Sessional Papers - 1897

PAPERS LAID BEFORE THE LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL OF HONGKONG 1897

Table of Contents

1. Administration of the Colony

Statement of Cost of, During 1895-96

2. Assessment

Report for 1897-98

3. Botanical and afforestation

Statement of Disbursements for forestry Works

4. Botanical and afforestation

Report for 1896

5. Bubonic Plague

Report on

6. Census

Report on the, for 1897

7. Criminal Statistics

For 1896

8. Defence Works (Hongkong)

Despatch Respecting

9. Education

Reports for 1896

10. Enteric Fever

Report on Certain Cases of

11. Finance Committee

Reports of Proceedings for 1897

12. Financial Returns

For 1896

13. Fire Brigade

Report for 1896

14. Gaol

Report for 1896

15. Government Balances

General instructions Regarding

16. Harbours Master's Report

For 1896

17. Law Committee

Report of Proceedings for 1897

18. Legislative Council

Minutes of Proceedings for 1897

19. Light Dues

Papers on the Subject of

20. Loans

Statements of 1887 and 1894

21. Medical Department

Report for 1896

22. Observatory

Report for 1896

23. Po Leung Kuk

Report for 1896

24. Police

Report for 1896

25. Post office

Report for 1896

26. Praya Reclamation

Report on the, Works for the First Half-Year 1897

27. Public Works

Report for 1896

28. Public Works

Report on the Progress of Public Works During the First Half-Year 1897

29. Public Works Committee

Reports of Proceedings for 1897

30. Registrar General's Report

For 1896

31. Salaries

Correspondence Respecting the, of officers Employed in the Public Service

32. Salaries, increase of

Report of the Committee on

33. Sanitary

Report for 1896

34. Sterling Payments

Return Shewing, from 1890-96

35. Volunteer Corps (Hongkong)

Reports on the, for Season 1896-97

36. Water account

Statement of, for 1896 (Amended)

37. Water account

Statement of, for 1896

38. Widows & Orphans' Fund

Report on the, for 1896

 

337

No. 23

97

HONGKONG.

STATEMENTS SHEWING COST OF ADMINISTRATION OF THE

COLONY DURING 1895 AND 1896.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor.

QUESTION.-In view of Your Excellency having received several applications for an increase of salary from officers in the service of the Government and your proposal to refer these to a Committee for consideration and report, will the Government lay upon the table a statement shewing the total cost of or expenditure on the administration of the Government, including pensions, exchange compensation, and all other allowances, during the years 1895 and 1896 separately?

ANSWER.

COST OF ADMINISTRATION DURING 1895 AND 1896.

DEPARTMENT.

Governor and Legislature,

Colonial Secretary,

Audit,

Treasury,

Public Works,

Post Office.........

Registrar General,

Harbour Master,

Lighthouses, ..

Observatory,

Stamp Office,................

Botanical and Afforestation,

Legal,...

Ecclesiastical,

Education,

Medical,

Magistracy,

Police,.........

Gaols,

Fire Brigade,....

Sanitary,

....་ ་་་ ་ -----

Salaries.

1895.

1896.

PERSONAL EMOLUMENTS.

Increase. Decrease. Personal Allowance. Increase. Decrease.

1895.

1896.

38,875,92 37,581.01

29,092.33 24,556.61

1,294.91

4,535,72

360.00

360.00

4,883.98 0,522.48 1,638.50

:.

25,386.70 22,740.32

2,646.38

120,00

77,643.99 78,979.93

1,335.94

...

480.00

480.00

28,563.5439,910.15 | 11,346.61

480.00

480.00

15,776.08 | 12,701.29

3,074.79 120.00

120.00

49,856.29 47,499.11

2,357.18 993.00 996.00

10,286.27 10,030.26

:

256.01

:

10,438.39 | 10,495.22

56.93

3,441.13

3,312.00

129.13

320.00

8,672.83 8,763.90

73,733.51 75,697,49

91.07

372.00

372.00

1,963.98

...

2,392.00

1,760.00

29,308.48 | 44,320.84 | 15,012.36

46,877.95

51,828.78

4,950.83

20,101.95 21,409.34 1,307.39

157,265.91 159,341.12 2,075.21

23.81

35,156.5935,185.40

13,531.27 11,958.00

38,058.62 38,052.16

:

660.00

300.00

600.00

600,00

264.00

1,573.27

6.46

$716,951.73 740,885.41 | 39,807.53 | 15,873.85

:..

264.00

:

:

:

:

:

120.00

320.00

632.00

360.00

7,164.00 5,732.00

1,432.00

COST OF ADMINISTRATION DURING 1895 AND 1896.

338

EXCHANGE COMPENSATION.

OTHER CHARGES.

PENSIONS.

DEPARTMENT.

1895.

1896.

Increase.

Decrease.

1895.

1896.

Increase.

Decrease.

1895.

1896.

Increase.

Decrease.

$

$

$

**

*

Governor and Legislature,

7,608.54

6,879.95

Colonial Secretary,

5,477.52

2,823.80

Audit,

Treasury,

617.37

1,158.40

Public Works,.

18,953.40

8,343.84

...

Post Office,

1,530,21

672.48

Registrar General,

2,958.79

1,558.37

Harbour Master,

9,199.98

5,020,39

Lighthouses,

Observatory,

1,959.69

1,490.83

. Stamp Office,

Botanical and Afforestation,

1,050.01

793.56

Legal,

12,835,22

7,480.20

Ecclesiastical,

Education,

7,982.91

4,237.59

Medical,

7,171.68

5,413.65

Magistracy,

2,368.27

1,083.23

Police.

24,864.26

15,455.70

Gaols,

8,341.05

4,578.53

Fire Brigade,

962.31

208.50

Sanitary,

5,497.64

3,170.88

Civil Pensioners,.......

Police Pensioners,

728.59

5,177.44

5,901.18

723.74

2,653.72

3,933.06

3,758.10

174.96

3,794.91

3,775.66

...

19,25

541.03

698.31

1,476.83

10,639,56

7,323.67

6,234.17

÷

:

:

:

:

:

:

857.73

165,196.73

147,891.02

1,400.42

1,203.33

1,107.81

:

:

778.49

1,089.50

17,305.71

95.52

:

:

:

:

:

:

་་་

***

17,403.95

13,840.90

3,563.05

4,179.59

5,277.07

3,641.87

1,635.20

468.86

2,995.16

2,194.99

800.17

266.27

256,50

9.77

...

256,45

8,302.00

10,647.94

2,345.94

5,355.02

2,629.32

3,155.01

525.69

1,830.00

1,815.00

15.00

3,745.32

30,171.76

31,880.92

1,709.16

1,758.03

26,813.67

57,334.41

30,520.74

1,285.04

1,311.17

1,344.93

83.76

:..

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

9,408.56

60,185,63

60,436.11

250.48

:.

8,762,52

15,705.07

24,176.73

8,471.66

753.81

3,638.03

18,997.48

15,359.45

:

2,326.76

46,023.48

56,766.29

10,742.81

78,465.83

90,181.37

11,715,54

34,311.14

27,873.34

6,437.80

+

TOTAL,

119,408.85

70,369.90

541.03

49,579.98

409,880.06

456,633.85

71,461.92

24,708.13

112,776.97

118,054.71

11,715.54

6,437,80

Personal Emoluments,

Exchange Compensation,..

Other Charges,.

Pensions,

21st June, 1897.

COST OF ADMINISTRATION 1895 AND 1896.

$

>

1895.

1896.

339

$

724,115.73

746,617.41

119,408.85

70,369.90

409,880.06

456,633.85

112,776.97

118,054.71

1,366,181.61

1,391,675.87

T. SERCOMBE SMITH,

Treasurer.

HONGKONG.

REPORT ON THE ASSESSMENT FOR 1897-98.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor.

489 No. 27

ASSESSOR'S OFFICE, HONGKONG, 17th July, 1897.

97

SIR, I have the honour to submit my Report on the Assessment for the year 1897-98. 2. By Order of His Excellency the Governor in Council I have made a new Valuation of the City of Victoria and the Hill District.

*3. The result of the new Valuation is that the Rateable Value of the City of Victoria is now $3,444,514 as against $3,247,726 last year (1896-97), being an increase in Rateable Value of $196,788 or 6.05 per cent.

4. The Rateable Value of the Hill District has been raised from $107,850 last year (1896-97) to $117,435, being an increase of $9,585 or 8.88 per cent.

5. The Rateable Value of the Kowloon Peninsula has increased $8,130 or 2.55 per cent., on account of new and improved tenements; and, owing to a similar cause, there is a small increase of $254 in the Rateable Value of the Ilongkong Villages.

6. The Rateable Value of the whole Colony is now $4,040,502, an increase, as compared with last year's Assessment, of $214,757 or 5.61 per cent.

7. During the period from 1st July, 1896, to 1st June, 1897, Interim Valuations have been made. as follows:--

In the City of Victoria.

314 new tenements, rateable value...

41 improved tenements, rateable value Replacing Assessments, amounting to

95 Assessments cancelled, tenements pulled down...

Increase in City of Victoria.......

In the Rest of the Colony.

53 new tenements, rateable value....

6 improved tenements, rateable value

Replacing Assessments, amounting to

$ 119,465

...

...$ 26,745 21,725

5,020

$ 124,485 32,745

$ 91,740

$ 11,848

$ 1,680

909

771

$ 12,619 2,759

65 Assessments cancelled, tenements pulled down......

Increase in the Rest of the Colony......$ 9,860

The total number of tenements affected by Interim Assessments being 574 and the increase in Rateable Value $101,600.

8. The number of reported vacant tenements in the City of Victoria inspected under section 35 of the Rating Ordinance is, I am pleased to report, smaller, having averaged about 170 monthly against 250 last year.

9. The usual tabular statements giving comparisons of the Valuation for 1896-97 and the new Valuation for 1897-98 are attached.

10. The Staff has been unchanged; Mr. CH'AN PUI, clerk, and Mr. IP YUK PUI, interpreter, have discharged their duties to my satisfaction.

L

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

The Honourable

T. SERCOMBE SMITH,

Colonial Treasurer.

ARTHUR CHAPMAN,

Assessor.

490

No.

DISTRICT NAME.

Table A..

THE CITY OF VICTORIA.

VALUATION,

1896-97.

VALUATION, 1897-98.

INCREASE.

1

Kennedy Town,

39,635

46,925

-7,290

2

Shek Tong Tsui,.............

116,941

119,704

2,763

3

Sai Ying Pun,.

679,975

737,530

57,555

4

Tai Ping Shan,

279,660

285,115

5,455

5

Sheung Wan,

434,125

455,070

20,945

6

Chung Wan,

1,329,915

1,405,800

75,885

7.

Ha Wan,

143,160

148,910

5,750

8

Wan Tsai,

117,865

130,660

12,795

9

Bowrington,.

42,230

44,055

1,825

10

Soo Kon Poo,

64,220

70,745

6,525

$5

3,247,726

3,444,514

196,788

DISTRICT.

The Hill District,...

LOCALITY.

The City of Victoria,

Hongkong Villages and Hill District,

Kowloon Peninsula, ...

Table B.

THE HILL DISTRICT.

VALUATION,

1896-97.

VALUATION, 1897-98.

INCREASE.

PERCENTAGE,

$

$

$

107,850

117,435

9,585

8.88

Table C

THE COLONY OF HONGKONG.

€9

$

VALUATION, 1896-97.

VALUATION, 1897-98.

INCREASE.

PERCENTAGE.

$

$

%

3,247,726

3,444,514

196,788

6.05

259,693

269,532

9,839

3.78

318,326

326,456

8,130

2.55

,3,825,745

4,040,502

214,757

5.61

1

1

No.

109

3 97.

HONGKONG.

STATEMENT OF DISBURSEMENTS FOR FORESTRY WORKS IN THE YEARS 1898 AND 1899.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor.

Statement showing Disbursements for Forestry Works in the years 1898 and 1899, for which contracts have been already made, and those for which contracts now require to be made.

APPROVED BY LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL ON THE 2ND APRIL, 1896.

1. Rearing and Planting Trees in 1898,...

Contracts to be now made which require approval:-

2. Rearing Trees to be planted in 1899

3. Planting Trees in 1899, .....

To be disbursed in 1898.

C.

2,000.00

To be disbursed in 1899.

$

C.

900.00

1,100.00

2,000.00

2,000.00

The works under headings 2 and 3 now require the approval of the Legislative Council in order that the contracts for them may be made; those under heading 1 have already been sanctioned and are now in progress.

CHARLES FORD, Superintendent,

Botanical and Afforestation Department.

Hongkong, 30th January, 1897.

:

123

No.

HONGKONG.

REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF THE BOTANICAL AND AFFORESTATION DEPARTMENT FOR 1896.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of

His Excellency the Governor.

No. 7.

BOTANIC GARDENS, HONGKONG, 4th February, 1897.

SIR,—I have the honour to submit for the information of His Excellency the Governor the Annual Report on this Department for 1896.

STAFF.

1. The second clerk, Mr. CHAN WAI HING, retired on May 31st and was succeeded on June 22nd by Mr. CHAN TSUN UN after selection by competitive examination.

32

2. LUI ASZE, a foreman gardener, retired on pension on the 31st August at the age of 69 after years

faithful service in this department.

REVENUE.

3. The receipts continue to increase, being about 13 per cent greater than those of the preceding year. The income was:-

From Plant Sales,

""

Loan of Plants, Forestry Products,

$ 843.75 177.30 751.44

$1,772.49

BOTANIC GARDENS.

TYPHOON.

4. The typhoon which swept over the Colony on the 29th July was the severest experienced here since the disastrous one of 1874. The gardens suffered very greatly by the loss and injury of trees and shrubs, which, together with the losses in 1894 from successive typhoons of that year, left traces which will take many years to recover from. The plant houses and other structures received but a small amount of damage owing to timely and efficient precautions having been taken to secure movable parts in such a manner as secured their safety. Portions which were carried away were renewed in a more substantial manner. The glass-houses came out of the storm unscathed with the exception of a few pieces of glass broken by material falling on them.

Many trees and shrubs were completely stripped of their foliage, but new growths of branches and leaves were quickly made, and in some instances trees which flower usually only once a year produced a second crop of flowers on the new shoots.

LAWN CATERPILLARS.

5. These appeared again this year at about the usual time, but instead of using expensive liquids, which are troublesome in application, for the destruction of the pest I tried the experiment of daily rolling the grass, where the insects appeared, from about 3 P.M. until nightfall, that being the feeding time of the caterpillar. This was so far successful that very little injury was done to the lawn by the pest.

WORKMENS' Cottages.

6. The old buildings in Garden Road in which some of the workmen were housed, and in which tools, &c., were kept, were condemned early in the year and a new building was sanctioned; this is situated on a new site close to the old buildings and its construction is considerably advanced.

VEGETABLE Garden.

7. The sudden demand for building sites to the eastward of the Botanic Gardens led me to recommend the removal of the vegetable garden which has existed in connection with this department for about 30 years to the site adjoining that which was used as a storage ground for composts, manures, and garden refuse. The recommendation was approved, a contract was made for the work, and its execution nearly completed when I received instructions to abolish the vegetable garden and make other arrangements for the storage of manure, &c., so that the whole of the land might be vacated,

.

جمہ

124

A saving in the cost of some labour has been effected by the abolition of this garden but it will not be more than sufficient to defray the greatly increased cost of the transport of manure, and other new arrangements which have to be made for the gardens in consequence of the loss of this land.

ORCHIDS AND ORNAMENTAL PLANTS.

8. Those plants which are too tender to live or thrive through the cold and desiccated air of the winter season and the heavy rains and storms of the wet one, and which are housed, some during the whole and others during a part of the year, in glass-houses provided with artificial heat in winter continue to flourish, but many of them require larger and more suitable structures for their develop- ment and accommodation. The structures in use are situated in the nursery, which is the most convenient place for management and supervision, but the position is one rather inaccessible to visitors, and consequently not taken full advantage of by them. These structures are very suitable for the purposes they were designed for i.e., for the propagation and cultivation of plants in their early life, but artistic and roomy glass conservatories placed in an easily accessible part of the gardens and filled with natures' treasures would afford a delightful promenade, and would be a source of interest and instruction which would, no doubt, be much appreciated by visitors. The structures should be of such an artistic and imposing design that they themselves, as well as the plants within them, would be an attractive feature in the gardens. Their construction would be somewhat costly, but not beyond the means of the colony, and the outlay would probably meet with the general approval of the community.

year.

RAINFALL.

9. The rainfall for the year was 77.62 inches. The daily returns are given in Appendix A.

CORRESPONDENCE.

10. Requests from different parts of the world for information become more numerous year by The information sought is both scientific and economic in relation to the flora and vegetable products of China. The economic is chiefly for commercial purposes, the applicants being merchants and others in trade. Whenever possible the required information is given.

DISTRIBUTION AND INTERCHANGE OF PLANTS, &c.

11. The receipts were 231 plants, and 19 lbs. of seeds in 273 packages, and 5 animals. The chief donors were:

Acclimatizing Association. Southern California.

Bodinier, Rev. E.

Botanic Gardens, Adelaide.

Cundall, C. H., Manila.

Dammann & Co., Italy.

Department of Agriculture, U.S.A.

""

""

Bangalore.

Brisbane.

""

""

Demerara.

*

""

""

Grenada.

"}

"}

Imperial University, Tokio.

Jamaica.

"1

"}

"3

""

Royal, Calcutta.

Kew.

""

Trinidad.

""

"

>>

""

,,

""

Saharunpur. Sydney.

Dorabjee, Nowrojee.

Hanbury, Marquis, T., Italy. Hawkins, Mrs.

Hill, W., Brisbane.

Hodgins, Capt., S.S. Formosa.

Humphreys, J. D.

Koebele, A., Honolulu.

Lawrence. Bt., Sir Trevor. Leigh, R. K.

Romano, A. G.

Mueller, Sir F., Melbourne.

Walker, Capt., Hankow.

Bourne, F. S. A.

12. In Exchange 2,267 plants, and 9 lbs. seeds in 142 packages, were distributed. The principal recipients were:-

Acclimatizing Association, Southern California. Agricultural and Botanical Department, Sierra

Leone.

Barton, J.

Botanic Gardens, Brisbane.

Natal.

British Guiana.

""

""

Jamaica.

"}

"

Mauritius.

"

>>

""

>>

""

2)

""

""

Palermo, Sicily. Royal, Kew.

Tokio.

O'Brien, Sir G. T. M. Cundall, C. H., Manila.

Trinidad.

Doberck, Dr. W.

Government Civil Hospital.

Hanbury, Marquis T., Italy. Hanham, Major.

Hodgins, Captain.

Holdsworth, C.

Jordan, Dr.

Kowloon Customs.

Mannich, J., Formosa. Price, Hon. J. F., Madras. Richards, Mrs.

Scharff & Shorting, California. Veitch & Sons, J., London. Walker, Captain, A., Hankow.

:

125

2

PLANT SALES.

13. The receipts for plants sold were $843.75. The number of plants sold was 3,834, that is, 777 more than in 1895.

LOAN OF PLANTS.

14. The demand for the loan of plants for decoration was greater than in the preceding year. The receipts were $177 30, an increase of $49.30 over those of 1895. The number of plants lent was 3,434.

HERBARIUM AND LIBRARY.

15. A parcel containing 177 herbarium specimens was purchased from Japan.

16. 310 specimens were mounted and incorporated.

17. The Catalogue of books in the library which I mentioned in par. 16 of the last Report as being prepared has been printed.

18. The following is a list of books and pamphlets received:

Agricultural Bulletin of the Malay Peninsula,

Garden and Forest Department, Straits Settlements, 1896.

Agricultural Journal, Department of Agriculture of the Cape Colony, Nos. 1-5, 6-22, 24 and 25, 1896.

Agricultural Ledger, India No. 16 of 1894, Nos.

2, 8, 14, 15, 18, 19, 20 and 23 of 1895. Nos. 1-7, 9-10, 12-14, 18-20, 22, 24-28 of 1896. Botanical Magazine, 1896. Purchased. Bulletin (Brisbane) Department of Agriculture,

""

""

1896.

Department of Land Records and Agri- culture, North Western Provinces and Oudh, 1895. (Grenada) of Miscellaneous Inform-

ation, 1896.

(Jamaica) of Botanical Department,

1896.

(Kew) of Miscellaneous Information,

1896.

Koloniaal Museum te Haarlem Maart,

1896.

Mississippi Fungi, Agricultural and Mechanical College, Experiment Station, 1896.

Bulletin (Trinidad) of Miscellaneous Informa-

tion, 1895.

""

U.S. Department of Agriculture, Office

of Experiment Stations, 1896. Dissemination of Plants. By Mary E. Gilbraith,

1895.

Fauna of British India, 1895. Purchased. Flora of British India, By Sir J. D. Hooker, Part XXI, 1896. Presented by Kew. Flora Capensis. Systematic Description of the Plants of the Cape Colony, Caffraria, and Port Natal 1896. Purchased.

Flore Forestière de la Cochin Chine, Part 21.

From Royal Gardens, Kew. Gardeners' Chronicle, 1896. Purchased. Hand List of Coniferae Grown in the Royal

Gardens, Kew, 1896.

Hand List of Trees and shrubs Grown in Arbo-

retum. Part II. Royal Gardens, Kew.

Hooker's Icones Plantarum, Fourth series, Vol. V, Parts II and III, 1896. Presented by the Bentham Trustees.

Indian Forest Reports.

Forest Administration in Ajmere-Merwara, 1894-

"}

""

})

""

* A

1)

95.

in Andamans, 1894-95.

in Baluchistan, 1894-95.

in Bombay Presidency in-

cluding Sind, 1895.

in Burma, 1894-95.

Forest Administration in Hyderabad Assigned

""

""

"1

}}

>>

19

in Central Provinces, 1894-

95.

in Coorg, 1894-95.

and Forest Survey Branch in India, 1894-1895.

Journal of the Board of Agriculture, India,

Vol. III, Nos. 1 and 2 of 1896.

Journal of Botany, 1896. Purchased. Map of China. To illustrate the Author's "His-

tory of Botanical Discoveries in China By E. Bretschneider, 1896.

11

""

13

}}

District, 1894-95.

in Lower

Provinces of

Bengal, 1894-95.

in N.W. Provinces and

Oudh, 1895.

in Province of Assam,

1894-95.

Progress of the Imperial Forest School Dehra Dun, 1894-95.

Review of in India, 1893-

94.

Manual of Forestry (Schlich's) Vol. V. Forest

Utilization.

Manures and their Applications, London, 1895. Ministero Delle Finanze, Roma, 1895.

Pomologist, 1894. From U.S. Department of

Agriculture.

126

Reports of Botanic Gardens, &c.

Board of Trustees of the Public Museum of the

City of Milwaukee, 1894-95.

Botanic Gardens, Bangalore, 1894-95.

""

""

"

""

19

19

British Guiana, 1894-95. Durban, 1895.

and Forest Department, Straits

Settlements, 1895.

Grenada, 1895.

11

""

""

""

Missouri, 1896.

""

Natal, 1895.

""

""

"

Royal Calcutta, 1895-96. Station, Colony of Lagos, 1895.

Department of Agriculture, Brisbane, 1894-95.

Experiment Station. University of California,

for the year 1894-96.

Proceedings of the Agriculture Horticultural

Society of Madras, 1896.

Proceedings of Agriculture Horticultural of

Moulmein, 1896.

Progress and Condition of the Government Bota-

nical Garden, Saharanpur, 1896. Records, Experiment Station, U.S. Department

of Agriculture. Vol. VI, No. 12. Vol. VII, Nos. 5, 6, 8-11. Vol. VIII, No. 1, 1896. Secretary of Agriculture Nova Scotia, 1895. Transactions of the Queensland Acclimatisation

Society, 1896.

Wheat Growing and Agriculture Generally in Australia, New Zealand, and Tasmania, 1896.

.C..

FORESTRY.

PLANTING.

19. The Total number of trees of all kinds which were planted was 29,949. Plans were prepared for planting a larger number, but owing to the partial failure of some of the nurseries of the man who contracted to supply trees for planting the plans could not be completed.

20. A row of Camphor trees was planted along the side of the mountain road from Shaukiwan to Tytam Tuk. The length of this road is 3 miles.

21. Of the Japanese pine, Pinus Thunbergii, which succeeds better at higher and more exposed positions than where the ordinary pine thrives, about 2,000 were planted on the southern side of Wanchai Gap. About 1,000 of Pinus densiflora, another Japanese pine, was also planted in the same locality. Further supplies of the former were reared for planting this year.

.

22. An indigenous tree found in the Happy Valley and Little Hongkong woods which has furnished seeds for sowing during the last few years has been entered in the returns as Spondias Mangifera, which it was supposed to be both by others and myself who had seen the tree in fruit only. About 16 years ago I found the male flowers on a dioecious tree in the Happy Valley woods which were sufficient to create an interest in it as they showed it to be a tree not hitherto recorded. In the early part of last year I instituted a search for the female flowers of the same tree and was fortunate in discovering them for the first time on the tree which had been supposed to be Spondias Mangifera. These flowers proved that the tree was a species of Poupartia, a genus of which only two species were hitherto known, one of them in Mauritius and the other in Rodriguez. Complete specimens were sent to Kew for further examination and the tree was there named by Mr. HEMSLEY Poupartia Fordii. The fruit, which resembles the Hog Plum, is edible, and is sought for by the natives, but it is not very palatable to others. In the Little Hongkong woods the tree is very conspicuous in winter by reason of its leaves being deciduous and its exposed branches having a whitish appearance.

23. The planting statistics are given in Appendix B.

.

THINNING OF PLANTATIONS AND SALE OF PRODUCTS.

24. The total number of trees cut out was a little less than in the previous year, but the receipts for forestry products was about 14 per cent greater than in that year.

25. Appendix C gives the statistics.

PROTECTIVE SERVICE.

gross

26. Trees cut and stolen amounted to 467, not quite half those of the previous year. The number of convictions obtained by the forest guards was 70, and the amount of fines paid was $118.50, the highest being $25, and the lowest 50 cts., the latter being double the amount of the lowest fine in 1895.

FIRES.

27. There were only 17 fires compared with 51 in the previous year; 11,760 trees were destroyed by them; 11,660 being destroyed by one fire at Tytam Tuk on December 27th.

28. The great prevalence of fires at Tytam Tuk and its distance from any station which can render assistance in extinguishing fires led me to recommend the permanent stationing of forest guards at Tytam Tuk during the dry season and placing it in electric signalling communication with the Stanley Police Station, which His Excellency the Governor has approved, so that assistance can be more quickly brought to bear in extinguishing fires in that neighbourhood.

127

A

29. I have again to thank the Police for valuable assistance in extinguishing grass fires. 30. The statistics of grass fires are given in Appendix D.

TYPHOON.

very

31. The typhoon of July 29th destroyed many large trees in the streets and roads, and a great number of young trees on the hills were forced into prostrate positions which employed an average of 27 coolies per day until the 5th of November, about three months, to place them upright again. The cost of this work was $402.26.

The violence of the storm was so great that the leaves on pine trees on very exposed slopes and ridges were killed, and a great quantity of trees of as much as ten years old died from the loss of

their leaves.

CATERPILLARS.

32. This pest-Eutricha punctata-again appeared and operations for its destruction were carried on from February 27th to July 8th, during which time 15 tons 16 cwt. 2 qrs. of caterpillars were destroyed at a cost of $736.46.

The island of Hongkong was almost free of caterpillars, the pest having been driven back to the peninsula of Kowloon on the mainland. It appears likely that the continuance of caterpillars at Kowloon was partly caused by the flight of the moth from Chinese territory, where the Chinese take no steps for its destruction.

What few caterpillars, cocoons, &c., remained after operations were suspended on July 8th were apparently completely destroyed by the typhoon of July 29th, as I have not seen a single insect in any of its stages since that date. From this experience we may learn that the devastation wrought by violent storms has its good, as well as its bad, side.

I continued making observations on the destructive action of parasites on the eggs of the moth, larvæ, and pupæ, and found that the parasites-wasps and flies-were more abundant, especially on the

eggs, than in the previous year. The balance between the pest and its parasitic enemies seems to have been now restored and there appears a fair promise of the caterpillar not becoming epidemic again, at least during the present year.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

Honourable J. H. STEWART Lockhart,

&c.,

Colonial Secretary,

&c.,

&c.

CHARLES FORD, Superintendent,

Botanical and Afforestation

Department.

128

Appendix A.

RAINFALL OBSERVATION MADE AT THE BOTANIC Gardens, duRING 1896.

ABOUT 300 FEET ABOVE SEA LEVEL.

DATE.

Jan.

Feb. Mar. April. May.

June. July.

Aug.

Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec.

1,

2,

:..

:

2.13

.11

:

.:.

.41

.59

.01

.26

1.73

.28

:

.02

.64

..07

:

.27

3,

.29

:

***.

:

1.26

.11

.24

.02

1.57

4,

.47

.08

.13

.04

1.57

.59

.25

.06

...

.02

.02

5,

90

.06

.13

.26

.::..

.08

.07

.07

.58

:

...

:

6,

7,

8,

9,

...

.19

:.

...

:.

.66

1.27

1.12

2.93

.25

...

A

10,

11,

12,

.:.

:.

:

:

:

:

.04

.08

.71

...

3.92

...

.07

...

.07

.07

.04

.42

.23

.58

:

.41

.03

.18

2.67

.34

...

.07

.08

.08

:

2.61

1.02

.87

.25

.20

:

.32

1.41

.06

1.25

.03

.58

.13

.68

.84

.01

.40

...

:

.14

13,

90*

..16

.31

.02

14,

.02

.18

:

:

...

...

:

...

.02

.06

.04

...

:

:

:

....

...

...

:

...

:

***

15,

.69

.02

.12

.09

...

16,

.10

:

17,

.04

.08

.12

.26

18,

.92

19,

.04

20,

.01

:

:

.02

21,

......

22,

.06

.33

...

.06

.05

:.

23,

24,

1.09

.13

:

:

:

:

:

:

.01

.14

.21

.81

:

...

:.

.14

.02

.93

2.21

2.76

.74

.03

1.23

.06

.31

.18

...

:

.05

:

...

...

.22

:

...

25,

:.

.01

26,

27,

28,

29,

.46

4165

.55

.35

.37

:

:

:

:

.02

:

.08

.03

:

30,

.01.

31,

.01

:

:

:

.10

.09

4.15

.08

* .26

1.20.

.03

.09

.55

.41

.53

.43

:

.18

.89

.09

.03

.61 2.26

.07

.02

.46

.53

:

:.

:.

.54

1.56

.01

:

:

.08 2.68

:.

.10

:..

...

:

:

:

:

:

.02

...

...

...

:

...

...

:.

.:.

:

:

.:..

...

.12

.16

:

X...

:

...

.05

.42

...

.03

:

Total,...... 1.72

8.13 1.96 2.75

1.27

17.34 13.54 5.34 11.10

8.53 2.33

3.61

Total inches for the year 77.62. Observation made at 10

a.m.

CHARLES FORD, Superintendent,

Botanical & Afforestation Department.

Appendix B、

STATISTICS OF PLANTING OPERATIONS.

Cina-

Celtis

LOCALITY.

sinensis.

Pinus Pinus Massoni- Thum- ana. bergii.

Pinus

densi-

flora.

Biota Tristanea' mamum conferta. cam- chinensis. phora.

Liqui-

dambar

chinensis.

Liqui-

dambar

formo-

Pou- Cupres- partia. sus Fordii. pendula.

Albizzia

Lebbeck.

Bamboo.

sana.

Aberdeen New Road,.....

Aberdeen and Wanchai Road,

Aplichau,...

Bonham Road,

Bowen Road,

Causeway Bay,

Garden Road,

Government Civil Hospital,

Kowloon,.............

Kennedy Town,

Mount Davis,

Mount Kellet,.

Peak Roads,

Peak District,

Pokfoolam,

Richmond Road,..

Shaukiwau,..

Tytam Tuk, Wanchai Gap, Sookunpo,

...

...

...

13

12

228

1,748

9

2,020

...

...

11

...

...

659

68

183

1,162

458

1,065

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

290

16

47

316

316 7,380

...

2,102

1,988

...

1,359

1,974

954

1,843

655

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

Miscel- Area in laneous. acres.

Grand

Total of

Trees.

...

3

109

153

65

22

...

3

...

17

78

...

:::

122

927

47

...

10

47

287

281

902

...

25

228

1호

1,748

9

14

2,042

...

109

153

...

68

11

67

-ka

659

:

cok+of+

68

3,283

1,065

::

>

10

47

316

96

11,786

7,353

902

Total,...

316

8,739

1,974

954

4,209

9,873

458

290

16

334

81

423

2,156

126

244

29,949

''

CHARLES FORD,

Superintendent,

Botanical & Afforestation Department.

129

130

Aberdeen, Bowen Road, Bowrington, Mount Davis, Happy Valley, Mount Kellet,... Kowloon,.... Pokfoolam, Sookunpo,

Tree Prunings, Camphor Trees,

Tristanea Trees,.............

Date.

1896.

Appendix C.

SALE OF FORESTRY PRODUCTS.

PINE TREES.

Localities.

Quantities.

Amount realized.

cts.

1,539

55.50

597

36.22

112

25.86

176

2.03

159

24.22

6,995

89.68

292

16.09

25,182

389.25

35

8.30

35,087

647.15

226,176 catties.

93.29

50

6.00

100

5.00

Total Revenue for Forestry Products,..........

751.44

Appendix D.

STATISTICS OF GRASS FIRES.

January 2

Leighton Hill Road,

3

Kennedy Road,

4

Mount Davis,

27

Stanley,

.....

February 25 April

Sheko,

37

Between Sheko and Chaiwan,

Aberdeen,

""

""

Wongma Kok,

"

"J

Aberdeen,

24

39

May

5

November 9 17

"

December 10

16

""

23

""

"9

27

Wongneichung Gap,

Wongma Kok, Tytam Tuk,

""

Sheko,

Tytam Tuk,

Aberdeen,

Kowloon,

Localities.

CHARLES FORD,

Superintendent,

Botanical & Afforestation Department.

Number of

Fire.

1

1

1

1

1

Number of Trees destroyed.

30

1

...

1

12

1

...

1

1

1

10

1

...

1

1

1

1

23 25

1

11,660

17.

11,760

CHARLES FORD,

Superintendent,

Botanical & Afforestation Department,

2

289

No. 20

97

HONGKONG.

MEDICAL REPORT ON THE PREVALENCE OF BUBONIC PLAGUE IN THE COLONY OF HONGKONG DURING THE YEARS 1895 AND 1896.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of

His Excellency the Governor.

INTRODUCTORY.

Dr. Lowson, Acting Superintendent Government Civil Hospital, has described in his able Report dated 2nd March, 1895, the Epidemic of Bubonic Plague in 1894. I propose to deal only in this Report with the history of the disease in Ilongkong during the years 1895 and 1896.

At the outset I propose to briefly record such data as are obtainable from the records of this Department bearing on the subject and such other information obtained from various sources, which may be useful in tracing the origin and subsequent progress of the disease.

of

In view of the important practical questions that at the present time are engaging the attention many experts in Europe and India I propose in concluding this report to set forth such deductions as appear to me may be reasonably made from such data; my object being to concisely enumerate the more important facts to be observed in preventing the occurrence or restricting the spread of the disease.

HISTORICAL.

The History of The Plague in China and Hongkong during modern times will probably be best gathered from the following extracts from ALLBUTT'S System of Medicine, 1896, and Dr. RENNIE'S report on the Plague at Canton in 1894 contained in the Imperial Maritime Customs Medical Reports, 47th and 48th issues.

In order that the progress and route taken by the disease may be clearly traced I attach a plan of the locality showing the several places referred to.

Extract from Allbutt's System of Medicine.

"The first definitely known epidemic of Plague in Yunnan was about 1860; but it is believed to have existed there at least since 1850, and probably long before, as it has all the characters of an endemic disease. It is said to have recurred nearly every year up to 1893.

In Pakhoi it is also frequent, but was absent from 1884 to 1893. Some think the epidemics of Pakhoi were derived from Yunnan.

It is impossible to trace the derivation of the disease from any other district. must in some way have found its way to Canton, where it broke out in 1894.

From Pakhoi it

Dr. RENNIE of Canton thinks it passed by land, since in 1891 a severe epidemic occurred in the district of Kao-chao, lying to the north of Pakhoi; and in the spring of 1894 it prevailed in towns to the South of Canton. From Canton to Hongkong it was carried by numerous persons suffering from the disease, or in the stage of incubation.”

Extract from Dr. Rennie's Report.

Dr. RENNIE in his report states that: The starting-point was doubtless Yunnan, and thence it nost probably found its way to Pakhoi by one of the usual trade routes.

The great highway of commerce between Yunnan and Kwangtung is the West River, on which are situated one or two entrepôts of trade with Pakhoi and Lienchow, through which opium and other products of Yunnan are transmitted to these cities. Inquiry in official circles shows, however, that no outbreak of plague has been known at Nan-ning-fu, Wuchow-fu or other cities on the West River which we should expect to find if the disease had spread by this Channel. We feel, therefore, justified in excluding this route and limiting ourselves to the more probable supposition that it reached Pakhoi overland through Kwangsi or the borders of Tonkin. Chinese Authorities state that it reached Pakhoi from Tonkin, but it is known sporadically in the borders of Kwangsi, this latter source is more probable. From official sources we learn that in 1891 the disease broke out in Kao-chao, the prefecture adjoining Lienchow, in which Pakhoi is situated; it had evidently, according to the Chinese, spread northwards from the latter city. During the present spring (1894) the disease prevailed in other places between Kao-chao and Canten; the outbreak at Yang-chiang was especially severe, and no doubt other towns and villages suffered equally from the ravages of the plague in its march northwards.”

290

"If it came to Canton by sea, it is rather remarkable that Hongkong, which is nearer to, and in direct communication with, Pakhoi, should have been visited by an outbreak nearly two months later than Canton."

PREVALENCE OF PLAGUE IN HONGKONG, 1895.

After a period of six months since the last case in 1894, a case of Plague was reported on 28th April, 1895, at No. 91, Praya Central.

Two more cases were brought into Hospital on the next day, one from No. 27, Stone Nullah Lane, Wanchai and the other from No. 79, Queen's Road West.

These three cases were brought from premises in widely different parts of the city and no con- nection between them could be traced.

In May from the 6th to the 9th two cases, apparently sporadic, were reported in the Central portion of the city, one from No. 2, Pound Lane and the other from No. 4, Wing Lok Street, the latter being that of a Chinaman (male adult) who arrived from Canton evidently suffering from the disease at the time of his arrival.

In June from the 14th to the 30th thirteen cases were reported. Eight being from Heung Lane, three from Holland Street, Kennedy l'own, one found on board the Canton steamer on its arrival and one from No. 335, Queen's Road West.

Two of the above cases from Heung Lane occurred on the isolation boats amongst those persons removed or having been in contact with persons attacked with the disease at Nos. 10 and 12, Heung Lane. These persons were removed three days prior to their developing the disease.

In July from the 19th to the 24th two cases were reported, one being from the district of Tsim Tsa Tsui. British Kowloon, and the other from No. 63, Queen's Road West.

In August from the 8th to the 25th four cases were reported, two from Nos. 3 and 27, Tsung San Lane West, one from the Canton steamer and one from No. 28, Bridges Street.

In September from the 7th to the 16th three cases were reported, one from No. 4, l'ossession Street,

one from No. 55, Aberdeen Street, and one from No. 44, Second Street.

In November from the 6th to the 25th five cases were reported, one from No. 17, Chung Wo Lane, two from No. 43, Centre Street, one from No. 13, Rutter Street, and one from the Alice Memorial Hospital.

In December from the 5th to the 30th twelve cases were reported, four from Nos. 5, 64 and 66, First Street, one from No. 67, Second Street, one from No. 20, Third Street, one from No. 1, Rutter Street, one from No. 20, Burd Street, two from No. 29, Mosque Junction, one from No. 33 Upper Lascar Row, and one from No. 13, Old Bailey.

From the foregoing, it will be seen that:-

(a) The total number of cases reported was 44.

(b) The disease commenced at the end of April and was prevalent during the remain ler of

the year.

(c) In no month did it assume such proportions as to constitute an Epidemic.

(d) During the months of June and December the greatest number of cases occurred.

(e) With the exception of Heung Lane in no portion of the Colony did the disease obtain

any serious hold.

METEOROLOGICAL DATA.

On reference to appendix A it will be seen that :-

(a) The prevalence of exceptionally low rainfall preceded the outbreaks of plague in 1894

and 1895.

(b) The year 1895 in which cases occurred during the months of March to December inclusive was one of exceptionally low rainfall, the total being only 45.835 inches as against an average annual rainfall of about 91 inches.

(c) The months of maximum mean temperature in each of the years 1894 and 1895 were

followed by a material reduction in the number of cases.

(d) The number of hours of Sunshine during the months May to September, 1895, was

considerably greater than in 1894.

N

291

PROCEDURE ADOPTED WITH A VIEW TO PREVENTING THE SPREAD

OF PLAGUE DURING 1895.

After the terrible experience of 1894 a strict watch was kept with a view of detecting the first recurrence of the disease.

Temporary hospital accommolation and burial grounds were provided on the recommendation of a special committee of officials appointed by His Excellency the Governor to consider "what excep- tional measures should be taken to protect the Colony against the reappearance of the disease, or in the event of its reappearing to limit its ravages as far as possible," and arrangements were made for the removal of patients, and the isolation of those who had been in immediate contact with the disease, and also for the disinfection and cleansing of infected premises.

A daily medical examination of all cases admitted to the Tung Wa Hospital was maintained.

On the 7th of June the Acting Captain Superintendent of Police and the Assistant Secretary of the Sanitary Board were appointed a Committee to control the work involved in the house to house visitation, in the removal of cocklofts and illegal cubicles, and in the stopping of the illegal occupation of basements and in the controlling the occupation of common lodging houses. In appendix B. is given their Reports dated 7th June and 21st October, 1895.

Immediately on the receipt of information that this disease had reappeared the following proce- dure was adopted:-

(a) House to House visitation.-A daily visitation of all houses in Health Districts Nos. 1, 2, 4, 5, 6 and 7 was made by five sections of Police and Military (Rifle Brigade and Royal Engineers), a special watch being kept on Lodging houses and basements. occupied as dwellings.

The Section in No. 5, Health District received special instructions concerning the search of passengers arriving from Canton and Whampoa by the River Steamers.

The night steamers from Canton were regularly watched by a detachment of Police in charge of Detective Inspector QUINCEY.

(b) Medical Examination.-Suspicious cases at the Hospitals were daily examined by my- self at the Tung Wa and Government Civil Hospitals and on being declared to be plague were removed to the Isolation Hospital at Kennedy Town, situated at the extreme West of the City.

Any suspicious cases occurring at the houses which were found by the search parties were prior to their removal to the Isolation Hospital examined by Medical Officers appointed for that purpose.

(c) Removal of Sick Persons.-After having been declared plague the sufferers were removed direct to Kennedy Town Hospital in ambulances provided for the purpose by the Sanitary Board, these ambulances being kept at the different Hospitals and Police Stations.

The ambulances were disinfected with a solution of Carbolic Acid at Kennedy Town Hospital on the removal of each patient.

(d) Segregation.-Arrangements were made for the isolation of those who had been in immediate contact with the disease at the infected houses, on house boats moored in the Harbour to the North-East of Stonecutters' Island.

(e) Infected premises.-On the 30th April, 1895, the following neighbourhoods were declared

to be infected by bubonic plague, viz.:-

(1) The district of the City of Victoria which is bounded by Wantsai Road,

Queen's Road, Spring Garden Road and the Praya.

(2) The district in the City of Victoria which is bounded by Sutherland Street,

Queen's Road, Queen's Street and Praya.

(3) The district of the City of Victoria which is bounded by Jubilee Street,

Queen's Road, Cross Street and Praya.

Steps were taken to thoroughly disinfect the premises in which the cases were found, and to cleanse and remove as far as practicable all obstructions to light and air existing in these districts.

(f) The_maintenance of cleanliness throughout the City.--Special attention was paid to the cleansing and disinfection of all public latrines. To secure the proper disinfection of the night soil in the Public latrines, three soldiers were detailed to assist the Inspectors in charge of the Health Districts, 10,000 lbs. of chlorinated lime were expended for this purpose alone in the month ending 7th June. There was some reluctance on the part of the keepers to comply with this order but only in one instance was it necessary to have recourse to legal proceedings.

A

292

(g) Overcrowding-The provisions of the Public Health Ordinance of 1887 and of Ordi- nance 4 of 1895 were strictly and steadily enforced and upwards of 400 common lodging houses were registered.

(h) Mezzanine Floors and Cubicles.-Illegal cocklofts, mezzanine floors and back-yard obstructions were removed and the ground surface of over 700 tenements concreted under the provisions of Ordinance 15 of 1894.

With regard to Sanitary legislation during 1895, the following regulation and bye-laws came intą force:-

(1) Regulation of common lodging houses. The series of bye-laws which were drafted by the Sanitary Board in 1891 relating to this were approved by the Legislative Council and came into force on the 1st January of this year, they deal with the question of overcrowding and the maintenance of cleanliness and ventilation.

(2) Bye-laws for the compulsory reporting of infectious, contagious or communicable diseases.-These were approved by the Legislative Council on the 25th November, 1895, and came into force at the latter end of the year.

They are practically the same as the Infectious Diseases Notification Act of 1889 in England. The object being to obtain early and complete knowledge of all cases of notifiable disease an 1 informa- tion of the particular district in which they occur.

GENERAL SANITARY CONDITION OF THE COLONY.

Though much had been done since the epidemic of 1894 towards the improvement of the general Sanitary Condition of the Colony, there existed many crowded quarters traversed by narrow lanes.

In these quarters the houses were ill ventilated and lighted, the lanes being in many cases obstructed by Sunshades and other similar structures.

The houses were mostly "tenement houses," occupied by the poorer class, the rooms in many cases sub-divided by mezzanine floors and partitions, adding to the general insanitary condition of the circumstances attending the occupation of such premises.

The district known as the "Resumed Area" of Taipingshan was no longer occupied.

The free issue of clothing and other articles from the pawnbrokers' shops, which in this Colony are to a large extent the store houses of the middle and lower classes of the native population, was continued and no steps were taken to disinfect such goods before being issued.

During the year :--

(a) The enforcement of the lodging house bye-laws was commenced.-These met with strong

opposition and only 437 houses were registered.

(b) Water supply.-The work of raising the Embankment at Tytam Reservoir was completed

so as to admit of the storage of an additional 40 million gallons of water.

The constant system of water supply was maintained till the 16th of April, but during the following periods it was intermittent, viz.:-

3rd June.

April 16th June 23rd 4th July.

October 1st-31st December.

The water only being turned on for from 3 to 4 hours daily; the daily supply averaging from 7.7 gallons per head per diem during April and June, to 9.7 gallons during June and July.

The water distributed is collected from two catchment areas outside the built area of the city and distributed by a system of cast iron mains with which street fountains and house services are connected.

REMOVAL OF EXCRETA AND WASTE WATERS.

Generally the pail system of removal prevailed throughout the Colony but few water closets being in existence.

The excreta is, as far as possible, removed once in 24 hours during the night, but the accom- modation for storing the pails in the native tenement houses still remained very defective, no suitable place for the purpose existing.

The waste waters are removed by underground drains and many house-drains have been con- nected with the new system of pipe sewers recently constructed.

WELLS.

Numerous wells situated on private premises but forming no part of the public water supply were found to be in an insanitary condition and were closed by order of the Sanitary Board.

FOOD SUPPLY.

*No material change had during the year 1894 taken place in the system of food supply though during the year 1895 the opening of the New Central Market in May effected a considerable improve- ment in the market accommodation in the middle of the City.

293

The opening of the new depôts for Sheep and Swine and the New Slaughter House at Kennedy Town on the 1st of January, 1895, resulted in the abolition of the old Slaughter House. On the opening of the new depôts, the practice of housing Sheep and Swine in houses in various parts of the native quarters was abolished.

No cases of serious communicable disease were observed amongst the animals imported and the health of the animals in the depôts was good during the year.

EXISTENCE OF PLAGUE IN THE VICINITY OF HONGKONG, 1895.

On the 7th January Surgeon-Major WESTCOTT reported to the Government that he had proceeded to Tungkun on 27th ultimo to investigate what was said to be an outbreak of Bubonic Plague. His conclusions were :-

(1) That there have been sporadic cases of the disease during November and part of

December in Canton, Fatshan, Sheklung and Tungkun.

(2) That no cases have been found by anybody during the last fortnight.

(3) That all those who reported the cases in December can find none now.

(4) That it is evident that the poison lingers in the district, but whether it will again cause an epidemic will depend on the Sanitary surroundings and climatic conditions which it will encounter.

MACAO.

Information of the existence of Plague in Macao-was obtained in March and on the 9th of April, Dr. Lowson visited Macao and his report dated April 13th contains the following information:---

"That the disease was and had been for 2 months prevalent in that Portuguese Colony. During the last two months there have been several deaths from "Foul gas fever." The deaths from the same cause have increased during the last two weeks at the Chinese Hospital, ranging from 6 to 12 daily. These were all said to be from "Foul gas fever," I saw four cases of this "Foul gas fever" and they proved to be well marked cases of Plague; one of which died whilst I was present. Two people had died suddenly the day before from the same cause.

The cases I saw presented typical plague buboes and had well marked cerebral symp- toms."

On the 23rd April His Excellency the Governor by a Proclamation prohibited the immigration and importation into the Colony of all Chinese from the Port of Macao and from the Island of Hainan. This was revoked by order of the Governor in Council on the 22nd June so far as the Island of Hainan was concerned.

CANTON, SWATow.

Information of the existence of plague in Canton and Swatow was received from Her Ma- jesty's Consuls on the 25th April.

The Medical Officer of Health for the Port was instructed to maintain a strict medical super- vision of the passengers and crews of all vessels arriving from Canton and Swatow,

On the 30th April the Governor in Council prohibited immigration and importation into this Colony of all Chinese from Swatow until further notice.

This Proclamation was revoked on the 22nd day of June.

The Proclamation prohibiting the immigration of Chinese into the Colony from the Colony of Macao was revoked by order of the Governor in Council on the 30th July.

DISTRIBUTION OF WORK.

The work in connection with the outbreak of plague was distributed, as follows:-

The Sanitary Board undertook all duties in connection with the removal of plague cases to Hospital, the subsequeut isolation of those who had been in immediate contact with. the disease and the disinfection of premises.

The Medical Department undertook the care of the sick after the arrival in hospital, and The Public Works Department undertook the erection of the necessary temporary buildings, the preparation of graves, the interment of the deceased, and the clearing and cleansing of declared districts.

The staff acting under the instructions of the Sanitary Board was augmented by the appointment of a Medical Officer of Health on the 25th of April, the appointment of an Assistant Secretary and Sanitary Superintendent and by the loan of the services of 24 Police and 15 Soldiers.

294

PREVALENCE OF PLAGUE IN HONGKONG, 1896.

The first case of plague was reported from Yu Lock Lane on the 4th January. In that month there were 45 cases confined principally to the Western portion of the City.

Towards the middle of February cases were reported from other districts than the Western one and the number of cases was distinctly on the increase.

On 19th February the Government was informed that in the opinion of the Sanitary Board the disease was epidemic and the Health Officer of the Port was instructed to cease issuing clean Bills of Health.

The districts of the city in which the greatest number of cases occurred were :---

Health District No. 2, bounded on the North by the Harbour, on the South by the Bowen Road, on the West by Garden Road and on the East by the Wanchai Road, approx- imate built area 95 acres.

Health District No. 4, bounded on the North by the Harbour, on the South by the Caine Road, on the West by Peel Street and on the East by Wyndham, approximate built

area 55 acres.

Health District No. 5, bounded on the North by the Harbour, on the South by the Caine Road, on the West by East Street and on the East by Peel Street, approximate built

arca 55 acres.

Health District No. 7, bounded on the North by the Harbour, on the South by Bonham Road, on the West by Shek Tong Tsui Nullah, and on the east by Eastern Street, approx- imate built area 50 acres.

Cases occurred in the outlying districts of Victoria Peak, Shaukiwan, Aberdeen, Stanley, Kow- loon Point, Hunghom and Yaumati.

A considerable number of cases occurred on the native boats in the harbour. The following table gives the number of cases reported in each month:-

January,

February,

March,

April,

May, June, July, August,

September, October,

November,

49

125

168

316

344

113

52

25.

9

2

1

Total.........

1,204

METEOROLOGICAL Data.

On reference to appendix A it will be seen that,--

(a) The drought of 1895 extended to June, 1896.

(b) The months of maximum mean temperature were followed by a material reduction in

the number of cases.

(c) The number of hours of Sunshine was considerably lower than that of the previous years

1892 to 1895.

(d) During the months of February, March and April, 1896, the humidity of the atmosphere

was exceptionally high.

PROCEEDINGS ADOPTED WITH A VIEW TO PREVENTING THE SPREAD

OF THE DISEASE IN 1896.

The proceedings adopted were similar to those adopted in 1895 already described in pages 3 and 4 with the exception that the isolation of persons in boats moored in the Harbour was abandoned towards end of February.

On the 27th of January the Sanitary Board considered a letter from the Colonial Secretary enquiring if, in view of the latest report from Her Majesty's Acting Consul at Canton to the effect that several cases of plague had occurred in that City, the Board advises the continuance of the "Marriage Boat Segregation System. It was decided that a reply be sent to the Colonial Secretary stating that the Board advised the continuance of the segregation.

On the 17th February a letter was received informing the Board that His Excellency the Governor had decided that in future all persons removed from premises infected with plague be allowed the option of leaving the Colony after disinfection of their clothes and that the segregation system be limited to those who elect to remain in Hongkong.

6.

295

Towards the end of March a scheme was submitted for the consideration of the Sanitary Board providing for persons suffering from Bubonic Plague being allowed to leave the Colony, this Scheme (See appendix C.) was approved by a majority of the Board. The President and Vice-President

voting against its adoption. The majority thought that by conciliating the Chinese in this way they might be induced to report more readily cases of this disease.

The privilege was shortly afterwards extended to the removal of corpses.

Neither scheme was availed of to any extent as only one sick person and four dead bodies were so removed.

Towards the end of February the large number of cases occurring daily rendered the continuance of the system of segregation boats impracticable and matsheds were erected in various parts of the City to which the occupants of infected houses were taken whilst their houses and clothing were being cleansed and disinfected. The persons were allowed to return to their houses after these opera- tions were completed.

The plague assumed such serious proportions early in April that the Sanitary Board addressed the Honourable the Colonial Secretary pointing out that the staff at present at their disposal was insufficient to carry out the necessary arrangements for coping with the outbreak and urged that the assistance of non-commissioned officers and soldiers of the Imperial forces and lukongs (Chinese police) should be obtained for the general cleansing and lime-washing of all tenement houses. See appendix D.

CLEANSING AND LIME-WASHING OF PREMISES.

The following Bye-law was approved by the Legislative Council on the 11th February

Bye-law made under sub-section 4 of section 13 of Ordinance No. 24 of 1887..

THE CLEANSING AND LIME-WASHING Of Premises.

Any house, or part of a house, which is occupied by members of more than one family shall- unless specially exempted by the Sanitary Board-be cleansed and lime-washed throughout, by the owner, to the satisfaction of the said Board not less than twice in every year, namely, during thể months of February or March and of September or October respectively; and notice of such intended cleansing and lime-washing shall be sent to the Secretary of the Sanitary Board three clear days before the work is commenced.

Made by the Sanitary Board, this 16th day of January, 1896.

Approved by the Legislative Council, this 11th day of February, 1896.

HUGH MCCALLUM, Secretary.

J. G. T. BUCKLE, Acting Clerk of Councils.

Early in April matsheds were erected in the Eastern, Central and Western portion of the City to which the occupants of houses were taken whilst their houses and clothing were being cleansed and disinfected.

GENERAL SANITARY CONDITION OF THE COLONY.

The Sanitary condition of the Colony at the commencement of 1896, though improved in some. respects as mentioned in page 4 since 1894, still left much to be desired.

During 1896 the concreting of ground surfaces of houses made considerable progress, narrow lanes and alleys were cleared of obstructions and a great deal of work was done by the officers of the Sanitary Board towards the improvement of the lighting and ventilation of the dwellings of the poorer classes.

The exceptionally low rainfall of 1895 and of the early months of 1896 necessitated the intro- duction of the intermittent water supply into the City of Victoria for a considerable period, viz., from January to March 29th and again from June 1st to the 14th, during this period the supply of water was at the rate of about 10 gallons per head per diem.

In the Kowloon Peninsula the water supply was constant throughout the year.

EXISTENCE OF PLAGUE IN THE VICINITY OF THE COLONY.

Canton. A few sporadic cases occurred in the early part of January.

Information was received towards the end of the month that plague was becoming more prevalent. H.B.M. Acting Consul reported on the 9th April that plague was assuming formidable dimensions. Towards the end of May plague was reported to be abating.

Hainan.-Plague was reported in the prefectural City of Kiang Chow on the 11th March. Information was received of the cessation of plague in the Island of Hainan on 30th May. Amoy.-In May Plague was reported as being prevalent.

Swatow. On the 18th June information was received from the Consul at Swatow of the exist- ence of Plague at that port.

Cessation of plague reported on the 18th July.

Formosa.-Existence of plague at Formosa was reported on 22nd October. Abatement of same reported towards the end of December.

296

DISTRIBUTION OF WORK.

The work in connection with the outbreak of Plague was distributed as follows:-

The Sanitary Board undertook all duties in connection with the removal of plague cases to the hospital, the subsequent isolation or temporary removal of those who had been in immediate contact with the disease, the disinfection of the premises, the clearing and the cleansing of the declared districts.

The Medical Department undertook the care of the sick after their removal to hospital, and The Public Works Department undertook the erection of the necessary temporary buildings, the preparation of graves and the interment of the deceased.

The Sanitary Board staff was augmented by the appointment of Dr. CLARK, Medical Officer of Health, and by the loan of 44 Police and 45 Soldiers.

The Medical Department was augmented by the loan of Dr. WILM of the Imperial German Navy.

MEDICAL.

The Pathology, symptoms and morbid anatomy have been so fully described elsewhere more particularly in Dr. Lowson's Report on the Plague in 1894 and in Dr. WILM's Report for 1896 that

will only refer to certain facts that our experience in 1896 has elicited.

Pathology. The main Channel by which the bacillus gains access to the body appears to be by the Digestive tract.

In most cases the mucusmembrane of the alimentary tract, from the stomach downwards, has been found distinctly hyperemic, the membrane being thickly coated with mucus and presenting petechia and inflammatory patches. The mesenteric and retroperitoneal glands in all cases were inflamed and in many cases surrounded by sanguineous effusion, the gland tissue itself being softened and crowded with plague bacilli.

In many of the cases these were the only post mortem appearances to be found.

Rats, Mice, Monkeys, Pigs and Fowls have been proved to have acquired plague after having been fed with fragments of organs of animals that have died of the disease.

The faces of those attacked undoubtedly contains the specific bacilli.

Infection by the skin (inoculation) occurs but very rarely, if this were the frequent mode of infection we should find more often inflammatory affections of the skin, as when animals are infected with the poison subcutaneously well marked inflammatory changes at the seat of inoculation always

occur.

Again the external glandular affections from which the disease derives its name are not met with as a rule until some three or four days after the period of invasion.

If infection by the skin is the rule one would expect, as Dr. WILM has pointed out, that axillary buboes would be quite as common as inguinal ones, this however is not the case.

As against the theory that the channel of reception of the bacillus is the respiratory tract (ie. infection through air) may be adduced the immunity of those who attended the patients and of the Sanitary Staff who superintended and were engaged in the inspection and disinfection of the infected houses.

The plague bacillus has not been detected in the air, many examinations were made of the air of the wards at Kennedy Town Hospital but always with negative results, the bacillus also does not survive desiccation.

The main channels of infection therefore appear to be the digestive tract and the skin.

It has also been proved that in addition to the faces the bacillus leaves the body by the urine. Culture experiments of the urine frequently demonstrated the presence of the bacillus.

In 95% of the cases albumen was found in the urine varying in amount from one tenth to a half.

SYMPTOMS.

Incubation.Although the period of incubation appears to be generally from three to five days, one case at the Gaol in 1896, as narrated by Dr. WILM, gives a period of fifteen days.

Plague without buboes. In 1896 many cases occurred without the formation of buboes, during the height of the epidemic the percentage of these cases was 20 and towards the end as high as 27.

In all cases the disease was diagnosed as plague by demonstrating the presence of the bacillus in the blood or by culture experiments of the blood, fæces or urine.

TREATMENT.

With reference to treatment the general plan was to allow in the Hospitals ample room and free ventilation.

The strength of the patient was maintained as far as possible with beef-tea, chicken broth and brandy, milk and eggs, if the patient could be kept alive for a week, his case was considered a more hopeful one, about 70 per cent. of the deaths occurring during the first six days.

297

At the height of the fever the pulse very often became weak and intermittent with marked cardiac dyspnea, strychnine hypodermically was found very useful at this stage in doses of two to four minims of the hypodermic solution given twice or thrice in twenty-four hours.

Morphia hypodermically in doses of

or grain gave the best results in the delirious stage.

VITAL STATISTICS.

Incidence of the Disease.

The following table gives the proportion of cases occurring, amongst the Chinese, in the whole population, that is the proportion of attacks to population.

District.

No. of Cases among Chinese.

Estimated Population Chinese only.

Rate per 1,000 of Population.

Total Cases. Total Deaths.

Percentage Mortality.

City of Victoria, No. 1, .

41

7,250

6.6

48

38

79.3

No. 2,

178

20,440

9.3

191

164

85.9

""

"?

No. 3, ...

20

2,610

9.9

26

18

69.2

No. 4,

147

24,390

6.0

155

142

91.6

"J

""

No. 5,

115

41,330

2.8

116

113

97.4

...

No. 6,

84

30,200

2.7

84

76

90.5

25

No. 7,

134

20,560

6.5

135

125

92.6

""

No. 8,

22

7,620

2.8

23

20

86.9

""

Kowloon,

181

32,200

5.6

189

160

84.6

Victoria Peak,...

10

1,600

6.2

10

10

100.0

Shaukiwan,

32

11,300

2.8

32

27

84.4

Aberdeen,

10

8,060

1.4

11

11

100.0

Stanley,

2

1,610

W

1.2

2

2

100.0

Boats,

121

17,540

6.9

121

119

98.3

Quarantine Station;.

6

6

5

83.3

Merchant steamers,

34

35

34

97.1

H. M. Navy,

2

2

2

100.0

No address,

18

18

12

66.6

Totals,

1,157

226,710

5.1

1,204

1,078

89.5

The total case mortality is from this table 89.5 per cent., as will be seen that in those admitted to the Hospital is only 74 per cent.

The cases occurring in No. 3, Health District were chiefly coolies employed by European house- holders as there are no Chinese houses in this district, they must probably have contracted the disease in the other parts of the city.

Age in relation to Mortality.

Age Period.

Number attacked.

Deaths.

Mortality per cent.

Under 5 years,

5 to 10

10

15

""

17

13

28

"

15

41

""

20

65

* * * 2

76.47

19

67.85

30

73.17

52

80.00

وو

""

H & NO N

20

25

62

47

75.80

""

25

35

90

63

70,00

""

""

35

45

45

65

49

75.38

""

""

55

32

22

68.75

""

>>

55

65

19

15

78.94

A

27

"}

65

75

CO

6

4

66.66

O

2

100.00

75 and upwards,

Totals,...........

*

427

316

74,00

10

Remaining on the Ist January, 1896,

January,

February,

1

A

March,

1

April,

..

May, June,. July, August,..

September,

October,

November,

December,

TOTAL, 11 5

10

ة

398

From the above table which gives the total number of cases admitted alive to the various Hospi- tals during 1896, it will be seen that the Case Mortality is highest during the years 15 to 20, the numbers over 75 are too small to be of any account.

The total case mortality is 74 per cent.

The following table gives the admission and deaths in the Government Hospitals during each mouth of the year arranged according to their nationalities.

Male.

Female.

Male.

Female.

Male.

Female.

EUROPEANS.

COLOURED.

CHINESE.

Total Admissions.

Total Deaths..

Admissions,

Deaths. Admissions.

Deaths.

Admissions.

Deaths.

MONTHS.

Male.

Female.

Male.

Female.

Male.

Female.

Male.

Female.

1

:..

:

:..

:

:..

1

28

2

::

1

28

1

I

32

1

1

401 40

3

2

2

78

4

2

2

69

3

1

2.7

1

:

4

1

...

:

...

CHAON~ : ~ :-:

9462

::

10

22

10

28

10

17

22

11

29

17

11

26

9

34

13

32

54

28

82

42

26

61

19

78

26

2

21

2

33.

2

3

Ι

2

5

2

2312

9862

2

22:

22

10

23

11

26

10

57

31

64

22

24

2

2

...

1

1

1

3 15 9.

10

5

4 283 104

216

83 309

118

226

90

PROPHYLAXIS.

Towards the end of June, 1896, Dr. YERSIN arrived from Saigon with plague Serum which he had obtained from Professor Roux of Paris and some which he had prepared himself at Saigon.

Unfortunately there were no acute cases in the Hospital at that time and we advised him to proceed to Amoy where the disease was then raging. We told him that we should be very pleased to give the Serum a trial if he would leave some with us but he did not do so.

On his return from Amoy he told me that he had cured some 15 out of 21 or 22 cases but, as he added, "from such a small number of cases no deductions can be drawn."

At the end of the year the Government communicated with Dr. YERSIN and Professor KITASATO in order to ascertain whether any plague Serum was obtainable. I enclose the replies to these letters in appendix E.

Professor HAFFKIEN has elaborated a plague Serum, this with Dr. YERSIN'S is now undergoing a trial at Bombay, the results are being watched with much interest here.

GENERAL CONCLUSIONS TO BE DRAWN FROM THE EXPERIENCE OF 1895 AND 1896.

A. That the occurrence of plague is favoured by:

www.common

(1) Long prevalence of drought or of abnormally low rainfall.

(2) Atmospheric temperature below 82° F.

(3) Absence of sunshine.

(4) General insanitary conditions such as obstruction to the free access of light and air to

domestic dwellings.

B. That the steps to be taken to retard the progress of the disease are:---

(1) General cleanliness and the free admission of light and air to domestic dwellings.

(2) The immediate isolation of the sick, and those who have been in close contact with the

disease.

(3) The careful and systematic disinfection of all premises in which cases occur, and of

latrines.

30th April, 1896.

J. M. ATKINSON.

Male.

Female.

11

MONTH.

Mean

Temperature.

Mean

Humidity.

· 1892.

Appendix A.

METEOROLOGICAL OBSERVATIONS REGISTERED AT HONGKONG OBSERVATORY, 1892–1896.

Mean

Vapour

Tension.

[Sunshine Rainfall Total.

Total.

Humidity.

Mean

о

Temperature.

Mean

1893.

1894.

1895.

Mean

Mean

Mean

Vapour Tension.

Sunshine Rainfall | Total. Total.

Sunshine Rainfall Vapour Total. Total.

Sunshine Rainfall

Vapour Total.

Total.

Tension.

Tension.

1896.

Mean

Sunshine Rainfall

Vapour

Total. Total.

Tension.

о

1%

January,.

59.7 72

February,

,61.3

March,

61.2

82

April,

70.3

82

May,

75.5

June,

80.6

83

July,.

81.4

August,

September,.....

78.7

77

October,

74.6

63

November,

69.6

December,

58.8

59

IN ON 8 8 8 13 3 + = R a

ins.

hours. ins.

%

0.375 160.5 0.520

55.6 79

85 0.469

0.455

0.623

83 0.738

76.1 1.250 55.5 51.7 3.900 61.9 83 95.2 11.595 70.2

115.7 8.575 75.2

$2

87

81

0.752

0.543

73

0.542

0.862 167,8 31.375 81.2 85 0.909 145.1 10.785 80.1 80.6 83 0.860 206.2 12.090 81.2 167.7 7.005 79.9 81 0.827 272.5 0.020 75.4 70 0.627 169.0 0.340 67.9 57 0.401

0,303 175.0 0.515 62.2 58 0.332

* N * & 2 2 18

ins. hours.

0.372

O

126.2

0.363

ins. 010 ins. hours. 1.530 59.6 74 0.392 126.5 55.4 0.460 60.0 74 0.394 140,5

ins.

о

1%

ins. hours.

ins.

о

%

ins.

hours.

ins.

0.895 56.5 75

0.346

151.2

0.410 62.0 76

0.580 60.2 79

0.419

73.6 0.835

56.0 85

0.467

88.4 3.385 63.3 77

0.454

129.5

0.270 63.1 78

0.471

0.645. 108.8 8.430 71.2 87

0.668

155.7

2.485 72.3

84

0.669

0.715

127.8 16.130 76.8 84 0.775

129.1

20.010 77.2 82

0.772

122.0 1.390 59.3 88

119.0

164.8 5.640

2,605 70.8

76.0 79

87

0.861

212.8

7.090 79.8 $6

0.873

126.9

16.540 81.2 80

0.849

203.8 4.970 80.7

85

85

0.876

168.5 21.220 81.1 83

0.880

203.4

9.475 82.1

81

0.886

225.4 18.870 82.9

82

85

0.901

187.7 8.730 80.9 85

0.892

180.0

16.530 81.4 81

0.868

220.3 6.125 82.4 80

162.7 15.035 81.0 79 244.6 17.870 74.5 67 294.6 0.030 70.0 60 228.9 0.045 62.4 64

0.836

167.7 19.110 80.1 69

0.712

216.8

3.965 $1,5

80

0.582

75

0.444 226.0 0.030 67.6 63 0.372 151.0 0.755 63.2 63

198.4 17.570 74.8

0.649 188.1

0.442 185.7

0.384 177.2

0.500 77.9 73

0.325 71,7 76

0.200

62.2 65

22 18 8 0 2 10 2 8 8 = 28

0.424

133.8

1.730

0,387

16.3

7.945

0.451

59.3

1.445

0.664

76.9 2.100

0.714

176.0 1.150

0.886 145.1 18.630

0.924 220.1 12.420

0.888

252.8 5.195

0.854

192.7

- 9.995

0.701 195.2

0.591

7.905

134.0 2.975

0.386 167.0

1.290

Year,...... 71.0

77 0.619

1802.5 90.970 70.5 77

0.616

2004.4

99.955 71.7 77

0.630

1934.7 104.250 71.6

76

0.622

2047.9

45,835 72.0

80

0.656 1769.2 72.780

299

300

Appendix B.

SANITARY BOARD ROOM,

HONGKONG, 7th June, 1895.

SIR,-Referring to the letter of the Assistant Sanitary Superintendent of the 3rd ultimo setting forth the steps that he had taken in pursuance of the instructions of the then Captain Superintendent of Police conveyed to him verbally immediately after the first case of plague had been reported, we have now the honour to submit the following report for the information of the Board.

SPECIAL SANITARY SERVICE.

House-to-house Visitation.

2. In the attached schedule A will be found a statement of the number of houses visited by the 5 sections of Police and Military told off for this special service. The total number of inspections made by the whole detachment, consisting of 24 Police and 15 Soldiers, was 41,646.

3. The examination of houses has gone on with great smoothness and regularity. Throughout, the attitude of the public has been friendly and the conduct of those engaged on the service good. The special instructions which have from time to time been issued to the Police Sergeant or Constable in charge of sections have been promptly and intelligently complied with.

4. In several instancès application has been made by Chinese householders for their houses to be exempted from the inspection on the ground that an invasion of the privacy of their dwellings would be objectionable as in cases of sickness after child-birth, &c. In such cases the searching parties have been promptly directed to omit the inspection. No requests for exemption on trivial grounds have been received.

5. Since the 17th of May in consequence of certain confidential information communicated to the Board regarding the existence of plague in the neighbouring Portuguese Colony of Macao, a special watch has been kept on all Chinese passengers arriving from Canton. The Captains and Officers of 'the river steamers who have been communicated with have expressed their willingness and intention to do everything in their power to meet the possibility of cases of plague arriving here from Macao via Canton. We are informed that suspicious cases of sickness are promptly rejected at Canton; and in the event of the officers observing while en route any sick persons who may have escaped detection. before the departure of the steamer, it has been arranged for the Police Sergeant on duty at the wharf here to be acquainted of the fact the moment the steamer arrives.

6. Another measure in the nature of a secret service has been adopted for the detection of im- ported cases, the details of which it is undesirable, in the interests of the public service, to disclose.

Latrine Service.

*

7. The order of the Board with regard to the disinfection of the night-soil in the latrines open to the public has been enforced to the utmost possible extent. Three soldiers were detailed for this service to assist the inspectors in charge of the Health Districts. 10,000 lbs. of chlorinated lime have been expended during the month for this purpose alone. At first there was some reluctance on the part of the keepers to comply with the order: but in only one instance did it become necessary to have recourse to legal proceedings, viz., in the case of the Gough Street latrine the keeper of which was fined $25.00 by the presiding Magistrate.

Disinfection of Houses, &c.

8. The 4 soldiers originally detailed for this service in the event of the plague obtaining a firm hold in the Colony were subsquently told off to strengthen the house-to-house visitation parties and to assist the inspectors in the work of their districts.

9. The Board having approved of a reduction from the 1st instant of the number of Police and Military engaged on special sanitary service, 9 men of the Rifle Brigade and 9 European and Asiatic Police were withdrawn from that date. The addition of chlorinated lime to the night-soil in public latrines has been discontinued, but as it was considered desirable to maintain for the present the use of this disinfectant on a modified scale, a number of earthenware pots containing small quantities of the powder moistened with water have been distributed in all the latrines open to the public in accord- ance with the recommendations of the Board.

10. The following are the details of the new scheme for house-to-house visitation by a party consisting of 3 European Police Constables, 12 Chinese Police Constables, 5 Non-Commissioned Officers and men of the Royal Engineers and 7 Non-Commissioned Officers and men of the Rifle Brigade. The detachment now works in 3 sections instead of 5 as formerly, each section being in charge of a European Police Constable. The extent and nature of the duties of these sections are set forth in the attached copies of the instructions handed over to the 3 Constables, detailed to take charge, on the night of the 1st instant.

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11. Only 5 cases of plague are known to have occurred since the day on which the first case was reported, viz., the 29th of April. Not a single case has been reported since the 10th of May. Particulars of these 5 cases will be found in schedule B.

12. 14 persons from infected premises were provided with accommodation in the "marriage" boats or native marine hotels hired for this service and anchored at the back of Stone Cutter's Island. No sickness developed among those segregated. On the 8th of May the last batch was released..

Mezzanine Floors and Cubicles.

13. In schedule C will be found a statement of the progress that has been made in the eight Health Districts of the City of Victoria in enforcing compliance with the provisions of section 7 of Ordinance 15 of 1891. In all 1,705 notices to remove either the cubicles or cocklofts have been served. A very large number of petitions for permission to allow cubicles and cocklofts to co-exist, which the Board has power to give, have been received. A considerable time must necessarily elapse before the law on this subject has been fully enforced throughout the City. In many instances where compliance with the law will involve considerable structural alterations the parties concerned have

placed the matter in the hands of their architects.

Basements.

14. Notices in writing of intention to take legal proceedings after a stated time have been served on the actual tenants, householders and owners of 95 basement rooms in illegal occupation as dwellings. The exact situation of each basement is set forth in schedule D. This return does not include a large number of basements which when first inspected were found to be inhabited and were subsequently vacated after the law had been explained to the occupants and a verbal warning conveyed. A com- plete descriptive return of all basements in the City and the uses to which they are applied is in preparation.

We have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your obedient Servants,

WM. C. H. HASTINGS,

Acting Capt. Supt. of Police. W. EDWARD CROW,

The Secretary,

SANITARY BOARD.

Asst. Sanitary Supt..

SANITARY BOARD,

HONGKONG, 21st October, 1895.

SIR,-Referring to our report dated the 7th of June (Government Notification No. 276 of 1895) we have now the honour to submit, for the information of the Board, the following further particulars of the progress of the special work entrusted to our joint directions.

HOUSE TO HOUSE VISITATION.

2. On the 1st of June the original detachment, consisting of 24 Police and 15 soldiers told off for this service, was reduced to 27 men working in three sections. Each section consisted of 4 soldiers, including 1 non-commissioned officer, and 4 Chinese constables in charge of an European Police constable. On the 15th of June the services of two of the sections were dispensed with, and to the remaining section was allotted the duty of visiting houses in the worst part of the City in the morning and in the afternoon of noting the destination of the passengers arriving by the Canton steamers. This section continued to discharge these duties until the end of July when the services of the Police and Military were discontinued.

3. The night steamers from Canton have been regularly watched by a detachment of Police in charge of Detective Inspector QUINCEY.

4. In appendix A will be found a statement of the number of houses inspected and of the number of passengers tracked to their destination. In all 15,147 inspections of houses have been made an:l 6,006 passengers from Canton followed to their destination after leaving the steamers.

5. It is gratifying to be able to report that the attitude of the public during the examination of houses by the search parties has been friendly throughout and that the conduct of those engaged on the service has been good. Although none of the house visitation parties discovered any cases of

13

302

plague, we are of opinion that the surprise visits made from time to time in various parts of the City have had a salutary effect in securing the prompt removal of the sick either to hospital or to places outside the Colony.

THE BUBONIC PLAGUE.

6. At the date of our last report only 5 cases of bubonic plague were known to have occurred since the day on which the first case was reported. After an interval of more than a month, viz., on the 14th June the disease re-appeared in Holland Street, Kennedy Town-two cases from No. 9 and 1 from a matshed situated on private property at the south end of the lane. On the following day (the 15th) 4 cases occurred in a room on the first floor of No. 10, Heung Lane, in the Sheung Wan District, and a further case from the adjoining house, viz., No. 12 was reported the next day (16th). Parti- culars of these cases as well as those that occurred subsequently will be found in appendix B to this report.

7. Five persons from No. 10 and one from No. 12, Heung Lane-the rest of the inmates having escaped before the Police arrived to take charge of the houses-were placed under observation in one of the "marriage boats," or native marine hotels, especially chartered for this service and anchored at the back of Stone Cutter's Island.

8. Five cases having occurred within two days in these two houses alone, it was decided at 3 p.m. on the 17th, after a close inspection of the other houses in this part of the lane, and on a joint certificate by the Acting Medical Officer of Health and the Assistant Superintendent of the Civil Hospital, to remove the occupants of the next two houses, viz., Nos. 14 and 16 until such time as the premises could be satisfactorily disinfected and cleansed. The majority accordingly proceeded to Canton the same evening, having declined the proffered accommodation afloat; the rest were housed in one of the marriage boats.

9. On the 17th of June at 10 p.m. a man suffering from plague entered the Tung Wah Hospital and stated that he had been living in No. 10, Heung Lane, having left the house before the arrival of the Police. He was unable to give clear account of his movements during the interval.

10. Two cases of plague developed among those segregated from Nos. 10 and 12, Heung Lane, viz., one from No. 10 (on the 18th) and one from No. 12 (on the 20th). Altogether eight cases of plague occurred in these two houses in Heung Lane.

11. The other cases do not call for any special remarks beyond those stated in the body and at the foot of the schedule. Not a single case has been reported since the 16th ultimo.

12. With regard to the segregating of persons found in infected premises it has been the practice in all cases to allow them the option of proceeding to Canton or of being housed in one of the marriage boats. In the majority of instances the former alternative has been readily accepted, only 21 persons being provided with accommodation afloat. On the 26th June the last batch was released.

DISINFECTION OF HOUSES.

the

13. In respect of the disinfection of houses in which cases of bubonic plague have occurred the provisions of Bye-law No. 25, made under section 13 of Ordinance 15 of 1894, have been rigidly enforced, and every article destroyed that could not be satisfactorily disinfected. In the case of the houses in Heung Lane, after fumigation with sulphur and clearing out all the moveable contents, floors, walls and ceilings were thoroughly saturated with the acid solution of perchloride of mercury as recommended in a Memorandum of the 26th August, 1892, by Dr. R. THORNE THORNE of the Medical Depatment of the Local Government Board.

14. It will be observed that most of the cases of bubonic plague occurred in No. 6 Health District. Mr. HORE, the District Inspector, is deserving of praise for the painstaking way in which he has discharged a trying and, to say the least, disagreeable duty.

LATRINE DISINFECTION.

15. The addition of Chlorinated Lime to the night-soil in public latrines, which had been discontinued at the end of May, was resumed in the case of the Heung Lane Latrine on the outbreak of bubonic plague in that locality and maintained until all danger of a further development of the disease in the vicinity had disappeared. For failing to comply with the Board's order in this matter and for a breach of one of the latrine bye-laws the keeper was fined $50 by the presiding Magistrate.

MEZZANINE FLOORS AND CUBICLES.

16. The work involved in enforcing compliance with the provisions of sections 7 and 8 of Ordinance 15 of 1894, the controlling of which had been delegated to us as a Select Committee of the Board, made satisfactory progress in the case of the worst class of houses in the City especially in districts Nos. 7 and 8, at the West, and Nos. 1 and 2 at the East end of the City. As, however, the Inspectors in charge of the Central Districts of the City proceeded it became evident that in granting permission for the retention of cocklofts in rooms partitioned into separate compartments the practice hitherto followed of dealing with each case on its merits could not be successfully pursued, and that clearly defined conditions applicable to all cases should be drawn up for the guidance of the Executive.

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303

17. The question as to whether the owner or occupier should be held responsible for complying with the law was also fully considered. In many cases the cocklofts are the property of the tenants; in others they belong to the owner. The Committee therefore decided to adopt the plan that had been found to work so well in the case of the illegal occupation of basements, viz., of serving the notice on both the owner and occupier. The notice on the occupier specified in schedule C to our last report was therefore discontinued and a new form, after meeting with the approval of the Attorney General, adopted (appendix (').

18. The conditions drawn up by the Committee on the subject of cocklofts in buildings erected before and after the passing of The Closed Houses and Insanitary Dwellings Ordinance (15 of 1894) which, after submission to and approval by the full Board, were published in the Government Gazette and in the English and Chinese newspapers, will be found embodied in the notifications included in appendix D.

19. Up to date, notices with copies of the Board's conditions attached, to comply with the provisions of sub-section 1 of section 7 and sub-section b of section 8, have been served on the owners and cccupiers in the case of 433 cocklofts and cubicles. So far this change of tactics has met with the -best results, and it is confidently hoped that within six months all illegal cocklofts will have been

removed.

BASEMENTS.

20. A complete list of the basements illegally occupied on the 1st of April, and on the owners and occupiers of which notices have been served, will be found in appendix E. The return does not include the very large number of basements in No. 7 District which were closed during the epidemic of plague last year and which are among the worst in the whole City. Great credit is due to Acting Inspector MACEWEN for the energy he has displayed in preventing their re-occupation as dwellings.

21. Under our joint personal supervision the whole of the basements in districts Nos. 4, 5 and 6, have been inspected at night. In all 244 inspections have been made before, and 140 after, midnight. The District Inspectors, Messrs. BURNETT, REIDIE and HORE, are doing their utmost to prevent their now illegal occupation.

PERMITS FOR COCKLOFTS AND BASEMENTS.

22. In a memo. dated the 9th of July (appendix F) the Committee referred for the consideration of the full Board the question as to whether permits for the retention of cocklofts, under section 7 and for the occupation of basements under section 6, should be granted to the owner or occupier. We are of opinion that the fullest publicity should be given to the fact that the Board has unanimously decided to grant such permits to the landlord only.

GENERAL REMARKS.

23. Although it may appear somewhat hazardous in the case of a disease like the bubonic plague, as to the origin and spread of which so little is known, we think it probable that the Colony has now seen the last of the disease in 1895. The widespread fear that the outbreak in Heung Lane was but the beginning of a formidable epidemic has happily not been realised. Twenty-six cases are known to have occurred; all died. If the particulars specified in appendix B are closely examined it will be found that among the later cases the disease showed no signs of abatement in point of virulence. The ex- perience of this year would seem to demonstrate that the disease was nipped in the bud, and an epidemic averted by the prompt removal and segregation of the inmates and the disinfection and cleansing of the infected premises. The drastic measures it was deemed necessary to adopt were fully justified by the nature of, and the circunstances attending the outbreak.

24. The question here very naturally arises what are the prospects of a recurrence of the disease in the early spring of next year? A vast improvement in the sanitary condition of the Colony has unquestionably been effectel during the last 12 months, but much still remains to be done. In our opinion no measure of sanitary reform calls for more prompt and vigorous action than that of clearing away the obstructions in back-yards and in the back parts of premises so as to provide a suitable and adequate area for the admission of light and air. This has been done already in many houses in the City. In Heung Lane the sanitary character of the houses, in which cases of plague originated, has been completely changed by this simple and by no means costly structural alteration. We submit that no consideration of Departmental economy should be allowed to interfere with the early carrying out of this most desirable reform.

We have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your obedient Servants,

WM. C. H. HASTINGS,

Acting Captain Superintendent of Policer W. EDWARD CROW, Assistant Secretary and Superintendent.

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304

Appendix C.

CONDITIONS SUBJECT TO WHICH PERSONS SUFFERING

FROM BUBONIC PLAGUE WILL BE PERMITTED

TO LEAVE THE COLONY.

1. Suitable ambulance boats shall be provided and they shall be towed astern of the S.S. Pasig, S.S. Tai On, or other river steam-boat to Whampoa and Canton, and shall on no account land any person or thing before arriving at Whampoa or Canton.

2. While in the waters of the Colony the ambulance boats shall fly the yellow quarantine flag.

3. While in the waters of the Colony the ambulance boats must lie within the quarantine ground, but they shall if required come to the China Merchants Wharf, Saiyinpoon, at 4 P.M. of the day on which they are to be towed to Whampoa and Canton, or at such other time as the Medical Officer of Health may fix.

.4. One ambulance boat if re quired shall leave the wharf every day at such hour as will permit of her being taken in tow, at a point west of the fairway buoy, by the afternoon steam-boat leaving for Whampoa and Canton.

5. Any person desirous of going to Whampoa or Canton by the ambulance boat must notify the Police before 2 P.M. o'clock (or such other hour as the Medical Officer of Health may fix) on the day he desires to leave.

On the receipt of such notification a medical man will visit the premises and if in his opinion the person is suffering from Bubonic Plague the medical man will give a certificate to that effect in the attached form.

6. All persons residing upon the premises in which a case of Bubonic Plague occurs will be allowed as soon as their clothing has been disinfected to proceed on board a Canton steamboat under the supervision of officers approved by the Sanitary Board.

7. In all cases where persons suffering from Bubonic Plague have elected to proceed to Whampoa or Canton, after their departure, the premises in which they resided shall be fumigated, cleansed, lime-washed, and dealt with as the Sanitary Board may direct.

8. In all cases where persons suffering from Bubonic Plague have elected to proceed to Whampoa or Canton, the clothing and bedding which have been used by them shall be taken possession of by some officer authorised by the Board and destroyed, and such persons must be provided with a new suit of clothing and then removed in an ambulance to the ambulance boat and put on board.

9. No persons, except attendants and those in charge of the ambulance boat, will be allowed on board the ambulance boat without a certificate from a Registered Medical Practitioner approved by the Board, which certificate must be in the form appended hereto, and presented at the time of embarkation when asked for.

Joy

10. The ambulance boats on returning to the waters of the Colony shall proceed direct to the Quarantine Ground there to be dealt with as the Sanitary Authority may direct.

11. All food required for the use of the persons on board the ambulance boats shall be put on board when they are at the wharf receiving sick persons. None of the attendants or others on board will be allowed to leave the ambulance boats while they are in the waters of the Colony without the written permission of the Medical Officer of Health.

SANITARY BOARD ROOM,

Hongkong, 21st March, 1896.

Appendix D.

HUGH MCCALLUM,

Secretary.

SIR,

SANITARY BOARD,

April 6th, 1896.

I have the honour to inform you that, in view of the somewhat serious increase in the number of cases of bubonic plague occurring in the City, the Acting Colonial Surgeon, the Medical Officer of Health and myself met yesterday and considered the steps that are now being taken to stay the pro- gress of this disease, and what further measures it is desirable to take.

16

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י

:

+

.

!

305

We were unanimously of opinion that the staff at present at the disposal of the Sanitary Board is insufficient for carrying out the necessary arrangements which may be classified under the following headings

(a) Removal of the Dead and Sick.

(b) Removal of persons to be isolated during the cleansing and disinfecting of "Infected

Premises."

(c) Cleansing and disinfecting of "Infected Premises."

(d) Disinfecting clothing.

(e) General cleansing and lime washing of all tenement houses.

(f) House to House visitation.

(g) Disinfecting of Public Latrines.

We were further of opinion that the following arrangements should be made for the efficient carrying out of the operations included in the above classification.

(a) Removal of the Dead and Sick should be undertaken as heretofore by the Police.

""

(b) Removal of persons to be isolated during the cleansing and disinfecting of " Infected Premises.' The present system is that the police take charge of infected premises until they are taken over by the Officers of the Board. This should be continued and a Lukong should conduct the persons (after their clothing has been disinfected) desirous of obtaining shelter in the premises set apart for temporarily housing them during the cleansing and disinfecting of the premises. One Chinese Constable to be on duty at each Isolation shelter, total number required 9.

""

(c) Cleansing and disinfecting of "Infected Premises be continued as heretofore by the

Nuisance Inspectors in their several districts.

(d) Disinfecting of clothing be attended to by the Nuisance Inspectors as at present.

(e) General cleansing and lime washing of all tenement houses to be carried out under the direct supervision of European Constables assisted by non-commissioned officers, soldiers and lukongs.

The staff required for this purpose being as follows:-

Health District. European Constables. Chinese Constables. Non-Com. Officers.

Soldiers.

1........

1

2......

1

4.......

1

2

5.........

1

6.........

1

NNNN 2

2

1

4

2

1

4

1

4

2

1

4

1

4

Total...... 5

10

5

20

(f) House to House visitation to be carried on throughout the City. The staff required is

as follows:

Health District. European Constables.

Chinese Constables. Non-Com. Officers.

Soldiers.

1 & 2.........

1

}

2 & 3.........

1

5.........

1

6.........

1

7 & 8.........

1

co co co co co

3

1

3

3

1

3

3

1

3

3

1

3

3

1

3

Total...... 5

15

5

15

(g) Disinfecting of Public Latrines to be carried out by the Nuisance Inspectors in their

several districts.

Summary of Staff required :-

European Constables.

10

Chinese Constables.

34

Non-Com. Officers. 10

Soldiers.

35

There are at present 9 European Constables and 9 Chinese Constables seconded to the Sanitary service so that one more European Constable and 25 Chinese are required.

Twelve soldiers, viz. :-4 Royal Engineer and 8 Rifle Brigade, have also been seconded so that one non-commissioned Officer, Royal Engineer, and 9 non-commissioned Officers of the Rifle Brigade and 23 Soldiers are required.

On the subject of this additional staff, I am addressing you separate communications.

ན་ཚ་

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I have also to point out the desirability of

(a) The Police keeping a watch on persons arriving from Canton and notifying the Medical

Officer of Health of the locality to which they proceed, especially the poorer classes. (b) The Inspector of Brothels and District Watchmen attached to the Registrar General's Department visiting all brothels and lodging houses and seeing that they are being maintained in a sanitary condition; any difficulty arising to be reported to the Medical Officer of Health.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

The Honourable

THE COLONIAL SECRETARY,

Appendix E.

I-From French Consul of 1st December.

FRANCIS A. Cooper,

President, Sanitary Board.

HONGKONG le 1re Decembre, 1896.

Monsieur

LE SECRETAIRE DE LA COLONIE,

Jái l'honneur de vous informer que Monsieur le Gouverneur-Genéral de l'Indo-Chine m'a chargé de vous transmettre sa reponse à la lettre que vous avez bien voulu l'addresser sous le No. 1744, le 9 Novembre dernier, au sujet du serum decouvert par le Docteur YERSIN pour la guerison de la peste.

Monsieur le Gouverneur-Genéral éstime que, si les experiences de Canton et Amoy permettre de croire à l'efficacité du remede, ces experiences n'ont pas été suffisamment nombreuses pour qu'on soit dés maintenant fixé sur son mode d'emploi el qu'on puisse confier à des personnes non instruits le soin de l'appliquer.

Ainsi pour ne pas compromettre le succès de sa decouverte, Monsieur YERSIN reserve-t-il jusqú à nouvel ordre l'application par lui-même ou par des medecins instruits par lui.

Monsieur le Gouverneur-Genéral ajonte quil serait heureux que le Gouvernement de Hongkong voulut bien autoriser le Docteur YERSIN, lorsquil sera de retour de France ã experimenter lui-même son serum sur les malades qui pourraient exister dans la Colonie de Hongkong.

Je serai personnellement heurieux, Monsieur le Secretaire de la Colonie, de transmettre â Monsieur le Gouverneur-Genéral de l'Indo-Chine toutes les communications que vous desirez lui adresser sur cette question d'interet humanitaire en les appuyant de tous les renseignements que j'aurai pu ceuillir dans cette Colonie.

Veuillez agreer, Monsieur le Secretaire de la Colonie, les assurances de ma haute consideration.

(Sd.), LEON GME. LE ROUX.

Monsieur

LE SECRETAIRE DE LA COLONIE, Hongkong.

II-From Her Britannic Majesty's Minister, Tokio, of 25th November, 1896.

TOKIO, November 25th, 1896.

SIR,

On the receipt of Your Excellency's letter of the 9th instant, I immediately caused inquiries to be made of Professor KITASATO whether he could and would supply antiplague serum to the Govern- ment of Hongkong.

I have now received his reply saying that he has only just begun to experiment on larger animals and that now and for some time to come he will not be able to supply any antitoxin.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your Excellency's most obedient,

humble Servant,

His Excellency

18

Sir WILLIAM ROBINSON, K.C.M.G.,

&C.,

&c., Hongkong.

&c.,

(Sd.), ERNEST SATOW.

HONGKONG.

REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF THE COLONY FOR 1897.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of Ilis Excellency the Governor.

467 No. 26

97

REGISTRAR GENERAL'S OFFICE,

HONGKONG, 20th June, 1897.

SIR, On the 30th November last instructions were received to take a Census of the Colony on the night of the 20th January on the same lines as the census taken in 1891.

2. The suitability of the date was questionel by so ne who maintained that it was so near to China New Year's Day, which fell this year on the 2nd February, that the usefulness of the returns would be diminished owing to the custom, prevalent among the Chinese, of returning home for the New Year. There was certainly some ground for this criticism, but after extensive enquiries I am inclined to think that the statistics, at any rate of Victoria, have not been seriously affected, the bulk of the people who leave the Colony at the end of the year not starting until a few days later, and a number of Chinese coming from the mainland to Hongkong for a few days at this time. On the other hand, the quarrymen employed in the quarries along the Shaukiwan Road had all left, and a number of fishing boats had gone, as is their custom, to Macao..

3. The recurrence of the plague last year and the consequent exodus of a large number of the Chinese had prevented the census being taken at a much earlier date, and any postponement would have had to be for at least seven weeks.

4. The Chinese population fluctuates exceedingly, and is affected one way or another by each one of the numerous festivals observed in China, and it is not easy to decide upon the best occasion for taking a census, but probably the most suitable time is early in the Chinese eleventh moon.

5. The special object of the census was to discover, if possible, in what way the population of Victoria had been affected by the sanitary measures occasioned by the plague in 1894, such as the resumption of Taipingshan, the closing of basements, the removal of cocklofts and the enforce- ment of the laws against overcrowding. It will require an exact knowledge of the town and of the changes which have taken place since the last census to draw the correct deductions from the attached returns. Suffice it at present to point out that from Table XIX. it appears that an area which was occupied by 110,007 persons in 1891 now holds 130,172, an increase of a little over 20,000, and that in every case where an enumerator has had to deal with more than 2,000 persons the number

very probably under the mark.

is

6. The particulars required for the immediate purpose of the census were simply the age, sex and race of each person. In addition to these, however, the birth-places and native-places of the Chinese land population have been ascertained, and the birth-places and the various races of the Europeans, Americans, &c.

7. The use of the two terms "race" and "nationality" gave rise to a discussion which was of an academic rather than of a practical interest, as the meaning which was to be attached to the two words was explained on the census schedules. Good authority can be found in modern standard diction- aries for conflicting uses of the words. Some natives of the British Isles seemed to have found a difficulty as to what entry should be made under the heading of race, but ninety-five per cent. elected to put themselves down as English, Scotch, Irish or Welsh.

8. Certain preliminary returns were made public on the first of February. They were compiled from the figures furnished by each enumerator, and could only be regarded as approximate. In pre- paring the attached tables the schedules were compared with the enumerators' books and the necessary corrections made. With the exception of the Chinese population of Victoria in which an error of 4,700 had been made and of the non-Chinese population of British Kowloon in which there was one of 270, the corrections required were unimportant.

9. The European and American population has been divided in some of the tables into Portu- guese and those other than Portuguese. There is a sufficient distinction between the l'ortuguese population and other Europeans to make this division advisable and interesting. The Portuguese of Hongkong form a European community settled in the Tropics, thoroughly acclimatised and apparently not recruited to any extent from Europe. It will not be for another generation that any other portion of the European community will be in a similar position. It is only now that a generation is

468

growing up of Europeans born of parents themselves born in the Colony. The difference between the -composition of the Portuguese and of the British community will be seen from the following table:-

Age.

British Resident Civil Population.

Portuguese Resident Civil Population.

Males. Females. Total.

Males. Females.

Total.

Under 5 years,.

138

147

285

134

127

261

5 and under 25 years,

322

302

624

468

468

936

25 and under 50 years,

749

395

1,144

299

456

765

50 and over,

103

36

139

110

191

301

Not stated,

12

9

21

Total,..

1,324

889 2,213 1,011

1,252

2,263

There are several points of difference in the two communities, which consist of almost the same number of persons. There is one to which attention may incidentally be drawn, that twenty-one members of the British community were either unable or unwilling to state their exact age, and that twelve of these were men.

10. Whatever may be their ethnographical position, for statistical purposes the Jews and Armen- ians have been included in the European and American population.

11. The Indians are a sufficiently numerous and important body to appear separately.

12. The return of the number of Eurasians is distinctly unsatisfactory. I am afraid that the arrangements made were not such as to ensure getting the correct number. It is quite evident that the 272 who have entered themselves as such in the census schedules form a very small portion of the Eurasian community. No doubt the large majority are included among the Chinese. In the Settlement of Singapore the Eurasians in 1891 numbered 3,589.

13. A detailed and exact comparison, according to locality of the component parts of the popula tion in 1891, with the population in the present year has been found impossible owing to the form in which the figures were presented, but in Table II. there will be found a fairly satisfactory one.

14. Exclusive of the Mercantile Marine the European and American community in 1891 num- bered 4,555. It has now risen to 5,532. The British resident civil population then amounted to 1,448, a number which does not apparently include the European police, 157 in number including women and children, nor the prisoners, nor some "temporary residents. In 1897, including these, it numbers 2,213 persons. The Portuguese community now consists of 2,263 persons as against 2,089 in 1891. The Germans, who numbered 208 in 1891, now number 292. The Americans have increased from 93 to 174, the French from 89 to 112, and the Spanish from 88 to 104. In 1891 there were 53 Europeans and Americans, "temporary residents," and 23 prisoners whose nationalities were not stated.

15. Counting those persons over 15 years of age as adults we find that in the British community the percentage of adult females to adult males is 55. In 1891 it was 38 and in 1881, 48. This sup- ports the statement in the Report on the Census of 1891 that family life among Europeans is increas- ing. Of the 2,374 persons of British origin enumerated in the census 1,466 claim to be English, 513 Scotch, 245 Irish and 26 Welsh. 1,580 or about two-thirds of the whole British population, were born in the British Isles, and 670 in other parts of the British Empire; 92 being born in Australia and New Zealand, 28 in Canada, and 457 in Hongkong. 72 were born in China and Japan. 241 persons of European and American race claim British nationality, including 118 Jews, 51 Portuguese, 18 Spaniards and 13 Armenians. Of the Eurasians 236 claim to be British subjects.

