Sessional Papers - 1895

PAPERS LAID BEFORE THE LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL OF HONGKONG 1895

Table of Contents

1. Assessment

Report for 1895-96

2. Botanical & afforestation

Report for 1894

3. Botanical & afforestation

Statement of Disbursements for foresty Works

4. Bubonic Plague

Medical Report on

5. Bubonic Plague

Statement of Expenditure

6. Bubonic Plague

Report Shewing Progress of Special Work

7. Criminal Statistics

For 1894

8. Education

Reports for 1894

9. Finance

Statement for 1894

10. Finance Committee

Reports of Proceedings for 1895

11. Fire Brigade

Report for 1894

12. Gaol

Report for 1894

13. Gap Rock Lighthouse

Report on the

14. Harbour Department

Letter Re alleged Corruption in the

15. Harbour Master'S

Report for 1894

16. Legislative Council

Minutes of Proceedings for 1895

17. Medical

Committee's Report

18. Medical Department

Report for 1894

19. Military Contribution

Despatches With Reference to

20. Military Lands & Buildings

Circular Despatch Re

21. Mr. Justice ackroyd

Despatch Respecting Pension of

22. Observatory

Report for 1894

23. Ordinance 1 of 1864

Despatch Repecting Repeal of

24. Personal Emoluments, Pensions, &C.

Statement Shewing total Cost of

25. Po Leung Kuk

Report for 1894

26. Police (Missing)

Report for 1894

27. Post office

Report for 1894

28. Public Works

Report on the Progress of Public Works During the First Half-Year 1895

29. Public Works

Report for 1894

30. Public Works Committee

Reports of Proceedings for 1895

31. Public Works Department

Supplementary Report of the Retrenchment Committee on the

32. Registrar General'S

Report for 1894

33. Revenue and Expenditure

Statement of, for 1894

34. Road from Victoria Gap to Mount Kellet

Letter as to Cost of Constructing Proposed

35. Sanitary

Reports for 1894

36. Taipingshan

Scheme for the Improvement of

37. Taipingshan

Report on the Resumption of Certain Properties in

38. Veterinary Surgeon'S

Report for 1894

39. Volunteer Corps

Report on the

40. Water account

Statement of, for 1894

41. Widows' & Orphans' Fund

Report on the, for 1894

 

HONGKONG.

THE ACTING ASSESSOR'S REPORT ON THE ASSESSMENT FOR 1895-96.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of

His Excellency the Governor.

437

No. 20

29

95

ASSESSOR'S OFFICE,

8th June, 1895.

SIR, I have the honour to subunit my Report on the Assessment for the ensuing year 1895-96. 2. By order of His Excellency the Governor in Council, the existing Valuation of the Colony has been adopted for the ensuing year.

3. Since taking over the duties of office as Acting Assessor in June last, Interim Valuations have been made by me as follows:-

From 1st July, 1894, to 30th April, 1895.

42 new tenements, rateable value,

5 improved tenements, ra Replacing Assessments,.

...

In the City of Victoria.

$38,510

value,

..$4,290 3,280

1,010

$39,520

7 Assessments cancelled, tenements removed,

Increase in City of Victoria,

1.780

$37.740

In the Rest of the Colony.

54 new tenements, rateable value,...... 1 improved tenement, rateable value,

$25,947

.$5,000

Replacing Assessments,....

3,600

1,400

$65,087

1,844

61 Assessments cancelled, tenements removed,

Total increase from Interim Assessments,

$63,243

4. The rateable value of the property in the enclosed area of Taipingshan resumed by the Government under Ordinance 8 of 1894 amounted to $58,805 including the old Taipingshan Police Station which was leased at an Annual Rent of $360, and excluding 6 tenements not rated for reason of occupancy, viz., free school and temples.

5. For the ensuing year therefore the rateable value of property in the enclosed area of Taiping- shan amounting to $58,805 has been omitted from the Valuation List of Tenements in the City of Victoria.

6. By including Interim Valuations, and increasing the rateable value of several tenements some- what under assessed, the amount of valuation for the City of Victoria for the new year 1895-96 is $3,160,874 as against $3,179,999 for present year, or a decrease of 0.6 per cent.

7. The Hill District, Hongkong Villages and Kowloon Peninsula shew an increase as compared with the preceding year, arising from new tenements having been rated for the first time, and aggre- gating an increase of $25,503 or 5.02 per cent.

S. I attach a tabular statement giving a comparison of the valuations for 1894-95 and 1895-96 for the whole of the Colony.

9. The number of tenements reported vacant, and inspected under section 35 of the Rating Ordinance has averaged 250 monthly, a number somewltat in excess of any corresponding month in the preceding year.

The above number, however, does not include some 60 tenements outside the enclosed area of Taipingshan which were closed during the plague and unfit for human habitation, and at this date remain unoccupied.

1

438

10. The result of the valuation for the new year has, I venture to conclude, proved satisfactory when taking into consideration that an extensive building area (Taipingshan) representing 417 tenements has been exempted.

The gain in rateable value of the Colony has been $6,378 for the ensuing year or 0·17 per cent. 11. There has been no change in the staff. Mr. CHAN PUI and Mr. Ip YUK PUI have continued to discharge their duties satisfactorily.

I have the honour to be,

The Honourable A. M. THOMSON,

Acting Colonial Treasurer.

LOCALITY.

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

CHAS. C. MALSCH, Acting Assessor.

THE COLONY OF HONGKONG.

VALUATION 1894-95.

VALUATION 1895-96.

INCREASE.

DECREASE.

$

$

19,125

The City of Victoria,

3,179,999

3,160,874

Hongkong Villages and Hill District,

216,987

238,364

21,377

Kowloon Peninsula,

291,308

295,434

4,126

*

3,688,294

3,694,672

25,503

19,125

Deduct Decrease,.

Total Increase,...

19,125

6,378

0.17 per cent.

!

283

No. 20

95

HONGKONG.

STATEMENT OF DISBURSEMENTS FOR FORESTRY WORKS IN THE YEARS 1896 AND 1897.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of

His Excellency the Governor.

Statement showing Disbursements for Forestry Works in the years 1896 and 1897, for which contracts have been

already made, and those for which contracts now require to be made.

APPROVED BY LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL,

C.S.O. No. 881

1894.

Estimated total cost.

To be disbursed iu 1896.

To be disbursed in 1897.

C.

C.

C.

1. Rearing Trees to be planted in 1896,.....

1,000.00

1,000.00

2. Planting Trees being reared under No. 1,

1,600.00

1,600.00

Contracts to be now made which require approval :-

3. Rearing Trees to be planted in 1897,

900.00

900.00

4. Planting Trees,.........

1,100.00

1,100.00

4,600.00

2,600.00

2,000.00

The works under headings 3 and 4 now require the approval of the Legislative Council in order that the contracts for them may be made; those under headings 1 and 2 have already been sanctione and are now in progress.

CHARLES FORD, Superintendent,

Botanical and Afforestation Department.

417

No. 27

95

HONGKONG.

REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF THE BOTANICAL AND AFFORESTATION DEPARTMENT

FOR 1894.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of

His Excellency the Governor.

No. 19.

BOTANIC GARDENS, HONGKONG, 27th May, 1895.

SIR, I have the honour to submit the Annual Report on the work and condition of this depart- ment for the

year 1894.

GENERAL.

2. The year under review was distinguished by a series of adverse events which imposed an almost continuous strain on the resources of the department to contend with the difficulties which arose in maintaining, with as little injury as possible, the various charges with which it is entrusted; but, in spite of all the strenuous efforts which were exerted, and which were successful to a great extent, con- siderable, but unavoidable, damages were sustained both in the Gardens and Plantations of the Colony. The events to which I allude were—(i) drought in the early part of the year, (ii) the plague of caterpillars in May and June, and (iii) a series of typhoons in September and October.

3. The suppression of the caterpillar plague occupied the almost undivided attention of the whole staff-except the Gardens' men, and many of these were also employed-for a period of two months, so that ordinary work had to be almost suspended during that time. For part of the time an additional clerk was lent from the Colonial Secretary's Office to assist in keeping accounts connected with the destruction of caterpillars.

4. Five typhoons visited the Colony within 28 days in September and October; they occurred on September 10th, 18th, 24th and 29th, and October 6th, respectively.

STAFF.

5. The Superintendent was absent on vacation leave from June 13th to September 28th.

6. The health of the native portion of the staff was good, and, fortunately, all escaped attack by the bubonic plague which raged for so many months.

REVENUE.

7. The total receipts of the Department are given in appendix A.

BOTANIC GARDENS.

DROUGHT.

8. During the first three months of the year only 2.46 inches of rain fell in the Gardens, and from April 1st to May 6th there were only 3.03 inches. The usual water supply to the Gardens was so suddenly diminished, and to such an extent, that plants in pots were exposed to great danger of being lost, and they were only saved by prompt arrangements which I made for obtaining water by carrying it from two trickling streams, which were temporarily dammed, outside the Gardens. An additional small supply was obtained by re-opening a well, within the Gardens, which had been closed for many years. The scanty supply procured was only enough for the plants which were in greatest need. Å more ample supply in dry seasons is much needed for both plants and lawns. The only lawns which can be irrigated, even when water is turned on continually, are those surrounding the flower beds, all the grass turf in other parts becomes as brown as hay throughout the dry season.

TYPHOONS.

9. On the approach of all typhoons extensive and troublesome preparations are always made to secure plants and property against damages as far as possible; the preparations for the 1894 typhoons were in all cases effectual so far as they went, but the October typhoon was of such violence as to place many things out of the bounds of practicable protection, and very great destruction and damage to large trees and shrubs inevitably occurred. Immunity from destructive storms for many years past had allowed the general effect of the Gardens to reach a state of great beauty, which, however, the last storm wrecked in a cruel manner, and it will be many years, under the most favourable circumstances, before the Gardens can recover the beauty which was so greatly marred.

418

10. The clearing away of débris, and preparations for replanting, &c., occupied all available time up to the end of 1894, and well into the present year.

GLASS HOUSES.

11. During a portion of the cold season the temperature falls so low that many tender plants which have to be kept, or housed, during the coldest weather, in glass houses suffer from cold. This has been remedied to a slight extent by the use of kerosene stoves, which, however, besides being troublesome and giving off an offensive smell, afford insufficient heat, and, I fear that fumes proceeding from the stoves are injurious to plant life. I had funnels, with tubes attached, placed over the stoves, and the tubes carried through the roofs of the houses, and so arranged that injurious fumes were carried off without their coming into contact with the plants, but also that the heat was retained almost completely within the houses. The heat obtainable by this means is, however, insufficient.

12. All the glass houses should now be provided with hot-water apparatus which could be heated from one modern improved boiler. The apparatus could be provided at a very moderate cost and the consumption of fuel would be very small for the short time during which artificial heat is essential.

ORCHIDS.

13. A very fair amount of success has been achieved in the cultivation of orchids, this success is sufficiently proved to encourage the continuation of efforts to cultivate and extend the collections. Some orchids can be grown well in open, shaded houses, but many of them at certain periods would be better in glass houses, while another class of orchids-those from hotter regions-should be always under glass. Glass houses are not only needed to provide a higher temperature for part of the year but also to protect the plants from storms of wind and rain. A suitable glass house could be erected in the nursery at a small cost, and it could be heated from the same boiler which I have alluded to above in my proposition for heating the other houses.

14. In appendix B I give a list of orchids which are now in cultivation here, and most of which are succeeding very well. The list is inserted not because it represents unusual extensiveness or excellence of kinds-although there are very many good kinds in the list--but to show what encourage- ment there is for the application of continued efforts in the cultivation and extension of this interesting, beautiful and fashionable class of plants. Those kinds marked with an asterisk have flowered in the Gardens.

LAWN CATERPILLAR. (Thialleta signifera, Walk.)

15. This caterpillar has given the usual trouble to circumvent its action in the destruction of lawns. It seems impossible to stamp it out, but the remedy-Jeyes' fluid, diluted-previously reported, is the best thing yet discovered to keep it in check.

The Cornell University Agricultural Experiment Station last year published an elaborate bulletin by Mr. E. P. FELT on "Grass-Eating Insects" of the genus Crambus, but amongst the remedies there given there is nothing which is as effective for the Thialleta as that which has been adopted here.

EXCHANGE OF LAND.

""

16. When the New Gardens were being formed in 1871 an old, open nullah was built over and covered with soil. It was afterwards discovered that this nullah was a boundary of the "Glenealy property, and that by the filling up of the nullah and laying out of the new land as a portion of the Gardens an encroachment had been made by the Government on the "Glenealy" property. This pro- perty subsequently changed hands and the new Roman Catholic Cathedral was then built on it. Last year the Cathedral authorities required an extension of land and proposed that it should be given them in exchange for the 1871 encroachment, to which the Government acceded. This arrangement readjusts the boundary line of the Gardens to the mutual satisfaction of both parties and gives a well-defined line.

DISTRIBUTION AND INTERCHANGE OF PLANTS AND SEEDS.

17. The receipts were 1,238 plants and 116 lbs. of seeds in 277 packages and 4 wardian cases. The chief donors were-

Assistant Superintendent of Forests, Penang. Acclimatizing Association, Southern California. Aldridge. Dr., Ichang,

Botanic Gardens, Bangalore.

Botanic Gardens, Royal Calcutta.

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??

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}}

Kew. Saharanpur. Singapore.

Trinidad.

British Guiana.

**

Jamaica.

>>

""

Mauritius.

""

??

Natal.

***

>>

Rio de Janeiro.

"

19

71

Royal, Ceylon.

Barton, J.

Botanist, Government, Melbourne. Bodinier. Rev. E.

Boxall, W., England.

Bourne, F. S. A., Canton.

419

Braysher, Mrs. Deighton, Kiukiang.

Bunting, Isaac, Yokohama.

Cooke, Mrs.

Corner, G. E., Public Gardens, Shanghai.

Coxon, Mrs. A.

Cundall, C. H., Manila.

Dammann & Co., Italy.

Falconer, Miss M., Swatow.

Hanbury, T., F.L.S., Italy.

Hodgins, Captain, S. S. Formosa.

Humphreys, Mrs. J. D. Henry, Dr. A., F.L.S.

Lawrence, Sir Trevor, Bart., England.

May, F. H.

Taylor, C. S.

Treseder, John, Sydney.

Veitch, James & Son, Chelsea.

Walker, Captain Alfred, Foochow. Webster, L.

Wicking, Mrs.

18. In exchange 8,705 plants and 6 lbs. of seeds in 63 packages and 5 wardian cases were sup- plied. The following being the principal recipients :-

Assistant Superintendent of Forests, Penang.

Armstrong, J. M.

Andrews, R. H., Manila.

Anderson, Miss

Burdon, Mrs.

Bourne, F. S. A., Canton.

Bull, William, London. Bunting, Isaac, Yokohama. Barton, J.

Barker, Mrs.

Botanic Gardens, Brisbane.

Jamaica.

Royal, Ceylon.

""

""

""

""

>>

""

""

""

"

2)

""

Coxon, Mrs. A.

Calcutta. Kew.

Trinidad.

Singapore.

Corner, G. E., Public Gardens, Shanghai.

Cundall, C., H., Manila.

Cooke, Mrs.

Gamble, J. S. Imperial Forest School, India. Hanbury, T., F.L.S., Italy. Henry, Dr. A., F.L.S. Humphreys, J. D.

Mrs. J. D.

Hay, Drummond, Shanghai.

Horder, Dr., Pakhoi.

Hodgin, Captain, S. S. Formosa.

Italian Convent.

Lawrence, Sir Trevor, Bart., England.

Musson, Rev. W.

Newton, W.

O'Brien, Sir G. T. M., K.C.M.G. Police Station, Mt. Gough.

>>

Shaukiwan

Stanley.

Peché, G., Burmah.

Taylor, C. S.

Veitch, James & Son, London. Williams, Rev. G. J.

Wicking, H.

Government Civil Hospital.

Goddard, Captain

Walker, Captain Alfred, Foochow.

PLANT SALES.

19. In 1893 the receipts for plants sold were abnormally large, and in 1894 they did not reach the same high figure. The receipts amounted to $501.76 for 2,338 plants which were sold. The orders received were 326, about half the number being cash transactions. It will be remembered that the Government make no profit on these sales, which are for the benefit of the purchasers only.

20. It seems incomprehensible why many purchasers will not apply usual business habits when sending orders for plants, paying accounts, &c.; but, on the contrary, will so frequently send com- munications addressed to me personally, the result being in case of my absence, which is naturally frequent, that inconvenience and unnecessary work is given to themselves and us, as that portion of the staff whose duty it is to attend to sales are unable to open covers addressed to me personally, instead of their being, as they should be, so addressed that any one in the office can open them and attend at once to the business.

LOAN OF PLANTS FOR DECORATION.

21. The loan of plants is almost confined to the winter months. At the commencement of the last season a new regulation came into force which required payment being made for the use of the plants. This, no doubt, operated in causing a diminution of the quantity of plants applied for, although the charge made is only 5 cents per plant, calculated to just cover the cost of growing them. The number of plants lent was 3,210, being 877 less than in the previous year; of the 3,210 lent, 2,276 were lent before the new regulation in regard to payment came into force. $47.40 was received for plants lent on hire.

22. The records are given in appendix C.

RAINFALL.

HERBARIUM AND LIBRARY.

23. The unusual circumstances which I referred to in paragraph 2, and my absence on vacation leave, left but very little time for herbarium work beyond preserving the contents of the herbarium in good condition.

420

24. The Director of the Royal Gardens, Kew, presented a collection of about 200 dried specimens of plants, chiefly Chinese.

25. Dr. AUGUSTINE HENRY also sent collections amounting to 767 specimens which he had collected in South Formosa during his residence there.

26. Specimens were also received from Dr. GEORGE KING, F.R.S., &c., Superintendent of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Calcutta ; and from the Rev. Father BODINIER, of Hongkong plants, many of which were found last year by Father BODINIER for the first time in Hongkong.

Father BODINIER has in his botanical researches made constant use of the herbarium and library throughout the year, and he has expressed his high appreciation of their usefulness to him in his studies.

27. The following is the list of books, journals, reports, &c., received :—- Agricultural Journal of the Leeward Island, 1894.

From Dept. of Agriculture

of the Cape Colony, 1894. Bulletin (Brisbane) of the Department of Agri-

culture, 1893.

Bulletin (Jamaica) of Botanical Dept. 1893-1894. Bulletin (Kew) of Miscellaneous Information

1894.

Bulletin (Grenada) of Miscellaneous Information

1894.

Bulletin (Trinidad) of Miscellaneous Information

1894.

Bulletin Koloniaal Museum to Haarlem Maart

1894.

Bulletin Cornell University Agricultural Experi-

ment Station, Ithaca, N. Y.

Bulletin Calumet Plantation, 1890-1892. By

Hubert Edson, Chemist.

Bulletin University of California, Agricultural

Station, 1894.

Botanical Magazine for 1894. Purchased. Catalogue of the Flowering Plants and Ferns

found growing wild in the Island of Penang. By C. Curtis, Esq., F.L.S.

Circular Notes Nos. 6 and 7. From Botanical

Department, Trinidad.

Flore Florestière de la Cochinchine. Dis septieme

Fascicule 1891. From Royal Gardens, Kew. Flora of British India, Part XX 1894. From

Royal Gardens, Kew. Gardeners' Chronicle for 1894. Handbook of Imperial Institute. From Govern-

ment Printing Office, Calcutta.

Purchased.

Hooker's Icones Plantarum Vol. II. Part IV and Vol. III Part IV. From the Bentham Trus- tees, through Kew.

Index Flora Sinensis, Part XI. From Royal

Gardens, Kew.

Index Kewensis Plantarum Phanerogamarum

nomina et synonyma omnium. Specierum a Linnæo usque adannum. Fasc. I, II, and III. Purchased.

Indian Forest Reports.

Forest Administration in central Provinces of

India, 1891-93.

Forest Administration in Madras, 1892-93.

"

""

"

in Baluchistan, 1892-93.

of the Forest Survey. Branch in India, 1892-93.

Forest Administration in Ajmere Merwara,

1892-93.

Forest Administration in Hyderabad Assigned

Districts, 1892-93.

Forest Administration in Provinces of Assam,

1892-93.

Forest Administration in Burma, 1892-93.

1893.

in N. W. P. and Oudh,

Forest Administration in the Bombay Presidency,

1892-93.

Forest Administration in the Lower Provinces of

Punjab, 1892-93.

Forest Administration in Coorg, 1892-93.

19

in Andamans, 1892-93. Journal of Botany for 1894. Purchased. Review of Forest Administration in British India,

1892-93.

Official Guide to the Museums of Economic

Botanic, 1893. From Royal Gardens, Kew.

Plantas novas cultivadas no Jardim Botanico do

Rio de Janeiro, 1893-94.

Report on the Royal Botanic Gardens, Ceylon,

1893.

Report on the Gardens & Forests Department,

Straits Settlements, 1893.

Report on the Botanic Gardens, Natal, 1893. Report on Diseases affecting the Sugar-Cane in

Barbados. By C. A. Barber, F.L.S. Report of the Department of Agriculture, Brisba-

be, 1892-93.

Report of the Royal Gardens, Trinidad, 1893. Report of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Calcutta,

1893-94.

Report on the Agricultural work in the Botanic

Gardens, British Guiana, 1893. Report for the Quarter ended 30th June, 1894, on

the Botanic Station Colony of Lagos, Africa. Report on Mussouri Botanic Gardens, 1894. Report of work of the Agricultural Experiment Sta-

tion of the University of California, 1891-92. Report on the Progress and Condition of the Government Saharanpur and Mussourie Gar- dens, 1893.

Report on the Government Botanic Gardens and

Parks, Bangalore, 1892-93.

Rice Growing and its Preparation for Markets,

Brisbane, 1894.

Record Vol. V. No. 1 of U. S. Dept. of Agricul-

ture, Office of Experiment Station, 1893. Supplement to the Leeward Islands Gazette, 1893. Science Papers, Pharmacological and Botanical. By Daniel Hanbury, F.R.S. From T. Han- bury, F.L.S., Mortala.

PLAN OF GArdens.

28. I am pleased to say that the Honourable the Director of Public Works has kindly undertaken to provide a plan of the Gardens. When it is complete I purpose producing a Guide to the Gardens which should be of use to visitors.

When it is complete I

421

FORESTRY.

29. Ordinary work was accomplished in spite of, and in addition to, the very large amount of work which was thrown on the department by the plague of caterpillars at the beginning of summer, and the typhoons at its end, but during the periods of those calamitous events regular operations were temporarily suspended.

PLANTING.

30. The number of trees planted was smaller than in most previous years; this is accounted for chiefly by the gradual reduction of expenses which has been introduced now that available and suitable planting lands have been to a great extent filled up, and by the contractor having failed to produce the stipulated quantity of trees in consequence of losses in the nurseries which were sustained owing to much of the land having been flooded by storm water.

31. In the contract for rearing trees for planting in 1893 I had provided for a large number of Cunninghamia sinensis in place of a corresponding value of the ordinary pine. The contractor suc- ceeded in supplying 20,000 good trees of this kind, and they were planted and have done well so far. I purpose, as far as possible, to substitute this tree for the common pine in all future work.

32. Upwards of 1,000 trees of Liquedamber formosana were also planted, and they made excellent progress. I intended to use this tree more extensively, but there is some difficulty in obtaining sufficient seeds; for those which have been obtained I am indebted to Mr. F. S. A. BOURNE, H.M. Vice-Consul at Canton. A further supply of seeds was obtained in December, but, unfortunately, very few matured on the trees last year, consequently, instead of the large number of trees which I expected to have very few were obtained for planting in 1895.

33. Special attention was also given to Bischoffia javanica, an indigenous tree, about 600 having been planted.

34. The timber of Liquedamber is valuable for making tea-chests as no odour is given off which would taint the tea. The wood of Bischoffia is in request by local boat-builders, being valuable for junks' and boats' knees. Whether marketable timber can be produced in Hongkong in any quantity requires time to prove. In favoured situations, however, it is certain that good timber can be grown. One tree which was blown down by a typhoon sold for $5 where it laid.

35. The required supply of Cunninghamia seed failed last year, the reason which the contractor alleged for the failure being that the typhoons had destroyed the cones before the seeds were ripe. As the seeds have hitherto been obtained from distant parts of the Kwangtung province I had no means of verifying his statement.

36. The usual planting statistics are given in appendix D.

FLOWERING OF BAMBOOS.

37. One species of bamboo (Bambusa Tulda, Roxb.) flowered more profusely and generally in Hongkong and Kowloon than in any previous year of my experience. It seeded, also, sparingly in some cases, but in most instances few or no seeds were ripened.

DESTRUCTION OF TREE-FERNS.

38. During the early period when the bubonic plague was prevalent the plants on the hills of a native tree-fern (Brainea insignis, Hook) were exposed to the risk of extermination by coolies who daily went to the hills to obtain supplies of the stems for medicine for the use of plague patients. I was informed that a decoction of the stems was made and used as a cooling beverage.

THINNING OF PLANTATIONS, &C., AND SALE OF FORESTRY PROducts.

39. The thinning of plantations has kept pace with the requirements of the standing trees. The number of trees removed was 31,415 as against 31,643 of the previous year. Of this number there were over a few hundreds of large old trees which were blown down by the October typhoon.

40. The revenue from forestry products was $770.22, an increase of nearly $200 on that of the

Statistics are given in appendix E.

year 1893.

PROTECTIVE SERVICE.

41. By the agency of the Forest Guards 106 cases of offences in the nature of damages to or des- truction of trees were dealt with by the Magistrates; 94 convictions were obtained. Fines amounting to $145 were paid by 36 convicted persons. The highest fine was $25, and the lowest $1.

42. The number of trees surreptitiously cut down, of which it has been possible to obtain records, was 606, not a large number when it is compared with the quantity of trees under conservation, but it is a slight increase over those of the previous year.

422

JUNGLE FIRES.

43. The fires were only 36, not much over half the number of those in 1893, but the damages which resulted from them were six times as great as in that year.

44. The neighbourhood of Aberdeen was distinguished by the greatest number and destructiveness of fires, two only of which were responsible for the destruction of 21,000 trees.

45. Tytam Tuk was the next locality on the list of destructive fires, four occurred in one day; they were caused by shells (?) fired from field-guns by the Volunteers while they were practising on January 3rd. About 3,000 well-grown trees were destroyed by these fires in what was one of the prettiest pieces of woodland scenery in the island. It will be many years, unfortunately, before the places can be restored to their former beauty. Similar practice should never be repeated during the dry season in any locality where there will be any danger of conflagrations.

46. The spring and autumn Chinese ancestral worship at tombs was well guarded as usual by a large body of men being posted all over the island to subdue any fires which might arise, and in consequence of these precautions but little damage was done.

The posting of notices cautioning worshippers to be careful in the use of fire has had a very good effect in educating the people, who seem willing to exercise care as requested.

47. The total number of trees destroyed by fire was 26,886.

TYPHOONS.

48. The trees of the Colony since the September typhoon of 1874 have never suffered so severely as they did from the typhoon in October of 1894.

49. On the morning of October 7th many of the streets and roads were blocked by fallen trees of small and large dimensions. Trees which had withstood the storms of 44 years were prostrated. No less than 76 trees were thus destroyed. The forestry staff, assisted by a large number of coolies, was distributed and set to work to clear the roads sufficiently for traffic, and before night no road was left entirely blocked. The entire removal of the fallen trees occupied several weeks.

For the work of clearing streets and roads I was fortunately able to obtain at once, by special arrangement, the services of 40 trained wood-cutters from the contractor who had the annual contract for thinning plantations.

50. The trees on the hills east and west of the Happy Valley suffered very severely when the wind swept down from the gap to the south of Wongneichung village. Pine trees of all sizes up to 43 years old and 6 feet in circumference of stem were strewed over the ground in all directions, especially on the eastern hill, but most of the largest ones came down in consequence of having had their large roots cut when excavations were made to obtain soil for filling in the ground within the Race Course a few years ago. The loss of these fine trees is very regrettable, especially as the loss might have been avoided if soil had been obtained from some place, which was possible, where no trees of such value need have been sacrificed.

51. Branches of Araucaria Cunninghamii were found at the Kowloon Docks, and as there are no trees at Kowloon from which these could have been deposited at the docks there is circumstantial proof that they were wrenched off large trees which were destroyed by the typhoon at East Point and carried by the wind, when the full force of the typhoon was blowing, across the harbour, a distance of just 2 miles.

52. Young pine trees on the hills all over the island, on Applichau island and in Kowloon were bent over when the soil was saturated with the storm rain, and they were unable to recover their upright positions when the storm had passed. As soon as the clearing of the roads was completed a large staff of men was employed up to December 27th in placing and securing these trees in an upright position again. About 200,000 trees were thus set up at a cost of close on $300 for wages. Trees which had been planted upwards of six years suffered very little except in some places where the force of the wind was concentrated, as in gaps between two hills and on exposed breasts of hills, in which places leaves were almost destroyed.

53. This was the first really serious typhoon which had visited the Colony since the afforestation of the island had commenced. It was predicted by some that violent storms would undo all our work in re-clothing the hills. The result of the trial which the trees went through in 1894 is sufficiently convincing that the theory which was entertained by those people was unsound. Some damage is inevitable, here as in all countries, from the effects of storms, and must always be allowed for.

PLAGUE OF CATERPILLARS.

*(EUTRICHA PUNCTATA, WALK.)

54. A report on this plague has already been furnished to the Government by my Assistant, Mr. TUTCHER. It is therefore necessary now only to supplement that report, which was called for by His Excellency the Governor, during my absence from the Colony, shortly before the measures which I organized for the extirpation of the pest had been successfully terminated.

*In the Kew Bulletin for November 1891 where the Hongkong Caterpillar Plague is referred to. the moth is referred to as Metanastria punctata, Walk. I presume that the generic name Metanustria has been adopted instead of Eutricha, which was given to me by Dr. GÜNTHER, Keeper of the Department of Zoology of the South Kensington Museum, when specimens which I sent to him were identified.

The Bulletin also states that the species is apparently not known out of South China, but is not remote, according to Mr. W, F. H. BLANDFORD, F.E.S., from the European Gastropacha pini.

423

55. In the beginning of March I observed the caterpillar of this moth on trees at North Point, but it existed only in very small numbers on a few trees. I kept it under very careful observation and found towards the end of April that it had appeared in many other localities, but there did not then seem any reason to suppose that it was necessary to adopt more special means for its destruction than in the previous two years. However, in May its extremely rapid increase in numbers and in size demonstrated an unusual visitation, and on May 15th I reported to the Government its presence and advised that immediate steps should be taken to destroy it. My recommendations met with His Excellency the Governor's approval, and I was at once provided with all the means and assistance which I had represented was necessary to carry out the work, and a careful organization was quickly completed.

56. The work to be accomplished was so extensive that it was necessary to secure auxilliary aid. This, fortunately, existed at the various police stations throughout the island and in Kowloon, and this assistance was, on application, placed at once at my disposal, with the sanction of the Government, by Mr. MAY, Captain Superintendent of Police.

57. The first steps taken were to employ a portion of the permanent staff of the department to collect caterpillars, in order to ascertain what would be a fair price to offer for them and then to communicate the information to the labouring classes in the town and villages that all who were inclined for the work would be employed to collect caterpillars.

58. Instructions were sent to the officers in charge of certain police stations to receive and pay for, by weight, all caterpillars which might be brought in, at the same time printed notices in Chinese offering payment for caterpillars were posted all over the Colony. Funds for disbursement on account of the work were advanced to the West Point, Pokfulam, Aberdeen, Shaukiwan and No. 2 Police Stations in Hongkong, and to those of Yaumati and Hunghom in Kowloon.

59. Operations commenced on May 24th, and on the 25th all the receiving stations were actively employed. In a short time there seemed no limit to the number of workers who could be obtained, whole families going to the hills to collect. At the busiest time there were probably over 1,000 people employed, and so great was the quantity of caterpillars brought in that the work of weighing them and paying away money, which was done daily, became a very severe task, occupying the greater portions of the afternoons. As the caterpillars increased in size, and therefore became easier to collect, the price offered was gradually reduced, and it was in like manner increased again in proportion to the work of collecting as the caterpillars became scarcer.

60. About the 12th of June nearly all the caterpillars had been collected, and as cocoons were forming the work of collecting them was then commenced and it was practically completed by the middle of July.

In

61. Communications were maintained daily by telephone or writing between the Gardens and the police stations, instructions being issued as required, and reports being sent in daily from the police stations, so that the Superintendent was in constant touch with all the work which was going on. addition, the Superintendent made visits of inspection as frequently as his absence from head quarters could be spared. The Head Forester and one Clerk were employed almost daily for two months in conveying supplies of money to the stations, 95 advances having been made in this manner.

62. The Government was kept constantly informed of the progress of the work.

63. Mr. TUTCHER rendered efficient and willing service in assisting to carry out the arrangements which were planned for the extirpation of the plague, and in supervising the completion of the work which remained to be done, (chiefly the collection of cocoons) at the time when the Superintendent was satisfied that the work was so nearly complete that he could go on vacation leave, which he had post- poned while his presence was required to conduct the work.

64. Statistics of the work were carefully kept, and these enabled Mr. TUTCHER, together with useful observations which he had made when inspecting plantations, to draw up the report which he submitted on the 10th of July.

65. This year the caterpillar re-appeared in April, but not in greater numbers than half a dozen coolies, who are still daily employed, have been able to destroy as fast as discovered. In the discovery of caterpillars the Forest Guards are employed to inspect trees, and to report daily, while they are engaged in their ordinary work.

66. The caterpillars were in myriads on nearly all the pine trees of the Colony, but they were much more numerous in certain places; these were Aberdeen New Road, Deep Water Bay, Causeway Bay, Quarry Bay, and Mt. Parker in Hongkong, and near Yaumati in Kowloon. The trees in those places were almost entirely denuded of their leaves. Many trees, which had been thus denuded and which were growing on unusually barren and dry soil, eventually died, but other trees made new, but weak, growth when the rains arrived; now, all are making new shoots of increased vigour, which promise complete recovery from the attack.

"

67. After the work of collecting had been in operation some time, and the trees were getting cleared I took the precaution of posting men along the boundary which divides British Kowloon from Chinese territory in order to intercept people who might be tempted to bring in caterpillars from China

424

for payment at our stations. This was found to be a necessary precaution, as, in a few days, what was expected took place, and many people were turned back who were in possession of loads of cater- pillars.

68. The exact quantity of caterpillars collected was 60,579 catties (36 tons 1 cwt. 0 qr. 20lbs.) and of cocoons 5,617 catties (3 tons 6 cwt. 3 qrs. 13lbs.) and the total cost of the work, exclusive of wages of members of the permanent staff who were employed, was $4,889.95.

69. Appendix F gives the quantity of caterpillars and cocoons received at each receiving station, and appendix G the daily expenditure from beginning to end. These will give an idea of the work performed in regard to its distribution and daily quantity.

70. I again express my appreciation of the value of the services of those police officers who gave such willing assistance, which was at a time when several of them were also engaged in special work in connection with the bubonic plague. The names of those police officers I had the honour to submit to the Government in letter No. 43 of the 10th September, 1894, when I specially brought their services to the notice of the Government.

71. Although there is no known record of such devastation committed elsewhere by the caterpillar which infested this Colony last year, it will be interesting to state here that terrible injury to trees has been wrought in other countries by other species, notably the Gipsy Moth in the United States, where in Massachusets, I am informed, $350,000 have been spent in attempts to exterminate it.

72. The Kew Bulletin for 1890, also, contained an account of a Forest Plague in Bavaria. The following extracts will be of interest. The documents in which they were contained were a despatch and enclosures from Mr. VICTOR DRUMMOND, at Munich, to the Foreign Office, which were sent by the Foreign Office to Kew Gardens.

"Mr. Drummond to Foreign Office.

"A very serious pest of the insects known as Liparis Monacha or "Nuns" has lately been causing great destruction to the Pine and Fir Forests in certain districts of Bavaria. This serious calamity to the kingdom had its first germs two years ago, when the Government, according to a statement made by the Upper Bavarian Agricultural Association, took measures to prevent it spreading. On the other hand, if public opinion is correct, the foresters, instead of carrying out hand and eye work in the forests, did not visit them as often as it was their duty to do. In any case the fact remains that the forest administration has been defeated by the "Nuns," and although everything is being done to extirpate them by killing thousands daily, it is now reckoned that Nature alone, "winter frosts," can rid the forests of the pest.

"It is calculated that the loss to the revenue from woods and forests for the nex tfinancial

year will amount to 800,000 marks (40,000 L.), and it is even feared that the amount may be larger, as where forests are injured by any special cause the "Bark beetle" follows and attacks the diseased wood; this will probably result next year.

"The enclosed translations of extracts taken from the "Münchener Neueste Nachrichten" show the extent of the calamity, and give a chronicle of the destruction caused by the "Nonne insects since the year 1449.

"(ENCLOSURE No. 1.)

and other

"Note from the Bavarian Forest Administration ( Finance Department) on the “Nonne. "The Forest Department of the Ministry of Finance state that the "Nonne" plague is now extended over nearly all Bavaria south of the Danube in scattered tracts. The infested districts are estimated at about 10,000 hectares. The fertility of the insect is great, and its numbers so enormous, that the Forest Department fear that no measures of destruction are of any avail. "We stand powerless before the immensity of the pest. The insect attacks chiefly the pine and fir with which Bavarian forests abound, but in default of these it does not despise the beech, oak, and other forest trees, and is even known to feed on shrubs and garden plants. It never attacks corn or wheat, and, curious to say, there is one tree it will not touch, viz., the horse chestnut.

"The means of destruction are various. Forest bonfires of worthless wood form an easy means within reach of all communes, &c. The insects are attracted by the fire and are smothered in the smoke, but only a comparatively small number are killed. Children and boys are also sent out to destroy the insects. From September to April, similarly, the eggs can be found in the bark and destroyed, and in April the very young caterpillars can be more easily killed. All these, however, are mere partial measures. The only efficient general measure seems to be the cutting down of whole forests when much infected, in which case the remedy is almost worse than the disease. One other method is used by the State, but not within reach of communes, therefore not described in the official pamphlet. A large electric light is placed in the forest by night and attracts thousands and hundreds of thousands of "nonnen" to the mouth of a large funnel through which a rapid exhaust current of air is forced, sucking in the insects by thousands into a hole under the earth where they are buried. Even this is only a partial measure, for in a forest containing perhaps a hundred millions of "nonnen” it is not much to destroy 200,000 or 300,000.

425

"(ENCLOSURE No. 2.)

"Translation of an Article in the "Münchener Neueste Nachrichten" of August 10th, 1890, entitled "Chronicle of the Destruction of Forests through the 'Nonne' and other Wood Insects.

.

"Just as men and beasts are from time to time carried off in multitudes by epidemics, which epidemics it has not yet been found possible entirely and finally to suppress by art and science and by doctors and veterinaries, in like manner the trees of the forest are now and then attacked and destroyed by forest insects. Fortunately these vanish, as a rule, as quickly as they come, by the operation of natural agencies. This is the only consolation we have in view of the desolate condition to which many of the pine forests of Germany, and in particular of Bavaria, have been reduced by the horrible devouring caterpillar the "Nonne."

"Before now in earlier centuries our woods have been attacked by similar calamities, and yet the German forests grow green and thrive, and yield, year by year, higher rents. This may serve to calm too anxious minds and to correct the views of those who are so ready with their judgments, and who ascribe the blame of the misfortunes which have fallen on the forests solely to the forest officials.

*

*

*

*

*

*

"1. In 1449 and 1450 a considerable plague of caterpillars attacked the Nürnberg forests, for which no remedy could be found (Nürnberg, Chronik.)

*

*

"10. In 1737 the caterpillars made such a dreadful invasion into the Thuringian Forest, that in a small part of the Duchy of Meiningen in 1742, 2,985 cords of dead wood still lay on the forest; but by good fortune at this time glass furnaces were introduced, which absorbed the wood killed by the 66 nonnen " pest. (K. v. Sprengeisen. Topograph, etc.)

*

*

**

**

""

"11. In 1783 and 1784, in the Fichtelgebirge (Bayreuth district), the "nonnen caterpillar caused great damage to the old and young pine trees. The bark beetle followed and finished the trees. (Kob.)

66

19

*

12. In 1791-96, in the forests of Kurmark, although for five years no trace of the caterpillar had been found, 650,000 "morgens of pine forest were devoured by the great pine caterpillar and the seventh part totally destroyed. (Hennert.) The bark beetle also took part in this destruction. The pest also spread to Mecklenburg, Saxony, and Bohemia.

"13. In 1794-97 the 'nonnen' caterpillar appeared in Vogtland, viz, in the pine and fir forests of Lobenstein, Schleiz, Ebersdorf, and Saalburg, and worked vast destruction, so that the loss was reckoned at 2,000,000 cords of wood, and the plague also threatened the neighbouring forests of Altenburg, Electoral Saxony, Saalfeld, and Schwarzburg."

CC

Bechstein, in his Forest Insectology (1818), describes the great destruction caused by the 'non- nen' caterpillar in 1794-97 in Vogtland, Lithuania, and West Russia, and gives figures which corres- pond exactly with our present situation. Seventy-two years ago he wrote as follows:--

"It is horrible to travel in those districts where these caterpillars swarm. Many thousands

crawl up and down the trees. One cannot take a step without treading on a number of them. There is a perpetual rain of their excreta, which often lies six inches deep, and being dissolved by the rain, collects in puddles, which diffuse a pestilential stench. One can form no idea of the magnitude and terrible nature of the destruction. Fortunately Nature herself stopped the pest through a kind of dysentery which attacked the cater- pillars in the beginning of June 1797. This deadly sickness was attributed to a kind of mildew. The caterpillars collected together in great thick clumps, four to six inches across, the excreta became pale, the intestines dirty, and so they died, leaving behind them a disgusting stench.'

"As to the measures of prevention and suppression of that day, they hardly differed from those in use now. Bechstein, in 1818, recommended-1st, protection and encouragement of insectivorous birds; 2nd, protection of useful insects which attack and pursue the "nonnen"; 3rd, scraping the eggs off the trees with brooms and scrapers with long and short stems; 4th, picking off the moths, caterpillars, and cocoons (in 1796 the Prussian district administration at Hof caused 1,838,000 female butterflies to be caught, and paid 6 krenzers for every thousand); 5th, the lighting of a number of small bonfires on dark nights (for it is well known that butterflies are attracted by the moonlight), and they paid in Bayreuth in 1796 for one night's maintenance of fire and bringing wood 5 groschen; 6th, isolation of the districts attacked by broad paths and ditches; 7th, cutting off in March and April of the branches nearly to the vertical, and burning them; 8th, cutting down of whole standing trees, and burning of the branches and bark; 9th, removal of moss and litter from the forests and burning, if eggs or cater- pillars are found therein.

"In connexion with the injury caused by the 'nonnen' in this century, we may briefly mention here the extensive 'nonnen' plague of 1839-40 in Upper Suabia (Würtemberg), which ravaged many hundreds of 'morgens' of pine forest. The same thing was repeated in 1855, and at the present

426

moment is appearing almost in the same spots in a very serious manner. But the most considerable 'nonnen' pest of all took place in Russia, and spread from 1845-1868 in a most devastating manner over Poland, Lithuania, and East Prussia. The invasion in East Prussia began suddenly in 1853, in the night of July 29-30, and covered a superficies of about 60 German square miles in the administra- tion of Gumbinnen, after it had already crossed over in 1851 and 1852 the southern boundary of the administration of Königsberg. At that time the 'nonnen' moths were driven by a storm into the sea while on their way, so that the insects were thrown up by the waves on to the coasts for a distance of 10 German miles in a bank 7 feet wide and 6 inches thick, and were used as manure by the coast inha- bitants. The extent of the ravages in Russia at that time was 6,400 German geographical square miles, in East Prussia 600 ditto, total 7,000. At the very least 55,000,000 Prussian cords or wood, of 184,000,000 cubic metres of wood, became the prey of 'nonnen' and bark beetles.

"These few examples may suffice to show that the 'nonnen' have made their appearance in former centuries in large numbers, and have generally disappeared with equal suddenness. The present catastrophe will likewise come to an end, after causing heavy losses, though it may possibly return many years later. But we possess no radical remedy against the 'nonnen,' and it seems doubtful if we shall ever find one. At all events it is the duty of the forest managers, forest owners, the Govern- ment, and the whole population to come to close quarters in every possible way with this dangerous visitor, even although Nature herself up till now has proved herself the best helper, and may continue so in future. When, however, the present evil will be conquered that God alone can certainly tell-“Let us hope for the best."'

73. The experience gained in Europe and related above is useful as indicating the habits and peculiarities of tree-eating caterpillars, and what the prospects may possibly be of the re-invasion in Hongkong of the caterpillar with which we have had so unfortunate an experience. There is one comfort here which was denied those on the European continent, viz., that our caterpillar does not seem to have the capacity to live on any other tree or plant except the common pine, so that all other things have been quite exempt from attack. The moth of our caterpillar, on the other hand, is not attracted by light, which I proved last May when experimenting with a view of ascertaining the best practicable methods of destroying the caterpillar.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

CHARLES FORD, Superintendent,

Botanical and Afforestation Department.

Honourable J. H. STEWART LOCKHART,

Colonial Secretary,

&c.,

fc.,

&c.

Appendix A.

TOTAL REVENUE COLLECTED BY THE DEPARTMENT DURING 1894.

Forestry Products,....

Sale of Plants,

Loan of Plants,

Appendix B.

$ 770.22 501.76

47.40

$ 1,319.38

CHARLES FORD,

Superintendent,

Botanical & Afforestation Department.

*Acampe multiflora.

Aërides affine?

*

"

Lobbii.

""

*

,"

odoratum.

quinquevuluerum.

testaceum.

*Anæctochilus Dawsonianus.

Roxburghii. sp. (Formosa).

*

Ansellia africana. "Appendicula bifaria. *Arundina chinensis.

LIST OF ORCHIDS CULTIVATED IN THE GARDENS,

*Bletia hyacinthina.

""

var alba.

*

*

Bulbophyllum delitescens.

*Calanthe Veitchii.

"

veratrifolia.

vestita.

Cattleya citrina.

lutea.

"

crispa.

""

Dowiana.

Gaskelliana.

""

"

gigas.

*These bave flowered in Gardens.

Cattleya labiata.

*

""

*

Mendelii.

Mossice.

Trianæ.

*Cleisostoma Fordii. Coelogyne cristata.

***

""

*

*

""

59

fimbriata.

flaccida.

lentiginosa. ochracea. odoratissima.

pandurata.

Schilleriana. speciosa

*Cottonia sp. *Cymbidium aloifolum.

**

**

**

*

27

29

>

ensifolium. pendulum.

sinense.

sp.

Cypripedium Argus.

bellatulum.

concolor.

>>

""

""

""

""

****

"

""

*

Dayanum. Haynaldianum. hirsutissimum. insigne Exul. Lowii. niveum.

Parishii.

purpuratum. Stonei.

villosum.

Cyrtopera flava.

*Dendrobium aduncum.

aggregatum. albosanguineum.

cambridgeanum. chrysotoxum. chrysanthum.

*

"

""

aureum.

19

"

"2

""

crassinode.

29

***

23

crumenatum.

33

crystallinum.

*

35

Dalhousieanum.

*

>>

*

Dearei.

39

وو

densiflorum.

Devonianum.

eburneum.

fimbriatum oculatum.

Findlayanum.

Fytchianum.

Farmeri.

29

formosum.

وو

giganteum.

Hillii.

Hildebrandianum.

infundibulum.

وو

""

japonicum.

Jamesianum.

"

*

"

Lindleyanum.

,,

Loddigesii.

luteolum.

""

*

""

39

**

moschatum.

Macræi.

macrostachyum. macrophyllum MacCarthic.

""

nobile.

"

*

Parishii.

25

*

plicatile.

**

Pierardi.

>>

*

Pelpitræ.

29

sp. (Australia).

tortile.

LIST OF ORCHIDS,-Continued.

Dendrobium thyrsiflorum.

"

virginalis. Wardianum.

Diacrium vitellinum, majus. *Epidendrum Hanburyanum? *Eria ambrosia.

Corneri. flava.

94

rosea.

*Goodyera procera.

Grammatophyllum truncatum Habenaria galeandra.

*

"

*

Miersiana.

militaris.

rhodocheila.

Susannæ.

*Hæmaria discolor.

Lælia anceps.

autumnalis.

">

*

""

Dayana.

"

majalis.

""

purpurata.

*Limatodes gracilis.

*

"

rosea.

*Liparis chloroxantha.

*

nervosa.

*Luisia grandiflora ?

Maxillaria grandiflora. *Nephelaphyllum sp. *Oberonia sp.

*

Odontoglossum citrosmum.

,,

grande.

Insleayi.

Oncidium crispum.

"

flexuosum.

sphacelatum.

*Ornithochilus fuxus.

Peristeria elata. *Phaius grandifolius.

maculatus.

*Phalaenopsis amabilis.

**

""

""

leucorrhoda.

Luddemanniana.

rosea.

Schilleriana.

sp.

Stuartiana.

*Pholidota chinensis.

19

imbricata.

*Platyclinis sp.

*Pogonia Fordii.

Renanthera bilinguis.

"

coccinea.

*Saccolabium Blumei majus.

giganteum.

Roxburghii.

*Sarcanthus sp.

**

多多

teretifolius.

Stanhopea tigrina.

Thunia Bensoniæ.

"

**

Marshalliæ.

pulchra.

Trichopilia laxa.

Vanda Batemanni.

*

concolor.

59

densiflora.

Denisoniana.

"

Hookeriana.

"

""

Sanderiana.

"

suavis.

sp.

teres.

tricolor.

""

Zygopetalum Mackayi.

*

These have flowered in Gardens.

427

CHARLES FORD,

Superintendent,

Botanical & Afforestation Department.

428

Appendix C.

RAINFALL OBSERVATIONS MADE AT THE BOTANIC GARDENS, DURING 1894.

ABOUT 300 FEET ABOVE SEA LEVEL.

TAKEN AT 10 A.M.

DATE.

Jan. Feb. March. April. May. June.

July.

Aug.

Sept.

Oct. Nov.

Dec.

1,

2,

3,

4,

...

:

:.

:

80.

:

...

90.

...

90.

:

:

:

:

:.

:

:.

...

:

:

...

*02

:

:

:

⚫01

*50

1-79

*05

:

1:

:

:

-25

⚫07

*26

:

:

.:.

:

⚫07

*07

•10

⚫03

•23

:.

:

60.

10.

...

.12

1.22

*05

•14

*04

06.

⚫30

⚫84

⚫50 1.20

•13

2.48

:

:

3.23

12.61

2.54

⚫02

:

80.

•23

..01

+36

⚫39

*05

3.05

*53

•21

:

T:

40.

09.

.07

2.19

⚫45

:.

:

:

:

:

6.20

1.16

2:51

•24

⚫03

•21

.02

:

.84

89.

10.

...

:

:

:.

:

1.10

86.

⚫34

.08

1.52

⚫01

⚫01

•27

*27

*55

:

1·85.

2.24

*50

*02

:

4.97

2.23

*05

10.

1.23

*05

...

1.58

:

:

:

:

:

:

:.

:.

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:.

:

:

:

:

:

60.9

:

F:

:

:.

:

•24

•10 2.39

...

:

:

:

:

1.28

2.29

:.

•19

⚫03

•87

*56

⚫01

...

*43

:

2.09

⚫01

...

...

:

...

...

16.I

10.

:

•11

+42

*07

12227

:

:

:

...

:

:

:

:

1.17

90.

4.70

09.

+21 1.24

⚫36

1.95

•40

•27 1.29

•62

•19

•37

1.20

*95

10.

•10

*10

⚫02

:

4.71

*03

...

:

:

:

:.

:

:

:

:

4:.

:

:

:

:

:

:

•25

*20

⚫04

:

:

:

:

:

5,

6,

7,

8,

9,

10,

11,

12,

10.

:..

*15

...

...

:

:

:

13,

14,

15,

16,

17,

18,

...

:

...

•13

19,

*05

:

:

:

:

20,

21,

22,

23,

24,

25,

26,

06.

:..

:

:

:.

27,

10

.10

28,

29,

⚫01

30,

80.

31,

*24

Total,...... 1.51

.73

•15

...

*21

:

:

:.

:

•10

...

17

*03

08.

CHARLES FORD,

Superintendent,

Botanical & Afforestation Department

+22 3:03 20.15 18.49 8.93 18.16 21.96 18.84

Total inches for the year 99. //2.86

⚫04

Appendix D.

STATISTICS OF PLANTING OPERATIONS.

* Pinus

LOCALITY.

Terns- Cunning Trista- Masso- træmia -hamia niana. japonica. sinensis. conferta.

nea

Cam-

phor.

Spondias

Liqui-

Bischo-

Area

Mangi-

dambar Quercus forino-

Bamboo.

sp.

Celtis

sinensis.

Miscella

fera.

ffia

javanica.

neous.

in

Acres.

Grand

Total of

Trees.

sana.

West Point,

Tytam,

Wanchai Gap,

Aberdeen New Road,

Do., and Wanchai Road,

Quarry Bay,

Kowloon,

Kennedy Town,

Magazine Gap Road,

Richmond Road,

Various Places,

146

232

...

:

276

384 200

:.

:

:

:

...

:

173

161

149

:

6/1/

8,202

323

39,151

7

8/3/2

10,395

1

:

...

1,153

1

:

:

1,418

289

99

1 1/2

1,760

38

136

501

:

:

:..

145

824

:

:

:

:

...

:

56

10

76

:

:

137

99

291

530

353

194

133

:.

:.

:

:

81

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

...

:

:.

:

4,766

2,138

759

24,946

14,032

5,407

3,972

:

:

450 703

:

:

:

:.

99

:

...

:

1,418

:

:

294

:.

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

304

:

:

F:..

56

:

:

:

:

:

10

61

2,931

830

521

1,192 730

486

173

637

463

521 63,607

Total,.

35,413 99 20,142

* Previously known as Pinus sinensis.

CHARLES FOrd,

Superintendent,

Botanical & Afforestation Department,

429

430

Appendix E.

SALE OF FORESTRY PRODUCTS, BOTANICAL AND AFFORESTATION DEPARTMENT.

West Point,

Deep Water Bay,

Mount Davis,

Causeway Bay,

North Point, Sookunpo Hill,

Wongneichung,

Kowloon,

Bowen Road,

Aberdeen,

Bowrington,

Little Hongkong,

Tytam Tuk,

Tree Prunings,

Brushwood,

Camphor Trees,

Seeds,

Timber,

Locality.

PINE TREES.

Quantity.

Amount.

$

C.

736

7.91

17,505

228.77

377

15.80

3,159

55.26

2,038

37.78

3,809

82.01

1,069

140.90

53

1.89

918

15.49

1,377

11.34

68

11.31

115

6.76

191

3.54

Total Number of Trecs,.

31,415

618.76

Total Revenue for Forestry Products,......

2,777 piculs.

115.84

541

13.57

35

2.80

55 catties.

13.75

5.50

770.22

CHARLES FORD, Superintendent,

Botanical & Afforestation Department.

Appendix F.

QUANTITIES OF CATERPILLARS AND COCOONS RECEIVED AT EACH STATION.

Station.

Quantity of

Quantity of

caterpillars

collected.

cocoons collected.

Catties. Taels.

Catties.

Taels.

No. 2 Police Station,

Shaukiwan Police Station,

Botanic Gardens,

Yaumati Police Station,

West Point Police Station,

Aberdeen Police Station,

26,529

556

4

9,201

8

799

1

7,271

477

11

5,287

4,699

4,290

Hunghom Police Station,

2,371

Pokfulam Police Station,

929

TNB∞ *

983

6

717

846

213

1,024

T: 012

Total,......

60,579

6

5,617

01/

CHARLES FORD,

Superintendent.

Botanical & Afforestation Department.

?

DATE.

Appendix G.

DAILY PAYMENTS ON ACCOUNT OF CATERPILLAR PLAGUE.

Amount paid for Caterpillars.

Amount paid for Cocoons.

DATE.

Amount paid for Caterpillars.

1894.

431

Amount paid for Cocoons..

May 24,....

1894.

..

5.95

$

*A

C.

C.

C.

Brought forward,....................

3,176.951

436.66

25,.......

103.07

June 20,

2.30

84.14

26,.......

618.61

21,

2.26

$1.91

>>

27,.......

18.13

""

22,

1.72

91.02

+

28,...

149.14

23,

96.27

33

"

29,....

383.63

24,

8.84

>>

30,...

437.66

""

25,

2.51

93.31

"

31,.......

333.98

26,

.96

111.24

June 1,.......

87.30

27,

123.80

2.........

187.601

"

28,

.40

75.76

""

3,.......

.66

S

29,

41.591

29

4,.......

266.291

""

30,

:

24.7311⁄2

5,........

101.39

July 1,

74.62

.22

2.

"

7..........

80.57

.69

3,

"

""

*

8,.......

1.96

4,

99

9........

57.49

.22

5,

"1

11..........

47.50

1.57

6.

12,.........

85.29

10.12

7,

"

"

13,.......

61.68

54.69

8,

""

14,........

50.55

110.42

9,

"2

19

""

15,.........

18.07

129.05

10,

""

16,.........

.89

5.48

11,

クラ

17,..........

3.76

12,

18,.........

2.92

53.53

13,

19..........

1.95

66.91

14,

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

.:.

6.91

48.19

33.66

28.63

33.99

24.35

37.00

1.40

55.08

32.26

25.20

49.174

43.771

13.94

Carried forward,......... 3,176.95

436.66

Total,................ 3,187.101

1,702.85

CHARLES FORd,

Superintendent,

Botanical & Afforestation Department

175

HONGKONG.

MEDICAL REPORT ON THE EPIDEMIC OF BUBONIC PLAGUE IN 1894,

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of

His Excellency the Governor.

No. 16

95

GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL,

HONGKONG, 2nd March, 1895.

SIR,

I have the honour to forward to you Dr. Lowson's report upon the late Plague epidemic in this Colony.

It reflects the greatest credit on its author for the care with which the records have been kept from the beginning, the practical way in which the symptoms, progress and treatment of the disease and its post mortem appearances have been treated, and the recommendations that have been made to prevent its occurrence in the future.

The necessity for remedying the results of faulty construction of the houses in the Chinese quarters, the want of ventilation, light and air in them, the impossibility of keeping them clean and wholesome, the inadequate water supply, the want of proper drainage, the overcrowded condition of the houses, the filthy condition of wells, the necessity for proper latrine accommodation, and the enormous amount of filth collected in the houses have now been fully revealed. I first called the atten- tion of Government to the state of things I have mentioned in my report dated the 15th April, 1874, within six months of my arrival in this Colony, In this report I mentioned by name the streets and lanes, and the position of many gullies without a name in that portion of Taipingshan which has now been walled in, and the condition of filth in which I found the houses, also streets and alleys in other portions of the town; almost the same state of things was found in 1894. Yet a further special report was sent in by a Commission appointed to verify the state- ments made in my report which was sent in in May 1875. In 1880 Mr. CHAD- WICK arrived with a Royal Commission to investigate the condition of things described, and his full report to the Secretary of State appeared in a Blue Book. Six years afterwards he again visited the Colony and expressed his surprise at finding how little had been done to remedy the state of things he had described, and again reported on them. Many laws have been made in the twenty years. previous to 1894 to remedy the insanitary state of the Colony, but most have remained dead letters owing to the difficulties of enforcing them and the prejudices of the Chinese especially and other sections of the community.

Since 1874 the divisions of the City of Victoria inhabited by Chinese have increased more than three fold in size, and the new portions are in nearly as bad a condition as the old.

The labours of Hercules in cleansing the Augean stables were a trifle com- pared with that which the Government has to contend with in the near future in cleansing the City of Victoria and other inhabited portions of the Colony.

Another report from the Permanent Committee of the Sanitary Board will describe the work done by those working under their supervision.

Dr. Lowson's report is a most interesting and valuable addition to medical literature, and will no doubt receive the commendations it deserves. He was most unsparing of himself during the progress of the epidemic and untiring in his efforts to render assistance to all who were working under his superintendence. The work done by him during this trying period cannot be too well recognised.

176

That the latrines are a source of propagating the infection as described by Dr. Lowson there is no doubt, and proof is afforded by the dates of the closing of the surrounding houses. I found on inquiry that during the end of May and the beginning of June, when the prevailing winds were from the cast and north, the houses to the west and south of the latrines were closed and afterwards, when the prevailing winds were from the south and west, the houses to the north and east of the latrines were closed, being found infectel and more than three deaths having occurred in each of them. Mr. RAM made elaborate plans of the City of Victoria showing where the plague existed, and the proportion of houses in each district that were infected.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

The Honourable J. H. STEWART LOCKHART,

Acting Colonial Secretary.

PH. B. C. AYRES,

Colonial Surgeon.

-

SIR,

GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL,

HONGKONG, 1st March, 1895.

I have the honour to forward herewith for your information a Report upon the Epidemic of Plague in Hongkong in 1894, so far as it concerns the medical work which I carried out under your directions.

I regret extremely that several important matters-including the epidemiology of the disease-which I could have wished to discuss at some length, have been touched upon very superficially, or passed over altogether in this Report. I will ask you to accept as an excuse for my shortcomings in these respects the following facts of which you are, I believe, already cognizant :—

(a) The overworked condition of the Medical Department during the Epidemic, and at the present time has necessitated my writing most of these pages during odd half hours which would, under other circumstances, have been devoted to recreation or repose.

(b) The proofs have had to be corrected during a period of convalescence

succeeding a prolonged attack of malarial fever.

(e) The temperature charts and pulse tracings have been reproduced with some difficulty with the scanty appliances at the command of the local printers.

I have written strongly-as I feel strongly-concerning the existence and con- dition of the Tung Wa Hospital, but you will understand that my objections to that institution are based entirely upon professional grounds. Conducted as it is at present, under the patronage and protection of the local Government, a certain amount of countenance is, or at any rate appears to be, lent to what I can only describe as medical and surgical atrocities. In addition to this, I believe that it constitutes a serious menace to the health of the community. I should, however, be sorry to have it supposed that I do not recognise the fact that where a large native population is concerned, some deference has to be paid to the inclinations, and even to the prejudices, of the majority. Personally I believe, however, that a scheme might be devised which would satisfy the wishes of the Chinese without sacrificing the sanitary well-being of the Colony; and I think that it is a matter for congratu- lation that the publicity that bas been recently given to the system under which the institution in question has been conducted in the past has already resulted in a marked improvement in the direction of order and cleanliness. In reading over the pages which I send you herewith I am fully conscious that I have expressed myself some- what uncompromisingly upon this and upon some other topics; but I have thought (and I hope that in this I shall have your concurrence) that in writing a medical report I am perhaps justified in taking a purely scientific view of the questions under discussion, leaving it to others to advance what is to be said (and I do not doubt that something is to be said) upon the side of expediency and public policy.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

DR. PH. B. C. AYRES, C.M.G.,

Colonial Surgeon.

JAMES A. LOWSON,

Medical Officer in charge of Epidemic Hospital and Acting Superintendent of Government Civil Hospital and

Lunatic Asylums.

177

THE EPIDEMIC OF BUBONIC PLAGUE. IN HONGKONG, 1894.

To write an historical introduction upon the subject of Plague should at the present moment be an easy matter, considering the many classical monographs and articles which have been written upon it within the last century. When the pre- sent outbreak occurred in Hongkong, the only authority that I had at my disposal was the article on Plague in Quain's Dictionary of Medicine" by J. N. RADCLIFFE, the experiences that we have had here being to a considerable extent new to the present generation. Latterly, the articles in the Encyclopædia Brittannica and DAVIDSON'S Tropical Medicine-not to mention HECKER's classical work-were brought to my notice. I have not been able to make myself familiar with the opi- nions of CABIADIS and others in print, consequently the notes on the disease which I now present are almost solely founded on experiences here during the past year.

The history of Plague, as regards the civilised West, has been told times without number, but, with the exception of RoCHER'S papers, the history of the disease in the Far East is a perfect blank. One would expect, seeing that China has the unenviable reputation of being the seat of the plague, that the Chinese classics would show some trace of the existence of epidemics of the disease. I have requested Mr. J. DYER BALL, one of the most eminent, and certainly one of the most painstaking of Chinese scholars, to make careful enquiry into the subject, and the result is that, after months of diligent searching, he finds that Chinese history makes no reference to any epidemic which has left a mark on the inefface- able records of time. The epidemic in Canton of 1894 is by far the most notice- able case (of which there is any record) of the disease carrying off large numbers of the population. The first time in contemporary history that plague has really made itself felt in China, was in 1844-just after the Egyptian epidemic had left its mark on European medicine,—and in this case, by the records at hand, the epidemic did not work nearly so much havoc amongst the population as it did during the year recently finished. Plague has been practically endemic in Pakhoi for over twenty years, as has been recorded by Drs. LowRY and HORDER; the only occasion. when it has been at all epidemic being about ten years ago.

The epidemic in Canton, according to the information at our disposal, began early in February 1894. During the four months following it was practically un- known in Pakhoi. In May it broke out in Hongkong, ninety miles from Canton, and three hundred and seventy miles from Pakhoi. Negative evidence is wanting to show that it did not come from Canton. Positive evidence is wanting to show that it came from Pakhoi.

An average of 11,090 passengers came from Canton every week whilst only 64 came from Pakhoi.

There were many patients fleeing from Canton on account of the plague,— none fleeing from Pakhoi.

Most certainly tens of thousands of persons died from plague in Canton, from January 1st to May 1st, 1894, whilst the dead were to be reckoned by tens only in Pakhoi during the same period, there being three or four steamers every day from Canton to Hongkong whilst there were only six in a month from Pakhoi.

Since 1873, it has been endemic in the province of Yunnan, a district about 900 miles from Canton, where the numbers dying of it yearly have been considerable. All this circumstantial evidence goes to prove that the disease was imported to Hongkong from Canton (and not from Pakhoi) although in Canton it has been unknown, until the present outbreak, since 1850.

On March 2nd, 1894, a large Chinese procession was held in Hongkong, and as a result large numbers of people came from the surrounding country, it being estimated that 40,000 of the lowest class coolies came from Canton for the occasion. It has been maintained by some persons that this was the period during which Hongkong became infected. It is possible, but it appears to me that before nine weeks had elapsed the epidemic would have reached such alarining proportions that it must have been noticed earlier. It was only in April that people were reported.

179

180

as fleeing from Canton on account of the plague, and as these people were almost certain to have been in contact with the sick, it is most probable that some of them brought the disease into the Colony.

"The Overland Friend of China of 23rd May, 1850, contains the

following:-

66 6

"The city of Canton, and the neighbouring towns and villages are afflicted by a malignant fever. It is commonly called Typhus; some Europeans-physicians are of "opinion that it is akin to the yellow fever of the West "Indies; others think that it resembles the plague which "desolated London two centuries ago. The disease is "said to be fatal invariably, its victims linger three or "four days, though in some instances they have died in "twelve hours. More than one European doctor cheer- "fully offer their services,--but the Chinese are obstinate "in their adherence to old custom-old ignorant quackery. "The distemper has not made its appearance at the 'Factories, and as it may arise from a want of cleanliness "among the people, we are in hopes that it will not "extend to Europeans.'

737

The following remarks by A. P. HAPPER, Jr., in the Imperial Maritime Customs' Annual Report, 1889, (dated 22nd February, 1890) are those of a most careful ob- server, although some of his statements as to the limitation of the disease are erron- eous-probably owing to a lack of knowledge of the literature upon the subject:

"In spite of such a favourable climate Mêng-tzü (in Yunnan), in common "with other parts of Yunnan, has suffered annually for a period of "years from the plague, (E), a kind of malignant fever, "fatal in a few days, having as one of its symptoms a hard swelling "on the neck, in the armpits, or in the groin, which has carried off "a number of its inhabitants. Indeed, the presence of fallow land "in the near neighbourhood of the city is attributed to the decima- "tion of the farming population by the pest. On approach of the "epidemic, the first victims are rats, which fearless of human beings, "rush madly into their presence, and after capering around the room. "fall dead at their feet. The next to suffer are cattle: the fatal "effect among them is equally as great. Surrounded by such distressing signs, it is no wonder that inhabitants of hamlets often "desert their houses and belongings en masse, to seek immunity on the mountain side; for a curious fact about the disease is, that it never descends to places under 1,200 ft. of altitude above the sea, "and it rarely scales heights over 7,200 ft. high. Strangely enough also, it seldom attacks people sojourning in Yunnan from other "provinces, its victims being confined to the aborigines and to "native-born Chinese. This disease certainly offers an interesting field for the study of western medical science, and the physician "who will find a specific against its ravages will be hailed as the "deliverer of Yunnan, so helpless are the native practitioners in

treating it."

(6

66

66

The question of the infection of rats, previous to the epidemic being noticed in human beings, has been made too much of, as have several other points in con- nection with plague. It is only natural that as rats have their snouts about an inch above the floors of houses they are much more liable to inspire plague-infected dust than people who have their mouths at least two feet higher. Inoculation too is easy. It must be remembered that rats usually die two or three days after inoculation; therefore the statement that the deaths of rats generally precede an epidemic-although generally true-is only dependant on the fact that rats and other small animals are peculiarly liable to be infected, and have a very short incubation period of the disease. Their habits and residence also conduce to their early affection after the disease has been introduced.

Many points have yet to be cleared up scientifically, as for instance the in- fection of pigs and cattle. It has been stated that these animals suffer from the same disease, but it would be better, by our later experience, to prove that it is definitely plague. I regret that after the hurry of the late epidemic our stock of plague bacilli has disappearel, but it is to be hoped that an opportunity for cluci-

dating some doubtful points will occur later on. Going upon recent experience here we have as yet no definite proof that, during this epidemic, pigs, cattle and dogs were infected. KITASATO's observations were unfortunately limited to what may be termed "Toy" animals, and it would have been more satisfactory if animals which are generally used for human consumption had been utilised also for experi- ment, and the direct connection of the disease between human beings and these animals had been definitely proved, so much depending on the food supply of certain communities in the Far East at the present moment.

It is satisfactory to know that the causa causans of the plague has been dis- covered, and some of us must regret that our time, being entirely taken up by practical work in connection with the treatment of the plague-for which no fame is secured-we had so little time to look to the more purely scientific side of the question.

In the following pages stress has been laid on the paucity of medical men who could be found to help in our extremity. It may be thought that we surely had enough time to make some efforts in the direction of discovering bacilli. I can only say that after a day of from twelve to eighteen hours hard and exciting work in the trying heat of a Hongkong summer none of the men who had to bear the brunt of medical supervision, and who had to look forward to a prolonged mental strain, were much inclined to start work with the microscope by gaslight,--more espe- cially as they were generally completely tired out and ready to sleep immediately; or were too exhausted to secure the repose necessary to enable them to start afresh next day. It may not be out of place to mention that in the Egyptian epidemic in 1843 half of the French physicians in Cairo perished from the plague; and in the Russian epidemic in 1879 (where Vetlianka was the principal seat of disease with about five hundred cases), the first three medical men who were in attendance on the sick died, as did numerous attendants. These were somewhat appalling figures when the epidemic broke out, and the outlook was not much improved when our numbers went up to four by the addition of Surgeon-Major JAMES, A.M.S., and Surgeon P'ENNY, R.N., the European nursing staff being reinforced by two Police Constables. It is noticeable that none of those who were in active attendance on, or engaged in removing, the sick during the whole period were attack- ed. This I put down to the instructions that were given at the beginning of the epidemic. On the second or third day after the epidemic was discovered it was proved that the disease could be propagated through the blood by inoculation. The fæces were also suspected as an additional mode of conveyance of infection. Cultures were made from these, but unfortunately this method of infection was not proved until KITASATO arrived, time being wanting to make frequent observations of our culture tubes. In the meanwhile, notwithstanding want of proof, the faces were always looked upon as the most prolific source of infection carbolic acid or quicklime being added to them before disposal in the sea, and it was a satisfaction to us when KITASATO confirmed our suspicions. The question as to whether infection from the contents of buboes could occur was answered in the affirmative early, and every precaution as regards antiseptics was taken in opening these swell- ings. With our present knowledge of the nature of the epidemic it may be said (and has been said) that our precautions at the beginning were excessive, but here again it is the same old story of "wisdom after the event." By the knowledge gained in Hongkong during 1894, plague has been divested of a great deal of its terrors if care be taken by the people engaged in fighting it. Not only this, but if proper sanitary precautions are taken, no civilised country should ever be the seat of an epidemic of plague. I am bound to admit that, if ever any place was ripe for such an epidemic, certain parts of Hongkong in May 1894 were in a condition for it to spread like wildfire. Full details as to the condition of the City of Victoria are given later, and it is satisfactory to know at the present time that attempts are being made by those in authority to remedy faults which have been accumulating for years, and which have been pointed out before but without result.

66

27

In these times of scientific research it is not too much to expect that some serum treatment will be found to neutralize the toxines produced by the Pest Bacilli, and when the further researches of KITASATO and YERSIN are published I hope we shall have some remedy suggested which will enable us to reduce the very high mortality due to Plague, should it ever unfortunately come to these shores again.

In the following pages I have avoided theorizing as far as possible, what follows being more a report on the epidemic than a treatise on the disease.

181

182

DEFINITION.

Bubonic Plague is a specific infectious fever, characterised by the presence of a definite bacillus, primarily affecting especially the lymphatic system, and after- wards the cerebral and vascular systems. When considering the symptoms (if this definition is kept in mind) it will be found to embrace all the developments which take place in the disease.

CAUSE.

The existing cause of the disease is a bacillus, which was, so far as the Hong- kong epidemic is concerned, discovered first by Dr. S. KITASATO, of Tokyo, on June 14th, in the Kennedytown Barrack Hospital. The bacilli are found in the fæces, in the contents of buboes, and in the blood.

(1)

Predisposing causes are, speaking generally, insanitary conditions, and of these Filth and Overcrowding must be reckoned as two of the most important factors. The district of Taipingshan supplied these factors in a marked degree at the begin- ning of the outbreak, the majority of the houses being in a most filthy condition, as owing to the uncleanly habits of the people the amount of what is generally termed rubbish accumulates in a Chinese house in a crowded city to an extent be- yond the imagination of most civilised people. When to a mixture of dust, old rags, ashes, broken crockery, moist surface soil, etc. is added fæcal matter, and the decomposing urine of animals and human beings, a terribly insanitary condition of affairs prevails; and that this is no overdrawn picture of what was to be met with in Taipingshan, many Europeans now know to their cost. The habits of the people are filthy, and their surroundings are correspondingly filthy if household scavenging is not looked after properly.

Overcrowding (2) was present also. The question as to how many people may go to the acre without overcrowding, must receive a different answer in every separate town according to the character and height of the houses, and the breadth of the streets. When, however, 30 to 40 people are huddled together with a cubic air space of less than 150 cubic feet per head, and that in a house which has no through ventilation, then one would suppose that it must be admitted that there is overcrowding; nevertheless one finds in Hongkong would-be sanitarians who will not admit the existence of overcrowding on any basis but that of how many go to the acre.

Other insanitary conditions were not wanting. In May 1894 in Taipingshan, and in other districts of Hongkong a large proportion of the houses were damp and badly ventilated, with drains of a most primitive and insanitary description. Earthen floors or floors laid with chunks of stones were the general rule while in most houses light seemed to be looked upon as an enemy to be carefully shut out.

Basements and cellars have been allowed to be inhabited practically all over Hongkong. These have the most meagre provision of ventilation and light, more especially those to the west of the Civil Hospital, where the hill rises abruptly; and in Taipingshan in the neighbourhood of Tank Lanc. Dwellings in these districts are very damp indeed in the summer season, a large number of houses being built directly back to back, or with only a very narrow lane between them.

(5)

In the infected areas the drainage arrangements within private premises are bad, a few houses only having been connected to the new system, whilst the majority have the old fashioned drains, square in section, badly constructed, leaking in all directions, and favouring deposit of solid matter-especially during the dry season~~- and directly connected with the old drains which have been relegated to the duty of conveying storm waters since the introduction of the new system. A few have no drainage at all.

The food supply of Hongkong is fairly good but could be improved from a public health point of view if the wishes of the Colonial Veterinary Surgeon were inore carefully attended to. The Chinese here have entertained the idea that the

(1) In 1887 an Ordinance entitled The Public Ilealth Ordinance was passed which handed over the sanitary control of the Colony to a semi-representative body called the Sanitary Board. Much of the work so delegatel to it has been carried out in an efficient manner. The external scavenging of the streets leaves little to be desired, and many efforts have been made to encourage and foster a higher standard of cleanliness amongst the native population. Unfortunately the Chinaman resents strongly any attempts to interfere with his domestic privacy, and a little too much deference has probably been shewn to his prejudices in this respect. In any case it must be admitted that the interior of the native houses was such as may fairly be described as a disgrace to a civilized community.

(2) The Health Ordinance provides for overcrowding, but its provisions were not put into effect owing to opposition

by the natives. (Sec section 67 of Ordinance)

(3) At the time of the outbreak of the Epidemic there was no restriction as to the use of basements as places for

habitation.

(4) There is no provision for back-to-back and badly ventilated houses.

(5) The Ordinance gives large powers in Drainage matters, Sections 49-54 dealing with the subject of drains.

5

epidemic was caused by eating pigs from Pakhoi, but as none of the pigs imported showed any sign of diseas, and as pigs have not yet been proved to be susceptible to the disease, this supposition has to be rejected.

The water supply is very good, but at present it is scarcely sufficient to meet the heavy demands made on it, on account of the waste and misuse of water within the closely built and thickly inhabited areas of the City, the water supply to the Chinese being almost unlimited. Its waste and misuse are, however, being remedied rapidly.

In addition to the Government supply there are numerous wells situated generally in houses, latrines, back-kitchens and other out-of-the-way places. These wells all come within the category of "Shallow Wells" and must as long as they exist prove a serious danger to the Public Health. These wells are numer- ous in the affected areas and some of then simply reek with organic matter; others have a considerable amount of ammonia and nitrites; whilst a very few only are at all fit for drinking purposes. To what extent the spread of the epidemic was due to these wells has not yet been determine; it is easy to see the possibility of their pollution by plague patients, but the question has not yet been studied carefully. Many are now shut up.

LATRINES.

To my mind one of the most important factors in the spread of the disease was the bad condition of the latrines. In Hongkong latrines are in some cases public, and in some cases private property; in both cases they are under the control of the Sanitary Board, and are used by the bulk of the Chinese population, few Chinese dwellings being provided with accommodation of this kind. The following extract from a letter I sent to the Colonial Surgeon bearing date 15th August, 1894, explains itself:-

"In my opinion the condition of the latrines in the Colony has been partly "responsible for the spread of the plague epidemic. My reasons for thinking so

are as follows:-

(C

"(1) The plague bacillus is abundantly found in the fæces.

"(2) There is practically no disinfection of fæces in the latrines. The gutters are washed down occasionally with a mixture of

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Jeyes' Fluid and water, but only some material described as opium packing is added to the fæces to raise its value as a inanure. This latter is practically of no use as a disinfectant. (3) Several times during the epidemic these latrines were not cleaned "out as regularly as they ought to have been. (This is not to "be wondered at considering the scarcity of labour.)

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(4) Plague-stricken coolies must often have visited the latrines, and "cach soil pan must necessarily have become a great danger to every healthy person who went into the latrine. A glance at one of these latrines will at once bring this prominently "before you. Their peculiar construction makes it absolutely "certain that any individual using them must inhale air laden "with impurities, and each soil pan must have been a prolific "breeding ground for the poison. There is here a favourable opportunity for being attacked, as all the three most usual "methods of infection-inoculation, respiration and entrance by "alimentary canal-may occur.

1:

5) Not only this but from the statistics and facts at present at my "disposal. I consider that these latrines were a source of infec- "tion to houses round about them; so that it was not neces- sary for the people to go into the latrines to get the disease, "it was probably borne by the air to neighbouring houses.

"There is a licensed private latrine at 113, Second Street. At a casual glance the shut up houses all around bear eloquent testimony upon this point. "Round this latrine there is scarcely a house occupied.

"In Centre Street at the corner of Third Street there is a latrine. On pass- "ing into Third Street to the South numerous houses are shut up and several "cases have occurred in neighbouring houses.

"At 82, First Street, there is a latrine with an entrance at 91, Second Street. "A very large number of cases occurred round about this place.

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"Around several other latrines, more especially at 29, First Street, numerous cases occurred; but in some of these instances it is difficult to prove that the "severity of the epidemic was so locally affected on account of the large number of

cases which occurred in almost every house.

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Sheung Fung Lane, off Second Street and opposite to No. 91 of that street, "is practically shut up. The mortality here was very great. The inhabitants "were principally night-soil coolics and almost all died. The occupants of houses

in Third Street adjoining this were also numerously attacked.

((

(6

(C

"I might mention that there is a latrine, no doubt well known to the sani- tary authorities, in Centre Street Market, and three yards distant from it a large quantity of meat is often hanging for hours at a time.

"The two questions :-(i) Was there infection of coolies in the latrines? and "(ii) Was there infection of the neighbourhood round about? must go hand in "hand seeing that so many of the inhabitants use the latrine. It must be remem- bered, however, that women and children do not patronise these institutions so "much as male adults, and as large numbers of the former have died, I think it "must be conceded, notwithstanding the fact that personal contact (as explained later on in this Report) may cause infection, that both these questions should be "answered in the affirmative. If not, why should not all parts of these streets "be equally affected?

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"I would ask you to inspect these latrines personally to see that my statements as to want of use of disinfectants to the fæces are correct. When visiting these places I have not seen a grain of quicklime, or a drop of carbolic acid, or any "other disinfectant used to treat the excreta, and from what I learned by examiua- "tion of attendants it is only by the merest chance that Jeyes' Fluid ever finds its

way into the soil-pan.

(6

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"Full statistics, such as I understand Mr. MAY has procured, would help very "much to arrive at an accurate result. I would suggest that some one with a little spare time should plot out' the figures of the severe plague localities upon a C map of the City, and then have the position of the latrines inserted. This will go to prove what I have indicated above. Of course, where so many cases have "occurred in the infected areas, it would be unwise to lay this down as absolute, "it is only suggested to me from what I have particularly noticed to the west of "the Civil Hospital. There may be a few exceptions with regard to the spread of "disease by latrines, and some houses seemed to have escaped in a remarkable "manner, possibly owing to some trade peculiarity, etc.; but with full statistics. "it may be found that even those which apparently have had no case have really "been infected, or, more probably still, their inhabitants had fled before being "attacked by the epidemic.

"If it is His Excellency's desire to have further details I shall furnish them "if I can.

"In conclusion, please bear in mind that I do not say this is the sole cause of "the spread of plague, it is one cause, and one that ought to be remedied at once "in case we have another outbreak in the near future.

Further investigation in the infected area to the west of the Government Civil Hospital has fully borne this out.

EFFECT OF CLIMATIC INFLUENCE.

The disease commenced here at the end of the dry season; it had raged furiously in Canton during the dry season; and increased here after the rain set in.

It was raging at Canton when the temperature was about 60° F. and in Hongkong when it was between 80° and 90° F. These facts show that at any rate between a tem- perature of 60° and 90° F. the epidemic will flourish and that the humidity or dryness of the atmosphere has not much influence on its forward march. Experi- mentally the bacillus grows best in a slightly moist medium at the temperature of the human body, and from this experience a humid condition of the soil and atmos- phere would favour the propagation of the disease. It must be kept in mind that the great breeding ground for the germs is in the human body, a fact which is often forgotten by people who wonder how the disease is propagated and speculate as to the effect that different temperatures and humidity have upon it. As a matter of fact it follows that conditions of temperature and humidity approximating to those of the human body are favourable to the multiplication of the bacillus.

It has been suggested that the increase of the disease after the rainy season. set in was due to the rise of subsoil water in the more or less porous ground causing the expulsion of ground air (more or less polluted from contact with soil infected by leaking drains) through the unpaved floors of dwellings, but I lay

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most stress on the fact that the heavy rains drove coolies and others into the infected houses to sleep instead of sleeping in the street as they generally do in the summer when the weather is at all good.

MODE OF INFECTION.

The poison is given off in the fæces, in the blood and in the contents of buboes. Skin to skin infection is impossible unless the one to be infected has some wound and the infector's skin has been soiled by fæces, blood or the contents of buboes. The poison is not given off in ordinary respiration. Cultivation experiments with, and microscopic examination of, sputum and saliva have given negative results in the only case in which I have been able to work on this point. The question of whether the bacillus is present in the vomit has not yet been solved. Dr. KITASATO does not at present think so, but seeing that animals feeding on bits of plague buboes contract the disease, I think it better to give a guarded opinion upon this point. That the bacillus may live under certain conditions in the stomach is evident; what these conditions are I cannot state, but in an unhealthy stomach with great decrease of gastric juice it is quite possible for the bacilli to live and even multiply.

Infection takes place by inoculation, inspiration, and introduction into the stomach. The latter is infrequent. In this epidemic the relative frequency of the two first mentioned channels could not be made out, and indeed it would be diffi- cult at any time to determine, as in cases of inspiratory infection the primary bubo noticeable may

be situated in any part of the body, whilst a scratch on the hand or foot which may be thought the primary wound is often an after result of an injury unimportant at incipience. Most of the coolies affected wore neither shoes nor stockings; almost all males go barefooted which would partly account for the large number of the coolie class being affected. The better class of Chinese, though living under almost identical sanitary conditions, generally wear shoes and stockings. Infection from bodies found in street or houses or awaiting burial may take place if clothes, etc. have been soiled by discharges.

Infection by flies and mosquitoes is improbable as no attendant in Hospital, although frequently bitten by these insects was affected. No bacteriological ex- amination of mosquitoes or flies was made.

INCUBATION.

The incubation period may extend to nine days; it is, however, generally from three to six days. How short it may be I do not know, but I should say that a few hours' incubation period is very improbable. Case I. had an incubation period of between one hundred and two and one hundred and thirty-eight hours. The first batch of soldiers who were affected were seized with fever three-and-a-half. four, and six-and-a-half days respectively (after cleaning out some badly infected houses), while another soldier had an incubation period of four days. Of course these dates may be wrong as far as incubation is concerned, as they might have been infected at any time during these days but at any rate the evidence is sigui- ficant. The limit period was in the following case. A Chinaman, MAN CHOY, was arrested on June 11th and put in the Police Cells during the day. He was sent- enced to imprisonment in Gaol on 12th June, and on 20th June in the evening, after having complained of not being well and being under observation for two days, became feverish, and was removed to Hospital. The following day (21st) a left femoro-inguinal bubo appeared. This case gives an incubation period of nine days and is very important. There were many cases where an incubation of be- tween three and six days could be proved, at least so far as one can speak of proof when eliciting evidence from Chinese. The Eurasian Italian Convent Sister who died from plague had an incubation period of five days.

The matter may be summed up as follows, the incubation period is generally from three to six days, is seldom under three or over six, but may reach nine.

CLINICAL.

Before describing in detail the clinical aspects of the bubonic plague it may not be out of place to give a brief description of the condition in which we found the sufferers during the early weeks of the epidéinic. In those days, very naturally, cases were discovered in a more advanced stage of the malady than later, when house-to-house visitation was well established, and hidden sufferers were less frequently found. To overpaint the pitiable surroundings associated with plague work at the commencement of the epidemic would be impossible. I have entered

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a long low cellar, without any window opening, and with the air entering only by a square open shaft from the level of the roof three or four stories high. side of the shaft ran a broken earthenware drain pipe, leaking freely, the contents streaming down the wall of the air shaft to a shallow pool of filth which crossed the undrained floor of earth. Although it was broad daylight outside a lantern was necessary to see one's way. On a miserable sodden matting soaked with abominations there were four forms stretched out. One was dead, the tongue black and protruding. The next had the muscular twitchings and semi-comatose con- dition heralding dissolution. In searching for a bubo we found a huge mass of glands extending from Poupart's ligament to the knee joint. This patient was be- yond the stage of wild delirium. Sordes cover the teeth and were visible between the parted and blackened lips. Another sufferer, a female child about 10 years old, lay in the accumulated filth of apparently two or three days, unable to speak owing to the presence of enlarged cervical glands. The fourth was wildly delirious (the conjunctivæ intensely congested) and was constantly vomiting. The attendant (sic)-the grandmother of the child-had a temperature of 103° F. and could only crawl from one end of the cellar to the other. She was wet through, and was herself doomed. This is no fancy sketch but a true picture of how we found some of our patients at the outbreak of the scourge in Hongkong. No one, unfamiliar with the horrors of some coolie accommodation in China, could credit "how the poor live" in Hongkong, or could imagine how the horrors of their everyday life were intensified by the plague.

The terrors of the disease itself were rendered greater by the fear the poor wretches often had of falling into the hands of the "foreign doctors." It is no great credit to our boasted civilisation or to our vaunted mission work that the average intelligent Chinaman of to-day prefers the fetish tricks of the native practitioner to the more enlightened methods of graduates of the western schools; but the fact remains that the horror of western medicine is by no means confined to, though almost universal among, the members of the coolie class. So evident was this fact that it was deemed prudent to allow such sufferers as preferred their own native doctors to be attended by them, in hospitals under European super-

vision.

Face to face with a hundred difficulties, accentuated by the natural suspicion and ignorance of the Chinese, whom as far as possible we wished to appease, natur- ally short handed as far as medical men were concerned (for the visitation gave us little warning and spread with alarming rapidity), the difficulties the executive had to combat were grave in the extreinc.

Wisdom after the event is a proverbially cheap attribute, and doubtless there are many people who possess it. We hear, now that the immediate strain and danger have passed, how very much more satisfactorily things might have been done, principally from people who did little or nothing to help us in the hour of our extremity. We hear of wiseacres who knew that the plague was here many weeks before it arrived, but who kept such valuable information strictly to themselves, in the interests, doubtless, of the community. Rash and inaccurate "first thoughts" have found their way into the British journals, and crude guesses have appeared in print under the false guise of "methodised experience." It will be prudent for plague students to accept very guardedly such early lucubrations. No man who really saw the plague in its early days had time for recording in a trustworthy way its often varying phases, and at that time sound clinical record was almost impossible. Later on in the light of a quieter time, and a more leisurely observa- tion there was time to expunge as error that which at first was not unreasonably recorded as fact. We constantly laboured under the difficulty of not being able to speak the language of our patients, and such a condition of affairs was not only more or less alarming to them, but greatly against our treatment throughout. Of course, we had attendants who were able to interpret, but an interpreter is an unsatisfactory necessity by the sick bedside, and often helps to confuse a sufferer, whose intelligence ab initio is none too clear, and whose approaching delirium dissipates coherency.

The sick person may be said roughly speaking to present upon first being seen many varying aspects. Sometimes the patient is brought in, in a condition to demand very careful diagnosis before committing him to a plague ward. There may be only general malaise with a temperature of say 102° F., a tongue somewhat coated, an anxious, sometimes terrified, expression, a quick small pulse (more or less the result of shock and fear), and a general feeling of aching over the body. Such symptoms of course may be the result of a dozen different pathological con- ditions and caution is ne ded. Another case may have the injected conjunctivae and high fever which forerun the stage of delirium and here the bubo is as a rule

9

easily found. Most cases aided diagnosis, in the first month of the visitation, by having well marked buboes upon admission to hospital. Sometimes the conjunctivæ show marked bile staining. It will not do to accept a bubo as indisputable evidence of plague-bear in mind that lymphadenitis is not eliminated from human ills at a time when the bubonic plague is in evidence and that in lymphadenitis (associated say with a wound of the foot) you may get your fever, pulse, general malaise and bubo in the most common site of bubonic plague selection. One or two such cases were sent to us during the recent epidemic. Sometimes an individual may not know he is suffering at all. In one case I took the temperature of an Indian who looked ill but who had come to see about the burial of a compatriot, and who com- plained of no unpleasant symptom, but was rather amused at my using the thermo- ineter in his case. He had a temperature of 103° F. and a small cervical bubo. In the wards he had a very grave attack and only just missed joining his friend whom he had come to bury.

The facies of a plague patient has been variously described by classical writers. Shortly it may be put down as a mixture of anxiety, cyanosis anl dyspnoe until the first mentioned is overcome by the nervous symptoms; whilst the character of the gait depends solely on the state of the cerebral system.

Generally speaking there is something indescribable in the face of the plague stricken which seems to help your diagnosis, an expression as if the sufferer himself knew all about it, and his inner consciousness had left its mark on his features.

Temperature attracts notice early. It rises, as a rule, gradually and not suddenly as it does in malaria. In most of the European cases and in the Japanese doctors, who were watched from the beginning, it took from twelve to thirty-six hours to reach the primary maximum. This primary maximum in the early part of the epidemic was generally from 104° to 106° F., a temperature of 106° F. being frequent. As time went on this seemed to fall to 105° and later still a temperature of 104° was seldom reached in the first stage. At the beginning of May the period of pyrexia due to the disease itself was somewhat longer than it was about the end of June, whilst in August it was shorter than it was in the middle of the epidemic. Secondary complications often keep up the temperature for a fortnight or even longer after the acute stage of the disease has passel. I am now speaking of cases that recovered. In most severe cases the tendency is for the temperature to keep about the same level for some time. In milder cases a gradual (sometimes only slight) fall takes place; most recovering cases show a well marked morning fall and evening rise. The temperature may fall by lysis or crisis-the latter being very rare. Antipyretics generally affect the temperature very slightly, and in looking at some of the charts, although falls of 2° or 3° are sometimes noticed, still the majority of cases show very little fall. In some cases where a large fall (say of four degrees) was brought about the fall was coincident with approaching death. During the first month the highest temperature on admission was 106.° 6 F. The highest temperature noted in this period was in a child at. 5 years on the third day when it reached 107.° 4 F. During the second month our highest temperature on admission was 106 and highest reached 106.94. F., but only five or six others were noted above 105°. The highest temperature recorded in the epidemic was 108.o8 in a child.

Well marked rigor at the commencement of the disease was conspicuous by its absence, in many cases the first thing that attracted notice being the headache due to fever. Many cases complained of a slight shiver or chillness. In connection with the absence of marked rigor it is interesting to note that in Hongkong malarial attacks have frequently no cold stage at all. Previous records of the disease make the rigor generally well markel.

The swollen glands that were apparent most generally affected the femoral chain in Chinese as well as in Europeans. In Chinese, infection by inoculation was frequent owing to coolies going barefooted. All the Shropshire Regiment men infected had femoral or inguinal buboes, and they were well booted; so that there must be some reason for the femoral glands being especially liable to enlargement. However, seeing that the disease often causes a general enlargement of glands, I think that the mere point as to which set of glands is usually enlarged has been made too much of; more especially considering that sometimes the biggest gland is situated in the abdomen out of sight until the post mortem examination is made. The pain in the bubo was very great at first; later on it became less; and finally towards the end when no apparent swelling was noticed it was only occasionally, on considerable pressure over some of the most generally affected regions, that what might be termed a "differential pain" was discovered. Sometimes pain was notice- able a considerable time before the enlarged gland was noticed. At the commence- ment of the epidemic the noticeable buboes were very large and as the epidemic

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went on their size gradually diminished. Although pain and size generally went together, frequently a small gland was to be met with which would be as painful as a very large one. At the commencement of the epidemic the bubo was always sur- rounded by a considerable amount of sero-sanguineous exudation, and as time went on it was found that this diminished also, the end of the epidemic showing very few cases which had any exudation at all.

exudation at all. Sometimes there was a very large amount of oedema around the bubo quite distinct from the sero-sanguineous exudation around, and a "doughy" feeling could be detected in the bubo during the course of the first twenty-four hours, probably due to the rapid pouring out of exudation. Femoral buboes as a rule were most painful, parotid swellings standing at the same level. Those situated in the axillary and cervical regions did not cause so much discomfort, unless in the latter region the swelling reached close to the trachea or the mastoid cells. The abdominal pain was I consider in some cases due to inflammation of some of the mesenteric glands. In the case of the Italian Convent sister who died this was undoubtedly the case, as the slightest pressure over a spot on the left side of the umbilicus caused great pain, and immediately under this spot the only well marked enlarged gland in the abdomen was found at the post mortem examination. This is interesting when one considers the question of sensibility of the peritoneum. The bubo when present generally appeared within 24 hours of the onset of the fever. In two or three cases we got a history of the bubo appearing before the fever, but as a thermometer had not been used I place some doubt on the accuracy of the statements made. In numbers of cases the swelling did not appear till later, in one case not till about the ninth day of the disease when the temperature suddenly dropped, and the case became rapidly convalescent. In another case it appeared on the sixth day and the disease still continued to run an acute course. In a few cases where a small bubo was present for four or five days a sudden enlargement was noticed and the patients rapidly sank. This was especially marked in three cases with cervical buboes. I ascribed this mostly to the sudden extension of the swelling to the larynx. From the rapid way in which the pulse and respiration became worse in these cases, however, it is quite possible that interference with the pneumo-gastric and phrenic nerves may have been the immediate causes of bringing about a suddenly fatal issue. I formed the opinion that a sudden enlargement of a bubo, after having been practically stationary for some time, is of grave portent.

Sometimes a whole chain of glands was enlarged; when this was so, if the patient survived, widespread sloughing was to be anticipated later. On two or three occasions on the post mortem table a large hæmorrhagic mass of glands was found running from the apex of Scarpa's triangle to the bifurcation of the abdominal aorta. The question as to whether the bubo was a true suppurating one was raised, one medical man being of opinion that an opening, (although made on account of supposed suppuration), was made too soon, and that suppuration was the result of incision. This had to be disproved more or less to his satisfaction. The Chinese

Hospital (Slaughter House) contained patients on whom a knife was never used, -one morning we counted 43 patients there. Of these, 34 had buboes that had suppurated and burst of their own accord, some of them having caused serious sloughing. An immediate small rise in temperature often followed the incision of a gland, even when pus was evacuated.

Cerebral symptoms appeared early in the disease. They were due to two causes principally (a) meningitis, (b) haemorrhages. Headache began with the fever. It was generally fronto-temporal and most severe in the early cases.

I may say here that all symptoms of the disease seemed to be more acute at the beginning of the epidemic than they were later. The headache was generally a combination of an acute dull pain accompanied by throbbing in the temples. Sometimes (rarely) a patient complained of occipital headache and, on one or two occasions, of pain in the back of the neck-evidently of spinal origin. The headache gradually merged into delirium as the meningitis developed. Convergent strabismus or divergent strabismus was occasionally present-generally the former. "Both eyes turned to right or left" was also noticed in some cases. Occasionally where hemorrhage was diagnosed the pupils were unequal but in one conspicuous case where a hemorrhage on one side of the brain was supposed to exist (diagnosis concurred in by Professor AOYAMA), no hemorrhage was found and I think that in many cases the mere meningeal inflammation caused symptoms which would lead one to suppose that a one-sided lesion was present. Cases generally developed brain symptoms which could be differentiated into four distinct types :-

(a) Comatose, where the patient lay practically paralysed, mind and body. (b) Wildly delirious, where he struggled and fought and still retained a

fair command of rational speech.

