,689.97

2.03

18,103.50

18,293.87

190.37

feitures,

35,030.67

5,069.33

Ecclesiastical,

73,462.00

83.711.52

10,249,52 !

5,720

14,045.60

8,325.60

2,200.00

wkers' Licences,

Education,

1,810.00

390.00

6,700

9,537.50

2,837,50

k Licences.

28,000

Medical Departments.

82,000.00

75,152.57

6,847.43

36,924.00

8,924.00

osene Oil Licences,

560

Magistracy,

112,609.00

113,663.19

1,054.19

625.00

65.00

rine Store Dealers' Licences.

Police,

19,588.00

21,353.58

1,765.58

5.400

riage Licences..

5,805.00

405.00

Gaols,

365

670.00

305.00

ey Changers' Licences,

545

Fire Brigade,

307,618.30

539,657.27| 32,008.97

485.00

60.00

um Monopoly,

372,000

Sanitary Department,

um Divan,

372,000.00

1,400

1,750.00

350.00

nbrokers' Licences,

39,000

.41,100.00

2,100.00

oting Licences,

100

cial Fruit Licences,

520.00

420.00

315.00

315.00

it Licences,

68,600

82,504.50

13,904.50

18,

300,000

Charitable Allowances, Transport,

Special Service,

Miscellaneous Services,. Military Expenditure, Public Works, Recurrent,

113,007.00

122,605.05 9,598.05

***

5,260.00

4,101.64

1,158.36

3,000.00

9,636.96

6,636.96

14,000.00

14,000,00

176,336.00

513,033.54 | 336,697.54

....

561,573.00

649,388.53 87,815.53

360,999.15

60,999.15

207,000.00

198,461.65

8,535.35

m-Launch Licences,

800

1,093.50

293.50

"

· COURT OR OFFICE, PAYMENTS FOR SPECIFIC PUR-

SES, AND REIMBURSEMENTS IN AID:

s of Health,

2.200

2,640.00

+40.00

hs and Deaths, Registration of.

165

330.50

165.50

go Boat Certificates,

1,900

2,046.00

146.00

etery Burials,

700

etery Fees from Public Cemeteries for Chinese,

1,128.25

428.25

1,200

cse Gazette, Sale of

1,175.00

25.00

27

34.00

panies, Registration of

1,500

viet Labour and other items,

5,638.00

7.00

4,138.00

14,000

ificate to Chinese entering America,

4,667.41

9,432,59

* 15,000

Is, Registration of

17,175.00

2,175.00

4,500

9,968.50 5,468.50

agement and Discharge of Seamen,

22,200

mination of Masters, &c.,

21,877.80

2,100

$57.50

· of Court,

Grant of T

for testing Fetroleum,

powder, Storage of..............

litary Departments, Seamen and Debtors,.

1 Expenses,-Recovery from Diplomatic, Naval and Mi-

2,385.70

13,000-

4.276.41

.276.41

..

1,270

1,877.50

607.50

scholders, Registration of

›erial Post Office, Contribution from

1- Hospital. Grant-in-Aid from Admiralty,

7,420

9,113.55

1,693,55

1,045

1,026,92

18.08

751,20

20,000 19,245.75

40.00

Imperial Post Office, Contribution from

Lock Hospital, Grant-in-Aid from Admiralty,

1,045

1,026.92

18.08

Medical Examination of Emigrants,

20,000

19,245.75

751.25

Medical Registration Fees,

10

50.00

Medical Treatment of Patients in the Civil Hospital,

25,000

25,253.39

40.00

253.39

Maintenance of Gap Rock Lighthouse, Contribution from

Chinese Imperial Government towards the

750

750.00

Official Administrator and Trustee,.

3,000

6,414.80

3,411.80

Official Signatures,..

460

636.02

176.02

Printed Forms, Sale of

200

274.00

74.00

Private Moorings and Buoys, Rent for

2,880

3,000.00

120.00

Queen's College, Fees from Scholars,

25,000

27,245.00

2,245.00

Registry Fees,

300

520.00

220.00

Refund of Police Pay,

1,500

1,744.15

244.15

Refund Cost of Police and other Stores,.......

500

755.54

255.5±

Sick Stoppages from Police Force,

800

Steam-Launches, Surveyor's Certificate,

1,241.98

441.98

1,500

1,920.00

420.00

Survey of Steam-Ships, .

11,000

11,678.61

678.61

School for Girls, Fees from Scholars,

Sunday Cargo-Working Permits,

715

15,000

772.50

57.50

21,825.00

6,825.00

Trade Marks, Registration of

3,500

4,719.00 1,219.00

POST OFFICE :—

Postage,..

330,000

317,909.36

12,090.64

RENT OF GOVERNMENT PROPERTY, LAND AND HOUSES:-

Buildings,

560

592.00

32.00

Laundries,

700

Leased Lands,.

1,200.00

500.00

232,000

Lands not Leased,

248,441.77

16,441.77

11,000

Markets,

15,298.18

4,298.18

75,700

80,901.38

5,201.38

Piers,..

15,000 12,780.46

...

2,219.54

Stone Quarries,

Slaughter House,

Sheep and Pig Depôts,

15,860 18,600.00 2,740.00 44,000 45,000.00 1,000.00 11,000 11,673.21

673.21

INTEREST,

1,500

1,500.00

MISCELLANEOUS RECEIPTS:~

Condemned Stores, &c., .

1,500

Interest for use of Furniture ar Government House,

2,239.24

739.24

145

Night Soil Contracts,

་ ་ ་

145.00

Other Miscellaneous Receipts,

27,840

30,384,00

2.544.00

15,000

Profit on Subsidiary Coins,

60,307.76 45,307.76

100,000

168,553,25

68,553,25

TOTAL, exclusive of Land Sales and Water Account,...$ 2,575,137 |2,865,759.76 323,908.44 33,285.08

LAND SALES,

WATER ACCOUNT-Ord, 16 of 1890,

200,000 617,824.72 | 417,824.72

Public Works, Extraordinary,

$ 2,563,771.80 | 3,031,131.60|506,042.28

310,500.00 131,660.76

111,000

126,558.77 15,558.77

TOTAL,..

$ 2,886,137 13,610,143.25 757,291.93| 33,285.68|

TOTAL,

...$ | 2,874,271.80| 3,162,792.36 | 506,042.28

Public Works Extraordinary chargeable against the New Loan,.$ 183,700

121,240.10

Treasury, Hongkong, 12th April, 1900.

A. M. THOMSON, Treasurer.

· Hospital, Grant-in-Aid from Admiralty,

LUIJ

ical Examination of Emigrants,

20,000

19,245,75

751,25

ical Registration Fees, ........

10

50.00

ical Treatment of Patients in the Civil Hospital,.

25,000

25,253,39

40.00

253.39

tenance of Gap Rock Lighthouse, Contribution from

Chinese Imperial Government towards the

750

750.00

ial Administrator and Trustee............

3,000

6,414.80

3.414.80

ial Signatures,...

460

636.02

176.02

ted Forms, Sale of

200

274.00

74.00

ate Moorings and Buoys, Rent for

2,880

3,000.00

120.00 i

n's College, Fees from Scholars,

25,000

27,245.00

2,245.00

stry Fees,

300

520.00

220.00

und of Police Pay,

1,500

1,744.15

244.15

and Cost of Police and other Stores,.

500

755.51

255.54

Stoppages from Police Force..

800 1,241.98

441.98

m-Launches, Surveyor's Certificate,

1,500

1.920.00

420.00

rey of Steam-Ships,

11,000

11,678.61

678.61

ol for Girls, Fecs from Scholars,

715

772.50

57.50

lay Cargo-Working Permits,.

15,000

21,825.00

6,825.00

le Marks, Registration of

3,500

4,719.00

1,219.00

"FICE -

age...

330,000

317,909.30

12.090.64

F GOVERNMENT PROPERTY, LAND AND HOUSES:--

idings,

560

592.00

32.00

ndries,

700

1,200.00

500,00

sed Lauds,.

232,000

248.441.77

16,441,77

ids not Leased,

11,000

15,298.18 4,298,18

rkets,

75,700

80,901.38 5,20138

15....

15,000

12,780.46

2,219.54

ne Quarries,

15,860

18,600.00 2.740.00

ughter House,

44,000

. 15,000.00

1,000.00

ep and Pig Depôts,

ST,

11,000

11,673.21

678.21

1,500

1,500.00

LANEOUS RECEIPTS:-

demned Stores, &c.,

1,500

2,239.24

739.24

erest for use of Furniture at Government House,

145

145.00

ht Soil Contracts,

27,840

er Miscellaneous Receipts,

15,000

fit on Subsidiary Coins,

...

100,000 168,553.25

30,384.00 2,544.00 60,307.76 45,307.76 68,553.25

TOTAL, exclusive of Land Sales and Water Account,...$2,575,137 2,865,759.76 | 323,908.44

33,285.08

$2,563,771.80| 3,031,131.60 | 506,042.28 :

SALES,

ACCOUNT-Ord, 16 of 1890,

200,000

111,000

617,824.72 | 417,824.72

Public Works, Extraordinary,

310,500.00 131,660.76

38,682.48

178,839.24

126,558,77 15,558.77

TOTAL,

$ 2,886,137 [3,610,143.25 757,291,93 33.285.68

TOTAL...

...$2,874,271.80 | 3,162,792.36 | 506,042.28 217,521.72

Public Works Extraordinary chargeable against the New Loan,.$

183,700

121,240.10

i

62,459,90

Treasury, Hongkong, 12th April, 1900.

A. M. THOMSON, Treasurer.

2.

31:

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF THE REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE OF THE COLONY OF HONGKONG IN 1898 & 1899.

REVENUE.

1898.

1899.

INCREASE.

DECREASE.

EXPENDITURE,

1898.

1899.

INCREASE. DECRE

$

C.

LIGHT DUES,

51,645.15

$

52,406.93

C.

C.

C.

761.78

LICENCES AND INTERNAL REVENUE NOT OTHERWISE

Charge on Account of Public Debt,.. Pensions,.

$ C.

163,805.03

$ ..

158,819.38

$

C.

164,210.26

170,646.26

6,436.00

SPECIFIED ;—

Governor and Legislature,

51,809.58

48,889.22

Arms Ordinance...

420.00

381.00

39.00

Colonial Secretary's Department,

34,862.11

32,187.34

Assessed Taxes,

466,619.37

519,184.42

52,565.05

Audit Department,

7,386.61

9,518.72

2.132.11

• NO. Hi

2,1

Auctioneers' Licences,

1,500.00

1,500.00

Billiard Tables and Bowling Alleys Licences,

1,100.00

1,100.00

Treasury,

Public Works Department,

22,409.02

22,381.83

89,574.10

93,909.77 4,335.67

Boarding House Licences,

3,197.92

2,143.75

1,051,17

Post Office,..

241,561.52

237,902.76

Boat Licences,

.....

9,847.30

10,053.30

206.00

Registrar General's Department,

14,994.92

14,448.22

Cargo Boat Licences,

11,209.50

11,471,20

261.70

Harbour Master's Department,

65,835.25

62,933.00

2,1

Carriage, Chair, &c., Licences,

44,025.80

46,225.40

2,199.60

Lighthouses...

14,934.94

. 11,864.44

Chinese Passenger Ships Licences,.

310.00

275.00

35.00

Observatory,

12,728.85

13,068.32

339.47

Chinese Undertakers' Licences, -

170.00

140.00

30.00

Stamp Office,

3,615.80

3,689.97

74.17

Dog Licences,

Emigration Brokers' Licences,.. Fines,

2,728.50

2,709.00

19.50

Botanical and Afforestation Department,

17,842.14

18,293.87

451.43

800.00

800.00

Legal Departments,

76,092.45

83,711.52

7,619.07

60,414.43

35,030.67

25,383.76

Ecclesiastical Department,

1,815.00

1,810.00

Forfeitures,

11,485.92

14,045.60

2,559.68

Education,

72,420.12

75,152.57

2,732.45

Hawkers' Licences,......

......

7,906.50

9,537.50

1,631.00

Medical Departments,

115.502.48

113,663.19

Junk Licences,

29,354.00

36,921.00

7,570.00

Magistracy,

21,405.00

21,353.58

Kerosene Oil Licences,

576.00

625.00

49.00

Police,

222,163.90

263,965.71

41,801.81

Marine Store Dealers' Licences,

5,625.00

5,805.00

180.00

Gaols,..

57,954.61

58,447.14

492.53

Marriage Licences,

500.00

670.00

170.00

Fire Brigade, .

14,920.09

17,244.42

2.324.33

Money Changers' Licences,

530.00

485.00

45.00

Opium Monopoly,.

357,666.66

372,000.00

14,333.34

Pawnbrokers' Licences,.

39,000.00

Shooting Licences,

255.00

Spirit Licences,

74,208.16

Special Fruit Licences,

41,100.00

520.00

82,504.50

315.00

2,100.00

265.00

Miscellaneous Services,

8,296.34

315.00

Stamps,.

327,105.8+

360,999.15

33,893.31

Sanitary Department,

Charitable Allowances,

Transport.........

Military Expenditure,

Public Works, Recurrent, Public Works, Extraordinary,

101,613.41

122,605.05

20,991.64

4,034,79

4,101.64

66.85

9,400.92

9,636.96

236.04

290,808.49

513,033.54

222,225.05

519,274.89 649,388.53 130,113.64

194,447.57 198,464.65

234,381.05

131,660.76

4.017.08

102

Steam-Launch Licences,

990.00

1,093.50

103.50

Opium Divan,

1,550.00

1,750.00

200.00

FEES OF COURT OR OFFICE, PAYMENTS FOR SPECIFIC PURPOSES, AND REIMBURSEMENTS IN AID :-

Bills of Health,.

2,730.00

2,640,00

90.00

Births and Deaths, Registration of..

385.50

330.50

55.00

Cargo Boat Certificates,.

2,170.00

2,046.00

124.00

Cemetery Burials,.

1.208.94

1,128.25

80.69

Cemetery Fees from Public Cemeteries for Chinese,

1,116.25

1,175.00

Chinese Gazette, Sale of.

28.00

31.00

58.75

6.00

Companies, Registration of

3,125.00

5,638.00

2,213.00

Convict Labour and other items,

3,941.74

4,567.41

625.67

Certificate to Chinese entering America,

18,600.00

17,175,00

1,425.00

Deeds, Registration of

6,058.25

9,968.50

3,910.25

Engagement and Discharge of Seamen,

10,175.40

21,877.80

11,702.40

Examination of Masters, &c.,.

1,927.50

Fees of Court,

13.582.66

2,357,50

13,045.45

020.00

430.00

537.21

450.00

Medical

Medicar

Registration Fees,

40.00

Medical Treatment of Patients in the

Official Signatures,...

Maintenance of Gap Rock Lighthouse,-Contribution from Chinese Imperial Government towards the... Official Administrator and Trustee,...

.. Hospital,...

26,199.20

50.00

25,253.39

401.25

10.00

945.81

750.00

4,567.22

Printed Forms, Sale of

487.02

6,414.80

636,02

750.00

...

1,847.58

149.00

372.00

ሰሶ ጎ

Private Moorings and Buove Red B

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF THE REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE OF THE COLONY OF HONGKONG IN 1898 & 1899.

REVENUE.

1898.

1899.

INCREASE.

DECREASE.

EXPENDITURE,

1898.

1899.

INCREASE.

DECREASE.

$

}

C.

C.

c.

$

C.

$

C.

C.

..

51,645.15

52,406.93

761.78

ND INTERNAL REVENUE NOT OTHERWISE

Charge on Account of Public Debt,. Pensions,.

163,805.03

158,$19.38

4,985.65

164,210.26

170,646.26

6,436.00

FIED :-

Governor and Legislature,

51,809.58

48,889.22

2,920.36

rdinance,..

1 Taxes,

420.00

466,619.37

381.00

39.00

Colonial Secretary's Department,

31,862.11

32,187.34

2,674.77

519,184.42

52,565.05

Audit Department,

7,386.61

9,518.72

2,132.11

eers' Licences,

1,500.00

1.500.00

Treasury,

22,409.02

22,381.83

27.19

Tables and Bowling Alleys Licences,

1,100.00

1,100.00

Public Works Department,

89,574.10

93,909.77 4,335.67

ig House Licences,

3,197.92

2,143.75

1,034,17

Post Office,.

241,561.52

237,902.76

3,658.76

cences,

9.847.30 10,053.30

206.00

Registrar General's Department,

14,994.92

14,448.22

546.70

loat Licences,

11,209.50

11,471.20

261.70

Harbour Master's Department,

65,835.25

62,933.00

2,902.25

e, Chair, &c., Licences,

44,025.80

46,225.40

2,199.60

Lighthouses...

14,934.94

11,864.44

3,070.50

Passenger Ships Licences,.

310.00

275.00

35.00

Observatory,

12,728.85

13,068.32

339.47

Undertakers' Licences,.

170,00

140.00

30.00

Stamp Office,

3,615.80

3,689.97

74.17

cences,

2,728.50

2,709.00

19.50

Botanical and Afforestation Department,

17,842.44

18,293.87

451.43

tion Brokers' Licences,.

800.00

800.00

Legal Departments,

76,092.45

$3,711.52

7,619.07

60,414.43

35,030.67

25,383.76

Ecclesiastical Department,

1,815.00

1,810.00

5.00

ures,

11,485.92

14,045,60

2,559.68

Education,

72,420.12

75,152.57

2,732.45

rs' Licences,...

7,906,50

9,537,50

1,631.00

Medical Departments,

115.502.48

113,663.19

1,839.29

icences,

29,354.00

...

36,924,00

7,570.00

Magistracy,

་་་

21,405.00

21,353.58

51.42

ne Oil Licences,

576,00

625.00

49.00

Store Dealers' Licences,

5,625.00

5,805.00

180.00

ge Licences,

500.00

670.00

170.00

"Changers' Licences,

530.00

485.00

45.00

Monopoly..

357,666.66

372,000.00

14,333.34

rokers' Licences,

ng Licences,

Licences,

39,000,00

255,00

74,208.16

1 Fruit Licences,

41,100.00

520.00

82,504.50

315.00

2,100.00

...

265.00

8,296.34

315.00

327,105.84

360,999.15

33,893.31

Police,

Gaols,..

Fire Brigade,.

Sanitary Department,

Charitable Allowances,

Transport...

Miscellaneous Services, Military Expenditure,

Public Works, Recurrent, Public Works, Extraordinary,

222,163.90

263,965,71

41,801.81

57,954.61

58,447.14

492.53

14,920.09

17,244.42

2.324.33

101,613.41

122,605.05

20,991.64

4,034.79

4,101.64

66.85

9,400.92

9,636.96

236.04

290,808.49

513,033.54

222,225.05

519,274.89 649,388.53 130,113.64

194,447.57 198,464.65

234,381,05 131,660.76

4,017.08

102,720.29

Launch Licences,

990.00

1,093.50

103.50

Divan,

1,550.00

1,750.00

200.00

COURT OR OFFICE, PAYMENTS FOR SPECIFIC

POSES, AND REIMBURSEMENTS IN AID :-

of Health,.

2,730.00

2,640.00

90.00

and Deaths, Registration of..

385.50

330.50

55.00

Boat Certificates,.

2,170.00

2,046.00

124.00

ery Burials,.

1.208.94

1,128.25

80.69

ery Fees from Public Cemeteries for Chinese,

1,116.25

1,175.00

se Gazette, Sale of.

28.00

34.00

58.75

6.00

nies, Registration of

3,425.00

5,638.00

2,213.00

et Labour and other items,

3,941.74

4,567.41

cate to Chinese entering America,

18,600.00

17,175,00

Registration of

6,058.25

9,968.50

rement and Discharge of Seamen,

10,175.40

21,877.80

ination of Masters, &c...

of Court,

♪ Innans

1,927.50

13.582.66

2,357.50

625.67

3.910.25

11,702.40

430.00

...

...

1,425.00

444

13,045.45

.920 DD

537,21

450.00

cal

1a siegistration Fees,

al Treatment of Patients in th

Hospital,..

26,199.20

enance of Gap Rock Lighthouse,--Contribution

50.00

25,253.39

451.25

10.00

945.81

om Chinese Imperial Government towards the...

750.00

1 Administrator and Trustee,...

750.00

4,567.22

! Signatures,

487.02

Forms, Sale of

372.00

6,414.80

636.02

274.00

1,847.58

149.00

› Moorings and Buoys, Rent for.

s College, Fros from kid

*JV.VU

Vieni auministrator and Trustee,.............

Official Signatures,............

4,567.22

487.02

750.00

6,414.80

1,847.58

636.02

149.00

Printed Forms, Sale of

372.00

274.00

98.00

Private Moorings and Buoys, Rent for.

2,970.00

3,000.00

30.00

Queen's College, Fees from Scholars,

Registry Fees,

21,598.00

481.00

27,245.00

5,647,00

520,00

39.00

Refund of Police Pay,

1,694.60

1,744.15

49.55

Refund Cost of l'olice and other Storcs,.

799.46

755.54

43.92

Shipping Crews and Seamen,

11,105.20

11,105.20

Sick Stoppages from Police Force,

945.91

1,241.98

296.07

Steam-launches, Surveyor's Certificate.

1,710.00

1,920.00

210.00

Survey of Steam-ships,

10,921.05

11,678.61

754.56

School for Girls, Fecs from Scholars

684.00

772.50

88.50

Sunday Cargo-Working Permits,.

25,325.00

21,825.00

4,100,00

Trade Marks, Registration of

1,997.18

4,719.00

2,721,82

Overtime Fees, Engagement and Discharge of Crews

on Board Ship,

1,285.00

POST OFFICE:-Postage,

337,179.99

317,909.36

1,285.00

19,270.63

RENT OF GOVERNMENT PROPERTY, LAND AND HOUSES :-

Buildings,

647.43

592.00

55.43

Laundries,

862.90

1,200.00

337.10

Leased Lands,

235,775,74

248,441.77

12,666.03

Lands not Leased,

10,715.27

15,298.18

4,582.91

Markets,

75,065.08

80,901.38

5,836.30

Piers,

8,539.64

12,780.46

4,240.82

Stone Quarries,

15,860.00

18,600.00 2,740.00

Slaughter House,...

Sheep and Pig Depôts,

11,276.05

42,372.00 45,000.00 11,673.21

2,628.00

397.16

MISCELLANEOUS RECEIPTS :-

Condemned Stores, &c.,

2,203.78

2,239.21

Interest for use of Furniture at Government House,...

117.93

Night Soil Contracts,

28,476.00 30,384,00

35.46

1,908.00

117.93

Other Miscellaneous Receipts,

Profit on Subsidiary Coins,..

18,873.59 60,307.76 41,434.17 148,044.49 168,553.25 20,508,76

TOTAL exclusive of Land Sales & Water Account,. 2,672,107.80 | 2,865,759.76

260,071.32 66,419,36

LAND SALES,

WATER ACCOUNT,

133,318.87 617,824.72 112,732.57 126,558.77

484,505.85

13,826.20

TOTAL,.

.$ 12,918,159.243,610,143.25

758,403,37

66,419.36

TOTAL,

Deduct Decrcuse,

Nett Increase,

Treasury, Hongkong, 12th April, 1900.

66,419,36

691,984.01

1

:

2,841,805,20 3,162,792,36 446,389.34

125,

Deduct Decrease,..

Nett Increase,

125,402.18

320,987.16

A. M. THOMSON, Treasurer.

Cmnese Imperial Government towards the...]

750.00

Administrator and Trustee,.

4,567.22

750.00

6,414.80

1,847.58

Signatures.

487.02

636.02

149.00

Forms, Sale of

372.00

274.00

98.00

Moorings and Buoys, Rent for.

2,970.00

3,000.00

30.00

College, Fees from Scholars,

Fees,

21,598.00

481.00

27,245,00

5,647.00

520.00

39.00

of Police Pay,

1,694.60

1,744.15

49.55

Cost of l'olice and other Stores,.

799.46

755,54

Crews and Seamen,

11,105.20

43.92

11,105.20

ppages from Police Force,

945.91

1,241.98

296.07

unches, Surveyor's Certificate.

1,710.00

1,920.00

210.00

€ Steam-ships,

10,924.05

11,678.61

754.56

r Girls, Fees from Scholars

684.00

772.50

88.50

argo-Working Permits,....

25,925.00

21,825.00

4,100.00

urks, Registration of

1,997.18

4,719.00

2,721,82

Fees, Engagement and Discharge of Crews

oard Ship,

1,285.00

...

.:-Postage,

337,179,99

317,909.36

1,285.00

19,270.63

ERNMENT PROPERTY, LAND AND HOUSES :-

617.43

592.00

55.43

862,90

1,200.00

ands.

235,775,74

248,441.77

337.10

12,666.03

t Leased,

10,715,27

15,298.18

4.582.91

75,065,08

80,901.38 5,836.30

8,539.64 12,780.46

4,240.82

urries,

House....

15,860.00

18,600.00 2,740.00

1 Pig Depôts,

11,276.03

11,673.21

US RECEIPTS :-

«l Stores, &c.,

2,203.78

›r use of Furniture at Government House,.

117.93

Contracts,

28,476.00 30,384.00

cellaneous Receipts,

subsidiary Coins,.......

18,873.59

148,014,49

42,372.00 45,000.00 2,628.00 397.16

35.46

1,908.00 60,307.76 41,434,17

2,239.21

117.93

168,553.25

20,508.76

1 exclusive of Land Sales & Water Account,.| 2,672,107.80 | 2,865,759.76

260,071.32 66,419.36

INT,

TOTAL,.

133,318.87 617,824.72 112,732.57 126,558.77

484,505.85

13,826.20

.$ 2,918,159.24 3,610,143.25

758,403.37

66,419.36

TOTAL....

Deduct Decreuse,

Nett Increase,

asury, Hongkong, 12th April, 1900,

MAN

66,419,36

691,984,01

2,841,805.20 3,162,792,36 446,389.34 125,402.18

Deduct Decrease,.

Nett Increase,

125,402.18

320,987.16

A. M. THOMSON, Treasurer.

321

Statement of Deposits not Available received and repaid in the Colony of Hongkong during the year 1899.

By whom deposited.

...

Sikh Police Fund,

Police Fine Fund,

Chinese Recreation Ground,

Estate of Deceased Policemen,...

Tender Deposit,

Intestate Estate,

Post Office Fine Fund,

2

Suitors' Fund,

Miscellaneous,

Board of Trade....

Gaol Library.

Custom Duties on Parcels, Widows and Orphans' Fund, Praya Reclamation Deposit, Praya Reclamation Fund, Belilios Donation,

Trade Marks,

...

:

:

:

Outstanding

on

1st January, 1899.

$ 2,568.00 116.23 2,437.45 170.82

Outstanding

on

Deposits received during the

Total.

year.

Deposits repaid during the year.

31st Dec.,

1899.

1,170.00

3,738.00

359.00

3,379.00

580.99 1,209.27

697.22 !

617.00

80.22

3,646.72

787.29

2,859.43

.07

170.89

170.89

4,035.00

6,765.00

10,800.00 7,775.00

3,025.00

707.58

280.41

987.99

987.99

29.10

48.52

77.62

77.62

60,244.44

242,762.39

303,006.83

228,371.43

74,635.40

1,350.00 517.62

15,674.07

17,024.07

1,624.07

15,400.00

519.49

519.49

1.87

103.90

103.90

103.90

92.34

68,172.62

115.05 3,901.90

207.39

89.72

117.67

72,074.52

1,067.13

1,007.39

317,000.00

317,000.00

317,000.00

318,195.99 9,000.00

96.456.30

414,652.29

143,331.03

271,321.26

...

9,000.00

9,000.00

499.00

499.00

499.00

Treasury, Hongkong, 28th March, 1900.

369,462.97

1,154,205.93 710,541.16

443,664.77

$ 784,742.96

* Loss in Exchange $1.87.

A. M. THOMSON, Treasurer.

Statement of Advances made and repaid in Hongkong during the year ended 31st December, 1899.

To whom advanced.

Outstanding

Advances made during the year ended

Total.

31st Dec., 1899.

Onl

1st January, 1899.

Advances repaid during the year ended: 31st Dec.,

Outstanding Balance

31st Dec., 1899.

Money Order,

Government of Singapore,

Supreme Court,

Captain Superintendent of Police,

Praya Reclamation,...

Crown Solicitor,...

:

1899.

$33,224.50

334,724.09 (1) 497.87 561.07

368,446.46

335,678.38

32,768.08

561.07

351.07

210.00

100.00 25.00 12,764.96

100.00

100.00

...

280.00 88,507.37 200.00 37,599.58

305.00

280.00

25.00

101,272.33

12,795.83

88,476.50

200.00 37.599.58

200.00 37,599.58

209.89

720.98

82.17

500.00 1,500.00

930.87

656.11

274.76

82.17

500.00

(2) 88.62

1,500.00

500.00 1,500.00

16.97 162.20

159.96

176.93

160.87

16.06

162.20

162.20

88.13 420.32

88.13

88.13

420.32

420.32

900.00

900.00

900.00

200.00

200.00

200.00

...

54.39

54.39

54.39

54.39

54.39

54.39

1,556.76 207.56

1,556.76

1,556.76

207.56

207.56

10,000.00 365.71

10,000.00

9,000 00

365.71

200.00

1,000.00 165.71

200.00

200.00

200.00

50.00

50.00

50.00

284.37

284.37

284.87

256.68

256.68

256.68

629.51

629.51

629.51

48,885.07 478,219.36 527,104.43 402,260.89

124,849.99

:

Sanitary Department,

Postmaster General,

Captain Hastings' Contribution to Widows and

Orphans' Fund.

Treasury,

Director Public Works Department,

H. B. Lethbridge,

J. D. Ball,

B. James,

F. Howell,

P. Tate,

Superintendent Fire Brigade,

Miss Millington,

Miss Robertson,.......

Sir H. Blake,

:

W. M. Arthur,

Belilios Donation,

J. H. Dandy,

New Territory,

Superintendent Botanical Department,.......

Sugar-Cane Mill,

E. Lewis,

II. P. Tooker,

:

:

:.

:

T:.

Less credit balance,

...

JA

6.45

$124,843.54

(1) Profit in Exchange, $497.87.

(2) Credit Balance, $6.45.

A. M. THOMSON, Treasurer.

Treasury, Hongkong, 28th March, 1900.

I

L

322

*

PUBLIC WORKS EXTRAORDINARY CHARGEABLE AGAINST THE NEW LOAN.

Praya Reclamation,

Praya Reclamation, Reconstruction of Government Piers,

Gaol Extension,

Sewerage of Victoria,

Water Works, Miscellaneous,

Drainage Works, Miscellaneous........

Quarters for Gaol Staff,

Swine Depôt, Kennedy Town, new shed on lowest terrace,

Treasury, Hongkong, 17th April, 1900

...

...

...

...$ 10,000.00

60,000.00

...

3,192.24

5,073.27

9,858.01

18,395.29

7,366.01

7,355.28

$121,240.10

A. M. THOMSON,

Treasurer.

Private Marine Lot Holders.

PRAYA RECLAMATION FUND.

STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURE TO 31ST DECEMBER, 1899.

Balance

Total

Estimated

1890.

1891.

1892.

1893.

1894.

1895.

1896.

1897.

1898.

1899. Expenditure.

Cost.

Balance

to be spent.

spent in Excess of

the Esti-

mated Cost.

$

*

$

$

$

$

$

$

Section No. 1,*.

Do.

No. 2,

D6. Ko. 3,

42,019.54 43,791.64 24,984.84 7,128.44 55,887.63 34,580.26 49,612.81 6,051.44|| 65,661.55|112,573.89

46,758.18 63,318.02

Do.

No. 4,

3,113.67

Do. No. 5,. Do. No. 6,. Do. No. 7,.

6,202.29

36,697.68

55,691.67 7,063.88 7,019.62 1,822,21 6,552.99 8,670.52 14,169.36 3,428.36

9,187.60 14,215.46

5,004.19 57,374.26 29,767.10 5,666.04 53,029.15 27,669.30 14,630.92 7,876.47 9,600.81 51,701.26| 44,549.27 27,309.82 21,788.35|| 31,817.59 77,925.38

35,455.12|| 36,245.99 35,455.12

33,075.47 31,593.99

39,144.85

63,670.23

423,260.67 328,130.33 29,091.12 32,355.42 14,086.90| 24,596.23 252,896.68 6,548.41 5,754.83 11,705.77 10,903.57 48,599.71 | 43,961.02| 25,030.76 14,247.88 31,946.66| 28,704.10 11,964.17 49,058.88 58,331.35 62,780.32|| 49,058.88 50,382.14| 52,327.67| 52,553.60 12,423.70

27,919.28 (1)

95,130.34

251,176.20

1,720.48

417,493.39

459,378.56

41,885.17

193,023.82

227,892.11

34,368.29

329,686.00 288,516.27 523,788.60 351,276.65 316,268.44 289,319.16

41,169.73 |

172,511.95

26,949.28

410,294.28

Total, 106,850.19 204,450.45 332,808.10|114,032.85 240,561.81 272,503.71 228,333.44 233,308.93 198,358.66 205,164.46 | 2,120,656.30 2,530,950.58412,014.76

Less... 1,720.48

Government.

Section No. 4, Do. No. 5,.. Do. No. 6,. Do. No. 7,

Total,......

443.53

1,418.47

755.45

814.38

1,260.26

2,520.24

4,213.30

1,400.02

2,119.82

32,304.19

48,472.28 111,086.04

3,290.36 5,464.26 9,727.49 233.81

303.87 1,697.95| 16,858.62|| 18,515.52 | (2) 774.39

1,003.11 3,337.25 1,541.61 1,036.00 637.44

544.73 3,393.29 12,954.74 12,473.23 10,156.55 5,709.57

4,678.83 5,661.37

31,878.16

38,734.40 6,856.24

11,741.06

57,369.71

67,194.90

9,825.19

1,094.88

3,005.03

5,888.25

2,178.44

18,355.45

46,818.00

28,462.55

241,733.36

259,218.77

17,485.41

34,921.64 53,206.92118,679.42

14,324.94

11,802.19 18,171.01

36,819.23 28,536.42

9,761.28 24,486.58

349,336 68

411,966.07

62,629.39

Grand Total,...$141,771.83 257,657.37 451,487.52 128,357.79 252,364.00 290,674.72 265,152.67 261,845.35 | 208,119.94 229,651.04 2,469,992.98 2,942,916.65472,923.67

* This includes Marine Lots Nos. 188, 189 and 190, which belong to the Government.

(1) Expenditure,.... Less Transfers,

$21,242.23

36,958.53

Cr. Balance,

$15,716.30

Treasury, Hongkong, 26th April, 1900.

(2) Expenditure,....... Less Transfers,

..$ 8,486.01 9,858.96

Cr. Balance,..

1,372.95

A. M. THOMSON,

Treasurer.

323

-

د.

324

FINANCIAL STATEMENT FOR 1899.

Dr.

To Inscribed Stock Loan at 33% interest,

LOAN ACCOUNT.

to be paid off on the 15th April, 1943,...]£341,799.15.1

Cr.

By Sinking Fund.

£12,625.18.11

ASSETS AND LIABILITIES,

ON THE 31ST DECEMBER, 1899.

ASSETS.

e.

LIABILITIES.

C.

Balance in Bank at Current Account,

40,980.16 | Crown Agents drafts in transit,

20,000.00

Coins in transit,

200,000.00

Military Contribution,

53,581.78

Arrears of Taxes, .

293.47 Deposits not available,..

443,664.77

Crown Rent,

38,242.60 Refund of Taxes,

2,300.00

27

>>

>>

>>

New Territory,...

40,000.00

Officers' Remittances,

22,505.81

Miscellaneous,

1,517.41 Money Order Remittances,

9,342.30

"7

Advances,

Suspense House Service,

124,843.54 | Transit Charges, General Post Office,..........

6,360.00

€65.95 Civil Pensions,

19,100.00

Profit Money Order Office,

8,000.00 | Police Do.,

13,400.00

Private Drainage Works,

292.36

Public Works,..

37,224.70

Miscellaneous,.

14,016.87

TOTAL ASSETS,*......$

454,543.13

Suspense Account,

115,809.52

BALANCE,...........

311,773.82

Balance Overdrawn, Crown Agents.............

8,718.31

766,816.45

TOTAL LIABILITIES....

766,816.45

*Not including $831,109,92, value of Silver at Mint.

Treasury, Hongkong. 19th April, 1900.

A. M. THOMSON,

Treasurer.

HONGKONG.

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR 1899.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of

His Excellency the Governor.

ASSETS.

ASSETS AND LIABILITIES,

ON THE 31ST DECEMBER, 1899.

C.

LIABILITIES.

545

No. 34

1900

$

C.

Balance in Bank at Current Account,

Coins in transit,

Arrears of Taxes,

Crown Rent,

40,980.16

200,000.00 | Military Contribution,

293.47 Deposits not available,.

38,242.60 Refund of Taxes,

Crown Agents drafts in transit,

20,000.00

53,581.78

443,664.77

2,300.00

29

>>

""

""

""

New Territory,...

40,000.00 Officers' Remittances,

22,505.81

Miscellaneous,

"

1,517.41 Money Order Remittances,

9,342.30

Advances,

Suspense House Service,....

124,843.54 Transit Charges, General Post Office,.

6,360.00

665.95

Civil Pensions,

19,100.00

Profit Money Order Office,

8,000.00 Police Do.,

13,400.00

Private Drainage Works,

292.36

Public Works,....

37,224.70

Miscellaneous,......

14,016.87

TOTAL ASSETS,*......$

454,543.13 Suspense Account,

115,809.52

BALANCE, .............$

311,773.32 | Balance Overdrawn, Crown Agents...

8,718.31

$

766,316.45

TOTAL LIABILITIES,......$

766,316.45

* Not including $831,109.92, value of Silver at Mint.

A. M. THOMSON,

Treasurer.

Treasury, Hongkong, 19th April, 1900.

546

on Land Sales,

Total Estimated Revenue,.

ESTIMATED BALANCE OF THE ASSETS OF THE COLONY ON THE 31ST DECEMBER, 1900.

Estimated Revenue on Account of 1900,

وو

$ 3,215,203.00 764,604.00

.$3,979,807.00

Estimated Expenditure, Ordinary,

Extraordinary,

.$3,176,525.00

404,126.00

Total Estimated Expenditure,

Estimated Revenue in excess over Expenditure,

3,580,651,00

.$ 399,156.00

Balance on 1st January, 1900,................

Plus Revenue in excess of 1900 Expenditure,

Estimated Balance of 1900 Assets,

Treasury, 20th September, 1900.

* Value of Silver at Mint,.

Debit Balance,

Net Balance,..

$831,109.00 311,773.00

.$519,336.00

Dr.

ESTIMATED LOAN ACCOUNT, 1900.

To Inscribed Stock Loan at 3% interest, to be paid off on the 15th April, 1943,

£341,799.15.1

By Sinking Fund, .........

Treasury, 20th September, 1900.

Dr.

To Inscribed Stock Loan at 3% interest,

to be paid off on the 15th April, 1943,

Treasury, 20th September, 1900.

LOAN ACCOUNT, 1899.

£341,799.15.1

By Sinking Fund,

.$ 519,336.00*

399,156,00

.$ 918,492.00

A. M. THOMSON, Treasurer.

Cr.

£16,350.17.5

A. M. THOMSON, Treasurer.

Cr.

£12,625.18.11

A. M. THOMSON, Treasurer.

г

HONGKONG.

215

No. 12

1900

REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF FIRE BRIGADE FOR THE YEAR 1899.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor.

POLICE OFFICE, HONGKONG, 6th February, 1900.

SIR,-I have the honour to submit the following report on the Government Fire Brigade for the year 1899.

2. There were 31 Fires and 97 Incipient Fires during the year. attached. The Brigade turned out 38 times during the year.

Details regarding each are

The estimated damage caused by the fires was $829,814 and by the incipient fires $354.

3. Very serious damage was caused by the fire at Nos. 24 and 25, Praya, Kennedy Town, which was undoubtedly caused by the careless storage of cotton which had become wet by rain falling at the time.

But the year will be remembered by the disastrous fire at the Cháp Yik Godown in Hing Lung Lane by which property to the value of some $500,000 was destroyed. The fire originated among some matting on the upper floor of a compartiment of the godown on the ground floor of which were stored in close proximity large quantities of sulphur and saltpetre.

The Brigade, which had had timely notice of the fire, was engaged in extinguishing it and there is no doubt would have done so before the fire could have spread to any of the seven adjoining compart- ments of the godown, when a violent explosion took place which blew a portion of the roof off that particular compartment of the godown and shattered a portion of its walls.

One of the firemen was seriously burnt about the face and hands, and injured about the head by falling bricks, and narrowly escaped with his life.

A few minutes afterwards another terrific explosion occurred. The remainder of the roof was lifted off that half of the godown which is on the East side of Hing Lung Lane, and an immense mass of burning matter was blown into the air to a height of from 50 to 60 feet while the four compartments of the godown on the opposite of the lane were set on fire.

The roof of an adjoining building on the East side was seriously damaged, and a building in Queen's Road West at a distance of 100 yards was ignited by burning débris and completely destroyed. There was a very large quantity of Chinese crackers stored in the Cháp Yik Godown, but not in the immediate proximity of the seat of the original fire. Owing to the fact that the Brigade were diven out of Hing Lung Lane by the first explosion it is impossible to absolutely locate the seat of the second explosion, but I think there is little doubt that it occurred on the ground floor of the compartment (known as No. 4 Godown) in which the fire originated.

4. A searching enquiry was held by the Acting Police Magistrate into the origin of and cir- cumstances attending this fire, and Captain LANGHORNE, of the Royal Artillery and Ordnance Depart- ment, gave evidence regarding the capacity for explosion of Chinese fire crackers, while Mr. F. BROWNE, Government Analyst, gave evidence on the subject of explosion caused by the fusing of saltpetre and sulphur.

The evidence of these gentlemen is of so much importance that I append a copy of it.

5. The danger arising out of the uncontrolled storage of fire crackers is one that had not escaped attention, and long before this fire occurred proposals were under consideration for guarding against it, and a Bill is about to be introduced into the Legislature dealing with the subject.

There are no regulations for the storage of sulphur or saltpetre, and this is a matter which is now receiving attention. I confess it had escaped me before.

6. A list is attached shewing the number of fires that have occurred during each of the last ten years with the estimated value of property destroyed in each case.

7. The water in the mains was not turned off at any time during the year.

8. I attach a list of places where Fire Despatch Boxes are kept and copy of a report by the Engineer on the state of the Fire Engines, which are all in good order.

9. The Fire Station at Yaumati was strengthened during the year by transferring thither a steam Fire Engine and the necessary staff to work it.

216

The mobility of the Brigade at the Central Fire Station has been materially increased by the acquisition from Messrs. MERRYWEATHER & SONS of a quatricycle despatch box by means of which 4 firemen can transport themselves and 600 feet of hose and the necessary appliances to the scene of a fire in a very short time.

There has not yet been sufficient opportunity to thoroughly test the usefulness of this machine, but it has already proved of service and ought to be a valuable aid to the Brigade.

10. The shelters for despatch boxes referred to in paragraph 7 of my report for 1898 have proved useful. The telephones fixed at certain points as described in paragraph 8 of the same report have not been availed of by the Public as yet.

11. No addition has yet been made to the ladder supply of the Brigade. I have been in com- munication with Messrs. MERRYWEATHER & SONS, and with their Agents in the Colony, on the subject of ladders, but have found it impossible to decide on what type would be most suitable for the peculiar conditions obtaining in this City.

The assistance of Mr. WODEHOUSE, C.M.G., for many years Superintendent of the Brigade, is now being sought to inspect the various patterns of ladders at home and to make a selection from among them.

12. The conduct of the Brigade during the year has been good.

The Honcurable

THE COLONIAL SECRETARY.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your obedient Servant,

F. H. MAY, Superintendent of Fire Brigade.

List of Places where Fire Brigade Despatch Boxes are kept.

1 Box. No. 1 Police Station.

3 Boxes. Engine House at No. 2 Police Station. 1 Box. Naval Dock Yard.

1

1

1

1

31

1

1

"1

1

""

Clock Tower.

Government Offices.

Government House.

No 7 Queen's Garden, Engineers' Mess. Central Police Station.

Wellington Street at Lyndhurst Terrace. Government Civil Hospital.

Staunton Street at Sing Wong Street. Water Lane at Queen's Road Central.

2 Boxes.

1 Box.

1

1:

1

**

1

>>

1

1

2 Boxes.

1 Box.

1

1

,,

No. 7 Police Station.

Bonham Strand West, at West End. Gas House, West Point.

Fat Hing Street, at Queen's Road West. Ko Shing Theatre.

Government Lunatic Asylum.

Nain Pak Hong Fire Station. Man Mo Temple.

No. 5 Police Station.

Kennedy Town Hospital. Collinson Street.

No. 463 Queen's Road West.

List of Telephones to which the Police can have access to communicate with Central Station

in the event of a

Hongkong and China Gas Company, East and

West Point, from 7 A.M. to 9 P.M.

Tung Wá Hospital, Po Yan Street.

Man On Insurance Office, Queen's Road West.

Fire breaking out.

Hongkong Hotel, Praya Central.

Royal Naval Yard, Queen's Road East. Mr. J. KENNEDY'S, Causeway Bay. Electric Light Company, Queen's Road East.

HONGKONG, 8th January, 1900.

SIR, I have the honour to forward herewith a report on the state of the Government Fire Engines for the year ending 31st December, 1899.

STEAMER NO. 1.

(Floating Engine by Shand and Mason.)

This Engine has been three years in service; it has done good work at fires during the year. During the month of August it was laid up for a general overhaul and inspection; several small repairs were found necessary; the hull, engines and pumps are all in good order and condition.

217

STEAMER No. 2.

(Land Engine by Shand and Mason.)

This Engine has been twenty-one years in service (boiler two years); it has been regularly tested at drill for drivers and has been overhauled and inspected during the year and is now in good working order.

STEAMER NO. 3.

(Land Engine by Shand and Mason.)

This Engine has been twenty years in service; it has been thoroughly overhauled during the year. It is now stationed at Yaumati and is in good working order.

STEAMER No. 4.

(Land Engine by Shand and Mason.)

This Engine has been eighteen years in service; it has been opened up for inspection during the year and found in good order and condition; it has also done some good work at fires.

STEAMER No. 5.

(Land Engine by Shand and Mason.)

This Engine has been thirteen years in service; it has been thoroughly overhauled during the year, has done some good work at fires, and is now in good order and condition.

All the Manual Engines and gear as well as the hose reels, ladders and supply carts are in good order and condition.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your obedient Servant,

JOHN W. KINGHORN,

Chief Engineer, Government Fire Brigade.

The Honourable

F. H. MAY, C.M.G.,

Superintendent,

Government Fire Brigade.

(Evidence given by Capt. Langhorne and Mr. Frank Browne at the Magisterial Enquiry into the Origin of the Fire at the Cháp Yik Godown.)

Captain LANGHORNE said-I am an officer of the Ordnance Department. I have made experiments with crackers similar to those produced. One kind was put in close confinement in a small cylinder, was heated in a fire and burst very violently. About one-third of the cracker exploded. The other kind of cracker, when subjected to similar treatment, produced very much the same result. The experiments were carried out in an ordinary forge fire, gradually heated up. I should think the explosion occurred at from 600 to 700 degrees Fahr.

Mr. MAY-Supposing that cracker box was full of either of these kinds of crackers, and it was exposed to a severe heat at a fire, what do you imagine the effect would be?

Witness-I should think if a good many of the boxes were put so that they formed a big pack, the ones inside would be so heated that they would explode, and then the outside ones would probably be blown outwards, of course--that is to say, if they had not been burned before. I should think there would be sufficient restraint on the inside ones to produce a fairly violent explosion.

Mr. MAY--Supposing you had 500 or 600 stored in this room, and they were subjected to such a heat as would cause them to explode as you describe, can you tell us what you would effect would be on the building?

expect the

Witness-It would certainly be an extremely violent explosion, sufficient to do a good deal of damage. I think the explosion would be local. It would be more or less on the same lines as the explosion of a cap. The explosion would spread by throwing débris and burning rubbish, and even by throwing the crackers themselves, about the place. The actual effects of the explosion, however, would be purely local.

(Witness was shown some other specimens of crackers.)

Mr. MAY-From the experiments made with these two kinds of crackers you have experimented upon, do you consider these crackers dangerous articles?

Witness--I should think they were dangerous articles unless special precautions were taken for their custody. They are pretty easily ignited. I do not suppose they would ignite through friction- anyone treading on them-but in case of fire it would be extremely dangerous.

218

Mr. MAY-Do you consider it safe to allow them to be stored in unlimited numbers ? Witness-I think they should be stored in a certain way. I should allow for air space

in storing. The Magistrate-Do you think they are likely to be exploded by spontaneous combustion or by friction?

Witness-It is extremely unlikely.

saltpetre

FRANK BROWNE, Government Analyst, said-I have experimented with saltpetre and sulphur with a view to seeing whether sulphur and salt petre exploded when heated together. I found that when sulphur and saltpetre are heated together above the melting point of each that they give rise to an explosion. The sulphur is dissolved into a very large volume of gas and the mixture of melted saltpetre and sulphur emits a dazzling white heat. On January 13, I was shown over the scene of the fire by P. C. MACKAY. I examined No. 4 Godown and found there some melted saltpetre. In No. 6 Godown I found a large quantity of saltpetre had been liquified by the heat-in fact, there was a layer of saltpetre one foot thick. A low grade heat is quite enough to melt either saltpetre or sulphur.

Mr. MAY-We have it in evidence that this No. 4 Godown was stored on the upper floor with a large quantity of matting, and that there was a fierce fire burning there when the firemen got there. There was also a certain amount of fire on the ground floor. Would such a beat as that be sufficient to liquify the sulphur and saltpetre?

Witness-I think so, because after the first explosion I presume the floor fell in.

All the saltpetre would not fuse at once. A portion would fuse, and the intensity of the union of the two would be such that a much larger quantity would fuse.

Mr. MAY-We have it in evidence that there was over 4,000 packages of saltpetre store 1 on the ground floor of No. 4, and 300 bags of sulphur close to them--the man said about two feet away from the saltpetre. We were also told that there were about 150 catties of saltpetre in a package, and a picul in a bag of sulphur-i.e., 300 piculs of sulphur. Would the explosion produced by the liquify- ing of these quantities be sufficient to account for the accident which occurred at the godown described by the firemen ?

Witness-That would cause an enormous explosion.

Mr. MAY-Do you think it a safe thing to store sulphur alongside of saltpetre?

Witness-No; they should not be stored together.

Mr. MAY-Is it safe to store sulphur with any other explosive substance?

Witness-No.

Witness further said that he did not think sulphur would produce an explosion by itself.

No.

DATE.

:

FIRES, 1889.

NO. OF BUILDINGS.

DESTROYED.

SITUATION OF FIRE.

Wholly. Partly.

ESTIMATED AMOUNT OF PROPERTY

DESTROYED.

3 No. 1, Rozario Street,

7 No. 197, Queen's Road West, 6 No. 92, Wing Lok Street,

1

January

2

3

February April May

12

6

""

June July

No. 292, Queen's Road West,

5 No. 145, Bonham Strand,

9 No. 10, Wilmer Street,

29

No. 242, Queen's Road West, 4 No. 227, Queen's Road West,

August 24 No. 95, Hollywood Road,

26 No. 174, Third Street,

September 16 | No. 203, Queen's Road Central,

21 No. 1, Wing Wo Street,....

21 No. 112, Queen's Road Central,

25 No. 220, Queen's Road Central,

9

10

""

11

12

""

13

14

15

29

No. 9, Hillier Street,

16

October

10

17

19

18

19

20

21

November

و,

No. 42, Battery Street, Yaumati, 30 No. 154, Queen's Road Central,

4 No. 7, Nullah Lane,

5

December 23

دو

No. 55, Queen's Road West,

No. 334, Queen's Road Central, 30 No. 17, Bonham Strand,

TOTAL,.........

2

1

1

1

1

1

$ 1,000 2,000 20,000

20

1

300

121-

10,000

3,000

1

1,300

400

1,500

1

2,000

1

1,200

2

4,000

3

1

1,500

1

8,000

1

1,000

1

16,000

1

5,000

20,000

..$

98,223

No.

DATE..

219

FIRES, 1890.

SITUATION of Fire.

No. oF BUILDINGS

DESTROYED.

Wholly. Partly.

ESTIMATED

AMOUNT OF PROPERTY

DESTROYED.

1234 10 6700

January

""

""

25

5 No. 7, Station Street,........

No. 33, Tung Man Lane, No. 229, Praya West,... No. 8, Lyndhurst Terrace,

18

28

No. 23, Bonham Strand,

"

February

10

No. 18, Gage Street,

14

No. 8, St. Francis Street,

99

8

May

2

No. 68, Bonham Strand,

9

19

The Hongkong Dispensary,

10

23

11

July

7

No. 12, Kwong Un Street, East, No. 32, Square Street,

12

September 9

Blackhead & Co., Praya Central,

13

22

No. 38, Gilman Bazaar,..

14

November 11

No. 47, Bonham Strand,

15

15

No. 69, Upper Station Street,

16

December 15 No. 112, Queen's Road Central,

No.

DATE.

TOTAL,...

FIRES, 1891.

3

1,000

1

500

1

1

8,000

1

10,000

1

400

1

300

1

550

4

2

41,000

100,000

1

3,000

1

500

1

30,000

1

100

1

2,000

1

250

2

6,000

203,600

::

:

No. oF BUILDINGS

DESTROYED.

SITUATION OF FIRE.

Wholly. Partly.

5

1

2

8 Nos. 170 and 172, Third Street,

5 No. 41, Hillier Street,

123+

January February April

8 | No. 353, Queen's Road West,

4

May

7 The Hongkong and China Bakery, Morrison Hill Road,

East Point,

5 No. 331, Queen's Road Central,

5

6678

""

July

1}

December

19

6 | No. 280, Queen's Road Central,

No. 72, Station Street, Yaumati, No. 57A, Wanchai Road,

TOTAL,.

No.

DATE.

FIRES 1892.

SITUATION OF FIRE.

2211

ESTIMATED AMOUNT

OF PROPERTY

DESTROYED.

$3

3,000

700

1,500

1

1,000

11,500

12,000

1,800

600

32,100

No. OF BUILDINGS

DESTROYED.

ESTIMATED AMOUNT

OF PROPERTY

DESTROYED.

Wholly. Partly.

TON CO T

1

January

10

No. 9, Queen's Road Central,

13

""

Bonham Strand,

1♡

I

40,000

3

8,000

16

No. 528, Queen's Road West,

I

6,000

21

""

No. 81, High Street,

1

100

April

1

No. 26, Sai Wo Lane,

1

1,000

**

10

No. 17, Queen's Road West,

1

400

11

""

No. 104, Queen's Road West,

1

1,500

May

22

No. 17, Tank Lane,

1

250

9

10

June July

21 No. 29, Centre Street,

100

3 No. 91, Wing Lok Street,

5,000

11

August

12

13

14

15

20

19

16

18 No. 49, Queen's Road West, 21

September 15 December 8

No. 48, Queen's Road West, No. 80. Queen's Road West,.

No. 333, Queen's Road Central, No. 14, Jubilee Street, 22 No. 16, East Street,

300

3,000

4

4,000

1

5,000

1

300

600

TOTAL,.....

75,550

220

No.

DATE.

FIRES, 1893.

SITUATION OF FIRE.

No. of BUILDINGS

DESTROYED.

Wholly. Partly.

ESTIMATED

AMOUNT

OF PROPERTY

DESTROYED.

1

January

7

No. 73, Hollywood Road,

1

800

2

11

No. 79, Nullah Lane,

1

300

3

18 No. 2, Square Street,

1

10

:

4

February

11

No. 68, Jervois Street, 13 No. 101, Wing Lok Street,

2

I

10,000

1

6,000

6

March

22 No. 22, Holland Street,

1

1

40,000

7

26

No. 301, Queen's Road West,

1

2

8,000

"

8

A pril

13

No. 87, Jervois Street,

1

2,000

9

25

No. 15, West Street,

1

800-

19

10

"

27

No. 1, In On Lane,..........

2

1

19,000

11

12

May June

13

No. 344, Queen's Road Central,

1

2,000

16

No. 406, Queen's Road West,

1

2,000

13

""

16

No. 28, Tsz Mi Lane,.....

1.

700

14

July

3

No. 191, Hollywood Road,.......

1

1

1,500

15

14

No. 19, Gough Street,

150

19

16

19

No. 280, Queen's Road West,

1

1

1,000

39

17

""

20

No. 12, Tung Loi Lane,....

4

20,000

18

August

16

No. 337, Queen's Road West,

1

300

19

17

No. 32, Queen's Road West,

1

2,800

20

25

No. 155, Second Street,.

1

20,000

52

21

September 5

No. 7, Ezra Lane,

1

400

22

19

18

No. 248, Hollywood Road,

1

4,000

23

30

No. 127, Bonham Strand,

1

5,000

""

24

October

12

No. 14, Li Shing Street,

1

5,500

25

November 11

No. 115, Praya West,......

26

11

No. 58, Square Street,

* 21

3

1

20,000

1

3,000

"

27

16

No. 5, Pan Kwai Lane,

1

1,000

"

28

21

No. 9, Tannery Lane,.....

1

40

39

29

23

No. 314A, Queen's Road Central,

1

8,000

""

30

26

No. 22, Tsz Mi Lane,....

1

1

5,500

"3

co co co co co co

31

December

4

No. 31, Wing Fung Street,

1

10

32

5

No. 131, Bonham Strand,

2

2,000

""

33

9

No. 11, Bonham Strand,

""

34

10

No. 240, Queen's Road West,

21

2

5,000

1

9,000

35

13

No. 99, Praya West,

1

400

""

36

25 No. 100, Queen's Road West,

1

2,000

"1

.$

208,210

TOTAL,...

FIRES, 1894.

NO. OF BUILDINGS

DESTROYED.

No.

DATE.

TIME.

SITUATION OF FIRE.

ESTIMATED DAMAGE.

Wholly. Partly.

1 2 3 4 16

January

9

12.30

p.m.

14

""

16

""

4

February

7.55 a.m.

6

1.40 p.m.

14

25

"

7 p.m.

8

March

3

7.30 a.m.

8.45 p.m.

1.25 a.m.

4.50 p.m.

No. 56, First Street,

No. 13, U Lok Lane,

No. 273, Queen's Road West, No. 26, Market Street,

No. 57, Queen's Road West,.... No. 28, Upper Station Street, No. 86, Queen's Road West,.......... No. 17, Salt Fish Street,

I

800

1

400

1

1,200

:

2

2,500

1

01

4,000

1

300

1

50

2

1,500

9

28

9.35 a.m.

10

April

4

9.20 p.m.

No. 17, Upper Lascar Row,..... No. 136, Bonham Strand,

1

1

5,000

6

1

150,000

11

17

10.30 a.m.

No. 211, Hollywood Road,

1

1

2,000

12

28

9 a.m.

No. 63, Wanchai Road,.

1

1,500

13

30

2 a.m.

No. 122, Queen's Road Central,

3

2

55,000

14

May

1

7 p.m.

No. 116, Queen's Road Central,

1

1

18,000

15

15

3 a.m.

No. 137, Queen's Road West,

Ι

2

4,500

16

June

3

3 a.m.

No. 15, Jervois Street,

1

2,500

17

3

3.10 a.m.

No. 228, Queen's Road Central,

2

20,000

18 July

1

10.25 p.m.

No. 123, Queen's Road Central,

1

3,000

19

August

14

10.30 a.m.

No. 59, Square Street,

1

500

20

21

3.45 a.m.

No. 68, Jervois Street,

1

1

18,000

23

21

October

2

2 a.m.

No. 9, Sai On Lane,

:

1

200

22

3

>>

11.30 p.m.

No. 21, West Street,

1

800

23

11

""

6.20 p.m.

No. 2, Ship Street,....

1

200

24

24

12.10 a.m.

No. 127, Queen's Road West,

1

15,000

25

31

""

10 p.m.

26

November 30

7.40 p.m.

27

December

1

10 p.m.

28

1

""

-29

13

""

11.20 p.m.

5.30 p.m.

No. 207, Queen's Road Central,

No. 183, Hollywood Road,

No. 22, Queen's Road West,.

TOTAL,...

No. 115, Queen's Road Central, No. 32, Bonham Strand,

3

4,600

1

2,000

1

8,000

1

1

2,000

1

100

TOTAL,...........................

$

323,650

*

FIRES, 1895.

221

No.

DATE.

TIME.

SITUATION OF FIRE.

House No. 230, Queen's Road Central, House No. 4, Wellington Street, House No. 189, Queen's Road Central, House No. 15, Mercer Street, House No. 337, Queen's Road West, House No. 73, Bonham Strand, House No. 149, Queen's Road Central, House No. 3, Wai Tak Lane, House No. 228, Queen's Road West, House No. 7, Li Shing Street,.. House No. 96, Bonham Strand,

House No. 212, Queen's Road West, House No. 352, Queen's Road Central, House No. 1, Queen's Street, House No. 144, Queen's Road West,

1 2 3 4 106

January

6.

7.45 p.m.

12

9.30 p.m.

>>

3

18

5.45 p.m.

29

18

6.45 p.m.

>>

21

""

9 p.m.

February

6

9.15 p.m.

10

1 a.m.

39

20

1.20 p.m.

""

9

March

2

6.40 p.m.

10

3

"

11

"

☺ ☺

7 p.m.

24

8 p.m.

12

26

8.30 p.m.

""

13

30

2.50 a.m.

""

14

April

6

3.25 a.m.

15

11

12 Noon.

29

16

18

39

7 p.m.

House No. 34, Bonham Strand,

17

24.

10.15 p.m.

18

June

14

3.05 a.m.

19

July

29

4.50 a.m.

20

29

12.30 a.m.

""

22

21

22

August September 6

5

1 a.m.

3.45 a.m.

23

6

8.30 a.m.

24

October

5

12.50 a.m.

25

6

8.20 p.m.

""

26

15

11.15 p.m.

""

27

30

12.45 a.m.

""

8888888

28 November 21

29 December 13

7.35 p.m.

11.15 p.m.

4.30 p.m.

House No. 19, Jervois Street, House No. 76, Jervois Street, House No. 34, Winglok Street,

House No. 3, Station Street,

House No. 70, Jervois Street,

House No. 4, Praya Central, premises of

Messrs. Wieler & Co.,.......

House No. 12, Nullah Terrace, Quarry Bay, House No. 169, Hollywood Road,

Matshed at Quarry Bay,

House No. 149, Queen's Road Central,

American ship Wandering Jew, Victoria

Harbour,

House No. 111, Praya West,

A matshed at Kun Chung,

A squatter's hut on the Hillside at the

back of Shaukiwan Station,

House No. 110, Praya West,

No. OF BUILDINGS

DESTROYED.

Wholly. Partly.

:

:

ESTIMATED

DAMAGE.

1.

$

6,000

1

4,000

1

2,000

I

9,000

1

1,000

1

6,000 -

1

30

1

200

2

3

12,000

1

3,000

1

3

Unknown.

1

3,000

1

2

5,000

1

5,000

1

3,000

1

1,000

1

12,000

1

2

1

1

22N

Not known.

5,000

800

22,000

1

100

1

700

1

1

8,000

1

500

1

100

150,000

6,000

ja ja j

200

30

13

>>

1

25

8,000

31

16

1 a.m.

""

32

17

1 a.m.

"

33

23

1.35 a.m.

""

34

24

"

35

30

6 p.m. 1.10 a.m.

House No. 247, Queen's Road Central, House No. 285, Queen's Road Central, Houses Nos. 347 & 340, Queen's Road West, House No. 40, Queen's Road West,..

1

2

122N

15,000

2

4,000

5,325

5,000

TOTAL,

.$

297,980

FIRES, 1896.

NO. OF BUILDINGS DESTROYED.

No.

DATE.

TIME.

SITUATION OF FIRE.

ESTIMATED DAMAGE.

Wholly. Partly.

1234 19 19 17 30 σ)

January

15

7.45 p.m.

16

""

8.20 p.m.

25

""

10.30 p.m.

February

I

12.30 a.m.

6

1.00 a.m.

House No. 30, Wing Lok Street,........ House No. 63, Queen's Road Central,.... House No. 205, Queen's Road West, House No. 302, Queen's Road West, House No. 56, Jervois Street,

2

2

$

9,000

30

1,000

1

2,600

1

Ι

6,000

6

6

2.45 a.m.

House No. 57, Queen's Road West,

3

2

16,000

7

8

11.05 p.m.

House No. 133, Praya West,

2

6,000

8

26

4.25 a.. House No. 309, Queen's Road Central,..

1

1

5,000

9

March

9

4.00 a.m.

House No. 367, Queen's Road Central,....

5,000

10

April

1

5.10 a.m.

House No. 3, Wing Lok Street,

1

8,000

11

12

1

4.45 a.m.

House No. 288, Queen's Road West,

1

4,000

59

6

4.20 a.m.

House No. 21, Salt Fish Street,

1

8,700

""

13

8

4.15 a.m.

House No. 13, Wing Woo Street,

1

2,000

14

15

16

RAA A

22

1.15 a.m.

House No. 48, Praya West,

1

3,000

24

3.15 a.m. House No. 15, Cochrane Street,

1

600

26

8.45 a.m.

17

27

""

18

29

""

9.50 p.m.

19

May

9

20

14

""

House No. 31, Belcher's St., Kennedy Town, 10.15 a.m. House No. 238, Hollywood Road,

1.10 a.m. House No. 12, Sutherland Street,

10.15 p.m.

House No. 73, Jervois Street,

1

3,500

1

2,000

House No. 115, Praya West,

1

2,300

1

50

2

6,000

21

June

5

9.20 p.m.

House No. 3, Tsz Mi Lane,

1

1,290

22

15

7.30 a.m.

""

23

29

19

3.30 p.m.

24

August

14

3.10 p.m.

25

October

28

2.10 p.m.

26

November 5

27

2.1

""

828

28

29

10.

30

21

19

December 8

Licensed Cargo Boat No. 69,

On Board the British barque Glen Caladh, House No. 10, Ship Street,

House No. 137, Wing Lok Street,

12.40 a.m. House No. 109, Queen's Road West, 3.20 a.m, House No. 138, Queen's Road West, 8.30 p.m.

House No. 18, New Street, 1.00 a.m. House No. 10, Queen's Road West,

House No. 63, Bonham Strand,

4,500

...

Unknown.

1

600

1

7,000

:

1

25

1

200

1

...

1,000

1

200

...

Trifling.

TOTAL,........

བླླ་

105,595

222

FIRES, 1897.

No.

DATE.

TIME.

SITUATION Of Fire.

On board the S.S. Fausang, House No. 138, Jervois Street, House No. 213, Praya West, House No. 24, Cross Street,

Government Offices, Lower Albert Road,. House No. 124, Jervois Street,

House No. 128, Queen's Road Central, House No. 351, Queen's Road Central, House No. 99, Jervois Street,

House No. 95, Wing Lok Street,.

1234 10 CON 00✪

January

12

10.30 p.m.

18

10.15 p.m.

February

3

4.20 a.m.

11

1.20 p.m.

""

15

9.15 a.m.

""

28

1.35 a.m.

??

April

1

1.20 a.m.

House No. 14, Cross Street,.

8

3

12.30 a.m.

""

9

11

2.24 a.m.

,,

10

21

5.25 a.m.

""

11

21

10.15 p.m.

On board S.S. Belgic, ...

12

25

1.55 a.m.

ܙܝ

-

:

13

May

1

7.40 p.m.

House No. 8, Cross Street,

14

20

1.45 a.m.

"

15

June

15

2.30 a.m.

16

July

23

10 p.m.

17

27

11.55 p.m.

""

18

August

3

4.15 p.m.

19

22

2.05 a.m.

25

20

September

4

1.15 p.m.

21

18

7.15 a.m.

22

19

12.20 p.m.

House No. 5,

"3

23

November 24

11.35 p.m.

House No. 64, Third Street,.

24

24

7 p.m.

25

28

7.10 a.m.

""

26

December 22

1.15 p.m.

H. M. Naval Yard,

House No. 71, Jervois Street, House No. 114, Jervois Street,

Hongkong Hotel, Queen's Road Central,. House No. 248, Queen's Road West, House No. 15, Praya Fuk Tsun Heung,... House No. 213, Queen's Road West, House No. 16, Tung Loi Street, House No. 49, Quarry Bay,

"Wild Dell,'

House No. 53, Stanley Village, House No. 122, Second Street,

TOTAL,..

No. of BUILDINGS DESTROYED.

Wholly. Partly.

1

1

:

:

1

ESTIMATED DAMAGE.

$

500

25,000

17,000

300

200

1

1

20,000

1

1

4,000

1

200

2

24,000

1

3,000

3,000

1

5,000

1

700

2

13,050

3

34,000

1

300

1

300

7,000

2

600

3

...

6,900

1

600

1

---

300

1

1,200

5

3,000

1

5,000

1

2,000

177,150

::

:

H

No.

DATE.

TIME.

FIRES, 1898.

NO. OF BUILDINGS DESTROYED.

SITUATION OF FIRE.

ESTIMATED DAMAGE.

Wholly. Partly.

1234106

3.10 a.m.

11

""

25

""

3.35 p.m.

January 22 26

""

February 5

3.55 p.m. 4.40 p.m.

9.00 p.m.

House No. 21, Lyndhurst Terrace, Government Asylum, Eastern Street, House No. 46, Praya Central,

1

500.00

1

150.00

1

House No. 125, Wanchai Road,

1

Matshed at British Kowloon,

March

12

12.40 a.m.

House No. 2, Graham Street,

1

200.00

4,000.00 Unknown.

$ 1,000.00

7

April

11

3.00 a.m.

8 May

10

11.10 p.m.

9

June

1

7.05 p.m.

House No. 288, Queen's Road West, House No. 295, Queen's Road West, House No. 67, Praya Central,

1

600.00

1

700.00

100.00

10 August

10

11

September 10

2.00 p.m.

3.00 a.m. House No. 22, Belchers Street,

Matshed at the Peak,

1

7,000.00

7

200.00

12

October

10

5.30 p.m.

House No. 2, West Street,

2

11,628.74

13

November 18

7.30 a.m. House No. 76, Praya East,

1

200.00

14 December

9

5.50 p.m.

15

12

6.15 p.m.

House No. 56, Jardine's Bazaar, House No. 136, Queen's Road East,

1

1

2,500.00

1

1

800.00

16

13

10.00 a.m.

Hut at Shaukiwan,

5

5,423.00

""

TOTAL,..............

..$

35,001.74

.....

*

No.

DATE.

TIME.

FIRES DURING THE YEAR 1899.

No. of

BUILDINGS

SITUATION OF FIRE.

DESTROYED.

ESTIMATED

DAMAGE.

CAUSE.

Wholly. Partly.

1

REMARKS.

2

12

1 Jan.

7

13

""

3.40 p.m.

10.30 p.m.

House No. 33, Wing Wo Lane,

House No. 35, Wongneichung,

3

""

20 10.30 p.m.

House No. 234, Hollywood Road,

F:

I

$1,000.00 Bursting of a kerosine lamp, 100.00 Sparks from a cooking fur- nace setting fire to some

|

grass.

Insured in the Hanseatic Fire Insurance for $4,800. No Insurance effected.

1,500.00 Pork dripping being ignited Insured in the Chun On Insurance Coy. for $1,600. by flames from a charcoal

stove.

4

29

""

2.00 p.m.

House No. 28, Nullah Terrace, Quarry Bay,

1

2

1,500.00 | Burning joss sticks accid-

Insured in Messrs. Butterfield and Swire's Office.

papers.

Feb.

10

6 Mar.

17

07

8.45 p.m.

2.30 a.m.

House No. 143, Wanchai Road,

House No. 3, Wai Sun Lane,

-

*

18 7.30 p.m.

House No. 226, Queen's Road Central,

8

9 April 19 10 May 2

19

12.30 p.m.

Hunghom West,

3

matshed

1

1.25 a.m.

House No. 61, Queen's Road West,

7.15 a.m.

On board Gerinan Steamer Sabine Rickmers, Tai-

1

Kok Tsui Wharf.

11

12

13

123

10

""

11.05 p.m.

House No. 118, Hollywood Road,

1

23

""

8.25 p.m.

House No. 100, Wellington Street,

June

10

11.50 a.m.

On board the British Steamer Amara, Wanchai Anchorage.

1

14

16

4.30 a.m.

Nos. 24 and 25, Praya Kennedy Town,....

1

15

21

7.35 p.m.

16 July

18

Midnight.

House No. 205, Queen's Road Central, Praya Kennedy Town near Chater Street,

:

:

1

matshed

1

200.00 | Unknown,

17 Aug.

8

3.00 a.m.

House No. 65, Queen's Road West,

:

18

"1

10

8.00 p.m.

No. 2 Store, Kowloon Dock,

:

entally set fire to some

50.00 Unknown,

3,000.00 | Unknown,

30,000.00 | Bursting of a kerosine lamp,

160.00 | Flames from grass stack set fire to the matshed.

200.00 Unknown,

40.00 | Oil being ignited by hot cinders. 3,000.00 Unknown, 300.00 | Unknown, 27,500.00 Upsetting of kerosine oil in engine room lamp oil store.

150,000.00 Spontaneous combustion amongst cotton.

Insured for $170,000 in various Offices. Insured in the North British and Mercantile Insur- ance Coy. for $800. Messrs. Shewan, Tomes & Co., agents.

Insured in the Transatlantic Fire Insurance Coy. for $16,000.

Not insured.

Insured in Meyer Fire Insurance Coy. for $1,000. Not covered by Insurance.

Insured in the Chun On Insurance Coy. for $1,000. Not insured.

The cargo was insured in the Canton Marine Fire Insurance Office for $25,000. The ship was damaged to the extent of $2,500 which was not insured.

The greater part of stock was insured in David Coy. South British and Chun On Coy. for the sum of $230,000.

2,500.00 Bursting of a kerosine lamp, Insured in the Hanseatic Office for $7,000.

The coals were insured in the China Fire for $15,000 and in the Royal Fire, Melchers & Co. Agents, for $55,000.

2,880.00 | Upsetting of a kerosine lamp, Insured in the Chun On Insurance Coy. for $1,200 and in the Netherlands Fire Insurance Coy. for $1,500.

1 1,500.00 Unknown,

Covered by Insurance for $75,000.

Carried forward.......

225,430.00

223

FIRES DURING THE YEAR 1899,-Continued.

No. DATE.

TIME.

SITUATION OF FIRE.

No. of

BUILDINGS

DESTROYED.

ESTIMATED

DAMAGE.

CAUSE.

Wholly. Partly.

REMARKS.

224

Brought forward,....

:

225,430.00

20

2822

19 Aug.

11

12

1.00 a.m.

12.15 a.m.

House No. 83, Station Street, Yaumati,

3

600.00 | Unknown,

House No. 373, Queen's Road Central,

1

2

19,000.00 Unknown,

matshed

1

unknown

Unknown,

21 Sept. 10

22

Oct.

6.15 a.m.

McDonald Road,

5

6.15 p.m.

House No. 256, Des Vœux Road,

1

1

caught fire.

23

""

9.50 p.m.

House No 235, Queen's Road Central,

}

6,500.00 Upsetting of a lamp,.

24

11

55

9.20 p.m.

House No. 28, Praya West,.

1

12,000.00 Unknown,

25

Nov.

8.30 p.m.

House No. 1, Duddell Street,

1

150.00 Unknown,

26

6.00 a.m.

""

27

Dec.

6.35 p.m.

On board S.S. Poseidon in Victoria Harbour, Lam Lo Mi Village, Kowloon City,

2

buts

13

28

29

2

6.30 a.m.

Nga Chin Loong Village, Kowloou City,

1

...

13

6.20 a.m.

House No. 76, Jervois Street,..

1

30

"

22

8.50 p.m.

Godowns next to Hing Lung Lane,

40,000.00 Unknown,

154.00 Unknown,

180.00 Unknown,

23,000.00 Falling or bursting of a kerosine lamp.

500,000.00 Unknown,

.....

Not insured.

Insured for $23,000 in Reuter, Bröcklemann & Co.

Insured in Chan On, Commercial Union, Tung On, South British, North British, North German, London and Lancashire, David & Co., Reuter, Bröcklemann & Co., Carlowitz & Co. for $334,000.

Not insured.

Insured in the Chun On Insurance Coy. for $11,000.

Not insured.

2,500.00 | Some hemp accidentally | Insured in the Tung On Insurance Coy.

Insured in the Atlas Insurance Coy.

Insured for $12,000 in Siemssen & Co. and also for $8,000 in Dodwell Carlill & Co.

