Sessional Papers - 1898

PAPERS LAID BEFORE THE LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL OF HONGKONG 1898

Table of Contents

1. Alcoholic Liquors Commission

Report of

2. Assessment

Report for 1898-99

3. Botanical and afforestation

Report for 1897

4. Bubonic Plague

Report on

5. Civil and appeal Cases

Return of, for 1897

6. Court Revenue

Returns of

7. Criminal Statistics

For 1897

8. Education

Reports for 1897

9. Finance Committee

Reports of Proceedings for 1898

10. Financial Returns

To accompany Estimates for 1899

11. Financial Returns

For 1897

12. Fire Brigade

Report for 1897

13. Gaol

Report for 1897

14. Government offices, New

Correspondence Regarding

15. Harbour Master's Report

For 1897

16. Insanitary Properties Commission

Report of

17. Legislative Council

Minutes of Proceedings for 1898

18. Medical Department

Report for 1897

19. Observatory

Report for 1897

20. Piers Committee

Minutes of Meetings of

21. Po Leung Kuk

Report for 1897

22. Police

Report for 1897

23. Post office

Report for 1897

24. Praya Reclamation Works

Report for 1897

25. Probate and administration

Calendar of, for 1897

26. Public Works

Report on Progress of, During First Half-Year 1898

27. Public Works

Report for 1897

28. Public Works Committee

Reports of Proceedings for 1898

29. Public Works Stores

Report on

30. Registrar General's Report

For 1897

31. Sanitary

Report for 1897

32. Speeches in Legislative Council

Despatch on, Regarding appreciation of Sir William Robinson's Services

33. Volunteer Corps, Hongkong

Report on the, for Season 1897-98

34. Water account

Statement of, for 1897

35. Widows' and Orphans' Fund

Report on the, for 1897

 

HONGKONG.

REPORT

OF THE

COMMISSION

ON

577 to 670

ALCOHOLIC LIQUORS,

TOGETHER WITH THE

PROCEEDINGS OF THE COMMITTEE,

MINUTES OF EVIDENCE,

AND

APPENDIX,

HONGKONG:

PRINTED BY NORONHA & Co., GOVERNMENT PRINTERS.

1898.

Report.

Proceedings of the Committee.

Evidence of-

The Hon. F. H. MAY, C.M.G.,

Mr. FRANK Browne,

CONTENTS.

Appendix No. 1.-The Commission,

29

2.-Questions sent to Colonel THE O'GORMAN, D.A.A.G.,

Lieut.-Col. THE O'GORMAN'S reply,

Minutes of the Commissioners,

Deputy-Inspector

Questions

fleets

tals, Surg.-Col. EVATT, and the Principal Civil Medical Officer,

35

>>

The replies,.......

Questions to the Secretary to the Commodore,.......

The reply of the Secretary to the Commodore,

Questions to the General Managers, China Sugar Refinery,

Questions to Chinese holders of Distillery Licences,

3. List of Applicants for Spirit Licences,.....

4.-List of holders of Wholesale Spirit Licences,

List of holders of Grocers' Spirit Licences,

List of holders of Distillery Licences,

List of Eating-house Licences,

Page.

1 and 13

14 and 19

I

II

II

IV

IV

V-VI

VI

VII-XI

XI

XII

XIV

XX

XX

XXI

XXI

"

5.-List of holders of Chinese Spirit Licences,

XXII

15

""

6.-Report of proceedings of Meetings of the Justices of the Peace,

XXVII-XXXIII

>>

*J

7.-

Do.

do.,

XXXIII-XXXVIH

3.9

8.-Report of proceedings of a Special Meeting of the Justices of the

Peace,

XXXVIII-XL

"}

9.--Appointment of Commander W. C. H. HASTINGS, Ret. Com., R.N.,

as Chairman of the Commission,

XLI

"

"

10.--Appointment of Dr. F. O. STEDMAN as a member of the Commission,.

XLI

3

11.-List of Prices of Wines and Spirits,

XLI

>>

""

12.-Report on Samshu, by Mr. FRANK BRowNE,

XLI

"

""

13.-The Sale of Food and Drugs Ordinance, 1896,

XLVII

*

37

,, 14.-The Spirit Licences Ordinance, 1886,

ΣΙ

:

}

+

7

!

"

3

ALCOHOLIC LIQUORS COMMISSION.

REPORT.

HONGKONG, 12th August, 1898.

We, the undersigned members of the Commission appointed on the 14th day of Appendix February, 1898, to enquire into and report on the importation into Hongkong, and the manufacture and sale in Hongkong of Alcoholic Liquors of all kinds and into the operation of the laws regulating the same, and to ascertain whether any and what descriptions of crude, inferior, adulterated, or deleterious liquors are manufactured, or sold and by whom and to what extent, and what measures may usefully be taken to improve the laws and to check the importation, manufacture, and sale in licensed houses and elsewhere of such crude, inferior, adulterated, or injurious liquors, have the honour to forward herewith the evidence taken by us and our opinion thereon.

Appendices

2. The Commission was appointed because there was a strong opinion in some No & 1. quarters that deleterious liquors were being sold in the Colony, which were doing a great deal of mischief to soldiers and sailors. After the second meeting of the Commission on the 25th February, Mr. WoDEHOUSE, Dr. HARTIGAN, and Mr. MCCALLUM left the Colony, so, in order to complete the investigation, it was necessary to ask the Government to appoint others so as to enable a quorum of members to be present at the sittings of the Commission. Captain HASTINGS, R.N., was appointed a member and Chairman in Appendix place of Mr. WODEHOUSE, and the other two vacancies were not filled up. Subsequently, with but three members it was found to be impossible on two occasions to have a Appendix quorum present, so an additional member was asked for and Dr. F. O. STEDMAN was appointed.

9.

10.

No. 2.

3. With a view to obtaining the fullest information on the objects of this enquiry, Appendix questions were sent to the Deputy Inspector-General of Fleets and Hospitals, Hong- kong, Colonel THE O'GORMAN, D.A.A.G., The Principal Medical Officer of H. M. FORCES, Hongkong, The Principal Civil Medical Officer, Hongkong, Mr. LAWFORD (Secretary to the Commodore), The Managers of the China Sugar Refinery, to all Chinese holders of Distillery Licences, and to one foreign Consul. It has been found necessary to examine two witnesses and to hold four meetings. In view of the reasons assigned for the sixty-seven cases of alcoholism that occurred during 1897 in the Government Civil Hospital we did not think it necessary to call the Principal Civil Medical Officer before the Commission.

4. At the first meeting on the 22nd February last, we requested the Secretary to draw up a report on the manufacture and composition of the Chinese liquors known as samshu, also to visit the Chinese distilleries and report upon the quality of the materials Appendix used.

12.

Appendix No. 11.

Browne, 15

et seq.

5. As regards importation we have evidence that a quantity of cheap liquors are brought into this Colony. We have evidence also that because these liquors are cheap it does not follow that they must be made from crude, inferior, or decayed materials. Manufactured from good spirit there is a large profit on the liquors which are sold at 20 cents a bottle. Moreover, analysis has shown that these cheap liquors do not contain deleterious substances, but that they lack flavour, body, and aroma, and that they contain less fusel oil than genuine spirits. The tests to which liquors are subjected in the Government Laboratory are sufficiently severe to warrant the Government Analyst passing them as harmless, and this opinion is eutirely supported by the medical evidence received by us and by the records of the amount of drunkenness in the Colony. Appendix There is no ground whatever for the assertion that there exist in Hongkong deleterious liquors of which a small quantity produces sudden and temporary insanity in the con- sumer or the appearance of having been drugged.

Browne, 16.

12.

6. Patent-still spirit from the China Sugar Refinery, and the Chinese liquors known as samshu are the only liquors manufactured in Hongkong. The former is of good quality, and the composition of the principal Chinese liquors-Leu Pun Chau, Sheung Apread Ching Chau, and Sam Ching Chau-together with the knowledge from inspection that only sound materials are used in the samshu distilleries, is sufficient to justify our opinion that the effect of drinking these Chinese liquors is practically the same as that produced by whiskey of the same strength. The high proportion of compound ethers in samshu will afford a means of ascertaining its presence in liquors should it be suspected from its odour. Although samshu is the national drink of the Chinese, drunkenness amongst them is conspicuous by its absence.

Browne, 19.

May, 2 et seq.

7. It appears that a few years ago it was customary for beach-combers to frequent a place at the corner of Upper Lascar Row known as "Samshu Corner," and there to drink samshu, but no drinking in this quarter in recent years has been noticed.

8. There appear to be no grounds for dissatisfaction either with the general conduct of Hongkong public-houses or with the Police supervision of these houses. Drunken- ness in this Colony amongst the European population is not in excess of the amount found in other ports and cities. The analysis of thirty-one samples of the Browne, 15. cheapest liquors has shown that such liquors are not crude, inferior, or adulterated,* so that we fail to find that any evil whatever exists as regards the conduct of the liquor traffic of the Colony.

May, 4, 8.

* Since the evidence of the Government Analyst was taken a number of samples have been submitted for analysis and four prosecutions have been instituted for adulteration (deficiency of strength).

9. It does not appear to us to be compatible with the public safety that The Food Browne, 17 and Drugs Ordinance, No. 18 of 1896, should be a dead letter, and we recommend that steps be taken in order that largely increased numbers of samples may be examined in the Government Laboratory, so that as much as possible may be done to prevent the sale of any adulterated or deleterious liquors.

Maclean, iv. Evatt, v.

10. As all the evidence collected has shown that the drunkenness here is due to Atkinson, vithe quantity and not to the quality of the liquor consumed, we are of opinion that the

cheapness of liquor is conducive to the increase of drunkenness.

As samshu is very cheap, legislation should be undertaken so that this liquor or any liquor containing May, 11. samshu may not be sold either directly or indirectly to Europeans.

Appendix No. 6.

11. It is essential that the holders of public-house licences should be persons of good character, and as cases have occurred in which householders have been guarantors for a person wholly unfit to hold a licence, it is desirable that the fullest in- formation should be obtained as to the character of the applicant for such a licence.

12. We are of opinion that the number (twenty-three) of public-houses now licensed in the Colony is amply sufficient for present needs.

We have the honour to be,

Sir.

Your most obedient Servants,

WM. C. H. HASTINGS,

Chairman.

Jxo. J. FRANCIS, q.c. (I desire to call special attention to Mr. Browne's evidence, p. 17 and the first sixteen lines of p. 18- another Analyst or Apothecary 'is surely needed.)

R. F. COBBOLD, M.A.

F. O. STEDMAN, M.D., B.S., London.

His Excellency Major-General WILSONE BLACK, C.B.,

Acting Governor,

HONGKONG.

:

-

?

PROCEEDINGS OF THE COMMITTEE.

Tuesday, February 22, 1898.

MEMBERS PRESENT :

Hon. H. E. WODEHOUSE, C.M.G., Chairman. Dr. HARTIGAN.

Mr. H. MCCALLUM.

Mr. J. J. FRANCIS, Q.C.

Rev. R. F. Cobbold, M.A.

Mr. FRANK BROWNE, Secretary.

The Committee deliberated.

Friday, February 25, 1898.

MEMBERS PRESENT :

Hon. H. E. WODEHOUSE, C.M.G., Chairman.

Dr. HARTIGAN.

Mr. H. McCALLUM.

Rev. R. F. COBBOLD, M.A.

Mr. FRANK BROWNE, Secretary.

Mr. F. H. MAY, C.M.G., examined.

Saturday, April 30, 1898.

MEMBERS PRESENT :

Captain HASTINGS, R.N., Chairman. Mr. FRANCIS, Q.C.

Rev. R. F. COBBOLD, M.A.

Mr. FRANK BROWNE, Secretary.

Hon. F. H. MAY, C.M.G., and Mr. FRANK BROWNE, examined.

Considered answers to some questions sent to The Deputy Inspector-General of Fleets and Hospitals, Hongkong, Colonel THE O'GORMAN, D.A.A.G., The Principal Medical Officer of H. M. FORCES, Hongkong, The Principal Civil Medical Officer, Mr. LAWFORD (Secretary to the Commodore), The Managers of the China Sugar Refinery,

and others.

Friday, August 12, 1898.

MEMBERS PRESENT:.

Captain HASTINGS, R.N., Chairman.

Rev. R. F. COBBOLD, M.A.

Dr. STEDMAN.

Mr. FRANK BROWNE, Secretary.

The Secretary reported that replies to questions had been received from the Managers of the China Sugar Refinery, and from the Chinese holders of Distillery Licences. The Members requested that a digest of the amounts of samshu, and of Chinese wines, as made and sold during 1897 in Hongkong, be inserted in the Elue Book.

Mr. FRANK BROWNE was further examined.

The Members then considered a new Licensing Bill. No amendments were recommended.

The Members directed the Secretary to write to Mr. FRANCIS asking him to place himself in correspondence with the Attorney-General with regard to the new Licensing

Bill.

A draft report was then considered paragraph by paragraph, and after amending, it was proposed by the Chairman that the Report as amended be the Report of the Commissioners, which was agreed to.

Ordered, to Report, together with the Minutes o Evidence and an Appendix.

3

:

1

ALCOHOLIC LIQUORS COMMISSION.

The Commission met on Friday, the 25th February, at 2.30 p.m., at the Magistracy.

Present:-The Honourable H. E. WODEHOUSE, C.M.G. (Chairman).

Dr. W. HARTIGAN.

Mr. H. MCCALLUM.

The Reverend R. F. COBBOLD, M.A.

Mr. F. BROWNE, Secretary.

Absent. Mr. J. J. FRANCIS, Q.C.

The Honourable FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G., was called and examined.

The CHAIRMAN-You are Captain Superintendent of Police ?

Witness-Yes.

As such you have general control over the licensed houses for the sale of liquors ? -Yes.

think

Amongst those houses are included public-houses?—Yes.

According to this return they are twenty-five in number. Just look at that; I you will find the number is correct; it is taken from the Justices' return.-Yes. Some of these are not licensed now.-The "Travellers" and the "Grand."

So there are twenty-three ?-Yes.

In what does your control over these houses consist?-To see that the conditions of the licences and the provisions of the law are carried out.

The conditions of the licences are contained in Ordinance 21 of 1886 ?--Yes.

Are there any special conditions for public-houses not contained in the body of the Ordinance ?-There are no special conditions except those contained in the body of the Ordinance.

I will just turn to the body of the Ordinance. It says:-"The business of every "licensed publican or adjunct licensee shall be carried on subject to the following

regulations:-

"(1) No liquor shall be sold or drunk on the premises licensed except "between such hours as the Magistrate shall enter on the certificate to be

granted under clause 12.

<<

"(2) No disorder shall be permitted on the premises.

"(3) No person shall be allowed to become drunk on the premises, nor

"shall liquor be supplied to any person who is drunk.

"(4) No game of chance shall be played on the premises.

66

(5) A decent and suitable privy and urinal shall be maintained in a state

"of cleanliness and good repair for the use of customers.

"(6) The licensee shall not abandon the occupation of his house, or permit

CC any other person to become virtually the keeper thereof.

"(7) The licensee shall not employ any person to sell or dispose of any "liquors outside of his licensed premises, nor shall. he allow or suffer

any liquors to be so disposed of on his own account."

(2)

Those are the regulations attached to public-house licences ?--Yes.

Then there are no regulations regarding the quality of drink to be supplied on the premises?-There is the provision about adulterated liquor in the Ordinance.

Is that the only regulation regarding the quality of liquors ?—No, there is also the Food and Drugs Ordinance, 18 of 1896.

But I inean in this Ordinance, 21 of 1886 ?—Yes.

The regulation or rather the definition about adulterated liquor is as follows:--- "Adulterated liquor shall mean any liquor mixed or coloured to the prejudice of the "purchaser with any ingredient whatever, or with water, either so as to increase its "bulk or measure, or so as injuriously to affect the quality of such liquor, or to "conceal its inferior quality, or any liquor which is not virtually of the nature and quality demanded by the purchaser, or of the liquor which it is labelled as being or "purported to be, whether such adulterated liquor be injurious to health or not. Spirits shall not be considered to be adulterated if mixed with water only so as not "to reduce the strength more than twenty-five degrees below proof in the case of "brandy, whisky, or rum, or more than thirty degrees below proof in the case of gin." Except for that definition the quality of the liquor is not touched upon in the Spirit Licences Ordinance, 21 of 1886 ?—No.

There is other legislation with regard to adulteration in the Sale of Food and Drugs Ordinance, 18 of 1896 ?—Yes.

Does that apply to liquors as well as to food and drugs ?—Yes.

"The term food, when used in this Ordinance, shall include every food or article "used for food, or drink by man, other than drugs or water."

drugs or water." Is your control exercised personally or through the medium of your officers ?-Through the medium of my officers.

They being constables of what rank?-All European officers. Generally, the police on duty see that the law is observed; but I have also special men-detective-sergeants -in the Central District to look after all licensed premises, and to see that the licences. are taken out and that there are no unlicensed premises. So that therefore the public- houses are supervised by the police on duty-all the police on beat and patrol-and also specially by detective-sergeants.

Have they any orders in writing as to what they are to do ?—No.

Are they allowed to enter a public-house at any time while on duty ?-Yes, if they enter it on duty.

Is it your business also to enquire into the character of the applicants for licences ? Yes.

How is that done? Is it done by any special man or by anybody you choose to depute ?--It would be done by the officer in charge of the district.

The officer in charge of the district in which the public-house is ?—Yes.

The officer in charge would be an Inspector ?—Yes. In the Central District a detective-sergeant might be told off to report.

By you or by an Inspector?-By me. So that it is done by special officers, is

it ?-Yes.

Of any particular rank or by anybody you happen to select ?-Generally the Inspectors make the enquiries.

With regard to these twenty-three houses, have you any complaints to make as to their management or any fault to find with them ?-No; they are well conducted.

i

:

:

( 3 )

Have you had any complaints as to the quality of liquors supplied by any of them? -No. There have been complaints made from time to time by the military authorities.

What is the nature of the complaint ?-They complained that the men got so drunk that the liquor must be bad.

They have done that more than once, have they ?-There have not been recent complaints. I recollect complaints as far back as 1889, I think. They have cropped

from time to time.

up

Have you had any knowledge yourself of the supply of deleterious liquors in these houses beyond what was contained in the complaints from the military ?—No.

In

It has never come under your observation at all ?—No.

How did you meet those complaints? Did you take any steps or do anything ?- my time I do not think there have been any complaints. I am speaking of my own

tenure of office.

When did your tenure of office commence ?-In 1893.

From 1893 until now you have had no complaints either by the naval or military people of the quality of liquors supplied by these houses ?—Not to my recollection ; there may have been some while I was away.

If there have been you could easily find out?—Yes.

Are your own police allowed to frequent these public-houses?-They are not supposed to frequent them.

Are they allowed to ?--There is nothing to prevent a man from going into a public- house if he be in plain clothes and off duty.

They are allowed to?-Off duty a man can go into a public-house for his own purposes.

The CHAIRMAN.--They have their own canteen at the Central Station, have they not? Yes.

That is where they can get their liquor?-Yes.

Where is the liquor bought from?-The local wholesale dealers.

With no reference to the quality at all?-The liquor is approved by myself. I mean I know the brands that are consumed there.

In your time have the police suffered from the sale of deleterious liquors in these places?—No.

You have had no instance of it amongst the police ?-No.

Is drinking carried on largely amongst the police?-No. There is very little.

Dr. HARTIGAN.-Does that also apply to the Water Police ?—Yes. that there is very little drinking amongst them.

I should say

The CHAIRMAN.-The securities that secure the publicans, so far as you know are they genuine securities, that is to say, are they a genuine guarantee as to the character of the publican secured? This is the guarantee." We, the undersigned house- "holders residing at Victoria in the said Colony, certify that the above named applicant "is a person of good fame and reputation, and fit and proper to be licensed to keep an inn or public-house." Then follow the names of three householders. Generally speaking, I should say, yes.

In certain cases they have not been persons "fit and proper to be licensed to keep "an inn or public-house?"-There have been exceptions.

(4)

Have there been any prosecutions during the last few years or recently for allowing drunkenness on the premises of any of these public-houses ?-No.

Does that mean that the men do not become drunk on the premises, or simply that there are no prosecutions ?--It means that there is very little disorder on the premises.

And so far as you know people are not allowed to become drunk on the premises of these public-houses, nor is liquor supplied to them when they are drunk ?-I would not go so far as that. I should say that as a rule public-houses are very well conducted here, and that they compare favourably with a similar class of houses in any city.

Have you any suggestion to make in regard to them?--In what direction.

In regard to the working of the law. Have you found that in any respect it could be improved?-Well, I think that the provisions of Ordinance 18 of 1896 regarding the sale of food should be enforced in a systematic manner. Section 6, of course, prohibits the sale of articles of food and drugs not of the proper nature, substance, or quality, and then there are provisions in section 12 for the obtaining of food in order to submit it to analysis.

You think that if there were a more systematic application of Ordinance, 18 of 1896, there would be less danger of the sale of deleterious liquors ?-Yes. Of course, it depends upon how much time the analytical department have got. It would be useless to attempt the thing without having a strong analytical department. I do not know whether the analyst would have time to do all the work thrown upon him.

In your imagination what do you think is a strong analytical department ?—There are about fifty grocers' licences, twenty-three public-houses; they make seventy-three.

I mean of what in your imagination should the analytical department consist ?— Well, I was just reckoning. There are seventy-three houses, so that to do any good at all under that Ordinance you would have to take samples from each of these houses-say, one sample a month at least.

And to do that would require what?-It would require an analyst to make seventy- three analyses per month, which would be a pretty big thing.

And probably that number does not include all that would be required?—No. Of course, there are the wholesale licences, and then there are all the Chinese licensees.

Suppose an analytical department existed, do you think it might do good?—That is what is done at home, of course. In Ireland the police visit the public-houses and cach county has an analyst, and the samples are forwarded to him. He analyses them and prosecutions follow.

Is that with a view to the liquor being good or with a view to revenue purposes? Mr. MCCALLUM.-The quality of the liquor is dealt with differently for revenue purposes.

WITNESS.-I think the provisions of Ordinance, 18 of 1896, are copied from the law

at home.

Yes.

The CHAIRMAN.-In addition to public-houses there are also adjunct licences?—

At the present moment there is only one adjunct licence? At any rate they are insignificant in number?-Yes.

Have you any remarks to make about them?-Well, of course, you would have to analyse their liquor as well.

I mean you

do not object to their existence?--No.

Have you any remark to make about them ?--No.

>

t

( 5 )

J

In addition to publicans' licences and adjunct licences there are also grocers' licences. A grocer's licence is defined to mean "a licence to sell intoxicating liquors by the bottle, such liquors not to be consumed on the premises." How many are there of these?--About fifty.

The SECRETARY.--Forty-seven.

The MAGISTRATE.--These also are under your control as Head of the Police ?-- Yes.

They are forty-seven in number?--Yes.

There are no special conditions attached to them?-There are the provisions of the Ordinance.

Are these licences issued by the Colonial Secretary ?—Yes.

And the regulations for them are made by the Governor in Council?

?—Yes.

There are no such regulations at present, are there?-No special regulations.

Have you any remarks to make about grocers' licences ?-The liquor that they retail would have to be supervised in the same way as the publicans'.

Yes, but with your experience of them have you any remarks to make about them? -No.

Are they well conducted

?—Yes.

What do they do? Do they nerely sell intoxicating

What is their business? What do they do?

liquors? They do a general grocery business as well.

And no liquors are consumed on the premises ?—No.

You have had no complaints with regard to those houses?-No, I have had no complaints.

Then there are eating houses. Those also come under your control ?—Yes. They are sixteen in number ?-Yes.

And the licences are granted by the Colonial Secretary ?—Yes.

Have you any complaints to make about them ?--No. Of course, they have to be looked after to see that they do not sell liquor. They are not licensed to sell liquor.

By retail?-Yes.

Have complaints been made to you that they do sell liquor ?-The Police have found them selling liquor.

Yes.

You have to rely upon the Police to obtain that information regarding them ?-

Prosecutions take place occasionally.

Have they to find the same guarantee as to character and so on ?-No, there is no formal guarantee.

To whom do you report as to the character of the licence-to the Colonial Secretary? -Yes.

Mr. MCCALLUM.-Are the eating houses licensed ?-Yes. They must have a licence as eating houses.

They must be licensed before they open ?-Yes.

The CHAIRMAN.-Are they not allowed to retail liquor at all on the premises ?-No.

Not unless they have a licence ?—Not unless they have a licence.

( 6 )

I see the section runs :-"No person, unless licensed to retail intoxicating "liquors or Chinese spirits under this Ordinance, shall keep an eating house, coffee house, refreshment bar or saloon, restaurant, or other place where meals or refresh- "ments are supplied to persons not resident on the premises, without a licence from "the Colonial Secretary."--Of course, they can have an adjunct licence if they want to retail liquor.

The question of the sale and importation and so on of liquors having come up, have you any remarks that you wish to make on the subject ?~Well, as far as experience has shown this liquor that is sold here, when submitted to analysis, does not appear to contain deleterious substances. Such has been the result of the analyses that have been made, and the question is to find out whether it does possess these extremely intoxicat- ing qualities or not. I am inclined to think that the extreme intoxication is due to the extreme cheapness of the liquor.

To the quantity rather than to the quality ?--Yes. It appears to me that the best way to reduce the intoxication would be to increase the price of the liquor by putting a duty on liquor imported into the Colony.

Have you ever considered whether it would be advisable to put public-houses under the control of the Government ?-They are under control.

I mean to be run by the Government?-No.

The Government or Municipal Council ?—No.

Have you ever considered it ?-No.

Do you consider it would be advantageous or not to do so? Can you imagine that it would be advantageous, or do you think that it is out of the question?—I do not see that you would gain anything by it.

The gain would be that the Government would supply the liquors to be con- sumed and would have their own nominees in charge of the houses, and the profits would go not to the benefit of individuals but to the Government.-Well, of course, that would be the Gothenburg system.

Have you ever considered whether that would work in this place?—I have not con- sidered it in reference to this place.

And you are of opinion on the face of it that it might work well?-I would not care to express an opinion off hand.

Have you any other remarks that

you

would like to make on the subject generally? For instance, there is no way that you can suggest for preventing these people from becoming drunk on the premises. They are always found drunk in the street and they are not prosecuted for being drunk on the premises, and presumably that is because there is no satisfactory way of controlling it.-I do not think there is a great deal of drunkenness here.

You frequently see sailors carried off from Pedder's wharf?---Not unless there is a Russian ship in the harbour.

They must get drink in these places ?--Yes.

It is against the law to have liquor supplied to them when drunk on the premises. "No person shall be allowed to become drunk on the premises." You cannot suggest any more effective control than there is now ?--No, I think the control is sufficient in that respect.

Dr. HARTIGAN-With regard to adulteration, the definition of which is "no liquor mixed or coloured &c."-you know the definition. What means are taken to ensure that the section of that Ordinance is carried out-as far as the Police are con-

.

:

:

(7)

cerned? There have been from time to time analyses made of the liquor sold in public- houses and the result has invariably been the same.

As far as you know no liquor has been found to be deleterious on analysis?--As far as my knowledge goes it has never been pronounced to contain deleterious substances.

Would it be possible for the liquors to be mixed in a public-house without the Police knowing it? I mean, in other words, do you consider that the supervision and control that the Police exercise over these houses are sufficient to prevent adulteration of this liquor suppose a man wants to do so?--I do not pretend to say for one moment that the supervision is complete. To increase the supervision is the only means I can suggest as far as police supervision is concerned.

I will put the question more direct. Under the present circunstances it is quite possible for this adulteration to occur? We have reason to believe that the liquors are mixed with a very inferior samshu. Do you think it is quite possible to occur?--Of course, it can occur. You can never prevent that. The only thing you can do is to devise means for catching the men at it.

That is the very thing I wanted. You consider that the present means are not suffi- cient to catch the men at it; in other words, the detective department is not suffi- ciently strong?—I do not say that. I say that the thing has never been systematized.

We

Therefore it can occur. With regard to this definition of adulterated liquor, there are the words, "any liquor which is not of the nature............of the liquor which it is labelled as being or purported to be." Well, we know that whiskey is sold and brandy is sold in this place and openly marked "made in Germany." You do not consider that would come under the Ordinauce? The label is there and "made in Germany." know that is not whiskey: we know that whiskey as whiskey comes from England or Ireland, America, and Canada. Those are the only places where whiskey as whiskey is known.--It is the stuff demanded by the purchaser, isn't it?"Of the quality demanded by the purchaser."

1

Yes, the quality demanded by the purchaser, or liquor which it is labelled as being. go in and ask for a glass of whiskey and I am served with whiskey out of a bottle.- If

you ask for Scotch whiskey and he gives you whiskey made in Germany, I should think that would come under the Ordinance. But if you ask for whiskey and you are served with whiskey made in Germany, I am not sure whether a prosecution would succeed. I do not see why they should not make whiskey in Germany.

I am asking the question. You say a constable is the man who sees to the proper conduct of these places. You mean the general management of the place ?—I said they were supervised in two ways-firstly, generally by the Police on duty; and secondly, specially by the detective staff.

How many samples would be seized in the year? Take since 1893- since you were in charge.--I told you at the outset that the provisions of Ordinance, 18 of 1896 have not been carried out systematically.

The constable on duty is the man who is responsible for the general conduct of the houses......... ?--I do not think that these houses are conducted in a disorderly manner. I think they compare very favourably with those in any city.

Why have there been so many complaints by the naval and military authorities?— The men go into barracks and are found drunk, but a great many of the drunks that take place in barracks do not take place in licensed premises. The men take the liquor

into the barracks.

That liquor is procured from licensed premises ?-From grocers or licensed premises. So that there is a good deal of the drunkenness, in your opinion, that comes from the grocers ?—I do not say in my opinion. I say that a great deal of the drunkenness

( 8 )

complained of by the military authorities does not take place in licensed premises, but that the liquor is taken into the barracks. The complaint of the military is that the men get so very drunk that the liquor must be very bad. They do not drink much of it, they say, and yet they get very drunk.

Yet, notwithstanding that, you say that in your opinion the liquor is not very bad judging from the analysis ?—I do not say so. I say only that so far as I am aware the analyses have not proved the presence of deleterious qualities. It may not be rotten drink, but raw spirit. It may be sound. New spirit is extremely intoxicating, I believe.

That is just what I wanted to get at. There were a great many complaints by

the "Rifles" here ?-Yes.

Colonel NORCOTT himself spoke to me about it.-I am given to understand the "Rifles " principally got drunk on samshu. I am told they drank a good deal of samshu.

And there is no control over the sale of samshu in Hongkong whatever?—Yes. A man must have a licence to sell Chinese spirits and he is not allowed to sell to a European either directly or indirectly.

He is not allowed to sell samshu to a European ?—No.

Mr. MCCALLUM-Is that provided for in the licence? In his licence.

Dr. HARTIGAN-How do you suppose these men were able to obtain it if these spirits licence people are not allowed to sell to a European? Do they sell to a middle man?

The Europeans would send a boy to buy a bottle for them.

So that although they are not allowed to sell to Europeans there is no control over them? There have been several prosecutions.

My boy can go and get it ?-Of course, the law can be evaded like any other law. The "Rifles" were here a year while that was going on ?-Prosecutions were going on during the year. There is a flaw in the Ordinance and most of the prosecutions failed. I think some of them came before you (The Chairman). The conditions of a Chinese spirit shop licence are not in the schedule of the Ordinance, and therefore you cannot get a conviction. That is being altered now.

You spoke just now about constantly analysing liquor. Do you think that would be sufficient control ?--Suppose you gave the police carte blanche and had a laboratory here? I am speaking from the police point of view, not scientifically.-From the police point of view the only mode I can suggest is systematic action under Ordinance, 18 of 1896. I do not know whether the present analyst and his staff have the time to do it. For that purpose you would require a good deal of time for the analyst. That is my view as a policeman.

Would it not be more easily controlled by preventing the sale, suppose we say it is inferior potato whiskey ?-How preventing the sale?

I am asking the question.-If it was possible absolutely to prevent the sale of bad liquor that would be much the best of all, but I do not see how you are to do it.

Get the liquor here in bulk and it would be better than getting it from the shop. -But cheap liquor would always find its way into shops.

But if it was analysed in bonded warehouses. It is much better to analyse it in bulk than one bottle from every case?-You might issue it to the houses sound, but you would still have to go on analysing.

Dr. HARTIGAN.-Even supposing the liquor was good it could be adulterated after- wards. I was merely wishing to bring out the fact for the moment that a large quantity of this liquor was being brought into the Colony.-I agree with you. I do not say so as Chief of the Police, because it is outside my province, but I consider there ought to be an excise here on liquor.

(9)

You said that a great deal of this so-called bad liquor was found on analysis not to be deleterious. You may know something about the sale of liquor in South Africa and West Africa. A great deal of agitation has been going on for years?—Yes.

It is supposed to be the same spirit-this German potato spirit ?—I have heard that the West African spirit was potato spirit.

There are a large number of authorities who pronounce it as being specially dele- terious, and in the face of that do you still think that the analysis alone is sufficient to go upon?

Mr. MCCALLUM.--From the retail shops or from the wholesale?

Dr. HARTIGAN.-From either. What I mean is that there is a great deal of evidence with regard to the trade in this class of whiskey.-I do not know enough about the subject. I know that in 1890 it was proposed here to place a legal limit of strength on retail liquor.

Was that favourably considered ?--That is to say that liquor retailed should not be above a certain degree of proof.

That, of course, would cover what you said about strong liquors ?--It seems to me odd that liquor should be sold so very strong, because it would pay any publicau to dilute it. If he had a bottle of very strong liquor it would pay him to make two bottles of it.

Mr. MCCALLUM.-I was going to ask you if there should be a minimum.-There is a minimum. If you dilute the liquor below a certain standard it is adulterated.

Dr. HARTIGAN.-I understand you to say that excessive drinking is due to the extreme cheapness of the liquor. You do not mean in the public-houses?—Yes.

But it is ten cents a glass in a public-house. That is not so very cheap. A soldier has not so many dollars in the world, you know.-Well, I have not been into the public-houses to buy liquor and I do not know what the price is, but I think there must be some cheaper stuff than that.

So far as the Police know, can we get any information on the subject about the price?--Yes. I imagined it was much cheaper than that because you can get a bottle of whiskey for twenty-five cents.

In the public-houses or in the grocers'; because you see what your detective got cost us $1?-As I said before, the publicans are not responsible for all the drunkenness that takes place. There is the grocer.

There were many complaints by the last Regiment?-There were complaints by the last Regiment of men bringing liquor into barracks.

Was that supposed to be samshu?—No, bottles of liquor. I was asked to put a stop to it, and I explained that there was nothing to prevent the shopmen from selling it.

Therefore, as far as your opinion goes, you think that what we should try to get at is the sale of samshu in regard to the checking of drunkenness ?-No, I do not say

that.

It would be inferred from what you said.--I say that the sale by grocers probably accounts for as much drunkenness as the sale by publicans.

Can a grocer sell samshu under his licence ?—No, he cannot sell Chinese spirits.

Unless he puts it in another bottle ?—He is not allowed to sell Chinese spirits.

( 10 )

The complaint of the last Regiment-the West liquor from these grocers' shops and got very drunk. have been samshu ?--I did not say it was samshu.

Yorks-was that the men got the Therefore the liquor ought not to

You said it was in the case of the "Rifles " ?--I said I had been told it was.

Well, would not that all point to the fact that the quality of the liquor was very bad ?—No, because they may have got it from a Chinese shop.

But I mean that the report of the officers was that it was bought from the grocers, and that as regards the Rifles the liquor was samshu. Colonel NORCOTT told me that.--- The last Regiment complained that the men were continually bringing bottles of liquor-whiskey they called it--into the barracks, and they asked me to put a stop to it. A man could go and buy a bottle of whiskey in a hundred places and in my opinion it was for the officers to prevent the men going into barracks with bottles in their pockets.

Do you think it would be a good thing to provide in the Ordinance that grocers should not sell single bottles?—I do not think it would. You cannot legislate for that sort of thing. It would be very hard if I sent out for a bottle of whiskey and could not get it.

With regard to guarantees for character signed for publicans' licences, do you think that any enquiry is made by people who sign these applications? I mean the different firms ?--I do not know. I think you get full information from the Police.

**** the Police reported nost unfavourably upon and yet we have three highly respectable people to give him a character. Taking that as a positive fact, together with the case of SCHWALM the other day, do you think the guarantees are genuine ?--The exceptions have not been many.

This man

****

And you think all these other people are of good character? Remember that you yourself brought up * * *.- How can you get people to be absolutely honest in giving characters ?—A servant leaves an employer and he is often known to be a bad servant and yet he gets a character.

Therefore a character is not of much value ?-The Justices do not go on these characters; they go on the Police reports.

I am afraid they go on the others.-I think, taking them on the whole, the guarantees are bonâ fide guarantees.

They guaranteed that man SCHWALM.-There have been exceptions, undoubtedly. With regard to the eating-houses-they have guarantees-do you mean that the Police make some enquiry as far as they can and simply report to the Colonial Secretary or to you?--With every licence issued there is a report.

But the Police do not get a guarantee from the householder; they go in and get what information they can ?-Yes.

Has it not been reported that they were issued for other purposes than was intended ?-Of course, it has. This is a class of houses that gives a good deal of trouble; prosecutions are fairly numerous.

In fact, they are not a respectable class of houses ?-Some of them are; others are not. They are not of a very high class.

You could suggest, I suppose, regulations that would bring them more into line and make a better class of them ?--I do not think so. You must live and let live. That class of house is quite as good as any in the slums of other cities. In every city you find these coffee houses. If you intend to level them up to such a high tone a man with $20 or $30 a month would not be able to get a meal.

4

:

i

:

4

:

:

+

( 11 )

Is it not possible that Chinese liquors are sold in these places ?—I say that if they do sell these liquors they are liable to a very heavy punishment and they will lose their licences. The risks are therefore considerable.

If a man gets a meal there are there no means of getting a bottle of beer?-No intoxicating liquor may be sold.

They cannot send out and drink it on the premises ?--Yes. They may do that.

Mr. MCCALLUM—A man is brought up drunk to the station; is he examined by a medical officer, or is he simply put into a cell?-He is put into a cell, but not medically examined.

Do you classify them as "drunks," or "drunk and incapable?"—" Drunk,” "drunk and disorderly," and "drunk and incapable."

And none of those cases are seen by a medical officer ?-Not unless a man appears to be ill.

Have the Police any reason to suppose that liquor is supplied in brothels-shebeen- ing, as it is called in Scotland? Is there an illicit sale of liquors in brothels ?—Yes, if I refer to a special class of house-

Have the Police any reason to suppose that is carried on ?--Well, I do not know about the Police. I myself have reason to suppose that it is to some extent.

But not to any great extent ?-No. I mean to say it is no more than in the way of entertainment. You would not call it beyond the entertainment of guests, I should

say.

What I am thinking of is this, that men from ships may come ashore and get into these houses, and really get drunk on the liquor they get in there ?-I do not know; I doubt that. I do not think that in the lower class of houses there is much supplying of liquor in brothels.

Either European or Chinese liquors ?—Yes. I should not think drinking is carried on to any very great extent in that way.

It is possible for a grocer to hold a licence to sell both European and Chinese liquors, I take it ?—No, Chinese liquor is excepted.

He gets a licence to sell European liquors and then he applies and gets a licence to sell Chinese liquors, and both may be sold on the premises?-But he cannot. A grocer's licence does not permit the sale of Chinese spirit, and a Chinese spirit licence does not permit the sale of European liquor.

It struck me just now that it might be so.

Rev. R. F. COBBOLD.-You can get what you want by comparing the names in these two lists.

Witness. He is asking me if it would be possible for a man to hold two licences for the same premises. I should object to it if there was such an application. I do not know of any instance.

instance. Is there any instance there?

Rev. R. F. COBBOLD.-It would take a long time to compare. There are 224 in one list and 282 in another.

Dr. HARTIGAN.-282 selling Chinese liquors ?

Rev. R. F. COBBOLD.-Yes.

( 12 )

Mr. MCCALLUM.-I fancy it is done in the compradores' shops. I am not absolutely certain, but I think so. As regards the eating-houses, suppose I go into an eating-house and order a meal, and I wish to have a glass of beer with my meal, would it be an infringement of the eating-house licence if I sent out and got the beer in ?--No.

Mr. MCCALLUM.--The object of the question, of course, is to see whether these eating-houses are able to send out for beer and also for Chinese liquors.

Mr. MCCALLUM.-There is a place in Queen's Road known as "Samshu Corner" even amongst Europeans, so far as the seafaring community are concerned.—I suppose they can get samshu easily enough by telling a Chinaman to get it, but the holder of a licence to sell it is not allowed to sell it directly or indirectly to an European.

The CHAIRMAN.-With regard to the number of public-houses, do you consider that the number is more than sufficient ?---No.

Would you impose any restrictions on the number ?—No, I would not.

You would leave it to be regulated by supply and demand?—Yes; there are very few.

Some of these very cheap liquors apparently come from Chinese compradores' shops? Yes.

Is it advisable to allow them to sell European liquors by retail?—I do not see why they should not. The liquors are no worse than those sold by German firms and no cheaper. I say "no worse," but I do not know anything of my own knowledge about the quality.

f

3

:

i

( 13 )

Meeting held at the Magistracy, Hongkong, at 4 p.m. on Saturday, April 30th, 1898.

Present:-Commander W. C. H. HASTINGS, R.N. (Chairman).

The Reverend R. F. COBBOLD, M.A.

Mr. J. J. FRANCIS, Q.C., and

Mr. F. BROWNE, (Secretary).

The Hon. F. H. MAY, C.M.G., Captain Superintendent of Police attended for the purpose of replying to certain interrogations.

you

Mr. FRANCIS. On what principle do the police under your command deal with cases of drunkenness ? Do take notice of all cases of drunkenness in the streets, or do the police interfere only when men are drunk and creating a disturbance ?--We interfere only when a man is drunk and disorderly, or drunk and incapable. If a man is in charge of his friends or able to take care of himself we do not interfere.

If a man is simply drunk, no matter how drunk, the police do not interfere ?—No ; if he is incapable and cannot get about by himself we interfere, but not otherwise.

Incapable or creating a disturbance ?—Yes.

That is, you do not treat simple drunkenness as an offence ?--No.

Do you consider from your experience of the Colony that there is much drunken- ness here ?-No; I think there is very little.

Is there any respect in which you as Captain Superintendent of Police would desire to see the existing laws with reference to any class of house where liquors are sold, amended or altered ?---No.

.

So far as your practical experience goes in connection with the police nothing has attracted your attention as needing alteration or amendment as regards the regulations of taverns and public-houses ?---No.

Have any cases come to your knowledge, or have you had reason to believe in. any case coming before the police, that the men were suffering from anything else but the quantity of liquor consumed ?-No.

Have you any complaint to make that the sale of liquors in brothels-especially European brothels--seriously interferes with the work of the police and the orderly management of the town ?-No.

Has it never suggested itself to you that there is necessity for making the law more stringent than it actually is with reference to the sale of liquors in such places ?— No; I have never had anything come under my notice to suggest that.

Assuming the sale of liquors to go on in these places, it has not resulted in any disorder that has been brought to your notice ?-No.

Mr. COBBOLD. You say there is very little drunkenness in the Colony, you mean

in comparison with the European population ?-Yes.

And then you say there is no need for any alteration or amendment of any existing laws?—Mr. FRANCIS did not put it as wide as that. He said with

He said with regard to the law dealing with the regulation of the houses.

Mr. FRANCIS.--I mean, of course, the laws dealing with the sale of liquors either

in licensed or unlicensed houses.

( 14 )

Mr. MAY.-Of course, the Ordinance, as no doubt Mr. FRANCIS has observed, in looking through it, is a very unsatisfactory one.

Mr. FRANCIS.-It is very badly worded.

Mr. MAY.--It is very badly worded. With regard to the sale of samshu to Europeans, it is obvious that an amendment should be made in the schedule of the Ordinance. One of the conditions on which a licence is granted is that samshu should not be sold to Europeans either directly or indirectly. Prosecutions for selling samshu to Europeans have failed because the conditions are not set out in the schedule of the Ordinance. Of course, that is a necessary alteration, but, except in minor details and in re-arranging the Ordinance, that is really the only important amendment I would suggest as far as the regulations for the sale of liquors are concerned.

Mr. COBBOLD.—And is the Sale of Food and Drugs Ordinance effective in its operation?

Mr. MAY.-It is in operation. The duty of applying it just now to licensed houses has been put into the hands of the Inspector of Weights and Measures. He has already sent some samples for analysis with the result I have already mentioned-that the Analyst could detect no deleterious matter in them.

The CHAIRMAN.--Thank you, Mr. MAY.

Mr. FRANK BROWNE, Acting Government Analyst, was then examined as follows:-

The CHAIRMAN.-What are the known injurious constituents besides alcohol in- (a) brandy, (b) whisky, (c) gin, (d) rum?

Mr. BROWNE. The injurious substances are supposed to be the higher alcohols usually represented by the term "fusel oil."

Do you mean by the term "higher alcohols" those that distil at a higher tempera- ture? The "higher alcohols" is a term used to denote alcohols which have a higher molecular weight than ordinary alcohol.

Can

you estimate these injurious constituents quantitatively ?—Yes.

Are there any others supposed to be injurious in which you can ascertain the presence of qualitatively but not quantitatively ?-No.

Do you know any

of the effects or symptoms supposed to be produced by imbibing spirits containing undue or excessive quantities of each or any of these injurious con- stituents?The higher alcohols when taken in excess cause giddiness, nausea, and other unpleasant symptoms.

What quantities of each or any of the injurious substances you have named are required to produce toxic effects ?-About three grains of amylic alcohol, which alcohol may be regarded as typical of these higher alcohols. That is, three grains taken by itself or dissolved in spirit.

What is the average percentage of each severally of the injurious substances you have named in (a) fairly matured good whiskey, brandy, gin, or rum; (b) recently distilled good whiskey, brandy, gin, or rum ?-About 1 per cent. is the amount of higher alcohols in fairly matured good whiskey. A little less than 1 per cent. is usually found in brandy and rum, and a mere trace only in gin.

I understood from you before, when we were discussing the matter, that age did effect new spirit. Do the higher alcohols decompose in any way, and are they thus removed ?—Raw spirit is matured by age in cask, but it is not due to the conversion of the higher alcohols into other products. They remain unaltered.

To what are the changes due?—Evidence points to the conversion of certain empyreumatic substances of the nature of aldehydes which are changed by age.

:

:

( 15 )

Mr. FRANCIS. Then there are substances you do not include among the higher alcohols ?--Yes.

The CHAIRMAN.-And these empyreumatic substances cease to operate when the spirit is old ?—They are present in newly-distilled pot-stili spirit, but they undergo an alteration with age.

Mr. COBBOLD.-Do you consider these substances are injurious ?—No.

Though the higher alcohols are?-A man may drink new whiskey in which there may be a certain amount of these empyreumatic substances, but it is only when you take an excessive quantity that head-ache and similar symptoms are produced.

Do you mean to say that the same quantity of matured would produce exactly the same effects ?-No, not the same effects.

Mr. FRANCIS.-Taken in moderation new or old spirits would produce no ill effects ?-No ill effects.

But it would take a smaller quantity of new spirits to produce a bad effect than of old ?—Yes.

The CHAIRMAN.-Have you analysed many specimens of the cheaper kinds of spirits sold in the Colony?—I have examined 31, which had been bought from places where it would be likely to obtain these cheap liquors.

If So, what percentage of these various injurious compounds do you find in the samples you have examined?—I found in them a mere trace of the higher alcohols and usually no trace of furfuraldehyde, a substance always present in pot-still whiskey, and invariably absent from patent-still whisky. In a sample of whiskey-gin I found ∙1398 per cent. of higher alcohols, all the other samples contained under ·1 per cent. calculated on the liquids of proof strength.

Mr. FRANCIS.-In fact, you found fewer traces of the higher alcohols in these cheap spirits than you find in good spirits?—Yes.

The CHAIRMAN.-If the percentage differs from that of ordinary more expensive spirits, can you explain why?--Because the cheap liquors may be made in two ways. Firstly, by means of a patent still; and secondly, by adding flavouring agents to plain spirit.

If cheap spirits are manufactured by adding together alcohol, water, and various flavouring substances, is the alcohol used for that purpose likely to be a more or less pure product, i.e., free from fusel oil, etc., or any injurious constituent?-The spirit is likely to be pure.

Have you analysed samshu or any other Chinese spirit? Yes.

If so, have you been able to discover that samshu or other Chinese spirit has been added to any spirits that you have examined?—No Chinese spirit has been added to the spirits I have examined, in my opinion.

Mr. FRANCIS.- Do you think you have the means of ascertaining the presence of samshu if it had been mixed?—Yes. Samshu has a particular odour, and I can detect it always in Chinese wines.

goes.

Mr. FRANCIS.-Is it only by its odour it can be detected?-As far as any experience

The CHAIRMAN.—Do you feel tolerably certain it can always be detected by its odour ?—Yes; I feel pretty certain it may be detected by its odour.

How is artificial whiskey prepared?—I have here the price list of a most respect- able firm, and I see that they sell whiskey essence at 22 shillings a pint. One pint of this essence (Scotch or Irish) added to 100 gallons of proof spirit, or spirit of the desired strength, forms whiskey of a superior quality.

|

( 16 )

Have you examined the China Sugar Refinery spirit?—Yes.

If so, what is your opinion of its quality?—I think its quality is good.

Do you think it advisable to set up standards for the amounts of impurities in whiskey?—No, such an attempt has been made in Switzerland, but their standards exclude some high class malt whiskies and admit all the patent-still whiskies.

Do you consider your method of testing sufficiently severe ?-Yes, I test each sample for amounts of alcohol, acid, solid matter, and higher alcohols, and apply qua- litative tests for the presence of poisonous metals, basic nitrogenous substances, and for any likely impurity.

Do you think that any impurities in these cheap spirits have escaped your notice? -No.

Do you consider there are any grounds for the suggestion that a good deal of bad liquor is sold in this Colony?--No. A number of people have mentioned to me that there is a lot of bad stuff sold, and I have asked them if they have tried it themselves, and they have replied, "We should not think of drinking the poison." I think it is a mere opinion. No facts have been brought under my notice to support such an opinion. Is there not a supposition that a good deal of fiery liquor is made on the Continent and sent abroad?-There is such a supposition.

Do you think that a good deal of fiery liquor is shipped to the West Coast of Africa?-No, some liquor sent there has been examined in recent years and it has been found to be of good quality.

Do you consider that selling Highland whiskey "made in Germany," when whiskey is asked for, is a breach of the Food and Drugs Ordinance, No. 18 of 1896?-No; be- cause the term "Highland" can be considered in various ways. It may mean a similar whiskey to that which is drunk in the Highlands. This cheap whiskey resembles chemically a good deal of the whiskey manufactured and drunk in the Highlands.

And the "made in Germany" will save the marks?—Yes. A man has no pro- prietary right to the term "Highland.”

Mr. FRANCIS. He is not infringing any proprietary right, that is perfectly true, but is he selling that which he has been asked for ?-I consider that the vendor sells to the man a whiskey which is identical as regards physical and chemical characteristics with much of the whiskey sold in the Highlands.

many

The CHAIRMAN.-I take it that the "made in Germany" shows the origin.

Mr. FRANCIS.—If it is called "Highland whiskey" and is labelled "made in Ger-

there is no deception.

The CHAIRMAN.-That is what I mean.

Mr. BROWNE.I would point out that the term "Highland" is probably used only to refer to a whiskey of a particular flavour, and if a man in Germany can make whiskey of that particular flavour I think it is whiskey of the Scotch type.

Mr. FRANCIS.--From what material was the original Scotch whiskey manufactured? -From malt or malt and grain.

From what grain?-From barley usually. Scotch whiskey, by which of course I refer to genuine Scotch whiskey of the old type, was made from malt, and distilled from a pot-still, but now frequently raw grain is used and the infusion is distilled from patent stills whereby the greater portion of the bye-products are removed.

No doubt, you would be inclined to say that the process of manufacture now is such that the term "Scotch whiskey" has ceased to have any special significance ?— Yes, it refers to whiskey of a certain flavour.

:

;

( 17 )

It is now understood to mean practically every whiskey ?-Yes, as long as the whiskies have flavours similar to Scotch Whiskey.

The CHAIRMAN.—What, in your opinion, is the best method of ensuring the sale of wholesome liquors?—I think Ordinance No. 18 of 1896 should be enforced by the

authorities.

How many samples should be yearly examined under the Food and Drugs Ordi- nance No. 18 of 1896, and how does the number examined in this Colony compare with the number examined in England and Wales ?-The number of samples of all kinds examined in England and Wales in 1892 was 32,447. This for every 250,000 inhabitants, which is about the population of Hongkong, is 279. The number of samples of all kinds examined in Hongkong in 1897 was 26. Of the total number of samples examined in England and Wales, a certain number-36 only-were wines, spirits, and beer. In Hongkong, of the 26 samples examined, 11 were wines, spirits, and beers.

Mr. FRANCIS. Then, in your opinion, the Ordinance of 1896 is not enforced as it ought to be ?-No.

The CHAIRMAN.-Can this number be now examined in the laboratory ?—No; that has always been the difficulty. I may state that certain arrangements are made with those who are responsible for sending in the samples. When we find a large number of samples coming from the Sanitary Board, the Government Analyst would write and say, "I have a lot of work on hand, it is no use sending any more." The Government Analyst has other work besides analytical work to do.

Mr. FRANCIS.-What is the number of public analysts in England and Wales for this 29 millions of population ?-I cannot give you that information.

The CHAIRMAN.-What additional aid would be required in the Government laboratory in order that a proper number of samples may be examined ?--Hongkong is a place where a very large amount of toxicological work is required, which, of course, is of great importance and requires a great deal of time, and I consider that the Govern- ment Analyst should be entirely free from work which is extraneous to analytical work, and that an assistant should be appointed to undertake the supervision at present undertaken by the Government Analyst, which is required at the Government Civil Hospital. That, of course, would require some additional help at the Government Civil Hospital, but it would really be only a small addition not costing at the utmost more than $3,000 per annum.

Mr. FRANCIS.-Would it not be better for the Sanitary Board to have an analyst of their own to do their work and nothing else? The Sanitary Board is responsible for the enforcement of this Ordinance. The Government Analyst could then be left to attend to the Hospital and the toxicological work?--That would mean two laboratories, and I do not think the Government would agree to go to that expense.

Mr. COBBOLD. It would be a greater expense than appointing another assistant to the Analyst ?—Yes; I do not think the system would work of having an analyst for the Sanitary Board and an analyst to do toxicological work,

Mr. FRANCIS.-Why not?-Because there may be a large amount of toxicological work to do, the same as during the past three months. Then two months may come when there may be scarcely any toxicological work to do, and the examination of food and drugs would all go on during the latter period.

You mean it might leave the Government Analyst without any work at all during certain periods?-Yes. For a laboratory to work properly you want to have a certain amount of work continually coming in but not too much.

Mr. FRANCIS. Then you think the whole of the Sanitary Board's work as well as the ordinary Government work could be effectively done by the existing establishment

+

4

( 18 )

with another assistant ?-Yes. I would particularly draw attention to the fact that the Government Analyst proper should not have his time taken up with supervision at the Government Civil Hospital.

That is a question as to the division of the work, but however you divide the work could the whole of the work at the Hospital be effectively carried out if there were another assistant ?—Yes.

Would that enable the whole work to be as effectively done, as far as the Sanitary Board's work is concerned, as in England?-Yes, provided that the Government Analyst has no other work but analytical work to do. I must draw attention to that point, because it is really of great importance.

That means the complete separation of what I may call the apothecary's work from the analyst's work ?—Yes.

Mr. COBBOLD.-How many analysts are there now in the service of the Government of Hongkong ?-Two.

And how many more are required to carry out the Food and Drugs Ordinance effectively?--One.

The CHAIRMAN.--Can you suggest any useful practical result likely to be obtained by proceeding further with the present enquiry?-I have to prepare a report on samshu, and I think it would be as well that the Commission should have that report before finishing their labours.

Mr. COBBOLD.--I understood you have practically tested some of the cheap liquors by consuming them yourself?--Yes.

In how many cases ?--I have examined several.

I do not mean how many have you examined, but how many have you subjected to this practical test ?-About nine or ten out of thirty-one.

Have you analysed the beer ?--Yes; the beer is very good in the Colony.

Have you taken sufficient liquor to produce toxic effects ?-No. I would draw attention to the fact that some spirits were sent to me and it was asserted that one glass would cause a man to become insensible. After having chemically examined them I considered such an effect to be impossible, but as I wanted to make positively certain whether such injurious liquor existed in the Colony I drank in some cases two ounces and I found them, if anything, weaker than ordinary good whiskey.

Have you examined the cheapest spirits so far as you know ?--Yes, that sold at 20 cents or 35 cents a bottle.

I thought you said it was sold at 20 cents ?--I forget how much, but it is sold at various prices. I would say as regards all these cheap liquors that they lack flavour and body, but otherwise there is nothing else the matter with them.

From what is samshu distilled ?--From rice.

And have you visited and inspected the distilleries here ?--One only.

Are there many ?-There are a number of them, but I am reporting on samshu for the use of the Commission later.

Mr. BROWNE.-Here I have eight samples of these cheap whiskies, here also a sample of spirit containing 1 per cent. of amylic alcohol. You will see that the cheap liquors have but little odour and that if tested roughly for fusel oil by rubbing on the hand the cheap whiskies leave no odour whatever.

The Commission then adjourned.

<

.

<

|

:

!

( 19 )

(Mecting held at the Magistracy, Hongkong, at 5 p.m., on Friday, August 12th, 1898).

Present:-Commander W. C. H. HASTINGS, R.N., Chairman.

Rev. R. F. COBBOLD, M.A.

Dr. F. O. STEDMAN.

Mr. F. BROWNE, (Secretary).

Mr. FRANK BROWNE, Acting Government Analyst, was further examined as follows:-- The CHAIRMAN.—Have you any remarks to make on the analysis of samshu?

Mr. BROWNE.-I shall be glad to make clear anything in my report on which further information may appear desirable. I may say that I have made very complete enquiries as to the sale of samshu to Europeans by Chinese retailers.

Have you inspected the samshu distilleries ?—Yes.

Did you see any decayed or inferior materials ?-Nọ.

Have you made enquiries as to whether samshu is drunk by Europeans-soldiers and sailors, and others?-Yes, I found that a few years ago it was customary for beach- combers to frequent a place at the corner of Upper Lascar Row known as "Samshu Corner" and there to drink samshu, but no drinking in recent years has been noticed. There have also been a few cases in which samshu has been taken into barracks for the. use of soldiers.

Dr. STEDMAN.-Is there any clause in the Ordinance to prevent samshu being sold to Europeans?

The CHAIRMAN.-It is forbidden in Schedule N of the proposed new Licensing Bill. Dr. STEDMAN.-Then under the present Ordinance can any European get samshu ? The CHAIRMAN.-There is a flaw in the Ordinance.

.

Dr. STEDMAN. But what is the advantage of forbidding the sale of samshu to Europeans? Is it because samshu is so cheap? I believe samshu is not a deleterious liquor.

Mr. BROWNE.-I presume it is because samshu is so cheap that its sale to Europeans has been prohibited.

Rev. R. F. COBBOLD.-Is it cheaper than some of the cheap Hamburg liquors ?- Yes.

The CHAIRMAN.-Twelve years ago there was not such cheap European liquor ?— No.

And samshu always was cheap ?--The price of samshu has varied but little. If anything, it is dearer now in consequence of the rise in the cost of rice.

Do you know a brand of whiskey known as "

a bottle). It is labelled “

"?—Yes. (producing Pure Scotch Whiskey, guaranteed distilled in Scotland." This was sent to me for examination. I heard from a clerical friend that this whiskey made soldiers and sailors very drunk; that one glass only of it was sufficient to make them drunk. Its composition is as follows:-

In 100 fluid parts of proof strength.

Strength.

Total solids dried at 100° C. in 100

fluid parts.

Free acid as acetic.

Compound ethers as acetic ether.

Higher Alcohols.

33 u.p.

.048

.005

.080

.015

( 20 )

Dr. STEDMAN. It is under the legal limit of strength ?—Yes, most of the cheap whiskies are.

The CHAIRMAN. Is this whiskey very intoxicating ?-No; there are less impuri- ties here than in genuine whiskey. Perhaps you would like to smell or taste this whiskey [handing round the bottle]. I have tasted the whiskey myself, and it lacks. flavour, body, and aroma.

Dr. STEDMAN.-It smells like spirit and water.

Mr. BROWNE.—It is practically only spirit and water. The CHAIRMAN.-There is no trace of aldehydes ?—No. Rev. R. F. COBBOLD.-You say it is watered ?—Yes.

Do you think it is watered here or before it is sent here ?-Here, I think. Whiskey is usually sent out from England a few degrees over proof.

Dr. STEDMAN.-Would it be sent out in barrels ?-Yes, usually, and water to break it down should be added at a certain temperature; but here I understand some merchants pay very little attention to temperature, consequently much whiskey is below strength.

The CHAIRMAN.-What is your opinion as to the results ?-That this whiskey is not deleterious.

What does it cost? This bottle was 60 cents.

Is it Scotch ?--Yes.

Rev. R. F. COBBOLD.-If any whiskey here is adulterated is it done in the process of bottling ?-It is probable that a large quantity of whiskey would be broken

down and then bottled.

The bottling is done here, is it ?—I think so.

Is there any adulteration of the liquor which is sent out from England in bottles?— I do not think they would send it out adulterated from England.

Is there any means of adulterating it here after it has been sent out in bottles?— No.

Have you heard of any process of boring a hole in a bottle, extracting some of the liquor and adding water, and filling the hole up again with wax ?--I have never heard of that being done.

It would be possible, would it not?—I do not think it would be possible for such a practice to escape detection.

The CHAIRMAN. Do you think liquor is mixed with inferior samshu ?--No, because from my investigations concerning samshu I find there is no inferior samsbu.

Have you enquired whether samshu is drunk in brothels ?—Yes; I sent a China- man and also a European to make enquiries, and I found that samshu was not drunk in brothels at all-not in European brothels-that is, Chinese brothels for Europeans.

Dr. STEDMAN.-Is there anything so very distinctive about samshu which would enable you to state for certain that it had not been added to any other spirit ?—I could detect the substitution of samshu from the smell of samshu, and I could verify my suspicions by analysis, the compound ethers are very high in samshu-much higher than in whiskey-and if I found them high in a whiskey in which the odour of samshu was present I should feel disposed to conclude that samshu was present.

Then there is no specific body in samshu by which you can identify it; it is only that it contains a higher percentage of compound ethers than European spirits ?—Yes.

So that it is a matter of quantity only ?—Yes.

4

.

ז

( 21 )

And if there was only a little samshu added the quantity might not be sufficiently high for you to be certain of your conclusions, although you might suspect it ?—That is quite true.

The CHAIRMAN.-Do you think any improvement can be made in the quality of samshu ? —No; I examined the distillers and they said they were satisfied with the present composition of samshu.

Is it desirable to fix a standard for the strength of samshu ?—No; I do not think The Chinese do not want it. Although variable, it does not make much difference whether it is a little stronger or weaker as far as the Chinese are concerned.

SO.

Is the percentage of compound ethers in samshu greater than that found in an average specimen of whiskey or brandy ?—Yes.

Is the percentage of higher alcohols found in samshu greater than that found in an average specimen of whiskey or brandy ?-No, it is less.

Are any injurious effects, such as violent intoxication or delirium, known to be pro- duced by these compound ethers and higher alcohols ?—No, it is a common thing for some Chinese to drink pretty nearly a bottle of samshu without getting intoxicated. The compound ethers are composed principally of acetic ether, of which a fair quantity may be drunk without danger.

Dr. STEDMAN. And the total percentage of these ethers is ?-About one-third of one per cent.

The CHAIRMAN. Is the percentage of compound ethers in samshu sufficient to produce any of those injurious effects supposing the quantity of samshu drunk at one time to be not greater than the quantity of whisky or brandy of the same strength which would under ordinary circumstances make a man intoxicated ?--No; in my opinion the alcohol would produce more harmful results than the ethers.

THE CHAIRMAN.--I presume that the presence of an excessive quantity of higher ethers in spirits would increase their toxic effects, would it not?

Mr. BROWNE.-Well, within certain limits only. In the case of samshu of 50 degrees under proof strength you have about 17 grains of compound ethers in a bottle. If a man were to drink one bottle full of samshu containing 17 grains of compound ethers I think the effect of the ethers would be entirely nullified on account of the effect produced by the alcohol.

Dr. STEDMAN.--What is the strength of the samshu of which you say a man could drink one bottle?--About 58.7 degrees under proof.

And ordinary whiskey is ?-About 25 degrees under proof.

Then proof spirit contains about 50 per cent. of alcohol ?—Yes; you may say about half of alcohol and half of water by weight.

And what is samshu of 58.7 degrees under proof?-Every 100 fluid parts contain 41.3 parts of proof spirit and 58.7 parts of water.

And in an ordinary whiskey which is about 25 degrees under proof there are 75 parts of proof spirit ?-That is so.

Rev. R. F. COBBOLD.-Does it follow the toxic effects would be in proportion to the amount of alcohol present ?-Yes, in my opinion.

Dr. STEDMAN.-There is one other question I would like to put to Mr. BROWNE, and that is whether he knows of any spirits containing so-called fiery ingredients such as is said to be in the spirits sold to the natives of West Africa, and does he know what those ingredients are ?-This so-called "fiery spirit" sent to West Africa has been found on analysis to be very good spirit.

( 22 )

Then you know of no spirits sold which contain any injurious bodies besides ethers and higher alcohols ?-No; I know of no injurious bodies present in spirits, except alcohol to which the intoxication can be attributed.

You know of no reported analysis where deleterious bodies which would produce violent intoxication have been found ?-No; many times I have seen the assertion that such bodies exist in cheap whiskies, but I have seen no analysis which has discovered any substance which has produced madness or the appearance of having been drugged in the consumer of cheap whiskies.

Supposing you take a bottle of whiskey and add a couple of ounces of sulphuric ether, would that make a man intoxicated quicker than if the ether had not been added? -Yes.

Is anything of the sort ever added?--No. I doubt very much whether a man would drink whiskey containing two ounces of ether; he would at once detect there was something wrong with it.

Dr. STEDMAN.I have known men to drink methylated spirits for the sake of the spirit, and they would not be deterred from drinking whiskey because there was a cer- tain amount of ether in it.

Mr. BROWNE.-If a man were drinking whiskey containing two ounces of ether he would at once detect it.

Dr. STEDMAN. There is one other question with regard to samshu, and that is whether during the time you have inspected these distilleries you have always found the rice of good quality ?-The probability is that decayed rice would so affect the samshu that there would be no sale for it. I found that the sainshu distillers were particularly careful as regards the quality of the ric: they used and also of the cleanli- ness of their utensils. I think it would be strange if they used decomposed rice for

samshu-making.

Dr. STEDMAN-It does not sound likely, of course.

The CHAIRMAN.-It would affect the business.

Mr. BROWNE.-Yes.

The CHAIRMAN.-I remember the sinking of a junk laden with rice, and the rice was got out of it as the vessel lay under water. I was told it was wanted for samshn. That was the general idea.

Dr. STEDMAN.-The smell was so bad from the rice that one of the men engaged in getting it up became unconscious.

Mr. BROWNE.-I consider that, were such rice used for samsiu, a very inferior spirit would result, and further I doubt if there would be a sale for the product.

Rev. R. F. COBBOLD.-You said in the early part of your evidence that one of your informants had said that samshu had been carried into barracks ?—Yes.

Is that done to any extent ?-A case happened a few weeks ago and the offenders were punished and steps taken so that such a thing should not occur again.

The Commission then adjourned.

i

.

:

=

APPENDIX.

E

THE INSANITARY PROPERTIES COMMISSION.

Appendix No. 1.

COMMISSION BY HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR.

[L.S.] WILLIAM ROBINSON,

Governor,

Whereas it is expedient that a Commission be appointed to inquire into the existence of insanitary properties in the Colony and the means to be adopted to improve such properties and to abate overcrowding, with special reference to the following details, viz.:-

1. Whether it is desirable to resume insanitary properties, improve them and

then re-sell them.

3

2. The means by which such properties are to be resumed and the compensa-

tion to be paid for same assessed.

3. How the said properties should be improved and by whom such improve-

ment should be carried out.

4. The means to be adopted for housing the occupants of any dwellings pend-

ing improvement.

5. The amount of capital required for resumption and improvements, how it is to be raised and how far it will be met by a re-sale, with any sug- gestions or recommendations the Commission may make on the subject.

Now therefore, I, Sir WILLIAM ROBINSON, Knight Commander of the Most Distinguished Order of Saint Michael and Saint George, Governor and Commander-in- Chief of the Colony of Hongkong and its Dependencies and Vice-Admiral of the same, in Executive Council assembled, do hereby under the powers vested in me by Ordinance 27 of 1886, entitled The Commissumers Powers Ordinance, 1886, appoint you—

1 The Honourable JAMES HALDANE STEWART LOCKHART, Colonial Secretary

and a Member of the Executive and Legislative Councils,

2. The Honourable CATCHICK PAUL CHATER, a Member of the Legislative

Council,

3. The Honourable THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD, a Member of the

Legislative Council,

4. NATHANIEL JOSEPH EDE, Esquire,

5. THOMAS JACKSON, Esquire,

to be a Commission for the purpose of instituting, making and conducting such inquiry ; And I do hereby appoint you the said JAMES HALDANE STEWART LOCKHART to be the Chairman of such Commission; And I do hereby appoint ARATIOON SETH, Esquire, to be the Secretary to such Commission; And I do hereby order and direct that for all or any of the purposes of this Commission three Members thereof inclusive of the Chairman shall be and constitute a quorum. And I do further hereby order and direct that the

1

[iv]

said Commission shall, for the purpose of making the said inquiry, have all such powers as are vested in the Supreme Court of this Colony or in any Judge thereof on the occa- sion of any suit or action in respect of the following inatters, viz.:--

The enforcing the attendance of witnesses and examining them on oath,

affirmation or otherwise;

The compelling the production of documents;

The punishing persons guilty of contempt;

The ordering the inspection of any property; with power also, for the pur-

pose of this Commission, to enter and view any premises.

And I do hereby further direct that every examination of witnesses shall be held in private; And I do further require you to report to me the evidence and your opinion thereon; And I hereby charge all persons in the Public Service to assist you herein.

Given under my hand and the Public Seal of the Colony in Executive Council, this Twenty-ninth day of July, One thousand Eight hundred and Ninety-six.

To

By Command,

F. J. BADELEY,

Acting Clerk of Councils.

Appendix No. 2.

THE INSANITARY PROPERTIES COMMISSION.

(SUMMONS FOR ATTENDANCE OF WITNESS FOR EXAMINATION )

In the matter of "The Commissioners Powers Ordinance, 1886"

and

In the matter of the Commission appointed by His Excellency the Governor dated the 29th day of July, 1896, to inquire into the existence of insanitary pro- perties in the Colony and the means to be adopted to improve such properties and to abate overcrowding.

You are hereby summoned to attend before the Commissioners appointed by His Excellency the Governor to form the above Commission at

the

on the

day of

at

o'clock in noon of the same day, to give evidence concerning the matters to be inquired into by the said Commission. And take notice that should you fail to attend you may be fined One hundred dollars or be imprisoned for two months.

Witness my hand this

Secretary.

day of

1896.

Chairman of the Commission.

?

.

.

!

:

Public Works Department.

No. 369.

[v]

Appendix No. 3.

SIR,

PUBLIC WORKS OFFICE, HONGKONG, 29th August, 1895.

I have the honour to report as follows on the question of Public Latrines.

2. The present latrine accommodation within the City of Victoria, as shewn by Mr. RAM's report, is quite inadequate to meet the requirements of the population, when it is considered that the majority of Chinese houses have no accommodation of this nature within their curtilage.

3. The Chinese population of the several health districts may be taken at approximately,-

District No. 1,

6,000

2,

>>

14,000

3.

"3

"}

1,000

4,

"}

30,000

>>

5,

33

40,000

6,

11

"1

35,000

7.

>"

29

25,000

>>

"

8,

9,000

160,000 .

Total,........

4. There exist at present in the City 12 Government latrines which have a total number of 167 seats and 19 public latrines, privately owned, having a total number of 579 seats, making in all 31 latrines and a total of 746 seats, or at the rate of 215 persons

to 1 seat.

5. It cannot be expected that the whole of the Chinese population, including women and children, would make use of public latrines, but, supposing the number of persons be reduced to one half, we have upwards of 100 persons to each scat,

Under ordinary circumstances, where the pail systein is adopted, one seat for every 30 persons is considered a reasonable allowance, we, therefore, find that to provide adequate provision in this respect 2,700 seats are at least required.

6. These should be distributed according to the population in the several districts, and so placed as to render them easy of access; conditions by no means easily acquired in a densely populated city like Victoria and situated on a steep hillside.

7. In Districts 1, 2, 5 and 8, suitable sites on Crown Land can be obtained for the erection of latrines containing in all 554 seats which, added to the present number in Government latrines, make a total of 721.

8. For providing the remaining number required, say 2,000, it will be necessary to resume private property.

9. I estimate the cost of erecting new latrines on Government land and improving the existing ones at $50,000, and the cost of resuming the necessary land and erecting latrines containing 2,000 seats at $400,000 making a total of $450,000.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

The Honourable

THE COLONIAL SECRETARY,

JC.,

&c.,

&c.

FRANCIS A. COOPER,

Director of Public Works.

[VI]

SIR,

Appendix No. 4.

THE INSANITARY PROPERTIES COMMISSION,

HONGKONG, 7th August, 1896.

I am directed to request you to be good enough to furnish me at your early con- venience, for the use of the Commission, with a complete list with plans attached shewing the insanitary properties in the Colony divided into three separate and distinct classes such as bad, worse, worst.

I have the honour to be,

The Honourable

F. A. COOPER,

Director of Public Works,

&'c.,

&c.

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

A. SETH,

Secretary.

Appendix No. 5.

Public Works Department.

No. 417.

SIR,

PUBLIC WORKS OFFICE, HONGKONG, 8th August, 1896.

In reply to your letter of the 7th instant requesting me to furnish you with a complete list with plans shewing the insanitary properties in the Colony divided into three separate and distinct classes such as bad, worse, worst, I have the honour to inform you that I have not the necessary information for the preparation of the plans and lists required.

2. I have further to point out that the proposed classification appears to be so vague as to render it impossible for me to compile the lists required without further information as to what the terms bad, worse and worst are intended by the Committee to imply.

3. I can hardly think that the Committee have any idea of the enormous amount of work entailed in complying with their request, and would submit for their favourable consideration that, in the first instance, the Medical Officer of Health and myself should prepare for their information a general report accompanied by plans on the conditions of the buildings from a sanitary point of view dealing with such matters as appear to us to bear on the subject referred to the Commission.

4. I may, however, add that owing to the comprehensive nature of the enquiry it will probably be found advisable in such a report to deal with certain portions of the Colony and certain classes of defects first.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your obedient Servant,

A. SETH, ESQ.,

Secretary,

Insanitary Properties Commission.

FRANCIS A. COOPER,

Lirector of Public Works.

!

Hon. D. P. W.

[VII]

Appendix No. 6.

Will you kindly note that the members of the Commission will be glad to receive the report which you have suggested should be drawn up by you and the Medical Officer of Health and pass this paper to the latter officer for his information?

THE SEC. I. P. C.,

Noted and passed to the M. O. H.

Noted.

F. W. C.

13. 8. 96.

Passed to Sec., I. P. C.

F. W. C.

14. 8. 96.

J. H. S. L.

13. 8. 96.

F. A. C.

13. 8. 96.

Appendix No. 7.

HONGKONG, 9th September, 1896.

SIR,

In reply to the President's minute dated the 13th August, 1896, requesting us to furnish a general report as to the sanitary condition of buildings in the Colony dealing with such matters as appear to us to bear on the subject referred to the Commission, we have the honour to report as follows:--

2. Tenure of Land.-The whole of the buildings within the City of Victoria and principal villages throughout the Colony are erected on land held under lease from the Crown, term of lease varies, being 999 years, 75 years, 21 years, and 1 year.

In the more scattered districts of Hongkong and Kowloon the houses are in the majority of cases erected on land held under the form of tenure known as a squatter's licence; these licences are issued annually but their number is rapidly decreasing owing to the issue of leases as advised by the Squatter's Board established under Ordinance No. 27 of 1890.

3. Conditions of Leases, Ordinances and Regulations.-The usual form of Crown leases contains the following provisions:-

CC

"Executors, Administrators and Assigns shall and will, from time to "time, and at all times hereafter, when, where, and as often as need or occasion "shall be and require, at his and their own proper costs and charges, well and "sufficiently, Repair, Uphold, Support, Maintain, Pave, Purge, Scour, Cleanse, Empty, Amend and keep the messuage or tenement, messuages or tenements, "and all other erections and buildings, now or at any time hereafter standing upon the said piece or parcel of ground hereby expressed to be demised, and "all the Walls, Rails, Lights, Pavements, Privies, Sinks, Drains and Water- "courses thereunto belonging, and which shall in any-wise belong or appertain "unto the same, in, by and with all and all manner of needful and necessary "reparations, cleansings and amendments whatsoever, the whole to be done to "the satisfaction of the Surveyor of Her said Majesty, Her Heirs, Successors, or "Assigns; And the said messuage or tenement, messuages or tenements, "erections, buildings and premises, so being well and sufficiently repaired, "sustained and amended, at the end, or sooner determination of the said term

LC

[ VIII]

"hereby granted, shall and will peaceably and quietly deliver up to Her said Majesty, Her Heirs, Successors, or Assigns; And also that the said Executors, Administrators and Assigns "shall and will during the term hereby granted, as often as need shall require, "bear, pay and allow a reasonable share and proportion for and towards the costs "and charges of making, building, repairing, and amending, all or any roads, pavements, channels, fences and party-walls, draughts, private or public "sewers and drains, requisite for, or in, or belonging to the said premises, hereby expressed to be demised or any part thereof, in common with other "premises near or adjoining thereto, and that such proportion shall be fixed " and ascertained by the Surveyor of Her said Majesty, Her Heirs, Successors, "or Assigns, and shall be recoverable in the nature of rent in arrear; And "further that it shall and may be lawful to and for Her said Majesty, Her Heirs, Successors, or Assigns, by Her or their Surveyor, or other persons. deputed to act for Her or them, twice or oftener in every year during the "said term, at all reasonable times in the day, to enter and come into and upon the said premises hereby expressed to be demised, to view, search and "see the condition of the same, and of all decays, defects and wants of repara- "tion and amendment, which upon every such view or views shall be found, "to give or leave notice or warning in writing, at or upon the said premises, "or some part thereof, unto or for the said..

66

26

"Executors, Administrators, or Assigns, to repair and amend the same within "Three Calendar Months then next following, within which said time or space "of Three Calendar Months, after every such notice or warning shall be so "given, or left as aforesaid, the said........

.......Executors,

"Administrators or Assigns will repair and amend the same accordingly."

4. The first Building Ordinance contained in the statute book of the Colony is No. 8 of 1856. Section 8 of this Ordinance runs as follows:-

66

It shall not be lawful to construct, reconstruct or (if now in the course "of construction or reconstruction) to complete any house without a sufficient and safe place for lighting of fires and cooking of food; and also a sufficient "water-closet or privy and a sufficient ashpit furnished with proper doors "and coverings; all which shall be provided to the satisfaction of the

·Surveyor General, and from time to time emptied and cleansed, at such "periods as the Surveyor General may direct; and every person offending against any of the enactments in this section contained shall for every such "offence forfeit and pay to the Crown a penalty not exceeding fifty dollars "nor less than ten dollars."

<.

The above Ordinance was repealed in 1889 and Ordinance 15 of 1889 substituted for it; this Ordinance, as amended by Ordinances 25 of 1891, 15 of 1894, aud 7 of 1895, is still in force and contains provisions as to minimum height of floors, mezzanine floors, ventilation under floors, construction of privies, width of private streets, window area, and construction of damp course.

5. The Public Health Ordinances 24 of 1887 and 15 of 1894 contain many important provisions as to the prohibition and use of house unfit for human habitation, overcrowding, drainage, construction of areas, paving of floors and yard surfaces, erection of cubicles and mezzanine floors, construction of backyards in buildings erected on sites obtained from the Crown since the passing of Ordinance 24 of 1857, certificate necessary before occupation, height of buildings, and width of street.

6. Regulations have been made under section 13, Ordinance 24 of 1887, in respect of drainage, bake-houses, laundries, latrines, cominon lodging-houses, and under Ordinance 15 of 1894 respecting concreting, &c., of ground surfaces of buildings, areas, latrines, &c., ventilation, overcrowding, and sanitary maintenance of buildings. occupation of vaults and cellars.

24

..

.

3

[ IX ]

7. The Building Ordinance 8 of 1856 contained no provisions as to the construc- tion of open areas at the backs of houses, the width of streets, height of buildings, or area of windows. It was not until the passing of Ordinance 24 of 1887 that the con- struction of backyards could be insisted upon (and then only in the case of erecting houses on land purchased from the Crown after the passing of that Ordinance), or the width of private streets regulated by Ordinance 15 of 1889 or the provision of sufficient window space made compulsory.

"}

The result was that many houses of the "back to back type were erected unprovided with sufficient window area and fronting on narrow lanes quite inadequate to prevent excessive surface-crowding.

8. It has been urged that such buildings were erected with the approval of the Surveyor General, but there is not and never was any provision in the Building Ordi- nances requiring the Surveyor General's approval of the plans of proposed buildings, and indeed it was not until 1889 that the depositing of such plans was made compul- sory; his action was consequently limited to interference only in the event of the provisions of the Ordinances being contravened.

9. Structurally Insanitary Dwellings-Classification of.-Structurally insanitary dwellings in the Colony may be classified as follows:-

(a) Back to back houses.

(b) Houses fronting on narrow lanes.

(c) Houses with insufficient open spaces in their rear.

(d) Houses abutting against the hill-side.

10. Back to Back houses have been universally condemned as most insanitary. In such buildings it is impossible to secure sufficient ventilation and, generally speaking, sufficient light. Back to back houses without thorough ventilation and rooms facing narrow enclosed courts in which the atmosphere is always sunless and stagnant exercise an unfavourable influence on health and tend to produce an excessive mortality from phthisis, respiratory diseases, diarrhoea and zymotic diseases generally. This subject has been carefully investigated for the Local Government Board by Dr. BARRY and Mr. GORDON SMITH in a report upon back to back houses (1888) and by Dr. RANSOME, F. R. S., in various papers on the relationship between phthisis prevalence and over- crowding in Manchester and Salford.

The following table shews the influence of back to back houses upon the death rate and the zymotic death rate; it relates to the Greengate district of Salford which is inhabited by the poorer labouring class and is taken from Dr. BARRY and Mr. GORDON SMITH'S report above referred to. It is explained in the report that the average sur- roundings and class of population were practically the same in each district:-

Average Propor-

tion of

back to back houses.

Population.

All causes.

Death rates from

Phthisis.

Other Re-

spiratory

Diseases.

Diarrhoea.

Zymotic Death

Rate.

District I......

II......

23%

8,713

11,749

27.5

2.8

6.6

1.4

4.5

29.2

2.3

7.8

1.6

4.8

""

III......

56% 11,405 39.5

3.6

7.9

2.1

6.2

""

>

[x]

11. Houses fronting on narrow lanes.-Many cases exist in which private property has been laid out, the block of buildings being only separated by narrow lanes from 5 to 10 feet wide which afford the only means of access to such buildings from 30 to 50 feet in height. Such buildings must evidently, especially on the ground floor, be in- sufficiently lighted and inadequately ventilated. The laying out of property in this manner leads to surface-crowding and their insanitary condition is much aggravated by the tenants having the free use of the lanes in which they carry out their trades or use them for storage purposes.

12. Houses with insufficient air space in their rear.--Under this heading is included the larger portion of insanitary dwellings in the City of Victoria. The necessity of insisting on open spaces in the rear of houses has long been recognised in England, and we now find most of the Urban Authorities in England availing themselves of the power conferred upon them under section 157 of the Public Health Act of 1875 and insisting on ample open spaces beign provided in the rear of all new buildings.

13. The Local Government Model Bye-laws provide that in the rear of every new house there must be an open space exclusively belonging to the house 150 square feet in area extending along the entire width of the house, and in the statement attached to this report copied from Vol. XII., Sanitary Institute Proceedings, will be found the requirements in this respect in Brighton, Birmingham, Liverpool and Newcastle-upon- Tyne.

14. Houses abutting against the Hill-side.--Owing to the steepness of the ground in the City of Victoria, many building sites are formed by extensive examination, and the lower stories of the houses abut against the hill-side, though the upper stories above the ground may be adequately provided for in respect of light and ventilation.

15. It will be observed that the enforcement of the provisions of section 52 of Or- dinance 15 of 1889 respecting the erection of new buildings will eventually get rid of many of the houses included in class (b), but some further provision is necessary to compel owners of property to provide open spaces at the rear of all houses in order to improve the condition of houses included in classes (a), (c) and (4), and we urge upon the attention of the Commission the importance of the early introduction of legislation in this respect.

16. Having dealt with the most glaring sanitary defects in the design and erection of houses it is necessary to point out that many houses which could not originally be considered insanitary have been brought into that category by subsequent additions and misuse.

17. Obstructions of Yards.-It is evident that in many cases where originally open yards existed at the rear of houses these yards have been subsequently obstructed by being covered over and converted into stores. cook-houses and latrines. Indeel, such is the extent of surface-crowding within the City of Victoria that every available open space is encroached upon permanently or temporarily by the tenants of the houses in their immediate neighbourhood.

18. Mezzanine Floors, Cocklofts and Cubicles.-Though these structures have to some extent been regulated by Ordinance 15 of 1894, the sub-division of a room, say, 40 feet in depth with a frontage of 15 feet into a number of cubicles precludes the access of light and air to such an extent as to seriously affect the sanitary condition of such premises, and we would here call attention to the necessity of limiting the sub-division of any floor by the erection of partitions unless the cubicle so formed are adequately lighted and ventilated.

19. In the villages exist many houses to which the previous remarks apply, but the course adopted by the Government during recent years in laying out the villages of

}

[ XI ]

:

:

;

C

Yaumati and Hunghom appears to specially tend itself to the erection of sanitary dwel- lings.

In these villages many of the houses front on a public street and at the back abut on a public lane, over such streets and lanes the tenants have a right of way but are not permitted to obstruct them.

The lanes which should not be less than 15 feet in width form a convenient mode of access for the scavengers and afford facilities for drainage.

In some instances, however, the lanes are private property and have been more or less encroached upon.

20. In the less important villages the houses are mere hovels, many of the present occupants being the descendants of persons who settled here in the early days of the Colony. The houses are scattered about without regard to level or alignment and little improvement appears possible without dealing with the whole of a village at the same

time.

21. As regards the special points referred to the Committee, we would point out that it appears only necessary to resume insanitary properties in such cases as large areas are proposed to be dealt with is which several interests are concerned. We are, however, of opinion that in many cases no such resumption is from a sanitary point of view necessary, and would call attention to the various sanitary improvements that have been required by local authorities under the Public Health Act of 1875 without any resumption or compensation to the owners of such properties.

22. Resumptions of large insanitary areas bave been carried out in various cities and towns either by special local Acts, such as the Liverpool Acts, or under the pro- visions of the Housing of the Working Classes Act 1890, and under several Acts of Parliament which were repealed on the passing of this Act.

23. The means hitherto adopted in this Colony for resumption of property have been those contained in the Crown lease, private arrangement, and more recently the provision of the Taipingshan Resumption Ordinance, No. 8 of 1894.

24. The resumption of the Taipingshan area is, as far as we are aware, the only instance in this Colony in which property has been resumed solely on account of its insanitary condition.

The provisions of this Ordinance appear to be inuch more favourable to owners of insanitary properties than those contained in the Housing of the Working Classes Act, 1890, which it will be observed contains provisions for making certain deductions on account of buildings unfit for habitation or in an insanitary condition or where the rental is enhanced by reason of overcrowding or illegal use.

it

25. In all cases where property is not resumed, it appears desirable that the owners should effect the necessary alterations, but in the event of large areas being resumed, appears desirable that where possible the alignment and gradients of the streets should be improved, which work together with the laying out of new streets and lanes and preparation of building sites should be done by the Government.

26. All legislation in England, with the exception of the Liverpool Act of 1864, has rendered it compulsory for the part of the public authorities effecting the resump- tion of property for the purposes of improvement to provide accommodation for the persons disturbed. This provision has, however, been generally held to have practically prevented many desirable improvements being carried out.

In dealing with the City of Victoria it must be remembered that there is at present a large area in Taipingshan unoccupied, and the progress of reclamation will add a

[ XII]

further area to the city; and if the further resumption of insanitary properties is effected, by degrees, it seemed doubtful if any exceptional provision will be required for housing the persons disturbed.

In the case of the villages other sites might be allotted to the occupants of insanit- ary dwellings on which they can erect sanitary dwellings prior to being disturbed.

27. The capital required for the resumption and subsequent improvement of pro- perties must at the present time be more or less a subject of speculation. Before any definite estimate can be given, complete plans and other information must be prepared in connection with the areas proposed to be resumed and the method of resumption and valuation decided upon.

28. The experience gained in England in connection with the resumption of insanitary areas does not appear to favour the idea that such resumptions are likely to prove financially a success, but that as far as possible they should be avoided except in such cases as those in which a material public advantage can be gained.

29. During recent years various blocks of model dwellings have been erected by corporations and companies, but a reasonable return on the expenditure has only been effected by constructing large blocks of very lofty buildings and the result has not been satisfactory, leading to considerable surface-crowding.

In providing accommodation for the "working classes" we submit the following particulars as deserving of special attention:-

Healthiness of site.

Open surroundings and wide impervious areas.

Prevention of fire and facilities for escape.

No basement or cellars.

Lighting, ventilation and drainage.

Arrangement of kitchens, bathrooms and latrines.

We have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servants,

A. SETH, ESQ.,

Secretary,

Insanitary Properties Commission.

FRANCIS A. COOPER,

Director of Public Works.

FRANCIS W. CLARK,

Medical Officer of Health.

Appendix No. 7 (a).

BYE-LAWS FOR OPEN SPACES AROUND NEW DWELLING-HOUSES.

Open Space in Acts under which front, extending throughout whole

Bye-laws are

framed.

line of frontage,

to be at least

Open Space at Rear of Building, exclusively belon ging to it, and free from any erection above the level of the ground, except a W.C., E.C. or a privy and ashpit, extending

Aggregate

laterally throughout entire width of building.

Distance across or depth of open space everywhere to be according to height of building.

Date of Adoption.

Model Bye-laws of

Local Government

Board.

Manchester,

extent not less than

Public Health

21 ft.

150 sq. ft.

In any case

At least 10 ft.

Height 15 ft. Height 25 ft. At least 15 ft. At least 20 ft.

Height 35 ft. Height exceeding

35 ft.

At least 25 ft.

At least 25 ft.

Act, 1875, Section 157.

1890 | Local (Manches-

ter) Improve.

36 ft.

150 sq. ft.

10 ft.

15 ft.

20 ft.

25 ft.

25 ft.

(24 ft. if strect

ment Acts.

is less than

36 ft. wide).

Brighton,

1886

Public Health Act; Towns Improvement Clauses Act,

1847;

Brighton Improvement

Act, 1884.

12 ft. to centre of street, if street laid out before Local Government Acts;

15 ft. to centre, if street laid out before 1886

18 ft. to centre, if laid out after 1886.

200 sq. ft.

10 ft.

15 ft.

(300 sq. ft.

20 ft.

(400 sq. ft.).

25 ft.

(500 sq. ft.).

aggregate

extent).

25 ft.

(500 sq. ft.).

Birmingham,

1876*

18874

Public Health

150 sq. ft.*

10 ft.*

Act; Local

24 ft.†

(Birmingham)

2 storeys.

15 ft.*

3 storeys.

20 ft.*

Consolidation

More than

3 storeys.

25 ft.*

Act, 1883.

Liverpool,

1890

Public Health

Act.

Newcastle-upon-Tyre, | 1866

1870

Bye-laws,

1866;

1871

Newcastle

Improvement

Acts, 1870,

1871.

30 ft. (12 ft. 6 in. from centre of street, if street is less than 25 ft. wide, and was laid out before 1890).

One-fourth the area of ground belonging to build. ing may be at the side instead

of the rear,

applies to corner houses.

150 sq. ft.

5 ft. (Open Space must be equal in depth to the height of the back wall of the house, but this may include 9 ft. of the adjoining strect).

Height of wall between 20 and 30 ft.

10 ft.

Height of wall extending. 30 ft.

15 ft.

Limitations.

[

XIII

]

These regulations only apply to houses, the net rateable annual value of which will not exceed £20; and when thorough venti- lation of such open is secured, or when on the re-erection of buildings within the Borough; these dimensions cannot be ad- hered to without considerable sacrifice of property, they may be modified in special cases at the discretion of the Town Council.

The open space may be at the side of the house, and not in the rear, when the back of the house has a window in each storey, opening to a street not less than 9 ft. wide. Unless the open space at the rear is of an aggregate extent of 500 square feet, it must on three sides adjoin an open space of another dwelling. house, or adjoin a street.

These regulations do not apply to new dwelling-houses erected en a site previously occupied by a dwelling-house, unless the former house had an equal or g cater extent of open space at the side or rear. Where the open space was less in extent than that required by the regulation, then the open space for the new house must not be les than that which previously existed. In the case of dwelling-houses built prior to 1871, and having open spaces not greater than that required by the regulation, these open spaces are never to be built upon, except with the approval of the corporation.

SIR,

[ XIV ]

Appendix No. 8.

THE INSANITARY PROPERTIES COMMISSION,

HONGKONG, 26th October, 1896.

I am directed to acknowledge with thanks the receipt of the valuable report by the Medical Officer of Health and yourself, dated the 9th ultimo.

2. As this Report does not cover all the suggestions contained in paragraph 3 of your

letter No 417 of the 8th August last, the Commissioners conclude that you pur- pose furnishing them with a further report containing a list of insanitary properties, accompanied by plans, so as to enable them to consider what steps should be taken. with regard to such properties.

I have the honour to be,

The Honourable

No. 17.

THE DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC WORKS,

&c.,

&C.,

&c.

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

A. SETH,

Secretary.

Appendix No. 9.

PUBLIC WORKS OFFICE, HONGKONG, 14th January, 1897.

SIR,

In continuance of previous correspondence we have the honour to forward you for the information of the Commission the following

(a) A statement shewing the lanes less than 15 feet in width in the City of

Victoria upon which houses front.

(b) A statement shewing backyards in the City of Victoria that are obstructed.

(c) Plan of a portion of the City of Victoria bounded on the north by the Harbour, on the east by Eastern Street, on the south by Second Street and on the west by Western Street, illustrating the insanitary arrange- ment of house property.

We have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your obedient Servants,

FRANCIS A. Cooper,

Director of Public Works.

FRANCIS W. CLARK,

Medical Officer of Health.

A. SETH, ESQ.,

Secretary,

Insanitary Properties Commission.

[ xv ]

Appendix No. 9. (a.)

CITY OF VICTORIA.

Statement showing Lanes, Streets, etc., less than 15 feet in width upon which houses front.

Street.

No. of Houses

Blacksmith Lane,.

Fung Un Street,

Small Lane off Leighton's Hill Road,

Ui Lung Lane,

Amoy Lane,

Cross Lane,

Hi Lung Lane,

Holy Infant Lane,

Man Ming Lane, Rock Lane, Shek Kai Lane, St. Francis Lane, Swatow Lane, Tai Wong Lane, Tik Lung Lane,

Tsui Lung Lane,

Tsui In Lane,

Tsing Kai Lane,

Ui Hing Lane,

·

Wing Fung Lane, East,

Kai Un Lane,

No name, between Nos. 8 & 10, Queen's Road Central,

No name, between Nos. 60 & 64, Peel Street,

Overbeck Terrace,

Rednaxela Terrace,

Chuk Hing Lane,

Chinese Street,

Chuk On Lane,..

7

18

17

15

4

8

32

6

4

1

1

6

4

1

Health District.

Width.

Remarks.

fronting on Lane.

1

5

13'. 0"

3

13'. 6"

** AN AAAAAAAAAAAA A A A A A RATH

3

8*. 0"

15

11. 0"

18

12' 0"

4

6'. 6"

5

13'. 6"

12

12'. 0"

424

5'. 6"

7.0" 7'.

11'. 6"

12′. 0"

11'. 6"

14'. 0"

6'.