16. Of the Portuguese population 1,214, or more than one-half, were born in Hongkong and 931 in Macao. 75 were born in China and Japan and 10 in Portugal. Only 51, as stated above, claim British nationality. The rest, with the exception of three, in whose case there is perhaps some confu- sion between race and nationality, remain subjects of the King of Portugal.

17. The members of races other than European, American and Chinese, have increased in number from 1,439 to 2,502. Of these 272 are Eurasians. It is unfortunately not possible to say in which race the increase has been greatest. Most probably it is among the Indians. These now number 1,348, of whom 371 or 28 per cent. are females. Of the remaining 882, the Japanese number 335, the Malays 207, and the Filipinos 216. Of the Malays 131 or 63 per cent. are females, and of the Filipinos $2 or 38 per cent.

!

..

469

18. In Return II. of the Report on the Census of 1891 the Chinese Land Population is stated to be 178,960. This number includes 1,132 persons employed in the Mercantile Marine, passengers, and on foreign men-of-war. The corresponding number for this year is 201,528 including 1,523 persons on board the foreign shipping. This is an increase of 22,568 or 12.61 per cent. In 1891 the number of adult males was 113,241 and of adult females 33,523; the percentage of the latter to the former being 29.60. In 1897 the number of adult females has risen to 38,860 and of adult males to 129,893, the percentage of females to males being 29.92. The number of Chinese families in Victoria in 1891 was said to be 14,120. In 1897, in the same area, it is returned as 21,740. This is an apparent increase of 53.88 per cent., and may be accounted for by heads of families neglecting to make the proper entry in the schedule in 1891. In the present census the enumerators were instructed to ascertain by enquiry the number of families in their sections, but the task of ascertaining the correct number is complicated by concubinage as well as by polygamy. There are two great hindrances to the increase of family life among the Chinese in Hongkong, namely, the position which the Chinese wife holds towards her parents-in-law and the difficulty of finding suitable accommodation affording privacy for families owing to the style of the buildings and the high rents.

19. In the floating population the percentage of females to males is 60; the number of the latter being 19,872 and of the former 11,880. The total, 31,752, shows a decrease of 283 compared with last census.

The correct enumeration of this portion of the community is an exceedingly difficult task unless it can be accomplished in one day. On this occasion the enumeration of the harbour was not completed until the 24th of January, the work having commenced on the 20th at 9 P.M., the enumerators working all night in order to get as much done as possible before the boats began to move.

20. Of the Chinese land population, including those persons on board the European shipping, it is only a very inconsiderable number, namely, 4,002 who do not belong to the Kwang-tung province. There are 1,283 natives of the Fokien province, 336 of Kiang-su and 198 of Chekiang. Ten persons were not ashamed of belonging to the Boat Population, and 1,523 persons, of whom three-fifths are women, claim Hongkong as their native place. I think it probable that the persons who claim Annam, Corea and Siam as their native places are not Chinese, but Annamese, Coreans and Siamese. In addi- tion to stating the district of China or the province to which they belonged the Chinese were asked to state their birth-place, if not born in China, and 9,033 persons give it as Hongkong. Very probably this number should be larger. In Wanchai there was current a report that all persons born in Hongkong were to be at once re-vaccinated. One woman who had told the enumerator that her children were born' in Hongkong ran after him after he had left the house, and was very urgent that he should correct what she said was her mistake. In the same district on the first day on which the schedules were 'distributed several women left their homes and ran away to the hill-side at the back of the town. In Saiyingpun there was also a little commotion among the lower classes, and one Fokien man, at whose house a schedule was left, made a great disturbance. As he did not understand Cantonese and refused to look at the schedule, the inisunderstanding was only put an end to by the Chief Watchman persuading him to go to one of the Fokien hongs where the taking of a census was explained to him. There was the usual number of persons who thought that they were being served with writs. In many cases it required some persuasion on the part of the enumerator to induce people to take the schedule, and I am afraid that where obstinacy seemed impervious to reason the enumerator was driven to refer rather roughly to the penal clauses of the Census Ordinance. The Registrar General's Office received the assistance of the Chinese press in an endeavour to give as much publicity as possible to the intention of the Government to take a census and to allay the usual suspicions, and I do not well see what more could have been done beyond perhaps making an attempt to reach the people through their children by preparing a brief lecture in Chinese on a census and asking the Chinese teachers of the Grant-in-aid Schools to explain it to their scholars.

21. The natives of the Kwang-tung province number 197,526 persons. Of these, 156,603 belong to the Kwang-chau prefecture, of which Canton is the chief town. From the neighbouring district of San-on there are 21,697 persons in the Colony. From Pun-ue and Namhoi, the two districts in which. Canton is situated, 27,421 and 22,470 respectively. Whilst 27,090 come from Tung-kun and 18,235 from San-ui.

22. In the Report on the Census of 1891 the term Victoria was restricted to the ten registration districts, the easterù boundary of which is the west side of Causeway Bay. For sanitary purposes the town now extends as far as North Point, and in the present report the term Victoria is used in this sense unless another meaning is expressly given to it.

23. The population of Victoria consists of 6,446 Europeans, Americans, Indians, Japanese, &c., 251 Eurasians and 160,273 Chinese. The population of each of the ten health districts into which the town is now divided is given in Table XX. For the purpose of comparison with the previous census, the Chinese population of eight of the Registration Districts is given in Table XVIII. This table does not include the Chinese living in houses or tenements occupied by members of another race, The most noticeable feature in the return is the large increase of 11,011 (32 per cent.) in the popu- lation of the Saiyingpún District. In the Taipingshan District there is an apparent decrease of 12,513, but in 1891 the houses which have since been destroyed in the Taipingshan Resumption Area were occupied by 13,643 persons, so there is an increase also here, though slight. In the Sheungwan District there is a decrease of 58. In the Chungwan District there is an increase of 5,001 or 14 per cent., aál

470

n the Hawan and Wanchai Districts of 4,044 or 24 per cent. Table XIX., which gives the population of the sections into which the town was divided for the purpose of the census and the corresponding population in the year 1891, will be of assistance in an enquiry into the causes of this apparent increase. The number of prisoners in Victoria Gaol was 24 Europeaus and Americans, 7 Indians and other non-Chinese, and 485 Chinese.

24. The European and American population of the Peak has increased from 213, excluding the Police, to 381. This latter number includes 5 persons occupants of the police stations. The number of children under 15 is 87. The Chinese population is 1,591. Of these, 427 were workmen employed on buildings in course of erection.

25. The European and American population of the villages in Hongkong is not given in the Report on the Census of 1891. It is probably included under the heading Victoria. It now amounts

to 125.

26. The district of Shaukiwan shows a slight increase in the Chinese population from 7,272 to 7,438, notwithstanding that the three villages of Sant'sün, Hung-heung-ló and T'ung-lo-wan are now included in Victoria and the village of Hoktsui in Stanley, and that the quarrymen to the number of about 500, according to the estimate of the police inspector in charge of the district, had left to spend the New Year holidays at their homes on the mainland.

27. The increase in the population of the Stanley District is due to the presence of workmen employed on the Tytam Waterworks.

28. The population of the Aberdeen District remains unchanged whilst there is an increase of 115 persons in the district of Pokfulam, of whoin about 40 are workmen temporarily employed on a new building.

29. The European and American population of British Kowloon has increased from 183 to 377. Of these, 93 are under 15 years of age. The Chinese population of the peninsula continues to grow rapidly. In 1881 it was 9,021. In 1891 it was 19,997. It is now 26,142. There are no parti- culars given in the report on the last census from which to ascertain in what part of the peninsula the increase has taken place, but it is sufficiently obvious without them. Yaumati is now a town of 8,000 inhabitants, Hunghom of 6,000, whilst there is a population of 3,500 round the promontory

of Taikoktsui.

30. The number of Europeans, Americans and other non-Chinese on board the merchant shipping in the waters of the Colony on the night of the census was 448 compared with 1,016 in 1891; the number of Chinese 1,523 compared with 1,063. Of the Europeans, 161 were British, 74 Germans, 29 Norwegians and 17 Swedish. There were 49 ́Americans, 63 Japanese and 12 Malays. The number of ships was 54.

31. The Chinese floating population numbers 31,752 persons living on board 5,141 vessels. This is a slight decrease compared with the year 1891 when the population was 32,035 and the number of vessels 5,220. The number of fishing boats was 1,594 compared with 1,141 in the year 1891; the number of boats plying in the waters of the Colony 3,408, and the number of passenger and trading junks 139. The population of the harbour was 21,311 compared with 23,662 in the year 1891. Of these 13,687 were found in boats moored on the south shore and in the middle of the harbour and 7,624 along the north shore, compared with 17,215 and 6,447 respectively in the year 1891. But the position of the boats is largely affected by the weather, and cannot be depended upon. The floating population of Shaukiwan remains practically the same; that of Aberdeen shows an increase caused by the presence of a number of fishing boats which lie up there for the New Year. The an- chorage at Stanley is unsafe during the south-west monsoon when it is almost deserted. accounts for there being only ninety boats there at the time of the last census which was taken on the 20th May. The number of boats at Stanley on this occasion was 206, of which 201 were fishing boats, and the police officer in charge of that station reports that the number of the latter would have been greater but that during the days previous to the census some had left the anchorage for Aberdeen and Macao for the New Year Holidays.

This

32. The census of all persons living outside Victoria and of the floating population was taken by police officers placed for that purpose at the disposal of the Registrar General.

L

33. Victoria itself was divided for census purposes into four blocks:-Block A. bounded on the west by Mount Davis, on the south by the Pokfulam, Bonham and Caine Roads, on the east by Peel Street as far as Staunton Street, Staunton Street as far as the Old Bailey, the Police Compound, Wyndham Street and Pedder's Street, and on the north by the harbour; Block B. bounded on the West by Block A., on the south by the Hill District, on the east by Murray Road and the Albany Nullah and on the north by the harbour; Block C. bounded on the west by Block B. on the south by the Kennedy Road, on the east by the Naval Hospital, Bullock Lane, and No. 2 Police Station, and on the uorth by the harbour; Block D. consisting of the rest of the town south and east of Block C. Blocks B. and D. were enumerated entirely by the Police. In Blocks A. and C. they enumerated the European, American and other non-Chinese portion of the population and the Chinese living in buildings and tenements occupied by them, whilst the mass of the Chinese population in these two blocks, consisting of 142,830 persons, was numbered by 76 Chinese enumerators working directly under the Registrar General, and supervised by six chief watchmen.

471

:

34. The Mercantile Marine was numbered by the two Boarding Officers.

35. Occupants of Government Buildings were numbered by the Department concerned.

36. The total number of Police Officers employed on the work was 88, 34 being European and 44 Chinese. In addition there were 51 boatmen, engineers and stokers, who received a small gratuity for extra duty.

37. The number of persons in Victoria numbered by the Police was 6,296 Europeans, &c., and 15,616 Chinese. For this work two Sergeants, one Acting Sergeant, eight European Constables, one Sergeant Interpreter and nine Chinese Constables were detailed. The average number of persons dealt with by each European officer was 572 Europeans, &c., and 1,420 Chinese. The Chinese officers accompanied the Europeans and did not work separately. In the Central District the distribution of the papers occupied six days and the collection eight. The work, to be accurate, ought to be done quicker, and I think that at the next census it will be advisable to engage six additional Europeans. There ought to be no difficulty in obtaining suitable Portuguese, and one or two English-speaking Indians would be very useful.

38. Of the seventy-six Chinese enumerators acting immediately under the Registrar General thirteen were District Watchmen. The rest were volunteers. They were paid $4.00 for the work, but it is quite certain that very few, if any, would be willing to do the work again for the same sum. They found it much harder than they had expected. On the occasion of another census it will be necessary to raise the pay to at least $7.00 and to reduce the size of the sections. The average number of inhabitants to each section was 1879. It should not be more than 1,250, and no section should have more than 1,600 inhabitants. It is very important also that the enumerators should be of a good class. The work demands a great deal of good temper, patience and tact, as the lower classes, and especially the women, frequently do not understand what is required of them, and long explanations are necessary. The enumerators were all well educated and intelligent and did their work carefully, and I hope it will be possible on another occasion to obtain the services of men of similar position. As the New Year holiday had commenced, a number of teachers of the Grant-in-aid Schools were able to act as enumerators, but in term-time their assistance cannot be expected. In the Chinese part of Victoria the taking of the census was best done and first completed in the Wanchai and Hawan Districts which were under the supervision of the Chief Watchman of the Districts, TANG KUN-TSÉ, who performed his duties with intelligence and in the most satisfactory manner. The first section to be completed was one in Wanchai numbered by D. W. 15 Ló Tsor who handed in his returns on the afternoon of the 23rd January, and the second, one in Chungwan num- bered by YUNG KWONG-IP, one of the volunteers. All through, I was pleased to see an honourable spirit of emulation among the Chinese employed as enumerators and as clerks.

39. The arrangements made by the police officers in charge of the census in the Western and Eastern Districts of Victoria, and in the out-districts were good, and I was able to judge from an inspection of the schedules and of the enumerators' books and from the returns furnished that the work had been done with care and metliod. There were enough men for the work except in the Kowloon peninsula. This district was divided into seven sections, each section being entrusted to a European police officer who was assisted by one or more Chinese. It took five days to distribute and five days to collect the schedules. There was only one European officer and one Chinese for the whole of Hunghom, and one European and two Chinese for that part of Yaumati south of the pumping station. At least seven more Chinese ought to have been employed.

40. The floating population was numbered by the Water Police. The work was commenced on the night of the 20th with six boats. On the 21st two boats were employed all the day and one, half the day, and three boats were employed all day on the 22nd, 23rd and 24th. More than half the work was completed by the morning of the 21st, but when once the boats had begun to move there To ensure accuracy, was naturally more difficulty in discovering those which had not been numbered.

the work ought to be completed in one day, and steps taken to intercept boats leaving and entering the harbour. I do not think that there will be any difficulty in obtaining extra men other than the police to act as enumerators.

41. The rate of pay of those. employed in taking the census was as follows:-

Inspectors of Police,

Sergeants,

European Constables,

·

Sergeant interpreters and Chief Watchmen,

Chinese Constables, District Watchmen and other Chinese enumerators,. Boatmen, &c.,

$20.00

10.00

7.00

5.50

4.00

1.00

In judging of the rate of pay for the enumerators it must be remembered that the lower classes are quite unable to fill up the census schedules themselves and that this has to be done for them by the enumerators who have also to re-write a great many schedules which have been incorrectly filled up. I must not omit to mention that the schedules served on the houses in Sokompó Valley were kindly filled up for the villagers by the schoolmaster there and that in the Aberdeen District the schoolmasters gave similar help.

472

42. There was no room in any Government Building which could be used as a census office and a floor was therefore rented in D'Aguilar Street. The situation was very convenient but the space was not quite sufficient. The clerks employed were all Chinese One was paid at the rate of $30 a month, one at $20 a month, and the others partly by piece work and partly at the rate of $15 a month.

43. The sum paid in salaries to enumerators was $1,004 and to clerks in the census office $739.90, and the total cost of the census was $2,197.97.

44. In this connection it will be instructive to quote certain figures from the Report on ths Census of the Straits Settlements in 1891. For that part of Singapore within the municipal limits containing 19,541 houses and 153,043 inhabitants, 319 enumerators were employed at an average salary of $6.51, and 20 supervisors at an average salary of $52.25. For the floating population of 6,864, 19 enumera- tors were employed at $5 and three supervisors at $50. Transport was paid in addition. The cost of taking the census of the whole island, containing 184,554 inhabitants, was $6,445.61. The cost of compiling the returns for the whole of the Straits Settlements containing a population of 512,905 persons was $10,637.07, and the number of clerks employel was 29. The Superintendent of the Census recommends that at the next census the remuneration of enumerators within the municipal limits should be $7, and of supervisors $60, transport included. A good many of the enumerators were clerks employed in Government offices, in the municipal offices, and in merchants' offices, who had to do their work out of office hours. This was not the case in Victoria. If it had been, with the staff employed, the taking of the census would have been a work of very much greater length. In the municipality of Singapore the average number of inhabitants in an enumerator's section was 480; in Hongkong, 1,698.

45. The Military and Naval Authorities at the request of the Government assisted by taking a census of their establishments.

46. Mr. CHAPMAN, the Government Assessor, made the arrangements for taking the census in the out-districts and helped to supervise the clerks in the census office.

47. The following Tables are attached to this report :--

Table I.

Table II.

Table III.

Table IV.

Table V.

Table VI. Table VII.

Table VIII.

Table IX.

Table X.

Table XI.

Table XII. Table XIII.

Table XIV.

Table XV.

Table XVI. Table XVII.

Table XVIII. Table XIX.

Table XX. Table XXI. Table XXII.

The total Civil Population.

A Comparison between the population in the years 1891 and 1897. The European and American population according to race.

Persons of European and American race who claim British Nationality. Birth-places of the population of British origin.

Birth-places of the Portuguese.

Nationalities claimed by the Portuguese.

The Non-Chinese population other than Europeans, Americans and Eurasians. The ages of the European, American, and the other non-Chinese resident civil

population.

The ages of the Europeans, Americans and other non-Chinese on board the

shipping.

The ages of the total European, American and other non-Chinese civil population. The ages of the Chinese.

Native-places of the Chinese land population.

Natives of the Kwang-tung province according to their districts. Birth-places of the Chinese.

Chinese population of the villages of Hongkong.

Chinese population of British Kowloon.

Chinese population of the Registration Districts of Victoria in 1891 and in 1897. Comparison between the population of certain portions of Victoria in 1891 and

in 1897.

Population of Victoria according to Health Districts.

The number of Chinese families in Victoria in the year 1891 and in 1897. Number and description of boats and junks in the waters of the Colony and the

number of persons on each class of boat. Table XXIII. Military and Naval Establishments.

I have the honour to be,

The Honourable

THE COLONIAL SECRETARY.

Sir,

Your obedient Servant,

A. W. BREWIN, In charge of the Census.

LOCALITY.

Table I.

TOTAL CIVIL POPULATION OF THE COLONY.

+4

163

251115,154

45,119 | 160,273 | 118,809 48,161 166,970

10

6

14 1,485 106 1,591 8,159 3,485 11,644 8,318 19,202 7,240 26,142 19,673

1,719

289 2,008

3,513 11,831

7,485

27,158

1

47

50

.57

63

:

مد

9

9

European and

Americans other than Portuguese.

Portuguese.

Indians.

Races other than the before mentioned.

Total.

Eurasians.

CHINESE.

TOTAL.

Males. Females. Total. Males. Females. Total. Males. Females. Total. Males. Females. Total. Males. Females. Total. Males. Females. Total. Males. Females. Total. Males. Females.] Total.

NON-CHINESE.

403 882 4,437 3,325 7,762

87 437

11 448

Land Population.

Victoria,

1,452 988 2,440 979 1,219 2.198

715 273 988 421

399 820 3,567 2,879

6,446

888.5

The Peak,

210

166 376

1

4

18

2

20

1

ลง

2 230 173

403

Hongkong Villages,....

95

25

120

3

2

er

54

54

1

8 159

28 187

...

British Kowloon,

205

120

325

27

25

52 185

96

281

50

Stone Cutter's Island andĮ

1

2

LO

Green Island, ....

:

LO

...

}

Gap Rock,

'4

:

:

...

:

:

2

...

52

122

467

243

710

10

2

12

...

:

:

:

4

:

Total,..

96

176

1,970

1,299 3,269 | 1,011

1,252

2,263

977 371 1,348 479

345

11 356

4

4

1

1 87

:

Mercantile Marine,......

Floating Population.

The Harbour,

Aberdeen,

Shaukiwan,

Stanley,

Total,...

Grand Total,.

:

:

:

:

:

:..

...

:..

:

:

...

...

...

:

:

2,315 1,310 3,625 | 1,015

1,252

2,267

...

...

:

...

:

...

...

...

...

:

:

:

:

:

...

...

:

978

371 1,349 566 403 9694,874

:

5

272 |144,052 | 55,953 200,005|148,585

59,454 208,039

1,498

25 1,523 1,935

36 1,971

:

:

13,558

7,753

21,311

13,558

7,753

21,311

2,972

1,932

4,904

2,972

1,932

4,904

2,393

1,561

3,957

2,393

1,564 3,957

949

631

1,580

949

631 1,580

19,872 11,880

31,752

19,872

11,880 | 31,752

176

272|165,422 67,858 233,280 170,392 71,370 241,762

:

:

:

...

99

***

3,336

8,210

96

473

LOCALITY.

Table II.

COMPARISON BETWEEN THE CIVIL POPULATION IN THE YEARS 1891 & 1897.

MALES.

1891.

FEMALES.

MALES.

1897.

FEMALES.

474

Total.

Total.

Under 15. Over 15.

Total,

Under 15.

Over 15,

Total.

Under 15.

Over 15.

Total.

Under 15. Over 15.

Total.

[Victoria,

The Peak,

571

20

1,561

2,132

612

1,131

1,743

3,875

624

1,807

2,431

670

1,537

2,207

4,638

111

131

29

53

82

213

40

171

211

47

123

170

381

European and American, Civil Population,

Hongkong Villages,.

7

91

98

11

16

27

125

...

British Kowloon,

22

Police,...

22

223

95

117

21

45

95

117

22

18

Mercantile Marine,

740

740

24

Not included in the above,..

59

68

123

66

183

50

182

232

43

102

145

377

40

157

24

761

345

349

10

11

360

127

127

8

10

1

11

Total,...

635

2,602

3,237

743

1,339

2,082

5,319

727

2,601

3,331

772

1,789

2,561

5,892

Races other than Europeans,

Land Population,....................

124

850

974

150

315

465

1,439

273

1,277

1,550

344

604

948

2,498

Americans, and Chinese,

Mercantile Marine,.

251

251

1

1

252

83

88

88

...

Not included in the above,

2

1

1

2

4

Total,..

124

1,101

1,225

150

316

466

1,691

273

1,367

1,640

345

605

950

2,590

Total Civil Population other than Chinese,...

759

3,703

4,462

893

1,655

2,548

7,010

1,000

3,971

4,971

1,117

2,394

3,511

8,182

Chinese Land Population,-Victoria,

2,441

86,554

98,995

13,012

26,762

39,774

138,769

12,089

'Shaukiwan,.

Stanley,

753

·4,476

5,229

641

1.402

2,043

7,272

696

129

427

556

91

235

326

882

107

103,065

4,524

587

115,154

13,734

31,385

45,119

160,273

5,220

663

1,555

2,218

7,438

694

99

251

350

1,044

Aberdeen,

238

1,810

2.048

200

484

681

2,732

286

1,670

1.956

250

572

822

2,778

Pokfulam,

34

136

170

35

64

99

269

45

244

289

32

68

95

384

British Kowloon,

2,213

12,286

14,499

1,825

3,673

5,499

19,997

2,378

16,824

19,202

2,319

4,921

7,240

26,442

Mercantile Marine,

...

1,044

1,044

19

19

1,063

18

1,480

1,498

7

18

25

1,523

Not included in the above,

291

6,458

6,749

274

884

1,158

7,907

38

1,499

1,537

14

95

109

1,646

Floating Population,-Harbour,

Shaukiwan,

4,246

11,235

15,481

3,295

4,986

8,181

23,662

3,195

10.360

13,558

3,120

4,633

7,753

21,311

1

802

1,457

2,250

641

928

1,569

3,828

585

1,808

2,393

495

1,069

1,564

3.957

Stanley,..

115

237

352

$9

127

216

568

306

643

949

257

374

631

1,580

Aberdeen,

723

1,520

2,243

706

1,028

1,734

3,977

818

2,154

2,972

621

1,311

1,932

4,004

Total Chinese,.

21,985

127,640 149,625

20,809

40.492

61,301

210,926

20,564

144,858

165,422

21,611

46,247

67,858

233,280

Gran 1 Total,

22,714

131,343

154,087

21,702

42,147

63,849

217,936

21,564

148,829

170,393

22,728

48,641

71,369

241,762

Table III.

European and American population according to Race.

RESIDENT POPULATION. MERCANTILE MARINE.

475

TOTAL.

RACES.

Males. Females. Total. Males. Females. Total. Males.

Females. Total.

English,

816

576 1,392

72

Scotch,

315

149

464

49

Irish,

132

106

238

246

2

74

888

578

1,466

49

364

149

513

1

7

138

107

245

Welsh,

12

8

20

6

6

18

8

26

Other Natives of the British Isles

not defined as above,

49

50

99

21

+

25

25

70

54

124

1,324

889

2,213

154

American,

79

95

174

46

73

7

161

1,478

896

2,374

3

49

125

98

223

Armenian,

10

5

15

10

5

15

Austrian,

10

14

24

Belgian,

3

5

8

CO 2

3

3 2

13

14

27

2

5

5

10.

Bohemian,

I

1

1

Brazilian,

3

Chilian,

}

Danish,

10

Dutch,.

13

Or - mad Q

6

3.

6

9

1

2

2

7

17

3

W N

2

3

1

4

3

13'

7

20

5

18

13

5

18

:

Finnish,

1

1

1

1

2

2

:

French,

81

31

112

6

6

87

31

118

German,

203

89

292

74

74

277

89

366

Greek,

1

1

2

1

1

Hungarian,

4

2

6

::

4

2

6

Italian,

17

31

48

2

2

19

31

50

Jewish,

106

57

163

106

57

163

Maltese,

1

2

3

1

2

3

Norwegian,.

13

1

14

29

29

42

43

Peruvian,

2

1

3

2

2

4

1

5

Polish,

1

1

2

1

1

2

Portuguese,

1,011

1,252

2,263

4

4

1,015

1,252

2,267

Roumanian,

-

2

1

3

2

1

3

Russian,

4

7

11

4

4

8

7

15

Slavonic,.

1

.1

2

1

1

2

Spanish,

63

41

104

1

1.

64

41

105

Swedish,

11

4

15

16

1

17

27

5

32

Swiss,

6

1

7

6

1

7

...

Total,......

2,981

2,551

5,532

349

11

360

3,330

2,562

5,892

Table IV.

Persons of European and American Race who claim British Nationality.

Resident POPULATION.

MERCANTILE MARINE.

TOTAL.

RACES.

Males Females. Total.

Males. Females. Total. Males. Females. Total.

American, Armenian, Austrian,

2

1

.....

5

13

2

1

Danish,

1

1

∞ to co *

3

3

:::

3

13

3

2

1

1

1

3

Dutch,....

2

2

2

2

:

French,

12.

German,

5

WN

12

12

3

8

5

23

12

8

Hungarian,

1

1

1

1

...

Italian,

1

1

1

1

Jewish,

79

Maltese,

Norwegian,

912

39

118

79

39

2

3

82

118

2

3

2

2

2

Polish,

1

1

1

1

Portuguese,

21

30

51

21

30

51

Spanish,

9

9

18

9

9

18

Swedish,..

1

1

1

1

2

Total,...

135

104

239

1

2

136

105

241

476

Table V.

Birth-places of the population of British origin.

BRITISH POPULATION.

BRITISH POPULATION.

WHERE BORN.

WHERE BORN. -

Males. Females.

Total.

Males. Females.] Total.

England,

Wales,

686

351

1,037

Austria,

1

1

20

7

27

Batavia,

1

1

Scotland,

289

84

373

Brazil,

1

1

Ireland,

......

88

47

135

Caroline Islands,

2

2

Channel Islands,

8

8

China,

28

25

53

Formosa,

2

2

Total,.

1,091

489

1,580

France,

1

3

4

Germany,

5

5

Aden,..

1

1

Holland,

Australia,

Ascension Island,

Barbadoes,.

Bermuda,

1

1

...

Italy,

2

39

47

86

Japan,

1

2

3

Macao,

11 N

1

1

3

5

13

2

4

1

1

Morocco.

1

British Guiana,.

Burmah,

Canada,

Cape Colony,

Ceylon,

Gibraltar,

Hongkong,

India,..

Jamaica,

Malta,

:7:2

1

1

2

Russia,

1

1

2

1

1

South America,

1

2

10

1

No

28

Spain,

3

1

4

2

3

Switzerland,

1

1

1

1

Turkey,

1

1

6

8

14

United States of America,

2

4

6

213

244

457

Venezuela,

1

1

17

17

34

West Indies,

4

5

∞ N

2

2

At Sea,

1

3

8

Not Stated,

6

41

4

5

7

Manila,

3

1

4

Mauritius,

1

1

2

Newfoundland,

1

1

New Zealand,

3

6

Total,...

69

55

124

Straits Settlements,

4

11

Trinidad,

3

4

Total,......

318

352

670

Grand Total,

1,478

896

2,374

Australia,

The Azores,

China,.

Damão,

England,.

Hongkong,

India,

Japan,...

Loanda,

Масао,

Where born.

The Philippine Islands,

Portugal,

Siam,

Straits Settlements,

Timor,

Not Stated,

...

Table VI.

Birth-places of the Portuguese population.

Males.

Females.

Total.

1

1

1

23

43

66

...

2

2

1

588

626

1,214

94

9

1

10

4

5

9

1

1

374

557

931

5

5

10

6

4

10

4

3

7

1

1

2

1

1

1

1

Total,......

1,016

1,251

2,267

American,

British,

German,

Portuguese,

Spanish,.....

NATIONALITY.

Table VII.

Nationalities claimed by the Portuguese population.

MALES.

FEMALES.

TOTAL.

1

1

21

30

51

1

1

991

1,219

2,213

1

1

Total,

1,015

1,252

2,267

Table VIII. -

Non-Chinese Races other than European and American.

*477

RESIDENT POPULATION.

RACES..

Males. Females. Total.

Afghans,

13

13

Africans,

19

3

22

1

Annamese,

1

1

:

Arabians,

19

1

20

Asiatics (not defined),

12

19

5

MERCANTILE MARINE.

TOTAL.

Males. Females. Total. Males. Females. Total.

13

...

13

1

20

3

23

1

1

Caroline Islanders,....

10

5

:

Egyptians,

1

1

Japanese,

173

162

335

63

:

:

:

:

19

1

20

5

12

12

24

5

5

:

5

1

...

1

63

236

162

398

Malays,

76

131

207

12

...

12

83

131

219

Persians,......

12

5

17

12

:

Philippine Islanders,.......

134

82

216

Siamese,....

2

2

1

:

Singhalese.......:....

15

15

:

Timor, Native of

1

1

Turkish,.

2

2

4

West Indians,

4

1

3

:

:

:..

:..

:..

:..

:

:

:

134

82

ઉપલ

17

216

1

3

:

3

15

15

:

:

:

:

1

1

ลง

2

2

4

4

1

5

Not stated,

A

2

4

2

2

4

Total,..........

479

403

882

87

:

:.

87

566

403

969

Table IX.

THE AGES OF THE EUROPEAN, AMERICAN AND THE OTHER NON-CHINESE RESIDENT CIVIL POPULATION.

BRITISH.

AMERICANS.

OTHER EUROPEANS EXCEPT PORTUGUESE.

PORTUGUESE.

INDIANS.

EURASIANS.

THE REST OF THE NON-CHINESE.

TOTAL.

AGE.

Male. Female. Total. Male. Female. Total. | Male. Female. Total. Male. Female. Total. Male. Female. Total. Male. Female. | Total.

Male.

Female. Total. Male. Female. Total.

478

Under 1 year,

1 and under 5 years,

33

38

71

1

1

7

t-

10

17 28

30

58

1276

16

37

8

2

10

6

7

13

103

104

207

105

109 214

1

7

8

24

28

52 106

97

203

43

51

94

14

30

44

19

17

36

312.

339

651

5

10

84

103

187

2

9

26

29

}}

""

28

55 115

111

226

43

43

86

18

28

46

24

33

57

316

349

665

10

15

51

63

114

3

5

8

25

17

42 109

123

232

28

34

62

16

38

54

32

46

78

264

326

590

15

""

20

67

59

126

12

36

23

59 132

107

239

52

"1

22

37

89

19

35

54

49

75

23

20

25

120

77

197

17

26

59

33

92 112

127

239

173

73

246

10

14

19

68

75

"}

12 18

124

359

344

703

143

546

416

962

25

30

202 '151 353

19

25 83

56

}}

139 95

146 241

198

51

249

1

13

68

50

118

27

660

478

1,138

30

35

196

110 306

10

19

}}

>>

23

72

39

111

74

97

171

146

20

166

7

****

61

38

99

35

"

40;;

168

66

234

10

18

65

11093

28

88

93

53

53

68 121

99

13

112

6.

10

49

23

72

825

559

320

879

446

214

660

40

45

106

37

143

00

5

10

13

61

12

"}

73 39

80 119

52

13

65

1

4

5

33

12

45

300

163

463

"}

45

50

77

31

108

11 37

13

50

38

75

113

39

8

47

w

21

9

30

221

141

362

50

55

53

18

71

9

37

43

35

68

103

37

42

16

25

184

113

297

"}

"}

55

60

26

13

39

9

16

23

40

"

""

60

65

17

4

21

1

00

6

14

15

"}

""

2015

57

97

22

26

:

13

3

16

123

87

210

30

45

12

12

...

:

10

12

65

43

108

65

70

"}

>>

70

75

"

75

80

25

80

85

12 8 18

H

1

10

1

1

2

2

7

12

13

25

6

2

8

1

1

2

3

2

5

32

22

54

"}

:

""

"}

:

$5

90

}}

90

95 and over,

Full,

95

"}

25

:

Adult,

**

...

...

...

Age not stated,

9

...

:

...

...

Total,..

1,324 889

2,213

80

95

175

567

315

:

:

::

:

:

1

5

:

:

:

:

:

15

1

1

4

7

11

15

1

5

16

17

33

F:

T

:

:..

:

:

6

9

2

1

3

3

...

...

CU

2

5

1

3

1

...

240

:

:

:

3

Co

:

:

-

:

:

:

7

7

14

...

:

1

5

11

...

3

co

3

:

...

...

:

...

:

...

...

...

:

...

...

:

:

:

...

:

...

...

:..

...

:

:

...

...

...

***

:

882 1,011

:

1

...

1

...

:

...

...

:

F.

...

3

2

5

...

...

2

:

2

:

1

1

11

7

18

1,252 2,263 977

371

1,348

96 176

272 479.

403

882

4,533

3,501

8,031

+7

Table X.

INDIAN.

THE REST OF THE NON- CHINESE POPULATION.

TOTAL.

THE AGES OF THE EUROPEANS, AMERICANS AND OTHER NON-CHINESE ON BOARD THE SHIPPING.

BRITISH.

AMERICAN.

PORTUGUESE.

OTHER EUROPEANS.

+

Under 1 year,

Males. Females. Total. Males. Females. Total. Males. Females. Total. Males. Females. Total. Males. Females. Total. Males. Females. Total. Males. Females. Total.

:

:

1 year and under 5,...

...

1

1

5

10,...

2

""

10

15,...

:

15

44

20,...

5

:

:

:

లు

:

:

:

:.

...

:

:

20

25,... 18

18

.i

"

25

"

30,

37

1

38

7

:

1

2

found

1

30

""

3

35,... 30

3

33333

5

5

LO

335

15

40,..

27

29

7

1

8

40

45.

50

34

45,... 18

50,... 9

55,...

18

4

4

:

:

8

:

C

2

1

3

:

:.

:

:

:.

:

55

33

60,

"}

60

65,...

1

65

"

70,...

Not Stated,

...

:

...

:

...

:

:

1

:

2

:

:

:

:

2

:

:..

:

:

:.

:

:

...

:.

:

:.

:

...

...

:

.:.

:

:

:..

1

:

2

17

'1

42

:

:

32

1

15

:

17

9

.4

...

:

:

:

:

...

:

:

:

1

:

:

...

...

1

1

17

42

333

15

17

9

4

2

:

:

:.

:

:

F:.

...

:

...

:

1

:

:

:

:

...

:

:

...

:

...

:.

:

:.

1

:

:

:

:

20

...

:

:.

:

:.

:..

27

9

9

5

10

5

:

:

:

1.

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

...

:

:

:

:.

:.

4

.

:

1

1

1

4

9

18

:

18

20

60

1

61

27

114

1

115

9

76

80

9

58

61

44

44

...

29

:

29

9

-

10

14

:

14

3

...

N

10

:..

:

5

Total,..

154

7

161

46

3

49

4

4 145

1

146

1

Jud.

s

1 87

:

5

Сл

87

437

11

448

479

AGE.

Table XI.

THE AGES OF THE TOTAL EUROPEAN, AMERICAN AND THE OTHER NON-CHINESE CIVIL POPULATION.

AMERICANS,

OTHER EUROPEANS, EXCEPT PORTUGUESE.

PORTUGUESE,

INDIANS.

EURASIANS.

THE REST OF THE NON- CHINESE POPULATION,

TOTAL.

Males. Females. Total. Males. Females. Total. Males. Females. Total. Males. Females. Total. Males. Females. Total. Males. Females. Total. Males. Females. Total. Males. Females. Total.

BRITISH.

480

· Under 1 month,

1

1

2

1

2

1

1

1

1

2

3

5

8

:.

1 month and under 12,

32

37

69

1

you

1

7

10

17

27

29

56

22

1 year and under 5,

105

110

215

1

7

8

5 years and under 10,

86 103

189

2

9 27

22

21

28

52 106

97

203

43

233

15

37

7

2

9

6

LO

11

101

99

200

51

94

14

30

44

19

17

36

312

340

652

29

56 115

111

226 43

43

10

>>

15,

51

63

114

3

5

8

25

255

23

17

15

19

20,

72

59

131

7

8

15

37

23

288

42 109

123

232 28

34

888

86

18

28

46

24

33

57

320

349

669

62

16

38

54

32

46

78

261

326

590

60 132

107

239

52

37

89

19

35

54

58

20

28

25,

138

77

215

12

18

30

76

33 109 114

127

241

173

73

246

10

14

19

25

"

30,

239

152

891

13

19

32

125

56

181

96

146

242 198

51

249,

LO

13

95

11253

195

888 38

75

133

377

344

721

75

163

606

417

1,023

50

145

774

479

1,253

30

235

35,

226

113

339

14

10

24

104

40

119

144

74

97

171

146

20

166

6

t

70

38

108

635

321

959

35

40,

195

68

263

15

11

26

10

"}

45,

124

37

161

12

5

10

2=3

80

88

28

108

53

68

121

99

17

78

12

90 39

80

119

52

13

සස

13

112

4

6

10

58

23

81

504

217

721

65

1

4

5

38

12

50

344

163

507

45

50,

86

31

117

16

3

19

46

99995

13

59 38

75

113

39

8

47

1

2

3

24

9

33

250

141

391

,,

55

689

50

>>

55,

56

18

71

8

co

12

41

6

47

"

60,

30

13

43

10

13

21

28

市经

35

68

41

57

338

103

37

42

4

4

16

9

25

193

114

307

338

98

22

4

26

13

16

137

87

224

:

60

65

29

"

65,

18

22

22

3

I

10

16

15

30

45

"}

70,

4

70

75,

3

AC

CYP

3

1

1

1

:

75

"

80,

:

80

$5,

"

85

90,

90

95 and over,

"1

95,

***

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

...

...

:.

:

:

...

:

10

:

:

:

:.

:

2

7

12

13

25

ગા

12

:..

12

10

12

68

43

111

:

~

8

1

1

3

2

5

LO

34

22

7

4

11

15

1

1

4

1

10

5

.16

17

3333333

26

56

3

6

9

2

.1

2

2

7

7

14

:

...

2

5

1

3

1

1

1

5

LQ

11

Full.

1

1

...

Adult,

Co

2

5

LO

***

...

...

:

***

Age not stated,.

15

2

2

:

...

...

...

...

...

Total,....

1,478

896

2,374

125

98

223

712

316

1,028 | 1,015

1,252

2,267

978

*871

1,349

F

:..

.:.

...

*3

...

...

:.

:..

:

:

ce

:

:

:

3

...

:

:

:.

:.

:

:

3

...

...

:.

F:

:

:

:

:

:

:

...

...

:

...

.

:

:

:

1

1

3

...

2

Б

...

:

5

1

6

16

7

23

:

...

96

36

176 272

566

403

969 4,970

3,512

8,482

:

:

:

:

...

:

...

...

Table XII.

THE AGES OF THE CHINESE POPULATION.

STONE CUTTER'S,

HONGKONG

VICTORIA.

THE PEAK.

VILLAGES.

BRITISH

KOWLOON.

GREEN ISLAND AND GAP ROCK.

TOTAL.

MERCANTILE

MARINE.

FLOATING

POPULATION.

TOTAL.

AGES.

Males.

Fe-

males.

Total. Males.

Fe-

males.

Total. Males.

Fe-

males.

Total. Males.

Fe-

males.

Total. Males.

Fe-

males.

Total. Males.

Fe-

males.

Total. Males.

Fe-

males.

Total. Males.]

Fė-

males.

Total.Males.

Fe-

males.

Total.

Under 1 month,

12

20

1

2

3

9

16

25

:

:

:

1 month and under 12 months,

128 141 269

2

10

12

16 22

38

146

173 319

1 year and under 5 years,

3,007 3,824 6,831

4

9 261 313 574 690 765 1,455

5 years and under 10,

3,756 4,876 8,632|

10

16

10

15

26

.15,

5,190

4,881 10,071

21

3

""

"1

>>

"

20,

13,487

3,794 17,281 168

3

171 772

394 384 778 805 24 476 336 812 867 820 1,092 2,129

855 1,660

:

:.

:

:

223

:

:

9

16

25

22

3,962 4,907 | 8,869 |

1

...

4,965 6,121 11,086

1

674 1,541

3

3 | 6,557 | 5,894 |12,451

16

1

26 48 168 200 368

4 1,410 1,436| 2,846 | 5,373 | 6,346 | 11,719

3

1,725 1,641|3,366| 6,691| 7,764 | 14,455

17 1,836 1,390| 3,226| 8,409 | 7,285|15,694

t

558 2,687

8

816,564 4,675 21,239

134

20

25,

[18,981 4,612 (23,593 291

3

294|1,252

294 1,546 3,406

}}

"}

25

}}

"}

30,

18,184 4,243 |22,427 | 350

30

35,

14,845 | 3,884 18,729 248

"

39

35

""

""

40, .....

40

45,

161

|11,268 | 3,282 |14,550 | 9,338 3,428 12,766 104

218

75

45

>>

59

50,

6,655 2,373 9,028 :

66

359 1,270

10 258 988

16 177 813

15 119 631 12 78 499 217 716 933 355 1,288

277 1,547 3,103

251 1,239 2,414

254 | 1,067 | 1,778

849|1,408

724 4,130

704❘ 3,807

611❘ 3,025

515 2,293

13

...

13 23,943

5,633 (29,576

301

3

14

1

15 22,921 5,234 28,155

285

4

289 2,531

134 | 2,040 | 1,236 | 3,276 |18,738 | 5,911|24,649 304 2,733 1,182 3,915 26,977| 6,818 33,795 959 3,490 25,737 6,197 31,934

2

2 18,497 4,756 23,253

250

2

252 | 2,305

904

3,209 21,052 | 5,662|26,714

4 14,024 | 4,067 18,091

188

2

190 1,437

623

2,060 15,649| 4,692|20,341

397❘ 1,805

LO

5 11,486 4,058 |15,544

136

2

1

3 | 8,155 | 2,958 11,113

64

:

:

136

1,391

64 734

50

"}

55,

5,065| 2,466 | 7,531

40

15

55

2

60,

2,741 1,347 4,088

11

5

10

55 359 227 586 685 357 1,042 16 219 136 355 454 230

1

1

6,149 | 3,066 | 9,215

35

35

739

657 2,048 13,013| 4,715|17,728 469 1,203 8,953 | 3,427 | 12,380 501 1,240 6,923 3,567 10,490

684

3,425 | 1,718 | 5,143

7

t-

7

332

213

575 3,764 1,961 | 5,725

60

"

"}

65,

1,545 998 2,543

co

4 12 126

107

233 283 211

494

1

35 33

>>

"}

70,

551 440 991

3

Co

52

61

113

111 105

216

70

75

013

"

""

75,

283 314 597

:

:

33333

30

63

55

80

135

A

80,

85

133 218

:

က

23

31

22 46

68

...

...

...

:.

:

:

:

:

.:.

1,963 1,320 3,283

6

6

to

299 261

560 2,268 1,581 3,849

717

606 1,323

1

1

97

115

...

212 815 721 1,536

371

115 202 317

424 795

98

104

202

469 528 997

:

32

37

69

...

69

147 239 386

80

85,

32

99

32

53 85

3

20

23

11

15

26

...

85

90,

4

12

16

:

90

""

""

95,

1

3

4

93 and over,

3

3

...

Not Stated,

...

...

:

:

:

:..

:

5

LO

7

8

LA

***

:

...

:

...

1

1

....

...

:

...

...

:

:

:

...

...

:

...

...

30

6

36

...

46 88 134

24

29

...

4

3

...

...

30

6

36

73

7 80

81

62 143 184

75

19

30 49

65 118

183

00

3

11

13

27

40

1

CH

:

20

a

10

10

3

...

:

1233

259

Total,..

115,154 45,119 | 160,278|1,485

106 1,591

8,159 3,485 11,644 |19,202|7,240 26,442|

52

62

Co

55 | 144,052 55,958 | 200,005 1,498

25 1,523 19,872 11,880 31,752 165,422 67,858 238,280

481

482

Table XIII.

Native places of the Chinese Land Population.

Provinces and Countries.

Males.

Females.

Total.

Provinces and Countries.

Males.

Females.

Total.

Brought forward,... 144,934

54,941

199,875

Anhui,

3

CVS

11

Bannermen,

2

1

3

Chekiang,

174

24

198

Boat Population,....

2

&

10

Fokien,

1,024

259

1,283

Hakka,

3

6

Hupeh,

19

1

20

Annam,

7

27

34

Hunan,

34

17

51

Australia,.

1

1

Kansu,

1

British Empire,

-་

7

7

14

Kiangsi,

26

4

30

Corea,

2

2

Kiangsu,

151

185

336

Formosa,

1

Kuangsi,

53

94

147

Germany,

2

2

Kuangtung,

143,238

54,288

197,526

Hongkong,

567

956

1,523

Kweichau,

1

1

India,

2

1

Pechili,

25

44

69

Japan,

8

4

12

....

Shansi,

10

5

5

Масао,

6

19

25

Shantung,

F G

64

5

69

Siam,

1

1

Shensi,

2

2

Straits Settlements, ...

2

4

Szechuen,

2

2

United States of

America,...

4

6

10

Yunnan,....

31

34

Lukfa, (?),

1

Province not stated,..

76

13

89

Yanming, (?),

1

1

Carried forward,... 144,934

54,941

199,875

Total,... 145,550

55,978

201,528

Table XIV.

Natives of the Kwang-tung Province resident in the Colony accordiag to their Districts.

483

Name of Prefecture

Males. Females.

Total.

and District.

Name of Prefecture and District.

Males.

Females.

Total.

Chiu Chau Fu-

Lo Tung Chau—

Chinghoi,

389

27

416

Saining,

21

14

35

Chiuyeung,

2,507

132

2,639

Tung-on,

468

107

575

Fungshun,

12

12

Not stated,

44

7

51

Hoiyeung,

242

37

279

Iuping,

30

7

37

Total,

533

128

661

Kityeung,

26

12

Póning,

126

Táipó,

20

297

38

135

Lui Chau Fu-

27

Hoihong,

1

1

Wailoi,

21

21

Suikai,

1

Not stated,

612

62

674

Tsui-man,

3

Not stated,

4

11

15

21310

2.

3

Total,

3,985

293

4,278

Total,.......

9

12

21

Ka Ying Chau-

Cheunglok,

1,374

.383

1,757

Chanping,

4

6

10

Nam Hung Chau-

Nam-on,..

1

1

Hingning,

580

48

628

Ping-uen,.

2

4

6

Tszhing,

1

1

Not stated,

O

4

6

Not stated,

694

126

820

Total,.......

3

10

5

8

Total,..

2,654

567

3,221

King Chau Fu-

Shiu Chau Fu-

Cheungfa,

1

1

Kukkong,

Hoinám,

26

26

:

Lokcheung,

Kingshan,

26

Lamkó,

11

9

35

Yingtak,

1

Yanfá,

5

45

1

Lok-ui,

2

2

Not stated,

00 110 12

3

8

1

5

50

2

3

Mancheung,

Ui-tang, Not stated,

33

2

35

5

5

Total,

52

12

64

42

Total,..

134

22

29

71

Shiu Hing Fu—

42

176

Fungchün,

26

26

Hoikin,

5

5

Ko Chau Fu-

Mauming,

4

7

11

Hoiping,

4,004

773

4,777

Hokshán,

3,012

511

3,523

Ngehun,.

1

Shekshing,

Sun-i,

Tinpák,

-Not stated,

::

Q

00

Ko-iu,

2,759

359

3,118

3

3

2

4

Ko-ming,

69

3

72

14

14

Kwangning,

29

4

33

24

32

Sanhing,

409

33

442

Sz-ui,

1,525

313

1,838

Total,.

14

51

65

Yanping,

1,592

217

1,809

Yeungkong,

15

10

25

Kwang Chau Fu-

Yeungtsun,

6

9

Fa-uen,

1,534

528

2,062

Not stated,

481

162

643

Heungshan,

7,030

4,143

11,173

Lungmun,

27

Namhoi,

16,348

24 6,122

51

Total,.....

13,932

2,388

16,320

22.470

{

Punue,

16,894

10,527

27,421

Wai Chau Fu-

Samshui,

5,670

1,420

7,090

Cheungning,

Sanning,

4,670

805

5,475

Hoifung,

1 2,191

1

***

181

2,372

Sanon,

14,471

7,226

21,697

Ho-uen,

64

22

Sanui,

15,251

3,034

18,285

Kwaishin,

8,116

2,690

86 10,806

Shuntak,

6,843

2,491

9,334

Lukfung,

56

7

63

Tsangshing,

1,067

427

1,494

Lungchün,

208

12

220

Tsinguen,

1,198

224

1,422

Poklo,

759

263

1,022

Tsungfá,

58

16

74

Wingon,.

87

9

96

Tungkun,

Not stated,

17,724 195

9,366

27,090

Wo-ping,

5

1

6

970

1,465

Not stated,

1,130

257

1,387

Total,..

109,280

47,323

156,603

Total,........

12,617

3,442

16,059

Lim Chau Fu—

Hoppó,

Lingshan,

Not stated,

722

4

11

2

Fá Chau,

:

1

4

Total,......................

10

8

18

Kám Chau,

Lin Ping Chau, Tak Hing Chau, Tsim Chau,

227

2

2

14

1

1.

1

6121

Lin Chau Fu-

Linsban,

3

3

Yeungshan,

1

1

Total,

5

17

22

223

Not stated,

Total,.........

6

6

10

:

10

Grand Total,... 143,238

54,288

197,526

484

BIRTH-PLACES.

Annam,

British North Borneo,

Hongkong,

Honolulu,

India,

Italy,

Japan,

Kam Shau,

*

Straits Settlements,

United States of America,

Other Countries not in China,

Total,.

Table XV.

Birth-places of the Chinese population.

MALES.

FEMALES.

TOTAL.

1

1

1

1

4,574

4,459

9,033

1

1

3

2

1

3

2

1

3

19

15

34

24

28

52

1

1

15

10

25

4,642

4,516

9,158

"Kam Shan" denotes either the United States of America or Australia.

Table XVI.

Chinese population of the Villages of Hongkong.

VILLAGES.

Pokfulam,

Tinwan,

MALES.

FEMALES.

TOTAL.

289

95

384

48

15

63

Aberdeen,

890

277

1,167

Tai-shü-wan,

Aplichau,

4

4

8

783

340

1,123

Fui Hiu Tsün,

Little Hongkong, Old Village,

Little Hongkong, New Village,

21

11

32

95

115

210

68

51

119

Wongchukhang,

18

5

23

Shamshuiwan,

17

19

Tongpó,

12

2

14

Aberdeen District Total,..

1,956

822

2,778

Tsinshuiwan,

15

15

Stanley,

375

256

631

Wongmakok,

23

21

44

Taitam,

33

29

62

Taitamtuk,

24

19

43

Taitam Waterworks,...

211

211

Hoktsui,

13

25

38

Stanley District Total,

694

350

1,044

Shek-o,..

128

128

256

Chaiwan,

95

73

168

Akung-ngam,. Shaukiwan,

Futau Wat, Kau Kan Uk, Ma Shan Ha,.. Chun Lung Uk,.. Tsin-shui Matau, Sai Wan Ho, Wongkoktsui, Shui-tsingwan, Quarry Bay,

180

188

368

1,302

636

1,938

34

34

68

10

12

22

119

48

167

89

45

134

871

447

1,318

206

129

335

90

54

144

140

90

230

1,617

191

1,808

Tsat Tszmui,.

339

143

482

Shaukiwan District Total,

5,220

2,218

7,438

Grand Total,

8,159

3,485

11,644

7

VILLAGES.

Table XVII.

Chinese population of British Kowloon,

MALES.

FEMALES.

TOTAL.

Kaupuishek,

Matau wai,

Matauchung,

28

21

49

125

155

280

171

117

288

Mataukok,

147

64

211

Haupuilung,

46

37

83

Sanshan,......

196

50

246

Tokwawan,

710

380

1,090

Shekshan,

139

88

227

Hok-uen,

924

303

1,227

Kwolowan,...

116

73

189

Taiwan,

26

19

45

Hunghòm,

4,488

1,388

5,876

Tsopaichai,

13

6

19

Kowloon Point,

1,591

169

1,760

Yaumati,

5,289

2,762

8,051

Uenchau,

80

29

109

Fopang,

36

36

72

Mati,

558

262

820

Mongkoktsui,..

1,250

406

1,656

Taishekku,

48

27

75

Homantin,

180

117

297

Mongkok,

102

116

218

Ho-pui,

21

8

29

Taikoktsui,

1,651

450

2,101

Cosmopolitan Dock,

556

62

618

Fuktsünheung,

711

95

806

Total,

19,202

7,240

26,442

Table XVIII.

Population of the Registration Districts of Victoria in 1891 and in 1897.

DISTRICTS.

1891.

1897.

485

INCREASE.

DECREASE.

Nos. 1 and 2,...........................

No. 3,......

3,581

4,282

701

34,559

45,570

11,011

...

No. 4,.

31,302

18,784

No. 5,

12,067

12,009

12,518

58

No. 6,.......

36,196

41,197

5,001

Nos. 7 and 8,.

16,944

20,988

4,014

134,649

142,830

20,757

12,576

Deduct decrease,.

12,576

Total increase,

8,181

486

Table XIX.

Comparison between the population of certain portions of Victoria in 1891 and 1897.

Census Section.

Overcrowding Report Section.

Population in Population in

Increase.

Decrease.

1891.

1897.

III.

4,

20,

1,533

1,821

288

5,

19,

1,755

2,092

337

""

6,

18.

1,468

1,410

58

"

7,

17,

1,936

2,378

442

8,

16.

995

3,282

2,287

9,

27, 28,

2,797

3.739

912

>>

.10,

29,

1,957

1,789

168

"2

.11,

30,

1,795

2,089

294

"

.12,

31,

1,370

2,178

808

29

13,

33, 34,

1,439

1,767

328

""

14,

35, 36,

727

1,989

1,262

"

.15, 16,

37,

3,359

3,346

13

>>

.17,

38, 39,

1,641

1,841

200

""

..18,

40, 41,

1,576

2,917

1,341

19, 20,

63, 64,

2,522

2,904

382

"

.21,

65,

1,361

2,250

889

"

22,

66,

1,082

1,203

121

23,

67, 68,

1,278

1,373

95

""

IV.

1,

59, 60, 61, 62,

1,514

1,828

314

2,

87, 88, 89, 90, 91,

1,438

1,709

271

">

3.

85, 86, 96, 97,

2,847

2,060

787

22

.4,

5,

70, 71, 78, 79, 80, 81, 82,

2,881

3,425

544

"

6,

76, 77, 83, 84,

1,475

1,884

409

7,

72, 73, 74, 75,

1,434

1,767

333

8.

109, 110,

1,069

1,295

226

"

9.

108,

1,453

1,163

290

"

10,

107,

1,587

1,346

241

19

19.

.11,

100,

1,120

890

230

༢.

1,

69, 118,

1,486

1,304

182

2,

112, 113, 117,

1,678

1,939

261

>>

3,

111, 114, 115,

1,655

1,923

268

""

4,

116, 119, 120, 121, 122,

1,488

1,615

127

5,

128, 129, 130, 131,

1,664

2,075

411

""

6,

132,

461

460

1

>>

.7, VI 7,

123, 124, 125,

2,612

2,534

78

""

99

V 8, VI 6,

127, 133,

2,642

2,842

200

VI.

2,

161,

1,347

1,216

131

3,

153, 157,

1,629

2,452

823

""

4,

158, 159, 160, 174, 175,

1,708

2,041

333

""

5,

184,

1,852

2,215

363

"

8,

126,

1,563

1,358

205

19

9.

148, 149, 150, 154,

1,630

2,333

703

..

"

10,

151, 152, 155, 156,

1,347

1.225

. 122

..11,

176, 177,

1,556

1,811

255

""

.12.

135,

1,292

1,178

114

"J

.13, 14,

136, 137, 138,

3,115

3,013

102

>>

.15,

139, 140,

2,353

3,223

870

""

12

.16, 17, 18,

180, 181, 182, 183, 184, 185,

5,065

6,289

1,224

19,

141, 142, 143, 144, 145, 146, 147,

1,672

2,052

330

.20,

.178, 179,

1,684

1,702

18

""

.21, 22, 23,

186, 187, 188,

1,591

4,649

58

VII. & VIII... 1,

207, 209, 210,

1,664

2,834

1,170

2

2,

208, 208A, 211,

1,615

2,134

519

3,

212, 213, 214,

1,704

1,948

244

"}

"}

4,

215,

575

1,313

738

>>

"

"

.5, 6,

216, 217,

2,902

3,458

556

>"

"

7,

218, 219, 220, 221, 222, 223, 227, 228,

1,648

3,713

2,065

8,

230, 231, 232,

1,583

585

998

35

""

9.

233, 234, 235, 236, 237, 238, 239,

1,473

1,684

211-

13

..10,

224, 225, 229,

1,775

1,756

19

""

*

19

..11,

226, 241, 242,

1,569

1,563

6

110,007

130,172

23,910

3,745

Deduct decrease,

3,745

Total increase,

20,165

Table XX.

Population of Victoria according to Health Districts.

EUROPEANS, AMERICANS

AND RACES OTHER

EURASIANS.

CHINESE.

TOTAL.

487*

HEALTH

THAN CHINESE.

DISTRICTS.

Males. Females. Total. Males. Females. Total. Males. Females.

Total.

Males. Females. Total.

No. 1,.........

227

182

409

4 5,737

1,956

7,698

5,964

2,142

8,106

2,...

523

535

1,058

20

31

51

15,796

5,306

21,102

16,339

5,872

22,211

""

3,

910

874

1,784

9

55

64

3,370

830

4,200

4,289

1,759

6,048

4,.

1,015 736

1,751

27

47

74

15,663

7,553

23,216

16,705

8,336 25,041

5,.

211

124

335

1

1

2

""

13,370

8,334

21,704

13,582

8,459

22,041

6,.

217

163

380

6

18

24

12,871

3,787 16,658

13,094

3,968 17,062

ד

79

91

170

:

11,243

4,740 15,983

11,322

4,831

16,153

8,.

96

27

123

20

20

""

14,123

9,

98

55

153

4

6

""

10

17,067

"

10,.

191

92

283

1

1

2

5,914

4,407 18,530 14,239 6,774

23,841 17,169 1,432 7,346 6,106

4,434 18,673

6,835 24,004

1,525

7,631

Total,...... 3,567

2,879

6,446

88

163

251

115,154

45,119 | 160,273118,809

48,161 166,970

Table XXI.

Number of Chinese families in the ten registration districts of Victoria.

In 1891,........

In 1897,......

.14,120 families.

21,740. 99

Table XXII.

CHINESE FLOATING POPULATION.

Number and description of Boats and Junks in the waters of the Colony and the number of

persons on each class of Boat.

POPULATION.

SHAUKI-

DESCRIPTION OF VESSELS. HARBOUR.

STANLEY. ABERDEEN. TOTAL.

WAN.

Males. Females. Total.

Passenger Boats,

1,197

Cargo Boats and Lighters,

1,102

21

1

1,197 1,124

Steam Launches,

78

1

1

Harbour Boats,

644

289

4

70

2,706

2,783 5,489 5,676 3,293 80

563 1,007 2,982

8,969

1

564

1,626

4,608

Total,......

3,021

310

5

10

72

3,408

11,927 7,703

19,630

Fishing Boats,

332

335

201

726

1,594 6,046 3,901

9,947

Passenger and Trading Junks,...

127

12

Grand Total,.......

3,480

657

206

798

139 1,899

5,141

276

2,175

19,872 11,880

31,752

Army,

Navy,

Table XXIII.

Military and Naval Establishments.

......2,850

.2,268

Total,.....

...5,118

:

599

145

No. 91/7

8

HONGKONG

RETURNS OF SUPERIOR AND SUBORDINATE COURTS FOR 1896.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor.

No. 8.

SUPREME COURT, HONGKONG, 8th January, 1897.

SIR,-I have the honour to forward to you herewith the Return of Criminal cases in the Supreme Court for 1896.

The Honourable

Number of Cases tried.

Number of Persons tried.

9217

23

THE COLONIAL SECRETARY,

&c.,

&c.,

&.c.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

J. W. NORTON KYSHE,

Registrar.

RETURN of CRIMINAL CASES tried in the SUPREME COURT of HONGKONG during the Year 1896.

SENTENCE.

Charges

Cases

Abandoned. Postponed."

CRIMES.

Convicted.

Administering stupifying drug,.

Applying a destructive substance with intent to

disable,

Assault with intent to rob,..

Assault with intent to ravish,

Attempt to bribe,

1

Burglary and Larceny,

Forgery,

10

Larceny,

1

Piracy and Murder,

Rape,

III24

Larceny after previous conviction,

Larceny by a Servant,

Manslaughter,..

Murder,

Obtaining money under false pretences, Perjury,

Receiving stolen goods,

3

1

Setting fire to a dwelling house,

1

Uttering a forged request for payment of money,.

1

1

11 15

Wounding with intent to do grievous bodily harm,.. Women and Girls' Protection Ordinance 1890,

Offences under,.....................

00

53

-⠀⠀⠀⠀~~WH:: Ni mi w

2

3

8

7

27

26

2

Acquitted.

Death.

Death Recorded.

Hard Labour

over one Year.

Hard Labour one Year and under.

Solitary Confinement→ Number of Persons.

Privately Flogged- Number of Persons.

No. of Cases.

No. of Persons.

No. of Cases.

No. of Persons.

6

:

1

:

~

15

10

1

4

:

:

Of 60 Persons only

....53 were tried.

6 were not indicted which are included under the heading of "Charges Abandoned,".. Cases postponed....................................

6

1

60 Persons.

Registry Supreme Court, Hongkong, 8th day of January, 1897.

J. W. NORTON KYSHE,

Registrar.

1

Co

6

1 1

:

:

...

+

146

INDICTMENTS and INFORMATIONS in the SUPREME COURT of HONGKONG for the Year 1373.

Including Attempts and Conspiracies to commit the several offences.

Showing how the cases tried in the Superior Courts ended.

(Each Prisoner tried counts as a separate case; where a large number of Prisoners have been convicted together, the fact is mentioned in a note.)

Total.

Manslaughter.

Attempt at Murder.

Concealment of Birth.

Murder.

27

2

:

Judgment for the Crown,

Judgment for the Prisoners,....... 26

Prisoner found Insane,

or

Cases which fell through for

want of prosecution absence of accused, and cases thrown out by the Grand Jury (Attorney General),

Cases postponed,

:

6

-1

60

3

:

3

Ι

:

:

:

10

5

Rape.

Unnatural Crimes.

Robbery with violence.

Other offences against the Person.

Offences against Property.

Miscellaneous Offences.

:

Abortion.

:

:

:

:

:

:

...

:..

:

:

Registry Supreme Court, Hongkong, 8th day of January, 1897.

:

:

:

:

:

1

10

10

2

15

10

5

4

4

30

15

:

6

J. W. NORTON KYSHE, Registrar.

1893.

1894.

1895.

1896.

COMPARATIVE TABLE showing the NUMBER of OFFENCES, APPREHENSIONS, CONVICTIONS and AQUITTALS

for the last Four Years.

The Number of Convictions in the Superior Couris-

17

16

17

15

1. For Offences against the Person,

1

10

2. For Offences against Property,

:

16

4

2

3. For other Offences,

The Number of Persons acquitted-

2. In the Superior Courts,

Registry Supreme Court, Hongkong, 8th day of January, 1897.

16

17

9

32

J. W. NORTton KYSHE,

Registrar.

RETURN of CRIMINAL CASES that have been brought under the COGNIZANCE of the Supreme Court,

during the last Ten Years.

147

Postponed.

Charges Abandoned.

Number Number

YEAR.

of Cases.

of Persons.

Convicted. Acquitted.

No. of Cases.

No. of Persons.

No. of Cases.

No. of Persons.

(f) 1887,

94

155

82

36

17

26

1

8

188,

101

186

99

47

28

40

(g) 1589,

92

143

64

41

24

37

1890,

59

80

43

20

17

1891,

32

37

26

9

2

2

:

:

:

Total,

378

601

314

153

78

122

1

8

1892,

30

to

1893,

13

==

44

57

88

18

17

4

9

33

16

8

1894,

36

44

21

17

6

6

1

1895,

26

39

23

5

1896,

64

60

27

26

CO

*

1

Total,

199

244

122

85

23

36

2

6

Average of 1st |

Period, ....

753

1201

624

30%

150

247

Average of 2nd } Period,....f

39/1/

483

242

17

422

7}

avko

f. In three cases the recognizances were estreated.

g. In one case the recognizance estreated, this case is included in the total, but not in any other of the above headings.

Registry Supreme Court, Hongkong, Sth day of January, 1897.

13

}}}

J. W. NORTON KYSHE,

Registrar.

148

No. 11.

SUPREME COURT, HONGKONG, 9th January, 1897.

SIR, I have the honour to forward to you herewith the Retura of Revenue, for the Supreme Court for 1896.

2. The Return shews an excess of $2,429.64, over and above the Estimated Revenue.

Much as I should have been glad to see the Revenue exceed that for 1895, estates administered to by the Official* Administrator were less in value last

year than the year before.

3. The Return does not of course include Probate Duty which appears in the Return of the Collector of Stamp Revenue.

.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

The Honourable

THE COLONIAL SECRETARY,

&c.,

&c.,

&c.

J. W. NORTON KYSHE,

Registrar.

RETURN of all SUMS RECEIVED as REVENUE in the Registry of the Supreme Court during the Year 1896.

Original Jurisdiction,

Summary Jurisdiction,

Bankruptcy Jurisdiction,

Probate Jurisdiction,

Official Administrator's Commission,

Official Assignee's Commission,

Official Trustee's Commission,.

Sheriff's Fees,

Bailiff's Fees,

Interest on Deposit of Surplus Cash,

Fees on Distraints,

Registrar of Companies,

Fine and Forfeitures,

Admiralty Fees,

Land Office Fees.....

$$,003.80

4,862.95

785.35

1,987.25

2,485.84

5.15 58.26

102.00

1,137.50

1,701.41

1,530.05

2,471.50

10.00 704.17

$20,845.23 6,825.50

$27,670.73

J. W. NORTON KYSHE,

Registrar.

Registry Supreme Court, Hongkong, 8th day of January, 1897.

RETURN of all SUMS COLLECTED in the Registry of the Supreme Court for the Year 1896, and paid into the Treasury.

1896.

1895.

REGISTRAR.-Court Fees paid by Stamps,

OFFICIAL ASSIGNEE.-5% on amounts encashed and paid into the Treasury... OFFICIAL ADMINISTRATOR,

$13,862.72 84.18 5,218.56

$12,332.40 5.15 2,485.84

OFFICIAL TRUSTEE.-2% on amount of Trust on taking over up to $10,000; above $10,000, Commission 1% on further amount; 1% Commission on income,

250.14

BAILIFF,

1,434.50

58.26 1,137.50

SHERIFF,

83.50

Registrar of Companies,.

2,524.25

INTEREST on Deposit of Surplus Cash,

2,177.78

102.00 2,471.50 1,701.41

FINE AND FORFEITURES,

ADMIRALTY FEES,

613.78

10.00 541.17

LAND OFFICE FEES,.

$26,249.41 5,814.51

$20,845.23

6,825.50

$27,670.73

Registry Supreme Court, Hongkong, 8th day of January, 1897.

$32,063.92

J. W. NORTON KYSHE, Registrar.

149

No. 4.

MAGISTRACY,

HONGKONG, 30th January, 1897.

SIR,-In compliance with Circular No. 8 of the 20th October, 1896, I have the honour to forward the usual returns of this Department for the year, 1896.

1. Strength of the Department.

2. Abstract of cases during the year.

3. Comparative returns of cases for the past ten years.

4. Criminal statistics I, II, III and V.

In addition, I have the honour to submit statistics of the Light and Pass Regulations.

In November 1895, the provisions of the Light and Pass sections of Ordinance 13 of 1888 were revived and up to the end of the year 1,739 persons were convicted and 9 discharged.

On the 11th January last by Government Notification No. 7 the hours, which had previously been from 7 and 9 P.M from which times respectively Light and Passes had to be carried to sunrise were reduced to "from-between midnight and sunrise."

During last year 3,441 persons were charged for breach of the Regulations, 79 were discharged, 116 had their bails estreated and 3,246 were fined or imprisoned. Table A gives the details.

Examination of Table A will show that whilst the fines were uniformly small, the number of offenders did not diminish to any appreciable extent as however the fines increased the numbers decreased till now readier obedience to the law has been enforced.

A comparative return of "Serious offences" for the first two quarters of the years 1895-96 is attached. Table B.

Taking first the comparative return of crimes the 3rd column from the right contains the total number of cases reported and dealt with, the last and last but one the number of individuals convicted and discharged respectively.

The difference between the 3rd column for the periods under review for 1895 and 1896 are as follows:-

Murder,

Robbery with violence from the person,

Burglary or Larceny from Dwelling,

Kidnapping and Protection of Women and Girls,

Unlawful Possession,........

Larcenies,

Felonies not already given,

....

1896.

INCREASE.

Decrease.

2

2

...

18

18

...

...

103

203

7

Murder, Kidnapping and Protection of Women and Girls can in no sense be considered as liable to control by the Light and Pass sections.

Burglary and Larceny from the Dwelling have unfortunately been put under the one head; if they had been dissociated and Burglary and louse-breaking differentiated the correct comparison of day light crimes under this head would have been arrived at.

The decrease in the number of cases of Unlawful Possession and Larcenies is most marked. In Unlawful Possession from 238 to 135 or 43% in Larcenies from 1,082 to 879 or 19 % and this decrease has been arrived at coincidently with a marked increase in the number of individuals convicted. In 1895 the percentage of convictions for Larcenies was 43.25, in 1896 for the same offence 55.83. Under the principal heads of crime therefore viz.:-

(a.) Unlawful Possession has decreased 43 % and,

(b.) Larcenies in the number of cases has decreased 19 % whilst the proportion of convictions

has increased 12.48 % or a nett gain of over 31 %.

In addition, 295 Rogues and Vagabonds have been convicted, 14 discharged and 1 bound over.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

The Honourable J. H. STEWART LOCKHART,

Colonial Secretary.

WM. C. H. HASTINGS,

Acting Police Magistrate.

TOTAL

NUMBER

TOTAL

NUMBER

OF

OF

PRISON-

CASES.

ERS.

Convicted

and

Punished.

Abstract of CASES under COGNIZANCE of the POLICE MAGISTRATES' COURT during the Year 1896.

CASES, HOW DISPOSED OF, AND THE NUMBER OF MALE AND FEMALE PRISONERS UNDER EACH Head.

Discharged.

for Trial at

the Supreme

Committed

Court.

Detained

to l'rison, or

Committed

pending Orders

of H. E. the

Governor.

Ordered to find Security.*

*

Total

WRITS ISSUED BY THE POLICE MAGistrates duRING THE YEAR 1896.

Number of Prisoners.

Summons

for

Warrants.

Defendants.

for Witnesses.

Summons

Notices of Re-hearing.

Arrest.

Distress.

Search.

For

Gambling entering

Houses.

Magis- trates'

Orders.

TOTAL.

TOTAL

NUMBER.

OF FIRE

ENQUIRIES

HELI>

DURING THE YEAR 1896.

W.

17,767

19,568.6,659 797

F. M. F.

1,371

M. F. M. F. M. F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

Ꮇ .

F. M. F.

M.

F.

203

62

14

21

1

2

:

230

72

28

...

5 115 1 18,468 1,100 4,551

99

17

163

TOTAL MALES AND FEMALES,

19,568

Consisting of Offenders not sentenced to Imprisonment.

1

:

1,406

174

6,410

10

150

THE CASES CONSISTED OF:-

151

OFFENCE.

NO. OF CASES.

NO. OF

PRI-

SONERS.

Arms Consolidation Ordinance 8 of 1895,-

OFFENCE.

Brought forward,..

NO. OF CASES.

No. of PRI-

SONERS.

849 1,489

Ammunition-Being in possession of

Arms-Carrying or having possession of, without a

license.

-Dealers neglecting to keep Register of

-Dealing in. without a license,

Banishment and Conditional Pardons Ordinance 8 of 1882,--

Banishment-Returning after......

Board of Ship Liquor Sale Ordinance 18 of 1886,-

Spirituous Liquors Selling on board Ships,

Building Ordinance 15 of 1889,-

3

3

98

100

Gambling Ordinance, -('ontinued.

Watchmen to Street Gamblers-Acting as,..

Good Order and Cleanliness-Ordinance 14 of 1845,

4.

4

1

1

Animals-Cruelty to,

19

19

7

7

Bonfire-Making,

48

48

Breach of the Peace,

40

43

36

36

Cattle turned loose on public ways,.

2

Disorderly behaviour,

522

962

1

3

Dogs-Allowing unmuzzled ferocious, to be at large,.

7

7

-Inciting, to attack persons, &c.,

1

....

Blasting Stones to the danger of Persons & Property,. Cutting earth, or turf, and extracting stones from

Crown Land,

11

12

Domestic Servants-Misconduct as,

37

37

59

59

Firearms- Discharing, to the danger of the Public,... Furious driving,

1

29

38

Drain-Connecting, with the Government Main

Sewer without obtaining a permit, Hoardings and Scaffoldings-Neglecting to erect dur-

ing repair of Buildings,

Inflammable Structures-Erecting, without permis-

sion of the Director of Public Works,

Plans of Building-Neglecting to submit, to the

Director of Public Works,

Cattle Diseases Ordinance 17 of 1887,-

Pigs-Keeping, for the purpose of being slaughtered in a place other than a properly constructed Government Depôt,

-Keeping, in a way which caused needless or avoidable suffering to them,

Chinese Emigration Consolidation Ordinance 25 of 1889,-

Decoying Men or Boys into or away from the Colony,

Chinese Extradition Ordinance 26 of 1889,-

Closed Houses and Insanitary Dwellings Ordinance 15 of

1881,-

1

1

Indecent exposure of person by bathing, or otherwise, Nuisances-Allowing dirt and filth, &c., to remain

13

13

exposed,

49

49

1

70

70

Nuisances-Discharging sewage water and offensive

matter into the public side channel, Nuisances-Hanging wet clothes, &c., over Public

1

1

50

ways,

1

1

Nuisances Throwing rubbish, &c., into the Streets,. Obstruction of Roads and Streets by Hawkers, and

173

183

8888

Shopkeepers,

1,581

1,592

N

ลง

Posting bills on walls without permission,.. Private Watchman-Misconduct as,

1

2

2

2

Streams--Defiling,

14

14

ta

4

Unlawful possession of property,

240

300

"J

of trees, shrubs, &c.,

35

36

10

10

Vehicles-Unnecessary noise by,

16

16

Chinese Territory-Crimes and Offences committed

in,

Hongkong Fire Brigade Ordinance 4 of 1868,-

Firemen Misconduct as,

28 8272 226 22

6

12

1

11

47

2

27

1

10

879

977

70

31

3

18

365

365

923 923

ཱཧྨ R=3ཨ ཿཧྨཌ ཝནྡྷནྡྷ སྶཀལནྡྷ

Counterfeit Coins- Uttering, or being in possession of,

10

Common Law,—

Bribery,

Conspiracy to defraud,

2

False imprisonment.

Indecent and obscene prints-Exposing for Sale...

1

Perjury,

1

Piracy.

1

Suicide Attempting to commit.

18

attend In uest,...

Dangerous Goods Ordinance 8 of 1873,-

Dangerous Goods-Carrying, uncovered in boat,

Larceny and Other Similar Offences.-Ordinance 7 of

1865,-

Church, Chapel, &c.-Entering, with intent to com-

mit felony,.

Embezzlement,

False pretences-Obtaining, or attempting to obtain

goods or money by,

3

Burglary,

Backyards-Neglecting to keep, clear of obstruction,. Basement floors-Inhabiting.

38

888

38

33

33

Cocklofts and Mezzanine floors-Erecting, without

permission from the Sanitary Board,

1

1

Cocklofts and Mezzanine floors-Neglecting to re-

move.

173

173

Cubicles-Breach of Regulations for,

2

""

Dead Bodies-Breach of Regulations for removal of,. Ground Surface, &c.-Domestic buildings-Offence

15

23

as to.

3

Houses-Neglecting to cleanse and limewash,

Coinage Offences-Ordinance 10 of 1865.-

♡ co

Co to

3

Felony-Attempting to commit,

-Found in Dwelling house, &c., by night, with intent to commit,

Housebreaking,.....................

Larceny-Accessory before the fact,

-as a bailee,

-by servants,

-Common,

from the person...........................

-from Ships or boats in the Harbour,

of cattle or other animals,

-of fruit or vegetagle productions in Garden.

Menaces-Demanding money by,.

Stolen goods-Receiving,

Licensing Consolidation Ordinance 21 of 1887,—

Hawking within the prescribed limits of Market,...

-Unlicensed,

Public Vehicles-Breach of Bye-laws for Quarry Bay.

-Demanding more than legal fare,

"

1

1

1

19

"

"

7

7

""

-Carrying no lights between sunset

and sunrise,

-not keeping rule of the Road, --Obstruction of Streets by,

19

19

10

18

2001 22∞

44

20

20

450

575

-Refusing to accept hire when un-

employed,

21

39

29

-Refusing to complete journey,

1

11

11

??

19

Refusing to pay fare of,

12

12

**

">

2

2

-Refusing to show licences to Police,

-Unlicensed,

285

""

"

"

762

-Using, for conveyance of merchan- dise, or dead bodies or persons suffering from infectious diseases..........

10

10

2 Magistrate's Ordinance-10 of 1890,- Disorderly hehaviour while drunk, Drunkenness,

172

172

181

181

3

11

False Charge,-Preferring-or wilfully giving false

evidence,

32

34

31

Insulting expression-Using, or behaving in an in-

sulting manner before Magistrate,

17

1

Recognizances-Breach of.....

194

Malicious injuries to property-Ordinance 8 of 1865,-

Arson,

Injuries to property,

Injuries to trees or vegetable productions in Garden,. Markets Ordinance 17 of 1887,-

93

* F ***

2 12 128

33

17

194

6

32

93

Articles of food for man-

-Exposing for Sale, în a

N

-3

7

place other than a Public Market.

349

350

N

28

79

50

9999

666

Game Plucking, in a place other than that set apart

for the purpose,.........

Fish, &c.,-Selling in Markets, not being holders of

stalls,

13

13

I

79

Market-Entering during prohibited hours,

2

12

849 1,489

Carried forward,.....

8,099,595

Coroner's Abolition Ordinance 17 of 1888,-

Juror-Neglecting to answer Coroner's Summons to

-Conveying or exposing for Sale,

without attaching labels to cases or vessels con- taining the same,

Dangerous Goods-Ships, &c. lying alongside Wharf or landing place to land or ship, for more than 15 minutes,

Dangerous Goods-Ships, &c, neglecting to hoist a

Red Flag when laden with,

Dangerous Goods-Storing, more than the quantity

allowed by licence,

Dangerous Goods-Storing, without a licence,

-Transhipping, in prohibited place, Defences Sketching Prevention Ordinance I of 1895,-

Battery or Fort-Entering, or found in immediate

vicinity thereof, with sketching instruments.................

Dogs Ordinance 9 of 1893,-

Dogs Unlicensed keeping of,

Exportation of Military Stores Ordinance 13 of 1862,—

Exporting ammunition prohibited by Proclamation,.... Forgery-Ordinance 6 of 1865,--

Forged instruments-Obtaining goods or money by,... document-Uttering, with intent to defraud,. Document-Forging, with intent to defraud,.........

19

Forts Protection Ordinance 10 of 1891,—

Battery, Fieldwork, or Fortification-Entering, with-

out a written permit...

Fugitive Offenders Act 1881,-

Offences under....

Gambling Orilinance 7 of 1891.-

Common Gaming House-Keeping, or playing in, Street Gambling,

Carried forward,..

152

OFFENCE.

CASES,-Continued.

No. of CASES.

No. of

PRI- SONERS.

OFFENCE.

Brought forward,

No OF

No. of

CASES.

PRI-

SONERS.

10,397 12,109

"

Brought forward.......

Markets Ordinance 17 of 1837,—Continued.

Market-Nuisances in,

13

-Obstructing the Avenue of,

Unwholesome provisions-Exposing for Sale, or

bringing, into the Colony,

Merchandise Marks Ordinance 15 of 1890,—

Breach of,

Merchant Shipping Act, 1891,-

Breach of Regulations for preventing Collision at Sea, Seamen-Disobeying lawful orders of Masters in

British Ships,

Seamen-Neglect or refusal of duty by, in British

Ships,

Surreptitious passage —Obtaining,

Merchant Shipping Consolidation Ordinance 26 of 1891,

Anchorage of Ships of War-Dredging at,

Boarding Ships without permission..................

Boats-Beating drums or gongs during prohibited

hours,

"

Demanding more than legal fare,

-Failing to carry Licences on board,

-Making fast to ship under way,

8,089 9,595

18

18

18

18

9

9

1

2

1

1 |

6

6

"

10

16

12

77

29 22

29 27

10

16

Opium Ordinance 22 of 1887 and 22 of 1891,-

12

77

Offences against the person. Ordinauce 4 of 1865,--Con-

tinued.

Shooting with intent to do grievous bodily harm... Stupefying drug, &c.—Administering,...

Workman, &c.-Intimidating,

Opium Ordinance as amended by 4 of 1894,-

Breach of,

Opium Ordinance. (Prepared) 21 of 1891,-

Excise Officer-Assault on,

Prepared Opium-Being in possession of, without

having valid certificates....

Breach of (Raw),

Order and Cleanliness-Ordinance 9 of 1867,—

Bye-laws-Breach of,

Pawnbrokers Ordinance 3 of 1860,-

131 19

www

Bww

N

~

-Assuming the designation of,.

CO OT

1,237 1,2+1

10

10

1541

1

Illegal pawning,

1

5

4

Pawnbrokers-Acting as, without a license,

-Failing to make proper entries,

1

7

7

to render assistance after collision...

1

1

Peace and Quiet Ordinance 17 of 1844,

11

11

Breach of,

6

"

-Mooring in shore between the hours of 9

o'clock at night and gunfire in the morning,.

226

226

Piers and Wharves Ordinance 18 of 1884,-

Private Wharves-Trespass on,..

1

"

-Refusing to accept hire,...

1

to show Licences to Police,

23

23

Police Force Consolidation Ordinance, 14 of 1887,-

Police Constables-Misconduct as,

10

5

"

"

to stop or go alongside Wharf when

Police Force Regulation, Ordinance 9 of 1862,—

called upon by Police,..

9

9

-Transferring Licences,

1

Police Constables-Assault on, in execution of duty,.

-Obstructing, or resisting, in the

44

55

}}

"

&c.-Unlicensed,

...

263

264

discharge of their duties,

9

Boat Licences—Breach of conditions of,.

12

12

Private Vehicle Ordinance 13 of 1895,—

Fairways-Obstructing,

88

88

Private Vehicles-Breach of Regulations for,.

21

Goods unlawfully obtained-Throwing into water,

1

2

Junk-Anchoring in prohibited place,

2

2

Not keeping rule of the Road, -Unlicensed,

40

40

45

45

200

Navigation-Breach of rules of,

Nuisances in Harbour,

158

160

Public Buildings, Gardens, &c.-Regulations for main- tenance of good order and preservation of property

Quarantine Regulations-Breach of,

1

in, Ordinance 8 of 1870,-

"

19

"J

"

"

99

"

Seamen-Absenting from duty, from British or

Foreign Ships,

-Desertion of, from British or Foreign Ships. --Remaining behind Ships after having

signed the Articles, .

Ships, &c.-Anchorage or Harbour-Leaving with-

out Clearance or during prohibited hours,. -Cargo, &c.—Furnishing untrue particu-

lars of,

-Clearance-Neglecting to return, to the

Harbour Master,

-Fireworks-Discharging,

-Lights-Neglecting to exhibit at night,...

-Not having certificated Master,

--Passengers-Carrying, in excess,.

Steam Launch-Anchoring, without an Anchorage

-Exhibiting side lights not fitted with

&c.-Refusing to pay fare of,

Steam Whistles-Unnecessarily blowing,

Telegraph Cables-Anchoring within the limits of

area of,

Wharves-Embarking passengers at prohibited,

Morphine Ordinance 13 of 1893,-

Kennedy Road Regulations-Breach of,

4

16

10

21

21

Sa

10

Public Gardens-Breach of Regulations for,

20

20

Wong Nei Chung Recreation Ground Regulations--

Breach of,

Q

2 Public Health Ordinance, 24 of 1887,--

Bakehouse Bye-laws-Breach of,

33

33

Boats, &c.-Breaming on foreshore...

10

Common Kitchen-Using, as sleeping room, Common Lodging Houses Regulations-Breach of, Common Lodging Houses-Unlicensed keeping of, Drain, &c.-Leaving open and unprotected, Excretal matters-Irrigating land with, near Public

FREE

29

29

17

17

68

68

98

98

11

11

237

237

Road,

3

3

Latrine Begulations-Breach of,

18

18

47

48

Laundries-Using, as sleeping rooms,

1

pass,

""

in board screens between sunset and

sunrise,

Unlicensed,

1

1

Night Soil or noxious waters-Carrying, during pro-

hibited hours, or depositing in the Streets,

76

Pigs, &c.--Keeping, without licence,

Nuisances-Neglecting to abate, after notice served

by the Sanitary Board,.

Pigsties, &c.-Neglecting to clean,

Plague and other infectious diseases-Neglecting to

report cases of,

Registration of Births and Deaths Ordinance 16 of

1896,

Breach of,

99

1989

77

451

45

99

18

2. FRECKE FREE *3* N

27

1

1

1

-Obstruction of, by boat people,

Breach of,

5

Naval Stores Ordinance 9 of 1875,-

Marine and Naval Stores-Dealers in, not keeping

books according to Schedule,......

4

Marine and Naval Stores-Dealing in, without a

licence,

11

11

Nuisances-Ordinance 10 of 1872,-

Chai Mui-Night noises by playing at the Game

known as,

68

Rough dressing, &c. of granite in or near a Public

place,

5

5

Street Cries by Hawkers,

136

136

Offences against the person.

Ordinance 4 of 1865,-

Assault-Causing grievous bodily harm,..

1

1

-Common,

601

785

"

-Indecent,

7

??

99

-On boys and females under 14 years of age, -With intent to ravish,

1

23

11

to rob,

Child Stealing,

Cutting and wounding with intent to do grievous

Regulation of Chinese People, Ordinance 8 of 1858,—

Building-Occupying or erecting, on land not being

Mendicancy,

68 Regulation of Chinese Ordinance 13 of 1888,-

Drums and Gongs-Night noises by beating,. Fireworks-Discharging, without permits,... Householders neglecting to report change of tenants,. Lights or Passes - Chinese out at night, without, Pass-Using, without authority of the holder, River Steamers, Ordinance 16 of 1895,——

Passage-Obtaining, or attempting to obtain, with-

out payment in River Steamers,

Rogues and Vagabonds, 5th of Geo. IV Chapter 83. s. 4.—|

Rogues and Vagabonds-As suspicious characters......

11

"

-Found in Dwelling house,

10

10

1

1

Co

00

8

60

60 Regulation of Chinese Burials, and Prevention of certain

Nuisances, Ordinance 12 of 1856,—

20

10

Obeying calls of nature in the streets or in improper

places,

104

104

Roads and Streets-Injury to,

3

5

Trespass on Crown Land,

209

209

under lease from the Crown,

154

154

36

36

14

14

872 872

3 3,325 3,325

1

3

1

24

24

!

7

23

27

bodily harm,

Manslaughter,

Murder,

Rape,

2361

&c. with intent to commit felony therein,

41

41

""

21

-Indecent exposure of person,

1

1

5

19

">

-Wandering abroad and lodg-

ing in the open air,

261

261

Carried forward..........

17,409 19,167

Carried forward,

10,397 12,109,

$ c.

1.50

3

ea co

$2

1

****

$

$

€9 10

~ €

$8

A.-Return showing number of Persons charged for having no light or pass under sections 30 and 31 of Ordinance 13 of 1888.

AMOUNT OF FINE INFLICTED.

IMPRISONED.

MONTH

No. of

Persons

Paid fine. In default

1896.

charged.

Peremp-

Dis-

charged.

Non-

appearance in Court

Bail

C.

C.

of payment

of fine.

tory.

estreated.

25

50

$1

$9

5*

10

$

***

99 10

12 15

154

*

$

20

$

****

30

...

278

16 52

4

January,

602

474

81

6

41

133 416

:

1

2

February,

310

251

49

1

1

.8

293

1

March,....

534

428

87

7

12

512

:

:

:

1

2

2

:

:.

2

***

....

April,

495

379

888

:

:

7

21

2

8178

1 89 71

18 87

4 9

May,

412

294

82

14

12

10

16

30 68

2120 1

79

June,

312.

176

July,

153

78

62

8.89

99.

20

5

12

2 9

3

1

August,

283

146

116

September,

168

84

68

4

7

:

:

:.

1 1

:

:

:

12277

16 39

5 10

20

28

16

...

24

57 2 49

44

:

76

...

:

.

:

:

1

...

33

....

October,

103

61

36

...

November,

49

16

29

...

3

1

:

December,

20

7

10

8

4

13

...

14

11

1

36 2

3

6 22

27

5 25

1

1 10

4

9

19

1

3

5

...

3833

:.

:

...

...

44 4

63 10 13

51

2

1.

14

1

...

....

:

75 I 13

10

:

2 1

6 1 2

:

:

:

་་་་

:.

:

:.

:

:

:

7

ant

:

:

1

:

167 1,453 1 | 191 | 266 21 407 14 |323

$ 7,552.00

705.22

$ 8,257.22

3,441

2,394

802

50

79

116

2

Total fine paid

....

Total bail estreated

WM, C. H. HASTINGS,

Acting Police Magistrate.

OFFENCE.

Brought forward,

Slaughter-Houses Ordinance, 17 of 1887.-

Slaughter-house Regulations-Breach of, Spirit Licences, Ordinance 21 of 1886,—

Chinese Spirit Shop Regulations-Breach of,... Intoxicating Liquors-Selling without licence, Licensed Publicans-Breech of Regulations for,

Stamp, Ordinance 16 of 1886,-

Breach of,

Stone Cutter's Island, Ordinance 11 of 1889,-

Fort-Entering,

The Tramway's Ordinance 6 of 1883,-

Trespass on the Tramway line,

The Uniform Ordinance 10 of 1895,-

Military Uniform-Wearing,.

Vagrancy, Ordinance 12 of 1888,-

Vagrants.

Verandahs erected over Crown Lands, Ordinance 4 of 1888,-

Enclosure of,

Waterworks, Ordinance 16 of 1890,-

Breach of,

Carried forward,.

CASES,--Continued.

No, OF CASES.

No. of PRI- SONERS.

17.409 19.167

10

1

1

22

26

OFFENCE.

Brought forward,...

153

No. OF

CASES.

No. or PRI- SONERS.

17,641 19,410

43

43

16 Weights and Measures Ordinance 8 of 1885,

Breach of,

Women and Girls Protection Ordinance 11 of 1890 and

6 of 1894,-

Decoying women or girls into or away from the

Colony,

Defilement of girl between 12 and 16 years of age, Detaining, harbouring, or receiving women or girls

for the purpose of prostitution,

Disorderly House-Keeping a.

"

571

82

16

23

1

-Not complying with Magistrates'

Order to discontinue the use of,...

Letting out for hire women or girls for the purpose of prostitution and knowingly deriving profits therefrom,

Procuration of girls under 16 to have carnal connex-

ion, Purchasing, pledging, or selling women or girls for

the purpose of prostitution,

22

2

167

167

17,641 19,410

TOTAL,

17,767 19,568

Magistracy, Hongkong, 30th January, 1897.

WM. C. H. HASTINGS,

Acting Police Magistrate,

ABSTRACT of CASES brought under COGNIZANCE at the POLICE MAGISTRATES' COURT during a period of

Ten Years, from 1st January, 1887, to 31st December, 1896, inclusive.

CASES, HOW Disposed of, and THE NUMBER of Male and FEMALE PRISONERS UNDER EACH HEAD.

Committed to Prison or detained pending Orders of His Excellency

TOTAL NUMBER

YEARS.

OF

CASES.

Convicted and Punished.

Discharged.

Committed for Trial at Supreme Court.

Ordered to find Security.

Punished for Preferring

Total

the Governor.

To keep the Peace, to be of Good Beha- viour, and to answer

or giving

False Charge Undecided.

Number

False

of Defendants.

any Charge.

Testimony,

1

2

3

5

6

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

1887,

12,015 10,354 325

2,620 159

158

9

28

4

411

52

14

48

13,633 549

1888,

11,617 9,700 232

2,704 145

168

6

98

11

177

15

3

48

2

12,898 411

1889,

8,670 6,626 268

2,319 178

157

10

44

10

303

34

17

64 $

9,530 503

1890,

9,739 7,423 317 2,406 151

102

15

259

59

3

دن

:

دن

2

10,243 529

1891,

13,676 13,438 534 1,906

134

40

12

153

19

1

143

2

15,693

689

Total,...... 55,747

47.541 1,676 11,955

767

625

25

197

25 1,303

179 38

338

9

6:,997 2.681

Average per

Year,

125-0 |11,1494 | 9,508 2 | 335-2 | 2,3910 | 1534

5:0 39 4

5:0

260.6

35 8

76

:

67.6

1.8

12,399 4 | 536-2

1892,

1893,

.1894,

1895,

1896, ....

11,920 11,771 327 1,927 151

10,727 10,049 306 1,532 75

10,447 9,463 302 1,716 95

17,016

17,787

40

102

63

19

1.

LA

:

191

20

1-

7

-

242

36

17

10

255

23

10

1

= 193 19

28

13,969 502

23

11,972 420

16

11,530 423

15,058 725 2,345 196

51

232

77

12

199

17,897 1,001

16,659 797 1,371 203

62 21

1

232

72

28

5

115

I

18,408 1,100

Total,..... 67,877

63,002 2,457 8,891 720

318 32

18

2

1,152 228 74

6

381

1

73,836 | 3,440

Average per

Year,

|13,575 4 12,600 4 491-4 | 1,778-2

144:0

63.6 64

3.6

0.4

230-4

45.6 148

1-2

76.2

0-2

14,767-2 | 689-2

Grand Total

for the 10 123,624 | 110,543 | 4,133 20,846 1,487 Years,.....

943 57

215

27

2,455 407 112

6

719

10

135,833 6,127

Average per

Year,

943 |12,362-4 11,054-3 | 413-3 | 2,08461487

5.7

21.5

2-7

245.5

407

11-2

0.6

719

1.0

13,583 3 612-7

Magistracy, Hongkong, 30th January, 1897.

War. C. H. HASTINGS,

Acting Police Magistrate.

B.-Return of Serious Offences for the 1st and 2nd quarters in the year 1895.

1

...

49

269:

...

1

21

JANUARY.

FEBRUARY.

MARCH.

APRIL.

MAY.

JUNE.

TOTAL.

Cases.

Con-

vict.

Dis. Cases.

Con-

vict.

Con-

Con-

Con-

Con-

Con-

Dis. Cases.

Dis. Cases.

Dis. Cases.

Dis. Cases.

Dis. Cases.

Dis.

vict.

vict.

vict.

vict.

vict.

19

15

.6

1

:: 2 :

8

3

11

00:

:::

122:

1

...

38

37

9

166

85

11

197

6

2

ཨ:ཎྜཱ॰

46

46

76

6

3:002

1

Janak

1

1

15

::

15

10

11

44

41

5

238

242

39

28

178

88

28

1,082

468

128

3

5

1

44 21

14

251

140

31 228 138

24

259

130

54

231

126

35

1,436

768

206

Murder,......

Robbery with violence from the person,

Burglary or Larceny from Dwelling,

Assault with intent to rob,

Kidnapping and Protection of Women

and Children,

5

2

: D Nܐ

:

10

2

2

1

11

...

::

...

:::

::2:

10

6

5

7

1

~

1

2

2

1

Piracy,

...

...

Unlawful possession, ....

42

45

4

27

27

4

41

46

Larcenies,

204

84

21 150

58

23

187

82

Felonies not already given,..................

6

3

1

10

co

3

11

3333

1674

Return of Serious Offences for the 1st and 2nd quarters in the year 1896.

264

140

29

203

94

4

1

...

4

1

67

9

:.

...

:::

1.

સ્થ

...

192

333

34

135 157

879 491

37 11

25

NOT: N

16

69

20

27 1,159 704 131

H. B. LETHBRIDGE,

Acting Captain Superintendent of Police.

Murder,

Robbery with violence from the person,

Burglary or Larceny from Dwelling,...

15

Assault with intent to rob,..........

~::

2

...

14

2+

1

...

7

10

1

:

...

...

...

10:

1

1

1

13

5

1

8

2

00:

..4

...

Kidnapping and Protection of Women

and Children,

Piracy,

Unlawful possession,

Larcenies,.

145

Felonies not already given,

20:08

.: 09463

5

4

8

5

6

I

10

16

...

...

...

23 30

1

12

12

30

30

92

9

105

47

9

148

85

.8: :

9

28

11 168

2

4

5

1

1

6

3

8888888

29

100

10

පය‍:

3

20

30

154

79

28:5

11

4

2

22

26

11

6

3

6

8

1

7

159

6

88

100 10

198

129

19

143

65

13

192

118

20

217

139

20

207

132

32

202

121

155

156

MAGISTERIAL ENQUIRIES INTO DEATHS.

TABLE 4.-RETURN OF ALL DEATHS REPORTED DURING THE YEAR 1896.

NATIONALITY.

Europeans and Americans, ...

Indians and Malays,

Japanese,.

Chinese,............

Aida de reparti dek wool for

FORMAL ENQUIRIES HELD.

BURIED WITHOUT FORMAL ENQUIRIES.

Men. Women. Boys. Girls. Total. Men. Women. Boys. Girls.

Very much decomposed;

sex not ascertainable.

Total.

1

4

:.

1

:

:

:

:

:

10

:

10

...

5

1

1

7

1

1

2

30

8

2

3

43

212

35

148

140

35

570

Total,..........

35

8

3

48

228

36

149

141

35

589

Total for 1895,

41

3

3

2

49

128

20

118 117

8

391

TABLE B.-RETURN OF FORMAL ENQUIRIES DURING THE YEAR 1896.

FINDING.

Euro-

peans.

Indians.

Chinese.