11

(c) Apathetic. where he lay perfectly quiet, and took nourishment when it was offered to him; in fact lay in a drowsy, but always more or less conscious, condition until improvement or death took place. (d) A convulsive type brought on either by the inflammation of the meninges and brain matter or by a hemorrhage. These convul- sions were often severe. (In Case I. they were only stopped by chloroform. P.M. no hemorrhage was found.)

*

In Case XV. they always began in the left arm (hand) and were truly Jack- sonian in nature pointing to some cortical lesion round the right fissure of Rolando. (See remarks on case.) Occasionally they resembled tetanus, the opisthotonos being very great. Subsultus tendinum did not occur early as a rule, but generally late in the disease. Picking at the bed clothes, trying to catch imaginary objects, in fact all the symptoms of meningitis were almost always present; in a few cases however they were absent, and such cases were usually of a very mild nature. Patients often had hallucinations beginning generally on the second day of the illness. All these cerebral symptoms followed the primary lymphatic affection and their rapid appearance was not to be wondered at when one considers the close connection between the arachnoid and the lymphatic system.

The vascular is the other system which was especially affected. The principal items to note were-

(1) The vasomotor paralysis which rapidly appeared involving the heart

itself as well as the vessels.

(2) The liability to sudden heart failure.

3) The symptoms probably due to organic changes in the heart in those

who recovered.

There are four stages of the pulse in plague. During the first stage it is in the majority of cases full and bounding. In some it is feeble and collapsed. When in the latter state cyanosis is usually well marked and the patient is evidently moribund. The pulse which at first is full and bounding becomes (usually in from six to thirty-six hours) dicrotic and fairly easily compressible at the wrist. The accompanying tracing shows such a pulse where the dicrotism, although not extreme, is well marked.

Intermittency is often noticeable in this second stage of the pulse and becomes more marked as the third stage develops, when it becomes anacrotic and almost like the pulse of aortic insufficiency, there being no rebound wave at all, nor the slightest trace of it by sphygmograph in a well marked case. In addition it is at this period very easily compressible, and the actual range of movement of the vessel is very limited at the wrist, whereas in the larger vessels the upheaval is usually well marked, slight pressure at the femoral being sufficient to arrest the pulse. The following tracing of the radial pulse is taken from a patient at this stage, there being no pressure on the sphygmograph button, except its own weight.

&

This patient was a very lean man, and consequently a tracing of his femoral pulse could be easily obtained as the vessel passed over the brim of the pelvis. With slightly over an ounce of pressure, (enough to visibly diminish the range of movement), the accompanying tracing was got.

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From this anacrotic stage gradual or sudden failure may set in, unless there is a general improvement in the case. The pulse generally becomes fast and run- ning and scarcely perceptible or if perceptible it is generally intermittent. On the second day if a thin patient was naked one could usually see the femoral arteries beating at a distance of several yards, and this was equally true of the other large arteries. Often this large movement was to be seen in the vessels in the neck, axilla, or groiu, and yet at the radial or posterior tibial arteries the pulse was hardly perceptible.

.

These four stages of the pulse (1) full and bounding (2) dicrotic (3) anacrotic (4) failure, may be looked upon as the usual sequence; though one or more of them may under some circumstances escape observation. They may all be of the shortest duration, and of course sudden heart failure may at any time prevent the later stages developing.

The area of cardiac dulness was generally enlarged early in the disease (apex downwards and to the left of usual position) and sometimes remained so for weeks in those who recovered, there being also an increase of dulness on the right side. There was practically no muffling of the sounds. These conditions pointed to dila- tation, yet murmurs were of rare occurrence. One would have expected to hear them more frequently even in those who were long sick and recovered. The first sound was invariably weak in the later stages. Pain in the cardiac region was gene- rally complained of. These symptoms pointed to a true myocarditis. Palpitation was frequently present and complained of. A pericardial rub I never heard, although in a few cases post mortem a small accumulation of fluid was found in the pericar- dium. I think that the tendency to hemorrhage must have been caused by some inflammatory or fatty degenerative change in the small vessels, and this may be one of the reasons why digitalis was so frequently a failure. It is to be expected that the microscopic pathology of the disease will be written by AOYAMA at some future time.

When blood was drawn from the finger tip it was found to flow more easily and to look more fluid than normal. When put under the microscope it was found that the corpuscles crenated rapidly, and did not run into rouleaux readily. The number of leucocytes increased always when the disease was at its height, and in the later stages there were occasionally to be found broken down or badly formed corpuscles. The number of red corpuscles was not materially diminished until the 7th-10th day when convalescence was setting in. The amount of homo- globin in the blood commenced to diminish from the second day of the disease, and, in some cases, became very low. In Case I. it was as low as 18 % of the normal quantity, but in this case the patient was always somewhat anæmie. A diminution to 30 % was frequent. The bacteriological examination of the blood

will be discussed later.

Digestive System.The important symptoms in connection with this system are (i) condition of mouth and fauces; (ii) vomiting; (ii) diarrhoea or cons- tipation. The mouths of Chinese patients were invariably dry from the commence- ment, and the teeth and lips were early covered with sordes. The tongue was at the beginning of the attack almost covered with a thin white fur which became thicker, and then went through a transformation from white to black. In the early stages it was very like a typhoid fever tongue-white fur with red edges and tip, but in plague there was little or no tailing off of the fur as it approaches the edges, and the edges were not of such a bright colour as is generally the case in enteric fever. As the disease advances the fur changes from white to yellow and brown, dark-brown and black. The latter colour is confined to the middle part of the organ, toning down towards the edges which still retain their original colour, in fact like a heavy tobacco chewer's tongue dried up.

The edges get somewhat redder as the disease goes on. The tongue is protruded with difficulty, the cause of this evidently being the cerebral condition, or possibly pain in the cervical glands. In Europeans, tongue conditions were never marked, owing to nourishment being taken often, and to the frequent use of the toothbrush. the opinion of some people the dry condition of the mouth was the cause of the tongue not being casily protruded, but I consider this is a very minor cause. The fauces and pharynx were generally somewhat injected, and the tonsils somewhat swollen. When the principal bubo was situated in the cervical region, (especially if affecting the anterior cervical glands,) the tonsils and pharynx were usually intensely congested from the spread of the glandular inflammation.

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Vomiting usually came on early and was of a bilious nature, being at first greenish, but going on to a dark-brown colour, almost grumous. Hæmatemesis was exceedingly rare during the epidemic. The question arises whether the dark grumous material vomited was not blood altered by stomachic causes.

I do not think that this is so because in these cases, (if efficient treatment was not adopted), the vomiting was sometimes constant, and pure or almost pure blood would neces- sarily have been vomited much more frequently. The vomit was generally of the same colour as the bile found in the gall-bladder post mortem.

The vomiting genз- rally disappeared after counter irritation and a dose of calomel had been administered, and a free evacuation of the bowels secured. Where calomel was given early this troublesome symptom very seldom appeared. Under the care of native doctors vomiting was much more frequent than in our hospitals, and this I ascribe to want of purging, and also to the horrible concoctions of medicines and food which they forced down their patients' throats. Considering the cerebral condition of some patients it was to be expected that vomiting and retching would be frequently met with; but after the above explanation and taking into consideration the fact that the vomiting did not show the ordinary cerebral characteristics, I think that this symptom must be put down as mainly due to the condition of the liver and bowe's. The feeling of oppression, and sometimes burning, in the epigastrium was due partly to the stomach trouble, but mainly, I believe, to cardiac conditions. Hiccough was often distressing, but the first dose of morphia generally stopped it.

Constipation was the general rule, though diarrhoea was met with in a number of cases and might be classed as (a) slight looseness of the bowels; (b) severe diarrhoea. Many cases of slight diarrhoea did very well, in fact I put it down as a favourable symptom, but then it only appeared in what seemed to be milder cases. Severe diarrhea need not necessarily be a bad symptom. As a rule when severe it was very fœtid and evidently due to an acute enteritis. There was sometimes considerable straining with it resembling dysentery, but in only one case in the epidemic in our hospitals did I see blood in the evacuations, and then it was dark in colour, no bright blood as is often found in dysentery, and had evidently come from some distance up the bowel. Pain over the liver was never complained of, pain over the spleen on a few occasions only; pain in the abdomen was due possi- bly to one or more swollen glands, or may be ascribed to colic, or frequently to distension of the bladder. Enlargement of liver and spleen was only occasionally made out by palpation and percussion.

Respiratory System.-Dyspnoea was a constant symptom and was due to a combination of causes :-(a) oedema of the lungs brought on by the vasomotor paralysis and possible changes in the small vessels; (b) the febrile state, and loss of hæmoglobin; (c) cardiac. It was of an anxious and distressing character, coming on early in the disease with rapidity of respiration; the alæ nasi, however, were soon at work and the respiration became more rapid still. The dyspnoea was more of a pneumonic than of an asphyxiative type. Physical signs of hypostatic inischief were seldom well marked before the third day of illness, and even then was only so in the severe cases. Some cases got well in whose lungs no moist sound was ever heard, but I am bound to add that many a one died with precisely the same condition of affairs, post mortem examination always showing some con- gestion at the bases of the lungs. Cough was generally absent in the early stages of the disease; or if present was evidently caused by the oedema of the lungs, and was then of a short and irritating character. Many cases showed oedema of the lungs without cough. These were generally rapidly fatal, the patient becoming comatose as the lungs became choked up. In a few cases the oedema went on to acute pneumonia and pleurisy, but this as a rule was only seen late in the disease. Pleural effusion was seldom marked enough to diagnose before death. In some cases multiple pneumonic abscesses-undiagnosed-occurred..

Among Chinese the voice in almost every case-even where the patient was sensible-was very weak; it was not so as a rule with the Europeans whose lung power and larynges were always in a much better state than those of the natives. Laryngitis when occurring was generally the result of extension of cervical glandular inflammation, and at the end of the epidemic, when these glandular inflammations were of an extremely mild character, laryngeal mischief was not met with at all.

Affections of the urinary system were practically limited to a slight and transient albuminuria. This was always slight, a trace to 1/20th being the common report on the charts. A larger amount I never saw. Hæmaturia was not noticed amongst Retention of urine was frequent and, notwithstanding every attention to cleanliness, cystitis developed on several occasions where frequent catheterisation was necessary. Unconscious urination at the beginning of the epidemic was also

our cases.

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frequent, generally coincident with incontinence of fæces if the bowels were at all loose. Urine was generally dark coloured and of high specific gravity, with increased secretion of urea. I noticed no casts in the urine. Sometimes the apparent in- continence in the Chinese Hospitals was due to distention of the bladder.

SKIN.

With two exceptions (urticaria and a herpetic eruption) which were ouly coincidental no rash was noticed, (but vide Case XXII.). The skin was dry and, pungently hot, except in collapsed cases when it was cold and clammy. After the acute stage of the disease perspiration in most cases was marked. The question of the occurrences of hemorrhages should be considered in conjunction with the post mortem appearances of organs where hemorrhages have occurred. At the begin- ning of the epidemic almost all the Chinese showed small red spots about the size of a pea. When I was in Canton and enquiring about these spots a Chinese coolie volunteered the information that they were the result of insect bites, generally mosquitoes and flies. I think I am giving a guarded opinion when I say that 95% of these spots seen during the epidemic were caused by mosquitoes or flies. The condition of the blood was such that the slightest scratch or injury was generally followed by a dull pink blush appearing round it. On incision it was found to be composed of a small extravasation of thin light coloured fluid blood. All the hospitals except the Hygeia were swarming with insect life which we could not get rid of, although thousands were slaughtered daily by fly-papers and other con- trivances. In almost every case the spots appeared on the exposed parts, ankles and feet, wrists and hands and face. On the lygeia patients received at the com- mencement of their illness scarcely ever had a single spot and there were no mos- quitoes on board and few flies. A puncture with a pin or a trivial blow or ex- coriation was often followed by the characteristic discoloration a few days later. The Chinese method of pinching (as a counter irritant) caused wonderful appear- ances on the chest and neck, the whole of this region of the body being sometimes of a colour varying from dull pink to dark violet. Mosquitoes, flies, etc., are very numerous all over Hongkong and the dead bodies which were picked up in the street showed the same spots. I never saw one of these spots above the size of a five-cent piece (the same size as a blister caused by a mosquito bite). In Kennedy- town Hospital, where patients had their pyjamas properly fastened, these spots were almost invariably confined to the exposed parts of the body. I never saw a hemorrhage in the skin anything like those seen in purpura, which are darker in colour, at least in the centre. All these plague marks were small and dull pink in colour. One day they appeared as typical mosquito bites, the following day they looked like hæmorrhagic spots.

The word "Carbuncle" should be expunged from plague literature as I take it that "Carbuncle" when used in this connexion is meant for a hæmorrhagic blister, or a bubo in the neck, several of which looked like carbuncles but were really glandular in character. These were seen in only a few cases (four I think of the early cases). A true carbuncle was never seen. Boils were several times met with during convalescence as a result of the debility caused by the disease, and differed from the ordinary tropical boils common in Hongkong in that the pus was thinner and that there was no true core or slough, whilst an inflammatory areola of redness was seldom present,-in fact they ought to be called multiple abscesses rather than boils. In one case true boils occurred early. In one bad case of multiple abscesses, necrosis of several parts of the skull took place.

Hemoptysis was very rare, only two cases (on the Hygeia and at Kennedy- town hospital) being serious. Hæmatemesis and Melona were equally rare.

Bleeding from nasal or buccal mucous membrane was noticed several times early in the epidemic. Hæmaturia was never noticed. Haemorrhage into the conjunc- tive was noticed in a few cases. Two cases of hypopyon came under observation. In speaking of hemorrhages into the conjunctivæ as being occasionally seen it must be noted that congestion of the conjunctivæ was very general at the onset of the acute cerebral symptoms.

Every pregnant woman brought to hospital aborted. All died with one exception. Contrary to what one might have expected none died from uterine hæmorrhage, but evidently from the virulence of the disease. In the cases I saw the uterus had contracted well. Haemorrhage from the genital canal was noticed in a few instances, notably in the case where hemorrhagic endometritis was found post mortem.

The following list gives the numbers of those who had apparent haemorrhages in the Government Hospitals. It is possible that one or two more should be on

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the list, as our Wardmasters could not be expected to note it in cases where the patient came in through the night and died before the doctor's first visit in the morning. Out of about 450 cases there was Hæmatemesis in 7; Melæna 4; Hæmoptysis 4; Epistaxis 2; Haemorrhage from Gums 1; Haemorrhage from Vagina 2; Hæmorrhagic Blebs 3; Hemorrhage into conjunctivæ 2. Of these 23 cases 18 occurred in May, so that it is evident that haemorrhages were most liable to occur when the disease was most virulent in its epidemic form.

The course of the bubocs after formation was one of four: (1) early resolution, (2) lengthened period of enlargement, (3) suppuration, (4) sloughing.

Early resolution may take place though it was only seen in some mild cases where the glandular enlargement was slight. Lengthened periods of enlargement occurred in several patients in the Slaughter House Hospital (under native doctors) where the swelling did not.go down even after two months in hospital. An indu- rated mass sometimes remained on which iodine, mercury and other usual remedies had very slight effect. One of our patients (who was afterwards retained as an attendant) had a glandular mass remaining at the end of four months with practic- ally no change in size or consistence. If the patient survived, suppuration was the most frequent termination during the first two months of the epidemic, either alone or combined with sloughing. If the glandular mass was very large there was generally a slough, caused by the surrounding inflammation and suppuration, which was vividly described by a Chinese nurse as a "mixture of boiled cheese and thread." If the bubo was small it generally terminated in simple suppuration without the separation of any decided slough. Sometimes great necrosis of skin and superficial tissues occurred over the buboes, and the proximity of femoral buboes to the femoral vessels had a tendency to make one over-cautious with the knife. In the case of ALLEN the bubo took six months to heal up, the glands along the iliac vessels having evidently been enlarged, and giving the greatest trouble after suppuration.

Lymphatic abscesses may develop along the line of the lymphatic vessels. This was especially marked in the case of AOYAMA.

For a long time after the acute phase of the disease was over the tissues remain in a very low condition, incisions taking a long time to heal, there being often no appearance of the epidermis growing over an ulcer for weeks. The granulations remained flabby and unhealthy, and there was a well marked line between the granu- lations and the skin, with no attempt at growth of epidermis over the ulceration.

The presence of bacilli in the blood being a most important symptom I make no excuse for describing it fully, so far as it is necessary for diagnostic purposes. Examination is very easy when one has observed an expert at work, but it is only by attending to every little detail that easy and satisfactory examination can be carried out. Take care to have good clean cover-glasses and slides (we were bothered here very much by having on hand cover-glasses which had become hazy from climatic influences). Cleanse the finger tip with alcohol; allow the alcohol to evaporate; constrict the finger with a small strip of lint; puncture the finger with a pen-nib from which half of the nib has been broken off and which has been sterilised in the flame of a spirit lamp. With a sterilised platinum point smear a very little blood in a fine layer on the clean cover-glass. Four or six cover-glasses are generally prepared as the bacillus may not be discovered in a solitary preparation. The moment the cover-glass is dry pass it three times through the flame of a spirit lamp with the blood-side away from the wick. See that the flame is a spirit flame and not merely a burning dry wick. Do not wait hours before passing the cover slip through the flame as then the specimen will generally be found useless. After passing through the flame the staining and examination can take place practically at leisure.

Dr. KITASATO found fuchsin the best stain for the bacillus while Dr. YERSIN used gentian violet. It is all a matter of taste I believe and what one is most accustomed to. Personally I find examination may be prolonged with more com- fort to the eye if gentian violet be used or even methyl blue. Fuchsin is the best stain if only a few preparations want examination. The staining fluids ought not to be too concentrated. Place a few drops of the stain on to the cover-glass pre- paration. This is better than floating it in a watch glass, being easier and wast- ing less stain (a matter of consideration in Hongkong). If of methyl blue, at once turn on to a slide, compress the preparation between a couple of layers of blotting paper without "fluff" on it, and the specimen is ready for examination. If fuchsin or gentian violet be used a period of from three to five minutes should be allowed for staining (according to the depth of the colour of the solution) and then the cover-glass should be washed with distilled water and placed on the slide and dried in the same way as above with blotting paper. If the specimen is to be kept the

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water should be slowly evaporated above the flame of the spirit lamp, and mounted in Canada Balsam which has been heated for a few seconds after being on the slide. Then examine with a 1/12th inch oil immersion. The bacilli are often few and far between, but it is of the utmost importance that a careful examination be made in cases where no glandular swelling can be felt and where the diagnosis is doubt- ful. During the latter part of the epidemic about 80% of the cases were diagnosed by the microscope alone, involving many hours' labour a day on what to most people is not interesting work. Once the bacillus is found the case is one of plague. Should the bacillus on the other hand be absent it does not necessarily follow that it is not plague. On one or two occasions we had to wait for the post mortem examination to give us the cause of death. I put a hypodermic needle into the spleen (where the bacilli are generally abundant) in order to verify the diagnosis of one case. If a case is diagnosed plague then this examination completes the chain of evidence. In the case of a bubo which may or may not be a plague one it is advisable to take the blood direct from the gland, by a hypodermic needle or through a small incision with a tenotomy knife. These details are well known to bacteriologists, but unfortunately every one is not a bacteriologist.

For diagnostic purposes it is sometimes necessary to get a culture on agar- gelatine or blood serum. This has to be done in the most careful manner, as far as precautions are concerned, in order to get a satisfactory result, for it is to be remembered that in out-of-the-way places where plague may develop it is not always easy to obtain agar-gelatine or blood serum and even if obtained it is a tedious process to get them properly sterilised. Other points on the bacillus will be touched upon later; what has been written is enough for symptomatic or diagnostic purposes.

DIFFERENTIAL DIAGNOSIS.

When diagnosis has been reduced to a question of microscopic examination there cannot be much to be said upon the subject. The only difficulties we had in determining cases, previous to Dr. KITASATO's discovery, were with bad malarial fever cases, lymphangitis with irritative bubo of leg; one or two inflamed glands. of the neck, and enteric fever. As regards intermission of temperature I cannot bear out CABIADIS' statement that no intermission occurs in plague. Intermissions do occur.

A case of mistaken diagnosis No. XII. is given which was diagnosed by us as not plague owing to the absence of head symptoms, and on account of other reasons which are given. Another case of mistaken diagnosis is given which, even before microscopic examination was made, we pronounced to be not plague, because of the absence of a symptomatic tongue, head symptoms, and the pulse usually met with in plague, and on account of the presence of another cause for the illness.

The question as to whether there has or has not been exposure to infection should weigh little or nothing at all during an epidemic of plague for there are many roundabout methods of infection.

One serious difficulty we had in determining the cause of death in dead bodies. required for burial purposes, more especially towards the end of the epidemic. The mortuaries situated in different parts of the Colony had to be examined regularly every day, but as the very idea of post mortem examination had to be kept in the background, the difficulty of being able to tell fairly accurately whether a person had died of plague at once becomes apparent. If the Chinese had been allowed to remove their bodies, as they wished to do, it might have been expected that plague would break out in outlying places. It is to be remembered that in Hongkong the Chinese are allowed to exhume the dead after an interval of seven years; there was therefore all the more reason for getting every plague corpse buried in a special cemetery where exhumation was not to be allowed. Swollen glands were the first thing to look for, then sordes in the mouth, then the special appearance of the tongue. Often the bodies bore the typical "facies" of the disease after death. The occurrence of the pink blush round mosquito bites, with any hemorrhages apparent, also helped to determine where the corpse should be interred. Micros- copic examination of blood removed from the spleen will probably be the method of diagnosis in these cases in future. Typhoid fever is a disease possible to be mistaken for plague-vide Case XVI.

PROGNOSIS.

There is no one special sign that gives hope for recovery, whilst there are many that are decidedly bad, and which are valued according to the ordinary ideas of medicine. Buboes do not suppurate as a rule until the primary fever has fallen, by which time you know that the patient is better.

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To imagine that suppuration is a good sign is to put the cart before the horse, the suppuration coming after the recovery from the acute stage of the disease.

I liked to see a patient with three or four copious loose motions per diem, not amounting to diarrhoea. As a rule this was often the patient who was not troubled with vomiting, and whose brain symptoms were not so severe.

In this as in other diseases a good heart, physically and morally, is the best thing a patient can possess.

TREATMENT.

Hospital Prophylaxis. At the beginning of the epidemic every precaution that we could think of was taken to prevent the infection of attendants. Most of these precautions were useful and necessary, whilst others proved to be more in the nature of luxuries. As our knowledge and experience of the disease progressed we were able to bring down our requirements to fine lines. Plenty of fresh air was a sine qua non, both for patients and attendants. At first attendants were allowed to smoke as they pleased, and as a couple of rabbits died in two days, after inoculation by blood from our first case, nurses had strict orders to be careful of all wounds or scratches on their fingers, and to see that they were dressed with some antiseptic at once. They were ordered to use cucalyptus oil or carbolic acid solution on their hand- kerchiefs, more especially when the hospitals were crowded, but when a more plenti- ful supply of fresh air was forthcoming this was left off. Fæces were disinfected by quicklime or carbolic acid, as were all dressings. At the Slaughter House Hospital Jeyes' fluid was used as the disinfectant all along. If at any time the wards smelt badly from any cause, or the stillness and closeness of the atmosphere became oppressive, some eucalyptus oil evaporated over small lamps had a wonderful effect in alleviating the nauseated feeling that sometimes came over the attendants. In the beginning nausea was sometimes brought on by the cigars or pipes which were freely used, but as we gained experience this was all remedied.

All patients' clothes, being practically worthless, were burned on admission. Patients were given a hot bath, if in a condition to stand it; or were sponged down on the bed. Chinese who were not wildly delirious were placed on the ordinary Chinese bed and mat; but if likely to do themselves harm they were put on a mattress. Mattresses, pillows and inats were burned after being in use some time, the length of time in use depending on the amount of soiling. If we had had a more ample supply of mackintosh sheeting, a large one would have been put on each bed, as being by far the best way of keeping beds in a sanitary condition. One thing to be beware of is not to give purgative medicine to all new patients at the same time. Often when a number of patients ha calomel after the evening rounds the nurses had rather a hard time of it the following morning, which delayed the routine work of the hospitals too much. Carbolic acid and permanganate of potash were of necessity freely used in the wards; blankets and sheets being frequently washed in a solution of the former. With the accommodation at our disposal attendants, when unemployed, were kept as far away from the hospital as possible, and plenty of

soap and carbolic acid was supplied to them.

Any attendant, complaining of headache, languor, sore throat or fever was immediately relieved from duty. Only healthy people should be allowed to approach plague cases.

Prophylactic measures should consist in remedying the causes that predispose to the disease. During an epidemic personal cleanliness should be carefully observed by those who have any work to do which takes them near the infected district. In addition to the usual daily tub a bath should be taken immediately after coming out of the affected area, some disinfectant like Jeyes' fluid being used in the water. A change of clothes is essential, and those that are discarded should be removed immediately, and exposed to the fresh air. If it is no trouble they may be put through the steam steriliser, but it will be found that free exposure to air in the sunlight will be suffic'ent. With regard to those who are employed on cleaning or disinfecting houses the following precautions should be observed. Free smoking should be allowed. The workers should be warned about scratches or wounds on their bodies; and a medical inspection of them should be made every day; those with wounds not being permitted to do the dirty part of the work. Preferable to smoking would be the use of respirators with exit and entrance valves; and a sprinkling of thymol or menthol over the entrance valves. Professor KITASATO suggested oil of peppermint. If smoking goes on then a carbolic mouth-wash should also be insisted on. As regards stimulants, these should be dispensed carefully but not too freely, the nauseating character of the work in a dirty town sometimes suggesting a too occasional glass of whiskey or other alcoholic stimulant. Before

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cleaning out houses the furniture &c. should be well washed with carbolic solution, by means of a hand hydrant, and cleaning should proceed whilst the furniture etc. is wet. After removal another good wash with carbolic or quicklime should take place. Chlorine will prove an efficient disinfectant if used in good quantity within a building, the doors and windows being carefully closed. Dirt and rubbish removed should be at once burned. The removal of the healthy from infected houses should be insisted on. They should be transferred at once to some outside encampinent. When it is realized that the floating population of Hongkong practically escaped scot free it is a matter for regret that a suggestion made by Surgeon-Major JAMES and myself (on May 31st) to form water camps for the inhabitants of Taipingshan was not acted upon. "To keep the people in Taipingshan separate from those in "the as yet unaffected districts we recommend very strongly as a suggestion that "a water camp be formel, separate from those on the land proposed for the "unaffected districts (whilst a thorough scavenging of the other parts of the "town was going on). Things look so serious that these measures appear to us to be absolutely necessary to prevent a rapid increase of the disease throughout the city and in Taipingshan especially and we beg your most serious consideration "of our proposals." In spite of the remarks made by the special correspondent of the British Medical Journal in its issue of 1st September (Dr. JAMES CANTLIE), I am convinced that an epidemic of plague in Hongkong could be tackled and got under rapidly if men in sufficient number could be got to do the work. Isolated Feople should be medically inspected every day and fresh cases would soon cease to occur if the camps were looked after in a proper manner.

(

As regards treatment of the sick, a certain routine of treatment was carried out in most cases. Towards the end of the epidemic a true "survival of the fittest" of the medicines at our disposal occurred.

A ten-grain dose of calomel throughout the epidemic was the usual purgative to commence with; compound jalap powder grains XL was added sometimes, but as a rule the calomel proved efficient, a seidlitz powder six or eight hours afterwards being occasionally indicated. We began feeding with the most easily assimilable nutrient food that could be got; egg flip and strong beef tea, being the most easily procured and the cheapest, formed the most considerable part of the Chinese diet during the acute stage. Brand's Essence and other patent preparations were also given but did not give so good a return for the money expended; they are expensive without being any improvement upon the egg flip and strong beef tea. Moreover the Brand's Essence is generally disliked by the Chinese. Brandy is not so much disliked. Within ordinary limits any nourishment that a plague patient fancied he had, and we were glad to see him take as much as possible during the first two days of illness before he became delirious, as afterwards the difficulty of getting him to take anything at all was very great. So long as the pulse was good we did not stimulate, but began when dicrotism was evident. Ammonia and cinchona we generally started with (half a drachm each of Sp. Ammon. Co. and Tinct. Cinchon. Co. with an ounce of chloroform water being given as a rule every 4 hours). Digitalis generally required to be added early. Sometimes the infusion was used, sometimes the tincture. Different mixtures were kept in stock and according to the patient's condition either ammonia and cinchona were given alone, or with varying doses of digitalis or with strophanthus added. Strychnia was also given, prescribed alone, as the carbonate of ainmonia precipitates the alkaloid if used with the mixture. One would have expected that digitalis would markedly improve the pulse if the dilatation of vessels were solely due to vasomotor nervous conditions, but it did not. From experience I found strophanthus better, as it never caused the pulse to get worse as digitalis sometimes undoubtedly did. Far better than either, however, is strychnia which we began to use liberally towards the end of the epidemic, and I think that in future cases the routine use of strychnia should be begun early. The dose, of course, varied with the case, but from 5-10 m. of the liquor strychnia by stomach every four hours did not seem at all too large a dose, and I should be inclined to give considerably larger doses than this some- times. Digitalis in theoretical medicine ought to be the best of the drugs above named, but undoubtedly strychnia impressed me as the better drug for the vascular condition. Although it would be scarcely fair to blame digitalis for making all intermittent pulses worse, when intermittency was already evident, yet it certainly did so sometimes. Liq. Ammon. Fort applied to the nostrils was of great use some- times in the heart failures which often took place, whilst hypodermic injections of cther at this stage were occasionally a necessity. Whilst the majority of heart failure cases proved rapidly fatal, yet in some cases where treatment was energetic it was wonderful to see how some practically moribund sufferers would rally and sometimes get better. We did not despair even when the pulse could not be felt

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Vomiting was often one of the first symptoms that required treatment and this was usually stopped by an efficient mustard plaster on the epigastrium. Vomiting and diarrhoea rarely went together and the best treatment for the former was to procure satisfactory purgation by calomel. I can only remember one or two cases where vomiting was persistent and obstinate after this treatment. If the above means were not sufficient, ice to suck and some hydrocyanic acid and liq. morphiæ in an effervescing mixture, given occasionally, generally suffice to check it. A mustard plaster was also a most efficient application to the epigastrium.

In mild cases small doses of quinine gr. iii thrice a day were sometimes sufficient, with adequate nourishment. Before speaking further of treatment the following axiom must be enunciated-never use depressants if you can possibly do without them The great tendency to cardiac failure has often been noticed in Bubonic Plague, but I do not suppose its more frequent occurrence due to the introduction of Western medicine has been noted. I must confess that many cases were not benefitted by soine of the drugs used--drugs which are so often given with impunity in other serious diseases-and in making this statement I am criticising my own as well as my colleagues' treatment. The reason why we did not find out this almost at the beginning of the outbreak was that we had no time to watch the immediate effect of our treatment as there was so much to do, and in many cases which we had marked to watch carefully the patient had succumbel before the next visit was paid.

It has to be borne in mind that we had great difficulties to contend with as regards exact and proper clinical observation at the outbreak of the visitation, there being so many duties to perform-apart from Hospital work-that our medical staff was quite unequal to the strain thrown upon it.

Reduction of temperature was always attempted by tepid sponging, and even then ice had to be freely used as the temperature of the water we had to use was always over 75° F. and generally over 80° F. Patients with a temperature of 104° F. and over were sponged every hour through the day or as nearly every hour as circumstances would permit. All patients with a high temperature were benefitted by cold applied externally, and this sponging was always the best antipyretic. Antipyrin in large doses was frequently followed by disastrous results, and towards the end of the epidemic grs. v. of phenacetin were given when the pulse was fairly good, phenacetin evidently being less depressing than antipyrin. Not only this but even by the use of large doses of antipyrin or phenacetin tempe- rature was only very occasionally re laced by more than 2° F.; a result hot commensurate with the danger run. Brandy and tepid sponging were without doubt the best antipyretics. Aconite and antimoay were tried once or twice to commence with; the idea being that by keeping the circulation quiet for 24-48 hours and then stimulating, the patient might have a better chance of pulling through. This treatment was a failure.

The question of procuring sleep was an important one and here mor hia was our sheet anchor all through the epidemic. Notwithstanding the fact that in plague we have almost all the contra-indications for the use of morphia yet it was far and away the most serviceable drug. In the early stages of the disease it was often given freely; and in the later stages, used in much smaller doses, it was of equal benefit. Granting its apparent danger, it proved in result much more satisfactory than any other hypnotic use. From one eighth to one half a grain at night was given as a rule with safety at the commencement of sickness, while in later stages gr., re- peated if required, was the general dose. Notwithstanding all this I admit that it is necessary to carefully judge what cases to give it in, and when to give it; and to remember that grave issues must be faced in giving it.

Hyoscin in doses of from 1/200 gr.-1/75 gr. was the next best hypnotic we used. In some cases it acted in a marvellous way, in others it was apparently without effect. Chloral and bromide of potash in combination (the usual doses of grs. xx and grs. xxx respectively) was in many instances quite sufficient, but here the cases were as a rule mild. The ice-bag should be in continuous use. Case our hospital "boy "-was conscious at intervals almost to the last, and the only thing he resented was the removal of the ice-bags when they had to be refilled. The ice bags should be large and one should be placed on the forehead and the other at the nape of the neck.

I.--our

Blistering of the nape of the neck and lower occipital region was sometimes beneficial. We found the best way to do this was to use the emplastrum lyttæ ás Dr. HORDER suggested, viz., by repeated but short applications just to prevent vesication. Of Leiter's tubes we had none, and the imitations we got made by Chinese workmen were not a success consequently they were not tried.

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Thirst in European patients was more marked than in the Chinese, and the soldiers attacked seemed to thrive on beer and stout which had been well ice 1. This was what they preferred to have and I must say it did excellently well, being at once stimulant, soporific, nutritious, and thirst quenching. Ice cream made with pure cream was also greatly relished by the European patients.

As regards diarrhoea the best results were got from salol grs. x every 4 hours. Naphthol and other similar drugs would probably have been equally good but were not so easily procurable. In another epidemic some of these so-called intestinal anti- septics should be freely used, as they do no harm as a rule, and the possibility of diminishing the virulency of the fæces by their means should not be overlooked. Mist Astring c. Opio was of little avail. Enemata of starch and opium were not of much use either, being seldom retained for more than a minute. If straining was troublesome a suppository of morphia gr. 4 and cocaine gr. as a rule brought about comparative comfort after two or three introductions. The treat- ment of the bubo resolved itself into simple methods. Glycerine and belladonna at the beginning of the epidemic was the most useful applications, on account of the painful character of the swelling; whilst later, when suppuration did not take place so often, iodine proved the more useful application. In the earlier period of the epidemic this drug would have had no more effect than ditch water. When- ever redness appeared we poulticed at once and opened; whenever pus was diagnosed, we opened freely and drained; iodoform being the best application, the bacilli in the swelling disappearing from the discharge in a few days. It was very necessary to ensure good drainage, as if imperfect, burrowing was almost sure to be very troublesome. Bladder trouble,-Retention, Cystitis, &c.,-had to be met by catheterization, diluent drinks, strychuia,-in fact ordinary treatment; lung trouble by ordinary medical measures; the addition of a little senega to the ammonia, cinchona and digitalis being as a rule quite sufficient to bring about improvement. Pneumonia was treated secundum artem as it arose-and we soon learnt to keep a sharp lookout for it, especially after the first fever.

Camphor was given to Professor AOYAMA, (as it was one of his favourite drugs) as a cardiac stimulant. It could not do harm, but we took good care to let him have plenty of ammonia, brandy, digitalis, &c., as well.

AOYAMA himself, before his attack, had suggested in the wards that digitalis folia would probably be the most satisfactory method of exhibit ng this drug—his suggestion was applied in his own case, but without any specially markel good

effect.

When it is borne in mind that the loss of hæmoglobin was noted as an import- ant symptom from the very beginning of the outbreak, the possibility of the transfusion of healthy blood naturally suggested itself as likely to be at least a small help in treatment. Some experimenters maintain that it is no use, or rather that salt and water is as good. I doubt it. Not only would the amount of hæmoglobin be increased, but fresh and healthy leucocytes would be introduce into the patient's system, and there is no knowing what assistance this might not be to the fighting line of the person attacked. When Captain VESEY was so ill we had numerous volunteers from his regiment to give blood if the course of the case proved suitable for the operation, but as in his case the hæmoglobin did not fall below 40% and his lung and brain symptoms were so acute, the occasion did not occur. In one case where a Chinaman had been lying in a collapsed condition for almost two days we transfused him with a bot saline solution with the result that his circulation improved for some hours, but he again sank into his former state of collapse and died. The fluid was injected at a temperature of 110° F. in the funnel, and had a distinctly beneficial effect on his general condition, but it was only temporary as we expected it would be.

A supply of oxygen for inhalation was kept ready for all the European and Japanese patients. When administered it always improved the pulse and respira- tion for a short time. It was only used in the worst cases-the trouble of prepara- tion and administration, and the want of time preventing an extended experience. of it being gained.

Injection of iodide of mercury into the bubo was tried at the Alice Memorial Branch Hospital but I do not think with success. We triel carbolic acid in a few cases but it was useless. I do not think that these injections can ever be of the slightest good after the disease has developed, as the greater part of the solution cannot be absorbed, and the amount necessary to counteract the poison would simply assist in killing the patient.

Nitrite of amyl and nitroglycerine were suggested by some enthusiasts as suitable drugs to be used in heart failure in the later stages. They were never tried as in my opinion they would only have made the vascular condition worse.

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MORBID ANATOMY.

On opening the abdomen in only a few cases could the spleen be seen coming below the ribs. It was however always somewhat enlarged and hyperamic. In consistence it was softer than normal but not diffluent as is sometimes met with in malignant malarial cases The malpighian bolies were always swollen and well marke. There were occasionally small punctate subcapsular hemorrhages, these were never large on the surface of the spleen. In one or two post mortems consider- ably enlarged spleens were met with, but in my opinion the enlargements were principally due to malarial causes, and this seemed to be borne out by the greatly thickened and fibrous capsules. This would not be likely to happen in the course of a week's illness. Towards the end of the epidemic very few haemorrhages were found on the surface of the spleen, or in fact anywhere.

The liver as a rule showed no marked enlargement. It was generally soft and more friable than normal. Occasionally small hæmorrhages were seen on the upper surface---punctate in character. It was generally somewhat paler than usual, but in two cases the substance was deeply bile-stained. The gall bladder was almost always full of dark brown tarry bile-on very few occasions post mortem was it found really distended. The kidneys were usually congested, with occasional small subcapsular hæmorrhages; none were seen in the substance of the kidney.

In the mesentery very large hæmorrhages were sometimes met with, and these seemed to be largest in cases where the glandular affection partook of a large hæmorrhagic character. Hæmorrhage on the serous coat of the stomach was not seen. On the mucous surface they were occasionally seen, and here again they were always punctate in character. The small intestine was occasionally inflamed somewhat, and here on several occasions Peyer's patches were distinctly affected, rising slightly above the surrounding surface, and presenting a retiform appearance. On a few occasions some of the solitary glands in the large intestine showed a similar inflammation. The mesenteric glands were almost always enlarged; some- times slightly, generally markedly, and occasionally considerably. When small they were of a dark blue or purple colour, with no hemorrhage into or around them. As the size of the gland enlarged there seemed to be a greater tendency to a sero-sanguineous effusion around, as in the case of the externally apparent buboes. Hæmorrhage into the ovary (considerable) was met with once, and also a hæmorr- hagic endometritis.

The lungs were generally somewhat congested and dark at their bases, and occasionally some fluid was found in the pleurae; but this was never seen in quantity say of a pint. Pneumonia was present in a few cases. Hæmorrhages were rare on the visceral pleura; on the parietal pleura they were not seen at all. In two or three cases of persons who died late (i.e, after the tenth day) in the disease mul- tiple abscesses were found, pyæmnic in character. The bronchial glands were often enlarged although rarely to a great degree. I never saw any of the bronchial glands exhibit the hæmorrhagic type sometimes found in the mesentery. The larynx was sometimes congested and inflamed, but this was co-existent usually with large cervical glandular enlargement, though by no means invariably so.

In some of the early cases we found the left side of the heart firmly contracted, with the right side dilated. In almost every case examined the right side of the heart was dilated, but in some of these cases we were rather surprised to find the left contracted--it was perhaps to be expected that it might be empty or almost so, but not in the firm condition in which we found it. To my mind this calls for thoughtful consideration, and I regret that a reasonable explanation does not suggest itself to me at present. On a few occasions

On a few occasions a small amount (a few ounces) of pericardial fluid was present. The substance of the heart in those who had been ill for several days was generally softer and paler than usual-inflamma- tion going on to fatty degeneration. Under the visceral pericardium on several occasions punctate hemorrhages were seen-none upon the endocardium. No fresh endocarditis or pericarditis was seen. Antemortem clots were frequently found, especially on the right side; these were generally small however, and did not fill up the cavities, a large quantity of fluid dark watery blood being also present, whilst the vena cava were generally distended by the same fluid.

The thyroid gland was never enlarged except when evidently due to direct extension of the inflammatory mischief in the neck. The thymus in a child was in one case the seat of a large abscess, co-existent with pyæmic abscesses of the lungs.

On opening the skull the meninges were invariably found to be hyperæmic, as was frequently the brain matter. In a few cases there was an increase of cerebro-spinal fluid, but this was seldom marked. Both the dural and pial

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membranes were generally bright red all over the brain, and occasionally the grey matter underneath was rosy red showing a condition of acute cerebritis. The longitudinal and lateral sinuses were generally full of the dark fluid watery blood. At the base the congestion of meinbranes, and even the Pons and Medulla them- selves, was most marked. Hæmorrhages were rare in the substance of the brain itself, only on three occasions did I see a hæmorrhage in the Pons Varolii, others had been diagnosed during life but not found post mortem.

As regards the glands which are affected one met possibly with only one markedly enlarged, or many lymphatic glands in the body enlarged either slightly or to a very great extent. In the early cases, as I have already mentioned, the enlargement in one special region seemed to swamp the interest taken in the rest of the glandular system. The enlarged glands principally affecte I were generally surrounded by a sero-sanguineous exudation, in the midst of which a hæmorrhagic gland, or glands, was situated. Only in two or three instances was pus actually met with in these on the post mortem table. The periglandular effusion was in a few cases very great round a small gland, and sometimes the œdema would extend round this further still; whilst often a chain of glands would be greatly enlarged without any surrounding exudation at all. As the epidemic went on the extravasated fluid became gradually less, and at the end of the epidemic it was seldom seen, the slightly enlarged gland or glands being generally clearly seen as a dark blue body distinctly outlined in the surrounding fatty or subcutaneous tissues (referring to the femoral glands which were generally first cut down on).

Sometimes a very great amount of oedema was present in the neighbourhood of the bubo.

MORTALITY.

Taking the total number of deaths and recoveries amongst the Chinese (as far as official figures go) the death-rate was 93.4 %. Amongst Indians it was 77 %; Japanese, 60%; Eurasians, 100%; Europeans, 18.2 %.

I have no doubt that one cause of the heavy mortality amongst Chinese was the want of efficient medical attention and nursing in the early days of their illness. Many died in their houses without the slightest attendance. The Chinese admitted to European Hospitals only came in after having been several days sick, when the most favourable opportunity for treatment had passed. The cases which lived longest, or which recovered, were usually under treatment from almost the beginning of their illness. All the Europeans were under treatment at an early date as were several of the Japanese who recovered; and although some of the European cases were not severe I think that early and suitable treatment had a great deal to do with the diminished mortality. I regret to say, that with the Eurasians this was not so. Two of these were under treatment early but both died, whilst another case which was not diagnosed early died on the seventh (?) day. There is no doubt that European blood and stamina had a good deal to do with recovery, and I say this notwithstanding the fact that they were necessarily more carefully nursed and looked after than some of the Chinese. It must always be borne in mind that an intelligent European had every chance in his favour; he was in the first instance very jealous of his earliest departure from health, and lost no time in placing himself in communication with experienced help; then he was able to explain his own symptoms in his own tongue to a medical man who spoke and understood the same language. Again he had confidence in the power of western medicine to help him, and he was untroubled by the constant dread of the "foreign doctor" which environs not only every ignorant coolie, but the vast majority of the more or less cultured classes of the Chinese nation.

CONVALESCENCE AND AFTER EFFECTS.

When a bubo was opened I found that iodoform was the best application for insufflating purposes. After a couple of days' treatment by plugging with lint soaked in carbolic oil and smeared over with iodoform the bacilli usually disappeared from the discharge. This was due, I think, to the antiseptics employed and not to any possible death of the bacilli by the growth of staphylococcus in the pus. In some lymphatic abscesses (in the case of Professor AOYAMA,) which had been. present for several days before opening, the bacilli were found in numbers. corrosive sublimate fomentations were the best external applications in most cases, being cleanly and easily applied. Where the bubo was large, dirty, and discharging freely, poultices of linseed, either alone, or with charcoal and dusted over with iodoforin, were preferable. Suppuration was sometimes prolonged for a month or more, and where this was so a careful examination sometimes revealed a large

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slough which had completely separated, but which still caused a good deal of suppuration (one more reason why one should open the primary bubo freely). The use of iodine, iodide of potash ointment, mercury, &c. locally, all seemed useless even in the later stages of the bubo which had not suppurated. Treat the debility, and the bubo will disappear of its own accord was what our experience taught us. Not only this but the irritation caused by these applications sometimes led to unpleasant results, which it was well to avoid. As a rule an open bubo took from one to three months to close, very few healed under a month. Keloid formation on the site of bubo was frequent in the Mongolian subject. Several cases have come to Hospital lately to be seen.

The vitality of the tissues after plague reached a lower point, I think, than it does after any other debilitating acute disease. In most cases there was not the slightest reaction of the tissues, if cut they remained almost in statu quo for days, and granulating wounds were generally called "granulating" by courtesy.

It was only to be expected that head symptoms would occasionally persist for some time. Irritability, perversity of temper, and headache occurred frequently, and even a temporary aberration of mind in some cases.

The condition of the vascular system generally improved rapidly-after the fever disappeared-under iron, strychnia and arsenic, but even here palpitation, breathlessness, and other signs of cardiac weakness persisted for a time.

No case of permanent cardiac valvular mischief have I yet noticed however in any of the European patients. In convalescence digitalis has not been prescribed. In the few cases where symptoms of oedema of lung, or pneumonia, persisted after the fall of temperature the condition improved by good food, tonics, and the occasional application of iodine externally to the chest.

In some cases the sloughing was extensive, and extended by the lymphatic vessels. In these cases no attempt to heal up took place until the general tone of the system improved.

I have seen some cases lie absolutely comatose for several days in the Chinese Hospital and recover in a most marvellous manner, but these were the exceptions. The mere fact that a man was comatose for so long a time as four days would point to a bad prognosis; yet in the Slaughter House several cases lay in that condition almost uncared for and recovered without a bad symptom afterwards.

Death occurs by-

(a) Sudden heart failure.

In some cases the slightest exertion caused death, even in those who seemed to be convalescent; and it was of the utmost importance that all movement out of bed be disallowed. Some cases had this failure brought on while on the bed pan. Others jumped out of bed in delirium only to be put back, practically pulseless, to die.

(b) Gradual heart failure depending on brain conditions and cardiac

weakness.

In these cases the lungs were usually edematous, and the combination of brain and dyspnoea generally brought about a rapidly fatal result.

(c) Extension of the inflammatory mischief in the neck by causing

obstruction.

In these cases nothing could really be done as the state of the patient when it occurred would have made tracheotomy a difficult if not a totally ineffective operation, and would in all human probability have proved fatal. In these cases the amount of oedema and sero-sanguineous exudation all round the anterior part of the neck would have made the operation so tedious that the patient would probably have died before its completion. (d) Hæmoptysis.

The cause of a couple of deaths. (e) Hæmorrhage after sloughing buboes.

Two cases of sloughing into the iliac arteries occurred and death took place almost instantaneously.

(f) Hæmorrhage into the Pous Varolii.

This undoubtedly helped to bring about a dissolution in

some cases.

(g) Pyæmia and exhaustion.

These were occasionally the cause of death, but infrequently. (h) Meningitis and cerebritis.

These really come under (b).

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THE BACILLUS.

The Bacillus was found in practically every part of the body to which the blood has access. It was especially abundantly found in the enlarged glands and in the spleen. It was found in the other organs of the body and in the blood, but in fewer numbers. In the bubo and in the spleen they were found in much greater numbers in June than they were in September, and I have no doubt that they are always more numerous in cases where a large hæmorrhagic bub is present. Slight variation in size was met with. The bacillus taken from the blood looks. like a diplococcus, when stained with aniline dyes, the intermediate part only staining slightly. The bacillus taken from the bubo stains almost equally all over at first, but after keeping specimens for some time many of them show the appearance of those found in the blood, the staining of the interglobular part of the bacillus evidently not catching hold of that part so well. The bacilli vary slightly in size even in the same case. The capsule of the bacillus is usually distinct under the 1/12th oil immersion lens, and is best seen in some of the bacilli from a bubɔ where the interpolar part is not too deeply stained. The bacilli grow most abundantly on blood serum or glycerine agar agar at a temperature of from 96-100° F. The blood serum is not liquified. A culture from blool shows small grey semi-translucent colonies over the surface of the serum. Spore formation has not been noticed. When animals that are susceptible are inoculated with a cul- ture they get rapidly affected and die in a few days, the length of time varying generally according to their (the animals') size. Mice, rats, rabbits and guinea pigs are susceptible to the disease. The only pig that I inoculate is still alive, but as I have doubts as to the virulency of the culture a definitive opinion cannot yet be given as to the susceptibility of these animals Dogs have not yet been proved to be susceptible. The question of the infection of pigs is of the greatest importance, as so much of the meat supply of Hongkong consists of pigs brought from Pakhoi and Canton, where the disease may become endemic Strict measures may have to be taken in the case of a recrudescence of the disease in Canton. I can only say that so far as it has been noticed dogs seem to have escaped; dead dogs in the streets being conspicuous by their absence. Whenever a fresh culture of bacilli can be obtained this point will be cleared up.

After animals which had been inoculated died, the point of inoculation was found on dissection to present almost the same appearance as the peri-bubonic tissue in man. The spleen was generally enlarged, and in rats there was well marked enlargement of the lymphatic glands. Feeding animals on plague flesh and on buboes generally resulted in their death a few days after.

A one per cent. solution of carbolic killed the bacilli after an hour's application. A two per cent. solution killed practically immediately. Quicklime was almost as efficacious. Four days' exposure of the bacilli to fresh air generally killed them--no positive results being obtained from culture after that exposure whilst bacilli exposed directly to the sun proved innocuous after four hours. (Temperature of Black bulb being from 150°-160° F.)

I have already mentioned that the bacillus may be found in the blood six weeks after the acute stage of the disease has passed; but this statement must be qualified by the remark that, in the later stages of the disease, it was found that they had generally disappeared in about three weeks.

Patients were not discharged from Kennedytown and Hygeia Hospitals until the bacilli had disappeared from the blood; but at the Chinese Hospital they were generally kept about two months, i..., those who recovered.

QUESTION OF QUARANTINE.

On this much debated subject it is perhaps best to say as little as possible. The question of quarantine, or the medical prevention of the introduction of disease must be decided by each country according to the sanitary state it is in; and upon the history of the disease as I have given it, and upon the facts there recorded the question will have to be settled. The great danger undoubtedly arises in most cases from its introduction by emigrants and their clothing from infected ports. Introduction by merchandise from an infected port though possible is very improbable indeed. If quarantine is to be imposed it is to be remembered that the incubation period has been proved to extend to nine days. I have no hesitation in saying that if immigration was disallowed in non-affected ports quarantine would be unnecessary; but if emigrants from an infected port are allowed to land then quarantine should be enforced, and more particularly so in the case of Chinese. Their baggage in

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particular should be most carefully disinfected as the ways of the "heathen Chinee" are just as peculiar in the matter of clothing as they are in some other things. The risk of the introduction of the disease by other immigrants (the ordinary first and second class passengers) is practically nil.

ÅDMINISTRATIVE.

On May 10th when the epidemic was first discovered the Government Medical Staff available for service was composed of the following Europeans:-

Colonial Surgeon, Acting Superintendent Government Civil Hospital, Messrs. CROW and BROWNE, nine Sisters, Mr. CHAPMAN, Steward- Wardmaster BRETT, Government Civil Hospital, Wardmasters CUM, MING and BAYLEY, Lunatic Asylum.

On the discovery of the outbreak on 11th May, the hospital hulk Hygeia was moved from behind Stonecutter's Island to West Point, within easy reach of the shore, and every preparation was made for receiving a large number of patients on board. These patients did not arrive on that date as was at first arrangel owing to difficulty with the Tung Wah Hospital authorities, but early on Saturday, 12th May, all the plague-affected Chinese in the Tung Wah were removed to the ship, after a prolonged interview between the Colonial Surgeon, Mr. MAY and myself, and the Chinese Committee of that hospital. On this day Police Constables GIDLEY and MCKILLOP were seconded for service in this Department.

On the evening of 13th May, Surgeon PENNY, R.N., having volunteered for service, reported himself for duty whilst Surgeon-Major JAMES of the Army Medical. Staff was also sent to assist us and commenced work on the 14th, chiefly under the orders of the Sanitary Board.

On 14th May, owing to the rapidity with which the Hygeia had been filled, Kennedytown Police Barracks was placed at our disposal and was immediately opened as a hospital.

.

On the 11th May, fourteen Chinese "boys," cooks, and coolies were secured to act as nurses on the Hygeia, and also three amahs; and on 14th May, eleven more attendants were engaged for Kennedytown; the European staff being dis- tributed between the Government Civil Hospital, Asylums, Hygeia, and Kennedy- town with orders to remain at their posts until relieved.

On the morning of the 15th May, it was discovered that almost all the attend- ants at Kennedytown had disappeared--notwithstanding the fact that they were receiving double wages-and in addition several of the Hygein attendants also, decamped-having either swam ashore or dropped into the sea to reach adjacent sampaus--whilst the other nurses had been looking after the sick. The Chinese Apothecaries, UI KAI and CHAU KAM-TSUN, had been detailed to superintend the dispensary and the administration of medicines, one being stationed at Kennedy- town, and the other on the Hygeia; whilst the Chinese clerks, LEUNG FU-CHU and LEUNG PING-FAI, had to keep the registers, and procure as much information about cases as possible. The result of this was that on 16th May in addition to the Medical Officers, the following was the staff that was practically doing twenty- four hours' duty on the Hygeia:-

Two Sisters.

Police Constable J. MCKILLOP, Wardmaster. Police Constable T. I. GIDLEY, Wardmaster. A Po, Chinese Wardinaster.

One Chinese Apothecary.

LEUNG PING-FAI, second clerk.

There were also about fourteen Chinese "boys" and coolies to assist. The boatswain and one caretaker of the Hygeia (who were in charge of the ambulance boat) had also disappeared. The above staff had to do the whole of the work of getting patients up the gangway, washed, put to bed, given nourishment and medicine, removed when dead, coffined, and conveyed to Kennedytown by boat for burial. In fact they had to do everything but dig the graves and fill them up.

At Kennedytown the following was the only available staff :-

Two Sisters.

Wardmaster CUMMING.

One Chinese Apothecary.

A CHING, Chinese Wardmaster,

and about a dozen "boys" with an occasional hour's help from some of the Hygeia staff, whilst bodies from the hulk were awaiting burial. The Medical Officers generally had to lend a hand at anything that required to be done.

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On 19th May, we arranged to retain the services of Dr. W. F. C. Lowson for additional work. It should be mentioned that at this time the work at the Govern- ment Civil Hospital was very heavy, the result being that every European was doing on an average sixteen hours' duty per diem, the surgical work at the Govern- ment Civil Hospital being much more important than is usual.

On 21st May, the Glassworks Hospital was opened and this relieved our staff to a certain extent. The hygiene of this hospital however caused us a great deal of trouble, and it was only by the occasional employment of extreme measures that this place was prevented from becoming a certain death trap to every one who entered it.

On 15th May six Petty Officers from the Victor Emanuel were detailed to assist us with the launches-the Chinese crews having shown a disinclination to work—and as a result of their help the conveyance of the living and the dead was greatly accelerated. It also relieved us of the necessity of sending a Wardmaster with the dead to Kennedytown. The necessity of water transit was also diminished, as the sick for Kennedytown now began to be taken by road-not quite so com- fortable a method of conveyance as by boat but one which saved the Medical De- partment a lot of trouble.

On the 27th May six Alice Memorial Hospital students were engaged by the Permanent Committee to assist; two to look after the sanitation of the Glassworks, and four to assist in town work. The weather at this time was very depressing being very hot and wet, and oilskins and sou'westers were absolutely necessry for any one venturing out of doors.

On the 28th May the ventilation of the Glassworks had to be improved by removing all the glass from the windows.

الله

On the 29th May Wardmaster GIDLEY and all the Chinese on the Hygeia were removed to Kennedytown, as I expected that Europeans might soon be at- tacked by the disease. This apprehension was justified as one Shropshire man was admitted the same afternoon, and two on the following day. After this the Hygeia was kept solely for Europeans, Japanese and Eurasians, no more Chinese being taken on board.

On the 31st May it was discovered that the Alice Memorial students had fled from the Glassworks, some of their relatives having unfortunately died, but we soon got help from the Army and Navy Authorities as Privates J. R. MAKIN and H. E. HUSSEY of the Army Medical Staff Corps were seconded (on the 8th June) for services in the Glassworks; whilst Sick-Bay Steward MITCHELL, and Sick-Bay man GEORGE SMITH from the Naval Hospital arrived on the 9th to render further assistance; and improvement in the condition of that place at once took place; the result of obedience to our orders.

On the 7th June I offered to take charge of the whole of the nursing and medical department, an offer made because the Chinese had mismanaged (medically and sanitarily) the Glassworks Hospital; and also because we had been promised assistance, in the way of attendants by Major-General BARKER. We were quite in a position to make this offer as a result of our experience of the previous month, and also from the fact that we were now fairly well provided with medical men. However the Permanent Committee said "no."

The Slaughter House Hospital was opened on 8th June-a building well suited for the occasion, with brick walls, concrete floors, fairly good ventilation, and easily kept clean. In my opinion, however, it was not nearly so good as the old Cattle Depôt which, in addition to good drainage and floors, had magnificent ventilation, long stalls, which would have made splendid wards; equally easily kept clean; and where a small nursing staff could have looked after a large number of patients.

By Saturday, June 16th, all the patients in the Glassworks had been removed to Canton or to the Slaughter House Hospital and the place was shut up.

The Matshed erected opposite the Glassworks was opened on June 17th under the medical supervision of the Alice Memorial Hospital Staff. Owing to the want of proper drainage here, and to the usual tendency of the Chinese, when not looked after, to throw rubbish about, an insanitary pool of rubbish accumu- lated at the southern end of the shed which had to be carefully watched to prevent a recurrence. The ventilation of the matshed was necessarily good, as large open spaces had been left between the walls and the roofs, and windows and doors were plentiful. This hospital was closed on July 21st the experiment having proved rather expensive.

On June 19th Dr. J. F. MOLYNEUX arrived from Ningpo to assist in the medical work and on June 24th Surgeons MEADEN, R.N., and BEARBLOCK, K.N., also arrived, and-under the orders of the Permanent Committee--proceeded with the inspection,

27

of junks and vessels arriving from Canton and Macao. Their services were really not required as, with the co-operation of Dr. MOLYNEUX, the staff associated with me was now quite sufficient for the work which had to be done. A judicious interchange of work however enabled the latest arrivals to see a good lot of the plague, and allowed some of those who had been working on shore all along to have a few days fresh air on the water. The junk inspection might have been effective two months earlier.

Dr. MOLYNEUX left on 19th July; Surgeons BEARBLOCK and MEADEN about the end of same month.

On 10th August all the patients in the Slaughter House Hospital were removed to Kennedytown Hospital, and the former place was cleaned up and thoroughly disinfected by carbolic acid, all fittings which had been used being burned. The Alice Memorial Matshed on closing was disinfected by carbolic acid freely applied to the floors, whilst most removables in the way of beds, tables, &c. were burned, or freely treated with carbolic acid. A typhoon in September completed the dis- infection by blowing the shed out of sight. The disinfection of the Glassworks was done by carbolic acid and quicklime applied to the walls; all wooden floors being removed and burnt, and the refuse added to the flames. The Hygeia was closed on August 8th, the two European patients being transferred to the Civil Hospital. Disinfection here was done by carbolic acid and fresh air.

Kennedytown Hospital was closed on September 26th, the remaining patients being removed to the small-pox observation hut in the Civil Hospital grounds. This hospital was also disinfected by carbolic acid, whilst the convalescent matshed adjoining was conveniently removed piecemeal by successive typhoons in Septem- ber and October. This matshed had been erected early in June, it being essential to transfer patients to another ward after the acute stage of the disease was over. By this arrangement we had always two lots of patients, one lot requiring very little actual nursing, and the other lot all together in the place where the nursing had to be done.

The Hygeia proved a most valuable hospital for Europeans, every medical visitor being greatly impressed with its suitability for this purpose providing did plenty of fresh air, every breeze in the harbour, no mosquitoes, and the charm of sea life during convalescence. It would probably have gone very hard with some of the European patients and the Japanese doctors had they been treated on shore, every slight breeze in the harbour bringing great relief to the sufferers. When the rush of Chinese patients came, however, the ship was rather taxed for accommodation, as one private ward had to be used as a mortuary, another as an office, and the others to accommodate the extra staff, &c., which was necessary. Her use as a European hospital during last summer alone has more than justified

her existence.

Kennedytown Barracks proved a fairly good hospital, but its proximity to the trees on Mount Davis made it a hunting ground for flies and mosquitoes which sometimes added greatly to our patients' sufferings. The arrangements of the rooms also left much to be desired.

The Commissariat of the Chinese Hospitals at the Glassworks and at the Slaughter House Hospital was in charge of the Chinese themselves. In the Glass- works the food was principally used by the attendants, the patients not requiring very much or when receiving it receiving what was unsuitable. As one or two cases began to recover however the arrangements began to improve, and at the Slaughter House Hospital, when affairs were running smoothly, the commissariat was efficient as far as supply was concerned. The supplies and furnishings to the Hygeia, Kennedytown Hospital and Alice Memorial Branch were under the charge of Mr. ROBERT CHAPMAN, the Steward at the Government Civil Hospital, with Sergeant SMITH, R.A., specially detailed to assist him in Alice Memorial Branch work from June 20th to July 21st. The amount of work done by Mr. CHAPMAN was almost incredible, and I trust that the Government may be able to satisfactorily reward this officer, who was constantly at work from shortly after five A.M. till ten It must be remembered that all this time he had his Čivil Hospital work to do also; and when one considers that on no single occasion was there any delay in the delivery of or want of supplies one can only come to the conclusion that it was a hard bit of work well done.

P.M.

Dispensary hours were long at the commencement of the epidemic, but after getting large supplies of "stock" mixtures made we were able to arrange matters so as to allow Mr. CROW and Mr. BROWNE to devote a considerable amount of time to disinfecting work in the town.

205

%

:

206

28

The detai's as to the changes of the nursing staff were left to Miss EASTMOND, our Matron, and we were able to arrange that the sisters, after being on plague duty for a week, were on duty during the following week at the Civil Hospital, where the work though as heavy was not disgusting or depressing.

During the epidemic two wards were kept at the Government Civil Hospital for observation purposes. This was necessary as cases of plague turned up at this hospital during the night; and as coolies to transfer them to Kennedytown at once could not be procured even at very high wages these had to be kept till morning.

If ever this Colony has had reason to congratulate itself it was when we were able to procure well-trained British nurses. I think the greatest compliment that I can pay these ladies is to say that had it not been for their presence there could have been no well-run epidemic hospital during last summer. Amateur nurses at the beginning of an epidemic, or indeed at any stage where there is a rush, are worse than useless, and multiply the worries of a medical officer ad infinitum; not only this but all outsiders took care to give our hospitals a wide berth. When the hospitals were crowded it was often a matter of difficulty for the Medical Officers employed to keep their meals on their stomachs. It would have been much harder if they had had to remain in constant attendance all the time as our Sisters had to do. Small-pox is bad, but there is something specially awe inspiring in plague which seems to appal the onlooker. Cholera and small-pox show external evidences which make a spectator aware of the existence of a severe disease, but to witness rows of plague patients dying off in a hospital has, I am sure, a much more depressing effect on by-standers than the two diseases I have mentioned.

The carbolic mouth-wash for the soldiers employed in cleansing work was made up regularly twice a day at the Civil Hospital for some weeks, the following formula being used :—

ft gargarisma.

R. Ac. Carbolic Liquid,

Eau de Cologne, Spirit Camphor, Aquam ad,

in. 160

m. 140

m. 180

o. IV

Quinine in 5-grain doses was also served out to every soldier by the Army Authorities.

Among the attendants at the various hospitals there is evidence of at least three deaths. The Italian sister who died of the disease was nursing at the Alice Memorial branch hospital, and got infected by excessive zeal.

Her death was very much regretted, as it was the only death in a European hospital; and we had by this time got so far through the epidemic without loss that it seemed probable every attendant would come out safely. The dangers of nursing should have been carefully pointed out to her. An amali at the Slaughter House hospital became infected and died after removal to Lai-Chi-Kok. An attendant at Lai- Chi-Kok hospital, finding himself attacked by plague, promptly came over to Hongkong and walked up to Kennedytown hospital, where he afterwards died. It is to me a source of keen gratification that none of the attendants in the Government Hospitals were attacked.

Rules had to be made regarding visitors in the Chinese Hospitals, as many people wanted to see friends and relations. These rules were simple-(1) Visitors had to be escorted by the Chinese policeman, and night talk to a patient for five minutes but without touching him. (2) Anyone wanting to stay longer and assist a patient was detained, and reckoned as an ordinary hospital attendant until the patient was better, and then had to undergo a few days' isolation and disinfection. We were able to keep an observation ward in the Slaughter House Hospital.

STATISTICAL.

The following table gives the admissions and deaths of those treated in the Government Hospitals :-

May,.. June, July,

·

"Hygeia."

Total.

Plague.

Observation.

Deaths.

157

143

14

114

11

3

1

3

3

2

171

154

17

117

May, June, July, August,. September, October,.

29

Kennedytown Hospital.

A

Total.

Plague.

Observation.

Deaths.

71.

67

4

58

121

115

6

90

39

28

11

17

95

51

44

32

8

2

6

2

1

1

1

335

264

71

200

It will be noticed that in August and September the proportion of observation cases was large. It was most essential at this period that all possible foci of disease should be removed; and it must be remembered too that at this stage of the epidemic, apparent glandular swellings were seldom met with. Of the fifty-one cases of plague admitted in August only eight had visible buboes when admitted; whilst only two developed them in hospital.

June and July,

ALICE MEMORIAL BRANCH HOSPITAL,

Total. 112

Plague.

110

Observation.

2

Deaths.

93

In the Glass Works and Slaughter House Hospitals under Chinese treatment the following were the numbers. These are given in a somewhat different manner, but I believe the figures are correct :-

Admitted Living,

Admitted Dead,

Sent to Canton,

Sent to Kennedytown and Alice Memorial Branch up to

31st July,.

Sent to Lai-Chi-Kok,

·

Under Observation,

To Kennedytown in August,

Plague Cured,

Deaths from Plague,

1,627

828

194

26

13

69

11

74

..2,068

2,455 2,455

In addition to these there were treated in the Government Civil Hospital Isolation Wards 32, of which-

7 6.....

19,.

Died.

Transferred to Hygeia. ...Transferred to Kennedytown.

This, of course, is only as far as found in town and sent straight

The following table gives the numbers of different nationalities who were affected and died, with the percentage of deaths. hospital statistics go--the number of dead bodies to the burial ground is not included here:-

Europeans, Japanese, Manilamen,

Eurasians,

Indians,

Malays,

Portuguese,

....

West Indians,

Chinese,.....

Affected.

Died.

Mortality

per cent.

11

18.2

10

6

60'

1

1.

100.

3

3

100.

13

10

77.

18

12

66.

3

3

100.

1

1

100.

.2,619

2,447

93.4

The Chinese figures are difficult to work out owing to so many removals having taken place. The above are the numbers where definite results as to recovery or death are known.

Of the 1,627 persons admitted to the Slaughter House Hospital alive 1,037 were males and 590 females. Of the 828 bodies brought in dead 472 were males and 356 females. Considering the comparative smallness of the Chinese female population it will be seen that they suffered severely. By last census the proportion of females

207

208

30

to males was only 23:57. This heavier female mortality was only to be expected when it is remembered that women and children were practically confined to the houses in the infected areas every hour of the twenty-four; whilst the men were generally absent during the day, and in many cases slept in the streets at night, a thing which the women as a rule are not accustomed to do.

Out of the 2,619 Chinese cases we had reliable information as to age in 2,050 instances. The following table gives the numbers of those affected in the different decades of life:

}

Under 5 years,

Between 5 and 10 years,

Males.

Females.

18

27

65

73

10

20

.281

190

17

""

20

30

244

84

>>

>>

3.0

40

..323

75

""

29

>>

40

50

..233

74

";

""

50

60

""

""

*

..127

$6

60

70

56

49

>>

51

21

24

""

Over 70 years,

Here again the mortality is somewhat difficult to give correctly on account of the removal of the patients to Canton and owing to other reasons.

TIME OF OUTBREAK.

The question as to when the epidemic started in Hongkong cannot be satisfac- torily settled now,

The statements made in certain medical quarters here that the plague was raging in Hongkong early in April cannot be entertained by any thoughtful person who has taken the trouble to study the question. The evidence, on which these conclusions were based, was obtained from Chinamen, who are notoriously deficient in the art of truthful description; and its value is further discounted by the fact that it was freely stated that the disease had been here either for years or "as long as could be remembered.". Add to this that these statements were only made after the epidemic had been raging for some time, when every Chinaman was wildly excited, and I think it will be conceded that no credence can be put on such state-

ments.

17

Personally I believe that the first deaths took place in the carly days of May. The mortality statistics cannot be depended on in this Colony as far as the proper registration of the cause of death is concerned, but the number of deaths given by the Registrar General may be looked upon as not far wide of the mark. These numbers were as follows from the 1st April till 9th May, Chinese only in this list :—

April 1st,

7 ;

>>

2nd, ......16;

22

April 14th, 15th,

9;

9;

:)

3rd,

10;

95

16th,

9;

>>

April 27th,.........................12 ; 28th, ...18; 29th,

.12;

4th,

9;

17th,

.13;

30th,

..14;

>>

>>

""

5th,

•.10

18th,

.13

May 1st.

"2

6th,

8;

19th,

14;

2nd,

8; 9:

>>

7th,

8;

20th,

.11

""

3rd,

..21;

:)

8th,

.14:

21st,

8

4th,

2)

.15

;

""

9th,

...12;

""

22nd,

.11;

::

5th,

.17;

-

>>

10th,

8 ;

23rd.

18

6th,

13:

?"

11th, .....14;

""

12th,

......14;

24th, 25th,

8;

7th,

18:

8;

8th,

.24;

"?

13th, .........14;

26th,.........17;

9th,

..27.

These figures are significant. From the 3rd to the 9th May the average daily number of deaths had risen somewhat but to nothing like the numbers which occurred afterwards. Moreover the number of Chinese burials during the first week of May was not excessive, and did not show any evidence pointing to an earlier period of outbreak. If people had been dying in great numbers their bodies must have either been buried, or remained in the houses; and it was noticeable that scarcely a single body found by the search parties was in an advanced stage of decomposition.

We know that plague corpses decompose rapidly, more especially in the hot weather, so that the evidence given above, although not conclusive, is about as nearly so as it can possibly be.

31

QUESTION OF INFECTION OF SOIL.

A great amount of interest has centred round the district known as Taiping- shan during the past months. The area which was walled in was undoubtedly one of the most noticeably infectel parts of the City of Victoria, though First, Second, and Third Streets in the Saiyingpun district were equally bad. Much general interest has been taken on this head owing to the resumption of the land by the Government, money matters having entered largely into this question in a purely mercantile community like Hongkong, where anything of a temporary commercial character always conmands the greatest attention.

Taipingshan (by this I mean the closed area) was shut up :--

1st. Because it was badly infected.

2nd. Because in the opinion of the Medical Officers connected with the plague, the majority-if not all-of the houses were not fit for human habitation at that time.

The first of these reasons needs no further demonstration when it is stated that it was difficult to find a house which had not a case of plague in it, while most of them had more than three cases.

and

The second cause has been demonstrated in the medical part of this report,

be briefly summarised thus:--

may

(a) Filth everywhere, scavenging being conspicuous by its merely no-

minal presence as far as the front door.

(b) Overcrowding undoubted.

(c) The absence or very meagre provision of light and ventilation in

most of the houses.

(d) Basements abutting upon retaining walls and with floor surfaces

formed of filth-sodden soil.

(e) “cocklofts," ie., mezzanine floors, and cubicles which effectually led

to overcrowding and prevented the entrance of light and air.

Taipingshan having been shut up, the next thing to be considered was "What is to be done with it?" The Housing Commission, appointed by the Governor to consider ways and means for the housing of the native community during the emergency, took evidence on this matter the opinions of Drs. KITASATO and YERSIN being asked, the possibility of the infection of the soil entering largely into the question.

After receiving evidence the decision arrived at was briefly that Taipingshan should be resumed, and should be destroyed, preferably by fire.

Naturally the desire of all medical men is to see a town which is perfect from a sanitarian's point of view, but it is a totally different matter when questions of economy have also to be considered. The fact remains that only a very small portion of the town has been improved, whilst the rest of it--some parts in equally bad sanitary condition at present--has been left in statu quo.

I have no hesitation in saying that where a Chinese population has to be dealt with, it will never be possible to keep even a perfectly laid out city in order, unless the strictest surveillance is kept over the inside of the houses; by this I mean looking after the numbers of inmates, the cleanliness of the houses, and the light and ventilation, drainage, etc.

No evidence was given by the local witnesses regarding the infection of the soil, though some of them expressed their opinions. Dr. KITASATO was asked his opinion on the subject only a few days before he left for Japan. I took him round the streets, and as he had lived with me for a month, I was able to get his opinions and views in a much more satisfactory way than by half-an-hour's writing. Dr. KITASATO'S statement as regards infection of the soil was as follows.

66

I examined several times the dust of the floors, and the soil of infected houses with regard to their bacteriological contents, and only once I found in the dust of a house the plague bacillus. In soil taken from a considerable depth it has not been found so far, but these experiments require to be carried further." It was impossible for him to give a lengthy and careful report on the subject, his report being specially directed at the extremely insanitary condition of some houses. He was astonished at the state of affairs he saw, and although quite ready to help

* About ten acres of the most densely populated part of the City was closed by the Government at the height of the epidemic, all the inhabitants being turned out of their dwellings and housed elsewhere. The streets were walled up and constables were stationed to prevent ingress to the "forbidden city.”

209

:

:

210

32

by giving his opinions he did not give a full report on the subject. This meant time, and as he had what was to him much more important work on hand it was not to be expected that he should take a great interest in the matter. His views were those of one who wants to see a sanitary Utopia, and his expressions of opinion were mainly directed against the conditions which allowed such a state of affairs as he found to be brought about. Dr. KITASATO's recommendations with regard to the removal of soil was especially directed at some houses with earthen floors where the soil had become polluted with filth to an almost incredible extent. Dr. YERSIN's report was given after a few more days consideration, but even under these circumstances I think he made a mistake. Dr. KITASATO did not state that there was plague infection of the soil. Dr. YERSIN On the contrary maintained that there was. His opinion was expressed as follows:--

"I have had no difficulty in discovering in the soil of several infected houses a little bacillus identical with regard to aspect and the culture of the plague bacillus. The microbe inoculated into animals does not kill the guinea pig or the mouse--it possesses no virulence. This property does not surprise me--for already for a long time I had begun to separate microbes of different virulence in the buboes, and I have authentic cultivations of plague which kill neither the guinea pig nor the mouse, like the bacillus in the soil."

This paragraph opens up subjects which would provide material for a lengthy controversy-subjects which call for much discussion and require many proofs.

Now it seemed that if the plague bacilli were found underground after a few short weeks of the outbreak it was a very serious thing to tackle; and to me it was a mystery how they could find their way through tiled floors-even though the tiles might be porous. If the soil was infected, then it was necessary that serious measures should be undertaken-if not, then there was still time by proper means to make any future infection of the soil impossible. As so much hinged on this question, I got Dr. KITASATO's assistant, Dr. TAKAKI, who had just arrived from Japan, to make an extended series of experiments with me, which effectually proved that there was no infection of the soil. An

An organisin was found which was almost identical with the plague bacillus, but this, on closer examination, was found to be really different, and this view was afterwards borne out by Dr. KITASATO, to whom numerous specimens of earth from the worst houses were sent, and to whom the results of our local experiments were submitted for criticism.

This same organism, closely resembling the plague bacillus, was found in earth taken from the garden of the Government Civil Hospital. I have not time at present to go into the minute details of the case, suffice it to say that numerous experiments with soil at depths of from one inch to twenty inches were made in the most careful manner, and the results were always the same as regards the absence of the plague. bacillus.

The main causes of the spread of the plague were as follows:-

(1) Want of means for the isolation of people who were almost certainly

incubating the disease.

(2) The grossly insanitary condition of the latrines.

(3) Overcrowding.

(4) Want of efficient house scavenging and the filthy habits of the inhabitants. These were the most potent factors in the spread of the epidemic; and these simple but urgent matters should be put right forthwith. While I write this, the houses in First Street and several other streets not far from the Government Civil Hospital are in as bad a condition as-if not worse than-they were in April

1894.

PROPHYLACTIC VALUE OF OPIUM.

Several statements were made-probably by interested persons-during the epidemic as to an alleged immunity from the disease acquired by opium smokers. There was no such immunity, as many opium smokers died in the various hospitals. The following extract from a letter to the Colonial Surgeon on this subject dated 11th August, 1894, gives my views upon the subject :-

"In answer to your question I have to state that it is not a fact that 'no opium smoker has died from plague.' Numerous opium smokers and several opium eaters have died during the epidemic. The proportion of opium smokers admitted will never be ascertained as so many patients arrived at the hospitals delirious or

comatose.

"Opium smokers would certainly be less liable to infection than those who do not smoke anything at all but I am of opinion that in the case of plague smoking

33

good tobacco is of greater benefit than smoking opium. In plague it is the atomised carbon which is of prophylactic value. An opium pipe cannot have the specific effect in prevention of plague that it undoubtedly possesses in malaria.

"After a person has been attacked by plague an opium pipe under judicious medical supervision will undoubtedly act as a sedative in the acute stage; but here again it could not have the wonderful effect as a curative that it often has in malaria, phthisis, and bad neuralgia.

"During convalescence after plague its use is indicated for those who have smoked opium previously and is here of great benefit."

In the case of two opium divans where careful enquiry was made I found that no inmate had been attacked by plague and several customers had made them their residence for some time. Any one who has been into a busy divan in the City of Victoria knows that the amount of smoke generally evolved by the inmates prevents one seeing across the room. Infection by inoculation is of very frequent occurrence, and I cannot see how opium smoking could possibly prevent infection by this channel unless by physical or chemical action outside the body. An opium smoker may finish his smoke and afterwards go into an adjacent house and be infected with the disease-the pipe he smoked some time before is then of no prophylactic use.

Moreover the mere fact that these houses were opium divans was not the only reason why they escaped as each lessee took very good care in his own interests to keep out any visitors who had any appearance of being sick, and if any one had become ill in the house it is pretty certain that he would have been very soɔn turned out of it.

Opium smokers who recovered were not allowed to smoke in the Government Hospitals but, from the rapid way that several opium smoking inmates of the Slaughter House Hospital convalesced when allowed to smoke, I should be disposed in future to allow them to have their usual pipe in some outside ward or matshel. Several patients were noticed in the native hospitals who smoked through their whole illness, some of their friends attending them to keep the pipe frequently filled, and it must be said that they seemed to give very little trouble, whilst food very rarely crossed their lips.

DRAINAGE STATISTICS.

.

The following table prepared by Mr. J. R. CROOK, Sanitary Surveyor, shews that in the principal infected areas houses which were drained under the Public

· Health Ordinance were affected in fewer numbers than those which were not connected with the new drainage scheme.

Taipingshan District.

May.

June.

Houses redrained under Public Health Ordinance...... 33% affected 30% affected

Houses not so drained

36% affected 36% affected

Western District.

May.

June.

July.

Houses redrained under Public Health Ordinance.....

10%

17%

2%

Houses not so drained

13%

26%

31%

These differences are so small that it would be wise not to attach too much importance to them as a proof of the necessity of having efficient drainage.

PRESENT SANITARY REQUIREMENTS.

The following matters require urgent attention :-

(1) Vital Statistics.-A reliable record of vital statistics prepared under the immediate supervision of a duly qualified medical practitioner should be at once institute 1. Compulsory notification of death is necessary.

There is no law at present to enforce it.

211

212

34

(2) House Drainage.-Existing regulations should be enforced regarding the design and construction of house drains, and remedial measures for removing existing defects should be put into effect.

(3) Scavenging.-Thorough and efficient scavenging of all public and private streets, lanes, alleys, yards and premises throughout the Colony is a great necessity.

-

(4) Light and Ventilation.--The existing laws with regard to light and ven- tilation require to be enforced, and regulations as to the height of buildings and the width of streets should be introduced. (A new Act has just been made.)

(5) Basements.--An enactment prohibiting the occupation of basements as

domestic dwellings is very necessary.

(6) Wells.--All wells situated within the thickly populated areas of the

City and used for dietetic purposes should be closed at once.

(7) Latrines should be provided on suitable sites throughout the City and

maintained by the authorities in a cleanly condition.

(8) Insanitary Dwellings.-The laws relating to insanitary dwellings and the closing of those unfit for human habitation should be enforced.

(9) Private Lanes and Streets.-All private lanes and streets should be

resumed by the Government and maintained in a proper condition.

(10) Back-to-back houses should be demolished as soon as possible.

(11) Dairies.-All dairies should be removed from the crowded districts of the city. This has been pointed out in previous years by the Colonial Veterinary Surgeon.

(12) Bakehouses.-Existing laws and regulations affecting bakehouses require

enforcement.

(13) Importation of dead meat from the mainland should be strictly prohibited. (14) Importation of Animals.-Reception lairs should be provided to allow

proper inspection of all animals imported into the Colony.

(15) Markets.--Several public markets require sanitary improvement and a market for the wholesale trade in fruit and vegetables should be instituted and efficient inspection should be carried out. The latter is extremely necessary during the summer season.

(16) Sheep and pigs should not be kept in houses which are inhabited by

or are built for the inhabitation of human beings.

It is a matter for regret that the Resumption of Taipingshan should have been carried out before these most necessary sanitary improvements have been effected which are, I believe, far more necessary than the former. They are the common-places of Public Health, but they require a judicious expenditure of money to carry them out and efficient men to supervise them.

CONCLUSION.

:

In conclusion I wish on my own behalf to heartily thank those especially associated with me in the medical work, Surgeon-Major JAMES, A.M.S., Surgeon PENNY, R.N., Dr. W. F. C. LowsON and Dr. J. F. MOLYNEUX, for the very great. assistance they rendered at a critical time, Each had a certain amount of routine work to get through, but where so many developments occurred at all hours of the day and night a serene temper and a ready obedience to orders were necessary to enable us to get through the work during the early days of the epidemic. These were always forthcoming and it was only our perfect unanimity which enabled us to do so much. Surgeon-Major JAMES' duties at the Tung Wah Hospital were as revolting as they well could be--even the dirty work which the officers and inen of the Shropshire Regiment had to do was less disgusting.

It is as well to point out that Drs. W. F. C. LoWSON and MOLYNEUX were the only volunteers to help us when matters were really serious. We had other volun- teers when the heavy part of the fight was over.

The subordinates of the Medical Department I also cordially thank for their splendid conduct, under circumstances trying to the best tempers, and for the implicit confidence they placed in all orders and directions given for their welfare.

35

CLINICAL CASES.

The notes of these cases are necessarily rough. Time to re-write them is unfortunately not at my disposal, but it is to be hoped that they will afford a certain amount of interest to medical men even as they are. The remarks made on some of them are not lengthy for the simple reason that we have still a good deal to learn on the subject of plague, and many doubtful points suggest them- selves, which it is to be hoped may yet be cleared up. It will be found that some of the treatment does not correspond with what has been advocated in foregoing pages, but it should be remembered that, in dealing with such a fatal disease, it was some time before the best treatment could be definitely laid down; whilst it is probable that even now we have not yet arrived at the best method of dealing with it.

Case I.-Chinese. Et. 25.

This boy was our hospital attendant. He left hospital at 9 p.m. on Sunday, April 29th, and came back at 9 a.m., May 1st. This thirty-six hours was the only time that he was out of the hospital and did not leave again before he went on the sick list. He complained of feeling unwell on the afternoon of the 5th May, and when his temperature was taken at 6 p.m. it was found to be 103° F. I did not see him until about 1 a.m. on the 8th; he informed me that the swelling of the left femoral gland, which was apparent, first commenced on the evening of the 6th May, but he had not mentioned that to the Medical Officer on duty. The gland was, at this time, the size of a large walnut; there were no lymphatic vessels affected, at least, none were to be seen inflamed; there was no sore on the foot but a small scratch was visible two inches below the knee on the inner side and there were no signs of inflammation or suppuration around it; there were no other glands to be felt enlarge. Great headache. Treatment up to the 8th was quinine grs. x. every three hours and phenacetin grs. x. occasionally, but during the latter day had aconite m. v. and antimony wine m. viii. every four hours only.

106-

105-

104-

103-

102-

101

100-

99-

98-

10

5

6

7

8

MAY, 1894.

9

10

11

12

13

:

On the 9th: pulse still fairly good, but although the temperature is better he is in a moro stupid condition and very anxious about himself at times; the mouth and throat are very dry; ice-bag applied to nape of neck and top of head. Chlorate of potash gargle ordered for the throat in addition to aconite mixture. 10th very torpid this morning, pulse worse and easily compressible complains greatly of hotness in the throat, passing urine in bed, 3 p.m. had a convulsion. Examina- tion of blood shewed rapid crenation of corpuscles-some of them broken down and particles of pigment in some of the white ones (I believe that some of those when seen stained were bacilli, but I did not recognise them as such). At 7.15 that evening the convulsions became very frequent and he had hyd. of chloral gr. xxx. and brom. of potash gr. XL in two doses. The percentage of homo- globin in the blood 50.

At 2 a.m. on the 11th: as the convulsions were still severe, he had brom. grs. XL. and chloral grs. xxx. again. In the morning his mind was clearer and he complained much of his mouth being dry, with sordes on the teeth, &c. Hæmoglobin 35 per cent. There have been no more convulsions since the bromide and chloral in the carly morning. All day the conjunctivæ have been suffused-

213

214

36

he can retain his urine to-day. The blood is very fluid and watery. 12th much clearer in the mind this morning. No convulsions. Muttering delirium and picking at the bed clothes occasional. Heart's action is very tumultuous. There are no lung symptoms. The superficial veins in the axillæ and chest are notably prominent. There are no more glands to be felt, however, than the enlarged one in the femoral region. The urine is very scanty and contains trace of albumen and bile salts. Rabbit and guinea-pig injected with blood. Rabbit lived three days, the guinea-pig two. Treatment after the 11th: "ammonia and ether frequently, with brandy, eggs and milk with grs. xxx. bromide of potash on the afternoon of the 11th.'

Hemoglobin on the 12th 18 per cent.

Died comatose on the 13th, 10 a.m.

Post mortem examination same afternoon. Small rose-red spot round scratch below the kuce. Small discoloration, scarcely amounting to a petechia just close by bubo.

No enlargement of glands apparent in any other region of the body.

On incision into the petechia below the knee, there is found a hypodermic effusion of thin watery blood. There is no attempt at clotting of blood. On dissection of the bubo the same effusion is found round it. Slight-congestion of the lungs. Spleen is somewhat enlarged. The liver friable and pale. The gall-bladder is empty. Some enlarged mesenterie glands. The kidneys somewhat paler than usual. No hæmorrhages in the peritoneum or thorax. The meninges were intensely congested, and no hemorrhage was found in the brain. Heart (left side) firmly contracted, right side full of dark fluid blood.

REMARKS. This post mortem did not assist much as I had only a few minutes in which to examine the body after it had been opened. This case, however, showed us the value of the ice-bag in relieving the headache as so long as the boy was conscious or even semi-delirious he told us that the ice-bag was the only thing be wanted. He took his nourishment well and being most anxious to get well, contrary to the majority of his fellow countrymen affected, did everything and took everything he was told. The boy was anæmic, always and the low percentage of haemoglobin on the 12th, which was several times and most carefully estimated, was not so remarkable as if it had occurred in a full-blooded person. This suggested, at the time, transfusion of blood, supply of oxygen for inhalation, and early administration of iron and chlorate of potash. It will be noticed that some of the treatment was different from what I have recommende:l..

Case II-Japanese. Et. 36.

On the 28th June, at a dinner given by the Japanese Doctors to several of the Hongkong Medical gentlemen connected with the plague, Professor AOYAMA's temperature was 101.6° F. He slept well during that night. On the morning of the 29th Dr. CANTLIE saw him and found him suffering from what he supposed to be the results of a dissection wound. At 5.30 p.m. he was seen by Dr. MOLYNEUX and myself, and, the case being immediately diagnosed as plague, he was removed to the Hygeia. From the evidence which we procured it seems that on the 22nd or 23rd of June, whilst making a post mortem examination, he scratched the left third finger on the posterior and ulnar aspect of the first phalangeal joint. On the 27th of June, he again scratched himself on the end of the right thumb.

When removed to the Hygeia he had a temperature of 105° F.; had a bubo in the left axilla without lymphangitis; had a well marked lymphangitis of the right arm extending up to the level of the middle of the humerus; was delirious, very sleepy, and the conjunctivæ were intensely suffused; pulse apparently full and bounding but easily compressible. The bubo was very painful. The heart dulness was increased to the left and the apex beat was about one inch to the left of the nipple line. This was a most extraordinary state of affairs considering that within thirty-six hours the apex beat returned to its usual position and the heart dulness returned to exactly the nipple line; whilst Dr. KITASATO assured us that, as far as he knew, AOYAMA had no previous heart mischief to his knowledge.

Treatment ordered: sponging every half hour; milk, eggs, Braud's essence, with a small amount of brandy ad lib; calomel grs. x. at once; a mixture composed of

every two hours.

Ammou. Carb Tr. Cinchon Infus. Digitalis.

Aq. Chorof. ad.

.grs. iv.

.m. xx.

..3 ii. .zi.

At 2.30 a.m. on the 30th the pulse was much weaker, temp. 105°. Mixture with m. xxx. Sp. ammoniæ added, ordered every hour, in addition to champagne.

At 4.30 a.m. there was no improvement, pulse still very bad. In one of his calm moments he had urged that an ice-bag should be placed over his heart; and, although delirious, had argued so rationally that we permitted him to keep it on during the night. As we thought that this might be one of the causes of the exceedingly bad pulse it was removed; and at 9 a.m. the pulse had considerably improved. At this time on examination he had no splenic tenderness: the condition of anxious dyspnoea was well marked, but did not seem so intense as it was in the early morning. The mixture ammonia, etc., was continued every hour, lead and opium lotion being applied to the right arm and belladonna and glycerine to the bubo, nourishment, being continued as before.

At 3.30 p.m. he had been sleeping somewhat heavily, and in a coherent moment when he awoke announced himself better. The conjunctiva were less congested, the headache, which up to this time had been well marked, now disappeare:l, and he seemed generally easier. The digitalis is now

37

omitted from the mixture which is still given every hour and in addition a pill of monobromide of camphor-gr. i. was given every two hours as he had expressed a wish to have that.

JUNE.

JULY, 1894.

29

30

1

2

3

4

20

5

6

106-

105-

104-

103-

102-

101-.

100-

99-

:

98-

124

112

112

120

120

120

100

Pulse

126

128

116

1161

120

121

112

112

Resp.

32

32

30

32

28 30

B.O.

B

1

3

36 31 32

404

48 44 36 50

50

40

5

5

0

4 2 2

2

On the 1st July, at 3.30 a.m., pulse occasionally intermittent, doses continually, appears better (for temp. see chart). At 9.30 a.m. the right thumb and the left third finger being very painful and considerably inflamed were opened freely and iodoform applied with a linseed meal poultice. Ammon. and cinchon. mixture every two hours, along with the mouobromide of camphor and nourishment. At 11.30 p.m. has not slept at all; very delirious, pulse again bad; complains of pain in the incised thumb; has vomited slightly; only sp. ammonia co. m. xxx. every hour now given in addition to champagne and brandy frequently, and during the night to have two doses of

ii. of infusion digitalis.

On the morning of 2nd July, the condition was practically the same, but on examination of the lungs there was found to be some hypostasis at both bases, especially on the right side. From this date until the 5th the condition was practically the same; acute delirium, intermittent pulse; frequent stimulation by ammonia, camphor, brandy, champagne, with an occasional dose of digitalis being the order of the day; of sleep, during this time, he had practically none. Sponging on an Diarrhoea was average every three hours; the water now being used at a temperature of 65° F. considerable on the 3rd: treated by enemata of starch and opium, and sub-nitrate of bismuth grs. x. oue dose only. On the 4th and 5th it was extremely difficult to keep him in bed, and it was only by tricking or frequent drinking to the health of the Emperor of Japan or Queen Victoria, that we could get him to take any nourishment or medicine.

JULY, 1894.

9

10

11

12

13

14

106-

105-

101-

103-

102-

101-

100-

99-

!

98-

104

196

18.£

#96

188

94

100

Pulse

87

80

77

83

96

92

104

124

Ser.

Resp. 40 48. 72

B.0.

48 40 32 32 26 30

36

36 36 26 28 32

|∞

2

SCV.

sev.

2

7

co

3

2

C

215

216

38

On the 5th, at 11 p.m., he had 1/100° of grain of hyosciu hypodermically and slept eight hours after. On the morning of the 6th, well marked pneumonia at the right base had developed and by this time the catheter had always to be used. Diarrhoea was also distressing and for this grs. x. bismuth sub-nitrate was given practically every four hours. At 10.30 p.m on the 6th the pulse became suddenly very intermittent and almost imperceptible. Hypodermic injections of ether were given frequently during the following hour and ammonia to the nostrils; the ammonia mixture being continued every two hours. The pulse improved during the night, but the intermittency still remained well marked. At 9 a.m. on the 7th he had a belladonna plaster over the heart and m. vii. of tincture of strophanthus added to the ammonia mixture every two hours, whilst the monobromide of camphor was discontinued.

On July 8th another attack of heart failure occurred, the pulse being imperceptible for some time at the wrist. Hypodermic injection of ether over the heart with hot sponges applied in the same region were followed by an improvement in the pulse within an hour. Diarrhoea afterwards became worse with extreme tenesmus and he was put on salol grs. v. every four hours, stimulation by ammonia still proceeding. In addition, as there was considerable pain in the abdomen and tym- panitis, lead and opium lotion was applied in fomentation. On the 11th the condition of the right lung had improved to some extent. The bubo in the right axilla was opened and found to contain pus. It had been very painful during the previous twenty-four hours. Pulse still intermittent, diarrhoea with tenesmus still present. Liq. strich. m. v. ordered three times a day. On the 12th the diarrhoea had diminished, no tenesmus, but still very offensive and the pulse was now only rarely intermittent ; salol grs. x. was continued three times a day.

On the 14th the temperature shot up to 104° F. again, and, on examining the right lung, a fresh well marked pleurisy was discovered all round the right base. A blister was applied, and on the sugges- tion of Dr. CANTLIE, chloride of ammonium grs. vi. were given every four hours with the ammonia mixture. On the 17th he was improving in general condition, ammonia mixture being continued along with the chloride of ammonium, and as the pulse was now fairly good and regular the strychnia was left off. On the 20th quinine grs. v. thrice a day was ordered; extract of malt thrice a day with ammonia mixture every four hours; Burgundy and the most nourishing food being freely administered. On the 21st a very large slough was removed from the axilla. On the 15th the opening of numerous lymphatic abscesses was commenced upon both arms and proceeded at about the rate of six a day for the following week, over 40 in all being opened. On the 24th sulphide of calcium pills gr. every four hours together with 3 ii. of cod liver oil thrice a day was all the medicine he was getting. By the 26th he was put on a sumptuous diet and small doses of quinine the cod liver oil being continued.

JULY, 1894.

1,5

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

106-

105-

104-

103-

102-

101-

100-

99-

98-

120

101

112

104

༨ དང་ ་ ་ང་བ་

Pulse

108

112

100

112

108

112

116

120

112

112

108

104

44 44

Resp.

36

11

41

48

11 11

30

3

1

૭ |

44 36 40 32 28 36 32

2

2

1

2

3

1

3 0 2

2 1 0 2

On the evening of the 2nd of August, after getting a little too excited over the prospect of getting home, he was suddenly seized with breathlessness and palpitation and when I saw him a few minutes afterwards I found him with a fast running feeble puise about 120 and this continued for about an hour; ammonia being the principal stimulant used in treatment. On the following morning he was prescribed a mixture of iron, arsenic, and strychnine. Cod liver oil stopped and extract of malt substituted. He improved until he was discharged on the 21st of August, when he was advised to take the following mixture:-Liq. arsenical m. v., liq. ferri dialysat m. x., liq. strychnin m. v., aq. ad 3 i. t.i.d.

On the 2nd July there was a trace of albumen in the urine. On the 6th of July there was no albumen in the urine. On the 9th of July there was no albumen in the urine. And on the 31st of July there was no albumen in the urine. He woke up on the 19th of July and was quite rational for the first time, after having beeu non compos mentis for almost three weeks. If I remember right he said that his usual weight was about 160 lbs. On July 29th he was 1343 Bbs. On August

39

6th he was 1311bs. And on August 20th 136 s. Bacilli were found in the blood by KITASATO on the morning of the 30th of June. On the 11th of July when the bubo was opened numerous bacilli were found in the discharge. On the 15th of July no bacilli were found in the discharge. On the 16th bacilli were found in each of the lymphatic abscesses opened. On the 3rd of August no bacilli were found in the blood.