Q"

8'. 4"

7.0"

11′

0′′

12'. 0′′

6'. 3"

11'. 3"

S'. 0"

7.0"

10′

0′′

6'. 6′′

32

14. 1"

"7

4

6'. l'

""

D'Angilar Lane,

3

9′, 0"

21

Ezra Lane,

77

8'. 0"

77

Gutzlaff Street,.

12

14′ 0′′

22

Hing Lung Street,

42

14′. 10′′

>>

Laue, behind Nos. 108 and 110, Wellington Street,..

2

6'. 0"

22

Lok Hing Lane,

11

12'. 1′′

""

Pottinger Lane,

7'. 6"

>>

Sun Wai Lane,

11'. 6"

"

Tung Tak Lane,

6′ 0′′

>>

Tun Wo Lane,

Tsun Wing Lane,..

Tit Hong Lane,

Wai Tak Lane,.

Wo On Lane,

Wing Wa Lane, (Southern Portion),.

20724

8'. 0′′

3

11'. 0"

27

12

14'. 0"

10

9′. 0"

17

14′ 0′′

Crown Land.

6'. 0′′

Crown Land.

Yan Shau Lane,

8' 0"

"

Chung Wo Lane,

5

23

12′. 0°

Georges Lane,

"

Gilman Street,

12

""

I'On Lane,

13

77

Kan U Fong,

>>

South,

15

"

North,

""

West,

"

"

Kin Sau Lane,

11

""

Man Hing Lane, Mee Lun Lane,........... Ming Yun Lane,

On Wo Lane,

Pak Tsz Lane,

19

16

29

""

18

""

Sam Ka Lane,

Shin Hing Lane,

RAK

12

11'. 0"

Carried forward,...........

60

547

20 69 00 1-10 2K-OON ∞ 0*2

8

7

9'.10" 14'. 6"

10′ 0′′

10' 0"

10′ 0′′

12'. 6"

10. 4"

11'. 6"

6

10′ 6′′

S'. O"

6

7'. 0" 11'. 0"

8'. 6" 11'. 6" 14'. 6"

[ XVI ]

Statement showing Lanes, Streets, etc.,-—Continued.

Health

No. of Houses

Street.

Width.

Remarks.

District.

fronting

on Lane.

Brought forward,..

60

547

Tung Man Lane,

5

44

12'. 3"

Tsui On Lane,

8

10′. 0"

12

Tung Shing Lane,

11'. 0"

"

Tung Wa Lane,

9′. 0"

"}

Un Wo Lane,

Wa Hing Lane, Wa On Lane, Wa In. Fong, East, Wa In Fong, West, Wing On Street, A Chung Lane,

3

S'. 0"

>>

6

8'. 0"

>>

5

11. 2"

18

8′.0"

16

11'. 6"

""

45

11'. 10"

6

6

11′ 8′′

Crown Land.

Kwai Wa Lane,

Kwong Yuen Street, East,

Ping On Lane,

Kat Sing Lane,.......

Tan Kwai Lane,

U Hing Lane,

Wing Shing Street,

Ng Kwai Fong,

Tung Loi Lane,

12

9'. 6"

16

12'. 8"

""

Kwong Yuen Street, West,..

13

12'. 9′′

"7

3

6'. 0"

""

5

""

g'.

9′. 2"

""

6

8'. 6"

>>

Upper Ladder Street Terrace,

Cheung Hing Lane, .

6'.10"

23

8' 0"

14'. 6"

4

12'. 5"

Crown Land.

Yu Yam Lane, Fat Hing Street, Heung Lane,. Ng Fuk Lane, Pan Kwai Lane,

* * *

25

14'. 2"

6

9'. 0"

""

17

12'. 9*

11

6' to 12"

Crown Land.

3

8'. 0"

""

10

9'. 0"

27

Sai Woo Lane,

27

14. 4"

39

Tsung Sau Lane, East,

22

13'. 0"

""

Tsung Sau Lane, West,

28

13'. 0"

>>

Tsz Mi Alley,

26

14'. 6"

""

Au Fung Lane,...

1

12'.10"

Fuk Luk Lane,

13

12' 0"

""

Fuk Sau Lane,

8

12'..0"

""

Kung Sau Lane, Lau Ü Lane, Leung I Fong, On Wai Lane,

Sai Chung Lane,

Sheung Fung Lane, Sung Hing Lane, Tak Sing Lane,

U Lok Lane,..

7

5'. 9"

16

4'.11"

23

10

13'. 4′′

""

10. 0"

4'. 0"

3

""

13'. 0"

13'. 2′′

22

35

>>

18

7 135

25

19'.10" 13'. 4"

14'. 0′′ {12'. 3* 8′. 6"

6'. 6"

Un Shing Lane,

20

7. 8"

""

14'. 4"

Un Fuk Lane,

10

13'. 11"

22

Hing Lung Lane, East,

10

5

12'. 0"

I Yik Lane,

20

14'. 7"

""

No. 3 Lane,

12'. 0"

No. 6 Lane,

Sam To Lane,

6

11'. 9"

"

9

12′. 0"

""

Sai On Lane,

11

13'. 6"

Sai Wo Lane,

4

10′ 0′′

Tung Wo Lane West,

21

14'. 2′′

"}

Sai Hing Lane,........

10

10′ 0′′

"9

Wo On Hong,

8

14'.10"

29

Total No. of Streets and Houses,..

116

1,225

}

[ xvia]

Statement showing Private Lanes, Streets, etc. of a width of 15 feet or more

upon

which houses front.

Street.

*

No. of

Health

Houses

Width.

Remarks.

;

District.

fronting

on Street.

Lamont's Lane,.... Fletcher Street, McGregor Street,.

12

8

67'. 0"

40

30′ 0′′

32

21′ 0′′

""

San Wa Fong,

17

56'. 0′′

""

Shan Piu Lane,..

10

15'. 0"

""

Mosque Terrace,

10

16′. 6"

Li Yuen Street, East,

30

24′. 0"

Li Yuen Street, West,

15

24' 0"

Tsui Yuen Lane,

3

18'. 3"

Wai San Lane,

6

17. 0"

Alveston Terrace,. Gilman's Bazaar,

5

4

15'. 1′′

41

18'. 3"

Hong Ning Laue,

7

15′. 2′′

""

Tsun Hing Lane,

7

15'. 1"

""

Wing Kut Street,

36

24'.11"

""

Wing Shing Street,

13

19'. 6"

""

Wing Wo Street,

33

18′. 9′′

""

Yun Woo Street,

7

15'. 1′′

""

( 20'. 1"

Wa Lane,

7

7

10'. 6"

Kom U Street,

6

19'.10"

Li Sing Street, Sutherland Street, Wo Fung Street, Cheong On Lane,........ Chung Ching Lane, Ham Yu Street, Sai Yuen Lane,

Tak Hing Alley, East,

Tak Hing Alley, West,.

Ui On Lane,

Kwong Fung Lane,

༠ ི རྟ མཆ བ བ མི མི མ བྱ

14

18'. 0"

9

15'. 0"

6

19′. 0"

8

16' 3"

22

20′. 0"

34

16' 1"

26

20'. 1"

24

25'. 2"

24

25'. 10"

8

15'. 1"

1

42'. 8"

Yat Foo Lane,

Total No. of Streets and Houses,..

14

20′. 0"

32

522

i

:

[ XVII ]

Appendix No. 9 (b).

STATEMENT SHEWING BACKYARDS THAT ARE OBSTRUCTED.

CITY OF VICTORIA.

Health District No. 1.

Name of Street.

House No.

Name of Street.

House No.

13

10

5

7

9

Ui Lung Lane,....

10

12

Matheson Street,

5

10 -

7

15

17

19

6

21

23

Leighton's Hill Road,

8

4A

25

6A

27

SA

29

41

1

43

5

53

7

55

9

57A

11

59

13

Wanchai Road,

59A

15

63

17

65

19

67

21

69

23

71

25

73

27

75

29

77

31

79

33

81

35

83

49

85

51

87

53

89

Jardine's Bazaar,

55

91

6

93

95

10

97

12

99

14

101

16

18

1

20

3

22

5

24

7

28

9

30

11

32

Ui Lung Lane,.

13

34

15

38

17

40

00 C3 A N

6

12

44

54

56

Name of Street.

[ XVIII]

Health District No. 1,-Continued.

House No.

Name of Street.

House No.

64

9

66

10

68

11

70

12

72

13

74

14

76

15

78

16

80

17

82

18

Jardine's Bazaar,

84

19

86

20

88

21

92

22

94

23

96

24

98

25

Yee Wo Street,

100

26

102

27

104

28

106

29

30

Fung Un Street,

1 50 10

31

3

5

32

33

34

35

3

36

Blacksmith's Lane,

37

7

38

9

39

40

4

41

5

42

Yee Wo Street,

6

7

8

Health District No. 2.

Total,.................

172

Name of Street.

House No.

Name of Street.

House No.

36

1A

37

2

38

4

39

Triangle Street,

6

40

8

41

12

42

13

Praya East,

52

53

54

55

Tai Wo Street..........

56

41 67

5

57

58

*10

7

8

[ XIX ]

Health District No. 2,-Continued.

House No.

Name of Street.

House No.

Name of Street.

Tai Wo Street,.

{

11

12

13

6

7

8

9

4

6

10

11

8

12

10

13

12

18

14

Albany Street,

19

16

20

18

21

Cross Street,.

20

22

22

23

23

26

24

28

25

29

26

30

27

28

30

44

2

6

6

8

3

5

7

9

24∞∞ 100 10

St. Francis Street,

8

10

12

14

2+

82

84

86

11

88

13

90

15.

92

17

94

19

Queen's Road East,

96

21

98

Nullah Lane,

.....

23

100

25

102

35

104

37

106

39

108

41

110

43

45

6

47

18

Kat On Street,

8

10

20

12

22

22

24

26

888

28

Lung On Street,.

30

123 TH

3

4

Albany Street,

Nullah Lane,

4

5

123 10

+880

64

66

68

70

Name of Street.

[xx]

Health District No. 2,-Continued.

House No.

Name of Street.

House No.

1

3

5

7

9

Ship Street,

42

44

46

48

50

52

Wing Fung Street,

{

24

2

4

6

Wing Fung Lane West,.

10

12

14

Arsenal Street,

3

CO THE LO

4

5

28

30

Queen's Road East,

32

34

36

Queen's Road East,

Health District No. 3.

38

40

42

44

46

48

50

52

54

56

58

60

62

3

5

7

11

13

15

.

17

19

80

130

132

135

137

139

Total,

189

Name of Street.

House No.

Name of Street.

House No.

4

5

Queen's Road Central,

Beaconsfield Arcade,

6

{

11

13 17A

7

8

Total,.......

8

Health District No. 4.

Name of Street.

House No.

Name of Street.

House No.

21

225

19

25

20

35

36

Praya Central,

22

Praya Central,

37

23

40

24

41

2

Name of Street.

[ XXI ]

Health District No. 4,—Continued.

House No.

Name of Street.

House No.

肝肝肝

43

15

44

23

45

33

46

35

Praya Central,

48

37

49

Graham Street,.

39

50

41

59

43

60

46

48

Jubilee Street,

13

LO 1 ∞ co

5

7

8

8

10

Peel Street,

12

14

14

16

60

5

62

7

69

9

77

11

78

32

79

34

80

36

81

38

83

Wellington Street,

39

84

42

92

51

94

53

96

76

98

84

100

88

103

118

Queen's Road Central,

104

108

110

15

112

18

114

43

116

118

Stanley Street,

45

46

120

54

123

64

125

126

128

Wing Wa Lane,.......

19

1

130

132

134

Wo On Lane,.

17

136

138

9

140

11

13

Tit Hong Lane,

{

6

15

00

8

17

Wyndham Street,

19

5

21

7

Li Yuen Street East,.

23

8

25

15,

27

Name of Street,

[ XXII ]

Health District No. 4,—Continued.

House No.

Name of Street.

House No.

23

24

25

26

26

28

D'Aguilar Street,

28

34

30

36

32

Hollywood Road,

38

40

40

42

1

44

2

Lan Kwai Fong,

46

5.

48

6

3

Cochrane Street,.

31

7

Gutzlaff Street,

14

Old Bailey Street,

9

11

15

17

17

18

19

1

20

2

Gage Street,

21

3

22

4

23

Shelley Street,

6

24

8

10

16

12

18

Hollywood Road,.

20

22

Total,.

166

Health District No. 5.

Name of Street.

House No.

Name of Street.

House No.

212

99

216

105

218

113

220

115

236

Jervois Street,

102

251

118A

253

120

255

122

Queen's Road Central,

257

124

259

313

Lower Lascar Row,

16

272

26

274

28

276

Gage Street,

39

280

41

282

43

9

7

Jervois Street,

13

11

61

Gough Street,.

19

89

21

:

Name of Street.

[ XXIII]

Health District No. 5,-Continued.

House No.

Name of Street.

House No.

81

56

83

82

Bonham Strand,.

103

81

Wing Lok Street,

105

86

107

109

4

24

co

8

29

Mercer Street,

10

33

12

59

16

107

18

115

Bonham Strand,.

119

Hillier Street,

27

121

26

Burd Street,

23

36

52

54

Total,......

70

Health District No. 6.

;

Name of Street.

House No.

Name of Street.

House No.

}

19

175

44

177

49

179

50

180

51

181

53

183

87

185

89

187

98

189

100

193

136

195

138

196

140

197

142

198

144

199

Queen's Road West,

146

148

Queen's Road West,

200

201

150

202

152

203

154

206

156

207

158

208

160

209

162

210

166

212

167

213

168

214

169

217

170

219

171

221

172

223

173

227

Name of Street.

[ XXIV]

Health District No. 6,-Continued.

House No.

Name of Street.

House No.

229

18

Queen's Road West,

231

20

22

359

Possession Street,

24

356

26

360

28

Queen's Road Central,

362

30

364

366

189

197

6

204

8

206

CO

9

208

Fat Hing Street,

11

210

12

212

13

214

14

216

15

218

17

220

224

Heung Lane,

4

работка

226

Hollywood Road,

228

1

230

3

232

9

233

11

234

13

236

15

238

17

240

19

242

21

244

23

246

25

248

27

31

1

33

2

35

3

37

Wah Lane,

4

39

5

47

6

Bonham Strand West,...

49

7

51

53

A Chung Lane,

12 10 10 CO

55

57

3

63

65

67

6

69

71

22

21

77

23

79

25

81

6

85

Possession Street,

&

87

10

8

12

10

14

12

16

14

>

.

:

Name of Street.

[ 21XXX]

LIST OF HOUSES IN No. 5 DISTRICT,- Continued.

A

No. of

Back to House. back house.

B

Fronting on a lane less than 15 feet wide.

C

Insufficient| open space in rear.

1

1

D Abutting

against hillside to a depth of more than

4 feet.

No. of cubicles on each Floor.

Ground. 1 2 3

::

1

:

Wing Lok Street,

""

""

17

1

19

1

...

21

1

...

23

1

>>

25

1

"9

27

1

1

1

3

""

29

1

1

1

...

31

1

1

>>

33

1

1

1

1

"

35

1

1

4

""

37

1

...

""

39

1

1

1

...

19

41

1

1

1

...

...

.43

1

1

1

1

...

...

""

45

1

1

2

ARA A

47

1

1

3

...

49

1

1

3

...

51

}

1

1

4

53

1

1

1

5

...

...

>>

55

1

1

2

...

""

57

1

1

1

3

ور

59

1

1

...

...

...

>>

61

1

J

63

1

>>

65

1

67

1

1

...

>>

69

1

2

"

71

T

1

73

1

"

75

1

1

1

77

1

1

*

79

1

1

...

81

1

...

}}

83

1

1

...

""

85

1

1

...

87

1

1

-----

2

...

2

3

...

1

2

...

1

...

...

""

89

1

1

...

25

91

1

2

3

وو

93

1

17

95

1

39

97

1

1

1

,,

66

1

1

"

101

1

1

1

1

...

...

"9

103

1

1

105

1

1

I

1

...

...

...

>>

:

107

1

1

1

1

""

109

1

1

...

111

I

1

2

1

113

1

1

2

3 3

115

1

1

...

>>

117

1

1

...

...

119

1

1

...

29

2

...

4

3

""

4

39

6

2

3

5

""

""

1

""

8

1

1

2

...

""

10

1

}

I

2

""

12

1

1

1

3

29

14

1

2

""

16

1

1

1

2

25

18

1

1

2

20

1

1

1

2

2

...

22

1

1

1

3

39

24

Ι

1

1

...

CC

26

1

2

...

""

28

1

3

CC

30

...

""

Name of Street.

[ DDIXXX ]

LIST OF HOUSES IN No. 5 DISTRICT,-Continued.

A

No. of Back to House. back house.

B

Fronting on a lane less

than 15 feet wide.

C

Insufficient

open space in rear.

D Abutting against hillside to

a depth of

more than 4 feet.

No. of cubicles on

each Floor.

Ground.

1 2 3 4

Wing Lok Street,

32

1

1

***

1

-

34

1

1

...

...

36

1

1

1

...

...

""

38

1

1

1

...

32

40

1

1

2 1

...

29

42

1

1

2

...

""

44

1

1

2

...

...

""

46

1

...

""

48

1

50

1

""

52

1

""

54

1

""

56

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

...

2

...

2

***

2

1

...

1

2

58

1

1

1

...

""

60

1

1

""

62

1

1

1

>>

64

1

1

...

99

1

1

1

1

17

68

1

1

1

2

3

""

70

1

1

2

...

"

72

1

1

1

1 1

""

74

1

1

1

3

3

""

76

1

1

1

1

2

>>

78

1

I

1

...

"2

80

1

}

1

""

82

1

1

1

2

""

84

1

1

1

I

...

""

86

1

1

1

2 2

...

88

1

...

1

2

CC

90

1

1

1

...

92

1

1

3

"

...

94

1

1

2

1

...

...

96

1

1

2

98

1

1

1

3

...

100

1

1

1

1

""

102

1

1

""

...

104

1

""

106

1

22

108

1

1

1

1

"

110

1

1

2

2

""

...

112

1

1

27

Wellington Street,

105

1

1

107

1

1

1

27

109

1

1

1

1

4

""

111

1

1

COIA 1:

2

4

17

113

1

1

""

...

115

1

1

1

27

117

1

1

I

""

119

1

1

1

2

2

>>

121

1

1

""

...

123

""

125

">

...

127

"

...

129

2

77

...

131

22

133

""

136

1

""

...

138

1

3

3

22

140

1

""

144

1

""

1

1

146

1

4

1

2

""

...

148

"2

...

...

...

150

1

""

...

152

23

...

T

154

>>

156

1

27

158

1

160

1

:- :

1

1

2

1

1

3

2

1

1

4

2

1

2

2

1

1

1

1

2

י

[xxxibb ]

LIST OF HOUSES IN No. 5 DISTRICT,—Continued.

A

Name of Street.

No. of Back to House. back house.

B

Fronting on a lane less than 15 feet wide.

C

Insufficient

D Abutting against

No. of cubicles on

each Floor.

open space hillside to

in rear.

a depth of

4 feet.

more than

Ground.

Wellington Street,

162

1

1

1

3

4

164

1

1

1

...

"

166

1

1

1

1

168

1

1

1

2

""

170

1

1

1

2

""

172

1

1

4

""

174

1

1

1

176

1

1

1

4

...

...

27

178

1

1

1

3

...

25

180

1

1

3

""

182

1

1

1

...

"

184

]

1

""

186

1

1

""

188

1

1

RAR ***

""

190

1

192

194

2

1

196

198

...

...

1

1

1

1

Wa In Fong East,

""

""

1 2 3 4

1

1

1

2

2

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

Ι

1

1

1

""

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

""

1

1

""

1

1

1

"

8A

1

1

...

""

""

10

""

11

"

12

"

13

90128

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

""

14

1

1

27

15

1

1

22

16

1

1

""

17

""

1

Wa In Fong West,.

3

1

1

1

1

: co co to 14 co co co no

2

3

3

3

3

...

"

1

19

1

""

""

9

11

1

1

""

13

1

""

15

/1

""

2

1

1

2

2

3

3

4

1

1

""

6

1

1

8

1

1

""

10

1

1

""

12

1

1

"

14

1

1

16

1

2

1

3

2

2

2

A

Yee Yuen Lane,.

140 O

1

1

2

1

1

1

2

3

1

1.

...

1

1

5

1

2

6

1

-- ~ ~ THC HHH g

CO CO - NN ÎN ÎN ÎN ——-~~~~ co co co -

00 30 1 2 O ON ON CO OD O

1

2

4

2

2

4

11

2

2

2

2

1

Yau Wo Lane,

Hi the

T....

""

""

">

""

264 10 © 1

:

4

...

1

...

2

...

4

2

2

1

...

::

3

3

...

...

""

""

Mar

April, 1897.

NIT

יזי

7

OF HEIL

JOHN REIDIE,

Inspector.

[ XXXII]

List of houseS IN No. 6 DISTRICT CLASSIFIED AS

FOLLOWS.

A

B

C

D

Fronting on

Insufficient

No. of

Name of Street.

Back to House. back house.

a lane less than 15

open space in rear.

feet wide.

Abutting against hillside to a depth of more than 4 feet.

No. of cubicles on each Floor.

Ground. 1 2 3

4

East Street,.

1

""

""

>>

11

"7

13

15

17

(6

...

***

...

...

""

19

21

>>

23

""

25

""

27

...

17

29

ور

31

""

33

11

35

})

37

39

39

41

43

...

45

...

47

"J

49

...

51

...

""

53

3

...

"

West Street,

55

09 10 1

ཡི མཻ ནི ཡི མཻ ནི ནི རྒྱུ རྒྱུ ནི ནི ནི མ མ བྷ ནི མ མ མ མ ནི ཀྵ བྷ ན ནི རྨ ི ནི ནི ནི ནི ནི མ ི མི ི

...

...

6

11

13

15

17

19

21

23

25

27

29

37

39

41

43

45

47

49

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

51

53

...

...

55

57

...

2

8

10

12

14

16

18

20

24

2225

...

...

co co :

3

3

...

3 2

...

4

2

***

3

...

6

3

...

...

7

...

*

...

...

74647774

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

+

4

5

6

4

4

2

...

...

4

4

44

444

...

...

...

...

+

9

QAAA WCIA 010 A 000000; co co co 10 c⠀⠀

2

3

...

...

3

6

...

...

***

6

...

...

6

5

16644

4

...

...

է

[ XXXIII]

LIST OF HOUSES IN No. 6 DISTRICT,—Continued.

A

No. of

Name of Street,

Back to House. back house.

B

Fronting on a lane less than 15 feet wide.

C

Insufficient

open space in rear.

D Abutting against hillside to

No. of cubicles on each Floor.

a depth of

more than 4 feet.

Ground. 1 2 3

4

West Street,

26

28

19

""

30

32

"

34

39

36

""

38

""

CC

""

وو

40

42

44

...

...

...

46

...

""

48

"

50

""

52

54

56

""

Upper Station Street,...

1

1

1

5

++++ 10 10 10 10 CO 1010 TO 1 0 21 to

3

44

6

...

::

...

"?

""

4

"

9

27

19

9

1

4

"

""

11

1

1

""

13

1

""

>>

15

I

1

""

>>

17

1

1

""

""

19

1

1

CC

t

21

1

1

""

23

1

1

6

""

"J

AA

"

CC

...

""

""

8

RRRAARA AA

""

10

""

12

""

14

"

16

18

20

22

""

...

24

*

...

Taipingshan Street,

""

??

AA

1979

5

1

1

1

Pound Lane,

1

Latrine.

3

1

"

""

"

>>

2

1

4

...

...

46136 67 CO 10 10 H COOH SHI× CO KO CO co co es 444

10 10

3

:

...

1

1

1

:

...

...

1

1

1

1

4

3

...

...

Market Street,

78

te

""

""

***

I

80

Chung Hing Theatre.

82

1

...

84

1

Po Yan Street,

1

}

...

1

1

...

1 1

1

1

1

39

>>

""

1

...

1

...

1

8

1

""

""

""

10

1

...

12

Tung Wah Hospital.

...

Cheung Hing Lane,

1

1

1

1

...

3

1

1

1

...

"

...

3

...

4

+:

5

6 8

3

54

10 10

10

Name of Street.

LIST OF HOUSES

A.

No. of

Back to House. back house.

[ XXXIV]

IN No. 6 DISTRICT,—Continued.

B

Fronting on a lane less than 15 feet wide.

Insufficient open space in rear.

D

Abutting against hillside to

a depth of

No. of cubicles on each Floor.

more than 4 feet.

Ground.

1 2 3

4

Cheung Hing Lane,

1

1

1

1

>>

27

1

1

"

"

1

"

"

1

""

""

1

Wah Lane,

1

1

1

1

"

">

""

J7

"2

CON

1

1

1

1

4

1

I

1

1

1

1

: co

3

5

4

7

9

10 10.00 1-6

8

6

101010042

1:10 10 10 10 61

2

8

A Cheung Lane,....

""

27

O CI HA CO NO pod

1

I

1

I

1

1

1

1

1

I

1

1

1

1

1

1

دو

1

1

NAN:

3

4

:

Ng Kwai Fong,

1234

1

1

1*

1

1

1

...

1

1

1

3

27

1

1

I

Lower Lascar Row,.

37

1

1

3

:

3 2

>>

""

39

1

1

41

""

1

1*

2

A

43

>>

"

1

1*

"

45

""

1

1

*

""

27

1

1*

""

49

27

1

1*

27

51

""

1

1

53

""

1

*

3

""

55

1*

57

""

22

1

1*

*

42

>>

1

1

A

44

1

1

46

""

27

1

1

22

48

27

Archway.

50

>>

""

1

52

27

""

1

1

"

54

""

1

1

56

97

1

I

58

دو

وو

>>

1

1

2

60

""

1

1

62

22

"J

1

1

64

1

27

""

1

...

66

1

"J

1

""

68

""

"

288

1

70

1

""

""

:

Possession Street,

1

33

>>

""

""

9

27

""

""

A

11

22

13

"

39

15

>>

""

17

""

>>

A

19

19

21

"

"

ན ནཾ ཉྙ ནྟཾ རྒྱུ ཀྵ

""

23

27

25

""

27

1

""

1

"

"

* Basement.

3

2

2 3 3

1

6

1

2

1

612

1

4

4

2

4

5

.

XXXV ]

LIST OF HOUSES IN No. 6 DISTRICT, - Continued.

A

Name of Street.

No. of Back to House. back house.

B

Fronting on a lane less than 15 feet wide.

C

Insufficient

open space in rear.

D

No. of Cubicles ou each Floor.

Abutting against hillside to

a depth of

more than 4 feet.

Ground.

1 2

3

4

Possession Street,

1

1

3

""

10

1

22

12

1

>>

14

1

1

6

4

""

16

1

1

"

""

18

1

1

6

6

"

20

1

1

22

1

1

6 5

">

24

1

1

"J

""

26

1

1

6

"

""

28

.1

1

4

""

27

30

1

1

4

5

3

5000+10 10:00 10

10 10 10 10 000 10 10

4

4

4

"J

22

New Street,.

1

1

1

9

2

4

*7

11

3

>>

13

??

6

3

13A

...

6

29

...

15

1

""

1

17

1

2

""

19

1

""

1

4

21

1

1

4

23

1

1

4

,

25

1

19

1

4

4

3

27

1

1

4

2

29

1

1

4

4

31

1

2

""

3

...

2

1

3 1

4

1

3

""

1

1

3

3

""

8

10

1

1

2

""

1

1

...

12

"

1

1

3

14

""

1

1

16

"}

1

1

5

4 5

18

""

1

1

3

20

**

1

1

4

...

20A

1

37

22

"

1

1

2

2

2

24

1

1

"

26

1

1

6

28

1

1

3

2 3

30

: 1

1

3

3

""

Hollywood Road,

180

1

1

...

182

1

1

"J

"

186

1

1

1*

3 3

ཝཱ

""

188

1

1*

3

19

""

190

1

1*

2

"

""

192

4

22

>

192A

"}

""

194

]

3

"

""

196

1

1

1*

4

>>

198

""

200

1

3

3

3

202

1

1

>>

204

1

1

2

37

**

206

1

1

"

"

208

1

1

"

"

210

1

1

"

212

1

1

>>

"

214

1

1

2:

216

1

1

4

19

218

1

1

>>

""

220

1

8

⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ CO KO KO KO

4677KITT∞

410 10 10 10 10 10 10 00

...

4

4

6

...

5

27

""

* Basement.

Name of Street.

[ IAXXX ]

LIST OF HOUSES IN No. 6 DISTRICT,—Continued.

A

No. of Back to House. back house.!

B Fronting on a lane less than 15 feet wide.

C

Insufficient open space in rear.

D Abutting against hillside to a depth of

No. of cubicles ou each Floor.

more than 4 feet.

Ground. 1 2 3

4

Hollywood Road,

222

1

1

5:10

224

1

1

3

""

226

1

1

4

**

*

228

1

1

3

>>

230

1

...

1

4

>>

">

232

A

""

234

3

2

5

23

>>>

236

4

5

>>

29

238

77

23

240

1

1

1

5

4

...

6

>>

""

242

1

1

>>

244

1

AAA

""

246

1

1

...

248

1

""

250

1

1

...

29

252

1

1

""

254

1

1

"

256

1

...

>>

258

1

1

>>

187

1

1

""

""

189

1

1

3

>>

*?

191

1

""

27

193

1

1

2

""

*

195

1

""

"

197

1

""

>>

199

Archway.

**

201

1

1

37

203

1

1

""

205

1

>>

207

1

1

>>

25

209

1

>>

>>

211

2

3

6

...

213

1*

""

>>

215

1

1*

""

>>

217

1

1*

* * *

">

""

>>

;:སྤུ

219

1

1

219A

1

""

221

221A

1

64

223

1

2

2

6

#GA¦ ¦ ACA N; NA;

...

...

77

>>

225

1

""

227

1

1

وو

25

229

1

1

">

27

231

1

}

22

233

""

"

235

1 Latrine.

...

""

>>

237

1

1

3

4

27

"

239

1

I

:

01: 1000 10

>>

29

Upper Rutter Street,...

1

10

2

""

"

""

"

""

""

"

"

""

""

وو

.

35

6

""

15

6

10

"

>>

11

""

"

"J

""

12 13

>>

"J

Lower Rutter Street,..

.

27

>>

19

""

22

>>

""

""

:

1

2

...

*Basement.

...

5

5

5 5

4

4

6

3

2

5

5

6

2

...

...

3

10 10 10 10

...

5

Y

E

[ XXXVII]

LIST OF HOUSES IN No. 6 DISTRICT,—Continued.

A

Name of Street.

No. of Back to House. back house.

B

Fronting on a lane less than 15 feet wide.

C

Insufficient open space in rear.

D Abutting against hillside to a depth of more than 4 feet.

No. of cubicles on each Floor.

Ground. 1 2 3

4

Lower Rutter Street,

""

"

A

* * * * *

32

>>

8

9

35

""

10

11

12

13

...

4

5

*:*:

6

3

2

10+ 0 0

4

4

5

5

3

4

Fat Hing Street,.

"

1

""

"

""

""

19

"

1

1

1

1 1

Being rebuilt.

1

1

2

>>

>>

27

>>

9

>>

>>

10

>>

11

12

""

13

**

14

1

>>

>>

1

1

15

1

>>

1

...

3

16

:

1

>>

75

1

1

5

">

་་

17 18

...

1

1

1

1

>>

Morrison Street,..

1

1

3

1

1

"J

>>

1

1

""

1

2

1

:

:

9

?

29

72

Archway.

11

1

1

1

""

>>

13

1

1

""

15

1

1

>>

23

17

1

1

27

""

Bonham Strand,

100

1

102

1

1

23

104

1

1

""

106

1

>>

"

108

1

""

""

110

1

A

31

112

""

22

114

""

116

19

""

118

1

>>

>>

120

1

1

>>

""

122

1

1

""

124.

1

1

>>

>>

126

1

"

Y

">

128

1

3

5

,,

39

130

1

4

4

""

22

132

1

>>

>

134

3,

>>

136

1

"}

""

138

1

33

>>

140

1

""

>

142

1

1

"

27

144

1

1

2

⠀ ⠀

na in

2

3

5

""

146

1

1

>>

148

1

:2

""

135

""

>>

137

""

27

139

1

1

"">

>>

141

1

1

"

>>

143

1

1

2

""

""

145

1

1

37

""

147

1

2

2

ל3

>>

⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀

[ XXXVIII]

LIST OF HOUSES IN No. 6 DISTRICT,— Continued.

B

C

D Abutting

against hillside to

Fronting on Insufficient

A

Name of Street.

No. of Back to

a lane less House. back house.

than 15 feet wide.

open space in rear.

a depth of more than 4 feet.

No. of cubicles on each Floor.

Ground.

I

2

3 4

Bonham Strand,........ 149

1

1

:

Queen's Road Central,...

335

337

A

31

>>

339

">

311

46

343

>>

""

345

1*

1*

1*

1*

1*

1*

32

>>

347

1*

多少

""

349

1*

**

27

351

1*

""

37

353

1*

"

>>

355

1*

>>

$57

I*

""

27

359

1

1*

12

">

361

1

1*

1

CL

19

363

1

1*

2

""

CC

"

""

دو

""

""

""

27

77

*** A A A A A A

ARRA

>>

365

1

1*

367

1

1*

369

1 *

371

1*

373

375

1

377

1

...

379

1

336

1

338

1

1

340

1

1

342

1

1

2

344

1

1

346

1

1

2

"?

348

1

1

1

2

""

}"

350

1

1

CC

352

1

I

37

>>

354

1

""

"

356

1

1

""

""

358

1

22

29

1.360 ·

1

>>

>>

562

1

1

27

"

364

1

1

2

4

22

11

992

1

1

"

>>

368

1

">

""

370

1

1

...

"

""

372

1

...

"

A

374

""

576

2

39

""

378

...

22

,,

380

"}

"

382

23

384

77

22

386

Tung Loi Lane,

1

1

1

...

1

1

"

1

1

"

1

1

""

6

1

>>

""

11

1

**

>>

13

1

3

77

25

15

1

"J

""

17

1

>>

"}

19

...

""

"}

21

1

"J

??

99

""

""

"

27

མ མ ཀྵ ཡི མི བ ི

23.

1

25

1

2

1

⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀

...

* Basement.

2

[ XXXIX ]

LIST OF HOUSES IN No. 6 DISTRICT,—Continued.

B

C

Fronting on Insufficient

A

No. of

Back to

a lane less

Name of Street.

+

House. back house.

than 15

feet wide.

D Abutting

No. of cubicles on

against

each Floor.

en space

hillside to

a depth of

more than

Ground. 1

3

4 feet.

ofe

in rear.

Tung Loi Lane,

10

1

1

12

1

27

14

1

1

יי

**

16

1

""

*

18

""

"

20

2.

">

22

29

24

"

Praya West,

"

Archway.

1

1

: 10

3

3

:

1

9

1

**

10

1

4

>>

11

1

وو

12

1

1

**

13

1

1

*

14

1

1

>>

15

I

A

1

16

1

}

aim co

2 2

3 6

5

17

1

2*

3

18

1

3

22

19

1

2

20

1

""

21

I

3

"

22

23

23

34

24

1

I

}:

25

1

*

26

1

1

2

27

1

1

>

28

1

1

29

1

1

2:

30

}

5

2)

31

1

1

""

82

1

1

""

1

1

">

34

1

1

3

27

35

1

1

2

27

36

1

1

**

37

1

1

""

38

1

1

4

>>

39

"

40

""

41

22

42

1

"?

43

1

"

44

وو

45

1

"

46

>?

995

1

46A

2

3

"2

21

47

48

49

2

2

""

50

51

52

1

53

1

1

2

2

54

1

1

55

1

56

1

1

57

1

1

"J

58

1

""

59

1

1

1

""

""

">

""

3828

60

1

1

61

1

1

62

1

1

2

63

1

1

"

:

¦ co co

3

A

2

2

[ XL ]

LIST OF HOUSES IN No. 6. DISTRICT,—Continued.

A

No. of

Name of Street.

Back to House. back house.

B

Fronting on a lane less than 15 feet wide.

C

D

Insufficient

open space in rear.

Abutting against hillside to

a depth of more than 4 feet.

No. of cubicles on each Floor.

Ground. 1 2 3

Praya West,

64

1

65

1

6

33

:

1

77

67

25

68

69

ΤΟ

2:

71

72

1

1

1 1

1

""

73

I

>>

1

I

""

1

2

:¿ེ:5:ས:::;;ས

>>

1

77

27

78

"

Archway

79

1

22

80

6

6

>>

81

29

Archway

82

1

1

""

83

1

1

"

84

1

>>

85

1

1

86

1

19

87

Archway

4

39

88

1

1

"?

89

1

1

2

29

90

1

""

91

1

1

92

77

Archway

""

93

1

1

""

94

1

95

Archway

>>

96

97

1

98

1

99

1

100

"}

101

*

102

1

"

103

"

104

""

105

3

""

106

1

>>

107

1

5

6

...

>>

108

1

109

110

1

1

111

1

112

29

113

1

1

27

114

1

>>

115

"

116

""

117

33

118

""

1

3

1

Rebuilding

"J

119

*

120

25

121

""

122

123

1

1

...

1

1

3

""

124

1

TH

125

1

>>

126

1

127

1

1

128

1

I

5

>>

129

1

1

""

130

1

1

23

131

1

1

>>

132

""

Archway

: co co co co¦ ¦ ¦ NNA co

4

:

[ XLI ]

LIST OF HOUSES IN No. 6 DISTRICT,~Continued.

A

Name of Street.

No. of Back to House.back house.

B

Fronting on a lane less than 15 feet wide.

Insufficient open space in rear.

D Abutting against hillside to

No. of cubicles on each Floor.

a depth of more than 4 feet.

Ground. 1 2

4

Praya West,

133

1

134

1

135

1

""

136

1

12

137

و,

138

1

""

139

""

Archway.

6

6

...

"

140

1

1

141

1

1

">

142

1

1

27

143

1

,,

144

1

2

>>

145

1

:

27

Wing Lok Street,

121

Old Harbour Offices.

123

1

1

125

1

>>

127

1

17

129

1

27

2)

131

1

1.

133

1

2

2

27

135

1

137

32

13

139

1

2

"}

141

1

1

2

""

>>>

143

1

1

??

145

1

1

2

2

>>

>>

147

1

1

...

"}

13

149

1

1

4

>>

>>

وو

151,

1

1

33

153

1

1

22

:

"

155

1

1

>>

"3

157

1

1

27

39

159

1

1

4

23

""

161

1

1

3

5

""

""

163

1

1

,,

>>

165

2

A>

>>

167

1

22

>>

169

1

1

""

ל

171

1

4

4

>>

7

>>

173

1

1

3

**

وو

175

1

1

""

>>

177

1

,,

>>

179

I

1

2

4

""

""

181

1

""

>>

183

1

1

"}

79

185

1

29

>>

187

I

29

""

189

1

""

>>

191

1

"

193

1

8 3

""

.

""

195

1

2

>>

197

I

>>

,,

199

1

1

>>

"

201

1

1

>>

""

203

1

1

114

1

1

2

>>>

116

1

1

"}

""

118

1

2

>>

>>

120

1

1

122

1

1

23

124

1

25

126

1

3

"}

128

1

1

""

71

130

1

""

132

1

1

""

**

134

}

"

39

136

1

4

>>

19

138

""

29

2

A

B

Name of Street.

No. of Back to House.back house.

a lane less

[ XLII ]

LIST OF HOUSES IN No. 6 DISTRICT,—Continued.

Fronting on Insufficient

C

D Abutting

than 15 feet wide.

open space

against hillside to

No. of cubicles on each Floor.

in rear.

a depth of

more than

Ground. 1 2 3

1

4 feet.

Wing Lok Street,

140

:

"

142

>>

144

وو

146

"

1

I

148

25

i

}

"

**

150

I

1

>>

152

"

}

}

3

3

154

>>

1

1

23

>>

156

*

158

>>

1

93

160

162

31

"

164

27

166

1

"

1

168

21

1

3

*

170

""

172

די

174

J

1

176

"

1

3

178

,,

180

39

1

182

1

1

184

1

وو

1

3 3

186

1

188

"

""

1

I

Bonham Strand West,..

"

1

1

1

"

}

2

4

Hin 30

1

دو

1

""

9

1

1

11

1

""

"

2

13

1

1

15

1

""

1

""

17

دو

1

2

19

1

"3

25

A

21

1

1

2

23

1

93

1

32

A

25

1

""

1

27

1

23

1

3

2

*

29

1

"1

I

31

**

3

33

1

35

1

93

1

37

1

jaa ja

2

""

39

1

1

3

">

*

.

41

1

1

دو

وو

دو

43

1

1

1

2

""

47

""

1

93

49

1

1

2

3

""

51

1

دو

1

3

""

53

1

**

2

":

55

1

دو

1

34

57

1

3

59

I

1

""

""

61

1

32

1

63

1

31

2

39

65

1

""

3

4

"

>>

A

67

1

2

""

69

1

"

2

71

1

33

73

1

"

75

1

""

77

1

J

2

1

79

1

25

29

2

2 4

81

1

"

>>

83

1

"

29

85

1

"

::

5

1

:

7

A

No. of

Name of Street.

Back to House. back house,

a lane less

[ XLIII]

LIST OF HOUSES IN No. 6 DISTRICT,- -Continued.

B Fronting on Insufficient

C

D Abutting

No. of cubicles on

than 15 feet wide.

open space in rear.

against hillside to

each Floor.

a depth of

more than 4 feet.

Ground. 1

Bonham Strand West,..

27 13

1

1

2

2

*

""

246

1

1

1

1

1

1

"

91

1

1

""

"

10

1

6 9

""

12

1

1

"

"

14

1

1

"

16

1

1

>>

""

18

1

"

20

1

1

6 6

3

>>

,

22

1

1

*

24

1

1

"

26

1

1

3.

28

1

1

939

";

30

1

1

2 8 611

دو

22

32

1

1

"

2)

34

1

1

2

4

"

36

1

1

3

3

A

وو

38

1

1

40

1

1

35

42

1

1

">

42A

1

1

99

44

1

1

3

29

46

1

1

وو

*

48

1

1

9

"3

"

50

1

1

3

3

"

99

52

1

1

"

99

3

54

1

1

*

>>

56

1

1

*

دو

58

1

""

""

60

وو

""

62

""

64

99

"

66

68

27

AA

70

"J

72

1

1

1

1

2

1

1

1

2

10

10

""

74

1

29

""

Heung Lane,

"

*

100 101-246

1

1

6

Latrine.

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

2

I

1

I

**

8

1

1

1

"

10

1

1

"

12

1

1

4

3

14

1

1

2

16

1

1

"

Queen's Street,

1

1

:

1

6

1

1

**

>>

1

9

1

2

11

2

11 11

13

1

2

610

ཁ་

15

17

...

""

39

29

]

5

3

3

19

1

1

1

1

2

...

1

3

3

1

"

8

1

""

10

1

29

12

1

""

1

2

1

4

1

....

2 2

...

....

:

[ XLIV ]

LIST OF HOUSES IN No. 6 DISTRICT,—Continued.

Insufficient

A

No. of

Name of Street.

Back to House. back house.

B

Fronting on a lane less than 15 feet wide.

C

open space in rear.

D Abutting against hillside to a depth of more than

1 feet.

No. of cubicles on

each Floor.

Ground. 1

3

Queen's Street,

14

16

18

"

40*22

1

1

1

1

1

2

2

1

1

2

2

Tsung Sau East,

*

1

5

3

1

1

1

1

3

4

"

""

1

1

29

"

9

1

1

""

""

11

1

1

2

3

39

"

13

1

1

3

"3

15

1

1

4

*

17

1

1

"3

"

19

1

1

"

21

1

1

31

2

1

1

5

"

4

1

1

""

6

1

1

19

8

1

3

"

10

1

1

3

**

12

1

1

2

"

14

1

1

33

""

16

1

1

"

""

18

1

19

20

1

1

2

"

"

22

1

1

Tsung Sau West,

1

1

1

3

1

1

>>

35

5

1

1

*

""

1

1

4

""

""

9

1

I

"

"

11

1

1

??

13

1

1

99

15

1

1

3

4

"

*

17

1

1

4

""

19

1

1

3

39

""

21

1

1

3

""

23

1

1

3

2

19

"

25

1

1

35

27

1

1

2

"3

6-1

2

1

1

3

"

* * *

4

1

1

3

...

6

1

1

8

1

1

"

"

10

1

1

**

""

12

1

1

""

14

1

1

"

"

16

1

"

18

1

1

"

20

1

99

22

Ι

1

co:

3

""

24

1

26

1

2

4

3

3

""

28

1

: 00

37

Woo Fung Street,

"J

39

""

55

""

"

"}

CIA CON -

2

1

1

Godowns

Pan Kwai Lane,.

"

}

1

1

1

1

...

1

I

""

9

1

1

>>

O OI OI

co:

3

:

:

:

:

:

:

[ XLV ]

LIST OF HOUSES IN No. 6 DISTRICT,—Continued.

A

No. of

Name of Street.

Back to House. back house.

B

Fronting on a lane less than 15 feet wide.

C

Insufficient

open space in rear.

D Abutting against hullside to

a depth of more than

4 feet.

Pan Kwai Lanc,...

No. of cubicles on

each Floor.

Ground. 1

4

10

24609

1

1

1

1

1

3

I

1

1

2

1

1

1

1

:

:

∞∞NNN

:

:

⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀

Sutherland Street,

>>

Godowns

1

:

:

""

1

1

1

4

1

1

8

1

2

>>

10

1

1

6

12

1

1

29

14

1

1

6

"J

+

it imoa O

5

Li Sing Street,

1

I

1

:

4

1

1

"

1

1

29

7

1

9

1

1

5

5

11

1

1

13

1

1

**

2

1

1

1

1

4

"

1

1

8

1

1

10

12

14

024

1

1

1

1

I

Wilmer Street,

1

3

}

52

ور

1

""

""

23

29

>>

""

8

1

1

1

10

I

1

12

1

:

Tsz Mi Alley,..

1

1

1

1

";

1

3

""

1

>>

9

1

4

99

11

1

1

13

1

5

""

15

1

""

17

1

19

Ι

1

""

21

1

1

23

1

1

29

1

I

5

1

1

I

""

8

1

1

10

1

"1

12

29

14

1

"}

16

1

"

18

1

""

20

1

1

22

1

1.

99

24

1

1

"

26

1

""

28

1

1

"

Sai Woo Lane,

1

1

1

1

:

:

:

[ XLVI ]

LIST OF HOUSES IN No. 6 DISTRICT,

Name of Street.

No. of Back to House. back house.

B

Fronting on a lane less than 15 feet wide.

C

Insufficient open space in rear.

Continued.

D Abutting against hillside to a depth of more than 4 feet.

No. of cubicles on each Floor.

Ground. 1

3

4

Sai Woo Lane,

"

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

4

4

1

1

:

11

1

1

1

13

}

I

1

15

1

1

17

I

1

}

19

1

1

I

""

21

1

1

33

23

1

1

1

""

1

1

1

"

1

}

1

1

1

31

1

1

3

"

1

1

1

4

93

10

1

>>

12

1

39

14

1

1

33

16

1

1

""

18

1

1

""

20

1

季节

22

1

1

""

24

1

1

5

33

26

1

1

1

""

28

1

J

Eastern Street

SAN

I

1

4

1

1

1

*

1

";

10

12

39

14

16

1

""

18

1

3

>"

20

I

22

1

24

1

26

1

1

28

1

1

30

1

...

32

1

1

34

1

1*

36

1

**

>>

38

*

40

33

42

3

4

2

...

"

44

:

>>

Ng Fuk Lane..

>>

"

In Kü Lane,

11

??

29

CN -

123

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

7

Godowns

8

9

""

10

11

"

12

13

"

14

""

* Basement.

:: co

3

4

+ ::

a

...

!

[ XLVII]

LIST OF HOUSES IN No. 6 DISTRICT,—Continued.

A

Name of Street.

No. of Back to House. back house.

B

Fronting on a lane less than 15 feet wide.

C

Insufficient

open space in rear.

D Abutting against hillside to a depth of more than 4 feet.

No. of cubicles on each Floor.

Ground.

1 2 3

Kum Ü Street,

I

:

1

1

"

་་

Godowns.

1

5

1

6

"

Queen's Road West,

1

1

3

I

"

??

1

1

29

1

1

23

""

1

1

多多

""

11

1

1

>>

25

13

1

1

15

1

1

"

17

1

1

""

19

1

1

21

1

1

23

1

1

12

25

1

1

29

99

39

27

1

1

"

""

29

1

1

3

3

""

31

1

""

33

I

1

3

"

35

1

3

""

"

9 3

...

37

1

1

3

100 naiina so co co co co co

3 2

3

""

39

1

1

""

41

1

1

43

1

1

+1

45

1

1

5"

"

29

47

1

1*

19

49

1

1

1

12

#

51

1

""

""

53

1

*

"2

55

1*

.་

66

57

1

*

59

1

*

27

61

1

1*

وو

""

63

1

1*

""

""

""

65

1

coco co co m⠀⠀

3

3

3

3

3

4

""

1

1

""

29.

69

1

1

""

71

1

""

1

4

3

"

73

1

1

59

75

1

1

77

Archway

"

79

1

3

4

""

29

81

1

1

5

""

83

1

1

5

1

1

""

وو

1

""

23

89

1

1

A

91

1

1

1*

"

93

""

Archway

4

""

95

1

1

1

*

3

33

"

97

1

1

1*

""

99

1

1*

4

101

1

1

1

*

""

103

1 *

""

105

1

1

*

2

"

>>

107

1

}

*

""

109

1

1

2

""

111

1

1

*

113

1

1*

2

,,

115

1

29

117

1

1

1

*

119

1

1

1

""

""

121

1

1

"5

...

123

1*

**

లు: :

3

4

""

""

* Basement.

[ XLVIII]

LIST OF HOUSES IN No. 6 DISTRICT,- Continued.

A

Name of Street.

No. of Back to House. back house.

B

Fronting on a lane less than 15 feet wide.

C

Insufficient open space in rear.

-

D Abutting against hillside to

a depth of more than

4 feet.

No. of cubicles on cach Floor.

Ground. 1 2 3

1

Queen's Road West,

125

127

29

129

"

131

1

1

1

1

1*

1

1

* *

3

*

*

133

135

"

39

99

137

*

#

139

*

"1

141

1*

99

143

**

""

"

☺ ☺

145

147

...

149

""

27

151

""

153

1

**

1*

1

5

""

155

1*

2

""

99

157

1*

""

159

1*

19

161

1

35

29

163

1*

"

29

165

1*

167

1

1*

*

>

169

1

1

1*

""

171

1

1

1*

""

""

RAA

173

1

1

1*

175

1

1*

177

1

1

1*

4

179

1

1

1*

"

181

1

1

""

183

1

1

1*

39

""

185

1

1

1*

""

""

187

1

1

1

"

19

189

1

1

*

""

وو

191

1

Ι

35

29

193

1

1

""

29

195

1

1

""

+9

29

***

197

1

1

199

1

201

1

*

22

203

1

1

3

5

5

3

6

27

205

"

་་

207

1

1

29

209

1

4

39

211

Archway

""

213

1

1

1*

3

39

215

1

1*

4

""

217

1

1*

219

...

1

}*

""

221

1

1*

""

""

223

1

1

1*

""

""

225

Archway

35

""

227

1

1

25

""

229

1

1

3

3

""

231

1

1

""

19

233

1

22

""

235

1

1

*

""

39

237

1

1*

*

""

""

2

"

"

99

>>

6

""

"J

8

""

""

10

""

12

""

>"

14

""

"

16

""

·

18

"

"

20

""

"

22

21

39

24

55

*Basement.

3

4

3

Y

[ XLIX]

LIST OF HOUSES IN No. 6 DISTRICT,—Continued.

A

Name of Street.

No. of Back to House. back house.

B

Fronting on a lane less

than 15 feet wide.

Insufficient

open space

in rear.

D Abutting against hillside to

a depth of

No. of cubicles on each Floor.

more than 4 feet.

Ground.

Ι

Queen's Road West,

26

28

""

30

""

"

32

""

"

34

""

36

1

99

""

36A

1

72

""

38

1

"

29

40

1

coco

2010: 20 10 09 20

3

co co co do

2

""

""

12

1

""

""

3

44

1

>>

">

46

1

""

""

48

1

""

"

50

1

"

52

1

1

""

54

1

1

">

56

1

1.

25

""

58

1

1

5

""

A

60

1

1

""

""

62

1

1

""

*

64

1

1

9

66

Ι

1

"

68

1

1

""

70

1

1

39

72

1

1

""

""

*

""

"

""

""

39

74

76 78

80

1

1

1

1

1

To bo torrijar or

HHHH :

Do NO

5

8

7

5

4001 - 7∞

5

4

1

1

1

1

80A

79

""

82

1

1

5

""

""

84

1

1

86

1

1

39

I

88

39

99

Western

Hotel

1

92

""

79

94

1

""

96

1

""

""

98

1

55

100

1

59

102

""

104

2

5

106

39

108

""

""

110

""

112

""

>>

114

??

""

116

12

99

118

""

120

29.

29

122

""

122A

>>

""

"

124 126

""

""

128

""

130

"9

39

132

""

""

134

""

136

1

1

""

"9

99

*****

138

1

1

140

1

1

142

1

1

144

}

1

146

1

1

4

""

99

""

29

""

""

* * *

148

1

1

4

150

1

152

1

1

5 3 3

154

]

1

156

1

1

⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀0 10 10 10 H 10 ON GO CO CO

⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀

3

2

3

""

L

LIST OF HOUSES IN No. 6 DISTRICT,—Continued.

A

Name of Street.

B

Fronting on No. of Back to a laue less House. back house. than 15

feet wide.

C

Insufficient

open space in rear.

D Abutting against hillside to a depth of more than 4 feet.

No. of cubicles on each Floor.

Ground.

1 2 3 4

...

3

3

3

Queen's Road West,

158

1

1

160

1

1

""

162

1

1

>>

164

1

3 2

"

166

Ι

""

168

1

2

170

1

1

2

"

ލ

172

1

174

""

34

176

1

1

""

""

178

I

I

2

"

180

1

""

>>

182

1

1

3

""

184

1

1

2

...

22

""

186

1

1

...

"

""

188

1

1

"

""

190

1

1

93

23

192

1

1

3

""

194

1

1

3

""

"

196

1

""

"3

198

1

32

""

200

1

""

202

1

59

25

""

204 Archway

ico co coimaa janico co co co co co ay

2

3

2

2

2

3

3

Sai Cheong Lane,

"

12

Queen's Road West,

206

208

1

??

""

210

وو

,,

212

""

214

95

""

216

""

""

218

220

""

19

222

""

""

39

19

224

Eastern Street, (New A2

building.)

1

B2

1

""

New Praya Connaught

1

Road.

66

~ :

1

1

1*

1

:

:

:..

3

co:

3

2

ON CO

3

: co

1

1

1

1*

10:

5

1

1*

1

4

1

1

8

1

9

1

"

10

1

...

11

1

12

1

13

1

14

1

دو

15

1

1

""

16

1

""

17

1

******

18

1

19

20

21

...

22

Old Praya,

New Reclamation,

1

:

2

1

...

...

""

6

"

10

""

11

1

""

* Basement.

...

:

:

:.

:

:

:

4:..

:

...

:

3

4

...

...

...

:

:

:

:

3

:

...

2

3

4

2

2

3

4

:

6

cmc:

:

...

:

2

[LI]

LIST OF HOUSES IN No. 6 DISTRICT,-Continued.

A

No. of

Name of Street.

Back to House. back house.

B

Fronting on a lane less than 15 feet wide.

Insufficient

open space in rear.

D

Abutting

against hillside to a depth of more than 4 feet.

No. of cubicles on

each Floor.

CO

Ground.

12:

3

New Reclamation,

12

1

13

1

""

14

1

""

15

1

16

1

17

1

""

18

1

""

19

39

20

21

39

22

""

3

April, 1897.

THE MEDICAL OFFICER OF HEALTH.

Q

|

...

:

...

...

...

کن

3

5

H

...

⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀

...

...

...

...

THOMAS HORE,

Inspector.

SIR,

[ LII]

Appendix No. 14.

GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL,

HONGKONG, 2nd March, 1895.

I have the honour to forward to you Dr. Lowson's report upon the late Plague epidemic in this Colony.

It reflects the greatest credit on its author for the care with which the records have been kept from the beginning, the practical way in which the symptoms, progress and treatment of the disease and its post mortem appearances have been treated, and the recommendations that have been made to prevent its occurrence in the future.

The necessity for remedying the results of faulty construction of the houses in the Chinese quarters, the want of ventilation, light and air in them, the impossibility of keeping them clean and wholesome, the inadequate water supply, the want of proper drainage, the overcrowded condition of the houses, the filthy condition of wells, the necessity for proper latrine accommodation, and the enormous amount of filth collected in the houses have now been fully revealed. I first called the attention of Government to the state of things I have mentioned in my report dated the 15th April, 1874, within six months of my arrival in this Colony. In this report I mentioned by name the streets and lanes, and the position of many gullies without a name in that portion of Taipingshan which has now been walled in, and the condition of filth in which I found the houses, also streets and alleys in other portions of the town; almost the same state of things was found in 1894. Yet a further special report was sent in by a Commission appointed to verify the statements made in my report which was sent in in May 1875. In 1880 Mr. CHADWICK arrived with a Royal Commission to investigate the condition of things described, and his full report to the Secretary of State appeared in a Blue Book. Six years afterwards he again visited the Colony and expressed his surprise at finding how little had been done to remedy the state of things he had described, and again reported on them. Many laws have been made in the twenty years previous to 1894 to remedy the insanitary state of the Colony, but most have remained dead letters owing to the difficulties of enforcing them and the prejudices of the Chinese especially and other sections of the community.

Since 1874 the divisions of the City of Victoria inhabited by Chinese have increased more than three fold in size, and the new portions are in nearly as bad a condition as the old.

The labours of Hercules in cleansing the Augean stables were a trifle compared with that which the Government has to contend with in the near future in cleansing the City of Victoria and other inhabited portions of the Colony.

Another report from the Permanent Committee of the Sanitary Board will describe the work done by those working under their supervision.

Dr. Lowson's report is a most interesting and valuable addition to medical literature, and will no doubt receive the commendations it deserves. He was most unsparing of himself during the progress of the epidemic and untiring in his efforts to render assistance to all who were working under his superintendence. The work done by him during this trying period cannot be too well recognised.

That the latrines are a source of propagating the infection as described by Dr. Lowson there is no doubt, and proof is afforded by the dates of the closing of the sur- rounding houses. I found on inquiry that during the end of May and the beginning of June, when the prevailing winds were from the cast and north, the houses to the west and south of the latrines were closed and afterwards, when the prevailing winds were

1

.

[ LIII]

from the south and west, the houses to the north and east of the latrines were closed, being found infected and more than three deaths having occurred in each of them. Mr. RAM made elaborate plans of the City of Victoria showing where the plague existed, and the proportion of houses in each district that were infected.

I have the honour to be,

The Honourable J. H. STEWART LOCKHART,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

Acting Colonial Secretary.

Appendix No. 14 (a).

PH. B. C. AYRES, Colonial Surgeon.

EXTRACTS

From the Report of Mr. Osbert Chadwick, on the Sanitary Condition of Hongkong, dated 19th July, 1882. [C.-3387.]

66

+6

"149.-The absence of any lane or alley giving access to the backs of the houses, a "defect but too common in Victoria, is a great impediment to improvement in sanitation. It is a principle, almost universally admitted, that drains should not pass under the houses, but where there are no back alleys this is impossible. The want of a backway "to the house is an almost insuperable obstacle to the introduction of the dry-earth, or any other improved system of conservancy. For the effective application of such systems, the work of cleansing and removal must be done by persons employed and directed by some public authority. If left to private persons, neither regularity nor "thoroughness can be ensured. In the absence of a back entrance, the Government "employees must traverse the whole dwelling, an arrangement to which the Chinese

not unnaturally object, for reasons that will be stated under the head of scavenging.

66

66

150.-In framing regulations as to open spaces, continuous back alleys should "be insisted on wherever practicable, and in case of existing buildings every effort should “be made to introduce means of access to the back parts of them. The Chinese like to "retain such alleys as private property, and to close them with gates at night. There "will be no objection to this especially if, following the general tenour of their own "customs, the neighbours appoint some person to be responsible for order and cleanli- "ness in the common alley. The obstruction of the alley by partitions of any sort "should be absolutely prohibited in new houses. Further, to encourage the construction "of alleys, a smaller proportion of space might be permitted, when in the form of a “continuous lane communicating with the public street, than when it takes the form of "an enclosed court

66

666

"151.--The following are the amounts of open space prescribed by authorities in England. The Metropolitan Buildings Act (18 & 19 Vic., c. 122, sect. 29) specifies that Every building used or intended to be used as a dwelling house, unless all the rooms "can be lighted and ventilated from a street or alley adjoining shall have in the rear or "on the side thereof, an open space exclusively belonging thereto, of the extent at least "of one hundred square feet.'

44

[LIV]

"152.--The Model Bye-laws issued by the Local Government Board for the use of sanitary authorities are more precise, and more exacting, in their demands. Local sanitary authorities frame their own regulations, subject always to the approval and "sanction of the Local Government Board. The Model Bye-laws are promulgated by "that body for the guidance of sanitary authorities, and set forth the minimum provisions "which will, under ordinary circumstances, be sanctioned. The Model Bye-laws for a great number of municipal purposes have been prepared, and I would strongly recom- "mend that the Colonial Government should be supplied with a complete set.

I am "well aware that they are not by any means literally applicable to Colonial requirements, "but they cannot fail to afford many valuable suggestions.

46

66

“153.—In Part IV., New Streets and Buildings, pp. 29-32, with regard to the sufficiency of space about buildings to secure a free circulation of air, paragraph 53 provides that in front of the house, along its whole frontage, there shall be an open space, free from walls or other obstructions more than 7 feet high, not less than 24 "feet wide. In other words, from the front of the house to the boundary of the property "on the opposite side of the road there must be a clear space of not less than 24 feet."

66

!

APPENDIX.

:

?

:

:

སྟྭ

:

ALCOHOLIC LIQUORS COMMISSION.

Appendix No. 1.

COMMISSION BY HIS EXCELLENCY THE ADMINISTRATOR.

[L.S.] WILSONE BLACK,

Major-General,

Administering the Government.

Whereas it is expedient that a Commission be appointed to inquire into and report on the importation into Hongkong, and the manufacture and sale in Hongkong of Alcoholic Liquors of all kinds, and into the operation of the laws regulating the same, and to ascertain whether any and what descriptions of crude, inferior, adulterated, or deleterious liquors are imported, manufactured, or sold and by whom and to what extent, and what measures may usefully be taken to improve the laws and to check the importation, manufacture, and sale in licensed houses and elsewhere of such crude, inferior, adulterated, or injurious liquors.

Now, therefore, I, WILSONE BLACK, C.B., Major-General Commanding Her Majesty's Forces in China and Hongkong, and administering the Government of Hongkong, in Executive Council assembled, do hereby under the powers vested in me by Ordinance 27 of 1886, entitled The Commissioners Powers Ordinance, 1886, appoint you—

(1) The Honourable HENRY ERNEST WODEHOUSE, C.M.G.,

(2) WILLIAM HARTIGAN, Esquire, M.D.,

(3) HUGH MCCALLUM, Esquire,

(4) JOHN JOSEPH FRANCIS, Esquire, Q.C.,

(5) The Reverend ROWLAND FRANCIS COBBOLD, M.A.,

to be a Commission for the purpose of instituting, making, and conducting such inquiry; And I do hereby appoint you the said Honourable HENRY ERNEST WODEHOUSE to be the Chairman of such Commission; And I do hereby appoint Mr. FRANK BROWNE to be the Secretary to such Commission; And I do hereby order and direct that for all or any of the purposes of this Commission three members thereof inclusive of the Chairman shall be and constitute a quorum. And I do further hereby order and direct that the said Commission shall, for the purpose of making the said inquiry, have all such powers as are vested in the Supreme Court of this Colony or in any Judge thereof on the occasion of any suit or action in respect of the following matters, viz.:— The enforcing the attendance of witnesses and examining them on oath, affirma-

tion or otherwise;

The compelling the production of documents;

The punishing persons guilty of contempt;

The ordering the inspection of any property; with power also, for the purpose

of this Commission, to enter and view any premises.

And I do hereby further direct that every examination of witnesses shall be held in private; And I do further require you to report to me the evidence and your opinion thereon; and I hereby charge all persons in the Public Service to assist you herein.

Given under my hand and the Public Seal of the Colony in Executive Council, this 14th day of February, One thousand eight hundred and ninety-eight.

By Command,

Council Chamber, Hongkong, 14th February, 1898.

J. G. T. BUCKLE,

Clerk of Councils.

[ i ]

Appendix No. 2.

Questions sent to Colonel The O'Gorman, D.A.A.G., Hongkong.

HONGKONG, 4th March, 1898.

will

SIR-I am requested, on behalf of the Commission appointed to enquire into the importation, manufacture, and sale of alcoholic liquors in Hongkong, to ask if you be so kind as to favour the Commissioners with information on the following points

1. The number of cases of drunkenness reported to you during the year 1897

amongst the Garrison, also the strength of the Garrison.

2. To what extent does ordinary and excessive drunkenness affect the career

of a soldier? Give instances.

3. From your experience do you consider that the amount of drunkenness in the Garrison is excessive? Do you think that the excess, if any, is due to the quality of the liquor rather than to the quantity consumed? 4. Have a considerable number of good conduct men become bad or indifferent

during their stay in Hongkong on account of alcoholism?

5. Is the canteen under military control? (A) Whence is the liquor obtained? (B) How far is the canteen effective in inducing the soldiers. to neglect the city drinking taverns and saloons?

The Commissioners will be further much obliged if you will favour them with any remarks on the objects of their enquiry. A copy of the Commission is enclosed herewith.

I have the honour to be,

{

1

¿

?

{

Colonel THE O'GORMAN, D.A.A.G.

Sir,

Your obedient Servant,

FRANK BROWNE, Secretary for the Commission.

To FRANK BROWNE, Esq.,

Secretary to the Commission.

HONGKONG, 5th May, 1898.

SIR, With reference to your letter of the 4th March I have the honour to render a report upon the subject of the consumption of alcoholic liquors by soldiers in Hongkong. In sending this report I beg to observe that I much regret the delay, which was caused by my having to obtain much of the information from Singapore from the West Yorkshire Regiment who garrisoned Hongkong in 1897.

REPORT.

I assume that you refer to cases of drunkenness among British Troops because the Indian soldiers' consumption of alcoholic spirit is infinitisimal and the report would be misleading if these Troops were considered in the calculation.

(b) It also would not be right to include Non-Commissioned Officers in this report because a Sergeant, to keep his rank, must be a sober man, a single case of drunkenness might lead to his reduction and would militate against his claims to promotion to rank of Color-Sergeant, Quarter-Master-Sergeant, Sergeant-Major, or to any position of responsibility or trust, regimental or garrison: besides which a Sergeant is a man of superior education and ability, and he takes pride in supporting creditably his position.

i

1

:

[iii]

Similar remarks, modified, apply to a corporal who is practically always a

didate for promotion to Sergeant. I therefore confine my observations to the Private Soldier, Gunner, and Sapper.

(1) Number of cases reported to Commanding Officers and Company Officers in 1897 amounted to 951.

Strength of British Garrison 1,509.

(2) Ordinary drunkenness, by which I understand fewer than 4 instances within a year, would not materially affect a private soldier's career provided that in his debau- ches he is not guilty of insubordination or violence. Here, however, the quality of the liquor is an important factor: in the Canteen or Institutes the liquor is always of good quality and a soldier may get drunk on it, be put into the Guard room and be duly disposed of with a fine or award of some days' confinement to Barracks, but the Chinese liquor (commonly called "Bazaar liquor") has very frequently the effect of making men violent, and one act of such violence might seriously affect a man's career.

For instance, a soldier gets drunk and becomes violent, he assaults a Non- Commissioned Officer, is tried by District Court-Martial and probably is awarded stop- page of pay and imprisonment.

This is likely to sour a man's temper and drive him to commit further crime: on discharge from the Army on completion of term of service he would probably not be given a "good" character, a very serious matter because a soldier trusts to employ- ment in civil life on the strength of a good character from his Company and Commanding Officers.

Commanding Officers have reported that this cheap Chinese liquor makes men mad for a time and is the cause of most of the serious crimes. Non-Commissioned Officers have told me that this fiery spirit takes effect upon soldiers very quickly, drives them off to brothels, and is the cause of nearly all the cases of insubordination and other crimes.

Excessive drunkenness ruins a soldier's career; he is deprived of pay, imprisoned, forfeits privileges such as passes, etc.; he breaks down in health, becomes a jail bird and an incumbrance in his corps, and on discharge is given a "bad" character; he leaves the Army a discontented man and his example is detrimental to recruiting.

(3) No; drunkenness in this Garrison is not excessive, one seldom sees a drunken soldier by day in the streets and not often at night.

(4) No; instances are very rare where good conduct soldiers have taken to drunken habits during their stay in Hongkong.

(5) Yes, under military control.

Usually from Messrs. McEwEN or Messrs. A. YOUNGER. Whiskies, Gin, etc., from respectable English merchants in Hongkong.

B. Most successful inasmuch as the liquor is good, cheap, and easily obtained. Soldiers do, however, occasionally go on a spree, and from curiosity, good fellow- ship, or other cause-perhaps because the liquor is cheap --enter some of the many drink- ing saloons and imbibe this fiery Chinese intoxicant.

Drunkenness in the Army is undoubtedly much on the decrease; the soldier is well fed and well cared for; he gets clothes in sufficient quantity for his wants; he is encouraged to take part in shooting competitions, cricket, football, athletic competi- tions and exercises. Theatres, sing songs, etc., etc., are kept up and entertainments provided for him; every encouragement is given him to enjoy himself in a healthy and recreative manner. Corps support Army Temperance Association and Good Templar Lodges which soldiers frequent in considerable numbers; most of these benefits to the

[iv]

soldier are the growth of recent years and they tend to make him fairly content with his lot so long as he remains a temperate and well-conducted man.

Unfortunately in Hongkong the Barracks are in the town and access to taverns is easy, therefore men who are easily tempted have unusual facilities for falling into vice. I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your obedient Servant,

N. P. O'GORMAN, Lt. Col.,

Chief Staff Officer.

(Minutes on Answers.)

This report is of no use to us unless Lieutenant-Colonel The O'GORMAN will tell us how many of the 951 cases of drunkenness during 1897 were accompanied by crimes of violence or were clearly the result of that inferior liquor which Commanding Officers speak of as driving men mad.

Taking his reply to Question 3 in connection with Surgeon-Colonel EVATT'S report I should say the serious cases were very few or none, but we ought to have as accurate information as possible.

10th May, 1898.

J. J. F.

This report contains the expression of an opinion that there exist in the Colony cheap Chinese liquors which have the effect of making men "mad" and "violent." This should be capable of verification or refutation.

10th May, 1898.

R. F. C.

I have seen Colonel THE O'GORMAN subsequent to his furnishing this report, and I asked him how many of these 951 cases of drunkenness were accompanied by crimes of violence, and he stated that he could not say that one was, adding further that in his experience of many stations Hongkong is one of the best for the private soldier.

W. C. H. H.

14th May, 1898.

Questions sent to G. Maclean, Esq., R.N., Deputy-Inspector General of Fleets and Hospitals, H. M. Naval Hospital, Hongkong; Surgeon-Colonel Evatt, P.M.O., Hongkong; Dr. Atkinson, P.C.M.O., Hongkong.

HONGKONG, 28th February, 1898.

SIR,--On behalf of the Commission which has been appointed to enquire into the sale, manufacture, and consumption of spirituous liquors in Hongkong, I have the honour to ask if you will kindly furnish information on the following points:---

1. The number of patients suffering from alcoholism admitted to hospital, or

coming under treatment during the year 1897.

2. Whether any of the cases showed symptoms of suffering from any intoxicant

other than alcohol; and, if so, from what intoxicant.

[v]

3. Whether you have any reason to think that the condition of any of the cases was due to the quality rather than to the quantity of the liquor consumed.

4. Have any instances of delirium tremens come under your notice which

considered to be the result of a brief period of intoxication?

you

The Commission will be further much obliged by your favouring them with any observations that may occur to you generally on the subject of the importation, sale, and consumption of alcoholic liquors which may assist them in their inquiry.

Your communications will be considered as confidential in any respect that you may consider necessary.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your obedient Servant,

F. BROWNE,

Secretary for the Commission.

From Surgeon-Colonel G. J. H. Evalt, M.D., Army Medical Staff. To the Secretary for the Commission to enquire into the sale, &c. of spirituous

liquors in Hongkong.

OFFICE OF PRINCIPAL MEDICAL OFFICER, H. M. FORCES,

CHINA AND HONGKONG, 8th March, 1898.

SIR, With reference to your letter of 28th ultimo, I have the honour to inform you that-

1. Nine cases of alcoholism were admitted to hospital during the year 1897.

2. None of these cases showed symptoms of suffering from any other in-

toxicant than alcohol.

3. The condition of the cases was apparently due to the quantity rather than

the quality of the liquor consumed.

4. There were no cases of delirium tremens which were considered to be the

result of a brief period of intoxication.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your obedient Servant,

G. J. H. EVatt, Surgeon-Colonel,

Principal Medical Officer, China and Hongkong.

No. 205

GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL,

HONGKONG, 26th April, 1898.

SIR,-In reply to yours of the 28th February last, I have the honour to reply as follows to your several queries:-----

1. 67 cases with 2 deaths.

2. Cases have been admitted to the Government Civil Hospital during 1897

suffering from the following intoxicant in addition to alcohol:-

i. Datura.

ii. Indian Hemp.

[vi]

3. My opinion is that the condition of these patients has been chiefly due to the quantity and not the quality of the liquor they have consumed.

4. Yes.

With reference to the latter part of your letter it is impossible here to discuss generalities, and I think the better plan would be to call me before the Commission to give evidence.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your obedient Servant,

F. BRowNE, Esq.,

Secretary for the Commission.

J. M. ATKINSON, Principal Ciril Medical Officer.

R. N. HOSPITAL,

HONGKONG, 2nd March, 1898.

Sin,-In reply to your letter of the 28th ultimo, I beg to furnish the following replies to the questions propounded therein:-

1. 3 cases of patients suffering from alcoholism were treated in the Naval

Hospital in the

year 1897.

2. No other intoxicant than alcohol was specially indicated in these cases.

3. Reply in negative.

4. Reply in negative.

As will be observed from the foregoing replies my experience of alcoholism in patients in the Naval Hospital has been altogether too limited to justify me in expres- sing any confident opinion on the subject of the enquiry referred to in your letter; but I have heard from Medical Officers of ships in harbour that they have frequently to deal with cases among their ships' companies of men suffering from the effects of what thay have reason to believe to be deleterious, adulterated liquors supplied to them on shore; and I am informed that the cases of intoxication which occur in the Seamen's Club are invariably the result of inferior liquor supplied to the men from outside by native vendors. I need hardly add the expression of my personal opinion that a careful supervision of the importation, sale, and consumption of alcoholic liquors in the Colony is in the highest degree desirable in the interests of the health and well-being of the community.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your obedient Servant,

G. MACLEAN,

Dep. Insp. General, R.N.

The Secretary to the Commission on Alcoholic Liquors, &c.

Questions sent to V. A. Lawford, Esq., R.N., Secretary to Commodore.

Hongkong, March 4, 1898.

SIR, I am requested, on behalf of the Commission appointed to enquire into the importation, manufacture, and sale of alcoholic liqours in Hongkong to ask if you will

1

1

j

:

į

[vii]

be so kind as to favour the Commissioners with information on the following points :-

1. The number of cases of drunkenness occurring in Hongkong from the Fleet, which were reported to you during 1897, also the number of men in the Fleet on this station during 1897.

2. To what extent does ordinary and excessive drunkenness, respectively,

affect the career of a sailor or marine? Quote instances.

3. From your experience do you consider that the amount of drunkenness in

the Fleet on this station is excessive? Do you think that the excess, if any, is due to the quality of the liquor rather than to the quantity consumed?

4. Have a considerable number of good conduct men become bad or indifferent

during their stay in Hongkong on account of alcoholism?

5. Is the Royal Naval Seamen's Club, Queen's Road East, under naval control?

(A.) Whence is the liquor obtained? (B.) How far is this Club suc- cessful in inducing the men to neglect the city drinking taverns or saloons ?

The Commissioners will be further much obliged if you will favour them with any remarks on the objects of their enquiry.

A copy of the Commission is enclosed herewith. Your communications will be considered as confidential in any respect that you may consider necessary.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your obedient Servant,

FRANK BROWNE,

Secretary for the Commission.

!

V. A. LAWFORD, Esq., R.N.,

Secretary to Commodore.

H.M.S. "TAMAR

AT HONGKONG,

12th April, 1898.

SIR,-In reply to your letter of 5th March, I have the honour to forward here- with the attached reports (5) from ships which were present at Hongkong on the date of your enquiry.

2. As such cases of drunkenness as ordinarily occur in a ship are not reported specifically to the Senior Officer (although shown in detail in the quarterly returns of punishment), it is not practicable to give a definite answer to your first question. The number of men in the Fleet on this station during 1897 averaged between 5,000 and 6,000.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your obedient Servant,

The Secretary to the Commission on Alcoholic Liquors,

Hongkong.

VINCENT A. Lawford,

Secretary to Commodore.

[viii]

H.M.S. "TAMAR," AT HONGKONG,

10th March, 1898.

Drunkenness in the Royal Navy.

SIR, I have the honour to submit the following answers to the questions in the letter from the Secretary of the Alcoholic Liquors Commission, dated 5th March, 1898, re drunkenness amongst meu of Her Majesty's Fleet at Hongkong:-

1. and 2. By scale of punishment laid down by the Admiralty a man ordinarily drunk may return to his leave and get off with a small punishment, whereas from excessive drinking he inost probably breaks his leave, and of course, gets a heavier punishment which affects his career and pension. 3. No; but on all stations there are places where vile liquor may be obtained, and the quality of the liquor will often knock over immediately men who are not accustomed to drink on board.

4. Not in this ship, but, being a stationary one, men get much more leave

and consequently make their money spread over a longer period.

5. Yes.

(a.) CALDBECK, MACGREGOR & Co., and MACEWEN, FRICKEL & Co. principally. The spirits supplied are the same as used in the Hongkong Club.

(b.) Considerably. The Club is open till 11.30 p.m. Amusements are provided with good and cheap liquor, consequently men have not the inducement to go to outside places.

I would suggest that, as at Malta, all public houses should be under police super- vision by periodical taking of samples of the liquor sold, and, if found bad or adulterated, that house be put out of bounds.

I have the honour to be.

Sir,

Commodore

SWINTON C. HOLLAND, A.D.C.,

&e..

fc.,

&e.

Your obedient Servant,

W. H. F. TAYLOR,

Commander.

H.M.S. "IMMORTALITÉ," HONGKONG, 13th March, 1898.

Drunkenness amongst the men of the Royal Navy, Hongkong.

SIR,-I have the honour to submit the following remarks called for by you relative to drunkenness amongst men of the Royal Navy at Hongkong.

1. Not known.

2. The usual punishments for drunkenness naturally affect the career of seamen or marines. I have often noticed that drunkenness leads to the very serious crime of smuggling liquor into the ship.

ན་

{

i.

:

[ix]

3. No, except at Japanese ports where the vile and poisonous liquor sold to the men capsizes them at once.

4. No.

5. Yes.

(a.) Not known but believed to be good.

(b.) Very successful.

Commodore

SWINTON C. HOLLAND, A.D.C.,

Hongkong.

I have the honour to be.

Sir,

Your obedient Servant.

E. CHICHESTER.

Captain.

H.M.S. CENTURION" AT HONGKONG.

16th March, 1898.

Drunkenness amongst the Ship's Company.

SIR,-With reference to the information required by the Commission appointed to enquire into the sale of alcoholic liquors at Hongkong, I have the honour to report as follows:-

Par. 1. Number of cases of returning from leave drunk, 9; of leave breaking (probably due to drunkenness) 48. The ship's company numbers 700 ; these cases occurred in a period of about two months.

Par. 2. Drunkenness and leave breaking affect a man's career in the service to

a serious extent. For instance:-

5th May. Two men of very good character awarded cells for leave

breaking offences.

7th May. Two men deprived of Good Conduct Badges for leave

breaking offences.

Par. 3. From my own experience which is short and from what I have been told, I do not consider that the drunkeneess at Hongkong is so bad as at some of the Japanese ports, and the liquor is decidedly better at most of the grog shops; at some few, however, it is of inferior quality.

Par. 4. No, the cases have not been numerous amongst the ship's company

of the "Centurion,”

As stated in par. 3, the liquor generally is of pretty good quality; but, no doubt, the cases of drunkenness would be lessened if it could be ensured that no inferior qualities be sold.

Commodore

SWINTON C. HOLLAND, A.D.C.,

Hongkong.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your obedient Servant,

J. E. JELLICOE,

Captain.

[ x ]

H.M.S. "PEACOCK ' AT HONGKONG,

22nd March, 1898.

H.M.S." Peacock." Drunkenness amongst men, at Hongkong.

SIR,-With reference to your memo. of 5th instant, I beg to report that no cases of drunkenness have occurred amongst the men of this ship whilst at Hongkong.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your obedient Servant,

THE COMMODORE.

Minute by the Commodore.

PERCY S. ST. JOHN,

Lieutenant and Commander.

Returned to "Peacock."

Attention is drawn to the directions that "each paragraph is to be taken sepa- rately."

31st March, 1898.

SWINTON C. HOLLAND,

Commodore.

Minute by the Lieutenant and Commander, II.M.S." Peacock."

THE COMMODORE,

1. Not known.

2. Excessive drunkenness prevents a man's advancement and ruins his career in the Navy, subsequently materially affecting the amount of his pension.

3. I consider the amount of drunkenness on the station excessive compared with other stations on which I have served.

4. Not on board "Peacock.”

5. Yes.

A. Not known.

B. From all accounts, most successful.

í.

H.M.S. PEACOCK,"

5th April, 1898.

PERCY S. ST. JOHN,

Lieutenant and Commander.

[xi]

H.M.S. "ARCHER," HOOW, Homow, 27th March. 1898....

The Alcoholic Liquors Commission.

SIR,-In compliance with your letter dated 5th March, 1898, I have the honour to forward the attached remarks.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your obedient Servant,

Commodore

S. C. HOLLAND, A.D.C.,

Hongkong.

CH. E. KINGSMILL,

Commander.

The Alcoholic Liquors Commission.

1. I am unable to answer these questions as Archer's returns for 1897 have gone home, ship having paid off on December 31st, 1897.

2. Ruins his career. I have no instance to quote for same reasons as question (1), 3. (a) No; (b) In most cases, not only in Hongkong, but more especially in out- ports, where Chinese have control of retailing liquor on their lands, due to quality of liquor.

4. Not in Archer.

5. Yes.

(a) Unable to state.

(4) Most decidedly does the Naval Club induce the men to neglect the city taverns and saloons. I have always found that the men I have had to punish for drunkenness stated that the bad liquor they drank in the neighbourhood of the brothels was their excuse for their offences.

CH. E. KINGSMILL,

Commander.

HONGKONG, March 5, 1898.

Messrs. JARDINE, MATHESON & Co.,

General Managers,

CHINA SUGAR REFINERY.

GENTLEMEN,-1 have the honour by direction of the Commission now enquiring into the manufacture, importation and sale of alcoholic liquors in Hongkong, to invite you to furnish the Commission' with full and definite answers to the following ques-

tions

1. What was the total quantity of Rum distilled by you, in the Colony, during

1897 ?

:

[ xii]

2. What was the total quantity of Rum sold by you during 1897–(A) to firms and persons in the Colony; (B) to firms and persons outside the Colony ?

[A letter was sent later asking for names of firms and persons and

quantities supplied to each in answers to A and B.--Secretary.]

3. What was the total quantity of rectified spirit of wine distilled by you during

1897 in the Colony?

4. Specify the various materials used by you during 1897, in the Colony, in the

manufacture of rectified spirit of wine and the approximate quantity of each such material.

5. Do you manufacture rectified spirit of wine of more than one alcoholic strength? If so, specify the different strengths so made and sold, giving the total quantity of each kind.

6. How was the rectified spirit of wine you manufactured during 1897 disposed of, i.e., was it all sold—(A) as spirit of wine; (B) or was some of it sold in other forms; (C) and if so, in what forms; (D) giving the total quan- tity of each such form sold; (E) and a list of the firms and persons to whom it was sold?

Give a list of the firms and persons in the Colony to whom you sold rectified spirit of wine during 1897 and the approximate quantity so sold to each.

Give a list of the firms and persons outside the Colony to whom you sold rectified spirit during 1897 and the approximate quantity so sold to each.

Your communications will be considered as confidential in any respect that you may consider necessary.

I have the honour to be,

Gentlemen,

Your obedient Servant,

FRANK BROWNE, Secretary for the Commission,

[The replies to this letter were to be treated as confidential.—Secretary.]

Questions sent to Chinese holders of Distillery Licences.

The Commissioners appointed to enquire into the importation, manufacture and sale of Alcoholic Liquors in Hongkong will be glad to receive as complete answers as possible to the questions given below. All communications will be regarded by the Commissioners as confidential. Please send in your answers as soon as possible.

FRANK BROWNE, Secretary for the Commission.-

Hongkong, May 23, 1898.

1. Give a complete list of the various kinds of spirits which you distil and manu- facture.

2. Give a complete list of the various substances which you use in the distillation and manufacture of alcoholic liquors.

3. Give the quantity of each kind of alcoholic liquor which you distilled and manufactured during 1897.

[xiii ]

4. Give the quantity of each kind of alcoholic liquor which you sold during 1897——

(a) To firms and persons in the Colony.

(6) To firms and persons outside the Colony.

5. Do you import alcoholic liquors from places in China, and if so, give a list of those so imported by you and the quantity of each kind imported during 1897.

6. Give a list from your books of the firms and persons in the Colony whom you have supplied with alcoholic liquors, giving the kind of liquor, also the quantity, supplied to each.

[The replies to this letter were to be treated as confidential- Secretary.]

The Chinese translation of the Questions sent to Chinese holders of Distillery

Licences.

委查香港酒業委員經歷鮑 號東主

知悉照得現奉

明切切特諗 本委員所自知而秘密者决不宣示於外爾等毋庸見疑務須早日覆 須按下開所問各款逐一詳細覆明繕列一單爲要至於所覆各欸係 督憲札委查察本港發售各式烈酒無論自然自製或販或運各酒均

一千八百九十八年

計開

一凡蒸製各式酒均須詳細清列一單

某人逐一詳明列淸 來各式烈酒若干詳細淸列一單 至若運來之酒賣與何處某店 五.中國內地會有烈酒運來否如有則須於一千八百九十七年內運

賬部抄出 四凡一千八百九十七年內所發售各烈酒若干詳細淸列一單 卽賣與本港某店某人若干 并賣與港外某店某人若干 均照 三凡一千八百九十七年內所蒸製各烈酒每欸若干詳細清列一單 二凡蒸製各式酒所用各物料詳細淸列一單

!

!

[ xiv]

Appendix 3.-LIST OF APPLICANTS FOR SPIRIT LICENCES FOR THE YEAR COMMENCING

No.

Name of Applicant.

Whether before Licensed.

Description

of Licence.

Sign of House.

Situation of House.

1

JOACHIM GOMES,

Yes.

Publican's licence.

The Man at the Wheel.

No. 306, Queen's Road

Central.

2

I. P. MADAR,

New Victoria Hotel.

27

No. 9, Queen's Road

Central.

3

G. J. CASANOVA,

L. M. LOBO,

5

A. R. Hock Goon,

Vide page following application No. 21

وو

""

The Peak Hotel.

The Kowloon Hotel.

No.

The Grand Hotel.

""

6

J. A. DREWES,

Yes.

Praya East Hotel.

22

+7

M. STERNBERG,

8

J. SILBERMAN,

J

9

G. NEUBRUNN,

10

C. A. STUHLMANN,

19

Rural Building Lot. No.

77, the Peak.

Elgin Road, Kowloon.

Nos. 240, 242 and 244, Queen's Road Central.

Nos. 38 and 39, Praya

East.

The Colonial Hotel.

No. 1, Jubilee Street.

The Globe Hotel.

No. 184, Queen's Road

Central.

The Land we live in Hotel. | Nos. 332 & 334, Queen's

Road Central.

The Travellers' Hotel.

Nos. 12 and 13, Queen

Victoria Street.

11

WM. KRATER,

Rose Shamrock & Thistle. | No. 90, Queen's Road

22

Central.

The Criterion Hotel.

12

FRED. MELHUISII,

"

Jy

Nos. 21 and 23, Pottinger

Street.

13

F. J. F. BEDFORD,

The Western Hotel.

>>

>>

14

HANS JERTRUM,

The German Tavern.

22

Nos. 90 and 92 Queen's

Road West.

No. 268, Queen's Road Central and also three upper floors of No. 266, Queen's Road Central.

:

[

[ xv ]

1ST DECEMBER, 1897, AND ENDING 30TH NOVEMBER, 1898.

Names and Additions of

Proposed Sureties.

in each Case.

Previous History

Remarks in each Case.

Report of Captain Superintendent of Police.

1. P. Vass. 2. Lam Kiu.

Has held a licence

I. House well conducted.

No objection.

for about 29 years.

II. Character of applicant good.

F. H. MAY,

9.11.97.

1. Dorabjee Nowrojee. 2. Paul Jordan.

Has held a licence for about 9 years.

I. House well conducted and cha- No objection.

racter of applicant good.

F. H. MAY,

9.11.97.

1. A. Findlay Smith. 2. J. Maclehose.

Has held a licence

for about 2 months.

I. Hotel satisfactorily conducted. II. No objection to renewal.

No objection.

F. H. MAY,

9.11.97.

1. Dorabjee Nowrojee. 2. I. P. Madar.

Has held a licence for about 6 years.

F. H. MAY,

1. Loong Kee.

2. A. E. Allemão.

I. House well conducted. II. Character of applicant good.

Has never held a li- | I. Proprietor of house was fined

cence before.

1. J. R. Capell. 2. R. Houghton.

Has held a licence for about 1 years.

1. Carlowitz & Co. 2. Lam Wing.

Has held a licence for about 2 years.

1. Carlowitz & Co. 2. Paul Brewitt.

Has held a licence for about 4 years.

1. Carlowitz & Co. 2. Paul Brewitt.

1. Hung Mak Hoi. 2. Harling, Buchmann

& Menzell.

1. D. R. Crawford. 2. J. R. Capell.

$50 on 28.7.97 for selling adul- terated whiskey. The wife now applies for the licence but she has managed the business all along.

II. Two barmaids in the house live next door and they have been seen taking sailors &c. in with them.

III. Character, bad.

No objection.

9.11.97.

I object to this application on account of the disrepu- table character of the ap- plicant.

F. H. MAY,

9.11.97.

9.11.97.

I. Police have found the Hotel No objection.

satisfactorily conducted but complaints have been made by the Military Authorities about it. They (the Police) have no objection to renewal.

I. Proprietor fined $50 ou 27.7.97 for allowing disorderly conduct on his premises.

II. Applicant's character is bad.

F. H. MAY,

I object on the ground of the bad character of ap- plicant.

9.11.97.

I. Proprietor cautioned 16.7.97 No objection.

by Magistrate for selling adul- terated whiskey.

Has held a licence | I. House well conducted.

for about 2 years. II. Character of applicant good.

F. H. MAY,

F. H. MAY,

9.11.97.

No objection.

F. H. MAY,

9.11.97.

Has held a licence I. House well conducted but hus- No objection.

for about 1 month.

Has held a licence

band and wife quarrel with each other.

F. H. MAY,

9.11.97.

for about 3 years.

I. House well conducted. II. Character of applicant good.

No objection.

F. H. MAY,

9.11.97.

1. Carlowitz & Co. 2. Lam Wing.

Has held a licence for about 2 years.

I. House well conducted and cha-Object to adjunct license.

racter of applicant good. A publican's licence desirable.

Should apply for Publican's license.

F. H. MAY,

9.11.97.

1. Carlowitz & Co.

2. Lam Wing.

1. G. Harling.

2. E. Girault.

Has held a licence | I. No complaints against the con- No objection.

for about 1 year.

duct of house. II. Applicant's character good.

F. H. MAY,

9.11.97.

No objection.

for about 3 months. II. Character of applicant good.

F. H. MAY,

9.11.97.

Has held a licence I. House well conducted.

Minutes made

at the Session of Justices.

.

[ xvi ]

LIST OF APPLICANTS FOR SPIRIT LICENCES FOR THE YEAR COMMENCING

No.

Name of Applicant.

Whether before Licensed.

Description of Licence.

Sign of Honse.

Situation of House.

15

J. W. OSBOrne,

Yes.

Publican's licence.

Bay View Hotel.

Shaukiwan Road.

16

J. C. GOODCHILD,

11

Thomas' Grill Room.

No. 2, Queen's Road

Central.

17

P. BоHм,

18

CAWASJEE BYRAMJEE,

19

A. D. Death,

The Windsor Hotel.

*

>>

No.

"

The Hung Hom Hotel.

Hongkong Hotel.

20

Moosa MAHOMED,

Yes.

Stag Hotel.

,,

No. 13, Queen's Road

Central.

No. 30, Bulkeley Street,

Hung Hom.

Nos. 21, 23, 25 and 31, Queen's Road Central, and Nos. 1 & 3, Peddar's Street.

Nos. 148 & 150, Queen's

Road Central.

21

P. HARDMAN,

No.

17

+

22

22

HOCK GOON, .

Yes.

Sailors' Home.

Praya West.

The Grand Hotel.

Nos. 240, 242 and 244,

Queen's Road Central.

The Colonial Hotel.

No. 1, Jubilee Street.

23

J. H. DONNENBERG,.

""

;

...

[ xvii]

1ST DECEMBER, 1897, AND ENDING 30TH NOVEMBER, 1898,-- Continued.

Names and Additions of Proposed Sureties.

Previous History in each Case.

Remarks in each Case.

Report of Captain Superintendent of Police.

Minutes made

at the Session of Justices.

1. E. Girault. 2. L. Martel.

Has held a licence for about 7 years.

1. House well conducted. II. Character of applicant good.

No objection.

F. H. MAY,

9.11.97.

1. Yeung Nai On. 2. Ng Pak To.

Has held a licence I. Nothing against this house.

for about 1 month.

No objection.

F. H. MAY,

9.11.97.

1. E. Girault. 2. T. Rosselet.

Has held a licence

for about 3 years.

I. House well conducted. II. Character of applicant good.

No objection.

F. H. MAY,

9.11.97.

1. Rustomjee Sorabjee. 2. Rustomjee Rutton-

jee.

Has held a licence

for about 1 year.

I. Hotel well conducted, II. Applicant's character good.

No objection.

F. H. MAY,

9.11.97.

1. R. C. Wilcox.

2. W. Powell.

Has never held a I. Hotel well conducted. licence before. II. No Police objection.

No objection.

F. H. MAY,

9.11.97.

All applicatious

granted except No. 5 (Grand Hotel) which is refused. H. E. WODEHOUSE,

1. Poon King.

2. Choi Chik Nam.

1. A. Moir.

2. G. P. Guterres.

1. Loong Ki.

Has held a licence for about 1 year.

I. House well conducted. II. No Police objection.

No objection.

F. H. MAY,

9.11.97.

Has never held a I. Is the only licensed house in the No objection.

licence before.

2. Lui Kwan Shan.

Has held a licence

for about 12 years.

Western District. The house has been well conducted and bar only opened for a few hours daily.

II. Applicant is Supt., and of

good character.

9.11.97.

F. H. MAY,

I. Proprietor was fined $50 on 28.7.97 for selling adul- terated whiskey.

II. The proprietor has rented

for the past 17 months and still rents the 2nd floor of No. 238, Queen's Road Central adjoining the li- censed premises. The said floor has been during such period occupied by two barmaids employed by the proprietor in the licensed premises, and has been used by themselves as a com- mon brothel.

III. I oppose the issue of a licence on account of the above facts and of the dis- reputable character of the applicant.

F. H. MAY,

Application refused, H. E. WODEHOUSE, Police Magistrate.

1. O. Kuhn. 2. J. P. Cottam.

Has held a licence

for 5 years.

26.11.97.

No objection.

F. H. MAY,

7.12.97.

PRESENT:

Chairman -H. E. WODEHOUSE, C.M.G.

DR. F. W. CLARK,

A. FINDLAY SMITH, W. M. B. ARTHUR.

7th December, 1897.

Application granted. H. E. WODEHOUSE,

Magistrate.