Not insured.

Covered by Insurance.

Not insured.

31

""

26

8.30 p.m.

House No. 1, Ship Street,

TOTAL, ΤΟΤΑΙ......

1

1

300.00 | Unknown,

829,81

829,814.00

* ༦

F. H. MAY, Superintendent of Fire Brigade,

No.

DATE.

TIME.

INCIPIENT FIRES DURING THE YEAR 1899.

SITUATION OF FIRE.

DAMAGE.

CAUSE.

REMARKS.

:

Grass on fire,..

Unknown. Grass on fire,. Unknown,

$15

Grass on fire,. Unknown, Grass on fire,.

Do.,

Trifling

Unknown,

Do.,

Grass ou fire,..

Do.,

Do.,

Do.,

Do.,

Overheating of a stove-pipe set fire to a beam, Carelessness while worshipping,

Grass on fire,..

Do.,

Attempted arson,

Grass on fire,.

Do.,

Do.,

Do.,

Do.,

Do.,

Accident while worshipping, Grass on fire,...................

Burning crackers,

Extinguished by Police. A considerable number of young trees were damaged.

Extinguished by Police.

A bundle of wood in the kitchen caught fire. Ex- tinguished by occupants and Police.

Extinguished by Police. No damage done to trees. Extinguished by Coolies.

Extinguished by Police.

Extinguished by Police and a squad of Coolies. About 30 acres of grass burnt and a number of fir trees scorched.

Extinguished by Police.

Some grass stored on the foreshore caught fire and burnt itself out.

Extinguished by Police assisted by boatmen. trees damaged.

A few

Put out by a squad of Coolies and Police. A large number of trees were destroyed.

An acre of grass and a few trees burnt.

Police and a squad of Coolies.

Fire burnt itself out.

Put out by

A large number of fir trees were scorched. Put out by Police and hired Coolies.

Extinguished by the occupants.

Extinguished by Police assisted by Villagers.

Put out by Police and hired Coolies. About 30 fir trees were slightly scorched.

Extinguished by Police and Coolies.

Two men were charged with attempting to set fire and were discharged at the Police Court.

Extinguished by Police and Coolies.

Extinguished by the Caretakers of the Temple. Extinguished by Police and Coolies.

Extinguished by Police.

Do.

Extinguished by Police. About 7,000 square yards grass fired and several trees damaged.

Put out by inmates and Police.

Extinguished by Police.

Extinguished by Police and Boat-people.

1 Jan. 6

234

15 30 1-∞o

9

26

10

27

11

""

A

12

>>

13

8 to 10 NN

28

28

4.45

p.m.

30

>>

14

15

+3

30

""

30

29

17

18

19

20

21

23

2 22 228288 NR

16 Feb.

3

7

>>

2.00 p.m.

8

""

""

5.00 p.m.

9

3.15 a.m.

9

>>

1.00 p.m.

9

10.30 p.m.

""

10

>>

11

1.45 a.m.

""

15

"}

19

""

23

12 Noon.

>>

24

>>

......

1.00 p.m.

5.40 p.m.

4.30 p.m.

3.00 a.m.

3.00 p.m.

7.45 p.m.

12.30 p.m.

2.00 p.m.

1.00 p.m.

Hillside North of Magazine Gap Road,

Unoccupied Matshed at Stone Cutters' Island, Hillside to the West of Mount Kellett Road,. House No. 150, Hollywood Road,

Hillside South of Victoria Peak,

A Stack of Grass at Mong Kok Tsui, Hillside at Tai Tam Tuk Village,

Hillside above Bonham Road,

A Matshed at Tai Tam Village,.. Stanley Village,

Hillside at Sai Wan,

Hillside above Fly Point,..

Hillside above Holland Street,

Hillside above Tai Tam Tuk, Hillside near Little Hongkong:

House No. 6, Mountain View, Matshed adjoining To Ti Temple, Shan Ki War,

Hillside near Little Hongkong,

Hill at Tai Wan Bay east to the back of Cape Collinson House No. 58, Stanley Street,.....

Hillside at Wong Ma Kok,

$10

:.

:

$40

:

::

9

1.00 p.m.

Hillside south of Stanley Village,

9

""

24

""

2.30 p.m.

10 | 12 Midnight.

Hillside above Tai Hang Village,

Hillside above Shallow Water Bay,

25

10

>>

26

10

၁၀

Hillside, Little Hongkong,

""

2.30 p.m.

Hillside, Kai Lung Wan,.

27

10

7.30 a.m.

House No. 15, Pokfulam Road,

""

28

11

Hillside near Shek O,

>>

29

13

Noon.

Matroof of Queen's Wharf,

""

Carried forward,..

$65

225

No.

DATE.

TIME.

INCIPIENT FIRES DURING THE YEAR 1899,-Continued.

SITUATION OF FIRE.

DAMAGE.

CAUSE.

REMARKS.

226

Brought forward,....

$65

30 Feb.

13

10.00 a.m.

House No. 6, Li Un Street, East,

$60

Sparks from a smoking pipe,

31

16

6.00 a.m.

House No. 7, Li Un Street, East,

Carelessness with joss-sticks,

32

16

10.00 a.m.

Public Gardens,

Grass on fire,.

"}

33

28

"The Chalet," at Mount Kellet,

$10

""

34 Mar.

2

9.00 p.m.

House No. 8, " Wild Dell,"

:

co co co co c

35

8

>>

36

11

""

37

19

*=*

Hillside North of Victoria Peak,

Hillside South of Kennedy Road,

Hillside near Brick Works, Aberdeen,

>>

38

39

*40

19

11.05 p.m.

House No. 15, Station Street, North, Yau Ma Ti,

""

19

وو

1.00 p.m.

A Shed at Queen's Road West,

$8

$40

19

3

41

20

وو

223

3.15 p.m.

West side of Mount Davis,

Hills between Deep Water and Repulse Bay,

...

42

43

44

234

20

"}

5.30 p.m.

House No. 79, Ma Tan Wai

$60

20

33

7.30 p.m.

21

""

45

22

"}

46

""

24

2.00 p.m.

24 11.30 p.m.

47

28

2253

48

30

10.00 a.m.

""

49 Apr.

4

5.30 a.m.

50

8

6.30 p.m.

5.00 p.m.

South of Stone Cutters' Island, Reclamation Ground at Yau Ma Ti,

Hillside near Aberdeen Cemetery,

Hillside near Aplichau,

House No. 73, Queen's Road Central,

Hillside at Pokfulam,

House No. 255, Queen's Road Central, Morrison Hill,

:.

Do.,

$10

:

51

52

53

སྶ སྶསྶ

9

Hillside near Aplichau Cemetery,

""

11

3.15 p.m.

Hillside at Wong Ma Kok,...

13

1.00 p.m.

Hillside at Aplichau,

54

15

"

1.00 p.m.

Hillside at Mount Davis,

Do.,

Do.,

Do.,

...

Do.,

Overheating of bricks in the kitchen

igniting a beam.

Extinguished by inmates assisted by Police. Extinguished by inmates.

Extinguished by Police.

Do.

Overheating of pipe from cooking stove Extinguished by Firemen.

set fire to a beam.

Grass on fire,.

Do.,

Do.,

Mosquito curtain accidentally caught fire,. Sparks from fire underneath the boiler set fire to some leaves and straw, Grass on fire,.

Do.,

Sparks from chimney setting fire to wood work....... Chimney on fire,

Grass on fire,.

Unknown,

Grass on fire,..

Do.

Some joss-paper accidentally took fire, Grass on fire,.

Extinguished by Police.

Do.

Put out by Police and hired Coolies. fir trees were scorched. Extinguished by Police.

About 50 or 60

Extinguished by Police assisted by some Chinese.

Extinguished by Police and a gang of Coolies.A large number of trees were scorched.

Extinguished by Police and hired Coolies. Hundreds of fir trees suffered more or less from the effect of flames.

Fire burnt itself out.

Extinguished by occupants.

About 200 square yards of grass burnt and 30 small trees damaged. Put out by Police.

One acre of grass was burnt. Extinguished by Police and a squad of Scavenger Coolies.

A quantity of palm leaf matting caught fire. Put out by Police.

Extinguished by Police and hired Coolies. About 50 fir trees were slightly scorched. Do.

Put out by inmates and Police. Extinguished by Police.

Do.

Do.

Extinguished by Police and hired Coolies. About 16 fir trees were damaged.

Extinguished by Police and hired Coolies. About 10,000 square yards of grass fired and a large quantity of fir trees damaged.

Carried forward,...........

$253

1

No.

DATE.

TIME.

INCIPIENT FIRES DURING THE YEAR 1899,-Continued.

SITUATION OF FIRE.

DAMAGE.

30

2

63

64

3

""

2

5

65

66 June

20

"}

27

67

27

10.00 a.m.

House No. 50, Bonham Strand,

"5

68 | July

69

""

70 Aug.

798

9.30 p.m.

Stage of the City Hall,

3.30 p.m.

Hillside near Stanley Village,

8.00 p.m.

Second Floor of No. 67, Queen's Road West,

Brought forward,...

$253

Grass on fire,..

288288 8828 8 8

59

55 | Apr.

56

57

58

"}

15

2.00 p.m.

Hillside near Aberdeen Cemetery,

15

6.00 p.m.

Hillside, Kee Lung Wan,....

Do,,

Do.,

17

1.00 p.m.

Hillside above Aberdeen,..

""

18

10.30 p.m.

""

A small Matshed used as Shelter for Chinese braves at Kowloon.

$20

Uuknown.

26

4.30 a.m.

A Matshed belonging to Military Authorities at Stone Cutters' Island.

$4

Do.

60

61

62 May

29

co to & to

4.45 a.m.

House No. 10, Tai Ping Shan Street,

$5

Do.,

5.30 p.m.

1.00 p.m.

3.00 p.m.

3.00 p.m.

8.30 p.m.

2.15 a.m.

Hillside above Wong Chok Hang,

Hillside above Aberdeen Cemetery, Coal Godown, No. 81, Praya East, House No. 4, George's Laue, ...

House No. 10, Western Street,

Hillside above Chai Wan Cemetery,

Chimney on fire, Grass on fire,..

Do.,

$5

$10

$20

Trifling

72

73

74

75

76

77

78

81

FOR FRANK 285 28*

71 Sept.

8

9

""

10

11

}}

""

"}

888=

13

28

4.00 p.m.

8.30 a.m.

2.00 p.m.

9.30 a.m.

10.35 p.m.

House No. 314, Queen's Road Central, Praya Reclamation near Hillier Street,

House No. 314, Queen's Road Central,

House No. 314, Queen's Road Central, House No. 17, Centre Street,

Unknown,

Lan Tau Island opposite to Cheung Chow,

Grass on fire,.

29

5.30 p.m.

House No. 7, Gage Street,

30

""

5.00 p.m.

A Dwelling House at Tung Chung,

$10

Do.,

79 Oct.

80

""

13

>>

18

83

""

84

* *

22

N15 BOA

7.00 p.m.

6.40 p.m.

3.40 p.m.

Hillside above Sung Yuen Leng Village, Kowloon,... House No. 48, Gage Street,

Grass on fire,.

$7

Unknown,

Grass on fire,

Mount Davis,

11.30 p.m. 11.15 a.m.

Stockhold of U.S.S. Isla de Cuba, Hung Hom Docks,

Unknown,

27

2.20 a.m.

A Matshed used as Plague Mortuary at Cheung Chow, Fenwick & Co.'s Moulding Shop, Praya East,

Unknown

$20

""

Carried forward,..

$354

CAUSE.

REMARKS.

Put out by Police and hired Coolies. Several acres

of grass were burnt damaging about 400 young fir trees.

Extinguished by Police.

Extinguished by Police and hired Coolies.

Do.,

Unknown.

Extinguished by inmates and Police.

Extinguished by Firemen.

Extinguished by Police and Coolies.

Extinguished by Police and Coolies. About 60 fir trees damaged.

Extinguished by Police and hired Coolies.

Sparks from a pipe setting fire to bedding, Extinguished by Police and occupants. Chimney on fire,

Caused by the foot-lights,

Grass on fire,..............

Burning of a beam from the adjoining house which had been on fire.

Unknown,

Do.,

Do.,

Attempted arson,

Accident,

Carelessness while worshipping graves,... Overheating of a drying oven setting fire to the roof.

Extinguished by the occupants.

Extinguished by Assistant Engineer Fire Brigade. Extinguished by Police. A few shrubs damaged. Extinguished by Police.

Extinguished by inmates.

Do.

Some empty match boxes caught fire.

Police.

Put out by inmates.

Put out by Police.

Fire burned itself out.

Put out by occupants.

Put out by Police. Put out by Police.

Put out by Police.

Put out by

About 100 yards of grass burned.

Put out by Forest Guards. Fire spread over 2 acres of the hill. Several trees and shrubs destroyed. Extinguished by Dock employees. Put out by Police.

Put out by Fire Brigade.

No.

DATE.

TIME.

INCIPIENT FIRES DURING THE YEAR 1899,—Continued.

SITUATION OF FIRE.

DAMAGE.

CAUSE.

REMARKS.

Brought forward,.

$351

Grass on fire,

85

Νον. 28

Lamma Island near Luk Chow,

86

87

= 8 x8 = ∞∞

3

7.00 p.m.

Watchmen's Quarters at No. 2 Tank, Caine Road,..

Exploding of a kerosine lamp,..

>>

17

9.15 p.m.

House No. 6, Arsenal Street,

Trifling

>>

88

89

90 Dec.

22

House No. 159, Second Street,

"

28

4.07 p.m.

"}

1

10.10 a.m.

Among some bales of Jute on board 1st class Cargo-

House No. 10, Queen's Road Central, (premises of Messrs. Sander, Wieler & Co.)

Slight

Unknown,

boat No. 15 at Praya East.

Grass on fire,................

91

92

1

F

12.15 p.m.

Hillside near Pokfulam,

93

94

95

96

2 8 1085

1

Hillside above Kai Lung Wan,

Do.,

"

1

4.00 p.m.

Hillside, Mount Davis,....

>>

1

6.38 p.m.

>>

1

10.25 p.m.

"}

5

>>

97

21

6.30 p.m.

House No. 47, Stanley Street, House No. 21, Hollywood Road,. House No. 25, Caine Road, ‹ House No. 16, Praya West,

Do.,

Chimney on fire,

Do.,

...

Bursting of a kerosine lamp,

Put out by Police and hired Coolies. An area of about square mile burned.

Four men received injuries from burns. Extinguished by the occupants.

Some shavings accidentally caught fire,... Put out by Police and occupants. Chimney on fire,

Put out by Fire Brigade.

Do.

Put out by Police and hired Coolies. Several trees damaged.

Put out by Police and hired Coolies. About 300 young fir trees scorched.

Put out by Police and hired Coolies. About 3 acres of grass burned.

Put out by Fire Brigade.

Put out by occupants and Police,

Overheating of the chimney set fire to a beam,... Put out by Firemen. Overheating of flue,

Put out by Coolies.

TOTAL,...

$354

F. H. MAY,

Superintendent of Fire Brigade.

(

HONGKONG.

181

No. 1900

8

REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF VICTORIA GAOL FOR 1899,

No. 20/1900.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor.

VICTORIA GAOL,

22nd January, 1900. ̧

SIR,-I have the honour to submit for your information the following report on the Victoria Gaol for the year 1899.

2. The number of prisoners admitted to the Gaol during the year under sentence from the ordinary Courts was 4,164, besides 89 soldiers and sailors sentenced by Courts Martial. There were 35 persons admitted for debt and 501 in default of finding security, making a total of 4,789. Of these 736 were old offenders, including 11 juveniles who were merely sent to the Gaol to be birched, leaving a total of 725 old offenders who actually underwent imprisonment.

The corresponding numbers for the preceding year were respectively as follows:-

Convicted by the ordinary Courts...

Courts Martial

Debtors

In default of finding security..

Total (including 760 old offenders)

4,976

69

51

331

5,427

3. The daily average number of prisoners confined in the Gaol during the year was 434 as com- pared with 511 for the year 1898.

4. The number of prisoners committed to the Gaol for offences not of a criminal nature was 1,858 made up as follows:-

:

Committed under the Prepared Opium Ordinance

Market

Arms

Vehicle

Sanitary bye-laws

Harbour Regulations. For Drunkenness

For Trespassing....

For Disorderly Conduct

For Gambling

For Contempt of Court....

Destitutes...

Total.........

386

254

56

58

118

94

107

80

439

205

17

44

..1,858

5. The following table shows the number of prisoners who were committed to Gaol without the option of a fine and in default of payment of fine.

Year.

Total.

Imprisonment without the option of Fine.

Imprisonment in default etc.

Total.

Served the Imprisonment.

Paid full fine.

Paid part fine.

· 1899

4,253

1,903

2,350

1,281

895

174

Ordinance No. 7 of 1899, under which part payments of fines are accepted, came into operation* on the 7th March, 1899.

182

6. There were 2,459 prisoners reported for breaches of prison discipline, being an average per prisoner of 5.66 as compared with 4,038, with an average per prisoner of 7.90 for the preceding year. The throwing of tobacco over the prison walls caused an increased number in the reports for having tobacco.

In 1897 with a daily average population in the Gaol of 462 the average number of reports per prisoner was the same. The lower average with lower population shows how much better discipline is maintained when the Gaol is not overcrowded.

7. The following improvements referred to in paragraph 9 of the report for 1898 have been carried out during the year almost entirely by prison labour :

(a.) The east ramp has been entirely removed, and on the site it occupied a large lean-to shed for laundry purposes has been constructed, providing accommodation for 16 washers and rendering better supervision possible.

(b.) Two boilers for heating water and boiling clothes have been built.

(c.) A latrine for the use of the laundrymen has been erected.

(d.) The old washing shed has been pulled down and a large drying-room built on the site. Fourteen horses have been added, by the Public Works Department, to the old drying apparatus, making a total of 26 drying horses.

(e.) The old drying room has been converted into a shed for mat-making in which 4 looms

have been fitted up.

(f.) An extra work-room has been added to the printing workshop which was greatly needed in order to meet the increased requirements of the printing and bookbinding depart-

ment.

(9.) "B" Wing has been pulled down by prison labour, and a new wing to accommodate 78

prisoners in separate confinement is being constructed on the site by free labour.

(1.) A new hot water service for bathing purposes has been laid on by the Public Works

Department.

8. The building of quarters for the Prison Staff outside the prison has been commenced. On the the completion of the quarters for the Indian Staff, the hospital, which is now occupied by them, will be available for prisoners.

9. There have been no escapes or attempts to escape during the year.

10. Industries are steadily increasing. Special attention has been given to instruct well-con- ducted prisoners, who have completed their period of No. 1 Hard Labour, in the various industries carried on in the Gaol, such as Bricklaying, Carpentering, Tinsmithing, Boot and Shoemaking, Mat- making, Netmaking, Tailoring, Printing, Bookbinding, etc.

Every prisoner undergoing imprisonment for any period over 42 days, has now an opportunity of learning a useful trade.

11. The profits on Industrial Labour amounted to $16,822.02 as compared with $6,204.19 for the preceding year and $2,620.08 for the year 1897.

The large increase is principally due to the printing and bookbinding done for Government. This work has been satisfactorily carried out in spite of the enormous excess in the actual requirements of almost all the Departments over their original requisitions. Much of the increase is due to the acquisition of the New Territory.

Altogether 2 088,199 forms were issued and 5,009 books were bound during the year. For these forms Governinent would have had to pay the Government Printers $10,551.20, and as the value of the paper purchased for the Gaol does not amount to the value of the paper formerly supplied to the Government Printers, the above amount represents a direct saving to Government, without taking into consideration the value of the bookbinding, regarding the prices formerly paid for which by Government I have no information. After deducting the cost of machinery (which was necessarily heavy in the first year) and the paper, the net earnings of this industry were $6,589.04.

12. The new regulations for the Prison and new scales of diet came into force on the 7th March, 1899, and have worked most satisfactorily.

I attribute the large decrease in floggings in great measure to the encouragement to good con- duct given to prisoners by the extension of the progressive stage system under the new rules, and to the decrease under it in the time spent by a well-conducted prisoner at No. 1 Hard Labour from 3 months to 42 days. At the same time credit is due to the Assistant Superintendent and the Prison Staff for the manner in which discipline has been enforced during the year. Mr. R. H. CRAIG was appointed Assistant Superintendent of the Gaol in May 1899, Principal Warder PIERPOINT Succeeding him as Chief Warder; and both these officers have given me entire satisfaction in the discharge of their new duties.

183

To Mr. CRAIG'S technical knowledge and capable supervision is principally due the large and successful extension of the Printing and Bookbinding industry in the Gaol.

The changes in the Prison Staff were much fewer than in previous years.

The Houcurable

THE COLONIAL SECRETARY.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your obedient Servant,

F. H. MAY,

Superintendent.

(A.)

VICTORIA GAOL.

Return of Reports for talking, idling, short oakum picking, &c., in the years 1896, 1897, 1898, and 1899.

MONTH.

1896.

1897.

1898.

in Prison, 510.

1899.

in Prison, 434.

Daily average number | Daily average number | Daily average number Daily average number

in Prison, 514.

in Prison, 462.

January,

214

200

170

60

February,

March,

April,

May,

June,

July,

August,

209

161

113

73

249

147

165

95

257

154

213

192

270

191

223

69

261

166

241

134

191

142

282

65

192

159

331

100

September,.

213

132

274

121

October,

174

160

227

127

November,

174

151

131

158

December,

188

140

100

90

Total,

2,592

1,903

2,470

1,284

(B.)

Return of Offences reported of Prisoners fighting with or assaulting each other, or officers,

for the years 1896, 1897, 1898, and 1899. .

MONTH.

1896.

1897.

1898.

1899.

Daily average number Daily average number Daily average number | Daily average number

in Prison, 514.

in Prison, 462.

in Prisou, 510.

in Prison, 434.

January,

February,.

March,

April,

4

1

4

2

May,.

June,

July,

August,

September,.

2

2.

October,

2

November,

8

4

1639∞ ∞ ∞ ∞ — 1– 18:00

142-1244-∞

3

5

6

6

3

4

9

1

7

4

5

3

3

December,

Total,

28

34

66

45

184

January,

February,.

March,

April,

May,.

(C.)

Return of Offences of Prisoners having Tobacco for the years 1896, 1897, 1898, and 1899.

1896.

1897.

Daily average number | Daily average number

in Prison, 514.

in Prison, 462.

1898.

1899.

Daily average number Daily average number

in Prison, 510.

in Prison, 434.

MONTH.

June,

July,

August,

September,.

October,.

November,

December,

Total,

4

3

4

7

6

4

2

1

0

1

4

3

III&I LO CO CO 00 10

1

4

7

1

2

0

6

1

1

8

2

2

jad ja -Į 00 00 -1 10 1 O IN 30 IF

3

42

30

45

(D.)

9

10

6

5

1

1

1

4

60

Comparative Return of Prisoners confined in Victoria Gaol on the 31st December, for the years 1896, 1897, 1898, and 1899.

CONVICTION.

1896.

1897.

1898.

1899.

1st,

444

321

363

316

2nd,

60

56

52

41

3rd,

23

27

28

26

4th,

10.

15

15

5th,

11

15

4

6th,

7th,

8th,

9th,

10th,

11th,

12th,

13th,

16th,

21st,

Total,

1412 N

7

7

2

5

1

1

2

2

NNN:

2

2

2

1

1

2

...

1

568

430

486

418

(E.)

Abstract of Industrial Labour, Victoria Gaol, for the year 1899.

Dr.

OAKUM.

Cr.

1899.

To Stock on hand, 1st January,

Cost of Paper Stuff purchased

during the year,.............

527.60 1899.

427.50

By Oakum sold during the year,

Stock on hand, 31st December,

1899,

$ 2,123.19

Nil.

Profit,....

1,168.09

Total,............$.

2,123.19

Total,...

2,123.19

COIR.

1899.

To Stock on hand, 1st January, 1899,. $ 990.37 1899.

Cost of Material purchased during

""

By Matting, &c., sold during the year, $ 1,964.69

Articles made for Gaol use,

the year,

1,147.53

Stock on hand, 31st Deceinber,

1899,

15.94

1,229.22:

Profit,

1,071.95

Total,...$ 3,209.85

Total,.......

3,209.85

Dr.

NET-MAKING.

1899.

To Stock on hand, 1st January, 1899,. Cost of Material purchased during

nil.

1899.

the year, ..........

31.82

Profit,

19.50

Total,........

51.32

TAILORING.

By Nets and Nettings sold and re-

paired,

Stock on hand, 31st December,

1899,

CA

185

Cr.

39.33

11.99

Total,.....$

51.32

1899.

""

To Stock on hand, 1st January, 1899,. $ Cost of Material purchased during

79.86

1899.

By Articles sold and repaired,

66.49

....

Work done for Gaol,

556.20

>"

the year,

550.78

""

Stock on hand, 31st December,

1899,

151.23

Profit,

143.28

Total,............$

773.92

Total,........

..$

773.92

PRINTING AND BOOK-BINDING.

To Stock on hand, 1st January, 1899,. $

Cost of Material and Machinery

purchased during the year,

1899.

By Printing done for outside,....

""

5,183.90

6,589.04

29

Printing, etc. done for Government, 11,772.94 Stock on hand, 31st December,

1899,

1899.

19

Profit,

Total,............$

11,772.94

WASHING.

Total.............$

11,772.94

By Washing done for Prison and Police

Officers at 1 cent per piece, Washing Prisoner's Clothing at

1 cent per piece,

Stock on hand, 31st December,

1899,

1899.

To Stock on hand, 1st January, 1899,. $ 19.80

Cost of Material purchased during

1899.

the year,

Profit,

711.28

2,489.62

J

Total,...........$

3,220.70

$ 1,182.93

2,006.09

31.68

Total,............$

3,220.70

RATTAN WORK.

1899.

""

To Stock on hand, 1st January, 1899,. Cost of Material purchased during

5.47

1899.

the year,

17.50

By Articles sold during the year,

Articles made for Gaol use, Stock on hand 31st December,

1899,

22.40

.80

4.25

Profit,.

4.48

Total,............$

27.45

Total,...........$

27.45

TIN-SMITHING.

1899.

""

To Stock on hand, 1st January, 1899,. $ Cost of Material purchased during

27.25

1899.

By Work done for outside,...

1.71

"

Work done for Gaol,.......................

121.33

the year,.

Profit,

70.15

Stock on hand, 31st December,

1899,

5.63

31.27

Total,...... .$

128.67

Total,......

128.67

186

Dr.

CARPENTERING.

Cr.

1899.

To Stock on hand, 1st January, 1899,. $ Cost of Material purchased during

38.86

1899.

the year,

227.45

""

By Articles sold and repaired during

the year,

Work done for Gaol,...

$

""

Profit,....

105.97

Stock on hand, 31st December,

1899,

72.65

282.14

17.49

Total,...... ..$

372.28

Total,............$

372.28

GRASS-MATTING.

1899.

>>

To Stock on hand, 1st January, 1899,. $ Cost of Material purchased during

7.15

1899.

By Matting sold during the year,

$

38.18

"

the year,.................

72.92

Matting and Mats made for Gaol

during the year,

32.48

""

Profit,.......

8.05

Stock on hand, 31st December,

1899,

17.46

Total,...... .$

88.12

Total,......

.$

88.12

1899.

"

To Stock on hand, 1st January, 1899, $

Cost of Material purchased during

the year,.....

Profit,..

SHOE-MAKING.

1899.

""

By Outside work during the year, Gaol work during the year,

$ 18.64

131.56

169.43

""

Stock on hand, 31st December,

1899,

30.10

10.87

Total,............$

180.30

RECAPITULATION.

$1,168.09 1,071.95

19.50

1899.

By Surplus,

1899.

Oakum, Coir,

Net-making,

Tailoring,

143.28

Washing,

2,489.62

Rattan,

4.48

Tin-smithing,

31.27

Carpentering,

105.97

Grass-matting,

8.05

Shoe-making,

10.87

Printing,

6,589.04

Total,.....

..$

180.30

Total,...$ 11,642.09

Total,....

Table showing the Number of Casualties in the Gaol Staff during the Year 1899.

Total

Establish- ment.

Transferred Resigned Resigned Services Transferred Joined. from other Volun- through dispensed to other

Departments. tarily. Sickness. with. Departments.

Dis- missed.

Number of Casualties.

Europeans,

29

7

Indians,

44

6

7

2

1

1

10

4

2

1

:

:

6

The above Table does not include-The Superintendent.

Assistant Superintendent.

Chief Warder.

Clerical Staff.

Servants.

Return showing the employment of Prisoners and the value of their labour.

187

Description of Employment.

Daily average number of prisoners.

Value of Prison Labour.

Total.

Males.

Females.

Total.

Non-Productive,

C.

*A

C.

Crank labour, shot and stone, debtors, remands, sick and

under punishment,

117

117

.

In Manufactures.

Bookbinding,

10

10

Printing,

35

35

427.50 1,496.25

Knitting,

2

28.50

Oakum picking,

48

18

66

376.20

7

Tinsmithing,..

4

114.00

Coir Matting,

36

36

1,026.00

Grass Matting,.

6

6

...

51.30

Shoe-making,

4

4

136.80

Tailoring,

11

11

470.25

Net-making, string making, and ship's fender making,..

14

14

199.50

4,326.30

In Building.

Bricklaying,

11

Carpentering and Fitting,

6

Painting,

2

Miscellaneous

42

42

1822

470.25

6

273.60

57.00

1,197.00

1,997.85

In Service of the Prison.

g, White-washing,

888

26

30

1,282.50

13

13

474.50

23

23

655.50

2

2

57.00

2,469.50

Total,.....

412

22

434

Total, ...$

8,793.65

Dr.

Cr.

$

C.

C.

To Machinery purchased through Crown

Agents,

Paper purchased through Crown Agents, . Materials purchased locally,

2,442.00 1,681.00

""

By Printing 1,681,043 forms,.....

Binding 5,009 books,...

10,551.20 1,221.74

1,060.90

Profit,

6,589.04

Total,

11,772.94

Total,

11,772.94

1899.

FLOGGING RETURN.

Table of floggings showing the number of strokes in each case.

Average number of pri-

soners in Gaol. By Assistant Su-

perintendent.

By Assistant Supt.

and Visiting Justices.

By Judge..

By Magistrate.

Total.

Number of prisoners flog-

ged more than once.

Number of floggings ordered

by Superintendent alone.

Number

of floggings ordered by As- sistant Supt. and Visiting Justices.

Number of floggings or- Number of floggings or-

dered by Judge. dered by Magistrate. Total number of floggings.

Date.

Refusing to

Labour.

188

Other Prison offences for which

floggings were inflicted.

Three times.

Total.

More than four

Personal violence

times.

Four times.

to au Officer. Personal violence to

a fellow prisoner.

Using threatening lan-

guage to an Officer.

Wilful and Malicious destruct-

ion of Prison Property.

Creating a disturbance when

under Punishment.

commit suicide.

Attempting to

Acts of insubordination re- quiring to be suppressed by extraordinary means.

:

:

:

:..

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

2

:.

:

1

:

:.

:

:

:.

:

:

:.

:

:

:.

:

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:.

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:

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2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. | 12. | 15. 18. | 20. | 30.

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:.

:

...

F:..

...

:

1 1 31 3

Ind

:

:

:.

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:.

2

1

:

:.

...

:.

3

GO

3

1

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3 3

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...

:

3

:.

:

:

:

:

3

1

1

2

3

5

5

4

1

3

1

1

4

1

1

...

3

T

4

10

1

...

:

-

3

:

:

...

:

:

:

...

...

10

6

3

3

4

1

...

1

...

...

:

...

:

12

12

10

13

16

16

18

12

11

12

6

...

:

:

:

...

:

...

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...

:

:

1

10 12

T:

li

12

:

:.

:

:

D

:

...

:

:

:

:

FD.

Jan.,

Feb.,

482

476

March,

389

April,

405

May,

412

June,

418

July,

421

425

D.

:

:

:

:

8

10 10

13

15

...

16 1

10

16

6

9

8

2

3

CO

9

18

12

11

4 7 12

1 7

6

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:

...

:.

E

:

:

:

:

:

:

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:

:.

:

:

:

:

...

:

Aug.,

Sept.,

Oct.,

Nov.,

Dec.,

...... 453 1

466

******* 457

....... 414

:

Total,..............

1

י

...

:.

4

7

2

11

2 36 99148

1

:

:

:.

3

:..

2

...

:.

...

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1 15 3

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415

No. 21

1900

HONGKONG.

SECRETARY OF STATE'S DESPATCH WITH REFERENCE TO THE GOVERNOR'S SALARY.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government.

HONGKONG.

No. 93.

SIR,

DOWNING STREET,

6th April, 1900.

Since my despatch No. 280 of the 8th December, 1899, was written, in which I authorised the increase of the Governor's Entertainment Allowance by $3,000 a year, my attention has been drawn to the fact that the salary of the Governor is not equivalent to the full amount of £5,000, which by the Governor's Pension Act (28 and 29 Vict. Cap. 113) is laid down as the minimum salary entitling a Governor to the highest rate of pension on retirement.

2. I have the honour to inform you that I am of opinion that a Colony occu- pying the important position of Hongkong should pay its Governor a salary equivalent to £5,000, and I have little doubt that the Legislative Council will readily agree to do so.

3. I would suggest that out of the total salary of £5,000, £800 should be regarded as an Entertainment Allowance, that being the approximate equivalent of the present Entertainment Allowance of $8,000. The Exchange Compensation Allowance at present received by the Governor will, of course, cease to be paid.

4. I have accordingly to request that you will lay these proposals before the Legislative Council, and that you will invite the Council to vote the increased salary from the 1st January next.

5. The proposal that the Governor's salary should be reckoned in sterling and paid to him at the current rate of exchange, is intended to meet the require- ments of the Imperial Act above referred to. The same argument does not apply to the ordinary Civil Service of the Colony, whose salaries will, of course, continue to be reckoned in dollars.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient, humble Servant,

J. CHAMBERLAIN.

Governor

Sir HENRY A. BLAKE, G.C.M.G.,

&c.,

&c.,

&c.

421

No.

24

1900

HONGKONG.

REPORT OF THE HARBOUR MASTER FOR 1899.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government.

No. 71.

HARBOUR DEPARTMENT, HONGKONG, 24th February, 1900.

SIR,I have the honour to forward the Annual Report for this Department for the year ending 31st December, 1899.

I. Number, Tonnage, Crews, and Cargoes of Vessels entered. II. Number, Tonnage, Crews, and Cargoes of Vessels cleared.

III. Number, Tonnage, Crews, and Cargoes of Vessels entered at each Port. IV. Number, Tonnage, Crews, and Cargoes of Vessels cleared at each Port.

V. Number, Tonnage, and Crews of Vessels of each Nation entered. VI. Number, Tonnage, and Crews of Vessels of each Nation cleared. VII. Junks entered from China and Macao.

VIII. Junks cleared for China and Macao.

IX. Total Number of Junks entered at each Port.

X. Total Number of Junks cleared at each Port.

XI. Junks (Local trade) entered.

XII. Junks (Local trade) cleared.

XIII. Summary of Arrivals and Departures of all Vessels.

XIV. Licensed Steam Launches entered and cleared.

XV. Vessels registered.

XVI. Vessels struck off the Register.

XVII. Chinese Passenger Ships cleared by the Emigration Officer (Summary).

XVIII. Vessels bringing Chinese Passengers to Hongkong from places out of China (Summary).

XIX. Marine Magistrate's Court.

XX. Diagrain of Tonnage of Vessels entered.

XXI. Statement of Revenue Collected.

XXII. Return of work performed by the Government Marine Surveyor.

XXIII. Return from Imports and Exports (Opium) Office.

SHIPPING.

1. The total tonuage entering and clearing during the year 1899 amounted to 18,101,309 tons, being an increase, compared with 1898, of 835,529 tons, and the same number in excess of previous year.

There were 44,278 arrivals of 9,052,501 tons, and 44,349 departures of 9,048,808 tons. Of British Ocean-going tonnage 2.587,478 tons entered, and 2,587,369 tons cleared.

any

Of River Steamers (British) 1.774.728 tons entered and 1,775,441 tons cleared; making a grand total of British tonnage of 8,725,016 tons entering and clearing.

Of Foreign Ocean-going tonnage 2.352.740 tons entered, and 2,347,745 tons cleare 1.

Of Foreign River Steamers 5,823 tons entered, and 5,823 tons cleared; making a grand total

of Foreign Tonnage of 4,712,131 tons entering and clearing.

Of junks in Foreign Trade, 1,849,435 tons entered and 1,846,749 tons cleared.

Of junks in Local Trade, 482,297 tons entered, and 485,681 tons cleared.

Thus--

British Ocean-going tonnage represented 28.5%.

Foreign Ocean-going

"

River

River Junk (Foreign Trade)

(Local Trade)

"+

"

19.5%.

::

25.8%.

0.6%.

20.3%.

5.3%.

2. Five thousand three hundred and eighty-six (5.386) steamers, 58 sailing vessels, and 22,566 junks in Foreign Trade entered during the year. giving a daily average of 76.9 as against 96 in 1898.

For European-constructed vessels the daily average entry would be 14.91, against 15.17 in 1898, and, of the steamers entering, 68.17% were British.

422

3. A comparison between the years 1898 and 1899 is shewn in the following Table :-

Comparative Shipping Return for the Years 1898 and 1899.

1898.

1899.

INCREASE.

DECREASE.

9,635 386,293 32,655

British,.. Foreign,

Junks in Foreign Į

Trade,

*

Ships. Tonnage. Ships. Tonnage. Ships. Tonnage. Ships. Tonnage.

7,456 8,705,648 7,408 | 8,725,016 3,602 | 4,547,085| 3,497| 4,712,131

*

--

+

||58,936|| 3,626,754 45,067 3,696,184

Total,...... 69,994 | 16,879,487 55.972 | 17,133,331

Junks in Local

Trade,

967,978 23,020| 581,685

19.368 165,046

48 105

69,430|13,869

253,844 14,022

++

Grand Total,... 79,629 17,265,780 88,627

718,101,309 23.020 | 835,529 (14,022

NETT,

8,998 835,529

* Including 18,700 Conservancy and Dust Boats measuring 409,840 tons. Including 4.918 Conservancy and Dust Boats measuring 108,834 tons. ‡ Including 12,826 Conservancy and Dust Boats measuring 316,300 tons.

4. For vessels under the British Flag, this table shows a falling off of 48 ships. This may be attributed to the return to normal conditions of the shipping of the port. In 1898 there was a large extra number of tramp colliers entered from home. These were subsequently employed in the inflated rice trade to Japan, which continued up to the end of 1898. These steamers have now returned home. An additional cause for the diminution lies in the fact that the steamers of the Northern Pacific Line have turned over to the United States Flag. There is also a great decrease in the number of sailing vessels calling here which, alone, would account for more than the 48.

The British tonnage, on the other hand, shows an increase of 19,368 tons. accounted for by the gradual substitution of large for small vessels.

This may be

For vessels under Foreign Flags, there is also a numerical decrease with an increase of measure- ment. The decrease of 105 ships is explained by-(i) The total disappearance of West River Lorchas under German colours. (ii) A certain number of German coasting steamers, usually calling here, having been, during the greater part of the year, on time charter in the Northern ports.

And (iii) Three Danish steamers, of small tonnage and of former frequent entry, have ceased to call here.

The increase of tonnage of 165,046 tons is accounted for by-(i) The starting of a new Japanese line of steamers, the Osaka Shosen Kaisha. calling here. (ii) The increased number of Japanese coast- ing steamers. (iii) An increase in Marty's Fleet French). (iv) The Northern Pacific Line, having shifted from British to United States colours, were running here during the first half of the year. (v) The greatly increased size of many steamers now employed on the European runs. The remarks as to British sailing vessels (above) also apply here.

5. The actual number of ships, of European construction, (exclusive of River steamers) entering the port during the year 1899 was 603, being 312 British and 291 Foreign.

In 1898,

Thus 53 fewer vessels entered 203 less times, and gave a total tonnage increased by 69,005 tons.

These 603 vessels entered 3,316 times, and gave a total tonnage of 4,940,218 tons.

656 vessels entered 3,564 times, and gave an aggregate tounage of 4,871,213 tons.

STEAMERS.

Ships.

No. of times Entered.

Total Tonnage.

Flag.

1898. | 1899. | 1898. 1899.

1898.

1899.

British,

303

289 1,690

Austrian,

9

11

25

27

Belgian,

I

3

4

1,654 | 2,545,055 66,159 2,174

2,557,920

71,195

4,574

Chinese,

21

18

211

191

262,613

248,809

Danish,

68

11

43,045

23,560

Dutch,

5

6

2

8,839

2,470

French,

German,

Hawaiian,

པླས

20

20

157

221

175,227

218,669

8*

78

695

632

881,094

826,275

I

5

2

11,696

4,596

Italian,

6

13

15

18,995

26,710

Japanese,

60

68 240 330

502,618

671,817

Norwegian,

36

25 204 125

188,213

117,220

Portuguese,

31

1,672

Russian,

1

1

4

3,427

4,889

Spanish,

3

1

3

6

1,200

3,516

United States,

11

17

19

48 39,793

80,493

Total,.........

568

550 3,338 3,303 | 4,750,148

4,864,385

SAILING SHIPS.

Ships.

No. of times Entered.

Total Tonnage.

Flag.

1898. 1899.

1898. 1899.

1898.

1899.

British,..

36

23

115

27

52,287

29,558

German,

10

5

51

5

16,918

Italian,

1

1

1

1

794

United States,

32

24

50

25

44,233

9,241 794

36,240

Danish,.............

1

1

382

French,..

1

1

1,114

Hawaiian,

2

2

2,159

Norwegian,

3

3

2,398

Russian,

I

Siamese,

471 309

...

Total,.........

88

53

226

58 121,065

76,833

:

423

6. The 312 British ships carried 2,286 British Officers, and 27 Foreign Officers; as follows:-

British

German

United States...

Danish

Swedish

Austrian.

Portuguese

Total,.

.2,286

10

8

5

1

1

2

.2,313

The proportion of Foreign Officers was, therefore, 1.18%, comprising 6 nationalities--a decrease of 0.62% with an increase of ships.

The 291 Foreign ships carried 1,867 Officers, of whom 253 were British; borne as follows:

In Japanese ships

Chinese ships

French ships.

159

73

9

""

Belgian ships

United States ships.. German ships

1

Total,......... 253

The proportion of British officers in Foreign ships was, therefore, 15.6 %, distributed among 6 nationalities. An increase of 4.3 % on 1898, with a decrease of 26 ships.

Of the crews of British vessels-

17.6% were British.

0.7% Other Europeans.

81.7%

>"

""

Asiatics.

Of the crews of Foreign vessels-

2.2% were British.

24.0% Other Europeans. 73.8%

19

Asiatics.

This shows a tendency towards a greater employment of Asiatic labour both in British and Foreign vessels, with a corresponding reduction in the proportion of Europeans.

At the same time, there is a reduction in the percentage of "Other Europeans" employed in

British ships, and an increased proportion of British seamen employed in Foreign vessels.

Taking the total entries and departures, the average crew of British ships was 60 (an increase of

3), of whom 18.2% were Europeans (a decrease of 18 %). For Foreign ships the average crew num- bered 53 (an increase of 6), of whom 26.2% were Europeans (a decrease of 2.4 %).

?

424

TRADE.

7. The principal features to be remarkel as to the trade of the port for the year 1899 are:-

(i) A large increase reported in the Case Oil imported.

(ii) The import of Rice, which had more than doubled in 1898, shows a still further

increase.

(iii) A great decrease in the Coal trade reported.

(iv) Sugar and Hemp also show a great falling off.

Case Oil, which was stationary in 1898, appears to have increased by 21,473 tous in 1899, (or 36.4%). Bulk Oil, on the other hand, has declined by 6.335 tons.

Rice again shows an increase of 24,435 tons, or 3.2 %.

Timber increases by 14,511 tons, or 31.0 %.

Coal, which had increased unprecedentedly in 1898, now suffers a reaction, and falls off by 130,410 tons, or 25.25 %.

Hemp decreases by 22,292 tons, or 40.0 %, while Sugar declines 84,260 tons, or 31.8%.

The net decrease in imports reported amounts to 206,884 tons.

In exports there is also a decrease (net) of 237,298 tons.

The transit cargo return shows a net decrease of 62,619 tons.

As has already been pointed out in previous annual returns, these cargo statistics cannot be re- garded as accurately representing the trade of the port, as they are compiled from information. gratuitously given, without any special staff or power to demand accurate returns.

8. The total import trade of the port for 1899 amounts to 28,010 vessels of 8,570,204 tons, carrying 5,707,898 tons of cargo, of which 3,750,195 tons were discharged at Hongkong. This does not include tonnage, number or cargo of Local Trade Junks.

COUNTRY.

CARGO.

SHIPS.

TONS.

Discharged.

In Transit.

CLASS I.

Canada,.

20

56,740

21,766

130

Continent of Europe,

111

279,458

106,815

194,306

Great Britain,

156

431,791

229,155

492,461

Mauritius,..

3

2,671

1,665

United States,

136

319,719

204,860

107,462

426

1,090,349

564,261

794,359

CLASS II.

Australia and New Zealand,

India and Straits Settlements,

50

84,268

34,359

35,487

139

268,874

202,475

138,081

405

881,705

649,499

337,644

144

181,675

214,770

41,371

1

89

60

11

16,787

5,524

2,000

750

1,433,398

1,106,687

554,583

CLASS III.

Japan,

Java and Indian Archipelago,

North and South Pacific,

Russia in Asia.....................

North Borneo,

Coast of China,

Cochin-China,

Formosa,

Philippine Islands,

Hainan and Gulf of Touquin,.

Siam,

Macao,

15

22,765

28,480

1,129

1,441,014

247,992

3,000 540,897

246

269,648

446,586

7,200

150

118,479

32,150

148

153,854

77,559

300

298

235,947

225,483

49,964

166

171,932

268,230

7,400

33

2,832

2,185

2,416,571

1,326,480

608,761

CLASS IV.

River Steamers,-Canton, Macao and West River,

2,083

1,780,551

184,177

CLASS V.

Junks in Foreign Trade...

22,566

1,849,435

568,590

TOTAL,..

23,010

8,570,204

3,750,195

1,957,703

-

425

Similarly, the Export Trade for 1899 was represented by 27,962 vessels of 8,563,127 tons carry- g 2,914,797 tons of cargo, and shipping 493,871 tons of Bunker Coal.

COUNTRY.

CARGO.

SHIPS.

TONS.

Shipped.

Bunker Coal.

Russia in Asia,...

CLASS I.

Canada,..

21

57,013

19,291

Continent of Europe,

86

225,823

66,980

Great Britain,

Mauritius...

Sandwich Islands,

South America,

United States,

93

287,622

81,617

21,482 750

1

828

700

400

2

1,884

120

4

4,306

4,404

87

214,486

180,688

2,200

294

791,962

353,800

24,832

CLASS II.

Australia and New Zealand,

India and Straits Settlements,

Japan,

Java and Indian Archipelago,

North and South Pacific,

38

64,230

31,506

7,145

158

272,881

240,368

55,123

375

790,787

246,001

41,326

36

49,419

11,474

11,015

1

89

103

27

37,183

30,760

4,625

635

1,214,589

560,212

119,234

CLASS III.

North Borneo,

18

Coast of China,

1,572

23,078 2,074,365

4,499

4,150

570,293

173,838

Cochin-China,

243

278,199

48,316

48,819

Formosa,

15

15,845

65,865

2,290

Philippine Islands,

142

150,731

123,096

30,023

Tainan and Gulf of Tonquin,..

336

272,101

111,581

41,895

m,......

80

95,182

33,110

22,088

Lochow,

3

6,148

150

480

Cao.

38

12,914

1,612

15

CLASS IV.

River Steamers,—Canton, Macao and West River,

CLASS V.

Junks in Foreign Trade,.....

TOTAL,..

2,447

2,928,563

958,522

323,598

2,085

1,781,264

131,362

26,207

22,501

1,846,749

910,901

27,962

8,563,127

2,914,797

493,871

Comparing this with 1898, we find that the Import Trade has decreased generally. The decrease being fairly evenly distributed among the several classes. There is, however, a slight increase in

classes I and IV.

The Transit cargo has also decreased.

In Exports, although the tonnage cleared has increased by 137,623 tons, yet the number of vessels is less by 7,027, and the Export Cargo has diminished by 91,677 tons.

9. During the year 10,905 vessels of European construction, of 13,437,147 tons (Net Register) carried 7,637,075 tons of cargo, as follows:-

Import Cargo Export

Transit

Bunker Coal shipped

..3,181,605

.2,003,896

.1.957,703

493,871

7,637,075

426

The total number of tons carried was, therefore, 56.8% of the total registered tonnage, or 74.0 % exclusive of River steamers, and was apportioned as follows:--

Imports--

British Ships,

.1,718,003

Foreign do.,

.1,463,602

3,181,605

Exports-

British Ships,

.1,144,090

Foreign do.,

859,806

2,003,896

Transit-

British Ships,

.1,191,828

Foreign do.,

765,875

1,957,703

Bunker Coal-

British Ships,

280,747

Foreign do.,

213,124

493,871

Grand Total,...................

....

.7,637,075

Trade of the Port of Hongkong for the Year ending 31st December, 1899.

TONS.

No. of

Ships.

Discharged. Shipped.

In Transit.

Bunker Coal Shipped.

Passengers Carried.

Total.

Registered Tonnage.

British,

3,370

1,541,468 1,023,070

1,191,828

255,237

4.011,603

5.174.847

139,621 Arr. 105,701 De 44,358 E

289,680

77,214 Ar 57,517 Dep..

Foreign,.

3,367

1,455,960

849,464

765,875

212.427

3.283.726

4,700,485

16,717 Em.

151,448

River Steamers (British). .

4.038

176,585

121,020

25,510

323,065

3.550.169

558,028 Arr. 537,238 Dep.

1,095,266

Do.

(Foreign),

130

7,612

10,342

697

18,681

11.646

Total........

10,905 3,181,605 2.003,896

1,957,703

493,871

7,637,075 13,437,147

774,863 Arr. 700,456 Dep. $1,075 Em.

1,536,394

Junks in Foreign Trade,................

45,067

568,590

910,901

1,479,491

3.696,18£

$3,239 Arr. 80,859 Dep.

164,098

858,102 Arr.

Total.....

55.972

3,750,195 2,914,797

1,957,703

493,871

9,116,566

17.183.331

781,315 Dep. 61,075 Em.

1,700,492

Junks in Local Trade...

32,655

165.286

34,545

199,831

47,087 Arr. 16,694 Dep.

967,978

93,781

905,189 Arr.

828,009 Dep.

Grand Total,................. 88,627 3,915,481 2,919,342 1,957,703

498,871 9,316,397

18,101,309

61,075 Em.

1,794,273 Total.

1898.

IMPORTS.

EUROPEAN CONSTRUCTED VESSELS.

1899.

Increase.

Decrease.

427

No.

Tonnage.

No.

Tonnage.

No.

Tonnage. No.

Tonnage.

Steamers,

3,338

4,750,148 3,303

4,864,385

114,237

35

River Steamers,.

1,975

1,768,489 2,083

1,780,551

108

12,062

Sailing Vessels,

226

121,065

58

75,833

168

45,232

Total,........

5,539

6,639,702

5,444 6,720,769

108

126,299

203

45,232

Nett..........

81,067

108

Imported tons,

3,388,489

3,181,605

As follows:---

Articles.

1898.

1899.

Increase.

Decrease.

Beaus,

Bones,

11,092 500

8,110 1,800

2,982

1,300

Coal,

817,967

687,557

130,410

Cotton Yarn and Cotton,.

36,611

34,470

2,141

Flour,

103,544

101,939

1,605

Hewp,

55,160

32,868

22,292

Kerosine (bulk),

67,362

61,027

6,335

,,

(case),

59,115

80,588

21,473

Lead,..

4,200

6,468

2,268

Liquid Fuel,

2,150

2,150

Opinm,

2,638

2,775

137

Pitch,

Rattan,

Rice,

Sandalwood,

6,441

3,998

2,448

747,395

771,830

24,435

2,055

1,282

773

Sulphur,

Sugar,

Tea, Timber, General,

535 267,422 6,554 46,599

506

29

183,162

84,260

6,287

267

61,110

14,511

1,151,149

1,185,828

15,321

Total,......

3,388,489

3,181,605

64,124

271,008

Transit,

2,020,322

1,957,703

62,619

Grand Total,................ 5,408,811

5,139,308

64,124

333,627

Nett.......

269,503

i

428

EXPORTS.

1898.

1899.

Increase.

Decrease.

No.

Tonnage. No.

Tonnage. No.

Tonnage.

No. Tonnage.

Steamers,

3,319

River Steamers,

4,728,952

1,970 1,765,555

3,319

4,861,012

132,060

2,085

1,781,264

115

15,709

Sailing Vessels,

230

118,524

57

74,102

173

44,422

Total,.....

5,519 6,613,031

5,461 6,716,378

115

147,769

173

44,422

Nett,......

103,347

58

Exported tons,......

2,241,194

2,003,896

237,289

Strs.

Bunker Coal. Strs. Bunker Coal.

Strs.

Bunker Coal.

Strs.

Bunker Coal.

Steamers,

3,319

River Steamers,...

4

1,970

467,729

25,922 2,085

3,319 467,664

65

26,207

115

285

Total,.....

5,289

493,651

5,404

493,871

115

285

65

Nett,.

115

220

1898,

1899,

Year.

RIVER TRADE.

Imports, Exports and Passengers.

Imports.

Exports.

Passengers.

164,769

131,127

1,144,639

184,177

131,362

1,095,266

JUNKS.

Imports.

Foreign trade, 22,566 measuring 1,849,435 tons.

Local trade,

16,268

Total, ......38,834

482,297

2,331,732

Imported 733,876 tons as under :-

Tea,

3,277 tons.

506

Oil....

Rice,

Swine,

Earth and Stones.

General....

652

1,233

..134.066

.594,142

Total.....

....733,876

**

1

Exports.

Foreign trade, 22,501 measuring 1,846,749 tons. Local trade,

16,387

};

485,681

2,332,430

22

Total, ....38,888

Exported 945,446 tons as under :-

Kerosine (1,413,692 cases),

Rice and Paddy,

Earth and Stones,. General,

Total,..

50,489 tons.

:.

397,430

11

8,116 .489,411

""

..945,446

10.

PASSENGERS.

1898.

1899.

Increase. Decrease.

British vessels arrivals,

130,176

139,621

9,445

departures,

92,296 105,701

13,405

Emigrants,

47,278

44,358

2,920

Total,......

269,750 289,680

22,850

2,920

Nett,..

19,930

Foreign vessels arrivals,

65,802

77,214

11,412

22

139

departures,...

Emigrants,... 13,154

49,511 57,517

8,008

16,717

3,563

Total,.....

128,467 151,448 22,981

Nett,..

22,981

River steamers arrivais,

579,012 558,028

20,984

departures,

Total,...........

565,627 537,238

28,389

1,144,639 1,095,266

49,373

Nett,........

49,373

Junks foreign trade arrivals,. 120,795

83,239

37,556

ور

departures, 124,749

80,859

43,890

Total,......

245,544 164,098

81,446

Nett,.........

81,446

Total arrivals,

departures,

895,785 858,102

37,683

832,183 781,315

50,868

Total,..

1,727,968 1,639,417

88,551

"

Emigrants,

Total.......

60,432

1,788,400 1,700,492

61,075

643

643

88,551

Nett,

87,908

429

430

PASSENGERS,—Continued.

1898.

1899.

Increase. Decrease.

Diff. of Arrivals and Dep.......

63,602 76,787

13,185

Emigrants,

60,432

61,075

643

:

Remainder+or-

+

3,170 + 15,712 + 12,542

Nett......

+ 12,542

Junks local trade arrivals,

4,114

47,087 42,973

departures,.

3,577

46,694

42,117

Total,......

7,691

93,781

85,090

Nett,..

85,090

:

:

REVENUE.

11. The total Revenue collected by the Harbour Department during the year was $190,555.50, being an increase of $6,927.49 on the previous year.

1. Light Dues,...........

2. Licences and Internal Revenue,

3. Fees of Court and Office,............

Total,

b

$52,406.93

39,127.50

99,021.07

$190,555.50

STEAM LAUNCHES.

12. On 31st December there were 165 Steam Launches employed in the Harbour; of these 71 were licensed for the conveyance of passengers, 77 were privately owned, 12 were the property of the Colonial Government, and 5 belonged to the Imperial Government in charge of the Military

Authorities.

One Master's Certificate was suspended for three months, two for one month, and one Master was cautioned.

EMIGRATION.

13. Sixty-one thousand and seventy-five (61,075) Emigrants left Hongkong for various places during the year; of these, 44,358 were carried by British ships, and 16,717 by Foreign ships; 110,448 were reported as having been brought to Hongkong from places to which they had emigrated, and of these, 86,235 were brought in British ships, and 24,213 by Foreign ships.

Returns Nos. XVII and XVIII will give the details of this branch of the Department.

REGISTRY OF SHIPPING.

14. During the year, 7 ships were registered under the provisions of the Imperial Act, and 7 Certificates were cancelled.

MARINE MAGISTRATE'S COURT.

15. Twelve cases were heard in the Marine Magistrate's Court; refusal of duty and breach of Harbour Regulations were the principal offences.

431

EXAMINATION OF MASTERS, MATES, AND ENGINEERS

(Under Section 15 of Ordinance No. 26 of 1891).

16. The following table will show the number of Candidates examined for Certificates of Com- petency, distinguishing those who were successful and those who failed :-

Grade.

Passed:

Failed.

Masters,

First Mates,

Only Mates,

Second Mates,

18

2

24

5

6

Total,................

48

12

First Class Engineers,

Second Class Engineers,

Total,.

14

1

29

16

43

17

MARINE COUrts.

(Under Section 13 of Ordinance No. 26 of 1891).

17. The following Courts have been held during the year:-

1. On the 12th and 13th January, inquiry respecting the circumstances connected with the loss of the British Steam-ship Glenavon, Official No. 84,305, of Glasgow, on the Ling Ting rocks on the night of the 29th December, 1898. The Master's (WILLIAM PITHIE) certificate of competency was suspended for twelve months.

2. On the 13th and 14th April, inquiry respecting the circumstances connected with the loss of the British barque Clwyd, Official No. 106,845, of Liverpool, on the Pratas Shoal on the 1st April, 1899. The Master's (THOMAS THOMAS) certificate of competency was suspended for six months.

3. On the 22nd September, inquiry respecting the circumstances connected with the loss of the British Steam-ship White Cloud, Official No. 64,124, of Hongkong, when about 80 miles from Hong- kong, on the morning of the 9th September, 1899. The Master (ARTHUR MYRVIN RAYMOND) was not present at the inquiry, though he was served with a notice to attend. The loss of the White Cloud was to be attributed to her not being in a seaworthy condition for the voyage to Manila. She was not prematurely abandoned, and her loss was not caused by any wrongful act or default of the Master or Officers.

4. On the 25th October, inquiry respecting the circumstances connected with the British Steam- ship Esmeralda, Official No. 95,859 of Hongkong, striking some submerged obstacle on the 14th September, 1899, whilst on a voyage to Manila via Ainoy. The Master's (ALEXANDER WILLIAM ROSS COBBAN) certificate of competency was returned to him.

5. On the 2nd November, inquiry respecting the circumstances connected with the stranding of the British Steam-ship. Shantung, Official No. 99,039, of London, when passing close to Seraia Island (Natuna Group) on the 7th July, 1899. The Master's (HEATHFIELD CHARLES DALTON FRAMPTON) certificate of competency was returned to him.

6. On the 19th December, inquiry respecting the circumstances connected with the foundering of the British Steam-ship Hupch, Official No. 99,024, of London, in the China Sea on the 20th November, 1899. The Master's (GEORGE HENRY PENNEFATHER) certificate of competency was returned to him.

SUNDAY CARGO-WORKING.

(Ordinance No. 6 of 1891.)

18. During the year, 233 permits were issued, under the provisions of the Ordinance; of these, 67 were not availed of owing to its being found unnecessary for the ship to work cargo on the Sunday, and the fee paid for the permit was refunded in each case, and 25 permits were issued, free of charge, to Mail steamers.

The Revenue collected under this heading was $21,825; this was $4,100 less than in 1898.

432

The Revenue collected each year since the Ordinance came into force is as follows:-

1892,

1893,

1894,

1895,

1896,

1897,

1898,

1899,

SEAMEN.

.$ 4,800

7,900

13,375

11,600

7,575

11,850

25,925

21,825

:

19. Eighteen thousand three hundred and fifty-four (18,354) seamen were shipped, and 21,094 discharged, at the Mercantile Marine Office and on board ships during the year.

Two hundred and twelve (212) "Distressed Seamen" were received during the year; of these, 33 were sent to the United Kingdom, 1 to Singapore, 2 to Sydney, 1 to Calcutta, 1 drowned, 3 died, 2 remained at the Victoria Gaol, 4 at the Government Civil Hospital, and 165 obtained employment.

Five thousand four hundred and forty-two Dollars and Twenty-five Cents ($5,142.25) were expended by the Harbour Master on behalf of the Board of Trade in the relief of these "Distressed Seamen," and $704 by the Colony.

MARINE SURVEYOR'S SUB-DEPARTMENT.

20. Return No. XXII shows the work performed by this branch of the Harbour Department, and in forwarding this I again desire to record my appreciation of the manner in which the work of this sub-department is carried out.

In my Annual Report of 1894 I referred at length to the case of the Government Marine Sur- veyor and his Assistant, and I reproduced an extract from a report made by me in a letter dated 14th June, 1892, as follows:-

"The duties of these Surveyors, I am convinced, are very onerous, the inspection of "boilers and engines, especially during the hot weather, being most trying.

"The conditions also under which these surveys are held at Hongkong are peculiar, 'owing to the short time that vessels as a rule remain in port. In order to save time, applica- "tions for survey are constantly received before the vessel's arrival, and it frequently happens "that the completion of the survey is the final act before she again leaves. They cannot "even afford to wait for their passenger certificates, clearances being frequently granted "them by me on receipt of a report from the Surveyor that the requirements of the law have "been complied with.

"It is, therefore, most important that the work of surveying vessels should be carried on as expeditiously as possible, and the importance of these surveys renders it imperative "that the examination should be thorough; in order to insure these conditions it is necessary "that there should be an adequate and efficient staff. It will be seen from the report of "Mr. DIXON attached hereto that the survey of a vessel for Passenger Certificate occupies "himself and his Assistant eight hours, spread over a number of visits, about four. "time consumed, however, on this work is often considerably in excess of this eight hours, "as the ship may be anywhere between the Hunghom Docks aud Aberdeen. Other surveys, "though not occupying so much time, in each case, are made under somewhat similar cir- 66 cumstances.

The

"There are four local Marine Surveyors carrying on business in Hongkong; in addition to these, some of the Steamship Companies employ special surveyors for their vessels. The Government Marine Surveyors practically do a very large proportion of the "amalgamated work of all these, having at the same time to so arrange that if possible there "should be no delay or inconvenience to any one. No easy matter in a place where, as

may be expected, each owner or agent considers his own interest as paramount.'

In the same report (1894) I compared the work done at Liverpool by eleven men and at Cardiff by six men, and I showed that at Liverpool there were about 40 vessels of 92,000 tons per surveyor and at Cardiff 27 vessels of 53,000 tons, while at Hongkong with all its disadvantage of climate, &c., we had 56 vessels of over 100,000 tons to each surveyor.

433

Once more I must dwell on this subject; the amount of work performed by our surveyors continues to increase and, that it becomes necessary for me to draw attention to it is, I think, ample testimony that it is satisfactorily performed, for we all know that public duties ill performed soon declare themselves.

During the ten months January-October, 1899, the tonnage surveyed at Liverpool was 1,077,260 tons, in Hongkong 239,280 tons were surveyed, this gives 97,932 tons per surveyor at Liverpool and 119,640 tons per surveyor at Hongkong.

The Revenue derived by the Colony from the work performed by the Marine Surveyors has increased from $10,055.87 in 1890 to $13,598.61 in 1899, the "overtime" fees alone in 1899 amount- ing to $480.

The Right Honourable the Secretary of State for the Colonies has recently notified his sanction to an increase in the salaries of certain Officers, and I would very respectfully suggest that his pro- fessional qualifications might place the Government Marine Surveyor in the same category as the senior Executive Engineers of the Public Works Department with regard to their increase, and similarly that the Assistant Marine Surveyor who is also a qualified Engineer should be placed on the same footing as the other Executive Engineers of the Public Works Department.

LIGHTHOUSES.

21. The amount of Light Dues collected was as follows:-

Class of Vessels.

Rate per ton.

No. of Ships.

Tonnage.

Total Fees Collected.

C.

Ocean Vessels,

1 cent

Steam-Launches,

3,381 118

River Steamers, (night boats),...",

1,187

4,947,355 4,355 846,072

49,473.55

43.55 2,820.61

Launches plying exclusively to

Macao and West River, by night,

388

20,725

69.22

River Steamers (day boats),

Free

896

934,479

Launches plying to Macao and

West River, by day,........

do.

206

10,812

Total,.....

6,176

6,763,798 52,406.93

Telegraphic and telephonic communication has been kept up with the Gap Rock and Cape D'Aguilar during the year. From the former station 907 vessels have been reportel as passing, and in addition 149 messages were received and 3,444 sent, including the daily weather report for the Observatory,

From Cape D'Aguilar 1,271 vessels were reported, and in addition 1,827 messages were sent and 14 received.

28 hours and 50 minutes of fog were reported from Gap Rock during the year, and the fog signal gun was fired 181 times. On one occasion the fortnightly relief could not be effected owing to the rough sea.

GOVERNMENT GUNPOWDER DEPÔT.

22. During the year 1899 there has been stored in the Government Gunpowder Depôt, Stone Cutters' Island:-

No. of Cases. Approximate

Weight.

Gunpowder, privately owned,

Do., Government owned,..

Cartridges, privately owned,

Do.. Government owned,

Explosive Compounds, privately owned,

33,403 91 6,613 77

lbs.

604,170 1,820

1,363,358

2,342

16,225 123,339

Do.,

Government owned,

21

1,226

Total,.....

42,547

2,110,138

ן

434

During the same period there has been delivered out of the Depôt :-

No. of Cases. Approximate

Weight.

bbs.

For Sale in the Colony :-

Gunpowder, privately owned,

18,886

317,102

Cartridges,

do.,

2,512

597,666

Explosive Compounds, privately owned,

356

24,095

For Export:-

Gunpowder, privately owned,

7,139

124,193

Cartridges,

do.,

2,875

561,142

Explosive Compounds, privately owned,

1,794

89,604

Total,......

33,562

1,713,802

On the 31st December, 1899, there remained as under :--

No. of Cases.

Approximate Weight.

lbs.

Gunpowder, privately owned,

7,378

162,875

Do., Government owned,............

50

1,000

Cartridges, privately owned,

1,226

204,550

Do., Government owned,

41

14,840

Explosive Compounds, privately owned,

192

9,640

Do.,

Government owned,.

Total,...

8,887

392,905

GENERAL.

23. As there appears no immediate prospect of any improvement in the accommodation provided for the work of the Harbour Department I desire to call special attention to the matter.

The present building was first occupied in 1874 or 25 years ago, the staff is practically the same as it was then, the pay taken on a sterling basis is less, and the tonnage has increase 1 from 6,528,000 tons to over 18,000,000 tons.

The pre sent offices are small, badly lighted, badly ventilated and badly arranged, in fact the Harbour Office combines all the disadvantages of which we have frequently heard in connection with the Post Office and the Law Courts; but being at the West end of the town and somewhat out of the European business quarter, it is out of sight and, I fear, out of mind.

As the Port Office of the largest Shipping Port in any British Possession abroad it is, least of it, not creditable.

In 1894, I stated to the Retrenchment Committee as follows:-

to say

the

"The only way in which the enormous amount of clerical work, which goes on at the "Harbour Office is done, is owing to the fact that the clerks at work there-the first, second, "third, and fourth-are all men who have been in the Harbour Department for upwards of 20 or 25 years. They have grown with the work and it is only because they have grown "with it that they are now able to do it."

This statement I have now to reiterate, with one exception only, namely, that the fourth clerk has only been in the office for 1 years-though he was in the Opium Office branch 11 years pre- viously he came in when the first clerk retired on pension in 1898, and there was a general “fleet up" amongst the others on a diminished scale of pay.

The work continues to increase with the increase of shipping, to say nothing of territory, over- time work is the rule rather than the exception, and any temporary absence through sickness-a condition which happily seldom happens-is keenly felt by the others.

It is much to be desired that the New Harbour Office will shortly receive attention. The new site is now reclaimed and the sale of the old site would pay for building the new office, which sale, I under tand, could take place any day "on time.'

435

IMPORTS AND EXPORTS (OPIUM) OFFICE.

24. The Return shows that during the year the amount of Opium reported was as follows :-

Increase.

1898.

1899.

chests.

chests.

chests.

Imported

.....39,3921

41,690

2,297

Exported

...37,828

40,524

2,695!

Through Cargo reported but 15,4824

Į

17,346

1,8631

15,300 permits were issued from this Office during the year, being an increase of 117 as com- pared with 1898.

A daily memo. of exports to Chinese ports was during the year supplied to the Commissioner of Imperial Maritime Customs at Kowloon, and a daily memo. of exports to Macao was supplied to the Superintendent of Raw Opium Department of Macao.

Surprise visits were paid to 93 godowns during the year.

I have the honour to be,

The Honourable F. H. MAY, C.M.G.,

&c.,

Acting Colonial Secretary,

&c.,

Sir.

Your most obedient Servant,

&c.

R. MURRAY RUMSEY, Retd. Comd., R.N.,

Harbour Master, &c.

436

V.-NUMBER, TONNAGE and CREWS of Vessels of each Nation ENTERED at Ports in the Colony of Hongkong

in the Year 1899.

NATIONALITY OF

VESSELS.

ENTERED.

WITH CARGOes.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels.

Tous. Crews. Vessels. Tons. Crews, Vessels.

Tons.

Crews.

American,

96

110,098

4,599

6

8,462

161

102

118,560

4,760

Austrian,

27

71,195

1,630

27

71;195

1,630

Belgiau,

3

3,474

122

1,100

27

4

4,574

149

British,

3,518 | 4,155,327 | 173,707

181

206,879

8,607

3,699

4,362,206 | 182,314

Chinese,

186

200,722 9,900

41

52,083

2,199

227

Chinese Junks,

13,198

1,136,256149,795

9,368

713,179

87,955

22,566

252,805 12,099 1,849,435 237,750

Danish,

11

23,560

300

1!

23,560

300

Dutch,

2

2,470

91

2

2,470

91

French,

221

218,669

15,832

221

218,669

15,832

German,

555

751,134

23,824

82

84,382

2,814

637

835,516

26,638

Hawaiian,

2

4,596

83

2

4,596

83

Italian,

16

27,504

1,213

16

27,504

1,213

Japanese,

329

670,995

21,713

822

42

330

671,817

21,755

Norwegian,

89

89,880

2,647

36

27,340

1,097

125

117,220

3,744

Portuguese,

31

1,672

381

31

1,672

381

Russian,

Spanish,

34

4,348

177

1

541

25

4,889

202

2,344

158

1,172

6

3,516

235

TOTAL............. 18,260 7,472,572 450,791 9,750 1,097,632 103,385

28,010 8,570,204 509,176

VI-NUMBER, TONNAGE and CREWS of Vessels of each Nation CLEARED at Ports in the Colony of Hongkong

in the Year 1899.

CLEARED.

NATIONALITY

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

OF

VESSELS.

Vessels. Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Vessels. Tous.

Crews.

American,

90

Austrian,

27

97,685 71,195

4,668

9

15,528

306

99

1,686

27

355

113,213

4,974

71,195

1,686

Belgian,

I

1,099

25

2

British,

3,536

4,124,220174,581

173

2,375 238,590

Chinese,

223

248,286 10,578

6

Chinese Junks,

13,422

1,473,858 174,344

|

9,079

Danish, ....

12

23,953

434

1

5,605 372,911 592

52 8,424 279 61,492

3

3,474

77

3,709 229 22,501

4,362,810

183,005

253,891 10,857

1,846,749 | 235,836

22

13

24,545

456

Dutch,

2

2,570

91

2

2,570

91

French,

222

217,682

14,347

1

1,042

35

223

218,724

14,382

German,.

543

724,715

22,591

94

110,822

2,999

637

835,537

25,590

Hawaiian,

2

4,596

84

2

4,596

84

Italian,

15

25,098 1,517

2

3,200

62

17

28,298 1,579

Japanese,

214

473,031 17,977

114

194,125

5,861

328

667,156

23,838

Norwegian,

80

75,556 2,388

47

42,023

1,312

127

117,579

3,700

Portuguese,

31

1,672

372

31

1,672

372

Russian,

5

·6,928

240

6,928

240

Spanish,

9

4,190

319

4,190

319

TOTAL,..

18,434 7,576,314 426,242 9,528

986,813

80,844

27,962

8,563,127 507,086

1.-NUMBER, TONNAGE, CREWS, and CARGOES of Vessels Ex

BRITISH.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

COUNTRIES WHENCE ARRIVED.

Cargoes.

Cargoes.

Vessels.

Tons.

ews. Dis-

charged. Transit.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Dis- charged, Trans

37

54,590 2,183

12

20

37:

54,390 2,183

12 20

27.751 168 18.643, 719 24,270 36 56,740 3561

21,706

1

6.nda.

Australia and New Zealand,

British North Borneo,..

Coast of China,..

Cochin-China,

Continent of Europe,

Formosa,

Great Britain,

India and Sin apore,

Japan,.....

Java and other Islands in the Indian Archipelago,.

Macao.

Mauritius,

North and South Pacific,

Philippine Islands,

Ports in lainan and Gulf of Tonquin,

Russia in Asia,

Siam,

United States of America,

་ . ་་ ་་་་་་..་

27,751 16,353

18,643 719 24,270 3,000 56,740 3,561 21,766 130

1,951 2,041,425 83,805 278,972. 327,020 5,900 82.286 3,656|| 135,025

31,053 11,910

72

14

33.495 599

96

73,502 5,020

19,550

129 343,456 8,262 188,915 402,562, 102 21.621| 9,827 157,207 127,639 143 311,955) 9,821) 191,609_153,696 121 157,234 7.268 179,410

165 185,373 7,777 2,116 2,226,798 91,582 278,972 327)

5.!

599 31,053 11,3

19.550 129 343,456 8.262 188,915) 402, 104 216,000 9,937 157,07) 127,( 143 311.955 9,821 191609|| 153,0 121 157,234 7,268 179.410 4(), 506 852,184 20,401|| 41,769

72

82,286 3,656 135,025||

14

33,495

4,379

2,582 164

110

100

76.084, 5,184

40,000

505 351,656 20,374

41,769

528;

27

...

89

8

60

$6

94 276 5,502)

52,518

191

23,694 1,095

35.203

8,594)

10,246 439 3,771 90

89.

GO 52,518 93 104.522 5,941|

27,465 1,183 35,203

4,800

66 151,338 4,248

98,895 90,224

144 149,527 7,761 234,030)

144 149,527 7,761; 234,030) 151,338 4,248 98,895

66

90.

TOTAL,..

3,518 4,155,327 173,707 1,718,003,1,191,828 181 206,879 8,607 3,699,4,362,206) 182,314 1,718,003 1,191.

II.-NUMBER, TONNAGE, CREWS, and Cargoes of Vess

WITH CARGOES.

BRITISH.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

COUNTRIES TO WHICH DEPARTED.

Shipped.

Shipped.

Bunker

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Cargoes.

Tons. Crews. Coal. Bunker Vessels.

Coal.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Cargoes. Coal.

Bunker Vessels.

Tons.

Australia & New Zealand,

23

35,274 1,701

24.358

3.245

1,785

38

7001

26

British North Borneo,

Canada,

7 10,154 18

432 52,458 3.532

2,534

1,780

5,493

199

700)

11

37,009 1,739) 15,647

631

24 358 2,534

8.945 2,480

10 22,09

4.

5,49

19,291

3,231

451

201

55,689 3,577

19.291

Coast of China,

2,419 2,667,516 108,703

382.821| 122,527|

52,065 2,550

Cochin-China,

11

10,693 674

6.454

2,755

70,326 2,600

9,130 11,135

63

Continent of Europe,

6,080 119

*}

81,019 3,076)

6,080

2,464 2,719,581 111,253 382,821 6,424

131,657 13,266;2,161.28

16,890

80 85,18

Formosa....

Great Britain,

India and Singapore,..

Kiaochow,..