Remarks.-This was a most difficult case to treat. Here was a well built strong man wh⋅ had been a delightful social companion but when delirious was—well, difficult to manage. Fortunately we had one sister who spoke German and another Japanese and this was a great help as, presumably infected with the war fever, he would not allow a Chinaman to come near him during his delirium. It may appear that too much physie was administered but it has to be remembered that he was in a most desperate condition and ammonia had to be given as practically part of his nourishment and not only that but his mental condition was often such that he could not or would not take part or all of his medicine, so that the above treatment was simply suited to the circumstances of the case at each visit and simply meant stimulate and nourish as much as possible. In his delirium he would often argue in the most rational manner, especially on medical subjects. From the 6th to the 11th July he was too ill to do this as during the most of this period he was in an apathetic semicomatose condition with occasional outbursts of violent conduct. He became conscious on the 19th July and after that slowly improved until able to leave for Japan. The prominent points in his case were the extremely bad pulse, the long period of pyrexia, the complications-pneumonia, retention of urine for a long time, the numerous lymphatic abscesses, the profuse and very foetid diarrhoea and the long period during which he was unconscious and of which he remembers nothing. The bacilli disappeared in a few days from the abscesses after use of iodoform. I saw him in September. At many of the incisions there was a tendency to formation of keloid and although I could find no physical evidence of cardiac weakness he informed me that he was very easily perturbed and tired and that he had headache often whenever he tried to do any serious work. He now relates with glee how he disappointed us -as his coffin had been taken on board on the 3rd July and every preparation made for his funeral

on the morrow.

The physical signs of the condition of the heart on the 29th of June require some explanation, which I am unable to give. One can scarcely imagine it possible that the mere application of an ice-bag would cause a change in the position of the heart, which there undoubtedly was.

It is a significant fact that after the ice-bag was removed the apex. beat and the area of cardiac dulness soon returned to their usual positions.

Case III-Japanese. Et. 38.

Dr. I. was assisting KITASATO in bacteriological work. Whilst preparing to remove Aoyama to the Hygeia our attention was directed to this patient who had that day felt "out of sorts," and on taking his temperature found it was 102° F.-pulse rapid, considerable headache, no shiver, slight pain in the left axilla. In addition he had the indefinable appearance of a plague patient, the recogni- tion of which comes intuitively to one who has seen a lot of the disease. He was at once removed with his colleague to the Hygeia. On arrival there his temperature was 99° F. At midnight it was 102° F. On the 30th at noon it was 104° F. and at 6 p.m. it had reached its primary maximum 105° F.

Examination showed the absence of any open wound on the left hand; but there was the mark of a small scar on one of the fingers, where he said he had scratched himself some days before. On the morning of the 30th the bubo was very painful, the conjunctivæ very suffused and his condi- tion generally worse. Treatment: ammonia and cinchona, sponging, monobromide of camphor grs. ii. every four hours, with the usual nourishment, egg flip, Brand's essence, beef tea, etc.

JUNE.

JULY, 1894.

29 30 1

2

3 4 5

6 7

8 9 10

11

12 13 14

15

106-

105-

104-

103-

102-4

101-

100-

99.

98--

Pulse

104 108 ¡92

120 103 104

88 84 80

96 76 78

68 180 SO

80 80 84 80

100 38 76

92 80 81 80 80 106

921 88 88 92

Resp.

217

218

40

On the 1st of July he was rather delirions and breathing, at times, spasmodic, pulse good and regular, but with slight inclination to throw the ice-bag about. The first cardiac sound is prolonged and booming and occasionally a distinct bruit is noticeable. At 6 p.m. he complained of a sore throat and on examination the pharynx was found intensely congested with an ulcer on the palate and left tonsil. Delirium had not been so marked during the day. On this day in the after- noon he had some digitalis added to the ammonia mixture as the pulse began to get weaker and somewhat dicrotic. Chlorate of potash gargle for the throat. On the 2nd of July calomel grs, x. given at night. Urine contains trace of albumen.

:

3rd of July seems better this morning-pulse improved, throat also improved. Digitalis left out of mixture during the day. Monobromide of camphor grs. ii. every four hours, still going on. 4th of July condition unaltered, digitalis again given with the ammonia mixture-dozing slightly through the day, but very delirious at night. July the 6th: retention of urine. Began to sleep now first time for three days. July the 7th some cystitis evident,―some muco-pus in the eye of the catheter and a tinge of blood. Large quantities of barley water ordered. 8th of July: delirium practically gone and condition improved-strychnin and iron mixture ordered, liq. strychninæ m. v. and liq. ferri dialysat, m. viii. thrice a day.

On the 13th of July slight pleuritic rub right side, mustard plaster locally. On the 26th of July some lymphangitis of the left arm, treated by lead and opium. Discharged cured on August the 3rd. Bacilli found in blood morning of the 30th June. Bubo was opened on the 8th and was almost closed when he left for Japan. The pleuritic rub disappeared in a few days.

Remarks.--This patient was easy to manage as he was not physically so strong as some of the patients who were on the Hygeia at the same time. The study of delirium in its early stages was a most interesting one at this period. In one ward we had Case V. whose great desire was to have a "quiet wrestle" with his attendant whom he nearly threw out of the window at an early stage of the disease and which he was inclined to try again had not effectual means been taken to prevent him getting out of bed. In the next room was a patient who fancied himself a "fowl in the air and who usually was in a most happy mood. Next to this patient we had one who, until prostrated, was a most violent subject to deal with, whilst I's failing was a desire to stand up in bed and address an imaginary audience, but-quite different from II.-always ready to listen to our reasoning and at once obey orders. It will be noticed that this patient's temperature fell from 103° F. to normal in twenty-four hours, a fall closely resembling a crisis. The throat affection was the only marked one we had where the prominent glandular swelling was not in the cervical region and led me to consider if he had been infected by respiration and not by inoculation. Here also, notwithstanding scrupulous attention to the cleanliness of the catheter, cystitis developed in about thirty-six hours after the catheter was first used but which got rapidly well by simply giving diluent drinks and strychnin and iron. The occurrence of lymphangitis during convalescence was noticed in several other patients, but is only to be expected if the slightest irritation is present.

Case IV-English. Et. 35.

Admitted May 31st with high temperature, considerable headache, vomiting and a left inguinal bubo. Treatment: tr. aconite m. v., vin. antimonial m. viii., aq. chlorof. ad. 3 i. 4 times a day with draught chloral hydrat. grs. xx. and pot. bromid. grs. XL. at 9 p.m.; nourishment--as much as he could take. Same treatment on the 1st, but as the aconite mixture had not brought down his temperature at 6 p.m. he had antipyrin grs. x. every four hours, four doses in all, aconite being stopped.

MAY.

31

1

106-

105-

104-

103-

102-

101-

100--

99--

98--

Pulse

Resp.

B.O.

2

+

JUNE, 1894.

2

3

116

100

108

1041

100

116

36

40

18 50 56

2

2

2

3

Ι

1

41

On June the 2nd he continued to take as much nourishment as possible. At 2.30 a.m. as his temperature had not come down with the antipyrin a cold sheet was frequently applied; but with no effect on the temperature until about 8 a.m. when it dropped about two degrees, and as he then shivered slightly it was removed. In the afternoon the amount of hemoglobin was estimated at 60 per cent., cynosis considerable. In the evening vomiting was severe and a mustard plaster was applied to the epigastrium. Iced champagne ordered in addition to the brandy in egg flip.

June 3rd: no more vomiting during the uight, had only a few suatches of sleep. Quinine grs. v. three times a day, in addition to digitalis and strychnin mixture-tr. digitalis m. vi., liq. strychuinæ m. iii. every hour for three doses. At 6 p.m. hæmoglobiu was estimated at 53 per cent. There is now slight dulness and fine crepitations at the left base and at night the digitalis and strychnin mixture was repeated every four hours with ammonia mixture. On the 4th--has had a very bad night, great delirium. There are now a few fine crepitations at the right base (hypostatic). The pulse occasionally intermits and the hemoglobin is estimated at 40 per cent. As his condition was getting rapidly worse I asked Dr. HORDER who had seen a considerable amount of plague at Pakhoi to see him with us but in spite of frequent stimulation by champagne, æther, and ammonia he rapidly sank and died at 9.45 p.m. During the afternoon he had frequent inhalation of oxygen which improved his pulse and respiration temporarily each time; but on the oxygen being discontinued they very soon got as bad as before. Ice-bags had been almost continuously on his head from the time of the commencement of delirium, in addition to a blister on the back of his neck.

On the 2nd of July from the rapid onset of acute delirium and the increase of respiration along with the marked cyanosis a most unfavourable pragnosis was given. Sleep was unfortunately out of the question that night owing to the hideous noises of a Chiuese procession on shore. Several times the patient dosed off only to be awakened by the sound of an extra hundred crackers · blazed off being wafted over the calm waters of the harbour, and which the patient even in his delirium complained bitterly of. The aconite and antimony were left off whenever the pulse began to get dicrotic and stimulation commenced.

Case V-English. Æt. 26.

On the 26th of June at 2 p.m. was requested to see this patient, found him suffering from plague and had him removed to the Hygeia at once. History:-On the 23rd June felt quite well. On 24th of June at 10 a.m. felt feverish, temperature 102° F., same evening 105° F. Noticed slight swelling in left femoral region. On the 25th knocked off work. Treatment on admission: calomel grs. x. and later on liquor morphiæ m. XL., milk, eggs, brandy, Brand's essence ad lib. Had a fairly good night.

JUNE.

JULY, 1894.

106-

26 27 28 29 30 I 2

4

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

105-

101-

103-

102-

101-

100-

99-

98-

8.1

80

82 82 88 88 80 80

Pulse-

Res p

B.O

5

3

80 76 80 80/80

76 78 80 96

84

32 28, 40 32 24 287 20

32 28: 20 28

28. 20 18 20

86 28 36 22

22 27 20 22 20

0

10

219

220

42

On the 27th quinine pill grs. v. three times a day ordered. Tepid sponging every two hours and liquor morphiæ m. xxx. at 9 p.m. On the 28th morning, pulse slightly intermittent and tendency to delirium; tr. digitalis m. xii., sp. ammon co. m. xxx., tr. cinchon co. m. xxx. ordered every four hours. No sleep during the night. On the 29th delirium marked; pulse still slightly intermittent. Hyoscin hypodermically gr. TỔO.

On the 30th at 2 a.m. he had another gr. r as he had not slept at all and was continually wanting to get out of bed. At 9 a.m. has had no sleep, pulse very irregular now; pupils widely dilated, (? Hyoscin). 12.30 p.m. had grs. x, bromide of ammonium.

1st July at 3.30 a.m. he had gr. morphine. "He repudiates the ice-bag"-pulse inter- mittent, and anacrotic-no rebound wave by sphygmograph. The morphia had no effect in quieting him and at 4.30 a.m. he had a hypodermic injection of gr. hyoscin. After this he slept for over an hour. At 10 a.m. urine was drawn off by catheter, highly coloured, ammoniacal, deposit of mucus, trace of albumen, and deposit of phosphates (by microscope). The digitalis and ammonia mixture continued as before. At midnight he at last got a good sleep and slept until 5 a.m., morning of the 2nd July; pulse still intermittent-no lung complications; taking his nourishment well; ammonia and digitalis mixture continued and grs. iiss. quinine instead of grs. v. three times a day. No sleep at night. July 4th, situation unchanged.

During the night of the 5th as the pulse had improved though still intermittent, the digitalis was left out of the mixture. No sleep. Until the night of the 7th ccndition got worse. Low muttering delirium, and his pulse was now very bad, stimulants being given freely. On the evening of the 7th he had a hypodermic injection of hyoscin gr. and slept until about 7 a.m. on the 8th. This seemed to be the turning point for on the 8th he was much better and was put upon strychnin and iron, in addition to the cinchona and ammonia.

On the 12th the bubo was opened and a large amount of pus evacuated. On the 16th ammonia and cinchona three times a day was the medicine he was getting. His pulse was still somewhat intermittent but otherwise much improved in quality. On the 18th extract of malt three times a day ordered. On the 20th he was ordered tinct. strophanthi m. x. and liq. strychnin m. v. thrice a day under which the condition of the pulse rapidly improved.

On the 5th of August cultivations from and microscopic examination of blood and bubonic discharge showing no bacilli, he was removed to the Civil Hospital. At this time there was some considerable enlargement of the glands along the iliac vessels and as there had been a great amount of sloughing in the upper part of the thigh careful surgical attention was necessary. The mass in the iliac fossa remained large and indurated for over a month and was opened by Surgeon PENNY whilst I was in Japan, whilst several other openings were made afterwards. A long and tedions convalescence terminated by his discharge from Hospital on December 2nd, the most of the swelling having disappeared and the scar being firmly healed.

JULY, 1894.

13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29

106-

105-

104-

103-

102-

101-

100--

99-

98-

76

176

90

90

88 81 72 90 $2 92

72/171 188 69

72

70

Pulse

88

635

92

20

20

22

Resp. 20 20

201 22 16

12 16 18 16 14 16

100 96 88 941 96 100 98 96 104 104 104 104 $8 83 Su

20 18 16 14 19 15 12/12 16 14 16 16 16 0

16 18 16

B.O.

O

-

C

Remarks. This was a most tedious and anxious case up till the end of October. The enlarged iliac glands (the induration round which extended to within an inch of the umbilicus) gave rise to considerable atony and obstruction of the bowel, which necessitated urgent manual mea- sures on several occasions. The femoral artery lay bare on the surface of the callous ulcer for a long time

43

and at one period it was a question whether the external iliac artery should be tied for fear of serious hæmorrhage, as had occurred in two fatal cases. There was also some cystitis which persisted for a considerable time. The cardiac condition improved slowly-the intermittency persisting for at least two months. On December 31st he was examined again and his pulse although not inter- mittent was very irregular--no valvular disease of the heart could be detected.

Case VI.-Eurasian. Æt. 18.

Became feverish on the morning of the 1st July.

A right femoral bubo developed during the day and he was removed to the Hygeia on the 2nd. Treatment: nourishment; ammonia and cinchona every two hours; phenacetin grs. v. every four hours, if temperature above 103° F., quinine grs. v. thrice a day and sponging frequently with water at temperature of 75° F.

JULY, 1894.

4

1

106-

105-

104-

103-

102-

101-

100-

99-

98-

108

$2.

Pulse

110

120

120

24

22

24 *20

24

Resp.

0

1

3

2

On the 3rd he was delirious, complaining of being cold and the sponging was left off. Skin was moist and clammy; and there was a considerable degree of cyanosis; he had no sleep during the night; always wanting to get out of bed; plague pulse, but not intermittent. Ammonia and cinchona every two hours as before and quinine grs. v. three times a day. At 7.30 p.m. the temperature was 106° F. and he was now sponged, but without much effect in reducing the temperature; his pulse was still fairly good though dicrotic but not intermittent.

At 2 a.m. on the 4th while the Sister was calling me to see another patient, he got out of bed to go to stool, his attendant having gone to procure ice, and when I went into the ward the attendant was putting him into bed. I found him pulseless and moribund. He had ether injections frequently, hot mustard and water to the heart, ammonia to the nostrils; but all of no avail and he died at 2.30 a.m.

Remarks.-The rapid onset of delirium in this case and the extreme cyanosis which developed on the third day betokened a fatal ending, but the mere coincidence of the attendant and the Sister having to leave the ward at the same time brought about an earlier death than was anticipated. At this time we were able to give an attendant to each bad case on the Hygeia in order to prevent as far as possible any accident occurring. It was noticeable that there was a greater tendency to heart failure in Asiatic patients than in Europeans. In this case also the delirium was low, muttering and stupid from the commencement-I much prefer a trace of violence with a tendency to argument, in which case the patient's vitality is generally considerable and there is not the rapid succumbing that is so often seen when the delirium partakes of the stupid dazed type. Note in this case the fall of four

221

222

41

degrees of temperature after two five-grain doses of phenacetin, one example of what I have noted elsewhere in this report that in a severe case when the temperature is affected readily to this extent by antipyretics it is not a favourable sigu. It shows, I think, that the circulatory system is in a condition where it cannot stand much depressing influence.

Case VII.--English. Et. 23.

This man was on the whitewashing party for twenty days before becoming ill. Felt sick with slight shivering on 8th June. On the 10th June admitted to the Hygeia, with vomiting, tempe- rature 105° F. no headache, small femoral bubo in left groin, yellow furred tongne, pulse full and bounding, but yet easily compressible.

JUNE, 1894.

10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17

18 19 20

21

22 23 24 25 26

106-

105-

104-

103-

102-

101-

100-

99.

98-

www

Pulse

Resp.

Between the 10th and the 13th the bubo increased very much in size, having a boggy feeling and with a good deal of surrounding redness. It was also very painful. Treated by lead and opium the inflamatory appearance disappeared in four days. On the 21st the bubo was opened and there was a considerable amount of pus evacuatel. Treatment :--tepid sponging, quinine grs. v. three times a day. Bromide of potash grs. XL. and hydrate of chloral grs. xx. every night during the period of delirium with plenty of iced beer and usual nourishment. Discharged on the 27th July.

When examined in the beginning of December this patient is found to have very tumultuous action of the heart which is most irregular at times. There is no bruit to be discovered. The apex beat is just outside the nipple linc. The pulse is 122 when sitting at rest, and irregular. IIc appears

He very nervous and shaky. He frequently suffers from headache, but evidently of not so severe a character as his fellow soldiers. The spleen shows no enlargement. There is an occasional cramp of the muscles of the front of the left thigh, evidently due to some implication of the anterior crural nerve in the cicatrix. He frequently suffers from shortness of breath and palpitation, more especially when marching up a hill,

Remarks. This case was one which showed a great amount of after-change in the nervous mechanism of the vascular system and led one to suspect that the enervation of the heart had been permanently affected by the disease.

Case VIII.--Chinese. Et. 38.

Was admitted to the Government Civil Hospital on the evening of the 8th June, suffering from incised wound of the scalp about six inches long with severe hæmorrhage. The woman fainted whilst in the receiving room. The wound was caused by her falling down stairs. On the 9th she was very stupid but did not have the appearance or symptoms of a patient with compression or concussion of the brain. On the evening of the 9th plague was diagnosed and she was removed on the following morning to Kennedytown where she died the same evening from plague. It was remarkable how very few similar accidents occurred. Here there was no fracture of the vertex and

.

45

no sign of any fracture at the base of the skull.

The only thing that was remarked, when she was admitted, was the extreme difficulty in stopping the hæmorrhage and even after the wound had been. stitched up a considerable amount of oozing took place. Her stupid condition for the first twenty- four hours was attributed to the loss of blood, but as undoubted symptoms of plague developed on the evening of the 9th the falling down stairs, the fainting-fit and the copious hæmorrhage were all explained.

-1

Case IX.--Parsee. Et. 22.

JUNE, 1894.

11 12 13

14

15

106-

105-

104-

103-

102-

101-

100-

99-

A

98-

Pulse

Resp.

This chart is an exception to the rule as here it took four days at least for the temperature to reach the primary maximum. Such a long time was very rare indeed during the epidemic, almost every other case reaching the primary maximum within forty-eight hours.

Case X-Chinese. Æt. 28.

Admitted 17th June, 1894 with fever and vomiting during the previous twenty-four hours. Right femoral bubo, no headache.

JUNE, 1894.

JULY.

17 18 19 20: 21

22

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

1 2 3

106-

105-

104-

103-

102-

101-

100-

99-

98-

.

223

:

224

46

On the 22nd, five days after her admissiou, a well marked lymphangitis was noticed on the dorsum of the right foot. A small sore between the first and second toes being noticed; this was not visible the day before. The lymphangitis rapidly spread, until it reached up to the femoral bubo. I never noticed a case of plague where lymphangitis preceded the bubo; several cases were sent in with lymphangitis supposed to be suffering from plague, but all of these were not cases of plague. Of course it is difficult to say that there was never lymphangitis before lymphadenitis and when the statement is made that lymphangitis, when it did occur, always followed the inflammation of the gland or glands, it is meant that no redness along the line of the lymphatics was apparent, no hardness was noticed, and no uneasiness or pain felt. The lymphangitis on the postero-internal part of the leg went on to suppuration with extensive sloughing extending from the level of the internal malleolus to the knee and required free incision. After a lengthened convalescence she was discharged on August 20th, repeated attacks of lymphangitis above the knee having occurred for two or three days at a time during that period.

JULY, 1894.

4 5 6

7

8

9

10 11

12 13.14

15 16 17 18 19 20

106-

105-

104-

103-1

102-

101-

100-

90-

98-

Case XI.-Indian. Et. 20.

Was admitted for observation on the 22nd June, having suffered for the previous twelve hours from headache which he thought was due to malarial fever and in consequence had treated himself with quinine. He was suspected of having plague by Dr. STEDMAN as he was an inmate of a house which had already supplied us with two patients. On the morning of the 23rd the following note was made.

"A right cervical (parotid) bubo appeared during last night and is now very large." During the course of the day the surrounding oedema became very great, extending almost right round the neck and swallowing was a matter of extreme difficulty. The breathing was also con- siderably embarrassed and he rapidly sauk dying at 8 a.m. on the 24th. His temperature chart is subjoined.* The fall in temperature was caused by phenacetin grs. viii and was another instance of a bad case, easily affected by antipyretics, rapidly proving fatal. The end was sudden, as after passing a motion in the bed pan he turned over and died.

Case XII--Jewess.

Et. 24.

Admitted at 8 p.m. on 30th June, with an cnlarged gland on the left side of the neck. (Temperature chart as follows.†) The history which we got of this case was as follows. On the 24th June, she first became ill "giddy and swimming in the head.” On the following morning she had a temperature of 105° F. She had quinine and phenacetin. On the evening of the 26th she had slight vomiting and pain in the chest and was prescribed a mixture of ascetate of ammonia, antipyrin and digitalis. On the 26th she was "very bad.” It seems that about the 21st June, she first began to pass blood in the urine and after that day blood was almost constantly present in the urine until admission. On the morning of the 30th the swelling on the left side of the neck is said to have com- menced. Menstruation finished on the 23rd and returned on the 27th for one day only. One year ago she bad a child, a well marked mitral bruit being present at the time of confinement.

On examination on the 1st July she complained of a general pain or soreness confined to the left half of the body. On palpation of the left kidney she complained of pain on pressure and mentioned that she had frequent attacks of pain there; no pain over the right kidney. There was some tenderness over the left ovary; there was a well marked regurgitant mitral bruit-no œdema of the lower extremities. The gums, lips and conjunctivæ blanched. No bacilli were found in the blood by KITASATO. No blood was now found in the urine, only a deposit of mucus. Diagnosis suspended. July 2nd complained of much pain in left hip shooting down the leg again. No bacilli found by KITASATO. Diagnosis "not plague." July 8th: deep fluctuation in the abscess of the neck; a small incision was made, but no pus was evacuated on account of the patient's violent behaviour. On July 10th chloroform was administered and pus evacuated from the centre of the glaud, a small drain-

*

Temperature chart has been lost since this was written, the fall mentioned was about 4° F. This chart has also gone amissing.

47

age tube being inserted. On this date KITASATO again failed to find bacilli in the blood. August 3rd the glands on the right side of the neck were slightly enlarged but these went down under lead and opium fomentatious. She was kept under observation in a separate ward by herself until August the 8th when she was discharge.

Remarks.--This was a difficult case for diagnosis. The case was sent in by three medical men as a case of plague. Surgeon PENNY who saw her first in hospital had doubts as to the correctness of this diagnosis and ou the following morning Dr. MOLYNEUX and myself saw her in consultation with him. The reasons why we thought it not a case of plague were absence of facies and anxiety generally met with, tongue clean, no cerebral symptoms such as she would be sure to have had after a week's illness if suffering from plague-in fact it was quite the reverse, she was perfectly clear in the head and rational. The pulse was also different from either of the types usually met with in the later stages of plague. The history of the case looked as if she had been suffering from renal colic whilst the enlargement of the gland was, I believe, a coincidence. Hysteria was also

well marked.

On the 9th July KITASATO also examined some of the discharge from the wound made in the gland and found no bacilli, but as iodoform had been applied freely the day before, no value can be attached to this observation. On the 10th, when under chloroform and the gland could be freely exposed, it had a totally different appearance from that of a plague-infected gland. Instead of being of a dark blue colour and soft in consistence it was yellow with an outside zone of hardness, which en- closed a cheesy purulent centre and while operating I thought that it must have been of somewhat longer duration than eleven days. Besides this the fact that frequent and careful examination of the blood by KITASATO proved negative further convinced us that the case was not one of plague.

Case XIII-English. Et. 23.

Admitted 2nd June with a temperature of 101° F. A right inguino-femoral bubo. Slight frontal headache. First became ill same morning. Temperature chart as follows:-

JUNE, 1894.

2 3 4

5

106-

6 7 8 9

10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18

105-

104-

103-

102-

101-

100-

99-

98-

Pulse

80 80

92 84

102 8+ 80 84 72

108 100 8+ $8 76

Resp.

During the 3rd of June his temperature was practically normal and led us to doubt the accuracy of diagnosis. No antipyretics had been administered. On the morning of the 4th, however, his temper- ature shot up to 104° F. and he rapidly became delirious. On the 5th his condition was much worse— pulse dierotic, and very delirious. Has not slept for three nights. Treatment now ice-bags to head and nape of neck, tepid sponging, quinine grs. x three times a day and at 9.30 p.m. he had grain morphia hypodermically, after which he slept most of the night. As will be seen from his temperature chart he rapidly improved and was discharged on the 27th July. The bubo suppurated and had to be opened about the 11th.

On being examined early in December it is found that he has never regained his lost weight and he is now over a stone lighter than he was before disease attacked him. There is some enlargement of the cardiac dulness, the apex beat being just outside the nipple line. He has slight enlargement of the spleen, but has suffered frequently from ague. He is often troubled by occipital headache which is occasionally severe; and has had, on several occasions, to fall out of parade. He is very nervous and apparently easily excited and to a medical eye is evidently not the same man physically that he was. His pulse, however, is not nearly so fast as No. VII's, varying between

90 and 96.

225

226

48

Remarks. As already mentioned, the temperature on the second day was somewhat peculiar and no other case during the epidemic showed a practically normal temperature for almost the second twenty-four hours of the disease. He was seen by Dr. HORDER. of Pakhoi on admission, who concurred in our diagnosis, and he was also somewhat surprised to note this temperature. Had we not seen this man on the 2nd when his temperature was 101° F. it is quite possible that this case might have been put down as one where the bubo was apparent forty-eight hours before the fever began. It is to be noted also that when the temperature again went up on the 4th, the onset of delirium was particularly rapid. The want of sleep during the first two nights, I think, was caused by the anxiety on the part of the patient which necessarily was present in every European case, and which was more than usually well marked in this man. The other soldiers who suffered from the disease were examined at the same time as the two Cases VII. and XIII. One suffered from occasional occipito-cervical pain and shortness of breath whilst another had a tumultuous action of the heart with irregular pulse and frequent vertical headache. The urine of all was normal, no albumen. Although these men were discharged from the Hygeia on the 27th July some of them had to remain a considerable time in the Military Hospital on account of the indolent character of the ulcers left after the buboes.

Case XIV.--Eurasian. Æt. 49.

On August 3rd some blood was sent for examination and as plague bacilli were found in it the patient was removed to Kennedytown. History :-Was at the Alice Memorial Branch nursing ou Saturday, 21st July. She has had fever for eight days. Temperature chart affixed.

Her tongue showed the typical advanced condition of plague. Dyspnoea was considerable and the pulse very feeble and slightly intermittent. There was no bubo to be seen. She complained of considerable abdominal pain about the umbilicus. She died the same evening.

JULY, 1894.

AUGUST.

27 28 29 30 31

1

2

3 4

106-

105-

104-

103-

102-

101

100

99

98-

Post mortem examination on the following morning was partial; the spleen was soft and slightly enlarged, there were no externally visible swollen glands in the femoral, axillary or cervical regions, but there was a considerably enlarged and congested mesenteric gland almost directly situated at the seat of pain; in addition there were several other glands which were enlarged but not to such a considerable extent as the one before mentioned. There were no hemorrhages in the abdomen. Bacilli were numerous in the glands and spleen. There was no inflammation of the intestines or stomach and no hæmorrhages on the mucous surface of the latter organ.

Case XV--Chinese. Et. 21.

Was admitted on August 7th. This patient was sent by Surgeon-Major JAMES from the Tung Wah Hospital. On arriving at the Government Civil Hospital for bacteriological examination of the blood, he had a convulsion. Bacilli were found in the blood, so he was sent down to Kennedy- town. He had never had fits before. Had been sick for three days. On examination it was found that he protruded the tongue to the left side-the left leg and left arm were paralysed; pupils equal; left side of palate also paralysed; the left facial nerve apparently not affected. After the convulsions he was immediately conscious, and before they occurred he could sometimes tell that they were coming on. During the last two days he has had numerous fits. There was no involuntary urination. "He says a fit is now coming on and he thinks so because of a feeling in his chest. During the fit, the eyes are turned to the left. The muscles of the paralysed left limbs jerk somewhat but not enough to raise the limbs off the bed as they do on the opposite and sound side. The mouth is drawn over to the left side and the head jerks over to the left side also. During the fit the pulse is rather weak and remains so for a short time after." On the 8th the paralysis of the previous day had become only

49

There was slight

paresis and the tongue when protruded did not come out so much to the left. paresis of the left facial nerve on this date and the fits were not nearly so frequent. 9th August: bad only one fit during the night and one during the morning up to noon. He now lies all the time with an india rubber ring to bite or insert between his teeth. He had a large number of short fits on the morning of the 10th, but they were of much shorter duration--the longest only lasting for about half a minute. The grasp in the left hand was now fairly good, but could not perform fine movements with his fingers. These short fits gradually diminished in number and on the 16th it was noted that they are confined to irritation of the leg muscles. He was now very drowsy; this was ascribed to the amount of bromide of potash that he was then having, grs. xxx. four times a day. On the 26th it was noted that there had been no twitchings of the leg muscles for about four days, and the patellar reflexes were somewhat exaggerated. There was no álbumen at any time in the urine--he never had a fit before his attack of plague and never had one after 26th of August until the day of his discharge. Remarks:-Any diagnosis in this case is difficult to make; evidently a unilateral lesion was present, but its exact location is doubtful. With the experience of Case XVII in mind it is quite possible there was no hæmorrhage. Here the man's cerebral condition between fits was good, while Case XVII was unconscious all the time, and I do not think there were enough symptoms On several of meningitis to say that it was severe enough to account for the above condition. occasions the convulsion distinctly commenced in the left thumb and my opinion at the time was that a small hemorrhage was present in the region of the "arm" centre at the upper part of the right fissure of Rolando, but I am afraid now this would not explain all the symptoms.

227

Case XVI-Japanese. Et. 23.

Admitted 15th August, 1894, with slight dyspucea, headache, furred tongue, slight pain in the left femoral region and tenderness on pressure. Has had fever for some days. The glands in the left femoral region are slightly enlarged. Temperature chart. Bacilli were found in blood by Dr. TAKAKI on the day of admission. On the 18th a number of roseolar spots appeared over the upper part of the abdomen and chest, with gurgling and tenderness in the right iliac region. The bowels were constipated but stool was very light yellow, and the patient kept on fluid nourishment as typhoid was suspected in addition. On the 19th was seen by Professor AOYAMA who also said typhoid." On the 20th again plague bacilli were found in the blood. There were several crops of spots. The patient was discharged well on the 11th October.

66

106-

105-

104-

103-

102-

101-

100-1

AUGUST, 1894.

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

90-

98-

Remarks.--The only result we could come to in this case was that it was one of mixed infection, typhoid and plague. Typhoid is one of the most likely diseases to be mistaken for plague, when no history can be got from the patient. Patients brought in by the search parties often could not give us any assistance and in this case we were all the more cautious as on one previous occasion a diagnosis of plague was made when post mortem examination showed the disease from which the patient had suffered was typhoid but this was before the bacteriology of the disease was properly known.

228

,

50.

Case XVII--Chinese. Et. 6.

Admitted 1st August, 1894, at 4 a. m. with convulsion, and temperature of 105° F. On admission had grs. iv. of phenacetin. I was called to see her at 8 a.m. and found her comatose with a temperature of 108.8° F. Recognized her as an out-patient seen two days before, who had com-. plained of slight fever with a few blotches of what I took to be urticaria on her face, and for which small doses of quinine and magnesia were ordered. She was immediately put into a cold bath (75° F. at that time of year) which was cooled down to 55° F. by the use of ice. When the temperature had come down, on examination it was found that the right pupil was dilated and there was internal strabismus of the left eye. The head was turned over to the right side all the time. On pressure in the left groin, the left leg was drawn up slightly but as the child was unconscious nothing else could be elicited. As there was the possibility that it was a case of plague, the blood was examined by Dr. TAKAKI as well as myself without definite result ;--but on some blood being withdrawn from the spleen by a hypodermic syringe numerous bacilli were found. A hæmorrhage in the brain was diagnosed but its situation could not be fixed. The child remained unconscious all day in almost the same condition, never moving at all, and died at 8.40 p.m.

AUGUST, 1894.

M

1

E

2

109-

108-

107-

106-

105-

104-

103-

102-

101-

100-

99-

98-

97-

Pulse

Resp.

The post mortem examination was made the following morning. The left femoral region was first cut down on through about half an inch of fat, and a solitary dark blue enlarged gland about the size of a cracknut was found. There were no glands enlarged in the right femoral region. There were numerous mesenteric glands inflamed and slightly enlarged: the spleen enlarged and follicles swollen. The meninges were intensely congested as was also the superficial brain matter in proximity, especially the Pons Varɔlii and Medulla. No hæmorrhage was found after exceedingly careful examination.

Case XVIII.--Chinese. ¿Et, 53:

This was the

Admitted 12th May, 1894. Died on the 13th after having been five days sick. first case we saw which had a hemorrhagic bleb. The bubo was in the right femoral region and the bleb was situated on the outer side of the right ankle. It was about the size of a dollar and the epidermis rose gradually over the sanguineum fluid until the swelling seemed to have a height of about half an inch. From the time of his admission until the time of his death twenty-eight hours

51

later this did not increase in area, unfortunately we were not able to find out how long it had been in existence. There were no blebs on any other part of the body. The bleb when pricked a few hours before death showed a base similar in appearance to that seen in the vesicles of moist spreading gangrene. Another case admitted on same date, aged 42, presented two blebs on the right arm, which developed on the 14th May, and were of the same character. This man died the morning following their appearance.

Case XIX.--Chinese. Et. 15.

Was admitted on the 12th May with fever and delirium. On the 14th buboes developed in the cervical region left groin and left axilla, all of which soon became very painful. On the 15th hæmatemesis occurred. On the 24th numerous abscesses, evidently pyæmie in character had developed in the right side and numerous situations on the head and neck. This man had also most severe diarrhoea. This was the first case we had where pyæmic symptoms were well developed.

MAY, 1894.

12 13

14

15 16 17

18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27

28

106-

105-

101-

103-

102-

101

100-

99+

98.

1

2

106-

105.

104-

103-

102-

101

100-

99.

98.

JUNE, 1894.

:

៩.

3

4

5

6 7 8 9 10 11

12

أمام

13 14 15 16 17

229

2

230

52

Case XX-Chinese. Æt. 20.

Admitted 12th May, 1894. This was a case where the respiration was very hurried before death. On the 13th May his temperature was 105° F. His pulse was 112. His respirations were 66, cyanosis extreme, his face being perfectly livid. He died on the 14th May. A short time before death with respirations 82 and pulse imperceptible. When the respirations go above 40 without well marked lung conditions to cause greater rapidity of respiration, then generally expect death.

Case XXI--Chinese. Et. 17.

Admitted 12th May, 1894, to the Government Civil Hospital with the diagnosis malarial fever. Treatment: antipyrin grs. x. every three hours if temperature above 103° F. and quinine grs. x. three times a day. On the 18th May although no bubo was apparent the case was diagnosed plague and he was removed to the Hygeia and on the following morning a cervical bubo appeared. The following was the temperature chart:--

13

106-

105-

101--

103-

102-

MAY, 1894.

15

16

17

18

19

20

101-

100-

99-

98-

126

112

100

118

112

116

114

Pulse

128

90

120

114

112

118

32

130

132

30

B4

30

Resp.

30

32

36

30

32

32

MAY, 1894.

21- 22

23

24 25

106-

105-

104-

103-

102

101-

100-

99-

98-

and shows another case with a long period of pyrexia, but in this case, different from case No. XXIV, there was no lung complication. It will be noticed that the large doses of antipyrin given brought his temperature down almost six degrees in twenty-four hours, but at this stage he was very collapsed, and stimulants were ordered freely. Thinking over the case later, this collapse ought to have put one on the lookout for plague, as I have never seen a case of malarial fever collapse with the same amount of antipyrin; the doses given were, of course, very serious doses for a man suffering from plague. The bubo here did not appear for a week and immediately it did appear the inau's condition became worse.

53

Case XXII.-Chinese. Et. 24. F.

MAY, 1894.

19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28

14

15

16

17

18

106-

1054

104-

103-4

102-

101-

100-1

99-

98-

H

Admitted 14th May, 1894, with well marked plague.. On the way to hospital had vomited a considerable quantity of blood. Notwithstanding this the pulse was still full, though rapid. On the 15th she had hemorrhage from the gums. On the 16th she had more hæmorrhage from the gums and considerable hæmorrhage from the vagina. The breath was most offensive, having a smell like that of a patient seized with hemorrhage from a gangrenous lung. This patient had petechia on the arms and face and curious to relate, on the 24th May, extensive desquamation of the skin in several parts of the body was evident, but I do not think that this can be put down as a result of the plague. This woman's skin was always dry and rough, in addition to being very dirty when she came into hospital, and I have seen many similar cases in Chinese which I can only describe as dirt desquamation. No special treatment for the hæmorrhage was given. The delirium. in this case was very slight and it is just possible that this to some extent is accounted for by the considerable amount of blood which she lost. She was discharged cured.

Case XXIII. -Chinese.

Admitted on 16th May died on the 19th. The temperature after death rose to 108° F. the end being very rapid, and this was the nearest approach to death by hyperpyrexia that I saw during the .epidemic.

Admitted 19th May, 1894.

Case XXIV.--Chinese. Et. 18.

Showed the following temperature chart. He died on the 31st May. This was a long period of pyrexia, complicated by boils (pyæmic abscesses) appearing on the 20th, and hæmoptysis on the 26th with considerable consolidation of the left lung. In this case I consider that the pyrexia in the later stages was due to the pneumonic condition--probably pyæmic abscess of lung.

17 18 19

20 21

22

106-

105-

MAY, 1894.

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

104-

103-

102-

101-

་་་་་་་་་

100-

99-

98-

231

i

:

232

54

Case XXV.--Chinese. Æt. 14,

Admitted 19th May, 1894. Showed the following temperature chart. In the first instance had a right axillary bubo and the notable point in her history was that on the 2nd June, fresh buboes in the right groin and left neck appeared which increased to a very considerable size and which in addition to the primary one suppurated.

MAY.

106

19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

JUNE, 1894.

1 2 3 4

105-

104-

103-

102-

101-

100+

99

98.

Case XXVI.--English. Et. 45.

""

Admitted to Civil Hospital 31st May, temperature 104° F. rising to 105° F. in the evening. Right axilliary bubo with very great surrounding edema developed during the night; removed to Hygeia in the morning. This was a very alcoholic subject who had been". on the beach for some time and who was an almost hopeless case whenever delirium set in. He died suddenly at 3 a.m. on June 5th after using the bed pan. There were many enquiries as to how this man became affected and doubts as to the correctness of diagnosis were freely expressed by people who did not know that he had been wandering about the slums of Taipingshan for the previous fortnight.

Case XXVII--English. t. 24.

Admitted 29th June, 1894. Sent in as a case of plague. Was found suffering from well marked lymphangitis and erythema of right leg, irritative bubo in right groin, temperature 102° F. Had been diagnosed on seeing bubo as plague. However, he had in addition a dirty foul ulcer on the dorsum of the foot which evidently was the cause of the above condition. He had none of the well marked symptoms of plague beyond "a bubo," and no bacilli were found in the blood or in the bubo. He had been a chronic alcoholic for some time. Under suitable treatment he got well in a few days.

Remarks.--This was one case of several sent in as plague, where evidently the practitioner sending them to Hospital either made a mistake or did not take sufficient time to make a careful examination, which was all the more necessary at that time as the moral effect of the announcement of "another European case of plague" was not reassuring to many European residents who were unable to get reliable information.

55

A CHINESE VIEW OF THE PLAGUE.

The following translation from a Chinese publication gives the latest theories and treatment of the plague, and as it is a peculiar document I give it in full. The translation has been kindly supplied by Mr. J. DYER BALL. It should be noticed that the author lays great stress on what one might term the "disinfection of the family well," I am convinced with a considerable amount of reason. Although the various wells through the City of Victoria are much better built than some of those I have seen in other Chinese places, and in the foregoing report I have given a guarded opinion as to the question of their pollution in Hongkong, still I feel pretty certain that in Canton these wells had a good deal to do with the propaga- tion of the Epidemic. The treatment recommended closely resembles what I saw in the Chinese Hospitals here and represents the most advanced views of Chinese Medicine.

Notification by Planchette by the God of War of precious instructions to rescue the world—a harmless remedy to drive away the plague. Do not consider the words as too many. It is urgently requested of you that you must carefully read this and reverence paper with characters on it.

Whereas we have heard that calamities are caused by atmospheric influences and destiny-Good deeds can cause an avoidance of them. The terrific plague has recently been prevalent; it depresses the hearts and is painful to the sight. Although already people of the whole place distribute prescriptions and medicines free, and offer up all manner of prayers to avert the calamity, which means are the best that men can devise as preventives, yet the noxious influences have not been swept away. The reason of this failure is because the people have not done all the good deeds that they should to move Heaven and gain its approval.

It so happened that the gentlemen of the Society for Offering up Good Deeds, who had been eye-witnesses of the existing calamity, on the night of the 5th day of the 3rd moon, fasted and bathed their persons and reverently invited the gods to proclaim by Planchette a cure for the plague, to help the world. By good luck they were favoured by the presence of Kwan Tai (the God of War) who descended from heaven to put his hand to the pen (of the Planchette) to write out his instructions which are more than a timely warning.

Really this god has an ardent desire to awaken the sleeping world and to instruct the people !

Should we not earnestly reform betimes?

With respect we record below the words of the Planchette in full:-

[This is followed by three sets of scribblings representing the markings of the planchette. The first is not like any writing at all, and no translation of its import is given. From what follows it is evidently intended to represent the halberd of the god. "Revelations by Planchette" Nos. 2 and 3 have, however, renderings of their meaning given as below. They are somewhat like writing.]

Revelation by Planchette No. 2 :--

The seal of Kwan So-and-So, Assistant Superintendent of the Depart-

ment governing Pestilences.

Revelation by Planchette No. 3:

Honesty, Bravery, Intelligence.

The unworthy know their unworthiness themselves.

Revelation by Planchette No. 4:—

I am the Great Han (dynasty) Kwan So-and-So.

I inform you who seek for medicine.

If worshippers ask concerning the things of the present,

You must know that the year has arrived at such a stage as not to be

peaceful;

And moreover near the city is a coal mine,

And irritating poison has collected for a long time and is very powerful. You at ordinary times are wicked and rude.

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56

In times of distress repent before the Buddhas and chant liturgies. It is difficult to escape from destiny.

Although there are charms and medicines, how can they be effectual? You say that Canton suffers from this plague;

But I tell you that Shantung and Shansai will be more in danger. There have already been warnings in Kingchow and Chihli. Why have you not yet repented of

Fate now makes no mistake.

your sins?

Firstly, men die because their destined existence ends.

Secondly, because they are punished for their secret iniquities.

The deaths now occurring only amount to ten or twenty per cent. of the

number destined to die.

The time is not yet up for the termination of this calamity.

Strictly speaking I should not divulge what heaven has designed; But with a view to protect children and sympathize with mankind, There is nothing like carrying out an advice of mine.

(If you do so) I shall myself attend to the matter.

See how I acted in my previous engagements:

On all sides the devils feared and the gods reverenced me.

I entreat those who have no righteous thoughts, who slaughter animals

as offerings to gods,

Who spend much on joss paper, incense and candles-

Can these deliver you from illnesses and prolong your lives?

Repent of your sins before me betimes,

Swearing before heaven that you will do so.

Who is not aware of my bravery and propitiousness?

You should neither secretly nor openly deceive your fellow-creatures.

Vow that you will perform a charitable deed.

And thus establish a proof of your contrition which is not of small value;

Or show some evidence by founding charitable institutions;

Or read my liturgy and follow to the letter the instructions therein

contained,

And when you have shown sufficiently that you have not deceived me,

Kwan,

If you read my liturgy for ten days, you will be heard.

I, Kwan, shall appear then in person.

You will then believe that I am to be revered and am propitious.

Revelation by Planchette No. 5:—

I, Kwan, was formerly favoured by the Emperor of the Ta Tsing (the present) dynasty by having conferred upon me certain additional titles (these are) Inspector of all the Buddhas and all the Gods, Superintendent of the host of Genii and other Demi-gods, Dispensor of Elixirs and Permits of Longevity (and Governor) of the Dark Land which causes death, and Overseer of Matters connected with the Buddha, K'e Lam. To which was added the title of Celestial Excellency. Again, thanks to the Gemmeous Ruler, Who, appre- ciating me for my loyalty, faithfulness and uprightness, allowed all important matters directed by him in connection with heaven to be passed by me before being put into force.

On the 24th day of the third moon, I went to the Tin Ts'ai Kwún to offer congratulations on his birthday, and to deliberate concerning the important matters of life and death of the human race. Mounting back to the three heavenly gates I happened just to meet the two Gods of Fire and Wind and the Star of Gold, Venus, holding the Imperial Decree, descending from heaven to mortal abodes in great haste. I stopped them and asked them concerning their mission. From them I learned that Heaven was exasperated and said that the world was overcrowded with people and had been for a long time increasingly harbouring wicked men; that even a small child of three feet in height was also full of evil deeds. Heaven had ordered Venus to go to the Palace of the Sea Dragon (Neptune) on a certain day of a certain moon to again cause floods in the rivers, to make the winds and the waters come into conflict, and the fire and the pestilence to burst out, which were to scourge and destroy more than one half of the population as a manifestation of the endless permutations of the creative power. I hurriedly stopped them and ran up to the Palace of Heaven in haste, and with a distressed heart memorialized the Gemmeous Ruler, praying that he (the Ruler) would bear in mind the virtue of

57

having consideration for human life. Now, thanks to the Gemmeous Ruler, who revoked two of his decrees, has limited the time for destruction to half a year.

In every city or town, should there have been the number of five thousand families who had repented and showed true evidence of reformation, the Inspectors of Human Merits and Demerits on duty were to be directed to memorialize (in favour of them) to the Heavenly Throne. Whereupon the Heavenly Throne ordered me, Kwan, to superintend matters connected with the Board of Pestilential Visitations, and to immediately despatch one hundred Inspectors of Merits and Demerits to each province, and one thousand spirits of the defunct virtuous and upright Government Officials and demons of the night, whose duty it should be to go amongst the human race to examine their deeds. So now we have devils and men in company with each other. Is it possible for you men of flesh to be aware of this? But demons of pestilence do not enter the doors of those who are filial to their parents and true to their friends, and you need not be alarmed if you are (such).

I hope you unworthy creatures will remember the report made by me, Kwan, interceding on your behalf and my deepest sympathy for you. You should also remember my ardent desire in making these revelations by Planchette. Doɔ not say that the calamity is now all over and that there is no danger. Of course, I have no right to reveal the secrets of Heaven without any reason; but I have been compelled to reveal them. Hence I have done so. I am apprehensive that one manuscript of any revelations would not induce people to carry out my intentions, thus frustrating the object of my urgent petition. Should any one be found presuming to blaspheme concerning these instructions of mine, then small offenders of this kind shall be consumed by the fire of pestilence; and as for the great offenders I shall order my orderly Chow Chong to put them to death with the halberd, which they are not to resent. Now as 1, Kwan, am the Assistant Su- perintendent of the Board of Pestilence people cannot escape from this calamity without my assistance. I, Kwan, am an upright and just god and am not such a god as those who covet animals offered in sacrifice and worship. This being so, are my instructions to be trifled with? If you really crave my protection, let the rich subscribe their names to benevolent institutions. When I find there is any evidence of this being done, I shall be satisfied that they are sincere and true. Let those who are poor, recite my liturgy. If I find that their hearts are in accord with my liturgy, I shall be satisfied that they are sincere and true.

Should women be unable to read my liturgy, let them each morning and night burn some sticks of incense, and pray aloud, which will move me; but nonc except those who are loyal and filial, honest and virtuous, should read my liturgy. This is important. But as to those who were formerly wicked and cruel but now have become filial and faithful to friends, those who used false weights and measures and who have become honest and upright and in general have changed from all their former evil deeds, it is not too late for these classes to repent. If

you are really sincere and will not deceive me, Kwan, you should swear before me and sketch out my precious halberd after the pattern given here, inserting in it the thirty-six circles which will serve as evidence of your sincerity.

Below it write the characters, "Assistant Superintendent of the Department governing Pestilences, the seal of Kwan So-and-So." These ten characters, together with the picture of the halberd, posted before the door of the house will prevent the demons of plague from disturbing you; but, on the other hand, if you, having not sworn before me and promised repentance, should have posted up my name without my authority, you shall not be treated with leniency, should this. your conduct, be reported to me by the Inspectors of Merits and Demerits. After your repentance you should immediately take the medicines I shall herein pre- scribe. In addition to so doing, burn some water purifying charms in your family wells and also throw into them some garlic and some kwún chung (medicine). This is a precaution against plagne because the water (in the family wells) is becoming colder and poisonous in the plague season, to which has been added the filthy flaid from the bodies of the dead rats which has percolated into them from the drains.

Without taking the above precautions nothing will be of avail in warding off the plague. Should there be any buboes on bodies of the sick, get some sharp pointed itching taro and rub it well on the chest and back and the joints of the bones. But as there are so many forms of diseases it is not easy for common

235

:

236

58

doctors to detect the symptoms of this disease. When the disease begins, more generally the head is giddy and it is accompanied with fever and cold at intervals, the mouth has a difficulty in articulating. If buboes appear on the skin with eruptions lined with red lines, use a silver needle to prick them, that the poisonous blood may ooze out; but if the dark poisonous blood has extended its attack to the heart the disease is highly dangerous, in which case get some sharp pointed. itching taro and boil it with water in a clean saucepan till the water becomes thick with it. It (the water) should then be taken internally. This will dissipate the dark poisonous blood.

I, Kwan, for this special purpose have here given these my revelations (by Planchette), my ardent and real desire being to look after the country and relieve the people.

Do not compare these my instructions to false words, then I shall feel honoured. If any person distributes twenty copies of this, he will save himself, and, if two hundred copies, his whole family.

Take two mace each of (1) Kwún Chung, Ngau Pong Tsz (47), Shán Chí Tsz (†), Forsythia suspensa (Lín Kiú), Kwai shan (), Libanotis (Fong Fung), China root from Yunnan (Wan Ling); Liquorice-root ( Kam Ts'o) one mace; half a

mace each of Atractylodes Chinensis or Rubra (Ts'ong Shut), Sz Ch'ün Justicia [or possibly contice] (Chun Lín), Areca Catechu (Pan Long), putchuk (★ Muk Heung); four mace of Cypress Pin Pak); three mace each of magnolia hypoleuca (Hau Pok), midsummer root [prepared from two or three Aroid plants] (Fát Há); five mace each of Evonymus Vieboldianus (?) (Wai Mau), roots of rushes (?) [phragmites (?)] (Lò Kan).

Should fever come on and buboes appear, boil the above medicines in water and take (the water) internally. In this illness sometimes there is a kind of evil wind enters into the chest. This wind will prevent the sufferer from swallowing and make him throw up any medicine he has taken. (If this is the case) first get one candarin weight of Tung Kwán powder and blow into the nostrils. For simultaneous purging and vomiting and cramp; for convulsions of infants, purging and vomiting where cooling medicines do no good with slight fever in the after- noon which is light during the day and heavy at night, with the eyes turning up: for these two ailments take away from the prescription the Ngau l'ong Tsz and Shán Chí Tsz, but boil the Yunnan China root and the Cypress, the Wai Mau and Lò with two mace each of Ts'ong Shut (Atractylodes Chinensis or Rubra) and Fok Heung (), and one inace of cloves and take the water internally.

As regards those who are really sincere and faithful and suffering from diseases (other than those mentioned here) for curing which different diseases the above medicines are not the proper remedies, I will personally go to their houses to treat them.

I will not retract these words. I expressly give these revelations with the pen of the Planchette.

Printed by NORONHA & CO., Printers to the Hongkong Government, Nos. 5, 7 & 9, Zetland Street, Hongkong.

95

HONGKONG.

REPORT SHEWING PROGRESS OF SPECIAL WORK CARRIED OUT FOR THE PREVENTION OF THE FURTHER SPREAD OF BUBONIC PLAGUE,

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of

His Excellency the Governor.

SANITARY Board, HONGKONG 21st October, 1895.

SIR,--Referring to our report dated the 7th of June (Government Notification No. 276 of 1895) we have now the honour to submit, for the information of the Board, the following further particulars of the progress of the special work entrusted to our joint directions.

HOUSE TO HOUSE VISITATION.

2. On the 1st of June the original detachment, consisting of 24 Police and 15 soldiers told off for this service, was reduced to 27 men working in three sections. Each section consisted of 4 soldiers, including 1 non-commissioned officer, and 4 Chinese constables in charge of an European Police constable. On the 15th of June the services of two of the sections were dispensed with, and to the remaining section was allotted the duty of visiting houses in the worst part of the City in the morning and in the afternoon of noting the destination of the passengers arriving by the Canton steamers. This section continued to discharge these duties until the end of July when the services of the Police and Military were discontinued.

3. The night steamers from Canton have been regularly watched by a detachment of Police in charge of Detective Inspector QUINCEY.

4. In appendix A will be found a statement of the number of houses inspected and of the number of passengers tracked to their destination. In all 15,147 inspections of houses have been made and 6,006, passengers from Canton followed to their destination after leaving the steamers.

5. It is gratifying to be able to report that the attitude of the public during the examination of houses by the search parties has been friendly throughout and that the conduct of those engaged on the ervice has been good. Although none of the house visitation parties discovered any cases of plague, we are of opinion that the surprise visits made from time to time in various parts of the City have had a salutary effect in securing the prompt removal of the sick either to hospital or to places outside the Colony.

THE BUBONIC PLAGUE.

6. At the date of our last report only 5 cases of bubonic plague were known to have occurred since the day on which the first case was reported. After an interval of more than a month, viz., on the 14th June Le disease re-appeared in Holland Street, Kennedy Town-two cases from No. 9 and 1 from a matshed situated on private property at the south end of the lane. On the following day (the 15th) 4 cases occurred in a room on the first floor of No. 10, Heung Lane, in the Sheung Wan District, and a further ase from the adjoining house, viz., No. 12 was reported the next day (16th). Particulars of these cases as well as those that occurred subsequently will be found in appendix B to this report. Me: 7.

7. Five persons from No. 10 and one from No. 12, Heung Lane-the rest of the inmates having escaped before the Police arrived to take charge of the houses-were placed under observation in one of the "marriage boats," or native marine hotels, specially chartered for this service and anchored at the back of Stone Cutter's Island.

8. Five cases having occurred within two days in these two houses alone, it was decided at 3 p.m. on the 17th, after a close inspection of the other houses in this part of the lane, and on a joint certificate by the Acting Medical Officer of Health and the Assistant Superintendent of the Civil Hospital, to remove the occupants of the next two houses, viz., Nos. 14 and 16 until such time as the premises could be satisfactorily disinfected and cleansed. The majority accordingly proceeded to Canton the same evening, having declined the proffered accommodation afloat; the rest were housed in one of the marriage boats.

9. On the 17th of June at 10 p.m. a man suffering from plague entered the Tung Wah Hospital and stated that he had been living in No. 10, Heung Lane, having left the house before the arrival of the Police. He was unable to give a clear account of his movements during the interval.

10. Two cases of plague developed among those segregated from Nos. 10 and 12, Heung Lane, viz., one from No. 10 (on the 18th) and one from No. 12 (on the 20th). Altogether eight cases of plague occurred in these two houses in Heung Lanc.

11. The other cases do not call for any special remarks beyond those stated in the body and at the foot of the schedule. Not a single case has been reported since the 16th ultimo.

2

12. With regard to the segregating of persons found in infected premises it has been the practice in all cases to allow them the option of proceeding to Canton or of being housed in one of the marriag boats. In the majority of instances the former alternative has been readily accepted, only 21 person being provided with accommodation afloat. On the 26th June the last batch was released.

DISINFECTION OF HOUSES.

13. In respect of the disinfection of houses in which cases of bubonic plague have occurred provisions of Bye-law No. 25, made under section 13 of Ordinance 15 of 1894, have been rigidly enforced, and every article destroyed that could not be satisfactorily disinfected. In the case of the houses in Heung Lane, after fumigation with sulphur and clearing out all the moveable contents, the floors, walls and ceilings were thoroughly saturated with the acid solution of perchloride of mercury as recommended in a Memorandum of the 26th August, 1892, by Dr. R. THORNE THORNE of the Medical Department of the Local Government Board.

14. It will be observed that most of the cases of bubonic plague occurred in No. 6 Health District Mr. HORE, the District Inspector, is deserving of praise for the painstaking way in which he discharged a trying and, to say the least, disagreeable duty.

LATRINE DISINFECTION.

15. The addition of Chlorinated Lime to the night-soil in public latrines, which had been discontinued at the end of May, was resumed in the case of the Heung Lane Latrine on the outbreak of bubonic plague in that locality and maintained until all danger of a further development of the disease in the vicinity had disappeared. For failing to comply with the Board's order in this matter and for a breach of one of the latrine bye-laws the keeper was fined $50 by the presiding Magistrate.

MEZZANINE FLOORS AND CUBICLES.

16. The work involved in enforcing compliance with the provisions of sections 7 and 8 of Ordinance 15 of 1894, the controlling of which had been delegated to us as a Select Committee of the Board, made satisfactory progress in the case of the worst class of houses in the City especially in districts Nos. 7 and 8, at the West, and Nos. 1 and 2 at the East end of the city. As, however, the Inspectors in charge of the Central Districts of the city proceeded it became evident that in granting permission for the retention of cocklofts in rooms partitioned into separate compartments the practice hitherto followed of dealing with each case on its merits could not be successfully pursued, and that clearly defined conditions applicable to all cases should be drawn up for the guidance of the Executive.

17. The question as to whether the owner or occupier should be held responsible for complying with the law was also fully considered. In many cases the cocklofts are the property of the tenants; in others they belong to the owner. The Committee therefore decided to adopt the plan that had been found to work so well in the case of the illegal occupation of basements, viz., of serving the notice on both the owner and occupier. The notice on the occupier specified in schedule C to our last report was therefore discontinued and a new form, after meeting with the approval of the Attorney General adopted, (appendix C).

18. The conditions drawn up by the Committee on the subject of cocklofts in buildings erected before and after the passing of The Closed Houses and Insanitary Dwellings Ordinance (15 of 1894) which, after submission to and approval by the full Board, were published in the Government Gazette and in the English and Chinese newspapers, will be found embodied in the notifications included in appendix D.

19. Up to date, notices with copies of the Board's conditions attached, to comply with the provisions of sub-section 1 of section 7 and sub-section b of section 8, have been served on the owners and occupiers in the case of 433 cocklofts and cubicles. So far this change of tactics has met with the best results, and it is confidently hoped that within six months all illegal cocklofts will have been

removed.

BASEMENTS.

20. A complete list of the basements illegally occupied on the 1st of April, and on the owners and occupiers of which notices have been served, will be found in appendix E. The return does not include the very large number of basements in No. 7 District which were closed during the epidemic of plague last year and which are among the worst in the whole City. Great credit is due to Acting Inspector MACEWEN for the energy he has displayed in preventing their re-occupation as dwellings.

21. Under our joint personal supervision the whole of the basements in districts Nos. 4, 5 and 6, have been inspected at night. In all 244 inspections have been made before, and 140 after, midnight

The District Inspectors, Messrs. BURNETT, REIDIE and HORE, are doing their utmost to prevent their now illegal occupation.

PERMITS FOR COCKLOFTS AND BASEMENTS.

22. In a memo. dated the 9th of July (appendix F) the Committee referred for the consideration of the full Board the question as to whether permits for the retention of cocklofts, under section and for the occupation of basements under section 6, should be granted to the owner or occupier.

occupier. We are of opinion that the fullest publicity should be given to the fact that the Board has unanimously decided to grant such permits to the landlord only.

!

GENERAL REMARKS.

23. Although it may appear somewhat hazardous in the case of a disease like the bubonic plague, as the origin and spread of which so little is known, we think it probable that the Colony has now seen he last of the disease in 1895. The widespread fear that the outbreak in Heung Lane was but the ginning of a formidable epidemic has happily not been realised. Twenty-six cases are known to have curred; all died. If the particulars specified in appendix B are closely examined it will be found that among the later cases the disease showed no signs of abatement in point of virulence. The experience of this year would seem to demonstrate that the disease was nipped in the bud, and an epidemic averted by the prompt removal and segregation of the inmates and the disinfection and cleansing of the infected premises.

The drastic measures it was deemed necessary to adopt were fully justified by the nature

and the circumstances attending the outbreak.

24. The question here very naturally arises what are the prospects of a recurrence of the disease in the early spring of next year? A vast improvement in the sanitary condition of the Colony has unquestionably been effected during the last 12 months, but much still remains to be done. In our opinion no measure of sanitary reform calls for more prompt and vigorous action than that of clearing away the obstructions in back-yards and in the back parts of premises so as to provide a suitable and adequate area for the admission of light and air. This has been done already in many houses in the City. In Ileung Lane the sanitary character of the houses, in which cases of plague originated, has heen completely changed by this simple and by no means costly structural alteration. We submit that no consideration of Departmental economy should be allowed to interfere with the early carrying

ut of this most desirable reform.

We have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your obedient Servants,

WM. C. H. HASTINGS, Acting Captain Superintendent of Police.

W. EDWARD CROW,

Assistant Secrctury and Superintendent.

Appendix A.

Number of inspections of houses made by 3 sections (A, B and C) of Police and Soldiers from 1st to 15th June.

Section.

Nos. of Health Districts.

Strength of party. Lodging houses. Tenement houses.

Total.

A

حلم

1, 2 and 4

419

2,025

2,644

B

5

763

1,257

2,020

C

6, 7 and 8

9

2,957

532

3,489

Grand Total,...

27

4,139

4,014

8,153

Number of inspections of houses made by one section of Police and Soldiers from the 16th June to the 31st July.

Period.

Nos. of Health Districts.

Strength of party. Lodging houses. Tenement houses.

Total.

16th to 30th June

6, 7 and 8

1st to 31st July

various

695

1,442

2,077

874

4,043

4,917

Grand Total,.....

1,509

5,485

6,994

Number of passengers arriving from Canton watched to their destination by one Section (B) of Police and Soldiers.

Period,

No. of

passengers,

June 1st to 15th.

June 16th to 30th.

July 1st to 31st.

1,451

1,414

3,141

Total.

6,006

W. EDWARD Crow,

Soreturn and Superintend

དངས་པ། ། ་ ོ

Appendix B.

CASES OF BUBONIC PLAGUE REPORTED DURING 1895.

8,153

1st July.

Total.

the infected mic averted

experience

> found that

wn to have

vas but the

is now seen

c plague, as

the nature

Appendix B.

CASES OF BUBONIC PLAGUE REPORTED DURING 1805.

Date

No. of

5. of

of

ise.

Occurrence.

Health

District.

28th April,

5

29th

"

29th

"

6th May,

Oth

"}

14th June,

14th

"

14th

>>

15th

"

10

15th

"

15th

6

}}

15th

13

16th

"

14

17th

>>

15 18th

"

20th

"}

24th

30th

10 C2 COCO 1 00 00 00 00 ❤❤ÛÛÛÜÜÜÜ

2, Pound Lane,

Do.,

10, Heung Lane,

6

Residence of Patient previous to Discovery, Treatment or Segregation.

91, Praya Central,.. 27, Stone Nullah Lane, 79, Queen's Road West,

4, Wing Lok Street,.......(a) |

9, Holland Street, ......

Matshed above Holland Street,..

Do.,

Do.,

Do.,

12, Heung Lane,

Floor.

Name.

Sex.

Age.

Date and Hour of Admission into Tung Wa Hospital.

Date and Hour of

Admission

into Kennedy Town Hospital.

Date and Hour

of

Death.

First,

Sam Shu Wai,

Male,

42

28th April,

9 p.m.

Lai Tui, . . .

....

Female,

37

29th "

1 p.m.

29th April, 4.30 p.m.

29th April, 29th

5 p.m.

"

8.40 p.m.

"

Lau Yam,

Male,

Unknown 29th

"

3 p.m.

29th

6

p.m.

2nd May,

7.15 a.m.

Lami Su,

Female,

13

6th May,

11 a.m.

Third,

Wong Kiu,

Male,

25.

9th "

11 a.m.

6th May, 12.30 p.m. Oth "

6th

"1 11.20 p.m.

1.45 p.m.

12th

5 a.m.

Second,

Wong Tsun Ho,

··

Female,

17

14th June,

6.30 a.m.

14th June, 11.10 a.m.

14th June,

9 p.nl.

Tsoi Mak Wan,

Male,

9

14th

5.15 p.in.

15th

"

1 p.m.

17th

8.45 a.m.

"

21

Ground,

First,

"

"}

Chan Tsak,

ᏞᎥ Ꮮ,

Choi Sing,

Choi Kan,

28

14th

"}

11 p.m.

15th

"

1 p.m.

20th

>>

8.55 p.m.

""

"

Kwong Sun,

བ བ ཐཱ བ

48

15th

1.30 a.m.

15th

4.35

"}

"?

p.m.

17th

4 p.m.

54

15th

7 8.11.

15th

"

"}

1 p.m.

16th

"}

4.05 p.m.

20

15th

8 a.m.

15th

I

"}

"}

p.m.

19th

4.30 a.m.

"

19

15th

11 a.m.

15th

"}

"

1 p.m.

16th

""

7 p.m.

"}

"

Lo Shin,

46

16th

"}

6.30 p.m.

17th

"}

12.30 p.m.

18th

"}

+

>>

"}

10, Heung Lane,

Chan Sau,

24

17th

""

10 p.m.

18th

10.35 a.m.

19th

11.40 p.m.

2.50 p.m.

,,

"

"

6

Do.,

(b)

Ho Yaw,

51

18th

7

"

p.m.

21st

""

8.35 a.m.

"

6

12, Heung Lane,

(c)

Kan A-Ping,

53

20th

3.35

""

p.m.

21st

"

4.10 p.m.

"

"

6

335, Queen's Road West,

Ground,

Fu Chiu,

32

19

6

30, Eastern Street,

First,

Cheng Yi,

19

24th June,

30th

8 a.m.

1 a.m.

24th

30th

10.10 a.m.

"

"}

"

"

13

19th July,

Kowloon, West 8, MacDonnel Road,

Ground,

Ty A-Yuk,

31

....

,.

24th

6

63, Queen's Road West,

Second,

Chan Ping Chi,

18

"}

8th Aug.,

6

27, Tsung Sau Lane, West,

First,

Hau Fong Hoi,

}

24th July, 8th Aug., 9.45

"

21st

6

3, Tsung Sau Lane, West,

Second,

Wong Si Li,...

Female,

26

21st

""

"}

24th

From Canton Steamer,

Sing Kwoon Hing,

Male,

27

24th

25th

5

28, Bridges Street,

First,

Lam Su,

8

25th

7th Sept.,

6

4, Possession Street,

Ground,

Lam Kan,

34

7th Sept.,

2 a.m.

թ.ու.

21st 7.30 a.m.

6.30 p.m.

9 p.m.

24th

26th

"}

""

"}

"

'6

16th

7

44, Second Street,

First,

Ho Sam,

27

16th

"}

4 p.m.

8 p.m.

16th

7th Sept., 6.30 p.m. 8.35

"}

10.50 a.m.

....

24th July, 10.15 a.m. 9th Aug., 12.35 p.m.

4

1st July, 3.30 a.m.

During the night of 18-19 July.

24th July, 12.20 p.m. 10th Aug., 2.30 a.m.

25th 8.20 a.m.

8.30 P m.

2.30 p.m.

4.50 a m.

7.50 a.m.

26th

p.m.

25th

26th

""

):

5.30 p.m.

8th Sept., 9.30 p.m.

16th p.m.

"

9.05 p.ш.

2,077

4,917

6,994

A Soldiers.

Fotal.

6,006

CROW.

Superintendent.

(a) Transferred from S.S. Belgic. Came down from Cauton the day previous and passed the night in 4, Wing Lok'Street. (b) Had been segregated since the 15th of June.

Had been segregated since the 17th of June.

(d) Found by one of the night search party on board the S.S. Fatshan on her arrival from Canton.

(e) Found dead on board the S.8. Nanchang at 6 A.M. on the 19th July. Walked on board from No. 8, MacDonnel Road, Kowloon, the previous evening.

W: EDWARD CROW, Beorotary and Super

Ast June, 1895.

To the Owner and Occupier of the

Appendix C.

SANITARY BOARD.

HONGKONG.

In the matter of The closed houses and insanitary dwellings Ordinance, 1894.

Notice is hereby given to you on behalf of the Sanitary Board that cocklofts or mezzanine floors and cubicles are being continued or maintained in the above domestic building in contravention of Ordinance 15 of 1894, and that if such continuance or maintenance exists on and after the

a prosecution will be instituted.

To

day of

1

189

By order of the Sanitary Board,

Secretary.

:

2. It

nder sec

greater

undersi

fire netti Bro-third

Colo

The

Colo

Extract from Ordinance 15 of 1894.

Section 7.-"It shall not be lawful to construct, put up, continue or maintain in any room of any domestic building now or hereafter erected or in course of erection any mezzanine floor, storey or cockloft where such room is partitioned or divided off into separate compartments without the permission in writing of the Sanitary Board.”

Section 8, Sub-section (b).-" Where any room of any domestic building is divided into separate compartments by partitions, it shall not be lawful to put up, continue or maintain partition walls of a greater height than 8 feet, or to leave a space between the top of the partitions and the ceiling or underside of the joists, of less than 4 feet, or to allow such space to be closed except in such manner and with such material as may be prescribed by the Sanitary Board, and unless the whole of such compartments are provided with light and ventilation to the satisfaction of the Sanitary Board. For the purposes of this section every sub-division of a domestic building unless it has one window at least, as herein before specified opening directly into the external air, shall be considered a compartment." (The window is required to have a total area, clear of the window frame, of at least one-tenth of the floor area of the room.)

Section 13, Bye-law No. 7.-The space required by section 8, sub-section (b), of Ordinance 15 of 1894, to be left above partitions shall not be enclosed except with wire netting, iron bars, lattice work or carved wood work, arranged in such a way as to leave at least two-thirds of such space open and as far as practicable evenly distributed.

N.B. The words "domestic building" include-"any human habitation or building where persons (other than a caretaker) pass the night." (Section 2.)

Appendix D.

GOVERNMENT NOTIFICATION.-No. 373.

Cocklofts and CUBICLES in

Buildings erected BEFORE the passing of the Closed Houses and Insanitary Dwellings Ordinance No. 15 of 1894, (29th December, 1894).

1. No permission will be granted under the provisions of sub-section 1 of section 7 of Ordinance 15 of 1894 for the crection or continuance of mezzanine floors, stories or cock lofts in rooms partitioned or divided off into separate compartments unless the following conditions are complied with:-

(a) The premises are constructed and maintained in a satisfactory sanitary condition. (b) Such mezzanine floor, storey or cock loft is situated on the top or ground floor of

premises...

1. U Construct

9th of I

situate

on of t must be

2. N

Mons are

Hor

'houses and ance, 1894.

floors and

vention of

I after the

(c) In the case of top floors such mezzanine floor, storey or cock loft does not exte d over more than one-half of the floor area of the room, and has a clear space above it of not less than eight feet and below it of not less than nine feet measured vertically. When the roof has no ceiling or tie the measurement shall be made from the level of the floor up to half the vertical height of the rafters over such mezzanine floor, storey

or cockloft.

(d) In the case of mezzanine floors, stories or cocklofts on ground floors that do not comply with the conditions specified in the preceding paragraph, no permission will be granted for their continuance except for storage purposes only, and provided that the space so encroached on by such mezzanine floor, storey or cockloft shall not be included in the calculation of the cubic capacity of the room available for habitation. 2. It should be noted that, under the provisions of sub-section b of section 8 and Bye-law 7 under section 13 of this Ordinance, the partition walls of every separate compartment must not be f a greater height than 8 feet, and must leave a space between the top of the partitions and the ceiling or underside of the joists of not less than 4 feet, and that such space must not be closed except with wire netting, iron bars, lattice work, or carved wood work arranged in such a way as to leave at least two-thirds of such space open and as far as practicable evenly distributed.

By Command,

Colonial Secretary's Office, Hongkong, 30th August, 1895.

visidan

J. H. STEWART LOCKHART,

Colonial Secretary.

GOVERNMENT NOTIFICATION.-No. 407.

The following is published.

By Command,

stic building artitioned or

ompartments

8 feet, or to or to allow Board, and itary Board. hereinbefore

d to have a

1894, to be rk, arranged

>ther than

anitary

1.

Ordinance partitioned

:

on.

ul floor of

a

Colonial Secretary's Office, Hongkong, 27th September, 1895.

J. H. STEWART LOCKHART,

Colonial Secretary.

SANITARY BOARD NOTIFICATION.

MEZZANINE FLOORS, STORIES, OR COCKLOFTS

IN

Buildings erected AFTER the passing of Ordinance 15 of 1894,

(29th December, 189±).

1. Under the provisions of sub-section 2 of section 7 of Ordinance 15 of 1894, it is unlawful to construct, put up, continue or maintain in any room of any domestic building erected after the 29th of December, 1894, any mezzanine floor, storey or cockloft whatsoever, except where such room is situated on the ground floor and is used as a shop or workshop, in which case the written permis- sion of the Sanitary Board must be first obtained and any conditions imposed in such permission must be complied with.

ainu je dazK AL

2. Notice is hereby given that such permission will not be granted unless the following condi tions are complied with:-

gaaq (wła9782

(a) The building shall be constructed and maintained in a satisfactory sanitary condition. (b) The mezzanine floor, storey or cockloft shall not extend over more than one half of the floor area of the room and shall have a clear space below it of not less than eight feet measured vertically, provided that this space is sufficient to prevent the obstruction of any doorway situated in an external wall.

(c) The space both above and below such mezzanine floor, storey or cockloft shall be used for storage purposes only and shall not be enclosed except with wire netting, bamboo lattice or carved wood-work arranged in such a way as to leave at least two-thirds of such space open and as far as practicable evenly distributed, and the space encroached on by such mezzanine floor, storey or cockloft shall not be included in the calculation of the cubic capacity of the room available for habitation,

By order of the Sanitary Board,

525

HUGH MCCALLUM,

Secretary

No. of Health

District.

Appendix E.

Schedule setting forth the situation of the basements illegally occupied on the 1st of April and on the owners, etc. of which notices have been served and compliance with the law enforced.

1

Wanchani Road,

12

Ship Street,

3

Name of Street.

Hou Fung Lane, Queen's Road East, Wing Fung Street.

Pedder's Hill,

Mosque Junction,..

Kai Un Lane,

Stanley Street, Pottinger Street,

...

..

Nos. of the Houses.

Total No. of Basements.

The 6 and 7 of

permit form cubicles.

2. ln

Committee sub-let, the

3. Th

77A, 79A,

2

m

retention o

32, 40, 52,

and cubicle

2, 5, 7,

16

62, 217,

10, 12, 14, 16, 18, 20, 22, 24,

1, ('"),

49, 45,

East end of Lane,

cases the or Committee occupier. prejudice th be charged

5

Cochrane Street,

Wellington Street,

Staunton Street, ... Hollywood Road,... Gage Street,

Queen's Road Central, Lyndhurst Terrace,. Wing Wah Lane,

Hollywood Road,.....

Ping On Lane,

Gough Street,

Bridges Street,.

9, 11, 13, 47,

10, 12, 14, 16,

25, 29, 31,

15в, 15c, 15D, 21, 23, 27, 29, 51, 59, 61, 91,

93, 99, 101,

9, 13, 15, 17,

1, 28, 27, 29, 31,..

9.

82, 84,

29,

19,.

41, 43, 45, 47, 49, 51, 53, 55, (3, 93, 95, 97, 99, 101, 103, 105, 107, 109, 111, 113, 115,

117, 119, 121, 125, 127, 129, 131, 133, 135, 137, 140, 142, 146, 148, 160, 162, 164, 166, 168,.

1, ('), 2, 5,

23, 25, 31, 35, 36, 37, 39,

1, 3, 5, 7, 66a,

33, 35, 37,

·

28, 38, 40, 41, 42, 44, 46, 48,

2, 3, 12, 13, 15, 17, 18, 24, 42,

4, 5,

196,

1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7,

160, 162, 164, 303, 305, 307, 309, 311, 313, 315, 319, 321, 323, 325, 327, 329, 331, 333,

21, 22,

5,

Staunton Street, Tank Lane, Square Street, Circular Pathway, Shing Wong Street, Wellington Street. Kau U Fong South,

Queen's Road Central,

Chung Wo Lane,.

Wa In Fong East,

....

Lower Ladder Street Terrace,

Upper Lascar Row,

Lower Lascar Row,..........

Tan Kwai Lane,

...

Tsui On Lane,

6

Queen's Road Central,

Queen's Road West,

7

Third Street,..

9,

4,

1, 3, 5, 34,

2, 4, 6, 17, 19, 21, 23, 25,

1, 2, 3, 5, 7, ..

1, 2, 3, 4, 7, 8,.

335, 341, 343, 345, 349, 351, 353, 355, 357,

359, 361,

55, 63, 91, 97, 101, 125, 131, 133, 167, 209,

227

127,

21st October, 1895.

Total No. of Basements,.

39

The Secreta

SAN

134

2223

1

219.

W. EDWARD CROW, Assistant Secretary and Superintendent.

1

Total No. of Basements.

16

Appendix F.

Memorandum on the subject of Permits for the Occupation of Basements and the

Retention of Cocklofts.

HONGKONG, 9th July, 1895.

The Committee appointed to control the work involved in enforcing the provisions of sections 6 and 7 of Ordinance 15 of 1894 beg to submit for the consideration of the Board the attached draft permit forms † in respect of the occupation of basements and the retention of mezzanine floors and cubicles.

2. In both drafts the permits have been made out in favour of the registered owner. The Committee are of opinion that, having regard to the conditions under which basements are let and sub-let, the permission for occupation under section 6 should only be granted to the landlord.

3. The Committee are in doubt, however, as to the advisability of framing the permit, for the retention of cocklofts and cubicles, in favour of the owner. In the vast majority of cases cocklofts and cubicles are erected by the tenants without even the knowledge of the landlord. In nearly all cases the order for removal under section 7 has been served on the occupier. On the other hand the Committee do not see their way clear to advising that the permit be made out in favour of the occupier. By such a course the Board would, they think, be taking a step which might soriously prejudice the interests of owners of property, and would be incurring a responsibility it should not be charged with.

W. C. H. HASTINGS, Acting Captain Superitendent of Police.

W. Edward Crow,

Assistant Secretary,

1,

39

The Secretary,

SANITARY Board.

† Omitted.

.66,

இசுதல்

97,

15,

35,

313, 331,

5, 357,

37, 209,

22

1

219

WARD CROW,

and Superintendent.

tary

134

J

HONGKONG.

STATEMENT OF PLAGUE EXPENDITURE.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of

His Excellency the Governor.

STATEMENT OF PLAGUE EXPENDITURE

from 1st January to 31st October, 1895.

535

No. 37

95.

Remuneration to-

Men of the Rifle Brigade,

600.00

Royal Engineers,.....

684.10

Police,

844.40

Staff of the Government Civil Hospital,

450.00

District Watchmen,

426.75

Others,

664.25

$ 3,669.50

Conveyance and Travelling Expenses,

824.07

Salary and Conveyance Allowance of Acting Medical Officer of Health and

Interpreter,

Salary of Temporary Boarding Officers for inspecting Junks, &c.,.......................

1,742.65

624.00

Expenses in connection with the Kennedy Town Hospital-

Building matsheds and other works executed,

Salary of Staff,

$5,131.51

571.51

Provisions and Incidental Expenses,..

Hire of Steam Launches,

802.63

6.505.65

$3,381.00

Coal for

Do.,

507.16

3,888.16

Hire of Marriage Boats,

$

264.70

Provisions, &c., .............................

White-washing 1,670 houses,.

Disinfecting Expenses,

Burial Expenses,................

149.70

414.40

8,032.90

2,046.87

296.84

Miscellaneous (for sundry works executed and Incidental Expenses),

1,006.11

TOTAL,......

29,051.15.

A. M. THOMSON,

Acting Treasurer.

Hongkong, 12th November, 1895.

No. 1.

HONGKONG.

RETURNS OF SUPERIOR AND SUBORDINATE COURTS FOR 1894.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor.

123

No. 10

95

REGISTRY SUPREME COURT,

HONGKONG, 5th January, 1895.

SIR,--I have the honour to forward the accompanying Returns :--

1. Return of Criminal Cases tried in the Supreme Court of Hongkong during the year 1894. 2. Indictments and Informations during the year 1894.

3. Comparative Table showing the number of offences, apprehensions, and acquittals for

the last four years.

4. Return of Criminal Cases that have been brought under the cognizance of the Supreme

Court during the last ten years.

5. Return of all sums received as Revenue in the Registry of the Supreme Court during the

years 1893 and 1894.

I have the honour to be,

The Honourable

THE ACTING COLONIAL SECRETARY,

fc.,

&c.,

&c.

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

C. F. A. SANGSTER,

Acting Registrar.

124

Number of Cases tried.

Number of Persons tried.

RETURN of CRIMINAL CASES tried in the SUPREME COURT of HONGKONG during the Year 1894.

CRIMES.

Convicted.

Acquitted.

Death.

2:2421

2:2227

2

3

Attempting to commit buggery,

Bribery, Burglary,

Conspiracy to murder,

Embezzlement,

Feloniously administering stupefying drug with

intent to commit larceny,

Feloniously attempting to set fire to a dwelling

house,

Feloniously wounding with intent to murder,.

Feloniously uttering forged bank notes,

Forgery,

Larceny,

Larceny in a dwelling house,

Larceny by a servant,

Larceny from the person....

Manslaughter,

Obtaining money under false pretences,

3

4

Murder,

1

Perjury,

2

Robbery from the person with violence,

Unlawfully and wilfully falsifying accounts and

destroying certain books,

Unlawfully uttering certain counterfeit coin,

Unlawfully bringing into the colony a certain girl

for the purpose of emigration,

1

1

ܗ: ܗ:

1

:

2

1

1

1

21

2

:-

1

1

1

1

1

Unlawfully bringing into the colony a certain girl

for the purpose of prostitution,...................... Uttering a forged instrument with intent to defraud,

1

30

38

Of 49 Persons only

Ni Ni -

Death Recorded.

Hard Labour over one Year,

Hard Labour one

Year and under.

SENTENCE.

Solitary Confinement→→ Number of Persons.

Number of Persons.

Privately Flogged-

No. of Cases.

No. of Persons.

No. of Cases.

No. of Persons.

DONED.

PONED.

CHARGES

CASES

ABAN-

POST-

:

1

::

::

:

::

21

17

1

1

14

:

1

1:

:

H:

:

1

1

1

+

1

1

5

:

:

::

Co

6

6 1

5

10

::

C13

::

::

:

..38 were tried.

6 were not indicted which are included under the heading of "Charges Abandoned,"... 6 Case Postponed, Persons,

Registry Supreme Court, Hongkong, 5th day of January, 1895.

5

49 Persons.

C. F. A. SANGSTER,

Acting Registrar.

125

ÍNDICTMENTS and INFORMATIONS in the SUPREME COURT of HONGKONG for the Year 1894.

Showing how the cases tried in

the Superior Courts ended.

Including Attempts and Conspiracies to commit the several offences.

(Each Prisoner tried counts as a separate case; where a large number of Prisoners have been convicted together, the fact is mentioned in a note.)

Total.

Murder.

Manslaughter.

Attempt at murder.

Concealment of Birth.

Judgment for the Crown,

21

2

1

Judgment for the Prisoner,

17

2

2

Prisoner found Insane,

Cases which fell through for want of prosecution or ab- sence of accused, and cases thrown out by the Grand Jury (Attorney General),..

Cases postponed,

6

1

10

5

10

:

~

1

:

:

:

49

10

3

3

Abortion.

Rape.

Unnatural Crimes.

:

:

:

Registry Supreme Court, Hongkong, 5th day of January, 1895.

:

:

:

Robbery with violence.

Other offences against the Person.

Offences against Property.

Miscellaneous offences.

:

1

4

8

1

4

1

2

1

:

:

:

:

:

:

4

:

2

4

15

3

9

C. F. A. SANGSTER, Acting Registrar.

COMPARATIVE TABLE showing the NUMBER of Offences, APPREHENSIONS, CONVICTIONS and ACQUITTALS

for the last Four Years.

1891.

1892.

1893.

1894.

The Number of Convictions in the Superior Courts-

1. For Offences against the Person,

13

6

17

16

2. For Offences against Property,

9

8

3. For other Offences,

4

4

16

4

The Number of Persons acquitted-

2. In the Superior Courts,

Registry Supreme Court, Hongkong, 5th day of January, 1895.

9

17

16

17

C. F. A. SAngster,

Acting Registrar.

126

RETURN of CRIMINAL CASES that have been brought under the COGNIZANCE of the SUPREME Court,

during the last Ten Years.

Charges Abandoned.

Cases Postponed.

YEAR.

Number of Cases.

Number of Persons.

Convicted. Acquitted.

No. of Cases.

No. of Persons.

No. of Cases.

No. of Persons.

1885,

91

147

103

22

16

22

(e) 1886,

75

107

59

20

16

27 (e)

1

1

(f) 1887,

94

155

82

36

17

26

1

8

1888,

101

186

99

47

28

40

(g) 1889,

92

143

Total,

453

738

407

1890,

59

80

1891,

32

37

1892,

30

44

1893,

13

57

1894,

36

44

ཙ།༤།བས

64

41

24

37

166

101

152

2

9

43

20

26

9

18

17

16

17

F-4446

17

12900

8

6

I

Total,

200

262

141

79

23

42

1

5

Average of 1st

Q

903

1478

81

331/

201

30%

1#

Period,....

Average of 2nd}

40

Period, ....S

523

281/

15#

42

8/2/

18

1

e. In one case the recognizance estreated.

f. In three cases the recognizances were estreated.

g. In one case the recognizance estreated, this case is included in the total, but not in any other of the above headings.

:

C. F. A. SANGSTER,

Acting Registrar.

Registry Supreme Court, Hongkong, 5th day of January, 1895.

RETURN of all SUMS RECEIVED as REVENUE in the Registry of the Supreme Court during the Year 1894.

Original Jurisdiction,

Summary Jurisdiction,

Bankruptcy Jurisdiction,

Probate Jurisdiction,..

Official Administrator's Commission,

.$ 3,220.30

4,153.80

469.15

2,547.47

Official Assignee's Commission,

Official Trustee's Commission,

717.52

72.88

94.48

Appraiser's Fees,

Sheriff's Fees,

73.00

Bailiff's Fees,

1,280.00

Interest on Deposit of Surplus Cash,

1,823.42

Fees on Distraints,

1,823.75

Registrar of Companies,

1,220.75

Fine and Forfeitures,

45.00

Admiralty Fees,..........

Land Office Fees,

Registry Supreme Court, Hongkong, 5th day of January, 1895.

1,088.16

$18,579.68

3,766.00

$22,345.68

C. F. A. SANGSTER,

Acting Registrar.

127

RETURN of all SUMS COLLECTED in the Registry of the Supreme Court for the Year 1894, and paid into the Treasury.

1893.

1894.

REGISTRAR.-Court Fees paid by Stamps, ....

$ 11,413.56

$ 12,214.47

OFFICIAL ASSIGNEE.-5 % on amount encashed paid into the Treasury,

OFFICIAL ADMINISTRATOR,

202.94

2,431.34

72.88

717.52

OFFICIAL TRUSTEE.-2 %% on amount of Trust on taking over up to $10,000, above $10,000 commission 1 % on further amount, I commission on income,

150.97

94.48

APPRAISER OF INTESTATE ESTATES.-2 on Houses, Land, Goods, Furni-

ture, &c., 1% on cash, Banking account or Shares,

BAILIFF,

1,077.50

FINE AND FORFEITURES,

SHERIFF,

REGISTRAR OF COMPANIES,

INTEREST on Registrar's Balance at the Bank,

ADMIRALTY FEES,

70.50

1,498.00

1,230.00

73.00

1,220.75

1,671.78

1,823.42

50.00

45.00

1,088.16

LAND OFFICE FEES,

$18,566.59 4,368.00

$18,579.68

3,766.00

$22,934.59

$22,345.68

UNCLAIMED BALANCES under Ordinance No. 11 of 1888,

.$ 1,085.43

Registry Supreme Court, Hongkong, 5th day of January, 1895.

$468.04

C. F. A. SANGSTER,

Acting Registrar.

"

128

WRITS ISSUED BY THE POLICE MAGISTRATES DURING THE YEAR 1894.

Warrants.

HHHHT10

TOTAL.

TOTAL

NUMBER

OF FIRE

ENQUIRIES

HELD

DURING THE YEAR 1894.

Abstract of CASES under COGNIZANCE of the POLICE MAGISTRATES' COURT during the Year 1894.

CASES, HOW DISPOSED OF, AND THE NUMBER OF MALE AND FEMALE PRISONERS UNDER EACH HEAD.

Ordered to find Security.*

10,447

M. F.

11,953 9,465 302

M. F.

1,716 95

M. F. M. F. M.

63 2

F.

M. F. M.

F. M. F. M. F. M.

F.

5

LO

:

81

9

171

14

10

1 16

11,530 423 2,107

154

143

160

835

235

TOTAL MALES AND FEMALES,..

11,953

TOTAL

TOTAL NUMBER NUMBER

OF

CASES.

OF

PRISON-

ERS.

* Consisting of Offenders not sentenced to Imprisonment.

:

3,634

17

THE CASES CONSISTED OF:

129

OFFENCE.

Animals-Cruelty to

Arms Consolidation Ordinance-Breach of Arson-Attempting to commit,..

Assault-Causing grievous bodily harm,......

-Common

--Indecent

""

""

""

-On Females and Boys under 14 years of age,

}"

27

-On Excise Officers in the execution of their

duty, and obstructing and resisting them, -On Police in the execution of their duty, and

obstructing and resisting Police,

---On Sanitary Officers in the execution of their duty, and obstructing and resisting them, -With intent to commit an Unnatural Offence, Banishment-Returning after..

Births and Deaths-Breach of Ordinance for Registration

of..

Boats-Offences as to the numbering of..

"

-Refusing to accept Hire when unemployed,.

Breach of the Peace,

Bribery, or attempting to bribe Sanitary Officer,

Brothels-Unregistered,

Building Ordinance-Breach of

Buildings-Occupying or erecting, on land not being under

Burglary,

lease from the Crown,

with Violence,.

Bubonic Plague-Neglecting to report cases of... Cargo-Furnishing untrue particulars regarding the ge-

neral character of

Cattle Diseases Ordinance-Breach of.......

"J

- Slaughtering in a place other than one set apart

for the purpose,..........

Child Stealing,

Chinese Territory-Crimes and Offences committed in. Coffee House-Breach of Conditions added to licence

respecting

Coin-Offences relating to

Convict Licence-Breach of

Cutting and Wounding with intent to do grievous bodily

harm,.

Dangerous Goods Ordinance-Breach of

Decoying Men or Boys into or away from the Colony,

19

or imprisoning or detaining them for the purpose of emigration or for any purpose whatsoever,

Women or Girls into or away from the Colony,... Defences Sketching Prevention Ordinance-Breach of Desertion from H.M.'s Army and Navy,

""

British Merchant Ships,

Disorderly Behaviour-Fighting and creating a disturb-

ance,

-While Drunk,..

under

Distraint for Rent-Fraudulently removing properties

Dogs-Allowing unmuzzled ferocious, to be at large, &c., Domestic Servants-Misconduct as

Drugs-Administering

Drunkenness,

Embezzlement,

40

3

25

2 242 023000

-

ON

20*

10

1

""

32

36

"2

90

90

38

385

"

20

22

7

11

3

3

1

1

"?

32

32

""

504 863

""

171

171

"1

2

19

10

49

3

125

""

多多

"

200226

125

No. of

No. or CASES.

PRI-

OFFENCE.

BONERS.

22

22

Brought forward,..

94

94

Larceny-By Servant,.

1

1

-Common,

4

-from the scene of fire,...

23

587

757

"

-from Ships or Boats in the Harbour,

1

1

-from the Person,

2

19

to

7

8

17

25

5

5

47

to 10 a 10

5

3 Libel,

-from the Person with Wounding or with Vio-

lence,

-from Wreck,

-in a Dwelling House,

-of Beasts or Birds, not the subject of Larceny

at Common Law,

-of Fruit or Vegetable production in a Garden,

Lights-Chinese not carrying at night,.. Malicious Injury to Electric or Magnetic Telegraph,.

to Property,

6

820

883

2

2

12

15

83

90

181

1 19

1

3

1

24110

31

31

2

Manslaughter,

4

Marine Store Dealers-Breach or Ordinance for

2

28

28

Markets Ordinance-Breach of.

699

699

2

Menaces-Demanding Money by

12

1

1

Mendicancy,

297

297

3

Merchandise Marks Ordinance-Breach of.

1

Merchant Shipping Act-Offences against

8

357

357

Morphine Ordinance-Breach of

15

15

4

1

38

38

10

10

2

101000 22

5

Murder,

4

12

5

"

-Aiding, abetting, counseling, and procuring

to commit

Night-Found in Dwelling Houses by-with intent to

1

3

commit Felony therein,

""

-Noises, by playing at the Game called Chai-Mui,

-Noises by beating Drums and Gongs,

13

13

4

13

13

***

4

220

20you

12

8

39

and Property,

19

-Blowing Whistles,

-Boarding Ships without permission,

Nuisances-Allowing Dirt and Filth to remain on Pre-

mises or in immediate Vicinity thereof, -Blasting Stones to the danger of Persons

2

2

*+088

3

4

28

90

90

29

29

*** 88

3

4

28

NO. OF CASES.

No. or PAI- SONE RI.

2,9874,271

6

5

5

"3

by Servants,

4

Vehicle Drivers and Shopkeepers,.

Embracery,

1

1

-Boats mooring inshore, between the hours of

9 o'clock at night and gunfire in the morning,| -Boats, obstructing Fairways,

Breach of Bye-laws respecting the Licenc- ing and Regulations of Depôts, &c., for Cattle, &c.,

-Carrying or exposing Night Soil or Noxious Waters in the Streets in uncovered Buc- kets, and in open Boats along the Praya,... -Drains, &c.-Leaving open and unprotected -Hanging wet Clothes, &c., to dry over

Public Ways,.....

-Keeping Pigs, &c., without a Licence, -Latrine,

-Neglecting to clean out Dust Bins, and

throwing Rubbish, &c., into the Streets, -Obeying Calls of Nature in the Streets, -Obstruction of Wharves by Boat People.... -Regulations-Breach of.

-Throwing Rubbish into the Harbour or on

the Beach,

Obstruction of Roads and Streets, &c., by Hawkers,

Offensive Weapons-Having Possession of

2

2

933

Escape of Prisoners or attempting to escape from Custody

Opium Ordinance-Breach of Prepared

of Police,...

1

1

-Breach of Raw...

17

Extradition Act of 1870-Offences against

I

2 Passage-Obtaining surreptitiously a

False Charge-Preferring-or giving wilful false evidence,

11

11

Passengers-Carrying in Excess of that allowed by

Imprisonment,

Licence,

Pretences-obtaining Goods and Money by

56

65

11

-Furnishing untrue Particulars regarding

Falsification of Accounts,

Passes Chinese out at Night without

262

Felony-Accessory before or after the Fact to

Pawnbrokers-Breach of Ordinance for

2282 2 827** ****

42

- 16

42

1

1

6

15

15

4

123

123

55

12

70

968

12

839

43

43

22

22

262

""

---Attempting to commit

21

21

Pawning-Illegally

1

* 2882 2 8*8** ***-

55

12

70

12

28

4

1

Firemen to Government Fire Brigade-Misconduct as...

1

Fire Works-Discharging without permits,

204

204

Perjury, (see also Preferring false Charge and giving

wilful false Testimony),

1

1

Foreign Offenders-Temporary detention of

Placards in Chinese Language-Exhibiting without per-

Forged Bank Note, Cheque, &c.--Uttering...

mission,

2

11

Instrument-Obtaining goods or money by

4

Police Constables-Personating as...

1

1

Forgery,

"

Fugitive Offenders Act, 1881-Offences against.............

Furious Driving,

35

35

19

""

-Rescuing or attempt to rescue Pri-

soners from Custody of -Misconduct as

Gambling Ordinance-Breach of....

217

921

""

1

-Negligently allowing Prisoners to

Gaol Subordinate Officers-Misconduct as

4

4

escape,..

2

Harbour-Dredging at Anchorage for Ships of War in the

Regulations--Breach of

31

31

28

28

House Breaking,

16

19

Public Gardens-Breach of Regulations for maintenance

of good order and preservation of property in the

Householders-Breach of Ordinance for Registration of... Indecent Exposure of Person by Bathing or otherwise,

and Lewdness,

1 Receiving Stolen Goods,

Recognisances-Breach of

9

Roads and Streets-Injury to..

9

20

21

45

45

1

Insulting or Threatening Expression-Using before the

Magistrates,

Robbery-From the Person,.

923-2

Junk-Neglecting to report Arrival of

--Using for a purpose other than that specified in

the licence,

Carried forward,.

43

1

2,987 4,271

""

-From the Person with Wounding or with

Violence,

On the Highways with Arms or with Violence,.

1 Rogues and Vagabonds-Gambling in the Street,

Carried forward,....

3315

3

1

5

5

7,7839,221

130

19

91

OFFENCE.

Brought forward,.

Rogues and Vagabonds-As suspicious Characters,

-Indecent Exposure of Person,.

-Wandering abroad and lodging

in the open air,

Sanitary Regulations-Breach of Scavenging Contract-Breach of

No. of

CASES.

CASES,-Continued.