[ xviii]

LIST OF APPLICANTS FOR SPIRIT LICENCES FOR THE YEAR COMMENCING

No.

Name of Applicant.

Whether before Licensed.

Description

of Licence.

Sign of House.

Situation of House.

24 JULES MARCESSE,

25

G. H. SCHWALM,

No.

Publican's licence.

The Travellers' Hotel.

Nos. 12 and 13, Queen

Victoria Street.

35

The Central Hotel.

Nos. 240, 242 and 244, Queen's Road Central.

:

[ xix]

1ST DECEMBER, 1897, AND ENDING 30TH NOVEMBER, 1889,—Continued.

Names and Additions of

Previous History

Proposed Sureties.

in each Case.

Remarks in each Case.

Report of Captain Superintendent of Police.

Minutes made at the Session of Justices.

:

1. E. Girault. 2. L. Martel.

Has never held a li-

cence before.

1. Lui Kwan Shan. 2. Lung Kee.

Has never held a li-

cence before.

PRESENT:

Applicant was convicted in 1895 for selling liquor without a licence and fined $100. A large amount of liquor was seized. Case: No. 13664/95. Previous to that he was long suspected of illicitly dis- tilling malt liquors.

I object to the issue of a li- . cence to applicant on the ground that he is not a fit and proper person to hold

one.

F. H. MAY, Capt. Supt. of Police.

20.12.97.

Hon. H. E. WODEHOUSE, C.M.G., Chairman. W. M. B. ARTHUR, J.P.

Application refused. H. E. WODEHOUSE,

Magistrate.

of Mr. MASTER for the

applicant.

Applicant is a man

straw and merely a blind put forward by Hock Goon and his wife. An agreement has been entered into by these parties to the effect that Mr. Hock Goon disposes of his interest for $6,000. $200 of this amount to be paid as soon as licence is granted and Mr. and Mrs. Hock Goon to re- main in the Hotel until the balance $5,800 is paid up. The smallness of the amount

to be paid over at once shows that the sale is not a bona fide one and that Hock Goon and his wife would remain per- manently on the premises and carry on the business which would be objec- tionable.

28.12.97.

F. A. HOWE,

for C.S.P.

PRESENT: H. E. WODEHOUSE, C.M.G., Chairman,

G. M. BAIN,

H. WICKING,

Dr. HARTIGAN,

Revd. COBBOLD,

W. M. B. ARTHUR.

Consideration of ap- plication adjourned till Friday, 7th Ja-

nuary.

H. E. WODEHOUSE, Police Magistrate.

Application refused. H. E. WODEHOUSE, Police Magistrate.

No.

[xx]

Appendix 4.

1897.

WHOLESALE SPIRIT LICENCES.

Name.

I-Dodwell, Carlill & Co.........

2-Reuter, Bröckelmann & Co........

3-W. Hutton Potts......

4-Shewan, Tomes & Co.......

5-William Shewan

6-Scheele & Co.

7-G. C. Anderson

8-L. A. J. Pereira

9-Melchers & Co.......

10-Siemssen & Co........

11-Stolterfoht & Hagan 12-Wieler & Co........

13-Harling, Buchmann & Menzell

14-J. J. dos Remedios & Co.

15-Carlowitz & Co.

16-Lauts, Wegener & Co......... 17-Arnhold, Karberg & Co.

18-China Export Import & Bank Co............................

19-Douglas, Lapraik & Co.

20-U. Nervegna & Co.

21-Seattle Brewing & Malting Co.

22-F. B. S. Jacob

8, Praya Central.

Address.

1, Ice House Road.

17, Queen's Road Central.

9, Praya Central.

26, Praya Central.

20, Stanley Street.

13, Praya Central.

18, Shelly Street.

10, Praya Central. 2, Praya Central.

13, Praya Central.

4, Praya Central.

3, Queen's Road Central.

47, Wyndham Street.

8, Ice House Road.

16, Praya Central.

8, Praya Central.

10, Praya Central.

33, Praya Central.

31, Wyndham Street.

1, Ice House Road.

10 & 12, Duddell Street.

1897.

GROCER'S SPIRIT LICENCES.

No.

Name.

Address.

1-Cheung-hok-lam

.114, Queen's Road Central.

2--Cottam & Co.........

3, Pedder's Street.

3--Mrs. Hoy-Tei

4-H. Price & Co.

5--B. A. P. Campos

6--U-hoi-chau....

7-H. Ruttonjee

8--Kok-sing-wo

9–Chung-hoi

10--Untsung-Cheong

11-Chung-Ching-wu

12––R. N. Jeejeebhoy 13––Chung Shau pang 14--P. C. Patell & Co.....

15--Wong-hi-tsenug 16--Wong-uing

17-Lam-tak-yau

18--Cheung-yut-sing

19-Radecker & Co...................... 20—Lai-lui-hing

21-Lo-I

22-MacEwen, Frickel & Co.........

23--Heuermann, Herbst & Co.

24--U-yik-wo

25-Pang-tsung-yui

16, D'Aguilar Street.

12, Queen's Road Central.

5, Fletcher Street.

..138 & 140, Queen's Road Central.

21 & 22, Elgin Road, Kowloon.

29, Praya Central.

52, Queen's Road East.

10, Queen's Road East.

73, Praya Central. 19c, Hollywood Road. 29, Stanley Street. 40, Lyndhurst Terrace. 75, Queen's Road East. 24, Queen's Road East. ..272, Queen's Road Central.

24, Lyndhurst Terrace.

1, Wyndham Street.

97 & 99, Queen's Road Central.

13, China Street.

7, Duddell Street.

14, Queen's Road Central.

15, Lyndhurst Terrace.

29, Hinglung Street.

:

No.

[xxi]

GROCER'S SPIRIT LICENCES,—Continued.

Name.

26--Lane, Crawford & Co.

27--Chau-pong.

28-Tang-Ku & Co

29--H. Ruttonjee.

30--Watkins & Co.

31-Li-Ku-Cheong

32--A. S. Watson & Co. .

33--G. Girault

34-Li-Ku-Cheung

35--Yeung-chiu-leung

36-Kruse & Co.

37--F. Blackhead & Co.

38-Robert Jack & Co.

39-W. G. Humphreys & Co........................

40-Fletcher & Co.

41-To Sui-ting

42--Carmichael & Co., Ltd..........

43--Chan Keng

44--L. M. Alvares & Co........

45-Sum Chu On ............

46--I. C. L. Rouch

47-Caldbeck, MacGregor & Co.....

Address.

33, Queen's Road Central.

80, Praya Central.

31, 32 & 33, Praya Central.

13, D'Aguilar Street. .The "Apothecaries Hall.” .110, Queen's Road Central. .The "Hongkong Dispensary."

6, Queen's Road Ceutral. 108, Queen's Road Central. .... 68, Praya Central.

The Connaught House.

10, Praya Central.

5 & 7, Pottinger Street. 14, Queen's Road Central.

23, Queen's Road Central.

.124, Queen's Road Central.

18, Praya Central.

16, Victoria Street.

1st Telegraph House, Queen's Road.

46, Stanley Strect.

..186, Queen's Road East.

15, Queen's Road Central.

1897.

DISTILLERY LICENCES.

No.

Name.

i-Leung Tun-po

2--Au-Kau

3--Tsui-tung-li

4--Wong-yung

ễ-Lai-hoi

6--Ma-un-tat

7--William Taylor.

8-Lo-chu-king and others....

9--H. N. Cooper.......

Address.

Tiu Uen Sauce Factory, Yaunati.

71, Hok-un in Tokwawan.

.Lot No. 1358, Tung-lo-wan.

1, Shaukiwan.

54, Shaukiwan.

26, Belcher's Street, Kennedy Town ou

Inland Lot 239.

.China Sugar Refining Co., Ltd.

2, Shaukiwan.

Kowloon Lot No. 44.

1897.

EATING-HOUSE LICENCES.

Name.

No.

1-Mak-To

2--Rosa Glasse

3-Ernst Ladewig

4-M. Papier

5--Cheung-hing & Cheung-kwong 6-Mariana Fernandez

7--Unoske Nishikawa

S--Gora Nomura 9--Wong-kwan 10--Mrs. L. F. Scott 11-Tang Kwai 12--Kuwabara Choske...

13--Sit-wing-ip 14-Cheung-kwong 15--Long Shing 16-Li Tsun Wo

Address.

.189, Queen's Road Central, First floor.

22, Cochrane Street.

12, Graham Street.

64, Stanley Street.

.203, Queen's Road Central. .311, Queen's Road Central,

90, Wellington Street, Ground floor.

44, Stanley Street, First floor.

132, Queen's Road Central.

5, Arsenal Street, Ground floor.

139, Queen's Road East.

122, Wellington Street.

2, Possession Street.

..205, Queen's Road Central.

199, Hollywood Road.

......................257, Queen's Road Central, First floor.

[xxii]

Appendix 5.

No.

1-Chan Hiu

CHINESE SPIRIT LICENCES FOR 1897.

Name.

2-Au Yung Shin, and Au Yung Wo......

3-Lam Im Lap

4-Wong Hing

5-Leung Man Cham.........

6—Au Kwong

7-Tso Tsun Li, and Tso Kwong Shu

8-Tso Shin Ip

9--Au Shang

10-Lo Chi Tong.....

11-Heung Yik Un.........

12-Leung Tsan transferred to Tong Tai Tsun ...

13-Li Ut..................

14-Kwok Pun......

15-Chan Pan

16--Lau Man, Au Shing..

17-Chan Wan Tai .....

18-Tsu Wa, Tsu Wing

19--Ching Tai Yan

20––Chin Chung

21-Wong Ut Hin.....

22--Leung Ng Fuk .....

23--Lai Yau.........

24-Chan Shiu.

25-Li Man Leung, and Su Shun Fong..............

26-Ching Tai

27-Wong Ng

28--Ng Hoi

29-Wong Un Kit

30-Wong Tak..........

31-Tsang-loi Chiu, and Wan In Ling

32-Lo Tsan, Li Ling

33–Lai Hoi

34-Man Yuk

35-Lin Shing

36-Lau Kam Shing .....

37-Chong Wing Kwong

38-Ho Tseung,

39-Lo Yuk

40-Au Yeung Kwong, and Au Yeung Tsun ....

41-Chan Shing

42-Ho Tso, Li Kan Kan

43-Au Chung, Au Kong and Au Shun

44-Chan Ip Kan.......

45-Chin Chun, and Lai Long

46-Un Tang Kun

47-Li Lau Chi

48-Chan Shi ................

49-Pun Fai.......

50-Chan Tsiun

51-Chan Yeuk Chun...

Address.

32, Jardine's Bazaar.

57 & 58, Praya Central.

62, Station Street, Yaumati.

88, Praya Central. .211, Hollywood Road,

.145, Queen's Road Central.

7, Morrison Street. 8c, East Street.

21, Upper Lascar Row.

...258, Hollywood Road.

13, Quarry Bay.

1, Wing Fung Street.

96, Station Street, Yaumati.

17, Praya, Yaumati.

58, Staunton Street.

.196, Hollywood Road.

.175, Hollywood Road.

224, Queen's Road West.

24, Jardine's Bazaar.

17, Mercer Street.

68,

Taikoktsui.

.234, Queen's Road West.

.13 & 15, Possession Street.

38, High Street.

....369, Queen's Road Central.

61, Third Street.

30, Ship Street.

89, Wanchai Road.

165, Queen's Road West.

42, Staunton Street.

5, Taikok tsui.

..325, Queen's Road Central.

56, Shaukiwan.

........176a, Praya West.

...278, Queen's Road West.

..514, Queen's Road West.

14, Second Street.

30, Centre Street.

..223, Queen's Road Central.

.......187, Hollywood Road.

9, Victoria Street. Removed to 109, Market

Street, Hung Hom.

50, Hollywood Road.

51, Praya Central.

38, Station Street, Yaumati.

99, Market Street, Hung Hom.

30, Cross Street.

36, Praya East,

28, Praya Central.

3, Taipingshan Street.

78, Third Street.

62, Queen's Road East.

#

[ xxiii]

CHINESE SPIRIT LICENCES,—Continued.

No.

Nume.

52-Wong Chik ·

53-U Ping Nam......................

aiLin Kim

55-Au Yeung Un

56-Au Yeung Hing

57-Tso Pui

58-Tso Pui .............

59-Chan Sing Sam.......

60-She Cheuk Lam, and Sam Cheuk Kwan ....

61-Lan Kwan Shan,

62-Chan Ping.....

63-U Ping Nam

64-Ching Wing Him, and Ching Wing Tun

65—Lau Kwong

66-Chu Tsun

G7-Wong Tang

68-Chung Un Fu

69–Wongsuitong

70-Ip Tam

71-Chan Hontung

72-Lam Yik, Lam Wai......

73-Li Chun U.

Address.

.129, Station Street, Yaumati.

..226, Queen's Road West.

1, Dock Street, Hung Hom,

28, West Street.

84, Staunton Street.

.105, Shaukiwan.

98, Shaukiwan.

61, Praya West.

137, Queen's Road Central.

20, Possession Street.

85, Wing Lok Street. ..251, Queen's Road West.

43, Aberdeen Street. 28, D'Aguilar Street. 104 & 106, Winglok Street.

38, Praya Central.

32, Shaukiwan.

28, Gough Street.

64, Jardine's Bazaar.

Removed to 20, Recla-

mation Street, Yaumati.

24, Praya, Yaumati.

.219, Praya West.

21, First Street.

74-Chan Lai

75-Wong Hong

76-Leung Shang

77––Tang Tsun

78-Wong I Shing

79-Li Kan, Au Hing and Leung Hap

80-Kwok Yuk Wa........

81-Wong Chik Wing..... 82-Yung Fuk

83-Chu Chik

84-Wong Yung Kwai ......

85-Wong Sui

86-Li Fo..................

87-Tse Shun Shiu.

88--Wong Shing

89-Leung Kun 90-Lam Cheung 91-Chiu Shing ..

92-Lo Yeung 93-To Tat Ting.. 94--Au Luk

95-Li Shap 96-Leung Shing Lai

97-Ng King 98-Chan Leung 99-Chau Cheung Nam 100-Leung Chin........ 101-Tam Shing

102-Chan Pok Wan.....

103-U Hung.......

26, Third Street.

.299, Queen's Road Central.

.131, Praya West.

84, Hollywood Road. .156, Queen's Road East.

25, Praya Central.

25, Square Street.

84, Praya Central.

42, Lyndhurst Street.

42 & 44, Wing Lok Street.

32, Praya, Yaumati. Removed to 74, Recla-

mation Street, Yaumati.

.536, Queen's Road Central.

73, Market Street, Hung Hom.

19, Praya Central.

46, Second Street.

..121, Queen's Road West.

51, Stanley Street.

17, Bonham Strand.

75, Tokwawan.

44, Aberdeen Street.

..365, Queen's Road Central.

33, Staunton Street.

18, Praya East.

.116, Aplichau.

.131, Queen's Road Central.

85, Aplichau.

.247, Queen's Road East. .183, Queen's Road West.

.....213, Hollywood Road.

27, Centre Street.

}

[ xxiv]

No.

104-U Hung.....

105--Au Shun Pong.

106-Tsu Yan and U Lai..

107--Ng Tat Chi

108-Leung Chiu 109---Chan Châu....

110-Chan In.............

111-Chan Pak I.

112-Chin Wing

113-Au Yun...

114-Tong Wing

115-Lai Kin

116--Lok Tsung..

117-Wong Yik..

118--Chung Ying

CHINESE SPIRIT LICENCES,—Continued.

Name.

Address.

48, Second Street. Removed to 183, Praya

West.

.163, Hollywood Road. Removed to 169,

Hollywood Road.

16, Cross Street.

12, Aberdeen Street.

34, Praya Central. ..208, Hollywood Road. 52, Jardine's Bazaar. 52, Connaught Road. .127, Jervois Street.

17, Cross Street.

...245, Queen's Road East.

71, Aplichau.

14, St. Francis Street.

100, First Street.

1, Upper Rutter Street.

119-Cheung Yuktong transferred to Cheung Ka Ching......304, Queen's Road West (removed to 104).

120-Tsun Sui Pui

121-Lam Sui......

122-Chan Tin

123-Li Tat Shan

124-Lam Shun Chak

125-Leung Tong 126-Chong In Kai 127-U Fuk

128-Chan Wai Nam......

129–Ng Tsz Chung

130-Li Sui

131-Mok Kin Wai. 132-Ng Kin Nam

133-Sit Hung Cheung..

134-Chan Lok 135-Wong Wing

136-Au Yeung Wo.. 137-Sham Fongtsun... 138-Wong King ........ 139-Tang Tat 140-Ng Chak Fong

141-Ho Tai Pong............... 142––Mai Chung

148-Chan Pau In ......

144-Chin Lai

145-Ying Shing

146-Yung Shan

147-An Yeung Shing 148-Tsang Cheung Shi 149-Wong I Man.... 150-Ching In

151—Au Yun.................. 152–Cheung Shiu Kwong 153-Cheong Lai Tsün ....

154-Wong San

155-Chan Lai Toug........

5, Jubilee Street.

29, Bonham Strand.

32b, Third Street.

...227, Queen's Road Central.

...412, Queen's Road West.

9, Jubilee Street.

43, Centre Street.

..135, Market Street, Hung Hom.

189, Hollywood Road.

..340, Queen's Road West."

.222, Hollywood Road.

30, Tung Man Lane.

88, Aplichau.

50, Gage Street.

82, Reclamation Ground, Yaumati.

28, Wellington Street.

Praya West.

40, Praya Central. 83, Shaukiwan.

42, Praya Central.

40, Wanchai Road.

5, Cross Street.

Removed to 153,

84, Reclamation Street, Yaumati.

.345, Queen's Road Central.

74, Station Street, Yaumati.

...115, Praya Central.

63, Praya Central.

21, Hollywood Road,

74, Lower Lascar Row.

50, Shaukiwan,

..148, Station Street, Yaumati. ...252, Queen's Road West.

60, Bridges Street. 69, Station Street.

72, Station Street.

.133, Bonham Strand.

169, Queen's Road West.

:

No.

156-Wong Fuk.. 157-Chan Kwong.

158-Mui Yat.......

159-Wong Kwai

159-Wong Kwai

160-Ü Cheung

[ xxv ]

CHINESE SPIRIT LICENCES,—Continued.

Name.

161-Tam Tsz aud Li Ying....

162-Sham Ching

163-Li Wing Chong and Chan Cheuk Im ... 164-Tsun Sham

165--Chan Fuk, Lo Iu, Tang Wai and Lo Shai

166-Wong Ü.....

167-Ho Shing

168-Luk Un and Lung Shan ...

!

169-Siu Tz

170-Mak Kwai Cheung

171-Lo Tsin Kiu

172-Lo Ü.....................

173-Li Fat

174-Li Wai

175-Su Ling..

176-Chan Ying.. 177-Toug Chin.................

178-Li Seung Hoi 179-Lo Shang 180-Li Fo ....................

181-Mak Shin Tong

19, Battery Street.

Address.

33 & 35, Mosque Street.

9 & 11, Cochrane Street.

1, Mongkoktsui.

3, Taikoktsui, owner of Lot 691.

35, Stanley Street.

51, Wellington Street.

... 75, Queen's Road West.

96, Shankiwan.

42, Queen's Road East.

..178, Taikoktsui.

.....

15, Des Voeux Road.

1, Fletcher Street.

100, Reclamation Street, Yaumati.

27, Nullah Lane.

..280, Queen's Road West.

...176, Praya West.

15, Cochrane Street.

52, Gage Street.

.117, Shaukiwan.

5, Graham Street.

47, Praya Central.

32, Hollywood Road.

38, Gough Street.

78, Reclamation Street, Yaumati.

35, Centre Street.

182-Su Tat

2, Graham Street.

183-Ü Yan

184-Wong Wan

185-Tsang Sik Ming 186-Chin Li

187-Cheung Lit

188–Tong Lan

189-Sham Hang Tong.......

190-Cheng I Kan and Wong Ut Ting ... 191-Ho Nang

192-Fung Tung Ping

193-Ho Fung Chi

194-Li Fuk

195-Cheung Sz Wai......

196-Yik Ip Tseung

197-Wong Yam

198-Sz To Kat......................

199—Au Yeung Ku ................ 200-Leung Lit Lam... 201-Tang In .............

202-Tong Tat

203-Wong Shan Mi

204-Sanada Sataro

205-Wong Kung Wo 206-Li Sam Hing.

207-Wong Lin

17, Western Street.

6, Praya, Yaumati.

67, Bulkley Street, Yaunati.

.119, Wing Lok Street.

Ia, Station Street, Yaumati.

14, Gage Street.

60, Praya Central.

123, Bonham Strand.

.355 & 357, Queen's Road Central.

to 242, Queen's Road Central.

10, Staunton Street.

.....193, Queen's Road East.

25, Pokfulum Road.

.114, Queen's Road East.

80, Shaukiwan.

19, Cross Street.

........ 66, Lower Lascar Row.

......140, Wellington Street.

81, Bonham Strand.

61, Nullah Lane.

..............210, Hollywood Road.

5, Dock Street, Hung Hom. 9, Stanley Steet, Second Floor.

74, Taikoktsui.

74, Tokwawan.

18, Wellington Street.

Removed

No.

208-Li Sz

209-Tsang Tsün Fat

210-Chan Lut Wan

[ xxvi ]

CHINESE SPIRIT LICENCES,-Continued.

Name.

211-Kwan Li Shang and Chan Chin Shing

212-Fung Kam..............

213-Li Kam

214-Chan Wan...

215–Chan Hong

216-Chan Kan 217-Ü Chi.....

218-Au Yeung Cheung. 219-Wong Pun............... 220-Wong Un

221-Ü Sz.

222–Tam Tung....

223-Chu Ching Shing

224-Chin Fat

225-Lam Wing Luk......

226-Chiu Kwan and Chin Yam

227-Wong Kwong and Wong Pui ...........

228-Wong Cheuk Hin..... 229-Wong Lai Tsün

230-Leung Tin.......

231-Tsaug Sz

232-Lan Yung

233-Ng Wing Fuk

234-Tong Chin...

235-Leung Ki Chin...

236-Chu Chik

237-Hung Man Yuk and Hung Kuk Chiu

238-Cheung Lai

239-Fong Fuk

240-Yik Ping Chung

241-Tsang Loi Chiu 242-IIo Tung 243-Cheung Chun Wai

244-Chan Tsoi Tsau

245-Lai Pui

246-Au Tsün

247-Kwong On................

248-Ün Kun.....................

249-Li Kwai....

250-Au Hin

251-Lam Chin Wing

252-Leung Tun Po

253-Wong Yau.......

254-Ngan Wing Shing

255-Lam Tong and Lenng In...

256--Lo On Tak

257-Tong Hung

258-Lun Kai In

259-Li Shing

260-Wong Ping and Wong Wai..

261-Lam Ki

16, New Street.

45, Shaukiwan.

Address.

121, Wellington Street.

19, Praya West.

1, Temple Street.

80, Mongkoktsui. ..346, Queen's Road East.

15, D'Aguilar Street.

4, Graham Street. 53, Queen's Road East.

9,

.224, Hollywood Road.

7, Shing Wong Street. 91, Queen's Road West. ...132, Hollywood Road. .... 30, Queen's Road West.

...116, Queen's Road Central. .356, Queen's Road West.

54 & 56, Staunton Street. 28, Wellington Street. 3, Wing Lok Street. 122, Queen's Road East.

103, Station Street, Yaumati.

.111, Market Street, Hung Hom.

6, Shaukiwan.

20, Market Street, Hung Hom. ...207, Hollywood Road.

30, Hillier Street.

72, Lower Lascar Row.

32, Queen's Road West.

1, Station Street, Yaumati.

64, Praya West.

..349, Queen's Road Central.

1, Elgin Road, Tsimshatsui.

33,

Aberdeen.

112, Queen's Road East.

.123, Wellington Street.

35, Taikoktsui.

1, Taipingshan Street. .166, Wellington Street. 7, Tsak Ü Chung.

.290, Queen's Road West.

71, Praya Central.

46, Bonham Strand.

..358, Queen's Road Central.

55, Wing Lok Street.

..116, Praya East.

42, Queen's Road West.

97, Market Street, Hung Hom. 54, Nullah Lane.

...221, Hollywood Road.

.117, Queen's Road East. 76, Wellington Street. 50, Bridges Street.

[ xxvii ]

CHINESE SPIRIT LICENCES,-Continued.

No.

262-Li Kwong

263--Wong Yam

264--Li Mui

265-Wong Pun..

266-Leung Ip 267--Fung On

268-Tong Ting Sun...

269--Lo Cheung... 270--Pun Fai....

271-Lam Wai

272-Fung Man

273--Cheung Kam Tsun

274-Chan Ying...

275-Wong Hin In

Name.

Address.

10, Fletcher Street.

30, Hollywood Road.

..101, Station Street, Yaumati.

.224, Hollywood Road.

..130, Third Street.

55, Praya, Yaumati.

67, First Street.

16, Bonham Strand West. 145, Hollywood Road.

31, Jardine's Bazaar.

77, Stanley.

76, Shaukiwan.

26, Quarry Bay.

57, Praya West.

276-Kung Wing

277--Ching Uu Kai

......540, Queen's Road West.

278-This is No. 96 transferred to U Mo Ngan and Pun U Wa

279-Chan Fun

280-Pang Kwok Cheung....

281-Chan Hin, (Renewal of No. 1)

41, Queen's Road West,

.328, Queen's Road Central.

19, Li Ün Street, East.

32, Jardinc's Bazaar.

282-Leung Man Cham, (Renewal of No. 5)

.211, Hollywood Road.

283-Au Yeung Chin and Au Yeung Wo, (Renewal of No. 2) 57 & 58, Praya Ceutral.

284--Lo Ping Tsün..

285-Wong Hing, (Renewal of No. 4)

..135, Shaukiwan.

88, Praya Central.

286---Lam Mau and Au Wing, (Renewal of No. 16)................................196, Hollywood Road. 287-Lai Yau, (Renewal of No. 23)

13 & 15, Possession Strect.

288-Tso Tsün Li and Tso Kwong Shu, (Renewal of No. 7) 7, Morrison Street. 289-Tso Shin Ip, (Renewal of No. 8)

8, East Street.

No. 3.

SIR,

Appendix 6.

MAGISTRACY, HONGKONG,

15th January, 1898.

I have the honour to forward, for the information of His Excellency the Governor, a report of the proceedings at two meetings of Her Majesty's Justices of the Peace held on the 28th of December last and the 7th January, for the purpose of considering an application from one G. H. Schwalm for a licence to carry on the business of a Publican on the premises previously known as the "Grand Hotel" in houses situate at 240, 242, and 244, Queen's Road Central.

The attached extract marked A from the China Mail newspaper gives an almost verbatim report of what took place at the meeting held on the 28th December to which the various reporters of the Press were admitted.

For the purpose, however, of eliciting certain information which for obvious reasons it was considered advisable should be done in private, all except Mr. Schwalm, and his solicitor were requested to retire. Mr. Schwalm was then interrogated and made a statement to the following effect:-

:---

(6

"I kept a hotel at Frankfort where I made a considerable sum of money, but competition being too keen I decided to come to Hongkong. I brought with me a sum of money in gold " which on arrival here I converted into silver amounting to about $6,000. This sum has "been kept by me in the German Consulate the whole time I have been employed there, "and is there now. It is absolutely my own money, and if I obtain the licence I am

(6

applying for, it will be at once used in paying the sum of $5,800 in fulfilment of the terms " mentioned in the agreement produced.”

[ xxviii]

After receiving this statement from Mr. Schwalm, the Justices adjourned the further consideration of the application until noon on Friday, the 7th instant, for further enquiries into the character of the applicant and the bona fides of his application.

On the 4th instant the man Schwalm was brought before me in the Police Court, charged with obtaining the sum of $500 by false pretences from one Chiu Hing.

The German Consul was called as a witness in the case, and I attach herewith a copy of his evidence given on oath (marked B).

At the adjourned meeting of the Justices on the 7th instant a report from Police Sergeant Scott to the Captain Superintendent of Police was read (copy attached marked C).

Upon hearing this report and the evidence of the German Consul, the Justices unanimously refused to grant the application, and after some remarks by the Chairman which are reported in the local press and forwarded herewith (marked D) it was moved by Mr. Granville Sharp, J.P., and seconded by

Mr. G. Murray Bain, J.P.-

"That the Justices in meeting request the Magistrate to allow the opinions he has expressed

66

upon the inadequacy of the present arrangements to secure adequate knowledge of the "character of applicants for licences for the sale of intoxicating liquors to be placed before "the Government with a view to ridding the Colony of such people as we have had experi-

66

66

ence of within the past week or two, and of obtaining some more effective guarantee that applicants are of good character and standing."

This proposition being put to the meeting was carried unanimously and in accordance therewith I now have the honour to transmit the same.

The Honourable

J. H. STEWART LOCKHART,

Colonial Secretary.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

H. E. WODEHOUSE,

Police Magistrale.

(Enclosures.)

Tuesday, 28th December, 1897.

THE GRAND HOTEL LICENCE.

CONSIDERATION POSTPONED.

A.

A special session of H.M. Justices of the Peace was held to-day in the Justices' Room, at the Ma- gistracy. Mr. H. E. Wodehouse, Police Magistrate, presided. The Justices present were:-Dr. Hartigan, Messrs. G. Murray Bain, Harry Wicking, W. M. B. Arthur and Rev. R. F. Cobbold.

The meeting was convened to consider an application from one G. H. Schwalm for a Publican's licence to sell and retail intoxicating liquors on the premises situate at Nos. 240, 242, and 244, Queen's Road Central, under the sigu of "The Central Hotel." These premises were formerly known as "The Grand Hotel."

Mr. G. C. C. Master appeared for the applicant.

Mr. Wodehouse read the application, from which it appeared the applicant had never held a licence before. The Police report, which was signed by Deputy Superintendent T. A. Howe, was as follows:-"The

“The applicant is absolutely a man of straw, and merely a blind put forward by Hock Goon and his wife. An agreement has been entered into between these parties to the effect that Mr. Hock

!

.

:..

( xxix)

Goon disposes of his interest for $6,000, $200 of this amount to be paid as soon as the licence is granted, and Mr. and Mrs. Hock Goon are to remain on the premises until the balance of $5,800 is paid up. The smallness of the amount to be paid over at once shows that the sale is not a bona fide one, and that Hock Goon and his wife would remain permanently on the premises and carry on the business, which would be decidedly objectionable."

Mr. Master-I should like the Police report to be in some way proved-that this Mr. Schwalm is a man of straw.

Mr. Wodehouse- Let us have the man in.

The applicant was admitted into the room.

Mr. Master handed the Magistrate a copy of the following agreement:-"Mr. and Mrs. Hock Goon have sold on the 9th December, 1897, their hotel, situated at Nos. 240, 242 and 244 Queen's Road Central, in Victoria, Hongkong, to Mr. G. H. Schwalm, for the sum of $6,000. A deposit of $200 is paid down by Mr. Schwalm. As soon as the licence is granted to Mr. Schwalm he has to pay $5,800 to Mr. and Mrs. Hock Goon, and as soon as this sum is paid Mr. and Mrs. Hock Goon have to leave the house. (Signed) Mrs. Hock Goon and Hock Goon.”

Mr. Arthur-I may say there were two applications for this same house, the sureties in which were the same as the old sureties of Hock Goon-two Chinese: one at 62 Jervois Street and the other at 33 Circular Pathway. Some little correspondence took place as to which applicant they intended. to take, and they finally decided upon the applicant who offered the best terms to them.

Mr. Wodehouse (to applicant)-Is it part of your agreement that Mr. and Mrs. Hock Goon remain in the hotel until the money is paid?

Applicant-Until this afternoon, whenever I am granted the licence. They will leave as soon as possible after the granting of the licence. They remain until the money has been paid.

Mr. Bain-What money? The $200 or $5,800 ?

Mr. Master-$200 has been paid.

Mr. Wodehouse said the agreement read as if the $200 was to be paid as soon as the licence was granted.

Mr. Master-If the Police report is founded on fact, I can quite understand the Justices refusing the application, but I would ask leave to adjourn the application in order to see my client,-who only came to see me about an hour and a-half ago—and be able to show that this report is not founded on fact. My client is not going to pay money and then have his licence refused. He had to pay the money for the benefit of the lease that is still running. I imagine Mr. and Mrs. Hock Goon have a lease of the premises. Mr. Schwalm has to see that he gets consent of his landlord, because probably in the lease there is a clause that there will be no transfer of the lease without consent of the landlord. Another thing he will have to see about before handing over the money would be that he gets the furniture. I submit that report by Mr. Howe is nothing unless founded on something. It is a very damaging report if founded on fact. It is as much as to say that Mr. and Mrs. Hock Goon are to take the benefit of the hotel, and somebody else's name is going to be put up. If that be the case, I myself shall have nothing to do with it. I am instructed by Mr. Schwalm that it is a bona fide purchase, and I think it would be better if your Worships will postpone the consideration of this application for a week, in order that I may consult with Mr. Schwalm, and be in a position to show that the money is actually in my possession, and that I am holding it until the completion of the transfer. Perhaps your Worships will signify whether or not you would grant the application, provided this sale was a bond fide one.

The Justices then considered in private whether they would adjourn consideration of the applic- ation, and it was decided to postpone the hearing until Friday week.

Friday, 7th January, 1898.

THE GRAND HOTEL LICENCE.

D.

A meeting of the Justices of the Peace was held to-day in the Justices' Room, at the Magistracy. Mr. H. E. Wodehouse, Police Magistrate, presided. The Justices present were:-Rev. R. F. Cobbold, Dr. Clark, Messrs. G. Murray Bain, D. R. Crawford, C. S. Sharp, Granville Sharp, Harry Wicking, Captain Superintendent May and W. M. B. Arthur.

J

1

[xxx]

Mr. Wodehouse said-Gentlemen, you will remember that at the last meeting held to consider the application of G. H. Schwalm, you were pleased to grant an adjournment for the purpose of ascertain- ing the bona fides of the application and with a view to making some inquiry into the character of the applicant. The result of the inquiry into the character of the applicant is shown in the following report from the Sergeant of Police who made the inquiries, and is addressed to the Captain Superinten- dent of Police, Mr. May.

The Magistrate then read the report, from which it appeared that about three years ago a woman, named Mrs May York, was a prostitute in No. 15 Graham Street. She left that place and went to Saigon, where she took up with G. H. Schwalm, who was then a soldier. They went together to Singapore, where he was pimp to the woman, who lived in a brothel in Malay Street. He got into money difficulties, was sued in Court and ran away, coming to Hongkong about eighteen months ago along with this woman, whom he passed off as his wife, with whom he is now living, and whose husband was a pimp in Singapore. Shortly after coming to Hongkong, this woman opened a shop at No. 15 D'Aguilar Street. She was afterwards employed as barmaid in the Stag Hotel. About May, 1897, Schwalm got employment in the German Consulate, and went to live at No. 18 Wyndham Street with the woman.

When the Consul's secretary returned his services were dispensed with. About three months ago he wanted to take over a coffee shop licence in Graham Street, but could not raise the money required ($150). From inquiries made at the German Consulate it had been found that he had no money there.

Mr. Wodehouse (continuing) said-Gentlemen, it is with strong feelings of indignation that I read this report to you. Your time and attention have been taken up with a deliberate attempt to impose upon you, and to take you in. The Ordinance under which consideration of these licences is given to the Justices is Ordinance 21 of 1886, and there is no doubt that the intention of that Ordinance is that the Justices shall make proper inquiry into the character of the applicant and shall satisfy themselves not only that the applicant is a man of good character, but also that he is not a man of straw, but is of substance and of some standing in the Colony. The Ordinance requires that before a licence is granted the applicant shall enter into recognizance according to the nature of the licence he requires. That recognizance contains a certificate in terms of the Ordinance, and also a certificate by householders that the applicant is a person of good fame and reputation, and fit and proper to be licensed to keep an inn or public house. The names of the proposed sureties on this occasion were Liu Kwong Shun and Leung Kan, and we heard last week that the condition of their surety was that this man, after he got the licence, was to obtain his aërated waters from them. Experience of most of these sureties and the assurances of the householders as to the good reputation of the applicant has also been found to consist generally in a mere undertaking on the part of the applicant that if the licence be obtained liquors shall be obtained from these sureties. I think it is quite clear, gentlemen, that the present cystem of granting licences does not contain sufficient security that the men to whom we grant these licences are fit and proper persons to sell intoxicating liquors. A few weeks ago some resolutions were informally drawn up regarding the sale of deleterious liquors, and these were forwarded to the Government for consideration. The Government has now sent a reply to this communication which was made to them, and it is proposed in the course of some day next week to call a meeting of the Justices at the City Hall, when that communication will be read to them and their advice taken on the next step which will have to be made. In regard to this particular application, which has not been formally withdrawn, of course, there is nothing more now to do but to refuse it. I may also inform you that the applicant is at present before the Magistrate charged with having obtained $500 by false pretences, and that the German Consul has been a witness in that case, and has stated that when he took on the defendant so far from his depositing any money with him, the first thing he did was to ask a loan of $100 from the Consul, and that he has never from that day to this deposited any money or had any in his possession. The Medical Officer in the Gaol now states that the man Schwalm is suffering from insane delusions, and I think that one of his insane delusions must have been the idea that he could, by bringing forward the bogus agreement that he showed us the other day between parties of the character of Hock Goon and himself, that he could impose on you by the mere impression of a ten-cent stamp and the intervention of a solicitor. I am extremely sorry, gentlemen, that your time has been taken up to no purpose-I will not say to no purpose your time was taken up by such an application as this one, and instead of putting off the meeting, as I might have done, I thought it better to call you together and inform you of what has taken place in case any of you have any observations to make. I have only to add that in future the Justices will be convened to consider applications for licences at a particular time, instead of at the time any application is made and that the time will be the first Tuesday after the end of each quarter, at noon.

}

!

[ xxxi]

Each time when a meeting is convened it will be notified in a paper as usual, and a direct notice will be sent to each of you. That is all the business, gentlemen, unless any of you wish to make any remarks.

Mr. G. Sharp-Would it be competent for the Justices assembled here to-day to say anything, or to put anything on record, in support of the remarks fallen from yourself as to the inadequacy of the present arrangements to secure sufficient knowledge of the character of the applicant?

Mr. Wodehouse-I think, gentlemen, it is competent for you to do anything you please at this meeting. The meeting is not yet closed, and it is competent for you to move any resolution or do anything you please.

Mr. G. Sharp-Might I move that the remarks of the Magistrate be brought to the notice of the Government? Don't you think that would be suitable?

Mr. C. S. Sharp-Gentlemen, we had better decide formally a resolution with regard to this application.

Mr. Wodehouse-I presume the application is unanimously rejected.

The meeting acquiesced..

Mr. Wicking-I would like to ask your Worship if an applicant who deliberately makes a false statement is not liable to some punishment?

Mr. Wodehouse-I am afraid he is not liable for conduct of that sort.

Mr. Wicking--Could he receive no punishment presuming he was sworn?

Mr. Wodehouse-Even then. There is no power to swear him. He could not be put upon his oath. All that we can do is to call upon him to give sworn affidavits. If he had done that, then he might have been liable. I admit it is a most outrageous thing trying to defraud a body of gentlemen like the Justices in the way this man has treated us. Your time is valuable and you have no wish to meet here to consider applications of this sort. It is no business of ours to see that these pimps and parasites of the place shall obtain a living, and so far as we are concerned I wish that the Government would exercise their power to banish every one of them out of the Colony. They merely prey upon Society and are not of the slightest use in the place.

Mr. Murray Bain intimated he had great pleasure in seconding Mr. G. Sharp's resolution.

Mr. G. Sharp-That the Justices in meeting request the Magistrate to allow the opinions he has expressed upon the inadequacy of the present arrangements to secure adequate knowledge of the character of applicants for licences for the sale of intoxicating liquors. That these remarks of the Chairman be placed before the Government.

Mr. Murray Bain-I have great pleasure in seconding that.

Captain Superintendent May--I do not think that is where the shoe pinches. We know all about these people.

Mr. G. Sharp-Faced before the Government with the request that some further—-

Captain Superintendent May--I think what you want is to ask the Government to rid the Colony of those people.

Mr. Murray Bain-You can easily do that. You can add, "With the view to ridding the Colony of such applicants as the one whose application has been rejected."

Captain Superintendent May-I have reason to believe that most of these people are being moved on from towns in other countries, and this is really becoming a dumping ground for the refuse of other cities.

Mr. Wicking-Can they be deported?

Mr. Wodehouse-I believe the Government has it in their power to deport them so long as they are not British born. I will undertake to bring this matter before the Government. I understand that it is your general wish that this matter should be brought forward, and that you are not particular about the wording of the resolution so long as your purpose is attained.

Mr. Murray Bain-Only it might be as well to add, "With the view to ridding the Colony of such people as we have had experience of within the past week or two."

Mr. Wodehouse-Also with the view to obtaining some guarantee that the applicant is a man of good character and good standing.

This was all the business.

[ xxxii ]

B.

Remand Case No. 3.

Regina by KwOK CHIU HENG v. G. H. SCHWALM.

Ludwig von Loeper sworu states-I am Consul for Germany in Hongkong. I am acquainted with the defendant. He has been clerk in my office for about nine months and was so in December last year.

He ceased to be clerk when my Secretary came back. It is not the case that I promised to lend him one thousand dollars. A few days before he left my service I gave him a certificate in German saying that he had been in my service for some months as clerk and that I was satisfied with his services and dismissed him because my Secretary had come back. I have had some conversation with him about money.

When he first came to the office as clerk he said he was in debt and asked me to lend him one hundred dollars. I refused. I have never had any other conversation with him about lending him money. When he joined me he described himself as a native of Germany. On the 3rd January at 1 p.m. the last witness came to me. In consequence of what he said to me I went to the Police Station.

True copy.

W. M. B. A.

14. 1. 98.

C.

CENTRAL POLICE STATION,

4th January, 1898.

SIR, I have the honour to report that from inquiries made about Georg Henry Schwalm who has applied for a licence for the Grand Hotel under the name of the Central Hotel, I have gained the following information.

About three years ago a woman named Mrs. Mi Yorke was a prostitute in No. 15 Graham Street. She left that place and went to Saigon where she picked up Schwalm who was then a soldier in the French Army, from which he deserted and was smuggled away in the German steamer Tetartos to Singapore where he was pimp to this woman who lived in a brothel in Malay Street; he got into money difficulties; was sued in Court, and ran away, coming to Hongkong about eighteen months ago along with this woman, Mrs. Mi Yorke, whom he passed off as his wife, and with whom he is now living at No. 18 Wyndham Street, but whose husband is a pimp in Singapore. Shortly after coming to Hong- kong this woman opened a shop at No. 15 D'Aguilar Street; he was pimp to her there; from there she went to the Stag Hotel as barmaid, where she remained about two months, then she went to the Globe Hotel as barmaid, and remained there about six months about this time, "May, 1897." Schwalm got employment as a clerk in the German Consulate during the absence on leave of the Secretary, and went to live at No. 18 Wyndham Street, but the Secretary having returned his services are no longer required and he is out of employment. About three months ago he wanted to take over the Coffee Shop Licence held by Ladewig at No. 12 Graham Street, but could not raise the money required— about $150.

From inquiries made at the German Consulate I find that he has no money deposited there, and never bad.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

To Honourable

Your most obedient Servant,

(Signed)

A. SCOTT, Sergeant.

F. H. MAY, C.M.G.,

Captain Superintendent of Police,

&C.,

£0.9

&c.

True copy.

W. M. B. A.

14.1.98.

:

[ xxxiii]

IN THE POLICE COURT AT VICTORIA IN THE COLONY OF HONGKONG.

APPLICATION FOR PUBLICAN'S LICENCE.

(Under Ordinance No. 21 of 1886.)

Name of Applicant, George H. Schwalm. Address, Imperial German Consulate. Nationality, German. Has held a licence, never. Licensed house to be at Nos. 240, 242, 244 Queen's Road Central. Its name or sign to be "The Central Hotel." Sureties

of 63 Jervois Street, and of

33 Circular Pathway.

To the Magistrates.

I give notice that I intend to apply at the next Licensing Meeting to Her Majesty's Justices of the Peace, for a licence to sell and retail intoxicating liquors, in the house and appurtenances thereunto belonging above named, which I intend to keep as an Inn or Public-house.

Hongkong, 7th December, 1898.

(Signed)

G. H. SCHWALM.

We, the undersigned householders residing at Victoria in the said Colony, certify that the above- named applicant is a person of good fame and reputation, and fit and proper to be licensed to keep an Inn or Public-house.

(Signed)

E. NIEDHART, The Medical Hall.

( Do. )

G. D. BONING.

( Do. )

PAUL BREWITT.

Appendix 7.

MEETING OF HER MAJESTY'S JUSTICES OF THE PEACE AT THE CITY HALL.

No. 5.

SIR,

Reporting the appointment of a Committee by, and asking powers of a Commission for.

MAGISTRACY,

HONGKONG, 24th January, 1898.

I have the honour to report that at a meeting of the Justices of the Peace held on Thursday, the 20th instant, to consider the communication of the Government to them on the question of the sale of deleterious liquors in the Colony, the following resolution was moved by Dr. Hartigan and seconded by Mr. A. F. Smith:-

"That this meeting appoint a Committee of five members to enquire into the question of "the working of the liquor laws of this Colony, and that the Government be requested to give "such Committee the powers of a Commission."

A Committee was then appointed consisting of Dr. Hartigan, Messrs. H. McCallum, J. J. Francis, Q.C., Rev. R. F. Cobbold, and myself.

On behalf of the Committee I have the honour to ask that His Excellency the Governor will be pleased to entrust it with the powers of a Commission for the purpose of calling and examining witnesses.

I have the honour to request that the terms of the reference may be made wide enough to include any question that is likely to arise in connection with the liquor traffic and the licensing of the sale of spirituous liquors in this Colony.

(Signed)

I have, &c.,

H. E. WODEHOUSE,

Police Magistrate.

The Honourable

J. H. STEWART LOCKHART,

Colonial Secretary.

#

[ xxxiv]

Thursday, 20th January, 1898.

THE SALE OF INJURIOUS LIQUORS IN HONGKONG.

MEETING OF JUSTICES.

Yesterday afternoon a general meeting of the Justices of the Peace was held in the City Hall for the purpose of considering a communication from the Government on the subject of the resolutions recently submitted to them in regard to the sale of injurious liquors in Hongkong.

Hon. H. E. Wodehouse (Police Magistrate) presided and there were also present-Messrs. W. M. B. Arthur. J. A. de Carvalho, N. J. Ede, Dr. Hartigan, A. Shelton Hooper, G. C. Cox, W. Danby, A. Findlay Smith, C. Palmer, A. J. May, H. C. Nicolle, D. R. Crawford, Gershom Stewart, C. S. Sharp, D. E. Brown, J. H. Lewis, F. Dodwell, J. B. Coughtrie, R. M. Gray, H. M. Mehta, T. H. Reid, Dr. Clark, H. McCallum, Dr. Stedman, Rev. R. F. Cobbold, T. Jackson, R. C. Wilcox, Dr. Bateson Wright, H. L. Dalrymple, G. Sharp, E. W. Mitchell, H. Smith, C. Inchbald, A. W. Brewin, B. Layton, W. H. Percival, G. T. Veitch, J. Thurburn, G. C. Anderson, G. B. Dodwell, R. M. Moses, and Hon.

T. H. Whitehead.

The Chairman-Gentlemen, before commencing the proceedings I should like to know whether it is your wish that the meeting should be public. The reporters are here and they will take notes if you will permit them.

Mr. Ede-Certainly. I propose that reporters be admitted.

Dr. Hartigan seconded.

Carried.

The Chairman, after reading the notice convening the meeting, said-Before declaring the meeting open I should like briefly to explain the circumstances under which this meeting has been called. At a meeting of Justices held in November last for the purpose of considering applications for licences, the question of the sale of injurious liquors was brought forward and a strong wish was expressed that some means should be taken to control or suppress what was styled the pernicious traffic in poisonous liquors which is believed to exist in the Colony. The traffic was pronounced to be injurious not only to our soldiers and sailors at large but also to many other individuals who partake of these liquors, intending to do so moderately and at last succumbing to their influence with loss of credit to themselves, a loss to their purses, and a loss of promotion in the service generally. The meeting was followed up by an informal meeting of gentlemen consisting not only of Justices of the Peace but of officers of the Navy and Army, when the question was again considered, and the result was that certain resolutions were drawn up and afterwards circulated for the consideration of the Justices of the Peace. I will now read those resolutions. There were present at the meeting-Mr. H. E. Wodehouse, c.M.G., Colonel Gordon, W. Y. Regt., the Honourable T. H. Whitehead, Lt.-Colonel Clarke, o.D., Mr. C. S. Sharp, Mr. N. J. Ede, Dr. Clark, and Mr. J. J. Francis, q.c., and it was resolved:-

(1.)-That there was no evidence to show that the wines and spirits sold in the Colony were adulterated to any serious extent, that the existing law sufficiently provided for any such cases, but that there was good reason to believe great harm and injury was being done by the sale in licensed taverns of crude (imported) liquors of very inferior quality and by the supply of deleterious inferior Chinese spirits in brothels.

(2.) That in the interests of soldiers and sailors and of the community generally some steps ought to be taken to check the importation and sale of crude spirits of all kinds and to place some restrictions on the sale of Chinese spirits and liquors.

(3.) That the most effective means of checking the importation and sale of crude spirits would in our opinion be that the Government should establish a standard as to the maximum percentage of fusel oil (amylic alcohol) or other crude products of distillation to be allowed in any spirit, and that the possession by any licensed person of spirits not in accordance with the standard should be made a punishable offence.

(4.)—That an invariable part of the punishment should be the endorsement of the conviction

on the offender's licence and that a second conviction within three years should entail a forfeiture of the licence.

4

Ľ

7

:

[ xxxv ]

(5.) That the Government should undertake by its official experts an examination into the qualities and kinds of Chinese wines and spirits, the methods of manufacture, modes of adulteration, &c., and on the report of its scientific advisers, should fix some minimum standard of quality to which all Chinese spirits should conform. Adherence to this standard to be enforced by penalties on the same lines as those for imported crude spirits, and

(6.) That these resolutions be circulated among the Justices of the Peace, and, if approved of

by a majority, be forwarded to the Government for their consideration.

With regard to those resolutions, gentlemen, I think I may say on behalf of those who were responsible for them that it was thought they should not be considered as so many axioms beyond the scope of controversy, or as the final decision on the question, but rather that they should put into form an expression of the general nebulous feeling entertained on the subject, and that they should form a basis on which to approach the Government. I circulated the resolutions for the information of the Justices in the following terms:-"The undersigned has been requested to circulate the accompanying memorandum amongst the Justices of the Peace and will be obliged if they will express their approval of the resolutions which it is proposed to forward for the consideration of the Government.-H. E. Wodehouse, Police Magistrate." The result was that a large proportion of the Justices signified their approval of the resolutions. There was a small minority against the resolutions.

The next step was to forward the resolutions for the consideration of the Government, which was done in the following

letter:-

SIR,

"THE MAGISTRACY, HONGKONG, 14th December, 1897.

I have the honour to forward for the consideration of the Government copy of resolutions relating to the sale of injurious liquors passed at an informal meeting held at "Derrington" on the 16th November, 1897, at which were present-[Here follow names of gentlemen present as given above.]

I have further to forward, in original, the endorsement of the general body of the Justices of the Peace to whom the foregoing resolutions were submitted.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

(Signed)

H. E. WODEHOUSE, Police Magistrate.

To that letter a reply was received from the Government in the form of a minute by the Colonial Secretary, which was forwarded to you in the following letter:-

SIR,

"THE MAGISTRACY, VICTORIA,

HONGKONG, 15th January, 1898.

With reference to the forthcoming meeting of the Justices of the Peace at the City Hall, it may be to your convenience to know that the Government requests that the Justices will appoint a Committee of their own body to consider the matter and make definite recommendations to the Government such as can be embodied in an Ordinance and are likely to secure the object aimed at.

The foregoing is the communication referred to in my letter convening the meeting.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

(Signed)

H. E. WODEHOUSE, Police Magistrate.”

My own opinion with regard to that minute is that if it is left to the Justices to deal with the matter the result will not be so favourable as if the Government themselves took the matter in hand and formed a Committee or Commission with power to call witnesses and examine them. (Applause.) It is, however, for you yourselves, gentlemen, to decide that question. I think I need make only one more

( xxxvi)

remark, and that is in regard to myself personally. As you are aware, by Ordinance the Magistrate presides at meetings of the Justices of the Peace held to consider applications for transfers or for licences. He is also generally used as a medium through which to convene a meeting, but the meetings once convened and opened I am of opinion that the functions of the Magistrate cease, and that after that he becomes merged in the general body of Justices. Therefore, in now declaring the meeting opened, I will call upon you to elect your Chairman. (Applause.)

The Chairman then left his seat.

Mr. Ede proposed that the Hon. H. E. Wodehouse be appointed Chairman of the meeting.

Mr. Mehta seconded.

Carried unanimously.

The chair was again taken by the Hon. H. E. Wodehouse,

The Chairman-I have great pleasure in occupying the chair, and we will now proceed to discuss the answer of the Government which I have already read to you. I will call upon any gentleman present to make any remarks or move any resolution he may feel inclined to move.

In answer to Mr. Crawford, the Chairman said-So far as my recollection goes- I have not the Ordinance with me now-there is no provision in the Ordinance regarding the sale of deleterious liquors. There is a provision for the sale of adulterated liquors, and adulterated liquors are defined in a particular way which does not include the quality of liquors such as we are now considering.

Mr. Crawford-If there be no special provision for Hongkong we are under the ordinary English law.

The Chairman-That is not so. The English law is not in force here subsequent to 1843 unless it has been expressly put in force by Ordinance.

Mr. Hooper-Is there any law in England at the present time which deals with this question?

The Chairman-I am unable to say.

Dr. Hartigan-As nobody else seems inclined to take the matter up I suppose I must, although I did not intend to do so. With regard to the Government proposal that we should form a Committee, it seems to me that it would be better to ask the Government to form a Commission, or, as has been suggested, that we ourselves, if we form a Committee, should ask the Government to give it the powers of a Commission. I do not think we should be able to carry out the object we have in view unless we get very ample powers-powers to take evidence and compel people to give evidence. If we were simply what I might designate an irresponsible Committee we probably should not be able to get a certain amount of conclusive evidence which we should require, as the Government have asked us to give them certain definite details on which they could found an opinion. Everybody knows that the question of drink in Hongkong is one of the very highest importance. You cannot walk out in the streets at night without seeing the results of the present regulations-or non-regulations-and any medical man here can vouch for the evil results. Certainly I know that naval and military officers can say that the results on their men produced by this particular liquor is very bad indeed, as it is not a mere case of drunkenness, but it is a case of frenzy. It is not a case of drunkenness for a day, but for a week. I bave never seen any honest liquor produce this result even when taken in larger quantities. In order to settle this question we should ask the Government to give the Committee the full powers of a Commission as regards the taking of evidence that they think is necessary. This present trouble is, as you all know, of very long standing and I am sorry to say it is increasing. My own idea was that having called the attention of the Government to the matter, the functions of the Justices were finished, but as the Government have not taken that view I see no reason why we should not meet them, and as to a certain extent they have endorsed our opinion that something ought to be done. We certainly ought to meet them half way and if necessary appoint a Commission at once. The one objection taken to the original resolutions was that it was impossible to find any means of nailing this matter; but it seems to me that if we can prove that this evil is doing an immense amount of injury to those who some day may have to defend us the Government ought to take steps to remedy that defect, no matter what interests are involved. (Applause.) I may say that a gentleman who knows all about these cases told me that you can get quite a respectable drop of good honest Irish or Scotch whiskey for the same price as the poisonous stuff is sold at. If that is so, we can deal with the matter by means of the licences. We can compel licence holders to sell only genuine stuff and not spurious as it is to a great extent at present. Then as regards Chinese liquor, that is more easily dealt with, because we could say it should be kept up to a certain standard, and that could easily be accomplished by putting a provision in the

A

!

Ordinance.

[ xxxvii]

The view we should take is that if the evil exists a remedy should be found. The Govern- ment is here to govern and if the Government cannot find a remedy we should take means to abolish an evil which is sapping the foundations of a great portion of the population. I beg to conclude by hoping that we shall come to some definite results to-day and not allow this question to be in abeyance as it has been to my certain knowledge for twenty years, and probably twenty years before that. (Applause.)

Mr. Ede--I see here an expert gentleman, Mr. McCallum. I should like to ask him whether it is possible to establish a standard that would not interfere with legitimate liquor and by which we should be able to ascertain if there were deleterious substances in the liquors sold.

Mr. McCallum-I think it is quite possible to fix a standard, both for foreign liquors and for Chinese liquors.

Dr. Hartigan-I beg to propose the following resolution: "That this meeting appoint a Committee of three members to enquire into the question of the working of the liquor laws of this Colony, and that the Government add two members thereto and give such Committee the power of a Commission.”

Mr. A. Findlay Smith seconded.

Mr. Coughtrie Mr. Chairman, do you think five members will be sufficient on the Committee? It might be necessary to have sub-Committees.

The Chairman-That is entirely a matter for yourselves to decide.

Mr. Dalrymple-Mr. Chairman, I beg to move the following amendment-"That if it is considered advisable by the Justices present that a Committee or Commission should be appointed, that that Commission should be appointed by the Government entirely." Personally I think that this is a matter which the Government should deal with. They are possessed of the necessary machinery, and I think it is the duty of the Government to take steps to prevent the importation and sale of injurious liquors.

Mr. Thurburn seconded the amendment.

The Chairman-I think I may as well say that when putting this resolution and amendment before you it will be well to bear in mind the fact that we have no facts before us at present on which we could ask for a Commission, and that it is possible that the Justices who have taken the initiative in the matter will be called upon to say in what way the evil exists. We have been told that it exists, but at present there is nothing before the Government to prove that it does, and I think that before they take such an important step as appointing a Commission they would like to be furnished with certain facts showing the nature of the evil. Before coming to a conclusion on this amendment and resolution I should like you to consider that point. It seems to me, gentlemen, that there will be no difficulty in obtaining sufficient grounds for the Government to go upon if we invite officers of the Navy, and Army, and the Mercantile Marine, to give us information on the matter. That information will be quite sufficient for the Government if it thinks proper to appoint a Commission.

Mr. Coughtrie-In regard to what you have just observed, the matter appears to me in exactly the same light. I think that certain facts should be brought out by the Committee of the Justices and represented to the Government. Upon these facts the Government may appoint a Commission with the fullest powers. My idea is that if the Justices elect a Committee of seven and take evidence there will be something for the Government to go upon. At present there is nothing to lay before the Government in a tangible form. I have a list of names here and I therefere beg to propose another amendment:-"That Hon. H. E. Wodehouse, Rev. R. F. Cobbold, Dr. Hartigan, Mr. N. J. Ede, Mr. C. S. Sharp, Mr. D. R. Crawford, and Mr. H. L. Dalrymple form a Commission of seven to obtain all the information they can on this matter and report to the general body of Justices."

Mr. Dalrymple-May I ask if the Government would itself give powers to any Committee in the collation of facts?

The Chairman--Of course I am unable to answer that.

Mr. Coughtrie-We are here at the request of the Government for the purpose of making a recommendation to the Government, and I am of opinion---

The Chairman-I think the Government would like general facts.

Mr. Coughtrie-How can we get them unless we have the power? (Applause.)

The Chairman-What I suggested was that the officers of the Navy and Army and the Mercantile Marine would be able to supply us with the necessary facts sufficient for the Government to take action

upon.

Mr. Coughtrie--I am afraid the Committee would like wider information than that.

[ xxxviii]

The Chairman-We will leave it to the Committee to deal with the matter as they choose.

Mr. Moses seconded Mr. Cougbtrie's amendment.

Mr. Herbert Smith-I should like to say that it seems to ine that with every amendment we are getting further and further away from the main issue. (Applause.) The Justices have plainly pointed out to the Government what they consider should be done and I am sorry to say that the Government, as usual, have shirked their responsibility and referred the matter back to the Justices of the Peace. It seems to me that though we are all agreed that the Government have the necessary machinery and should have every wish to put an Ordinance in force to try and ameliorate this trade in inferior drink, that, as the Justices have been distinctly asked, they should act at once, and I would suggest to the gentleman who proposed the first resolution that he might amend it by moving that the Justices now appoint five gentlemen, whose names shall be submitted to the Government, to enquire into and report upon the traffic in these liquors on condition that they are given all the powers of a Government Commission. (Applause.) I may say that two members of the Government might be put on the Committee, as, for instance, Mr. Wodehouse and Dr. Clark or Mr. McCallum.

Mr. Inchbald supported the suggestion.

Dr. Hartigan, the mover of the first resolution, said he consented to the alteration being made as suggested by Mr. Herbert Smith. The resolution would then read "that the Committee consist of five members and that the Government add two members thereto.”

Mr. Herbert Smith-Leave that last part out. We will do it ourselves. says the Government wish us to appoint the Committee. Why not do it?

The minute distinctly

Dr. Hartigan--I was informed that the objection to that would be that if we ask for the powers of a Commission we must have Government members.

Dr. Stedman-We can appoint two officials from amongst ourselves.

The Chairman then put Mr. Coughtrie's amendment to the meeting.

Four Justices voted for it and twenty-two against. The amendment was therefore lost.

:-

The amendment proposed by Mr. Dalrymple was then put to the meeting and lost by 10 votes to 22.

The following original resolution was then put to the meeting and carried unanimously:-

"That this meeting appoint five members to enquire into the question of the working of the liquor laws of this Colony, and that the Government be requested to give such Committee the powers of a Commission."

Mr. Smith proposed and Mr. Ede seconded that the following Committee be appointed:-Hon. H. E. Wodehouse, Dr. Hartigan, Mr. H. McCallum, Mr. J. J. Francis, q.c., and Rev. R. F. Cobbold.

Carried.

This was all the business and a vote of thanks to the Chairman having been passed the proceedings

concluded.

Appendix 8.

SPECIAL MEETING OF THE JUSTICES OF THE PEACE.

On Saturday afternoon, the 16th April, 1898, a special meeting of Her Majesty's Justices of the Peace was held in the Chamber of Commerce Room, City Hall, "for the purpose of considering questions which have arisen in connection with the Commission to enquire into the sale of deleterious liquors" in the Colony. The meeting was convened by circular signed by Commander W. C. H. Hastings, Acting Police Magistrate. Some time ago the Justices of the Peace submitted a series of resolutions to the Government recommending that steps should be taken for the prevention of the sale of injurious liquors in the Colony. A reply was received from the Government, and a meeting of the Justices was held on Thursday, January 31st, to consider this reply. Subsequently a Commission was appointed to go into the subject, and before this Commission evidence was given by the Captain Superintendent of Police, the Hon. F. H. May.

At the meeting on Saturday the chair was occupied by Commander Hastings, and there were also present, Rev. R. F. Cobbold, Dr. Stedman, Dr. Lowson, Dr. Clark, Messrs. G. Murray Bain, J. J. Francis, A. J. May, H. P. Tooker, C. V. Ladds, R. C. Wilcox, C. Ford, E. W. Mitchell, G. Sharp, and C. W. Duggan.

1

·

i

!

:

[ xxxix]

The Chairman-Gentlemen, by direction I have invited you to come here to ask you two questions-The Government appointed a Commission on the 14th February. Mr. Wodehouse, one of the members, has left the Colony, Dr. Hartigan has resigned, and Mr. McCallum was not able to serve when he came out of hospital. I am going to ask you two questions--Whether you wish the Commission. to be dissolved or go on, or if you do wish the enquiry to go on, will you nominate members who are willing to serve, or will you leave the nomination of the members to the Government?

Mr. Francis said-Gentlemen, to some extent I am responsible for the present meeting and for placing you in your present position, and I have asked the Chairman for permission to explain it. After the Committee was appointed, Mr. Wodehouse was very active, and we had two or three preliminary meetings before the Commission was actually appointed at his house at which we exchanged our views on the subject, and endeavoured to ascertain, as far as we could, what lines the examination of witnesses and the investigation generally should take. As soon as the Commission was issued we met again and prepared a lengthy series of questions to be addressed to the different interests in the Colony--the wine merchants, importers of wines and spirits, the licensed dealers and the naval and military medical authorities. The answers to some of these have been received and the result of our preliminary enquiries and investigation was this, that so far as we could see there was nothing very serious the matter, there was nothing really substantial to enquire into. From Mr. McCallum and Mr. Browne we ascertained that so far as their knowledge and experience went there was nothing in the shape of adulteration practised in the Colony. They had never had any proof of it, and so far as their experience went they believed adulteration was not prevalent. The very most that was done was that the liquor was weakened, and if there was anything wrong it was in connection with the liquor imported; perhaps a good deal of the liquor was too crude and not of the very best quality. The Captain Superintendent of Police was the only witness examined by the Commission at the sittings it held. Mr. May had nothing to complain of either as to the conduct of the keepers of public-houses generally, or the quality or quantities of the liquors sold, and in fact said there was no reason to complain of drunkenness in the Colony. They had received answers from the naval and military medical officers and they had no serious complaint against the quality of the liquors supplied to the men. They had nothing to suggest, and, broadly, we came to the conclusion that there was little or nothing substantial to enquire into. One point with reference to which amendment was possible could only be tackled by interfering with the trade of the port, and imposing restriction on the import of liquors of different descriptions, and imposing tests and calling for examinations and reports from the importers of liquors, which would seriously interfere with the free trade of the port, and which would be most strenuously resisted. Therefore, when Mr. Wodehouse had to go away-the meetings of the Commission were delayed in consequence of his illness,-when Dr. Hartigan was leaving the Colony for twelve months, when Mr. McCallum was taken ill and had to leave, so that it was absolutely necessary to re-constitute the Commission, I mentioned the matter to Mr. Cobbold, who was practically the only other member of the Commission besides myself, and we agreed that there was very little to enquire about, and very little use to continue the Commission, and, therefore, I informally addressed the Government on the matter. The result of that communication was that Mr. Wodehouse was asked to hold a meeting of the then members of the Committee to ascertain their views. I attended one meeting, and we were unable to get a quorum. Mr. Wodehouse called another meeting on the morning before he went away, but it was impossible to get a quorum, and this meeting was called. I, therefore, beg to move that the Commission be allowed to lapse.

The Rev. R. F. Cobbold-Gentlemen, it may be a matter of surprise to some of you, as it was to myself, when I received notice of this meeting, to learn that until five minutes ago I had no idea whatever as to what the business was. Mr. Francis will pardon me if I express my entire disapproval of what he has said. It is true that some time before Mr. Wodehouse left I had a conversation with him, but I think he must have absolutely misunderstood what I said. Mr. Francis has just said entirely on his own authority that the result of the enquiry as far as it has gone is that there is nothing very serious the matter. That, gentlemen, is a point on which I absolutely disagree with him. I have no intention whatever of shirking the duty which, gentlemen, at your instigation and request, has been placed upon us by the Government. We cannot possibly pre-judge this question. Whatever our opinion may be at present as to the possible result at which we may arrive, I do not think we have any right whatever at the present moment to say that this Commission ought to cease to exist. (Applause.) It has been suggested that not long ago a Commission sat at home to enquire into very much the same kind of matters we have in hand, and that the result of their enquiry was practically nothing could be done. I believe it is partly upon that ground that it has been suggested that this Commission should cease, but, gentlemen, our conditions here are not the same as those at home. I do not say we shall

$

1

[XL]

not arrive at the result which Mr. Francis has so clearly sketched out to us, but this is not the question before us.

The Commission has been appointed with definite powers, definite scope, and it is our duty to continue it.

Mr. Francis-I would ask leave to say one word in explanation. If I conveyed the idea that there was any formal expression of opinion, I failed to express myself clearly, but communicating personally with Mr. Cobbold he distinctly expressed at the time his agreement with me. I have carefully perused Mr. May's evidence, as submitted to the Committee, and I am perfectly satisfied, and anybody who reads it over will be fully satisfied, that the Captain Superintendent of Police, who has immediate control of the licensed houses, coffee shops, and other public houses here, sees nothing that requires amendment, and is satisfied with the method of conducting the public houses. Mr. Browne, the Secretary, stated emphatically to myself and Captain Hastings, when talking the matter over the other day, that in the reports of the military and naval medical officers, in answer to questions submitted to them, that they had nothing whatever to complain of. All they said was that the men got too great a quantity of liquor, but as to the quality they had nothing to say.

The Rev. R. F. Cobbold--I am sure Mr. Francis will agree with me in this point that hearsay evidence is of no practical value. I have not seen the answers to questions formulated by the Commission, neither has Mr. Francis, and we are not in a position to say that there is no use for the Commission.

Dr. Stedman-I beg to second Mr. Francis' motion. I was appointed to the Commission in place of Dr. Hartigau, and I have had a lot of conversations with Mr. Browne on the subject, and he tells me emphatically and distinctly that he cannot by analysis detect any deleterious principles in the cheap whiskies and gins that are sold in this Colony; that the cheap whiskies and gins sold in this Colony are cheap because they are not natural spirits, but manufactured spirits, and, so far as he can tell, were manufactured with more or less pure proof spirit. Certain flavours are added to them, certain small proportions of whisky or gin, as the case may be, to give them a flavour, so that these manufactured spirits contain less fusel oil and far less furfuraldehyde than other expensive liquors. Mr. Browne has told me that in all these cheap whiskies he cannot find as much fusel oil, furfuraldehyde, and one or two other things, which are supposed to be injurious in newly-distilled whisky, as was found in much more expensive whisky, and further, that these cheap whiskies have been brought to him from these low grog shops in the town, and after analysing them and failing to find anything deleterious in them he has drunk these common cheap whiskies at his own table, and not only received no injury from them, but found them very much like the ordinary whisky, except that they had not the same amount of flavour. It seems to me it is entirely a matter of analysis; we are left entirely in the analyst's hands, and if the Commission were to investigate the spirits sold in this Colony and send them for analysis, and the analyst tells you beforehand that be cannot find anything deleterious in the liquor the whole thing must end in smoke.

Dr. Clark--I would just like to say that the statement we have heard from Dr. Stedman is a most important one, one which practically settles the question. We are receiving the statement of the Government Analyst at second hand, and I would like to suggest, Sir, prior to the dissolution of this Commission-Would it not be well if the Commission took the evidence of Mr. Browne on that point, and if necessary call another meeting of the Justices to hear at first hand the evidence of the Government Analyst?

Mr. Francis-In the present state there is no Commission. The question is whether the Government should re-constitute it. There are only two members of it-myself and Mr. Cobbold.

Dr. Clark-And these two members constitute the Commission.

Mr. Francis-No, a quorum consists of the Chairman and two other members.

Dr. Clark-I will move,-"That the Government be recommended to appoint the Acting Police Magistrate Chairman of this Commission, and that this meeting of the Justices begs to suggest to the Commission that they take the evidence of the Government Analyst upon the question as to whether it is possible by analysis to prove the deleteriousness or otherwise of cheap liquors sold in this Colony, and report the result of that evidence to a future meeting of the Justices." Then, Sir, we should be in a position to consider the question whether it is worth while to waste valuable time in taking further evidence. Until we get that, we have no evidence before us to justify the dissolution of the Commission.

Dr. Lowson seconded.

Mr. Francis withdrew his proposals in favour of Dr. Clark's resolution.

Dr. Clark's resolution was carried unanimously.

[ XLI ]

Appendix 9.

No. 784.

SIR,

COLONIAL SECRETARY'S OFFICE,

HONGKONG, 28th March, 1898.

With reference to your letter No. 18 of the 25th instant, I am directed to inform you that His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government has been pleased to appoint you to be Chairman of the Commission recently appointed to enquire into and report on the sale of deleterious liquors in the Colony, in the place of Mr. WODEHOUSE, C.M.G.

Your appointment will be duly notified in the next issue of the Government Gazette.

Commander W. C. H. HASTINGS, R.N.,

Acting Police Magistrate.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

T. SERCOMBE SMITH,

Acting Colonial Secretary.

Appendix 10.

GOVERNMENT NOTIFICATION.--No. 356.

With reference to Government Notification No. 71 of 14th February, 1898, His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government in Executive Council has been pleased to appoint FREDERIC OSMUND STEDMAN, M.D., to be a Member of the Commission appointed thereunder.

By Command,

T. SERCOMBE SMITH,

Acting Colonial Secretary.

Colonial Secretary's Office, Hongkong, 6th August, 1898.

Appendix 11.

PRICES OF WINES AND SPIRITS (the cheap variety).

Free on Board Hamburg.

IN CASES.

per case

12/1 btls.

per case

per case

24/2 btls. 24 flasks.

484

per case

flasks.

plain. wired. plain. wired. plain. wired. plain.wired.

Brandy

50 under proof.............

Old Tom Gin

36

""

>>

Rum

25

3/6. 4/-. 5/-. 3/9. 4/3. 5/3. 4/-. 1/6. 5/6.

5/10. | 5/-.

5/10. 7/6. 8,8.

6/1. 5/3.

6/1.

79.

8/11.

6/4. 5/6.

6/4.

8/-.

9/2.

Whisky

Brandy

20

""

Geneva

27

Cherry Cordial

Cherry Brandy

Port Wine, Hambro'...

""

99

Sherry, Hambro'

Vermouth, French Vermouth, Italian

25

""

"

";

"

per case 12 btls. 1 liter each

12 2 imp. galls. 3j3.

4/3.

25

15

4

"

19

""

22

""

>>

6/3.

25

15

5

""

"

""

לי

""

7/3.

12

""

"}

quarts 4/-.

24 btls. pints 5j-.

12

5/3.

24

6/3.

27

>>

""

25

وو

"3

12

""

"

55

4/6.

24

**

"

5/6.

12

3/8.

24

48.

"

""

39

12

دو

""

4/6.

24

">

"1

5/6.

12

"

1 liter each 3/10. 24

liter each 4/4.

12

1

دو

2)

6/-. 24

""

7/-.

[ XLII ]

PRICES OF WINES AND SPIRITS,-Continued.

IN BULK.

Brandy 1 to 2 over proof.....{

32

Geneva

>>

Old Tom Gin

"2

وو

""

22

in hogsheads 1/4., in qr. casks 1/4. per imp..gall.

22

""

>>

1/7., 1/10.,

""

22

33

1/75. 1/10.

""

">

"

وو

""

""

""

22

extra.

21

29

Original French bogsheads 13 d., qr. casks 2 d.

in puncheons 1/5 in hogsheads 1/61⁄2.

>>

1/5

hogsheads 1/4

""

"

>>

""qr. casks

proof

Genuine Schiedam Hambro'

">

""

>>

""

""

"

22

Rum 35 to 40 over proof...

""

10

23

"

Port Wine, Hambro'...

"}

""

"

initated Jamaica.

13

double strength

""

1/7 1/10

""

* 37

"J

1/3

" puncheons 1/6

وو

دو

1/6 1/4. 1/7

""

>>

>>

39

>>

"

"

>>

1/103.

2 "}

23

>>

""

"

"

1/35.

21

""

"

hogsheads 1/64.

>>

per Pipe of 115 imp. galls. £ 8.15/-. Half Pipes or Butt 10,—

5.15/-.

27

38 degrees Sykes...

115

22

"}

""

""

38

115

""

""

17

27

>>

""

38

Butt 108

""

23

"

"}

""

""

5.15-.

per Pipe or Butt extra.

per l'ipe or Butt extra.

4. 5. (Quarter Pipes or Butts 20/—

Sherry, Hambro"

Free on board Glasgow.

PRICES OF SCOTCH WHISKIES.

The lowest price quoted by a Scotch firm of distillers for a well-known blend of 8 over-proof strength is 2/6 a gallon. The highest price quoted by the same firm for a high-class single whisky of I over-proof strength is 8/- a gallon.

COST OF MAKING ARTIFICIAL SPIRITS.

Brandy.-Brandy Essence 13/- ib.

Fifty ounces of this Essence added to 100 gallons of Proof Spirit (or Spirit of the desired strength) in which 4 tbs. of the best white sugar has been dissolved will produce 100 gallons of superior Brandy adding sufficient colouring matter (burnt sugar) to produce either Pale or Brown Brandy.

Rum.-Rum Essence 10,6 b.

One pint of this Essence added to 100 gallons of Proof Spirit (or Spirit of the desired strength)

forms unsweetened Rum of a superior quality.

Whisky.-Whisky Essence (Scotch or Irish) 22/-.

One pint of this Essence added to 100 gallons of Proof Spirit (or Spirit of the desired strength)

forms unsweetened Whisky of a superior quality.

The cost of white spirit of wine, of 60 over-proof strength, is about 60 cents a gallon free on board Hamburg.

[The remarks as to the superior quality of the artificial liquors produced by the essences are quoted from the price list of the vendors. These artificial liquors lack flavour, body, and aroma, as compared with genuine spirits.-Secretary.]

COST OF SAMSHU.

Leu Pun Chau,

5 cents a catty.

Sheung Ching Chau,...

7

""

""

Sam Ching Chau, Fa Chau,

.10

""

وو

وو

7

دو

:

'

M4

""

Appendix 12.

SAMSHU.

By FRANK BROWNE, Ph. Ch., F.C.S., Acting Government Analyst, Hongkong.

The term

Samshu is a name which is derived from the Chinese word Sam Shiu or thrice burnt. Samshu refers to that variety of Chinese liquor known as Sam Ching Chau or thrice-distilled liquor, but as now used it covers the three spirits known as Leu Pun Chau, Sheung Ching Chau, and Sam Ching Chau, all of which are obtained from rice. Moreover, the name Samshu is frequently loosely applied so as to include any spirit of Chinese production, such as beverages in which either Leu Pun Chau, Sheung

:

[ XLIII]

Ching Chau, or Sam Ching Chau forms a part, and also to the liquor known as Fa Chau,-a spirit obtained from molasses, and to the beverages prepared from Fa Chau; but in this report Samshu should be under- stood to mean only Leu Pun Chau, Sheung Ching Chau, and Sam Ching Chau,

There are three well-known varieties of samshu:-

1. Leu Pun Chau (half materials liquor) or Mei Chau (rice liquor).

2. Sheung Ching Chau or twice distilled liquor.

3. Sam Ching Chau or thrice distilled liquor.

These three kinds are not made by all distilleries; in several of the nine samshu distilleries in Hongkong only Leu Pun Chau is made.

LEU PUN CHAU.

To make Leu Pun Chau the chief beverage 180 catties of rice are mixed with 180 catties of water and the mixture is placed in an iron pan heated direct by means of a wood fire and boiled for half an hour. The softened rice is spread out on a large wooden tray placed at an angle so that the rice water drains away. The cooled rice is now put into twenty pots together with the rice water. To each pot is added one and a half catties of a substance known as Chau Pang together with 10 catties of water. Chau Pang is a substance composed of rice, bean flour, red earth, and leaves which are stated to be cassia leaves. It is imported from Canton, but it is manufactured in Honam. Chau Pang is usually in dry flat cakes about 8 inches square by 1 inch thick. An analysis showed that 100 parts contain :-

Moisture,......

Ash,

7.24

.44.01

Chau Pang is the fermenting material. It has no particular odour. The mixture of rice, Chau Pang, and water is allowed to stand for a period varying from 23 to 28 days, after which the contents of three pots are transferred to a still heated direct by means of wood. The still is composed of three parts.

1. A circular iron pan furnished with an iron cover in the centre of which is a large orifice. On the top of this perforated cover is

2. The Adapter which is merely a coil of cane plaited very thickly and closely so as to be impervious to moisture. Sometimes two or more Adapters are used. On the top of the Adapter is

3. The Condenser, which is a cylindrical metal apparatus greatly resembling an alembic with a reservoir above the upper surface of the alembic to contain water for cooling purposes. A piece of metal piping carries off the spirit which has been condensed and run down into the upturned inner rim of the alembic, while a much larger piece of piping serves to let out the water from the reservoir which serves as a con- denser (see figure).

The contents of the three pots having been put into the pan, a rope basket containing thick, crude, earth nut oil is situated on the Adapter by means of a piece of wood so as to swing in the orifice of the pan. This arrangement is to prevent bumping and spurting. The Condenser is then put in position, and the reservoir having been filled with water, the distillation commences. The weight of water in the Condenser keeps it firmly pressed on to the Adapter. Thirty catties of samshu are collected in about one and a half hours. The water in the Condenser is changed three times during this period, the hot water being run off completely from the bottom by the large pipe in a few seconds. The distillation being finished, the pan is almost emptied of its contents by means of a large ladie, three more pots of liquid are emptied into it, and another distillation proceeds. Thus it will be seen that to make 200 catties of Leu Pun Chau it is necessary to take-

Rice,

Chau Pang,

.180 catties.

30 catties.

To distil this quantity 200 catties of firewood are allowed.

SHEUNG CHING CHAU.

This liquid is a little stronger than Leu Pun Chau. It is made by placing in the still 3 pots of the usual fermented liquid and 10 catties of Leu Pun Chau and distilling 30 catties.

* One catty

pounds (Avoir.)

This liquid is the strongest samshu.

[ XLIV ]

SAM CHING CHAU.

It is made by placing in the still 3 pots of the usual fermented liquid and 30 catties of Leu Pun Chau, and distilling 30 catties.

COMPOSITION Of samshu.

The following table shows the nature of samshu. The ethers and higher alcohols were determined by the method as used by Beli in his investigations for the Select Committee on British and Foreign Spirits, 1891, as described in Appendix No. 4 of their report.

In 100 fluid parts of proof strength.

Description.

Strength of sample.

Total solids dried at 100°

C.in 100 fluid

Free acid as

parts.

acetic.

Compound ethers as acetic ether.

Higher Alcohols.

Leu Pun Chau, 1,

58.7 u.p.

.015

.279

.230

.032

Do.,

2,.

50.9 u.p.

.006

.127

.305

.034

Sheung Ching Chau, 1,...

53.5 u.p.

.035

.217

.231

.062

.Do.,

2,...

42.4 u.p.

.008

.123

.821

.035

Sam Ching Chau, 1,......

15.0 u.p.

.012

.078

.242

.034

Do..

2,

22.6 u.p.

.018

.073

.205

.068

All the samples contain a faint trace of furfuraldehyde.

The amount of compound ethers is noteworthy, but it is not a surprising amount considering the nature of the materials used for the production of Samshu.

The strength of Leu Pun Chau somewhat varies as will be seen from the following analyses :—

Sample.

Leu Pun Chau 1 1.......

2.......

Strength.

.58.7 u.p. ....50.9 u.p.

3......

4........

....52.2 u.p.

.......53.7 u.p.

5.......

6.........

.59.0 u.p. ..62.6 u.p.

Leu Pun Chau is the staple beverage and is preferred to the others which are not liked for habitual use on account of their greater strength in alcohol. Samshu is never diluted; when Sheung Ching Chau or Sam Ching Chau is drunk very small sips only are taken. Drunkenness is very uncommon amongst the Chinese. Many do not drink Samshu except on festival days. It is a common thing ou such occa- sions for some Chinese to drink a catty or even more of Leu Pun Chau without becoming intoxicated.

Samshu is a colourless liquid of characteristic odour. It may be defined as a spirit consisting of plain spirit or ethylic alcohol mixed with the bye-products derived from rice and Chau Pang. Leu Pun Chau and Sheung Ching Chau are usually slightly opalescent. The opalescence disappears when alcohol is added. It is usually stored in jars and it is said not to improve by keeping.

By mixing samshin with certain substances a number of well-known Chinese beverages are prepared. The names and composition of these liquors are as follows:-

Ching Mui Chau is composed of Leu Pun Chau, sour plums, and sugar.

Mau Kan Chau from Triticum repens, Leu Pun Chau, and sugar.

Chang Chau from oranges, Leu Pun Chau, and sugar.

Mui Kwai Chau from roses, Leu Pun Chau, and sugar.

Ka Pi Chau from Ka Pi (a bark used for rheumatism), Leu Pun Chau, and sugar.

Ning Mun Chau from limes, Leu Pun Chau, and sugar.

Muk Kwa Chau from paraws, Leu Pun Chau, and sugar.

PLUG,

TUB FOR WARM WATER.

WATER.

CONDENSER.

BOILER.

Section of Still.

Scale fo

Drawn by C. H. GALE.

FLEXIBLE ADA

05 CAND.

..

SPIRIT RECEIVER.

UND LEVEL.

[ XLV ]

OTHER LIQUORS.

Several distilleries are making a liquor known as Fa Chau. Of this 100 catties are prepared from :-

Molasses,

165 catties.

Tso Sui, (contents of pots for making Leu Pun Chau), 165

Of coal 90 cattios are allowed.

Two samples of Fa Chau were 41.5 u.p. and 38.9 u.p., respectively. Fa Chau is used for making several of the wines in which Leu Pun Chau is ordinarily used. Shüt Li Chau is made from Fa Chau and Tientsin pears.

No Mei Chau is a liquid of varied composition. Fa Chau is used for it together with No Mei or full-grown rice, or No Mei Chau is frequently sweetened Leu Pun Chau in the preparation of which No Mei or full-grown rice has been used. Shan Kut Chau is a wine prepared from Shan Kut―a very small hard bitter orange-and Fa Chau.

OTHER INDUSTRIES CARRIED ON BY SAMSHU MAKERS.

All distillers make sauce by converting Leu Pun Chau or Fa Chau into vinegar and adding the appropriate ingredients.

One distiller makes vinegar for the purpose of making white-lead as well as for sauce-making.

COST OF MATERIALS IN HONGKONG.

Labour.

Rice,

3.00 for 100 catties.

Chau Pang,

Firewood,

Coal,

$ 4.50 ""

$ 0.70

$10.00 a ton.

""

A coolie gets 42 cents for every 100 catties of samshu made.

PRODUCTION AND CONSUMPTION.

""

(See Table annexed).

COST TO CONSUMERS.

Samshu is a cheap beverage.

Leu Pun Chau

costs five

cents a catty.

Sheung Ching Chau

seven

:

""

"}

,,

One distiller makes vinegar for the purpose of making white-lead as well as for sauce-making.

COST OF MATERIALS IN HONGKONG.

Labour.

Rice,

Chau Pang,

Firewood,

$3.00 for 100 catties.

$ 4.50

$ 0.70

Coal,

""

""

..$10.00 a ton.

">

A coolie gets 42 cents for every 100 catties of samshu made.

PRODUCTION AND CONSUMPTION.

(See Table annexed).

COST TO CONSUMERS.

Samshu is a cheap beverage.

Leu Pun Chau

.costs five

cents a catty.

Sheung Ching Chau

seven

"7

:

Sam Ching Chau

ten

"

"}

Fa Chau

seven

>>

Ching Mui Chau

Mau Kan Chau.......

Chang Chau .....

Mui Kwai Chau

Ka Pi Chau

Ning Mun Chau

eight

eight

步步

""

eight

"

forty

>>

>>

thirty

""

>>

eight

}}

Muk Kwa Chau

Shüt Li Chau

eight

""

"

"}

eight

No Mei Chau..........

seven

>>

"

""

Shan Kut Chau

eight

""

A visit was paid to each distillery in order to observe the processes used and the quality of the mate- rials. The processes are practically the same in all. The rice in all factories is the cheapest kind, known as Choo Mei; in no case was it unsound. The Chau Pang was of good quality. The factories were kept

in a clean condition.

[ XLVI ]

Table showing the amounts of Chinese Liquors distilled in, imported into, sold in, and exported from Hongkong during 1897, by Chinese holders of Distillery Licences, and other particulars.

[It should be remembered that these Statistics refer only to the business done by Chinese holders of Distillery Licences. There are also 289 holders of Chinese Spirit Licences who sell, export, and import Chinese Liquors.] C. catty.

Amount of Chinese Liquor

distilled,

1,979,831 c. CONSISTING OF :—

Leu Pun Chau.

Sheung Ching Chau.

Sam Ching Chan.

Fa Chau,

895,930 c.

63,568 c.

12,986 c.

1,007,347 c.

Total of Chinese

Liquor distilled and imported.

1,979,831 c. + 20,300 c.

2,000,131 c.

Amount of Chinese Liquor imported,

20,300 c. of Leu Pun Chau.

2,011,885 c. cONSISTING OF :--

Leu Pun Chau,

Sheung Ching Chau.

Sum Ching Chau.

Fa Chau.

Amount of Chinese Liquor sold for export and local consumption,

634,279 c.

47,894 c.

11,800 c.

457,668 c.

Other Liquor prepared by means of Leu Pun Chau or Fa Chau.

860,244 c.

Amount of Chinese Liquor

sold locally.

323,057 c. CONSISTING OF :—

Leu Pun

Chau.

Amount of Chinese Liquor known to have been ex- ported,

Sheung Ching Ching Chau. Chau.

Sam

Fa

! Ching

Mui

Chau.

Shüt Li No Mei Chau.

Chau.

Chau.

Mui

Kwai

Chau.

Muk

Ning

Ka Pi Mau Kan Chau. Chan.

Chang

Kwa

Mun

Chau.

Received

Chau.

Chau.

by places.

Total.

[201,760c. 10,096 c. | 10,526 c.

1,000 c.

6,643 c.

371 c. 88,935 c. 1,444 c.

562 c.

1,330 c.

90c.

150 c.

150 c.

Australia received

8,454 c.

180 c.

1,569 c.

13,747 c. 1,062 c.)

966 c.

British North Borneo rc-

ceived

150 c.

100 c.

China received

201,760 c. 8,146 c.

820 c.

100 c.

4,400 c.

·

382 c.

382 c.

Sandwich Islands received.... Japan received

150c.

150 c. 26,128 c.

350 c.

215,126 c.

764c.

40,650 c.

1,800 c.

150c.

4,750 c.

33,800 c.

sell, export, and import Chinese Liquors.]

C.

catty.

1,979,831 c. CONSISTING OF :~

Total of Chinese Liquor distilled and imported.

Leu Pun Chau.

Sheung Ching Chau.

Sam Ching Chan.

Fa-Chan.

1,979,831 c.

+

20,300 c.

Amount of Chinese Liquor distilled,

895,930 c.

63,568 c.

12,986 c.

1,007,347 c.

2,000,131 c.

Amount of Chinese Liquor imported,

20,300 c. of Leu Pun Chau.

2,011,885 c. cONSISTING OF :-

Leu Pun Chan.

Sheung Ching Chan.

Sam Ching Chau.

Fa Chan.

Amount of Chinese Liquor sold for export and local consumption,

634,279 c.

47,894 c.

11,800 c.

457,668 c.

Other Liquor prepared by means of Leu Pun Chau or Fa Chan.

860,244 c.

Amount of Chinese Liquor

sold locally.

323,057 c. CONSISTING OF :—

Leu Pun

Sheung

Sam

Fa

Ching

Mui

Muk

Ning

Ching

Ching

Chau.

Chau.

Amount of Chinese Liquor

Chau.

Chau.

Mui

Chau.

Shüt Li No Mei Chau. Chau.

Kwai

Ka Pi Mau Kan

Chau.

Chang

Kwa

Mun

Chau.

Chau.

Received

Chau.

Chau.

Chau.

by places.

Total.

known to have been ex-

ported,

201,760c. 10,096 c.10,526 c. 1,000 c. 6,643 c.

371 c. 88,935 c.

1,444 c.

562 c.

1,330 c.

90 c.

150 c.

150 c.

Australia received

8,454 c.

180 c. 1,569 c.

:

13,747 c..

1,062 c.

966 c.

:

British North

Borneo re-

ceived

China received

201,760 c.

150 c.

8,146 c.

100 c.

100 c.

:

:

$20 c.

4,400 c.

382 c.

382 c.

Sandwich Islands received.

Japan received

1,800 c.

150c.

4,750c.

33,800 c.

150c.

Philippine Islands received.

202 c.

180c.

281 c.

787c.

180 c.

202 c.

Straits Settlements received

35,100 c.

150 c. 26,128 c.

350c.

215,126 c.

764c.

40,650 c.

1,832 c.

35,100c.

Peru received

United States of America received

960 c.

660 c.

144c.

90c.

1,001 c.

162 c.

90 c.

:

960 c.

2,147 c.

2,011,885 c.

323,057 c.

Amount of Fa Chan used by distillers for making Vinegar,

201,260 c.

1,688,828 c.

:

:

[ XLVII]

Appendix 13.

No. 18 or 1896.

An Ordinance enacted by the Governor of Hongkong, with the advice and consent of the Legislative Council thereof, to make better provision for the Sale of Food and Drugs in a pure state.

Titia.

LS

WILLIAM ROBINSON,

Governor.

BR

[19th August, 1896.

E it enacted by the Governor of Hongkong, with the advice and consent of the Legislative

Council thereof, as follows:-

-----

1. This Ordinance may be cited as The Sale of Food and Drugs Ordinance, 1896.

2. The term food, when used in this Ordinance, shall include every food or article used for food or drink by man, other than drugs or water.

The term drug, when used in this Ordinance, shall include medicine for internal or external use.

3. Any person who shall mix, colour, stain, or powder, or order or permit any other person to mix, colour, stain, or powder, any article of food with any ingredient or material so as to render the article injurious to health, with intent that the same may be sold in that state, and any person who shall sell any such article so mixed, coloured, stained, or powdered, shall be liable in every case, upon summary conviction before a Magistrate, to a fine not exceeding the sum of five hundred dollars and in default of payment of the said fine to imprisonment for a period not exceeding six months with or without hard labour.

4. Any person who shall mix, colour, stain, or powder, or order or permit any other person to mix, colour, stain, or powder, any drug with any ingredient or material so as to affect injuriously the quality or potency of such drug, with intent that the same may be sold in that state, and any person who shall sell any such drug so mixed, coloured, stained, or powdered, shall be liable in every case to the same punishment as prescribed in the preceding section of this Ordinance.

5. Provided that no person shall be liable to be convicted under either of the two last foregoing sections of this Ordinance in respect of the sale of any article of food, or of any drug, if he shows to the satisfaction of the Magistrate before whom he is charged that he did not know of the article of food or drug sold by him being so mixed, coloured, stained, or powdered as in either of those sectious mentioned, and that he could not with reasonable diligence have obtained that knowledge.

6. Any person who shall sell to the prejudice of the purchaser any article of food or any drug which is not of the nature, substance, or quality of the article demanded by such purchaser, shall be liable in every case, upon summary conviction before a Magistrate, to a fine not exceeding two hundred dollars and in default of payment of the said fine to imprisonment for a period not exceeding three months with or without hard labour; provided that an offence shall not be deemed to be committed under this section in the following cases; that is to

say:

(1) Where any matter or ingredient not injurious to health has been added to the food or drug because the same is required for the production or preparation thereof as an article of commerce, in a state fit for carriage or consumption, and not fraudulently to increase the bulk, weight, or measure of the food or drug, or conceal the inferior quality thereof;

(2) Where the drug or food is a proprietary medicine, or is the subject of a patent in force, and is supplied in the state required by the specification of the patent;

(3) Where the food or drug is unavoidably mixed with some extraneous matter in

the process of collection or preparation..

Short title.

Interpretation

of words. (38 & 39 Vic. c. 63, s. 2.)

Prohibition against the mixture of food with injurious ingredients and against selling when

so mixed. (Ibid, s. 3.)

Prohibition

against the mixing of injurious ingredients with drugs and against selling tho mixture.

(Ibid, s. 4.)

Exemption in case of proof of absence of knowledge. (Ibid, s. 5.)

Prohibition against the sale of articles of food and drugs not of the proper nature, substance, or quality.

(Ibid, s. 6.)

:

In sale of adulterated

articles no

defence to

allege pur- chase for analysis.

(42 & 43 Vic.

c. 30, s. 2.)

Penalty on Pale of compounded tood or drug.

(3% & 39 Vic.

c. €3, p. 7.)

Protection

from offence

by giving of label. (Ibid, s. 8.)

Prohibition against the abstraction of any part of an article of food

before sale,

and selling without notice.

(Ibid, 8. 9.)

Power to purchaser or seller of food or

drug to have it analysed.

(Ilid, s. 19.)

Oflicer named to obtain a sample of

10od or drug

to submit to analyst. (Ibid, s. 19.)

Provision for

dealing with the sample when purchased.

(Ibid, s. 14.)

frovision when sumple is not divided.

(Ibid, s. 15.)

Person refusing to

well any

:rticle to any officer liable

to pentity.

(Ibid, s. 17.) (42 & 43 Vic. c. 30, s. 3.)

[ XLVIII]

7. In any prosecution under the provisions of this Ordinance for selling to the prejudice of the purchaser any article of food or any drug which is not of the nature, substance, and quality of the article demanded by such purchaser, it shall be no defence to any such prosecution to allege that the purchaser, having bought only for analysis, was not prejudiced by such sale. Neither shall it be a good defence to prove that the article of food or drug in question, though defective in nature or in substance or in quality, was not defective in all these respects.