Total.

Man.

Men.

Men. Women.] Boys.

Girls.

1

1

1

:-:

1

...

1

1

...

1

...

1

...

1

1

:

Accidental death by fracture of the skull caused by a fall from the roof of 79 Praya Central whilst escaping with the proceeds of a robbery,

Accidental death-Fracture of the skull,

Accidental death--Immediate cause-) -Fracture of the skull received

in a landslip,

Accidental death--Shock resulting from burns,

Accidental death-the result of a fall,

Blood poisoning,

Cause of death-Bright's Disease,

Cause of death-Cancer,

Cause of death-Dislocation of the neck in pursuance of sentence of the

law,

Cause of death-Fracture of the skull caused by an accidental fall from

the 2nd floor of 167 Queens Road East,

Cause of death-Fracture of the skull, the result of a fall from the 2nd floor of No. 11 Gough Street while endeavouring to escape from the Police,

Cause of death--General debility,

Cause of death-Heart Disease,

Cause of death--Shock from extensive burus,

Cause of death-Syncope, the result of rupture of the left kidney, which might have resulted from the heavy falls it is in evidence the deceased had had prior to capture, Death by hanging in pursuance of a sentence passed in accordance

with law,

Death by poison-opium-self administered,

Death caused by drowning, the result of an accident from an error made

by the Cargo Boat people,

Death from general debility, the result of opium smoking,

Deceased died of a pistol shot wound self inflicted,

.....

Hæmorrhage-Accidental death from a mass of stone falling on deceas-

ed, causing death instantaneously,

Hæmorrbage from wound in throat, self inflicted,

Manslaughter against some person unknown for causing the death of Chau Loi Ho by breaking a lamp with a stone, thereby setting fire to the said Chau Loi, Ho on the 14th September, 1896, death resulting therefrom at 4.30 a.m. on the 23rd, the immediate cause being "Shock from burns,"...... Manslaughter-Rupture of spleen caused by Tsang Sz,

Carried forward,.................

::

:

:

:

1

1

1

1

...

1

***

1 1

}

1

1

1

1

:::

1

1

:

2

1

3

1

1

:

-::

1

1

1

1

::

::

::

::

:

:

1

1

1

::

:

:

::

1

1

~ ::

2

2

1

1.

1

1

...

...

::

1

1

2

17

4

1

3

27

TABLE B. RETURN OF FORMAL Enquiries during the Year 1895,--Continued.

FINDING.

Brought forward,.....

Euro-

peans.

Indians.

Chinese.

157

Total.

Man.

Men.

Men. Women. Boys. Girls.

:

2

17

4

1

3

27

1

...

1

1

1

1

1

1

Plague,......

Pulmonary congestion and general debility,.

Suicide-Death by hanging,

Suicide Death by hanging by means of a false queue in her own cell. There was no evidence before the Jury to show how the deceased became possessed of the false queue,

Suicide-Death by strangulation,

Suicide-Dislocation of the second cervical vertibra,

Syncope-Suicide whilst of unsound mind,

That death was caused by exhaustion produced first by gangrene and

then by anæmia and general debility,

That deceased C. Baldwin died from privation,

That deceased died from fracture of base of skull caused by being knocked down by a pony ridden by Henry Percy White who had lost control of the pony,

That deceased died from general debility, complicated by pulmonary

congestion,

....

That deceased died of asphyxia by strangulation but that there is no

evidence to show by whom the strangulation was effected,

That deceased died of diarrhoea and general debility,

That deceased died of lardaceous disease of the intestines brought about

by anæmia,

That deceased died of pulmonary consumption, That deceased met his death by asphyxia produced by strangulation....) That Pan Kwoon-loi died from hemorrhage resulting from injuries to spleen and left kidney caused by a bullet fired by one Sunt Singh,..... That Sunt Singh died from cerebral concussion resulting from injuries

caused by a bullet fired by himself,

Wilful murder by Leung Tat Tsoi, Leung Tat Ngan, Leung Tat

Wong, Leung Tat Yau, and Leung Shau Tsai,

Wilful murder by some person or persons unknown,

Wilful murder of P.C. 218 Lai Tak Shing committed by a man named

Lai Mit,

Total,.

1

1

:

1

1

:.

1.

:

:

::

:.

::

:

:

:

::

:::

:

:

::

1

1

1

I

1

S

I

1

:

:::

:

:

:

1

:

:

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

::

:

:

::

1

:

:

::

:

1

1

1

1

4

30

8

2

3

48

TABLE C.--RETURN OF BURIALS WITHOUT FORMAL ENQUIRIES DURING THE YEAR 1896.

Reason why no Formal Enquiry was held.

Found o Land.

Found in Harbour.

Total.

ascertainable.

Sex not

Chinese.

Europeans

and

Americans.]

Indians and Malays. Japanese.

Men. Women Boys. Girls. Men. Men.

Boy. Girl.

Man. Woman.

1

1

1

:

:

:

:

No suspicious circumstances, .. No evidence and/or decomposed

state of body,

80 11

28

28

9

26

7 106

91

:

:

Post Mortem satisfactory,

99

16

13-

21

1

2

Suspected persons were tried for the murder of deccased, Suspected persons were tried for causing the death of deceased,

:

3

1

1

Total,.......

212

35 148 .140 10

Magistracy, Hongkong, 18th January, 1897.

10

1

:.

O:..

1

1

162

60

47

21

34

35

265

165

100

...

1

153

81 13

15

11

:

:

:

11935

4

3

5

3

:

1

2

:

589

150

255

39

145

Wu. C. H. HASTINGS,

Acting Police Magistrate.

ī

221

No.

14

HONGKONG.

CALENDAR OF PROBATES, ETC. AND RETURN OF SUPREME COURT CASES FOR 1896.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor.

No. 53.

viz.

:

REGISTRY SUPREME COURT, HONGKONG, 22nd March, 1897.

SIR,-I have the honour to forward to you herewith the following Returns for the year 1896,

1. Calendar of Probate and Administration granted by the Supreme Court during the

year 1896.

2. Return of Cases coming under the cognizance of the Court in its Original; Summary and Appellate Jurisdictions.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your obedient Servant,

J. W. NORTON KYSHE, Registrar.

The Honourable

THE COLONIAL SECRETARY,

&c.,

&c.,

&c.

222

CALENDAR of PROBATE and ADMINISTRATION granted by the SUPREME Court of Hongkong during the Year 1896.

No.

Date of

Name of Testator or Intestate.

Time and Place of Death.

Grant.

Probate, Administration with the Will annexed, or Administration.

Value

Name and Description of the Executor or Administrator.

Sworn

under

$

C.

1896. 1 Jan.

7 William Hall Jackson,

Plymouth, England,

2

22 Franz Schoenfeld,

25th May, 1895,

Foochow, 26th July, 1894,

Letters of Adm. with the Expl. of the Will annexed, Letters of Adm.,

3

22 Candido Antonio Ozorio,

Hongkong, 4th Dec., 1895,

Probate,

4

"

22 John Roberts Wilson,

At Sea, off Chenhai,

5

29 Lok Shing,

29 Charles Nielsen,

7

29 Frederic Albert Ott,

11th Aug., 1895,

Canton, 31st Nov., 1895,

At Sea,

26th Dec., 1895,

Shanghai, 24th Nov., 1895,

Letters of Adm. with the Expl. of the Will annexed, Letters of Adm.,

Do.,

George Cobban Anderson, Attorney for Olive Elizabeth Jackson, widow, the relict of the deceased, Johann Nicolaus Goosmann, Attorney for Linse Schoenfeld nee Krôbn, widow, the relict of the deceased................... Carlos Danenberg and Guilhermina Rou- malda Alves Ozorio, the Executor and Executrix respectively, Godfrey Cornewall Chester Master, At- torney for Louisa Wilson, widow, the relict of the deceased, Lam Tsing, widow, the relict of the

deceased,

4,300.00

4,500.00

2,000.00

1,000.00

500.00

Francis Arthur Hazeland, Acting Official

Administrator,

350.00

DO..

Alfred Bulmer Johnson, Attorney for

Louis Rudolph Burkhardt, the sole Administrator,

1,000.00

8

Ki.

9

29

Tsang Tai Wan,

10 Feb.

3 Louis Mendel,

29 Li Tsing Luk alias Li Lui | Shui ChingWan, Hongkong,

16th Mar., 1891, Swatow, 26th Nov., 1894,

Hongkong, 4th Nov., 1895,

Do.,

Probate,

Letters of Adm. with the Will annexed,

Chu Fook Kiu, widow, the relict of the

deceased,

Robert Lyman Richardson, the Executor,

1300.00 3,000.00

11

"!

4 Cheang Seng Choo,

At Sea,

Julius Kramer and Max. Carl Johann Grote, Attorneys for Jacob Arnhold and Lorenz Poesnecker, the Executors, (the Letters of Administration grant- ed on the 30th November, 1895 to the Acting Official Administrator having been revoked),

30th Dec., 1895, | Letters of Adm., | Kam Un Po, the uncle of the deceased,

(the Letters of Administration grant- ed on the 22nd January, 1896 to the Official Administrator having been revoked),

Chan Wai Hing, the Executor,

10,800.00

12

"

7 Chan Chee,

13

??

.7 James Alexander Taylor,

Nam Hoi, China.

31st Jan., 1896, Edinburgh, 8th Mar., 1895,

14

"

15

""

11

16

""

Probate,

Letters of Adm. with the Expl. of the Will annexed, Probate,

Do.,

300.00 32,000.00

Victor Hobart Deacon, Attorney for John

Cooper, the Executor,

100.00.

William Gall Roberts and Robert Adam,

the Executors,

1,600.00 500.00

1,200.00

7 Charles Watts,

Lau Kam Tong,

11 Ong Kew Ho,

+

17 Frank Trowers,

17

""

18

29

24 Li Foong Kew,

19

"

24 Maria Rufina Brandão Go-

mes.

20 Mar. 16 | Edmundo José de Couto,

Shanghai, China,

6th Nov., 1895, Hongkong, 26th Jan., 1896, Singapore, 18th Feb., 1889,

Hongkong, 22nd Jan., 1896,

Hongkong, 5th Feb., 1896, Hongkong, 13th Dec., 1895,

Shanghai, 15th Jan., 1893,

|

Letters of Adm. with the Expl. of the Will annexed, Letters of Adm.,

Probate,

Letters of Adm.,

Lau Wan Kwong, the Executor,

William Henry Ray, Attorney for Beng

Hee Neo, the Executrix,..

Francis Arthur Hazeland, Acting Official

Admisnistrator,........

Tang Kit Shang, the Executor, Augusto Jose Gomes, the husband of the

deceased,

Count Bernardino de Senna Fernandes, Attorney for Maria de Couto de Senna Fernandes, the daughter of the deceased,

Do.,

400.00

Hongkong, 27th Nov., 1895.

Hongkong, 7th Feb., 1896, Hongkong, 23rd Feb., 1896,

Honam, Canton,

Probate,

DO.

Pun Hung otherwise Pun Sz Lin, the

Executor,

23,000.00

9,300.00

240.00

77,500.00

7,300,00

21

22

225

16 Poon Pong,

"

16 Wong Yung Ching,.......................

16 Joanna Genoveva do Rozario.

23

19

24

17 Chau U Fai,

24 Maria Antonia Botelho,...... Macao,

25

26

11

24 Jivandas Mulji,

27

31 Joaquim Victor de Jesus,

28

99

31 Lee Tak,

29 Apr. 15 Frederick Baptiste Aubert,.

17th Feb., 1896,

6th Mar., 1896,

Lanouli, Poona, India,

15th Apr., 1894,

Hongkong, 10th Feb., 1895,

Hongkong, 10th July, 1887,

Shanghai, 22nd Sept., 1895,

Shanghai, 6th Nov., 1894,

San-ning, China,

16th Aug., 1895, 4th Dec., 1895,

Letters of Adm.,

Letters of Adm. with the Will annexed, Probate,

Letters of Adm. with the Expl. of the Will annexed;

Letters of Adm.,

Do.,

Probate of the Will re-sealed, Letters of Adm. with the Expl. of the Will annexed.] Probate,

Letters of Adm. with the Will annexed,

30

:)

15 Dewitt Clinton Jansen,

31

"J

15 Li Tin Shat,

32

15 Henrique Caetano Victor de Shanghai,

Figueiredo.

33

15 Adrian Ivanovich Oborin,... Odessa,

34

"

15 Hormusjee Rustomjee Ko-Hongkong, 5th Mar., 1896,

tewall.

15th Dec., 1893, Letters of Adm.

with the Expl. of the Will annexed, Probate.

35

15 Cheang Kang,

At Sea,

Ho Moi Shi and Chan Ah Tong, the

Executors,

Vicente Alexandre de Paulo Collaço, the

nephew of the deceased,

| Li Shi, widow, the relict of the deceased,

Augusto Cezar Botelho, the Executor,

James Jardine Bell-Irving, Attorney for Devakaras Dharamsi, Kasandas Lakh- midas, Thaparsi Tokadas and Prenji Gokaldas, the Executors, Albina Roza de Jesus, widow, the relict

of the deceased,

Lee Wong Ngan, widow, the relict of

the deceased,.

Johnson, Stokes and Master, Solicitors

for the Executor, Alfred Bulmer Johnson, Attorney for Ellen McGroth Jansen, the Executrix,

Li Kum Yuen and Li Kum Chak, the

Executors,

Francisco d'Assis Gomes, Attorney for Euphrasia Josepha de Figueiredo, the Executrix,

Alfred Bulmer Johnson, substituted At- torney for Andrei Alexandrovich Kalankiewicz, the Exécutor, Cheang A Cheung, the Executrix,

11th Mar., 1896, Letters of Adm., Cheang Hu Shi, widow, the relict of the

deceased,

200.00

10,600.00

18,800.00

11,200.00

200.00

3,000.00

3,800.00

600.00

39,000.00

1,600.00

800.00 3,200.00

4,600.00

C ▼LENDAR of PROBATE and ADMINISTRATION,—Continued.

223

No.

Date of

Name of Testator or Intestate.

Time and Place of Death.

Grant.

Probate, Administration with the Will annexed, or Administration.

Value.

Name and Description of the Executor or Administrator,

Sworn

under

1896.

$ C.

36 Apr., 28

James Francis,.

37 May

5

Solomon David Sassoon,...

Bombay, India,

Do.,

18th Mar., 1894,

Hongkong, 20th Apr., 1896, Letters of Adm., | James William Norton Kyshe, Official

Administrator,

David Reuben Sassoon, Attorney for Flora Solomon Sassoon, widow, the relict.of the deceased,

200.00

233,500.00

38

39

40

11

"

6

Leung Tak Kin,

6

Pang Min Ting,

"

6

Jurgen Freidrich Raben,

...

Canton, China,

24th Jan., 1896, Canton, China,

30th Aug., 1895, Apenrade, Germany,

9th Feb., 1895,

41

6 Chan Ping,

"9

42

"

6 Lee Chak, ...........................

9th Apr., 1896,

肝路

45

46 June 2❘ Sultan Khan,

43

"J

44

11.

14

16

John Robinson White,

47

"9

2❘ Leung Tai,

14 Christian Frederich Wil-

helm Petersen,

Ah How otherwise Ng Ah

How.

Sai Chiu, China,

Canton, China,

1st June, 1894,

Hongkong, 24th Apr., 1896, | Letters of Adm.,

Hongkong, 3rd Apr., 1896,

Macao, 1st Feb., 1896,

Hongkong, 29th Apr., 1896,

Honam, China,

Mary Petersen, widow, the relict of the

deceased,

Ng Lun, the brother of the deceased,

Walter Harry Wotton, one of the Exe-

cutors.....

Probate,

Do.,

Letters of Adm. with the Will and Codicil annexed, Probate,

Leung Shun, the Executor,

3,000.00

Fung Shi, the Executrix,

4,000.00

| Albert Welbelm Arthur Becker, Attorney for Marie Christine Raben, the Exe- cutrix,....

3,600.00

Do.,

Chan Kwai Cheong, the Executor........

Lee Pak Moo, the Executor,.....................

16,000.00

120,000.00

Do.,

Probate,

Letters of Adm.,

16,000.00 131.00

6,300.00

Do.,

48

"1

2 Zelindo Maria Barradas,.............. Kobe, Japan,

49

50

2 Andrew Johnson,

""

15

2 William Porter Moore,

51

"

19 Percy Redgrave Wilson,

5th May, 1896,

10th Aug, 1895, San Francisco,

28th Mar., 1896, Hongkong, 18th May, 1896,

Hongkong, 24th Feb., 1896,

Do.,

Dalel Khan, the cousin of the deceased...

Leung Kan, the nephew of the deceased,

Jose Paulino Xavier, Clerk,

20.00

25.00

1,500.00

Do.,

Probate,

Letters of Adm.,

James William Norton Kyshe, the Official

Administrator,

9,000.00

Justiniana Maria Bishop, the Executrix,.

1,000.00

56

19

57

3 Tam Kam Woon,..

13

6 Galbraith Moffat,.

59

"

6 Josephina Maria de Carva-

lho.

52

53

54

19

19 Chan Chak alias Chen Chik At Sea,

alias Chan Chiu Lun.

"J

19

13

24

Yu Cheuk Tong otherwise

Yu King Chung. Dadabhoy Sorabjee Fatta-

kia.

55 July 2 Joseph Cian Harmon,..

186

58

3 Herbert William Johnson,...

17th Sept., 1894,

Hongkong, 5th Feb., 1896,

Hongkong, 1st Apr., 1896,

East Acton, Middlesex,

England, 6th Feb., 1896, Hongkong, 24th June, 1896,

Hongkong, 10th Apr., 1896,

Hongkong, 14th June, 1896,

Hongkong, 8th Aug., 1891,

Do.,

Probate,

Do.,

Probate

of Will re-sealed, | Letters of Adm.,

Letters of Adm.,

Do.,

Duncan Clark and Charles Grant, Attor- neys for Samuel Redgrave Wilson, the father of the deceased (the Letters of Administration granted on 24th March, 1896 to the Official Adminis- trator having been revoked),..................... Chan Chau Shi, widow, the relict of the

deceased, Yu Tak and Yu Pan Nam, the Executors,

Sorabjee Behramjee Bhabha and Rutton-

jee Cursedjee Vania, the Executors,....... Janet Harmon, the Executrix,..

James William Norton Kyshe, the Official

Administrator,

6,500.00

600.00 12,000.00

Nil. 35,297.42

500.00

Tam Kam Sun, the cousin of the deceased,

750.00

Do..

Elizabeth Francis Moffat, widow, the

relict of the deceased, Januario Antonio de Carvalho, the father

300.00

60

6 Catharino Manuel do Roza-

Hongkong, 5th June, 1896,

Do.,

19

rio.

61

10 William Samuel,

11

Hongkong, 24th June, 1896,

Do.,

of the deceased,......... Florinda Maria Spencer do Rozario,

widow, the relict of the deceased,................ James William Norton Kyshe, the Official

Administrator,

20.00

1,200.00

250.00

62

28 Nicholas Nolan,

警惕

63 Aug. 10

Samuel Thomas Moore,

64

11

10

Chan Man Kai,

Hongkong, 4th July, 1896,

Hongkong, 22nd July, 1896,

Kwong Tung, China,

DO.,

Margaret Nolan, widow, the relict of the

deceased,

1,200.00

Probate,

Martha Matilda Moore, the Executrix,

1,000.00

Do.,

Chung Ching Nam, the Executor,

3,000.00

65

"

10

Cheung Ah Tak alias Cheung Kwai Sin, China,

Fuk Cheung,

66

""

10

Ng Yu Tin,

21st Apr., 1896,

9th June, 1896, Hongkong, 16th Jan., 1896,

Do.,

Wong Ah Kee, the Executrix,.

1,400.00

Do.,

Ng Yew Chow, the Executor,

2,000.00

67

10 Hsu Fü Yuen,

99

68

J

10 Akid Robert Isaac Kew,...... Hongkong, 17th May, 1896,

69

88

10 Hung Kiu,

70

10 Lam Yat,

"

71

11 William Mulholland,

"

72

99

73

21 Lai Hing,

74

TDC..

75

77

12 Maria Francisca Cameron,...

27 Bernard John Keaney,

27

76 Sept. 10

Chan King Tong alias Chan Keung alias Chan Kiu, William Henderson Mac-

Kenzie.

10 John Stewart,

|

Soochow, China,

11th Aug., 1895,

At Sea, 13th Nov., 1895, Pun U, China.

26th May, 1896, Middlesex, England,

17th Mar., 1896, Hongkong, 24th July, 1896,

Hongkong, 21st Oct., 1890,

Hongkong, 19th July, 1896,

Sun Ui, Kwong Tung,

Letters of Adm. with the Will annexed, Letters of Adm.,

Expl. of the Will re-sealed, Letters of Adm.,

Do.,

Do.,

Probate, China, 2nd Apr., 1896, Ramsgate, England, Letters of Adm.

27th Sept., 1895, with the Will

annexed, Hongkong, 21st July, 1896, | Letters of Adm.,

Alfred Bulmer Johnson, Attorney for

Hsü Pao Ho, the sole Executor,

William Kew, the father of the deceased,

3,600.00

135.00

Do., Do.,

Lam Yeung, the mother of the deceased, Siu Wan. widow, the relict of the de-

370.00

ccased,

20.00

William Henry Ray, the Attorney of the

Executor,

49,900.00

James William Norton Kyshe, the Official

Administrator,

4,000.00

Lau Asin, widow, the relict of the de-

ceased,

150.00

James William Norton Kyshe, the Official

Administrator,

50.00

Chan Un Sz, the Executor,

20,000.00

John Hughes Lewis, Attorney for Emma Eavelyn MacKenzie aud Andrew Vans. Watson, the Executors, James William Norton Kyshe, the Official

Administrator,

124,000.00

1,500.00

224

CALENDAR of PROBATE and ADMINISTRATION,—Continued.

Date No. of

Grant.

Name of Testator or

Intestate.

Time and Place of Death.

Probate, Administration with the Will annexed, or Administration.

Value

Name and Description of the Executor or Administrator.

Sworn

under

1896.

78 Sept. 10 Ng Wai alias Ng Kang Heungshan, China,

Probate,

Yeung Siu Po, Ng Chan Pang and Lo

Tong.

29th June, 1896,

Liu, the Executors and Executrix respectively,

7,000.00

79

10 James Joseph Enslie,

Hiogo, Japan,

"

14th June, 1896,

Probate of the Expl. of the Will.

Harold Catmar Brushfield, the Executor,. 24,200.00

81

∞∞ 8

80

23

Ho Chiu Kau,

23

Catherine Afah,

""

82 Oct.

7 David William Jones,....

Hongkong, 5th June, 1896, | Hongkong, 3rd Sept., 1896,

Dumfries, Scotland,

21st Jan., 1896,

Do.,

83 Nov.

84

85

86

2 George Frank Graham,

3 John Ham,

19

3

Harriki,

3 Leong Ho.....

87

"

88

.89

7 Oscar Wilhelm Wieler,

90

"

3 John Heinrich Northmann,. 3 Chan Wai....................

13 George Kenrick Moore,

St. Dogmedls near Cardigan, Wales, 12th Apr., 1896,

Hongkong, 11th Oct., 1896,

Hongkong, 8th May, 1896, At Sea, 5th Sept., 1896, Hongkong, 27th Sept., 1896, Hongkong, 8th Oct., 1896, Hamburg, 25th Aug., 1895,

Letters of Adm. with the Will annexed,

Do.,

Letters of Adm.,

Letters of Adm., | Ho Ko How, son of the deceased,

Kenneth MacKenzie Ross, Attorney for John Alfred Jones, William Alexan- der Dinwiddie, William Dobie and Robert Stoba, the Executors,........ Alfred Bulmer Johnson, Attorney for Mary Ann Hodges Graham, widow, the relict of the deceased, James William Norton Kyshe, the Official

Administrator,

1,000.00

James William Norton Kyshe, the Official

Administrator,

1,200.00

3,750.00

10,400.00

Do.,

Do.,

200.00 20.00

Do..

Do.,

1,000,00

Do.,

Do.,

2,500.00

Do., Probate,

Poon Man, mother of the deceased,...... Gustav Adolph Wieler, one of the Exe.

100,00

cutors,

4,850.00

Hongkong, 20th Oct., 1896,

Do.,

Lucy Harriet Moore, widow, the relict

91

16 Filomena Joanna Xavier,

Hongkong, 10th Oct., 1896,

DO..

of the deceased,.....

Augusto Cezar Botelho, the Executor,

"

92

""

16 | U Chün alias U Sam Woo, . Kwong Tung, China,

Do.,

U Chiu alias U Man Woo, the Executor,.

Nil. 2,500.00 2,600.00

7th July, 1896,

93

16

Chan Hung alias Chan Ho

Hung.

94

95

"}

16

Tsang Shi nee Sz Koo,.....

16

Lo Hee Lune,

Hongkong, 1st Oct., 1896, Kwong Tung; China,

""

96

16 Li Hok alias Li Hoi,

39

27th July, 1896, Yau-ma-ti, British Kowloon, 15th July, 1894,

97

16 Pedro Aranas,.

""

98

28 John Hinchcliff,

Mergin, Rangoon,

Strathfield near Sydney,

16th May, 1895,

17

99

28 Yum Yune,

21st June, 1894,

100 Dec.

9 Roger Martin,

Do.,

101

14 John Mathieson, Junior,

....

7th Feb., 1896,

102

22

Simon James Shelley,

103

22

Chau Sz Fuk,

"

104

22 Luk Tsun Ting,

"

105

11

22 Choy Chew,

106

""

22 Yung Yat Wa,..

Hongkong, 15th Dec., 1896,

Aberdeen, Hongkong,

14th Oct., 1895, Samshui, China,

20th June, 1896, Hongkong, 11th Nov., 1896,

Foochow, China,

Letters of Adm. with the Expl. of the Will annexed, Letters of Adm.,

| Hongkong, 4th Mar., 1895, | Letters of Adm., | Mok Man Cheong, Attorney for Chau Ng

30th July, 1895,

Hok Shan, China,

Hongkong, 2nd Oct., 1896,

Banff, Scotland,

Probate, Do.,

Letters of Adm.,

Do,,

Probate of Will re-sealed, Probate.

Shi, widow, the relict of the de-

ceased,

800.00

Leung Pang Sam, the Executor,

600.00

Yuen Man Choy, the Executor,

500.00

| Li Yuk, brother of the deceased,

55.00

Antonio Leon, the uncle of the deceased,.

200.00

Johnson, Stokes and Master, Solicitors

for the Executor,

1,300,00

Lu Shi, widow, the relict of the de-

ceased,

1,500.00

Norman MacDonald and Victor Hobart

Deacon, the Executors,

'166,500.00

Godfrey Cornewall Chester Master, At-

|

torney for Alexander Leslie and James Primrose, the Executors... Caroline Shelley, widow, the relict of

the deceased,..

4,600.00

1,300.00

Do.,

Ip Yuk, widow, the relict of the de-

ceased,

60.00

Do.,

Luk Fung Shi, widow, the relict of the

deceased,

7,500.00

Do.,

Choy Tai Shi, widow, the relict of the

deceased,

5,000.00

Probate.

Yung Wan, the Executor..

4,800.00

23rd Nov., 1894,

J. W. NORTON KYSHE,

Registrar.

Registry Supreme Court, Hongkong, 22nd March, 1897.

1896.

CASES TRIED.

JUDGMENT.

In

Settled

No. of

Depend- Cases

Jurisdiction.

ency in 1895.

Total.

in

Debt

and Damages.

or

Withdrawn

before

1896.

Trial.

Plaintiff.

Defendant.

Non-Suit.

Struck out, Dismissed and Lapsed Writs.

In Dependency.

Debt and

Damages recovered.

$ C.

$

Original,

37

77

114 315,416.94

38

· 6

e

61

110,302.86

Summary,

30

1,733

1,763 186,398.04 898

601

75

19

156

14

84,264.45

No. of Cases.

APPEALS COMMENCED.

Judgment.

1896.

APPEALS.

Appellant. Respondent. Pending.

APPEALS TRIED.

225

Judgment.

No. of Cases.

Appellant. Respondent.

Pending.

6

1

3

2

6

}

3

Registry Supreme Court, Hongkong, 22nd March, 1897.

J. W. NORTON Kyshe, Registrar.

HONGKONG, No. 70.

Governor

227

No. 15

97

HONGKONG.

SECRETARY OF STATE'S DESPATCH RESPECTING DEFENCE

WORKS AT HONGKONG.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor.

Secretary of State to Governor.

DOWNING STREET,

30th March, 1897.

SIR,

I have the honour to inform you that since the construction of the Defence Works at Hongkong, it has been found necessary at all stations to provide a more efficient defence against torpedo craft, and it is now proposed to make the neces- sary change of armament.

2. The estimated cost of such armament, including guns, mountings, &c., is £28,500; and the total estimated cost of the necessary works in connection with the new armament is £8,230; this amount being made up as follows:-

Emplacements, &c., at Stone-cutters' £1,900, Emplacements at Belcher's

Point £4,000, Platforms, Magazines, &c., at Lyemun £1,500, and Storage for six Machine Guns for general defence £830.

3. Following the precedent in regard to the cost of the existing Works and Armament, Her Majesty's Government propose that the cost of this new armament shall be borne by the Imperial Government, and the cost of the works by the Colonial Government; and I trust that the Legislative Council will agree that this is a fair and reasonable arrangement.

4. The expenditure might be spread over two years, about £4,000 being pro- vided before 31st March, 1898, and the remainder before 31st March, 1899. I am assured by the Secretary of State for War that the possibility of utilising the existing works as much as practicable will be carefully considered and that every endeavour will be made to keep down the cost of the works.

5. I have to add that there are various new services of the nature of Barracks or for the completion of existing defences, which will have to be executed at Hongkong; but as these were not included in the Barrack Scheme already entered into with the Colonial Government, it is not now proposed to make

any claim upon the Colony in respect of these services, which will, it is estimated, cost some £11,500.

Sir W. ROBINSON, K.C.M.G.,

&6.,

&c.,

sc.

I have, &c.,

J. CHAMBERLAIN.

No 11.

117

No. 97

5

HONGKONG.

REPORT OF THE HEAD MASTER OF QUEEN'S COLLEGE FOR 1896.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor.

QUEEN'S COLLEGE,

19th January, 1897.

SIR, I have the honour to forward the Annual Report on Queen's College for the year 1896,

1. The total number on the Roll was 988. In 1895 the attendances had to a great extent recovered from the depletion of 1894; but in 1896, instead of a continuance of this improvement, there was a relapse partly due to the recurrence of Bubonic Plague. There was however no evidence of panic, such as was manifest in 1894, the absence of several boys being attributable to the removal of families from the colony to escape sanitary precautions, not from fear of the Plague itself, as was reported early in the year to the Inspector of Schools by several School Managers. The admissions and re-admissions were in each quarter of the year quite up to the average; which would be incon- sistent with the idea that Chinese had in 1896 the same fear of Hongkong as a plague centre that they had in 1894.

2. The falling-off ($3,000) in Revenue from Fees is quite out of proportion to the diminution in attendance referred to above, and is largely attributable to the reduction of the Second and Third Classes by one half, through causes not under my control. It will take two or three years for the attendances in the Upper School, where the Fees are highest, to attain their former figure. An economy of $350 was effected by closing two classrooms and dispensing with the services of a Tem- porary Assistant and two Monitors.

3. On the recommendation of the Governing Body, the Section known as Chinese School, (i.e. the classes in which for 36 years Chinese boys were taught to compose in their native language, and to read and understand their native literature) was abolished. By the removal of these ten hours a week devoted to the study of Chinese by the Lower and Preparatory Schools, an increase of three hours a week for the acquisition of English was obtained for the Second and Third Classes and Lower School. It was not possible to increase the hours in the First Class, where with Special Classes, 31 hours a week were already assigned to English, and where the scholars for eight years had been exempt from Chinese studies. It should not be forgotten that the adoption of this course was formally recommended by the Inspector of Schools in 1887, and mooted by him even earlier.

-W

4. To meet the difficulty of ignorance of their native language on the part of Chinese boys, the Governing Body proposed an Entrance Examination; but after a short experience, the manifest tendency to debar admissions altogether, led to the removal of this restriction.

5. From the balance of the salaries of the Native Teachers in Chinese School, after the payment to them of pensions, the Governing Body approved and recommended the increased scale of salaries for Native Assistants in English School, the importance of which has been urged in my Reports for some years. A new post of Clerk was created, to which Mr. U. HANG-KAM, A. A. was appointed; the duties of clerk having previously been discharged by the First and Second Chinese Assistants upon whose time it was found to make too great a demand.

6. A lecture on Education in Burma, delivered before the Rangoon Teachers' Association last spring, by a Chinese gentleman, Assistant Secretary to the Chief Commissioner, shows that the educa tional problems that are engaging attention in Hongkong, are not unknown elsewhere. His words are:-

"The constitution of the Educational Department in Burma dates only from 1866. "One generation has passed away, and literary culture does not appear to be prized among "the natives of Burma, beyond the walls of the school or college. Further the students, "who are supposed to know English, and who have passed high University examinations แ are unable either to speak or write fairly well in that language."

118

7. It cannot be said in Hongkong, that English studies are neglected by students after leaving Queen's College; there is abundant evidence that they aim at progressive self-improvement. Nor must we forget the little colony of our boys in the Northern Universities, as well as those scattered over the area from Japan down the coast of China and Tonquin, even to Singapore, and beyond to Penang. A large proportion of these speak and write in the English language admirably, and several of them are anxious to assist their fellow-countrymen in the acquisition of Western ideas; they there- fore write for the most part in Chinese, and but little is known of their unostentatious labour. Mr. LUK, our Second Chinese Assistant, is engaged in bringing out a Second Edition, Revised and Enlarged, of his bilingual English Grammar; and Mr. WAN, our late Fourth Chinese Assistant published a Chinese Translation of Outlines of English History. Several works too have appeared, due to the industry of our old scholars; a book on Insurance and two on European and Chinese Civili- sation compared, by Mr. CHAN HE-WAN; and last year Messrs. Lo SING-LAU and MOK LAI-CHI have independently published little books on English Conversation with Chinese equivalents.

8. While on the subject of publishing, it may not be amiss to add that within the last three years, six little books for the use of this college have been printed (as they are for private circulation, the word published is hardly appropriate) at the expense of the Government. One of these is Notes on the Geography of the Chinese Empire, a very useful book by Mr. DEALY, Senior Assistant Master; the remaining five are Translations of Chinese books in use in various classes, made long ago by different masters, but suffering from the effects of tradition and transcription, on which account they were finally revised by myself. Considerable saving of time, hitherto employed in copying from the Blackboard is thus effected, to say nothing of the prevention of many careless errors in taking down handwriting.

9. His Excellency the Governor, at the Prize Distribution last February, offered two prizes of $50 and $25 respectively to the Chinese boys of this Institution, who should write the best and second-best Essays on the Progress of the British Empire during the last Fifty Years. Seven boys competed last November, and the Governing Body, who acted as judges, reported Li Ur and SIN CHEUNG, as writers of the two best essays. His Excellency accordingly presented them with the

amounts.

10. Mr. JONES has been on leave throughout the year. Mr. JAMESON and Mr. WOODCOCK went on leave in April, the latter on completion of six years' service. Messrs. BARCLAY and COURTNEY have been Acting Assistant Masters since April and June respectively. Mr. FUNG KI-CHEUK A. A. one of our cleverest Junior Chinese Assistants, resigned in April, on getting employment as Assistant Compradore.

11. Our boys paid 33 fees for the Oxford Local Examinations, but only 24 presented themselves, equally divided among Seniors, Juniors and Preliminary. Of these 11 or 46% passed; exactly one half of the Seniors and the same proportion of the Preliminary passed; which may be viewed as satis- factory, being the average of former years. The Mark Good, which is next to Distinction was awarded as follows, to 9 boys for Arithmetic, 1 for History, 1 for Shakespeare, 3 for Robinson Crusoe, 3 for Geography and 1 for Acts.

12. Acting under instructions from the Governing Body, I conducted the Annual Examination. Pursuing the practice of former years, I took 100 marks as the maximum in every subject; less than 50 obtained was reckoned a failure in any subject; for a class pass, a boy had to pass in half the subjects offered i.e. in the Upper School, passes in 7 subjects, in 5 in the Lower School, and in 3 in the Pre- paratory, were required; which is sufficiently severe. The general result of the examination is far above the average; in fact, I should have been justified in characterising it as a phenomenal success, had it not been for extreme weakness in Class 1 B. and the two lowest non-Chinese sections. The total number examined was 517 boys, of whom 469 or 90% passed, represented as follows in the three main Sections:

Total number examined.

1896

Percentage passed.

1894

1896

1894

Upper School.......... 114.

217

81

90

Lower School..........209

201

93

92

Preparatory............194

169

94

96

The whole staff deserves great credit for steady and careful teaching of which there is ample evidence, even in those cases referred to above where the percentages are low. In by far the majority of papers, there was none of the drudgery attendant upon the correction of ill-digested and badly written answers. 13. "The usual Tables of the number of boys examined and passed in each subject, and of percent- of passes are here subjoined.

ages

CLASS.

TABLE I.-NUMBER OF BOYS PASSED IN EACH SUBJECT, 1896,

*119

Total No. Examined.

Total No. Passed.

Colloquial.

Reading.

Arithmetic.

Dictation.

English to Chinese.

Chinese to English.

Grammar.

Geography.

Map-Drawing.

Composition.

History.

Algebra.

Euclid.

General Intelligence.

Book-keeping.

French.

Shorthand.

Shakespeare.

IA.,

IB., II., IIIA.,

8 8

8

14 10

11 14 8

if co

8 6

10 10

9

10 5

29 26 19

29 18

∞ ∞ 10 00

5

1-

7

7

8

5

8

0

11

5

11

1

11

9

7

10 9

7

10

619

23

23

22 25 24

IIIB.,

20

19

10 19

15

14

11

10 20

N. 1,

N. 2,

67

4

5

6

4

6

7

6

6

...

N. 3,

11

6

11

1

11

N. 4,

9 5

4

9

5

7

2222 I

24

14

4

3

2

1

IVA.,

IVB.,

32

VA., V.B.,

23

VIA., VIB., VIC.,

27

VIIA.,

VIIB.,..........

VIIC.........

VIIIA.,

VIIIB.,

VIIIC.,

**G**********

39 36

24

39

17

29

35

34 28

31 23

32

21

29

27

28 27

40 33 25

36

17

25

32

26 21

222

32

34 36

26.

24

20 24

23 18 23

18

20

23

22 20

22

19

25

23 15 25

20

22

18

21

24

21 20

23 21 11

22

14 17

14

20

21

19 15

27

27 24

24

23

27

26

23 21

161000202:::

706

27

212

12

10

6 6

3

9 5 5

21 20

20 16 17

4 1

යත

45 10

5

0

::

లు రా

6

***

0

5 3 4 5

4

0

0

5

8

...

1

3

...

28

...

***

***

...

***

37

***

...

...

23

***

...

***

***

***

48 45

48 34 38

35 43 45

...

32

26

29

27

...

32

32

29

23

23

25

23

...

30

30

30 27

Total,...... 517 469 195 502 349 407 362 402 344 223 157 214

222285

225

28 21 22 15 26 24 27 16 21 14 27 27

29 31 17 26

22 23

...

...

...

...

26

288

25

:::

...

8828

30 23

***

...

...

29

...

...

66

18

65 49

23 14

15

19 9

Examined in each Subject; } 296 517517 | 517 | 450 | 450 | 443 | 323|209|248|114│105

85 45 42

26

25

Do.

do., (1894),... 418 587 587 587 541 541 485 418 201 | 364 210 210 | 186 | 110 | 60

TABLE II-PERCENTAGE OF PASSES IN EACH SUBJECT, 1896.

***

233

35

59

......

23 100 78 100 78 25 92 60 100 23 91 48 96 61

100 89 89 100 71 79

78 95 94

88 66 69 56 96 75 93 55 72 52 100

91 91 97 63 96

100, 100 96 96 100

100 90 87

68 79

99 57 72

97 86

6 67 83 100

IB.,...

II.,

IIIA.,

70

50 100 70

IIIB.,

N. 1,

67100

33 67

N. 2,

86

N. 3,

11 45 55 100

9 100

29 43 27 18

N. 4,

IVA.,

IVB., VA.,

9 56 44 100 39 91 62 100 32 97 72 100 40 83 63 90

56

78

11

67

...

0

44

74 92 90

72 82

66 91

96

84 81 75 88

...

43

63

91

74

53 50

60 93

87100

96

87 96

83 100

VB.,

VIA.,

80

88

86 100

96 84

80

74

70100

91 83

65

VIB.,

VIC.,

27 100

85100

96 85 78

...

VIIA.,

48 94

...

VIIB........

32 81

VIIC........ VIIIA.,

29 93 32 100

93

VIIIB., VIIIC.,

23100 30 100

1896,.......

517 90

1894,.

587

8888

66

888

97

84

8185

888

6852 2

...

...

71 79 100 57 10100

0 79

36 79 7

90 100

50 90

70 100 90 70

...

¿

CLASS.

Total No. Examined.

Total Percentage Passed.

Colloquial.

Reading.

Arithmetic.

Chinese to English. Dictation. EN English to Chinese.

87 92

! ! ! ! បន គឺ៖គឺ

Writing?

8 | 100 | 100 | 100 14

75 63 100 100 100 63

29 90 66 100 62 79 85 82 86 83 20 95 50 95 75

7 71 100 100 86

...

100 75

79

88 75 75 50

7 71 64 21'36

100 90 60

83 69

72

55 80 85 100

90 50 50

69

67 17 33 100 7157

82 55

14 14 43

18 18

...

63

83 50 67

Grammar.

Geography.

Map-Drawing.

Composition.

94 100 97

...

81 90

78 69 75

86 58

89

86

60 51 76

84 50

69 52 36 60

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀≈ELANON: Algebra.

AğION

⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ 882

Euclid.

General Intelligence.

2 ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Book-keeping.

62 58 51 33 58 76 26

68

8888888

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

....

...

...

...

100

57 71 0 56

25

75

...

...

French.

Shorthand.

¦ ¦ 62¦⠀⠀ Shakespeare.

...

...

120

14. Remarks on Individual Subjects-

Reading.-Generally careful, and very good. I must still complain of want of imitation in intonation, without which Reading is merely perfunctory, and loses the opportunity of being an aid to acquiring conversational power in a foreign language.

Colloquial.-Very good in the Upper School with the exception of the two lowest sections of the non-Chinese classes. Good in the Lower School.

Dictation. With the exception of I.B, who utterly failed, very marked improvement, chiefly due to more drill in spelling exercises, which is much needed, as Chinese beside confusing vowel-sounds," are perplexed with double final consonants.

Composition.-Deserves high praise. Boys in the Upper School require however to utilise laws of Syntax and principles of Analysis in finally correcting their own sentences.

Grammar.-Here all the non-Chinese sections were lamentably poor, otherwise the work is of a far higher order of merit than usual.

History.-Two

Two classes marred what would otherwise have been an excellent record. In Classes I.A and N. 1, I could not refuse full marks to two boys.

Geography.-Generally good, a decided improvement on 1894.

Map Drawing. This is a test from memory in the Lower School. The result is quite up' to the average, several maps being marvels of re-production. In the Upper School, the drawing of a map forms one of the questions in Geography, but as the portion selected is uncertain the test is severer and but few boys satisfy it.

Translation into Chinese.-Lower percentage than 1894.

Translation from Chinese.-This is chiefly mechanical, being memoriter work. Where boys attempt independent translation, they are seldom successful, as their ignorance of Chinese leads them to guess-work.

General Intelligence.-Considerable improvement in the highest classes.

Arithmetic.-Good, but comparing the work of the year with the results of the examination, the effect produced is disappointing.

Algebra.-Good; but exceedingly poor in non-Chinese sections.

Euclid.-Excellent in II.A; Very good in I.A and III.A; Good in I.B; Bad in the three non- Chinese sections.

Book-Keeping.-Taught by Messrs. BARLOW and BARCLAY, is good; the work of several boys being excellent. Some non-Chinese boys tried this year, but though none of them passed, they showed fair acquaintance with the principles.

French.-Introduced as a substitute for Latin in non-Chinese sections cannot be expected to have attained a high standard in so short a time.

Short-Hand.-Non-Chinese boys in all four sections passed a very creditable test, restricted at present to transcription.

Shakespeare.-Very good in I.A and N. 1, Total collapse in I.B and N. 2.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient servant,

The Honourable

J. H. STEWART Lockhart,

Colonial Secretary.

GEO. H. BATESON WRIGHT, D. D. Oxon, Head Master.

1896.

QUEEN'S COLLEGE.

121

Month.

Number of Scholars.

Number

of

Number of

Average

Attendances.

School Days.

Daily Attendance.

Remarks.

January,

576

12,977

25

519

February,

489

2,290

5

458

March,

677

12,099

21

576

April,

601

8,409

17.

495

May,

558

10,587

23

460

June,

558

12,481

25

499

July,

554

11,311

22

514

August,

516

1,506

3

502

September,

618

11,099

20

555

October,

606

......

14,280

26

549

November,

588

13,400

25

536

December,

561

12,001

23

522

Total,............

122,440

235

Total Number of ATTENDANCES during 1896,

Number of SCHOOL DAYS during 1896, .

Average DAILY ATTENDANCE during 1896,

Total Number of SCHOLARS at this School during 1896,

.122,440

235

521

988

GEO. H. BATESON WRIGHT, D.D., Oxon, Head Master.

AVERAGE EXPENSE of each SCHOLAR at Queen's College during 1896.

Expenditure,-

Cash Book,

Do., Exchange Compensation,.

Crown Agents,

Do.,

Adjustment of Exchange,

Deduct,-

School Fees,

Sale of Books,

.$27,747.70

3,085.08

3,734.48

2,924.39

$37,491.65

.$9,948.00 2.50

$ 9,950.50

A

Total Expense of the College,.....

Average Expense of each Scholar per Number on Roll,

Do.

do.

per Average Daily Attendance,

.$27,541.15

.$27.87 52.86

GEO. H. BATESON WRIGHT, D.D., Oxon,

Head Master.

307

21

HONGKONG.

THE EDUCATIONAL REPORT FOR 1896.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor,

No. 97

No. 24.

EDUCATION Department,

HONGKONG, 13th April, 1897.

SIR,-I have the honour to forward to you the Annual Report on Education for the

year 1896.

2. GENERAL EDUCATIONAL STATISTICS.-The total number. of Educational Institutions of all descriptions, known to have been at work in the Colony of Hongkong during the year 1896, amounts to 215 Schools with an enrolment of 9,686 scholars. More than one half of these, viz. 5,178 scholars attended 101 Grant-in-Aid Schools under the supervision of this Department; 2,462 scholars attended 17 Government Schools; 1,625 scholars were under instruction in 89 Kaifong Schools, and 421 scholars in 8 unclassed public or private Schools. As regards the nationality of the above scholars, exact statistics cannot be given, but I may say that of the 9,686 scholars who attended local Schools in the year 1896, about 6,872 scholars were Chinese and 2,814 non-Chinese. Compared with the enrolment of the preceding year (236 Schools with 10,876 scholars), these figures show a decrease, caused by the renewed outbreak of plague during the first few months of the year 1896, and amounting to 21 Schools with 1,190 scholars. This decrease in school attendance occurred principally in the previously overcrowded central part of the city (Chungwán District) where the Grant-in-Aid Schools alone lost, in the year 1896, as many as 860 scholars, and in the villages where the attendance was reduced by 386 scholars. On the other hand the districts chiefly affected by the previous outbreak of plague in 1894, shewed in 1896 a marked increase of attendance which partially balanced the losses which the attendance suffered in other districts.

3. DECENNIAL STATISTICS OF SCHOOLS UNDER THE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT.-The total number of Schools subject to supervision and examination on the part of the Education Department (exclusive of Queen's College and the Police School) amounted in the year 1896 to 116 Schools, as compared with 90 Schools in the year 1886, and 41 Schools in the year 1876. The total number of Scholars enrolled in this same class of Schools during the year 1896 amounted to 6,313 scholars, as compared with 5,844 scholars in 1886, and 2,922 scholars in 1876. It will thus be seen that, while the number of Schools and scholars was actually doubled during the ten years from 1876 to 1886, there has been, during the last ten years an increase of indeed 26 Schools but of 469 scholars only. This abnormal proportion explains itself partly by the withdrawal from the Education Department of 1 School (Queen's College) which at the time figured in these returns with 1,012 scholars, and by the effects of the plague on the returns of the years 1894 and 1896, which reduced the attendance in all Chinese Schools very materially, while it but slightly diminished the number of Schools at work during the

last decade.

4. TRIENNIAL STATISTICS OF SCHOOLS UNDER THE EDUCATION DEPATMENT.-For the reasons mentioned in the preceding paragraph the number of scholars attending Schools under the Education Department has sensibly diminished during the last three years, the annual decrease amounting to 1,360 scholars in 1894, 454 scholars in 1895, and 479 scholars in 1896.

5. COMPARATIVE STATISTICS OF SCHOOLS UNDER THE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT WITH REFERENCE TO SCHOOL FEES.-Of the whole number (6,313) of scholars who attended, during the year 1896, the 116 Schools under the supervision of the Education Department, there were about 82 per cent. (5,178 scholars) enrolled in 101 Grant-in-Aid Schools receiving a Christian education whilst about 18 per cent. or 1,135 scholars attended 15 Government Schools receiving a secular education. Both the Grant-in-Aid Schools and the Government Schools offer purely Chinese instruction free of all charge, and the mass of the population desire no other than Chinese education. It is only in the case of Schools giving a European education (in English or Portuguese) that 12 Grant-in-Aid Schools and one of the Government Schools under the Education Department charge school fees, varying from half a dollar, to three dollars a month. An absolutely free European education is offered in the English language by 8 Grant-in-Aid Schools, and by 5 Government Schools, in the Portuguese language by 3 Grant-in-Aid Schools, and in the Chinese language by 3 Grant-in-Aid Schools. It may be of interest to note, with regard to the whole number of scholars who attended, in the year 1896, schools of any description in the Colony, 5,535 scholars received a Chinese education free of charge, 1,639 scholars received a European education free of charge,, and 2,512 scholars paid fees for a European education. In other words, as many as 74 per cent. of all the scholars (9,686) under instruction in local Schools, in the year 1896, received their education free of charge.

6. ATTENDANCE IN SCHOOLS UNDER THE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT.-At the beginning of the year 1896, when the Schools were reopened after the Chinese new-year holidays, they commenced

308

filling so rapidly that it seemed as if the disastrous effects of the outbreak of plague in 1894 were about to be wiped out entirely, but within a few weeks the movement suddenly stopped and numbers of Chinese Schools were left almost empty owing to a sudden recurrence of the epidemic in some parts of the Colony. The average attendance, instead of increasing beyond that of 1895, which stood at 4,689 scholars, fell to 4,005 scholars. The proportion of average daily attendance to enrolment which in 1893 equalled 78.19 per cent., and which, after falling to 61.41 per cent. in 1894, had again risen in 1895 to 76.95 per cent., fell accordingly in 1896 to 74:48 per cent. instead of yielding, as in the ordinary course it would have done, a considerable increase.

7. LOCAL DISTRIBUTION OF SECULAR AND RELIGIOUS SCHOOLS IN THE COLONY.-The terms "secular" and "religious" have to be applied to local Schools in a peculiar sense, which requires a few words of explanation. Nearly all the Grant-in-Aid Schools are virtually "religious" Schools in the ordinary sense of the word, but under the Grant-in-Aid Code, which deliberately and wisely ignores the question of religion altogether, the Government aids these Voluntary Schools exclusively on the basis of the results obtained "in the subjects of the standards" (reading, dictation, composition, history, mathematics, natural science etc.), and leaves these Schools absolutely free to teach as much or as little as they please of any religion whatsoever. The Institutions which in this Colony are denominated “secular" Schools are the Government Schools, established, maintained and controlled exclusively by the Government apart from any question of payment by result, and the Kaifong Schools, maintained by Chinese Associations which decline to receive any aid from Government in order to be absolutely free from any European interference. Now these Schools are not altogether secular, because these so called secular Schools inculcate the principles of Confucianism, Tauism and Buddhism in teaching the Chinese standard school books and the one Government School which has lately ceased giving a Chinese education, teaches in certain classes, preparing for the Oxford Local Examinations, portions of the Christian Scriptures. Nevertheless all the Government Schools as well as the Kaifong Schools are secular in this sense that they do not make it their aim to inculcate the principles of Christianity. They are secular so far as they are non-Christian, and aim rather at the propagation of morality than of religion ordinarily so called. Taking, however, the distinction of religious and secular School in the sense in which these terms are locally applied, it is interesting to note that, with the exception of the comparatively unsettled districts of Kennedy Town and Shek-tong-tsui (at the extreme West end of the town) every district of the Colony that has any Schools at all, has a sufficient proportion of both secular and religious Schools to answer the varied demands of the people. The subjoined Table exhibits this aspect of local school accommodation with sufficient clearness and requires no further explanation. I may add, however, this Table, apart from illustrating the topographical distribution of secular and religious Schools, also illustrates the fact that the mass of the native population, although they are devout Confucianists, Tauists or Buddhists, have as a rule, no objection to send their children to the religious Grant-in-Aid schools in spite of their decidedly Christian character. It will be noticed that the religious Grant-in-Aid Schools have a larger attendance than the secular Government and Kaifong Schools put together, and the reason is simply that the Grant-in-Aid Schools, being worked on the principle of payment by results, are impelled by self interest to maintain a higher rate of efficiency and that the latter aspect outweighs with Chinese parents all other considerations.

Table shewing the Local Distribution of Secular and Religious Schools in 1896.

Districts

exclusive of Peak District.

Govern-

Kaifong.

Grant- in-

Private. Private.

Total.

Total.

ment.

Grand Total.

Aid.

Secular Schools.

Scholars.

Secular Schools.

Scholars.

Religious Schools.

Scholars.

Secular Schools.

Scholars.

Religious Schools.

Scholars.

Secular Schools.

Scholars.

Religious Schools.

Scholars.

Schools.

Scholars.

of all.

Descriptions.

Schools

1. & II. Kennedy Town and Shek-

tongtsui,

III. Saiyingpun,

IV. & V. Taipingshan & Sheungwán,. VI. Chungwán,

VII. & VIII. Hawán and Wantsai,

IX. & X. Bowrington & Sookonpou,... XI. Villages of Hongkong,

XII. Villages & Settlement of British

Kowloon,

7 222

191 12 204 15 835

41,705

2:424E

:

18 350 16 978 1 37 32 559 22 1,580|

237 10 228) 12 489

1 67 2 39 3 142

7 199 7110 10| 367

1 63 8. 135 16 565

:

:

:

Totals,..

1 17

:

8 239 8 239 14 395 15 835 29 1,230 19 387 16 978 35 1,365 4136 36 2,264 26 1,716 62 3,980

2231 12 465 14 720 26 1,185

3 106 3 142 6 248 14 309 10 367 24

676

9 198

16 565 25

768

17 2,462 89 1,625 101 5,178

1 37 7384 1074,124 108 5,562 215 9,686.

8. EDUCATIONAL EXPENDITURE OF THE GOVERNMENT.-The sum total of disbursements made by the Government for educational purposes during the year 1896 ($76,501 as compared with $73,775

Years.

309 in the year 1895) amounted, after deducting school fees and educational refunds paid into the Treasury ($10,443.00 as compared with $13,635.00 in 1895) to $66,158.76 as compared with $60,140.24 in 1895. The details of educational expenditure incurred in the year 1896 are as follow:-Office of Education Department (including rent of premises) $6,026.21; Queen's College (after deducting school fees and refunds) $27,541.15; Belilios Public School (after deducting school fees) $3,043.39; fifteen other Departmental Schools $5,488.10; 101 Grant-in-Aid Schools (for 1895) $24,249.64; Special Educational Grants $647.92; Government Scholarship $1,848.91; Physical Training $192. The nett cost of education ($66,158.76) amounted in the year 1896 to 2.52 per cent. of the total Colonial Revenue (as compared with 2.37 per cent. in 1895 and 2.07 per cent. in 1894). As the total number of scholars nnder instruction, during the year 1896, at the expense or with the aid of the Government (the Police School excepted) was 7,301, the education of each scholar cost the Govern- ment $9.06, as compared with $7.69 in 1895 and $7.66 in 1894. In the several classes of educational institutions in the Colony, the cost to Government of the education of each scholar under instruction was as follows:-in Queen's College, $27.87; in Belilios Public School $19.14; in the Departmental Schools, $5.60; in the Grant-in-Aid Schools which have the largest number of scholars (5,178 out of 7,301) $4.68. The Managers of those 101 Grant-in-Aid Schools, who received from the Govern- ment, during the year 1896 altogether the sum of $24,897.56, expended during the same year on those Schools, out of the resources of their respective Missionary Societies, supplemented in the case of seven Schools by school fees, an aggregate of $59,102.23.

9. NATURE OF THE EDUCATION GIVEN IN THE SCHOOLS OF THE COLONY.-No material change has taken place, as regards the nature of the education given in local Schools, since the Government (in 1895) announced its determination henceforth to promote English rather than Chinese education among the native population, except that the Chinese classes of Queen's College have been abolished. There has been, however, a tendency observable among the Managers of Grant-in-Aid Schools to conform, as soon as possible, to this new policy of the Government which, since the desire for au education revolution is spreading among the Chinese people, for political reasons, now animates also to some extent, the native population of Hongkong. As the demand, on the part of the Chinese, for an English education is increasing, the Government and the Managers of Grant-in-Aid Schools will pari passu be moved to increase both the existing staff and the existing accommodation for English teaching in the Colony. The need for a Training School for native teachers of English, for the benefit of local Schools in general, is gradually becoming more pressing. Unless this need is supplied by the Government, English education will, so far as the native population of this Colony is concerned, continue to be what it has been all along, viz., an expensive luxury beyond the means of the mass of the people. As things are at present, two thirds of all our local Schools offer a Chinese, and one third a European education.

10. FEMALE EDUCATION. According to the Census of 1881 and 1891, it appears that the average proportion of girls to boys of school-going age in the Colony, is equal to 48.08 per cent. From the subjoined Table it will be seen that the proportion of girls under instruction in the year 1896 has slightly improved during the last three years, as it has risen from 32.49 per cent. (in 1894) to 33.26 per cent. of the whole number of children known to have attended school in 1896. But it will also be observed that that proportion is still considerably below the normal rate (48.08). Though the number of girls in school has fallen in 1896 (because of the plague) below what it was in 1894, yet there is abundant evidence to indicate that there is a progressive movement at work and that the old prejudice of the Chinese people against female education is giving way so far as a Chinese education is concerned. But as regards bringing the Chinese girls of the Colony under the influence of an English education, there is among the Chinese residing in this Colony, and even among those who have themselves studied English, with the sole exception of those who have been abroad for many years, the old prejudice, viz. the fear that an English education would instil in the minds of Chinese girls a desire for liberty and independence incompatible with the subordinate status which Chinese society assigns to woman. The only class among whom English education has of late made consider- able strides in advance, and whose English attainments are now meeting with laudable appreciation, are the Eurasian girls whose educational interests had in former years been neglected through local prejudice.

Table shewing the Proportion of Boys and Girls under instruction in Local Schools.

Boys.

GIRLS.

Government

Schools.

Kaifong

Schools.

Grant-in-Aid

Schools.

Private

Schools.

Total Boys.

Percentage.

1894,

1,928 1,735 3,251

102

7,016

402

22 2,713

241 3,378

32.49

1895,

1,752 2,170 3,091

67

7,080

380

30

2,593

453

3,456 32.80

1896,...

1,745 1,604 2,856

21

6,226

378

21

2,322

383

3,104 33.26

Government

Schools.

Kaifong

Schools.

Grant-in-Aid

Schools.

Private

Schools.

Total Girls.

Propor-

tion of Girls to

Total of Scholars.

310

11. NUMBER OF UNEDUCATED CHILDREN IN THE COLONY.-The difficulty in estimating the number of children remaining uneducated lies in the absence of statistics as regards the number of children of local school-going age (6 to 16 years) actually residing in the Colony. The estimate of the latter number will always partake of the nature of guess-work when there are no details provided by a Census. According to the Census of 1881, the number of children of local school-age amounted to 9.26 per cent. of the population. As the Census of 1891, which gave that percentage as 9.90, shewed an increase of .64 per cent. for the ten years, it will be safe to take the proportion of children of school- going age in 1896 at 10.22 per cent. of the population, which, according to the partial Census of January 1897, amounted to 236,382 persons residing in the Colony in 1896. Therefore, the number of children of school-going age residing in the Colony in 1896 may be estimated as amounted to 24,158 children. Now the proportion of girls to the total of children of school-going age was, according to the Census of 1891, equal to 47.32 per cent. Taking then 48.98 as the normal percentage of girls, I estimate that, among the 24,158 children of local school-going age residing in the Colony, in the year 1896, there were about 11,625 girls and 12,533 boys. But the records show that there were, in 1896 under instruction in Schools of all descriptions (the Police School excepted) in the Colony, only 3,060 girls and 6,287 boys. It appears therefore that 8,565 girls and 6,246 boys failed to attend school. It would, however, be unfair to put down the whole of these 14,811 children as remaining uneducated because the estimate is based on 10 years' schooling whilst the mass of the Chinese children remain in school but 3 or 4 years. Accordingly the number of those children who remain entirely uneducated may not exceed, say, 7,400.

·

12. RESULTS OF THE ANNUAL EXAMINATIONS.-As far as the Grant-in-Aid Schools are concerned, the detailed results of the examination of 86 of these Schools will be found summarized, as usual, in Tables X. and XI. appended to this report, where the grants allowed and the percentage of scholars passed in each School in 1896 are stated and compared with the results of the preceding year, and in Table XII. which records the percentage of passes gained in each subject. As regards the Depart- mental Schools, Tables II. to VII. supply the most important particulars. Five of the Grant-in-Aid Schools, having been temporarily closed, had no scholars to bring under examinations and in the case of thirteen other Schools the annual grant had to be assessed on the basis of the average earnings gained by examination during the previous three years because sudden and continued illness prevented my completing the examinations before the close of the school year.

13. BELILIOS PUBLIC SCHOOL.-The annual examination of this School shewed good and solid results, in the Chinese as well as in the English Divisions. The work of this Institution being happily free from all trammels of competitive examinations and keeping, in its English Division, at present within the range of an elementary School, is absolutely free from cramming. There are consequently no specially showy results in the case of individuals to refer to, but the attainments of each class as a whole showed a high average such as testifies to the ability and efficiency of the staff. Though there is a fair sprinkling of aliens in the English Division, English and English only is spoken both in class and on the play-ground, and the speed with which some Indian and Eurasian children learned to speak English is surprising. The great attention bestowed on object lessons in the lower and on recitation and memorizing in the upper classes, is the principal cause of this success. The establishment of a school library, the purchase of a piano and the popularity of the physical drill exercises have done much to brighten school-life in this Institution, but there is still one desire of staff and children unfulfilled viz. the acquisition of a tennis court for which there is ample room on the premises.

14. DEPARTMENTAL DISTRICT SCHOOLS.-The number and work of the Government Schools has not been been diminished during the year, though for many months the attendance was sadly reduced. Some of these Schools which are situated in town have felt the effects of increased attention being of late given by Chinese parents to English studies. In some places, however, like Yaumati and Stanley, the demand for English teaching is disproportionately small and insignificant.

15. GRANT-IN-AID SCHOOLS.-The year 1896 has proved a most unfortunate period in the history of local education so far as Schools attended by Chinese scholars are concerned. It was not merely the recurrence of the plague and not solely the measures taken, and rightly so, against over- crowding, but it was principally the abnormal rise of house rent which adversely affected Chinese and Anglo-Chinese Schools and their attendance. All such Schools and particularly Chinese Girls-Schools lost a large proportion of their scholars, and five Schools had to be closed until the end of the year. At the same time when the Chinese Schools suffered such unusual stress, the other Schools attended by non-Chinese children, remained in a normal condition with the exception of the British Kowloon College. This School, which all along has laboured under unusual difficulties, had its School-house levelled to the ground by a typhoon and though the School was continued in temporary quarters, it had to be closed at the end of the year. Although the British Kowloon College had from the begin- ning an experimental character, it has shewn distinct signs of permanent vitality. In view of the steady growth of the European settlement which has sprung up on the Peninsula and in view of the sacrifices of time, work and money, which the School Committee have made from year to year, His Excellency the Governor has recognized the reasonableness of the Committee's request that the School be either converted into a Government School reserved for the children of the European residents of the Peninsula in the same way in which so many Schools on the Island are virtually reserved for the

311

Chinese community, or that the Government provide ground and school-building in which case the Committee would cheerfully work the School at their own expense on the lines of a Grant-in-Aid School, with little doubt of success.

16. OXFORD LOCAL EXAMINATIONS.-The results of the Oxford Local Examinations held in Hongkong in July 1896 were as under:-I. Preliminary Candidates. Honours List, none. Pass List, St. Joseph's College, 4 passes; Victoria English Girls School, 2 passes; Private Tuition, 2 passes; Queen's College, 1 pass; British Kowloon College 1 pass. Candidates who, having exceeded the limit of age, satisfied the Examiners,-St. Joseph's College, 5 passes; Queen's College, 3 passes, Victoria English Boys School, 3 passes; Diocesan School 2 passes; Victoria English Girls Schools, 1 pass; Private Tuition, 1 pass. Successful Candidates who obtained distinction-none. Details:- Candidates presented, 65; examined 54; passed in. preliminary subjects, 47; in religious knowledge, 37; in English history, 45; in geography, 22; in mathematics, 11; in natural science, 1; in drawing, 18. Total of certificates issued to preliminary candidates to candidates of proper age, 10; to can- didates beyond the limit of age, 15.-II. Junior Division. Honours List, third class, Private Tuition, 1 pass.

Pass List-Diocesan School, 3 passes; Queen's College, 2 passes; St. Joseph's College, 2 passes; Victoria English Girls School, 1 pass. Candidates who, having exceeded the age of 16 years, satisfied the Examiners.-St. Joseph's College, 2 passes; Queen's College, 1 pass; Victoria English Boys School, 1 pass; Victoria English Girls School, I pass. Candidates who obtained distinction-

1 Diocesan School, 1 in religious knowledge and in English. Details as to results of the examination of Junior Candidates;-presented 46; examined, 40; passed in preliminary subjects, 40; in religious knowledge, fully 19, partly 7; in English, fully 16, partly 6; in mathematics, 10; in French. I; in natural science, 1; in drawing, 3. Certificates issued to candidates of proper age, 9; to candidates beyond the limit of age, 5.-III. Senior Candidates. Honours List, none.-Pass List. Queen's College, 3 passes; Victoria English Boys School, 2 passes; Private Tuition, 2 passes; Diocesan School, 1 pass. Candidates who, having exceeded the limit of age, satisfied the examiners,-Queen's College, 1 pass; Victoria English Girls School, 1 pass; Diocesan School, I pass.→Details. Candi- dates presented 22; candidates examined, 20. Candidates passed, in preliminary subjects, 19; in religious knowledge, fully 8, partly 3; in English, fully 8, partly 7; in mathematics, 7. Certificates issued, to candidates of proper age, 8; to candidates beyond the limit of age, 3. The foregoing results may be summarized as follows:--candidates examined 114; certified as passed, 50; failed, 64; passes obtained by St. Joseph's College, 13 passes; by Queen's College, 11 passes; by Diocesan School, 7 passes; by Victoria English Girls School, 6 passes; by Victoria English Boys School, 6 passes; by Private Tuition, 5 passes; by British Kowloon College, 1 pass. Distinction,-1 scholar of Diocesan School gained distinction in religious knowledge and in English subjects. Honours,-1 pass in third class was gained by Private Tuition.

17. BELILIOS MEDAL AND PRIZE EXAMINATIONS.--The Trustees of the Belilios Medal and Prize Fund have not thought it advisable as yet to resume the annual competitive examinations but will be in a position, by the close of the year 1897, to offer again prizes for competition though probably on altered and improved conditions.

18. PHYSICAL TRAINING.-The Military Authorities have continued to grant the services of a private whose drill instruction is much appreciated by eight of the local Schools.

19. INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION.--Apart from the R. C. Reformatory School at West Point, which gives regular instruction in several handicrafts, there is one Kindergarten School, established some years ago by the Basel Mission, which gives gratuitous teaching to young Chinese children at Saiying-poon, not merely combining play with work but giving useful instruction in the rudiments of industry by systematic training of hand and eye. It is to be hoped that the Government will see. its way to encourage the Basel Mission, if but as an experimental measure, and in a small way, to expand this movement for the benefit of native children, by a small merit grant based on inspection and average attendance.

20. MEDICAL EDUCATION --There are now fourteen students connected with the College of Medicine for Chinese, and the standard of preliminary preparation is on the whole improving. The departure of Dr. CANTLIE from the Colony early in the year was a serious loss to the Institution, but others have come forward to take part in the teaching, and the work is going steadily forward in spite of the disadvantages under which the College labours through the lack of a suitable building and a permanent staff.

21. SCHOLARSHIPS.--The draft of the revised Government Scholarship Scheme, referred to in former reports, is still under the consideration of the Government. Meanwhile, however, other Colonics, having Scholarships on the same lines on which the Hongkong Scholarship Scheme was worked, have also come to the recognition that Scholarships so conditioned, although benefitting smart individuals who any how have an advantage over others by their higher natural gifts, do not materially benefit education generally nor the Colony which makes such large pecuniary sacrifices. I am still of opinion that the re-establishment of our Government Scholarships on lines more or less like those sketched out in my draft report of 7 February, 1894, would prove a boon to the general

.

312

educational movement of the Colony by paving the way for the development of secondary education. As to non-official Scholarships, Queen's College had, in the year 1896, the benefit of 4 Belilios Scho- larships, 2 Morrison and 1 Stewart Scholarship. The management of the Morrison Scholarship has been placed on the proper legal footing which, in a former report, I pointed out as desirable. St. Joseph's College had the benefit of one and the College of Medicine that of seven Belilios Scholarships.

22. I enclose the usual Tables (I to XIII).

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

E. J. EITEL, Ph. D. (Tubing.), Inspector of Schools and Head of the Education Department.

The Honourable J. H. STEWART LOCKHART,

Colonial Secretary.

TABLE 1.-NUMBER of SCHOLARS attending Schools under the EDUCATION DEPARTMENT during the Year 1896.

No.

Name of Schools.

Scholars Scholars attending attending Government Grant-in-Aid Schools. Schools.

Total Scholars

in attendance

12341 OZ

"""

"

23

>>

American Board Mission, Bridges Street (Boys),

Queen's Road West (Boys),

23

Hawan (Girls),

Chungwan (Girls),

Yaumati (Girls),

46

46

33

33

20

20

34

34

26.

26

6

8

"

9

10

Matauchung (Boys),...

11

"}

12

13

14

15

16

17

""

18

11

19

20

"

21

وو

22

""

23

>>

24

11

25

11

Third Street (Girls),

26

"?

27

""

28

">

A

29

**

30

>>

31

">

Aplichau (Girls),

32

33

""

34

11

35

36

37

38

,,

39

""

40

17

Aplichau (Boys).......

Basel Mission, Shamshuipo (Boys),

>>

Shaukiwan (Boys),

Tokwawan (Boys),

Mongkok (Boys), High Street,

Belilios Public School (English) (Girls),

Berlin Foundling House School (Girls),

Berlin Ladies Mission, Queen's Road West (Boys),

C. M. S., St. Stephen's Chinese School (Boys),

">

Pottinger Street (Boys),

Saiyingpun (Boys),

St. Stephen's Baxter Memorial (Girls),

Lyndhurst Terrace (Girls),

Yaumati (Mixed),

Hunghom (Girls),

Quarry Bay (Girls),

Little Hongkong (Boys),

Aberdeen School (Boys),

Victoria Home and Orphanage (Chinese) (Girls),

""

(English) (Girls),

St. Stephen's Anglo-Chinese (Boys), Morrison English School (Boys),

Diocesan Home and Orphanage (Boys),

F. E. S., Bonham Road Chinese Division (Girls),

High Street (Girls),

Queen's Road West (Girls),

Saiyingpun Praya (Girls),

37

37

33

33

62

62

40

40

26

26

26

...

26

94

94

159

159

(Chinese) (Girls)

219

219

25

25

43

43

Mongkoktsui (Boys), Tsattszmui (Boys),

No. 2 (Boys),

42

42

44

44

70

70

69

69

104

104

68

68

45

45

40

40

28

28

57

57

32

32

23

23

24

24

28

28

26

26

49

49

8

8

92

92

101

་་

101

196

196

48

48

22

22

44

44

34

34

41

27

Pottinger Street (Girls),

11

11

42

>>

Stanley School (Girls),

45

45

43

Shaukiwan (Girls),..

29

29

44

"

Tokwawan (Girls),.

19

19

45

Bonham Road English Division (Girls),

31

31

17

46

L. M. S., Square Street (Boys),

68

68

47

Wantsai Chapel (Boys),

44

44

Carried forward,

415

2,049

2,464

313

TABLE I.-NUMBER of SCHOLARS attending Schools under the EDUCATION DEPARTMENT during the Year 1896,- Contd.

75

76

77

""

78

""

79

"J

80

"

81

32

82

""

83

""

84

""

85

""

86

">

87

JJ

88

""

3)

"

No.

Name of Schools.

Scholars Scholars attending attending Government Grant-in-Aid Schools. Schools.

Total Scholars

in attendance.

Brought forward,.

415

2,049

2,464

48

L. M, S., Yaumati (Boys),....

40

40

49

""

Shektongtsui (Boys),......................

41

41

50

"

Saiyingpun I Division (Boys),

66

66

51

"}

17

52

53

"

>>

A

54

"

55

56

3 3

II

""

(Boys).

57

11

58

"

(Girls),

59

""

60

">

""

No. 2 (Boys),

61

Shaukiwan (Boys),.

62

Taikoktsui (Boys),

63

"

64

65

"

..

66

>>

67

68

""

69

""

70

71

""

72

دو

73

""

>>

29

II

""

II

Hunghom (Boys),

Hospital Chapel (Boys),

Shektongtsui (Girls),....

Saiyingpun 2nd Street I Division (Girls),.

Ui-hing Lane I Division (Girls),

Tanglungchau No. 1 (Boys),

(Boys),

48

48

30

80

43

43

13

13

35

35

98

98

56

56

45

45

48

48

61

61

45

45

27

27

74

Square Street (Girls),

Matauwai (Boys), Third Street (Boys), D'Aguilar Street (Girls), Fletcher Street (Girls), Kau-u-fong (Girls),

Tanglungchau (Girls),

Aberdeen Street (Girls),

Wantsai Chapel (Girls),

Staunton Street (Girls),....

Taipingshan English School (Boys), Pokfulam (Boys).,

R. C. M., Cathedral School (Boys),

وو

Bridges Street Chinese Division (Girls), St. Theresa School, (Girls),

Holy Infancy School, I Division (Boys),

31

Yaumati (Girls),...

Shaukiwan (Girls),.

Hunghom (Girls),

II

39

(Girls),

Italian Convent Chinese School (Girls),.

Sacred Heart School Chinese Division (Girls),

St. Joseph's College Chinese Division (Boys),

**

European

"

Italian Convent English Division (Girls),

Portuguese (Girls),

(Boys),

49

49

23

23

33

33

59

59

33

33

54

54

74

74

22

22

57

...

15

32

...

67

21

36འ:38བ

57

15

32

67

21

56

56

47

47

41

41

47

47

71

71

22

22

56

56

257

257

212

212

92

92

89

""

Bridges Street English

>>

(Girls),

22

22

90

""

Portuguese (Girls),

56

56

""

91

"}

92

,,

93

29

94

English

""

95

""

96

"

97

Nova Escola Portugueza (Girls),

Sacred Heart School English Division (Girls),

St. Francis Portuguese Division (Girls),

Victoria Portuguese School Portuguese Division (Mixed),

Saiyingpun (English) (Boys),

35

35

22

22

37

37

...

""

(Girls),

English

25

25

24

24

""

(Mixed),

19

19

191

191

93

99

(Chinese) (Boys),

""

Sheko (Boys),

(65)

100

101

102

Taitamtuk (Boys),

103

St. Paul's College School (Boys),...

Stanley (Anglo-Chinese) (Boys),

Tanglungchau (Hakka) (Boys),

104

Victoria English School (Boys),

སྐ : ;

18

18

107

107

45

12

67

147

147

105

"

106

107

108

109

110

11

""

British Kowloon School (Mixed), Wantsai (English) (Boys),.

(Chinese) (Boys),

Wesleyan Mission, Spring Gardens (Boys),...

Wellington Street (Boys),.

(Girls),

57

57

50

50

237

237

(138)

55

55

111

111

111

"

(Girls),

40

40

112

Lascar Row (Boys),

41

41

"3

113

Wantsai School (Boys),..

23

23

114

""

Graham Street (Girls),

60

60

115

Kennedy Town (Boys),

32

32

116

>>

Lyndhurst Terrace English School (Boys),

45

45

117

Wongmakok (Boys),

12

12

118

Wongnaichung (Anglo-Chinese) (Boys),

60

60

119

Yaumati (Anglo-Chinese) (Boys),

63

63

Total,..

1,135

5,178

6,313

1

Aplichau,

2

Belilios Public School (English),

314

TABLE II.-NUMBER of SCHOLARS attending GOVERNMENT SCHOOLS under the EDUCATION DEPARTMENT and EXPENSES of each SCHOOL during the year 1896.

No.

Name of Schools.

*A

Expense.

120.00 3,043.39

Boys.

Girls.

Total.

37

37

...

159

159

3

""

(Chinese),

219

219

1,032.00

4

Pokfulam,

15

15

132.00

Saiyingpun (English),

191

906.10

191

6

(Chinese),

(65)

228.00

Sheko,

18

18

120.00

Stanley (Anglo-Chinese),

45

45

312.05

9

10

11

Taitamtuk,

Tanglungchau (Hakka),.

Wantsai (English),.

12

12

132.00

67

67

180.00

237

1,023.88

12

""

(Chinese),

(138)

:

237

374.30

13

Wongmakok,

12

14

Wongnaichung (Anglo-Chinese),

60

15

Yaumati (Anglo-Chinese)......

63

288

12

132.00

60

392.92

63

402.85

Total,.....

757

378

1,135

8,531.49

TABLE III.--AVERAGE EXPENSE of each SCHOLAR at Government SCHOOLS under the EDUCATION DEPartment and

at the GRANT-IN-AID SCHOOLS during the year 1896.*

I.--EXPENDITURE OF GOVERNMENT SCHOOLS.

(Cost of working the Schools irrespective of cost of erection or repairs of Buildings.)

1. BELILIOS PUBLIC SCHOOL.

Expenditure,

Deduct School Fees, refunded,

$ 3,518.39 475.00

$ 3,043.39

.$ 5,488.10

II.--EXPENDITURE ON THE GRANT-IN-AID SCHOOLS.

Total Cost to Government, in 1896,

.$ 24,249.64

2. OTHER DEPARTMENTAL SCHOOLS, (no School Fees).

Cost to Government, in 1896,

III.--AVERAGE COST OF EACH SCHOLAR. (Calculated by the Enrolment.)

Average Cost, to Government, of each Scholar :-

1. at Belilios Public School (not including cost of building), 2. at Other Departmental Schools, 3. at Grant-in-Aid Schools,

19.14

5.60

.$

1.68

IV.--AVERAGE COST OF EACH SCHOLAR. (Calculated by the Average Daily Attendance.)

Average Cost, to Government, of each Scholar :-

1. at Belilios Public School (not including cost of building),. 2. at Other Departmental Schools,

3. at Grant-in-Aid Schools,

35.10

9.57

7.73

*NOTE.-The Cost of the Inspectorate of Schools ($6,026.21), being connected with both Grant-in-Aid Schools and Government Schools, is not included.

4

TABLE IV.--ENROLMENT and ATTENDANCE at Government Schools under the EDUCATION DEPARTMENT

No.

during the year 1896.

Name of Schools.

ì

Aplichau,

2

Belilios Public School (English),

>>

"J

(Chinese),

Pokfulam,

Saiyingpun (English),

"J

(Chinese),.

Sheko,

Stanley (Anglo-Chinese),

Taitamtuk,

Tanglungchau (Hakka).

9

10

Wautsai (English),

12

(Chinese),

13

14

15

Yaumati (Anglo-Chinese),

Wongmakok,...

Wongnaichung (Anglo-Chinese),

Average Monthly Enrolment.

Average Daily Attendance.

23.25

15.65

101.63

86.70

99.41

78.27

11.50

9.35

107.05

100.81

31.91

33.12

21.66

21.42

28.90

26.52

10.25

9.51

35.58

29.90

116.25

98.02

86.41

70.64

10.33

9.59

47.08

42.41

82.00

28.15

.

Total,...

763.21

660.06

315

TABLE V.--MAXIMUM and MINIMUM ENROLMENT and DAILY ATTENDANCE at GOVERNMENT SCHOOLS under the EDUCATION DEPARTMENT during the year 1896.

No.

Name of Schools.

Maximum Daily Minimum Daily

Attendance

Attendance

Maximum

Monthly Enrolment.

Minimum Monthly Enrolment.

(Monthly average). (Monthly average).

1

Aplicbau,

31

9

23.04

3.22

.....

2

Belilios Public School (English),

121

88

107.60

72.34

3

Pokfulam,"

59

رو

(Chinese),

129

59

114.00

46.87

15

9

13.12

7.86

Saiyingpun (English),

Sheko,

126

92

112.80

87.05

(Chinese),

36

25

34.68

23.50

24

16

22.86

16.00

Stanley (Anglo-Chinese),

36

22

31.08

21.50

9

Taitamtuk,

12

8

11.08

7.77

10

Tanglungchau (Hakka),

44

19

36.31

18.91

11

Wantsai (English),

167

96

150.73

64.58

12

(Chinese),

122

72

114.15

46.17

13

Wongmakok,

11

9.

11.00

8.69

14

Wongnaichung (Anglo-Chinese),

54

42

46.07

39.80

15

Yaumati (Anglo-Chinese),.

53

19

44.23

13.68

Total,.......

982

585

872.75

477.94

No.

TABLE VI.-NUMBER of DAYS on which the GOVERNMENT SCHOOLS under the EDUCATION DEPARTMENT

were taught during the

year 1896.

Name of Schools.

School Days. No.

Name of Schools.

School Days.

1

Aplichan,

242

9

Taitamtuk,

2

Belilios Public School (English),

258

10

Tanglungchau (Hakka),

3

(Chinese),

241

11

Wantsai (English),

Pokfulam,

240

12

""

Salyingpun (English),

242

13

(Chinese),

239

14

Sheko,

247

15

(Chinese),

Wongmakok,

Wongnaichung (Anglo-Chinese), Yaunati (Anglo-Chinese), .

8 Stanley (Anglo-Chinese),

219

251

248

241

239.

254

237

- 237

Total Enrolment.

for the year.

TABLE VII.-SUMMARY of ENROLMENT and ATIFNDANCE at the GOVERNMENT SCHOOLS for the last twenty-five years.

YEARS.

Maximum Daily Attendance

Minimum Daily Attendance

(Monthly Average).

Minimum Montbly Enrolment.

(Monthly Average).

1872,

1,480

1,157

837

665

1873,

1,838

1,326

852

760

1874,

1,932

1,271

974

836

1875,

1,927

1,312

988

863

1876,

2,171

1,383

1,057

925

1877,

2,148

1,446

1,212

1,035

1878,

2,101

1,324

1,100

936

1879,

2,043

1,356

1,027

904

1880,

2,078

1,468

1,082

937

1881,

1,986

1,384

1,093

956

1882,

2,114

1,444

1,062

988

1883,

2,080

1,414

1,138

990

1884,

1,978

1,420

1,066

941

1885,

1,988

1,424

1,661

926

1886,

1,893

1,544

1,040

886

1887,

1,814

1,552

1,126

1,000

1888,

1,933

1,653

1,139

1,040

:

1889,

2,293

1,992

1,190

1,118

1890,

2,514

1,999

1,494

1,370

1891,

2,540

1,909

1,403

1,291

1892,

2,622

2,101

1,536

1,407

1893,

2,356

1,829

1,443

1,317

1894,

1,282

1,039

420

320

1895,

1,108

893

607

545

1896,

1,135

872

585

477

}

316

TABLE VIII.-NUMBER of SCHOLARS attending Schools receiving GRANTS-IN-AID (under the Provisions of the Scheme of 1893), expenses incurred and amount of Grant gained by each in 1896.

Class of

Expenses

Name of Schools.

Boys.

Girls.

Total.

School.

incurred in

1896.

Amount of Grant gained

for 1896.

I

American Board Mission, Bridges Street (Boys),

46

46

$ € 243.00

168.73

"1

"

"}

Queen's Road West (Boys),

33

33

236.00

142.06

"

"

Háwan (Girls).........

20

20

156.00

50.62

"J

??

39

Sheungwan (Girls),

34

34

324.00

66.63

""

Yaumati (Girls),

26

26

145.40

85.08

19

}}

"

"

Basel Mission, Shamshuipo (Boys),

Shaukiwan (Bo ys),

33

33

203.79

108.09

62

62

347.32

246.24

19

"

12

Tokwawan (Boys).

40

40

233.00

122.07

"

"

Matauchung (Boys),

26

26

102.82

89.45

17

J.

17

19

"

""

19

""

"1

"

#!

Third Street (Girls),

Lyndhurst Terrace (Girls),

!!

"

Yaumati (Mixed),

"

":

Hunghòm (Girls),

17

19

Quarry Bay (Girls),

"}

"

Little Hongkong (Boys),

17

""

,"

""

"

་་

"

"?

"

95

Mongkok (Boys),....

Berlin Ladies Mission, Queen's Road West (Boys),

Tsat-tsz-mui (Boys),..

C. M. S., St. Stephen's Chinese School (Boys),..

29

No. 2, (Boys),

Pottinger Street (Boys),

Saiyingpun (Boys),

St. Stephen's Baxter Memorial (Girls),.

26

26

$1.09

43.59

43

43

147.77

174.74

Mongkoktsui (Boys),

42

42

117.08

125.58

44

41

61.17

67.45

70

70

336.06

203.22

69

69

389.63

179.53

104

104

351.82

213.48

68

68

292.31

180.34

45

45

258.82

112.36

40

40

265.76

126.58

24

1

??

17

??

Aberdeen School (Boys),

Aplichau School (Girls)..

F. E. S., Bonham Road Chinese Division (Girls),

22

High Street (Girls),

Queen's Road West (Girls),

Saiyingpun Praya (Girls),..

Pottinger Street (Girls), Stanley School (Girls), Shaukiwan (Girls),... Tokwawan (Girls),

L. M. S., Square Street (Boys),

Wantsai Chapel (Boys), . Yaumati (Boys),

Shektongtsui (Boys),.

Saiyingpun 1. Division (Boys),

28

RER : :*****

28

28

210.34

83.85

17.

57

214.86

113.25

32

32

188.28

116.83

23

23

147.68

51.36

24

120.3.7

21.90

28

167,67

127.40

26

26

77.60

48

48

541.20

252.64

22

22

175.50

61.37

44

44

206.75

90.29

31

34

230.75

119,38

11

11

145.05

34.26

45

45

124.70

139.92

29

29

200.50

86.47

44

40

:)

19

""

19

19

II.

"?

"

(Boys),

!!

Hunghòm (Boys),

11

Hospital Chapel (Boys),

$1

""

Shektongtsui (Girls),

12

""

"1

II.

""

39

""

Ui-hing Lane I. Division (Girls),"

19

(Boys),

II.

*

..

11

(Girls),

""

""

11

""

11

་་

Square Street (Girls),

"

"

"

"

"

41

66

48

30

43

Saiyingpun, Second Street I. Division (Girls),

""

17

"

"

""

""

21

""

2:

""

;;

Yaumati (Girls),

19

11

Shaukiwan (Girls),

1)

"

Tanglungchau No. 1 (Boys),

No. 2 (Boys),

Shaukiwan (Boys),....

Taikoktsui (Boys),

Matauwai (Boys),

Third Street (Boys),

D'Aguilar Street (Girls), Fletcher Street (Girls), Kau-ü-fong (Girls), Tanglungchau (Girls), Aberdeen Street (Girls), Wantsai Chapel (Girls), Staunton Street (Girls),

R. C. M., Cathedral School (Boys),

Bridges Street Chinese Division (Girls), St. Theresa School (Girls),

Holy Infancy School I. Division (Boys),

"

48

45

27

23

21

II.

""

(Girls),

":

19

་་

""

*

(Girls),

"

Lascar Row (Boys),

"

Wantsai School (Boys),

"

Graham Street (Girls),

Kennedy Town (Boys), ......

Berlin Mission (Girls),

Hunghom (Girls),

Italian Convent, Chinese School (Girls),

Sacred Heart School Chinese Division (Girls),

Wesleyan Mission, Spring Gardens (Boys),

Wellington Street (Boys).

";

:

55

111

41

23

32

III

"1

*

"

W. M.. Lyndhurst Terrace, English School (Boys),

"

St. Paul's College School (Boys).

1

་་

F. E. S., Bonham Road. English Division (Girls),

Basel Mission, High Street (Girls),

C. M. S., Victoria Home and Orphange Chinese Divison (Girls),

St. Stephen's Anglo-Chinese (Boys),

Morrison English School (Boys),

92

101

45

107

*N.

:

!?

Doc san Home and Orphanage (Boys),

L. M. S., Taipingshan, English, School (Boys),

R. C. M., St. Joseph's College Chinese Division (Boys),.

""

Italian Convent English Division (Girls),.

196

57

56

18+2=6983 : 19695 12:

1999 ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ***** 125 8*SEN : : : 18 289 ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀

19

19

106.60

81.50

68

409.31

216.54

44

327.42

171.91

40

230.31

141.12

41

226.36

137.14

66

338.46

252.68

48

279.26

174.26

30

209.36

54.96

43

283.31

151.50

13

13

152.14

31.05

35

56

45

45

45

49

33

59

33

54

74

22

32

67

56

47

41

47

71

22

*******59* : :828*7* 18628226

35

222.57

99.09

98

332.04

309.94

56

230.16

213.51

200.67

155.34

48

289.26

157.71

61

249.74

136.21

222.61

134.26

27

196.62

9.46

49

286.82

131.06

23

171.51

101.34

233.51

280.74

33

79.36

59

401.62

99.59

33

159.06

93.48

54

403.73

125.26

74

350.99

72.85

22

237.21

89.02

132.00

32

280.00

117.76

67

*470.00

190.32

168.00

40.77

56

460.00

220.59

47

462.00

81.93

41

317.00

144.37

47

340.00

140.83

71

530.00

442.48

657.00

93.03

55

211.00

141.20

111

332.00

229.05

40

228.00

75.87

41

214.00

73.66

23

208.00

82.01

60

60

222.00

222.08

32

166.00

134.42

94

94

760.76

596.35

25

25

981.00

209.88

49

49

1,814.84

463.28 -

92

499.85

485.30

101

1,482.96

186.32

45

456.00

227.55

107

1.649.43

418.78

196

13,994,65

1,052.72

31

31

531.00

229,59

57

452.23

332.81

56

European

(Boys),.

257

257

}

113.43

4,125.34

2,261.91-

212

212

2,524.10

1,381.70

Carried forward........

2,674

1,910

4,584

48,594.07

17,692.49

Class

of School.

TABLE VIII-NUMBER of SCHOLARS attending Schools receiving GRANTS-IN-AID.- Continued.

Name of Schools

317

Boys.

Girls.

Total.

Expenses incurred in 1896.

Amount of Grant gained

for 1896.

Brought forward............

2,674

1,910

4,584

$48,594.07

$17,692.49

III

R.C.M., Italian Convent Portuguese Division (Girls),

>>

*

Bridges Street English Division (Girls),

::

Portuguese Division (Girls),

19

""

Nova Escola Portugueza (Girls),,

13

"

19

23

"

English

"

11

"

"

39

13

19

British Kowloon School (Mixed),

(Girls),

Sacred Heart School, English Division (Girls),

St. Francis Portuguese Division (Girls),

Victoria Portuguese School, Portuguese Division (Mixed),...

Victoria English School (Boys),

19

(Girls).

English

"

(Mixed)....

147

2:3

20

"

C.M.S., Victoria Home and Orphange English Division (Girls),

∞8: KENANGANG

92

92

780.00

471.29

22

22

285.00

132.08

56

56

595.00

288.13

35

35

431.67

126.19

22

22

854.00

99.69

37

37

288.75

184.90

25

25

374,56

124.78

16

24

91.13

1.116.20

12

19

114.82

147

945,16

5,782.98

57

57

604.63

30

50

294.25

40.84

2,856

2,322

5,178

59,102.23

21,210.38

TABLE IX.-ENROLMENT, ATTENDANCE and NUMBER of SCHOOL DAYS at the GRANT-IN-AID SCHOOLS during 1896.

No.

Name of Schools.

Maximum Minimum Monthly Monthly

Enrol- ment.

Attend-

ment.

ance,

Average Average Maximum Minimum

Daily Enrol-

Daily Attend-

ance.

Average Monthly Enrol-

Average Daily

Number

Attend-

ance for

of School

ment.

the Year.

Days.

1

American Board Mission, Bridges Street, (Boys),

46

25

44.34

21.33

39.36

37.46

238

2

"

27

Queen's Road West (Boys),

32

24

30.88

23.15

29.60

28.12

238

3

"

"

Hawan (Girls),

19

11

16.25

9.81

14.70

12.24

227

4

"

"

Chungwan (Girls),

20

6

14.87

5.66

13.50

12.27

266

5

6 Basel Mission, Shamshuipo (Boys),

Yaumati (Girls),

25

12

20.62

7.28

18.60

16.16

212

32

12

28.96

10.33

26.10

23.19

226

7

"

Shaukiwan (Boys),

62

35

57.46

28.83

55.50

48.48

228

8

19

Tokwawan (Boys),

38

26

33.25

12.72

32.07

+

23.64

230

9

Matauchung (Boys),.

26

11

22.11

8.09

22.90

18.91

251

10

"}

Mongkok (Boys),

26

14

24.12

13.00

21.20

19.18

216

11

12

"

13

"

"9

""

14

Berlin Ladies Mission, Queen's Road West (Boys),

C.M.S., St. Stephen's Chinese School (Boys),

43

30

39.40

20.92

41.30

35.49

260

Mongkokisui (Boys),

42

19

39.23

19.00

38.00

30.88

195

Tsat-tszmui (Boys),

31

13

25.70

8.50

27.25

20.90

260

69

43

62.12

38.04

55.90

50.45

258

15

No. 2 (Boys),

43

30

40.00

27.20

38.00

35.07

267

16

19

Pottinger Street (Boys),

70

27

57.53

24.33

52.58

47.96

263

17

"

Saiyingpun (Boys),

46

20

40.62

19.33

38.58

34.68

260

18

15

St. Stephen's Baxter Memorial (Girls),

29

19

28.00

15.33

23.75

19.23

276

19

""

Lyndhurst Terrace (Girls),

25

9

22.73

9.00

21.18

18.16

263

20

Third Street (Girls),

28

15

24.29

11.73

21.30

16.71

217

21

Yaumati (Mixed),.

41

10

22.80

7.66

24.50

17.51

245

22

Hunghòm (Girls),

30

12

25.32

9.76

22.54

18.67

248

23

11

Quarry Bay (Girls),

17

7

16.11

4.83

15.50

12.72

268

24.

Little Hongkong (Boys),

22

3

19.44

3.00

18.25

13.81

264

25

"

Aberdeen School (Boys),

27

14

21.79

11.16

23.60

18.80

215

26

*

Aplichau (Girls),

26

7

23.53

14.60

22.22

18.21

229

28

29

30

"

31

":

32

33

11

35

36

17

37

"1

C

38

39

"

27 F.E.S., Bonham Road, Chinese Division (Girls),

34

High Street (Girls),

Queen's Road West (Girls),

Saiyingpun, Praya (Girls),

Pottinger Street (Girls),

Stanley School (Girls),

Shaukiwan (Girls),

Tokwawan (Girls).

L.M.S., Square Street (Boys),

Wantsai Chapel (Boys),

Yaumati (Boys),

Shektong-tsui (Boys). Saiyingpun, I. Division (Boys),

37

26

33.58

23.73

32.27

29.15

229

22

16

17.29

12.64

18.20

14.82

233

31

16

27.60

14.96

20.83

17.69

281

31

23

23.57

19.50

27.00

21.27

240

10

8.

8.84

6.16

9.00

7.88

108

41

21

32.50

17.66

39.08

29.04

254

29

18

19.37

14.92

20.66

15.42

230

19

12

17.23

9.50

16.63

15.25

254

60

31

53.88

30.33

49.90

47.09

245

38

27

35.94

25.83

36.50

32.33

212

39

28

38.00

21.10

36.44

32.25

192

39

11

27.46

11.00

32.60

22.28

203

66

27

55.03

26.66

57.72

17.37

237

40

II.

39

(Boys),

45

18

38.05

17.00

38.81

33.52

242

41

Hunghòm (Boys),

30

14

23.52

7.64

23.11

15.92

208

42

"?

Hospital Chapel (Boys),

41

13

36.12

10.66

34.54

31.00

235

43

"

Shektong-tsui (Girls),

11

6

7.81

4.66

9.18

7.05

238

44

""

Salyingpun, Second Street, J. Division (Girls),

33

12

22.42

12.00

25.63

21.69

216

45

II.

"

*

(Boys).

86

30

62.63

25.66

73.18

54.39

229

46

"

Ui-bing Lane, I. Division (Girls),

48

38

40.77

34.08

42.33

87.03

220

47

48

49

"

II. Tanglungchau No. 1 (Boys).

No. 2 (Boys),

(Girls),

45

35

40.81

31.00

42.50

36.68

228

46

18

39.03

11.46

34.54

28.42

251

36

25

30.16

17.70

31.63

24.43

260

50

"

Shankiwan (Boys),

43

24

35.04

21.92

38.40

32.53

226

51

Taikoktsni (Boys),..

27

12

24.70

10.85

22.22

18.92

196

52

11

Square Street (Girls),

39

20

32.19

13.83

29.90'

24.13

230

53

Matauwai (Boys).

23

11

21.50

9.96

20.66

18.68

206

54

19

Third Street (Boys),

...

55

4

11

D'Aguilar Street (Girls),

56

Fletcher Street (Girls),

30

12

22.57

Carried forward,.......

1,960

| 1,006

1,669.08

7.57

857.57

19.70

15.22

1,641.12 1,380.35

:སྤྱི།:

229

318

ENROLMENT, ATTENDANCE and NUMBER of SCHOOL DAYS at the GRANT-IN-AID SCHOOLS,--Continued.

No.

Name of Schools.

Maximum Minimum Monthly Monthly

Enrol- Enrol

ment.

ment.

Average Average Maximum Minimum Daily Daily Attend- Attend-

Average Monthly

Average Daily

Number

of

Attend-

Enrol-

School

ance for

ment.

ance.

ance.

the Year.

Days.

Brought forward,

1,960

1,006

1,669.08

857.57

1,641.12

1,380.35

57

L.M.S., Kau-ü-fong (Girls),

47

16

37.40

12.80

21.09

17.19

277

58

}}

Tanglungchau (Girls),

23

59

13

Aberdeen Street (Girls),

60

11

Wantsai Chapel (Girls),

61

Staunton Street (Girls),

62

R.C.M., Cathedral School (Boys),

63

**

Bridges Street, Chinese Division (Girls),.

31

64

"1

St. Theresa School (Girls),

*2*2 **

9

19.65

7.07

16.33

12.96

273

30

15

25.09

7.92

21.81

15.53

277

58

14

42.84

12.59

27.58

19.71

278

20

13

19.40.