Japan,

Java and other Islands in the Indian

118 251,663 8,550 141,446

12 12,994 662 51.222 67 189,789) 4.617| 68,157 112 210,080 10,597|| 194.087)

2.040,

750

35,200

اة

17,005

9

1,088 641

185 8,243

19,433 870

250

1,360

131 14,052

119 726

84 219,74

51.222

2,290

2 1,7!

67 189,739 4,617) 117 218,323 10,782 194,087|

68,157

750

224 97,88

36,560

40, 53,11

3 6.1.

Archipelago,

Macao,

14 19.901 873 509 358,586 20,583

8,504 20,873

5,915 4 855

14

19,530

499

141

19

790

3,510 15

39,481 1,372| 510 358,727 20,602|

127 271,096 8,920 141,446

28

17,795

146 340,52

8.5041

9,425

ن

5.1:

20,873

4,870

866 94,1

Mauritius,

North and South Pacific,..

Philippine Islands,

S$

Ports in Hainan & G. of Tonquin,

89 98,176 5,948 29.522 1,421

103 93,742 10 600

Russia in Asia,

12,292

349

6,300

20,157 6.425 1,730

11,693

334

18

23,288

996

2,110 3,040

89 95 109,869 6,282

103 93.7421

22,267

40

$2,91

44

52,810 2,417

10,600)

257

24

70

12,549 373

Sandwich Islands,.

1

Siam,

58

961 58,909 5,080

120

27,110

16,643

8 360

244

1,910

South America,

2 2,330 43

3,304

1,176

20

96 67,269 3,324

8,512

7

9.465 6.300 1,800

120 27,1101 18,553

251 174,8 18 24.6

12

21,2

63

United States of America,

58)

97,662 2,879

83,064

200

12,531

237

1,800

44 110,193 3,116

3,304 83,064

J:

2,000!

43; 104,2

TOTAL,....

3,536,4,124,220, 174,581 1,144,0 241,227) 173 238,590 8,424 39,520 3,7094,362,810 183,005 1,144,090 280,747 14,8983,452,0

RRIVED.

rchipelago,.

TOTAL....

İ.—ÑUMBER, TONNAGE, CREWS, and CARGOES of Vessels EPTERED at Ports in the Colony of Hongkong

BRITISH.

IN BALLAST.

FOI

WITH CARGOES.

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOES.

Is B

Cargoes.

Cargoes.

Cargoes.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.Į

Vessels.

Dis-

Tons. Crews. Vessels. Tons. Crews.

charged. Transit.

Dis- charged. Transit.

Tons. Crews. Vessels,

Dis-

Vessels.

j

charged. Transit

37

54,590 2,183) 27,751 16,353

37

12

18,643 719 24,270 3,000 20, 56,740 3,561 21,766 130

12 20

34,390 2,183 27.751 16,858 18.643 719 24,270 3.000 56,740 3561 21,706 180

174

72

111

96)

1,951 2,041,425 83,805 278,972 327,020 82,286 3,656| 135,025) 5,900 33,495 599 31,053 11,910 73,502 5.020

19,550

1

19

129 343,456 8,262 188,915 402,562 102 211.621| 9,827|

143 311,955 9,821) 197207 127,639|

153,696

121 157,234 7,268 179,410|| 40,000| 505|| 951,656 20,374||||| 41,769|

89 94 276 5,502)

23,691 1,093| 35.203 8,594

144 149,527 7,761| 234,030|

66 151,338 4,248 98,895] 90,224

2,582 164

4,379 110

100

165 185,373 7,777 2,116 2,226,798 91,582|| 278,972 721 82,286 3,656 185,025 14 33,495 599 31,053 76.084 5,184 19.550

11,910

327.020. 13,0781,545,540 157,690 5.900. 174 187,362 6,012 97 245,968; 10.072

49

41,763 2.171

13: 29,878; 1,402 6,608 19,134

3 4,122

4,210

650,770, 213,877|| 9,133 311,561; 1,800! 75 762 182,396 12,600,

528

27

129 343,456 8.262 188,915 402.562 104 216,000 9,987 157,:07] 127,639 143 311.955 9,82|| 191.609|| 153,696| 121 157,234 7,268 179.410 506 352,184 20,401|

26

88,303 2,639,

34

52,046 2,025

40.240 89,899 45,268 10.442

260

567,627 17,893

457,890, 183.948

40,000

41,769

24 500

23,613 727

74,657 12,262)

35,360 1,371 29.243

4:8

2,671 141

1,665

8

60 52,518

::

1

89

GO

10,246 439

3,771

90

93 104.522 5,941] 52,518, 21 27,465 1,183 35,203

43

4,800

8,594

144 149,527 7,761 284,030 4,800 66 151,338 4,248 98,805 90,224

87,645 1,829 208,482

25,041

300;

9,667 190,280,

41.370

16.787 683 5,524.

2,000,

22 22,405 726 34,200 70 168,381 5,971| 195,965.

2,600

17,238

3,5184,155,327 173,707 1,718,003|1,191,828 181 206,879 8,607 3,699 4,362,206) 182,314 1,718,003 1,191,828 14,742 3,317,245 232,052,032,192 765,875 9,569

II.-NUMBER, TONNAGE, CREWS, and CARGOES of Vessels CLEARED in the Colony of Hongkong fo

WITH CARGOES.

BRITISH.

IN BALLAST.

ΤΟΤΑΙ..

WITH Cargoes.

FOREIGN.

IN BALLAST.

Shipped.

Tons. Crews.

Cargoes.

Bunker Vessels.

Coal.

Tons. Crews.

Bunker Coal.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Shipped.

Cargoes.

Shipped.

Eu

Bunker Vessels. Tons.

Coal.

Crews.

Cargoes.

unker vessels. Coal.

Tons.

35,274|| 1,701|

10,154

432

52,458 3.532

24.358 3.245 2,534 1,780 19,291,

2,667,516 108,703 382.821 122,527

10,693

674 6.454

2,755

52

6,080

119

12,994 662

51.222

2.040

189,789 4.617 68,157

750

210,080 10,597 194.087

35,200

251,663 8,550 141,446

17,005

9

89

98,176 5,948

12,292 3491

961

873 19.901) 358,586 20,583| 20,873

103 93.742 20,157

29.522 1,421 10 600

8,504

5,915

14

4 855

1,735 38 199 5,498] 3,231

451 52,065 2,550 9,130 70,326 2,600 14,135

1,088 64

8,243 185

19,433 370 499 19,530

141 19

26 7001

11 700

20

37,009 1,739 15,647

631

55.689 3,577

24.358 3.945 2,534! 2,480 19,291

10 22,093 1,105|

4

246 5,496

7.148 1,965

3,200,

5,128.

54

1,670

1,985

81

1

1,824

16

6,424 16,890 81,019 8,076

2,464 2,719,581 111,253 382,821 131,657 13,266 2,161,284; 192,578,1,148,489

63

62,023 8,971 870.732 60,470,

80 85,186 2,572

41,862

13.493

100 111,994. 3,448

6,080 119

250

13

14,082 7261

1,360

790 127 271,096 8,920

28 3,510

39,431 1,372| 15 510 358,727 20,602|

51,222 2,290 67 189,739 4,617 68,157 750 117 218,323 10,782 194,087 $6,560

1,763

84 219,743 7,590

2:

66,980

21,482

77

14,648

26 97,883 2.80%

13,46

40;

53,114 3,069) 6,148 87

46,281

18,568

1,444

21.

150

480

8,504

20,873

141,446| 17,795 9,425 4,870

146|| 340,528 10,436|| 104,555|

22,266 102 179,163 5,271

SCC

163 5,122 94,160 15,596

2.970

1,010;

119

828

54

700

400

6.425

18

6,300

1,730

11,693 334 2,110 23,288 996 3,040

24 257

70

120

:

58,909 3,080 27,110

16,643

2,330 43 3,304 97,662 2,879| 83,064

200

8 360 244 1,176 20 12,531 237

*1,910

1,800

89 95 109,869 6,282 44 52,810 2,417|

12,549 96 67,269 3,324 3 3,512 68 44 110,193 3,116]

103

93,742

22,267

10,600

378

6,300

120, 27,110 3,304 83,064

9.465 1,800

18,558

24,634

29,354 40 32,990 1,646 251 174,804 8,504 100,981

18

6,576

28,395

77. 4,866 10,808 1,369

196 7.872 44,487 1,276

660

24,460

2,825

...

1,788

25

2,000

12 21,231

14 794 43 104,298 3,871|

502

6.000 3,535

4.

6,682

116

1,100 97,62

200

6,4,124,220 174,581 1,144,0

241,227

173 238,590 8,424 39,520 3,709 4,362,810 183,005 1,144,090 280,747 14,8983,452,094 251,661 1,770,707 186,118 9,355 748,223||72,420

:

ong from each Country for the Year ending 31st December, 1899.

437

FOREIGN.

N BALLAST.

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOES.

TOTAL.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Cargoes.

Car_oes.

Cargoes.

Tons. Crews. Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Dis-

Transit charged

Dis- i charged Transit.

Vessels. Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Dis- charged.

Transit.

13 29,878 1,402 6.608 19.134 50,

4,122 174 4,210

84,268 3,585;

34,359 35,487 15 22.763 898 28,480 8.000 20 56,740 3,561 21.766 130

50

15:

848,741 90,348 22,211 2.391,281 248.03 650,770 213,877 15,029 8,586,965 241,495 929,742 510.897 9,298|1,034,114

174 187,362 6,0:2 311,561

97 245,963 10,072

446,586||

1.800 246|| 269,648| 9,668

7,200 182,896| 111 279,458 10,671 106.815| 194,306,

145 115,265 7,191 82.1.50

81.268 3.585. 31.859 85,487 22.765- 893 28,480 3,00| 20 56.740 8.561; 21.766 98,125|24,327|4,621,079 339,620 929.742

187

130

540,897 7,200

246 269,648, 9,668 416.586 111 279,458 10,671 106,815. 194,506 3,214

150 1:8,479, 7,876 82.150 156; 431,761 10.912|||| 229.155, 492,461 5,207 149 189; 268,874 12.001| 292,475 138,081 2.123

43 405 881,705 27.757 649,499 837,641 828 36 144. 181.675. 8,031 214.770 41.871 26,400 5,896||| 1,184| 452,753 36,532 71,017 2,671 141 1,665,

89 153,854 8,179

75,762

50

42,395 2,191

27

828 2,123 828 25,912 3,869

43

36

12 600 88,305 2,650| 40.240 89,899 35 52.874 2.064| 45.268 10,442 262||| 569,750 17,936| 457,890|| 183,948| 23 24,411 763 35,360 1,371 978 100,569 16,131]

29,248

186

403

155 431,759, 10,901) 229,155|| 492.46!

268,067 11,852 202.475_138,081) 879,582 27,714 649.499 337,641

143

180,847 7,995 214,770

41871

1

1,065

426,313 32,636

71,017

419

2,671 141

1,665

1,665 60

11,687 409

25,041 55 49,332, 2,238 277 208,482 9,667 190,280 16,787 683 5,524 22 22,405 726 3.4.200 70 168,381 5,971 105,965

300 41.370 2,000

300

19

49 964

21.933; 8,771!

848

148

298

2600

2,000 7,400

17,238

2,671 141 1

89 8 129 131,921 7381 77,559 296 232,176 10,760||| 225,483 11 16,787 683) 5,524 166 171,932 8,487 268,230| 136 319,719 10,219| 204,860|||107,462

S

60.

77,559

200

49 964

2,000

7.400

235.947 10,850 225,483

11 16.787 683 5,524

166

171.932. 8,487; 268,230,

186 319,719 10,219 204,860 107.462

890,753 94,778 24,311 4,207,998 326,562 2,082,192 765,875 18,2607,472,572 405,791 3,759,195 1,957,703|| 9,750 1,097,682) 103,

Į

for each Country for the Year ending 31st December, 1899.

28,010 8,570,201 509,176|8,750,195|1,957,703

TOTAL.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOES.

TOTAL.

Shipped

Shipped.

Shipped.

Bunker Coal.

Bunker

Vessels.

Tons. Crew's.

Cargoes

Bunker Vessels. Tous. Crews.

Coal.

Cargoes

Bunker Vessels.

{'an',

Tous. rews.

Coal. Vessels. Tons. Crev

Car_oes.

Lunker Coa'

12

27,221 1,159|

7.148

26

7 7,431 327 1,965

1,324 IG

1,510 22,287 2,532,016 253,048 1,148,489 180 197,180 6,020| 41,862 18,430

84 219,748 7,590)

66,980 14,643 13,460

3,200 1 670

35

57.367: 2,806;

31,506

0.445

6.863

92

111

15 650 678 4.499

3,450

7.428

280

700! 38 700

64.230 2.898!

31.506

7.145

18 52,458 3,532 19,291 63,538 15,685 4,828,800 301,281 1,531,310 31.929 91 95.879 3,048, 48,316 21,482 8 225,828 7,709 66,980

4,555

61

184 550

9,016

422,797 63,020

16,248|

152

21,482

1.7631 97,888 2,802]

77

14.757

41

51558 3,090| 46,281

6,143 87

150

1,265

248|| 519,69115,706 104,555

580

985 104,968 16,965

828

9.988 240 2,970 61.985

7001 400!

18,503| 480 23,581 1,590

739 65,865 93 287,622 7,119| 81,617 152 263,194 13,666|| 240,368 6,148 87 150 264 592,19118,955|| 246,001

2,040

750

53,763

480:

39,271

182,320 6,018]

1.088 64

9,687; 206!

111 198,596 5,641

10,640 32,571

250

1,860,

2,055

18 28 078 9581 4.499 211 57,018 3,593 19.291 24,701|5,251,597 364,301 1,581,5 0 245 278.199; 9,096 48,316 SG 225,823 7,709 66,980 15 15,845 803 65,865 93 287,622 7.419 $1,617 158 272,88|| 13,872 240,368,

B 6,148) $71 875 790,787 24,626|||246,001|

4.160

195,190

48,819

21.482

2,290

750

65,123

150

480

41,326

19

25,023 1,036] 11,474 1,375 452,746 36,179 82,858

828

89

54 9

700

6.925 4,855 400

17 24.396 120 10,949 1,388

576)

4,090

15

1

:

36 49,419 1,612 11,474. 1,495 463,695 37,5671 82,858

828 54

11.015

4,870

700,

400

103

89

9

103

1.180

4,035

47 40.862 1,842 29,354 7,756 292 219.291 9,870 100,98!

128 131,166 7,591 123,096

32,430

18

24 634' 660 24,160

2,825

26,733 277 204 326 10,015| 111,581| 34,820 26 36,926 1,009| 80,760 4.555

1

1,788 2.5

1

16.

27,913,

618 6,000

3,535

70

1

794 14 1,100

96 80,140 0,582 3,130 57

43 104,293 3,871 97.624

2001

120 33,110 4,404 81 201,955 6,750 180,688

7

20,178

10

4001

14 19.565

530 59 €7.775 2,272 2575 24 1,788 25 15,042 360 1.176 20 12.581 287 1,800

3.290

7,075 70

142 150,731; 8,121 123,096 386|| 272,101| 12.287 111,581

30,023

41.895

27

37.188 1,038 1.884 32

$0.760

4,625

1910

80

95,182 8942

4,306

120: 83,110

22,088

77:

87 214,486 6,987

4,404 180.688

2,200

27,006|24,253 4,200,317|324,081|1,770,7

1,770,707

213,124 18,4347,576,314 426,242 2,914,797 427,345|||9,528 986,813 80,811 66,526 27,962 8,563,127 507,088 2.914.797, 493,871

III. TOTAL NUMBER, TONNAGE, CREWS, AND CARGOES

WITH CARGOES.

BRITISH.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOES.

NAMES

OF PORTS.

Cargoes.

Cargoes.

Ca

VIs.

Tons. Crews.

Vls.

Tons.

Crews. Vls. Tons. Crews.

Vis.

Tons. Crews.

Dis- charged.

Transit.

Dis- charged.

Transit.

Dis- charged

Aberdeen,

Cheung Chau,

499. 123!

10,288 2,511;

6,27

3,027 755

2,56

Hunghom,

Shaukiwán,.

1,179

10,427 5,450|

13,53

837

5,929 2,263

3.04

Stanley,.

Tai O, Victoria, Yaumáti, and

Sham Shui-po,

138

2,372

628

1,74

64

1,506 379

1,03

3,518 4,155,327 178,707 1,718,003) 1, 91,828

181 206,879 8,607 3,699 4,262,206182,314 1,718,003 1,191,828 9,863 2,951,989 196,950 1,781,77

2,539 325,707 23,148|| 222,23.

Total,...... 3,518 4,155,327 173,767 1,718,003 1,191,828

181 206,879 8,607 3,699 4,362,206182,314 1,718,003 1,191,828 14,742 3,317,245 232,081|2.032.19

1

NAMES

OF PORTS.

Aberdeen,

Cheung Chaú............

IV. TOTAL NUMBER, TONNAGE, CREWS, AND CARGOES

WITH CARGOES.

BRITISH.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

WITH CAI

Shipped.

Shipped.

Vis.

Tons. Crews.

Vls.

Tons. Crews.

Cargoes.

Bunker Coal.

Bunker Coal.

Vls.

Tons. Crews.

Vls.

Tons. Crews.

Bunker

Cargoes. Coal.

120

2,487 653

771

2,856

645

351

16,714 2,819

426 34,347 5,843

Hunghom,

Shaukiwán,

Stanley,. Tai O, Victoria,

Yaumáti, and

1

70 2,247 457

45 1,242

201

3,536, 4,124,220174,581 1,144,090, 241,227 173 238,500| 8,42439,520 3,7094,362,810 183,005 1,144,090 280,747 10,619,2,969,861 211,979

Sham Shui-po,

Total,

2,890 422,340.29,474

3,536 4,124,220174,581 1,144,090| |241,227| 173 238,590 8,424|||| 39,520 3,709 4,362,810 188,005 1,144,090 280,747 14,898 3,452,094 251,661

***

III.-TOTAL NUMBER, TONNAGE, CREWS, AND CARGOES OF VESSELS ENTERED AT EACH PORT IN THE CO

RITISH.

FOREIGN.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOES,

IN BALLAST.

ΤΟ ΤΑΙ.

Cargoes.

Cargoes.

Cargoes.

Fous. Crews. Vis. Tons. Crews.

Vis.

Tons. Crew

Vis.

Tous. Crews. Vls.

Tons.

Crews.

Dis- charged.

· Dis-

Transit.

Transit.

charged.

Dis- charged. i

Transit.

...

409 123

10,288 2,511|

6,270,

GO

3,027 755

2,563

83

1,179

16,427 5,450|

13,535

837

5,929 2,263

3,040

138

2,372 628 1,744

776 274 559 1,947 589 286 295 15,263 2,432 1,474 696) 34,293 4,895 1,033 45 490 219 183

500 175

11,064 2,785 6,270 4,974 1,344 2,563

31,690 7,882

13,535

40,222 7,158

3,040

2,862 847

1,744

64 1,506 379 1,031

84 2,006 5541 1,031

06,879 8,607 3,699 4,362,206 182,314 1,718,003 1,191,828 9,863 2,951,989 196,950 1,781,774 765,875 5,703 531,853 57,984 15,566 3.483,842 254,934 1,781,774 765,875

2,539 325,707 23,148 222,235

2,667|| 305,631|28,216||5,206|| 631,338 51,358 222,235

06,879 8,607 3,699 4,862,206 182,314 1,718,003 1,191,828 14,742 3,317,245 282,0842,032,192 765,875|| 9,509|| 890,753,94,778 24,3114,207,998 326,862 2,032,192 765,875

IV. TOTAL NUMBER, TONNAGE, CREWS, AND CARGOES OF VESSELS CLEARED AT EACH PORT IN THE COL

BRITISH.

FOREIGN,

BALLAST.

TOTAL,

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Shipped.

Shipped.

ons. Crews.

Bunker Coal.

Vls. Tons. Crews.

Vls.

Tons. Crews.

Vls.

Tons. Crews.

Cargoes.

Bunker Coal,

Cargoes.

Bunker Coal.

Bunker Coal.

Vis.

Tons. Crews.

Ca

120

2,487 653 1,307

409

5,699 1,803

529

8,180 2,456

77 2,856 645

2,048

112

1,164 575

189

4,020 1,220

351

16,714 2,819

15,289

1,107

14,542 5,026

1,458

31,256 7,845

726

34,347 5,843

29,564

302

5,435 1,957

1,028

39,782 7,300

70, 2,247 457 45 1,242 291.

35

547 232

8,424 39,520 3,709 4,362,810 183,005 1,144,090 280,747 10,619 2,969,861 211,979 1,497,885 186,118 4,954 510,754 40,674

2,890 422,340 29,474 222,482

2,316 209,384|21,725|

3,590 8,424|||| 39,520 3,709 4,362,810 188,005 1,144,090 289,747 14,898 3,452,094 251,661 1,770,707 186,118 9,355 748,223 72,420|

i

2,945 885

80 1,789 523 27,006 15,573 3,480,615 252,655 1,4!

5,206 631,72451,199) 2:

27,006 24,253 4,200,317 324,081 1,77

1,365 817

120;

698 423

190

PORT IN THE COLONY OF HONGKONG, IN THE YEAR 1899.

'OTAL.

WITH CARGOES.

TOTAL.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Cargoes.

Cargoes.

Cargoes.

rews.

VIs.

Tons.

Crews.

Vls.

Tons.

Crews.

Vis.

Dis- charged.

Dis-

Tous. Crews.

Transit.

Transit.

charged.

Dis- charged.

Transit.

2,785 6,270

499

10,288

2,511

6,270

60

776

274

559

11,064: 2,785

6,270

,344 2,563

123

3,027

755

2,563

83

1,947

589

286

4,974 1,344

2.563

7,882

13,535

1,179

16,427

5,450

13,535

295

15,263

2,432

1.474

31,600

7,882

13,535

2,158

3,040

337

5.929

2,263

3,040

696

34,293

4,895

1,033

40,222

7,158

3,040

847

1,744

138

2,372

628

1,744

45

490

219

183

2,862

847

1.744

554

1,031

64

1,506

379

1,031

20

500

175

84

2,006, 554

1,031

4,934 1,781,774 765,875

13,381

7,107,316 370,657

3,499,777||||1,957,703

5,884

1,358 222,235

2,539

6,862 2,032,192 765,875

325,707 23,148

18,267,472,572 405,791 3.750,195) 1,957,703

222,235

66,591

2,667

305,631 28,210

9,750 1,097,632 103,385

738,732

19,265 7,846,048 437,248

3,499,777 1,957,7.8

5,2061 631,338 51,358,

922,235

28,010|||| 8,576,204 500,176 3.750,195 1,957,703

'ORT IN THE COLONY OF HONGKONG, IN THE YEAR 1899.

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOES.

TOTAL.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Shipped.

Shipped.

Shipped.

Vls.

Tons. Crews.

Vis.

Tons. Crews.

Vis.

Tous. Crews.

Cargoes.

Bunker Coal.

Cargoes.

Bunker Coal.

Bunker Coal.

Vis.

Tons. Crews.

Cargoes.

Bunker Coal.

529

8,180 2,456

1,307

120

2,487 653 1,307

469 5,099 1,803

529

8,186 2,456 1,807

189

4,020 1,220} 2,048

77

2,856 645

2,048

1,458

31,256| 7,845 15,239

351

16,714 2,819

15,239

112 1,164 575 1,107 14,542 5,026

1891

4,020 1,220 2,048

1,458;

31,256| 7,845 15,239

1,028

39,782 7,300 29,564

726

34,347 5,343

29,564

190

2,945 885 1,365

70

2,247! 457

1,365

80

1,789 523

817

45

1,242 291

17

...

2,890||| 422,340 29,474 222,482

5,573 3,480,615 232,655 1,497,885 213,124 14,155 7,094,081 386,560 2,641,975 427,345 5,127|| 749,34449,098

2,945 E85 1,365 80 1,789 523 817 66,526 19,282 7,848,425 435,658 2,641,975 493,871

5,206 631,724 51,199 222,482

5,206 631,724 51,199|||222,482

4,2534,200,317 324,081 1,770,707 213,124 18,434 7,576,314 426,242 2,914,797 427,345 9,528 986,813 50,844 60,526 27,962 8,568,127 507,086 2,914,797 493,871

1

302j 5,435 1,957 120

1,028

39,789) 7,300) 29,564

35

690 428 547 232

190

2,316 209,384 21,725

...-244";

439

VII. Total Number, Tonnage, Crews, Passengers and Cargo of Junks ENTERED at Ports in the Colony of Hongkong, from Ports on the Coast of China, and Macao, during the Year ending 31st December, 1899.

CARGO.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Ves- sels.

Tons. Crews.

East Coast,... San On Dis- trict, West

3,230

9,146

258,130 23,537||

River, &c.,

West Coast,

Macao,

Passen- Cargo Ves-

Discharged. gers.

Tons. sels.

693 192,297 877

781,464111,067 58,962 | 335,249 7,734 599,11873,009|| 22,401 16,880 1.380,582 184,076 81,363 335,249

262 22,005 2,929, 33 11,796 371 19,258 3,821! 946 633 41,263 6,750

979 11,796

560 74,657 12,262

98 29,248 386 23,608 3,460

946 98,265 15,722 98 29,248

Total,... 13,1981,136,256 149,795 59,786 568,590 9,368 713,17987,955 23,45322,566 1,849,435 237,750 83,239 568,590

Tons. Crews.]

Passen- Ves- gers. sels.

71,195 7,665 106 4,107 329,325, 31,202

Tous

¡Crews.

l'assen- Cargo

Discharged. gers. Tons.

799 192,297

VIII. Total Number, Tonnage, Crews, Passengers and Cargo of Junks CLEARED at Ports in the Colony of Hongkong, for Ports on the Coast of China, and Macao, during the Year ending 31st December, 1899.

Cargo.

BALLAST.

TOTAL..

Ves- sels.

Tons. Crews.

Passen- Cargo Ves-

Shipped. gers.

sels. Tons.

Tons. Crews.

East Coast,.....

1,165

San On Dis-

trict, West

River, &c.,

West Coast,

609

Macao,

833

98,610 10,948) 464 38,191 2,429| 161,453 16,990

10,815 1,236,046142,059|||| 78,022| 778,448 6,282 177,684 41,100

50,865 6,307

15 33,889 249 22,966 2,033

88,317, 15,030 182 60,373 119 10,808 1,369,

64

l'assen- Ves- gers. sels.

3,594 260,063 27,938

Tous. Crews. Passen-

Cargo

gers.

Shipped. Tons.

528

38,191

Total,... 13,4221,473,838 174,344 78,683 910,901|9,079 372,911|61,492

1,873 17,0971,413,730183,159 79,895 778,448

150 858 73,831 8,340- 165 33,889

89 952 99,125, 16,399) 271 60,373

2,176 |22,501|1,846.749 235,836) 80,859 910,901

1

IX.-Total Number, Tonnage, Crews, Passengers and Cargo of Junks ENTERED at each Port in the Colony of Hongkong (exclusive of Local Trade), during the Year ending 31st December, 1899.

CARGO.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Aberdeen,.

Cheung Cháu,

Hunghom,...... 1,179

Shaukiwán,

...

Stanley,

337 138

Tai 0,

64

Ves- sels.

499 10,288 2,511 123

3,027 755 16,427 5,450| 5,929 2,263 2,372 628 1,506 .379

Tons. Crews.

gers.

l'assen- Cargo Ves-

Discharged.

Tons. sels.

Tons. Crews..

Passen- Ves- gers. sels.

Tons. Crews.

l'assen-

gers.

Cargo Discharged. Tons.

6

6,270 60 776 274 2,563 83 1,947 589 13,535 295

15,263 | 2,432| 50

3,040 696

34,293 4,895 55 1,744 45

490 219 118 1,031

20

500 175

92

559 206

11,064 2,785

6,270

4,974 1,344

98

2,563

25

1,474 1,033

31,690 7.882

13,535

40,222 7,158

75

3,040

183

ས་་

2,862 847

55 1,744

Victoria,

8,319

Yaumáti and

46

138 1,031

771,000114,661 59,511 | 318,172| 5,502 354,279 51,161| 23,196 | 13,821:1,125,279165,822 82,707 | 318,172

Shamshuipo, 2,539 325,707 23,148

Total,... 13,198 1,136,256 149,795 59,786 568,590 9,368 713,179 87,955 23,45322,566 1,849,435,237.750 83,239 568,590.

20

84 2,006 554

¡

222,235 2,667 305,631 28,210 120 5,206, 631.338 51,358 166 222,235

440

X.-Total Number, Tonnage, Crews, Passengers and Cargo of Junks CLEARED at each Port in the Colony of Hongkong (exclusive of Local Trade), during the Year ending 31st December, 1899.

1

CARGO.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Ves-

Tons. Crews.

sels.

Passen- gers.

Aberdeen,

120

2,487 653

Cheung Chán,

77

2,856 645

10

Cargo

Ves- Shipped.

Tons. I sels.

1,307 409 2,048 112

Tons. Crews.

P'assen- Ves- gers. sels.

Tons. Crews.

ews Passen-

Cargo Shipped.

gers.

Tons.

5,699 1,803

5291

8,186 2,456||

1,307

1,164 575

32

189

4,020 1.220

42

2,048

Hunghom,.

351

16,714 2,819

15,239 1,107

14,542 5,026|

1,458

31,256 7,845

15,239

Shaukiwán,

726

34,347 5,343| 52

29,564 302

5,435 1,957

1,028

39,782 7,300,

52

29,564

Stanley,..

70

2,247 457

55

1,365

120

698

428

190

2,945

885

55

1,365

Tai O,

45

1,242 291

78

817 35

547 232

88

80

1,789 523

166

817

Victoria,

9,143

991,605 134,662

78,470

638,079 4,678

135,442 29,746

1,914 | 13,8211,127,047 164,408

80,384

638,079

1

Yanmáti and

>hamshuipo, 2,890 422,340 29,474

18

222,482 2,316| 209,384 21,725

142 5,206 631,724 51,199

160

222,482

Total,... 13,422 1,473.838 174,344 78,683

910,901 9,079 372,911 61,492 2,176 22,501 1,846,749 235,836 80,859

910,901

XI.—Return of Junks (Local Trade) ENTERED at each Port in the Colony of Hongkong, during the Year ending 31st December, 1899.

CARGO.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Ves- sels.

Tons. Crews.

Passen- Cargo Ves-

Discharged. gers. Tons. sels.

Tons.

Crews.

Ves- Passen-

gers. sels.

Tons. Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Cargo Discharged. Tons.

Aberdeen,.

121

6,125

Cheung Cháu,

23

575

1,183 159

3,683

33 |

1,020

267

50

154

7,145 1,450| 50

467

3

15

14

20

26

590

173

28

3,683 467

Hunghom,....

550

4,128

2,114

3,395

83

3,101

528

633

7,229

2,642

3,395

Shaukiwán,

22

136

74

135

2

189

16

24

325

90

135

...

Stanley,

14

148

64

53

16

131

70

30

·

279

134

53

7

164

51

50

5

5,392

Shamshuipo,

60 İ 3,925 395

4

Tai O, Victoria,

Yaumáti and

Total,... 6,189 221,445 68,356 12,152 165,286 10,079 260,852 | 59,530 35,735 16,268 482,297 127,886 47,887 165,286

169

37

12

333

88

50

206,244 64,316 12,140 155,152 9,904 255,085 58,326 35,665 15,296 461,329 122,642 47,805

155,152

2,351 33 1,142 | 272

93 5,067 667

+ 2,351

XII. Return of Junks (Local Trade) CLEARED at each Port in the Colony of Hongkong, during the Year ending 31st December, 1899.

CARGO.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Ves-

Tous. Crews. Passen-

sels.

gers.

Cargo Ves- Shipped. Tons.

sels.

Tons. Crews. Passen- Ves- gers. sels.

Tons. Crews. Passen-

gers.

Cargo Shipped. Tons.

Aberdeen,......` Cheung Cháu,

Hunghom,......

Shaukiwán,

79

3,230 758

1,375

105 6,793

9

696

79

618

34

-848

1,021 218

50 116

184 10,023 1,779 43 1,544 297

50 116

112

3,077

659

2,591

537

4,585

2,020

649 7,662

2,679

...

1,375 618 2,591

6

255

48

34

20

128

68

26

383 116

34

21

+

Stanley,..

Tai O,

Victoria,

Yaumáti and

Shamshuipo,

17

711

149

Total,... 4,234 137,001 37,036 44,723

186

89

138

2

10

7

23

196

96

...

138

76

18

19

3

3,986 128,77035,236 44,723

99 29,260 11,376 | 332,247 88,169|

16

7

175

34

19

1,805 15,362 461,017|123,405 46,528

29,260

510

76 3,970 640

34,545 12,153 348,680 92,159 1,971 |16,387 | 485,681 129,195 46,694 | 34,545

93

4,681 789

510

441

XIII. SUMMARY.

FOREIGN TRADE.

No. OF VESSELS.

TONS.

CREWS.

British ships entered with Cargoes,...

Do.

do. in Ballast,

3,518 181

4,155,327

173,707

206,879

8,607

Total,....

3,699

4,362,206

182,314

British ships cleared with Cargoes,.

3,536

Do.

do. in Ballast,

173

4,124,220 238,590

174,581

8,424

Total,......

3,709 4,362,810

183,005

Total British ships entered and cleared,

7,408 8,725,016

365,319

Foreign ships entered with Cargoes, .....

Do.

do. in Ballast,

1,544 201

2,180,989

82,289

177,574

6,823

Total,.....

1,745

2,358,563

89,112

Foreign ships cleared with Cargoes,

Do.

1,476

1,978,256

77,817

do. in Ballast,

276

375,312

10,928

Total,........

1,752

2,353,568

88,245

Total Foreign ships entered and cleared,

3,497

4,712,131

177,357

Junks entered with Cargoes,

Do. do. in Ballast,

13,198

1,136,256

149,795

9,368

713,179

87,955

Total,......

22,566

1,849,435

237,750

Junks cleared with Cargoes,

13,422

1,473,838

174,344

Do.

do. in Ballast,

9,079

372,911

61,492

Total,......

22,501

1,846,749

235,836

Total Junks entered and cleared,

45,067

3,696,184

473,586

Total of all Vessels entered,

Total of all Vessels cleared,

28,010 8,570,204 27,962 8,563,127

509,176

507,086

Total of all Vessels in Foreign Trade entered and cleared,

55,972

17,133,331

1,016,262

LOCAL TRADE.

Total Junks entered,.

Do.

16,268

482,297

127,886

cleared,...

16,387

485,681

129,195

Total of all Vessels in Local Trade, entered and cleared,

32,655

967,978

257,081

Do.

all

Total of all Vessels in Foreign Trade, entered and cleared,

do. Local Trade, entered and cleared,

Grand Total of all Vessels entered and cleared,

55,972 17,133,331 32,655 967,978

1,016,262

257,081

88,627 18,101,309

1,273,343

;

442

XIV.-RETURN of LICENSED STEAM-LAUNCHES for the Year ending 31st December, 1899.

ENTERED.

CLEARED.

PLACES.

Vessels.

Tonnage. Crews. Passengers. dis-

Cargo

charged.

Tons.

Vessels. Tonnage.

Crews. Passengers. Shipped

Cargo

Tons.

Within the Waters of the Colony,

75,353 2,801,542 593,020 2,686,732 |

75,353 | 2,801,542 593,020 | 2,686,127

Total,...... 75,353 2,801,542 593,020 | 2,686,732

75,353 2,801,542 593,020 2,686,127

Within the Local

Trade Limits,

7,604

183,612 56,460 267,393

7,604 183,612 56,460 264,725

Total,......

7,604

183,612 56,460

267,393

7,604 183,612

56,460

264,725

Outside the Local

Trade Limits,-

Sam Shui, ...

Kong Mun,.

556

29,690 11,073

24,105 3,571

556

29,690

11,073

24,999 10,763

Kam Cheuk,

Wn Chow,

85

3,061

799

186 1,292

85

3,061

799

Macao,

52

2.467

788

1,371

1,166

52

2,467

788

128 1,277 1,309 1,342

Other Places,

19

674

129

19

674

129

8

Total....... 712 35,892 12,889

25,612 | 6,029

712

35,892 12,889

26,444 13,382

6,029 2,979,737 6,029 83,669 | 3,021,046 | 662,369 | 2,977,296 | 13,382

Grand Total,... 83,669 3,021,046 662,369 2,979,737

XV.-RETURN of VESSELS REGISTERED at the Port of Hongkong, during the Year 1899,

}

Name of Vessel.

Official Number.

Regis- tered Tonnage.

Horse Power.

Rig.

Built of

Where built and when.

Remarks.

Haiching, (str.),

107,029 1.267 239

Schooner

Diamante, (str.),...

107,030

1,255

256

Schooner

Steel Port Glasgow, 1898. Steel | Aberdeen, 1899.

Queen of the Isles, (str.),

109,851

89

54

Fore & Aft Schr.

Yiksang, (str.),

91,934

887

120

Schooner

Wood | Benicia, Cal., U.S.A., 1898. Steel Dumbarton, 1886.

Foreign name "Queen of the Isles.”

Foreign name "Yiksang."

Sam Shui, (str.),

109,852

166

75

None

Steel

Hongkong, 1899.

Wuchow, (str.),

109,853

156

80 Noue

Steel

Pelayo, (str.),

70,660

1,100

211

Schooner

Iron

Shanghai, 1899. Berkenhead, 1872.

Foreign name "“Equatoria.”

XVI.—RETURN of REGISTRIES of VESSELS Cancelled at the Port of Hongkong, during the Year 1899.

Name of Vessel.

Official Number.

Regis- tered Tounage.

Date of Horse Register. Power.

Rig.

Built of

Where built and when.

Reason of Cancellation.

White Cloud, (str.), 64,124

528

1875

150

Retriever,

95,872

96

1896

None Schooner

Trial,

95,873

61

1897

Lorcha

Cam,

107,009 106

1897

Lorcha

Kong Pak, (str.),

107,018 172

1897

25

Schooner

Shing Lung,

107,021

85

1898

Yik Sang, (str.),...| 91,934

887

1899

120

Lorcha Schooner

Wood Hongkong, 1875. Wood Y'hama, J'pan, 1886. Wood Hongkong, 1877. Wood Macao, 1885. Wood Hongkong, 1897. Wood Canton, 1897. Steel Dumbarton, 1886.

Foundered. Sold to Foreigners. Sold to Foreigners. Broken up. Sold to Foreigners. Sold to Foreigners. Transferred to London.

XVII-SUMMARY of CHINESE EMIGRATION from HONGKONG to Ports other than in China, during the Year ending 31st December, 1899.

BRITISH VESSELS.

443

443

FOREIGN VESSELS.

GRAND TOTAL.

WHITHER BOUND.

Adults.

Children.

Adults. Children.

Adults.

Children.

Total.

Total.

Total.

M.

F.

M. F.

M. F.

M. F.

M.

F.

M. F.

To Honolulu, Sandwich Islands,..

428

54

32

,, Japan Ports,

69

11

14 528

356 5 7

368

784

59

39

14

896

1

72

22

23

91

1

95

,, Mauritius,

621

2

623

621

623

""

Portland, Oregon,

524

524

125

125

649

649

""

San Francisco, U.S.A.,

3.974

22

76 10 4,082 3,428

17 56

8 3,509 7,402

39

132]

18

7,591

,, Seattle, U.S.A.,

74

74

74

74

Straits Settlements,.

30,424 3,061|

,, Tacoma, U.S.A.,

88

88! 372

720 291 34,496 9,2481,413 344 165 11,170 39,672 4,474 1,064

372 460

456

45,666

460

Vancouver, British Columbia,

3,583

25

Victoria, British Columbia,

9791

3,589

979 453

3,583 453 1,432

6

3,589

1,432

TOTAL PASSENGERS,

40,060 3,138 835 316 44,35814,699 1,435 410 17316,717 54,768 4,573 1,245

489

61,075

Total Passengers by British Vessels,

40,069 3,138 835

316

44,358

Total Passengers by Foreign Vessels, .

Excess of Passengers by British Vessels,

14,699 1,435 410

|25,370 1,703- 425 143

173

16,717

27,641

XVIII.--SUMMARY of CHINESE IMMIGRATION to HONGKONG from Ports other than China,

during the Year ending 31st December, 1899.

BRITISH VESSELS.

FOREIGN VESSELS.

GRAND TOTAL.

WHERE FROM.

Adults.

Children.

Adults. Children.!

Adults.

Children.

Total.

Total.

Total,

M. F

M. F.

J.

F

M. F

JL.

F.

M. F.

From Bangkok, Siam...

1,803

1,803

295

295

2,098

2,098

Honolulu, Sandwich Islands,

483

17

9

514 550 33 14 19

616

1,033

50

23 21

1,130

""

Japan Ports,

14

14

14

14

Mauritius,

674

91

695

674

695

11

Melbourne,.

381

17

New South Wales...

389

忆起

390

23

23

104:

413

2

2

394

129

129

518

523

""

*:

15

*

"" New Zealand Ports,

Portland, Oregon,

Queensland Ports..................

Seattle, U.S.A.,

125

125

125

125

87

591

2

San Francisco, U.S.A.,.

2.992

68

38

298

91

$7

91

603 254

20 3,118 2.614 37 19

254 20 2,690

845

857

5.606

105

57

40

5,808

157

:.

:

157

157

157

South Australian Ports,

128

128

128

128

" Straits Settlements,

71,205 3,211|1,361

"

""

Sumatra,

:

606 76,383| 17,306 689 319 165 18,479 88,511 3,900 | 1,680 626 4 12. 1 6431 626

94,862

12

643

Tacoma. U.S.A.,

78

Tasmania,

23

79 211 23

2 1

214

289

293

23

23

;

"!

Vancouver, British Columbia,

2,280

B

"

Victoria, British Columbia...

272

2,298 272

2,280 13

18

:

18

290

2,298 290

TOTAL PASSENGERS,

80,851 3,315; 1,425 644 86,235 22,857 773 374 209 24,213 103,708 |4,088 |1,799

$53, 110,448

Total Passengers by British Vessels,

Total Passengers by Foreign Vessels,

Excess of Passengers by British Vessels,

80.851 | 3,315 |1,425

22,857 778 374

57,994 |2,542 |1,051

644 86,235

209 24,213

435 62,022

444

444

NATURE OF Charge.

XIX. RETURN of MARINE CASES tried at the MARINE MAGISTRATE'S COURT, during the Year 1899.

DEFENDANTS HOW DISPOSED OF.

No. of Cases.

No. of Defendants.

Imprisoned with Hard

Labour.

Fined.

Absent from ship without leave,

Assault,

Anchoring.in prohibited place (Junk),

Harbour Regulationn, Breach of

Refusal of duty,................

CO LO www N

2

6

6

4

11

1

1

2

2

3

30

29

~ : ~ :

1

Total,

12

50

36

11

1

2

Ni

Forfeiture

of Pay.

manded.

Repri-

Sent back to

duty.

Dismissed.

XXI.-STATEMENT of the REVENUE collected at the Harbour Department, during the Year 1899.

Head of Receipt.

$

Amount.

cts.

1. Light. Dues, Ordinance 26 of 1891,

2. Licences and Internal Revenue not otherwise specified :—

52,406.93

Chinese Passenger Ship Licences, Ordinance 1 of 1889, Emigration Brokers' Licences, Ordinance 1 of 1889,

275.00

800.00

Fines,

35.00

Junk Licences, &c., from the New Territory,

2,792.75

Junk Licences, &c., Ordinance 26 of 1891,

34,131.25

Steam Launch Licences, &c., Ordinance 26 of 1891,

1,093.50

3. Fees of Court or Office, Payments for specific purposes and Re-imbursements-in-

Aid :-

Cargo-boat Certificates, Ordinance 26 of 1891,

2,046.00

Engagement and Discharge of Seamen, Ordinance 26 of 1891,

21,877.80

Examination of Masters and Engineers of Launches, Ordinance 26 of 1891,

402.50

Examination of Masters, Mates and Engineers, Ordinance 26 of 1891,

1,955.00

Gunpowder, Storage of, Ordinance 26 of 1891,

14,276.41

Medical Examination of Emigrants, Ordinance 1 of 1889, Printed Forms, Sale of, Harbour Regulations, Tide Tables, &c.,

19,245.75

274.00

Private Moorings and Buoys, Half-yearly Rent, Ordinance 26 of 1891, Registry Fees (Merchant Shipping Act), Ordinance 26 of 1891,...... Steam Launches, Surveyor's Certificates, Ordinance 26 of 1891, Survey of Steam-ships, Ordinance 26 of 1891,

Sunday Cargo-Working Permits, Ordinance 6 of 1891,.

3,000.00

520.00

1,920.00

11,678.61

21,825.00

Total,.....

190,555.50

Years.

Passenger

Certificate and

Inspection of

Bottom.

XXII.-RETURN of WORK performed by the Government Marine Surveyor's DEPARTMENT.

1889,

130

73

1890,

112

77

1891,

108

38

1892,

122

51

1893,

136

74

1894,

124

62

1895,

102

64

1896,

142

68

6

1897,

158

79

24

1898,

164

83

10

1899,

144

61

10

60 21 30 30 0 10 10 10 00 00 00

45434

Estimated Total

Number of Visits in

connection with Fore-

going Inspection.

4

80

1

3

84

1

1

73

3

16

85

10

16

1

94

20

19

116

11

28

1

98

97

ཿཧྨ

18

34

20

37

109

41

85

121

61

26

134

102

27

2543 JIKE825

39

36

1,127

61

19

986

44

19

1,615

60

96

1,678

64

25

1,659

54

18

1,364

24

1,452

66

1,409

96

51

1,631

72

48

1.729

57

78

1,602

Remarks.

:

35

28

Amount of Fines.

-DIAGRAM of Tonnage entered at Hongkong, from 1867 to 1899, inclusive.

RED LINE represents British Shipping Tonnage only.

1871.

1872.

BLUE LINE represents Foreign Shipping Tonnage only.

GREEN LINE represents British and Foreign Shipping Tonnage,

YELLOW LINE represents Junk Tonnage only excluding Local Trade.

THICK BLACK

LINE

represents entire

Trade

in British and Foreign Ships and Junks.

1873.

1874.

1875.

1876.

1877.

1878.

1879.

1880.

1881.

1882.

1883.

1884.

1885.

1886.

1887.

'8381

1889.

1890.

1891.

1892.

1893.

1894.

1895.

1896.

1897.

1898.

1899.

TONS.

8,600,000

8,500,000

8,400,100

5

7,900,00

7,800,00

7,700,000

7,600,000

7,500,000

7,400,000

7,300,000

7,200,000

7,100,000

7,000,000

6,900,000

6,800,000

6,700,000

6,600,000

6,500,000

6,400,000

150

÷

6,600,000

6,500,000

6,400,000

6,300,000

6,200,000

6,100,000

6,000,000

5,900,000

5,800,000

5:700,000

5,600,000

5,500,000

5,400,000

5,300,000

5,200,000

5,100,000.

5,000,000

4,900,000

4.800,000

4,700,000

4,600,000

4,500,000

4,400,000

4,300,000

4,200,000

4,100,000.

4,000,000

3,900,000

3,800,000

3,700,000

3,600,000

3,500,000.

3,400,000

3,300,000.

3,200,000,

3,100,000

3,000,000

3,300,000

3,200,000

3,100,000

!

3,000,000

2,900,000

2,800,000

2,700,000

2,600,000

2,500,000

2,400,000

2,300,000

2,200,000

2,1000

$800,000

1,700100

1,600,000

1,500,000

1,400,000

1,300,000

1,200,000

1,100,000

1,000,00

900,00

800,00

:

TONS.

8,600,000

8,500,000

8,400,000

8,300,000

8,200,000

8,100,000

8,000,000

7.900,000

7,800,000

7,700,000

7,600,000

7,500,000

7,400,000

7,300,000

7,200,000

7,100,000

7,000,000

6,900,000

6,800,000

6,700,000

6,600,000

6,500,000

1367.

1868.

1869.

1870.

1871.

1872.

1873.

1874.

1875.

1876.

1877.

1878.

1879.

1880.

1881.

1882.

1883.

1884.

XX-DIAGRAM of Tonnage entered at Hongkong, from 1867 to 1899, inclusi

RED LINĖ represents British Shipping Tonnage only.

BLUE LINE represents Foreign Shipping Tonnage only.

GREEN LINE represents British and Foreign Shipping Tonnage.

YELLOW LINE represents Junk Tonnage only, excluding Local Trade.

THICK BLACK LINE

represents entire

Trade

in British and Foreign Ships and Jur

1885.

1886.

1887.

*8381

1889.

1890.

1891.

1892.

1893.

1894.

ن اساسا و بالارون

6,600,000

6,500,000

6,400,000

6,300,000

6,200,000

6,100,000

6,000,000

5,900,000

5,800,000

5,700,000

5,600,000

5,500,000

5,400,000

5,300,000

5,200,000

5,100,000

5,000,000

4,900,000.

4,800,000

4,700,000

4,600,000

4,500,000

4,400,000

4,300,000

4,200,000

4,100,000

4,000,000

3,900,000

3,800,000

3,700,000

3,600,000

3,500,000

3,400,000

3,300,000

3,200,000

3,100,000

3,200,000

3,100,000

3,000,000

2,900,000

2,800,000

2,700,000

2,600,000

2,500,000

2,400,000

2,300,000

2,200,000

2,100,000

2,000,000

1,900,000

1,800,000

1,700,000

1,600,000

1,500,000

1,400,000

1,300,000

1,200,000

1.100,000

1,000,000

900,000

800,000

700,000

600,000

500,000

400,000

300,000

XXIII-IMPORTS AND EXPORTS OFFICE.

IMPORTS.

447

MALWA.

PATNA. BENARES. PERSIAN.

TURKISH.

CHINESE.

TOTAL.

chests.

chests.

chests.

chests.

chests.

chests.

chests.

1898, 1899,

7,483

19,631

7,319

4,894

31

34

39,392

9,028

17,866

8,739

5,966

51

39

41,690

Increase,..... 1,545

1,420

1,072

20

4,062

Decrease,

1,765

1,765

EXPORTS.

MALWA.

PATNA.

BENARES.

PERSIAN.

TURKISH.

CHINESE.

TOTAL.

chests.

chests.

chests.

chests.

chests.

chests.

chests.

1898, 1899,

6,895

18,236

7,721

4,905

37

34

37,828

9,017

17,812

8,597

5,034

27

37

40,524

Increase,.... 2,1211 Decrease.

876

129

3

3,129

424

10

434

Through Cargo reported in Manifests but not landed, 1999,

| 1898,.....

15,482 chests. 17,346

Increase,..

1,863 chests.

NUMBER OF PERMITS, &c., ISSUED.

1898.

1899.

Increase.

Decrease.

Landing Permits,..

341

325

16

Removal Permits,

8,324

8,404

80

Export Permits,

6,518

6,571

53

Permits to Chinese Customs' Station, Samsuipoo, Memo. of Exports to the Commissioner of Chinese

99

34

65

...

Customs, Kowloon,..

545

535

10

Memo. of Exports to the Superintendent of Raw

Opium Department, Macao,

299.

292

:

:

7

SUMMARY OF EXPORTS, 1899.

Malwa Patna Benares Persian chests. chests. chests. chests.

Turkish Chinese chests. chests.

Total chests.

Total in piculs.

By Steamers to Amoy,

77

32

1,444

3051/

1,878 2,185.3375

Bagdad,

7.175

British Columbia,

British North Borneo,

61 1

61

73.2

31

36

37.775.

Bunder Abbas,

5

5

5.125

Canton,

886

3,882

1,158

5,930

6,938.1

Chefoo,

25

3

26

54

Foochow,

1,530

998

384

531

3.443

Formosa,

17

3,502

37

3,556

59.8 3,732.675 3,64 3.55

Haiphong,

5

6.

Hankow,

Hoihow,

21

32

18

71

81.

553

107

660

792.

Macao,.

4,557

102

6

1,666

5,397.825

Mauritius,

}

1.2

Merida (Yucatan),

Mexico,

1

1

1

1.025

1

1.025

Newchwang,

10

10

10.

New York,

1.025

Pakhoi,

34

78

112

134.4

Panama,

32

37

43.5

Philippine Islands,

432

330

762

914.4

San Francisco,

10

10

10.25

...

Shanghai,

3,886

5,223 4,144

27

13,280

15,154,575

Straits Settlements,

572

20

592

Swatow,

2,23541 1,790

790

31

4,846

606.3 5,363.275

Tientsin,

17

17

20.4

Wuchow,......

2

2

2.4

Zanzibar,

I

1.

By Junks to various adjacent Ports in China,

328

142

12

477

507.3125

Total,.......

9,017

17,812 8,597

5,034

27

37

40,524 45,931.65

The Information in Column 8 above is on the following assumption :-

Patna and Benares, per chest,

Malwa, Turkish and Chinese, per chest,

Persian, per chest,

.1.20 piculs.

.1.

""

..1.025

33

3

167

No.

1900

HONGKONG.

PAPERS ON THE SUBJECT OF THE JUBILEE ROAD ROUND THE ISLAND.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor.

(Secretary of State to Governor.)

HONGKONG.

No. 153.

SIR,

DOWNING STREET,

11th August, 1899.

I have the honour to inform you that my attention has been drawn to the statement, in Mr. ORMSBY'S report on the Public Works Department for 1898, that no beginning has been made with the road around the Island of Hongkong, which has been projected in commemoration of the sixtieth anniversary of Her Majesty's reign.

2. In paragraph 2 of his despatch No. 110 of the 18th May, 1897, your pre- decessor stated that full particulars regarding this road would be furnished in due There appears, however, to be no record of any further communication on the subject having been received in this Department.

course.

3. The delay in this matter, unless it is due to the most exceptional circum- stances, might almost be held to amount to a breach of faith with the public, who were induced to subscribe in 1897 towards the cost of making this road, on the understanding that Government would see the work carried out. I should be glad to receive at an early date a full explanation of the causes of this postponement, and as to whether it is proposed to take steps towards the immediate commence- ment of the road.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient, humble Servant,

Governor

Sir H. A. BLAKE, G.C.M.G.,

&c.,

Fc.,

&c.

J. CHAMBERLAIN.

SIR,

(Chairnian, Jubilee Committee, to Secretary of State.)

HONGKONG, 15th September, 1899.

In accordance with the terms of a Resolution passed unanimously by the Hongkong Jubilee Committee at a meeting held on the 15th August last, I have the honour to address you on the subject of the proposed construction of a Road from Kennedy Town to Aberdeen, which was decided upon as one of this Colony's Memorials of Her Most Gracious Majesty's Sixty Years Reign.

2. The necessity for appealing to you in this matter has arisen principally through the action of Major-General BLACK, C.B., who has attempted to thwart the wishes of the Colonists generally by raising objections to the construction of the road on Military grounds.

168

2

3. The Committee desire to lay before you as briefly as possible the circum- stances of the case.

4. In the early part of 1897, the Jubilee Committee, through the medium of the Press, invited suggestions from the public, as to what form a permanent Memorial of the event referred to should take.

5. The suggestions were carefully considered and after full discussion it was resolved that the most fitting Memorials would be :-

(1) The construction of a Hospital and Nursing Institute, and

(2) The construction of the Road already mentioned.

6. The Hospital and Nursing Institute need not be referred to further than to say that, after considerable delay, caused by a transfer of the site from the lower levels to the Peak District on the representation of the Principal Civil Medical Officer, this part of the scheme is likely to be soon realized. I will therefore con- fine myself in what follows to the Road portion of the scheme.

7. In the first place, the Committee desire to state that the the fullest publi- city was given to their proceedings while the various suggestions which had been made were under discussion, the representatives of the Press being present and full reports appearing in the newspapers.

8. The Resolutions specify the form of the Memorials decided upon were passed by the Committee on the 26th April, 1897, and, as the wording of the one relating to the road is somewhat important, I will quote it in full :--

Resolution 3.

"That the money so collected together with an equal amount pro- "mised by the Colonial Government be deposited at interest in the Hongkong and Shanghai Banking Corporation in the name of the Jubilee Committee, and be disbursed by them after paying for the local celebra- "tions-one half towards the erection of the Hospital for Women and "Children and the training of nurses and the other half towards the con- "struction of the first section of the carriage road from Kennedy Town to "Aberdeen which the Government undertakes to commence forthwith and "to carry on the remaining portion of the road until completed."

9. These Resolutions were submitted to His Excellency the Governor, by whom in turn they were referred to you, and the Committee were informed that they had received the approval of the Government and of yourself as Secretary of State for the Colonies. They were also published in the newspapers.

10. During this time Major-General BLACK was in command of the Forces in the Colony and, as a member of the public, made a suggestion as to the form the Memorial should take, which however did not commend itself to the Committee and was consequently rejected.

11. On the basis of the Resolutions which were passed, subscriptions were collected from the entire community, the Chinese subscribing largely on account of the Road portion of the scheme, which it was anticipated would form an outlet for the inhabitants of the crowded western section of the City on the lower levels. When the subject was under discussion at the meeting of the 15th August, Mr. FUNG WA-CH'UN, one of the most active members of the Committee, stated "that he had collected funds from the Chinese on the promise that the road from Kennedy Town to Aberdeen would be undertaken."

12. The desirability of avoiding any action with regard to the disposal of the fund which could possibly give rise to a charge of breach of faith with the Chinese section of the community is self-obvious.

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i

13. As you will gather from the Resolution already quoted, the construction of the Road was to be carried out by the Government, the cost of it being defrayed as far as possible from the moneys collected and the Government undertaking not only to complete that section but to carry out by degrees other sections until a good road was constructed encircling the greater portion of the Island.

14. Under these circumstances, the Committee left it to the Government to take whatever steps they considered necessary towards carrying out the Road portion of the scheme. The matter was allowed to remain in abeyance until the arrival of Mr. ORMSBY, who had been appointed to succeed Mr. COOPER as Director of Public Works. A survey of the entire route was then undertaken, under Mr. ORMSBY's direction, and in August, 1898, that gentleman's report was forwarded for the Committee's consideration.

15. In his report the following passage occurs :--

،

"I am strongly in favour of first constructing the Road between "Shaukiwan and Aberdeen and so completing a carriage road round the "Island, leaving the construction of the section round Mount Davis-(ie.,

from Kennedy Town to Aberdeen)—for future consideration.”

16. That was the first intimation which the Committee received of any proposal to deviate from the scheme which had been decided upon in April, 1897, 16 months previously.

17. The Committee wish here to point out that Mr. ORMSBY had then only been 10 months in the Colony and on the strength of that comparatively brief sojourn he proposed to upset a scheme which had been prepared by the Jubilee Committee (of which his predecessor, Mr. COOPER, was a member), and had received the approval of His Excellency the Governor, Sir WM. ROBINSON, and of yourself as Secretary of State. All the members of the Committee are men of standing and many of thein have spent much of their lives in the Colony.

18. The Committee, after considering Mr. ORMSBY's report, informed the Government that they considered themselves bound by Resolution No. 3, which I have already quoted in full, and did not therefore consider that they had power to expend the money collected on any other section of the road than that between Kennedy Town and Aberdeen.

19. At this period Major-General BLACK was administering the Government and it was not until after the arrival of His Excellency Sir HENRY BLAKE, G.C.M.G., that

any further communication was made to the Committee. Then, for the first time, in December, 1898, an extract from a letter of General BLACK's to His Excellency the Governor, in which Military objections were urged to the construction of the Road, was communicated to the Committee. General BLACK's letter, a copy of which is enclosed, is dated 2nd December, 1898.

20. To this the Committee replied in similar terms to those above mentioned, and pointed out that early in 1897 the Government had undertaken with your approbation, and without objection on the part of the Military Authorities, to commence the Road forthwith and to gradually carry it on until completed.

21. The Committee were subsequently informed that the question of the construction of the proposed first section of the Road from Kennedy Town round Mount Davis had been reported upon by General BLACK and General GASCOIGNE, who were both opposed to it on Military grounds, and that His Excellency the Governor would not therefore feel justified in approving of it at present.

22. The Committee have no desire to even appear to question General GASCOIGNE'S opinion, but it is obvious that, for an Officer in his position to incur the responsibility, immediately upon his arrival in the Colony, of differing from his predecessor in office on such a question, is hardly to be expected.

170

1

23. As nothing is said in this, the latest communication received from Govern- ment, regarding Mr. ORMSBY's objections to the construction of the Mount Davis section of the road, the Committee infer that His Excellency the Governor was prepared to over-rule these objections which were chiefly grounded on the excessive cost of it as compared with the remaining sections. From the evidence given by expert witnesses when the scheme was under consideration, the Committee are disposed to think that Mr. ORMSBY has over-estimated the cost and that, if tenders were invited, it would be found practicable to construct the entire section with the funds in hand, which now amount to fully $100,000, and are earning interest at the rate of 5% until disbursed.

24. The onus of the deadlock which has arisen therefore rests with General BLACK.

25. Whilst deferring to General BLACK's experience in Military matters, the Committee unanimously venture to take exception to his objections to the proposed scheme. As the road is to be only eighteen feet in width, it is scarcely justifiable to describe it as a "broad' road. Again, it appears that the road could be rendered practically useless for hostile purposes by destroying a few short portions of it and, from the nature of the coast, the Committee have no hesitation in saying that the landing of a force under cover of darkness at any point between Sandy Bay and Kennedy Town, would be an exceedingly difficult, if not impossible, operation. The road as designed would traverse the hillside at a level of about fifty-five to sixty feet above sea-level and would therefore have to be gained, assuming the landing to have been effected, by scrambling over ground which General BLACK himself describes as "so steep and rugged that no formed body of soldiers could move along it at night."

26. Finally, the Committee regard General BLACK's objections as out-of-date and somewhat far-fetched.

27. The scheme for a road round Mount Davis is not a new one.

It was mooted on the occasion of the Colony's Jubilee in 1891, and was warmly taken up then but, owing to the depressed condition of affairs at that period, it was considered improbable that a sufficient sum of money could be raised to admit of its being carried out, and accordingly it was dropped, only to be revived again at the first opportunity which presented itself. No mention of any objections on military grounds was then made either by Major-General BARKER, who was in command of the Forces at the time, or by any other Military Officer.

28. The Committee venture to think that the road will ere long become an absolute necessity in order to open out new sites to provide for the influx of the wealthier class of Chinese which is constantly going on. Of late, there have been repeated instances of the purchase of villa residences on the upper levels of the city by Chinese and this is a tendency which should be encouraged. The number of such residences being limited, however, it is necessary that new sites be opened out, if the demand is to be met, and the Committee are informed that several Chinese have signified their intention of building villas along the new road, if constructed. It would also become possible for the Chinese to indulge in driving: exercise as is common among them both in Shanghai and Singapore whilst an impetus would be given to cycling which has already gained a considerable hold in the Colony.

29. In this connection it is interesting to repeat a quotation from General BLACK's letter in support of his own proposal which was made use of by the mover of the resolutions of the 26th April, 1897. It runs as follows:-

"I need hardly urge the appropriateness of a road to mark a great "occasion; roads are the precursors of progress and civilization; they distinguish a rising from a barbarous state. Roads for recreation and 'health are one of the great wants in this island."

CC

<<

No. 274.

171

5

30. The Members of the Jubilee Committee therefore ask you, Sir, on behalf of the subscribers to the fund and the Community generaliy, to whom the carrying out of this scheme will undoubtedly be of great benefit, to give this appeal your earnest consideration and, if possible, to endorse the approval which you were good enough to express when the proposal was first laid before you.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient and humble Servant,

The Right Honourable

JOSEPH CHAMBERLAIN,

C. P. CHATER, Chairman, Jubilee Committee.

Her Majesty's Principal Secretary of State for the Colonies.

(Governor to Secretary of State.)

GOVERNMENT HOUSE, HONGKONG, 27th September, 1899.

SIR,

I have the honour to acknowledge the receipt of your despatch No. 153 of 11th ultimo with reference to the expenditure of the funds subscribed for a memorial of Her Majesty's Jubilee in 1897.

2. The money was placed in the hands of Trustees, to be devoted :-

(i.) To the construction of a Road round the Island.

(ii.) The building of a Hospital for Women and Children, and a

Nursing Institute.

3. The plans for the Hospital have been prepared, and the site acquired from the Government, and it is being proceeded with. The construction of the Road has not been undertaken as yet for the following reasons.

4. Immediately after my arrival in the Colony I was addressed by the Director of Public Works by a letter dated 29th November, 1898, in which he urged that some understanding should be arrived at with the Jubilee Committee on the subject of the Jubilee Road, about which there was a deadlock, and suggested that the opinion of the Major-General who had administered the Government previous to my arrival should be asked for. The question at issue was whether the road was to be commenced at the West or the East of the Island. The westernmost section from Kennedy Town to Aberdeen would absorb all the funds subscribed, while many more miles could be made for that money round by the East.

5. The Trustees hold that they are bound by a resolution that the money was to be devoted to the construction of a road round the island, the first section of which was to be from Kennedy Town to Aberdeen round the Western promontory of Mount Davis. The Government bound themselves to continue the road until its completion after the money subscribed was exhausted, and some of the money subscribed was so subscribed after the resolution so binding the Trustees had been published.

6. As previous minutes showed that Major-General BLACK had, while ad- ministering the Government, expressed himself as opposed to this section on Military grounds, I referred the question to him on that point, and received his answer dated 2nd December, 1898. It is to be regretted that Major-General BLACK did not urge this Military objection when the proposition was made or before the laying of the memorial stone, at the point at which the road was to begin, by my pre- decessor, at which ceremony General BLACK was present.

172

6

7. However, a short time after the arrival of Major-General GASCOIGNE, I submitted the papers to him with a minute dated 13th January, 1899, and on the 17th January I received his answer, in which he agreed with Major-General BLACK that a road round Mount Davis near sea level would be highly undesirable in a Military sense.

8. As there is a considerable difference of opinion in the Colony as to the advisability of this road, apart from the Military aspect, I allowed the matter to rest, in the hope that the Trustees might see their way out of the difficulty by calling a meeting of the subscribers, but in the beginning of August I was informed that the Committee were preparing a statement to be submitted to you, which statement I received a few days after the receipt of your despatch. As the opinions of Major- General GASCOIGNE and of the Director of Public Works were mentioned I sent copies of the letter of the Committee to them for their observations. You will observe that Major-General GASCOIGNE's views are materially modified, and his last minute does not convey to me that there would be any serious Military objection to the road.

9. Personally, as I have stated in my minute, apart from Military considera- tion, I see no reason why the road should not be first made in accordance with the resolution, especially as the Government is bound to continue the road until its completion round the island, but as the question has been submitted to you I think it better to forward with the letter of the Committee all the correspondence and minutes in the case that you may have an opportunity of seeing it in all its bearings, and, as Major-General GASCOIGNE intimates the probability in his last minute that the construction of the road may probably necessitate some alteration in the scheme of defence you may consider it advisable to have the views of the Defence Com- mittee on the subject. I may add that the statement in the letter of the Committee as to the position of the proposed road and the extremely rugged character of the shore is quite correct.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient, humble Servant,

:

.

{

-

The Right Honourable

JOSEPH CHAMBERLAIN, M.P.,

&c.,

&c.,

&c.

H. A. BLAKE,

Governor.

No. 94 G.

Şir,

(Governor to General Officer Commanding.)

GOVERNMENT HOUSE, HONGKONG, 30th November, 1898.

I have the honour to enquire whether in Your Excellency's opinion there is any Military objection to the construction of the Victoria Jubilee Road between Kennedy Town and Aberdeen by carrying it round Mount Davis on the sea side.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

HENRY A. BLAKE, Governor.

His Excellency

Major-General BLACK, C.B.

7

From Major-General Wilsone Black, C.B.,

To His Excellency Sir H. A. Blake, G.C.M.G., &c., &c.

HEAD QUARTER HOUSE,

173

SIR,

2nd December, 1898.

In answer to Your Excellency's letter of the 30th ultimo, No. 94-G, I have the honour to state that the slopes of Mount Davis between Sandy Bay and Ken- nedy Town are so steep and rugged that no formed body of soldiers could move along them at night.

II. If a broad level road were constructed from Sandy Bay to Kennedy Town, a force landed under cover of darkness anywhere between these points could move easily and rapidly to the latter place.

III. I am, therefore, of opinion that it is inadvisable on Military grounds, to give an enemy an easier method of access to the town of Victoria.

IV. I have seen it stated that a small fort or work might be built to defend the road, and that the fire from Belcher's Battery would sweep it, and would an- swer that the small garrison of Hongkong cannot afford to detach men to defend yet another work, and that during darkness the fire from Belchers would be of little avail.

:

V. Perhaps I may be allowed to add some further remarks as the subject was often before me as Officer Administering the Government, before Your Excellency's arrival. One reason advanced for the construction of this section is the statement that people subscribed to the Jubilee Fund on the understanding that this section was to be first constructed. I can only say on this head that my strong impression is that no condition of this nature was set forth on the subscription list put before me, and that this impression prevails amongst all those whom I have asked on this point.

VI. I need not dwell on the great expense of this section as compared with the others, on the unlikelihood of any one using this road in summer, fully exposed to the Westering Sun-on the apparent absurdity of a road following an indented coast line when a thoroughly good and shorter road already exists, or on the un- pleasant neighbourhood of the two plague cemeteries, but I would lay considerable stress on the fact that such a road would necessitate the removal of the temporary Plague Hospitals at Kennedy Town, for, I venture to say, that there is no other site in the Colony so isolated or in every way so convenient for the treatment of this terrible disease.

VII. The need of the Colony is to have a road round the Island as soon as possible. This will be effected by beginning simultaneously from Shaukiwan and from Aberdeen, and sanitary reasons favour an immediate beginning, for the scheme includes filling in the Inlet between Aberdeen and Little Hongkong, to which the Medical men ascribe the Malaria that has made this neighbourhood and that of Magazine Gap so unhealthy. These sections finished, and easier gradients secured by a slight deviation of the present Pokfulam road, the Jubilee road will be com- plete.

After that, if found desirable, it will be time enough to undertake the heavy expense of a needless carriage way round Mount Davis.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your obedient Servant,

W. BLACK,

Major-General.

174

No. 2250.

SIR,

(Colonial Secretary to Chairman, Jubilee Committee.)

COLONIAL SECRETARY'S OFFICE,

HONGKONG, 7th December, 1898.

I am directed to transmit, for the information and consideration of the Jubilee Committee, the enclosed extract from a letter addressed by Major-General BLACK, C.B., to His Excellency the Governor urging certain military objections to the pro- posal to carry the Victoria Jubilee Road round Mount Davis on the sea-side.

His Excellency trusts that the Committee will attach due weight to General BLACK's remarks,

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

T. SERCOMBE SMITH,

-

Acting Colonial Secretary.

Honourable C. P. CHATER, C.M.G.,

Chairman, Jubilee Committee.

SIR,

(Chairman, Jubilee Committee, to Acting Colonial Secretary.)

HONGKONG, 6th January, 1899.

I have the honour to inform you that the Jubilee Committee have given to your

letter of the 7th December last the fullest consideration. They regret to say that they find themselves unable to accede to the suggestion as to the new road, conveyed in His Excellency Major-General BLACK's letter of the 2nd December last.

They are Trustees of the monies raised for the purpose of constructing "the first section of the carriage road from Kennedy Town to Aberdeen" and this road the Government undertook, with the approbation of the Secretary of State for the Colonies, and without objection on the part of the Military Authorities, "to commence forthwith and to carry on the remaining portion of the road until com- pleted."

The Committee earnestly hope that the promise of the Government will be kept, and the work commenced at once.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your obedient Servant,

C. P. CHATER, Chairman, Jubilee Committee.

The Honourable,

T. SERCOMBE SMITH,

Acting Colonial Secretary.

No. 82 G.

SIR,

9

(Governor to General Officer Commanding.)

175

GOVERNMENT HOUSE, HONGKONG, 19th September, 1899.

I have the honour to forward to Your Excellency the enclosed copy of a letter addressed by the Chairman of the Jubilee Committee to the Secretary of State for the Colonies, on the subject of the projected road round the Island of Hongkong which was intended to commemorate the sixtieth anniversary of Her Majesty's Accession.

I shall be glad to receive from Your Excellency any remarks on this subject which you may feel disposed to offer.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

His Excellency

Major-General W. J. GASCOIGNE, C.M.G.,

&c.,

&c.,

&c.

HENRY A. BLAKE, Governor, &c.

(Minute by the General Officer Commanding.)

YOUR EXCELLENCY,

I do not know that I have anything to add to my previous remarks.

It was a matter of regret to me that the first opinion I was called upon to express officially after my arrival in the Colony should be unfavourable to a scheme which it appeared was desired by a large number of residents.

There can be no question whatever that the making of this road would not be a source of strength, in a defensive sense, but rather the reverse.

It would be an increase of anxiety, and would probably necessitate some alteration in the scheme of defence. Therefore, any Military Commander, if asked whether he preferred that the road should or should not be made, would be bound to reply that he preferred that it should not be. At the same time if Your Excel- lency informed me that to make this road would satisfy a great and pressing need for the Colony generally, I should not consider the Military objections to be so imperative as to necessitate my urgent protest against it.

I can add nothing more to this.

W. J. GASCOIGNE, Major-General.

22nd September, 1899.

471

No. 28

1900

HONGKONG.

FURTHER CORRESPONDENCE ON THE SUBJECT OF THE JUBILEE ROAD ROUND THE ISLAND.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government.

(Acting Colonial Secretary to Chairman, Jubilee Committee.)

COLONIAL SECRETARY'S OFFIce,

No. 587.

SIR,

HONGKONG, 6th April, 1900.

With reference to the Colonial Secretary's letter No. 1689 of the 3rd of October last, I am directed to transmit to you for the information of the Jubilee Committee the enclosed copy of a despatch from the Secretary of State for the Colonies in answer to the Governor's despatch No. 274 of the 27th of September last, in which was forwarded the statement which you submitted on behalf of the Jubilee Committee under date of the 15th of the same month on the subject of the proposed construction of a road from Kennedy Town to Aberdeen.

The conditions upon which the Military Authorities are prepared to withdraw their objections to the road are as follows:-

(a.) The road to follow generally the 150' contour.

(b.) The revetments on the seaward side of the road to form a 3' parapet. (c.) The platforms over any nullahs the road may cross to be easily

removeable, and

(d.) Projections to be formed at points suitable to serve as gun posi-

tions.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

The Honourable

C. P. CHATER, C.M.G.,

HONGKONG.

No. 56.

Chairman, Jubilee Committee.

(Secretary of State to Governor.)

F. H. MAY, Acting Colonial Secretary.

DOWNING STREET,

SIR,

28th February, 1900.

I have the honour to acknowledge the receipt of your despatch No. 274 of the 27th September last, forwarding copy of correspondence relating to the projected construction of a road round the island of Hongkong in commemoration of the sixtieth anniversary of Her Majesty's Accession to the throne.

472

2. Subject to the military considerations of which you are separately advised, I am prepared to concur in the opinion expressed in paragraph 9 of your despatch under acknowledgment; assuming that the Trustees of the subscribers consider that they are bound by Resolution Three of the Jubilee Committee, and do not see their way to adopt Mr. ORMSBY's suggestion, which would have seemed preferable on other grounds, and begin the work at the Shaukiwan end.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient, humble Servant,

Governor,

Sir HENRY A. Blake, G.C.M.G.,

&C.

&c.,

&c.

J. CHAMBERLAIN.

:

SIR,

(Chairman, Jubilee Committee, to Acting Colonial Secretary.)

HONGKONG, 25th May, 1900.

In reply to your letter No. 587 of the 6th April, enclosing a copy of a despatch from the Secretary of State for the Colonies on the subject of the proposed con- struction of a road from Kennedy Town to Aberdeen, I have the honour to inform you that at a meeting held on the 18th instant, the Jubilee Committee (Executive) carefully considered the conditions upon which the Military Authorities are pre- pared to withdraw their objections to the road, and that the Committee see no reason why these conditions should not be complied with.

2. There has already been too much delay in starting the road, and the Com- mittee strongly urge that the preparation of working plans, specification, &c. may now be put in hand at once, and that tenders may be called for and the work com- menced at as early a date as possible.

3. The Committee further express the hope that in the event of the Public Works Department being too short-handed to make an immediate start, the matter may be referred back to them with a view to the employment of a local firm of Engineers, it being distinctly understood that the plans must be approved by the Director of Public Works who would also exercise a general supervision.

4. It is presumed that, in any case, before tenders are called for, the plans will be submitted to the Jubilee Committee for any remarks they may may have

to make.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your obedient Servant,

C. P. CHATER, Chairman, Jubilee Committee.

Honourable

F. H. MAY, C.M.G.,

Acting Colonial Secretar,

&c.,

&c.,

&c.