8. Any person, who shall sell any compound article of food or compounded drug which is not composed of ingredients in accordance with the demand of the purchaser, shall be liable in every case, upon summary conviction before a Magistrate, to a fine not exceeding two hundred dollars and in default of payment of the said fine to imprisonment for a period not exceeding three inonths with or without hard labour.

9. Provided that no person shall be guilty of any such offence as aforesaid in respect of the sale of an article of food or a drug mixed with any matter or ingredient not injurious to health, and not intended to fraudulently increase its bulk, weight, or measure, or conceal its inferior quality, if at the time of delivering such article or drug he shall supply to the person receiving the same a notice, by a label distinctly and legibly written or printed on or with the article or drug, to the effect that the same is mixed.

10. Any person who shall, with the intent that the same may be sold in its altered state without notice, abstract from an article of food any part of it so as to affect injuriously its quality, substance, or nature, and any person who shall sell any article so altered without making disclosure of the alteration, shall be liable in every case, upon summary conviction before a Magistrate, to a fine not exceeding two hundred dollars and in default of payment of the said fine to imprisonment for a period not exceeding three months with or without hard labour. Any person selling "skimmed milk" to a purchaser demanding "milk” shall be liable to the same punishment.

11. Any purchaser or seller of an article of food or of a drug shall be entitled, upon payment of the sum of five dollars to the Government analyst or to any analyst appointed by the Governor for the purposes of this Ordinance, to have such article analyzed by such analyst, and to receive from him a certificate of the result of his analysis.

12. Any inspector of nuisances, or inspector of weights and measures, or inspector of markets, or any police coustable acting under the written instructions of the Secretary to the Sanitary Board or of the Captain Superintendent of Police or of the Medical Officer of Health may, at the cost of the Government, procure any sample of food or drugs, and, if he suspect the same to have been sold to him contrary to any provision of this Ordinance, shall submit the same to be analysed by the Government analyst or by some analyst appointed by the Governor for the purposes of this Ordinance, and such aualyst shall, upon receiving payment as is provided in the last section, with all convenient speed analyse the same, and shall give a certificate to such officer, wherein he shall specify the result of the analysis.

13. Any person purchasing any article with the intention of submitting the same for analysis shall, after the purchase shall have been completed, forthwith notify to the seller or his agent selling the article his intention to have the same analysed by the Government analyst or by some other analyst appointed by the Governor for the purposes of this Ordinance, and shall offer to divide the article into three parts to be then and there separated, and each part to be marked and sealed or fastened up in such manner as its nature will permit, aud shall, if required to do so, proceed accordingly, and shall deliver one of such parts to the seller or his agent.

He shall retain one of the said parts for future comparison and shall himself submit the third part, if he deems it right to have the article analysed, to the analyst.

14. If the seller or his agent do not accept the offer of the purchaser to divide the article purchased in his presence, the analyst receiving the article for analysis shall divide the same into two parts, and shall seal or fasten up one of those parts and shall cause it to be delivered, either upon receipt of the sample or when he supplies the certificate to the purchaser, and the purchaser shall retain the same for production in case proceedings shall afterwards be taken in the matter.

15. If any such inspector or constable as described in section 12 hereof, acting under such written instructions as therein mentioned, shall apply to purchase any article of food or any drug exposed to sale, or on sale by retail in any premises, shop or stores, or in any street or place, and shall tender the price for the quantity which he shall purchase for the

f

i

I

;

4

:

:

!

[ XLIX]

2

+

?

purpose of analysis, not being more than shall be reasonably requisite, and the person exposing the same for sale shall refuse to sell the same to such inspector or constable, such person shall be liable, upon summary conviction before a Magistrate, to a fine not exceeding one hundred dollars, and in default of payment of the said fine to imprisonment for a period not exceeding two months with or without hard labour.

16. The certificate of the analysis shall be in the form set forth in the schedule to this Ordinance or to the like effect.

17. The Government analyst and every analyst appointed by the Governor for the purposes of this Ordinance shall report quarterly to the Colonial Secretary and to the Secretary to the Sanitary Board the number of articles analysed by him under this Ordinance, and shall specify the result of every analysis, and such report shall be published by the Colonial Secretary in the Government Gazette.

18. When the analyst having analysed any article shall have given his certificate of the result, from which it may appear that an offence against some one of the provisions of this Ordinance has been committed, the person causing the analysis to be made or if such person reglects to do so the Secretary to the Sanitary Board may take summary proceedings before a Magistrate in respect of such offence.

19. At the hearing of the charge in such proceeding the production of the certificate of the analyst shall be sufficient evidence of the facts therein stated, unless the defendant shall require that the analyst shall be called as a witness, and the parts of the articles retained by the person who purchased the article shall be produced, and the defendant may, if he think fit, tender himself and his wife to be examined on his behalf, and he or she shall, if he so desire, be examined accordingly.

20. The Magistrate before whom any complaint may be made under this Ordinance, or the Court before whom any case may be reheard, may, upon the request of either party, in his or its discretion cause any article of food or drug to be sent for analysis either to the Government analyst or to some analyst appointed by the Governor for the purposes of this Ordinance, and such analyst shall thereupon give a certificate to such Magistrate or Court of the result of such analysis: aud the expense of such analysis shall be paid by the complainant or the defendant as the Magistrate or Court may by order direct.

21. In any prosecution under this Ordinance, when the fact of an article having been sold in a mixed state has been proved, if the defendant shall desire to rely upon any exception or provision contained in this Ordinance, it shall be incumbent upon him to prove the same. 22. If the defendant iu any prosecution under this Ordinance prove to the satisfaction of the Magistrate or Court that he had purchased the article in question as the same in nature, substance, and quality as that demanded of him by the prosecutor, and with a written warranty to that effect, that he had no reason to believe at the time when he sold it that the article was otherwise, and that he sold it in the same state as when he purchased it, he shall be discharged from the prosecution.

23. Any person who shall forge, or shall utter knowing it to be forged for the purposes of this Ordinance, any certificate or any writing purporting to contain a warranty, shall be guilty of a misdemeanour and shall be punishable on conviction before the Supreme Court by imprisonment for a period not exceeding two years with or without hard labour.

Every person who shall wilfully apply to an article of food, or a drug, in any proceedings under this Ordinance, a certificate of warranty given in relation to any other article or drug, shall be guilty of an offence under this Ordinance, aud be liable, upon summary conviction before a Magistrate, to a fine not exceeding two hundred dollars and in default of payment thereof to imprisonment for a period not exceeding three months with or without hard labour.

Every person who shall give a false warranty in writing to any purchaser in respect of an article of food or a drug sold by him as principal or agent, shall be guilty of an offence under this Ordinance, and be liable, on summary conviction before a Magistrate, to a fine not exceeding two hundred dollars and in default of payment thereof to imprisonment for a period not exceeding three months with or without hard labour.

Every person who shall wilfully give a label with any article sold by him, which shall falsely describe the article sold, shall be guilty of an offence against this Ordinance and be liable, upon summary conviction before a Magistrate, to a fine not exceeding two hundred dollars and in default of payment thereof to imprisonment for a period not exceeding three anonths with or without hard labour.

From of the certificate. (Ibid, s. 18.)

Quarterly report of analyst. (Ibid, s. 19.)

Proceedings against uffenders. (Ilil, s. 20. )

Certificate of analyst to ba prima facie evidence for the prosecu- tion, but analyst to bres called if required. (Ibal, e. 21.)

Power to Court or Magistrate

to have article of food er drug analysed. (Ibül, s. 22.)

In any prose- cution defendant to prove that he is protected by exception or provision. (Ibid, s. 24.) Defendant to be discharged if he prove that he bought the article in the same state as sold and with a warranty. (Ibid, s. 25.)

Punishment for forging certificate or warranty. (Ibid, s. 27.)

For wilful misapplica- tion of Warranty;

For false warranty;

For false

label:

Proceedings

by indictment and contracts not to he affected.

(Ibid, s. 28.)

The Governor

To have power

to appoint

analysts for

purposes of

this Ordinance.

Special

provision as to time for and

notice of

proceedings. (Ibid, s. 10.)

Forfeiture and destruction of

article of food

or drug.

(See 23 of 1890,

· 4. 4.)

[L]

24. Nothing in this Ordinance contained shall affect the power of proceeding by indictment, or take away any other reinedy against any offender under this Ordinance, or in any way interfere with contracts and bargains between individuals and the rights and remedies belonging thereto.

of

Provided that in any action brought by any person for a breach of contract on the sale any article of food or of any drug, such person may recover alone or in addition to any other damages recoverable by him the amount of any penalty in which he may have been convicted under this Ordinance, together with the costs incurred by him in and about his defence thereto, if he prove that the article or drug, the subject of such conviction, was sold to him as and for an article or drug of the same nature, substance, and quality as that which was demanded of him, and that he purchased it not knowing it to be otherwise, and afterwards sold it in the same state in which he purchased it; the defendant in such action being nevertheless at liberty to prove that the conviction was wrongful or that the amount of costs claimed is unreasonable.

25. The Governor shall have power, upon receiving such evidence as to fitness as he shall in his absolute discretion deem sufficient, to appoint any person under his hand to be an analyst for the purposes of this Ordinance. Such an appointment shall be published in the Government Gazette, and the production of such Gazette containing a notice of such appointment shall be sufficient evidence of such appointment in any Court of law.

26. In all prosecutions under this Ordinance, and notwithstanding the provisions of section eighteen hereof, the summons to appear before a Magistrate shall be served upon the person charged with violating the provisions of this Ordinance within a reasonable time, and, in the case of a perishable article, not exceeding twenty-eight days from the time of the purchase from such person for test purposes of the food or drug, for the sale of which in contravention to the terms of this Ordinance the seller is rendered liable to prosecution, and particulars of the offence or offences against this Ordinance of which the seller is accused, and also the name of the prosecutor, shall be stated on the summons, and the summons shall not be made returnable in a less time than seven days from the day it is served upon the person summoned.

27. It shall be lawful for any Court or Magistrate to order the destruction of any article of food or drug in connection with which an offence is proved to have been committed under this Ordinance.

Passed the Legislative Council of Hongkong, this 5th day of August, 1896.

F. J. BADELEY,

Acting Clerk of Councils.

Assented to by His Excellency the Governor, the 19th day of August, 1896.

J. H. STEWART LOCKHART,

Colonial Secretary.

SCHEDULE.

FORM OF CERTIFICATE.

To (1)

a sample of

I, the undersigned, do hereby certify that I received on the

from a

day of

18

3

), and

for analysis (which then weighed have analysed the same, and declare the result of my analysis to be as follows:-

I am of opinion that the same is a sample of genuine

or,

I am of opinion that the said sample contained the parts as under, or the percentages of foreign

ingredients as under.

Observations

As witness my hand this

day of

(1) Here insert the name of the person submitting the article for analysis.

A.B.,

Analyst.

(2) Here insert the name of the person delivering the sample.

(3) When the article cannot be conveniently weighed, this passage may be erased, or the blank may be left untilled. (4) Here the analyst may insert at his discretion his opinion as to whether the mixture (if any) was for the purpose of rendering the article pota le, or palatable, or of preserving it, or of improving the appearance, or was unavoidable, and may state whether in excess of what is ordinary, or otherwise, or whether the ingredients or materials mixed are or are not injurious to health.

In the case of a certificate regarding milk, butter, or any article liable to decomposition, the analyst shall specially report whether any change had taken place in the constitution of the article that would interfere with the analysis.

i

[LI]

APPENDIX 14.

No. 21 or 1886.

An Ordinance entitled The Spirit Licences Ordinance, 1886.

[11th June, 1886.]

*

*

*

*

**

**

*

*

*

*

1. This Ordinance may be cited as The Spirit Licences Ordinance, 1886.

2. In this ordinance, unless the context indicates the contrary :—

Adjunct licence shall mean the licence granted under this ordinance to hotel-keepers, restaurateurs, or confectioners, for the retail sale of intoxicating liquors as an adjunct to their respective businesses without keeping a public bar.

Adulterated liquor shall mean any liquor mixed or coloured to the prejudice of the purchaser with any ingredient whatever, or with water, either so as to increase its bulk and measure, or so as injuriously to affect the quality of such liquor, or to conceal its inferior quality, or any liquor which is not virtually of the nature and quality demanded by the purchaser, or of the liquor which it is labelled as being or purporting to be, whether such adulterated liquor be injurious to health or not. Spirits shall not be considered adulterated if mixed with water only so as not to reduce the strength more than twenty-five degrees. below proof in the case of brandy, whisky or rum, or more than thirty degrees below proof in the case of gin.

Chinese spirits shall mean the intoxicating liquors commonly known as samshu. Gallon shall mean an imperial gallon, or, if the liquor be in bottles, six reputed quart

bottles, or twelve reputed pint bottles.

Grocer's licence shall mean a licence to sell intoxicating liquors by the bottle, such

liquors not to be consumed on the premises.

Intoxicating liquor shall include spirits, malt liquor, and any wine or other fermented

liquor whatever.

Pint bottle and quart bottle shall mean the reputed pint and quart bottles ordinarily

used in commerce.

Public house shall mean any house or place of entertainment where intoxicating liquors are sold by retail aud may be consumed on the premises, but shall not include any place of entertainment kept under an adjunct licence.

Retail sale shall mean the sale of liquors in less quantities than two gallons as above

defined.

Spirit shop shall mean any shop licensed to retail Chinese spirits not to be consumed

on the premises.

Wholesale licence shall mean a licence to sell intoxicating liquors by the unopened cask or case, in quantities not less than two gallons of one liquor at one time, such liquors not to be consumed on the premises.

Distilleries.

3. No person shall make, distil, or rectify any spirits, or shall knowingly keep or have in his possession any still or other utensil, or apparatus for distilling or making or rectifying spirits, without a licence under this ordinance.

It shall be lawful for the Colonial Secretary to issue a licence free of all charge to any apothecary, chemist, or druggist applying for the same, to keep and use on his premises, a still of not more than eight gallons contents for the purpose of his trade only, provided that every person wishing to keep such still shall notify his intention so to do to the said Colonial Secretary, who shall thereupon required such person to give a bond with two suf- ficient sureties in the sum of one thousand dollars, that he will not make use of such still, or suffer it to be made use of except for the preparation of medicines or other articles re- quired bona fide for medical purposes, and every such person found to have such still without having entered into such bond and obtained such licence, shall be deemed to be guilty of an offence under this ordinance.

Title.

Interpreta- tion of terms.

Unlicensed distilling prohibited. (8 of 11. ani 3 of 69.]

Apothecaries. chemists ani druggists may have stills of eight gallons

contents. [Ord. 8 of 1844 section 3.

Licences to

distil.

3 of 69.]

Adulterated liquors.

[38 & 39 V. c. 63, s. 5.]

Unlicensed

sale prohibit-

હે.

[11 of 44, 1.]

Wholesale

and retail sale.

[Sec 11 of 44. 2-1.3

Temporary Licences.

Application

for licence. (11 of 44. 3.]

Sessions.

I of 44. 4.]

Disagreement of Justices. 11 of 44. 4.]

Applicants reignisances, ¡H of 44, 5]

[ LII]

4. The Colonial Secretary may issue licences to distil in the form of schedule A, on each of which licences an annual fee of one hundred and twenty dollars shall be payable in advance. Such conditions as the Governor in Council may from time to time determine may be added to such licences. Every licensed distiller may sell by wholesale the liquors

he distils.

5. Any person who shall distil, make, import, sell, dispose of, or deal in any adulterated intoxicating liquor shall be guilty of an offence against this ordinance, and if such adulter- ated liquor be injurious to health he may, on a second conviction, be sentenced to imprison- ment with or without hard labour for a period not exceeding six months besides any other penalties to which he may be liable under this ordinance.

No person shall be convicted under this section if he shows to the satisfaction of the Magistrate before whom he is charged that he did not know that the liquor sold by him was adulterated, and that he could not have known it with any reasonable diligence.

Sale of intoxicating liquors.

6. No person shall sell or dispose of, or advertise or expose for sale any intoxicating liquor either by wholesale or retail within the Colony, or shall permit or suffer any such intoxicating liquor to be sold or disposed of or advertised or exposed for sale in his house or other place within the Colony without a licence under this ordinance. The delivery of any intoxicating liquors shall be taken, in any proceeding under this ordinance, to be primá facie evidence that money or other consideration was given for the same.

7. The holder of a retail or grocer's licence may also sell intoxicating liquors whole- sale, but no person shall sell intoxicating liquors by retail without a licence to that effect, and this section shall apply to all retail sales of liquor to any person on pretence that he is a customer for other goods, as well as to all sales of quantities exceeding two gallons with an understanding that part is to be returned, and generally, to any act whatever which, under whatsoever pretence, constitutes a retail sale of intoxicating liquor.

8. The Colonial Secretary may at any time issue temporary licences for the sale of liquors at any public entertainment or on any public occasion on payment of such fee in each case as to the Governor shall seem fit.

Public house, and adjunct licences.

9. Every person desirous of obtaining a publican's or adjunct licence shall give ten days' notice to the Magistrates in the form of schedule B or C according to the nature of the licence required.

10. The Magistrates, or either of them, may from time to time appoint a day for the granting or transferring of licences, which shall be advertised in the Government Gazette and a public newspaper at least one week previously, and the said Magistrates, or either of them, with the assistance of such other Justices of the Peace as may attend on the said day, shall take into consideration all applications which may have been made for licences for the sale of liquors within the Colony, and the presiding Magistrate may adjourn the con- sideration of all or any of such applications to any other lawful day.

11. Every application for the grant or transfer of a licence shall be decided by a majo- rity of votes of the Justices present, in the case of equality the presiding Magistrate shall, in addition to one original vote, have a casting vote. Provided however that in case of any applicant being dissatisfied with the order of the Justices or the majority thereof, it will be lawful for the Governor in Council to alter and amend the order, on the petition of the dissatisfied party.

12. Every applicant for a licence, who may be approved by the Justices assembled as above, shall enter into a recognizance in the form of schedule D or E according to the nature of the licence he requires, whereupon the Magistrate shall deliver to him a certificate in the form of schedule F or G according to the nature of his application; and the Magis- trate shall, within ten days, transmit to the Treasurer a return of all such certificates as may have been granted in the form of schedule H to this ordinance.

I

¿

[ LIII]

13. The applicant may, within fourteen days from the date of such certificate, lodge it in the Treasury together with the fee provided by schedule P to this ordinance, whereupon the Treasurer shall issue to him a licence in the form of schedule I or J according to the nature of the licence for which the certificate is granted, such licence to be called a public house licence in the one case, or an adjunct licence in the other.

14. Every public house or adjunct licence shall be valid only until the 30th of November next following the date on which it is granted: always provided that where this period is less than a year a proportionate part only of the aforesaid fee shall be charged, to which, (except in the case of the transfer of a licence) ten per cent shall be added.

15. The Magistrates shall keep a record of all recognizances entered into under section 12, and the Treasurer shall keep a record of all licences issued under section 13 of this ordi-

nance.

16. The presiding Magistrate and Justices at their meetings hereinbefore provided for may transfer, in the form of schedule K, any public house licence or adjunct licence to the nominee of the original holder of such licence, such nominee making like application, receiving a like certificate, and entering into like recognizances as if applying for a licence on his own behalf.

17. In case of the death or insolvency of any person holding a public house licence or adjunct licence under this ordinance, the executor, or administrator, or trustees of such licensee may carry on the business of such licensed house until the expiration of the licence, subject to all the same regulations as the original licensee. And such executor, adminis- trator, or trustees shall enter into new recognizances under this ordinance.

18. The Justices may permit the business licensed under a public house or adjunct licence to be removed to other premises if they shall be satisfied that the application to remove such business (which shall be by written memorial) may reasonably be granted. The licensee shall enter into new recognisances, and shall receive a new certificate entitling him to a new licence for the remainder of his term on payment of a fee of five dollars.

19. Every licensed publican or adjunct licensee shall have his full name painted in legible letters at least three inches long, with the words Licensed to retail wines and spirits, constantly and permanently remaining, and plainly to be seen and read, on some conspicuous part of his house, and no person not actually holding a public house licence or adjunct licence (except the keeper of a spirit shop as hereinafter provided) shall keep up any sign, writing, painting, or other mark, which may imply or give reasonable cause to believe that his premises are licensed for retail or barter of intoxicating liquors, or that such liquors are sold, served, or retailed therein.

20. The business of every licensed publican or adjunct licensee shall be carried on subject to the following regulations :--

(1.) No liquor shall be sold or drunk on the premises licensed except between such hours as the Magistrate shall enter on the certificate to be granted under clause 12.

(2.) No disorder shall be permitted on the premises.

(3.) No person shall be allowed to become drunk on the premises, nor shall liquor be

supplied to any person who is drunk.

(4.) No game of chance shall be played on the premises.

(5.) A decent and suitable privy and urinal shall be maintained in a state of clean-

liness and good repair for the use of customers.

(6.) The licensee shall not abandon the occupation of his house, or permit any other

person to become virtually the keeper thereof.

(7.) The licensee shall not employ any person to sell or dispose of any liquors ont- side of his licensed premises, nor shall he allow or suffer any liquors to be so disposed of on his account.

21. When any licensed publican or adjunct licensee shall be charged with any offence under this ordinance and shall not appear to answer to such charge, it shall be lawful for any Magistrate to order that the recognizance of such licensed publican or adjunct licensee be forfeited until his appearance, and in case any licensed publican or adjunct licensee be twice convicted of any offence under this ordinance, it shall be lawful for the Magistrate to

Fee. Licare. {1} of 44.7.

Period of licence. [10 of 69)

Records.

Transfer of licences. [1 of 44. 9.

Death or insolvency I licepsec. [11 of 14. 10.]

Rem: of business.

(11 of 1844. 11.

Sign. Produc- tion of licence. [11 of 44. 13.)

Regulations. ¡Sec. 11 of 44. 13 and #⚫hedule.}

Forfeiture of recognisance (11 of 44. 15.

Action on Recount of

liquors.

[1 of 44. 17.0

Taking

pledzes.

11 of 44. 16.7

Measures.

11 of 44. 19.]

Suspected premises.

11 of 11.35.)

Drinking in unlicensed place.

11 of 44, 36.]

j'ayment of workmen,

11 of 44, 37.)

Wholesale and

grocers'

licences,

How obtained,

Power to

make rules.

Chinese spirit shops.

Til of 44.

27-30.]

[ LIV ]

order, on the second conviction, that any fine imposed on such offender, not exceeding the amount of his recognisances, be paid by his sureties.

22. No licensed publican shall maintain any action for, or recover any debt or demand on account of liquors, unless such debt shall bona fide have been contracted at one time to the amount of five dollars or upwards, nor shall any item in any account for liquors be allowed where the liquors bona fide delivered at one time shall not amount to the full sum of five dollars, nor shall any amount of debt whatsoever incurred by any seaman or soldier in Her Majesty's service for liquors be allowed: provided always that nothing herein contained shall extend to prevent innkeepers from keeping an account with lodgers and travellers, in which any charge for liquors may be included, and recovering the amount thereof in a Court of Justice.

23. No licensed person shall take or receive in payment or pledge for liquor or any entertainment whatever supplied in or out of his house any article or thing whatever ex- cept money.

24. Every licensed publican or adjunct licensee shall sell and dispose of his liquors by the measures legalised in this Colony and not otherwise, except when the quantity is less than half a pint, or except when the liquor is sold in bottles, and shall also measure such liquor in the presence of any customer who may require him to do so.

25. If any person be convicted of unlawfully retailing any intoxicating liquor, the house and premises of such person, and the house, lodging, shop, or warehouse where such offence shall have been committed, and any court or yard connected therewith, shall be liable to be searched at any time of the day or night, by any Police officer, with or without warrant, for six months next after such conviction, provided that the same or any part thereof shall be occupied by the person so convicted.

26. Whenever any Police officer shall find any person drinking in any place in which any intoxicating liquor shall be sold or disposed of by retail, and the licence for such sale shall not on demand be produced to such Police officer, it shall be lawful for such Police officer to apprehend all such persons so found drinking there; and every such person so found drinking shall, upon conviction before any Magistrate, forfeit and pay for every such offence a sum not exceeding twenty dollars, unless such person shall inform against such unlicensed person or voluntarily become a witness against him, in respect of such act of selling and retailing.

27. No master or other person employing journeymen, workmen, servants, or labourers, shall pay or cause any payment to be made to any such journeyman, workman, or labourer in or at any house in which any intoxicating liquor is sold by retail.

Wholesale and Grocer's licences. Spirit shops.

28. Every person desirous of obtaining a wholesale or a grocer's licence to sell intoxi- cating liquors shall apply to the Colonial Secretary, who may in his discretion grant to the applicant a licence in the form of schedule L or M according to the nature of his application, on production of a receipt from the Treasurer for a fee of one hundred and twenty dollars. Such licence may be renewed annually on like conditions.

29. It shall be lawful for the Governor in Council from time to time to make, alter, amend and repeal regulations and conditions for the granting of wholesale and grocer's licences. Such conditions may require the providing by applicants of one or more sureties, may alter the above scale of fees, may regulate the times of commencement and expiry of such licences, the hours and conditions of sale, and all other matters connected with such licences. All such regulations when published in the Government Gazette shall have the force of law.

30. The Colonial Secretary may grant a licence in the form of schedule N to any person to retail Chinese spirits, such Chinese spirits not to be consumed on the premises. where they are sold, and the holder of such licence shall exhibit conspicuously and perma- nently in front of his licensed place of business his name and number and the nature of such licence, on a sign, the size and design of which shall be approved by the Colonial Se- cretary, and the fee of ten dollars monthly shall be paid in advance by each licensee to the

1

>

i

"

یا

Treasurer.

schedule O.

[LV]

The Colonial Secretary may permit the transfer of any such licence in form of

Eating houses.

31. No person, unless licensed to retail intoxicating liquors or Chinese spirits under this ordinance, shall keep an eating house, refreshment bar or saloon, restaurant, or other place where meals or refreshments are supplied to persons not resident on the premises, without a licence from the Colonial Secretary, for which licence a fee of ten dollars a year shall be payable in advance. Such conditions as the Governor in Council may determine may be added to any licence granted under this section.

32. No person licensed under the preceding section shall knowingly or wilfully permit drunkenness or other disorderly conduct in his house or other place of entertainment, or knowingly suffer any unlawful games or gaming therein, or knowingly permit or suffer any public prostitute to frequent such house or other place or to remain therein.

Police inspection. Search.

33. When information upon each shall be laid before any Magistrate to the effect that any illicit distillation or rectification or illegal sale of intoxicating liquors is carried on within any building or on board of any vessel in the Colony, it shall be lawful for such Magistrate by a warrant under his hand to empower any officer of Police to enter such building or vessel at any hour of the night or day, using force that purpose if necessary, and to make search for any stills, parts of stills, or intoxicating liquors which may be found there, and to arrest any persons who may appear to have committed or to be attempting to commit any offence against this ordinance.

Every person licensed under this ordinance shall produce his licence to any Police officer on being required thereto.

Any officer of Police shall have free access to every part of any house licensed under section 13 or 31 of this ordinance at any hour of the night or day.

Penalties and their recovery.

34. For every offence against this ordinance not otherwise provided for, there shall be payable for a first offence a fine not exceeding three hundred dollars, and for a second offence a fine not exceeding six hundred dollars. And all intoxicating liquors, stills, or parts thereof with respect to which any offence against this ordinance may have been com- mitted, as well as the vessels or packages which contain them, may be forfeited, as also any boat or vessel of less than fifteen tons burden in which such intoxicating liquors or stills or parts of stills may be found.

35. Offences against this ordinance shall be considered to be :-

Eating Houses.

Disorder int eating houses. [2 & 3 Vic. c. 17. s. 44.j

Fines and forfeiture.

Offences defined.

:

(1.) Refusal, neglect, or omission to do any act commanded by this ordinance.

(2.) Refusal to permit, or obstruction of any such act. (3.) The doing of any act forbidden by this ordinance.

(4.) On the part of a licensed publican, adjunct licensee, or keeper of a spirit shop,

any breach of the terms of his licence or recoguisance.

36. On the conviction of any licensed person for a second offence against this ordi- nance the Magistrate may order his licence to be forfeited, in addition to any other penalties hereinhefore provided.

37. All penalties for offences against this ordinance may be recovered in a summary way before a Magistrate, but proceedings for the recovery of such penalties shall be com- menced within six months after the offence was committed.

38. One-half or a less portion of any fine levied under this ordinance may be paid to

the informer.

Forfeiture of licence. [See. 11 of 44. 30.0

Recovery o penalties.

Awards to informers. [11 of 44. 32.]

Power to make rules.

Commence- ment of ordinance.

[ LVI ]

Power to make rules.

39. The Governor in Council may from time to time make, alter, and repeal rules consistent with this ordinance for the better carrying out of the same. All such rules shall be published in the Gazette, and when so published shall have the force of law.

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

41. This ordinance shall take effect on a day to be hereafter proclaimed by the Gov-

ernor.

SCHEDULES.

(A.)

THE SPIRIT LICENCES ORDINANCE, 1886.

Distillery licence, (Sec. 4.)

dollars paid by

In consideration of the fee of

I hereby license him to have

stills of

gallons capacity at

and to

18

distil spirits therewith and to sell such spirits by wholesale from this date until

Hongkong,

188

(B.)

Name of applicant

Nationality

Licensed house to be at No.

Its name or sign to be

THE SPIRIT LICENCES ORDINANCE, 1886.

Application for publican's licence, (Sec. 9.)

address

Has hold a licence

+

years.

Street.

Sureties

and

of

of

Colonial Secretary.

To the Magistrates.

I give notice that I intend to apply at the next licensing meeting to Her Majesty's Justices of the Peace, for a licence to sell and retail intoxicating liquors, in the house and appurtenances thereunto belong- ing above named, which I intend to keep as inn or public-house.

Hongkong,

188

We, the undersigned householders residing at Victoria in the said Colony, certify that the above-named applicant is a person of good fame and reputation, and fit and proper to be licensed to keep an inn or public-

house.

1.-

2.

(C.)

THE SPIRIT LICENCES ORDINANCE, 1886.

Application for adjunct licence, (Sec. 9.)

Name of applicant

Nationality

address

Has held a licence

years.

Licensed house to be at No.

Street.

,

Other business carried on

Suretics

and

of

of

To the Magistrates.

I give notice that it my intention to apply at the next licensing meeting for a licence to sell and retail intoxicating liquors, in any quantity under two gallons at one time, in the house and appurtenances

*

[ LVII]

thereunto belonging above named, as an adjunct to the business which I am carrying on in the said house and premises.

Hongkong,

188

We, the undersigned householders, certify that the above named applicant is a person of good fame and reputation, and fit and proper to be licensed for the sale of intoxicating liquors as aforesaid.

1.-

2.-

3.-

COLONY OF

(D.)

THE SPIRIT LICENCES ORDINANCE, 1886. Publican's recognisance, (Sec. 12.)

HONGKONG Be it remembered, that on the

TO WIT.

called the licensee and

day of

188.

hereinafter

and

hereinafter

called the sureties came personally before me, a Magistrate in the Colony of Hongkong, aui acknowledged themselves to owe to our Lady the Queen, to wit, the said licensee the sum of three hundred dollars, and the said sureties each the sum of three hundred dollars of lawful current dolars of Hongkong, to be respect- ively levied of their several goods and chattels, lands and tenements, to the use of our said Lady the Queen, Her Heirs, and Successors, in case default shall be made in the performance of the conditions hereunder

written :--

The conditions of this recognisance are such, that whereas the said licensee is to be licensed to keep a public house, and to sell intoxicating liquors, at the sign of the

situate at

If the said licensee do observe all the conditions of The Spirit Licences Ordinance, 1886, then this recognis- ance to be void, otherwise to remain in full force.

Taken and acknowledged the day and year above written, before me.

(E.)

THE SPIRIT LICENCES ORDINANCE, 1886.

Adjunct licensee's recognisance, (Sec. 12.)

COLONY OF

HONGKONG Be it remembered, that on the

TO WIT.

called the licensee and

day of

188

Magistrate.

hereinafter

and

hereinafter

called the sureties came personally before me a Magistrate in the Colony of Hongkong, and acknowledged themselves to owe to our Lady the Queen, to wit,--the said licensee the sum of three hundred dollars, and the said sureties each the sum of three hundred of lawful current dollars of Hongkong, to be respectively levied of their several goods and chattels, lands and tenements, to the use of our said Lady the Queen, Her Heirs, and Successors in case default shall be made in the performance of the conditions hereunder written :-

The conditions of this recognisance are such, that whereas the said licensee is to be licensed to sell in-

toxicating liquors, in any quantity under two gallons, in the house, No.

as an adjunct to the busi-

ness of

longing

carried on by him in the said house and appurtenances thereunto be. ; If the said licensee do observe all the conditions of The Spirit Licences

Ordinance, 18886,-then this recognizance to be void, otherwise to remain in full force.

Taken and acknowledged the day and year above written, before me

Magistrate.

A

[ LVIII ]

(F.)

THE SPIRIT LICENCES ORDINANCE, 1886.

Publican's certificate, (Sec. 12.)

Authority to the Treasurer to issue a spirit licence to

Premises No.

Sign of house

Street.

?

Licence to expire

18

I authorise the Treasurer to issue a licence to the person named above to keep an inn or public-house

as above set forth, I am satisfied the said person is a person of good fame and reputation, and is fit and pro-

per to keep an inn or public-house; and I have taken from the said person and his sureties a recognisance in the sum of three hundred dollars each, according to the form prescribed by the said ordinance.

Hongkong,

Hours for sale

.to

188

(G.)

THE SPIRIT LICENCES ORDINANCE, 1886.

Adjunct licensee's certificate, (Sec. 12.)

Authority to the Treasurer to issue an adjunct licence to

Premises No.

Street.

Business carried on

Licence to expire

18

Magistrate.

I authorise the Treasurer to issue an adjunct licence to the above named person to retail liquors in any quantity under two gallons on the premises named above as an adjunct to the business carried on by him in the said house. I am satisfied the said person is a person of good fame and reputation, and is fit and proper

to conduct such house as aforesaid; and I have taken from the said person and his sureties the requisite recognisances in the sum of three hundred dollars each, according to the form prescribed by the said ordi-

nance.

Hongkong,

Hours for sale.

to

188

To the Treasurer.

(H.)

THE SPIRIT LICENCES ORDINANCE, 1886.

Return of licensees, (Sec. 12.)

Public house or adjunct licences may be granted to the undermentioned persons.

Magistrate.

Whether

Licensee.

Sign of

house.

Road or

Addresses

Nature of

No.

before licensed Sureties.

street.

of Sureties.

licence.

or not.

Magistrate.

Hongkong,

18

i

Licence

Sign of house

No.

Period of Licence, from

Fee, S

[ LIX]

(I.)

THE SPIRIT LICENCES ORDINANCE, 1836.

Public House Licence, (Sec. 13.)

to

Street.

both days inclusive.

I license the above named person to keep a public house, and to sell and retail in the house in which

he now dwells and in the appurtenances thereunto belonging, but no elsewhere, al intoxicating liquors during the period above written.

No.

Hongkong,

18

Treasurer.

(J.)

THE SPIRIT LICENCES ORDINANCE, 1886.

Adjunct Licence, (Sec. 13.)

Licensee

Business

Address, No.

"

Period of Licence, from

to

Street.

both days inclusive.

I license the person named above to sell and retail intoxicating liquors in quantities not exceeding two

gallons in the house in which he now dwells and in the appurtenances thereunto belonging, but not else-

where; as an adjunct to the business he carries on there and without keeping a public bar during the period

above written.

No.

Hongkong,

18

Treasurer.

New Licensee

(K.)

THE SPIRIT LICENCES ORDINANCE, 1886.

Transfer of Public House or Adjunct Licence, (Sec. 16.)

Sign of house

or Business carried on

No.

Period of new Licence, from

Former Licensee

Street.

to

both days inclusive.

I license the person named above to sell and retail intoxicating liquors in the house named above and

in the appurtenances thereunto belonging, but not elsewhere, during the period above written.

No.

Hongkong,

18

>

Treasurer.

(L.)

THE SPIRIT LICENCES ORDINANCE, 1886.

Wholesale Licence, (Secs. 28 ‹ ; 29.)

is licensed to sell in toxicating liquors by the unopened cask

or case, in quantities not less than two gallons of one liquor at one time on the premises known as Such intoxicating liquors are not to be consumed on the premises.

Hongkong,

18

Colonial Secretary.

[ LX ]

(M.)

THE SPIRIT LICENCES ORDINANCE, 1886.

Grocer's Licence, (Secs. 28 & 29.)

excepted) by the bottle on the premises known as

is licensed to sell intoxicating liquors (Chinese spirits

Such intoxicating liquors are not to be consumed on the premises. Liquors may also be sold wholesale

under this licence.

Hongkong,

Conditions

18

(N.)

THE SPIRIT LICENCES ORDINANCE, 1886.

Spirit Shop Licence, (Sec. 30.)

No.

is licensed to sell spirits not to be consumed on his premises at No.

the sign or shop name of which is

until

18

Colonial Secretary.

1.—

2.-

3.--

&c.-

Hongkong,

18

Colonial Secretary.

The spirit licence No.

(0.)

THE SPIRIT LICENCES ORDINANCE, 1886.

Transfer of spirit licence, (Sec. 30.)

granted to

is transferred to

who is hereby licensed to sell spirituous liquors, not to be consumed on the premises, at No.

the sign or shop name of which is

until

18

Conditions.

1.-

2.“་་

3.-

(P.)

SCHEDULE OF FEES.

1.--Public house and adjunct licences, (Sec. 13.)

When the annual valuation of the premises occupied is

under $1,000, a licence fee of $300 a year.

under $4,200

over $4,200

II.

Distillery licence, (Sec. 4.)

- Other fees chargeable under this ordinance.

Temporary spirit licence, (Sec. 8),

33

}}

,,

$360 $480

>>

$120 a year.

.Discretionary.

Licence for removed business, (Sec. 18),

$ 5

Grocer's licence, (Sec. 28),

$120 a year.

Wholesale licence, (Sec. 28),

$120

37

Chinese spirit licence, (Sec. 30),.

$120

12

Eating house licence, (Sec. 31),

$10

32

Colonial Secretary.

1

}

:

Name of Street.

[ xxv ]

Health District No. 6,-Continued.

House No.

Name of Street.

House No.

16

70

18

84

20

85

22

86

24

88

28

89

30

90

32

91

34

97

36

98

38

99

40

100

42

102

42A

105

Bonham Strand West,

44

106

46

Praya West,

107

48

108

50

109

52

110

54

111

58

112

60

113

62

114

64

116

66

119

68

70

72

2388

136

137

140

141

146

142

148

150

1

Wing Lok Street,

152

3

158

5

166

7

199

9

11

106

13

122

Li Sing Street,

2

124

4

Bonham Strand,...

126

6

136

8

138

10

145

12

14

15

17

18

19

6

20

Sutherland Street,

8

24

10

25

12

Praya West,

26

14

38

65

15

66

17

67

New Street,

19

68

21

69

23

Name of Street.

New Street,...............................

Po Yan Street,

[ XXVI ]

Health District No. 6,-Continued.

House No.

Name of Street.

House No.

25

6

27

Po Yan Street,.............

8

10

24

Total,.

293

Health District No. 7.

Name of Street.

House No.

Name of Street.

House No.

301

303

First Street,

305

307

20

309

311

24

SN 22*1

69

71

313

28

315

30

Queen's Road West,

317

32

319

48

321

50

323

52

325

54

341

56

343

58

345

60

347

62

64

168

66

Praya West,

169

68

171

70

172

72

74

5

9

Second Street,

76

78

Sam To Lane,

13

80

17

82

19

84

21

86

88

246

90

92

94

8

63

10

65

12

71

14

75

First Street,

16

95

18

97

22

99

24

101

52

103

54

105

56

107

67

109

3

+

Name of Street.

[ XXVII ]

Health District No. 7,-Continued.

House No.

Name of Street.

House No.

2

51

8

53

10

55

12

57

14

59

16

61

18

63

20

65

22

71

24

High Street,

73

26

75

28

77

30

79

32

81

32A

83

32B

85

42

87

44

89

46

91

48

50

2

52

10

54

12

56

14

58

16

60

18

62

20

64

5

66

Third Street,

Pokfulam Road,........

9

68

11

70

13

72

15

74

17

76

19

78

21

80

23

82

25

84

86

29

88

31

90

33

92

35

94

37

31

35

Centre Street,

39

41

37

43

39

45

41

47

43

28

45

30

47

49

51

53

55

Un Sing Lane,...........

57

59

61

123 TH LO CON

4

5

6

7

Name of Street.

[ XXVIII]

Health District No. 7,-Continued.

House No.

Name of Street.

House No.

8

9

Queen's Road West,.........{

410

412

Un Sing Lane,

10

11

12

5 11 5

7

9

11

13

Un Fuk Lane,.

1 2 3 4 CE∞O

15

17

3

Sung Hing Lane,.....

6

8

5

10

6

7

12

14

8 9

Western Street,

404

Queen's Road West,

406

408

Total,......

233

16

18

17

Health District No. 8.

Name of Street.

House No.

Name of Street.

House No.

12345

12

15

Belcher's Street,

17

18

6

174

Praya, Kennedytown,

8

176

19

178

11

180

12

184

13

186

14

Third Street,

188

190

Belcher's Street,..

6-— “A WNH

1

192

2

194

3

196

4

198

5

200

7

9

Total,.

37

4

:

[ XXIX ]

Appendix No. 10.

Friday, 29th January, 1897.

MEMO.

The Commissioners, accompanied by the Medical Officer of Health (Dr. CLARK) and the Secretary, visited the following premises this day, leaving the Hongkong Club at 2.30 P.M., viz.:—

Tung Wa Lane.-There are 6 houses in this Lane, 3 on each side. No. 4 was inspected, the other houses being exactly the same.

Wa On Lane.-There are 5 houses in this Lane. No. 2 was inspected, the others being of the same description.

Mi Lun Lane.--Nos. 1 and 4 were inspected, the other houses in the Lane being of the same description.

Peel Street.-No. 29 was inspected.

Man Hing Lane.-No. 2 was inspected.

I On Lane.-Nos. 2, 8, 10 and 12 were inspected.

Shin Hing Lane.-Nos. 6 and 12 were inspected.

Wa Lane.-Nos. 1 and 4 were inspected.

Ng Kwai Fong. The back of No. 21 Possession Street, which opens into this Lane, was inspected.

A Chung Lane.-No. 6 was inspected.

Hollywood Road.-Nos. 204, 212 and 216 were inspected. These are Chinese

brothels.

The light and ventilation in all the houses in the several Lanes and Streets men- tioned were very defective.

The inspection was concluded at 4.15 P.M.

Appendix No. 11.

A. SETH,

Secretary.

No. 149.

SIR,

SANITARY BOARD ROOM, HONGKONG, 2nd September, 1896.

In answer to your letter No. 1,246 dated the 7th August, 1896, requesting to be furnished with precise information as to the provisions which the Sanitary Board desires to see inserted in an Ordinance for the further amendment of the Public Health Ordinance, I am directed by the Board to transmit you the enclosed extract from the minutes of the proceedings of the Board, at a confidential meeting held on the 27th ultimo, and to state that the paragraphs of the extract which are numbered 1, 2, 3 and 4 contain a summary of such provisions.

[xxx]

You will observe from the paragraph numbered 5 that it is requested that the Ordinance, when drafted, be sent to the Board for its consideration and report.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

HUGH MCCALLUM,

Secretary.

The Honourable

J. H. STEWART LOCKHART,

Colonial Secretary.

Extract from the Minutes of the proceedings of the Sanitary Board at a confidential meeting held on Thursday, the 27th day of August, 1896.

**

*

****

*

****

****

Domestic Dwellings.-A letter--which had been circulated to Members--from the Colonial Secretary requesting the Board to furnish him with precise information as to the provisions which the Board desires to be inserted in the proposed Ordinance to further amend the Public Health Ordinance, was laid on the table.

A discussion ensued.

It was agreed---

1. That in all cases where encroachments on what were originally open spaces in the rear of domestic buildings can be proved to have taken place since the erection of such domestic buildings, the removal of such encroachments be made compulsory.

2. That in cases where the kitchens extend throughout the entire width of the domestic building without the intervention of an open space and also in every case where satisfactory proof cannot be obtained that an open area originally existed in the rear of any domestic building, and that such open space has since been encroached upon, that power be conferred upon the Magistrate, in all cases in which he is satisfied that such domestic buildings are unfit for human habitation, to order the removal of such portion of the kitchens as to admit of a clear and unobstructed space of at least 40 square feet in the rear of such buildings being

obtained.

3. That in cases where what were originally open yards situated between the domestic buildings and the kitchens belonging thereto and where such yards have been encroached upon that powers be obtained to cause the removal of all the encroachments other than bridges not exceeding 3 feet in width.

4. That no street on which buildings abut shall be permitted to be obstructed either temporarily or permanently in such manner, as to interfere with the efficient lighting and ventilation of such buildings.

5. That the opinion of the Board be transmitted to the Colonial Secretary in the usual manner with a request that the draft of the proposed Ordinance be sent to the Board for considera- tion and report.

*

True Extract,

HUGH MCCALLUM.

[ XXXI ]

Appendix No. 12.

The Secretary,

INSANITARY PROPERTIES COMMISSION.

Herewith a tabular statement of the sanitary condition of all the houses in Nos. 5 and 6 Health Districts. By "insufficient open space in the rear," heading C, is meant every house in which the backyard is obstructed by a bridge more than 3′ 6′′ in width, or by any other structure, and every back to back house (i. e., having no backyard) in which the kitchen has not been opened out to the extent of at least one half of the width of such house, and for the entire depth of such kitchen.

The following will be found to be the results obtainable for this statement :-

A-Back to back houses,

166

B-Houses fronting on narrow lanes,

68

C-Houses with insufficient open space in the rear,

228

D-Houses abutting against the hillside to a depth of more than 4 feet,

114

A+ B

90

A+ C

1,193

A+ D

40

A+B+C

78

A+B+D.

A+ C + D

A+B+C+D...........

B+C

4

158

57

33

B+D

B+C+D

C+ D.....

9

9

283

Total....

Total number of houses in the two districts

....

Number of houses in fairly good sanitary condition

May 1st, 1897.

FRANCIS W. Clark,

2,530

3,095

565

Medical Officer of Health.

[ xxxIα ]

Appendix No. 13.

LIST OF HOUSES IN No. 5 DISTRICT CLASSIFIED AS FOLLOWS.

A

No. of

Name of Street.

Back to House. back house.

B Fronting on

a lane less than 15 feet wide.

Insufficient

open space in rear.

D Abutting against hillside to

a depth of more than 4 feet.

No. of cubicles on each Floor.

Ground. 1 2

3

Aberdeen Street,..

>>

27

1

...

1

2

22

9

>>

11

1

1 1

11A

CC

13

1

""

15

1

1

1

...

...

...

""

17

1

1

...

CC

19

1

1

""

...

21

1

1

2

2

""

23

1

1

""

25

1

1

2

""

27

1

1

37

29

1

1

""

31

1

1

22

37

1

""

39

1

41

1

...

43

1

3 3

"7

45

1

47

1

49

1

...

وو

51

1

4

""

53

1

3

""

55

1

""

57

1

...

"

""

""

224

1

3

2A

1

...

1

2

1

1

1

>>

6

1

1

""

8

1

1

...

>>

10

1

...

"9

12

1

1

...

""

14

1

1

...

16

1

...

""

...

18

1

3

1

2

4

3

3

3

2

""

20

1

...

"

22

19

...

24

""

26

1

6

""

...

...

28

1

"5

...

30

1

وو

...

32

1

""

...

...

34

1

""

36

1

""

"

19

"

38 40 42 4

1

1

1

44

1

Alveston Terrace,

""

"

"

Bonham Strand,

""

""

1231

4

1817-18

""

6

""

11

>>

13

15

17

"

1

1

1

1

1

1

...

1

...

4

...

3

1

3

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

...

1

1

...

1

***

:

1

1

1

1

1

...

1

::

1

H1 H3 H ~ ~ ~ ~ — — co co co co ay 10 ~~~ 20 210 10 10 1 1 0 0 10 10

1

4

2

2

3

3 3

...

3

1

3

3

...

4

4

4

...

...

4

...

2

...

5

...

...

3

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

1

1

2

1

...

...

...

1

2

...

H2

:

:

!

[ XXXIO ]

LIST OF HOUSES IN No. 5 DISTRICT,—Continued.

A

No. of

Back to

Name of Street.

House. back house.

B

Fronting on a lane less than 15

feet wide.

C

Insufficient

open space in rear.

D

Abutting against hillside to a depth of more than 4 feet.

No. of cubicles on each Floor.

Ground. 1 2

3

4

"

Bonham Strand,

19

1

1

21

1

1.

...

""

23

1

1

""

25

...

""

27

1

1

1

29

1

1

""

31

1

1

2

33

1

1

1

35

1

1

1

37

1

1

1

""

39

1

I

**

41

1

...

1

1

43

1

1

45

1

1

""

47

>>

1

1

1

49

1

...

1

1

51

1

1

29

53

1

...

1

1

31

55

1

1

2

10 10 10 1 m3 20 10 10 10 10 10

1010

10 01 00 10 10 ::∞

39

57

1

...

1

1

>>

59

1

""

...

1

1

61

1

1

""

63

1

1

""

65

1

1

في

کا کا

67

1

1

1

1

69

1

1

3

""

!

71

1

1

1

73

1

...

1

1

>>

75

1

***

1

1

1

">

77

1

27

79

1

23

I

...

...

1

1

81

1

15

83

1

...

""

85

1

""

87

1

""

89

1

...

"

91

1

93

1

-

>>

I

95

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

""

97

1

...

1

...

2

***

1

1

...

2

27

99

1

...

1.

...

19

101

1

1

...

...

>>

103

1

1

""

105

1

1

1

...

""

107

1

1

1

...

"

109

1

1

1

1

...

""

111

1

...

1

1

2

22

113

1

...

1

1

73

115

1

2

...

""

117

1

1

...

23

119

1

1

2

1

...

"

121

1

1

123

1

...

1

1

2

125

1

1

1

""

127

1

1

2

129

1

1

1

4

...

131

1

1

...

133

1

1

"

2A

1

1

...

2

1

1

4

1

1

...

**

6

1

1

...

...

...

8

""

10

1

1

I

1

...

...

12

14

I

1

1

...

16

...

"

18

1

1

I

...

">

20

1

1

5

3

...

[XXXIC]

LIST OF HOUSES IN No. 5 DISTRICT,—Continued.

A.

No. of

Name of Street.

Back to House. back house.

B

Fronting on a lane less than 15 feet wide.

C

Insufficient

open space in rear.

D Abutting against hillside to

a depth of more than 4 feet.

No. of cubicles on

each Floor.

Ground. 1 2

CO

3

4

Bonham Strand,

22

1

1

1

...

24

1

1

2

1

26

1

1

1

2

""

28

1

1

...

...

>>

30

1

2

...

...

32

1

5

1

4

...

34

1

36

1

""

38

1

2

...

40

1

1

5

42

1

2

11

4.4

1

1

2

>>

46

1

1

6

""

"2

48

1

1

10

...

50

T

1

2

6

27

52

1

1

1

1

>>

54

1

1

1

3

5

"2

56

1

1

27

58

1

1

2

""

60

1

1

5

...

*

62

1

1

3

دو

64

1

10

""

66

1

1

3

""

68

1

2

6

...

دو

ΤΟ

1

1

1

2

...

""

72

1

1

1

3

>>

74

1

1

2

...

"2

76

1

1

3 5

""

78

1

1

3

...

29

80

1

2

2

">

82

1

1

1

N

...

...

>>

84

1

1

...

...

""

86

1

1

""

88

...

""

06

,,

92

...

""

94

32

"

"

Bridges Street,

96

98

...

2

1

3

...

1

...

32

6

I

1310 79

1

1

1

1

1

1

...

1

1

1

1

1

1

...

...

2

2

3 3

...

...

""

""

11

""

13

...

...

"

15

""

17

...

>>

19

...

66

2

6

">

8

10

12

""

14

22

16

""

18

>>

20

"9

22

...

"

22A

...

«

24

...

""

26

***

28

""

30

...

""

32

34

27

36

17

...

4

2

1

4

3

...

1

1

2

...

...

1

...

5

5

1

3

...

1

1

6

2

...

1

3

1

1

1

2

...

1

2

4

1

1

3 2

...

1

4

...

1

1

1

...

1

1

I

3 2

...

1

2

1

1

6

5

...

1

4

1

...

1

3

...

1

1

1

...

1

2

1

...

2

...

...

...

...

...

...

A

i

14

:

:

[ xxxid]

LIST OF HOUSES IN No. 5 DISTRICT,-Continued.

A

Name of Street.

No. of Back to House. back house.

B

Fronting on a lane less than 15 feet wide.

C

Insufficient

open space in rear.

1

D Abutting against hillside to

a depth of more than 4 feet.

No. of cubicles on each Floor.

Ground. 1 2 3

Bridges Street,

38

...

40

"J

1

42

1

""

44

46

22

97

48

50

1

1

4

1

3

1

:

"

52

}

22

54

1

1

""

56

1

""

58

1

27

60

1

66

62

1

5

""

66.

""

64

66

66A

1

3

1

1

Burd Street,

""

!

>>

14 30 10 1− a)

1

1

1

1

1

1

NO, O JA HAN ∞ CAN ∞

...

3

2

2

9

>>

11

1

1

2

3

""

13

...

T

1

5 3

2

15

1

1

3

"?

...

17

1

1

2

22

...

3

19

1

1

""

21

1

1

2

3

37

AAA

23

I

1

2

2

25

1

1

...

4 3

27

1

1

1

: ܗ:

2

2

3

5

""

...

4

1

1

27

...

...

4A

1

1

>>

6

1

1

22

8

1

1

2

29

...

10

1

}

3 4

22

12

1

1

""

77

12A

1

14

1

""

16

1

>>

...

18

1

1

1

1

3

4 3 3

...

20

1

""

"

22

1

:

Caine Road,....

19

21

29

23

"

25

...

1

1

1

1

1

2 3

2

5

""

...

...

Chung Wo Lane,

1

1

1

وو

1

1

""

""

6

1

66

11

13

1

1

1

...

15

1

1

...

*

17

1

وو

19

1

1

>>

21

1

...

2

1

1

""

1

1

""

8

1

1

""

10

1

1

...

""

12

1

1

""

14

I

1

...

""

16

1

1

...

18

1

4

4

3

+

3

4

3

4

4

Q1 1 0 0 0 0 2 20:12:

2

3

3

5

""

***

...

...

...

[ XXXIe ]

LIST OF HOUSES IN No. 5 DISTRICT,—Continued.

A

No. of

Back to

Name of Street.

|House. back house.

B

Fronting on a lane less than 15 feet wide.

C

Insufficient

open space in rear.

D Abutting against hillside a depth of more than 4 feet.

to

No. of cubicles on

each Floor.

Ground.

1 2 3

Co

بوب

4

Chung Wo Lane,

Circular Pathway,

20

2223

I

1

1

1

IP:

:

1234 10 CO

RAR RARE A

...

9

10

2

1

:~ ~ ~ ~ ~ SO I MID

5

...

11

""

12

1

I

"

13

1

1

1

72

14

1

1

1

1

>>

15

1

1

>>

16

:

""

17

1

1

...

""

18

1

05 01 00 00 C9 HA HP IP H 1O Co; co co 1 ∞ ∞ N

2

19

1

20

1

3

1

21

1

2

...

>>

22

1

5

23

1

...

3

24

1

1

3

25

1

26

1

1

>>

27

1

1

1

>>

28

""

29

[.

I

1

1

1

1

2

...

25

30

1

1

1

...

31

1

1

""

32

1

1

33

1

1

"

34

1

1

3

...

RRRRRRRRR

35

1

1

1

2

36

...

1

1

3

3

37

1

1

...

38

1

39

1

1

2

40

1

1

3

41

1

1

42

1

1

Cleverly Street,

1

1

1

...

1 A

1

1

T

1

...

1

...

3

1

1

""

}

1

27

7

1

...

1

""

7A

Ι

1

1

1

1

14:27

...

...

79

2

1

1

""

...

4

1

1

...

>>

6

1

1

...

"J

...

8

1

1

""

10

1

1

""

...

12

>>

...

...

14

1

1

...

2 1

""

16

1

""

...

East Street,..

1

...

"

1

""

1

...

...

59

8A

1

1

1

...

...

3

3

""

8B

1

1

1

80

1

1

2

...

""

10

1

3

...

...

...

...

.

...

...

...

...

...

East Street,.

12

3

...

1

14

1

4

...

16

وو

18

1

1

25

22

1

وو

24

1

1

1

>>

.

26

1

6

19

28

1

">

30

1

1

4

""

32

1

6

""

!

34

1

""

36

1

**

38

1

""

40

1

>>

42

1

"J

44

...

7)

46

1

48

""

"}

50

Elgin Street,

"}

1

...

1

1

I

4 6 10 TION

6

3

3

5

I

J

9

Ι

...

"

11

1

""

13

1

""

15

I

99

17

1

...

...

1

2

1

1

1

1

2

وو

19

1

:

"

2

1

1

1

:

4

1

**

6

19

8

>>

10

12

4433 N N

3

2

2

2

2

29

14

...

:

"

Gage Street,

27

1

29

1

...

"?

31

1

">

33

1

>>

35

1

37

1

>>

39

1

41

I

1

43

1

""

26

1

دو

28

1

...

>7

30

99.

32

""

34

""

,,

36

38

19

40

"

42

""

""

39

12

""

O O HA HA H

44

46

48

...

...

50

...

52

""

George's Lane,

"

""

"

,,

12341 6 1-

1

1

1

1

1

3

1

1

3

1

1

3

1

1

1

1

4

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

3 3

1

1

3 3

1

1

1

1

1

1

...

1

1

1

2

1

2

3

...

1

1

1

1

3

1

1

1

3

2

4

1

...

0 2 2

...

1

1 1

5

3

...

1

...

1

...

: co¦ ¦ AA:

3

1

4

3

3

4

3

...

LIST OF HOUSES IN No. 5 DISTRICT,– Continued.

A

No. of

Name of Street.

Back to House. back house.

B

Fronting on a lane less than 15

feet wide.

Abutting

C

D

Insufficient open space in real.

against hillside to a depth of more than 4 feet.

No. of Cubicles on cach Floor.

Ground. 1 2 3

4

[fIXXX ]

4

[ xxxig ]

LIST OF HOUSES IN No. 5 DISTRICT,—Continued.

B

Fronting on Insufficient

A

C

D Abutting

No. of

Back to

a lane less

Name of Street.

House. back house.]

than 15 feet wide.

open space in rear.

against hillside to

a depth of

No. of cubicles on each Floor.

more than 4 feet.

Ground.

1 2

3

4

George's Lane,

Gilman's Bazaar,

""

27

00

1

""

1317.

I

1

5

:

:

1

9

""

11

1

"27

13

""

15

""

17

"}

19

>>

21

1

""

23

1

})

...

25

1

27

""

29

""

31

""

33

""

35

">

37

""

39

>>

41

"}

43

""

1

1

22

1

""

6

1

1

""

8

1

""

2

10

1

""

3

12

""

1

1

3

14

1

3

"

3

16

1

1

""

3

18

1

>>

20

1

1

22

3

22

""

1

...

24

1

""

26

1

1

28

""

1

1

30

1

32

""

1

1

34

1

1

دو

36

1

27

38

1

co.co:

""

I

THI 10 10 10 10 10 10 CO + 100 el co co co co

5

4

...

Gough Street,,

>>

>>

32

13176

1

1

1

5

1

1

1

1

9

1

1

""

11

1

1

>>

13

1

"

15

1

1

17

...

19

21

23

5

3

2

3

1

2

4 3

...

2

~∞∞200`00.00 co

3

...

23

25

>>

27

"}

29

1

1

2

27

4 2 3

31

1

1

1

2

""

3

3

33

1.

1

1

1

35

1

1

3

""

37

1

23

39

3

""

2

4

1

1

1

3

4

""

4

...

1

1

3

""

སྶ མ མ

8

1

4

...

10

...

1

2

4

3

...

[ YIXXX ]

Name of Street.

LIST OF HOUSES IN

A

No. of Back to House.back house.

No. 5 DISTRICT,-

Continued.

C

B

Fronting on a lane less than 15 feet wide.

Insufficient open space in rear.

D Abutting against hillside to

Gough Street,

""

""

18

2468

12

14

*

16

1

"

20

1

...

22

1

C6

24

1

و"

26

1

...

*2

28

""

30

"

32

1

""

34

1

25

36

1

""

38

1

...

27

40

37

42

1.

""

44

Ι

""

Hillier Street,

22

""

180 1

1

1

1

No. of cubicles on

each Floor.

a depth of

more than

4 feet.

Ground. 1 2 3

I

1

4

4

1

1

1

2

3

1

4

3

I

1

3

2

3

...

3

2

2

1

1.

1.

...

3

2

2

...

2

3

4

...

...

1

1

1

TH

I

I

...

I

...

2

""

1

1

""

11

1

1

1

2

""

13

1

1

""

15.

1

1

1

وو

17

1

1

19

1

1

1

2

3

21

1

1

""

23

1

1

...

""

25

1.

1

...

""

27

1

1

...

I

1

1

3

3

1

1

دو

29

1

""

31

1

A

...

33

1

...

35

1

1

""

...

37

1

1

CC

...

39

I

1

1

41

1

1

2

"

...

43

1

· 1

...

"

"

མི བ མ ནི * དྷ ནྟེ ཊྛ བ བ ཐ བ

2

1

1

...

4

1

1

""

6

1

1

8

1

1

...

10

1

Ι

<<

...

...

12

1

1

77

...

14

1

1

16

1

1

18

1

1

20

1

2

3

...

1

2

I

22

24

1

1

""

26

1

1

""

28

1

1

""

...

30

1

1

99

32

1

1

34

1

1

""

36

1

1

2

1 1

2

1

38

1

1

"7

...

...

Hollywood Road,

41

43

1

27

""

45

1

"

47

1

""

49

29

""

51

>>

""

...

...

53

"1

55

""

""

55A

1

1

I

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1.

"

ION: NC -

NO NOWA W 10 19 H;

:

:

1 3

2

3

4

1

3

2

E

:

...

...

...

་་་

Hollywood Road,

""

""

}}

"

583

57

12

8

59

Alice Memorial Hospital.

...

...

...

61

1

1

}

1

3

4

...

63

1

1

1

3

4

""

"

65

1

1

2

...

""

"

67

1

1

4

...

"

""

69

1

1

3

""

""

71

1

1

3

>>

73

1

1

2

""

75

2

3

43 2

"

>>

1

3

...

>>

79

1

2

"

81

83

>>

"

85

...

">

87

1

...

39

>>

89

1

...

"7

>>

16

1

3

3

3

1

}}

39

93

1

1

...

39

"}

95

1

""

"J

97

1

27

""

99

1

27

""

101

1

...

I

1

1

4

1

1

4

3

??

99

103

1

1

::

37

""

...

105

1

1

1

""

"

107

1

4

...

...

""

35

109

1

2

23

CC

111

1

3

...

""

""

113

1

3

3

"

""

115

1

1

3

"}

117

1

...

...

...

>>

""

119

...

...

1

3

""

121

1

3

33

>>

125

1

4

1

77

...

>>

127

1

77

...

35

129

1

37

...

39

131

1

1

66

...

""

133

1

3

...

...

22

135

1

"

137

...

1

5

5

""

139

1

Ι

1

"

141

1

1

1

"}

143

I

1

1

3

2

""

"}

145

1

1

1

""

147

1

2 3

59

>>

149

1

1

...

>>

t

151

1

1

2

3

"

""

153

1

1

1

...

>>

""

155

1

1

1

2

3

* A

""

157

1

1

1

>>

159

1

1

1

2

3

>>

161

1

1

1

29

39

163

1

1

1

1

وو

11

165

1

1

1

""

"}

167

"

1

1

""

169

1

}

""

171

29

1

1

""

173

1

1

1

3

2

""

175

1

1

1

2

"

177

1

1

"

""

179

1

1

2

5

6

>>

""

181

""

1

1

1

2

183

1

1

2

2

2

"

""

60

""

1

""

62

>>

1

64

"

1

1

2

1

2

"

66

>>

1

Τ

1

2

27

1

1

33

70

>>

::

1

1

2

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

LIST OF HOUSES IN No. 5 DISTRICT,—Continued.

A

No. of Back to House. back house.

B

Fronting on a lane less than 15 feet wide.

C

Insufficient

open space in rear.

D Abutting against hillside to a depth of more than 4 feet.

No. of cubicles on each Floor.

Ground.

1 2 3

4

[ 21XXX]

Name of Street.

F

Name of Street.

[ xxxij]

LIST OF HOUSES IN No. 5 DISTRICT,— Continued.

A

No. of

Back to House. back house.

B

Fronting on a lane less

C

D

Insufficient

than 15 feet wide.

open space in rear.

Abutting against hillside to a depth of more than 4 feet.

No. of cubicles on each Floor.

Ground.

1

2 3

4

}}

A

"

"}

Hollywood Road,

72 74

...

$

"

""

76

"

"

78

>>

::

80

""

""

82

...

"}

""

84

""

""

86

""

"

88

""

19

90

"

""

92

>>

"

94

29

"

96

""

""

98

...

""

""

>>

"}

""

""

""

»

""

**

22

"J

>>

""

"

"

""

"

""

""

ཀྵ ནྟ ཐཱ བྷ ནྟི ནི བྷ ཀྨ རྒྱུ རྨ རྒྱུ ཐ ཐཱ ཨི ཐ རྒྱུ རྣ རྒྱུ རྒྱུ རྒྱུ རྒྱུ རྒྱུ རྒྱུ

100

102

104

106

1

108

110

112

114

...

116

118

...

120

122

124

1

...

...

1

1

1

1

...

1

1

...

1

...

1

...

3

2

6

5

...

...

4

...

...

1

4

4

...

...

5

...

4

...

...

1

1

1

...

1

...

1

2

4

1

1

Ι

2

1

1

2

4

...

1

1

1

2

4

1

1

...

4

I

1

1

1

...

1

1

5

1

...

1

1

...

...

1

1

6

...

1

1

1

...

126

1

...

...

128

...

...

...

130

1

...

132

1

...

1

2

134

1

...

1

1

1

136

1

...

1

1

1

3

138

1

...

1

1

1

140

1

...

1

1

1

3

142

1

1

1

1

3

3

144

>>

"}

1

1

2

2 2

"

146

"

1

...

1

1

1

:

148

1

""

""

...

1

2

150

1

1

1

2

""

29

"

r

15

"

""

""

29

"

22

"}

19

རྒྱུ རྒྱུ རྒྱུ ཐ ཐ རྒྱུ རྒྱུ རྒྱུ རྒྱུ ང སྙ སྶ

152

1

...

1

1

1

3

4

154

1

"

...

1

1

4

156

1

...

1

1

4

158

1

1

1

3

2

...

160

1

2

...

162

1

...

164

1

...

166

1

...

168

1

...

170

1

...

172

1

::::

1

1

...

1

1

2

3

2

...

...

Hong Ning Lane,

1

...

2

...

...

...

""

""

4

...

...

...

...

Li.

...

: co co co +O

4

5

3

3

I

i

:

A

I' On Lane,..

1

1

3

1

1

1

1

>>

1

1

1

1

"

11

1

1

""

"

""

246

1

1

1

1

1

1

"

...

...

...

...

...

2

2

:

2

3

...

2

4

2

1

3

4

...

...

...

...

Name of Street.

LIST OF HOUSES

A

No. of

Back to House. back house.

[ xxxik ]

IN No. 5 DISTRICT,—Continued.

B

Fronting on a lane less than 15 feet wide.

C

Insufficient

open space in rear.

I' On Lane,....

10

27

12

14

****

8

1

1

1

1

...

1

1

1

1

""

Jervois Street,

66

"1

22

""

11

Co

13579

6

1

1

1

1

1

...

13

""

15

1

""

}

1

1

1

""

17

1

...

1

19

1

1

>>

21

1

23

1

1

19

25

""

1

1

27

1

1

29

1

>>

...

1

31

1

1

33

"

...

...

35

"

...

37

•••

39

...

""

41

43

1

"

""

45

1

""

47

1

"

49

1

51

+9

1

53

1

55

>>

1

57

1

1

1

59

99

1

1

19

1

1

63

1

1

19

65

1

1

67

1

1

69

1

1

">

71

1

1

73

1

75

1

77

1

1

79

1

81

1

""

83

1

22

85

1

""

87

1

99

89

91

39

""

93

1

95

19

1

...

""

97

1

22

66

1

"}

101

1

103

1

105

1

107

*9

109

1

...

""

111

99

113

1

"

115

1

""

117

55

119

121

123

125

J9

127

D

Abutting against hillside to a depth of more than 4 feet.

No. of cubicles on

each Floor.

Ground.

2 3 4

...

4

: co:

3

4

I

I

...

1

...

I

4

10 10 TÊ TCH

2

...

...

1

1 1

1

1

...

221N

2

2

1

8

2

2 2

1

...

1

1

1

...

4

1

...

1

1

...

1

1

1

1 2

1

1

1

1

1

...

1

1

2

1

Ι

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

2 3

2

1

1

...

1

2

...

1

I

...

1

2

1

1

1

...

...

1

1

::221

3

I

1

1

3 4

1

1

3

...

1

1

1

2

1

1

...

1

1

2

1 3

...

1

...

1

1

2

1

1

2

2

1

1

1

2

2 5

...

1

1

...

4

⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀

...

...

...

...

...

...

[ xxxil ]

LIST OF HOUSES IN No. 5 DISTRICT,—Continued.

A

Name of Street.

No. of House. back house.

Back to

B

Fronting on a lane less

C

Insufficient

than 15

open space in rear.

feet wide.

D

Abutting against hillside to a depth of more than

4 feet.

No. of cubicles on each Floor.

Ground. 1 2 3

4

Jervois Street,

""

24

...

}

1

1

...

1

1

1

44

1

""

6

1

...

1

8

1

1

10

1

12

1

1

"

14

1

1

16

1

...

"

18

1

1

35

20

1

I

"

22

1

"

24

1

1

26

1

1

23

28

1

...

30

1

+4

1

""

32

1

1

""

34

1

...

36

1

1

""

38

1

1

1

95

40

"

1

42

1

1

33

44

"

1

1

44A

""

1

1

46

""

1

1

48

""

1

1

50

1

1

**

52

1

1

33

54

1

1

56

1

1

""

58

1

Ι

"

60

1

""

62

1.

""

64

1.

66

1

68

1:

1

39

70

72

1

1

...

»

7.

}

1

"

76

1

1

778

1

1

80

1

دو

82

1

1

...

""

84

Ι

1

86

1

1

"

88

1

1

90

}

I

92

1

1

1 2

94

1

96

1

2

1

وو

98

1

1

100

1

:

وو

102

1

...

1

104

1

1

106

1

1

108

1

1

1

to

"

110

1

1

1

66.

112

1

1

0

114

1

1

1

114A

1

1

116

1

...

1

"

118

1

49

118A

1

1

...

""

120

1

1

}

...

""

122

1

1

1

""

124

1

...

1

""

126

1

1

1

""

128

1

...

99

130

1

1

1

...

...

...

...

...

4

[ xxxim]

LIST OF HOUSES IN No. 5 DISTRICT,-Continued.

A

Name of Street.

No. of Back to House. back house.

B Fronting on a lane less than 15 feet wide.

C

Insufficient open space in rear.

1

D Abutting against hillside to a depth of more than 4 feet.

No. of cubicles on each Floor.

Ground. 1 2 3

Jervois Street,

132

1

134

1

""

136

19

138

1

>>

140

1

""

Kiu Sau Court,

1

...

...

...

1

1

1

1

1

...

:

AN ON NIINNN H

1

2

2

2

2

3

2

6

66

">

39

22

>>

13

3

7

1

1

...

...

...

1

...

1

II

I

1

...

1

1

4

1

1

Ι

...

>>

8

· 1

1

...

10

1

:

:

...

"

Kau Ü Fong,

1

1

1

1

2

1

1

I

1

"

>>

"

""

""

??

Kau Ü Fong Sonth,

"1

""

**

19

""

A

CON

1310 7G

3

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

I

1

...

...

...

1

1

19

1

99

>>

:

>>

"

""

11

13

15

17

>>

"

"

"

22

"

>>

">

A

""

""

10

"

""

Kau Ü Fong North,

""

""

"

""

Kan Ü Fong West,

"

29

"

>>

23

>>>

""

">

""

"

23

""

AA

:

1'

14 30 40

1

:::

1

1

1

...

1

...

1

1

1

1

1

1

+

}

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

:

...

...

1

1

...

...

...

...

:

4

N NONN-:

1 1

2

2

3

2

...

...

...

QHHTH OTH

2

4

3

3

3

2

1

...

...

3

3

2

...

1

::

4

...

2

3

3

1

3

424

:::

⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀

DANN

Kwai Wa Lane,

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

"

1

1

"?

1

1

1

1

1

1

""

1

1

1

...

""

1

1

1

""

1

1

1

""

1

1

1

""

10

1

1

1

""

11

1

1

1

1

1

>>

12

1

1

1

1

"

COFA HI HA HIPO #POE

4

3

5

3

}

{

;

Name of Street.

[ UIXXX]

LIST OF HOUSES IN No. 5 DISTRICT,—Continued.

A

No. of Back to House. back house.

B

Fronting on a lane less than 15 feet wide.

Insufficient

open space in rear.

D Abutting against hillside to a depth of more than 4 feet.

No. of cubicles on each Floor.

Ground.

1 2

00

3

Kwong Yuen Street

East.

1

1

1

1

:

3679

1

1

1

1

...

1

1

1

3

...

...

1

1

1

4

11

1

1

1

13

15

"

""

""

""

""

2 10 2 246∞

1

1

1

1

1

1

2A

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

...

1

1

1

1

3

...

8

1

1

21

10

1

}

...

39

12

1

1

...

""

14

1

1

1

"2

16

1

1

23

Kwong Yuen

West.

>>

Street

1

1

1

1

1

:..

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

6

1

1

""

11

1

1

1

13

1

1

1

2A

1

1

1

وو

2

1

1

1

1

1

1

6

1

1

""

8

1

"

10

1

33

12

1

1

NNEN no co⠀⠀

...

""

Lower Lascar Row,

"

"

A

13

11

""

""

""

5

13679I∞N

...

...

...

...

1

19

""

21

""

>

23

""

25

"

*

27

...

29

31

33

12

35

97

22

...

1

1

1

...

:

4

1

1

1

1

...

3

...

3

3

1

2

1

1

I

1

1

1

1

1

1

3

2 I

1

3

1

2

3

1

>>

A

I

23

10

""

12

14

1

16

1

33

18

1

2

20

1

19

...

22

""

24

I

I

3

1

"

26

1

2

28

1

1

""

30

1

""

32

1

1

""

34

1

...

I

1

1

"

⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀

3

3

...

...

[ XXXIO ]

LIST OF HOUSES IN No. 5 DISTRICT,-Continued.

A

No. of

Back to

B

Fronting on a lane less

C

Insufficient

Name of Street.

House. back house.

than 15 feet wide.

open space in rear.

D Abutting against hillside to

a depth of

more than 4 feet.

No. of cubicles on each Floor.

Ground. 1 2 3

4

2

Lower Lascar Row,

"

888

36

38

40

Jamal Jamned prevent

1

1

1

Ladder Street,.

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

232

3

042

"

1

1

...

1 1

3 1

5

5

...

1

1

"

39

8

1

1

3

10

1

1

5

12

1

1

2

"

Lower Ladder Street

Terrace.

33

""

1

1

1

:

:

O CO

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

...

"

1

:

:

Mau Hing Lane,..

""

"

""

",

""

25

""

""

✪ CTA CON -

1

1

3

...

1

1

I

A

4

1

1

3

1

1

...

1

1

3

3

3

cffin co

Mau Wa Lane,

1

1

~

::

1

I

12

1

1

Mercer Street,.

1

1

1

2

1

3

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

>>

1

"

1

11

1

1

""

13

1

""

1

3

15

1

1

1

""

3

1

...

17

1

1

""

2

1

29

4

1

1

""

1

1

""

1

8

1

""

1

1

10

1

1

29

1

1

12

1

2

""

14

1

1

دو

16

1

1

"

2

1

18

1

""

20

1

1

1

""

22

1

1

19

24

1

1

:

Mi Lun Lane,

1

1

1

1

1

3

1

1

1

""

1

1

1

""

1

1

1

9

1

1

1

co co co co

3

3

3

"J

11

Ι

1

1

1

"J

13

1

1

1

15

1

1

1

"}

2

1

1

1

59

1

1

1

1

1

...

""

8

1

1

1

10

1

1

1

4

4

3

3

3

3 3

1

12

1

1

1

14

1

1

1

16

1

1

1

3

3

2

2

ico a

:

""

Morrison Street,

2

1

:

1

:

:

...

...

18

[ xxxp]

LIST OF HOUSES IN No. 5 DISTRICT,- Continued.

A

No. of

Name of Street.

Back to House. back house.

B

Fronting on a lane less than 15 feet wide.

C

D

No. of cubicles on cach Floor.

Insufficient open space in rear.

Abutting against hillside to a depth of more than 4 feet.

Ground. 1 Ι 2 3

4

1

Morrison Street,.

10

39

12

40002

1

1

1

I

1

1

1

1

1

On Wo Lane,

"

""

**

1 30 101-

1

1

1

...

1

1

2

1

I

1

1

9

11

1

1

1

1

މ

13

1

1

""

15

1

1

""

17

1

1

""

2

1

1

1

1

"

1

1

1

""

1

1

1

""

1

1

""

10

1

I

I

"

12

1

1

2

""

14

I

1

1

1

16

1

1

2

NN=NU61 20 — NAHN HNNNN –

2

"

Pak Tsz Lane,

""

>

123 + 10 CO

1

1

1

I

1

1

1

1

1

:

1

1

1

5

1

1

1

6

1

1

10 TH OD CO

""

Peel Street,

**

27

24

29

150

9

11

11 A

13

...

...

...

13A

15

17

ད་

19

21

1

23

1

1

25

1

1

"

27

1

1

1

94

29

1

I

1

99

31

i

1

1

31A

33

1

1

**

35

1

""

37

1

1

"3

39

1

1

"

41

1

1

""

43

1

45

...

47

1

*

**

49 51

1

1

""

59

Ping On Lane,

1

2

1

1

>:

1

1

""

1

1

""

1

1

..

4

5

5

1

1

4

-NIN DEN NI N

2

⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀

A A CO C

CO ++

...

[ xxxiq]

LIST OF HOUSES IN No. 5 DISTRICT,—Continued.

A

No. of

Back to

Name of Street.

House. back house.

B

Fronting on a laue less than 15 feet wide.

C

Insufficient open space in rear.

D Abutting against hillside to

a depth of more than 4 feet.

No. of cubicles on

each Floor.

Ground.

Co

3

...

Praya Central,

63

1

1

1

64

1

1

1

39

65

66

1

...

""

67

""

68

*"

69

1

1

...

11

70

1

71

1

>>

72

73

39

1

""

1

N

76

1

1

32

77

1

1

1

78

1

1.

79

1

"

80

1

1

""

81

1

15

82

1

83

1

""

84

""

21

85

86

2

1

1-3 co co co co co

111212

4路4443

3

10

1

1

3

2

3

3

4

3

1

4 5

1

2

3

33

87

2

"5

88

1

"

89

10

>>

90

1

""

91

1

1

19

92

1

1

""

93

1

1

""

94

1

37

95

""

96

1

97

2

6

97A

""

97B

98A

98

""

99

1

2

100

1

1

>>

101

1

1

21

102

1

""

103

1

1

1

""

104

1

1

""

105

1

3 2

1

2

"3

106

1

1

3

""

107

1

1

3

""

108

1

1

4

"S

109

1

1

"

110

1

2

33

111

1

112

I

113

1

1

:>

114

1

1

2

35

...

115

1

1

"

116

1

1

33

117

Ι

1

23

118

1

:5

"

$

119

1

120

1

1

1

121

1

.1

122

1

1

دو

123

1

1

1

*>

124

1

1

1

125

1

1

>>

126

1

1.

6

""

127

1

2

1

""

128

I

:

}

.

[XXX]

LIST OF HOUSES IN No. 5 DISTRICT,—Continued.

B Fronting on Insufficient

A

No. of

Back to

Name of Street.

House. back house.

a lane less than 15

feet wide.

C

D Abutting against hillside to

open space in rear.

a depth of

more than 4 feet.

No. of cubicles on each Floor.

Ground. 1 2 3

Praya Central,

129

1

130

1

...

131

1

1

1

1

2

2

...

1

3

"

132

1

...

1

...

19

133

1

...

19

134

1

1

...

"1

135

1

...

136

1

>

137

1

1

1

4

1

3

3

...

1

1

1

2

...

tf

138

1

1

3

...

39

139

1

1

...

...

""

140

1

1

...

"

141

1

1

""

142

1

1

61

143

1

1

...

"}

144

1

1

...

39

145

1

1

...

...

19

146

1

1

2

2

3

2

...

"

147

1

I

...

32

148

1

1

...

29

149

1

1

4.

...

"

150

1

1

...

""

151

1

1

""

152

1

1

2

1

⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀

...

...

...

...

...

...

99

Queen's Road Central,... 137

1

139

1

1

141

1

1

39

143

...

""

145

1

""

"

147

1

1

2

...

1

...

19

"

149

1

...

...

"9

"

151

1

2

"J

""

153

1

1

66

""

155

1

1

1

1

1

"1

:

...

"

159

1

1

""

"

161

1

1

...

#7

>>

163

1

1

Ι

2

""

""

165

1

1

...

33

"

167

1

1

""

25

169

1

91

39

171

1

I

39

""

175

1

1

1

1

39

"

177

1

1

1

دو

""

179

1

1

1

1

A

""

""

181

1

1

1

2

23

35

183

1

1

...

""

""

185

1

1

"

187

"

""

189

1 1 1

...

""

27

191

""

22

193

I

...

"

""

195

...

...

197

...

...

...

199

""

201

29

"

203

...

""

205

207

209

59

...

...

211

213

1

1

1

3

"3

215

...

"

217

وو

219

1

...

32

221

"9

223

""

225

1

دو

""

...

227

...

...

[ SIXXX

LIST OF HOUSES IN No. 5 DISTRICT,—Continued.

Name of Street.

No. of Back to House. back house.

B

Fronting on a lane less than 15 feet wide.

Insufficient

open space in rear.

Queen's Road Central,... 229

...

D Abutting against hillside to

a depth of more than 4 feet.

No. of cubicles on each Floor.

Ground.

| 1 | 2 | 3

3

4

1

...

1

231

404

...

233

"

...

...

...

...

235

21

""

...

237

1

...

1

""

"1

...

...

239

!

1

"

35

241

27

"

""

A

243

1

245

1

19

"

247

وو

1

249

1

""

::

...

261

1

29

...

253

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

2

1

1

...

1

1

...

...

1

1

...

...

...

1

...

...

""

27

...

255

1

"

""

>>

"

AAA

257

1

1

1

1

...

1

2

...

259

1

1

...

...

...

261

1

1

"J

""

...

263

1

1

265

I

1

1

"

"

267

...

269

1

1

"

271

1

1

55

...

273

1.

1

275

1

"J

""

...

""

...

277

1

1

...

...

1

...

1

1

2

3

...

...

279

1

31

""

...

1

...

281

1

1

59

29

...

...

283

1

"

...

2

...

...

285

1

29

31

...

•••

1

287

1

>>

""

...

...

...

...

***

289

"

>>

...

...

...

...

291

19

""

...

293

1

""

""

1

1

...

""

""

""

::

295

...

1

1

...

1

2

1

297

1

1

...

1

1

1

I

299

35

1

...

1

1

...

1

301

32

>>

...

1

303

1

""

1

1

2

2

305

1

**

"

1

1

4

307

1

22

...

1

1

1

309

1

"

""

AAA

...

1

1

...

3

311

...

1

1

1

...

...

313

1

دو

1

I

315

1

"

"

...

...

1

1

2

317

1

1

95

...

319

1

1

多喃

1

...

2

2

1

321

1

1

1

...

1

323

1

""

1

}

3

325

1

1

1

**

""

...

...

327

1

""

>>

...

1

1

329

1

17

"

...

1

1

331

1

93

""

1

I

1

1

333

1

I

1

"

""

...

...

142

1

"

1

1

99

3 1

144

1

وو

1

1

1

4

3

146

1

1

06

1

1

"

148

1

1

97

"

...

...

⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀

...

...

***

...

...

...

...

4

...

...

1

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

150

1

1

59

J

...

...

...

152

1

""

"

...

154

1

""

""

"

***

156

1

***

...

158

1

...

""

"

*

"

99

25

وو

*AAA**

160

1

162

1

164

1

166

168

170 172

2

5

2

2 1

...

1

1

1

6

I

1

4 1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

...

...

...

1

I

1

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

Y

[ xxxit ]

LIST OF HOUSES IN No. 5 DISTRICT,- Continued.

A

Name of Street.

No. of Back to House. back house.

B

Fronting on a lane less than 15 feet wide.

C

Insufficient open space in rear.

D Abutting against hillside to

a depth of more than

4 feet.

No. of Cubicles on each Floor.

Ground. 1 2 3

4

Queen's Road Central,... 174

1

1

1

CC

176

...

22

178

25

180

17.

182

22

}}

5

184

""

""

186

>>

188

"}

""

190

""

192

??

""

194

""

""

196

""

198

>>

"

200

""

""

202

29

"

204

""

206

"

208

1

1

...

1

...

1

1

1

...

1

1

1

...

1

1

2

2

...

66

...

***

1

1

...

3

1 2

1

1

4

1

1

...

1

1

1

...

1

1

1

2

...

...

1

1

2

44

1

1

2

1

1

1

1

***

1

1

وو

...

210

1

}

1

...

""

212

1

1

...

""

214

1

1

1

2

...

>"

216

1

1

2

***

>>

218

1

1

"

""

220

1

1

1

3

⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀

...

"

""

224

1

1

1

...

""

""

226

1

1

2

"

""

228

1

1

1

...

"9

29

""

ARA

230

1

1

2

...

232

1

1

...

234

1

1

1

"

>>

236

1

1

1

99

و"

238

1

1

2

""

240

1

1

...

97

""

242

1

244

1

1

...

""

19

246

1

1

1

1

...

""

248

...

"}

73

250

...

:

""

""

252

...

""

254

...

1

"

""

256

I

>>

"}

258

97

260

""

""

262

...

264

...

27

""

266

...

፡፡

268

...

""

""

270

1

""

""

272

1

1

1

""

""

""

"

""

RAAAAAA

AA

15

274

]

276

1

1

1

278

...

280

1

282

...

284

286

150

...

288

3

1

1

1

2

1

1

2

2

1

1

...

1

1

1

1

2

1

1

...

1

.1

1

1

2

...

3

2

1 3 4

4

1

4

1

1

1

1

I

a merend

...

I

*

***

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

>>

290

""

292

"}

294

...

...

...

...

""

""

296

...

""

"

298

...

4

...

...

>>

"J

300

...

1

4

>>

""

302

2

...

...

"

"

304

1

2

...

""

>>

306

1

2

....

...

...

""

""

308

1

1

1

1

""

""

310

""

""

312

>>

::

1

1

1

1

1

2

...

[ xxxiu ]

LIST OF HOUSES IN No. 5 DISTRICT,—Continued.

A

B

C

Name of Street.

No. of Back to House. back house.

a lane less than 15

Fronting on Insufficient

D Abutting

open space in rear.

against hillside to

No. of cubicles on each Floor.

feet wide.

a depth of

more than

Ground. 1 2

3

4

4 feet.

Queen's Road Central,... 314

:

...

1

1

>>

1

الم كل لور

1

1

2

1

1

4

10 00

5 2

2

...

1

1

314A

""

316

""

818

""

320

>>

322

""

324

*

""

326

22

33

328

66

""

330

">

""

332

22

""

334

""

Shin Hing Lane,

""

"9

"3

">

“ረ

11

""

29

""

53

"

Shing Wong Street,

>>

""

39

>>

27

""

""

>>

""

33

"2

...

...

1

1

...

1

1

1

10

12

H 2010 NO HNHO¤QN

1

1

1

I

I

1

1

1

2

3

2

9

1

1

2

I

1

1

...

1

1

...

1

1

1

1

1

I

1

1

1

...

1

1

1

INA HOOK-

1

...

1

1

...

1

1

1

...

:::

1

1

1

...

3

3

ao os on co CO ON CO TH Co co co co

co co co 33 14 co to co co co co

01H 1 10 23 co o

1

1

5

1

1

1

3

1

5

1

3

1

1

1

1

1

3

Ι

3

Staunton Street,.

31

1

33

1

***

35

1

22

37

1

77

39

1

41

1

43

1

>>

45

1

...

13

47

1

27

38

1

""

40

22

...

42

27

44

""

46

""

48

""

50

...

...

52

54

*AAA* * * * * * * * * * * * *

56

58

1

I

60

1

...

62

1

64

1

...

66

1

68

...

...

70

1

72

...

74

...

76

i

1

78

1

1

80

1

82

1

84

1

86

...

88

H

1

2

...

1

1

1

1

2

1

1

1

3

3

...

2

3

3

2

CONTACT — 21 HOI AN - Q -

...

:

.

[ XXXIV]

LIST OF HOUSES IN No. 5 DISTRICT,- Continued.

against hillside to a depth of more than 4 feet.

No. of cubicles on

ench Floor.

Ground.

1

A

Name of Street.

No. of

Back to House. back house.

B

Frouting on a lane less than 15 feet wide.

C

D Abutting

Insufficient

open space in rear.

H

...

Staunton Street,..

90

1

1

1

6

3

-H

Stavely Street,

}:

""

""

"7

10

~+000

1

1

1

1

1

1

8

1

1

1

1

co co co co as

3

CO LO CO HA N

- NW 05 05

3

3

Square Street,..

""

}

1

1

1

1

1

...

1

1

1

1

I

1

دو

1

2

com

3

3

11

1

1

"}

13

1

1

2

5

19

15

1

1

...

""

17

1

1

1

""

19

1

1

1

...

CC

21

1

1

...

""

23

1

1

""

25

1

1

""

27

1

1

27

29

1

1

""

31

1

1

""

33

1

1

33

35

1

1

""

37

1

1

ፈረ

39

1

1

:

""

41

27

43

...

""

45

""

47

...

>>

""

""

""

"

49

51

53

55

28

...

No co co to co 00 00 01 00 20 10NNNA-::

6

1

1

""

30

1

I

33

32

1

1

...

""

34

1

1

1

a a

6

6

23

36

1

1

""

38

1

1

1

22

40

1

1

Ι

""

42

1

1

1

""

44

1

1

27

46

1

1

1

""

48

1

1

1

CO 10 10 10 10 10 10

coaj⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀a Hin Him Him Him Hin Ho

Sam Kai Lane,

Tan Kwai Lane,..

>>

77

Tank Lane,.

"7

""

CC

123

246

1:30 10 1O

1

1

1

1

121

44

1

1

1

1

1

1

...

...

1.

1

12:

2

4

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

02:06

9

3

3

...

>>

Tsui On Lane,

1

1

1

1

2

2

1

"}

1

""

1

ཐཱ ཀྵ པོ པོ

1

6

7

1

...

COJA LO OR CO ROA

[ xxx12]

LIST OF HOUSES IN No. 5 DISTRICT,-Continued.

A

No. of

Back to House. back house.

Insufficient

B

Fronting ou

C

open space in rear.

a lane less than 15 feet wide.

D Abutting

against hillside to

a depth of more than

4 feet.

No. of cubicles on each Floor.

Ground. 1 2 3

4

Name of Street.

6

Tsui On Lane,

8

10

...

1

1

1

Tung Shing Lane,

""

>"

I

1

1

3

1

1

5

1

1

1

1

27

""

9

1

1

Tung Wa Lane,

1

2

""

>"

>>

>>

Tsün Hing Lane,

""

""

"

"

Taipingshan Street,

"

"

Un Wo Lane,

""

1

1

1

1

...

1

1

1

...

1

1

1

1234 1 67

1 30

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

3

1

...

1

1

...

1

1

2

3

::

1

1

1

3

co co:

3

2.