11.34

17.60

16.04

253

26

29.56

23.15

29.75

27.03

264

54

39

53.04

37.22

49.58

44.14

247

65

11

Holy Infancy School, I. Division (Boys),

18

13

14.76

12.26

16.00

13.55

239

66

II.

19

11

11

(Girls),

49

24

45.24

22.77

41.91

38.69

266

67

11

Yaumati (Girls),

39

20

30.25

12.19

26.83

20.87

279

68

!!

Shaukiwan (Girls),

41

18

33.93

14.28

33.66

29.24

268

69

"

Hunghòm (Girls),...........

41

28

37.54

21.41

31.83

29.16

273

70

"

Italian Convent, Chinese School (Girls)..

71

67

63.78

69.68

67 66

66.46

272

71

"

Sacred Heart School, Chinese Division (Girls),

22

16

20.75

13.10

20.33

18.57

261

72

Wesleyan Mission, Spring Gardens (Boys),

55

37

19.80

25.88.

51.40

40.76

236

73

*

"

Wellington Street (Boys),

80

62

64.72

12.07

72.90

56.10

221

74

+9

19

"

(Girls),

30

19

22.50

16.61

25.00

19.74

228

75

"

Lascar Row (Boys),

41

29

36.68

25.17

36.20

31.33

234

76

>>

11

Wantsai School (Boys),

23

20

21.70

18.51

22.11

20.03

206

77

>>

"

Graham Street (Girls),...

39

27

36.04

15.15

33.81

28.17

266

78

!!

33

Kennedy Town (Boys),

32

23

24.00

14.48

29.60

20.84

232

79

Basel Mission,

90

61

78.68

51.83

78 09

68.52

244

.80

Berlin Mission (Girls),

25

22

24.55

21.00

24.09

23.18

262

81 C.M.S., Victoria Home and Orphanage, Ch. Div. (Girls),.

44

40

43.64

38.57

42.10

41.60

234

82

:9

St. Stephen's Anglo-Chinese (Boys),

84

33

75.68

31.33

62.72

59.30

239

83

19

Morrison English School (Boys),

56

24

45.20

15.08

39.20

30.32

232

84

85

Wesleyan Mission. Lyndhurst Terrace, Eng. Sch. (Boys), St. Paul's College School (Boys),

35

20

30.04

16.71

27 30

23.55

242

73

27

60.32

26.00

57.27

52.78

241

86

Diocesan Home and Orphanage (Boys),

127

85

103.15

74.50

108.58

91.76

253

87

F.E.S., Bonham Road. English Division (Girls),

26

22

23.40

19.78

24.27

21.77

218

88

L.M.S., Taipingshan, English School (Boys),

57

43

53.63

35.00

48.50

44.81

220

20

""

91

""

92

#t

93

་་

89 R.C.M., St. Joseph's College, Chinese Division (Boys),...

11

European Division (Boys),. Italian Convent, English Division (Girls),

Bridges Street, English Division (Girls),

31

25.30

8.66

20.72

19.43

250

212

182.

190.77

173.81

200.09

180.91

257

174

120

161.09

88.63

165.63

141.20

224

Portuguese Division (Girls),

81

40

78.35

25.95

68.18

56.79

224

19

10

16.38

8.90

16.83

14.58

247

94

""

11

Portuguese Division (Girls),

50

42

45.76

36.04

46.66

40.63

247

95

""

Nova Escola Portugueza (Girls), ·

35

13

26.38

11.50

24.16

18.18

235

96

97

11

98

Sacred Heart School, English Division (Girls), . St. Francis, Portuguese Division (Girls),..

English Division (Girls).

21

16

20.30.

14.72

18.72

17.19

226

31

26

29.68

24.52

28.66

27.40

279

20

14.

19.21

13.34

16.75

16.28

279

99

""

100

Victoria Portuguese School, Port. Liv. (Mixed),. Eng. Div. (Mixed),.

16

8

15.55

6.18

11.75

10.13

231

16

$

14.61

7.88

13.08

11.82

231

101

Victoria English School (Boys),

105

63

95.38

60.38

83.91

76.48

*

262

102

103

(Girls), British Kowloon School (Mixed),

54

33

19

49.71

31.77

47 53.

43.81

262

37

28

33.93

25.03

32.33

23.25

254

104 C.M.S., Victoria Home and Orphanage, Eng. Div. (Girls), .

8

5

7.83

5.00

7.40

6.81

250

"

Total,....

4,331

2,535

3,766.27

2.145.33 3,651.42

3,133.97

*

NAME OF SCHOOL.

TABLE X.-RESULTS of the EXAMINATION of the GRANT

Class of School.

No. of Scholars Presented.

No. of Scholars Examined.

Stand. I.

Stand. II.

Stand. III.

Stand. IV

Stand. V.

Stand. VI.

Stand. VII.

Stand. I.

Stand. II.

Stand. III.

Stand. IV.

Stand. V.

Stand, VI.

Stand, VII,

Stand. 1.

Ordinary Subjects.

Special Subjects.

NUMBER OF SCHOLARS WHO PASSED.

1.- American Board Mission, Bridges Street, (Boys),

I 37

2.-

91

Queen's Road West, (Boys)

30

3.-

Háwan, (Girls),

11

4.--- 5.-

29

"

6.-Basel Mission, Shamshuipo, (Boys),

Chungwan, (Girls),

I

12

Yaumati, (Girls), .

16

25

-25

7.—

"

31

Shaukiwan, (Boys),..

56

8.-

"}

Tokwawan, (Boys),..

25

9.- 10. 44

"

35

Matauchung, (Boys),

23

44

Mongkok, (Boys),.

15

15

12.-

13.

51

"

15.-

35

19

16.-

"

17.

*

Saiyingpun, (Boys),

18.

11.-Berlin Ladies Mission, Queen's Road West, (Boys),

14.-C. M. S., St. Stephen's Chinese School, (Boys),

Pottinger Street, (Boys),

St. Stephen's Baxter Memorial, (Girls),

I

36

Mongkoktsui, (Boys), Tsat-tszmui, (Boys),.

38

38

31

43

41

No. 2, (Boys),

.38

43

42

36

18

19.- 20.

Lyndhurst Terrace, (Girls),..

I

20

20

"

Third Street, (Girls),

I 15

21.

++

Yaumati, (Mixed),

24

22.

""

Hunghòm, (Girls),

19

-23.

55

Quarry Bay, (Girls),

I

14

11

24.

19

Little Hongkong, (Boys).

16

25.-

: 55

Aberdeen School, (Boys),

I

24

24

26.-

"

Aplicau, (Girls),

I

20

20

28.

19

29.-

"

30.

19

31.

19

32.

33.

High Street, (Girls),

36

59

27.-F. E. S., Bonham Road, Chinese Division, (Girls),

34.- "

Queen's Road West, (Girls),

Saiyingpun Praya, (Girls),.

Pottinger Street, (Girls),

Stanley School, (Girls), Shaukiwán, (Girls), Tokwawan, (Girls), .

35.-L. ML S., Square Street, (Boys),

Wantsai Chapel, (Boys),

I

29

I

14

17

I

22

21

34

17

I

15

40

36

37.- 88.- 39.-

17

Yaumati, (Boys),.

"

Shektongtsui, (Boys),

29

99

Saiyingpun I. Division, (Boys),

I 52

40. 41.-

II.

(Boys),

15

Hunghom, (Boys),

I 15

42.

>>

Hospital Chapel, (Boys),

I

13.

"

Shektongtsui, (Girls),.

44.

+1

45.-

Saiyingpun, Second Street, I. Division, (Girls),

II.

»

46.-

11

Ui-hing Lane, I. Division (Girls),'

55

(Boys),

47.

"

"

18.

11

49.

35

50.

"

51.-

91

52.-

"

53.- 54.-

>>

"

55.-

56.-

59

57.-

"3

58.- 59.- 60.--

13

II.

Si

Tanglungchau, No. 1 (Boys),

No. 2 (Boys),

Shaukiwan, (Boys),

Taikoktsui, (Boys),

Square Street, (Girls),

Matauwai, (Boys),

Third Street, (Boys),

D'Aguilar Street, (Girls),

Fletcher Street, (Girls),.. Kau-ü-fong, (Girls),

Tanglungchan, (Girls), Aberdeen Street, (Girls),

(Girls),

CHEEKARANKAN REAM-RAN22:

29

31

9

25

67

39

33

31

26

37

27

26

23

BERKERN-XXII.~*AQ-RP : : : :NREROMHZ-HJANKAN :RA:

36

6 15 12

28

8

7 12

11

4

3

3

:::

12

4

5

16

6

5

3

4

5

55

28

14 10

25

7

11

22

10

8

3

6

4

36

3

13 16

6

11

15

31

3

8

2

13 9 15

37 12

9 10 11 22 8

35

9 15

18

5

15

6 4

23

19

6

6

5

8

37

35 10 9 13

37

50

37 37 12 1 18

14

9 5

31

12

-A2578««« : : : : : : : :?

8

12

13

29

10

3

2

3

6

10

3 4

6

2

10

4

2

5

3

3

3 11 21

9 8 11

12 13

9 20 15

:::::::::~:::::

10

9

9

3 હૈ

21 12 3

3

61

15 21

11

39 10.13

9

15 32

9

7

26

6 3 17

26

9

8

32

14 7

8

25

11

6

21

16

16

16

19

*

Wantsai Chapel, (Girls),

13

13

61.-

15

Staunton Street, (Girls),

17

16

62.-R. C. Mission, Cathedral School, (Boys),

63.

19

64.-

""

Bridges Street, Chinese Division, (Girls), St. Theresa School, (Girls)...

25

41

65.

"

Holy Infancy School, I. Division, (Boys),

10.

66.-

"

II.

67.-

Yaumati, "(Girls),

5)

(Girls),

36

16

15

68.-

"

Shaukiwan, (Girls),

30

30

69.-

"

Hanghom, (Girls),

24

70.-

3

71.-

19

Italian Convent, Chinese School, (Girls),.. Sacred Heart School Chinese Div., (Girls),.

72.-Wesleyan Mission, Spring Gardens, (Boys),.

56

16

30

73.-

1.

""

Wellington Street, (Boys),.

I

58

74.

17

(Girls),.

I

19

17

75.-

51

$1

Lascar Row (Boys),..

I

27

24

76.-

לל

15

Wantsai School, (Boys),.

I

19

10

77.-

"}

>>

Graham Street, (Girls),

I

38

78.--

"

55

Kennedy Town, (Boys),

I

30

79.-Basel Mission, High Street, (Girls),

75

80.-Berlin Mission School, (Girls), .

II

25

22

82.-

83.-

"

»

90.-

17

91.-

12

81.-C. M. S., Victoria Home and Orphanage, Chi. Div., (Girls), II 39

St. Stephen's Anglo-Chinese, (Boys), Morrison English School, (Boys),..

84.-Wesleyan Mission, Lyndhurst Terrace, Eng. Sch., (Boys),. 85. St. Paul's College School (Boys)...

86.--Diocesan Home and Orphanage, (Boys), 87.-F. E. S., Bonham Road, English Division, (Girls), 68.-L. M. S., Taipingshan, English School, (Boys), 89.—R. C. M., St. Joseph's College, Chinese Division, (Boys),

Italian Convent, English Division, (Girls),..

III

58

III

28

III 31 31 22

III 52

8: : 8-EKES: CON-HUMAN: 225000:

16 10

15

16

19

::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

10

5

3

3

33

13 4

15

8

14

15

10

***

6

25

11 13

10

36

8

2

2

11

15331

4

11

22 10

56

13

11

16

22

3

54

2

8

4

37 12

16

30

13

12

3

57

11

24

50

37

III 73

III 21

III 44

42 20

5

III 15

13

9

4

European

12

(Boys),

III 174

170

25

26 27 28 21

III

118

115

29

24 13 19 12 10 4

92.-

}

53

93.

"

Portuguese Division, (Girls), Bridges Street, Englisli Division, (Girls),

III

47

45

9

18

18

III 16

16 12 2 2

91.

وو

95.--

Portuguese Division, (Girls),. Nova Escola Portugueza, (Girls),

III

32

32 15

12

III

13

13

4

3

95.-

"

97.-

""

98.- 99. 100. 101.-

">

M

English

25

17

*

11

55

102.

Sacred Heart School English Division, (Girls), St. Francis, Portuguese Division, (Girls),

Victoria Port. School, Port. Division, (Mixed).. Eng. Division, (Mixed),. English School, (Boys), (Girls), 103.-British Kowloon School (Mixed),

104.— C. M. S., Victoria Home & Orphann e, Eng. Div., (Girls). III

ILI 10

10

5

III 23

23

14

>>

(Girls),

III 12

12

4

111 10

10

III 13

13

5

III 61

III 37

III 22

19 cr

3

Physical Geography.

Avonmored he CSO 15 of 1897.

::::::::::::::~:::::::::::::

:::::::::::::::::

42 46 41 24

گاه

::

i wi si

2

i mi vi

2

5

:::

Ni

Ordinary St

Stand. 11.

Stand. III.

| Stand. IV.

1

1

10

Hi wi

TABLE X.-RESULTS of the EXAMINATION of the GRANT-IN-AID SCHOOLS in 1896, under the provisions of the Schemi

NUMBER OF SCHOLARS who Passed.

NUMBER OF SCHOLARS WHO Failed.

TOTALS.

Ord

Stand. TTT.

Failed.

Passed.

Failed.

Sabjects. Subjects.

Ordinary Special

Average Daily Attendance

during the Year.

* Stand. I,

Stand. II.

Class of School.

No. of Scholars Presented.

No. of Scholars Examined.

Stand. I.

Stand. II.

Stand. III.

Stand. IV

Stand. V.

Stand. VI.

Stand. VII.

Stand. I.

Stand. II.

Stand. III.

Stand. IV.

Stand. V.

Stand. VI.

Stand. VII.

Stand. I.

Stand. II.

Stand. III.

Stand, IV.

Stand. V.

Stand. VI.

Stand. VII,

Stand. I.

Stand. II.

Stand. III.

Stand. IV.

Stand. V.

Stand. VI.

Stand. VII.

Passed.

Ordinary Subjects.

Special Subjects.

Ordinary Subjects.

Special Subjects.

(Boys)

oys),

rls),

684

on, (Girls),

(Boys),

223

1, (Girls),

on, (Boys),

(Girls),

i, (Girls),...

iv., (Girls),....|

ט

5

77

1- ∞ ∞

ел

22

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12

N

+ 0.

:: 8:

224 OD DO

* 站44557

LO 3 ∞ ∞ DO SO LO 2

:08+0

12728~•

5121

w: WNT

Div., (Girls),

ch., (Boys),

rls),

}

: SONG: 5:

III

174

III 118

TII 47

32

13

10

III

III

Div., (Girls). III

E

00

M

w::

3471

N

-0

3125 GOL

2545D SK TN ON LO

63

حلم بم

Compos

Aunroved he C.5.0. 15 of 1897.

1

4

12

46

:2=

N

:

J 19

*

::

2.2

2212 -

+00

ลง

2 52

IA IA

~

·

15

1211

NA

*

:

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:

114.

: :

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A

-

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*

:

4

351

221

28.12

12.24

12.27

16.16

23.19

48.48

23.64

18.91

19.18

35.49

30.88

20.90

50.45

35.07

47.96

34.68

19 23

:9

321

10

I No No :

131

1243

22

18.16 16.71

17,51

cr

:

18.67

12.72

13.81

18.80

18.21

29.15

14,82

17.69

21.27

7.88

29.04

15.72

15.25

47.09

32.33

32.25

22.28

47.87

33.52

15.92

31.00

7.05

9

21.69

36

N

If I co

::

13 3 3 Ca

12

12:

:

5

8:

54.39 45 84

37.03 30

36.€8 45 28.42

18

24.43 32.53

18.92

24.13

18.68

292222

33:

15.22

17.19

12.96

15.53

19.71 16.04

27.03

44.14

13.55

38.69

:NR IR :H°

N

15

• 45 2

:

20.87

29 24

29.16

66.46

18.57

..

40.76

56.10

19.74

31.83

6

20.03

28.17

20 84

68.52

23.18

41.60

59.30 198

30.32 108

:00:00 ** **

23.55 132

52.78 22 91.76

21.77 44.81 174

19 43

180.91

150 208

141.20 174 192

56.79

14.58 32

40 63

96

18.19 24 2-1

..

17.19

8

27.40 84 16.28

16

40

、.

10.13

11.82

76.10

43.81

: දය

28.25

6.84

:99

128:00

#fite.

OOLS in 1896, under the provisions of the Scheme of 19th August, 1893.

WHO FAILED.

TOTALS.

SUMS TO WHICH THE SCHOOL IS ENTITLED.

319

Stand. II.

Stand. III.

Stand. IV.

Stand. V.

Stand. VI.

Stand. VII.

Passed.

Failed.

Passed.

Failed.

Special Subjects.

Ordinary Special

Subjects. Subjects.

Average Daily Attendance during the Year.

Stand. I.

Stand. II.

Stand. III.

Stand. IV,

Stand. V.

Stand. VI.

Stand. VII.

Ordinary Subjects.

Special Subjects,

Needle Work.

co

7

8

37

32

18

32.33 30 36 78

28

32.25 27 32

25

22.28

48 78

45

26

21

47.87 27 80 90

31

G

15

6

33.52 36 4 108

19

55

36

31

26

HERRA HR:

14

15.92 27 20

31

8

6

· Has co en es i

3 1

5

4

9

51

13 00 03 HI

1

31.00

36 40

7.05 9

12

3

21.69

36 12 18

7

54.39

45 $4

3

21

37.03

30

52

1

13

18

26

21

3312

36.€8

45 36 42

28.42 18 12 24.43

27 36

29 3

32.53 42 28

18.92

24

19 2 10

12

19

24.13 33 28 36

1 18.68

15 .24

16

15

16

19

13

16

ගසපඈත

14

15.22 17.19

30 12

18 16 12

12.96 18 16

15.53 12 20

19.71 15 20 18

8 1

16.04 18 23

18

7

2

28

13

8

30

14

25

22

51

5

IN* :3 :Haa

32

• 10 2

22

25

23 6

27.03 44.14 13.55

38.69

20.87

30

12

11

9

39

14

10

51

3

15

2

11 13

18

36

25

22

::::::::::

3

29 24

8

29.16

10

66.46

18.57

40.76

56.10

19.74

31.83

20.03

36

28.17 36

20 84 68.52

23.18

41.60

57

59.30 198

23

31

52.78

91.76

21.77

:::: M:::

42

44.81

174

13

22 15 15

9 155 15 153

61

19 43 180.01

:8*2*288PR :82018: :2: 22 ::ZE

12

48 16

24 20

12 28

33

24 18

30 16

15

52

15

16

63 84

28

6

24 24 24

8

52

20 18

88

30.32 108 8 40 23.55 132 72

54

111 4

45

56.79 54 144180

:

::::::::::

16

32

13

10

20

12

10

13

14.58 72 16

: : : : :

40 63

90 96

15

3

18.19

17.19 30 8 40

27.40 84 16 40 16.28

24 40 30

10.13 12 48 20

11.82 30 40 30

76.16 43.81

28.25 36 40

6.84 18 16

24 24

33

3

$7.46

18 60

72

27

4

24

10

12

4

28.12 24 23 72 12.24 12 12 18

12.27 12 20 6

16

16.16

18

20

5 13

G

23.19 27 16 30

52

5 44

7

48.48 84 56 60

24

16

23.64

212214

20 18

21 44 36

21

18.91 30 32

18

10

5

19.18 18 16

32

4

35.49 9 52

46

32

6

14

17

37 4 16

32 5 20

41

1

37

47.96

30.88 18 44 90 20.90 9 36 12 50,45 39 36 90 35.07 36 36 60 33 83 48

34

2 32

34.68

27 60 60

17

1

15

19 23

15 28 18

20

17

2

18.16

:::::::::::::::

14

14

8

4.50

22.00

5.50

8

11

12

3

10

21

2

18

1

12

11

2

24

15

10

***::::::

21

20

22:8:::8: : : : : : :* :*++H2~∞2

6

NN

2

2 17.51

18 32 36 16.71 12 12 2-1 60

18 16 18.67 21 16 18 12.72 18 12

21

12

13.81

18.80

15 36

36

18.21 15 36

29.15

:::::::::7 : 29

14.82

17.69

21.27 7.88

24 32

29.04

15.72 15.25

::::

30

47.09 9

44 126

::::: : : : : : :

Here :-8730:*::******::*:*:***** :* :8* :S: :8GRAZÈ8÷GARA :::

30

56

:: 85: :: :: :: ::: ::::::::: E:

:: :: 1 ∞ ∞ ∞ :

3.00 ·1.50

2.00

1.50

2.50

3.00

8

24

::::

3.00

3.00

+207.74

2,00 6.00 14.50

16.00 2.50

3.50

3.00

3.00 13

3.75

7.50

6.00

3.75

1 8 8 8 1 1 1 S

11111

3.00

| | | | | | | | | | | ❤✨ | |*|* |~| ¦ ¦ ¦ | |

3 3.00

ĝ | | | | | | | ........................

$

Stand. I.

Stand. II.

Stand. III.

Stand. IV.

.................................... Stand. V.

ZA

£A

C

Stand. VI.

Stand. VII.

Very Good.

Good.

Fair.

Capitation Grant.

Total Grant earned in 1896.

Amount due to Teacher.

Amount due to Manager.

†51.90

166.30

4.00

6.75

†23.76

+114.07

†59.79

†67.13

14

66

54

::::2:::::

5.00

3.75

2.50

6.00 12 1.50

4.50

3.00

0.00

.50

1.50

.75

66

56

16.50

9.75

54

28

7.50

4.50

1.00

102

4.00

7.50

48

7.00

3.00

48

48

12

16

24

16

28

18

35

14

8

4 18

36

49

16

18

12

7

21

16

7

8

84

88

45

12

14

::: :::* : : : : : : : :29 : :-50

7.50 $.00 5.00

2.00

2.25

9

4.00

1,50

*** || ¦ :* || :~ ¦ ¦ | | | | | * | | | |

CA

$

$

18.73

168.73

42.18

126.55

14.06

142.06

35.51

106.55

2.50

6.12 50.62 12.65

$7.97

1,50

4 4 1.50

1.50

6.13 66.63 8.08 11.59 24.24 246.24

16.65

49.98

85.0$ 21.27 108.09 27.02

63.81

81.07

61.56

181.63

11.82

122.07

30.51

91.56

9.45

89 45

22.36

67.09

9.59

43.59

10.89

32.70

17.74

174.74

43.68

131.06

15.44 $125.58

1.. 194.19

67.45

4 9.00

2,50 10.50 8 2.00

3.00 10

10.45 25.22 203.22 50.80 17.53 179.53 44.88 134.65 23.98 213.48 53.37 160.11 17.34 180.34 45.08 135.26 9.61 112.36 28.09 84.27 9.08 126.58 31.64 94.94 8.35 83.85 8.75 113.25

16.86 50.59

152.42

20.96

62.89

28.31

84.94

14 1.00 2 1.00

9.33 116.83

29.20 87,63

6.36

51.36

12.84

38.52

6.90

21.90

5.47

16.43

9.40 127.40

31.85

95.55

2.50

9.10

77.60

19.40

58.20

†30.33

14,57

252.64

63.16

189.48

†2.06

7.41

61.37 15.34

46,03

†15.15

8.84

90.29 22.57 67.72

4.50

4

†.50

10.63

119.38

29.84

89,54

+6.56

3.94 †11.33 14.52 139.92 †18.92 7.76

+6.75

34.26

8.56 25.70

34.98

104.94

86.47

21.61

64.86

7.62

81.50

20.37

61.13

23.54 16.16 171.91

216.54

54.13 162.41

42.97 128.94 16.12 141.12 35.28 105.84

11.14 137.14 34.28 102,86

23.68 252.68

63.17

189,51

16.76 174.26

43.56

130.70

7.96

54.96

13.74

41,22

15.50 151.50

37.87

113.63

4

2.00 5 7.00

3.52 31.05

7.76

23.29

10.84 99.09

24.77

74.32

4 1,50

27.19 309.94 77.48

232.46

13 6.00

18.51 213.51 53.37

160.14

4 9.00

18.34 155.34 38.83

116.51

3

14.21 157.71 39.42 118,29 12.21 136.21 34.05 102.16 16.26

134.26 33.56 100.70

4

7.50

9 46 12.06 9.34

$9.46 131.06

9.46

32.76

98.30

101.34 25.33

76.01

3.00

4.50 10 .50 6 4.00

6.00 13 .50

8 2.00

4,00

3.00 0 1.00

7.61 79.36 8.59 6.48 7.76 9.85 72.85 18.21 54.64 8.02 89.02 22.25 66.77

19.81

59,52

99.59 24.89 74.70

93.48 23.37 70.11 125.26 31.31 93.95

7.50

3.75

2

5.50

9.75

3.00 15.00

5.50 8.25

1

13 3.00 1.50 11

7.50

4 7.00 13.51 117.76 17 4.50 22.07 190.32 6.77 40.77 19.34 220.59

29.44 88.32 47.58

142.74

10.19

30.58

55.14

165.45

2.50

2.25

3

5 5.00

3.00

4.00

2.25 6.75 22

10.50

S 2,50

24.00

37

1.50

442.48

10.13 $1.93 20.48 14.62 144.37 14.58 39.23

61.45

36.09

109.28

140.63 35.20

105.63

110,62

331.86

3.00

.75

3

3.00

7

1.00

93.03 9.28

23.25

69.78

+120.82

20.38

141.20

35.30 105.90

54

28.05

229.05

57.26 171.79

6

1.50

4 5.50

9.87

75.87 18.96 56.91

4 48

96

42

1.50

17 7.50

72

15.66

73.66 18.41 55.25 10.01 82.01 20,50 61.51 14.08 222.08 55,52 166.56 10.42 134.42 33,60 100.82

56 18

55

+494.49

+382.14

+50.47

51.39

596.35

149,08 447.27

7,50

10.50

1.50 †49.94

17.38

209.88

52,47 157.41

463.28

80

60

31.20 59.30 435.30 121.32

115.82 347.46

60

81

363.98 30.32 186.32 46.58 139.74 23.55 227.55 56.88 52.78 418.78 101.69

170.67

314.09

+960.96 +178.66

91.76 1,052.72

263.18

789 54

+29.16

21.77 229.9

57.39

172.20

64 50

40

150 208 270 336 294 272

198

123

06

141.20 174 192 130 228 168 160

72

49.50 55

12.00 6.00 21 9.50

41.81 332.81 19.43 113.43 180.91 2,261,91 141.20 1,381.70

83.20

249.61

28.35 $5.08

565.47 1,696.44

345.42 1,036.28

56.79 471,29

20

50

GO

:::

| | | | | | | | ||

:*:

+888.70

+519.66 40

6

1.50

3

16,50 13.50

2

1.09 1.00

141.16

117.82 353.47

2 4.50 14.58 132.08 33.02 99,06 5.50 40.63 288.13 72.03 216.10

31.54 94.65 24.92 74.77

18.19 126.19 17.19 99.69 27.40 184.00 46.22 138.68 16.28 124.78 31.19 93.59 10.13 91.13 22.78 68.35 11.82 114,82 28.70 86.12 76.46 915.16 236.29 708.87 43.81 604.03 151.15 453.48

28.25 294.25 73.56

6.84

220.69 40.81 10.21 30.63

:

TOTAL,..

.$21,210.38 5,268,48 15,910.51

NAME OF SCHOOL.

Class of School.

No. of Scholars Presented.

No. of Scholars Examined.

Stand. I.

Stand. II.

Stand. III.

Stand. IV

Stand. V.

Stand. VI.

Stand. VII.

Stand. I.

Stand. II.

Stand. III.

Stand. IV.

Stand. V.

Stand. VI.

Stand. VII.

Ordinary Subjects.

Special Subjects.

NUMBER OF SCHOLARS WHO I ASSED.

1.- American Board Mission, Bridges Street, (Boys),

1

37

36

6

15

12

15.-

16.- 17.- 18.- 19.- 20.- 21.-

33

"

*39

19

""

Third Street, (Girls),

"

19

Yaumati, (Mixed),

22.- 23.- 24.-

??

Hunghòm, (Girls),

"}

Quarry Bay, (Girls),

"

Little Hongkong, (Boys),

25.-

53

Aberdeen School, (Boys),

26.

"

Aplican, (Girls),

2.-- 3.- 4.-- 5.-

*

>>

*

""

>>

"

6.-Basel Mission, Shamshuipo, (Boys),

7.-

Shaukiwan, (Boys),.

"

8. 9.- 10.-

35

35

Tokwawan, (Boys),..

35

Matauchung, (Boys),

"

Mongkok, (Boys),.

-12.-

Mongkoktsui, (Boys),

13.-

"

Tsat-tszmui, (Boys),..

No. 2, (Boys),

Queen's Road West, (Boys)

30

28

8

7

12

Hawan, (Girls),

11

11

4

3

3

Chungwan, (Girls),

12

12

5

Yaumati, (Girls),

16

16

3

25

25

5

56

55 28

14 10

44

25

25

7

11 6

23

22 10 8

3

:::::EE:

A.

4

:::

15

15

6 4

11.-Berlin Ladies Mission, Queen's Road West, (Boys),

14.-C. M. S., St. Stephen's Chinese School, (Boys),

35

Pottinger Street, (Boys),

Saiyingpun, (Boys),

St. Stephen's Baxter Memorial, (Girls),

Lyndhurst Terrace. (Girls),.

I

36

86

38

38

31

31

43

41

38

37

43

42

36

36

18

20

15

15

24

23

19

19

14

11

16

24

24

20

28.

"

29,-. 30.-

"

17

31.-

32.-

33.- 34.-

"

36

"

37.

Yaumati, (Boys)..

19

38.

"

39. 40.-

>>

(Boys),

41.- 42. 43.- 44.

"1

Hospital Chapel, (Boys),

19

Shektongtsui, (Girls),..

**

.

45.-

»

46.

"

27.-F. E. S., Bonham Road, Chinese Division, (Girls),

፡፡

"

High Street, (Girls),

Queen's Road West, (Girls),

Saiyingpun Praya, (Girls),.

Pottinger Street, (Girls), Stanley School, (Girls), Shaukiwán, (Girls),

Tokwawan, (Girls),.

35.-L. M. S., Square Street, (Boys),

Wantsai Chapel, (Boys),

Shektongtsui, (Boys),

Saiyingpun I. Division, (Boys),

II.

Hunghom, (Boys),

29

14

17 22

21

6

$4

17

I

15

40

37

36

39

29

29

I

52

I

37

I 15

I

31

9

31

50.-

""

51.-

""

52.- 53.

>

"

54.

"

55.

"

56.

"

57.-

11

58.-

"

59.-

55

60.-

>

61.-

55

47.

48.- 49.-

»

Saiyingpun, Second Street, I. Division, (Girls),

Ui-hing Lane, I. Division (Girls),

II.

*

Tanglungchau, No. 1 (Boys),

35

No. 2 (Boys),

Shaukiwan, (Boys),

Taikoktsui, (Boys),

Square Street, (Girls),

Matauwai, (Boys),

Third Street, (Boys),

D'Aguilar Street, (Girls),

Fletcher Street, (Girls),..

Kau-ü-fong, (Girls),

Tanglungchan, (Girls),

Aberdeen Street, (Girls),

Wantsai Chapel, (Girls),

Staunton Street, (Girls),

62.-R. C. Mission, Cathedral School, (Boys),

Bridges Street, Chinese Division, (Girls), St. Theresa School, (Girls),...

Holy Infancy School, I. Division, (Boys),

25

II.

(Boys),

67

39

(Girls),

33

31

26

37

27

26

23

28-172600RRIER : : : : : : :MROMIN HJ88228 :32:

3

13 16

6

11

15

3

9

2

13 9

15

12

9

10

12

13

11

22 8

29

9

15

10

32

5

7

3

2

5

5

6

8

6

7

10

*

6

5

8

::

3

11

21

35 10

9 13

10

es: : : : : eo! :::::: wi mi

2

3

37

9

8 11

12

13

50

9

20 15

37

12

1 18

14

9

5

31

12

10

9

9

3

3

21

12

3

3

61

15

21

11

39

10

13 9

15 32

9

7

26

6

26

9

පස

3

17

9

32

14 7 8

11

21

::::::::::::::::::::::

::::::::::::

-∞

3

33

13

15 6

2

S.

10

14

15 10

4

:::::::::::

::

2

2

3

Ordinary Subjects,

Stand. I.

Stand. II.

Stand. III.

Stand. IV.

3

2

::: ::

iNi

2

::

:::

: Ni

1

16

16

16

15

16

16

19

19

4

13

13

17

16

63. क्र

25

25

10

15

5

3

64.-

41

41

16

11

13

10

"

65.- 66.-

10.

10

4

1

"

II.

"

67.

"

Yaumati, "(Girls),

"

(Girls),

I

36

36

8

I

16

15

68.

>

Shaukiwan, (Girls),

I

30

30

11

69.-

35

Hanghom, (Girls),

I

24

22

1)

6

3

70.-

»

71.-

Italian Convent, Chinese School, (Girls),. Sacred Heart School Chinese Div., (Girls),.

I

56

56

5

13

9

22

1

3

I

16

16

19

72.-Wesleyan Mission, Spring Gardens, (Boys),...

I' 30

73.

""

Wellington Street, (Boys),

I

58

54

74.

""

"T

"

(Girls),.

I

19

17

75.

"

45

Lascar Row (Boys),....

I

27

24

2

wi:::mi wi mi

3

::::::::::::

76.

"

Wantsai School, (Boys),

I

19

19

"

**.-

»

33

Graham Street, (Girls),

I

38

12 37

16 6

78.

55

Kennedy Town, (Boys),

I

30

30

13 12

79.-Basel Mission, High Street, (Girls),

11

75

80.-Berlin Mission School, (Girls),..

II

25

22

3

82.-

وو

81.-C. M. S., Victoria Home and Orphanage, Chi. Div., (Girls), II

St. Stephen's Anglo-Chinese, (Boys),

39

III

58

57

11

83.-

+

Morrison English School, (Boys),.......

III

28

24

81.-Wesleyan Mission, Lyndhurst Terrace, Eng. Sch., (Boys),. 85.-St. Paul's College School (Boys),.

III

31

31

III

52

50 37

6

86.--Diocesan Home and Orphanage, (Boys), 87.-F. E. S., Bonham Road, English Division, (Girls), 88.-L. M. S., Taipingshan, English School, (Boys), 89.-R. C. M., St. Joseph's College, Chinese Division, (Boys),

III

73

III

21

III

41

42

29

5

III

15

13

9

4

90.

European

+

11

"

(Boys),

IlI

174

25 170

26

91.

Italian Convent, English Division, (Girls),..

III

29 115 118

91

92.-

+

35

Portuguese Division, (Girls),

III

47

45

9 18

93.-

**

Bridges Street, English Division, (Girls),

III

16

16

12

94.

"

Portuguese Division, (Girls),.

III

32

95.

51

Nova Escola Portugueza, (Girls),

III

13

13

98.-

97.-

"

Sacred Heart School English Division, (Girls), St. Francis, Portuguese Division, (Girls),

III

10

10

III

23

98.-

English

"

(Girls),

III

12

12

.99.-

Victoria Port. School, Port. Division, (Mixed),.

III 10

10

"

100.

17

13

101.-

35

"

102.

Eng. Division, (Mixed), English School, (Boys), (Girls), 103.-British Kowloon School (Mixed),

III 13

13

III

61

III

37

III

22

101.-C. M. S., Victoria Home & Orphann e, Eng. Div., (Girls). III

23O3200::25

15

4

5

14

සහ

6+4223–25653100

27

24 13 19

18

2

: : : : :~::::::::::

:

28

42

46

24

3

10

:::::::::*:

10

:

::::::::

*Physical Geography.

Assessed ander the special circumstances. Approved by C.S.O. 15 of 1897.

Under C.S.O. 2753 of 1896, the grant nominally earned ($167.44) is subject to a reduction of 25 per cent leaving $125.58, of which sum three fourths ($94.19) is payable to Man § No examination held, see C.S.O. 2753 of 1896, and the grant, with the exception of capitulation money, declared forfeited.

Education Department, Hongkong, 22nd February, 1897.

Stand, V.

Stand. VI.

23

::::

::¦:

Stand. VII.

Stand. I.

::::::::::: : : :* :

6

13

3:

3

9

Stand. II,

7

: : : : :

Special Subjects.

NUMBER OF SCHOLARS WHO FAILED.

Ordinary Subjects,

SUMS TO WHICH THE SCHOOL ID UNTILLAberd

Ordinary Subjects.

Special Subjects,

✪ | Stand. IV.

Stand. V.

Stand. VI.

Stand. VII.

es

Stand. II.

*

Stand. III.

Stand. IV.

Stand. V.

Stand. VI.

Stand. VII.

Stand. I,

Stand. I.

Stand. II.

Stand. III.

Passed.

Failed.

Passed.

Failed.

Ordinary Special

Subjects. Subjects.

Average Daily Attendance

during the Year.

TOTALS.

Stand. I.

Stand. II.

Stand. III.

Stand. IV.

Stand. V.

Stand. VI.

Stand. VII.

Stand. I.

Stand. II.

Stand. III.

Stand. IV.

Stand. V.

Stand. VI.

Stand. VII.

Stand. I.

Stand. II.

Stand. III.

Stand. IV.

Stand. V.

Stand. VI.

Stand. VII.

>LARS WHO PASSED.

Special Subjects.

10

:: 2

*

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10

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37.46

28.12

12.24

12.27

16.16

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30 G3

:115

$

CA

ᎦᏅ

3688283: *888

828

23.19

48.18 84 23.64

18.91 30 32 19.18 18 16

:::

35.49 9 52

30.88 18 44

20.30 0 36 50.45 39

35.07 36 36 47.96 33 83 34.68

19 23 15 18.16

16.71 12

17,51 18

18.67 21

822002

*

10

::

:::::

::

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2:

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2.00

6.00 3.00

14.50

16.00 2.50

3.50 7.50

3.00

2.00

2.50 3.00

12.72 18 13.81

18.80

15

18.21

29.15

14.82

17.69

21.27

7.88

29.04

15.72

15,25

47.09

32.33

32.25

22.28

47,37

33.52

15.92

31.00

::::

OFER A CO 33.

•1243

2

814

♡ -

13

7.05

21.69

54.39 37.03

כין

3.00 3.00

+207.74

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4.00 6.75

+23.76

+114.07

+59.79

+67.13

5,00

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:

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13

36.68

45

28.42

24.13

32.53

18.92

24.13

18.68

99

13

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15.22

17.19

12.96

15.53

19.71

16.04

27.03

44.14

13.55

38,69

20.87

IA CO

.5 2

323115

29 24

29.16

66.46

18.57

40.76 56.10

2.50

3.00

4.00 3.00

+494.49

+382.14

19.74 21 31.33 6 20.03 24 28.17

36

20 84

68.52

::

23.18

41.60

59.30 198

30.32 108

23.55 132 52.78 222

91.76

21.77

***

44.81 174

19 43

54

2x8: 8:

8:: 2:18: 8:

02:: 8:2

180.91 1150 208 270

141.20 174 192

56.79 54 144

1:

14.58

72❘ 16

40 63

90

18.19

24 24

17.19

30

27.40

16.28

10.13

11.82

76.46

43.81

28.25

6.84

199

: 8:

665

9828

: 5:

:*:::

rcent leaving $125.58, of which sum three fourths ($94.19) is payable to Manager, and one-fourth ($31.30), being the Teacher's bonus, is forfeited to Government.

oney, declared forfeited.

CA

A

S

CA

*

Stand. II.

Stand. III.

Stand. IV.

Stand. V.

Stand. VI.

Stand, VII.

Passed.

Failed.

Passed.

Failed.

Special Subjects.

Ordinary Special

Subjects. Subjects.

Average Daily Attendan during the Year.

Stand. I.

Stand. II.

Stand. III.

Stand. IV.

Stand, V.

Stand. VI.

Stand. VII.

Stand. I.

Ordinary Subjects.

Special Subjects.

Needle Work.

€9

Stand. II.

:00:

:

:::

33 3

27

10

12

4

16

2

20

5

13

52

5

44

24

16

21

1

10

5

:::::::::::::::

25

32

::: mwal ::

$7.46 18 60

24

28.12

24 28 72

12.24

12

12

12.27

12

20

16.16 18

20

23.19

27 16 30

48.18

84 56

23.64

21

44 36

18.91

30

32

19.18

18

16

35.49 9

52

32

30.58

18

44 90

14

37

16

32

29

41

37

34

2

32

17

15

20

17

12

3 10 2

21

6

• CO DI KO NNN A

20.90 મી

36

50.15 39

36

35.07 36

36

47.96 33

88

34.68

27

60

19 23

15 28

18.16

18 32

16.71 12 12

17.51

18 16

18

12

11

2

18.67 21 12.72 13.81

16

18 12

24

15

10

18.80 15 18.21

36 36 7 15 36

.: EXSN-MOASSK8A: KUSURLUN

72

18

:::

6

14

1111

18

14

4.50

3.00

60

22.00

18

کرد

5.50

3.75

96

12

90

60

00

48

60

18

14

36

2-J

60

18

12

6

29.15

14.82

17.69

21

20

21.27

32

18

28

25

45

26 21

31

15

5

* :

CRANKA :22:

14

31

8

6

3

19

55

51

1881 6:::::

7.88 29.04

15.72

15.25

47.09

1

32.33

32.25

22.28

47.87 27 80

15.92 27 20

3

31.00 7.05

21.69

36

21

54.39 45 84 37.03 30

31

1

2

13

$6.68

26

18

1

26

21 2

29

3

24

1 19

4 24.13

19

2 10

1 18.68

16

15.22 30 12

15

14

16

17.19 12.96 18

19

15.53 12 20

13

19.71 15

16

00

8

16.04 18

18

22

27.03 30 12

28

13

25

44.14 48

8

2

13.55 12

30

6 23

38.69

24

14

1

20.87

25

5

11

29 24

33

22

9

8

29.16

51

5

39

10

14

2

10

4

66.46 18.57

15

51 !

3

40.76 56.10 63

15

2

19.74

21

11

13

31.33

18

1

20.03

24

36

36

28.17

36

::.: : : :::::::::*::::::::::::

:

25

5

20 84 68.52

22

23.18

20

57

41.60

59.30 198

23

30.32 108

31

23,55

50

52.78

222

NO: N: UN NO: GEBENEA: : : 68: *NXACAX,UNUR: NOTTI⠀⠀RI

24

32

30

36

27

32

48

33.52 36 4 108

36 40

12

36 12

45 36

28.42 18 12 102

36

24.13 27 $2.53 42 28

18.92

33 28

15 24

18

16

16

20

23

16

20

24

30 16

52

15 16

84

28

6

4

24

52

18

88

8

132 72

91.76

21.77

42

13

22

15

9 155

15 153

111

4

45

16

32

13

::

10

20

12

10

13

:M::::::::::::::

61

44.81 174 19 43 180.91

64

54

141.20 174 192 130 228 168 160

w::::::::::::

40 63 90 18.19 17.19

10.13 12 48 11.82

58.79 54 144 180

14.58 #2 16

20

96

50

27.40

24 2.4 30 8 84

60

40

16 40

16.28 24 40 30

20

30 40 30

76.16

21

15

43.81 28.25 36

40

6,84 18 16

:::::::perag is :48**** :** : ****80* : ****88*:***** :8 :89 :8 : 18÷RARABS++ARA ::8:

-*- ***CHOON :00:00 N

: : : 100 :*:*::::

8

2.00 6.00

3.00 3.00

14.50 6.00

16.00 2.50

3.75

3.50 7.50

3.00 1,50

2.00

2.50

1.50 3.00

13

3 3.00

8

TI

24

+207.74 +51.90

118

3.00 3.00

+66.30

30

4.00 6.75

44 126 14

78

66

78

90

54

18

66 56

52 54 28

42

::::::::::::::

†23.76

+114.07

+59.79

†67.13

5.00 3.75

2.50 4.50

6,00

3.00

6.00

.50

36

48

12

12

24

30 28

18

18

30

4 18

36

12 28 12 7

18 21

30

30

12 14

54

6

48

24

8 96

42

72

56

18

80

60

40

60

50

::::: 8: *: : : ::::FR-2-5: 28: :: 85: 4:

:00 ::::::::::::2

1.50 .75

16.50 9.75

7.50

4.50

1.00

4.00

7.50

7.00

3.00

7.50

3.00

5.09

2.00

2.25

16

4.00

1.50

16

.00

8

35

14

49 16

7

84

: : : :00 19:9**::::::::::::::

4.00

8

7.50 5.50

3.75

9.75

18

5.50 8.25

16

8 9

88

45

2.50 2.25 3.00 4.00

2.25

6.75 22

9

3.00

.75

[ * ] } { * { {| | | | |°3 [*||~| | | | | | | | | | | | * | |~~ || ¦ ¦ * | | :* ] ] | | | | | | | | | |~~ |~|~|~~

1

:::

Stand. III.

Stand, IV.

* Stand. V.

Stand. VI.

Stand. VII.

Very Good.

Good.

Fair.

Capitation Grant.

Total Grant carned in 1890

Amount due to Teacher,

Amount due to Manager.

$

$

$

CA

18.73

168.73

42.19 126.55

14.06

142.0€

35.51 106.55

2.50

6.12

50.62

12.65 $7.97

1.50

6.13

66.63

16.65

49.98

1.50

1.50

8.08 85.08

21.27 63.81

11.59 108.09

27.02

81.07

24.24

246.24

61.56

181.63

11.82

122.07

20.51

91,56

9.45

89 45

22.36

67.09

9.59

43.59

10.89

32.70

17.74

174.74

43.68

131.06

15.44 $125.58

+..

$94.19

10.45 67.45

16.86

50,59

25.22 203.22 17.53 179.53 23.98 213.48 17.34

50.80

152.42

44.88 134.65

53.37 160.11

180.34

45.08

135,26

9.00

4 2.50

9.61

112.36

28.09

84,27

10.50 8 2.00

9.08

126.58

31.64

94,94

3.00 10

8.35

83.85

20.96

62.89

8.75

113.25

28.31

$4,94

14 1.00

9.33

116.83 29.20

87,63

2

1.00

6.36

51.36 12.84 38.52

6.90

21.90

5.47 16.43

9.40

127.40

31.85

95.55

2.50

9.10

77.60

19.40

58.20

+30.33

14.57

252.64 63.16

189.48

†2.06

†15.15

4.50

+.50 +6.56

7.41 8.84 10.63 119.38

61.37 15.34

46.03

90.29

22.57

67.72

::

3.94 34.26

+11.33

14.52 139.92

29.84 89.54

$.56 34.98 104.94

25.70

†18.92

7.76

86.47

21.61

64.86

+6.75

7.62

81.50

20.37

61.13

23.54

216,54

51.13

162.41

16.16

171.91

42.97 128.94

16.12 141.12

35.28 105.84

11.14

137.14

34.28

102.86

12 1.50

23.68

252.68

63.17 189,51

2

16.76

174.26

43.56

130.70

7,96

54.96

13.74

41.22

15,50

151.50

37.87

113.63

2.00

3.52

31.05

7.76

23.29

5

7.00

10.84

99.09

24.77

74.32

4

**

27,19

309.94

77.48 232.46

13

6.00

18.51

213.51

58.37

160.14

4 9.00

18.54

155.34

38.83 116.51

14.21

3

12.21

16.26

9 46

7.50

12.06 9.34

157.71 39.42 119.29 136.21 34.05 102.16 134.26 $9.46 151.06

33.56

32.76

100,70 9.46 99.30

101.34 25.33 76.01

2 4.50

7.61

79.36

10

.50

8.59

99.59

19.81 24.89 74.70

59,52

3.00 6 4.00

6.48

93.48 23.37 70.11

6.00 13

.50

7.76

125.26

31.31

93.95

8

2.00

9.85

72.85

18.21

54.64

3.00

9

1.00

8.02

89.02 22.25

66,77

3.00

4 7.00

15.00

17

4.50

3

3.00 13 7.50 1.50 11 5

13.51 22.07 190.32 6.77 40.77 19.34 220.59

117.76

29.44

88.32

47.58

142.74

10.19

30.58

55.14 165.45

10.13

81.93

20.48

61.45

5.00

14.62

144.37

36.09

105.28

10.50 S

2.50

14.58

140.83

35.20

105.63

24.00 37

1.50

33.23

412.48

110.62

331.86

3.00 7

1.00

9.28

93.03

23.25

69.78

+120.82

20.38

141.20

35.30

105.00

28.05

229.05

57.26 171.79

1.50

5.50

9.87

75.87

18.96

56.91

15.66

73.66

18.41

55.25

10.01

82.01

20.50

61.51

:

1.50

17 7.50

14.08

222,08

55.52

40

150 208 270 336 294 272 198

22::::::::::::

*::::::

166,56

:

10.42

134.42

33.60 100.82

+494.49

+50.47 51.39

595.35

149.08

447.27

7,50

10.50 6 1.50

17.38

209.85

52.47 157.41

+382.14

†49.94

31.20

463.28

115.82 347.46

59.30

435.30

121.52 363.08

30.32

186.32

46.58 139.74

23.55

227.55

56.88

170.67

52.78 418.78

101.69

314.09

†960.96 +178.66

91.76 1,052.72

263.18

789 54

+29.16

21.77

229.9

57.39

172.20

41.81 332.81

88.20

249.61

92 123

96

19.43 180.91 2,261.91

113.43

28.35

85.08

72

565.17 1,696.44

2

49.50 55 12.00 6.00 21 9,59

4.50 14.58

141.20 1,381.70

345.42 1,036.28

56.79

471,29

117.82

353.47

132.09

33.02 99.06

6

5.50 40.63

288.13

72.03 216.10

1.50 3 16,50 1

18.19 17.19

126.19

99.69

24.92

27.40 184.90

31.54 94.65

74.77 46.22 138.68

13.50 1

16.28

121.78

31.19 93.59

1.09

10.13

91.13

1.00

11.82

68.35 114.82 28.70 86.12

22.78

+863.70 +519.66

76.46

915.15 236.29

708.87

†11.16

43.81

30

56

: ;

604.63

151.15 453.48

40

28.25

294.25

and one-fourth ($31.39), being the Teacher's bonus, is forfeited to Government.

TOTAL,..

73.56 220.69

6.84 40.81 10.21 30.63

.$21,210.38 5,268.48 15,910.51

E. J. EITEL, Inspector of Schools.

TABLE XI-PERCENTAGE of SCHOLARS who passed in the GRANT-IN-AID SCHOOLS during the last two Years.

321

No.

Name of Schools.

1895.

1896.

Increase.

Decrease.

IQ 0 4 1O CON ∞ ∞

1

American Board Mission, Bridges Street (Boys),

56.09

91.66

35.57

2

""

""

Queens Road West (Boys),

91.17

96.42

5.25

3

Háwan (Girls),

80.00

90.90

10.90

""

""

"

وو

Chungwan (Girls),

47.61

100.00

52.39

Yaumati (Girls),

96.55

100.00

3.45

6

8

>>

Basel Mission, Shamshuipo (Boys),

Shaukiwan (Boys),

Tokwawan (Boys),

91.66

80.00

11.66

96.61

94.54

2.07

96.29

96.00

0.29

9

""

Matauchung (Boys),.

81.25

94.14

12.89

10

Mongkok (Boys),

71.44

66.66

4.78

11

12

13

>>

""

""

14

Berlin Ladies Mission, Queen's Road West (Boys),

"

C. M. S., St. Stephen's Chinese School (Boys),

93.33

88.88

4.45

Mongkoktsui (Boys),

75.75

84.21

8.46

Tsatszmui (Boys),

63.15

45.16

17.99

93.47

90.24

3.23

15

""

No. 2 (Boys),

97.05

86.48

10.57

16

""

Pottinger Street (Boys),

98.33

97.61

0.72

17

""

Saiyingpun (Boys),

87.18

94.44

7.26

18

19

20

21

AAR:

St. Stephen's Baxter Memorial (Girls),

95.83

94.44

1.39

Lyndhurst Terrace (Girls),

81.81

100.00

18.19

Third Street (Girls),

96.00

80.00

16.00

...

Yaumati (Mixed),

75.00

91.30

16.30

22

""

Hunghom (Girls),

94.11

94.73

0.62

23

>>

Quarry Bay (Girls),

61.11

100.00

38.89

24

Little Hongkong (Boys),

76.92

33.33

43.59

25

""

Aberdeen School (Boys),

100.00

100.00

26

Aplichau

(Girls),

75.00

27

28

""

29

""

30

27

31

""

>>

29

34

36

"

37

""

38

""

35

F. E. S., Bonham Road, Chinese Division (Girls),

29

High Strert (Girls),

Queen's Road West (Girls),.........、

Saiyingpun Praya (Girls),

Pottinger Street (Girls),

Stanley School (Girls),

Shaukiwan (Girls), Tokwawan (Girls),.

L. M. S., Square Street (Boys),

Wantsai Chapel (Boys),

Yaumati (Boys),. Shektongtsui (Boys),.

96.15

100.00

100.00

100.00

100.00

80.00

82.75

76.92

100.00

100.00

100.00

96.87

91.42

5.45

78.00

75.67

2.33

83.72

86.20

2.48

39

22

Saiyingpun, I. Division (Boys),

86.27

90.00

3.73

40

II.

""

>>

"

(Boys),

97.77

83.78

13.99

41

Hunghom (Boys),

93.33

100.00

6.67

42

Hospital Chapel (Boys),

88.09

100.00

11.91

43

Shektong tsui (Girls),

90.90

66.66

23.24

:

44

Saiyingpun, Second Street I. Div. (Girls),

56.00

79.16

23.16

45

22

""

??

II. (Boys),

86.20

85.93

0.27

46

"5

Ui-hing Lane I. Division (Girls),

100.00

92.30

7.70

47

""

48

""

49

""

50

""

22

II.

22

Tanglungchau No. 1 (Boys),

No. 2 (Boys),

Shaukiwan (Boys),

(Girls),

70.27

96.87

26.60

89.28

100.00

10.72

97.22

100.00

2.78

93.33

90.62

2.71

51

39

Taikoktsui (Boys),

94.44

52

29

Square Street (Girls),

80.00

96.00

16.00

53

""

Matauwai (Boys),

89.28

90.47

1.19

54

>>

Third Street (Boys),

93.75

55

""

D'Aguilar Street (Girls),

92.50

56

11

Fletcher Street (Girls),

100.00

57

"

Kau-ü-fong (Girls),

85.10

100.00

14.90

58

19

Tanglungchau (Girls),

93.75

100.00

6.25

59

Aberdeen Street (Girls),

97.22

100.00

2.78

60

29

Wantsai Chapel (Girls),

92.15

100.00

7.85

61

Staunton Street (Girls),

100.00

87.50

12.50

62

R. C. M., Cathedral School (Boys),

71.42

63

22

Bridges Street, Chinese Division (Girls),

85.71

72.00

13.71

64

}}

St. Theresa School (Girls),

97.33

68.29

29.04

65

""

Holy Infancy School, I. Division (Boys),.

100.00

80.00

20.00

66

II.

"2

>>

>>

(Girls),

100.00

83.33

16.67

67

Yaumati (Girls),

96.29

93.33

2.96

68

""

Shaukiwan (Girls),

86.20

83.33

2.87

69

"

Hunghom (Girls),

72.41

100.00

27,59

70

""

Italian Convent, Chinese School (Girls),

95.65

91.07

3.58

71

Sacred Heart School, Chinese Div. (Girls),.

95.83

87.50

8.33

72 Wesleyan Mission, Spring Gardens (Boys),

94.11

78

""

Wellington Street (Boys),

92.50

94.44

1.94

74

""

""

22

""

(Girls),

88.88

88.23

.65

75

"

"1

Lascar Row (Boys),

73.68

45.83

27.85

76

Wantsai School (Boys),

95.74

94.73

1.01

>>

""

Class

of

School.

322

TABLE XI-PERCENTAGE of SCHOLARS who passed in the GRANT-IN-AID SCHOOLS,-Continued.

No.

Name of Schools.

1895.

1896.

Increase.

Decrease.

Wesleyan Mission, Graham Street (Girls),

100.00

97.29

78

Kennedy Town (Boys),

96.55

83.33

2.71 13.22

79

Basel Mission, High Street,

93.54

80

Berlin Mission (Girls),

88.46

100.00

11.54

81

C.M.S., Victoria Home and Orphanage Chin. Div. (Girls),

94.73

82

39

St. Stephen's Anglo-Chinese (Boys),

98.18

100.00

1.82

83

وو

Morrison English School (Boys),

80.76

95.83

15.07

84

85

W. M., Lyndhurst Terrace, English School (Boys), St. Paul's College School (Boys),

91.17

100.00

8.83

96.66

100.00

3.31

86

Diocesan Home and Orphanage (Boys),

89.02

87

88

F. E. S, Bonham Road, English Division (Girls), L. M. S., Taipingshan, English School (Boys),

83.33

100.00

100.00

89

R. C. M., St. Joseph's College Chinese Division (Boys),

80.00

100.00

20.00

90

""

>>

""

European

""

(Boys),

92.65

91.17

1.48

91

""

92

}}

Italian Convent, English Division (Girls),

"}

88.70

96.52

7.82

Portuguese Division (Girls), .

100.00

100.00

....

93

">

Bridges Street, English Division (Girls),

92.85

100.00

7.15

94

""

""

Portuguese Division (Girls),.

97.14

100.00

2.86

95

""

Nova Escola Portugueza (Girls),.

100.00

100.00

96

97

"

Sacred Heart School, English Division (Girls), St. Francis, Portuguese Division (Girls),

87.50

100.00

12.50

100.00

86.91

13.09

98

"

English Division (Girls);

95.23

100.00

4.77

99

"

Victoria Portuguese School, Port. Div. (Mixed),

100.00

100.00

100

Eng. Div. (Mixed),

100.00

100.00

101

Victoria English School (Boys),

88.88

102

دو

(Girls),

100.00

....

103

British Kowloon School (Mixed),

100.00

95.45

4.55

104 C.M.S., Victoria Home and Orphanage Eng. Div. (Girls),

100.00

Name of Schools.

TABLE XII.--PERCENTAGE of PASSES in the various subjects in which the GRANT-IN-AID SCHOOLS were examined in 1896.

Reading.

Writing

or Com-

position.

I.

American Board Mission, Bridges Street (Boys),

95.60

91.30

:

17

}}

"

Queen's Rd. West (Boys),

96.42 100.00 14.28

95.60

100.00

:

19

""

,,

Háwan (Girls)..

100.00 90.90

19

13

*

Chungwan (Girls),

100.00 100.00

100.00

100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00

"

"1

Yaumati (Girls),

100.00 100.00

100.00

"

Basel Mission, Shanshuipo (Boys),

Shaukiwán (Boys),

92,00 72.00 68.52

100.00 100.00

86.27

,,

19

11

"

Tokwawan (Boys),

11

"

Matauchung (Boys), .

**

"3

""

"1

19

19

100.00 96.00

94.11

100.00 94.14

100.00 100.00

100.00 100.00

100.00 100.00 100.00

...

***

100.00

Mongkok (Boys),

Berlin Ladies Mission, Queen's Road West (Boys),

Mongkoktsui (Boys),

C.M.S., St. Stephen's Chinese School (Boys),

No. 2 (Boys),

93.33 73.33

100.00

94.44

94.44

100.00 100.00

97.36 84.21

100.00 100.00

Tsat-tszmui (Boys),

54.83 70.96

100.00 100.00

100.00 90.24 84.21

100.00 100.00

100.00 $6.48 80.55

19

13

Pottinger Street (Boys),

100.00 100.00 88.09

Failed

100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 Failed

19

Saiyingpun (Boys),

97.22 97.22 88.88

100.00 100.00

"

St. Stephen's Baxter Memorial (Girls),

100.00 94.44 88.23

Failed

100.00 83.33

...

"

Lyndhurst Terrace (Girls),..

100.00 100.00 89.47

100.00 100.00

"}

Third Street (Girls),

100.00 80.00 83.33

100.00 100.00

""

Yaumati (Mixed),

100.00 86.95 75.00

100.00

100.00 100.00

.*

>>

Hunghom (Girls),

100.00 94.73 100.00

100.00

100.00 100.00

""

19

Quarry Bay (Girls),

100.00 100.00

100.00 100.00

"

Little Hongkong (Boys),

100.00 Failed

100.00

100.00 100.00 100.00

"

Aberdeen School (Boys),.

100.00 100.00

100.00

49

"

Aplichau (Girls),

95.00 80.00

100.00 100.00 100.00

95.00 100.00

"J

17

High Street (Girls),

"

11

Saiyingpun Praya, (Girls),.

100.00 100.00 100.00

...

100.00 100.00

F.E.S., Bonham Road, Chinese Division (Girls),

"

"

་་

99

Queen's Road West (Girls),

Pottinger Street (Girls),

Stanley School (Girls),

Shaukiwan (Girls),

Tokwawan (Girls),

L.M.S., Square Street (Boys),

Shektongtsui (Boys),

Saiyingpun, 1. Division (Boys),

"

11

Wantsai Chapel (Boys),

"1

Yaumati (Boys),

*

"

"

II.

25

(Boys),

་་

Hunghom (Boys),

,,

Hospital Chapel (Boys),

Shektongtsui (Girls),

:

100.00 100.00 100.00 91.42 94.73 100.00 78.37

100.00

100.00 100.00 100.00

100.00 100.00

DA

100.00

96.55

89.66 96.00 92.00

97.29 83.78

100.00 100.00

100.00 100.00

100.00

71.42

:

Failed 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00

..

100.00

100.00 100.00 88.88 100.00 66.66 25.00

100.00 100.00

100.00 100.00

"

Saiyingpun, Second Street, I. Div. (Girls),..

"

100.00 79.16 57.14

100.00 83.33 Failed

"

II. (Boys).. 100.00 87.50 87.13 Ui-hing Lane, I. Division (Girls),

100.00 92,30 100.00

100.00 100.00

63.63

72.72

100.00 100.00

.

Class

of

School.

TABLE XII-PERCENTAGE of PASSES,—Continued.

Name of Schools.

323

Staunton Street (Girls).

"1

!!

Bridges Street, Chinese Division (Girls),. St. Theresa School (Girls),

I.

L.M.S., Ui-hing Lane, II. Division (Girls),

Tanglungchau No. 1 (Boys),

No. 2 (Boys),

Shaukiwan (Boys),

22

"?

11

**

11

"

Taikoktsui (Boys),

27

Square Street (Girls),

11

"

""

2:

""

"

""

"

"9

"

"}

"9

"1

19

1.

"

"

"+

Matauwai (Boys),....

D'Aguilar Street (Girls), Fletcher Street (Girls), Kau-u-fong (Girls), Tanglungchau (Girls), Aberdeen Street (Girls), Wantsai Chapel (Girls),

R.C.M., Cathedral School (Boys),

Third Street (Boys),..

100.00 96.87 1.33 100.00 100.00 94.73 100.00 100.00 91.30 100.00 90.62

100.00 100.00 100.00

100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00

100.00

100.00 92.00 82.60 100.00 90.47 90.90

100.00 100.00

100.00 100.00 | 100.00

100.00

100.00 100.00

100.00 100.00 100.00

100.00

100.00 100.00 | Failed

100.00 100.00

100.00

100.00 100.00

100.00 100.00

100.00

100.00 100.00

100.00 100.00

100.00 100.00 88.88

100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00

***

...

100.00 60.00 88.00

100.00

100.00 100.00

""

**

Holy Infancy School, I. Division (Boys),

100.00 65.85 100.00 $0.00

86.20

100.00

97.53 90.90 100.00 100.00

***

...

""

II.

11

19

"

Yaumati (Girls),

""

Shaukiwan (Girls),

100.00 (Girls),

71.42 79,31 100.00 86.66

93.33 76.66 78.57

100.00

100.00 95.45

66.66

100.00

100.00 100.00

19

Hunghom (Girls),

100.00 95.45 52.94

22

Italian Convent, Chinese School (Girls),

96.42 76.78 79,59

100.00

11

""

"

"

"

1

"

11

Sacred Heart School, Chinese Division (Girls),.

Wesleyan Mission, Spring Gardens (Boys),

Wellington Street (Boys).

""

(Girls),

Lascar Row (Boys),

Wantsai School (Boys),

87.50 87.50 71.42

100.00 100.00

100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 97.14 33.33 100.00 100.00 | 100.00

100.00 94.44

100.00 100.00

100.00 88.23 75.00 45.83

100.00

100.00 100.00

95.83

100.00 94.73

100.00 100.00

*

Graham Street (Girls),

100.00

Kennedy Town (Boys),

96.66

97.29 Failed 90.00

100.00

100.00 100.00 100.00

+

93.75

**

Basel Mission, High Street,

...

Berlin Mission (Girls),

100.00

86.34 100.00

Phys. Goo.

100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00

""

St. Stephen's Anglo-Chinese (Boys),

"

99

Morrison English School (Boys),

C.M.S., Victoria Home & Orphanage Chi. Div. (Girls),

Wesleyan Mission, Lyndhurst Terrace Eng. Sch. (Boys), 100.00 100.00

100.00 100.00 100.00 79.16

St. Paul's College School (Boys),

100.00 98.07

98.24 100.00 | 100.00 95.83 100.00 100.00 70.96 98.07❘ 100.00

100.00 85.71

"

Diocesan Home and Orphanage (Boys),

...

"

"}

F.E.S., Bonham Road, English Division (Girls), L.M.S., Taipingshan, English School (Boys),

R.C.M., St. Joseph's College, Chinese Div. (Boys),

11

"

32

European Div. (Boys),. Italian Convent, English Division (Girls),!..

100.00 100.00 90.47 100.00

61.53 100.00 92.30 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 85.20 100.00 91.89

19

""

Portuguese Division (Girls),...

180.00

84.44

99

??

Bridges Street, English Division (Girls),

100.00

100.00

""

"

"

Nova Escola Portugueza (Girls),.

Portuguese Division (Girls).......

100.00

96.87

100.00

11

"

Sacred Heart School, English Division (Girls), St. Francis, Portuguese Division (Girls),

English Division (Girls),'

Victoria Portuguese Sch., Port. Div. (Mixed),...

Eng. Div. (Mixed),.

11

"

80.00 96.47 94.40 100.00 96.55 76.57 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 93.33 100.00 | 100.00 87.50 100.00 100.00 75.00 100.00 | 100.00 92.30 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 | 100.00 95.65 86.95 43.47 100.00 100.00 100.00 91.66 83.33 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 90.00 | 100.00 | 100.00 100.00 92.30 92.30 100.00 | 100.00

""

Victoria English School (Boys),

"

British Kowloon School (Mixed),.

(Girls),

100.00 95.45

"

C.M.S., Victoria Home & Orphanage Eng. Div. (Girls). 100.00 100.00 100.00

68.18 90.90 100.00 100.00 100.00

100.00

TABLE XIII.-NUMBER of UNEDUCATED CHILDREN in the COLONY in the year Estimated Number of Children of local school-age (6 to 16 years) in the Colony, in 1896:-

Boys, Girls,

Deduct, Recorded Number of Scholars under instruction in the Colony, in 1896:-

Government Schools,

Grant-in-Aid,

Kaifong Schools,

Private Schools,.

1896.

...

.12,533

...11,625

24,158

Boys,

Girls.

Total.

..1,745

378

2,123

..2,856

2,322

5,178

.1,604

21

1,625

82

339

421

9,347

..14,811

Uneducated or imperfectly educated Children in the Colony, in 1896,

E. J. EITEL, Ph. D., (Tubing).

Inspector of Schools and Head of the Education Department.

SIR,

સં

A

HONGKONG.

REPORT ON CERTAIN CASES OF ENTERIC FEVER.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor.

No.

501

31

87

SANITARY BOARD OFFICES,

HONGKONG, August 20, 1897.

I have the honour to submit, for the information of His Excellency the Governor, the following report concerning the cases of Enteric Fever which have occurred in the Colony during the current

year:

Fifty-six cases have been reported to me, of which forty-three were Europeans, seven were Chinese, five were Japanese and one an Indian; of these fifty-six cases, nineteen were imported into the Colony by the shipping, leaving thirty-seven cases to be accounted for locally, twenty-seven of which were of European nationality. In some of these, it has been impossible to trace, with any degree of certainty, the source of the infection, and in such I have been compelled to fall back upon the theory of an infected food-supply of Chinese origin; in the series of European cases, however, which occurred during the month of June, it is very clear to my mind that they must have had some con- nection with the milk supplied to these persons, and this conviction became more certain when I proved that such milk-supply was in part derived from Chinese sources, and that these sources were extremely liable to contamination, owing to the adulteration of the milk with water.

In a report upon this subject submitted by me to the Government, last month, I suggested the introduction of an Ordinance similar in effect to the Imperial Infectious Diseases Prevention Act of 1890, empowering the Government to prohibit, for a time, the supply of milk from any dairy, when such milk is likely to cause or has caused infectious disease in the Colony, and I have drafted, for the approval of the Honourable the Attorney General, a Bill which would furnish these powers.

The most recent cases of Enteric Fever which have been reported are six Chinese cases, all from one address, and these are clearly traceable, in my opinion, to an imported European case, the patient dying, shortly after arrival, in one of the Missionary Homes in the City.

I have the honour to be,

Honourable J. H. STEWART LOCKHART,

Colonial Secretary.

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

FRANCIS W. CLARK,

Medical Officer of Health,

No. 1.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 3rd May, 1897.

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART LOCKHART), Chairman. His Excellency the Major-General Commanding, (Major-General WILSONE BLACK, C.B.). The Honourable the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

the Colonial Treasurer, (THOMAS SERCOMBE SMITHI).

33

>>

the Director of Public Works, (FRANCIS ALFRED COOPER).

""

the Earbour Master, (ROBERT MURRAY RUMSEY, R.N.).

""

99

""

**

the Captain Superintendent of Police, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.). CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS, C.M.G.

79

WEI YUK.

وو

ABSENT:

55

C.S.0.

The Honourable JAMES JARDINE BELL-IRVING.

The Committee met at the request of the Colonial Secretary.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 7th December, 1896, were read and confirmed. Read the following Minutes under the hand of His Excellency the Governor :-

2607 of 1896.

C.S.O.

2439 of 1896.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Nine hundred and Fifty-nine Dollars and Fifty Cents, ($959.50), for expenses incurred in connection with the quarantine of the S.S. Cheang Hok Kian.

Government House, Hongkong, 16th December, 1896.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

$

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Four thousand four hundred and Eighty-eight Dollars, ($4,488), to meet the following expenses during the current year-

Personal Emoluments,-

Assistant Surgeon, Medical Department,

Resident Surgeon, Tung Wa Hospital,.

Messe:rger,

Other Charges,-

For conveyance,

$2,400.00

1,800.00

72.00

216.00

Total,..............

$4,488.00

Government Hcuse, Hongkong, 9th January, 1897.

C.O.D.

255 of 1896.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One thousand and Two hundred Dollars, ($1,200), being increase to the salaries of the undermentioned Officers for the current year :-

Mr. W. CHATHAM, Executive Engineer, Public Works' Department, Mr. H. P. Tooker,

>>

37

.....$600.00

600.00

Total,.

$1,200.00

Government House, Hongkong, 9th January, 1897.

}

56

C.S.O.

496 of 1897.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to re-vote the sum of Twenty-eight thousand Six hundred and Twelve Dollars and Thirty-two cents ($28,612.32), being the unexpended balances on the following votes for 1896, for Extraordinary Public Works:-

Slaughter-house, Pig and Sheep Depôts including Pier

Raising Praya Wall, Shektongtsui opposite M. L. 126 and 177-183 Improvement of Street Lighting

Storm Water Drain, Wing Fung Street Salisbury Road, Kowloon

....

$ 8,471.16

5,000.00

8,872.65

3,943.51

2,325.00

Total....

$ 28,612.32

C.S.O.

Government House, Hongkong, 24th February, 1897.

641 of 1897,

C.S.Ö. 440 of 1897.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recominends the Council to re-vote the sum of Two thousand Four hundred and Twenty-four Dollars and Ninety-three Cents, ($2,424.93), being the unexpended balance under the vote "Isolation Hospital 1896."

Government House, Hongkong, 10th March, 1897.

WILLIAM ROBINSON

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Five hundred and Fifty Dollars, ($550.00), to cover the salary and allowances of the newly appointed Student Interpreter from 1st March to 31st December, 1897 :-

Salary at $40 per month,

Allowance for a Chinese Teacher at $15,

$400.00 150.00

Total,...$550.00

G.S.0.

Government House, Hongkong, 12th March, 1897.

821 of 1897.

C.S.O. 956 of 1897,

C.S.O. 1021 of 1897.

(S.0.

296 of 1897,

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Six hundred Dollars, ($600), in aid of the vote "Maintenance of Juvenile Offenders in the Reformatory."

Government House, Hongkong, 31st March, 1897.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Two hundred Dollars, ($200), in aid of the Vote "Isolation Hospital."

Government House, Hongkong, 14th April, 1897.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Six thousand Dollars, ($6,000), for repairs to Roads outside the City of Victoria.

Government House, Hongkong, 24th April, 1897.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Three thousand Four hundred and Thirty-eight Dollars and Seventy-six Cents, ($3,438.76), to meet the following expenses in connection with the Kennedy Town Hospital during the months of January, February, March and April, 1897 :-

Personal Emoluments, Other Charges, Water Rate,

$ 816.40 2,589.46

32.90

Total,......

$3,438.76

Government House, Hongkong, 29th April, 1897.

The Committee unanimously agreed to recommend that the above votes be passed.

The Committee then adjourned.

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 10th May, 1897.

Read and confirmed on the 17th May, 1897.

J. G. T. BUCKLE,

Clerk of Councils.

J. H. STEWART LOCKHART,

Chairman.

-

-

No. 2.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG, On the 17th May, 1897.

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART LOCKHART), Chairman. The Honourable the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

the Colonial Treasurer, (THOMAS SERCOMBE SMITH).

11

""

the Harbour Master, (ROBERT MURRAY RUMSEY, R.N.).

"}

the Captain Superintendent of Police, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.).

}:

57

C.S.O.

the Acting Director of Public Works, (WILLIAM CHATHAM). CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS, C.M.G.

WEI YUK.

;)

ABSENT:

His Excellency the Major-General Commanding, (Major-General WILSONE BLACK, C.B.). The Honourable JAMES JARDINE BELL-IRVING.

The Committee met at the request of the Colonial Secretary.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 7th December, 1896, were read and confirmed. Read the following Minutes under the hand of His Excellency the Governor :-

425 of 1897.

C.S.O.

1118 of 1897.

C.S.O.

1175 of 1897,

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One hundred and Eighty-seven Dollars, ($187), in aid of the vote "Repairs to Health Officer's launch.”

Government House, Hongkong, 5th May, 1897.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One hundred and Fifty Dollars, ($150), in aid of the vote "Post mortem Examinations and Medical Attendance at Inquests.”

Government House, Hongkong, 7th May, 1897.

WILLIAM ROBINSON. -

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One thousand Five hundred and Fifty Dollars, ($1,550), in aid of the vote for Post Office "Incidental Expenses."

Government House, Hongkong, 12th May, 1897.

The Committee unanimously agreed to recommend that the above votes be passed.

The Committee then adjourned.

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 31st May, 1897.

Read and confirmed on the 31st May, 1897.

J. G. T. BUCKLE,

Clerk of Councils.

J. H. STEWART LOCKHART,

Chairman,

No. 3.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 31st May, 1897.

59

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART LOCKHART), Chairman. His Excellency the Major-General Commanding, (Major-General WILSONE BLACK, C.B.). The Honourable the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

'C.S.O.

the Colonial Treasurer, (THOMAS SERCOMBE SMITH).

""

the Harbour Master, (ROBERT MURRAY RUMSEY, R.N.).

݂ܕ

"}

>>

""

A

the Captain Superintendent of Police, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.).

the Acting Director of Public Works, (WILLIAM CHATHAM).

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS, C.M.G.

WEI YUK.

ABSENT:

The Honourable JAMES JARDINE BELL-IRVING.

The Committee met at the request of the Colonial Secretary.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 17th May, 1897, were read and confirmed. Read the following Minute under the hand of His Excellency the Governor :-

1362 of 1897.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Seven hundred and Fifty Dollars, ($750), in aid of the Hongkong Public Library.

Government House, Hongkong, 28th May, 1897.

The Committee unanimously agreed to recommend that the above vote be passed.

The Committee then adjourned.

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 28th June, 1897.

Read and confirmed on the 28th June, 1897.

J. G. T. BUCKLE,

Clerk of Councils.

J. H. STEWART LOCKHART,

Chairman.

No. 4.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 28th June, 1897.

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (JAMES Haldane STEWART LOCKHART), Chairman. His Excellency the Major-General Commanding, (Major-General WILSONE BLACK, C.B.). The Honourable the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

the Harbour Master, (ROBERT MURRAY RUMSEY, R.N.).

;;

""

the Captain Superintendent of Police, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.).

""

the Colonial Treasurer, (THOMAS SERCOMBE SMITH).

"

""

"'".

""

19

the Acting Director of Public Works, (WILLIAM CHATHAM).

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS, C.M.G.

JAMES JARDINE BELL-IRVING.

"

WEI YUK.

61

C.S.0.

The Committee met at the request of the Colonial Secretary.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 31st May, 1897, were read and confirined. Read the following Minute under the hand of His Excellency the Governor :-

941 of 1897.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Three hundre‍l and Forty-six Dollars and Forty-two Cents, ($346.42), in aid of the vote "Repairs to Post Office Steam Launch."

Government House, Hongkong, 12th June, 1897.

The Committee unanimously agreed to recommend that the above vote be passed.

The Committee then adjourned.

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 23rd August, 1897.

Read and confirmed on the 23rd August, 1897.

J. G. T. BUCKLE,

Clerk of Councils.

J. II. STEWART LOCKHART,

Chairman.

No. 5.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 23rd August, 1897.

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART LOCKHART), Chairman. His Excellency the Major-General Commanding, (Major-General WILSONE BLACK, C.B.). The Honourable the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

the Harbour Master, (ROBERT MURRAY RUMSEY, R.N.).

""

::

the Captain Superintendent of Police, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.). the Colonial Treasurer, (THOMAS SERCOMBE SMITH).

"

the Acting Director of Public Works, (WILLIAM Chatham).

"

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER, C.M.G.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS, C.M.G.

""

12

JAMES JARDINE BELL-IRVing.

WEI YUK.

23

63

C.S.O.

The Committee met at the request of the Colonial Secretary.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 28th June, 1897, were read and confirined. Read the following Minutes under the hand of His Excellency the Governor :-

1807 of 1897.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One hundred and Three thousand Dollars, ($103,000), to meet the following expenses during the current year :--

Public Works Annually Recurrent Expenditure.

Repairs to Buildings,........................

Maintenance of Telegraph,

..$12,000

1,000

Public Works Extraordinary.

* Water and Drainage Works, Miscellaneous,

42,000

Taipingshan Improvement,.

40,000

Forming and Kerbing Streets, Victoria, Gardener's Cottage,

3,000

5,000

$103,000

*Chargeable to Loan.

C.S.O.

1308 of 1897.

#

Government House, Hongkong, 6th August, 1897.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Five thousand Dollars, ($5,000), for the Construction of a new Road at the Peak District, from Plantation Road to Magazine Gap.

Government House, Hongkong, 6th August, 1897.

1.

64

€.S.O.

1785 of 1897.

C.S.O.

1972 of 1897.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Five hundred and Twenty-three Dollars ($523), to meet the cost of certain fire-extinguishing appliances at the Gaol.

Government House, Hongkong, 16th August, 1897. --

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Three hundred and Forty-nine Dollars and Thirty Cents ($349.30), in aid of the vote "Slaughter-House, Sheep and Pig Depôts, including Pier."

Government House, Hongkong, 20th August, 1897.

The Committee unanimously agreed to recommend that the above votes be passed.

The Committee then adjourned.

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 26th August, 1897.

Read and confirmed on the 26th August, 1897.

J. G. T. BUCKLE,

Clerk of Councils.

J. H. STEWART LOCKHART,

Chairman.

1

No. 6.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 26th August, 1897.

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART LOCKHART), Chairman. His Excellency the Major-General Commanding, (Major-General WILSONE BLACK, C.B.).

The Honourable the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

the Captain Superintendent of Police, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.).

21

""

the Colonial Treasurer, (THOMAS SERCOMBE SMITH).

""

17

3

""

79

the Acting Director of Public Works, (WILLIAM CHATHAM).

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER, C.M.G.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS, C.M.G.

JAMES JARDINE BELL-IRVing.

WEI YUK.

""

ABSENT:

65

C.S.O.

The Honourable the Harbour Master, (ROBERT MURRAY RUMSEY, R.N.).

The Committee met at the request of the Colonial Secretary.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 23rd August, 1897, were read and confirmed. Read the following Minute under the hand of His Excellency the Governor :-

2026 of 1897.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Five hundred Dollars ($500), in aid of the vote "Materials for Remunerative Industry; Victoria Gaol."

Government House, Hongkong, 23rd August, 1897.

The Committee unanimously agreed to recommend that the above vote be passed.

The Committee then adjourned.

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 6th September, 1897.

Read and confirmed on the 13th September, 1897.

J. G. T. BUCKLE,

Clerk of Councils.

J. H. STEWART LOCKHART,

Chairman.

No. 7.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 13th September, 1897.

67

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART LOCKHART), Chairman.

the Colonel Commanding, (Colonel HENRY ELSdale, R.E.).

the Captain Superintendent of Police, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.). the Colonial Treasurer, (THOMAS SERCOMBE SMITH).

""

""

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

"

the Harbour Master, (ROBERT MURRAY RUMSEY, R.N.).

""

""

"}

""

""

""

the Acting Director of Public Works, (WILLIAM CHATHAM).

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER, C.M.G.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHItehead.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS, C.M.G.

JAMES JARDINE BELL-IRVING.

""

WEI YUK.

""

The Committee met at the request of the Colonial Secretary.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 26th August, 1897, were read and confirmed.

Bill entitleD AN ORDINANCE TO AUTHORISE THE APPROPRIATION OF A SUPPLEMENTARY SUM OF THREE HUNDRED AND FORTY-ONE THOUSAND AND TWENTY-FIVE DOLLARS AND THIRTY-SEVEN CENTS TO DEFRAY THE CHARGES OF THE YEAR 1896.

The several items in the Bill were considered separately.

The Committee unanimously agreed to recommend that the several items be passed with the exception of the item "Military Expenditure."

Mr. WHITEHEAD moved that the said item be omitted.

Mr. CHATER seconded.

Discussion ensued.

The Committee divided.

For the motion.

Honourable WEI YUK.

J. J. BELL-IRVING. ·

>>

E. R. BELILIOS.

""

T. H. WHITEHEAD.

HO KAI.

""

C. P. CHATER.

>"

Against the motion.

Honourable the Acting Director of Public Works.

the Colonial Treasurer.

the Captain Superintendent of Police.

the Harbour Master.

""

11

the Attorney General.

the Colonel Cominanding.

""

""

the Colonial Secretary.

The motion being lost by a majority of one, the item for "Military Expenditure" was retained in the Bill accordingly.

The Committee then adjourned.

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 25th October, 1897.

Read and confirmed on the 25th October, 1897.

J. G. T. BUCKLE, Clerk of Councils.

J. H. STEWART LOCKHART,

Chairman.

No. 8.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 25th October, 1897.

69

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART LOCKHART), Chairman.

the Colonel Commanding, (Colonel HENRY ELSDALE, R.E.).

11

""

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

""

the Harbour Master, (ROBERT MURRAY RUMSEY, R.N.).

""

""

""

};

"

""

the Captain Superintendent of Police, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.). the Colonial Treasurer, (THOMAS SERCOMBE SMITH).

the Director of Public Works, (ROBERT DALY ORMSBY).

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER, C.M.G.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS, C.M.G.

JAMES JARDINE BELL-IRVING.

WEI YUK.

The Committee met at the request of the Colonial Secretary.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 13th September, 1897, were read and confirmed. Read the following Minutes under the hand of His Excellency the Governor :-

C.S.O. 2189 of 1897.

C.S.O. 972 of 1897.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Three thousand Dollars ($3,000), in aid of the vote "Expenses for Volunteers."

Government House, Hongkong, 18th September, 1897.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote the following sums to meet certain expenses in the Police Department:---

For Clothing and Accoutrements,

Bedding, Mess Utensils, &c.,

17

Incidental Expenses,

$4,500

750

1,400

"2

Conveyance of Police Pensioners, &c.,

1,000

Secret Service,

400

Total,.....

.$8,050

C.S.O.

2867 of 1897.

Government House, Hongkong, 18th September, 1897.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Dollars Ninety-eight thousand Eight hundred and Ninety-two and Cents Twenty-eight ($98,892.28), being the Government. contribution towards the Jubilee Fund.

Government House, Hongkong, 29th September, 1897.

The Committee unanimously agreed to recommend that the above votes be passed.

The Committee then adjourned.

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 1st November, 1897.

Read and confirmed on the 1st November, 1897.

J. G. T. BUCkle,

Clerk of Councils.

J. H. STEWART LOCKHART,

Chairman.

No. 9.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 1st November, 1897.

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART LOCKHART), Chairman. His Excellency the General Officer Commanding, (Major-General WILSONE BLACK, C.B.). The Honourable the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

>>

;;

the Harbour Master, (ROBERT MURRAY RUMSEY, R.N.).

the Captain Superintendent of Police, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.). the Colonial Treasurer, (THOMAS SERCOMBE SMITH).

the Director of Public Works, (ROBERT DALY ORMSBY).

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER, C.M.G.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS, C.M.G.

""

JAMES JARDINE BELL-IRVING.

:).

WEI YUK.

""

71

The Committee met at the request of the Colonial Secretary.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 25th October, 1897, were read and confirmed.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO APPLY A SUM OF NOT EXCEEDING TWO MILLIONS THREE HUN- DRED AND FORTY-THREE THOUSand Seven hunDRED AND THIRTY DOLLARS TO THE PUBLIC SERVICE OF THE YEAR 1898.

The Committee unanimously agreed to recommend that the several items in the Bill be passed, subject to further consideration regarding the item "Water for Government House" and similar items appearing in the estimated expenditure of other Departments.

The Committee then adjourned.

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 8th November, 1897.

Read and confirmed on the 8th November, 1897.

J. G. T. BUCKLE, Clerk of Councils.

J. H. STEWART LOCKHART,

Chairman.

No. 10.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 8th November, 1897.

73

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART LOCKHART), Chairman. His Excellency the General Officer Commanding, (Major-General WILSONE BLACK, C.B.). The Honourable the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

C.S.O.

the Harbour Master, (ROBERT MURRAY RUMSEY, R.N.).

the Director of Public Works, (ROBERT DALY ORMSBY).

""

the Captain Superintendent of Police, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.).

";

>>

M

"1

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

??

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER, C.M.G.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS, C.M.G.

JAMES JARDINE BELL-IRVING.

ABSENT:

The Honourable the Colonial Treasurer, (THOMAS SERCOMBE SMITH).

""

WEI YUK.

The Committee met at the request of the Colonial Secretary.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 1st November, 1897, were read and confirmed. Read the following Minute under the hand of His Excellency the Governor :--

2583 of 1897.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Six hundred and Fifty Dollars, ($650), in aid of the vote "Purchase and Repair of Boats" Police Department.

Government House, Hongkong, 3rd November, 1897.

The Committee unanimously agreed to recommend that the above vote be passed.

The Committee then adjourned.

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 22nd November, 1897.

Read and confirmed on the 22nd November, 1897.

J. G. T. BUCKLE,

Clerk of Councils

J. H. STEWART LOCKHART,

Chairman.

No. 11.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 22nd November, 1897.

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART LOCKHART), Chairman.

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

**

??

*:

""

""

"}

the Harbour Master, (ROBERT MURRAY RUMSEY, R.N.).

the Captain Superintendent of Police, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.). ̧ the Colonial Treasurer, (THOMAS SERCOMBE SMITH).

the Director of Public Works, (ROBERT DALY ORMSBY).

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER, C.M.G.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS, C.M.G.

JAMES JARDINE BELL-IRVING.

WEI YUK.

*

ABSENT:

75

C.O.D.

His Excellency the General Officer Commanding, (Major-General WILSONE BLACK, C.B.).

The Committee met at the request of the Colonial Secretary.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the Sth November, 1897, were read and confirmed. Read the following Minutes under the hand of His Excellency the Governor :-

61 of 1897.

C.S.O.

2738 of 1897.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Three thousand and Two hundred Dollars, ($3,200), to meet certain expenses in connection with the Kennedytown Hospital.

Government House, Hongkong, 6th November, 1897.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One hundred Dollars, ($100), in aid of the vote "Meals for Prisoners in Cells " Police Department.

Government House, Hongkong, 15th November, 1897.

The Committee unanimously agreed to recommend that the above votes be passed.

The Committee then adjourned.

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 8th December, 1897.

Read and confirmed on the 8th December, 1897.

J. G. T. BUCKLE,

J. H. STEWART LOCKHART,

Clerk of Councils.

Chairman, ̧

No. 12.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 8th December, 1897.

77

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART LOCKHART), Chairman.

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

the Harbour Master, (ROBERT MURRAY RUMSEY, R.N.).

"}

";

the Captain Superintendent of Police, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.). the Colonial Treasurer, (THOMAS SERCOMBE SMITH).

>>

the Director of Public Works, (ROBERT DALY ORMSBY).

C.S.O.

""

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER, C.M.G.

Ho KAI, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD. WEI YUK.

ABSENT:

His Excellency the General Officer Commanding, (Major-General WILSONE BLACK, C.B.). The Honourable JAMES JARDINE BELL-IRVING.

15

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS, C.M.G.

The Committee met at the request of the Colonial Secretary.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 22nd November, 1897, were read and confirmed. Read the following Minutes under the hand of His Excellency the Governor :-

758 of 1897.

C.S.O.

2367 of 1897.

C.O.D.

208 of 1897.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Four hundred and One Dollars and Forty-one Cents, ($401.41), in aid of the vote "Water for Markets, &c.," Sanitary Department.

Government House, Hongkong, 30th November, 1897.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Thirteen thousand Four hundred and Fifty-one Dollars and Seventy-two Cent ($13,451.72), to meet the Expenses in connec- tion with the Jubilee Illuminations, &c.

Government House, Hongkong, 2nd December, 1897.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Two hundred and Seventy-five Dollars ($275), being the Salaries and Allowances of two new Cadets for the months of November and December, 1897.

Government House, Hongkong, 2nd December, 1897.

The Committee unanimously agreed to recommend that the above votes be passed. The Committee then adjourned.

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 20th December, 1897.

Read and confirmed on the 23rd February, 1898,

J. G. T. BUCKLE, Clerk of Councils.

J. H. STEWART LOCKHART,

Chaira an.

J

HONGKONG.

FINANCIAL RETURNS FOR THE YEAR 1896.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor,

TREASURY,

165

11

No. 97

SIR, I have the honour to transmit the following returas:

1. Revenue and Expenditure for the year 1896.

HONGKONG, 27th March, 1897.

2. Comparative Statement of Revenue and Expenditure for 1895 and 1896.

3. Return of Deposits not available.

4. Return of Advances Outstanding.

5. Return of Assets and Liabilities, 1896.

6. Return of Public Works Extraordinary chargeable against the Loan.

7. Statement of Expenditure from the Praya Reclamation Fund.

I have the honour to be,

The Houourable

THE COLONIAL SECRETARY,

&C.,

&c.,

&c.

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

A. M. THOMSON,

Acting Treasurer.

?

COLONY OF HONGKONG.

RETURN OF REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE DURING THE YEAR ENDED 31

EXPENDITURE.

REVENUE'

Amount Total Estimated. Revenue.

LIGHT DUES,

LICENCES AND INTERNAL REVENUE NOT OTHERWISE SPE-

$ 102,000

$ 117,314.45

C.

$3

CIFLED:-

Arms Ordinance,..

200

Assessed Taxes,

425,000

370.00 402,212.68

170.00

Auctioneers' Licences,

1,800

1,200.00

22,787.32 600.00

Billiard Tables and Bowling Alleys Licences,

850

1,000.00

150.00

Boarding-house Licences,

1,500

1,947.94

447.94

Boat Licences,..

5,953

6,661.65

708.65

Cargo Boat Licences,

10,786

11,981.80

1,195.80

Emigration Brokers' Licences,.

Carriage, Chair, &c., Licences,....

Chinese Undertakers' Licences,

Dog Licences,

Fines,

Forfeitures,

40,800

42,977.00

2,177.00

Chinese Passenger Ships Licences,

350

395.00

45,00

160

180.00

20.00

2,500

2,509.50

9.50

1,000

1,000.00

30,525

63,518.48

32,993.48

5,000

3,808.03

1,191.97

Hawkers' Licences,

5,582

5,537.00

45.00

Junk Licences.

25,000

32,622.25

7,622.25

Kerosene Oil Licences,

330

441.00

111.00

Marine Store Dealers' Licences,

4,500

5,340.00

840.00

Marriage Licences,.

319

320.00

1.00

Money Changers' Licences,

575

535.00

40.00

Opium Monopoly,

286,000

286,000.00

Pawnbrokers' Licences,.

38,700

39,000.00

300.00

Shooting Licences,

100

Spirit Licences,

60,000

85.00 65,549.00

15.00

Stamps,.

196,000

Steam-Launch Licences,

1,400

215,517.68 808.50

5,549.00 19,517.68

More than Less than Estimated. Estimated.

C. $ C.

15,314.45

Charge on Account of Public Debt, Pensions,

Governor and Legislature,

Colonial Secretary's Department, Audit Department.......

Treasury.

Public Works Department,.

Post Office,

Registrar General's Department,

Harbour Master's Department,

Lighthouses,

Observatory,

Stamp Office,

Botanical and Afforestation Departmer

Legal Departments,

Ecclesiastical,

Education,

Medical Departments,

Magistracy,

Police,

Gaols,..

Fire Brigade,

Sanitary Department,

Charitable Allowances, Transport,

Miscellaneous Serviccs,. Military Expenditure, Public Works, Recurrent,

་་་་་་་་་་་

591.50

FEES OF COURT OR OFFICE, PAYMENTS FOR SPECIFIC PUR-

POSES, AND REIMBURSEMENTS IN AID :-

Bills of Health,

2.200

2,349.00

149.00

Births and Deaths, Registration of......

100

141.70

41.70

Cargo Boat Certificates,

1,800

1,986.00

186.00

Cemetery Burials,

550

1,067.69

517.69

Cemetery Fees from Public Cemeteries for Chinese,

1,750

1,511.58

Chinese Gazette, Sale of

46

30.00

238.42 16.00

Companies, Registration of

1,200

2,471.50

Convict Labour and other items,

4,000

5,526.92

Deeds, Registration of

3,500

5,062.00

1,271.50 1,526.92 1,562.00

+44

***

...

Discharge of Crews and Seamen,

8,000

10,543.00

2,543.00

Examination of Masters, &c.,

1,600

2,682.50

1,082.50

Fees of Court,

14,040

14.144.77

104.77

Fees on Grant of Leases,

800

1,373.50

573.50

Fees for testing Petroleum,

300

425.00

125.00

Gaol Expenses,-Recovery from Diplomatic, Naval and Mi-

litary Departments. Seamen and Debtors,..

1,200

1,354.05

154.05

Gunpowder, Storage of......

10,000

11,882.69

1,882.69

Householders, Registration of

1,160

1,366.50

Imperial Post Office, Contribution from

6,816

6,563.65

Lock Hospital, Grant-in-Aid from Admiralty,

960

924.16

Medical Examination of Emigrants,

Medical Registration Fees,

22,000 10

21,063.50

206.50

252.35 35,54 936.50

Medical Treatment of Patients in the Civil Hospital,

15,000

35.00 18,601.69

25.00 3,601.69

...

Maintenance of Gap Rock Lighthouse,

Contribution from

Chinese Imperial Government towards the

750

Official Administrator and Trustee,..............

1,500

750.00 2,549.25

1,049.25

Official Signatures,.

350

Printed Forms, Sale of

200

265.00 227.00

85.00

27.00

Private Moorings and Buoys, Rent for

2,640

2,760.00

120.00

Queen's College, Fees from Scholars,

13,000

9,948.00

3,052,00

Registry Fees,

250

444.00

194.00

Refund of Police Pay,

1,500

2,153.64

653.64

Refund Cost of Police and other Stores,.

500

694.82

194.82

Shipping Crews and Seamen,.

9,100

11,791.20

2,691.20

Sick Stoppages from Police Force,

800

1.056.09

256.09

Steam-Launches. Surveyor's Certificate,

1,500

1,375.00

115.00

Survey of Steam-Ships,

10,000

10,484.07

484.07

School for Girls, Fees from Scholars,

Sunday Cargo-Working Permits,

Trade Marks, Registration of

550 11,000 1,000

475.00

7,575.00 1,436.96

75.00 3.425.00

436.96

POST OFFICE :—

Postage,.......

225,000

245,280.33

20,280.33

RENT OF GOVERNMENT PROPERTY, LAND AND HOUSES:-

Buildings,

Cattle Shed,.

Laundries.

Leased Lands,.

Lands not Lensed,

Markets,

760 2,600

434.00

326.00 2,600.00

480

540.00

208,000

217,252.39

60.00 9,282.39

7,000 68,000

11,532.14 4,532.14

Piers....

4,000

69,458.51

4,259.57

1.458.51

259.57

15 950 00

7 850.00

COLONY OF HONGKONG.

AND EXPENDITURE DURING THE YEAR ENDED 31ST DECEMBER, 1896.

170.00

...

22,787.32

1,000.00

150.00

1,947.94

447.94

Total Revenue.

More than Less than

C.

$ 117,314,45

370.00

402,212,68 1,200.00

Estimated. Estimated.

$ 15,314.45

C.

c.

Charge on Account of Public Debt, Pensions,

600.00

Governor and Legislature,

Colonial Secretary's Department,

Audit Departmenʊ,.............

Treasury,

Public Works Department,.

Post Office,

EXPENDITURE.

Amount

Total More than Less than Estimated. Expenditure. Estimated. Estimated.

$ *.

131,552.64

$ C. 127,153.67

$ C.

$ 4,398.97

C.

103,000,00

43,259.00

118,054.71 15,054.71

43,482.19

223.19

29,016.00 28,674.71

341.29

10,000.00

10,298.11

298.14

22,454.00 24,217.15

1,763.15

88,282.00

85,694,10

2,587.90

185,180.00

188,281.17

3,101.17

6,661.65

708.65

Registrar General's Department,

14,253.00

13,929.10

11,981.80

1,195.80

Harbour Master's Department,

323.90

63,813.00

62,336.01

42,977.00

2,177.00

Lighthouses,

1,476.99

17,098.00 13,672.13

395.00

45.00

Observatory,

3,425.87

12,802.00

12,690.21

111.79

180.00

20.00

Stamp Office,

3,572.00

3,568.50

3.50

2,509,50

9.50

Botanical and Afforestation Department,

19,122.00

19,783,84

661.84

1,000.00

Legal Departments,

70,898.00

63,518.48 32,993.48

Ecclesiastical,

80,612,50 · 9,714.50

2,200.00

1,815.00

3,808.03

1,191.97

Education,

77,020.00

76,501.76

385.00 518.24

5,537.00

45.00

Medical Departments,

93,715.00

109,763.19

16,018.19

32,622.25

7,622.25

Magistracy,

...

18,836.00

22,754,27

441.00

111.00

Police,

3,918.27

223,973.00

219,777,23

5,340.00

840.00

Gaols,.