No. of

PRI- SONERS.

No. of

No. or

OFFENCE.

PRI-

CASES.

SONERS.

7,783 9,221

Brought forward,

8,226 9,664

88

88 Threats-Using

1

3

3 Trees, &c.-Cutting and destroying

Trespass on Crown Land,

120

120

140

140

66

66 Unlawful Possession of Property,

305

350

3

3

手掌

of Trees, Shrubs, &c.,.

43

43

21

2 Unlicensed-Cargo Boats,

21

2

Seamen-Refusal of duty by Foreign

"

- Refusal of duty by British Merchant

51

5

-Hawkers,

795

795

"

2

2

13

-Keeping of Dogs,

88

88

"

"}

Ships, &c.-Neglecting to have a Riding Light on board,. -Leaving Anchorage during prohibited hours,. -Leaving Harbour without a Clearance, --Not having certificated Master,

40

40

"

-Plying of Boats for Hire,

2021

202

24

24 Unnatural Offence,......

3

35

35 Unwholesome Provisions-Exposing for Sale, or bring-

1

11

ing into the Colony

5

Shooting with intent to do Grievous Bodily Harm,

1 Vagrancy Ordinance-Breach of

47

Small-Pox-Neglecting to report Cases of

8 Vehicles-Offences against Public

336

355

Spirit Licences Ordinance-Breach of.....

24

24 Watchmen-Misconduct as Private

1

Stones and other Missiles--Discharging to Danger of

Persons and Property,

Waterworks Ordinance-Breach of...

51

9 Weights and Measures-Breach of Ordinance for

54

201101 0

47

54

Streams-Defiling

Street Noises by Hawkers,...

Suicide-Attempting to commit

105 14

5 Wharf-Taking or disembarking Passengers from pro- 105

hibited

81

8

Sunday Cargo-Working Ordinance-Breach of

Tramways Ordinance-Breach of

Carried forward,........

14 Women and Girls Protection Ordinance-Breach of

2 Workmen-Intimidating

13

17

6

8,226 9,664

TOTAL,.

10,447 11,953

H. E. WODehouse, Police Magistrate.

Magistracy, Hongkong, 24th January, 1895.

ABSTRACT of CASES brought under COGNIZANCE at the POLICE MAGISTRATES' COURT during a period of

Ten Years, from 1st January, 1885, to 31st December, 1894, inclusive.

CASES, HOW DISPOSED OF, AND THE NUMBER OF MALE AND FEMALE PRISONERS UNDER EACH HEAD,

Committed to Prison or detained pending Orders of His Excellency the Governor.

To keep the Peace,

TOTAL NUMBER

YEARS.

OF

CASES.

Convicted and Punished.

Discharged.

Committed for Trial at Supreme

Ordered to find Security.

Punished for Preferring

Total

or giving

False Charge Undecided.

Number

Court.

to be of Good Beha- viour, and to answer

any Charge.

False Testimony.

of Defendants.

2

3

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

M.

F.

M.

F.

M.".

F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F. M.

F.

M.

F.

1885,.

10,281

7,951 849

2,188

258

159

2

11

Co

357

99

Co

6

18

10,690 1,211

1886,

14,611 12,081 842

2,198 190

157

2

5

869

:

100 32

3

168

15,510 1,137

1887,

12,015 10,354 325

2,620 159

158

1888,

11,647 9,700 232

2,704

145

168

6

1889,.

157

10

0000 $

28

4

411

52

14

48

13,633 549

98

11

177

15

3

48

12,898 411

44

10

303

34

17

64

9,530

503

8,670 6,626 268 2,319 178

Total,...... 57,224 46,712 2,516 12,029 930

799 29

186

28

2,117

300

72

3 346

LO

5

62,2613,811

Average per

Year,

11,444-8 | 9,342.4 | 503·2 | 2,405-8186-0

159-8 5.8 37.2

5.6

423.4

60·0

14.4 0-6

30

69.2

1.0 12,452-2762.2

1890,

9,739 7,423 317 2,406 151

102

15

259

59

35 2 10,243 529

1891,

1892,

13,676 13,438 534 1,906 134

11,920 11,771 327 1,927 151

40

· 12

:

153

19

143

15,693 689

40

4

191

20

7

28

13,969 502

1893,

10,727 10,049 306

1,532 75

102

7

1

242

36

17

23

11,972 420

1894,

9,465 10,447

302 1,716 95

63

2

5

255

23

:

10

16

11,530

423

Total,...... 56,509 52,146 1,786 9,487 666

Average per

per 11,301-8 10,429-2 357-2 1,897-4121-2

Year,

Grand Total

347

00

69.4 1.6

for the 10 113,733 98,858 4,302 | 21,516 1,536 1,146 37 Years,

44

1

1,100

157

38

1

245

4

63,407 2,568

8.8

0.2

220.0

31-4 7.6 0-2

49.0

0.8

12,681:4 512-6

230

29

3,217

457 110

4

591

125,668 | 6,374

Average per

Year,

11,3733 9,885-8430-2 2,151.6 153 6

114:6

3.7

23.0

2.0

321.7

45-7 11.0

0.4

59.1

0.9

12,566-8 637-4

Magistracy, Hongkong, 24th January, 1895.

H. E. WODEHouse, Police Magistrate.

131

Total.

MAGISTERIAL ENQUIRIES INTO DEATHS.

TABLE 4.-RETURN OF ALL DEATHS REPORTED DURING THE YEAR 1894.

FORMAL ENQUiries held.

BURIED WITHOUT FORMAL ENQUIRIES.

Men. Women. Boys. Girls. Total. Men. Women. Boys. Girls.

Very much decomposed;

sex not acertainable.

NATIONALITY.

Europeans and Americans, ...

00

8

1

6

:

1

49

Co

:

9

6

:

4:

1

3

3

2

57

111

15

129 102

:

:

4

365

64

3

4

2

73

119

15

129

102

373

Total for 1893, ...

49

9

10

5

4 67

82

15

124

86

9

316

Indians and Malays,....

Japanese,

Chinese,.....

Total,......

Chinese.

Women. Boys. Girls.

TABLE B.-RETURN OF FORMAL ENQUIRIES DURING THE YEAR 1894.

FINDING.

Europeans and Americans.

Indians.

Japanese.

Men. Boys. Men.

Men. Men.

1

1

2

: ܗ:

-:

Total.

7

1

10

1

1

1

::

:

::

::

:

1

...

3

1

1

2

1

1

::

:

:::

:

::

:::

1

1

::

:

...

:

1

:

1

::

:

1

:

::

:

:

::

1

1

1

:::

Accidental death,

Accidental death from burning,

Accidentally drowned,

Death by asphyxia caused by self hanging,

Death by a bullet wound maliciously inflicted by some

person unknown,

Death by drowning,

Death by drowning on the occasion of a collision between the boat on board of which the deceased was and the Steam-launch Hang Mui in the Harbour of Shaukiwan, Death by drowning on the occasion of a collision between the boat on board of which the deceased was and the Steam-launch Charles May in Victoria Harbour, Death by injuries received from a fall from the roof of No. 1 Wa Lane while an entry under warrant was being made by the Police into Houses Nos. 4 and 6, Wa On Lane,......

Death from an overdose of Opium,

Death from an overdose of Morphia self administered, the overdose being probably due to an accident, Death from exhaustion consequent upon dysentery and

phthisis,

Death from fracture of skull,

Death from injuries received through burns or suffocation, Death from injuries from a bullet wound self inflicted,.. Death from moist gangrene following on the amputation

of a leg which appears to have been broken by falling down some steps while running away from some pursuers who had been called upon by a woman named A Tsoi to beat him,

Death from injuries received from a landslip. The jury desire to add that in their opinion no blame attaches to the Public Works Department in connection with the deaths, but they would like to suggest that earth cutting might be placed under some kind of supervision whether on private or public property with a view to prevent the recurrence of similar fatalities,...............

Death from natural causes,

:

::

:

::

Carried forward,...

6

1

2

::

1

1

1

1

2.

1

1

...

1

:

84

00 H

27

2

2

1

41

132

Total.

2

1

41

1

1

14

TABLE B.-RETURN OF FORMAL ENQUIRIES DURING THE YEAR 1894,--Continued.

FINDING.

Europeans and Americans.

Indians.

Japanese.

Chinese.

Men. Boys. Men. Men. Men. Women. Boys. Girls.

6

1

:

:

:

::

:

:

27

:

12

1

:

:

I

1

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

1:

::

:

1

1

:

:

1

=

:-

:

:

1

1

1

1

1

:

:

:

:

-::

F:..

1

Brought forward,....

Death resulted from injuries received by fire whether by suffocation or burning the cause of fire being accidental,

Death resulted from injuries received from a blow from a plank falling upon him from the top of the tank at the bottom of which he was engaged in working,

Death resulted from injuries received from falling into the hold of S.S. Progress from either the 'tween deck or the upper deck,

Death resulted from hanging self inflicted, Death resulted from injuries occasioned by a fall down the open fore hatchway on the 'tween deck of the S.S. Tokyo Maru..................

Death resulted from injuries sustained from a fall while attempting to escape from the Police who were forcing an entrance into House No. 16 Nullah Lane, Death occasioned by fracture of the skull arising from the use of an insufficiently strong chain to support the weight it was being used to lift. In the absence of No. 1 Coolie it is not possible to fix the blame which undoubtedly attaches for the use of an obviously improper chain,....

Deceased died from a rifle wound self inflicted while under the mental effects of bad news received from his home,

Found drowned,..............

Suicide by drowning,...

Suicide of hanging,

Suicide by opium poisoning,.

The deceased died from some kind of poison of the

nature of strychnine self administered,

The deceased died from the effects of an overdose of Prussic acid self administered but whether acciden- tally or with the intention of committing suicide there is no sufficient evidence to definitely decide. The Magistrate further finds that at the time of taking the poison the deceased was perfectly sober, The deceased died from dislocation of the neck con- sequent upon the execution of the deceased by being hanged by the neck in pursuance of a sentence of death passed upon him by the Supreme Court of Hongkong at the March Criminal Sessions of 1894,

The deceased died from shock occasioned by fracture of skull and other injuries incurred in falling from the top floor of House No. 22, Tung Man Lane whence he was pushed down in a rush occasioned by the attempt of P.C. 251, Lo Kai, to arrest some men on the top floor whom he found engaged in playing a game of chance,

The deceased met with his death by rupture of the spleen occasioned by falling or jumping over a wall in the premises of the Government Civil Hospital in which he was temporarily lodged, he being at the time of his death of unsound mind, The deceased P.C. 140, Cheng Leung, met with his death by a bullet fired intentionally at him by the deceased Sorain Singh who at the same time met with his own death by inflicting a bullet wound on his own person with intent to commit suicide, there being no evidence to show for certain whether the deceased Sorain Singh was or was not in his right mind at the time and there being no evidence forth- coming to explain the reason of this action towards the deceased P.C. 140,

:

Total,..

:

:

1

1

1

I

1

1

1

:

:

:

1

...

1

1

1

1

1

:

:

:

:

1

1

8

1

6

1

49

3

3

2

2

73

1333

TABLE C-RETURN OF BURIALS WITHOUT FORMAL ENQUIRIES DURING THE YEAR 1894.

133

Chinese.

Europeans & Americans.

Reason why no Formal Enquiry was held.

Men.

Indians. Very much

de- composed;

Found on

Land.

Found in

Harbour.

Women.

Total.

Boys. Girls.

Men.

Men.

sex not ascertain- able.

Known.

Un-

known.

Known,

Un-

known.

No suspicious circumstances,

No evidence and/or decomposed state of Body, Post Mortem satisfactory,.

Abdoola Khan was tried for murder of de-

ceased. P.M. Case No. 1028,

Ip Wai was tried for murder of deceased.

P.M. Case No. 5823,

Au Chun, Li Pong, Ip Sam, Pun Fuk and Pun Chu were tried for murder of deceased. P.M. Case No. 9679–81,.

1 115 83

102

198

13

14

19

3

153

54

45

32

£8

212

157

...

3

3

:

:

1

1

1

1

1

1

Lam Chung was tried for causing the death

of deceased. P.M. Case No. 9839,

1

:

:

:

2

2

1

:

:

...

Total,...

111

15

129

102

4

4.

8

373

61 202

33 77

:

:

:

:

:

1

1

2923

:

:

22

55

Magistracy, Hongkong, 12th January, 1895.

H. E. WODehouse, Police Magistrate.

No. 138.

HONGKONG.

RETURNS OF SUPERIOR AND SUBORDINATE COURTS FOR 1894.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor.

319

No. 23

95

REGISTRY SUPREME COURT,

HONGKONG, 27th April, 1895.

SIR-I have the honour to enclose the following Returns:-

1. Civil Cases commenced and tried in Original and Summary Jurisdictions for the year

1894.

2. A Return of Appeals commenced and tried for the same period.

3. Probates and Administrations granted in the same year.

I have the honour to be.

The Honourable

THE COLONIAL SECRETARY,

&c.,

&c.,

&c.

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant.

C. F. A. SANGSTER, Acting Registrar.

320

1894.

CASES COMMENCED. ·

JUDGMENT.

Settled or

No.

Debt and

withdrawn

Struck out,

Jurisdiction.

of

Cases.

Damages.

before Trial.

Defend- Non-

Dismissed

Plaintiff.

ant.

Suit.

and Lapsed Writs.

In Dependency.'

TOTALCASES TRIED.

Debt and

Cases. Damages

recovered.

Original,

73

$460,088.97

9

6

Summary,

1,583 $151,870.40 709

607

689

:

5

53

6

$11,780,35

69

6

160

32 682 $72,808.19

Registry Supreme Court, 21st April, 1895.

1894.

CASES TRIED.

JUDGMENT.

C. F. A. SAngster, Acting Registrar.

Jurisdiction. No. of Cases.

Debt and Damages.

Plaintiff. Defendant. Non-Suit.

Struck out or Dismissed.

Debt and Damages recovered.

Original,

Summary,

11 (a)

$43,690.35

9

~

874 (b) $90,699.28

625

79

164

$37,690.35

$76,239.55

(a) 5 of these cases were pending on the 31st December, 1893. (b) 59 of these cases were pending on the 31st December, 1893.

Registry Supreme Court, 21st April, 1895.

C. F. A. SANGSTER,

Acting Registrar.:-

1894.

APPEALS COMMENCED.

JUDGMENT.

Respondent.

Pending.

No. of Cases.

Appellant.

Registry Supreme Court, 21st April, 1895.

1

2

No. of Cases.

Appellant.

3

Registry Supreme Court, 21st April, 1895.

C. F. A. Sangster, Acting Registrar.

1894.

APPEALS TRIED.

JUDGMENT

Respondent.

Pending.

1

2

C. F. A. SAangster,

Acting Registrar.

321.

CALENDAR of PROBATES and ADMINISTRATION granted by the SUPREME COURT of HONGKONG during the Year 1894.

Date...

of

Name of Testator: or Intestate.

Time and Place

of Death..

Grant:

Probate, Administration

with Will annexed; or Administration.

Name and Description of the Executor or Administrator.

Value of

Effects as set forth in

the Commis- sion of Apar praisement.

1894.

Jan. 8 Philip. Albert Myburg,,

!!

26 Yeong Tak Wai,

mann,

26 Charles Theodor Henry Kuhl- Hamburg, in the Empire

of Germany,

28th Sept., 1893,

Probate;

Do.,

South Kensington. in the County of Middlesex,⠀⠀ England, 4th July, 1892, Hongkong, 16th Jan., 1894,

Exemplification Alfred Bulmer Johnson,

of Probate,

Yeong Pow Shi and Siu Heung Chuen,

executrix and executor,

$ 28,350.00

45,000.00

John Muir, one of the executors named in the said Will. Power being re- served to grant the like Probate to Carl Ludwig Wilhelm Kuhlmann, brother of the said deceased when he shall duly apply for same,

Feb. 12 Alexandre de Britto,

28 William Gilbert,

Hongkong, 11th Jan., 1894,

Foochow, 14th Aug., 1893,

Do.,

Mar. 1 Zilly Allschüler,

1 Sir James Russell, K.C.M.G.,

11

1 Charles Cole,

Hongkong, 30th Jan., 1894, Strathpeffer, Scotland,···

1st Sept., 1893,

Letters of Adm., | Maria das Dores Noronha Britto, the

lawful wife of the deceased, Thomas Gittins, of Foochow, the duly authorized attorney of Horace Gil- bert, of Chapham, in the County of Surrey, England, for the use and benefit of the said Horace Gilbert, and until he shall duly apply for Letters of Administration to be grant-- ed to him,

Do., Probate,:.

Official Administrator,

Thomas Jackson. Power being reserved to grant the like Probate to James Wilson whenever he shall duly apply for same,

Shanghai, 12th Jan., 1893, Letters of Adm.,: William Henry Ray, the duly authorized

1 Ellen Brown,

Amoy,

· 30th Oct., 1893, Letters of Adm.

with Expl..of the Will annexed,

1 Wong Kai Kam,`.

attorney of Eliza Skinner Collett, for the use and benefit of the said Eliza Skinner Collett, and until she shall duly apply for Letters of Adminis- tration to be granted to her, Anthony Babington, the duly appointed attorney of the said Ellen Favell Brown, for the use and benefit of the said Ellen Favell Brown, and until she shall duly apply for Probate of the said Will to be granted to her,....

On board S.S. Wing Yuen, Letters of Adm., Wong Tai Hee,

on the way from Macao

60,082.00

100.00

6,700.00 300,00

80,900.00

1,400.00

3,362.00 100.00

Lo Tat Tong.

7 Lim Chiu Guan,

to Hongkong,

10th Feb., 1894,

Macao,

23rd Nov., 1893,

Do.i

Lo Man Shek,

Foochow, 9th April, 1894,

Do.,.

2,800.00

Probate,

Probate,

Kau Hong Tak, the duly appointed at- torney of the said Lim Ewe Tae, for the use and benefit of the said Lim Ewe Tae, and until he shall apply for Letters of Administration to be granted to him,

Official Administrator, Friedrich Alexander, Alfred Busing Brockelmann aud Ernst Richard Fuhrmann,..

See Shi, widow and executrix,..

240.00 500.00

22,300.00

100.00

John Shaw Burdon and Alfred Gurney

Goldsmith, executors,

1,200.00

Letters of Adm.,

Leonilda Joana Collaço,

600.00

Letters of Adm.,

Official Administrator,

200.00

Probate,..

Kwok Ping Ün and Pang Kam Ming,

executors,

1,500,00

"

10 Ng Man Kwan,

{

10 Ernst: Carl Ludwig Reuter,

Singapore, 6th April, 1893, At Sea,

22nd July, 1889,

Do.,

Letters of Adm. de bonis non,

10 Pow Shi,

""

16 Richard Goodridge,

28 Maximiano Antonio Collaço,

29 Edward Moore,

29 Kwok Kan alias Fung Lam

alias Ki Shan,

Apr 7 Helen Colebrooke Mary, Camo

ron,

Honam, in Canton,

4th Feb., 1894, Hongkong, 3rd Mar., 1894,

Unknown... Hongkong, 3rd Mar., 1894, Hongkong, 20th Dec., 1893,

"

Cape Town, Cape of Good |:Letters of Adm., | Henry Edward Ranson Hunter, the duly

Hope, 7th Sept., 1893,

""

7 Cheung Shing Tin,

7 William. Foulkes,

Hongkong, 15th Jan., 1894.

Hongkong, 22nd Jan., 1894,

+:

7 Thomas Wiseman,

2

7 Robert Crawford McMurdo,.

1

7 Richard Young,

Tullibody House, Cambus, Clackmannanshire in Scotland, 1st Aug., 1891, No. 4, Devonshire Terrace, in the Isle of Wight, England, 17th Feb., 1893,

Biggor, in the County of

Lanark, in Scotland,

24th Aug., 1893,

authorized attorney of Sir William. Gordon Cameron, for the use and benefit of the said Sir William Gordon Cameron, and until he shall duly. apply for Letters of Administration to the said Estate, Cheung Yung Shi, widow, and Cheung

Man U, executrix and executor,

| Official Administrator,

Probate,

Letters of Adm. with the Will annexed, ¡Letters of Adm., Victor Hobart Deacon,

Letters of Adm. with the Will ::

annexed,

Letters of Adm.:

with the Will annexed,

James Johnston Keswick, the duly. au-,

thorized attorney of Catherine Mc- Murdo and Andrew John Nash, for. the use and benefit of the said Cathe- rine McMurdo and Andrew John Nash, and until they shall duly apply for Letters of Administration to the. said Estate,

Alfred Bulmer Johnson, the duly author.

ized attorney of the said James Irving John Steward and Alexander Young, for the use and benefit of the said James Irving John Stewart and Alexander Young, and until they shall duly apply for Letters of Ad- ministration to the said Estate,

7,700.00

40,000.00 350.00

3,525.00

35,813.00

27,900.00

322

Calendar of PROBATES and ADMINISTRATION,

Date of Grant.

Name of Testator or Intestate.

Time and Place of Death.

Probate, Administration with Will annexed, or Administration.

Continued.

Name and Description of the Executor or Administrator.

Value of Effects as set forth in the Commia- sion of Ap. praisement.

1894.

Apr.

7 Tang A-Sam,

Macao,

23rd July, 1893, Letters of Adm. Ng Pui Lau, widow,

with the Will annexed, Probate,

16 Yam Wing alias Yam Nam Shan, Hongkong, 23rd Mar., 1894,

19

12

Sham Cheuk Tong,.....

16

99

Chan Kan,

29

16

Framjee Hormusjee Mehta,

""

"

25

"

19 Tan King Ho,

20 Cheung Kai,........

24 Ng Hau Pui,

Hongkong, 27th June, 1894, Hongkong, 21st Aug,, 1893, Bombay, 23rd June, 1888,

Quai Gandot, Saigon,

17th June, 1885, Hongkong, 10th Jan., 1894,

Canton, 8th Sept., 1887,

Hongkong, 2nd July, 1894, Hongkong, 15th Oct., 1893,

Chan Yeung alias Chan Hin Sau, Canton, 30th Mar., 1892,

30 Hector Coll Maclean,.

"

30 Cavusjee Dorabjee Gotla,

""

30 Chan King Shi,

30

May

5

Hugh Mackenzie,

5 Maggie Patterson,

Technamooty,

4 Thomas Edmund Davies,

*

" 10

19

11 Kwok Ah Kwye alias Kwok

Asoo alias Kwok Kwai,

Hongkong. 24th Mar., 1894. Hongkong, 15th Jan., 1894, Hongkong, 15th Apr., 1894, Hongkong, 15th Apr., 1894, San José, California,

26th Feb., 1890, Kwalla Kang, Sa Road,

Penang, 29th Oct., 1893,

Kwok King On alias Kwok Tze Honam, Canton,

George Duddell,

16

97

Lee Shing,

16

John Stewart Lapraik,

June 8

Chong,

19

16

At Sea, 31st Mar., 1894, Hongkong, 13th July, 1894,

23rd Apr., 1894, Queen's Park, Brighton,

31st Dec., 1887,

"

11

21

"

""

21

27

"9

27 Andrey Andreywitch

lovy,

Wong U Kwong alias Wong Kai, Elia Pulqueria Hyndman,..... Rita Angelina Gomes e Lourenço, Samuel John Gower,

27 John Ashton Papillon,

27 Yu Hing,

July 9 Donald MacDonald,

9 Chung Sun Lung,

A

Letters of Adm..

Probate,

Letters of Adm. with Expl. of the Will annexed,

Yam Sit Shi, single woman, of Victoria, Hongkong, limited to Yam Ku, son of the above named deceased, attain- ing the age of twenty-one years, &c... Sham Wong Shi, widow, Chan Fai Hing,

|

Rustomjee Merwanjee Mehta,

Letters of Adm., Victor Hobart Deacon,

Probate,

Letters of Adm. de bonis non, Letters of Adm.,

Probate, Do.,

$ 1,500.00

8,200.00 15,300.00

500.00

2,200.00

1,070.00

Cheung Yau, Cheung Yun Kung and

Lam Shi,

200,000.00

Ng Chui Shi.

2,000.00

Hormusjec Cavusjee Gotla,

3,800.00

Chan Chui Yam, executor, Chan Kiu Tong, executor, Ho Tung, executor,

10,000.00

18,000.00

18,300.00

| Official Administrator,

160.00

DO.,

Do., Ranggumma,

150.00

500.00

Do.,

Official Administrator, .......

1,400.00

Letters of Adm. Lo A-Sam,

1,000.00

Official Administrator, John Douglas Lapraik, Kwok Sing,

300.00

1,420,728.15 1,300.00

250.00

Do.,

Letters of Adm., Do.,

with Expl. of the

Will annexed, Letters of Adm.,]

Probate, Letters of Adm.

Letters of Adm. Victor Hobart Deacon, with Expl. of the Will annexed, Letters of Adm.,

Do., Do., Probate Re-sealed,

Hongkong, 9th May, 1894, Hongkong, 9th June, 1894, Macao, 15th May, 1894, St. Alans, Victoria Drive,

Bogner, England,

2nd Oct., 1892, 27th June, 1894, 16th May, 1893, | Letters of Adm., |

Belogo-Tientsin,

9 Emilie Fordyce Dunstan,

13 Mahomed Razack,

"

"

13 Leung Tat Choi,

+9

13 Herbert Victor Cox,

"

25 Cosme Menino Gracias,

""

25 | Sit Chong,

"" 25 Manoel Pereira,

"

25 Mahomed Hadjee Madar,

Undercliff, Sandgate in Letters of Adm.

England, 24th Dec., 1891, | with Expl. of the

Will annexed,

Hongkong, 18th Feb., 1894, Hongkong, 16th June, 1894, Canton, 13th May, 1894, Peumacumawr, in the Coun-

ty of Carnarvon in England, 6th Aug., 1893,

Hongkong, 29th June, 1894, Canton, 16th June, 1894, Hongkong, 30th June, 1894, Hongkong, 23rd June, 1894, Hongkong, 8th June, 1894, Hongkong, 8th June, 1894, Rua São João da Matta, Lisbon, 14th Nov., 1898,

|

Probate, Letters of Adm., Probate, Letters of Adm. with the Will annexed,

Letters of Adm., Probate,

|

Wong Shü Mui,

Henrique Hyndman,

Eduardo Cyrillo Lourenço, Sarah Matilda Gower,

Carl Jantzen, the duly authorized attor- ney, for the use and benefit of the said Nadejda Belogolovy, until she shall duly apply for Letters of Ad- ministration to the said Estate, John Bulmer Johnson, the duly author- ized attorney, for the use and benefit of the said Lydia Charlotte Papillon and David Papillon, and until they shall apply for Probate to the said Estate,

Yu King Chung, Official Administrator, Chung Tai-loi, executor,

James Johnston Keswick, the duly au

thorized attorney, for the use and benefit of the said Wydham Rowland Dunstan, and until he shall duly

apply for Probate to the said Estate,. Official Administrator, Leung Chan Shi............... Letters of Adm., | Official Administrator,

Do.,

Maria Guilhermina Gracias,.. Osman Madar,.

Do.,

Do.,

Do.,

Sit Wing Yit,

4,000.00

1,100.00

4,189,89

6,640.27

4,400.00

600.00 60,734.00

1,150.00

50,000.00

3,765.50

1,000.00

1,000.00

200.00

160.00

100.00

600.00

Sotheby Godfrey Bird, the duly author-

ized attorney of the said Adrião Pe- reira, for the use and benefit of the said Adrião Pereira, and until he shall duly apply for Probate to the said Estate,

27 Hector McDonald Crowlie,

99

Aug. 9 Un Fung Shi,

15 Tam Kit,

Canton River.

Lo Sam, China,

Kow Chow, China,

99

11th Oct., 1893,

30th Jan., 1880,

22nd June, 1894,

Probate,

Letters of Adm.,

Probate,

James Wilson,

41,900.00 2,000.00

Un Leung Tsoi,

Wong Chuk Yau and Tam Kit Shan,

executors,

40,000.00

22 Chun Shee alias Leung Chun Honam, Canton,

Do.,

Leung Ngan,

7,000.00

11

Shee,

12th May, 1894,

22 Lo Kwai Fan,

"}

22 James Whittall,

"

Wetherby Garden, South

Kensington, London,

18th Dec., 1893,

Hongkong, 6th May, 1894, | Letters of Adm.,

Letters of Adm. | Edward Fleet Alford, the duly author-

with the Will

annexed,

"

24 Yeung Fat,

San Chau, Whampoa,

Probate,

14th June, 1894,

ized attorney of the said Elizabeth Whittal, for the use and benefit of the said Elizabeth Whittal, and until she shall apply for Letters of Admi- nistration to the said Estate,.. Young Chiu and Yeung Chi, executors,.......

Lo Hung,

700.00

3,400.00 21,500.00

Date

of Grant.

1894.

Name of Testator or Intestate.

Aug. 30 Pang Tsz,

30 Shi Iu Man,

31 Cheung Sui Shang,....

Ip Nam,

Sept. 3

Tang Tung Shan,

20 Harriet May,

CALENDAR of PROBATES and ADMINISTRATION,—Continued.

Probate, Administration

Time and Place of Death.

with Will annexed, or Administration.

323

Name and Description of the Executor or Administrator.

Value of Effects as set forth in the Commis- sion of Ap- praisement.

Tai Leak, Nam Hoi,

Do.,

29th June, 1891, Kwoon Tong, Heung Shan, 28th June, 1894, Macao, 7th June, 1894,

S.S. Honam, off Canton,

4th June, 1894, Canton, 21st July, 1894, Arnison Road, in the County

of Surrey,

16th Oct., 1893,

Pang Shu Fun and Pang Yu Fun, exe-

cutors,

12,000.00

Do.,

Probate,

Shi Yu Sun and Shi Wai Chung, exe-

cutors,..

30,000.00

Cheung Kwan and Cheung Hong, exe

cutors,.

119,768.70

Do..

Do.,

Cheong King. Cheong Chew and Cheang

Fook, executors, Tang Kom Shee, executrix,

10,000.00

300,750,00

Do..

Sotheby Godfrey Bird, the duly author- ized attorney of Charles Lena May, one of the executors named in the said Will. for the use and benefit of the said Charles Lena May, and until he shall apply for Probate of the said Will, Chai Lai Shi,

=

19

12 Chan Kum,

""

};

12 Yune Kam,

17 Tevil Silbermann,

Chan Tai,

";

17

11

26

Wong Sui Ki,

21

19

James Jordan,

17

19

Pedro Medina,..

21

Gerhard M. Krohn,

"

21

13

Henry Mason,

28

""

Ng Chai Hung,

Oct. 17 Leong Nin,

17 Peter Ventnor Grant,

Hongkong, 17th Feb., 1886,

Leung Lew, Shun Tak,

26th July, 1894, Hongkong, 3rd Aug., 1894, Canton, 25th May, 1894, Canton, 28th June, 1894, Hongkong, 30th Aug., 1894, | Hongkong, 9th June, 1894, Hongkong, 8th Sept., 1894, Hongkong, 8th Sept., 1894, Tai Kok Tsoi, 6th July, 1894, Wang Fung, Sun Wui Dis-

trict, 7th Jan., 1894, Cairo, in Egypt,

37,689.00

Letters of Adm. de bonis non. Probatc,

Do..

3,400.00

Yune Tsok Ming,

5,000.00

Sarah Silbermann,

6,000.00

Do.,

Chan Tsun Wing,

50,000.00

Do.,

Wong Jau Shi,.........................

1,000.00

Letters of Adm.,

Official Administrator,

50.00

50.00

Do.,

Do.,

100.00

Do.,

Do.,

200.00

Do.,

Do.,

Probate,

Ng Luk,

600.00

Do.,

Leong Mun Lam,

12,000.00

Letters of Adm. 21st Mar., 1894, with Expl. of the

Will annexed,

17 Wee Boon Teck,

Singapore, 22nd Sept., 1888, Letters of Adm.

with the Will annexed,

18 Fung Tsun,

Hongkong, 5th Oct., 1894,

Probate,

Do.,

30 Kwan Lin Oi alias Kwan Ngan, Macao, 9th Sept., 1894,

"

30 Leong Chak Lum,

30 Henry Batten,...

Nov.

6

Ho Tsun San,

6

Frank Lapsley,

"1

6

F. D. Dr per,

19

6 Wong Tsung,

"4

6 John Macgregor,.............

Canton, 23rd June, 1894, Khartoun Villa, Beach Road, in the Island of Jersey,

9th Dec., 1893,

Macao, 12th June, 1894, Hongkong, 17th Oct., 1894, Hongkong, 6th Oct., 1894, Hongkong, 3rd July, 1886,

Shanghai, 7th Nov., 1893,

Do., Letters of Adm. with Expl. of the Will annexed,

Probate, Letters of Adm., Do., Letters of Adm. de bonis non, Frobate,

Alfred Bulmer Johnson, the duly author- ized attorney of the said John Pren- tice, Charles W. Hay and Brodie A. Clarke, and until they shall duly apply for and obtain Probate to the said I'state, Godfrey Cornewall Chester Master, the duly authorized attorney of the said Lim Hoh Poah, for the use and be- nefit of the said Lim Hoh Poah, and until he shall duly apply for and obtain Probate to the said Estate, Fung Tan Shi,.... Liu Hau,

Leong Tsoi Shi, Charles Dowdall, the duly authorized attorney of the said Isabell Batten Thomas and Jesse Lambly Thomas, for the use and benefit of the said Isabell Batten Thomas and Jesse Lambly Thomas, and until they shall duly apply for and obtain Probate to the said Estate,

Ho Lum Shi, Official Administrator, Do., Wong Chan Shi,

Kenneth Mackenzie Ross, one of the exe- cutors named in the said Will, power being reserved to make a like grant to James Jardine Bell-Irving and Robert Macgregor, the other execu- tors named in the said Will,

Chui Tung Tak,

Godfrey Cornewall Chester Master,

Yune Tsok Ming,

134,700.00

1,200.00

6,000.00

3,100.00

300.00

840.00 15,000.00

50.00

50.00

4,000.00

88,533.91

5,000.00

765.42

5,000.00

100.00

4.000.00

6 Chui Sut Hing,

Kau Tau, Sun Úi,

Do.,

"

17 William Duffus,

12th Sept., 1894, Edinburgh, 30th Apr., 1894,

Re-sealing

"

11

17 Yune Hee Ming alias Yune Pung, Seung Leu, Kwong Tung,

Testament. Probate,

1

21 | Cháu A-Tsoi,

"

6 Wong Ying,

Hongkong, 24th May, 1894,

Wong Kong, Sun Ning,

Letters of Adm., | Lau A-Ho,

Sept. 7 Tang Tung Shang,

Canton,

25th June, 1894,

21st July, 1894,

Letters of Adm. with the Will annexed, Probate and Codicil,

Wong Tsz Pau,

Nov. 30 Lau King Sam,

Ma Wan, Heung Shan,

8th Oct., 1894,

600.00

Dec.

4 George John Vowles,

8 Lee Yik Chee,

Hongkong, 5th Nov., 1894,

Honam, Canton,

Lee Leong Shi,

""

8 Lee Ah Sun alias Lee U Nam,... Kowloon City, (Chinese).

>>

3rd July, 1894,

21st Nov., 1894,

Do..

Probate,

Letters of Adm., Lee Chan Shi, the lawful widow,

1,627.25

11,000.00

3,000.00

Tang Koon Shi, power being reserved to grant a like Probate to Ho A-kin, the other executrix named in the said Will,

Letters of Adm., Lau Mo San, the duly authorized attor- ney of Cheong Shi, for the use and benefit of the said Cheong Shi, and until she shall apply for Letters of Administration,

Official Administrator,

300,750.00

324

CALENDAR of PROBATES and ADMINISTRATION,—Continued.

Date

of Grant.

Name of Testator or Intestate.

Time and Place of Death,

Probate, Administration, with Will annexed, or Administration.

Name and Description of the Executor or Administrator.

1894. Dec.

3 Frederick William Speidel,

Saigon,

Nov. 21 Robert H. Nisbet, Dec. 18 Grace Maria Ogle,

Value of Estate as set forth in the Commis- sion of Ap- praisement.

1st Oct., 1893,¦ Letters of Adm. | Albert Wilhelm Arthur Becker, the duly

Hongkong, 27th Oct., 1894, Yokohama, 25th Oct., 1894,

with the Will annexed,

Letters of Adm., Letters of Adm. with the Will and Codicil annexed,

authorized attorney of Charles Theo- dor Speidel, for the use and benefit of the heirs of Frederick William Speidel, deceased, and until they shall apply for Probate of the said Estate,. Official Administrator, Charles Stewart Sharp, the duly author-

ized attorney of John William Hard- ing, for the use and benefit of the said John William Harding, and until he shall duly apply for Probate of the said Estate,..... Kwa Chui Sik,

4,679.00 50.00

8,200.00

28 Kwan Shing,

31 Lo Sham,

}}

**

28 Henry Kennett, 28 Woo Tim,

Hoi Ping, China,

22nd Nov., 1894, Fung Sun, Sam Shiu,

8th Sept.. 1894, Hongkong, 22nd Nov., 1894, Kowloon City, (Chinese),

Probate,

Do.,

Letters of Adm., Do.,

8,000.00

So Leung Shi,

100,00

Beatrice Theresa Kennett, widow, Woo Lau Shi, widow,

2,000.00

500.00

Registry Supreme Court, Hongkong, 25th April, 1895.

C. F. A. SANGSTER, Acting Registrar.

No. 13.

HONGKONG.

REPORT OF THE HEAD MASTER OF THE QUEEN'S COLLEGE FOR 1894.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor.

91

No. 4

95

QUEEN'S COLLege, HONGKONG, 16th January, 1895.

SIR, I have the honour to forward the Annual Report on Queen's College for the year 1894. 1. The total number on the College Roll for the year was 1,048. The Plague, which mercifully spared the lives of our masters and scholars, has however played ruthless havoc with fully half the statistics in the Table following.

2. The following tables will illustrate the condition of the College during the last five years :—

YEAR.

Average

Total Number of Scholars.

Number of School days.

Monthly Enrolment.

Daily Attendance.

Maximum.

Minimum.

1890,

1891,

1892,

1893,

1894,

1890,

1891,

1892,

1893,

1894,

1,075

236

890

683

758

1,108

231

932

712

759

1,062

237

862

700

728

1,012

238

840

639

683

1,048

222

881

85

545

Number

of

YEAR.

School Boys Examined.

Percentage of Passes.

Actual Net

School Fees.

Expenditure.

Average Expense of each

Scholar per Average Daily Attendance.

692

89.45

11,912.00

19,222.46

25.34

709

90.26

12,237.00

18,158.60

23.92

671

96.12

12,342.00

19,741.43

27.09

625

93.28

12,348.00

21,405.46

31.33

587

88.58

11,562.00

25,752.00

47.22

3. ATTENDANCE.-The minimum monthly attendance 85 in July contrasts sadly with the maximum 881 in April, which nearly equals the 890 of 1890. In the course of the year 403 boys were admitted, as against 308 in 1893; and of these, 56 entered in the second half of the year, as against 44 in the same period last year. This increased demand for admission, in spite even of an epidemic, may be viewed as an indication, that this college has not suffered in reputation.

4. FINANCES.-It is specially disappointing to note the low figure, at which Revenue derivable from Fees stands. I have already reported to the Treasury that, in view of the $700 actual gain in the first five months of the year, and of the increased admissions above alluded to, there is no exaggeration in assuming $1,200 as the total increase, and $13,500 as the total revenue, that might naturally have been expected, had it not been for the Plague. The total loss in Fees due to this cause cannot be taken at less than $2,000, of which $1,181 is accounted for, by the amount remitted to boys, who were absent in the months of June and July, having left the Colony with their families, in the scare naturally engendered by the Plague. The balance, $800, may be attributed to the fees of six months unpaid by about 100 boys, who are in excess of the number of absentees in the corresponding months of last year. With a heavy loss of revenue and a terrible reduction in attendance, as observable in the fifth column, it is not a matter for surprise, that the Average Expense in the tenth column should appear disproportionate. The Table at the end of this report contains two additional items of expenditure, viz: Adjustment of Exchange in Crown Agents' Account, and Exchange Compensation paid to three masters, who accepted three shillings exchange for the dollar when on leave; these account for the increase in expenditure observable on last year.

5. BUBONIC PLAGUE. On the 1st May, the absentee list, in accordance with normal conditions, was under 4% of the number on the monthly roll; but on account of the outbreak of the Plague over 42% were absent on June 1st, and on July 1st 96.5% were absent, exactly inverting the percentages of two months previously, when that was the precentage of attendance. From the end of May, the non-Chinese scholars, nearly to a boy, absented themselves; two little English boys in the Preparatory School were a bright exception, coming regularly till the College was closed. Of the Chinese boys, the Upper School boys deserve the most credit for regular attendance; for some time, the First Class formed the bulk of the total College attendance. As daily, dead bodies were carried out of streets in

92

the vicinity of the College, and the smoke and smell of burning stuff, refuse from plague-stricken houses, were borne into the building from a spot not 50 ft. distant, the gradual nature of the exodus deserves praise rather than censure. It is difficult to ascertain with precision, how many of our boys succumbed to this disease. Eight deaths have been reported as due to this cause. Early in June two of our boys, living in quite different parts of the town, suddenly died of plague. Só Man-chau was in school on Saturday, the 2nd, and reported dead and buried on Monday the 4th; on the same Monday, Leung Shi-chák was removed to hospital, and reported dead on the following day. As a consequence, 280 boys left, in the course of the week, and 120 more, before the close of the month. With rare exceptions, the boys observed the usual formalities, bringing their parents or guardians to apply for leave. On the 14th July, there were 48 boys for the 21 class-rooms instead of 832 as in May. His Excellency the Governor, under the circumstances permitted the vacation to begin a fortnight earlier than usual.

6. On re-opening on the 3rd September, 557 boys returned and by the end of the month, this number had risen to 625, not counting 37 boys newly admitted. I attribute this satisfactory return, of so large a number of boys, to the Governor's kind consideration, in remitting on account of the Plague, the arrears of fees due from boys who were absent in the months of June and July; for there can be no doubt that otherwise a considerable number would have stayed away on account of inability to pay such large lump sums as $12, $8 &c. As it is, 235 names were missing between May and September, as against 109 last year or an extra loss of 126 boys in the summer of 1894.

7. RETRENCHMENT.-Experience, as observable in connexion with the formation of a new department, or the extension of an old one, has shown that the expenses grow, in the first few years, to a considerable extent in excess of the original estimate. It is therefore to the credit of Dr. STEWART and Dr. EITEL that their approval of my estimate in 1887 of the number of officers, and items of expenditure, required for the New Building has in no particular been subject to increase; for we cannot take into account, the general increase of 35% and 20% to the Civil Service, nor the item, English Books, where fall in silver has necessitated further adjustment; neither of which events could possibly have been foreseen. The Colonial Treasurer in his evidence before the Retrenchment Committee, said (p. 127) "When men become trained in Treasury work, they become very valuable. If a rush of prosperity comes to the Colony, several of my staff, some of whom are really intelligent men, may leave me at once for better pay" and this sentiment was echoed by other Heads of Department. The same argument applies with greater force to the trained Chinese Assistants of this establishment; if they continue to be underpaid, the old experience of their departure, when their services are most valuable, will again be felt. The onus of showing, that younger and more incompetent Chinese are suitable to be teachers of English, in fourteen of the twenty-one classes of this College, falls on those who dispute my position, which is, that Chinese teachers of ages ranging from 25 to 40, competent to teach a variety of English subjects, surely deserve higher salaries than young Chinese clerks five and ten years their junior, who are only required to copy or translate documents. It has however gravely been suggested to reduce the salaries of these masters which are already lower than those of copying clerks; this would certainly reduce expenditure, but render any chance of maintaining efficiency hopeless.

8. DISTINGUISHED VISITORS.-Dr. GUSTAV OPPERT, Professor at Madras University, and Dr. DENNYS, Protector of Chinese in British North Borneo, both paid a visit and expressed great interest in the education given here. The latter paid us the highest compliment, by selecting after competitive examination, a First Class boy to accompany him back to Borneo, as clerk and interpreter in his own Department.

9. CHANGE IN THE CONSTITUTION OF THE COLLEGE.-On the 3rd September I received notice that the Secretary of State had decided that all connection with the Education Department and Queen's College should cease, and that the College should be placed under the management of a Governing Body." This was supplemented on the 6th December, by an explanation conveyed in an extract from the Secretary of State's Despatch, viz: "The change which is now being initiated has been devised in Dr. WRIGHT'S own interests, as well as those of the school. It is an alternative to the existing system, which has been found to be unsatisfactory."

10. NON-CHINESE CLASSES.-It was a pleasure to me to observe that the Retrenchment Committee (par. 136) share my opinion, that it is the duty of the College to make special provision for the education of such English and other non-Chinese boys as wish to enter. Two classes have been specially formed for their benefit, under the charge of English masters; but it will be only possible to maintain these, if the number of pupils does not fall below a minimum of 60 for the two classes combined. It rests therefore entirely with the parents to show their appreciation of the advantages specially devised for them. One well-known Government Official, by sending his two sons here, has broken through the prejudice, with which we have always had to contend viz: that the preponderance of Chinese scholars renders this place unsuitable for boys of other nationalities. In this connexion however it is not to be forgotten, that there is hardly a school in the Colony but has at length admitted Chinese, after starting with exclusively non-Chinese pupils. The two classes, above spoken of, are for convenience called from the position of their class-rooms, Class Ic. and IIc, but this gives an inaccurate impression of the standard of work. Each of these classes is divided into two sections. In Class Ic, only one boy took the papers of Class IA, the remainder of the Senior Section taking those of IB; while the Junior Section found Class II papers sufficiently difficult. Class IIc, took History, Geography and Composition with Class III, and the Seniors also worked Euclid and Algebra papers prepared for the same class; but in Arithmetic and Grammar, the Senior Section sat with Class IV, and the Junior

}

93

with Class V. As a compensation for the time spent in Chinese by other classes, these two take Latin. To remove any misconception, and as an act of justice to the masters concerned, I have, this year, kept the four sections of the non-Chinese classes separate, distinguishing them as N1, N2, N3, N4. I must not omit to mention, that His Excellency the Governor has shown his sympathy with this movement, by relieving the Master in charge of the Senior Non-Chinese Class, Mr. MACHELL, of further study of Chinese, that he may devote himself more completely to developing this branch of the College, and continue without overstrain to himself to superintend the athletics of these boys.

11. OXFORD LOCAL EXAMINATIONS.-We paid 18 fees, but only 15 boys presented themselves, of whom eight obtained certificates, viz: three Seniors under 19 years of age, and five Juniors over 16 years of age.

Of Special Subjects, 1 boy passed in Bookkeeping, 2 in Drawing, 2 in Physiography and 1 in Trigonometry. U HANG-KAM, who headed the Senior List in this place, was marked Good in Arithmetic, Shakespeare and Algebra; and Fox CHI-YAN, who took the same position amongst the Juniors, obtained the same mark in Arithmetic and Shakespeare. Of the eight boys who obtained Certificates, 4 were marked Good in Arithmetic, 4 in Shakespeare, 2 in Geography and 1 in Algebra. Taken as a whole the result is very satisfactory, the percentage of passes as compared with last year being 53: 58. There is a marked improvement in the work of the non-Chinese boys, though the Chinese still lead.

12. ANGLO-CHINESE CLASS.-The number of boys examined in these divisions dwindled from 58 in 1889 to 12 in 1893. When then in March last I found only two boys presenting themselves to form a class, I first enquired of the parents the cause of their sons' absence, and then reported to the Government the extinction of the Anglo-Chinese Class. The reasons alleged by the parents appeared to be valid, and may be classified in the following manner, (1) several boys are under ten years of age, and it is objected that the study of Chinese, in addition to English is too severe a strain; (2) others profess to attend classes for improvement in their own languages, Portuguese, Arabic &c; (3) others live out at East Point, and find it impossible or unhealthy to remain from 8 A.M. till 5 P.M. without a solid meal. Of the 103 non-Chinese boys on the Roll, 71 are in the Upper School and therefore exempted by Government Order, there remain then 32 to form the Anglo-Chinese Class, but 20 of these are about 8 or 9 years of age.

13. THE STAFF.-I am happy to report an exceptionally good Bill of Health. Mr. MAY, the Second Master, went on leave in April, after the completion of six years' service, and Mr. DEALY is acting for him, proving a very energetic and satisfactory substitute. Mr. BARLOW also went on leave, on a plea of urgent private affairs. Mr. JONES was temporarily transferred to the Magistracy, as Acting First Clerk. We were therefore, for eight months, short of the services of three masters. The consequent necessary changes put the First Chinese Assistant in charge of the Preparatory School, Mr. WAN of Class IIB, the highest Upper School Class yet entrusted to a Chinese Assistant, and deprived one of the Lower School Classes of the advantage of an English Master, a luxury we can only afford when the complete English Staff is on duty. Of the Chinese Assistants, four were employed in the Upper School, instead of two, as last year. Messrs. LUK, WAN, NG and LEUNG were in charge of Classes IIIA, IIB, IIIc, and IIIB, respectively, and their percentages, 89, 88, 92 and 92, compare very favourably with the average results of this year. My recommendation of increased salaries for Chinese Assistants is thus strongly supported by further experience.

14. HALF-YEARLY EXAMINATIONS.-In 1894, for the second year running this important factor in the general success of the year was forcibly held in abeyance, on account of the general exodus from the Colony. A considerable proportion of the failures among boys educationally weak, is due to the absence of this check and its attendant advice.

15. RECREATION.-Drill still continues, but unless it can be put in charge of a duly qualified instructor, it not only entails waste of time and money, but as conducted last year is positively prejudicial to the maintenance of discipline. The following report from Mr. MACHELL on Recreation may prove of interest.

(6

**

"The sports have developed an organisation, that bids fair to stand. Boys now play "regularly and heartily, who looked askance at athletics two years ago. The Cricket "team of masters and boys is thus far undefeated. Football as played in the College grounds is an expensive amusement; three balls are used up monthly, though diligently "repaired and well kept. For a month prior to commencement of Annual Examination, "the verandahs of Hollywood Crescent and the space outside the lower West Gate were thronged with spectators of the 4 to 5 P.M. games. Lost balls were kicked back with "a zest which produced great merriment when a too zealous coolie unwisely kicked "squarely at the ball with his bare toes. There are two or three privately owned "cricket sets and at least three independent football owners. These occupy the lower ground during the longer periods of recess &c. No accident has marred play, though "keen rivalry exists between the first and second teams. The drill has been very "unsatisfactory. A broken succession of tactless and incompetent instructors wearied "the boys beyond measure, and they were only kept from openly resenting the tiresome "bungling by my frequent presence at and personal conduct of the drill. The Cadet "Section is kept up. Their uniform is only fitted for summer wear. Five of the "Queen's College Cadets are now Volunteers. The formation of a Chinese Cadet Corps "was, owing to the Plague and the resulting lee-way in class-work, out of the question.

94

"The entire question of recreation is beset with difficulties. The College grounds are "fairly large but sharply and strongly marked off into Southern, Central and Northern "areas respectively. Football and Cricket are possible only in the Northern area, and "then only at a costly expenditure of material. The Valley is distant (a serious matter "when time is short and many of the boys poor) and no proper site can be uninterruptedly "used. Bowrington Plantation will provide sites shortly, but the distance must always prove a drawback. Where one master only organises and regularly attends sports it "is very uphill work. The mere playing, on invitation, in an important match, is "kindly but useless from any sustaining and developing standpoint.'

(6

16. ANNUAL EXAMINATION.-Two courses were open to me, in conducting the examination this year. Either to set easier papers, and report that this course was adopted on account of the disorganised year's work; or to adhere to the usual severe standard, and claim lenient judgment on the same plea. I preferred the latter course, in the interests of comparative statistics, which would become valueless with an uncertain standard. The total number examined was 587, of whom 520 or 88 per cent. passed, i.e. a loss of 5 per cent. on last year, though in 1894 we had only three-quarters of a school year; a result which cannot be viewed as despicable. The three sections of the College are thus represented :-

Passed percentage.

Boys examined.

1894

1893

1894

190

88

280

82

155

93

Upper School......................217 Lower School..........201

Preparatory...

...169

1893

90

92

96

From the above figures it is clear, that the Lower School has suffered most, and this was reasonably to be expected. As I have above reported, the Upper School was more steady in attendance during the Plague while the Preparatory, being usually examined on a half-year's work, was not much affected by that calamity. With the exception of Arithmetic, Geography and History, the general percentages of subjects are fairly up to the mark. The figures obtained in Colloquial, Reading and Latin exceed last year's. The fatally small percentages in some classes in a few subjects is the result of the presence of idly disposed or less mentally robust scholars, who naturally found it more difficult to recover lost time. I think that the masters deserve credit for their steady application in the face of peculiarly depressing circumstances, while some of them are entitled to special commendation for results hardly inferior to the average year.

17. The usual Tables of the number of boys examined and passed in each subject, and of percentages of passes are here subjoined:

TABLE I.-NUMBER OF BOYS PASSED IN EACH SUBJECT, 1894.

CLASS.

Total No. Examined.

Total No. Passed.

Colloquial.

Reading.

Arithmetic.

Dictation.

English to Chinese,

Chinese to English.

Grammar.

Geography.

Map Drawing.

Composition.

History.

Algebra.

Euclid.

General Intelligence.

Book-keeping.

Shakespeare.

Latin.

IA.,

IB., N1, N 2, IIA......

IIB...... N 3, N 4,

15

19

14 15 14

494

16 13 19

14 13 14 14

127

11 5 8 11 4 4

11

10

15 13

12

3 14

32

14

10

15 8 9 12

12

14

14

18

3 11 11

11

7 13

14 10 5

IIIA.,

IIIB.,

IIIc.,

IVA.,

IVB.,

IVC.,

VA.,

26 25 24 26 20 19 23 25 22 22 24 17

18 23 14 11 11 14 4 12 7 6 7 7 3 6 38 34 31 38 19 23 35 37 23 8 24 22 23 24 14 16

23 24 12 11 24 22 21 24 18 22 23 23 20 3 41 37 36 41 17 31 39 34 22 24 23 20 24 5 15 17 13 11 17 2 11 41 32 33 41 21

::མམ;:;

2 3

9

24

25

20

25

21 16 18

6 2

∞1∞

227

24 23

23 19

13

2899

4

3

383

20

13

19 10

22 33 33

22 20 11 16 20 21

15 11 6 11 12 14

21

33

30 14 24

VB.,

18 23 4

9

VIA.,

23

VIB.,

28 28

VIIA.,

44 38

VIIB.,

23 21

VIIIA.,

VIIIB.,

VIIIC.,

28 26 49 48 25 25.

Total,................

24 15 26 24 25 26 6

24 25 23 16 20

21 28 11 28 25 28 27 17 25

42 31 28 35 35 33

23 16 22 21 20 17

26 24 20 23 25

49 48 46 44 45

25 22 24 24 22

587520 353 | 580 | 336 | 422 | 480|463293 | 215 | 153 | 307 | 108 | 146 98

Examined in each Subject,.....(1894) | 418 | 587 587 | 587 | 541 | 541 485 418 201 364 210 210 186 110

...(1893) | 470 625 625 625 | 573 573 538 | 470 280 392 190 173 | 134 93 51

Do.

do.,

19

14

4 6 16

227228

240

222 222 ⠀⠀⠀

20

24 5

15

10

11 28

11

3

270346

314

12

9

13

a

9

10

10

12

2 +

8

5

18

co

10

:མྦུ」:

20

13

30

18

Writing.

...

25

: : : 85

46 25

...

43

33333

36 39 23

60 59 39

42 49

CLASS.

TABLE II-PERCENTAGE OF PASSES IN EACH SUBJECT, 1894.

Total No. Examined.

To. Percentage Passed.

Colloquial.

Reading.

Arithmetic.

Dictation.

English to Chinese.

Chinese to English.

Geography.

Map Drawing.

Grammar.

Composition.

History.

Algebra.

Euclid.

General Intelligence.

Book-keeping.

Shakespeare.

Latin.

IA.,

15

93 100 93

73

67100

87 93 67

100

IB.,

19

84 68 100

63

16

74

63

74

74

N 1,...

14

93 100 100

50

79

...

50 93

94 16 100 71

37

21 71

N 2,

11

42

72 100

36

36

18 28

82

18

36 9 28

53 60 80 80 60 87

58 58 36

47

53

85 57

36

42

IIA......

26

96

92100

77

73

88

92

77 96

92 88

77

92 19

69

IIB.,

25

88

88 96

68

72

92

84

64 72

92

76

60

44 24

N 3,

14 79 79 100

28 86

43 14

93 64

71 21

56:::

8:

71

N 4, IIIA.,

7

86 100 100

43

86

28

14

38

89

81 100

50

60

92

97

60 21

IIIB., IIIC.,

24 92

96 100

58

67

96

100

50

46

24 92

88100

75

92

96 96

83

12

IVA.,

IVB., IVC.,

42

41 90

88 100 41

76

95

83

54 54

80

24 96

83 100

21

62

92

83

46

66

83

17 76

65 100 12

65

88

65

35 65 70

VA.,

41 78

80100 51

51

80

73

34 58 66

VB.,

24 62

75 96

17 37

79

58

17 25

67

VIA.,

26 92

96 100

23 88

92 96

88 61

77

VIB.,

28100

75100

39 100

89 100

96 43

89

VILA., ................

44

86

95 70 64

79 79

75

VIIB.,

23

92

VIIIA.,

28

93

93

VIIIB.,

49

VIIIc.,

25 100

8888

98

100

8888888

100 69 96 92 87 74

85 71 82 89

Writing. ***J***

86

43

87

29

74 53

::

54

92 54

42

92

...

...

***

100 98 94 89

96 96

888888

92

:

89

94

...

100

1894,............ 587 88 84 99 57

1893,....... 625 93 79 97

5855

72

83

77 86

888

89

888888

86

60

51

76

84

50

69

52 36 60 68

86

70 77

86 90

78

70

64

71

88889

59

63 74

51

TABLE III-CHINESE EXAMINATION, 1894.

CHINESE SCHOOL. Percentage Table of Passes.

Class.

Total No. Examined.

Essay.

Letter.

King-kai.

Prosody. Tuitui.

Total Percentage Passed.

80

97

73

1,

2,

41

25

3,

47

4,

5,

6,

7,

2 3 4 3 2

40

51

45

44

8,

45

90

80

87

82

92

70

71

53

8 8 + O 2 2 2 8

83

61

76

44

70

81

47

:

:

2 2 2 8 a

71

73

73

82

53

72

≈ 8 * 8 * * N 8

73

68

73

60

47

32

84

91

84

90

2 2 2 2 ∞ ∞ ∞

70

67

82

≈ 2 8 8 8 8

73

75

88

68

75

73

80

18. REMARKS ON INDIVIDUAL SUBJECTS.

Reading. Some advance even on last year. An attempt to develop better modulation of the voice, in all classes including non-Chinese would produce further improvement.

Colloquial.-Highly creditable; the conversation in the topmost classes ranging freely over a variety of unforeseen topics surprised me by the amount of intelligence displayed in the answers, and knowledge of general subjects outside the class routine.

Dictation.-Fairly up to the average. Considerable improvement in Ia.

Composition.-Excellent results. Considerable acquaintance with English idiom is manifested. More drilling however is required, as good papers are often marred by careless mistakes, which the writers themselves should be capable of correcting.

95

96

Grammar.-Makes but a poor show. I gather from the mistakes in parsing and analysis, that masters do not generally pursue the healthy custom of drawing attention to grammatical difficulties that occur in the course of a reading lesson. These impromptu studies in grammar are the most impressive and effective that can be given.

History-Generally very good. In the three sections of Class III there was too great evidence of memoriter work, which probably accounts for the poverty of the answers, which were largely unconnected with the questions.

Arithmetic.-Generally very weak.

Algebra.-Considerable improvement in the three sections of the First Class, and excellent work

in III. B.C.

Euclid. Excellent in IIA; still terribly poor among non-Chinese.

Geography.-Poor results in all, but the five sections of the first two classes. Shakespeare.-Admirable work on a paper perhaps stiffer than last year. Translations from and into Chinese. Maintain their average good standard.

Latin.-Taking into account the shortness of the school-year the papers of all three sections deserve very considerable praise. In N1, N2 the translations from Cæsar and parsing are weak. I also fail to understand, why boys in N3. after one year's study should have a better knowledge of the use of case, than boys in N2. after two years' work. However the failure of last year in this subject is amply atoned for by the progress observable in 1894.

Book-Keeping.-Taken by Mr. JAMESON, in the absence of Mr. BARLOW, is quite equal to last

year's work.

General Intelligence.--Universal collapse, with the exception of IA.

Chemistry.-Had to be omitted from examination, as irregular attendance utterly marred the prospect of success in a weekly subject which requires steady application.

Mensuration.-One boy took this subject with Latin as substitutes for Translation papers from and into Chinese to enable him to compete for the Morrison Scholarship, in IA. He did a very good paper; and was only 62 marks behind the total 1303 (out of 1500) obtained by the successful

I have the honour to be,

candidate.

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

GEO. H. BATESON WRIGHT, D.D. Oxon,

The Honourable J. H. STEWART LOCKHART.

Acting Colonial Secretary.

&c.,

&c.,

&c.,

1894.

QUEEN'S COLLEGE.

Head Master.

Month.

Number of Scholars.

Number

of Attendances.

Number of School Days.

Average Daily Attendance.

Remarks.

January,

645

11.891

February,

807

3,144

March,

859

17,462

April,

881

11,930

May,

860

17,491

June,

529

3,505

July,

85

752

UNNENAN

20

594.55

4

786.

22

793.72

15

795.33

24

728.79

25

140.2

18

41.77

August,

September,

662

12,540

22

570.

+

October,

659

14,963

25

598.52

November,

641

14,837

25

593.48

December,

614

12,546

22

570.27

Total,

121,061

222

Total Number of ATTENDANCES during 1894, Number of SCHOOL DAYS during 1894,

Average DAILY ATTENDANCE during 1894,

Total Number of SCHOLARS at this School during 1894,

.121,061 222 545.32 1,048

GEO. H. BATESON WRIGHT, D.D. Oxon,

Head Master.

}

AVERAGE EXPENSE of each SCHOLAR at Queen's College during 1894.

Expenditure,-

Cash Book,

Exchange Compensation,

.$ 29,717.50

1,432.95

97

Do.,

Crown Agents,

Do.,

Adjustment of Exchange,

Deduct,-

School Fees,.....

Refund,.........

....

4,029.10

2,136.45

$ 37,316.00

..$ 11,562.00

2.00

$11,564.00

Total Expense of the College,...........

......$ 25,752.00

Average Expense of each Scholar per Number on Roll,

Do.

do.

per Average Daily Attendance, ...........................................

.$24.57

47.22

GEO. H. BATESON WRIGHT, D.D. OxoN,

Head Master.

No. 13.

HONGKONG.

THE EDUCATIONAL REPORT FOR 1894.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of

His Excellency the Governor.

447

No. 31

95

EDUCATION Department,

HONGKONG, 4th May, 1895.

SIR,-I have the honour to forward to you the Annual Report on Education for the year 1894.

2. GENERAL EDUCATIONAL STATISTICS.-The total number of Educational Institutions of all descrip- tions, known to have been at work in the Colony of Hongkong during the year 1894, amounts to 232 Schools, with an enrolment of 10,750 scholars. More than one half of these, viz., 5,964 scholars, attended 99 Grant-in-Aid Schools; 2,686 scholars attended 21 Government Schools; 1,757 scholars were under instruction in 104 Chinese Kaifong Schools, and 343 scholars in 8 unclassed public or private Schools. Compared with the enrolment of the preceding year, these figures show a decrease of 45 Schools with 1,373 scholars. This extraordinry decrease is caused by the outbreak, in summer 1894, of the bubonic plague and the consequent removal from the Colony of untold numbers of families children. But as these figures refer only to enrolment, which was well nigh fixed before the plague commenced, the 45 Schools that have disappeared do not represent the whole injury inflicted by the plague upon local education, but merely the nett number of Schools entirely closed. It will be shewn below that the attendance of the Schools suffered even greater loss than the mere enrolment.

3. DECENNIAL STATISTICS OF SCHOOLS UNDER THE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT.-The total num- ber of Schools, subject to supervision and examination on the part of the Education Department (exclusive of Queen's College and Police School), amounted in the year 1894 to 118 Schools, as com- pared with 90 Schools in the year 1884 and 39 Schools in the year 1874. The total number of scholars, enrolled in this same class of Schools during the year 1894, amounted to 7,246 scholars, as compared with 5,885 scholars in the year 1884 and 2,563 scholars in the year 1874. In other words, there has been an increase of 51 such Schools with 3,322 scholars during the ten years from 1874 to 1884 and a similar, but (owing to the plague and the withdrawal of Queen's College) much smaller increase of only 20 Schools and 1,361 scholars.

4. TRIENNIAL STATISTICS OF SCHOOLS UNDER THE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT.-In the year 1892 there were 130 Schools with 8,277 scholars under the supervision of the Department. In the follow- ing year (1893) there was a decrease of 4 Schools and an increase of 329 scholars, but, owing to the above mentioned causes, a further adventitious decrease of 18 Schools and 1,360 scholars took place in the year 1894.

5. COMPARATIVE STATISTICS OF GRANT-IN-AID SCHOOLS AND GOVERNMENT SCHOOLS UNDER THE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT.-Referring again to those 118 Schools with 7,246 scholars under the cognizance of the Education Department, there were in the year 1894 as many as 5,964 scholars (nearly five-sixths of the whole number) enrolled in 99 Grant-in-Aid Schools where they received a Christian education, whilst 1,282 scholars (a little over one-sixth) attended 19 Government Schools receiving a secular education. These secular Government Schools are all Free Schools with the exception of the Belilios Public School, the fees of which (covering also cost of books and stationery) are considerably below the average of fees charged in similar Voluntary Schools. All the religious Grant-in-Aid Schools, as well as the Government Schools, offer purely Chinese instruction free of all charge. It is only in the case of Schools giving a European education that twelve of the Grant-in-Aid Schools (9 English and 3 Portuguese Schools) and one Government School (Belilios Public School) charge school-fees, the latter at the rate of half a dollar a month, the former at rates varying from half a dollar to three dollars a month. An absolutely free European education is offered in English by 8 Grant-in-Aid Schools and 4 Government Schools, and in Portuguese by 3 Grant-in-Aid Schools, whilst an absolutely free Chinese education is offered by 77 Grant-in-Aid Schools and 14 Government Schools.

6. ATTENDANCE IN SCHOOLS UNDER THE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT.-The havoc wrought by the outbreak of the plague among those Schools which maintained their existence throughout this ordeal, appears very strikingly from the Tables (IV, V, VII, and IX) appended to this report. Comparing the attendance of Schools in 1894, as given in these returns, with the corresponding returns of the preceding year, it is seen that the minimum daily attendance, which in 1893 equalled 64.92 per cent. of the maximum daily attendance, fell in 1894 to 38.80 per cent., and that the average daily attendance, which in 1893 amounted to 78.19 per cent. of the enrolment, fell in 1894 to 61.41 per cent.

448

7. LOCAL DISTRIBUTION OF SCHOOLS IN GENERAL.-The injuries which the local distribution of Schools suffered during the year 1894, in consequence of the plague, affected the Saiyingpoon District more than any other portion of the town. In the other Districts, Schools closed through the plague were within a few months re-opened in other houses not far off. While thus the total loss of Schools extinguished by the plague is very evenly distributed over all the Districts of the Colony, each losing from 4 to 6 Schools only, as many as 15 Schools were wiped out of existence by the plague in the one District of Saiyingpun. Of the Schools extinguished by the plague, the vast majority (40) were Kaifong Schools. The changes which the location of the people underwent, in the districts principally affected by the plague, will soon be overtaken by the natural expansion of the Grant-in-Aid system, and I have no doubt that in a few years the educational injuries caused by the plague will be entirely effaced. As tentative measures have been taken both at Kowloon and on the Peak to supply the English families of those two Districts with Schools, there is now not a single District in the Colony left unsupplied with a measure of School accommodation, sufficient at least in proportion to the exist- ing demand. I subjoin a Table exhibiting the distribution of secular and religious Schools throughout the Colony.

Table shewing the local distribution of Secular and Religious Schools in 1894.

Districts

exclusive of Peak and Tsimshatsui.

Govern- ment.

Kaifong.

Grant- in-

Un-

Un-

Total.

Total.

classed.

classed.

Aid.

Grand Total.

Schools

Sec. Schools.

Scholars.

Sec. Schools.

Scholars.

Rel. Schools.

Scholars.

Sec. Schools.

Scholars.

Rel. Schools.

Scholars.

Sec. Schools.

Scholars.

Rel. Schools.

Scholars.

Schools.

Scholars.

of all

Descriptions.

I. & II. Kennedy Town and Shek-

tongtsui,

III. Saiyingpun,

IV. & V. Taipingshan & Sheung-

wan,

VI. Chungwan,

VII. & VIII. Hawan & Wantsai,.

IX. & X. Bowrington & Sookon-

pou,

XI. Villages of Hongkong,

...

3 90

3

215 8 100 18|1,040|

:

:

:

41,450 31 458 22 1,625

1 29

1

356 26 453 211,580

3 305 11 244 11 605

66 1 16

3

118

218 12 189 9 350

...

:

:

:

:

:

-J

Co

XII. Villages of Kowloon,........ 2 76 15 297 12 556 1 40

1

2

$8

52

4 142

4 142

42

11 315

20 1,082

31

1,397

...

36 1,937

I

54 27 809

22 1,634

2126

14 549 13 731

2 22

221,625

858 998

3,562

49

2,443

27 1,280

:

:

:

:

2

82

19

18

Co

3

118

200

407 9 350 28 757

413 12 556 30 969

8888

Total,..... 21 2,686 104 1,757 995,964 2 69 6 274 127 4,512 |105|6,238 232 10,750

8. EDUCATIONAL EXPENDITURE OF THE GOVERNMENT.-The sum total of educational payments made by the Government during the year 1894 ($79,268.14 as compared with $79,413.84 in 1893) amounted, after deducting school-fees and educational refunds paid into the Treasury ($11,896.19 as compared with $12,683.00 in 1893), to $67,371.95 (as compared with $66,730.84 in 1893). The slight increase in nett expenditure is chiefly due to the decrease caused by the plague, in the item of school-fees. The details of educational expenditure incurred in the year 1894 are as follows:-Office of Education Department $5,411.52; Queen's College (after deducting school-fees) $24,321.63; Belilios Public School (after deducting school-fees) $2,777.67; sixteen other Departmental Schools $5,743.07; 99 Grant-in-Aid Schools $25,312.44; Physical Training $192.00; Government Scholar- ships $3,805.62. The nett cost of education ($67,371.95) amounted in 1894 to 2.07 per cent. of the total Colonial Revenue (as compared with 3.22 per cent. in 1893, and 3.29 per cent. in 1892). The total number of scholars educated in Hongkong in 1894 at the expense or with the aid of the Govern- ment being 8,294, the education of each scholor cost the Government (exclusive of two scholarships held in England) $7.66 (as compared with $7.75 in 1893 and $8.57 in 1892). In the several classes ...of educational institutions in the Colony, the cost to Government of the education of each scholar under instruction was as follows:-in Queen's College $24.57; in Belilios Public School $21.87; at other Departmental Schools $4.86; in Grant-in-Aid Schools $4.23. The Managers of those 99 Grant-in-Aid Schools, who received from the Government in 1894, as Grants-in-Aid based on the definite results ascertained by the individual examination of each scholar, the sum of $25,312.44,

449

expended during the same year on those Schools, out of the resources of their respective Societies, supplemented in the case of seven Schools by school-fees, the sum of $58,950.55.

9. NATURE OF THE EDUCATION GIVEN IN THE SCHOOLS OF THE COLONY.-As regards the nature of the education given in local Schools of all descriptions, the vast majority give, of course, a purely Chinese education in the classical Chinese language. There were, in the year 1894, as many as 187 such Schools with 6,538 scholars at work, viz., 95 Kaifong Schools with 1,627 scholars, 88 Schools under Government supervision with 4,689 scholars, and 4 unclassed Schools with 222 scholars. As to Schools giving a purely English education in the English language only, there were, in 1894, at work 26 English Schools with 1,900 scholars, viz., 13 Schools under Government supervision with 1,649. scholars, 9 Kaifong Schools with 130 scholars and 4 unclassed Schools with 121 scholars. But to these must be added the Anglo-Chinese Schools of the Colony, that is to say, Schools in which the English language is taught with the use of the Chinese vernacular (in the lower standards). Of such Anglo-Chinese Schools there were at work, in the year 1894, 11 Schools under Government super- vision with 1,951 scholars. There were further 5 Schools giving to 201 scholars a European education in the Portuguese language, and 3 Schools giving to 160 scholars a European education in the Chinese language.

10. FEMALE EDUCATION.-Leaving the Police School with 356 scholars (men) out of considera- tion, but including Queen's College with its 1,048 boys, the relative numbers of boys and girls under instruction in the Colony stood in 1894 as under :-Government Schools, 1,928 boys and 402 girls; Grant-in-Aid Schools, 3,251 boys and 2,713 girls; Kaifong Schools 1,735 boys and 22 girls; unclassed Schools 102 boys and 241 girls; total 7,016 boys and 3,378 girls. In other words, among the whole number of scholars under instruction in the Schools of the Colony in the year 1894, the girls numbered only 32.49 per cent. This is below the average of the last three years and to some extent caused by the plague which naturally affected girls' schools comparatively more than boys' schools. But the fact is nevertheless quite clear that female education in the Colony is generally in a backward condition, and notably neglected in the Kaifong Schools.

11. NUMBER OF UNEDUCATED CHILDREN IN THE COLONY.-The population of Hongkong, in 1894, has been estimated by the Registrar General, without reference to the removal from the Colony of large numbers of women and children, at 246,006 persons, including 235,224 Chinese and 10,782 persons of non-Chinese extraction (including Army and Navy). On the basis of these figures I estimate the number of children of local school age (6 to 16 persons) present in the Colony, before the outbreak of the plague, at 31,980, viz., 16,950 boys and 15,030 girls. From the returns of this Department, it appears that there were under instruction in Schools of all descriptions during the year 1894, 7,016 boys and 3,378 girls. This would. indicate that as many as 21,586 children, viz., 9,934 boys and 11,652 girls of school-going age were not attending School during the year 1894. But as it is certain that a considerable number (say one half) of these boys and girls, 6 to 16 years of age, though not attending School in 1894, owing to their having left School without going through the full course of 10 years' schooling, had previously been for 3 to 4 years under instruction, all that can be said is that the official returns indicate that 9,934 boys and 11,652 girls remained imperfectly educated, and that about half of this number, viz., 4,967 boys and 5,826 girls escaped the education net altogether, and may be put down as remaining uneducated.

12. RESULTS OF THE ANNUAL EXAMINATIONS.-As far as the 99 Grant-in-Aid Schools are concerned, the detailed results of the annual examination of these Schools will be found summarized in Tables X and XI appended to this report, where the grants allowed, and the percentage of scholars passed in each School in 1894, are stated and compared with the results of the preceding year, and in Table XII which records the percentage of passes gained in each subject. As regards the Depart- mental Schools, Tables II to VII supply the most important particulars.

13. BELILIOS PUBLIC SCHOOL.--The former Girls' Central School (giving an English education to European, Eurasian and Chinese children) having been amalgamated, in December 1893, with two existing Chinese Schools which gave a purely Chinese education, has been denominated, since 1st January, 1894, the Belilios Public School. This School, located in a fine building erected by the Honourable E. R. BELILIOS on the site of the old Central School granted by the Government, has been worked in 1894 as one School in two divisions, viz., an English and a Chinese division. The Chinese division consisted, until the close of the year, of two distinct Chinese Schools under separate Masters, but will, owing to the retirement of one master, whose place has been supplied by female teachers, henceforth appear in the returns as one. The enrolment of the Belilios School stood in 1894 at 402 scholars, viz., 127 in the English, and 175-scholars in the Chinese division. This must be considered as a very satisfactory beginning. The average daily attendance, however, was not so encouraging. It stood in April (before the plague commenced) at 253 scholars and in December at 144 scholars. Owing to the proximity of the building to the centre of the infection, the Belilios School felt the effects of the plague far more than the majority of the Schools under this Department. The results of the teaching given in this School are very satisfactory, and the institution is steadily commending itself to those classes of the population for whose special benefit it has been established.

14. DEPARTMENTAL DISTRICT SCHOOLS.-Three of the Government Schools were swept away by the plague and will not be re-opened as the Grant-in-Aid system will readily make good the gap. The other Schools weathered the storm bravely and commenced to resume their ordinary aspects

450

before the close of the year. New regulations for the conduct of these Schools were issued in March 1894, to amend the old regulations of 1882 with respect to certain illegal practices and particularly to make provision for the more systematic teaching of English colloquial in Anglo-Chinese Schools.

15. GRANT-IN-AID SCHOOLS.-Five new Grant-in-Aid Schools were opened at the commence- ment of the year 1894, but nine other Grant-in-Aid Schools had to be struck off the list in autumn, as they had been annihilated by the plague and by the consequent movement of the population. In the middle of the year a new district (Tsimshatsui) on Kowloon Peninsula was supplied with an English Grant-in-Aid School by the energetic public spirit which animates the British residents of Kowloon. The Committee which started this School encountered, however, extraordinary difficulties and found themselves unable to comply with all the conditions of the Code. Although recognized by the Government, this School could not be included, during the year, in the list of Schools entitled to a grant, but the Government promised to give to the Committee every assistance to enable them to succeed in their praiseworthy endeavour to make this much-needed School a self-supporting institution. In addition to the School-house at Little Hongkong, the former Harbour Office at Aberdeen was placed at the disposal of the Church Mission at a nominal rent to use these old buildings for the purposes of Grant-in-Aid Schools. A vacant room in the School-house on Caroline Hill was also leased to the London Mission for use as a Grant-in-Aid School. On 21st May, 1894, a panic spread, like wild fire, and emptied most of the Chinese Schools in town owing to the rumour that the Govern- ment had resolved, in order to stop the plague, to select a few children from each School and to excise their livers in order to provide the only remedy which would cure plague patients. This silly rumour, accredited by the fact that Chinese national custom sanctions the medical use of excised portions of the living human body, gained general credence among the mothers of children attending purely Chinese Schools and served to show how little way has been made yet by the Government of Hong- kong in the direction of making their more enlightened aims understood by the Chinese population. Chinese women in Hongkong do not seem even now to have any more confidence in the Colonial Government than they had some ten years ago when the girls' schools of the Colony were suddenly emptied by the rumour that the Government was about to select a girl from each school to bury the children alive in the Taitamtuk tunnel to ensure the success of the aqueduct. It must be said to the credit of the Managers that not only every effort was made to counteract this panic, but that every- thing possible was done by them to keep all roomy and well-ventilated Schools at work in spite of their depletion by the plague. School Managers and teachers were altogether unfortunate during the year 1894, as regards Grants-in-aid. The grants earned at the close of the year 1893 and payable in February, 1894, had to be subjected to a pro rata reduction of 8 per cent. as the amount earned under the Code ($27,432.78) exceeded the amount available under the vote of the Legislature ($25,370.00) by $2,062.78, and as at the close of the year 1894 the earning power of the Chinese Schools had, under the restrictions of the New Code and in consequence of the plague, so much decreased that the sum total earned as grants for 1894 ($20,388.75), instead of increasing as hitherto had been the case from year to year, fell short of the grant of the preceding year by $7,044.03. This first application of the new Code (1893) to the examination of Grant-in-aid Schools, which have now seven standards and a considerable list of special subjects, gave satisfactory evidence of the wholesome nature of the changes made. The regular gradation, now in force, of all the subjects from the lowest to the highest, has resulted in a greater evenness of results in each. The examinations in Elementary Science and English Etymology clearly indicated that these subjects, which have evidently been taken up con amore by both teachers and scholars, are producing a good effect towards raising the standard of general intelligence among the scholars. At the suggestion of the Honourable Dr. Ho KAI, the Board of Examiners passed, in June 1894, a stricture on the system of teaching English in local Schools for Chinese, which is virtually a repetition of the complaints which I repeatedly made during the last few years. I regret to have failed to convince Her Majesty's Government of the reality and serious nature of the defect referred to, which is painfully in evidence by the fact that the promotion of the use of the English language in the Chinese commercial and social life of this Colony makes no progress because it is not materially aided by local Schools. What I refer to, is a Resolution of the Board of examiners which has been brought by the local Government to the notice of the Schools concerned in the following words :-"Resolved, that it is desirable to solicit the attention of the Government to the fact elicited by the examination lately held with reference to vacancies under the Government of Perak, as well as by previous examinations, viz., that in the education of Chinese youths insufficient attention seems to be bestowed in Hongkong on English Colloquial, the Chinese candidates examined by the Board being generally unable to speak English idiomatically." Apart from the plague, the year 1894 has proved disastrous to the educational interests of the Colony also by the extraordinary inroads made by death among local educationists. The death of Bishop RAIMONDI deprived not merely the Roman Catholics of the Colony of their greatest and most energetic educational reformer, but all supporters of religious education of one of their foremost leaders. Ever since Dr. LEGGE established the reign of secularism in the Colony (in 1861), Bishop RAIMONDI was the principal champion in the Colony of local religious education and fought for it long before the Protestant Missionaries burst the fetters of secu- larism in 1879. To the late Mr. C. J. BATEMAN, by whose premature death the High School came to an end, the Colony owes the introduction of the Cambridge and Oxford local examinations. The late Brother PATRICK of St. Joseph's College, whose death in 1894 was by all interested in education in this Colony felt to involve an irreparable loss was, like Mr. BATEMAN, not only a born teacher but a

451

specially successful tutor in the subjects of secondary education. Both these Masters exercised a very strong personal influence on their scholars who will ever treasure their memory with gratitude.

16. LOCAL EXAMINATIONS.-The results of the annual Oxford Local Examinations, held in Hongkong in July 1894, were as under:-I. Junior Division.-Honours List, none. Pass List. Diocesan School, 6 passes; Victoria English School, 1 pass. Candidates, who, having exceeded the age of 16 years satisfied the Examiners,-Queen's College, 5 passes. Successful candidates who obtained distinction, none. Details of examination results of Junior Division:-presented 27; examined 23; passed in preliminary subjects, 20; passed in religious knowledge, fully 5, partly 4; passed in English, fully 20, partly 2; passed in mathematics, 7; passed in drawing, 2. Total of certificates issued to candidates of proper age, 7; to candidates beyond the limit of age, 5. H. Senior Division.-Honours List, none. Pass List,-Queen's College, 3 passes. Successful candidates who, having exceeded the limit of age (19 years), satisfied the examiners, Queen's College, none. ful candidates who obtained distinction, none. Details of examination results, of Senior Division:- presented, 13; examined, 10; passed in preliminary subjects, 9; passed in religious knowledge, fully 2, partly 2; passed in English, fully 8, partly 1; passed in inathematics, 3; passed in drawing, 1. Total of certificates issued to candidates of proper age, 3. The foregoing results may be summarized thus-Queen's College 8 passes (of which 5 were obtained by excess of age); Diocesan School, 6 passes; Victoria English School, 1 pass.

Success-

17. BELILIOS MEDAL AND PRIZE EXAMINATIONS.-At the annual competitive examinations for Belilios Medals and Prizes (for the year 1894), 30 picked scholars from the principal Schools of the Colony entered the lists viz.:-11 European or Chinese boys, 5 European girls and 14 Chinese girls. The Schools represented in this competition were St. Joseph's College, the Diocesan School, the Victoria English School, the Victoria Home and Orphanage School, the Basel Mission and the Berlin Foundling House School. In the boys' division, St. Joseph's College took the 1st and 4th and the Diocesan School the 2nd, 3rd and 5th prizes. In the English girls' division, the Victoria English School took the 1st and 2nd prizes. In the Chinese girls' division, the 1st and 3rd prizes fell to the Victoria Home and Orphanage, and the 2nd, 4th and 5th prizes to the Basel Mission School.

18. PHYSICAL TRAINING. An inspection parade of the Cadet Corps was held on 8th January, 1894, and, in result, the Military Authorities, discouraged by the excessive preponderance of alien elements in the Corps, resolved to abstain from giving the local Cadet Corps the status and control which similar Corps are granted in England, and advised that the Corps should be trained in sections at the several Schools. This has accordingly been done. The Military Authorities granted the services of a private, instead of a non-commissioned officer, for the physical drill which has been continued, in 1894, in eleven local Schools.

19. INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION.-A grant of $2,500 having been made in 1894 to the Roman Catholic Reformatory, to cover the cost of the surrounding wall and to provide enlarged accommoda- tion, the late Bishop RAIMONDI placed this Industrial School under the Reformatory School Ordinance as a School certified by the Government for the reception of juvenile offenders. A regular Kinder- garten, for the benefit of the children of the poor Chinese residing at Saiyingpun, established by the Rev. G. REUSCH of the Basel Mission (in February, 1894), now gives gratuitous instruction to young Chinese children in the rudiments of industrial work by systematic training of hand and eye.

20. MEDICAL EDUCATION.-At the close of the year four more of the students of the College of Medicine for Chinese completed their curricula, with a minimum period of study of five years. The names of the new graduates are WONG I-YIK, who is certified to have passed his professional examina- tions with high distinction, Ü I-KAI, LAU SZE-FUK, and WONG SAI-YAN. The College has its head- quarters in the Alice Memorial Hospital, with which and the Nethersole Hospital, it is affiliated for practical purposes, but it is ruled by an independent Court, and the Examiners are professional men who have no other connection with it. The officers and lecturers, all of whom give their services gratuitously, have at the present time ten students under professional training.

21. SCHOLARSHIPS.-The draft of the revised Governinent Scholarship Scheme referred to in my last report is still under the consideration of Her Majesty's Government. As to non-official Scholar- ships, Queen's College had, in the year 1894, the benefit of 4 Belilios Scholarships, 2 Morrison and 1 Stewart Scholarship. The management of the Morrison Scholarship Fund is in an illegal condition and requires rectification. St. Joseph's College had the benefit of one and the College of Medicine that of 5 Belilios Scholarships coupled with some special grants.

22. I enclose the usual Tables (I to XIII) somewhat reduced in number owing to the with- drawal of Queen's College from the supervision of this Department, it having been placed in 1894 under a separate Board of Governors.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

E. J. EITEL, Ph. D. (Tubing.), Inspector of Schools and Head of the Education

Department.

1

The Honourable J. H. STEWART LOCKHART,

Colonial Secretary.

452

TABLE 1.-NUMBER of SCHOLARS attending Schools under the EDUCATION DEPARTMENT during the year 1894.

No.

Name of Schools.

Scholars Scholars

Total attending attending Scholars Government Grant-in-Aid in

Schools. Schools. attendance.

1 American Board Mission, Bridges Street (Boys),....

72

72

2

3

39

""

دو

5

>>

Hinglung Lane (Boys),

Queen's Road West (Boys),

29

Háwan (Girls),

Sheungwan (Boys),

62

62

39

39

28

28

25

25

6

Aplichan (Boys),

Basel Mission, High Street (Girls),

41

11

83

93

8

Shamshuipo (Boys),

27

27

9

"

Shaukiwan (Boys),

34

34

10

""

Tokwawan (Boys),

44

44

11

""

Matauchung (Boys),

34

34

12

13

14

"

15

16

17

18

>>

19

""

20

21

""

22

"

23

""

24

25

26

25

27

28

"

29

30

>>

St. Stephen's Anglo-Chinese (Boys),

31

32

33

""

34

Belilios Public School (English) (Girls),

Berlin Ladies Mission, Queen's Road West (Boys),.

C. M. S., St. Stephen's Chinese School (Boys),

""

Pottinger Street (Boys),

Saiyingpun (Boys),................

No. 2 (Boys),

St. Stephen's Baxter Memorial (Girls), Lyndhurst Terrace (Girls),

Third Street (Girls),.

Yaumati (Mixed),

Hunghom (Girls),

Quarry Bay (Girls),

Little Hongkong (Boys),

Aberdeen School (Boys),

Victoria Home and Orphanage (Girls),

Diocesan Home and Orphanage (Boys),

F. E. S., Bonham Road, Chinese Division (Girls),

High Street (Girls),

Queen's Road West (Girls),

127

127

(Chinese No. 1) (Girls), (Chinese No. 2) (Girls),

123

123

152

152

21

21

Foundling House School (Girls),

26

26

80

80

46

46

86

86

89

89

89

89

56

56

55

55

74

74

28

28

29

29

25

25

42

42

ان

51

87

87

145

145

44

44

33

33

54

54

35

"

Hollywood Road (Girls),.

33

33

36

""

Pottinger Street (Girls),

40

40

37

""

Stauley School (Girls),

41

41

38

Shaukiwan (Girls),

28

28

""

39

"7

Tokwawan (Girls),

17

17

40

Bonham Road English Division (Girls),

17

17

12

41

L. M. S., Square Street (Boys),...

174

174

42

Wantsai Chapel (Boys),

78

78

""

43

دو

Yaumati (Boys),

80

80

44

Shektongtsui (Boys),

48

48

45

Saiyingpun I. Division (Boys),

83

83

46

47

48

49

II.

"

22

(Boys),

Hunghom (Boys),

Shektongtsui (Girls),

89

89

56

56

50

51

>>

وو

52

12

53

وو

21

II.

(Girls),

54

55

23

Hospital Chapel (Boys),.

Saiyingpun Second Street I. Division (Girls),

Ui-hing I. Division (Girls),

Tanglungchau No. 1 (Boys),

(Caroline Hill) No. 2 (Boys),

56

56

19

19

47

47

II.

19

(Boys),

83

83

59

59

23

23

12

42

30

30

.......

56

>>

Shaukiwan (Boys),

54

54

57

Taikoktsui (Boys),

33

33

58

">

29

Square Street (Girls),..

52

52

59

وو

Li Yuen Street (Girls),

35

35

60

>>

61

62

63

D'Aguilar Street (Girls), Matauwai (Boys), Kau-u-fong (Girls),. Tanglungchau (Girls),

66

66

35

35

73

73

46

46

64

ji

Aberdeen Street (Girls),

61

61

65

Wantsai Chapel (Girls),

139

139

66

67

68

**

Taihang (Girls),

69

27

Staunton Street (Girls),

Saiyingpun Second Street East (Girls),

Taipingshan English School (Boys),

49

49

43

43

37

37

...

69

69

70

Third Street

39

""

""

(Boys),

38

38

71

"

Lok-ying

33

33

(Boys),

42

42

72

Morrison

>>

وو

"

(Boys),

81

84

73

Mongkoktsui (Boys),

20

20

Pokfulam (Boys),.

12

12

75

R. C. M., Cathedral School (Boys),

64

64

Carried forward,.

475

3.771

4,246

453

TABLE I.—NUMBER of SCHOLARS attending Schools under the EDUCATION DEPARTMENT during the year 1894.-Contd.

No.

Name of Schools.

Scholars Scholars attending attending Government Grant-in-Aid

Schools.

Total Scholars

in Schools. attendance.

Hunghom (Girls),

"}

دو

"

Brought forward,................

76

77

78

">

R. C. M., Bridges Street Chinese Division (Girls),

Hollywood Road Chinese School (Girls), Holy Infancy School I. Division (Boys),

79

II.

"2

(Girls),

80

13

81

82

83

19

84

""

85

>>

86

87

88

89

"

90

91

92

93

>

475

3,771

4,246

81

81

80

$0

51

51

57

57

وو

English

95

33

96

دو

98

100

101

102

103

104

*

(Girls),..

105

106

وو

(Chinese) (Boys),

107

Yaumati (Girls),.......

Shaukiwan (Girls),

St. Joseph's College Chinese Division (Boys),

Italian Convent English Division (Girls),

Portuguese Division (Girls),

Bridges Street English Division (Girls),

Portuguese Division (Girls),

Nova Escola Portugueza (Girls),

St. Francis Portuguese Division (Girls),

Victoria Portuguese School Portuguese Division (Mixed),

94 Saiyingpun (English) (Boys),

97

99

(Punti) (Boys),

(Hakka) (Boys),

Shekó (Boys),

St. Paul's College School (Boys), Stanley (Anglo-Chinese) (Boys), Taitamtuk (Boys),

Taiwongkung (Boys),

Tanglungchau (Hakka) (Boys), Victoria English School (Boys),

Wantsai (English) (Boys),

Wesleyan Mission, Spring Gardens (Boys),

80

80

60

60

18

48

18

43

European

37

(Boys),

287

287

197

197

39

39

82

82

85

85

36

36

24

24

"

""

(Girls),

English

39

39

17

17

وو

(Mixed),

26

26

184

184

(58)

31

31

30

30

107

107

37

37

16

16

70

70

66

66

147

147

76

76

235

235

(193)

15

45

108

**

>>

Wellington Street (Boys),

104

104

109

وو

>>

(Girls),

52

52

110

>"

Lascar Row (Boys),

60

60

111

**

""

(Girls),

54

54

112

#9

Wantsai (Boys),

62

62

113

""

A

23

Graham Street (Girls),

114

Kennedy Town (Boys),

115

Wellington Street English, School (Boys),

116

Wongmakok (Boys),

117

Wongnaichung (Anglo-Chinese) (Boys),

118

Yaumati (Anglo-Chinese) (Boys),..

BERS

82

82

23

23

49

49

11

11

71

71

56

56

Total...

1,282

5,964

7,246

TABLE II.-NUMBER of SCHOLARS attending GOVERNMENT SCHOOLS under the EDUCATION DEPARTMENT and EXPENSES of each SCHOOL during the year 1894.

No.

Name of School.

Boys.

Girls.

Total.

Expense.

1

Aplichau,

41

41

$

2

Belilios Public School (English),

127

127

168.00 2,777.67

"

"

""

(Chinese No. 1),...........

123

123

448.07

>>

"

23

(Chinese No. 2),.

152

152

484.31

Mongkoktsui,

20

20

55.00

Pokfulam,

Saiyingpun (English),

12

12

132.00

184

911.00

184

Taitamtuk,

(Punti),

9

(Hakka),

10 Shekó,

11

Stanley (Anglo-Chinese),

12

13

Taiwongkung,

14

Tanglungchau (Hakka),

·

15

Wantsai (English),

16

(Chinese),

17

Wongmakok,

18

19

(58)

228.00

31

31

144.24

30

30

120.00

37

37

337.75

16

16

132.00

70

70

174.00

66

66

180.00

235

(193)

حلم

1,018.35

235

372.00

11

Wonguaichung (Anglo-Chinese),..

Yaumati (Anglo-Chinese),

71

==

11

132.00

71

56

56

310.35 396.00

Total,....

880

402

1.282

$ 8,520.74

454

TABLE III.-AVERAGE EXPENSE of each SCHOLAR at GOVERNMENT SCHOOLS under the EDUCATION DEPARTMENT and at the GRANT-IN-AID SCHOOLS during the year 1894.*

1.--EXPENDITURE OF GOVERNMENT SCHOOLS.

(Cost of working the Schools irrespective of cost of erection or repairs of Buildings.)

1. BELILIOS PUBLIC SCHOOL.

Expenditure,

Deduct School fees, refunded,

.$3,106.67 $ 329.00

-$ 2,777.67

2. OTHER DEPARTMENTAL SCHOOLS, (no School fees).

Cost to Government, in 1894,

$ 5,748.07

II.—EXPENDITURE ON THE GRANT-IN-AID SCHOOLS.

Total cost to Government, in 1894,

$ 25,238.45

III. AVERAGE COST OF EACH SCHOLAR.

(Calenlated by the Enrolment.)

Average Cost, to Government, of each Scholar :-

1. at Belilios Public School (not including cost of building),..................

2. at Other Departmental Schools,.........

3. at Grant-in-Aid Schools,

IV.-AVERAGE COST OF EACH SCHOLAR.

(Calculated by the Average Daily Attendance.)

.$21.87

4.86

$ 4.23

Average Cost, to Government, of each Scholar :-

1. at Belilios Public School (not including cost of building),

2. at Other Departmental Schools,.......

3. Grant-in-Aid Schools,........

$50.60

.$ 9.56

.$ 7.86

* NOTE.-The cost of the Inspectorate of Schools ($5,111,52), being connected with both Grant-in-Aid Schools and Government Schools, is not included.

TABLE IV.—Enrolment and ATTENDANCE at Government Schools under the EDUCATION DEPARTMENT

No.

during the year 1894.

Name of Schools.

Average Monthly Enrolment.

Average Daily Attendance.

]

Aplichau,

25.72

24.25

2

Belilios Public School (English),

70.00

54.89

3

>>

(Chinese No. 1),

54.45

36.73

4

37

"5

(Chinese No. 2),

65.00

42.84

5

Mongkoktsui,

17.20

11.58

6 Pokfulam,..

11.00

9.31

7

Saiyingpun (English),

84.09

68.11

8

""

(Punti),

27.27

17.36

9

プラ

(Hakka),.

26.08

22.21

10

Shekó,

24.91

24.41

11

12

Stanley (Anglo-Chinese),

Taitamtuk,

30.63

27.30

11.27

9.55

13

Taiwongkung,

42.50

39.35

14

Tanglungchau (Hakka), ...

39.72

36.17

15

Wantsai (English),

127.63

112.47

16

(Chinese),

96.45

86.60

17

Wongmakok,

10.81

10.25

18

Wongnaichung (Anglo-Chinese),

49.09

41.87

19

Yaumati (Anglo-Chinese),

31.09

27.16

Total,...........

$44.91

702.51

TABLE V.-MAXIMUM and MINIMUM ENROLMENT and DAILY ATTENDANCE at Government Schools under the EDUCATION DEPARTMENT during the year 1894.

455

No.

Name of Schools.

Maximum Monthly Enrolment.

Minimum Monthly Eurolment.

Maximum Daily Attendance

Minimum Daily Attendance

(Monthly average). (Monthly average).

1

Aplichau,....

38

10

36.63

7.50

2

Belilios Public School (English),

91

74.80

2.32

3

"

59

(Chinese No. 1},{

93

76.84

1.55

1

>>

"

(Chinese No. 2),

122

36

102.00

5.88

5

Mongkoktsui,

20

14

14.48

8.11

6

Pokfulam,

12

9

11.30

7.24

17

Saiyingpun (English),

130

7

114.54

5.66

8

*

(Punti),

34

སྙམ

3

32.00

2.00

9

(Hakka),....