2 2 2 2

:

∞ 10: co co

112 112

:

3

00 1.00 ∞o co

3

3

3

2

2

2

NNNNNI

1 2

2

~~~22:

...

#48429 19:

I

2

•••

1

2

1

...

2

...

4

4

...

1

...

::

a:

...

...

::

...

::

3

1

14

4

3

...

Ü Hing Lane,.

"J

""

"

""

99

134246

1

...

1

1

I

...

1

1

3

2

3

1

1

1

...

1

1

...

1

1

:

228 +4 E

OCCIA ŁO I CO

...

Upper Lascar Row,

1

1

1

...

1

1

1

2

3

2

"

1

1

1

1

"

1

1

"1

9A

6

2

6

1 4

...

"}

11

1

I

...

1

2

...

29

13

1

1

3

1

27

15

1

3

1

...

""

17

1

...

"

19

1

2

>>

9

21

1

1

1

99

23

1

1

3

...

""

25

1

1

1

3

...

">

27

1

*R*

29

1

}

3

...

""

31

1

1

3

...

33

1

1.

1

...

""

A

35

1

1

2

3

...

...

"

37

1

1

3

""

39

1

1

2

3

...

...

""

2

1

1

3

...

66

4

1

1

3

...

********

6

1

1

1

3

3

3

...

10

12

14

16.

18

*024620

8

1

1

4

...

1

1

...

1

1

...

1

1

...

1

1

1

1

...

2

4

1

2

5

...

..

A

B

No. of

Back to

a lane less

{ xxxix]

LIST OF HOUSES IN No. 5 DISTRICT,—Continued.

Fronting on Insufficient

C

D Abutting

No. of cubicles on

against

each Floor.

House. back house.

than 15

feet wide.

open space in rear.

hillside to

a depth of

more than

Ground. 1 2

ลง

3

4

4 feet.

222223

1

...

1

...

1

3 5

1

3

4

1

3

3

Name of Street.

1

...

Upper Lascar Row,

20

}

1

وو

24

1

""

26

1

28

1

17

30

1

""

32

1

22

34

1

17

36

1

37

38

1

""

40

1

""

42

1

"

Upper Ladder St. Terrace,...

5

...

...

3

2

1

2

2

...

1

1

1

...

1

1

1

1 2

...

1

...

co co co co — 00

3

3

3

3

1

3

1 00 00 00 10 N

2

2

NO ON NH

IN N N N N

...

""

""

22

""

"

"}

Wa Hing Lane,

""

""

""

""

Wa On Lane,

"}

""

">

""

10 10 100

1234106

12304410

1

...

6

1

1

1

4

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

...

...

1

1

1

...

1

1

1

...

1

1

I

...

...

1

1

...

...

::.

1

1

1

1

...

1

1

3

1

1

3

3

1

1

1

1

2

Wing Kut Street,

1

1

...

""

1

...

"J

...

1

...

2

2

1

3

2

1

5

aa jam 10 10 10 2 Q10 10 10 10 10 21 10 10 10

2

1

1

COCO CO ON CO ONE IN INNO 12 H 10 H 12 1O GO 1O 1O 1O CO — HH

2

1

1

3

1

2

...

1

1

1

1

1

2

1

...

...

...

>>

11

...

13

15

17

19

21

23

25

وو

27-

...

""

29

>>

31

33

1

64

35

1

""

}

1

""

1

1

""

1

1

""

1

1

وو

10

1

1

**

12

1

1

""

14

1

1

""

16

1

1

J*

18

1

1

...

""

20

1

1

""

22

1

1

""

24

1

1

...

19

26

1

1

""

28

I

1

>>

30

1

""

32

1

""

34

1

17

36

1

:

Wing Wo Street,

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

:

:

5

4.

2

:

[ XXXIy ]

LIST OF HOUSES IN No. 5 DISTRICT,—Continued.

B Fronting on Insufficient

A

C

D Abutting

Name of Street.

No. of Back to House. back house.

a lane less

than 15 feet wide.

open space in rear.

against hillside to

No. of cubicles on each Floor.

1

a depth of

more than 4 feet.

...

Ground. 1 2 3

...

3 4 3 5

1

1

...

Wing Wo Street,

""

1

1

...

1

1

""

1

وو

11

1

"

13

1

>>

15

1

17

1

1

>>

19

1

>>

21

1

1

66

23

1

27

25

1

1

27

1

""

29

1

1

""

31

1

"}

33

1

1

""

>>

"}

""

8

....

""

""

""

10

12

14

...

...

"

16

"

18

...

CC

20

>>

22

>>

24

""

26

28

""

""

30

Wing Shing Street,

""

FI

1

...

...

...

4

+ HOHN 30 m

3 6

2

2

3

2 4

1

1 3

++; co — co en co ----~~~-

2

1 1

1

2

3 3

3

...

...

1

1

...

1 2

2

1

3

...

2

2

...

1

...

"

">

9

1

1

...

""

11

"

13

>>

15

22

17

...

""

19

...

66

21

1

•••

...

""

23

1

وو

2

1

...

""

1

>>

1

1

1

1

""

8

1

""

10

1

1

1

""

12

1

""

14

1

...

>>

16

1

...

"J

18

1

1

1

1

1

20

1

...

..

>"

""

22

2222

...

24

1

1

26

1

1

28

1

1

-: -

1

1

...

...

Wing Lok Street,

""

"" >

""

1351-0

1

1

::

1

1

1

1

1

1

""

11

1

1

1

27

13

1

1

I

""

15

1

1

""

15A

:

22

CHCIA: 4 A H

4

4

I

4

...

1

2

3

...

3

3

4

.

367 No. 29

98

HONGKONG.

REPORT ON THE ASSESSMENT FOR 1898-99,

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government.

ASSESSOR'S OFFICE, HONGKONG, 21st July, 1898.

SIR, I have the honour to submit my Report on the Assessment for the year 1898-99.

2. The City of Victoria.-The result of the new Valuation is that the Rateable Value of the City of Victoria is, in the List which came into force on the 1st instant, $3,828,577 as compared with last year's (1897-98) Assessment $3,444,514-an increase in Rateable Value of $384,063, equivalent to 11.14 per cent.

3. The Hill District.-The Rateable Value of the Hill District is now $133,765 against $117,435 last year-an increase of $21,330, or 18.16 per cent.

4. Hongkong Villages.-There is an increase of $20,446 or 13.44 per cent. in the Rateable Value of the Hongkong Villages, which is now $172,543 against $152,097 last year.

5. Kowloon Point.-The Rateable Value of this portion of the Kowloon Peninsula is now $137,335

as compared with $118,970 last year-an increase of $18,365, or 15.43 per cent.

6. Kowloon Villages.--The Rateable Value of the Kowloon Villages (which include Yau Ma Ti and Hung Hom) is now $244,727-an increase of $37,241, or 17.94 per cent. over last year's figure of $207,486.

7. The Whole Colony.-The Rateable Value of the whole Colony is now $4,521,947 as compared with last year's Assessment of $4,040,50z-an increase of $481,445, or 11.91 per cent.

8. Interim Valuations.-Daring the period from 1st July, 1897, to 1st June, 1898, Interim Valuations have been made as follows:-

In the City of Victoria.

222 new tenements, rateable value....

53 improved tenements, rateable value Replacing Assessments, amounting to.

$162,310

4

$ 43,480 29,575

13,905

$176,215

21,980

$154,235

29 Assessments cancelled, tenements pulled down, or being in

other respects not rateable

Increase in City of Victoria,.

In the Rest of the Colony.

237 new tenements, rateable value...... 8 improved tenements, rateable value

Replacing Assessments, amounting to

..$ 63,674

..$ 15,845 7,745

8,100

$ 71,774

18,546

$ 53,228

147 Assessments cancelled, tenements pulled down, or being in

other respects not rateable

Increase in Rest of the Colony..

The total number of tenements affected by Interim Valuations being 696 and the increase in Rateable Value $207,463.

9. Vacant Tenements.-The number of reported vacant tenements in the City of Victoria in- spected under section 35 of the Rating Ordinance averaged about 125 monthly against 170 last year.

10. Tabular Statements.-The usual tabular statements giving comparisons of the Valuation for 1897-98 and the new Valuation for 1898-99 are attached.

368

11. Staff.-Mr. CH'AN PUI, a most efficient officer, who had been in this office since November, 1888, was promoted to be 5th clerk in the Treasury from 1st January last. His place has been satisfactorily filled by the appointment of Mr. CHAU YUNG-CHEUNG, transferred from the Police Department.

Mr. IP YUK PUI, interpreter. resigned on 4th September, 1897. Mr. CHEUNG YUK FAI has been appointed in his stead, and gives satisfaction.

The messenger CHAN WING absented himself without permission and was dismissed. successor, SIN Poxe, died of Plague on 24th May, and a new man CHAN TUNG has been appointed.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

His

The Honourable

A. M. THOMSON,

Acting Colonial Treasurer.

Table A.

THE CITY OF VICTORIA.

VALUATION,

No.

DISTRICT NAME.

1897-98.

ARTHUR CHAPMAN,

Assessor.

VALUATION, 1898-99.

INCREASE.

PERCENT-

AGE.

1 Kennedy Town,

46,925

63,780

16,855

2

Shek Tong Tsui,

119,701

147,274

27,570

3

Sai Ying Pun,

737,530

$34,290

96,760

1

Tai Ping Shan,

285,115

326,680

41,565

5

Sheung Wan,

455,070

500,381

45,311

6

Chung Wan,.

1,405,800

1,535,742

129,942

7

Ha Wall,....

148,910

158,855

9,945

8

Wan Tsai,..

130,660

142,405

11,745

Bowrington,

44,055

44,115

60

10

Soo Kon Poo,........

70,745

75,055

4,310

$

69

3,444,514

3,828,577

384,063

11.14

DISTRICT.

The Hill District,

Hongkong Villages,

Table B.

THE HILL DISTRICT AND HONGKONG VILLAGES.

*

VALUATION,

1897-98.

VALUATION, 1898-99.

INCREASE.

PERCENTAGE.

117,435

138,765

21,330

18.16

152,097

172.543

20,446

13.44

269,532

311,308

41,776

15.49

DISTRICT.

Table C.

KOWLOON POINT AND KOWLOON VILLAGES.

VALUATION,

1897-98.

VALUATION, 1898-99.

369

INCREASE.

PERCENTAGE.

}

Kowloon Point,

118,970

137,335

18,365

15.43

Kowloon Villages,.....

207,486

244,727

37,241

17.94

326,456

382,062

55,606

17.03

Table D.

THE COLONY OF HONGKONG.

LOCALITY.

VALUATION, 1897-98.

VALUATION, 1898-99.

INCREASE.

PERCENTAGE.

$

The City of Victoria, .

3,444,514

3,828,577

384,063

11.14

The Hill District and Hongkong Villages,

269,532

311,308

41,776

15.49

Kowloon Point and Kowloon Villages,

326,456

382,062

55,606

17.03

4,040,502

4,521,947

481,445

11.91

317

No. 26

98

HONGKONG.

REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF THE BOTANICAL AND AFFORESTATION

DEPARTMENT FOR 1897.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency

the Officer Administering the Government.

No. 15.

BOTANIC GARDENS, HONGKONG, 4th June, 1898.

SIR,I have the honour to forward my Report on the work of this department for 1897.

STAFF.

2. The Superintendent was absent on leave from March 19th to November 14th, during which time Mr. TUTCHER, the Assistant Superintendent, acted as locum tenens, and I am pleased to say he discharged his duties satisfactorily.

The second clerk, Mr. CHAN TSUN UN, was promoted to a post in the Medical Department on the 26th April, and he was succeeded by Mr. WONG KWONG MING on June 4th.

QUARTERS FOR CHINESE STAFF,

3. The Workmen's Quarters-Gardeners' Cottages is an inappropriate termn-referred to in para- graph 6 of my report for 1896, were completed and occupied in September. The building contains accommodation suitable in every respect for 12 married men and their families and 30 single men, and the basements are well adapted and used as tool-rooms, &c.

REVENUE.

4. The receipts were :-

From Plant Sales

Loan of Plants.....

"?

39

Forestry Products

Total.......

$880.30

227.99

573.69

$1,681.98

The receipts from plant sales and loan of plants amounted to $1,108.29, being an increase of $87.24 over those of the previous year.

BOTANIC GARDENS.

IMPROVEMENTS.

5. The site on which the workmen's old buildings stood has been enclosed by a substantial and ornamental wall on the sides next the roads, and by a bamboo hedge on the nullah side, and the ground has been laid out in terraces which are to a great extent covered over with suitable roofing to provide shade for plants in pots. The whole of the collection of loan plants in pots, which numbers about 1,300 specimen plants, is now accommodated in this place, which is much more convenient and economical for management than as they were before-scattered in different parts of the gardens and in the Government House grounds wherever places could be found for them.

6. The flat roof of reed shading over No. 3 plant house-a fern house-has been replaced with an iron-span framework supported on iron pillars-three and five-inch piping-on which are fixed split bamboos, with their concave sides uppermost, at about one inch apart. The advantages gained by this arrangement are greater durability and elegance and the carrying off of two-thirds of the rain- fall instead of plants growing underneath receiving the whole rainfall as formerly, which was inju rious to many of the more delicate kinds. This will also save the loss of time and trouble in rolling off the reed shading on every threatened typhoon which it was necessary should be done to save it from destruction by wind.

7. Split bamboos have also replaced the reed shading on the curved iron framework over No. 9 house, and a plant-shed in the nursery.

I hope as opportunity and means permit to continue similar improvements to other plant-houses.

318

8. Iron and wire trellises five feet high and 284 feet long, on which creepers are trained, have been constructed between the plant-houses in the east garden and the higher ornamental grounds so as to screen from view the tops of the houses.

9. A large retaining wall, near the plant-houses, built when the gardens were formed upwards of 30 years ago, collapsed in a deluge of rain, and was afterwards rebuilt.

10. Near this, place a bamboo hedge was planted across the southern corner of the garden in order to screen that portion of ground which has now to be used for purposes of utility rather than

ornament.

PLANT-HOUSES.

11. These have been all kept in good preservation, which, however, requires constant attention on account of the perishable nature of many of them.

12. The collections of plants in the houses are all in good order and health.

The orchids are chiefly in Nos. 1 and 10; they have much improved and increased in number, chiefly by purchases when I was in England, by a handsome donation by Messrs. J. VEITCH & SONS, of London, and by exchanges with Mr. PECHE, of Burmalı, and Mr. CUNDALL, of Manila. There has been a good show of bloom during the year. In Appendix A I give a list of those in cultivation and those kinds which have flowered during the year.

13. I also give in Appendix B a list of ferns in cultivation.

AVIARIES AND DEER PENS.

14. The animals and birds are very attractive to visitors and the collection might be increased to advantage, but the aviary in the east garden is dilapidated and urgently needs rebuilding in substantial and imperishable material, which I hope it may soon be possible to do.

DISTRIBUTION AND INTERCHANGE OF PLANTS.

15. This work has been carried on as usual.

Acclimatizing Association, Southern California. Barton, J.

Botanic Gardens, Bangalore.

British Guiana.

"

>>

Natal.

Jamaica.

Ootacumund.

>>

11

>>

>>

Penang.

""

>>

15

""

""

**

12

";

""

:)

Bourne, F. S. A.

Royal, Ceylon.

Kew.

Trinidad.

Saharunpur. Sydney.

Cundall, C. H., Manila.

The following were the principal recipients:- Acclimatizing Association, Southern California. Balbas, Venancio, Manila.

Barton, J.

Botanic Gardens, Adelaide.

""

>>

37

""

**

""

""

Bangalore. Baroda, India.

British Guiana.

Grenada. Mauritius. Nagpur, India. Royal, Calcutta.

""

""

Kew.

22

""

Trinidad.

15

Sierra Leone.

11

The chief donors were:-

Dammann & Co., Italy. Henry, Dr., Mengtse. Humphreys, H.

Koebele, A., Honolulu.

Lawrence, Bt., Sir Trevor, England.

Loher, A., Manila.

Niedhardt, E.

Osmond, J. H., Manila.

Pettigrew, A. W.

Peché, G., Moulmein.

Roebelen, C.

Stevens, T. L.

Veitch, J. & Sons, Limited, London. Walker, Frank, Tasmania.

Botanic Gardens, Tokio, Japan. Cundall, C. H., Manila.

Hill, W., Queensland

Osmond, J. H., Manila.

Peché, G., Moulmein.

Public Gardens and Plantations, Jamaica. Public Museum, Milwauke.

Roebelen, C.

Royal Naval Hospital.

Scharff and Shorting, California.

Siemssen, G., Foochow,

Stephens M. J. D.

Walker, J. Pokfulam.

sales.

PLANT SALES.

16. The number of plants sold was 3,717, and they realised $880, a slight increase over the 1896

i

LOAN OF PLANTS.

319

:

17. The number of plants lent was 4,466, for which $227.99 was collected, which are consider- able increases over the previous year's returns.

RAINFALL.

18. The rainfall at the gardens was 110.27 inches. The daily returns are given in Appendix C. I am indebted to Mr. L. GIBBS, of the Public Works Department, for the accurate altitude of the rain gauge, which he found to be 306.8 feet above mean sea level.

HERBARIUM AND LIBRARY.

19. Annual Reports, Bulletins, &c., have been received from the Botanic Gardens, &c., as follows:-

British Guiana, Ceylon, Calcutta, Dominica, Durban, Grenada, Jamaica, Kew, Kolonial Museun Haarlem, Mysore, Palermo, Rio de Janeiro, Saharunpur, Straits Settlements, Sierra Leone, Trinidad, the Horticultural Society of India, the Agri-Horticultural Society Madras, the Agricultural Departments Cape of Good Hope, England, India, United States of America, Queensland, and Victoria Reports of Forest Administration in Ajmere, Andamans, Balu- chistan, Bombay Presidency, Burma, Central Provinces, Ceylon, Hyderabad, Bengal, Madras Presidency, North-West Provinces and Oudh, Punjab, and Western Australia. The following works have also been added to the library:--

Presented:-

Catalogue of Plants growing in the open air in the Garden of Thos Hanbury. Presented by Thos. Hanbury, Esq.

Commercial Plants and Drugs, 1897. Present-

ed by Messrs. Christy & Co.

Flora Forestière de la Cochin-Chine, Part XXII.

Presented by Royal Gardens, Kew.

Flora of British India, Part XXII. Presented

by Royal Gardens, Kew.

Purchased:

Botanical Magazine, 1897.

Extra Tropical Plants, Von Mueller.

Flora Capensis, Vol. VI. Part I.

Gardeners' Chronicle, 1897.

Hand List of Tender Monocotyledons, 1897.

Presented by Royal Gardens, Kew. Hooker's Icones Plantarum, Vol. VI., Parts 1 and 2. Presented by the Bentham Trustees through Royal Gardens, Kew. New Natal Plants, decade I. J. Medley Wood.

Presented by the Author.

Index to the Street, Houses aud Leased Lots,

Hongkong.

Monographiae Phanerogamarum, Vol. Nonum.

De Candolle.

20. My absence on leave in England prevented any work in the incorporation of additional specimens in the collections of dried plants.

The dried specimens which are scientifically arranged are contained in 26 cabinets, each cabinet containing 10 drawers.

FORESTRY.

21. Planting operations for the year were completed before I left for England in March, the season having been favourable for early work. The total number of trees planted was 26,066.

The usual tabular statement is contained in Appendix D.

22. Alterations and improvements of roads, and the extension of recreation grounds in the Happy Valley necessitated the transplanting of 46 large road-side trees; most of these trees were of great age and about 30 feet high; the operations were successful in all but four cases.

About 800 feet of the road on the eastern side of the recreation ground extension was planted with young trees of camphor and Albizzia.

A hedge of bamboos 2,000 feet in length was placed along three sides of the recreation ground. 23. Mr. WILLIAM FAWCETT, M.A., Director of the Botanical Department, Jamaica, in bis Bulletin for October, 1896, refers as follows to a communication from a late celebrated botanist :-

"Baron Sir F. VON MUELLER, the veteran Government Botanist of Victoria, who has done so much for the economic botany of the world, sent to the Director in April, 1895, seeds of a Melaleuca (M. leucadendron), to which he thus refers:-This tree should become of the utmost importance also to the Western Hemisphere. As a tropical tree, fit to grow in malarial swamps, and containing in its foliage much antiseptic and antimiasmatic oil, it deserves your special attention. It will grow where no Eucalyptus could be reared.'

This tree was introduced to our gardens, where it is an ornamental object, many years ago, and last year I had seeds collected from which about 2,000 seedlings were reared; these have been planted this year in the vicinity of Kennedy Town Hospital.

320

The late Baron Sir F. VON MUELLER had corresponded regularly on botanical subjects and exchanged seeds, &c., with this department for a great number of years, and to him, I believe, I was indebted for the seeds from which our original trees were raised.

24. The exhaustion of soil in nurseries owing to repeated cropping and the removal with the trees of a portion of soil during many years renders it much more difficult than formerly to rear trees for planting, and the rapid absorption of lands, previously under cultivation, for other public works and industries has left very little suitable land available for tree nurseries, so that it is impossible to obtain desirable change of land.

THINNING OF PLANTATIONS.

25. Plantations in 13 localities were thinned by the removal of 23,444 trees. Particulars are given in Appendix E.

PROTECTIVE SERVICE.

26. Illicit tree-cutting greatly increased in the past year, 1,961 trees having been cut. The number of convictions obtained was 59.

This branch of work formed the subject of a special report in C.S.O. No. 254 of 1898 where suggestions were made for action which, it is anticipated, will have the effect of checking the destruction of trees.

FIRES.

27. Grass fires were again less numerous and destructive; there were only 15 fires, and trees were destroyed in only four cases, the total number being 1,185. A list of localities where fires occurred and the number of trees destroyed are furnished in Appendix F.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

Appendix A.

CHARLES FORD, Superintendent,

Botanical and Afforestation Department.

ORCHIDS CULTIVATED IN THE BOTANIC GARDENS.

Those marked * have flowered during the year.

* Acampe multiflora.

Erides affine.

Lawrenciæ.

99

Leeanum.

""

Lobbii.

12

odoratum.

25

"

""

quinquevulnerum.

suavissimum.

testaceum.

Anæctochilus Dawsonianus.

"

Roxburghii.

"

sp.

Ansellia africana. Appendicula bifaria. * Arundina chinensis. *Bletia byacinthina.

Bulbophyllum delitescens.

""

radiatum. siamense.

*

*

Cattleya Leopoldii.

*

Loddigesii Harrisonae. Mendelii.

Mossiae.

"

Trianaei.

"

* Cleisostoma Fordii.

*

""

virginale.

Coelogyne cristata.

fimbriata.

""

*

33

flaccida,

"

lentiginosa.

*

*

pandurata.

Schilleriana.

*

speciosa.

* Cottonia Championii.

* Cymbidium aloifolium.

"

39

**

19

29

"9

sp.

"

sp.

""

sp.

*Calanthe vestita.

"

*

Intea.

"

39

eburneum. elegans. ensifolium. pendulum. sinense.

sp.

sp.

rosea.

* Calathea curculigoides.

"

Veitchii.

veratrifolia.

Cattleya bicolor.

crispa superba. Dowiana.

??

17

aurea.

1)

"

11

Eldorado. Gaskelliana.

"

2

Gigas.

*

labiata.

Lawrensiana.

33

*

";

>>

Cypripedium argus.

Ashburtoniæ.

barbatum O Brieni.

bellatulum.

;

"}

Calypso.

29

Charlesworthii.

ciliolare.

39

..

Cythera.

"

*3

Dayanum. Euryale.

Exul.

་་

Germinyanum.

Godseffianum. Haynaldianum.

ORCHIDS CULTIVATED IN THE BOTANIC GARDENS,---Continued.

Cypripedium Hornianum.

>>

Janthe.

"

Lathamianum.

* Eria rosea.

*

sp.

sp.

}"

19

Lowei.

Leeanum.

Mastersianum.

*

་་

niveum.

51

Orestes.

41

Parishii.

"?

34

་་

philippinense.

purpuratum.

radiosum.

Schroderæ.

Sedeni.

candidulum.

Spicerianum.

**

*

*

*

*

*

sp.

Goodyera procera.

Grammatophyllum Rumphianum. Habenaria linguella.

22

""

"

Miersiana.

militaris. rhodocheila.

Susannæ.

*Hamaria discolor.

Laelia anceps.

autumnalis.

*

22

Dayaua. Perrinii.

>

"

321

31

Stonei.

superciliare.

T. B. Haywood.

villosum.

* Dendrobium aduncum.

var hircoglossum.

aggregatum. albosangineum.

99

"9

"

19

aureum.

*

chrysotoxum.

་་

crassinode.

"

cretaceum.

crumenatum.

13

Dearei.

"

Dalhousieanum.

densiflorum.

Draconis.

Farmerii.

fimbriatum oculatum. Findleyanum.

formosum giganteum.

fuscatum.

hainanense.

Loddigesii.

91

Hillii.

""

*

34

*

luteolum.

"?

Macraei.

55

19

moschatum.

purpurata.

Limatodes gracilis.

Liparis chloroxantha.

*

*

J

nervosa.

"" sp.

* Microstylis congesta.

*

Miltonia Morelliana.

"

sp.

*

Nephelaphyllum cristatum.

*

Odontoglossum cirrhosum.

grande.

Pescatorei.

Oncidium flexuosum.

وو

sphacelatum.

Peristeria elata.

* Phaius albus.

*

*

""

Bensoniæ.

grandifolius.

Marshallianus.

Phalaenopsis amabilis.

leucorrhods.

Phalaenopsis Luddemanniana.

23

var hieroglyphica.

rosea.

"

Schillerana.

""

Stuartiana.

""

sp.

19

**

""

uobile. Palpebrae. Parishii.

Phalaenopsis Schroderiana

Pierardi. plicatile.

primulinum.

secundum.

91

,

superbum.

thyrsiflorum. tortile.

Victoria Regina. virginalis.

* Pholidota chinensis.

imbricata.

Platyclinis sp.

Pogonia Fordii.

* Renanthera bilinguis.

coccinea.

storiei.

Saccolabium curvifolium.

"

J

guttatum. Roxburghii.

* Sarcanthus formosanus.

teretifolius.

vanda densiflora.

"

》་

violaceum.

23

**

>>

sp.

*

sp.

*

sp.

*

sp.

*

sp.

**

sp.

sp.

*1

sp.

#

2

sp.

sp.

* Tainia augustifolia.

Vanda Batemanni.

Boxallii.

sp.

sp.

11

*

densiflora.

**

sp.

Hookeriana.

""

sp.

"

laevigata.

*

"J

*

24

flava.

"

29

pusilla.

* Doritis Wightii. * Eria ambrosa.

convallarioides.

Corneri.

*

Sanderiana.

"

***

25

suavis.

""

teres. tricolor.

"

"

sp.

CHARLES FORD. Superintendent,

Botanical & Afforesttaion Department.

322

Appendix B.

LIST OF FERNS CULTIVATED IN THE BOTANIC GARDENS.

Acrostichum appendiculatum.

Cibotium glaucum.

flagelliferum.

quercifolium.

repandum.

Adiantum æthiopicum.

Bausei.

**

Capillus-veneris.

caudatum.

concinnum.

cuncatum.

*

var. gracillimum.

najus.

cyclosorum.

22

"J

daphnites.

""

diaphanum.

"

Fergusonii.

"

flabellulatum.

formosum.

""

13

hispidulum.

""

Legrandii.

Davallia divaricata.

"

elegans.

fijiensis. var. plumosa. marginalis.

platy phylla. pulcbra. solida.

speluncæ.

tenuifolia.

Didymochloua lunulata.

Gymnogramme calomelanos.

decurrens.

javanica.

Gymnopteris subcrenata.

Lastræa sylvatica.

Lygodium circinatum.

"

japonicum.

scandens.

29

"

"

"

lunulatum.

macrophyllum. peruvianum.

scutum.

tenerum.

var. farleyense.

tetraphyllum. trapeziforme.

Victoriæ.

29

Meniscium simplex.

وو

trifidum.

Mesochlæna polycarpa.

Nephrodium decompositum.

decurrens.

"

""

membranaceum.

molle.

"

""

setigerum. sophoroides.

Nephrolepis biserrata.

Alsophila podophylla.

""

spinulosa.

tomentosa.

Angiopteris evecta.

Aspidium aristatum.

>>

auriculatum.

decurrens, var. major. falcatum.

gracilescens.

laserpitiifolium.

95

membranaceum.

29

podophyllum.

>>

squamulosum.

subtriphyllum.

var.

bulbosa.

Duffi.

exaltata.

Onychium japonicum. Osmunda bipinnata.

javanica.

regalis corymbos.

Platycerium alcicorne.

"

sp.

"

sp.

35

vastum.

sp.

sp.

Asplenium caudatum.

29

>>

""

cuneatum. esculentum. heterocarpum.

lanceum.

maximum.

25

nidus.

*1

Prionitis.

J+

resectum.

"

Wichuræ.

""

Wightianum.

sp.

Blechnum braziliense.

orientale.

Brainea insignis.

Cænopteris Sieboldii.

Polypodium adnascens.

*

"

"

**

39

amœnum.

conjugatum. difforme.

hemionitideum.

longissimum.

nigrescens.

normale.

triphyllum.

sp.

Pteris argyrea.

"

23

biaurita.

crenulata.

cretica, var. albo-lineata. longifolia.

quadriaurita.

semipinnata.

serrulata.

tremula.

Todea harbara.

Woodwardia orientalis.

CHARLES FORD,

Superintendent,

Botanical & Afforestation Department.

+

1.

Appendix C.

RAINFALL OBSERVATIONS MADE AT THE BOTANIC GARDENS, DURING 1897.

RAIN GAUGE 306-8 FEET ABOVE MEAN SEA LEVEL.

323

DATE.

Jan.

Feb. Mar. April. May. June. July. Aug. Sept. Oct.

Nov.

Dec.

2,

3,

4,

5,

6,

7,

8.

9.

10,

:

:

:

:

11,

12.

13.

.14

1.39

.04

.19

.02

14,

15,

16,

.01

.37

.31

:

.06

.07

2.83

.05

.02

:

.28

.18

.07

4.11

.02

.08

.02

.07

.17

.32

:སྐྱ

.12

.50

:

:

:

:

:

:

:.

.63

4.67

:

:

.65

.01

:

.27

:

.12

1.85

.11

.01

.06

1.25

.93

.05

.09

.01

2.71

.65

.12

:

:

:

:

:

1.20

:

:སྐྱ

2.47

.11

=

.19

.06

.03

.01

.17

8.18 4.10

.31

.08

.50

.01

.04

.37

.01

.28

.32

.24

.14

.06

.90

.37

1.89

4.

:

:

:

.07

.16

3.61

.04

.01

.04

.01

.02

:

.06

.01

.23

.01

.01

.96

1.95

:

:

:..

:

:

:

:

:

.14

.26

4.11

.08

:.

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:.

:.

:

:

:

:

.:..

:.

.03

.12

.02

.19

1.35

.69

3.18

.43

.01

.11

.07

1.01

.16

.01

6.22

:

:

.37

.35

.36

3.47

1.04

.09

.64.

.30

.57

.02

.01

:

.21

.19

.01

.02

.20

.31

.01

.03

:

:

.22

.46

.06

3.12

1.22

.01

:

:

:

:

:

.74

.02

:

:

:

:

:

.30

.63

.53

:

:

:

:

.03

1.26

1.97

:

:

:

.18

:

:

:

.18

.74

3.19

37 1.35

:

:

:

.03

.19

.03

.27

.14

:.

.04

.28

.02

.06

:

.01

.04

..

:

:

:

:

5.15

.03

:.

:

3.50

.20

.14

.07

.54

.07

.92

:

:

:

F:

:

.24

.02

:

:.

:

:

:

:

:

.05

:

:

.03

.06

:

:

17,

.05

.05

18,

.11

.01

19,

20,

21,

22,

23,

24,

25,

26,

27.

28.

:

:

29.

:ལྦུ

.02

30,

.07

31,

Total,..... 2.01

1.74

.79

2.87

16.64 26.64

6.79 30.41

6.95

7.20 7.83

.40

Total inches for the year=110.27. Observations made at 10 a.m.

CHARLES FORD,

Superintendent,

Botanical & Afforestation Department.

324

Appendix D.

STATISTICS OF PLANTING OPERATIONS.

Tristanea Cunning- Cain-

LOCALITY.

Pinus Massoni-

Pinus

Thu

conferta.

ana.

bergii.

hamia sinensis.

Eugenia phor. odorata.

Area

Bamboos.

Miscel- laneous.

in Acres.

Grand Total of Trees.

Upper Albert Road,..

Bowen Road,. Bowrington, Garden Road,

Bonham Road,

Mount Kellett,

Pokfoolam,

Richmond Road,

Sookunpo,

Wanchai Gap,

Government Civil Hospital,

Botanic Gardens,

152

20

172

50

42

92

62

522

14

598

180

39

219

12

12

192

192

19/1/0

23,596

6

رف

6

120

120

544

136

136

379

379

10,661

2,857

6,253 3,045 780

544

Total.....

10,661

3,401

6,253 3,045

842

382

1,388

94

20/1/

26,066

CHARLES FORD,

Botanical & Afforestation Department.

Superintendent,

Aberdeen,

Bowen Road,

Little Hongkong,.

Mount Davis,

Mount Kellett,

Pokfoolam,

Richmond Road,.

Sookunpoo,

Tytam Tuk,

Victoria Peak,

Wanchai Gap,

West Point,

Wongneichung,

Appendix E.

SALE OF FORESTRY PRODUCTS.

Localities.

Pine Trees.

Tree Pruning,....

Total Revenue for Forestry Products,......

Quantity.

Amount realized.

cts.

3,515

36.37

2,883

73.38

26

1.50

1,624

45.47

568

10.92

2,832

62.28

1,273

46.16

142

4.20

1

.11

43

5.02

2,690

45.84

545

24.29

7,302

187.14

23,444

542.68

77,544 catties.

31.01

573.69

CHARLES FORD,

Superintendent,

Botanical & Afforestation Department.

T

Date.

Appendix F.

STATISTICS OF GRASS FIRES.

1897.

January

""

1

Tytam Tuk,

Stanley Road,

Tytam Tuk,

""

Ngau Tau Wan,

Wanchai and Aberdeen Road,

Mount Kellett,

""

12

"

Stanley Gap,

March

April

9

Mount Davis,

16

Tytam Tuk,.

5

Kai Lung Wan,

27

99

Sandy Bay,

Sai Wan,

May

1

September 23

December 19

Aplichau, Stanley,

Wong Ma Kok,

Localities.

325

Number of Fires.

Number of Trees destroyed.

1

614

1

528

1

1

15

1

1

1

1

1

1

28

1

1

15

1,185

:

CHARLES FORD,

Superintendent,

Botanical & Afforestation Department.

423

No. 93

33

98

HONGKONG.

REPORT ON THE EPIDEMIC OF BUBONIC PLAGUE IN HONGKONG IN THE YEAR 1898.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor.

To The President

of the SANITARY BOARD.

SANITARY BOARD OFFICES, HONGKONG, 25th August, 1898.

SIR,-I have the honour to submit for the information of His Excellency the Officer Administer- ing the Government the following Report upon the epidemic of Bubonic Fever (Plague) which has occurred during the current year.

The total number of cases reported has been 1,315, of which 75 were among non-Chinese; during the first quarter of the year 213 cases occurred (7 being non-Chinese), during the second quarter there were 1,094 cases (66 of which were among non-Chinese), while during July there were 7 cases (2 being non-Chinese), and during August one case was reported, but this was subsequently consider- ed to have been one of Remittent Fever.

The following is a tabular statement of the non-Chinese cases :-

European,

Portuguese,

Indian,..

Japanese,

Filipinos,

January.

February.

March.

April.

May.

June.

July.

Total.

1

3

1

1

1 8 15

6

∞ co a ∞

2

26

13

...

4

24

10

1 1

2

2

5

27 35

4

2 75

The incidence of the disease upon the two sexes is shown in the following table:-

Chinese cases,..

Non-Chinese cases,.

J Male,......775 Female,...465

J Male,...... 52

Female,... 23(

=1,240

=75

It is interesting to note that among the Chinese the females suffered in a much less proportion during the first quarter of the year than during the second quarter; thus during January-March there were 206 Chinese cases of which 59 were females or 28.6 per cent., while during April-June there were 1,028 Chinese cases of which 383 were females or 37.2 per cent.

The proportion of females in the Chinese population is 29.9 per cent., and I think that the much higher proportion of female cases during the second quarter suggests that many of the earlier cases were imported by males (who are naturally the greater travellers) and that, when the infection had thus become again located in the houses, the women suffered more severely, as would be expected, from the fact that they are more confined to the houses than are the men.

A consideration of the ages of the patients shows that Chinese children suffered very consider- ably, for there were 299 Chinese cases at ages under 15 years, which is equal to more than 24 per cent. of the total cases whereas the proportion of children under that age in the Chinese population is only 18 per cent.

The death-rate among the Chinese was considerably higher than among the non-Chinese, for of the 75 non-Chinese cases 49 died or 65.3 per cent., whereas of the 1,240 Chinese cases 1,111 died or 89.6 per cent.; the determining causes of this higher mortality being, no doubt, inferior physique, less healthy surroundings and lack of the necessary medical treatment of the disease.

424

The City of Victoria is divided into ten Health Districts, and the first of these to be declared infected with Bubonic Fever were Districts 2, 4, 5, and 5, on March 24th; the remaining districts of the City were subsequently declared infected as were also the districts in the Kowloon peninsula, comprising the villages of Yaumati, Taikoktsui, Mongkoktsui and lunghom.

With a view to combating the epidemic the following officers were appointed by His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government, in accordance with bye-law 25 made under section 13 of Ordinance 15 of 1894, to assist the Medical Officer of Health in inspecting and reporting upon dirty or insanitary premises :-

Honourable F. H. MAY, C.M.G., Captain Superintendent of Police;

Mr. FRANK BROWNE, Acting Government Analyst;

Mr. JOSEPH J. BRYAN, Assistant Sanitary Surveyor.

And the following additional staff was placed at our disposal:-

13 European Police Officers.

1 Naval chief petty officer.

24 Sappers and Privates.

16 Chinese Constables.

About 300 coolies.

The various duties performed by these officers and men, in association with the Board's perma- nent staff, were as follows:-

1. Removal of the sick and of dead bodies.

2. Detention of persons who had been in contact with the sick, pending the disinfection

of their clothing.

3. Disinfection of infected clothing.

4. Disinfection of infected premises.

5. Temporary accommodation of persons displaced during the disinfection of infected

premises.

6. House to house visitation, and inspection.

7. House to house cleansing and lime-washing.

8. Disinfection of Public Latrines.

9. Extra flushing of sewers.

(1.) The removal of sick persons and of dead bodies was undertaken by the Inspectors of Nuisances in charge of the several districts, information of the existence of such cases being conveyed to them by messages sent from the Police Stations nearest to their residences; after May 5th, however, it was found-more convenient for these removals to be effected by the Police, and this was arranged accord- ingly.

Ambulances and dead boxes are kept at the Board's matshed shelters at Praya East, Taiping- shan and Praya West, at Hunghom and Yaumati, and also at the Tung Wah Hospital. Patients were taken direct to Kennedy Town Hospital and placed in observation wards there until seen by the Medical Officer in charge, until the Native Plague Hospital was opened on May 2nd, (vide infra) after which date all Chinese patients were taken to the Tung Wah Hospital and there examined by Dr. CHUNG, whence those certified to be suffering from Bubonic Fever were drafted to the Native Hospital, or to the European Hospital, as they desired.

Dead bodies were all taken direct to the Public Mortuary at West Point, and were there examined by the Medical Officer in charge, and such as had died of Bubonic Fever were removed to the Plague Cementery at Kennedy Town under the superintendence of a private of the Royal Engineers, and interred there, chloride of lime or carbolized sawdust being placed in the coffins.

(2.) The detention of persons who had been in contact with the sick, pending the disinfection of their clothing and bedding, was effected by Chinese lukongs obtained from the nearest Police Stations by the Inspector of Nuisances of the district in which the infected premises were situated.

(3.) The Inspector furnished the occupants so detained in their own dwellings with suitable clothing, obtained from one of the aforesaid matshed shelters or from the disinfecting station in High Street, and sent the clothing of the persons so detained in baskets, accompanied by a list of the articles sent, to the disinfecting station in charge of a Chinese or Portuguese foreman, who waited at the station while the clothing was disinfected and then returned with it to the house; the period of deten- tion thus did not exceed some two or three hours.

(4.) This clothing was then returned to the owners who were then required to vacate the house for a few hours while the Inspector disinfected, and

}

.

:

1

7

425

(5.) Cleansed it; during this time they were at liberty to go to the Board's matshed shelters and had occasionally to spend one night there pending the proper disinfection of their premises, but were not detained there, being at liberty to go about their daily avocations. When this cleansing and dis- infection of the premises was complete the people were permitted to return to their houses.

(6.) A house to house visitation, in search of cases of the disease and of dead bodies, was performed by Police and Soldiers under the control of the Captain Superintendent of Police, (vide also Appendix B.), and these search parties succeeded in discovering 106 cases and dead bodies, while another fifteen cases were brought to light by Chinese detectives. A house to house inspection was at the same time made, in the infected districts, by the Medical Officer of Health and the officers especially appointed by the Board with the approval of the Governor, in accordance with Bye-law 25 made under section 13 of Ordinance 15 of 1894 who certified in writing what premises were to be

(7.) Cleansed and lime-washed; and this cleansing was done by gangs of coolies in charge of Police and Soldiers, while the lime-washing was done by contract and had to be done to the satisfaction of the Inspecting Officer.

(8.) The disinfection of the public latrines was effected by means of chloride of lime which was supplied to each latrine by the Board and was used under the direction of the Inspectors of Nuisances.

(9.) The extra flushing of the sewers was arranged by the Director of Public Works and was effected by increasing the frequency of the discharges of the flushing tanks which are placed at the heads of all the main sewers.

The care of the sick was undertaken by the Medical Department, but, in consequence of the difficulty experienced in getting the Chinese to submit to Western treatment, it was decided by the Government to permit the opening of a Native Plague Hospital, under European supervision, and on May 2nd such a hospital was opened at Kennedy Town, within the compound of the Government Infectious Diseases Hospital, and Dr. THOMSON was placed in charge of the sanitary arrangements. This hospital remained open until June 27th, and during that time 224 patients applied for treatment, of whom 209 were suffering from Bubonic Fever; the total number of deaths that occurred there was 173, giving a rate of mortality of 82.8 per cent., as compared with the general rate among the Chinese of 89.6 per cent. which shows, as might be expected, that hospital treatment even by Chinese doctors, under European supervision, produces slightly better results than obtain when the patient is treated by Chinese in his own home. The night-soil from the patients at both Hospitals was burnt, by mingling it with sawdust, sprinkling this with paraffin oil, and placing it on the top of a wood pyre erected on an improvised incinerator within the Hospital compound. The incinerator was of the simplest des- cription, consisting of a couple of parallel walls about 2 feet 6 inches high and 6 feet long, with a grating of iron bars across the top, the ground surface between the walls being concreted.

Owing to the proximity of the mainland of China, a considerable number of sick Chinese escaped daily from the Colony, and made their way to Chinese Kowloon (where a small matshed hospital, free from European control. was established) or to the delta of the Canton river, and thus endangered the future welfare of this Colony by infecting neighbouring rural districts which had hitherto kept free from the disease. With a view to restricting this exodus of infectious persons, the police patrol iu the harbour was increased, and the following regulations were adopted by the Board :-

CONDITIONS SUBJECT TO WHICH PERSONS SUFFERING FROM BUBONIC FEVER WILL BE

PERMITTED TO LEAVE THE COLONY.

Any person suffering from bubonic fever who wishes to leave the Colony may embark between the hours of 6 a.m. and 6 p.m. at a wharf to be erected off the new Reclamation in front of Bonham Strand West subject to the following conditions:-

(1) The patient or his friend shall notify the patient's name and address or addresses at which he has been residing during the last ten days to an officer of the Sanitary Board on duty at the wharf.

(2) The destination to which the patient is to be removed shall be notified to the officer on

duty at the wharf.

(3) The patient or his friends must provide a licensed junk, or licensed boat (the latter to be towed by a launch) in which the patient is to be reinoved, and must furnish the officer on duty with the number of such junk or boat and the name of such steam-launch. (4) No removals will be permitted to places within a radius of 40 miles of the Colony. (5) The junk or boat used for the conveyance of the patient must on its return to the Colony at once proceed to the Water Police Station at Tsim Sha Tsui for disinfection.

426

Very few sick persons, however, availed themselves of this official permission to leave the Colony, but a considerable number were still smuggled away, the object being to get out of the Colony without furnishing the addresses at which they had been residing, and it is this suppression by the Chinese of the addresses of infected premises that has necessitated, in each epidemic, a general house to house cleansing and disinfection. A certain number of dead bodies were removed from the Colony under similar restrictions, but, with regard to these also, smuggling was not uncommon, dead plague bodies being even conveyed to Canton in ordinary boxes as cases of hardware, etc., so as to avoid their

nterment at the Plague Cemetery.

Considerable assistance was rendered to the Board by Mr. H. M. HILLIER, Commissioner of Customs, and the Chinese Officials on the mainland, by furnishing the addresses of fugitives from the Colony who landed in the neighbourhood, thus enabling the Officers of the Board to disinfect the premises whenever there appeared to be any reason to suppose that a case of Bubonic Fever had occurred therein.

I attach a list of the addresses of all cases which occurred in the City of Victoria during 1896 and a parallel list of the addresses of cases which occurred this year, and from these lists it will be seen that in no less than 77 houses out of a total of 599 houses known to have been infected, cases occurred during each of these years. The total number of houses in the city of Victoria is roughly 7,000 (exclusive of Barracks and Police Stations) so that the presumption is that many of these 77 houses had retained the infection of the disease since 1896, and not that they were re-infected afresh this year.

I have already somewhat fully discussed the actiology of the disease in my Annual Report for 1897, but for convenience of reference and to render this report more complete, I append herewith a reprint of the remarks made by me at that time: "This (ie., the occurrence of cases in houses pre- viously infected) appears to me to suggest that the infection of the disease adheres most tenaciously to dwellings which have once become infected, and in view of much of the experimental evidence con- cerning the vitality of the Bubonic Fever bacillus under certain conditions, I am strongly inclined to apply, tentatively, Sanarelli's theory concerning the bacillus of Yellow Fever, namely, that the vitality of the bacillus, outside the living bodies of man and animals, depends largely upon the co-existence of vegetable moulds by which it is nourished, to the infective material of this disease also. It is already well known that a moist atmosphere, defective ventilation, a moderate amount of heat, and the absence of sunlight, are the most favourable conditions for the development of the Bubonic Fever bacillus, while they are also the conditions which encourage the free growth of the vegetable moulds, and it is not unreasonable therefore to surmise that this property of symbiosis, which has also been observed by Metchinkoff in connection with the bacillus of cholera, may have not a little to do with the persistence of the bacillus of Bubonic Fever in damp and ill-ventilated dwellings. This theory may perhaps also serve to throw a side-light upon the origin of the recent epidemic of Bubonic Fever in Bombay and other parts of India, for one of the causes to which the outbreak was freely attributed by scientific authorities on the spot was the consumption of inferior qualities of mouldy grain, which if imported from a district in which the disease is endemic, such as parts of China or North-west India, might well have conveyed the specific bacillus. The following extract from the Indian press bears out this point. In a public lecture in the Sassoon Institute, Bombay, Dr. G. WATERS disposed of the theory that Bubonic Fever had been imported into Bombay from Hongkong by rats in ships. He inclined to the belief that it was not introduced from other ports, but had its origin in the large granaries of the Mandvie quarter of the town.

of the town. The first outbreak was among the granary employés, and rat murrain was first discovered there. Surgeon-Colonel CLEGHORN, who has made a special investigation for the Indian authorities holds the same opinion. It is stated as a curions fact by both doctors that wheat and rice eaters have enjoyed almost complete immunity from the disease, which has been most pre- valent among the millet eaters (Hindoos)-millet being a generic term for various kinds of inferior grain. The grain would probably in such a case be primarily infected by rats suffering from the disease, but such infection would only be retained by the inferior and mouldy grain, the bacilli deposited with the excreta in sound, dry grain being unable to retain their vitality during exportation from the infected to uninfected areas. It is an important fact, in this connection, that many of the historical outbreaks of Bubonic Fever have been associated with a failure of the cereal crops and occa- sionally also with outbreaks of ergotism. It is true that the Asiatic races do not eat their rice and other grain uncooked, but most of the inferior grain is ground into flour, which is made into cakes, and the heat necessary to cook these cakes, which are just browned on the outside, is not sufficient to destroy any bacilli there may be in the flour. I do not wish to suggest, however, that diet is the only, or eveu necessarily the most important factor in the dissemination of this disease, for I am still of the opinion that the atmosphere in the immediate neighbourhood of a patient suffering from the disease, where such patient is confined in a dirty, dark and ill-ventilated dwelling, is infective to very much the same extent as in Typhus Fever, and that when such atmosphere is breathed for any length of time by a healthy individual, the bacilli have every opportunity of gaining access to the lymphatic system of the respiratory tract by inhalation, and of the alimentary tract by swallowing the mucus and saliva of the mouth and pharynx, to which any particulate bodies in the atmosphere would naturally adhere. I certainly cannot subscribe, however, for the reasons given in my Annual Report for 1895, to the

""

4

?

1

:

i

}

427

}

#

theory which has been so freely canvassed in connection with the outbreak of this disease in Bombay, that infection is contracted, in the great majority of the cases, by inoculation through small abrasions of the skin. These reasons were that the inguinal and femoral buboes have been found to occur just as frequently among the European cases of the disease, who are carefully shod as among the natives who habitually go barefooted; the Europeans employed in house to house visitation and cleansing work during the Plagne epidemics in this Colony of 1894 and 1896, who contracted the disease, all had femoral or inguinal buboes, although it can hardly be denied that their bare hands and arms were, by the nature of the work in which they were employed, far more exposed to any infection by inocu- lation than were their feet and legs; secondly, that only in very rare cases is there any evidence of a wound, of any local inflammation, or of lymphangitis, although in cases of experimental inoculation of animals these latter have always occurred, except (it is said) in a few cases in which a pure culture of the bacillus has been used, and in view of the fact that pus, blood, sputum and intestinal excreta are the natural media of transmission of the disease, it would be unreasonable to suppose, as is necessary to render this theory of infection by inoculation tenable, that contact of the supposed wound with a pure culture, is in the human subject the almost invariable rule. Another objection to this theory is that none of the diseases which are unquestionably transmitted by inoculation (e.g., rabies, tetanus, charbon, etc.) have hitherto been known to occur in widespread epidemics, and the theory therefore commits us to an entirely new phase in the aetiology of the communicable diseases, and one which certainly ought therefore to be fully substantiated by facts before its advocates can expect it to ineet with general acceptance.

It is difficult, I admit, to explain, with any other theory, why the inguinal and femoral glands should be so frequently the first to betray the disease, but I must confess that I still adhere to the explanation of this fact given by me in my Annual Report for 18 95, namely, that the disease is essen- tially one of the lymphatic system generally, and that, as can be seen at any post-mortem examination, most of lymphatic glands of the body are in a more or less inflamed and irritable condition, while the special enlargement of any particular group of superficial glands (which does not by any means always occur) is due to purely accidental circumstances, such as by the carrying of heavy weights upon one's shoulder (as is invariably done by Asiatics) during the initial period of the disease, great strain being thus thrown upon one leg, by climbing up and down narrow flights of stairs as was done by the Europeans employed in house to house visitation and cleansing (most of the arduous manual labour was performed by coolies acting under the direction of these Europeans) or in fact by any of the ordinary daily avocations of life which happen to be of a laborious nature.

Murchison's opinion, although not perhaps scientifically accurate in the light of modern bacterio- logical research, yet indicates the close resemblance of Typhus Fever and Bubonic Fever, for he wrote: Plague is perhaps the Typhus of warm climates, the two diseases being generated from similar causes and differing only in intensity from the effects of climate and other collateral circumstances."

66

The marked recurrence of cases in houses previously infected, even after an interval of more than twelve months, has convinced me that only the most thorough disinfection, and even in some cases the removal of all existing unsound woodwork, will era licate the disease from an infected dwelling, and I have decided to abolish the processes of disinfection by burning sulphur and by washing the floors with some coal tar preparation, which have hitherto been in vogue in this Colony, and to adopt the system of disinfection, which has proved so successful in Paris, of spraying floors, walls, etc. with a 1 in 1,000 solution of Perchloride of Mercury; the rooms will subsequently be exposed as far as it is practicable in the ill-ventilated and mostly back to back dwellings in which these cases occur, to a free current of air by opening all doors, windows and ventilators as fully as possible, and keeping the premises unoccupied for a few days. There is, however, but one course for the Government to adopt, if this Colony is to be kept free from this and other filth diseases, and that is the absolute prohibition of back to back houses, and the compulsory provision of an adequate amount of light and ventilation in all the Chinese dwellings in the Colony.'

""

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your obedient Servant,

FRANCIS W. CLARK,

Medical Officer of Health.

A

428

Appendix A.

Addresses of all Cases of Bubonic Fever which were reported as occurring in the City of Victoria during the

Street.

1896.

Years 1896 and 1898.

House No.

No. of Cases.

Street.

1898.

No. of

House No.

Cases.

No. 1 Health District.

Bowrington Canal,...

Coffee Plantation,

1

No. 1 Health District.

Blacksmith's Lane,

2

1

3

""

>>

""

Ewo Street,

""

*"

Hill-side,

Jardine's Bazaar,

28

1

41

1

1

Ewo Street,

1

Fuk Hing Lane,

6

Caroline Hill,

East Point Hill,

(Hon. Bell-Irving's Stables),

Great George Street,

Irving Street,

121 10

2

5

25

2

12

2

25

1

2

1

...

16

13

1

""

>"

"

42

1

15

1

""

""

""

44

1

31

1

99

""

56

1

38

1

""

"

""

""

62

2

Jardine's Bazaar,

5

1

""

70

1

21

1

""

""

""

29

1

37

1

>>

>>

""

33

1

51

1

35

1

60

1

""

>>

""

49

1

1

""

>>

3

Keswick Street,

14

2

>>

Lamont's Lane,

1

1

Lamont's Lane, Leighton Hill Road,

Morrison Hill Road,

1

Leighton Hill Road,

1

...

1

No. 2, Police Station,..

2

2

14

22

2

Praya East,

70

1

122

""

""

"

""

1

161

1

"

""

""

Matshed, Wanchai,

Praya East,

"9

1

""

""

91

1

Quarry Bay Road,

2

...

97

1

Royal Naval Hospital,.

1

>>

"

""

115

1

Russell Street,

...

Race Course, Wanchai Road,

Tung Lo Wan,

2

1

.

3

Valley Road,

1

5

1

Wanchai Road,

11

1

...

>>

,,

19

1

13

1

""

"3

"

"

69

1

25

1

"

A

17

"}

""

33

1

*

69

""

"J

"}

"}

43

2

71

1

""

99

65

1

131

1

وو

""

119

Ι

"}

Chapel,

1

""

Wild Dell Buildings,

1

...

""

School,

Wong Nei Chong,

50

Wong Nei Chong,

Wong Nei Chong Road,

1

Village,

Yee Wo Street,

::::

2

1

(

26

1

2

47

54

No. 2 Health District.

Albany Street,

No. 2 Health District.

·

14

1

...

Albany Street,...

3

1

16

1.

6

1

}

""

""

20

1

7

"

""

""

22

1

8

1

""

29

""

26

2

9

1

"

">

23

3

25

1

18

1

""

""

""

17

27

1

*

19

1

>>

"

""

19

1

1

""

""

""

""

2

......

*Amoy Lane,

2

1

""

*Amoy Lane,

2

1

11

1

"}

"

1

1

16

1

""

""

""

""

>>

>>

22

15

1

1

**

99

18

1

Arsenal Street,

1

Commissariat Lane,

Convent, French,

*Cross Street,

1

Blue Buildings,

4

3

Cross Lane,

1

2

...

وو

* Street,

7

1

7

8

*

"}

"}

""

"

"

""

4

26

2221

16

1

>>

20

1

...

""

*

4

2

""

21

1

77

Carried forward,

26

Carried forward,

23

Street.

Addresses of all Cases of Bubonic Fever, &c.,-Continued.

House No.

No. of Cases.

Street.

429

House No.

No. of Cases.

1896.

1898.

No. 2 Health District,—Contd.

Brought forward,

No. 2 Health District,~Contd.

26

Brought forward,

23

*

Fletcher Street,...

""

23

"7

>>

1

*Cross Street,

26

1

7

31

1

وو

""

9

Fletcher Street,

30

1

35

32

1

10

19

""

*

19

35

1

11

Garden Road, (Dairy Farm),

1

""

""

17

1

Hau Fung Lane,

2

A

19

Ι

Hill-side,

1

3"

""

""

""

21

1

Holy Infant Lane,

1

22

1

""

Kennedy Road, (Laundry),

2

23

1

10

""

""

19

28

1

...

Street,

2

1

""

""

*

31

20

1

27

""

39

2

*King Sing Street,

11

1

وو

"

"2

Garden Road,

Hau Fung Lane,

""

Ι

Lung On Lane,

1

1

8

1

McGregor Barracks,

2

7

1

Street,

27

Hill-side,

3

""

""

Kennedy Road, ...

4

*Murray Barracks,

""

Street,

14

1

Naval Yard,

:མ་::

21

1

34

1

7

1

King Sing Street,

5

1

Nullah Lane,

17

1

...

*

11

1

18

2

""

""

>>

"2

Lung On Street...

.2

26

1

"

"}

*Murray Barracks,

4

27

1

";

"

Nullah Lane,......

1

40

1

})

"

6

1

41

1

"

12

8

1

*

£5

1

"

""

""

12

1

1

""

""

"2

16

*

"

""

13

2

22

**

21

1

"}

}}

A

23

1

"J

>>

""

Praya East,

33

35

"

"

""

"

43

""

}}

22

"1

!

45

1

""

""

""

""

47

1

""

22

19

49

1

19

""

53

1

""

"

"J

Queen's Road East,

""

65

I

*

"}

"J

"

""

3 ::N;

1

3

3

1

1

1

1

5

1

1

1

4

71

""

"

"}

""

"2

(Temple),

1

106

1 1

"}

وو

Praya East,

20

1

112

1

>>

"}

118

1

""

""

Queen's Road East,

124

1.

27.

>>

80

148

Ι

دو

""

"}

""

84

2

151

2

22

"

""

>>

86

*

153

1

""

>>

""

114

154

1

"

""

""

*

116

*

161

1

"

""

>>

""

126

1

164

2

"

}}

"

27

171

1

"

"

>>

47

1

177

2

25

""

8.5

3

180

1

""

22

""

121

1

203

1

>>

37

""

""

143

1

213

1

25

95

"}

""

151

1

223

1

>>

27

""

""

*

153

5

225

1

"2

22

"?

""

157

1

261

1

""

""

>>

27

159

1

265

1

"

""

*

"

༦༤--

""

161

1

6

"

""

""

229

1

Rock Lane,

2

1

""

237

1

Shan Ping Lane,

2

""

""

259

1

1

27

"

,,

"

3

Ship Street,..

7

1

"

Rock Lane, Ship Street,

2

1

*

11

1

"

"

*

2

21

1

....

">

26

32

1

""

23

""

>>

73

""

""

"

*****

""

""

3

1

6

"

""

11

1

Sow Wali Fong,

10

15

14

1

......

>>

""

Carried forward,

133

Carried forward,

134

430

Street.

1896.

Addresses of all Cases of Bubonic Fever, &c.,—Continued.

House No.

No. of Cases.

Street.

House No.

No. of Cases.

No. 2 Health District,-Contd.

*Ship Street,

25

Shek Kai Lane,...

دو

25

Brought forward,

Spring Garden's Lane, Swatow Lane,

"

27

>>

*

27

">

""

14

Tai Wo Street, Tai Wong Street,

""

10

دو

13

وو

""

""

"2

15

""

""

*Tik Lung Lane,

**

">

Tsu Lung Lane, *Ui Hing Lane,.......

دو

2:24:46:00 17:26+

133

21

1.

4

St. Francis Convent,

1

Swatow Lane,.......

No. 2 Health District,--Contd.

1898.

Brought forward,

Spring Garden Lane,

1

NAN:

2

4

>>

>>

>>

Tai Wo Street,

...

وار

"

1

""

1

وو

1

9

2

Tai Wong Street, Tik Lung Lane,

134

2

:23

6

12

13

14

117

2

16

1

3

2

6

1

2:

12

1

...

2

2

1

1

*

>>

2

1

"}

1

4

1

""

1

6

1

"

1

1

"

Triangle Street,

99

15

1

54

1

1

Tsing Kai Lane,

1

}

1

Tsui In Lane,

1

1

1

""

""

20

1

Ui Hing Lane,...

2

1

9

"

1

8

1

""

""

وو

13

1

12

1

>>

27

12

15

1

14

1

""

""

""

27

*

*

1

20

1

27

99

29

1

28

1

""

""

22

**

31

31

1

22

""

1

27

Wanchai Road,

24

1

*Wanchai Road,

26

1

*

26

1

"

32

1

36

2

27

""

>"

34

1

64

1

"3

""

"

>>

52

1

1

>>

""

27

58

2

>>

"3

66

1

"

""

*Wellington Barracks,

Wing Fung Lane East,

1

2

1

***

3

""

27

""

""

West,

5

1

*Wellington Barracks

2

Wing Fung Street,

17

1

Wing Fung Street,

10

20

1

>>

""

9

Ι

24

2

""

""

""

>>

15

26

1

وو

""

""

>>

Wing Fung Lane West,

""

""

2

44

1

12

;"

10

48

1

77

*

27

"7

...

5

1

4

"

""

191

191

No. 3 Health District.

No. 3 Health District.

Beaconsfield Arcade,

Castle Road,

Caine Road,

1

7

1

Bowen Road,

+

21

1

Caine Road,.

""

Cathedral Compound,

*Glenealy,

*Hongkong Hotel,

*Hongkong & Shanghai Bank,

*Italian Convent,

1

Duddell Street,

>>

1

*Glenealy,

1

2

*Hongkong Hotel,

*Hongkong & Shanghai Bank,

1

;

3

4

5

1

1

1

1

Ice House Lane,

1

3

*Italian Convent

1

Kai Un Lane,

Lower Albert Road,

Mosque Terrace,

Mosque Street, ...

1

1

Lower Castle Road,

1

Ι

1

22

Mosque Terrace,...

4

1

1

Mosque Junction,

43

1

1

45

1

""

>>

Matsheds,

2

Mosque Street,..

2

1

19

1

""

"2

37

2

""

""

43

1

""

"

Nethersole Hospital,

Peddar's Street,

Praya Central,...

27

Reclamation (Kien On Mat-

shed),...

1

2

1

Carried forward,

17

Carried forward,

1

26

+

1

:

Addresses of all Cases of Bubonic Fever, &c.,-Continued.

431

Street.

House No.

No. of Cases.

Street.

House No.

No. of Cases.

1896.

1898.

No. 3 Health District,—Contd.

No. 3 Health District,--Contd.

Brought forward,

17

Brought forward,

26

Queen's Road Central,

10

1

Praya Reclamation,

Ι

16

1

Queen's Road Central,

5

1

>>

22

""

"

>>

29

27

""

17

1

17a

1

""

**

21

1

19

1

27

"

24

1

Rednaxella Terrace,

6

1

Seymour Terrace,

6

2

Robinson Road, (Mr. Lemm's

Upper Albert Road,

1

House),

1

Robinson Road,

1

St. Paul's College Pathway,

1

West Terrace,

2

1

West Terrace,...

1

1

Woodland Terrace,

1

2

2

2

""

""

Villa East,..

"

Zetland Street,...

26

41

No. 4 Health District.

*Chinese Street,

No. 4 Health District.

11

2

Arbuthnot Road,

14

1

20

I

Caine Road,......

7

1

"}

97

*Central Police Station,

*Cheuk On Lane,

1

>>

"Kingsclere,"

21

1

3

2

Chuk Hing Lane,

Cochrane Street,

1

32

1

*Central Police Station,...

Central Market (Fish Stall No. 134), Chinese Street,

3

1

9

1

34

1

11

2

29

""

"J

"

39

1

13

1

""

"?

""

"

D'Aguilar Street,

34

1

Chuk Hing Lane,

1

1

37

1

Chuk On Lane,

1

1

">

"

40

1

*

3

1

22

""

""

>>

1

Cochrane Street,

29

1

""

Ezra Lane,

2

1

D'Aguilar Street,

24

2

3

1

38

1

??

92

دو

6

1

52

1

>>

>>

7

1

Elgin Street,

18

1

"

Elgin Street,

""

Gage Street,

Graham Street,

Gutzlaff Street,...

"

9

1

48

I

""

да

19

1

50

1

"2

2

""

Gage Street,

5

1

7

1

9

1

27

2

11

I

وو

54

1

12

1

"

8

1

Graham Street,

23

I

1

43

1

""

*Hing Lung Street, Hollywood Road,

Gutzlaff Street,

*

""

>>

"}

""

*Jubilee Street,..

Li Yuen Street East,

13

*

25

"}

">

"1

12

Street West,

""

19

>>

""

""

Lok Hing Lane,

Lyndhurst Terrace,

""

""

Old Bailey Street, *Pottinger Street,

>>

""

10

13

77

"

27

>>

27

37

Peel Street,

"

""

>>

Praya Central,

""

22

""

**

Queen's Road Central,

""

Carried forward,

88; 25; 85: 9550i aõnн -+5; öğ

19a

1

*Hing Lung Street,

196

1

Hollywood Road,

""

1

8

"}

12

1

27

1

13

1

22

2

18

1

""

"

1

*

196

1

......

""

1

21

1

"}

>>

1

25

Ι

دو

""

1

26

1

""

""

1

46

1

""

""

65

1

22

""

1

2

22

""

1

*Jubilee Street,

13

1

1

14

1

97

1

15

1

27

11

1

"J

""

1

Ku Yau Lane,......

1

1

1

Li Yuen Street East,

1

1

1

1

""

>>

""

1

2

""

"}

""

1

12

1

""

??

""

5

*

25

1

}}

"J

>>

1

""

>>

West,.

8

1

1

11

1

>>

"J

>>

63

Carried forward,

57

432

Street.

Addresses of all Cases of Bubonic Fever, &c.,—Continued.

House No.

No. of Cases.

Street.

House No.

No. of Cases.

1896.

No. 4 Health District,-Contd.

Brought forward,

1898.

No. 4 Health District,-Contd.

63

Brought forward,

57

Queen's Road Central,

2

Pottinger Lane,

3

1

Shelley Street,

"

Street,

11

1

رو

*

""

>>

"

,,

"

1

13

1

""

1

35

1

وو

8

2

43

3

Stanley Street,

11

2

"

22

16

2

Praya Central,...

21

1

""

>>

31

1

39

2

""

>>

""

33

1

>>

(Marine Club),

1

""

36

1

2

"}

"

39

1

Queen's Road Central,

36

1

>>

47

1

37

1

""

"}

};

62

1

45

1

"}

27

84

1

46

2

""

>"

86

1

70

1

">

"3

4

1

"2

""

"

">

Staunton Street,

1

1

4

*Shelley Street,

}}

4

1

10

1

دو

*Tit Hong Lane,

1

Stanley Street,...

5

2

Tung Tak Lane,

1

7

1

""

""

*Victoria Gaol, Wellington Street,

1

14

1

"

"

1

1

21

1

""

""

5

1

24

1

""

33

70

1

**

36

1

"

""

103

1

50

1

17

17

"}

"2

15

1

54

1

"7

17

""

38

1

1

""

"

دو

37

44

4

Staunton Street,

1

"

25

46

1

*Tit Hong Lane,

9

4

>>

62

Tung Tak Lane,

""

""

64

*Victoria Gaol,

"

""

67

Wai San Lane,

2

1

"

""

68

1

5

1

.

""

""

74

1

"

27

22

Tak Lane,

1

1

76

1

2

""

""

80

1

3

1

""

>>

"

91

1

Wellington Street,

14

1

"

""

94

1

41

2

79

"

17

3

58a

1

>>

"

""

39

Wai Tak Lane,

""

Wai San Lane,

Wo On Lane,................

"}

وو

272

1

586

1

"}

""

I

*

70

1

"

>>

5

1

**

103

1

}}

"

2

105

1

19

33

8

1

2

""

27

29

9

1

• S

Wing Wah Lane,

9

1

12

1

*Wo On Lane,.......

8

1

>"

Wyndham Street,

"

*Yan Shau Lane,

31

1

Wyndham Street,

18

1

65

1

59

1

""

"

1

1

73

1

""

27

I

+

""

*Yan Shau Lane,

1

1

3

1

>

**

5

1

"

>>

130

124

No. 5 Health District.

No. 5 Health District.

Alice Memorial Hospital,.......

Aberdeen Street,

5

2

Alveston Terrace,

1

1

16

1

""

Aberdeen Street,

12

1

30

1

""

*

36

1

36

4

RAAA

27

17

2

37

1

"

27

22

26

39

""

37

"

38.

1

51

1

A

>>

""

19

44

55

1

,

""

""

29

57

2

*

57

4

""

>"

"

45

59

1

+ 0.0 0.4,0

"J

ARR

""

47

1

4

"}

97

>>

:

2 Chun Hing Lane,

3

""

Carried forward,

16

Carried forward,

24

Street.

Addresses of all Cases of Bubanic Fever, &c,—Continued.

House No.

No. of Cases.

Street.

433

House No.

No. of Cases.

}

1896.

No. 5 Health District,—Contd.

Caine Road, Gage Street,

1898.

No. 5 Health District,-Contd.

Brought forward,

16

Brought forward,

24

1

Chung Wo Lanc,

6

1

15

1

10

1

17

1

13

2

>>

"}

"

21

1

""

30

1

وو

22

George's Lane,

Gilman Street,

6.

1

""

""

Elgin Street,

27

27

>>

19

1

6

1

17

1

1

1

...

Gage Street,

32

1

:

"

""

5

1

George's Lane,...

2

1

44

1

7

1

"

"

*

"

Gilman's Bazaar,

Gough Steeet,

"

>>

Graham Street, .

3

1

Gilman's Bazaar,

10

1

31

1

15

1

""

20

1

35

1

""

"ን

32

1

36

1

""

""

1

9

1

Gilman Street,... Gough Street,

24

30

17

1

*

32

I

23

>>

17

...

27

33

1

33

""

""

39

1

36

1

22

Hollywood Road (Totsai Chapel),

57

1

1

""

Hollywood Road,

""

67

72

1

وو

Hong Ning Lane,

5

1.

48

1

""

""

I Ou Lane,

4

1

I On Lane,

2

""

""

*Kau U Fong,

"

8

1

3

2

15

1

6

1

2

1

""

"

""

*Mee Lun Lane,...

6

1

1

""

***

""

8

1

Kau U Fong,

1

7

1

2

"

33

""

""

11

1

**

1

""

""

دو

"

Man Hing Lane,

""

1

1

10

1

"}

2

1

3

1

""

""

22

On Wo Lane,..........

3

1

29

Praya Central,

""

""

Pak Tsz Lane,

""

*Peel Street,

52

1

*Mee Lun Lane,

*

On Wo Lane,

Peel Street,

6

1

1

""

4

1

1

3

*

3

1

""

1

3

""

37

1

14

1

""

>>

3

1

21

1

"

11

1

25

2

""

"

""

19

23

1

51

1

""

""

"

1

Praya Central,...

5

"

29

Queen's Road Central,

159

1

Queen's Road Central,

3

Sam Ka Lane,

3

1

*Shin Hing Lane,

4

*Shin Hing Lane,

2

9

1

"3

""

1

Staunton Street,

39

1

""

وو

Shing Wong Street,

41

1

27

"

Staunton Street,...

22

45

1

+99

"2

Synagogue

23

1

48

1

:99

35

1

1

وو

*:

"}

""

"

43

1

Tung Man Lane,

13

1

1

39

Ι

>>

Tung Man Lane,

5

1

Tung Shing Lane,

1

1

17

1

4

2

"}

9.3

""

""

18

1

1

27

""

"}

"

22

1

Tung Wa Lane,

1

""

"

23

1

Wa On Lane,

1

...

""

"

24

1

1

"

""

33

>>

Tung Shing Lane,

9

1

1

""

""

Tung Wah Lane,

1

Wellington Street,

113

1

Un Woo Lane,

2

1

123

1

"}

·29

Wellington Street,

117

1

124

1

>>

22.

186

1

128

1

>>

>>

""

"2

Wing Kat Lane,

9

1

180

1

""

""

Wing On Lane,...

1

192

I

""

""

6

1

Wing On Lane,

4

1

""

38

1

24

1

وو

">

43

1

Yan Wo Lane,...

1

1

""

""

44

2

""

""

45

+

77

90

106

}

434

Street.

Addresses of all Cases of Bubonic Fever, &c.,--Continued.

House No.

No. of Cases.

Street.

House No.

No. of Cases.

1896.

No. 6 Health District.

1898.

No. 6 Health District.

Boulam Strand,

Bridges Street,

"

>>

147

28

2

27

....

66

112—

Bridges Street,...

4

1

13

1

وو

27

22

A

27

24

2

27

26

1

"?

54

1

"

62

1

>>

*

66

1

""

27

Circular Pathway,

10

1

18

1

""

""

Circular Pathway,

>7

23

1

>>

""

""

""

:738

7

1

15

3

30

1

25

1

1

""

""

27

1

>>

""

Hillier Street, ...

وو

41

1

3

""

Hollywood Road,

88

1

Hollywood Road,

110

1

91

I

"

""

117

2

111

1

"

""

"

""

*

121

I

114

1

"

27

131

1

115

2

">

""

""

147

1

117

1

- 99

وو

دو

""

157

*

121

"}

"

21

124

1

"

137

1

"}

>>

152

1

201

Jervois Street,

I

27

>>

""

Jervois Street,.......

1

11

1

Kwai Wa Lane,...

1

Kwong Yuen Street, East,

1

Kwai Wa Lane,

Kwong Yuen Street, East,

1

4

1

Lower Lascar Row,

7

1

""

West,

6

1

11

1

7

1

11

97

""

""

"

17

1

10

1

وز

""

"

""

Man Wa Lane,

1

Ladder Street,...

10

1

Mercer Street,

15

1

4

"2

??

Praya Central,

114

1

Lower Lascar Row,

10

1

Ping On Lane,.......

3

1

5

1

"2

Praya Central,..

90

1

7

12

Queen's Road Central,

294

1

Queen's Road Central,.

197

1

Shing Wong Street,

4

1

4

""

"

Square Street,

5

1

27

Square Street,...

""

13

1

1

Tsui On Lane,.......

6

1

Ulling Lane,

1

Upper Lascar Row,

Wai Yau Lane, .......

Wing Lok Street,

Wing Wo Street,

""

**:2:

13

1

Un On Lane,

1

1

3

I

Upper Ladder Street,

7

1

1

Upper Lascar Row,

1

ř

10

1

Wah Hing Lane,

2

1

1

Wing Lok Street,

1

36

73

No. 7 Health District.

No. 7 Health District.

Cheung Hing Street,

1

1

2

1

"

""

3

1

""

*Cleverly Street,

East Street,

la

1

*Cleverly Street,

la

1

3

1

7

1

"3

""

4

1

East Street,...

8a

1

""

""

"7

>>

>>

""

""

6

1

14

* *

"

"

16

1

*

45

L

*

35

1

-

""

"}

*

دو

39

1

Hollywood Road,

186

"

77

45

1

190

1

*

48

1

""

32

Hollywood Road,

186

ARA

"

192

1

201

1

""

Carried forward,

10

Carried forward,

13

Street.

Addresses of all Cases of Bubonic Fever, &c.,—Continued.

House No.

No. of Cases.

Street.

House No.

435

No. of Cases.

1896.

1898.

No. 7 Health District,-Contd.

Brought forward,

No. 7 Health District,--Contd.

10

Brought forward,

13

Hollywood Road,

205

1

4

77

Ladder Street, ...

10

1

Lower Lascar Row,

20

1

Lower Lascar Row,

17

1

50

1

21

1

"7

"}

"2

"

2

4

22

"2

22

*Lower Rutter Street,

3

1

*Lower Rutter Street,...

3

1

*

5

1

*

5

1

""

>>

1

11

35

3)

Morrison Street,

""

3

1

12

1

>>

وو

1

1

Pó Léung Kuk..........

1

New Street,

13

1

No. 8 Police Station,

Possession Street,

1

Pound Lane,

1

Pound Lane,

6

I

Queen's Road Central,

314

1

3

">

""

Taipingshan Street,

7

I

Queen's Road Central,

308

1

Tank Lane,

Taipingshan,

Upper Lascar Row,

·

Taipingshan Street,

1

1

29

Kwong Fuk

2

1

Chi Temple,

1

28

1

Taipingshan,

2

""

>>

""

""

>>

>>

29

1

Tank Lane,

9

2

30

1

Tung Loi Lane,

21

1

>>

Upper Rutter Street,

27

1

1

27

4

"

27

وو

1

Upper Rutter Street,

Upper Station Street,....

I

1

""

23

2

1

27

""

9

1

6

2

""

"

>>

""

10

2

10

1

""

22

37

Upper Station Street,

22

1

U Yam Lane,

3

1

1

2

>>

""

Wah Lane,

3

Ι

31

">

West Street,

295

""

24

1

50

1

""

""

"?

""

"

"

West Street,

4

10

1

13

27

45

64

No. & Health District.

Berlin Foundling Mission...

No. 8 Health District.,

1

Connaught Road,

Eastern Street,

38

1

Fat Hing Street,

::

40

1

Government Civil Hospital,

7

23

""

Heung Lane,...

Hollywood Road,

2

1

Heung Lane,

16

1

2

Hollywood Road,

228

1

224

1

232

1

27

246

1

1

22

""

وو

1

""

Li Sing Street,

9

1

Hospital Road,

New Street,

1

11

2

29

"

5

1

13

1

15

2

New Street,..

11

1

""

>>

""

""

""

27

"

16

1

12

2

22

27

1

13

2

""

"3

30

وو

Possession Street,

1

Po Yan Street,

8

1

Po Yan Street,

6

1

*

5

Praya West.

113

Praya West,

44

1

6

95

1

""

""

""

""

Queen's Street,

**

1

113

1

"

""

Queen's Road West,

27

1

137

1

25

""

79

2

8

""

22

"2

22

*

106

Ι

Queen's Road West,

14

1

»

110

1

45

1

دو

22

""

A

"

"}

25

""

>>

>>

""

202

I

55

1

""

""

203

2

58

1

25

""

209

1

106

>>

5

129

1

""

""

Carried forward,

44

Carried forward,

60

436

Street.

Addresses of all Cases of Bubonic Fever, &c.,—Continued.

House No.

No. of Cases.

Street.

House No.

No. of Cases.

1896.

No. 8 Health District,-Contd.

Tsung Sau Lane, East,......

1898.

No. 8 Health District,- Contd.

Brought forward,

44.

Brought forward,

60

9

1

Queen's Road West,

137

1

1

138

1

"

""

"?

""

West,.

27

""

"

>>

"7

15

19

N69:

""

2

170

1

""

>>

1

171

1

23

""

2

1

173

1

22

}"

177

1

"?

194

1

"}

""

198

2

29

""

208

1

""

27

5

>>

*

""

Sai Woo Lane,...

""

""

Shiu Cheung Lane,

Sutherland Street,

""

Tsung Sau Lane, East,

Tsz Mi Alley

""

2

1

23

1

...

1

1

8

1

""

13

1

وو

West,...

1

1

1

""

16

1

""

"

18

1

""

""

Tung Wah Hospital,

2

Wilmer Street,...

1

Wing Lok Street,

127

1

Wo Fung Street,

1

:

Wo Fung Street,

1

51

92

No. 9 Health District.

Centre Street,

*

""

""

""

Eastern Street, First Street,

...

No. 9 Health District.

2

22

5

...

1 2 2 CO 1

Algar Court,

Centre Street,

2

12

2

14

1

27

"

3

22

1

"

1

36

1

22

""

24

1

3

>>

>>

>>

40

2

AAA

54

1

Des Voeux Road,

First Street,..............

2

7

1

75

1

10

2

""

""

""

88

1

11

1

""

99

""

"

92

1

15

1

""

""

AAAAAAR

""

99

1

25

1

"}

>>

104

1

39

1

""

""

**

>>

107

1

46

"J

"

"

>>

112

1

48

"

""

117

Ι

55

""

"}

"

121

69

"}

"

#

115

1

76

""

""

"

127

83

2 1

13

""

""

Fuk Sau Lane,

1

86

1

""

*

6

1

95

1

22

"}

"

"}

7

1

97

1

>>

>>

27

High Street,

7

1

98

1

""

"

17

1

103

1

22

23

"

32

22

1

110

1

""

""

"

""

26

1

115

1

""

""

"J

37

I

116

2

""

35

>>

49

1

119

2

""

""

""

53

1

125

1

"}

,,

19

""

55

}

3

""

>>

22

""

87

1

Fuk Luk Lane,

2

1

">

"}

1

9

1

>>

""

39

Ki Ling Lane,

Leung I Fong, Lunatic Asylum, On Wai Lane, Praya West,

...

1

10

1

10

1

Fuk Sau Lane,

3

Ι

I

*

6

1

33

"

1

2

Fuk Shing Lane,

1

176

1

High Street,....

12

1

184

1

59

1

""

>>

>>

Pokfulam Road,

14

1

"

""

Carried forward,

46

Carried forward,

54

Street.

Addresses of all Cases of Bubonic Fever, &c.,-Continued.

House No.

No. of Cases.

1896.

No. 9 Health District,-Contd.

Brought forward,

46

Pokfulam Road,...

16

Street.

1898.

437

House No.

No. of Cases.

No. 9 Health District,-Contd.

Ki Ling Lane,... Kung Shun Lane, On Wai Lane,....... Pokfulam Road,

""

""

Brought forward,

7426

51

1

1

1

1

1

24

1

2

25

Praya West,

1

Queen's Road West,

227

1

Queen's Road West,

208

1

250

1

246

1

""

""

"?

>>

266

1

258

1

"

""

22

"

302

278

1

"}

""

22

""

305

1

298

1

>>

"

""

317

Ι

301

i

""

328

Ι

322

2

""

12

330

1

342

""

1

345

1

>>

29

No. 7 Police

S

No. 7 Poliee

27

""

"7

""

Station,..

Sai Yuen Lane,........

358

1

Station,..

358

1

1

1

Queen's Road West,

363

1

*

7

1

2

>>

22

""

14

1

29

Sai Yuen Laue,

13

...

15

14

""

"2

""

"J

26

1

1

">

"

Second Street,

6

1

Second Street,...

18

1

1

53

1

""

""

};

25

***

55

2

>>

52

*

61

1

37

"J

""

*

55

63

1

>>

>>

12

*

61

69

1

"}

"

>>

62

71

1

"

""

"2

68

1

72

1

11.

""

"

"

76

73

"}

29

12

وو

78

1

80

"}

"

...

1

""

>>

96

91

1

">

""

"}

"

117

1

...

93

2

""

">

""

>>

121

101

2

"3

"}

""

""

...

103

1

""

"

105

1

>>

""

111

1

""

,,

112

1

·

27

"

115

2

116

1

27

Sheung Fung Lane,

***

22

17

>>

""

Shing Hing Lane

"1

""

Third Street,......

"

""

2012"

*Sheung Fung Lane,

6

1

6

1.

10

1

>>

>>

1

16

1

17

21

1

3

27

""

3

1

Sheung Hing Lane,

12

1

16

1

Shing Hing Alley,

2

8

Third Street,

9

1

11

17

3

""

""

""

"

17

2

21

1

"1

""

"}

32

45

I

"

""

""

29

......

36

1

67

2

"}

44

1

63

1

"

22

}}

51

1

94

1

"}

"}

""

65

1

100

1

""

"}

**

""

71

1

102

1

27

19

"

"

79

1

104

>>

>>

"

87

1

106

1

}}

"

>>

""

92

1

112

2

""

>>

>>

27

93

1

114

1

""

""

*

96

1

126

1

39

""

""

""

103

1

5

99

""

105

I

Torsien Street,.

10

27

"}

121

1

""

U Lok Lane,

16

1

124

1

"

Ui On Lane,

1

1

وو

.....

128

1

Uun Fuk Lane,

6

2

1

""

Un Shing Lane,

4

1

U Lok Lane,

4

1

16

1

"

"

Carried forward,

108

Carried forward,

146

438

Street.

Addresses of all Cases of Bubonic Fever, &c.,-Continued.

House No.

No. of Cases.

Street.

House No.

No. of Cases.

1896.

1898.

No. 9 Health District,Contd.

No. 9 Health District,--Contd.

Brought forward,

108

Brought forward,

146

U Lok Lane,......

7

1

Un Shing Lane,

17

1

Ui On 'Lane,

1

Western Street,

9

1

3

1

21

>>

1

22

"

""

"

1

122

""

""

""

""

8

1

""

Western Street,...

19

1

115

153

No. 10 Health District,

No. 10 Health District.

""

*Bonham Road, "Fairlea,"

>>

Basil Mission,

Hill Road,

I' Yik Laue,

9

2

Belcher's Path,

2

1

*Bonham Road, "Fairlea,"

9

1

3

"

""

"Westward Ho,"..

1

1

1

12

1

9

""

وو

17

1

>>

""

Kennedy Town Hospital,...

2

Kennedy Town Matshed,...

1

*Praya West,......

188

1

""

198

"

""

""

>>

1

""

Pokfulam Road,...

13

1

*Queen's Road West,

337

1

22

Connaught Road,

Hill Road,

Holland Street,

>>

"

I' Yik Lane,

""

Isolation Matshed,

Kennedy Town, Feather Factory,.. Pokfulam Road,

1

7

19

1

1

10

14

1

19

2

1

...

3

1

365

1

13

1

"

"}

"}

""

12

366

1

19

1

""

"}

387

1

Praya West,......

6

394

1

Praya Kennedy Town,

19

1

498

1

3

""

>>

""

508

1

""

Queen's Road West,

256

1

574

1

297

1

""

""

""

Sai Wo Lane,

Sam To Lane,

""

1

364

1

2,

""

1

*

366

2

""

""

I

368

1

>"

">

>>

""

Sheep and Swine Depôts,...

Second Street,

Tung Wo Lane West,

1

370

1

وو

"J

129

2

374

2

""

"}

1

376

1

>>

""

""

""

>>

>>

99

1279

1

393

1

""

""

1

406

""

""

1

408

>>

>>

1

410

1

1

37

""

>>

>>

1

471

1

""

""

"7

""

""

Third Street,

132

1

473

1

دو

""

138

1

594

1

"

"

">

97

>>

">

169

1

Sam To Lane,...

9

1

Third Lane,

3

1

17

I

>>

Second Street,.

163

1

Sixth Lane,..

6

1

Third Street,

150

1

184

1

...

""

Tung Wo Lane, West,.

13

1

Whitty Street, ...

I

Whitty Street,...

3

Wo On Hong, ...

7

1

42

62

Appendix B.

439

Report on House to House Search during epidemic of Plague by Honourable F. H. May, C.M.G.

No. 75.

M

POLICE OFFICE, HONGKONG, 14th July, 1898.

SIR,-I have the honour to forward, for the information of the Board, the following report on the work carried out during the recent epidemic of Plague in connection with the house to house search for plague patients.

The work, which began on the 19th April and ceased on the 11th June, was organised in the following manner :--

No. 2 Health District was divided into 2 sections and a search party consisting of 2 European Police Sergeants, 3 Soldiers and 3 Chinese Constables visited each section on alternate days.

No. 4 Health District was divided into 3 sections and a search party consisting of 1 European Police Constable, 2 Soldiers and 3 Chinese Constables visited one section a day.

No. 5 Health District was divided into 4 sections and a search party consisting of 1 European Police Sergeant, 1 European Police Constable, 4 Soldiers and 3 Chinese Constables visited one and a half sections a day.

No. 6 Health District was divided into 3 sections and a search party consisting of 1 European Police Constable, 2 Soldiers and 3 Chinese Constables visited two sections a day.

Nos. 7 and 8 Health Districts were divided into 3 sections and a search party consisting of 1 European Police Constable, 2 Soldiers and 3 Chinese Constables visited two of the sections each on alternate days.

No. 9 Health District was divided into 3 sections and a search party consisting of 1 European Police Constable, 1 Soldier and 2 Chinese Constables visited two of the sections each on alternate days. The remaining section in No. 8 Health District and the remaining section in No 9 Health District were visited by a search party consisting of 1 European Police Constable, 2 Soldiers and 3 Chinese Constables each on alternate days.

The total number of searchers employed was 45.

There were 62 cases of plague discovered by the search parties; of these 52 were alive and 10 dead. There were also 8 cases of suspected plague removed to Hospital which were pronounced not to be plague. All cases of plague or suspected plague, with the exception of those found in No. 9 Health District up to the 14th of May, were removed, in the first instance, to the Tung Wa Hospital where they were diagnosed by Dr. CHUNG and forwarded, if pronounced plague, to the Plague Hospital. After the 14th May the cases in No. 9 Health District were also forwarded, in the first instance, to the Tung Wa Hospital.

There was only one complaint made by the public against the Police engaged on house to house visitation. On investigation it was found to be without foundation. There were two complaints. against the soldiers which were apparently well founded, and the men were removed from this duty, otherwise the soldiers did their work in a very orderly manner.

The search parties worked from 9 a.m. to noon and from 2 to 5 pm. Each party was allowed half a day off duty once a week, and 24 hours' leave once a month.

The sections into which the Health Districts were divided, with a memo. of the number of houses in each, are filed at the Police Office for reference in the future if desired.

The Acting Secretary,

SANITARY Board,

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

F. H. MAY, Captain Superintendent of Police.

440

Appendix C.

Report on Plague work at Kowloon by Mr. Frank Browne, (Acting Government Analyst).

GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL,

HONGKONG, 22nd June, 1898.

SIR, I have the honour to report for the information of the Board that the cleansing work in British Kowloon, for which I was appointed in April last by His Excellency the Acting Governor on the recommendation of the Board, is now concluded.

2. A great deal of cleansing was done particularly in Yaumati. The following table shows the extent of the cleansing carried out at the expense of the Government :-

No. 11 District (Hunghom and Villages:)

Floors washed only,

29

Cleansed and lime-washed (floors),...202

Obstructions removed,

88

* Coolies employed-one day each,.496

No. 12 District (Yaumati, &c.:)

36

528

68 875

Where washing only was required in houses, the inmates usually carried out the work of their own accord, which fact will explain the small amount of washing only, that was done by the Govern- ment. Although an opportunity was afforded to the tenants to do the lime-washing required, very few availed themselves of it on account of the expense.

3. The obstructions removed consisted of bunks, cocklofts, cubicles, doors, josses, and latrines, which had been erected in such a way as to deprive the rooms of light and air. A great improvement has been effected in most houses by these removals as the removal of a single obstruction has in many cases converted a dark ill-ventilated room into a healthy and cheerful habitation. However, experience has shown that these obstructions are put up again as soon as vigilance is relaxed, so it is earnestly hoped that special attention will be directed so that such structures may be at once demolished if re-erected.

No. 11 District-(Hunghom and Villages).

4. Cleansing in this district was commenced on April 20th, and completed on May 23rd. The houses here are for the most part very good and substantial, but in the event of another epidemic attention should be particularly directed to Shung On Lane and Dock Lane, in which the houses are inferior. Several cases of plague having been traced from Shung On Lane, on May 7th the whole of Hunghom was disinfected with a mixture of salt, manganese di-oxide, and sulphuric acid. It was considered advisable to disinfect the whole of the place as a number of dead bodies had been found on the hill-side, and it was impossible to find out which houses were infected and which were not, so the safest plan was adopted of disinfecting them all.

No case of plague could be found to have occurred in the houses of Hunghom after the disinfec- tion although several bodies (see table of cases of plague attached) were afterwards found on the hill- side, but the number of these bodies being only 11 from May 7th to June 13th, a further disinfection on a wholesale scale was not considered necessary.

No. 12 District-(Yaumati, Tai Kok Tsui, Mong Kok Tsui, &c.)

5. Cleansing operations were commenced on April 20th, and the work was completed on June 2nd. A number of cases of plague having occurred at Tai Kok Tsui a visit was paid to this village on April 24th, when it was seen that a large proportion of the inhabitants were living in insanitary dwelling-huts, boats, and hovels. On April 26th the whole of the district was disinfected with salt, manganese di-oxide, and sulphuric acid. The people in the huts, boats, and hovels were for the most part trespassers on Crown land; they were not agriculturists but apparently merely loafers of no use to the Colony. In an industrial centre like Tai Kok Tsui, such dirty and insanitary hovels are particularly objectionable; fortunately, now, many of them have been destroyed. Since the disinfection on April 26th no further cases of plague have occurred in the houses at Tai Kok Tsui, but several cases have been found in the hovels and on the foreshore. The majority of the houses in Tai Kok Tsui are well constructed and with the hovels removed there should be little fear of plague another year.

6. It was early seen in Yaumati from the number of deserted floors that a number of bodies had been carried out from the houses and placed in the street or in other open places.

The whole place was therefore disinfected as in Tai Kok Tsui, on May 7th, and the number of dead bodies found in the street, subsequent to this disinfection, being considerable, chloride of lime was placed on every floor at Yaumati on May 17th.

* Exclusive of lime-washers who were paid by piece-work.

A

441

7. It was not at all surprising to find so many dirty houses in Yaumati, considering that with the present arrangement of the kitchen it is absolutely impossible to prevent smoke from penetrating the living rooms. There are but few houses in Yaumati that have proper arrangements for carrying

In away smoke.

In many houses the smoke is continually present in such quantities as to be extremely irritating to the eyes and nostrils of an European. Can people living in such houses be expected to keep either their houses or themselves clean? But, worst of all, in order to keep the smoke out of the living rooms, the inmates block up the window between the kitchen and the living room so that a through current of air is shut off from that direction. This smoke nuisance can easily be abated as suitable clay fire-places can be easily and cheaply put in.

8. Many dark houses would be greatly improved by letting a small square of glass into the roof. Dark houses were nearly always dirty.

9. Houses 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 Fourth Lane are in a dirty and insanitary condition; they are little better than hovels. They have been disinfected three times; some boats on the foreshore above high water mark at Yaumati should be removed.

10. The houses in Fuk Sing Lane will require a lot of attention as a number of cases of plague have occurred there. The drains in several of these houses have had to be unblocked several times; probably they need repair.

11. On May 31st all the sampans in the district were examined. The boats were very clean for Chinese sampans. No sick people were found except two children just recovering from small-pox.

Disinfection and Disinfectants.

12. A large number of houses have been disinfected with chlorine. The process employed for disinfecting simultaneously a large number of houses without removal of the inmates was to place in each room on each floor two ounces of a mixture of one part of salt, and one part of manganese di- oxide. On this mixture was poured six ounces of dilute sulphuric acid (1 in 4). This gave off slowly but continuously for about 12 hours a stream of chlorine, which did not greatly interfere with the inmates, who were told to open all their doors and windows if the action of the chlorine became too suffocating. Throughout Kowloon the Chinese gladly receive this disinfectant, and, speaking generally, we found that they were ready to obey any directions in order to be protected from plague, provided that such directions did not mean that they were put to any expense.

13. For disinfection of closed houses in which plague had occurred the following process was employed:-

Where the

Close the doors, windows, and all apertures as completely as possible; [a carpenter is required for this]. Then place half a pound of chlorinated lime in a pot and well mix with a quart of water, place in the centre of the floor and pour on a quart of diluted sulphuric acid (1 in 5). floors are large two pots to each should be used. Commence to disinfect on the top floor.

The following quantities of substances for disinfection have been used:-

3 cwt. manganese di-oxide.

3 cwt. salt.

800 pounds of sulphuric acid.

3,000 pounds of chlorinated acid.

House to house Visitation.

14. This was carried out by Sergeant CAMERON and P. C. CORMACK after the cleansing of the whole district of Kowloon was completed on June 2nd. All the Chinese houses in British Kowloon were visited. The visitation was considered by me to be unnecessary after June 18th.

Conclusion.

15. C. P. O. LOVELL was in charge of a cleansing party from April 20th to May 13th when his place was taken by P. C. CORMACK who returned to his ordinary duties on June 19th. Sergeant CAMERON was in charge of a cleansing party from April 20th to June 18th, after which he returned to his ordinary duties.