4,195.77

58,191,00

59,626.13

320.00

1.00

Fire Brigade,

1,432.13

17,818.00

30,955.48 13,137.48

535.00

40.00

Sanitary Department,

286,000.00

Charitable Allowances,

86,882.00

94,818.45

7,936.45

5,200.00

5,767.99 567.99

39,000.00

300.00

Transport,

2,000.00

85.00 65,549.00 5,549.00

215,517.68 19,517.68

808,50

15.00

Miscellaneous Services,

3,254,40 1,254.40

138,507.00

Military Expenditure,

239,319.78 100,812.78

Public Works, Recurrent,

591.50

179,700.00

440,215.00 523,128.45 82,913.45

185,469,13 5,769.13

2,349.00

149.00

141.70

41.70

1,986.00

186.00

1,067.69

517.69

1,511.58

30.00

238.42 16.00

2,471.50 1,271.50 5,526.92 1,526.92

5,062,00

1,562.00

10,543.00 2,543.00

*

2,682.50

1,082.50

14,144.77

104.77

1,373.50

573.50

425.00

125.00

1,354.05

154.05

11,882.69

1,882.69

1,366.50

206.50

6,563.65

252.35

924.46

21,063.50

35.54 936.50

35.00

25.00

18,601.69

3,601.69

750.00 2,549.25

1,049.25

265.00

85.00

227.00

2,760.00

27.00 120.00

9,948.00

3,052.00

444.00

194.00

2,153.64

653.64

694.82

194.82

11,791.20

2,691.20

{"

1.056.09

256.09

1,355.00

115.00

10,484.07

484.07

475.00

75.00

7,575.00

3.425.00

=

1,436.96 436.96

245,280.33 20,280.33

434.00

326.00

2,600.00

510.00

60.00

217,282.39 9,282.39

11,532.14 1,532.14

69,458.51 1,458.51

4,259.57

259.57

- 250 00

i once, Gaols..

Fire Brigade,

Sanitary Department, Charitable Allowances, Transport,

Miscellaneous Services,. Military Expenditure, Public Works, Recurrent,

Kerosene Oil Licences,

Marine Store Dealers' Licences,

Marriage Licences,..

Money Changers' Licences,

Opium Monopoly,

Pawnbrokers' Licences,.

330

44.00

111.00

4,500

5,340,00

840.00

319

320.00

1.00

575

535.00

40.00

286,000

286,000.00

38,700

Shooting Licences,

Spirit Licences,

Stamps......

Steam-Launch Licences,

100

60,000

196,000

39,000.00 85.00 65,549.00 215,517.68

300.00

15.00

5,549.00 19,517.68

1,400

808,50

591.50

FEES OF COUET OR OFFICE, PAYMENTS FOR SPECIFIC PUR-

POSES, AND REIMBURSEMENTS IN AID :—

Bills of Health,.

Births and Deaths, Registration of..

2.200 100

2,349.00

149.00

141.70

41.70

Cargo Boat Certificates,

1,800

1,986.00

186.00

Cemetery Burials,

550

1,067.69

517.69

Cemetery Fees from Public Cemeteries for Chinese,

1,750

1,511,58

238.42

Chinese Gazette, Sale of

46

30.00

16.00

Companies, Registration of

1,200

2,471.50

1,271.50

Convict Labour and other items,

4,000

5,526.92

1,526.92

Deeds, Registration of

3,500

5,062.00

1,562.00

Discharge of Crews and Seamen,

8,000

10,543.00

2,543.00

Examination of Masters, &c.,

1,600

2,682.50

1,082.50

Fees of Court,

14,040

14144.77

104.77

Fees on Grant of Leases.

800

1,373.50

573.50

Fees for testing Petroleum,

300

425.00

125.00

Gaol Expenses,-Recovery from Diplomatic, Naval and Mi-

litary Departments, Seamen and Debtors,..

1,200

1,354.05

154.05

Gunpowder, Storage of......

10,000

11,882.69

1,882.69

Householders, Registration of

1,160

1,366.50

206.50

Imperial Post Office, Contribution from

6,816

6,563.65

252.35

Lock Hospital, Grant-in-Aid from Admiralty,

960

924.16

35.54

Medical Examination of Emigrants,

22,000

21,063.50

936.50

Medical Registration Fees,

10

Medical Treatment of Patients in the Civil Hospital,.

Maintenance of Gap Rock Lighthouse,―Contribution from

15,000

35.00 18,601.69

25.00

3,601.69

Chinese Imperial Government towards the

750

750.00

Official Administrator and Trustee,..

1,500

2,549.25

1,049.25

Official Signatures,...

350

265.00

85.00

Printed Forms, Sale of

200

227.00

Private Moorings and Buoys, Rent for

2,640

2,760.00

27.00 120.00

Queen's College, Fees from Scholars,

13,000

9,948.00

3,052.00

Registry Fees,

250

444.00

194.00

Refund of Police Pay,.

1,500

2,153.64

653.64

Refund Cost of Police and other Stores,..

500

691.82

194.82

Shipping Crews and Seamen,.

9,100

11,791.20

2,691.20

Sick Stoppages from Police Force,

800

1,056.09

256.09

Steam-Launches, Surveyor's Certificate,

1,500

1,385.00

Survey of Steam-Ships,

10,000

10,484.07

484.07

School for Girls, Fees from Scholars,

550

475.00

Sunday Cargo-Working Permits,

11,000 7,575.00

Trade Marks, Registration of

1,000

1,436.96 436.96

115.00

...

75.00 3,425.00

14

POST OFFICE —

Postage,....

RENT OF GOVERNMENT PROPERTY, LAND AND HOUSES :-

225,000

245,280.33

20,280,33

Buildings,

760

434.00

Cattle Shed,...

2,600

326.00 2,600.00

Laundries,

480

540.00

60.00

Leased Lands,.

208,000

217,282.39

9,282.39

Lands not Leased,

7,000

11,532.14

1,532.14

Markets,

68,000

69,458.51

1,458.51

Piers..

4,000

4,259.57

259,57

Stone Quarries,

8,000

15,850.00 7,850.00

Slaughter House,

40,440

42,750.00 2,310,00

Sheep and Pig Depôts,

6,900

10,452.86 3,552,86

INTEREST,

5,000

5,000.00

MISCELLANEOUS RECEIPTS:-

Condemned Stores, &c.,

1,000

1,431.39

Interest for use of Furniture at Government House,

144

144.40

431.39 .40

Night Soil Contracts,

28,440

28,240.00

Other Miscellaneous Receipts,

19,000

18,394.09

200.00 605.91

Profit on Subsidiary Coins,

110,000

110,196.20

196.20

TOTAL, exclusive of Land Sales and Water Account,...$ 2,133,366 2,250,179.57 159,047.08| 42,233.51

LAND SALES,

WATER ACCOUNT-Ord. 16 of 1890,

TOTAL,..

Treasury, Hongkong, 20th March, 1897.

70,000

85,000

270,858.99 | 200,858.99 88,840.38 3,840.38

$2,288,366 2,609,878.94|363,746.45

42,233.51

Public Works, Extraordinary,

TOTAL,...

Public Works Extraordinary chargeable aş

2,622.25

7,622.20

44.00

111.00

5,340.00

840.00

Gaols,...

320.00

1.00

singistracy, Police,

Fire Brigade,

223,973.00

219,777.23

4,195.77

58,191.00

59,626,13

1,432.13

535.00

40.00

Sanitary Department,

17,818.00

30,955,48 13,137.48

6,000.00

Charitable Allowances,

86,882,00

94,815.45 7,936.45

9,000.00

300.00

Transport,

5,200.00

5,767.99 567.99

85.00

15.00

Miscellaneous Services,

2,000.00

3,254.40 1,254.40

5,549.00

5,517.68

5,519.00 19,517.68

Military Expenditure,

138,507.00

239,319.78100,812.78

Public Works, Recurrent,

808.50

591.50

440,215.00 179,700.00

523,128.45

82,913.45

185,469.13 5,769.13

2.349.00

149.00

141.70

41.70

1,986.00

186.00

1,067.69

517.69

1,511.58 30.00

238.42

16.00

2,471.50

1,271.50

5,526.92 1,526.92

5,062.00

1,562.00

10,543.00

2,543.00

2,682.50

1,082.50

...

14144.77

104.77

1,373.50

425.00

573.50 125.00

...

1,354.05

154.05

11,882.69

1,882.69

1,366.50

206.50

6,563.65

252.35

924.46

35.54

21,063.50

936.50

35.00

25.00

18,601.69

3,601,69

750.00

2,549.25

1,049.25

265.00

85.00

227.00

27.00

2,760.00

120.00

9,948.00

3,052.00

444.00

194.00

2,153.64

653.64

694.82

194.82

11,791.20

2,691.20

1.056.09

256.09

1,385.00

115.00

10,484.07

484.07

475.00

75.00

7,575.00

3.425.00

1,436.96 436.96

245,280.33

20,280.33

434.00

326.00 2,600.00

510.00

60.00

217,282.39

9,282.39

11,532.14

4,532.14

69,458.51

1,458.51

4,259.57

259.57

15,850.00

7,850.00

42,750.00 2,310.00

10,452.86 3,552,86

5,000.00

1,431.39

431.39

144.40

.40

28,240.00

18,394.09

200.00 605.91

110,196.20

196.20

250,179.57 159,047.08 42,233.51

270,858.99 200,858.99

88,840.38 3,840.38

,609,878.94 | 363,746,45

42,233.51

$ 2,158,561.64 2,405,399.39 264,606.97

17,769.22

Public Works, Extraordinary, .

123,300.00 69,510.98

53,789.02

TOTAL...

2,281,861.64 2,474,910.37 | 264,606.97

71,558.24

Public Works Extraordinary chargeable against the New Loan, $

197,200 230,619.32 33,419.32

A. M. THOMSON, Acting Colonial Treasurer.

167

...

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF THE REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE OF THE COLON

REVENUE.

1896.

INCREASE.

DECREASE.

EXPENDITURE

C.

Charge on Account of Public Debt,.. Pensions,.

Governor and Legislature,

Colonial Secretary's Department, Audit Department,

Treasury,

Public Works Department,

Post Office,.

Registrar General's Department,....

Harbour Master's Department,

Lighthouses,..

Observatory,

Stamp Office,

Botanical and Afforestation Departi

Legal Departments,

Ecclesiastical Department,

Education,

Medical Departments, Magistracy,

Police,

Gaols,....

Fire Brigade,..... Sanitary Department,

Charitable Allowances, Transport,..

Miscellaneous Services,

Military Expenditure, Public Works, Recurrent, Public Works, Extraordinary,

1895.

$

C.

C.

$

C.

LIGHT DUES,

LICENCES AND INTERNAL REVENUE NOT OTHERWISE

107,315.91

117,314.45

9,998.54

SPECIFIED :-

Arms Ordinance,.

230.00

370.00

140.00

Assessed Taxes,

404,105.75

402,212.68

Auctioneers' Licences,

2,100.00

1,200.00

1,893.07 900.00

Billiard Tables and Bowling Alleys Licences,

1,000,00

1,000.00

Boarding House Licences,

2,193.75

1,947.94

245.81

Boat Licences,.

6,123.25

6.661.65

538.40

Cargo Boat Licences.

11,425.00

11,981.80

556.80

Carriage, Chair, &c., Licences,

42,308.00

42,977.00

669.00

Chinese Passenger Ships Licences,

325.00

395.00

70.00

Chinese Undertakers' Licences,.

160.00

180.00

20.00

Dog Licences,

2,370.50

2,509.50

139.00

Emigration Brokers' Licences,. Fines,

1,000.00

1,000.00

36,229.03

63,518.48

27,289.45

Forfeitures,

"Hawkers' Licences,..

4,149.06

3,808.03

5,597.00

5,537.00

341.03 60.00

Junk Licences,

31,534.50

32,622.25

Kerosene Oil Licences,

441.00

Marine Store Dealers' Licences,

2,745.00

5,340.00

1,087.75 441.00 2,595.00

Marriage Licences,

331.00

320.00

11.00

Money Changers' Licences,

535.00

535.00

Opium Monopoly,.

295,133.34

286,000.00

9,133.34

Pawnbrokers' Licences,.

39,000.00

39,000.00

Shooting Licences,

110.00

85.00

25.00

Spirit Licences,

65,143.50

65,549.00

Stamps,.

206,040.48

Steam-launch Licences...

1,228.50

215,517.68 808.50

405.50 9,477.20

420.00

FEES OF COURT OR OFFICE, PAYMENTS FOR SPECIFIC

PURPOSES, AND REIMBURSEMENTS IN AID :-

Bills of Health,.

1,932.00

2,349.00

417.00

Births and Deaths, Registration of...

102.15

141.70

39.55

Cargo Boat Certificates,..

1,951.00

1,986.00

35.00

Cemetery Burials,.

968.21

1,067.69

99.48

Cemetery Fees from Public Cemeteries for Chinese,

1,475.60

1,511.58

35.98

Chinese Gazette, Sale of.

45.00

30.00

15.00

Companies, Registration of

2,524.25

2,471,50

52.75

Convict Labour and other items,

5,526.92

5,526.92

Deeds, Registration of

4,726.75

5,062.00

335.25

Discharge of Crews and Seamen,

8,622.00

10,543.00

1,921.00

Examination of Masters, &C.,.

2,020.00

2,682.50

662.50

Fees of Court,

16,064.50

14,144.77

1,919.73

Fees on Grant of Leases,.

870.00

1,373.50

503.50

Fee for testing. Petroleum,

425.00

425.00

Gaol Expenses,--Recovery from Diplomatic, Naval, and

Military Departments, Seamen and Debtors,

1,354.05

1,354.05

Gunpowder, Storage of

23,114.52

11,882.69

11,231.83

Householders, Registration of

1,209.25

1,366.50

Imperial Post Office, Contribution from

6,583.65

.157.25 ́ ́6,563.65′

Lock Hospital, Grant-in-Aid from Admiralty,

924.46

Medical Examination of Emigrants,

21,612.25

21,063.50

Medical Registration Fees,

Medical Treatment of Patients in the Civil Hospital,...

35.00 18,601.69

924.46

35.00 18,601.69

548.75

Maintenance of Gap Rock Lighthouse,-Contribution

from Chinese Imperial Government towards the... Official Administrator and Trustee,..

5,552.88

750.00 2,549.25

750.00

Official Signatures,...

Printed Forms, Sale of

271.00 282.50

265.00

227.00

3,003.63 6.00 55.50

Private Moorings and Buoys, Rent for.

2,640.00

2,760.00

Queen's College, Fees from Scholars,

9,948.00

Registry Fees,

249.00

444.00

120.00 9,948.00 195.00

Refund of Police Pay,

Refund Cost of Police and other Stores,..

2,153.64 694.82

2,153.64

694.82

Shipping Crews and Seamen,

9,716.40

11,791.20

2,074.80

Sick Stoppages from Police Force,

1,056.09

1,056.09

Steam-launches, Surveyor's Certificate.

1,575.00

1,385.00

190.00

Survey of Steam-ships,

9,240.21

10,484.07

1,243.86

School for Girls, Fees from Scholars,

475.00

475.00

Sunday Cargo-Working Permits,.

11,600.00

7,575.00

4,025.00

Trade Marks, Registration of

562.6+

1,436.96

874.32

POST OFFICE:-Postage,

244,449.71

245,280.33

830.62

RENT OF GOVERNMENT PROPERTY, LAND AND HOUSES

Buildings,

2,225.30

434.00

1,791.30

Cattle Shed,

2,220.00

2,220.00

Laundries,

350.00

540.00

190.00

Leased Lands,

230,803.46

217,282.39

13,521.07

Lands not Leased,

8,419.01

11,532.14

3,113.13

Markets,

63,574.35

69,458.51

5,884.16

Piers,

4,367.09

4,259.57

107.52

Stone Quarries,

8,100.00

15,850,00

7,750.00

Slaughter House,..

40,440.00

42,750.00

2,310.00

Sheep and Pig Depôts,

4,883.80

10,452.86

5,569.06

INTEREST,

5,936.78

5,936.78

MISCELLANEOUS RECEIPTS :-

Condemned Stores, &c.,

2,032.35

1,431.39

600.96

Interest for use of Furniture at Government House,.

144.40

Night Soil Contracts,

24,690.00

144.40 28,240.00

3,550.00

X

THE REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE OF THE COLONY OF HONGKONG IN 1895 & 1896.

1896.

INCREASE.

DECREASE.

EXPENDITURE.

1895.

1896.

INCREASE.

DECREASE.

C.

C.

..

C.

c.

117,314.45

9,998.54

Charge on Account of Public Debt,. Pensions,.

110,374.21

127,153.67 16,779.46

112,776.97

118,054.71

5,277.74

Governor and Legislature,

44,053.36

43,482.19

...

370.00

140.00

Colonial Secretary's Department,

33,385.39

28,674.71

571.17 4,710.68

402,212.68

1,893.07

Audit Department,

8,678.89

10,298.14

1,619.25

1,200,00

900.00

Treasury,

26,205.04

24,217.15

1,987.89

1,000.00

Public Works Department,

85,447.66

85,694.10

246.41

1,947.91

245.81

Post Office,..

194,240.27

188,281.17

5,959.10

6.661.65

538.40

Registrar General's Department,..

17,099.41

13,923,10

3,170.31

11,981.80

556.80

Harbour Master's Department,

68,256.24

62,336.01

5,920.23

42,977.00

669.00

Lighthouses,..

15,563.34

13,672.13

1,891.21

395.00

70.00

Observatory,

13,433,55

12,690.21

743.34

180.00

20.00

Stamp Office,

4,027.40

3,568.50

458.90

2,509.50

139.00

Botanical and Afforestation Department,

17,346.83

19,783.84

2.437.01

1,000.00

Legal Departments,

78,754,83

80,612.50

1,857.67

63,518.48

27,289.45

Ecclesiastical Department,

1,830.00

1,815.00

15.00

3,808.03

341.03

Education,

60,140.24

76,501.76

16,361,52

5,537.00

60.00

Medical Departments,

74,291.62

109,763.19

35,471.57

32,622.25

441.00

5,340.00

1,087.75 441.00 2,595.00

Magistracy,

21,413.12

22,754.27

1,341.15

320.00

11.00

535.00

286,000.00

9,133.34

Police,

Gaols,.....

Fire Brigade,.

Sanitary Department,

Charitable Allowances,

217,451,54

219,777.23

2,325.69

51,125.66

59,626.13

8,500.47

17,169.30

30,955.48

13,786.18

84,082,10

94,818.45

10,736.35

3,955.16

5,767.99

1,812.83

39,000.00

Transport,...

4,743.65

3,254.40

1,489.25

85.00

25.00

Miscellaneous Services,

232,243.49

239,319.78

7,076,29

65,549.00

215,517.68

405.50 9,477.20

Military Expenditure,

366,156.71

523,128.45 156,971.74

***

Public Works, Recurrent,

170,284.98

185,469.13 15,184.15

808.50

420.00

Public Works, Extraordinary,

837,842.05

69,510.98

768,331.07

2,349.00

417.00

141.70

39.55

1,986.00

35.00

1,067.69

99.48

1,511.58

35.98

30.00

2,471,50

15.00 52.75

5,526.92

5,062.00

5,526.92 335.25

...

10,543.00

1,921.00

2,682.50

662.50

14,144.77

1,919.73

1,373.50

425.00

503.50 425.00

1,354.05 11,882.69 1,366.50

1,354.05

11,231.83

6,563.65

.157.25 6,563.65

924.46

924.46

21,063.50

548.75

35.00 18,601.69

35,00 18,601.69

750.00

750.00

2,549.25

3,003.63

265.00

227.00

6.00 55.50

2,760.00

9,948.00

444.00

2,153.64

694.82

...

120.00 9,948.00

195.00

2,153.64 694.82

11,791.20

2,074.80

1,056.09

1,056.09

1,385.00

190.00

10,484.07

1,243.86

475.00

475.00

7,575.00

4,025.00

1,436.96

874.32

245,280.33

830.62

434.00

1,791.30

2,220.00

540.00

190.00

217,282.39

13,521.07

11,532.14

3,113.13

69,458.51

5,884.16

4,259.57

107.52

15,850,00

7,750,00

42,750.00

2,310.00

10,452.86

5,569.06

1,431.39 144.40 28.240.00

5,936.78

600.96

3.550.00

Suooung Licences,

Spirit Licences,

Stamps,

Steam-launch Licences,..

140.00

65,143.50

65,549.00

206,040.48

1,228.50

215,517.68 808.50

405.50 9,477.20

420.00

DUIDUCIALJUD MULYARODY

Military Expenditure, Public Works, Recurrent, Public Works, Extraordinary,

FEES OF Court or OfficE, PAYMENTS FOR SPECIFIC

PURPOSES, AND REIMBURSEMENTS IN AID :-

Bills of Health,.

1,932.00

2,349.00

417.00

Births and Deaths. Registration of...

102.15

141.70

39.55

Cargo Boat Certificates,..

1,951.00

1,986.00

35.00

Cemetery Burials,.

968,21

1,067.69

99.48

Cemetery Fees from Public Cemeteries for Chinese,

1,475.60

1,511.58

35.98

Chinese Gazette, Sale of...

45.00

30.00

15.00

Companies, Registration of

2,524,25

2,471.50

52.75

Convict Labour and other items,

5,526.92

5,526.92

Deeds, Registration of

4,726,75

5,062.00

335.25

Discharge of Crews and Seamen,

8,622.00

10,543.00

1,921.00

Examination of Masters, &C.,.

2,020.00

2,682.50

662.50

Fees of Court,

16,064.50

14,144.77

1,919.73

Fees on Grant of Leases,.

870.00

1,373.50

503.50

Fee for testing Petroleum,

425.00

425.00

Gaol Expenses,-Recovery from Diplomatic, Naval, and

Military Departments, Seamen and Debtors,

1,354.05

1,354.05

Gunpowder, Storage of

23,114.52

11,882.69

11,231.83

Householders, Registration of

1,209.25

1,366.50

Imperial Post Office, Contribution from

6,583.65*

Lock Hospital, Grant-in-Aid from Admiralty,

924.46

157.25 6,563.65 924.46

Medical Examination of Emigrants,

21,612.25,

Medical Registration Fees,

Medical Treatment of Patients in the Civil Hospital,...

21,063.50 35,00 18,601,69

548.75

35,00 18,601.69

Maintenance of Gap Rock Lighthouse.-Contribution

from Chinese Imperial Government towards the... Official Administrator and Trustee,..

750.00

750.00

5,552.88

2,549.25

Official Signatures,

271.00

265.00

Printed Forms, Sale of

282.50

227.00

3,003.63 6.00 55.50

Private Moorings and Buoys, Rent for.

2,640.00

2,760,00

120.00

Queen's College, Fees from Scholars,

9,948.00

Registry Fees,

249.00

444.00

9,948.00 195.00

...

Refund of Police Pay,

2,153.64

2,153.64

Refund Cost of Police and other Stores,.......

694.82

694.82

Shipping Crews and Seamen,

9,716.40

11,791.20

2,074.80

Sick Stoppages from Police Force,.

1,056.09

1,056.09

Steam-launches, Surveyor's Certificate.

1,575.00

1,385.00

190.00

Survey of Steam-ships,

School for Girls, Fees from Scholars,

Sunday Cargo-Working Permits,.

Trade Marks, Registration of

POST OFFICE:-Postage,

RENT OF GOVERNMENT PROPERTY, LAND AND HOUSES

9,240.21

10,484.07

1,243.86

475.00

475.00

11,600.00

7,575.00

4,025.00

562.61

1,436.96

874.32

244,449.71

245,280.33

830.62

Buildings,

2,225.30

434.00

1,791.30

Cattle Shed,

2,220.00

2,220.00

Laundries,

350.00

540.00

190.00

Leased Lands,

230,803.46

217,282.39

13,521.07

Lands not Leased,

8,419.01

11,532.11

3,113.13

Markets,

63,574.35

69,458.51

5,884.16

Piers,

4,367.09

4,259.57

107.52

Stone Quarries,

8,100.00 15,850.00

7,750,00

Slaughter House,.....

40,440.00 42,750.00

2,310.00

Sheep and Pig Depôts,

4,883.80 10,452.86

5,569.06

INTEREST,

5,936.78

5,936.78

MISCELLANEOUS RECEIPTS:-

Condemned Stores, &c.,

2,032.35

1,431.39

600.96

Interest for use of Furniture at Government House,..

144.40

144.40

Night Soil Contracts,

24,690.00

28,240.00

3,550.00

Other Miscellaneous Receipts,

82,979.88

18,394.09

64,585.79

Profit on Subsidiary Coins...

152,600.88

110,196.20

42,404.68

TOTAL exclusive of Land Sales & Water Account,. 2,275,577.69 2,250,179.57

139,847.42

165,245.54

LAND SALES,

130,471.79

270,858.99

WATER ACCOUNT,

80,179.41

88,840.38

140,387.20 8,660.97

TOTAL,........

*2,486,228.89 | 2,609,878.94

288,895,59

165,245.54

TC

Deduct Decrease,

Nett Increase,

Treasury, Hongkong, 20th March, 1897.

165,245.54

.$

123,650.05

* Not including Appropriations in Aid $49,047.55 which have been deducted from the

.00

.50

2018

48

80.00

65,549.00 215,517.68

808.50

20.00

Miscelaneous SerVICOS,

405.50 9,477.20

Military Expenditure,

366,156.71

523,128.45

156,971.74

Public Works, Recurrent,

170,284.98

420.00

Public Works, Extraordinary,

837,842,05

185,469.13 15,184.15

69,510.98

768,331.07

.50

.00

..00

.00

.50

0.00

2487884 18888

2,349.00 141.70

417.00

39.55

1,986.00

35.00

1,067.69

99.48

1,511.58

35.98

30.00

15.00

2,471.50

52.75

5,526.92

5,526.92

5,062.00

335.25

10,543.00

1,921.00

2,682.50

662.50

14,144.77

1,919.73

1,373.50

503.50

425.00

425.00

1,354.05

1,354.05

1.52

11,882.69

11,231.83

1.25

1,366.50

157.25

0,563,65

6.563.65

924.46

924.46

2.25

21,063.50

548.75

35.00

35.00

...

18,601.69

18,601.69

750.00

750.00

2.88

2,549.25

3,003.63

1.00

265.00

3.50

227.00

6.00 55.50

0.00

2,760.00

120.00

9,948.00

9,948.00

1.00

444.00

195.00

2,153.64

2,153.61

694.82

694.82

3.40

11,791.20

2,074.80

1,056.09

1,056.09

5.00

1,385.00

190.00

),21

10,484.07

1,243.86

475.00

475.00

0.00

7,575.00

4,025.00

3.64

1,436.96

874.32

9.71

245,280.33

830.62

...

5.30

434.00

0.00

1,791.30 2,220.00

0.00

540.00

190.00

1.16

217,282.39

13,521.07

1.01

11,532.14

3,113.13

1.35

69,458.51

5,884.16

7.09

4,259.57

107.52

0.00

15,850.00

7,750,00

0.00

42,750.00

2,310.00

3.80

10,452.86

5,569.06

3.78

5,936.78

2.35

1,431.39

600.96

1.40

144.40

0.00

28,240.00

3,550.00

1.88

18,394.09

64,585.79

1.88

110,196.20

42,404.68

7.69 2,250,179.57 139,847.42 165,245.54

1.79 270,858.99 140,387.20

0.41

88,840.38

8,660.97

8.89 2,609,878.94

288,895.59

165,245.54

TOTAL.........

.$ 2,972,373.01|2,474,910.37 297,785.51 795,248.15

165,245.54

123,650.05

Deduct Increase,

Nett Decrease,

Not including Appropriations in Aid $19,017.55 which have been deducted from the Expenditure.

297,785.51

497,462.64

A. M. THOMSON,

Acting Colonial Treasurer.

Statement of Deposits not Available received and repaid in the Colony of Hongkong during the year 1896.

By whom deposited.

Outstanding

169

Outstanding

Ou

1st January 1896.

Deposits received during the

Total.

Deposits repaid during the

On

31st Dec.,

year.

year.

1896.

Sikh Police Fund,

1,878,00

746.00

2,624.00

917.00

1,707.00

Police Fine Fund,

401.30

689.84

1.091.14

749.33

341.81

Chinese Recreation Ground Fund,

840.11

1,655.38

2,495.19

1,626.36

869.13

Estate of Deceased Policemen,

169.97

.85

170.82

170.82

Tender Deposits,

Intestate Estates,

Gaol Library, Miscellaneous, Suitor's Fund,

Board of Trade,

1,170.00

5,360.00

6,530.00

4,670.00

1,860.00

214.74

147.75

362.49

362.49

103.90

103.90

103.90

6,715.59

6,745.59

6,745.59

104,749.45

104,749.45

60,823.54

43,925.91

1,896.89 * 55.50

1,952.39

1,952.39

$ 11,523.61

115,301.66

126,825.27

77,484.21

49,341.06

* Loss in Exchange $55.50

Treasury, Hongkong, 18th March, 1897.

A. M. THOMSON,

Acting Treasurer.

Statement of Advances made and repaid in Hongkong during the year ended 31st December, 1896.

To whom advanced.

Outstanding

on

1st January,

1896.

Advances made during the ended

year 31st Dec.,

Total.

Advances repaid during the year ended 31st Dec., 1896.

Outstanding Balance on 31st Dec.,

1896.

1896.

Money Order,

20,194.96

227,272.95

247,467.91

221,037.79

26,369.24

(1) 60.88

Government of Singapore,

124.00

124.00

99.40

24.60,

Supreme Court,

Captain Superintendent of Police,

100.00 25.00

100.00

100.00

Praya Reclamation,

6,829.94

Superintendent Fire Brigade,

Director of Public Works,

Treasury,

Botanical and Afforestation Department,

80.00 4,109.22 200.00 1,500.00 500.00 1,000.00

105.00

80.00

25.00

10,939.16

6,829.94

1,109.22

200.00 1,500.00

200.00

1,500.00

500.00 1.000.00

P. C. Fyfe,

217.46

217.46

Crown Solicitor,

Sanitary Department,

Government of Sandakan,

Postmaster General,

700.00 17,715.72 6.20 4,535.00

700.00 17,715.72

6.20

500.00 1,000.00

184.55

(2) 32.91

700.00 17,715.72 6.20

4,535.00

4,535.00

Mrs. Ackers,...

130.00

130.00

130.00

G. A. Yvanovich,

740.79

740.79

462.23

278.56

A. Watson,

168.34

168.34

164.60

3.74

A. Chapman,.

Surrender Value of Insurance Policies of Nicholas,

Mitchell and Coleman,.

T. Warren,

P. C. Langley,

E. A. de Carvalho, P. O'Sullivan,

Coins,

741.11

741.11

733.32

(4) 7.79

202.38

277.43

277.43

(6) 75.05

111.84

182.33

132.33

(7) 20.49

334.36

334.36

15.00

319.36

377.40

877.40

40.00

337.40

136.17

136.17

136.17

512,974.23

512.974.23

508,368.80

|(5) 4,605.43

29,147.60

771,975.01

801,122.61

769.559.23

31,563.38

(1) 60.88

32.91

3.74

(6) $75,05 Profit in Exchange.

(7) $20.49 Balance at Credit.

7.79

4,605.43

$4,710,75 Loss in Exchange.

Treasury, Hongkong, 18th March, 1897.

A. M. THOMSON,

Acting Treasurer..

170

Dr.

FINANCIAL STATEMENT FOR 1896.

LOAN ACCOUNT.

To Inscribed Stock Loan at 33% interest,

to be paid off on the 15th April, 1943,... | £341,799.15.1

Cr.

By Sinking Fund.

£1,594.9.9

ASSETS AND LIABILITIES, ON THE 31ST DECEMBER, 1896.

ASSETS.

..

LIABILITIES.

$

C.

Subsidiary Coins,

38,000.00 Drafts drawn by Crown Agents, in

transit,

200,000.00

Balance in Bank at Current Account,

700,717.26 Military Contribution,

7,247.73

Deposits not available,.

49,341.06

Balance in hands of Crown Agents,

34,641.93

Deposit in England at call,..............

Praya Reclamation Deposit Account,

207,567.57 Refund of Taxes,

225,000.00

3,200.00

Arrears of Taxes,

628.88

Arrears of Crown Rent,

Officers' Remittances, not yet paid, .......................

Money Orders, not yet paid,.....

53,452.03 Transit Charges,.................................

395.00

4,732.80

5,500.00

Advances to be recovered,......

31,563.38

Pensions due to Civil Officers,

Do. to Police,

12,670.00

9,520.00

TOTAL LIABILITIES,......$

Balance,.....

517,606.59

*

548,964.46

TOTAL ASSETS,.....$ 1,066,571.05

* Balance of Assets and Liabilities,

Less Balance of 1893 Loan,.

Treasury, Hongkong, 17th March, 1897.

1898.

$1,066,571.05

.$518,964.46 535,546.14

$ 13,418.32

A. M. THOMSON, Acting Colonial Treasurer.

PUBLIC WORKS EXTRAORDINARY CHARGEABLE AGAINST THE NEW LOAN.

Central Market,

Praya Reclamation (Ordinance 16 of 1889),.....

Praya Reclamation. Reconstruction of Government Piers and Landing Steps,

Slaughter-House, Sheep and Pig Depôts,

Gaol Extension,

New Water Mains,

Sewerage of Victoria,

Water Supply, Kowloon Peninsula,

Tytam Waterworks Extension,

Water and Drainage Works, Miscellançous,....

Storm Water Drain, Wing Fung Street,

$ 1,200.00 65,000.00

50,000.00

5,227.34

10,585.44

22,684.65

11.711.25

4,108.86

19,153.21

37,942.08

3,056.49

$230,619.32

A. M. THOMSON,

Acting Colonial Treasurer.

Treasury, Hongkong, 20th March, 1897.

PRAYA RECLAMATION FUND.

STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURE TO 31ST DECEMBER, 1896.

Expenditure in Expenditure in Expenditure in Expenditure in Expenditure in Expenditure in Expenditure in

1890.

1891.

1892.

1893.

1894.

1895.

1896.

Total

Expenditure.

Estimated

Cost.

Balance to be

Spent.

Private Marine Lot Holders.

$

$

Section No. 1,

7,128.44

42,019.54

48,791.64

24,984.84

46,758.18

63,318.02

14,086.90

242,087.56

423,260.67

181,173.11

Section No. 2,

1

55,887.63

34,580.26

49,612.81

35,455.12

36,245.99

6,202.29

5,754.83

223,738.93

251,176.20

27,437.27

Section No. 3,

6,051.44

65,661.55

112,573.89

33,075.47

31,593.99

36,697.68

48,599.71

334,253.73

459,378.56

125,124.83

Section No. 4,

3,113.67

6,552.99

7,019.62

1,822.21

7,063.88

55,691.67

39,144.85

120,408.89

227,392.11

106,983.22

Section No. 5,

5,004.19

9,187.60

14,215.46

3,428.36

14,169.36

8,670.52

63,670.23

118,345.72

310,486.00

192,140.28

Section. No. 6,

7,876.47

14,630.92

27,669.30

5,666.04.

53,029.15

57,374.26

29,767.10

196,013.24

523,788.60

327,775.36

Section No. 7,

21,788.35

31,817.59

77,925.38

9,600.81

51,701.26

44,549.27

27,309.82

264,692.48

316,268.44

51,575.96

Total,..

....$

106,850.19

204,450.45

332,808.10

114,032.85

240,561.81

272,503.71

228,333.44 1,499,540.55 2,511,750.58 1,012,210.03

Government.

Section No. 4,

443.53

814.38

1,260.26

303.87

233.81

9,727.49

5,464.26

Section No. 5,

1,418.47

2,520.24

4,213.30

1,003.11

774.39

1,697.95

16,858.62

18,247.60

28,486.08

38,734.40

20,486.80

84,906.90

56,420.82

:

Section No. 6, . Section No. 7,

755.45

1,400.02

2,119.82

544.73

637.44

1,036.00

1,541.61

3,035.07

46,818.00

38,782.93

32,304.19

48,472.28

111,086.04

12,473.23

10,156.55

5,709.57

12,954.74

233,156.60

259,218.77

26,062.17

Total,.........$ 34,921.64

53,206.92

118,679.42

14,324.94

11,802.19

18,171.01

36,819.23

287,925.85

429,678.07

141,752.72

Grand Total,......$

141,771.83

257,657.37

451,487.52

128,357.79

252,364.00

290,674.72

265,152.67 1,787,465.90

2,941,428.65

1,153,962.75

Hongkong, 13th April, 1897.

A. M. THOMSON, Acting Colonial Treasurer.

171

HONGKONG.

REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF FIRE BRIGADE FOR 1896.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor.

325

No. 97

22

:

No. 44.

FIRE BRIGADE DEPARTMENT,

HONGKONG, 5th February, 1897.

SIR,-I have the honour to submit the following report on the Government Fire Brigade for the year 1896.

2. Commander HASTINGS was in charge of the Brigade up to the 2nd April, Mr. LETHBRIDGE had charge from that date until the 7th of October, when I returned off leave of absence.

3. There occurred 30 fires-two of which were in the harbour-and 54 incipient fires during the year.

Details regarding each will be found in the annexed schedules. The estimated damage caused by the fires.was $105,595 and by the incipient fires $1,586.

I also attach a list shewing the number of fires that have occurred during each of the last ten years with the estimated value of property destroyed in each case.

4. There has been a marked diminution in the number of fires occurring on land since the third week in April last. Up to the 22nd April there were 14 fires and since that date there have been an equal number.

This is no doubt due to the action taken by the Fire Insurance Companies in instituting a Tariff which came into force in April, and increasing the rates of premium; while the conviction for arson at the May Sessions of two Chinese partners in the Shop No. 48 Praya West, and the heavy sentence of twelve years hard labour passed upon each, have evidently had a salutary effect in deterring others from incendiarism.

5. During three months of the year, from January to March, the water in the mains was turned off from 10 a.m: to 6 a.m. daily, except on an alarm of fire when it was turned on and used only till salt water was obtained.

6. A list of places where Fire Despatch Boxes are kept, and of private telephones to which the Police have courteously been granted access in the event of a fire, together with Mr. KINGHORN's report on the state of the engines, are attached.

7. With regard to the working of the Brigade of which I have now had four months' experience' I consider that while the personnel especially the European portion of it is good-the organisation is capable of improvement.

The very small number of men available for duty at the first outbreak of a fire, and the want of the means of conveying rapidly to the scene of a fire, the necessary appliances for extinguishing it, are the principal defects that I wish to remedy. Street coolies are relied on to drag the engines and appliances at the Central Fire Station to a fire, and it depends almost entirely on the alacrity of these in offering themselves for hire, whether the appliances will reach the fire in good time or otherwise.

While should the fire occur at a distance from the Central Fire Station-at East or West Point for instance-it is, of course, obvious that an enormous amount of valuable time must be lost owing to the slowness with which the appliances must under such a system travel.

8. The remedy for these defects is to increase the permanent staff of the Brigade, and to enlarge the Central Fire Station to make room for such increased staff, and for more firemen who are also members of the Police Force.

I have already reported on how these improvements could be effected, and my proposals have received the approval of His Excellency the Governor.

9. Unfortunately, the enlargement of the Central Fire Station to enable the concentration I have recommended, and the provision of motive power for the heavy gear, involves the expenditure of a large sum of money; but I trust that it may nevertheless be found possible to carry out these improvements at no very distant date.

10. I have to acknowledge the very valuable assistance rendered in the extinction of fires during the year by the Private Fire Brigades belonging to the Nam Pak Hong and Silk Mercers.

The former is especially smart in turning out, and being nearer to the area within which the majority of fires occur than the Government Brigade, it is frequently the first to arrive at a fire.

326

I consider that the usefulness of this Brigade would be much increased if it were placed under European supervision, and I have offered to lend the Nam Pak Hong the services of two thoroughly competent European foremen, who speak Chinese, whose duty it would be to take charge of their Brigade at a fire and direct its operations.

I have as yet made little progress in my negotiations for this desirable innovation, but I am not without hopes that in the course of time I shall attain my object.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

The Honourable

J. H. STEWART LOCKHART, Colonial Secretary.

F. H. MAY,

Superintendent of Fire Brigade.

List of Places where Fire Brigade Despatch Boxes are kept.

No. 1 Box. No. 1 Police Station.

""

Engine House at No. 2 Police Station. Engine House in Albany Street. Naval Dock Yard.

Government House.

No. 1 Box. No. 9 Police Station.

"1

Government Civil Hospital. Engine House at West Point. No. 7 Police Station.

Gas House, West Point.

Nam Pak Hong Fire Station.

""

Clock Tower.

"7

>>

Government Offices.

31

""

Ko Shing Theatre.

"

"

No. 1 Queen's Garden, Engineer's

Mess,

Man Mo Temple.

No. 5 Police Station.

"}

Central Police Station.

11

List of Telephones to which the Police can have access to communicate with Central Station

in the event of a Fire breaking out.

Hongkong and China Gas Company, East and West

Point, from 7 A.M. to 9 P.M.

Tung Wá Hospital, Po Yan Street.

Man On Insurance Office, Queen's Road West.

Hongkong Hotel, Praya Central.

Royal Naval Yard, Queen's Road East. Mr. J. KENNEDY's Causeway Bay.

Electric Light Company, Queen's Road East.

HONGKONG, 12th January, 1897.

SIR,-I have the honour to forward herewith a report on the state of the Government Fire Engines for the year ending 31st December, 1896.

STEAMER NO. 1.

(Floating Fire Engine by Merryweather & Son.)

This engine has been 29 years in service (the boiler two years); it has been seldom used during the year except at drill; the engine and pumps are very much worn, and when the new Floating Engine is completed this engine may with advantage be dispensed with altogether, as it is very slow in its movements, and also very heavy on coal.

STEAMER No. 2.

(Land Engine by Shand & Mason.)

This engine has been 18 years in service; it has done some good service at fires; the boiler is very much worn and the pressure has been reduced; a new boiler has been ordered from home and will be fitted in place immediately on arrival.

STEAMER No. 3.

(Land Engine by Shand & Mason.)

This engine has been 18 years in service and is now in good order; it has been kept as reserve engine and regularly tested for efficiency at drill.

327

STEAMER No. 4.

(Land Engine by Shand & Mason.)

This engine has been 15 years in service. At the beginning of the year it did some good services at fires; it has not been disabled and is now in good working order.

STEAMER No. 5.

(Land Engine by Shand & Mason.)

This engine has been 11 years in service; it has done some good service at fires during the year and has been regularly tested at the monthly drills for drivers; it is now in good working order.

Seven Manual Engines and fittings are all in good order.

The Hose, Recls, Ladders and Supply Carts are all in good order and condition.

The Assistant Engineer and Engine Drivers have conducted themselves to my satisfaction and have always been attentive to their duties.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

JOHN W. KINGHORN, Engineer, Govt. Fire Brigade.

The Honourable F. H. MAY, C.M.G.,

Supt. Govt. Fire Brigade.

No.

DATE.

FIRES, 1886.

SITUATION OF FIRE.

1

February

2 No. 186, Hollywood Road,

17

No. 3, Wing Fung Street,

6

No. 84 Queen's Road East,

2 March

May

11 Matsheds at Belchers Battery near Pokfulam Road,

September 17

No. 41, Saltfish Lane,

October 22

No. 3, Tak Hing Lane,

November 24

Horse Repository, Garden Road,

9

10

""

26

December 15

No. 106, Queen's Road West,

No. 91, Queen's Road West,

17

No. 223, Queen's Road West,

""

11

19

No. 67, Bonham Strand West,

No.

DATE.

FIRES, 1887.

SITUATION OF FIRE.

1

January

12

2

""

""

19

No. 16, Sai Woo Lane,

13 No. 142, Second Street,

15 No. 48, Queen's Road West,

22 Man Mo Temple, Hollywood Road,

25 No. 63, Wellington Street,... 26 No. 59, Queen's Road West,

February 10 No. 3, Bonham Strand,

"

17 No. 129, Queen's Road West,

9 No. 15, Tsz Mi Lane,......

10 No. 76, Jervois Street,

9

March

10

53

11

23 No. 17, Wing Kat Street,

12

24

No. 34, Bonham Strand,

13

April

14

5 Blackhead & Co.'s Godowns at Tsimshatsui, 30 No. 273, Queen's Road Central,

"

15

May

4 No. 35, Battery Road,

......

16 June

14 A Carpenter's Shed at Kennedy Town,

17

July

3 No. 28, Tank Lane,

NO. OF BUILDINGS

DESTROYED.

Wholly. Partly.

The whole of the Po Lok Theatre Buildings des- troyed.

ESTIMATED AMOUNT

OF PROPERTY

DESTROYED.

7

1

1

$

200

1,200

3,500

12,000

270

10

I

40,000

431

2

19,000

16,000

2

18,000

NO. OF BUILDINGS

DESTROYED.

Wholly. Partly.

ESTIMATED AMOUNT

OF PROPERTY

DESTROYED.

122

3

4

2 H

$ 1,400

14,000 23,000

25

1

3,000

1

12,000

1

1

2,900

6

19,000

2,500

1

1,800

2

8,000

1

60

200

300

328

No.

DATE.

FIRES, 1887,—Continued.

SITUATION OF FIRE.

NO. OF BUILDINGS

DESTROYED.

Wholly. Partly.

ESTIMATED

AMOUNT OF PROPERTY

DESTROYED.

18

July

25

No. 185, Queen's Road West,

15

4

26,000

19

August

23

No. 311, Queen's Road Central,

2

2,000

20

September 15 No. 39, Wing Lok Street,

1

1,200

21

́ 21 | No. 76, Queen's Road West,

1

4,000

22

October

5 No. 9, In Kee Lane,

1

1,500

23

7

No. 5, Gage Street,

1

1

3,000

24

November

5

No. 9, Sheung Fung Lane,

1

25

16

No. 253, Queen's Road Central,

24

"

26

24

No. 13, Triangle Street,

1

: :

100

10

90,000

150

"

27

28

29

30

27 No. 1, Nullah Lane,

28 No. 107, Wellington Street,

29 No. 163, Queen's Road East,.. 29 No. 165, Queen's Road East,

1

1

...

2

1

...

31

30

No. 40, Wing On Street,

3

190 1,000 150

150

16,000

32

December

1

No. 31, Pound Lane,

'33

11

No. 15, Morrison Street,

"

34

20

No. 5, Kau Ù Fong,

22

35

28

No. 56, Bonham Strand,

200

1,800

...

4

1,500

16

30,000

95

FIRES, 1888.

NO. OF BUILDINGS

DESTROYED.

ESTIMATED AMOUNT

No.

DATE.

SITUATION OF FIRE.

OF PROPERTY

DESTROYED.

Wholly. Partly.

1

January

1

No. 147, Queen's Road West,

1-

2

$39

2

17

No. 77, Praya West,

1

1

"

28

No. 93, Bonham Strand,

1

500

700 5,500

"

February

10

No. 151, Hollywood Road,

1

500

12 No. 7, Ship Street,

1

1

200

35

29

No. 229, Queen's Road West,

8

1

22,000

"

March

12

No. 139. Queen's Road Central,

4

1

35,000

14

No. 21, Centre Street,

1

1

9,000

""

9

22

No. 3, Gilman Street,.

:

*

10

April

3 No. 201, Queen's Road West,

5

2

11,500

11

13

No. 29, Graham Street,

400

""

12

24

No. 186, Wing Lok Street,

1

1

4,000

13

وو

وو

27

No. 89, Queen's Road West,

1

200.

14

May

11

No. 81, Jervois Street,

1

2

16,000

15

12

No. 9, Chinese Street,.

1

400

>>

16

18

No. 55, Queen's Road West,

1

4

17

31

No. 15, Ship Street,

""

18

June

11

No. 58, Wing Lok Street,

1

300

19

No. 339, Queen's Road Central,

1

500

"

20

29

39

21

July

No. 114, Jervois Street,..

6 No. 42, Queen's Road West,

1

1,000

22

23

No. 138, Second Street,

214

2

25,000

11

6,000

"

23

24

Nos. 6 & 8, Peel Street,

:

2

2,000

39.

24

26

25

26

August

15

27

No. 17, Jervois Street,

27 No. 19, Tank Lane,

No. 2, Cochrane Street,

17 Jubilee Strect,..............

1

1

10,000

1

200

1

20

3

28

19 No. 86, Hollywood Road,

1

??

29

28

No. 18, Lyndhurst Terrace,

12

30

31

30

""

32

33

October

34

September 26

30 No. 112, Queen's Road Central, 4 No. 21, Chung Sau Lane West,

4 171, Queen's Road West,

No. 388, Queen's Road Central, No. 110, Queen's Road Central,

1

1

2412

14,000 2,000

80,000

1

5,500

2

7,500

3

27,500

1

500

3

1

10,000

"}

35

22

"

36

30

No. 114, Queen's Road Central, No. 217, Queen's Road West,

1

1

::

8,000

3,000

19

37

November

3

No. 46, Praya Central,

2

8,000

38

8

No. 18, Albany Street,

100

:

39

11

No. 53, East Street,

1

29

40

15

No. 99, Queen's Road East,

39

41

17

No. 103, Bonham Strand Central,.

2

1,000

800

10,000

42

43

""

44

18

"2

45

17 No. 39, Praya, Yaumati,

17 Aberdeen Village,

December 21 No. 115, Praya West,

2

1,800

No. 83, Jervois Street,

2

150 25,000

1

4,000

:

No.

DATE.

329

FIRES, 1889.

SITUATION OF FIRE.

NO. OF BUILDINGS DESTROYED.

Wholly. Partly.

ESTIMATED AMOUNT OF PROPERTY

DESTROYED.

1

January

3 No. 1, Rozario Street,........

2

1

2

7 | No. 197, Queen's Road West,

}

1

$ 1,000 2,000

3

February

6

No. 92, Wing Lok Street,

1

1

20,000

4

April

12

No. 292, Queen's Road West,

20

:

May

5

No. 145, Bonham Strand,

1

300

9

""

No. 10, Wilmer Street,

1

10,000

June July

29

No. 242, Queen's Road West,

2

3,000

9

August

10

11

12

"

13

29

14

29

15

29

"J

16

October

10

17

30

4 No. 227, Queen's Road West, 24 No. 95, Hollywood Road,

No. 174, Third Street,

26

September 16

21

No. 203, Queen's Road Central, No. 1, Wing Wo Street,....... No. 112, Queen's Road Central, 25 | No. 220, Queen's Road Central,

No. 42, Battery Street, Yaumati, No. 154, Queen's Road Central,

1

...

1,300

1

400

1

1,500

1

2,000

1

1,200

2

4,000

No. 9, Hellier Street,

I

1,500

I

1

8,000

18

November

4

No. 7, Nullah Lane,

I

1,000

19

5

No. 55, Queen's Road West,

1

16,000

20

December

23

No. 334, Queen's Road Central,

1

5,000

21

30

No. 17, Bonham Strand,

4

20,000

>>

No.

DATE.

FIRES, 1890.

SITUATION OF FIRE.

1 January

5

No. 7, Station Street,.......

""

No. 33, Tung Man Lane,

">

18

No. 229, Praya West,

""

26

No. 8, Lyndhurst Terrace,.

28

No. 23, Bonham Strand,

""

February

10

No. 18, Gage Street,

14

"

No. 8, St. Francis Street,

8

May

9

""

10

""

11

July

12

13

2 No. 68, Bonham Strand,

19 The Hongkong Dispensary,

23 No. 12, Kwong Un Street, East,

7 No. 32, Square Street,

September 9 Blackhead & Co., Praya Central,

14 November 11

15

>>

16

December

No. 47, Bonham Strand,

15 No. 69, Upper Station Street,

15 No. 112, Queen's Road Central,

22

No. 38, Gilman Bazaar,

No.

DATE.

FIRES, 1891.

NO. OF BUILDINGS

DESTROYED.

Wholly. Partly.

Co

ESTIMATED AMOUNT

OF PROPERTY

DESTROYED.

$ 1,000 500

SITUATION of Fire.

1

January 8 | Nos. 170 and 172, Third Street,

February

8 | No. 353, Queen's Road West,

April

5 No. 41, Hillier Street,

"

7 The Hongkong and China Bakery, Morrison Hill Road

East Point,

5

10 01-00

8

May

5 No. 331, Queen's Road Central,

""

6 No. 280, Queen's Road Central, 11 No. 72, Station Street, Yaumati, December 19 No. 57A, Wanchai Road,

July

3

1

1

1

8,000

1

10,000

1

400

...

1

300

1

550

4

2

41,000

100,000

3,000

1

500

1

30,000

1

100

1

2,000

1

...

250

:

2

6,000

NO. OF BUILDINGS

DESTROYED.

Wholly. Partly.

ESTIMATED AMOUNT

OF PROPERTY

DESTROYED.

$ 3,000

2

700

1

1,500

1

1,000

221

2

11,500

12,000

1,800

1

600

330

No.

DATE.

FIRES, 1892.

SITUATION Of Fire.

1

January

10

No. 9, Queen's Road Central,

2

13 Bonham Strand, .........

16

No. 528, Queen's Road West,

19

4

21

No. 81, High Street,

April

1

No. 26, Sai Wo Lane,

10

No. 17, Queen's Road West,

11 No. 104, Queen's Road West,

May

22

No. 17, Tank Lane,

June

21

No. 29, Centre Street,

10

July

3

No. 91, Wing Lok Street,

11

August

12

1

13

14

15

18 No. 49, Queen's Road West,

21 No. 48, Queen's Road West,

September 15 No. 80, Queen's Road West,

| . 8 No. 333, Queen's Road Central,

December

20 No. 14, Jubilee Street,

16

22

No. 16, East Street,

No.

DATE.

FIRES, 1893.

NO. OF BUILDINGS

DESTROYED.

Wholly. Partly.

ESTIMATED AMOUNT OF PROPERTY.

DESTROYED.

1

::

$40,000

3

8,000

1

6,000

1

100

⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀

1

1,000

1

400

1

1,500

1

250

1

100

1

5,000

1

300

1

3,000

41

4,000

2

5,000

1

...

300

1

1

600

SITUATION OF FIRE.

No. of BUILDINGS

DESTROYED.

Wholly. Partly.

ESTIMATED AMOUNT

OF PROPERTI

DESTROYED,

101004 12 CO 3 – 00 σ

January

2

3

February

7 No. 73, Hollywood Road, 11 No. 79, Nullah Lane, 18 No. 2, Square Street, 11 No. 68, Jervois Street, ..

1

$

800

1

300

10

2

10,000

5

13 No. 101, Wing Lok Street,

1

6,000

6

March

22 No. 22, Holland Street,

1

40,000

26

No. 301, Queen's Road West,

1

2

8,000

April

13

25

>>

27

>>

11

13

12

8

9

10

May June

16 No. 406, Queen's Road West,

No. 87, Jervois Street,

2,000

No. 15, West Street,

1

...

800

No. 1, In On Lane,............

ลง

2

19,000

No. 344, Queen's Road Central,

2,000

1

2,000

13

14

July

15

16 No. 28, Tsz Mi Lane,......

3 No. 191, Hollywood Road,.................. 14 No. 19, Gough Street,

1

700

1

1

1,500

150

16

17

33

18

19

20

19

21

22

"

23

August

""

September

19 No. 280, Queen's Road West, 20 No. 12, Tung Loi Lane,..... 16 No. 337, Queen's Road West, 17 No. 32, Queen's Road West, 25 | No. 155, Second Street,

5 No. 7, Ezra Lane,

18 No. 248, Hollywood Road, 30 No. 127, Bofiham Strand,

1

1

1,000

4

20,000

1

300

1

2,800

1

20,000

1

400

1

4,000

1

5,000

24

25

October November

12

No. 14, Li Shing Street,.

1

5,500

11

No. 115, Praya West,

26

22

11

No. 58, Square Street,

2 20

3

1

20,000

1

3,000

27

"

16

No. 5, Pau Kwai Lane,

1

1,000

28

"

21

No. 9, Tannery Lane,....

1

40

29

""

80

""

23 No. 314A, Queen's Road Central, 26 | No. 22, Tsz Mi Lane,...................

1

8,000

1

1

5,500

31

32

33

34

35

36

ARR *

December

">

4 No. 31, Wing Fung Street,

5 No. 131, Bonham Strand,

9 No. 11, Bonham Strand,

10 No. 240, Queen's Road West, 13 No. 99, Praya West,

25 No. 100, Queen's Road West,

1

10

2

2,000

2

5,000

9,000

:

1

400

2,000

-

No.

DATE.

TIME.

FIRES, 1894.

SITUATION OF FIRE.

331

NO. OF BUILDINGS

DESTROYED.

Wholly. Partly.

ESTIMATED DAMAGE.

1

INCH TO CO

January

9

12.30 p.m.

No. 56 First Street,

1

800

2

14

""

8.45 p.m.

No. 13 U Lok Lane,

1

400

3

26

1.25 a.m.

""

February

1

7.55 atm.

6

1.40 p.m.

14

4.50 p.m.

25

""

7 p.m.

8

March

3

7.30 a.m.

9

28

9.35 a.m.

""

10

April

4

9.20 p.m.

No. 273 Queen's Road West, No. 26 Market Street,

No.57 Queen's Road West,.. No. 28 Upper Station Street, No. 86 Queen's Road West, No. 17 Salt Fish Street, No. 17 Upper Lascar Row, No. 136 Bonham Strand,

1

:

1,200

22

2

2,500

1

2

4,000

300

1

50

2

1,500

1

5,000

6

150,000

11

17

10.30 a.m.

No. 211 Hollywood Road,

2,000

"

12

28

9 a.m.

No. 63 Wanchai Road,

1,500

""

13

30

2 a.m.

""

14

May

1

7 p.m.

No. 122 Queen's Road Central, No. 116 Queen's Road Central,

3

2

55,000

1

1

18,000

15

15

3 a.m.

No. 137 Queen's Road West,

2

4,500

16

June

3

3 a.m.

17

3

3.10 a.m.

"}

18 July

1

10.25 p.m.

19

August

14

10.30 a m.

No. 15 Jervois Street, No. 228 Queen's Road Central,

No. 123 Queen's Road Central, No. 59 Square Street,

1

2,500

2

20,000

1

3,000

1

500

20

21

3.45 a.m.

No. 68 Jervois Street,

1

1

18,000

»

21

October

2

2 a.m.

22

3

>>

11.30 p.m.

23

11

""

24

24

6.20 p.. 12.10 a.m.

"

25

31

"J

26

November 30

27

December 1

10 p.m.

28

1

11.20 p.m.

29

13

""

5.30 p.m.

10 p.m.

7.40 p.m.

No. 9 Sai On Lane,

No. 21 West Street, No. 2 Ship Street,...

No. 127 Queen's Road West, No. 115 Queen's Road Central, No. 32 Bonham Strand,

No. 207 Queen's Road Central, No. 183 Hollywood Road, No. 22 Queen's Road West,

FIRES, 1895.

200

1

800

1

200

...

1

15,000

3

4,600

1

2,000

1

8,000

1

1

2,000

«

100

No.

DATE.

TIME.

No. of BUILDINGS DESTROYED.

SITUATION OF FIRE.

ESTIMATED DAMAGE.

123410

January

6

7.45 p.m.

2

12

""

9.30 p.m.

18

""

5.45 p.m.

18

وو

21

>>

February 6

10

1 a.m.

8

20

1.20 p.m.

House No. 3, Wai Tak Lane,

6.45 p.m.

9 p.m.

9.15 p.m.

House No. 230, Queen's Road Central, House No. 4, Wellington Street,

House No. 189, Queen's Road Central,

House No. 15, Mercer Street,

House No. 337, Queen's Road West, .... House No. 73, Bonham Strand,

House No. 149, Queen's Road Central,..

Wholly. Partly.

...

$

6,000

4,000

2,000

9,000

1,000

1

6,000

1

30

1

200

9

March

2

6.40 p.m.

10

3

7 p.m.

House No. 228, Queen's Road West, House No. 7, Li Shing Street,

2

3

12,000

1

:

3,000

""

11

24

"}

8 p.m.

House No. 96, Bonham Strand,

1

Unknown.

12

26

"

8.30 p.m.

House No. 212, Queen's Road West,

1

3,000

13

30

2.50 a.m.

""

14

April

6

3.25 a.m.

House No. 352, Queen's Road Central, House No. 1, Queen's Street,

1

5,000

1

5,000

15

11

12 Noon

29

16

18

7 p.m.

House No. 144, Queen's Road West, House No. 34, Bonham Strand,

1

3,000

1

1,000

""

17

24

""

18

June

14

10.15 p.m.

3.05 a.m.

House No. 19, Jervois Street,

1

12,000

House No. 76, Jervois Street,

1

Not known.

...

21

2272 AAWAN

19 July

29

4.50 a.m.

House No. 34, Winglok Street,

2

5,000

:

20

29

12.30 a.m.

August September

5

1a.m.

House No. 3, Station Street,

House No. 70, Jervois Street,

1

1

800

2

22,000

6

3.45 a.m.

House No. 4, Praya Central, premises of

Messrs. Wieler & Co..

1

100

23

30

8.30 a.m.

24 October

5

12.50 a.m.

House No. 12, Nullah Terrace, Quarry Bay, House No. 169, Hollywood Road,

1

700

1

3,000

25

6

8.20 p.m.

Matshed at Quarray Bay,

1

500

"}

26

15

"

11.15 p.m.

House No..149, Queen's Road Central,

100

27

30

12.45 a.m.

American ship Wandering Jew, Victoria

21

150,000

Harbour,

Ce po co to co co to t

28

November

21

7.35 p.m.

House No. 111, Praya West,

1

29 December

13

11.15 p.m.

A matshed at Kun Chung,

6,000 200

30

13

4.30 p.m.

"

A squatter's hut on the Hillside at the back

of Shaukiwan Station,

1

31

16

1 a.m.

House No. 110, Praya West,

1

:

::

...

"}

32

17

1 a.m.

House 247, Queen's Read Central,

1

33

23

1.35 a.m.

34

24

6 p.m.

35

30

1.10 a.m.

House No. 285, Queen's Road Central, Houses Nos. 347 & 349, Queen's Road West, House No. 40, Queen's Road West,

3

2

1222

25 8,000

15,000

4,000

5,325

5,000

No.

DATE.

TIME.

FIRES DURING THE YEAR 1896.

SITUATION OF FIRE.

No. of BUILDINGS ESTIMATED DESTROYED. DAMAGE.

CAUSE.

Wholly. Partly.

REMARKS.

332

Upsetting of a kerosine Insured in the Office of Messrs. Schellhas & Sanders lamp. for $12,000, and in the Jardine's for $4,000.

1 Jan.

15

7.45 p.m.

House No. 30, Wing Lok Street,

2

2

$9,000

2

16

"

8.20 p.m.

House No. 63, Queen's Road Central,

$30

Unknown,

25

10.30 p.m.

House No. 205, Queen's Road West,

1

$1,000

Unknown,

4 Feb.

112.30 a.m.

House No. 302, Queen's Road Central,

1

$2,600

5

=

1.00 a.m.

House No. 56, Jervois Street,.

6

6

"

2.45 a.m.

House No. 57, Queen's Road West,

8

99

11.05 p.m.

House No. 133, Praya West,

26

4.25 a.m.

House No. 309, Queen's Road Central,

"1

Insured in the Office of Messrs. Turner & Co. for $30,000.

Chan Kun, 34, married woman, and her two daughters Su Fuk Oi, aged 7 years, and Su Fuk Loi, aged 2 years, who resided in the second floor, were burned to death during the fire. Ground floor insured in the Office of Northern Assurance Coy. for $1,500.

Accidentally upsetting & Ground floor insured in the Office of China Fire In- kerosine lamp.

1

1

$6,000

Unknown,

2

$16,000

Overheating of a quantity of tobacco left drying on a furnace.

A kerosine lamp accidental- ly knocked down.

12

1

$6,000

1

$5,000

Unknown,

9 Mar.

9

4.00 a.m.

House No. 367, Queen's Road Central,

1

$5,000

10 April

1

5.10 a.m.

House No. 3, Wing Lok Street,

1

surance and Messrs. Shewan & Co. for $2,400. 1st and 2nd floors were family houses not insured.

The 1st and 2nd floors insured in the Office of Trans- atlantic Fire Insurance Coy. for $13,000. Fire spread to No. 231, Queen's Road Central, insured for $2,000 in the China Fire Insurance Coy.

Insured in the Office of Sanders & Co. for $2,000. Reuter, Bröcklemann & Co. for $2,400, and Miji Fire Insurance for $1,500.

Insured in the Office of the Fire Insurance Coy. of Hamburg for 6,500.

Insured in the Office of Messrs. Jardine, Matheson & Co. for $2,000. With Schellhas & Co. for $2,400 and in the Chun On Fire Insurance Coy, for $1,000.

Upsetting of a kerosine Insured in the Office of Miji Fire Insurance for lamp. $2,200 and in the Hongkong Fire Insurance for $1,500.

:

...

$8,000

Unknown,

Insured in the Office of Sun On Fire Insurance for

$10,000.

#.

FIRES DURING THE YEAR 1896,-Continued,

No. of

BUILDING

No.

DATE.

TIME.

SITUATION OF FIRE.

DESTROYED.

ESTIMATED

DAMAGE.

CAUSE.

Wholly Partly.

11 April

12

1

4.45 a.m.

House No. 288, Queen's Road West,

1

$4,000

6

4.20 a.m.

House No. 21, Salt Fish Street,

$8,700

&

13

8

4.15 a.m.

House No. 18, Wing Woo Street,

1

:

$2,000

Unknown,

...

""

14

22

1.15 a.m.

House No. 48, Praya West,.

:

1 $3,000 Incendiarism,

>>

13

REMARKS.

Knocking over of a kero- sine lamp.

Accidently upsetting a kero- sine lamp.

$3,500 Unknown,

Insured in the Office of Transatlantic Insurance Co. for $3,000.

Insured in the Office of Hamburg Bremen Insurance Coy., Messrs. Carlowitz & Co. Agents. Insured in the Office of Messrs. Siemssen & Co. for $1,000.

Insured in the Office of Messrs. Sander & Co. for $3,500. The two Chinese partners charged with and convicted of Arson at the Supreme Court in May and sentenced to 12 years' hard labour each. Insured in the Northern Fire Insurance Coy. for $1,500.

The building belongs to the Rope Works, and is insured in various Offices for $225,000. No insurance effected.

Insured for $3,500.

Firewood, paper, &c. are saturated with Kerosine oil and 6 vessels containing Kerosine oil were placed about the floor. The floor was occupied by a Chinese broker and his wife who had absconded, and is supposed to be insured, amount not ascertained. Exploding of a kerosine Insured in the Hamburg Bremen Fire Insurance Coy.

$6,000

lamp.

1

$1,290

Unknown,

:

$4,500

Unknown,

for $8,500.

Insured in the Northern Fire Insurance Coy., Messrs. Bradley & Co. Agents, for $2,600.

The fire is supposed to have broken out in the cabin of of the Cargo boat, where a tallyman named Man Ting Tau had been smoking opium and set fire to the Kerosine. The Cargo boat was lying along- side the German ship Columbus loading Kerosine and lead, 1,200 cases on board, when the fire broke out. The boat and all her cargo of Kero- sine was completely burnt, and was insured in a New York Office; amount unknown. The fire spread to the ship Columbus damaging her side and part of her rigging and awnings not seriously. Tallyman Man Ting Tau, a girl aged 7 and a boy of 4, who were on board the Cargo boat, were burnt to death.

15

16

17

18

""

19 May

24

3.15 a.m.

House No. 15, Cockrane Street,

1

$600 Unknown,

>>

26

8.45 a.m.

House No. 31, Belcher's Street, Kennedy Town,

1

"

27

10.15 a.m.

House No. 238, Hollywood Road,

:

1 $2,000

29

9

9.50 p.m. 1.10 a.m.

House No. 115, Praya West,

I

House No. 12, Sutherland Street,

1

Unknown,

$2,300 Unknown, $50 Incendiarism,

20

>>

21 June

14 10.15 p.m.

9.20 p.m.

7.30 a.m.

House No. 73, Jervois Street,...

House No. 3, Tsz Mi Lane,........ Licensed Cargo Boat No. 69,

22

15

""

:

-333

FIRES DURING THE YEAR 1896,-Continued.

No. DATE.

TIME.

SITUATION OF FIRE.

No. of

BUILDINGS

DESTROYED.

DAMAGE.

CAUSE.

Wholly. Partly.

23 June 29

3.30 p.m.

On board the British barque Glen Caladh,

...

cargo

Unknown, Overheating amongst the in the main hold.

24 Aug.

14

3.10 p.m.

House No. 10, Ship Street,

25 Oct.

28

2.10 p.m.

House No. 137, Wing Lok Street,

26 | Nov.

5 | 12.40 a.m.

House No. 109, Queen's Road West,

27

21

3.20 a.m.

House No. 138, Queen's Road West,

28 Dec.

29

""

30

8

8.30 p.m.

House No. 18, New Street,

10

1.00 a.m.

House No. 10, Queen's Road West,

21

a

House No. 63, Bonham Strand,

""

:

1

REMARKS.

334

1

$600

Unknown,

$7,000

Unknown,

1

$25

Ignition of Joss paper,

$200

Unknown,

1

$1,000

Unknown,

$200

Unknown,

Trifling Chimney on fire,

The fire originated through some overheating amongst the cargo in the main hold. The ship was load- ing at the time with a general cargo including rice, tea, fire-crackers, paper, matches and, mat- ting bound for Callao. The cargo was damaged by fire and water, extent unknown, and was insured in several local Offices. The damage by fire to the ship does not appear to be extensive; she was insured in a Glasgow Office.

Insured in the Office of Messrs. Mitsui Bussan Kaisha Coy. for $500.

Insured in the Chun On Fire Insurance Coy. for $10,000.

Insured in the British Mercantile Insurance Coy. for $2,000, and in the Magdeburg Fire Insurance of Hongkong for $3,000.

Insured in the Office of Messrs. Schellhas & Co. for $9,000 on goods, and $1,000 on clothing and $2,500 in the Northern Fire Insurance Coy. Messrs. Turner & Co. Agents.

The fire broke out on the ground floor in the stair- case and the flames quickly spread to the 2nd and 3rd floors. The house was occupied by different families, 2 women and a child were burnt to death being unable to make their escape. No insurance effected.

Insured in the Office of Messrs. Siemssen & Co. for $1,800.

Insured in the Chun On Fire Insurance Coy. for $2,000 on goods.

:..

:

:..

:

F. H. MAY, Superintendent Fire Brigade.

A

No.

DATE.

TIME.

INCIPIENT FIRES DURING THE YEAR 1896.

SITUATION OF FIRE.

ESTIMATED

DAMAGE.

CAUSE.

REMARKS.

Accidental,. Attempted arson.

Overheating of a flue,

Accidental.

Accidental,

1

Jan.

2

2 p.m.

2

10

7.45 p.m.

Grass on Leighton Hill,

Stairs of House No. 153, Queen's Road West,

3

12

3.30 p.m.

19

>>

6.15 p.m.

A beam at House No: 9, Stewart Terrace, Matshed at Kwo Lo Wan, Hung Hom,

Nil

Trifling

$30

5

24

""

6.30 p.m.

No. 3, Sun Wai Lane,

Trifling

24

8.45 p.m.

25

6 p.m.

A matshed within enclosed area of Taipingshan, House No. 40, Elgin Street,

Flame from candle,

""

Chimney on fire,

""

8-

>>

9

"

29

A

6.15 p.m.

31 2.30 a.m.

10 Feb.

A

7

6 p.m.

11

11

""

12

March 2

13

2

"

14

"

Noon.

12 Midt.

6.10 p.m.

A matshed on the hill above Tung Wa Hospital,. No. 6, Hillside Street, Hung Hom,.. House No. 189, Queen's Road East, An unoccupied house at Shek Ó,. A matshed at top of Ship Street, House No. 217, Queen's Road Central,

""

Sparks from the oven.

"9

Burning joss sticks,

Explosion of a kerosine lamp.

$3

Unknown,

15

co -

1 a.m.

11 p.m.

House No. 38, Hollywood Road, Chinese Mail Office,

...

Carelessness with crackers. Chimney on fire,

Trifling Burning joss sticks, Attempted arson,

Grass on fire,.... Unknown,

Ma

Store-room of Messrs. J. D. Humphreys at Kowloon, Trifling Spontaneous combustion.

About 30 fir trees were burnt.

Extinguished by Police and inmates.

Extinguished by Inspector Quincey and occupants. Extinguished by occupants.

Extinguished by Police and occupants.

Extinguished by Police.

Put out by Police and villagers.

Put out by Mr. Campbell and members of Fire Bri- gade.

Extinguished by Police and inmates.

A burning joss stick attached to a box of matches wrapped in kerosine soaked paper was discovered on a cupboard under compositors' desk which had apparently been put through the windows the vene- tians of which were open.

About 4 acres of grass burnt.

The fire broke out amongst a quantity of charcoal. An alarm was raised and the Brigade turned out to Praya West where a quantity of rubbish was being burnt by the Sanitary Authorities.

A quantity of shavings caught fire.

This was a false alarm.

Extinguished by Police and inmates.

16

:

18

67B

28

""

17 April

2

18

5 p.m.

12.30 a.m.

7 p.m.

Hillside between Shek Ó and Chai Wan Gap,

House No. 10, Ship Street,

Praya West,

19

20

21

2222

""

*

26

June 11

8.30 a.m.

7 p.m.

New Hongkong Club,

18

3 a.m.

22 July

4

10.30 p.m.

House No. 42, Eastern Street, Kellet's Island,

Burning joss sticks and papers, Accidental.

23

17

6.30 a.m.

House No. 83, Market Street, Hung Hom,

Trifling

Accidental,

"

24

18

10.40 p.m.

House No. 221, Queen's Road West,

Accidental.

...

"}

25

29

"}

6 p.m.

House No. 37, Pottinger Street,

...

Chimney on fire.

26

29

7.15 p.m.

Alice Memorial Hospital,....

Do.

""

28

27 Aug.

29 | Sept.

2

2 p.m.

A matshed at Tai Shek Kü,

Unknown.

6

"

3

30

t-

7

8 p.m.

12.40 a.m.

:

>>

31

8333

25

"

32

33 Oct.

2825

9 p.m.

28

10.30 p.m.

House No. 7, Upper Rutter Street, House No. 250,"Queen's Road West,

$4

12

2.30 a.m.

House No. 81, Aplichau,.

$1,000

7.20 p.m.

House No. 86, Wellington Street,

House No. 119, Queen's Road West, House No. 350, Queen's Road West,

$24

Chimney on fire.

A kerosine lamp upset,...........

A small pot of kerosine oil was accident- ally set on fire,

Bursting of a kerosine lamp,

Accident with a lighted lamp,. Unknown,

Extinguished by Acting Sergt. 69, Williamson and occupants.

Extinguished by Police and occupants.

Extinguished by Inspector Hennessy and inmates. Extinguished by Police and occupants.

Extinguished by Police and inhabitants at Aberdeen. Property not insured.

335

No.

DATE.

TIME.

INCIPIENT FIRES DURING THE YEAR 1896,-Continued.

SITUATION OF FIRE.

ESTIMATED

DAMAGE.

CAUSE.

REMARKS.

336

34 Oct. 24 5.30 p.m.

House No. 5, Tsui Yune Lane,

35

25

4 a.m.

House No. 9, Elgin Street,

$12 Some charcoal caught fire, Trifling Burning incense sticks,.....

36

27

}}

10.45 p.ni.

37

29

A

6 p.m.

House No. 103, Queen's Road West, House No. 116, Jervois Street,

"

"}

Hillside near W

Vong

Ma Kok,

38 Nov. 8

888888888

40

*42

1 p.m.

Hillside near Observatory,

House No. 7, Possession Street,

Overheating of a tea-drying furnace, A basket of joss sticks accidentally caught fire,

Grass on fire,

Trifling Bursting of a kerosine lamp in the dining

room,

.....

Do.,

39

16

""

2 p.m.

$8

Mosquito curtain caught fire,

22

>>

3.10 p.m.

41

27

"}

10.10 p.m.

At the Hongkong Observatory, Kowloon,

肝纤代

42

Dec.

4.45 a.m.

House No. 83, Aberdeen,......

43

5

>>

9.40 p.m.

House No. 121, Wellington Street,.

44

11

12 Midt.

Matshed, Praya Reclamation,

""

45

11

Opposite Tai Tam Tuk,

>>

46

">

11

House No. 151, Hollywood Road,

"

Bursting of a kerosine lamp,

47

48

15

Stanley Road on the hillside,

21

""

10.35 p.m.

Wellington Barracks, ...

49

24

Hillside between Shek Ó and Cape Collinson,

50

25

11.15 a.m.

House No. 166, Queen's Road East,

""

51

27

House No. 8, D'Aguilar Street,

52

28

House No. 14, Jubilee Street,

.....

""

53

28

}}

54

"3

8838

7.45 a.m.

29

4.50 p.m.

Matsheds at Tung Lo Wan,

******

Unknown,

Bursting of a kerosine lamp, Grass on fire,

Do.,

Grass on fire,......................

"

Chimney on fire,

Trifling

Grass on fire,....

$5

Chimney on fire, Unknown,

Chinese Constable's Cookhouse, Yaumati P. Station,. No damage

$500

Attempted arson, Chimney on fire,

Upsetting of an oil lamp,

Put out by the inmates, and property insured for $600 in the Office of Schellhas & Co.

P.C. 152, Lo Man, discovered some firewood on verandah had caught fire and burning joss sticks were close to the firewood. Extinguished by the people in the house. Not insured.

The fire was put out by the occupants. Shop insured for $7,000 in the Office of Siemssen & Co.

A lighted lamp placed too near a basket of joss sticks. Extinguished by inmates. Property in- sured $8,000 in the Office of Schellhas & Co. Extinguished by Police.

Do.

Fire originated through the mosquito curtain falling on to a lighted lamp on a table near the bed. Premises not insured.

Fire discovered by Lo Shui, Watchman, who called out others to assist him to extinguish it.

Put out by Police.

Put out by occupants.

Put out by Police.

Do.

Put out by occupants.

A man named Abdool Rader, 34, and his son Abdool Hossein, 10, both suffer- ed from severe burns about the face, arms, and hands.

Burnt itself out before the arrival of the Police.

Put out by Military.

Put out by Police.

Put out by Police and occupants.

Untraceable.

Do.

Put out by Police.

Extinguished by Fire Brigade.

F. H. MAY,

Superintendent, Fire Brigade.

די

111

No. 9/17

4

HONGKONG.

REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF VICTORIA GAOL FOR 1896.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor..

SUPERINTENDENT'S OFFICE, VICTORIA GAOL, 28th January, 1897.

SIR,-I have the honour to forward for the information of His Excellency the Governor the Annual Report on Victoria Gaol for 1896.

2. I returned to the Colony from leave of absence on the 21st March when I resumed charge of the Gaol.

4

}

3. The total number of admissions during the year was 5,582, of which 668 were old offenders. 4. The daily average number of prisoners was 514 as compared with 472 in 1895. I am glad to be able to report that the number of long sentence prisoners continues to decrease steadily.

5. There were 3,887 prison offences committed as compared with 5,365 during the previous year. 6. The profit in industrial labour during the year amounted to $2,684.48.

7. The female prisoners were moved into the Gaol on the 31st October. The portion of the Gaol now allotted to females consists of 6 separate cells, 5 associated cells and 2 penal cells. This accommodation which is somewhat limited might be increased when the improved hospital accommo- dation is provided, but, limited as it is, it is far more satisfactory than the house in Wyndham Street which had been used for some years as a female prison.

8. The conduct of the staff generally has been good.

9. I forward herewith the usual returns.

The Honourable

THE COLONIAL SECRETARY.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

H. B. LETHBRIDGE,

Superintendent.

112

(A.)

VICTORIA GAOL.

Return of Reports for talking, idling, short oakum picking, &c., in the years 1893, 1894, 1895 and 1896.

MONTH.

1893.

1894.

Daily average number Daily average number

in Prison, 458.

in Prison, 455.

1896. Daily average number in Prison, 514.

1895. Daily average number

in Prison, 472.

January,.

264

122

301

214

February,

150

166

314

209

March,

330

209

223

249

April,

240

180

236

257

May

• 198

223

295

270

June,

138

179

311

261

July,

242

211

447

191

August,

211

187

374

192

September,.

204

410

346,

213

October,

79

441

309

174

November,

94

363

273

174

December,

132

205

225

188

Total,

2,282

2,896

3,654

2,592

(B.)

Return of Offences reported of Prisoners fighting with or assaulting each other, or Officers, for the years 1893, 1894, 1895 and 1896.

1893.

1894.

1895.

MONTH.

Daily average number Daily average number Daily average number Daily average number

in Prison, 458.

in Prison, 455.

in Prison, 472.

1896.

in Prison, 514.

January,..

13

6

Nil.

February,

5

19

5

4.

1

March,

5

12

3

April,

12

3

12

May,

9

12

12

June,

3

16

4

July,

13

4

August,

11

3

9

September,

11

1

2

October,

11

7

10

542.2

November,

5

5

3

December,

7

7

3

Total,............

105

95

69

28

(C.)

Return of Offences of Prisoners having Tobacco, for the years 1893, 1894, 1895 and 1896.

MONTH.

1893.

1894.

1895.

1996.

Daily average number Daily average number| Daily average number Daily average number

in Prison, 458.

in Prison, 455.

in Prison, 472.

in Prison, 514.

January,. February, March,

April,

23

15

18

1-00

18

15

11

13

11

5

10

17

8517

2

1

4

1

May,

7

3

1

June,

15

11

11.

1

July,..

17

10

3

2

August,

10

......

10

6

September,

6

8

20

October,

3

12

15

November,

13

6

4

December,

23

5

3

10 6 5 00 10

5

6

8

5

Total,.

141

117

126..

42

(D.)

Comparative Return of Prisoners confined in Victoria Gaol on the 31st December for the years 1898, 1894, 1895 and 1896.

CONVICTION.

1893.

1894.

1895.

1896.

1st,

324

366

340

444

2nd,

65

63

54

60

3rd,

27

21

4th,

22

5th,

7

བས༠

21

23

12

20 24

10

11

6th,

+7

7th,

5

8th,

45422

6242

4

2

4

1

1

* 22

7

4

5

9th,

10th,

11th,

12th,

13th,

Total,

2

467

:::

488

(E.)

...

::

...

1

472

568

Abstract of Industrial Labour, Victoria Gaol, for the year 1896.

113

Dr.

OAKUM.

1896.

To Stock on hand, 1st January, 1896,. $ 252.90 1896.

وو

Cost of Paper Stuff purchased

By Oakum sold during the year,

Oakum used for Gaol,

during the year,................

1,997.80

Stock on hand, 31st December,

1896,

2

Cr.

$ 2,885.48

0.50

640.80

Profit,

1,276.08

Total,....

3,526.78

Total,............$

3,526.78

COIR.

1896.

""

To Stock on hand, 1st January, 1896,. $ 173.45 1896.

Cost of Material purchased during

the year,......

Profit,................

806.15

494.19

Total,............$

1,473.79

To Stock on hand, 1st January, 1896,.

Cost of Material purchased during

1896.

""

NET-MAKING.

1896.

2.91

19.17

the year,

$

Profit,.......

Total,......

22.08

TAILORING.

1896.

To Stock on hand, 1st January, 1896,. $ 10.94

"0

Cost of Material purchased during

the year,......

1,179.58

Profit,........

256.54

Total,....... ..$ 1,447.06

1896.

By Matting, &c., sold during the year, $1,228.89

Articles made for Gaol use, Stock on hand, 31st December,

1896,

""

53.59

191.31

Total,............$

1,478.79

By Nets and Nettings sold and re-

paired,

....

$

22.08

"

Stock on hand, 31st December,

1896,

Total,.....

22.08

By Articles sold and repaired,

"

Work done for Gaol,

Stock on hand, 31st December,

1896,

$5 305.11 1,140.14

1.81

Total,............$

1,447.06

114

PRINTING.

To Stock on hand, 1st January, 1896,. $.90

1896.

By Printing done for outside,.

"

Printing done for Gaol,

20.87

""

Stock on hand, 31st December,

1896,

135.48

1896.

"

Cost of Material purchased during

the year,...

Profit,.................

Total,.....$

157.25

BOOK-BINDING.

1896.

.99

To Stock on hand, 1st January, 1896,. $ Cost of Material purchased during

9.92 1896.

the year,..

Profit,......

91.48

49.74

Total,.....

151.14

SHOE-MAKING.

1896.

""

To stock on hand, 1st January, 1896, $ Cost of Material purchased during

the year,...........

.89

1896.

43.25

Total,...$

44.14

$

14.05

143.20

Total,..

157.25

By Book-binding and repairing done

for outside,........................

Book-binding and repairing done

for Gaol,

Stock on hand, 31st December,

1896,

پیل ہے

$

119.95

28.89

2.30

Total,......

151.14

By Articles sold and repaired during

19

the year,....

Work done for Gaol,...

Stock on hand, 31st December,

1896,

$

4.29

38.15

1.70

Total,............$

44.14

WASHING.

1896.

""

To Stock on hand, 1st January, 1896,. $ 27.52

Cost of Material purchased during

1896.

By Washing done for which cash

was received,..

$

3.40

the year,....

778.49

"

Washing done for Prison Officers

375.93

at 1 cent per piece,

Profit,.

396.99

29

Washing Prisoners' Clothing at

795.10

1 cent per piece,

Stock on hand, 31st December,

28.57

""

1896,

Total,...... ...$ 1,203.00

Total,....... .$

1,203.00

GRASS MATTING.

1896.

To Stock on hand, 1st January, 1896, $ 8.38

1896.

Cost of Material purchased during

99

the year,....

38.64

By Matting, &c. sold during the year, $

Matting made for Gaol use, Stock on hand, 31st December,

1896,

43.70

13.16

1.35

Profit,.......

11.19

Total,........

58.21

Total,...$

58.21

1896.

""

To Stock on hand, 1st January, 1896,.

Cost of Material purchased during

the year,....

RATTAN.

1896.

By Articles sold during the year,

44.79

""

$ 25.48

"

Articles made for Gaol use,........ Stock on hand, 31st December,

1896,

19.31

Profit.......

Total,...$

44.79

Total,......

$

44.79

To Stock on hand, 1st January, 1896,. Cost of Material purchased during

the year,.....

TIN SMITHING.

1896.

""

115

2.41

1896.

By Work done for outside,....

.92

""

53.22

""

Work done for Gaol,................. Stock on hand, 31st December,

1896,

57.05

2.77

5.11

Profit,............

Total,.....

.$

60.74

CARPENTERING.

1896.

To Stock on hand, 1st January, 1896,. $ Cost of Material purchased during

8.50 1896.

the year,.......

Profit,.

145.60

وو

??

20.68

1896.

1000

Oakum, Coir, Net-making, Tailoring, Printing, Book-binding, Shoe-making, Washing, Grass Matting,. Rattan Work, Tin-smithing,

Carpentering,

Total,...... ..$

174.78

Total,........

60.74

By Articles sold and repaired during

the year,..

Work done for Gaol,........................ Stock on hand, 31st December,

1896,

RECAPITULATION.

$1,276.08 494.19

1896.

By Surplus,

19.17

256.54

135.48

49.74

...

396.99

11.19 19.31

5.11

20.68

$

15.81

155.44

3.53

Total,.... ..$

174.78

$ 2,684.48

3

Total,...

..$

2,684.48

Total,...$

2,684.48

2:

529

No. 3

35

97

HONGKONG.

GENERAL INSTRUCTIONS REGARDING GOVERNMENT BALANCES.

Luid before the Legislative Council by Command of

His Excellency the Governor.

QUESTION.-Under what authority and for what purposes have the Crown Agents for the Colonies recently sold in London to the Exchange Banks o/d bills on Hongkong for large amounts; if this has been done in virtue of any special instructions will the Government lay a copy thereof on the table together with a copy of the Secretary of State's general instructions in connection with the custody and the disposal of the Colonial Government's cash balances in Hongkong?

ANSWER.-

Extracts from Colonial Office Despatch No. 222 of 10th October, 1890,

"I will now give you definite instructions as to the limit to be placed upon Government balances in the Banks, which in the last paragraph of my despatch No. 69 of 18th April last, I proposed to give as soon as I received further information as to the possibility of reducing the balance of ordinary current accounts.

"In view of the fact that the Revenue of Hongkong is larger than when the limit of $200,000 was fixed as the maximum of Government balances including current account and deposits at interest and on the clear understanding that the total amount is not placed in one Bank, I am prepared to sanction the increase of the limit of such balances to $350,000 including the Praya Fund as well as ordinary balances and deposits. Out of this amount the current account at the Hongkong and Shanghai Bank for ordinary expenditure must never exceed $125,000 but should, as a rule, not exceed $100,000 ; › and the amounts in each of the other Banks should not exceed $75,000.

"I am not prepared to sanction any excess upon the above limits so long as the balances or deposits in the Banks are unsecured, but if any of the Banks are willing to give security for sums in excess of such limits, I should not object to larger amounts being entrusted to them.

"In order to prevent the necessity in future of the current account at the Hongkong and Shanghai Bank being raised to an excessive amount for the purpose of meeting large drafts by the Crown Agents for expenditure on behalf of the Colony in this country, I have caused them to be directed, pending further instructions, to draw $50,000 every fortnight, beginning about the middle of this month, so that they will have money in hand in advance of their requirements, and not have to make very large drafts at any time. If, however, a further sum is still occasionally required by them they will tele- graph to you, stating that they propose to draw such larger amount."

Extracts from Colonial Office Despatch No. 57 of 30th March, 1893.

"I have the honour to inform you that as long as only two Banks in the Colony are employed for the custody of Government funds, I am willing that the instructions given in my predecessor's despatch No. 222 of 10th October, 1890, should be modified to the following extent. The maximum balances, $350,000, may be divided between the two Banks, provided that not more than $200,000 remains in the Hongkong and Shanghai Bank, and not more than $150,000 in the Chartered Bank of India, Australia and China. It will therefore be necessary for you to further reduce the balances in the former Bank.

"As regards your remark that it is necessary to have large balances in order to meet occasional large drafts by the Crown Agents, I have to refer you to the fifth paragraph of Lord Knutsford's despatch No. 222 of the 10th October, 1890, which shows that there is no need to accumulate excessive balances for this purpose, if only arrangements are made with the Crown Agents to make small drafts periodically so that they may have money in hand in advance for all their requirements."

530

Extracts from Colonial Office Despatch No. 169 of 20th October, 1893.

ار

"I have the honour to inform you that I see no reason for modifying the instructions relative to the Government Balances in the local Banks, laid down in my despatch No. 57 of the 30th of March last and in my predecessor's despatch No. 222 of 10th October, 1890.

"I have also received your despatch No. 178 of the 5th ultino, from which it appears that the total balances had by the end of August increased to nearly $670,000 or more than $100,000 beyond the amount specified in your despatch of the 28th of August, and over $300,000 in excess of the authorized limit. I have accordingly authorized the Crown Agents to draw upon the Hongkong Government for the sum of three hundred thousand dollars and to draw further from time to time on receipt of telegraphic instructions from you as suggested in the last paragraph of your despatch of the 28th of August. The sums thus remitted to England will be temporarily employed by the Agents for the benefit of the Hongkong Government, until the money, or part of it, is required to meet their expen- diture in this country on behalf of the Colony.

"It is impossible to foretell the course of exchange, or to foresee whether this process of remitting the surplus balances to this country will result in gain or in loss to the Colony; but the only alter- native course, which I should be prepared to approve, is that described in the last paragraph of my predecessor's despatch No. 222 of the 10th of October, 1890, namely, to place the surplus in a Government Safe where it will earn no interest, but will at any rate be free from the risk of loss owing to unforeseen changes in the rate of exchange.

"The restrictions placed on the amounts of the bank balances are imposed not for the sake of profit, but of greater security, and, as I have said above, I see no reason for modifying the instructions of my predecessor that the aggregate of unsecured balances must not exceed $350,000, whether that amount be divided between three or only two banks.”

:

No. 103.

HONGKONG.

HARBOUR MASTER'S REPORT FOR 1896.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor.

257

No. 18

HARBOUR DEPARTMENT, HONGKONG, 25th February, 1897.

97

SIR,-I have the honour to forward the Annual Report for this Department for the year ending 31st December, 1896.

I. Number, Tonnage, Crews, and Cargoes of Vessels entered. II. Number, Tonnage, Crews, and Cargoes of Vessels cleared.

III. Number, Tonnage, Crews, and Cargoes of Vessels entered at each Port.

IV. Number, Tonnage, Crews, and Cargoes of Vessels cleared at each Port.

V. Number, Tonnage, and Crews, of Vessels of each Nation entered. VI. Number, Tonnage, and Crews, of Vessels of each Nation cleared. VII. Junks entered from China and Formosa.

VIII. Junks cleared for China and Formosa.

IX. Junks entered from Macao.

X. Junks cleared for Macao.

XI. Total Number of Junks entered at each Port.

XII. Total Number of Junks cleared at each Port.

XIII. Junks (Local Trade) entered.

XIV. Junks (Local Trade) cleared.

XV. Summary of Arrivals and Departures of all Vessels.

XVI. Vessels registered.

XVII. Vessels struck off the Register.

XVIII. Chinese Passenger Ships cleared by the Emigration Officer. (Summary.)

XIX. Vessels bringing Chinese Passengers to H'kong from places out of China. (Summary.)

XX. Marine Magistrate's Court.

XXI. Diagram of Tonnage of Vessels entered.

XXII. Statement of Revenue Collected.

XXIII. Return of work performed by the Government Marine Surveyor.

XXIV. Return from Imports and Exports (Opium) Office.

SHIPPING.

2. The total tonnage entering and clearing amounted to 16,515,953 tons, being an increase over 1895 of 883,840 tons.

There were 40,244 arrivals of 8,250,853 tons and 40,219 departures of 8,259,100 tons.

Of British tonnage 4,382,546 tons entered and 4,375,748 tons cleared.

Of Foreign tonnage 1,786,795 tons entered and 1,788,309 tons cleared.

Of Junks in Foreign trade 1,881,746 tons entered and 1,885,657 tons cleared.

Of Junks in Local trade 205,768 tons entered and 209,386 tons cleared.

British tonnage therefore represented 53 % Foreign tonnage represented 21 %

Junk tonnage (Foreign trade) represented 22 %. Junk tonnage (Local trade) represented 2%.

258

3. 4,578 Steamers, 100 Sailing vessels, and 29,818 Junks entered during the year, giving a daily average of 94 vessels as against 85 in 1895.

·

For European constructed vessels the average daily entry would be 12.81 as against 12.45 in 1895, and of the steamers arriving 69.8% were British including all the River steamers of which the daily entries averaged 3.81.

4. A comparison between the years 1895-1896 is shown in the following shipping Return:— Comparative Shipping Return for the Years 1895 and 1896.

1895.

1896.

Entered and Cleared. Entered and Cleared.

INCREASE.

DECREASE.

Ships. Tonnage. Ships. Tonnage. Ships. Tonnage. Ships. Tonnage.

British,. Foreign,

Junks in Foreign

6,626 | 8,589,637 6,454 8,758,294 2,463 2,935,949 2,898 53,027 3,683,700 59,576

...

Trade,

168,657 172 3,575,102 435 639,153 3,767,403 6,549

83,703

***

44

172

Total,......... 62,116 | 15,209,286 68,928 16,100,799 | 6,984 | 891,513

Junks in Local {

Trade,

11,645 422,827 11,535 415,154

Grand Total,... 73,761 | 15,632,113 |80,463 | 16,515,953 | 6,984| 891,513

NET,.......

6,702 883,840

110 7,673

282 7,673

tons.

5. The above statement shows a decrease of 172 British ships, but an increase of 168,657 British The decrease is mainly due to the River steamer Wing Tong (to which reference was made in the 1895 Report) which made this year only 12 entries and 11 departures, against 114 round trips in 1895. Exclusive of all River steamers the Return would show an increase of 30 British ships and 120,783 British tons.

6. Another cause of apparent decrease in British ships compared with 1895 will be found in the number of Chinese owned vessels which appeared in 1895 under the British flag and which have since returned to their own, and appeared in 1896 as Chinese; the number of their entries and clearances in 1895 were 112, with a tonnage of 165,774 tons. If these were also excluded from the comparison, we would get an increase of 142 British ships and 286,557 British tons, or 51⁄2 %.

7. A large increase in Foreign ships and tonnage is shown in the above comparative statement. This increase is found principally under the German, Japanese and Chinese flags.

8. The record for the German flag in 1896 is represented by an increase of 175 ships entering and clearing with a tonnage of 233,156 tons, a still larger increase is shown if the Chinese ships which sailed under the German flag in 1895 were taken out of the comparison. These amounted to 92 entries and clearances of 97,914 tons, and the actual increase under the German flag would then become 267 ships entering and clearing with a tonnage of 331,070.

9. This substantial increase is built up by an increased number of entries and clearances in the Coasting trade, coupled with the new "Rickmers" line from Europe, and the large new steamers of D. D. R. line which came to Hongkong during the year under review.

10. Under the Japanese flag there is an increase over 1895 of entries and clearances amounting to 107 ships of 194,104 tons, made up principally of 16 vessels of the new lines to Europe, Australia and elsewhere, which made during the year 72 entries and clearances, of a combined tonnage of 119,846 tons. The increase under this flag is the most notable for the year. For 8 years previous to the war the average yearly entry of Japanese vessels was 44 with a tonnage of 61,578, in 1896 it rose to 80 ships of 144,493 tons.

11. A large increase in Chinese ships is also shown, viz., 225 ships entering and clearing of 263,711 tons, but when consideration is given to the Chinese ships which appeared in 1895 under the British and German flags, 204 ships of 263,688 tons, this increase is more apparent than real.

12. The total increase under the foregoing is reduced by a falling off under the Danish flag amounting to 78 entries and clearances of 27,678 tons, owing to the stranding of the S.S. Activ and to the absence, on time charter, of the S.S. Frejr-two "regular customers."

13. The net increase in Foreign flags is thus brought to 435 entries and clearances with a ton- nage of 639,153 tons.

14. Taking entries and clearances together, we get the following increases shown for 1896 over 1895:-

British, German, Japanese,

.....

5%

23 % ...195 %

259

15. The actual number of ships of European construction exclusive of River Steamers which entered the Port in 1896 was 579, being 325 British and 254 Foreign. In the previous year the numbers were 336 British and 250 Foreign.

STEAMERS.

No. of

TOTAL

FLAG.

SHIPS.

TIMES ENTERED.

TONNAGE.

British,

American,

298

1,806

2,665,438

3

14

37,445

Austrian,

24

59,314

Danish,

58

29,684

Dutch,

3

10

14,218

French,

18

120

165,680

German,

77

708

846,713

Italian,

2

11

16,079

Japanese,

25

80

146,315

Norwegian,

27

124

122,225

Russian,

4

4

11,587

Swedish,

1

10

9,890

Chinese,

21

211

247,981

Spanish,

4

4

8,139

Belgian,

I

1

1,689

TOTAL,.......

495

3,185

4,382,397

British, American,

German,.....

FLAG.

Italian,

Norwegian,

Siamese,

Spanish,

Hawaiian,

Total,

SAILING VESSELS.

No. OF

SHIPS.

TIMES

TOTAL TONNAGE.

ENTERED.

27

31

36

42

10

13

2

5

1

1

2232678

35,536

50,427

10,609

1,440

3,305

1

656

900

2

2

2,497

84

100

105,370

16. In 1895 the entries amounted to 3,051 times with an aggregate collective tonnage of 4,114,403 tons. In 1896 the entries were 3,285 with a tonnage of 4,487,767 tons.

17. Thus a decrease of 7 ships with an increase of 234 entries, gave an increase of 373,364 tons. 18. The decrease of 7 ships was made up as follows, viz.:-11 fewer British ships and 4 more Foreign.

19. The increase of 234 entries was made up as follows, viz.:-24 more British entries and 210 more Foreign entries.

20. The 210 Foreign increases were made up chiefly under the following:-from Chinese (113) German (83) and Japanese (53) with a decrease in Danish (39).