31

17

26.00

16.00

10

Shekó,

30

R

92

29.96

18.88

11

Stanley (Anglo-Chinese),

37

27

31.35

20.71

12

Taitamtuk,

12

10

10.74

8.28

13

Taiwongkung,

50

25

42.58

23.37

14

Tanglungchau (Hakka),

46

31

41.72

30.50

15

Wantsai (English),

186

66

167.56

54.50

16

(Chinese),

132

59

125.55

50.66

17

Wongmakok,

11

10

11.00

8.00

18

Wongnaichung (Anglo-Chinese),

60

35

56.12

30.57

19

Yaumati (Anglo-Chinese),

40

21

35.05

18.73

Total.......

1,175

420

1,039.22

320.79

No.

TABLE VI.—NUMBER of DAYS on which the GOVERNMENT SCHOOLS under the EDUCATION DEPARTMENT

were taught during the year 1894.

Name of School.

School Days. No

Name of School.

School Days.

1

Aplichau,

248

11

Stanley,....

240

2

Belilios Public School (English),

237

12

Taitamtuk,

249

3

>>

;;

(Chinese No. 1),

227

13

Taiwongkung,

118

4

33

>>

""

(Chinese No. 2),

227

14

Tanglungchau (Hakka),

234

5

Mongkoktsui,

112

15

Wantsai (English),

226

6

Pokfulam,

223

16

(Chinese),

226

Saiyingpun (English),.

229

17

Wongmakok,

258

8

""

(Punti),

225

18

Wongnaichung (Anglo-Chinese),

221

9

"

(Hakka),

119

19

Yaumati,

227

10

Shekó

256

456

TABLE VII.—SUMMARY of ENROLMENT 474 ATTENDANCE at the GOVERNMENT SCHOOLS for the last twenty-five years.

YEARS.

Minimum Daily

Total Enrolment for the year.

Maximum Daily Attendance

Minimuna Monthly

Enrolment.

(Monthly Average).

Attendance (Monthly Average).

1870,

1,302

950

683

556

1871.

1,292

937

711

571

1872,

1.480

1.157

807

665

1873,

1,838

1.826

852

760

1874,

1,932

1,271

974

836

1875,

1,927

1,812

983

863

1876,

2,171

1.383

1,057

925

1877,

2,148

1,446

1,212

1,035

1878,

2,101

1,324

1,100

936

1879,

2,043

1,356

1,027

904

1880,

2,078

1.468

1,082

937

1881,

1,986.

1,384

1,093

956

1882,

2,114

1,444

1,062

988

1883,

2,080

1,414

1,138

990

1884,

1,978

J,420

1,066

941

1885,

1,988

1,424

1,061

926

1886,

1,893

1,544

1,040

886

1887,

1,814

1,552

1,126

1,000

1888,

1,933

1,653

1,139

1,040

1889.

2,293

1,992

1,190

1,118

1890,

2,514

1,999

1,494.

1,370

1891,

2,540

1,909

1,408

1,291

1892,

2,622

2,101

1,536

1,407

1893,

2,356

1,829

1,443

1,317

1894,

1,282

1,039

420

320

457

TABLE VIII-NUMBER of SCHOLARS attending Schools receiving GRANTS-IN-AID (under the Provisions of the Scheme of 1893), expenses incurred and amount of Grant gained by cach in 1894.

Class

of

Expenses

Name of Schools.

Boys.

Girls.

Total.

School.

incurred in 1894.

Amount of Grant gained

for 1894.

I

American Board Mission, Bridges Street (Boys),

72

72

213.10

$

118.36

*

"

::

Himlung Lane (Boys),

62

62

237.00

119.10

"

Queen's Road West (Boys),

39

39

243.00

120.79

!

"

""

""

Tokwawan (Boys).

Matauchung (Boys),

Háwan (Girls),......

Basel Mission, Shamshuipo (Boys),

Shaukiwan (Boys),

28

183.00

105.03

Sheungwan (Boys),

25

25

66.26

27

27

195.43

74.95

34

205.13

139.59

44

44

177.12

90.53

34

34

149.93

100.36

*

+

Berlin Ladies Mission, Queen's Road West (Boys), C. M. S. St. Stephen's Chinese School (Boys)...

No. 2. (Boys),

Pottinger Street (Boys),

21

21

82.68

80

80

369.91

175.56

46

46

858.06

100.80

86

86

291.38

174.60

Saiyingpun (Boys),

$9

89

294.40

161.06.

17

St. Stephen's Baxter Memorial (Girls),..

89

89

292.89

100.86

**

Lyndhurst Terrace (Girls),

56

56

306.46

109.22

Third Street (Girls),

55

55

200.47

150.15

Yaumati (Mixed).

64

10

74

203.24

125.91

Hunghom (Girls).

28

28

166.02

64.26

"

་་

"

11

Little Hongkong (Boys),

و,

!!

"

""

!!

""

1

3:

";

32

>>

19

7"

21

19

(Boys),

Hunghom (Boys).

Quarry Bay (Girls),

Aberdeen School (Boys),

F. E. S. Bonham Road Chinese Division (Girls),

High Street (Girls),

Queen's Road West (Girls),

Hollywood Road (Girls),

Pottinger Street (Girls), Stanley School (Girls),

Shaukiwan (Girls),.. Tokwawan (Girls),..

L. M. S. Square Street (Boys),

Wantsai Chapel (Boys), Yaumati (Boys),

Shektongtsui (Boys),

Saiyingpun I. Division (Boys),

II.

29

20

147.36

61.03

25

150 59

21.91

42

146.97

106.95

44

11

652.26

274.54

33

191.27

60.51

54

51

233.67

65.82

33

33

241.51

53.16

40

40

238.00

66.81

41

41

135.00

133.63

28

28

235.70

121.30

17

17

124.00

58.55

174

174

503.87

82.48

78

78

297.14

294.55

SU

383.52

241.04

48

246.13

123.71

83

$3

470.22

271.68

89

89

291.85

168.93

56

56

350.18

128.80

31

"!

19

"

3"

"1

"J

12

21

11

19

:1

Shaukiwan (Boys),.

9

"

1

97

11

Hospital Chapel (Boys),

Shektongtsui (Girls),....

Saiyingpun, Second Street I. Division (Girls),

II.

Ui-hing Lane I. Division (Girls),"

II.

Tanglungchan No. 1 (Boys),

No. 2 (Boys),

Taikoktsui (Boys),

Square Street (Girls),

Li-Yuen Street (Girls),

D'Aguilar Street (Girls),

Matauwai (Boys),

Kau-ü-fong (Girls),

56

56

308.09

79.77

19

150.66

59.11

47

47

263.79

148.20

::

(Boys),

83

186.59

59

259.73

269.25

(Girls),

23

23

216.05

80.65

42

42

198.89

136.96

30

30

135.88

54

54

276.53

198.79

33

**

33

244.78

106.77

52

52

288.63

120.33

35

35

251.16

98.50

66

66

262.78

276.45

35

169.33

109.80

73

73

351.44

143.16

33

Tanglungchau (Girls),

46

46

218.14

98.70

11

Aberdeen Street (Girls),

61

61

380.69

155.94

""

Wantsai Chapel (Girls),

139

139

427.09

278.69

"

"

Staunton Street (Girls),

49

49

338.95

79.11

11

"

Saiyingpun, Second Street East (Girls), Taibang (Girls),

43

353.11

102.36

37

126.95

83.53

>>

7:

11

>>

>>

21

>>

"

23

Yaumati (Girls),.

""

"

Hunghom (Girls),

**

!:

St. Stephen's Anglo-Chinese (Boys),

St. Paul's College School (Boys),

""

Third Street

་.

..

Morrison

"

"

>>

::

Bridges Street English Division (Girls),

Portuguese Division (Girls),

R. C. M. Cathedral School (Boys),

Bridges Street Chinese Division (Girls), Hollywood Road Chinese School (Girls), Holy Infancy School I. Division (Boys),.

Shaukiwan (Girls),......

Wesleyan Mission Spring Gardens (Boys),

Wellington Street (Boys),

Lascar Row (Boys),

Wautsai (Boys),

Graham Street (Girls)...

Kennedy Town (Boys),

Basel Mission High Street (Girls),...........

Berlin Mission (Girls),

C. M. S. Victoria Home and Orphange (Girls),

Wesleyan Mission Wellington Street, English School (Boys),.

Diocesan Home and Orphanage (Boys),

F. E. S. Bonham Road, English Division (Girls),

L. M. S. Taipingshan, English School (Boys),

Lok-ying English School (Boys),

R. C. M. St. Joseph's College Chinese Division (Boys),.

Italian Convent English Division (Girls),..............

Portuguese Division (Girls),

64

64

$7.75

70.46

81

81

270.00

282.77

80

80

372.00

308.90

51

136.07

76.17

II.

"

(Girls),

431.00

186.16

80

405.00

146.48

60

60

270.00

212.70

48

305.00

159.35

45

45

246.48

174.91

104

104.

335.90

162.87

(Girls),

(Girls),

52

236.64

78.06

60

60

275.06

176.51

54

54

217.92

72.41

62

62

258.36

178.12

82

$2

274.09

186.97

23

23

139.62

102.22

83

83

762.96

360.33

26

26

982.00

251.47

51

51

2,192.04

406.04

$7

87

609.54

290.99

49

49

295.54

36.28

107

10-

n° 0.00

017

145

145

17

37

650.

188.88

69

69

566.54

195.86

(Boys),

(Boys),

European

38

38

442.51

87.91

42

42

305.08

127.95

84

84

1,047.71

145.86

43

43

159.07

"?

(Boys)...

287

287

5,079.00

2,129.33

197

197

1,012,55

39

39

3,252.75

216.89

82

82

586.32

$5

85

1,655,00

296.11

11

English

#

Nova Escola Portugueza (Girls)...

St. Francis Portuguese Division (Girls),

Victoria Portuguese School, Portuguese Division (Mixed),...

Victoria English School (Boys),

(Girls),

36

36

163.85

*

24

24

126.23

761.00

(Girls),

English

39

39

258.91

12

17

122.84

1,137.77

*

(Mixed)....

IS

26

133.83

147

147

946.38

76

76

5,747.00

605.12

3,251

2,713

5,964

58,950,55

20.388.75

456

TABLE IX.-ENROLMENT, ÅTTENDANCE and NUMBER of SCHOOL DAYS at the GRANT-IN-AID Schools during 1891.

No.

Name of Schools.

Maximum Minimum Monthly Monthly Enrol- Eurol-

mcut.

ment.

Average Average Maximum Minimum Daily Daily Attend- Attend-

ance.

ance.

Average Monthly Enrol-

Average Daily

Attend-

Number of School

ance for

ment.

the Year.

Days.

1

American Board Mission Bridges Street, (Boys),

71

I

66.66

1.09

26.81

32.72

208

Hinglung Lanc (Boys),

GI

24

40.96

22.88

12.37

36.21

178

3

Queen's Road West (Boys),

39.

21

36.37

17.28

33.44

20.58

202

4

Hawan (Girls),

28

20

27.68

15.16

24.09

22.06

26+

5

"

Shonngwan (Boys)..

25

10

21.37

6.62

18.88

15.53

201

Basel Mission, Shamshuipo (Boys),

22

24.92

11.33

25.00

19.91

201

7

Shaukiwan (Boys),

28

32.07

7.30

31.70

25.18

222

8

Tokwawan (Boys),

24

36.41

18.76

82.11

25.06

209

Matauchung (Boys),.

34

24.

28.80

9.58

31.40

24.73

230

10

11

Berlin Ladies Mission, Queen's Road West (Boys), C.M.S., St. Stephen's Chinese School (Boys),

IS

20.38

14.65

19.77

17.86

179

80

12

"

No. 2 (Boys),

46

13

27

14

""

Saiyingpun (Boys),

15

Pottinger Street (Boys),

St. Stephen's Baxter Memorial (Girls), ..........

64

69

16

Lyndhurst Terrace (Girls).

43

17

*

Third Street (Girls),

18

>>>

Yaumati (Mixed),

19

争警

Hunghom (Girls),

27

20

""

Quarry Bay (Girls),

22

21

Little Hongkong (Boys),.

24

22

Aberdeen School (Boys),

40

23

F.E.S., Bonham Roail. Chinese Division (Girls), ...

32

24

High Street (Girls),

33

38

39

Aanaa.. 23 18 18 18

25

Queen's Road West (Girls),

12

26

Hollywood Road (Girls),

30

27

28

29

30

31

++

33

11

34

17

35

27

36

Pottinger Street (Girls),

Stanley School (Girls), Shaukiwan (Girls), Tokwawan (Girls),

L.M.S., Square Street (Boys),

Wantsai Chapel (Boys), Yaumati (Boys),

Shektongtsui (Boys).

Salyingpun, 1. Division (Boys),

Il.

36

11

28

17

119

75

80

47

83

??

(Boys),

69

37

**

Hunghom (Boys),

56

99'

Hospital Chapel (Boys),

56

**

Shektong-tsui (Girls),

19

RECEREBARERETRESAPONA32

13

66.84

6.21

45.18

85.12

260

43.16

2.84

24.63

22.11

240

56.44

22.05

45.41

41.21

252

59.16

41.00

32.12

269

53.63

B1.91

25.73

256

36.62

24.41

22.44

246

36.28

20.15

$5.99

28.80

275

20

42.34

12.21

87.83

27.82

258

16

24.90

11.09

22.27

19.52

247

13

21.16

11.12

17.58

14.07

272

15.69

2.27

17.29

9.83

239

25

BLIB

16.85

30,00

21.91

245

31.70

27.18

30.27

28.58

213

11

26.12

2.84

19.80

13.02

240

34.74

2.50

22.08

19.67

238

27.52

8.37

1881

7.66

240

4

30.01

3.07

18.99

16.63

219

زانه

35.12

23.82

36.01

20.27

266

14

25.04

13.63

24.50

20 60

256

11

14.52

7.16

14.75

13.11

249

6

105.55

3.50

55.30

41.96

208

33

68.95

45.34

61.8%

56.10

239

17

74.82

29.56

66.44

54.08

204

16

40.50

15.12

31.18

27.12

214

26

75.50

26.00

67.77

56.87

191

22

60.63

18.90

44.20

37.86

200

39

46.19

11.12

40.90

33.60

206

19

41.65

16.00

33.80

27.54

183

10

17.96

9.66

15.45

13.21

240

40

**

41

9

42

43

11.

"

44

19

Tanglungchau (Boys),

45

46

39

47

11

48

49

"

50

22

51

""

52

"

19

Saiyingpun, Second Street, I. Division (Girls),

Ci-hing Lane, I. 'Division (Girls),

No. 2 (Boys),

Shaukiwan (Boys), Taikoktsui (Boys),.. Square Street (Girls), Li Yuen Street (Girls).. D'Aguilar Street (Girls). Matauwai (Boys). Kau-ü-fong (Girls),

46

23

34.83

16.65

32.44

24.91

202

II.

(Boys),

78

33

59.04

19.65

53.33

38.19

202

53

40

50.50

38.87

47.20

43.56

223

(Girls),

23

19

20.44

17.22

21.55

19.31

213

42

10

40.00

6.66

34.50

29.93

221

29

18

25.26

17.25

25.18

22.27

238

54

45

46.43

39.00

49.90

43.50

219

33

23

31.83

20.95

29.30

27.54

229

16

14

37.80

9.66

34.00

25.66

205

35

19

33.96

18.04

27.40

25,00

210

58

2-4

48.96

14.47

42.28

85.91

219

34

19

31.03

14.00

30.63

28.61

235

55

18

51.80

15.03

36.54

33.33

232

53

*

Tanglungchau (Girls),

35

11

33.95

10.11

20.75

16.40

273

54

Aberdeen Street (Girls),

34

10

32.29

9.07

27.20

23.98

210

55

Wantsai Chapel (Girls),

105

51

82.28

26.58

76.16

54.39

283

56

Staunton Street (Girls),

44

B3

38.12

10.66

26.80

22.22

203

57

Saiyingpun, Second Street East (Girls),

38

11

34.32

8.00

23.70

21.72

191

58

Tailang (Girls),..

26

17

22.56

11.37

21.75

17.06

262

59

R.C.M., Cathedral School (Boys),

39

10

35.81

4.76

22.91

18.93

257

60

61

"

62

>>

64

Shaukiwan (Girls),

Bridges Street, Chinese Division (Girls),. Hollywood Road, Chinese School (Girls), Holy Infancy School, I. Division (Boys),

II.

Yaumati (Girls),

77

47

73.40

38.81

62.16

58,55

258

72

40

63.96

35.86

59.45

54.80

221

30

18

24.93

15.87

24.00

20.84

256

"

(Girls),

51

31

47.87

28.80

45.08

42 32

271

76

26

60.40

17.13

48.66

36.97

274

51

30

44.12

25.36

41.32

37.41

264

Hunghom (Girls),...

42

25

35.46

18.30

37.33

30.70

268

68

»

69

59

70

"2

71

39

72

#

73

>>>

74

75

67 Wesleyan Mission, Spring Gardens (Boys),

19

Lascar Row (Boys),

Wantsai (Boys):

Graham Street (Girls),...

Basel Mission, High Street (Girls),

45

23

40.14

18.25

40.72

31.83

241

Wellington Street (Boys),

108

24

89.70

16.92

61.10

49,75

214

11

(Girls),

52

15

43.72

10.30

29.90

23.12

208

60

52.95

2.00

41.00

37.03

200

爷爷

(Girls),

3+

12

31.44

11.76

21.66

19.83

248

62

3

54.52

3.00

39.09

31.24

202

61

50.08

5.07

38.08

29.94

229

Kennedy Town (Boys),

23

17

20.41

4.63

21.33

14.44

231

78

12

71.44

26.27

52.45

48.44

217

76

Berlin Mission (Girls),

26

26

25.17

24.00

26.00

24,63

262

77

C.M.S., Victoria Home and Orphanage (Girls),

48

38

£7.80

38.00

44.00

43.39

251

78

St. Stephen's Anglo-Chinese School (Boys).....

10.

67.94

5.30

42.63

32.99

255

79

Wesleyan Mission, Wellington St., Eng. School (Boys),

32

5

27.14

2.16

15.72

12.28

205

80

St. Paul's College School (Boys),

72

20

65.34

13.64

42.36

35.91

228

81

Diocesan Home and Orphanage (Boys),

105

52

91.88

44.09

88.18

78.47

251

82 F.E.S., Bonham Road, English Division (Girls),

17

17

16.15

11.33

16.41

15.38

195

84

85

86

Morrison English School (Boys),..

87

83 L.M.S., Taipingshan English School (Boys),. Third Street English School (Boys),.

Lok-Ying English School (Boys),.

R.C.M., St. Joseph's College, Chinese Division (Boys),...

64

16

57.52

9.05

37.10

31.86

210

38

10

36.26

7.66

22.25

21.91

172

12

21

40.85

17.20

30.28

27.95

172

50

14

38.87

10.81

32.66

27.86

187

35

9

30.00

7.66

23.00

21.07

213

88

**

European Division (Boys),.

237

170

204.90

129.21

207.00

179.33

227

89

Italian Convent, English Division (Girls),

161

115

155.52

102.95

145.45

135.55

215

**

20

Portuguese Division (Girls),

38

22

36.90

18.70

32.36

28.89

205

"

91

92

""

93

"

94

"

95

English Division (Girls),

96

Bridges Street, English Division (Girls),

15

Nova Escola Portugueza (Girls),

St. Francis, Portuguese Division (Girls),..

Victoria Portuguese School, Port. Div. (Mixed),. 14

73

نان

66.80

36.54

64.27

50.80

236

Portuguese Division (Girls),

70

44

53.19

34.88

59.00

45.61

236

31

22

11

32

97

""

""

Eng. Div. (Mixed),.

25

98

Victoria English School (Boys),.

110

50

99

"

"

+1

(Girls),

58

25

PERE288

17

27.23

13.29

26.60

21.85

226

18.85

6.76

17.16

12.73

262

27

29.76

16 06

30.58

25.91

262

10

14.00

5.56

12.66

10.84

224

12

23.33

8.50

20.66

16.83

224

89.22

45.42

85.58

77.38

269

56.92

21.60

47.91

44.92

266

Total..

5,227

2,306

4,507.39 1,749.29

3.816.71 3.210.55

NAME OF SCHOOL.

X.-RESULTS of the EXAMINATION of the GRANT-IN-AID SCHOOLS in 1

:::

::::::::::::::*:::

Class of School.

No. of Scholars Presented.

No. of Scholars Examined.

Stand. I.

Stand. II.

Stand. III.

Stand. IV.

Stand. V.

Stand. VI.

Stand. VII.

Stand. I.

Stand. II.

Stand. III.

Stand. IV.

Stand. V.

Stand. VI.

Stand. VII.

Stand. I.

Stand. II.

Stand. III.

Stand. IV.

Stand. V.

Stand. VI.

Stand. VII.

Stand. I.

Stand. II.

Ordinary Subjects.

Special Subjects.

Ordinary Subjects,

Spe

NUMBER OF SCHOLARS WHO Passed.

NUMBER OF SCHOLARS WHO Fa

:::

:::::::::::5

10

:::

:

:::

: : : : :2

19

3

37

16

:*:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::.

39

32

11 188 10292 :

3

3

:::

3

::

2

1.-American Board Mission, Bridges Street, (Boys),

1

24

21

9

10

2

3.- 4.-- 5.-

"

Hinglung Lane, (Boys),.

37

34

×

9

Queen's Road West, (Boys) Háwan, (Girls),

1

26

25

10

I

21

21

8

Sheungwan, (Boys),

16

15

19

6.-Basel Mission, Shamshuipo, (Boys),

23

22

Shaukiwan, (Boys),....

28

28

12

1

8.-

*

9.-

"

"3

Tokwawan, (Boys),.

24

22

11

Matauchung, (Boys),

25

21

12,-

}}

15

13.- 14.-

"

10.-Berlin Ladies Mission, Queen's Road West, (Boys),

11.-C. M. S., St. Stephen's Chinese School, (Boys),

Pottinger Street, (Boys),

18

17

I

37

36

4

14

15

No. 2, (Boys),

I

19

19

3 J

6

I

40

38

13

19

"

Saiyingpun, (Boys),

I

34

32

5

13

13

15.-

21

St. Stephen's Baxter Memorial, (Girls),

20

20

11

6

3

16.-

"

Lyndhurst Terrace, (Girls),-

19

17

6

5

1

4

17.- 18.

"

Third Street, (Girls),

29

20

15

8

"

Yaumati, (Mixed),

27

26

11

10

19.- 21).- 21.--

**

Hunghom. (Girls),

16

16

5

1

"

Quarry Bay, (Girls),

B

13

4

*

Little Hongkong, (Boys),

I

11

11

1

22.-

35

Aberdeen School. (Boys),

I

27

26

14

24.-

"

25.- 26.-

""

27.

"

28.--

中量

29.

"

30.-

sa

32.-

33.-

"

34,- 35.

*

36.

23.—F. Ë. S., Bonham Road, Chinese Division, (Girls),

High Street, (Girls),

Queen's Road West, (Girls),

Hollywood Road, (Girls),

Pottinger Street, (Girls),

Stanley School, (Girls),

Shaukiwán, (Girls),

Tokwawan, (Girls), .

31.-L. M. S., Square Street, (Boys),

Wantsai Chapel, (Boys), Yaumati, (Boys),. Shektongtsui, (Boys),

Saiyingpun T. Division, (Boys),

II.

I

23

23

12

12

12

12

10

11

11

33

32

25

25

13

11

12

12

60

53

21

56

56

10 10

26

25

8

10

64

61

3 21

21

:::::::2::::::::::::

95

"

(Boys),

40

39

14

9

12

37.

"

Hunghom, (Boys),

34

31

6 13

7

38.

39

Hospital Chapel, (Boys),

23

22

2

39.

P

40.~

14

41.- 42.- 43. 4.4.- 45.- 45,-

*

44

55

}}

19

21

"

19

47.-

1

48.

53

49.

""

50.

"

51.-

52.-

53-

"

Shektongtsui, (Girls),.

Salyingpun, Second Street, I. Division, (Girls),

Ui-hing Lane, T. Division (Girls), (Girls),

II.

Tanglungchau, No. 1 (Boys),

No. 2 (Boys),

Shaukiwan, (Boys),

Taikoktsui, (Boys), .

Square Street, (Girls),

Li-yuen Street, (Girls),

D'Aguilar Street, (Girls), Matauwai, (Boys), Kan-ü-fong, (Girls),

Tanglungchau, (Girls),

I

11

1L

3

I

25

21

11.

"

(Boys),

44

42

49

47 19

12

20

18

2

ՅՍ

4

13

26

26

11

11

48

9

21

28

26

27

11

19

43

43

34

31

28

25

19

18

5

54.-

"

Aberdeen Street, (Girls),

26

25 4

12

55.-

:)

Wantsai Chapel, (Girls),

62

61

3)

56.

"

Staunton Street. (Girls),

13

12

6

57.

55

53.-

"

Saiyingpun Second Street East, (Girls), Taihang, (Girls),

19

19

7

6

22

22

7

59.-R. C. Mission, Cathedral School, (Boys),

16

15

î

60.-

**

61.-

95

62.- 63.-

13

Bridges Street, Chinese Division, (Girls), Hollywood Road, Chinese School, (Girls), Holy Infancy School, 1. Division, (Boys),

II.

(Girls),

I

47

47

15

53

53

14

18

18

30

30

9

$1

64.-

"5

Yaumati, (Girls),

23

23

$ 8

G5.-

"

Shaukiwan, (Girls),

I

38

38

17

GB

W

Hanghom, (Girls),

I 31

31

15

67.-Wesleyan Mission, Spring Gardens, (Boys),.

I 36

36

1 15 16

68.-

*

"

Wellington Street, (Boys)..

I

40

39

16 12

69.-

19

"

(Girls),.

I 17

16

8 G

70.-

"

1,

Lascar Row (Boys),............

I $5

34

17 13

71.-

"

13

Lascar Row (Girls),

I 14

13

5 2

5

72.-

"

H

Wantsai, (Boys),

I 38

35

9

8

17

73.--

"

Graham Street, (Girls),

I 30

20

5 5

7.1.-

"

Kennedy Town, (Boys),

I 23

23

7

75.-Basel Mission, High Street, (Girls),

76.-Berlin Mission, (Girls),

77.-C. M. S. Victoria Home and Orphanage, (Girls),

11 43

43 18

II 26

26

8

II 47

47

78.-

St. Stephen's Anglo-Chinese, (Boys),.

III 37

36

24

79.-Wesleyan Mission, Wellington S., Eng. School, (Boys),. 80.-St. Paul's College School (Boys),... 81.-Diocesan Home and Orphanage, (Boys),

III

1

4.

III 24

22

3

III 85

80

5 15

82.-F. E. S. Bonham Road, English Division, (Girls), 83.-L. M. S. Taipingshan, English School, (Boys),.

II 17

16

3

28

27

16

13

59

Third Street,

Lok-ying, Morrison,

89.-

11

89.--

"

90.-

59

91.-

92.-

81.- 85.- 86.- 87.-R. C. M., St. Joseph's College, Chinese Division, (Boys), European (Boys), Italian Convent, English Division, (Girls),..

Portuguese Division, (Girls), Bridges Street, English Division, (Girls),

»

(Boys),..

III

11

**

33

"

(Boys),. (Boys),..

III

20

30

III 17

14

11

III 21

21

•1

III 160 III 81 III 24 DI 66

155

78 15 16 23

20

18

11 8

66 21 8

59

93.-

"

94.- 95.- 3.- 97.- 95.

17

St. Francis, Portuguese Division, (Girls),

Portuguese Division, (Girls),. III 41 Nova Escola Portugueza, (Girls),

III

23

35 23

14

11

13 8

III 14

14 8 6

English

(Girls),

HI

30

30

13

...

Victoria Port. School, Port. Division, (Mixed),.. III

B

13

1

Eng. Division, (Mixed),

III 16

16

Q

"

"

}

59

English School, (Boys),

HI 66

66

99.-

"

13

(Girls),

III

42

42

5 6

: : : : : :00

13

.

10

41

17

12121

45

19 30

:::::::::::::::::

13

15 11

to si

:::::::::::::

in 1894, under the provisions of the Scheme of 19th August, 1893.

Stand. 11.

Stand. III.

Stand. IV.

Stand. VII.

Stand. V.

Stand. VI.

Pussed.

Failed.

Passed.

Failed.

Special Subjects.

Ordinary Special

Subjects. Subjects.

10 FAILED.

TOTALS.

Average Daily Attendance during the Year.

Stand. I.

Stand. II.

Stand. III.

Stand. IV.

Stand. V.

Stand. VI.

Stand. VII.

Ordinary Subjects.

SUMS TO WHICH THE SCHOOL IS ENTITLED,

Special Subjects.

Needle Work.

22

21

3

32.72

22

12

10

21

10

2

:::::::::::::::::::::::*

21)

12

3 10

17

28

20

22

16

33

18

38

31

20

17

28

25

11

5

13

3

25

27

19

::2:2::::::~:::::::::**

6

36

60

36.21 15 32

54

29.58 15

20

60

22.06 24

16

48

15.53

6

28

6

19.91

27 20

18

25 18

36

16

54

21

25.08

24.73

చిలు

33 2.4

27

36

18

17.36

12 20

42

35.12 12 56

90

22.11

9 36

36

24

41.21 32.12 15 52 78 25.73 33 21 18 22.44 18 2.) 29.80 45 32

36 76

42

B

30

27.82 33 12 19.52

16 15 14.07 12 36

60

6

*:::: AMD ::::: :8 :~~

21

28

8

7

9.83 3

14

21.91 42 24 30

8

28.58 3

24

12

14

12

13.02 12 20

12

12

19.65 18 16

6

10

15.32 18 12

6

9

23

20

11

16.53 3 12 29.27 21 32 20.60 21 21 13.11 15

24

30 14

18

8

24

12

44.96 12

48

5

51

34

56.10 6

47

42 51.08 30

48

126

76

108

24

27.42 18 32

60

18

13

2 43

35

56.87 9 37.83 42 36

81

126

72

26

33.60 18 52

42

15

27.51 8

36

21

11

13.21 9 16

21

16

42:

.00

22

8

9

21.91

15

20

24

31

45

15

25

CT CE & Co.

27

33.19

30

24

81 21

43.50 57

28 72

8

15

11

19.31 6 36 21 29.93 12 32 78 22,27

33 16 66 43.58 27 84 66

21

27.54 15 36 42

22

19

3

25.66 33 36 12

16

42

19

21

25.00 35.91 23.61 12 33.33 21 20

28 9 21 44

18

5 t

OT: ONE:::::::::

28

28

14

49

35

21

56

X

78

:::::::::::::::::00 ::::** :*::::::::

*::2:::::::::::::::::

*

Stand. I.

* : : : :

Stand. II.

Stand. III.

Stand, IV.

Stand. V.

Stand. VI.

|||||Stand. VII.

Very Good.

Good.

Fair.

Capitation Grant.

Grant earned in 1894.

∞ | Total

| Amount duo to Teacher.

Amount due to Manager.

$

16.36

11-36

29.59

88.77

18.10

119.10

29.77

89.33

14.79 120.79

30.19

90 60

5.00

11.03

105.03

26.25

78.78

0.50

3.00

7.76 66.26

16.56

49.70

9.95

74.95

18.73

56.22

12.59 139.59

34.89

304.70

12.53

90.53

22.63

67.99

12.36

100.36

25.09

75.27

8.63

82.68

20.67

62.01

17.50

175.56

43.89

131.67

5.00 3.75

11.05

100 80

25,20

75.60

20.60

174.60

43.65

130.95

18.03 161.06

49.26 120.80

::

4.50 12.00

1.50

12.36 100.88

25.21

75.65

6

1.00 2.25

25.50

11.22 109.22 14.40 150.15

27.30

81.02

37.53 112.62

13.91

125.91

31.47 94.44

3.00

4

3.50

9.76

64 26

16.06

18.20

6

7.03

61.03

15.25

15.73

4.91

21,91

5.47

.6.41

10.95

106.95 26.73 80.22

24

27 100

2.25

24.09

12.00

1.00

14.29

274.54

68.63 205.91

2.00

6.51

60.51

15.1%

15.39

65 3.00

9.82 C5.82

16.47

49.37

3.00

& 0.50

6.0"

6

8

6.00

6

7.50

11

3.00

2

7.66 53.16 0.50 8.31 66.-1

14.63 2.00

133.03 33.40 1.50

10.30 121.30

6.55

13.29

39.87

16.70

50.11

100.23

30.82 90.99

58.55 14.63 43.9%

22.48

82.48 20.62

61.86

8

11.50

0.75

1.50

28.05

291,55

7:.63

220.92

27.04 241.01 18,71 28.43 271.68

60.26

180.78

123.71 30.92

92.79

67.92

203,76

18.93 168.93

42.23

126 70

16.80

128 89

32.20

96.60

18.77

79.77

19.94

59.83

1.50

6.61 59.11

14.77 41.34

8

2.00 0.75 0.50

2

1.50

5.50

12.45

148.20

37.05

111.15

3.00

19.09

186.59

36.64

139.95

4.50 2.25

40

12 49

18

25

16.40 15 2:1 48 23.89 12 48 36

13

54

54.39 90

40 43

14

21

12

19

19

3

22.22 18 8 6 21.72 21 24 30 17.06 21 36 19

16

14

1

18.93 21

4 36

41

6

20

59.55

43

10

32

54.80

45 20 21

72

28

32

58 49

56

48

14 4

20.31 12

12 42

25

17

20

19

37

16

28

12

•2121d

2

42.32 27

8 18 42 40

36.97 9

32 18 14 32

37.41 51

32 42

21

16

1

30.70 45 12

48

14

32

31.83

3 60

96

35

15

34

12

49.75 18 45 42

23.12 24 24 37.03 12 68 78

19.83 15

6

31

26

21

43

2

25

42

35

20

:::::::::

11.44 21 21) 54

8 30

34.21 27

32 102

29.94 15

20 42

35

32

3

48.44 24.63

72 32

30

45 48

10

22

18

45

66

43.39 23 32.99 1144 32

51 88

45

50

22

72 10

12.28 21

96

28 16

:::::::::::::::28:

9

::::::::::

::::::::::::::::: aa:

9.50

:::::::

:::::::::: wi ::

12.00

22 4.50

21.75

269.25

67.31

201.94

5.00

9.65

$0.65

20.16

60.49

:

14.96

136.9

34.24 102.72

11.13

::

135.88 33.97 101.91

21.79 198.79 49.69

149.10

13.77 106.77 26.69

80.08

3.00

7.00

12.83 120,33

30.08

90.25

4.50

3 2.50

12.50

98.50

21.62

73.83

7.50

16 8.00

17.95

276.45 69.11

207.34

11 80

109.80

27.45

82 35

16.30

3

16.66

143.16

35,79

107.37

1.50

5

1.00

8.20

98.70 24.67

74.03

9.00

12 2.00

11.94

155.91 38.98

116.96

12 14.50

27.19

278.69

209,02 69.67

10 1.00

7.50

2

10.86

8.53

83.3 2:1.98

9.46

11.11 79.11 19.77 59.54

102.36 27.5% 76.77

70.46 17.6! $2.85

19.50

6.00

12

10.00

29.27

2×2,77 70.9

16.00

4.50

25 7.00

27.40

10.17 76.17

8.50

17

9.50

8.00

15.00 9

6.00

4.50

11

:

24.87

77.22 231.66 19.04 4.50 21.16 188.16 46.54 139.62 7 6.50 18.48 145.15 36.62 109.86

18.70 212.70

159.53 53.17 3.50 15.35 159.35 39.83 119.52 15.01 174.91 43.72 131.19 122.16

308,90

57.14

3.50

11.56

162,87 40.71 78.06 19.51

58.55

18.51

176.51 41.12

12.00

9

78

[02

26

15

13.38 18 16 31.86

35.91 18 48 78.17 30 120 140 132 238 112 70 16 40 21 20 24

21.31 12 24

27.95 54 16 30

::::::

18.00

6 24.00 24.00

15 12:18

2.50

9.91

13

3.00

72.41 17.12 178,12 44.53 133,59 11.97

132.89 18.10 54.31

186.97 46.74 140.23

7.22

1, 2,22

25.55

76.87

36.33

360,33

90.08

270.25

18.17 251.47

62.86

188.61

23

3.50

32.54

404.04

101.51

304.53

32.99 12.28 35.91 241.91

290.99 72.74 218,25

36.28

9.07 27.21

60.47 181.44

82

78.47 1.258.47

314.61

943.86

4.50

2.00

13.38

188.83

47.22

141.66

31.83 195.80

48.98

146.90

21.91 87.91

21.97 65.94

6

4

20

14

8 116

63

3

22

1

27.83 66 16 21.07

48 179,33 120 135.55 90 28.89 66

36

90

زاق

10

50.82 126

240 216 448 238 141 216

84 291 128 100 30 61

140 156 61

96

31

4

45.61 84

$8

00

21

2

21.85 78 64

11

12.73 48

45

26

13

16

25.31 10.84 24 16.83 51 43 20

30 101 30

36

50

:::::

28

13 55 11

38

40

2

77.3S 21 44.92 30

32 48

80 120 (196 112 60 108

98

48

72

冠忠::

::

:

18

15

90

18 9 1 1 1 1 1 11

90

76

45.00

13,50

14

22,50

21

12.00

2

16

3.00

19

51 HAWA: BEES:

33

7.00 0.50

28.89 216.89

27.95 127.9% 31.98 95.97

27.88 14785

21.07 159.07 179 33 2,129.3. 135.55 1,01.5

35.46 19.49 39.76 19.3 532.331, 97.0 253 13 A4.2

759 42

162,67

8.00 10) 5,50

6.00 50.82 #86.32 45.61 286.11 21.85 133.85

148.58

459.74

74,02 222.09

40.99 122.89

1.50

3

2.00

12.73 25.91

1.G.23 258.91

31.55 94.68

64.72

19.19

2.00

10.81 122.81

30.71

9.13

1.00

16.83

133.83

33 15

100 38

77.38

$16.38

233.56

709.79

9.50

44.92

151.37 €95.42

451.07

TOTAL

$20,333.75 5,096.79 15,291.96

461

TABLE XI.—PERCENTAGE of SCHOLARS who passed in the GRANT-IN-AID SCHOOLS during the last two Years.

Jacht 30 10 H

2

"

"

"

"

啼啼

7

2:

No.

1 American Board Mission, Bridges Street (Boys),.

:>

Hinglung Lane (Boys),

Queen's Road West (Boys),

Hawan (Girls),

Sheungwan (Boys),

Basel Mission, Shamshuipo (Boys),.

Shaukiwan (Boys),

Name of Schools.

1893.

1894.

Increase.

Decrease.

86.66

87.50

.81

81.35

68.75

95.12

84.00

12.60 11.12

85.18

95.23

10.05

80.00

60.00

77.27

17.27

86.86

100.00

13.14

8

19

:>

Tokwawan (Boys),

71.50

95.45

23.95

"

Matauchung (Boys).

96.50

91.66

4.84

10

11

12

>>

*

13

>>

Pottinger Street (Boys),

14

Berlin Ladies Mission, Queen's Road West,

C. M. S., St. Stephen's Chinese School (Boys),.

No. 2 (Boys),

Saiyingpun (Boys),

94.11

96.61

91.66

4.95

92.30

94.73

2.43

94.84

100.00

5.16

97.50

96.87

......

.63

15

St. Stephen's Baxter Memorial (Girls),

90.00

100.00

10.00

16

Lyndhurst Terrace (Girls),

100.00

100.00

17

Third Street (Girls),

100.00

96.55

3.45

18

Yaumati (Mixed),

96.66

96.53

.13

19

Ilunghom (Girls),

80.00

68.75

11.25

20

Quarry Bay (Girls),

100.00

100.00

21

:

Little Hongkong (Boys),

78.94

27.27

51.67

22

Aberdeen School (Boys),

88.88

96.15

7.27

23

F. E. S., Bonham Road, Chinese Division (Girls),

82.75

96.42

13.67

24

""

High Street (Girls),

$0.00

100.00

20.00

25

**

Queen's Road West (Girls),

92.85

100.00

7.15

26

""

27

>>

28

""

29

;;

"

31

32

>>

33

"

34

*

35

"!

36

30

Hollywood Road (Girls),

Pottinger Street (Girls),

Stanley School (Girls), Shaukiwan (Girls), Tokwawan (Girls),.

L. M. S., Square Street, (Boys),

Wantsai Chapel (Boys),

Yaumati (Boys),...

Shektongtsui (Boys),....

Saiyingpun, I. Division (Boys),

II.

96.15

100,00

3.85

87,50

$1.81

5.69

86.20

71.87

14.33

85.72

80.00

*5.72

100.00

100.00

97.43

100.00

2.57

92.15

96.22

4.07

78.57

83.92

5.35

82.85

96.00

13.15

$7.50

78.68

8.82

"

(Boys),

92.62

89.74

2.88

37

Hunghom (Boys),

94.34

83.87

10.47

38

"}

Hospital Chapel (Boys),

96.36

68.18

28.18

39

Shektongtsui (Girls).....

100.00

100.00

40

Saiyingpun, Second Street 1. Division (Girls),

88.00

91.66

3.66

41

II.

"

42

Ui-hing Lane, 1. Division (Girls),.

99

(Boys),

$0.75

+

91.66

95.74

4.08

43

"

""

44

"2

45

"

46

21

47

48

49

>>

50

}}

51

+1

52

**

II.

Tanglungchau (Boys),

"

No. 2 (Boys),

Shaukiwan (Boys), Taikoktsui (Boys), Square Street (Girls), Li Yuen Street (Girls), D'Aguilar Street (Girls), Matauwai (Boys). Kau-ü-fong (Girls),

(Girls),

'82.14

83.33

1.19

75.00

80.33

5.33

100.00

98.00

91.11

6.89

83.33

80.76

2.57

93.75

81.48

12.27

90.33

100.00

9.67

92.50

97.67

5.17

76.19

55.88

20.31

95.74

84.00

11.74

53

"

Tanglungchau (Girls),

96.77

100.00

3.23

54

""

Aberdeen Street (Girls),

97.22

100.00

2.78

55

"

Wantsai Chapel (Girls),

82.19

88.52

6.33

56

""

Staunton Street (Girls),

75.75

100.00

24.25

57

Saiyingpun, Second Street East (Girls),

92.30

100.00

7.70

58

Taihang (Girls),

100.00

86.36

13.64

59

R. C. M., Cathedral School (Boys),

91.17

93.33

2.16

60

"

61

62

63

Bridges Street Chinese Division (Girls), Hollywood Road Chinese School (Girls), Holy Infancy School 1. Division (Boys),

II.

82.93

$7.23

4.30

86.00

83.01

2.99

83.33

77.77

5.56

APTORS

"

(Girls),

$2.35

83.33

.98

64

Yaumati (Girls)...

85.71

86.95

1.24

65

Shaukiwan (Girls),.

96.77

97.36

.59

66

Huughòm (Girls),

100.00

98.38

1.62

67

Wesleyan Mission, Spring Gardens (Boys),

81.25

94.44

13.19

68

"

5:

Wellington Street (Boys),

91.66

$9.74

1.92

69

"}

**

70

"

:)

Lascar Row (Boys)..

(Girls),

94.28

93.75

.53

97.87

100.00

2.13

71

>>

(Girls),

89.28

92.30

3.02

72

**

Wantsai (Boys).

100.00

97.14

2.86

73

Graham Street (Girls),

75.00

$9.66

14.66

74

Kennedy Town (Boys),

88.23

91.30

3.07

.

75

Basel Mission, High Street (Girls)....

98.59

100.00

1.41

76

Berlin Mission (Girls),

100.00

96.15

3.85

77

C. M. S., Victoria Home and Orphange (Girls),

100.00

80.95

19.05

78

St. Stephen's Anglo-Chinese (Boys)..

96.22

97.22

1.00

79

Wesleyan Mission, Wellington Street English School (Boys),

76.00

100.00

24.00

80

St. Paul's College School (Boys),

97.43

90.90

6.53

$1

Diocesan Home and Orphanage (Boys),

92.95

97.55

4.60

82

F. E. S., Bonham Road English Division (Girls),

60.86

93.75

32.89

83

L. M. S., Taipingshan English School (Boys),

97.67

$8.88

8.79

84

**

Third Street (Boys),

95.65

90.90

1.75

85

1)

86

87

88

!!

::

وو

89

90

"

91

.་

92

1}

93

Nova Escola Portugueza,

94

95

"

English

96

Lok-ying English School (Boys), Morrison

R. C. M., St. Joseph's College Chinese Division (Boys),.

Italian Convent English Division (Girls),

Bridges Street English Division (Girls),

St. Francis Portuguese Division (Girls),

Victoria Portuguese School Portuguese Division (Mixed),

160.00

70.00

30.00

(Boys),

94.44

100.00

5.56

100.00

80.95

19.05

European Division (Boys),

96.52

94.83

1.63

97.00

96.15

.85

Portuguese Division (Girls),

97.05

95.65

1.40

95.08

84.84

10.24

Portuguese Division (Girls),

90.00

88.57

1.43

91.30

76.19

100.00

23.81

97

!!

"

(Girls),

English

95.99

86.66

9.33

100.00

100.00

(Mixed),

100.00

98

Victoria English School (Boys),

86.07

83.33

99

"

7:

(Girls),

100.00

95.23

2.74

1.77

Class

of

School.

462

TABLE XII-PERCENTAGE of PASSES in the various subjects in which the GRANT-IN-AID SCHOOLS

were examined in 1894.

Name of School.

Reading.

Writing

or Com-

position.

Arith-

metic.

"

American Board Mission, Bridges Street (Boys)..

I,

""

15

*

Hing-lung Lane (Boys),

19

33

"

Basel Mission, Shamshuipo (Boys),

"J

Queen's Rd. West (Boys),.. Háwan (Girls), Sheungwan (Boys),

91.66 97.05 64.70 92.00

91.66

:

100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00

$8.00

Failed

100.00 95.23

100.00 100.00 | 100.00 100.00 100.00

93.33

87.50

100.00

""

"

Shaukiwán (Boys),

19

"

Tokwawan (Boys),

95.45 77.27 100.00

95.45 95.45

96.42

100.00

"

91.66 91.66

100.00

...

100.00 100.00 100.00

95.45 100,00 100.00 100.00 33.33 100.00 100.00 | Failed 100.00 100.00 100.00

""

"

>>

$3

39

"

Matauchung (Boys),

Berlin Ladies Mission, Queen's Road West,

C.M.S., St. Stephen's Chinese School (Boys),

No. 2 (Boys),

Pottinger Street (Boys),

Saiyingpun (Boys),

St. Stephen's Baxter Memorial (Girls),

Lyndhurst Terrace (Girls),.

100.00

88.23

100.00 91.38 100.00 94.73 100.00 100.00

***

100.00 96.87

100.00 100.00

100.00 100.00

100.00 100.00

100.00 100.00 100.00

...

100.00 100.00

100.00 100.00

100.00

>>

37

Third Street (Girls),

100.00

96.55

"

""

Yaumati (Mixed),.

100.00 96.15

100.00

**

39

Hunghom (Girls),.

93.77

87.50

100.00

尊重

""

Quarry Bay (Girls),

100.00 100.00

"

"

Little Hongkong (Boys),

90.90

9.09

100.00

??

37

Aberdeen School (Boys),.

100.00

96.15

33

F.É.S., Bonham Road, Chinese Division (Girls),.

100.00

$9.29

100.00

100.00 100.00

100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00

100.00 100.00 Failed

100.00 100.00

100.00

100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00

90.90 100.00 95.23 100.00

"2

""

High Street (Girls),

100.00 100.00

100.00

100,00 100,00

"3

>>

Queen's Road West (Girls),

100.00 91.66

100.00

100.00 100.00

19

""

Hollywood Road (Girls),

100.00 100.00

100.00 100.00

"

"

"

>>

"

""

"

19

"

33

11

Pottinger Street (Girls),

Stanley School (Girls),

Shaukiwan (Girls), Tokwawan (Girls),

L.M.S., Square Street (Boys),

Wantsai Chapel (Boys),

Yaumati (Boys),

Shektongtsui (Boys),

100.00 81.81 90.62 71.87 100,00 80.80

100.00

100.00 100.00

...

100.00

100.00 100.00| 100.00

100.00

100,00 100,00

100.00 100.00

100.00

100.00 100.00

100.00 100.00

100,00

100.00 94.33

100.00

100.00 100.00 75.00

100.00 $5.71

Failed

98.21 100.00 Failed

100.00 96.00

او

19

Saiyingpun, I. Division (Boys),

93.49 81.96

33.33

100.00 100.00

100.00 100,00 100,00

II.

"

""

";

(Boys),

97.43 94.87

97.43 100,00

""

13

Hunghòm (Boys),

96.77 83.87

100.00 100.00

+

""

>>

""

""

""

12

"

"

33

39

"?

""

""

";

"

99

25

"

97

"

"

31

""

>>

""

J

Hospital Chapel (Boys),

Shektongtsui (Girls),

Saiyingpun, Second Street, I. Div. (Girls),.

Ui-hing Lane, I. Division (Girls),

II.

Tanglungchau (Boys),...

No. 2 (Boys),

Shaukiwan (Boys),

Taikoktsui (Boys),

Square Street (Girls),

Li Yuen Street (Girls), D'Aguilar Street (Girls),. Matauwai (Boys),.... Kau-ü-fong (Girls), Tanglungchau (Girls),...

81.81 68.18

100.00 83.33

100.00 100.00

100.00 100.00

100.00

91.66

37.50

100.00 100.00

11. (Boys),

100.00 90.47

42.85

100.00 100.00

28.57

100.00 100.00

77.77

100,00 80.95 50.00

(Girls),

100.00 83.33

100.00 100.00

93.33 83.33

96.66 100.00

100.00 100.00 57.69

100.00 100.00

97.77 91.11

100.00 100.00

80.76 | 100.00

100.00 100.00

96.29

81.48

100.00 100.00

100.00 100.00

100.00

100.00 100.00

100.00 97.67

100,00

100.00 100.00 100.00

85.29 64.70

100.00

$1.00

85.71

100.00 100.00

31

Aberdeen Street (Girls),

100.00 100.00

100.00

97.05 100.00

100.00 100.00

100.00

100.00 100.00 | 100.00

Wantsai Chapel (Girls),

100.00 85.24

83.33

100.00 100.00 100.00

75.00

Staunton Street (Girls),

100.00 100.00

100.00

100.00 100.00 Failed

"}

"

Saiyingpun, Second Street East (Girls), Taihang (Girls),

100.00 100.00

100.00

100.00 100.00

95.45 86.36

100.00 100.00

19

"

"}

*1

"

R.C.M., Cathedral School (Boys),

Bridges Street, Chinese Division (Girls).. Hollywood Road, Chinese School (Girls), Holy Infancy School, 1. Division (Boys),

100,00 93.33

100.00 100.00

100,00

76.59

100,00

100.00 100.00 100.00

92.45 69.81

100.00

100.00 100.00

82,22 88.88

100.00 100.00

II.

"

59

"}

>>

>>

(Girls),

96.66 80.00

83.33

1000.0 100.00

55

Yaumati (Girls),

91,30 91.30

100.00

100.00 100.00

وو

:>

"

Hunghòm (Girls),

99

Shaukiwan (Girls),

Wesleyan Mission, Spring Gardens (Boys),

100.00 89.47

100.00

100.00 100.00

100,00 90.32

66,66

100.00 100.00

88.88 88.88

100.00 100,00

??

"

>>

Wellington Street (Boys),

92.30 92.30

100.00 100.00

"}

**

51

Lascar Row (Boys),

100.00 100.00

100.00 100.00

!!

35

**

(Girls),

100,00 92.30

100.00 100.00

Wantsai (Boys).

100.00 97.14

100.00 100.00

"

"

Graham Street (Girls),

100.00 82.75

90.00

100.00 100.00

:)

:9

"

*

II.

33

III.

"

*

St. Paul's College School (Boys),

""

Diocesan Home and Orphanage (Boys),

"

""

??

"

Third Street,

""

"

??

"" Morrison,

Lok-ying,

>

31

$1

??

"!

??

99

""

**

J.

"

""

37

""

:>

:

Kennedy Town (Boys), Wellington Street (Girls),

Basel Mission, High Street (Girls),

Berlin Mission (Girls),

C.M.S., Victoria Home and Orphanage (Girls),

St. Stephen's Anglo-Chinese School (Boys)..

Wesleyan Mission, Wellington St., Eng. Sch. (Boys),..

F.E.S., Bonham Road, English Division (Girls)..

| L.M.S., Taipingshan, English School (Boys),

R.C.M., St. Joseph's College, Chinese Div. (Boys),

European Div. (Boys),. Italian Convent, English Division (Girls),

Portuguese Division (Girls),...| Bridges Street, English Division (Girls),

Portuguese Division (Girls)..

Nova Escola Portugueza,

St. Francis, Portuguese Division (Girls),

English Division (Girls),

Victoria Portuguese Sch., Port. Div. (Mixed),...

Eng. Div. (Mixed),.

Victoria English School (Boys),

95.65 91.30

100.00 100.00

100.00 93.75

100.00

100.00 100.00

100.00 97.67 100.00

100.00

100.00

100,00 96.15 84.61 100,00 89.36 93.61

100.00

100.00

Failed 75.00 Failed

77.77

09.23

75.00

(Boys),

(Boys),

(Boys),

94.44 94.44 97.22 100.00 100.00 50.00

95.45 100.00 59.09 83.33 100.00 97.50 95.00 65.00 94.91 100.00 87.50 68.75 80.00 100.00 92.59 88.88 100.00 100.00 90.90 72.72

87.50

$7.50

100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00

100.00

70.00

100.00

100.00 90.00

60.00 75.00

71.12

100.00 100.00

81.25 100.00

$3.33

100.00 61.90 100.00 100.00 100,00 89.03 75.48 97.22 94.81 100,00 91.02 80.76 93.61 95.74 100.00 95.65 91.30 100.00| 100.00 96.96 72.72 68.18 100.00 92.30 94.28 82,85 71.42 100.00 100.00 100.00 82.60 92.85 | 100.00

18.18

100.00 96.29

100.00

78.26

100.00

71.42

100.00

""

59

(Girls),

93.33 90.00 80.00 77.77 50.50 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 | 100,00| 100.00 100.00

98.48 81.81 68.18 92.98 93.44 100.00 93.75 100.00 100.00 73.80 93.54 94.59 100.00 100.00

G.

R.

No..6867

Aberdeen Police Station,

Date....................1919

Received the sum of 25 cents, being fee for 500 gallons of

water to be issued at Aberdeen.

$0:25

Meter at finish..

"5

59

finish..................... start.........................

Inspector in charge.

TABLE XIII.-NUMBER of UNEDUCATED CHILDREN in the Colony in the year 1894.

Estimated Number of Children of local school-age (6 to 16 years) in the Colony, in 1894 :-

463

Boys,....

Girls,

..16,950

.15,030

31,980

Number of Scholars in Schools of all descriptions, in the Colony, in 1894:-

Boys.

Girls.

Total.

Government Schools,

1,928

402

2,380

Grant-in-Aid Schools,

3,251

2,713

5,964

Kaifong Schools,

1,735

22

1,757

Unclassed Schools,

102

241

343

10,394

Uneducated or imperfectly educated Children in the Colony, in 1894, ................................21,586

E. J. EITEL, Ph. D. (Tub.),

Inspector of Schools and Head of the Education Department.

HONGKONG.

FINANCIAL STATEMENT FOR 1894.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of

His Excellency the Governor.

119

8

No. 95

Dr.

LOAN ACCOUNT.

Cr.

To Inscribed Stock Loan at 33% interest,

to be paid off on the 15th April, 1943,... £343,199.15.1

Sinking Fund. Nil.

ASSETS AND LIABILITIES,

ON THE 31ST DECEMBER, 1894.

ASSETS.

..

LIABILITIES.

$

C.

Subsidiary Coins,

5,000.00 Drafts drawn by the Crown Agents, in

transit,

400,000.00

Deposit in Bank,

150,000.00 | Deposits not available,...........

5,977.43

Balance in Bank at current Account,

358,886.99

Praya Reclamation Deposit Account,

Refund of Taxes,

100,000.00

4,000.00

Deposit in England at call,...................

1,157,350.99 Officers' Remittances, not yet paid,

2,480.25

Money Orders, not yet paid,.

5,941.72

Balance in hands of Crown Agents,

26,808.73

Amount due to Post Offices,London,}

Italy, France, &c.,

40,500.00

Subsidiary Coins in transit,...

200,000.00

Pensions due to Ciyil Officers,

16,000.00

Arrears of Taxes,

15,138.22

Do.

to ex-Police Constables,..............

6,400.00

Arrears of Crown Rent,

66,460.04

TOTAL LIABILITIES,..........

Advances to be recovered,.........

30,267.81

Balance,..........

581,299.40

*

1,428,613.38

TOTAL ASSETS,......$ 2,009,912.78

* Of which $979,974.38 represents unexpended balance of 1893 Loan of £200,000.

2,009,912.78

N. G. MITCHELL-INNES,

Colonial Treasurer.

Treasury, Hongkong, 28th February, 1895.

No. 1.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 26th February, 1895.

49

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART LOCKHART), Chairman.

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

""

>>

the Colonial Treasurer, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES).

>>

the Director of Public Works, (FRANCIS ALFRED COOPER).

"9

""

19

?"

the Harbour Master, (ROBERT MURRAY RUMSEY, R.N.). CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

Ho KAI, M.B., C.M.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS, C.M.G.

ALEXANDER MCCONACHIE.

The Committee met at the request of the Acting Colonial Secretary.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 12th December, 1894, were read and confirmed.

(1) Read the following Minute under the hand of His Excellency the Governor :-

C.S.O. 1319 of 1894,

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Twenty thousand Dollars, ($20,000), for the purchase of a Floating Fire Engine.

Government House, Hongkong, 19th January, 1895.

The Committee unanimously agreed to recommend that the vote be passed.

(2) Read the following Minute under the hand of His Excellency the Governor :—

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

C.S.O. 2098 of 1894.

C.S.O.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One thousand Seven hundred and Fifty Dollars, ($1,750), for the purchase of conservancy buckets.

Government House, Hongkong, 25th January, 1895.

The Committee unanimously agreed to recommend that the vote be passed.

(3) Read the following Minute under the hand of His Excellency the Governor :-

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

137 of 1895.

C.S.O.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One thousand Five hundred and Thirty-five Dollars, ($1,535), being amount of contribution to the Imperial and Colonial Institute from the 10th May, 1893, to 31st December, 1895, inclusive, at the rate of £58 per annum at 2/-- to the Dollar.

Government House, Hongkong, 22nd January, 1895.

The Committee unanimously agreed to recommend that the vote be passed.

(4) Read the following Minute under the hand of His Excellency the Governor:

418 of 1895.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Five hundred Dollars, ($500), for the construction of a new Buoy to mark the position of the Bokhara Rock.

Government House, Hongkong, 20th February, 1895.

The Committee unanimously agreed to recommend that the vote be passed.

The Committee then adjourned.

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 12th March, 1895.

Read and confirmed on the 12th March, 1895.

ARATHOON SETH,

Clerk of Councils.

J. H. STEWART LOCKHART,

Chairman.

No. 2.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG.

On the 12th March, 1895.

51

C.S.O.

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART LOCKHART). Chairman.

the Acting Attorney General, (ANDREW JOHN LEACH, Q.C.).

>"

>>

""

>>

""

""

the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON).

the Director of Public Works, (FRANCIS ALFRED Cooper).

the Harbour Master, (ROBERT MURRAY RUMSEY, R.N.). CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS, C.M.G.

ALEXANDER MCCONACHIE.

The Committee met at the request of the Acting Colonial Secretary.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 26th ultimo, were read and confirmed. (1) Read the following Minute under the hand of His Excellency the Governor :---

$22 of 1895.

C.S.0.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Eight hundred thousand Dollars, ($800,000), being compensation to the owners and other persons having any right or interest in the lots of land within the resumed area of Taipingshan, interest on the above from 1st June, 1894, to date of payment at 7 %, and costs awarded against the Crown by the Board of Arbi- trators under The Taipingshan Resumption Ordinance, 1894.

Government House, Hongkong, 8th March, 1895.

The Committee unanimously agreed to recommend that the vote be passed.

(2) Read the following Minute under the hand of His Excellency the Governor :---

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

564 of 1895,

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Two hundred and Seventy Dollars, ($270), being salary of an Overseer at the New Central Market, from 1st April next, at $30 per month.

Government House, Hongkong, 11th March, 1895.

The Committee unanimously agreed to recommend that the vote be passed.

The Committee then adjourned.

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 20th March, 1895.

Read and confirmed on the 28th March, 1895.

ARATHOON SETH, Clerk of Councils.

J. H. STEWART LOCKHART,

Chairman.

No. 3.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 28th March, 1895.

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART LOCKHART), Chairman.

the Acting Attorney General, (ANDREW JOHN LEACH, Q.C.).

""

the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON).

>>

the Director of Public Works, (FRANCIS ALFRED COOPER).

""

the Harbour Master, (ROBERT MURRAY RUMSEY, R.N.). CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

"1

53

C.S.O.

"

">

";

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK,

Ho KAI, M.B., C.M.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS, C.M.G.

ALEXANDER MCCONACHIE.

The Committee met at the request of the Colonial Secretary.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 12th instant, were read and confirmed. (1) Read the following Minute under the hand of His Excellency the Governor :-

$85 of 1895.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Five hundred and Forty Dollars, ($540), being salary of a temporary Clerk to the Sanitary Department at the rate of $60 per mensem for 9 months from 1st April, 1895.

Government House, Hongkong, 21st March, 1895.

The Committee unanimously agreed to recommend that the vote be passed.

(2) Read the following Minute under the hand of His Excellency the Governor :

C.0. Tel. 15.3.95.

C.S.0.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to re-vote the sum of Fifty-eight thousand Dollars, ($58,000), for payment of Exchange Compensation in respect of 1894.

(The above is approximately the unexpended balance of the sum previously voted.) Government House, Hongkong, 25th March, 1895.

The Committee unanimously agreed to recommend that the vote be passed.

(3) Read the following Minute under the hand of His Excellency the Governor :-

708 of 1805,

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Six hundred Dollars. ($600), for the salaries of the Chinese staff at the new Sheep and Swine Depôt.

Government House, Hongkong, 26th March, 1895.

The Committee unanimously agreed to recommend that the vote be passed. The Committee then adjourned.

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 4th April, 1895.

Read and confirmed on the 4th April, 1895.

ARATHOON SETH,

Clerk of Councils.

J. H. STEWART LOCKHART,

Chairman.

No. 4.

1

55

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 4th April, 1895.

}

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART LOCKHART), Chairman.

"

""

the Acting Attorney General, (ANDREW JOHN LEACH, Q.C.).

+

21

}}

A

the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON).

the Director of Public Works, (FRANCIS ALFRED COOPER).

the Harbour Master, (ROBERT MURRAY RUMSEY, R.N.). CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS, C.M.G.

ALEXANDER MCCONACHIE.

The Committee met at the request of the Colonial Secretary.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 28th ultimo, were read and confirmned. Read the following Minute under the hand of His Excellency the Governor:

C.S.O. 707 of 1895.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Three thousand Dollars, ($3,000), for certain additions to the Sheep and Swine Depôts, recommended by the Sanitary Board.

(The estimated cost of the above is approximately $7,000, and the available balance of the sum already voted is $4,000.)

Government House, Hongkong, 28th March, 1895.

The Committee unanimously agreed to recominend that the vote be passed. The Committee then adjourned.

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 11th April, 1895.

Read and confirmed on the 11th April, 1895.

ARATHIOON SETH, Clerk of Councils.

J. H. STEWART LOCKHART,

Chairman.

No. 5.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 11th April, 1895.

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART LOCKHART), Chairman.

""

the Acting Attorney General, (ALFRED GASCOYNE WISE).

"}

the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON).

>>

the Director of Public Works, (FRANCIS ALFRED COOPER).

57

""

25

>>

""

>>

the Harbour Master, (ROBERT MURRAY RUMSEY, R.N.). CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS, C.M.G.

ALEXANDER MCCONACHIE.

The Committee met at the request of the Colonial Secretary.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 4th instant, were read and confirmed. Read the following Minute under the hand of His Excellency the Governor :-

C.O.D.

5 of 1895

and

of

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One thousand Three hundred and 32 or 1895. Twenty-four Dollars, ($1,324), in respect of additions to the salaries of the under mentioned Officers as from the 1st January, 1895, as sanctioned by the Secretary of State on the recom- mendation of the Retrenchment Committee:-

The Colonial Veterinary Surgeon,

The Steward of the Government Civil Hospital,...$120. Inspector Germain, Sanitary Department,

The Head Bailiff, Supreme Court,

The 2nd Bailiff, Supreme Court,

Government House, Hongkong, 8th April, 1895.

$600.

$120 (for knowledge of Chinese).

$204.

...$280.

The Committee unanimously agreed to recommend that the vote be passed.

The Committee then adjourned.

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 17th April, 1895.

Read and confirmed on the 23rd May, 1895.

J. G. T. BucKLE, Acting Clerk of Councils.

J. H. STEWART LOCKHART,

Chairman.

No. 6.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG, On the 23rd May, 1895.

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART LOCKHART), Chairman.

,,

the Acting Attorney General, (ALFRED GASCOYNE WISE).

""

the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON).

the Director of Public Works, (FRANCIS ALFRED COOPER).

";

"1

""

""

""

the Harbour Master, (ROBERT MURRAY RUMSEY, R.N.). CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS, C.M.G.

ALEXANDER MCCONACHIE.

})

JAMES JARDINE BELL-IRVING.

"1

59

C.S.O.

The Committee met at the request of the Colonial Secretary.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 11th ultimo, were read and confirmed. (1) Read the following Minute under the hand of His Excellency the Governor:~

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

1223 of 1895.

C.S.O.

The Governor recommends the Council to re-vote the sum of Three thousand Eight hundred and Twenty-four Dollars and Seventeen Cents, ($3,824.17), for the extension of MacDonnell and Austin Roads at Kowloon.

(The above is the unexpended balance of the sum voted for the above work for 1894.) Government House, Hongkong, 4th May, 1895.

The Committee unanimously agreed to recominend that the vote be passed.

(2) Read the following Minute under the hand of His Excellency the Governor:

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

1440 of 1895.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Twenty thousand Dollars, ($20,000), for expenses incurred in connection with the Resumption of Taipingshan.

Government House, Hongkong, 22nd May, 1895.

In connection with this vote the Committee discussed the question of remuneration to Messrs. ALFORD and DANBY, Arbitrators appointed under The Taipingshan Resumption Ordinance, for their services on the Arbitration Board.

It was finally decided to recommend that the sum of $4,000 be paid to each of the above gentlemen.

The Committee then unanimously agreed to recommend that the vote be passed.

The Committee then adjourned.

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 6th June, 1895.

Read and confirmed on the 6th June, 1895.

J. G. T. BUCKLE, Acting Clerk of Councils.

J. H. STEWART LOCKHART,

Chairman.

No. 7.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 6th June, 1895.

61

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART LOCKHART), Chairman.

the Acting Attorney General, (ALFRED GASCOYNE WISE).

the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON).

""

>>

the Director of Public Works, (FRANCIS ALFRED COOPER).

""

* * * * *

the Acting Harbour Master, (WILLIAM CHARLES HOLLAND HASTINGS, R.N.).

the Postmaster General, (ARTHUR KENNEDY TRAVERS).

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS, C.M.G.

ALEXANDER MCCONACHIE.

JAMES JARDINE BELL-IRVING.

The Committee met at the request of the Colonial Secretary.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 23rd May, were read and confirmed.

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE TO AUTHORISE THE APPROPRIATION OF A SUPPLEMENTARY SUM OF THREE HUNDRED AND FIFTY-FIVE THOUSAND THREE HUNDRED AND NINETY-FIVE DOLLARS AND EIGHTY-EIGHT CENTS TO DEFRAY THE CHARGES OF THE YEAR 1894.

The various items in the above Bill were considered separately, and the Committee unanimously agreed to recommend that the Bill be passed by the Legislative Council.

The Committee then adjourned.

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 16th August, 1895.

Read and confirmed on the 25th November, 1895.

J. G. T. BUCKLE, Acting Clerk of Councils.

J. H. STEWART LOCKHART,

Chairman.

No. 8.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 25th November, 1895.

63

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART LOCKHART), Chairman.

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON).

">

"

the Director of Public Works, (FRANCIS ALFRed Cooper).

""

"9

""

>>

3

""

22

the Acting Harbour Master, (WILLIAM CHARLES HOLLAND HASTINGS, R.N.). the Postmaster General, (ARTHUR KENNEDY TRAVERS).

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS, C.M.G.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

ALEXANDER MCCONACHIE.

The Committee met at the request of the Colonial Secretary.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 6th June, were read and confirmed.

Read the following Minutes (Nos. 14 to 31 inclusive) under the hand of His Excellency the Governor :-

C.S.O.

1367 of 1895.

C.S.0. 2889 of 1895.

C.S.O.

2792 of 1895.

C.S.Ú.

2429 of 1895.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Two thousand Four hundred Dollars, ($2,400), in aid of the vote for Incidental Expenses in the Sanitary Department.

Government House, Hongkong, 22nd June, 1895.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Ten thousand Dollars, ($10,000), in aid of the vote "Repairs of Buildings."

Government House, Hongkong, 2nd November, 1895.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One thousand Five hundred Dollars, ($1,500), in aid of the vote for "Maintenance of Sewers," (Public Works Annually Recurrent).

Government House, Hongkong, 2nd November, 1895.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Three thousand Dollars, ($3,000), in aid of the vote for "Miscellaneous Works," being approximately the cost of re-building the retaining wall, Seymour Road, which has been charged thereto.

Government House, Hongkong, 2nd November, 1895.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Four thousand Four hundred and Sixty Dollars and Fifty Cents, ($4,460.50), for repairs, &c., to the Hospital Hulk Hygeia, being difference between the amount spent ($5,260.50) and the amount voted in the Estimates ($800).

Government House, Hongkong, 2nd November, 1895.

1

64

C.S.O.

1609 of 1895.

C.S.O.

2423 of 1895.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Six hundred and Eighty Dollars, ($680), being salary drawn by Dr. BELL from 8th June to 15th August, 1895, while acting as Assistant Surgeon in the Government Civil Hospital during Dr. ATKINSON's absence on sick leave.

Government House, Hongkong, 2nd November, 1895.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Four thousand and Six hundred Dollars, ($4,600), to meet the following expenses in the Police Department:-

For Passages and Bonuses,

For Incidental Expenses,

..$3,000

1,600

C.S.O.

2691 of 1895.

C.S.O.

2666 of 1895.

C.S.O. 2389 of 1895.

C.S.O. 2368 of 1895.

C.S.O. 2464 of 1895.

Government House, Hongkong, 2nd November, 1895.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Five thousand Dollars, ($5,000), for carrying out certain works in connection with the Taipingshan Improvement Scheme.

Government House, Hongkong, 2nd November, 1895.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Two hundred Dollars, ($200), in aid of the vote for "Government Marine Surveyor, Other Charges, coal, oil, and water for Steam-launch."

Government House, Hongkong, 2nd November, 1895.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Two thousand Five hundred Dollars, ($2,500), for "Maintenance of Water Works."

Government House, Hongkong, 2nd November, 1895.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Twelve thousand Dollars, ($12,000), in connection with Water and Drainage Works at Kowloon.

Government House, Hongkong, 2nd November, 1895.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One thousand and Twenty Dollars, ($1,020), to meet the following expenses in the Sanitary Department:-

Uniform for Staff,

Cost of Street Watering,.

Market Incidental Expenses,

....$520

400

100

C.S.O. 1626 & 1627 of 1895.

C.S.0. 1691 of 1895.

Government House, Hongkong, 2nd November, 1895.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Two hundred and Seventeen Dollars, ($217), being travelling allowances to certain Inspectors of Nuisances and Overseers of the Sanitary Department for the current year.

Government House, Hongkong, 2nd November, 1895.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Five thousand Dollars, ($5,000), to cover the cost of lighting the New Central Market during the current year.

Government House, Hongkong, 2nd November, 1895.

65

C.S.O.

1174 of 1895.

C.O.D.

195 of 1895.

'C.S.O.

2925 of 1895.

C.S.O.

2040 of 1895.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Twenty-nine thousand Dollars, ($29,000), for expenses incurred in connection with preventive measures against a recurrence of the plague.

Government House, Hongkong, 2nd November, 1895.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One thousand Five hundred and Eighty Dollars, ($1,580), to cover the salary and allowances of the newly appointed Medical Officer of Health from 2nd August to 31st December, 1895.

Government House, Hongkong, 2nd November, 1895.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sumn of Six hundred and Fifty Dollars, ($650), in aid of the vote "Harbour Department, Steam Launches, Other Charges, coals, repairs, etc."

Government House, Hongkong, 3rd November, 1895.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Three thousand and Five hundred Dollars, ($3,500), in connection with the construction of a road in Kowloon to be called Salisbury Road.

Government House, Hongkong, 5th November; 1895.

The Committee unanimously agreed to recommend that all the above votes be passed.

The Committee then adjourned.

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 5th December, 1895.

Read and confirmed on the 5th December, 1895.

J. G. T. BUCKLE, Acting Clerk of Councils.

J. H. STEWART LOCKHART,

Chairman.

No. 9.

:

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 5th December, 1895.

67

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART LOCKHART), Chairman.

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON).

">

the Director of Public Works, (FRANCIS ALFRED COOPER).

19

>).

""

A

"}

""

""

2)

the Harbour Master, (ROBERT MURRAY RUMSEY, R.N.).

the Acting Captain Superintendent of Police, (WILLIAM CHARLES HOLLAND

HASTINGS, R.N.).

CATCHICK PAul Chater.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS, C.M.G.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

ALEXANDER MCCONACHIE.

The Committee met at the request of the Colonial Secretary.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 25th November, 1895, were read and confirmed.

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE TO APPLY A SUM NOT EXCEEDING TWO MILLIONS FOUR HUNDRED AND SEVENTY-NINE THOUSAND AND SIXTY-TWO DOLLARS TO THE PUBLIC SERVICE OF THE YEAR 1896."

The Committee unanimously agreed to recommend that the several items in the Bill be passed, with the exception of the item "Military Expenditure," the consideration of which was postponed until 2,30 P.M. on Thursday, the 12th December, 1895.

The Committee then adjourned as above.

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 14th December, 1895.

Read and confirmed on the 14th December, 1895.

:

J. G. T. Buckle, Acting Clerk of Councils.

J. H. STEWART LOCKHART,

Chairman.

No. 10.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 14th December, 1895.

69

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART LOCKHART), Chairman.

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON).

"3

the Director of Public Works, (FRANCIS ALFRED COOPER).

,,

>>

""

11

the Harbour Master, (ROBERT MURRAY RUMSEY, R.N.).

the Acting Captain Superintendent of Police, (WILLIAM CHARLES HOLLAND

HASTINGS, R.N.).

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS, C.M.G.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

ALEXANDER MCCONACHIE.

The Committee met at the request of the Colonial Secretary.

BILL ENTITLED

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 5th December, 1895, were read and confirmed.

AN ORDINANCE TO APPLY A SUM NOT EXCEEDING TWO MILLIONS FOUR hundred AND SEVENTY-NINE THOUSAND AND SIXTY-TWO DOLLARS TO THE PUBLIC SERVICE OF THE YEAR 1896."

The Colonial Secretary moved the adoption of the item "Military Expenditure" $440,215. The Acting Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Mr. CHATER moved as an amendment-

That the vote for the Military Contribution be reduced to 17 per cent. of the general revenue of the Colony, less the proceeds of Land Sales and less the Municipal Revenue, the items of which this latter shall be composed to be adjusted between the Imperial and Colonial Govern- ments.

Dr. Ho KAI seconded.

The Committee divided, and the amendment was lost by one vote.

The original motion was then put, and carried by a majority of one, the Unofficial Members voting against it.

The Committee then adjourned.

Laid before the Legislative Council this 14th day of December, 1895.

Read and confirmed on the 11th February, 1896.

J. G. T. Buckle, Acting Clerk of Councils.

J. H. STEWART LOCKHART,

Chairman.

HONGKONG.

REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF FIRE BRIGADE FOR 1894.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of

His Excellency the Governor.

273

No.

18

No. 14.

FIRE BRIGADE Department,

HONGKONG, 11th March, 1895.

SIR,-I have the honour to forward the annual return of fires and fire alarms for the year 1894. Although the return shows a slight decline on that for 1893, the fires for the most part present the same characteristics as were pointed out in my report for that year.

In the spring the Brigade was seriously embarrassed in its operations by the supply of fresh water becoming intermittent and almost entirely ceasing, and the comparatively large conflagration that occurred in the month of March in Bonham Strand owed its spread directly to this cause.

It is true that arrangements are made by which water can be turned on upon an alarm of fire occurring, but a good deal of time is lost in carrying them out, and a fire is able to make headway before it can be properly tackled, and in a crowded Colony such as this is, with its narrow and steep streets, delay might easily result in very serious consequences.

I have always been of opinion that the completion of the Tytam water works would admit of the introduction of radical changes in the composition of the Fire Brigade, and time has shown that if the water supply were only constant it would be unnecessary to keep any steam engines other than the floating engine. The pressure of water in the streets is excellent, and cannot be exceeded by the results of the best steam engine. The street hydrants are numerous and well placed, and with the gradual increase of the number of Fire Despatch Boxes it ought to be possible to keep within moderate limits at very small expense any fire taking place in the limits of Victoria. It is, however, a sine qua non of the proper treatment of fires that the water must be unstinted, and so long as it is necessary to hamper the Brigade in its use and at times to cut it off altogether, so long must the steam engines be maintained with their complement of drivers, stokers, and officers.

At the present time, moreover, there is a particular danger in curtailing the fresh water supply, as owing to the Praya Reclamation works, it may at any time be impossible to obtain water from the sea in particular places. It is, therefore, with the greatest anxiety that one learns of an order dim- inishing the supply of fresh water, and it will be an immense relief to me when the supply is made adequate for all purposes.

I have the honour to give a list of the places where the fire despatch boxes are now located, and in conclusion to report that the officers and men have throughout the year given every assistance in the suppression of fires.

I attach copy of Mr. KINGHORN's report on the state of the engines.

I have the honour to be,

The Honourable J. H. STEWART LOCKHART,

Acting Colonial Secretary.

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

H. E. WODEHOUSE, Superintendent, Fire Brigade.

List of places where Fire Despatch Boxes are located.

1. No. 1 Police Station.

2. Engine House in Wanchai Road.

3. Engine House in Albany Street.

4. Royal Naval Yard.

5. Government Offices.

6. Government House.

7. House No. 7, Queen's Gardens.

8. Clock Tower.

9. Central Fire Brigade Station (3.) 10. Central Police Station.

274

11. No. 9 Police Station.

12. House No. 1, Seymour Terrace.

13. Man Mo Temple.

14. Nam Pak Hong Engine House in Bonham Strand. 15. Ko Shing Theatre.

16. Government Civil Hospital.

17. The Superintendent's Residence, "Larkspur." 18. No. 7 Police Station.

19. The Gas Works Premises.

H. E. WODEHOUSE, Superintendent, Fire Brigade.

HONGKONG, 2nd February, 1895.

SIR,-I have the honour to forward herewith a report on the state of the Government Fire Engines for the year ending 31st December, 1894.

STEAMER No. 1.

(Floating Engine by Merryweather & Sons.)

This Engine has been 28 years in service. In the month of September last, a new boiler was fitted, and the launch received a general overhaul, the time occupied by these repairs was 38 days. Since the overhaul it has done good service, and has given every satisfaction.

STEAMER No. 2.

(Land Engine by Shand & Mason.)

This Engine has been 16 years in service (9 years in Volunteer Brigade). During the year it has been thoroughly overhauled, has not been disabled at a fire, and is now in good working order.

STEAMER No. 3.

(Land Engine by Shand & Mason.)

This Engine has been 16 years in service. (Boiler 6 years.) In August last it was thoroughly overhauled and is now in good working order.

STEAMER No. 4.

(Land Engine by Shand & Mason.)

This Engine has been 13 years in service. In the month of August last, the boiler was repaired and fitted with a new crown on fire box, and the Engine was thoroughly overhauled, it has been regularly used at the monthly drills for drivers, and is in excellent working order.

STEAMER No. 5.

(Land Engine by Shand & Mason.)

This Engine has been 9 years in service. It has done some good work during the year; has been overhauled; and is now in good order.

Nine Manual Engines are all in good order. The hose, reels, and supply carts and gear are all in good order and condition.

The Assistant Engineer and drivers have given every attention to their duties.

At the beginning of the year four men applied to be taught engine driving; they attended drills, and have passed their examination successfully.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

JOHN W. KINGHORN,

Engineer, Government Fire Brigade.

H. E. WODEHOUSE, Esq., C.M.G.,

Superintendent,

Government Fire Brigade.

INCIPIENT FIRES DURING THE YEAR 1894.

No.

DATE.

TIME.

SITUATION OF FIRE.

3

6

1 2 50 TO 10 780

Jan.

Grass on Hillside at Tai Tam,

1.45 a.m.

""

6.30 a.m.

The Stag Hotel, Queen's Road Central, House No. 1, Woi On Lane,

ESTIMATED

DAMAGE.

$60

Unknown, Chimney on fire.

CAUSE.

REMARKS.

Trifling

""

""

2 p.m.

Grass on Hillside at Stanley,

Mat bags caught fire while burning joss paper. Unknown.

A number of trees destroyed.

8

10 a.m.

House No. 137, Queen's Road East,

Chimney on fire.

""

8

""

12.30 p.m.

Grass on Hillside near Hok Tsui,

Unknown.

9

12

A

9

12

10

14

11 p.m.

6.45 p.m.

8.30 p.m.

9.30 p.m.

A Stack of Hay at Yaumati,

A Stack of Hay at Hung-Hom,...

House No. 81, Third Street,

$0.50

Falling of a kerosine lamp.

House No. 115, Stanley,

$70

Unknown.

$10

$50

11

16

2

7.20 p.m.

Small Pox Hospital,

$10

12

17

1.45 a.m.

House No. 34, Tung Mau Lane,.

Trifling

13

Feb.

12

6.45 p.m.

The Man Loong Soy Factory, Yaumati,

14

18

12.40 a.m.

House No. 52, Lower Lascar Row,

"}

15

18

95

5.45 p.m.

House No. 38, Gage Street,

16

18

""

11.30 p.m.

House No. 17, Wing Kat Street,

99

""

""

17

19

"3

4 p.m.

Grass on Hillside near Mount Kellett,

Incendiarism, Unknown.

Upsetting of a kerosine lamp. Burning of joss sticks.

Unknown.

""

Papers saturated with kerosine oil were found.

18

24

7.30 p.m.

A Grass Stack at Sai Wan Ho,

19

24

10.40 p.m.

A Grass Stack at Shaukiwan,

""

20

26

6.30 a.m.

21 March 4

A certain House (numbered) in Fuk Cheung Lane,... House No. 198, Wellington Street,

$25

$30

""

""

...

>>

>>

22

4

4.45 a.m.

House No. 214, Praya West,

Trifling

>>

23

4

""

7.20 p.m.

A Matshed on the Reclamation Ground, Praya West,.

24

10

""

12.30 p.m.

House No. 4A, Upper Mosque Terrace,..

"

Firing of squibs. Unknown.

25

12

Grass on Hillside at Aberdeen,

"

26

17

""

2 p.m.

Grass on Hillside at Stanley,

27

18

Grass on Hillside at Aberdeen,

""

>>

""

28

24

""

1 p.m.

Grass on Hillside above Wong Nei Chung,

"

29

26

Grass on Hillside at Shek (),

>>

""

30

26

"1

31

26

"9

32

""

33

30

34

April

2

28

4.30 p.m.

3 p.m.

11 p.m.

Grass on Hillside at Pokfulam,

"}

House No. 2, West Street,

Trifling

Grass on Hillside at Aplichau,

Carelessness with lighted candle. Unknown.

Grass on Hillside at Little Hongkong,

""

House No. 3, Tsing Kai Lane, Wanchai,

Trifling

Careless use of matches.

35

33

11.30 a.m.

Grass on Hillside at Mount Davis,

Burning of joss paper while worshipping at graves.

36

Grass on Hillside at Aplichau,

"

""

37

Grass on Hillside at Stanley,

""

38

Grass on Hillside at Aberdeen,

"

39

Grass on Hillside at Kennedytown,

""

40

""

41

1.30 p.m.

7.30 p.m.

Grass on Hillside at Fuk Tsum Henng,

The Ko Shing Theatre,

42

10

7.30 a.m.

43

22

"

9.20 p.m.

House No. 1, Ki Ling Lane, West Point, House No. 10, Hollywood Road,

$10

44

27

8.20 p.m.

House No. 188, Queen's Road Central,

45 May

5

3.55 a.m.

House No. 118, Wing Lok Street,..

Trifling

""

""

Unknown.

False alarm.

A mosquito curtain caught fire from a lighted lamp. Chimney on fire.

Unknown.

275

INCIPIENT FIRES DURING THE YEAR 1894,—Continued.

276

No.

DATE.

TIME.

SITUATION OF FIRE.

ESTIMATED

DAMAGE.

CAUSE.

REMARKS.

46 May 6

3.30 p.m.

A Matshed at Tsat Tsz Mui,

$200.

Firing of crackers.

47

13

9.30 p.m.

A Matshed at Tsat Tsz Mui,

$1,300.

Carelessness while smoking,

7 Matsheds burnt down.

48

14

7.30 p.m.

House No. 6 Station Street,

Trifling.

49

23

9.45 p.m.

A Matshed near the Naval Yard at Kowloon,

$60.

Bursting of a kerosine lamp. Unknown.

50

27

5.20 p.m.

House No. 27 Wyndham Street,

Chimney on fire.

51

29

12.25 a.m.

House No. 365 Queen's Road West,

$150.

Unknown,

>>

52 June 1

10.55 p.m.

House No. 217 Queen's Road West,

$100.

Breaking of a kerosine lamp.

53

July 10

7.30 p.m.

House No. 376 Queen's Road West,

$20.

Unknown.

54

13

1.30 p.m.

55

13

9.15 a.m.

A Hut at Mati, Kowloon, House No. 76 First Street,

$100.

$150.

Playing of matches by children. Unknown.

56

13

35

3 p.m.

House No. 12 New Street,

Chimney on fire.

57.

17

1 a.m.

House No. 108 Third Street,

Unknown.

"J

58

18

6.15 p.m.

House No. 60 Praya East, .....

Trifling.

Burning of joss paper.

59

19

7.45 p.m.

House No. 376 Queen's Road West,

$5.

Unknown.

60

20

>

2.45 p.m.

House No. 25 New Street,

Trifling.

61

31

J7

5 p.m.

62 Aug. 7

63

8 a.m.

Messrs. Blackhead & Co., Praya Central, House No. 198 Wellington Street,...

Chimney on fire,

7

""

9.45 p.m.

House No. 143 Queen's Road Central,

64

17

House No. 66 Praya Central,

>>

59

""

65

66

67

""

68 Sept. 3

69

19

9 a.m.

House No. 28 Possession Street,

29

10.30 p.m.

House No. 129 Wanchai Road,

$5.

31

11.30 a.m.

4 am.

6.30 p.m.

Grass on Hillside at Stanley, House No. 8 Upper Station Street, House No. 5 Victoria Street,

Trifling.

""

""

70

9.30 p.m.

House No. 19 Aberdeen Street,

""

71

"

2 p.m.

Grass on Hillside at Stanley,

72

25

8

p.m.

59

73

Oct.

10

9 p.m.

House No. 228 Queen's Road Central, House No. 194 Queen's Road West,

74

18

75

19

5 p.m.

12.30 a.m.

A Matshed at Yaumati Village,.. House No. 62 Queen's Road West,

Trifling.

$400.

""

Incendiarism,

Explosion of a kerosine lamp. Unknown.

Bursting of a kerosine lamp.

Breaking of a kerosine lamp.

Unknown.

Careless use of fire for drying clothes. Upsetting of a kerosine lamp.

Careless use of fire,

Unknown.

A bundle of joss sticks saturated with kero- sine oil was found on the premises.

7 Matsheds burnt down.

76

22

5.45 a.m.

Ho Tung's Godown at Praya West,

...

9.9

77

24

>>

2 p.m.

A Matshed at Kennedytown,

78

28

7.15 a.m.

79

30

11.30 a..

The Tai Li Soy Factory at Hunghom West, Grass on Hillside above Taitam Bay,

Trifling.

$5,000.

""

""

""

80 Nov.

6

6 p.m.

Godown No. 122 Praya East,...

$150

81

6

10.45 p.m.

House No. 153 Queen's Road West,

82

"

1.30 p.m.

Grass on Hillside above Bonham Road,..

83

84

"

2 p.m.

House No. 146 Market Street, Yaumati,

13

85

12

12

3.30 a.m.

10.30 p.m.

House No. 4 Centre Street,

A Matshed at Quarry Bay,..

""

86

18

19

1.50 p.m.

House No. 5 West Street,

87

23

5.30 a.m.

Godown No. 74 Praya East,

89

888888

24

12.30 a.m.

The Stag Hotel, Queen's Road Central,

Trifling.

...

$300.

Spontaneous combustion of coal. Incendiarism,

Unknown.

Burning of joss paper and sticks. Unknown.

>>

Spontaneous combustion of coal. Chimney on fire.

Matches and papers saturated with kerosine

oil were found on the stairs.

""

26

11 a.m.

A Stack of Grass at Stanley,

$12.

Unknown.

.......

90

27

""

8.30 p.m.

Hut No. 8 on the Reclamation Ground, Praya West,

Trifling.

Upsetting of a kerosine lamp.

INCIPIENT FIRES DURING THE YEAR 1894,-Continued.

CAUSE.

REMARKS.

91 Nov.

92 | Dec.

93

94

95

95

TIME.

29

1 a.m.

5

2 a.m.

9.20 p.m.

3.15 p.m.

5.40 p.m.

10.45 a.m.

14

96

16

97

17

""

5 p.m.

98

18

""

3 p.m.

99

19

"

100

22

11.15 a.m.

101

23

10.15 p.m.

102

23

3.15 p.m.

103

25

1 p.m.

104

25

1 p.m.

105

28

106

31

4 a.m.

4.30 a.m.

SITUATION OF FIRE.

ESTIMATED

DAMAGE.

House No. 237 Queen's Road Central, A Haystack at Mongkok Tsui, House No. 10 I Wo Street,.

Trifling.

$10.

Unknown.

"?

Triffing.

House No. 32 Second Street,

$200.

A European House at Peak Road, House No. 16 Ship Street,

Grass on Hillside at Tsat Tsz Mui, House No. 20 Western Street, The Magistracy,

House No. 380 Queen's Road West,

House No. 201 Hollywood Road, House No. 14 Second Street, House No. 18 Belilios Terrace, Grass on Hillside at Stanley, The Central Police Barracks, House No. 109 First Street,

...

Trifling.

...

Falling of a kerosino lamp. Overheating of flue.

Unknown.

""

Chimney on fire.

Incendiarism,

Burning of joss paper.

Incendiarism,

Unknown.

Incendiarism,

Unknown.

No.

DATE.

TIME.

SITUATION OF FIRE.

No. 273 Queen's Road West,

123

Jan.

9

14

""

:

12.30 p.m.

8.45 p.m.

No. 56 First Street,

No. 13 U Lok Lane,

=

26 1.25 a.m.

4

Feb.

1

No. 26 Market Street,..

5

6

""

14

54

25

7.55 a.m.

1.40 p.m.

4.50 p.m.

7 p.m.

8

March 3

28

7.30 a.m.

9.35 a.m.

"}

No. 57 Queen's Road West, No. 28 Upper Station Street, No. 86 Queen's Road West,

.....

No. 17 Salt Fish Street, No. 17 Upper Lascar Row,.

Chimney on fire.

A jacket hanging close to a lighted lamp caught fire.

Newspapers saturated with kerosine oil were spread over chairs and stools and were partly burnt.

Lighted papers were found on the staircase.

A bottle of kerosine oil and matches saturated with kerosine oil were found on the verandah close to the venetians.

H. E. WODEHOUSE, Supt. Fire Brigade.

FIRES DURING THE YEAR 1894.

No. of

BUILDINGS

DESTROYED.

ESTIMATED

DAMAGE.

Wholly Partly.

CAUSE.

REMARKS.

Insured with the Economic Fire Insurance Company for $7,000.

1

1

$800

$400

Breaking of a kerosine lamp,

Not Insured.

Unknown,

Not Insured.

1

:

$1,200

Do.,

2

$2,500

1

N:

2

$4,000

1

$300

$50

Carelessness with lighted matches, Firing of crackers, Unknown,

Overheating of a stove for drying medicine,

Not Insured.

Insured with the Meiji Fire Insurance Com- Not Insured. [pany for $2,500.

Insured in the Office of Messrs. Carlowitz & Co. for $5,000.

Insured in the Office of Messrs. Carlowitz & Co. for $3,000.

2

$1,500

Unknown,

1

1

$5,000

Careless use of matches,

Not Insured.

277

FIRES DURING THE YEAR 1894,-- Continued.

No. of

BUILDINGS

ESTIMATED

No.

DATE.

TIME.

SITUATION OF FIRE.

DESTROYED.

CAUSE.

DAMAGE.

Wholly. Partly.

10

11

17

33

12

28

>>

1

7 p.m.

13

April 4

"}

14 May

30

9.20 p.m. 10.30 a.m.

9 a.m.

2 a.m.

No. 63 Wanchai Road,

No. 122 Queen's Road Central,

No. 136 Bonham Strand,.

6

1

$150,000

Unknown,

No. 211 Hollywood Road,

}

1

$2,000

Falling of a kerosino lamp,

co:

$1,500

Unknown,

3

2

$55,000

Falling of a kerosine lamp,

No. 116 Queen's Road Central,

1

I

$18,000

Unknown,

13

15

3 a.m.

No. 137 Queen's Road West,

1

2

$4,500

""

16 June

3 a.m.

No. 15 Jervois Street,

1

17

3

3.10 a.m.

No. 228 Queen's Road Central,

Breaking of a kerosine lamp, $2,500 Explosion of a kerosine lamp, $20,000 Explosion of a kerosine lamp,

REMARKS.

278

....

Dropping of sparks from a furnace on wood shavings,

Insured in different Offices for $12,000. Insured with Messrs. Kruse & Co. for $2,000. Insured with Messrs. Kruse & Co. for $2,500. Insured with Messrs. Brockelmann & Co. for $8,000.

Insured with the Netherlands Fire Insurance Company for $12,000.

Insured with the Hamburg Bremen Fire Insurance Company for $4,000.

Insured with Messrs. Siemssen & Co. for

$7,200.

Insured with the Baloise Fire Insurance Company for $10,000 and with the Prussian National Insurance Company for $15,000.

Insured with Messrs. Kruse & Co. for $3,000- and with Messrs. Schellhass & Co. for $2,000.

Not Insured.

Insured with Messrs. Reuter, Brockelmann & Co. for $12,000.

Insured with the Transatlantic Fire Insurance Company for $5,000.

Not Insured.

Not Insured.

Insured with Messrs. Scheele & Co. For $4,500 and with Messrs. Schellhass & Co. for $10,000.

Insured with the London and Lancashire Fire Insurance Company for $5,150. Insured in the North German Fire Insurance Company for $3,000.

Insured in the Office of Messrs. Meyer & Co. for $16,000.

Insured in the Office of Messrs. Bradley & Co. for $1,800.

Insured with Messrs. Schellhass & Co. for $1,400.

H. E. WODEHOUSE, Supt. Fire Brigade.

18 July

1

19 | Aug. 14

20

21

""

21 Oct.

*

10.25 p.m.

10.30 a.m.

3.45 a.m.

No. 123 Queen's Road Central,

No. 59 Square Street, No. 68 Jervois Street,.

:

:

1

$3,000

Unknown,

$500

Do.,

$18,000

Bursting of a kerosine lamp,

2

2 a.m.

No. 9 Sai On Lane,

$200

22 23 24

3

AAA

11.30 p.m.

No. 21 West Sirect,

1

$800

Unknown,

11

6.20 p.m.

No. 2 Ship Street,

1

$200

Careless use of matches,

24

12.10 a.m.

No. 127 Queen's Road West,

:

$15,000

Unknown,

1:3

31

10 p.m.

1

10 p.m.

1

25

26 Nov. 30

27 Dec.

28

7.40 p.m.

No. 32 Bonham Strand,

No. 115 Queen's Road Central,

Go

$4,600

Do.,

1

:

$2,000

Do.,

No. 207 Queen's Road Central,

$8,000

Do.,

29

13

"

11.20 p.m.

5.30 p.m.

No. 183 Hollywood Road,

1

1

$2,000

Upsetting of a kerosine lump,

No. 22 Queen's Road West,

1

:

$100

Unknown,

HONGKONG.

85

No. 3

95

No. 57.

REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF VICTORIA GAOL FOR 1894.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor.

VICTORIA GAOL, SUPERINTENDENT'S OFFICE, HONGKONG, 28th January, 1895.

SIR,-I have the honour to forward for the information of His Excellency the Governor the Annual Report on the Victoria Gaol for 1894.

2. The total number of admissions was 3,913 of which number 753 had been previously convicted. The number of old offenders admitted during the last two years is nearly 49 per cent. less than in

1892.

3. The daily average number confined in the Gaol, was 455 as compared with 458 in 1893. During the months of July, August and September, the daily average number of prisoners was greatly reduced owing to the effect on the Colony of the epidemic of bubonic plague. The numbers for those three months were 401, 398 and 404 respectively. The lowest number in Gaol on any one day was 373 on the 11th August, but as the epidemic disappeared the number increased till the daily total reached 539 on the 10th December.

4. There were 5,120 offences against prison discipline committed during the year being 11.27 offences to each prisoner as compared with 11.15 in 1893.

5. The sanitary state of the Gaol was good. There were 3 cases of bubonic plague, the first case being noticed on the 21st May. The prisoner who was discharged on the afternoon of that day had been 2 days in Gaol. In the second case the prisoner was admitted to Gaol on the 5th June, was admitted to hospital on the 8th and was released on the 14th June. In the third case the prisoner was admitted to Gaol on the 12th June, was admitted to hospital on the 20th and was released on the 21st June. The Gaol Medical Officer informs me that he is of opinion that in no case was the disease contracted in the Gaol. All prisoners were subjected to a searching medical examination on admission before they were told off to cells and every precaution was taken to prevent the disease from spreading. 6. Attention has been directed during the year to the very large number of prisoners on light labour by order of the Medical Officer. The daily average number of these prisoners was 105 or about 23 per cent. of the prisoners in Gaol. This is a very large proportion and under such conlitions the Gaol becomes an asylum.

7. The amount paid into the Treasury during the year on account of industrial labour was $383.33 less than in 1893. This is due to the decreased profit on the oakum sold owing to the further increased cost of paper stuff.