C. P. O. LOVELL, P. C. CORMACK and Sergeant CAMERON carried out extremely satisfactorily the work entrusted to them.

16. Herewith is attached a return showing that in No. 11 district 26 cases of plague were removed from March 16th to June 13th, and that in No. 12 district during the same period 149 cases of plague were removed.

I have the honour to be,

The Secretary,

THE SANITARY BOARD.

Sir,

Your obedient Servant,

FRANK BROWNE, Acting Government Analyst.

442

Return showing Number of Cases of Plague sent from Kowloon between 16th March and 13th June, 1898, in No. 11, Health District, (Hunghom).

Date.

March 16th Matsheds, Hunghom,

Where from

17th Foreshore

""

""

20th

""

""

26th

دو

"

"}

30th

"

31st

Hunghom, West,

8, Market Street, Ground Floor,

April 9th Foreshore, Hunghom,

21st

23rd

">

23rd

"

"

May

"

""

""

"

June

""

No. 102, Market Street,

**

13, Hunghom, West, 23rd Foreshore, Tokwawan, 25th Hok Ün, Village,

1st No. 6, Shung On Lane,

68, Market Street,

5th

6th

68.

12th Hok Ün,

15th Foreshore, Hunghom,

16th | Hill-side, Tai Wan, 16th Foreshore, Hunghom, 16th Hok Ün,

18th Foreshore, Hunghom, 24th

29

"5

27th Hunghom, West, 29th Hill-side, Hunghom,

1st Foreshore, Hunghom,

3rd

""

"2

Totals,.............

Males.

Females.

Remarks.

1

Dead.

25

1

""

1

1

""

1

1

1

""

Sick. Dead.

1

""

1

*

1

""

1

29

1

1

""

Sick. Dead.

1

""

1

99

1

+9

39

1

99

1

""

1

17

9

دو

"

>>

Return showing Number of Cases of Plague sent from Kowloon between 30th March and 3rd June, 1898, in No. 12,

Date.

Where from

March

30th Hongkong Regiment, Kowloon, 31st Rifle Range,

31st No. 48, Battery Street,

April

7th No. 46, Temple Street,

"

9th

29

8th Yaumati,

"

9th Taikoktsai,

9th

11

""

9th

་་

15

10th Foreshore, Yaumati,

16th

""

""

19th Fuk Tsun Heung,

??

"

""

20th Foreshore, Yaumati, 23rd

33

Taikoktsui,

23rd No. C. M. Dock Launch,

24th Hill-side, Hung Chung,

24th No. 16, Fuk Sing Lane,

1st No. 158, Station Street,

2nd Indian Barracks, Kowloon,

26th Station Street,

"3

29th Taikoktsui,

"

May

**

2nd Taikoktsui,

"9

3rd Foreshore, Yaumati,

4th Hung Chung,

4th Foreshore, Taikoktsui,

5th No. 68, Reclamation Street,

""

""

5th No. 15, Station Street,

******

5th No. 15,

5th Mati,

39

7th Station Hospital Kowloon,

7th Yaumati,

8th

""

8th Taikoktsui beach,

Health District.

Males.

Females.

Remarks.

Sick.

1

Dead.

1

Sick.

1

Dead.

1

1

Sick.

Dead.

1

"

1

...

""

""

"

1

""

1

1

1

1

1

21

95

:

:

19

"

1

1

Sick.

1

1

Dead.

19

1

1

""

Sick.

1

"

1

1

1

1

Dead.

""

Sick. Dead.

19

1

""

Carried forward,..........

19

14

Return showing Number of Cases of Plague sent from Kowloon, etc.,--Continued.

443

Date.

Where from

Brought forward,

Males.

Females.

Remarks.

May 8th Foreshore, Yaumati,

"

8th Kowloon City,

9th No. 17, Battery Street,

9th

92

9th Taikoktsui,

"9

10th | Foreshore, Stonecutters' Island,

10th No. 94, Taikoktsui,

"}

10th On a boat at Yaumati,

"

11th

No. 17, Fuk Shing Lane,

11th

"

11th

""

"

""

""

11th

No. 27, Station Street,

12

11th

On a boat at Yaumati,

""

11th

11th Foreshore

"

No. 36, Taikoktsui,

"

"

12th On a boat at Yaumati,

12th

5

29

""

19

14

1

Dead.

1

Sick.

1

Dead.

1

1

1

17

}

""

""

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

"

Sick. Dead.

"

Sick. Dead.

"

1

1

1

...

""

*

>>

14th

""

"

14th 26, Elgin Road,

""

>>

29

"}

15th

"

No. 23,

""

15th On a boat at Taikoktsui,

15th Hill-side,

12th No. 6, McDonnell Road."

12th No. 1, Reclamation Street, 13th Yaumati,..

14th No. 8, McDonnell Road,

"

""

14th On a boat at Yaumati,

14th Foreshore, Stonecutters' Island, 14th

"

14th No. 52, Battery Street,

""

...

1

"

1

Sick.

1

Dead. Sick.

1

...

"

1

""

Dead.

1

79

1

...

1

""

1

""

1

"

1

"

"

16th No. 54,

,,

}}

"

16th No. 91,

11

16th

16th No. 54, Station Street,

"1

16th | No. 70, Reclamation Street,

16th No. 54, Station Street,

No. 27, Mati,

""

1

Sick. Dead.

"

>>

1

27

1

"

"2

16th Matsheds at Kung Chung,

""

""

17th Reclamation Street,

1

#

12

17th No. 52, Reclamation Street,

1

"

39

17th On a boat at Yaumati,

1

"

"

17th Praya, Fuk Tsun Heung,

">

""

17th Matshed at Taikoktsui,

1

"1

18th No. 33, Battery Street,

1

"

"

18th No. 81, Taikoktsui,

1

19th No. 56, Reclamation Street,

1

"

"

19th Hill-side, Mongkoktsni,.

1

""

19th No. 56, Station Street,

1

...

"

19th Foreshore, Taikoktsui,

""

19th No. 56, Station Street,

1

17

19th Fuk Tsun Heung,

19

"J

Sick.

"

20th

21st

23

No. 25, Battery Street, On a boat at Taikoktsui,

21st Foreshore, Mongkoktsui,

1

99

""

1

**

22nd

Yaumati,

1

"3

??

""

22nd Rifle Range,

I

""

"

23rd Yaumati,

1

""

??

23rd Yaumati,

1

"}

23rd No. 44, Stution Strect,

1

"

""

24th

""

27

23rd | No. 11, Elgin Street,..

Reclamation Street,

24th Foreshore, Mongkoktsui,

""

Dead.

1

""

24th No. 155, Station Street,

1

""

24th Station Street,

1

""

"

25th Yaumati, .....

1

""

25th No. 24, Fuk Sing Lane,

1

"J

25th Foreshore, Stonecutters' Island,

1

""

25th Sixth Lane, Yaumati,

1

""

26th No. 9, Elgin Road,...

Sick.

""

Dead.

""

Siek.

"

"

****

26th ,, 10, Temple Street,

1

Dead.

26th Foreshore, Stonecutters' Island,

1

"

27th Yaumati,.

1

Sick.

27th No. 2, Canton Villas,....

1

27

Carried forward,..........

56

49

444

Date.

Return showing Number of Cases of Plague sent from Kowloon, etc.,—Continued.

Where from

Males.

Females.

Remarks.

Brought forward,......

May

27th | No. 4, Fuk Tsun Hung,

27th

78, Taikoktsui,

27th Foreshore,

13

""

27th Hill-side, Mongkok tsui,.

27th On a boat at Yaumati,

""

27th Foreshore, Cosmopolitan Dock,

28th No. 13, Reclamation Street,

28th ,, 51, Mongkoktsni,

28th Foreshore, Yaumati,

56

1

1

1

1

49

...

...

Sick.

Dead.

>>

""

1

1

1

Sick. Dead.

1

;

""

""

وو

23

29th

""

28th On a boat at Yaumati,

29th No. 6, Kennedy Street, 29th Yaumati,

29th No. 46, Mongkoktsui,

29th No. 13, Kennedy Street, 29th No. 64, Station Street,

1

1

1

>>

1

....

"

1

"}

1

>>

1

و"

"

29th | No. 60,

30th Hill-side, Yaumati,....

">

30th

Rifle Range,

>>

30th

On a boat at Yaumati,

""

30th

""

""

31st

"

31st

On a boat at Yaumati,

"

31st

Foreshore, Mongkoktsui,

""

31st

""

31st Yaumati,.

1

I

>>

1

"}

1

1

>>

No. 129, Station Street,

1

""

1

"

1

وو

June

1st

Reclamation,

1st Matshed at Kung Chung,

No. 22, Mongkoktsui,

2nd Foreshore, Yaumati,

1

1

...

"}

"

Sick.

1

19

1

"J

1

""

""

3rd Hill-side, Fuk Tsun Heung,

1

""

3rd

No. 4, Ship Lane, Taikoktsui,

1

">

4th

"

No. 31, Temple Street,

1

4th

On a boat at Taikoktsui,

Ι

"

4th

1

}}

*

""

4th McDonnell Road,

>>

>>

5th No. 12, Station Street,

1

"

,

7th No. Market Lane, Yaumati,

1

7th No. 33, Mongkoktsui,

1

19

Sick. Dead.

»

7th Kowloon Road,

1

"

""

8th Hill-side, Yaumati,

1

"

39

"

10th Mongkoktsui,

1

Sick.

10th Taikoktsui,

1

99

"

""

11th No. 48, Temple Street,

1

12th On a boat at Yaumati,

Dead.

"}

"

12th Foreshore, Yaumati,

1

>>

"

Totals,.

85

64

[

!

217

HONGKONG.

No. 20

RETURN OF CIVIL AND APPEAL CASES HEARD IN THE SUPREME COURT IN 1897.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government.

98

No. 89.

SUPREME Court, HONGKONG, 29th April, 1898.

SIR,—I have the honour to forward to you herewith the Return of Civil and Appeal Cases heard in the Supreme Court in 1897.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

The Honourable

THE ACTING COLONIAL SECRETARY,

se.,.

&c.,

&c.

1897.

J. W. NORTON-KYSHE,

Registrar.

CASES TRIED.

JUDGMENT.

In Depend- of

No.

Settled

Jurisdiction.

ency

Cases Total.

in

in

Debt and Damages.

or

Withdraw

wn

1896.

1897.

before Trial.

Plaintiff.

Defendant.

Non-Suit.

Struck Out,

Dismissed,

and Lapsed

Writs.

In Dependency.

Debt

and

Damages Recovered.

Original,

61

79

140

$216,019.72*

5

17

:

53

$71,974.30

Summary,..

14

1,347 1,362 $164,686.09 539

511

54

15

143

85 $69,654.13

*Exclusive of two cases wherein the amounts claimed were £847.13s. 1d. and Taels 3,500.

APPEALS COmmenced.

1897.

APPEALS.

Judgment.

No. of Cases.

Appellant.

Respondent.

Pending.

7

7

Supreme Court, Hongkong, 29th April, 1898.

:..

No. of Cases.

APPEALS TRIED.

Judgment.

Appellant.

Respondent.

Pending.

1

6

J. W. NORTON-KYSHE,

Registrar.

77

No.

98

No. 2.

HONGKONG.

SUPREME COURT REVENUE RETURNS, &c. FOR 1897.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor.

SUPREME COURT, HONGKONG, 8th January, 1898.

SIR,-- I have the honour to forward to you herewith the Return of Revenue for the Supreme Court for 1897, and a Return of Intestate Estates for the half-year ending the 31st December, 1897.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

The Honourable

THE COLONIAL SECRETARY,

&c.,

&.c.,

&c.

J. W. NORTON KYSHE,

Registrar.

RETURN of all SUMS RECEIVED as REVENUE in the Registry of the Supreme Court during the Year 1897.

Original Jurisdiction,

$ 3,752.84

4,474.65

Summary Jurisdiction,

Bankruptcy Jurisdiction,

Probate Jurisdiction,....

Official Administrator's Commission,

Official Assignee's Commission,

Official Trustee's Commission,........

Sheriff's Fees,

Bailiff's Fees,

Interest on Deposit of Surplus Cash,

Fees on Distraints,

Registrar of Companies,

Fine and Forfeitures,

Admiralty Jurisdiction,.

Auctioneer's Commission paid in by the Bailiff,

Land Office Fees,

Registry Supreme Court, Hongkong, 7th January, 1898.

717.15 2,163.15 3,164.36

...

55.45

116.50

902.50

405.54

1,275.25

2,863.25

549.35

7.48

$20,447.47

5,998.00

$26,445.47

J. W. NORTON KYSHE,

Registrar.

RETURN of all SUMS COLLECTED in the Registry of the Supreme Court for the Year 1897, and paid into the Treasury.

1897.

REGISTRAR.-Court fees paid by Stamps,

OFFICIAL ASSIGNEE.-5% on amounts encashed and paid into the Treasury......... OFFICIAL ADMINISTRATOR,

44.

OFFICIAL TRUSTEE.-2% on amount of Trust on taking over up to $10,000, above $10,000 commission 1% on further amount, 1% commission on income,

1896.

$12,332.40

5.15 2,485.84

$12,735.04

3,164.36

58.26

BAILIFF,

1,137.50

SHERIFF,.

102.00

REGISTRAR OF COMPANIES,.

2,471.50

INTEREST on Deposit of Surplus Cash,

1,701.41

55.45 902.50 116.50 2,863.25 405.54

FINE AND FORFEITURES,.

ADMIRALTY FEES,

10.00 541.17

AUCTIONEER'S COMMISSION paid in by the Bailiff,

197.35 7.48

LAND OFFICE FEES,

$20,845.23 6,825.50

$27,670.73

$20,447.47

5,998.00

$26,445.47

Registry Supreme Court, Hongkong, 7th January, 1898.

J. W. NORTON KYSHE,

Registrar.

78

for Dis- bursements.

Balance on closing Account.

RETURN of ESTATES of INTESTATE for the Second Half-year ending 31st December, 1897.

Amount received on Account of Estate.

Deductions

Disposal of Balance.

$ c.

David Symington,

227.08

$ c. 217.49

$ c.

9.59

Estate being administered.

Claudio J. da Silva,

59.35

3.22

56.13

Paid to A. J. Reed, the Administrator.

C. F. Burdett,....

727.30

49.57

677.78

Estate being administered.

Esmail,

20.92

1.05

19.87

Wong Kan,.

.04

.04

F. Irene,

2.86

.11

Marie Gabriel Simon Lajeat,...

183.45

15.67

2.75 167.78

Do.

Do.

Paid into the Government Treasury.

Paid to French Consul.

Tong Sam Chi,

.15

.15

Paid into the Government Treasury,

Bartholomew Spain,

7.26

4.96

2.30

Do.

Jindah Singh,..

5.00

.25

4.75

Do.

J. H. Meyers,..

58.93

8.45

Arthur Norman,

175.10

167.76

7.34

Do.

John Caldwell Melrose,.

1,874.17

121.81

1,752.36

Do.

Sumi,

24.60

1.23

Chan Sing Sam,.

980.00

65.25

Thomas Campbell,

277.13

Samuel Barff,

334.60

191.20

Chan Tsau Shing,

11.60

.56

50.48 Estate being administered.

23.37 | Paid into the Government Treasury.

914.75 Paid to W. & Grist, Solicitors for the Administratrix. 277.13 Estate being administered.

143.40

Paid to Mrs. Kate Barff, the Administratrix. 11.04 Paid to Wong Shi, the mother of deceased.

Dated this 7th day of January, 1898.

J. W. NORTON KYSHE, Official Administrator.

:

:

119

No. 6

98

HONGKONG.

CRIMINAL STATISTICS AND CORONER'S RETURNS FOR 1897.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government.

No. 2.

MAGISTRACY,

HONGKONG, 12th January, 1898.

SIR,-- In compliance with Circular No. 10 of the 20th October, 1897, I have the honour to for- ward the usual returns of this department for the

1. Abstract of cases during the year.

year 1897.

2. Comparative return of cases for the past ten years.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

H. E. WODehouse,

Police Magistrate.

The Honourable

J. H. STEWART LOCKHART,

Colonial Secretary.

:

120

:

4,004

10

"ABSTRACT of CASES under Cognizance of the POLICE MAĞıştrates' CouRT during the Year 1897.

CASES, HOW DISPOSED OF, AND THE NUMBER OF MALE ANTY EEMALE PRISONERS UNDER EACH HEAD.

Discharged.

Committed

for Trial at

the Supreme

Court.

Committed

to Prison, or

Detained

Ordered to find Security.'

WRITS ISSUED BY THE POLICE MAGISTRATES DURING THE YEAR 1897.

Supmens for

Befendants.

Summons for Witnesses.

Notices

of

Re-hearing.

Arrest.

Distress.

Warrants.

Search.

For

entering Gambling Houses.

Magis-

trates' Orders.

TOTAL

ΤΟΤΑΣ

NUMBER

OF FIRE

ENQUIRIES

HELD

DURING THE YEAR 1897.

M. F. M. F. M. F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

12,886 |10,237

548 | 1,481 151 73

12

95

M. F.

56 86 32

M. F.

M. F. M. F. M.

F.

2

25

:

•1 79 4 12,079 S07

2,172

6

130

1,465

147

*

TOTAL MALES AND FEMALES,

Consisting of

uders not sentenced to Imprisonment.

12,886

Punished.

and

Convicted

TOTAL

NUMBER

ΤΟΤΑΣ

NUMBER

OF

OF

CASES.

PRISON-

KRS.

11,185

+

1

:

:

į

:

:

:

THE CASES CONSISTED OF:-

121

OFFENCES.

No. of CASES.

No. of

PRI- SONERS.

OFFENCES.

No. or

No. of PRI-

CASES. SONERS.

Arms Consolidation Ordinance 8 of 1895,--

Ammunition-Being in possession of Arms-Carrying or having possession of, without a

license.

11

-Dealers neglecting to keep Register of

Selling to unauthorised persons,

Banishment and Conditional Pardons Ordinance 8 of 1882,-

Banishment-Returning after

Building Ordinances 15 of 1889, 25 of 1891 and 7 of 1895,-

Blasting Stones to the danger of Persons & Property,. Cutting earth, or turf, and extracting stones from

Crown Land,

Drain-Connecting, with the Government Main

Sewer ithout obtaining a permit,

Ground Surface-Failing to concrete,

Hoardings and Scaffoldings-Neglecting to erect

during repair of Buildings,

Matshed Overcrowding.

Cattle Diseases Ordinance 17 of 1887,-

Cattle-Landing at prohibited wharf, &c.....

Infected areas -- Removal of animal or articles from.... Chinese Emigration Consolidation Ordinance 1 of 1889

amended by 25 of 1889,

Decoying Men or Boys into or away from the Colony,... Passage Brokers-Neglecting to attend before Emi- gration Officer for the purpose of delivering contract tickets to Passengers,

Chinese Extradition Ordinance 26 of 1889,

Chinese Territory-Crimes and Offences committed in. Closed Houses and Insanitary Dwellings Ordinance 15 of

1-94-

Basement floors-Inhabiting.

68

Brought forward,

440

1,005

6

13

Gambling Ordinance,—Continued.

Street Gambling,..

85

113

45

1946

45

Watchmen to Street Gamblers Acting as,

3

3

Good Order and Cleanliness-Ordnance 1 of 1845,-

Animals-Cruelty to,

19

23

Bonfire-king,

109

33 33

Breach of the Peace,

Cartile turned loose op public ways....

2

"Dead Body, exposiart in the public street,

Disorderly beha four,

Dogs-Allowing unmuzzled ferocious, to be at large, 13

-Ingting, to attack persons, &c.,

Domesti Servants-Misconduct as,

ཀླཌྭ

109

19

22

1

1

2

3

614 1.131

13

1

52

52

Firearms Discharging, to the danger of the Public, Furius driving,

3

3

56

82

10 CO

21

56

Furnitures, &c.,-Removing to evade rent,

1

1

Horse Riding on the footpath,

1

1

Indecent exposure of person by bathing, or otherwise, Nuances Allowing dirt and filth, &c., to remain

14

14

posed,

31

31

Co

Co

Nuisances Discharging sewage water and offensive

matter into the public side channel, Nuisances-Hanging wet clothes, &c., over Public

ways,

3

3

51

51

1

1

Nuisances-Throwing rubbish, &c., into the Streets, Obstruction of Roads and Streets by Hawkers, and

Shopkeepers,..

92

103

664

665

2

3

Stones-Throwing to danger of the public...

1

1

Streams---Defiling,

1

1

Unlawful possession of property,

320

364

9

9

of trees, shrubs, &c.,

72

74

Cocklofts and Mezzanine floors-Erecting, without

permission from the Sanitary Board, Cocklofts and Mezzanine floors Neglecting to re-

Vehicles-Unnecessary noise by,

3

3

16

16

Hongkong Fire Brigade Ordinance 4 of 1868,-

Firemen Misconduct as,

1

1

move.

3

3 Larceny and Other Similar Offences.-Ordinance 7 of

'ubicles-Breach of Regulations for,

13

13

1865,-

Ground Surface, &c.-Domestic buildings-Offence

Burglary,

as to,

1

Embezzlement

13

**

2

13

Houses-Neglecting to cleans and limewash,

4

مهر

Premises-Neglecting to keep clean and whole-

some condition,

False pretenges- Obtaining, or attempting to obtain-

goods of money by,

48

55

2

Coinage Offences-Ordinance 10 of 1865.

Counterfeit Coins- Uttering, or being in possession of, Common Law,——

7

+

Housebreaking,

Bribery,

3

Champerty,

Conspiracy to defraud,

Felony-Astempting to commit,

Found in Dwelling house, &c., by night,

with intent to commit,

Larceny as a bailee,

-by servants,

Common..

3

13 14

7

3

17

18

19

19

1

1

5

5

977

1,073

Intimidating Witnesses,

from the person,....

80

84

Piracy,

from the person with violence,

3

Suicide Attempting to commit,

17

from Ships or boats in the Harbour,

10

18

Prisoner-Escaping from lawful custody of Police, Coroner's Abolition Ordinance 17 of 1888,-~

1

of fruit or vegetable productions in Garden,

4

Menaces-Demanding money by,

14

Juror-Neglecting to answer Coroner's Summons to

Stolen goods Receiving.

28

attend Inouest,...

1

1

icensing Consolidation Ordinance 21 of 1887,-

Dangerous Goods Ordinances 8 of 1873 and of 1892,-

Dangerous Goods-Boat laden with, anchoring in

prohibited place

Hawking within the prescribed limits of Market,

335

335

-Unlicensed

689

690

Money Changer+Unlicensed,

Dangerous Goods - Boat conveying, without proper

precution,

Public Vehicles+Demanding more than legal fare....

19

+888-2

22

-Carrying no lights between sunset

Dangerous Goods-Carrying, uncovered in boat, Dangerous Goods-Conveying or exposing for Sale, without attacking labels to cases or vessels con- taining the same,

4

and sunrise,

3

3

-not keeping rule of the Road,.

8

--Obstruction of Streets by,

98

110

""

"

16

16

-Refusing to accept hire when un-

Dangerous Goods Ships, &c. lying alongside Wharf or landing place to land or ship, for more than 15 minutes,

Dangerous Goods-Ships, &c, neglecting to hoist a

Red Flag when laden with,

employed,

52

56

-Refusing to pay fare of,

14

14

13

13

10

-Unlicensed, plying with,

153

160

-Using, for conveyance of merchan-

dise, or dead bodies or persons

Dangerous Goods-Storing, more than the quantity

allowed by license.

"

Dangerous Goods-Selling without a licence,

1

suffering from infectious diseases, ---Unlicensed drivers or bearers of-

Plying for hire,

Dangerous Goods-Unlicensed storing of.

Magistrate's Ordinances 7 and 10 of 1890,-

Dangerous Goods-Wharf-Unlawfully alongside of

-while another ship was discharging,

Disorderly behaviour while drunk,

Drunkenness,

122

Offences under,.

Dogs Ordinance 9 of 1893,-

Dogs-Unlicensed keeping of,

Exportation of Military Stores Ordinance 13 of 1862,—

Exporting ammunition prohibited by Proclamation,. Forgery-Ordinarice 6 of 1865,--

Forged instruments-Obtaining goods or money by.. document-Uttering, with intent to defraude... Document Forging, with intent to defraud,

11

Forts Protection Ordinance 10 of 1891,-

Battery, Fieldwork, or Fortification-Entering, with-

out a written permit,

Fugitive Offenders Act 1881,-

Gambling Ordinance 7 of 1891.-

False Charge,-Preferring-or wilfully giving false

11

11

evidence,

➢ཆེརྒྱསཆེ

17

17

59

59

194

194

123

30

30

1

nsulting expression-Using, or behaving in an in-

sulting manner before Magistrate,

2

2

Recognizances-Breach of,

44

44

00 10

Falsification of accounts, &c. with intent to defraud,. Malicious injuries to property-Ordinance 8 of 1865,—

Arson,..

r-

1

5

5

Injuries to property,

19

21

Injuries to tree or vegetable productions in Garden.... Markets Ordinances 17 of 1887 and 23 of 1890,—

81

81

1

1

Articles of food for man-Exposing for Sale, in a

place other than Public Market,

244

244

Common Gaming House-Keeping, or playing in, Lotteries-Dealing in,.........

67

612

5

5

Fish, &c.,-Selling in Markets, not being holders of

stalls, Market-Nuisances in,

28

28

5

Carried forward,.....

440 | 1,005

Carried for pard,

6,117

7,482

122

CASES,-Continued.

3

19

-Sleeping in,

OFFENCES.

Brought forward.....

Markets Ordinances 17 of 1887 and 23 of 1890,- Contå.

Market-Obstructing the Avenue of,

Sign-board-Failing to have.-in front of lan,

No. of

CASES.

NO. OF PRI-

SONERS.

OFFENCES.

No. of CASES.

No.of

PRI-

SONERS.

6,1177,482

Brought forward,..

Offences against the person. —

-Continued.

14

14

7

7

Opium Ordinance as amended by 4 of 1894,-

1

Unwholesome provisions-Exposing for Sale, or

bringing, into the Colony,

Workman, &c.-Intimidating.

Opium found on board of any ship. Not on the

Manifest,

7,853

9,507

5

9

1

1

7

7 Opium Ordinance. (Prepared) 21 of 1891.—

Merchandise Marks Ordinance 15 of 1890,-

Breach of,

1

Prepared Opium-Being in possession of, without

having valid certificates,

1,486

1,486

Merchant Shipping Act, 1894,--

Seamen-Disobeying lawful orders of Masters in

Opium Ordinance 22 of 1887 and 22 of 1891,— ་་

Breach of (Raw),.

10

12

British Ships,

10

10

Seamen-Neglect or refusal of duty by, in British

Pawnbrokers Ordinance 3 of 1860,-

License-Breach of, by taking in pawn in prohibited

Ships,

Surreptitious passage-Obtaining,

Merchant Shipping Consolidation Ordinance 26 of 1891,

Boarding Ships without permission,

Boats-Beating drums or gongs during prohibited

hours,

Boats-Concealing the number of.

-Making fast to ship under way,

วง

7

7

hours,

4

6

Peace and Quiet Ordinance 17 of 1844,-

Breach of.

10

11

35

36

Police Force Consolidation Ordinance. 14 of 18$7,—

Police Constables-Misconduct as,

4

4

29

N28

Police Force Regulation, Ordinance 9 of 1862.-

19

-Mooring within the limits of Men-of-War

anchorage,

1

"

Police Constables-Assault on. in execution of duty..

---Obstructing, or resisting, in the discharge of their duties, -Being in possession of Police

21

26

7

10

"?

-Mooring in shore between the hours of 9

79

o'clock at night and gun-fire in the morning,

-Mooring, unlawfully within the Typhoon

Refuge,

-Plying between this Colony and places out of Colony not having a licence from Har- bour Master,

-Refusing to accept hire,

to stop or go alongside Wharf when

called upon by Police,

&c.-Unlicensed,

appointments, not being a member thereof,

1

1

70

70

Post Office Ordinance, 1 of 1887,—

Regulation of transmission of Chinese Correspond-

7

7

ence Breach of.

10

10

Forged Stamps-Using........

1

2

**

to show Licenses to Police,...

60 21.00

* 200

Praya Reclamation Ordinance 15 of 1889,—

Boats. &c.-Unlawfully entering Reclamation Area,... Prison Ordinance 18 of 1885,--

Prisoner-Escaping or attempting to escape from

Victoria Gaol,

Prisoner-Aiding and abetting.-to escape.

Private Vehicle Ordinance 13 of 1895. —

Private Vehicles-Not keeping rule of the Road,

-Unlicensed,

Public Buildings, Gardens. &c.-Regulations for main- tenance of good order and preservation of property

in. Ordinance 8 of 1870,-

38

38

12

12

13

Co ma

7

7

13

6

134

136

Boat Licences -Breach of conditions of,

3

3

Cargo-boat-License, breach of conditions of,

3

3

Fairways-Obstructing,

39

40

Goods unlawfully obtained-Throwing into water,

7

Junk-Anchoring in prohibited place,

5

Nuisances in Harbour,

93

104

Quarantine Regulations-Breach of,

...

2

Public Gardens-Breach of Regulations for. Wong Nei Chung Recreation Ground Regulations-

17

19

Seamen-Absenting from duty, from British or

Breach of,

2

2

Foreign Ships,

16

16

3:

Seamen-Boarding House Unlicensed Keeping of,

>>

- Desertion of, from British or Foreign Ships, --Remaining behind Ships after having signed

the Articles.

Ships, &c.-Anchorage or Harbour-Leaving without

Clearance or during prohibited hours...

-Explosive on board,-Neglecting to report

on arrival,

-Fireworks-Discharging,

-Gunpowder, possession of more than 15

1

Public Health Ordinances 24 of 1887 and 4 of 1895,--

Boats, &c.-Breaming on foreshore.

9

12

12

2

A

Common Lodging Houses Regulations-Breach of, Common Lodging Houses-Unlicensed keeping of, Drain, &c.-Leaving open and unprotected, Latrine Regulations-Breach of,

10

10

40

40

11

11

Laundries-Using, as sleeping rooms,

→OO**** -

3

3

Laundries-Unregistered,

1

11

步步

Ibs. on,

"

-Lights-Neglecting to exhibit at night,

-Not having certificate: Master,..

"

Nuisances-Neglecting to abate, after notice served

1

Night Soil or noxious waters-Carrying, during pro- hibited hours, or depositing in the Streets,

by the Sanitary Board

67

67

I

1

101

101

Offensive trade-Establishment, Breach of Bye-Laws

1

made under,

4

--Passengers-Carrying, in excess,

Steam Launch-Exhibiting side lights not fitted with

in board screens between sunset and sunrise,..

Steam Whistles-Unnecessarily blowing,

Telegraph Cables-Anchoring within the limits of

area of.

Wharves-Embarking passengers at prohibited,

Morphine Ordinance 13 of 1893,-

21

21

Overcrowding-in tenement house,

3

Pigs, &c.--Keeping, without license,

159

159

Pigsties, &c.-Neglecting to clean,

13

13

Plague and other infectious diseases-Neglecting to

report cases of, .

---Obstruction of, by boat people,.

8896

2

2

Reformatory Ordinance 19 of 1886,-

6

Breach of,

1

1

39

39

-

Registration of Births and Deaths Ordinance 16 of

1896, -

Breach of,

10

5

10

5

Dead Bodies-Unlawful removal of,

14

Naval Stores Ordinance 9 of 1875,-

Anchorage of Ships of War.-Dredging at,

40

40

Nuisances-Ordinancë 10 of 1872,-

Chai Mui-Night noises by playing at the Game

known as,

Death-Failing to report,

-Wilfully giving false information to Police &c.,

Regulation of Chinese Burials, and Prevention of certain

Nuisances, Ordinance 12 of 1856.

+21

19

923

1

48

48

Rough dressing, &c. of granite in or near a Public

Obeying calls of nature in the streets or in improper

places,......

143

place,

4

4

Roads and Streets-Injury to,

Street Cries by Hawkers,

171

171

Shrubs, Trees-Cutting or destroying,

Offences against the person. Ordinances 4 of 1865, and

9 of 1897.

Trespass on Crown Land,

888888

143

7

2

89

Assault-Causing grievous bodily harm,..

-Common,

690

943

Regulation of Chinese People. Ordinance 8 of 1858,–

Building-Occupying or erecting, on land not being

under lease from the Crown,

14

16

"2

-Indecent,

4

Mendicancy,

21

21

፡፡ On Peace Officer,...

Person-Forcible taking or keeping of,

Regulation of Chinese Ordinance 13 of 1888,-

Bills-Posting, without permission from Registrar

-Unnatural Offence-Committing,..

3

3

General.

3

4

Child Stealing,

17

Drums and Gongs-Night noises by beating,

10

10

Cutting and wounding with intent to do grievous

bodily harm.

18

18

Cutting and wounding with intent to commit murder,

Fireworks-Discharging, without permits..... Lights or Passes-Chinese out at night, without, River Steamers, Ordinance 16 of 1895,-

342

342

149

149

Manslaughter,

Murder,

Rape,

Stupefying drug; &c.-Administering,

Carried forward,..

|7,853 9,507

Passage-Obtaining, or attempting to obtain, with-

out payment in River Steamers,

Rogues and Vagabonds, 5th of Geo. IV Chapter 83. s. 4.- Rogues and Vagabonds-As suspicious characters,..

Carried forward ..

9

11

11

10,632 12,315

:

:

OFFENCES.

Brought forward,.....

Rogues and Vagabonds,― Continued.

Rogues and Vagabonds-Being in possession of house-

breaking implements,

Rogues and vagibonds-found in Dwelling house,

&c. for unlawful purpose,

Rogues and Vagabonds-Receiving monies &c. for

Charitable Contributions under false pretences,... Rogues and Vagabonds-Indecent exposure of person, logues and Vagabonds--Gambling in the Street, Rogues and Vagabonds-Wandering abroad and

lodging in the open air,

Sale of Food and Drugs Ordinance 18 of 1896,-

Breach of,

Spirit Licences, Ordinance 21 of 1886,-

Grocer's Licence-Refusing to show-to Police, Intoxicating Liquors-Selling without license,

12

-Adulteration of, .

Public House-Intoxicating Liquor, Selling during

prohibited hours in,

Public House-Permitting disorder in,,

"

-Refusing to produce-License of-to |

Police,

-Sign-Production of Spirit License..

Unlicensed Place-Drinking intoxicating liquor in....)

Stowaways Ordinance 7 of 1897,--

The Tramways Ordinance 6 of 1883,-

Stowaways.

Breach of,

Carried forward,

Magistracy, Hongkong, January 1898.

CASES,-Continued.

No. OF CASES.

No. OF

PRI- SONERS.

OFFENCES.

No. 07 CASES.

123

No. of PRI- SONERS.

10,632 12,315

Brought forward,..

|10,938 | 12,621

The Uniform Ordinance 10 of 1895,-

Military Uniform-Wearing,..

4

4

6

Vagrancy, Ordinances 12 of 1888 and 25 of 1897,—

Vagrants.

10

10

71

71

Waterworks. Ordinance 16 of 1890,-

Water Wasting,

129

130

1

3

Water Works-Valve of-Wrongfully opening.. Weights and Measures Ordinance 8 of 1885,-

1

1

Breach of,

21

21

197

197

Wild Birds and Game, Ordinances 15 of 1885 and 4 of

1892,-

Birds and Game - Unlicensed taking of,

3

4

2

2

Women and Girls Protection Ordinances 11 of 1890, 6 of

1894, and 9 of 1897,-

1

1

10

10

Decoying women or girls into or away from the

Colony,

37

49

2

Detaining, harbouring, or receiving women or girls

for the purpose of prostitution,

16

20

Disorderly House Keeping a,

9

Indecent assault upon any female,

1

-

Letting out for hire women or girls for the purpose

of prostitution and knowingly deriving profits therefrom,

Procuration of girls under 16 to have carnal con-

nexion,

3

3

Purchasing, pledging, or selling women or girls for

the purpose of prostitution,

11

11

2

2

10,938 |12,621

TOTAL,..

11,185 12,886

H. E. WODEHOUSE, Police Magistrate.

124

ABSTRACT of CASES brought under COGNIZANCE at the POLICE MAGISTRATES' COURT during a period of Ten Years, from 1st January, 1888, to 31st December, 1897, inclusive.

CASES, HOW DIsposed of, and THE NUMBER OF Male and FEMALE PRISONERS UNDER EACH Head.

YEARS.

TOTAL NUMBER

OF CASES.

Convicted and Punished.

Discharged.

Committed for Trial at Supreme

Court.

Committed to Prison or detained pending Orders of His Excellency the Governor.

Ordered to find Security.

Punished for Preferring

Total

To keep the Peace,

False Charge | Undecided.

Number

to be of Good Beha- viour, and to answer

any Charge.

or giving False Testimony.

of Defendants.

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

B

1-1

15

16

17

|

M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F. M.

F.

M.

F.

1888,

11,647

9,700

232

2,704

145

168

co

98

11

177

15

3

48

:

889,.

8,670

6,626

268 2,319

178

157

10

44

10

303

34

17

64

1890,

9,739

7,423 317

2,406

151

102

15

259

59

:

3

...

35

炒炒饼

1891,

13,676

13,438

534 1,906

134

40

12

153

:

19

1

143

1892,

11.920

11,771 327 1,927

151

40

4

5

191

20

7

:

28

2 12,898 411

9,530 503

10,243

529

ลง

15,693 689

13,969 502

Total,..... 55,652

48,558 1,678 11,262

759

507

20

174

21

1.083

147

31

318

д

62,333 2,634

Average per

Year,

11,130-4

9,791 6 335-6 2,252-4

151-8

101-4 4:0

348

4.2

2166

29.4

2

6.2

63.6

1-8

12,466 6 526.8

893,

10,727

10,049 306 1,532

75

102

01

1894,

10,447 9,465 302 1,716

95

63

1895,

1896,

17,016 15,058 725 2,345 196

17,767 16,659 797 1,371 203

51

62

21

1897,

11,185 10,237 518 1,481 151

73

12

1

242

36

17

23

11,972

420

5

255

23

10

1

16

11,530 423

232

77

12

199

17,897 1,001

232

72

28

5

115

18,408 | 1,100

183

88 25

79

12,079 807

Total,...... 67,142 61,4682,678 8,445 720

351

40

14

A

1,144

296

92

10

432

71,946 3,751

Average per}

Year,

13,428 4 12,293 6 535-6 1,689 0

144-0

70 2

80

2.8

0.4

228.8

59-2

18:4

2:0

86.4

10

14,389 2 | 750-2

Grand Total

for the 10 122,794 110,4264,856 | 19,707 1,479 Years,

858

60

188

28

2,227

143

123

10

750

14

134,279 6,385

Average per

Year,

12,279 4 1,042-6435-61,970-7 1479

85.8

6:0

18.8

28

222.7

44 3

12:3

1.0

75·0

13,427-9638.5

Magistracy, Hongkong, January, 1898.

H. E. WODEHOUSE,

Police Magistrate.

No. 2.

MAGISTRACY,

HONGKONG, 28th January, 1898.

SIR-I have the honour to forward herewith the usual Annual Returns for the year 1897 in connection with all cases of death brought to my notice during the year.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

The Honourable

J. H. STEWART LOCKHART,

Colonial Secretary.

H. E. WODEHOUSE,

Police Magistrate.

125

BURIED WITHOUT FORMAL ENQUIRIES.

TABLE A.-Return of ALL DEATHS REPORTED DURING THE YEAR 1897.

NATIONALITY.

FORMAL ENQUIRIES HELD.

Men. Women. Boys. Girls. Total. Men. Women. Boys. Girls.

Sex not ascertainable.

Total.

Europeans and Americans,

11

...

Indians and Malays,......

:

:.

Japanese,

...

Chinese,

32

16

:

CH

11

-K

4

2

1

my

:

:

2

1

3

1

:

:

:

:

:

1

6

58

128

27

212 208

16

591

Total,......

43

16

4

6

69 135

30

213

208

16

602

Total for 1896, .

35

8

2

3

48

228

36

149

141

35

589

H. E. WODEHOUSE,

Police Magistrate.

TABLE B.-RETURN OF FORMAL ENQUIRIES DURING THE YEAR 1897.

Magistracy, 28th January, 1898.

FINDING.

Euro-

peans.

Chinese.

Men. Men. Women. Boys. Girls.

1

10

1

1

1

1

1

:

:

1

:

:

:

:

co

3

I

Total.

:

:

2

1

1

::

Accidental death,.

Accidental death-Suffocated by a fall of earth,........

Accidental drowning,

Accidentally drowned,

Cause of death-Fracture of the skull caused by a fall from a verandah whilst

suffering from the effects of drink,

Cause of death-Pressure on the brain from hemorrhage the result of a blow given by one Meelun, a seaman on board H. I. G. M. S. Arcona, with a stick,........

Compound fracture of the skull occasioned by a fall while attempting to escape

from the lawful arrest of the Police,

Death by burning occasioned by an accidental outbreak of fire in Houses

Nos. 14 and 15, Fuk Tsun Heung,

Death by drowning caused by the subsidence of 360 feet of the Praya Recla-

mation wall. We attach no blame to anybody,

Death by opium poisoning, but how or by whom administered to the Deceased,

there is no evidence before the Court to show,...

Death from an overdose of opium,.

Death from asphyxia,

Death from asphyxia caused by a wound inflicted on the neck of the deceased with some sharp instrument by some person supposed to be the husband of the deceased and with intent to murder,

Death from asphyxia caused by hanging, self-inflicted,

Death from heat apoplexy,......................

Death from injuries received from a blow from a drum weighing thirty-four

pounds and falling a distance of thirty feet upon the head of the deceased,... Death from intra-cranial hoemorrhage occasioned by a fall from the hatch of

the main deck of the S.S. Haimun into the hold below,.

Death from natural causes,.

Death from phthisis,

Death from suffocation or fire upon the occasion of the destruction of House

64, Third Street by fire on the night of the 23rd November,...

Death occasioned by injuries received from a fall in jumping over the verandah of the first floor of the Government Civil Hospital in which he was a patient while in a state of mental aberration,

Carried forward,.

:

:

.:

12

Ι

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

:

2

1

-

1

1

2

1

1

1

3

:::

:

:

1

1

1

1

1

2

1

10

5

15

1

3

24

14

4

5

50

126

Chinese.

TABLE B.-RETURN OF FORMAL ENQUIRIES DURING THE YEAR 1897,—Continued.

FINDING.

Euro-

peans.

Men.

Men. Women. Boys. Girls.

Co

3

24

14

:

2

21

:

:.

:

:

:

'Total.

10

5

:

:.

50

2

1

1

1

1

I

J

1

1

1

3

3

1

1

1

1

2

2

1

1

Brought forward,..............

Death occasioned by the falling of the buildings 248 and 250, Queen's Road West, through the collapse of the party wall, occasioning death by asphyxia in the case of Un Ming and death by shock through injuries received in the case of Lai Tai Sin, there being no sufficient evidence to show what was the immediate cause of the collapse of the party wall...... Death occurred from injuries received from an accidental explosion.......... Death resulted from a bullet wound self-inflicted consequent upon mental distress in connection with money difficulties into which he had fallen with the Hongkong High-Level Tramway Co., Ld, of which he had been the Superintendent since 1892,

Death resulting from injuries received through the collapse of the party wall

dividing Houses 92 and 94, Hollywood Road,................

Death resulting from the effects of a fall from the verandah of the Second floor of Wellington Barracks over which the deceased jumped while in an unsound state of mind,

Drowned by deceased's boat being run down by the Danish S.S. Frejr. Accident due to Deceased having put her helm down instead of up and so attempted to re-cross the bows of the steamer,

Found drowned,

Murdered by some person or persons unknown,

Suicide by cutting her throat whilst temporarily insane, Suicide by drowning whilst temporarily insane,

Suicide by hanging,........

Suicide by hanging whilst of unsound mind,

Suicide by shooting through the head whilst in a state of mental aberration, That deceased came to his death by the collapse of No. 35, East Street due

to the shore having given way,

The Magistrate finds that the death of the deceased was occasioned by injuries received from a fall while engaged in working a piece of machinery on board H.M.S. Undaunted over the side of the ship, and that the fall was occasioned by the use of an old or worn out strand which gave in the hands of the deceased as he pulled at it,

Total,....

Magistracy, 28th January, 1898.

:

1

1

:

:

:

1

1

11

32

16

4

6

69

H. E. WODEHOUSE,

Police Magistrate.

TABLE C-RETURN OF BURIALS WITHOUT FORMAL ENQUIRIES DURING THE YEAR 1897.

Reason why no Formal Enquiry was held.

Chinese.

Europeans and Americans.

Indians

and Malays.

Japanese.

Men. Women. Boys. Girls. Men. Women. Boys. Men. Women. Man.

Sex not

*p[qvux641008u

Total.

Found on

Found in

Harbour.

Known.

Land.

Un-

known.

Known.

Un-

known.

102 19 170 168

4

5

41

38

17

2

:.

No suspicious circumstances, No evidence and/or decomposed

state of body,

Post Mortem satisfactory,

Suspected persons were tried

for the murder of deceased, ... Suspected persons were tried for

causing the death of deceased,

Total......

4

:

ลง

2

1

:

:

:

128

27

212

208

Magistracy, Hongkong, 28th January, 1898.

:

1

1

1

1

469 70

290

20

89

:

16

102

55

47

1

:..

21 13

6

2

N

:

:

:

A

:

:

:

7

7

3

3

:

:

1

1

16

602 93

351 20

138

:

:

H. E. WODEHOUSE, Police Magistrate,

145

No. 10

98

HONGKONG.

SUPREME COURT RETURNS FOR 1897.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government.

No. 28.

SUPREME COUrt, HONGKONG, 10th February, 1898.

SIR, I have the honour to forward to you herewith the return of Criminal cases in the Supreme Court for 1897.

The Honourable

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

J. W. NORTON KYSHE, Registrar.

COLONIAL SECRETARY,

&C.,

&c.,

&c.

RETURN of CRIMINAL CASES that have been brought under the COGNIZANCE of the SUPREME Court,

during the last Ten Years.

Charges Abandoned.

Postponed.

Number Number

YEAR.

of Cases.

of Convicted. Acquitted. Persons.

No. of Cases.

No. of Persons.

No. of Cases.

No. of Persons.

1888,

101

186

99

47

(g) 1889,

92

143

64

41

24

1890,

59

80

43

20

1891,

32

37

26

9

1892,

30

44

18

17

8472+

40

37

17

2

9

Total,

314

490

250

134

65

105

:

1893,

43

57

33

16

1894,

36

44

21

17

1895,

26

39

23

9

1896,

64

60

27

26

(f) 1897,

52

67

39

17

11

89761

4654

1

1

11

Total,

221

267

143

85

30.

38

2

6

Average of 1st)

Period,

624

98

50

261

13

21

Average of 2ndĮ

441

Period,....f

383

cako

283-

17

6

73383

:

g. In one case the recognizance estreated; this case is included in the total, but not in any other of the above headings.

In one case the recognizance estreated.

J. W. NORTON KYSHE,

Registry, Supreme Court, Hongkong, 10th day of February, 1898.

Registrar.

146

INDICTMENTS and INFORMATIONS in the SUPREME Court of HONGKONG for the Year 1897.

Including Attempts and Conspiracies to commit the several offences.

Showing how the cases tried in the Superior Courts ended.

(Each Prisoner tried counts as a separate case; where a large number of Prisoners have been conviened together, the fact is mentioned in a note.)

Total.

Murder.

Manslaughter.

Attempt at Murder.

Concealment of Birth.

Judgment for the Crown,.........

39

1

Judgment for the Prisoners,...... 16

1

Prisoner found Insane,

1

1

Cases which fell through for want of prosecution or ab- sence of accused, and cases thrown out by the Grand Jury (Attorney General),

Cases postponed,

11

3

:

67

:

CO

6

5

:

:

:

:.

:

:

:

Abortion.

:

:

Registry, Supreme Court, Hongkong, 10th day of February, 1898.

Rape.

Unnatural Crimes.

Robbery with violence.

Other offences against the Person.

Offences against Property.

Miscellaneous Offences.

:

:.

:

1

:

:

1

:

:

:

:.

3

15

10

10

5

3

1

10

5

:

:

:

CO

3

:

N

1

1

6

21

14

12

J. W. NORTON Kyshe,

Registrar.

COMPARATIVE TABLE showing the NUMBER of OFFENCES, APPREHENSIONS, CONVICTIONS and ACQUITTALS

for the last Four Years.

The Number of Convictions in the Superior Courts-

1. For Offences against the Person, ....

2. For Offences against the Property,

3. For other Offences,......

The Number of Persons acquitted-

2. In the Superior Courts,

Registry, Supreme Court, Hongkong, 10th day of February, 1898.

1894.

1895.

1896.

1897.

16

17

15

24

1

10

10

4

2

10

5

17

9

32

3e

28

J. W. NORTON Kyshe,

Registrar.

}

་ ་་-་

1

A

Number of Cases tried.

Number of Persons tried.

RETURN of CRIMINAL CASES tried in the SUPREME COURT of HONGKONG during the Year 1897.

SENTENCE.

147

Charges Cases

Abandoned. Postponed.

CRIMES.

3

1

1

1

1

3

Administering stupifying drug with intent to

commit an indictable offence, ...

Arson,

Assault with intent to commit buggery, .........

Bribery of a Police Constable,

Buggery..

Conspiring to obstruct and pervert the due course

of public justice,

Demanding money with menaces,

Embezzlement,

Forgery,

Having forged Bank Note in possession, knowing

1

1

same to be forged,

1

Larceny,

Larceny by a Servant,

Larceny in a dwelling house,.

Manslaughter,.

Murder,

Obtaining money under false pretences,

Perjury,

1

1

1

Rape,

1

1

Returning from banishment,

Robbery with violence,

Setting fire to a dwelling house, there being person

therein,

Uttering a forged letter,

41

57

la

Uttering counterfeit coin,

Women and Girls'

Protection Ordinance 1890,

ai!

Offences under,..

Wounding with intent to do grievous bodily harm............

16 Wounding with intent to commit murder,

3

Of 67 Persons

Recognizance estreated........

1

Nin

Convicted.

3

:

:

:

2

1

:

:

:

:

Acquitted.

Death.

Death Recorded.

Hard Labour

over One Year.

Hard Labour One

Year and under.

Solitary Confinement-

Number of Persons.

Number of Persons. Privately Flogged-

No. of Cases.

No. of Persons.

No. of Cases.

No. of Persons.

1

ܗ: ::

39

17

3

2

1

:

27

H

C1

Hei Hi Hi ami

3

1

10 were not indicted which are included under the heading of "Charges Abandoned," ...10

Nii

::

1

2

::

com:

1

1 1

...

...

...

3

...

1

11

11

..56 were indicted.

1

67 Persons.

-

a. Defendant failed to appear, and recognizance estreated.

b. Prisoner having been found by a Jury empannelled for the purpose was committed to Gaol pending the Orders of His Excellency

the Governor.

Registry, Supreme Court, Hongkong, 10th day of February, 1898.

J. W. NORTON KYSHE, Registrar.

...

65 ·

No.

1

98

No. 1.

HONGKONG.

REPORT OF THE HEAD MASTER OF QUEEN'S COLLEGE FOR 1897.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor.

QUEEN'S COLLEGE,

4th January, 1898.

SIR,-I have the honour to forward herewith the Annual Report on this College for the

year 1897.

1. 681 boys were admitted in the course of the past twelve months, raising the total Roll from 531 in January to 1,212 in December. It is thus evident that we have in the same year been practi- cally dealing with two separate schools, an old and a new one, each as large as the old Central School, whose record total attendance in 1888 was 634. It is a somewhat formidable undertaking to organise in one year an entirely new school of 600 scholars; but the task of suitably accommodating and classifying an inrush of 600 new candidates for admission is even more complex.

2. The total accommodation provided is 924 seats. We had a monthly attendance of over 900 scholars, during seven months of the year; the largest numbers being 961 in September, 950 in May, 942 in June. The attendance 900 has only been touched in one previous year, viz., 1891, when the College was a novelty; in March and April of that year the figures 919, 932 were attained, to fall however before its close to 744, whereas in December last 866 boys were present.

3. This sudden access of numbers is due to a natural spontaneous cause, which we may therefore reasonably expect to prove abiding. A demand for European education has arisen, during the last two years, throughout the length and breadth of China. Native English teaching schools have sprung up in Canton, Swatow and the neighbourhood of Macao; while even in Yokohama, the Chinese com- munity are about to open a school where English, Japanese and Chinese will be taught.

4. It is a matter of congratulation to the Government, that the original estimate of 700 seats, made by Dr. STEWART in 1882, was not adhered to. Ten years ago, I recommended 770 as a minimum, and subsequently 924 as a maximum accommodation; alleging as a reason the overcrowding in the Central School, owing to the want of capacity in the building to meet the demand, increasing every decade. From a financial point of view, too, it must be satisfactory to have 224 extra monthly fees, without additional cost in the way of increased staff.

5. My experience at the old Central School, with its 450 boys, taught me, that it was only when the demand exceeded the supply, that regular attendance could be enforced with the necessary strict- ness. Chinese are like most other people, they value most what there is some difficulty in obtaining. If a guardian finds that his boy's seat, vacated for some trivial cause, is taken in his absence by another, he learns to respect the exigencies of school routine. I am therefore glad to draw attention to a pronounced improvement this year in attendance.

6. The total amount of Fees collected this year has been $13,460 or $3,500 in excess of last year's revenue from this source, and beating the previous record in 1895 of $12,667. It should be remem- bered that the largest amount of Fees collected in the old Central School was $6,899 in 1888, and prior to my arrival in 1882, $4,051 in 1881.

7. It should be manifest, that the introduction of so many new boys has necessitated very rapid promotions; this will be the more evident when it is understood, that of the 587 new boys (not including 94 re-admissions) 443 went to the Preparatory, 115 to the Lower, and 29 to the Upper School, 22 of these last being admitted to the non-Chinese classes. As a consequence 8 Boys from Class IV were examined in Class II, 24 from Class V in Class III; and more remarkable still 23 boys from Class VII were examined in Class IV, and 12 from Class VIII in Class V. From these speci- mens, the intensity of the upward impetus may perhaps be estimated.

8. Three little books on English Conversation were prepared by myself, at the instance of the Governing Body, and printed at the expense of the Government early in the year.

in the year. But as the cost necessitated excess of the amount provided for this item, the Government more than re-imbursed itself by selling to scholars the balance of these stores in hand. His Excellency the Governor then approved of my recommendation that all books, published in the Colony for the express use of this College, should cease to be included in School Stores, the expense of which is defrayed by the Fees paid in Vacation Months. Scholars were therefore instructed to procure such books for themselves at shops.

9. The immediate result was, that a very useful bilingual vocabulary long in use in manuscript form, prepared by the Second Master (Mr. A. J. MAY), was approved by the Governing Body and published.

66

[10.

10. Towards the end of the year, I submitted three suggestions, which, on the recommendation of the Governing Body, received His Excellency's approval. The object aimed at in all of them was the same, viz., the increase of English-teaching power throughout the College, as follows:-in the Preparatory School, by abolishing Monitors and appointing an extra Chinese Assistant;-in the Lower School, by relieving English Masters of Mathematical lessons in the Upper School; a com- petent Native Mathematical Master to be appointed, thus leaving the English Masters at liberty to give lessons in English Reading, etc. to classes in the Lower School;-in the College generally, by increasing the English Staff by two Masters. The scheme is to divide the Assistant Masters into two Grades, Senior and Junior, four in each, thus providing eight instead of six English Masters, at a slight additional cost to Governinent, the services of two Chinese Assistants being, of course, dispensed with. Mr. JAMESON's resignation affords opportunity for the appointment of one of these additional masters, the full realisation of the project having to await a further vacancy in the Senior Grade.

11. Mr. JAMESON, absent on leave, resolved not to return to the Colony as he has found the climate prejudicial to his health; he accordingly resigned from the 30th September. During his nine years' service, he proved himself a capable and energetic master, all the classes under his charge pass- ing with very high percentages at the Annual Examinations. The College experienced another serious loss, in the untimely death, last August, of Mr. CHU TSUN-CHING, Third Chinese Assistant, for many years most successfully in charge of the Fourth Class. Mr. CHỮ was head boy of the Second Class, at the first Annual Examination conducted by me on my arrival in January 1882, and with one excep- tion was the oldest of the Chinese Assistants, who began their professional career under my manage- ment. Being of a happy, cheerful disposition, he was a general favourite with the whole Staff, English and Chinese. Mr. BARCLAY, who acted for Mr. JAMESON, left in July on obtaining an appointment as Head Master of an English School at Nanking. We were fortunate in securing the services of Mr. HANKEY, in October, to supply the vacancy. Mr. WOODCOCK returned from leave in the middle of October. In September Mr. JONES, who returned from leave in January, was temporarily transferred to the Supreme Court, as we then were daily expecting Mr. JAMESON's return.

12. The rapid promotions amongst the Chinese Staff call for some remark. Mr. LUK SIK-KWONG, who was Second Pupil Teacher last January, is now Acting Sixth Chinese Assistant, which represents a rise of seven steps in twelve months. No fewer than 17 different men were Acting Monitors and Pupil Teachers. Considerable strain has therefore been put on all the Junior Chinese Assistants and Pupil Teachers, which was further intensified by the backwardness of their Pupils (para. 7). It affords me much pleasure to be able to speak very highly of the steady courage which they exhibited in cop- ing with these difficulties.

13. Four boys, none of whom was in Chinese dress, obtained Oxford Local Certificates, two Senior and two Junior. As this represents only 18 % instead of our usual 50 %, the result is very disappointing. The depletion of the Upper School, referred to in my last Report, is the chief cause, as may be gathered from the fact that only seven boys remained in December to represent 1.A. and I.B. classes together.

14. The Hongkong Branch of the Navy League awarded two prizes of $20 each to C. B. HAYWARD and R. PESTONJEE, respectively, for successful Essays on the subjects"The Command of the Sea" and "The Use of the British Navy." The Chairman at the Annual Meeting paid a well-deserved compli- ment to Mr. MACHELL on the instruction given by him to the boys in six lectures. I cannot do better than seize this opportunity for recording my appreciation of the improvement in the general work of 1.C. in the past year.

15. On my return from Japan, in September, I noticed that the entire interior of the building had been coloured and painted. For this we are indebted to the activity of the Acting Director of Public Works (Hon. W. CHATHAM), as previously it had been considered impossible to perform this feat within the limits of the vacation-four weeks. Keeping the interior of a school bright and fresh is not a luxury; it conduces largely to the cheerfulness and health of scholars and masters. I would suggest therefore that, if practicable, the interior should be at least colour-washel, once in four or five years. It is nearly twice that period of time since the original painting of this building.

16. I regret to have to report, that there is no abatement in the immoral notoriety of the imme- diate neighbourhood of this College, mentioned in my Aunual Report two years ago. It would appear, that existing legislation is too cuinbrous a machine to set in motion, for the removal of a well known and generally admitted nuisance from a district in the vicinity of several public buildings, a hospital, a Chapel, a large boys' school and the Belilios Public School for Girls.

Attached are the usual Tables.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

GEO, H. BATESON WRIGHT, D.D., Oxon.,

Head Master,

Honourable J. H. STEWART LOCKHART,

Colonial Secretary.

January, February,

March,.

April,

May,

June, July,

August,

1897.

QUEEN'S COLLEGE.

Month.

Number of Scholars.

Number of

Number

Average

of

Attendances.

School Days.

Daily Attendance.

Remarks.

September,

October,

November,

December,

Total,......

531

8,348

17

491

751

4,334

6

722

857

21,101

27

782

915

10,973

13

844

950

21,852

25

874

942

19,313

22

909

20,216

23

877

5,946

961

14,369

953

22,237

920

22,023

866

18,980

NRTEROR

878

879

7

849

16

898

25

889

26

847

23

825

189,692

230

Total Number of ATTENDANCES during 1897,

.189,692

Number of SCHOOL DAYS during 1897,

230

Average DAILY ATTENDANCE during 1897, ...

825

Total Number of SCHOLARS at this School during 1897,

1,212

AVERAGE EXPENSE OF EACH SCHOLAR AT QUEEN'S COLLEGE DURING 1897.

Expenditure,-

Cash Book,

Do., Exchange Compensation,

Crown Agents, ....

Do.,

Adjustment of Exchange,

Deduct,-

School Fees,

Sale of Books,.

.$28,033.55

4,593.95

4,090.54

2,575.56

$39,343.60

$13,460.00

260.08

$13,720.08

$25,623.52

67

Total Expense of the College,..

Average Expense of each Scholar-

Per Number on Roll,

Per Average Daily Attendance,......

$21.14.

.... 31.06

GEO. H. BATESON WRIGHT, D.D., Oxon.,

Head Master.

169

No. 14

98

1

;

:

.

HONGKONG.

REPORT ON QUEEN'S COLLEGE BY THE EXAMINERS APPOINTED BY THE

GOVERNING BODY FOR 1897.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government.

HONGKONG, 11th January, 1898. GENTLEMEN.-We have the honour of laying before you the following report of the Annual Examination which we have, by your request, lately conducted.

A schedule of work was given us and we carefully prepared papers so as at the same time to test the general efficiency of the School and to be able to arrange the boys of each class in order of merit. Some of the questions set were consequently rather difficult for the more backward boys in some classes, but none were really beyond their standard as indicated by the schedule.

We think, on reviewing the whole of our work, that we may have been a little severe in with- holding marks from the lower boys in each class, and we are not prepared to say that the number of boys obtaining less than half marks represents truly the number of those who should be written down as failures. Such remarks as we shall make should be read in connection with the results as shown by

the mark sheets.

We consider, (in view of the fact that a large number of boys have been in the School less than six months), that the result of the Examination shows that there has been steady and useful work going on, and that, in spite of conspicuous failures in some classes, the education given is satisfactory. It should be borne in mind that in a School of nearly 900 boys it is difficult to impart a uniformity of knowledge in the various subjects, and that under the most favourable conditions there is likely to be a large number of stupid or idle boys whose work will tend to lower the standard of the class in which they are examined. We make this suggestion to, in some way, mitigate what may be considered the severity of some of our critical remarks.

The task of reporting upon the work done is as difficult as the work itself is lengthy. If 900 boys do exercises in Dictation, Translation, Arithmetic or Reading, it is manifestly impossible to sum- marise the whole of the work in one subject in a simple sentence or a short one. We have therefore, in some cases, given a more detailed opinion.

The first and last feature which presented itself to us in this examination was, we think, a very important one, and we wish to call attention to it. We refer to the great unevenness of merit in almost every class in almost every subject. No examiner looks for equality throughout a class, but we certainly expected to find more uniformity in each of the eight classes, and especially in each A section. We have been surprised again and again by the disparity between a few boys near the top and a considerable number near the bottom of the same class. We understand that the cause of this is the very rapid promotion which has been made during the past year. We are aware that there has been a very large addition of new boys, but this ought not to produce the result just alluded to. If boys are thus artificially promoted and forced up the School by a large influx at the bottom, one of two results must follow, either the boys thus too rapidly promoted will continually fail, or the standard of the class in which they are thus placed will be lowered. If either of these results obtains, and if the boys are examined on a few months' work only, an annual examination becomes a mere farce and waste of time. We venture to suggest that a remedy may be found in the creation of more parallel divisions so that promotions may be made according to absolute, rather than merely relative, merit.) If there be a class of 150 boys of a certain standard and 50 new boys arrive able to be placed in the same class it is manifestly unwise to promote 50 out of this class to inake room for the new-comers. Possibly also it might be arranged that new boys should not be examined until they have been in the School a certain time unless they show special ability. It would, of course, be necessary to see that at no part of the School, where any idle or stupid boys being neglected for the sake of the more industrious or clever ones. (Though it would be desirable to keep each class full, the first object should be to preserve the standard of it, rather than the number of boys attending it. The work of examination would be easier, and more reliable, and one year's work might be more accurately compared with that of another. We have had in mind the efforts that have been made to promote the study of English, and we are

) glad to be able to state that we have observed some marks of progress in this respect. Some of the Composition and Grammar papers, and the Reading and Conversation, lead us to think that there has been improvement, but there is much yet to be done.

Owing to the inevitable withdrawal of one of the three examiners on account of the pressing nature of his other public duties, the whole of the work devolved upon us. But, with the united approval of yourselves and the Head Master, in Reading and Conversation, we examined a few boys only in each section of the eight classes. The Head Master himself very kindly undertook to hear every boy read and converse before the rest of the examination began so that marks in these subjects could be awarded. We are much indebted to him for this as our tables of marks would be very incomplete without reference to these two subjects. One of the assistant masters also furnished us with marks for shorthand in one class.

170

We now append our remarks on each subject.

Reading and Conversation.-The reading in the upper part of the School was satisfactory; and in the lower fair, but it is scarcely a test to give boys a passage to read which they have already read so often that it has become quite familiar. We notice a tendency to disregard punctuation, to omit or slur over small words of great importance to the sense, and to confuse singulars and plurals, and past and present tenses. It struck us that the chief faults in reading were due to carelessness. In con- versation a few boys did well, many poorly. We hope that it will be found possible to increase the European Staff so that boys can learn to read and speak and write correctly. Much remains to be done before English colloquial can be said to hold its proper place as a subject of instruction in Queen's College.

Writing.-Marks for writing were awarded on the dictation exercises. This writing was eminently satisfactory, showing that almost every boy could write a good hand. Had the general work in other papers been marked for writing, there would have been less satisfaction. Boys often spoilt their work by carelessness, especially in the geography, grammar, and arithmetic papers; and it should be impressed upon them that in examination work there should be more uniformity of neatness. Inaccuracy of work and consequent loss of marks frequently resulted from untidiness.

Dictation. In the upper school, with the exception of IIc (Junior), the dictation was satisfac- tory. The other classes call for more particular remarks. After listening to Chinese masters giving dictation we were not surprised to find a number of words wrongly spelt; for example, in class VB, C, it was very common to see builts for builds, white for wide, comsist for consists, family for firmly, this for these, which for each, and each for its. We are convinced that such mistakes as misserssion, cristinous, dissmisteres, mistrict, esmeid, which occurred in one class as spellings of one word would not have been made if the class had been dictated to by an English voice. In the majority of papers the spelling was fairly correct, but the mistakes, such as escaped for escape, begin for begins, and others equally careless, or showing an equal ignorance of syntax, were far too frequent. VIA,B,C, the punctuation was feeble; some boys showed intelligence, placing the commas correctly; but as a general rule they were omitted or put in promiscuously. In another class we heard the dictation given and were quite prepared to find it written for eat, and eat for it, rope and rogue confused, and teeth spelt teef. We give these instances, in no hypercritical spirit, but because we think them very important. The divisions of class VIII use two different reading books which appear to us to be of unequal standard. The work in VIIIc was absurdly easy and very well done. Boys should be taught simple punctuation, not to divide monosyllables, and how to divide polysyllables.

Arithmetic.-Class IA,B, is very small, only 7 boys. Five of them did satisfactory work on a fairly difficult paper. In Ic., two boys, taking the same paper, did better than any boy in IA, and the rest did well. Several papers in IIA were good, but the work was very uneven: although easy ques- tions were for the most part well done, there were many failures in the harder work. Class III does not compare favourably with the two higher classes. They showed weakness in fractions. Out of 47 boys in IIIA 28 did an example in vulgar fractions in the same way wrongly, and 29 could not do division of decimals correctly. Ic (Junior), who were examined with III, found the

paper too difficult. The work of IV and IIc (Senior) was for the most part untidy, and mistakes were made in consequence of carelessness in writing. In the upper division of V vulgar fractions were fairly well done, but mistakes occurred by boys multiplying when they were asked to divide. In this class and IIc (Junior), who take the same work but do not seem to be up to the same standard, there was here and there a good paper; but on the whole the work was weak. Class VI was also disappointing, Class VII scarcely satisfactory, but the work of Class VIII was neat and promising.

Translation: English to Chinese.-Results in this subject show an improvement upon those of two years ago. The work of IIA, in which class all passed, deserves special mention. Throughout the School the work was well done. We noticed, however, in the lower school, that many boys mistook the meaning of simple English words; and in the upper School, especially in IA, there was a tendency to go beyond mere translation by introducing phrases and even entire sentences which had little or nothing to do with the subject. This latter fault should be carefully guarded against. Chinese who are able to translate correctly often fail to do so because of a disposition to sacrifice accuracy to style. We would suggest that correct translation should be insisted upon as the only means of rendering this part of the work efficient.

Translation: Chinese to English-With a few exceptions in the upper School, there was no attempt at independent translation; the renderings being almost word for word those found in the printed translations. It is not possible to attach much value to the reproduction in examinations of translations learnt by heart; and we are of opinion that the only real test would be made by setting each class a sentence or two of "sight" translation, which should be simpler than the prepared exercises.

Grammar.-The Grammar of the upper school, with the exception of the three non-Chinese classes, was excellent. There was strong evidence of very careful teaching; and we were pleased to find that boys could compose short sentences correctly to illustrate particular points. The analysis of sentences was good. In the other classes the work was weak. Many papers were full of

171

absurd errors arising apparently from attempts to remember statements in the text books which had nothing to do with the questions. In Vc, we noticed a curious instance of the mistake already referred to as cominon in reading, viz., the pronunciation of eat and similar sounds-it and its being given as parts of the verb to eat. A few papers in VA, B were satisfactory, but boys evidently expected certain questions and wrote matter which they were not asked for. In VI half the boys did fairly, but those at the bottom of the class were very weak indeed. The work of VII is very elementary. Parsing in the lower school was poor.

وو

Geography.-Class I took a paper on Physical Geography as well as on the geography of Europe. A few boys did excellently showing that the subject had been well taught, but as a whole the work was spoilt by some very weak papers. There was a common confusion between trade winds and monsoons: the variation in the length of the day at a given place was too often ascribed to the distance of the earth from the sun which was frequently said to be greater in winter than in summer. The practice of guessing, which is not confined to one class, should be strongly discouraged. Class II had studied the geography of England; about a quarter of the boys did well, the rest did not seem to understand the subject. It appeared as if the few at the top had been taught at the expense of the rest of the class. It is necessary to teach boys to answer the questions set, and not to write down random answers, or lists of names not required. There were far too many stupid answers (as "From London to Calais by railway we pass Leeds," "Severn flows N.E. to Humber" and "The coalfields are Ceylon, Russia, South and West Indies"). The maps drawn from memory were good. About half the boys in Class III did satisfactory work; the B section being considerably better than the a. The subject had evidently been carefully taught, but the map-drawing was rather disappointing. The liabit of guessing was again evident. One boy, after writing "Crimea is a town in Germany," wrote "Crimea is a town in Denmark. There were again many ridiculously wrong answers. Class IV offered the geography of China. A fair number of these papers were satisfactorily done, but there were an appalling number of mistakes arising from guessing or ignorance of English. There is too much learning by rote. Many boys do not understand what they write. There were frequent confusions between imports and exports, between imports and seaports, between imports and importance. We think it is right that boys should be taught the geography of their own country; and we would suggest that the geography of China be the subject of lessons in at least two classes. In drawing maps boys should be taught to mark the positions of towns as well as to insert the names, and, in doing so, not to put the position in the sea. They should also be taught to enter in their maps only such names as they are asked to If the text book on China in use now in the School is to be continued, we hope that it may be revised. There does not appear to be consistency in the romanising of Chinese names: for instance, we notice Chungkeng, Chungking, Choongking for the same city; So-ngan and Si-ngan; Kew-kiang and Kiu-kiang; Shan-tung and Shang-tung; Quang-sai and Quang-si; Anam and Annam, &c.; and the provinces of Kiang-si and Kiang. su confused. Class V: Many boys gave definitions well, but failed largely in giving examples in Europe and Asia, which continents they were supposed to have studied. The work of the lower part of the class was very poor: the definitions were much confused, showing that boys had not understood what they had been taught. It seems a pity that the maps to be drawn from memory, which were fairly well done, should not be maps of at least part of the coun- tries learnt from the text book. Had the subject been Africa (the same as the map), we think many boys would have done much better. Class VI: The fact that two or three boys got fair marks, and one (in a) good marks, points to a failure in the rest of the class which should have been avoided. Boys, who are taught "definitions," should be able to give fair examples of them. Scarcely any boys could give the capitals of England, China, and India. The maps of Hongkong drawn from memory were for the most part good.

enter.

Composition:---In Class I and in two divisions of Class V there was a high percentage of passes. In the other classes the percentage varied from 50 to 70, except in Class IIc (Junior) which was miserably weak. The highest class wrote on the question, "What are the best means of developing the resources of China." Five good essays were sent in from each section of the class. There was little evidence of original personal effort, but several boys showed an appreciation of China's condition, and an acquaintance with schemes of reform which have from time to time been suggested in news- papers. In the best papers the examiners are able to commend the order of treatment and general style. To the other classes short stories were read, and the boys were required to reproduce them in their own language immediately afterwards. Class II did fairly well; but as regards the style of composition in the lower classes, we can only say that many boys wrote in a language so peculiarly their own as to be quite unintelligible to the examiners. We would here repeat the opinion which has been already expressed that until colloquial English is more thoroughly learned by Chinese boys in the lower classes, their written English will never be satisfactory.

History:--A special period of 150 years only was offered by Class I; Classes II and III offered outlines of longer periods. The work of Ia, Ic (Senior) and IIA was good, and that of IIIB excellent. In Ic (Junior), IIc and IIIA answers were generally feeble and meagre. Two boys in Ic distinguished themselves, C. H. LEE gaining full marks and C. B. HAYWARD, 96. Although no general history was offered by Class I, the examiners deemed it advisable to ask a few easy questions outside the special period scheduled. Results showed, in many cases, so slight an acquaintance with facts of primary importance outside the period, that we question whether all the time devoted to this subject is wisely

172

spent in teaching comparatively unimportant details within the period. Whilst we think special studies in history should be encouraged, we are strongly convinced that broad general outlines should be clear in the mind before special attention is given to brief epochs in the early centuries of English History. We suggest, therefore, that boys in the highest class be required to prepare for their year's work both special and general history.

.

Algebra:-There is evidence of careful teaching in this subject. Two boys in Ia did excellently. While in Ic (Senior) fully three-quarters of the boys passed satisfactorily. In IIA a fair proportion of the boys gained good marks, but there were many weak papers. In IIIA there was some satisfactory work, but only three attempts were made at factors which are evidently not taught; there were also many mistakes in simple rules. IIIB is, in this subject as in so many others, in strong contrast to IIIA. They took the same paper and showed that they had been taught to work accurately. Ic (Junior) ought to have done better. IIc (Senior) have evidently not been taught factors, and the common mistakes in simple rules were very frequent. At present it would be better not to teach this class Algebra, but to let them improve their arithmetic.

Euclid:-In Ia there were two excellent papers, and two very poor indeed. The upper part of IIA and a few boys scattered up and down did very well indeed, in the small amount that they offered (Book I. 1-26). The rest did badly, making terrible confusion between the uses of and, therefore, for and because in an argument; they failed to apply I. 4 properly. In Ic (Junior), taking a shorter paper (propos. 1-15), only two boys wrote proposition 2 and only one proposition 12 correctly. No other propositions were written out well. The papers were full of bad mistakes. In IIIA only 15 boys out of 47 passed, but most of these did creditably (on propositions 1-12). The faults arising fom attempts at learning by heart are evident in the omission of important steps in an argument, and in the impossible order in which sentences are arranged. The majority of these boys do not under- stand what they try to write and the suggestion was forced upon the examiners again and again that the time of the class might be spent more profitably. In Euclid, if symbols are allowed for abbreviation care should be taken that they are thoroughly understood. In IIIB there was again evidence of much better teaching: Many propositions were correctly written out. On November 20th, within a month of the examination, the Head Master reported to us that one division of Class II could not offer Euclid as "they know nothing." As they had offered the first 15 propositions and this is supposed to be a year's work, the remark which was made in the Report of 1895, that "at present the time spent upon it (Euclid) is, in the majority of cases, wasted," is, in this particular case, partially confirmed.

General Information and Intelligence:-This paper afforded a test of power of expression rather than of information in possession of the boys. Although there were some intelligent papers, the results showed a weakness amongst boys other than English in expressing themselves.

Shorthand:-We consulted an expert in regard to the special test in shorthand; he writes to us as follows:--"The writer should not have tackled dictation with his present knowledge of contractions and grammalogues; and if an examiner were inclined to be severe he would deduct marks for faulty outlines. Between each line of shorthand there should be a clear line of space; then outline does not run into outline. As a general rule there should be no speed dictation until the pupil has reached the

reporting style '.'

Shakespeare:--Class I. prepared the first two Acts of "The Merchant of Venice." The upper boys in both divisions of the class did remarkably good papers: the rest were very weak. This short portion of a play appears to be the work of one term only. We suggest that the work of a longer period should be presented for the annual examination.

French :--One boy did excellently. Several boys in Ic did very satisfactorily on an easier paper. IIc (Senior) was very weak, but they had apparently only just begun the subject.

Book-keeping-Of the seven papers from Ia four were correctly, though not very neatly, done. In IIA half the boys passed, though only two obtained high marks.

Both

Latin:--One boy offered Latin and did a good paper on elementary grammar and Cæsar I. 1-30.

papers were marked by accuracy and style.

Pupil Teachers:--We examined three Pupil Teachers in ten subjects along with Class I, but their work did not compare favourably with that of the boys. All failed in Dictation and Geography, only one passed in History and in Arithmetic, but in Grammar and Composition they did fairly.

We recommend the following boys for Scholarships :-

Morrison Senior: C. H. LEE.

Morrison Junior: HUNG HING KAM.

Stewart:

LO PUN FAI.

Belilios Senior:

C. H. LEE and C. B. HAYWARD.

}

Belilios Junior:

WONG TAK KWONG.

And prizes for special subjects according to the mark sheets.

-

173

In the above remarks, we have tried to make a fair criticism of the work as it was presented to us, and if we have been obliged to censure some of the work we would not have it forgotten that there is much which we have praised. In almost all classes the work of many boys was distinctly satis- factory, and we are of opinion that there has been a general improvement in most subjects during the past two years. We strongly recommend the increased study of the English language, and, as far as possible, under English Masters. Believing that the large number of admissions during the past year has been chiefly due to an increasing desire on the part of the Chinese to receive an English education, we trust that the College will be fully able to meet this demand.

Lastly, we have to thank the Head Master and the Assistant Masters for their help during the examination.

We have the honour, Gentlemen,

To be your obedient Servants,

R. F. COBBOLD, M.A.,

THOMAS W. PEARCE,

Examiners.

P.S.-Appended is a table showing the percentages of "Passes" (half marks or over) in each

subject in each class.

To the

GOVERNING BODY OF QUEEN'S College,

Grammar.

Geography.

History.

Reading.

Eng. to Ch.

Ch. to Eng.

HONGKONG.

QUEEN'S COLLEGE, HONGKONG.

ANNUAL EXAMINATION, 1897.

Percentages of Passes in each Subject in each Class.

French.

Shorthand.

Arithmetic.

Algebra.

Euclid.

Book-keeping.

Composition.

Writing.

Shakespeare.

Colloquial.

Dictation.

Gen. Int.

IA., Ics,

86

29

63 55

Ic.,

53

20

IIA.,.

88

27

IIcs,

0

IICJ.,

15 8 38

220*

≈22

71 100 73

100

100

100

13 100

::

::

:882383

80

90

73

::

17

20

IIIA.,

91 26

IIIB.,

100 65 97

82895

69 100

100

82

37

36

95

28

85

::

47

10

15

76

98

100

IVA., IVB., IVc.,

35 59

100

21 41

100

35 49

100

VA VB., Vc.,

8

39

100

29 16

100

16

9

100

!

VIA., VIB.,

35

32

VIC.,

11

69:

97

10

100

96

VIIA.,

VIIB.,

VIIC.,

VIIIA., VIIIB., VIIIC.,

P.T.,

100

0 33

92293

49

87

20

:::

96

86

94

89

94 73

28253

*** 8 8 N 288 288 **

83

92

87

66

78

65

71

65

66

68

39

70 41

72

63

60

82

76 85

82

65 77

40

281 282 28 28I RAI 89

32

26

90

39

26:22

43 29 43 86 58 73

45

7 13

888

100

51

50

5

32

71

65

31

65

30

10

78

54

65

16

༄ན་མ|ཚེཎྜཤྩ

100

43

70

100 64 100 100

93

100 0 60 100

69

100

100 100

100

100

::

100 100

100

100

100

50

100

588 589 2 898953

57 71

29

50

8880

12

57

77

0

47

60

85

46

31

72

98

50

68

90

65 92

46

78

63 65

49 91

61

81

31 66

69

19

73

18

71

14

888

31

66

41 70

13

68

87

67

63

61

100 100

:

:::

:

:

:

:

53

100

89

47

100

70

34

100

67

585

81

100

69

100

61

100

67

:

:

100

100

20885

:::

:

:

:

91

76

98

:::

que a aca ao & 00 20 2000

8

16

13

32

57

35

34

58

32

34

58

33

58

56

31

53

56

37

67

0

0

3

900

No. of Boys.

351

No. 28

98

HONGKONG.

THE EDUCATIONAL REPORT FOR 1897.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government,

No. 29.

EDUCATION DEPARTMENT,

HONGKONG, 25th May, 1898.

SIR,-I have the honour to forward to you the Annual Report on the schools under my super- vision for the year 1897.

2. GENERAL EDUCATIONAL STATISTICS.--The total number of Educational Institutions known to have been at work in the Colony during the past year is 224 with an enrolment of 11,177 pupils. This number includes the Police School where 344 police officers receive irregular instruction, and 111 schools with 2.827 pupils which are in no way connected with the Government; 103 being schools maintained by the Chinese community, and the rest, with one exception, being schools supported by Roman Catholic religious institutions. The remaining schools, 112 in number, are maintained by the Government or aided by it, and are all subject to Government supervision, and in them 7,929 scholars were under instruction. Compared with the year 1896 these figures are on the whole satisfactory, but to obtain a correct idea of the position it is necessary to go back as far as the year 1893, as the effects of the plague in 1894 and in 1896 are still felt in various localities. Com- pared then with that year the Government Schools, and in these I do not include the Police School which is of an exceptional character, show an increase of 121 scholars. This is more than accounted for by the large increase in the number of pupils in the schools where English is taught, and in the Chinese division of the Belilios Public School. The actual number of schools has decreased from 24 to 16. The Grant-in-Aid Schools have decreased in number from 102 to 96, and the number of scholars attending them is 708 short of what it was in 1893. This loss occurs principally in the three districts of Saiyingpun, Tai-ping-shan, and Sheungwan in Vict ria, where the number of schools has fallen from 41 to 29, and of scholars, from 2,784 to 1,900. The Kai-fong Schools in these districts also show a loss of 29 schools and 406 scholars, whilst in the villages of Hongkong 10 schools have been closed. The total figures for the Kai-fong Schools for the past year are 103 schools and 2,247 scholars, as compared with 144 schools and 2,596 scholars in 1893. There is thus room for a good deal of improvement before the position of education, so far as Chinese Schools are concerned, becomes as good as it was before the plague. Of the nationality of the scholars, it is impossible to speak with exactness, but I believe about 7,780 to be Chinese and 3,060 non-Chinese.

3. DECENNIAL STATISTICS OF SCHOOLS UNDER THE INSPECTORATE.-The total number of schools subject to supervision and to examination by the Inspector of Schools last year was 111, and the number of scholars receiving instruction in them was 6,787. The corresponding figures for the years 1887 and 1877 are respectively 93 and 5,373, and 44 and 2,534. The large increase in the number of schools and scholars between the years 1877 and 1887 was due to the revision of the Grant-in-Aid Code in 1878.

4. TRIENNIAL STATISTICS.-As stated above, the number of scholars in schools subject to examination by the Inspector of Schools last year was 6,787. In 1896 it was 6,313, and in 1895, 6,792. There is therefore no progress to be reported.

5. SCHOOL FEES.-Elementary education in Hongkong is practically free. All the Government and Grant-in-Aid Schools which teach Chinese give a free education, and children of European extraction whose parents can plead poverty are charged no fees for an English education in Govern- ment Schools. In the Grant-in-Aid Schools in which fees are charged for an English education the ordinary fee is very small, and even this is reduced where the parents of a scholar are not well-to-do.

6. SCHOOL ATTENDANCE.--The average daily attendance was 4,567. This is considerably larger than it was in 1896, but is still 122 less than it was in 1895; the maximum monthly enrolment shows a slight improvement. The ratio of average daily attendance to enrolment is 76.93. In 1893 it was 78.19. In 1895 it was 76.95, and in 1896, 74.48.

7. LOCAL DISTRIBUTION OF SECULAR AND RELIGIOUS SCHOOLS.-In the subjoined table showing the distribution of the secular and religious schools the terms used have the same meaning as in previous reports. "Religious Schools" practically mean schools under the management of Christian religious societies. "Secular Schools" are schools managed by Chinese or by Europeans not connected with any religious society. "Government Schools" are schools conducted by the Government, whilst "Grant-in-Aid Schools" are managed by private bodies but are under the supervision of the Government and receive from it a grant which is assessed by an annual examination. "Kai-fong Schools" are

are public schools maintained by the Tung Wa Hospital and members of the Chinese

352

community and are completely independent of the Government. The table shows that the Chinese have no difficulty in finding a conveniently situated secular school to which to send their children, but the class from which the children are drawn who attend the public Chinese Schools have no hesitation in sending their children to a school where Christianity is taught, and it is noticeable that the average number of pupils in Grant-in-Aid Schools (exclusive of Homes and Orphanages), which give a Chinese education is 50 compared with 22 in the Kai-fong Schools. The European community is in part less fortunately situated, as the inhabitants of Kowloon have no convenient school-either secular or religious-to which to send their children.

Table showing the local distribution of Secular and Religious Schools in the year 1897.

Districts

exclusive of the Peak

Settlement.

Govern-

ment.

Grant- Kaifong. in-

Grand

Private. Private.

Total.

Total.

Total.

Aid.

Secular Schools.

Scholars.

Secular Schools.

*81B[0[oS

Rel. Schools.

Scholars.

Secular Schools.

Scholars.

Rel. Schools.

Scholars.

Secular Schools.

Scholars.

Rel. Schools.

Scholars.

Schools.

Scholars.

of all

Descriptions.

School

I. & II. Kennedy Town and Shek-

tongtsui,

III. Saiyingpun,

IV. & V. Taipingshan,

VI. Chungwan,

VII. & VIII. Hawan & Wantsai,.

IX. and X. Bowrington & Sookon-

pó,

...

:

3:80

7 243

1

58

2192 11|252| 15 | 981

19491 14 919 1 35

3 |1,700| 39 |811 26 1,974

2257

9224 10 | 465

7 210 7132

1

55

37

3 163

9354

XII. Villages of British Kowloon,

1 63 16 300 12 423

XI. Villages of Hongkong,

:.

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

÷

:

:

8 301 8

301

13 444 15 981

28

1,425

2223

20 526 14

919 34

1,445

4239 42 2,855 | 30 |2,213

72

5,068

2255 11 481 12 720

23

1,201

3

36

92

3

163 6

255

14 342 9

354 23

17

363

12

423 29

828

696

786

Total,.

16 2,477 103 2,247 96 5,522

1 35

75521205,103 | 103 | 6,074 223 11,177

8. EXPENDITURE ON EDUCATION.-In the year 1897 the Government expended $72,984 on education, as compared with $76,501 in 1896. After deducting revenue obtained from school fees, &c., the nett expenditure for the year was $58,645.75 or 2.18 per cent. of the revenue, as compared with 2.52 per cent. in 1896 and 3.01 per cent. in 1887. The sums expended on schools under the Inspectorate were as follows:

as follows:-Belilios Public School (after deducting school fees) $2,966.25; fourteen other Government schools $5,458.16; 96 Grant-in-aid Schools (for 1897) $21,210.38. In the Belilios Public School the cost to the Government of the education of each scholar under instruction was $15.77, in the other Government schools $5.06, and in the Grant-in-aid Schools $3.84. In addition to the grant, the Societies which maintain Grant-in-aid Schools expended on them during the year a sum of $57,070.63.

9. NATURE OF THE EDUCATION GIVEN IN THE SCHOOLS IN THE COLONY.-There is no change to record under this heading. The Government has been unable as yet to give effect to its resolve to encourage an English education in future for the Chinese population. In schools which give an English education the syllabus is founded on that in force in English primary schools, and the text- books used are also those in use at home. But it is questionable whether either syllabus or books are suited for the teaching of English to Chinese. The text-book most in use in the First Standard seems to have been compiled with the object of including as few words as possible. Any boy of twelve-and that is the age at which Chinese begin to study English-should be able to learn twice or three times as many words in the course of a year. I do not see how the same methods and books can be suitable both for English and Chinese boys, nor how, from an educational point of view, the best results can be obtained in a school where boys of both nationalities are taught in the same class, and I doubt whether there are compensating social advantages to be gained from the association. In purely Chinese schools the education approximates very closely to that given in schools in China. It is true that geography (of a very elementary kind) is taught in the higher standards and arithmetic, as an extra subject, but in the teaching of Chinese itself there has been no advance for the last twenty years.