21. The increase of Tonnage was made up as follows, viz.:-61,527 British tonnage and 311,837 Foreign tonnage.

22. Compared with 1895 we get 11 fewer British ships, 4 more Foreign ships, 24 more British entries, 210 more Foreign entries, 61,527 more British tons, 311,837 more Foreign tons.

23. The 325 British ships carried 2,422 British Officers and 41 Foreigners as follows:-

British, Germans,

Americans, ...... Danes, ......

Swedes,

Dutch,

...

..2,422

12

15

3

3

1

Austrian, Portuguese, Norwegian,

....

Total,.

1

3

3

.........................2,463

The proportion of Foreigners was therefore 1.6 % comprising 8 nationalities.

260

1

24. The 254 Foreign ships carried 1,626 officers of whom 202 were British as follows:-

""

In Chinese ships, Japanese,, French

.....

""

""

Dutch German

"}

}

....109 74

4

...

14 1

The proportion of Britishers in Foreign vessels was therefore 12 % distributed under 4 different flags of which the Chinese takes over 6 %; the 14 officers who appear in Dutch ships, however, are chiefly those serving on board two British ships the Stentor and Palinurus which for some purpose have been temporarily placed under the Dutch flag.

25. Of the crews of these European Constructed Vessels-

14% were Britishers. 14% other Europeans.

72%

27.

Asiatics.

TRADE.

26. The year has been marked in the second half by a shortness in the Southern rice crop; an import of 578,770 tons was reported up to 30th June; the total for the year was only 704,530 tons. This falling off, in addition to reducing the totals for our European Constructed Vessels, was also very clearly marked in the Junk trade, which in the last quarter of the year showed a decrease compared with 1895 of 1,642 vessels of 69,010 tons. From March to July inclusive, Hongkong was under- going quarantine at Singapore, Manila, and the Northern Ports. With the exception, however, of Manila the enforcement of Quarantine Regulations was made as little irksome as practicable.

27. It is also very apparent that the total amount of cargo to be carried does not increase as rapidly as the tonnage available for its conveyance, principally owing to the enormous carrying capacity of a great number of the newer ships. This, combined with keen competition, places tonnage at the disposal of shippers in excess of what is actually required, consequently vessels cannot obtain full cargoes and are glad to accept low rates of freight to fill up vacant space.

28. The principal sufferers from such a condition of things will no doubt be the "outside" tramp steamers which occasionally appear and frequently are found laid up for want of work. During the third quarter of the year there were 7 British ships aggregating 12,039 tons laid up in the harbour for periods varying from 23 to 86 days.

29. In Returns I. and II. will be found the number and register tonnage of all vessels entering and clearing between this Colony and each country with which trade relations exist, and the amount of cargo reported as "shipped," "discharged," and "in transit," to and from these various countries.

30. The accuracy or otherwise of these returns, so far as cargo is concerned, depends entirely on the reliability of the information afforded to this Department on application made to the Master, and în some cases to the Agents, of vessels concerned.

31. The Chamber of Commerce noted "some apparent errors" in the Returns furnished in my last Annual Report, and they were apprehensive that these might prove "misleading," and the question arose in their mind whether it was worth while attempting to make the Return at all.

32. It is not surprising to know that "apparent errors" can be discovered in Returns compiled as these are. Indifference, want of knowledge, and commercial jealousy, will probably always militate against accurate information being supplied; but in order as far as possible to prevent the Returns being "misleading" the sources of the information on which they depend are clearly stated. It rests, I think, to a great extent with those who are principally concerned with the correct- ness of the Return, if they possess the means for so doing, to assist in preventing the same from being anything less than accurate, in the meanwhile there appears no good reason for relinquishing the attempt to present a Return which though not absolutely correct, is as nearly so as circumstances will permit, and which, as it stands, may be considered a useful indication of the nature and volume of the trade of the Colony.

33. An interesting review of the trade is obtained by a classification of Returns I. and II. as follows:-

Class

I. Vessels that trade to and from Europe and distant Countries, such as,-

Canada.

Cape of Good Hope.

Continent of Europe. Great Britain.

Mauritius.

Sandwich Islands.

South America.

United States,

261

Class II. Vessels that trade to and from the less distant Countries, such as,-

Australia and New Zealand.

India and Straits Settlements.

Japan.

Java and Indian Archipelago.

North and South Pacific.

Russia in Asia.

Class III. Vessels that trade on the Coast of China and to and from adjacent Countries,

such as,-

North Borneo.

Coast of China and Formosa.

Cochin-China.

Philippine Islands.

Hainan and Gulf of Tonquin.

Siam.

Class IV. River Steamers between Hongkong and Canton and Macao.

Class V. Junks in Foreign trade.

34. Using this classification we find that the total import trade of 1896 was represented by 34,526 vessels aggregating 8,051,085 tons carrying 5,138,903 tons of cargo, of which 3,293,503 tons were discharged in Hongkong.

Canada,

Cape of Good Hope,

Great Britain,

Continent of Europe,

Sandwich Islands,.

Mauritius,

South America,.

United States,.

COUNTRY.

Cargo.

SHIPS.

TONS.

DISCHARGED.

IN TRANSIT.

CLASS I.

18

51,037

2

2,508

105

252,773

14,691 1,550 110,929

22 207,454

165

362,906

158,931

473,210

2

2,031

1,650

7

6,194

3,370

I

794

91

200,730

145,426

48,290

391

878,973

436,547

728,976

CLASS II.

Australia and New Zealand,

45

58,117

43,974

24,761

India and Straits Settlements,.

253

385,193

260,898

141,725

Japan,

401

754,389

561,128

353,726

Java and Indian Archipelago,.

70

94,875

153,126

✰ 5,233

North and South Pacific,.

4

1,349

900

150

Russia in Asia,

1

2,582

5,000

774

1,296,505

1,020,117

530,595

CLASS III.

North Borneo,

Coast of China and Formosa,

Cochin-China,

"Philippine Islands,

Hainan and Gulf of Tonquin,

22

19,775

22,978

400

1,350

1,572,589

184,440

529,002

227.

255,903

418,630

6,230

105

94,737

106,188

1,700

226

171,286

123,632

46,497

Siam,

189

197,471

324,990

2,000

Macao,

1

528

2,120

2,312,289

1,180,858

585,829

CLASS IV.

River Steamers, Canton and Maceo,

1,393

1,681,572

154,367

4,678 6,169,339

2,791,889

1,845,400

CLASS V.

Jurks in Foreign Trade,

TOJAL,.

29,848 1,881,746

34,526 8,051,085

501,614

3,293,503

1,845,400

262

35. Similarly, the Export trade of 1896 was represented by 34,402 vessels aggregating 8,049,714 tons carrying 2,647,476 tons of cargo and shipping 413,396 tons of bunker coal.

COUNTRY.

CARGO.

SHIPS.

TONS.

DISCHARGED.

BUNKER Coal.

CLASS I.

Canada,

19

52,212

17,247

Cape of Good Hope,.

1

1,486

1,200

Continent of Europe,

71

169,090

31,666

Great Britain,

Mauritius,

South America,.

52

131,294

38,590

1

1,015

400

20,354 1,500 580

Sandwich Islands,....

2

952

1,400

1

981

1,229

...

United States,

107

214,830

200,439

4,895

254

571,860

291,671

27,329

CLASS II.

Australia and New Zealand,

India and Straits Settlements, Japan,

Java and Indian Archipelago,.

North and South Pacific,

Russia in Asia,

42

61,341

39,490

4,165

292

530,538

282,447

54,030

308

573,965

213,387

28,706

13

17,752

6,030

5,095

6

1,818

698

200

6

6,687

4,100

690

667

1,192,101

546,152

92,886

CLASS III.

North Borneo,.

Coast of China and Formosa,

Cochin China,

Philippine Islands,

Hainan and Gulf of Tonquin,

Siam,

Macao,

20.

1,699

17,547 2,086,642

3,400

4,592

458,840

170,604

224

248,501

61,531

36,594

79

82,176

27,810

14,178

241

181,920

104,170

23,443

96

101,807

26,131

22,330

2

1,111

⭑20

2,361

2,719,704

681,882

271,761

CLASS IV.

River Steamers, Canton and Macao,

1,392

1,680,392

107,087

21,420

4,674

6,164,057

1,626,792

413,396

CLASS V.

Junks in Foreign Trade,

TOTAL,.........

.......

29,728

1,885,657

1,020,684

34,402

8,049,714

2,647,476

413,396

36. During the year 9,352 vessels of European Construction aggregating 12,333,396 Register tons, carried 6,677,477 tons, made up as follows:-

Import Cargo,

2,791,889

Export

1,626,722

""

Transit

1,845,400

1)

Bunker Coal Shipped,................

413,396

6,677,477

263

The total number of tons carried was therefore 54 % of the Registered tonnage and was apportioned as follows :--

Imports-

British ships, Foreign

Exports-

British ships, Foreign

Transit-

British ships, Foreign

Bunker Coal-

British ships, Foreign

""

37.

IMPORTS AND EXPORTS

Trade of the Port of Hongkong for year ending 31st December, 1896.

38.

TONS.

Passen-

No. of Dis- Ships. charged.]

Shipped.

In Transit.

Bunker

Coal Total. Shipped.

Re- gistered

gers. Carried.

Tonnage.

British,

Foreign,

3,669 1,604,383| 864,733 1,259,933) 230,185|3,959,234 5,396,330| 293,441

2,898 1,033,139| 654,972 585,467161,791 2,435,369 8,575,102 137,971

River

Steamers (British),

2,785 154,367 107,087

21,420 282,874 3,361,964* 897,843

Total,

9,3522,791,889 1,626,792|1,845,400| 413,396|6,677,477 12,333,396 1,329,255

Junks in

Foreign Trade,..

59,576 † 501,614†1,020,684|

|1,522,298| 3,767,403) 204,106

Total,

68,928 3,293,503| 2,647,476|1,845,400| 413,396|8,199,775|16,100,799|1,533,361

Junks in

Local Trade,..

|11,535 § 131,933| || 14,397

146,330

415,154

10,008

Grand Total,

80,463|3,425,436| 2,661,873|1,845,400 413,396|8,346,105|16,515,953|1,543,369

* Inclusive of Passengers carried by Hongkong, Canton and Macao Steam-boat

.Company.

† Includes 3,920 tons Tea and 1,290 tons Vegetable Oil.

+++

Includes 20,767 tons Kerosine Oil and 479,783 tons Rice.

Includes 126,140 tons Earth and Stones.

Includes 122 tons Earth and Stones.

IMPORTS.

European Constructed Vessels.

...3,185 measuring 4,382,397 tons.

Steamers,

River Steamers, ..1,393

""

1,681,572

Sailing vessels,

100

105,370 ""

Total,........4,678

>>

6,169,339

"

1,758,750 1,033,139

-2,791,889

971,820

654,972

-1,626,792

1,259,933

585,467

1,845,400

251,605

161,791

413,396

6,677,477

264

Imported 2,791,889 tons of cargo as follows:-

ARTICLES.

1895.

1896.

INCREASE.

DECREASE.

Beans,

3,849

250

3,598

Bones,

2,340

3,660

1,320

Coal,

563,767

539,721

24,046

Cotton Yarn & Cotton,

50

11,090

11,040

Flour,

101,767

85,021

16,746

Hemp,

1,200

32,790

31,590

...

Kerosine, (Bulk),

24,450

41,758

17,308

Kerosine, (Cases),

42,601

44,129

1,528

(1,192,828 cases) (1,235,612 cases) (42,784 cases)

Lead,

1,350

915

435

Opium,

2,464

2,299

165

Rattan,

..

3,140

3,140

Rice,

764,368

704,530

59,838

Sandal Wood,

1,262

3,707

2,445

Sulphur,

500

220

280

...

Sugar,

185,616

186,759

1,143

Tea,

20

5,447

5,427

Timber.

26,389

49,363

22,974

General,.

1,173,236

1,077,090

96,146

Total,....

2,895,228

2,791,889

97,915

201,254

Transit,

1,623,883 1,845,400

221,517

Grand Total,..

4,519,111 4,637,289

319,432

201,254

NETT,........

118,178

Comparative Statement 1893-1896.

Year.

Ships.

Tonnage.

Imported tons.

1893,

.4,371

5,266,349

2,859,876

1894,

....

.4,225

5,233,146

2,746,285

1895,

.4,546

5,772,298

2,895,228

1896, ..........4,678

6,169,339

2,791,889

39.

Exports.

Steamers, ........

European Constructed Vessels.

3,186 measuring 4,382,211 tons.

River Steamers,

.1,392

}}

1,680,392

">

Sailing Vessels,

96

101,454

""

""

Total,. 4,674

"3

6,164,057

**

Exported 1,626,792 tons of Cargo and shipped 413,396 tons of Bunker Coal.

Comparative Statement 1893-1896.

Ships. Tonnage. Exported tons. Bunker Coal tons.

Year.

1893,...4,387 5,269,510

1,613,642

406,800

1894,...4,227 5,236,036 1,598,588

353,455

1895,...4,543 5,753,288 1,663,007

387,870

1896,...4,674 6,164,057 1,626,792

413,396

40.

IMPORTS.

Junks.

Foreign trade, 29,848 measuring 1,881,746 tons. Local trade,

5,718

Total,......35,566

Imported 633,547 tons as under :-

Tea,

Oil,.....

Earth and Stones, General,

י

""

205,768

2,087,514

>>

3,920 tons. 1,290

.126,140 ""

""

,502,197

41.

Total,............633,547

EXPORTS.

Junks.

""

Foreign trade, 29,728 measuring 1,885,657 tons.

Local trade,

5,817

11

Total,.......35,545

Exported 1,035,081 tons as under :

Kerosine,....

Rice and Paddy,

Earth and Stones,

General,

209,386

,,

2,095,043

""

20,767 tons.

479,783

"}

722 "" 534,409 "}

265

Total,...........1,035,081

42. European constructed vessels imported 1,165,097 tons in excess of exports; junks exported an excess of 401,534 tons. The excess of imports is thus reduced to 763,563 tous, from this must be deducted 413,396 tons of bunker coal shipped leaving a balance of 350,167 tons consumed, manufac- tured, and in stock in the Colony or unaccounted for.

43. The River Steamers aggregating 3,361,964 tons, inwards and outwards, imported 154,367 tons of cargo, exported 107,087 tons, shipped 21,420 tons of bunker coal, and conveyed 897,843 -

passengers.

44.

British ships,

PASSENGER TRAFFIC.

Arrivals.

· Departures.

.145,871

147,570 including Emigrants.

Foreign ships,

71,987

65,984

19

River Steamers,

...457,631

440,212

Launches (outside waters of thel

Colony),

63,178

60,993

Junks (Foreign Trade),

..........102,349

101,757

841,016

816,516

Excess of arrivals over departures (Foreign Trade),......

.24,500

Junks, Local Trade, Launches,

Arrivals.

5,602 ....2,087,492

2,093,094

Departures.

4,406

2,099,199

2,103,605

Excess of departures over arrivals (Local Trade),...

.10,511

Difference excess of arrivals,

...13,989

266

REVENUE.

45. The total Revenue collected by the Harbour Office during the year was $234,990.16, an increase of $571.87 over 1895.

The details are as follows:-

(i) Light Dues,

....

$117,314.45

(ii) Licences and Internal Revenue,...... (iii) Fees of Court and Office,

34,851.75 82,823.96

$234,990.16

STEAM LAUNCHES.

46. On 31st December there were 135 Steam Launches employed in the Harbour; of these 56 were licensed for the conveyance of passengers, 62 were privately owned, 12 were the property of the Colonial Government, and 5 belonged to the Imperial Government in charge of the Military Authorities. One Master's Certificate was suspended for one month and one Engineer's Certificate for three months.

EMIGRATION.

47. 66,822 Emigrants left Hongkong for various places during the year; of these 53,376 were carried by British ships and 13,446 by Foreign ships; 119,463 were reported as having been brought to Hongkong from places to which they had emigrated, and of these 89,210 were brought in British ships and 30,258 by Foreign ships.

It was in this branch of the shipping business that the case of an "Infected Port" was most keenly felt during the months March-July.

Returns Nos. XVIII. and XIX. give the details of this branch of the department.

REGISTRY OF SHIPPING.

48. During the year five ships were registered under the provisions of the Imperial Act, and five Certificates were cancelled.

MARINE MAGISTRATE'S Court.

49. 29 cases were heard in the Marine Magistrate's Court; refusal of duty and assault were the principal offences.

EXAMINATION FOR MASTERS, MATES, AND Engineers.

(Under section 15 of Ordinance 26 of 1891.)

50. The following table will show the number of candidates examined for Certificates of Com- petency distinguishing those who were successful and those who failed :—

GRADE.

PASSED.

FAILED.

Masters,

27

6

First Mates,.

19

Only Mates,.

1

Second Mates,

9

COCO 1 ∞n

6

3

TOTAL,..

56

16

First Class Engineers,

Second Class Engineers,

TOTAL,..............

11

9

29

28

40

37

MARINE COURTS.

(Under section 13 of Ordinance 26 of 1891.)

51. The following Courts have been held during the year :-

1. On the 7th February, inquiry as to the stranding of the British Steamship On Sang, Official No. 105,745 of London, on Cust Rock, Hongkong Harbour, on the night of the 20th January. The Certificate of the Master (WILLIAM VIZE CARMICHAEL) was not dealt with as he did not appear before the Court. The Court, however, was of opinion that the Master would have displayed better judginent if he had not attempted to enter the Port at night and that it appeared that his local knowledge did not justify him in doing so.

267

2. On the 5th March, inquiry into the loss of the British Barque Lynnwood, Official No. 80,035 of Windsor, N.S., on Pratas Shoal, China Sea, on the morning of the 16th February. The Master's (JAMES Ross) Certificate of Competency was returned to him. 3. On the 16th March, inquiry respecting certain charges of misconduct brought against P. J. DONOVAN, Second Mate of the British Steamship Chittagong, Official No. 85,878 of London, by OLIVER DAVEY, Master of the said vessel. The Second Mate's (P. J. DONOVAN) Certificate of Competency was returned to him.

4. On the 22nd April, inquiry as to the stranding of the British Steamship Exe, Official No. 94,309 of London, on rocks lying off the Southeru extremity of Hongkong Chaú of the Samoun Group of Islands on the morning of the 9th April. The Master's (HENRY WILLIAM PELL) Certificate of Competency was returned to him.

5. On the 15th May, inquiry as to the stranding of the British Steamship Menmuir, Official No. 77,120 of London, off the Town of Imabari, Inland Sea of Japan, on the morning of the 1st May. The Master's (HUGH CRAIG) Certificate of Competency was returned

to him.

SUNDAY CARGO-WORKING ORDINANCE 1891.

52. During the year 63 permits were issued, under the provisions of the Ordinance; of these 15 were not availed of owing to its being found unnecessary for the ship to work cargo on the Sunday, and the fee paid for the permit was refunded in each case.

21 Permits were issued free of charge to Mail Steamers.

The Revenue collected under this heading was $7,575; this was $4,025 less than in 1895.

SEAMEN.

53. 19,313 seamen were shipped and 21,450 discharged at the Shipping Office and on board ships during the year.

304 Distressed Seamen were received during the year; of these 66 were sent to the United King dom, 5 to Bombay, 5 to Singapore, 2 to Sydney, 1 to Port Darwin, 9 to Calcutta, 1 to Port Said, 1 to Bangkok, 5 to Shanghai, 1 disappeared, 2 died, 198 obtained employment, 4 remained at Govern- ment Civil Hospital, 1 on board Hygeia and 3 at Sailors' Home.

$6,567.76 were expended on behalf of the Board of Trade in the relief of these men.

MARINE SURVEYOR'S SUB-DEPARTMENT.

54. Return No. XXIII shows the work performed by this branch of the Harbour Department.

LIGHTHOUSES.

55. The amount of Light Dues collected was as follows:-

CLASS OF VESSELS.

RATE No. OF PER TON. SHIPS.

TONNAGE.

TOTALFEES [COLLECTED.

Ocean Vessels paying full dues,. 23 cents. 3,295

4,495,525 112,388.10

Launches paying full dues,

...

32

River Steamers (night-boats),...

cent.

711

823 730,896

20.60 4,872.61

Launches plying exclusively to

Macao,

::

:

90

682

4,970 950,676

33.14

303

17,211

River Steamers (day-boats),

Launches plying to Macao by

day,

TOTAL,..............

5,113 6,200,101 117,314.45

56. The subject of Light Dues has occupied some attention recently and has elicited statements and arguments the basis of which is found in the phrase "Freedom of the Port."

57. But even from those whom this phrase falls most glibly have not attempted to explain precisely what meaning they attach to it. Hongkong is described by them as a "Free Port," and the Government is anathematized for destroying its freedom, yet there has been no proposal on the part of the Government to alter in principle the condition of things which has existed for the last quarter. of a century.

58. A "Free Port" in the general acceptance of the term is, I venture to assert, a port where there is no Custom House and where goods are free from Custom duties and control. Also in some cases

268

it is applied to Ports where ships are free and not subject to charges such as Light Dues, Tonnage Dues, &c. There is no Custom House at Hongkong and goods are free, but for the last 25 years European Shipping has been subject to a charge for Light Dues, and for 30 years native craft have been subject to Port charges.

But it is now contended that here in Hongkong "Freedom of the Port" must include both of these exemptions and that without Free Ships as well as Free Goods there is no "Free Port," a condi- tion which, so far as I have been able to discover, is not supported by precedent in any port of im- portance in any part of the world.

59. Reference has also been made by way of argument to a "Free Port" proclamation issued in 1842 when in the words of the ratepayers' petition to the House of Commons, Hongkong was "a barren rock, the abode of a few fishermen and pirates" and when as yet the treaty by which it became a British Possession had not been ratified.

60. Hongkong we are told has arrived at its present state of prosperity through being a "Free Port." Now for 30 years Hongkong has not been a "Free Port" within the apparent meaning of those who advance this statement, for from the 1st January, 1867, a charge was levied on all native craft trading to the Port which charge has been continued up to the present time, and in 1875 Light Dues was first imposed on European shipping.

61. The prosperity of Hongkong in 1867 (when charges were first levied on native craft) was represented by a European tonnage entry of 1,194,826 tons and a Junk entry of 1,367,702 tons making a total of 2,562,528 tons.

62. In 1875, when European shipping was first taxed by the imposition of Light Dues, the total entry had increased to 3,562,774 tons.

63. In 1890, when the rate of Light Dues was increased to 2 cents a ton, the tonnage entry had reached 6,688,994 tons, and last year it was 8,051,085 tons.

64. Thus the prosperity of Hongkong has increased from an entry of 2 million tons to an entry of 8 million tons during 30 years of taxed shipping, a fact which completely capsizes the assertion that its prosperity is due to its being a "Free Port" from a shipping point of view.

Also it is averred that Hongkong can only maintain its prosperity through continuing to be a "Free Port," yet it must be clear that it cannot continue to be a "Free Port" if it has not hitherto existed in that condition.

In short, Is it or is it not a "Free Port"? If its present condition is one of Freedom, I say there is no proposal to alter that condition. If it is not a "Free Port" then why apply the term to it?

65. It has also been asserted that the imposition of any tax on shipping will have the result of preventing ships coming to the Port.

I have already shown that this assertion is not borne out by our previous experience, but, after all it is only an assertion, to support which not one tittle of evidence or argument is offered.

66. From the opinion also which has been freely stated that, the entry of this large amount of tonnage is the cause of Hongkong's prosperity I take leave to differ, holding rather that it is the result thereof, the cause being found in the geographical convenience of the Port as a shipping centre, and the stability and general prosperity of trade in the East, offering a lucrative business to ships, to partake in which there is a competition of ever increasing keenness. But however this may be, there remains the fact which can hardly be disputed but which seems likely to be lost sight of, namely, that ships come here, as they go elsewhere, solely for their own benefit, and not with the object of benefitting Hongkong, so long therefore as benefits accrue to ships from the use of our waters, whether on account of their geographical position, or from any other cause, so long will ships continue to come, and the measure of these benefits, I am convinced, will not be found in a tax, even exceeding the present one of 2 cents a ton, which represents the paltry sum of £7 for a ship of 3,000 tons, a charge which makes Hongkong, in addition to its many other advantages, compare favourably as to its charges, with almost any port in the world.

67. During the year the Lighthouses have been maintained as usual. The Gap Rock suffered to some extent from the typhoon of July 29th-30th. Although on this occasion the buildings received no substantial damage, the sea reached them with some force, not only from the East-the direction from which the severe damage was done in 1893-but from the South also; the typhoon lasted about 12 hours as compared with 24 hours in 1893. It is probable that it was only owing to this that we have escaped a somewhat similar experience as on the former occasion.

68. Telegraphic and telephonic communication has been kept up with the Gap Rock and Cape D'Aguilar during the year. From the former station 550 vessels have been reported as passing and in addition 222 messages were received and 2,199 sent including the daily weather report for the Observatory.

From Cape D'Aguilar 1,007 vessels were reported and in addition 576 messages were sent and 40 received.

270

V. NUMBER, TONNAGE and CREWs of Vessels of each Nation ENTERED at Ports in the Colony of Hongkong

in the Year 1896.

ENTERED.

NATIONALITY

WITH CARGoes.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

OF

VESSLES.

Vessels. Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tons.

Crews. Vessels.

Tons.

Crews.

American,

39

72,412

2,224

17

15,460

247

56

87,872

2,471

Austrian,

24

59,314

1,513

24

59,314

1,513

Belgian,

1

1,689

26

1

1,689

26

British,

3,018

4,141,244 150,760

212

241,302

8,697

3,230

4,382,546 | 159,457

Chinese,

139

173,095 6,945

72

74,886

3,699

211

Chinese Junks,

14,424 | 1,027,039 | 160,569

15,424

854,707 | 131,783

29,848

247,981 10,644 1,881,746 292,352

Danish,

52

26,548

1,181

3,136

262

58

29,684 1,443

Dutch,

10

14,218

309

...

10

14,218

309

French,

118

164,154

10,789

2

1,526

57

120

165,680

10,846

German,

603

752,106

22,067

118

105,216

3,462

721

857,322

25,529

Hawaiian,

1

1,516

23

1

981

17

2

2,497

40

Italian,

12

16,725

717

1

794

15

13

17,519

732

Japanese,

75

140,371

4,937

5

5,944

252

80

146,315

5,189

Norwegian,

103

100,163

2,557

27

25,367

680

130

125,530

3,237

Russian,

3

8,799

181

2,788

133

4

11,587

314

Siamese,

1

656

18

1

656

18

Spanish,

7

9,039

253

7

9,039

253

Swedish,

10

9,890

273

10

9,890

273

TOTAL,........ 18,640 6,718,978 365,342 15,886 1,332,107 149,304

34,526 8,051,085 514,646

VI. NUMBER, TONNAGE and CREWS of Vessels of each Nation CLEARED at Ports in the Colony of Hongkong

in the Year 1896.

CLEARED.

NATIONALITY

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

OF

VESSELS.

Vessels. Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tons.

Crews, Vessels.

Tons.

Crews.

American,

51 84,822 2,489

6

7,014

104

57

91,836

2,593

Austrian,

24

59,314 1,520

24

59,314

1,520

British,

3,063

4,138,495

4,138,495

154,743

161

Chinese,

195

235,689 9,612

15

Chinese Junks,

18,979 | 1,481,673 | 218,612

10.749

237,253 11,547 403,984

6,013 701 72,178

3,224 | 4,375,748 |160,756

210

247,236

10,313

29,728

1,885,657

290,790

Danish,

51

• Dutch,

10

14,218

French,

119

164,531

25,914 1,102 395 11,218

7

3,770

280

58

29,684

1,382

10

14,218

395

2

1,526

57

121

166,057 11,275

German,

622

758,406

23,079

101

10,080

2,924

723

858,486

26,003

Hawaiian,

2

2,497

36

2

...

2,497

36

Italian,

12

17,496

762

1

646

14

13

Japanese,

56

97,359

4,018

24

47,134

1,401

18,142 80 144,493

776

5,419

Norwegian,

82

71,004

2,201

48

54,170

1,196

130

125,174

3,397

Russian,

4

11,587

419

4

11,587

419

Siamese,

1

656

15

...

1

656

15

Spanish,

7

...

9,039

258

17

9,039

258

Swedish,.

9

8,901

209

1

989

24

10

9,890

233

TOTAL,....

23,280 7,172,040 430,430

|

11,122

877,674

85,150

34,402 8,049,714 | 515,580

*

GOVERNMENT GUNPOWDER DEPOT.

269

69. During the year 1896 there has been stored in the Government Magazine Stone Cutters', Island :-

NO. OF CASES.

APPROXIMATE

WEIGHT.

Gunpowder, privately owned,

Do., Government owned,...

16,421 26

lbs. 356,290

2,808

Cartridges, privately owned,.....

4,701

1,048,274

Do., Government owned,

109

16,602

Explosive Compounds, privately owned,......

797

45,214

Do.,

Government owned,

25

1,353

TOTAL,...

22,079

1,470,541

On the 31st December, 1896, there remained as under:--

NO. OF CASES.

APPROXIMATE WEIGHT.

Ibs.

Gunpowder, privately owned, ....

4,133

84,631

Do., Government owned,.

Cartridges, privately owned,

1,620

283,500

Do., Government owned,.

98

14,657

Explosive Compounds, privately owned,.....

95

5,722

Do.,

Government owned,

21

1,226

TOTAL,..

5,967

389,786

IMPORTS AND EXPORTS (OPIUM) OFFICE.

70. The Return shows that during the year the amount of Opium reported was as follows:-

Decrease.

1895.

chests.

1896.

chests.

chests.

Imported,

..36,609

34,208

2,4011/

Exported,

....

..36,241

33,385

2,855

Through cargo reported

but not landed.....

}

16,1901⁄2

14,838

1,352

15,642 permits were issued from this office during the year, being a decrease of 1,392 as compared with 1895.

A daily memo. of Exports to Chinese ports was during the year supplied to the Commissioner of Imperial Maritime Customs at Kowloon.

Surprise visits were paid to 97 Godowns during the year.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

The Honourable J. H. STEWART LOCKHART,

&c.,

Colonial Secretary,

&c.,

R. MURRAY RUMSEY, Retd. Comd., R.N.,

Harbour Master, &c.

&c.

1

I.-NUMBER, Tonnage, Crews, and CARGOES of Vessels 1

BRITISH.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

COUNTRIES WHENCE ARRIVED.

Cargoes.

Cargoes

Vewels.

Tons. Crews.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Dis- charged

Transit.

Dis- charged.

Tra

35

Australia and New Zealand,

British North Borneo,.........

Canada,

47,924 2,030

34,683 24,661

35

47,924 -2,030|

34,683)

20

18,811

967

22,060

400

20

18,811 967

22,060)

181

51,037 3,546|

14,691

18

51,037 3,546

14,69

2

2,508

79

1,550

22

2

2.508 79

1,550

Cape of Good Hope,...........

Coast of China and Formosa...............................................................................................................

Cochin-China,

Continent of Europe,

Great Britain,

India and Singapore,

Japan,

Java and other Islands in the Indian Archipelago,

Масао,

Mauritius,

North and South Pacific,

Philippine Islands,

l'orts in Hainan and Gulf of Tonquin, .........................

Russia in Asia, ................

Sandwich Islands,.

Siam,......

South America,......................

United States of America,

TOTAL.....

1,651 2,011,760 72,960 245,709 282,438

90,818 2,501| 162,410|

65 20 50,30 | 1,005|

39,583

2,730 55,763

159 351,044 8,852 147,801| 469,510| 179 286,127 13,785 196,469 108,990 222 435,575 13,024) 301,761| 231,100)

66,218 2,180) 117,380) 312 344,252 14,480| 37,778

:

.43

6.789

173

1,093

3,071 528

501

45

44)

204 229,902 8,392 1,855 2,241,662 81,352|| 245,709) 28

65 20

5.

90,818 2,501] 162,410| 50,301 1,005 39,583 159|--351,044 8,852] 147,801| 46: 179 286,127 13,785 196,469) 10. 226 442,364|13,199| 301,761 23.

69,289 2,230). 117.380| 313 344,780 14,524 : 37,778

J

69 65,525 3,538|

900 72,399

150

3

1,269 40

69

65,525 3,538)

900 72,399

...

23 32,923

7551

32,470 34,786|

23

32,923 755

...

32,740)

2,300

3

2537

62 2,300

1,012 36

131

1,269 40

:

3 2,537 62

130 140,613 5,894 226,870|

64 142,002 5,062 101,666 48,290||

::

141,625 5,930, 226,870

64 142,002 5.969

101,666)

3,018 4,141,244 150,760 1,758,750 1,259,983 212 241,502 8,697 3,2304,382,546 159,457 1,758,750 1,25%

II-NUMBER, Tonnage, Crews, and Carc

WITH CARGOES.

BRITISH.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL

COUNTRIES TO WHICH

DEPARTED.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Shipped.

Cargoes! Coal,

Shipped.

Bunker

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Bunker Coal.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Bunker Cargoes. Coal..

Vessels.

Tons.

Australia & New Zealand,

34

-51,223| 2,666|

British North Borneo, ...................... Canada,

16

14,829 816

37.140 3,400

2,065 4,192

2,979

74

720

36

54,202 2,740|

37,140

2.785

7,13

2

681

36

100

18

15,510 852

3,400 4,292

16

47,037 3,304)

17,247

21

3,746

55

18

50,783 3,359)

Cape of Good Hope,

1

: 1,486

34

Coast of China & Formosa,

2,090 2 607,240|94,902

Cochin-China,

20

32,145

Continent of Europe,

1

862 1.468 38

1 200 344.792′ 125,525

4,850

1,486)

34

17,247) 1,200

49

56,023 2,004|

6,805

2,1392,663,263 96,906 344,792 132,330|18,960|2,136,62

3,550

31

6,605 44,466 1,153|

51

76,611 2,005|

4,850

10,155 110 107,63

10

1

1,468

Great Britain,

India and Singapore,

Macao,

Japan,

Java and other Islandsjin the Indian

Archipelago,

Mauritius,

48 120,716 3,506 37,430|| 209 394,780) 15,124) | 226.013)

147 285,607 9,887| 136,200|

5,915 222 310 342,142] 14,380|

1,200

::

:

38 48 120,716 3,506|

4

40.771 16,381 5,600 1,730 31.184

9,364

209 1.150

361

70,375 1,366

1,625

10 37,430 215 404,144 15,333, 226,013 183 355,982 10,753||| 136,200|

70 167,62.

1,200

4

10,57

41,921

68 119,13

18.006

78 141,34:

7,060

112

2,490

8

4,341

528

28

20

334 12,975 511 842,670 14,108

5,600

4,220

31

2,66.

31,184

4,361

621 74,21

1 1,01:

...

:

North and South Pacific,

1

Philippine Islands,

50

560 47.893

15 2.502

500 23,732

130

10

8,400

14 336

293

1,960

58

Ports in Hainan & G. of Tonquin,]

19

23,476

781

8,110

3,425

9,310 311

1,205

26

Russia in Asia,

:

Sandwich Islands,................

1

4911 15

800

690 62,229 2,795 32,786 1,092

491

25

500 *23,732)

8,110

3

21:

10,360 4,630

4,880

193 131,40

6,687

15

Siam,

42

43,754 1,953 14,505|

11,640

South America,

United States of America,

54 17,733 4,246 79,107

3,575

TOTAL..........

3,063 4,138,495 154,743 971,820 226,795

288 13,108

3 5,147 74

161 237,253 6,013

2,130

51 56,862 2,241|

8001 14,505 13,770

34

46: 33,09:

1

57 122,880 4,320| 79,107 24,810 3,224 4,375,748 160,756 971,820 251,605 20,217 3,033,54i

3,575

47

981 87,847

>

i

-Number, Tonnage, Crews, and CARGOES of Vessels ENTERED at Ports in the Colony of Hongkong from each Country for the Year ending

FOREIGN.

BRITISH.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Cargoes.

Cargoes.

Cargoes.

Cargoes.

Vessels. Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Transit.

ged

Dis- charged.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Vessels. Tons.

rews. Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Transit.

683 24,661

35

47,924 2,030|| : 34,683|

060

400

20

18,811 967 22,060

24,661 400

Dis- charged.

9,212 218 9,291 964 26 918

Transit.

Dis- charged

Tra

100

981

17

691

18

51,037 3,546 14,691

::

10 10,193 235 9,291

2

964 26

918

550

22

22

709 282,438

4.10 2,730

583 55,763 801 469,510

469 108,990]

761 231,100

380

1,093

778

150

20

282,438 14,3741,438,366 168,137 541,811 246.564 15,367 1,032.444 136,322 29,741 2,470,8:0 301.459 541,311 24

2,780 161 163,972 4,740 256,220| 55,763

2 2.508 79 1,550 204 229,902 8,392 1,855 2,241,662 81,352|| 245,709 65 90,818 2,501 162,410 50,301 1,005 39,583 159 351,044 8,852|| 147,801| 179 286,127 13,785 196,469 108,990 226| 442,364|13,199| 301,761 231,100

45 69,289| 2,230| 117.380| 313 344,780 14,524| 37,778

421

6.789 173 3,071

50

44

لالان

162 165,085 4,770 256,220{

900

99

170

...

34,786

200

70

666

48,290

***

1,012

85 202,172 8,213 71,346

469 510

6

71

11,862 233 95,03 || 3,059

3,500 151,691 11,130 3,700

1,113 30

85 202,472 8,213|

6 11.862 233

64,520 32,735

168

300,114 8.924 259,367| 122,626

7

1,093

24

24,274 738 35,746

4,140

407

56,002 10,477|| 15,623|

276

4.032 89 11,911 292 1,312 20 23,181 3,306

74 175

71,346) 15 11.130 : 99,066 3,148 64,520 3: 312,025 9,216 259,37 12:

25

25,586 758 35,746

683

79,183 13,783)

15,623

2

...

{

2,031 70 1,650

2,031 70

1,650

3 1,269 40

69

23

65,525 3,538 32,923 755 32,740

900 72,399

150)

80

}

80

34 26,943 899 33,789

1,700

2

2,269 45

861

29,212 94!

33,789

34,786

192 129.972 5,256

90,892

11,711

11

8,391 406

203

138,363 5,662)

90,892

་་.

2,582 74

5,000

2,582 74

3

2 537

62

2,300

36

131| 141,625| 5,930, 226,870|

58

£2 1,275 34 55,846 1,581|

...

..

64 142,002 5,062 101,666 48,290

26

56,813 1,903

1,070 98,120 2,000

43,760

2,382 37

3,657

71

1,070)

58

55,846

1,581

98 120

794

15

11

794

15

1 1,915 21

27

58,728 1,924)

43,760

750 1,259,933 212 241,302 8,697 3,2304,382,546 159,457 1,758,750 1,259,933 15,622 2,577,734 214,582 1,534,753 585,467 15,674 1,090,805 110,07 31,2963,668,539 355,189 1,534,753 58:

II.-NUMBER, TONNAGE, CREWs, and CARGOES of Vessels CLEARED in the Colony of Hongkong for each Country for the Year

TISH.

FOREIGN.

LLAST.

TOTAL

With CargOES.

IN BALLAST.

ΤΟΤΑΣ

Shipped.

Shipped.

>hipped.

Crews.

Bunker Coal.

Tons. Crews. Vessela.

Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Cargoes.

735

74

36

720 1001

36 54,202 2,740 18 15,510 852

Bunker Coal.

37,140 2.785

Cargoes. Coal.

Bunker

Tons. Crews. Vesscle.

Bunker Coal.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Cargoes.

Bunker

`oal.

Vess

7,139

335 2,350 1,380

7,139 335 2,350

1,380

551

18 50,783 3,359|

3,400 4,292 17,247

:

...

1 1,486 34 1,200

2,004 1,153

راة

6,805 2,139 2,663,263 96,906 6,605

344.792 132,3530||18,960|2,136,627 234,087|1,154.351

76,611 2,005 4,850 10,155

110 107,634 3,166|

1 1,468 38

48 120,716 3,506|

10 87,430

56,681 70 167,622 8,005| 31,156

2,037 35 1,429 20

51,473 10,763 434,792|73,322| 16,790 63 64,256 1,808

300

35 2,037 1,429 20

300

3,880 29,723 2,571,419 307,409 1,154,351| 9,6491 173 171,890 4,974

55,353 21,0

56,681

26,439

1

20,354

...

70 167,622 8,005

31,156

20,354

1,200

4 10,578 356

1,160

209 1.150

215 404,144 15,333, 226,013

41,921

68 119,138 3,484

56,434

300 11,595

...

4 10,578 356

1, 60

800)

5 1,366

1,625

183 355,982 10,753|||136,200|

18.006

78 141,342 4,168

77,187

9,065

47

7,256 182 76,641 1,941|

514 1,635

77 126,394 3,666]

56.434

125 217,983 6,109 77,187

12,109] 10,700

CIN

112

2,490

8 12,975 354

5,600]

4,220

31

2,664 89

430

775

2

2,113)

35

100,

5 4,777 124

430

875

28

201

611

342,670 14,408|

31,184

4,361

621

74,210 13,007|

56,284

24

2,240 301

648

:

76.450 13,308|

56,284

9.

1

1,015 54

400

580

-

1,015 54

400

580

10

293 311

1,960 58

1,205 26

2008

690 62,229 2,795

25

500

31

219

31

198

1

32,786 1,092

23,732

8,110 4,630

10,360

8 4,880 200

4,078

715

13

193 131,409 5,129

96,060 16,385

909 15,067 399! 22 17,725 710 2,428

27

200

41

1,128 58

198

200

21 3,103

19,947 599 215 149,134 5,839

4,078 3,818

96,060 18,813)

2

6,687

235

4,100

690

:

6 6,687 235

4,100

690

3

288

2,130

491 15 56,862 2,241

800 14,505 13,770

461

14

600

1

34 33,092

981

71 74

79,107 3,575

3 6,013

57 122,880 4,320 24,810 3,224 4,375,748 160,756 971,820 251,605 20,217 3,033,545 275,687 1,675,656 137,817 10,961

11,626 1,229 47 87,847 2,338 121,332

974

151

11 6,395

1,320

45 2,165

1

50

11,853 301

4,103 56

640,421 79,137 23,974 31,178 3,673,966 354,824 1,675,656 161,791 23,2

461

600 44,945 1,275 11.626

14

8,560

981 15 1,229 91,950 2,394 121,332

...

1,820

1

from each Country for the Year ending 31st December, 1896.

REIGN.

ALLAST.

TOTAL.

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Cargoes.

Cargoes.

Cargoes.

ons.

rews. Vessels.

Tons.

Crews.

981

17

10 2

Dis- charged

10,193 235 9,291

964

918 26

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Vessels. Tons.

rews. Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Transit

...

Dis- charged

100 44 57,136 2,248 43,974 24,761

22

9931 22,978' 19,775

400 18 51,037 3,546 14,691

2 2,508

1,550 79

Transit.

Dis- Transit. charged.

981

17

45 22

18

22

2.444 136,322 29,741 2,470,8:0 304.459

6

[ 1.862

4.032 89 1,911] 292 1,312 20 13,181 3,306

741 175 312,025 9,216

25 683

541,311 1,113 30 162 165,085 4,770| 256,220|

85 202,472 8,213 71,346 151,691 11.130 3,700 64,520 32,735 259,37||| 122,626|

233

99.066 3,148

11

25,586 758

35,746

4,140

3

79,183 13,783

15,623

719

277

:

2,031 70

1,650

2,031

80

80

3

70 40 1,269

1,550

246,564 16,025 3,450,126 241,097 787,020 529,002 15,571|1,262,346 144,714 31,596 4,712,472 285,811 787.020 529,002

3,5001 226 254,790 7,241| 418.630| 6,230]

105 252,773 9,218 110,929 207,454 165 362.906 9,085 158,931 473,210 250 381,161 16,844 260,989 141.725 390 735,689 21,948 561,128 353,726| 67 90,492 2,918] | 153,126 5,233

400,254 24,957 53,401 1,650

227 255,903 7,271 418,650 6,230 105 252,773 9.218 110,929 207,454 165 362,906 9,085 158,931 473,210 253 385,193 16,033 260,989 141,725 401 754,389 22 415 561,128 353,726

70 94,875 2,988 153,126 996 423.963 28,307)

58,117 2,265 43.974 24,761

993 19,775

400 51,037 3,546) 2 2,508 79

22,9781

14,691)

22

1,113 30

4.032 89 18,790 467

4,383 70 23,709 3,350

5,233

53,401

...

21

2,031

70

1,650

9001

2,269

45

36

29,212 911

33,789

1.700

103 92,468 4,437 106,188

1501 1,700

80

7

4

1,349

47

900

150

2

2.269

105 45

94,737 4,482 106,188

1,700

8,391 406 203 138,363 5,662

90,892

11,7:1

2,582 74

5,000

1,915

2,382

58 794 15

211 27

37

3,657 71

55,846 1,581

794 15 58,728 1.924)

1,070 98 120

43,760

215 162,895 6,011| 123,632}

1 2,582 74 5 3,812

46,497

8,391

406

226

171,286 6,417 123,632

46,497

5,000

2,582

74

5,000

96 3,370

2,382

87

6,194)

2,000

188 196,459 7,475 324,990

2,000

1

1,012

36

189

133 197,471 7,511 324,990

3,370

2,000

1

794

15

794

15

48,290

90 198,815 6,965 145,426|

48,290

1 1,915

91 200,730 6,986 145,426

30,805 110,607 31,296 3,668,539 355,189 1,534,753 585,467 18,640 6,718,978 365,342 3,293,5031,845,400 15,886 1,332,107 148,304 34,526 8,051,085 514,646 3,293,503 1,845,400

ongkong for each Country for the Year 1896.

3,508|1,84

271

TOTAL.

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Shipped.

Shipped.

Shipped.

ker

1.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Cargoes.

300

62-

7,139

325 2,350

2,037

35

Bunker Coal.

1,380 40

300

Cargoes

Bunker Coal.

Bunker Coal.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Cargoes.

Bunker Coal.

1,429 20

649

880 29,723 2,571,419 307,409 1,154,351

173 171,890 4,974|| 56,681)

70 167,622 8,005|

4 10,578 356

31,156| 1. 60

514

77 126,394 3,666|| 56.434

635

125 217,983 6,109 77,187

3001 12,109 10,700

58,362 3,001 39,490 3.445 16 14,829 876 3,400 4,192 16 47,037 3,304 17,247 1.486 34 1,200 55,353 21,050 4,743,867 328,989 1,499,143 26,439 180 139,779 4,018 61,531 20,354 71 169,090 8,043 31,166 52 131.294 3,862 38.590 277 573,918 18,608 282,447| 225 426,949 13,555 * 213,887

2

176,998 10,812 20,340 94

2,979 74 2,718 71 5,175

751

490,815 75,326|| 108,722 2,961|

720 420

42 20

61.341 3,075 39,490 4,165 17,547 887 3,400 4,592 19 52,212 3.370 17,247

1 1,48C 34 1,200 10,685 31,862 5.234,682 404.315 1,499,143 16.254 224 248 501! 6,979, 61,531

187,683

36,594

20,354

1,500

52,366

15 16,620 3911

25,446

83 147,016 3,307

100

5

4,777

124

430

875

7

8,579 311

6,030

2,505

6 9,173 147

1,664 3,260 2,590

71 169,090 8,043 31.166 52 131,294 3,862 -38,590| 292 530,538 18,999||||282,447| 54,030 308 573.965 16,862 213,387)

20,354

1.500

28,706

13

17,752 458

6,030

5.095

648

76,450 13,308 56,284

934

416,352 27,387

87,468

4,341

25

2,768 329

201

959 419,120 27.416

87,468|

4,361

1,015

200

4

1,128

54 58

400 198

580円

1,015 54

400

580

1

770

54

400

550

:..

...

200

4

779

46

698

1,039 37

2001

6

1.818

83

698

200

103

21 19,947 599 4,078 3,818)

58

52.778 2,702Į 87,810

9,115

428

215 149,134 5,839 96,060 18,813)

212

154,885 *5,910||| 104,170|

19,810

223

21 29,403

29

692 27,035 1,021 3,633

5,063

79

82 176 3,894

27,810

14,178

241

181,920 6.931

104.170

23,443

6

6,687

235 4,100

690

6

6.687 235 4,100

6901

6,687 235

4,100

690

1

461

14

600

2

952

29 1,400

21

165

45

44,945 1,275 11,626 8,560

76

50

981 15 1,229 91,950 2,394 121,332

76,846 2,927 26,131 18,035

981 15 1,229 1,320 101 205,580 6,584 220,439

4,895

20

24,961 589 4,293

96

952 29 1,400 101,807 3,516|| 26,131

22,330

1

61

74 31,178 3,673,966 354,824 1,675,656 161,791 23,280 7,172,040 430,430 2,647,476 364,612 11,122

9,250 130

877,674 85,150

987 15 1,229 107 214,830 6,714 200,439

4.895

1

48,784 34,402 8,049,714 515,580 2,647,476 413,896

• NAMES

OF PORTS.

Aberdeen,

Hunghom,

Shaukiwán,.

Stanley,..

Victoria,

*

III.—TOTAL NUMBER, TONNAGE, CREWS, AND CARGOES (

WITH CARGOES.

BRITISH.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOES,

Cargoes.

Cargoes.

Vls.

Tons. Crews.

Vls.

Tous. Crews. Vls. Tons. Crews.

Vls.

Tons. Crews.

Dis- charged.

Transit.

Dis- charged.

Transit.

Cargo

Dis- charged.

581 455

16,261 3,799 10,726

6,614 2,005

6,036).

457

11,966 2,810

5,750

264

4,715 1,580 3,092

}

3,0184,141,244150,76|1,758,750|| 1,259,933|

212 241,302 8,697 3,230 4,382,546|159,457 1,758 750 1,259,93312,10 2,354,184 187,326 1,340,071

1,695||||183,994|17,062||| 168,248|

Yaumáti,..

Total,...... 3,018 4,141,244 150.760|1,758,750| 1,259,933| 212 241,302 8,697|| 3,230 4,382,546|159,457|1,758,750 1,259,933,15,622 2,577,734|214,5821,534,753,

IV. TOTAL NUMBER, TONNAGE, CREWS, AND CARGOES O

WITH CARGOES.

BRITISH.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

WITH CARG

NAMES

OF PORTS.

Shipped.

Shipped.

Vls.

Tons. Crews.

Vis.

Tons. Crews.

argoes.

Bunker Coal.

Bunker Coal.

Vls. Tons. Crews.

Vis. Tons. Crews.

Cargoes.

Bunker Coal.

"

Aberdeen,

182

Hunghòm,

286

6,429 1,513 13,613 1,875

Shaukiwán,....

051

33,760 5,023

Stanley,.

Victoria,

3,063 4,138,495 154,743 971,820| 226,795,

135 3,366 991 101 237,253 6,013|||| 24,810 3,224 4,375,748160,756 971,820 251,605 16,967 2,754,587 243,1841,

Yaumáti,

1.996 221,790|23,151|

Total,..... 3,063 4,138,495 154,743 971,820 226,795| 161 237,253 6,013| 24,810, 3,224 4,375,748160,756 971,820 251,005 20,217 3,033.545,275,687|1,

t

-TOTAL NUMBER, TONNAGE, CREWS, AND CARGOES OF VESSELS ENTERED AT EACH PORT IN THE COLONY C

FOREIGN.

TOTAL..

Cargoes.

'ews. Vls. Tons. Crews.

VIS.

Tons. Crews.

Dis- charged.

Transit.

581

..

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Cargoes.

Cargoes.

Vis. Tons. Crews. Vls,

Tons. Crews.

Vls.

Transit.

1011

265

68

3,132 777 682 15,051 2,098| 720 30,069 4,931 1,045

Dis- charged.

19,393 4,576 10,726 21,665 4,103'

Transit.

6,936

42,035||| 7,741

5,750

29

5,081 1,769

3,022

581

455

487

264

15,20×

1,695

Dis- charged.

16,261 3,799. 10,726 4551 6,614 2,005 6,086.

11,966 2,810 5,750 2014 4,715 1.580 3,022

437

5,697||3,230 4,382,546 159,457 1,758 750 1,259,935 12,190 2,354,184 187,326 1,340,971 585,407 12,947 1,724

1,695 183,99417,062 168,248

,097 3,230 4,382,546 159,4571,758,750 1,259,933 15,622,577,784 214,5821,584,758 585,467 15,674

366 189 293, 872,317 112.701 25,137 3.226.501 300,0271,340,971585,467 169,870 19,911|| 3,419 353,864, 36,973 168,248|

1,090,805 140,607 31,296 8,668,539 355,189,1,534,758 585,467 18,640

-TOTAL NUMBER, TONNAGE, CREWS, AND CARGOES OF VESSELS CLEARED AT EACH PORT IN THE COLONY OF

H.

FOREIGN.

ST.

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST,

TOTAL.

Shipped.

Shipped.

Shipped

ews.

Bunker Coal,

Vis. Tous. Crews.

Vis.

Tons. ¡Crews.

Vls.

Tons. Crews.

Cargoes.

Bunker Coal.

1

Cargoes.

Bunker Coal.

Bunker Coal.

Vls.

Tons. Crews.

Cargoes.

182

...

013

013

6,429 1,513 2,538 2861 13,613 1,875 13,022 33,760 5,023| 25,417 135 3,366 991 2,974

051

24,810 3,224 4,375,748160,756 971,820 251,605 16,967 2,754,587 243,134 1,455,088 137,817

| 1.996 221,790|25,151|| 176,617|

159 1,729 793 8,070 478,493 57,134

1,423

132,074 13,637

24,810 3,224 4,375,748 160,756 971,820 251,605 20,217 3,033.545 275,687 1,675,C56 137,817 10,961 640,421 79,157

294

5,095 1,784 2,974 23,074 25,1:37 3,233,080 500,2681,455,08 10

3,419 353,864 36,788 176,617

23,974 31,1783,673,966354,821|1,675,656|||10|

500

12,964 3,063

434

7,254 2,125

682 720

19,309 4,576| 2,538 20,867) 4,000) 13,022

375

7,907 2,385|

1,026

41,667 7,408) 25,417

ORT IN THE COLONY OF HONGKONG, IN THE YEAR 1896.

1

t

'AL.

WITH CARGOES.

TOTAL.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Cargoes.

Cargoes.

Cargoes.

rs.

Vls.

Tons.

Crews.

Vls.

Tons.

Crews.

Vis.

Tons. Crews.

Dis-

Dis-

Transit.

Transit.

charged.

charged.

Dis- charged.

Transit.

76 10,726

581

16,261

3,799

10,726

101

3,132

777

682

19,393

4,576

10,726

03

6,936

455

6.614

2,605

6,036

265

15,051

2,098

720

21,665

4,103

6,036

1 5,750

437

11,966|

2,810

5,750

608

30,069

4,931

1,045)

42,035 7,741

5,750

***

69 8,022

264

4,715 1 580

3,022

271,340,971 585,467,

15,208

6,495,428 338,086|||| 3,099,721|

1,845,400

73| 168,248|

1,695 183,994 17,062 168,248

29

189 13,150 1,113,619 121,398

1,724 169,870

366

293

5,081;

1,769

3,022

...

19,911

28,367| 3,419

7,609.047 450,484 3,099,7211,845,400

891,534,753 585,467 18,640 6,718,978| 365,342|||| 3.293,503|| 1,845,400| 15,886 1,332,107 149,304 34,520

· 353,864) 36,973 168,248

8,051,085 514,646||||3,293,503|1,845,400

T IN THE COLONY OF HONGKONG, IN THE YEAR 1896.

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOES.

TOTAL.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

-

Shipped.

Shipped.

Shipped.

ls.

Tons. Crews.

Vls.

Tons. Crews.

VIS.

Tons. Crews.

Cargoes.

Bunker Coal.

Cargoes.

Buuker Coal,

Bunker Coal.

Vis.

Tons. Crews.

Cargoes.

Bunker

Coal.

026

294

682 19,398 4,576 2,538 720 20,867) 4,000) · 13,022) 41,667 7,408] 25,417

5,095 1,784 1:37 3,233,080/300,2681,455,08

...

286

182 6,429 1,513 2,538 13,613 1,875| 13,022

500

12,964 3,063

434

7,254 2,125

651 33,760 5,023| 25,417

375

7,907 2,885

682 720 1,026

19,393 4,576| 2.538 20,867|| 4,000|| 13,022|

2,974

419 353,864 36,788 176,617|

3,366 991 2,974

161,79120,030: 6,893,082 397,877 2,426,908 364,612 8,231

1,996| 221,790|23,151| 176,617|

1783,673,966354,8211,675,656 161,791 23,280 7,172,040 430,4802,647,476|| 364,612 11,122

135

159 1,729 793

294

41,667| 7,408| 25,417 3,095 1,784 2,974

715,746 63,147

1,423

132,074|13,637

877,674 85,150

48.784 28,261| 7,608,828,461,024'2,426.908| 413,396

3,419 353,804 36,788 176,617

48,784 34,402 8,049,714 515,5802,647,476 418,396

*

273

VII. Total Number, Tonnage, Crews, Passengers and Cargo of Junks ENTERED at Ports in the Colony of Hongkong, from Ports on the Coast of China and Formosa, during the Year ending 31st December, 1896.

CARGO.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Ves- sels.

Tons. Crews.

Passen- Cargo Ves-

Discharged. gers. Tons. sels.

Tons. Crews.

East Coast,.

2,544 174,712 20,995

608 155,951 284 7,709 2,093

Passen- Ves- gers. sels.

80 2,828 182,421| 23,088|

Tons. Crews.

San On Dis- trict, West

River, &c., West Coast,

---Cargo Discharged.

Tons.

Passen- gers.

688 155,9.51

11,419 789,926 128,343 74,328 326,256 14,454 799,068 121,641 27,304 | 25,873 1,588,994249,984 101,632 326,256

3,784 410 24,749 4,743| 21

464 31,148 5,497

29 3,784

8

54 6,399 764

Total,... 14,017 971,037 150,092 74,944 485,991 15,148 831,526 128,477 27,405 |29,165|1,802,563|278,569 102,349 | 485,991

VIII.-Total Number, Tonnage, Crews, Passengers and Cargo of Junks CLEARED at Ports in the Colony of Hongkong, for Ports on the Coast of China and Formosa, during the Year ending 31st December, 1896.

Cargo.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Ves-

Tons. Crews.

sels.

Passen- Cargo Ves-

Shipped. gers:

sels. Tons.

Tons. Crews.

Tons. Crews.

San On Dis-

East Coast,..... 1,101 43,023 8,210

trict, West River, &c., West Coast,

16,778 1,329,273192,116

543

17,879 1,605| 113,442|12,815

96,684| 919,122| 9,059 282,598 58,270

476 35,167 5,279

Total,... 18,355 1,407,463 205,605 97,265 964,400 10,726 402,327 71,919

38 27,399 62 6,287 834

11

l'assen- Ves-

Passen- gers. sels.

gers.

163 2,706 156,468 21,025 706 17,879

4,218 25,837 1,611,868,250,386 100,902 919,122

538 41,454 6,113

49 27,399

4,392 | 29,081 1,809,790277,524 101,657 | 964,400

Cargo Shipped. Tons.

IX.-Total Number, Tonnage, Crews, Passengers and Cargo of Junks ENTERED from Macao, during the

Year ending 31st December, 1896.

CARGO.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Ves- sels.

Tons. Crew ».

Passen- gers.

Victoria,

407

56,002 10,477)

Cargo Ves- Discharged.

Tons. sels.

15,623 276 23,181 3,306

Tous. Crews. Passen- Ves- gers. sels.

683

Tons. Crews.

Passeu-

gers.

Cargo Discharged. Tons.

79,18313,783

15,623

Total,...

407

56,002 10,477

15,623

276

23,181 3,306

683

79,183 13,783

15,623

X.-Total Number, Tonnage, Crews, Passengers and Cargo of Junks CLEARED for Macao, during the

Year ending 31st December, 1896.

CARGO.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Ves- sels.

Tons. Crew.

624 74,210 13,007

Cargo Passen-

Shipped. gers. Tons.

100 56,284 23 1,657 259

Ves- sels.

Tons. Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Ves- sels.

Tons. Crews.

Passen- gers.

Cargo Shipped, Tens.

647

75,867 | 13,266)

100 56,284

Total,... 624 74,210 13,007

100 56,284 23 1,657 259

647

75,867 13,266 3,266

100 56,284

Victoria,

274

XI.—Grand Total Number, Tonnage, Crews, Passengers and Cargo of Junks ENTERED at each Port in the Colony of Hongkong (exclusive of Local Trade), during the Year ending 31st December, 1896.

CARGO.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Ves- sels.

Tons. Crews.

Passen- Cargo Ves-

Discharged. gers.

Tons. sels.

Tons. Crews.

Passen- Ves- gers. sels.

Tons. Crews.

Passen- Cargo

Discharged.. gers.

Tons.

Aberdeen,

581

16,261 3,799| 187

10,726

Haugh:ng..

455

6,614 2,005

8

Shaukiwán,

437

11,966 2,810 190

Stanley,

264

Victoria,

10,992

Yaumáti,

1,695

101! 3,132 777 6,036

265 15,051 2,098 5,750 608 30,069 4,931| 47 1,045 42,035 7,741| 237 5,750 4,715 1,580

3,022 29 366

293 5,081 1,769

3,022 803,489 133,313 74,516 | 307;832|12,697 | 636,219 103,877 27,24923,6891,439,708 237,190 101,765 | 307,832 183,994 17,062 43 168,248 1,724 169,870 19,911 54 3,419 353,864| 36,973| 97❘ 168,248

55

682 720

19,393 4,576 242 21,665 4.103

10,726

6,035

189

Total,... [14,424 |1,027,039160,569 74,944 | 501,614|15,424| 854,707 131,783| 27,405 |29,848|1,881,746|292,352|102,349 | 501,614

XII.—Grand Total Number, Tonnage, Crews, Passengers and Cargo of Junks CLEARED at each Port in the Colony of Hongkong (exclusive of Local Trade), during the Year ending 31st December, 1896.

CARGO.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Ves-

Tons. Crews.

sels.

Passen- Cargo Ves-

Shipped. gers. Tons. sels.

Tons. Crews.

Passen- Ves-

gers. sels.

Tons. Crews.

Passon- Cargo

Shipped. gers. Tons.

Aberdeen,

Hunghòn,

286

182 6,429 1,513 13,613 1,875

178

14

2,538 500 13,022 434

12,964 3,063

51

682

19,393 4,576

229

2,538

7,254 2,125

6

720

20,867 4,000

20

13,022

Shaukiwán,

651 33,760 5,023

191

25,417

375

7,907 2,385

5

1,026

Stanley,

135 3,366 991

Victoria,

Yaomáti,

1,996 221,790| 23,151|

||15,729 ¦1,202,715 186,059 yo

Total,... 18,979 1,481,673 218,612 97,365 1,020,68410,749

3

2,974

159

1.729 793

294

41,667 7,408| 5,095 1,784

196

25,417

3

2,974

800,116 7,858

242,056 50,175

4,205 23,587 1,444,771 236,234 101,121

800,116

176,617 1,423

132,074 13,637|

125

3,419 353,864 36,788 188

57

176,617

403,984 72,178

4,39229,7281,885,6-290,790 101,757 1,020,684

XIII.-Return of Junks (Local Trade) ENTERED at the Port of Victoria from the Out-stations of the Island and the Villages in British Kaulung, during the Year ending 31st December, 1896.

Victoria,

*

CARGO.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Ves- sels.

Cargo Passen- Tons. Crews.

gers.

Ves- Discharged.

Tons. sels.

Tons. Crews. Passen- Ves- gers. sels.

Passen- Tons. Crews.

gers.

Cargo Discharged. Tons.

4,064 156,223 50,400||||| 2,852 | 131,933| 1,654| 49,545|13,680| 2,750 | 5,718 | 205,768|64,080) 5,602 | 131,933

Total,...

4,064 156,223 50,400 2,852 | 131,933| 1,654 49,545|13,680| 2,750 5,718 205,768 64,080 5,602 131,933

XIV.-Return of Junks (Local Trade) CLEARED at the Port of Victoria for the Out-stations of the Island and the Villages in British Kaulung, during the Year ending 31st December, 1896.

CARGO.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Ves- sels.

Tons. Crews.

Cargo Passen-

Ves- Shipped. gers.

Tons. sels.

}

Tons. Crews. Passen- Ves- gers. sels.

Tons. Crews. Passen-

Cargo

Shipped.

gers.

Tons.

Victoria,

2,347 68,121 19,812

3,767

14,397 3,470 141,265 | 44,950|

639 5,817 209,386 | 64,762|

4,406 14,397

Total,... 2,347 68,121 19,812 3,707 14,397, 3,470 141,265 44,950

639 5,817 209,386 | 64,762|

4,406 14,397

FOREIGN TRADE.

275

XV.-SUMMARY.

No. of VESSELS.

TONS.

CREWS.

British Vessels entered with Cargoes,

Do.

do. in Ballast, ....

3,018 212

4,141,244

150,760

241,302

8,697

Total,............

8,230

4,382,546

159,457

British Vessels cleared with Cargoes,..

3,063

4,138,495

154,743

Do.

do. in Ballast,

161

237,258

6,013.

Total,.......

3,224

4,375,748

160,756

Total of all British Vessels entered and cleared,

6,454

8,758,294

320,213

Foreign Vessels entered with Cargoes,

Do.

do. in Ballast,....

15,622

2,577,734

214,582

15,674

1,090,805

140,607

Total,.......

31,296

3,668,539

355,189

Foreign Vessels cleared with Cargoes,

Do.

*:

do. in Ballast,..

20,217 3,033,545 10,961

275,687

640,421

79,137

Total,......

31,178

3,673,966

354,824

Total of all Foreign Vessels entered and cleared,................

62,474

7,342,505

710,013

Total of all Vessels entered with Cargoes,

18,640 6,718,978

365,342

Do.

do. in Ballast,

15,886

1,332,107

149,304

Total of all Vessels entered,...!

34,526

8,051,085

514,646

Total of all Vessels cleared with Cargoes,

Do.

do. in Ballast,

23,280

7,172,040

430,430

11,122

877,674

85,150

Total of all Vessels cleared,...

34,402

8,049,714

515,580

Total of all Vessels entered and cleared with Cargoes,

Do.

do.

do. in Ballast,

41,920 13,891,018 27,008 2,209,781

795,772

234,454

Total of all Vessels engaged in Foreign Trade only, entered and cleared,

68,928

16,100,799 1,030,226

LOCAL TRADE.

Total of all Vessel entered,

5,718

205,768

64,080

Do.

cleared,

5,817

209,386

64,762

Total of all Vessels engaged in Local Trade only, entered and cleared,

11,535

415,154

128,842

Total of all Vessels engaged in Foreign Trade only, entered and cleared,

Do.

do. in Local Trade only,

68,928

do.

do.,

11,535

16,100,799 415,154

1,030,226 128,842

Grand Total of all Vessels entered and cleared,.......

80,463

16,515,953

1,159,068

276

XVI.-RETURN of VESSELS REGISTERED at the Port of Hongkong, during the Year 1896.

Name of Vessel.

Official Number.

Regis- tered Tonnage.

Horse Power.

Rig.

Built of

Where built and when.

Remarks.

Stanfield,....

63,533 560

Hai-Mun, (str.) .....

95,869

636 210

Barque. Wood Sunderland, 1869.

Schooner. Steel Port Glasgow, 1896.

Tainan, (str.)

95,870

46

14

Labuan, (str.)

Retriever,

95,871

121

40

95,872

96

Schooner. Wood Mongkok, Hongkong, [1896. Schooner. Wood British Kowloon, 1896.

Schooner. Wood Yokohama, Japan, 1886. Foreign name

" Retriever."

Name of Vessel.

Official

Number.

XVII.—RETURN of Registries of VESSELS cancelled at the Port of Hongkong, during the Year 1896.

Regis- tered Tonnage.

Date of

Registry.

Horse Power.

Rig.

Built of

Where built and when.

Reason of Cancellation.

Sin Taiwan, (str.),| 64,130 Samtor, (str.), ..... 95,853

Kitty,

85,926

Kwong Mo, (str.), 95,861

Wing Hong, (str.), 95,868

47 1876 20 Sloop

69 1889 28 Schooner

803 1894 Barque

Composite Hongkong, 1876.

Wood

Iron

177 1894 55 Schooner

217

1895 40 Schooner

Hongkong, 1889.

Amsterdam, 1856.

Composite Whampoa, 1889.

Wood

Sold to Foreigners.

Transferred to S'pore.

Transferred to S'hai.

Mongkok, H'kong,

Sold to Foreigners.

Sold to Foreigners.

[1895.

XVIII. SUMMARY of CHINESE EMIGRATION from HONGKONG to Ports other than in China or Japan,

during the Year ending 31st December, 1896.

BRITISH VESSELS.

FOREIGN VESSELS.

GRAND TOTAL.

WHITHER BOUND.

Adults.

Children,

Adults.

Children.

Adults.

Children.

Total.

Total.

Total.

M. F.

M.

F.

M. F. M. F.

M.

| F.

M. F.

4,196 135

52

,, Mauritius,

...

""

San Francisco, U.S.A.,

3,418 74

Straits Settlements,.

"

""

Tacoma, U.S.A.,

,, Vancouver, British Columbia,

,, Victoria,

...

To Honolulu, Sandwich Islands,.

33,755 4,418 1,053 699 39,920 8,791 1,463 308 252 10,814 42,546 5,876 1,361

427

44 4,427 884 17 12 5 918 5,080

152

641 49

5,345

42

12 3,546

910 3 23 721 34 19

936 910 778 4,139

3

23

108

61

16

936 4,324

951

50,734

427

427

4,183

8

3 4,196

...

Do.,

8511

4 880

TOTAL PASSENGERS,.

: : : / 8

:

...

427

4,183

8

3

4,196

851

1

4

860

46,830 4,628 1,156 762 53,376 11,306 1,517 362 261 13,446 58,136 6,145 1,518 1,023 66,822

Total Passengers by British Vessels,

Total Passengers by Foreign Vessels,.

Excess of Passengers by British Vessels,

|46,830 4,628 1,156

11,306 1,517| 362

35,524 3,111 794

762 53,376

261 13,446

501 39,930

XIX.-SUMMARY of CHINESE IMMIGRATION to HONGKONG from Ports other than China or Japan,

during the Year ending 31st December, 1896.

277

BRITISH VESSELS.

FOREIGN VESSELS.

GRAND TOTAL.

WHERE FROM.

Adults,

Children.

Adults.

Children.

Adults.

Children.

Total,

Total.

Total.

M. F. M.

F.

M. F. M. F.

M.

F. M.

F.

From Aroe Bay, Medan & Langkat, Sumatra,

616

616

616

616

19

Bangkok, Siam,.

2,276

3 2,286 1,694

3

"

Callao, Peru,

98 10

"

Honolulu, Sandwich Islands,

331

15

4 358

417 14 16

2300

1,703

3,970

10

5

3,989

122

98 10

6

122

455

748

29

24

12

813

""

Mauritius,

445

448

445

448

"

Melbourne,.

258

11

271

258

11

...

271

??

New South Wales......

569

2

3

575

569

2

3

575

"

New Zealand Ports,

78

781

78

B

78

,,

Portland, Oregon,

281

1

30

28

1

1

30

"

Queensland Ports,.......

377

2

379

377

. 2

379

11

San Francisco, U.S.A......

2,928

100 67

57 3,152 1,359 37 23 17 1,436

4,287

137

90

74

4,588

"

South Australian Ports,

119

2

128

119

7

128

"

Straits Settlements,

99

Tacoma, U.S.A.,

"

Vancouver, British Columbia,

72,472 3,215 | 1,380 | 665 77,732 24,020 878 407 173 25,478

96,492

4,093 | 1,787 838 103,210

"3

Victoria, British Columbia......

1,368 8 2,443 24

4 4 1,384

336

6

19 2

7 2,493

344

***

1,368

8

2,443

24

19

336

6

492

4

1,384 7 2,493

344

TOTAL PASSENGERS,

83,588 3,880 1,504 743 89,210 28,649 946 457 206 30,258 112,232 | 4,326 | 1,961 | 949 119,468

Total Passengers by British Vessels,........

Total Passengers by Foreign Vessels,

Excess of Passengers by British Vessels,

83,583 3,380 |1,504 | 743| 89,210

28,649 946 457 206 30,258

54,931 2,434 1,047 537 58,952

XX.-RETURN of MARINE CASES tried at the MARINE MAGISTRATE'S COURT, during the Year 1896.

NATURE OF Charge.

No. of Cases.

No. of Defendants.

DEFENDANTS HOW DISPOsed of.

Fined.

Absent from Ship without leave,.........

3

4

2

Assault,

8

16

11

2

Disorderly Behaviour,

2

2

2

***

Drunkenness,

1

1

1

Harbour Regulations-Breach of (Junk),

2

6

6

Refusal of duty,.......

13

68

67

.:.

Total,........

29

97

83

...

:

2

...

3

:

:

:

:.

:..

8

:

...

:

:

:

Amount of Fines.

:

1

明:

6

22

:

26

278

XXII.-STATEMENT of the REVENUE collected in the Harbour Department during the Year 1896.

Head of Receipt.

Amount.

Remarks.

1. Light Dues, Ordinance 26 of 1891,.

2. Licences and Internal Revenue not otherwise specified :--

Chinese Passerger Ship Licences, Ordinance 1 of 1889, Emigration Brokers' Licences, Ordinance 1 of 1889,..

Fines,

Junk Licences, &c., Ordinance 26 of 1891,...

Steam Launch Licences, &c., Ordinance 26 of 1891,...

3. Fees of Court or Office, Payments for specific purposes and

Re-imbursements-in-aid :--

Cargo-boat Certificates, Ordinance 26 of 1891,

Discharge of Crew and Seamen, Ordinance 26 of 1891, Examination of Masters and Engineers of Launches, Ordi-

$

cts.

117,314.45

395.00

1,000.00

26.00

$2,622.25

808.50

1,986.00

10,543.00

nance 26 of 1891,

257.50

Examination of Masters, Mates, and Engineers, Ordinance

26 of 1891,

2,425.00

11,882.69

-

Gunpowder, Storage of, Ordinance 26 of 1891,

Medical Examination of Emigrants, Ordinance 1 of 1889,.... Printed Forms, Sale of, Harbour Regulations and Tide Tables, Private Moorings and Buoys, Rent for, Ordinance 26 of 1891, Registry Fees, (Merchant Shipping Act), Ordinance 26 of 1891, Shipping Crews and Seamen, Ordinance 26 of 1891,................................ Steam Launches, Surveyor's Certificates, Ordinance 26 of

1891,

Survey of Steam Ships, Ordinance 26 of 1891,

21,063.50

227.00

2,760.00

444.00

11,791,20

1,385.00 10,484.07

7,575.00

.......$234,990.16

Sunday Cargo-Working Permits, Ordinance 6 of 1891,.

Total,............................

XXIII.—RETURN of WORK performed by the GOVERNMENT MARINE SURVEYOR's Department.

Years.

Passenger Certificate and

Inspection of Bottom.

Tonnage for CONGOING Emigration.

Com co ∞ ∞ CO O 10 ZŁ

1887,

153

101

3

6

9

1

72

15

14

42

31

1888,

161

97

9

1

4

2

1

42

36

1,042

1889,

130

73

3

4

1

80

1

39

36

1,127

1890,.

112

17

2

3

84

1

61

19

986

1891,

108

38

3

1

73

3

16

44

19

1,615

1892,

122

51

3

1

85

10

16

60

96

1,678

1893,

136

74

4

1

94

20

19

64

25

1,659

1894,

124

62

17

2

1

116

11

28

54

18

1,364

1895,

102

64

5

1

98

18

34

57

24

1,452

1896,

142

68

6

3

97

20

37

77

66

1,409

2280

GO:000

223

930

Registration.

British Tonnage.

Foreign Vessels. Certificate for

Inspection of

Crew space,

Lights and

Markings.

Minor Inspec-

tion.

Survey of Licen-

Steam-launches.

sed Passenger

Boilers under

Survey of

Construction.

Inspection of Government

Launches.

Examination of Engineers.

Examination of Chinese Engi- neers for Steam- launches.

Number of Visits in connection with Fore- Estimated Total

going Inspection.

TONS.

8,100,000

8,000,000

7,900,000

7,800,000

7,700,000

7,600,000

7,500,000

7,400,000

7,300,000

7,200,000

7,100,000

7,000,000

6,900,000

6,800,000

6,700,000

6,600,000

6,500,000

6,400,000

6.300.000

6,200.000

6.100.000

6,000,000

5,900,000

5.800,000

5,700,000

5,600,000

5,500,000

5,400,000

5:300,000

5,200,000

5,100,000

5,000,000

4,900,000

+,800,000

4.700,000

4,600,000

4.500,000

1867.

XXI-DIAGRAM of Tonnage entered at Hongkong

RED LINE represents British Shipping Tonnage only BLUE LINE represents Foreign Shipping Tonnage o: GREEN LINE represents British and Foreign Shipp YELLOW LINE represents Junk Tonnage only, exclu

THICK BLACK LINE represents entire Trade in Bri

1868.

1869.

1870.

1871.

1872.

1873.

1874.

1875.

1876.

1877.

1878.

1879.

1880.

1881.

1882.

1883.

}

at Hongkong, from 1867 to 1896, inclusive.

ing Tonnage only.

oping Tonnage only.

d Foreign Shipping Tonnage.

nnage only, excluding Local Trade.

tire Trade in British and Foreign Ships and Junks.

279

1880.

1881.

1882.

1883.

1884.

1885.

1886

1887.

1888.

1889.

1890.

1891.

1892.

1893.

1891.

1895.

1896.

TONS.

8,100,000

8,000,000

7,900,000

7,800,000

7,700,000

7,600,000

7,500,000

7,400,000

7,300,000

7,200,000

7,100,000

7,000,000

6,900,000

6,800,000

6,700,000

6,600,000

6,500,000

6,400,000

6,300,000

6,200,000

6,100,000

6,000,000

5,900,000

5,800,000

5,700,000

5,600,000

5,500,000

5,400,000

5,300,000

5,200,000

5,100,000

5,000,000

4,900,000

4,800,000

4,700,000

4,600,000

+,500,000

4,900,000

+,800,000

4.700,000

4,600,000

4,500,000

4,400,000

4,300,000

4,200,000

4,100,000

4,000,000

3,900,000

3,800,000

3,700,000

3,600,000

3,500,000

3,400,000

3,300,000

3,200,000

3,100,000

3,000,000

2,900,000

2,800,000

2,700,000

2,600,000

2,500,000

2,400,000

2,300,000

2,200,000

2,100,000

2,000,000

1,900,000

1,800,000

1,700,000

1,600,000

1,500,000

1,400,000

1,300,000

1,200,000

1,100,000

1,000,000

900,000

800,000

700,000

600,000

500,000

400,000

300,000

5,000,000

4,900,000

4,800,000

4,700,000

4,600,000

+,500,000

4,400,000

4,300,000

4,200,000

4,100,000

4,000,000

3,900,000

3,800,000

-3,700,000

3,600,000

3,500,000

3,400,000

3,300,000

3,200,000

3,100,000

3,000,000

2,900,000

2,800,000

2,700,000

2,600,000

2,500,000

2,400,000

2,300,000

2,200,000

2,100,000

2,000,000

1,900,000

1,800,000.

1,700,000

1,600,000

1,500,000

1,400,000

1,300,000

1,200,000

1,100,000

1,000,000

900,000

800,000

700,000

6oo,coo

500,000

400,000

300,000

XXIV.-IMPORTS AND EXPORTS OFFICE.

281

IMPORTS.

MALWA

PATNA.

BENARES.

PERSIAN.

TURKISH.

TOTAL.

chests.

chests.

chests.

chests.

chests.

chests.

1895, 1896,

10,494

15,892

6,491

3,717

15

36,609

7,576

17,883

5,008

3,687

54

34,208

Increase, Decrease,.....

1,991

39

2,030

2,918

1,483

30

4,431

EXPORTS.

MALWA.

PATNA.

BENARES.

PERSIAN.

TURKISH.

TOTAL.

chests.

chests.

chests.

chests.

chests.

chests.

1895, 1896,

10,348

15,608

6,658

3,607

20

36,241

7,475

16,387

5,378

4,091

54

33,385

Increase, Decrease,..

779

...

484

34

1,297

2,8721/

1,280

4,152

Through Cargo reported in Manifests but not landed, { 1896,.

1895,..

16,190 chests. 14,838

وو

Decrease,....

1,352 chests.

NUMBERS OF PERMITS, &c., ISSUED.

1895.

1896.

Increase.

Decrease.

Landing Permits,

389

352

37

Removal Permits,..

9,545

8,650

895

Export Permits,

6,931

6,509

422

Permits to Chinese Customs' Station, Samsuipo, Memo. of Exports to the Commissioner of Chinese

Customs, Kowloon,

169

131

38

546

558

12

SUMMARY OF EXPORTS, 1896.

Total

Malwa Patna Benares Persian Turkish Chests. Chests. Chests. Chests. Chests. Chests.

Total in piculs.

By Steamers to Amoy,

Bombay,

00

80

194 1,242 2,139

3,655

3,995.675

11

11

11.

British Columbia,.

334

334

400.8

British North Borneo,

Bushire,

...

Canton,

791

3,122

533

2 CO ∞

2

2.05

3

3

3.075

3

4,449

5,180.075

Chefoo,

7

10

17

Foochow,

1,5381

1,025

105

538

3,206

19. 3,445.95

Formosa,

34

991

1,025

1,056.575

Haiphong,

110

110

132.

Hankow,

60

Hoihow,

со

8

55 290

115

126.

298

356.

London,.

97

Macao,..

4,409

1

1

2222

32

129

131.425

4,433

5,315.025

Pakhoi,

53

54

Philippine Islands,

San Francisco,

Shanghai,

265

129

5

:::

107 394

128.4

472.8

5

+

6.

3,372

5,069

2,797

20

11,258

Swatow,...

Straits Settlements,

Timor,....

1,406

1,416

332

104

3,258

12,831.7 3,610.7

30

187

217

227.675

1

1

...

༤.

By Junks to various adjacent Ports in China,

2001/

150

1

6

:

357

387.85

Total,.......

7,475

16,387

5,378 4,091

54 33,385 37,840.775

The information in Column 7 above is on the following assumption :

Patna and Benares, per chest,....

Malwa and Turkisk, per chest, Persian, per chest,

1.20 piculs.

1. 1.025

""

>>

No. 1.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

LAW COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 1st November, 1897.

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGII GOODMAN), Chairman.

JAMES JARDINE BELL-IRVING.

Dr. KO KAI.

5:

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS, C.M.G. WEI YUK.

The Committee considered clause by clause a Bill entitled "An Ordinance to consolidate and amend the Laws relating to the Construction of Ordinances, to further shorten the Language used in Ordinances, and for other like purposes," and recommended that it be reported to the Council, without amendment.

W. MEIGH GOODMAN,

Chairman.

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 8th November, 1897.

J. G. T. BUCKLE,

Clerk of Councils.

89

!

:

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 1.

THURSDAY, 25TH FEBRUARY, 1897.

. 1

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(Sir WILLIAM ROBINSON, K.C.M.G.).

His Excellency the Major-General Commanding (Major-General WILSONE BLACK, C.B.).

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary and Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART

22

LOCKHART).

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON).

19

the Director of Public Works, (FRANCIS ALFRED COOPER).

""

the Harbour Master, (ROBERT MURRAY RUMSEY, R.N.).

""

}"

"

the Captain Superintendent of Police, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.). CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS, C.M.G.

WEI YUK.

>>

ABSENT:

The Honourable JAMES JARDINE BELL-IRVING.

The Council met pursuant to summons.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 14th December, 1896, were read and confirmed. JURY LIST 1897.-The Council then proceeded to consider the Jury List for 1897 in private. The List was duly revised, in accordance with section 8 of Ordinance 18 of 1887. ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned sine die.

Read and confirmed this 3rd day of May, 1897.

J. G. T. BUCKLE,

Acting Clerk of Councils.

WILLIAM ROBINSON,

Governor.

:

"

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 2.

MONDAY, 3RD MAY, 1897.

3.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(Sir WILLIAM ROBINSON, K.C.M.G.).

His Excellency the Major-General Commanding (Major-General WILSONE BLACK, C.B.).

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary and Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART

LOCKHART).

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

19

""

the Colonial Treasurer, (THOMAS SERCOMBE SMITH).

"}

the Director of Public Works, (FRANCIS ALFRED COOPER).

**

the Harbour Master, (ROBERT MURRAY RUMSEY, R.N.).

">

>"}

"}

>>

the Captain Superintendent of Police, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.). CATCHICK PAUL CHATER,

Ho Kai, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS, C.M.G. WEI YUK.

ABSENT:

The Honourable JAMES JARDINE BELL-IRving.

The Council met pursuant to summons.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 25th February, 1897, were read and confirmed. NEW MEMBER.-Mr. THOMAS SERCOMBE SMITII took his seat as Colonial Treasurer, after having taken the Oath prescribed by the Promissory Oath Ordinance, 1869.

PAPERS.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following papers:-

1. Papers respecting the reconstitution of the Sanitary Board.

2. Statement of Post Office Receipt and Expenditure for the years, 1893, 1894 and 1895.

3. Statement shewing annual cost of and revenue derived from the Gap Rock and other

Lighthouses for the years 1893, 1894 and 1895.

4. Despatch respecting the Military Contribution.

5. Report of the Director of the Observatory.

6. Report on the Widows and Orphans' Fund, 1896.

7. Statement of Disbursements for Forestry Works in the years 1898 and 1899.

8. Report of the Superintendent of Victoria Gaol.

9. Report of the Head Master of Queen's College.

10. Report of the Superintendent Botanical and Afforestation Department for 1896.

11. Report of the Captain Superintendent of Police for 1896.

12. Return of Superior and Subordinate Courts for 1896.

13. Papers on the Subject of the Light Dues.

14. Statement of Water Account for 1896.

15. Financial Returns for 1896.

16. Report of the Dirctor of Public Works for 1896.

FINANCIAL MINUTES.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following Financial Minutes, (No. 28 of 1896 and Nos. 1 to 9 of 1897), and moved that they be referred to the Finance Committee:-

C.S.O.

2607 of 1896.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Nine hundred and Fifty-nine Dollars and Fifty Cents, ($959.50), for expenses incurred in connection with the quarantine of the S.S. Cheang Hok Kian.

Government House, Hongkong, 16th December, 1896,

C.S.O.

2439 of 1896.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Four thousand Four hundred and Eighty-eight Dollars, ($4,488), to meet the following expenses during the current year :—

Personal Emoluments,-

Assistant Surgeon, Medical Department, Resident Surgeon, Tung Wa Hospital, Messenger,

Other Charges,-

J

For conveyance,

S LUGEN

.....

.$2,400.00 1,800.00 72.00

216.00

Total,.

$4,488.00

C.O.D.

285 of 1896.

Government House, Hongkong, 9th January, 1897.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One thousand and Two hundred Dollars, ($1,200), being increase to the salaries of the undermentioned Officers for the current year :-

Mr. W. CHATHAM, Executive Engineer, Public Works' Department, Mr. H. P. TOOker,

""

ī

""

$600.00 600.00

Total,.........$1,200.00

C.5.0

406 of 1897.

Government House, Hongkong, 9th January, 1897.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to re-vote the sum of Twenty-eight thousand Six hundred and Twelve Dollars and Thirty-two cents ($28,612.32), being the unexpended balances on the following votes for 1896, for Extraordinary Public Works:-

Slaughter-house, Pig and Sheep Depôts including Pier

Raising Praya Wall, Shektongtsui opposite M. L. 126 and 177-183 Improvement of Street Lighting

Storm Water Drain, Wing Fung Street Salisbury Road, Kowloon

$ 8,471.16

5,000.00

8,872.65

3,943.51

2,325.00

Total......

&

$ 28,612.32

C.S.0.

Government House, Hongkong, 24th February, 1897.

641 of 1897.

C.S.O. 440 of 1897.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to re-vote the sum of Two thousand Four hundred and Twenty-four Dollars and Ninety-three Cents, ($2,424.93), being the unexpended balance under the vote "Isolation Hospital 1896."

Government House, Hongkong, 10th March, 1897.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Five hundred and Fifty Dollars, ($550.00), to cover the salary and allowances of the newly appointed Student Interpreter from 1st March to 31st December, 1897:-

Salary at $40 per month,

Allowance for a Chinese Teacher at $15,

$400.00

150.00

Total,...$550.00

C.S.O.

Government House, Hongkong, 12th March, 1897.

821 of 1897.

C.S.O.

956 of 1897,

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Six hundred Dollars, ($600), în aid of the vote "Maintenance of Juvenile Offenders in the Reformatory."

Government House, Hongkong, 31st March, 1897.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Two hundred Dollars, ($200), in aid of the Vote "Isolation Hospital."

Government House, Hongkong, 14th April, 1897.

5

C.S.O. 1021 of 1897.

C.S.O.

296 of 1897.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Six thousand Dollars, ($6,000), for repairs to Roads outside the City of Victoria.

Government House, Hongkong, 24th April, 1897.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Three thousand Four hundred and Thirty-eight Dollars and Seventy-six Cents, ($3,438.76), to meet the following expenses in connection with the Kennedy Town Hospital during the months of January, February, March and April, 1897-

Personal Emoluments, Other Charges, Water Rate,

Total,..

Government House, Hongkong, 29th April, 1897.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

RESOLUTIONS.-The Colonial Secretary moved as follows:

$ 816.40 2.589.46

32.90

$3,438.76

That the Council having considered the statement drawn up by the Superintendent of the Botanical and Afforestation Department, resolves that it is expedient to incur the liability proposed to

be incurred in 1898.

Statement showing Disbursements for Forestry Works in the years 1898 and 1899, for which contracts have been already made, and those for which contracts now require to be made.

APPROVED BY LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL ON THE 2ND APRIL, 1896.

To be disbursed in 1898.

C.

To be disbursed in 1899.

$

C.

1. Rearing and Planting Trees in 1898,.....

Contracts to be now made which require approval :-

2. Rearing Trees to be planted in 1899

3. Planting Trees in 1899,

2,000.00

2,000.00

900.00

1,100.00

2.000.00

The works under headings 2 and 3 now require the approval of the Legislative Council in order that the contracts for them may be made; those under heading 1 have already been sanctioned and are now in progress.

he

Hongkong, 30th January, 1897.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded. Question-put and agreed to.

CHARLES FORD, Superintendent, Botanical and Afforestation Department.

Mr. WHITEHEAD, with His Excellency's permission, withdrew the following resolution, of which gave notice on the 14th December last :-

That, whereas the Special Gap Rock Light Dues were imposed for the sole purpose of raising the monies required for the construction of the said lighthouse, and the Government are pledged, to their abolition as soon as the requisite amount had been raised, and whereas it appears that a sum of about $42,000 in excess of the amount required has already been received- Resolved that in the opinion of this Council the Special Gap Rock Light Dues should no longer be levied.

NOTICE OF QUESTION.-Mr. WHITEHEAD gave notice that at the next meeting of Council he would ask the following question

Will the Government lay upon the table a detailed statement framed in terms of and in accord- ance with the instructions contained in the Secretary of State's despatch, dated 17th March, 1897, showing (1) the estimated total revenue which will be receivable from all shipping, separately under each head, during the year 1898, and (2) the estimated total expenditure which will be chargeable to all shipping, separately under each head, during the same period?

6

SANITARY BYE-LAWS.--The Colonial Secretary laid on the table certain Bye-laws made by the Sanitary Board on the 11th March, 1897, under sub-sections 4, 12 and 13 of section 13 of Ordinance 24 of 1887, and moved that they be approved.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Mr. WHITEHEAD moved that Counser be heard in support of a Petition addressed to His Excellency by the Opium Farmers against the passing of the Bye-laws.

Mr. CHATER seconded.

Discussion ensued, Council divided,-

For.

Hon. WEI YUK.

Hon. E. R. BELILIOS.

Hon. T. H. WHITEHEAD. Hon. Ho KAI.

Hon. C. P. Chater.

Motion lost by a majority of seven votes to five.

Question-put and agreed to.

Against.

The Captain Superintendent of Police. The Harbour Master.

The Director of Public Works.

The Colonial Treasurer.

The Attorney General. The Colonial Secretary.

His Excellency the Major-General Commanding.

The Colonial Secretary laid on the table certain Bake-house Bye-laws Amendment, and Additional Bake-house Bye-Laws made by the Sanitary Board on the 3rd December, 1896, under sub-section 10 of section 13 of Ordinance 24 of 1887, and moved that they be approved.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Mr. WHITEHEAD moved that the consideration of these Bye-laws be postponed.

Mr. BELILIOS seconded.

Discussion ensued.

Council divided,-

For

Hon. WEI Yuk.

Hon. E. R. BELILIOS.

Hon, T. H. WHITEHEAD.

Motion lost by a majority of nine votes to three. Question-put and agreed to.

Hon. Ho Kai.

Against.

Hon. C. P. CHATER.

The Captain Superintendent of Police. The Harbour Master.

The Director of Public Works.

The Colonial Treasurer.

The Attorney General.

The Colonial Secretary.

His Excellency the Major-General Commanding.

The Colonial Secretary laid on the table certain Bye-laws made by the Sanitary Board on the 17th December, 1896 under section 13 of Ordinance 15 of 1894, and moved that they be approved.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Mr. CHATER moved that the consideration of these Bye-laws be postponed for a fortnight. Dr. Ho KAI seconded.

Discussion ensued.

Council divided,-

For.

Hon. WEI YUK.

Hon. E. R. BELILIOS.

Hon. T. H. WHITEHEAD. Hon. Ho Kai,

Hon. C. P. CHATER.

Against.

The Captain Superintendent of Police. The Harbour Master.

The Director of Public Works.

The Colonial Treasurer.

The Attorney General.

The Colonial Secretary.

His Excellency the Major-General Commanding.

}

His Excellency addressed the Council and consented to postpone the consideration of the Bye- laws until the 10th instant.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND TUE VACCINATION ORDINANCE, 1890.-The Attorney General moved the first reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question--put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO ENABLE THE GOVERNMENT TO PROVIDE SUITABLE LATRINE ACCOMMODATION FOR THE PUBLIC.-The Attorney General moved the first reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

7

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE LAW AS TO FLOGGING.-The Attorney General moved the first reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded. Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE REGULATION OF CHINESE ORDINANCE, 1888.-The Attorney General moved the first reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO PROVIDE FOR THE PUNISHMENT OF STOWAWAYS ARRIVING IN THIS COLONY.--The Attorney General moved the first reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question--put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO CONSOLIDATE AND AMEND THE LAWS RELATING to the Pro- TECTION OF WOMEN AND GIRLS.-The Attorney General moved the first reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO FURTHER AMEND THE MEDICAL REGISTRATION ORDINANCE, 1884. The Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question--put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed and Bill reported without amendment.

The Attorney General moved the suspension of the Standing Rules and Orders.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to."

The Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO DECLARE AND AMEND THE LAW OF PARTNERSHIP.-The Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO CONSOLIDATE AND AMEND THE LAWS RELATING TO PROBATES AND LETTERS OF ADMINISTRATION IN THIS COLONY.-The Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

ADJOURNMENT.The Council then adjourned until Monday, the 10th May, 1897, at 3 P.M.

Read and confirmed, this 10th day of May, 1897.

J. G. T. BUCKLE, Acting Clerk of Councils.

WILLIAM ROBINSON,

Governor.

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 3.

MONDAY, 10TH MAY, 1897.*

9

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(Sir WILLIAM ROBINSON, K.C.M.G.).

His Excellency the Major-General Commanding (Major-General WILSONE BLACK, C.B.).

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary and Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART

LOCKHART).

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

"

the Colonial Treasurer, (THOMAS SERCOMBE SMITH).

""

the Acting Director of Public Works, (WILLIAM CHATHAM).

>>

the Harbour Master, (ROBERT MURRAY RUMSEY, R.N.).

""

17.

the Captain Superintendent of Police, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.). CATCHICK PAÚL CHATER.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS, C.M.G.

9).

WEI YUK.

""

ABSENT:

The Honourable JAMES JARDINE BELL-IRVING.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 3rd May, 1897, were read, amended and confirmed. NEW MEMBER.Mr. WILLIAM CHATHAM took his seat as Acting Director of Public Works, after having taken the oath prescribed by Ordinance 4 of 1869.

PAPERS.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following papers:-

1. Reports on the Hongkong Volunteer Corps.

2. Calendar of Probates, etc. and Return of Supreme Court Cases for 1896.

3. Secretary of State's Despatch respecting Defence Works at Hongkong. (No. 70 of 1897.) REPORT OF THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the report of the Finance Committee dated the 3rd May, 1897, (No. 1), and moved its adoption.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

QUESTION. Mr. WHITEHEAD pursuant to notice asked the following question

Will the Government lay upon the table a detailed statement framed in terms of and in accord- ance with the instructions contained in the Secretary of State's despatch, dated 17th March, 1897, showing (1) the estimated total revenue which will be receivable from all shipping, separately under each head, during the year 1898, and (2) the estimated total expenditure which will be chargeable to all shipping, separately under each head, during the same period?

The Colonial Secretary replied.

THE OPIUM FARM.-His Excellency addressed the Council as follows on the subject of the Opium Farm:-

The Honourable Member for the Chamber of Commerce asked a question on the 7th Decem- ber last in regard to the Opium Farm. He desired to know if the Government would appoint a Commission to investigate and report on the opium revenue generally, and upon the advisability or otherwise of substituting for the present Opium Farm bonded warehouses and a fixed duty on all opium not bona fide exported in a raw state. I may mention that I have given this matter my careful consideration and I do not intend to appoint a Commission to inquire into the advisability of substituting bonded warehouses and a fixed duty for the system at present in force.

10

SANITARY BYE-LAWS.-Bye-Laws made by the Sanitary Board on the 17th December, 1896, under section 13 of Ordinance 15 of 1894.

His Excellency addressed the Council on the subject of the above Bye-Laws.

The Council then proceeded to consider the Bye-Laws clause by clause, and unanimously approved the following clauses :--

Nos. 1 to 4 (inclusive), 6 to 10 (inclusive), 12 to 14 (inclusive), 16 to 25 (inclusive), and

No. 27.

In regard to the remaining clauses, the Council agreed that; No. 5 should be omitted and referred to the Insanitary Properties Commission for report, and that Nos. 11, 15 and 26 be amended in certain particulars.

The Council further agreed that the amended Bye-Laws be referred back to the Sanitary Board for report.

The formal approval of the Bye-Laws was accordingly postponed until the 17th May, 1897. ADJOURNMENT.—The Council then adjourned till Monday, the 17th May, 1897, at 3 P.M.

WILLIAM ROBINSON,

Read and confirmed this 17th day of May, 1897.

J. G. T. BUCKLE,

Clerk of Councils.

بیند

Governor,

11

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 4.

MONDAY, 17TH MAY, 1897.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(Sir WILLIAM ROBINSON, K.C.M.G.).

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary and Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART LOCKHART).

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

the Colonial Treasurer, (THOMAS SERCOMBE SMITH).

""

""

"3

the Harbour Master, (ROBERT MURRAY RUMSEY, R.N.).

$9

the Captain Superintendent of Police, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.).

""

the Acting Director of Public Works, (WILLIAM Chatham). CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

""

""

>>

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS, C.M.G. WEI YUK.

ABSENT:

His Excellency the Major-General Commanding (Major-General WILSONE BLACK, C.B.). The Honourable JAMES JARDINE BELL-IRVING.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 10th May, 1897, were read and confirmed. PAPERS.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following papers :-

1. Registrar General's Report for 1896.

2. Report of the Pó Léung Kuk Society for the year ending 31st December, 1896.

FINANCIAL MINUTES. The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following Financial Minutes, (Nos. 10 to 12 of 1897), and moved that they be referred to the Finance Committee:-

C.S.O.

425 of 1897.