(Acting Colonial Secretary to Chairman, Jubilee Committee.)

473

:

;

No. 979.

SIR,

COLONIAL SECRETARY'S OFFICE,

HONGKONG, 31st May, 1900.

I am directed to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 25th instant, stating that the Executive Committee of the Jubilee Committee had, at a meeting held on the 18th instant, considered the conditions upon which the Military Authorities are prepared to withdraw their objections to the construction of the road from Kennedy Town round Mount Davis to Aberdeen, being the first section of a carriage road round the Island of Hongkong in commemoration of the sixtieth anniversary of Her Majesty's Accession to the throne, and saw no reason why such conditions should not be complied with.

You further state on behalf of the Committee that it is desirable that steps should be taken at once for the commencement of the work of construction and that, if the Public Works Department are not in a position to undertake the work, the matter should be referred back to the Committee with a view to the employ- ment of a local firm of Engineers for the purpose.

In reply, I am to inform you that the Director of Public Works has no officer he can spare for the work, and that the Government accepts the suggestion that the Committee should itself make arrangements for the construction of the road on the distinct understanding that the plans, specifications, and tender for the road must be first approved by the Director of Public Works and that the work of construction is placed under the general supervision of that officer.

I have further to state that the Government concurs in the suggestion contained in the last paragraph of your letter under reply.

I am to add that the Director of Public Works is of opinion that a rough trace of the road with no steeper gradient than 1 in 20 (made with a road tracer) should be opened in the first instance to prove if the proposed road is practicable. If the trace is approved by the Director of Public Works the proper survey and section for the road could then be made, and I am to enquire whether the Committee are prepared to adopt the Director of Public Works' suggestion.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

i

The Honourable

C. P. CHATER, C.M.G.,

Chairman, Jubilee Committee.

F. H. MAY, Acting Colonial Secretary.

(Chairman, Jubilee Committee, to Acting Colonial Secretary.)

HONGKONG, 13th June, 1900.

SIR,

In reply to your letter of 31st May, I have the honour to inform you that the Jubilee Committee are prepared to adopt the suggestions of the Director of

474

Public Works to cut a rough trace of the Mount Davis section of the Jubilee Road in the first instance, with no steeper grade than 1 in 20, to prove if the pro- posed road is practicable.

Messrs. DENISON & RAM have been instructed to do this work and to apply to the Director of Public Works for a permit. It is proposed to employ this Firm subsequently to make the proper survey and to carry out the work.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your obedient Servant,

C. P. CHATER,

Chairman, Jubilee Committee.

Hon. F. H. May, c.m.g.,

Acting Colonial Secretary.

:

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 1.

THURSDAY, 15TH FEBRUARY, 1900.

1

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(Sir HENRY ARTHUR BLAKE, G.C.M.G.).

His Excellency Major-General WILLIAM JULIUS GASCOIGNE, C.M.G., General Officer Commanding. The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.).

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

">

the Harbour Master, (ROBERT MURRAY RUMSEY, R.N.).

""

""

""

15

""

:

""

10

""

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON). the Director of Public Works, (ROBERT DALY ORMSBY). ARTHUR WIMBOLT BREWIN, (Inspector of Schools). CATCHICK PAUL CHATER, C.M.G.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS, C.M.G.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

WEI YUK.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 28th December, 1899, were read and confirmed. NEW MEMBER.-Mr. A. W. BREWIN took his seat as a Member of the Council, after having taken the Oath prescribed by Ordinance No. 4 of 1869.

PAPERS. The Acting Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following papers :—

1. Protest by the Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD against "The Summoning of Chinese

Ordinance" (No. 40 of 1899), and the Colonial Secretary's Memorandum thereon.

2. Despatches relative to the Salaries of Officers in the Government Service.

3. Report on the Widows' and Orphans' Pension Fund for the

4. Report of the Director of the Observatory for 1899.

year 1899.

5. Secretary of State's Despatch on the subject of Short-period Leases of Crown Lands.

6. Papers on the subject of the Jubilee Road round the Island.

7. Report of the Pó Léung Kuk Society for the year ending 31st December, 1899.

Dr. HO KAI addressed the Council in regard to Mr. WHITEHEAD's protest.

His Excellency addressed the Council.

Mr. WHITEHEAD also addressed the Council.

FINANCIAL MINUTES.-The Acting Colonial Secretary, by Command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following Financial Minutes, (Nos. 1 to 6), and moved that they be referred to the Finance Committee:-

C.S.O.

190 of 1900.

C.S.O.

13 of 1900.

HENRY A. BLAKE.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Four thousand and Three hundred Dollars ($4,300) to meet the expenditure for the erection of a Chair Shelter at the Peak.

Government House, Hongkong, 18th January, 1900.

HENRY A. BLAKE.

The Governor recommends the Council to re-vote the sum of Eighteen thousand Five hundred (Extension) and Twenty-five Dollars and Fifty-two Cents ($18,525.52) to cover the expenses incurred by the Public Works Department in connection with the works, &c. in the New Territory.

Government House, Hongkong, 26th January, 1900.

Note. The above is the unexpended balance of the sum previously voted.

,

2

C.5.0.*

202 of 1900.

HENRY A. BLAKE.

The Governor recommends the Council to re-vote the following sums being unexpended balances of the Votes for 1899 under the heading "Extraordinary Public Works

1. Public Works Department Store,

2. Disinfector Station, &c.,

3. Public Latrines,.

4. City of Victoria, Water Works, &c.,

5. Quarters for Gaol Staff,

6. Electric Lighting Government House,.......... 7. Pokfulum Conduit Road,

..$ 4,064.86

1,597.84

5,000.00

19,637.26

4,000.00

685.50

3,768.74

Total,.......

.$38,754.20

C.S.O.

2895 of 1899.

C.S.O.

138 of 1900.

Government House, Hongkong, 30th January, 1900.

HENRY A. BLAKE.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Eight thousand and Two hundred Dollars ($8,200) to meet the expenditure for extending the large storm-water nullah at Yau- mati, north of the Pumping Station.

Government House, Hongkong, 6th February, 1900.

HENRY A. BLAKE,

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Seven thousand Dollars ($7,000) (Extension.) to cover expenses incurred in the New Territory for the current year.

Government House, Hongkong, 9th February, 1900.

The Attorney General seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

REPORT OF THE PUBLIC WORKS COMMITTEE.-The Director of Public Works laid on the table the Report of the Public Works Committee dated the 3rd January, 1900, (No. 1).

QUESTIONS.-Mr. WHITEHEAD, pursuant to notice, asked the following questions:-

(1.) Will the Honourable the Colonial Secretary lay upon the table a copy of the general instructions received from the Secretary of State under which Crown Leases were granted to the Lee Hing Company for the dredging and collection of shells in and around Ping Chau Island in the New Territory as stated by him in Council on 14th December last, and a copy of the said Leases?

(2.) Will the Honourable the Director of Public Works inform the Council of the cause of the prolonged delay in constructing the shelter for the Chinese Chair Coolies at Victoria Gap the upper terminus of the Peak Tramway, and whether this urgently needed work cannot be proceeded with without further delay?

(3.) Will the Honourable the Colonial Secretary lay on the table a copy of the correspondence which has passed since May, 1899, between the Colonial Office and the Hongkong Govern- ment, also a copy of the letter, dated 15th September last, from the Jubilee Committee here to the Secretary of State for the Colonies and a copy of the latter's reply thereto, in con- nection with the road proposed in 1897, to be constructed round the Island to commemorate the 60th year's reign of Her Majesty Queen Victoria ?

The Acting Colonial Secretary replied to the first and last questions.

The Director of Public Works replied to the second question.

CONTRIBUTION TO THE SOUTH AFRICAN WAR FUND.-The Acting Colonial Secretary moved that the Orders of the Day be suspended, and moved the following resolution :-

"That this Council devote the sum of $50,000 as a contribution towards the South African War Fund at present being raised by the Lord Mayor of London, and that the distribution and allocation of the said sum be left wholly to the discretion of the adminis- trators of the fund."

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Mr. CHATER addressed the Council supporting the resolution. Mr. WHITEHEAD addressed the Council.

Dr. Ho KAI addressed the Council.

Mr. BELILIOs addressed the Council.

His Excellency addressed the Council. Question-put and agreed to unanimously.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO FURTHER AMEND THE POST OFFICE ORDINANCE, 1887.-The Attorney General moved the first reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE FOR THE NATURALIZATION OF Wan Kam TsunG, alias WAN TSING KAI, alias WAN MING KAP.-The Attorney General moved the first reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO FURTHER AMEND THE PUBLIC HEALTH ORDINANCE, 1887.- The Attorney General moved the first reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO AUTHORIZE THE IMPOSITION OF FEES FOR THE ISSUE BY THE GOVERNMENT OF HONGKONG OF CERTAIN CERTIFICATES TO CERTAIN CHINESE.-The Attorney General moved the first reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE FOR THE ESTABLISHMENT OF A HOSPITAL FOR INFECTIOUS DISEASES IN CONNECTION WITH THE TUNG WA HOSPITAL.-The Attorney General moved the first reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

ADJOURNMENT.—The Council then adjourned until Monday, the 5th March, 1900, at 3 p.m.

Read and confirmed, this 5th day of March, 1900.

R. F. JOHNSTON, Acting Clerk of Councils.

t

HENRY A. BLAKE,

Governor.

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 2.

MONDAY, 5TH MARCH, 1900.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(Sir HENRY ARTHUR BLAKE, G.C.M.G.).

His Excellency Major-General WILLIAM JULIUS GASCOIGNE, C.M.G., General Officer Commanding. The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.).

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the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

the Harbour Master, (ROBERT MURRAY RUMSEY, R.N.).

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON).

the Director of Public Works, (ROBERT DALY ORMSBY). ARTHUR WIMBOLT BREWIN.

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER, C.M.G.

Ho KAI, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD. EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS, C.M.G. JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

WEI YUK.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last two Meetings, held on the 15th and 28th February, 1900, were read and confirined.

PAPER.The Acting Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following paper :-

Report of the Superintendent of Victoria Gaol for 1899.

FINANCIAL MINUTES.--The Acting Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following Financial Minutes, (Nos. 7 and 8), and moved that they be referred to the Finance Committee:-

C.S.O.

42 of 1900.

HENRY A. BLAKE.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Three thousand Six hundred and Sixty Dollars ($3,660) being compensation to the Dairy Farm Company, Limited, for the loss of certain cattle at "Sassoon's Villa."

Government House, Hongkong, 13th February, 1900.

HENRY A. BLAKE.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One thousand Dollars (Extension.) to meet the expenditure for extending the Telephone line in the New Territory.

Government House, Hongkong, 24th February, 1900.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question--put and agreed to.

($1,000)

REPORT OF THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Acting Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the report of the Finance Committee dated the 15th February, 1900, (No. I), and moved its adoption.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

QUESTIONS.-Mr. WHITEHEAD, pursuant to notice, asked the following questions :—

(1.) Will the Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary inform the Council whether any report was made by the late Acting Attorney General on Ordinance No. 40 of 1899, entitled "An Ordinance to provide for the Summoning of Chinese before the Registrar General,' and on my Protest in connection with the said Ordinance; and, if so, will the Government lay a copy of such reports on the table; and, if not, why not?

(2.) Will the Honourable the Director of Public Works inform the Council whether it is still the intention of the Government to carry out the original plans for the improvement of the grounds in the Wong-Nei-Chong Valley by diverting the course of the stream and complet- ing the filling in and levelling of the Bowrington end so as to make one recreation ground extending from side to side of the Valley; and, if not, what are the reasons for further delaying the completion of the work?

The Acting Colonial Secretary replied to the first question. The Director of Public Works replied to the second question.

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6

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE FOR THE NATURALIZATION OF CAPITOLINO JOÃO XAVIER.-The Attorney General moved the first reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE FOR THE NATURALIZATION OF FOO SIK alias Foo YIK PAN.-The Attorney General moved the first reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO FURTHER AMEND THE POST OFFICE ORDINANCE, 1887.-The Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed and Bill reported with amendments.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE for the NatuRALIZATION OF WAN KAM TSUNG, alias WAN TSING KAI, alias WAN MING KAP.-The Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed and Bill reported without amendment.

The Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO FURTHER AMEND THE PUBLIC HEALTH ORDINANCE, 1887.- The Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Dr. Ho Kat addressed the Council and opposed the second reading of the Bill.

Mr. BELILIOS seconded.

The Acting Colonial Secretary addressed the Council.

Question-that the Bill be read a second time was then put.

Council divided.

For.

His Excellency the Major-General Commanding.

The Acting Colonial Secretary.

The Attorney General.

Against.

Mr. CHATER.

Dr. Ho KAI.

Mr. BELILIOS.

Mr. WEI YUK.

The Harbour Master.

The Colonial Treasurer.

The Director of Public Works.

Mr. A. W. BREWIN

Mr. WHITEHEAD.

Mr. KESWICK.

Motion carried by a majority of five.

Bill read a second time.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed and Bill reported with amendments.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO AUTHORIZE THE IMPOSITION OF FEES FOR THE ISSUE BY THE GOVERNMENT OF HONGKONG OF CERTAIN CERTIFICATES TO CERTAIN CHINESE.-The Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed and Bill reported with amendinents.

.

Y

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE for the ESTABLISHMENT OF A HOSPITAL FOR INFECTIOUS DISEASES IN CONNECTION WITH THE TUNG WA HOSPITAL.-The Attorney General inoved the second reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question--put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed and Bill reported without amendment.

The Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

ADJOURNMENT. The Council then adjourned until Thursday, the 8th March, 1900, at 3 p.m.

Read and confirmed, this 8th day of March, 1900.

R. F. JOHNSTON, Acting Clerk of Councils.

HENRY A. BLAKE,

Governor.

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL,

COUNCIL, No. 3.

THURSDAY, 8TH MARCH, 1900.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(Sir HENRY ARTHUR BLAKE, G.C.M.G.).

His Excellency Major-General WILLIAM JULIUS GASCOIGNE, C.M.G., General Officer Commanding. The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.).

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* * * * * *

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON).

the Director of Public Works, (ROBERT DALY ORMSBY).

ARTHUR WIMBOLT BREWIN.

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER, C.M.G.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS, C.M.G. WEI YUK.

The Honourable JAMES JOHnstone KeswICK.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

ABSENT:

:

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 5th March, 1900, were read and confirmed. PAPERS.-The Acting Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following papers :---

1. Report of the Head Master of Queen's College and of the Examiners appointed by the

Governing Body for 1899.

2. Report of the Captain Superintendent of Police for the

year 1899.

FINANCIAL MINUTES.-The Acting Colonial Secretary, by Command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following Financial Minute, (No. 9), and moved that it be referred to the Finance Committee:--

C. O. Desp. 280 of 1899.

HENRY A. BLAKE.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Twenty-six thousand One hundred and Eighty-nine Dollars ($26,189) to defray during the current year the increases in salaries of Government Officials sanctioned in the Secretary of State's Despatch No. 280 of 8th Decem- ber, 1899.

Government House, Hongkong, 3rd March, 1900,

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

REPORT OF THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Acting Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the report of the Finance Committee dated 5th March, 1900, (No. 2), and moved its adoption.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

RESOLUTION.-The Attorney General gave notice that, at the next meeting, he would move the following resolution:-

Whereas by section 6 of The New Territories Regulation Ordinance (No. 12 of 1899), it was enacted that the said Ordinance should remain in force for the period of one year from the date of its coming into operation, and for such further period or periods as might, from time to time, be determined by resolution of the Legislative Council :

And whereas it is desirable that the said Ordinance should be continued in force for a further period of one year:

It is hereby resolved by this Council that The New Territories Regulation Ordinance shall be continued in force for the further period of one year from the 18th day of April, 1900 (inclusive).

10

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE FOR THE NATURALIZATION OF CAPITOLINO JOÃO XAVIER.-The Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded. Question--put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed and Bill reported without amendment.

The Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE FOR THE NATURALIZATION OF FOO SIK alias Foo YIK PAN.-The Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed and Bill reported without amendment.

The Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO FURTHER AMEND THE POST OFFICE ORDINANCE, 1887.-The Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO FURTHER AMEND THE PUBLIC HEALTH ORDINANCE, 1887.- The Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO AUTHORIZE THE IMPOSITION OF FEES FOR THE ISSUE BY THE GOVERNMENT OF HONGKONG OF CERTAIN CERTIFICATES TO CERTAIN CHINESE.-The Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned until Thursday, the 15th March, 1900, at 3 p.m.

Read and confirmed, this 15th day of March, 1900.

R. F. JOHNSTON, Acting Clerk of Councils.

HENRY A. BLAKE,

Governor.

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LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 4.

THURSDAY, 15TH MARCH, 1900.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(Sir HENRY ARTHUR BLAKE, G.C.M.G.).

His Excellency Major-General WILLIAM JULIUS GASCOIGNE, C.M.G., General Officer Commanding. The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.).

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the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

the Harbour Master, (ROBERT MURRAY RUMSEY, R.N.). the Colonial Treasurer, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON).

the Director of Public Works, (Robert Daly Ormsby).

ARTHUR WIMBOLT BREWIN.

HILGROVE CLEMENT NIColle.

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER, C.M.G.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS, C.M.G.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

WEI YUK.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 8th March, 1900, were read and confirmed.

11

NEW MEMBER.Mr. H. C. NICOLLE took his seat as a Member of the Council, after having taken the Oath prescribed by Ordinance No. 4 of 1869.

PAPERS. The Acting Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following papers :—

1. Coroner's Returns, for the year 1899.

year 1899.

2. Report of the Superintendent of the Fire Brigade, for the RESOLUTION.-The Attorney General moved the following resolution :

Whereas by section 6 of The New Territories Regulation Ordinance (No. 12 of 1899), it was enacted that the said Ordinance should remain in force for the period of one year from the date of its coming into operation, and for such further period or periods as might, from time to time, be determined by resolution of the Legislative Council:

And whereas it is desirable that the said Ordinance should be continued in force for a

further period of one year:

It is hereby resolved by this Council that The New Territories Regulation Ordinance shall be continued in force for the further period of one year from the 18th day of April, 1900 (inclusive).

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

QUESTION. Mr. WHITEHEAD gave notice that, at the next meeting, he would ask the following question:

Ilas the attention of the Honourable the Director of Public Works been directed to the dangerous condition of Yee Woo Street at the corner of Mr. Kennedy's Horse Repository at Causeway Bay and alongside the site of the proposed new Laundry to be erected there; and to the fact that the southeast boundary stone of the latter lot projects some six inches above the level of the ground and has been placed well nigh in the middle of the road; and to the fact that on the south side a drain has been dug of considerable depth, without any protection; and will the Honourable member inform the Council why this state of matters is permitted to continue? RESOLUTION.-Mr. WHITEHEAD gave notice that, at the next meeting, he would move the follow- ing resolution :--

That the Honourable the Colonial Secretary lay upon the table a copy of the Crown Leases granted last autumn to the Lee Hing Company for the dredging and collecting of shells in and around Ping Chau Island in the New Territory, asked for in my question of 15th February last.

12

--

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO FACILITATE THE HEARING, DETERMINATION, AND SETTLEMENT OF LAND CLAIMS IN THE NEW TERRITORIES, to establish a Land CourT, AND FOR OTHER PURPOSES. The Attorney General laid on the table his report as Chairman of the Standing Law Committee on the New Territories Land Court Bill, addressed the Council, and moved that the Council go into Committee to consider the Bill clause by clause.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Mr. WHITEHEAD addressed the Council and moved that the Council resume in order that Mem- bers may have the opportunity of considering the Bill with the amendments of the Law Committee thereon.

Mr. CHATER seconded.

Question that the Council do resolve itself into Committee-put and agreed to.

Mr. WHITEHEAD gave notice that he would lay on the table his protest against the ruling of the Council.

The Council then resolved itself into Committee.

Mr. WHITEHEAD moved that further consideration of clause 3 be postponed until the next meet- ing of Council.

Dr. Ho KAI seconded.

The result of a division was as follows:

For the motion.

Mr. WEI YUK,

Mr. WHITEHEAD,

Dr. Ho KAL

Against.

Mr. BREWIN.

Mr. NICOLLE.

Mr. KESWICK.

Mr. BELILIOS.

The motion was passed in the negative.

Mr. CHATER.

The Director of Public Works.

The Colonial Treasurer.

The Attorney General.

The Acting Colonial Secretary.

His Excellency the General Officer Commanding..

Council resumed and Bill reported with amendments.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned until Thursday, the 22nd March, 1900, at 3 p.m.

HENRY A. BLAKE,

Governor.

Read and confirmed, this 22nd day of March, 1900.

R. F. JOHNSTON,

Acting Clerk of Councils.

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LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 5.

THURSDAY, 22ND MARCII, 1900.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(Sir HENRY ARTHUR BLAKE, G.C.M.G.).

His Excellency Major-General WILLIAM JULIUS GASCOIGNE, C.M.G., General Officer Commanding. The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.).

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

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the Colonial Treasurer, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON).

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the Director of Public Works, (ROBERT DALY ORMSBY).

ARTHUR WINBOLT BREWIN.

HILGROVE CLEMENT NICOLLE.

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER, C.M.G.

Ho Kai, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS, C.M.G.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

""

WEI YUK.

13

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 15th March, 1900, were read and confirmed.

PROTEST.-Mr. WHITEHEAD, pursuant to notice, laid on the table his Protest in connection with the new Territories Land Court Bill.

FINANCIAL MINUTES.-The Acting Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following Financial Minutes, (Nos. 10, 11 and 12), and moved that they be referred to the Finance Committee:--

C.S.O.

56 of 1900.

HENRY A. BLAKE.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Fifty thousand Dollars ( $50,000), (Extension.) in aid of the vote "Taipo Road" (Public Works Extraordinary).

C.S.O.

62 of 1900.

Government House, Hongkong, 13th March, 1900.

HENRY A. BLAKE.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One thousand and Fifty Dollars (Extension.) ($1,050) for the Maintenance of Roads in New Territory.

C. O. Desp. 28 of 1900.

Government House, Hongkong, 16th March, 1900.

HENRY A. BLAKE.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Three thousand Three hundred and Eighty Dollars ($3,380) in aid of the following votes in the Sanitary Department:—

Salary for 2 Inspectors at $100 per mense each for 9 months, Rent Allowance for same at $30 per mensem each for 9 months, Approximate Incidental Conveyance Expenses,

.$1,900.00

570.00

320.00

210.00

Salary for 1 additional Clerk at $40 a month for 94 months,

380.00

Total,........

$3,380.00

Uniforms for Inspectors,...

Government House, Hongkong, 17th March, 1900.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

14

NOTICE OF QUESTION.-Mr. WHITEHEAD gave notice that, at the next meeting, he would ask the following question:-

Will the Honourable the Registrar General inform the Council whether it is a fact that the occupants of disorderly houses who had been moved out of houses in the Central districts and gone into houses to the West thereof are again being moved, and if so whether the movements have been or are being effected by virtue of orders made by the Magistrate or by the summary actions of the Police?

QUESTION. Mr. WHITEHEAD, pursuant to notice, asked the following question :-

Has the attention of the Honourable the Director of Public Works been directed to the dangerous condition of Yee Woo Street at the corner of Mr. Kennedy's Horse Repository at Causeway Bay and alongside the site of the proposed new Laundry to be erected there; and to the fact that the south-east boundary stone of the latter lot projects some six inches above the level of the ground and has been placed well nigh in the middle of the road; and to the fact that on the south side a drain has been dug of considerable depth, without any protection; and will the Honourable member inform the Council why this state of mitters is permitted to continue? The Director of Public Works replied as follows :--The question seems to refer, not to Yee Wo Street, in which no trench has been dug or boundary stone fixed, but to an unfinished road now under construction, leading to Tai Hang Village. The trench, two feet in depth, was opened in order that a water-main might be extended, the extension being rendered necessary by the sale of land in the neighbourhood. The boundary stone is not in the middle of any road, but correctly marks the boundary of land sold some time ago. While a road is in an incomplete state, the persons who elect to use it must necessarily suffer some inconvenience.

RESOLUTION.Mr. WHITEHEAD, pursuant to notice, moved the following Resolution, and addressed the Council:-

That the Honourable the_Colonial Secretary lay upon the table a copy of the Crown Leases granted last autumn to the Lee Hing Company for the dredging and collecting of shells in and around Ping Chau Island in the New Territory, asked for in my question of 15th February last.

The Acting Colonial Secretary addressed the Council.

His Excellency the Governor addressed the Council.

The motion was not seconded.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO FACILITATE THE HEARING, DETERMINATION AND SETTLEMENT OF LAND CLAIMS IN THE NEW TERRITORIES, TO ESTABLISH A LAND COURT, AND FOR OTHER PURPOSES. The Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Mr. WHITEHEAD addressed the Council, and moved, as an amendment, that the Bill be recommitted. The motion was not seconded.

Question-that the Bill be read a third time was then put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

ADJOURNMENT.—The Council then adjourned until Thursday, the 29th March, 1900, at 3 p.m.

Read and confirmed, this 29th day of March, 1900.

R. F. JOHNSTON,

Acting Clerk of Councils.

HENRY A. BLAKE,

Governor.

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 6.

THURSDAY, 29TH MARCH, 1900.

15

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(Sir HENRY ARTHUR BLAKE, G.C.M.G.).

His Excellency Major-General WILLIAM JULIUS GASCOIGNE, C.M.G., General Officer Commanding. The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.).

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON).

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the Director of Public Works, (ROBERT DALY ORMSBY).

ARTHUR WINBOLT BREWIN.

HILGROVE CLEMENT NICOLLE.

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER, C.M.G.

12

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

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THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD. WEI YUK.

ABSENT:

The Honourable EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS, C.M.G.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 22nd March, 1900, were read and confirmed.

REPORT OF THE FINANCE COMMITTEE. The Acting Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the report of the Finance Committee dated 22nd March, 1900, (No. 4), and moved its adoption.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

FINANCIAL MINUTE.-The Acting Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following Financial Minute, (No. 13), and moved that it be referred to the Finance Committee:

HENRY A. BLAKE:

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Thirteen thousand Dollars ($13,000) to cover the cost of increases on salaries for Chinese employees of the Government, sanctioned by the telegram from the Secretary of State of the 24th February, 1900.

Government House, Hongkong, 26th March, 1900.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

QUESTION.In the absence of Mr. WHITEHEAD, Mr. CHATER put the following question, of which notice had been given at the previous meeting:-

Will the Honourable the Registrar General inform the Council whether it is a fact that the occupants of disorderly houses who had been moved out of houses in the Central districts and gone into houses to the West thereof are again being moved, and if so whether the movements have been or are being effected by virtue of orders made by the Magistrate or by the summary actions of the Police?

The Acting Colonial Secretary replied as follows:-"The houses to the east of Whitty Street are being moved, and the movements are being effected by virtue of orders issued by the Acting Registrar General."

BILL TO AMEND THE ARMS ORDINANCE.-On the motion of the Attorney General, the Council went into Committee to consider the Bill entitled An Ordinance to amend and consolidate the law relating to the carriage and possession of arms and ammunition.

Council resumed and Bill reported with amendments.

PETITION.-Mr. WHITEHEAD addressed the Council, and presented a Petition from Ladies of Hongkong and Kowloon against the rise of prices in Food Stuffs.

"

16

NOTICE OF RESOLUTION.-Mr. WHITEHEAD gave notice that, at the next meeting, he would move the following Resolution :-

That a Committee be appointed to enquire into the continuous rise in the market prices of most

necessaries of life such as meat, fish, and garden produce, and to report.

SALARIES OF SUBORDINATE OFFICIALS.-His Excellency_the_Governor addressed the Council, and announced that he had nominated Messrs. R. M. GRAY, D. GILLIES and R. SHEWAN to form a Committee to enquire into the subject of the Salaries of Subordinate Officers.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned until Thursday, the 5th April, 1900, at 3 p.m.

Read and confirmed, this 5th day of April, 1900.

R. F. JOHNSTON, Acting Clerk of Councils.

WILLIAM J. GASCOIGNE,

Officer Administering the Government.

I

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 7.

THURSDAY, 5TH APRIL, 1900.

17

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE OFFICER ADMINISTERING THE GOVERNMENT (Major-General WILLIAM JULIUS GASCOIGNE, C.M.G.).

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (FRANCIS HENRY May, C.M.G.).

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

""

""

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON).

97

""

""

""

?"

19

the Director of Public Works, (Robert Daly Ormsby).

ARTHUR WINBOLT BREWIN.

HILGROVE CLEMENT NICOLLE.

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER, C.M.G.

Ilo KAI, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS, C.M.G.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK,

WEI YUK.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

His Excellency the General Officer Commanding the Troops addressed the Council, on his taking the chair as the Officer Administering the Government.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 29th March, 1900, were read and confirmed. PAPER.-The Acting Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Officer Administer- ing the Government, laid on the table the following paper :--

Report on the New Territory during the first year of British Administration.

FINANCIAL MINUTE.--The Acting Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government, laid on the table the following Financial Minute, (No. 14), and moved that it be referred to the Finance Committee:--

C. O. Desp.

36 of 1900.

HENRY A. BLAKE.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Two hundred and forty Dollars ($240), being an allowance granted to Inspector JOHN LEE of the Registrar General's Depart-

ment.

Government House, Hongkong, 28th March, 1900.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

REPORT OF THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Acting Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government, laid on the table the report of the Finance Committee dated the 29th March, 1900, (No. 5), and moved its adoption.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Mr. WHITEHEAD addressed the Council.

The Acting Colonial Secretary addressed the Council.

Mr. CHATER addressed the Council.

Question-was then put and agreed to.

NOTICE OF QUESTIONS.-Mr. WHITEHEAD gave notice that, at the next meeting of Council, he would ask the following questions:-

(1.) Does the Government, in view of the fact that a large area of recently cut soil is exposed all round the building, consider it safe to send boys into the "Belilios' Reformatory" at Causeway Bay at any time within the next two years?

(2.) Will the Government before sending any boys into the Reformatory, obtain a detailed medical

report as to the sanitary condition of the surroundings of the Reformatory?

18

RESOLUTION.-Mr. WHITEHEAD addressed the Council, and, pursuant to notice, moved the following Resolution :-

That a Committee be appointed to enquire into the continuous rise in the market prices of most

necessaries of life such as meat, fish, and garden produce, and to report.

Mr. KESWICK seconded.

Mr. WHITEHEAD suggested the names of certain gentlemen to form the Committee of Enquiry. The motion was put and carried, the Colonial Treasurer and Mr. NICOLLE Voting against it. It was agreed that the selection of the Committee be left to the discretion of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government.

BILL TO AMEND THE ARMS ORDINANCE.-The Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill entitled An Ordinance to amend and consolidate the law relating to the carriage, movement, and possession of arms and ammunition.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Mr. CHATER addressed the Council.

The Attorney General addressed the Council.

Mr. WHITEHEAD addressed the Council, and moved as an amendment that the Bill be re-committed for the purpose of adding a clause postponing, for six months, its coming into operation.

The Attorney General addressed the Council.

Dr. Ho KAI addressed the Council, and seconded the amendment.

His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government addressed the Council.

The amendment was then put, and Council divided as follows:--

For the amendment.

Mr. WEI YUK.

Mr. BELILIOS.

Mr. WHITEHEAD.

Mr. KESWICK.

Dr. Ho KAI.

Against the amendment.

Mr. CHATER.

Mr. NICOLLE,

Mr. BREWIN.

The Director of Public Works. The Colonial Treasurer.

The Attorney General.

The Acting Colonial Secretary.

The amendment was lost by a majority of two votes.

Mr. WHITEHEAD addressed the Council, and moved that the Bill be re-committed for the purpose of having a clause inserted whereby the fees of $1,200 shall not be payable until the 1st of January,

1901.

Mr. BELILIOS seconded.

The amendment was then put, and Council divided as follows:

For the amendment.

Mr. WEI YUK.

Mr. BELILIOS.

Mr. WHITEHEAD.

Dr. Ho KAI.

Against the amendment.

Mr. KESWICK.

Mr. CHATER.

Mr. NICOLLE.

Mr. BREWIN.

The Director of Public Works.

The Colonial Treasurer.

The Attorney General.

The Acting Colonial Secretary.

The amendment was lost by a majority of four votes. The Bill was then read a third time. Question put-that this Bill do pass. Bill passed.

ADJOURNMENT.—The Council then adjourned sine die.

Read and confirmed, this 12th day of April, 1900.

R. F. JoNSTON, Acting Clerk of Councils.

WILLIAM J. GASCOIGNE, Officer Administering the Government.

4

*

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 8.

WEDNESDAY, 11TH APRIL, 1900.

19

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE OFFICER ADMINISTERING THE GOVERNMENT (Major-General WILLIAM JULIUS GASCOIGNE, C.M.G.).

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.).

""

""

""

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON).

the Director of Public Works, (Robert Daly (RMSBY).

ARTHUR WINBOLT BREWIN.

HILGROVE CLEMENT NICOLLE.

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER, C.M.G.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS, C.M.G. JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK. WEI YUK.

ABSENT:

The Honourable THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

The Council met pursuant to summons.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 5th April, 1909, were read and confirmed.

NEW MEMBERS. Mr. May took his seat as Acting Colonial Secretary, after having taken the Oath prescribed by Ordinance 4 of 1869. Mr. BREWIN also took the Oath and his seat on his appointment as an Official Member of Council.

REPORT OF THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Acting Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government, laid on the table the Report of the Finance Committee dated the 5th April, 1900, (No. 6), and moved its adoption.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

QUESTIONS. Pursuant to notice, Mr. CHATER, in the absence of Mr. WHITEHEAD, asked the following questions:--

(1.) Does the Government, in view of the fact that a large area of recently cut soil is exposed all round the building, consider it safe to send boys into the "Belilios' Reformatory" at Causeway Bay at any time within the next two years?

(2.) Will the Government, before sending any boys into the Reformatory, obtain a detailed medical

report as to the sanitary condition of the surroundings of the Reformatory?

The Acting Colonial Secretary replied as follows :-

In answer to the first part of the question, I have to state large area of recently cut soil is exposed all round the building. Reformatory stands was cut years ago and no soil has been cut to eight months.

it is not the case that a The site on which the speak of within the last

In answer to the second part of the question, I have to state that undoubtedly the Govern- ment, before placing boys in the Reformatory, will obtain a medical report as to the fitness of the Institution for their reception. The site is not likely to be a feverish one, for the build- ings occupied by Europeans in the immediate vicinity are free from fever, and moreover I am informed by the architect that the workmen who have been engaged in erecting the building have not suffered from fever, which is a very hopeful sign. It has been generally found that when a building is going to be feverish the workmen engaged on it are subject

to fever.

VALIDATING BILL.-The Attorney General moved the first reading of a Bill entitled An Ordi- nance to validate and legalize the proceedings of the Legislative Council of this Colony during the time that Mr. ARTHUR WINBOLT BREWIN illegally sat as a member of such Council, under an invalid provisional appointment.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

The Attorney General moved the suspension of the Standing Rules and Orders. The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

20

The Attorney General addressed the Council, and moved the second reading of the Bill. The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed, and Bill reported without amendment.

The Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned sine die.

Read and confirmed, this 7th day of May, 1900.

R. F. JOHNSton, Acting Clerk of Councils.

WILLIAM J. GASCOIGNE, Officer Administering the Government.

4

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 9.

MONDAY, 7TH MAY, 1900.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE OFFICER ADMINISTERING THE GOVERNMENT, (Major-General WILLIAM JULIUS GASCOIGNE, C.M.G.).

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.).

""

""

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99.

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>>

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON).

the Director of Public Works, (ROBERT DALY ORMSBY).

ARTHUR WINBOLT BREWIN.

HILGROVE CLEMENT NICOLLE.

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER, C.M.G.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

WEI YUK.

RODERICK MACKENZIE GRAY,

HERBERT SMITH.

The Council met pursuant to summons.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 11th April, 1900, were read and confirmed.

21

NEW MEMBERS.-Messrs. RODERICK MACKENZIE GRAY and HERBERT SMITH took the Oath prescribed by Ordinance 4 of 1869, and their seats on their appointment as Unofficial Members of Council.

PAPERS.-The Acting Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Officer Administer- ing the Government, laid on the table the following papers, viz. :-

1. Extracts from Despatch No. 50 of 16th February, 1900, from the Secretary of State for the Colonies, regarding the Memoranda from Unofficial Members of Council, and the Protest of the Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD, on the subject of the Estimates for 1900. 2. Report on the Health and Sanitary Condition of the Colony of Hongkong, for the year,

1899.

3. Report of the Director of Public Works, for the year 1899.

4. Financial Returns for the year 1899.

FINANCIAL MINUTES.-The Acting Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government, laid on the table the following Financial Minutes, (Nos. 15 to 21), and moved that they be referred to the Finance Committee :-

C.S.O.

537 of 1900.

C.S.0.

2159 of 1899.

C.S.O.

465 of 1900.

C.S.O.

484 of 1930.

HENRY A. BLAKE.

The Governor recomiends the Council to vote a sum of Five hundred and fifty Dollars ($550) to defray the cost of an addition of $20 per mensem to the pay of the Corps Quarter Master Sergeant in the Hongkong Volunteer Corps on his appointment as Corps Sergeant Major, and of the pay of an Orderly Room Clerk.

Government House, Hongkong, 3rd April, 1900.

WILLIAM J. GASCOIGNE.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Three thousand Two hundred and One Dollars and Forty Cents ($3,201.40) for the provision of a Rifle Range for the Hongkong Volunteer Corps in the Sokompoo Valley.

Government House, Hongkong, 5th April, 1900.

WILLIAM J. Gascoigne.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Four hundred and Twenty Dollars ($420) to cover the salary of a Temporary Clerk at the Colonial Secretary's Office for the current year at $35 per mensem.

Government House, Hongkong, 6th April, 1900.

WILLIAM J. GASCOIGNE.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Five hundred and Forty-four Dollars ($544) to cover certain expenses of a Survey for Rent Roll

purposes in the New Territory during four months of the current year.

Government House, Hongkong, 7th April, 1900.

r

22

C. O. Desp.

41 of 1900.

C.S.O. 1095 of 1900.

WILLIAM J. GASCOIGNE.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Six hundred and Ninety Dollars ($690) to defray, during the current year, the increase in salary of Mr. CHARLES FORD, Superintendent of the Botanical and Afforestation Department, sanctioned in the Secretary of State's Despatch No. 41 of 12th February, 1900.

Government House, Hongkong, 24th April, 1900.

WILLIAM J. GASCOIGNE.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote the following sums for further Public Works Extraordinary to be undertaken in the year 1900:-

1. Road from Upper Tram Station to High West,

.......

2. Completion of improvements Wongneichong Recreation Ground, 3. No. 7, Police Station, Vote on account of Estimate for $45,000,

$ 6,050.00 15,897.00

8,000.00

$29,947.00

'

C.5.0.

1042 of 1900.

Government House, Hongkong, 2nd May, 1900.

WILLIAM J. GASCOIGNE.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Three thousand Dollars ($3,000) for the erection of a Public Latrine in Gough Street.

Government House, Hongkong, 2nd May, 1900.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

BILL TO AMEND ORDINANCE No. 10 or 1872.-The Attorney General moved the first reading of a Bill entitled An Ordinance to amend Ordinance No. 10 of 1872.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

BILL TO FURTHER AMEND ORDINANCE No. 13 OF 1888.-The Attorney General moved the first reading of a Bill entitled An Ordinance to further amend the Regulation of Chinese Ordinance, 1888.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

WIDOWS AND ORPHANS' PENSION FUND BILL.-The Colonial Treasurer moved the first reading of a Bill entitled An Ordinance to consolidate and amend the law providing for the grant of pensions to the widows and orphans of deceased public officers.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question--put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

ADJOURNMENT.—The Council then adjourned until Monday, the 14th May, 1900, at 3 p.m.

Read and confirmed, this 14th day of May, 1900.

R. F. JOHNSTON,

Acting Clerk of Councils.

WILLIAM J. GASCOIGNE,

Officer Administering the Government.

L

}

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 10.

MONDAY, 14TH MAY, 1900.

23

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE OFFICER ADMINISTERING THE GOVERNMENT, (Major-General WILLIAM JULIUS GASCOIGNE, C.M.G.).

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.).

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

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""

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON),

""

the Director of Public Works, (Robert Daly Ormsby).

"1

33

""

""

""

HILGROVE CLEMENT NICOLLE.

ARTHUR WINBOLT BREWIN.

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER, C.M.G.

Ho Kai, M.B., C.M.

WEI YUK.

HERBERT SMITH.

The Honourable JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

""

RODERICK MACKENZIE GRAY.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

ABSENT:

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 7th May, 1900, were read and confirmed. PAPER.-The Acting Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Officer Administer- ing the Government, laid on the table the following paper, viz. :—

Report of the Superintendent of the Botanical and Afforestation Department, for the year

1899.

REPORT OF THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Acting Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government, laid on the table the Report of the Finance Committee dated the 7th May, 1900), (No. 7), and moved its adoption.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

FINANCIAL MINUTES.-The Acting Colonial Secretary, by cominand of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government, laid on the table the following Financial Minutes, (Nos. 22 to 25), and moved that they be referred to the Finance Committee:-

C.S.O.

87 of 1900.

WILLIAM J. GASCOIGNE.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of (Extension.) Five thousand Dollars ($5,000) in aid of the following votes in connection with the New

Territory:--

Balance of expenditure on Tàipò Police Station,.

Wages of caretakers employed at Old Customs Station, Temporary

Draftsman, &c., for 9 months at $135 per month,

..$ 500.00

1,215.00

Sundry stores required in connection with above,

200.00

Travelling allowances to Officers, launch hire, &c., Incidental works,

700.00

2,385.00

Total,.

....$5,000,00

Government House, Hongkong, 4th May, 1900.

WILLIAM J. GASCOIGNE.

C.S.0.

1112 of 1900.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Two hundred Dollars ($200) in aid of the vote "Incidental Expenses,' Nursing Institute."

Government House, Hongkong, 7th May, 1900.

24

C.S.O.

32 of 1899.

WILLIAM J. GASCOIGNE.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of One (Extension.) thousand and Six hundred Dollars ($1,600) in aid of the vote for the construction of the

Steam Tender Stanley for the New Territory.

C.S.O. Confidential

Government House, Hongkong, 10th May, 1900.

WILLIAM J. GASCOIGNE.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of 18 of 1900. Three thousand Two Hundred and Ninety-two Dollars and Eighty-eight Cents ($3,292.88)

for the construction of a Public Latrine at the Sookunpoo Market.

Government House, Hongkong, 14th May, 1900.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

SANITARY BOARD BYE-LAW.-The Acting Colonial Secretary laid on the table the Bye-law made by the Sanitary Board on the 26th April, 1900, under Sub-section i of Section 13 of Ordinance No. 25 of 1887, and moved that it be approved by the Council.

The Director of Public Works seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

NATURALIZATION OF LEUNG SHEK CHIU BILL.-The Attorney General moved the first reading of a Bill entitled An Ordinance for the Naturalization of LEUNG SHEK CHIU, alias LEUNG FOON MAN, alias LEUNG KIN.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

PROTECTION OF WOMEN AND GIRLS ORDINANCES AMENDMENT BILL.-The Attorney General moved the first reading of a Bill entitled An Ordinance to further ameud The Protection of Women and Girls Ordinance, 1897, and to repeal two Sections of The Protection of Women and Girls Amendment Ordinance, 1899.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

BILL TO AMEND ORDINANCE No. 10 or 1872.-The Attorney General addressed the Council, and moved the second reading of the Bill entitled An Ordinance to amend Ordinance No. 10 of 1872.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Dr. Ho KAI addressed the Council.

The Acting Colonial Secretary replied. Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed, and Bill reported without amendment.

The Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do

Bill passed.

pass.

REGULATION OF CHINESE ORDINANCE AMENDMENT BILL.-The Attorney General addressed the Council, and moved the second reading of the Bill entitled An Ordinance to further amend the Regu- lation of Chinese Ordinance, 1888.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question--put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resumned and Bill reported without amendment.

The Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass. Bill passed.

į

25

WIDOWS AND ORPHANS' PENSION FUND BILL.-The Colonial Treasurer moved the second reading of the Bill entitled An Ordinance to consolidate and amend the law providing for the grant of pensions to the widows and orphans of deceased public officers.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded. Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed, and Bill reported with amendments.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned until Monday, the 28th May, 1900, at 3 p.m.

Read and confirmed, this 28th day of May, 1900.

R. F. JOHNSTON, Acting Clerk of Councils.

WILLIAM J. GASCOIGNE,

Officer Administering the Government.

1

www.

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 11.

MONDAY, 28TH MAY, 1900.

27

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE OFFICER ADMINISTERING THE GOVERNMENT, (Major-General WILLIAM JULIUS GASCOIGNE, C.M.G.).

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.).

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

""

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALEXANDER MacDonald THOMSON).

2)

the Director of Public Works, (ROBERT DALY ORMSBY).

HILGROVE CLEMENT NICOLLE.

ARTHUR WINBOLT BREWIN.

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER, C.M.G.

19

""

""

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

""

WEI YUK.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

The Honourable HERBERT SMITH.

""

RODERICK MACKENZIE GRAY.

ABSENT:

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 14th May, 1900, were read and confirmed. PAPERS.-The Acting Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Officer Administer- ing the Government, laid on the table the following papers, viz. :-

1. Reports of the Medical Officer of Health, the Sanitary Surveyor, and the Colonial Veteri-

nary Surgeon, for the year 1899.

2. Report of the Registrar General, for the year 1899.

3. The Secretary of State's Despatch with reference to the Governor's Salary.

4. Final Statement in respect of the Loan of £200,000 raised under Ordinance No. 2 of

1893.

REPORT OF THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Acting Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government, laid on the table the Report of the Finance Committee dated the 14th May, 1900, (No. 8), and moved its adoption.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

FINANCIAL MINUTE.-The Acting Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government, laid on the table the following Financial Minute, (No. 26), and moved that it be referred to the Finance Committee:-

C. O. Tele- gram, 19th

May, 1900.

WILLIAM J. GASCOIGNE.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote the following suns for expenses, during the seven months, 1st June to 31st December, 1900, connected with a Land Court under The Land Court (New Territories) Ordinance, 1900 :—

Salaries,

Travelling Allowances,

Incidental Expenses,

$10,500.00

1,000.00

2,300.00

$13,800.00

Government House, Hongkong, 28th May, 1900.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

28

SANITARY BOARD BYE-LAW.-The Acting Colonial Secretary moved that the amendment to Bye-law 25 of the "Bye-laws made under Section 13 of Ordinance 15 of 1894," made by the Sanitary Board on the 17th day of May, 1900, be approved by the Council.

The Director of Public Works seconded.

Dr. Ho KAI addressed the Council, and moved as an amendment that the amendment to the Bye-law be referred back to the Sanitary Board for further consideration.

Mr. WEI YUK seconded the amendment.

The Acting Colonial Secretary addressed the Council. ·

The amendment was withdrawn.

Question that the original motion be passed-put and agreed to.

NOTICE OF RESOLUTION.-The Attorney General gave notice that, at the next meeting of Council, he would move a resolution amending the Standing Orders of the Council.

NATURALIZATION OF LEUNG SHEK CHIU BILL.-The Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill entitled An Ordinance for the Naturalization of LEUNG SHEK CHIU, alias Leung FooN MAN, alias LEUNG KIN.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed, and Bill reported without amendment.

The Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

PROTECTION OF WOMEN AND GIRLS ORDINANCES AMENDMENT BILL.-The Attorney General addressed the Council, and moved the second reading of the Bill entitled An Ordinance to further amend The Protection of Women and Girls Ordinance, 1897, and to repeal two Sections of The Pro- tection of Women and Girls Amendment Ordinance, 1899.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question--put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed, and Bill reported without amendment.

The Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question--put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

{

WIDOWS AND ORPHANS' PENSION FUND BILL.-Council resumed Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed, and Bill reported with further amendments.

The Colonial Treasurer moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

ADJOURNMENT.—The Council then adjourned until Monday, the 11th June, 1900, at 3 p.m.

Read and confirmed, this 11th day of June, 1900.

R. F. JOHNSTON, Acting Clerk of Councils.

WILLIAM J. GASCOIGNE,

Officer Administering the Governmer

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 12.

MONDAY, 11TH JUNE, 1900.

29

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE OFFICER ADMINISTERING THE GOVERNMENT

(Major-General WILLIAM JULIUS GASCOIGNE, C.M.G.).

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.).

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the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON).

the Director of Public Works, (ROBERT DALY ORMSBY).

ARTHUR WINBOLT BREWIN

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER, C.M.G.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

WEI YUK.

""

ABSENT:

The Honourable JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

""

RODERICK MACKENZIE GRAY.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 28th May, 1900, were read and confirmed. PAPERS. The Acting Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Officer Administer- ing the Government, laid on the table the following papers, viz. :-..

1. Reports of the Acting Postmaster General for the year 1899.

2. Report of the Hongkong Volunteer Corps for the year 1899.

3. Report of the Harbour Master for 1899.

4. Statement of Water Account for the Year ended 31st December, 1899.

FINANCIAL MINUTES.-The Acting Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government, laid on the table the following Financial Minutes, (Nos. 27. 28 and 29), and moved that they be referred to the Finance Committee:--

C.S.O. 788 of 1990.

C.S.O.

1331 of 1900.

C.O.D. Secret of

WILLIAM J. GASCOIGNE.

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The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote u One thousand Seven hundred and Seventy-two Dollar an. ixty-six

ixty-six cums cover the cost of printing the Draft Code of Civil Procedure for the Supreme Court of ing kong.

Government House, Hongkong, 30th May, 1900.

WILLIAM J. GASCOIGNE,

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The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Two thousand and Three hundred Dollars ($2,300) in aid of the vote "Contribution towards Defence Works."

Government House, Hongkong, 5th June, 1900.

WILLIAM J. GASCOIGNE.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of 25th August, Sixteen thousand Five hundred and Twenty-eight Dollars ($16,528) to defray the cost of the

purchase of arms and other stores for the Police.

1897.

Government House, Hongkong, 5th June, 1900.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

30

REPORT OF THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Acting Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government, laid on the table the Report of the Finance Committee dated the 28th May, 1900, (No. 9), and moved its adoption.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

MOTION.-The Attorney General moved that the Standing Rules and Orders of this Council made in pursuance of Article XIX of the Royal Instructions of the 19th day of January, 1888, and dated the 9th day of June, 1890, be amended as follows:-

(a.) That No. 34 of the said Rules and Orders be amended by striking out the words "by the consent of the President and a majority of the Members present," and by substituting, in lieu thereof, the words "if a motion to that effect is carried by a majority of votes; and on such motion the Governor, or the Member presiding, shall have an original vote in common with the other Members of the Council, as also a casting vote if the votes shall be equal."

(b.) That No. 41 of the said Rules and Orders be amended by striking out the words "at least";

and substituting, in lieu thereof, the words or, in the case of the Standing Law Committee, in the presence of at least four Members thereof."

64

(c.) That the words following be added to No. 48 of the said Rules and Orders, viz. :-

If any Member of either the Law Committee or the Public Works Committee shall die, or become incapable of acting, or be absent from the Colony or resign by writing under his hand, or if from any cause his seat on either of such Committees becomes vacant, the President may, at any meeting of the Council, appoint another Member of Council, in his place, to be a Member of such Committee."

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

MAGISTRATES ORDINANCE AMENDMENT BILL.-The Attorney General moved the first reading of a Bill entitled An Ordinance to further amend The Magistrates Ordinance, 1890, (No. 10 of 1890).

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question--put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

PIERS ORDINANCE AMENDMENT BILL.-The Attorney General moved the first reading of a Bill entitled An Ordinance to amend The Piers Ordinance, 1899.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

ADJOURNMENT.—The Council then adjourned until Monday, the 25th June, 1900, at 3 p.m.

Read and confirmed, this 25th day of June, 1900.

R. F. JOHNSTON, Acting Clerk of Councils.

WILLIAM J. GASCOIGNE,

Officer Administering the Government.

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31

7

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LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 13.

MONDAY, 25TH JUNE, 1900.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE OFFICER ADMINISTERING THE GOVERNMENT (Major-General WILLIAM JULIUS GASCOIGNE, C.M.G.).

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.).

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the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON).

the Director of Public Works, (ROBERT DALY ORMSBY).

ARTHUR WINBOLT BREWIN.

BASIL TAYLOR, (Acting Harbour Master). CATCHICK PAUL CHATER, C.M.G.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

WEI YUK.

RODERICK MACKENZIE GRAY. JOHN THURBurn.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 11th June, 1900, were read and confirmed.

NEW MEMBERS.-Mr. BASIL TAYLOR took his seat as a Member of Council during the absence on leave of the Honourable Commander ROBERT MURRAY RUMSEY, Retd., R.N., after having taken the Oath prescribed by Ordinance No. 4 of 1869. Mr. JOHN THURBURN also took the Oath and his seat on his appointment as an Unofficial Member of Council in the room of the Honourable THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD, absent on leave.

PAPERS.-The Acting Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Officer Adminis- tering the Government, laid on the table the following papers :-

1. Returns of Superior and Subordinate Courts for 1899.

2. Further Correspondence on the subject of the Jubilee Road round the Island.

3. Secretary of State's Despatch with reference to the Colony's contribution to the South

African War Fund.

REPORT OF THE FINANCE COMMITTEE. The Acting Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government, laid on the table the report of the Finance Committee dated the 11th June, 1900, (No. 10), and moved its adoption.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

FINANCIAL MINUTES.-The Acting Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government, laid on the table the following Financial Minutes, (Nos. 30 to 34), and moved that they be referred to the Finance Committee:--

C.S.O.

1375 of 1900.

C. O. Desp. 115 of 1900.

C. O. Desp. 138 of 1900.

WILLIAM J. GASCOIGNE.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Six thousand Dollars ($6,000) in aid of the vote "Water Account, (Meters, &c. )".

Government House, Hongkong, 9th June, 1900.

WILLIAM J. GASCOIGNE.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Eight hundred Dollars ($800) being increase to the salary of the Local Auditor for the current

year.

Government House, Hongkong, 12th June, 1900.

WILLIAM J. GASCOIGNE.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Eighteen hundred Dollars ($1,800) to cover the cost of increases of salaries of Messrs. CHAPMAN, Assessor of Rates, DIXON, Government Marine Surveyor, and MACDONALD, Assistant Govern- ment Marine Surveyor, during the current year.

Government House, Hongkong, 14th June, 1900.

32

C.S.O.

1485 of 1900.

C.S.0.

1466 of 1900.

WILLIAM J. GASCOIGNE.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Seven thousand Dollars ($7,000) in aid of the vote "Maintenance of Waterworks, City and Hill District."

Government House, Hongkong, 18th June, 1900.

WILLIAM J. GASCOIGNE.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Six hundred and Fifty Dollars ($650) for the Salary of an additional Clerk at the Shanghai Branch Post Office.

Government House, Hongkong, 21st June, 1900.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded,

Question-put and agreed to.

MAGISTRATES ORDINANCE AMENDMENT BILL.-The Attorney General addressed the Council, and moved the second reading of the Bill entitled An Ordinance to further amend The Magistrates Ordi- nance, 1890, No. 10 of 1890.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed, and Bill reported without amendment.

The Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

PIERS ORDINANCE AMENDMENT BILL.-The Attorney General addressed the Council, and moved the second reading of the Bill entitled An Ordinance to amend The Piers Ordinance, 1899.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council in Committee ou the Bill.

Council resumed, and Bill reported without amendment.

The Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

ADJOURNMENT.—The Council then adjourned till Monday, the 9th July, 1900, at 3 p.m.

Read and confirmed, this 9th day of July, 1900.

R. F. JOHNSTON. Acting Clerk of Councils.

HENRY A. BLAKE,

Governor.

1

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 14.

MONDAY, 9TH JULY, 1900.

PRESENT;

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(Sir HENRY ARTHUR BLAKE, G.C.M.G.).

His Excellency Major-General WILLIAM JULIUS GASCOIGNE, C.M.G., General Officer Commanding. The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.).

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON).

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the Director of Public Works, (Robert Daly ORMSBY).

ARTHUR WINBOLT BREWIN.

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BASIL TAYLOR, (Acting Harbour Master).

33

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CATCHICK PAUL CHATER, C.M.G.

Ho Kal, M.B., C.M.

WEI YUK.

RODERICK MACKENZIE GRAY.

JOHN THURBURN.

ABSENT:

The Honourable the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

27

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

His Excellency addressed the Council.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 25th June, 1900, were read and confirmed.

REPORT OF THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Acting Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the Report of the Finance Committec dated the 28th June, 1900, (No. 11), and moved its adoption.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

FINANCIAL MINUTE.-The Acting Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following Financial Minute, (No. 35), and moved that it be referred to the Finance Committee :-

C.S.0. 148 of 1898.

WILLIAM J. Gascoigne.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Twenty-nine thousand, Four hundred and Fifty-three Dollars and Eighty-eight Cents ($29,453.88), being amount of compensation awarded to Madame LUCIA V. Musso in respect of the Praya Reclamation in front of Marine Lots 188 and 189.

Government House, Hongkong, 29th June, 1900.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

NEW TERRITORIES LAND COURT BILL.-In the absence of the Attorney General, the Acting Colonial Secretary moved the first reading of a Bill entitled An Ordinance to facilitate the hearing, determination, and settlement of land claims in the New Territories to establish a Land Court, and for other purposes.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

LIQUOR LICENSES ORDINANCE AMENDMENT BILL.-The Acting Colonial Secretary moved the first reading of a Bill entitled An Ordinance to amend The Liquor Licenses Ordinance, 1898, and to repeal The Liquor Licenses Amendment Ordinance, 1899.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question--put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

34

SUPPLEMENTARY APPROPRIATION BILL.-The Colonial Treasurer moved the first reading of a Bill entitled An Ordinance to authorise the Appropriation of a Supplementary Sum of Four hundred and Eighty-one thousand Three hundred and Thirty-five Dollars and Thirty-five Cents, to defray the Charges of the Year 1899.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

PUBLIC WORKS COMMITTEE.-The Honourable R. M. GRAY and the Honourable Dr. Ho KAI were appointed members of the Public Works Committee vice the Honourable E. R. BELILIOS, resigned, and the Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD, absent.

ADJOURNMENT.—The Council then adjourned until Monday, the 16th July, 1900, at 3 p.in.

HENRY A. BLAKE, Governor.

Read and confirmed, this 16th day of July, 1900.

R. F. JOHNSTON, Acting Clerk of Councils.

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 15.

MONDAY, 16TH JULY, 1900.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(Sir HENRY ARTHUR BLAKE, G.C.M.G.).

35

His Excellency Major-General WILLIAM JULIUS GASCOIGNE, C.M.G.)., General Officer Commanding. The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.).

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON).

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the Director of Public Works, (ROBERT DALY ORmsby). ARTHUR WINBOLT BREWIN.

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12

BASIL TAYLOR, (Acting Harbour Master). CATCHICK PAUL CHATER, C.M.G.

Ho KAI, M.B., C.M.

WEI YUK.

RODERICK MACKENZIE GRAY.

27

JOHN THURBurn.

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ABSENT:

The Honourable JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK,

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 9th July, 1900, were read and confirmed.

REPORT OF THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Acting Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the report of the Finance Committee dated the 9th July, 1900, (No. 12), and moved its adoption.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

FINANCIAL MINUTE.-The Acting Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following Financial Minute, (No. 36), and moved that it be referred to the Finance Committee:--

C.8.0.

1344 of 1900.

HENRY A. BLAKE.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One hundred and Twenty-nine Dollars ($129) for the salary of a Temporary Assistant Junk Inspector from 9th July to 31st December, inclusive.

Government House, Hongkong, 12th July, 1900.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

HONGKONG AND SHANGHAI BANK ORDINANCE AMENDMENT BILL.-The Attorney General moved the first reading of a Bill entitled An Ordinance to again continue in force for a further period the provisions of section 3 of the Hongkong and Shanghai Bank Ordinance, 1899, with regard to the excess issue of bills and notes payable to bearer on demand.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question--put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

NEW TERRITORIES LAND COURT BILL.-The Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill entitled An Ordinance to facilitate the hearing, determination, and settlement of land claims in the New Territories. to establish a Land Court, and for other purposes.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question--put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed, and Bill reported without amendment.

The Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass. Bill passed.

36

LIQUOR LICENSES ORDINANCE AMENDMENT BILL.-The Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill entitled An Ordinance to amend The Liquor Licenses Ordinance, 1898, and to repeal The Liquor Licenses Amendment Ordinance, 1899.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question--put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed, and Bill reported without amendment.

SUPPLEMENTARY APPROPRIATION BILL.-The Colonial Treasurer moved the second reading of the Bill entitled An Ordinance to authorise the Appropriation of a Supplementary Sum of Four hundred and Eighty-one thousand Three hundred and Thirty-five Dollars and Thirty-five Cents, to defray the Charges of the Year 1899.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question--put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

The Colonial Treasurer moved that the Bill be referred to the Finance Committee. The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

ADJOURNMENT.—The Council then adjourned till Monday, the 23rd July, 1900, at 3 p.m.

Read and confirmed, this 23rd day of July, 1900.

R. F. JOHNSTON, Acting Clerk of Councils.

HENRY A. BLAKE,

Governor.

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 16.

MONDAY, 23RD JULY, 1900.

37

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(Sir HENRY ARTHUR BLAKE, G.C.M.G.).

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.).

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

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the Colonial Treasurer, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON).

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the Director of Public Works, (ROBERT DALY ORMSBY).

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295

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ARTHUR WINBOLT BREWIN.

BASIL TAYLOR, (Acting Harbour Master).

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER, C.M.G.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

WEI YUK.

RODERICK MACKENZIE GRAY.

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JOHN THURBurn.

ABSENT:

His Excellency Major-General WILLIAM JULIUS GASCOIGNE, C.M.G., General Officer Commanding. The Honourable JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 16th July, 1900, were read and confirmed.

REPORT OF THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Acting Colonial Secretary, by command of Hie Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the Report of the Finance Committee dated the 16th July, 1900, (No. 13), and moved its adoption.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

FINANCIAL MINUTE.-The Acting Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following Financial Minutes, (Nos. 37 to 39), and moved that they be referred to the Finance Committee:-

Nos. 165, 170

1900.

HENRY A. BLAKE.

C. O. Desp. The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Two thousand and Seven and 173 of hundred Dollars ($2,700) to cover, during the current year, the cost of increases of salaries of His Honour Sir JOHN W. CARRINGTON, Knight, C.M.G., Chief Justice, Mr. E. C. LEWIS, Assistant Postmaster General, and Messrs. C. H. GALE and A. H. HOLLINGSWORTH, Assistant Engineers in the Public Works Department.

C.$.0.

16 17 of 1900.

C.5.0. 1458 of 1900.

Government House, Hongkong, 13th July, 1900.

HENRY A, BLAKE.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Four thousand and One hundred Dollars ($4,100) to meet certain expenses of the Victoria Gaol during the current year.

Government House, Hongkong, 17th July, 1900.

HENRY A. BLAKE.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Five thousand Dollars ($5,000) to cover the cost of repairs to roads, etc. caused by the rainstorm of the 14th to 15th June.

Government House, Hongkong, 20th July, 1900.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

REPORT OF THE PUBLIC WORKS COMMITTEE.--The Director of Public Works laid on the table the report of the Public Works Committee dated the 13th July, 1900, (No. 2), and moved its adoption.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

38

KOWLOON GODOWNS TRAMWAYS ORDINANCE AMENDMENT BILL. The Attorney General moved the first reading of a Bill entitled An Ordinance to further amend the Kowloon Godowns Tramways Ordinance, 1897.

The Director of Public Works seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

HONGKONG AND SHANGHAI BANK ORDINANCE AMENDMENT BILL.-The Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill entitled An Ordinance to again continue in force for a further period the provisions of section 3 of the Hongkong and Shanghai Bank Ordinance, 1899, with regard to the excess issue of bills and notes payable to bearer on demand, and addressed the Council.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed and Bill reported without amendment.

The Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

LIQUOR LICENSES ORDINANCE AMENDMENT BILL.-The Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill entitled An Ordinance to amend The Liquor Licenses Ordinance, 1898, and to repeal The Liquor Licenses Amendment Ordinance, 1899, and addressed the Council,

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question--put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass. Bill passed.

SUPPLEMENTARY APPROPRIATION BILL.-Council considered in Committee the Bill entitled An Ordinance to authorise the Appropriation of a Supplementary Sum of Four hundred and Eighty-one thousand Three hundred and Thirty-five Dollars and Thirty-five Cents, to defray the Charges of the Year 1899.

Council resumed and Bill reported without amendment.

The Colonial Treasurer moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned until Monday, the 6th August, 1900, at 3 p.m.

Read and confirmed, this 8th day of August, 1900.

R. F. JOHNSTON, Acting Clerk of Councils.

HENRY A. BLAKE,

Governor.

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 17.

WEDNESDAY, 8TH AUGUST, 1900.

39

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(Sir HENRY ARTHUR BLAKE, G.C.M.G.).

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.).

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

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the Colonial Treasurer, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON). the Director of Public Works, (ROBERT DALY ORMSBY).

BASIL TAYLOR, (Acting Harbour Master).

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER, C.M.G.

Ho Kai, M.B., C.M.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

""

79

"

WEI YUK.

""

11

RODERICK MACKENZIE GRAY.

JOHN THURBURN.

ABSENT:

His Excellency Major-General WILLIAM JULIUS GASCOIGNE, C.M.G., General Officer Commanding. The Honourable ARTHUR WINBOLT BREWIN

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 23rd July, 1900, were read and confirmed. PAPERS. The Acting Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following papers, viz. :--

1. Report of the Inspector of Schools for 1899.

2. Report on the Assessment for 1900-1901.

3. Report of the Principal Civil Medical Officer for 1899.

REPORT OF THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Acting Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the Report of the Finance Committee dated the 23rd July, 1900, (No. 14), and moved its adoption.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

FINANCIAL MINUTE.-The Acting Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following Financial Minutes, (Nos. 40 to 45), and moved that they be referred to the Finance Committee:-

€.S.0.

1785 of 1900.

C.S.0. 1786 of 1800.

C. O. Desp. 202 of 1900.

C.5.0.

1808 of 1900.

HENRY A. BLAKE.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Five hundred Dollars ($500) in aid of the vote "Government House: Repairs to furniture and incidental expenses.

Government House, Hongkong, 27th July, 1900.

HENRY A. BLAKE.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Two thousand and Five hundred Dollars ($2,500) in aid of the vote "Arms and Ammunition for Police."

Government House, Hongkong, 28th July, 1900.

HENRY A. BLAKE.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Three hundred Dollars ($300) being increase authorised by the Secretary of State for the Colonies to the salary of the Colonial Veterinary Surgeon.

Government House, Hongkong, 2nd August, 1900.

HENRY A. BLAKE.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Four hundred and Fifty Dollars ($450) to cover the salary of the Assistant Government Marine Surveyor for four-and-a-half months of the current year.

Government House, Hongkong, 4th August, 1900.

40

C.S.O.

901 of 1900.

C.S.O.

1232 of 1900.

HENRY A. BLAKE.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One thousand and Thirty-five Dollars ($1,035) for additional fittings to two Police Launches.

Government House, Hongkong, 4th August, 1900.

HENRY A. BLAKE.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Eighty-one Dollars ($81) to defray the wages for 4 months of an oiler for the new steam tender.

Government House, Hongkong, 7th August, 1900.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

REPORT OF THE PUBLIC WORKS COMMITTEE.-The Director of Public Works laid on the table the report of the Public Works Committee dated the 23rd July, 1900, (No. 3), and moved its adoption.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

NATURALIZATION OF WEI LUN SHEK BILL.-The Attorney General moved the first reading of a Bill entitled An Ordinance for the Naturalization of WEI LUN SHER, alias WEI CHU, alias WEI SHIU WING, alias WEI YAU YING.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

The Attorney General moved the suspension of the Standing Rule and Orders.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question--put and agreed to.

The Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council in Cominittee on the Bill.

Council resumed and Bill reported without amendment.

The Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

KOWLOON GODOWNS TRAMWAYS ORDINANCE AMENDMENT BILL.-The Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill entitled An Ordinance to further amend the Kowloon Godowns Tramways Ordinance, 1897.

The Director of Public Works seconded.

Question-put and agreed to,

Bill read a second time.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed and Bill reported without amendment.

The Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Director of Public Works seconded.

Question--put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned sine die.

Read and confirmed, this 1st day of October, 1900.

R. F. JOHNSTON, Acting Clerk of Councils,

HENRY A. BLAKE,

Governor.

41

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 18.

MONDAY, 1ST OCTOBER, 1900.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(Sir HENRY ARTHUR BLAKE, G.C.M.G.).

His Excellency Major-General (WILLIAM JULIUS GASCOIGNE, C.M.G.), General Officer Commanding. The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART LOCKHART, C.M.G.).

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

27

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON).

})

the Director of Public Works, (ROBERT DALY ORMSBY).

**

99

the Captain Superintendent of Police, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.). BASIL TAYLOR, (Acting Harbour Master).

""

""

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER, C.M.G.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

WEI YUK.

RODERICK MACKENZIE GRAY.

""

>*

JOHN THURBurn.

ABSENT:

The Honourable JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

The Council met pursuant to summons.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 8th August, 1900, were read and confirmed. RE-APPOINTMENT.-Mr. FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G., took his seat on his re-appointment as a Member of the Council after having taken the Oath prescribed by Ordinance No. 4 of 1869.

REPORT OF THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the report of the Finance Committee dated the 8th August, 1900, (No. 15), and moved its adoption.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

FINANCIAL MINUTES.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following Financial Minutes, (Nos. 46 to 53), and moved that they be referred to the Finance Committee:--

C.S.O. 1813 of 1900.

HENRY A. BLAKE,

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Forty-seven thousand Three hundred and Eighty-eight Dollars and Fifty-eight Cents ($47,388.58), in aid of the following votes (Public Works Extraordinary) :-

Sai Kung Police Station,

Starling Inlet Police Station,

City of Victoria and Hill District Water Works,

Survey of New Territory,

Rifle Range, Tai Hang,

Gaol Extension,

$ 6,500.00

5,471.98 15,000.00

15,000.00 416.60 5,000.00

Total,.........

$47,388.58

C.S.O.

133 of 1900

Government House, Hongkong, 23rd August, 1900.

HENRY A. BLAKE,

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Eight thousand One hundred Extension, and Thirteen Dollars and Ninety Cents ($8,113.90) to cover the cost of the re-construction of C. o. Tel., the Pier at Sham Shui Po.

30th August,

1900.

€.5.0.

2091 of 1900.

Government House, Hongkong, 6th September, 1900.

HENRY A. BLAKE.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One thousand Dollars ($1,000) in aid of the vote "Maintenance of Telegraphs."

Government House, Hongkong, 6th September, 1900.

42

C.S.O.

165 of 1900.

HENRY A. BLAKE.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Seventy thousand Nine hundred Extension and Eighty Dollars ($70,980) to cover the cost of construction and chartering of Steam-

launches, &c., for the use of the New Territory.

C.S.0.

1966 of 1900.

C.S.O. 2136 of 1900.

Government House, Hongkong, 8th September, 1900.

HENRY A. BLAKE. ·

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Three hundred Dollars ($300) in aid of the vote "Incidental Expenses in the Supreme Court."

Government House, Hongkong, 8th September, 1900.

HENRY A. BLAKE.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Eight thousand and Nine hundred Dollars ($8,900) in aid of the following votes:-

Provisions,

Medical Comforts,

Fuel and Light,

Washing,.....

Government Civil Hospital.

Incidental Expenses, Furniture, &c.,

D

$6,900.00

350.00

500.00

400.00

250.00

Medicines,

New Territory.

500.00

Total,......

$8,900.00

6:5.0.

2143 of 1900.

C.S.O. 1356 of 1900.

Government House, Hongkong, 12th September, 1900.

HENRY A. BLAKE.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Four thousand and Five hundred Dollars ($4,500) in aid of the vote "Maintenance of Waterworks, Kowloon."

Government House, Hongkong, 17th September, 1900.

HENRY A. BLAKE.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Two hundred Dollars ($200) to defray the salary of a Clerk during the current year in connection with the Census of 1901.

Government House, Hongkong, 25th September, 1900.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

REPORTS OF THE PUBLIC WORKS COMMITTEE.-The Director of Public Works laid on the table the reports of the Public Works Committee No. 4 dated the 8th August, 1900, and No. 5 dated the 23rd August, 1900, and moved their adoption.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

His Excellency the Governor then addressed the Council as follows:-

In laying the Estimates on the table, I have to congratulate you on the prosperous condition of the Colony as disclosed in the figures to be laid before you.

The period embraced within the past twelve months has been one fraught with momentous issues to the British Empire. The carefully planned attempt to subvert British Supremacy in South Africa has happily been frustrated, and I congratulate this Colony upon the generous con- tribution of over $153,000 in response to a call for funds for the families of Sailors and Soldiers engaged in the serious South African War, now rapidly drawing to a successful conclusion.

Nor can we close our eyes to the gravity of the present position in the North of China, where a fanatical anti-foreign movement originating with the Boxer Society was ultimately joined by the Imperial Troops. The Foreign Settlements of Tientsin were attacked, large numbers of foreign missionaries and native Christians have been murdered under circum- stances of horrible barbarity, and for eight weeks the Legations of all the Foreign Powers in Peking were closely besieged by Chinese soldiers aided by Boxers. The capture of the Taku Forts, the Chinese City of Tientsin, and of Peking was not effected without grievous loss of life and destruction of property, and now the Allied Forces are in full possession of the Capital, while it has yet to be decided what retribution shall be exacted from the Chinese

43

Empire for these sanguinary murders, and the gross violation of the universal inviolability of Diplomatic Missions.

.

The present effect of this position upon Hongkong is to increase its income. Large numbers of transports have passed through the Port bearing Troops of all Nations, and money has been spent. Considerable sums have been sent down from China to be invested under the ægis of British security in the Colony, and the godowns are taxed to their utmost capacity for the storage of merchandise. But it must be remembered that this apparent plethora of business is caused to a great extent by the unreadiness of Chinese buyers to take delivery in consequence of the uncertainty of the trade conditions in the interior, and we must look forward to a possible diminution in the volume of trade during the ensuing year.

I regret to say that during the present year we have again been visited by a serious epidemic of plague, the number of cases up to the present being 1,065, and the number of deaths 1,007, or 94.5%. I have directed that returns similar to those of last year shall be prepared in the hope that ultimately the comparison of returns may afford some clue to the conditions especially favourable to this scourge. I can vouch for the activity of the Sani- tary Board, but so far nothing that has been done appears to affect the high death rate of those stricken with the disease. The systematic killing of rats has been actively carried out and this year up to the present 40,500 have been destroyed. It is possible that this may account for the diminution of the number of cases as compared with last year.

The condition of the New Territory is satisfactory and the people now realize the bene- fits of effective protection of life and property. The collection of Land Revenue has been delayed owing to the necessity of having an accurate Survey of the land occupied, and the determination of rights of occupancy, on which subject many conflicting claims have been entered. The Survey is being rapidly carried out by a staff of surveyors, lent by the Indian Government, and the Land Court has been established, which will begin its operations in November. The Main Road projected for easy access to the New Territory in all weathers has now been completed to deep water in Mirs Bay, north of Shatin, and will be pushed for- ward to Táipó Hü during the coming year.

The estimated Revenue for 1901 is $3,909,349.00 and the estimated expenditure $3,994,270.29 making a deficit of $84,921.29. These figures do not include an estimated surplus in hand at the end of the current year of $846,507.00.

Having regard to the great uncertainty of the China trade in the immediate future it is desirable to have a substantial balance in hand and in considering the Public Works E traordinary submitted in the Estimates, it must be further borne in mind that a large expen diture on Sanitary Works may become necessary. I therefore invite you to scrutinise carefully the Public Works Extraordinary that will be submitted to you. In the meantime plans of all these works have been prepared and will accompany the Estimates when sub- mitted to the Secretary of State, so that no time shall be lost in carrying out the Works finally approved by him. I am happy to inform you that the plans of the Law Courts have been finally approved and the foundations are being proceeded with, and the long deferred Jubilee Road round Mount Davis will be undertaken by private contractors without delay. The extensive public and private works now in progress or projected, involving the expen- diture of many millions of dollars may, however, exhaust the available supply of labour and modify our estimate of the time in which proposed public works may be completed.

The following Bills will be submitted to you :-

A Bill entitled An Ordinance to apply a sum not exceeding Three million Three hundred and Eighty thousand One hundred and Thirty-four Dollars and Twenty-nine Cents to the Public Service of the Year 1901.