8. The daily average number of females was 14. The want of proper accommodation for female prisoners has been severely felt.

9. The record of casualties in the staff shows that 48 third class Turnkeys, 4 second class Guards and 1 Nurse of the Female Prison joined during the year; 1 second class and 22 third class Turnkeys and 1 second class Guard were dismissed for misconduct; 2 third class Turnkeys deserted and the services of 7 third class Turnkeys were dispensed with being found useless; 2 second class and 9 third class Turnkeys, 1 first class and 1 second class Guard and 1 Nurse of the female prison resigned their appointments; 1 first class Turnkey was invalided; 1 third class Turnkey and 1 Indian Sergeant were pensioned; 1 third class Turnkey was transferred to the Sanitary Department; 2 second class and 4 third class Turnkeys were promoted to the rank of first and second class Turnkeys respectively and 1 second class Guard died.

10. These figures I submit speak for themselves and clearly show how extremely unsatisfactory the condition of the staff was during the year and the necessity for placing it on a better footing without further delay. I was again obliged to ask for the services of some men of the garrison to act as turnkeys, but latterly I have been successful in obtaining a far superior class of men to fill the vacancies. I am glad to be able to report that this perpetual weeding out of the staff has been attended with good results and that the conduct of those serving at the end of the year has been generally satisfactory.

11. The Warden J. JONES retired on a pension on the 1st August. He was an energetic and conscientious officer and served in the prison service for 21 years.

86

12. During the year I have reported fully as to the improvements which should be made in the Gaol. If my recommendations be approved I trust that by the close of the present year the yard space in the male prison will be increased and that proper accommodation will be provided for female prisoners.

13. I forward herewith the usual returns.

The Honourable

THE ACTING COLONIAL SECRETARY.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

H. B. LETHBRIDGE, Superintendent.

(A.)

VICTORIA GAOL.

Return of Reports for talking, idling, short oakum picking, &c., in the years, 1891, 1892, 1893 and 1894.

1891.

1892.

MONTH.

Daily average number | Daily average number

in Prison, 507.

in Prison, 515.

1893. Daily average number in Prison, 458.

1894. Daily average number in Prison, 455.

122 166

January,

252

237

264

February, March,

April, May,

116

316

150

227

351

330

209

202

253

240

180

257

142

198

223

June,

313

129

138

179

July,

427

96

242

211

August,

473

224

211

187

September,

489

142

204

410

October,

397

108

79

441

November,

441

129

94

363

December,

469

259

132

205

Total,..

4,063

2,386

2,282

2,896

(B.)

Return of Offences reported of Prisoners fighting with or assaulting each other, or Officers, for the years 1891, 1892, 1893 and 1894.

MONTH.

1891.

1892.

1893.

1894.

Daily average number Daily average number

in Prison, 507.

in Prison, 515.

Daily average number Daily average number

in Prison, 458.

in Prison, 455.

January, February, March, April,

·

12

10

13

13

9

19

16

5

12

8

12

May,

5

9

9

12

June,

3

6

S

16

July,

7

5

13

August,

17

20

11

September,

11

October,

11

9

11

November,

5

December,.

7

GARRQOHANN

6

3

4

3

1

5

77

Total,

86

114

105

95

87

(C.)

Return of Offences of Prisoners having Tobacco, for the years 1891, 1892, 1893 and 1894.

1891.

1892.

Daily average number Daily average number

in Prison, 507.

in Prison, 515.

1893.

1894.

Daily average number Daily average number

in Prison, 458.

in Prison, 455.

MONTH.

January,

17

16

23

7

February,

March,

April,

24

19

15

18

30

46

11

13

20

18

5

10

May, June, July,

16

8

21

15

15

11

31

23

17

10

August,

25

10

10

10

September,

26

33

6

8

October,

22

58

3

12

November,

12

36

13

6

December,..

10

25

23

5

Total,..

254

307

141

117

(D.)

Comparative Return of Prisoners confined in Victoria Gaol on 31st December, 1891, 31st December, 1892, 31st December, 1893 and 31st December, 1894.

CONVICTION.

1891.

1892.

1893.

1894.

1st,

373

297

324

366

2nd,

50

56

65

63

3rd,

25

27

27

21

4th,

20

19

22

12

5th,

15

11

7

9

6th,

10

12

7

4

7th,

6

5

8th,

9th,

4

10th,

1

11th,

1

12th,

13th,

Total,.

502

441

467

488

(E.)

Abstract of Industrial Labour, Victoria Gaol, for the year, 1894.

Dr.

OAKUM.

Cr.

1894.

To Stock on hand, 1st January, 1894, $ 385.96 1994.

""

Cost of Paper Stuff purchased

>>

By Oakum sold during the year,....

Oakum used for Gaol,

$ 2,369.56

3.25

during the year,

1,988.89

37

Stock on hand, 31st December,

1894,

221.58

Profit,.

219.54

Total,........$

2,594.39

Total,..

.$

2,594.39

COIR.

1894.

17

To Stock on hand, 1st January, 1894, $ 153.53

Cost of Material purchased during

1894.

the year,...

Profit,

603.51

""

555.36

1894,-

Material,

By Matting, &c., sold during the year, $ 1,010.18

Articles made for Gaol use,

Stock on hand, 31st December,

Manufactured Articles,

7.98

205.82 88.42

Total,........$ 1,312.40

Total,........$

1,312.40

88

NET-MAKING.

1894.

""

To Stock on hand, 1st January, 1894, $ Cost of Material purchased during

1.31

1894.

By Nets and Netting sold and re-

paired,

157.60

the year,...

Profit,

126.52

Stock on hand, 31st December,

1894,-

30.59

Material,

.82

Total,........$

158.42

Total,..... .S

158.42

TAILORING.

1894.

To Stock on hand, 1st January, 1891, $ Cost of Material purchased during

3.69

1894.

By Articles sold and repaired,

112.60

Work done for Gaol,

591.37

27

the year,

674.65

Stock on hand, 31st December,

"

1894,-

Profit,........

60.53

Material,

34.90

Total,........$

738.87

Total,.

.$

738.87

PRINTING.

1894.

""

To Stock on hand, 1st January, 1894, $ Cost of Material purchased during

5.95

1894.

By Printing done for outside,

Printing done for Gaol,

24.57

138.90

the year,

16.07

>>

Stock on hand, 31st December, i

1894,-

Profit,.

145.61

Material,

4.16

Total,..

$

Total,.

.$

167.63

167.63

BOOK-BINDING.

1894.

""

Cost of Material purchased during

the year,

To Stock on hand, 1st January, 1894, $ 18.55 1894.

By Book-binding and repairing done

for outside,

224.35

107.57

Profit,.

136.09

Book-binding and repairing done

for Gaol,

Stock on hand, 31st December,

30.15

Total,..

$

262.21

SHOE-MAKING.

1894.

To Stock on hand, 1st January, 1894, $ 12.92

Cost of Material purchased during

1894.

13

the year,

40.12

""

Profit,.

23.86

1894,-

Material,

7.71

Total,.

262.21

By Articles sold and repaired during

the year,.

Work done for Gaol,

Stock on hand, 31st December,

$$$

33.90

31.20

1894,-

Material,

1.80

Manufactured Articles, -

10.00

Total,..

$

76.90

Total,........$

76.90

WASHING.

1894.

"}

To Stock on hand, 1st January, 1894, $ Cost of Material purchased during

14.32

1894.

By Washing done for which cash

was received,.

$

3.67

the year,

644.03

""

Washing done for Prison Officers

at 1 cent per piece,

398.89

Profit,...

636.78

""

Washing Prisoners' Clothing at

1 cent per piece,

865.36

Stock on hand, 31st December,

1894,-

Material,

27.21

Total,.

1,295.13

Total,..

1,295.13

GRASS MATTING.

:

89

1894.

To Stock on hand, 1st January, 1894, $ 5.09

1894.

27

Cost of Material purchased during

27

the year,

Profit,...

39.13

"2

By Matting sold during the year,.

Matting made for Gaol use,. Stock on hand, 31st December,

1894,-

$

29.82

12.08

3.87

Material,

6.19

Total,..

$

48.09

RATTAN.

1894.

To Stock on hand, 1st January, 1894, | $ Cost of Material purchased during

16.99

1894.

the year,

31.97

Profit,...

12.02

Total,.

60.98

TIN-SMITHING.

Total,.

$

By Articles sold during the year,.

Articles made for Gaol use,.

Stock on hand, 31st December,

1894,-

Material,

Manufactured Articles,..

JA

48.09

43.10 10.08

1.30

6.50

Total,

.$

60.98

1894.

25

To Stock on hand, 1st January, 1894, $ Cost of Material purchased during

1.43

1894.

By Work done for outside,

3.20

Work done for Gaol,.

14.08

""

the year,

16.65

"

Stock on hand, 31st December,

1894,-

Material,

.80

Total,

18.08

Total,..

.$

18.08

CARPENTERING.

1894.

>>

To Stock on hand, 1st January, 1894, $ Cost of Material purchased during

4.79 1891.

the year,

86.30

1894.

Oakuin, Coir, Net-making, Tailoring,

Printing,

Bookbinding,

Shoemaking,

Washing,..

Grass Matting, Rattan Work, Tin-smithing, Carpentering,

Total,.

91.09

By Articles sold and repaired during

the year,

多少

Work done for Gaol,

Stock on hand, 31st December,

1894,-

Material,

RECAPITULATION.

CA

$

21.91 67.35

1.83

Total,........$

91.09

$ 219.54

1894. By Surplus,

....

$ 1,824.25

555.36

30.59

60.53

145.61

136.09

23.86

636.78

3.87 12.02

Total,. . . . . .

.$ 1,824.25

Total,........$

1,824.25

79

No. 1

95

HONGKONG.

REPORT BY MESSRS. COODE SON & MATTHEWS ON THE GAP ROCK LIGHTHOUSE.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor.

GAP ROCK LIGHTHOUSE.

HONGKONG, 10th January, 1895.

SIR, Ou the 21st November last, Mr. MATTHEWS, who was at that time engaged on professional business at Colombo, was informed by the Colonial Secretary of Ceylon that His Excellency the Governor of that Colony, had received a cablegram from His Excellency the Governor of Hongkong, enquiring if he (Mr. MATTHEWS) could visit the last named Colony for the purpose of inspecting the Gap Rock Lighthouse.

2. Upon subsequently ascertaining that such an investigation would be practicable, having regard to other engagements previously fixed in the Cape Colony, Mr. MATTHEWS left Colombo on 19th ultimo, arriving at Hongkong on 1st instant, where he was met by the Director of Public Works, who kindly furnished plans and reports giving full particulars of the Gap Rock Lighthouse and the works in connection therewith.

3. Inspection of Gap Rock.-After perusing the last named papers Mr. MATTHEWS, accompanied by the Director of Public Works and the Harbour Master, visited the Gap Rock on 3rd instant, and very carefully examined the existing Tower with its lantern and apparatus, and also the European and Chinese Quarters. The peculiar configuration of the Rock with the Gap on the east and on the west faces was particularly noted as also the spur on the south-east end of the Rock and the effect of the same considered in the concentration of the sea and the diversion of the waves into the eastern gap during typhoon periods.

4. Instructions for Report.-On 5th instant we received from you definite instructions relative to the points upon which our opinion is more particularly requested. These are-

(i) As to the establishment of a permanent lighthouse on the Gap Rock, having due regard

to the practicability of retaining, as far as possible, the existing buildings.

(ii) As to efficiently maintaining such buildings and the light, including staff and service

between Hongkong and the Gap Rock.

5. General description of Rock, Lighthouse and Buildings.-Gap Rock is about 30 miles south- west of Hongkong. The centre of the Rock runs about north-east and south-west and is 440 feet in length in this direction. About midway there is a gap on either side of the centre, the inner ends of which converge until at the connecting ridge between the northern and southern portions the Rock is only 10 feet, or thereabouts, in width. The axis of the southern patch extends north-west and south-east and is 480 feet across in this direction. This section of the Rock consists of a mass rising to a height of 94 feet 6 inches above mean sea level, flanked on the south-east side by a spur of 220 feet in length. The north-east face of this spur is practically vertical for a height of 35 feet, whilst the adjacent face of the gap rises 75 feet, in a horizontal width of 50 feet. It follows from this extremely unfavourable configuration of the eastern gap and spur of rock that any seas from north- east around to south-east are concentrated into a funnel-shaped cavity, thereby intensifying even the abnormally severe waves which are associated with the occurrence of typhoons.

6. The northern portion of the Rock is of much more favourable shape, being practically circular and of 280 feet in diameter at its base. It rises to 74 feet 6 inches above mean sea level, where there is a flat area of 100 feet by 80 feet. A small section of this Rock, at the northern portion of the plateau, rises to a further height of 10 feet.

7. The gap on the western face between the two sections of the Rock is less exposed than that on the eastern side and is of a much more favourable shape. We do not therefore apprehend that any damage would arise to the Lighthouse and Buildings in consequence of the existence of this gap.

8. The landing place has been rightly fixed on the western face which is generally the side on which most shelter is to be found.

9. The Lighthouse and Quarters for the Keepers, both European and Chinese, have been erected on the crest of the southern portion of the Rock, the Tower being about 60 feet from the eastern gap, to the exposure of which we have alluded.

10. The whole of the buildings are of brickwork faced with granite. They consist mainly of a Light Tower 32 feet 6 inches in height flanked by the European Quarters. This last named structure is of oblong form 38 feet in length, 18 feet in breadth, and 30 feet in height. It contains a base- ment having store and water tank, these being surmounted by two floors for the accommodation

80

of the Keepers. Northward of this last named block and connected therewith by a short passage, a further building has been erected for use by the Chinese Assistant Keepers and by the Telegraph Clerk. This structure is also of rectangular shape and measures 43 feet 6 inches in length, 20 feet 9 inches in width, and 22 feet in height.

11. The lantern and apparatus were prepared by Messrs. CHANCE BROTHERS, the former has flat glass and is not, in our opinion, of so good a form as the helical frame lantern with circular glazing, which has been adopted by the Trinity House. We may, however, observe, in this connection, that had the circular glazing been adopted, we are of opinion that the damage which was caused by the Typhoon of October 1893 would not have been averted. The apparatus is of the usual form for a light of this character. It is of the first order, dioptric, giving a flashing light at half minute intervals. The focal plane is 141 feet 8 inches above mean sea level and the light is visible, in clear weather about 20 miles.

12. The light was first shown in the early part of April 1892, and has since been continuously exhibited with the exception of one night, viz., on 2nd October, 1893, after the typhoon which oaused the damage.

13. The cost of the Lighthouse, buildings, apparatus, etc., complete, exclusive of the expenditure incurred in the purchase of the attendant tug Fame, was $145,000.

14. Importance of Light.--The light on the Gap Rock is an extremely important one in the interests of navigation. It is "made" by vessels approaching Hongkong from the South, and also indicates the position of the islands and rocks to vessels leaving the Port southward. It is evident from a perusal of the papers that Gap Rock was decided upon as the best position for the light only after the most mature deliberation, strong reasons for fixing on this Rock for the then proposed lighthouse will be found in the letters from Commodore MORANT, R.N., and the Surveyor General, dated respectively 30th September and 20th November, 1886. Although therefore the Gap is unquestionably a most exposed site for a lighthouse and the configuration of the Rock, as we have pointed out, is unfavourable, still it would appear highly undesirable to remove the light to a less exposed position, in view of the strong reasons which were given in favour of erection on its present site, putting aside the prolonged negotiations which had to be conducted with the Chinese Government before the present position was definitely fixed, and which would have to be re-opened were it decided to remove the light to one of the larger adjacent islands.

15. Damage caused by typhoon of October 1893.-The Director of the Hongkong Observatory in a letter dated 20th October, 1893, pointed out that it was blowing with typhoon force at the Gap Rock from the morning of 2nd October, until the early morning hours on the 3rd, also that the typhoon was one of exceptional severity at the Gap and that the disaster was greatly intensified by the unusually great length of time the blow lasted. It would also appear from this letter that the Gap Rock lies very near the track of the worst typhoons that have been felt in the Colony.

16. We have been informed by Mr. CHARLES NICHOLAS, the Senior Keeper, who was on the Rock when the typhoon occurred, that the chief damage was caused about noon on 2nd October; this consisted mainly in the breaking of four panes of lantern glass, inch in thickness, on the east side, three centre panels of the apparatus destroyed and one damaged; one upper panel of prisms broken and others slightly damaged, three bottom panels of prisms slightly fractured. Sundry damage was occasioned to the doors, windows and other details connected with the buildings as described in the report by the Director of Public Works dated 16th October, 1893.

17. In consequence of the damage to the lantern and apparatus no light was exhibited, as we have previously named, on 2nd October. On 3rd three lamps were rigged temporarily by the Keepers and the light was partially shown; it was only, however, on two or three days after the disaster, that the flashes could be exhibited with approximate regularity.

18. Upon reference to the log kept at the Rock, it would appear that from 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. on 2nd October, which covers the period when the damage occurred, the wind was from east, thus, when the typhoon was at its height, the gap and spur must have assisted in a material degree to produce the disaster, in consequence of the latter directing the seas into the funnel, which were then concen- trated and shot on to the Lighthouse and buildings.

19. Although it is patent now from experience, what serious results can be produced by the spur and gap, we can fully realize the disadvantages under which the original designers of the Lighthouse and buildings laboured from the limited knowledge of the Rock which was all that was then available.

20. Upon the occurrence of the disaster, both the Director of Public Works and the Harbour Master adopted, with the least possible delay, such measures as were necessary for the reinstating and service of the light in an efficient manner, strong iron shutters have also been fitted to the most exposed of the windows in the quarters.

21. Whilst on this point we may observe, that it is not, in our opinion, practicable to adopt efficient measures for protecting the lantern glass during typhoons. Any protection of this kind which might be provided could not be fixed with such readiness and certainty as is imperative under the extremely adverse conditions which would prevail; and moreover if it were possible so to shield the lantern, the efficiency of the light to the mariner must inevitably be impaired thereby at a time when it is most required.

A

22. Typhoon of October last typhoon, also of exceptional severity, occurred on 5th October last. On this occasion the direction of the wind during the height of the typhoon varied from east to

81

-south-south-west. The full force of the seas therefore fell on the southern face of the Rock when the spur would act as a protection to the eastern gap. Mr. NICHOLAS, who was on the Rock during both typhoons, confirms, by his observations of the direction of the seas, the views we have above expressed. In consequence of the full force of the typhoon being more southerly in October last than during the previous typhoon, the circumstance is entirely due that practically no damage was produced by the former whilst the latter was peculiarly disastrous.

منست

23. Previous Reports. Two reports have been prepared by the Director of Public Works bearing on the foregoing subject, these documents are dated 16th and 25th October, 1893, respectively, and show clearly the extent of the damage caused by the typhoon and the conditions which attended the disaster.

24. On 8th August last the Engineer to the Trinity Corporation, to whom the matter had been referred, reported, inter alia, that the Buildings offer great resistance to the sea and that in his opinion they are inadequate for such an exceptionally exposed position. The report concludes with the following paragraphs :—

"I am of opinion it would have been preferable had the Lighthouse been erected at the north "end of the Rock, as it will be seen from the formation of this site that it is well "protected and only broken water, to a harmless extent, could, at any time, have "surrounded a building so placed. The Tower should also, I consider, have been treated "as a Rock Lighthouse, constructed of cylindrical form and having a cylindrical lantern

as used in the Corporation service."

**

"A repetition of the damage recently experienced might not improbably be averted by "filling the gully on the east side, previously referred to, and the removal of the cause- way at the end of the gully which would have the effect of easing the sea over the "Rock. I regret to state, however, that even if this were successfully carried out, "which would involve considerable expenditure, the safety of the existing Lighthouse "and premises would still remain a source of anxiety."

RECOMMENDATIONS.

25. Accompanying Drawings.-This report is accompanied by two drawings* marked No. 1 and No. 2 respectively.

26. Drawing No. 1 shows a plan of the Gap Rock with contour lines at each 10 feet in height. These bring out the configuration of the Rock, as far as it is practicable to do so, although without an inspection, it is difficult to grasp the effect which the sea would have on the gaps and more particularly that on the eastern face. The sheet also shows by red colour the new position which we propose for the Lighthouse and the European Quarters.

27. Drawing No. 2 shows general views of the New Tower and Quarters, from which their scope and character and the mode of construction proposed to be adopted will be readily understood. The details indicated on this sheet are, of course, subject to modification by the Director of Public Works upon preparing the larger scale drawings from which the structures would be executed. This sheet also shows a longitudinal section whereon the new Lighthouse and works are coloured red, whereas those portions of the existing buildings which we consider should be removed are crossed by red lines.

28. New Tower. Upon referring to the drawings it will be observed, that we propose to build a new Tower on the northern portion of the Rock. It would be a cylindrical structure, generally of 14 feet internal diameter, the walls being of massive proportions and consisting of brickwork faced with granite. It would rest on a heavy base and sub-base of granite and concrete, coming well within the edge of the plateau at the crest of the Rock to which reference has been made. The Tower would carry a new lantern of cylindrical form, furnished with helical framing and circular glazing, all of the most recent type as adopted by the Trinity Corporation. The existing apparatus would be re-fixed in the new Tower, so that the character of the light would remain unchanged. Efficient arrangements would have to be adopted for the exhibition of a temporary light during the carrying out of the modifications. The focal plane of the apparatus, when re-fixed, would be 150 feet above mean sea level, as compared with 141 feet 8 inches as at present, a modification, which whilst necessary for construction purposes, would not exercise any material effect on the light.

29. New Quarters for Europeans.-To the north-west of the new Tower and abutting thereon, we propose to erect quarters for three European Keepers. The building would be one story only in height and would rest on a lower base corresponding with that which carries the Tower. Underneath the floors a large tank would be provided for the storage of fresh water caught from the roofs. The accommodation afforded by the new quarters would be practically the same as that now provided with regard to space and air, but the walls would be much heavier and the block of buildings placed on the lee side of the Tower facing Ladrone Islands and the mainland, where they would be in shelter.

30. Having regard to the heat during the summer season, when the day temperature within the existing buildings is from 86° to 88°, we are opinion that external quarters for the Keepers are in this case imperative, as distinguished from quarters within Rock Towers as provided at home, where the heat is less severe. Moreover, in this case no disadvantage will arise, or source of weakness result, from the adoption of external quarters of the character suggested and shown on the drawings.

* Not printed.

82

31. Removal of Existing Buildings.-The existing Lighthouse Tower, as also the block of build- ings abutting thereon, would be removed to the level of the ground floor, at which level a new and substantial flat roof would be provided, so that water may be collected therefrom and from the other block of buildings, and discharged into the existing Tank, which lies under the present quarters of the European Keepers. It will be observed from the section on drawing No. 2, that when the build- ings have been removed as proposed, no obstacle will be presented to the free exhibition of the new light.

We

32. The connecting passage between the European and Chinese quarters would also be removed, but not the block of buildings constituting the last named quarters and the telegraph room. propose that these buildings, the roof of which is at such a level as not to obstruct the new light seaward, should remain intact. During typhoons, the Chinese Assistants would, when necessary, for the two or three days when storms prevail, be housed in one of the rooms of the Tower itself.

33. New Landing Place.-As considerable difficulty and not a little danger sometimes attends landing on and departure from the Rock, we are of opinion that a second landing place, furnished with a derrick, might with advantage be provided to the southward of the existing landing, in the position suggested by Captain RUMSEY. From this new landing a zig-zag path would have to be formed up the face of the Rock, leading to the present causeway.

34. General remarks with regard to the proposal.—It is to us a subject of extreme regret, that we have been unable to put forward any project for adoption which involves the maintenance of the existing Tower and the European Quarters. We concur in the views expressed by the Engineer to the Trinity Corporation, that the north end of the Rock is the proper site for the Tower and that as long as the Lighthouse and buildings remain in their present position, they will prove a source of anxiety and expense. In a matter of such moment there ought, in our view, to be no uncertainty with regard to the satisfactory and continuous exhibition of the light. If it sometimes fails when most required, viz., during storms, instead of being a means of safety, it might become a positive source of danger to the mariner. This is so well recognized at home, that no expense is spared to remedy proved defects in the lighthouse service around the coasts of Great Britain, and we would urge that a similar policy is the only satisfactory one to pursue in the present instance.

35. We have carefully considered both on the Rock, and subsequently, if the difficulties attendant on this case could be removed, to the requisite extent, by filling up the eastern gap, so as to ease the run of the sea therein. We are of opinion, after an inspection of the site and an examination of the configuration and character of the rocks, that the difficulties attendant upon the execution of such a slope would be exceptionally great, particularly at the toe where some work below low water level would be required. We consider that the cost of such a slope, including the formation of the toe, would exceed that of the execution of the proposals which we have put forward for adoption. We also entertain considerable doubt, as to whether the toe could be permanently executed in such an exposed position, the rocks at this spot being waterworn to a glassy surface sloping outwards. For the foregoing reasons we much regret that we are unable to devise any satisfactory form of treatment for the dissipation of the seas falling into the eastern gap.

your

36. Estimate.It is not practicable to arrive at more than an approximate estimate of the cost of the proposed works in consequence of the difficulties attendant upon the landing of the men and materials, and the extent to which the operations will be governed by the seasons. We believe, however, that an expenditure of $139,000 will be found sufficient for the satisfactory execution of the works proposed. 37. As to the maintenance of the Buildings and the Light.-With reference to the second head in letter of 5th instant, we would recommend that the services of the present European Keepers be retained, or that other experienced men from the Trinity service be engaged in lieu of them on the expiration of their agreements, provided suitable arrangement cannot be made with the existing Keepers or that they may be unwilling to remain. In such an exposed position, where as in the case of the typhoon of October 1893, the Keepers may be required to act on their own responsibility, it is most important that only experienced Europeans should be in charge. The Chinese Assistants would, we take it, continue to be employed as hitherto.

38. With regard to the services of a Tug for the relief and provisioning of the Keepers, the conveyance of stores, and the making of inspections, etc., although, of course, it is a matter of consider- able importance, that adequate provision in these respects should be made, it appears to us that this is a question which can be better dealt with by the Harbour Master, and with reference to which he will, no doubt, be glad to furnish such information as may be desired.

39. Conclusion. In conclusion, we have to express our thanks to the Director of Public Works and the Harbour Master for the assistance they so courteously rendered in the making of our inspection and subsequent thereto. Our thanks are especially due to Mr. COOPER for the readiness with which he has at all times aided us and for the assistance rendered by his staff in the preparation of the accompanying drawings and the Bill of Quantities upon which the foregoing estimate is based.

We have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your obedient Servants,

The Honourable

THE ACTING COLONIAL SECRETARY.

COODE SON & MATTHEWS.

HONGKONG.

99

No. 9

5

95

LETTER No. 385 OF THE 27TH FEBRUARY FROM THE ACTING COLONIAL SECRETARY TO THE HARBOUR MASTER RELATIVE TO THE ALLEGED EXISTENCE OF

CORRUPTION IN THE HARBOUR DEPARTMENT.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of

His Excellency the Governor.

No. 385.

SIR,

COLONIAL SECRETARY'S OFFICE,

HONGKONG, 27th February, 1895.

With reference to paragraph 12, of page 56, of the Evidence appended to the Report of the Retrenchment Committee, I am directed to inform you that Mr. THOMSON denies the accuracy of the words therein attributed to him by the Chairman, but admits having made a confidential statement before the Emigration Committee to the effect that from current reports amongst the Chinese, of which he, as Acting Registrar General, was informed confidentially, there was a certain amount of reason to believe that corruption existed in the passing of emigrants.

As, however, no proof appears to be forthcoming in support of the accuracy of such rumours, I am to state that the Government cannot place any credence therein, and I am to express regret that by inadvertence publicity was given to what appeared to be a charge of corruption but which, on investigation, is found to be the repetition of mere rumours unsupported by a vestige of evidence.

I am to add that this letter will be laid on the table at the next meeting of the Legislative Council.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

The Honourable

THE HARBOUR MASTER.

J. H. STEWART LOCKHART,

Acting Colonial Secretary.

No. 75.

HONGKONG.

THE HARBOUR MASTER'S REPORT FOR 1894.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of

His Excellency the Governor.

237

No. 17

95

HARBOUR DEPARTMENT,

HONGKONG, 11th February, 1895.

SIR,-I have the honour to forward the Annual Returns for this Department for the year ending 31st December, 1894.

I. Number, Tonnage, Crews, and Cargoes of Vessels entered. II. Number, Tonnage, Crews, and Cargoes of Vessels cleared.

III. Number, Tonnage and Crews of Vessels of each Nation entered.

IV. Number, Tonnage and Crews of Vessels of each Nation cleared.

V. Total Number, Tonnage, Crews, and Cargoes of Vessels entered at cach Port. VI. Total Number, Tonnage, Crews, and Cargoes of Vessels cleared at each Port. VII. Return of Junks entered from Macao.

VIII. Return of Junks cleared for Macao.

IX. Return of Junks entered at each Port from China and Formosa.

X. Return of Junks cleared at each Port for China and Formosa.

XI. Grand Total Number of Junks entered at each Port.

XII. Grand Total Number of Junks cleared at each Port.

XIII. Return of Junks (Local Trade) entered.

XIV. Return of Junks (Local Trade) cleared.

XV. Summary of Arrivals and Departures of all Vessels.

XVI. Return of Vessels registered.

XVII. Return of Vessels Struck off the Register.

XVIII. Amount of Fees received under Table B of Ordinance 26 of 1891.

XIX. Return of Chinese Passenger Ships cleared by the Emigration Officer.

XX. Return of Vessels bringing Chinese Passengers to Hongkong from places out of

China.

XXI. Return of Marine Cases tried.

XXII. Diagram of Tonnage of Vessels entered.

XXIII. Return of the work performed by the Government Marine Surveyor.

XXIV. Return from Imports and Exports (Opium) Office.

SHIPPING.

2. The total of arrivals and sailings amounted to 14,248,670 tons, or a decrease on 1893 of of 100,452 tons. There were 31,470 arrivals with a tonnage of 7,123,748 tons, and 31,321 departures of 7,124,922 tons.

The decrease in tonnage in European constructed vessels is 66,677 tons, the numerical decrease is 306; and although 106 of these latter are British, still British shipping on the whole shows an actual increase of 46,201 tons, the increase in the size of ships as indicated last year, having been continued.

The foreign junk trade shows a decrease of 1,336 vessels measuring 5,883 tons, here also an increase in individual bulk is indicated. If the decrease was fairly apportioned, tonnage to numbers, the decrease of 1,336 would average slightly over 4 tons a-piece, whilst the 45,861 actually shown averages a trifle under 76 tons a-piece. Similarly the decrease in the local junk trade (1,408 vessels measuring 27,892 tons) seems to indicate the retirement of the smaller craft, the decrease averaging slightly over 19 tons a-piece, and the vessels engaged averaging over 35 tons a-piece, presumably there- fore increased size means increased economy even with Chinese craft.

238

3. The following statement shows how the amount of shipping is apportioned.

Comparative Shipping Return for the Years 1893 and 1894.

1893.

1894.

INCREASE.

DECREASE.

Ships. Tonnage. Ships. Tonnage. Ships. Tonnage. Ships. Tonnage.

British, Foreign,

.....

Junk in Foreign

Trade,....

6,128 7,732,195 6.022 7,778,396 2,630 2,803,664| 2,430| 2,690,786 47,197 3,488.007 45,861|| 3,182,124

46,201

106

200 112,878

1,336 5,883

Total,

55,955|14,023,866 54,313 13,951,306

Junks in Local Trade,.......

9,886 325,256 8,478 297,364

1,408 27,892

Grand Total....65,841 | 14,349,122 62,791 | 14,248,670

46,201 3,050 | 146,653

NET......

3,050 100,452

4. The 1,646 British ships, exclusive of river steamers, that entered the port in 1894, carried 11,402 British officers and 197 foreigners as follows:-

British, American,

Austrians,

Danes,

Germans,

Portuguese, Swedes,

.11,402

83

18

12

32

31

21

11,599

100 of the British officers belonged to the Royal Naval Reserve 14 of them being engineers.

The 1,214 foreign ships, exclusive of river steamers, that entered in 1894, carried 856 British officers:-

In American ships,..

""

Chinese German Japanese

5.9

35

18

..552

30

,256

856

5. The number of European constructed vessels, exclusive of river steamers, that entered the port during the year is shown in the following tables, distinction being drawn between (i) those that entered eight times and less, or on an average at intervals of six weeks; (ii) those that entered from nine to twelve times, i.e., on an average once a month, and (iii) those that entered thirteen times and oftener, or more frequently than once a month.

The second table divides the steamers into nationalities, and gives the numbers of ships and num- bers of entries for each.

EIGHT TIMES AND UNDER.

THIRTEEN TIMES

NINE TO TWELVE.

TOTAL.

AND OVER.

FLAG.

Ships.

No. of times

enter- ed.

Steam

Total Ships. Tonnage.

No. of times Sailing

No. of times

enter- ed.

Total Tonnage.

Ships.

enter- Ed.,

Steam Total Ships. Tonnage.

No. of times enter- ed.

¡No. of

Steam

Steam Total Tonnage.

times

and Sail

Ships.

British.

211 734 1,264,777

American,

6

20

44,723

22

32 40 48.004 25

258 310,773

28

614

629,096

enter-

Total

ed. Tonnage.

2961,646 | 2,252,710

32

35 45,202

38

55 89,925

Austrian,

6

22

57,223

:

G

Chinese,

13

48

37,917

9 8,442 2

49

Danish,

1,788

595

98

73,788 $2,506

22 57,223 16 106 120,147

102

41,889

Dutch,

15

19.295

:..

6

15

19,295

French,

11

60 112,139

2

40,645

13

115

152,784

German,

47 187 281,200

Italian,

13

19,238

52

3,295 1,578

95

77,603

17

352

311,882

78

639

£73,980

5

16

20,816

Japanese,

18

49

76,735

18

49

76,735

Norwegian,

10

25

20,578

4

1,848

1

11 22,154 2

33,783

15

$5

78,363

Nicaraguan,

1

673

1

673

Russian,

1

2.785

1

Siamese,

1

656

2,785

656

Spanish, Hawaiian,

2

4

2,448

1

70

:

:

2

2,505

2,518

2,505

Total.......

3351,181 1,940,846 79

93 | 104,486

36

373 418,972 511,213 1,131,700

501 2,860 3,596,004

NO. OF ENTRIES.

ARRIVALS-STEAMERS, 1894.

239

TOTAL.

British.

American.

Austrian.

Chinese.

Danish.

Dutch.

French.

German.

Italian.

Japanese.

Norwegian.

Russian.

Spanish.

Ships.

Entries.

One,

48

2

1

Two,

33

1

Three,

36

1

pred 2N

1

773

748

Four,

35

4

:

Five,

22

2

1

Six,

12

Seven,

10

271

7

4

1

3

2

1

2

1

- Cot

3

1

Eight,

15

Nine,.. Ten,

9

1

2

Eleven,

11

Twelve,

Thirteen,

5

Fourteen,

4

Fifteen,..

Sixteen,

}

Seventeen,

1

Eighteen,

3

Nineteen,

1

Twenty,

Twenty-one,..

Twenty-two,

1

Twenty-three,

1

Twenty-four,

1

Twenty-five,

1

Twenty-six,...

1

1

1

Twenty-seven,

1

1

Twenty-eight,

1

Twenty-nine,

1

Thirty,

2

Thirty-one,

1

Thirty-two,

1

Thirty-five,

1

Thirty-six,

I

1

...

'Thirty-seven, Forty-two,

1

2

::

1

75

75

2

56

112

::

47 141

53

212

39

195

29

174

16

112

20

160

13

117

2

20

4

1

16

176

2

5

60

1

6

78

1

70

30

1

64

17

3

108

1

19

2

3

60

1

1

21

2

44

1

23

1

24

1

25

3

78

54

84

29

60

31

1

32

3

105

1

36

1

37

84

264

6

6

16

6 13 73 3 18

13

1

2

425 2,767

6. In European constructed vessels the general import trade from places other than China and adjacent countries was as follows:-

Vessels with cargo.

Vessels in bullast. Cargo discharged.

Cargo transit.

Tons

Tons

Tons

Tons

British, Foreign,

1,108,500

3,859

987.047

578,259

522,100

6,817

452,667

227,285

Total,

.....1,630,600

10,676

1,439,714

805,544

from places in and adjacent to China the imports were---

Vessels with cargo.

Vessels in ballast. Cargo discharged.

Cargo transit.

Tons

Tons

Tons

Tons

British,............................. Foreign,

2,671,713

105,780

813,573

361,310

736,345

78,032

492,998

302,990

Total, .....3,408,058

183,812

1,306,571

664,300

240

The general export trade was as follows, to places other than China and adjacent countries: —

Bunker Coal.

Vessels with cargo. Vessels in ballast.

Cargo shipped.

Tons

Tons

Tons

Tons

British, Foreign,

681,378

99,445

528,172

51,675

339,879

77,243

271,102

39,502

Total.

.1,021,257

176,688

799,274

91,177

To places in and adjacent to China the exports were-

Vessels with cargo.

Tons

Vessels in ballast.

Cargo shipped.

Bunker Coal.

Tons

Tons

Tons

British,

.2,934,937

172,784

474,962

162,842

Foreign,

784,673

145,697

324,352

99,436

Total, ......3,719,610

318,481

799,314

262,278

Comparing tonnage of the above with 1893, we get as follows:---

Import tonnage.

Increase.

From places other than China, &c.,.. From China and adjacent countries,

Total Decrease,.............

Decrease.

10,014

23,189

33,203

Export tonnage.

To places other than China, &c.,

To China and adjacent places,

Increase.

Decrease.

100,490

67,016

Nett Decrease,.

33,474

JUNKS.

:

7. Compared with the average of the past three years, the foreign junk trade shows an increase of 167,724 tons and a decrease of 69 vessels, the increased size of all the newer craft has already been noted. The local trade for the same period has decreased 187,774 tons with 4,966 vessels.

8. The foreign junk trade for 1894 shows a decrease from the previous year of 1,336 vessels and 5,883 tons, doubtless more or less directly due to the Plague.

9. The decrease in the local trade for 1894 below 1893, of 1,408 vessels with 27,892 tons, is the result also of the Plague, and partly of the decrease in work on the Praya Reclamation.

TRADE.

10. 4,132 steamers, 93 sailing vessels and 23,023 junks arrived during the year, giving a daily average of 75 vessels arriving as against 90 the previous year. For European constructed vessels the average daily entries would be 11.57 as against in 1893, 11.97. Of the steamers 71.9% were British, and 33 were River craft, all of which latter were also British.

11. The trade of the Colony in 1894 was influenced by two special and memorable events, viz., the Plague and the War.

It is difficult, if not impossible, yet to apportion the respective "spheres of influence" of these two events, for some time they ran concurrently, though perhaps with contrary results. There can, however, be no doubt as to which influence made itself most felt.

The port was proclaimed infected with bubonic plague on 10th May, and the shipping returns for that quarter showed a decrease in arrivals of 51 European vessels and 251 junks. It was not, however, until later that the full effect on shipping was made apparent, and the September quarter showed an additional falling off of 375 European vessels and 1,824 junks. During this quarter both influences were at work, and, until the 12th September, our shipping trade remained under a ban. With the raising of the " quarantine blockade," however, things began to improve, and at the end of December we had reduced our deficit in arrivals for the year to 306 European vessels and 1,336 junks.

241

12. The river steamers, during the second half of the year, show a decrease of 27 entries aggregating 10,036 tons, owing in a great measure to the restriction on this branch of trade unavoidably made by the method adopted of examining all vessels, as far as practicable, arriving from the Canton River and its neighbourhood.

These river steamers, on the other hand, had the benefit of the general exodus of Chinese from Hongkong and their subsequent return, and though the passenger returns were not so good as in the previous year, they yet reached the very respectable total of 941,958 carried. Some of these vessels also minimised their losses by a special mode of retrenchment, as remarkable for its ingenuity as for the small result attained. The "night boats" (which are the only ones which pay light dues and that at very reduced rate) finding that they would not be permitted to enter the harbour until the passengers had been medically inspected, remained in Chinese waters until daylight absolved them by law from paying their small contribution to the revenue of the Colony, the saving thus effected aggregated $1,204.44. The report would not be complete without my mentioning that there was one "night boat" which did not adopt this plan and she was the Chinese owned Tai On.

13. The following tables illustrate the result of the combined influences at work during the year:-

ARRIVALS, 1894.

1ST QUARTER.

2ND QUARTER.

3RD QUARTER.

4TH QUARTER.

FLAG.

No.

Tonnage.

No.

Tonnage.

No.

Tonnage.

No.

Tonnage.

British,

449

598,605

419

589,163

343

475,795

395

540,088

American,

4

10,484

7

12,531

4

11,073

5

10,635

Austrian,.

6

15,653

6

15,154

4

10,716

6

15,600

Chinese,

51

55,797

44

50,874

11

12,711

1

765

Danish,

23

9,770

26

11,462

24

10,366

28

12,696

Dutch,

4

6,118

5

7,496.

1

1,490

5

4,191

French,

33

40,123

27

37,925

25

34,525

German,

155

164,100

165

173,884

136

148,372

178

Italian,

4

5,830

3

4,414

3

4,497

Japanese,

27

39,796

16.

25,799

6

11,140

Norwegian,

28

20,599

19

20,709

16

15,370

Russian,

1

2,785

Spanish,

2

...

1,376

༧::ས

30

3

40,211 184,329 4,497

18

19,837

2

1,172

Total,..

785

969,660

739

950,787

573

736,055

671

834,016

STEAMERS

STEAMERS

1ST QUARTER, 1893. 1ST QUARTER, 1894.

INCREASE.

DECREASE.

FLAG.

No. Tonnage. No.

Tonnage.

No. Tonnage. No. Tonnage.

British,

402

536,801

449

598,605

47

61,804

American,

3

7,355

4

10,484

Austrian,..

4

8,968

6

15,653

Chinese,

41

51,209

51

55,797

120

3,129

6,685

4,588

...

Danish,

26

11,745

23

9,770

3

1,975

Dutch,

3

3,731

4

6,118

1

2,387

French,

18

30,445

33

40,123

15

9,678

German,

161

161,858

155

164,100

2,242

Co

Italian,

3

4,497

5,830

1

Japanese,

11

15,508

27

39,796

16

1,333 24,288

Norwegian,

16

21,432

28

20,599

12

833

Russian,

1

2,785

1

2,785

Spanish,

...

...

3

1,962

:

3

1,962

Total,.......

691

855,511

785

969,660

106

118,919

12

4,770

It will be seen from the second of these tables that 1894 opened very favourably, the first quarter showing a nett increase of 94 vessels of 114,149 tons, and thus that, at one time, there might have been expected an increase over last year of three quarters of a million of tons in European constructed vessels, which would almost certainly have brought in its train a corresponding increase in the junk trade. Unfortunately, from causes already referred to, this expectation was not realized.

242

Trade of the Port of Hongkong for the Year ending 31st December, 1894 :—

British,...

TONS.

No. of ships.

Dis- charged.

Shipped. In Transit.

Bunker Coal Shipped.

Total.

Registered Tonnage.

PASSENGERS

CARRIED.

Foreign,

River Steamers (British),.

Total,..

3,293 1,679,945 * 909,356 2,430 945,665 595,454 2,729 120,675 93,778

939,569 194,313

3,723,183 4,503,069

248,880

530,275

138,938 20,201

2,210,332 | 2,690,786

93,868

234,657 3,275,327 | 1,041,958

8,452

Junks in Foreign Trade,

Junks in Local Trade,

45,861

2,746,285 | 1,598,588 | 1,469,844

437,307818,911

220,948

Total,..

54,313

8,478

3,183,592 2,417,499 | 1,469,844

90,964 9,597

Grand Total,..

62,791 3,274,556 | 2,427,096 | 1,469,844

*

7,495 tons Kerosine, 2,900 tons Rice.

353,455 6,168,172 10,469,182 | 1,384,706

1,256,218 3,482,124

353,455 7,424,390 13,951,306 1,605,654 100,561 297,364 10,893

353,455 7,524,951 14,248,670 | 1,616,547

9,248 tons Kerosine, 1,800 tons Rice, 135 tons Gunpowder, 1,000 Rifles, 1,000 Bayonets, and 2,000,000 Cartridges. 19,941 tons Kerosine.

14. Following up the attempt which was made in my last report to gauge the trade of the Colony by means of Import and Export Returns, I am enabled by means of somewhat elaborate statistics, compiled by the Assistant Harbour Master, to give more complete returns for 1894. As before stated these do not profess absolute correctness, and they are obtained through the courtesy of the agents and

masters.

In Returns Nos. I and II, and V and VI will be found, in addition to the customary information as to registered tonnage, &c., the amount of cargo reported as "shipped," "discharged," and "in transit" to and from each country with which trade relations exist, and I hope that the information will be valued in proportion to the amount of time and trouble expended in its compilation.

During the year, 8,452 European constructed vessels aggregating 10,469,182 tons, carried 1,384,706 passengers, and 6,168,172 tons, the latter made up as follows:-

Import cargo,

Export Transit

""

39

Bunker coal shipped,

Steamers,

Sailing vessels,

Total,

.2,746,285 tons.

1,598,588 .1,469,844

IMPORTS (EXCLUDING RIVER TRADE).

39

353,455

52

6,168,172

""

..2,767 measuring 3,491,518 tons.

93

""

Total,......2,860

""

104,486

3,596,004

""

imported 2,625,610 tons made up as follows:-

Beans,

Bones,

Coals,

Copra, Flour,

.....

3,995 2,040 562,909

10

60,250 100,367

Kerosine,

Oil, Opium,

3,804

2,825

Rattan,

625

Rice,

619,075

Saltpetre,

50

Sandalwood,

1,625

Sapanwood,

1,300

Sugar,

170,499

Tea,.. Timber,

350

16,040

Vermecilli,

170

1,545,934

General,

1,079,676

2,625,610

Transit,

...1,469,844

Total.

4,095,454

Compared with last year this gives 132 ships less, measuring 61,073 tons carrying 42,280 tons more,

EXPORTS (EXCLUDING RIVER TRADE).

..............2,769 measuring 3,494,360 tons.

Steamers,.. Sailing vessels,

94

104,491

""

""

Total,.... ...2,863

""

3,598,851

"

243

exported 1,504,810 tons of cargo amongst which were 16,743 tons of kerosine and 2,583 tons of opium. These 2,769 steamers shipped also 333,251 tons of bunker coal. Compared with last year, this gives 137 ships less, measuring 64,825 less carrying 19,655 tons more, and shipping 53,350 tons less of bunker coal.

Junks exported an excess of From this must be deducted Majesty's ships and foreign

European vessels imported 1,147,697 tons in excess of exports. 381,604 tons, thus the total excess of imports is reduced to 766,093 tons. 353,455 tons of bunker coal shipped-exclusive of that supplied to Her men-of-war---leaving a balance of 412,638 tons consumed, manufactured, and in stock in the Colony or unaccounted for.

15. 2,729 river steamers, measuring 3,275,327 tons, imported 120,675 tons of cargo, exported 93,778 tons, shipped 20,204 tons of bunker coal, and conveyed 1,041,958, passengers, i. e., imported less than last year 21,291 tons, exported 34,709 tons less, and carried fewer passengers by 135,673.

16. Junks in local trade discharged, in various parts of the Colony, 90,964 tons, of which 85,443 were earth and stones, clearing from Victoria with 9,597 tons of general cargo, of which 987 tons were earth and stones.

17.

PASSENGER Traffic, 1894.

British vessels arriving carried

130,767

""

"9

departing (excluding Chinese passenger ships) carried 96 Chinese passenger ships carried..........

80,891

37,222

248,880

Foreign vessels arriving carried

51,544

departing (excluding Chinese passenger ships) carried 34 Chinese passenger ships carried

30,523

11,801

93,868

River steamers arriving carried

""

416,176

departing

525,782

941,958

""

Macao launches arriving carried

departing

12.524

13,126

""

25,650

Launches other places arriving carried

198,229

departing

203,885

>>

402,114

Junks in foreign trade arriving carried

108,387

>>

departing

"

112,561

220,948

Total arrivals,

917,627

>>

departures,

966,768

1,884,395

وو

emigrants,

49,023

1,933,418

244

Junks in local trade arriving carried

دو

departing

6,064

4,829

10,893

Launches in waters of Colony arriving carried

1,969,307

...

departing

""

.1,930,597

3,899,904

Total local arrivals,

departures

...1,975,371 ...........1,935,426

3,910,797

Grand total arrivals,

"

departures including emigrants,

.2,892,998

2,951,217

5,844,215

Difference,

58,219

REVENUE.

18. The total revenue collected by the Harbour Department during the year was $195,175.62, a decrease of $645.40 on the previous year. Compared with the average of the last five years it shows an increase of $39,086.44. The details are as follows:-

i. Light Dues, ....

ii. Licences and Internal Revenue,

iii. Fees of Court and Office,............

.$ 92,909.31

29,418.30

72,848.01

$195,175.62

STEAM LAUNCHES.

19. On the 31st December, there were 131 steam launches employed in the harbour, of these 60 were licensed for the conveyance of passengers, 55 were privately owned, 11 were the property of the Colonial Government, also a floating fire engine, and 5 belonged to the Imperial Government in charge of the military authorities.

All these launches, except those which belonged to Her Majesty or any Foreign Government, are required to have a certificated master and engineer whose certificates are liable to suspension or cancel- lation should they prove negligent or incompetent. During the year one master was reprimanded and cautioned. The generally seamanlike manner in which these launches are handled deserves a word of commendation. I regret to say they don't always observe the "rule of the road"; but this very fact, taken together with their absence from accident, to a great extent points towards good judgment, and "results" are, after all, not an unfair criterion.

EMIGRATION.

20. There has been, as might be expected, a great falling off in emigration. For the three months June, July and August, emigration was practically stayed; the last three months of the year, however, made some amends, and finally the numbers amounted to 49,023 as against 82,336 in 1893, a decrease of 33,313; but it was not much under 1892, and it was better than the three years immediately preceding that one.

During the year, 451 ships reported having brought to Hongkong 96,095 Chinese passengers from various places to which they had emigrated.

245

REGISTRY OF SHIPPING.

21. During the year 6 vessels, of 1,742 tons, were registered under the provisions of The Merchant Shipping Act, 1854, and 8 Certificates of Registry, with a total of 2,661 tons, were cancelled. Return No. XVIII shows the remainder of the work done in this branch.

MARINE MAGISTRATE'S COURT.

22. 15 cases were heard in this Court with 47 defendants. Refusal of duty (9) were the principal offences in the case of ships. Breach of harbour regulations (2) in the case of junks.

EXAMINATIONS FOR THE POSTS OF MASTERS, MATES AND ENGINEERS, UNDER

SECTION 15 OF ORDINANCE No. 26 or 1891.

23. The following table shows the number of candidates examined for certificates of competency distinguishing those who were successful and those who failed:-

NATIONALITY.

British,

British Indian,

American,

German,

Nova Scotian,

Swede,

British,

River Str.,

For Steamships,

Master.

Grade.

Passed.

GRAND TOTAL,

11

DECK OFFICERS.

Failed.

Total.

1111111

10 8 18

8

9

...

:

:

:

:

:

:

1

2

First Mate.

:

:

:

:

:

Only Mate.

:

:

:

:

1

:

:

:

Second Mate.

:

8 1

1

1

1

...

:

:

:

:

:

:

I

ENGINEERS.

Total.

Grade.

Passed.

Failed.

Total.

Grade.

Passed.

Failed.

**

9

First Class Engineer.

Total.

GRAND TOTAL

26 11 37 86

:

01

:

2

2

1

1

1

1

:

:

:

:

Second Class Engineer.

:

13

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

دارم

8

19

£ 13

1

1

10 1 11

10

4

14

28 12 4098

TOTAL DECK OFFICERS,..

.44

TOTAL ENGINEERS,.........54

MARINE COURTS, UNDER SECTION 13 OF ORDINANCE No. 26 of 1891.

24. The following Courts have been held during the year:-

i. On the 19th February, inquiry as to the collision between the British steamship Hangchow, Official No. 91,878 of London, and an unknown vessel on the night of the 7th February off Breaker Point. The Master's (CHARLES JAMES DERBY) certificate of competency was returned to him.

ii. On the 7th December, inquiry as to the grounding of the British steamship Zafiro, Official No. 88,829 of Hongkong, off Mount Bremer near Quarry Bay, Hongkong, on the 14th November. The Master's (ALEXANDER WILLIAM ROSS COBBAN) certificate of competency was returned to him.

SUNDAY CARGO-WORKING ORDINANCE, 1891.

25. During the year, 110 "permits" were issued, 20 were not availed of, owing to its being found unnecessary for the ship to work cargo on the Sunday, and the fee paid for the "permit" was refunded in each of these cases.

30 "permits" were granted free of charge, in accordance with the instructions received that certain mail steamers, not having Hongkong as a terminal port, should be exempt from payment of the fee.

26. The question of "bunker coal" was once more to the front. We have now on record the opinion of two Police Magistrates that "bunker coal" is not "cargo." The legislature, however, remains silent on the point.

246

27. Another, and rather novel, experience was gained during the year in connection with these Sunday permits. A "compradore order," having been tendered and accepted in payment of the fee, was on presentation by the Bank to the drawers refused acceptance, and the reason given was "First already paid." The order was afterwards passed on to the Crown Solicitor, and, I believe, with satis- factory results.

Compradore orders," however, are not now received in payment of these fccs.

66

28. The amount collected in fees during the year was $13,375, nearly double what it was in 1893. The intention of the Ordinance was, I believe, to put a stop, or nearly so, to Sunday work on board European vessels in the harbour, and the fee originally fixed was thought to be a prohibitive one. It is evident that it is not so, however, and, if I am correct in my surmise as to the intention of the Ordinance, I think the fee should be doubled.

SEAMEN.

29. 14,670 seamen were shipped and 15,835 discharged at the Shipping Office and on board ships during the year.

30. 239 distressed seamen were received during the year; of these 78 were sent to the United Kingdom, 1 to Sydney, 2 to San Francisco, 5 to Bombay, 7 to Calcutta, 4 to Singapore, 4 died and 131 obtained employment, and 7 remained at the Government Civil Hospital on the 31st December, 1894. $6,798.00 were expended by the Board of Trade in the relief of these men.

MARINE SURVEYOR'S SUB-DEPARTMENT.

31. Return No. XXIII shows the work performed in this branch of the Harbour Department, and in forwarding this, I desire to record my appreciation of the manner in which the work of this sub- department is carried out.

32. It is necessary that I should explain with reference to this return, that although the number of vessels surveyed during 1894 was less than in some previous years, the tonnage and horse power repre- sented by these vessels exceeded any former records.

33. I would further like to reproduce in this report extracts from a report made by me on the subject of the Government Marine Surveyors in a letter dated 14th June, 1892.

66

66

***

*

*

"The duties of these surveyors, I am convinced, are very onerous, the inspection of boilers and engines, especially during the hot weather, being most trying.

"The conditions also under which these surveys are held at Hongkong are peculiar; owing to the "short time that vessels as a rule remain in port. In order to save time, applications for survey are constantly received before the vessel's arrival, and it frequently happens that the completion of the 66 survey is the final act before she again leaves. They cannot even afford to wait for their passenger "certificates, clearances being frequently granted them by me on receipt of a report from the surveyor "that the requirements of the law have been complied with.

46

"C

"It is, therefore, most important that the work of surveying vessels should be carried on as expe- ditiously as possible, and the importance of these surveys renders it imperative that the examination "should be thorough; in order to insure these conditions it is necessary that there should be an adequate and efficient staff. It will be seen from the report of Mr. Dixon attached hereto that the survey of a "vessel for passenger certificate occupies himself and his assistant 8 hours, spread over a number of "visits, about four. The time consumed. however, on this work is often considerably in excess of this 8 "hours, as the ships may be anywhere between the Hunghom Docks and Aberdeen. Other surveys "though not occupying so much time, in each case, are made under somewhat similar circumstances.

+6

"There are four local Marine Surveyors carrying on business in Hongkong; in addition to these, "some of the steamship companies employ special surveyors for their vessels. The Government Marine Surveyors practically do a very large proportion of the amalgamated work of all these, having at the "same time to so arrange that if possible there should be no delay or inconvenience to any one. No easy matter in a place where, as may be expected, each owner or agent considers his own interest as paramount."

26

46

common.

These opinions expressed by me in 1892 I have to reiterate in 1895; the work of the Government Marine Surveyors goes on increasing, and "overtime" and Sunday work are becoming more and more

In 1890 the gross tonnage surveyed amounted to 168,098, in 1894 it was 204,623 tons. Statistics issued by the Board of Trade show that, at Liverpool, during the eleven months January- November, 1894, there were 423 vessels surveyed for passenger certificate, with an approximate gross tonnage of 1,015,200 and indicated horse power of about 846,000. In the performance of this work I am informed there are no less than eleven engineer and shipwright surveyors employed.

During the same period at Cardiff the numbers were 160, the gross tonnage surveyed for passenger certificate was about 320,000 tons, and the horse power 140,000. At this port there are 6 surveyors.

247

At Hongkong for the same period, the number of vessels for survey was 112, with a gross tonnage of 201,600 tons, and indicated horse power of 140,000. For this work we have one surveyor and one assistant surveyor.

Thus at Liverpool there are about 40 vessels of 92,000 tons per surveyor, at Cardiff 27 vessels of 53,000 tons, while at Hongkong, with all its disadvantages of climate, &c., we have 56 vessels of over 100,000 tons to each surveyor.

A consideration of these facts can, I think, only lead to an improvement in the pay of our Surveyors or an increase in the staff.

LIGHTHOUSES.

34. The amount of dues collected was as follows:-

Total

Class of Vessels.

Rate per ton.

No. of ships.

Tonnage.

fees collected.

$ C.

Ocean vessels paying full dues,

Launches paying full dues,

2 cents. 2,865 3,572,535 89,313.46

do.

64 1,805 45.07

River Steamers (Night Boats),

cent. 551

525,647 3,506.19

Launches plying exclusively to Macao,.

do.

132

6,622 44.29

River Steamers (Day Boats),

Free.

814 1,111,495

Launches plying to Macao by day,

do.

562 27,178

4,988 5,245,28292,909.81

35. Under this heading I desire to make a few remarks, the gist of which have already been put forward by me in previous reports.

The subject of the tax on shipping is one that, I think, deserves attention. In my opinion the pre- sent tax of "light dues" is an "ill-conditioned" one, and an even larger amount of revenue than at present could be collected on a more equitable basis.

The principle advocated by me presents itself more and more forcibly as exchange gets lower and lower, and it means the amelioration of "local traders."

At present all European vessels, excepting river steamers, pay a tax of 25 cents a ton, which tax is called "light dues." The revenue derived from this tax is one of the important items of the income of the Colony. It is larger than its name implies, and, "extraordinary works" excepted, it is consider- ably in excess of what is required for the maintenance of the lighthouses for which the Colony is responsible.

A larger revenue, for general purposes, might be raised, and, at the same time, a, to my mind, more equitable tax levied, by the substitution of a periodical payment, based, as light dues are, on "tonnage," but on an entirely different principle.

At the present time the local traders, whose carnings are in local currency, whose shares are held locally, and most of whom purchase their stores and supplies in the Colony, are on the same currency footing as the "trunk liners" some of whom lie here for lengthened periods paying "per entry" the same as the local traders, while the bulk of their earnings are in gold, their stores purchased in Europe or America, and probably most important consideration of all, whose owners or shareholders are not concerned with the prosperity of the trade of Hongkong beyond the extent to which for the time being it offers them a remunerative field as carriers.

"Comparisons are odious," but for purposes of illustration are nevertheless at times necessary. I hope, therefore, I will be excused for making use of them in the present case.

A P. & O. mail steamer enters this port and pays 24 cents a ton for that one entry, she proceeds to Shanghai and pays 66 cents a ton, this would clear her for 4 months in all Chinese treaty poits, but, as she does not go to these, it practically amounts to her entry at Shanghai, and she can only return once during the 4 months for which the "chop" holds good.

.

248

A Canadian Pacific Railway steamer enters Shanghai, pays 66 cents a ton for a few hours, and proceeding to Hongkong, lies here three weeks at a cost of 2 cents a tou. The entry at Shanghai on the return voyage reduces the cost of the "Grand Chop" to 33 cents, but only by making 2 complete trips in 4 months can she reduce her payment to China to about 30 per cent. more than for these trips she has paid in this British port.

So much for the "trunk liners."

On the other hand, a "Douglas" or "Indo-China" steaner enters, pays the same 2 cents a ton, remains here for 12 or 24 hours, and, returning again in three days from Canton or the Coast, has to again pay light dues.

A quarterly or half-yearly port tax, seems, therefore, to be the fairest. Vessels could then go in and out continually, availing themselves of the lights, or lie in harbour occupying space, as may seem best for the peculiar circumstances of each branch of trade. But, of course, that tax could not remain at 24

cents a ton.

Then again as to the present dues paid by river steamers. Twenty years ago or thereabouts when light dues were first imposed on European shipping, (junks had contributed to the revenue for 8 years previous to this), these river steamers were given exceptional rates in order to foster a particular trade. That trade has now arrived at a position quite capable of paying a fair share of the expenses of a Govern- ment under the aegis of which it was created.

At the present rate of light dues these vessels, under the special privilege of paying only one-third of the fixed rate, and that only for those of them which arrive at night, (all the other being free of the port,) paid last year $3,506 for a total tonnage arriving, amounting to considerably over a million and a half of tons, or at the rate of less than of a cent per ton, and side by side with this they have been paying, if my information is correct, about $17,000 at Canton for the same period.

They thus contribute to the Chinese revenue about 5 times more than to the revenue of the Colony whose flag they fly and the protection of whose laws they crave.

I am not advocating the cause of the Chinese methods of obtaining revenue, I merely wish to illustrate to those, who are accustomed to hear a sort of "commination service" read, having the

freedom of the port" for its theme, how very mild our methods are in Hongkong.

36. The lighthouses were maintained as usual during the year. The new lenses for Gap Rock, to replace those injured by the typhoon in October 1893, arrived from England and the light was restored to its original condition of efficiency in May.

37. Telegraphic and telephonic communication, with some few breaks, has also been kept up with the Gap Rock and Cape D'Aguilar during the year. From the former station, 373 vessels have been reported as passing, and in addition 233 messages were received and 1,915 sent, including the daily weather report for the Observatory.

From Cape D'Aguilar 983 vessels were reported, and in addition 31 messages were sent and 106 received.

38. The means of communication with Gap Rock are not, in my opinion, satisfactory. In 1893 severe damage was sustained by the Light and buildings, and the keepers were in a position of no little danger. Telegraphic communication being broken by the typhoon, information of the state of things only reached Hongkong through the courtesy of the captain of the P. & O. steamer Clyde, who, in answer to a signal, sent a boat to communicate with the Rock. With considerable difficulty the immediate wants of the keepers were relieved the following day.

Now, the station is in more or less danger from every typhoon which affects Hongkong, and we ought to be in the best possible position to satisfy ourselves as to their condition at any time during a typhoon, and to send succour to them if necessary immediately the weather permits. Such a position we are not in at the present time, the more severe the typhoon and thus the greater the danger to the keepers, the more likelihood is there that the telegraphic communication will be interrupted, and, with that condition of things, the people may be in the greatest peril without our knowledge, and if, as happened on one occasion, the Fame could not be spared by the Dock Company until 24 hours after the weather had moderated, the knowledge might eventually come too late.

The Light has been established at considerable expense, no reasonable expenditure should be grudged to ensure its efficiency and the safety of those in whose charge it is.

The station was not damaged to a great extent by the typhoons of 1894, though in the one of 4th to 5th October the sea was washing up to the buildings, the derrick was carried away, and other minor damage was sustained.

GOVERNMENT GUNPOWDER DEPOT.

249

39. During the year 1894 there has been stored in the Government Magazine Stone Cutters' Island:-

No. of Cases, &c.

Approximate Weight.

Gunpowder, privately owned, ....

18,920

lbs. 519,983

Do., Government owned,................

Cartridges, privately owned,.....

3,673

492,912

Do., Government owned,

Explosive Compounds, privately owned,....

72

5,958

5,098

320,380

Do.,

Government owned,

28

1,759

Total,......

On the 31st December, 1894, there remained as under:--

27,791

1,340,992

No. of Cases.

Approximate Weight.

Gunpowder, privately owned,

6,563

lbs. 164,868

Do., Government owned,............

Cartridges, privately owned,...

2,866

377,931

Do., Government owned,

27

1,208

Explosive Compounds, privately owned,

2,115

95,468

Do.,

Government owned,

24

1,120

Total,...

GENERAL.

11,595

640,595

40. There has been no change in the staff of the Harbour Department during the year under review. The first Boarding Officer and the Principal Lightkeeper have been granted leave of absence to England.

The Assistant Harbour Master has continued to perform the duties of the Second Magistrate, an arrangement which when assented to by me was thought would be merely temporary but which has now lasted for nearly 3 years. The arrangement is unsatisfactory. Captain HASTINGS by working out of hours is able to perform those duties which are independent of the Harbour Master, such as the compila tion of statistical records, the arrangement of the buoys in the harbour (nearly all of which were relaid last year) and so on; but, as he is generally absent from the Harbour Ofice for half of the usual office hours, he is unable to take up the general management of the details of the Department, which I take to be the meaning of the words "to assist the Harbour Master in the performance of his various duties,' and which is the first of the Assistant Harbour Master's duties as laid down.

Opinions have from time to time been expressed as to the abolition of the post of Assistant Harbour Master, and at times even those who have not sufficient knowledge of the subject to entitle their opinion to serious consideration, have nevertheless not refrained from expressing it.

Whatever opinion, however, may be held on that point one thing I think is certain, namely, that an Assistant Harbour Master who is not in a position to fully assist in duties connected with the Harbour Department, is an anomaly, and places the Harbour Master in a false position.

The following opinion expressed by me to the Retrenchment Commission appears in their report. As these opinions are sometimes lost sight of, and as I hold this one strongly still, it may I think well find a place of record in this annual report.

*

*

*

"I consider that with much advantage both to the public and the Government service the Water "Police might be made a branch of the Harbour Department and the Harbour Master appointed Super- "intendent and the Assistant Harbour Master Deputy Superintendent and practical head thereof.

250

"The duties of the Water Police are primarily the proper discipline of the Harbour and the vessels "therein and the prevention of disorder and confusion; this embraces such matters as (i) regulation "of fairways; (ii) supervision of passenger traffic; (iii) overloading; (iv) shipment, transhipment and "discharge of dangerous goods; (v) illegal boarding of vessels; (vi) improperly crowding ships or buoys "and all the other offences in the waters of the Colony' embraced in section 28 of the Merchant Shipping "Ordinance.

<

"All these duties connected with offences against the Ordinance are within the purview of the "Harbour Department, but that Department has no executive authority in most cases and no machinery "to enforce the provisions of the Ordinance which it is specially designed to carry out, viz., the control "and management of the waters of the Colony and the regulation of vessels navigating the same.

When breaches occur which this Department desires to take action on, applications have to be made through the heads of the departments concerned. Delay ensues on such communications, two sets of "orders have to be given, and in nine cases out of ten the opportunity has passed before action can be taken, and the public only knows of the laches and condemns, being ignorant of the well-meant but "cumbrous efforts made by the two Government Departments concerned.

#6

66

"That is one argument in favour of placing the Water Police under the Harbour Master. A second "and perhaps more cogent one is that the advisability of placing a body of men under an officer who "is practically familiar with the duties which his subordinates have to perform must be the best method "of obtaining the most favourable results.

66

*

*

*

*

and it is only reasonable to suppose that the Harbour Master, a specially qualified man constantly "requiring the Water Police to assist him in the due discharge of his duties and who has an assistant "in daily personal and active intercourse with the shipping and craft amongst which the Water Police "have to do duty, would be the most fitting head for that force."

The Committee in their report stated, with reference to my suggestion-" We beg to state that we "have no hesitation in recording our decisions that no change should be made in the existing system" (Police); yet not one word of explanation was asked of me, nor one question on the subject put to either myself or the Assistant Harbour Master when our evidence was taken, while a reference to the published evidence of the Captain Superintendent of Police and the Deputy Superintendent, will show that a considerable number of questions, some of which, I think, might be almost termed "leading" were put to these officers, with the apparent object of proving how puerile and unsupportable my suggestion was. To my mind, the answers to these, however, only showed how frail was the argument advanced against my suggestion, the real meaning of which, apparently, both the Retrenchment Commission and the Police officers entirely failed to grasp. And, it may be observed, the evidences of myself and of Captain HASTINGS were taken more than 2 months after the Captain Superintendent had given his views on my proposal.

There is, in my opinion, necessity for continuing the post of Assistant Harbour Master, and I am further of opinion that, by placing the Harbour Police under the control of the Harbour Master and making the Assistant Harbour Master their practical Head, efficiency would be increased, anomalies removed, and, very probably, economy effected.

IMPORTS AND EXPORTS (OPIUM) OFFICE.

41. The Return shows that during the year the amount of Opium reported was as follows:-

Decrease.

1893.

1894.

Increase.

Imported,

..39,098

41,578

2,479 1/2

***

Exported,

.43,5491

38,978

4,571

but not landed,..............

Through cargo reported } 16,6081⁄2

22,986

6,377

...

19,156 permits were issued from this Office, being a decrease of 2,582 as compared with 1893.

A daily memo. of exports to Chinese ports was during the year supplied to the Commissioner of Imperial Maritime Customs at Kowloon.

Surprise visits were paid to 95 godowns during the year.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

R. MURRAY RUMSEY, Retd. Comd., R.N.,

The Honourable J. H. STEWART LOCKHART,

&c.,

Acting Colonial Secretary,

&c.,

&c.

Harbour Master, &c.

WITH CARGOES.

I.-NUMBER, Tonnage, Crew

BRITISH.

IN BALLAST.

COUNTRIES WHENCE ARRIVED.

Cargoes.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tons.

Dis- charged.

Transit.

Australia and New Zealand,

British Columnbia,...........

British North Borneo,.........

36

14

17

Coast of China and Formosa................................................................................................

Cochin-China,

Continent of Europe,

Great Britain,

India and Singapore,

29,805 47,249 2,126| 42,042 2,939| 23,646 821 14,230 13,343 1,637 1,984,492 71,302 230,150 341,121) 4,980 79 106,513 3,129 188,200 21 46,996 901 37,612 49,112 144 275,110 7,305 156,439 288,597| 120 186,348 9,445 123,852

24,795

36

47,249

14

42.042

56

18

13.399

96 105,724 3,763 1,733|2,090,216| 7

79 106,513

21

46,996

144 275,110

71,820

120 186,348

Sandwich Islands,......

Siam,

United States of America,

Japan,

Java and other Islands in the Indian Archipelago,

Macao,

Mauritius,

North Pacific,

Philippine Islands,

Ports in Hainan and Gulf of Tonquin,

South America.............

202 332,106 10,440 378 483) 119,950;

42 64.543 1,885 311 331,423 16,219]

113,919 29,433

144

2.778 1,081

96

204 334,884 1

56

43

65,624

40

311 331,423 1

...

132 127,675,742 219,100|

...

73

26

69,264 3,454, 39,005)

63,250

1 200

787

2

9821

32

69,210 500

12,069

1,900

2

960

27

450

53 112,164 4,041 122,341

23,985

53 112,164

TOTAL,....

2,911 3,780,213 140,545|1,800,620) 939,569

100 109,639 3,900 3,0113,889,852 14

73

69,264

26

39,005

2

982

132 127,673

2

960

II.-NUMBER, TONNAGE, CREWS

WITH CARGOES.

BRITISH.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL

COUNTRIES TO WHICH DEPARTED.

Shipped.

Shipped.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Cargoes.

Bunker Coal.

Bunker Coal.

Vessels.

Tons. [Crews.

Cargoes.

Bun Co:

Australia & New Zealand,

21

29,109 1,808

25,500

1,231

1

1,653

33

British Columbia..

1

948

19 1,000

British North Borneo,

14

Cape of Good Hope,

1

11,550 804

1,486

2,560

2,850

3

1,452

44

450

45

34

Coast of China & Formosa,...

Great Britain,

Cochin-China,

Continent of Europe,

India and Singapore,

11

1,982 2,461,818 91,263 367

12,330

1.000 392,552 111,088

7,085

22

17 1

30,762 1,841

25,500 1.

948

19

1,000

13.002

848

2 560

2,

1,486

34

1.000

53

1,760

44

60,113 2,321) 61,086 1,624)

12,017 9,089

2,035 2,521,981 93,584

55

392.552 123,

73,416 1,991

7,085

10.

Japan,

48 104,769 5,714| 42,150 164 283,420 8,987 216.903 132 227,572 8,369 187,135|

8,975

::

...

48 104,769 5,714]

42,150 3.

28.701

10,163

54

8,586 202 85,514 1,903

1,550

2,845

170 292,006 9,189 216.903 186 313,086 10,272] 187,135

30.

13,

Java and other Islands in the

Indian Archipelago,

Macao,

480 15,735 9 324 355,940 18,547,

1,740 11,600 39.965 4,828

~

3,692

122

940

11

North Pacific,

2

521

26

602 11,600 19,427 324 355,940 18,547 521 26

39,965

Philippine Islands,

30

Ports in Hainan & G. of Tonquin,

21

29,118 1,495 23,005

18,700 5,475

12 20,613

335

570

42

49,731 1,830)

18,700

902

6,150

5,4001

12

17,865

363

785

33

40,870 1,265,

6,150

2456

2.

4,

6.

Russia in Asia,

1,493

23,

80

1.493 23

...

Sandwich Islands,..

2

982 30

1,670

982 30

1,670

Siam,

44

41,176 1,636

7,950

8,600

7

11,134

188

335

51

52,310 1,824

7,950

South America,

3

2,056 48 3,190

2,056 48 8,190

United States of America,

7

13,808

200

38,024

...

13,808

200

38,024

...

TOTAL,....................

2,815 3,616,315 140,726 1,003,134 185,891

196 272,229 7,161 28,626 3,011 3,888,544 147,887 1,003,134 214,

I. NUMBER, TONNAGE, CREWS, and CARGOES of Vessels ENTERED at Ports in the Colony of Hongkong from eac

BRITISH.

IN BALLAST.

FOREIGN.

WITH CARGOES.

TOTAL,

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

Cargoes.

Cargoes.

Cargoes.

Tons. Crews.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Dis- charged.

Transit.

Dis- charged.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Vessels.

Transit.

Dis- charged.

Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tons.

Transit.

47,249 2,126| 29,805

24,795

42,042 2,939

23,646

13,343

821

14,230

56

5

46,996 901

37,612

,984,492 71,302 230,150 341,121|

106,513 3,129 188,200|

275,110 7,305 156,439 288,597

4,980 49,112

186,348 9,445 123,852

71,820

*

332,106 10,440 378 483 119,950

64.543 1,885| 113,919]

2-

2.778 1,081

96 36

112,164 4,041 122,341

331,423 16,219

29,433

40

***

69.264 3,454)

63,250

1200

39,005

737

69,210

12,069

982

32

500

127,67

5,742|| 219,100

1,900

960

27

450

23,985

3,780,213 140,545|1,800,620 939,569

36 47,249 2,126 29,805 24,795 14 42.042 2,939 23,646 18

826 13.399 96 105,724 3,763 1,733 2,090,216 75,065

79 106,513 3,129,

901 21 46,996 144 275,110 7,305 120 186,348 9,445 204 334,884 10,536 43 65,624 1,921 311 331,423 16,219|

14,230

3

1

1,689

58

1,649

...

...

...

::

577

14

650

3

1,689

1

577

80 174,607 7,687 71,063

3

31

87 5,327 43,790 1,629

1,983 50,910

118

194,142 5,234 200,530

27

27,526

864

42,050

40

444

66,008 11,343

14,488

230,150 341,121| 13,836|1,379,172 166,971 534,260 294.290 8,952 787,555 106,643 22,788 2,166,727

4.980 188,200

123 118,007) 3,758 186,040 49,112 37,612 156,439|| 288 597 123,852] 71,820 378.483 119,950 113,919 29,433

3,200 129,534

123 118,007

80 174,607

6,880

3

5,327

24.820

31

43,79€

65,999

3

4,521 69

121 198,66€

40

27

...

27,520

283

27,781 8,367

727

93,789

2

:

2,100 60

2,000

2

2,100

2

831 12

73

69,264 3,454

63,250

26

39,005

737

69,210

1.200 12'069

36

23,614 1,077

209

117,118

5,342

15

24,427 112,600

...

21

85

2.400

3,100

2

2

982 132 127,673 5,742

960

32

27

53 112,164 4,041

500 219,100 450 122,341|

1

1,900

39

961 15 33,812 1,073

500

02 2

3

2,109

50

39

25,72

693

34

211 117,811

1,502

22

3

2,46:

57,840

39

33,81:

1

35 23,985

392 13 71,483 2,300|

50

794

14

2

1,18

81,917

12

351

71,481

·

BRITISH.

100 109,639 3,900 3,011 3,889,852 144,445 1,800,620 939,5€9 14,991 2,260,408 207,517|1

|1,382,972|| 530,275 9,246 824,955 110,189 24,237|3,085,36:

II.-NUMBER, TONNAGE, CREWS, and CARGOES of Vessels CLEARED at Ports in the Colony of Hongkong for each

FOREIGN.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL

Shipped.

Shipped.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

anker Coal.

Bunker Coal.

Vessels.

Tons.

Crews.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Cargoes.

Bunker Coal.

Cargoes.

Bunker Coal.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Bunker Coal.

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

1,231

1

1,653

2,850

11,088 53

1,760

44

33

1,452 44;

60,113 2,321 61,086 1,624

450

45

22

30,762 1,841,

25,500

1,681

...

948

19

1,0001

17

13.002

848

2 560

2,895

:::

***

***

12,017 9,089

55

1 1,486 2,035 2,521,931 93,584 73,416 1,991

34

1,000 392.552 7,085

123,105 15,043 1,792,901 202,940 916,928

57

48.991 10,849

49,456 1,612| 401 97,082 5,649] 14,420

80

39,422 7,621 442,837 72,736

9,017

74,802 2,366|

11,433 22,6642,235,738 275,676 12,9531

137 124,258 3,978

8,210

...

3,975

48 104,769 5,714]

42,150

3,975

::

...

401 97,082 5,619

...

28.701

10,163

54

8,586 85,514 1,903

2021

1,550

2,845

170 292,006 9,189 216.903 186 313,086 10,272 187,135

30,251| 13,008

78,632 62 106,712 3,484 99 153,017 5,163| 120,269

20,656 9,411

3

49

4,611 71,175 1,673

79

840 3,195

65 111,323 3,563 148 224,192 6,836

1,740

2

3,692 122

940

4,828

...

11

602 19,427 324 355,940 18,547|

5,475

521 20,613 5,400| 12 17,865

2

26

2

521

26

...

121

335

570

42

49,731 1,830)

363

785

83

40,870 1,265|

11,600 2,680 39,965 4,828

18,700

6,045 6,150 6,185

2

683

64 2,321 94,772 14,454

400 67,137

570

1

27

1,457 2,445

57

700

3

544

11

70

308 6,694 208 115,861 5,088)

90 7,550 88,382

...

.:.

...

::

710

3,778 97,217 14,998|

121

1

1,385 15,823

12,279

188

550

191

10

7,417

252

528

70 18,973 218 123,278 5,340

6 496

80

***

8,600

11 1,493

23

80

:

...

::

2

982

30

1,670

1

11,134

188

335

51

52,310 1,824|

7,950

8,935

19

461 15,772

12

750

511

7,950

3,615

2,396

74

3

2,056

48

3,190

3,098 71

4,140

7

13,808

200

38,024

21

29,911

423

58,726

:

...

::

242

...

630

22

461 18,168

12

585

3,098

71

21

29,911

423

...

[85,891

196 272,229 7,161

28,626 3,011 3,888,544 147,887 1,003,134 214,517 16,252 2,468,128 239,785 1,414,365 108,109 7,802 619,419 77,969 30,829 24,054 3,087,547 317,754

1

“Hongkong from each Country in the Year 1894.

IGN.

LAST.

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOES.

TOTAL.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Cargoes.

Cargoes.

Cargoes.

3.

Crews. Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Dis-

Transit.

charged

Dis- charged.

Transit.

Dis- charged.

Transit.

:

...

1,689 38 1,649

577 141

39

14 42,042 2,939}

39

23,646

::

14

48,938 2.164 31,454 24,795 42,042 2,939

650

5

...

48,938 2,164 31,454 24,795|

18 13,920 835 14,880

3,200 202 224,520 6,887 374,240| 8,180

56

25,646 19 13,976 840 14,880

555 106,643 22.788 2,166,727 273.614 534,260 294,290 15,473 3,363,664 238,273 764,410 635,411 9,048 893,279 110,406 24,521 4,256,943 348,679 764,410 635,411

123 118,007 3,758 186,040

80 174,607 7,687|

***

4:

...

:::

202 224,520 6,887 374,240| 8,180 101 221,603 8,588 108,675 178,646 147 280,437 7,392 158,422|| 295,477 151 230,138 11,074 174,762 96,640 7,299 155 325 533,547 15,829 579.013| 185,949 1 1,081 36 70 93,150 2,785 155.969 27,781 3,367 1,038 425,212 30,929| 43,921 2,100 60 2,000

5

521

59

31 121 198,663 5,293 200,530

71,063 3 5,327 87 1,983 43,790 1,629, 50,910

129,534

6,880

24,820

65,999

320

27

27,520 864 42,050

40 69

101 221,603 8,588 108,675 178,646 147 280,437 7,392 158,422 295,477 151 230,138 11,074 174,762 96,640 526,248 15,674 579,013| 185,949

92,069 2,749 155,969

40

781 8,367

727

93,789 14,710)

14,488

755

397,431 27,562|

43,921

40

283

2,100 60

83

2,000

2

2,100

CO

2,000

12

109

50

39

25,723 1,127

693 34 211 117,811

5,376|

502

22

3 2,463 37

89 33,812 1,073

15 24,427 112.600|

500 57,840

83

12

15

2.400 3.100

109

92,878 4,531 235 156,123 6,059| 3 1,943 47

87,677

3,600

181,810|

15,169

1,000

32 2

171 161,485 6,815

276,940

1,900

•••

794

141

2 1,186 27

50

3 1,352 40

500

35

71,483 2,500)

81,917]

12

88 183,647 6,341 204,258)

23,997

40 40

83

12

15

2,109 50 693 34 1,502

22

794

112 237

94,987 4,581 87,677 156,816 6,113 181,810

3,600

15,169

...

14

5 3,445 69 1,000 171 161,485 6,815 276,940|

4 2,146 54

1,900

500

88 183,647 6,341 204,258

23,997

955 110,189 24,237 3,085,363 317,706 1,382,972 530,275 17,902 6,040,621 848,062 3,188,592 1,469,844 9,346 934,594 114,089 27,248 6,975,215 462,151 3,183,592 1,469,844

*Hongkong for each Country in the Year 1894.

TOTAL.

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOes.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Cargoes.

Shipped.

Bunker Vessels.

Coal.

Shipped.

Shipped.

Tons.

Crews.

Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Cargoes

21

:::

...

1

14 1

|22,664 2,235,738 275,676 916,928 137 124,258 3,978 48,991 40 97,082 5,649| 14,420

65 111,323 3,503| 78.632 148 224,192 6,836 120,269|

21,496] 12,606

Bunker Coal.

29,109 1,808 25,500 1,231

1,653 33 948 19 1,000] 11,550 804 2,560 2,850

1,452 44, 1,486 34 1,000 50,855, 17,025 4,254,719 294,203 1,309,480 150.510 7,674 502,950 75,057 21,970 68 61,786 1,979| 56,076 10,777 124 135,888 8,990

8,210

40 97,082 5,649Į 14,420 8,210 48 104,769 5,714 42,150 3.975 226 390,132 12,471 295,535 231 380,589 13,532 307,404

Bunker Coal,

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Cargoes.

Bunker Coal.

1

***

450

45

22 1

30,762 1,841

25,500 1,681

948

19 1,000

17

13,002

848

2,560 2,895

1 1,486 34] 1,000

23,450 24,699 4,757,669 369,260 1,309,480 173,960 22,042 192 197,674 5,969 56,076 32,819

40

97,082 5,649 14,420

8,210

49,357|

19,574

9 13,197 281 103 156,689 3,576

2,390

6,040

48 104,769 5,714 42,150 6,975 235| 403,329 12,752|| 295,535| 334 537,278 17,108 307,404 25,614

51,747

3

710

3,778 97,217 14,998

121

400 67,137

1,270

1,007

11 18,056 544 12,000 450,712 33,001 107,102

2,310

4,828

1

70

6

19

18,973

496

:

218 123,278 5,340

...

461

***

90 7,550 88,382

1,935] 16,351

41 229

70 35,812 1,803|

90 26,250 138,866 5,990 94,532

1.498 23

6

...

6,860 201 21,223

22 80

3 5,149 179 27 2,445 544 521 26 523 32,892 25,282 615

1,640

1,120 1,313

3

61

14 23,205 723 12,000 3,950 1,034 453,157 33,545|| 107,102

591 32 68,704 2,326 26,250 251 164,148 6,605

4,828

90

7,980

94,532

22,536

1 1,493 23

80

...

12

22

18,168

585

750 7.950

4,245

63

3,098

71

4,140

21

29,911 423 58,726

1,443 42 2,420 56,948 2,147 15,900 5,154 119 7,330 28 43,719 6231 96,750

3

1,443 42 2,420

12,215 10 13,530 262

965

73

70,478 2,409 15,900

13,180

***

8 6,154 119 7,330]

28

43,719 623 96,750

9 24,054 3,087,547 317,754 1,414,365 188,938 19,067 6,084,443 380,511 2,417,499 294,000 7,998 891,648 85,130

59,455 27,065 6,976,091 465,641 2,417,499 353,455

251

253

III.-NUMBER, TONNAGE and CREWS of Vessels of each Nation ENTERED at Ports in the Colony of Hongkong

in the Year 1894.

ENTERED.

NATIONALITY

WITH CARGoes.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

OF

VESSELS.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews. Vessels. Tons. Crews. Vessels. Tons. Crews.

American,

48

Austrian,

22

80,355 57,223

2,480

7

9,570

128

55

89,925 2,608

1,362

22

57,223

1,362

British,

2,911

3,780,213 | 140,545

100

109,639

3,900

3,011 | 3,889,852

3,889,852

144,445

Chinese,

98

114,158

4,862

8

5,989

437

106 120,147

5,299

Chinese Junks,

13,888

1,001,963

160,048

9,135

740,106

107,200

23,025

1,742,069 267,248

Danish,

98

42,903

2,031

4

1,986

143

102

44,889 2,174

Dutch,

15

19,295

577

15

19,295

577

French,

114

152,491

10,555

1

293

14

115

152,784

10,569

German,

574

624,691

20,397

65

49,289

1,661

639

673,980

22,058

Hawaiian,

2

2,505

35

2

2,505

35

Italian,

15

20,022

925

1

794

14

16

20,816

939

Japanese,

48

75,501

2,502

1

1,234

47

49

76,735

2,549

Nicaraguan,

1

673

12

1

673

12

:

Norwegian,

62

62,739

1,495

23

15,624

538

85

78,363

2,033

Russian,

1

2,785

50

1

2,785

50

Siamese,

1

656

18

Ι

656

18

Spanish,

2,448

168

70

10

5

2,518

175

TOTAL,............ 17,902 6,040,621 348,062 9,346 934,594 114,089 27,248 6,975,215 462,151

IV. NUMBER, TONNAGE and CREWS of Vessels of each Nation CLEARED at Ports in the Colony of Hongkong

in the Year 1894.

CLEARED.

NATIONALITY

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

OF

VESSELS.

Vessels. Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tons. Crews, Vessels.

Tons.

Crews.

American,

38

71,935 2,379

12

15,604

242

50

Austrian,

22

57,123

1,367

22

...

87,539 57,123

2,621

1,367

British,

2,815

3,616,315

3,616,315

140,726

196

Chinese,

101

115,534

5,083

5

Chinese Junks,

15,250

1,343,576

195,425

7,588

272,229 4,613 396,479

7,161 275 71,320

3,011

3,888,544

147,887

106

120,147

5,358

|

22,838 1,740,005

266,745

Danish,

97

42,307

1,947

2,582

193

102

44,889

2,140

Dutch,

12

14.779

462

4

5,973

197

16

20,752

659

French,

113

151,306 10,209

1

739

31

114

152,045

10,240

German,

528

574,894

19,316

116

103,679

3,289

644

678,573

22,605

Hawaiian,

1

989

Italian,

16

20,111

17 942

1

1,516

22

2

2,505

39

16

20,111

942

Japanese,

22

34,962

1,298

Nicaraguan,

1

673

14

Norwegian,

46

35,356

1,144

8888

:.

29

43,851

1,309

51

78,813

2,607

1

673

14

...

39

43,007

989

85

78,363

2,133

Russian,

1

2,785

68

...

2,785

68

Siamese,

1

656

18

1

656

18

Spanish,

3

1.142

96

2

1,376

102

5

2,518

198

TOTAL,... 19,067 6,084,443 380,511

| |

7,998

891,648 85,130

27,065 6,976,091 465,641

254

VII.—Total Number, Tonnage, Crews, Passengers and Cargo of Junks ENTERED from Macao, during the

Year ending 31st December, 1894.

CARGO.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Ves- sels.

Tons.

crews.

Passen- gers.

Victoria,

444 66,008 11,343

Cargo Ves- Discharged.

Tons. sels.

14,488 282 27,106 3,345

Tons. Crews. Passen- Ves- gers. sels.

726

Tons. Crews. İ

Crews.

Passen- gers.

Cargo Discharged.

Tons.

93,11414,688]

14,488

Total,...

444 66,008 11,343

14,488

282 27,106 3,345

726

93,114 14,688|

14,488

VIII. Total Number, Tonnage, Crews, Passengers and Cargo of Junks CLEARED for Macao, during the

Year ending 31st December, 1894.

CARGO.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Ves- sels.

Tons. Crews. Passen-

gers.

Cargo Ves- Shipped.

Tons. sels.

Tons. Crews.

Passen- Ves- gers. sels.

Tons. Crews.

Passen- gers.

Cargo

Shipped. Tons.

Victoria,

680 89,28214,209

64,088 27 2,445 544

707

91,727 14,753|

64,088

Total,... 680

89,282 14,209

64,088 27 2,445 544

707

91,727 14,753

64,088

IX.-Total Number, Tonnage, Crews, Passengers and Cargo of Junks ENTERED at Ports in the Colony of Hongkong,

from Ports on the Coast of China and Formosa, during the Year ending 31st December, 1894.

Cargo.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Tons. Crews.

East Coast,. San On Dis- trict, West

Ves-

Passen Cargo Ves-

Discharged. sels.

gers.. Tons. sels.

2,618 193,743 | 23,457;

843 158,005 1,188

10,737 730,459 123,897 78,716 | 256,158 | 6,825|

...

Passen- Ves-

Passen- Cargo gers. sels.

gers.

62,785 18,936| 449 3,806 256,528 37,393 1,292 158,005

605,232|80,407| 28,840 |17,562|1,335,691 201,304| 107,056| 256,158

West Coast,

89 11,753 1,351

33 8,656 840 44,983 9,512 6 029 56,736 10,863

39 8,656

Total,... 13,444 935,955 148,705 79,592 422,819 8,853 713,000|103,855|| 28,795 22,2921,648,955 252,560 108,387 422,819

Tons. Crews.

Tous. Crews.

Discharged. Tons.

X.-Total Number, Tonnage, Crews, Passengers and Cargo of Junks CLEARED at Ports in the Colony of Hongkong,

for Ports on the Coast of China and Formosa, during the Year ending 31st December, 1894.

Cargo.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Ves-

Tons. Crews.

Shipped.

sels.

1,154 44,054 8,432

Passen- Cargo Ves-

gers.

Tons. sels.

461 20,310| 2,749 219,611 31,012

Tons. Crews.

Tons. Crews.

12,984 1,180,867 168,122 106,037 714,490 4,482 154,724 35,687

East Coast,..

San On Dis- trict, West

River, &c.,. West Coast,

462 29,373 4,662) 36 20,023 330 19,669 4,077

Total,... 14,570 1,254,294 181,216 106,534 754,823 7,561 394,034 | 70,776|| 6,027 22,131 1,648,328 251,902|| 112,561| 754,823

55

792 49,072 8,739

Passen- Ves-

gers. sels.

3,873 263,665 39,414 516 20,310

5,972 17,4661,335,591203,809 112,009 714,490

36 20,023

Passen-

gers.

Cargo

Shipped.

Tons.

V.-TOTAL NUMBER, TONNAGE, CREWS, AND CARGOES

WITH CARGOES.

BRITISH.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOES.

NAMES

OF PORTS.

Cargoes.

Cargoes.

Ca:

Vls.

Tons. Crews.

Vis. Tons. Crews. Vls. Tons. Crews.

Vis.

Tons. Crews.

Dis- charged.

Transit.

Dis- charged.

Dis-

Transit.

| charged

Aberdeen,

Hunghom,

Shaukiwán,.

Stanley,.

Victoria,

2,9118,780,213 140,545 1,800,620 939,569

Yaumáti,..

***

Total,.

2,9113,780,213 140,545 1,800,620 939,569

747

20,702 6,486; 6,81

724

11,300 3,335

9,95

781

41,679 6,644

30,58

7,395 1,732 5,81

100 109,639 3,900 3,011 3,889,852 144,445 1,800,620|| 939,569,10,632 1,983,601 169,7921,158,58 1,828|| 195,671|19,528; 171,25

...

100 109,639 3,900 3,011 3,889,852|144,445 1,800,620 939,569)14,991|| 2,260,408 207,517|1,382,97

VI. TOTAL NUMBER, TONNAGE, CREWS, AND CARGOES

279

WITH CARGOES.

BRITISH.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

WITH CA

NAMES

OF PORTS.

Shipped.

Shipped.

Vis. Tons. Crews.

Vls.

Tons. Crews.

Bunker

Bunker Coal.

Vis. Tons. Crews.

Vls. Tons. Crews.

Bunker

Cargoes. Coal.

Cargoes. Coal.

Aberdeen, Hunghom,

Stanley,.

236 6,561 1,724

472

25,575 3,30:

Shaukiwán,.

...

878

53,231 6,98;

Victoria,

Yaumáti,..

Total,.....

2,815 3,616,315 140,726 1,003,134 185,891

...

2,815 3,616,315 140,726 1,003,134 185,891

126 6,354 1,081

196 272,229 7,161 28,626 3,011 3,888,544 147,887 1,003,184 214,617 12,354 2,159,099 204,04

...

2,186 217,308 22,650

196 272,229 7,161 28,626 3,011 3,888,544 147,887,1,003,134 214,517,16,252 2,468,128|239,78;

NUMBER, TONNAGE, CREWS, AND CARGOES OF VESSELS ENTERED AT EACH PORT IN THE COLONY OF HONG

FOREIGN.

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST,

TOTAL.

WI

Cargoes.

Cargoes.

Cargoes.

Tons. Crews.

Vis.

Dis- charged.

Tons. Crews.

Vis.

Tons. Crews. Vls.

Tons. Crews.

Vls.

Tons.

Transit.

747

Dis- charged.

20,702 6,486; 6,819

Trausit.

Dis- charged.

Transit.

245

8,330 2,708 992

724

11,360 3,335| 9,959

581

34,293 5,720] 1,305

781

41,679 6,644 30,588

925

54,058 9,036 1,706

29,032 9,194 6,819 45,653 9,055 9,959 95,737 15,680) 30,588

747

20,702

724

11,360

781

41,679

279

7,395 1,732 5,817

93

3,889,852 144,445 1,800,620|| 939,569 10,632 1,983,601 169,792 1,158,533 530,275

4,265

3,137

2,317 987 3721 463,293 55,797 14,897 2,446,894 225,589,1,158,533 530,275 262,664 35,941 4,965 458,335, 55,469 171,256

9,712 2,719

5,817

279

7,895

13,543

5,763,814

...

1,828

195,671

1,828 195,67119,528 171,256

13,889,852 144, 145|1,800,620||| 939,569|14,991| 2,260,408,207,517 1,382,972 530,275 9,246

824,955 110,189 24,237) 3,085,363 317,706 1,382,072 530,275 17,902 6,040,621

L NUMBER, TONNAGE, CREWS, AND CARGOES OF VESSELS CLEARED AT EACH PORT IN THE COLONY OF HONC

FOREIGN.

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Shipped.

Shipped.

Shipped.

er Vis. Tons. Crews.

Vls.

Tons.

Crews.

Vls.

Tons. Crews.

-

dl.

Cargoes.

Bunker Coal.

Bunker

Bunker Coal.

Vls.

Tons.

Crews.

V}

Bunker

Cargoes. Coal.

Cargoes. Coal.

236

472

6,561 1,724 2,792 25,575 3,305 24,142 878 53,231 6,985| 46,836 126 6,354 1,081 5,419

3,358 1,624 ,626 3,011 3,888,544 147,887 1,003,134 214,517 12,354 2,159,099 204,040 1,147,522 108,109 2,487 298,459 22,969

2,186 217,308 22,650||187,654

2,712 234,292 31,901| ,626 3,011 3,888,544 147,887 1,003,134 214,517,16,252 2,468,128 239,785 1,414,365 108,109 7,802 619,419 77,969

...

29,032 9,194 2,792 45,653 9,055 24,142

93,992| 15,240| 46,836)

9,712 2,705| 5,419

30,829 14,841 2,457,558 227,009 1.147,522 138,938 15,

4,898 451,600 54,551 187,654|

2,

30,829 24,054 3,087,547 317,754 1,414,365 138,938 19,'

756

22,471 7,470|

833

20,078 5,750

768

40,761 8,255)

246

992 1,805

1,646

372

RT IN THE COLONY OF HONGKONG, IN THE YEAR 1894.

ΓΑΣ.

WITH CARGOES.

TOTAL.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Cargoes.

Cargoes.

Cargoes.

VS.

Vls.

Tons.

Crews.

Vls.

Tons. Crews. Vls.

Tons.

Crews.

Dis- charged.

Transit.

Dis- charged.

Dis-

Transit.

Transit.

charged.

94 6,819

747

20,702 6,486

6,819

245

8,330,

2,708

992

29,032

9,194

6,819

53

9,959

724

11,360 3,335

9,959

581.