C.S.O.

1118 of 1897.

C.S.O. 1175 of 1897.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One hundrel and Eighty-seven Dollars, ($187), in aid of the vote "Repairs to Health Officer's launch."

Government House, Hongkong, 5th May, 1897.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

>>

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One hundred and Fifty Dollars, ($150), in aid of the vote " Post mortem Examinations and Medical Attendance at Inquests.'

Government House, Hongkong, 7th May, 1897.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One thousand Five hundred and Fifty Dollars, ($1,550), in aid of the vote for Post Office "Incidental Expenses."

Government House, Hongkong, 12th May, 1897.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

REPORT OF THE PUBLIC WORKS COMMITTEE.-The Acting Director of Public Works laid on the table the report of the Public Works Committee, dated 10th May, 1897, (No. 1), and moved its adoption.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

The Colonial Secretary laid on the table certain Bye-laws made by the Sanitary Board on the 17th December, 1896 under section 13 of Ordinance 15 of 1894, as amended the Council at the last meeting, and moved that they be approved subject to further verbal amendments in Bye-law No. 25.

Mr. WHITEHEAD rose to a point of order and addressed the Council as follows:-

These bye-laws having been approved I rise to a point of order. At the meeting of Council held two weeks ago attention was called to the fact that the important and lengthy bye-laws, extending over many folios of print, had been in the possession of the unofficial members for consideration only two clear days before being brought before the Council. reply I was informed by the Colonial Secretary that if I had been anxious to ascertain the

In

12

views of the owners of the bakehouses I could have obtained copies from the Sanitary Board I submit Sir, that the unofficial members should not be required to go to the Sanitary Board to obtain such papers and in future I hope your Excellency will cause instructions to be issued to the usual authority, the Clerk of Councils, for the unofficial members to be furnished with the papers and given full time to consider them in order that they may consult those whose interests may be seriously affected by any proposed changes in by-laws. I think that the dignity of the Council would be consulted if more consideration was shown by the Hon. Colonial Secretary to the unofficial members. At a meeting of the Council in December last the Hon. Colonial Secretary accused the unofficial members of endeavouring to "burk" a Bill then before the Council, namely, the Military Contribution Bill. Now, Sir, the word "burk" was entirely inapplicable, and why it was employed I do not understand. have before me here the despatch of the Secretary of State on the subject of this Bill dated 12th Feb., 1897, and Paragraph 2 states-"I have to request that you will convey to the unofficial members of the Legislative Council my regret that the Ordinance was submitted · to them before the receipt of my despatch in answer to their memorandum, enclosed in your despatch No. 225 of the 23rd September, 1896." I do not make any formal complaint, but I think the dignity of the Council would be consulted and would not be injured if the Hon. the Colonial Secretary showed more consideration to the unofficial members.

The Colonial Secretary replied as follows :—

I

I think the request made by the Hon, member that sanitary bye-laws should be placed in the hands of the unofficial members for a sufficiently long time to allow of their due consi- deration is a most reasonable one and it is a request which I am sure your Excellency will see carried out. In regard to the Hon. member's accusation that the Colonial Secretary treats the unofficial members with a want of consideration I regret that that should be his opinion, and I trust it is not shared by his colleagues. If I have ever in any way treated Hon. members with a want of consideration it has not been from a desire to do so, but has been quite unintentional. I trust that the other Hon. members of this Council do not hold the same opinion as that expressed by the Hon. member who represents the Chamber of Commerce.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE VACCINATION ORDINANCE, 1890.-The Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill."

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed and Bill reported without amendment.

The Attorney General moved the suspension of the Standing Rules and Orders.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

The Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

.1

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE LAW AS TO FLOGGING.-The Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill.

4

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question--put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed and Bill reported without amendment.

The Attorney General moved the suspension of the Standing Rules and Orders.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

The Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time...

Question put that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

13

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE REGULATION OF CHINESE ORDINANCE, 1888.-The Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed and Bill reported without amendment.

The Attorney General moved the suspension of the Standing Rules and Orders.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

The Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do

Bill passed.

pass.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO PROVIDE FOR THE PUNISHMENT OF STOWAWAYS ARRIVING IN THIS COLONY.--The Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question--put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed and. Bill reported without amendment.

The Attorney General moved the suspension of the Standing Rules and Orders.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

The Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question- put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

¿

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO CONSOLIDATE AND AMEND THE LAWS RELATING TO THE PRO- TECTION OF WOMEN AND GIRLS.-The Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed and Bill reported without amendment.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned until Monday, the 31st May, 1897, at 3 P.M.

Read and confirmed, this 31st day of May, 1897.

J. G. T. BUCKLE,

Clerk of Councils*

WILLIAM ROBINSON,

Governor.

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 5.

MONDAY, 31ST MAY, 1897. -

15

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

..

(Sir WILLIAM ROBINSON, K.C.M.G.).

His Excellency the Major-General Commanding (Major-General WILSONE BLACK, C.B.). The Honourable the Colonial Secretary and Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART LOCKHART)

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

the Harbour Master, (ROBERT MURRAY RUMSEY, R.N.).

";

>>

>>

the Colonial Treasurer, (THOMAS SERCOMBE SMITH).

the Captain Superintendent of Police, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.).

the Acting Director of Public Works, (WILLIAM CHATHAM). CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

:

";

}}

"}

""

""

WEI YUK.

""

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS, C.M.G.

ABSENT:

The Honourable JAMES JARDINE BELL-IRVING.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 17th May, 1897, were read and confirmed. LIGHT DUES AND SHIPPING EXPENDITURE.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excel- lency the Governor, made the following statement :-

Honourable Members will remember that not long ago there was laid on the Council table a despatch from the Secretary of State on the subject of light dues. On receipt of that despatch His Excellency the Governor at once took steps to have a return drawn up showing the expenditure incurred on account of shipping and the fees levied on shipping in this Colony. The Governor has received a return from the Treasurer, Harbour Master, and Captain Superintendent of Police. From this return His Excellency is satisfied that the question of shipping dues and shipping expenditure cannot be definitely settled until evidence has been taken on the subject. His Excellency therefore thinks that a Com- mission should be appointed to enquire into the important question of the fees levied upon and the expenditure incurred on account of shipping and has asked the following gentlemen whether they will serve as members of such a Commission:-(1) Sir JOHN CARRINGTON, (2) Honourable T. SERCOMBE SMITH, (3) Honourable Ho KAI, (4) Mr. HERBERT SMITH,

5) Mr. JOHN THURBURN. His Excellency hopes they will consent to serve.

PAPERS.-The Colonial Secretary, by cominand of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following papers :-

1. Harbour Master's Report for 1896.

2. Medical Report on the Prevalence of Bubonic Plague in the Colony of Hongkong during

the years 1895 and 1896.

3. Postmaster General's Report for 1896.

REPORT OF THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.--The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the report of the Finance Committee dated the 17th May, 1897, (No. 2), and moved its adoption.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

FINANCIAL MINUTE.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following Financial Minutes, (No. 13 of 1897), and moved that it be referred to the Finance Committee:-

*C.5.0.

1362 of 1897.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Seven hundred and Fifty Dollars, ($750), in aid of the Hongkong Public Library.

Government House, Hongkong, 28th May, 1897.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

16

NOTICE OF QUESTION.-Mr. WHITEHEAD gave notice that at the next meeting of Council he would ask the following question : -

In view of Your Excellency having received several applications for an increase of salary from officers in the service of the Government and your proposal to refer these to a Committee for consideration and report, will the Government lay upon the table a statement shewing the total cost of or expenditure on the administration of the Government, including pensions, exchange compensation, and all other allowances, during the years 1895 and 1896 separately? BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO ENABLE THE GOVERNMENT TO PROVIDE SUITABLE LATRINE ACCOMMODATION FOR THE PUBLIC.-The Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question---put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed and Bill reported without amendment.

The Attorney General moved the suspension of the Standing Rules and Orders.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

The Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO CONSOLIDATE AND AMEND THE LAWs relating to the Pro- TECTION OF WOMEN AND GIRLS.-The Attorney General moved that the Bill be re-committed.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question--put and agreed to.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed and Bill reported with amendments.

The Attorney General moved the suspension of the Standing Rules and Orders.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question--put and agreed to.

The Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

ADJOURNMENT.—The Council then adjourned sine die.

Read and confirmed, this 28th day of June, 1897.

J. G. T. BUCKLE,

Clerk of Councils.

J.

WILLIAM ROBINSON,

Governor.

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 6.

/

MONDAY, 28TH JUNE, 1897.

17

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR (Sir WILLIAM ROBINSON, K.C.M.G.).

His Excellency the Major-General Commanding (Major-General WILSONE BLACK, C.B.). The Honourable the Colonial Secretary and Registrar General, (JAMES Haldane Stewart LOCKHART)

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

""

"

the Harbour Master, (ROBERT MURRAY RUMSEY, R.N.).

""

"1

་་

the Captain Superintendent of Police, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.). the Colonial Treasurer, (THOMAS SERCOMBE SMITH).

""

""

19

""

19

the Acting Director of Public Works, (WILLIAM CHATHAM). CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS, C.M.G.

JAMES JARDINE BELL-IRVING.

WEI YUK.

The Council met pursuant to summons.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 31st May, 1897, were read and confirmed. PAPERS.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following papers :-

1. The Educational Report for 1896.

2. Report of the Superintendent of Fire Brigade for 1896.

FINANCIAL MINUTE.-The Colonial Secretary, by cominand of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following Financial Minute, (No. 14 of 1897), and moved that it be referred to the Finance Committee:-

C.S.O.

941 of 1897.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Three hundred and Forty-six Dollars and Forty-two Cents, ($346.42), in aid of the vote "Repairs to Post Office Steam Launch."

Government House, Hongkong, 12th June, 1897.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

REPORT OF THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the report of the Finance Committee dated the 31st May, 1897, (No. 3), and moved its adoption.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

REPORT OF THE PUBLIC WORKS COMMITTEE.-The Acting Director of Public Works laid on the table the report of the Public Works Committee, dated the 31st May, 1897, (No. 2), and moved its adoption.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

SANITARY BYE-LAW.--The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table a Bye-law made by the Sanitary Board on the 17th June, 1897, under section 13 of Ordinance 15 of 1894, and gave notice that at the next meeting he would move its approval.

QUESTION. Mr. WHITEHEAD, pursuant to notice, asked the following question :-

In view of Your Excellency having received several applications for an increase of salary from officers in the service of the Government and your proposal to refer these to a Committee for consideration and report, will the Government lay upon the table a statement shewing the total cost of or expenditure on the administration of the Government, including pensions, exchange compensation, and all other allowances, during the years 1895 and 1896 separately The Colonial Secretary replied and laid on the table the statement asked for by the Honourable Member.

18

NOTICE OF QUESTIONS.-Mr. WHITEHEAD gave notice that at the next meeting of Council he would ask the following questions: -

With reference to the Report of the Retrenchment Commission will the Government lay upon the table a copy of the despatches and instructi ns received from the Secretary of State for the Colonies in relation thereto, and in connection with applications in respect of salaries similar to those recently referred by His Excellency the Governor to a Committee?

Will the Government lay upon the table a return shewing all sterling payments made in Eng- land for any purpose or in the Colony en a gold basis with the equivalent dollar amounts disbursed by the Treasury in respect thereof, such return to commence with 1890 and to include the estimated payments for 1897 and 1898?

What steps do the Government now propose to take with a view to the speedy disposal of the Crown land available at Taipingshan and what were the causes of the failure of the Govern- ment to obtain a bid for any lot at the recent sale by public auction?

Will the Government lay upon the table a detailed statement or account of the loan of £200,000 raised in 1887, shewing separately in sterling and in dollars all receipts and all payments in connection with or in respect of the principal, interest, and sinking fund, with the dates and the rates of exchange at which each item was converted from sterling into dollars or vice versâ, in short, a detailed account shewing how much interest per cent, per annum the rate- payers have paid for the loan in question, and a similar account to date in respect of the last loan of £200,000 floated in 1894, shewing in addition what amount thereof is still available, if any, how and in what way the monies have been expended, and what are the available assets in respect of said disbursements? The statement to shew in what securities the sinking

fund has been invested, the cost thereof in sterling and in dollars, the annual revenue derived therefrom and the present market value of the securities.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO AUTHORISE THE APPROPRIATION OF A further SupplemenTARY SUM OF NINE hundred DOLLARS TO DEFRAY THE CHARGES OF THE YEAR 1895.-The Colonial Trea- surer moved the first reading of the Bill,

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

The Colonial Treasurer moved the suspension of the Standing Rules and Orders.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

The Colonial Treasurer moved the second reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time..

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed and Bill reported without amendment.

The Colonial Treasurer moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO Give effect tO THE CHANGE IN THE NAME AND STYLE OF THE OFFICE HERETOFORE KNOWN AS THAT OF THE COLONIAL SURGEON.-The Attorney General moved the first reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

The Attorney General moved the suspension of the Standing Rules and Orders.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

The Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question--put and agreed to.

Bill read a second timę.

Council in Committee on the Bill,

Council resumed and Bill reported without amendment. The Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill. The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question -put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned sine die.

WILLIAM ROBINSON,

Read and confirmed, this 23rd day of August, 1897.

J. G. T. BUCKLE,

Clerk of Councils.

Governor.

19

21

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, NO. 7.

MONDAY, 23RD AUGUST, 1897.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR (Sir WILLIAM ROBINSON, G.C.M.G.).

His Excellency the Major-General Commanding (Major-General WILSONE BLACK, C.B.). The Honourable the Colonial Secretary and Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE STEwart Lockhart).

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

the Harbour Master, (ROBERT MURRAY RUMSEY, R.N.).

17

"

the Captain Superintendent of Police, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.).

>>

>>

17

")

the Colonial Treasurer, (THOMAS SERCOMBE SMITH).

the Acting Director of Public Works, (WILLIAM CHATHAM),

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER, C.M.G.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS, C.M.G. JAMES JARDINE BELL-IRVING.

WEI YUK.

The Council met pursuant to summons.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 28th June, 1897, were read and confirmed.

PAPERS.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following papers:--

1. Reports of the Secretary, Sanitary Board, and the Medical Officer of Health, for 1896.

2. The Colonial Surgeon's Report for 1896.

3. Report on the Census of the Colony taken on the 20th January, 1897.

4. Report on the Assessment for 1897-98.

5. Amended Statements of Water Account for the year ending 31st December, 1896.

FINANCIAL MINUTES.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following Financial Minutes, (Nos. 15 to 18), and moved that they be referred to the Finance Committee:-

C.S.O.

1907 of 1897.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One hundred and Three thousand Dollars, ($103,000), to meet the following expenses during the current year :--

Public Works Annually Recurrent Expenditure.

Repairs to Buildings,..

Maintenance of Telegraph,

Public Works Extraordinary.

*Water and Drainage Works, Miscellaneous,

Taipingshan Improvement,.

Forming and Kerbing Streets, Victoria, Gardener's Cottagė,

*Chargeable to Loan.

.$12,000

1,000

42,000

40,000

1

3,000

5,000

$103,000

'C.5.0.

1398 of 1897.

Government House, Hongkong, 6th August, 1897.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Five thousand Dollars, ($5,000), for the Construction of a new Road at the Peak District, from Plantation Road to Magazine

Gap.

Government House, Hongkong, 6th August, 1897.

C.S.O.

1786 of 1897.

C.S.O.

1972 of 1897.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Five hundred and Twenty-three Dollars ($523), to meet the cost of certain fire-extinguishing appliances at the Gaol.

Government House, Hongkong, 16th August, 1897.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Three hundred and Forty-nine Dollars and Thirty Cents ($349.30), in aid of the vote "Slaughter-House, Sheep and Pig Depôts, including Pier."

Government House, Hongkong, 20th August, 1897.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

REPORT OF THE FINANCE COMMITTEE. The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the report of the Finance Committee dated the 28th June, 1897, (No. 4), and moved its adoption.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

REPORT OF THE PUBLIC WORKS COMMITTEE.-The Acting Director of Public Works laid on the table the report of the Public Works Committee, dated the 4th August, 1897, (No. 3), and moved its adoption.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

QUESTIONS.-Mr. WHITEHEAD, pursuant to notice, asked the following questions :-

With reference to the Report of the Retrenchment Commission will the Government lay upon the table a copy of the despatches and instructions received from the Secretary of State for the Colonies in relation thereto, and in connection with applications in respect of salaries similar to those recently referred by His Excellency the Governor to a Committee?

Will the Government lay upon the table a return shewing all sterling payments made in England for any purpose or in the Colony on a gold basis with the equivalent dollar amounts dis- bursed by the Treasury in respect thereof, such return to commence with 1890 and to include the estimated payments for 1897 and 1898?

What steps do the Government now propose to take with a view to the speedy disposal of the Crown land available at Taipingshan and what were the causes of the failure of the Govern- ment to obtain a bid for any lot at the recent sale by public auction?

Will the Government lay upon the table a detailed statement or account of the loan of £200,000 raised in 1887, shewing separately in sterling and in dollars all receipts and all payments in connection with or in respect of the principal, interest, and sinking fund, with the dates and the rates of exchange at which each item was converted from sterling into dollars or vice versa, in short, a detailed account shewing how much interest per cent. per annum the rate- payers have paid for the loan in question, and a similar account to date in respect of the last loan of £200,000 floated in 1894, shewing in addition what amount thereof is still available, if any, how and in what way the monies have been expended, and what are the available assets in respect of said disbursements? The statement to shew in what securities the sinking fund has been invested, the cost thereof in sterling and in dollars, the annual revenue derived therefrom and the present market value of the securities.

Will the Government direct the Medical Officer of Health to report:-(1.) Upon all cases of typhoid fever which have occurred in the Colony during the last 12 months; and (2.) As to whether or not he has instituted any enquiry into the history of these cases, adding thereto the causes which have led to the recent greater prevalence of this disease in the Colony, and with what results?

The Colonial Secretary replied and laid on the table the various statements and a Report of the Medical Officer of Health asked for by the Ionourable Member.

23

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO FURTHER AMEND THE PREPARED OPIUM ORDINANCE, 1891.- The Attorney General moved the first reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE WIDOWS' AND ORPHANS PENSIONS (AMENDMENT) ORDINANCE NO. 28 or 1895.-The Colonial Treasurer movel the first reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE FOR THE NATURALIZATION OF Ho Mui Sz ALIAS HO LIN SIING.- The Attorney General moved the first reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

ADJOURNMENT.—The Council then adjourned till Thursday, the 26th August, 1897, at 3 P.M.

Read and confirmed this 26th day of August, 1897.

J. G. T. BUCKLE,

Clerk of Councils.

Lod

WILLIAM ROBINSON,

Governor.

25

SPECIAL MEETING

OF THE

EXECUTIVE AND LEGISLATIVE COUNCILS,

on the occasion of the Completion of the 60th Year of Her Majesty the Queen's Reign.

TUESDAY, 22ND JUNE, 1897.

V

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(Sir WILLIAM ROBINSON, K.C.M.G.).

His Excellency the Major-General Commanding (Major-General WILSONE BLACK, C.B.). The Honourable the Colonial Secretary and Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART LOCKHART).

-

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

HENRY ERNEST WODEHOUSE, C.M.G.

""

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1)

the Harbour Master, (ROBERT MURRAY RUMSEY, R.N.).

""

the Captain Superintendent of Police, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.)

""

the Colonial Treasurer, (THOMAS SERCOMBE SMITH).

""

י

the Acting Director of Public Works, (WILLIAM CHATHAM).

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

};

>>

1)

"7

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS, C.M.G.

JAMES JARDINE BELL-IRVING. WEI YUK.

The Council met pursuant to notice.

His Excellency the Governor addressed the Council, and noved that the following telegram be despatched to Her Most Gracious Majesty the QUEEN through Her Majesty's Principal Secretary of State for the Colonies:-

"We, the Governor, Executive Council, and Legislative Council of Hongkong in Council assembled on this auspicious occasion of national rejoicing and thanksgiving, desire on behalf of ourselves and all your other loving subjects in this Colony to give expression to our feel ings of loyalty and devotion to your Majesty's throne and person. We pray that by the grace of God your glorious reign may be long continued over a peaceful and prosperous Empire."

Mr. CHATER Seconded and addressed the Council.

Question-put and passed.

The Council then adjourned.

Read and confirmed, this 26th day of August, 1897.

J. G. T. Buckle,

WILLIAM ROBINSON,

Governor.

Clerk of Councils.

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 8.

THURSDAY, 26TH AUGUST, 1897.

27

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(Sir WILLIAM ROBINSON, G.C.M.G.).

His Excellency the Major-General Commanding (Major-General WILSONE BLACK, C.B.).

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary and Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART LOCKHART).

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

>>

29

the Captain Superintendent of Police, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.).

""

the Colonial Treasurer, (THOMAS SERCOMBE SMITH).

"

13

""

""

the Acting Director of Public Works, (WILLIAM CHATHAM).

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER, C.M.G.

Ho KAI, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS, C.M.G.

JAMES JARDINE BELL-IRVING. WEI YUK.

ABSENT:

The Honourable the Harbour Master, (ROBERT MURRAY RUMSEY, R.N.).

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 23rd August, 1897, and of a Special Meeting held on the 22nd June, 1897, were read and confirmed.

PAPERS.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following papers :--

1. The Blue Book for 1896.

2: Correspondence respecting the Salaries of Officers employed in the Public Service. FINANCIAL MINUTE.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following Financial Minute, (No. 19), and moved that it be referred to the Finance Committee':

C.S.O.

2026 of 1897.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Five hundred Dollars ($500), in aid of the vote "Materials for Remunerative Industry, Victoria Gaol."

Government House, Hongkong, 23rd August, 1897.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

REPORT OF THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the report of the Finance Committee dated the 23rd August, 1897, (No. 5), and moved its adoption.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

REPORT OF THE PUBLIC WORKS COMMITTEE.-The Acting Director of Public Works laid on the table the report of the Public Works Committee, dated the 23rd August, 1897, (No. 4), and moved its adoption.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

2

28

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO FURTHER AMEND THE MEDICAL REGISTRATION ORDINANCE, 1884, AND TO REPEAL ORDINANCE No. 1 of 1897.-The Attorney General moved the first reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

The Attorney General moved the suspension of the Standing Rules and Orders.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

The Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question--put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed and Bill reported without amendment.

The Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put, and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO FURTHER AMEND THE PREPARED OPIUM ORDINANCE, 1891.- The Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question--put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

On the motion of the Attorney General the Council went into Committee on the Bill.

On the interpretation clause being read, the Attorney General moved, as an amendment, that the last line be altered so as to read "his family and bonâ fide private guests.'

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

99

The Honourable Ho KAI moved, as an amendment to Section 6 (c), that the words "a bonâ fide member of such keeper's family" be added after the word "or" in the last line.

The Honourable WEI YUK seconded.

The Council divided.

For.

Honourable WEI YUK.

Honourable J. J. BELL-IRVING. Honourable E. R. BELILIOS.

Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD.

Honourable Ho KAI.

Honourable C. P. CHATER.

Honourable the Colonial Treasurer.

Honourable the Colonial Secretary.

H. E. the Major-General Commanding.

Amendment carried by a majority of 6.

Against.

Honourable the Acting Director of Public Works. Honourable the Captain Superintendent of Police. Honourable the Attorney General.

Council resumed and Bill reported with amendments.

The Attorney General moved the suspension of the Standing Rules and Orders.

The Colonial Secretary seconded,

Question-put and agreed to.

The Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this bill do pass.

Bill passed.

29

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE WIDOWS' AND ORPHANS' PENSIONS (AMENDMENT) ORDINANCE No. 28 or 1895.-The Colonial Treasurer move the second reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

1

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed and Bill reported without amendment,

The Colonial Treasurer moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE FOR THE NATURALIZATION OF HO MUI SZ ALIAS HO LIN SHING.- The Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed and Bill reported without amendment.

The Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question--put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned till Monday, the 6th September, 1897, at 3 P.M.

Read and confirmed this 6th day of September, 1897.

J. G. T. BUCKLE,

Clerk of Councils.

WILLIAM ROBINSON,

Governor.

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 9.

MONDAY, 6TH SEPTEMBER, 1897.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(Sir WILLIAM ROBINSON, G.C.M.G.). -

The Honourable Colonel HENRY ELSDALE, R.E.

""

>>

""

ད་

>>

31

the Colonial Secretary and Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART LOCKHART). the Harbour Master, (ROBERT MURRAY RUMSEY, R.N.).

بھیجو

the Captain Superintendent of Police, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G. ) the Colonial Treasurer, (THOMAS SERCOMBE SMITH).

the Acting Director of Public Works, (WILLIAM CHATHAM).

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER, C.M.G.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS, C.M.G.

JAMES JARDINE BELL-IRVING.

WEI YUK.

""

ABSENT:

His Excellency the Major-General Commanding (Major-General WILSONE BLACK, C.B.). The Honourable the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

اردو

NEW MEMBER.--Colonel HENRY ELSDALE, R.E., took the Oath of Allegiance on his provisional appointment to a seat in the Council vice His Excellency Major-General WILSONE BLACK, C.B., absent on leave.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 26th August, 1897, were read and confirmed. REPORT OF THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the report of the Finance Committee dated the 26th August, 1897, (No. 6), and moved its adoption.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

REPORT OF THE PUBLIC WORKS COMMITTEE.-The Acting Director of Public Works laid on the table the report of the Public Works Committee, dated the 26th August, 1897, (No. 5), and moved its adoption.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO AUTHORISE THE APPROPRIATION OF A SUPPLEMENTARY SUM OF THREE HUNDRED AND FORTY-ONE THOUSAND AND TWENTY-FIVE DOLLARS AND THIRTY-SEVEN CENTS TO DEFRAY THE CHARGES OF THE YEAR 1896.-The Colonial Treasurer moved the first reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question--put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO PREVENT THE SPREAD OF INFECTIOUS DISEASE ARISING FROM THE CONSUMPTION OF CONTAMINATED OR UNWHOLESOME MILK. The Colonial Secretary moved the first reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO FURTHER AMEND THE HONGKONG FIRE BRIGADE Ordinance, 1868. The Colonial Secretary moved the first reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned till Monday, the 13th September, 1897, at 3 P.M.

Read and confirmed, this 13th day of September, 1897.

J. G. T. BUCKLE,

Clerk of Councils.

:

WILLIAM ROBINSON,

Governor.

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 10.

MONDAY, 13TH SEPTEMBER, 1897.

33

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(Sir WILLIAM ROBINSON, G.C.M.G.).

The Honourable Colonel HENRY ELSDALE, R.E.

the Colonial Secretary and Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART LOCKHART).

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

the Harbour Master, (ROBERT MURRAY RUMSEY, R.N.).

""

99

the Captain Superintendent of Police, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.).

""

the Colonial Treasurer, (THOMAS SERCOMBE SMITH).

""

""

""

AAR:

the Acting Director of Public Works, (WILLIAM CHATHAM). CATCHICK PAUL, CHATER, C.M.G.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS, C.M.G. JAMES JARDINE BELL-IRVING.

WEI YUK.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

}

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 6th September, 1897, were read and confirmed.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO AUTHORISE THE HONGKONG AND KOWLOON WHARF AND GODOWN COMPANY LIMITED, TO LAY AND MAINTAIN TRAMWAYS ON CERTAIN PUBLIC ROADS AT Kow- LOON, IN THE COLONY OF HONGKONG, AND TO CONFER UPON THE SAID HONGKONG AND KOWLOON WHARF AND GODOWN COMPANY, LIMITED, CERTAIN OTHER RIGHTS, POWERS AND PRIVILEGES.—Mr. BELL-IRVING moved the first reading of the Bill.

Mr. CHATER seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO AUTHORISE THE APPROPRIATION OF A SUPPLEMENTARY SUM OF THREE HUNDRED AND FORTY-ONE THOUSAND AND TWENTY-FIVE DOLLARS AND THIRTY-SEVEN CENTS TO DEFRAY THE CHARGES OF THE YEAR 1896.-The Colonial Treasurer moved the second reading of the Bill and addressed the Council.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question---put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

The Colonial Treasurer moved that the Bill be referred to the Finance Committee. The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill considered in Finance Committee and reported to the Council without amendment. Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resuined and Bill reported without amendment.

The Colonial Treasurer moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Mr. WHITEHEAD moved, as an amendment, that the third reading of the Bill be postponed until the next meeting of Council.

Mr. CHATER seconded.

Council divided:-

For the amendment.

Honourable WEI YUK.

Honourable J. J. BELL-IRVING. Honourable E. R. BELILIOS.

Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD.

Honourable Ho KAI.

Honourable C. P. CHATER.

Against the amendment.

Honourable the Acting Director of Public Works. Honourable the Colonial Treasurer.

Honourable the Harbour Master.

Honourable the Captain Superintendent of Police.

Honourable the Attorney General.

Honourable the Colonial Secretary.

Honourable the Colonel Commanding.

Amendment lost by a majority of seven votes to six.

The original motion was then put, and the Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

34

*

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO PREVENT THE SPREAD OF INFECTIOUS DISEASE ARISING FROM

THE CONSUMPTION OF CONTAMINATED OR UNWHOLESOME MILK.-The Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed aud Bill reported without amendment,

The Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO FURTHER AMEND THE HONGKONG FIRE BRIGADE ORDINANCE, 1868.-The Attorney General addressed the Council and moved that the second reading of the Bill be postponed.

The Colonial Secretary seconded. Question--put and agreed to.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned till Monday, the 20th September, 1897, at 3 P.M.

Read and confirmed this 25th day of October, 1897.

J. G. T. BUCKLE,

Clerk of Councils.

WILLIAM ROBINSON,

Governor.

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 11.

MONDAY, 25TH OCTOBER, 1897.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(Sir WILLIAM ROBINSON, G.C.M.G.).

The Honourable Colonel-HENRY ELSDALE, R.E.

""

35

the Colonial Secretary and Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART LOCKHART). the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

""

""

the Harbour Master, (ROBERT MURRAY RUMSEY, R.N.).

91

the Captain Superintendent of Police, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.).

""

the Colonial Treasurer, (THOMAS SERCOMBE SMITH).

21

""

""

39

19

the Director of Public Works, (ROBERT DALY ORMSBY).

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER, C.M.G.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS, C.M.G.

JAMES JARDINE BELL-IRVING.

WEI YUK.

The Council met pursuant to summons.

NEW MEMBER.-Mr. ROBERT DALY ORMSBY took his seat as Director of Public Works, after having taken the Oath prescribed by Ordinance 4 of 1869.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 13th September, 1897, were read and confirmed. PAPERS.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following papers :-

1. Report on the progress of Public Works during the half-year ending 30th June, 1897. 2. Report on the Praya Reclamation Works for the first half-year 1897.

FINANCIAL MINUTE. The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following Financial Minutes, (Nos. 20, 21 and 22), and moved that they be referred to the Finance Committee:

C.S.O.

2139 of 1897.

C.S.O. 972 of 1897.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Three thousand Dollars ($3,000), in aid of the vote "Expenses for Volunteers."

Government House, Hongkong, 18th September, 1897.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote the following sums to meet certain expenses in the Police Department:-

For Clothing and Accoutreinents,

Bedding, Mess Utensils, &c.,

Incidental Expenses,

""

Conveyance of Police Pensioners, &c.,

Secret Service,

......

""

$4,500

750

1,400

1,000

400

Total,...

$8,050

C.S.O.

2367 of 1897.

Government House, Hongkong, 18th September, 1897.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Dollars Ninety-eight thousand Eight hundred and Ninety-two and Cents Twenty-eight ($98,892.28), being the Government contribution towards the Jubilee Fund.

Government House, Hongkong, 29th September, 1897.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

36

REPORT OF THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the report of the Finance Committee dated the 13th September, 1897, (No. 7), and moved its adoption.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

SANITARY BYE-LAW.-The Colonial Secretary informed the Council that he would move the approval of the Bye-law (made by the Sanitary Board on the 16th September, 1897, under sub-section 12 of Ordinance 24 of 1887 and sub-section Ď of section 1 of Ordinance 26 of 1890) at the next meeting.

QUESTIONS.-Mr. WHITEHEAD, pursuant to notice, asked the following questions:--

Was the evidence taken by the Honourable the Captain Superintendent of Police and the Crown Solicitor in connection with the charges against Inspector Stanton and other members of the Police Force submitted to the Honourable the Attorney General for his opinion, and was he satisfied as to its sufficiency before action was taken thereon, and did His Excellency the Governor sanction the dismissal of Inspector Stanton and other members of the Police Force with the advice of the Executive Council or on the sole recommendation of the Captain Superintendent of Police?

His Excellency replied.

1

Under what authority and for what purposes have the Crown Agents for the Colonies recently sold in London to the Exchange Banks old bills on Hongkong for large amounts; if this has been done in virtue of any special instructions will the Government lay a copy thereof on the table together with a copy of the Secretary of State's general instructions in connection with the custody and the disposal of the Colonial Government's cash balances in Hongkong? Can the Colonial Government's contribution of $98,892.28 towards the Queen's Jubilee Fund be paid out of the existing balance of the sterling loan, or out of revenue balances in hand, or partly out of one and partly out of the other, or is it to be paid out of revenue? If out of revenue how is such revenue to be raised and will the Imperial Government forego its claim to the Military Contribution of 171⁄2 per cent. on $98,892.28, viz., $17,306.15, and present it to the colony as the Imperial Government's contribution towards the Jubilee Fund? The Colonial Secretary replied.

NOTICE OF QUESTION.- Mr. WHITEHEAD gave notice that, at the next meeting of Council, he would ask the following question:

If the Honourable the Colonial Secretary, after last meeting of the Finance Committee of this Council held on 13th ultimo, requested or directed the Reporter of the "Daily Press" and for the official Hansard report of the proceedings of this Council, to suppress any portion of the discussion on the subject of the Military Contribution which took place at said meeting, and if it was at his suggestion that a question put by me at that meeting with reference to the Military Contribution, the Honourable Member's reply thereto, and the Honourable the Colonial Treasurer's correction of an error inte which the Honourable the Colonial Secretary had fallen in his reply, did not appear in the report of the meeting of the Finance Committee in any one of the three local newspapers and is not contained in the official Hansard report as sent round by the "Daily Press" to Honourable Members for revision.

JUBILEE VOTE.-His Excellency addressed the Council on the subject of the Cypher Telegram sent to the Secretary of State on the 14th April, 1897, in connection with the Government contribution towards the Jubilee Fund.

His Excellency then addressed the Council as follows:-

HONOURABLE GENTLEMEN OF THE LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL,

I have much pleasure in laying upon the table the Estimates for 1898.

These Estimates have been in your hands for the last fortnight. You have therefore had sufficient time to give them your careful attention, except in one important item which will necessitate a change in the figures of these Estimates.

Whilst

Before proceeding to deal in detail with those points which call for special remark, it affords me satisfaction to announce that, in deference to the wishes of the Shipping Commu- nity, the charge for Light Dues has been reduced from 2 cents to 1 cent per ton. I am glad to be able to redeem the promise of the Government in this matter, I would remind you that, if hereafter necessity should arise for increasing the Revenue, it may be necessary to again raise the shipping charges. I trust that this contingency may not occur.

37

It gives me equal pleasure to inform you that, notwithstanding the reduction of the Light Dues which will involve a decrease of some $70,000 in the receipts from this source, and the unprecedentedly low value of the dollar, taken at 1s. 9d., I do not propose to levy any additional taxation. The deficiency, if any, will be fully met by large receipts from Land Sales during the coming year, as well as by the increased value of the Opium Farm. The estimate in the first case is based upon the fact that the Government has a very valuable asset in Taipingshan, a large portion of which will almost certainly be recovered in 1898, as well as in valuable sites in other much-sought-after localities.

I would now invite your attention to the following points.

The Revenue has been cautiously estimated, and is expected to amount to $2,694,868 as against $2,609,878 collected in 1896, or an estimated increase of $84,990 on the total receipts for the latter year. The most noteworthy increases (in round numbers) are as

follows:

Opium Monopoly,

Assessed Taxes,

.$71,680

57,700

11,500

Stamps,

Medical Treatment in the Civil Hospital, 3,400

Official Signatures,.

2,500

Queen's College, Fees from Scholars,

...

3,500.

Postage,

14,700

Leased Lands,

17,700

Water Account,

14,000

There are also minor increases under other headings, and two new items, viz.:-

Certificates to Chinese entering America, $20,000

Interest,

3,000

The increase under the heading "Assessed Taxes" is expected in view of the prospective re-valuation of all rateable tenements which will come into force from the 1st July next, and the number of new buildings nearing completion. The estimated increase in the receipts on Water Account is due to the additional revenue derived from the establishment of the new Waterworks in Kowloon and elsewhere.

J

In 1896 there were no receipts on account of "Interest," the Government balances being exhausted by the expenditure incurred in connection with the resumption of Taipingshan, and in dealing with the Plague Epidemic during that year.

The principal items, which will probably show a falling off as compared with the receipts for 1896, are as follows:-

Light Dues,

Fines,

..$72,000

22,500

Junk Licences,

4,600

Fees of Court,

2,000

Miscellaneous Receipts,

5,000

Subsidiary Coins,

10,000

Land Sales,........

15,800

in addition to other minor decreases.

The Government intends to adopt a bold policy in regard to the supply of subsidiary coins, and it is probable that, if the demand for them continues to be as brisk as it is at present, the result may be more gratifying than the estimated revenue from this source would lead me to conjecture. The Government is much indebted to the Chief Manager of the Hongkong and Shanghai Bank for his assistance and advice in connection with this subject.

As regards Land Sales, I should not be surprised if, for reasons which I have already stated, instead of falling short of the somewhat exceptional figures for 1896, the revenue from this source for 1898 actually exceeded the receipts for the former year.

38

The total Estimated Expenditure, including Public Works Extraordinary, for 1898 amounts to $2,770,706. Of this sum $137,830 is chargeable to the Loan, leaving a balance of $2,632,876 to be defrayed from current revenue. This gives an estimated surplus of revenue over expenditure of $61,992. In estimating the Expenditure the rate of exchange, for the purpose of sterling payments, has been taken at the low value of 1s. 9d.

I

The difference between the estimate of expenditure for 1898 and the total sum expended in 1896 is $295,796. Of this increase no less than $270,906 is on account of the more extensive programme for Public Works Extraordinary which it is proposed to carry out in 1898, and which includes several works of pressing importance to the sanitary well-being of the Colony and of a remunerative nature. Some of these are destined for the general benefit and con- venience of the community. Amongst the latter I may mention the Improvement of the Recreation Ground at Wongneichong, which will be partly paid for in 1898; the extension of the new road, known as Chamberlain Road, at the Peak; the extension of certain streets in Kowloon; and the proposed new road from Plantation Road to Magazine Gap. This road, whilst improving the means of communication between the Hill Districts, will open up several very desirable building sites for private residences.

You will, probably, have observed that no provision has been made in the Estimates for the new Victoria Road, Victoria Hospital, and Nursing Institute, which are intended to commemorate the completion of the sixtieth year of Her Majesty's reign. This loyal com- munity having subscribed $98,000, the Government, in accordance with its promise, proposes to add a like sum: The Finance Committee will therefore be asked to-day to vote that amount. When the vote is passed it will be charged to the revenue for the current year. The Fund will then stand at the handsome total of over $196,000, and it is proposed to draw upon it to defray the expenditure on those special works that may be incurred during 1898 and following years. It may interest you to know that I have applied for the services. of three Sisters who will be at the disposal of the community on fixed terms as soon as they arrive early next year.

Having explained the greater part of the estimated increase of expenditure for 1898 as compared with that incurred in 1896, it remains to point out the most noticeable increases under other heads, viz. :--

Public Debt, Pensions,...

Post Office,.....

Sanitary Department,..

Public Works Recurrent,

$48,970

26,950

23,500

..... 10,000 -

13,500

The increased expenditure on account of Public Debt is partly due to the contribution to the new Sinking Fund, which only commenced in October 1896, and partly to the depreciation of the dollar. An increase for Pensions is only to be expected as the Colony grows older and the number of pensioners increases.

The increase for Public Works Recurrent is explained by the general extension of works and the consequently increased cost of maintenance. The other increases are accounted for in the foot-notes contained in the Estimates.

The following substantial decreases, on the other hand, as compared with the expenditure for 1896 should be recorded :—

Legal Departments,

Magistracy,

Police and Gaol,

Miscellaneous Services,..

Military Expenditure,

$ 6,600

3,200

10,100

66,200

26,800

I have now, I think, dealt as fully as time permits with the Estimates for 1898 and any further information that may be desired will be furnished in Finance Committee.

As regards the financial prospects of the current year, you will observe that the revised Estimate of Revenue only amounts to $2,446,065. The revised Estimate of

!

77

89

Expenditure, on the other hand, is put at $2,590,870, giving an estimated excess of Expend- iture over Revenue of $144,805. Since the revised Estimate of Revenue was prepared, the financial barometer has risen considerably and the depression, which was likely to affect the items "Land Sales and "Subsidiary Coins," has disappeared. I have now good reason for stating that the revenue from Land Sales is almost certain to double the amount estimated, i.c., $200,000 instead of $100,000; whilst if exchange maintains its present higher rate, it is not too much to expect a profit of 41 per cent. from subsidiary coins which, on the total consignments ordered for the year, should bring in some $100,000 instead of $65,000 as previously estimated. This disposes of $135,000 of the anticipated excess, and the remaining $9,800 is more than covered by the balance in hand at the end of 1896 (exclusive of Loan monies) amounting to $13,486. An estimated deficit of over $144,000 will thus be converted into a surplus of $3,686. I am hopeful of even a more favourable result. The prospect may, I think, be considered satisfactory especially when it is borne in mind that over $98,000 will have been contributed from current revenue to the Jubilee Fund, and that Public Works have by no means been neglected.

And here, Gentlemen, I will briefly review the position of the Colonial Finances. At the time of my arrival the Colony was reaping the inevitable results of over-speculation and labouring under the weight of severe financial depression. The outlook was anything but bright; business was dull, and the revenue suffered accordingly. On the other hand, there were Public Works of pressing importance to be carried on, e.g., the Praya Reclamation, the Central Market, the Extension of the Gaol, and the Water, Drainage, and Sewerage Works. It was evident that the revenue was insufficient to meet the demands made upon it.

However, I awaited the financial results of my first year of administration; and those results, Gentlemen, convinced me of the necessity of raising a loan, and if you will refer to my speech to this Council on the 25th January, 1892, you will recollect that I then approached you on the subject with an expression of regret that it should have fallen to my lot to make such a proposal to you in my first address. Further experience of the situation and a study of the financial prospects for 1893 confirmed me in my opinion, and, in laying the Estimates on the 16th November, 1892, I definitely announced to you that a loan had become a necessity. You admitted that necessity, and in 1893 an Inscribed Stock Loan of £200,000 at 3 per cent. was negotiated by the Crown Agents. In the following year, the unredeemed balance of the 1887 Loan, amounting to £140,000, was converted from 4% Debentures into 34 % Inscribed Stock, and thus brought into conformity with the 1893 Loan.

The Public Debt of the Colony now stands at £341,799, the figures over and above the sum of £340,000 representing extra stock issued in connection with the expenses of con- version. Against this debt must be set the sum of £1,594, already contributed to the new Sinking Fund, and the unexpended balance of the Loan which, on the 31st August last, stood at £43,139.

The relief afforded by the Loan soon produced visible results. At the end of 1894, our balances in hand amounted to no less than $450,000, and my early-expressed hopes seemed destined to be fulfilled. It was not, however, within the power of human foresight to contemplate the exceptional circumstances which intervened at this juncture, and which absorbed the entire amount of our credit balances. The Plague of 1894 and its recrudescence- in 1896 has cost this Colony-directly and indirectly-nearly $1,200,000, not to mention the large increase in the cost of the Sanitary Department, and the expenditure on various sanitary improvements. Then again, the dollar has depreciated in value nearly 100 per cent., and our sterling payments have increased proportionately. It was not therefore a matter for surprise that at the end of 1895 our balances of $450,000, in addition to the ordinary surplus for the year, had been wholly expended, and that a debit balance of $171,908 was carried forward to the 1896 account. It is, however, a matter for congratulation that that debit balance was wiped out during the year, and that at the beginning of 1897 a balance of $13,400 stood to our credit, and that, notwithstanding the Government contribution to the Jubilee Fund, there is every reasonable prospect of the accounts for the year 1898 opening with a balance on the right side.

And now, Gentlemen, my statement in regard to the financial position has been neces- sarily somewhat long, but it will, I venture to hope, be regarded as most satisfactory taking

40

into consideration all the opposing circumstances to which I have referred. I have endea- voured to fulfil my promises to avoid all "harassing and embarrassing" legislation, and to effect economy.

The fulfilment of the former will be recognised in the way in which the Estimate of Revenue for 1898 has been framed, and of the latter in the retrenchment which has been generally effected throughout the Service. I think it right, however, to state that, in my opinion, certain posts in the Civil Service are insufficiently paid, especially when compared with similar appointments in other Colonies. I trust it will be possible to remedy this defect, and thus retain in Hongkong the services of experienced officers who might otherwise accept a transfer to Colonies where they would be more highly remunerated.

While on this subject I desire to avail myself of this opportunity to acknowledge the great assistance I have received during my Government from all branches of the Civil Service, and to express my appreciation of the loyal manner in which they have co-operated with me in furthering the interests of the Colony.

I have every reason to adhere to my confidence in the resources of Hongkong and its financial soundness. A handsome advance has been secured on the price at present paid for the Opium Farm, and I wish I could look forward with equal certainty to a rise in the sterling value of the dollar.

As regards the events of the year, with one exception to which I shall refer later, there is but little to record. The Captain Superintendent of Police, reports a period of compara- tive peace.

There are, however, two noteworthy items of "Police news" to which I may refer. The first is the placing of District Watchmen on Police beats under the supervision of Europeans between the hours of 6 p.m. and 6 a.m., thus re-inforcing the Police by forty auxiliaries of a very useful stamp.

The arrangement has so far worked satisfactorily, and it is hoped that the additional protection thus afforded will tend to reduce the number of armed gang robberies, which are only too frequent in the winter months. The other innovation is the withdrawal of the Night Pass and Light Regulations. Night Passes were first introduced in 1857, when, no doubt, good reasons existed for such a stringent measure.

In this present year of grace, however, such restrictions cannot but be regarded as a relic of a barbarous past and incon- sistent, in these enlightened times, with the liberty of the subject. Results, have justified the repeal of these Regulations, and I am sure the relief has been fully appreciated by the respectable Chinese.

And here, I must refer with great regret to the grave irregularities which have recently been shown to exist in the Police Force and in other Departments of the Government Service amongst the subordinate officers. You are aware of the action taken by the Government in this matter, and I believe that it has been guided to a proper course. I fear there can be no doubt that these irregularities have been in existence for very many years That they have now been brought to light, and that stringent measures have been taken to put an end to them must ultimately conduce to a better state of things in the future.

As regards the Public Health, I can give you an exceptionally favourable report, which may, to some extent, compensate for the large amount of Sanitary Legislation which has of late

years fallen upon us.

There have been only 17 cases of Plague during the year, several

of which are said to have been imported from the mainland. This is very satisfactory when it is remembered that the disease was prevalent in the neighbouring ports of Amoy and Swatow, and in the island of Formosa for several months. The comparative immunity from Plague enjoyed by Hongkong during 1897 may be due to the improved sanitary condition of the Colony and the increased vigilance of the Sanitary Board.

The death rate of the British and Foreign community for the first 9 months of the year is 21.5 per thousand as compared with 23.6 for the corresponding period of 1891, whilst the death rate amongst the Chinese community for the like periods has been reduced from 26.9 per 1,000 to 18.9 per 1,000. This represents an annual saving of nearly 2,000 Chinese lives and about 17 European.

The main drainage has been, practically, completely re-modelled. Thirty-six miles of sewers have been laid, not including the drains constructed in connection with the re-drainage

41

of houses, which would nearly double those figures. I am informed that Victoria may now be regarded as one of the best drained cities east of Suez, and that its domestic sanitation will compare favourably with that of any of the large cities in England:

Bye-laws have been made for the compulsory concreting of ground floors in dwellings, for the prevention of overcrowding, for the regulation of bake-houses, laundries, opium- smoking divans, offensive trades, and animal depôts, for the regular periodical cleansing of tenement dwellings, and for the notification of communicable diseases, and these are being quietly and steadily enforced.

The New Central Market, the Slaughter-houses and adjoining Cattle Depôts at Kennedy Town and Kowloon which have an important bearing on the food supply of the Colony have been completed during my administration, whilst the water supply, which is of vital import- ance to the health of the community, has been increased to 400,000,000 gallons, and extended to the Kowloon Peninsula, and to the populous villages of Shaukiwan and Aberdeen.

The most noticeable features in the history of Education during my term of office have been--(1) the revision of the Grant-in-Aid Code in 1893, which added arithmetic to the subjects for which grants should be given to schools giving a purely Chinese education, elementary science in the case of schools giving a European education in the Chinese. language, and a seventh standard in all classes of schools. (2) The graduating of two pupils in July, 1892, from the Chinese College of Medicine, being the first two graduates from that Institution. (3) The opening of the Belilios Public School for Girls in December, 1893, for which we have to thank the generosity of an Honourable Member of this Council; and (4) The limitation in November, 1895, of grants-in-aid to schools giving a European educa- tion in the English language-a measure which was induced by the very marked deficiency in this respect on the part of the Chinese community resident in this Colony, and the necessity recognised from the experiences of 1894 of providing a more enlightened education. I trust that this policy will be maintained, and that a training institution, which will furnish a supply of qualified teachers and so place the means of acquiring a useful knowledge of the English language and Western ideas within the reach of the poorer classes of the Chinese community may be provided. I consider that such expenditure will be incurred in a most important cause, and I commend to the notice of the Council the desirability of increasing the Grant-in-Aid Vote, and of continuing to substitute subsidised schools for the Govern- ment schools that still remain in existence..

in

As regards the attendance at the various educational establishments in the Colony, I re- gret to say that the check experienced in 1894 on account of the Plague has been more per- manent in its results than was originally anticipated, and recovery has been further impeded by its recrudescence in 1896. I hope that, given favourable circumstances, the progress this direction which was so noticeable during the first three years of my term of office, may again make itself evident at an early date, and that education will receive that support which it so fully deserves.

The shipping returns, though not attaining to the figures of 1896, are, nevertheless- quite satisfactory. During the nine months ended on the 30th September, 7,108 vessels of European construction, aggregating nearly 9,000,000 tons Register, entered and cleared at the Harbour Office. The increase of shipping under Foreign flags (principally German and Japanese) has been very noticeable, but 68 per cent. of the total tonnage, and 56 per cent. of the ocean-going tonnage alone was British. These ships carried, in and through our waters, about 5 million tons of cargo and bunker coal, and over a million passengers.

As might be expected, junks followed the European shipping, and the figures do not come up to those for the corresponding period of last year.

There is no reason, however, for assuming that the falling off is anything but temporary, and it can in a large measure be traced to a short rice crop in the period under review, during which 430,000 tons less were reported than in the same period of 1896.

The commercial progress of the Colony during the last five years is very marked. The tonnage, which is always a more or less reliable indication, has increased by 2,510,255

"

42

tons, whilst the value of the transit trade has improved to the extent of 28,933,788 Haikwan taels, or nearly £5,000,000 sterling. No less remarkable is the development of local indus- tries, of which, believing in the policy of independence, I have always been a warm supporter. The establishment of two large kerosene oil depôts, feather-dressing and match factories, soap, coal briquette and rattan works, the extensions of the Docks, the large Sugar Refine- ries, the rope and cement works are standing monuments of that development, whilst the spirit of local enterprise is again evident in the recent formation of a Public Company for the establishment of cotton mills in this Colony.

I am particularly gratified at this latest movement. It is nearly four years since I first made the suggestion to you in this Council and promised my co-operation so far as the ac- quisition of land was concerned. It is nearly two years since I repeated the suggestion and renewed my promise. I trust that whilst you have given practical effect to the former, I have not failed in my fulfilment of the latter.

It remains to mention one other event of great importance to the trade of this Colony, viz., the opening of the West River ports to Foreign trade on the 3rd June last. You will recollect that in my address to you of the 25th November, 1895, I assured you that although for a time, at least, local interests might necessarily be postponed in favour of purely Imperial interests, this question had by no means been lost sight of.

The result has proved that I was justified in making that statement, and it affords me much pleasure to have witnessed before my departure the accomplishment of this object. When communication has been satisfactorily established between Hongkong and the West River ports, this Colony will, doubtless, share to the fullest extent in the harvest to be reaped from these additional fields for commercial enterprise.

My relations with the Chinese community of this Colony have always been of the most cordial nature. I have had no reason to change my earliest-formed impression of their industrious, peaceful, and law-abiding qualities. On the other hand, I have had every reason to adhere to my original promise that they would find in me not only a Governor but also a friend. And if on one or two occasions I have had to disguise my good intentions under the cloak of official authority, I have on such occasions endeavoured to combine firmness with consideration for their feelings and national customs. My object has always been to promote their welfare and secure their best interests.

In proof of the sincerity of these professions, if any such proof is required, I would refer to the concessions granted during the Plague Epidemic of 1894 under circumstances which involved a very large degree of responsibility. I would also mention the support accorded by the Government to the Pó Léung Kuk, which has enabled that charitable Society to erect a new home, which I opened in person, and to continue its beneficial work under more favourable circumstances. Great improvements also have been effected in the administration and sanitary condition of the Tung Wa Hospital, the benefits of which are already evident and are daily becoming more appreciated by the native community.

I have already referred to the modification of the Light and Pass Regulations which prove to have been an unnecessary restriction. And if any further illustration is needed of my regard for the interests of the Chinese, I would mention the additional representation on this Council recently accorded to them at my suggestion.

And here I desire to express my indebtedness to the Registrar General, whose know- ledge of the Chinese characteristics and of the language, and whose advice in all matters relating to their interests, has always been of the greatest assistance to me.

I cannot conclude my remarks without reference to that unique occasion in the annals of our national history which has recently been celebrated throughout the vast British Empire. I mean, of course, the completion of the sixtieth year of Her Majesty's beneficent reign.

It is impossible to appreciate adequately or relatively the enthusiastic expressions of loyalty, respect, and devotion towards our beloved Queen-Empress which that commemo- ration called forth from countless millions of British subjects throughout the world; but I

43

venture to state that in no other corner of British territory were those expressions more spontaneous and sincere in their utterance, or more practical proof of their sincerity furnished, than in this remote Colony of Hongkong.

Gentlemen, I am proud of the loyalty of this community; and it will always be a pleasing reminiscence of my life that I had the privilege of representing our august Sovereign in Hongkong on that occasion. I trust that you will continue to co-operate with the Imperial Government for the defence and maintenance of that immense Empire, of which this Colony is a small but not unimportant part.

In conclusion, I thank you for your patient hearing. I have endeavoured to illustrate, in the course of my remarks, a marked progress during the last six years-financial, commercial, industrial, and social-a progress upon which the Secretary of State for the Colonies in a recent despatch was pleased to comment in favourable terms, and which the result of a comparison between the Hongkong of 1891 and the Hongkong of to-day places beyond all doubt.

I appreciate the enterprising spirit of the community which has contributed to that result, and I trust that I have not failed in the fulfilment of my desire to encourage that spirit and to promote that enterprise.

I thank you, Gentlemen, for

your co-operation in the past, and I rely on a continuance of your loyal support and valuable assistance during the remainder of my term of office. It is a source of gratification to me that I have been connected with this Colony during a period of prosperity. I need hardly say that I contemplate my approaching departure with regret, and whilst I feel assured that I shall take away with me an expression of your good-will, I trust that I may also have gained, in some degree, the confidence and respect of the entire community.

COUNCIL CHAMBER,

Hongkong, 25th October, 1897.

Mr. CHATER also addressed the Council.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

STANDING COMMITTEES.-His Excellency appointed the following Committees:-

(a) Finance Committee,--

The Colonial Secretary, Chairman.

All the Members of Council, except the Governor.

(b) Law Committee,—

The Attorney General, Chairman.

Honourable J. J. BELL-IRVING.

Honourable Ho KAI.

Honourable E. R. BELILIOS.

Honourable WEI YUK.

(c) Public Work Committee,-

The Director of Public Works, Chairman.

The Colonial Treasurer.

Honourable C. P. CHATER.

Honourable E. R. BELILIOS.

Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO APPLY A SUM NOT EXCEEDING TWO MILLIONS THREE HUNDred AND FORTY-THREE THOUSAND SEVEN HUNDRED AND THIRTY DOLLARS TO THE PUBLIC SERVICE OF THE YEAR 1898.-The Colonial Secretary moved the first reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE CHINESE EXTRADITION ORDINANCE, 1889.-The Attorney General moved the first reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

·44

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO CONSOLIDATE AND AMEND THE LAWS RELATING TO THE CON- struction of Ordinances, to FURTHER SHORTEN THE LANGUAGE USED IN ORDINANCES, AND FOR OTHER LIKE PURPOSES.-The Attorney General moved the first reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question--put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO FURTHER AMEND THE WATERWORKS ORDINANCE, 1890.--The Attorney General moved the first reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE FOR THE NATURALIZATION OF U HOI CHAU alias U CHIU TSUN.- The Attorney General moved the first reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE CLOSED HOUSES AND INSANITARY DWELLINGS ORDINANCE, 1894.-The Attorney General moved the first reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE LAW RELATING TO VAGRANTS.-The Attorney General moved the first reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO AUTHORISE THE HONGKONG AND KOWLOON WHARF AND GODOWN COMPANY, LIMITED, TO LAY AND MAINTAIN TRAMWAYS ON CERTAIN PUBLIC ROADS at Kow- LOON, IN THE COLONY OF HONGKONG, AND TO CONFER UPON THE SAID HONGKONG AND KOWLOON WHARF AND GODOWN COMPANY, LIMITED, CERTAIN OTHER RIGHTS, POWERS AND PRIVILEGES.—Mr. BELL-Irving moved the second reading of the Bill..

Mr. CHATER seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed and Bill reported with amendments.

Mr. BELL-IRVING moved the third reading of the Bill.

Mr. CHATER seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do

pass.

Bill passed:

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned till Monday, the 1st November, 1897, at 3 P.M.

Read and confirmed this 1st day of November, 1897.

J. G. T. BUCKLE,

Clerk of Councils,

WILLIAM ROBINSON,

Governor.

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 12.

MONDAY, 1ST NOVEMBER, 1897.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(Sir WILLIAM ROBINSON, G.C.M.G.).

His Excellency the General Officer Commanding (Major-General WILSONE BLACK, C.B.). The Honourable the Colonial Secretary and Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART LOCKHART).

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

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37

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the Harbour Master, (ROBERT MURRAY RUMSEY, R.N.).

the Captain Superintendent of Police, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.).

the Colonial Treasurer, (THOMAS SERCOMBE SMITH).

the Director of Public Works, (Robert DalY ORMSBY).

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER, C.M.G.

Ho KAI, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS, C.M.G. JAMES JARDINE BELL-IRVING.

WEI YUK.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

45

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 25th October, 1897, were read and confirmed. PAPERS.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following paper, viz. :—

General Instructions regarding Government Balances.

REPORT OF THE FINANCE COMMITTEE. The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency. the Governor, laid on the table the report of the Finance Committee dated the 25th October, 1897, (No. 8), and moved its adoption.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to

SANITARY BYE-LAW.--The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table a Bye-law made by the Sanitary Board, under sub-section 12 of section 13 of Ordinance No. 24 of 1887 and sub-section D of section 1 of Ordinance No. 26 of 1890, and moved that it be approved.

The Attorney General seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

SANITARY BYE-LAW-The Colonial Secretary informed the Council that he would move the approval of the Bye-law, made by the Sanitary Board on the 17th June, 1897, under section 13 of Ordinance 15 of 1894 at the next meeting of Council.

QUESTION.-Mr. WHITEHEAD, pursuant to notice, asked the following question:-

If the Honourable the Colonial Secretary, after last meeting of the Finance Committee of this Council held on 13th ultimo, requested or directed the reporter of the "Daily Press" and for the official Hansard report of the proceedings of this Council, to suppress any portion of the discussion on the subject of the Military Contribution which took place at said meeting, and if it was at his suggestion that a question put by me at that meeting with reference to the Military Contribution, the Honourable Member's reply thereto, and the Honourable the Colonial Treasurer's correction of an error into which the Honourable the Colonial Secretary had fallen in his reply, did not appear in the report of the meeting of the Finance Committee in any one of the three local newspapers and is not contained in the official Hansard report as sent round by the "Daily Press" to Honourable Members for revision.

The Colonial Secretary replied.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO APPLY A SUM OF NOT EXCEEDING TWO MILLIONS THREE HUN- DRED AND FORTY-THREE THOUSAND SEVEN HUNDRED AND THIRTY DOLLARS TO THE PUBLIC Service OF THE YEAR 1898.-The Colonial Secretary moved the second reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

The Colonial Secretary moved that the Bill be referred to the Finance Committee. The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

46

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE CHINESE EXTRADITION ORDINANCE, 1889.-The Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill and addressed the Council.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question--put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Bill left in Committee.

Council resumed.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO CONSOLIDATE AND AMEND THE LAWS RELATING TO THE CON- STRUCTION OF ORDINANCES, TO FURTHER SHORTEN THE LANGUAGE USED IN ORDINANCES, AND FOR OTHER LIKE PURPOSES.—The Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

The Attorney General moved that the Bill be referred to the Law Committee.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO FURTHER AMEND THE WATERWORKS ORDINANCE, 1890.--The Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill.

The Director of Public Works seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed and Bill reported without amendment.

The Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Director of Public Works seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE FOR THE NATURALIZATION OF U HOI CHAU alias U CHIU TSUN. The Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed and Bill reported without amendment.

The Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question--put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do

Bill passed.

pass.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE CLOSED HOUSES AND INSANITARY DWELLINGS ORDINANCE, 1894.-The Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed and Bill reported without amendment.

The Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE LAW RELATING TO VAGRANTS.-The Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

ADJOURNMENT.—The Council then adjourned till Monday, the 8th November, 1897, at 3 P.M.

Read and confirmed this 8th day of November, 1897.

J. G. T. BUCKLE,

Clerk of Councils.

WILLIAM ROBINSON,

Governor.

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 13.

MONDAY, 8TH NOVEMBER, 1897.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(Sir WILLIAM ROBINSON, G.C,M.G.).

47

His Excellency the General Officer Commanding (Major-General WILSONE Black, C.B.). The Honourable the Colonial Secretary and Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART Lockhart).

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

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the Harbour Master, (ROBERT MURRAY RUMSEY, R.N.).

the Captain Superintendent of Police, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.).

the Director of Public Works, (ROBERT DALY ORMSBY).

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER, C.M.G..

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS, C.M.G.

JAMES JARDINE BELL-IRVING.

ABSENT:

The Honourable the Colonial Treasurer, (THOMAS SERCOMBE SMITH).

WEI YUK.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 1st November, 1897, were read and confirmed. FINANCIAL MINUTE.-The Colonial Secretary, by con.nand of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following Financial Minute, (No. 23), and moved that it be referred to the Finance Committee :-

C.S.O.

2583 of 1897.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Six hundred an1 Fifty Dollars, ($650), in aid of the vote" Purchase and Repair of Boats" Police Department.

Government House, Hongkong, 3rd November, 1897.

The Harbour Master seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

REPORT OF THE FINANCE COMMITTEE. The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the report of the Finance Committee dated the 1st November, 1897, (No. 9), and moved its adoption.

The Harbour Master seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

REPORT OF THE LAW COMMITTEE.-The Attorney General laid on the table the report of the Law Committee on "The Interpretation Bill," dated 1st November, 1897. (No. 1.)

SANITARY BYE-LAW.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table a Bye-law made by the Sanitary Board, under section 13 of Ordinance No. 15 of 1894, and moved that it be approved.

The Attorney General seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

RESOLUTION.-The Attorney General addressed the Council and moved the following resolution :- Be it resolved that sub-section 2 of section 13 of the Hongkong Code of Civil Procedure shall be and the same is hereby amended by the adlition after the words "upon filing an affidavit" of the words "made by himself, or by any other person who can swear positively to the facts. The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

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BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO APPLY A SUM NOT EXCEEDING TWO MILLIONS THREE HUNDred AND FORTY-THREE THOUSAND SEVEN HUNDRED AND THIRTY DOLLARS TO THE PUBLIC SERVICE OF THE YEAR 1898.-Mr. WHITEHEAD addressed the Council.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed and Bill reported without amendment.

The Colonial Secretary moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Harbour Master seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

48

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE CHINESE EXTRADITION ORDINANCE, 1889.-Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed and Bill reported with amendment.

The Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO CONSOLIDATE AND AMEND THE LAWS RELATING TO THE CON- STRUCTION OF ORDINANCES, TO FURTHER SHORTEN THE LANGUAGE USED IN ORDINANCES, AND FOR OTHER LIKE PURPOSES.-The Bill having been reported without amendment by the Law Committee, the Attorney General moved the third reading.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question--put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned till Monday, the 22nd November, 1897, at 3 P.M.

Read and confirmed this 22nd day of November, 1897.

J. G. T. BUCKLE,

Clerk of Councils.

WILLIAM ROBINSON,

Governor.

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No.

No. 14.

MONDAY, 22ND NOVEMBER, 1897.

49

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(Sir WILLIAM ROBINSON, G.C.M.G.).

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary and Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART LOCKHART).

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

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the Harbour Master, (ROBERT MURRAY RUMSEY, R.N.).

the Captain Superintendent of Police, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.).

the Colonial Treasurer, (THOMAS SERCOMBE SMITH).

the Director of Public Works, (ROBERT DALY ORMSBY).

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER, C.M.G.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS, C.M.G.

JAMES JARDINE BELL-IRVING.

WEI YUK.

""

ABSENT:

;

His Excellency the General Officer Commanding (Major-General WILSONE BLACK, C.B.).

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 8th November, 1897, were read and confirmed. PAPER.-The Colonial Secretary, by cominand of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following paper, viz. :-

Report of the Committee appointed to inquire into and report on certain applications for

Increase of Salaries from Officers in the l'ublic Service of the Colony.

FINANCIAL MINUTES.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following Financial Minutes, (Nos. 24 and 25), and moved that they be referred to the Finance Committee :-

C.O.D.

61 of 1897.

C.S.O.

2738 of 1897,

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Three thousand and Two hundred Dollars, ($3,200), to meet certain expenses in connection with the Kennedytown Hospital.

Government House, Hongkong, 6th November, 1897.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One hundred Dollars, ($100), in aid of the vote "Meals for Prisoners in Cells" Police Department.

Government House, Hongkong, 15th November, 1897.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question put and agreed to.

REPORT OF THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the report of the Finance Committee dated the 8th November, 1897, (No. 10), and moved its adoption.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO FURTHER AMEND THE WIDOWS' and ORPHANS' PENSIONS ORDI- NANCE, 1890.-The Attorney General moved the first reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

50

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO FACILITATE THE RECOVERY OF POSSESSION OF TENEMENTS AND PREMISES OF SMALL VALUE-The Attorney General moved the first reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

AMEND THE LAW RELATING TO VAGRANTS.-Council in

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND

Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed and Bill reported with amendment.

The Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill. The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned till Monday, the 6th December, 1897, at 3 P.M.

Read and confirmed, this 8th day of December, 1897.

J. G. T. BUCKLE,

Clerk of Councils.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

Governor

51

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 15.

MONDAY, 8TH DECEMBER, 1897.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(Sir WILLIAM ROBINSON, G.C.M.G.).

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary and Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART LOCKHART).

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

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the Harbour Master, (ROBERT MURRAY RUMSEY, K.N.).

the Captain Superintendent of Police, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.).

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER, C.M.G.

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the Colonial Treasurer, (THOMAS SERCOMBE SMITH).

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the Director of Public Works, (ROBERT DALÝ ORMSBY).

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29

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD. WEI YUK.

ABSENT:

His Excellency the General Officer Commanding (Major-General WILSONE BLACK, C.B.). The Honourable JAMES JARDINE BELL-IRVING.

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EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS, C.M.G.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 22nd November, 1897, were read and confirmed. FINANCIAL MINUTES.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following Financial Minutes, (Nos. 26, 27 and 28), and moved that they be referred to the Finance Committee:-

C.S.O.

758 of 1897.

C.S.O.

2367 of 1897.

C.O.D.

208 of 1897.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Four hundred and One Dollars and Forty-one Cents, ($401.41), in aid of the vote "Water for Markets, &c.," Sanitary Department.

Government House, Hongkong, 30th November, 1897.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Thirteen thousand Four hundred and Fifty-one Dollars and Seventy-two Cents, ($13,451.72), to meet the Expenses in connec- tion with the Jubilee Illuminations, &c.

Government House, Hongkong, 2nd December, 1897.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Two hundred and Seventy-five Dollars ($275), being the Salaries and Allowances of two new Cadets for the months of November and December, 1897.

Government House, Hongkong, 2nd December, 1897.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

REPORT OF THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the report of the Finance Committee dated the 22nd November, 1897, (No. 11), and moved its adoption.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

RESOLUTION. The Attorney General moved the following resolution :—

That this Council approves of the repeal by the Sanitary Board of the Bye-laws made by such Board, under section 13 of Ordinance 15 of 1894, on the 19th and 28th days of March, 1895, which were approved by this Council on the 20th day of March, and the 4th day of April, 1895, respectively, and were published in the “Gazette" by Government Notifications Nos. 111 and 134 of 1895. Such repeal to have effect as regards all such Bye-laws except No. 4 as from the 22nd May, 1897, and, as regards No. 4, as from the 13th day of November, 1897, on which dates respectively new Bye-laws were published in the "Gazette." The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

52

NOTICE OF QUESTION. Mr. WHITEHEAD gave notice that, at the next Meeting of Council, he would ask the following question :

Will the Government lay upon the table a copy of the correspondence which has passed between the home authorities and the Colonial Government in connection with the proposed new Public Offices subsequent to that already published?

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO FURTHER AMEND THE WIDOWS' AND ORPHANS' PENSIONS ORDINANCE, 1890.-The Attorney General moved the second realing of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed and Bill reported with amendments.

The Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do

Bill passed.

pass.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO FACILITATE THE RECOVERY OF POSSESSION OF TENEMENTS AND PREMISES OF SMALL VALUE.-The Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question--put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed and Bill reported with amendments.

The Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

ADJOURNMENT.—The Council then adjourned till Monday, the 20th December, 1897, at 3 P.M.

K

Read and confirmed, this 20th day of December, 1897.

J. G. T. BUCKLE,

Clerk of Councils:

WILLIAM ROBINSON,

Governor.

:

53

J

:

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 16.

MONDAY, 20TH DECEMBER, 1897,

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(Sir WILLIAM ROBINSON, G.C.M.G.).

His Excellency the General Officer Conmanding (Major-General WILSONE BLACK, C.B.). The Honourable the Colonial Secretary and Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE STEwart Lockhart).

the Harbour Master, (ROBERT MURRAY RUMSEY, R.N.).

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the Captain Superintendent of Police, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY, C.M.G.).

the Colonial Treasurer, (THOMAS SERCOMBE SMITH).

the Director of Public Works, (ROBERT DALY ORMSBY).

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER, C.M.G.

Ho KAI, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS, C.M.G.

WEI YUK.

ABSENT:

The Honourable the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

>>

JAMES JARDINE BELL-IRVING.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

His Excellency the Governor stated that the Attorney General was unable to be present owing to his detention in the Supreme Court.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 8th December, 1897, were read and confirmed. REPORT OF THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the report of the Finance Committee dated the 8th December, 1897, (No. 12), and moved its adoption.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded. Question-put and agreed to.

RESOLUTION.—The Harbour Master addressed the Council and moved the following resolution :--- Whereas, by sub-section (1) of section 33 of The Merchant Shipping Ordinance, 1891, (No. 26 of 1891) it is enacted as follows:-

"The owner or master of every ship which enters the waters of the Colony, shall pay such dues in respect of the said lighthouses, buoys, beacons, cables, wires and other apparatus, as may, from time to time, be fixed by Order of the Governor, pursuant to resolution of the Legislative Council to such officers, as the Governor shall, from time to time, appoint to collect the same, and the same shall be paid by such officers into the Colonial Treasury.

Provided that unless and until such Order is made, the dues in Table P to this Ordi- nance shall be payable."

And whereas, it is desirable that the dues mentioned in the said Table P should be altered, and other dues be fixed by Order of the Governor, pursuant to Resolution of the Legislative Council, and made payable on and after the 1st day of January, 1898.

This Council hereby resolves as follows:-

In lieu of the dues mentioned in Table P in the Schedule to Ordinance No. 26 of 1891, it is desirable that the following Dues should be fixed and made payable by Order of the Governor, on and after the 1st day of January, 1898, namely:--

Light and other Dues payable under section 33 of The Merchant Shipping Consolidation Ordinance, 1891, from and after the 1st day of January, 1898.

1. Áll ships which enter the waters of the Colony, except British and Foreign Ships of War, and except such other ships as are, hereby, exempted, in whole or in part, shall pay the following Dues, viz :-

One cent per ton.

2. Such dues shall be paid either at the time of "entry" or at the time of "clearance."

3. All steamers plying only between Hongkong and Canton, or Macao, or the West River, which enter the waters of the Colony by day, and all Chinese Junks, are, hereby, exempted from the pay- ment of such Dues.

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54

4. All steamers plying only between Hongkong and Canton, or Macao, or the West River, which enter the waters of the Colony by night, shall pay, as Dues, one-third of a cent per ton.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Mr. WHITEHEAD addressed the Council.

Question-put and agreed to.

QUESTION. Mr. WHITEHEAD, pursuant to notice, asked the following question :—

Will the Government lay upon the table a copy of the correspondence which has passed between the home authorities and the Colonial Government in connection with the proposed new Public Offices subsequent to that already published?

The Colonial Secretary replied.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE FOR THE NATURALIZATION OF WONG CHUK-YAU, alias WONG Mau, alias WONG SUN-IN.-The Colonial Secretary moved the first reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE FOR THE MORE EFFECTUAL PUNISHMENT OF BRIBERY AND CERTAIN OTHER MISDEMEANORS.-The Colonial Secretary moved the first reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

ADJOURNMENT.--The Council then adjourned sine die.

Read and confirmed this 25th day of January, 1898.

J. G. T. BUCKLE,

Clerk of Councils.

WILLIAM ROBINSON,

Governor.

:

159

No. 9/

79

HONGKONG.

PAPERS ON THE SUBJECT OF THE LIGHT DUES.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of

aid

His Excellency the Governor.

Governor to Secretary of State.

No. 15.

SIR,

GOVERNMENT HOUSE, HONGKONG, 18th January, 1897.

I have the honour to forward herewith a petition which I have received from shipping firms in this Colony on the subject of the light dues levied at this port.

2. To facilitate the consideration of the question I should mention that light dues were first imposed in 1875 when one cent a ton was charged on European shipping entering the port and in 1890 they were increased to 2 cents a ton, the increase being made in order to meet the expenditure in connection with the erection and maintenance of the lighthouse on the Gap Rock. It should also be borne in mind that in 1867 a charge was levied on all native craft trading with this port and has been continued up to the present time. This charge yielded in 1895 a revenue amounting to about $50,000.

3. Petitioners now ask that the dues be reduced to the original charge of one cent, as the additional levy of 14 cents has more than paid for the cost of the Gap Rock Light, and as the charge of 1 cent a ton is more than sufficient to cover the cost of the upkeep and maintenance of the present lighthouses. They state that any charge over and above that necessary to cover such cost will deter shipping from this port and is an infringement of the freedom of the port, which will affect its welfare.

4. So far as light dues are concerned I agree with petitioners that the revenue derived from them should be applied to the purpose for which it is raised, viz., the upkeep and maintenance of the lighthouses; and it is true that the charge of one cent a ton is sufficient to cover all present expenditure incurred on that account.

5. With regard to the increased rate of 13 cents a ton there seems to have been an understanding at the time it was raised that it was to be devoted to defraying the cost of the Gap Rock Lighthouse and there was an implied, if not a distinct, promise that it would not be devoted to any other purpose without the Legislative Council being consulted. In order therefore to redeem this promise, and I have informed the Council that in my opinion it should be redeemed, it will be necessary to abolish the present Gap Rock rate by a resolution of the Council. But petitioners not only desire the increase rate to be abolished in fulfilment of the promise made by Government but they wish the light dues to be permanently reduced to one cent, pointing out that any levy in excess of that amount is not required for the lighthouse service but will be merged in the general revenue to which they contend that shipping should not contribute.

6. In this contention with one exception all the Unofficial Members of the Legislative Council, to whom I referred the matter, do not concur, being of opinion that shipping should not be entirely exempt from taxation as petitioners desire, and they maintain that if the present dues of 2 cents a ton are continued not as light dues but as harbour dues there will be no infringement of the freedom of the port-a free port being one at which no customs duties are levied, and there is no intention to charge customs dues at Hongkong. They also consider that the prosperity of the Colony will not be affected by the imposition of such harbour dues.

The Right Honourable

JOSEPH CHAMBERLAIN, M.P.,

&c.;

&c.

160

7. With regard to the argument advanced by petitioners that any tax on shipping will be an infringement of the freedom of the port, I do not think they can be aware of the fact that there are many free ports where the tax on shipping is very heavy, and I agree with those members of the Legislative Council who consider a free port to be one where no customs duties are charged.

8. With respect to the fear expressed by petitioners that ships will be deterred from coming to Hongkong if a charge of 24 cents a ton is imposed the following figures show that the entry of European shipping into Hongkong has steadily increased since light dues were first levied. In 1875 when the dues were first levied the European tonnage entering the port was 1,951,855 tons. In 1880 it had increased to 2,535,587 tons and in 1885 to 3,866,709 tons.

In 1890 light dues were increased from one cent to 2 cents. In that year the tonnage entering the port amounted to 4,893,733 tons and in 1895 it reached 5,772,298 tons.

9. It will be observed that petitioners admit that shipping should pay for the lighthouses which are established and maintained for its benefit. If this principle be extended there appears to be no reason why shipping should not contribute towards other services which are maintained either directly or indirectly on its account such as the Harbour Department, Water Police, etc., the cost of which exceeds the amount raised from the dues of 2 cents a ton imposed on shipping.

10. As I have stated above the charge on native craft yields a revenue of about $50,000 a year, and if the principle is once admitted that European shipping should not be levied for purposes of general revenue, it would seem 'only fair to extend the same principle to native craft.

11. The amount inserted in the Estimates for 1897 as likely to be derived from light dues amounts to $113,000. If the prayer of the petition be granted and a charge of one cent instead of 2 cents a ton is levied the amount of the estimate will be reduced to $45,200.

12. As you are aware the sources of taxation in this Colony are limited and only two years ago the fees charged for various licences were raised considerably. It is true the tax charged on the rateable value of house property is not a heavy one and might be increased without imposing too great a burden on owners of property. But I do not regard the present time a favourable one for increasing taxation in this direction as recent sanitary legislation has involved a considerable outlay on house property, though, should the necessity arise, an increase might be made.

13. After a careful consideration of the arguments advanced by the petitioners and of the views held by others on the subject of the taxing of European shipping entering this port, I am of opinion that a charge of 2 cents a ton imposed on such shipping as harbour dues is not an unfair one, and is not calculated to injuriously affect the prosperity of this port, which even if this charge be imposed, will still be one of the cheapest ports for shipping in the world. If it appeared to me that harbour dues, such as I recommend should be imposed, would have an injurious effect on the welfare of this Colony, I should not hesitate for a moment to advise that no such a tax should be levied. I am fully alive to the importance to this Colony of shipping and to the necessity of care being taken to avoid imposing on it any burden which would deter vessels from visiting it. But in view of the

figures given above which show that the tonnage entering the port has steadily increased though it has had to pay for seven years a tax of 2 cents a ton, exactly the same amount which it is now proposed to impose permanently as harbour dues, and of the fact that Hongkong is such a cheap port for shipping, I am led to the conclusion that the fears expressed by the petitioners are groundless and that harbour dues of 2 cents a ton will not keep vessels away from the Colony to the injury of its trade and its prosperity.

11. I am advised that in order to give legal effect to the change which I pro- pose of converting the present light dues into harbour dues it will be necessary to pass an Ordinance. I have therefore to request, if you concur in the conclusion at which I have arrived, that you will authorise me to introduce into the Legislative Council an Ordinance for this purpose, and that you will convey to me your authority by telegram as it is important that this question should be definitely settled with as little delay as possible.

I have, &c.,

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

!

HONGKONG. No. 64.

(Secretary of State to Governor.)

161

DOWNING STREET,

17th March, 1897.

C. O. to P. & O., 6th March, 1897.

P. & O. to C. O., 10th March, 1897.

SIR,

With reference to your Despatch No. 15 of the 18th of January last and to my telegram of the 15th instant, I have the honour to transmit to you copies of correspondence with the Peninsular and Oriental Steam Navigation Company, as noted in the margin, on the subject of the Light Dues at Hongkong.

2. I consider that the shipping interests were given a reasonable expectation that the Light Dues should be reduced, when the cost of the Gap Rock Light- house was met. At the same time, I concur in your view that moderate dues may properly be levied in Hongkong, provided the proceeds do not in ordinary times exceed the total expenditure on the Harbour Department including Light- houses, Water Police, etc.

3. I am, however, of opinion that in calculating the proceeds of the harbour dues, the charges on native shipping must be included, as well as those on ocean going steamers, as suggested in the enclosed letter from the Peninsular and Oriental Steam Navigation Company.

4. I am not therefore prepared to sanction your proposal to make a permanent charge of 24 cents per ton on general shipping although that charge must be con- tinued to the end of the present year, in order to avoid a dislocation of the year's finances.

5. Next year the charge must be reduced to such a rate as will, with the other harbour receipts, be sufficient to cover all harbour and lighthouse expenditure; and it will be necessary to find some other source of revenue to make up the deficiency, which may perhaps most conveniently be done by increasing the Assessed Taxes. I shall be glad to learn, at your early convenience, what changes in taxation you will recommend in order to carry out the above decision, so that the matter may be settled before the time arrives for passing next year's Estimates.

6. I desire to add, that if at any time hereafter urgent necessity should arise for increasing the general revenue, I should be prepared to consider any proposal for again raising the shipping dues, as I have no reason to think that the present charge has borne very hardly on the shipping interests.

I have, etc.,

J. CHAMBERLAIN.

Governor

SIR WILLIAM ROBINSON, K.C.M.G.

(Under Secretary of State to Secretary, P. & O. S. N. Co.)

(Immediate.)

Sir,

DOWNING STREET,

6th March, 1897.

With reference to the letter from this Department of the 18th ultimo, I am directed by Mr. Secretary CHAMBERLAIN to transmit to you, for your information and for that of the other steamship companies whose representatives signed with you the letter of the 13th ultimo, the enclosed copy of a despatch from the Governor of Hongkong, relative to the proposal to maintain, as Harbour Dues, the charge of 24 cents per ton at present levied as Light Dues on all shipping at Hongkong.

2. Mr. CHAMBERLAIN concurs in Sir W. ROBINSON'S view that it is not unreason- able to levy moderate harbour dues in Hongkong, provided that the proceeds do not exceed the total expenditure on the Harbour Department, including Lighthouses, Water Police, etc., and he has at present under his consideration to adopt one of the two following alternatives, viz., (1) a uniform charge of 2 cents (instead of 2 cents) per ton on all shipping, or (2) a charge on a graduated scale such as is levied at Gibraltar beginning at 2 cents per ton on smaller vessels, and rising to a maximum charge of (say) $30 or $40 on ships of (say) 1,800 tons and over.

162

3. Before finally deciding the question he will be glad to consider any observations you may wish to offer, but I am to ask that any representations may be made at your earliest convenience as the Governor wishes to be informed by telegraph of Mr. CHAMBERLAIN's decision.

I am, etc.,

SELBORNE.

The Secretary to the

PENINSULAR AND ORIENTAL

STEAM NAVIGATION COMPANY.

SIR,

(Secretary, P. & O. S. N. Co. to Under Secretary of State.)

PENINSULAR AND ORIENTAL STEAM NAVIGATION COY.,

122, LEADENHALL STREET, LONDON, E.C.,

10th March, 1897.

I have the honour to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 6th instant, No. 3982 of 1897, enclosing, by the direction of Mr. Secretary CHAMBERLAIN, for the information of the signatories to the letter of the 13th ultimo, copy of a despatch from the Governor of Hongkong relative to the proposal to maintain, as Harbour Dues, the charge of 24 cents per ton levied at present as Light Dues on shipping at Hongkong, also adding that Mr. CHAMBERLAIN concurs in the view that it is not unreasonable to levy moderate Harbour Dues in Hongkong, provided that the proceeds do not exceed the total expenditure on the Harbour Department, including Lighthouses, Water Police, etc.

In reply, I am desired to state, on behalf of the signatories to the letter above referred to, that they regret that Mr. CHAMBERLAIN does not consider it expedient to reinstate Hongkong in the position of an absolutely free port, that having undoubtedly been the mainspring of the importance it has arrived at as a port of call and converging centre for the bulk of the shipping visiting the Far Eastern Seas.

In view, however, of Mr. CHAMBERLAIN'S opinion that the amount levied as Harbour Dues should not exceed the total expenditure on the Harbour Department, I am desired to draw attention to the following facts, which, it is considered, conclusively indicate that, on this basis, there is no ground for increasing the levy of 1 cent per ton which has been hitherto collected as fixed Light Dues.

In the letter from His Excellency the Governor of Hongkong it is stated that the tonnage which visited the port in 1895 amounted to 5,772,289 tons, which at 1 cent per ton yield a revenue of upwards of $57,000. In the letter from the Shipping Firms of the 13th ultimo, it was pointed out that the present total expenditure of the whole Lighthouse Establishment of Hongkong is under $17,000. There is consequently a balance of upwards of $40,000 available from this source for General Harbour Expenditure and, as is shown in Sir W. ROBINSON'S letter, there is a further revenue of $50,000 a year emanating from the charge on native craft also available for that purpose, but in addition to this sum of $90,000 per annum, I am able to state that there are further charges on shipping collected by the Harbour Department, such as native Emigration Fees, taxes on Moorings and Lighters, etc., which bring in a considerable annual revenue, though I am unable, from the information at my disposal in this country, to state what the amount is.

It is considered, however, that the foregoing statements may be fairly held to indicate that the revenue at present collected by the Harbour Department (exclusive of the special levy of 14 cents per ton as Light Dues in connection with the Gap Rock Lighthouse) is already in excess of the total expenditure of that Department, and it is therefore respectfully urged that no further tax of any description may be levied upon shipping, as such charge would be exclusively applicable to the general expenditure of the Colony, and is absolutely not required to meet any expenditure either directly or indirectly connected with shipping.

It is satisfactory to note that the Secretary of State is of opinion that no charge should be forced on shipping in the interest of what may be called the general Budget of the Colony.

I am, etc.,

H. H. JOSEPH, Secretary.

THE UNDER SECRETARY OF STATE,

Colonial Office.

ī

HONGKONG.

497

No. 30

STATEMENTS IN CONNECTION WITH THE LOANS RAISED IN 1887 AND 1894.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor.

97

QUESTION. Will the Government lay upon the table a detailed statement or account of the loan of £200,000 raised in 1887, shewing separately in sterling and in dollars all receipts and all payments in connection with or in respect of the principal, interest, and sinking fund, with the dates and the rates of exchange at which each iteni was converted from sterling into dollars or vice versâ, in short, a detailed account shewing how much interest per cent. per annum the ratepayers have paid for the loan in question, and a similar account to date in respect of the last loan of £200,000 floated in 1894, shewing in addition what amount thereof is still available, if any, how and in what way the monies have been expended, and what are the available assets in respect of said disbursements? The statement to shew in what securities the sinking fund has been invested, the cost thereof in sterling and in dollars, the annual revenue derived therefrom and the present market value of the securities.

ANSWER.-

STATEMENT OF 1887 LOAN OF £200,000.

1887, ....Loau raised in 1887, at 4% per annum,

Less Debentures redeemed,.

1894, .... Balance converted at 3% Stock,

£ 200,000. 0, 0 at 3/2 $1,263,157.90

60,000. 0. 0

£ 140,000. 0. 0.

STATEMENT OF PAYMENTS IN CONNECTION WITH 1887 LOAN OF £200,000.

Year.

Commission, Stamps and other Expenses.

Interest.

Sinking Fund.

Average Rate of Exchange for the

year.

Total.

£ s. d.

$

..

£

s. d.

£

s. d.

$

C.

C.

1887,

2,105. 6.9

13,296.86

2,520.19.0

15,921.55

3,536.0.0

22,382.64

3'2

51,551.05

2

1888,

40.15.0

257.37

8,000, 0.0

50,526.32

7,072.0.0 44,665.26

"

95,448.95

1889,

40.15.0

257.37

7,976. 0.0

50,374.73

7,072.0.0

44,665.26

95,297.36

1890,

41.11.3

246.76

8,024. 0.0

47,641.74

7,072.0.0

41,989.35

3.44:

4217

89,877.85

1891,

41. 8.6

260.78

8,000. 0.0

50,360.66

7,072.0.0

44,518.82 3,24/

95,140.26

1892,

41. 7.3

289.52

8,000. 0.0

55,761.84

7,072.0.0

49,274.80 2,9973+

105,326.16

1893,

41. 8.9

332.36

7,990. 0.0

62,095.40

7,072.0.0

54,942.53 2/6/1/

117,370,29

1894,

18. 9.0

175.79

6,155. 0.0 57,754.82

7,072.0.0

66,075.73 2,14

124,006.34

£2,371. 1.6

$15,116.81 £56,665.19.0 $390,437.06 £53,040.0.0 $368,464.39

STATEMENT OF 1893 LOAN OF £200,000 AT 31⁄2 %.

1893,

1894,

........Loan raised in 1893, at 31⁄2 %· ....Balance of 1887 Loan converted in 1894 at 33 % Stock,

Stock crcated to defray Expenses of Conversion, ......

$ 774,018.26

£200,000. 0. 0 at 274=$1,536,000.00 140,000. 0. 0 at 214= 1,330,693.07 1,799.15. 1 at 211= 17,106.57

£341,799.15. 1

$2,883,799.64

{

STATEMENT OF PAYMENTS IN CONNECTION WITH 1893 LOAN OF £200,000 AT 31 %.

Year.

Advertising, Stamps, &c.

Brokerage on Allotment.

Commission to Crown Agents.

Half-yearly interest due 15th April and 15th October.

Expenses in connection with the Conversion.

Contribution to Sinking Fund.

Average

Rate of

Exchange for the year.

Total.

498

C.

:

2/61/

49,439.56

2/14

109,993.08

2/176

116,959.96

1,709, 0. 0

16,124.23

2/2

127,153.67

1893,

1894,

1895,

1. 7. 6

12.65

1896,

2.0. 9

19.00

£ s. d.

1,649. 4. 1

$

C.

12,388.60

£ s. d.

537.13. 0

C.

4,053.87

£ s. d.

1,017.10. 0

C.

8,217.23

£ s. d.

2,890.19. 8

c.

£ s. d.

0.

£ 8.

d.

24,779.86

8. 4

3.92

23.14. 0

229.59

10,090. 7. 4

97,572.79

1,260. 7. 5

12,186.78

:

679.18. 0

6,860.89

11,962.16. S

110,086.42

14.19. 0

141.06

11,977.16, 3

110,869.38

£1,653. 0, 8 $ 12,424.17 £ 537.13, 0 $ 4,053.87 | ± 1,736. 1. 0 | $ 15,448.77 | £36,921.19.11 343,308.45 £ 1,260. 7. 5

12,186.78 £ 1,709, 0, 0 | $ 16,124.23

$ 403,546.27

499

WORKS CHARGEABLE AGAINST THE LOAN.

Amount realised from 1893 Loan,

Amount expended on Public Works Extraordinary :-

In 1892,

In 1893,

In 1894,

In 1895,

In 1896,

Balance, 31st December, 1896,

£ 31,782.10. 1 43,309.11.10 25,105.12. 5 19,560.16. 1 24,736.14.10

£201,257.11. 6

144,495. 5. 3

...$535,546.14 at 2/11 = £ 36,762. 6. 3

Revenue from certain Public Works Extraordinary represents the available Assets,

i.c., Central Market $36,830. Slaughter-House, Sheep and Pig Depôts $10,452. Water Account $8,500. Praya

Reclamation.

-

INVESTMENT OF SINKING FUND.

Date.

South Australia 3% Stock.

New Zealand

3% Stock.

Cost.

Rate.

Dollar.

£

s. d.

£

s. d.

£

s. d.

$

C.

1896, October 29th,....

1,104.19. 0

1,196. 3. 2

2/2

$ 11,041.46

Ditto.

489.10. 0

512.16.10

"

1

£1,709. 0. 0

4,733.92

$ 15,775.88

+

Annual Revenue derived,

£ 53.19. 0

Market value of South Australia 34% Stock, 1113. Į

Do.

New Zealand

108. }

3

15th July, 1897.、

Treasury, Hongkong, 16th August, 1897.

T. SERCOMBE SMITH, Treasurer.

તે

No. TX6.

HONGKONG.

THE COLONIAL SURGEON'S REPORT FOR 1896.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor.

413

No. 25

GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL,

HONGKONG, 28th April, 1897.

97

SIR,-I have the honour to forward the Annual Report of the Medical Department for the year 1896, the report of Dr. ATKINSON, the Superintendent of the Government Civil Hospital, to which are attached a report by him on the prevalence of Plague during the years 1895 and 1896 also a report of the outbreak of Cholera on board the S.S. Cheang Hock Kian; these reports show the arduous nature of the work done by him, and for nearly the whole of the first six months of the year he was doing the work of the Colonial Surgeon in addition to his own duties. A valuable report is

sent in by Mr. BROWNE, the Assistant Government Analyst. Reports have already been sent in from Staff-Surgeon WILM of the Imperial German Navy who assisted Dr. ATKINSON at the Kennedy Town Hospital during the Plague epidemic, and from Dr. CLARKE who holds the new appointment of Health Officer and Superintendent to the Sanitary Board, which serves to show how necessary this long-needed appointment was. All these reports also show how much under-manned the Medical Staff of the Colony has long been and is now, and for the last three years has been compelled to depend on the assistance of outsiders all the time. My annual reports for the previous twenty years show how very frequently this has been necessary. I am happy to think that in the near future there is a prospect of this state of things being remedied and that any successor will not be compelled to go through the terrible anxiety and arduous work that I have experienced in over twenty-three years of my service in this Colony.

POLICE.

This year has been the worst as regards admissions to Hospital of any of the previous six years; the greatest excess has been among the Indian portion of the Force. There is a slight increase among the Chinese portion and it has been the healthiest apparently of the last ten years for the European portion. But admissions to Hospital from this portion of the Force do not show the ill-health among the men as I have remarked in previous reports, many of the married men being attended in their own quarters. In only two of the last ten years has the number of deaths been exceeded. The follow- ing tables show the admissions and deaths :-

Europeans.

Indians.

Chinese.

Admission to Hospital, 1887,

...139

293

187

Do.,

1888,

....147

279

231

Do.,

1889,

.....166

230

194

Do.,

1890,

.....149

254

179

Do.,

1891,

..169

285

118

Do.,

1892,

...152

224

120

Do.,

1893,

...134

255

133

Do.,

1894,

...127

244

134

Do.,

1895,

96

254

116

Do.,

1896,

94

370

124

There have been fourteen deaths among the members of the Force during the year: one European died in Hospital, one Indian and five Chinese died in Hospital. Two Indians committed suicide. One Chinese died of Plague on one of the segregation boats, one was drowned, two died while on leave in China, one died in his family house.

The total admissions to Hospital and deaths in the Force for the last ten years are given in the following table:-

Admissions. 619 .....657

.......590

Deaths.

9

15

14.

....582

7

...570

7

...496

7

522

6

....505

15

......466

8

14

1887,

1888,

1889,

1890,

1891,

1892,

1893,

1894,

1895,

1896,

.......588

414

Among the many improvements going on in the Colony as regards sanitation, the Police quarters in most cases are in very old buildings and are much overcrowded. The main buildings of the Central Station are all old and insufficient for the needs of the Force. Nos. 2, 3, 5, 7 and 8 in the City are all old and more or less insufficient in accommodation. No. 8 has to take in men that ought to be in No. 7 who, in most cases, have to walk more than a mile to their duties. No. 7 is wholly untit for habitation and should be entirely rebuilt, so also ought No. 3, but whether on their present sites or position I leave to the Captain Superintendent to say as being better acquainted with the needs of the Force. These two buildings as regards sanitation are altogether abominations; both sites have plenty of room for much larger and better buildings. No. 9 has been done away with and the site sold. Stations on the southern side of the island at Pokfulam, Aberdeen and Stanley will always be more or less unhealthy, and no sites on that side of the island will be healthy or fit for building purposes as long as the lagoon to the east of Aberdeen is allowed to exist. The large and valuable Dock there is rarely used, on account of the unhealthiness of the district and the great amount of sickness occurring among the employees of the Dock Company. The Captain Superintendent has already fully reported about the Police accommodation and the much-needed improvements cannot be too strongly represented. .

The

TROOPS.

Table IV. shows the average strength, admissions to Hospital and deaths. There is a slight decrease in the average strength compared with last year, an increase of 1,175 in admissions to Hospital and a decrease of nine in the number of deaths. Both White and Black show the increase

in sickness which is specially noticeable in the last years and is due to the abolition of the Contagious Diseases Ordinance. During the last two years even voluntary examination has been disallowed by orders from home. This increase in the ill-health of the Troops is to be deplored as it is preventable. The ten years from 1874 (when the Ordinance was in full working order) to 1883, and the strength of the Troops only averaged 400 less than it does now the lowest number of admissions was 820 and the highest number 1,502, the lowest number of deaths was 36 and the highest 70. This shows while the real health of the Troops was much worse, as regards climatic disease, their health as regards venereal disease was infinitely better. The ten years from 1887 to the present year show the lowest number of admissions was 1,485, the highest number of deaths was only 39, while the highest number of admissions has increased to 4,274 and the lowest number of deaths 14. Thus in over 20 years the admissions have increased from 820 to 4,274, while the deaths have decreased from 70 to 14. The increase of the average strength of the Troops is from 1,055 in 1874 to 2,784 while the increases in strength has not doubled the increase in admissions to Hospital has more than qua- drupled from 820 to 4,274. Thus venereal disease has been terribly increased; the number of women of all nationalities flaunting their occupation in the streets also. In spite of legal enactments morality among men and women has not been improved, indeed very much the reverse. The dread of contracting disease has no effect on either the male or female portions of the population in the English Possessions either at Home or abroad. The following table shows the number of admissions to Hos- pital and deaths among the Troops for the last ten years and speaks for itself:-

Admissions.

Deaths.

1887,

1,749

14

1888,

1,485

21

1889,

1,732

16

1890,

1,915

15

1891,

1,851

17

1892,

2,844

31

1893,

2,927

28

1894,

2,905

39

1895,

3,099

28

1896,

4,274

19

GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL.

The Superintendent's report goes thoroughly into every detail as regards the staff, the buildings, the admission of patients, the characters of the diseases and the number of deaths. The sickness among the staff, the leave granted in most cases well earned and more than earned in all cases absolutely necessary from ill-health, caused by the exhaustion from the overwork of the last three years his report goes thoroughly into every detail.

415

The following table gives the number and classification of those brought to Hospital for the

past 10 years-

1887.

1888.

1889.

1890.

1891. 1892. 1893. 1894.

1895. 1896.

Police,

619

657

590

582

570

496

522

505

466

588

Board of Trade,

103

153

135

110

135

157

132

100

129

-87

Private paying Patients,

324

313

402

527

464

378

467

491

498

632

Government Servants,....

147

159

135

191

179

168

205

168

203

269

Police Cases,.

Destitutes,.....