A Bill entitled An Ordinance to consolidate and amend the Laws relating to the

Post Office.

A Bill entitled An Ordinance to provide more effectual means to ensure the obser- vance, by those in charge of certain steam launches, of reasonable precautions against piracy and robbery.

A Bill entitled An Ordinance to amend the Law with respect to the Jurisdiction exerciseable in cases relating to the Receipt or Possession of Stolen Property. A Bill entitled An Ordinance to extend the operation of such of the Laws of this Colony as are not at present in force in the New Territories to a certain portion of such New Territories.

A Bill entitled An Ordinance to further amend The Raw Opium Ordinance, 1887. A Bill entitled An Ordinance to amend the Widows and Orphans Pension Fund

Ordinance, 1900.

I commend them to your careful consideration, and I earnestly hope that the shadow of disturbance that now broods over the Far East may pass away after such a settlement as will insure to all men security for person and property, when peaceably pursuing their lawful

avocations.

44

APPROPRIATION BILL.-The Colonial Secretary moved the first reading of a Bill entitled An Ordinance to apply a sum not exceeding Three million Three hundred and Eighty thousand One hundred and Thirty-four Dollars and Twenty-nine Cents to the Public Service of the Year 1901.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

POST OFFICE CONSOLIDATION BILL.-The Attorney General moved the first reading of a Bill entitled An Ordinance to consolidate and ainend the Laws relating to the Post Office.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

STEAM LAUNCH (PROTECTION AGAINST PIRACY) BILL.-The Attorney General moved the first reading of a Bill entitled An Ordinance to provide more effectual means to ensure the observance, by those in charge of certain steam launches, of reasonable precautions against piracy and robbery.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

LARCENY AMENDMENT BILL.-The Attorney General moved the first reading of a Bill entitled An Ordinance to amend the Law with respect to the Jurisdiction exerciseable in cases relating to the Receipt or Possession of Stolen Property.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question--put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

EXTENSION OF LAWS BILL.-The Attorney General moved the first reading of a Bill entitled An Ordinance to extend the operation of such of the Laws of this Colony as are not at present in force. in the New Territories to a certain portion of such New Territories.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

RAW OPIUM AMENDMENT BILL.-The Attorney General moved the first reading of a Bill entitled An Ordinance to further amend The Raw Opium Ordinance, 1887.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

WIDOWS AND ORPHANS PENSION FUND AMENDMENT BILL.-The Attorney General moved the first reading of a Bill entitled An Ordinance to amend the Widows and Orphans Pension Fund Ordi- nance, 1900.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

ADJOURNMENT.--The Council then adjourned till Monday, the 15th October, 1900, at 3 p.m.

Read and confirmed, this 15th day of October, 1900.

R. F. JOHNSton, Acting Clerk of Councils.

HENRY A. BLAKE,

Governor.

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 19.

MONDAY, 15TH OCTOBER, 1900.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(Sir HENRY ARTHUR BLAKE, G.C.M.G.).

45

His Excellency Major-General WILLIAM JULIUS GASCOIGNE, C.M.G., General Officer Commanding. The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART LOCKHART, C.M.G.).

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN, Q.C.).

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON).

the Director of Public Works, (ROBERT DALY ORMSBY). BASIL TAYLOR, (Acting Harbour Master).

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER, C.M.G.

""

""

""

""

"}

""

>>

WEI YUK.

""

JOHN THURburn.

""

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

RODERICK MACKENZIE GRAY.

ABSENT:

The Honourable the Captain Superintendent of Police, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.).

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 1st October, 1900, were read and confirmed. STANDING COMMITTEES.-His Excellency appointed the following Committees :—

(a.) Finance Committee,-

The Colonial Secretary, (Chairman).

All the Members of Council, except the Governor,

(b.) Law Committee,-

The Attorney General, (Chairman).

Honourable J. J. KESWICK.

Honourable HO KAL.

Honourable WEI YUK.

Honourable R. M. GRAY.

(c.) Public Works Committee,-

The Director of Public Works, (Chairman).

The Colonial Treasurer.

Honourable C. P. CHATER.

Honourable HO KAI.

Honourable J. THURBURN,

REPORT OF THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excel- lency the Governor, laid on the table the Report of the Finance Committee dated the 1st October, 1900, (No. 16), and moved its adoption.

The Attorney General seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

FINANCIAL MINUTES.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following Financial Minutes, (Nos. 54 and 55), and moved that they be referred to the Finance Committee:-

C.S.O.

151 of 1900.

HENRY A. BLAKE.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Nine hundred and Forty-four (Extension.) Dollars and Four Cents ($944.04) to cover the cost of establishing telephone communication

with the Police Station at Santin.

C.S.O.

32 of 1899.

Government House, Hongkong, 9th October, 1900.

HENRY A. BLAKE.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Three hundred and Eighty-one (Extension.) Dollars and Seventy-five Cents ($381.75) to defray the cost of various articles required for

the Government Steam Lighthouse Tender Stanley.

Government House, Hongkong, 9th October, 1900.

The Attorney General seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

46

SANITARY BYE-LAWS.-The Colonial Secretary moved that the Bye-laws, made by the Sanitary Board on the 27th day of September, 1900, under Section 13 of Ordinance No. 24 of 1887, be approved.

The Director of Public Works seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

CROWN LANDS RESUMPTION BILL.-The Attorney General moved the first reading of a Bill entitled An Ordinance to facilitate the resumption by the Governor of Crown Lands required for a public purpose.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

APPROPRIATION BILL.-The Colonial Secretary moved the second reading of the Bill entitled An Ordinance to apply a sum not exceeding Three million Three hundred and Eighty thousand One hundred and Thirty-four Dollars and Twenty-nine Cents to the Public Service of the Year 1901.

The Attorney General seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

The Colonial Secretary moved that the Bill be referred to the Finance Committee.

The Attorney General seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

POST OFFICE CONSOLIDATION BILL.-The Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill entitled An Ordinance to consolidate and amend the Laws relating to the Post Office, and ad- dressed the Council.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed, and Bill reported without amendment.

The Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

STEAM LAUNCH (PROTECTION AGAINST PIRACY) BILL.-The Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill entitled An Ordinance to provide more effectual means to ensure the observance, by those in charge of certain steam launches, of reasonable precautions against piracy and robbery, and addressed the Council.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed, and Bill reported without amendment.

The Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

LARCENY AMENDMENT BILL.--The Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill entitled An Ordinance to amend the Law with respect to the Jurisdiction exerciseable in cases relating to the Receipt or Possession of Stolen Property, and addressed the Council.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question--put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed, and Bill reported without amendment.

The Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

47

EXTENSION OF LAWS BILL.-The Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill entitled An Ordinance to extend the operation of such of the Laws of this Colony as are not at present in force in the New Territories to a certain portion of such New Territories, and addressed the Council.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed, and Bill reported with amendments.

RAW OPIUM AMENDMENT BILL.-The Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill entitled An Ordinance to further amend The Raw Opium Ordinance, 1887, and addressed the Council.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed, and Bill reported without amendment.

rney General moved the third reading of the Bill.

nial Secretary seconded.

put and agreed to.

a third time.

but-that this Bill do pass.

WIDOWS AND ORPHANS PENSION FUND AMENDMENT BILL.-The Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill entitled An Ordinance to amend the Widows and Orphans Pension Fund Ordinance, 1900, and addressed the Council.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed, and Bill reported without amendment.

The Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question--put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned till Monday, the 22nd October, 1900, at 3 p.m.

Read and confirmed, this 22nd day of October, 1900.

R. F. JOHNSTON, Acting Clerk of Councils.

:

HENRY A. BLAKE,

Governor.

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, NO. 20.

MONDAY, 22ND OCTOBER, 1900.

49

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(Sir HENRY ARTHUR BLAKE, G.C.M.G.).

is Excellency Major-General WILLIAM JULIUS GASCOIGNE, C.M.G., General Officer Commanding. The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART LOCKHART, C.M.G.).

>>

>>

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11

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3

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN, Q.C.).

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON). the Director of Public Works, (Robert Daly Ormsby). BASIL TAYLOR, (Acting Harbour Master).

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER, C.M.G.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

WEI YUK.

RODERICK MACKENZIE GRAY.

JOHN THURBURN.

ABSENT:

The Honourable the Captain Superintendent of Police, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.).

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 15th October, 1900, were read and confirmed,

REPORT OF THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the report of the Finance Committee dated the 15th October, 1900, (No. 17), moved its adoption, and addressed the Council.

His Excellency the Governor addressed the Council.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

DANGEROUS SMOKING BILL.-The Attorney General moved the first reading of a Bill entitled An Ordinance to provide against smoking in certain Naval and Military premises.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

CROWN LANDS RESUMPTION BILL.-The Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill entitled An Ordinance to facilitate the resumption by the Governor of Crown Lands required for a public purpose, and addressed the Council.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed, and Bill reported with amendinents.

APPROPRIATION BILL.-The Colonial Secretary moved that Council go into Committee on the Bill entitled An Ordinance to apply a sum not exceeding Three million Three hundred and Eighty thousand One hundred and Thirty-four Dollars and Twenty-nine Cents to the Public Service of the Year 1901.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed, and Bill reported without amendinent.

The Colonial Secretary moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

1!

50

EXTENSION OF LAWS BILL.-The Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill entitled

An Ordinance to extend the operation of such of the Laws of this Colony as are not at present in force in the New Territories to a certain portion of such New Territories.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

ADJOURNMENT.—The Council then adjourned till Monday, the 5th November, 1900, at 3

p.c

Read and confirmed, this 5th day of November, 1900.

R. F. JOHNSTON, Acting Clerk of Councils.

HENRY A. BLAKE,

Governor.

*

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 21.

MONDAY, 5TH NOVEMBER, 1900.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(Sir HENRY ARTHUR BLAKE, G.C.M.G.).

51

His Excellency Major-General WILLIAM JULIUS GASCOIGNE, C.M.G., General Officer Commanding. The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (JAMES HAldane Stewart LOCKHART, C.M.G.).

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*

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12

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the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN, Q.C.).

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON).

the Director of Public Works, (ROBERT DALY ORMSBY).

the Captain Superintendent of Police, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.). BASIL TAYLOR, (Acting Harbour Master).

Ho KAI, M.B., C.M.

WEI YUK.

RODERICK MACKENZIE GRAY.

JOHN THURburn.

ABSENT:

The Honourable CATCHICK PAUL CHATER, C.M.G.

""

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 22nd October, 1900, were read and confirmed. PAPER.-The Colonial Secretary laid on the table the Blue Book for 1899.

FINANCIAL MINUTES.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following Financial Minutes, (Nos. 56, 57, and 58), and moved that they be referred to the Finance Committee:-

C.8.0.

2403 of 1900.

C.S.O. 2117 of 1900.

HENRY A. BLAKE.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One hundred Dollars ($100) in aid of the vote "Furniture and Incidental Expenses," Registrar General's Department.

Government House, Hongkong, 17th October, 1900.

HENRY A. BLAKE.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a suin of One thousand and Three hundred Dollars ($1,300) in aid of the following votes in the Sanitary Department:-

Market Expenses,

Watering Streets,

Allowance for knowledge of Chinese,

$ 200.00 800.00 300.00

Total,..........

$1,300.00

C.S.O.

2438 of 1900.

Government House, Hongkong, 19th October, 1900.

HENRY A. BLAKE.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Two thousand and Forty-five Dollars ($2,045) in aid of the following votes :-

Provisions for Prisoners,

Rent for Warders' Quarters,

Victoria Gaol.

Materials for Remunerative Industry,..

Incidental Expenses,

Government House, Hongkong, 30th October, 1900.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

$ 1,000.00

145.00

500.00

400.00

Total,......

..$ 2,045.00

:

!

52

SANITARY BYE-LAW.-The Colonial Secretary moved that the Amendment to Bye-law 3, made by the Sanitary Board on the 11th day of October, 1900, under sub-section 6 of section 13 of Ordi- nance No. 24 of 1887, be approved.

The Attorney General seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

DANGEROUS SMOKING BILL.-The Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill entitled An Ordinance to provide against smoking in certain Naval and Military premises, and addressed the Council.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed, and Bill reported without amendment.

The Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

CROWN LANDS RESUMPTION BILL.-The Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill entitled An Ordinance to facilitate the resumption by the Governor of Crown Lands required for a public purpose.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

ADJOURNMENT.--The Council then adjourned sine die.

Read and confirmed, this 10th day of December, 1900.

C. CLEMENTI,

Acting Clerk of Councils.

HENRY A. BLAKE,

Governor.

ར་

53

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 22.

MONDAY, 10TH DECEMBER, 1900.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(Sir HENRY ARTHUR BLAKE, G.C.M.G.).

His Excellency Major-General WILLIAM JULIUS GASCOIGNE, C.M.G., General Officer Commanding. The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART LOCKHART, C.M.G.).

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN, Q.C.).

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON).

the Captain Superintendent of Police, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.). BASIL TAYLOR, (Acting Harbour Master).

"}

11

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the Director of Public Works, (Robert DALY ORMSBY).

""

""

"}

""

""

>"

WEI YUK.

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER, C.M.G.

Ho Kai, M.B., C.M.

JAMES JOHNStone Keswick.

JOHN THURBURN.

The Honourable RODERICK MacKenzie GRAY.

The Council met pursuant to summons.

ABSENT:

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 5th November, 1900, were read and confirmed. PAPER.--The Colonial Secretary laid on the table a Report on the Epidemic of Bubonic Plague in Hongkong in the year 1900.

FINANCIAL MINUTES.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following Financial Minutes, (Nos. 59 to 69 inclusive), and moved that they be referred to the Finance Committee:--

C.S.O. 2424 of 1900,

C.S.O. 2047 of 1900.

C.S.O. 2577 of 1900.

HENRY A. BLAKE.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Six hundred and Eighty-six Dollars and Twenty-five Cents ($686.25) to cover the cost of certain sundry utensils, &c., required for the Government Steam Lighthouse Tender Stanley.

Government House, Hongkong, 3rd November, 1900.

HENRY A. BLAKE.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Six hundred Dollars ($600) to cover the cost of repairing the boiler and machinery of the Disinfecting Engine.

Government House, Hongkong, 3rd November, 1900.

HENRY A. BLAKE.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Six thousand and Five hundred Dollars ($6,500) in aid of the following votes :-

Public Works, Annually Recurrent Expenditure.

Maintenance of Sewers, Maintenance of Waterworks, City and Hill District,.

$ 2,000.00 4,500,00

Total,......

$ .6,500.00

Government House, Hongkong, 13th November, 1900. HENRY A. BLAKE.

C.S.O.

2564 of 1900.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Two thousand and Two hundred Dollars ($2,200) in aid of the following votes in the Sanitary Department:-

Electric Lighting of Central Market,

Incidental Expenses,

$1,300.00 900.00

Total,..

.$2,200.00

Government House, Hongkong, 13th November, 1900.

54

*

C.S.O.

222 of 1900.

HENRY A. BLAKE.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One thousand Dollars ($1,000) (Extension) to cover the cost of New Territory Public Works Miscellaneous.

C.S.. 224 of 1000.

Government House, Hongkong, 19th November, 1900.

HENRY A. BLAKE.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Three hundred and Fifty Dollars (Extension.) ($350) for the purchase of a Boat, one Iron Safe and Office Furniture for the Harbour Master's'

Station at Sai Kung.

C.S.O.

2514 of 1900.

C.S.0.

2672 of 1900.

C.S.O.

2117 of 1900.

C.S.O. 2569 of 1900.

C.S.O.

1831 of 1900.

Government House, Hongkong, 19th November, 1900.

HENRY A. BLAKE,

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Six hundred and Twenty Dollars ($620) for the construction of an Armoury for the Police.

Government House, Hongkong, 23rd November, 1900.

HENRY A. BLAKE.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Eight hundred Dollars ($800) to cover the cost of repairing the Government Marine Surveyor's Launch Hilda,

Government House, Hongkong, 23rd November, 1900.

HENRY A. BLAKE.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Six hundred Dollars ($600) in aid of the vote "Watering Streets", Sanitary Department.

Government House, Hongkong, 30th November, 1900.

HENRY A. BLAKE.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Two hundred and Fifteen Dollars ($215) to defray the cost of purchasing a new Typewriter for the use of the Attorney General's Office.

Government House, Hongkong, 30th November, 1900.

HENRY A. BLAKE.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Two thousand and Five hundred Dollars ($2,500) in aid of the vote "Contribution towards Defence Works."

Government House, Hongkong, 30th November, 1900.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

REPORT OF THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the report of the Finance Committee dated the 5th November, 1900, (No. 18), and moved its adoption.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

SANITARY BYE-LAW.-The Colonial Secretary moved that the Amending Bye-law, made by the Sanitary Board on the 8th day of November, 1900, under sub-section 1 of section 13 of Ordinance No. 24 of 1887, be approved.

The Attorney General seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

POLICE FORCE CONSOLIDATION BILL.-The Attorney General moved the first reading of a Bill entitled An Ordinance to consolidate and amend the Law for the establishment and regulation of the Police Force of the Colony.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

BANKRUPTCY AMENDMENT BILL.-The Attorney General moved the first reading of a Bill entitled An Ordinance to further amend the Bankruptcy Ordinance, 1891, and addressed the Council.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

55

CHAN PING HUNG NATURALIZATION BILL.--The Attorney General moved the first reading of a Bill entitled An Ordinance for the Naturalization of Chan Ping Hung alias Chan Shek Shan.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

ARMS AND AMMUNITION AMENDMENT BILL.-The Attorney General moved the first reading of a Bill entitled An Ordinance to amend the Arms and Ammunition Ordinance, 1900.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

STATUTE LAWS (REVISED EDITION) BILL.-The Attorney General moved the first reading of a Bill entitled An Ordinance to make provision for the Preparation aud Publication of a New and Revised Edition of the Statute Laws of the Colony.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question--put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned till Monday, the 17th December, 1900, at 3 p.m.

Read and confirmed, this 17th day of December, 1900.

C. CLEMENTI,

Acting Clerk of Councils.

>

HENRY A. BLAKE,

Governor.

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 23.

MONDAY, 17TH DECEMBER, 1900..

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(Sir HENRY ARTHUR BLAKE, G.C.M.G.).

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART LOCKHART, C.M.G.).

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN, Q.C.).

36

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON).

57

""

>>

the Director of Public Works, (ROBERT DALY ORMSBY).

35

the Captain Superintendent of Police, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.).

15

>>

""

وو

BASIL TAYLOR, (Acting Harbour Master).

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER, C.M.G.

Ho KAI, M.B., C.M.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

""

WEI YUK.

JOHN THURBURN.

ABSENT:

His Excellency Major-General WILLIAM JULIUS GASCOIGNE, C.M.G., General Officer Commanding. The Honourable RODERICK MACKENZIE GRAY.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 10th December, 1900, were read and confirmed. FINANCIAL MINUTE.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following Financial Minute, (No. 70), and moved that it be referred to the Finance Committee:

C.S.O.

501 of 1900.

HENRY A. BLAKE.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Six thousand Nine hundred and Fifty-four Dollars and Forty Cents ($6,954.40) to cover the cost of the erection of a Signal Station at Green Island.

Government House, Hongkong, 7th December, 1900.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

REPORT OF THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excel- lency the Governor, laid on the table the Report of the Finance Committee dated the 10th December, 1900, (No. 19), and moved its adoption.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

POLICE FORCE CONSOLIDATION BILL.-The Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill entitled An Ordinance to consolidate and amend the Law for the establishment and regulation of the Police Force of the Colony, and addressed the Council.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed, and Bill reported without amendment.

The Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

BANKRUPTCY AMENDMENT BILL.-The Attorney General moved that the second reading of the Bill entitled An Ordinance to further amend the Bankruptcy Ordinance, 1891, be postponed.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

}

58

CHAN PING HUNG NATURALIZATION BILL.-The Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill entitled An Ordinance for the Naturalization of CHAN PING HUNG alias CHAN SHEK SHAN.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed, and Bill reported without amendment.

The Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

ARMS AND AMMUNITION AMENDMENT BILL.-The Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill entitled An Ordinance to amend the Arms and Ammunition Ordinance, 1900, and addressed the Council.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed, and Bill reported without amendment.

The Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

STATUTE LAWS (REVISED EDITION) BILL.-The Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill entitled An Ordinance to make provision for the Preparation and Publication of a New and Revised Edition of the Statute Laws of the Colony, and addressed the Council.

The Colonial Secretary addressed the Council and seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed, and Bill reported without amendment.

The Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill. The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do Bill passed.

pass.

ADJOURNMENT.--The Council then adjourned sine die.

Read and confirmed, this 24th day of January, 1901.

R. F. JOHNSTON,

Acting Clerk of Councils.

HENRY A. BLAKE,

Governor.

HONGKONG.

417

No. 22

1900

FINAL STATEMENT IN RESPECT OF THE LOAN OF £200,000 RAISED

UNDER ORDINANCE No. 2 OF 1893.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency

the Officer Administering the Government.

Amount realised,

Dr.

Cr.

......

$1,792,153.62

Praya Reclamation,

$386,134.40

Do .

Reconstruction of Government Piers,................

140,000.00

Central Market,

222,729.59

Slaughter House, Pig and Sheep Depôts,

103,567.92

Cattle Depôts,

15,049.61

Water and Drainage Works,

759,215.64

Gaol Extension,

165,456.46

Total,........

$1,792,153.62

$1,792,153.62

Treasury, 17th May, 1900.

A. M. THOMSON,

Treasurer.

No. 4.

S

HONGKONG.

507

33

No. 1900

REPORT OF THE PRINCIPAL CIVIL MEDICAL OFFICER FOR 1899.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of

His Excellency the Governor.

MEDICAL DEPARTMENT,

GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL,

HONGKONG, 17th March, 190).

SIR,-I have the honour to submit for the information of His Excellency the Governor the following report on the working of the Medical Department for the year 1899.

2.

MEDICAL STAFF.

Leave taken in 1899.

Date of first Appointment

Name of Officer.

Offices held in 1899.

under Government.

Name of Acting Offic r.

Full Pay.

Half Pay.

Dr. J. M. Atkinson,

""

G. P. Jordan,

J. A. Lowson,

6th August, Principal Civil Medical

1887.

Officer.

17th August, Health Officer of Port.

1888.

1st Nov., 1889.

Medical Officer Infectious Hospitals, Medical Offi- cer of Health, Medical Officer to Victoria Gaol, and Visiting Surgeon to Tung Wa Hospital.

Medical Officer of Health.

21 days.

Dr. J. F. Wale ..

F. W. Clark,

14th Sept., 1895.

43 days.

Dr. J. A. Low: ɔn,

J. Bell,

""

J. C. Thomson,

1st June, 1896.

1st January, 1897.

Medical Officer, Lunatic

Asylums.

Visiting Surgeon to Tung Wa Hospital, and Me- dical Officer, Victoria Gaol.

3 months.

15 days.

Dr. J. A. Low: ɔn.

POLICE.

3. The admissions to the Hospital were 204 in excess of those of the previous year, the num ers being 692 as compared with 488 in 1898, the average strength of the Force being 716 as compared with 630 in 1898.

This large increase was to a great extent caused by admissions from the New Territory. Prior to the hoisting of the Flag in April, 1899, accompanied by the Director of Public Works and the Captain Superintendent of Police I spent some days in visiting the district and selecting the most suitable sites for Police Stations.

gs,

Malarial fevers have contributed the greatest number of cases, undoubtedly much of the f ver has been occasioned by the temporary nature of the buildings in which the Police have of necessity been housed, when permanent brick buildings have taken the place of the temporary buildi: mostly matsheds, I anticipate a considerable diminution in the number of cases of malarial fever.

The admission to Hospital from the various sections of the Force is given in the follov ing table :--

Yeur.

Europeans.

Indians.

Chinese.

1890,

149

254

179

1891,

169

285

118

1892,

152

224

120

1893,

134

255

133

1894,

127

244

134

1895.

96

254

116

1896,

94

370

124

1897,

99

320

107

1898.

87

279

122

1899,

117

421

154

..

508

There were sixteen deaths amongst the members of the Force during the year, three less than in 1898; four of these occurred in the Hospital, viz., three Europeans and one Indian, the latter was a Police recruit and died of Phthisis; of the Europeans one died from Acute Peritonitis, one from Delirium Tremens and the third from Hyperpyrexia occurring in the course of fever.

Table I gives the admissions to the Hospital and the mortality during each month of the year; from this return it will be seen that August and September were the months in which the greatest number of admissions occurred.

Table II gives the average strength, rate of sickness and mortality.

Table III shows the admissions to the Hospital from the different stations and districts in each month of the year; to this return have been added the various stations in the New Territory.

Of the old Stations Aberdeen continues much healthier, there being only half the number of admissions there were in 1898.

Tsim Tsa Tsui (Water Police) Station contributed more than double the number of cases in 1898; this increase, which occurred chiefly amongst the Chinese, was due to the prevalence of beri- beri.

In the New Territory Un Long and Táipó contributed the largest number of admissions. The following table gives the total admissions to Hospital and deaths in the Force for the last ten years :-

Year.

Admissions.

Deaths.

1890,

582

7

1891,

570

ī

1892,

496

7

1893,

522

6

1894,

505

15

1895,

166

8

1896,

588

14

1897,

526

7

1898,

488

19

1899,

692

16

TROOPS.

The number of admissions to the Hospital was 818 in excess of that in 1898, whilst the average strength of the garrison was only increased by 125.

The rate of mortality was increased in both the European and Indian Troops, that in the latter being more than double the rate in 1898; the number of deaths was 29 as compared with 21 in the previous year.

The following table gives the sickness and mortality among the Troops for the past ten years :-

Year. 1890,....

1891..

1892,

1893,

1894,

1895,

1896,..

1897

1898, 1899,...

Admissions.

Deaths.

1,915

15

1,851

17

2,844

31

2,927

28

2,905

39

3,099

28

4,274

19

4,455

15.

3,896

21

4,714

29

GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL.

The number of admissions is the greatest yet recorded in the history of the Hospital.

The increasing demand for hospital accommodation is likely to continue, as I have already pointed out the addition to the Colony of the New Territory has already contributed a large increase in the numbers of sick Police, there have also been many serious surgical cases admitted and several Chinese from the New Territory have availed themselves of the benefits to be derived from an institution of this sort.

I would here reiterate what I stated in my last report that it will be necessary for the Govern- ment to seriously consider the question of either considerably enlarging the present hospital or better still of erecting an entirely new hospital supplying increased accommodation and arranged more in accordance with the best modern practice.

During the year a scheme for training European female nurses has been inaugurated three pro- bationers--one from Shanghai, one from Macao and another from Manila-have been appointed and there are already several names of applicants for vacancies on the Matron's list.

In the winter months lectures on elementary anatomy and physiology and on nursing were given to the probationers, and a course of lectures on midwifery to the Sisters.

509

The following table gives the number and classification of those admitted during the past t n

years :--

1890. 1891. 1892.

1893. 1894. 1895.

1896. 1897.

1898. 189.

Police,......

582

570

496

522

505

466

588

529

488

69

Board of Trade,.........................

110

135

157

132

100

129

87

45

65

2

Private-paying Patients,.

527

464

378

467

491

498

632

603

741

76:

Government Servants,.

191

179

168

205

168

203

269

227

186

20

Police Cases,

264

240

232

247

272

319

244

299

306

30

Destitutes.

283

279

284

262

427

668

778

742

785

73

1,957

1,867 1,715

1,835 1,963 2,283 2,598 2,445

2,571

2,73 L

It will be seen that in addition to the large increase in the number of Police admitted there i a small increase in the Private-paying patients and Government servants; a marked diminution in the Board of Trade patients admitted, and a decrease in the number of destitutes.

The admissions and deaths in Hospital for the past ten years are as follows:-

Year.

1890,

1891,

1892,

1893,

1894,

1895,

1896,

1897,

1898,

1899,

Admissions.

Deaths.

1,957

98

1,867

84

1,715

68

1,835

67

1,963

101

2,283

114

2,598

143

2,445

119

2,571

138

2,734

114

The rate of mortality, 4.16 per cent, is by far the smallest recorded for the past six years.

The largest number of admissions occurred during the months of August and Septembe, similar fact has been recorded in the case of the sick Police so we may conclude that in 1899 tlese two months were the most unhealthy during the year.

LUNATIC AS. LUMS.

There were ten less admissions than in 1898.

During the year there were 9 deaths and 11 were transferred to Canton. A report on the work ing of the Asylum by Dr. BELL, the Medical Officer in charge, is contained in Enclosure V.

INFECTIOUS HOSPITALS, KENNEDY TOWN HOSPITAL.

There were 263 admissions during the year :-

Small-pox,.. Plague,.

Cases,

37

226

Deaths.

7

185

In addition eleven were under observation and two in attendance.

The mortality of plague cases was somewhat higher than usual-81 per cent.

HOSPITAL HULK "HYGEIA."

This ship was moved and anchored off Kenndytown Hospital.

MATERNITY HOSPITAL.

There were 36 confinements during the year as against 24 in 1898, 15 were Europeans an 24 Chinese, there was one fatal case, that of a sampan woman; she was moribund when admitted the cause of death being rupture of the uterus.

As I had anticipated. many more Chinese availed themselves of this institution, several bein of the better class; there were 24 admitted as against 14 in the previous year.

PUBLIC MORTUARY.

Enclosure II. gives the return of dead bodies taken to the Mortuary and as far as possible the causes of death.

From this it will be seen that 1,669 bodies were received during the year-an increase of 3:5 as compared with 1898; particulars as to nationality and cause of death are given in the report f the Medical Officer in charge.

510

VICTORIA GAOL.

10. The following table gives the number of admissions to the Goal and the daily average number of prisoners for the past ten years :-

Year.

1890.

1891.

1892,..

1893.

1894,...

1895,

1896,...

1897.

1898... 1899,

Total number admitted to Gaol.

Daily Average No. of Prisoners.

3,444

566.00

5,231

507.00

5,046

515.00

4,010

458.00

3,913

455.00

5,014

472.00

5,582

514.00

5,076

462.00

5,427

511.00

4,789

434.00

The total admissions to the Gaol was 4,789, or 793 less than in 1898; the daily average 434 or 77 less than in the previous year.

The total number of admissions to Hospital was 503 as compared with 298 in 1898.

Remittent fever caused 63 of them as against 24 in the previous year; dysentery and diarrhwa contributed more cases and 81 were admitted suffering from debility as against 14 in 1898.

There were five deaths from natural causes, one prisoner committed suicide by hanging himself and two were executed.

The New Warders' Quarters is in course of erection, when this building is finished the New Hospital will be available; it is at present occupied by the Warders.

TUNG WAH HOSPITAL.

There were 2,542 patients treated in this hospital during the year, a decrease of 456 as compared with 1898.

Of this number 419 were transferred to other institutions, viz.:-

Government Civil Hospital,

Kennedytown Hospital,

Lunatic Asylums,

Tung Wah Branch Plague Hospital,. Italian Convent,

19

2

.135

.262

1

419

Of the admissions 1,491 patients, or 58 per cent., were treated by the Chinese native doctors whereas 556, or 21 per cent., were under Western treatment.

There were 852 deaths as against 842 in the previous year, 268 being moribund on admission. Two thousand two hundred and sixty-one (2,261) Vaccinations were performed in Victoria and the outlying districts, an increase of 673 as compared with 1898.

The chief improvement during the year has been the erection of an Incinerator for destroying condemned clothing, bedding, &c.

The Directors having obtained a free grant of land between Market and Station Streets from the Government the foundation stone of an extension to the hospital was laid by His Excellency the Governor in November last.

This new building, I understand, is intended to supply further accommodation more especially for surgical cases; it includes an operating theatre, and there are also to be several small wards for maternity cases, the latter to be under the immediate care of the Resident Surgeon; in all some 76 extra beds will be provided.

After several consultations the plans were finally decided upon at a meeting of the Directors on the 10th March when Dr. CHUNG and myself were present.

NEW TERRITORY.

Mr. Ho NAI HOP, a licentiate of the local College of Medicine, was appointed Chinese Medical Officer to the New Territory in April last and was stationed at Táipó, his duties being to attend to the minor ailments, mild attacks of fever, &c., occurring amongst the Civil Staff and the Police.

He regularly visits the several Police Stations and treats free any villagers who may apply for advice and medicine.

Free vaccination is a'. performed by him during the winter months.

J

VACCINE INSTITUTE.

The Vaccine Institute has been satisfactorily maintained and was in working order during the whole of the year, with the exception of four months in the summer when Mr. LADDS was away on sick leave.

The lymph as usual was of excellent quality.

The following vaccinations were performed during the year :-

Victoria Gaol,.

Government Civil Hospital,

Alice Memorial Hospital,

Tung Wah Hospital:-

Victoria,

Aberdeen,

Stanley,.

Hunghom,

Shaukiwan, Yaumati,..

PRIVATE NURSING INSTITUTE.

.3,378 608

273

2,009

81

57

22

24

68

6,520

}

511

During the year the two Private Nursing Sisters along with the three probationers have ben housed at Westward Ho" pending the erection of the Nursing Institute.

The services of the two Private Nurses have been in constant requisition during the year, tl ey undoubtedly supply a long felt public need.

The amount of money received in fees during the year has been $1,465.56.

HEALTH OF THE COLONY.

The estimated population of the Colony for 1899 was 259,310.

There were 1,132 births and 6,181 deaths, of the latter 1,434 were from plague.

The birth rate was 4:3 per 1,000 as against 47 per 1,000 in 1898.

The death rate was 23.8 per 1,000 as compared with 22:30 per 1,000 in 1898; excluding the deaths from plague the death rate would have been 18.3 per 1,000.

The following figures gives the death rate in the different nationalities for the past two years : --

Whites,. Coloured,

Chinese,

1898.

Death rate.

16.2 per 1,000 .33.6 .22.54

""

1899.

12.5 per 1,000

28.3

;)

24.4

The increase amongst the Chinese was due to the greater number of cases of plague.

Plague was again prevalent in an epidemic form; this is the first time that the Colony has been attacked by the disease in an epidemic form in two successive years.

Undoubtedly many cases must have been introduced as the disease was prevalent all round us, only in March knowledge of its presence at Pakhoi was obtained.

The disease was also prevalent in Canton and its districts, Wuchow being affected carly in the year. It was also epidemic in Anoy and at Formosa.

From August 1898 to February 1899 inclusive only 9 cases were notified, the marked recurrence of cases, however, in houses previously infected shows that the bacilli are but dormant and in th; ill ventilated, badly lighted and overcrowded Chinese dwellings which exist in this Colony only require certain atmospheric conditions to favour their growth and spread.

Early in April No. IX. Health District was declared infected, the disease became much røre prevalent in May and in June, the remaining Health Districts were declared infected.

The disease did not reach its maximum until June, quite a month later than was the case in the previous year.

Fortunately very few Europeans were attacked this year.

As usual in epidemic years rinderpest was prevalent amongst the cattle in the Colony, practically all the dairies being affected.

;

The Legislature realising that much more radical measures must be taken to rid the Colon of this disease introduced and passed the Insanitary Properties Ordinance, 1899; practically this Bill will further the better sanitation of the Colony by doing away with back-to-back houses and by the provision of more light and ventilation to the Chinese dwellings in this Colony.

I attach to this the reports of:-

1. Government Civil Hospital.

2. Medical Officer in charge of Mortuary.

3. Medical Officer to Victoria Gaol.

4. Visiting Surgeon to the Tung Wah Hospital.

5. Medical Officer to the Lunatic Asylums.

6. Government Analyst.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your obedient Servant,

J. M. ATKINSON, M.B. (Lond.), D.P.II. (Camb.) &c., Principal Civil Medical Officer.

The Honourable F. H. MAY, C.M.G.,

Acting Colonial Secretary.

512

}

POLICE.

Table I.-Showing the ADMISSIONS into and DEATHS in the GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL during each Month of the Year 1899.

EUROPEANS.

INDIANS.

CHINESE.

MONTHS.

TOTAL Admissions. Deaths.

TOTAL

Admissions.

Deaths. Admissions.

Deaths. Admissions. Deaths.

Remaining on the 1st Jan.,

1899,.

January,

February,

March,

April,

May,

244757

2

18

1

26

15

16

1

24

1

1

38

53

June,

14

37

12

63

July,

12

1

50

14

76

1

August,

14

56

26

96

September,

19

59

30

108

October,

6

37

17

60

November,

13

32

15

60

December,

10

87

13

60

Total.......

117

Co

3

421

1

154

692

J. M. ATKINSON, Principal Civil Medical Officer.

Table II.-Showing the RATE of SICKNESS and MORTALITY in the POLICE FORCE during the Year 1899.

AVERAGE STRENGTH.

TOTAL SICKNESS.

TOTAL DEATHS. RATE OF SICKNESS.

RATE OF MORTALITY.

European. Indian.

Chinese.

Total. European. Indian.

Chinese. European. Indian.

Chinese. European. Indian.

Chinese. European.

Indian.

Chinese.

112 277 327 716 117 421 154

9

104.46 151.98 47.09 3.57 1.08 2.75

J. M. ATKINSON, Principal Civil Medical Officer.

Table III.-POLICE RETURN of ADMISSIONS to HOSPITAL from each District during the Year 1899.

STATIONS.

Remaining

on 1st January, 1899.

January.

February,

*{1}]{

April.

May.

June.

July.

August.

September.

October.

November.

December.

Total.

Central. Nos, 5 & S-

European

Indian.

13

105018

1 19 19

Chinese

Government House, Nos. 2 & 3-

European

Indian...

Chinese

No. 1, Stone Cutters' Island-

European

Indian.....

Chinese

No. 6, Mountain Lodge—

European

Indian...

Chinese

Water Police Station, Tsimshatsui-

European

Indian..

Chinese

Tsat-tszmui, Shaukiwan & Shek-o-

European

Indian... Chinese

Pokfulam-

European

Indian...

Chinese

Aberdeen-

European

Indian..

Chinese

Stanley and Taitamkuk-

European

Indian.....

Chinese

10

1ON

1

001-01

::

-

****

3

14

*AL

44 44

**

26

59

1

+

པོསྶསྶ 'ཡ

:* :

ori co

::

+

Carried forward

19

19

30

34

50

44

+

:-

13

::

59

G

59

17

219 H

13

22

$

30

15

28

10

50

52

12

::

100

43

39

36

475

POLICE RETURN of ADMISSIONS to HOSPITAL from cach District during the Year 1899,-Continued.

STATIONS.

Remaining on 1st January. 1899.

January.

February.

March.

April.

May.

June.

July.

August.

September.

October.

November.

December.

513

'otal.

No. 7-

European

Indian...

Chinese

Brought forward................

Yaumati aud Hunghom-

European

Indian...

Chinese

l'ing Shan-

European

Indian.

Chinese

Sha Tin-

European

Indian...

Chinese

Kowloon-

European

Indian..

Chinese

Tai Po-

European

Indian.. Chinese

Cheung Chau-

European Indian. Chinese

Un Long-

European Indian.....

Chinese

Tai O-

European

Indian.....

Chinese

Fu Ti Au-

European Indian Chinese

Tung Chung-

European Indian.. Chinese

Au Tau-

European

Indian.. Chinese

Lamma Islands-

European

Indian.....

Chinese

Sha Tau Kok-

European

Indian...

Chinese

Cheung Sha Wan--

European

Indian....

Chinese

TOTAL,

تت

2.1

19

19 30

1

0000 1

34

50

11

59

75

43

39

36

475

10+

The th

121

1

8

31

18

:

⠀⠀

:༢21

::

~ :

:::

12:

- 30:

1

:::

1

6

:

:

0100

: ܗ:

:ལ:

::

1

1

6

€ 10 00

15

::

w

10

:

3

10

1

3

18

1 3

1

:

:- :

:::

25

1

Jared 23 Jul

1

2

1

1

1

2

21:

2

21.

WN

22

1

26

22

27

37

53

63

76

96

108

60

60

60

692

J. M. ATKINSON. Principal Civil Medical ‹ ficer.

Table IV. Showing the RATE of SICKNESS and MORTALITY of the TROOrs serving in HONGKONG during the Year 1899.

AVERAGE STRENGTH.

ADMISSIONS INTO

HOSPITAL.

DEATHS.

RATE OF MORTAL-

AVERAGE DAILY RATE OF SICKNESS.

ITY PER 1 000 OF THE STRI NGTH.

White.

Black. Total.

White.

Black.

Total.

White.

:

Black.

Total.

White.

Black. White.

Black.

1,048

1,325

2,814 1,000 2,968

4,714

19

10

29

186.43

64.91 11.5

7.55

M. R. RYAN, Lieut.-Colonel, R.A.M.C. Principal Medical Office China and Hongkong.

:

514

Table V.-Showing the ADMISSIONS and MORTALITY in the GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL during the Year 1899.

Small Pox,

Cow Pox.

GENERAL DISEASES.

Chicken Pox,

Measles,.

Rubella. Synonyms, Rotheln, German Measles. Epidemic Rose

Rash

Plague,

Influenza,

Mumps.

DIPHTHERIA—

Laryngral Diphtheria, Synonym. Membranous Croup. Simple Continued Fever, Synonym, Febricula.

Enteric Fever, Synonym, Typhoid Fever,..

Dysentery,

Beri-beri Synonym, Kakké,

MALARIAL FEVER-

a. Intermittent, Synonym. Agne.

b. Remittent.

c. Malarial Cachexia.....

PHAGEDÉNA-

a. Sloughing Phagedona...

Pycemia,

Tubercle.

......

SYPHILIS, SYNONYM, POx--

4. Primary. Hard Chancre or infecting sore. 5. Secondary, or Constitutional.

c. Inherited.

Gonorrhoea. Synonyms, Clap. Blennorrhagia.

Discases dependent on Animal Parasites,.

}:

Vegetable

Effects of Animal Poisons,

.་

་་

Vegetable Inorganic heat.

לי

chemical agents,

immersion.....

י!

ADMISSIONS.

DEATHS.

TOTAL.

Euro-

Indians & Asiatics, Coloured (Japanese

Indians &

Euro-

peans.

Persons. included).

peans.

Coloured Asiatics. Persons.

TOTAL.

10-119

17

NHAN

ALCOHOLISM-

Delirium tremens,

Rheumatic Fever. ~ynonym, Acute Rheumatism.

Rheumatism.

Gout.

ÜSTEOARTHRITIS, SYNONYMS, ARTHRITIS NODOSA-

Cyst,

Arthritis defarmans, Rheumatoid arthritis....

New Growth, non-malignant,

Anoemia.

Malignant,

IDIOPATHIC ANEMIA. SYNONYM--

Pernicious Anomia,

Diabetes mellitus. Synonym. Persistent Glycosuria, Congenital Malformations,

Debility.

LOCAL DISEASES--

Discases of the--

Nervous System.

Eye,

Ear,

Nose.

Circulatory System,

Respiratory.

Digestive.

Urinary System,

Lymphatic.

Male Organs,

Female Organs.

Organs of Locomotion.

Connective Tissue,

Skin,

Injuries...

Local Injuries,

Under Observation,

10

cor 5⠀

2123

15

32

13

***

23

10

6

33

သိအေ

G

25

17

47

44

རེཚུལ

34

Ne

179

98

367

37

31

102

1

212

17

1

ن حيرت

35

G~3

12

HIHI HOC

00100000001-

220000

38

65

106

16

-e-o∞.55

995:

6

19

17

42

94

1

1

13

1

101000014

3

1

14

25

112 40 10

:ལ:

42

12

42

82

24

12

26

10

36

14

9

49

56-SON 3~298+ -

75

128

46

9

20

55

165

61

67

210

14

38

9

28

12

59

57

67

55

113

14

48

13

37

39

38 259

42 347

15

2

2721

-

00:

N

:00

i co

1

1

1

14

15

TOTAL,

811

659

1,264

2,734

33

15

66

111

J. M. ATKINSON,

Principal Civil Medical Officer.

A

Table Va.-LIST of OPERATIONS performed during the Year 1899.

SURGICAL OPERATIONS.

Removal of Tumours,-Buboes, Incision,

Scraping,

Sebaceous Cyst,

Strumous Glands,

Epithelioma of Scrotum,

39

of Scalp,

Polypus Nasi,

Ulcer of Tongue, Wart of Eyelid,

Wart of Nose, -

Warts of Labium, &c.,

Wounds,~Of Arın (Gun-shot),

Of Foot,

Of Kuce joint,.......

Of Chest (Gun-shot),.....

Operations on the Eye,-Excision of Eye-ball,

...

Cataract, Pyterygium, Tridectomy,

Operations on Head and Neck,-Necrosis of Jaw,

Malignant Pustule,..... Harelip,

Necrosis of Nasal-bones, Tracheotomy,

Operations ou Respiratory Orgaus,-Paracentesis Thoracis,

Empyema,

Operations on Genito-Urinary Organs,-

Male,-IIydrocele,

Circumcision,

Lithotomy,

Perineal Abscess,

Abscess of Penis,

Phagodena,...

Abscess of Scrotum,

Ruptured Urethra,

Female,-Labial Abscess,

Pelvic,

Operations on Digestive Organs,-Hemorrhoids,

Fistula-in-Ano,

Paracentesis Abdominitis, Hernia,......

Abscess of Liver,

Laparatomy,

Operations on Organs of Locomotion,-Amputation of Thigh,

515

OPERATIONS.

DEAT S.

54 12

3

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

2

1

1

3

3

1

1

1

37

I

1

1

3

1

of Arm,

3

33

of Fingers and Toes,...

Necrosis of Femur,

3

1

of Foot,

1

Tumour (Non-Malignant) of Leg.... Synovitis,

1

2

Periostitis,

1

Needle in hand,

Operations on Cellular Tissue,--Abscess of Arm,

**

of Finger,

of Palm,

">

**

of Leg,

,

of Thumb,...

**

of Back,

of Chest Wall,

39

of Abdominal Wall,...

17

of Neck,

22

! m [ ?{ ।-

1

2

2

of Forehead,

Plantar Abscess,

Carbuncle,

30 G) KA 10 10 -

2

2

1

Total,

234

·6

......

J. M. ATKINS N,

Principal Civil Medica Officer.

GENERAL DISEASES.

516

Table Vb.-Showing the ADMISSIONS and MORTALITY in the GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL during the Year 1899.

ADMISSIONS.

DEATHS.

Group A.-Sub-Group 1.

1. Small-pox, (transferred to Small-pox Hospital),.

2. Cow-pox,

3. Chicken-pox,

4. Measles,

5. Epidemic Rose-rash, (Rotheln),

6. Scarlet Fever,

7. Dengue,

8. Typhus,

9. Plague,

10. Relapsing Fever,

11. Influenza,,

12. Whooping Cough,

13. Mumps,

14. Diphtheria,

15. Cerebro-spinal Fever,

16. Simple Continued Fever,

17. Enteric Fever, Synonym, Typhoid Fever,

18. Cholera, Synonyms, Asiatic Cholera, Epidemic Cholera,.

Nostras,

19. Sporadic Cholera, Synonyms, Simple Cholera, Cholera

20. Epidemic Diarrhoea,

21. Dysentery,

Total,

Europeans.

Indians.

Asiatics.

3

3

13

Total.

Europeans.

Indians.

...

4

4

15

23

3

17

10

32

7

3

10

6

2

1

5

6

27

33

6

11

J. M. ATKINSON, Principal Civil Medical Officer.

Table Vc.-Showing the ADMISSIONS and MORTALITY in the GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL during the Year 1899.

ADMISSIONS.

DEATHS.

GENERAL DISEASES.

1. Malarial Fever,-

Group A.-Sub-Group 2.

. Intermittent, Synonym, Ague,

b. Remittent,

c. Malarial Cachexia,

2. Beri-Beri,

Monthly Table of Malarial Fever Cases amongst the Police.

INTERMITTENT.

REMITTENT.

ΜΟΝΤΗ,

Europeans.

Indians.

Asiatics.

January,

February,

1

March,

April,

8254

May,

June,

15

July,

15

August,

26

September,

October,

11

November,

15

December,

16

Total,..

25 143

26

:

12-

222

6 32

1-

Deaths.

Europeans.

Indians.

Asiatics.

Deaths.

Total Number of

Cases.

Total Number of

Deaths.

426

18

34

47

50

19

25

23

I

239

131 219 169 519 1

J. M. ATKINSON, Principal Civil Medical Officer.

25

17

17

1

96

37

45 178

7

2

Europeans.

Indians.

Asiatics.

95 179

93367

34 37 31 102

12:

]

6

44

44

CO

3

8 12

Total.

Europeans.

Indians.

Asiatics.

Total.

18

Asiatics.

Total.

5

10

15

20

25

35

40

45

50

517

Table Vd.-DIAGRAM showing CASES of MALARIAL FEVER occurring every Month amongst the POLICE Forci, the MEAN MONTHLY TEMPERATURE and the MONTHLY RAINFALL during the Year 1899.

Number.

Inches.

March.

April.

May.

June.

July.

August,

September.

October.

November.

30

-60°

Red Wave, Green Wave,

Blue Wave,

Black Wave,....

Intermittent Fever Cases.

Remittent

""

""

Monthly Rainfall in inches.

Mean Monthly Temperature in Degrees Fahrenheit.

J. M. ATKINSON, Principal Civil Medical Officer.

་་

-10°

20°

-30°

40°

-50°

·709

December.

Degrees

Fahr.

Mean

Monthly

Temperature.

800

90°

00°

518

Table VI.-Showing the RATE of MORTALITY in the GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL during the last 10 Years.

Rate to Total Number of Rate to Number of Europeans Rate to Number of Coloured Rate to Number of Asiat s

Admissions.

Admitted.

Persons Admitted.

Admitted.

Per cent.

1890,

5.00

1890,

Per cent.

2.38

Per cent.

Per cent.

1890,

5.30

1890,

7.8)

1891.

4.49

1891,

3.46 | 1891,

2.97

1891,

7.83

1892,

3.96

1892,

2.92 | 1892,

3.28

1892,

5.7 £

1893,

3.65

1893,

1.57 1893,

2.28

1893,

7.81

1894,

5.14 1894,

3.71

1894.

3.51

1894,

7.36

1895,

4.99

1895,

2.47

1895,

1.32

1895,

8.15

1896,

5.50 1896.

3.65

1896,

1.84

1896,

8.18

1897,

4.86 1897,

3.63

1897,

2.61 1897,

6. 6

1898,

5.36 1898.

5.07

1898,

2.07

1898,

6. 9

1899,

4.16 1899,

4.06

1899,

2.27

1899,

5.12

J. M. ATKINSON,

Principal Civil Medical Offi er.

Table VII.-Showing the ADMISSIONS into and DEATHS in the GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL during each Month of the Year 1899.

EUROPEANS.

COLOURED.

ASIATICS.

MONTHS.

Total Admissions.

To: al Dea hs.

Admissions. Deaths. Admissions.) Deaths. Admissions. Deaths.

Remaining on the 1st

January, 1899,

29

9

52

90

January,

67

41

February,

55

31

March,

60

3

29

April,.

53

3

50

May,

72

6

60

June,

64

50

July,

67

72

August,

68

81

September,

80

84

:00:01 02 10 02

102

75

96

68

89

94

90

130

135

October,

73

57

124

November,

66

48

106

December,.

57

17

103

65637775546

210

161

3

185

171

3

221

: 4

208

9

229

2

279

1

299

9

254

220

207

8

Total,

811

33

659

15

1,264

66

2,734

1 4

J. M. ATKINSON. Principal Civil Medical › 'fficer,

Table VIIa.-MONTHLY AGGREGATE NUMBER of PATIENTS visited in the HOSPITAL daily for

1899, 1898, and 1897.

Months.

1899.

1898.

1897.

January, February,

3,414

3,321

3,501

3,070

3,006

2,819

March,

3.400

3,184

3,270

April,

3,287

3,138

3,212

May,

3,526

3,316

3,295

June,

3,129

3,086

3,146

July,

3,207

3,449

3,384

August,

3,745

3,353

3,442

September,

4,054

3,654

3,453

October,

3,697

3,303

3,391

November,

3,471

2,732

3,226

December,

3,530

3,188

3,131

Total,

41,539

38,730

39,270

J. M. ATKINSO 1,

Principal Civil Medica Officer,

520

Table VII.-Shewing the ADMISSIONS into and DEATHS in the GOVERNMENT LUNATIC ASYLUMS

during each Month of the Year 1899.

MONTHS.

EUROPEANS.

COLOURED.

CHINESE.

Remaining on the 1st

Admissions. Deaths. Admissions. Deaths. Admissions. Deaths.

January, 1899,

January,

February,

March,.

April,. May, June,

1

July,

August,

September,

October,

November,

December,

Total,....

12

(૩

29

1

1

සපැ

Total Admissions. Deaths.

Total

9 4

1

7

10

2

6

5

12

12

૨૭૨૭૪

7

59

5

78

9

J. M. ATKINSON,

Principal Civil Medical Officer.

Table VIIc.—Shewing the ADMISSIONS into and DEATHS in the GOVERNMENT HOSPITAL HULK Hygeia

during each Month of the Year 1899.

MONTHS.

Remaining on the 1st

January, 1899,

January,

February,

March..

April,

May,

June,

July,

August,

September,

October,..

November,

December,.

Total...

EUROPEANS.

COLOURED.

CHINESE.

Total Admissions. Deaths.

Total

Admissions. Deaths. Admissions.

Deaths. Admissions. Deaths.

1

MANY VID

1

J. M. ATKINSON,

Principal Civil Medical Officer.

5221

Table VIId.---Shewing the ADMISSIONS into and DEATHS in the GOVERNMENT KENNEDY TOWN HOSPITAL during each Month of the Year 1899.

MONTHS.

COLOURED.

Total Admissions.

Total Dea bs.

EUROPEANS.

CHINESE.

Admissions.

Deaths.

Deaths. Admissions.

Deaths.

Remaining on the 1st

Small- Pox.

Plague.

Small- Pox.

Plague.

Small- Pox.

Plague.

Small- Pox.

Plague.

Sinail- Pox.

Plague.

Small- Pox.

Plague.

Small-

1'OX.

Plague.

Small- Pox.

lague.

Admissions.

January, 1899,

January,

February,

March,

April, May, June,

July,

August,

September, October,

1

November,

December,..

Total,.

10

11

10

9

13

37

33

121

101

15

14

-cana a vi

2

7

37

6

126

3

27

20

14

BORE'

33

02

7

6

1

1

6

18 202

6

173

37 *266

85

* Of these 213 were cases of plague, 11 under Observation, and 2 in attendance.

J. M. ATKINSON,

Principal Ciril Medical Of eer.

Table VIIe.-Shewing the ADMISSIONS into and DEATHS in the GOVERNMENT LYING IN HOSPITAL

during each Mouth of the Year 1899.

MONTHS.

Remaining on the 1st

EUROPEANS.

COLOURED.

CHINESE.

Total Admissions. Dea hs.

Total

Admissions.

Deaths. Admissions. Deaths.

Admissions. Deaths.

January, 1899,

January,

February,

March,

April,

May,

June,

July,

August,

1

September,

1

October,.

3

November,

...

December,...

2

Total,. . . . . .

15

21

1

36

J. M. ATKINSON,

Principal Civil Medical Off er.

!

522

Enclosure I.

GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL.

HOSPITAL BUILDINGS.

The main portion of the Hospital has been maintained in an efficient state without any exceptional repairs; it is, however, time that the buildings should be painted and colour-washed throughout.

A great improvement would be effected by the introduction of electric light in place of the present means of lighting the Hospital with gas; in addition to a better illuminant the wards would be much cooler in the hot summer months-a great desideratum in a building such as this situated on the lower levels.

The question of providing Laundry and Wash-house accommodation is still in abeyance. I hope the necessary funds will soon be available for erecting and fitting up a suitable hospital laundry, the washing as at present conducted by Chinese dhobies is very unsatisfactory and ruins the clothing much sooner than would be the case had we a proper laundry.

The new Women and Children's Hospital and Nursing Institute to be built in commemoration of Her Majesty's Jubilee have not yet been commenced; the plans, however, have been decided the sites selected, so that we may shortly expect to see these buildings in course of erection.

LUNATIC ASYLUMS.

upon and

The day room of the European Asylum was enlarged by including the verandah. the iron bars which formerly guarded the windows being removed.

INFECTIOUS HOSPITAL AND HOSPITAL HULK Hygeia.

The Hospital at Kennedy Town was in use for the greater part of the year.

The Hygeia was transferred from its anchorage off Stonecutter's Island on the 17th March to be in readiness in case of need; it was only found necessary, however, to treat one case of plague there—a European-who recovered.

MATERNITY HOSPITAL.

This building was maintained in a satisfactory state of repair.

MEDICAL STAFF QUARTERS.

No alterations have been made during the year, this building also requires painting and colour- washing.

HOSPITAL PREMISES.

The grounds are in good order. A wall was erected to the west of the Women's Hospital as it was found that the Chinese cinployees were in the habit of entering and leaving the premises at this place. An improvement would be effected by concreting the vacant space immediately to the west of the Women's Hospital.

HOSPITAL AND NURSING STAFF.

Mr. F. BROWNE, Assistant Apothecary and Analyst, was promoted to be Apothecary and Analyst on 5th December, 1898, (C.O.D. No. 28 of 1899).

Mr. CHAN KUN-SHING, Apothecary's Assistant, resigned on 31st December, 1898, and was suc- ceeded by Mr. Cheng Kam-ming (C.S.O. No. 2771 of 1898).

Mr. CHENG KAM-MING, Student Apothecary, was promoted to be Apothecary's Assistant on, 1st January, 1899, (C.S.Q. No. 2771 of 1898).

Mr. U I-CHU, Student Apothecary, was promoted to Mr. CHENG KAM-MING'S place on 1st January, 1899, (C.S.Q. No. 2771 of 1898).

Mr. LI-NUM was appointed Student Apothecary in place of Mr. U I-CHU on 1st January, 1899, (C.S.O. No. 2771 of 1898).

Miss ANNIE E. Penruddocke (Sister MARGARET) resigned on 6th January, 1899.

523

$

Miss CLARA WATSON (Sister CLARA) arrived on 28th February, 1899, in place of Miss GERTRUDE BROOKES (C.O.D. No. 329 of 1898).

Miss CATHARINE MCINTOSH (Matron) resigned on the 13th March, 1899, after more than eight years' service. She is the last of the original Nursing staff who came out in 1890; she was succeeded by Miss SARA E. BARKER (C.O.D. No. 41 of 1899).

Miss HEITY DAVID (Sister FAITH) arrived on 4th March, 1899, in place of Miss ANNE PATTESON and was invalided home on 13th June, 1899, (C.O.D. No. 325 of 1898 and confidential C.S.O. No. 35 of 1899).

Misses ISABEL MANNERS, ELSA STEWART HOGG, and CAROLINE JOSEPHINE MCCARTHY were appointed probationers in April 1899, (C.S.O. No. 533 of 1899).

Misses ADA ELLEN GORHAM and KATHARINE ELIZABETH STOLLARD arrived from England on 4th May, 1899, in place of Misses A. E. PENRUDDOCKE and SARA E. BARKER (C.O.D. Nos. 35 and 36 of 1899).

Mr. GEORGE SYDNEY, Assistant Wardmaster Lunatic Asylums, resigned on 7th August, 1899, and was succeeded by Mr. EDWARD ABBOTT (C.S.O. No. 1984 of 1899).

Mr. T. J. WILD, Assistant Apothecary and Analyst, arrived on 26th September, 1899, in place of Mr. F. BROWNE promoted (C.O.D. No. 145 of 1899).

Miss ANNIE A. LAZENBY (Sister ANNIE) arrived from England ou 15th December, 1899, in place of Miss HETTY DAVID (C.O.D. No. 173 of 1899).

The following officers were away on leave :-

Miss FLORENCE M. BARR (Sister FLORENCE) from 26th May to 23rd August. 1899, (C.S.O.

No. 915 of 1899).

Dr. J. C. THOMSON from 16th September to 31st December, 1899, (C.S.O. No. 1919 of 1899). Dr. J. A. Lowsox from 10th November to 30th November, 1899, (C.S.O. No. 2793 of 1899), during his absence Dr. J. F. WALES was engaged temporarily to assist the department.

WORK DONE DURING THE YEAR.

Attached to this report are the following tables :-

GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL.

I. Showing the admissions into and deaths in the Government Civil Hospital, during each month of the year, of the Police.

II. Showing the rate of sickness and mortality in the Police Force during the year.

III. Police Return of admissions to Hospital from each district during the year.

V. General Return of the sick treated in the Hospital.

Va. Surgical operations performed during the year.

Vb. Zymotic Diseases, sub-group 1.

Ve.

""

2.

Vd. Diagram showing number of cases of Malarial Fever occurring amongst the members of the Police Force admitted in each month of the year.

VI. Showing the rate of mortality in the Government Civil Hospital during the last 10 years. VII. Showing the admissions into and deaths in the Government Civil Hospital during each month of last year.

years.

VIIa. The aggregate monthly number of patients visited in the Hospital daily for the last three

VIIb. Table of admissions into and deaths in the Lunatic Asylums during the year. VIIc. Table of admissions into and deaths in the Epidemic Hulk Hygeia during the year. VIId. Table of admissions into and deaths in the Infectious Hospital, Kennedy Town. VIIe. Table of admissions into and deaths in the Maternity Hospital.

The total number treated during the year was as follows:-

In-patients.. Out-patients,

2,784 13,744

16,478

Many minor surgical cases treated in the Receiving Ward are not included in these figures.

524

In-patients. The total number shows an increase of 163 as compared with 1898 as already stated there were more in-patients treated during 1899 than in any previous year, the figures for the past three years are as follows:-

1897,.

1898,

·

1899,

2,445

2,571

2,734

Deaths.-The total number of deaths was 114, a percentage of 4·16, the lowest mortality for the past six years; of these 39 were in a moribund condition when admitted, 31 dying within twenty-four hours and 8 within forty-eight hours of their admission.

The average daily number of sick was 106.36 as against 98.81 in 1898.

Women.--The number admitted was 402. At present the only accommodation we have for women and children of every nationality is one general ward with 14 beds and one private ward : further accommodation for women and children is very much required and will be provided in the New Women's Jubilee Hospital.

Private Paying Patients.-The number of first and second class patients for the past three years

has been as follows:-

First class,.. Second class,

1897.

1898.

1899.

53

58

74

153

154

158

206

212

232

NATIONALITY.

Europeans. As compared with the previous year there was an increase of 23.

Indians -The largest increase was amongst the Indians, 226 more having been admitted than in 1898. The Police contributed 141 of this number, the greater majority being cases of malarial fever admitted from the New Territory, the rest are destitute Indians who have come to this Colony in search of work.

Asiatics. These form by far the greatest majority of patients admitted to the Hospital, no less than 1,264 out of a total of 2,734 being Chinese and Japanese; many cases have had to be refused admission and if it is intended that the Hospital shall meet with the public requirements further accommodation will have to be provided.

Diseases --The following diseases caused the greatest number of admissions :-

Fever:-

Malarial, Intermittent,

--Remittent,

27

Enteric,

Febricula,

Venereal Diseases,

Diseases of Digestive System,

17

Respiratory

"

Nervous

""

""

367

102

33

6

-508

226

210

165

128

Injuries of various kinds contributed 347 cases.

Deaths. The following diseases caused the greatest number of deaths :-

Disease of Respiratory System,

Enteric fever,

Disease of Urinary System,

Whereas 15 deaths were the result of injuries.

.25

11

9

Police. The total number admitted was 208 in excess of the previous year, there being 30 more Europeans, 142 more Indians and 32 more Chinese under treatment.

525

Gaol Officers.-There were 56 under treatment as compared with 30 in the previous year :—

Principal Warder,.

Warders,

Assistant Warders, Guards,

1

23

8

24

56

malarial fevers and influenza contributing the greatest number of admissions, viz., 17 and 4 respectively.

Influenza.-There were 32 cases under treatment with no deaths.

Enteric Fever.-There were 33 cases under treatment with eleven deaths. Thirteen originated locally, one being an Indian Constable from the Central Police Station, one was from Canton and the remaining nineteen were from ships, nine of these being from foreign men-of-war, all having contracted the disease away from the Colony.

As Dr. MANSON states in his book on Tropical Diseases this disease is a very virulent one in the tropics with a death rate twice as heavy as the death rate of typhoid in England.”

Our experience also bears out his statement "that constipation is much more common in tropical typhoid than in the disease in Europe.”

Diphtheria.-Six patients were admitted suffering from this disease with two deaths both Chinese ; in each case tracheotomy was performed.

Cholera. There were no cases admitted suffering from this disease; this is the third year in succession that we have been free from this disease.

Dysentery.-Forty-seven cases were under treatment with two deaths.

Malarial Ferers.--I have to report a large increase in the number admitted suffering from this class of disease, the figures being 469 as compared with 334 in 1898.

There were three deaths--one European, one Indian and one Chinese.

This large increase was mainly due to Police admitted from Stations in the New Territory; by reference to Table Ve it will be seen that 118 admissions are thus accounted for.

Knowing how malarious many of the districts in the New Territory were, instructions were drawn up for the guidance of officers stationed there, special prominence being given to the prophylactic use of quinine in small daily doses during the summer months.

The disease although prevalent was not of a severe type, there being only one death, that of the Inspector at Cheang Chau, and it is doubtful whether this was a case of true malarial fever.

He was admitted to the hospital in July last with fever and rapidly developed hyperpyrexia, his temperature rising to F. 109°.

A careful post mortem examination was made and, as this was a most exceptional case, portions of the various organs were preserved and sent to Dr. MANSON. From a report which I have received from the Tropical School of Medicine this would be more correct to consider this as a case of Siriasis or Thermic fever.

Two other cases of hyperpyrexia occurred during the year, blood films of both of these were sent to Dr. MANSON for examination; but no malarial parasites were found, they occurred in patients suffering from delirium tremens.

Beri-beri.-There were 44 cases under treatment with 7 deaths, an increase of 15 as compared

with 1898.

Seventeen were Chinese Constables, seven being admitted from the Central and six from the Water Police Station; most of these cases were recruits, the disease developing during their three months' probation.

Venereal Diseases.-The number of admissions from constitutional syphilis continues to show a small but steady increase as the following figures prove :-

Primary Syphilis,

Secondary

17

1897.

1898.

1899.

66

76

63

82

87

106

148

163

169

526

The large increase in those suffering from secondary syphilis shows that the disease is much more prevalent in the Colony, 65 of these cases were Chinese.

Many of this nationality have to be treated as out-patients on account of our limited accommoda- tion; unfortunately Chinamen suffering from venereal diseases are not admitted to the Tung Wah Hospital. This is a fact much to be deplored as now this institution is becoming more under the influence of Western medicine many cases might be treated there who now undoubtedly disseminate this disease abroad.

There were 54 cases under treatment suffering from Gonorrhoea as against 48 in 1898.

Injuries.-There were 347 adinissions with 15 deaths as against 352 with 18 deaths in 1898. Surgical Operations.-There were 234 during the year with 6 deaths as against 224 with 10 deaths in the previous year.

Amongst the more important operations during the year were the following

Lithotomy.---A Chinaman was admitted from Táipó in the New Territory and was successfully operated on, the calculus weighing 24 ounces.

Hermia.--Five cases were operated on with but one fatal result; this was the case of a Chinaman in whom the hernia had been strangulated for some days, the intestine was quite gangrenous and although it was removed and an artificial anus formed the patient never rallied. It is unfortunate that the Chinese do not realise the serious nature of this complaint and present themselves for treatment earlier.

Abscess of Liver.-Three cases were operated on successfully, the notes of two are given in the appendix.

result.

Laparotomy.- -This operation was performed on an European for perityphlitis with a successful

We

Gunshot Wounds.-There were several cases admitted during the year and operated on. found the Rontgen rays of great assistance in locating the same; in one severe case of injury to the shoulder in which the head of the humerus was smashed the joint was excised and although the bullet could not be found the man made an excellent recovery.

Anaesthetics.-Chloroform has been administered 164 times during the past year. Unfortunately two deaths occurred from its effects-the first in the hospital. Both cases were Europeans. These cases were fully reported to The Lancet. The deaths occurred under different administrators and under different systems.

The majority of cases (156) were anesthetised by Krohne and Seismann's modification of Innker's inhaler and the remainder with Skiemer's inhaler.

Using the former method:-

The average time taken to produce anesthesia was 5'. 37".

The average duration of the operation 11'. 26", and the average quantity used was 2 drs. 13 minims.

No notes were kept of the cases under Skiemer's inhaler, but it undoubtedly uses or rather wastes a much larger amount of the anesthetic and the danger of an overdose is less easily guarded against.

The drawback to Innker's inhaler is the amount of india rubber used in the machine as this rapidly deteriorates in this climate.

FRACTURES AND DISLOCATIONS.

The following fractures and dislocations have been treated during the year :---

Fracture of the skull,

4

spine,

">

humerus,

5

radius and ulna,

6

""

femur,

tibia..

10

31

**

""

inferior maxilla,.

ribs, clavicle,

Dislocation of the hip..

1

I

1.

ankle,.

2

"

shoulder, elbow,

1

2

527

Alcoholism.-There were 75 cases admitted with four deaths; two of these, as already stated, developed hyperpyrexia which was the immediate cause of death.

Poisoning.-There were 8 cases of poisoning during the year, five were cases of datura poisoning, two of opium and in one the poisonous agent was exalgine; all of these recovered.

Vaccination.-Six hundred and eight vaccinations were performed during the year with the following result:-

Primary cases,........

Re-vaccinations,

Successful.

..115

Unsuccessful.

Total.

2

117

290

201

491

608

Fees.-The fees received during the year were as follows:-

Government Civil Hospital,.

Lunatic Asylums,..............

Infectious Hospitals,.

Government Nursing Institute,

$24,486.21

269.00

682.71

1,465.56

$26,903.48

The fees received from the Government Civil Hospital show an increase of $1,009.87 as compared with the previous year.

Appendix. In the appendix is given the notes by Dr. BELL of four cases of interest that have occurred in the Hospital during the

year.

The second one is of particular interest not only from the nature of the disease but that it is the first case of liver abscess in a Chinaman which has been recorded, at any rate, in this Hospital.

Staff-I take this opportunity of thanking cordially the several members of the staff for the assistance rendered during the past year.

Gifts of Flowers, Newspapers, &c.—The patients have been indebted to several residents of the Colony for frequent gifts of flowers, newspapers, &c.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your obedient Servant,

The Honourable F. H. MAY. C.M.G.,

Acting Colonial Secretary.

J. M. ATKINSON, Principal Civil Medical Officer.

i

Appendix.

HEPATIC ABSCESS.

OPERATION. RECOVERY.

An English officer in the mercantile marine, aged 39, was admitted to hospital on the 7th February. Previous history.-He had had an attack of dysentery in 1881. Last March was laid up with an attack of malarial fever on the West Coast of Africa and had two relapses whilst in England.

Present history. For the last 5 or 6 months has been troubled with pain in the region of the liver which four days ago becaine inuch more severe and was accompanied by pain in the right shoulder. Liver dulness is increased with distinct tenderness in lower intercostal spaces on right side. Breath very short. Temperature 100.8° on the 9th, under chloroform an aspirating needle have proved the presence of pus; an incision was made in the 9th interspace and a drainage tube inserted. The temperature at once came down to normal and remained so up to 25th day when there was a slight rise (100) owing to a small accumulation of pus in the rapidly closing sinus. This was evacuated and the patient was discharged quite cured on the 36th day, having gained 8lbs in a week.

·

528

ABSCESS OF LIVER. REMOVAL OF LARGE GALL STONE. RECOVERY.

NG WAN, Chinese lukong, aged 38, was admitted on 30th May.

He had been ill with fever 4 days. The liver dulness was increased two fingers breadth below the cartilages and was very tender especially over the seat of the gall bladder. There was dulness in the right chest posteriorly with feeble breath sounds. He had never had dysentery. The temperature varied from 99° in the morning to 104° in the evening.

On the 6th June the liver was explored and pus found and next day under an ancesthetic an incision was made below costal cartilage of 7th rib in nipple line and a tube was inserted into an abscess and two pints of pus evacuated.

The temperature dropped at once and kept normal on 16th August as there was still a discharging sinus the patient was put under chloroform again and the sinus scraped. A calculus was felt and part removed. On 21st August he was again operated on and after some trouble a calculus was removed in pieces weighing 420 grains. The patient rapidly improved in weight from 114 to 127 lbs and general health and was discharged on 16th September with the sinus quite healed and the liver dulness normal. Throughout the case there was no jaundice or any bile discharged through the sinus.

SEVERE WOUND OF KNEE JOINT. SUTURE OF PATELLA.

RECOVERY.

A healthy Chinese male adult was admitted on 31st July at 11.45 p.m. with a severe wound of the knee joint. The joint was washed out, the knee put up in McIntyre's splint and the patient put

to bed.

Next morning under an ancesthetic it was found that he had a clean cut wound through the patella about in. from the lower border and notching the outer condyle about 2 inches in depth. It was determined to give the patient a chance of preserving his leg and the wound was most thoroughly cleaned out by irrigation sponges and a nail brush across the bony section. Some time and care were bestowed on this and to this fact must be attributed the very excellent result. The patella was brought together by two silver wire sutures and the skin wound sewn with silk. The knee was then fixed in a McIntyre's splint. There was scarcely any fever throughout. The splint was removed on the 28th day and passive movement begun. The patient was discharged on 27th September and three months afterwards was seen here with a good useful leg. He was able to bend it about 45°.

PROTRUSION OF THE INTESTINES IN A NEW-BORN INFANT.

On April 8th at 9 a.mn. a Chinese female child was brought to hospital immediately after birth. On removing the filthy wrappings, the cord with placenta attached and about two feet of intestines were found lying on the abdomen. On examination it was seen that the cord about two inches from the umbilicus was thinned out and attached all round an opening into the abdomen about one and a half inches in diameter through which the intestines had escaped. The child was crying a little but did not seem in any pain nor was it at all collapsed. The intestines were cleaned and after some trouble were returned, a ligature of silk was slipped round the opening and tied, and the cord then dissected off. At 6 p.m. this ligature unfortunately slipped and the intestines had again to be returned. Three deep and three superficial silk sutures were now inserted.

The child throughout took milk well though there was occasionally some vomiting. The stitches were removed on the 6th day and the baby discharged on the 20th day quite well. There was no rise of temperature throughout the case save on the 3rd day when it reached 99.6. This abnormality is a rare one as no one who saw the case had ever seen anything similar. The absence of peritonitis throughout the case is worthy of note.

Enclosure III.

Report of the Acting Medical Officer of Victoria Gaol.

VICTORIA GAOl, HONGKONG, 15th March, 1900.

SIR,I have the honour to forward you for the information of His Excellency the Governor the Annual Medical Report on the condition of Victoria Gaol during the year ending 31st December, 1899. The total number of admissions to the Gaol was 4,789 as compared with 5.437 in 1898 and 5,076. in 1897 respectively; and the daily average number of prisoners was 434.53 as compared with 511 and 462 in the previous two years.

529

Five hundred and three prisoners were admitted to hospital as compared with 298 in 1898 and 342 in 1897; and 1,778 medical and surgical cases, not requiring admission to hospital, were treated in the cells as compared with 1,033 cases in 1898 and 455 in 1897. Of the 1,778, 972 were medical cases, the daily average being 19.14. Eight hundred and six were surgical cases with a daily average of 26.18.

The amount of venereal disease in prisoners admitted continues on the increase, and deductions are not difficult to draw. The following are the numbers for the last three years:-

Syphilis,. Gonorrhoea,

1897.

86 39

1898.

149

73

1899.

167

103

Vaccination has been carried out as usual. The supply of lymph has been good in quality, but on several occasions our supply ran out. Out of a total number of 4,789 prisoners admitted to Gaol 3,378 were vaccinated. The others were old men or those suffering from debility and whom it was not advisable to vaccinate, whilst a few escaped vaccination when our supply failed. The table shows a very

favourable percentage of successful vaccinations.

The increase of admissions from 298 to 503 is accounted for mainly by admissions for Remittent Fever, General Debility, Diseases of the Digestive System (mainly diarrhoeas), Diseases of Connective Tissue, and those under observation.

Infectious Diseases were represented by 2 cases of Enteric, 4 of Influenza and 3 of Leprosy. One Enteric case was infected before admission. Another case was supposed to have been infected in Gaol; as I was on other duty at the time I do not know the circumstances of the case.

The very cold weather of January and February was responsible for a large number of Fever and other cases, and now in cold weather I have ordered special hot drinks either of plain water, tea or congee to be given occasionally to debilitated prisoners. It is more especially in the morning between 3 and 5 a.m. that such is necessary; most of the prisoners felt the cold most acutely at that time.

Dr. THOMSON was on duty from 1st to 10th January and from 15th May to 14th September. During the rest of the year I acted for him, with the exception of three weeks in November when Dr. BELL was in charge.