34,293

5,720

1,305

45,653 9,055

9,959

80

30,588

781

41,679

6,644

30,588

925

54,058

9,36

1,706

95,737 15,680|

30,588

19 5,817

279

7,395

1.732

5,817

93

2,317

987

372

9,712 2,719

5,817

39,1,158,533 530,275

13,543

5,763,814 310,337

2,959,153||||1,469,844

4,365

572,932

59,697)

69 171,256

1,828

195,671 19,528

171,250

5,137

262,664 35,941|

17,908 4,965

*061,882,972 580,275 17,902 6,040,621 848,062 3,183,592 1,469,844 9,946

6,336,746 370,034|| 2,959,153|1,469,844

934,594 114,089 27,248 6,975,215 462,151 3,183,592 1,469,844

458,385 55,469

171,256

RT IN THE COLONY OF HONGKONG, IN THE YEAR 1894.

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOES.

TOTAL.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Shipped.

Shipped.

Shipped.

S.

Tons. Crews.

Vis.

Tons. Crews.

Vis.

Tons. Crews.

Cargoes.

Bunker Coal.

Cargoes.

Buuker Coal.

Bunker Coal.

Vis.

Tons. Crews.

Cargoes.

Bunker

Coal.

092 29,032 9,194 2,792

...

905

45,653 9,055] 24,142

646

93,992 15,240 46,836

372

9,712 2,705

5,419

126 6,354 1,081 5,419

2,186 217,308 22,650 187,654

236 6,561 1,724 2,792 472

25,575 3,305 24,142 878 53,231 6,985 46,836

...

3,358 1,624

841 2,457,558 227,009 1.147,522 138,938 15,169 5,775,414 344,766 2,150,656 294,000 2,683 570,688 30,130 898 451,600 54,551| 187,654

2,712 234,292 31,901

0543,087,547 317,754 1,414,365 138,938 19,067 6,084,443 380,511 2,417,499 294,000 7,998 891,648 85,130

372 9,712 2,705 5,419

59,455 17,852 6,346,102 374,896 2,150.656 353,455

4,898 451,600 54,551 187,654

59,155|27,065| 6,976,091 465,641 2,417,499 353,455

756

22,471 7,470|

992

29,032 9,194 2,792

833

20,078 5,750

1,305

45,653 9,055 24,142

768

40,761 8,255

1,646

93,992 15,240| 46,836

246

255

257

XI.-Grand Total Number, Tonnage, Crews, Passengers and Cargo of Junks ENTERED at each Port in the Colony of Hongkong (exclusive of Local Trude), during the Year ending 31st December, 1894.

CARGO.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Ves- sels.

Tons. Crews.

Crews. Passen-

gers.

Cargo Ves- Discharged.

Tons. sels.

Tous. Crews.

Passen- Ves- gers. sels.

Tons. Crews.

l'assen-

gers.

Cargo Discharged.

Tons.

Aberdeen, Hungbom,.

747

20,702 6,486| 252

724

11,360 3,335

173

Shaukiwán,

781

41,679 6,644

204

Stanley,

279

7.395 1,732

3

Victoria,

9,529

725,156122.323|| 78,877

Yaumáti,

1,828 195,671 19,528

83

6,819 245 9,959 581 30,588 925

5,817 212,868 171,256 3,137| 262,661|35,941| 50

8,330 2,708

31

992

29,032 9,194 283

6,819

34,293 5,720| 54,058 9,036

26

1,305

45,653 9,055

199

9,959

43

1,706

95,737 15,680

247

30,588

93 2,317 987 4,154 378,444|52,808|| 28,644

372

9.712 2,719

5,817

13,683 1,103,600|175,131 107,521

212,868

4,965 458,335 55,469 133

171,256

Total....13,888 1,001,963 160,04 79,592 | 160,048 | 9,135 | 740,106 107,200 28,795 23.0231,742,069|267,248 108,387

160,048

XII.-Grand Total Number, Tonnage, Crews, Passengers and Cargo of Junks CLEARED at each Port in the Colony of Hongkong (exclusive of Local Trade), during the Year ending 31st December, 1894.

CARGO.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Ves- sels.

Tons. Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Cargo Ves- Shipped.

Tons. sels.

Tons. Crews.

l'assen- Ves- gers. sels.

Tons. Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Cargo Shipped.

Tons.

Aberdeen, Hunghom,

Shaukiwán,

Stanley,....

Victoria,

Yaumáti,

236 6,561 1,724 154 2.792 756 472

25,575 3,305 131 24,142 878 53,231 6,985 284 46,836 126 6,354 1,081

4 5,419 11,352 1,034,547|159,680) 105,874 | 552,038 2,273

2,186 217,308| 22,650||

22,471 7,470|

29

992

29,032 9,194 183

2,792

833

20,078 5,750

5

1,305

45,653 9,055

136

24,142

768

40,761 8,255|

10

1,646

93,992 15,240

291

46,836

246

87 187,654 2,712

3,358 1,624 75,519 16,320 234,292 31,901

372 9,712 2,705

5,419

5,669

13,625 1,110,066 176,000, 111,543 310 4,898 451,600 34,551| 397

552,068

187,654

Total,... 15,250 1,348,576|195,425] 106,534 | 818,911 | 7,588

396,479 71,320

6,027 | 22,8381,740,055|266,745 112,561

818,911

XIII.—Return of Junks (Local Trade) EXTERED at the Port of Victoria from the Out-stations of the Island and

the Villages in British Kaulung, during the Year ending 31st December, 1894.

CARGO.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Ves- sels.

Crev Tons. Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Cargo Ves- Discharged.

sels. Tons.

Tons. Crews.

l'assen- Ves- sels. gers.

Tons. Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Cargo Discharged, Tons.

Victoria,..

2,825 | 106,791 | 34,652

2,082 | 90,964 1,397 41,742 11,378

Total,... 2,825| 106,791|34,652|||||2,082

3,982 4,222 148,533 46,030 6,064 90,964

90,964 1,397 41,742 11,378

3,982 | 4,222 | 148,533 46,030 6,064 90,961

XIV.—Return of Junks (Locul Trade) CLEARED at the Port of Victoria for the Out-stations of the Island and

the Villages in British Kaulung, during the Year ending 31st December, 1894.

CARGO.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Ves- sels.

Tons. Crews. Passen-

gers.

Cargo Ves- Shipped.

Tons. sels.

Tons. Crews. Passeu- Ves- gers. sels.

Tons. Crews. Passen-

Carge

Shipped.

gers.

Tons.

Victoria,

1,881 49,848 | 14,963| 3,571

9,597 2,375 98,98331,175

98,983 31,175 1,258 | 4,256| 148,831 46,138 4,829

9,597

Total,... 1,881 49,848 14,963||||3,571 9,597 2,375 98,983 31,175

98,983 31,175 1,258 4,256| 148,831|46,138|||||| 4,829

9,597

258

XV.—SUMMARY.

FOREIGN TRADE.

No. of VESSELS.

TONS.

CREWS.

British Vessels entered with Cargoes,

Do.

do.

in Ballast,

2,911 100

3,780,213

140,545

109,639

3,900

Total,......

3,011

3,889,852

144,445

British Vessels cleared with Cargoes,..

2,815

3,616,315

140,726

Do.

do. in Ballast,

196

272,229

7,161

Total,.......

3,011

3,888,544

147,887

Total of all British Vessels entered and cleared,

6,022

7,778,396

292,332

Foreign Vessels entered with Cargoes,

14,991

2,260,408

207,517

Do.

do. in Ballast,....

9,246

824,955

110,189

Total,.................

24,237

3,085,363

317,706

Foreign Vessels cleared with Cargoes,

16,252

2,468,128

239,785

Do.

do. in Ballast...

7,802

619,419

77,969

Total,.

24,054 3,087,547

317,754

Total of all Foreigu Vessels entered and cleared,.........

18.291

6,172,910

635,460

Total of all Vessels entered with Cargoes,.

17,902

6,040,621

348,062

Do..

do. in Ballast,.

9,346

934,594

114,089

Total of all Vessels entered,.....

27,248

6,975,215

462,151

Total of all Vessels cleared with Cargoes,.

Do.

do. in Ballast,

19,067

6,084,443

380,511

7,998

891,648

85,130

Total of all Vessels cleared,.

27,065

6,976,091

465,641

Total of all Vessels entered and cleared with Cargoes,

36,969

12,125,064

728,573

Do.

do.

do. in Ballast,

17,844

1,826,242

199,219

Total of all Vessels engaged in Foreign Trade only, entered and cleared,

54,318

13,951,306

927,792

LOCAL TRADE.

Total of all Vessels entered,

4,222

148,533

46,030

Do.

cleared,

4,256

118,831

46,138

Total of all Vessels engaged in Local Trade only, entered and cleared,

8,478

297,264

92,168

Do.

Total of all Vessels engaged in Foreign Trade only, entered and cleared,

do. in Local Trade only,

54,313

do.

8,478

13,951,306

297,864

927,792

92,168

Grand Total of all Vessels entered and cleared,...

62,791

14,248,670 1,019,960

XVI.-RETURN of VESSELS REGISTERED at the Port of Hongkong, during the Year 1894.

259

Name of Vessel.

Official Number.

Regis- tered Tonnage.

Horse Power.

Built

Rig.

Where built and when.

Remarks.

of

Kitty,

85,926

803

Barque

Iron

Amsterdam, 1856.

Foreign name "Stad Euschede."

Kwong Hoi, str.,......

73,794

513 400

None

Iron

Clyde, 1875.

Formerly "Ooryia."

Fame, str.,

19,498

140

74 None

Iron

South Shields, 1857.

Sabah, str.,

95,865

42

24 None

Wood

Hongkong, 1894.

Kwong Mo, str.,.........

95,861

177

55 Schooner

Compo

Whampoa, 1889.

Foreign name "Kwong Mo."

site

Caleb Curtis,

95,866

67

:

Schooner Wood Boston, Massachusetts, U.S.A.,

Foreign name "Caleb Curtis."

1859.

XVII-RETURN of REGISTRIES of VESSELS cancelled at the Port of Hongkong, during the Year 1894.

Name of Vessel.

Regis- tered Tonnage.

Rig.

Built of

Where built and when.

Reason of Cancellation.

Kiung Chow, str.,. 73,448

Pilot Fish, str.,.... 88,836

Tarapaca,

Avochie, str., 88,860

Kwong Mo, str.,... 95,861

Chin Shan, str., 95,862

Kwong Hoi, str.,... -3,794

Tai Ping, str.,.......... 95,863

45,387

441

289 1881 40 Schooner

116 1885 62 None

495 1898

Barque

1,056 1890 200 Schooner

102 1892 80 Schooner

85 1893 33 Schooner

1893 400 None

77 1893 25 None

Wood Hongkong, 1877.

Iron

Wood Liverpool, 1862.

Iron

Sold to be broken up.

Kowloon, Hongkong, 1885.

Stranded near Tamtoo Island.

Registered anew at Bombay.

Low Walker on Tyne, 1881.

Sold to Foreigners.

Compo-

site

Iron

Clyde, 1875.

Wood Mongkok, Hongkong, 1893.

Whampoa, 1889.

Wood Mongkok, Hongkong, 1892.

Registered de nero in consequence

of alteration in tonnage.

Sold to Foreigners.

Registered de novo in consequence

of alteration in tonnage. Sold to Foreigners.

:

Pad

XVIII. ·AMOUNT of FEES received under the Merchant Shipping Act, 1854, and Table B of Ordinance No. 26

of 1891, in the Harbour Department, during the Year 1894.

Matter or Duty in respect of which Fee taken.

Number. Fee. Amount.

Remarks.

Certifying Desertion,

82

ff

Copy from Registry Book,

Declaration of Ownership,

Endorsement of change of Master,

Endorsement of change of Ownership,

Granting Certificate of Imperial Registry,

Inspection of Registry,...

Recording Mortgage of Ship,

Recording Transfer of Mortgage,

Recording Discharge of Mortgage......

Recording Sale of Ship,

82

10

16

54

6

15

90

1

11

5

25

10

30

15

Registering Certificate of Sale,

Total,.........$ 353

260

XIX. RETURN of CHINESE PASSENGER SHIPS cleared by the Emigration Officer, Hongkong, during the Year

ending the 31st day of December, 1894.

No.

DATE CLEARED.

SHIP'S NAME,

Toxs.

1

January 3

Dardanus, str.

1,491 British

Q

**

3

Mogul, str.

1,827

NATION-

ALITY

OF SHIP.

T. Purdy T. Golding

ADULTS.

CHILDREN.

MASTER'S NAME.

WHITHER BOUND.

TOTAL.

M.

F.

M.

F.

Straits Settlements

149

149

Victoria, B.C.

32

Tacoma, U.S.A.

48

16

99

Belgie, str.

2,695

W. H. Walker

San Francisco

46.

40

,,

6

Wing Sang, str.

1,517

9

Stura, str..

10 Gisela, str.

12

""

Peru, str.

12

Loo Sok, str.

"

13

Propontis, str.

وو

10

""

13 Arratoon Aprar, str.

29

21

20 | China, str.

"

12

>>

20 Hongay, str.

1,416 Italian 2,043 Austrian 2,540 American 1,020 British 1,390 1,392

1,113 German 1,564 British

d'A. de St. Croix E. De Negri F. Kossovich D. E. Friele G. Anderson W. H. Fanand J. E. Hausen

Straits Settlements

664

111

21

13

8:9

499

74

16

596

169

10

183

San Franci-co

89

2

:

91

Straits Settlements

234

13.

253

308

45

360

191

49.

254

P. Voss

564

54.

10

645

31

J. Young

94

94

>>

13

23 Victoria, str.

1,992

V. Perkes

Victoria, B.C.

32

63

"

وو

Tacoma, U.S.A.

31

14

23 Gouverneur Gencraals' Jacob, s.j

1,569 Dutch

N. Kamminga

Straits Settlements

121

18

140

Victoria, B.C.

52

15

>>

24 Empress of China, str.

3,003 British

R. Archibald

187

Vancouver, B.C.

135

16

ގ

24 | Chelydra, str.

27

30

31

34

35

36

37

38

41

≈ 22378 & *** & *2 3 -88-88 8 ******** * 28 7 834835 3 886 3 888 8 5882 2 887

17

""

25 Oceanic, str...........

1,574 2,410

R. Cass

Straits Settlements

265

76.

14

2

357

Honolulu

29

W. M. Smith

""

San Francisco

46

::

70

18

26 Deuteros, str.

30

97

14

19

29

20 February 1

21

Lightning, str........

City of Rio de Janeiro, str.

1,198 German 2,124 | British 2,275 American

W. A. Dinse

Straits Settlements

137

27

169

J. G. Spence

158

30

191

J. T. Smith

San Francisco

41

43

29

Catherine Apear, str.

1,734 British

J. G. Olitent

Straits Settlements

189

202

17

Catterthun, str.

1,400

N. Shannon

"

Thursday Island

31

3+

23

24

23

وو

21

Empress of India, str.

3,003

O. P. Marshall

Victoria, B.C.

74

242

Vancouver, B.C.

168

21

Hupeh. str.

1,846

T. Quail

""

19

25

22

City of Peking, str.

,

26

23

23

Wing Sang, str.

3,120 | American 1,517 British

W. B. Seabury d'A. de Ste. Croix

Straits Settlements San Francisco Straits Settlements

350

19

374

38

40

347

44

3

400

وو

27

Tacoma, str.

1,662

J. R. Hill

Victoria, B.C.

50

65.

""

Tacoma, U S.A.

15

28 Mareli

1 Propontis, str.

1,390

??

29

3 Arratoon Apear, str.

1,892

W. H. Farrand J. E. Hansen

Straits Settlements

786

3

857

703

69

7

7

786

27

""

Honolulu

""

6

China, str.

2,401

W. Ward

396

21

San Francisco

218

5

33

Phra Chom Khan, str.

1,012

J. Fowler

Straits Settlements

587!

5

600-

32

8 Stura, str.............

33

10 Marquis Barqueham, str..

1,416 Italian 2,740 Austrian

13 | Chelydra, str.

1,574 British

E. De Negri G. Walluschnig R. Cass

5231

46!

11

€90

;

370

12

384*

592

31.

10

636

15 Hongay, str..........

""

15 Belgic, str.

20

Mogul, str.

1,564 2,695

1,827

J. Young

602

25

635

1

J1

W. H. Walker

San Francisco

445

5

452

T. Golding

Victoria, B.C.

56

175

""

11

Tacoma, U.S.A.

119

20

China, str.

""

39

""

3

21 Empress of Japan, sir.

40

""

22 | Lightning, str...

23

Peru, str.

29

42

27 Kutsang, str.

1,113 German

3,003 British 2,124 2,540 American 1,495 British

P. Voss

Straits Settlements

630

37

G80

G. A. Lee

Victoria, B.C.

48

Vancouver, B.C.

691

::

739

""

43 April

3 Catherine Apcar, str.

1,784

J. G. Spence D. E. Friele W. H. Jackson J. G. Olifent

Straits Settlements

774

86

9

878

San Francisco

739

7:

1

750

traits Settlements

748

17:

776

6031

99

18

19

736

44

3 Oceanic, str..

2,440

W. M. Smith

San Francisco

497

6

508

45

""

5 Bisagno, str.

1,499 Italian

A. Tognasso

Straits Settlements

692

36

12

745

46

19

6. Phra Chom Khao, str..

1,012 | British

J. Fowler

631

667

47

>"

7 Chow Fa, str.

1,055

F. W. Phillips

348

23

383

25

48

10 Victoria, str.

1,992

J. Panton

Victoria, BC.

95

""

A

""

Tacoma, U.S.A.

49

10 Thibet, str.

""

50

10 Borneo, str. ...

51

93.

11

Empress of China, str.......

52

11

""

City of Rio de Janeiro, str.

13 Wing Sang, str.

99

16 Maria Valerie, str.

55

18 Ardgay, str.

1,665 1,561 Dutch 3,003 British

2,275 American 1,517 British 2,644 Austrian 1,081 British

J. C. Theunissen

R. Archibald

J. Thom

R. A. Peters

Straits Settlements

481

14:

499

443

29

484

J

Victoria, B.C.

63

393

Vancouver, B.C.

830

J. T. Smith

San Francisco

51

1

57

d'A. de Ste. Croix

| Straits Settlements

532

56

601

G. Costanzo

30

659

25

634

31

673

25

56

18 Hupeh, str.

1,846

T. Quail

11

692

"2

""

"J

57

""

20 Arratoon Apear, str.

1,392

J. E. Hansen

692

96

14

807

"

J

Honolulu

223

15

13

58

">

24 Gaelic, str.

2,691

W. G. Pearne

398

""

San Francisco

135

3

:

59

""

27 Kong Beng, str.

862

"

B. Pigot

Straits Settlements

600

42

7

60

""

28 Chelydra, str.

1.574

R. Cass

8561

**

"

61 May

1 Hougay, str..

15,64

J. Young

564

61

127

650

914

640.

Victoria, B.C.

57

62

""

2 Empress of India, str.

3,003

O. P. Marshall

220

32

Vancouver, B.C.

169

63

,,

3 City of Peking, str.

64

Stura, str....

53

65

22

5 Lightning, str..

66

"

5 Tritos, str.....

67

22

Azamor, str.

3,129 | American 1,416 Italian 2,124 British

1,085 German 2,005 British

R. R. Searle

San Francisco

48

3

ان

E. De Negri K. H. Sundberg

J. Desler

P. Gibson

Straits Settlements

628

135

21

804

505

66

602

Singapore

22

:

390

Mauritius

357

Straits Settlements

346

32

393.

68

""

9 Devawongse, str.

1,057

R. Unsworth

449

484

**

69

29

15 China, str.

2,401

W. Ward

San Francisco

159

7

169

70

"

15 Kutsang, str.

1,495

W. H. Jackson

Straits Settlements

669

74

16

14

773

""

71

"

23 Empress of Japan str.

3,C03

G. A. Lee

Victoria, B.C.

44

188

**

72

"}

24 Belgic, str.

2,695

73

29 Sikh, str.

1,736

74 June 1 Peru, str.

2,540 American

W. H. Walker J. Rowley D. F. Friele

Carried forward,.... 140,462

Vancouver, B.C. San Francisco Victoria, B.C. San Francisco

Carried forward..........

144

82

85

26

:

26

16

23

27,513 2,081

422 201

30,277

RETURN of CHINESE PASSENGER SHIPS cleared by the Emigration Officer, Hongkong,—Continued.

CHILDREN.

261

No.

DATE CLEARED.

SHIP'S NAME.

TONS.

NATION- ALITY OF SHIP.

ADULTS.

MASTER'S NAME.

WHITHER BOUND.

TOTAL.

M.

F. M. F.

Brought forward,..............| 140,462

Brought forward,27,513 2,081

422 261 80,277

75 Angust 11

Peru, str.

76

21

Oceanic, str.....

2,540 American 2,440 British

D. E. Friele W. M. Smith

San Francisco

16

43

151

21

1

45

78

80

81

85

87

P 2 8 3 Z ❀ B*£ £ 8682281685 8 8

23 Victoria, str.

1,992

J. Panton

Victoria, B.C.

59

""

28

City of Rio de Janeiro, str.

79 Sept.

5

Empress of India, str..

3,003 British

*

19

82

11 Gaelic, str.

20 City of Peking, str.

26 Tacoma, str..........................

2,691 3,129 American

,,

1,662 British

V. Perkes

"

2,275 American

J. T. Smith

O. P. Marshall

W. G. Pearne

R. R. Searle

Victoria, B.C. Vancouver, B.C. San Francisco Honolulu San Francisco Victoria, B.C.

Tacoma, U.S.A.

2

San Francisco

29

32

1671

::

::

61

30

199

70

72

477

45

***

54

19

23

621

31

48

Tacoma, U.S.A.

17

83

""

26 Chelydra, str.

84

26

Azamor, str...

1,574 2,005

R. Cass

Straits Settlements

421

86

519

"

P. Gibson

356

24

391

وو

29

Chow Fa, str.

1,055

J. E. Farrell

192

27

236

"

86 Oct.

2

China, str.....

2,401

W. Ward

San Francisco

84

88

3 Empress of Japan, str.

3,003

""

"3

3 Lightning, str.

2,124

89

>>

8 Bisagno, str..

1,499 | Italian

90

9 Vindobona, str.

2,688 Austrian

G. A. Lec

K. H. Sundberg

E. Barabino P. Mersa

Victoria, B.C.

301

Vancouver, B.C.

98

::

128

Straits Settlements

318

155

19

141

506

442

85

14

11

552

361

193

23

14

591

""

91

"

13

Belgic, str.

2,635 British

92

11

13 Shantung, str.

93

53

13 Kutsang, str.

1,835 1,495

"

W. H. Walker H. C. D. Frampton J. Young

San Francisco

40

49

Straits Settlements

286

66

6

362

446

172

261

13

657

"2

94

27

18

Propontis, str.

1,390

W. H. Farrand

G08

89

161

720

27

""

95

""

20

Catherine Apcar, str.

1,734

J. G. Olifent

656

182

261

885

وو

"

96

21

20

Peru, str.

2,540 American

D. E. Friele

San Francisco

56

97

98

27

Hupeh, str.

1,846 British

T. Quail

Straits Settlements

3591

48

Honolulu

133

14

30 | Oceanic, str.............

2,440

W. M. Smith

San Francisco

91

99

"}

31

Empress of China, str.

3,003

R. Archibald

Victoria, B.C.

24

Vancouver, B.C.

102

:.

::

∞ c

:

59

415

254

126

100

39

31

Wing Sang, str.

1,517

d'A de Ste. Croix

Straits Settlements

579

196

16

101

Nov.

3 Bormida, str.

1,499 Italian

102

""

A

3 Chow Fa, str.

1,055 British

A

193

104

105 106

25

6 Arratoon Apcar, str.

3 Tritos, str.

A

22

6 Victoria, str.

""

6

City of Rio de Janeiro, str.

107

10

Gisela, str.

108

14 Chelydra, str.

109

""

14 Loo Sok,

110

16

Ardgay, str.

111

""

19

Glenavon, str.

112

""

113

114

115

"

116

"

117

25

30

1,085 German

1,992 British

19

1,392 2,275 American 2,643 | Austrian

1,574 British

E. De Negri J. E. Farrell

P. Cornelsen

J. Panton

J. T. Smith

A. Mitis

R. Cass

550

144

17

22

498

82

15

676

799

19

730

601

"J

Singapore

Go

342

Mauritius

273

7

Victoria, B.C.

21

:

28

Tacoma, U.S.A.

7

J. E. Hansen

Straits Settlements

346

151

16

14

$27

San Francisco

29

1

34

Straits Settlements

479

100

16

17

612

461

94

14

15

584

1,020

J. B. Jackson

""

""

350

35

30

419

1,081

1,912

D. Smith

E. Norman

137

20

160

:

189

12

205

119

120

121

22

118 Dec.

20 Gaelic, str.

23 Lightning, str.

28 Empress of India, str..

28 City of Peking, str.

28 Propontis, str.

Choy Sang, str..

Bisagno, str..

6 Shantung, str.

7 Poseidon, str.

8 Catherine Apcar, str.

3,129 | American 1,390 | British 1,194 1,499 Italian 1,835 British 2,443 Austrian 1,734 British

W. H. Farrand J. Young E. Barabino H.C.D. Frampton A. Fellner J. G. Olifent

2,691

W. G. Pearne

San Francisco

103

103

""

2,124

2)

K H. Sundberg

Straits Settlements

390

133

13

14

550

3,003

""

O. P. Marshall

W. Ward

Victoria, B.C.

6

Vancouver, B.C.

96

} 102

San Francisco

25

25

Straits Settlements

489

71

17:

579

369

48

427

"

29

269

45

321

12

170

17

195

"}

138

119

15

286

22

278

36

7

325

27

Honolulu

154

6

122

11

China, str.

"

2,401

W. B. Seabury

San Francisco

85

}

258

123

""

18

Wing Sang, str..

1,517

d'A. de Ste. Croix

| Straits Settlements

558

162

14

17

751

124

"

18

Belgic, str.

2,695

W. H. Walker

San Francisco

41

I

47

by

125

,,

20

Kong Beng, str.

802

,,

B. Pigot

Straits Settlements

429

54

6

495

126

""

24

Empress of Japan, str.

3,003

""

127 128

"}

24

Arratoon Apcar, str.

1,392 Britishı

23

28

Peru, str.

129 130

""

20

Propontis, str.

وو

31

Ardgay, str.

;)

2,540 | American 1,390 British 1,081

G. A. Lee

J. E. Hansen

Victoria, B.C.

5

73

Vancouver, B.C.

68

Straits Settlements

504

81

14

608

D. E. Friele W. H. Farrand D. Smith

San Francisco Straits Settlements

40

}

42

587

68

14

676

175

21

207

25

TOTAL TONS,.

252,489

TOTAL PASSENGERS,

42,568 5,008|

8721 575 49,023

ADULTS.

CHILDREN.

TOTAL.

SUMMARY.

M. F. M. F.

Mauritius,

27

Queensland Ports,........

55

Straits Settlements,

""

Tacoma, U.S.A.,

,, Victoria,

To Honolulu, Sandwich Islands,

San Francisco, U.S.A.,

Vancouver, British Columbia,.

1,170 102

47

40

1,359

630

8

11

649

31

3

34

3,453

93

23

16

3,585

34,072 4,802|

791 519

40,184

245

2,168

...

799

245 2,168 799

Do.,

TOTAL PASSENGERS,

42,568 5,008] 872 575

49,023

262

XX.-RETURN of VESSELS bringing CHINESE PASSENGERS to the Port of Victoria, Hongkong, from Places

out of the Chinese Empire, during the Year ending 31st December, 1894.

No.

DATE ARRIVED.

SHIP'S NAME.

TONS.

NATION-

ALITY OF SHIP.

ADULTS.

CHILDREN.

MASTER'S NAME.

WHERE FROM.

TOTAL.

M.

F.

M.

F.

1 January 1 Stura, str.

2

"

1 Cheang Hock Kian, str...

1,416 Italian 956 British

De Negri Kunath

Straits Settlements

134

7

523

17

"

52

CO CO

152

518

Port Darwin

10

Thursday Island

3

Cooktown

Townsville

3

"

2 Chingtu, str.

1,459

Innes

98

Brisbane

New Zealand

16

Sydney

33

Melbourne

19

6639

2

2 Empress of China, str.

3,003

Archibald

Victoria, B.C.

54

";

Vancouver, B.C.

291

237

10 30 1 00

5

""

3 Thames, str.

2,101

Seaton

Straits Settlements

36

""

6

"2

5

Irene, str..

2,207 German

Schüder

194

11

""

6 Keemun, str.

1,985 British

Castle

281

"

8 Arratoon Apcar, str.

1.392

Hansen

402

13

272

47

A

10

36

200

5

300

417

Port Darwin

16

Cairns

6

8 Catterthun, str.

1,406

Shannon

Sydney

33

Melbourne Adelaide

10

8 Loo Sok, str.

1,020

Anderson

"

Bangkok

30

30

11

8

Peru, str.

2,540 American

Friele

San Francisco

209

219

12

9 Victoria, str.

1,992 British

Panton

Victoria, B.C.

103

104

+

13

9 Teheran, str.

1,684

Cole

Straits Settlements

187

203

""

14

""

9 Mongkut, str.

859

Stonham

Bangkok

47

47

"

15

12 Phra Nang, str.

1,021

Watton

25

++

19

16

12 Glenorchy, str.

1,822

17

12 Diomed, str.

1,432

Ferguson Hannah

Straits Settlements

260

185

0010

::

25

268

200

"

21

31

22222*********

18

"}

12 Telamon, str.

1,555

Jackson

>

""

35

35

19

49

15 | Phra Chom Klao, str.

1,012

Fowler

Bangkok

43

43

20

15 Poseidon, str.

2,443 Austrian

Fellner

Straits Settlements

660;

12

6

680

16 Aglaia, str.

1,556 German

Petersen

171

173

>>

16 Nam Yong, str.

23

24

19

17 Donar, str.

25

77

19

26

27

31

17 Choy Sang, str.

Preussen, str.

20 Canton, str........

20 Oceanic, str. .........

984 British

1,194

"

1,015 German 2,977

2,044 British

Nicol

397 11

1

412

29

Bradley

3801 7

4

397

""

Grundmann

Mauritius

128

136

Hagemann

Straits Settlements

240

15

15

295

Field

266

270

2,440

Smith

San Francisco

405

3

421

""

28

""

20

Nanshan, str.

29

"

20

Borneo, str.

805 1,490 Dutch

Blackburn

Bangkok

52

52

"

Theunissen

73

73

30

19

22 Taicheong, str.

828 German

Duhn

Medan, Sumatra

113

113

22 Tantalus, str.

2,299 British

Jones

Straits Settlements

350

a

363

Port Darwin

10

Thursday Island

31

32

3e

Cooktown

1

22 Tsinan, str.

1,460

15

Ramsey

92

Townsville

14

Sydney

35

Melbourne

29

33

59

24 Lightning, str.

2,124

Spence

Straits Settlements

846

34

""

24 Daphne, str.

1,291 German

Voss

263

16

35

"

25 Kaisow, str.....

1,934 British

Gray

230

""

36

25

Chow Fa, str.

1,055

Phillips

Bangkok

160

**

99

37

"

26 City of Rio de Janeiro, str.

2,275 American

Smith

San Francisco

132!

38

27 Monmouthshire, str.

1,871 British

Gedye

Straits Settlements

318

""

39

"

27 Glenfalloch, str.................

1,434

Darke

265

*

40

30 Formosa, str.

2,616

Bishop

86

3276

01 30-H

:

19

41

19

30 Kut Sang, str.

1,495

Jackson

262

"

42

"

31 Kriemhild, str.

1,709 German

Hildebrandt

179

**

:

43

31

Empress of India, str.

3,003 British

Victoria, B.C.

301

Marshall

Vancouver, B.C.

121

44 Feb.

1

Sikh, str.

45

"

2 Laertes, str..

46

"

3 Bisagno, str.

1,736 1,351 1,499 Italian

"

11

47

""

5 Bengloe, str.

1,183 British

48

5 Gaelic, str. ......

2,691

""

49

;)

7 Catherine Apcar, str.

1,734

Rowley Grier Tognasso Sarchet Pearne Olifent

Straits Settlements

30

38

;"

29

29

111

""

San Francisco

162

Straits Settlements

182

"

50

17

8 Shanghai, str.

2,044

Street!

165

4251

an oo - mo

:)

"5

51

39

8 Siam, str.................

992

Messer

Bangkok

80

""

52

9 Glenesk, str.

2,275

Webster

Straits Settlements

41

19

53

9 Teucer, str.

1,803

"

Riley

40

884

272

238

160

138

325

276

92

282

180

151

30

38

29

2

120

1

168

4

200

169

80

45

40

Port Darwin

13

Cooktown

91

54

10 Changsha, str.........

1,463

Williams

Townsville

91

Sydney

271

Melbourne

36

2835

55

10 Omega

56

12 Lawang, str.

57

12 Oanfa, str.

480 1,637 German 1,970 British

Brown

Callao, Peru

70

Binger Shaw

Straits Settlements

63

25

202

""

888888

80

68

29

99

Thursday Island

Townsville

58

99

12 Menmuir, str.

1,287

""

Craig

34

Rockhampton

19

Sydney

3

$238233

59

>>

60

61

62

"

63

99

17 Bayern, str.......

64

19 Wing Sang, str.

65

21 Tai Cheong, str.

Carried forward.......

15 Marquis Bacquehem,

15 Tailee, str.

16 Tacoma, str.

....

16 City of Peking, str.

str.

2,740 Austrian 828 German 1,662 British 3,129 American 3,435 German 1,517 British

828 German

111,488

Walluschnig Calender Hill Seabury Schmaelder Ste. Croix Duhn

Straits Settlements

91

91

Medan, Sumatra

35

Tacoma, U.S.A.

26

J

27

San Francisco

51

1

53

Straits Settlements

73

10

2

89

92

5

1

100

Medan, Sumatra

14

:

44

Carried forward................

10,906 261 149

68

11,387

RETURN of VESSELS bringing CHINESE PASSENGERS to the Port of Victoria, Hongkong,-Continued.

263

No.

DATE ARRIVED.

SHIP'S NAME.

TONS.

NATION- ALITY OF SHIP.

ADULTS.

CHILDREN.

MASTER'S NAME.

WHERE FROM.

TOTAL.

M. F.

M.

F.

Brought forward......| 111,488

Brought forward..... 10,906|||| 261

149 68 11,387

CCRCCLE=32882888 2 8

22

22

23

;;

26

**

26

""

"

1

11

2

导斧

2

"

2

2

"

3

66 Feb. 22 Myrmidon, str.

67

69

69

70

71

72

73

74

75

76

77

78

79

80

81

"

29

"3

""

March 1 Benalder, str.

"

1,816 British

Nelson

Straits Settlements

534

3

China, str.

2,401

Honolulu

23

Ward

"

San Francisco

641

Mongkut, str.

869

""

Stonbam

Bangkok

25

Nam Yong, str.

984

Nicol

""

Straits Settlements

688

Arratoon Apcar, str.

1,392

Hansen

39

786 14

"

26 | Ixion, str.

2,299

Nish

668

36

34

54 20

540

5

102

25

1037

5

702

803

700

China, str.

1,113 German

Voss

Bangkok

35

35

27 Loo Sok, str.

1,020 British

Anderson

56

56

28 Empress of Japan, str.

3,003

"

Lee

Vancouver, B.C.

40

40

Glengyle, str.

1.294 2,244

""

McIntosh

Straits Settlements

30

30

Gassou

Stura, str.

Bellona, str.

Diamond, str.

""

1,416 Italian

1,722 German

1,030 British

482

De Negri

202 18

:29

20

502

5

227

Joger

350

350

Ellis

698 20 10 12

""

Java, str.

2,632

**

Tillard

783!

**

Cheang Hock Kian, str....

956

宁师

Kunath

292

23

NNO

740

790

**

297

"

3

Phra Chom Klao, str.

1,012

Fowler

>>

Bangkok

291

29

#1

Gwalior, str.

1,618

Denny

Straits Settlements

241

10

3

254

Port Darwin

Townsville

84

>

6 Airlie, str.

1,494

33

Ellis

Dunedin, N.Z.

33

Sydney

Melbourne

Adelaide

85

86

Belgic, str.

2,695

""

7 Pakling, str.

1,911

""

Walker Long

San Francisco

32

36

Straits Settlements

278

12

300

$7

7 Agamemnon, str.

1,491

19

Williams

228

238

*

88

8 Chelydra, str.

1,574

""

Cass

837

877

"

89

90

Devawongse, str.

9 Jocob Diedericksen, str..

1,057

""

Unsworth

Bangkok

100

100

623 German

Hundewadt

30

30

91

10 Niobe, str.

1,440

19

Pfaff

Straits Settlements

483

483

92

""

13

Aden, str.

2,517 British

Hill

400!

20

2

426

93

94

95

96

97

98

99

"}

14

Peru, str.

2,540 American

Friele

San Francisco

32

1

33

""

15

Titan, str.

1,525 British

Brown

Straits Settlements

214

9

226

""

16

Karlsrhue, str.

3,450 German

Kessler

230 35

14

5

284

"

16

Lightning, str.

2,124 British

29

16

Tailee, str.

#1

16

Taichiow, str.

828 German 862 British

Spence Calender

398

51

454

Deans

Medan, Sumatra Bangkok

29

29

40

40

"1

17

Moyune, str.

1,714

11

De la Perrelle

Straits Settlements

50

50

Port Darwin

Thursday Island

2

Townsville

100

"

19 Tai Yuan, str..............

1,159

Brisbane

"

Nelson

Auckland

200

70

Adelaide

Sydney Melbourne

11 42

6

101

102

19

Maria Valerie, str.

2,644 Austrian

"!

21

Cyclops, str.

1,363 British

103

:

21 Diomed, str.

1,432

$9

Costanzo Barr Wilkinson

Straits Settlements

612

30 25

15

682

72

3

>>

:

75

489

500

21

104

""

22 Kut Sang, str..

1.495

**

Jackson

5701 17

12

605

105

22 | Phra Chula Chom Klao, s.

1,012

+

Morris

Bangkok

34

34

106

11

24 Phra Nang, str.

1,021

22

Watton

120

120

107

"

27

Thames, str.

2,101

99

Seaton

Straits Settlements

74

74

108

+

27

Catherine Apcar, str.

1,734

Olifent

556! 102

22 28

708

109

"

27

Gerda, str.

2,111 German

Ehlers

720 30

20

13

783

110

29

27 Nam Yong, str.

984 British

Nicol

821

41

10

5

877

111

27 Normandie, str.

628 Norwegian

Berg

Bangkok

50

50

112

"

27 Oceanic, str.

2.440 British

Honolulu

54

Smith

153

San Francisco

94

113

11

28 Velocity,

491

Martin

Honolulu

102

22.00

117

114

28 Dryfesdale, str.

1,574

"

Stewart

Straits Settlements

30

30

115

"

28 Cardiganshire, str.

1,623

Sincock

30

30

"

116

"

28 Empress of China, str.

3,003

Archibald

Vancouver, B.C.

66

76

117

**

29 Kong Beng, str.

862

"

l'igot

Bangkok

54

54

:

118

"

29 Victoria, str.

1,992

Perkes

Victoria, B.C.

10

30

Tacoma, U.S.A.

20

119

17

29

Polyphemus, str.

120

"

121

122

22

123

124 April

30 Hiroshima Maru, str..

30 Bisagno, str.

30 Phra Chom Klao, str.

31 Loo Sok, str.

2,031 Japanese

1.499 Italian

Scale

1,813

Straits Settlements

188

188

11

Macmillan

237

237

>

1,012 | British 1,020

2 City of Rio de Janeiro, s.

125

":

2 Chow Fa, str.

1,055 British

126

""

2 Glencarn, str.

1,425

"

127

#!

3 Ghazec, str..

1,764

Murray Scotland

128

3 Wing Sang, str.

1,517

Ste. Croix

"

129

**

4 Thibet, str.

1,665

Peters

"

130

19

4 Achilles, str.

1,488

"

131

Devawongse, str.

1,057

"

Tognasso Fowler

144

146

Bangkok

21

21

Jackson

64

64

2,275 American

Smith

San Francisco

62

2

64

Phillips

Bangkok

251

25

Straits Settlements

234 15

3

253

107

110

427 25 30

20

502

**

100

108

37

Harvey

"1

Unsworth

Bangkok

77 87

82

96

Port Darwin

Cooktown

Townsville

132

"

Guthrie, str.

1,494

Helms

Brisbane

""

Sydney

Dunedin, N.Z.

Melbourne

133

11

5 Ningchow, str.

1,735

Grattan

Straits Settlements

22

Carried forward.

221,003

Carried forward..........

25

80

80

26,872

847 383 215

28,317

264

RETURN of VESSELS bringing CHINESE PASSENGERS to the Port of Victoria, Hongkong,-Continued.

No.

DATE ARRIVED.

SHIP'S NAME.

TONS.

NATION-

ALITY OF SHIP.

ADULTS.

CHILDREN.

MASTER'S NAME.

WHERE FROM.

TOTAL.

M. F

M.

F.

Brought forward

221,003

Brought forward... 26,872 817

383 215

28,317

134 April

7 Chingtu, str.

1,459 | British

Innes

Sydney

7

35

Melbourne

28

135

""

9 Independent, str.

871 German

Ahrenkiel

Bangkok

64

64

136

137

10 Benlawers, str.

10 Sachsen, str.

1,184 British

Webster

Straits Settlements

368

6

374

3,435 German

Supmer

145 16

10

5

175

138

11 Oceana, str..

1,628

Behrens

200

202

>

139

12 Glenfruin, str.

1,892 British

Norman

101

4

105

::

140

13 Kiel, str.

831 German

Krutzfeldt

Bangkok

34

34

141

39

14

Gaelic, str.

2,691 British

Pearne

San Francisco

113

7

3

125

142

143

144

145

""

14

Arratoon Apcar, str.

1,392

Hansen

Straits Settlements

297 27

328

""

14

Ajax, str.

1,477

Goodwin

196

208

"

""

14

Vindobona, str.

2,688 Austrian

Mersa

169

11

7

187

$1

16

Ulysses, str................

2,299 British

Lapage

104

2

110

A

146

""

18

Angers, str..

2,077

Bannister

33

33

11

147

18

Phra Chula Chom Klao,s.

1,012

Morris

Bangkok

81

84

148

18 Donar, str.

1,015 German

Grundmann

72

72

>

149

"

21 Chelydra, str.

150

23 Palamed, str.

151

"

23 Kong Beng, str.

152

33

23

City of Peking, str.

153

154

155

"

24

Nan Yang, str.

1,574 British

1,489

862

:)

3,129 American

983 German

Cass

Straits Settlements

774

16

10

817

Robinson

48

48

"

"

Pigot

Bangkok

28

28

Searle

San Francisco

35

35

Schulz

Bangkok

95

95

""

24

Japan, str.

2,796 British

25

Phra Nang, str.

1,021

Hall Watton

Straits Settlements

589

10

11

618

Bangkok

73

73

156

>>

25 Empress of India, str.

3,003

Marshall

""

Vancouver, B.C.

60

Port Darwin

Cooktown

157

12

26 Tsinan, str.

1,460

""

Ramsay

Townsville

61

Sydney

16

Melbourne

39

158

26

Stura, str.

159

26 Benledi, str.

1,416 Italian 1,481 British

De Negri

Straits Settlements

91

Farquhar

96

!!

160

1:

27

Nam Yong, str.

161

27

Salatiga, str.

162

">

28 Oolong, str...

984 " 1,640 German 2,308 British

Nicol

694

• C

>>

Christensen

276

""

Allen

3011

;;

163

28

Radnorshire. str.

""

1,889

Davies

30

"

*

164

""

28 | Phra Chom Klao, str.

1,012

Fowler

Bangkok

46

103

96

742

301

301

30

46

Port Darwin

Townsville

165

ས་

28 Catterthun, str.

1,406

Brisbane

Adelaide

53

333

Shannon

Sydney

13

New Zealand

26

166

32

30 Glenartney, str.

1,944

"

McGregor

Straits Settlements

230

230

167

>>

30 Lightning, str.

2,124

"

Sundberg

423

42

470

"

168 May

1 Singapore, str.

748

Main

Bangkok

30

30

""

169

2 Devawongse, str.

1,057

Unsworth

145

145

"J

170

"

3 Cheang Chew, str.

1,213

Webb

Straits Settlements

447

25

""

Honolulu

143

171

"

4 China, str.

2,401

Ward

""

San Francisco

108

30

172

19

5 Priam, str,

1,803

Jackson

Straits Settlements

30

""

173

5 Priok, str.

174

7 Tacoma, str.

1,662 British

1,637 German

Madsen

Hill

345

35

Tacoma, U.S.A.

33

8;སསསྶ ;

10

502

299

25

6 2 10

40

410

33

175

7

Gouverneur Generaals' Jacob,..

1,569 Dutch

Blinde

Samarang

39

39

176

"

7 Malacca, str.

2,616 British

Case

Straits Settlements

2801

10

296

177

8

""

Kut Sang, str.

1,495

Jackson

379

48

3

432

""

178

12

8

Loo Sok, str.

179.

180

19

181

182

11 Kiel, str.

183

12 Taichiow, str.

184

12 Cheang Hock Kian, str.

185

"

12 Gisela, str.

10 Preussen, str.

10 Glenogle, str.

10 Wuotan, str.

1,020

2,399 British

1,016 German

831 862 British 956 2,643 Austrian

Jackson

Bangkok

100

100

2,977 German

Hagemann

Straits Settlements

125

20

10

10

165

Duke Ott

177

177

125

125

Krutzfeldt

Bangkok

127

127

""

Deans Kunath Kossovich

80

80

Straits Settlements

255

241

13

4 6

267

3

263

??

Thursday Island

3

Townsville

9

186

15 Menmuir, str.

1,287 British

Craig

Sydney

15

41

Auckland

Melbourne

11

187

""

15

Empress of Japan, str.

3,003

Lee

Victoria, B.C.

33

43

188

"

15

Belgic, str.

2,695

Walker

San Francisco

95

11

2

108

189

"

15

Catherine Apcar, str.

1,731

"1

190

"

15 Diamond, str.

1,030

Olifent Ellis

Straits Settlements

509 59

35

27

630

364

6

370

:

""

191

16 | Kintuck, str.

2,312

""

Kemp

195

20

10

5

230

"

192

"

16 | Phra Chula Chom Klao, s.

1,012

Morris

Bangkok

69

69

193

17 Donar, str.

1,015 German

Grundmann

127

127

"}

194

ور

18 Sishan, str.

845 British

Murphy

27

27

:1

195

""

18 Mongkut, str.

859

Stonham

95

95

""

196

""

18 Diamond, str.

1,432

Wilkinson

Straits Settlements

226

15

250

::

197

19

19 Dardanus, str..

1,507

"

Purdy

971

97

Cooktown

Townsville

Brisbane

198

ཝཱ

})

19 Changsha, str.........................

1,463

Williams

Sydney

66

New Zealand

Launceston

Melbourne

32

199

:9

21 Wing Sang, str.

200

"?

21 Manila, str.

201

202

* 3

22 Peru, str.

1,517 2,711 2,540 American

Ste. Croix

Straits Settlements

460 77

575

19

Lendon Friele

240

10

259

23 Kong Beng, str.

862 British

Pigot

San Francisco Bangkok

74

4

1

80

30

30

Carried forward......

336,50-1

Carried forward....

38,847 1,464 633

343

41,287

RETURN of VESSELS bringing CHINESE PASSENGERS to the Port of Victoria, Hongkong,—Continued.

265

No.

DATE ARRIVED.

SHIP'S NAME.

TONS.

NATION- ALITY OF SHIP.

ADULTS. CHILDREN.

MASTER'S NAME.

WHERE FROM,

TOTAL.

M.

F. M.

F.

Brought forward.

336,504

Brought forward... 38,847| 1,464

633 343

41,287

203 May

23

Frigga, str.

1,295 German

Ostermann

Straits Settlements

364 15

390

201

26

Phra Nang, str.

1,021 British

Watton

Bangkok

84

$5

205

1:

28

Phra Chom Klao, str.

1,012

Fowler

SO

206

"

28

Bisagno, str.

1,499 Italian

Barabino

Straits Settlements

226) 40

207

"

28

Nam Yong, str.

984 British

Nicol

7071 45

27

208

11

28 | Arroyo, str.

2,307

Samuel

60

209

??

30 Arratoon Apcar, str.

1,392

Hansen

741 22

29

210

30

"

Pakshan, str.

835

Jenkins

"

Bangkok

33

211

14

31

Nam Yang, str.

983 German

Schulz

200

;:;:

80

20

10

296

15

5

772

60

11

10

5

779

33

:

200

212

**

31

Ping Suey, str.

1,982 British

Davies

Straits Settlements

2021

15

262

8

250

213

31

Palinurus, str...

1,536

Jackson

28

28

爷爷

214 June

2

Oceanic, str.

2,440

Smith

San Francisco

97

5

1

104

,,

215

4 Devawongse, str.

1,057

Unsworth

""

Bangkok

150

150

216

19

5 Chelydra, str.

1,574

Cass

Straits Settlements

611

1.

217

11

5

Bayern, str.

3,435 German

Schmolder

142

218

6

Empress of China, str.

3,003 British

Archibald

Vancouver, B.C.

154

219

7

Loo Sok, str.

220

"?

7

Bombay, str.

1,020 2,048

Jackson

19

Bangkok

55

:224 ;

15

11 16

653

12

6

160

7

5

172

55

Sleeman

Straits Settlements

86!

8

11

221

>

7

Irene, str.

222

S

Kiel, str.

223

224

"

9

Victoria, str.

2,207 German

831

1,992 British

Schnder

217

11

47

3

101

10

245

Krutzfeldt

Bangkok"

126

126

"?

Victoria, B.C.

14

Panton

35

Tacoma, U.S.A.

21

**

9

Cheang Chew, str.

225

11

11

Cardiganshire, str.

1,213 1,623

"

Webb Sincock

Straits Settlements

617

53 20

15

735

30

30

J

:1

226

27

11

Lightning, str.

2,121

Sundberg

269

7

277

11

227

228

229

??

11

Cheang Hock Kian, str....

956

Kunath

311

38

10

394

21

17

12

City of Rio de Janeiro, str.

2,275 American

Smith

San Francisco

62

5

2

69

32

13

Tartar, str.

1,568 British

Bailey

Straits Settlements

961

3

111

230

17

13 Melpomene, str.

1,848 Austrian

Brelick

174

10

194

""

231

""

14 Mongkut, str.

S59 British

Stonham

Bangkok

60

60

Port Darwin

17

Thursday Island

23

Brisbane

9

232

2

16 Airlic, str.

1,492

Ellis

Dunedin, N.Z.

2

97

Wellington, N.Z.

11

Sydney

221

Melbourne

10

233

16 | Aglaia, str.

234

18 Deuteros, str.

235

19 Canton, str.

236

20 | Phra Chula Chom Klaos.

1,556 German 1,198 2,044 British 1,012

Petersen

Straits Settlements

188

O

3

3

2

202

77

237

238

::

239

240

19

241

11

242

11

243

244 July

245 246

23 Japan

25 Gaelic, str.

26 Bormida, str.

26 Empress of India, str..

27 | Phra Chom Klao, str.

27

Kut Sang, str..............

27 Kreimhild, str.

3 Donar, str.

3 City of Peking, str. 4 Karlsruhe, str..

1,709 German 1.015

3,129 American

3,450 German

392 Italian

2,691 British

Dinse Field Morris Ganstavino

Pearne

Bangkok

921

:

Straits Settlements

124

00

2

134

Bangkok

55

Callao, Peru

20

در

25

92

55

27

J❘ Honolulu

113!

234

San Francisco

71

20

15

15

1,499 Italian 3.003 British 1,012 1.495

De Negri

Straits Settlements

59

60

Marshall

Vancouver, B.C.

70

70

Fowler

"

Bangkok

23

23

Jackson

Straits Settlements

726

25

771

Forck

68

84

>>

Grundmann

Bangkok

60

60

Searle

San Francisco

85

35

Schukmann

Straits Settlements

191

30

12

14

247

Port Darwin

14

Thursday Island

3

Cooktown

Cairns

247

7 | Guthrie, str.

1,494 British

Helms

19

Melbourne

89

New Zealand

12

248

""

7 Catherine Apcar, str.

1,734

17

249

9 Telamon, str.

1,555

Olifent Jackson

Straits Settlements

477

12

400

3:

250

"

11 China, str.

2,401

Ward

San Francisco

92

10

11

251

11 Tritos, str.

252

13 Wing Sang, str.

1.085 German 1,517 British

Desler

Mauritius

162

1

Ste. Croix

Straits Settlements

188

14

253

"

13 Lawang, str.

1,637 German

77

2

"}

254

"

13 Marquis Bacquchem, str.

255

.}}

14 Tacoma, str.

2,740 Austrian 1,662 British

68

Tacoma, U.S.A.

74

256

16 | Chingta, str.

1,459

Townsville

Brisbane Sydney

:

✪ 1 1 2 →

104

Binger Walluschnig Perkes

Port Darwin

Thursday Island Cooktown

Sydney

Melbourne

7

502

412

107

174

210

79

71

74

Innes

67

201

10

New Zealand

27

257

16 Formosa, str.

-17

2,616

268

"

17 Glenorchy, str.

1,822

Bishop Sommers

Straits Settlements

106

71

??

259

17 Empress of Japan, str.

3,003

Lee

"

Vancouver, B.C.

161

260

23 Arratoon Apcar, str.

1,392

Hansen

Straits Settlements

454

19

co to i

261

25 Teucer, str.

1,803

Riley

134

262

25 Belgic, str.

2,695

Walker

San Francisco

160

ง D

106

77

1

164

5

480

136

172

>>

Cooktown

Townsville

263

27 Tsinan, str.

1,460

??

Ramsay

Brisbane

25

Sydney Melbourne

261

99

27 Laertes, str........

1,351

""

265

27 Chelydra, str.

265

28 Sikh, str.

267

11

31 Sachsen, str.

1,574 1,736 3,435 German

Grist Cass

Straits Settlements

630

210

85

10 00

2

W to

??

??

Rowley Supmer

Tacoma, U.S.A. Straits Settlements

28 205

643

220

28

11

2

222

Curried forward....

450,291

Carried forward...

.50,806 1,998

877 514

54,195

:

266

RETURN of VESSELS bringing CHINESE PASSENGERS to the Port of Victoria, Hongkong,--Continued.

No.

DATE ARRIVED.

SHIP'S NAME.

TONS.

NATION- ALITY OF SHIP.

ADULTS. CHILDREN.

MASTER'S NAME.

WHERE FROM.

TOTAL.

JL. F

M.

I.

Brought forward..

450,291

Brought forward... 50,806 1,998

$77 514

54,195

268 Aug.

1

Java, str.

269

1

Rio, str.

2,632 British 1,109 German

Tillard

Straits Settlements

194 13

7

223

Davidsen

305 23

20

366

270

1

""

Peru, str.

2,540 American

Friele

San Francisco

48

:

48

271

3 Myrmidon, str.

1,816 British

Brown

Straits Settlements

156

164

272

Glengarry, str.

1.925

Ferguson

153

164

273

7 Lightning, str.

2,124

Sundberg

349

37

389

274

*

7 | Oanfa, str.

1.970

Davies

69

71

25

275

"

9 Hertha, str.

2.199 German

Hildebrandt

272

27

302

*

Port Darwin

10

276

"

10 Catterthun, str.

1,406 British

Shannon

Cooktown

1

27

Sydney

16

277

10 Oceanic, str.

2.440

278

11 Sarpedon, str.

1,571

Smith Barr

San Francisco

522

55

80

70

727

Straits Settlements

364 27

14

11

416

*

279

13 Kut Sang, str.

1,495

Jackson

131 17

456

280

**

13 Devawongse, str..

1.057

Unsworth

Bangkok"

100

100

281

14

Aden, str..

2,517

Hill

Straits Settlements

152

12

171

282

15

Ixion, str.

2,299

Nish

148 12

160

283

15

Loo Sok, str.

1,020

Jackson

Bangkok"

42

42

284

285

21

286

287

288

17

18 Maria Valerie, str.

City of Rio de Janeiro, str.

22 Diamond, str.

24 Bellona, str.

25 Catherine Apear, str..

2.275 | American

1,030 British

Ellis

2,614 Austrian

Costanzo

Straits Settlements

276 20

15

10

321

Smith

San Francisco

75 13

18

14

120

Straits Settlements

172

1

485

250

250

356

17

384

"

289

"

25 | Titan, str.

53

1,722 German 1,734 British

Jager

Olifent

1,525

Thompson

Port Darwin

Thursday Island

290

291

"

292

25 Menmuir, str.

27 Japan, str.

27 Bormida, str.

1.287

George

Brisbane

Sydney

Melbourne

2,796

Hall

Straits Settlements

1.499 Italian

De Negri

#

293

"

28 | Glenesk, str.

294

"

29 Tantalus, str.

2.275 British 2,299

295

*

29

Gera, str.

3.407 German

296

..

29

Empress of India, str.

3,003 British

297 Sept.

1

Gaelic, str.

2,691

298

1

Wing Sang, str.

1,517

299

3 Devawongse, str.

1,057

>>

300

5 Phra Nang, str.

1,021

301

7 Loo Sok, str.

1,020

302

A

111

69

200

"

Vancouver, B.C.

153

San Francisco

160

13

Straits Settlements

199

53

ོ གས 1:ཀྱི

15

74

59

53;

Thursday Island Cairns

Cooktown

7 Changsha, str.

1,463

Williams

Webster

00 21 a

#!

Hannali

Blanke

Marshall

Pearne Ste. Croix Reid Watton Jackson

Port Darwin

Bangkok

**

Townsville

Brisbane Sydney Melbourne Port Darwin Thursday Island Townsville

Rockhampton

38

73

52

130

.69

246

10

OWN

171

192

573

74

润润

59

53

75

303

10 Airlic, str.

1,492

Ellis

36

33

New Zealand

Sydney

Adelaide

30+

$5

10

Antenor, str.

1,376

Hutchison

Straits Settlements

25

905

**

10

Gerda, str.

2,111 German

Ehlers

30

396

"?

306

10

Pakshan, str.

835 British

Jenkins

Bangkok

24

24

307

11

::

Arratoon Apcar, str.

1,392

Hanscu

Straits Settlements

441

27

478

308

11 Vindobona, str.

2,689 Austriau

Mersa

229

309

13 City of Peking, str.

3,129 American

Searle

San Francisco

47

:

::

235

47

310

14 Malwa, str.

1,694 British

Peters

Straits Settlements

154

164

311

15 | Glenfarg, str.

2.350

Selby

219

21

260

312

15 Chelydra, str.

1,574

Cass

847

358

313

15 Rio, str.

1.109 Gerinan

Davidsen

767 22

789

314

15

Phra Chom Klao, str.

1.012: British

Fowler

Bangkok

39

39

315

18 Pathan, str..

316

19 Ajax, str.

317

20 | Empress of Japan, str.

1,762 1,477 3,003

::

**

Wright Goodman Lec

Straits Settlements

90.

90

30

30

Vancouver, B.C.

137

137

318

20

Donar, str.

319

21 Tacoma, str.

1,015 German

1,662 British

Grundmann

Bangkok

130

130

320

21

Oceana, str.

1,628 German

321

24

Siam, str......

1.589 | British

Perkes Behrens Weighill

Tacoma. U.S.A.

53

Straits Settlements

379

406

23

322

24

Phra Chula Chom Klao, s.

1,012

Morris

21

Bangkok

65

Honolulu

323

24 China, str.

2,401

Ward

440

San Francisco

288

324

25 Cheang Chew, str.

1.213

Webb

Straits Settlements

848

922

325

26 Darmstadt, str.

3.405 German

Hagemanu

298

312

**

326

26 Cheang Hye Tong, str.

923 British

Scott

498

583

3.

327

27 Lightning, str.

2,124

"

Sundberg

£55

498

328

27 Machew, str.

329

28 Achilles, str.

996 1.488

Andersen

""

Bangkok

30

**

Harvey

Straits Settlements

30

-330

28 Bisagno, str.

331

28 Deuteros, str.

332

29 Malacca, str.

2.616 British

€ 333

B Palamed, str.

1.489

T +334

3 Glenavon, str.

1.912

€335

3 Diamond, str.

1,030

336

Mongkut, str,

859

1.499 Italian 1,198 German

Dinse Case

Williams

Norman Ellis

Stonham

Barabino

126

Bangkok

32

Straits Settlements

་་

630 S$

Curried forward.....

573,740

37

76

33

267

630

Bangkok

89

Carried forward....

64,623] 2,665 1,264 763 69,315

621

00:30 10

137

:

252 10

A

RETURN of VESSELS bringing CHINESE PASSENGERS to the Port of Victoria, Honghong,-Continued.

267

No.

DATE ARRIVED.

SHIP'S NAME.

TONS.

NATION- ALITY OF SHIP.

ADULTS.

CHILDREN.

MASTER'S NAME.

WHERE FROM.

TOTAL.

M. F. M.

F.

Brought forward...... 573,740

Brought forward... 64,623 2,665 |1,264

763

69,315

Port Darwin

16

Cooktown

337

Oct.

3 Taiwan, str...

1,109 British

Anderson

Townsville

Sydney

15

82110

1

2

45

Melbourne

8

338

5 Belgic, str.

2,695

339

5 Niobe, str.

1,440 German

Walker Pfaff

San Francisco

172

Straits Settlements

270

177

281

Port Darwin

Thursday Island

Townsville

340

S Guthrie, str.

1,494 British

Helms

47

New Zealand

Sydney

Melbourne

14

341

S Loo Sok, str.

342

8 Ulysss, str.....

1,020 2.299

""

"

Jackson La Page

Bangkok

57

Straits Settlements

31

33

343

8

Kut Sang, str.......

1,495

341

::

9 Devawongse, str.

1,057

Jackson Reid

465

482

11

Bangkok

29

29

??

345

11

Empress of China, str.

3.003

Archibald

Vancouver. B.C.

170

170

346

11

Peru, str.

2,540 | American

Friele

San Francisco

88

88

33

347

12

Gisela. str.

2.643 Austrian

Mitis

Straits Settlements

451

29

16

10

506

"

348

13

Sikh, str.

1,736 British

Rowley

Tacoma, U.S.A.

30

1:

349

11

13

Phra Nang, str.

1,021

Watton

19

Bangkok

45

350

**

15

Benlawers, str.

1,484

Webster

Straits Settlements

160

160

351

.

15

Catherine Apear, str................

1,734

Olifent

514

-

569

??

352

""

18

Cheang Hock Kian, str...

956

Kunath

423

137

17

**

353

*

20

Priok, str.

1,687 German

Christiansen

378

184

??

354

20 Mandarin, str.

1,171 British

Tripp

407

428

Port Darwin

2

Townsville

355

20 Tsinan, str.

1,460

*

Ramsay

*

/Brisbane

New Zealand

Sydney Melbourne

131

89

14

Honolulu

741

350

*

24

Oceanic, str.

2,440

Smith

392

**

San Francisco

307

357

"

24 Kong Beng, str.

$62

Pigot

Bangkok

51

51

358

25 | Velocity,

491

Martin

Honolulu

200

200

*3

""

359

25 Kintuck, str.

2,312

Kemp

Straits Settlements

189

189

360

"

25 Wing Sang, str.

1,517

Ste. Croix

511

46

10

571

361

25 Bayern, str.

3,435 German

Schmolder

273 40

20

338

362

20 | Phra Chom Klao, str.

1,012 British

Fowler

Bangkok

13

:

43

"

363

"

27 Namyong, str..

984

Bullen

Straits Settlements

416

428

364

29 Victoria, str.

1,992

Panton

Tacoma, U.S.A.

103

107

"

365

29 Chow Fa, str.

1,055

Farrell

Bangkok

118

118

366

367

368

"

369 Nov.

370

>"

371

29 Bormida, str.

30 Cheang Hye Teng, str.

30

City of Rio de Janeiro, str.

1 Arratoon Apcar, str.

3 Priam, str.

: | Phra Chula Chom Klao, s

1,499 Italian

De Negri

Straits Settlements

57

60

923 British 2,275 American

Scott

434

N

441

Smith

San Francisco

148

151

1,392 British

Hansen

Straits Settlements

355

386

1.803 1.012

Jackson

61

61

"

">

Morris

*

Bangkok

34

.372

5 Lothair,

373

5 Orono, str.

374

5 Cheang Chew, str.

794 Italian 1,322 British 1,213

Cafranga

Callao, Peru

63

Hancock

Straits Settlements

42

Webb

.636

20

684

步步

875

5 Frigga, str.

1,295 German

Madsen

162

171

376

6 Bombay, str.

2.048 British

Sleeman

252

་་

877

6 Empress of India, str..

3.003

Marshall

Vancouver, B.C.

439

143

*

378

6 Machew, str.

996

Anderson

**

Bangkok

67

Port Darwin

Thursday Island Cairns

Cooktown

379

6 Catterthun, str.

1,106

Shannon

112

Townsville

Brisbane

10

Sydney

62

New Zealand

380

9 Loo Sok, str.

1.020

Jackson

Bangkok

76

76

381

10 Devawongse, str.

1.057

Reid

40

40

:

382

10 Chelydra, str.

1.574

Cass

Straits Settlements

446

10

474

383

12 Ching Wo, str...

2,517

Shaw

180!

12

204

384

12 Glenartney, str.

1.944

McGregor

2401

8

251

385

12

Gaelic, str.

2.691

Pearne

San Francisco

4731

7

485

"

*,

386

16

.་

Wuotan, str.

1.016 German

Ott

Straits Settlements

419

387

16

Poseidon, str.

"

388

"

17

Agamemnon, str.

2,443 Anstrian

1.491 British

Fellner

513

**

Steeves

294

ཀ╗ — "

465

40

566

300

.389

17 Canton, str.

2,044

Cubitt

224

224

390

19 Lightning, str.

2,124

Sundberg

390

22

417

391

19 Cheang Hock Kian, str.

956

.392

19 Irene, str....

2,207 German

Kunath Schüder

368

:

373

151

16

1

172

393

19 Diamond, str.

1,030 British

Ellis

452

474

**

394

23

20 Assam, str.

1.611

Leigh

124

130

#

395

21 Sachsen, str.

3.435 German

396

22 Rio, str.

1.109

Supmer Davidsen

3741

18

412

10%

106

428

**

397

22 Kong Beng, str.

862 British

Pigot

Bangkok

78!

78

398

23 Radnorshire, str..

1.889

Davies

Straits Settlements

30;

30.

399

24 City of Peking, str.

3.129 American

Ward

San Francisco

121

134

400

26 | Azamor, str..

2.005 British

Gibson

Straits Settlements

96

100

401

26 Kut Sang, str.....

1.495

27

Young

300 12

319

"

402

26 Namyong, str..

98.!

Bullen

405

11

419

**

403

26 Ningchow, str.

1,735

Sommer

80

80

12

Carried forward...

685,183

Carried forward.....

79,767 3,166 | 1,478

$55

85,266

268

RETURN of VESSELS bringing CHINESE PASSENGERS to the Port of Victoria, Hongkong,-Continued.

No.

DATE ARRIVED.

SHIP'S NAME,

TONS.

NATION- ALITY OF SHIP.

ADULTS. CHILDREN.

MASTER'S NAME.

WHERE FROM.

TOTAL.

M.

J. F

Brought forward...... 685,183

Brought forward... 79,767| 3,166 |1,478 855

85,266

Port Darwin

11

Thursday Island

404 Nov.

26 Menmuir, str.

1,287 British

Townsville

Craig

Brisbane

42

Sydney

Adelaide

405

}:

26 | Phra Chom Klao, str.

1,012

Fowler

Bangkok

80

105

107

408

27

109

410

28 Taichiow, str.

28 Glenfruin, str..

29 Palinurus, str.

29 Shanghai, str.

29 Omega,.

862

Deans

53

1,892

Darke

Straits Settlements

3

3

2

240

1,536

Jackson

"1

230

2,044

Crawford

"

238

480

Brown

*

Callao, Peru

53

Port Darwin

Thursday Island

411

29 Chingtu, str.

1,459

Innes

Cooktown

89

89

Townsville

Sydney

412

1:

30

Bisaguo, str.

1,499 | Italian

Barabino

Straits Settlements

70

413 Dec.

3 Catherine Apcar, str....

1,734 British

Olifent

397

11

420

414

*"

3

Cheang Hye Teng, str.

415 416

""

3 Mongkut, str.

923 859

Scott

146

""

:>

156

Farrell

"

Bangkok

27

27

??

3 Tacoma, str.

1,662

Perkes

"?

Tacoma, U.S.A.

82

417

};

4 China, str.

Honolulu

116

2,401

Seabury

San Francisco

533

8

00 00 it

86

14

697

418

#

Empress of Japan, str.

3,003

Lee

Victoria, B.C.

67

Vancouver, B.C.

345

412

419

"

5 Taicheong, str.

828| German

Dubne

Medan, Sumatra

101!

105

420

5

Nestor, str.

2,416 British

Asquith

Straits Settlements

36

36

421

6 Kreimhild, str.

1,709 German

Forck

**

233

11

3

2

249

422

6 Devawongse, str.

1,057 British

Reed

Bangkok

43

43

423

""

7 Mandarin, str.

1,171

Tripp

Straits Settlements

456)

10

6

4

476

Port Darwin

16

Thursday Island

4

Cairns

5

424

""

11 Changsha, str..

Townsville

1,463

Anderson

Brisbane

63

Sydney

Melbourne

New Zealand

425 426

427

"

12

Belgic, str.

2,695

"

12

Wing Sang, str.

1,517

Walker Ste. Croix

San Francisco

303

3

307

Straits Settlements

657

"

Keemun, str.

1.985

Grattan

">

488

QT 00

694

5

520

428

}

15

Formosa, str. ..............

2,616

Bishop

341

429

"

430

17 Marquis Bacquehem, str..

17 Kong Beng, str.

2,740 Austrian

Walluschnig

19

554

862 British

Pigot

Bangkok

42

42

431

432

17 Phra Nang, str.

19 Telamon, str.

1,021

Watton

46

46

1,555

"

Purdy

Straits Settlements

425

12

3

445

433

134

:1

435

20 Aglaia, str.

20 Arratoon Apcar, str.

20 Cheang Hock Kian, str..

1.556 German

Petersen

135

20

22

160

1,392 | British

Hansen

360

B

1

379

956

Kunath

143

""

11

:

450

436

**

22 | Peru, str.

2,540 American

Friele

San Francisco

185

189

437

24 | Propontis, str..

1.390 British

Farrand

Straits Settlements

140

140

.438

24 Gera, str.

*:

3,407 German

Blanke

511

14

??

21

549

439

>>

27 | Phra Chom Klao, str.

1,012 British

Fowler

. | Bangkok

140

140

440

27 Mongkut, str.

859

Farrell

13

"

43

Port Darwin

441

>>

27 Airlie, str.

1,492

Ellis

Cooktown Townsville New Zealand

Sydney

Melbourne

49

25

15

412

28 Sikh, str.

1,736

413

29 Chelydra, str.

1,571

""

Rowley Cass

Tacoma, U.S.A.

45

45

Straits Settlements

5$1

15

600

Port Darwin

Thursday Island

441

31 Tai Yuan, str..

Cooktown

1,459

Nelson

"

Townsville

37

Sydney

13

Melbourne

10

445

31 Orestes, str.

2,846

!!

446

31 Lawang, str.

447

31

31 Bormida, str.

1,637 German 1,499 Italian

Pulford Formes

Straits Settlements

214

215

142

:

142

De Negri

78

:)

80

448

31 Nam Yong, str.

984 British

Bullen

2801

286

449

"

31 Oopack, str..

2,517

Perrelle

323

30

་་

"

3

334

450

31 Taichiow, str.

451

31 Java, str.

862 2,632

Deans

12

Bangkok

51

51

Tillard

Straits Settlements

120

"

126-

TOTAL TONS..........

763,821

TOTAL PASSENGERS

90,224|3,393 | 1,577

901

96,095

Toxs.

7,000,000

6.900,000

6.800,000

€,700,000

6,600,000

6,500,000

6,400,000

6,500,000

6,200,000

6,100,000

6,000,000

5,900,000

5,800,000

5:700,000

5,600,000

5,500,000

5.400,000

5,300,000

5.200,000

5,100,000

5,000,000

4,900,000

4,800,000

4,700,000

4,600,000

4,500,000

4.400,000

4,300,000

1,200,000

XXII-DIAGRAM of Trade entered at Hongkong,,

(

RED LINE represents British Shipping Tonnage on

BLUE LINE represents Foreign Shipping Tonnage

GREEN LINE represents British and Foreign Ship,

YELLOW LINE represents Junk Tonnage only, excl

THICK BLACK LINE represents entire Trade in Bi

1867.

1868.

1869.

1870.

1871.

1872.

1873.

1874.

1875.

1876.

1877.

1878.

1879.

1880.

1881.

1882.

1883.

at Hongkong, from 1867 to 1894, inclusive.

ping Tonnage only.

hipping Tonnage only.

and Foreign Shipping Tonnage.

Tonnage only, excluding Local Trade.

entire Trade in British and Foreign Ships and Junks.

1879.

1880.

1881.

1882.

1883.

1884.

1885.

1886.

1887.

1888.

1889.

1890.

1891.

1892.

1893.

1894.

TONS.

7,000,000

6,900,000

6,800,000

6,700,000

6,600,000

6,500,000

6,400,000

6,300,000

6,200,000

6,100,000

6,000,000

5,900,000

5,800,000

5,700,000

5,600,000

5,500,000

5,400,000

5 300,000

5,200,000

5,100,000

5,000,000

4,900,000

+,800,000

4:700,000

4,600,000

4,500,000

4.400,000

4.300.000

269

4,700,000

4,600,000

4,500,000

4.400,000

4,300,000

4,200,000

4,100,000

4,000,000

3,900,000

3,800,000

3,700,000

3,600,000

3,500,000

3,400,000

3,300,000

3,200,000

3,100,000

3,000,000

2,900,000

2,800,000

2,700,000

2,600,000

2,500,000

2,400,000

2,300,000

2,200,000

2,100,000

2,000,000

1,900,000

1,800,000

1,700,000

1,600,000

1,500,000

1,400,000

1,300,000

1,200,000

1,100,000

1,000,000

900,000

800,000

700,000

600,000

500,000

400,000

300,000

+:700,000

4,600,000

4,500,000

4,400,000

4,300,000

4,200,000

4,100,000

4,000,000

3,900,000

3,800,000

3,700,000

3,600,000

3,500,000

3,400,000

3,300,000

3,200,000

3,100,000

3,000,000

2,900,000

2,800,000

2,700,000

2,600,000

2,500,000

2,400,000

2,300,000

2,200,000

2,100,000

2,000,000

1,900,000

1,800,000

1,700,000

1,500,000

1,500,000

1,400,000

1,300,000

1,200,000

1,100,000

1,000,000

900,000

800,000

700,000

600,000

500,000

400,000

300.000

............

دن نازل بالورد

3,800,000

3,700,000

3,600,000

3,500,000

3,400,000

3,300,000

3,200,000

3,100,000

3,000,000

2,900,000

2,800,000

2,700,000

2,600,000

2,500,000

2,400,000

2,300,000

2,200,000

2,100,000

2,000,000

1,900,000

1,800,000

1,700,000

1,600,000

1,500,000

1,400,000

1,300,000

1,200,000

1,100,000

1,000,000

900,000

800,000

700,000

600,000

500,000

400,000

300,000

3,8ဝ၁,ဝ၁၁

3,700,000

3,600,000

3,500,000

3,400,000

3,300,000

3,200,000

3,100,000

3,000,000

2,900,000

2,800,000

2,700,000

2,600,000

2,500,000

2,400,000

2,300,000

2,200,000

2,100,000

2,000,000

,၄၁၁,၁၁ဝ

1,8၁ဝ,ဝ၁၁

1,700,000

1,500,000

1,500,000

1,400,000

1,300,000

1,200,000

1,100,000

1,000,000

9၁၁,၁၁၁

8,၀၁၁

၁၁,၁၁၁

၆၁၁,၁၁၁

၁၁,ဝ၁၁

၁၁,၁၁၁

၁,၀၁၁

RETURN of VESSELS bringing CHINESE PASSENGERS to the Port of Victoria, Hongkong,--Continued.

From Bangkok, Siam,

""

Callao, Peru,

"

Honolulu, Sandwich Islands,

"1

Mauritius,

""

Medan, Sumatra,

"1

Melbourne,

New South Wales Ports,

""

11

New Zealand Ports,

""

Queensland Ports,

Samarang, Java..............

San Francisco, U.S.A.,

South Australian Ports,

Straits Settlements,

Tacoma, U.S.A.,

"

+1

Tasmania,

""

""

Victoria, British Columbia,

Vancouver, British Columbia,

SUMMARY.

271

ADULTS.

CHILDREN.

TOTAL.

M. F M F.

5,524 5

8

196

16

958

24

23

290

3

11

2426

5,539

223 1,027

325

1

:

:

310 326

363

363

646

3

651

138

138

417

417

39

39

5,655

255 176

153

6,239

237

245

72,455 3,057 | 1,307

702

77,521

515

5

524

2

2

2,153

23

22

11

2,209

311

322

TOTAL PASSENGERS,

90,224 3,393 1,577

901

96,095

XXI.--RETURN of MARINE CASES tried at the MARINE MAGISTRATE's Court, during the year 1894.

DEFENDANTS HOW DISPosed of.

NATURE OF CHARGE.

No. of Cases.

Absent from Ship without leave,..

1

2

2

Assault,

1

1

1

Drunkenness,

1

1

Harbour Regulations-Breach of (Junk),

Harbour Regulations-Breach of (Steam-launch),

Refusal of duty,......

2

2

1

1

:

:

6

40

34

Years.

Total,

1

15 47

37

:

...

:

| Fined.

:

...

...

:

:

of pay.

Reprimand-

ed.

Dismissed.

Forfeiture

:

...

1

1

:

:

3

1

Amount of Fines.

:

:

:

:

6

:

:.

:

:.

:

:

...

:

...

20

5

...

6

25

XXIII.-RETURN of WORK performed by the GOVERNMENT Marine Surveyor's DepartMENT.

Lights and

Markings.

Minor Inspec-

tion.

Survey of Licen-

Steam-launches. sed Passenger

Survey of Boilers under

Construction.

Inspection of Government

Launches.

Examination

of Engineers.

Examination of

neers for Steam- Chinese Engi-

launches.

number of visits in

Estimated total

connection with for- eign Inspection.

1887,.....

153

101

3

6

6

1

1888,....

161

97

1889,................

130

1890,..

112

1891,......

108

5 2 * 0

1

4

73

3

4

1

08

77

5

2

3

:

38

3

1

1892,.

122

51

3

6

1

≈ 8 8 3 2 68

72

15

14

80

1

Co

6

:

84

1

73

16

85

10

16

1893,...

136

1894,..

124

62

+2=2

74

4

1

94

20

19

...

17

10

5

1

116

11

28

2 2 8 5 8 2 A

31

61

44

60

2 0 2 2 6 13

96

42

930

42

36

1,042

39

36

1,127

19

986

19

1,615

1,678

64

25

1,659

54

18

1,364

272

XXIV.-IMPORTS AND EXPORTS OFFICE.

IMPORTS.

MALWA. PATNA.

BENARES. PERSIAN.

TURKISH.

CHINESE. TOTAL.

chests.

chests.

chests.

chests.

chests.

chests.

chests.

1893,...

9,803

17,935

6,674

4,684

2

~

39,098

1894,.....

10,910

18,314

7,252

5,092

10

41,578

Increase,.

1,107

379

578

408

CC

8

2,480

13

Decrease,..

EXPORTS.

MALWA.

PATNA.

BENARES. PERSIAN.

TURKISH.

CHINESE.

TOTAL,

chests.

chests.

chests.

chests.

chests.

chests.

chests.

1893,......

10,6951

18,196

7,894

6,690

73

43,549

1894,....

10,196

17,320

6,857

4,556

49

38,978

Decrease,

499

876

1,037

2,134

24

4,571

Through Cargo reported in Manifests, but not landed, 1994,

1893,...... 1894,.

16,608 chests. 22,986 39

Increase,...

6,3771

""

Landing Permits,

Removal Permits,

Exports Permits,

NUMBER OF PERMITS, &c. ISSUED.

Permits to Chinese Customs' Station, Sam-shui-poo, Memo. of Exports to the Commissioner of Chinese

By Steamers to Adelaide,

Amoy,

Bombay,

British Columbia,

British North Borneo,.

Bunder Abbas,

Bushire,

Canton,

Chefoo,...

Foochow,

Formosa,

Haiphong,

Hankow,

Hoihow,

London,

Macao,

Pakhoi,.

1893.

1894.

Increase.

Decrease.

404

533

129

.12,439

10,879

8,553

7,537

342

207

...

1,560 1,016 135

525

535

10

SUMMARY OF EXPORTS, 1894.

Philippine Islands,

San Francisco,

Shanghai,......

Straits Settlements,...........................

Swatow,

By Junks to various adjacent Ports in China,..

TOTAL,....

Total

Malwa Patna Benares Persian Turkish Chests. Chests. Chests. Chests. Chests. Chests.

Total in piculs.

1

1231

2

...

1

59

2,039

594

2,815

1.2 3,249.95

...

167 2

::

2

2.5

167

200.4

13

5

20

23.125

13

13

13.325

4

4

4.1

1,217

4,098

1,173

1

...

6,489

7,543.725

14 2,314 53

1

15

1,193

133

364

4,004

16

179 3,321

...

60

3,569 60

66

a8

32

6

243

12

99

15.2

4,278.8 3,691.025

72.

105.6

251

300.

...

44

44

4,175

130

108

330

222

27

5

4,207

44. 5,047.4

238

285.6

70

400

5

5

3,650 9

4,633

2,514

3

10,800

480.

6. 12,229.475

41

26

156

2,485

1,915

498

93

232 4,991

249.8

5,475.925

255

279

14

2

...

550

608.65

10,196 17,320

6,857

4,556

The information in column 7 above is on the following assumption :---

Patna and Benares per chest,

Malwa and Turkish

Persian per chest,....

49 38,978 44,358.825

..1.20 piculs. ..1.

"

.1.025 "

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 1.

TUESDAY, 26TH FEBRUARY, 1895.

1

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(Sir WILLIAM ROBINSON, K.C.M.G.)

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary and Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE

STEWART LOCKHART).

"

""

>

""

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

the Colonial Treasurer, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-Innes).

the Director of Public Works, (FRANCIS ALFRED COOPER).

the Harbour Master, (ROBERT MURRAY RUMSEY, R.N.). CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

21

""

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

"

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS, C.M.G.

ALEXANDER MCCONACHIE.

The Council met pursuant to summons.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 24th December last, were read and confirmed. PAPERS.-The Acting Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following papers :-

(1) Report by Messrs. COODE SON & MATTHEWS on the Gap Rock Lighthouse.

(2) Report on the Widows' and Orphans' Fund for the year 1894.

(3) Report of the Superintendent of Victoria Gaol for 1894.

(4) Report of the Head Master of Queen's College for 1894.

VOTES REFERRED TO THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Acting Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following Financial Minutes and moved that they be referred to the Finance Committee:-

C.S.O. 1319 of 1894.

C.S.O.

2098 of 1894.

C.S.O.

137 of 1895.

C.S.0.

418 of 1895.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Twenty thousand Dollars, ($20,000), for the purchase of a Floating Fire Engine.

Government House, Hongkong, 19th January, 1895.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One thousand Seven hundred and Fifty Dollars, ($1,750), for the purchase of conservancy buckets.

Government House, Hongkong, 25th January, 1895.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One thousand Five hundred and Thirty-five Dollars, ($1,535), being amount of contribution to the Imperial and Colonial Institute from the 10th May, 1893, to 31st December, 1895, inclusive, at the rate of £58 per annum at 2/-- to the Dollar.

Government House, Hongkong, 22nd January, 1895.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Five hundred Dollars, ($500), for the construction of a new Buoy to mark the position of the Bokhara Rock.

Government House, Hongkong, 20th February, 1895.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

%

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE TO PREVENT THE SKETCHING OF DEFENCES."-The Attorney General moved the first reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

The Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed and Bill reported without amendment.

The Attorney General moved the suspension of the Standing Rules and Orders.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

The Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Bill read a third time.

Question put--that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

JURY LIST, 1895.-There being no strangers present, the Council proceeded to consider the Jurors List for 1895.

The List was duly revised, corrected, and Special Jurors designated in terms of Section 8 of Ordinance 18 of 1887.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned until Tuesday, the 12th March.

Read and confirmed, this 12th day of March, 1895.

ARATHOON SETH, Clerk of Councils.

WILLIAM ROBINSON,

Governor.

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 2.

TUESDAY, 12TH ARCH, 1895.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(Sir WILLIAM ROBINSON, K.C.M.G.).

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary and Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE

STEWART LOCKHART).

the Acting Attorney General, (ANDREW JOHN LEACH, Q.C.).

3

11

>>

the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON).

>>

the Director of Public Works, (FRANCIS ALFREd Cooper).

""

>>

11

""

**

the Harbour Master, (ROBERT MURRAY RUMSEY, R.N.).

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

Ho KAI, M.B., C.M.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS, C.M.G. ALEXANDER MCCONACHIE.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 26th ultimo, were read and confirmed.

NEW MEMBERS. -ANDREW JOHN LEACH, Esquire, and ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON, Esquire, took their seats respectively as Acting Attorney General and Acting Colonial Treasurer after having severally taken the Oath and made the Affirmation required by The Promissory Oaths Ordinance 1869.

PAPERS.-The Acting Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following papers :--

(1) Statement showing the total Revenue and Expenditure in the (2) Report of the Captain Superintendent of Police for 1894.

year 1894.

(3) Letter No. 385 of the 27th February from the Acting Colonial Secretary to the Harbour

Master relative to the alleged existence of corruption in the Harbour Department.

(4) Financial Statement for 1894.

VOTES REFERRED TO THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Acting Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following Financial Minutes and moved that they be referred to the Finance Committee:-

C.S.O.

A

522 of 1895.

C.S.O.

564 of 1895,

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Eight hundred thousand Dollars, ($800,000), being compensation to the owners and other persons having any right or interest in the lots of land within the resumed area of Taipingshan, interest on the above from 1st June, 1894, to date of payment at 7 %, and costs awarded against the Crown by the Board of Arbi- trators under The Taipingshan Resumption Ordinance, 1894.

Government House, Hongkong, 8th March, 1895.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Two hundred and Seventy Dollars, ($270), being salary of an Overseer at the New Central Market, from 1st April next, at $30 per month.

Government House, Hongkong, 11th March, 1895.

The Acting Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

SANITARY BYE-LAWS.-On the motion of the Acting Colonial Secretary, the consideration of certain Bye-laws made by the Sanitary Board on the 4th instant under section 13 of Ordinance 15 of 1894 were, at the request of Mr. KESWICK, postponed until the next meeting.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND AND CONSOLIDATE THE LAW RELATING TO THE CAR- RIAGE AND POSSESSION OF DEADLY WEAPONS."--The Acting Attorney General moved the first reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO DECLARE THE EFFECT OF ORDINANCES REPEALING OTHERS.' The Acting Attorney General moved the first reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded. Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned until Wednesday, the 20th instant.

""

Read and confirmed, this 20th day of March, 1895.

ARATHOON SETH,

Clerk of Councils.

WILLIAM ROBINSON,

Governor,

J

*

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 3.

WEDNESDAY, 20TM MARCH, 1895.

5

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(Sir WILLIAM ROBINSON, K.C.M.G.).

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary and Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE.

STEWART LOCKHART).

the Acting Attorney General, (ANDREW JOHN LEACH, Q.C.).

35

>"

the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON),

""

*

**

""

19

the Director of Public Works, (FRANCIS ALFRED COOPER).

the Harbour Master, (ROBERT MURRAY RUMSEY, R.N.).

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

Ho KAI, M.B., C.M.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS, C.M.G. ALEXANDER MCCONACHIE.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 12th instant, were read and confirmed.

FINANCIAL STATEMENT.-The Governor, referring to the Statement of Revenue and Expenditure laid before the Council at its last Meeting, explained the cause of the discrepancy between the actual balance in hand as shewn therein and the amount stated by His Excellency at the Meeting held on the 29th November last.

PAPERS.-The Acting Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following papers :-

(1) Statement of Water Account to 31st December, 1894.

(2) Returns of Superior and Subordinate Courts for 1894.

(3) Report on the Resumption of certain Properties in the Taipingshan District in the City

of Victoria.

(4) Secretary of State's Circular Despatch respecting Colonial Military Lands and Buildings. REPORT OF THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.--The Acting Colonial Secretary laid on the table the report of the Finance Committee dated 12th March, 1895, (No. 2 of 1895), and moved that it be adopted.

The Acting Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

SANITARY BYE-LAWS.-The Acting Colonial Secretary laid on the table certain Bye-laws made by the Sanitary Board on the 19th March, 1895, under section 13 of Ordinance 15 of 1894, and moved that they be approved.

The Acting Attorney General seconded.

Mr. CHATER addressed the Council and moved as an amendment that the Bye-laws except Bye- law 31 be passed.

Mr. KESWICK seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE TO REGULATE THE ISSUE OF BANK NOTES."--The Acting Attorney General moved that the Standing Orders be suspended.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

The Acting Attorney General moved the first reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

The Acting Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Committee on the Bill.

Bill reported with the blanks filled in.

The Acting Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put--that this Bill do Bill passed.

pass.

6

BILL ENTITLED

"AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND AND CONSOLIDATE THE LAW RELATING TO THE CARRIAGE AND POSSESSION OF DEADLY WEAPONS."-The Acting Attorney General moved the second reading of this Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question--put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Bill entitLED

AN ORDINANCE TO DECLARE THE EFFECT OF ORDINANCES REPEALING OTHERS.' The Acting Attorney General moved the second reading of this Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Committee on the Bill.

Bill reported with a verbal amendment.

The Acting Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question--put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

ADJOURNMENT.--The Conncil then adjourned until Thursday, the 28th instant.

Read and confirmed this 26th day of March, 1895.

ARATHOON SETH,

Clerk of Councils.

:

WILLIAM ROBINSON,

Governor.

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 4.

TUESDAY, 26TH MARCII, 1895.

7

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(Sir WILLIAM ROBINSON, K.C.M.G.).

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary and Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART

LOCKHART).

the Acting Attorney General, (ANDREW JOHN LEACH, Q.C.).

""

the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON).

""

the Director of Public Works, (FRANCIS ALFRED COOPER).

"}

""

""

the Harbour Master, (ROBERT MURRAY RUMSEY, R.N.). CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

Ho KAI, M.B., C.M.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS, C.M.G.

ALEXANDER MCCONACHIE.

The Council met pursuant to notice.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 20th instant, were read and confirmed.

COLONIAL SECRETARY.-- His Excellency the Governor addressed the Council respecting the appointment of Mr. STEWART LOCKHART as Colonial Secretary in succession to Sir GEORGE OBRIEN, retired.

Mr. STEWART LOCKHART then took the Oath of the office, and addressed the Council.

C

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE PUBLIC HEALTH ORDINANCE, 1887,' IN RELATION

TO COMMON LODGING HOUSES."-His Excellency addressed the Council.

The Acting Attorney General addressed the Council, and moved the first reading of the Bill. The Colonial Secretary seconded, and addressed the Council.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

The Acting Attorney General moved that the Standing Orders be suspended.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

The Acting Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Committee on the Bill.

Bill reported with a verbal amendment.

The Acting Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Dr. Ho KAI addressed the Council.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put--that this Bill do Bill passed.

pass.

ADJOURNMENT.—The Council then adjourned until Thursday, the 28th instant.

Read and confirmed, this 28th day of March, 1895.

ARATHOON SETH,

Clerk of Councils.

WILLIAM ROBINSON,

Governor.

9

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 5.

THURSDAY, 28TH MARCII, 1895.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(Sir WILLIAM ROBINSON, K.C.M.G.).

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary and Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART

""

21

"}

LOCKHART).

the Acting Attorney General, (ANDREW JOHN LEACH, Q.C.).

the Acting Colonial Treasurer. (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON).

the Director of Public Works, (FRANCIS ALFRED COOPER).

the Harbour Master, (ROBERT MURRAY RUMSEY, R.N.).

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

Ho KAI, M.B., C.M.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS, C.M.G.

ALEXANDER MCCONACHIE.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 26th instant, were read and confirmed. PAPERS. The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following papers :-

(1) Report of the Sanitary Surveyor for 1894.

(2) Scheme for the Improvement of the Resumed Area in the District of Taipingshan.

The Colonial Secretary moved that the Report of the Director of Public Works respecting the scheme for the Improvement of the Resumed Area in the District of Taipingshan be referred to the Public Works Committee.

The Director of Public Works seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

FINANCIAL MINUTES.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following Financial Minutes and moved that they be referred to the Finance Committee:-

C.S.O.

585 of 1895.

C.O. Tel. 15.3.95.

C.S.0.

708 of 1995.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Five hundred and Forty Dollars, ($540), being salary of a temporary Clerk to the Sanitary Department at the rate of $60 per mensem for 9 months from 1st April, 1895.

Government House, Hongkong, 21st March, 1895.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to re-vote the sum of Fifty-eight thousand Dollars, ($58,000), for payment of Exchange Compensation in respect of 1894.

(The above is approximately the unexpended balance of the sum previously voted.) Government House, Hongkong, 25th March, 1895.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Six hundred Dollars, ($600), for the salaries of the Chinese staff at the new Sheep and Swine Depôt.

Government House, Hongkong, 26th March, 1895.

The Acting Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

SANITARY BYE-LAWS.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table certain Bye-laws for the regulation of the public depôts for sheep and swine, made by the Sanitary Board on the 14th instant, and moved their adoption.

The Acting Attorney General seconded.

The Acting Treasurer addressed the Council suggesting postponement. Question postponed.

10

BILL ENTITLED “AN ORDINANCE TO ENABLE THE GOVERNOR IN COUNCIL TO RESTRICT THE IMMI- GRATION OF CHINESE INTO THE COLONY AND FOR OTHER PURPOSES IN CONNECTION THEREWITH.”—The Acting Attorney General moved the first reading of this Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

C

199

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE TO FURTHER AMEND THE WATER WORKS ORDINANCE, 1890.'' The Acting Attorney General moved the first reading of this Bill.

The Director of Public Works seconded. Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE FOR REGULATING THE LICENSI G OF PRIVATE VEHICLES.”—The Acting Attorney General moved the first reading of this Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question--put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

{

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE TO FURTHER AMEND THE BUILDING ORDINANCE, 1889.'"-The Acting Attorney General moved the first reading of this Bill.

The Director of Public Works seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED

"AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND AND CONSOLIDATE THE LAW RELATING TO THE CARRIAGE AND POSSESSION OF DEADLY WEAPONS."-The Acting Attorney General moved that the Council do resolve itself into Committee to consider this Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Mr. KESWICK moved as an amendment that the consideration be postponed. Mr. MCCONACHIE seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

· ADJOURNMENT.—The Council then adjourned until Thursday, the 4th proximo.

Read and confirmed this 4th day of April, 1895.

ARATHOON SETH,

Clerk of Councils.

WILLIAM ROBINSON,

Governor.

11

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 6.

THURSDAY, 4TH APRIL, 1895.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(Sir WILLIAM ROBINSON, K.C.M.G.).

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary and Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE STEwart

LOCKHART).

the Acting Attorney General, (ANDREW JOHN LEACH, Q.C.).

::

37

the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON).

"}

>>

20

19

the Director of Public Works, (FRANCIS ALFRED COOPER).

the Harbour Master, (ROBERT MURRAY RUMSEY, R.N.).

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS, C.M.G. ALEXANDER MCCONACHIE.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 28th ultimo, were read and confirmed.

REPORT OF THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the report of the Finance Committee dated 28th March, 1895, (No. 3), and moved its adoption.

The Acting Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

FINANCIAL MINUTE.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following Financial Minute, and moved that it be referred to the Finance Committee :-

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

C.S.0.

707 of 1895.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Three thousand Dollars, ($3,000), for certain additions to the Sheep and Swine Depôts, recommended by the Sanitary Board.

(The estimated cost of the above is approximately $7,000, and the available balance of

the sum already voted is $4,000.)

Government House, Hongkong, 28th March, 1895.

The Acting Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question--put and agreed to.

SANITARY BYE-LAW.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table an Additional Bye-law (No. 31), made by the Sanitary Board on the 28th March, 1895, under section 13 of Ordinance 15 of 1894, and moved that it be approved.

The Acting Attorney General seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

BILL ENTITLED

{

AN ORDINANCE TO REPEAL ORDINANCE No. 1 of 1864, ENTITLED AN ORDI- NANCE TO PROVIDE FOR CONVERSION OF BRITISH CURRENCY IN ALL PAYMENTS BY OR TO THE Govern- MENT. -The Acting Attorney General moved the first reading of the Bill.

197

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

??

BILL ENTITLED (3 AN ORDINANCE TO ENABLE THE GOVERNOR IN COUNCIL TO RESTRICT THE IMMI- GRATION OF CHINESE INTO THE COLONY AND FOR OTHER PURPOSES IN CONNECTION THEREWITH.' -The Acting Attorney General moved the second reading of this Bill.

Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question--put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

On the motion of the Acting Attorney General the Council resolved itself into Committee on the

Bill reported with verbal amendments.

The Acting Attorney General moved the third realing of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put--that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

12

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND AND CONSOLIDATE THE LAW RELATING TO THE CARRIAGE AND POSSESSION OF DEADLY WEAPONS."-The Acting Attorney General moved that the Council do resolve itself into Committee on this Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded. Question-put and agreed to.

Committee on the Bill.

Progress reported.

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE TO FURTHER AMEND THE WATER WORKS ORDINANCE, 1890.'"- The Acting Attorney General moved the second reading of this Bill.

The Director of Public Works seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

On the motion of the Acting Attorney General the Council resolved itself into Committee on the Bill.

Bill reported with verbal amendments.

The Acting Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Director of Public Works seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

،

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO FURTHER AMEND THE BUILDING ORDINANCE, 1889.'"--The Acting Attorney General moved the second reading of this Bill.

The Director of Public Works seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

On the motion of the Acting Attorney General the Council went into Committee on the Bill. On the motion of His Excellency, seconded by the Colonial Secretary, that section 3 stand part of the Bill, Mr. MCCONACHIE moved as an amendment the omission of the words after the words "The Building Ordinance, 1889," in the sixth line from the bottom, and inserting in lieu thereof the following, viz. :-In the event of the information contained in such notice being proved to be materially incorrect, the person signing the same shall be notified to that effect by the Director of Public Works, and if, after stated reasonable time, the information contained in his notice is still found to be incorrect he shall be liable on summary conviction before a Magistrate to a penalty not exceeding $25 in respect of every such notice.