208

242

252

264

240

232

247

272

319

244

255

248

279

283

279

284

262

427

668

778

1,656 1,772 1,793 1,957 1,867 1,715 1,835 1,963 2,283 2,598

This table shows a steady increase in the numbers of nearly all classes of patients, but for the 1896 a very large increase in the numbers of Private Patients and also of Destitutes, Government Ser- vants also show very decided increases in the last two years. Curiously enough 1894, the year of the first Plague Epidemic, was one of the healthiest of the ten years; every one was then so busy and excited that they had no time to think of themselves but the last two years show the result of the reaction.

The admissions and deaths in Hospital for the last ten years are as follows:-

1887

1888,.

1889.

1890,

1891,

1892.

1893,...

1894,..

1895,

1896,....

Admissions.

Deaths.

.1,656

89

1,772

80

..1,793

77

.1,957

98

...1,867

84

..1,715.

68

..1,835

67

.1,963

101

2,283

114

.2,598

143

The admissions have increased in the past ten years, in 1896 by nearly 1,000.

In 1887 they were lowest 1,656; in 1896 highest 2,598. In 1893 the deaths were lowest in the past ten years 67, in 1896 highest 143.

This year Dr. ATKINSON suffered from another attack of Pneumonia and had to take a month's sick leave, but this year it was less severe than in the previous two years and the recovery much quicker to the great delight of all the Medical Staff. This year (1896) for the first time one of the Staff was attacked with Plague. Sister CATHERINE (Miss MCINTOSH), our Chinese scholar, who had done most valuable work in the Plague Hospital for the first three years, had a very severe attack of plague and caused us all great anxiety, and sincere gratification when she showed signs of convalesc- ence. She was sent home on sick leave as soon as possible and has made a complete recovery becoming so well that she gave up part of her leave and has gone out to India to assist the nursing of the Plague patients in the epidemic now raging there.

Mr. CHAPMAN, the Hospital Steward, who has done very hard work the last three years, fell ill and had to go away on sick leave. I had to represent that his illness was entirely due to overwork and the necessity of another Chinese clerk being appointed to assist him which has been sanctioned.

Dr. BELL, who was appointed on the 1st June, 1896, has done hard and valuable work; he took Dr. ATKINSON's duties while he was away on sick leave for a month, and has been of the greatest assistance to the Medical Staff. I regret to say he fell ill with a severe attack of typhoid fever the beginning of the year 1897 and is now away on sick leave. He reports his restoration to health and his return in a fortnight. Before his permanent appointment on the Staff he has many times held temporary appointments on the Hospital Staff in emergencies and rendered invaluable assistance.

A new building has been added to the Hospital accommodation and is to be used entirely for lying-in cases, and there is a prospect of a new buildng for women and children's wards and private wards for women with a Nurses Institute for the instruction of nurses and midwives for the benefit of the public. These buildings, very much needed, will relieve the congestion in the wards and private wards of the Hospital to which the Superintendent has drawn attention. For these additions we shall have to thank Her Majesty the Queen's Diamond Jubilee which cause the thanksgiving of thou- sands of the sick and suffering all over Her Majesty's possessions.

In this Hospital a first class paying patient can obtain accommodation, medical attendance, nursing by European Sisters of the first class who have been trained for five years in the London Hospital, food and medical comforts, including wine and spirits, of the best brand for $5 per diem. While in the first class hotels in this City he cannot get accommodation alone equal to that he receives

416

in the Hospital for $10 per diem, and an ordinary seaman receives similar attendance, food, medical comforts with stimulants in all respects similar to a first class patient with better accommodation in a general ward, than he can procure outside for $1, less than he would have to pay in the lowest class hotel for accommodation only. While destitutes of all classes receives the same for nothing.

For the Nursing Staff of Sisters whose services are generally acknowledged and so much appre- ciated, ladies who are received with pleasure into the best society, the Colony is indebted to Dr. ATKINSON whose knowledge of the nursing institutions at home enabled us to procure them soon after his appointment as Superintendent. They have earned the respect and good-will of the whole Colony and with a slight increase to their Staff have, through the Matron (Miss EASTMOND), undertaken the tuition of nurses for the public benefit. I cannot speak with too high respect of the untiring and noble work they have done during the heavy troubles that have lately fallen on this Colony, and I am happy to think that it has received suitable recognition by the Government and special recognition by the general public.

I would also mention the services of Mr. ACKERS, the Matron of the Venereal Wards for Women, formerly the Lock Hospital, whose services date back 13 years, who has been untiring and very kindly in the performance of her duties in many cases of a disagreeable and also dangerous nature and who has earned the respect and good-will of the poor creatures-her patients. She also has gone through very hard and fatiguing work, being in sole charge, and this year was compelled to go on sick leave.

Mr. BROWNE, Government Analyst and Apothecary, has also had arduous work this year, being in sole charge, with such assistance as we have been able to give him, Mr. Crow being absent on his first long and well-earned leave after over 10 years' service.

We have lost the services of Mr. U I-KAI, Chinese Apothecary, assistant in the Hospital. He obtained the Diploma of the Hongkong Medical College and has now been appointed House Surgeon of the Nethersole Hospital. During his 9 years of Government service he gave the Medical Staff great satisfaction in the performance of his duties and his loss is regretted.

As I am now retiring on pension I take this opportunity of thanking the whole Hospital Staff for the kindness, courtesy and untiring assistance I have always received from them and most gratefully acknowledge.

The Superintendent's report on the Hospital is so full that it would be needless repetition for me to say anything more.

LUNATIC ASYLUMS.

ز

Table VII B shews the admissions and deaths in the Government Lunatic Asylums during each month of the year.

-

There is an increase of admissions compared with last year of 49, and the deaths have exactly doubled. The total admissions are 128 and the deaths are 16. Sixteen Europeans were admitted, of whom one died. Four coloured lunatics were admitted, none died. One hundred and eight Chinese were admitted, of whom thirteen died and twenty-eight were discharged to Canton.

INFECTIOUS DISEASES HOSPITAL.

Table VII C shews the admissions during every month of the year to the hulk Hygeit. From January to June 15 small-pox cases were admitted, among whom there were 3 deaths: 1 European, 1 Coloured and 1 Chinese. There were no admissions in July, August, September and October. In November 31 Chinese suffering from cholera, from S.S. Cheang Hock Kean from Singapore, of whom 19 died. A full account of the outbreak is given in the Superintendent's appendix on Cholera.

The wooden building in the Government Civil Hospital compound used as a temporary small- pox Hospital was pulled down and a new building to be used as a Lying-in Hospital has been built in its place. This is a well constructed building of brick and granite and admirably suited to the purpose.

It was no longer needed for small-pox cases.

KENNEDY TOWN HOSPITAL.

This building has now been permanently handed over to the Medical Department as an Infectious Diseases Hospital, and with it and the hulk Hygeia there is no longer a necessity for a Temporary Small-pox Hospital. In the year 412 plague cases were admitted, of whom 306 died; a full account of which is given in Staff-Surgeon WILM's Report.

This Hospital was thoroughly disinfected and colour-washed in November.

18 Small-pox cases were admitted during October, November and December; of whom 2 died. The number of admissions and deaths from all causes for each month of the year are shown on Table VII D.

PUBLIC MORTUARY.

Table VIII gives the Return of Dead Bodies brought to the Mortuary and as far as possible the cause of death to this table is attached. A letter from Dr. BELL, now in charge, gives the reason for the unusual number under "unascertained causes."

417

One hundred and ninety bodies were brought in as compared with one hundred and fifty in 1895. Of these nine were European adults, one hundred and thirty-seven Chinese adults and forty-four Chinese children.

VICTORIA GAOL.

The following table gives the number of admissions to the Gaol and the daily average number of prisoners for the past ten years :-

1887,... 1888, 1889,

..

1890,

1891.

1892,

1893,

1894:

1895,..

1896,

Total number admitted to Gaol.

Daily average No. of prisoners.

+

4,302

584.00

.3,627

531.00

3,705

581.00

3,444

566.00

5,231

507.00

.5,046

515.00

4,010

458.00

3,913

455.00

.5,014

472.00

..5,582

514.00

The total number of admissions to the Gaol was 5,582, or 568 in excess of those admitted in 1895. The daily average 514, or 42, in excess of 1895. This increase in the daily average is due to the unusual number of beggars, vagrants and petty thieves on short sentences.

The total number of admissions to Hospital was 500 as compared with 231 in 1895; there were 10 deaths in Hospital as compared with 7 in 1895. Seven other deaths occurred in the Gaol. Two Chinese were executed, 2 Chinese found dead in their cells from natural causes. 2 Chinese men and 1 Chinese female hanged themselves in their cells.

Of the admissions to lospital 57 were put in under observation for a day or two and their com- plaints only found trifling were dischagred. 10 were found to be of unsound mind, 26 had Remittent Fever, 50 Intermittent Fever, 29 Febricula, 35 suffered from Cardiac Disease, 36 from Diarrhoea, 39 from abscesses chiefly in the soles of the feet, 25 from contusions caused by the punishment of flog- ging; one of these cases died, the contused abrasions sloughed, from what cause could not be ascertained, and septicemia set in, causing death. After the Coroner's inquest a Commission of Enquiry was appointed, and by their advice flogging with the cane was abolished and the birch appointed to be used in future. Seven hundred and forty cases were not admitted to Hospital but treated in their cells. Eight out of fifty-four opium-smokers were admitted to Hospital; there were no deaths among the eight from pulmonary congestion: None of the opium-smokers were of a very advanced age, or showed any peculiarly interesting characteristics; none of them smoked to unusual excess. 4 mace is the greatest amount and this man increased in weight 2 lbs. in the first four weeks' detention.

TUNG WA HOSPITAL.

This Hospital was under the daily observation of the Superintendent of the Government Civil Hospital during the year and many improvements were made in the wards the cubicle partitions and platforms on the floors done away with allowing for ventilation.

The number of patients treated in the Hospital during the year was 2,041; of these 792 died, 258 were admitted in a moribund condition. No small-pox cases were admitted during the year Government order.

In the City of Victoria 1,308 vaccinations were done and 293 in the Out-Districts of the Colony by the Native Doctors, the lymph being supplied from the Vaccine Institute.

1

This year (1897) from the 1st of January Doctor CHUNG, educated in the Medical College, has been appointed a resident Doctor to treat any of the patients who desire Western treatment or can be per- suaded to use it, and Dr. THOMSON to visit the Hospital twice daily, supervise the treatment and report on the cases admitted to Hospital, and the cause of death of the dead bodies brought in daily to the Registrar General. He sent in a report of the work done in the first quarter of this year which shows these gentlemen have been able to do good work and introduce many new improvements even in that short time by their knowledge of the language assisted by tact and discretion in dealing with

the Chinese Directors and the Native Doctors.

VACCINE INSTITUTE.

This has been under the superintendence of the Superintendent of the Government Civil Hospital in the absence of Mr. LADDS on leave during the year. A full report concerning this Institution is given in his Appendix B, shewing its success in producing good lymph, and as a money speculation bringing in good profit.

HEALTH OF THE COLONY.

A very able report on this subject is given by Dr. F. W. CLARKE, the newly appointed Health Officer and Superintendent of the Sanitary Board, leaves me but little to say. The percentage of deaths among the Foreign Residents shows a slight increase on the previous 5 years, being 2.63. Table XVI `shows the mortality and percentage of deaths among the Foreign Residents for the last ten years.

418

Attached are the usual tables showing the number of deaths among the European and Chinese Communities from diseases that may be attributable to filth for the last twenty-three years.

The table giving the return of deaths among the Chinese shows a marked improvement since the daily admission of patients and also the dead bodies sent to the Tung Wa Hospital has been under European supervision for the last two years, and I think will show further improvement under the new Government arrangement for that Hospital, supervision commencing last January.

DEATHS AMONG EUROPEANS (BRITISH AND FOREIGN).

FEVERS.

VOMITING

YEARS.

Enteric.

Simple Continued.

DIARRHEA. CHOLERA. AND

PURGING.

TOTAL.

Typhus.

1873,

6

2

17

1874,

17

1875,

18

778

25

26

24

1876, ......

1

14

21

1877,

4

10

27

1878,

15

9

29

1879,

21

14

38

1880,

1

12

10

24

1881,

2

17

10

29

1882,

10

13

13

37

1883,

1

9

9

19

1884,

7

4

12

23

1885,

11

9

19

46

1886,

8

5

18

1887,

7

10

6

25

1888,

16

25

50

1889,

2

io

16

1890,

4

12

1891,

5

15

1892,

6

7

1893,

11

17

1894,

3

9

1895,

9

1896,

4

1

19 18

* Sporadic.

DEATHS AMONG CHINESE.

FEVERS.

VOMITING

YEARS.

DIARRHEA.

CHOLERAIC DIARRHEA.

AND

TOTAL.

Enteric.

Simple Continued,

PURGING.

Typhus.

1873,

1874,

125

22

12

96

16

195

319

46

231

402

1875,

31

291

2

288

612

1876,

94

343

259

696

1877,

145

370

8

311

834

1878,

89

481

33

701

1,304

1879,

116

733

21

608

1,478

1880,

309

373

348

1,030

1881,

438

168

38

435

1,079

1882,

679

71

465

1,215

1883,

262

571

3

660.

1,496

1884,

132

600

2

301

1,035

1885,

105

755

561

176

1,604

1886,

9.

772

10

326

19

1,136

1887,

9

441

25

276

13

764

1888,

299

2

361

17

236

917 *

1889,

363

180

7

551

1890,

1

342

216

I

562

1891,

6.

427

329

9

771

1892,

446

231

677

1893,

448

294

742

1894,

2

433

312

1

752

1895,

10

199

264

18

487

1896,

7

120

254

19

400

!

419

This is the last Annual Report I shall furnish as I am retiring on pension. In my twenty-three years' service as the Head of the Civil Medical Department I think, it will be allowed, some improve- ments have been made. When I joined the Service in the Colony in 1873 I found my duties, besides general supervision of the Department, were Medical Officer to the Lock Hospital also to the Gaol, which was then also used as a Lunatic Asylum. I was also in charge of the sanitary supervision of the Colony with the assistance of two Sanitary Inspectors who had never been instructed in their duties which they performed in the best way they thought fit. I was also Meteorological Reporter to the Government. I was also expected to attend on all the families of Subordinates of the Civil Service drawing under £100 a year. A very sufficiently complicated set of duties for one man.

I was also expected to make up £200 a year of my pay by private practice, this being the sun deducted fron the pay of my predecessors for the privilege of having private practice. The Lock Hospital was the ouly decent building belonging to the Department. The Government Civil Hospital was a wretched okl bungalow formerly in occupation of a Mission wholly unfitted for the purpose. The Superintendent and Mr. BOTHELO, who was Apothecary, Government Analyst, Steward, Storekeeper and Clerk, with Mr. De Souza, Apothecary, Steward and Clerk of the Lock Hospital, were the only reliable subordinate officers in the Medical Department. The European wardmasters of the Hospital knew nothing of their duties and were drunken beachcombers and, as a rule, changed every few months, being dismissed for drunkenness and neglect of duty. The nurses were ignorant Chinese coolies; one of them afterwards the Chinese wardınaster A Lok was a thorough, good man, had been about 15 years in the service, was a competent and careful dresser and post mortem assistant. This Institution was a wretched build- ing with a wretched nursing staff, no armoury worthy of the name, not even a lancet fit to open a boil. The medical comforts were unwholesome milk and the cheapest brands of wine and spirits which I reported upon to Government and refused to permit the patients to touch. I had a good arinoury of my own which I lent to the Hospital till I could get sanction for one from Governinent.

But my great anxiety was my sanitary responsibilities and I was thankful, when after ten years, an appeal to the Secretary of State from the Surveyor General and myself, Mr. CHADWICK was sent out as Sanitary Commissioner, and his report resulted in the formation of a Sanitary Boar, and relieved me of all further responsibility.

The Hospital was reported on without effect, but it was blown down in the great typhoon of 1874. Then the vacant old Hotel d'Europe was taken for a Hospital, a much better building in every respect but still not suited for a hospital either in construction or situation. That building was burnt down in the great fire of 1878 and then began the building of the present Hospital by adding to the size of the Lock Hospital, not as satisfactory as I could wish but the best I was able to obtain.

The Colony has now a very decent Hospital which has had many improvements added to it and will have more in the near future; there is promise of a sufficient Medical Staff in the future. The Nursing Staff is all that can be desired. There are decent Lunatic Asylums, an Infectious Diseases Hospital and Hulk, a Public Mortuary and a fine building for the Quarters of the Nursing Staff. An Observatory has been built and has its own proper staff. The Lock Hospital, I regret to say, has been abolished and has become the female Venereal Wards of the Government Civil Hospital but only the very worst cases come in. The Sanitary Staff has been put on a proper footing, and the Sanitary Board indulges in less verbosity and does more business. What all my reports could not do the Plague Epidemic has done, opened the eyes of the Public and Government here and at Home to the deficiencies in the strength of the Medical Staff and the awful, unwholesome state of the Colony, and its continued presence does not permit them to forget. In the near future there is a good prospect for the place I have loved so well and in which I have made so many friends, and so

say farewell with the profoundest regret.

I

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

The Honourable

THE COLONIAL SECRETARY,

fc.,

SC.,

نے

fc.

PH. B. C. AYRES,

Colonial Surgeon.

Remaining

on 1st Jan., 1896,

Janitary, February,

3

March, April,

3

May,

2 23

June,

3

July,.

11

August,

.9

European.

ANONCE∞ Indian.

Chinese.

2

12

10

19

20

25

September, 9

32

October,. 10 29

November, 4 19

December,.. * 18

European.

Indian.

Chinese.

420

POLICE.

Table I.-Shewing the ADMISSIONS into and DEATHS in the GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL during each Month of the Year 1896.

EUROPEANS.

INDIANS.

CHINESE.

MONTHS.

Admissions. Deaths. Admissions.

Admissions. Deaths. Admissions. Deaths.

TOTAL Admissions. Deaths.

TOTAL

Remaining on the 1st Jan..

1896,......

4

3

January,

13

1

4

8

24

February, March, April, May,.

4

18

16

21

1

14

23

1

31

6

41

June,

31

10

45

July,.

12

58

1

13

83

2

August,

12

41

18

71

1

September,

10

51

17

78

1

October,

15

45

14

74

1

November,

6

36

18

60

December,

6

27

9

42

Total,......

94

1

370

124

10

5

588

77

J. M. ATKINSON, Superintendent.

Table II-Shening the RATE of SICKNESS and MORTALITY in the POLICE FORCE during the Year 1896.

AVERAGE STRENGTH.

TOTAL SICKNESS.

TOTAL DEATHS. RATE OF SICKNESS.

RATE OF MORTALITY.

European. Indian.

Chinese.

Total. European. Indian.

Chinese. European. Indian.

Chinese.

European. Indian.

Chinese.

European.

Indian.

Chinese.

105 214 306 625

94 370 124

1

3

10 89.52 172.89 40.52

.95 1.40 3.26

J. M. ATKINSON, Superintendent.

European.

Indian.

Chinese.

European.

Indian.

Table III. POLICE RETURN of ADMISSIONS to HOSPITAL from each District during the Year 1896.

TAITAMTUK,

CENTRAL No. 5

GOVERNMENT No. 1 STONE

HOUSE

CUTTERS'

8

No. 2

ISLAND.

GAP No. 6 MOUNTAIN

WATER POLICE STATIONS TSIMSHATSUI,

TSAT-TSZ-MUI, SHAUKIWAN,

POKFULAM.

ABERDEEN.

STANLEY,

SHEK-0.

3

LODGE.

WHITFIELD.

"1

Months.

No. 7.

YAUMATI,

HUNGHOM.

::

Chinese.

European.

Indian.

Chinese.

European.

:::

Indian.

Chinese.

European.

Indian.

Chinese.

European.

Total,

68 228

42

26 10

2

1 13 7

6 5 21 2 14

3

6

2 1 14

12

AVERAGE STRENGTH.

ADMISSIONS INTO HOSPITAL.

DEATHS.

White. Black. Total. White. Black. Total.

White.

Black.

::::::

::

:::

Indian.

Chinese.

European.

J. M. ATKINSON, Superintendent.

Table IV.-Shewing the RATE of SICKNESS and MORTALITY of the TROOPS serving in HONGKONG

during the Year 1896.

1,470 1,314 2,784

2,729 1,545 4,274

11

8

со

19

::

:

Indian.

Chinese.

European.

Indian.

Chinesc.

European.

Indian.

Chinese.

TOTAL.

:::::::::::::

$

24

18

21

23

41

45

$3

71

78

60

42

40 19 4 10

588

AVERAGE DAILY RATE OF SICKNESS.

RATE OF MORTAL- ITY PER 1,000 or THE STRENGTH.

Total. White. Black. White. Black.

128.73 59.59 7:48 6.08

E. W. EVATT, Surgeon-Colonel. A.M.S., Principal Medical Officer, China and Hongkong.

421

Table V.-Shewing the ADMISSIONS and MORTALITY in the GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL during the Year 1896,

Small-pox,

Measles,.

GENERAL DISEASES.

Rubella, Synonyms, Rotheln, German Measles, Epidemic Rose

Rash,

Typhus,

Plague,

Influenza,

DIPHTHERIA-

Laryngeal Diphtheria, Synonym, Membranons Croup. Simple Continued Fever, Synonym, Febricula,

Enteric Fever, Synonym, Typhoid Fever,

Choleraic Diarrhoea, Synonymn, Cholera Nostras,

Dysentery,

Beri-beri, Synonym, Kakké,

MALARIAL FEVER-

7. Intermittent, Synonym, Ague,

b. Remittent,

c. Malarial Cachexia,..

PHAGEDŒNA---

Sloughing Phagedona,

ERYSIPELAS—

Phlegmonous,

SEPTICEMIA-

Puerperal Fever,

Tetanus,

Tubercle,

LEPROSY, SYNONYM, ELEPHANTIASIS GRŒCORUM---

Tubercular,

SYPHILIS, SYNONYM, POX-

a. Primary, Hard Chancre or infecting sore, b. Secondary, or Constitutional..

c. Inherited,

Gonorrhoea, Synonyms, Clap, Blennorrhagia,

Diseases dependent on Animal Parasites,...

Vegetable

Effects of Animal Poisons,

15

33

Vegetable Heat,

وو

Chemical agents,

Scurvy,

ALCOHOLISM-~

Delirium Tremens,.

Rheumatism,

ADMISSIONS.

DEATHS.

TOTAL.

TOTAL.

Euro-

peans.

Indians & Asiatics, Coloured (Japanese Persons. included).

Indians &

Euro-

peans.

Coloured Asiatics. Persons.

Gout,

OSTEOARTHRITIS, SYNONYMS, ARTHRITIS NODOSA--

Cyst,

Arthritis defarmans, Rheumatoid arthritis,

New Growth. Non-Malignant,.

CO 1

1

1

1

10

21

34

1

13

13

16

3

:00 HON

သင်က

10

47

49

54

108

131

143

382

42

35

46

123

11

1

2

1

3

GAN

38

39

88

14

22

17

6

23

1

6931

ແລ

5

18

Now wa

13

44

25

1

1

1

46!877136218

M

19

80

Malignant,

Ancemia,

HODGKIN'S DISEASE, SYNONYM, ANŒMIA-

Lymphatica,

1

Diabetes Mellitus, Synonym, Persistent Glycosuria, Immaturity at Birth, Synonym, Premature Birth, Debility,

2

1

3

2

16

18

LOCAL DISEASES.

Diseases of the--

Nervous System,

Eye.

Ear,

Circulatory System,

Respiratory,

Digestive,

Lymphatic,

Thyroid Body,

Urinary System,

Generative System.. Male Organs Female Organs,

Organs of Locomotion, Connective Tissue,

Skin,

General Injuries,

Local Injuries,

Surgical Operations,

Poisons,

Under Observation...

BA

-~

:

:

1

1

3

-

3

:

2

2

* ::

19

3

36

11

17

19

31

11

25

64-9875 822882=8***

BOULONE

*****8-FOR FR

13

07

10

11

14

23

11

30

5

7

165

17

25

221

14

20

74

996

48

8

44

86

46

12

67

83

36

10

14

296

18

15

**

98

1

TOTAL...

877

595

1.126 2,598

32

100

143

J. M. ATKINSON, Superintendent.

422

Table Va.-LIST OF OPERATIONS performed during the Year 1896.

SURGICAL OPERATIONS.

Removal of Tumours;-

Buboes Incision,

Scraping,

Subaceous Cyst of face,

Gun-shot Wounds,-

Of Abdomen,

Of Thigh, Of Foot, Of Hand,

TA

Operations on Eye,--

Excision of Eye-ball, Iridectomy,

Operations on Head and Neck,--

Necrosis of Frontul Bone,

of Lower Jaw,

وو

Harelip,

......

Compound Fracture of Inferior Maxilla,

Necrosis Mastoid portion of Temporal Bone,

Operations on Respiratory Organs,-

Paracentesis Thoracis,

Empyoma,

Operations on Genito Urinary Organs,-

Male,--Stricture of Urethra,

Perineal Section,

***

Hydrocele (Radical Cure), Circumcision,

Lithotomy,

Female,-Craniotomy,

Placenta Privia, Forceps,

Vesico-Vaginal Fistula,

Operations on Digestive Organs,--

*Abscess of Liver,

Hæmorrhoids,

Fistula and Fissure in ano,

Stricture of Rectum,

Paracentesis Abdominis,

Operations on Organs of Locomotion,-

Amputation of Thigh,

17

of Arm,

>>

of Fingers and Toes,

Excision of Elbow,......

Necrosis of Femur,

..

***

......

of Tibia,

>>

of Os Calcis,

of Ribs,

of Phalanges,

Rupture of Tendo Achilles,

4.

.......

*

་ ་ཐཾ

...

A

.....

.

·

***

A

......

OPERATION. DEATHS.

1910-1919 Saic: or

19

5

1

в

1

1

9

I

1

3

1

1

3

ES

27

10

1

1

1

2

1

Total,.

Multiple abscesses following dysentery.

146

3

J. M. ATKINSON,

Superintendent.

1

1

1

423

Table Vb.-Showing the ADMISSIONS and MORTALITY in the GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL during the Year 1896.

ADMISSIONS.

DEATHS.

GENERAL DISEASES.

Group A.--Sub-Group 1.

1. Small-pox, (transferred to Small-pox Hospital),

2. Cow-pox,

3. Chicken-pox.

4. Measles,

5. Epidemic Rose-rash, (Rotheln),.....

6. Scarlet Fever,

7. Dengue,

8. Typhus,

9. Plague,.

10. Relapsing Fever,.

11. Influenza,

12. Whooping Cough,

13. Mumps,

14. Diphtheria,

15. Cerebro-spinal Fever,

16. Simple Continued Fever,

17. Enteric Fever, Synonyms, Typhoid Fever, (Typho-malarial

Fever),.......

18. Cholera, Synonyms, Asiatic Cholera, Epidemic Cholera, 19. Sporadic Cholera, Synonyms, Simple Cholera, Cholera

Nostras,

20. Epidemic Diarrhoea,

21. Dysentery,

Total,.......

Europeans.

1

10

21

34

13

3

8

20

13

4

17

:

3

N

حنا

1

ות

2

7

1

21

16

68

36

28

10

47

-

: 2

~

50 154

10

2.

8

20

J. M. ATKINSON, Superintendent.

Table Vc.-Shewing the ADMISSIONS and MORTALITY in the GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL during the Year 1896.

GENERAL DISEASES.

Group A.-Sub-Group 2.

1. Malarial Fever,-

a. Intermittent, Synonyms, Ague,

6. Remittent,

c. Malarial Cachexia,

2. Beri-Beri,

Monthly Table of Malarial Fever Cases amongst the Police.

INTERMITTENT.

REMITTENT.

January, February,

March, April, May, June, July, August,.. September,

October,

November,

December,..

MONTH.

Enropeans.

Indians.

Asiaties.

:

1

5

9

13

3 23

14

1

Total,.......... 11 101

1

Deaths.

Europeans.

Indians.

Asiatics.

:

Deaths.

Total Number of

Cases.

Total Number of

Deaths.

10

11

28

22

ན༑ 1= " *

27

14

37

10 26 18

203

:

ADMISSIONS.

Europeans.

Indians.

Asiatics.

Total.

Europeans.

DEATHS.

Indians.

Asiatics.

Total..

108 131 143 382

42 35

46 123

1

5 11

2

49

54

1

6

158 169 243 570

1

CO

6

J. M. ATKINSON, Superintendent.

...

1

*

424

Table VI.-Shewing the RATE of MORTALITY in the GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL during the last 10 Years.

Rate to Total Number of Rate to Number of Europeans Rate to Number of Coloured Rate to Number of Asiatics

Admissions.

Admitted.

Persons Admitted.

Admitted.

Per cent.

Per cent.

Per cent.

Per cent.

1887, 1888,

5.37

1887,

4.50

1887,

4.56

1887,

6.96

...

4.51

1888,

3.96

1888,

4.70

1888,

4.98

1889,

4.29

1889.

3.37

1889,

4.13

1889.

5.41

1890,

5.00

1890,

2.38

1890,

5.30

1890,

7.80

1891,

4.49

1891.

3.46

1891,

2.97 1891,

7.33

1892,

3.96

1892,

2.92

1892,

3.28

1892,

5.74

1893,

3.65 1893.

1.57

1893,

2,28 1893,

7.34

1894,

5.14

1894,

3.71

1894,

3.51

1894,

7.36

1895,

4.99 1895.

2.47

1895,

1.32

1895,

8.35

1896,

5.50

1896,

3.65

1896,

1.84

1896.

8.88

A

J. M. ATKINSON,

Superintendent.

Table VII.-Shewing the ADMISSIONS into and DEATHS in the GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL during each Month of the Year 1896.

EUROPEANS.

COLOURED.

ASIATICS.

MONTHS.

Total Admissions.

Total Deaths.

Admissions. Deaths. Admissions. Deaths. Admissions. Deaths.

Remaining on the 1st

January, 1896,

46

7

38

91

January,

72

February,

59

March,.

43

April,

53

May,

64

June,.

69

July,

85

August,

85

September,

October,

80

November,

81

This co co co pod pod ko

28

94

194

17

46

122

9

35

53

131

12

32

66

151

10

48

71

183

7

51

81

201

10

3

83

1

104

8

272.

12

71

1

117

10

273

12

1

70

116

11

268

13

60

105

6

245

12

48

125

13

254

18

December,.

.58

45

•ာ

3

110

10

213

17

Total,

877

32

595

11

1,126

100

2,598

143

;

J. M. ATKINSON, Superintendent.

Table VIIa.-MONTHLY AGGREGATE NUMBER of PATIENTS visited in the HOSPITAL daily for

1896, 1895 and 1894.

Months.

1896.

1895.

1894.

October,

Jaunary, February, March, April, May, June, July,. August,

September,

November,

3,846

3,047

3,170

2,615

2,835

2,431

2,939

3,034

2,785

2,671

2,998

2,450

3,074

2,978

2,798

3,008

3,136

2,981

3.726

2,920

3,208

3,996

3.334

3,237

8,952

8,750

3,017

8.420

3,635

3,130

3,350

3,530

2,802

December,

3,690

3,168

3,084

Total,.

39,787

38,365

35,043

J. M. ATKINSON, Superintendent,

10

30

-35

40

45

50

Fever Cases

Rainfall.

425

Table Vd.-DIAGRAM showing CASES of MALARIAL FEVER occurring every Month amongst the POLICE FORCE, the MEAN MONTHLY TEMPERATURE and the MONTHLY RAINFALL during the Year 1896.

Number. Inches.

January.

February.

March.

April.

May.

June.

July.

August.

September.

25

50°

20

.40°

Red Wave,... Blue Wave,

Green Wave,...

Black Wave,.

Intermittent Fever Cases.

.Remittent

.Monthly Rainfall in inches.

.Mean Monthly Temperature in Degrees Fahrenheit.

J. M. ATKINSON,

Superintendent.

10°

20°

30°

October.

60°

November.

70°

December.

Fahr.

Degrees

Mean

Monthly

Temperature.

80°

90°

Table VII.-Shewing the ADMISSIONS into and DEATHS in the GOVERNMENT LUNATIC ASYLUMS during each Month of the Year 1896.

427

MONTHS.

Remaining on the 1st

EUROPEANS.

COLOURED.

B

Dis-

ASIATICS.

Total Total charged Admissions. Deaths.

Admissions. Deaths. Admissions. Deaths. Admissions. Deaths.

to Canton.

3

201

January, 1896,

January,

February,

March,

April,.

May,

June,

July,

August,

September,

1

1

1

October,

November,

December,

Total,.

16

1

4

9

12

6

6

4

1

6

11

1

13

10

8

12

10

12

6

7

7

9

14

15

9

10

1.

8

8

1

108

15

128

16

28

J. M. ATKINSON, Superintendent.

Table VIIC.-Shewing the ADMISSIONS into and DEATHS in the GOVERNMENT HOSPITAL HULK Hygeia during each Month of the Year 1896.

MONTHS.

EUROPEANS.

COLOURED.

ASIATICS.

Remaining on the 1st

Admissions. Deaths. Admissions. Deaths. Admissions. Deaths.

January, 1896,

January,

February, March,

April,

May,

June,

July,

August,

1

3

1

1

...

1

I

2

Total Admissions.

Total

Deaths.

RNANHR

2

September,

October,.

32

19

November,

December,

1

33

81:5

32

19

....

20

+ 47

* 22

Total,.

*

+ 14 cases of Small-pox, 31 Cholera, 1 Dropsy and Diarrhoea and I in attendance.

3 deaths from Small-pox, 18 from Cholera and 1 from Dropsy and Diarrhea. These Cholera cases from S.S. Cheang Hock Kian.

J. M. ATKINSON, Superintendent.

Table VIId.--Shewing the ADMISSIONS into and DEATHS in the GOVERNMENT KENNEDY TOWN HOSPITAL during each Month of the Year 1896.

EUROPEANS.

COLOURED.

ASIATICS.

MONTHS.

Total Total Admissions. Deaths.

Admissions. Deaths. Admissions.

Deaths. Admissions.

Deaths.

Remaining on the 1st

January, 1896,

January,

February, March, April,.

May,

...

June, July, August,

October,...

September,

November,.

December,..

Total,.........

2

2

36

30

36

30

47

48

34

I 10

44

35

45

35

3

111

81

122

95

80

102

2

30

37

25

13

13

4

11

11

11

1

m

2

5

2

77

* 2

7

18

1

6

1

14

12 CO~

4

27

8

411

298

+456

*310

412 cases of Plague, 2 Cholera, 19 Small-pox, 19 under observation for Plague and 4 in attendance. Of these 306 deaths from Plague, 1 from Choleraic, Diarrhoea, 2 from Small-pox and I from Remittent Fever.

J. M. ATKINSON, Superintendent,

MONTHS.

January,

February,

March,

April,

May,

Table VIII-RETURN of DEAD BODIES brought to the MORTUARY, with the cause of death, in 1896.

10

4 3

:

:

:

N

:

:

Children.

Drowning.

Burns.

Fractured Skull.

Opium Poisoning. Heart Disease.

Malarial Fever.

Phthisis.

Wounds.

Debility.

Bright's Disease.

Heat Stroke.

Ruptured Spleen.

Pleurisy.

Meningitis.

Injury to Kidney.

Cancer of Liver.

Enteritis.

Premature Birth.

Exposure.

Hanging.

Pericarditis.

Peritonitis.

Strangulation.

Small-pox. Plague.

Unascertained,

EUROPEANS.

CHINESE.

Adults.

Children.

Adults.

428

1

I

*:

10

7

3

3

3:

1

:

:.

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:.

:

:

:

:.

:

:

:

1

Ι

:

:

:..

:

F

:.

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

...

:

:

:

:.

:.

:

:.

:

:.

:

:

:

1 1

]

...

3

...

:

:

:.

:

:

...

1

:

:

I

:

F

:

:

I

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

1

2

2

:

:

00

3

:.

:

÷

:

1

5

:

:

:

2

2

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

TD.

5 4

16

11

4

...

:

...

8

3

3

2

6

2

8

2

:

4.

3

1

1

00

1

10

1

8

1

4

++

2

...

15

6

2

I

18

6

2

2

18

8

3

Co

17

9.

10

...

:

:.

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:.

6

1

June,

July,

August,

1

September,.

October,

November,

December,

Total,

Government Civil Hospital, 31st January, 1897.

6

137

44 46

7

11

5

10

6

1

10

10

2

3

...

19

~

1

:

:

:

:

...

...

:

...

:

...

3

16

13

1 3

4

:

...

...

:

...

1 1 1 1

1

10

N

1

1

3

Q

29

J. BELL,

Medical Officer in charge of Post Mortems

429

Table IX.-K.-Shewing the ADMISSIONS into HOSPITAL in. VICTORIA GAOL, and MORTALITY during the Year 1896.

DISEASES.

Remaining under treatment 1st January, 1896,

Remittent Fever,

Intermittent Fever,

Febricula,

Measles,

1o,

>

Syphilis, 2o.

3°.

?

Bubo,

Gonorrhea,

Europeans.

:

017

ADMISSIONS.

7

7

:

:

18

26

1

42

21

8283

50

29

1

I

3

4

4

4

II

1

:

DEATHS.

1

:

Stricture,

Orchitis,

Lunibago,

Paralysis,

Keratitis,

1

Epistaxis,

Otitis,

Auæmia,

34

35

Cardiac Diseases,

7

1

Palpitation,..

Tonsillitis,

2

1

3

Ulceration of throat,

Inflammation of gland,

2

Rheumatism,

4

4

Bronchitis,

4

11

15

Phthisis,

10.

10

...

2

Asthma,

Constipation,

Diarrhoea,

9

9

:

1

3

36

44

2

2

Ascaris,

5)

Dysentery,

Colic,

Dyspepsia,

External Hoemorrhoids,.

Interual

Lardaceous degeneration of duodenum, Jaundice,

Bright's Disease,

Suppression of urine,...

6

6

2

2

2

2

2

1

3

3.

1

1

1

Iritis,

Hoematuria,

Cyst of left ear,

1

1

1

1

Abscesses,

Carbuncle,

Furunculus,

3

35

SKO KON

2

92321

Erysipelas,

Eczema,

Impetigo contagiosa,

Ulcer,

General Debility,

Alcoholism,

Spinal concussion,

Contused Wound,

from Flogging,

Punctured Wound,..................

Incised Wound,

Abscess from Flogging,

Contusion,

Sinus of buttock,

Scald,

Sprained ankle,

Dislocation of shoulder,.

Cancer,

Observation,

Unsound Mind,

Total,.

1

1

1

8

1

a a

9

9

1

1

1

4

5

25

25

Ι

1

10

10

2

2

1.

1

Other Deaths: 2 Chinese Executed.

6

51

57

10

10

68

3

436 507

2

Found dead in the cells.

"

2

"

hanged themselves in the cells.

1

>>

Female hanged herself in the cell.

:

1

9

10

430

Table X-N.—Shewing CASES not ADMITTED to HOSPITAL, treated by the MEDICAL OFFICER, during the Year 1895.

Diseases.

Europeans.

Coloured Persons.

Chinese.

Total.

Remaining under treatment 1st January, 1896, .......

15

15

Febricula,

Syphilis, 2,

.(1 Female),

I

I

1,

I

20

21

28

32

3,

8

8

Scrofula,

2

2

«

Bubo,

18

18

Gonorrhoea,.

Orchitis,..

Stricture,

Ecchymosis of right Eye,.

Opacity of Urnea,..

Trichiasis,.

Palpitation,

Rheumatism,

16

1

*.

I

1

35

51

1

1

1

1

1

9

9

1

1

Bronchitis,

Asthma,

(1 Female). (1 Female),

1

1

2

2

2

2

Phthisis,.

(1 Female)

1

Abscess,......

Diarrhoea,

Hæmorrhoid, External,

Hæmaturia,

Right Inguinal Hernia,

Synovitis of right Knee,

(1 Female),

1

I

3

9

12

2

2

1

50

55

1

Ringworm,..

Prickly Heat,

13

1

36

49

Pediculi Capitis,

Impatigo,

Blister of Fingers,

Boils,

Eczema,

Ulcers,

Scabies,

Herpes,

1

1

1

Cellulitis after vaccination,

1

8

9

17

10

1

4

23

33

8

49

53

125

125

I

1

Contused wounds from flogging,

Contused wound,

Punctured wound,.............

1

193

194

t

5

I

1

Incised wound,

Contusion,

Abrasion,

Scald,

Partus. Naturales,

*མ

Observation,

1

3

3

1

11

14

3

3

(1 Female),

1

2

Total,...

71.

A

667

740

Total number of Prisoners

admitted to Gaol.

Table XI.-0.-Shewing the RATE of SICKNESS and MORTALITY in VICTORIA GAOL, during the year 1896.

Rate of sickness.

Rate of mortality.

481

Total No. of Prisoners admitted to Gaol.

Daily average number of Prisoners. Hospital.

Total

Total

sick

in

sick, Total trifling deaths.

Percentage of serious sickness to

total.

cases.

To Total No. of admissions to Gaol.

To Daily average.

To Total No. of admissions to Gaol.

To Daily average.

55.82

514

500

740

17

8.975

2.223

2.414

0.304

3.307

DISEASES.

Table XIɑ.-P.-Shewing OPIUM SMOKERS ADMITTED into HOSPITAL and TREATED by the MEDICAL OFFICER during the Year 1896.

Remaining under treatment 1st January, 1896,-

General Debility No. 7, 13, 54,

Anaemia No. 8,

Pulmonary Congestion No. 12,

Sprain Ankle No. 44,

Diarrhoea No. 49,

Dysentery No. 50,

Total,................

ADMISSION.

Europeans. Indians. Chinese. Total.

:

3

...

1

1

1

co

8

Table XIb.--L.--Shewing the NUMBER and PERCENTAGE of PRISONERS ADMITTED into VICTORIA GAOL HOSPITAL, on the First Examination by the MEDICAL OFFICER, during the year 1896.

Sick in Hospital.

Admitted to Hospital on First Medical Examination.

Percentage of Hospital cases on

First Medical

Examination.

Percentage of Hospital

cases on First Medical Examination.

Europeans. Chinese.

Europeans.

Indians.

Chinese.

5,582

68

429

500

Total number of Vaccinations

and Re-vaccinations.

Total.

نت

Europeans.

Indians.

Chinese.

Total.

To total Gaol

admissions.

To total Hospital

cases.

Nil.

62

65

8.957 3.600

To total Hospital

cases.

TABLE shewing the NUMBER of PRISONERS VACCINATED by the MEDICAL OFFICER in VICTORIA GAOL HOSPITAL,

during the year 1896.

Taken.

831

631

Failed at First Vaccination and Re-vaccination,

200

Nil.

Total number of those who have been Vaccinated and Inoculated, outside the Gaol.

831

To total Hospital

cases.

3.962

Co

8

432

CASES ADMITTED to VICTORIA GAOL HOSPITAL, at the first Medical Examination by the MEDICAL OFFICER, during the Year 1896.

No.

SENTENCE.

Years. M'ths. Days.

DISEASES.

DATE OF ADMISSION.

DATE OF DISCHARGE.

REMARKS.

Contusion,

2nd Mar.

6th Mar. On remand.

General Debility,

6th

26th

""

"

1

Carbuncle,

14tb

27th

>>

""

Measles,....

15th

12

21

Unsound Mind,

25th April

27th

5th May

27

28

Secondary Syphilis,

15th May

2nd June

28

Bubo,

9th June

29th

42

Diarrhoea,.

10th

17th

22

وو

9

28

Observation,

11th

17th

>>

""

10

14

Dysentery,

12th

24th

>>

22

11

14

Bright's Disease,.

12th

24th

22

وو

12

3

Diarrhoea,..

13th

19th

>>

13

42

Observation,

18th

2nd July

14

14

Jaundice,

18th

30th June

""

15

84

Observation,

19th

30th ""

16

2

Do.,

23rd

29th

27

17

1

Do.,

23rd

18

14

Do.,

23rd

24th "" 24th

""

19

10

Bubo,

24th

20

42

Bronchitis,

24th

21

28

Intermittent Fever,.

24th

22

1

Oedema of Feet,

25th

23

...

7

Observation,

26th

"}

>>

1st July

29th June 29th

9th July

1st

27

""

24

10

Do.,

26th

29

25

1

Secondary Syphilis,

30th

""

27th June 28th July

26

14

Diarrhoea,.

1st July.

27

14

Contused wound of head,

1st

2nd 27

17th

""

28

14

Do.,

do.,

1st

17th

27

>>

29

2

Paralysis,.

6th

"

30

42

...

Gonorrhea,

11th

3rd Sept. 25th July

31

42

Bubo,

15th

32

10

Intermittent Fever,

26th

وو

وو

11th Aug.

33

14

Observation,

34

42

Chancre,

10th Aug. 13th

3rd

228d "" 28th

>>

""

33

35

10

Bright's Disease,.

15th

""

36

10

Diarrhoea,.

18th

37

21

Observation,

.29th

77

38

14

Intermittent Fever,.

39

Observation,

40

28

Ulcer,.

41

12

Syphilis,.

42

14

Unsouud Mind,

43

Insane,

44

Diarrhoea,.

45

46

:

28

Dysentery,

Astlima,

3rd Sept. 12th 24th 14th Oct. 16th 21st 26th 26th

22nd 21st >> 31st 10th Sept.

22

>>

18th

Ou remand.

37

27

30th

""

""

6th Nov. 20th Oct.

19

24th

""

On remand.

""

2nd Nov.

>>

4th JJ

4th Nov.

10th

47

42

Bubo left groin...

7th

17th Dec.

""

48

49

50

51

52

53

...

4

...

14

Debility,...

7th

10th Nov.

>>

28

...

Contused wound,

12th

24th

*

37

14

Debility,....

12th

24th

"

27

Unsound mind,

12th

19th

On remand.

22

14

Bubo left groin,.

17th

28th

"}

22

42

Bright's Disease,

28th

29th

Died.

""

>>

54

14

...

Observation,

28th

2nd Dec.

33

55

14

Alcoholism,

30th

3rd

""

>>

56

14

...

Observation,

3rd Dec.

57

7

General Debility,.

8th

4th 11th

""

Died.

22

""

58

28

59

60

61

42

8288

62

63.

64

65:

∞ = 2222 :

Diarrhoea,.

15th

21st

.....

"?

>>

14

Do.,

15th

21st

"}

""

Imbecility,

17th

21st

On remand.

"2

""

Observation,

19th

21st

""

42

Debility,..

21st

29

28

Do.,

22nd

29th

""

"

42

Bright's Disease,

22nd

24th

Transferred to G.C.H.

""

19

Observation,

26th

29th

Ou remand.

11

433

Table XIC.-Q.--Shewing the WEIGHTS of PRISONERS (OPIUM SMOKERS) for the First Four Weeks' Confinement in VICTORIA GAOL, during the Year 1896.

No.

AGE.

LENGTH OF TIME OPIUM

CONSUMPTION

PER DIEM.

WEIGHT WHEN ADMITTED.

WEIGHT FIRST FOUR WEEKS,

REMARKS.

SMOKER.

Years.

Mace.

ibs.

ibs.. lbs.

lbs.

Ibs.

12345678

27

2

1

105

107

107

108

106

**

28

1

90

89

90

· 91

53

20.

2

93

90

92

92

92

42

14

110

106

105

104

102

30

8Z

87

88

s

$7

27

95

92

92

95

9+

43

1

$8

87

88

90

90

40

20

I

100

95

98

99

52

20

2

114

121

115

113

113

10

42

16

1

118

123

124

123

124

11

25

8

1

120

94

93

92

92

12

50

30

103

100

Died 10.3.96 at 8.45 a. m.

13

32

80

103

111

111

111

14

31

109

108

107

106

109

15

47

10

99

100

100

105

105

16

40

7

108

106

103

100

101

17

59

20

2

127

121

122

120

121

18

34

4

108

109

107

106

105

19

44

10

109

123

120

114

117

20

30

5

99

99 100

*

104

21

59

12

107

105

107

112

111

22

112

37.

110

110

112

114

23

29

10

102

101

103

101

104

24

19

4

120

120

119

121

120

25

40

10

110

109

112

112

110

26

29

10

114

112

114

114

113

27

40

10

106

105

106

107

106

28

35

10

90

90

89

90

91

29

50

12

-106

105

103

104

105

30

30

10

109

108

105

105

104

31

56

40

103

100

101

100

101

32

39

20

101

100

98

97

97

33

33

83

82

$2

81

82

3+

40

24

98

97

96

95

96

35

53

20

99

99

98

94

95

36

32

104

104

105

105

106

37

49

16

120

118

118

117

118

38

42

22

105

105

105

39

47

30

104

104

103

104

104

40

58

30

99

98

99

99

99

41

19

3

88

87

88

87

88

42

56

26

107

107

108

107

107

43

21

98

97

99

99

98

44

60

.30

98

101

96

100

101

45

32

10

ΟΙ

93

90

92

91

46

50

20

110

107

105

107

108

47

52

15

100

103

102

103

102

48

56

13

117

120

120

122 124

49

88

10

110

105

106 109

110

50

41

15

120

119

122

119

115

51

45

12

104

105

105

109

109

52

67

36

97

94

91

96

96

50

10

1

107

110

107

108

107

49

10

104

104

102 103

Table XII.-STATISTICS relating to the TUNG WA HOSPITAL, during the Year 1896.

Remaining in Hos- pital 31st. Dcc.,

1895.

No. of Cases treated in the Hospital, 1896.

No. of Patients Dis-

charged during the year 1896.

Died during the year 1896.

Maie.

Female.

Total.

No. of Out-Patients treated during

the year 1896.

Remaining in Hos-

Moribund Cases,

1896.

pital 31st Dec.,

1896.

147

26

173 1,800

235 2,041 || 1,168 123 1,291 672

120 792

84,217 45,478 | 129,695

175

$3 258 114. 18

132

Total.

*[VIK

Female.

Total.

Table XIII.-CASES of SMALL-Pox treated at the TUNG WA HOSPITAL, during the Year 1896.

Remaining in Hospital!

31st December, 1895.

Admitted during 1890.

Discharged 1896.

Died 1896.

Remaining in Hospital 31st December, 1896.

Male. Female. Total. Male. Female. Total. Male. Female. Total. Male. Female. Total. Male. Female. Total.

Nil. Nil. Nil. Nil. Nil. Nil.

Nil.

Nil. Nil. Nil. Nil. NI. NU. Nil. Nil.

434

Table XIV.-VACCINATION performed during the Year 1896 by TRAVELLING VACCINATORS of the TUNG WA HOSPITAL.

In the City of Victoria.

1,308

In Out-Districts.

293

Total.

1,601

Table XV.-Shewing the Rate of MORTALITY among the FOREIGN RESIDENTS in Hongkong during the last 10 Years.

Years.

Number of European and

American Residents.

Deaths.

Percentage of Deaths to Number of Residents.

1887,

3,040

108

3.55

1888,

3,040

122

4.01

1889,

3,040

93

3.06

1890,

3,040

95

3.12

1891,

.0

4,195

57

1.36

1892,

4,195

75

1.79

1893,

4,195

93

2.22

1894,

4,195

105

2.53

1895,

4,195

102

2.43

1896,

4,195

115

2.74

Average of 10 Years,...

3,733.0

96.5

2.68

J. M. ATKINSON, Superintendent.

Enclosure 1.

Report of the Superintendent of the Government Civil Hospital.

GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL,

HONGKONG, 20th April, 1897.

SIR,—I have the honour to forward the Annual Report on the work done in the Government Civil Hospital, the Lunatic Asylums, and the Epidemic Hospitals during the year 1896.

I. THE HOSPITAL BUILDINGS.

The main portion of the Hospital has been maintained in a satisfactory condition.

The accominodation is annually becoming more and more cramped and though the laboratory in the lower building was abandoned and the room fitted up for the reception of Chinese `destitutes the accommodation at present available falls considerably short of what is required for the reception and treatment of all cases that present themselves for admission.

The absolute necessity for a Lying-in Hospital and separate wards for Women and Children is annually becoming more apparent.

As regards the former I hope that now that Kennedy Town Hospital has been permanently handed over to the Department for the purpose of an Infectious Hospital it will be found practicable to utilise the new building referred to in my last report as the Isolation Hospital as a Lying-in Hospital.

The question of Laundry and Wash-house accommodation is still in abeyance.

II. LUNATIC ASYLUMS.

The buildings have been satisfactorily maintained and nothing calling for special remarks has occurred.

(6

III. INFECTIOUS HOSPITAL AND HOSPITAL HULK HYGEIA."

The Infectious Hospital at Kennedy Town was in use all the year owing to the existence of Plague, Cholera and Small-pox in the Colony.

Temporary matsheds were erected in the compound to provide the additional accommodation required.

The Hygeia was used during the months of January, February, March, April, May, June and November when cases of Small-pox and Cholera were under treatment.

I understand that it is intended to remove the Public Disinfector to a piece of land closely adjoining Kennedy Town Hospital.

435

z‛? !! ༼,,。。

IV. MEDICAL STAFF QUARTERS.

This building has been maintained in a satisfactory state of repair.

V. HOSPITAL PREMISES.

The Hospital premises along the High Street frontage have been enclosed by the erection of an iron railing.

VI. HOSPITAL AND NURSING STAFF.

Mr. LUK CHow PoE, Interpreter to Medical Officer of Health, resigned on 7th January and was succeeded by Mr. G. MARQUES on the 8th January. (In C.S.O. No. 3,352 of 1895.)

Mr. H. C. BAYLEY, Caretaker Kennedy Town Hospital, resigned on the 29th February and was succeeded by Mr. J. R. CUNNINGHAM on 1st March (C.Š.O. No. 422 of 1896).

Dr. WILM was seconded to Medical Department for special Plague Work at Kennedy Town Hospital on the 14th March and recalled to his duty on the 26th August (C.S.O. No. 290 of 1896).

Mr. LUNG FU CHU, Senior Clerk, resigned on 23rd April and was succeeded by Mr. LUNG PING FAI on the 24th April (C.S.O. No. 1,028 of 1896).

Mr. J. R. LEE, European Wardmaster Lunatic Asylum, was granted six weeks' sick leave in April (C.S.O. No. 958 of 1896).

Dr. PH. B. C. AYRES returned from leave on 1st May and did not resume his duties until June 22nd (C.S.O. No. 1,107 of 1896).

Dr. L. P. MARQUES, Medical Officer of Gaol, retired on pension on 31st May (C.S.L. No. 731). Dr. J. BELL was appointed Assistant Surgeon on the 1st June (C.S.L. No. 818).

Mr. G. A. Souza was dismissed from the Service on 31st May and was succeeded by Mr. G. SYDNEY on 2nd November (C.S.O. No. 1,455 of 1896).

Mr. Lo Fuk Lam, was appointed Assistant Clerk on the 22nd June (C.S.L. No. 946).

Miss ANNE PATTESON (Sister GRACE) was appointed Holiday Sister and arrived here on the 19th July (C.S.O. No. 1,443 of 1896).

Mr. J. R. CUNNINGHAM was laid up with fever from 27th August to 7th September, arrangements having been made to secure from the Army Medical Staff Corps the services of Private MILLER to perform his duties (C.S.O. No. 2,022 of 1896).

The Superintendent of the Government Civil Hospital was granted one month's sick leave in September (C.S.O. No. 2,102 of 1896), arrangements having been made with Dr. HILL to assist in the performance of the duties (C.S.O. No. 2,116 of 1896).

Mrs. MARY JEX was taken on as Probationer on the 15th September (C.S.O. No. 2,166 of 1896). Mrs. J. ACKERS, Matron Female Venereal Ward, was granted two months' sick leave in October, arrangements having been made with Mrs. BARRY to perform her duties (C.S.O. No. 2,252 of 1896).

Mr. R. CHAPMAN, Steward and Storekeeper Government Civil Hospital, was granted one month's sick leave in November (C.S.O. No. 2,684 of 1896).

Mr. WONG ENOCH, Student Apothecary, was dismissed on the 20th December (C.S.O. No. 2,972 of 1896).

Miss MARY E. MEAD (Sister MARY) resigned on the ground of ill health on 31st December (C.S.O. No. 3,011 of 1896).

Mr. T. R. OHASHI was appointed Japanese Interpreter on the 15th December (C.S.O. No. 2,961 of 1896).

The following officers were away on leave:-

Dr. Pu. B. C. AYRES from 1st January to 30th April (C.S.O. No. 270 of 1895).

Dr. J. M. ATKINSON from 22nd September to 26th October (C.S.O. No. 2,102 of 1896).

Dr. J. A. Lowson from 25th May to 31st December (C.S.O. No. 942 of 1896).

Mr. W. E. Crow from 8th July to 31st December (CS.O. No. 360 of 1896).

Mr. F. BROWNE from 29th April to 14th June (C.S.O. No. 667 of 1896). Mr. UI KAI from 4th to 10th September (C.S.O. No. 2,049 of 1896).

Mr. R. CHAPMAN from 25th November to 30th December (C.S.O. No. 2,684 of 1896). Miss IRELAND (Sister GERTRUDE) from 1st January to 5th April (C.S.O. No. 963 of 1895). Miss HIGGIN (Sister FRANCES) from 20th March to 28th December (C.S.O. 342 of 1896). Miss MCINTOSH (Sister CATHERINE) from 2nd September to 31st December (C.S.O. No.

1,837 of 1896).

Miss BARKER (Sister ELIZABETH) from 12tli August to 13th October (C.S.O. No. 1846, of

1896).

Miss PENRUDDOCKE (Sister MARGARET) from 29th April to 29th June (C.S.O. No. 945 of

1896).

Mrs. ACKERS from 10th October to 21st November (C.S.O). No. 2,252 of 1896).

Mr. LEE from 25th April to 9th June (C.S.O. No. 958 of 1896).

436

VII.-WORK-DONE DURING THE YEAR.

GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL.

Attached to this report are the following tables:--

I. Shewing the admissions into and deaths in the Government Civil Hospital, during each month of the year, of the Police.

II. Shewing the rate of sickness and mortality in the Police Force during the

year. III. Police Return of admissions to Hospital from each district during the year. V. General Return of the sick treated in the Hospital.

Va. Surgical operations performed during the year.

Vb. Zymotic Diseases, sub-group 1.

Ve.

""

>>

:)

2.

Vd. Diagram shewing number of cases of Malarial Fever occurring amongst the members of the Police Force admitted in each month of the year.

VI. Shewing the rate of mortality in the Government Civil Hospital during the last 10 years. VII. Shewing the admissions into and deaths in the Government Civil Hospital during each month of last year.

years.

VIIa. The aggregate monthly number of patients visited in the Hospital daily for the last three

VIIb. Table of admissions into and deaths in the Lunatic Asylums during the year. VIIc. Table of admissions into and deaths in the Epidemic Hulk Hygeia during the year.

VIId. Table of admissions into and deaths in the Infectious Hospital Kennedy Town.

Table V. has been altered in accordance with the Memorandum of the Sub-committee on Classific- ation in the last edition of The Nomenclature of Diseases (Royal College of Physicians, London), the separate diseases being given under the heading "General Diseases," the division into groups being

omitted.

I have retained the Zymotic diseases in Tables Vb. Ve. and Vd. for purposes of reference. The total number of cases treated during the year was as follows:-

In-patients, Out-patients,..

...

...2,598 .....9,512

12,110

This gives an increase of 3,218 as compared with the year 1895. Minor surgical cases such as scalp wounds, lacerated and contused wounds, dog bites, teeth extraction, &c. which were treated in the Receiving Ward are not included.

In-patients.-The number of in-patients was 2,598, as against 2,283 in 1895; of these 91 remained at the end of 1895 and 2,507 were admitted during the year.

The following figures show the increase in the number of in-patients treated during the last three years:-

Year.

1894,

1895,

In-patients.

.1,963

.2,283

...

.2,598

1896,

The total number of deaths was 143, a percentage of 5.50 as compared with 4.99 in 1895; of these 53 were in a moribund condition when admitted 35 dying within 24 hours, and 8 within 48 hours of their admission. Most of these cases were admitted from the Tung Wa Hospital, excluding these the percentage of deaths is reduced to 3.46.

The average daily number of sick was 102.56 as against 96.31 in 1895.

Of the total number of in-patients 399 were females as against 326 in the previous year; there has also been a steady increase in the number of women admitted as is shown by the following figures:-

Year.

1894,

1895,

1896,

Number of Women.

254

...326

.399

Our only provision for these patients is one general ward supplying accommodation for 14 patients and two private wards which are only occasionally available for women.

"

+

:

437

Private Paying Patients.-The number of First and Second Class patients for the past two years has been as follows:-

First Class, Second Class,

1895.

20

..101

1896.

65

146

It must, however, be borne in mind that many first class patients have had to be treated in second class wards and second class patients in third class wards on account of the accommodation not being adequate for our requirements.

The total number of Private Paying Patients was 632 as against 498 in 1895. NATIONALITIES.-Europeans,-There was an increase of 27 as compared with the previous, year. Coloured. The largest increase was amongst the Indians, 216 more having been admitted than in 1895. The Police account for 116 of this number; the remainder are principally destitute Indians who have come to the Colony in search of work.

Asiatics.-From Table VII. it will be seen that of the total number treated 1,126 were Asiatics, the following figures prove conclusively that the Chinese are annually in increasing numbers availing themselves of the benefits of this Hospital:-

Year.

1893,

1894,

1895,

1896,

Number of Asiaties.

613

783

.1,054

..1.126

If it is intended that the Hospital shall meet with the public requirements further accommodation will have to be provided.

This would be effected to a great extent by the addition of a Hospital for Women and Children, a much-needed requirement as at present there is no separate children's ward and third class European and Native women have to be treated in one general ward with the children.

Tung Wah. A daily medical inspection of this Hospital was maintained during the year, 116 cases were transferred to this Hospital from the Tung Wah, 14 of these being carried over from the previous year.

The following diseases caused the greatest number of admissions :---

Fevers:-

Simple continued (Febricula),.

Enteric,

Intermittent,

Remittent,

Syphilis,..

Respiratory,

Alcoholism,

Digestive System,.

Beri-beri,

Plague,

Injuries of various kinds,

20

17

.382

.123

189

221

...166

51

54

34

....312

Deaths. Of the total number of deaths 25 were from Lung diseases, 21 from Injuries, 9 from Plague, 6 from Beri-beri.

Police.-The total number under treatment was 122 more than in 1895. There was a decrease of 2 in the European section of the Force, an increase of 116 in the Indian section and of 8 in the Chinese.

Gaol Officers.-There were 99 under treatment during the year as follows:-

Principal Warders, Warders,

Assistant Warders,

Turnkeys,

Gaol Guard,

Malarial Fever accounting for the greatest number of admissions, namely, 25.

·

6

26

22

9

36

The one fatal case was that of a European Warder, who died in July from Heat-stroke. Plague.- -There were thirty-four cases under treatment during the year with nine deaths. Twenty-one of these cases were transferred to Kennedy Town Hospital, particulars of the European cases are briefly as follows:-

The first case, that of the daughter of Warder GIDLEY, was admitted on the 30th March and died the following day.

On the following day a Master Mariner, Mr. JAMES ERNEST CLOUD, was admitted. It is believed that he contracted the disease on board a Chinese launch running between Hongkong and Kowloon ; be too succumbed to the disease on the 4th April,

*438

The third case was another daughter of Warder GIDLEY, both the children came from Queen's Road East where the disease was then rife. After a long illness she recovered.

The fourth case admitted on 27th April was an Austrian in the employ of a local firm of merchants; he recovered.

On 29th April one of the Sisters from the Italian Convent was admitted; she died on the 2nd May evidently having contracted the disease from a case which occurred in the Convent.

The sixth case was that of an European in the employ of Messrs. LANE, CRAWFORD & Co., after a severe attack he recovered. He probably contracted the disease while superintending the demolition of some structures in which cases of plague had occurred in 1894.

The seventh case, that of a Private in the Rifle Brigade, was admitted on 22nd May; he recovered after a long illness. In all likelihood he contracted it from the Chinese servants, as a case had occurred amongst the native servants at the Barracks.

The next case was that of a Sapper in the Royal Engineers; he was admitted on the 26th May from Wellington Barracks with marked constitutional depression; he died on the 28th May. As there had been a case of plague amongst the Chinese Submarine Engineers on the same block in the floor beneath that in which this Sapper lived, it is probable that he contracted the disease from the Chinamen.

The ninth case, that of Sanitary Inspector MOFFATT, was admitted on the 11th June; he was trans- ferred to Kennedy Town Hospital on the 13th and died from the disease.

The last case was that of one of the European Sisters Miss MCINTOSH; she was on duty at Kennedy Town Hospital when she contracted the disease and was admitted on the 23rd July. After a sharp attack she fortunately recovered and was discharged from the Hospital on the 13th August.

Influenza.-There were thirteen cases of the ordinary endemic variety usually met with here in the winter months; none proved fatal.

Typhoid.Of the 17 Enteric Fever cases 12 occurred in the Colony, one, had just arrived from Haiphong, one was from Canton and 3 were admitted from ships viz., one from U.S.S. Machias, one from the German gunboat Iltis and one from the S.S. Victoria; there were three fatal cases.

Diphtheria. There was an increase during the year in almissions from this disease, 8 cases, all children of European parents, having been admitted. Of these one proved fatal, in 6 of the cases either Professor KITASATO's or BEHRING's anti-toxin was a Iministered. The copy of a paper on the cases read before the Hongkong and China branch of the British Me lical Association is given in Appendix 4.

Cholera.-On the 1st November the S.S. Cheung Hock Kian with 610 Chinese passengers arrived with thirteen deaths on board.

These bodies were sent to the Tung Wah Hospital and were inspected by myself on my morning visit the following day.

As I could obtain no information from the Tung Wah Hospital Authorities concerning the prob- able cause of death, I reported the fact to the Police Magistrate and obtained an order from him to perform a post mortem examination.

On the 3rd a living case from the same ship was admitted to the Tung Wah Hospital presenting all the symptoms of cholera; he was transferred to Kennedy Town Hospital

The ship was placed in quarantine on the morning of the 4th instant.

There were three more deaths on the 4th and fifteen presenting symptoms of Cholera were transferred to the Hospital Hulk Hygeia.

Fresh cases kept occurring until the 8th instant.

All suspected cases were transferred twice daily to the Hygeia; 5 deaths occurred on board, these were towed ten miles out to sea, well weighted and dumped overboard.

Bacteriological examination by Dr. WILM and myself at the Laboratory at Kennedy Town Hospital proved conclusively that the disease was Asiatic Cholera as the "Cholera-rel" reaction was obtained in cultures of the contents of the intestines in peptone water, from living and dead cases, and the presence of "comma-bacilli" in these cultures was proved microscopically.

On the 7th November the whole of the passengers-second class and steerage-were transferred to

eight lighters and anchored in the quarantine ground under guard.

The disinfection and cleansing of the ship was then proceeded with and having been completed on the afternoon of the 9th the passengers were all examined and re-shipped on board by nightfall.

She was released from quarantine on the morning of the 10th and proceeded to Amoy.

The ship had left Singapore on the 25th of October.

33 cases in all were admitted to the Hospital Hulk Hygeia and Kennedy Town Hospital; of these 19 proved fatal, a mortality of 57 per cent.

The cause of the outbreak was evidently the water; this was analysed and examined bacteriologi- cally and that in one of the tanks was found to contain "comma-bacilli.”

Dysentery.-There were 47 cases with 4 deaths.

Malarial Fever Again I have to report an increase in the number of admissions from this class of disease, the number being 505 as against 368 in the previous year. The months July to November inclusive were those in which the disease was most prevalent.

:

439

The long continued hot weather accounted for the Disease continuing later in the year than is usual. The type of the disease was not severe as is shown by the fact that only one case proved fatal. Beri-beri.-There were 54 cases under treatment, with 6 deaths. This is more than double the number of cases occurring in 1895, the fatal European case was a Portuguese.

Venereal Diseases.-The number of patients admitted suffering from constitutional Syphilis was considerably in excess of those under treatment in the previous year, the exact numbers being

Primary Syphilis, Secondary

"1

1895.

1896.

..38

74

.31

46

69

120

Injuries. The increase in this class is only apparent, as in former years the effects of Injuries have been included under Diseases of Organs of Locomotion. If these two are taken together the numbers are 377 with 21 deaths as against 396 with 18 deaths in 1895.

Surgical Operations.-There were 146 operations during the year, with 3 deaths. Fractures and Dislocations.-The following were treated during the year:-

Skull (Base),.

Skull,.

Clavicle,

Humerus (Compound),.

Humerus,

Radius and Ulna (Compound), Radius and Ulna,

Radius,

Femur, Patella,.

Tibia and Fibula (Compound),.. Tibia (Compound),..

Dislocation of Humerus,..

""

Clavicle,

Ankle,.

1

6.

1

1

2

1

1

1

6

1

1

1

1

1

1

Alcoholism.-There were 51 cases as against 66 in 1895, two proving fatal. Poisoning.-There were only three cases of poisoning during the year in two the agent used was opium and in the other Datura, one of the former cases proved fatal.

Small-por.-There were 33 cases of Sinall-pox under treatment during the year with 5 deaths. 14 of these cases were treated on board the Hospital Hulk Hygeia; these all occurred in the first six months of the year, the remaining 19 were treated at Kennedy Town Hospital in the months of January, October, November, and December.

KENNEDY TOWN HOSPITAL,

During the year there were 412 cases of plague admitted to this Hospital with 306 deaths, a case mortality of 74 per cent. Particulars of the cases are given in table VIId.

Age Period.

Under 5 years,

5 to 10

22

Number attacked.

Deaths.

Mortality per cent.

17

13

76.47

28

19

67.85

10 15

;;

11

41

30

73.17

15 20

65

52

80.00

>>

20 25

62

47

75.80

>>

25

35

90

63

70.00

"?

<

35

45

65

49

75.38

45 55

32

22

68.75

11

55 65

19

15

78.94

""

11

65 75

G

4

66.66

""

39

""

75 and upwards,

2

2

100.00

Total,.

*

427

316

74.00

From the foregoing table giving the age period, the numbers attacked and the deaths of those ad- mitted to the different Hospitals alive suffering from plague during the year, it will be seen that the maximum mortality from plague occurred between the years 15 to 20.

Dr. WILM was in charge of this Hospital from the 14th March to the end of August and has written a special report on the cases treated there (Report on the Epidemic of Bubonic Plague at Hongkong in the year 1896 by Staff Surgeon WILM of the Imperial German Navy).

440

In May a bacteriological laboratory was fitted up, the instruments being obtained from Berlin, and much valuable work has been done particularly in reference to Plague, Cholera, and Diphtheria.

VACCINE INSTITUTE.

The Institute was open during the year with the exception of the summer months, viz., from the end of May to the commencement of October.

673 tubes of calf lymph were issued in addition to those supplied free to the different hospitals &c. A special report on the working of the Institute is given in Appendix B.

Vaccinations.—Three hundred and thirty-two (332) vaccinations were performed during the year with the following results:-

Primary cases, Re-vaccinations,

Successful.

..143

Unsuccessful.

9

..147

31

Totul.

152

180

332

Lunatics.There was a considerable increase in the number of lunatics under treatment as will be seen by reference to Table VII. 128 cases were admitted to the Asylums, 16 being Europeans and 108 Chinese, 81 of the latter were transferred to Canton.

A g

Fees. The fees received from patients in the Government Civil Hospital during the year amount- ed to $17,758.35; of this the Board of Trade paid $1,557 and the Police $1,056.09. The fees received from patients in the Lunatic Asylums amounted to $1,048.30; those from patients on the Hospital Hulk Hygeia $1,190.30 and those from patients in Kennedy Town Hospital $22.50, giving a total of $20,019.45 as against $15,917.88 in 1895.

Gifts of Flowers, Newspapers, &c.—The patients have been indebted to several residents of the Colony for frequent gifts of flowers, newspapers, &c.

I take this opportunity of again thanking the several members of the staff for the assistance rendered during the past year.

Dr. WILM of the Imperial German Navy at my suggestion was lent to this Department for special plague work at Kennedy Town Hospital and rendered inost efficient service.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your obedient Servant,

Dr. PH. B. C. AYRES, C.M.G.,

Colonial Surgeon.

J. M. ATKINSON, Superintendent.

Appendix A.

My paper is briefly an account of eight cases of diphtheria which have been under treatment in this Hospital during the year 1896.

Out of the eight one, namely, the first, proved fatal.

From such a small number of cases any deductions would necessarily be of very little value, but taking into consideration the fact that anti-toxin was used in all but one the notes of the cases may prove of interest.

Seven were treated with anti-toxin, the first two with "Kitasato's" preparation which I was able to obtain from Prof. KITASATO's Laboratory in Tokyo through the courtesy of Dr. NAKAGAWA, his assistant. I may mention that I visited this Laboratory in the summer of 1895 when on sick leave in Japan.

The remaining five were treated with Behring's Diphtheria remedy, which we have obtained through a German firm in this Colony.

I have here specimens of these anti-toxins together with a bottle of Burroughs and Welcome's anti-toxin with the directions for their use, which I now hand round.

There are also on the table microscopic slides showing stained preparations of Löcffler's bacilli, obtained some from the false membrane on the throat and others from cultures of the bacillus on

'agar-bouillon."

LÖEFFLER in 1890 reviewed the evidence upon which this bacillus is now generally held by bacterio- logists to be the special infectious agent in true diphtheria.

The following are the chief points in his demonstration :

i.

The bacillus is found in all true cases of diphtheria.

ii. The Klebs-Löeffler bacillus is found only in diphtheria.

iii. Pure cultures of this bacillus induce, when inoculated into certain lower animals, the

characteristic diphtheritic inflammation.

1.

441.

The bacillus diphtherice was first demonstrated in diphtheritic false membrane by KLEBS in 1883. In 1884 it was isolated in pure cultures and its pathogenic power was demonstrated by Loeffler.

Morphology.-

It occurs as rods straight or slightly curved with rounded ends, having a diameter of 0.5 to 0:8 m.m., and from 2 to 3 m.in. in length.

Irregular forins are very common, and indeed are characteristic of this bacillus.

In the same culture very great differences in form and dimensions may be observed.

It is stained by the use of Loeffler's solution of nethylene blue, and also by the carbolated solution of fuchsin.

The extremities of the rods are more highly refractive than the intermediate portion and in stained preparations these are seen to be most deeply coloured.

The diphtheria bacillus is aerobic, non-motile and non-liquefying, as you will see in the cultures before you; it does not form spores. It grows most freely in the

It grows most freely in the presence of oxygen.

Development occurs in various culture media at a temperature of from 20° to 40° C., the most favourable temperature being about 35° C.

Milk is a favourable medium for the growth of this bacillus, and, as it grows at a comparatively low temperature (20° C. or 68 F.) it is evident that this fluid may be the medium for conveying the infection.

Pathogenesis.-

In view of the evidence recorded it may be considered as demonstrated that the bacillus gives rise to the morbid phenomena which characterise the fatal disease in man known as diphtheria.

Sheep, rabbits, cats and guinea-pigs are susceptible to this disease, pigeons are but to a modified

extent.

Roux and YERSIN showed that symptoms are produced in pigeons by the subcutaneous inoculation of 5 c.c3. or more, but they commonly recover when the quantity is reduced to 2 c.c.

KITASATO maintains that he can obtain from sheep a stronger anti-toxin.

The rat and mouse have a remarkable immunity from the effects of this poison; thus, according to Roux and YERSIN, a dose of 2 c.c., which would kill a rabbit in sixty hours (weighing three kilogrammes), is without effect on a mouse which weighs only ten grammes.

After subcutaneous inoculations of the pure culture of the bacillus in guinea-pigs, which by the way are more susceptible to this disease than any other of the lower animals, the usual changes observed at the autopsy of death are :--

An extensive local edema, with more or less hyperemia and ecchymosis at the seat of inoculation, swollen and inflamed lymphatic glands, increased serous fluid in the peritoneum, pleura and pericar- dium, occasionally slightly swollen spleen, and sometimes fatty degenerations in the liver, kidney and myocardium; the bacillus being only found at the seat of inoculation.

BRIEGEL and FRANKEL have succeeded in rendering guinea-pigs immune against virulent cultures of the diphtheria-bacillus by injecting bouillon cultures of the diphtheria bacillus, three weeks old, which had been sterilised by exposure for an hour to 60° to 70° C. into the subcutaneous tissues, the amount used being from 10 to 20 c.cs.

According to ROUX and YERSIN" attenuated varieties" of the diphtheria bacillus may be obtained by cultivating it at a temperature of 39.5° to 40° C. in a current of air.

Immunity appears to result from the introduction of a substance which is not identical with the toxic product to which the cultures owe their pathogenic power.

This latter is destroyed by a temperature of from 55° to 60° C. while the substance which gives immunity is still present in the cultures after exposure to a temperature of from 60° to 70° Č., as shown by the protective results of inoculations made with such cultures.

J. M. ATKINSON.

Appendix B.

GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL,

HONGKONG, 29th March, 1897.

SIR,-I have the honour to report that I took over charge of the Vaccine Institute in 1895 and commenced work in October of that year, (see C.S.O. No. 1,342 of 1895).

The Institute was open from October 11th, 1895, to May 31st, 1896, during which time 2,374 capillary tubes of calf lymph were produced, 414 of these were sold realising $153.80, the remainder being distributed to the Public Vaccinators, Tung Wah Hospital, Alice Memorial Hospital and the various Government Institutions.

:

Among those supplied with lymph during the winter of 1895 and 1896 were the following:-

Army Medical Staff.

Navy.

Dr. HILL, Pakhoi..

Messrs. DAKIN CRUIKSHANK & Co.

A. S. WATSON & Co., LD..

442

In December 1895, Messrs. A. S. WATSON & Co., LD., wrote and informed me that they would not require any more lymph, accordingly since that date I have distributed it myself.

It was not found possible to open the Institute this winter until late in December, owing to the fact that the lymph obtainable was quite inert.

I commenced operations in October with some lymph that I brought down from the Government Depôt in Japan, but it was not until I had obtained, through the courtesy of the British Consul at Saigon, some perfectly fresh calf lymph from the "Institut de Microbiologie" there that we were able to re-establish our supply.

The Institute was opened on the 24th December, 1896, (see Government Notification No. 510). Since that date 3,895 capillary tubes and 123 "bulb" tubes of lymph have been issued, of this number 3,036 have been sold realizing $989.80.

Among those thus supplied, in addition to the Medical Practitioners in the town and the local drug stores, are the following:-

H.M. Flagship Centurion.

H.M.S. Humber.

"

Swift.

Immortalite.

>)

Rattler.

35

>>

33

Grafton.

Edlus.

Firebrand.

Alacrity.

U.S.S. Machias.

U.S. Flagship Olympia.

H.E.I.M.S. Kaiser, Irene and Princess Wilhelm.

H.E.S.M.S. Arcona.

Russian Cruiser Sabiaka.

R.M.S. Empress of India, and

Army Medical Staff.

The remainder having been distributed amongst the Tung Wah, Alice Memorial and Gaol Hos- pitals and the Italian and French Convents, I have received word from the Naval Doctors, Civil Practitioners and Public Vaccinators that the lymph has taken well.

The Institute consists of a series of buildings situated near the Kennedy Road between the Tram and the Garden Road Nullah.

There is a suitable stable, well ventilated and drained, with stalls sufficient to accommodate 20 calves, quarters for a caretaker and the necessary out-buildings.

The staff has consisted of myself, one Assistant and one caretaker,

In the winter of 1895 and 1896 Mr. Souza was the Assistant, he having left the Colony, at my request, Mr. SYDNEY, one of the Wardmasters at the Lunatic Asylums, was appointed Assistant on 2nd November, 1896, and another coolie was appointed on the same date to assist the caretaker :—

Assistant, One Caretaker, One Coolie,

$10.00 a month.

8.00

6.00

**

The calves we have obtained through the Inspector of Markets, and their age has been from 7 to 12 months, female calves always being used.

The calves are kept under observation for a few days before vaccination, careful records of their temperature, &c. being kept, after the lymph has been collected they are housed for a few days longer and then returned to the Slaughter House, $1.00 being paid to the contractor for the loan of each calf.

The fifth day after vaccination I have found the best for collecting the lymph.

Pure sterilised glycerine, free from acid, has been found the best vehicle to preserve and keep the

vaccine moist.

The glycerized pulp is generally recoguised as the best form of calf vaccine and is in almost universal use.

An emulsion was also made with vaseline but it did not prove so potent.

The amount of lymph produced since I have taken charge is 6,392 tubes.

The amount realised from the sale of lymph since I took charge is $1,143.60, if to this be added the value of the tubes supplied free to the various Hospitals, Convents, Charitable Institutions and Public Vaccinators, it would give a total amount of $2,026.20.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your obedient Servant,

Dr. PH. B. C. AYRES, C.M.G.,

Colonial Surgeon.

J. M. ATKINSON, Superintendent.

443

Enclosure 2.

Medical Report on the Prevalence of Bubonic Plague in the Colony of Hongkong during the Years 1895 and 1896.

INTRODUCTORY.

Dr. Lowson, Acting Superintendent Government Civil Hospital, has described in his able Report dated 2nd March, 1895, the Epidemic of Bubonic Plague in 1894. I propose to deal only in this Report with the history of the disease in Hongkong during the years 1895 and 1896.

At the outset I propose to briefly record such data as are obtainable from the records of this Department bearing on the subject and such other information obtained from various sources, which may be useful in tracing the origin and subsequent progress of the disease.

In view of the important practical questions that at the present time are engaging the attention of many experts in Europe and India I propose in concluding this report to set forth such deductions as appear to me may be reasonably made from such data; my object being to concisely enumerate the more important facts to be observed in preventing the occurrence or restricting the spread of the disease.

HISTORICAL.

The History of The Plague in China and Hongkong during modern times will probably be best gathered from the following extracts from ALLBUTT'S System of Medicine, 1896, and Dr. RENNIE'S report on the Plague at Canton in 1894 contained in the Imperial Maritime Customs Medical Reports, 47th and 48th issues.

In order that the progress and route taken by the disease may be clearly traced I attach a plan of the locality showing the several places referred to.

Extract from Allbutt's System of Medicine.

"The first definitely known epidemic of Plague in Yunnan was about 1860; but it is believed to have existed there at least since 1850, and probably long before, as it has all the characters of an endemic disease. It is said to have recurred nearly every year up to 1893.

In Pakhoi it is also frequent, but was absent from 1884 to 1893. Some think the epidemics of Pakhoi were derived from Yunnan.

It is impossible to trace the derivation of the disease from any other district. From Pakhoi it must in some way have found its way to Canton, where it broke out in 1894.

Dr. RENNIE of Canton thinks it passed by land, since in 1891 a severe epidemic occurred in the district of Kao-chao, lying to the north of Pakhoi; and in the spring of 1894 it prevailed in towns to the South of Canton. From Canton to Hongkong it was carried by numerous persons suffering from the disease, or in the stage of incubation."

Extract from Dr. Rennie's Report.

Dr. RENNIE in his report states that:-"The starting-point was doubtless Yunnan, and thence it most probably found its way to Pakhoi by one of the usual trade routes.

The great highway of commerce between Yunnan and Kwangtung is the West River, on which are situated one or two entrepôts of trade with Pakhoi and Lienchow, through which opium and other products of Yunnan are transmitted to these cities. Inquiry in official circles shows, however, that no outbreak of plague has been known at Nan-ning-fu, Wuchow-fu or other cities on the West River, which we should expect to find if the disease had spread by this Channel. We feel, therefore, justified in excluding this route and limiting ourselves to the more probable supposition that it reached Pakhoi overland through Kwangsi or the borders of Tonkin. Chinese Authorities state that it reached Pakhoi from Tonkin, but as it is known sporadically in the borders of Kwangsi, this latter source is more probable.

From official sources we learn that in 1891 the disease broke out in Kao-chao, the prefecture adjoining Lienchow, in which Pakhoi is situated; it had evidently, according to the Chinese, spread northwards from the latter city. During the present spring (1894) the disease prevailed in other places between Kao-chao and Canton; the outbreak at Yang-chiang was especially severe, and no doubt other towns and villages suffered equally from the ravages of the plague in its march northwards."

444

"On the outbreak of the disease in Canton many persons, especially the well-to-do, removed into the country, thus forming fresh foci for its dissemination; and in the same way the out- break in Hongkong no doubt arose from persons having migrated from Canton to Hongkong while actually suffering from the disease or during the short incubation period."

"If it came to Canton by sea, it is rather remarkable that Hongkong, which is nearer to, and in direct communication with, Pakhoi, should have been visited by an outbreak nearly two months later than Canton."

PREVALENCE OF PLAGUE IN HONGKONG, 1895.

After a period of six months since the last case in 1894, a case of Plague was reported on 28th April, 1895, at No. 91, Praya Central.

Two more cases were brought into Hospital on the next day, one from No. 27, Stone Nullah Lane, Wanchai and the other from No. 79, Queen's Road West.

These three cases were brought from premises in widely different parts of the city and no con- nection between them could be traced.

In May from the 6th to the 9th two cases, apparently sporadic, were reported in the Central portion of the city, one from No. 2, Pound Lane and the other from No. 4, Wing Lok Street, the latter being that of a Chinaman (male adult) who arrived from Canton evidently suffering from the disease at the time of his arrival.

In June from the 14th to the 30th thirteen cases were reported. Eight being from Heung Lane, three from Holland Street, Kennedy Town, one found on board the Canton steamer on its arrival and one from No. 335, Queen's Road West.

Two of the above cases from Heung Lane occurred on the isolation boats amongst those persons removed or having been in contact with persons attacked with the disease at Nos. 10 and 12, Heung Lane. These persons were removed three days prior to their developing the disease.

In July from the 19th to the 24th two cases were reported, one being from the district of Tsim Tsa Tsui, British Kowloon, and the other from No. 63, Queen's Road West.

In August from the 8th to the 25th four cases were reported, two from Nos. 3 and 27, Tsung San Lane West, one from the Canton steamer and one from No. 28, Bridges Street.

In September from the 7th to the 16th three cases were reported, one from No. 4, Possession Street,

one from No. 55, Aberdeen Street, and one from No. 44, Second Street.

* In November from the 6th to the 25th five cases were reported, one from No. 17, Chung Wo Lane, two from No. 43, Centre Street, one from No. 13, Rutter Street, and one from the Alice Memorial Hospital.

In December from the 5th to the 30th twelve cases were reported, four from Nos. 5, 64 and 66, First Street, one from No. 67, Second Street, one from No. 20, Third Street, one from No. 1, Kutter Street, one from No. 20, Burd Street, two from No. 29, Mosque Junction, one from No. 33 Upper Lascar Row, and one from No. 13, Old Bailey.

From the foregoing, it will be seen that:-

+

(a) The total number of cases reported was 44.

(b) The disease commenced at the end of April and was prevalent during the remainder of

the year.

(c) In no month did it assume such proportions as to constitute an Epidemic.

(d) During the months of June and December the greatest number of cases occurred.

(e) With the exception of Heung Lane in no portion of the Colony did the disease obtain

any serious hold.

METEOROLOGICAL DATA.

On reference to appendix A it will be seen that:-

(a) The prevalence of exceptionally low rainfall preceded the outbreaks of plague in 1894

and 1895.

(b) The year 1895 in which cases occurred during the months of March to December inclusive was one of exceptionally low rainfall, the total being only 45.835 inches as against an average annual rainfall of about 91 inches.

(c) The months of maximum mean temperature in each of the years 1894 and 1895 were

followed by a material reduction in the number of cases.

(a) The number of heurs of Sunshine during the months May to September, 1895, was

considerably greater than in 1894.

445

PROCEDURE ADOPTED WITH A VIEW TO PREVENTING THE SPREAD

OF PLAGUE DURING 1895.

After the terrible experience of 1894 a strict watch was kept with a view of detecting the first recurrence of the disease.

Temporary hospital accommodation and burial grounds were provided on the recommendation of a special committee of officials appointed by His Excellency the Governor to consider "what excep- tional measures should be taken to protect the Colony against the re-appearance of the disease, or in the event of its reappearing to limit its ravages as far as possible," and arrangements were made for the removal of patients, and the isolation of those who had been in immediate contact with the disease, and also for the disinfection and cleansing of infected premises.

A daily medical examination of all cases admitted to the Tung Wa Hospital was maintained.

On the 7th of June the Acting Captain Superintendent of Police and the Assistant Secretary of the Sanitary Board were appointed a Committee to control the work involved in the house to house visitation, in the removal of cocklofts and illegal cubicles, and in the stopping of the illegal occupation of basements and in the controlling the occupation of common lodging houses. In appendix B. is given their Reports dated 7th June and 21st October, 1895.

Immediately on the receipt of information that this disease had reappeared the following proce- dure was adopted :—

(a) House to House visitation.—A daily visitation of all houses in Health Districts Nos. 1, 2, 4, 5, 6 and 7 was made by five sections of Police and Military (Rifle Brigade and Royal Engineers), a special watch being kept on Lodging houses and basements occupied as dwellings.

The Section in No. 5, Health District received special instructions concerning the search of passengers arriving from Canton and Whampoa by the River Steamers. The night steamers from Canton were regularly watched by a detachment of Police in charge of Detective Inspector QUINCEY.

(b) Medical Examination. Suspicious cases at the Hospitals were daily examined by my- self at the Tung Wa and Government Civil Hospitals and on being declared to be plague were removed to the Isolation Hospital at Kennedy Town, situated at the extreme West of the City.

Any suspicious cases occurring at the houses which were found by the search parties were prior to their removal to the Isolation Hospital examined by Medical Officers appointed for that purpose.

(c) Removal of Sick Persons.-After having been declared plague the sufferers were removed direct to Kennedy Town Hospital in ambulances provided for the purpose by the Sanitary Board, these ambulances being kept at the different Hospitals and Police Stations.

The ambulances were disinfected with a solution of Carbolic Acid at Kennedy Town Hospital on the removal of each patient.

(d) Segregation.-Arrangements were made for the isolation of those who had been in immediate contact with the disease at the infected houses, on house boats moored in the Harbour to the North-East of Stonecutters' Island.

(e) Infected premises.-On the 30th April, 1895, the following neighbourhoods were declared

to be infected by bubonic plague, viz.:-

(1) The district of the City of Victoria which is bounded by Wantsai Road,

Queen's Road, Spring Garden Road and the Praya.

(2) The district in the City of Victoria which is bounded by Sutherland Street,

Queen's Road, Queen's Street and Praya.

(3) The district of the City of Victoria which is bounded by Jubilee Street,

Queen's Road, Cross Street and Praya.

Steps were taken to thoroughly disinfect the premises in which the cases were found, and to cleanse and remove as far as practicable all obstructions to light and air existing in these districts.

(f) The maintenance of cleanliness throughout the City.-Special attention was paid to the cleansing and disinfection of all public latrines. To secure the proper disinfection of the night soil in the Public latrines, three soldiers were detailed to assist the Inspectors in charge of the Health Districts, 10,000 lbs. of chlorinated lime were expended for this purpose alone in the month ending 7th June. There was some reluctance on the part of the keepers to comply with this order but only in one instance was it necessary to have recourse to legal proceedings.

446

(g) Overcrowding.The provisions of the Public Health Ordinance of 1887 and of Ordi- nance 4 of 1895 were strictly and steadily enforced and upwards of 400 common lodging houses were registered.

(h) Mezzanine Floors and Cubicles. Illegal cocklofts, mezzanine floors and back-yard obstructions were removed and the ground surface of over 700 tenements concreted under the provisions of Ordinance 15 of 1894.

With regard to Sanitary legislation during 1895, the following regulation and bye-laws came into

force :-

(1) Regulation of common lodging houses. The series of bye-laws which were drafted by the Sanitary. Board in 1891 relating to this were approved by the Legislative Council and came into force on the 1st January of this year, they deal with the question of overcrowding and the maintenance of cleanliness and ventilation.

(2) Bye-laws for the compulsory reporting of infectious, contagious or communicable diseases. These were approved by the Legislative Council on the 25th November, 1895, and came into force at the latter end of the year.

They are practically the same as the Infectious Diseases Notification Act of 1889 in England. The object being to obtain early and complete knowledge of all cases of notifiable disease and informa-- tion of the particular district in which they occur.

GENERAL SANITARY CONDITION OF THE COLONY.

Though much had been done since the epidemic of 1894 towards the improvement of the general Sanitary Condition of the Colony, there existed many crowded quarters traversed by narrow lanes.

In these quarters the houses were ill ventilated and lighted, the lanes being in many cases obstructed by Sunshades and other similar structures.

The houses were mostly "tenement houses," occupied by the poorer class, the rooms in many cases sub-divided by mezzanine floors and partitions, adding to the general insanitary condition of the circumstances attending the occupation of such premises.

The district known as the "Resumed Area" of Taipingshan was no longer occupied.

The free issue of clothing and other articles from the pawnbrokers' shops, which in this Colony are to a large extent the store houses of the middle and lower classes of the native population, was continued and no steps were taken to disinfect such goods before being issued.

During the year :--

(a) The enforcement of the lodging house bye-laws was commenced.-These met with strong

opposition and only 437 houses were registered.

(b) Water supply.-The work of raising the Embankment at Tytam Reservoir was completed

so as to admit of the storage of an additional 40 million gallons of water.

The constant system of water supply was maintained till the 16th of April, but during the following periods it was intermittent, viz.:-

April June October

16th

3rd June.

23rd

4th July.

1st 31st December.

The water only being turned on for from 3 to 4 hours daily; the daily supply averaging from 7.7 gallons per head per diem during April and June, to 9.7 gallons during June and July.

The water distributed is collected from two catchment areas outside the built area of the city and distributed by a system of cast iron mains with which street fountains and house services are connected..

REMOVAL OF EXCRETA AND WASTE WATERS.

Generally the pail system of removal prevailed throughout the Colony but few water closets being in existence.

The excreta is, as far as possible, removed once in 24 hours during the night, but the accom- modation for storing the pails in the native tenement houses still remained very defective, no suitable place for the purpose existing.

The waste waters are removed by underground drains and many house-drains have been con- nected with the new system of pipe sewers recently constructed.

WELLS.

Numerous wells situated on private premises but forming no part of the public water supply were found to be in an insanitary condition and were closed by order of the Sanitary Board.

FOOD SUPPLY.

No material change had during the year 1894 taken place in the system of food supply though during the year 1895 the opening of the New Central Market in May effected a considerable improve- ment in the market accommodation in the middle of the City.

447

The opening of the new depôts for Sheep and Swine and the New Slaughter House at Kennedy Town on the 1st of January, 1895, resulted in the abolition of the old Slaughter House. On the opening of the new depôts, the practice of housing Sheep and Swine in houses in various parts of the native quarters was abolished.

No cases of serious communicable disease were observed amongst the animals imported and the health of the animals in the depôts was good during the year..

EXISTENCE OF PLAGUE IN THE VICINITY OF HONGKONG, 1895.

On the 7th January Surgeon-Major WESTCOTT reported to the Government that he had proceeded to Tungkun on 27th ultimo to investigate what was said to be an outbreak of Bubonic Plague. His conclusions were:

Z.

(1) That there have been sporadic cases of the disease during November and part of

December in Canton, Fatshan, Sheklung and Tungkun.

(2) That no cases have been found by anybody during the last fortnight.

1

(3) That all those who reported the cases in December can find none now.

(4) That it is evident that the poison lingers in the district, but whether it will again cause an epidemic will depend on the Sanitary surroundings and climatic conditions which it will encounter.

MACAO.

Information of the existence of Plague in Macao-was obtained in March and on the 9th of April, Dr. Lowson visited Macao and his report dated April 13th contains the following information :-

"

“That the disease was and had been for 2 months prevalent in that Portuguese Colony. During the last two months there have been several deaths from "Foul gas fever.' The deaths from the same cause have increased during the last two weeks at the Chinese Hospital, ranging from 6 to 12 daily. These were all said to be from "Foul gas fever," I saw four cases of this "Foul gas fever" and they proved to be well marked cases of Plague; one of which died whilst I was present. Two people had died suddenly the day before from

the same cause.

The cases I saw presented typical plague buboes and had well marked cerebral symp- toms.'

On the 23rd April His Excellency the Governor by a Proclamation prohibited the immigration and importation into the Colony of all Chinese from the Port of Macao and from the Island of Hainan.

This was revoked by order of the Governor in Council on the 22nd June so far as the Island of Hainan was concerned.

CANTON, SWATOW.

Information of the existence of plague in Canton and Swatow was received from Her Majesty's Consuls on the 25th April.

The Medical Officer of Health for the Port was instructed to maintain a strict medical super- vision of the passengers and crews of all vessels arriving from Canton and Swatow.

On the 30th April the Governor in Council prohibited immigration and importation into this Colony of all Chinese from Swatow until further notice.

This Proclamation was revoked on the 22nd day of June.

The Proclamation prohibiting the immigration of Chinese into the Colony from the Colony of Macao was revoked by order of the Governor in Council on the 30th July.

DISTRIBUTION OF WORK.

The work in connection with the outbreak of plague was distributed, as follows:-

The Sanitary Board undertook all duties in connection with the removal of plague cases to Hospital, the subsequent isolation of those who had been in immediate contact with the disease and the disinfection of premises.

The Medical Department undertook the care of the sick after the arrival in hospital, and The Public Works Department undertook the erection of the necessary temporary buildings, the preparation of graves, the interment of the deceased, and the clearing and cleansing of declared districts.

The staff acting under the instructions of the Sanitary Board was augmented by the appointment of a Medical Officer of Health on the 25th of April, the appointment of an Assistant Secretary and Sanitary Superintendent and by the loan of the services of 24 Police and 15 Soldiers.

448

PREVALENCE OF PLAGUE IN HONGKONG, 1896.

The first case of plague was reported from Yu Lock Lane on the 4th January. In that month there were 45 cases confined principally to the Western portion of the City.

Towards the middle of February cases were reported from other districts than the Western one and the number of cases was distinctly on the increase.

On 19th February the Government was informed that in the opinion of the Sanitary Board the disease was epidemic and the Health Officer of the Port was instructed to cease issuing clean Bills of Health.

The districts of the city in which the greatest number of cases occurred were:-

Health District No. 2, bounded on the North by the Harbour, on the South by the Bowen Road, on the West by Garden Road and on the East by the Wanchai Road, approx- imate built area 95 acres.

Health District No. 4, bounded on the North by the Harbour, on the South by the Caine Road, on the West by Peel Street and on the East by Wyndham, approximate built

area 55 acres.

Health District No. 5, bounded on the North by the Harbour, on the South by the Caine Road, on the West.by East Street and on the East by Peel Street, approximate built area 55 acres.

Health District No. 7, bounded on the North by the Harbour, on the South by Bonham Road, on the West by Shek Tong Tsui Nullah, and on the East by Eastern Street, approx- imate built area 50 acres.

Cases occurred in the outlying districts of Victoria Peak, Shaukiwan, Aberdeen, Stanley, Kow- loon Point, Hunghom and Yaumati.

A considerable number of cases occurred on the native boats in the harbour. The following table gives the number of cases reported in each month:-

January, February,

*****

March,

.......

April,

May,

June,

July,..

August,

September,

October,

November,

49

125

168

316

344

113

52

25

9

2

1

Total,.......

1,204

METEOROLOGICAL DATA.

On reference to appendix A it will be seen that,--

(a) The drought of 1895 extended to June, 1896.

(b) The months of maximum mean temperature were followed by a material reduction in

the number of cases.

(c) The number of hours of Sunshine was considerably lower than that of the previous years

1892 to 1895.

(d) During the months of February, March and April, 1896, the humidity of the atmosphere

was exceptionally high.

PROCEEDINGS ADOPTED WITH A VIEW TO PREVENTING THE SPREAD

OF THE DISEASE IN 1896.

The proceedings adopted were similar to those adopted in 1895 already described in pages 3 and 4 with the exception that the isolation of persons in boats moored in the Harbour was abandoned towards end of February.

On the 27th of January the Sanitary Board cons