The health of the staff has been uniformly good. An outbreak of Influenza necessitated a con- siderable number being sent to the Civil Hospital for treatment, as they simply got worse always if they attempted to remain on duty.

I append the following tables :--

I. Showing admissions and Mortality in Victoria Gaol Hospital during the year 1899.

11. Showing medical cases treated by the Medical Officer in Victoria Gaol, but not admitted to

Hospital during the year 1899.

III. Showing Surgical cases treated by the Medical Officer, but not admitted to Hospital during

the year 1899.

IV. Showing the rate of sickness and mortality in Victoria Gaol during the

year 1899.

V. Showing the number and results of Vaccinations in Victoria Gaol during the past ten years. VI. Showing general statistics connected with Victoria Gaol and the Gaol Hospital during the

past ten years.

The total number of floggings with the birch was 148, 99 by order of the Police Magistrate, 36 by the Supreme Court, and 11 by the Superintendent and 2 by the Superintendent and Justices of the Peace. There was one flogging with the cat. No injury resulted requiring surgical treatment; in fact, the flogging with the birch does not require the attendance of a medical man.

The health of the Warders and Guards has been fairly satisfactory during the year.

The Wardmasters T. HOLMES and SUNDA SINGH performed their duties to my entire satisfaction.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your obedient Servant,

Dr. J. M. ATKINSON,

Principal Civil Medical Officer,

&c.,

&c.,

&c.

JAMES A. Lowson,

Acting Medical Officer.

530

JUNE.

Table I.- SHOWING THE ADMISSIONS AND MORTALITY

MARCH.

APRIL.

MAY.

Cases.

59.0

59.6

64.9

69.9

77.6

79.7

63.0

70.0

74.0

84.0

79.0

83.0

MONTHS.

JANUARY.

Mean Temperature.

Mean Humidity

DISEASES.

General Diseases.

Plague

Influenza

Cases.

Enteric Fever

Dysentery

Beri-beri

Malarial Fever-

(a) Intermittent (b) Remittent....

Leprosy-

(a) Tubercular Syphilis-

(a) Primary (b) Tertiary

Gonorrhoea Alcoholism

Rheumatism

Anæmia

Debility

FEBRUARY.

Deaths.

Cases.

Deaths.

-1 10

:

Cases.

1

1

I

Deaths.

:

Cases.

6

a:

:.

Deaths.

:

1

1

1

:2

10

14

Local Diseases.

DISEASES OF THE NERVOUS

SYSTEM.

Sub-section 2,-

Functional Nervous Disorders--

Apoplexy

Sub-section 3,-

Mental Diseases-

Idiocy

Dementia

Delusional Insanity

Diseases of the Eye

:

:

:

Cases.

IN

:

::

1

Deaths.

11

3

J

1

:

of the Ear

1

"

وو

of the Circulatory

System....

of the Respiratory

System....

1

of the Digestive

System...

9

of the Lymphatic

System.....

"}

"

1

of the Urinary

of the Generative

of the Organs of

Locomotion...

of the Cellular Tissue...

of the Skin..............

Injuries, Local

Parasites

Under Observation.............

System......

1

System.....

:

Basi

3

A

:

12

:

4

**

:

:

*

:

:

Deaths.

1

1

:

:

ලය :

:

i oni

5

5

1

:

:

90

:

:

:

1

:

:

:

CO

3

:

co

1

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

62

::

Total.......

40

47

3

44

1

2

со

8

38333

Other Deaths-Suicide by hanging,... 1

:

6:*

Executions,

Total,.

3

1

:

:

31

:.

:

:

:

: co

43

:

531

YEARLY

DECEMBER.

REMARKS.

TOTAL.

IN VICTORIA GAOL HOSPITAL, DURING THE YEAR 1899.

JULT.

AUGUST. SEPTEMBER. OCTOBER.

NOVEMBER.

82.9 82.0

80.9 85.0

80.3

74.8

67.8

66.2

72.0

75.0

66.0

62.0

78.0

75.0

Cases.

1

9

Deaths.

9

:6

:..

1

3

Cases.

:.

:

Deaths.

2

310

10

:

1

1

1

8

:

1

:.

:

:

No co

3

Cases.

:

:

Deaths.

:

2

::

::

:

C

K

:

Cases.

:

:

:

to

Deaths.

10

:2

:

:

1

3

He co

3

11

O

C}

Cases.

:

:

2

1

00

Deaths.

5

:

:

:

:

38

1 46

56

44

Cases.

:

:

1

Deaths.

Cases.

14222

18

Deaths.

2

~

:

::

8888

7

63

3

4

4

2

4

1

4

18

81

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:.

:

31

N

1

:

3

:

2

:

:

:

1

2

1

3

::

13

17

1

78

18

30

1

51

20

20

1

59

:

:

50

503

JAMES A. Lowson,

Acting Medical Officer.

532

Table II.-SHOWING CASES, TREATED BY THE MEDICAL OFFICER, IN VICTORIA

MONTHS.

Mean Temperature

Mean Humidity

DISEASES.

General Diseases.

Malarial Fever-

(a) Intermittent

(b) Remittent

Syphilis-

(a) Primary

(b) Tertiary

Gonorrhoea

Rheumatism

Debility

Local Diseases.

Diseases of the Circulatory

System....

"

of the Respiratory

System.....

15

"

of the Digestive

System....

39

of the Lymphatic

System......

19

of the Cellular Tissue .

Total.

Mean Temperature.

Mean Humidity

11

། :

:

Cases.

JANUARY.

FEBRUARY.

MARCH.

APRIL.

MAY.

JUNE.

59.0

59.6

64.9

69.9

77.6

79.7

63.0

70.0

74.0

84.0

79.0

83.0

Deaths.

Cases.

15

10

5

14

21

16

Deaths.

། :

12261

:

:

Cases.

95

33

66

54

25

10

cr

Deaths.

472

:

:

::

Cases.

30

33333

Deaths.

:

Cases.

70

4

64

129

Table III.-SHOWING SURGICAL CASES, TREATED BY MEDICAL OFFICER, IN

MONTHS.

DISEASES.

General Diseases.

Syphilis-

(a) Secondary

Gonorrhoea

Local Diseases.

Diseases of the Eve

Co

1- 01

Cases,

JANUARY.

FEBRUARY.

MARCH.

APRIL.

MAT.

JUNE.

59.0

59.6

64.9

69.9

77.6

79.7

63.0

70.0

74.0

84.0

79.0

83.0

Deaths.

- Į

Cases.

Deaths,

Cases.

Deaths.

Cases.

Deaths.

THO

1- 30

12

༢།༠

31

Cases.

Deaths.

of the Ear

"}

">

of the Digestive

System....

:

N

:

:

30

of the Lymphatic

System......

of the Generative

System.....

of the Cellular Tissue

N

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

འ་

:

:

2

**

of the Skin

27

15

16

139

10

18

2 10.00

to to:

20

Injuries, Local Parasites

σ 10

5

a x

10

11

2

12

40

Total....

66

58

43

65

NOR

78

78

:

13

Cases.

:

:

Deaths.

1-

3

Doaths.

18

10

5

12

:

Cases.

Deaths.

}

6

to co

3

Cases.

Deaths.

Cases.

Deaths.

3

1

111

129

Cases.

:

10

:

13

Cases.

Deaths.

5:

Cases.

Deaths.

GAOL, BUT NOT ADMITTED TO THE HOSPITAL DURING THE YEAR 1899.

Cases.

Deaths.

JULY.

AUGUST.

SEPTEMBER.

OCTOBER.

NOVEMBER.

DECEMBER.

YEARLY TOTAL.

REMARKS.

82.9

80.9

80.3

74.8

67.8

66.2

72.0

82.0

85.0

75.0

66.0

62.0

78.0

75.0

11

68129

18

13

1000 10

24

: *

7

19

17

9

41

46

31

j

19

18

30

46

10 10.

1

106

60

:

Cases.

19

45

1

10

71

19

*

12

61

25.

104

1

51

37

78

972

:

96

387

56

JAMES A. Lowsox, Acting Medical Officer.

VICTORIA GAOL, BUT NOT ADMITTED TO HOSPITAL DURING THE YEAR 1899.

OCTOBER.

NOVEMBER. DECEMBER.

JULY.

AUGUST.

SEPTEMBER.

YEARLY TOTAL.

82.9

80.9

80.3

74.8

67.8

66.2

72.0

82.0

85.0

75.0

66.0

62.0

78.0

75.0

REMARKS.

Deaths.

Cases.

Deaths.

10 -

1-6

N

3

co co

Cases.

Deaths.

1

6

:

1

2

15

4

323885

12

11

6

3

26

32

40

29

19

6

76

212

20

::

15

TO LO

33

81

88

co

: 000

91

15

260

23

1430

61

10

218

66

71

36

806

:

JAMES A. Lowsox, Acting Medical Officer.

22208

10

Cases.

Deaths.

77

42

Cases.

Deaths.

Deaths.

Cases.

Deaths.

533

534

Table IV. Showing the RATE of SICKNESS and MORTALITY in VICTORIA GAOL during the Year 1899.

TOTAL NUMBER OF:-

DAILY AVERAGE NUMBER OF :-

RATE PER CENT. OF:-

Daily Average Deaths due Number of all

Daily Average Number of

Sick in Gaol

to Hospital Sick in Hospital

!

Cases, includ-

Sick

Admissions

Prisoners Admis-

Deaths

Diseases, treated in

due to Diseases.

the Cells.

Pri- Sick soners in

in Hos- Gaol. pital.

not in Hos- pital.

to Total Admissions

to Gaol.

admitted sions to to Gaol. Hospital.

ing Skin

to Daily Aver-

age Number of Prisoners.

to

to Diseases

to Total

Daily Average Admissions

Number

of Prisoners.

to Gaol.

4.789

503

1,778

5

434.53 13.09 | 45.32

10.5

3.01

13.4

0.101

JAMES A. Lowson,

Acting Medical Officer.

Table V.---Showing the NUMBER and RESULTS of VACCINATIONS in VICTORIA Gaol.

Year.

during the past ten Years.

Number of Prisoners

Successful.

Unsuccessful.

Vaccinated.

Not inspected,

owing to early discharge from Gaol.

Number of those Vaccinated who showed marks of previous Vaccination.

1890

1,736

1,024

712

1,722

1891

2,836

1,090

1,346

2,521

1892

2,625

1,985

640

2,618

1893

1,417

763

654

1,325

1894

747

242

505

746

1895

942

455

487

941

1896

831

631

200

831

1897

2,830

1,678

1,016

136

2,410

1898

4,507

2,875

1,252

380

4,181

1899

3,378

2,004

1,063

311

3,069

JAMES A. Lowson,

Acting Medical Officer.

Table VI. Showing GENERAL STATISTICS connected with VICTORIA GAOL and the GAOL HOSPITAL

during the past ten Years.

Year.

Admissions to the Gaol.

Daily Average

Number of Prisoners.

Number of Cases treated in Hospital.

Number of less serions Cases, including Skin Diseases, treated in the Cells.

Deaths due to Diseases.

1890

3,444

566

368

699

1891

5,231

507

364

558

1892

5,046

515

312

723

1893

4,010

458

272

523

1894

3,913

455

271

614

5

1895

5,014

472

231

948

7

1896

5,582

514

507

740

10

1897

5,076

462

342

155

4

1898

5,427

511

298

1,033

6

1899

4,789

434.53

503

1,778

5

JAMES A. Lowson,

Acting Medical Officer.

535

Enclosure IV.

Report of the Inspecting Medical Officer of the Tung Wah Hospital.

TUNG WAH HOSPITAL, HONGKONG, 10th March, 1900.

SIR,I have the honour to submit, for the information of His Excellency the Governor, the Annual Report of the Tung Wah Hospital for the year 1899.

The number of patients in the wards at the beginning of the year was 148; 2,542 were admitted during 1899, making a total of 2,790, under treatment; 1,684 were discharged; 852 died; leaving 154 in the Hospital on the evening of 31st December.

The Admissions during the past ten years have been :-

1890, 1891.

1892, .

1893.

1894,...

1895,

1896..

1897.

.2.260

2,514

.2,455

2,255

.2.354

.2,732

2,041

2,776

.2,898

2,542

1898..

1899,.

Of the 2,542 Admissions, 1,491 were treated by the Chinese native doctors: 556 were under Western treatment; 495 are classed as transferred to other Hospitals. In this 495, however, 75 cases of Plague and 1 case of Small-pox- brought to Tung Wah Hospital in a dying condition, and are allowed to die before removal to Kennedy Town-are included for convenience of classification, so that the actual number removed elsewhere for treatinent was 419. These are distributed as follows:- 19 to the Government Civil Hospital, 2 to the Lunatic Asylum, 135 to Kennedy Town Hospital, 262 to the Tung Wah Branch Hospital, and 1 to the Italian Convent.

Ninety thousand and eighty-one (90,081) consultations in the Out-Patient Department are reported by the native doctors. In 1898 the number was 90,880.

Two thousand two hundred and sixty-one (2,261) vaccinations were performed, as compared with 1,588 in the previous year, in Hongkong and the out-lying districts, as shown in the appended Table, by a Public Vaccinator in connection with this Hospital, under the direct supervision of Dr. CHUNG.

Seven hundred and eighty-eight (788) male Destitutes were supplied with food and shelter for varying periods during the year, and given such further assistance as was considered desirable by the Directors of the Hospital. They came from sources as follows :---

Shipwrecked sailors and fishermen,

Sent from Registrar-General's Office,

Brought by Police,

·

Lodged for Pó Léung Kuk Committee, Arrived from Saigon,

**

Japan,

Amoy,

>>

Canton, Swatow,

Recommended by various hongs, &c.............

75

.142

8

70

418

5

23

11

20

16

788

Of the 852 deaths, 268 (177 male and 91 female) were within few hours after reception into the Receiving Ward. classed in the Table showing Admissions and Mortality as 146 as under Chinese treatment.

moribund on admission, death occurring Thus of the 268 moribund cases 122 are having been under Western treatment, and

Of these, 852 deaths, 32 bodies (27 male and 5 female) were sent to the Public Mortuary for internal examination for the purpose of obtaining the exact cause of death.

:

:

14

536

In addition to the above, 457 dead bodies (326 male and 131 female) were brought to the Tung Wah Hospital mortuary to await burial. Of these, 108 (76 male and 32 female) were removed to the Public Mortuary for post mortem examination, as suspected Plague, Typhoid fever, poisoning, etc.

Some of those who die in the Hospital and of those brought to the Hospital Mortuary are buried privately by their relatives, but a majority are buried at the expense of the Hospital funds. Large number of poor people who die in the Government Civil Hospital, and abandoned dead bodies found by the Police and taken to the Public Mortuary, are also buried by the charitable funds of the Tung Wah Hospital. During the year free burial was thus provided for 1,464 persons.

The Hospital Staff remained the same as in the previous year. On account of the high price of every necessity, Dr. CHUNG has at the end of the year taken the opportunity to recommend an increase of pay by 20 per cent to all employees working under him, hitherto the pay has been almost the same ever since the opening of this Hospital.

THE HOSPITAL BUILDINGS.

The Ko Fong Wards for the accommodation of female patients will soon be out of use as the Tung Wah Hospital extension scheme should soon be in active progress. The Foundation Stone for same was laid by His Excellency the Governor on the 25th November, 1899, amidst great éclat. The chief improvement during the year has been the erection of an Incinerator for destroying all condemned clothing, beddings, etc.

The wards and the ward work practically remained the same as in the previous year.

OPERATIONS.

The following operations were performed during the year :-

Amputation through the forearm,

of fingers,

Plastic operation for harelip,

Lateral Lithotomy for Verical Calculus, Operation for extraction of Bullets,..

Reduction of Dislocation of Shoulder-joint, Circumcision,.

Removal of necrosed bones,

Operations on eye, .....

1

2

1

4

2

1

5

2

5

2

.17

Excision of Tumours,

Paracentesis Abdominis,

(1 Lithotomy case died 4 hours after operation from Secondary Hemorrhage.) During the year 8 administrations of chloroform inhalation were given to cases in which a general ancesthesia was required; solution of conaine being chiefly used for minor operations.

Two midwifery cases were received into the Hospital attended by Dr. CHUNG, one of which required the use of forceps. Both cases did well.

In the Dispensary, attached to the Receiving Ward, the following minor operations were done by the Resident Surgeon on out-patients :-

60 Incisions for opening of abscess.

10 Removal of needles lodged under the skin.

4 Tapping for Hydrocele.

3 Urethral calculi.

20 Catheberization for metral Stricture and Retention of urine.

50 Tooth extraction.

Dr. THOMSON was in charge of the hospital at various times for about four months of the year and during the remaining months I have acted for him. Dr. CHUNG continues to carry out his duties with great tact and discretion, and it is largely due to him that Western Medicine is making the progress it is in the Tung Wah. It is especially gratifying to me to report on the great improvement in the Tung Wah Hospital administration of late years, as my previous criticisms have probably most to do with such improvement, bringing official pressure to bear on the authorities responsible for the administration to a sense of what should have been done long ago.

had

I hope in the near future to see a scheme finished for improving the nursing in the institution, but the difficulty of procuring suitable female help has postponed a commencement, as also the want of accommodation for same. However, it will soon come if we get a little assistance through our Chinese Directors.

TABLES.

537

I append the following Tables:-

I. Showing the Admissions and Mortality in the Tung Wah Hospital during the year 1899, with the proportion of cases treated by Western and Chinese methods res- pectively;

II. Showing General Statistics relating to the Tung Wah Hospital during the year 1899; III. Showing Vaccinations in, and in connection with, the Tung Wah Hospital during the

year 1899.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your obedient Servant,

Dr. J. M. ATKINSON,

Principal Civil Medical Officer,

&c.,

&c.,

&c.

JAMES A. Lowsox,

Inspecting Medical Officer.

Table I.-Showing the ADMISSIONS and MORTALITY in the TUNG WAH HOSPITAL during the Year 1899, with the proportion of Cases treated by Western and Chinese methods.

GENERAL DISEASES:

ADMISSIONS.

DEATHS.

Western Chinese Treatment. Treatment.

Total.

Western Chinese Treatment. Treatment..

Total.

*Small-pox,

4

1

*Measles,

1

1

:

*Plague,

468

468

75

1

75

Influenza,

Diphtheria,

Enteric Fever,

Dysentery,

Beri-beri,

12

15

1

1

::

5

7

37

45

— CO

1

3

67

212

279

17

106

Malarial Fever,-

a. Intermittent,

9

63

72

b. Remittent,

31

195

226

e. Pernicious Remittent,.

1

7

*རྩ::©

25

123

Erysipelas,

1

1

2

Pyœmia,

1

2

1

1

Septicemia,

Tetanus,

Tubercle,

4

Syphilis,

29

12

4242

16

10

6

2

8

3

41

4

Hydrophobia,

Alcoholism,

1

1

1

DORK NOT NOONG-

5

2

1

1

2

Rheumatism,

21

24

45

New Growth, non-malignant,

1

1

:

malignant,

4

10

Anæmia,

30-100

17

Debility,

LOCAL DISEASES :-

Diseases of the Nervous System,

34

29

""

of the Eye,

22

of the Circulatory System, of the Respiratory System,

22

68

of the Digestive System,.

52

of the Lymphatic System,

of the Urinary System,

of the Generative System:-

""

Male Organs,

Female Organs,

of the Organs of Locomotive,.....

of the Cellular Tissues,

of the Skin,

General Injuries,...

*NNOIN 2*2*8-

38

56

389

457

124

176

7

22

17

10.

1

4

11

44

59

36

37

3 ཧྨ ཎྞསྶནྡྷཱ@ 2 ཀྪཱུ

8

39

18

19

67

11

30

41

22

78

**

13

41

54

31

262

293

17

46

63

10

39

00

14

22

11

7

::

33

103

24

10 00

---

73

1

::

Local Injuries,...

Poison,

36

109

I

145 I

**

7

1

Total,...

1,051†

1,491

2,542

2121

640

852

* Transferred at once, unless actually dying. to Kennedy Town.

Includes 485 sent (76, as below, after death) to Kennedy Town and other Hospitals.

Includes I small-pox and 75 Plague, received in extremis, and allowed to die before removal to Kennedy Town.

JAMES A. Lowson, Inspecting Medical Officer,

*

538

Table II.-Showing GENERAL STATISTICS relating to the TUNG WAH HOSPITAL during the Year 1899.

Remaining in

Patients.

on

Hospital Ad-

mitted.

31st Dec., 1898.

Total under Dis- Treat charged. ment.

Remaining in

Des- titutes

Dead Bodies brought

Deaths.

Hospital

on

Out- Vaccina- tem- Patients. tious.

to

porarily

31st Dec.,

housed

Hospital Mortuary

1899.

and fed.

for burial.

Male,

131

2,122 2,253

1,436

690

127

61,679

1,055

788

326

Female,

17

420

437

248

162

27

28,402

1,206

131

Total,......

148

2,542 2,790

1,684

852

154

90,081

2,261

457

JAMES A. Lowson, Inspecting Medical Officer.

Table III.-Showing VACCINATIONS at, and in connection with, the TUNG Wan Hospital during the Year 1899.

Hongkong.

Shaukiwan.

Aberdeen.

Stanley.

Yaumati.

Hunghom.

Total.

2,009

24

81

57

68

22

Enclosure V.

2,261

JAMES A. Lowson, Inspecting Medical Officer.

GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL,

HONGKONG, 15th March, 1900.

SIR, I have the honour to submit a short report on the Government Lunatic Asylum during the year 1899, with two tables showing the admissions and deaths that have occurred and the diseases for which the patients were admitted. Sixty-nine patients were admitted, of whom eight died, eleven were sent to Canton and 33 were discharged in the care of friends or relatives.

Europeans.-No female European was admitted during the year. Amongst the males two deaths occurred one the result of debility and the other a melancholic who committed suicide by hanging himself. The case of delusional insanity is that of a German sailor who has been in the Asylum since April 1898. His bodily health is good and he is likely to last for a considerable length of time. The American female lunatic bas been in the Asylum since 4th January, 1895. Her bodily health is good but her mental condition quite incurable.

Chinese.-One death occurred by hanging.

These deaths in the persons of suicidal melancholies are difficult to prevent owing to the faulty construction of the building unless they are constantly kept in a straight jacket, which proceeding in summer is objectionable.

One case of dementia following upon bubonic plague was admitted during the year.

recovered.

He finally

Staff.—Miss BARKER, on the resignation of Miss MCINTOSH, assumed charge of the female side of the Asylum on the 14th March, 1899.

Wardinaster SYDNEY resigned on the 7th August, 1899, and was succeeded by Mr. EDWARD ABBOTT late sick bay Steward II.M.S. Undaunted.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your obedient Servant,

J. BELL,

Medical Officer in Charge of Lunatic Asylums.

THE PRINCIPAL CIVIL MEDICAL OFFICER.

TABLE showing the ADMISSIONS into and DEATHS in the GOVERNMENT LUNATIC ASYLUMS, during each Month of the Year 1899.

539

MONTHS.

Remaining on the 1st

Dis-

EUROPEANS.

Coloured.

CHINESE.

Total Total charged Admissions. Deaths. to

Admissions. Deaths. Admissions. Deaths. Admissions. Deaths.

Canton.

January, 1899,

January,

February,

March,

to:

April,

May,

June,

2

1

2

1

Ι

1

1

1

I

F

ANO

1

3

4.

10

2

4

2

4

July,

August,

1

September,

October,

4

Ι

8

November,

December,

5

12

2

12

Total,...

12

2

7

2

59

10

78

9

11

J. BELL,

Medical Officer in Charge.

TABLE showing the number of patients ADMITTED to the LUNATIC ASYLUMS under the respective diseases.

Mania,

Delusional Insanity,.

Dementia,

Melancholia, Idiocy,

DISEASE.

Total,....

Enclosure VI.

EUROPEANS.

CHINESE, &c.

Male.

Female.

Male.

Female.

1

1

7

I

3

3

35

7

1

NNA: O

9

6

2

12

1

46

19

GOVERNMENT LABORATORY,

HONGKONG, 14th March, 1900.

SIR.--I have the honour to submit a statement of the work done in the Government Laboratory during the year 1899.

2. The work is summarized as follows:-

Description of Cases.

Toxicological,

Potable Waters,

Petroleum oil and fuel,.

Morphine Ordinance,

Food and Drugs Ordinance,

Ores,

Coal, Opium, Sewage,

Fossil resin, Gunny covering, Gunny bags, Blood-

stains, Medicine--one each,

Total,

No. of Articles examined.

29

73

234

7

49

5

30

6

446

540

TOXICOLOGICAL.

3. The toxicological cases investigated comprise eight cases of human poisoning. No cases occurred amongst Europeans. The poison in seven cases was opium and in the other was Datura

Alba.

4. A Chinaman was convicted of throwing vitriol over a sampan woman. No personal injury was caused as the woman at once jumped into the harbour to free herself from the corrosive fluid.

5. A number of Chinese servants were rendered semi-unconscious by partaking of food containing the flower-heads of Datura Alba. The drug had been finely powdered then mixed with lard, which was thereupon mixed in with some ordinary food. The follen-grains of Datura Alba were easily recognized in the lard and byoscine was separated from the urine of the drugged persons.

WATERS.

6. The results of the analyses of samples taken each month from the Pokfulum and Tytam Reservoirs, and from the Kowloon service, indicate that these supplies continue to maintain their excellent qualities. Notwithstanding the increase in the number of residents in the Peak District, the Pokfulum water shows no sign of deterioration.

7. In the district recently leased from the Chinese Government 28 waters have been examined. In an Appendix will be found particulars of the monthly analyses of the public supplies, and of other waters.

S. The Dangerous Goods Ordinance, 1873 and 1892.--Of Petroleum and Petroleum Fuel, 234 samples were examined. Oil imported in tank steamers must undergo examination before being landed here; there are no regulations as to the quality of the oil imported in tins. With a view to ascertain the general nature of the illuminating oil on the Hongkong market, an examination of 50 samples procured from various stores in the Colony was undertaken. The average of the flashing points was 82° F. In every case when buying the samples the cheapest oil was asked for. The results of the experiments are recorded in an Appendix.

9. The Morphine Ordinance.-There were two prosecutions under this Ordinance and seven exhibits were examined.

10. The Food and Drugs Ordinance.--Forty-nine exhibits were examined. The following table shows the results of the examination of 41 samples taken for the purpose of analysis by the Police and by the Sanitary Board :---

Description.

No. of samples. No. found genuine. No. found adulterated.

Beer, Brandy,

Gin,

Milk,

....

Port Wine,

Rum,

Whisky,

3

5

ONO+OCO

0

2

0

4

0

0

14

6

NTN 0 10 10 0

2

12

2

3

5

9

NNNN CO LO OS

11. Eight samples of various kinds of food were examined for the public at the specially low fees laid down in the Ordinance.

12. The result of the systematic method of taking samples by the Police has been that the sale of adulterated liquor, has practically ceased in the Colony. As far as can be ascertained it appears that nearly the whole of the liquor as consumed at licensed houses by soldiers and sailors, is supplied with a certificate of freedom from adulteration either from this laboratory or from the analysts attached to the various distilleries in Great Britain and Ireland.

13. Examinations for the public.-A considerable number of articles of various kinds have been exa- mined for the public. The list comprises ores, coals, liquor, milk, resin, petroleum, opium, medicine, and water. For these examinations the public have paid $1,202.50 in fees.

14. Special reports.

Special reports have been supplied on:-

Liquid fuel.

Destruction of rats.

Sewage.

The British Pharmacopoeia of 1898.

The Discolouration of certain Buoys.

Petroleum lamps.

The Quality of Petroleum as supplied in Hongkong.

Food Preservatives and Colouring Matters.

541

Value of the work done. The value of the analyses performed as determined from the tariff of charges as published in Government Notification No. 319 is $4,235. This amount does not include the value of the analyses undertaken in connection with the Special Reports (see para. 14); also, there is much other work in connection with the laboratory for which nothing has been set down.

16. Library. A number of new standard works dealing in particular with the purification of sewage and water, with explosives and foods, together with some new works of reference of a useful character, have been ordered.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your obedient Servant,

THE PRINCIPAL CIVIL MEDICAL OFFicer.

FRANK BROWNE, Ph. Ch., F.C.S., Government Analyst.

HONGKONG PUBLIC WATER SUPPLIES.

Results of the Monthly Analyses.

Results expressed in grains per Imperial Gallon, (1 in 70,000).

Total Solid

1899.

Month.

Matter

Supply.

dried at 100° C.

Saline Chlorine. Ammo-

nia.

Albume- noid Ammo- nia.

Oxygen absorbed in 4 hours at 80° F.

Nitrites.

Nitrogen Sugar test for Poi-

in the detection Nitrates. of Sewage.

sonous

Metals.

Pokfulum.

4.0

.6

Absent. Absent.

.013

Absent.

Absent. No trace of Sew- Absent.

age indicated.

January

Tytam

4.0

Kowloon

2.7

69 69

.6

.010

.6

9 9

22

>>

27

.013

.008

27

>>

"

"

>>

A

>>

Pokfulum.

4.0

February

Tytam...

4.0

Kowloon

3.0

666

.6

.003

Absent.

""

وو

>>

**

""

.6

.010

27

""

25

""

>>

""

.G

.006

.008

""

وو

>>

>>

22

Pokfulum.

4.0

March

Tytam....

4.0

Kowloon

3.3

Pokfulum.

5.7

April

Tytam

5.0

Kowloon

3.0

.6

999980

.010

Absent.

"7

""

>>

22

""

.010

22

22

27

27

""

""

.010

.008

""

""

""

22

>>

.65

.006

"

""

.65

.006

.008 Absent.

""

.006

.008

27

27

RAR

35

>>

"

>>

Pokfulum.

5.7

.6

May

Tytam

5.7

.6

Kowloon

3.0

.6

666

.013

.024

"

>>>

23

.010

.008

""

3 9

"

.013

.008

27

17

ARR

Pokfulum.

4.7

.6

June

Tytam

5.8

.6

Kowloon

2.7

.6

990

.010

Absent.

33

"7

>>

.013

">

"

"

""

.003

.016

"

"2

*

27

AAS

""

37

وو

Pokfulum.

4.0

.6

July

Tytam

4.3

.6

Kowloon

2.7

.6

996

.013

ARR

.010

.013

ARA

Absent.

"7

27

.016

"

Pokfulum.

4.0

.6

August

Tytam

4.3

Kowloon

3.8

.6

699

.003

Absent.

27

""

17

"

.6

.005

22

""

""

>>

.005

.016

22

""

*

Pokfulum.

4.0

.6

September

Tv tam

4.3

Kowloon

3.0

.6

999

.006

**

""

.6

.006

22

21

Absent.

""

"

י

.006

.016

27

Pokfulum.

4.0

October..

Tytam

4.5

.6

Kowloon

2.7

.6

999

.6

.006

>>

Absent.

23

.006

"

77

"

*

.006

.008

"

37

Pokfulum.

4.3

November

Tytam Kowloon

4.0

2.7

.6

December

Pokfulum. Tytam Kowloon

4.3

.6

3.5 2.7

999 999

.6

.009

Abseut.

"

>

.6

.006

27

27

23

.003

.016

A

>>

27

77

**

**

.015 .015

Absent.

"

"

*

"?

""

.006

.016

27

#

27

Date.

WATERS.

RESULTS EXPRESSED IN GRAINS PER IMPERIAL GALLON, (1 Ix 70,000).

Situation.

Depth.

Total

solid matter

dried

at 100° C.

Saline

Chlorine. Ammo-

nia.

Albu- Oxygen Nitrogen menoid absorbed | in Nitrates Ammo- in 4 hours and nia. at 80° F. Nitrites.

Nitrites.

Sugar test for the detection of

sewage.

Poi-

sonons

metals.

General remarks.

""

>>

Fecal odour.

Fecal odour.

Fecal odour.

1899.

May

8 Well at Sha Tin Police Station,

12 feet.

19.0

7.0

Absent. Absent.

.027

.115

Absent.

No trace of sewage indicated.

Absent.

AAA

00:00 00

""

at Ping Shan Village,

14

9.0

2.0

.010

.172

""

وو

""

at Kowloon City,

5.3

.7

.0028

.017

>>

""

...

""

at Tai Po Hü,

4.3

.0056

.040

""

""

29

93

29

29

ARA

29

2778

333 3

""

at Kowloon City, A.,

2.1

.0112

"

}}

>>

""

at "Rosemeath," Kowloon,

17

8.0

2.0.

Absent.

.003

.065

""

19

وو

>>

at Kowloon City, B.,

12

63.

1.2

.0084

.100

.049

>>

>>

وو

at Cheung Chau, A.,

18

10.5

.0280

"}

>>

29 Spring at Tai Po Hü,

29 Well at Kowloon City, C.,

3.7

.5

.0028

.010

Absent.

Present.

Absent.

"

July

3

>>

at Un Loong, A.,

*9

8

"}

10

">

3.5

.0224 .0112

وو

:7

Absent. Absent.

.030

Absent.

>>

""

Sewage indicated.

No trace of sewage indicated. Sewage indicated.

No trace of sewage indicated.

""

Sewage indicated.

No trace of sewage indicated. Sewage indicated.

No trace of sewage indicated.

وو

>>

>>

22

RASA ARABERA A

وو

28

28

te te te te bo to co co co co co

>>

at Un Loong, B.,

1.0

.0140 .0028

Prevent

"?

at Sha Po,

1。

4.2

.0420 Absent.

""

at Tai 0,

12

"

at Cheung Chau, B.,

22

22

246.0

.0056 .0056

Absent.

>>

80.0

21.6

.0028 Absent. .040

1.151

Present.

";

at Lamina Island,

4

1.8

.0028 .0028

.020

>>

"

at Sheung Shui,

27.0

7.7

.0028 Absent.

.741

""

Absent.

Present. Sewage indicated.

>>

at Tung Chung,

6

3.0

.0014 .0016

.080

.411

Absent.

"}

"}

at Tai Po Hü at foot of hill,

2

1.0

Absent. Absent.

.010

"

77

at An Tan, Hill-side, A.,

2

.5

.0014

.023

...

>>

""

""

""

33

at Cheung Chan, C.

20

118.0

44.8

>

""

>>

at Tai O, Hill-side,

15

1.0

Absent.

.0028

...

وو

"5

.013

""

9

""

"}

29 Stream flowing into Cheung Sha Wan,

3.7

.3 Absent.

.010

Absent.

"}

""

No trace of sewage indicated.

}}

Aug. 19, Well at Fu Ti An,

1

2.8

97

19

at Tung Chung, Hill-side,

3.8

""

Oct.

4

at An Tau, Hill-side, B.,

2

at An Tan, Paddy-field,

B

br br br ja

.006

""

""

"}

""

"2

.0028

.013

>>

>>

>>

"}

.0028

.003

""

""

""

""

.0028

.003

"}

""

""

"}

23

at No. 3, Fuk Hing Lane,

14

.2000 .0056

...

...

>>

Nov. 16

at No. 4, Queen's Road Central,

6.3

.4760 .0560

Dee. 4

at Tung To, Foot of hill,

4

...

:

.4

.0028

Absent. .030

at Tung To, Hill-side,

:

.4

Absent.

.0028

.030

:..

>>

Present.

Absent.

Sewage indicated.

No trace of sewage indicated.

"}

...

""

542

Fecal odour. Animalcula. Animalcula.

RESULTS of the EXAMINATION of 50 samples of PETROLEUM procured from Stores in various parts of the Colony of Hongkong.

No. of

S.

Place where Purchased.'

543

Cost per Catty.

Flashing Points, (Abel close test).

Cash.

12, Queen's Road, West, A...

54

74° F.

274,

121,

54,

44

84

*

59

50

86

"

50

73

"

""

7

12,

8

237, Hollywood Road,

398, Queen's Road, West,

122, Queen's Road, East,

44

81

48

85

48

""

B,

73

40

86

9

190,

52

79

>

10

179,

56

83

11

54,

60

76

12

117,

58

82

13

32, Ship Street,..

50

83

14

152, Wellington Street,

52

84

15

33, Gage Street,

56

85

16

28, D'Aguilar Street,

56

87

17

45, Lyndhurst Terrace,

56

79

18

13, Aberdeen Street, a,

56

64

19

254, Praya Ceutral,

56

80

20.

58, Staunton Street,.

62

88

21

16, New Street,

62

90

22

1, Upper Rutter Street,

89

23

18, Staunton Street,.

88

24

18, Cochrane Street,.

62

89

25

8,

62

74

26

58, Wanchai Road,

50

89

27

63,

50

84

28

14 B, Praya East,

50

85

29

39, Wanchai Road,

50

85

30

36, Praya East,..........

50

75

31

40, Wanchai Road,

50

76

32

135, Market Street, Hunghom,....

50

72

33

45, Reclamation Street, Yaumati,

50

87

34

28, Pokfulum Road,

50

90

35

58, Third Street,

50

89

36

22, First Street,

50

37

46, Second Street,.

50

38

38, High Street,

50

89

39

360, Queen's Road, West,

50

87

40

43, Station Street N., Yaumati,

50

87

41

32,

44

63,

45

46

26,

47

48

49

224,

50

182,

42

43

1, Elgin Road, Kowloon,

""

77, Kramer Street, Taikoktsui,

59

24, West Street,

99

13, Aberdeen Street, B,.

158, Hollywood Road,

29

19

50

92

50

74

50

91

50

76

50

80

50

74

50

73

50

87

50

89

50

71

419

23

No. 1900

HONGKONG.

TELEGRAMS RESPECTING PROPOSED ERECTION OF MEMORIAL FOR BRITISH SOLDIERS

DIED DURING THE PRESENT WAR.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency

the Officer Administering the Government.

(1.)

(Editor," Daily Express," London, to Governor, Hongkong.)

Sir HENRY BLAKE,

Hongkong.

LONDON, 21st May, 1900.

Kindly cable opinion on scheme for erecting hall for heroes Memorial British dead London.

PEARSON, Daily Express.

(2.)

(Officer Administering the Government, Hongkong, to Editor, “ Daily Express,” London.)

PEARSON, Daily Express, London.

Cannot express opinion till details of scheme come by post.

(3.)

HONGKONG, 23rd May, 1900.

(3

(Editor Daily Express," London, to Governor, Hongkong.)

Sir HENRY BLAKE,

Hongkong.

GASCOIGNE.

:

LONDON, 23rd May, 1900.

It is proposed form Imperial Committee composed representatives Empire who shall formulate plans and build in London memorial worth enshrine names Empire's soldiers died present war.

Prince WALES given project hearty approval. Will give personal assistance if Committee formed. Plan receives widespread support. Among those sending approvals Balfour, Wyndham, Lansdowne, Wolseley, Lord Mayor, Dilke, Strathcona, Grenfell, Malta, Jermingham, Trinidad, Hardinge, Zanzibar, Winter, Newfoundland, Bathurst, St. Helena, Earl Kintore. Hundreds in Army, Navy, Arts, Sciences. Will you kindly wire adhesion if approve?

PEARSON, Daily Express.

!

251

No 15

1900

HONGKONG.

REPORT ON THE NEW TERRITORY DURING THE FIRST YEAR OF BRITISH ADMINISTRATION.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government.

No. 61.

SIR,

GOVERNMENT HOUSE, HONGKONG, 19th February, 1900.

I have the honour to forward for your information a report which by my direction has been prepared by Mr. STEWART LOCKHART, Colonial Secretary, shewing the result up to the present of the operations of the various departments in the New Territory. Mr. LOCKHART's report shows very clearly the difficulties with which we have had to contend and their satisfactory solution. The work of arranging the districts and sub-districts, with their committees, was carried out by Mr. LOCKHART with conspicuous energy and ability; it involved much physical labour and required the exercise of tact and discretion. In this arrangement of districts Mr. LoCKHART was ably assisted by Mr. T'sor, the First Chinese Clerk.

2. Much of the satisfactory feeling now being shown by the people is due to the sense of security, induced by the police arrangements and personal exertions of Mr. MAY, the Captain Superintendent of Police, whose vigorous action against the disturbance of the peace by land and sea has brought quiet and protection to a community hitherto subject to frequent attacks from gangs of armed robbers and pirates.

3. Since Mr. LOCKHART's return to Hongkong in July, the work of the New Territory has been carried on by Messrs. MESSER, KEMP and HALLIFAX, three Cadets who are carrying out their instructions in a most satisfactory manner.

4. It remains to be seen to what extent the New Territory can be developed, Much depends upon the possibility of producing succulent grasses or trees of commercial value upon the hill slopes. If the former, there is no reason why very valuable cattle breeding industry should not develop. Mr. FORD is about to try some experiments with camphor trees and vines, either would be a valuable addition to the resources of the Colony. No systematic examination of the Territory for minerals has yet been made. Silver exists in Lantau Island, where some years ago a considerable sum was expended on a silver mine by a Chinese Syndicate. Kaolin of good quality is found on the mainland, and examination of the rocks that replace the granite in various districts may result in the discovery of payable mines.

5. It will be necessary to complete the main road through Táipó-hui to the frontier, this and the completion of the police stations and quarters for the staff at Táipó-hui are the only Public Works that I contemplate at present. Later on it will be necessary to make practicable roads between Táipó-hui and Deep Bay and Castle Peak Bay. The existing roads are not even bridlepaths being mere footpaths zigzagging over the narrow divisions between the paddy fields.

6. A request was made to me ky elders from Ping Shan, au important village in the centre of the April disturbances, that a school should be opened for the teaching of English. I promised to accede to their request, and intend to do so as soon as possible.

The Right Honourable

JOSEPH CHAMBERLAIN, M.P.,

&c.,

&c.,

&c.

252

7. So far the experiment of taking over one hundred thousand Chinese and bringing their customs as far as possible into line with our ideas of good government has worked satisfactorily. I find the people peaceable and industrious, and I am informed on good authority that they are now quite contented with our rule, and are envied by the inhabitants of the Sam Chun valley that we held in Military occupation for some months. The Captain

The Captain Superintendent of Police informs me that he hopes before long to be able to reduce the strength of the police force in the different stations, and with economy in the administration of the Territory it will in my opinion pay its way in a few years and leave an appreciable balance to increase the General Revenue of the Colony.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient, humble Servant,

HENRY A. BLAKE, Governor, Sc.

SIR,

COLONIAL SECRETARY'S OFFICE,

HONGKONG, 7th February, 1900.

I have the honour to submit the following Report on the New Territory since the inauguration of British rule.

DISTRICTS AND SUB-DISTRICTS.

After the disturbance, which occurred when the New Territory was first taken over, had been settled, steps were at once taken to define the Districts and Sub- Districts under section 4 of the Local Communities Ordinance, No. 11 of 1899.

The principle followed in dividing the territory into Districts and Sub-Dis- tricts was to adhere as closely as possible to the divisions recognised by the Chinese inhabitants for many years.

These divisions as a rule follow the natural features of the country. Each sub-district on the mainland is in most cases coutained in a valley, throughout which are dotted groups of villages and small hamlets.

In some cases a sub-district originally arose from the combination of a num- ber of villages. Clan fights have been a common practice in the San On District for centuries and it has not been unusual for groups of villages to combine together

purposes of offence and defence.

for

Each of the Islands has been treated as a sub-district with the exception of the large island of Lantao, which has been divided into three sub-districts.

When considering the divisions of the territory, it appeared advisable not to include within the Local Communities Ordinance that portion of the territory to the South of the Kowloon range of hills, lying between Liümun on the East and Laichikok on the West. As this area is immediately contiguous with what has hitherto been known as British Kowloon, it was thought best, for police, sanitary, and other purposes, not to treat it differently from the older portions of the Colony, especially as the inhabitants are well acquainted with the laws and customs of Hongkong proper.

The island of Lamma also, owing to its proximity to Aberdeen, was excluded from the operation of the Local Communities Ordinance.

On the 25th of May, a list of the chief districts and sub-districts on the mainland and islands was gazetted, and a supplementary list was published on the 7th of July.

NUMBER OF DISTRICTS, SUB-DISTRICTS AND VILLAGES,

The territory has been divided into 8 districts and 48 sub-districts. An alphabetical list of village has been compiled. villages on the mainland and in the islands amounts to 597.

His Excellency

Sir HENRY A. BLAKE, G.C.M.G.,

The total number of This number includes

Governor, &c.,

HONGKONG.

253

even hamlets of two or three houses, which were considered as belonging to larger villages when my report of last year was drawn up, or in some cases omitted owing to the somewhat hurried nature of my first visit to the territory. Some of these villages are walled, the object being, as I pointed out in my former report, to afford the inhabitants greater security if attacked by robbers and to place them in a stronger position for purposes of defence in case of clan feuds. One of these walled villages in the sub-district of Lung Yeuk T'au was once besieged for three months by robbers. A map * is attached (Appendix No. I) on which the districts and sub-districts are marked,

APPOINTMENT OF COMMITTEE-MEN FOR SUB-DISTRICTS.

After the districts and sub-districts had been defined, circulars were issued to all the villages on the mainland and in the islands, requesting the villagers to send in the names of such persons as they wished to recommend for appointment as Committee-men of the sub-districts under section 4 of the Local Communities Ordinance.

Every village with a population of from 50 to 100 persons was entitled to nominate one Committee-man, as were also the smaller villages, the combined populations of which amounted from 50 to 100 persons. In the case of a large village, à Committee-man was allowed for every hundred of its population.

The names of the Committee-men for the sub-districts were duly submitted and approved by the Governor.

The first list was published in the Gazette on the 7th of July and a second list on the 15th of the same month.

On the 2nd of August, the Committee-men of the castern portion of the territory waited on the Governor at Táipó, and on the 4th of August the Committee-men of the western portion waited on His Excellency at P'ing-shan. I attach a copy of the Governor's remarks on those occasions and of the replies of the Committee-men (see Appendix No. II).

These Committee-men have formed a useful link between the Government and the villagers, and have been of much assistance in explaining to the people the objects of the various measures of Government which have been introduced from The Committee-men as a rule are those who possess influence in to, and whose lead is those to whom the g them to elucidate

tion 5 of the Local

No Chairmen of Committees have been ap Communities Ordinance, and it is not proposed to make such appointments until experience has shown them to be desirable.

No local tribunals have been established under Part VI of the Ordinance. It is very doubtful whether it will be ever necessary, even if it were regarded as desirable, to bring this part of the Ordinance into force.

LAND.

After the hoisting of the flag and the appointment of Sub-District Committee- men, attention was given without delay to the work of land registration.

I attach a memorandum on Chinese land tenure (see Appendix No. III) which has been prepared with the assistance of Mr. MESSER and Mr. T'so1. Á perusal of this memorandum will, I think, show that, though the Chinese system may be excellent in theory, it has not been well carried out in practice, with the result that the land question has proved one of great difficulty.

The Land Office in Victoria was constituted the head office. A branch office was established at Táipó in July under Mr. MESSER, assisted by a Chinese staff, and another at P'ing-shán in the month of October under Mr. KEMP, to deal with the work of registration in the districts north of the Kowloon range of hills and in the islands of the East, whilst the head office in Hongkong, with the assistance of Mr. CHAMPMAN and Mr. KING, attended to the work of registration in the districts south of the Kowloon range of hills and in the islands to the West of Hongkong.

The first object aimed at was to secure the registration of all the owners of cultivated land in the New Territories in order to prepare a Crown Rent Roll.

On the 12th of July a Chinese proclamation was issued by the Governor (see Appendix No. IV), informing the people of the procedure which the Government

* Not printed.

254

intended to adopt in connection with the registration of land, and the amount of land tax that would be charged.

The procedure adopted in inquiring into and registering claims is as follows. The Assistant Land Oficer, having settled which sub-district is to be dealt with, issues a notice to the villages in such sub-district, informing the inhabitants that their claims must be sent in by a certain date, and distributes forms (see Appendix No. V) to be filled in, giving the owners of land to understand that such forms must be accompanied, whenever possible, by such title deeds as the claimants may possess.

In all cases of registration the landlords or their representatives and the tenants are required to bring their title deeds to the Land Office in person. The landlords in every case have to report the names of their tenants, and the latter, in addition to giving a detailed account of the land occupied by them, have to report the names of their landlords. The object of requiring a report from both landlords and tenants is to provide against false and fictitious claims and to save confusion.

Title deeds are of two classes, officially stamped deeds which have been re- gistered and stamped by the Chinese Magistrate of the San On District; private deeds which are not officially stamped and which are records of private sales only (see Appendix No. VIA.B.C.).

In many cases deeds have been lost or destroyed. When this happens, the claimants to the land are required to produce substantial proofs of their ownership, such as their rent roll, receipts from the Chinese Government for land tax, and other particulars pertinent to the land in question.

The claimants have to report the nature of the land, whether cultivated, fertile or otherwise, the kinds and number of crops it produces, the rent paid, &c. The object of this is to help the Land Officers in their classifications; and the informa- tion is important owing to the fact that the Crown rent charged varies according to the several classes of land.

Owners or occupiers report their land in maus or Chinese acres, but as it has not been the general custom in the districts to calculate the area of land by maus, but rather by the amount of grain required to sow a field, they also report the area of their land in this manner, two and a half tau of orain being canivolan. to one mau (0.1515 English

But even this

official standard me and at Shat'aukok

throughout the U

The 1sm Tau of 8 shing is employed in the Ts'iin Wán and some other Districts. The areas reported can only be regarded as approximate for the present and no exact data can be obtained until the survey of the territory has been completed.

Claimants also have to state the situation of their fields. They generally give the local name of the land and the nearest village, but since no exact indications are given of the situation, it will not be easy to find any field from the description given by the claimants.

The Land Officer gives a number to each form filled up by a claimant, and a corresponding number to the title deed, if there be any, which will facilitate future reference.

After all the claims to land in the special district have been reported and ex- amined, a list (see Appendix No. VII) is posted in the neighbourhood of each village of all owners of land and of the holdings claimed, and the villagers are called upon to report any claim that is not inserted in the list or any alteration that may be required to make the list as accurate as possible.

After the Crown rent fixed as due on a claim has been paid, a provisional cer- tificate of title will be issued in the first instance, and if, after the lapse of sufficient time, no dispute regarding the claim arises, a certificate of the owner's title will be issued and registered.

I attach a memorandum by Mr. BRUCE SHEPHERD on the work done in the Head Land Office at Victoria in respect of the area south of the Kowloon hills and the islands to the West of the Colony (see Appendix No. VIII).

Although the system of land registration adopted by the Chinese Government is apparently simple, the difficulties that have been experienced in connection with it show it to be of the most unsatisfactory nature, especially as not much reliance can be placed upon the accuracy of any title deeds registered under it.

1

255

One great difficulty has been suspicion on the part of the inhabitants of the intentions of the Government. The people seemed to fear that the Government intended to take their land away from them and, in order to effect this object, wished to find out the owners by inducing them to register all their lands.

Before the territory was taken over the Governor issued a proclamation in Chinese, a translation of which will be found in Appendix No. IX. In this pro- clamation the people are assured that "their commercial and landed interests will be "safeguarded and their usages and good customs will not in any way be interfered (6 with,"

" and that "as subjects of the great British Empire their perfect freedo:n "from oppression is assured. Should they have any complaint to make the "Governor will always be willing to hear it and to order what is right."

(6

When the territory was taken over the Governor in a speech assured the people "that the taxes will be equal and the revenue will be collected justly. You need now have no fear of being squeezed by the officials. If exactions are made in "excess of the just charges, the Governor will dismiss the officials responsible. "The taxes collected will be expended in maintaining order and in public improve- "ments" (see Appendix No. X).

In the proclamation regarding land registration issued in July, His Excellency the Governor stated: "If any one has been forcibly deprived of his land or been "fraudulently induced to sell land at a low price, he may present a petition to the "District Officer, if he lives north of the Kowloon range of hills, or, if he lives "south of it, to the Registrar General or the Visiting Officer to be forwarded to the "Squatters' Board for enquiry," (see Appendix No. IV).

It may seem peculiar that suspicion should have arisen, seeing that His Excellency the Governor informed the inhabitants both by proclamation and by speech that the tenure of land would remain practically undisturbed and that the Chinese authorities repeatedly notified the inhabitants that the tenure of land would remain the same as before and that the rights of property would be respected. But, as is well nown, the Chinese are a suspicious race and it is not an easy matter to allay their suspicions when once aroused.

Another cause of difficulty and delay has been the ignorance of the land- lords regarding their own land. For generations landowners have been con- tent to collect their rents without ever having taken the trouble to enquire into the land itself, which has been left entirely under the control of the tenants. These tenants have changed from time to time; sub-leased the land; sold the right of cultivation or mortgaged that right, without consulting the landowners who were quite satisfied so long as the rent was regularly paid. It has often happened that some crafty tenant has asked his landlord to reduce his rent, giving as an excuse that it was impossible to make the land pay unless the rent were reduced, and that if the reduction were not agreed to the tenant must give up the land. The landlord, who has inherited the land without knowing any particulars regarding it, is practically at the mercy of his tenant and is constrained to comply since it is impossible for him to take over possession of land, which in many cases is far re- moved from his own village or district. Besides, tenants generally form a agreeing among themselves that no other person shall be allowed to take over cultivation from the tenant in occupation. It is easy to see how such farming rings are able to boycot the landlords. In fact, it is not an unusual proceeding for tenants, taking advantage of the ignorance of their landlords, to make an ab- solute sale of a part of the land, the part retained being sufficient to pay the

rent.

ring,

A reference to paragraph 12 of Mr. BRUCE SHEPHERD's memorandum (Ap- pendix No. VIII) shows that farmers or tenants have made a stand against the clans, their landlords. He states: The clans and farmers agree that the farmers are "absolute owners of the soil in perpetuity, but have been paying money or produce "to the clans for generations, which the clans claim to be rent payable to them. "The case for the farmers is that the land is and always has been theirs absolutely, "free from rent, and that the amount paid by them to the clans was the Govern- ment land tax, which they claim to pay direct to the Hongkong Government "without the intervention of the clans." It is hoped that some way out of this difficulty will soon be found.

A further source of delay has arisen from the fact that much of the land under cultivation has never been reported to, or registered by the Chinese Government. According to Chinese law all cultivated land must be registered, and should any land be discovered that has not been registered, the Government either enforces

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registration or confiscates the property after due notice has been given and a reasonable time allowed for registration. Long experience of their own Government methods has made the inhabitants distrustful of officials generally

-a distrust which cannot be easily overcome at once and which will require time to remove entirely. This want of faith in the justice of Government, and the fact that they are the possessors of land which has not been registered, have made owners most reluctant to report their land. They are afraid that the Government, having learned all the circumstances, might resume possession of their holdings.

Delay has also been due to disputes between individual landlords, as distinct from clans, and tenants as to whether rent is to be paid to the landlords or to the Government. These disputes have arisen owing to the tenants having confounded the rent due to their landlords and Crown rent due to the Government. The tenants have been under the impression that, if they made payment to the Govern- ment, they would not have to pay rent to their landlords. They thought that, if they paid taxes directly to the Government, they would forthwith be regarded as the owners of the land because, according to Chinese law or custoin, whoever pays the tax on any land is regarded as the owner of that land. They hoped by this step they would gain the land and be freed from the payment of rent to their landlords.

The landlords, being afraid of losing their rent as well as their land, were in great perplexity. Moreover, they did not seem to know for certain whether the tenants had the sanction of the Government for refusing to pay rent. At first they seemed inclined to refrain from: reporting their claims to land altogether, but they finally represented the matter to Government, as did also the tenants on their side, the work of land registration being in the meantime at a standstill. juncture the proclamation, dated the 20th of October, was issued, informing tenants that they should pay their rents to their landlords as heretofore (see Appendix No. XI).

At this

This proclamation proved so satisfactory that the work of registration of claims proceeded rapidly.

The small owners of land have shown themselves the most eager and willing to report, while the large owners of land and the clans have not been so prompt and have always asked for time to find out particulars regarding their property, of which they are ignorant. As a rule, the tenants of the clans have extended the area of land cultivated by them without having informed the clans. The result is that the returns furnished by the clans and their tenants seldom agree, the returns from the clans showing much less land under cultivation than that returned by their tenants. This is owing to the clans being willing to pay Crown rent only on such land as was originally leased to the tenants, while at the same time they receive increased rent from their tenants for their encroachments. Under these circumstances the importance of obtaining returns from both landlords and tenants, so that they may check each other, is obvious.

So far as can be judged, the areas reported have never been exact owing to Jack of surveys and any fixed standard of measurement, the deeds of sale in many cases reciting that the boundaries are clearly defined but that the area has not yet been ascertained.

Up to the 20th January last Mr. MESSER had registered at Táipó 21,736 claims and Mr. KEMP at P'ing-shán 5,613 claims.

It was thought advisable to have the question of claims settled before proceeding to collect any Crown rent. Now that such satisfactory progress has been made with the work of registration, no time will be lost in fixing the Crown rents to be paid as accurately as possible and making the necessary collections for the past and the present year.

As Mr. SHEPHERD states in his memorandum (Appendix No. VIII), arrange- ments have been made for the voluntary registration of all Chinese deeds by memorial under The Deeds Registration Ordinance of 1843.

It was thought at one time that it would be well to grant Crown Leases in exchange for existing Chinese titles, but, as Mr. SHEPHERD points out, the Govern- ment can only grant leases for a term not exceeding 99 years from the date of the Convention under which the New Territory is leased to Great Britain, so the idea of granting such Crown Leases had to be abandoned.

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When it is remembered that great confusion has existed in the matter of land in the New Territory for years and that disputes and family feuds have been general in consequence, it is not surprising that, now an endeavour is being made to adjust all difficulties and to introduce a well-ordered system, there should be many cases requiring re-adjustment by the Government.

The Government has come to the conclusion that such disputes can be most easily and readily dealt with by a Land Court, especially established for the purpose, and it is hoped that such a Court will shortly be created by law, as it cannot fail to be a great boon to the inhabitants of the New Territory.

BOTANICAL AND AFFORESTATION DEPARTMENT.

I attach a brief report (see Appendix No. XII) from Mr. FORD, Superintendent of the Botanical and Afforestation Department, which shows that steps have already been taken to protect trees in the New Territory. At the suggestion of Mr. FORD, a notice was issued in Chinese (see Appendix No. XII), urging the people not to cut down the old trees which surround most villages.

The result of the notice has proved satisfactory. With a view to encouraging the cultivation of sugar cane, the Governor obtained two Chattanooga Sugar Mills from America. Trials have been made with these mills, at which sugar cane growers were present. They expressed themselves as satisfied with the superiority of the new mills over their own mills, and it is not improbable that in time the Chattanooga Mill will supplant the native mill, when the natives realise that the former effects a saving in labour and produces more satisfactory results than the later.

Improved varieties of sugar cane are being obtained from Java, the Straits Settlements and Honolulu, and arrangements have been made for cultivating them when received.

Pine-apple is largely grown in the New Territory especially in the neighbour- hood of Ts'iin Wan, where a Cannery for canning the fruit of the pines has been started.

A superior variety of Pine-apple has been introduced from Ceylon by Mr. FORD for distribution among the growers of the plant.

PUBLIC WORKS.

I attach a memorandum (Appendix No. XIII) from the Director of Public Works, showing the work done by his Department in the New Territory during 1899.

The chief work on which the Director of Public Works has been engaged is that of the Main Road from British Kowloon to Táipó, which was cominenced immediately after the territory had been taken over. The only means of communica- tion hitherto existing between Hongkong and the newly leased area has been by sea, which in bad weather is impracticable, and by a rough footpath over a pass about 1,000 feet high from Kowloon to Shá-t'in, situated on an arm of Mirs Bay. There can be little doubt that the construction of this road, which is desirable both for strategical and administrative purposes, will bring the New Territory into closer relations with Hongkong proper, and will lead to an increase in traffic.

A reference to paragraph 8 of the memorandum of the Director of Public Works will show that good progress has been inade with this work, six miles being already open to traffic.

Communication between British Kowloon and Kowloon City has been im- proved by the extension of the Hunghom Road on the East side of the Kowloon peninsula to Kowloon City. This work has been almost completed.

Telephone lines have been laid for a distance of about thirty miles, connecting British Kowloon with Kowloon City, Shá-t'in, Táipó, Futi Au, Sheung Shui, Au-t'au, and Ping-shán. The lines will be further extended to Shat'au-kok. The thanks of Government are due to the Royal Engineers for having laid the line between Kowloon City, Táipó and Futi Au.

The Public Works Department has also been kept busy during the year in erecting permanent Police Stations and providing temporary quarters for the executive staff and the Police.

A permanent Police Station has been completed and occupied at Táipó. The permanent stations at Au-t'au and P'ing-shán are almost ready for occupation.

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No definite decision has as yet been arrived at regarding the erection of per- manent quarters for the executive staff, as it was deemed advisable to gain experience of the healthiness of the neighbourhood where the temporary quarters of the executive staff are situated before committing the Colony to any large expenditure. on account of permanent bulidings. In view, however, of the opinion of the Principal Civil Medical Officer that much of the malaria from which Government officers have suffered so much is due to the temporary nature of the buildings occupied by them, it seems desirable that permanent buildings should be erected without unnecessary delay.

SURVEY.

In my Report on the New Territory, dated 8th October 1898, it was pointed out that to deal satisfactorily with the land question, it would be necessary to have an accurate survey.

The desirability of a survey of the whole Territory was recognised by the Colonial Office, and I was instructed on my way out from home at the end of 1898 to place myself in communication with the Surveyor General of Ceylon, Mr. GRINLINTON.

I had the advantage of an interview at Colombo with him and the Honourable F. A. COOFER, Director of Public Works in Ceylon, and both these officers were strongly in favour of a complete survey of the territory being made, being of opinion that such a survey would, in the long run, prove most economical for Government, and recommended that an application should be made to the Govern- ment of India for the officers necessary to carry out the work. After my arrival in Hongkong in February last, the matter was referred to Mr. ORMSBY, the Director of Public Works, who consulted with Colonel ELSDALE, Commanding Royal Engineer, and, acting on their advice, the Governor decided that a survey should be undertaken. Application was made to the Government of India, which kindly consented to lend the staff required for the work.

On the 19th of October Mr. TATE, who is in charge of the survey operations, arrived and was followed, on the 1st November, by Mr. NEWLAND, the second survey officer, who brought with him a small staff of Indian trained surveying coolies and surveyors. The Detail Surveyors arrived at the end of November and were able to commence their work at once on the scale of 16 inches to a mile.

Before surveying was actually commenced, a Chinese notice (see Appendix No. XIV) was issued and posted throughout the territory, explaining the objects of the survey, which, it was feared, might be misunderstood by the natives.

I attach a report on the survey operations (see Appendix No. XV) with which Mr. TATE has been good enough to furnish me and which shows that steady progress is being made in the work of survey.

Mr. TATE is struck by the fact that the Chinese take little or on notice of the operations being carried on in their fields and that no incivility or hindrance has been experienced. He thinks this is due to the employment of Chinese coolies. but there can be no doubt that the issue of the Chinese notice, to which reference has been made, has also had a good effect.

The commencement of the survey has already induced many waverers to register their claims to land. The sight of the surveyors at work has convinced them that the Government is determined to ascertain the exact amount of land under cultivation, and that any further attempts to conceal the extent of their holdings will be useless.

EDUCATION.

For the purpose of ascertaining the general state of education in the New Territory, forms have been distributed throughout the villages in the various dis- tricts and sub-districts which the school teachers have been requested to fill up. A copy of the form will be found in Appendix No. XVI.

In reply to the request, 314 forms have been filled up and handed in. Out of this total, 121 are from Hakka schools, 97 from Punti schools, 15 from mixed Hakka and Punti schools, and 1 from Lamma Island, where Hakka, Punti and Hok-lo are taught in one school. Eighty of the forms have not been properly filled up so will have to be re-written. The lowest number of pupils in any school is 3 and the highest 56, but from 15 to 20 pupils seem to be the average. Holidays are frequent but long holidays are rare, the longest being the winter or New Year

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holidays, which last for a month or two. The spring holidays are next in length, which continue for about 20 days or a month and which are generally spent in worshipping the graves of ancestors. The schools in the New Territory are all adventure schools.

The teachers are generally natives of the sub-district in which the school is situated. Few hold any literary degree. The salary is small, from $5 (say 10s.) to $10 (£1) a month being the average pay. In many cases the salary is paid in grain. Tea and fuel are supplied gratis to the teachers by the parents of the pupils.

In a few instances teachers are hired by wealthy families, as for example in Ts'oi Hang which seems to be the only place in the New territory where girls are educated. The buildings used for schools are private houses, ancestral halls or temples. In no case has any building been specially erected as a school-house. The books used are the usual Chinese school books. The subjects taught are the Chinese classics. The school hours commence in the morning before breakfast, which is taken about 9 or 10 a.in. After breakfast lessons are continued and school does not break up till about an hour before sunset whatever the season may be.

The schools are mostly elementary and even the most pretentious are only secondary.

The Chinese Government has never paid anything towards the maintenance of these schools. The teachers are always paid by the parents of the pupils.

It is important to note that the greatest number of holidays and the shortest hours of study occur in the cold weather, whilst in the hot and trying weather the pupils have the shortest holidays and the hardest work.

Many of the inhabitants seem anxious to learn English, and it is hoped that before long arrangements may be made for encouraging the study of English. It might be well to establish a school for the teaching of English at Ün Long in the Shap Pát Héung District, which is the most central and populous of all the sub- districts. I am of opinion that the present village schools should be retained, but that steps should be taken by the Government to encourage the teachers.

MEDICAL.

I attach a Report (see Appendix No. XVII) drawn up by Dr. ATKINSON, the Principal Civil Medical Officer, showing the work done by his Department in the New Territory during the past year.

From this Report it will be seen that the officers of the executive staff and of the police suffered much from malaria. Dr. ATKINSON is of opinion that much of the fever was caused by the temporary nature of the buildings occupied by the executive and the police, and anticipates a considerable decrease in the number of cases of malarial fever when permanent buildings have been erected.

There was an outbreak of plague in the island of Cheung Chau in April. Prompt measures were taken to combat it with the result that by the middle of June the disease was stamped out.

Arrangements have been made to perform vaccination throughout the territory. and to prescribe for any villagers, who may apply for advice or medicine, free of

cost.

HARBOUR DEPARTMENT.

Up to the end of the year two Harbour Master's Stations had been established. in the New Territory: one at the Island of Ch'eung Chau and one at Tái Ó in the Island of Lantao.

The station at Ch'eung Chau was opened in September and that at Tái Ó in October.

Up to the 31st December last, 2,616 licences, clearances, permits, &e. had been issued to junks at Ch'eung Chau, and 1,353 at Tái 0.

POLICE.

Simultaneously with the taking over of the New Territory on the 16th April last, Police Stations were opened at Táipó, Shá-t'in, and Kowloon City. On the 22nd of April a station was opened at P'ing-shán, and on the 29th of that month another on the Island of Ch'eung Chau. One was opened at Futi Au, close to the Northern

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boundary, on the 14th of May, at Tai Ó on the 18th and at Yung Shui Wan, in Lamma Island, on the 30th of the same month; at Au T'au, near Ün Long, on the 3rd, and at Tung Chung, in the Island of Lantao, on the 24th of June; at Kat 0, in Mirs Bay, on the 14th; at Starling Inlet at the 24th of October and at San T'in on the 14th of December.

Want of suitable accommodation and of European officers to take charge pre- vented the opening of a station at Sai Kung and of another at Ts'ün Wan, both of which are required to complete the policing of the territory.

Two steam launches were chartered for the purpose of patrolling the waters of the New Territory and visiting the numerous islands, and these began their work as soon as the territory was occupied. A steam pinnace, formerly used for police work in the Harbour, was also sent to Táipó to patrol from thence the waters of Mirs Bay.

To man the stations and launches mentioned 75 Indian Police, 39 Chinese Police with 4 coxswains, 4 engineers, 4 stokers, and 8 Interpreters were enlisted in excess of the Estimates for the year, while 24 men of the Royal Welch Fusiliers were, by the kind permission of His Excellency the General Officer Cominanding, enrolled as special constables and utilised partly to assist the European Police Officers in the New Territory and partly to replace those officers in Hongkong.

Fifty more Indian recruits were obtained from India at the close of the year for the further stations that will be required and to release the men of the Royal Welch Fusiliers serving with the Police.

The efforts of the Police were from the first entirely directed to the preven- tion and detection of crime, to learning the country, and to cultivating friendly relations with the inhabitants.

The first case that demanded investigation was the murder of the man Tang Cheung on the night of the 16th of April.

Two persons, one an elder of the village of Ha Ts'ün, were brought to justice and hanged for this murder. Two other men had been murdered at the same time and by the same party as murdered Tang Cheung. Au elder of the village of Ün Long, his nephew, and a third person were indicted, convicted and sentenced to death for the murder of one of the two men. The nephew of the elder mentioned was pardoned, and the sentences on the elder and the third prisoner were commuted to imprisonment for life and ten years' with hard labour respectively. These convictions had a wholesome effect upon the population, especially as two of the culprits belonged to the local gentry.

It was found that robberies by night by gangs of armed Chinese principally from Chinese territory were very frequent, and no fewer that 27 cases of this description occurred during the first five months of the administration of the territory.

Twenty-five persons were arrested in respect of these robberies, of whom 18 were convicted and sentenced to long terms of imprisonment.

The Triad Society was also found to be very active, and steps were taken to suppress it.

One leader of the Society was arrested in possession of insignia and documents of the Society and was convicted and sent to prison. Another prominent member suffered the same fate, while two more leaders were arrested, convicted of robbery and sentenced to long terms of imprisonment.

During the last quarter of the year there has been a marked decrease in robbery and other crime in the territory, the result being due partly, no doubt, to the arrests and convictions above referred to, and partly to the system of patrols especially at night which the gradual opening of the required stations has rendered possible.

The Police have also been utilised in various ways in obtaining information. on various matters.

The territory as a whole has been found exceedingly malarious, and the Police of all nationalities suffered severely from fever.

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The total number of Police stationed in the New Territory at the end of the year after the opening of San T'in, the last station opened, was--

32 Europeans

86 Indians

27 Chinese

7 Interpreters.

There were also employed in patrolling in launches the waters of the New Territory-

9 Europeans 41 Chinese.

CRIME.

I attach a return (Appendix No. XVIII) of cases from the New Territory tried in the Police Court of Victoria during 1899, with which I have been furnished by Mr. GOMPERTZ, Acting Police Magistrate, who has also given me the figures and information on which the following remarks are based.

The first case was heard on April 24th, which gives roughly eight months or three-quarters of the year as the period during which cases from the New Territory have been brought into Hongkong.

The total number of cases, exclusive of those from the New Territory, heard in the Police Court of Victoria in 1899 was 10,003 comprising 11,175 accused persons for the twelve months. In addition there were 155 cases from the New Territory, with an aggregate of 271 accused persons.

The cases from the New Territory represent 0154 of the whole. If, however, the first quarter of the year be omitted, as the newly leased area was not then under the jurisdiction of this Colony, these cases will be 0206 of the whole.

They become more important, however, when the average of serious crime is taken into account.

If the standard be the number of cases committed for trial at the Criminal Sessions of the Supreme Court, it appears that out of 10,003 cases arising in Hongkong only 50 or 0049 of the whole were committed to the Sessions. On the other hand, out of 155 New Territory cases no fewer than 25, or 16 of the whole, were committed for trial.

This striking difference is no doubt chiefly due to the lawlessness which was rife in the New Territory when it was taken over and which continued until the Police Force had been organised.

The appointment of a Magistrate to try cases in the districts north of the Kowloon range of hills has relieved the Magistrate in Hongkong from the work of trying cases that occur in those districts, and owing to the small number of cases that the Magistrate in the New Territory has hitherto had to try, he is able to sit twice a week in Hongkong. This has sensibly lessened the strain which had to be borne by one Magistrate.

Up to the end of the year the Magistrate sitting at Táipó had to deal with 23 cases only which occurred in the districts north of the Kowloon range of hills. Two of them were serious. The remainder were trivial.

Cases from the Islands of Lamma and Lantao and from the district, south of the Kowloon range of hills are still brought to Victoria. From this portion of the New Territory have come one case of piracy and several of robbery with violence and aggravated assault.

The return of cases from the New Territory gives no particulars of Death Enquiries. The Police Magistrate in Victoria officiates as Coroner, and there have been four cases of death in the territory as to which it has been found necessary to hold a formal inquiry extending in each case over several days. In three of the -cases a jury was summoned.

The total amount paid on account of fines and forfeitures in connection with the cases tried in the New Territory in 1899. amounted to $936.32; a sum of -$783.65 has been paid in fines and a sum of $152.47 for forfeitures.

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REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE.

I attach a statement of Revenue and Expenditure (Appendix No. XIX) on account of the New Territory up to 31st December last, which has been drawn up by the Treasurer.

The total expenditure for 1899 amounted to, approximately, $233,000. Of this amount a sum of over $47,000 was expended on account of the Police Establish- ment whilst Public Works were responsible for about $112,000, chiefly for roads and Police Stations.

Three new launches are being constructed, and a sum of $31,875 has been expended on account of them. When they are finished no outlay for the construction of launches will be necessary for some time and a large saving will be effected under "Transport" which is responsible for a sum of $12,114. Some of the other items are also non-recurring, such as, Matsheds $3,964; Furniture, &c. $1,381, while the expenses of the Survey will, no doubt, be very much larger during this and next years.

Very little revenue was collected during last year, as it was deemed advisable to push forward the work of land registration before commencing to collect Crown

rent.

The Revenue for this year from all sources has been estimated at $100,000, including arrears for 1899, while it is roughly calculated that the Expenditure, exclusive of Public Works, Extraordinary, will be about $175,000, $150,000 of which, in round figures, will be required for the Police Establishment.

The expenditure on account of Public Works will amount to about $80,000, most of which will be expended on Police Stations, the Táipó Road and the Survey.

LEGISLATION.

By the Governor's Proclamation of the 8th day of April. 1899, (See Appendix No. XX) it was directed that from the 17th day of that month all laws and Ordi- nances which should be at that time in force in the Colony of Hongkong should take effect in the New Territory also, and should remain in force there until they should be altered or repealed by legislative enactment.

Ac-

It was found expedient, however, to exempt the New Territory from the operation of certain Ordinances owing to local conditions and variations. cordingly an Ordinance (No. 10 of 1899) was passed by which the New Territory was duly exempted from the operation of a number of Ordinances, a list of which was furnished in a schedule attached to the Bill, and which will be found in Appendix No. XXI.

In addition to the framing a list of Ordinances confined in their operation to the old limits of the Colony, it was found necessary to pass certain new laws to be enforced in the New Territory only.

Three of these laws were passed during 1899. The first, No. 11 of 1899, was entitled "An Ordinance relating to Local Communities and Tribunals," and was passed on April 18th. Reference has already been made, to the Committees appointed under this Ordinance.

The second law passed for the New Territory, No. 12 of 1899, was entitled "An Ordinance to provide for the Better Regulation of the New Territories." This law entrusted the Governor-in-Council with the power of making rules for the farming out or licensing of the right to sell dutiable articles or any other commo- dity whatever; and to make rules for the levying, collection and custody of all revenue obtained from the New Territory.

The third law, No. 40 of 1899, was entitled "An Ordinance to provide for the summoning of Chinese before the Registrar General." This law was unanimously passed at the sitting of Legislative Council held on December 28th. The object of this measure is to secure the attendance of the people so that full explanations of Government measures may be given to them and so that the Government may learn from the people what their views may be regarding any proposed measure, and what objections they may have to urge when matters do not appear to be working smoothly. No enquiry under the Ordinance can be held except by direction of the Governor.

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STAFF.

Until July of last year I resided permanently in the New Territory in order to start the civil administration of affairs. I was assisted by Mr. MESSER, Mr. Ts‘OI, and two Chinese Assistants.

On my returning to Hongkong Mr. MESSER remained in charge as Assistant Land Officer and was joined by Mr. HALLIFAX and Mr. KEMP. Mr. HALLIFAX was appointed to undertake the duties of Acting Magistrate which had been hitherto discharged by myself, and Mr. KEMP was sent to attend to the registration of land claims at Ping-shán in order to press forward the work of land registration.

Owing to a great increase in this work it was found necessary to strengthen the Chinese staff by the addition of a shroff, three interpreters, and three clerks.

All the members of the staff have worked most energetically and deserve great credit for the manner in which they have discharged their duties under trying and difficult circumstances.

CONCLUSION.

In view of the difficulties that had necessarily to be encountered in taking over the New Territory and of the short period during which it has enjoyed the benefits of British rule, the progress that has already been made may be regarded as satisfactory. An efficient Police Force has caused a great diminution in crime and has established confidence among the inhabitants. Improved communications have already led to an increase in traffic and steps are being taken to start new industries and to effect improvements in those already established. Progress in the New Territory may be slow, but now that confidence prevails among the people, it may be anticipated that capital will soon be attracted to it, which cannot fail to hasten its development.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant.