353

In the Annual Report for 1876 Dr. STEWART Wrote: "The School Book Committee's books, which

(C

were at first neglected and not a little despised, are now read in all the schools in the Colony over "which there is Government supervision.

*

*

*

The series promises to have more success than could ever have been anticipated for it." My predecessor held that Chinese must be taught according to Chinese methods, and that accounts perhaps for my finding that, with very few exceptions, these books are no longer to be met with in our schools. I am unable to believe that the Chinese have said the last word on education and that no progress is possible. According to the Code, in all standards except the first, explanation is required of the text-book which has been learnt by heart, but the masters have found it easier to teach their pupils to get the explanation itself by rote, than to train them to exercise their intelligence. The teaching of English to Chinese instead of their own language has not a few advocates, but to make a proper use of their English, Chinese ought to have a fair knowledge of their own language first, and con- sidering the short time that the ordinary Chinese boy stays at school, the small knowledge of English acquired by him does not compensate him for his complete ignorance of his own language. In his report for the year 1888 Dr. EITEL wrote:-" to enable every child first to learn to express thought "and feeling correctly in the vernacular tongue, before attempting to acquire a foreign language

(is a) sound pedagogical principle. @Aerie,

<<

(C

*

"Too many Portuguese parents, who speak Portuguese only, send their boys, when six years old, to "an English school and insist upon their being hurried as quickly as possible through standard after "standard, in order that they may the sooner get employment as clerks and contribute towards the support of the family. (The result in most cases is that the mental progress of such scholars is but superficial, that they become mere smatterers in English and, worst of all, such systematic hot-house training stunts not only the growth of the mental energies but has often also the effect of a blight upon the higher moral perceptions." The above remarks would be still more true of Chinese.

(

64

<<

10. FEMALE EDUCATION.-Very good work is being done among the Chinese by the various Missions which undertake female education. Its chief value, which lies not in any purely educational results but in the great progress which has been made in overcoming the distrust with which Chinese view advances made by Europeans, is derived from the close supervision exercised by European ladies and from the education and training of Chinese teachers having also been conducted by Europeans. I do not view with much sympathy efforts made to induce Chinese girls to learn English. Under present circumstances an education in English may tend to unfit them for the position which they expect to take in their own society. It certainly will not render them fitter to take it, nor to enter any other society. Improvements in the education of men must precede improvements in the education of women. The Chinese have not yet shown any appreciation of an education in English for their boys except as a means of making money, and it is idle to expect them to give to their daughters what they have not given to their sons. The objections which Chinese parents have to their daughters learning English are not based on unworthy motives, but are very natural and laudable. As a rule girls stay at school longer than boys, and twice as many girls as boys are presented for examination in the four highest standards. This has an important bearing on statistics dealing with the percentage of children at school, and also on the relative value of the education received at boys' and at girls' schools. The knowledge acquired in Chinese schools by children who leave before reaching the IVth Standard can hardly be said to have any immediate practical value. The actual number of girls at school is greater than it has ever been, though the proportion of girls to boys is not so high as it was in 1893. This is due to the large increase in the number of boys in schools in which English is taught.

a

Table showing the proportion of Boys and Girls under instruction in local Schools.

Boys.

GIRLS.

Govern-

Years. ment

Schools.

Kaifong Schools.

Grant-in- Aid Schools,

Private Total Schools. Boys.

Govern- ment Schools.

Kaifong Schools.

Grant-in- Aid Schools.

Private Schools.

Total Girls.

Proportion of girls to total of scholars.

Percentage.

1894

1,928

1,735

3,251

102

7,016

402

22

2,713

241

3,878

32.49

1895

1,752

2,170 3,091

67

7,080

380

30 2,593

453

3,456

32.80

1896

1,745

1897

1,645

1,604

2,217 2,975

2,856

21

6,226

378

21

2,322

383

3,104

33.26

108

6,945

488

30

2,547

479 3,544

32.71

11. KINDERGARTENS.-- The Kindergarten School attached to the Basel Mission is still in existence, but is no longer under trained European supervision. An application was made to have the school placed under the Grant-in-Aid Code, but it was not granted, and unless the Government is willing to make a grant to a considerable number of such schools, it will not be worth the while of any

354

Society to obtain the services of a trained teacher from home. I have been given an opportunity of seeing the school at work, and the brightness of the children, their cleanliness, and their absorption in their work and games left a very favourable impression. The school is a great boon to the poor women of the neighbourhood who have to be out at work all day; but if the Government ever undertakes the task of infant education, it will be necessary to insist on the schools being taught by properly trained teachers, or they will become merely nurseries without any educational effect. From a social and political point of view, the opening of infant schools under constant European super- vision is much to be desired, as the sooner Chinese children come in close contact with Europeans, the more perfect will be the harmony between the Government and the Chinese population.

12. NUMBER OF UNEDUCATED CHILDREN IN THE COLONY.-Latterly, on the ground that most children have to learn two languages, the local school-going age has been regarded as 6 to 16 years. But it is only the children of well-to-do parents who can be reasonably expected to spend 10 years at school. It would be more than satisfactory to find all children between the ages of 7 and 14 under education, and it will be a very long time before the mass of the Chinese community can be brought to regard even 7 years' schooling as necessary for their children. I prefer to fix the school-going age at from 7 to 14 years, as this department is principally concerned with primary education. Previous calculations of the number of uneducated children have assumed that all the children at school were between the ages of 6 and 16, but I find that 30 per cent. of the boys are over 16 years of age in the Grant-in-Aid Schools in which English is taught, whilst the Headmaster of Queen's College in- forms me that 59 per cent. of his scholars are over that age. I am not in possession of all the neces- sary figures, but I believe that I am very nearly correct in assuming that out of the 10,833 persons reported as attending school only 7,830 are between the ages of 7 and 14 years. Of these 5,063 are boys and 2,767 are girls. According to the Census of 1897, of the civil land population there were 8,181 boys and 8,809 girls between the ages of 7 and 14. It appears then that 3,118 boys and 5,042 girls were not attending school. There are, I understand, about 300 Chinese boys attending private schools so the number of boys not attending school is reduced to 2,818. It has been correctly pointed out in previous reports that "the mass of Chinese children remain in school but 3 or 4 years. At the last examination 99 per cent. of the boys and 93 per cent. of the girls were presented for exa- mination in the first three standards. It is therefore probable that there are very few Chinese boys who have not received some education. In the above calculation the floating population has been left out of account. The number of boys of school-going age in this portion of the community is 2,422, and of girls 2,025. Very few of these attend school. There are insuperable difficulties in the way of regular attendance. Those of them who are not living on junks and fishing boats, which may be absent from the Colony for days at a time, are living on boats which ply for hire and are liable to be called away to distant parts of the harbour and to be detained there for hours. It is only at Shaukiwan that any large proportion of the population lives in boats which are used only as house-boats. In the har- bour itself there are only 142 children on boats which presumably never move far from one place.

19

13. RESULTS OF THE ANNUAL EXAMINATIONS.-The results of the annual examinations of the Grant-in-Aid Schools will be found in Tables X, XI and XII. The standard required in schools in Class III was somewhat higher than the one to which these schools had been accustomed. Some difference was, of course, unavoidable, although I did my best to adhere as closely as possible to the standard fixed by my predecessor. There was no difficulty as to the standard for schools in Class I. In these it has been found possible and necessary to fix a rigid standard from which no deviation can be made, and to return composition and dictation papers after correction to the teachers.

14. BELILIOS PUBLIC SCHOOL.--The examination of this school was held in July, and I reported at the time the results obtained. The Chinese division of the school is now very popular, and the time will soon come when an attempt must be made to widen somewhat the education given. The examination of this division was confined to one in the subjects of a purely Chinese classical education with the addition of some very elementary geography and Chinese embroidery.

15. DEPARTMENTAL DISTRICT SCHOOLS. In tables II, IV, V and VII will be found some particulars regarding these Schools. I do not consider the work done by them as effective as that done by Grant-in-Aid Schools. For isolated hamlets like Shekó, Wongmakok and Taitamtuk, it is impos- sible to secure good teachers, and at Yaumati, Stanley and Wongnaichung, the master is set the impossible task of teaching Chinese and English classes simultaneously in one room.

16. GRANT-IN-AID SCHOOLS.-The average monthly enrolment in these has increased from 3,651 in 1896 to 4,224. The number of schools is 100 as compared with 104 in 1896. The four schools which have ceased to exist are a girls' school in Fletcher Street, ruined by the plague, the British Kowloon College, the boys' division of the Holy Infancy School, which has been converted into a mixed school, and a school at Mongkok. Of the hundred schools still in existence, four were temporarily closed on account of difficulties in procuring efficient teachers.

17. BRITISH KOWLOON SCHOOL.-This school has been closed. The negotiations entered into by the School Committee with the Government were, I regret to say, inconclusive.

355

18. SCHOLARSHIPS.-The Government offers annually four scholarships to be competed for by boys educated at the five Government Anglo-Chinese Schools. The holders are entitled to exemption from school fees for three years at Queen's College. Since the year 1892, there have been no compe- titors, but I hope that more interest will be taken in these scholarships in future. The Trustees of the Belilios Scholarship Fund offer two prizes of a value of $60 each to be competed for at the annual Government Examination of St. Joseph's College by boys who have passed the VIIth and VIth standards respectively.

19. PHYSICAL TRAINING.-Drill is conducted in eight schools by a non-commissioned officer of the Army.

20. I enclose the usual Tables (I to XII).

The Honourable T. SERCOMBE SMITH,

Acting Colonial Secretary.

I have the honour to be,

Sir.

Your most obedient Servant,

A. W. BREWIN,

Inspector of Schools.

TABLE. I.-NUMBER of SCHOLARS attending Schools under the EDUCATION DEPARTMENT during the Year 1897.

Scholars

Scholars

Total

No.

Name of Schools.

attending attending Scholars Government Grant-in-Aid

Schools.

in Schools. Attendance.

2

"

"

3

"

39

1 American Board Mission, Bridges Street (Boys)......

Queen's Road West (Boys)...... Hawan (Girls)

59

59

37

37

28

28

4

"}

>

Chungwan (Girls)

29

29

5

>

Mong Kok-tsui (Boys)..................

17

17

6

7

8

**

9

31

10

11

12

13

"

14

15

16

17

18

19

"?

20

21

22

Aplichau (Boys)

Basel Mission, Sham Shui-po (Boys)

Shau Ki-wan (Boys) To'kwa-wan (Boys) Matau-chung (Boys) High Street (Girls)

Belilios Public School (English) (Girls)

Berlin Foundling House School (Girls)

Berlin Ladies Mission, Queen's Road West (Boys)

Tsat tsz-mui (Girls)................

C. M. S. St. Stephen's Chinese School (Boys)

Pottinger Street (Boys)

Saiying-pun (Boys)

St. Stephen's Baxter Memorial (Girls)

Lyndhurst Terrace (Girls)

48

48

51

51

62

62

34

34

87

87

******

188

188

(Chinese) (Girls)

300

300

30

30

30

30

59

59

82

82

.

No. 2 (Boys)

65

65

92

92

66

66

60

60

63

63

23

39

Third Street (Girls)

39

39

*****

24

Yaumati (Mixed)

50

50

25

39

Hunghom (Girls)......

34

34

26

Quarry Bay (Girls)

23

23

27

*

Little Hongkong (Boys)

21

21

28

Aberdeen School (Boys)

34

34

29

"

Aplichau (Girls) ...

25

25

30

"

Victoria Home and Orphanage (Chinese) (Girls)

48

48

31

་་

""

"

(English) (Girls)

32

St. Stephen's Anglo-Chinese (Boys)

166

166

33

25

34

35

36

49

37

Morrison English School

Diocesan Home and Orphanage (Boys)

F. E. S. Bonham Road Chinese Division (Girls)................

High Street (Girls)

Queen's Road West (Girls)......

Salyingpun Praya (Girls)

Pottinger Street (Girls)

Stanley School (Girls)......

Shaukiwan (Girls)

To'kwa-wan (Girls)

51

51

185

185

LOA

51

51

28

28

42

42

A

38

39

>

40

41

""

42

"

43

>>

Yaumati (Girls)

......

44

Bonham Road English Division (Girls)

Carried forward,...

536

2,011

2,547

54

54

40

40

42

42

41

41

23

23

27

27

36

36

356

TABLE I-NUMBER of SCHOLARS attending Schools under the EDUCATION DEPARTMENT during the Year 1897.-Continued.

No.

Name of Schools.

Scholars attending attending Government Grant-in-Aid Schools, Schools.

Scholars

Total Scholars

in

attendance.

Brought forward,

536

2,011

2,547

ود

46

">

47

多多

48

*

49

50

51

52

"

53

54

55

39

56

"

57

21

""

58

59

60

61

62

""

63

64

"

65

66

67

68

69

70

"

71

72

19

"

II

""

25

Matau-wai (Boys)

74

29

75

,,

76

77

"

78

79

80

81

"

82

>>

83

29

84

85

"

86

>>

87

88

""

89

90

91

92

93

多多

English

95

"

(Chinese) (Boys)

96

Shekó (Boys)

97

98

99

45.

73

L. M. S. Square Street (Boys)

Wantsai Chapel (Boys)

Yaumati (Boys) ........

Shek tong-tsui (Boys)

Saiyingpun I Division (Boys)

II

Hunghom (Boys)

27

Hospital Chapel (Boys)

Shektong-tsui (Girls)

Saiyingpun 2nd Street I Division (Girls)

Ui-hing Lane 1 Division (Girls)

Tanglung-chau No. 1 (Boys)

No. 2 (Boys)

Square Street (Girls)......

Tai-kok-tsui (Boys)

Shaukiwan (Boys)

Third Street (Boys)

D'Aguilar Street (Girls) Kau-u-fong (Girls) Tang-lung-chau (Girls) Aberdeen Street (Girls)

Wantsai Chapel (Girls) Staunton Street (Girls) Tai-ping-shan English School

Pokfulam (Boys)

R. C. M. Cathedral School Division II (Boys)

Bridges Street Chinese Division (Girls) St. Theresa School (Girls)

Holy Infancy School (Mixed)

Yaumati (Girls)

Shaukiwan (Girls)

Hunghom (Girls)

Italian Convent Chinese School (Girls)

Sacred Heart School Chinese Division (Girls)... Cathedral School Division I (Boys)

St. Joseph's College School (Boys)......

Italian Convent English Division (Girls)......

Portuguese Division (Girls)

Bridges Street English (Girls)

Portuguese......

Nova Escola Portugueza (Girls)

Sacred Heart School English Division (Girls)................

St. Francis Portuguese Division (Girls)

Victoria Portuguese School Portuguese Division (Mixed)

94 Saiyingpun (English) (Boys)

69

69

69

69

44

44

33

33

68

68

(Boys)

......

65

65

30

30

64

64

15

15

76

76

II

95

(Boys)

(Girls)

121

121

73

37

73

PUR:

73

37

73

48

48

94

94

+

26

26.

......

35

35

45

45

56

56

42

42

37

37

36

36

40

40

85

85

14

14

32

32

85

35

65

65

73

73

:

45

45

...

47

17

N

42

42

103

103

48

48

53

53

236

236

248

248

77

77

24

24

54

54

13

13

19

19

29

29

,!

(Girls)

27

27

20

20

English

"

(Mixed)

18

18

192

192

(46)

26

26

102

103

104

""

105

106

"

107

St. Paul's College School (Boys) Stanley (Anglo-Chinese) (Boys) Taitamtuk (Boys)

100 Tanglungchau (Hakka) (Boys)

101 ! Victoria English School (Boys)

Wantsai (English) (Boys)

(Chinese) (Boys)

Wesleyan Mission, Spring Gardens (Boys)

Wellington Street (Boys)

(Girls)

98

98

32

32

14

14

55

55

162

162

.....

(Girls)

57

257

57 257

(165)

68

68

107

107

56

56

,,

35

108

27

Lascar Row (Boys)

65

65

***** 4

109

*

Wantsai School (Boys)

25

25

110

99

Graham Street (Girls)

76

76

111

17

Kennedy Town (Boys)

41

41

112

Lyndhurst Terrace English School (Boys)

67

67

113

Wongmakok (Boys)

10

114

Wongnaichung (Anglo-Chinese) (Boys)

66

115

Yaumati (Anglo-Chinese) (Boys)

63

52885

10

66

63

Total,....

1,265

5,522

6,787

:

:

;

!

TABLE II-NUMBER of SCHOLARS attending GOVERNMENT SCHOOLS under the EDUCATION DEPARtment and EXPENSES of each SCHOOL during the year 1897.

357

No.

Name of Schools.

Boys.

Girls.

Total.

Expense.

1

Aplichau,

48

48

$

120.00

2

Belilios Public School (English),.

188

188

2,966.21

3

5

Õ་

93

(Chinese),

300

300

960.60

Pokfulam,

Salyingpun (English),

14

14

132.00

192

979.77

192

Taitamtuk,

""

(Chinese),

7

Sheko, ...

8

Stanley (Anglo-Chinese),

9

10

Tanglungchau (Hakka),

11

Wantsai (English),

12

(Chinese),

13

Wongmakok,

14

Wongnaichung (Anglo-Chinese),

15

Yaumati (Anglo-Chinese),

Total,..................

(46)

228.00

26

26

120.00

32

32

300.43

14

14

132.00

55

55

180.00

257

1,017.00

257

(165)

372.00

10

66

63

2833

10

132.00

66

381.96

63

402.30

777

488

1,265

$ 8,424.37

TABLE III-AVERAGE EXPENSE of each SCHOLAR at GOVERNMENT SCHOOLS under the EDUCAtion Department and

at the GRANT-IN-AID SCHOOLS during the year 1897.*

1.-EXPENDITURE OF GOVERNMENT SCHOOLS.

(Cost of working the Schools irrespective of cost of erection or repairs of Buildings.)

1. BELILIOS PUBLIC SCHOOL.

Expenditure,...

Deduct School Fees, refunded,

2. OTHER DEPARTMENTAL SCHOOLS, (no School Fees).

.$ 3,585.21

619.00

-$ 2,966.21

Cost to Government, in 1897,

$ 5,458.16

II.—EXPENDITURE ON THE GRANT-IN-AID SCHOOLS.

Total Cost to Government, in 1897, .....

.........$ 21,210.38

III.-AVERAGE COST OF EACH SCHOLAR.

(Calculated by Enrolment.)

Average Cost, to Government, of each Scholar :-

1. at Belilios Public School (not including cost of building),. 2. at Other Departmental Schools, 3. at Grant-in-Aid Schools,

15.77

5.06

3.84

IV.—AVERAGE COST OF EACH SCHOLAR. (Calculated by the Average Daily Attendance.)

Average Cost, to Government, of cach Scholar:-

1. at Belilios Public School (not including cost of building),. 2. at Other Departmental Schools,

3. at Grant-in-Aid Schools,

27.81

7.49

5.68

* NOTE. The cost of the Inspectorate of Schools ($4,754.57), being connected with both Grant-in-Aid Schools and Government Schools, is not included.

TABLE IV.-ENROLMENT and ATTENDANCE at Government Schools under the EDUCATION DEPARTMENT

No.

1

Aplichau,

during the year 1897.

Name of Schools.

Belilios Public School (English),..

Pokfulam,

""

5 Saiyingpun (English),

(Chinese),......

(Chinese),

Sheko,

8

Stanley (Anglo-Chinese),

9

Taitamtuk,

10

11

Wantsai (English),.

12

""

(Chinese),

13

14

Tanglungchau (Hakka),

Wongmakok,

Wongnaichung (Anglo-Chinese),

15

Yaumati (Anglo-Chinese),....

Average Monthly Enrolment.

Average Daily Attendance.

24.81

15.38

132.45

106.66

199.63

162.15

10.63

10.04

119.54

112.60

25.45

24.67

20.45

19.95

16.36

13.12

12.63

11.15

29.27

25.46

164.45

157.33

94.90

82.50

9.54

8.17

53.09

48.91

38.41

36.36

Total,....

951.61

834.45

358

TABLE V.-MAXIMUM and MINIMUM ENROLMENT and DAILY ATTENDANCE at GOVERNMENT SCHOOLS under the EDUCATION DEPARTMENT during the year 1897.

No.

Name of Schools.

Maximum Monthly Enrolment.

Minimum

Monthly Eurolment.

Maximum Daily

Minimum Daily

Attendance

Attendance

(Monthly average) Monthly average).

1231

Aplichian

31

15

19.19

6.12

Belilios Public School (English)

141

123

113.18

86.00

(Chinese)

238

100

187.41

83.01

>"

4 Pokfulam...

13

9

11.00

7.13

5 Sayingpun (English)

129

94

123.00

83.00

(Chinese)..

29

22

28.11

20.64

7 Shekő

22

14

21.95

14.00

9

Stanley (Anglo-Chinese)

22

14

18.79

9.14

9

Taitamtuk

14

11

12.55

9.76

10 Tanglung-chau (Hakka)

34

20

30.50

17.27

11

Wantsai (English)

188

100

178.44

90.45

12

(Chinese)

109

76

94.59

44.66

13

Wongmakok

10

8

11.00

7.50

14 Wongnai-chung (Anglo-Chinese).

58

44

53.77

40.72

15

Yaumati (Anglo-Chinese)

48

28

42.03

26.92

No.

1,086

678

945.51

546.32

TABLE VI.-NUMBER of DAYS on which the GOVERNMENT SCHOOLS under the EDUCATION DEPARTMENT were taught during the year 1897.

Name of Schools.

School Days. No.

Name of Schools.

School Days.

= ∞ CO - IS CON∞0

1

Aplichau,

245

9

Taitamink,

241

2

Belilios Public School (English),

242

10

Tanglungchau (Hakka),

237

3

""

(Chinese),

234

11

Wantsai (English),...

231

Pokfulam,

241

12

""

(Chinese),.

232

Saiyingpun (English),

235

13

Wongmakok,

256

6

Sheko,

(Chinese),

235

14

Wongnaichung (Anglo-Chinese),

233

245

15

Yaumati (Anglo-Chinese),....

239

8 Stanley (Anglo-Chinese),

200

Total Enrolment

for the year.

TABLE VII.-SUMMARY of ENROLMENT and ATTENDANCE at the Government SCHOOLS for the last twenty-five years.

YEARS.

Maximum Daily Attendance

Minimum Daily Attendance

(Monthly Average).

Minimum Monthly

Enrolment.

(Monthly Average).

1873,

1,838

1,326

852

760

1874,

1,932

1,271

974

836

1875,

1,927

1,312

988

863

1876,

2,171

1,383

1,057

925

1877,

2,148

1,446

1,212

1,035

1878,

2,101

1,324

1,100

936

1879,

2,043

1,356

1,027

904

1880,

2,078

1,468

1,082

937

1881,

1,986

1,384

1,093

956

1882,

2,114

1,444

1,062

988

1883,

2,080

1,414

1,138

990

1884,

1.978

1,420

1,066

941

1885,

1,988

1,424

1,661

926

1886,

1,893

1,544

1,040

886

1887,

1,814

1,552

1.126

1,000

1888,

1,933

1,653

1,139

1,040

1889,

2,293

1,992

1,190

1,118

1890,

2,514

1,999

1,494

1,370

1891,

2,540

1,909

1,403

1,291

1892,

2,622

2,101

1,536

1,407

1893,

2,356

1,829

1,443

1,317

1894,

1,282

1,039

420

320

1895,

1,108

893

607

545

1896,

1,135

872

585

477

1897,

1,265

945

678

546

NAME OF SCHOOL.

Class of School.

No. of Scholars Presented.

No. of Scholars Examined.

Stand. I.

Stand. II.

Stand. III.

Stand. IV.

Stand. V.

Stand, VI.

Stand. VII.

Stand. I.

Ordinary Subjects.

NUMBER OF SCHOLARS WHO PASSED.

TABLE X.-RESULTS of the EXAMINATION of the GRAN

Stand. II.

1.- American Board Mission, Bridges Street, (Boys),

18

43

4

16

11

2.-

3.-

4.-

5.-

Queen's Road West. Boys) Háwan, (Girls),

33

33

7

18

20

20

3

39

Chungwan, (Girls),

18

7

5

Mongkoktsui, (Boys),

13

12

6.- Basel Mission, Shamshuipo, (Boys),

44

43

19

7.-

Shaukiwan, (Boys),.

59

59

25

**

"

8.--

"

35

Tokwawan, (Boys),..

26

24

2.-

15

""

Matauchung, (Boys),

11.-

13.- 14.--- 15.-

+1

"

"

Saiyingpun, (Boys),

16.

"1

10.-Berlin Ladies Mission, Queen's Road West, (Boys),

"

12.—C. M. S., St. Stephen's Chinese School, (Boys),

"

Pottinger Street, (Boys),

St. Stephen's Baxter Memorial, (Girls),

24

Tsat-tszmui, (Boys),.

33

55

No. 2, (Boys),

JB

I

57

40

28

17.

Lyndhurst Terrace, (Girls),.

29

18.

Third Street. (Girls),

28

"

95

19.- 20.

Yaumati, (Mixed),

".

Hunghòm, (Girls),

25

21.

Quarry Bay, (Girls).

22.-

..

Little Hongkong, (Boys),

23.-

"

Aberdeen School, (Boys),

21.-

W

Aplichau, (Girls),.

26.-

27.-

"

High Street, (Girls),

28. 29.- 30.

Salyingpun Praya, (Girls),.

25.-F. E. S., Bonham Road, Chinese Division, (Girls),

33.-

Queen's Road West, (Girls),

Pottinger Street, (Girls),

Stanley School, (Girls),

Shaukiwán, (Girls),

Tokwawan, (Girls),

Yaumati, (Girls),

34.—L. M. S., Square Street, (Boys),

Wantsai Chapel, (Boys), Yaumati, (Boys),

Shektongtsui, (Boys),

Sairingpun 1. Division, (Boys),

20

28

21

21

23

23

14

**

26

23

5

33

33

12

31.-

"

3.

"

17

16

5

20

19

12

+4

43

41

G

64

62

34

19 17

35.

""

26

34

G

16

BG

""

23

26 10

6

37.

"

54

51

17

13 18

38.

39.--

II.

(Boys),

24

54

18 14

12

fil.

Hunghiòm, (Boys),

13

11

3 3

41.-

Hospital Chapel, (Boys),

47

47 13 12

16

42.

".

Shektongtsui, (Girls),.

11

11

3 4

13.

"

Saiyingpun, Second Street, 1. Division, (Girls)...

33 13 3

41.

II.

(Boys),.

66

65

18

10

11

45.- 46.

"+

Ui-hing Lane, 1. Division (Girls),

60

27

6

II.

(Girls),

35

31

4

47 .

**

48.

49.

50.-

19

51.

52.-

53.-

99

54.

"

55.

56.- 57.

"

Tanglungchan, No. 1 (Boys),

"

Square Street, (Girls),

Taikoktsui, (Boys),

Matauwai, (Boys),

Shaukiwan, (Boys).

Third Street, (Boys), D'Aguilar Street, (Girls). Kau-ü-fong, (Girls),

Tanglungchau, (Girls),

Aberdeen Street, (Girls),

59

20

27

No. 2 (Boys),

48

- - S.

13

14

"

58.-

10

59.-

2 མྦ ཀྐ 4 - རལ་ག

8

4

14

7

18

16

15

10

15 14

9

13

30

31 13

12

11

15

7

5

11

7

10

13

2

26

25

29

13

Wantsai Chapel, (Girls).

30

3)

Staunton Street. (Girls),

22

30

60.-R. C. Mission, Cathedral School, I. Division, (Boys),

17

16

$1.-

Bridges Street, Chinese Division, (Girls),

31

31

62.-- 63. 64.-

St. Theresa School. (Girls)...

40

38

11

"

Holy Infancy School, (Mixed),

45

9

2002

20

Yaumati, (Giris),

65.- 66.--

Shaukiwan, (Girls),

10

>

12

Hanghom, (Girls),

67.- 68.

11

Italian Convent, Chinese School, (Girls).. Sacred Heart School Chinese Div., (Girls),

70

13

25

69.-Wesleyan Mission, Spring Gardens, (Boys)...

39

70.-

""

Wellington Street, (Boys)..

76

71.- 72.-

(Girls),

42

39

Lascar Row (Boys),..

62

59 19

"

་་

73.-

Wantsai School, (Boys),

17

16

"

Graham Street, (Girls),

51

61 22

Th

75.-

Kennedy Town, (Boys),

"

79.-

S0.--

"

$7.

33.

2.-

34

30.

**

76.-Basel Mission, High Street, (Girls),

77-Berlin Foundling House School, (Girls),

78.--C. M. S., Victoria Home and Orphanage, Chi. Div.,

St. Stephen's Anglo-Chinese, (Boys), Morrison English School, (Boys),.. 81-Wesleyan Mission. Lyndhurst Terrace. Eng. Sch., (Boys) 82-St. Paul's College School (Boys),.

83.-Diocesan Home and Orphanage, School, (Boys),.. SL.-F. E. S., Bonham Road, English Division, (Girls), 85.-L. M. S., Taipingshan, English School, (Boys), 89.-R. C. M., Cathedral School, I. Division, (Boys),

St. Joseph's College School, (Boys),

Italian Convent, English Division, (Girls),.

Portuguese Division, (Girls), Bridges Street, English Division, (Girls),

19

19

14

5

3

6

G 10 104

108

18 10

7 2

47

43

:::

35

54

20

90

85

23

23

63

63 39

35

35

131 131

24

10

6

30

135 135

25

III 42

41

18

20

20

2

1.

Portuguese Division, (Girls),.

85

34

12 10

92.

1+

Nova Escola Portuguēza, (Girls),

D3.

"

91.

Sacred Heart School English Division, (Giris), St. Francis, Portuguese Division, (Girls),

17

17

19

95.

English

(Girls),

22

9.-- 97.--

Victoria Port. School, Port, Division, (Mixed), Eng. Division, (Mixed)

13

14

99.--

98.-Victoria English School, (Boys),

(Girls),. 100.-C. M. S., Victoria Home & Orphanage, Eng. Div., (Giris)

69

13

Special Subjects.

Stand. III.

Stand. IV.

Stand. V.

Stand. VI.

Stand. Vil.

Stand. I.

Stand. H.

Stand. III.

Ordinary

JOL.

TABLE X-RESULTS of the EXAMINATION of the GRANT-IN-AID SCHOOLS in 1897, under the provisions of t.

NUMBER OF SCHOLARS WHO PASSED.

NUMBER OF SCHOLARS WHO FAILED.

TOTALS.

Class of School.

No. of Scholars Presented.

No. of Scholars Examined.

Stand. I.

Stand. II.

Stand. III.

Stand. IV.

Stand. V.

Stand. VI.

Stand. VII.

Ordinary Subjects.

Stand. I.

Street, (Boys),

48

43

4

16 11

5 Road West. (Boys)

33

7 18

, (Girls),

20

20

7

van, (Girls),

::::

ktsui, (Boys),

12

2

$1,

48

19

11

).....

59

59

25 26

26

24

4

30

8

s),

bad West, (Boys),

$

ni, (Boys)..

14

hool, (Boys).

18 16

18

TS),

15 14

1583

:::::: wi

+

57

13

30

40

12 11 15

norial, (Girls),

7 5

6

☛ls),....

29

11

7

12

10

G

13

10

15

Division, (Girls),

20

21

Is),.

21

23

21

26

21 14

28

28

5

33

33

12

17

16

5

20

19 12

45

41

G

62 24 19 17

34 10 G

13

26

10 6

(Boys), Boys).

54

17 13

18

12

51

54 18 14 12

14

13

11

3

4

47

47

13 12 16

11

11

3

et, I. Division, (Girls)..

61

33 13 3

18

II.

>>

(Boys),

66

65

18

10

1 (Girls),

60

57

27

6

(Girls),

35

31

7

4

ys), y's),

60

59

17

20

27

12

9

48

21

13

6

14

• Us

5

29

30

32

Division, (Boys),

17

mese Division, (Girls),

31

(Girls).....

40

. (Mixed),

45

nese School, (Girls),.

Chinese Div., (Girls),.

. (Boys)...

eet, (Boys)...

(Girls),.

oys),...

, (Boys),

(Girls),

(Boys),

69

Girls),

II 28

1269 18 133R¦Ã£Ã¤NACANAFARESREBACK

25

29

13

3)

30

16

12

38 15

12 12

21

13

7

13

21 18

22

5

19

: Giv

27

5

nage, Chi. Div, ( Girl

ΙΣ 3-4

31

3

-se, (Boys),

108 105 70 18

10

Boys)....

11

ace. Eng. Sch., (Buys),.

47

43

55

54 21

20

chool, (Boys),.

90

$5

vision, (Girls),

ool, (Boys),

sion, (Boys),

13 3

35 17 7 11

ol, (Boys).

Division, (Girls),.

esc Division, (Girls),

Division, (Girls),

se Division, (Girls),. (Girls).

lish Division, (Giris), Division, (Girls), (Girls),

rt. Division. (Mixed),.

ng. Division, (Mixed)..

age, Eng. Div. (Giris),.¦ III

to co o sol to to to to to

13

10

8

20

==

15

15

29

131

135

III 42

131 13 19 21 22 135 21 32 25 21

41

12 18

III 21)

10

IJI

17

19

22

13

III 14

III

69

32

CONOCER :

אן

11

13

13

ة

Special Subjects,

Stand. II.

Stand, III.

Stand. IV.

Stand. V.

Stand, VI.

Stand. VII.

10

2

10)

19

:—::

Stand. I.

Stand. 11.

4

Ordinary Subjects.

Special Subjects.

Ordinary Special

Subjects. Subjects.

Stand. III.

Stand. IV.

Stand. V.

Stand. VI.

Stand. VII.

Stand. I.

Stand. fl.

Stand. III.

Stand. IV.

Stand, V.

Stand, VI,

Stand. VI.

:::::::

10 10:

::::

l'assed.

Failed.

31 12

Passed.

Failed.

Average Daily Attendance

during the Year.

:

48.0

31 2 29 17

*

34.72

18.95

14.5:

11.14

12.1-

58

53.51

23

17

21.07

20.68

29.78

52

25

1

63.21

3

3

49.83

44

1

58.50

38

24

I

43.70

17

10

21

4

32.87

27

25

2

32.72

21

11

23.05

18

19.74

24

15

2

24.35

10.02

23.02

13.90

31.20

18.56

23.62

20

13

4

26.28

22.83

23.45

28.99

16.62

10

40

th

17.37

$1.89

60.88

32.38

23.23

23

59.62

27

نا

48.67

18.79

51.57

9.47

52.77

70

31

$2.80

58.93

33.13

37

6

53.27

20

45

23.74

21

9

51.18

20

&

5 14

20.75

1o 12 1AAR ABS 2

28.80

25.13

11

32.28

27.92

21

23.48

20

26.07

15

1

32.01

20.73

30,80

21 G

47.63

39 1

87.86

16

15 1 28.32 32.97

15

3 29.32

60 19 92.39 26.78

13

30

16 47.50

71

83.99

31

40.16

£9

58.02

14

16.70

50

4671

20

28.48

65

67.91

27

26 16

33

97 87

101

115.63

29.49

41

40 28

16 1:12:

64.23

13

70

17

55

35

30

21

30

15 102 29

121

14

41

20

31

5

17

11

: 88:::: ! ! ! ! :: S: : : 2:

100 58

23.87 61,83

33 85

81

161.69

163.30

50 58 16.42

40 78

8.02

15,39

2014

19.65

11.75

12,76

G9

20

83.79

52

13 37.19

HOOLS in 1897, under the provisions of the Scheme of 19th August, 1893.

RS WHO FAiled.

TOTALS.

SUMS TO WHICH THE SCHOOL IS ENTITLED,

stand. 1.

Stand, fl.

Stand. III.

Stand. IV.

Stand. V.

Stand. VI.

Stand. VII.

Passed.

Failed.

Passed.

Failed.

Special Subjects.

Ordinary Special

Subjects. Subjects.

Average Daily Attendance during the Year.

Stand. I.

Stand. II.

Stand. III.

Stand. IV.

Stand. V.

Stand. VI.

Stand. VII.

Ordinary Subjects.

3104

- 01

::::

20 10 10 • 1 card and u co to i

-

• Co

االله

-

·00

OF

*

36

*

Special Subjects.

Needle Work.

ED

අදා

ፍጹ

*A*

Co

CA

Stand. 1.

Stand. II.

Stand. III.

Stand. IV.

Stand. V.

Stand. VI.

Stand. VII.

Very Good,

Good.

30 Fair.

Capitation Grant.

30

Total Grant earned in 1897.

359

Amount due to Teacher.

FA

Amount due to Manager.

31

12

:

31

2

29

N

37

3

18

12

40

24

42.18

48.00

34.72

12

N

€4

66

12 28 108

18.95 21 20 18 14

14.59 21 28 12

11.14 9 8 42

N.

$ 50

67 44 36

1.00 4.50 10 3.00

3.75

4.00 7.50 26.00

58

48

53 51

75 104 42

23

17

21.07

33 16 48

18.00 9.00 6.00 3.75

20.68

29.78

24 16 42

42

א2

25

63.24 54 64

30 108

3

38

49.83 45 56

4

7.50 3.00 6 8.30 8.25 10

44

58,50 39 120 81

15.50 9.75

24

نان

10 21

27

25

2

21

32.72 23 09

45.70

41 #0 32.37 21 20 6

33 28 #0 20

5.50 975

14 18 42

$.00 6.00

12 21

6.00 3.00 3.00

3.00

:2:2:::::98: ;**~

24.00

17.36

166.00 206.86

41.50

124.50

51.71

155.15

6.50

6.09

5

5.00

21.59

9.47 89.97 22.49

7.29 106.54 26.63 79.01 5.57

64.57 16.14 48.43 207.09 51.77 155.32

26.75 274.75 68.68 205.07 10.53 117.28 29.32 87.96

67.48

3 8.00

2 8.00

6.00 13.50 12 15.00 G

11

5.00 2.5.

10.31 92.34 14.89 114.89 31.52 274.12 24.91 206.66 29.25 297.50 27.85 208.10 16.18 133.18 33.29 99.89 16.36 183.36 45.84 137.52

23.08 69.26

28.72

86.17

68 5%

205,59

$1.06

155.00

74.87 223.13

52.02 156.08

11.54

135.54 33.88 101.66

18

19.74

24

24.35

21 8 51 39

9.87

92.87 23.21 69.66

12 i 36

16

5.00 2.25

13.00

19.50 6

12.18

150.93

37.73 113.20

:

10.92 3

5.46

23.02 9 12 6

13.40 IS 12 12

11 51

8.46 59.51

2.11

6.35

14.87 41.6-1

31.20 12 2-1

30

48

2.00

4.50

200

12

3.00 15.00

6.95

55.95 13.98 41.97

15.60

18.56 27 28 18

10.50

.50

9.28

23.09 18 36 24 28

3.00

8

8.50

11.54

240.60 104.28 134.04 33.51

60.15 26.07

180.45

73.21

100.53

26.28 24 49 12

8.00

3.75 2

9.00 7

13.14 113.89 28.47

85.42

24

22.83 42 40

22

6

25

23.45 15 S 42 28.99 36 2x 30 16.62 15 21

12

2.50 3.00

7.50 12 2.00 8.00 1.50 13 6.00

11.41 114.91 28.72 86.19

11.72

146.72 36.63 110.01

14.49

136.99

31.24 102.75

3 2.00

831

82.31

20.57

61.74

17.37 36 16 IS

3.00

2.25

2,00

8 68

88.95

22.23

68.70

$1.89 18 32 114

25.91

233.94

58.48

175 46

60.68 72 76 102

15.00 5.26

30,24 300.59

75.14

225.15

32.38 30

24

96

23.23

30

2 £ 36

6.50 4.50

3.00

50.62

51

52 108

6.00 4.50

48.67

51 56 72

E

18.79

9 12 2+

$1,57

57 48 96

9.47

9 16

52.77

99 52 18

: 2.80

رد

53.93

45

20

+

14

72 60 55 45 108 36 49

33.13 33

28 | 24

53.27 66 68 120

23.74 21 48 34

51.18 63 52 36 35

20.75 21 32 30

28.80

21

::::::::::::::::

7.00 6.75

i6.19 177.19 41.29 1161 101.61 26.15 25.31 257.81 24.33 259.08

9:30

132.00

78.46

64.45

193.36

64.77 194.31

54.39

13.59 40.80

6.75

25.78

5.00

9.00 2.2.5 2 8.00 8.25 8.50 4.50 4

12.00

4 11.50

17.00

1 7.50

9.50 13.30 4.50 7.00 1.50

6.00

5

2.50

28 102

1.50

25.13 21 52 54

14

12

32.28 21 36 21

2.50 2.25

3.00

27.02 27 36 18 21 8

21

23.48 15 52 30 14 24

6.50 6.00

19

20

26.07 48 28 24 14

8

7.50 3.00

15

32,01 30 32 48 11

500

8.75

7.50 19 2.00 9 $.50

20.73 15 8 36

28

30.80 36 28 12 14

32

6

47.63 45 28 30 42

16

43

39

47.66 36 48 30

40

5.50 6.75 4.00 10.00 9.75

5.251

15

1

28.32 27 16 48 14 8

4.00 3.75

25

16

32,97 30 3 78

8.50 5.25

25

15

3 i

20.32 36 16 26 21

5.30 3.00

10.00 9.00

4.00

2.25

4.50

71

31

$

49

14

Cabra 10 :::

:

G 00

31.50

45.00 3.00

14.40 158.90 39.72 119.18 6.00 12.56 182,56 45.64 136.92 13 3.50 16.14 151.39 37.8+ 113.5.5 310,50 18.96 137.46 54.36 103.10 4.00 11.74 183.24 45,81 137.43 13.03 175.03 43.75 131.23 16.00 166.25 41.55 10,36 69.36 17.34 11 19.50 15.40 186.15 46.53 139.62 4.50 23 5.00 23.81 235.56 58.89 176.67 10.50

15 7.00 28.83 303.08 76.52 229.3 15 2.50 14.16 154.41 38.60 11581

124.69

52.02

5 2.50 1648 150.73 37.58 113.05 3 2.00 14.66 143.16 35.79 107.37 31 9.00 46.19 503.69 125.92 377.77

7

12.09 139.64 34.91 104.73 23.75

164.25 41.06 123.19 41.89 329.93 82.49 247.30

6,50 20.08 107.58 41.89 125,69

12.80

233.53 4.73 36.73 26.38 258.13 64.53 26.40 290.15 26.96 310.96 16.56 131.04 $276 98.30 26.67 303.63 75.90 227.73 11.87 136.37 31.00 102.28 25.74 246.24 61.55 184.68

10 37 95.87 28.96 71.91

58.58

175.15

9.18

27.55

193.60

72.53

217.62

77.74

233.22

30

14.50

3.75

24

60

35

16

33

81

161.69

14

163.30

20

50 58 16.42 40.78

29

52 13 37.19

56 11 60 19 24 1 19 1 30 9 6 16

20

25

92.39 33 52 78 31

26.78 $3 20 42

47.50 30 28 78

83.99 96 84 103 40.16 39 48 36 58,62 57 GO 90 16.70 6 21 36

44.74 66

126

28.43 18 20 51 67.91 76 114 112

26 16 24 30 16 97 87 12 18 48

7

63

20

115.63 |420 144 |100 72

29.49 42 16 10 40.93 132 72

64.25 126

200

: : : : : : BAZ: : NARN: 8:⠀⠀⠀⠀

100.58 66 188 120 14

23.87 36 16 20

61.65 234 104

30

33 85 102 54 110

78 152 1240 264

8.02 12 16 15.33

29 14

13.65

11.75

:aa23822889 188986:

42

:9 888 : : 1220 22

1140

144

30 82

101.69 1,515.60 379.17 1,137,52

12.76 12 64

REANDERS-AR:

126 256 250 252 224

32 72

96 180

94.50 24.00

65 22

1,50

153.80 1,536.30

$81.07 1,152.23

50.58 438.58

109.61 328.91

30 72

20

15 00

16.2

208.42 52.10 156.32

72 96 100

9.00

49.78

$27.78

81.94

245.81

10

8.02 46.02

32

10

7,50

16.29

149.89

11 50 87.47

31.52 112.42

78 48

.50

20 50 50

4.50

30

:

40

2.50

83.79 30 136 100

16 20

81

52:

70

144 64 114

26

21

12.00

$.50

29.14 150.64 $7.66 112.98

19.05

173.15 43.28 129.87 11.75 101.25 26.00 78.19 12.76 132.25 30.06 99.20

SA 79 37.19

!980.79 245.19 735.60 633.69 158.12 475.27

29.31 236.31

59.07

177.24

$.35 74.35

18.58

55.77

4.50

2

1.50

20 11,00

4 27.00 21 50 10 21.00 5 .50 22.50 10 4.00

22.37 319.12 14.21 50.93 19.62

79.78

239.84

106.21 26,55 79.66

538.93 134.73

404.20

171.12

42.78

128.34

28.40 115.68

29.19 $7.49

360.90

90 22

270.68

851.63

212.90

638.73

24.37 73.12

23 50 39

7.50 13 2,50

::

40.93 304.93 76.23 228.70 64.3 402.23 123.05 369.18 100.58 949.58 257.39 20,87 224.87 56.21 61.65 429.65 107.41

712 19

168.66

322.21

#3 85 301.85 73.46 226.39

:

TOTAL,.

.828,402.48 5,850.26 17,652.22

361

TABLE VIII-NUMBER of SCHOLARE attending Schools receiving GRANTS-IN-AID (under the provisions of the Scheme of 1893), expenses incurred and amount of Grunt gained by each in 1897.

Class

of

School.

"1

}

Name of Schools.

Expenses

Boys.

Girls.

Total.

incurred in .

Amount of Grant gained

1897.

for 1897.

Tsat-tsz-mui (Boys),

19

"

**

>>

""

"

""

""

"

""

37

11

Pottinger Street (Girls),

31

"T

""

11

"

""

"

"

事事

??

19

"1

Yaumati (Boys).

32

99

"

Aberdeen School (Boys),

Aplichau School (Girls)..

F. E. S., Bonham Road Chinese Division (Girls),

??

High Street (Girls),

Queen's Road West (Girls),

Saiyingpun Praya (Girls),.

Stanley School (Girls),

Shaukiwan (Girls),..

Tokwawan (Girls),.

Yaumati (Girls),

L. M. S., Square Street (Boys),

Wantsai Chapel (Boys),

Shektongtsui (Boys),.

Saiyingpun I. Division (Boys),

II.

I

American Board Mission, Bridges Street (Boys).

་་

41

""

Queen's Road West (Boys),

>>

**

Háwan (Girls)....

.,

27

Chungwan (Girls),

"

**

Mongkoktsui (Boys),

**

#

2:

Shaukiwan (Boys),

::

Tokwawan (Boys).

"

"

"

Basel Mission, Shamshuipo (Boys),

Matauchung (Boys),

Berlin Ladies Mission, Queen's Road West (Boys),

C. M. S., St. Stephen's Chinese School (Boys),...

No. 2 (Boys),

Pottinger Street (Boys),

Saiyingpun (Boys),

St. Stephen's Baxter Memorial (Girls),.............

>

Lyndhurst Terrace (Girls),

"

>

Third Street (Girls);

}}

"1

Yaumati (Mixed),

Hunghòm (Girls),

Quarry Bay (Girls),

Little Hongkong (Boys),

8:02 182082 DIN

59

37

28

17

62

34

30

30

59

82

65

65

92

92

66

66

60

60

63

********: *888

59

$

261.00

166.00

37

224.00

206.86

28

179.00

89.97

29

294.00

106.54

17

112.00

64.57

SI

228.59

207.09

62

346.34

274.75

34

215.27

117,28

181.62

92.34

59

68.25

114.89

317.05

274.12

362.70

206.66

340.82

297.50

284.71

208.10

246.99

133.18

272.64

183.36

39

39

189.71

135.54

10

50

231.41

92.87

3+

34

197.10

150.93

23

23

137.64

21

21

115.41

8.46

34

34

166.85

59.51

25

25

132.00

55.95

51

51

811.16

240.60

28

28

199.10

104.28

42

42

225.10

134.04

51

54

260.35

113.89

40

40

201.94

114.91

42

42

149.98

146.72

41

226.71

136.99

23

23

125.37

82.31

27

27

195.20

88.93

69

69

248.13

233.94

69

69

295.28

300.69

44

44

259.88

177.19

33

33

203.28

104.61

68

68

359.15

257.81

"

(Boys),

65

65

275.16

259.08

""

,,

Hunghom (Boys).

30

30

147.71

54.39

"

Hospital Chapel (Boys),

64

64

273.17

233.53

Shektongtsui (Girls)....

15

15

116.76

36.73

""

11

Saiyingpun, Second Street I. Division (Girls),

76

76

208.47

258.13

>1

II.

"

11

(Boys),

121

121

356.48

290.15

97

""

Ui-hing Lane I. Division (Girls),

73

73

240.86

310.96

II.

"

(Girls),

37

37

173.19

131.06

"

"

"

19

"

Tanglungchau No. 1 (Boys),

Square Street (Girls),

73

214.18

303.63

No. 2 (Boys),

48

198.55

136.37

94

94

275.76

246.24

19

"

Taikoktsui (Boys),

17

21

Matauwai (Boys),

26

26

170.33

95.87

"

1:

"}

17

Third Street (Boys),

步步

"

19

"

11

Shaukiwan (Boys),..

D'Aguilar Street (Girls),

Kau-ü-fong (Girls),

Tanglungchau (Girls),

Aberdeen Street (Girls),

209.06

245.97

158.90

45

282.14

182.56

56

56

337.12

151.39

42

12

149.09

137.46

37

37

364.17

183.24

Wantsai Chapel (Girls),

36

36

234.51

175.03

Staunton Street (Girls),

40

40

237.48

166.25

R. C. M., Cathedral School II. Division (Boys),

32

32

89.00

69.36

"

Bridges Street Chinese Division (Girls),

35

35

284.00

186.15

".

**

St. Theresa School (Girls),

65

65

531.10

235.56

"

Holy Infancy School (Mixed),..

30

43

73

520.00

306.08

""

Yaumati (Girls),

45

45

570.00

154.41

??

"1

Shaukiwan (Girls),......................

47

47

314.00

150.73

??

!>

Hunghom (Girls),

42

42

488.00

143.16

""

">

Italian Convent, Chinese School (Girls),

103

103

717.00

503.69

"

Sacred Heart School Chinese Division (Girls),

48

48

260.25

139.64

"

Wesleyan Mission, Spring Gardens (Boys),

68

68

235.00

164.25

M

19

>>

Wellington Street (Boys),

107

107

266.50

329.99

་་

"

(Girls);

56

56

254.00

167,58

H

""

Lascar Row (Boys),

65

65

226.00

236.31

11

::

?>

Wantsai School (Boys),

25

25

226.00

74.35

+9

15

Graham Street (Girls)...

76

344.00

319.12

19

Kennedy Town (Boys),

41

172.00

106.21

"

>>

*P

Basel Mission, High Street (Girls),

Berlin Foundling House School (Girls),

C. M. S., Victoria Home and Orphange Chinese Division (Girls),

St. Stephen's Anglo-Chinese (Boys).

Morrison English School (Boys),

87

87

780.08

538.93

30

30

774.00

171.12

48

48

504.12

360.90

166

166

713.42

$51.63

51

51

1,431.74

97.49

*

W. M.. Lyndhurst Terrace, English School (Boys),

67

67

554.00

304.93

17

St. Paul's College School (Boys),

98

98

1.220.29

492.23

11

Diocesan Home and Orphanage (Boys),

185

185

13,904.26

949.53

19

F. E. S., Bonham Road, English Division (Girls),,

36

36

611.70

224.87

17

L. M. S., Taipingshan, English School (Boys),

85

85

403.95

429.65

::

R. C. M., Cathedral School I. Division (Boys)... St. Joseph's College (Boys),

53

53

404.50

301.85

236

236

3,376.47

1,516.69

Italian Convent English Division (Girls),

248

248

2,488.46

1,536.30

Carried forward.........................

2,803

2,219

5,022

46,239.76

20,057.01

362

Class of

School.

TABLE VIII-NUMBER of SCHOLARS attending Schools receiving GRANTS-IN-AID.-Continued.

Name of Schools.

Boys.

Girls.

Total.

Expenses incurred in

Amount of

Grant gained

1897.

for 1897.

Brought forward,.

2,803.

2,219

5,022

$46,239.76

$20,057.01

III

D

R.C.M., Italian Convent Portuguese Division (Girls)..

Bridges Street English Division (Girls),

77

77

941.14

438.58

24

24

678.00

208.42

Portuguese Division (Girls),

54

54

582.00

327.78

"3

"

32

"

25

"

11

"

Victoria English School (Boys),

";

(Girls),

27

English

""

Nova Escola Portugueza (Girls)...

Sacred Heart School, English Division (Girls),

St. Francis Portuguese Division (Girls),

Victoria Portuguese School, Portuguese Division (Mixed)....

13

13

207.19

46.02

19

19

594.75

149.89

29

29

379.20

150.64

(Girls),

English

27

27

556.80

173.15

14

20

104.25

1.252.80

**

(Mixed)..

4

14

18

132.26

162

162

980.79

5.73$.99

57

57

633.69

C.M.S., Victoria Home and Orphange English Division (Girls);

2,975

2,547

5,522

57,170.63

23,402.48

TABLE IX.-ENROLMENT, ATTENDANCE and NUMBER of SCHOOL DAYS at the GRANT-IN-AID SCHOOLs during 1897.

No.

Name of Schools.

Maximum Minimum Monthly Monthly Enrol- Enrol- ment. ment.

Average Average Maximum Minimum Daily Daily

Average Monthly Enrol-

Average Daily

Number

Attend-

of School

Attend-

ance.

Attend-

ancc.

ment.

ance for the Year.

Days.

1 American Board Mission, Bridges Street. (Boys),

58

40

54.85

36.33

53.45

48.00

239

Queen's Road West (Boys),

37

29

36.15

27.85

35.54

34.72

243

*

3

爷爷

་་

Háwan (Girls),

28

17

23.57

15.80

22.72

18.95

269

99

"

Chungwan (Girls),

25

13

17.60

5.93

19.27

14.59

257

Mongkoktsui (Boys),

17

13.95

4.77

14.40

11.14

217

Basel Mission, Shamshuipo (Boys),

51

42

49.46

24.15

47.50

43.18

234

Shaukiwan (Boys),

62

51

59.00

23.16

59.10

53.51

221

8

9

10

11

""

"

ад

Tokwawan (Boys),

34

21

27.50

4.90

27.50

21.07

241

Matauchung (Boys),

...

Berlin Ladies Mission, Queen's Road West (Boys),

12 C.M.S., St. Stephen's Chinese School (Boys),

30

21

23.80

14.62

27.40

20.68

228

Tsat-tszmui (Boys),..

40

23

37.78

17.00

33.91

29.78

266

76

62

74.05

48.02

68.27

63.24

264

13

"

No. 2 (Boys),

65

42

57.38

38.11

54.36

49.83

251

14

"

Pottinger Street (Boys),

72

36

65.73

33.70

62.08

58.50

250

15

97

Saiyingpun (Boys),

54

23

48,33

21.88

£5.00

45.70

251

16

""

St. Stephen's Baxter Memorial (Girls),

52

16

43.87

12.38

36.66

32.37

267

17

39

Lyndhurst Terrace (Girls),

53

25

41.07

22.16

37.91

32.72

258

18

??

Third Street (Girls),

36

8

28.65

8.00

27.63

23.09

262

19

??

Yaumati (Mixed),

32

16

24.14

10.40

26.16

19.74

269

20

++

Hunghòm (Girls),

34

14

30.03

13.09

27.63

24.36

252

21

"

Quarry Bay (Girls),

20

10

19.58

4.01

16.10

13.50

196

22

""

Little Hongkong (Boys),

21

7

19.03

3.61

14.63

10.92

240

23

99

Aberdeen School (Boys),

30

13

26.96

7.75

26.54

23.02

237

24

Aplichau (Girls),

19

9

18.10

7.05

16.00

13.90

281

25

F.E.S., Bonham Road, Chinese Division (Girls),

36

30

35.10

26.72

33.45

31.20

232

26

High Street (Girls),

26

12

21.71

9.58

21.45

18.56

251

27

"

Queen's Road West (Girls),

34

16

26,96

11.91

27.66

23.09

277

28

Saiyingpun, Praya (Girls),

36

18

31,50

15.20

29.93

26.28

260

29

::

30

"

Stanley School (Girls),

31

32

"

33

34

35

"

36

27

37

38

"

Pottinger Street (Girls),

Shaukiwan (Girls),

Tokwawan (Girls),

Yaumati (Girls)..

L.M.S., Square Street (Boys),

Wantsai Chapel (Boys),

Yaumati (Boys),

Shektong-tsui (Boys),

Saiyingpun, I. Division (Boys),

31

8

27,61

6.10

25.25

22.83

265

34

24

29.45

19.07

30.33

23.45

266

38

17

33.44

13.50

33.27

28.99

248

20

15

18.32

9.36

18.36

16.62

261

26

12

22.40

9.00

21.27

17.37

251

64

43

58.72

42.00

55.45

51.89

254

69

52

68.04

41.03

64.36

60.68

236

44

11

33

68

39

II.

31

29

(Boys),

62

40

"

Hunghom (Boys),

30

41

Hospital Chapel (Boys),

64

42

"I

Shektong-tsui (Girls),

43

19

14

11

45

46

II.

17

"

47

*

48

49

17

50

11

Saiyingpun, Second Street, I. Division (Girls),

II.

Ui-hing Lane, I. Division (Girls),

Tanglungchau No. 1 (Boys),

..

No. 2 (Boys),

Square Street (Girls),

Taikoktsui (Boys),..

15

72

(Boys),

94

65

(Girls).

37

69

38

84

41

51

"1

Matauwai (Boys).

26

52

"

Shaukiwan (Boys),

53

争场

Third Street (Boys),

35

54

D'Aguilar Street (Girls),

37

122 12 12A

39.45

10.00

35.18

32.38

244

14

29.96

10.50

28.18

23.23

248

38

59.65

32.50

59.72

50.62

235

45

55.54

29.90

56.72

48.67

242

14

25.31

11.41

21.30

18.79

211

37

58.38

30.34

57.63

51.57

249

4

12.18

3.09

11.80

9.47

219

25

66.65

24.33

59.75

52.77

235

55

62.47

27.70

72.75

52.80

242

45

59.01

42.62

58.54

53.93

242

36.84

20.92

33.90

33.13

255

35

60.73

25.00

62.72

53.27

261

15

30.72

11.50

28.41

23.74

249

61.42

32.71

65.09

51.48

249

...

19

23.30

17.16

25.09

20.75

213

***

24

34.16

18.04

31.72

28.80

258

31.72

13.04

32.54

25.13

259

Carried forward,.

2,233

1,256

1,961.32 968.90 1,901.18 1,658.00

i

ENROLMENT, ATTENDANCE and NUMBER of SCHOOL DAYS at the GRANT-IN-AID SCHOOLS,-Continued.

363

No.

Name of Schools.

Maximum Minimum Monthly Monthly Enrol- Enrol- ment.

ment.

Average Average Maximum Minimum Daily Daily Attend- Attend-

ance.

Average Monthly Enrol-

Average Daily

Number

Attend-

ment.

ance.

ance for the Year.

of School Days.

Brought forward,

2,233

1,256

1,961.32

968.90

1,901.48

1,658.00

55 L.M.S., Kau-ü-fong (Girls),

44

15

39.32

14.27

35.00

32.28

248

56

Tanglungchau (Girls),

39

19

31.65

16.00

33.83

27.92

263

57

Aberdeen street (Girls),

32

17

29.08

15.76

27.72

23.48

253

58

Wantsai Chapel (Girls),

33

23

29.40

17.22

31.10

26.07

255

59

Staunton Street (Girls),

40

25

36.42

19.06

36.00

32.01

265

60

R.C.M., Cathedral School, I. Division (Boys),

29

6

27.44

6.00

21.16

20.73

254

61

Bridges Street, Chinese Division (Girls),

35

25

33.00

22.55

33.75

30.80

266

62

St. Theresa School (Girls),

63

30

55.59

29.05

54.41

47.63

257

63

Holy Infancy School (Mixed),

71

26

70.41

52.05

60.08

57.66

256

64

21

Yaumati (Girls).

43

26

33.14

24.14

36.50

28.32

275

65

66

19

Shaukiwan (Girls),

41

23

38.37

21.00

35.50

32.97

263

""

Hunghòm (Girls),....

37

20

32.88

17.50

32.16

29.32

267

67

19

Italian Convent, Chinese School (Girls),

100

88

98.81

83.73

94.25

92.39

273

68

??

Sacred Heart School, Chinese Division (Girls),

33

24

33.10

21.50

30.50

25.78

266

69

70

"

71

>

72

11

73

"

74

11

75

"

76

Wesleyan Mission, Spring Gardens (Boys),

**

Lascar Row (Boys), Wantsai School (Boys), Graham Street (Girls),.. Kennedy Town (Boys),

Basel Mission, High Street (Girls),

67

31

53.80

26.60

59.45

47.50

262

Wellington Street (Boys),

107

50

98.36

35.00

91.09

83.99

237

"

(Girls),

54

20

48.23

17.09

45.45

40.16

240

65

44

62.30

33.00

62.18

58.62

243

24

19

19.40

11.23

21.10

16,70

234

56

29

52.55

24.90

49.25

44.74

262

41

10

34.69

7.66

36.18

28.43

241

87

67

74.80

55.76

78.90

67.91

249

77

Berlin Foundling House School (Girls),..

30

23

30.00

20.65

28.27

26.16

267

78

C.M.S., Victoria Home and Orphanage, Ch. Div. (Girls),...

44

34

42.28

33.75

38.63

37.87

249

79

??

St. Stephen's Anglo-Chinese (Boys),

146

101

131.08

86.73

123.54

115.63

236

80

"}

Morrison English School (Boys),

51

23

45.08

18.16

38.27

29.49

236

81

Wesleyan Mission, Lyndhurst Terrace, Eng. Sch. (Boys),

50

20

46.84

18.33

43.17

40.93

244

82

St. Paul's College School (Boys),

82

41

76.87

38.23

67.27

64.23

239

83

Diocesan Home and Orphanage (Boys),

129

94

115.94

79.62

116.41

100.58

249

84

F.E.S., Bonham Road. English Division (Girls),

31

19

27.76

18.09

25.63

25.87

226

85

L.M.S., Taipingshan. English School (Boys),

75

47

70.04

44.00

65.00

61.65

220

86

R.C.M., Cathedral School, I. Division English (Boys),

39

27

36.96

26.04

35.25

33.85

250

87

88

??

St. Joseph's College, European Division (Boys), Italian Convent, English Division (Girls),

192

160

177.80

146.00

176.00

161.69

254

199

188

175.77

121.62

193.90

163.30

221

89

"

??

l'ortuguese Division (Girls),

66

58

56.61

36.62

62.90

50.58

221

90

11

Bridges Street, English Division (Girls),

23

20

19.86

12.15

21.66

16.42

265

91

15

13

Portuguese Division (Girls),

51

45

43.86

35.87

47.16

40.78

265

92

??

Nova Escola Portugueza (Girls).

13

7

12.06

5.26

9.50

8.02

222

93

97

94

>>

95

"

Sacred Heart School, English Division (Girls), St. Francis, Portuguese Division (Girls),...

English Division (Girls),

18

16

17.00

11.43

17.68

15 39

228

26

17

22.26

15.91

22.08

22.14

285

25

21

24.36

16.34

22.91

19.65

285

96

91

97

>"

Victoria Portuguese School, Port. Div. (Mixed),. Eng. Div. (Mixed),.

16

15.31

8.15

12.91

11.75

246

17

13

14.90

10.68

14.58

12.76

246

98

Victoria English School (Boys),

107

75

96.65

64.71

92.50

83.79

255

99

(Girls),

46

31

39.30

27.71

41.41

37.19

250

100 C.M.S., Victoria Home and Orphanage, Eng. Div. (Girls),.

Total,....

4,850.

2,982

4,332.67

2,436.01 4,223.62

3,732.13

364

TABLE XI.—PERCENTAGE of SCHOLARS who passed in the GRANT-IN-AID SCHOOLS during the last two Years.

No.

Name of Schools.

1896.

1997.

Increase.

Decrease.

123TO C∞

American Board Mission, Bridges Street (Boys)

91.66

72.09

19.59

19

Queen's Road West (Boys)

96.42

93.93

2.49

J

Hawan (Girls)

90.90

85.00

5.90

4

5

多少

Chung-wan (Girls).

100.00

100.00

"}

Mongkok-tsui (Boys)

84.21

100.00

15.79

6 Basel Mission, Shamshuipó (Boys)

80.00

93.02

13.02

7

8

9

Shaukiwau (Boys)

94.54

98.30

3.76

To'kwa-wan (Boys).

96.00

95.83

0.17

11

Matau-chung (Boys)

94.14

11

:

12

*

"

10 Berlin Ladies Mission, Queen's Road West (Boys)

13

C. M. S. St. Stephen's Chinese School (Boys)

88.88

86.36

2.52

Tsat-tsz-mui (Boys)

45.16

83.87

38.71

90.24

98.11

7.87

"}

"

No. 2 (Boys)

86.48

92.68

6.20

14

"

Pottinger Street (Boys)......

97.61

100.00

2.39

15

"

Salyingpun (Boys)...

94.44

97.58

3.14

16

St. Stephen's Baxter Memorial (Girls)

94.44

62.96

31.48

17

Lyndhurst Terrace (Girls)

100.00

100.00

18

Third Street (Girls)

80.00

100.00

20.00

19

.་

Yaumati (Mixed)

91.30

85.71

5.59

20

Hunghóm (Girls)

94.73

100.00

5.27

21

Quarry Bay (Girls)

100.00

22

Little Hongkong (Boys)

33.33

50.00

16.67

23

Aberdeen School (Boys)

100.00

50.00

50.00

24

Aplichau (Girls).

75.00

78.57

3.57

25

F. E. S. Bonham Road, Chinese Divisions (Girls).

100.00

26

High Street (Girls)

95.23

27

28

Queen's Road West (Girls)

100.00

Saiyingpun Praya (Girls)

100.00

95.23

4.77

29

30

*

31

32

33

34

35

"

36

37

Pottinger Street (Girls)..

Stanley School (Girls)

Shaukiwan (Girls) To'kwa-wan (Girls) Yaumati (Girls).

L. M. S. Square Street (Boys)..

Wantsai Chapel (Boys) Yaumati (Boys)

Shektongtsui (Boys)

100.00

84.61

75.75

93.75

100.00

100.00

100.00

97.56

2.44

91.42

96.77

5.35

75.67

94.11

18.44

86.20

84.61

1.59

38

""

Saiyingpun I Division (Boys)

90.00

88.88

1.12

39

II

(Boys)

83.78

90.74

6.96

40

"

Hunghóm (Boys)

100.00

90.90

9.10

41

Hospital Chapel (Boys)..

100.00

100.00

42

་་

Shektongtsui (Boys)

66.66

63.63

3.03

43

""

Saiyingpun, Second Street, I Division (Girls).

79.16

86.88

7.72

44

II

39

45

}"

46

""

19

II

""

47

""

48

"

49

""

50

"

51

"

52

>>

53

""

54

""

55

56.

""

Ui-hing Lane, I Division (Girls)

"

Tanglung-chau No. 1 (Boys)

"

No. 2 (Boys)

Square Street (Girls)..

Taikok-tsui (Boys)

Matau-wai (Girls).

Shaukiwan (Boys) Third Street (Boys)

D'Aguilar Street (Girls) Kau-u-fong (Girls).............. Tanglung-chau (Girls)

(Girls)...

85.93

76.92

9.01

92.30

96.49

4.19

(Girls)..

96.$7

80.64

16.23

100.00

100.00

100.00

96.29

3.71

96.00

93.75

2.25

90.47

76.92

13.55

90.62

81.81

96.96

100.00

92.30

7.70

100.00

100.00

57

""

Aberdeen Street (Girls)

100.00

96.55

3.45

68

Wantsai Chapel (Girls)...

100.00

100.00

59

Staunton Street (Girls).

$7.50

93.33

5.83

60

R. C. M. Cathedral School II Division (Boys)

81.25

61

"

Bridges Street, Chinese Division (Girls)..

72.00

87.09

15.09

62

>>

St. Theresa School (Girls)

68.29

92.10

23.81

63

Holy Infancy School (Mixed)

83.33

97.72

13.39

64

""

Yanmati (Girls)

93.33

100.00

6.67

65

>>

Shaukiwan (Girls).

83.33

92.59

9.27

66

>>

Hunghóm (Girls)

100.00

89.28

10.72

"

Italian Convent, Chinese School (Girls)

91.07

80.00

11.07

68

Sacred Heart School

>>

(Girls)

87.50

92.00

4.50

69

ΤΟ

""

39

Wesleyan Mission, Spring Gardens (Boys)....

Wellington Street, (Boys)

76.92

94.44

93.42

1.02

71

**

"

:

(Girls).

88.23

79.48

8.75

72

"

"

Lascar Row (Boys)

45.83

83.05

37.22

73

71

""

Wantsai School (Boys)

94.73

87.50

7.23

74

29

"

Graliam Street (Girls)

97.29

98.03

.74

75

Kennedy Town (Boys)

83.33

90.90

7.57

76

Basel Mission, High Street (Girls)

100.00

No.

TABLE XI-PERCENTAGE of SCHOLARS who passed in the GRANT-IN-AID SCHOOLS,—Continued.

365

Name of Schools.

1896.

1897.

Increase.

Decrease.

77

Berlin Foundling House School (Girls)

100.00

100.00

78

79

C.M.S. Victoria Home and Orphanage, Chin. Div. (Girls)

St. Stephen's Anglo-Chinese (Boys)

97.05

100.00

99.04

.96

80

19

Morrison English School (Boys)

95.83

90.90

4.93

81

82

Wesleyan Mission, Lyndhurst Terrace Eng. School (Boys) St. Paul's College School (Boys).

100.00

95.34

4.66

100.00

90.74

9.26

83

Diocesan Home and Orphanage (Boys)

82.35

84

85

:

86

87

"

88

F. E. S. Bonham Road, English Division (Girls) L. M. S. Tai-ping-shan, English School (Boys). R. C. M. Cathedral School I Division (Boys)...

St. Joseph's College, European (Boys) Italian Convent, English Division (Girls)

73.91

100.00

87.30

12.70

100.00

100.00

91.17

85.49

5.68

95.52

89.62

6.90

"?

89

""

""

90

Portuguese Division (Girls)... Bridges Street, English Division (Girls)

100.00

100.00

100.00

100.00

91

19

Portuguese Division (Girls)

100.00

100.00

92

99

Nova Escola Portugueza (Girls)

100.00

100.00

93

""

94

Sacred Heart School, Eng. Division (Girls) St. Francis Portuguese Division (Girls).

100.00

100.00

86.91

100.00

13.09

""

95

"

English

ܼܝ

(Girls)..

100.00

77.27

22.73

96

*

Victoria Portuguese School, Portug. Div. (Mix.)

100.00

100.00

97

""

Eng. Div. (Mixed)

100.00

100.00

98

Victoria English School (Boys)

93.84

99

"

""

(Girls)

100.00

100

C. M. S. Vict. Home and Orphanage, Eng. Div. (Girls)

Class

of

School.

TABLE XII.--PERCENTAGE of PASSES in the various subjects in which the GRANT-IN-AID SCHOOLS

were examined in 1897.

Name of Schools.

Reading.

I.. American Board Mission, Bridges Street (Boys),

"

"1

"

Queen's Rd. West (Boys),

93.02 100.00

74.71

100.00 100.00

96.96 93.54

100.00

100.00 100.00

...

"

"

"

Háwan (Girls),..

100 00

85.00

100.00

100.00 100.00

91

"

་་

"

Chungwan (Girls),

100.00

100.00 82.35

100.00

"

Mongkok-tsui (Boys),

100.00 100.00

100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00

"1

"

Shaukiwán (Boys),

尊重

J?

"}

14

11

"

Tsat-tsz-mui (Boys),

23

11

"

17

No. 2 (Boys),

"

"1

"

"

**

St. Stephen's Baxter Memorial (Girls),

11

"

Basel Mission, Shamshuipo (Boys),

Tokwawan (Boys),

Matauchung (Boys), .

Berlin Ladies Mission. Queen's Road West (Boys),

C.M.S., St. Stephen's Chinese School (Boys),

Pottinger Street (Boys),

Saiyingpun (Boys),

Lyndhurst Terrace (Girls),.

95.45 86.36 100.00 83.87

100.00 95.34 57.14

80.00

100.00 100.00 20.00

98.33 100.00 94.11

100.00 100.00

95.83 100.00 80.95

100.00 100.00

100.00 100.00

100.00 100.00

100.00 98.11 96.15

100.00 100.00

100.00 92.68

92.68

100.00 100.00

100.00 100.00

97.77

100.00 100.00

100.00 97.43 96.00

100.00 100.00

96.29 51.85 84.00

100.00

100.00 100.00

100.00 100.00 92.59

100.00 100.00

17

97

Third Street (Girls),

100.00 100.00 100.00

100.00 100.00

}}

"

Yaumati (Mixed),

95.23 90.47

100.00 100.00

11

+

Hunghom (Girls),.

100.00 100.00 88.23

100.00

100.00 100.00

11

Quarry Bay (Girls),

*1

·.

Little Hongkong (Boys),

100.00 50.00

50.00

Aberdeen School (Boys),..

80.00 55.00

100.00

100.00 100.00

Aplichau (Girls),

100.00 85.71

100.00 100.00

F.E.S., Bonham Road, Chinese Division (Girls),.

100.00 100.00 75.00

100.00 96.42 80.00

11

High Street (Girls),

100.00 95.23

100.00

100.00 100.00

11

Queen's Road West (Girls),

100.00 100.00

100.00

100.00 100.00

Saiyingpun Praya, (Girls),..

100.00 95.23 76.47

100.00 100.00

14

"1

11

"

"

Wantsai Chapel (Boys),

19

11

Yaumati (Boys),

11

"

19

31

J

39

12

11

Shektongtsui (Girls),

Pottinger Street (Girls),

Stanley School (Girls),

Shaukiwan (Girls),

Tokwawan (Girls),

Yaumati (Girls),

L.M.S., Square Street (Boys),

Shektongtsui (Boys),

Saiyingpun, I. Division (Boys),

Hunghòm (Boys),

Hospital Chapel (Boys),

Saiyingpun, Second Street, I. Div. (Girls),.

100.00 100.00 100.00 76 92 100.00 78.78 100.00 93.75 100.00 100.00

100.00 100.00

66.66

83.33

100.00 100.00

100.00

100.00 100.00

100.00

100.00 100.00

414

81.81

100.00 100.00

100.00 97.56

100.00

100.00 100.00 100.00

100.00 96.77

100.00 100.00

97.05 94.11 91.47

100.00 100.00

100.00 84.61 40.00

100.00 100.00

96.29 88.88 55.76

II.

19

""

(Boys),

98.14 94.44 81.81

50.00

100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00

80.00

90.90 90.90

100.00 100.00

100.00 100.00 62.28

100.00 100.00

99.99 63.63

100.00 100.00

98.36 88.52 54.54

100.00 50.00 Failed

11

""

"

Ui-hing Lane, I. Division (Girls),

II.

"

"}

2)

(Girls),

11. (Boys)..... 100.00 80.00 51.56 100.00 96.49 100.00

93.54 83.87

100.00

96.92 96.55

96.23

100.00

100.00 100.00

Failed

100.00 100.00

Class

of

School.

366

Name of Schools.

TABLE XII-PERCENTAGE of PASSES,-Continued.

Reading.

Writing

or Com-

position.

I.

::

11

1:

1:

"J

:1

T

L.M.S., Tanglungchau No. 1 (Boys),

ין

No. 2 (Boya), Square Street (Girls),

Taikoktsui (Boys),

Mariwai (Boys)...

Shaukiwan (Boys), Third Street (Boys), D'Aquilar Street (Girls),. Kan-i-fong (Girls), Tanglungehau (Girls), Aberdeen Street (Girls), Wantsai Chapel (Girls),

Staunton Street (Girls),

R.C.M., Cathedral School. II. Division (Boys),...

Bridges Street, Chinese Division (Girls)....

St. Theresa School (Girls),

Holy Infancy School (Mixed),. Yaumati (Girls),

Shunkiwan (Girls),

Hunghom (Girls),

It.. Convent, Chinese School (Girls),

wered Heart School, Chinese Division (Girls),. yan Mission, Spring Gardens (Boys),

Wellington Street (Boys).

量有

(Girls),

Lascar Row (Boys),

Wantsai School (Boys),

Graham Street (Girls),

Kennedy Town (Boys),

H. | Basel Mission, High Street (Girls).

iii.

Berlin Founding House School (Girls).

100 00 100.00 100.00

100.00

86.04 96.29 82.60 93.75 70.00

100.00 100.00

100.00

100.00 100.00 50.00

100.00 100.00

100.00

76.92 26.31

100.00 100.00

96.96

84.24 26.08

100.00 100.00

100.00

96.96

100.00

100.00 100.00 100.00

96.15

88.46

52.17

100.00

100.00 100.00

100.00 100.00

100.00

100.00 100.00

100.00 96.55 $7.50

100.00 96.55

100.00 100.00 100.00

100.00

100.00 100.00

96.66 96.66 93.75 95.75 81.25

100.00 100.00

100.00 100.00

100.00 74.25 96.29

96.29

100.00 100.00 80.00

100.00 92.10

100.00 100.00 97.50

100.00

100.00 100.00 100.00

100.00 100.00 78.91

100.00

100.00 96.29 100.00

100.00

78.57

83.33

100.00

98.57

72.85

Failed

96.00

100.00 100.00

100.00

92.30 82.05 27.27

100.00 97.36

100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 40.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00

...

...

100.00 82.05

100.00 100.00

100.00 89.83

96.61

93.22

100.00 87.50

100.00 100.00

100.00 94.11 94.44 100.00 90.90

100.00

100.00 100.00

100.00 100.00

Phys. Geo

100.00 100.00 | 100.00

100.00

100.00

100.00

100.00

96.29 96.29 100.00 100.00 100.00

100.00

100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 92.59 96.29

C.M.S., Victoria Home & Orphanage Chi. Div. (Girls),. 100.00

St. Stephen's Anglo-t'hinese (Boys). Morrison English School (Boys),

Wesleyan Mission, Lyndhurst Terrace Eng. Sch. (Boys),

"

St. Paul's College School (Boys),

1+

Diocesan Home and Orphanage (Boys),

"

F.E.S., Bonham Road, English Division (Girls)..

L.M.S., Taipingshan, English School (Boys),

"

17

R.C.M., Cathedral School, I. Division (Boys),

St. Joseph's College (Boys),

Italian Convent, English Division (Girls),

Portuguese Division (Girls),. Bridges Street, English Division (Girls),

Portuguese Division (Girls),

Sacred Heart School, English Division (Girls), St. Francis, Portuguese Division (Girls),

English Division (Girls),

100.00 91.17

99.04 98.09 98.09

100.00

81.81 83.33 60.00 100.00 75.00 33.33 100.00

100.00

90.90 90.90 81.81 100.00 100.00 90.69 95.84 93.02 98.14 98.14 92.59 84.84 100.00 90.58 95.29 75.00 100.00 91.30 26.66 93.33

88.88 90.47 90.04 100.00 94.28 100.00 100.00 100.00 70.22 72.03 79.66 100.00 91.85 87.40 84.21 100.00 90.24 90.24 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00| 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00

87.32 100.00

:

84.21 87.71 100.00 29.41

:

"

"

17

Nova Escola Portugueza (Girls),.

100.00 100.00

19

| 100.00 | 82.35

100.00 89.47

ད་

"

100.00

81.11.

"I

"

31

#

Victoria Portuguese Sch., Port. Div. (Mixed),..

100.00

100.00

100.00 100.00 100.00

94.11 84.21 50.00 100.00 100.00

100.00 100.00

76.47

100.00

>>

>>

"

Eng. Div. (Mixed),... 100.00

"

Victoria English School (Boys),

100.00

92.85 85.71 100.00 100.00 95.38 100.00

11

12

"

C.M.S., Victoria Home & Orphanage Eng. Div. (Girls),.

(Girls),

100.00

93.75

56.25 90.62 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00

96.87 100.00 | 100.00

No. 1.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 23rd February, 1898.

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART LOCKHART), Chairman.

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

""

the Harbour Master, (ROBERT MURRAY RUMSEY, R.N.).

32

"}

the Captain Superintendent of Police, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.). the Colonial Treasurer, (THOMAS SERCOMBE SMITH).

;;

"9

19

the Director of Public Works, (ROBERT DALY ORMSBY).

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER, C.M.G.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS, C.M.G.

""

WEI YUK.

"

ABSENT:

43

C

The Honourable JAMES JARDINE BELL-IRVING.

The Committee met at the request of the Colonial Secretary.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 8th December, 1897, were read and confirmed.

Read the following Minute under the hand of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government:-

C.5.0.

366 of 1898.

WILSONE BLACK.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to re-vote the following sums being unexpended balances of the votes for 1897 under the heading "Extra- ordinary Public Works"

Water Supply, Kowloon,

$ 2,069

Extension of Station Street North, Kowloon, and Streets at Mongkoktsui,... 1,771 Taipingshan Improvement,

10,000

City of Victoria and Hill District Waterworks, Road from Plantation Road to Magazine Gap,

15,460

1,531

Water and Drainage Works, Miscellaneous,

10,779

Government House, Hongkong, 11th February, 1898.

The Committee unanimously agreed to recommend that the above vote be passed.

The Committee then adjourned.

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 28th February, 1898.

Read and confirmed on the 25th July, 1898.

J. G. T. BUCKLE,

Clerk of Councils.

T. SERCOMBE SMITH,

Chairman.

No. 2.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 25th July, 1898.

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (THOMAS SERCOMBE SMITH), Chairman.

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

13

>>

the Harbour Master, (ROBERT MURRAY RUMSEY, R.N.).

**

the Captain Superintendent of Police, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.).

45

*:

>>

**

:

the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (Alexander MACDONALD THOMSON). the Director of Public Works, (ROBERT DALY ORMSBY).

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER, C.M.G.

Ho KAI, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS, C.M.G.

JAMES JARDINE BELL-IRVING.

WEI YUK.

The Committee met at the request of the Colonial Secretary.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 23rd February, 1898, were read and confirmed. Read the following Minutes under the hand of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government :-

C.O.D.

258 of 1897.

C.S.O.

938 of 1898.

C.S.O.

477 of 1898.

C.S.O.

716 of 1888.

C.S.O.

765 of 1898.

WILSONE BLACK.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of One thousand Four hundred and Nine Dollars ($1,409), being a gratuity to Mr. R. M. JAMESON, late Assistant Master, Queen's College.

Government House, Hongkong, 4th March, 1898.

WILSONE BLACK.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Four hundred and Seven Dollars ($407) in aid of the vote "Health Officer of the Port for repairs to Launch.”

Government House, Hongkong, 31st May, 1898.

WILSONE BLACK.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Seven hundred and Forty-seven Dollars ($747) in aid of the vote "Miscellaneous Works," Public Works Department.

Government House, Hongkong, 6th June, 1898.

WILSONE BLACK.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Three thousand Two hundred and Forty Dollars ($3.240) in aid of the vote "Repairs to Epidemic Hulk Hygeia."

Government House, Hongkong, 9th June, 1898.

WILSONE BLACK.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Four thousand Dollars ($4,000) for the extension and improvement of the Central Fire Brigade Station.

Government House, Hongkong, 10th June, 1898.

46

C.S.O. 1308 of 1898.

WILSONE BLACK.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Twelve thousand and Fifty Dollars ($12,050) in aid of the following votes:-

(a) Passages and Bonuses,

Police.

(b) Clothing and Accoutrements,

(c) Bedding and Mess Utensils,

$9,700

2,200

150

Total,..

$12,050

C.S.O.

1693 of 180°.

Government House, Hongkong, 20th June, 1898,

WILSONE BLACK.

The Officer Adininistering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Five hundred and Fourteen Dollars and Thirty Cents ($514.30) in aid of the following votes :-

(a) Executioner's Fee and inflicting Corporal Punishment. ......

..$100.00 (b) Rent of Quarters for Superintendent and Warders,................................ 414.30

Total,.

.$514.30

Government House, Hongkong, 11th July, 1898.

The Committee unanimously agreed to recommend that the above votes be passed. The Committee then adjourned.

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 3rd August, 1898.

Read and confirmed on the 3rd August, 1898.

J. G. T. BUCKLE,

Clerk of Councils.

T. SERCOMBE SMITH,

Chairman.

No. 3.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 3rd August, 1898.

47

!

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (THOMAS SERCOMBE SMITH), Chairman.

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

""

2

the Harbour Master, (ROBERT MURRAY RUMSEY, R.N.).

the Captain Superintendent of Police, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.). the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON). the Director of Public Works, (ROBERT DALY ORMSBY).

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER, C.M.G.

Ho KAI, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

JAMES JARDINE BELL-IRVING.

WEI YUK.

ABSENT:

The Honourable EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS, C.M.G.

The Committee met at the request of the Colonial Secretary.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 25th July, 1898, were read and confirmed. Read the following Minute under the hand of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government:-

a.s.o.

3037 of 1896.

WILSONE BLACK,

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Iwo thousand and Seven hundred Dollars ($2,700) in aid of the vote "Gaol Extension.”

Government House, Hongkong, 26th July, 1898.

The Committee unanimously agreed to recommend that the above vote be passed.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO AUTHORISE THE APPROPRIATION OF A SUPPLEMENTARY SUM OF THREE HUNDRED AND SIXTY-EIGHT THOUSAND, EIGHT HUNDRED AND SIXTY-NINE DOLLARS AND NINETY- THREE CENTS, TO DEFRAY THE CHARGES OF THE YEAR 1897.

The Committee unanimously agreed to recommend that the several items be passed.

The Committee then adjourned.

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 15th August, 1898.

Read and confirmed on the 15th August, 1898.

J. G. T. BUCKLE,

Clerk of Councils.

T. SERCOMBE SMITH,

Chairman.

No. 4.

+

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 15th August, 1898.

49

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (THOMAS SERCOMBE SMITH), Chairman.

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

>>

??

the Harbour Master, (ROBERT MURRAY RUMSEY, R.N.).

??

"}

the Captain Superintendent of Police, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.).

the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON).

the Director of Public Works, (ROBERT DALY ORMSBY).

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER, C.M.G.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS, C.M.G.

17

JAMES JARDINE BELL-IRving.

>>

WEI YUK.

The Committee met at the request of the Colonial Secretary.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 3rd August. 1898, were read and confirined. Read the following Minutes under the hand of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government :-

C.S.O.

1872 of 1998.

C.3.0.

1042 of 1898.

WILSONE BLACK.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Five hundred Dollars ($500) in aid of the vote "Coal, Oil and Water for Steam-launch."

Government House, Hongkong, 30th July, 1898.

WILSONE BLACK.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Two thousand and Five hundred Dollars ($2,500) in aid of the vote "Miscellaneous Works."

Government House, Hongkong, 5th August, 1898.

The Committee unanimously agreed to recommend that the above votes be passed.

The Committee then adjourned.

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 29th August, 1898.

Read and confirmed on the 29th August, 1898.

J. G. T. BUCKLE,

Clerk of Councils.

T. SERCOMBE SMITH,

Chairman.

No. 5.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 29th August, 1898.

51

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (THOMAS SERCOMBE SMITH), Chairman.

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

99

*

19

the Harbour Master, (ROBERT MURRAY RUMSEY, R.N.).

the Captain Superintendent of Police, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.). the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON).

the Director of Public Works, (ROBERT DALY ORMSBY).

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER, C.M.G.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS, C.M.G.

JAMES JARDINE BELL-IRVING.

WEI YUK.

The Committee met at the request of the Colonial Secretary.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 15th August, 1898, were read and confirmed. Read the following Minutes under the hand of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government:-

C.S.O.

2051 of 1898.

WILSONE BLACK.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Six thousand Dollars ($6,000)) in aid of the following votes:-

(1) Maintenance of Waterworks, City of Victoria and Hill District,. (2) Road from Plantation Road to Magazine Gap..

Total,

Government House, Hongkong, 18th August, 1898.

.$3,000.00

3,000.00

.$6,000.00

C.S.O.

2110 of 1898.

WILSONE BLACK.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Two thousand Dollars ($2,000) in aid of the following votes in the Police Department:-

(1) Coal, Oil, &c., for launches,

(2) Purchase and Repair of Boats,

$1,300.00

700.00

Total,.....

$2,000.00

Government House, Hongkong, 24th August, 1898.

The Committee unanimously agreed to recommend that the above votes be passed.

The Committee then adjourned.

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 12th September, 1898.

Read and confirmed on the 12th September, 1898.

J. G. T. BUCKLE,

Clerk of Councils.

T. SERCOMBE SMITH,

Chairman,

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 9.

SATURDAY, 1ST OCTOBER, 1898.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE OFFICER ADMINISTERING THE GOVERNMENT (Major-General WILSONE BLACK, C.B.).

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (THOMAS SERCOMBE SMITH).

the Acting Attorney General, (HENRY EDWARD POLLOCK).

""

the Harbour Master, (ROBERT MURRAY RUMSEY, R.N.).

""

""

""

the Captain Superintendent of Police, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.). the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON). the Director of Public Works, (ROBERT DALY ORMSBY).

39

19

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER, C.M.G.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS, C.M.G.

JAMES JARDINE BELL-IRVING.

11

WEI YUK.

19

ABSENT:

53

The Honourable THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

The Council met pursuant to summons.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 12th September, 1898, were read and confirmed. NEW MEMBER.Mr. POLLOCK took his seat as Acting Attorney General, after having taken the Oath prescribed by Ordinance 4 of 1869.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO APPLY A SUM NOT EXCEEDING TWO MILLIONS FIVE HUNDRED AND EIGHTY-SEVEN THOUSAND EIGHT HUNDRED AND NINETY-EIGHT DOLLARS AND EIGHTY CENTS TO THE PUBLIC SERVICE OF THE YEAR 1899.-The Acting Colonial Secretary moved the first reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned till Monday, the 10th October, 1898, at 3 p.m.

Read and confirmed this 10th day of October, 1898.

J. G. T. BUCKLE,

Clerk of Councils.

WILSONE BLACK, Officer Administering the Government.

No. 7.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 10th October, 1898.

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (THOMAS SERCOMBE SMITH), Chairman.

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

13

the Harbour Master, (ROBERT MURRAY RUMSEY, R.N.).

the Captain Superintendent of Police, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.).

>>

"

the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON). the Director of Public Works, (ROBERT DALY ORMSBY).

}}'

99

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER, C.M.G.

Ho Kar, M.B., C.M.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS, C.M.G.

JAMES JARDINE BELL-IRVING.

""

WEI YUK.

ABSENT:

55

The Honourable THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

The Committee met at the request of the Acting Colonial Secretary.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 12th September, 1898, were read and confirmed.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO APPLY A SUM NOT EXCeeding Two MILLIONS FIVE HUNDRED AND EIGHTY-SEVEN THOUSAND EIGHT HUNDRED AND NINETY-EIGHT DOLLARS AND EIGHTY CENTS TO THE PUBLIC SERVICE OF THE YEAR 1899.

The Committee unanimously agreed to recommend that the several items in the Bill be passed. The Committee then adjourned.

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 22nd November, 1898.

Read and confirmed on the 22nd November, 1898.

J. G. T. BUCKLE,

Clerk of Councils.

T. SERCOMBE SMITH,

Chairman.

<

No. 8.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 22nd November, 1898.

57

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (THOMAS SERCOMBE SMITH), Chairman.

the Harbour Master, (ROBERT MURRAY RUMSEY, R.N.).

>1

the Captain Superintendent of Police, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.). the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON). the Director of Public Works, (ROBERT DALY ORMSBY).

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER, C.M.G.

Ho KAI, M.B., C.M.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS, C.M.G.

JAMES JARDINE BELL-IRVING.

};

31

WEI YUK.

ABSENT:

The Honourable the Acting Attorney General, (HENRY EDWARD POLLOCK).

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

The Committee met at the request of the Acting Colonial Secretary.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 10th October, 1898, were read and confirmed. Read the following Minutes under the hand of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government:-

C.S.0.

2304 of 1898.

WILSONE BLACK.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Three thousand Four hundred and Seventy-two Dollars ($3,472) in aid of the following

votes:

(a) Provisions for Prisoners,

(b) Materials for Remunerative Industry, (c) Clothing, etc. for Gaol Staff,

.$2,000.00 1,000.00 472.00

Total,..

·

$3,472.00

C.S.O.

2159 of 1898.

C.O.D.

165 of 1898.

Government House, Hongkong, 26th September, 1898.

WILSONE BLACK.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Two thousand and Three hundred Dollars ($2,300) to meet the cost of certain alterations in the Gaol for laundry purposes.

Government House, Hongkong, 27th September, 1898.

WILSONE BLACK.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Two thousand and Seven hundred Dollars ($2,700) to meet the following expenses during the current year:

(1.) Half salary of the Acting Colonial Secretary from 26th June to 5th

October, 1898,

(2.) Expenses of the Special Commissioner (Honourable J. H. STEWART LOCKHART, C.M.G.) in connection with the extension of the Kowloon boundaries,

$1,347.82

1,352.18

Total,..............$2,700.00

Government House, Hongkong, 4th October, 1898.

58

C.3.0.

2106 of 1898.

C.S.O.

2625 of 1898.

C.S.O.

2659 of 1898.

C.S.O.

2696 of 1898.

WILSONE BLACK.

.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of One hundred and Fifty Dollars and Ninety-four Cents ($150.94) to cover the expenses incurred in connection with the recovery of the Gap Rock Moorings.

Government House, Hongkong, 20th October, 1898.

WILSONE BLACK.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Six hundred Dollars ($600) in aid of the vote "Improvement of Gas Lighting, City of Victoria."

Government House, Hongkong, 2nd November, 1898.

WILSONE BLACK,

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Five hundred Dollars ($500) in aid of the vote "Incidental Expenses" Sanitary Department.

Government House, Hongkong, 10th November, 1898.

WILSONE BLACK.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Nine hundred Dollars ($900) in aid of the following votes, Police Department:-

1. Oil and Wick and Gas for Barracks,

2. Meals for Prisoners in Cells,

3. Photography,

4. Secret Service,

Total,.

$500.00

100.00

200.00

100.00

.$900.00

Government House, Hongkong, 11th November, 1898.

The Committee unanimously agreed to recommend that the above votes be passed.

The Committee then adjourned.

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 22nd December, 1898.

Read and confirmed on the 22nd December, 1898.

J. G. T. BUCKLE,

Clerk of Councils.

T. SERCOMBE SMITH,

Chairman.

No. 9.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG

On the 22nd December, 1898.

59

C.S.O.

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (THOMAS SERCOMBE SMITH), Chairman.

the Harbour Master, (ROBERT MURRAY RUMSEY, R.N.).

the

>>

71

the Captain Superintendent of Police, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.).

>>

the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON). the Director of Public Works, (ROBERT DALY ORMSBY).

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER, C.M.G.

Ho KAI, M.B., C.M.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS, C.M.G.

WEI YUK.

ABSENT:

The Honourable the Acting Attorney General, (HENRY EDWARD POLLOCK).

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

2:

JAMES JARDINE BELL-IRVING.

"}

The Committee met at the request of the Acting Colonial Secretary.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 22nd November, 1898, were read and confirmed. Read the following Minute under the hand of His Excellency the Governor :-

832 of 1898.

HENRY A. BLAKE.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Twenty-nine thousand One hundred and Fifty Dollars ($29,150), to meet the expenses of the Post Office for 1898.

Government House, Hongkong, 30th November, 1898.

The Committee unanimously agreed to recommend that the above vote be passed.

The Committee then adjourned.

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 30th December, 1898.

Read and confirmed on the 25th January, 1899.

J. G. T. BUCKLE,

Clerk of Councils.

T. SERCOMBE SMITH,

Chairman,

:

V

HONGKONG.

FINANCIAL RETURNS FOR THE YEAR 1897.

203

No. 17

98

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency

the Officer Administering the Government.

No. 13.

SIR,--I have the honour to transmit the following returns

1. Revenue and Expenditure for the year 1897.

TREASURY, 15th March, 1898.

2. Comparative Statement of Revenue and Expenditure for 1896 and 1897.

3. Return of Deposits not available.

4. Return of Advances Outstanding.

5. Return of Public Works Extraordinary chargeable against the Loan.

6. Statement of Expenditure from the Praya Reclamation Fund.

The statement of Assets and Liabilities cannot be completed till the Crown Agents Sinking Fund

Account is received.

The Honourable

THE COLONIAL SECRETARY,

&c.,

&c.,

&c.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your obedient Servant,

T. SERCOMBE SMITH,

Treasurer.

COLONY OF HONGKONG.

RETURN OF REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE DURING THE YEAR ENDED 31ST

REVENUE.

Amount Total Estimated. Revenue.

More than Less thau Estimated. Estimated.]

EXPENDITURE.

$

C.

LIGHT DUES,

LICENCES AND INTERNAL REVENUE NOT OTHERWISE SPE-

113,000

114,176,41

$ (. 1.176.41

$ C.

CIFIED:-

Arms Ordinance,.

820

Assessed Taxes,

420,000

480.00 429,136.89

110.00 9,136,89

Gioverte Color: 1

tor's Department,

en Arcent of Public Debt,

egislature.

Audit Dp

Auctioneers' Licences,

1.800

Billiard Tables and Bowling Alleys Licences,

1,000

1,800.00 900.00

Treasur

Boarding-house Licences,

2,200

206.26

100.00 1,993.74

Public A

Post Of

Boat Licences..........

6.067

6,971.35

904.35

Cargo Boat Licences,

Carriage, Chair, &c.. Licences..........

Chinese Passenger Ships Licences,

Chinese Undertakers' Licences,

Dog Licences,

11,856

11,448.00

408.00

10,800

43,323.50

850

380.00

160

200.00

2,523.50 80.00 40.00

Observatory,

2,500

2,433.00

$7.00

Emigration Brokers' Licences,. Fines,

1,080

1,000.00

Legal Departments,

51,892

31,834.80

20,057.20

Department,.

Registrar te mails Department,

Harbour Masts Department,

Lighthouses.

Stamp Office.

Botanical and Allon stat

Ecclesiastical,

Department,

Forfeitures,

3,065

4,357.07

Hawkers' Licences,

5.861

6,834.50

1,292.07 973.50

Education,

Medical Departments.

Junk Licences.

81,500

29,063.80

2,486.20

Kerosene Oil Licences,

450

505.00

55.00

Marine Store Dealers' Licences,

5,500

5,280.00

220.00

Gaols,

Marriage Licences,

296

482.00

Money Changers' Licences,

540

550.00

183.00 10.00

Opium Monopoly,

286,000

286,000.00

Pawnbrokers Licences,.

89.000

39,000.00

Shooting Licences,

100

120.00

Spirit Licences,

65,000

67,1836.50

20.00 2,136.50

Magistracy,

Police,

Sanitary Department. Charitable Allowances,

Transport,

Miscellaneous Services, Military Expenditure, Public Works, Recurent.

Stamps,.

215,000

252,216.88

37.216.88

Steam-Launch Licences,

800

·932.50

182.50

FEES OF COURT OR OFFICE, PAYMENTS FOR SPECIFIC PUR-

POSES, AND REIMBURSEMENTS IN AID :-

Bills of Health,

2.200

2,046 00

154.00

Births and Deaths, Registration of..

110

247.58

Cargo Boat Certificates,

1.900

1.923.00

137.58 23.00

Cemetery Burials,

550

1.059.24

509.24

Cemetery Fees from Public Cemeteries for Chinese,

1,700

1,126.50

573.50

Chinese Gazette, Sale of

89

25.00

14.00

Companies, Registration of

1.200

2,863.25

1,663.25

Convict Labour and other items,

5,000

4.811.61

188.89

Deeds, Registration of

4,500

4,988.00

488.00

Discharge of Crews and Seamen,

9,500

10.024.00

524.00

Examination of Masters, &c.;

1.700

8.050.00 1,850.00

Fees of Court,

14,044

13,984.29

59.71

Fees on Grant of Lenses.

1,000

Fecs for testing Petroleum,

300

705.00 $35.00

295.00

35.00

Gaol Expenses,-Recovery from Diplomatic, Naval and Mi-

litary Departments, Seamen and Debtors,...

1,200

1,315.15

Gunpowder, Storage of......

9.000

13,353.44

115.15 4.353.44

Householders, Registration of

1.358

1.273.75

Imperial Post Office, Contribution from

6,804

5,375.97

84.25 1,428.03

Lock Hospital, Grant-in-Aid from Admiralty,

928

1,018.76

93.76

Medical Examination of Emigrants,

Medical Registration Fees,

22,000 10

19,814.25

2,185.75

Medical Treatment of Patients in the Civil Hospital,

18,000

30.00 19,021.58

20.00 1,021.58

Maintenance of Gap Rock Lighthouse,-Contribution from

Chinese Imperial Government towards the

750

Official Administrator and Trustee,..

1,500

Official Signatures,

300

750,00 3,496.71 14,160.11

1,998.71 13,860.11

Printed Forins, Sale of

200

Private Moorings and Buoys, Rent for

2,700

181.75 2.880.00

18.25

Queen's College, Fees from Scholars,

11,009

13,460.00

180.00 2,460.00

Registry Fees,

Refund of l'olice Pay,

300 1,800

706.00 1,817.29

406.00

17.29

Refund Cost of Police and other Stores,.

500

537.01

37.01

Shipping Crews and Seamen..

10,500

10,947.20

447.20

Sick Stoppages from Police Force,

700

1.023.54

323.54

Steam-Launches, Surveyor's Certificate,

Survey of Steam-Ships,

1,500 10,200

1.600.00

100,00

School for Girls, Fees from Scholars,

500

Sunday Cargo-Working Permits,

9.0.0

11,829.77 619.00 11,850,00

1.629.77

J19.00 2,850,00

Trade Marks, Registration of

1.000

2.956.04

1,956.04