Mr. CHATER seconded.

The Council divided.

For.

Mr. MCCONACHIE.

Mr. BELILIOS.

Dr. Ho KAI.

Mr. KESWICK.

Mr. CHATER.

Amendment lost by a majority of 1.

Bill reported without amendment.

Against.

The Harbour Master.

The Director of Public Works. The Acting Colonial Treasurer. The Acting Attorney General. The Colonial Secretary.

His Excellency the Governor.

The Acting Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put--that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned until Thursday, the 11th instant.

:

Read and confirmed, this 11th day of April, 1895.

ARATHOON SETII,

Clerk of Councils.

WILLIAM ROBINSON,

Governor.

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 7.

THURSDAY, 11TH APRIL, 1895.

13

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(Sir WILLIAM ROBINSON, K.C.M.G.).

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary and Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART

LOCKHART).

A

""

>"

""

""

"2

""

""

the Acting Attorney General, (ALFRED GASCOYNE WISE).

the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON).

the Director of Public Works, (FRANCIS ALFRED COOPER).

the Harbour Master, (ROBERT MURRAY RUMSEY, R.N.). CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS, C.M.G.

ALEXANDER MCCONACHIE.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 4th instant, were read and confirmed.

NEW MEMBER.--Mr. ALFRED GASCOYNE WISE took his seat as Acting Attorney General, after having taken the Oath prescribed by The Promissory Oaths Ordinance, 1869.

FINANCIAL MINUTE.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following Financial Minute and moved that it be referred to the Finance Committee:-

C.O.D.

5 of 1895

and

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Oue thousand Three hundred and 32 of 1895. Twenty-four Dollars, ($1,324), in respect of additions to the salaries of the under mentioned Officers as from the 1st January, 1895, as sanctioned by the Secretary of State on the recom- mendation of the Retrenchment Committee:-

$600.

$120 (for knowledge of Chinese).

.$204.

The Steward of the Government Civil Hospital,...$120. Inspector Germain, Sanitary Department,

The Colonial Veterinary Surgeon,

The Head Bailiff, Supreme Court,

Government House, Hongkong, 8th April, 1895.

The 2nd Bailiff, Supreme Court,

$280.

The Acting Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

REPORT OF THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the report of the Finance Committee dated the 4th April, 1895, (No. 4), and moved its adoption.

The Acting Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

PAPERS.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table

the following papers :-

(1) Registrar General's Report for the

year 1894.

(2) The Harbour Master's Report for 1894.

3) Medical Report on the Epidemic of Bubonic Plague in 1894.

BILL ENTITLED (4 AN ORDINANCE TO CONFER CERTAIN POWERS AND AUTHORITIES ON THE MEDICAL OFFICER OF HEALTH."--The Acting Attorney General moved the first reading of this Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question--put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

14

BILL ENTITLED .66

AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND AND CONSOLIDATE THE LAW RELATING TO THE CARRIAGE AND POSSESSION OF DEADLY WEAPONS.”—On the motion of the Acting Attorney General, the Council resumed Committee on this Bill.

Bill reported with verbal amendments and addition of schedules.

The Acting Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

ADJOURNMENT.-—The Council then adjourned until Wednesday, the 17th instant, at 3 P.M.

Read and confirmed this 17th day of April, 1895.

J. G. T. Buckle, Acting Clerk of Councils.

.

WILLIAM ROBINSON,

Governor.

$

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No.

No. S.

THURSDAY, 17TH APRIL, 1895.

15

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(Sir WILLIAM ROBINSON, K.C.M.G.).

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary and Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART

LOCKHART).

""

A

>>

""

>>

"7

"

the Acting Attorney General, (ALFRED GASCOYNE WISE.).

the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON).

the Director of Public Works, (FRANCIS ALFRED COOPER).

the Harbour Master, (ROBERT MURRAY RUMSEY, R.N.). CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK,

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS, C.M.G.

ALEXANDER MCCONACHIE.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 11th instant, were read and confirmed.

PAPER.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the Report of the Superintendent of Fire Brigade for 1894.

REPORT OF THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the report of the Finance Committee dated 11th April, 1895, (No. 5), and moved its adoption.

The Acting Colonial Treasurer seconded. Question-put and agreed to.

REPORT OF THE PUBLIC WORKS COMMITTEE.-The Director of Public Works laid on the table the report of the Public Works Committee dated 11th April, 1895, (No. 1), and moved its adoption.

The Acting Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

BILL ENTITLED (6

AN ORDINANCE TO CONFER CERTAIN POWERS AND AUTHORITIES ON THE MEDICAL OFFICER OF HEALTH."--The Acting Attorney General moved the second reading of this Bill.

Dr. Ho KAI opposed the motion and addressed the Council.

The Colonial Secretary replied.

Mr. MCCONACHIE addressed the Council.

Question-put and agreed to, Dr. Ho KAI dissenting.

Bill read a second time.

On the motion of the Acting Attorney General, seconded by the Colonial Secretary, the Council went into Committee on the Bill.

Bill reported as amended in Committee.

The Council resumed.

The Acting Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to, Dr. Ho KAI dissenting.

Bill read a third time.

Question put--that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned until Wednesday, the 1st May, 1895, at 3 P.M.

Read and confirmed this 23rd day of May, 1895.

J. G. T. BUCKLE,

Acting Clerk of Councils.

WILLIAM ROBINSON,

Governor.

I

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, NO. 9.

THURSDAY, 23RD MAY, 1895.

17

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(Sir WILLIAM ROBINSON, K.C.M.G.).

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary and Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART

LOCKHART).

the Acting Attorney General, (ALFRED GASCOYNE WISE).

**

17

the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON ),

";

the Director of Public Works, (FRANCIS ALFRED COOPER).

"

5

""

198

""

the Harbour Master, (ROBERT MURRAY RUMSEY, R.N.). CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS, C.M.G.

ALEXANDER MCCONACHIE.

JAMES JARDINE BELL-IRVING.

The Council met pursuant to summons, the Meeting adjourned till the 1st May being further adjourned by command of His Excellency the Governor.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 17th April, were read and confirmed.

NEW MEMBER.--Mr. BELL-IRVING took the Oath of Allegiance on his provisional appointment to a seat in the Council.

PAPERS.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following papers:-

(1) Report of the Pó Léung Kuk Society for the nine months ending 31st December, 1894. (2) Statement of Disbursements for Forestry Works in the Years 1896 and 1897.

(3) Report of the Director of Public Works for 1894.

(4) Reports on the Hongkong Volunteer Corps.

(5) Returns of Superior and Subordinate Courts for 1894.

(6) Supplementary Report of the Retrenchment Committee on the Public Works Depart-

ment.

(7) Report of the Medical Committee.

FINANCIAL MINUTES.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following Financial Minutes and moved that they be referred to the Finance Committee:-

FINANCIAL MINUTE, No. 12.

C.5.0.

1223 of 1895.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to re-vote the sum of Three thousand Eight hundred and Twenty-four Dollars and Seventeen Cents, ($3,824.17), for the extension of MacDonnell and Austin Roads at Kowloon.

(The above is the unexpended balance of the sum voted for the above work for 1894.) Government House, Hongkong, 4th May, 1895.

FINANCIAL MINUTE, No. 13.

€.5.0.

1440 of 1825.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Twenty thousand Dollars, ($20,000), for expenses incurred in connection with the Resumption of Taipingshan.

Government House, Hongkong, 22nd May, 1895.

The Acting Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

18

SANITARY BYE-LAWS.-The Colonial Secretary laid on the table certain Bye-laws made by the Sanitary Board on the 11th April, 1895, under section 13, sub-section 4, of The Public Health Ordinance, 1887, and moved that they be approved.

The Acting Attorney General seconded. Question-put and agreed to.

MOTION.--The Colonial Secretary moved as follows:-

That the Council having considered the following Statement by the Superintendent of the Botanical and Afforestation Department resolves that it is expedient to incur the liability proposed to be incurred in 1897.

Statement showing Disbursements for Forestry Works in the years 1896 and 1897, for which contracts have been already made, and those for which contracts now require to be made.

APPROVED BY LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL,

C.S.O. No. $81

1894

Estimated total cost.

To be disbursed in 1896.

To be disbursed in 1897.

C.

C.

1. Rearing Trees to be planted in 1896,......

1,000.00

1,000.00

2. Planting Trees being reared under No. 1,.........

1,600.00

1,600.00

Contracts to be now made which require approval:-

3. Rearing Trees to be planted in 1897,...........

4. Planting Trees,..

900.00

1,100.00

4,600.00

2,600.00

C.

900.00

1,100.00

2,000.00

The works under headings 3 and 4 now require the approval of the Legislative Council in order that the contracts for them may be made; those under headings 1 and 2 have already been sanctioned and are now in progress.

The Acting Colonial Treasurer seconded. Question--put and agreed to.

CHARLES FORD, Superintendent, Botanical and Afforestation Department.

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE TO AUTHORISE THE APPROPRIATION OF A SUPPLEMENTARY SUM OF THREE HUNDRED AND FIFTY-FIVE THOUSAND THREE HUNDRED AND NINETY-FIVE DOLLARS AND EIGHTY-EIGHT CENTS TO DEFRAY THE CHARGES OF THE YEAR 1894."-The Acting Colonial Treasurer moved the first reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded. Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

MAL

BILL ENTITLED. "AN ORDINANCE TO REGULATE AND RESTRICT THE WEARING OF NAVAL AND MILITARY UNIFORMS."-The Acting Attorney General moved the first reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

The Acting Attorney General moved the suspension of the Standing Rules and Orders. The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

The Acting Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed and Bill reported without amendment.

The Acting Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put--that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

19

BILL ENTITLED

AN ORDINANCE TO MAKE PROVISIONS FOR THE FURTHERANCE OF THE MORE EFFECTUAL ENFORCEMENT OF SANITARY MEASURES."-The Acting Attorney General moved the first reading of the Bill.

The Director of Public Works seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

The Acting Attorney General moved the suspension of the Standing Rules and Orders. The Director of Public Works seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

The Acting Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill.

The Director of Public Works seconded and addressed the Council. Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed and Bill reported with amendinents.

The Acting Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Director of Public Works seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

C

BILL ENTITLED “AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE RATING ORDINANCE, 1888."-The Acting Attorney General moved the first reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

{

BILL ENTITLED " AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE CROWN REMEDIES ORDINANCE, 1875."-The Acting Attorney General moved the first reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED “AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE MAGISTRATES ORDINANCE, (10 OF 1890)."- The Acting Attorney General moved the first reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

The Acting Attorney General moved the suspension of the Standing Rules and Orders. The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

The Acting Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed and Bill reported without amendment.

The Acting Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

BILL ENTITLED " AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND ORDINANCE No. 17 OF 1887."-The Acting Attorney General moved the first reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

The Acting Attorney General moved the suspension of the Standing Rules and Orders.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

The Acting Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question -put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

20

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE FOR REGULATING THE LICENSING OF PRIVATE VEHICLES."--The Acting Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill and addressed the Council.

The Colonial Secretary seconded and addressed the Council.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed and Bill reported without amendment.

The Acting Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put--that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

ADJOURNMENT.—The Council then adjourned until Thursday, the 30th instant, at 3.30 P.M.

Read and confirmed this 6th day of June, 1895.

J. G. T. BUCKLE, Acting Clerk of Councils.

WILLIAM ROBINSON,

Governor.

i

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 10.

THURSDAY, 6TH JUNE, 1895.

21

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(Sir WILLIAM ROBINSON, K.C.M.G.).

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary and Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART

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11

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23

);

11

LOCKHART).

the Acting Attorney General, (ALFRED GASCOYNE WISE).

the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON).

the Director of Public Works, (FRANCIS ALFRED Cooper).

the Acting Harbour Master, (WILLIAM CHARLES HOLLAND HASTINGS, R.N.).

the Postmaster General, (ARTHUR KENNEDY TRAVERS). CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS, C.M.G.

ALEXANDER MCCONACHIE.

JAMES JARDINE BELL-IRVING.

The Council met pursuant to summons, the Meeting adjourned till the 30th May being further postponed by command of His Excellency the Governor.

NEW MEMBERS.-Commander HASTINGS, Acting Harbour Master, and Mr. A. K. TRAVERS, Postmaster General, took the Oath of Allegiance on their provisional appointment to seats on the Council in the place of Commander RUMSEY, Harbour Master, and Mr. F. H. MAY, Captain Superin- tendent of Police, absent on leave.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 23rd May, were then read and confirmed.

PAPERS. The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following papers :-

(1) Report of the Director of the Observatory for 1894.

(2) Sanitary Superintendent's Report for the year 1894.

(3) Report of the Superintendent of the Botanical and Afforestation Department for 1894. (4) Colonial Veterinary Surgeon's Report for the

year 1894.

(5) Blue Book for 1894.

PERSONAL STATEMENT.-Mr. MCCONACHIE, with the permission of His Excellency the Governor, made a personal statement-

"At the meeting of Council on the 17th April I read out an extract from the Report of the Medical Committee, of which I had the honour of being a member. The fair copy came in to me for It was signature an hour or so before the meeting of Council I have just referred to. accompanied by the draft copy previously initialed by all members. I compared both copies and found them the same word for word, and appended my signature Knowing that the Ordinance to confer certain powers and authorities on the Medical Officer of Health would come up for discussion that afternoon, I made a hurried pencil extract from the Report in How I case I might find it useful, and it was from that hurried pencil note I read out. came to leave out certain words I cannot explain. It was entirely accidental, and I had no motive and certainly I never intended to do so. I now express my regret to the Government for the omission.'

>>

The Colonial Secretary briefly replied.

NOTICE OF QUESTION.—Mr. BELILIOS gave notice that at the next Meeting of Council he would ask the following question:

Is it the intention of the Government to invite competitive designs from local architects for the proposed new Government offices, or do the Government propose that the design shall be prepared, and the work carried out by the Public Works Department,

:

1

22

REPORT OF THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the report of the Finance Committee dated the 23rd May, 1895, (No. 9), and moved its adoption.

The Acting Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

REPORT OF THE PUBLIC WORKS COMMITTEE.--The Director of Public Works laid on the table the report of the Public Works Committee dated 23rd May, 1895, (No. 2), and moved its adoption in au address to the Council.

Mr. CHATER seconded and addressed the Council.

Mr. BELILIOS moved the following amendment and addressed the Council:--

That, before a final decision as to the condemned area in Taipingshan be arrived at, a Committee, formed of representatives of the Community, to consist of Messrs. Granville Sharp, W. Danby, S. G. Bird and A. Denison, be appointed to associate themselves with the Honour- able Director of Public Works and jointly give a report on the best means of disposing of property resumed by Government.

The Director of Public Works replied.

Mr. BELILIOS' amendment not being seconded, the motion of the Director of Public Works was carried, and the Report of the Public Works Committee adopted, Mr. BELILIOS dissenting.

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE TO SUPPLEMENT ORDINANCE 8 OF 1895." ("THE ARMS CON- SOLIDATION ORDINANCE, 1895.")-The Acting Attorney General moved the first reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

The Acting Attorney General moved the suspension of the Standing Rules and Orders. The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

The Acting Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed and Bill reported without amendment.

The Acting Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

BILL ENTITLED แ AN ORDINANCE FOR THE NATURALIZATION OF SAMUEL DONNENBERG."-The Acting Attorney General moved the first reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

The Acting Attorney General moved the suspension of the Standing Rules and Orders.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

The Acting Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed and Bill reported without amendment.

The Acting Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

23

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE RATING ORDINANCE, 1888,' and BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE CROWN REMEDIES ORDINANCE, 1875.'"-The Colonial Secretary moved that these Bills be discharged from the Orders of the Day.

The Acting Attorney General seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND ORDINANCE No. 17 of 1887." ("THE CATTLE DISEASES, SLAUGHTER-HOUSES AND MARKETS ORDINANCE, 1887.")-Council in Committee on the Bill.

Bill reported unamended.

The Acting Attorney General moved that the Council resume.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

The Acting Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

BILL ENTITLED

AN ORDINANCE TO AUTHORISE THE APPROPRIATION OF A SUPPLEMENTARY SUM

OF THREE HUNDRED AND FIFTY-FIVE THOUSAND THREE HUNDRED AND NINETY-FIVE DOLLARS AND Eighty-Eight CENTS TO DEFRAY THE CHARGES OF THE YEAR 1894."-The Acting Colonial Treasurer moved the second reading of the Bill and addressed the Council.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

The Council then adjourned until the Bill had been considered in Finance Committee.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

Bill reported and recommended by the Finance Committee.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Bill reported unamended.

The Acting Colonial Treasurer moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time and passed.

ADJOURNMENT.-His Excellency the Governor addressed the Council and made an order for adjournment sine die.

Read and confirmed this 16th day of August, 1895.

J. G. T. BUCKLE, Acting Clerk of Councils.

WILLIAM ROBINSON,

Governor.

י.

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 11.

FRIDAY, 16TH AUGUST, 1895.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(Sir WILLIAM ROBINSON, K.C.M.G.).

25

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary and Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART

LOCKHART).

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON).

"3

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the Director of Public Works, (FRANCIS ALFRED Cooper).

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the Acting Harbour Master, (WILLIAM CHARLES HOLLAND HASTINGS, R.N.).

the Postmaster General, (ARTHUR KENNEDY TRAVERS).

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

Ho KAI, M.B., C.M.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS, C.M.G.

ALEXANDER MCCONACHIE.

JAMES JARDINE BELL-IRVING.

The Council met pursuant to summons.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 6th June, were read and confirmed.

His Excellency the Governor addressed the Council.

-

PAPERS. The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following papers :-

(1) The Acting Assessor's Report on the Assessment for 1895-96.

(2) The Postmaster General's Report for 1894.

(3) The Educational Report for 1894.

(4) Despatches with reference to the Military Contribution and Barrack Accommodation

for the Garrison at Hongkong.

(5) Despatch respecting Ordinance 1 of 1864 and its Repeal.

(6) The Colonial Surgeon's Report for 1894.

Report on the Progress of the Public Works during the first half-year 1895.

REPORT OF THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the report of the Finance Committee dated 6th June, 1895, (No. 7), and moved its adoption.

The Acting Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

REPORT OF THE PUBLIC WORKS COMMITTEE.-The Director of Public Works laid on the table the report of the Public Works Committee dated 6th June, 1895, (No. 3), and moved its adoption.

The Acting Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

SANITARY BYE-LAWS.-The Colonial Secretary laid on the table certain Bye-laws made by the Sanitary Board on the 1st August, 1895, under section 13, sub-sections 14 and 23, of The Public Health Ordinance, 1887, and moved that they be approved.

The Attorney General seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

RESOLUTION.-The Colonial Secretary moved as follows:-

1. "That the percentages on the valuation of tenements in Yaumati and Kowloon Point at present payable as rates under The Rating Ordinance, 1888, as amended by Ordi- nance 5 of 1892 be altered from 101 per cent. to 121 per cent.

"J

2. "That the percentages on the valuation of tenements in Hung Hom at present payable as rates under The Rating Ordinance, 1888, as amended by Ordinance 5 of 1892 be altered from 8 per cent. to 102 per cent."

3. That the percentages on the valuation of tenements in Mong Kok Tsui at present payable as rates under The Rating Ordinance, 1888, as amended by Ordinance 5 of 1892 be altered from 7 per cent. to 9 per cent.

The Acting Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

26

QUESTION.-Mr. BELILIOS, pursuant to notice, asked the following question :-

Is it the intention of the Government to invite competitive designs from local architects for the proposed new Government offices, or do the Government propose that the design shall be prepared, and the work carried out by the Public Works Department.

The Colonial Secretary replied.

NOTICE OF QUESTION.-Mr. BELILIOS gave notice that at the next Meeting of Council he would ask the following question:-

66

In

my

In the report of the Director of the Observatory for 1894 the fourth paragraph runs:

last annual report I stated that Victoria Peak and Gap Rock would shortly be placed in direct communication with the Observatory. This improvement has not yet been effected, and the wind observations made at Victoria Peak are often received too late for insertion in the China Coast Register, and latterly no observations have been received until about 2.30 p.m. and frequently later than this each day. This apparently arises to a great extent from the roundabout method by which the observations are forwarded to the United Telegraph Offices in Queen's Road for transmission to the Observatory. The importance of the wind observations from Victoria Peak has frequently been insisted on by me, but their value is at once discounted through the delay in transmission." In view of the great importance of the storm warnings to the shipping of the port, and the impossibility of the Director of the Observatory giving accurate weather forecasts unless supplied with the wind observations promptly, may I ask if steps have since been taken to ensure the early and regular transmis- sion of such observations from the Peak and Gap Rock to the Observatory, and to whose neglect was due the delay in carrying into thorough effect so obviously necessary a system of communication?

The Colonial Secretary replied.

BILL ENTITLED

reading of the Bill.

"THE RIVER STEAMERS ORDINANCE."-The Attorney General moved the first-

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

The Attorney General moved the suspension of the Standing Rules and Orders.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

The Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill and addressed the Council.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed and Bill reported with a verbal amendment.

The Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

BILL ENTITLED (6 AN ORDINANCE TO PROHIBIT THE DEFACING OR CHOPPING OF BRITISH DOLLARS.' The Attorney General moved the first reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

The Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill and addressed the Council.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed and Bill reported without amendment.

The Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

27

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE TRADE MARKS ORDINANCES, (Nos. 16 OF 1873 and 8 of 1886).”—The Attorney General moved the first reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

The Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill and addressed the Council.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed and Bill reported without amendment..

The Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE TO FURTHER AMEND THE MERCHANT SHIPPING CONSOLIDATION ORDINANCE, No. 26 OF 1891."-The Attorney General moved the first reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

The Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill and addressed the Council.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed and Bill reported without amendment.

The Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put--that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

C

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE TO REPEAL ORDINANCE No. 1 OF 1864, ENTITLED AN ORDI- NANCE TO PROVIDE FOR CONVERSION OF BRITISH CURRENCY IN ALL PAYMENTS BY OR TO THE Govern- MENT.'"-The Attorney General addressed the Council and moved that the Bill be withdrawn.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

ADJOURNMENT.-His Excellency the Governor addressed the Council and made an order for adjournment sine die.

Read and confirmed this 25th day of November, 1895.

J. G. T. BUCKLE, Acting Clerk of Councils.

WILLIAM ROBINSON,

Governor.

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 12.

MONDAY, 25TH NOVEMBER, 1895.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(Sir WILLIAM ROBINSON, K.C.M.G.).

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary and Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART

LOCKHART).

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

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the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON).

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the Director of Public Works, (FRANCIS ALFRED Cooper).

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the Acting Harbour Master, (WILLIAM CHARLES HOLLAND HASTINGS, R.N.).

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the Postmaster General, (ARTHUR KENNEDY TRAVERS).

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CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS, C.M.G.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

ALEXANDER MCCONACHIE.

The Council met pursuant to summons.

NEW MEMBER.-Mr. A. MCCONACHIE took the oath of allegiance on his provisional appointment to a seat in the Council.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 16th August, were read and confirmed.

PAPERS. The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following papers :-

(1) Report shewing progress of special work carried out for the prevention of the further

spread of bubonic plague.

(2) Statement of Plague Expenditure.

FINANCIAL MINUTES.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following Financial Minutes, and moved that they be referred to the Finance Committee:-

C.S.O.

1867 of 1895.

C.S.O. 2839 of 1895.

C.S.O.

2792 of 1895.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Two thousand Four hundred Dollars, ($2,400), in aid of the vote for Incidental Expenses in the Sanitary Department.

Government House, Hongkong, 22nd June, 1895.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Ten thousand Dollars, ($10,000), in aid of the vote "Repairs of Buildings."

Government House, Hongkong, 2nd November, 1895.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One thousand Five hundred Dollars, ($1,500), in aid of the vote for "Maintenance of Sewers," (Public Works Annually Recurrent).

Government House, Hongkong, 2nd November, 1895.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Three thousand Dollars, ($3,000), in aid of the vote for "Miscellaneous Works," being approximately the cost of re-building the retaining wall, Seymour Road, which has been charged thereto.

Government House, Hongkong, 2nd November, 1895.

29

30

C.5.0.

2429 of 1895.

C.S.O.

1609 of 1895.

C.S.O. 2423 of 1895.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Four thousand Four hundred and Sixty Dollars and Fifty Cents, ($4,460.50), for repairs, &c., to the Hospital Hulk Hygeia, being difference between the amount spent ($5,260.50) and the amount voted in the Estimates ($800).

Government House, Hongkong, 2nd November, 1895.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Six hundred and Eighty Dollars, ($680), being salary drawn by Dr. BELL from 8th June to 15th August, 1895, while acting as Assistant Surgeon in the Government Civil Hospital during Dr. ATKINSON's absence on sick leave.

Government House, Hongkong, 2nd November, 1895.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Four thousand and Six hundred Dollars, ($4,600), to meet the following expenses in the Police Department :-

For Passages and Bonuses,

For Incidental Expenses,

.$3,000

1,600

C.S.O. 2691 of 1895.

C.S.O. 2666 of 1895.

C.S.O. 2889 of 1895.

C.S.O. 9368 of 1895.

€.8.0. 2464 of 1995.

Government House, Hongkong, 2nd November, 1895.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Five thousand Dollars, ($5,000), for carrying out certain works in connection with the Taipingshan Improvement Scheme.

Government House, Hongkong, 2nd November, 1895.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Two hundred Dollars, ($200), in aid of the vote for "Government Marine Surveyor, Other Charges, coal, oil, and water for Steam-launch.”

Government House, Hongkong, 2nd November, 1895.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Two thousand Five hundred Dollars, ($2,500), for "Maintenance of Water Works."

Government House, Hongkong, 2nd November, 1895.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Twelve thousand Dollars, ($12,000), in connection with Water and Drainage Works at Kowloon.

Government House, Hongkong, 2nd November, 1895.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One thousand and Twenty Dollars, ($1,020), to meet the following expenses in the Sanitary Department :-

Uniform for Staff,

Cost of Street Watering,

..$520

400

Market Incidental Expenses,

100

.....

€.S.O. 1696 & 1627

Government House, Hongkong, 2nd November, 1895.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Two hundred and Seventeen of 1895. Dollars, ($217), being travelling allowances to certain Inspectors of Nuisances and Overseers of

the Sanitary Department for the current year.

Government House, Hongkong, 2nd November, 1895.

31

C.S.O.

1691 of 1895.

C.S.O. 1174 of 1895.

C.O.D.

195 of 1895.

C.S.O. 2015 of 1895.

C.S.O.

2040 of 1895.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Five thousand Dollars, ($5,000), to cover the cost of lighting the New Central Market during the current year.

Government House, Hongkong, 2nd November, 1895.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Twenty-nine thousand Dollars, ($29,000), for expenses incurred in connection with preventive measures against a recurrence of the plague.

Government House, Hongkong, 2nd November, 1895.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One thousand Five hundred and Eighty Dollars, ($1,580), to cover the salary and allowances of the newly appointed Medical Officer of Health from 2nd August to 31st December, 1895.

Government House, Hongkong, 2nd November, 1895.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Six hundred and Fifty Dollars, ($650), in aid of the vote "Harbour Department, Steam Launches, Other Charges, coals, repairs, etc."

Government House, Hongkong, 3rd November, 1895.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Three thousand and Five hundred Dollars, ($3,500), in connection with the construction of a road in Kowloon to be called Salisbury Road.

Government House, Hongkong, 5th November, 1895.

The Acting Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

SANITARY BYE-LAWS.-The Colonial Secretary laid on the table certain Bye-laws made by the Sanitary Board on the 24th October, 1895, under section 13, sub-section 24, of The Public Health Ordinance, 1887, and moved that they be approved.

The Director of Public Works seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

NOTICE OF QUESTIONS.-Mr. WHITEHEAD gave notice that, at the next Meeting, he would ask the following questions:-

(1)

Will the Government lay upon the table a copy of the correspondence which has passed between the Government, including the elaborate memorandum of the honourable the Colonial Secretary which accompanied it, and the home officials, and between the latter and the Colonial Govern- ment concerning the petition from the ratepayers of Hongkong to the Commons of England · praying for reform in the constitution of the local Government, and for the rights and privileges common to the British people in the smallest parish in England or Scotland of settling their local municipal affairs in their own way and to their own mind; as well as copies of all communications on the subject of the appointment of two Unofficial Members to the Executive Council, and two additional Unofficial Members to the Legislative Council?

(2)

With reference to the numerously signed petition to your Excellency, from Peak residents, house owners, and other ratepayers, praying for the construction, with all reasonable speed, of a new road in lieu of the present steep and unsuitable one-really the original mountain path, widened and improved to meet the requirements of a traffic ever on the increase, and which has outgrown the road's capacities-leading from Victoria Gap, passing on the south of "Treverbyn" and "Stolzenfels," on a comparatively easy gradient, and terminating near the Peak Club or Mount Kellet-will the Government inform the Council whether it is proposed to proceed with this very necessary public work, good road communication being very necessary and earnestly desired by the large resident community; state the probable cost of the road, and if the work is not to be undertaken at present, what are the reasons which delay its being carried out?

32

(3)

With reference to the Colonial Secretary's letter No. 1187 of 27th June, 1892, to the Registrar General, forwarding a precis of correspondence re Home for Girls, the following paragraphs appear in the latter:--

"Five Chinese houses were accordingly erected near St. Stephen's Church in accordance with plans which the Pó Leung Kuk Committee had seen, and which, it was understood, they approved......

"The cost of building these houses was $8,000; the land on which they stand was

valued at about $12,000.

"There seems to have been some misunderstanding with regard to the rents to be derived from the lower floors, the Pó Leung Kuk Committee thinking that they were to go towards the maintenance of the Home, while the Government decided that they were to be paid into the Treasury.

"When the buildings had been completed the Pó Léung Kuk objected to move into them

because they considered them unsuitable, etc.,......?

and in the report to the Colonial Secretary dated 1st February, 1892, on a petition from the Pó Léung Kuk, the Registrar General says-

"I understand that it is the intention of the Government to sell the five houses, the top floors of which were intended for a Home. Their value, together with that of the ground on which they stand, has been estimated by the Surveyor General at $21,000."

Will the Government inform the Council whether these houses, erected at the public expense, were built upon inland lot No. 1,129; if so, have they been sold by private contract, the name of the buyer, and at what price? In connection with the sale, if there has been one, will the Government lay upon the table a copy of the correspondence which has passed between the Government and the Colonial Office on the subject?

(4)

Will the Government lay upon the table a statement of the number of convictions, the amount of

fines imposed and paid, in respect of offences against Ordinance No. 13 of 1895, from the date it came into force until the end of last week, and a copy of the correspondence which has passed between the home authorities and the Colonial Government in connection with the Bill, and also inform the Council whether it has yet received the sanction of the Imperial Government, and if not, state the cause of delay?

(5)

Will the Government lay upon the table a copy of the reports or letters to the Government from the sub-Committee appointed by the General Committee elected at the public meeting held at the City Hall on 27th September, 1894, to consider and report upon the question of recognition of services rendered during the suppression of the plague last year, and a copy of all the correspondence which has passed between the Government and the home authorities in connection therewith.

QUESTIONS. Mr. CHATER, by special permission of His Excellency the Governor, asked the following questions:-

(1) What are the reserves of water at the present moment, and will they be sufficient at the present

rate of distribution to last to the end of the dry season?

(2) In view of the great scarcity of water this year and the consequent inconvenience both to individuals and industrial enterprises, are any steps being taken to increase the supply and prevent a recurrence of a similar scarcity?

His Excellency the Governor replied.

His Excellency then addressed the Council as follows:-

HONOURABLE GENTLEMEN OF THE LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL,

I have much pleasure in meeting you again for the transaction of public business. The programme that I have to present to you is a somewhat lengthy one, the most pressing item in it is, of course, the Appropriation Bill for 1896. From the Draft Estimates, which I now lay on the table and which were circulated more than a fortnight ago together with the explanatory memoranda, you will perceive that the revenue for 1896 is estimated at $2,288,366. This estimate has been prepared with due caution; and I believe that it will be realised.

*

The total estimated expenditure, on the other hand, amounts to $2,479,062, of which $197,200 is for Public Works Extraordinary and chargeable to the Loan. After deducting this sum there remains a total estimated expenditure chargeable to current revenue of $2,281,862, or an estimated surplus of revenue over expenditure of $6,504.

The chief increases on the expenditure side, as compared with the Estimates for 1895, appear under the following heads :-

1. Public Works Extraordinary chargeable to revenue,

33

2. Public Works, Recurrent,.

3. Public Debt,

4. Military Expenditure,

5. Sanitary Department,

$90,130

$15,200

..$16,843

$44,215

...

.$12,206

6. Medical Departments,.

$ 5,921

The first item includes $30,000 towards the Taipingshan Improvement Scheme, $15,000 for Public Latrines, $17,000 for a new Isolation Hospital, a very urgent requirement, $10,000 towards the extension of the Public Recreation Ground at Happy Valley, and certain sums for the construction and extension of roads at Kowloon. The increase under the second head is partly on account of sewerage works, the extension of the system involving an additional cost for upkeep, and partly for maintenance of waterworks at Kowloon chargeable to Water Account.

The increase on account of Public Debt is due to the contribution to the New Sinking Fund, which commences in October next.

As regards the Military Expenditure the annual contribution has been calculated at 17 per cent. of the estimated revenue for 1896, exclusive of premia on Land Sales. There is also provided a sum of $40,000 for "Barrack Services" during the year. I am in possession of the views of the Unofficial Members on this subject, and they are receiving the attention of the Imperial Government. As the matter is still sub judice, I would ask you, gentlemen, to vote the sum provided in the Estimates subject to such further representations as you may hereafter have to make, and to such modifications as may hereafter be approved.

A

The large increase in the cost of the Sanitary Department appears alarming at first sight, but admits of easy explanation. It is on account of the additional staff required for the New Central Market and Sheep and Pig Depôts as well as for the cost of lighting the former ($7,000) for which no provision was made in the Estimates of 1895. Against this increase must be set the additional revenue derived from the new market and depôts. The increase in the Medical Department is accounted for by the appointment of a Medical Officer of Health who is borne on the medical establishment.

:

·

As a compensation for this additional expenditure various economies have been effected in other directions, notably in the Colonial Secretary's Office, the Registrar General's Department, the Magistracy, the Police, the Fire Brigade, and under Miscellaneous Services. Numerous offices have still to be dealt with on the lines recommended by the Retrenchment Committee.

+

تو

In addition to the reduction of establishments, which has already been effected, the salaries of the Treasury staff have been re-adjusted in such a manner as to secure a saving of $2,246. Reductions have also been made in the Post Office, Stamp Office, and the Supreme Court Office.

From this statement you will gather that no favourable opportunity for effecting retrenchment has been lost, and you may rely on me to curtail expenditure, so far as is practicable, as occasion offers in the future.

34

And now, gentlemen, having dealt with the Appropriation Bill for 1896, I have to ask you to vote the sum required to defray the Charges of the coming year. If there are any items in regard to which further information is desired, it will be forthcoming in Finance Committee or when the Council is in Committee on the Bill.

I will now make a few general remarks on the condition of the Colony. When I addressed you on a similar occasion last year, it was my painful duty to refer to a dismal succession of reverses and misfortunes. We were then only just recovering from the shock of a great disaster, and were but beginning to recognize the absolute necessity of a large measure of sanitary reform. To-day I have to announce to you a great improvement in these matters. The resumption of Taipingshan was perhaps one of the largest works ever undertaken by the Government of this Colony. Thanks to the efficiency and tact of the Board of Arbitrators all claims arising under that head have been amicably and speedily settled, the Crown has entered into possession, and the "Improvement Scheme," approved by this Council and by the Secretary of State, is being carried into effect. As I anticipated, the cost of resumption has amounted to $821,000. Of this sum $386,000 has been defrayed from balances in hand, and the remainder has been borrowed from Loan and other Government monies in the custody of the Crown Agents, interest being paid at the same rate as the money would earn by temporary investments at home. This course has been considered more economical than, and therefore preferable to, raising a further loan or to an overdraft on the local Banks, supposing such an arrangement to have been practicable.

As regards the liquidation of the outstanding balance of $435,000 on Taipingshan Account, I am glad to state that the receipts up to date are exceedingly satisfactory. The revenue for 1895 will be about $2,363,000 and the expenditure about $2,143,000, so that I have reason to expect a surplus of revenue over expenditure at the end of the present year of some $220,000. If this forecast is correct, there will be a pro tanto reduction of our indebtedness, and the year 1896 should begin with a debit balance on this account of $215,000 only.

In consequence of the improvement of Taipingshan a large area of land will probably be ready for sale in the course of next year, and with an expanding revenue it is to be hoped that the debit balance will disappear at the end of 1896. Then again, 1897 should witness extensive land sales in Taipingshan, and when the account is finally closed, the result will, in all probability, be more than gratifying. As regards the expenditure on this work, the total cost of which is estimated at $83,000, a sum of $30,000 has been provided in the Esti- mates for 1896, and you will be asked to vote the balance when the Supply Bill for 1897 comes before you. I have now, gentlemen, put briefly before you the financial position of the Colony, and having regard to all the circumstances you will doubtless agree with me in thinking that the state of affairs is both satisfactory and hopeful.

In addition to the resumption of Taipingshan other active measures for improving the sanitation of the Colony have been undertaken.

The provisions of The Public Health Ordinance, 1887, and of Ordinance No. 4 of 1895 have been strictly and steadily enforced, and upwards of 400 common lodging-houses have been licensed. It would thus appear that the evil of overcrowding has at length, to some extent, been successfully checked.

The enforcement of Ordinance No. 15 of 1894, which gave this Council no little trouble, has been accompanied by a marked amelioration of the sanitary condition of private premises throughout the Colony. Accumulations of filth and rubbish, illegal cocklofts, mezzanine floors, and back-yard obstructions have been removed, and the ground surface of upwards of 700 tenements have been concreted.

A special inspection of the drainage of private premises was made in the early part of the year and revealed a most insanitary state of affairs as regards the old drains, whereas the drainage of those premises in which the new system has been introduced was found to be in excellent condition. The re-draining of private premises progresses, upwards of 2,150 houses having been already drained; and with a view to the early completion of this work arrangements have been made by which drainage connections can be carried out by the Public Works Department. Owners should readily avail themselves of this facility.

The work of raising the dam at the Tytam Reservoir has advanced, and there is now storage capacity for an additional 40 million gallons of water. Unfortunately the small rain- fall up to date has not admitted of this additional quantity being stored. The long and unprecedented drought has been a source of much anxiety to the Government. The rain- fall up to the 30th September last was some 38 inches below the average, and some 15 inches below the minimum yet recorded. As a natural result the dry season commences with a water supply of 242,000,000 gallons instead of the usual quantity of 378,000,000 gallons. It has therefore already been necessary to curtail the supply to the City of Victoria by some 1,400,000 gallons daily. By this economy and by close supervision over the consumption of water generally, it is believed there will be a sufficient supply for ordinary wants until the rainy season comes round again. The new waterworks at Kowloon are sufficiently advanced to admit of water being supplied from public fountains to the most populous parts of the district, and a continuous supply is being maintained. When the pumping machinery is erected, the supply will be extended to the higher levels, but at present there is not enough pressure of water to reach them.

The mortality statistics shew that the health of the Colony is good, and the present year promises to be the healthiest on record notwithstanding the somewhat alarming prevalence of malarial fever, which is no doubt due to the exceptional drought.

Profiting by last year's experience, and looking to the prevalence of the plague in the neighbourhood of the Colony during the early part of 1895, I appointed a Committee of Officials to consider what exceptional measures should be taken to protect the Colony against the re-appearance of the disease, or, in the event of its re-appearing, to limit its ravages as far as possible. Temporary hospital accommodation and burial grounds were at their suggestion provided,—and arrangements made for the removal of patients, the isolation of those who had been in immediate contact with the disease, and the disinfection and cleansing of infected premises. It was further deemed advisable to prohibit Chinese immigration from certain infected neighbouring ports for several months during the year, but this restriction was not continued longer than was absolutely necessary. The precautions taken against the recurrence of the plague and the timely arrangements made for dealing with it have been efficacious. I am glad to inform you that only 29 cases have occurred during the year, and that at no time was an epidemic threatened.

35

In accordance with the recommendation of a Committee of Enquiry into the Medical Department, a Medical Officer of Health has recently been appointed. I regret to state that· there has been some misunderstanding between the Government and the Unofficial Members of the Sanitary Board in regard to this appointment, and it may not be out of place here to explain briefly the position of the Government in this matter. In my address to this Council on the 28th November last, I expressed my own views, which coincided with those of the Retrenchment Committee, regarding the Sanitary Board as hitherto constituted.

I deprecated the division of responsibility which such a constitution involved, and I urged the desirability of placing the sanitary system on a different basis. Some opposition has been offered to my views in certain quarters, and it is not improbable that a compromise will eventually be suggested by the Secretary of State, but as yet no decision has been arrived at. In this

36

uncertain state of affairs, I was unwilling to assign any definite position to the newly appointed Medical Officer as the subordinate of a Body which might, at any time, cease to exist.

I accordingly adopted the modus vivendi which was offered to me by the suggestion of the Medical Committee and which afforded the Government an opportunity of weighing the further recommendations of the Committee in regard to the reconstitution of the medical staff, on which the future position of the Medical Officer of Health must, to a great extent, depend. I should not have thought it necessary to make this explanation were it not for certain insinuations which have been made as to the motives of the Government. There are those who have pretended to see in the action of the Government an attempt to deal a death- blow to the Sanitary Board. I disclaim any such motive; and even had such been my object, I should at least have adopted measures better calculated to effect it-measures which would have left no doubt whatever as to my intentions.

As a matter of fact, however, the responsibility of deciding this vexed question does not rest with me. Having expressed my views, my duty ends, and I can only hope that whatever conclusion may be arrived at, it will effectually secure the sanitary well-being of this community, which after all is our common object.

Turning to other matters of general interest, the shipping returns up to the 30th · September last are more than encouraging.

For the first 9 months of this year, as compared with the corresponding period of last year, British shipping shews an increase of 378 vessels aggregating 575,306 tons.

Foreign shipping with a numerical decrease of 75 ships also shews an increase in tonnage of 11,887 tons. European vessels have handled and carried some 276,000 tons of cargo more than last year.

There is likewise an increase in the Foreign and Local Junk Trades of 178,747 tons and 79,263 tons, respectively.

The total increase over last year in the number of ships entered and cleared at this port is no less than 5,551 vessels aggregating 845,203 tons-a distinct improvement even on the exceptionally good returns for 1893.

:

The passenger traffic returns shew an increase of 25,186 in the number of emigrants, but immigration has fallen off considerably doubtless on account of the prohibition in force during several months in respect of certain neighbouring ports infected with the plague.

Chinese seamen's boarding-houses have recently been inspected and licensed for the first time, and there are now 67 such houses duly licensed, affording accommodation for 1,120 men.

The criminal statistics are gratifying, and there has been no repetition of the riots which occurred in the early part of last year. The public peace has been efficiently preserved by the Police, and with the exception of the coolie strike, which took place at the latter end of March last in connection with the enforcement of the bye-laws for the regulation of common lodging-houses, and the robbery with violence on the 18th and 22nd instant, there is, I rejoice to say, no "Police News" worthy of record.

!

:

The firm attitude of the Government during the coolie strike was, however, not maintained without loss and inconvenience to the commercial community, but the cir- cumstances did not admit of concession, and looking to future interests it will, I think, be generally admitted that the success achieved was not too dearly, purchased.

The community is indebted to the Naval and Military Authorities for their ready assistance in the emergency, and the Police, as usual, did excellent work in keeping order and relieving the situation as far as possible by providing coolies and cargo boats for the several firms.

37

With regard to education, it appears that the attendance at the several schools, which. fell off last year, has now recovered its normal proportions. Including Queen's College, there are now 16 Government Schools, and 105 Grant-in-Aid Schools, (of which latter 10 have been opened during the year) in addition to numerous Chinese "Kaifong" Schools.

It has often struck me as extraordinary-not to say discreditable-that, after 55 years of British rule, the vast majority of Chinese in Hongkong should remain so little "Anglicised.” I have thus been led to enquire more thoroughly than I have hitherto done into the system of education adopted in the local schools, and I am of opinion that too much attention has hitherto been paid to purely Chinese subjects. With a view therefore of promoting a more general knowledge of English amongst the Chinese, the Government proposes in future to subsidise only those schools in which special attention is paid to the teaching of the English language and modern subjects. It is hoped that this will tend to educate the rising generation of Chinese to more enlightened views and ideas, and to dispel the ignorance and blind superstition, which have proved and still are proving such a stumbling block to the promotion of their moral and physical well-being.

The silver question remains as much a problem as ever. I had hoped that before this the evils of a depreciated dollar would have been compensated for in some degree by an influx of English capital into the Colony, but the stability of exchange appears to be beyond all control, and so long as that is the case, English capitalists will probably prefer to assist the apparently failing industries of Lancashire rather than run any risk in industrial ventures abroad. I notice, however, that in Shanghai capital is being readily subscribed for the establishment of Cotton Mills and other industries, and I could wish to see a similar spirit of enterprise abroad in this Colony. With its unceasing water supply the "model settlement” has advantages in this respect which are denied to Hongkong; but there is no reason why local difficulties should not be faced and ultimately overcome, or why this valuable entrepôt of Eastern commerce should not also become ere long a great industrial centre.

Past and passing political events in the Far East are of special importance to Hong- kong. The peace of Shimonoseki, which brought the hostilities between Japan and China to a close in May last, has not been unproductive of disappointment, nor is the political horizon yet quite as clear as could be wished. It is to be hoped, however, that the Great Eastern Problem will work out peacefully and beneficially. In the meantime we may rest assured that the interests of Great Britain and her possessions will be safely guarded and judiciously forwarded by Her Majesty's Government as opportunity offers, and in this connection I would incidentally remark that whilst for a time at least local interests may necessarily be postponed in favour of purely Imperial interests, I have every reason to believe that the questions most particularly affecting this Colony have by no means been lost sight of.

In conclusion, gentlemen, I thank you for the patient hearing which you have accorded to me. The period which I have reviewed has been one of activity in sanitary reform and improvement in many other directions. I have looked in vain for the symptoms peculiar to a people "writhing under injustice" and "taxed up to the limit of endurance," and I have discovered only that happy condition of progress and prosperity which usually obtains in a well-ordered community. To the maintenance of that progress and prosperity, to financial economy, to sanitary improvements, and to the furtherance, generally, of the best interests of this community, I shall faithfully continue to devote myself. With your ready and loyal co-operation, gentlemen, I can safely look forward to some additional measure of success during the term of government that still remains to me.

38

Standing CommitTEES.-His Excellency appointed the following Committees :-

(a) Finance Committee,-

The Colonial Secretary, Chairman.

All the Members of Council, except the Governor.

(b) Law Committee,-

The Attorney General, Chairman.

The Registrar General.

Honourable J. J. BELL-IRVING. Honourable Ho KAI.

Honourable E. R. BELILIOS.

(c) Public Works Committee,

The Director of Public Works, Chairman.

The Colonial Treasurer.

Honourable C. P. CHATER.

Honourable E. R. BELILIOS.

Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD.

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE TO APPLY A SUM NOT EXCEEDING TWO MILLIONS FOUR HUNDRED AND SEVENTY-NINE THOUSAND AND SIXTY-TWO DOLLARS TO THE PUBLIC SERVICE OF THE YEAR 1896."-The Colonial Secretary moved the first reading of this Bill.

The Acting Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

6

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE WIDOWS' AND ORPHANS' PENSIONS ORDINANCES OF 1890 AND 1891 (Nos. 30 or 1890 AND 18 OF 1891)"."-The Acting Colonial Treasurer moved the first reading of this Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED " AN ORDINANCE TO FURTHER AMEND THE POLICE FORCE CONSOLIDATION ORDI- NANCE, 14 OF 1887."-The Attorney General moved the first reading of this Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED

AN ORDINANCE TO AUTHORIZE IN CERTAIN CASES JUDICIAL INVESTIGATIONS INTO THE CAUSES OF FIRE."-The Attorney General moved the first reading of this Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED

፡፡

AN ORDINANCE TO PROVIDE FOR THE RECOGNITION IN THE COLONY OF Probates AND LETTERS OF ADMINISTRATION GRANTED IN BRITISH POSSESSIONS."-The Attorney General moved the first reading of this Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED " AN ORDINANCE TO FURTHER AMEND THE BANKRUPTCY ORDINANCE, 1891.' ”— The Attorney General moved the first reading of this Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED " AN ORDINANCE TO FURTHER AMEND 'THE CATTLE DISEASES, SLAUGHTER-HOUSES, AND MARKETS Ordinance, 1887."-The Attorney General moved the first reading of this Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned until Thursday, the 5th December, 1895, at 3 P.M.

Read and confirmed this 5th day of December, 1895.

J. G. T. BUCKLE,

Acting Clerk of Councils.

WILLIAM ROBINSON,

Governor.

¿

4

39

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 13.

THURSDAY, 5TH DECEMBER, 1895.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(Sir WILLIAM ROBINSON, K.C.M.G:).

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary and Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE STEwart

LOCKHART).

"

""

""

""

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON).

the Director of Public Works, (FRANCIS ALFRED Cooper).

the Harbour Master, (ROBERT MURRAY RUMSEY, R.N.).

the Acting Captain Superintendent of Police, (WILLIAM CHARLES HOLLAND

HASTINGS, R.N.).

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS, C.M.G.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

ALEXANDER MCCONACHIE.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

NEW MEMBER.-Commander W. C. H. HASTINGs took the oath of allegiance on his provisional appointment to a seat in the Council.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 25th November, 1895, were read and confirmed.

REPORT OF THE FINANCE COMMITTEE. The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the report of the Finance Committee dated 25th November, 1895, (No. 8), and moved its adoption.

The Acting Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

REPORT OF THE PUBLIC WORKS COMMITTEE.-The Director of Public Works laid on the table the report of the Public Works Committee dated 25th November, 1895, (No. 4), and moved its adoption.

The Acting Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

QUESTION. Mr. CHATER, by special permission of His Excellency the Governor, asked the following question :-

Will the Government lay upon the table copies of all the correspondence that has passed between the Government of Hongkong and the Colonial Office on the subject of the Military Contribution since the receipt here of the Marquess of Ripon's despatch on that subject of the 27th June, 1895?

The Colonial Secretary replied and laid upon the table the Despatches on the subject of the Military Contribution.

NOTICE OF QUESTIONS.-Mr. BELILIOS gave notice that at the next Meeting of Council he would ask the following questions :—

Will the Government be good enough to say why (experiments having shown the practicability of such a course) steps are not taken to pump up sea water to the higher levels with which to wash out the drains?

Will the Government kindly inform the Council of the reasons for the suspension, for many months, of all work upon, and apparent indefinite postponement of completion of, the base and pedestal for the Jubilee statue of Her Majesty the Queen? Is there any insuperable obstacle in the. way of the erection of this statue, which has now for nearly a year been interned in a godown, instead of being placed in the position for which it was designed?

QUESTIONS.-Mr. WHITEHEAD, pursuant to notice, asked the following questions:-

(1)

Will the Government lay upon the table a copy of the correspondence which has passed between the Government, including the elaborate memorandum of the honourable the Colonial Secretary which accompanied it, and the home officials, and between the latter and the Colonial Govern- ment concerning the petition from the ratepayers of Hongkong to the Commons of England

40

praying for reform in the constitution of the local Government, and for the rights and privileges common to the British people in the smallest parish in England or Scotland of settling their local municipal affairs in their own way and to their own mind; as well as copies of all communications on the subject of the appointment of two Unofficial Members to the Executive Council, and two additional Unofficial Members to the Legislative Council?

(2)

With reference to the numerously signed petition to your Excellency, from Peak residents, house owners, and other ratepayers, praying for the construction, with all reasonable speed, of a new road in lieu of the present steep and unsuitable one—really the original mountain path, widened and improved to meet the requirements of a traffic ever on the increase, and which has outgrown the road's capacities-leading from Victoria Gap, passing on the south of "Treverbyn" and "Stolzenfels," on a comparatively easy gradient, and terminating near the Peak Club or Mount Kellet-will the Government inform the Council whether it is proposed to proceed with this very necessary public work, good road communication being very necessary and earnestly desired by the large resident community; state the probable cost of the road, and if the work is not to be undertaken at present, what are the reasons which delay its being carried out?

(3)

With reference to the Colonial Secretary's letter No. 1187 of 27th June, 1892, to the Registrar General, forwarding a précis of correspondence re Home for Girls, the following paragraphs appear in the latter:-

"Five Chinese houses were accordingly erected near St. Stephen's Church in accordance with plans which the Pó Leung Kuk Committee had seen, and which, it was understood, they approved......

"The cost of building these houses was $8,000; the land on which they stand was

valued at about $12,000.

"There seems to have been some misunderstanding with regard to the rents to be derived from the lower floors, the Pó Léung Kuk Committee thinking that they were to go ・towards the maintenance of the Home, while the Government decided that they

were to be paid into the Treasury.

"When the buildings had been completed the Pó Leung Kuk objected to move into them

because they considered them unsuitable, etc.,......?

and in the report to the Colonial Secretary dated 1st February, 1892, on a petition from the Pó Léung Kuk, the Registrar General says—

"I understand that it is the intention of the Government to sell the five houses, the top floors of which were intended for a Home. Their value, together with that of the ground on which they stand, has been estimated by the Surveyor General at $21,000."

Will the Government inform the Council whether these houses, erected at the public expense, were built upon inland lot No. 1,129; if so, have they been sold by private contract, the name of the buyer, and at what price? In connection with the sale, if there has been one, will the Government lay upon the table a copy of the correspondence which has passed between the Government and the Colonial Office on the subject?

(4)

Will the Government lay upon the table a statement of the number of convictions, the amount of fines imposed and paid, in respect of offences against Ordinance No. 13 of 1895, from the date it came into force until the end of last week, and a copy of the correspondence which has passed between the home authorities and the Colonial Government in connection with the Bill, and also inform the Council whether it has yet received the sanction of the Imperial Government, and if not, state the cause of delay?

(5)

Will the Government lay upon the table a copy of the despatch from the Secretary of State to the Colonies sanctioning the pension to be paid to the Honourable Mr. Justice Ackroyd on his retiring from the service?

(6)

Will the Government inform the Council on whose recommendation Mr. Matthews was requested to visit Hongkong, inspect professionally the Gap Rock lighthouse, and state the cost of his report?

(7)

41

Will the Government inform the Council as to the conditions on which the Golf Club have been granted authority to build their club house at the west end of the Wongneichong Valley, and the terms of the lease, if there is one?

(8)

Will the Government inform the Council whether it is propose:l to proceed with the construction of the much needed and desirable new road between Plantation Road Station and Magazine Gap; the probable cost; if the work is not to be proceeded with at present, what causes the delay, and when will the work be taken in hand?

(9)

Will the Government lay upon the table a statement showing the total cost of the administration, or the expenditure of the Government under the head of salaries, including allowances if any, pensions, exchange compensation, &c., for the years 1892, 1893, 1894, and 1895, separately?

The Colonial Secretary replied.

Mr. WHITEHEAD, with the permission of His Excellency the Governor, withdrew the following question:-

Will the Government lay upon the table a copy of the reports or letters to the Government from the sub-Committee appointed by the General Committee elected at the public meeting held at the City Hall on 27th September, 1894, to consider and report upon the question of recognition of services rendered during the suppression of the plague last year, and a copy of all the correspondence which has passed between the Government and the home authorities in connection therewith?

RESOLUTION. Mr. WHITEHEAD gave notice that at the next Meeting he would move the follow- ing resolution :-

That His Honour Mr. Justice E. J. Ackroyd (recently retired after forty-one years of true and faithful work in the Colonial Service, of which he served in Hongkong for fourteen years as Registrar of the Supreme Court, Puisne Judge, and Acting Chief Justice) rendered very many and most valuable services to the Colony, outside and in addition to the duties of the various offices held by him. That from 1882 to 1890 he was a member of the Commission for the revision of the laws of the Colony; he was on the Crown Lands Commission; on the Squat- ters Commission; on the Board for adjusting the claims of the squatters; on the Commission of enquiry into the defalcations in the Post Office, and in the Treasury; on the enquiry into the working of the emigration laws; and on the enquiry into the difficulties in 1891 which arose between the Opium Farmer and the Government, He rendered services of great value as Chairman of the enquiry into the expenditure and the cost of the Administration, and as Chairman of the Committee appointed to enquire into the resumption of the Taipingshan district, he carried out a most difficult, arduous, and delicate work with promptitude, impartiality, and to the entire satisfaction of the Government and the claimants. The Council desire to tender to the Honourable Mr. Justice Ackroyd their hearty thanks for all his zealous labours, ever readily and cheerfully rendered, and for his devotion to promoting the welfare' and the interests of the Colony, and to wish him every health and happiness, as well as a continued career of usefulness.

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE LAW AS TO CERTAIN MONEYS PAID INTO THE SUPREME COURT OR TO THE REGISTRAR THEREOF."-The Attorney General moved the first reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

(4

(

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO FURTHER AMEND THE STAMP ORDINANCE, 1886.'"-The Acting Colonial Treasurer moved the first reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO APPLY A SUM NOT EXCEEDING TWO MILLIONS FOUR HUNDRED AND SEVENTY-NINE THOUSAND AND SIXTY-TWO DOLLARS TO THE PUBLIC SERVICE OF THE YEAR 1896." The Colonial Secretary moved the second reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

42

The Colonial Secretary moved that the Bill be referred to the Finance Committee for consideration.

The Acting Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

"

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND

THE WIDOWS' AND ORPHANS' PENSIONS ORDINANCES

of 1890 and 1891 (Nos. 30 of 1890 and 18 of 1891)"."-The Acting Colonial Treasurer moved the second reading of the Bill.

The Attorney General seconded. Question--put and agreed to. Bill read a second time.

Bill considered in Committee. Bill reported unamended.

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE TO FURTHEr amend the POLICE FORCE CONSOLIDATION Ordi- NANCE, 14 OF 1887"-The Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Bill considered in Committee.

Bill reported as amended in Committee..

The Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put--that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

BILL ENTITLED

AN ORDINANCE TO AUTHORIZE IN CERTAIN CASES JUDICIAL INVESTIGATIONS INTO THE CAUSES OF FIRE."-The Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill and addressed the Council.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Bill considered in Committee.

Bill reported with amendments.

BILL ENTITLED

AN ORDINANCE TO PROVIDE FOR THE RECOGNITION IN THE COLONY OF PROBATES AND LETTERS OF ADMINISTRATION GRANTED IN BRITISH POSSESSIONS."-The Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Bill considered in Committee.

Bill reported without amendment.

The Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

6

BILL ENTITLED " AN ORDINANCE TO FURTHER AMEND THE BANKRUPTCY ORDINANCE, 1891'."- The Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Bill considered in Committee.

Bill reported without amendment.

The Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

F

43

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE TO FURTHER AMEND THE CATTLE DISEASES, SLAUGHTER-HOUSES, AND MARKETS ORDINANCE, 1887"."-The Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Bill considered in Committee.

Bill reported without amendment.

The Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned until Thursday, the 12th December, 1895, at 3.30 P.M.

Read and confirmed this 14th day of December, 1895.

J. G. T. BUCKLE, Acting Clerk of Councils.

WILLIAM ROBINSON,

Governor.

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 14.

SATURDAY, 14TH DECEMBER, 1895.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(Sir WILLIAM ROBINSON, K.C.M.G.).

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary and Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART

LOCKHART).

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON).

""

""

the Director of Public Works, (FRANCIS ALFRED COOPER).

39

""

""

""

""

the Harbour Master, (ROBERT MURRAY RUMSEY, R.N.).

the Acting Captain Superintendent of Police, (WILLIAM CHARLES HOLLand

HASTINGS, R.N.).

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS, C.M.G.

ALEXANDER MCCONACHIE.

The Council met pursuant to summons, the meeting fixed for the 12th December having been postponed until Saturday, the 14th December, 1895.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 5th December, 1895, were read and confirmed.

PAPER.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the report by the Director of Public Works on the cost of constructing the proposed road from Victoria Gap to Mount Kellet Road, and moved that it be referred to the Public Works Committee.

The Director of Public Works seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

REPORT OF THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the reports of the Finance Committee dated 5th and 14th December, 1895, (Nos. 9 and 10).

QUESTIONS.—Mr. BELILIOS, pursuant to notice, asked the following questions

Will the Government be good enough to say why (experiments having shown the practicability of such a course) steps are not taken to pump up sea water to the higher levels with which

to wash out the drains?

Will the Government kindly inform the Council of the reasons for the suspension, for many months, of all work upon, and apparent indefinite postponement of completion of, the base and pedestal for the Jubilee statue of Her Majesty the Queen? Is there any insuperable obstacle in the way of the erection of this statue, which has now for nearly a year been interned in a godown, instead of being placed in the position for which it was designed?

The Colonial Secretary replied.

BILL ENTITLED 66 AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE LAW AS TO CERTAIN MONEYS PAID INTO THE SUPREME COURT OR TO THE REGISTRAR THEREOF."-The Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill and addressed the Council.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Bill referred to Committee.

6

BILL ENTITLED. "AN ORDINANCE TO FURTHER AMEND THE STAMP ORDINANCE, 1886.'"-The Acting Colonial Treasurer moved the second reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Bill considered in Committee.

Bill reported with amendment.

The Acting Colonial Treasurer moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put--that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

45

46

6

66

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE TO APPLY A SUM NOT exceeding Two MILLIONS FOUR HUNDRED AND SEVENTY-NINE THOUSAND AND SIXTY-TWO DOLLARS TO THE PUBLIC SERVICE OF THE YEAR 1896."-Council in Committeee on the Bill.

The several items on the Bill were considered and adopted without discussion with the exception of the following:-

Governor and Legislature.

Mr. WHITEHEAD moved the reduction of this vote by $100 and addressed the Council.

Dr. Ho KAI seconded.

The Council divided.

For the amendment. Hon. A. McCONACHIE. Hon. E. R. BELILIOS.

Hon. T. H. WHITEHEAD,

Hon. Dr. Ho KAI

Hon. C. P. CHATER.

Motion lost by a majority of one.

Against the amendment.

The Acting Captain Superintendent of Police. The Harbour Master.

The Director of Public Works.

The Acting Colonial Treasurer. The Attorney General. The Colonial Secretary.

The vote was accordingly passed by the above majority without amendment.

Colonial Secretary's Department.

Mr. WHITEHEAD moved the reduction of this vote by $100 and addressed the Council. There being no seconder the vote was passed.

Medical Department.

Mr. WHITEHEAD moved the reduction of this vote by $100 and addressed the Council. There being no seconder the vote was passed.

Mr. CHATER moved—

Military Contribution.

That this vote be reduced to 17 per cent. of the general revenue of the Colony less the proceeds of Land Sales and less the Municipal Revenue, the items of which this latter shall be com- posed to be adjusted between the Imperial and Colonial Governments.

Dr. Ho KAI seconded and addressed the Council.

Mr. MCCONACHIE supported the amendment and addressed the Council. Mr. WHITEHEAD supported the amendment and addressed the Council. Mr. BELILIOS Supported the amendment and addressed the Council, His Excellency addressed the Council.

The Council divided-

For the amendment. Hon. A. MCCONACHIE. Hon. E. R. BELILIOS.

Hon. T. H. WHITEHEAD.

Hon. Dr. Ho KAI. Hon. C. P. CHATER.

Motion lost by a majority of one.

Against the amendment.

The Acting Captain Superintendent of Police. The Harbour Master.

The Director of Public Works. The Acting Colonial Treasurer. The Attorney General. The Colonial Secretary.

The vote was accordingly passed by the above majority without amendment.

Bill reported without amendment.

The Council resumed.

The Colonial Secretary moved the 3rd reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Treasurer seconded.

The Council divided-

For.

The Acting Captain Superintendent of Police.

The Harbour Master.

The Director of Public Works.

The Acting Colonial Treasurer.

The Attorney General.

The Colonial Secretary..

The motion was carried by a majority of one.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

Against.

Hon. A. MCCONACHIE.

Hon. E. R. BELILIOS.

Hon. T. H. WHITEHEAD. Hon. Dr. Ho KAI.

Hon. C. P. Chater.

2

47

6

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE WIDOWS' AND ORPHANS' PENSIONS ORDINANCES of 1890 and 1891 (Nos. 30 or 1890 AND 18 of 1891)'."-The Acting Colonial Treasurer moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

BILL ENTITLED

AN ORDINANCE TO AUTHORIZE IN CERTAIN CASES JUDICIAL INVESTIGATIONS INTO

the causes of firE."-The Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

ADJOURNMENT.--The Council then adjourned for the period of one month.

Read and confirmed this 11th day of February, 1896.

J. G. T. BUCKLE, Acting Clerk of Councils.

WILLIAM ROBINSON,

Governor.

MEDICAL COMMITTEE.

549

Appendix 4.

REPORT.

We, the undersigned, were appointed by His Excellency the Governor to be Mem- bers of a Committee of Inquiry into the Medical Department of the Colony and other relative matters embodied in a list of subjects which accompanied our letters of appoint-

ment.

2. We have accordingly proceeded on the lines laid done by the Government and have conducted our inquiry with special reference to the subjects upon which we were asked to report. In the course of that inquiry with a view to making ourselves thoroughly acquainted with the working of the Medical Department generally, we have had occasion to pay a personal visit of inspection to the Government Civil Hospital, and have examined several servants of the Government, to whom we are indebted for much valuable information and many useful suggestions, which we have adopted and embodied in our recommendations.

The following is a list of the Officers who have appeared before us in the course of our enquiry:-

The Colonial Surgeon.

The Superintendent of the Government Civil Hospital.

The Superintendent of the Gaol.

The Assistant Superintendent of the Government Civil Hospital.

The Secretary of the Sanitary Board.

The Health Officer.

The Medical Officer of the Gaol.

The Government Analyst.

Dr. CHUNG of the Alice Memorial Hospital.

Honourable Dr. Ho KAI, and the Matron of the Governinent Civil Hospital.

A copy of the evidence given by them forms an appendix to the report which we beg to submit below for the consideration of His Excellency the Governor.

For facility of reference we have drawn up our report in the form of answers to the various questions submitted to us, and corresponding numerically thereto.

REPORT.

Question 1.-The present distribution of work and the hours of duty of each mem- ber of the medical staff. What re-arrangement of duties, if any, is desirable with a view to securing the more efficient working of the Department?

Answer. We are of opinion—

(a) That the work required of the medical staff-as at present distributed- falls to a certain extent on the Colonial Surgeon, and chiefly on the Superintendent and Assistant Superintendent of the Government Civil Hospital, and that the time of those Officers is sufficiently occupied, more especially since the additional duty of daily inspecting the Tung Wa Hospital has been imposed on them.

(b) That the Medical Officer of the Gaol has not sufficient work, but that the present occupant of the post is not competent to assist at the Govern- ment Civil Hospital.

(c) That the duties of the Health Officer of the Port fully occupy the time.

of one Officer.

[ii]

In view of the above it appears to us that some re-arrangement of duties is desir- able with a view to distributing the work more equally among the Officers of the Department. At present, chiefly owing to the reason given in (b) above and to the fact that the services of the Health Officer of the Port owing to his being allowed private practice are not available for the general work of the Department in time of great pres- sure or emergency, serious inconvenience is likely to arise should the Colonial Surgeon or the Superintendent of the Government Civil Hospital or the Assistant Superintend- ent be incapacitated for duty by sickness. Further, under the existing arrangements, it is difficult to provide for leave due to Officers of the medical staff without outside assistance and this, we understand, is not readily available owing to the lapsing pay of the absent officer or officers being insufficient to induce doctors from ships, for instance, to place their services at the disposal of the Government. The result is that when either the Colonial Surgeon, the Superintendent of the Government Civil Hospital or the Assistant Superintendent takes leave, his share of the work must necessarily fall on the other two officers, the Health Officer of the Port and the Medical Officer of the Gaol for the reasons stated above not being available.

Being satisfied from the evidence before us that the present numerical strength of the medical staff, although not too large, is quite sufficient for the ordinary require- ments of the Colony, it remains to us to suggest such re-distribution of the duties as may, if not effectually overcome, at least considerably minimise, the disadvantages of the present system of administration in the department. In considering what re- arrangement is necessary for this purpose we have been guided by the following facts which have been brought to our notice :-

(1) That much of the Colonial Surgeon's time is occupied at present in at- tending subordinate officers of the Government and Police Officers and their families. Also that he is charged with the duty of inspecting the Tung Wa Hospital. This work we consider should not be ordin- arily performed by the Principal Medical Officer of the Government and we shall accordingly recommend the performance of these duties by a junior officer.

(2) That the Health Officer, although nominally under the control of the Colonial Surgeon, is not absolutely at his disposal in an emergency, owing to his being allowed private practice.

(3) That the services of the Medical Officer of the Gaol are not at present availed of when assistance is required in the Government Civil Hospital.

In view of the above facts, we beg to make the following recommendations for the re-constitution of the medical staff and a general re-distribution of the duties per- taining to them.

We consider that the title of Colonial Surgeon is a misnomer and should be abolished, and that in his place a Principal Medical Officer of the Government, whose duties should be both executive and administrative, should be appointed. Such officer should be the recognised head of the medical staff proper, but should, in our opinion, also perform the duties of the Superintendent of the Government Civil Hospital in so far that he should superintend and be responsible for the satisfactory management of that institution.

The Principal Medical Officer should have under his control and at his disposal the following staff:---

(a) Two Medical Officers who should ordinarily perform the duties of Assist- ants at the Government Civil Hospital. One of these officers to be available for attending the subordinate officers of the Government and the Police.

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(b) Health Officer of the Port. This officer would ordinarily not be avail-

able for other duties, but in times of emergency should be at the entire disposal of the Principal Medical Officer and at all times under his orders.

(c) Medical Officer in Charge of the Gaol, whose duties should also include a daily inspection of the Tung Wa Hospital. This Officer should like- wise be at all times under the orders of the Principal Medical Officer, and liable, when called upon, to assist at the Government Civil Hospital or available for any service at the discretion of the Principal Medical Officer.

Under the above arrangement we consider that many of the disadvantages of the present system would disappear. The Principal Medical Officer would have under his control a sufficient staff for the ordinary requirements of the Colony, and in the event of an officer falling sick or taking leave it would be open to him to distribute the duties of such officer amongst the remainder of the staff (taking his own share) without undue strain on any individual officer.

In addition to and independently of the above proposed medical staff proper, we recommend strongly the appointment of a Medical Officer of Health for the Colony vis-a-vis the Medical Officer of Health for the Port; but, unlike the latter officer, entirely independent of the control of the Principal Medical Officer. The Health Officer for the Colony should, in our opinion, have no connection whatever with the medical staff proper.

His position should be quite distinct. He should be the medical adviser of the Government on all sanitary matters through the Sanitary Board, to which he should be attached (not necessarily as a subordinate officer of the Board) and on which he should occupy a seat. He should however, in our opinion, be entitled to no vote, his duties on the Board being purely of an advisory nature, and it being obviously undesirable that he should enter into any discussion upon points on which he is called upon to advise.

We are not prepared to lay down definitely the specific duties that should be assigned to the proposed new officer; they must necessarily depend to a great extent on local conditions and circumstances, which are perhaps better known to the Government than to ourselves, but we consider that the duties performed by similar officers in some of our large towns at home should, mutatis mutandis, be assigned to the Health Officer for the Colony, and we append for the information of the Government a copy of the Appendix B. duties laid down by the Bradford Corporation for their Medical Officer of Health, * and Appendix can abstract of those performed by similar officers in the City of London,* which it may

be found desirable to adapt to local requirements.

With regard to the qualifications requisite for the proposed office, we are strongly of opinion that the selected candidate should possess a public health diploma in addition to his ordinary medical degree. Ho should, in short, be an expert in all matters affecting the public health.

Question 2.-Whether the existing staff is sufficient to meet the ordinary require- ments of the Colony, and what special arrangements, if any, should be made in case of emergency?

Answer. We have already dealt with the first part of this question and expressed our opinion that under the re-arrangement proposed above the numerical strength of the staff is sufficient for the ordinary requirements of the Colony.

With regard to the latter half of the question, we have also provided above for cases of moderate emergency in recommending that the services of all members of the medical staff proper should be available for other than their ordinary duties, when necessity arises, and that the Principal Medical Officer shall have the power of appor-

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tioning and allotting such special duties. In cases of great emergency we are unable to recommend any definite course of action, seeing that the proper steps to be taken on such occasions must necessarily depend on the circumstances and conditions and must be decided accordingly. We, however, venture to suggest that in the event of any grave emergency arising liberal inducement be offered to outside medical practitioners (local or otherwise) to place their services at the disposal of the Government, and that such temporary officers should be under the orders of the Principal Medical Officer in the same way as members of the permanent staff.

Question 3.-Whether it is desirable that any member of the staff should be allowed private practice.

Answer. We consider that in no case should private practice be allowed to officers of the medical staff of the Government, and have based our proposals for the re-organisation of the staff on the understanding that this privilege, where it now exists, will be withdrawn, and that the services of the whole staff will be entirely at the disposal of the Government.

We, however, make the above recommendation conditionally upon medical officers of the Government being allowed, as hitherto, to be called in by private practitioners for the purpose of holding consultations, to which we see no objection whatever.

In connection with the question of private practice, it has been brought to our notice that ex-patients of the Government Civil Hospital often visit Hongkong from the Coast ports for the purpose of consulting the medical officers at the Hospital, who are well acquainted with their cases, having treated them during their periods of sickness. In such cases we are given to understand that unless these ex-patients re-enter the Hospital, the doctors are not allowed to tender advice or opinions, and it has been suggested that to this extent and strictly within these limits private practice should be allowed and the doctors authorised to see such patients and charge a fee therefor. We are not, however, prepared to endorse this latter suggestion, it appears to us that there is no objection to these ex-patients consulting, if they so desire, the medical officers of the Hospital or to a fee being charged for medical advice in these cases, but seeing that the medical service is provided by the Government, and that the doctors are consulted in such cases quâ officers of the Government Civil Hospital and not quâ private prac- titioners, we think that all fees so chargeable should be credited to the Government and not to its individual officers.

Question 4.-To what extent the Chinese community avail themselves of the Civil Hospital, and what steps, if any, can be taken to make it more popular with the Chinese ?

Answer. From the evidence taken on this subject we are of opinion that, having regard to the accommodation provided, the strength of the medical and nursing staff &c., the advantages of the Hospital are fully availed of by the Chinese, and that the number of beds is at times hardly equal to the number of patients applying to be admit- ted. As regards the out-patients we learn that there are more applicants than, under the existing arrangements, can possibly be attended to, and that they have constantly to be sent away in consequence. It is anticipated that if the re-arrangement of the staff, which we have proposed above, is approved, the work of this branch of the Hospital will be more efficiently performed than at present, and will increase accord- ingly.

Question 5.-To what extent non-Government Hospitals have been visited and inspected in the past, and what improved arrangements, if any, should be made for the frequent and regular inspection of such institutions in the future?

Answer. We find that the only non-Government Hospital hitherto regularly inspected is the Tung Wa Hospital. We are of opinion that that institution should in

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future be visited at least once daily, and have already provided for the performance of this duty by a member of the medical staff. As regards other non-Government Hospitals we consider that power should be taken (by law if necessary) providing for the periodical inspection by an officer of the Government of all hospitals in the Colony, public and private.

Question 6.-Whether the scheme suggested in the enclosed letter from the Acting Superintendent of the Government Civil Hospital for the training of nurses locally is practicable, and, if so, whether it is desirable in the interests of economy and efficiency?

Answer. We consider that the scheme referred to is practicable to this extent, viz., that the young women, whom it is proposed to train, should be trained on the understanding that they can qualify as "nurses" only and can never attain to the rank of "sisters" to whom they will and must always reinain subordinate. We are of opinion they cannot be trained locally with a view to ultimately taking the place of the European sisters, and that, even if they could be, it would be obviously undesirable on the grounds of their nationality and origin to accord them such equality. Subject to the above limitations, we are prepared to recommend the scheme as a tentative measure and on the grounds of economy. We understand that in the future two of the sisters will be away on leave at the same time, and it is anticipated that with the assistance of the young women whom it is proposed to train, the remainder of the nursing staff will be able to carry on the work satisfactorily, and that the necessity of obtaining an extra sister from home to enable members of the nursing staff to take leave when it falls due, will thus be obviated. We are also prepared to recommend the scheme on independent grounds in the hope that, if it succeeds, the want of an outside nursing staff which would be available for private cases, would be gradually supplied. Whether or not the training of these young women will ultimately enable the Government to reduce the staff of European sisters, we are unable at present to say. It is possible, however, that if they prove to be capable nurses, the duties of the sisters may gradually become of a lighter and more supervisory nature, and in that event their number might eventually be reduced to what is necessary for the purpose of supervision, the "nurses" so-called doing much of the work at present performed by the sisters. We are not however in a position to forecast events, and we therefore make no recommendation for the reduction of the European nursing staff unless circumstances justify such reduction.

We think that the Superintendent of the Government Civil Hospital should report upon the success (or otherwise) of the scheme herein referred to after twelve months, and that its continuance should depend upon the nature of that report.

Question 7 (a).-How far the scheme for the establishment of dispensaries for the sale of European drugs at nominal prices to Chinese is practicable and desirable? Whether such establishments could be made self-supporting without sacrificing the object in view, and, if not, what extra cost would be involved thereby? Further, whether such institutions should be placed under Government control, or whether satisfactory arrangements could be made with the Chinese College of Medicine for their efficient working and management?

Answer.-We approve of the above scheme and the object which it has in view, but hesitate to suggest its general adoption not being in a position to form an accurate esti- mate of the expenditure that would be involved thereby and of its relative utility. In view, however, of the fact that British Kowloon is without either a qualified private medical practitioner, or a dispensary for the sale of European drugs, we consider it highly desirable that the latter at least should be provided without delay, and beg to recommend accordingly the establishment of a dispensary in that locality with a Chinese practi- tioner qualified in Western medicine in charge but under the direct control and supervision of the Government.

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We consider that a small charge should be made for drugs supplied to Chinese, this being the practice of the Medical Missions in China, and from the results shown by those societies we have every reason to anticipate that the dispensary would prove a financial success. The necessary checks, in view of the native character, should of course be exercised over the Chinese practitioner in charge, who should in our opinion be secured for a certain amount.

As regards the cost of the proposed dispensary, we understand that a sum of $1,500 a year would be sufficient to cover the expenditure for rent, drugs, and salary of the officer in charge, the latter to be fixed at $60 a month without private practice.

In addition to his duties in the dispensary, we consider that the Chinese dispenser should be required to make himself acquainted with and give early information of the existence of any epidemic disease, to enquire into the causes of suspicious deaths for the information of the Registrar General, and to act as public vaccinator for the district of Kowloon.

If the experiment proves successful in Kowloon, we recommend the general extension of the scheme to other parts of the Colony, but would point out that the Alice Memorial and Nethersole Hospitals would appear to meet the requirements of the native population in the districts in which they are locatet.

Question 7 (b).-In the event of a recurrence of the plague what medical arrange- ments should be made for the removal of patients from the Colony?

Answer.-We are of opinion that all persons, wishing to do so, should be allowed to leave the Colony subject to the following arrangements for and conditions of removal :---

(1) Patients to be removed at least 20 miles (as the crow flies) from the

Colony.

(2) Special junks, fitted up to the satisfaction of the medical authorities, to start at statel times from certain wharves, provided for the purpose in the Eastern and Western Districts.

(3) Such junks to proceed to a place more than 20 miles (as the crow flies) from the Colony under escort of at least one European before discharg- ing patients.

(4) Matsheds to be erected adjoining the wharves, for the temporary accom-

modation of the sick prior to their removal.

(5) One European Police officer and one medical officer, if possible, to be

on duty at each of the matsheds.

(6) Patients, wishing to be removed from the Colony, to report to the officer on duty at the matshed, who should arrange for their temporary accommodation and early removal in the manner prescribed above.

In this connection we would further suggest that dead bodies might also with advantage be removed from the Colony, provided that such removal is carried out speedily, and the limit of distance from the Colony is strictly adhered to.

Having now dealt with all the questions submitted to us for enquiry, we beg leave to add one or two suggestions which have occurred to us in connection with the subject under review.

It has come under our notice in the course of our enquiry that the present obser- vation ward at the Government Civil Hospital is wholly unsuitable for the purpose for which it is intended. Being a wooden structure, it is necessarily very inflammable in the dry season, and we learn that it has been more than once partially destroyed by

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fire. We would therefore respectfully submit the great danger to which patients are exposed by being housed in a wooden building, and urge the early erection of a per- manent brick or stone structure, for which we are informed plans have already been prepared.

We would further beg to suggest that the Kennedy Town Police Station be per- manently reserved as a Hospital for the reception of infectious or contagious diseases, when the Hygeia is full or when it is undesirable to remove patients across the water. With these additional suggestions, which we trust will receive the favourable considera- tion of the Governor, we beg to conclude our report.

Hongkong, April, 1895.

THOS. H. KNOTT,

Deputy-Inspector General, R.N.,

Chairman.

A. F. PRESTON, B.A., M.B.,

Surgeon-Colonel, A.M.S.

A. MCCONACHIE.

J. THURBURN.

JAS. CANTLIE, M.A., M.B., F.R.C.S.,

Dipl. Public Health,

R. C. P., London.

Appendix A.

MEDICAL COMMITTEE.

Meeting held 15th January, 1895.

Present:-Dr. KNOTT, Deputy-Inspector General, R.N.H., Chairman.

Surgeon-Colonel A. F. PRESTON.

Hon. A. MCCONACHIE.

Dr. JAMES CANTLIE.

Mr. J. THURBURN.

Dr. AYRES, Colonial Surgeon, called.

THE PRESIDENT.-Dr. AYRES, will you be good enough to give the Committee a general idea of your daily routine of duty?

Dr. AYRES.-I must premise what I have got to say by stating that I have got to attend at their own homes all Government officers drawing under $2,000 a year, if requested. On the Caine Road level I have got 79 patients, of whom 41 are children. I take these in my morning round; if I am pressed I generally take these early in the morning starting out at half-past seven o'clock. From eight to ten I am supposed to be at home to receive out-patients-that is to say, patients coming in from the out-stations who then go down and report at the office after seeing me. I receive letters and summonses for the day or letters from long distances-patients saying how they are going on and whether they require visiting that day or whether I can put it off to another day. At ten o'clock I take a run round the Caine Road level as far as Fairlea; I have got two patients there in No. 7 Station and I take several stations en route. Then I come back to the Hospital. I ought to be at the Government Civil Hospital at 11.30. Then I see my own hospital patients; on an average we have 500 out-patients a month. Then I have the women; and then I go up to the office and I see the out-patients there and see who have come in and examine any men who have come up. I examine them first on entering the Force-a full examination-and then again three and six months after. They have to be vaccinated. No applicant for Government service, European, Indian, or Chinese, is accepted without being examined. After I have settled up all the out-work I have the books, signing up all discharges and admissions, cheques received for payments, the account books, check all the pay sheets which have to be in duplicate; in fact, I have to make several hundreds of signatures every month in the office.

THE PRESIDENT.-That is at the Civil Hospital?

Dr. AYRES.-Yes. Then I give the clerks the letters I have prepared for them to be copied and forwarded to the Government. Then I take the Queen's Road level, and, as I come along, I am often called in to the Supreme Court to the Attorney General's, the Crown Solicitor's and the Registrar General's--they often want to consult me-and sometimes I am called into the Post Office and so on. I may even have to come up to the Government Offices for some reason or other. I forgot I have a new duty. After the Government Civil Hospital, I have got to go to the Tung Wah Hospital every day, Sundays included. There is a special ward there that used to be the insane ward and is now laid out as a reception ward; there I examine every new reception and diagnose the case as far as possible, and those I am uncertain about are put into a special ward

(2)

for me to see on the following day and take notes of, especially fever cases. I have the charts taken by Mr. Ü-I-KAI, one of the passed men of the Medical College. He is in our service at the Hospital and he goes round with me as interpreter: then I examine all the dead bodies, all those brought in and all those of persons who have died in the Hospital. All this goes into a book, and is sent down to the Registrar General. This arrangement has been in force during the last month, and takes from an hour to an hour and a half.

Dr. PRESTON.-Is it only a temporary duty?

Dr. AYRES.-I have to continue it so long as there is no one else to do it. Then I go along Queen's Road; I have got patients as far as No. 1 Station and No. 2 Station, and I make calls at Praya Road and Queen's Road on the way back, I generally have one or two or three cases on the list, and sometimes they are pretty bad cases. In the plague time I had to cover the whole distance out to Kennedytown and right to Jardine's gates and during that time I had three or four bad fever cases.

Then I come back to the Club, and go through the patients in the Central District, all about Shelley Street, Peel Street, Stanley Street, &c.; I have got there Police Officers and Officers belonging to the different departments. Sometimes I visit the Gaol and the Central Police Station; there are three families in the Central Station. Then I go home. If get home to tiffin at three o'clock I am lucky. From three to five I see patients at my own house. Doctors call from the ships to have their diplomas verified; doctors on board ship may take charge of Europeans but not Chinese unless I have seen their diplomas and verified them,

I

Dr. PRESTON.-They come ashore for that?

Dr. AYRES.-They bring me their diplomas. If they are registered I merely look their names up in the last register and give them their certificates that they are qualified men. After that I may have to see some patients. Generally I get an hour and a half in the Club; that is my sole recreation, or in the summer time I go for a swim perhaps twice or thrice a week. After dinner I have the Government letters to work at and the drafts to prepare for the clerks first thing in the morning when I go to the office. During the plague time I wrote on an average every night till four o'clock and very often till dawn.

THE PRESIDENT.-Just now you have additional duties to perform at the Govern- ment Civil Hospital?

Dr. AYRES.-Yes; and I may have to stop and assist with operations and con- sultations.

Mr. THURBURN.-The Tung Wah visitation is not supposed to be your work; it is meant to be the work of the Assistant of the Civil Hospital?

Dr. AYRES.-I proposed that the Assistant there should do it, but he said it was not in his agreement and it certainly was not. Then as they refused to give him any- thing extra, he declined to do it. He was getting only $120 per month.

Mr. MCCONACHIE.-Was he not bound to do it?

Dr. PRESTON.-He was a free-lance?

Mr. MCCONACHIE.-I understand you are referring to Dr. Lowson.

Dr. AYRES.-They did not bind him down in any way; I am speaking of Dr. Lowson's brother. He is not in the Government service. We had no hold over him at all. He joined the service simply as a favour to his brother. The duty of visiting the Tung Wah falls upon me. I have a lot of outside questions to deal with, such as sanitation, and have occasional reports to make.

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THE PRESIDENT.-Do you consider the present medical staff sufficient for the requirements of the Colony generally, or whether by redistribution it could be made sufficient?

Dr. AYRES.-Well, at times we are very heavily handicapped. The Hospital officers have all enough to do. For myself, if any of my patients require a second visit I have to call upon the Assistant Superintendent at the Hospital to do it for me. I have all sorts of cases all over the place and there are many occasions when I am called away from the Hospital. I have to remain at home if Dr. MARQUES goes to Kowloon or to the other side of the Island. He notifies me and I have to be in the

way in case of a call in his absence. When Dr. ATKINSON and Dr. Lowson are away I remain in case of accident at the Hospital. I have often to do operations myself. Last Sunday, I had two midwifery cases, two cut-throats and a disembowelling case to work by myself.

Mr. MCCONACHIE.-The question under discussion is whether the general staff is not sufficient for the wants of the Colony.

Dr. AYRES.-You see, the Health Officer is a gentleman with a private practice; he is not properly an officer of the Government in this way that his salary does not carry any pension.

Dr. MARQUES was engaged originally as Assistant at the Hospital. Dr. WHARRY and he could not agree. Dr. MARQUES was appointed in 1880, and Dr. WHARRY said he was no service to him. The public mortuary was opened and as Dr. WHARRY wanted to get rid of the post mortem examinations which involved a lot of work, and a lot of Court work, it was decided to put Dr. MARQUES in charge of it and the Lock Hospital. Then when the C. D. Ordinance was abolished, the women, who had arrived at a knowledge of the benefit they derived from being examined, applied to the Registrar General to have the examination continued, but as it was a voluntary matter they refused to be examined by Dr. MARQUES. So he was removed to take charge of the Gaol. In surgical cases he renders very little service.

Dr. PRESTON.-Is the present staff sufficient for the wants of the Colony?

Dr. AYRES.-I think it is a question of dollars. I think there should be a Health Officer attached to the Sanitary Board as Superintendent. Mr. MCCALLUM should be responsible for all inside work and should be on the spot always. The Health Officer should do all the outside work. From a sanitary point of view it is a medical man's work to look after the health of the Colony.

THE PRESIDENT.-Do you think a redistribution of duties could be effected so that the present staff would be sufficient for the wants of the Colony?

Dr. AYRES.-By adding this Health Officer and having the men now in the Government service devoting their whole time to the work.

Dr. CANTLIE.-Then it is not sufficient? With a redistribution of duties and the addition of this Health Officer you think it would be sufficient?

Dr. AYRES.-I do not mean to say Dr. JORDAN does not do his full amount of work. He does; and his partner, Dr. BELL, is placed at our service for no fee whatever. He goes down to the Hospital when any of the staff is sick, without any fee or reward. Dr. PRESTON.-Then we may take it that with a Health Officer and the present medical staff a redistribution would do?

Mr. MCCONACHIE.-You would add three new officers ? Two of these medical

men are not in the Government service entirely.

Dr. AYRES.-The doctor of the Gaol is a Government officer now.

Dr. CANTLIE.-With the Health Officer of the port entirely devoted to Government service

you would have a sufficient staff?

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Dr. AYRES.-There is this to be said: Dr. MARQUES was put in under exceptional circumstances. I must say I was very much against his appointment but Mr. POPE HENNESSY insisted upon appointing him. None of the Europeans will have anything to do with him; they come at once to me.

He is not liked.

Dr. PRESTON.-None of what Europeans?

Dr. AYRES.-You see he is a Portuguese, and the European in the service do not like him and make complaints. It caused a good deal of trouble in the Hospital.

THE PRESIDENT.-That comes under another question. Do you consider MARQUES is competent to take over the duties of Medical Officer of the Civil Hospital, in the event of necessity?

Dr. AYRES.—No, sir; certainly not.

Mr. MCCONACHIE.—I should like to be clear on this point; if the Health Officer of the port were to devote his whole time and attention to the Government duties, and the present doctor of the Gaol also did so, which he does I believe, would it not be possible, if the Health Officer of the port were put on the permanent staff, to do away with Dr. MARQUES?

Dr. AYRES.-It would not be possible. If he were Health Officer for the Colony we could give him the work at Kowloon and the out-stations round the Island. We have a great difficulty in attending to them now. If there is any trouble over at Kowloon I have to send the Assistant Superintendent.

Dr. CANTLIE.-Do you mean by Health Officer of the port the same man as the Health Officer of the Sanitary Board?

Dr. AYRES.No.

Mr. MCCONACHIE.---That is what I say, you want three men altogether. Could you not amalgamate the duties of the Medical Officer of the Gaol and of the Health Officer who goes afloat?

Dr. AYRES.-If you saw the work that was done by Dr. JAMES for the Sanitary Board you would understand better. He assisted us as Sanitary Board Medical Officer during the plague, and if you look over his report and see the condition of things you will see the necessity for a Health Officer.

THE PRESIDENT.--Do you not consider it would be a better arrangement to have an officer in place of Dr. MARQUES under the control of the Colonial Surgeon, and available both at the Gaol and Civil Hospital, if required?

Dr. AYRES.-Yes. We could make use of him. Then in case of sickness any of these officers could be substituted. We are hampered now; if one man is down it is hard work, but if two are gone as is the case just now, there is only myself and Dr. MARQUES to stop the gap. It is utterly impossible for Dr. JORDAN to give us his services. He does give his services for consultation and helps me in midwifery cases, and also helps in operations at the Hospital if wanted, and he goes a good deal out of his way to give us assistance.

Dr. PRESTON.-If he had no private practice he would be a great deal more at liberty to give his assistance.

Dr. AYRES.-Certainly.

Certainly. And the out-stations would be better looked after.

Mr. THURBURN.-Does the Gaol work take up much time?

THE PRESIDENT.--What authority have you as Colonial Surgeon over the Health Officer of the port?

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Dr. AYRES. All orders from the Government to him are sent through me; all reports he has to make in regard to cases on board ship are sent through me. He is under my orders.

orders. I give him his instructions. He is included in my department. Every dollar he expends, I have to know the why and the wherefore.

THE PRESIDENT.-Can you suggest any better arrangement than the present in connection with the Health Officer of the port?

Dr. AYRES.--What I have suggested covers that.

THE PRESIDENT.-Do you think it would be advisable to appoint a Medical Officer of Health to combine the duties of the port and the Colony?

Dr. AYRES.No.

Dr. CANTLIE.-Would he have enough to do without going afloat?

Dr. AYRES.-Yes; he would have to travel over the Peak Districts.

THE PRESIDENT.-If he had an Assistant Health Officer, could he combine the port and the Colony?

Dr. AYRES.-I do not think the Health Officer of the port has anything to do with the Health Officer of the Board.

Dr. CANTLIE.--But practically you are the Health Officer of the Sanitary Board and all medical matters connected with the port go through you, and the system works well enough, does it not?

Dr. AYRES. Suppose he is out looking after the shipping and something occurs on shore that requires inquiring into, everything would have to be delayed.

Dr. CANTLIE.--Unless he has an assistant.

Dr. AYRES.-One man could not do the work.

Dr. CANTLIE.-Would it be better to have two separate men with two separate appointments, or one man with an assistant?

Dr. AYRES.-Two separate men.

THE PRESIDENT.-Is there enough work for the Health Officer of the port without private practice?

Dr. AYRES.-Dr. JORDAN could not do the private practice if he had not Dr. BELL'S assistance.

Mr. THURBURN.--Dr. BELL practically does the work of the port?

Dr. AYRES.-Except the examination of emigrants, that Dr. JORDAN does himself and all cases of quarantine. Dr. BELL has of course assisted him; he is a perfectly competent officer.

Dr. PRESTON.—But it is purely a private arrangement. Dr. BELL is not recognised by the Government?

Dr. AYRES.-That is so..

Mr. THURBURN.-Is there any inconvenience to shipping by this arrangement?

Dr. AYRES.-I have never heard of any complaints forwarded to the Government. If a ship wants to see Dr. JORDAN, he goes. In all important questions, Dr. BELL reports to Dr. JORDAN and Dr. JORDAN goes at once himself.

THE PRESIDENT.-Will you tell us what arrangement could be made in case of the Hygeia being full of patients suffering from small-pox or cholera ?

Dr. AYRES.-At present I have insisted on retaining Kennedy Station as an Epidemic Hospital.

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Dr. PRESTON.-The Police Station.

Dr. AYRES.-Yes; and we have got it.

Dr. CANTLIE.-But in regard to men to take charge of it?

Dr. AYRES.-It is the Assistant Superintendent of the Civil Hospital who takes charge of the Hygeia.

Mr. THURBURN.—But suppose there was an epidemic and the Hygeia was full of small-pox or cholera patients, too great a strain would be put upon the Civil Hospital staff?

Dr. AYRES.-In that case Dr. ATKINSON has to take sole charge of the Hospital, and I am called in to assist him; because we cannot have the Assistant Superintendent off at infectious cases and then coming in to surgical cases in the Hospital. He comes ashore perhaps to look after the Lunatic Asylum. In the case of the outbreak of plague we would have been unable to cope with it if we had not got the assistance of the Military and Naval doctors. With the arrangement I have suggested we could work without any trouble.

Mr. MCCONACHIE.-Do I understand from you, Dr. AYRES, that you require six medical men—the Colonial Surgeon, the Superintendent for the Civil Hospital with his Assistant, a Sanitary Board medical man, a doctor for the Gaol, and a doctor for the port? It seems to me that is a large number for such a small Colony as Hongkong.

Dr. AYRES.—It is not a large number to do the work. At times, Dr. ATKINSON has been down, Dr. MARQUES has been away twice for long periods in Hospital, Dr. Lowson has been down several times and not only that, he has had to go away-he has had more leave than any of us.

Mr. MCCONACHIE.--For all practical purposes, that is your opinion?

Dr. AYRES.-Every one of us is working night and day. We have no hours of duty; we are not on from 10 to 5, but we are simply there to be called upon when wanted, and all clerical work is done at night.

Mr. THURBURN.--Is there a larger number of patients in the Hospital now than in Dr. WHARRY's time?

Dr. AYRES.-The Hospital is three times the size it was in Dr. WHARRY'S time. THE PRESIDENT.-To what extent do the Chinese come into the Hospital?

Dr. AYRES.-There were 613 Chinese admitted to the Hospital last year, and there were 5,721 out-patients at the Hospital. We have done everything to encourage them, and at the beginning of this year we had a board put up outside informing them that we gave them two hours in three afternoons every week for consultations and distribut- ing medicines gratis, without their being required to remain in the Hospital. But the thing against our Hospital is the post-mortem examination. It is not that post-mortem examinations are not conducted in ordinary hospitals, but in most of our cases, which are brought in by the police, inquiries are held at the Magistracy and the reports appear in the newspapers. What appears in the English newspapers is copied into the Chinese, and our Hospital has, therefore, a record for cutting people up. We have never got over that prejudice.

THE PRESIDENT.-Do you think the minimum charges for in-patients (Chinese) are too high?

Dr. AYRES.-There is no charge for Chinese patients. The only Chinese patients that pay anything are Government officials. The men belonging to the Police pay a minimum charge according to their salaries.

Mr. MCCONACHIE.-Any Chinese patient would be taken in free?

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Dr. AYRES.-Every Chinaman that comes in voluntarily or is brought in by the police is treated for nothing.

Mr. THURBURN.—But you would treat gratis a merchant or shopkeeper possessed of means?

Dr. AYRES.-No; you would not get that class to come in. If they came we would not take them for nothing. We get only the lower class Chinese. Since I have been attending the Tung Wah Hospital I have seen many curious things; one thing is that well-to-do Chinamen are turned out of their houses in a dying condition and brought to the Tung Wah, and huge coffins are then brought for their bodies simply because they would not have them dying in their own houses.

Dr. CANTLIE.-There is no doubt about that.

THE PRESIDENT.-To what extent have non-Government Hospitals been visited and inspected in the past, and what improved arrangements, if any, should be made for the frequent and regular inspection of such institutions in the future ?

Dr. AYRES.-There is only the Tung Wah Hospital. The Alice and Nethersole Hospitals are both under European supervision and I have never had any authority to visit them. The Tung Wah Hospital I have always seen, and been in and out there continually. My only authority in the old days was to see