J. H. STEWART LOCKHART,

Colonial Secretary and Registrar General.

Appendix No. II.

Speech of His Excellency the Governor delivered to the Committee-men on 2nd and 4th of August at Táipó and P'ing-shán.

His EXCELLENCY (the Honourable J. H. STEWART LOCKHART translating) then said-Now tha this territory has been divided into districts and the sub-district committee-men have been selected from the elders and gentry I wish to meet you and to explain to you the principles upon which the government of this portion of the colony of Hongkong will be conducted. I desire that you who have been officially appointed shall co-operate with the Government in regulating the local affairs of your villages so that the people shall enjoy security and that there shall be no disorder. The Government has appointed officials who will advise you as to sanitary improvement in the villages so that the health of the people may be preserved, for the Queen of England wishes that all Her Majesty's subjects shall be healthy and prosperous. In giving you the position of Committee-men I rely upon you to discharge your duties in a faithful and upright manner and would call your attention to the fact that one of our most stringent laws is that if as much as one cash is taken from the people except the rates and taxes levied under authority the person extorting it will be rigorously punished by fine and imprisonment and be dismissed in disgrace from his position. I wish to interfere as little as possible with your good customs, but there is one principle of British law that must be observed. All punishment for injuries must be inflicted by the appointed authority under the law. Therefore in case of injury the proper authority must be appealed to and the punishment must not be undertaken by private individuals.

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I

The time has now come when all occupiers of land must register their titles with the Land Officer. When application is made giving the exact area of land occupied, a notice will be posted in the village so that if another claims the land he can apply to the Land Officer, when the claims will be considered by the Land Court. No certificate of registration will be issued until the Crown rent has been paid. There should be no delay in registering your titles. The occupier will, in the absence of another claimant, be accepted as owner, but if the person in occupation is decided not to be the proper owner the amount paid by him will be returned, and the rent will be collected from the person decided to be the lawful owner. A few days ago some ill-advised people assembled near Ün Long and behaved in a riotous manner, assaulting a party who were examining certain lands. I warn you against such unlawful proceedings, as this was taking the law into their own hands. They should, if they objected, have applied to the Land Officer, who would have examined into the matter and decided upon their objections. Under the powers given to me by the law I could have placed a station of Police upon that land and compelled the villagers who created the disturbance to pay the entire cost of build- ing the station and paying the Police. But I have determined not to do so on this first offence but to warn the people through you that such illegal rioting will be severely punished in future. The elders of a village can always prevent such disorder by giving timely information to the Police. If they do not prevent it then they and the villagers will be held responsible. All persons of whatever nation must be free to move about without danger of molestation. You must understand from what I have said that clan fights cannot be allowed. The law is strong enough to protect the rights of every man, and must be appealed to in cases of dispute that cannot be settled by the local committees. I am sorry to find that robberies by armed gangs have been frequent, and against such violence you have hitherto not been adequately protected. I have established Police Stations in different parts of the territory for the purpose of preventing such robberies and protecting your lives and property. Since the territory was

was taken over three months ago many of those robbers have been arrested, the stolen pro- perty has been restored to the owners, and a large number of the robbers are now in gaol undergoing sentences of imprisonment for five and seven years. am dertermined that such robberies shall be put down and that law-abiding and peaceable people shall enjoy security that has hitherto been denied them. You have all heard of the cruel murders of innocent men that took place at Ün Long in April last. For the murder of one of those men two of the principals in that brutal crime after a fair and patient trial have paid the penalty with their lives. I hope that if any bad characters remain in the territory they will take warning and cease from evil ways. I have directed that the law against gambling shall be rigidly enforced. The Chinese law against gambling is very strong, but the officials have neglected it. In British territory all laws must be equally respected. You have seen by my proclamation the amount of Crown rent that has been decided upon as the land rent for the present. In considering what taxes are to be levied où you, you must remember that all the money paid by you to the Government is money that is paid for your protection and for the improvement and development of your property. The money paid for public works is paid to your own labourers for their labour and comes to the traders in the ordinary course of business. Up to the present over ten thousand dollars have been paid in wages to the working people of this district and now that gambling has been stopped this money will be spent in the purchase of land for farms or of food and clothing from the shops, while the main road from Kowloon to Táipó will enable the people to send in their produce to market in any weather. There will be a license tax on all business houses, but you have been relieved from the payment of all Customs Duties and monopolies that raised the price of everything that you consumed. Do not object to strangers coming to the district. They will all bring money and increase the wealth and comfort of the people. I know that many people from this district have travelled to other countries. They must have seen there how capital employs labour and produces wealth. With the introduction of fresh capital into this district that I hope to see one day some who are now driven to evil courses for want of occupation will find within their reach employment that will enable them to live respectable lives. I have appointed you to the responsible position of committee- men because you have been recommended to me by your villagers. Do not forget that your responsibility is very real, as I look to you to preserve the peace and good order of your villages, and to report to the authorities all bad characters and persons who endeavour to stir up, strife. With the support of the sub-district Committees and the villagers I look for the firm establishment of internal peace and prosperity, and I undertake that you shall be fully protected by the Government

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from any interference from without. I wished to add a few more words on the subject of land. It has been reported to me that as soon as the Convention between the Emperor of China and the Queen of Great Britain was signed certain people were induced to sell their lands at a low value by being told that the British Gov- ernment would take possession of the land without payment when they came into the territory. I take this opportunity of telling you, the elders and gentry of all the villages, that if any man has been induced to sell his land by these false mis- representations and he is not satisfied, he can give notice to the Land Officer, who will register the title until the real question at issue has been looked into and decided. I have mentioned all this before by proclamation, but I wish to emphasize it more strongly now that I see the gentry and elders before me, as I am determined that if any man has been improperly induced to give his land away under its value I won't accept the sale as valid.

YOUR EXCELLENCY,

I.

Reply of the Committee-men at Táipó.

Your subject, on behalf of the Committee-men present and the people of the Districts and Sub-districts whom they represent, thanks Your Excellency for honouring us with a visit.

We have eagerly looked forward to Your Excellency's coming to-day which marks a new era in the history of this Territory. This visit will infuse into the country and the people a new life and spirit and will be followed by peace, prosper- ity and happiness.

We know that Your Excellency will treat us justly, considerately and im- partially.

We congratulate ourselves on our good fortune in having placed over us such a kind. Governor, and proud indeed are we to be the subjects of such a benevolent Sovereign as Her Majesty QUEEN VICTORIA.

We pray that Your Excellency will, when memorialising the Throne, tender to Her Majesty our humble submission and our profound feelings of loyalty.

YOUR EXCELLENCY,

II.

Reply of the Committee-men at Ping-shán.

Your subject, on behalf of the gentry and elders present and the people whom they represent in this part of the Territory, thank Your Excellency for your trou ble and condescension in coming here. We have been waiting for this visit with as much anxiety as those who, in time of drought, await the refreshing rain. Your kindness in visiting us has given us the privilege of seeing you in person while the speech we have just heard, so dignified and so clear, has increased our reverence for Your Excellency.

We are well aware that Your Excellency's policy in this Territory is a kind and benevolent one and your subjects are unanimous in their feelings of gratitude. Your Excellency's character will act as a transforming influence for good among us. We also predict that this barren region will become a land of wealth and progress under Your Excellency's administration. What we feel with the deepest pleasure is that all evils are being now eradicated while what is good and noble are being encouraged. Law and order, peace and prosperity, alike distinguish Your Excellency's government.

We pray that Your Excellency will, when memorialising the Throne, tender to Her Gracious Majesty the humble submission and profound feelings of loyalty of her subjects in this Western portion of the Territory.

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We the people of the New Territory look up to Your Excellency's humane policy and we rejoice that you have come to visit us. We know that Your Excel- lency is doing your utmost for the good of the people and under your Government this outpost of the Empire will continue to be more and more prosperous and the people to enjoy greater peace and security.

As a slight mark of our respect and appreciation we humbly pray that Your Excellency will accept this tablet.

Appendix No. III.

MEMORANDUM ON LAND.

Chinese law regarding Land.

Land according to Chinese tenure is held as freehold by grant from the Crown and descends in the male line only. Daughters never inherit.

The land comprised in the original grant can be sold by the proprietors in sub-divisions and is most usually sold in perpetuity or for 1,000 years. The proprietors record their names in the districts registry as responsible for the tax, and their possession is legally secure so long as that is paid.

Deeds of absolute sale have been brought in from the New Territory for registration which were made in the reign of the Emperor KA TSING and of subsequent Emperors of the Ming Dynasty (A.D. 1519 to 1626) and which have been recognised by the present dynasty. Strictly, a grant issued by the present dynasty should be attached to all grants made by the previous dynasty. The present owners under such grants are all the existing male descendants of the original grantee and in one case the proprietors now number over 700.

All land under cultivation is supposed to pay a land tax and from time to time spasmodic attempts are made to survey the area under cultivation. But in spite of Government orders, all efforts to obtain correct data of the actual acreage brought under cultivation have been frustrated. The landowners, wishing to have their land exempted from the payment of taxes, seem to have succeeded in inducing the survey officers not to make correct reports. But when large and fertile tracts, yielding valuable crops, are not reported for registration, such as has been the case with extensive areas reclaimed from the sea near San T'in, the Chinese authorities generally confiscate and re-sell them to private individuals, after they discover them.

rate.

Different kinds of land that pay land tax.

Agricultural land is divided into three classes, each class paying a different

First class lands are those near villages in fertile valleys with a good depth of soil and a good water supply, producing annually two crops of rice or one crop of sugar cane.

Second class lands are those less fertile than the first class and are generally situated higher up the slopes of hills and have not such a good water supply as the first class. They produce annually one crop of rice or one crop of sugar cane.

Third class lands are those situated on still higher slopes and are far removed from a good water supply. They are generally devoted to the cultivation of pea- nuts, sweet potatoes, millet and other hardy crops which do not require much

moisture.

Fish ponds pay a special tax higher than that paid by cultivated land of the

first class.

Building land and orchards pay a very insignificant land tax, whilst burial grounds, which the people wish to be officially recognised and registered, pay once only a stamp fee for the title deed without being obliged to pay any further tax.

Hill land and Waste land.

All hills and waste lands are claimed by the nearest villages or most powerful clans in the neighbourhood or even at a distance.

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Even portions of the sea and the bed of the sea, foreshore, sand beaches, and any land whatever which may be turned into use and profit, are claimed and in some cases registered.

Crown land is undefined, and adjacent proprietors claim almost every inch of land under cover of vague grants, though they pay no land tax for such illegal possessions.

Land Measurement.

The acreage of land is not always calculated by square measure in maus (0 1515 English acres) as it should be according to law, but generally by the amount of grain required to sow the land, a method which is very uncertain and unsatisfactory and causes much friction with the farmers, especially as the grain measures vary in different localities.

Cultivated land.

All land under cultivation must be registered or is liable to confiscation. On registration stamped title deeds are issued by the District Magistrate.

Chinese Title Deeds.

Officially registered title deeds are called "red deeds" ( Hung Kai I) because they are stamped with the official stamp in red.

Private deeds of sale are called "white deeds" (Pak Kai ) because they are simply written on plain paper and do not bear the official red stamp; but the purchaser has the right to register his purchase and obtain a red deed.

There are also mortgages, operating as deeds of sale, redeemable within 30 years; perpetual leases at low rentals and leases for short terms of 5 or 10 years. Red deeds are the only deeds of which the Government takes cognisance and the Crown Rent is collected on these deeds only.

The descriptions of land in deeds are always vague, and can only be ascer- tained accurately by a survey of the actual land in occupation. The local name of the land is given and sometimes the nearest village, but these only show approx- imately where the land is situated.

Patches of fields situated in different districts are often contained in a single deed, and in one case a deed has been brought in for registration which purports to be a sale of land in 24 distinct villages. It is not rare to find two or three registered deeds produced in proof of ownership of the same lots. The Chinese Authorities kept no register of titles and, under their system of registry, fraudulent sales could' be registered with impunity until litigation ensued when, after a lapse of years, a vesting order in the rightful possessor could be issued by the District Magistrate.

The consideration money mentioned in the deeds is hardly ever accurate, being usually stated much below the actual sum paid so that the ad valorem duty payable on obtaining a red deed may be the minimum. In one case in which a sum of $4,000 was paid, the amount entered in the deed was only $475.

Deeds of sale in perpetuity generally state the amount of rent to be paid to the grantor by the grantee.

White deeds are merely unregistered transfers and give very few particulars beyond the rent to be received and sometimes the amount of grain required to sow the plot and its local name.

Forms of Red and White Deeds with translations are attached. (See Appendix No. VI A. B. C.)

Varieties of Tenure.

In most cases land is owned by clans or private families and individuals, and can be sold, mortgaged or settled upon specific trusts. In addition to these there are also the following varieties of tenure.

Ancestral land or “Sheung Tin," Temple land, or " Miu T'in," Land held by Associations, or Ui Tin."

Ancestral Land.

Ancestral land is land that has been originally set apart for ancestral worship and is increased by purchase from time to time in the name of the deceased ancestor, in whose name also the Government taxes are paid. The rent of ancestral lands is

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devoted to the upkeep of the ancestral temple, to the education of the members of the clan, to the worship of ancestors, to the relief of poor members of the clan, to the marriage expenses of those who require assistance and to the funeral expenses of those whose relations are poor. Such land is always held in the name of the ancestor who bequeathed the property, the land being nearly always leased to members of the clan who cultivate it and pay a yearly rent. Sometimes the different branches of a clan cultivate the land in rotation, the branch in occupation of the land being held reponsible for the payment of the expenses incurred on account of the objects for which the land was originally transmitted. Clan land cannot be alienated without the consent of the representatives and elders of the whole clan. The rent roll is kept by a Committee of the clan.

Temple Land.

Temple land is land devoted to the support and upkeep of a temple dedicated to the service of some specially selected idol in the name of which the land is held. Some of those who originally subscribed towards the erection of the temple or their descendants act as trustees and keep the rent roll and an account of current expenses.

Certain land in Kam Tin and Tsiu Káng is devoted to the support of a few nuns. The rent roll is kept by a trustee, the rent in grain being handed over to the nuns, who, in order to increase their meagre income, also go from village to village begging for alms from the inhabitants.

Land held by Associations.

China is a land of associations which are as numerous and the objects of which are as varied as the needs of man. Their formation is simple and easy. Certain villages, whatever their object may be, meet in a temple, ancestral hall or private house to deliberate over some scheme. If it is approved, a fund is raised to which the members contribute equally, their contributions being devoted to the purchase of a piece of land, landed property in China being considered the safest investment. The rent derived from this land may be used for the burial of a member of the association when he dies, or may be let out on interest, or may be used to assist members to emigrate to California and Australia, or for any other enterprise or good object that may be desired.

Land Sales.

If any owner wishes to sell his land, he is supposed to offer such land in the first instance to his nearest relatives, and is not at liberty to sell to any one outside of his clan, unless the nearest relatives are unwilling to purchase. In large clans transactions in land take place, as a rule, between different members of the clan without the property ever being disposed of to outsiders. In such transactions the deed of transfer is invariably worded as if it were a mortgage and no period for redemption is fixed, the vendor or mortgagor or his descendants thus having every opportunity to redeem the property at the original price even several generations after the transaction has been made. It is customary for the mortgagor to enter into possession so that a Chinese mortgage is often equivalent to a sale.

Collection of Land Tax.

Land tax is collected by the authorities sending out deputies, clerks and run- ners to different districts, notifications being posted calling upon landowners to pay the land tax with all haste. In some cases these collectors linger for more than a month in certain localities. No pay is given by Government to the land collectors. who are left to their own ingenuity and wits to make as much as they can out of the villagers without creating trouble. The villagers, of course, are anxious to get rid of these men and are only too glad to pay the "extras" necessary to effect that object, especially as they have not infrequently placed themselves in a false position by not having reported portions of their land on which taxes should be paid. The villagers are not slow to understand that the longer these collectors remain in their neighbourhood the greater the probability of their unregistered land being discovered. On this account the "extras" demanded are paid without much demur and indeed at times with alacrity.

Land that has been once registered but the cultivation of which has been abandoned is not resumed by Government. It has to pay the she tax as when it was under cultivation. It may be that for this reason the peop on the first occu- pation of the territory were so reluctant to register their land. The District Magistrate, who is required every year to send to the Provincia Treasurer a fixed sum as land tax, is naturally unwilling to exempt such land from taxation, as he

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himself would have to make up the deficiency resulting from such exemption. The land tax which has to be sent to Pekin from each Province is a fixed sum and has not varied for years. It is easy to see what an opportunity this system offers for incorrect returns, as new lands are continually being brought under cultivation.

New land brought under cultivation.

When land is brought under cultivation for the first time, the cultivator does not make a report to the Magistrate, but applies in the first instance to the clan or village which has taken the land under its protection. Generally, the arrangement with the clan or village results in a lease in perpetuity being made out, stating the situation of the land and the amount of rent in grain or local money that has to be paid by the cultivators. After the cultivator has arranged with the clan or village, he pays such rent as may be agreed upon, and not until it has been found that the land is worth cultivating is a report made to the authorities so that it may be duly registered.

It is noteworthy that the majority of those who bring out-of-the-way plots of land under cultivation are Hakkas, who can cultivate with success land which the Puntis would never think of attempting to turn into fields. This is due to the in- dustry of the Hakkas and to the fact that the Hakka women work as hard, if not harder, than their men, and also to the fact that the best and most available land had been appropriated by the Puntis before the Hakkas had settled in the district. The Hakkas have by industry and energy reclained large tracts from the sea and made many a hill-side hitherto barren yield good crops.

Landlord and Tenant.

The relation between landlord and tenant is often a complicated one, chiefly owing to the system of perpetual lease. Under such leases the landlords have practically renounced all rights to the exercise of ownership and are contented to do nothing further than to receive a yearly rent. They can sell this right of re- ceiving rent, but the land is otherwise under the absolute control of the cultivators, who often sell their perpetual leases.

The landlord is called the owner of the Ti Kwat" (H), which may be termed the right of receiving rent. The tenant is said to possess the "Ti Pi" (), or right of cultivation. Constant lawsuits result from this double owner- ship and the contending interests which it necessarily involves.

The question of perpetual lease in the case of land brought under cultivation for the first time and of the rights of landlord and cultivator will require very careful consideration.

The most common practice in the case of landowners, who do not farm their own land, is for them to let it out to tenants, who pay them a fixed rent in kind or in money, the amount of which is settled beforehand. In bad seasons the landlords grudgingly reduce their rent on being asked by their tenants, but they are not compelled to do so.

Small villages and hamlets often place themselves under the protection of large and influential clans to which they refer all their complaints and from which they expect assistance in case of attack, robbery, and lawsuits. In some instances the smaller villages pay their land tax to the Government through the influential clans.

These clans gain their local influence, not through numbers alone, but owing to the fact that certain of their members have official rank, gained through com- petitive examinations, or obtained by purchase, which keeps them in touch with the Magistrate and even higher officials.

The clans have, as before stated, claimed large tracts of land, which they have never occupied, but which they have leased in perpetuity to others, who undertake to bring the land under cultivation.

The greater part of the land claimed by clans was never registered and, as a rule, it appears that no land tax was ever paid on this land to the Government. The cultivators, who have paid rent for years to the clans, in view of the fact that the land had not been registered, were afraid to dispute the rights of ownership, as they anticipated it would result in the land being resumed by Government and they would thus be deprived of their right of cultivation.

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Appendix IV.

ENGLISH VERSION

OF

CHINESE PROCLAMATION ISSUED BY HIS EXCELLENCY SIR HENRY ARTHUR BLAKE, G.C.M.G., GOVERNOR, &c.

I, Sir HENRY ARTHUR BLAKE, Knight Grand Cross of the Most Distinguished Order of Saint Michael and Saint George, Governor and Commander-in-Chief of the Colony of Hongkong and its Dependencies, and Vice-Admiral of the same, hereby inform you, the landowners in the New Territories, that an Officer will visit the sub-districts for the purpose of registering landowners on a date due notice of which will be given to you. All you who can show that you have had possession of landed property for some time must fill up a schedule in the following form :--

1. Name of owner.

2. Nature of title.

3. Date of lease or grant (if any).

4. Number of years in occupation.

5. Description of land.

6. Dimensions of land.

7. Situation of land.

When these schedules are distributed to a village, any person who claims land as his property must fill up a schedule and bring it in person to the Visiting Officer, when he comes to the village in which such person resides; and the Officer will make an entry in the register that such person is the owner and will add such other particulars as may be necessary. A list of those who have been registered as landowners in the village and of their holdings will be posted in the village for seven days, and afterwards an extract of the entry of each holding will be made to be handed to the owner. But before it is handed to the owner he must pay the amount of Crown Rent fixed as due by him. If no Rent is paid, the land will be forfeited to the Government without fail.

If there is any unsettled dispute about property, the name of the person in actual possession will be registered, and he must pay the Crown Rent, but an extract of an entry in the Register will not be issued until the Squatters' Board has ascertained that the person in possession is the legal owner and the Board's decision has been approved by me. In that case an extract will be issued to him, and he will be permitted to remain in possession. But should the Board decide that the property is really not his property, the Crown Rent paid by him will be refunded, and the person who is adjudged by the Board to be the person who should pay the rent and who is approved as such by me, must forthwith pay the rent due. All you owners of land must report all the land in your possession. Should it be found at any time that any land owned by any person has not been reported, it will be treated as Government land. A survey will shortly be made of the whole of the Leased Territory, so that the boundaries of the various holdings may be clearly known; and any cases of neglect to report on the part of owners of land will be easily discovered, and will involve forfeiture of the property to Government. Do not say that I have not warned you. The Crown Rent including all charges fixed for the present is given below. You must all without exception obey. Do not be disobedient. A special proclamation.

(i.) For land draining in a Southerly direction to the sea between Liümun Point on the East and the Pier in the bay West of Lai Chi Kok

on the West per half mau or portion thereof as follows:-

(a.) For First class land 25 cents, or at the rate of $3.30 per

acre per annum.

(b.) For Second class land 20 cents, or at the rate of $2.64

per acre per annum.

(c.) For Third class land 10 cents, or the rate of $1.32 per

acre per annum.

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(ii.) For all land (except land draining in a Southerly direction to the sea between Liümun Point on the East and the Pier in the bay West of Lai Chi Kok on the West) per half mau or portion thereof as follows

(a.) First class land 15 cents, or at the rate of $1.98 per acre

per annum.

(b.) Second class land 10 cents, or at the rate of $1.32 per

acre per annuin.

(c.) Third class land 5 cents, or at the rate of 66 cents per

acre per annum.

The above scale of Crown Rent may be altered.

When the survey has been completed permanent certificates of titles will be issued. If anyone has been forcibly deprived of his land or been fraudulently induced to sell land at a low price, he may present a petition to the District Officer if he lives North of the Kowloon range of hills, or if he lives South of it to the Registrar General or the Visiting Officer, to be forwarded to the Squatters' Board for enquiry.

Dated 12th day of July, 1899.

Appendix Nọ. V.

Form to be filled up by occupiers of land and landowners.

NEW TERRITORY.

VILLAGE OF

CLAIM OF

I. Name of Owner or Occupier.

II. Nature of Title.

III. Date of Lease (if any)

IV. Number of years in occupation

V. Description of land

VI. Area of land in Maus

VII. Situation

Claim No.

名村

一 業主姓名

二 契券歎式

三. 批約及契券内是

名四 管業若干年

五. 該業是何等田地

* 該業四至界限畝數

七 該業坐落在何處

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Appendix No. VIA.

A.

1

Translation of a Red Deed.

The maker of this Deed of Absolute Sale of a plot of land, including Salt Pans now disused and Hill Land, is TANG KAI-SHEK who inherited the property from his ancestor who bought the same from UN CHEUNG-K'Ü. The land, which pays land tax, is situated near the village of Ch'an Ka Wai in the Sub-District of T'ün Mun. The tax in kind on this land is registered in the District Magistrate's Office as One Shek and Seven Shing of grain.

Since the payment of land tax is now being pressed for and the vendor is in want of money to pay this tax, he desires to sell the whole plot of land which has been bequeathed to him and which is covered by the title deed. The vendor, in the first instance, invited his nearest of kin to purchase it, but as none of them had the necessary funds wherewith to purchase the property, he asked the middle-men CHENG TSOI-CHEUNG and LEUNG YAT-UN to introduce him to CHENG IN IT'ONG, of Nam T'au City, who consented to enter into negotiations with a view to the purchase of the property.

It was agreed between the Vendor and Purchaser in the presence of the middle-men that the market price of this land shall be Fifty Dollars ($50) equiva- lent in weight was handed over in the presence of witnesses to TANG KAI-SHEK in person who paid out of it the land tax due.

TANG KAI-SHEK on the same day transferred the whole of the above property to CHENG IN I T'ONG, who is entitled to exercise all the rights of ownership and is at liberty to officially register the property in his own name whenever he may deem it convenient.

This is a genuine transaction and this sale has not been made as a set-off against any debt.

The four boundaries of this plot, including hill land, &c., are according to the limits within which the Vendor, TANG KAI SHEK, exercised his former rights of ownership, the plot being locally known as the Fuk Kin Farm at T'ün Mun Bay and is not now cultivated.

The Eastern Boundary extends to the Lò Ts'z Rock near U Kok Point at Lai Chi Kok; the Western Boundary to Hau Kok Lek; the Southern Boundary to Tang Lung Chau; the Northern Boundary to Tang Chim-yat's Farm. These limits include the bills with pines, the orchards and the buildings.

mau.

The boundaries are thus clearly defined and the registered area is twenty-six

If any difficulty hereafter arises in connection with the land, it must be ar- ranged by the Vendor and the middle-men, the Purchaser being in no way responsible.

This translation is inade with the mutual consent of both parties, and in case there may be no proof of an oral agreement, this Deed is drawn up and handed over together with another Stamped Deed to the Purchaser to be kept as evidence.

This Deed is registered in the name of Ts'or KWONG under the entry of TANG LEUNG of the 5th Tó, 4th T'ó, and 8th Káp.

It is further inserted in this deed in the presence of both parties that out of the total number of Eighty-four maus, Five fan, and Two Li, included in the various localities mentioned in the deed, only Twenty-six maus are sold to CHENG IN I TONG who may register the same in his own name. The remaining portion of the land is still under the ownership of the Tang clan, the tax for which the said clan shall continue to pay.

This is clearly stated to avoid all future disputes.

Signed by

Writer of the Deed LEUNG YAT-ÚN.

Middle-men CHENG Ts'OI-CHEUNG and LEUNG YAT-ÚN.

Maker of this Deed of absolute sale TANG KAI-SHEK.

16th Year Kwong Sii, 3rd Moon, 1st day.

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A.

壹張 印契壹張執爲 弌拾陸畝如有來歷不明係賣主同中理不買主之事此乃二家允願恐口無憑立斷賣契 竭石西至口角瀝南至燈籠洲止北至鄧占一圍止連松山果園屋宇一概在内四至明白稅載 地所四至照鄧介石賣主界限管業土名屯門海口福建荒圍并沙灘壹幅東至荔枝角魚角鷺 榔即日推出歸鄭飛詒堂管業任由日後方便過割歸戶此乃銀實數不是債析等情其山塲 時值花紅銀伍拾圓重叁拾陸兩正當衆一色司碼兌足鄧介石親手接回應納粮務其稅業一

親人等各無銀承買托中人鄭采章梁日垣引至南鄭燕詒堂允肯入頭承買三面言明酬同

圍載縣稅民壹碩零七升今因粮務緊迫無鏐應納愿將祖遺契内稅業一樁出賣與人先招 立斷賣舊洗鹽田山塲圍地一所契人鄧介石承祖遺下先年買受袁暢衡稅業土名屯門陳家

稅在五都四圖八甲戶長鄧的名才光

歸鄧姓自納根務特此聲明以免後論 再批明契内各土名共該捌拾四畝伍分厘撥弍拾陸畝 鄭燕詒堂過割歸戶尚餘仍

代筆人梁日垣

作中人鄭采章

梁日垣

光緒拾陸 年

三 月

立賣斷數人鄧介石的筆

274

"

Appendix No. VIв.

B.

Translation of a K‘ai Mi (†♬ )

The Provincial Treasurer of Kwong-tung has received a despatch from the Viceroy and Governor regarding compliance with a memorial which, after having been considered by the Board of Revenue, has received Imperial sanction.

6.

63

66

That despatch states :-"We have received a communication from the Board "of Revenue relative to a memorial dated 15th year K'in Lung, 1st moon, 22nd day, from Fu MING, Treasurer, of Ho Nám, which was submitted through "the officer in charge of the Ho Nám division of the Board of Revenue and which was considered by the Board and reported on to the Emperor. The memorial proposes the attaching of an officially stamped document to all title deeds, referring "to the buying and selling of real estate, and the transmitting of such documents "through the Prefects and Sub-Prefects to the Treasurer for examination and record. "In the same year, 12th moon, 12th day, the Board received Imperial sanction and "having made a copy of the memorial forwarded it to us in a despatch with forms authorising us to carry out the necessary arrangements. To that despatch was "annexed an enclosure which stated that in future all officially stamped documents attached to title deeds issued by the Provincial Treasurer to the people must be "classified and numbered; that the first half should as formerly contain the follow- ing particulars :-Name and surname of owner; amount of real estate; price; amount of taxes; that the second half should be stamped with the Treasurer's "seal at the space left blank so that, when taxes are paid, the price of the land and "the amount of the taxes may be filled in where the seal of the Treasurer has "been affixed; that the owners should examine the writing made in their presence where the first and second halves join before the two halves are separated; "that the first half should be handed to the owner to be kept that the second half "should be sent with the quarterly returns to the Treasurer for his inspection : "that the written characters in the column (where the seal has been affixed) being "in the same handwriting and divided evenly in two, any alteration in the figures "will be difficult; and that the forin of stamped document attached to leases formerly used by Magistrates and Treasurers must be abolished in order to pre- "vent confusion. We (the Viceroy and Governor) having received this despatch "forward to you the necessary instructions and form."

66

66

CC

Having received the above despatch of the Viceroy and Governor, I, the Pro- vincial Treasurer, have caused it to be printed and distributed. Hereafter all owners of ordinary property or of land allotted to military settlers, when presenting their deeds at the time of paying taxes, must comply with the new regulations and for each officially stamped document attached to a deed, a charge, based on the purchase price of the land, of 3 fên for each tael (the charge of 3 fên for each tael is paid into general revenue) and 1 fên for each tael in aid of the State Examinations (ie., a total charge of 4%) will be made.

The stamped document attached to the deed must be filled up, in accordance with the form, after the fees have been paid, and when the last column has been filled up, the two parts can be separated and the first part handed to the owner and the second part to the Treasurer.

If any one fails to apply for a properly stamped document, he will be dealt with as guilty of the offence of evading the payment of taxes.

This is an important despatch concerning this "K'ai Mi" or Form attached to Red Deeds.

The Landowner is CHEUNG IN T'ONG who bought the land in the 5th Tó, 4th T'ó, 8th Káp, from TANG KAI SHEK, the said land being situated near the village. of Ch'an Ka Wai in the Sub-district of T'ün Mun. The land pays the tax of the third class, the area being twenty-six maus.

The price of the land is thirty-six taels.

The ad valorem duty is

The charge in aid of State Examination is

This grant is made to the Landowner CHENG IN I T'ONG under the registered mark "Ló", No. 72.

16th year, Kwong Sü, 8th moon,

day

B.

字號

275

廣東等處承宣布政使司爲遵

計開

年十二月十二日奏本日奉 布政使司富明條奏賣買巴產將契尾粘連用印存儲申送府州藩司查核等因一摺於木 旨議奏事奉 兩院案驗乾隆十五年正月二十一日准 戶部咨河南司案呈本部議覆河南

司如有不請給契尾者照漏稅例治罪須至契尾者 例每契價銀壹兩收稅契銀三分科場銀壹分卽將契尾照式填寫騎字截給分別給民繳 等因到院行司並發格式一張奉此合行刊發嗣後凡有民屯業戶投契納稅卽便遵照定 筆跡平分爲工大小數目委難改換其從前州縣布政司備查各契尾應行停止以省文 業戶看明當面騎字截開前半幅給業戶收執後半幅同季册送布政司查核此係一行 稅銀若干後半幅於空白處預鈐印於投稅時將契價稅銀數目大小填寫鈐印之處令 布政司頒發給民契尾格式編列號數前半幅照常細書業戶等姓名買賣田房數目 依議欽此相應抄錄原奏同頒發格式行丈廣東督撫欽辦理可也計粘單一紙内開嗣

合銀後

業戶鄭燕詒堂買受五都四圖八甲戶丁鄧介石

房地田

百〇三十六兩〇錢〇分〇垕〇毫 下稅〇頃弍拾陸畝〇分〇厘〇毫〇〇忽微〇〇沙〇塵〇埃價銀 (1) 千

該秕契銀 百十兩錢分厘科塲銀百十兩

光緒十六 年

日給

布頌露字七十二號業戶鄭燕詒堂准此

坵坐落土名屯門陳家圍等處

Appendix No. VIc.

C.

Translation of a White Deed.

Deed.

A DEED REGARDING A STONE QUARRY.

The maker of this deed of the absolute sale of a Stone Quarry is Lai A-ts‘at, who years ago had bequeathed to him a Stone Quarry situated at a place known as Liümun. This Quarry faces the south. Its Eastern Boundary extends to the Tái Wong Temple; its Western boundary to the side of the Well; its Northern boundary to Little Kún Tong; and its Southern boundary to the edge of the sea, the four boundaries being thus clearly defined.

276

Being at present in urgent need of money, the Vendor wishes to sell this quarry and in the first instance invited his nearest of kin to take it over, but as they had not the money, the Vendor asked the middle-man, Ts'ó YAN-HOI, to take the deed to LO SIN-KO who is willing to purchase the said

quarry.

On that very day the sale of this quarry was settled orally between the Vendor and Purchaser in the presence of the middle-man, the market price fixed being Fifty Dollars ($50), the equivalent weight of which in silver is exactly Thirty-six Taels (Tls. 36 ).

After the sale of this quarry LO SIN-KO is at full liberty to carry on quarry- ing, whilst the Vendor, LAI A-TS'AT, and his descendants or relatives cannot raise any objections or cause any trouble or retract from or obstruct the sale.

In case there may be no proof of an oral agreement, this deed is drawn up as proof that both parties have made this agreement of their own free will, that no force or pressure has been used, that the sale of this quarry is absolute, and that the Vendor and his descendants henceforth renounce all rights connected therewith.

This deed of sale is drawn up to be kept in the custody of the Purchaser.

Signed by-

Middleman TsÚ YAN-HOI.

Writer of Deed Lát Kex-Mur.

Witness LÁI A-YAN, younger brother of LAI A-TS'AT.

Vendor Lar A-Ts'AT. [This is his genuine signature.]

29th

year T6 Kwong, 4th

intercalary Moon, 13th day.

C.

石塘契

兩無迫勒一賣千秋永斷葛籐立賣石塘字存照 七父子兄弟叔姪人等不得異說生端反悔阻當恐口無憑此係二家允意 價銀伍拾大圓足重兌三十六兩此石塘自于後任從羅先哥採取石塊賴 中人曹仁開送至羅先哥允意承接卽日經中三面言定賣石塘壹所時值 明兹今目下無銀應用情愿出賣與人先招親人等俱各無銀承接請得 東至大王爺爲界西至水井邊爲界北至官當仔爲界南至海爲界西至分 立賣石塘字人賴亞七先年還下有石塘壹所坐落土名鯉魚門坐北向南

代筆人賴觀妹

作中人曹仁開

在塲弟賴亞仁

道光式十九年

閏四月

十三日

立賣石塘字人賴亞七是實

Appendix No. VII.

Form of Notice posted in the Villages.

NEW TERRITORY.

新界

Claims to Provisional Certificates of Title in the.

.of...

呈報暫領在

分約

村附近之地契

CLAIMANT.

PROPERTY CLAIMED.

NUMBER RENT

所報田畝

OF

PER

YEARS ANNUM.

No. CLAIM

No.

Name of Owner

報號

or Occupier.

Class.

Description.

277

IN

REMARKS.

OCCUPA

Area in Maus.

TION.

年若雑記

賦干

業主姓名 何則 何等田地畝四 管幾

數至業年 5

JA

C.

Appendix No. VIII.

Memorandum of work done in the Land Office, Hongkong, in respect of the New Territories for the year 1899.

1. The preliminary work of the Land Office in respect of the New Territory: consisted in making arrangements for the registration of all the owners of cultivated lands there with a view to the preparation of a Crown Rent Roll; in devising methods for the classification of the lands for the fixing of proper Crown Rents; in assessing Crown Rents according to the classification of the lands, and in the drafting and superintending of the printing of the forms to be used in obtaining the requisite information of claims to land and the registers to be kept.

2. In the month of May last, soon after the New Territory had been taken possession of by the Colonial Government, questions arose in respect of the follow- ing matters, viz. :-

(1.) The registration of Chinese deeds under our Deeds Registration Or-

dinance of 1843.

(2.) The grant of Crown Leases by the Government in substitution of

the existing Chinese titles, or

(3.) The grant of Certificates of Title under which the existing titles

should be acknowledged by the Government.

3. As regards (1.) arrangements were then made for the voluntary registration of all Chinese deeds by Memorial under the Registration Ordinance; the last deed before the date of the Convention (19th June, 1898) to be taken as the root of title, the previous title to be produced in support if required, but not necessarily for re- gistration, if the circuinstances did not require it. It was also necessary to obtain a translation in English of the deed forming the root of title, and to secure the payment of the fees under the Registration Ordinance, and the stamping of the deeds with the ad valorem duty under the Stamp Ordinances.

.

4. The first deed, which was one relating to land at Kowloon Tong, was registered on the 3rd June, 1899, and from that date to the end of the

year deeds have been continuously coming into the Land Office for registration. The advantage of this registration is that the Government has no responsibility for the registered title, while the title of the registered owner is secured and if he is in possession

..78

becomes absolute in twenty years. The number of deeds translated and actually registered under the Ordinance to the end of the year was 134, leaving over for investigation and decision some 200. As there is only one translator in the Land Office the work done in registration may be considered highly satisfactory.

5. It is worthy of note that in one case the registered owner died within a few weeks after the registration of his title, and the next of kin, on understanding that such was the law of the Colony, applied to the Supreme Court in its Probate Juris- diction for letters of administration, and paid the administration duty without any demur or question, although wills, probates, and letters of administration of intestate estates are terms unknown in China outside of Hongkong.

6. With reference to (2.) as the Government under the terms of the Convention can only grant leases for a term not exceeding 99 years from the date of the Con- vention, the idea of granting such leases in exchange for the existing titles has been reluctantly abandoned, for the Chinese titles are in perpetuity, subject only to land tax, or, in cases of perpetual underleases, to a rent.

7. As regards (3.) it has been arranged to grant certificates of title in the first instance, provisionally, and if after the lapse of sufficient time there is no dispute, a certificate of the owner's title will be issued and registered.

One case in respect of land at Liümun is now being tried in order to decide upon the best method to adopt before granting certificates of title. The last Chinese deed of absolute sale before the Convention has been registered as a new root of title. The ground has been surveyed and marked out with boundary stones and advertise- ments issued by the owner claiming the land.

If, after the expiration of twelve months, he remains in undisputed possession of the land and no adverse claims are discovered within that time, the matter of granting a certificate of title will be submitted to the Government for decision.

8. The great difficulties to be got over arise from the circumstance that most valuable lands have more than one title, yet if each title is taken alone it appears to be in order. All deeds relating to land in the New Territory were registered in the San On District registry, but that registry is only a deed registry and not a registry of titles to land, and the conflicting titles could not be ascertained from the register there without some other clue than the register.

9. As a typical case of one class I may mention that the land at Cheung Sha Wán including the foreshore and the sea in front is claimed under four distinct titles vested in four different families. Two of the titles to the same land are derived direct from the Viceroy and Governor of Canton under recited Imperial Orders. The two other titles, before the Convention, conclude by Vesting Orders inade at trials before the San On Magistrates, one Magistrate deciding that the land belonged to the Tang Clan and another Magistrate deciding that the same land belonged to the Chiu Clan. Great value is placed upon this land and the matter is now waiting the formation of the proposed Land Court for decision.

10. A typical case of another class is that of some farm lands adjoining Deep Bay. About ten acres (English) had in course of time been added to the farm by the silting process of the sea and the detritus brought down by the Canton River. This natural accretion was claimed by the owners of the farm but was sold by the San On Magistrate as waste land belonging to the Government for Taels 600 ($833) to a friend, who, it is alleged, formed a syndicate consisting of himself, the Magistrate, the Major-General, and, under cover of the sale and by means of the soldiers at their command, took forcible possession of the whole farm, which was worth $60,000. This happened shortly before the Convention. The farm is now claimed by both parties and the matter is waiting the constitution of the new Land Court for decision.

11. Other cases there are of confiscation by the Magistrates and sale and relief from the forfeiture, after sale to others, upon payment of a fine. In these cases the original owners claim to retain possession of the land and the purchaser claims to be entitled to possession under the deed of sale from the Magistrate. Some land in the Kowloon district is held under a title by capture, where the clans fought, and the losing clan gave up a field as the price of the cessation of hostilities. Much time and trouble have been spent in the investigation of these claims, but without much result, as the parties prefer to wait for the information of the new Land Court to bring in their claims for decision.

!

12. The most serious matter of all, however, has been the stand taken by the faimers against the clans their former landlords. The clans and farmers agree that the farmers are absolute owners of the soil in perpetuity, but have been paying money or produce to the clans for generations which the clans claim to be rent payable to them. The case for the farmers is that the land is and always has been theirs absolutely free from rent, and that the amount paid by them to the clans was the Government land tax which they claim to pay direct to the Hongkong Govern- ment without the intervention of the clans. I have had several interviews with the representatives of some of the clans and with several of the head farmers and I have also visited the farms at Mui Wo. The farmers there now state that they will act under my advice and will cause no trouble to the Government, but they wish me to suspend any recommendation until I have visited the farms at Tung Ch'ung and Tái O, and they wish, if it be possible, that they should all be placed on the same equal footing. The system of payment in produce is one of the farmers' troubles because the measures used by the clans are larger than those intended by the deeds and are not the measures in general use in the district.

13. The consideration of these questions with other less important ones has. shewn the importance, in the interests of the Government and of the owners of the soil (the farmers), of providing for the redemption of the so-called rent of land tax payable by the owners to the clans, and also, in the meantime, of fixing the average price of produce by law so that payment may be made in money, as the farmers. desire, instead of in produce. Provisions for these objects have already been framed for legislative enactment.

14. Full particulars have been obtained from the islands of Ch'eung Chau, (which includes an important market town of 5,000 inhabitants), A Chau, a fish- ing station, and Po Tow Wan, and are now under examination. Owing to the value of the police protection now afforded by their incorporation into the Colony, the owners have voluntarily offered to pay increased Crown Rent, or such increased land tax as I may recommend to be fair.

15. Partial particulars have been obtained from the island of P'ing Chau, as well as from the islands of Lantao and Lamma, and the remaining information required is promised as soon as possible.

16. The bed of the sea surrounding Ping Chau, from which coral and shells can be dredged for the lime kilns, has been granted on lease for five years to the different owners of the lime kilns on the island, as they appeared to have the prior claims. The Crown Rents for this now amount to $1,300 per annum, and inves- tigations are being made into the coral beds of other places for the purpose of granting short leases to any persons entitled in priority, or otherwise on public tender, unt 1 the investigations into this peculiar business are completed.

17. The claims to the fisheries in the bays have been partly investigated, and where there are fixed nets worked from the shore an annual Crown Rent of $5 a net has been charged and paid.

18. The stone and granite quarries of Liümun have been examined and the titles investigated; most of the title deeds have now been lodged in the Land Office for registration, and a Crown rental of $3,725 per annum is now being obtained from them until the alternative policy of charging a royalty has been determined.

19. The number of petitions from the inhabitants of the New Territory relating to land questions and disputes amounted, at the end of the year, to upwards of 1,000, most of which have been dealt with, whil others are waiting for the institution of the Land Court, or for the compieшon or surveys.

20. At the present rate of progress it would take about two more years to com- plete the registration of the whole of the New Territory and the completion of correct rent rolls and registers; but now that the questions between the farmers and the clans are likely soon to be satisfactorily disposed of, the work will progress much more rapidly.

21. Forms shewing particulars in English and Chinese of all the cultivated lands from Lai Chi Kok to Kowloon Tong have been completed and posted up in the various villages, and as no objection has been raised the Crown Rent Roll of this district will shortly be completed. The particulars of the cultivated lands from small Kowloon to Liumun are now in preparation and are likely to be com- pleted in a month or two.

BRUCE SHEPHERD, Deputy Land Officer.

:

17th January, 1900.

=

Appendix No. IX.

Translation of the Chinese Proclamation issued by His Excellency Sir Henry A.

Blake, G.C.M.G., Governor and Commander-in-Chief of the Colony of

Hongkong and its Dependencies and Vice-Admiral of the same.

Whereas His Imperial Majesty the Emperor of China has leased to Her Majesty the Queen of Great Britain and Ireland, as an extension of the Colony of Hong- kong, certain territory situated in the District of San On, and certain islands adjacent thereto, the boundaries of which are as hereunder stated, viz.:—

The Northern boundary commences at the point of high water mark in Mirs Bay where the meridian of 114° 30′ East bisects the land, and follows that high water mark to a point immediately to the West of Sha-t'au-kok, and then follows the road along the Northern edge of this town till the middle of a stream becomes the boundary as far as the road to Kang Hau. From Kang Hau to about a quarter of a mile West of Kang Tó the Northern edge of the road is the boundary, From this point to the mouth of the Shamchun river the Northern bank of the Shamchun river forms the boundary. From the mouth of the Shamchun river the boundary follows the high water mark along the coast of Deep Bay till the point where the meridian of 113° 52′ bisects the land.

The Eastern boundary is 114° 30′ East Longitude. The Western boundary is 113° 52′ East Longitude.

The Southern boundary is 22° 9′ North Latitude.

All the islands situated within those boundaries are within the leased area as are all the waters of Mirs Bay and Deep Bay.

And whereas Her Majesty has been graciously pleased to appoint me as Governor of the said territory, and whereas it is desirable that British and Chinese territory should be clearly defined so that the friendly relations now existing between the two nations may be always maintained.

Now therefore I have fixed the 17th day of April, 1899, as the date on which the British Flag shall be hoisted and the administration of the territory be taken over by duly authorized British Officers.

To remove any cause for suspicion in your minds as to the good intentions of the British Government and to prevent you from being deceived and misled through ignorance by false reports disseminated by lawless persons who

may seek. to further their own interests by thus causing trouble, it is right for me to warn you against such persons and to assure you that all the inhabitants residing within the limits of British territory will be permitted to follow undisturbed their lawful occupations, whatever they may be.

I would also impress upon you that this territory having been leased by His Imperial Majesty the Emperor of China to Her Britannic Majesty the Queen, as subjects of Her Majesty's Empire, your commercial and landed interests will be safe-guarded, and that your usages and good customs will not in any way be interfered with.

It is the wish of Her Majesty the Queen that all her subjects in every part of the world shall be prosperous and happy, and it will be my duty to assist you to improve your position by every means in my power. The most respected of your elders will be chosen to assist in the management of your village affairs, to secure peace and good order and the punishment of evil-doers. I expect you to obey the laws that are made for your benefit, and all persons who break the law will be punished severely.

It will be necessary for you to register without delay your titles for the land occupied by you, that the true owners may be known. Should any land be required for public purposes it will be paid for at its full value.

Remember that as subjects of the Great British Empire your pefect freedom from oppression is assured. Should you have any complaint to make the Governor will always be willing to hear it and to order what is right. There will be no injustice allowed, nor any laxity in the administration of justice. All must render implicit obedience.

Dated this 9th day of April, 1899.

:

...

281

Appendix No. X.

Speech made by His Excellency Sir Henry A. Blake, Governor, &c., on the occasion of the hoisting of the Flag on the 17th of April, 1899.

*

This is the place where the British Flag is to be hoisted. The territory hasî › been ceded by the Emperor of China to the Queen of Great Britain. I, being the Governor of Hongkong, have been deputed by my Government to receive the New Territory, and I will treat you as friends and not as enemies. The day is an important epoch in your lives, for to-day you become British subjects. All the world over it is known that the ways of my country in ruling the people are excellent. We simply want to make the people happy, and our country is respected by all the nations of the world. Our dominions spread over the four quarters of the world and millions upon millions of people own our protection. From this day of hoisting the flag you and your families and your property come under British protection. This territory now becomes part of Hongkong If you, the Chinese, want to know how you will be treated you can go to Kowloon and Hongkong and there see for yourselves. There you will find that all the Chinese are well protected and all their interests cared for. You may carry on your lawful occupations and your buying and selling unobstructed. Your ances- tral temples and your temples for worshipping your gods will remain. Our Queen hopes that you will always enjoy prosperity and happiness, and I, the Governor, by command of Her Majesty's Government, hereby declare that all your customs and usages will be respected. Village courts will be established and representatives will be selected from your gentry to assist in the management of public affairs, and while acting in accordance with the law you will be allowed perfect freedom. I do not say that existing regulations may not be altered, but the alterations will only be such as will meet with the approval of the law-abid- ing people. The taxes will be equal and the revenue will be collected justly., You need now have no fear of being squeezed by the officials. If exactions are made in excess of the just charges, the Government will dismiss the officials re- sponsible. The taxes collected will be expended in maintaining order and in public improvements. I am going to make a road from this place to Shá-t'in and thence to Kowloon, so that you may easily transport your goods to Hongkong for sale.

There will be no Customs charges or likin, and you may freely bring back with you goods in exchange. You are now all British subjects and you will share in the benefits esulting from the prosperity of Hongkong. There you will find people who, starting with little capital, have built up great businesses. You will all have the same chance of becoming prosperous. In all the villages we will establish schools, and you will be protected in your rights; even the poorest people will be free from molestation. The laws that are made for your benefit must be obeyed, and all who break the law will be punished severely. All persons, the gentry, the scholars and the common people must act honestly. From this time forth you are British subjects, and should you have any complaint to make the Governor will listen to it, no injustice will be allowed nor any laxity. If you obey the law you need have no fear, and I hope that you will all form one united community bound together by ties of love and respect. I pray God to afford you His protection and give you happiness.

:

Appendix No. XI.

Translation of Chinese Notification issued by the Colonial Secretary (J. H. Stewart Lockhart, C.M.G.).

The following notice is issued for general information. As regards land owned by individuals it is a universal practice that tenants pay rent to their land- lords whilst landlords pay taxes to the Government. This is also an old custom in China which it is unnecessary to alter.

:

282

Information has lately been received that some ill-informed tenants have wrongly refused to pay rent on the land held by them on lease to their landlords under the pretext that the land in question is within the New Territory.

Again there are others who declare that since the land is within the New Territory all rents are to be paid to the Government and that landlords are not in any way concerned in the matter. Both these views are quite unreasonable.

Further, there are other lawless characters who have actually taken forcible possession of land or have tried to deceive the authorities by misrepresentations because they thought that the New Territory having been newly occupied, the authorities would not be able to differentiate between genuine and fictitious claims of ownership. Tenants have also endeavoured to usurp the rights of land- lords and landlords have also tried to deprive tenants of their rights as such. Such crafty and deceitful ways show great disregard of the law.

This notice is therefore issued for the special information of the elders and people within the New Territory.

Hereafter tenants must report the names of their landlords and landlords must report the names of their tenants, whilst both are required to report the acreage of all the land owned or cultivated by them in the New Territory.

All tenants must pay rent to their landlords and in case their.. original land- lords have sold the land to some one else they must in that case pay rent to the new landlords. Tenants must make no idle excuse for refusing to pay rent.

If tenants and landlords have any dispute they should lay the matter before the

proper authorities for decision. Resort to personal violence is strictly pro- hibited.

If any ill-behaved persons are rash enough to be guilty of any of the mal- practices alluded to above and are found out or complained against they will most certainly be severely punished according to law and no leniency will be shown to them.

Tremble and obey. A special notice. Dated this 20th day of October, 1898.

.:

Appendix No. XII.

Report by Mr. Ford, Superintendent, Botanical and Afforestation Department.

Shortly after the territory came under the control of the Government of this Colony steps were taken for rearing trees for planting in such places as needed them and subsequently an estimate was submitted for the expenditure of $2,500 during 1900 in forestry works in the territory, current expenses for 1899 being defrayed from other votes of this Department. Commencing in April and continu- ing throughout the year, I personally made tours over the greater part of the territory in order to gain as much knowledge of it as possible for application after- wards and to arrange for planting operations during 1900. Up to the end of December about 60,000 pits and sites had been prepared at Táipó, P'ing-shán, Au T'au and Fu-ti Au and along the course of the new road. The planting of trees and seed sowing will commence immediately.

His Excellency the Governor suggested that some Chattanooga Sugar Mills should be obtained from America to demonstrate to the sugar growers the advantages of using Western machinery in place of the primitive mills in use. The new mills have arrived and been fixed in the midst of the sugar districts and satisfactory trials of cane-crushing have been made. His Excellency the Governor and the Colonial Secretary were present at two of the trials. The arrangements of setting up these mills and conducting the trials were entrusted to and carried out by myself.

A considerable number of references have been made to this Department in connection with tree conservation and kindred subjects and I submitted a draft pro- clamation, which was authorized and published cautioning the people against the destruction of trees.

283

I have introduced from Ceylon a superior variety of Pine-apple plant for distri- bution amongst the growers of this plant.

By His Excellency the Governor's instructions improved varieties of sugar cane are also being obtained from Java, the Straits Settlements and Honolulu, and I have made arrangements for Mr. TANG HING-T'ONG to receive them and cultivate them during the ensuing season.

Hongkong, 17th January, 1900.

C. FORD.

(Enclosure in Mr. C. FORD's Report dated 17th January, 1900.)

Notice issued by the Colonial Secretary.

The Government has information that during some months passed certain inhabitants of the New Territory leased to the British Government have recklessly cut down a considerable number of large trees which hitherto had wisely been preserved. These deeds seem to have been committed by a few people in order to acquire temporary pecuniary gain for themselves only, thereby carelessly disregarding and sacrificing the present and future benefits derivable from such trees by all the people in general.

The Government, knowing the great benefits to the health and comfort of the inhabitants which trees confer upon them, and being convinced that there are not too many trees in the territory, desire to protect for the good of all people those large trees which have hitherto been preserved. The Government, therefore, counsels all persons concerned to discontinue cutting such trees and to exercise the greatest care in preserving them from any injury. The Government further warn people of mischievous intentions that the police have received instructions to prosecute any person detected destroying or injuring such trees without authority.

All the trees known as Hung Sam Káu (I) are included in this pro- hibition, and in future none may be cut unless a permit be obtained from the Super- intendent of the Botanical and Afforestation Department, Hongkong, the possession of which permit will protect the bearer of it, while legally employed, from interfer- ence by officers whose duty it is to protect trees.

This prohibition does not apply to the small pine trees which the people have themselves planted and which are usually used for fuel.

Dated this day of

1898.

Appendix No. XIII.

Memorandum on work done by the Public Works Department in

the New Territory during the year 1899.

1. Temporary accommodation in the form of matsheds was put up for the Police and Military during the months of April and May at Táipó, Au-t'au, Futi Au, Shá-t'in at a cost of $11,624.41.

2. The arrangements in connection with the hoisting of the flag on April 16th, which consisted in building a landing stage, forming an approach road, erection of sheds, providing and erecting a flagstaff, &c. cost $2,085.00.

3. Telephone lines have been constructed connecting British Kowloon with Kowloon City, Shá-t'in, Táipó, Futi Au, Sheung-shui, Au-t'au, Ping-shán, a total distance of about thirty miles, at a cost of $3,763.93.

284

4. A large permanent Police Station, containing 12 rooms and accommodation for 5 Europeans, 32 Indians and Chinese, was erected in 1899 at Táipó at a cost of $7,650.

5. A permanent two-storied Police Station (11 rooms) at Au-t'au near Un Long with accommodation for 6 Europeans, 21 Indians and Chinese, was nearly completed, the expenditure on it in 1899 being $8,330.

6. A similar station at P'ing-shán was also nearly completed, the expenditure in 1899 being $7,650.

7. A sum of $511.99 was spent in sanitation, in improving the drainage in Kowloon City in the vicinity of the old Customs Station now used as a Police Station, and in some minor works at Sheung-shui Police Station.

8. The main road into the territory starting fron! Mongkoktsui and crossing through a gap on the hills 450' high behind Ch'eungsháván and then down the Shá-t'in Valley to Táiwai was commenced in May. The earth work for a distance of seven miles from Tsim-sha-tsui ferry was completed in December. Four miles of the rockwork, bridges, culverts, &c. were practically completed in the same time and the road for six miles from the ferry open and ready for traffic. Considerable progress was made with rockwork and buildings in the Shá-t'in Valley. The trace on towards Táipó was made for three miles beyond Tái-wai. The total expenditure on this road during the year was $49,066.32. It is estimated that the second section, i.e., from Tái-wai to Táipó will be about seven miles, and the third from Táipó to the Northern boundary of the territory about nine miles more, the total distance from Tsim-sha-tsui ferry to a point near Shamchun being twenty-five miles.

9. The Hunghom Road on the East side of British Kowloon peninsula was extended to Kowloon City and nearly completed in 1899 at a cost in that year of $14,694.05.

10. A commencement was made with the renewal of the timber work of Kowloon City Pier. Estimated cost $6,316.00. Expenditure in 1899 $3,013.76.

11. Some improvement was made in the Official Quarters at Táipó to make them more fit for habitation in the winter at a cost of $355 charged to "Miscellaneous.'

"}

12. A three-roomed bungalow was built at Táipó for His Excellency's use at a cost of $2,139.75, but was afterwards given up for the use of the European members of the executive staff.

13. A survey party lent by the Indian Government arrived towards the close of the year and commenced a complete Trigonometrical and Cadastral Survey of the Territory, the expenditure on this account in the year being $1,206.44.

5th January, 1900.

(Signed)

R. D. ORMSBY,

Director of Public Works.

Appendix No. XIV.

Translation of Notification regarding the Survey.

The following notice is issued for general information. By a survey of the land the people will derive therefrom a real benefit. The Government has now decided that the land within the New Territory shall be thoroughly surveyed and when the work is properly carried out everyone's land, whether situated on hills on in valleys, will be marked on a map and the boundaries thereof will be minutely delineated. The areas will then be clearly defined and no one will be able to encroach on or appropriate the land of others. This survey ordered by the Government is intended to aid you in the protection of your own land, to prevent litigation and to enable you to long enjoy the peaceful possession of your property.

}

285

Lest you may not thoroughly understand the purpose of this survey as well as the good intentions that have actuated the Government, and thereby be filled with doubts and apprehensions leading to trouble and disturbance, this notice is issued for your information.

Landlords and others within the New Territory are hereby notified that, in accordance with the orders of His Excellency the Governor, British and Indian survey-officers have arrived in Hongkong and will shortly commence to make the survey.

When the survey officers are working in your neighbourhood, you gentry and people should, with due consideration for the good intentions of His Excellency the Governor, strive to assist the surveyors and in no way obstruct or molest them. Whenever such survey officers have any question to ask, you should answer them truthfully. All marks put up during the survey should in no case be removed. If any one dares to disobey he shall be severely punished without leniency.

Dated this 21st day of November, 1898.

Appendix No. XV.

Brief Report on Commencement of Survey Operations in the New Territory.

PRELIMINARY. ARRIVAL OF SURVEYOR.

Having been appointed to take charge of the survey operations I sailed from Calcutta on the 3rd October, and landed in Hongkong on the 19th of the same month. I was joined by Mr. NEWLAND, the second survey officer, with a small staff of Indian trained surveying coolies, and surveyors, who landed in the Colony on the 1st of November.

The Cadastral Survey was first put in hand. By the 8th Mr. NEWLAND had set the Indian surveyors at work to traverse the limits of the cultivated areas in that portion of the Hongkong District which is situated on the mainland.

TRAVERSE SYSTEM AS PRACTISED IN INDIA.

The system adopted was that practised in the Indian Cadastral Surveys. Traverses were run by means of theodolites, for the angular, and chains for the linear measurements, in order to provide suitable blocks for the Detail Surveyors who were being recruited in India through the Imperial Survey Department. As the contract system for the detail surveys had been adopted it was necessary that skeleton plots should be realy by the time the Detail Surveyors landed in the Colony. In order to insure these being in readiness the triangulation on which the Cadastral and Topographical Surveys are based was allowed to remain in abeyance for a time.

DETAIL SURVEYS.

The Detail Surveyors landed at the end of the month of November. Mr. NEWLAND had thus barely three weeks' start, but owing to the advantage that had been taken of this short period, a sufficient number of plots were completed, and ready for the Detail Surveyors who were thus enabled to commence their work (without undue delay) on the scale of 16 inches to a mile.

TRIANGULATION AND TOPOGRAPHY.

The triangulation was taken up in December. A base had been laid down and measured, and a connection was made with the Kowloon Obstory. The Spheroidal Coordinates of this point being known, those of the tion, when complete, will be referable to the value of the Kow Jongkong)

triangula-

286

Observatory as contained in the Nautical Almanac. During the mouth of Decem- ber, 1899, ten points were observed at, by means of which a sufficiency of points were fixed to enable the Survey of the Topography of the New Territory to be commenced on the scale of 1 inch to a mile. This was begun by the end of the month of December.

TRANSFER OF TRAVERSE PARTIES TO SHAP PÁT HÉUNG AND PÁT

HEUNG DISTRICTS.

It was considered advisable to begin the surveys in the immediate vicinity of the head quarters of the Colony. As soon as a sufficient area had been prepared for the detailed survey, arrangements were made to transfer the Traverse Camp to the Shap Pát Héung and Pát Héung Valleys where the principal cultivated areas on the mainland are situated.

PROGRESS OF THE SURVEYS.

Owing to the difficulties presented by the physical configuration of the country, and to want of familiarity with the surroundings, the progress of the survey has been slow. But it is hoped that as more local experience is gained a greater area will be traversed and surveyed in detail than has been the case in the short time that the survey detachment has been at work in the country. Efforts are being made to employ Chinese labour for chaining and carrying of instruments. Indian labour apparently can command higher wages, and the supply is also limited.

It is very remarkable that no incivility or hindrance of survey work has been experienced at present, the cultivators taking little notice of the operations going on among their fields. This is undoubtedly due to the employment of Chinese coolies.

GEO. P. TATE,

In charge New Territory Survey.

15th January, 1900.

Appendix No. XVI.

Translation of Form distributed throughout the villages.

1. Name of village.

2. Name of teacher and native place.

3. Degree, if any.

4. Salary.

5. How paid? i.e., by fees, in kind or in money?

6. Whether the school is endowed or not.

7. Pupils-Hakka or Punti?

8. Average number of pupils ?

9. Usual length of holidays?

10. Public or adventure school? (i.e., a private venture on part of teacher).

11. If Public, by whom teacher is appointed.

12. School-house rented by teacher or granted by community?

13. What books are used in each school?

1 What are the school hours?

How long has the school been established?

the school for primary, secondary, or higher education ?

287

Appendix No. XVII.

Report by Dr. Atkinson, Principal Civil Medical Officer.

From the enclosed returns it will be seen that malarial fever has been preva- lent in the New Territory since it was taken over in April last.

I attach the following tables :-

1. A return showing the admission to hospital of cases of malarial fever from the New Territory occurring amongst the Police during 1899.

2. A return showing admissions of Police to hospital from the several

stations in the New Territory during 1899.

It will be seen that Ün Long contributed the largest number of fever cases, viz., 19 out of 65, Táipó coming next with 14 cases. The disease was not of a particularly severe type, the only fatal case being that of the Inspector at Ch'eung Chau.

He was admitted to hospital with symptoms of remittent fever and rapidly developed hyperpyrexia.

A careful post-mortem examination was made and as this was a most excep- tional case portions of the various organs were preserved and sent to Dr. MANSON for examination. From a report which I have recently received from the Tropical School of Medicine, it is doubtful whether this was a true case of malaria and it would be more correct to consider it a case of Siriasis or Thermic fever.

In addition to the cases from the Police, three of the Cadets were admitted from Táipó suffering from attacks of remittent fever; they recovered.

Three cases of dysentery were admitted to hospital; one patient was a European and two Indians. Knowing how malarious many of the districts were, instructions were drawn up by myself for the guidance of Police and others, a copy of which I enclose, the object being to protect them as far as possible from anything that would tend to induce attacks of fever, special prominence being given to the prophylactic use of quinine in small daily doses.

Accompanied by the Director of Public Works and the Captain Superintendent of Police, I spent three days in visiting the territory and selecting the most suitable sites for the Police Stations. This was prior to the occupation of the Territory in April. Undoubtedly much of the fever has been occasioned by the temporary nature of the buildings in which the Government servants of necessity have been housed. When permanent brick buildings have taken the place of the temporary buildings, mostly matsheds, I anticipate a considerable diminution in the number of cases of malarial fever.

Dr. Ho NAI-HOP, a licentiate of the College of Medicine for Chinese in Hong- kong, was appointed Resident Medical Officer and was stationed at Táipó, his duties being to attend to the minor ailments, mild attacks of fever, &c. occurring amongst the Civil Staff and the Police. Arrangements have been made whereby he regularly visits the several Police Stations and treats free any villagers who may apply for advice and medicine. Free vaccination is also performed by him during the winter months on his periodical visits. I attach a time table showing the days and hours at which he visits the several stations.

Knowledge of the prevalence of plague at Cheung Chau was obtained in April last and Drs. THOMSON and CLARK were deputed to visit and take the necessary steps to eradicate the disease.

House to house visitation was instituted, a matshed hospital erected and free medicine distributed, so that by the middle of June the disease was practically stamped out. The Police carried out the house to house visitation, Inspector GILLIES particularly distinguishing himself. Indeed, I have very little doubt the the assiduous way in which he performed these duties undermined his health a predisposed him to the attack of fever which unfortunately proved fatal.

A few cases of plague occurred at Chinese Kowloon. No other case reported from any other portion of the New Territory although the di epidemic in Hongkong.

12th January, 1900.

J. M. ATKI

MALARIAL

FEVER.

(Enclosure No. 1 in Principal Civil Medical Officer's Report, dated 12th January, 1900.)

RETURN showing ADMISSION of CASES of MALARIAL FEVER to HOSPITAL from NEW TERRITORY, during the Year 1899, among the Police.

CH'EUNG

ÜN LONG.

CHAU.

TÁIPÓ.

FUTI AU.

TUNG CHUNG.

AUT AU.

P'ING-SHÁN.

SHA-T'IN.

KOWLOON

SHAT'AU

TAI Ó.

CITY.

Кok.

:

1

:

12

4

1

10

3

...

co

:

:

:

co

:

1

2

3

:

:

:

:

CO

2

ลง

:

:

:

2

1

:

:

:

band

. 1 1

:

:

1

:

:

:

N

:

:

:

:

1

:

:

:

1

:

:

:

1

European.

Indian.

Chinese.

European.

Indian.

Chinese.

European.

Indian.

Chinese.

European.

Indian.

Chinese.

European.

Indian.

Chinese.

European.

Indian.

Chinese.

European.

Indian.

Chinese.

European.

Indian.

Chinese.

European.

Indian.

Chinese.

European.

Indian.

Chinese.

European.

Indian.

Chinese.

Remittent

Fever,

1

Intermittent

Fever,

EUROPEANS.

RETURN showing ADMISSION of POLICE to HOSPITAL from NEW TERRITORY during the Year 1899.

INDIANS.

CHINESE.

TOTAL

15

50

Remittent

Fever.

Intermittent

Fever.

Other Diseases.

Total.

Remittent

Fever.

Intermittent

Fever.

Other Diseases.

Total.

Remittent

Fever.

Intermittent

Fever.

Other Diseases.

Total.

#5

+9

21

* 1 Death from Remittent Fever.

34

$49

91

3 Cases of Dysentery.

1 Case of Dysentery.

9

2

13

J. M. ATKINSON.

288

(Enclosure No. 2 in Principal Civil Medical Officer's Report dated

12th Jannary, 1900.)

Instructions to the Police to guard against Malaria.

289

1. Water from bath-rooms or cook-houses should not be thrown over the ground near the Station.

2. Pools or puddles of stagnant water near the Station should be filled up and turfed.

3. Preserve trees in the neighbourhood of the Station, as shade is beneficial.

4. On returning from duty wet, either from rain or perspiration, immediately get into a dry change of clothes having a hot bath before doing so if possible; par- ticularly avoid sitting in wet clothes.

5. Bathe in hot water not cold; this does not prohibit sea-bathing.

6. Eat, drink and smoke in moderation, especially remembering that though a small quantity of alcohol is beneficial a large quantity is injurious. Stimulants should not be taken until the day's work is over.

7. The best drink during the heat of the day is lemonade (made by boiling for half-an-hour a sliced lemon or four limes in a pint and a half of water, strain- ing, filtering and sweetening).

8. Be careful always to wear a helmet or sunhat when exposed to the sun.

9. As a preventative take a five-grain quinine pill every morning before break- fast during the months May-September.

(Enclosure No. 3 in Principal Civil Medical Officer's Report dated

12th January, 1900.)

TIME TABLE.

Stations.

Day of the Week.

Hour.

Futi Au,

Monday,

Shát in,

Wednesday,

11 a.m.

-1 p.m.

8 a.m.-10 a.m.

10 a.m.-11.30 a.m.

P'ing-shán,.

Au-t'au,

Thursday, the 11th of the 11th Moon, and every

second Thursday from that date,

12

1.30 p.m.

Shat'au-kok,

Thursday, the 18th of the 11th Moon, and every

second Thursday from that date,

11 a.m.

p.m.

Táipó,

Tuesday, Friday, Saturday, ...

9 a.m.-5 p.m.

Appendix No. XVIII.

RETURN of CASES from NEW TERRITORY TRIED at POLICE COURT, VICTORIA, from 24th April to 31st December, 1899.

DEFENDANTS IN EACH CASE, AND SENTENCE, DECISION, OR ORDER MADE.

290

TO BE IMPRISONED.

Number

of Case as

Recorded.

Total Number.

.Convicted and Punished.

Dis-

charged.

Committed for Trial

at the

Supreme

Court.

Ordered

to find

Security

to be of

good

behaviour.

Fined,

IN LIEU OF FINE OR SECURITY.

PEREMP-

TORY.

To be

whipped.

With Hard Labour.

With Hard

Labour.

M.

F.

M.

F.

ณ.

Al.

M.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

M.

Arms-Carrying or being in possession of, Ordinance 8 of 1895,

3

Banishment-Banishment and Conditional Pardons, Ordinance 8 of 1882, Infected Area--Removing Articles, &c. from, Ordinance 17 of 1887, Infectious Disease-Neglecting to Report, Ordinance 15 of 1894,

Perjury, (Common Law),.

Piracy with violence, (Common Law),..

Riot-Tumultuously disturbing the Peace by 3 or more persons, (Common Law), Common Gambling-House keeping or Playing in, Ordinance 7 of 1891, Gambling in the Street, Ordinance 7 of 1891,..

8

CO-NAN - 65 00 1

2

2

2

...

...

...

1

1

2

...

...

...

7

59

55

...

4

...

...

43

17

17

17

14

...

Robbery with violence, Ordinance 7 of 1865,

3

...

...

5

...

...

False charge-Preferring or wilfully giving false evidence, Ordinance 10 of 1890,. Recognizance-Breach of, Ordinance 10 of 1890,

1

I

1

་་་

...

...

...

Injuries to property, Ordinance 8 of 1865,

1

...

...

...

Indecent Exposure of person by bathing or otherwise, Ordinance 14 of 1845,...

1

...

Breach of the Peace, Ordinance 14 of 1845,.

I

Unlawful Possession of property, Ordinance 14 of 1845,

...

...

1

Burglary, Ordinance 7 of 1865,

...

...

Burglary with violence, Ordinance 7 of 1865,

Felony-Attempting to commit, Ordinance 7 of 1865,

House-breaking, Ordinance 7 of 1865,

Larceny, (Common), Ordinance 7 of 1865,

15

28

10

...

Menaces-Demanding money with, Ordinance 7 of 1865,

Trees-Damaging, Ordinance 14 of 1845,.

Assault, (Common), Ordinance 4 of 1865,

13

32

28

Cutting and wounding with intent to do grievous bodily harm, Ordinance 4 of 1865,... Murder, Ordinance 4 of 1865,

3

Opium (Prepared)-Being in possession of-without having valid certificates, Ordi- | nance 21 of 1891,

20

18

16

Opium (Raw) Ordinance--Breach of, Ordinances 22 of 1887 and 22 of 1891, Police Constable-Assaulting, Ordinance 9 of 1862,

2

1

....

1

Dead Bodies-Removing without a permit, Ordinance 16 of 1896,

1

1

Rogues and Vagabonds-- Wandering abroad and Lodging in the open air, 5 oft Geo. IV c. 83, s. 4,

22

22

21

Abduction of Girls, Ordinance 9 of 1897,

I

1

Triad Society-Suppression of-Triad and Unlawful Societies, Ordinance. 8 of 1887,...

4

4

: : : 2 2~~ 2:

1

...

2

15

2

2

3

25

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

1

20

...

...

1

**

1

...

1

1

11

1

...

1

21

**

I

4

Total,..

155

269

2

176

2

45

47

94

29

1

51

2

2 Bila

10th January, 1900.

W. M. B. ARTHUR, Magistrate's Clerk.

Stak

1

Appendix No. XIX.

NEW TERRITORY.

Statement of Revenue and Expenditure up to 31st December, 1899.

HEAD OF SERVICE.

Stone quarries,

Junk licences,

Pawnbrokers' licences,

Fines and Forfeitures,

Fishing nets,

Crown Rent,

Squatters' Fees,...

REVENUE.

AMOUNT.

C.

291

TOTAL.

C.

1,800.00

3,084.00

2,100.00

14.03

24.63

221.37

29.00

7,273.03

EXPENDITURE.

Personal Emoluments, Civil,

6,465.78

Do.,

Police,

26,116.83

32,582.61

Other Charges, Civil,

8,748.94*

Do.,

Police,

21,103.52†

29,852.46

Public Works,

112,012.22

Matsheds,

3,964.20

Transport,

12,114.00

Furniture,

1,381.79

Compensation to owners of land.........

2,566.53

Expenses of H. M.'s Navy, ....

3,061.05

Steam-launches under construction,..

Cost of Telephone Line from Kowloon to Táipó, Survey Party,

31,875.00

2,543.81

1,079.86

233,033.53

A. M. THOMSON, Treasurer.

Treasury, 23rd January, 1900.

* Includes expenses of launches, coal, oil, &c. Usual items under "Other Charges Police."

[L.S.]

Appendix No. XX.

PROCLAMATION.

HENRY ARTHUR BLAKE,

Governor.

By His Excellency Sir HENRY ARTHUR BLAKE, Knight Grand Cross of the Most Distinguished Order of Saint Michael and Saint George, Governor and Com- mander-in-Chief of the Colony of Hongkong and its Dependencies, and Vice- Admiral of the same.

Whereas by an Order of the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty in Council, made on the 20th day of October, 1898, after reciting that by a Convention dated the 9th day of June, 1898, between Her Majesty and His Imperial Majesty the Emperor of China, it is provided that the limits of British territory in the regions adjacent to the Colony of Hongkong, shall be enlarged under lease to Her Majesty in the manner described in the said Convention; and after reciting that it is expedient to make provision for the Government of the territories acquired by Her Majesty under the said Convention, during the continuance of the said lease, it was ordered (inter alia) as follows:

1. The territories within the limits and for the term described in the said Convention shall be and the same are hereby declared to be part and parcel of Her Majesty's Colony of Hongkong in like manner and for all intents and purposes as if they had originally formed part of the said Colony.

!

1

1

292

2. It shall be competent for the Governor of Hongkong, by and with the advice and consent of the Legislative Council of the said Colony, to make laws for the peace, order and good government of the said territories as part of the Colony.

3. From a date to be fixed by proclamation of the Governor of Hongkong, all laws and ordinances, which shall at such date be in force in the Colony of Hongkong, shall take effect in the said territories and shall remain in force therein until the same shall have been altered or repealed by Her Majesty or by the Governor of Hongkong, by and with the advice or consent of the Legislative Council.