Overtime Fees Engagement and discharge of Crews on

Board Ship,

515.00

515.00

POST OFFICE :—

Postage,...

240,000

268,616.49

28,616.49

RENT OF GOVERNMENT PROPERTY, LAND AND HOUSES

Buildings,

Laundries,

Leased Lands.

400 530 215,000

792.00 683.84

211,798.70

392.00 158,84 26,798.70

D1 500

10.190.47

1,309.53

COLONY OF HONG KONG.

AND EXPENDITURE DURING THE YEAR ENDED 31ST DECEMBER, 1897.

Total Revenue.

(.

$ 114,176.41

More than Less than Estimated. Estimated.

$ c. 1,176.41

EXPENDITURE.

Amount

Total More than Less than Estimated. Expenditure. Estimated. Estimated.

$ C.

Charge on Account of Public Debt, Pensions,

$ ር.

$ (.

$

$ C.

143,000.00

157,490.70

14,490.70

129,000.00

140,824.22

11,824.22

480.00

429,136.89

110.00 9,136.89

1.800.00

900.00

206.26

100.00 1,993.74

Governor and Legislature.

Colonial Secretary's Department, Audit Department,.

Treasury,

Public Works Department,. Fost Office,

42,903,60 !

14.243.94

1,840.94

30,616.00

25,691.46

4,924.54

10,000.00

12,103.80

2.103.80

22,742.00

22,249 23

492.77

90,826.00

89,556.92

1,269.08

207,361.60

207,080.29

280.71

6,971.35

904.35

Registrar General's Department,

12,957.00

12,195,32

761.68

11,448.00

108.00

Harbour Master's Department,

62,313.00

61.485.00

828.00

45,323.50 2,523,50

Lighthouses,

16,870.00

16.394.03

475.97

380.00

30.00

Observatory,

12,876 00

14,563.99

1,687.99

200.00

40.00

Stamp Office.

8.572.00

3,564.62

7.38

2,433.00

67.00

Botanical and Afforestation Department,

18,698.00

18,862.41

164.41

1,000.00

Legal Departments,

73,168.00

76,382.20

3,214.20

31.834.80

20,057.20

Ecclesiastical,

2.200.00

1.825.00

375.00

4,357.07 1,292.07

Education,

76,043.00

72,984.85

3,058.17

6834.50

973.50

Medical Departments,

98,257.00

114,978.80

16,721.80

29,063.80

2,436.20

Magistracy,

19,652.00

21.082.51

1.430.51

505.00

55.00

Police,

239,560.00

241,568.32

2,008.32

5.280.00

220.00

Gaols,

60,086.00

59.372.25

713.75

482.00

186.00

Sanitary Department,

96,622.00

96.662.40

10.40

550.00

10.00

Charitable Allowances,

5,260.00

4.231.09

1,028.91

286,000.00

Transport,

3,000.00

7,712.86 4,712.86

39,000.00

120.00

20.00

67,136.50

2,136.50

Miscellaneous Services, Military Expenditure,

Public Works, Recurrent,

470,294.00 476,869.66 6,575.66

203,000.00

206,451.67 3,451.67

136,607.00

307.265.81 170,658,81

252,216.88

37,216.88

·932.50

182.50

2,046 00

154.00

247.58

1.923.00

137.58 23.00

1.059.24

509.24

1,126.50

25.00

573.50 14.00

2,868.25

1,663.25

4.811.61

188.59

4,988.00

488.00

10.024.00

524.00

3.050.00 1,350.00

13,984.29

59.71

705 00

295.00

335.00

85.00

1,315.15

115.15

13,353.44

4.353.44

1,273.75

5,375.97

84.25 1,428.03

1,018.76

95.76

19,814.25

2,185.75

30.00

19,021.58

20.00 1,021.53

750.00

3.496.71

14,160.11

1,996.71 13.860.11

181.75

18.25

2.880.00

180.00

13,460.00

2,460.00

706.00

406.00

1,817.29

17.29

537.01

37.01

10,947.20

447.20

1.023.54

323,54

1.600.00

100.00

11,829.77

1.629.77

619.00

119.00

11,850,00

2.956.04 1,956.04

2.850.00

515.00

$15.00

268,616.49

28,616.49

792.00

6-3.81

392.00 153.84

211.798.70 26,798.70

1

Kerosene Oil Licences,

Marine Store Dealers' Licences, Marriage Licences.....

Money Changers' Licences,

Opium Monopoly,

Pawnbrokers' Licences,,

Shooting Licences,

Spirit Licences,

Stamps,

Stenni-Launch Licences,

Magistrany,

Police.

Sanitary Department, Charitable Allowances, Transport,

Miscellaneous Services, Military Expenditure, Public Works, Recurrent,

2.406.20

450

805.00

5,500

5.280.00

220.00

Gaols.

296

482.00

540

550.00

185.00 10.00

286,080

286,000,00

30,000

39,000.00

100

65,000

120.00 67,186.50

215,000

252,216.88

003

·932,50

20.00 2.136.50 87,216.88 182.50

Imperial Post Office, Contribution from

Cemetery Burials,

Chinese Gazette, Sale of

Companies, Registration of

Convict Labour and other items,

Deeds, Registration of

Discharge of Crews and Scamen,

Examination of Masters, &c.,

Fees of Court,

Fees on Grant of Leases.

Fees for testing Petroleum,

litary Departments, Scamen and Debtors,...

Gunpowder, Storage of.............

Householders, Registration of

Lock Hospital, Grant-in-Aid from Admiralty,

Medical Examination of Emigrants,

Medical Registration Fees,

FEES OF COURT OR OFFICE, PAYMENTS FOR SPECIFIC PUR-

POSES, AND REIMBURSEMENTS IN AID :--

Bills of Health,

Births and Deaths, Registration of.

Cargo Boat Certificates,

Cemetery Fees from Public Cemeteries for Chinese,

2.200

2.046 00

154.00

11 1.900

247.58

137.58

1.923.00

28.00

550

1.059.24

509.24

1,700

1,126.50

578.50

B9

25.00

14.00.

1.200

2.863.25

1,663.25

5,000

4.811.61

188.39

4,500

4,988.00

488.00

9,580

10.024.00

524.00

· 1.700

3.050.00

1,850.00

14,044

1,000

300

13,984.29 705 00 335.00

59.71

205.00

35.00

Gaol Expenses,-Recovery from Diplomatic, Naval and Mi-

1,200

1,815.15

9.000

13,353.44

115.15 4.353.14

1.358

1.278.75

6,804

5,875.97

84.25 1,428.03

923

1,018.76

95.76

22,000

19,814.25

2,185.75

10

Medical Treatment of Patients in the Civil Hospital,

Maintenance of Gap Rock Lighthouse,-Contribution from

18,000

30.00 19,021.58

20.00 1,021.58

Chinese Imperial Government towards the

750

750.00

Official Administrator and Trustee,.

1,500

3.496.71

Official Signatures,

300

14,160.11

1,996.71 13,860.11

Printed Forms, Sale of

200

181.75

18.25

Private Moorings and Buoys, Rent for

2,700

2,880.00

180.00

Queen's College, Fees from Scholars,

11,000

13,460.00

2,460.00

Registry Fees,

300

706.00

406.00

Refund of Police Pay,

Shipping Crews and Seamen,.

1,800

1,817.29

17.29

Refund Cost of Police and other Stores,.

500

537.01

37.01

10,500

10,947.20

447.20

Sick Stoppages from Police Force,

700

1.023.54

323.54

Steam-Launches, Surveyor's Certificate,

1,500

1.600.00

100.00

Survey of Steain-Ships,

10,200

11,829.77

1,629.77

School for Girls, Fees from Scholars,

500

619.00

119.00

Sunday Cargo-Working Permits,

9.0.0

11,850.00

2,850.00

Trade Marks, Registration of

1,000

2.956.04

1,956.04

Overtime Fees Engagement and discharge of Crews on

Board Ship,

515.00

515.00

POST OFFICE :—

Postage,...

240,000

268,616.49

28,616.49

RENT OF GOVERNMENT PROPERTY, LAND AND HOUSES :—

Buildings,

Laundries,

400 580

792.00 683.84

Leased Lands,.

215,000

241,798.70

392.00 153.84 26,798.70

Lands not Leased.

11,500

10,190.47

1,309.53

Markets,

69.663

70,519.15

856.15

Piers,.

6,000

4,082.19

1,917.81

Stone Quarries,

15,850

15,500.00

Slaughter House,

42,750

41,412.00

350,00 1,338.00

Sheep and Pig Depôts,

11.000

11,147.54

147.54

INTEREST,

10,000

4,576.84

5,423.16

MISCELLANEOUS RECEIPTS:-

Condemned Stores, &c.,

1,000

2.671,04

Interest for use of Furniture at Government House.

145

Night Soil Contracts,

28,440

Other Miscellaneous Receipts,

Profit on Subsidiary Coins,

156.43 27,840.00 20,000 12,924.417 115,000 115,015.91

1,671.04 11.43

600.00 7,075.53

15.91

TOTAL, exclusive of Land Sales and Water Account,...$ 2,248,823 2,352,366,32 |151,840,37| 48,297.05

LAND SALES,

WATER ACCOUNT-Ord. 16 of 1890,

100,000 224,500,59 | 124,500.59 90,000 110,047,79 20,047.79

Public Works, Extraordinary,..

TOTAL,

$ 2,438,8232,686,914.70 |296,388.75| 48,297.05

TOTAL........

Public Works Extraordinary chargeable again.

Treasury, Hongkong, 8th March, 1893.

29,063.80

2,886.20

505.00 5.280.00

55.00

220.00

482.00 550.00

186.00 10.00

286,000,00

39,000.00

120.00

20.00

67,186.50

2.136.50

252,216.88

37.216.83

932.50

132.50

2.046 00

154.00

247.58

1.928.00

137.58 28.00

1.059.24

509.24

1,126.50

573.50

25.00

14.00

2.863.25

1,663.25

4.811.61

188.39

4,988.00

488.00

10.024.00

524.00

3.050.00

1,850.00

13,984.29

705.00 335.00

59.71 295.00

35.00

1,315.15

115.15

13,353.44

4,353.44

1.273.75

5,875.97

84.25 1,428.03

1,018.76

95.76

19,814.25

2,185.75

30.00

20.00

19,021.58

1,021.58

750.00

3.196.71

14,160.11

1,996.71 13.860.11

181.75

18.25

2,880.00

180.00

13,460.00

706.00

2,460.00

406.00

1,817.29

17.29

537.01

37.01

10,947.20

447,20

1.023.54

323.54

1.600.00

100.00

11,829.77

1.629.77

619.00

119.00

2,850.00

Magistracy, Police,

Gaols.

Sanitary Department, Charitable Allowances, Transport,

Miscellaneous Services, Military Expenditure, Public Works, Recurrent,

19,65 239,560,00 60,086,00

96,622.00

5.260,00 3.000.00

21.082.51 1.430.5

241,568.32

2,008.32

59.372.25

713.75

96.662.40

40.40

4.231.09

1,028.91

7.712.86 4,712.86

136,407.00

307.265.81 170,658.81

470,294.00

208,000.00

476,869.66 6.575.66 206,451.67 3,451.67

11,850,00

2.956.04 1,956.04

515.00

268,616.49

792.00 683.84

241,798.70 26,798.70

515.00

28,616.49

:

:

392.00 158.84

10,190.47

1,309.53

70.519.15

856.15

4,082.19

1.917.81

15,500.00

41,412.00

350,00 1,338.00

11.147.54

147.54

4,576.84

5,123.16

2.671.04 156.43

1,671.04 11.43

27.840.00

12.924.47

600.00 7,075.53

115,015.91

15.91

2,352,366.32 151,840.37 48,207.05

224,500,59 124,500.59

Public Works, Extraordinary,

$ 2,287,483.00| 2,513,693.33 240,426.29: 14,215.96

113,500,00 127,716,38, 14,116.38

110,047.79 20,047.79

2,686,914.70 296,388.75| 48,297.05

TOTAL...

.$

2,401,083.00| 2,641,409,71| 254,542.67

14.215.96

Public Works Extraordinary chargeable against the New Loan, $

868,000

321,705.89

46,294.11

T. SERCOMBE SMITH,

Treasurer.

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF THE REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE OF THE COL

REVENUE.

1897.

INCREASE.

DECREASE.

EXPENDITU

C.

Charge on Account of Public De Pensions,.

Governor and Legislature,

Colonial Secretary's Department Audit Department,

Treasury,

Public Works Department, Post Office,.

Registrar General's Department

Harbour Master's Department, Lighthouses..

Observatory,

Stamp Office,

Botanical and Afforestation Det Legal Departments,

Ecclesiastical Department, Education,

Medical Departments, Magistracy,

Police, Gaols....

Fire Brigade..

Sanitary Department, Charitable Allowances, Transport,

Miscellaneous Services, Military Expenditure, Public Works, Recurrent, Public Works, Extraordinary,

1896.

$

(.

LIGHT DUES,

117,814,45

$ 114,176,41

c.

$

じっ

$ 3,138.04

LICENCES AND INTERNAL REVENUE NOT OTHERWISE

SPECIFIED :—

Arms Ordinance,..

370.00

433.00

60.00

Assessed Taxes,

Auctioneers' Licences,

Billiard Tables and Bowling Alleys Licences,

Boarding House Licences,

Boat Licences,

Cargo Boat Licences,

Carriage, Chair, &c., Licences,

Chinese Passenger Ships Licences,

Chinese Undertakers' Licences,.

Dog Licences,

402,212.68

429,136 89

1,200.00

1,800.00

26.924.21 600.00

1,000,00

90..00

100.00

1,947.94

206.26

1,741.68

6.661.65

6,971.35

309.70

11,981.80

11,448.00

533.80

42,977.00

48,328.50

346.50

395.00

380.00

15.00

180.00

200.00

20.00

2,509.50

2,483.00

76.50

Emigration Brokers' Licences,... F'ines,

1,000.00

1,000.00

63,518.48

31,834.80

31,683.68

Forfeitures,

3,808.03

4,357.07

Hawkers' Licences,...

5,537.00

6,854.50

549.04 1,297.50

Junk Licences,

82,622,25

29.063.80

3,558.45

Kerosene Oil Licences,

441.00

503.00

:

Marine Store Dealers' Licences,

5,340.00

5,280.00

Marriage Licences,

320.00

482.00

64.00

162.00

60.00

Money Changers' Licences,

535.00

550.00

15.00

Opium Monopoly.....

286,000.00

286,000.00

Pawnbrokers' Licences,

30,000.00

39,000.00

Shooting Licences,

85.00

:

Spirit Licences,

65,549.00

Stamps,...

215,517,68

120.00 67,136.50 252.216.88

35.00

1,587.50

36,699.20

Steam-launch Licences....

808 50

932.50

124.00

FEES OF COURT OR OFFICE, PAYMENTS FOR SPECIFIC

PURPOSES, AND REIMBURSEMENTS IN AID :-

Bills of Health,..

2,349.00

2,046 00

305.00

Births and Deaths, Registration of..

14170

247.58

105.88

Cargo Boat Certificates,.

1,986.00

1,923.00

63.00

Cemetery Burials,.

1.967,69

1,059,24

8.45

Cemetery Fees from Public Cemeteries for Chinese,

1.511,58

1,126.50

385.08

Chinese Gazette, Sale of

30.00

25.00

5.00

Companies, Registration of

2,471,50

2.868.25

391.75

Convict Labour and other items,

5.526 92

4,811.61

715.31

Deeds, Registration of

5,062.00

4,988.00

71.00

Discharge of Crews and Scamnen,

10,543.00

10,024.00

519.00

Examination of Masters, &c., ·

2,682.50

3,050.00

367.50

Fees of Court,

14,144.77

13,984.29

160.48

Fees on Grant of Leases,.

1,373 50

703.00

668.50

Fee for testing l'etroleum,

425.00

335.00

90.00

Gaol Expenses,-Recovery from Diplomatic, Naval, and

Military Departments, Seamen and Debtors,

1,354,05

1.315.15

38.90

Gunpowder, Storage of

11,882,69

13,353.44

1,470.75

Householders, Registration of

1.866.50

1.278.75

92.75

Imperial Post Office, Contribution from

6,563.65

5,375.97

1,187.68

Lock Hospital, Grant-in-Aid from Admiralty,

924.46

1,018.76

94.30

Medical Examination of Emigrants,

Medical Registration Fees,

21,063.50 35.00

19,814.25

Medical Treatment of Patients in the Civil Hospital,.......

18,601,69

30.00 19,021.58

1,249.25 5.00

£19.89

Maintenance of Gap Rock Lighthouse,--Contribution

from Chinese finperial Government towards the..... Official Administrator and Trustee,..

750.00

750.00

2,549.25

Official Signatures,

265.00

8,496.71 14,160.11

947.46 13,895.11

Overtime Fees, Engagement and Discharge of Crews

on Board Ship,

Printed Forms, Sale of

227.00

515.00 181.75

515.00

45.25

Private Moorings and Buoys, Rent for.

2.760.00

2,880.00

:

Queen's College, Fees from Scholars,

9,948.00

13,460.00

Registry Fees,

444.00

706.00

120.00 3,512.00 262.00

Refund of Police Pay,

2,153.64

1,817.29

336.35

Refund Cost of l'olice and other Stores,.

694.82

537.01

157.81

Shipping Crews and Seamen,

11,791.20

10,947.20

844.00

Sick Stoppages from Police Force,

1,056.09

1,023 54

32.55

Steam-launches, Surveyor's Certificate.

1,385.00

1,600.00

215.00

Survey of Steam-ships.

School for Girls. Fees from Scholars

10,484,07 475.00

11,829.77

1,345.70

Sunday Cargo-Working Permits,

7,575.00

Trade Marks, Registration of

1.436.96

POST OFFICE:-Postage,

245,280.33

619.00 11,850.00 2,956.04 268,616.49

144.00

4,275.00

1,519.08

23,336.16

RENT OF GOVERNMENT PROPERTY, LAND AND HOUSES:-

Buildings,

Laundries,

434.00 540.00

Leased Lands,

217.282.39

Lands not Leased,

11.532.14

Markets,

69,458,51

792.00 683.8T 241,798.70 10,190.47 70,519.15

358.00 143,84 24,516.31

1341.67

1,060,64

Piers,

Stone Quarries,

4,259,57 15,850,00

4.082.19

177.38

15,500.00

850.00

Slaughter House..

42,750,00

41.412.00

1,338.00

INTEREST,

Sheep and Pig Depôts,

MISCELLANEOUS RECEIPTS :-~

....... 1

10,452.86

1,147.54

4,576,84

694.68 4.576.84

1

ח יד

3

OF THE REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE OF THE COLONY OF HONGKONG IN 1895 & 1897.

1897.

$

INCREASE.

DECREASE.

EXPENDITURE.

1896.

1897.

INCREASE,

DECREASE.

C.

$ C.

$

C.

$

C.

114,176.41

3,138.01

Charge on Account of Public Debt,. Pensions,.

127,153.67

$ 157,490.70

$

2.

$

30,357.03

118,054.71

140,824.22

22,769.51

Governor and Legislature,

43.482.19

44,243.94

761.75

0

433.00

60.00

Colonial Secretary's Department,

28,674.71

25,691.46

2,983.25

429,136.89

26,924.21

1,800,00

600.00

Audit Department,

Treasury,

10,298.14

12,103.80

1,805.66

24,217.15

22,249,23

1,967.92

90.4.00

100.00

Public Works Department,

85,694.10

89,555.92

3.862.82

+

206.26

1,741,68

Post Office,.

188.281.17

207.080.29

18.799.12

6,971.35

309.70

Registrar General's Department,

13.929.10

12.195.32

.0

11,448.00

533.80

Harbour Master's Department,

62,336,01

61,485.00

1,738.73 85101

0

48,323.50

846.50

Lighthouses...

13.672.13

16.394.03

2.721.90

30

380.00

15.00

Observatory,

12.690.21

14,563.99

1,873.78

10

200.00

20.00

Stamp Office,

3,568.50

3,564.62

2,433.00

76.50

Botanical and Afforestation Department,

19,783.84

18,862.41

3.83 921.43

10

1,000.00

Legal Departments,

80,612.50

76,382.20

4.230.30

31,834.80

31,683.68

Ecclesiastical Department,

1,815.00

1.825.00

10.00

4,857.07

10

6.884.50

25

29,063.80

00

505.00

549.04 1,297.50

...

64.00

Education,

76,591.76

72,984.83

3,516.93

Medical Departments,

109.763.19

114,978.80

5,215.61

3,558.45

10

5,280.00

...

JO

182.00

· 162.00

550.00

15.00

00

286,000.00

60.00

Magistracy,

Police,

Guols....

Fire Brigade..

Sanitary Department,

Charitable Allowances,

22,754.27

21,082,51

1,671.76

219,777.28

218,905,85

87138

59.626.13

59,372.25

253.88

30.955.48

22,662,47

8,293.01

94.818.15

95,662.40

1,843.95

5,737.99

4,231,09

1,536,90

30

39,000.00

Transport,......

3.254.40

7,712,89

4,458.46

00

120.00

35.00

Miscellaneous Services,

239,319.78

307,265.81

67,946.03

30

67,186.50

1,587.50

Military Expenditure,

523,128.45

476,869,66

46,258.79

68

252.216.88

36,699.20

Public Works, Recurrent,

185,469.13

206,451.67

20.982.54

50

932.50

124.00

Public Works, Extraordinary,

69,510.98

127,716,38 58,205.40

1.00

1.25

..03

BREBASRASS8583 88889888 888

2,046.00

305.00

247.58

105.88

1,923.00

1,059.24

63.00 8.45

1,126.50

385.09

25.00

5.00

2.863.25

391.75

4,811,61

715.31

4,988.00

74.00

10,024.00

519.03

3,050.00

367.50

13,984.29

160.48

705.00

669.50

335.00

90.00

1.315.15

38.90

13,353.44

1,470.75

1,273.75

92.75

5,375,97

1,187.68

1,018.76

94.30

19,814.25 30.00 19,021.58

1,249.25

5.00

419.59

750.00 8,496.71

14,160.11

947.46 13,895.11

515.00

515.00

7.00

181.75

45.25

1.00

3.00

2,880.00 13,460.00

120.00 3,512.00

1.00

706.00

262.00

3.64

1,817.29

336.85

4.82

537.01

157.81

1.20

10,947.20

844.00

3.09

1,023 51

32.55

5.00

1,600.00

215.00

4.07

11,829.77

1,845.70

5.09

619.00

144.00

5.00

11,850.00

4,275.00

6.96

2,956.04

1,519.08

0.33

268,616.49

23,836.16

4.00

0.00

792.00 683.81

2.39

211,798.70

358.00 143.81 24,516,31

2.14

10,190.47

1,841.67

8.51

70,519.15

1,060.64

9.57

4.082.19

0.00

15,500.00

177.38 350.00

0.00

41,412.00

1,338.00

2.88

11,147.54

4,578,84

694.68 4.576.84

Pawnbrokers' Licences,

Shooting Licences,

Spirit Licences,

Stamps....

Steam-launch Licences........

FEES OF COURT OR OFFICE, PAYMENTS FOR SPECIFIC

85.00 65,519.00

215,517,68

120.00 67.186.50 232.216.88

803 50

932.50

35.00 1,587.50 36,699.20 124.00

PURPOSES, AND REIMBURSEMENTS IN AID :--

Bills of Health.....

Births and Deaths, Registration of...

2.319.00 111.70

2,046 00

303.00

247.58

105.88

Cargo Boat Certificates,.

1,986.00

1.923.00

63.00

Cemetery Burials, -

1.967.69

1,059,24

8.45

Cemetery Fees from Public Cemeteries for Chinese,

151158

1,126.50

385.08

Chinese Gazette, Sale of

30.00

25.00

5.00

Companies, Registration of

2,471.50

2.868.25

391.75

Convict Labour and other items,

5.526 92

4,811,61

715.31

Deeds, Registration of

5,062.00

4,988.00

74.00

Discharge of Crews and Seamen,

10,548.00

10,024.00

519.00

Examination of Masters, &c...

2,682.50

8.050.00

367.50

Fees of Court,

14.144.77

13,984.29

160.48

Fees on Grant of Leases,.

1,373 50

705.00

668.50

Fee for testing Petroleum,

425.00

385.00

90.00

Gaol Expenses,—Recovery from Diplomatic, Naval, and

Military Departments, Seamen and Debtors,

1,354.05

1.3315.15

38.90

Gunpowder, Storage of

11,882.69

13,353.44

1,470.75

Householders, Registration of

1.866.50

1,273.75

92.75

Imperial Post Office, Contribution from

Lock Hospital, Grant-in-Aid from Admiralty,

Medical Examination of Emigrants,

6,563.65

5,375.97

1,187.68

921.46

1,018.76

94.30

21,068.50

19,814.25

Medical Registration Fees,

35.00

Medical Treatment of Patients in the Civil Hospital,.

18,501.69

30.00 19,021.58

1,219.25 5.00

419.89

Maintenance of Gap Rock Lighthouse.--Contribution

from Chinese Imperial Government towards the... Official Administrator and Trustee.....

750.00

750.00

2.549.25

Official Signatures,

265.00

8,496.71 14,160.11

947.46 13,895.11

Overtime Fees, Engagement and Discharge of Crews

on Board Ship,

Printed Forms, Sale of

227.00

Private Moorings and Buoys, Rent for.

2,760.00

Queen's College, Fecs from Scholars,

9,948,00

515.00 181.75 2,880.00 13,460.00

515.00

45.25

120.00 3,512.00

Registry Fees,

444.00

706.00

262.00

Refund of Police Pay,

2,153.64

1,817.29

330.35

Refund Cost of l'olice and other Stores,

694.82

537.01

157.81

Shipping Crews and Seamen,

11,791.20

10,947.20

814.00

Sick Stoppages from Police Force,

1,056.09

1,023 54

32.55

Steam-launches, Surveyor's Certificate.

1,385.00

1,600.00

215.00

Survey of Steam-ships.

School for Girls, Fees from Scholars

Sunday Cargo-Working Permits,

10,484,07

11.829.77

1,345.70

475.00

619.00

144.00

++

7,575.00

11,850.00

4,275.00

Trade Marks, Registration of

1.436.96

2,956.04

1,519.08

POST OFFICE:-Postage,

245,280,33

268,616.49

23,336.16

RENT OF GOVERNMENT PROPERTY, LAND AND HOUSES :

Buildings,

434.00

Laundries,

540,00

792.00 683.81

358.00

143.84

Leased Lands,

217,282.39

211,798.70

24,516.31

Lands not Leased,

11,532.14

10,190.47

1,341.67

Markets,

69,458,51

70,519.15

1,060.64

Piers,

4,259,57

4,082.19

Stone Quarries,

15,850,00

15,500.00

177.38 350.00

Slaughter House,..

42,750,00

41,412.00

1,338.00

Sheep and Pig Depôts,

10,452.86

11,147.54

INTEREST,

4,576.84

694.68 4,576.84

MISCELLANEOUS RECEIPTS:—

Condemned Stores, &c.,

1,43139

2,671.04

1,239.65

Interest for use of Furniture at Government House,.

144.40

156.43

12.03

Night Soil Contracts,

28,240,00

27,840.00

Other Miscellaneous Receipts,

18,394.09

Profit on Subsidiary Coins,.

110,196,20

12,924.47 115,015.91

100.00 5,469.62

4,819.71

TOTAL exclusive of Land Sales & Water Account,. 2,250,179.57 | 2,352,366.32

159,151.93

56,965.18

LAND SALES,

270,858.99 224,500.59

46,358.40

WATER ACCOUNT,

88,810.38 110,047.79 21,207.41

TOTAL,

Miscellaneous Services,

Military Expenditure, Public Works, Recurrent, Public Works, Extraordinary,

.$ 2,609,878.94 |2,686,914.70 180,359.34 103,323.58

TOTA

Deduct Decrease,

Nett Increase,

Treasury, Hongkong, Sth March, 1898.

103,323.58

77,035.76

39.000.00

120.00

$5.00

67,186.50

1,587.50

252.216.88

36,699.20

932.50

121.00

2,046 00

303.00

247.58

105.88

1,923.00

63.00

1,059.24

8.45

1,126.50

385.08

25.00

5.00

2.863.25

391.75

4,811.61

714.31

4,988.00

71.00

10,024.00

519.05

8,050.00

367.50

13,984.29

160.48

705.00

068.50

335.00

90.00

1.315.15

38.90

13,353.44

1,479.75

1,273.75

92.75

5,375.97

1,187.68

1,018.76

91.30

19,814.25

1,249.25

30.00

5.00

19,021.58

119.89

:

750.00

3,496.71

947.46

14,160.11

13,895.11

515.00

515.00

181.75

45.25

2,830.00

120.00

13,460,00

3,512.00

706.00

262.00

1,817.20

338.35

537.01

157.81

10,947.20

844.00

1,023 64

32.55

1,600.00

215.00

11,829.77

619.00

1,345.70

144.00

Transport.

Miscellaneous Services, Military Expenditure, Public Works, Recurrent,

Public Works, Extraordinary,

3,254,40

239,319.78

7,712,86 307,265.81

4,458,46 67,916.03

523.128.45

476,869.66

46,258.79

185.469.13 206,451.67 20.982.54 69,510,98 127,716,38 58,205.40

11,850.00 2,956.04

268,616.49

4,275.00

1,519.08

23,336.16

792.00 683.81

358.00 143.84

211,798.70

24,516.31

10,190.47

1,341.67

70,519.15

1,060,64

4,082.19

15,500.00

177.38 850.00

41.412.00

1,338.00

11,147.54

4,578.84

694.68 4,576.84

2,671.04 156.43

1,239.65

12.03

27,840.00

12,924.47 115,015.91

400.00 5,469.62

4.819.71

352,866.32

159.151.93 56,965,18

224,500,59

46,358.40

110,047.79 21,207.41

686,914.70 180,359.34 103,323.58

TOTAL......

103,323.58

77,035.76

$2,474,910,37 | 2,641,409.71

211,593 56

75,094.22

Deduct Decrensc,

Nett Increase,

75,094.22

166,499 34

T. SERCOMBE SMITH, Treasurer,

Statement of Deposits not Available received and repaid in the Colony of Hongkong during the year 1897.

207

Outstanding

Outstanding

Deposits received

By whom deposited.

Total.

1st January, 1897.

during the

year.

Deposits repaid during the

on

31st Dec.,

year.

1897.

Sikh Police Fund,.

1,707.00

909.00

2,616.00

738.00

1,878.00

Police Fine Fund,

341.81

591.89

933.70

867.77

65.93

Chinese Recreation Ground Fund,

869.13

1,510.86

2,879.99

568.55

1.811.44

Estate of Deceased Policemen,

170.82

170.82

170.82

Tender Deposit,

1,860.00

126,600.00

128,520.00

125,070

3.450.00

Intestate Estate,

362.49

362.49

362.49

Gaol Library,

103.90

103.90

103.90

Miscellaneous,

1,550.00

1,550.00

1,050.00

500.00

Suitor's Fund,

43,925.91

180,092.52

224,018.43

153,420.15

70,098.28

Administration of Passenger's Estates,

292.36

292.36

292.36

Post Office Fine Fund,

6.20

6.20

6.20

.

$

49.341.06

311,612.83

360,953.89

281,714.47

79,239.42

Hongkong, 10th March, 1898.

T. SERCOMBE SMITH,

Treasurer.

Statement of Advances made and repaid in Hongkong during the year ended 31st December, 1897.

To whom advanced.

Outstanding

on

1st January,

Advances made during the year ended

Advances

Outstanding

repaid during Balance on

ended

31st Dec.,

1897.

Money Order,

Government of Singapore,

John Thomas,

Supreme Court,

Captain Superintendent of Police,

Praya Reclamation,

Superintendent Fire Brigade,.

Imperial Government, Mrs. Carew,

Director Public Works,

Treasury,

G. W. Watling,

Sanitary Departinent,

Crown Solicitor,

Audit Department,

Government of Mauritius,

Postmaster General,

....

G. A. Yvanovich,

T. Warren,

E. A. Carvalho,

P. C. Langley,

Total.

Ithe

1897.

31st Dec., 1897.

year 31st Dec.,

1897.

26,369.24

282,002.52

308,371.76

24.60

66.45

91.05

283,944.25 (1) 353 73 81.30

24,073.78

9.75

20.93

20.93

20.93

100.00

100.00

*100.000

25.00

80.00

105.00

80.00

25.00

4,109.92

1,730.54

5,839.76

4,109.22

1,730.54

200.00

200.00

200.00

1,354.59

1,354.59

1,354.59

4,500.00

4,500.00

4,500

500.00

500.00

500.00

326.34

326.34

90.00

236.34

200.00

200.00

119.95

80.05

600.00

600.00

600.00

275.18

275.18

275.18

60.00

60.00

57.55

(2)

2.45

23,500

23,500.00

4,500.00

19,000.00

278.56

278.56

278.56

118.13

118.13

95.46

22.67

337.40

337.40

337.40

319.36

319.36

180.00

139 36

103.54

103.54

103.54

377.40

377.40

377.40

75.94

75.94

75.21

(3) .73

100.00

100.00

100.00

49.87

49.87

49.87

129.66

129.66

60.00

69.66

125.56

125.56

125.56

$

31,563.38 316,496.65

348,060.03

300,514.75

47,515 28

Loss in Exchange—(1) 353.73 (2) 2.45 (3)

73

$356.91

Government of Thursday Island,

R. F. Drury,.....

Captain Hastings, Contribution to Jamaica Widows'

and Orphans' Fund,..

A. Broadbent,

J. Course,

J. Gowanlock,

G. A. Bell,

Hongkong, 10th March, 1898.

T. SERCOMBE SMITH,

Treasurer.

208

1897.

PUBLIC WORKS EXTRAORDINARY CHARGEABLE AGAINST THE NEW LOAN.

Praya Reclamation, Ordinance 16 of 1889,

Slaughter-House, Sheep and Pig Depôts,

Gaol Extension,

New Water Mains,

Sewerage of Victoria,

Water Supply, Kowloon,

Taitam Water Works Extension,

Water and Drainage Works Miscellaneous,

Storm Water Drain, Wing Fung Street,

City of Victoria and Hill Districts Water Works,

Water Account,

Hongkong, 10th March, 1898.

$ 65,000.00

6,871.25

51.176.95

4,607.92

8,860.66

2,930.94

8,962.55

61,220.05

2,945.25

104,539.93

4,590.39

$321,705.80

T. SERCOMBE SMITH, Treasurer.

PRAYA RECLAMATION FUND.

STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURE TO 31ST DECEMBER, 1897.

$

7,128.44

42,019.54

43,791.64 24,984.84

55,887.03

34,580.26

49,612.81

35,455.12

6,051.44

65,661,55

112,573.89

33,075.47

Do. No. 4,

Do. No. 5, Do. No. 6,. Do. No. 7,

3,113.67

6,552.99

7,019.62

5,004.19

9,187.60

14,215.46

7,876.47 14,630.92 21,788.35

7,063.88 55,691.67 3,428.36 14,169.36 8,670.52 27,669.30 5,666.04 53,029.15 57,874.20 31,817.59 77,925.38 9,600.81 51,701.26 44,549,27

1,822.21

1890.

1891.

1892.

1893.

1894.

1895.

1896.

1897.

Total

Expenditure.

Estimated

Cost.

Balance to

be Spent.

Private Marine Lot

Holders.

$

$

$

$399

Section No. 1,.

Do. No. 2,

Do. No. 3,.

$

40,758.18

63,318.02

11,086.90

24,596.23 266,683.79

423,260.67

156,570.88

36,245.99

31,593.99

6,202.29

36,697,68

5,754.83 11,705.77 235,441.70 48,599.71 43.961.02 378,214.75

251,176.20

15,731.50

459,378.56

81,163.81

39,144.85

11,964.17 132,373.06

227,392.11

95,019.05

63,670.23

62,780.32 181,126.04

310,486.00

129,359.96

29,767.10

27,309.82

50,382.14 246,395.38 523,788.60 277,398.22 27,919.28 292,611.76 316,268.44

23,656.63

Total,.

$

106,850.19

204,450.45 332,808.10 114,032.85 240,561.81

272,503.71

228,333.44

233,308.981,732,849.48 2,511,750.58 778,901.10

Section No.

Government.

Do. No. 5,

443.53

814.38

1,260.26

303.87

233.81

9,727.49

1,418.47

2,520.24

4,213.30

1,003.11

774.39

1,697.95

Do. No. 6,

755.45

1,400.02

Do. No. 7,

32,304.19

48,472.28

2,119.82

111,086.04

544.78

12,473.23

637.44

Total,

$

34,921.64

53,206.92

118,679.42

14,324.94 11,802.19 18,171.01 86,819.23

Grand Total,... $ 141,771.83

257,657.87

451,487.52 128,357.79 252,364.00 200,074.72 265,152.67

5,464.26

3,290.36 21,537.96 88,734.40 17,196.44

18,515.52 47,001.60 84,906.90 37,905.30. 3,837.25 11,372.32 46,818.00 3,393.29 230,549.89 259,218.77

35,445.68

22,668.88

16,858.62 1,036.00 1,541.61 10,156.55 5,709.57 12,954.74

28,580.42 316,461.77 429,678.07 113,216.30.

261,845.35 2,040,311.25 2,041,428.65 802,117.40

T. SERCOMBE SMITH, Colonial Treasurer.

Treasury, Hongkong, 11th March, 1898.

209

210

FINANCIAL STATEMENT FOR 1897.

Dr.

To Inscribed Stock Loan at 33% interest,

LOAN ACCOUNT.

Cr.

to be paid off on the 15th April, 1943,... £341,799.15.1

By Sinking Fund.

£5,174.14.4

ASSETS.

Subsidiary Coins,

ASSETS AND LIABILITIES

1

ON THE 31ST DECEMBER, 1897.

$ C.

LIABILITIES.

138,000.00 Drafts

Drafts drawn by Crown Agents, in

transit,

C.

316,000.00

.

Subsidiary Coins in transit,

700,000.00 Military Coutribution,

21,628.47

Deposits not available,.

79.239.42

Balance in hands of Crown Agents,

26,769.13

Arrears of Taxes,

110.17

Praya Reclamation Deposit Account,

Refund of Taxes,

261,000.00

3,000.00

Officers' Remittances, not yet paid,

23,652.69

Arrears of Crown Rent,

39,362.47

J

Money Orders, not yet paid,........

6,548.53

L

Advances to be recovered,.

47,545.28 | Transit Charges,

7,800.00

י

Pensions due to Civil Officers,

15,900.00

Do. to Police,

Overdrawn Balance,

0,293.00

210,782.86

TOTAL ASSETS,......*$ 951,787.05

Balance,...................

2,557.92

:

$ 954,344.97

TOTAL LIABILITIES,...... $

954,344.97

* Not including $350,000 being selling value of coins ordered and paid for but not already in transit.

Balance of 1893 Loan,...

Plus Excess of Liabilities over Assets,

.$262,091.95

2,557.92

Treasury, Hongkong, 5th April, 1898.

$264,649.87

A. M. THOMSON, Acting Treasurer.

419

No. 32

98

HONGKONG.

FINANCIAL RETURNS ACCOMPANYING THE DRAFT ESTIMATES FOR 1899.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government.

ASSETS AND LIABILITIES,

ON THE 31ST DECEMBER, 1897.

ASSETS.

LIABILITIES.

Subsidiary Coins, ...

138,000.00 | Drafts drawn by Crown Agents, in

transit,

.! 316,000.00

Subsidiary Coins in transit,

700,000.00 | Military Contribution,

21,628.47

Deposits not available,.

79,239.42

Balance in hands of Crown Agents,

26,769.13

Praya Reclamation Deposit Account,

261,000.00

Arrears of Taxes,

110.17

Refund of Taxes,

3,000.00

Officers' Remittances, not yet paid,

23,652.69

Arrears of Crown Rent,

39,362.47

Money Orders, not yet paid,

6,548.53

Advances to be recovered,..

47,545.28 Transit Charges,

7,300.00

Pensions due to Civil Officers,

15,900.00

Do. to Police,

Overdrawn Balance,

9,293.00

210,782.86

TOTAL ASSETS,..

Balance,...............

951,787.05

+

2,557.92

954,344.97

TOTAL LIABILITIES,..... $

954,344.97

* Not including $350,000 being selling value of coins ordered and paid for but not already in transit.

+ Balance of 1893 Loan,.

Plus Excess of Liabilities over Assets,

Treasury, Hongkong, 22nd August, 1898.

.$262,091.95

2,557.92

$264,649.87

A. M. THOMSON,

Acting Treasurer.

420

No. 54.

SIR,

TREASURY, 31st August, 1898.

With reference to my letter No. 49 of the 22nd instant, I have the honour to transmit the following returns:-

1. Estimated Balance of the Assets of the Colony on 31st December,

1898.

2. Estimated Loan Account 1898.*

3. Loan Account, 1897.*

The statement marked A will show how the balance of $365,090.91 is arrived at.

I have omitted all items appearing in the statement of Assets and Liabilities for 1897 set forth at page (C 16) of the Blue Book for 1897 which will form part of the Revenue and Expenditure for the current year.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your obedient Servant,

A. M. THOMSON,

The Honourable

THE ACTING COLONIAL SECRETARY,

&c.,

Se..

&c.

}

* Not printed.

Acting Treasurer.

ESTIMATED BALANCE OF THE ASSETS OF THE COLONY,

ON THE 31ST DECEMBER, 1898.

Estimated Revenue, 1898,

$2,779,922

Estimated Expenditure, Local,

Do.

Do.. Crown Agents,

$2,147,655 705.048

2,852,703

Estimated Expenditure in excess over Revenue, ...

.$ 72,781

Loan Works, 1st January to 30th June,

$26,259.06

Do.,

1st July to 31st December,

Total,....

78,000.00 (Estimated).

$104,259.06

Balance of Assets of 1897,*

$365,090.91

Less Expenditure in excess of 1898 Revenue,..

72,781.00

$292,309.91

Less Loan Works,.

104,259.06

Estimated Balance of 1898 Assets,...

$†188,050.85

*

Explanatory statement A attached.

Including Balance of Loan, $167,775.

Treasury, 31st August, 1898.

A. M. THOMSON,

Acting Treasurer.

3

#

h

!

:

=

ASSETS.

Statement A.

ASSETS AND LIABILITIES..

ON THE 31ST DECEMBER, 1897.

C.

LIABILITIES.

efy

Subsidiary Coins,

Subsidiary Coins in transit,............

138,000.00 | Drafts drawn by Crown Agents in transit,... 316,000.00

700,000.00 Deposits not available,

79,239.42

Balance in hands of Crown Agents,

26,769.13 Praya Reclamation Deposit Account,.

261,000.00

Advances to be recovered,.

47,545.28 Officers' Remittances, not yet paid,

23,652.69

Selling value of Coins ordered and paid for

but not already in transit,

Money Orders, not yet paid,

350,000.00

Overdrawn Balance,

6,548.53

210,782.86

Treasury, 31st August, 1898.

$1,262,314.41

TOTAL LIABILITIES,

897,223.50

BALANCE,

365,090.91

$1,262,314.41

A. M. THOMSON, Acting Treasurer.

421

C.

A

HONGKONG.

133

No.

REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF FIRE BRIGADE FOR 1897.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government.

No. 32.

POLICE OFFICE, HONGKONG, 31st January, 1898.

98

SIR,--I have the honour to submit the following report on the Government Fire Brigade for the year 1897.

2. There were 26 Fires, two of which occurred on vessels in the harbour, and 58 Incipient Fires during the past year. Details regarding each will be found attached. The Brigade turned out 40 times during the year.

The estimated damage caused by the fires was $177,150.00 and by the incipient fires $334.50. A list is attached shewing the number of fires that have occurred during each of the last ten years with the estimated value of property destroyed in each case.

3. There were three prosecutions for arson. In two cases the intention was to defraud and in these the prosecutions were successful. The first was in connection with the fire at No. 99, Jervois Street in which three occupants of the first floor, which had no connection with the shop on the ground floor where the fire originated, were smothered by smoke before they could be rescued.

Among the débris on the ground floor were found unmistakeable evidence of incendiarism, and the master of the shop was convicted and sentenced to 15 years' imprisonment with hard labour.

The second case was in connection with the incipient fire which occurred at No. 231, Queen's Road Central on the 21st of May.

The Chinese Constable on the beat noticed smoke issuing from the house, and forcing an entrance found the cubicle, used by the accountant of the shop on the ground floor, ou fire in four different places. With commendable courage and presence of mind he beat out the flames with an old curtain.

The accountant was convicted and sentenced to 5 years' imprisonment with hard labour. These convictions seem to have had a beneficial effect, for the estimated value of property des- troyed by the 14 fires that occurred up to the 21st of May amounted to $115,950, while the esti- mated value of property destroyed by the 12 fires occurring after that date amounted to $61,200, in- cluding the fire of the 15th June which took place before the second conviction.

4. The latter fire was the most destructive that occurred during the year. partly destroyed, and the value of the damage done was estimated at $34,000.

Three houses were

The spread of the fire to the adjoining houses in this case was entirely due to the large and stoutly constructed sunshades existing in Jervois Street, the removal of which had to be effected be- fore the Brigade could work with their ladders. The delay that was thus caused was considerable, and was undoubtedly the cause of the fire spreading.

Since then the shop-keepers in Jervois Street have been induced by Mr. CHATHAM, when Acting Director of Public Works, to make their sunshades moveable so as to avoid such obstruction in future.

5. At the fire in No. 64, Third Street on the 24th of November. 15 persons unfortunately lost their lives. They were occupants of the first floor. The fire originated under the only staircase leading to the floor, and the woodwork being light (as in most Chinese houses) it immediately burned so fiercely that no person could venture down the stairs.

The occupants retreated to the kitchen, and before assistance could arrive the whole floor was in flames and they were suffocated.

The houses on each side of that burned, had ladders leading from the kitchen to the roof, but unfortunately such was not the case in house No. 64.

6. The water in the mains was not turned off at any time during the year.

7. The new floating Fire Engine (the engines and appliances of which are by Messrs. SHAND and MASON) was completed and available for service in February last, and has given satisfaction.

8. I attach a list of places where Fire Despatch Boxes are kept, and of private telephones to which the Police have courteously been granted access in case of fire, together with copy of a report from the Acting Engineer on the state of the various Fire Engines, which are all in good working

order.

9. It has not been found possible yet to carry out the extension of the Central Fire Station that I recommended last year. Till that is done it is impossible to effect any material improvement in rapidity in dealing with fires from the Central Fire Station.

134

10. By an acceleration in sounding the alarms, a gain of two minutes has been effected in the turn-out of the firemen at the Central Police Station.

Electric alarms have now been fixed at East and West Point Police Stations, the Central Fire Station, and Central Police Station, from which further improvement in the rapidity of communicat- ing alarms is expected.

11. On the 11th of May the Nam Pak Hong Fire Brigade was, by the consent of the Committee, placed under the supervision of two European Engine Drivers, who take charge of this auxiliary Brigade at fires. The result has been satisfactory, and further improvement may be looked for.

12. The conduct of the Brigade throughout the year has been good.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

The Honourable

THE COLONIAL SECRETARY.

F. H. MAY, Superintendent of Fire Brigade.

112-

List of Places where Fire Brigade Despatch Boxes are kept.

Engine House at No. 2 Police Station. Engine House in Albany Street.

1 Box. No. 1 Police Station.

1

>>

2

""

Naval Dock Yard.

Government Offices.

1 Box. Government Civil Hospital.

1

1

"3

1

11

1

""

1

No. 7 Queen's Garden, Engineer's Mess.

6

""

1

Central Police Station.

"?

""

1

1

1

1

""

Clock Tower.

Government House.

Engine House at West Point.

No. 7 Police Station.

Gas House, West Point.

Ko Shing Theatre.

Nam Pak Hong Fire Station.

Man Mo Temple.

No. 5 Police Station.

List of Telephones to which the Police can have access to communicate with Central Station in the event of a Fire breaking out.

Hongkong and China Gas Company, East and

West Point, from 7 A.M. to 9 P.M.

Tung Wá Hospital, l'o Yan Street. Man On Insurance Office, Queen's Road West.

Hongkong Hotel, Praya Central. Royal Naval Yard, Queen's Road East. Mr. J. KENNEDY's Causeway Bay. Electric Light Company, Queen's Road East.

HONGKONG, 28th January, 1898.

SIR,-I have the honour to forward herewith a report on the state of the Government Fire Engines for the year ending 31st December, 1897.

STEAMER No. 1.

(Floating Fire Engine by Shand and Mason.)

This engine is new. It was finished on the 22nd January and commenced work in February. It did good service at the Fire on board the S. S. Belgir, on the 21st April and has been found very suitable for harbour work. The propelling engine is of sufficient power to maintain a speed of 9 miles per hour, so that little time is lost in reaching a fire in any part of the harbour. With the exception of a burst tube which gave out at the finish of the fire on the Belgic, the boiler and machinery has given every satisfaction.

STEAMER No. 2.

(Land Engine by Shand and Mason.)

This engine has been 19 years in service; the original boiler which was worn out was replaced by a new one this year supplied by Shand and Mason. It has been well tested at drill and found satisfac- tory, and is now in good working order.

STEAMER No. 3.

(Land Engine by Shand and Mason.)

This engine has been 19 years in service and is now in good order; the boiler has been regularly cleaned and examined and the machinery tested for efficiency at drill.

1

135

STEAMER No. 4.

(Land Engine by Shand and Mason.)

This engine has been 16 years in service; the pump valve seats have been thoroughly overhauled and new valves fitted. It has been regularly tested for efficiency at the monthly drills, and is now in good working order.

STEAMER NO. 5.

(Land Engine by Shand and Mason.)

This engine has been 12 years in service; it has been very little used for fires this year, but has been regularly tested at drill and is now in good working order.

Seven Manual Engines and fittings are all in good order. The hose, reels, ladders and supply carts are all in good order and condition.

The Honourable

F. H. MAY, C.M.G.,

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Superintendent, Government Fire Brigade.

Your obedient Servant,

D. MACDONALD,

Acting Engineer, Government Fire Brigade.

No.

DATE.

FIRES, 1887.

SITUATION OF FIRE.

NO. OF BUILDINGS DESTROYED.

Wholly. Partly.

ESTIMATED AMOUNT

OF PROPERTY

DESTROYED.

-∞∞ 10 CO - 00

1

January

12

No. 16, Sai Woo Lane,

2

13

""

No. 142, Second Street,

3

"

15

""

25

""

""

10

No. 48, Queen's Road West,.

22 Man Mo Temple, Hollywood Road,.

No. 63, Wellington Street,

26 | No. 59, Queen's Road West,.

February 10

122

2

100 10

2

$

1,400

14,000

4

23,000

25

1

3,000

No. 3, Bonham Strand,

12,000

17

""

No. 129, Queen's Road West,

1

2,900

9

March

9

No. 15, Tsz Mi Lane,

G

19,000

10

10

11

33

"

No. 76, Jervois Street,

23

No. 17, Wing Kat Street,

1

2,500

12

24

No. 34, Bonham Strand,

1

1,800

13

April

5

Blackhead & Co.'s Godowns at Tsimshatsui,

14

30

No. 273, Queen's Road Central,

2

8,000

15

May

4

No. 35, Battery Road,

I

60

16

June

14

A Carpenter's Shed at Kennedy Town,

1

200

17

July

3 No. 28, Tank Lane,

1

1

300

18

25

No. 185, Queen's Road West,

15

26,000

19

August 23

20

21

""

September 15

21

No. 76, Queen's Road West,.

No. 311, Queen's Road Central, No. 39, Wing Lok Street,..

2

2,000

1

1,200

2

Ι

4,000

22

October

5

No. 9, In Kee Lane,

1

1,500

23

No. 5, Gage Street,

1

1

3,000

24

November 5

No. 9, Sheung Fung Lane,

100

25

16

,,

No. 253, Queen's Road Central,

24

10

90,000

26

24

No. 13, Triangle Street,

1

150

27

27

""

No. 1, Nullah Lane,

I

190

28

28

""

No. 107, Wellington Street,

1

1,000

29

29

No. 163, Queen's Road East,

150

30

29

29

No. 165, Queen's Road East,

150

31

30

No. 40, Wing On Street,.

7

16,000

32

December

1

No. 31, Pound Lane,

200

331 33

11

31

No. 15, Morrison Street,

1,800

34

""

20

No. 5, Kau Ù Fong,

1,500

35

"

28 No. 56, Bonham Strand,

16

30,000

TOTAL,...

267,125

136

No.

DATE.

FIRES, 1888.

SITUATION OF FIRE.

NO. OF BUILDINGS

DESTROYED.

Wholly. Partly.

ESTIMATED

OF

AMOUNT

PROPERTY

DESTROYED.

1234567

January

17

1 No. 147, Queen's Road West,

No. 77, Praya West,

1

2

500

1

1

700

""

*"

12

29

March

12

8

>>

14

28

February 10

No. 7, Ship Street,.....

No. 229, Queen's Road West,

No. 139, Queen's Road Central,

No. 21, Centre Street,

No. 93, Bonham Strand,

5,500

No. 151, Hollywood Road,

500

1

200

1

22,000

1

35,000

1

9,000

9

22

""

No. 3, Gilman Street,

10

April

3

No. 201, Queen's Road West,

2

11,500

11

13

No. 29, Graham Street,-

1

400

12

24

"

No. 186, Wing Lok Street,

1

1

4,000

13

27

39

No. 89, Queen's Road West,

1

200

14

May

1.

No. 81, Jervois Street,

1

2

16,000

15

12

>>

No. 9, Chinese Street,

400

16

18

No. 55, Queen's Road West,.........

4

17

31

">

No. 15, Ship Street,

18

June

11

No. 58, Wing Lok Street,

1

300

19

21

No. 339, Queen's Road Central,

500

20

29

No. 114, Jervois Street,

1

1,000

21

July

6

No. 42, Queen's Road West,.

2

2

25,000

22

23

25

No. 139, Second Street,

11

6,000

23

24

"

Nos. 6 and 8, Peel Street,.

2

2,000

24

26

No. 17, Jervois Street,

1

1

10,000

>>

25

27

""

No. 19, Tank Lane,

200

26

August

15

No. 2, Cochrane Street,.

20

27

""

17 Jubilee Street,

4

14,000

:

28

19

39

No. 86, Hollywood Road,

1

2

2,000

29

>

28

No. 18, Lyndhurst Terrace,

12

4

80,000

30

September 26

No. 388, Queen's Road Central,

1

5,500

1

31

99

30

No. 110, Queen's Road Central,

1

32

30

33

October

4

No. 112, Queen's Road Central, No. 21, Chung Sau Lane West,

7,500 27,500

1

500

34

""

4 | 171, Queen's Road West,

3

1

10,000

35

""

22

No. 114, Queen's Road Central,

8,000

36

30

37

95

November 3

No. 217, Queen's Road West,

1

3,000

No. 46, Praya Central,

38

8

No. 18, Albany Street,

39

11

""

No. 53, East Street,

40

"

15

No. 99, Queen's Road East,

41

42

43

44

45 December 21

"

17

No. 103, Bonham Strand Central,

17

No. 39, Praya, Yaumati,

2

~

~

8,000

17

دو

Aberdeen Village,

18

No. 83, Jervois Street,

100 1,000 800 10,000 1,800 150 25,000

No. 115, Praya West,

4,000

359,770

TOTAL,......

FIRES, 1889.

NO. OF BUILDINGS

DESTROYED,

ESTIMATED AMOUNT

No.

DATE.

SITUATION OF FIRE.

OF PROPERTY

DESTROYED.

Wholly. Partly.

1

January

3

No. 1, Rozario Street,

2

$

2

7

No. 197, Queen's Road West,

1

3

February

6

No. 92, Wing Lok Street,.

1

1,000 2,000 20,000

April

12

No. 292, Queen's Road West,

May

5

No. 145, Bonham Strand,

1

20 300

9

No. 10, Wilmer Street,

10,000

""

June July

29

No. 242, Queen's Road West,

2

3,000

August

24

26

4 No. 227, Queen's Road West, No. 95, Hollywood Road,

September 16

No. 203, Queen's Road Central, No. 1, Wing Wo Street,

No. 112, Queen's Road Central,

No. 174, Third Street,

8

9

10

11

12

,,

21

13

21

;"

14

25

No. 220, Queen's Road Central,

15

"

29

No. 9, Hellier Street,

16

October

10

No. 42, Battery Street, Yaumati,

17

30

No. 154, Queen's Road Central,

18 November 4

19

20

21

No. 7, Nullah Lane,

5

99

No. 55, Queen's Road West,.

December 23

No. 334, Queen's Road Central,

""

30

No. 17, Bonham Strand,

TOTAL........

1

1,300

1

400

112

1,200

4,000

3

1

1,500

1

1

8,000

1

1,000

}

16,000

5,000

20,000

.$

98,223

1,500

2,000

1

+

137

No.

DATE.

10

14

>"

2

2

00-10CP 10 10 H

January

""

29

>>

"

February

5

7

18

26

28

No. 7, Station Street,......

No. 33, Tung Man Lane, No. 229, Praya West,

No. 8, Lyndhurst Terrace,

No. 23, Bonliam Strand,

FIRES, 1890.

SITUATION OF FIRE.

NO. OF BUILDINGS

DESTROYED.

Wholly. Partly.

3

1

ESTIMATED AMOUNT OF PROPERTY

DESTROYED.

1,000 500

8,000 10,000

- 400

1

No. 18, Gage Street,

300

No. 8, St. Francis Street,

550

19

23

7

12

13

14

15

28486

9

22

November 11 15 16 December 15

9

10

11

May

"

July

September 9

Blackhead & Co., Praya Central, No. 38, Gilman Bazaar,.

No. 47, Bonham Strand, No. 69. Upper Station Street, No. 112, Queen's Road Central,

No. 68, Bonham Strand,

N

The Hongkong Dispensary,

41,000

100,000

No. 12, Kwong Un Street, East, No. 32, Square Street,

·

3,000

1

500

1

30,000

1

100

I

N

TOTAL,...

2,000 250 6,000

203,600

No.

DATE.

FIRES, 1891.

SITUATION OF FIRE.

NO. OF BUILDINGS

DESTROYED.

ESTIMATED AMOUNT

OF PROPERTY

DESTROYED.

Wholly. Partly.

5

1

1

:

1 2 3

1031 ∞0

6

January February April

>>

July

-3 01 00 00

8

8

Nos. 170 and 172, Third Street,

No. 353, Queen's Road West,

No. 41. Hillier Street,

The Hongkong and China Bakery, Morrison Hill Road,

East Point,

No. 331, Queen's Road Central,

May

5

6

11

No. 280, Queen's Road Central, No. 72, Station Street, Yaumati,

TOTAL,

December 19 | No. 574, Wanchai Road,

No.

DATE.

FIRES, 1892.

SITUATION OF FIRE.

:

2 G

1

2

3,000 700

1,500

1

1,000

11,500

12,000

1,800

600

32,100

NO. OF BUILDINGS

DESTROYED.

ESTIMATED AMOUNT

OF PROPERTY

DESTROYED.

Wholly. Partly.

1

2

?>

16

""

29

April

January 10

13

21

No. 9, Queen's Road Central,

No. 528, Queen's Road West, No. 81, High Street,

I No. 26, Sai Wo Lane,

1

40,000

Bonham Strand,

3

Co

8,000

1

6,000

1

100

1,000

10

""

No. 17, Queen's Road West,..

400

11

""

No. 104, Queen's Road West,.

1,500

May

22

No. 17, Tank Lane,

1

250

9

Juve

21

No. 29, Centre Street,

1

100

10

July

11

August

18

12

3 No. 91, Wing Lok Street,.

21 No. 48, Queen's Road West,.

13 September 15 No. 80, Queen's Road West,...

14 December 8

No. 333, Queen's Road Central,

1

5,000

No. 49, Queen's Road West,

}

300

3,000

расотой разбиват

4

4,000

5,000

15

16

""

2223

20

No. 14, Jubilee Street,

No. 16, East Street,

300

600

TOTAL,........

75,550

!

138

No.

DATE.

FIRES, 1893.

SITUATION OF FIRE.

NO. OF BUILDINGS

DESTROYED.

Wholly. Partly.

ESTIMATED

AMOUNT OF PROPERTY

DESTROYED.

I

2

3

January

""

7

11

No. 73, Hollywood Road,

1

800

No. 79, Nullah Lane,....

]

300

18

No. 2, Square Street,.

1

10

February

11

No. 68, Jervois Street,

2

1

10,000

13

No. 101, Wing Lok Street,

1

6,000

March

22

No. 22. Holland Street,.

1

1

40,000

26

No. 301, Queen's Road West,

I

2

8,000

"

3

April

13

No. 87, Jervois Street,

1

2,000

9

25

No. 15, West Street,

800

10

27

29

No. 1, In On Lane,

19,000

11

May

13

No. 344, Queen's Road Central,

2,000

12

June

16

No. 406, Queen's Road West,

1

2,000

13

16

No. 28, Tsz Mi Lane,.

700

14

July

3

No. 191, Hollywood Road,

1

15

"

14

No. 19, Gough Street,

16

19

No. 280, Queen's Road West, ...

1

17

""

20

No. 12, Tung Loi Lane,

1,500

150 1,000 20,000

18

August

16

No. 337, Queen's Road West,

300

19

17

No. 32, Queen's Road West,

2,800

32

25

C

21

5

20

>>

September 5

No. 155, Second Street...

20,000

No. 7, Ezra Lane,

400

22

""

18

No. 248, Hollywood Road,

4,000

23

30

No. 127, Bonham Strand,

5,000

24

October

12

No. 14, Li Shing Street,

1

5,500

25

November 11

No. 115, Praya West,

26

11

No. 58, Square Street,

10 00

1

20,000

2

1

3,000

"

27

16

No. 5, Pan Kwai Lane,

1

1,000

28

21

No. 9, Tannery Lane,

1

40

29

23

No. 314A, Queen's Road Central,.

1

8,000

11

30

26

No. 22, Tsz Mi Lane,

1

1

5,500

31 December

4

No. 31, Wing Fung Street,

1

10

32

No. 131, Bonham Strand,

"

33

9

No. 11, Bonham Strand,

2

2,000 5,000

多步

34

10

*

No. 240, Queen's Road West,

9,000

35

13

No. 99, Praya West,

1

400

**

36

25

No. 100, Queen's Road West,

1

2,000

""

208,210

No.

DATE.

TIME.

TOTAL,....

FIRES, 1894.

NO. OF BUILDINGS

DESTROYED.

SITUATION OF FIRE.

ESTIMATED DAMAGE.

Wholly. Partly.

1

∞ ∞ ~ → CA CO 10 H

January

9

12.30 p.m.

No. 56 First Street,

1

800

2

14

8.45 p.m.

No. 13 U Lok Lane,

I

400

3

26

1.25 a.m.

February

1

7.55 a.m.

No. 273 Queen's Road West, No. 26 Market Street,

1,200

2,500

6

1.40 p.m.

14

>>

4.50 p.m.

7

25

;;

7 p.m.

8

March

7.30 a.m.

No. 57 Queen's Road West, No. 28 Upper Station Street, No. 86 Queen's Road West, No. 17 Salt Fish Street,

4,000

800

50

1,500

9

28

9.35 a.m.

No. 17 Upper Lascar Row,

1

5,000

""

10

April

4

11

17

27

9.20 p.m. 10.30 a.m.

No. 136 Bonham Strand,

6

150,000

No. 211 Hollywood Road,

2,000

12

28

9 a.m.

No. 63 Wanchai Road,

1,500

J

n

13

30

2 a.m.

,,

14

May

1

15

15

16

June

3

3 a.m.

7 p.m. 3 a.m.

No. 137 Queen's Road West, No. 15 Jervois Street,

No. 122 Queen's Road Central, No. 116 Queen's Road Central,

55,000

18,000

4,500

2,500

17

3

3.10 a.m.

18 July

10.25 p.m.

19

August

14

10.30 a..

20

21

""

21

92

October

""

2

2 a.m.

3

23

11

11

6.20 p.m.

24

24

>>

25

31

26 November 30

7.40 p.m.

27

December

}

10 p.m.

28

1

29

13

"}

5.30 p.m.

3.45 a.m.

11.30 p.m.

12.10 a.m.

10 p.m.

11.20 p.m.

No. 68 Jervois Street, No. 9 Sai On Lano,

No. 21 West Street, No. 2 Ship Street,

No. 127 Queen's Road West, No. 115 Queen's Road Central, No. 32 Bonham Strand,

No. 207 Queen's Road Central,

No. 183 Hollywood Road, No. 22 Queen's Road West,

No. 228 Queen's Road Central, No. 123 Queen's Road Central, No. 59 Square Street,

20,000

3,000

500

1

1

18,000

200

800

200

1

15,000

4.600

2,000

8,000

2,000

1

100

Total,.

....

323,650

..

:

FIRES, 1895.

139

No.

DATE.

TIME.

SITUATION OF FIRE.

NO. OF BUILDINGS DESTROYED.

ESTIMATED DAMAGE.

Wholly. Partly.

1

January

6

12

>>

7.45 p.m. 9.30 p.m.

18

""

5.45 p.m.

18

17

6.45 p.m.

21

9 p.m.

19

February

6

9.15 p.m.

10

1 a.m.

20

*

1.20 p.m.

9

March

2

6.40 p.m.

10

3

**

7 p.m.

House No. 230, Queen's Road Central, House No. 4, Wellington Street, House No. 189, Queen's Road Central, House No. 15. Mercer Street, House No. 337, Queen's Road West, House No. 73, Boubam Strand, House No. 149, Queen's Road Central, House No. 3, Wai Tak Lane, House No. 228, Queen's Road West, House No. 7, Li Shing Street,....

1

6.000

4,000

2.000

9,000

1.000

6,000

30

1

200

3

12,000

3,000

11

24

">

8 p.m.

12

26

8.30 p.m.

13

30

2.50 a.m.

14

April

6

3.25 a.m.

15

11

12 Noon

16

18

7 p.m.

>>

17

24

10.15 p.m.

House No. 96, Bonham Strand, House No. 212, Queen's Road West, House No. 352, Queen's Road Central, House No. 1, Queen's Street,

House No. 144, Queen's Road West, House No. 34, Bonbam Strand, House No. 19, Jervois Street,

Unknown.

3,000

5.000

5,000

3,000

1.000

I

12,000

""

18

June

14

3.05 a.m.

House No. 76, Jervois Street,

1

Not known.

19

July

29

4.50 a.m.

House No. 34, Winglok Street,

20

29

12.30 a mi.

House No. 3, Station Street,

1

"

21

22

August September 6

1 a.m.

House No. 70, Jervois Street,

10-10

5,000

800

22.000

3.45 a.m.

House No. 4. Praya Central, premises of

23

30

8.30 a.m.

??

24

October

5

12.50 a.m.

25

6

8.20 p.m.

27

26

15

11.15 p.m.

"

27

30

12.45 a.m.

28

November 21

7.35 p.m.

29

December 13

11.15 p.m.

80

13

31

16

I a.m.

4.30 p.m.

Messrs. Wieler & Co.,....

House No. 12, Nullah Terrace, Quarry Bay, House No. 169, Hollywood Road,

Matshed at Quarry Bay,

House No. 149, Queen's Road Central, American ship Wandering Jew, Victoria

Harbour,

House No. 111, Praya West,

A inatshed at Kun Chung,

A squatter's but on the Hillside at the back

of Shaukiwan Station,

House No. 110, Praya West,

1

100

1

700

1

3,000

1

500

1

100

150,000

6,000 200

: :

25 8,000

"

32

17

1a.m.

>>

33

23

1.35 a.m.

34

24

6 p.m.

35

30

1.10 a.m.

House 247, Quoon's Road Central, House No. 285, Queen's Road Ceutral, Houses Nos. 347 & 349, Queen's Road West, House No. 40, Qucen's Road West,................

15,000

4,000

5,325

2

5,000

Total,....

297,980

FIRES, 1896.

No.

DATE.

TIME.

SITUATION OF FIRE.

NO. OF BUILDINGS DESTROYED.

ESTIMATED DAMAGE.

Wholly. Partly.

1

- 3150 3 10 CO 1 - 30 o

January 15

16

7.45 p.m. 8.20 p.m.

25

10.30 p.m.

February

12.30 a.m.

6

1.00 a.m.

House No. 30, Wing Lok Street,. House No. 63. Queen's Road Central, House No. 205, Queen's Road West, House No. 302. Queen's Road West, House No. 56, Jervois Street,

2

2

$ 9,000

30

1

1,000

1

2,600

6,000

6

2.45 a.m.

House No. 57. Queen's Road West,

16,000

"

8

11.05 p.m.

House No. 133, Praya West,

6,000

26

4.25 a.m.

House No. 309, Queen's Road Central,

5,000

>>

9

10

11

March April

9

4.00 a.m.

House No. 367, Queen's Road Central,

5,000

1

5.10 a.m.

House No. 3, Wing Lok Street,

1

8,000

1

4.45 a.m.

House No. 288, Queen's Road West,

1

4,000

"

12

6

4.20 a.m.

House No. 21, Salt Fish Street,

1

8,700

>>

13

8

4.15 a.m.

House No. 13, Wing Woo Street,

2,000

14

22

1.15 a.m.

House No. 43, Praya West,

3,000

**

15

24

3.15 a.in.

House No. 15, Cockrane Street,

600

16

26

8.45 a.m.

17

27

10.15 a.m.

House No. 31, Belcher's St., Kennedy Town, Honse No. 238, Hollywood Road,

3,500

:

18

29

9.50 p.m.

>>

19

May

9

20

14

10.15 p.m.

**

21

June

5

9.20 p.m.

22

15

7.30 a.m.

23

29

3.30 p.m.

24 August

14

3.10 p.m.

25 October

28

2.10 p.m.

26

November

5

12.40 a.m.

27

21

3.20 a.m.

28

December

8

8.30 p.m.

29

10

>>

30

21

House No. 115, Praya West,

1.10 a.m. House No. 12, Sutherland Street,

1.00 a.m.

House No. 73, Jervois Street,

House No. 3, Tsz Mi Lane,

Licensed Cargo Boat No. 69,

On board the British barque Glen Caladh,. House No. 10, Ship Street,

House No. 187, Wing Lok Street,

House No. 109, Queen's Road West,

House No. 138, Queen's Road West,

House No. 18, New Street,

House No. 10, Queen's Road West, House No. 63, Bonham Strand,

2,000

2,300

50

6,000

1,290

1

4,500 Unknown.

600 7,000

25

200

1

1,000

200

Trifling.

Total......

105,595

No.

DATE.

TIME.

FIRES DURING THE YEAR 1897.

No. of

BUILDINGS

SITUATION OF FIRE.

DESTROYED.

ESTIMATED

DAMAGE.

CAUSE.

Wholly. Partly.

1 Jan.

12 | 10.30 p.m.

On board the S.S. Fausang,

2

3 Feb.

18 10.15 p.m.

House No. 138, Jervois Street,

}

""

4.20 a.m.

House No. 213, Praya West,

1

11

1.20 p.m.

House No. 24, Cross Street,

10

15

9.15 a.m.

Government Offices, Lower Albert Road,

:

"

REMARKS.

140

:

500

25,000

17,000

1

300

200

Spontaneous combustion among the bales of cotton. Falling of a kerosine lamp,.

Accidentally set fire by occupants while wor- shipping.

Unknown,

A boiling bucket of tar on the roof being upset became ignited and set fire to the rafters.

1

I

20,000

Unknown,

1

1

4,000

:

:

:

Insured in the Office of Messrs. Jardine Matheson & Co.

Insured with Messrs. Carlowitz & Co. for $25,000.

The 1st floor was insured for $1,800 with Mitsui Bussan Kaisha Coy, and the ground floor in differ- ent Offices for $15,000.

The ground floor was insured in the Miiji Fire In- surance, Mitsui Bussan Kaisha Coy. Agents, for $2,200, the 1st and 2nd floors were family houses.

Was insured for $18,500. ·

Accident with a kerosine Insured with the Manchester Fire Insurance Coy. for

lamp.

200

Unknown,

24,000

Unknown,

1

3,000

Arson,

:

3,000

Sparks from an earthen furnace in the 'tween decks which was being used for the purpose of fumigating the luggage of the 97,200 Chinese passengers.

$3,200. Messrs. Holliday Wise & Co. are the local Agents.

Insured with the North British Mercantile Fire In- surance Coy, for $4,850 Messrs. Shewan Tomes & Co. are the local Agents.

Insured with Chun On Fire Insurance Coy. for $3,500, No. 353 and the 1st floor of 351 was insured with Hongkong Fire Insurance Coy. for $10,000 and the Atlas Fire Insurance Coy. for $11,000.

The ground and 2nd floors were insured with the South British Fire Insurance Coy. for $7,000 and the 1st floor with the Transatlantic Fire Insurance Coy. for $2,000. Kung Pak Tit, 38, Master; Chan Pui Tin, 35, Accountant; and Kwong Ying Lun, 18, Cook were suffocated to death, Six men, the occupants of the ground and 2nd floors, were charged with arson. 1st defendant was sentenced to 15 years' imprisonment with hard labour at the Supreme Court and the rest were discharged.

6

28

1.35 a.m.

House No. 124, Jervois Street,

""

7 April

1

1.20 a.m.

House No. 14, Cross Street,

8

12.30 a.m.

House No. 128, Queen's Road Central,

9

11 2.24 a.m.

House No. 351, Queen's Road Central,

2

.....

10

21

5.25 a.m.

House No. 99, Jervois Street,.

11

21

""

10.15 p.m.

On board S.S. Belgic,

Carried forward,..

FIRES DURING THE YEAR 1897,-Continued.

No. of

BUILDINGS

No.

DATE.

TIME.

SITUATION OF FIRE.

DESTROYED.

ESTIMATED

DAMAGE.

Cause.

Wholly Partly.

Brought forward,.

$97,200

12 April 25

1.55 a.m.

House No. 95, Winglok Street,

1

5,000

Unknown,

13 May

11

7.40 p.m.

House No. 8, Cross Street,

1

700

Unknown,

14

20

1.45 a.m.

House No. 71, Jervois Street,....

:

:

2

13,050

Unknown,

"

15 June

15

2.30 a.m.

House No. 114, Jervois Street,

3

34,000

Unknown,

16 July

23

10 p.m.

Hongkong Hotel, Queen's Road Central,

17

27

11.55 p.m.

18 Aug.

3

4.15 p.m.

House No. 248, Queen's Road West, House No. 15, Praya, Fuk Tsun Heung,

19

22

2.5 a.m.

House No. 213, Queen's Road West,

"

20 Sept.

4

21

18

""

1

223

19

1.15 p.m.

7.15 a.m.

12.20 p.m.

24 11.35 p.m.

7 p.m.

House No. 5, "Wild Dell,”.

House No. 64, Third Street, House No. 53, Stanley Village,

23 Nov.

225

24

24

""

25

28

7.10 a.m.

19

26 Dec.

22

1.15 p.m.

H. M. Naval Yard,

House No. 122, Second Street,

House No. 16, Tung Loi Street,..

House No. 49, Quarry Bay,

TOTAL,...

REMARKS.

1

300

1

300

Unknown,

+

7,000

Accident with fireworks,

600

Upsetting of

lamp.

a

6,900

Unknown,

1

600

Not insured.

Overheating by a boiler.

Insured with the Hongkong Fire Insurance Coy, for $6,000 and the South British Fire Insurance Coy. for $6,000.

Insured with the North British Mercantile Fire In- surance Coy. for $6,000, Messrs. Shewan Tomes & Co. are the local Agents.

Insured with the Northern Assurance Coy. for $15,000. Messrs. Turner & Co. are the local Agents.

Insured with the Transatlantic Fire Insurance Coy. for $24,500 and for $2,000 in the Sun Fire In- surance Coy., Messrs. Siemssen & Co. are the local Agents.

The ground floor was insured for $800 with the Chun On Fire Insurance Coy.

Not insured. The charred remains of two bodies were found in the ruins.

kerosine The ground and 1st floors were insured for $1,200 with Messrs. Carlowitz & Co.

Accident with a lighted

Insured with the Miiji Insurance Coy. for $10,000.

lamp.

1

300

Carelessness with a lighted match.

Not insured.

1

1,200

Accident while worship-

Not insured.

ping,

The charred remains of 15 bodies were found in the building.

10

3,000

Upsetting of a kerosine

Not insured.

lamp.

1

5,000

:

:

Accident with a kerosine | Insured with Messrs. Butterfield & Swire for $4,000.

lamp.

I

2,000

Unknown,

$177,150

F. H. MAY, Superintendent of Fire Brigade.

141

No.

DATE.

TIME.

INCIPIENT FIRES DURING THE YEAR 1897.

SITUATION OF FIRE.

ESTIMATED

DAMAGE.

CAUSE.

REMARKS.

142

De.,

Do.,

Do.,

Chimney on fire.

Extinguished by occupants.

Extinguished by Police, about 70 fir trees slightly scorched.

Extinguished by Coolies engaged.

Extinguished by Police.

Do.

and Coolies.

A lamp placed in an alcove set fire to the Extinguished by occupants. Not insured.

1 Jun. 1

3.30 a.m.

2

2

""

House No. 110, Wellington Street, Stanley Road,

Trifling

"

Bed curtains accidentally set on fire, Grass on fire,

CC

-10 01 00

2

"

2 p.m.

Hillside near Tai Tam Tuk,

Hillside near Ngan Tau Wan,.

"

9

13

25

Hillside near Aberdeen Road, Queen's Road West,....

9

Feb. 25

27

March 9

10

??

}

12

16

""

13 April 3

8.30 p.m.

11 a.m.

6.15 a.m.

8.25 p.m.

6.55 p.m.

3.45 p..

8.50 a.m.

House No. 14, Jubilee Street,..

House No. 153, Second Street,

""

}}

14

#

">

lintel.

Chimucy on fire,

Carelessness with joss sticks.

Chimney on fire,

Flaring up of a kerosine lamp,.

Blinds caught fir

Carelessness with a lighted candle, Chimney on fire,

Smoking near dry grass.

Wooden hood of cook house chimney caught fire.

Capsizing of boiling tar on the roof. Arson,

Overheated flue set fire to the beams,. Burning of joss paper ignited a mosquito

curtain.

""

House No. 104, Queen's Road East,

""

House No. 30, Stanley Street,

"}

House No. 11, Wellington Street,

>>

On the hills between Tai Tam Tuk and Sheko, Stag Hotel, Queen's Road Central,.

Grass on fire,.

""

$1.50

14

6

"

11 p.m.

Fuk Tsun Heung Village,

Trifling

15

IS

1.30 p.m.

House No. 131, First Street,

16

May

4

10.50 p.m.

House No. 41, Third Street,

""

17

19

3.50 a.in.

House No. 1, Sun Wai Lane,

>>

18

19

9.45 a.m.

Praya West,

19

20

21

21

1.45 a.m.

وو

20

26

11 a.m.

House No. 231, Queen's Road Central,

Kellett's Bungalow,

""

30

1.30 p.m.

House No. 4, Kan Ü Fong,.....

$60

Trifling

22

31

23

31

6.30 p.m.

7.15 p.a.

House No. 79, Praya East,

House No. 64, Wellington Street,

$30

34

June

6

25

11

"

26

25

גי

28

Aug. 10

30

11

27 July 4

29 Sept.

7.45 p.m.

3.30 p.m.

9 p.m

House No. 16, Pokfulam Road,

House No. 54, Wellington Street, House No. 91, Queen's Road West,

6 p.m.

On deck of S.S. Benalder,

9 p.n.

House No. 31, Graham Street,

دو

4.45 p.m.

9.20 pun.

House No. 22, Upper Lascar Row,

House No. 1, On Ning Lane,

31

32

25

28

4 a.m.

House No. 24, West Street,

$2

House No. 122, Queen's Road Central,

33

28

"

I p.m.

On the hill near the Military Barracks at Stanley,.

34

Oct.

8 a.m.

House No. 32, Nullah Lane,

$10

35

8

5 p.m.

House No. 22 Upper Lascar Row,

...

Chimney on fire.

Some wood caught fire,

Extinguished by Fire Brigade.

Put out by Police and occupants.

About 150 acres of grass and shrub burnt. Put out by Firemen.

Extinguished by the Police and inhabitants. Extinguished by Firemen from No. 7 Station.

The accountant of the shop was convicted of arson and sentenced to 5 years' hard labour. Extinguished by the Servants and Police. Extinguished by the occupants and Firemen from No. 5 Station.

Extinguished by the Godown Keeper.

Ignition of curtain from a kerosine lamp,. Put out by occupants assisted by Police.

Upsetting of a kerosine lamp.

Do.

Attempted arson,

Spontaneous combustion of sulphuric acid. Falling of a lamp, -

Chimney on fire.

A man was seen attempting to set fire to the house, but escaped over the roof.

Extinguished by Sergt. McLennan. Put out by occupants and Firemen,

Spontaneous combustion of coke stored | Put out by Firemen from No. 7 Station,

Carelessness with joss sticks,

before cooling.

Chimney on fire,

Grass on fire,

Overheated flue set fire to the beams,

Extinguished by inmates and Sergeant Collett. Extinguished by occupants.

A few trees damaged.

Insured with the China Fire Insurance Coy. for $3,500.

No. DATE.

TIME.

INCIPIENT FIRES DURING THE YEAR 1897,—Continued.

SITUATION OF FIRE.

36

37

38

39

888998

Oct. 14

18

""

1.36 p.m.

12.30 a.m.

House No. 94, Queen's Road West, House No. 58, Lower Lascar Row,.

22

24

1 a.m.

House No. 8, Praya Central, Matshed at Jardine's Gardens,

"

==

House No. 4, West Street,

House No. 5, Centre Street,

ESTIMATED

DAMAGE.

CAUSE.

REMARKS.

Accidental ignition of gas.

Mosquito curtain set on fire by an inmate

who was drunk.

Chimney on fire.

$1.00

...

$75.00

:

$5

Attempted arson, .....

Cook house accidentally caught fire.

A quantity of firewood in the cook house caught fire.

Overheating of a smoke stack, Chimuey on fire,

A wooden shed on the roof caught fire, Flooring of cook house caught fire,. Chimney on fire,

Overheating of cook house fiue, Chimney on fire,

Overheated flue set fire to a beam.

A pile of wood stacked caught fire, Some tea lying on the floor for drying caught fire.

Chimney on fire,

The roof a wooden structure caught fire, Some old clothing caught fire,..

Grass on fire,..

Some baskets caught fire,...

Chimney on fire,

$384.50

Two mats saturated with keresine were found in front of the shed. A woman was charged with arson and was acquitted at the Supreme Court.

Insured with Messrs. Bradley & Co. for $3,000. Extinguished by Police.

Do.

Extinguished by the occupants. Extinguished by Police.

Extinguished by Police and occupants. Insured with Meyer & Co. for $12,500. Extinguished by Police and occupants. Do.

Extinguished by the Fire Brigade. Put out by Police and occupants.

Put out by Police.

Put out by occupants.

Do.

Extinguished by Police and occupants. Extinguished by Police assisted by Coolies. Extinguished by occupants.

40

77

41

25

25

>>

11.30 p.m.

42

Nov.

43

>>

44

12

59

45

15

3325

6.50 p.m.

Stoke's Bungalow West,

7 p.m.

4 a.m.

House No. 123, Wellington Street,

House No. 122, Winglok Street,....

8

>>

pon.

House No. 46, Stanley Street,

46

21

House No. 171, Queen's. Road Central,

17

21

وو

10 p.m.

House No. 42, Praya West,

$50

49

23

2.24 a.m.

House No. 12, West Street,

49

23

>>

12 p.m.

House No. 46, Stanley Street,

50

25

1.50 a.m.

Reclamation ground near Sai Ying Pun Nullah,

$100

>>

51

25

House No. 103, Queen's Road Central,

52

26

House No. 135, Wellington Street,

وو

53

30

11.15 a.m.

House No. II, Stanley Village,

54

Dee.

7

55

16

56

19

57

20

A

10 p.m.

11 a.m.

9.37 p..

House No. 23, West Street,. Hillside at Wong Ma Kok, House No. 78, Winglok Street,

House No. 12, Jervois Street,.

F. H. MAY,

Superintendent of Fire Brigade.

143

HONGKONG.

No.

REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF VICTORIA GAOL FOR 1897.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government.

:79

4

98

VICTORIA GAOL, HONGKONG, 31st January, 1898.

SIR-I have the honour to submit for the information of His Excellency the Governor the following report on the Victoria Gaol for the year 1897.

2. Mr. LETHBRIDGE had charge of the Gaol up to the 30th March, when he left the Colony and I assumed charge.

3. The number of prisoners admitted to the Gaol under sentence of the ordinary Courts was 4,711, besides 48 soldiers and sailors sentenced by Courts-Martial.

There were also 54 prisoners imprisoned for debt, and 263 in default of finding security, making a grand total of 5,076; of these 606 were old offenders.

4. The corresponding numbers for last year were:—

Convicted by ordinary Courts, 5,414; by Courts-Martial, 50; Debtors, 63; in default of

security, 55. Total for 1896, 5,582.

5. The daily average number of prisoners confined in the Gaol during the year was 462 as com- pared with 514 in 1896.

I attribute the decrease to the abolition of the Light and Pass regulations, and to the narrowing of the limits within which hawking is permitted in the vicinity of the markets in Victoria.

6. There were 2,619 reports made by the Prison Officers against prisoners for prison offences, compared with 3,887 in 1896, and 5,365 in the year 1895.

7. Discipline has been well maintained, and I am of opinion that the marked decrease is due to greater efficiency of supervision on the part of the Gaol Staff, and to a better appreciation of prison discipline on the part of the prisoners.

The reports during the year were dealt with as follows:---

One hundred and thirty-one cases were dismissed on the report, in the majority of instances,

of the Medical Officer. In 521 cases a caution was given, and

139 were punished with rice and water for 1 day.

254

116

""

""

91

2 days. 3

204 with solitary confinement and rice and water for 1 day.

231

263

30

48

>>

""

??

""

2 days. 3

""

5

19

31

"

""

7

17

""

80 bread and water for 1 day.

63

29

})

""

2 days. 3

37 solitary confinement on bread and water for 1 day.

26

31

9

"}

>>

""

>>

""

""

""

,,

2 days. 3

""

7

""

61 whippings by Superintendent. 13 Prisoners were twice whipped. The actual

number of prisoners whipped was therefore 48.

52 extra crank.

78

17 loss of marks.

shot and stone.

47 separate confinement.

60 to shot and stone.

59 to crank.

33 punishments awarded by the Superintendent and Justice of the Peace of.

Total,...1,967

which 8 were whippings.

80

8. The new rules and regulations for the Prison came into force on the 29th of March, and the power given under them to the Superintendent to award a maximum of 7 days' solitary confinement, and a maximum of 42 days' separate confinement upon full and penal or reduced penal diet in alternate weeks, has been exercised with marked effect.

9. There were 735 prisoners reported for refusing to labour during the year.

This offence in a prison filled principally with Chinese is a difficult one to deal with.

Since I have had charge of the Gaol I have only known one European who refused to labour. As a rule Europeans prefer to labour than to sit idle. Chinese prisoners on the other hand, with very few exceptions, would be content to sit in a cell from one year's end to another and do nothing.

This extreme apathy tends to induce to refusing to labour and undoubtedly accounts for the obstinacy with which Chinese prisoners will persist in refusing to labour.

I have found separate confinement on full and penal or reduced penal diet in alternate weeks the most efficacious punishment in obstinate cases of this extremely troublesome offence.

10. The number of prisoners reported for having tobacco during the year shows a further decrease. Three Indian Assistant Warders were dismissed during the last 9 months of the year for traffick- ing with prisoners, and since their dismissal the number of cases in which tobacco has been found on prisoners has materially decreased.

In November and December there were four such cases, but during those months there have been several free labourers at work in the Gaol.

11. I attach a return shewing details regarding all the whippings that were inflicted during the past year.

12. The profit in industrial labour during the year amounted to $2,620.08. The balance sheets for each industry are shown in enclosure E.

13. The report from the Gaol Medical Officer shows 4 deaths from natural causes, and 2 cases of suicide during the year.

The sanitary condition of the Gaol is good.

14. A modern apparatus has been constructed for the carrying out of executions.

15. A new fire main, with 3 hydrants, has been laid within the Prison walls, and a complete new set of fire-extinguishing appliances has also been supplied.

16. On the 22nd November a commencement was made in carrying out the improvements in the Gaol originally suggested by my predecessor in C.S.O. 1937 together with some additions in the matter of separate cells recommended by myself.

The principal of the suggested improvements within the Gaol were the increase of yard space by the demolition of D wing; the subdivision of a number of association cells into separate cells; and the extension of the female prison.

D wing has already been pulled down and, with the materials removed from it, 89 association cells are being rapidly converted into separate cells. Almost the whole of the labour is supplied by prisoners. The work is therefore being carried out at very small cost.

There were formerly in the Prison 248 separate cells and 115 association cells.

Within the next 6 months when the subdivision now in progress will be completed, there will be 427 separate cells, and 26 association cells, which will afford accommodation for 453 prisoners in separate confinement. In cases of necessity 104 extra prisoners can be accommodated by putting 5 prisoners in each association cell, making the total capacity of the Prison 557.

With 427 separate cells it will be possible in all ordinary times to locate every convicted criminal prisoner in a separate cell. This Prison will then be in as satisfactory a condition as it seems possible to render it on the present site.

17. The conduct of the Gaol Staff has been, on the whole, very good. I have already stated in paragraph 5 that the record of prison offences for the year gives evidence of increased efficiency in supervision.

Great credit is due to the Chief Warder for this result, to which the Principal Warders also have contributed materially by the example they have shown of tact and discretion in dealing with prisoners, and by the steady enforcement of discipline.

18. During the year 11 European Warders have been engaged locally. They have been drawn from H. M.'s Naval and Military Forces and have given satisfaction.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your obedient Servant,

The Honourable

THE COLONIAL SECRETARY.

F. H. MAY,

Superintendent.

(A.)

VICTORIA GAOL.

Return of Reports for talking, idling, short oakum picking, &c., in the years 1894, 1895, 1896 and 1897.

MONTH.

1894. Daily average number in Prison, 455.

1895. Daily average number

in Prison, 472.

81

1896.

1897.

Daily average number | Daily average number

in Prison, 514.

in Prison, 462.

January,

February,

March,

April,

122

301

214

200

166

314

209

161

209

223

249

147

180

236

257

154

May, June, July, August,

September,

223

295

270

191

179

311

261

166

211

447

191

142

187

374

192

159

410

346

213

132

October,

441

309

174

160

November,

363

273

174

151

December,

205

225

188

140

Total,

2,896

3,654

2,592

1,903

(B.)

Return of Offences reported of Prisoners fighting with or assaulting each other, or Officers, for the years 1894, 1895, 1896 and 1897.

MONTH.

1894.

1895.

in Prison, 472.

1896.

Daily average number Daily average number Daily average number

in Prison, 455.

in Prison, 514.

1897.

Daily average number in Prison, 462.

January,

6

Nil.

4

February,

March,

April,

19

5

1

1

12

3

4

3

12

2

May,

June,

12

12

1

16

July,

4

August,

September,

3

October,

7

10

November,

5

December,

7

+69203 co

4

1

2

4

2

2

4

1

3

8

Total,.

95

.69

28

34

(C.)

Return of Offences of Prisoners having Tobacco for the years 1894, 1895, 1896 and 1897.

1894.

MONTH.

1895. Daily average number Daily average number

in Prison, 455.

in Prison, 472.

1896.

1897. Daily average number Daily average number

in Prison, 514.

in Prison, 462.

January,

18

February,

18

15

2

1

March,

13

11

4

April,

10

17

1

May,

7

3

1

June,

11

11

1

July,

10

3

August,

10

6

September,.

8

20

October,

12

15

November,

6

4

December,

3

Q 10 6 00 00 10

2

6

6

8

5

O-347D20-122

Total,

117

126

42

30

82

(D.)

Comparative Return of Prisoners confined in Victoria Gaol on the 31st December, for the years 1894, 1895, 1896 and 1897.

CONVICTION.

1894.

1895.

1896.

1897.

1st,

2nd,

3rd,

4th,

5th,

6th,

366

340

444

321

63

54

60

56

21

21

23

27

12

20

10

9

9

24

11

4

7

7th,

8th,

9th,

10 4 2 2

1

1

422

7

3 2

2

2

10th,

11th,

12th,

1

13th,

Total,............

488

472

568

430

Dr.

(E.)

Abstract of Industrial Labour, Victoria Gaol, for the year 1897.

OAKUM.

Cr.

1897.

To Stock on hand, 1st January, 1897,. $ 640.80 1897.

By Oakum sold during the year,

""

Cost of Paper Stuff purchased

""

during the Year,

2,209.45

Stock on hand, 31st December,

1897,

$ 2,989.64

871.00

Profit,

1,010.39

Total,......

3,860.61

Total,.....$

3,860.64

COIR.

1897.

""

To Stock on hand, 1st January, 1897,. $ 191.31

Cost of Material purchased during

1897.

دو

By Matting, &c., sold during the year, $ 1,562.19

Articles made for Gaol use,

37.67

the year,..

1,029.13

Stock on hand, 31st December,

1897,

500.20

Profit,..

879.62

Total,..

.$

2,100.06

Total,.........$

2,100.06

NET-MAKING.

1897.

To Stock on hand, 1st January, 1897,. Cost of Material purchased during

1897.

the year,...

$ 78.92

Profit,......

67.98

Total,...$

146.90

By Nets and Nettings sold and re-

93

paired,

Stock on hand, 31st December,

1897,

$

145.00

1.90

Total,............$

146.90

;

i

...

TAILORING.

1897.

To Stock on hand, 1st January, 1897,. $ 1.81

Cost of Material purchased during

22

the year,......

Profit,....

1,283.94

53.70

Total,...... ...$

1,339.45

1897.

To Stock on hand, 1st January, 1897,. Cost of Material purchased during

""

the year,..

$

83

1897.

By Articles sold and repaired,

$

""

Work done for Gaol,...

46.67 1,290.50

Stock on haud, 31st December,

1897,

2.28

PRINTING.

1897.

13.65

87.55

Profit,

Total,.....

101.20

Total,...... ...$

1,339.45

By Printing done for outside,.. Printing done for Gael,

دو

$ 2.95 98.05

""

Stock on hand, 31st December,

1897,

.20

BOOK-BINDING.

Total,......

101.20

1897.

To Stock on hand, 1st January, 1897,. $

2.30

1897.

"

Cost of Material purchased during

By Book-binding and repairing done

for outside,....

$

29.65

the year,...

35.05

""

Book-binding and repairing done

for Gaol,

36.00

Profit,....

33.10

""

Stock on hand, 31st December,

1897,

4.80

Total,.......

70.45

Total,...$

70.45

SHOE-MAKING.

1897.

""

To Stock on hand, 1st January, 1897,. Cost of Material purchased during

1.70

1897.

By Articles sold and repaired during

the year,..

the year,..

24.74

Work done for Gaol,.

""

35

Profit,

9.24

Stock on hand, 31st December,

1897,

- 2.15

31.25

2.28

Total,............$

35.68

Total,............$

35.68

WASHING.

1897. To Stock on hand, 1st January, 1897,. $ 28.57

,, Cost of Material purchased during

1897.

By Washing done for which cash $

was received,...

1.00

the year,...

605.59

Washing done for Prison Officers

276.61

at 1 cent per piece,

Profit,...

412.79

Washing Prisoner's Clothing at

752.34

""

1 cent per piece,

Stock on hand, 31st December,

17.00

Total,......

1,046.95

1897,

Total,.......

..

1,046.95

84

GRASS MATTING.

By Matting, &c. sold during the year, Matting made for Gaol use,..........

11

"J

Stock on hand, 31st December,

1897,

1897.

To Stock on hand, 1st January, 1897,. $ 1.35 1897.

Cost of Material purchased during

99

the year,...

35.57

Profit,......

8.90

Total,.......

45.82

To Stock on hand, 1st January, 1897,. Cost of Material purchased during

1897.

"

RATTAN.

1897.

68.86

10.44

year,

$

Profit,

Total,......

79.30

TIN-SMITHING.

1.96 42.90

.96

Total,.......

45.82

By Articles sold during the year,

Articles made for Gaol use,

""

Stock on hand, 31st December,

1897,

$3

73.25

6.05

Total,...

..$

79.30

1897.

>>

To Stock on hand, 1st January, 1897,. Cost of Material purchased during

2.77

1897.

By Work done for outside,.

3.44

Work done for Gaol,.

58.37

the year,.......

59.94

""

Stock on hand, 31st December,

1897,

9.05

Profit,.

8.15

Total,...........$

70.86

Total,......

70.86

CARPENTERING.

1897.

93

To Stock on hand, 1st January, 1897,. Cost of Material purchased during

3.53 1897.

the year,.......

116.49

Profit,........

38.22

Total,............$

158.24

1897.

Oakum, Coir,

Net-making, Tailoring,.

Printing,

Book-binding,

Shoe-making,

Washing,

Grass Matting,

Rattan Work,

Tin-smithing,

Carpentering,

By Articles sold and repaired during

the year,...

Work done for Gaol,................. Stock on hand, 31st December,

1897,

RECAPITULATION.

$

18.50

133.18

6.56

Total,............$

153.24

$1,010.39 879.62 67.98

1897. By Surplus,

$ 2,620.08

53.70

87.55

33.10

9.24

412.79

8.90

10.44

8.15

38.22

Total,...$ 2,620.08

Total,........

$

2,620.08

i

1

AVERAGE

NUMBER

OFFENCES FOR WHICH FLOGGINGS WERE INFLICTED.

RETURN OF FLOGGINGS IN THE GAOL DURING THE YEAR 1897.

NUMBER OF PRISONERS FLOGGED MORE THAN ONCE

NUMBER OF FLOGGINGS

OF 6, 9, 12, 15, 18, & 20 STROKES.

Refusing to

Number of floggings ordered by

Superintendent alone.

Number of floggings ordered by

Supt. and Visiting Justices.

Number of floggings ordered by

Judge.

Number of floggings ordered by

Magistrate.

Total No. of floggings.

OF

By

DATE.

PRISONERS

IN

GAOL.

and

Visiting

Justices.

By Superin- By tendent Superin-

tendent.

By

Judge.

Magis- Total.

trate.

January,

541

1

February,.

471

March,

489

:.

:

:

:

6

426

2

438

:

432

2

442

432

:

:

:.

432

2

TOTAL,.

431

:..

1

...

:

1

1

3

3

2

T

13

N

...

1

:

6

12

10

5

12

2

4

N

:.

:..

T

14

16

...

:

4

4

*

6

9

6

10

Personal violence to a

fellow-prisoner.

Using threatening lan-

guage to an officer,

truction of prison pro- Wilful and malicious des-

perty.

Creating a

disturbance

when under punishment.

Attempting to commit

suicide.

quiring to be suppressed by extraordinary means.

Acts of insubordination re-

Four times.

More than four

times.

Labour.

Personal violence to an

officer.

Three times.

12 15 18 20

9 | 8

7

2

-

19 4

6

18

4

...

:

5

7

17

6

2

16

+

:

-

2

3

1

3

7

15

:

3

4

...

11

...

28

61

:

I

5

5

9

:

1

I

:

:.

3

1

3

I

1

14

3

లు

1

:

.5 12

2

8

:

12

6

7

00

8

71

1 1

:

T

2

to

4

:

3

2

2 3

1

I

1

2 2

2

...

1

:

...

:

:

11

:

10

5

-

141 23 22

3

4

F:

-

:.

2

1

4

1

1

1

3

1

2

1

119

65 11

17

6 14

:

:

12

1

:.

:..

6

9

1

:.

1

2

14

4

1

85

HONGKONG. No. 198.

SIR,

69

No. 2

98

HONGKONG.

FURTHER PAPERS RESPECTING THE PROPOSED

NEW GOVERNMENT OFFICES.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor.

(Secretary of State to Governor.)

DOWNING STREET,

9th October, 1897.

I have the honour to forward, for your consideration, the enclosed copy of a Report by the Consulting Architects on the plans of the proposed new Government Buildings at Hongkong.

2. In view of this Report I consider that the general arrangement of the buildings should be further carefully considered by you, and if you are prepared to recommend the adoption of the suggestions of Messrs. WEBB & BELL, I request that you will send home revised outline or sketch plans to be again referred to the Consulting Architects.

3. These plans should show clearly the general arrangements proposed, but need not give details or be highly finished up; the details can be proceeded with, when the further Report from the Consulting Architects is received.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient, humble Servant,

&C.,

Governor Sir W. ROBINSON, G.C.M.G.,

&c.,

&c.

SELBORNE,

for the Secretary of State.

GENTLEMEN,

(Messrs. Aston Webb & E. Ingress Bell to Crown Agents.)

19, QUEEN ANNE'S GATE, WESTMINSTER S.W., September 15, 1897.

Hongkong--Plans for Government Buildings--Reqn. 2642.

Having carefully considered the matter and after two interviews with Mr. GALE, we beg to report as follows:-

We are of opinion that the best method of providing a secure foundation for the buildings is by piling with hard wood piles as proposed. But we would urge that instead of grouping the piles under each column, they should be placed at equal distances along the frontage, that their heads should be connected by a grillage in the usual way, and that the Portland cement concrete laid thereon should be continuous. By this construction there would be less likelihood of a dislocation of the entablatures of the colonnade, by the subsidence of any individual point of support.

With reference to the question of cost, we are of opinion that a less costly style of building cannot properly be adopted considering the uses and importance of the buildings. Granite is the local, and, indeed, almost the only available, inaterial, and as the cost of granite, worked and set, is in Hongkong only the price of Bath stone in England, we do not think its use, for the proposed Government buildings, in any way extravagant.

We

may as well say here that we have had a careful detailed estimate prepared and priced in accordance with the Government schedule in local use; although the cost appears an astonishingly low one, for buildings of this character, our inquiries have all tended to confirm the official estimate.

70

With reference to the plans under consideration, we think it right to say that considering the difficulties of the site and area, under which they have been pre- pared, great ingenuity has been shown in meeting the requirements as far as possible, but we cannot consider them an altogether satisfactory solution of the problem.

The order of procedure in the Law Courts in Hongkong does not differ in essentials from that which obtains in England, and the provisions requisite for the orderly and convenient working of the establishment are, generally speaking, the same. There should be a Central Hall, large, lofty, well-lighted and well- ventilated, for the use of the general public having business with the Courts. and to which the public should be almost entirely restricted. From this Hall, direct access should be had to each Court through intervening lobbies. There should be at least two Waiting Rooms for Witnesses immediately wanted. There should be a "Bar" corridor and Reading Room which would be limited to the use of the Bar or, at most, shared by the Judges. There should be a Solicitors' Corridor, with suitable consultation rooms which are most desirable for use in the intervals of the sitting of the Courts. There should be a Prisoners' Entrance, and Detention Rooms, whither they could be directly brought for trial, and whence they could reach, by a special route, the steps leading immediately to the Dock, and by which they could also be removed after sentence.

The Judges and the Bar should have equally distinct entrance and exit, from the purlieus of the Courts. The several accessories should be arranged for the particular use of Judge, Bar, Jury, Witnesses and Public, and placed accordingly. We submit that, in respect of some of the above points, the plans, as they stand, are defective and in others deficient.

We are given to understand that the Registrar's Department and the space allotted to the Bailiffs and Interpreters are necessarily placed on the Ground Floor of the Court block and that the area allotted to them cannot be reduced. This being so we can only come to the conclusion, that the area of Plot No. 1 is in- sufficient for the proper housing of the legal offices. A glance at the plan will show that the arrangements are already somewhat congested and that there is no adequate space available for the proper disposition of the necessary rooms as above indicated, and would render any future extensión impossible.

Plot No. 2 is, on the other hand