And whereas it is expedient that from the 17th day of April, 1899, all laws and ordinances, which shall at such date be in force in the Colony of Hongkong, shall take effect in the said territories and shall remain in force therein until the same shall have been altered or repealed by Her Majesty or by the Governor of Hongkong, by and with the advice or consent of the Legislative Council:

Now, therefore, I, Sir HENRY ARTHUR BLAKE, do hereby, in pursuance of the powers reserved to me by the said Order of Her Most Excellent Majesty in Council and of every other power (if any) enabling me, by this Proclamation proclaim and direct that from the said 17th day of April, 1899, all laws and ordinances, which shall at such date be in force in the Colony of Hongkong shall take effect in the said territories and shall remain in force therein until the same shall have been altered or repealed by Her Majesty or by the Governor of Hongkong, by and with the advice or consent of the Legislative Council.

By His Excellency's Command,

J. H. STEWART LOCKHART,

Colonial Secretary.

GOD SAVE THE QUEEN.

Given at Government House, Victoria, Hongkong, this 8th day of April, 1899.

Appendix No. XXI.

Ordinance No. 10 of 1899.

SCHEDULE.

Number of Ordinance and

year.

Title or Short Title.

Extent of non-application.

The Cattle Diseases, Slaughter-houses, and Markets Ordi- The whole. nauce, 1887.

The Licensing Consolidation Ordinance, 1887.

No. 17 of 1887.

No. 21 of 1887. No. 22 of 1887.

The Raw Opium Ordinance, 1887.

No. 24 of 1887.

No. 15 of 1889.

The Buildings Ordinance, 1889.

No. 4 of 1890.

No. 12 of 1890.

No. 23 of 1890.

No. 26 of 1890.

No. 12 of 1891.

No. 21 of 1891. No. 22 of 1891. No. 25 of 1891. No. 4 of 1894.

No. 12 of 1894.

The Public Health Ordinance, 1887.

An Ordinance to amend The Public Health Ordinance, 1887. An Ordinance to amend The Cattle Diseases, Slaughter- houses and Markets Ordinance, 1887.

An Ordinance to amend The Cattle Diseases, Slaughter- houses and Markets Ordinance, 1887.

+

An Ordinance to amend The Public Health Ordinance, 1887. An Ordinance to further amend The Public Health Ordi- nance, 1887.

The Prepared Opium Ordinance, 1891.

The whole.

The whole.

The whole.

The whole.

The whole. The whole.

The whole except Sections 4 and 5. The whole. The whole.

The whole.

The Raw Opiuni Amendment Ordinance, 1891.

The whole.

The Building Amendment Ordinance, 1891.

The whole.

An Ordinance to amend The Prepared Opium Ordinance,

The whole.

1891.

Au Ordinance to amend The Cattle Diseases, Slaughter- houses and Markets Ordinance, 1887.

The whole.

No. 15 of 1894. No. 7 of 1895.

The closed houses and insanitary dwellings Ordinance, 1894. The Building (Amendment) Ordinance, 1895.

The whole.

The whole.

No. 17 of 1895.

The whole.

The whole.

No. 25 of 1895.

No. 5 of 1896.

No. 16 of 1896.

No. 15 of 1897.

No. 1 of 1898.

No. 24 of 1898.

An Ordinance to amend Ordinance No. 17 of 1887. An Ordinance to further ameud The Cattle Diseases, Slaugh- ter-houses, and Markets Ordinance, 1887.

An Ordinance to amend The Buildings Ordinance, 1889. The Births and Deaths Registration Ordinance, 1896. The Prepared Opium (Divans) Ordinance, 1897.

An Ordinance to amend The Prepared Opium (Divans) Ordinance, 1897.

The Liquor Licenses Ordinance, 1898.

The whole.

The whole.

The whole.

The whole.

The whole.

:

151

No. 1800

4

HONGKONG.

REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE OBSERVATORY FOR 1899.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor.

HONGKONG OBSERVATORY,

""

9th January, 1900.

SIR, I have the honour to submit my annual report for 1899 to His Excellency the Governor. My fifteenth volume of " Observations and Researches was published last autumn, and the sixteenth volume is now being printed. It contains the usual astronomical, meteorological, and magnetic observations.

2. Mr. FIGG has analysed his weather-forecasts for the past four years on the system explained in the Annual Report for 1896 § 5, with the following results :-

Partial Partial Total

Success.

success.

failure. failure.

January February March

April May June.. July

August

72

24

4

57

40

3

69

26

....

61.

33

65

26

67

30

....

73

22

62

34

September

58

37

...

October

63

30

November

73

24

December

57

38

C++ O 2 10 4 4 DO LO

4

1

4

OOHNŹ

1

1

3

5

HOO

0

0

...

Year

65

30

4

1

The comparison of weather-forecasts with the weather subsequently experienced in 1899 was as follows:-

Success 61%, partial success 33 %, partial failure 5 %, total failure 1%.

Following the method used in meteorological offices and taking the sum of total and partial success as a measure of success, and the sum of total and partial failure as a measure of failure, we find finally that :-

94% of the weather forecasts were successful in 1899.

3. The China Coast Meteorological Register was printed every morning at the Observatory, and information regarding storms was telegraphed and exhibited on notice boards as often and as fully as such information could be justified by the weather telegrams received. This happened on 91 days in 1899. The Red Drum was hoisted 2 times, the Black Drum 3 times, the Red South Cone 3 times, the Black South Cone 2 times, the Red North Cone ( times, the Black North Cone 2 times, the Red Ball 0 times, the Black Ball 2 times. The Gun was not fired in 1899. No printed bulletins were circulated in 1899.

4. On the 8th April, 1898, the telegraphic reports from Bolinao (Luzon) ceased as the Eastern Extension Telegraph Company's station was removed from there. On the 15th September reports commenced from Malate and Capiz, and on the 22nd from Tuburan. Reports ceased from Tuburan on the 27th October, from Malate on the 15th November, and from Capiz on the 24th November. On the 22nd May, 1899, telegraphic reports from Malate, Iloilo, and Bacolod, and on the 9th June

:

152

from Cebu commenced, with instruments supplied at the cost of the Hongkong Government. The observations are made by the staff of the Eastern Extension Telegraph Company. From Japan tele- graphic reports are received from Tokio, Kochi, Nagasaki and Kagoshima, and since July, 1898, also from Oshima, Naha and Ishigakijima. In fact returns from Naha had been received for some time previous to that date. All these telegrams are almost invariably received too late. From Formosa telegraphic reports were formerly received from the Chinese Government, but irregularly and too late. The Japanese Government improved matters greatly but still the returns were too late till the begin- ning of November, 1899, when the service was accelerated. The stations are Taihoku, Taichu, Tai- nan, Koshun, and Pescadores.

5. Telegraphic connection between the Observatory and Hongkong was interrupted on the 4th May, 1899, from noon to 2 15 p.; from 6.45 a. on the 3rd June, to 12.12 p. on the 4th; on the 5th, from 7.6 p. to Midt; from 2.15 p. on the 10th to 8.40 a. on the 12th; on the 13th from 7 a. to 8.30 a.; from 7.15 p. on the 13th to 7 a. on the 14th; from 7.5 p. on the 14th to 7 a. on the 15th; on the 15th, from 7.5 p. to 7.40 p.; from 10 p. on the 16th to 7 a, on the 17th; from 7.45 p. on the 17th to 6.50 a. on the 18th; from 7.10 p. on the 20th to 6.50 a. on the 21st; from 7 p. on the 21st to 6.45 a. on the 22nd; from 8 p. on the 22nd August to 7.45 a. on the 23rd; on the 24th, from 6.15 a. to 2.5 p.; from 6.45 a. on the 15th September to 10.57 a. on the 16th; from 5 p. on the 27th December to 5 p. on the 28th. Interruptions occurred therefore on 22 days, and, of course, also during thunder- storms. There was no telephonic interruption between the Peak and the Observatory during the year except during thunderstormis.

6. During 1899 in addition to meteorological registers kept at 40 stations on shore, 2195 ship- logs have been copied on board or forwarded by the captains. The total number of vessels, whose log books have been made use of, was 261. The total number of days' observations (counting separately those made on board different ships on the same day) was 19455.

7. The following is a list of ships from which logs have been obtained in 1899.

The majority are steam ships, and the others are distinguished as follows:-bk., barque; sh., ship; bqt., barquen- tine; sch., schooner :-Airlie, Alacrity (H.M.S.), Algerine (H.M.S.), Amara, Ambria, Amerigo Vespucci, Antenor, Ariake Maru, Arizona, Arratoon Apcar, Australian, Babelsberg, Ballarat, Bamberg, Barfleur (H.M.S.), Bayern, Belgian King, Bengal, Benlarig, Benvenue, Bombay, Bormida, Boston (U.S.S.), Candia, Canton (P. & (.), Canton (J.M.), Catherine Apcar, Centurion (H.M.S.), Changsha, Charterhouse, Chelydra, Chihli, China (P.M.), China (Ger.), Chingtu, Chiyuen, Chowfa, Chow Tai, Choysang, Chunsang, Chunshan, Chusan, City of Peking, City of Rio de Janeiro, Clam, Clara, Clyde, Concord (U.S.S.), Coptic, Coromandel, Cowrie, Dagmar, Dardanus, Deucalion, Devawongsé, Diamante, Domenico Balduino, Doric, Ebani, Ekaterinoslav (R.V.F.), Empress of China, Empress of India, Empress of Japan, Esmeralda, Esmeralda (sch.), Etna (H.R.I.M.S.), Ettrickdale, Fame (H.M.S.), Fausang, Formosa, Frundsberg, Fukui Maru, Fushun, Futami Maru, G. C. Tobey (bk.), Gaelic, Germania, Glenfalloch, Glengarry, Glengyle, Glenturret, Grafton (H.M.S.), Guthrie, Haiching, Hailan, Hailoong, Haimun, Hainan, Haitan, Hakata Marn, Haknai Maru, Hangchow, Hanoi, Herines, Hermione (H.M.S.), Hikosan Maru, Hinsang, Hiroshima Maru, Hitachi Maru, Hohenzollern, Hoihao, Hongkong, Hongkong Maru, Honglecng, Humber (H.M.S.), Hunan, Hupeh, Hyson, Imperator, Independent, Indrani, Indrapura, Indus, Ingraban, Istria, Ivy (sh.), Japan, Jason, Java, Kachidate Maru, Kagoshima Maru, Kaifong, Kamakura Maru, Kanagawa Maru, Kansu, Kasuga Maru, Katsuyama Maru, Keelung Maru, Keong Wai, Kiangnan, Kingsing, Kiukiang. Kongbeng, Kosciusco (bk.), Kumsang. Kutsang, Kwanglee, Kwangping, Kweiyang, Kyoto Maru, Lennox, Linnet (H.M.S.). Lion (Fr. Man-of-War), Loksang, Loongmoon, Loongsang, Loosok, Loyal, Lyeemoon, Machew, Maidzuru Maru, Manila, Marie Jebsen, Mausang, Mazagon, McLaurin (sh.), Meefoo, Menelaus, Merionethshire, Michael Jebsen, Miike Maru, Mongkut, Monmouthshire, Moravia, Moyune, Nanaimo (sh.), Nanchang, Nankin, Nanyang, Nestro, Ningpo, Nippon Maru, Nubia, Oanfa, Oceania, Olympia, Onsang, Orestes, Oslo, Pakhoi, Parramatta, Pathan, Patroclus, Peiyang, Pekin, Petrel (U.S.S.), Phra Chom Klao, Phra Chula Chom Klao, Phra Nang, Pigmy (H.M.S.), Plover (H.M.S.), P. N. Blanchard (sh.), Powerful (H.M.S.), l'reussen, Prinz Heinrich, Progress, Propontis, Pronto, Radnorshire, Raffaele Rubattino, Rohilla, Rose (sh.), Rosetta, Sabine Rickmers, Sachsen, Sagami Maru, Saida (S.M.S.), Salazie, Sandakan, San Gothards (Am. Transport), San Salvadore, Sarnia, Sendai Maru, Shanghai, Shantung, Siam (Br.), Siam (Dan.), Sherard Osborne, Siberia, Silesia, Singapore, Sishan, Socotra, Sofala (sh.), St. Paul (Am. Transport), Suisang, Süllberg, Sultan, Sumidagawa Maru, Sung Kiang, Swatow, Tacoma, Taicheong, Taichiow, Tailee, Taisang, Taiyuan, Tamsui Maru, Tam O'Shanter (sh.), Tantalus. Tartar, Tetartos, Thales, Tientsin, Tonkin, Triumph, Tsinan, Tsurugisan Maru, Victorious (H.M.S.). Vortigern, Wakasa Maru, Waterwitch (H.M.S.), Willy Rickmers, Wongkoi, Wosang, Yamaguchi Maru, Yedo Maru, Yiksang, Yuensang, Zafiro (U.S.S.), Zweena.

8. The entry of observations inade at sea in degree squares for the area between 9° south and 45° north latitude, and between the longitude of Singapore and 180° East of Greenwich for the construc- tion of trustworthy pilot charts has been continued, and 218869 observations in all have now been entered.

1

-,

Square

number.

Table I.

Meteorological Observations entered in 10° Squares in 1893-1899 incl.

Jan.

Feb.

Mar.

April. May.

June.

July. August.

Sept.

Oct.

Nov.

Dec.

287837

19

1

5

0

0

0

5

20

42

30

17

56

21

39

37

55

40

22

17

12

28

243

293

102

65

24 441

320

386

336

25

209

136

138

120

26

2565

2391

2900

2907

3318

27

0

0

3

55

20

29

26

20

56

19

51

30

15

57

53

71

44

75

58

70

71

105

64

59

132

156

143

51

3 7 3 2 8 9 8 * * * 9 2 8

23

10

6

1

10

102

8

35

25

29

10

0770

0

0

40

23

28

19

36

;

11

0

1

105

78

34

48

83

199

271

499

419

338

482

535

379

126

152

136

124

313

310

208

3354

3462

3604

3308

3307

2731

2755

4

2

3

1

0

18

46

30

30

16

10

12

40

49

52

12

32

22

20

34

57

35

12

54

26

36

71

51

56

19

33

71

61

90

101

70

20

95

142

112

60

283

311

285

176

173

222

338

256

174

202

203

213

61

2752

2392

3066

2783

3500

3760

3821

3807

3782

3749

3330

2920

62

1743

1820

2083

2015

2200

2273

2069

2056

2060

2007

1913

1883

63

14

23

22

21

33

36

17

9

13

13

11

14

91

47

70

49

64

22

26

21

31

35

48

82

92

92

62

77

57

62

20

13

12

19

35

29

82

93

54

64

39

31

1

26

1

26

28

34

60

94

67

78

79

101

70

97

73

35

33

92

145

65

95

89

119

70

96

97

63

61

58

54

96

66

145

96

1931

1717

1832

1791

2177

2167

2146

2002

1823

2020

1865

1819

97

859

815

1004

876

1012

1050

960

963

1003

1025

1076

988

98

275

243

272

293

357

408

374

363

393

349

337

324

127

146

77

96

109

77

59

94

85

$6

115

116

77

128

157

88

114

125

90

92

113

112

84

158

101

104

129

176

115

165

183

106

150

113

141

105

184

204

163

130

441

331

390

354

523

507

543

516

420

485

510

426

131

471

405

453

516

523

597

609

706

481

544

504

421

132

1333

1230

1471

1979

2392

2437

2685

2169

1992

2142

2039

1475

133

0

0

74

80

133

108

148

74

79

124

95

17

163

118

121

155

182

196

236

233

262

199

190

164

105

164

200

168

218

259

263

354

315

338

334

260

215

143

165

243

177

158

224

336

354

353

338

353

247

241

161

166

71

63

58

74

119

98

126

76

134

98

78

71

167

17

5

47

51

79

119

143

79

59

41

4

168

1

2

12

8

10

7

7

3

11

7

199

37

34

62

50

46

45

42

68

49

44

42

200

11

4

0

4

5

5

13

1

202

0

0

0

1

1

0

0

203

0

0

0

0

1

318

21

0

15

0

15

0

319

40

36

45

24

1

28

320

7

27

16

13.

35

9

3

321

0

1

+

11

0

1

DONOO

0

0

7

0

0

322

29

21

28

36

49

51

41

24

35

41

46

27

323

409

238

317

204

169

160

209

173

195

184

263

310

324

309

209

171

71

91

79

135

108

165

246

299

281

325 275

236

222

368

397

364

538

452

417

307

802

289

326

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

16506

14916

17017

17034

19341

20046 20908

19900

18593

19530 18470

16608

9. As stated in the "Instructions for making Meteorological Observations, etc.," meteorological observations forwarded by observers who regularly send their registers to the Observatory are verified here free of cost. During the past year 3 barometers were verified. In addition, several hundred barometers and aneroids on board ship were compared with our standard.

10. The mean values of the spectroscopic rainband (1-5) in 1899 were as follows :--January 1.58, February 1.93, March 1.80, April 2.40, May 2.23, June 2.77, July 2.74, August 2.36, September

Year 2.02. 2.03, October 1.32, November 1.40, December 1.68.

11. In 1899 the number of transits observed was 4890. The axis of the transit instrument was levelled 245 times, and the azimuth and collimation were determined 38 times by aid of the meridian mark erected in 1884. All these observations have been reduced by Mr. J. I. PLUMMER.

On 12. The sidereal standard clock has been practically untouched throughout the whole year. August 15 the platinum points of the contact springs were cleaned, but this was done without inter-

153

:

154

fering with the going of the clock or the adjustment of the springs themselves. Subsequently a shunt was introduced into the circuit which works the relay in order to prevent any spark occurring at these points. The standard mean time clock has likewise been going without interruption, a little additional oil being added to parts of the movement on November 16. The rate of this clock at the present time is not satisfactory. The time-ball clock was cleaned on February 25.

13. The errors of the time-ball are given in Table II. There were seven failures in 1899. The ball is not dropped on Government holidays. Upon March 14th it was under repair, and upon October 21st the Chinese assistant omitted to take the key of the time-ball tower with him. It was dropped successfully 340 times. The causes of the failures mentioned above are as under :-On February 28th a particle from the buff used in cleaning the platinum points on February 25 pre- vented actual contact and there was therefore no discharge current, on March 13th, the piston jambed between the tooth and the back of the cylinder, on June 22nd a corroded wire in the coil of the dis- charge circuit, on June 24th during the repairs attempts were made to drop the ball by means of hand apparatus but failed, on September 4th the piston would not rest on the tooth owing to the spring at the back of the lock having become slack, on September 5th the lock did not discharge owing to the fault on the previous day having been over-corrected, on December 17th no discharge current, proba- bly the clock had not been put in circuit. The probable error was in January ± 0.09, in February +0.22, in March ± 0.09, in April± 0.13, in May± 0.13, in June ± 0.27, in July ± 0.10, in August± 0.16, in September± 0.09, in October ± 0.11, in November± 0.09 and in December

± 0.10..

Table II.

Errors of Time-Ball in 1899.

means too late.

+ means too early,

Date.

Jan.

Feb. March. April.

May. June. July. August.

Sept.

Oct.

Nov.

Dec.

10

1570 10 0 1 0 0 O

0.1

0.1

0.1

+0.2

0.1

0.1

0.1

-0.3

0.1

0.1

2

-0.2

8

9

1833833332

0.1

0.1

0.1

+0.3

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

+0.2

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

-0.2

0.1

0.1

+0.2

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1 +0.3

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

-0.2

0.1

0.1

+0.3 +0.2

+0.2

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

+0.4

+0.3

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

-0.2

0.1

0.1

0.1

+0.5

+0.3

0.1

0.1

+0.4

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

+0.2

0.1

+0.3

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

+0.2

0.1

0.1

0.1

-0.3

0.1

0.1

11

0.1

0.1

01

0.1

+0.4

0.1

0.1

0.1

-0.3

0.1

0.1

12

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

+0.4

0.1

+0.2

0.1

-0.2

0.1

0.1

13

0.1

0.1

0.1

-0.2

+0.5

0.1

+0.3

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

14 +0.2

0.1

0.1

-0.2

+0.6

0.1

+0.6

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

15

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.2

+0.7

+0.2

+0.8

0.1

0.1

0.1

+0.2

16

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

+0.8

+0.3

+0.5

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

17

0.1

+0.3

0.1

- 0:2

+0.8

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

18

0.1

+0.7

0.1

0.1

0.1

+0.9

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

19

0.1 +1.1

0.1

0.1

0.1.

+0.6

+0.2

0.

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

20

0.1

+1.1

0.1

-0.2

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

-21

0.1 +1.2

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

+0.2

0.1

0.1

0.1

22

0.1

-0.4

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

23

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

24

0.1

0.1

0.1

+0.2

0.1

01

0.1

0.1

0.1

25

0.1

0.1

+0.2

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

26

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

-0.4

-0.2

0.1

0.1

0.1

છે.?

27

0.1

0.1

0.i

0.1 +0.2

0.1

.0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

28

0.1

0.1

...

0.1 +0.3 +0.2

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

29

0.1

0.1

30

0.1

+0.2

0.1 +0.4 0.1 +0.2

+0.2

0.1.

0.1

-0.3 +0.2

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1 +0.2

A

0.1

0.1

31

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

+0.2

0.1

0.1

14. Mr. J. I. PLUMMER determined the time and took charge of clocks, chronometers, chrono- graph and the time-ball. Mr. F. G. FIGG issued weather-forecasts and storm-warnings, and made magnetic observations. Miss DOBERCK, who was on leave during five months, attended to marine meteorology. The native assistant, under close supervision of Mr. FIGG and myself, attended to the meteorological instruments and the construction of meteorological tables, assisted by the native staff of computers and telegraphists.

15. The cisterns of the barograph and standard barometers are placed 109 feet above M.S.L. The bulbs of the thermometers are rotated 108 feet above M.S.L., and 4 feet above the grass. The solar radiation thermometer is placed at the same height. The rim of the rain-gauge is 105 feet above M.S.L., and 21 inches above the ground.

155

16. The monthly Weather Reports are arranged as follows :-

Table I. exhibits the hourly readings of the barometer reduced to freezing point of water, but not to sea level, as measured (at two minutes to the hour named) from the barograms.

Table II. and III. exhibit the temperature of the air and of evaporation as determined by aid of rotating thermometers. Table II. exhibits also the extreme temperatures reduced to rotating thermo- meter by comparisons of thermometers hung beside them. Table III. exhibits also the solar radiation (black bulb in vacuo) maximum temperatures reduced to Kew arbitrary standard.

Table IV. exhibits the mean relative humidity in percentage of saturation and mean tension of water vapour present in the air in inches of mercury, for every hour of the day and for every day of the month, calculated by aid of Blanford's tables from the data in Tables II. and III.

Table V. exhibits the duration of sunshine expressed in hours, from half an hour before to half an hour after the hour (true time) named.

Table VI. exhibits the amount of rain (or dew) in inches registered from half an hour before to half an hour after the hour named. It exhibits also the estimated duration of rain.

Table VII. exhibits the velocity of the wind in miles and its direction in points (1-32). The velocity is measured from half an hour before to half an hour after the hour named, but the direction is read off at the hour.

Table VIII. exhibits the amount (0-10), name (Howard's classification) and direction whence coming of the clouds. Where the names of upper and lower clouds are given, but only one direction, this refers to the lower clouds. With regard to the names of clouds ; nimbus (nim) is entered only when the rain is seen to fall; when no rain is seen to fall cumulo-nimbus (cum-nim) is entered. This name indicates clouds intermediate between cum and nim. Cumulo-stratus (cum-str) is the well-known thunder cloud, while strato-cumulus (str-cum) signifies a cloud intermediate between stratus and cum. Sm-cum means alto-cumulus.

Table IX. exhibits for every hour in the day, the mean velocity of the wind reduced to 4 as well as 2 directions, according to strictly accurate formulæ, and also the mean direction of the wind.

Below this is printed a list of the phenomena observed.

17. The following annual Weather Report for 1899 is arranged as follows :--

Table III. exhibits the mean values for the year (or hourly excess above this) obtained from the monthly reports. The total duration of rain was 606 hours. There fell at least 0.01 inch of rain on 121 days.

Table IV. exhibits the number of hours during a portion of which at least 0.005 inch of rain (or dew) was registered.

Table V. exhibits the number of days with wind from eight different points of the compass. The figures are obtained from the mean daily directions in Table VII. of the monthly reports. Days with wind from a point equidistant from two directions given. are counted half to one of these and half to the other, eg, half of the days when the wind was NNE are counted as N, and the other half as NE.

Table VI. exhibits the number of days on which certain meteorological phenomena were regis- tered, and also the total number of thunderstorms noted in the neighbourhood during the past year.

Table VII. shows the frequency of clouds of different classes.

Table VIII. is arranged as last year.

Table IX. exhibits the monthly and annual extremes.

Table X. contains five-day means.

The Honourable

THE COLONIAL SECRETARY,

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

W. DOBERCK,

Director.

&c.,

&c.,

&c.

Table III.

Mean Values and Hourly Excess above the Mean of Meteorological Elements in 1899.

11 a.

Noon.

1 p.

2 p.

3 p.

4 p.

5 p.

6 p.

7 p.

S p.

9 p.

10 p.

11 p. Midt.

Mean or

Total.

1 a.

24.

ja.

4 a.

5 a.

6 a.

7 a.

8 a.

£ à.

10 a.

156

Pressure,

+.006 —,004

Temperature,..

1.5

1.7

..012

1.9

-.014 −.009 +.004

2.1

2.2

2.2

+.018 +.032

1.6

+.043 +.041

P

0.5

+ 0.6 + 1.5

+.033 +.015 + 2.1 + 2.6

→.009 −.029 + 2.8 + 2.0

.042 045 + 2.6 + 2.1

042 —.032 + 1.3 + 0.4

J

-.018

0.1

-.001

0.5

+.012 +.021

0.7

0.9

+.020 +.015

1.2

29.845

1.4

72.0

Diurnal Range,.

8.7

...

...

...

Humidity,

+

6 +

Vapour Tension,

...

6 +

...

5

+.012.008 +.005 .000

6 +

+

6 +

6

+

3

0

3

P

5

8

-.004 ..003

..006 ..006

.00$ -.013

-.011 -012

...

S

014011

-

7

6

3

1

+ 2 +

3

+

Sunshine (Total),

9.8

85.1

162.0

191.5 206.4

Rainfall (Total).

3.010

2.160

4.000

4.185

3.115

3.435

2.220

3.840

2.655

Hours of Rain (Total).

40

37

31

36

23

48

39

Intensity of Rain..

0.075

0.058

0.118

0.116

0.107

0.072

0.057

33

0.116

34

2.475

32

218.4 223.8

4.305

230.9 228.0

-.011 -.005 215.5 197.5

-.001 +.00

+.010 +.013

++

+015 +.014

4

+ 5 +

75

+.013 +.012

0.624

98.9

9.6

2072.4

27

3.405

26

0.078 0.077

0.159 0.131

4.965 3.605 33 27 0.150 0.134

2.740

26

0.105 0.055

1.530

28

0.965

1.755

21

0.046

19

1.175

19

1.485

3.140

3.340

3.495

5.700

72.700

0.092

0.062

18

0.082

25

30

30

30

721

0.126

0.111

0.117

0.190

0.101

Wind-Velocity.

1.0

1.0

0.9 0.7

1.0

Wind-Direction,

62

40

40

50

1.5

1.0

-

0.2

၄၁

+ 0.6 + 1.0

+ 2.8 + 2.1

+ 2.1 + 2.0

£° + 1°

+ 6o + ́9°

Cloudiness,

Solar Radiation,

Excess of do. do..

+ 4

+ 1

+12° +13°

1

+1.6 +1.3 +14° + 13°

0.3

+ 0.7

+10° + 40

0.8

1.1

1.1

1.1

1.2

1.0.

12.7

0

20

40

69

89

100

E 1° S

65

128.8

51.9

Table IV.

Number of Hours during a portion of which it rained for each Month in the Year 1899.

10 p. 11 p. Midt Total.

2

2

2

O4OINIST1221

ONOH 2.0 10 20 ~ ~ ~ ~

1201 00 00 00 00 - 30 —

0

6

47

7

45

74

176

99

137

46

21

38

25

30

30 30

721

Month.

} a.

2 a.

a.

4 a.

5 a.

6 a.

7 a.

8 a.

9 a.

10 a.

11 a.

Noon. 1 p.

2 p.

3 p.

4 p. 5 p.

6 p.

7 p.

8 p.

9 p.

0

January,

1

February,

3

March,

1

April,

1

May,

3

June,

11

July,

4

5

August,

10

September,

1

October,

November,

December,

2-2

Total,

40

O3I2 #1-∞ 10 NONN

- CO NO HORN-Ono

1212 CON G∞ ∞ ->

}

2

2

0

37

34 36

22223

0

0

1

2

1

0

3

5

6

11

12

6

3

4

10

7

CCN 00 10 10 00 00

ONONINN2O21

2

3

5

OMON COZHO

1

0

1

3

4

6

7

6

ONON SO THEY COON-O

OMONOO-23-IO

ORINT - CO 61 CO--

OUI4 ∞ ∞ 10 #O-

ON O∞ 72 ∞ ∞ — — —

O-ON JOHON ———

ONCONTR2011

1

I

1

1

3

1

2

1

6

6

1

0

0

1

4

4

29

48

39

33

1

33

34

32

27 26

3333

1

2

2

1

1

1

1

1

0

1

1

0

0

1

425

27

26

888

28

21

.19

19

18

225

Table V.

Number of Days with Wind from eight different points of the Compass during each Month of the Year 1899.

Month.

157

N.

NE.

E.

SE.

S.

SW.

W.

NW.

January,

February,

March,

April,

10

3

2

2

May, June,

1101022-

12

18

20227

1

NO IA

4

2

1

1

1

1

I

1

17

3

2

2

8

4

8

9

July,

6

1

13

7

August,.

13

2

5

6

1

September,

3

1

21.

2

October,

4

4

22

1

November,..

14

3

13

December,....

1

1

24

2

1

Sums,..

40

28

198

21

17

30

20

11

January, February, March,

April,

May,

June,

July,

August,

September,

October,

November,

December,

Table VI.

Total Number of Days on which different Meteorological Phenomena were noted and Total Number of

Thunderstorms during each Month of the Year 1899.

Month.

10 10 1-3

5

2

2

1

1

1

4

4

11

11

13

13

19

17

8

2

21

20

12

16

16

3

10

1

2

124

3

5

4

1

3

es to con

Sums,..........

28

89

85

44

18

1

50

17

17

23

20

Table VII.

Total Number of Times that Clouds of different forms were observed in each Month of the Year 1899.

Month.

C.

c-str.

c-cum. sm-cum.

cum. cum-str.

str.

R-cum. cum-nim.

nim.

January,

11

February,

2

7

March,.

17

April,

May,

15

54

182835

55

73

23

7

73

25

2

6

33

39

120

27

3

6

43

127

27

1

14

35

61

138

4

35

June,

27

43

16

156

2

64

July,

20

79

36

180

1

29

August,

20

90

5

149

55

September,

12

69

42

129

6

2

21

October,

Ι

35

76

129

17

1

10

November,

10

42

38

75

22

29

December,

::

7

18

64

101

1

9

Sums,.

1

113

469

503

1450

1

181

9

64

333

158

Table VIII.

Mean

Weight

Diurnal

of Water

RAINFALL.

Baro-

Month.

metric

Variabi-Vapour in

Troy

Hourly Intensity

MEAN DIRECTION OF CLOUDS WHENCE

COMING.

NUMBER OF DAYS

CLOUDS BELOW.

WITH

Tide.

lity of

Grains in

of

Temper- each cubic

Rain.

ature.

Meau. foot of Air.

1899.

1899.

Lower.

Upper.

Cirrus. 2000 ft. 1000 ft.

January,

0.106

10.78

3.56

1.545

0.185

0.018

E-6° N W 17° S

:

February,

0.108

1..92

4.07

2.091

2.205

0.031

E 7° SW 18° S

March,

0.115

1.95

5.00

2.991

0.315

0.035

E 11° SW 9° S

April,.

0.100

2.32

6.67

5.980

3.140

0.043

E 19° S W 15° S

May,

0.084

1.30 ·

8.05

13.159

7.165

0.109

E 59° S W 3° N

June,

0.064

1.38

9.00

16.496 18.975

0.156

S 7° W W 38° N

July,

0.067

1.05

9.75

14.210 10.125

0.220

S 10° WE 45° N

August,

0.070

1 .29

9.46

13.482

19.980

0.247

E 59° S E 44° N

September,

0.083

0.99

8.31

8.833

6.305

0.252

E 13° N N 19° E

October,

0.098

1,36

6.12

5.794

0.875

0.049

E 9° NW 10° S

November,...... 0.097

2.13

4.87

1.302

1.640

0.026

E 12° N W 75° S

December,.

0.107

1.71

5.55

0.985 1.790

0.081

E 8° SW 49° S

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

12

6

17

6

13

3

9

4

3

2

Co

6

4

1

0

0

3

5

Mean,...... 0.092 1.60

6.70 86.867

72.700 0.106

E 27° S W 19° N

Table IX.

79

28

Monthly Extremes of the Principal Meteorological Elements registered during the Year 1899.

WIND

HUMI-

RADIA-

BAROMETER.

TEMPERATURE.

VAPOUR TENSION.

RAIN.

VELO-

TION.

DITY.

CITY.

MONTH.

Max. Min.

Max. Min.

Min.

Max. Min.

Daily

Hourly Max. Max.

Sun

Max.

Max.

January,

30.292 29.884 72.6

43.6

18

0.600 0.090

0.155

0.110

41

130.0

February,

.283

.758 74.5

47.6

14

0.629 0.072

0.900 0.220

46

138.9

March,

.184

.801

80.1

52.8

30

0.693 0.203

0.160 0.090

35

140.2

April,..

.101

.669

83.0

59.2

57

0.792 0.402

2.050

1.360

42

145.5

May,

.017

.436

88.5

67.6

34

0.947

0.370 1.990

0.580

31

149.6

June,

29.848

.506 88.0

68.9

61

0.985 0.605 3.425 1.170

43

149.6

July,

.758

.372 91.5

74.7

60

1.045 0.751 2.185 0.650

46

147.5

August,

.819

.163 92.9

75.0

September,

.911

.584 89.8

71.6

35

883

59

1.003 0.712 5.220 1.780

32

155.9

0.988 0.319 3.780 1.600

34

160.1

October,........

November,

30.090

.687 86.4

65.9

36

24

0.863 0.249 0.570 0.185

35

144.4

.240

.693 80.5

50.7

19

0.791 0.096 1.325 0.260

36

143.6

December,

.194

.835 78.7

54.0

29

0.673 0.138 1.200 0.290

37

137.0

Year,

30.292 29.163 92.9

43.6

14

1.045

0.072 5.220 1.780

46

160.1

Table X.

Five-Day Means of the Principal Meteorological Elements observed at Hongkong in 1899.

159

FIVE-DAY PERIODS. Barometer.

Temper-

ature.

Humidity. Tension.

Vapour

Wind Velocity.

Nebulosity. Sunshine.

Rain.

January

1- 5

30.053

56.9

52

6-10

.058

62.3

72

.11-15

29.989

62.8

76

.16-20

30.122

58.7

2203

0.246

9.6

2.5

8.1

0.000

0.407

18.9

6.9

5.8

0.005

0.440

13.0

6.5

5.1

0.032

65

0.324

9.8

4.6

5.7

0.000

""

21-25

.123

56.8

56

0.263

8.1

5.8

4.9

0.000

.26-30

.058

50.5

53

0.245

12.2

1.3

8.5

0.000

"

.31-4

.109

57.5

58

0.275

13.7

3.5

7.3

0.002

,,

February

5- 9

.139

58.1

48

0.238

12.3

1.4

7.9

0.000

10-14

29.982

61.9

79

0.440

17.5

7.8

4.3

0.001

21

.15-19

.876

58.4

83

0.410

15.0

8.3

2.1

0.252

>>

.20-24

.903

57.9

72

0.346

10.2

6.4

3.9

0.136

"

.25- 1

.913

65.2

85

0.585

17.1

7.7

4.7

0.000

"

March

2- 6

30.020

62.6

73

0.414

15.9

7.3

3.8

0.000

7-11

29.971

66.6

79

0.515

12.4

4.2

6.6

0.000

""

.12-16

30.009

64.1

70

0.424

13.9

4.6

6.9

0.000

وو

.17-21

29.991

63.6

70

0.419

19.3

5.2

6.7

0.002

""

92-26

.914

66.3

76

0.493

12.1

6.9

4.8

0.061

""

.27-31

.909

63.5

79

0.465

11.5

6.0

6.5

0.000

""

April

1- 5

.800

69.7

88

9.648

14.9

9.6

1.5

0.035

6-10

30.007

63.1

82

0.475

10.6

9.6

0.7

0.048

..11-15

29.883

70.9

80 ·

0.608

12.6

5.2

7.1

0.000

"

.16-20

.769

72.2

90

0.711

1.1.1

8.8

2.3

0.541

.21-25

.790

71.1

83

0.635

17.0

8.9

1.4

0.002

.26-30

.842

72.3

78

0.620

14.4

7.2

5.3

0.002

May

1- 5

.796

763

75

0.682

7.6

8.7

8.5

0.000

6-10

.794

73.8

81

0.672

11.6

8.8

3.7

0.659

"

.11-15

.901

75.6

69

0.615

13.2

4.5

7.3

0.000

>>

16-20

.781

78.8

81

0.801

8.3

5.7

9.2

0.000

""

.21-25

.603

81.1

81

0.861

9.7

8.4

4.2

0.005

"

.26-30

.599

79.3

87

0 869

11.9

8.5

3.3

0.753

""

31- 4

.630

80.8

83

0.874

17.1

9.9

1.2

0.625

"

June

5- 9

.718

76.0

87

0.786

16.2

9.5

2.1

1.526

10-14

.704

77.2

28

0.818

6.7

9.0

2.8

0.204

"}

.15-19

.750

80.2

85

0.872

9.7

8.7

4.2

0.801

"}

.20-24

.707

82.9

76

0.857

8.6

7.2

10.9

0.082

">

.25-29

.655

81.2

82

0.875

15.7

8.3

6.4

0.446

??

.30- 4

.557

80.9

86

0.901

23.6

7.5

5.7

0.809

July

5- 9

.439

85.0

80

0.970

8.0

4.4

9.4

0.001

.10-14

514

82.8

0.926

16.6

7.4

7.8

0.276

"

.15-19

514

83.1

0.931

11.5

6.6

6.9

0.649

20-24

.523

82.2

0.909

9.0

8.0

5.8

0.296

"2

"}

25-29

.656

83.1

80

0.908

5.3

6.3

7.8

0.056

.30- 3

.641

84.1

76

0.896

5.4

4.5

10.6

0.133

August

4- 8

.414

$2.6

79

0.882

14.1

8.3

4.6

0.696

9-13

.632

78.7

91

0.891

8.3

7.6

2.6

0.511

>>

14-18

.615

80.7

87

0.907

6.8

8.8

4.8

0.349

25

19-23

.543

81.9

83

0.900

11.2

7.2

7.4

1.183

""

.24-28

.682

79.6

89

0.895

12.5

8.4

5.0

0.774

>>

.29- 2

.706

79.9

87

0.881

17.5

8.9

3.6

0.483

"

September

3- 7

.797

81.8

81

0.875

7.9

4.1

9.1

0.006

8-12

.832

804

80

0.834

9.3

6.3

7.1

0.349

">

.13-17

.790

80.4

78

0.813

19.3

6.7

5.3

0.789

"

.18-22

.688

81.0

78

0.824

10.1

5.4

7.9

0.027

>>

23-27

.764

79.8

68

0.693

6.6

2.9

7.8

0.022

""

.28- 2

.861

76.7

46

0.422

13.8

4.1

7.1

0.000

>>

October.

3- 7

.809

76.5

53

0.485

12.9

4.1

7.0

0.114

8-12

.972

74.6

63

0.543

22.9

9.5

1.5

0.009

""

13-17

.939

76.2

76

""

18-22

.993

75.1

77

23-27

30.003

73.4

"

28- 1

29.971

72.7

""

November

2- 6

30.016

70.5

7-11

29.869

73.7

.12-16

.858

69.5

ANSZNUR

0.693

16.2

5.6

7.6

0.000

0.674

17.1

6.4

7.3

0.004

67

0.555

14.0

6.0

7.8

0.000

74

0.600

16.8

7.9

7.3

0.048

77

0.575

12.6

9.5

1.5

0.017

81

0.073

19.7

8.9

2.1

0.007

73

0.532

12.5

8.6

3.5

0.304

""

.17-21

30.009

68.3

51

0.354

9.1

4.8

6.7

0.000

"

.22-26

.104

62 6

45

0.256

12.4

0.8

9.8

0.000

......27- 1

.144

59.5

40

0.208

11.8

2.4

8.3

0.000

""

December

2- 6

.017

62.4

76

0.429

4.2

6.6

4.3

0.318

7-11

.034

65.4

73

0.464

13.3

6.7

5.6

0.004

"

12-16

29.950

68.7

82

0.574

14.6

5.2

6.5

0.000

""

..17-21

.925

68.0

81

0.555

9.6

6.7

4.7

0.003

""

..22-26

.989

67.5

83

0.561

15.1

5.6

6.3

0.000

.......27-31

.973

66.3

83

0.535

18.5

5.9

5.2

0.003

"2

1

160

Appendix A.

Magnetic Obserrations made during the year 1899, and Comparison of Magnetometers.

The observations of declination and horizontal force published in Tables XI and XII were made with magnet No. 55 on Kew pattern unifilar magnetometer Elliott Brothers No. 55 and with magnets 83 and 83A on magnetometer No. 83. The dips were observed with dip-circle Dover No.

71.

The times of vibration are each derived from 12 observations of the time occupied by the magnet in making 100 vibrations, corrections having been applied for rate of chronometer and are of vibration. The value of log 3K for 25° Cent. (determinel in 1898) was for No. 55 3.44901 ±0.00009, for No. 83 3.44851±0.00009, and for No. 3A 3.46870±0.00:04. The induction-coefficient is for No. 55 5.189±0.055, for No. 83 5.151±0.084, and for No. 83A 6.160±0.084. The temperature-coefficients of the magnetic moments are as follows:-

No. 55+ 0.000260t+0.00000244t2 (Hongkong 1886)

No. 83+0.000283t+0.00000102t (Kew 1897)

No. 83a :+0.000384t+0.00000166ť2 (Kew 1897)

The mean value of the magnetic moments were for No. 55 581.51, for No. 83 762.06, and for No. 83A 676.34.

The horizontal forces in Table XIII observed with No. 83 have been corrected by the subtraction of .00064, and those with No. 83a by subtraction of .00037 in order to reduce them to No. 55. The uncorrected means of observed values of horizontal force were for No. 55 0.36676, for No. 83 0.36740, and for No. 83A 0.36713.

All forces are expressed in C.G.S. units. The vertical (Y) and total forces exhibited in Table XIII have been obtained from the observed dips. The mean values of the dip obtained with needle No. 3 was 31°29′.08, with No. 4 31°29′.55, with No. 7 31°28′.63, and with No. 8 31°30'.19. No corrections have been applied to the dips observed with the different needles.

not agree.

In September the horizontal force was determined with Collimator magnet 55 used in magneto- meters 55 and 83 alternately. The result obtained in the latter exceeded the value obtained in the former by 0.00040, which agrees with the value by which the mean of the two horizontal forces obtained by the magnets 83 and 83A in magnetometer 83 exceed that obtained with 55 (0.00052 in 1898 and 0.00051 in 1899). The values of m x obtained from vibrations agree. The values of do The cause lies with the deflection bars. The bar belonging to 55 is certified to be correct throughout. The apparent distance from centre of instrument of graduation on bar belonging to 83 marked 30 cins is 29.990, and that marked 40 cms is 39.990 according to the certificate, and those corrections have been applied here. But when the two deflection bars are placed beside each other it is seen by the naked eye that these corrections are wrong. It is presumed that the bar belonging to 55 is right. It may be suspected that all the disagreements that are found between the results obtained with different magnetometers are caused by defective determination of the constants of the instruments.

Table XI.

Observations of Magnetic Declination and Dip.

161

1899.

H.K.M.T.

Declination East.

No.

Magnet Observer.

H.K.M.T.

Dip North.

Needle

Observer.

No.

January,

16d3h 10m.p.

0°25′31′′

55

F.G.F.

16.4.23m.p.

31°30'.73

31.95

February,

13 3 13 p.

23 5

83

27

13 4 19 p.

32 .37

31.32

March,...

15 3

O p.

21 25

83A

15 4 27 p.

29.23

""

32.73

April,

14 3

6 p.

19 41

55

14 4 33 p.

27.69

"

29.68

May,

16 3 10 p.

19 51

$3

16 4 22 p.

30.57

>>

32.49

June,

19 3 19 p.

19 50

83A

19 5

3 p.

27.97

"

30.67

July,

18 3 26 p.

20 27

83A

14 4

3 p.

29.20

">

29.04

August,

14 3 35 p.

20 22

83

16 4

""

5 P.

28.81

29.33

September,

18 3 34 p.

20 20

33

55

19 4

28.18

p.

"

27.17

October,

17 3 24 p.

21 17

83A

13

8 p.

26.81

26.88

November,

16 3 20 p.

21 0

83

December,.

14 3 26 p.

19 44

88888

17 4

4 p.

28.28

"

26.44

55

13 4

5 p.

27.06

ور

30.12

Table XIII.

Results of Magnetic Observations made in 1899.

8

∞ H ∞ ~ ∞ ~ ∞ I −1 00 00 - 001 00

3

F.G.F.

KARRA

وو

""

>>

""

""

""

"}

25

^

""

">

RAAAAAA

1-30 30 30 1-30 H

Magnetic Force.

Month.

Declination East.

Dip North.

X.

Y.

Total.

January, February, March,

0° 25′ 31′′

31° 31′ 20′′

23 5

31 51

0.36659 .36651

0.22484

0.43005

.22487

.43000

21 25

30 59

.36665

.22483

.43009

April,

May,

June,

July,

August,..

19 41

28 41

.36667

.22451

.42994

19 51

31 32

.36658

.22486

.43005

19 50

29 19

.36681

.22468

.43016

20 27

29 7

.36695

.22474

.43031

20 22

29 4

.86691

.22470

.43025

September,

20 20

27 40

.36681

.22444

.43002

21 17

21 0

19 44

October,

November,

December,...

Year,.....

0 21 3

31 29 22

0.36676

0.22465

0.43009

26 51

.36661

.22420

.42972

27 22

.36703

.22453

.43026

28 35

.36695

.22466

.43026

Table XII.

Observations of Horizontal Magnetic Force, (continued from Annual Report for 1898, Appendix B).

Dist.

M.

Date.

H.K.M.T.

Time of

one

Cent.

Temp. Torsion. Log m X.

m.

Value of Magnet. No.

H.K.M.T.

in

Temp.

Cent.

Deflection.

P.

Log

X.

Value of

X.

Observer.

c.in.

Vibration.

162

1899.

March 14,

3h 47m.p.

3*4234

22°.2

1'.51

2.40228

688.00

83A

3h. 6.p.

40

4 28 p.

30

40

April 13,

4 15 p.

3.6406

27 .5

1.38

2.32910 581.86

1135

55

3 22 p.

30

40

4 58 p.

30

40

May 15,

3 42 p.

3.1620

28.2 0.86

2.45130 769.78

83

3 12 p.

30

40

4 21 p.

30

40

June 17,

4 11 p.

3.4493

28.5 0.92

2.39712 679.60

83A

3 37 P.

30

40

4 47 P.

July 17,

4 2 p.

3.4629

32.75 0.94

2.39464 675.45

83A

3 28 P:

4 38 p.

August 15,

3 51 p.

3.1861

29 .7

0.71

2.44496 757.93

83

3 17 p.

4 31 P.

September 11,

3 59 p.

3.6421

28 .7

1.40

2.32894 580.75

*55

3 25 p.

4 43 p.

12,

4 2 p.

3.6440

30.8

0.94

2.32891

581.43

55

3 24 p.

""

4 45 p.

ACADO A CONCO HOONE & ACACO ACECO HOA & ACAC 2820

30 21°.7

7° 57' 7".5

5.65

3.27290 | 0.36702 F.G.F.

3 20 13.8

21 .8

7 57 22.5

3 20 17.5

27.1

6 43 45.0

7.02

3.20054 0.36667

"}

2 49 27.5

25 .6

6

44 17.5

2

49 41 .9

27.8

8 55 21.2

7.60

3.32144 0.36722

""

3 44 17 .5

27 .8

8

55 31.2

3

44 17 .5

28 .2

7 49 15.0

4.96

3.26738 0.36718

3 17 0.0

30

28.7

7 49 6.8

40

3 16 53.8

30

32 .65

7 45 33.7

5.76

3.26454 0.36732

""

40

3 15 23.8

30

32.1

7 45 30.0

40

3 15 20.0

30

29 .6

8 46 28.7

8.06

3.31431 0.36755

40

3 40 31.3

30

28.9

8 46 46 .3

10

3 40 37.5

30

28.5

6 42 43 8

7.20

3.19904 | 0.36724

40

2 48 56.2

30

28.4

6 42 43 .7

40

2 49 1.3

30

30.7

40

30

29.3

6 42 40.0

2 48 58.7

6 43 6.2

6.92

3.20008 0.36679

40

2 49 14.4

TABLE XII., Continued.

!

Dist.

M.

Time of

Date.

H.K.M.T.

one

Temp. Torsion. Leg mX. Cent.

m.

Value of Magnet. No.

H.K.M.T.

in

Temp.

Cent.

Deflection.

P.

Log X.

Value of

X.

Observer.

c.m.

Vibration.

1899.

September 13,

9h.58m.p.

35.6429

299.6

1.03 2,32894 580.92

*55

3 24 p.

30

40

4 41 r.

30

40

14,

3 58 p.

3.6414

27 .7

0.96 2.32895 581.43

55

3 24 p.

30

40

4 44 p.

30

15,

3 59 p.

3.6408

27 .7

1.07

2.32908 580.92

*55

3 23 p.

>>

4 42 p.

· October 16,

3 54 p.

3.4931

26.65 0.97 2.38570 662.30

83A

3 21 p.

4 32 p.

ACNO BONU AUNG NUAC

29°.4

6° 42′ 42′′.5

7.06

3.19930 0.36713

F.G.F.

2 48 56.9

28 .3

6 42 57 .5

2 49

7.5

27 .6

6 43 16.2

2 49 16.2

6.92

3.20004 0.36683

27 .6

6 43 17.5

40

2 49 16.3

30

27 .55

6 42 33 .8

6.56

3.19917 0.36725

""

40

2 48 55.0

30

27 .3

40

6 42 56 .3

2 49

8.7

30

26 .75

7 37 53.8

5.31

3.25640| 0.36698

40

3 12 12.5

30

25..9

7 38 18.7

40

3 12 23.7

November 15,

3 44 p.

3.2011

25.0 0.81

2.44010 749.27

3883

3 14 p.

30

40

4 24 p.

30

40

December 15,

3 57 P.

3.6372

22.0

1.50 2.32879

581.00

55

3 21 p.

4 42 p.

889 8989

24.6

8 41 37 .5

8.45

3.30918 0.36767

>>

3 38 28.7

24 .2

8 41 36 .3

3 38 23 .8

30

21 .5

6 44 13.7

7.50

3.19958 0.36695

40

2 49 36.9

30

20.9

6 44 13.8

40

2 49 38 .1

* Collimatar Magnet 55 in unifilar 83.

163

Week.

Rainfall in

inches per week.

14

13

12

11

10.

9

8

7

6

10

5

3

2

1

n

BUBONIC FEVER A

HONGK

1900

Sth

9th 10th 11th 12th 13th 14th

15th 16th 17th 18th 19th 20th 21st 22nd

:

:

AND RAINFALL.

KONG

00

22nd 23rd 24th 25th 26th 27th 28th 29th 30th 31st 32nd 33rd

34th

35th

No. of Cases of Bubonic Plague.

125

120

115

110

105

100

95

90

85

80

88 198

75

70

65

60

55

50

45

40

35

30

25

20

15

10

5

"

Week.

Rainfall in

inches per week.

14

13

12

11

10

7

6

10

5

4

3

2

1

0

1900

8th

9th. 10th 11th 12th 13th 14th

15th

16th 17th 18th 19th

20th 21st

22nd

Rainfall, black line.

Bubonic Fever Cases, red line.

2nd

23rd 24th

25th 26th 27th 28th

29th

30th 31st

32nd 33rd

34th 35th

No. of Cases of Bubonic Plague.

125

120.

115

110

105

100

4%

FRANCIS W. CLARK,

Medical Officer of Health.

+

35

95

90

85

80

1123

75

70

65

60

55

50

45

40

35

30

25

20

15

10

10

5

0

BUBONIC FEVER AND G

HON

1

WEEK.

8th

9th

10th

IIth 12th 13th 14th 15th 16th 17th 18th 19th 20th 21:

No. of Dead Rats

collected.

2500

2400

2300

2200

2100

2000

1900

1800

1700

1600

1500

'

1400

1300

1200

1100

1000

900

800

700

600

500

400

300

200

100

0

NERAL RAT MORTALITY.

KONG

00

22nd 23rd 24th 25th 26th 27th

28th 29th 30th 31st 32nd 33rd

34th

35th

No. of Cases of Bubonic Plague.

125

120

115

110

105

100

395

90

85

80

75

70

65

60

55

50

45

40

35

30

25

20

112

15

10

5

0

19

WEEK.

8th

9th

10th

11th

12th 13th

14th 15th

16th 17th 18th 19th 20th 21st

No. of Dead Rats

collected.

2500

2400

2300

2200

2100

2000

1900

1800

1700

1600

1500

1400

1300

1200

1100

1000

900

800

700

600

500

400

300

200

100

0

Dead Rats, black line. Plague Cases, red line.

O

id

23rd 24th 25th

26th

27th 28th 29th

30th

31st 32nd

33rd 34th

35th

#

No. of Cases of Bubonic Plague.

125

120

115

110

105

100

95

90

85

80

75

70

65

60

55

50

15

40

35

30

25

FRANCIS W. CLARK,

Medical Officer of Health.

20

15

10

10

5

0

......

f

اشه

Mean Weekly Temperature.

BUBONIC FEVER AND MEA

8th

9th 10th 11th 12th 13th 14th 15th 16th 17th

18th

90°F.

89°

88°

87°

86°

85°

84°

83°

82°

81°

80°

79°

780

77°

76°

75°

-

-

749:

73°

72°

71°

70°

69°

68°

67°

66°

65°

64°

63°

62°

61°

CAD

но

19th 20

ATMOSPHERIC TEMPERATURE.

GKONG

900

t 22nd 23rd 24th 25th 26th 27th 28th

29th 30th 31st 32nd 33rd

34th

35th

No. of Cases of Bubonic Plague.

125

120

115

110

105

100

05

90

85

80

75

70

65

60

55

50

45

40

35

30

25

20

15

10

10

5

Mean Weekly Temperature.

90°F.

89°

88°

87°

86°

85°

84°

83°

82°

81°

80°

79°

78°

770

76°

75°

74°

73°

72°

71°

70°

69°

68°

67°

66°

65°

64°

63°

62°

61°

60°

8th

9th 10th 11th 12tb

13th 14th 15th

16th 17th 18th

Mean Weekly Temperature, black line.

Plague Cases, red line.

19

19th 20th 21st

900

22nd

23rd

24th

25th

26th 27th

28th 29th 30th

31st

32nd 33rd

34th

35th

FRANCIS W. CLARK,

Medical Officer of Health.

No. of Cases of Bubonic Plague.

125

120

115

110

105

100

95

90

85

80

70

75

12 25

65

60

55

50

45

40

135

35

30

25

20

15

10

5

0

·

-1

:

*

A REPORT

ON THE

547

EPIDEMIC OF BUBONIC PLAGUE

IN

HONGKONG

IN THE YEAR 1900.

DIE

SOIT

ET

MON

DROIT

HONGKONG:

PRINTED BY NORONHA & Co., GOVERNMENT PRINTERS.

1900.

}

HONGKONG.

No 35

REPORT OF THE MEDICAL OFFICER OF HEALTH ON THE EPIDEMIC OF BUBONIC FEVER (PLAGUE) DURING THE YEAR 1900.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of

His Excellency the Governor.

1900

SANITARY BOARD OFFICES,

HONGKONG, October 31st, 1900.

To the President

OF THE SANITARY BOARD.

SIR,-I have the honour to submit, for the information of His Excellency the Governor, the following Report upon the epidemic of Bubonic Fever (Plague) which has occurred during the current year.

The total number of cases reported to date has been 1,082 of which 28 were among non-Chinese, and the total number of deaths recorded has been 1,034, 15 being non-Chinese. This gives the very high general case-mortality of 95.5 per cent., and a Chinese case-mortality of 96.6 per cent.

The following table gives the total cases, total deaths, and case-mortality for each of the five epidemic years :-

>

1894.

1896.

1898.

1899.

1900.

Cases

2,679

1,204

1,320

1,486

1,082

Deaths

.2,485

1,078

1,175

1,428

1,034

Percentage

92.7

89.5

89.0

Mortality

96.1

95.5

The non-Chinese cases comprised 6 Europeans, 5 Portuguese, 9 Indians, 7 Japanese and 1 Filipino, and of these 1 European, 4 Portuguese, 7 Indians and 3 Japanese died, giving a non- Chinese mortality of 53.6 per cent.

The European who died was a Britisher employed at the Naval Yard and he had only arrived in the Colony from England some six weeks previously. It has been observed before, in this Colony, that new arrivals from temperate climates are far more liable to contract the disease, and to succumb, than are residents of some standing. Two of the European cases were imported by the s. s. Coroman- del, a P. and O. mail steamer running between Bombay, Hongkong and Shanghai. The Coromandel lay alongside the wharf at Bombay from April 1st to the 10th loading general cargo, including a quantity of grain (Rice); she left on the latter date for China arriving in Hongkong on April 28th, and leaving for Shanghai the same day. The vessel lay at Shanghai for about three weeks, leaving there on May 21st, and on the following day two Europeans-one a steward and the other a waiter- occupying the same cabin, developed high fever and were landed in Hongkong on May 25th suffering from well marked symptoms of Bubonic Fever. On the day that these two men were first taken ill two dead rats were found in a storeroom close to the cabin occupied by them, and on the 25th two more dead rats were found in the infected cabin, both of which had been dead for some days. This cabin was close to the hold in which the grain was stored, and it is supposed that the grain was infected, that the rats contracted the disease from the grain and that the two men were infected by the rats which died in their cabin. The whole of the grain was accordingly destroyed and the ship thoroughly fumigated and disinfected, and all rats that could be found on board were killed and their .carcases burnt.

On May 27th a native fireman was landed from this steamer, also suffering from Bubonic Fever; the two European cases recovered, but the Indian died of the disease. No cases of Bubonic Fever were known to have occurred in Shanghai up to the date of the steamer leaving that port.

Of the remaining European cases one was a Greek sailor living at the Sailors' Home, one a French lad living in the Chinese quarter (No. 2 Health District) and one was an N. C. O. in the Royal Artillery.

Taking the 1,054 Chinese cases, there were 720 males and 334 females; this is equal to a per- centage of 31.7 of female cases, as compared with 35.8 per cent. in 1898. The proportion of females in the Chinese population is 29.9 per cent.

This lessened liability on the part of the women to contract the disease must be due to one or other of the following causes: either the proportion of women in the population has become lessened since the last Census was taken in 1897, or else the improvement in the sanitary condition of the homes of the poorer classes is beginning to show good results. Probably both causes have been operative, and the Census to be taken in January next will indicate how far the former cause is to be credited with this result.

The total number of cases among Chinese children, under fifteen years of age, has been 273 or 25.9 per cent. as compared with 24.1 per cent. in 1898. As the proportion of children under this age, among the Chinese population of the Colony, is only 18 per cent. it is apparent that children are more liable to contract the disease than are adults.

The number of deaths among Chinese children under this age was 264, which gives a case- mortality of 96-7 per cent., which is practically the same general case-mortality as among the Chinese of all ages.

The disease has prevailed throughout the year, the longest interval without a reported case being three weeks in the month of March, and the bulk of the cases has occurred, as in former years, during the second quarter-thus from January to March there were 20 cases with 19 deaths; from April to June 745 cases and 683 deaths; and from July to September 304 cases and 309 deaths, the excess of deaths over cases in this quarter being due to the fact that some of the 152 cases reported during the last fortnight of the second quarter did not die until the first week of the third quarter. During the month of October there have been 13 cases and 13 deaths.

No less than 412 of the cases have been dead bodies found in the streets or floating in the Harbour. This is equal to 37.1 per cent. of the total cases, as compared with 40 per cent. during 1899 and 36 per cent. during 1898. These bodies are thrown out at night by the other occu- pants of the infected houses, with a view to avoiding the disinfection of the premises, and it would appear to be impossible to put a stop to the practice without an enormous increase in the European Police force of the Colony. It is this practice by the Chinese that has necessitated such frequent. house to house visitations by the officers of the Sanitary Board, and until the better class Chinese can bring such pressure to bear upon their poorer neighbours as will result in a cessation of this method of disposing of their dead, and concealing the address of the infected premises, I fear that house to house visitation, with its attendant discomforts to the more respectable Chinese residents, must be pressed, or the alternative of a wholesale vacation of the houses in infected districts be put in force. This latter reinedy is universally admitted to be the most effective one for dealing with Bubonic Fever, but unfortunately its consequences to the property owner are most disastrous, as it naturally results in a loss of all rental for a period of some three or four months, and it is therefore as much to the interests of the property owner as to the Colony at large that all cases of this disease should be at once identified and isolated.

For convenience of reference I have appended to this Report a list of all the places in which dead bodies have been found, during the past year, and from this it will be seen that a considerable number have been persons who have found their way to the Canton Wharf with a view to taking passage to Chinese territory but have succumbed to the disease on reaching the wharf.

A very large number of bodies are found floating in the Harbour and these are not necessarily derived only from the floating population.

In the villages such as Yaumati, Mongkok tsui, etc., the facilities for putting dead bodies into the street are no doubt greater than in the City, and in consequence a considerable number of unclaimed bodies are thus thrown out.

The list will no doubt be suggestive to the Police as indicating the localities in which special vigilance is needed to stop this objectionable means of disposing of the dead, and at the same time of suppressing all information as to the actual address of the infected premises.

Should this continue, in spite of police vigilance, I see no other remedy than for the Board to decide to cremate all unclaimed dead bodies found in the streets, the Harbour, etc.

The

During the year more than 43,000 dead rats have been collected and removed from the City to the Rubbish Depôt, where they have been burnt with the City refuse, and in the appendix will be found a chart showing a comparison between the number of Bubonic Fever cases recorded and the general rat mortality from week to week. I have purposely described the chart in these terms, as on enquiry I am satisfied that comparatively few rats have been killed by the Chinese for the sake of the two cents reward, offered by the Government, and that practically the payment has been made, in all cases, to the scavenging coolies who have merely collected dead rats thrown out by the householders into the backlanes and alleys or placed in the rubbish boxes, or that have died in the streets. returns show that the average rat mortality, above ground, of the City is from 400 to 500 per week, but that during an epidemic of Bubonic Fever, as many as 2,000 or more dead rats are to be dis- covered; the removal of these from the City is undoubtedly beneficial, as removing one important source of infection, both to human beings and to healthy rats. It will be seen from the diagram that the augmented rat mortality begins earlier and lasts longer than the epidemic among human beings and the Government have, on the recommendation of the Sanitary Board, decided to continue the payment for rats, although the epidemic has now ceased, so that any increase in the number collected may give early intimation of any recrudescence of the disease. It is also interesting to record that although over 400 Chinese coolies have been employed regularly in the scavenging and cleansing of the City and in the disinfection of infected premises, and that practically the whole of the 42,000 dead rats must have been handled by these men, yet only three cases of Bubonic Fever are known to have occurred among them during the year.

:

:

A man em-

An interesting case of infection by the bite of a sick rat occurred during the year. ployed as a turn-cock and living in No. 2 Health District, was bitten on the left thumb and some two or three days later the arm became swollen and painful; the case was not reported and the man died in his home some nine or ten days after he had been bitten. On post-mortem examination two small wounds were found on the ball of the left thumb, the left hand and forearm were much swollen, and in the left axilla there was a brawny, oedematous swelling, in the midst of which was an enlarged, hæmorrhagic gland; a smear preparation from this gland showed numerous typical plague bacilli.

Another clear case of infection by inoculation was an Indian lad 3 years of age whom I was asked to see by an Army Medical Officer.. I found an abrasion of the left knee which had been caused by a fall in the street while at play some two days previously; the abrasion was covered by a dry scab and surrounded by an inflammatory areola; the femoral glands in the left groin were enlarged and painful, and there were the other characteristic symptoms of the disease.

Several instances have occurred of coolies actually engaged in loading junks, etc., and falling into the water and being drowned, who on post-mortem and bacteriological examination showed marked evidences of Bubonic Fever, and in one case a man working in a sugar refinery was struck by a beam upon the chest and fell down dead, and on post-mortem examination was found to present all the evidences of advanced plague infection. I may add, however, that no subsequent case occurred in the house in which this man slept, or among the fokis with whom he worked. These are no doubt instances of the ambulatory type of the disease, and death probably resulted from Syncope, the effect of the shock upon a heart already weakened by the Fever. It is such cases that render it so difficult to stay the progress of an epidemic, as they must be, more or less, a source of infection to the people with whom they are brought in contact.

The chart of" Bubonic Fever and mean atmospheric temperature" shows that, as in former years, the epidemic abates in this Colony as soon as the mean atmospheric temperature rises above 80°F. During this year the temperature after rising to 82.6°, fell for four weeks to below 80°, and in consequence there was a slight recrudescence of the epidemic, the nuinber of cases rising from 63 in the twenty-fifth week to 99 in the twenty-sixth week, but the number fell again to 65 in the following week, and from that time, with a mean temperature varying from 80° to 84°, the epidemic rapidly declined.

It is difficult, however, to explain why the disease does not recrudesce when the temperature again falls below 80° in the early autumn, but there are no doubt many other factors at work in the causa- tion of an epidemic, than mere atmospheric temperature.

The chart "Bubonic Fever and Rainfall" shows that the rainfall has some influence upon the pro- gress of the disease-thus in the twentieth week a heavy fall of rain is followed by a slight reduction in the number of cases, in the twenty-fourth week a very heavy rainfall is followed by another slight reduction, and in the twenty-sixth week a further big rainfall is followed by the final decline of the epidemic.

Early in the year the Government procured a considerable quantity of Haffkine's prophylactic serum, but unfortunately it has not been found possible to persuade many of the Chinese to accept protection in this form.

In the Appendix will be found a detailed account of 493 cases occurring in the City of Victoria, with known addresses, and it will be seen that, as in former years, Health Districts 2 and 9 have suffered the most severely.

;

:

:

:

HEALTH DISTRICT.

1

2

!

No. of Cases

CO

3

4

10

5

6

7

8

Co

9

10

44

131

0

67

63

30

24

19

98

17

During the progress of the epidemic a memorandum was issued by the Sanitary Board, for general information, detailing the method adopted for dealing with the outbreak; the following is a copy of this memorandum :-

METHOD OF DEALING WITH OUTBREAKS OF BUBONIC FEVER (PLAGUE).

1. Notification.-All cases of infectious disease should be reported at once to the nearest Police Station or to the Sanitary Board (Telephone No. 257), or to the Medical Officer of Health (Telephone No. 120). This is compulsory on "all persons knowing or having reason to believe that any person has been attacked by or is suffering from" Bubonic Plague, Cholera or Small-pox (Bye-law 17, Ordinance 15 of 1894); but it is universally evaded by the Chinese and even by the Chinese Doctors." The penalty for its evasion is $25.

6.

I

:

:

:

2. Detection of the Sick.-In the absence of notification this can only be effected by means of house to house visits. The Sanitary Board has power to institute such house to house visits in any district in which the disease may prevail and must define the limits of such district (Bye-law 25, Ordinance 15 of 1894).

The City of Victoria has been declared infected and European officers of the Board assisted by Chinese constables are at present engaged in house to house visiting, while a Chinese doctor trained in Western medicine is making similar visits. Their hours of duty are from 5-8 a.m. and 2-5 p.m., and a copy of the instructions which have been issued to these officers is attached. The villages on the Kowloon Peninsula have also been declared infected and European officers with Chinese constables are engaged in house to house visits in Yaumati, Mongkoktsui, Taikoktsui, and Hunghom.

3. Removal of the Sick.-Ambulances for the removal of the sick are kept at the various Police Stations, at the Canton Wharf, at the (native) Tung Wah Hospital and at the Board's matsheds at Praya East, Taipingshan, Yaumati and Hunghom, and sick persons are removed in these ambulances to the Tung Wah Hospital on application to the Sanitary Board, the Medical Officer of Health, or the Police, and are there examined by a Chinese Doctor trained in Western medicine and are either drafted at once by him to the Plague Hospital or detained under observation in case of doubt.

In making any such application care should be taken to state distinctly whether the patient is alive or dead, for in the case of dead bodies, a dead-box is forwarded for the removal. The ambulance is attended by a Chinese constable who conveys the details concerning the case to the Hospital Authorities.

Heavy wooden boxes, with rubber washers fitted to the lids are used for the removal of dead bodies to the Government Mortuary; these are kept at the various Police Stations and at the Board's matsheds and information concerning the death is forwarded on a card attached to the body.

4. Treatment of the Sick.-This is entirely in the hands of the Medical Department. The Government Hospital at Kennedy Town is supplemented by a series of Matshed Hospitals, also at Kennedy Town, which are managed by the authorities of the Tung Wah Hospital but are under the supervision of the Medical Department.

5. Disinfection of infected premises.-This is carried out by a European officer assisted by coloured foremen, a Chinese foreman and a varying number of coolies. As soon as it is known that a case of the disease has occurred at any house, a Chinese constable is sent from the nearest Police Station to detain all persons found therein (Bye-law 22, Ordinance 15 of 1894), and the officer in charge of the disinfection proceeds to the house to ascertain how many persons are detained there. He then procures, either from the matshed at Praya East or from the Disinfecting Station, as many suits of Government clothing as are needed for the persons so detained, and having thus provided these persons with clothing he removes their own clothing, bedding, curtains, and carpets, to the Steam Disinfecting Station, the clothing being tied up in sheets dipped in a solution of Jeyes' fluid and conveyed through the streets in closed baskets; persons who are able to obtain new or clean clothing from some uninfected premises are however not detained after they have discarded their infected clothing and handed it to the Inspector for disinfection. New goods, silk clothing which has not been recently worn, furs and leather goods are not removed to the Steam Disinfector, but must as a general rule remain on the premises until they have been fumigated. When the clothing, etc. is returned (in the course of some two hours) from the Disinfecting Station, the persons who have been detained are required to put on their own clothing and must then leave the premises for some 5 or 6 hours while it is disinfected and cleansed. The Government clothing is returned to the Disinfecting Station to be steamed before it is again used. The people so displaced from their homes are at liberty to make use of the Board's matshed shelters until the processes of disinfection of the premises are complete.

The disinfection of the premises consists in the spraying of the walls with a solution of perchloride of mercury (1 in 1,000) or fumigation with free chlorine obtained by the addition of diluted sulphuric acid to chlorinated lime (1 quart of a 1 in 8 solution of the acid to each tb of the chlorinated lime). Floors and furniture are then scrubbed with solution of Jeyes' fluid and the walls are then lime- washed, chlorinated lime being added to the lime-wash in the proportion of Ib. to the gallon.

6. Burial of the dead.-This is carried out under the superintendence of one of the Board's Officers, all bodies being buried at the Kennedytown Plague Cemetery, unless a special permit has been granted for burial elsewhere.

7. General sanitary precautions.-Chlorinated lime is supplied to all the public latrines for use in the buckets, and the officers of the Board are instructed to see that it is freely used.

A reward of 2 cents per head has been offered since January 16th for every rat brought to an officer of the Board.

Instructions for the Guidance of Officers of the Sanitary Board engaged in House to House Visiting under Bye-law 25 (Ordinance 15 of 1894).

I. Officers shall work in couples, so that while one of them enters a house to search for sick persons or dead bodies, the other may remain in the street to prevent the conveyance of the sick from the neighbourhood or from an unvisited house to one that has been already visited.

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II. Visits should be, as far as possible, of the nature of surprise visits and hence a fixed route should be avoided.

III. Discretion must be exercised in entering premises occupied by women and a reasonable time allowed them to make any necessary changes of toilet.

In no case should domestic premises be entered without knoicking or asking permission to enter. IV. Any sick person suspected to be suffering from Bubonic Fever is to be removed in an ambul- ance to the Tung Wah Hospital, the ambulance being accompanied by a Chinese constable who shall convey to the Hospital authorities the particulars concerning the address of the patient, etc.

V. Dead bodies are to be sent to the Government Mortuary in dead-boxes, and particulars are to be sent on a card attached to the body.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

FRANCIS W. CLARK, M.D., D.P.H.; Medical Officer of Health.

LIST OF DEAD BODIES FOUND IN THE STREETS, THE HARBOUR, &c.

Name of Streets, etc.

Aberdeen Street

Albany Street Arbuthnot Road Battery Path

Belcher Street

No. of bodies

found.

3

Name of Streets, etc.

Brought forward

No. of bodies found.

174

1

1

1

Roman Catholic Cemetry.... Sai Ying Poon Market.... Shaukiwan Road

1

1

9

3

Bonham Road

Bonham Strand

2

2

St. Francis St.

Bowen Road

Caine Road

Canton Wharf

Causeway Bay

Central Market

2

1

12

Shing Wong Street....

Ship Street

Stanley Street

Staunton Street...

Stavely Street

3

1

1

1

1

5

1

Swatow Lane

Centre Street..

......

Square Street

Cheuk Hing Lane

1

Stone Nullah Lane

Taipingshan Street

2

1

2

3

Coffee Plantation

Third Street

Cross Street

1

Torseen Street

2

Des Voeux Road, West.........

7

Tsui Hing Lane

1

Eastern Street

3

Tsui Lung Lane

1

Elgin Street

2

Victoria Street

1

Fuk Hing Lane

1

Wanchai Road

1

Gage Street

1

Wellington Street.

1

Gutzlaff Street

Heard Street

High Street

Hillier Street............................

2

Wing Fung Street

3

I

Wing Fung Lane

2

West Street

1

2

Western Street

2

Hillside, Lapsapwan

1

Wyndham Street

1

Wanchai

2

""

Wongneichung Road...........................

3

Glenealy

1

Yat Fu Street

1

39

Lo Pan Temple

Yee Wo Street

9

Hollywood Road

6

Irving Street ..

The Peak

2

Jardine's Bazaar

Barker Road

1

Kennedy Road

5

Ladder Street

2

The Harbour

70

Leighton Hill Road

1

Li Sing Street

2

Yaumati

43

Morrison Hill......

Kowloon Point

14

Mortuary Road

2

Blackhead's Point........

2

Mt. Caroline

New Street

Pak Tsz Lane

1

Stonecutter's Foreshore

3

3

1

Mongkoktsui

Pokfulum Road................

3

Taikoktsui

47

14

Possession Street

2

Po Yan Street

5

Praya Reclamation Central

15

Praya East

7

Praya West

13

Kowloon City

Shatin Road

Cheung Chau, N. Territory

Tung Chung, N. Territory

2

1

1

Queen's Road Central

3

Queen's Road East

12

Hunghom

Queen's Road West

3

Hok Un.

Robinson Road

14

5.

Total..........

412

Carried forward......... 174

No. 1 HEALTH

Width of

Depth

street

Nationality.

Age.

Sex.

Address.

of House.

Frontage.

fronting House.

Feet.

Feet.

Feet.

Chinese,

47,

M.

7

F.

"

45

M.

>>

30

"

27

F.

>>

33

M.

"

8

"

30

""

30

"J

28

M.

""

34

"2

Indian, Chinese,

16

24

F.

M.

18

""

34

35

15

79

13

"

30

""

12

F.

"

23

M.

""

36

""

10

F.

""

6

35

18

وو

74

ཀྵ རྨ

19

60

وو

16

"

8

Portuguese,

11

Chinese,

24

48

">

20

>>

20

ནི མ མ ནི མི ཆ བྷ 2 མ མ ནི

17

ཁྐྲ་ཊྛ མི་མ ིི ནི ཟླ ནི ནི ནི མ མཁྲི མི མཚོ མ མ ་ ཚ ནི

བར་ མ་ བ མི

12, Irving Street,

40

13

29

12,

40

13

""

24,

40

13

27,

45

13

""

40,

41

13

19

42,

40

13

22222

29

29

29

29

29

"

21, Jardine's Bazaar,

46

16

30

29,

45

16

21

""

36,

38

17

26

42,

38

9

26

و"

64,

38

17

28

""

2, Keswick Street,....

45