Sessional Papers - 1894

PAPERS LAID BEFORE THE LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL 1894

Table of Contents

1. Assessment Department

Report for 1894-95

2. Blue Book

Report for 1893

3. Botanical & afforestation Department

Report for 1893

4. Bubonic Plague

Governor's Despatch on

5. Caterpillar Plague

Report on the

6. Criminal Statistics

For 1893

7. Education

Reports for 1893

8. Finance Committee

Reports of Proceedings for 1894

9. Fire Brigade

Report for 1893

10. Gaol

Report for 1893

11. Harbour Master

Report for 1893

12. Leave Salaries

Despatch Respecting the Drawing of

13. Legislative Council

Proceedings for 1894

14. Medical Department

Report for 1893

15. Observatory

Report for 1893

16. Po Leung Kuk incorporation Ordinance

Despatch on the Subject of the

17. Police

Report for 1893

18. Post office

Report for 1893

19. Praya Reclamation Works

Report for 1893

20. Public Loan

Correspondence Relative to the Conversion of Part of

21. Public Works

Report for 1893

22. Public Works

Report on the Progress of Public Works During the First Half-Year 1894

23. Public Works Committee

Report of Proceedings for 1894

24. Registrar General

Report for 1893

25. Revenue and Expenditure

Statement of Revenue and Expenditure for 1893

26. Sanitary

Reports for 1893

27. Veterinary

Report for 1893

28. Volunteer Corps.

Report on the

29. Water

Statement of account for 1893

30. Widows' & Orphans' Fund

Report on the Widows' and Orphans' Fund for 1893

 

293

No. 22

94

HONGKONG.

THE ASSESSOR'S REPORT ON THE ASSESSMENT FOR 1894-95.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of

His Excellency the Governor.

ASSESSOR'S OFFICE,

13th June, 1894.

SIR,-I have the honour to submit my fifth Annual Report, on the Assessment for the year 1894-95.

2. By order of His Excellency the Governor in Council, I have made a new Valuation of the City of Victoria, the Hill District, Kowloon Point, Hung Hom and Yau Ma Ti; the existing valuations of all other villages and places being adopted for the ensuing year.

3. The result of the new valuation is that the rateable value of the Colony as a whole has increased by $50,651 equal to 1.39 per cent.

4. There is an increase of $34,140 or 1.08 per cent. in the rateable value of the City of Victoria. 5. For the first time since 1890-91 the rateable value of the City of Victoria shews an increase as compared with the preceding year. This result is owing, in a large measure, to an apparently decided check upon rental depreciation, the reductions from this cause being only $59,000 against $129,340 last year and $145,720 in the Valuation of 1892-93. The gain, in rateable value, from new tenements, and property increased in value is $93,000.

6. The Hill District, Kowloon Point, Hung Hom and Yau Ma Ti all shew improved rateable values, aggregating $8,590 or 2.79 per cent.

7. In the rest of the Colony, i.e., the Chinese Villages, there has been an increase in the assessed values of $7,921 or 4.28 per cent., which arises from new tenements having been rated for the first time since the last valuation.

8. From 1st July, 1893, to 1st June, 1894, Interim Valuations were made as follows:-

In the City of Victoria.

1-17 new tenements, rateable value,

22 improved tenements, rateable value,........ Replacing Assessments amounting to

Increase,

....

In the Rest of the Colony.

8. new tenements, rateable value, 3 improved tenements, rateable value, Replacing Assessments amounting to

$46,520

.$ 8,735 8,080

655

$ 1,920

8,730

Increase,

••,, 1,800

120

$56,025

Total increase from Interim Assessments,.

9. The number of houses, &c., reported to be vacant, and inspected under section 35 of the Rating Ordinance has been about 2,500. Last year I estimated the number at 3,500.

10. I attach Table A, giving a comparison of the Valuations for 1893-94 and 1894-95 of the City of Victoria, the amount increased or decreased in each of the ten Districts, and the net increase; Table B, a similar comparison for the Hill District, Kowloon Point, Hung Hom and Yau Ma Ti; and Table C, a summary for the whole Colony.

11. There has been no change in the staff. Mr. CH'AN PUI, Clerk to Assessor, and Mr. IP YUK PUI, Interpreter-who has been placed on the permanent establishment,--have continued to discharge their duties satisfactorily.

The Honourable N. G. MITCHELL-ÎNNES,

Colonial Treasurer.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

ARTHUR CHAPMAN,

Assessor.

294

No.

DISTRICT.

Table A.

CITY OF VICTORIA.

VALUATION

1893-94.

VALUATION 1894-95.

INCREASE.

DECREASE.

Name.

1

Kennedy Town,

18,940

20.985

2,045

Shek Tong Tsui,

113,964

115,049

1,085

3

Sai Ying Pun,

640,770

660,045

19,275

4

Tai Ping Shan,

325,810

324,620

1,190

1

5

Sheung Wán,

412,830

415,770

2,940

1

6

Chung Wan,

1,278,455

1,287,225

8,770

7

Hà Wang....

143,815

140,945

2,870

8-

Wan Tsai,

112,440

114,220

1,780

9 Bowrington,

42,710

39,335

3,375

10.

So Kon Po,

56,125

61,805

5,680

$

3,145,859

3,179,999

41,575

7,435,

Deduct Decrease,..........

7,435

Total Increase,

34,140=1.08 per cent.

ARTHUR CHAPMAN,

Åsessor.

Table B.

THE HILL DISTRICT, KOWLOON POINT, HUNG-HOM AND YAU-MA-TI.

LOCALITY.

VALUATION 1893-94.

VALUATION 1894-95.

INCREASE.

The Hill District,..

Kowloon,Point,

Hung-Hom,

Yau-Ma-Ti,

$

6號

87,230

90,395

3,165,

102,270

103,955

1,685

73,635

77,225

3,590

43,855

44,005

150

306,990

315,580

8,590

=2.79 per cent.

ARTHUR CHAPMAN,

Assessor.

LOCALITY.

Table C.

THE COLONY OF HONGKONG.

VALUATION 1893-94.

VALUATION 1894-95.

INCREASE.

$

295

The City of Victoria,

3,145,859

3,179,999

34,140

Hongkong Villages and Hill District,

213,842

216,987

3,145

Kowloon Peninsula,...............

277,942

291,308

13,366

$

*A

3,637,643

3,688,294

50,651

=1·39 per cent,

ARTHUR CHAPMAN,

Assessor.

HONGKONG.

REPORT ON THE BLUE BOOK AND DEPARTMENTAL REPORTS FOR 1893.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor

273

No. 19

94

1.-TAXATION.

A fee of $1.50 annually is chargeable under Ordinance No. 9 of 1893 for each dog licensed by the Captain Superintendent of Police.

2.-REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE.

The Revenue amounted to $2,078,135.26, or excluding premiums from Land Sales and Water Account to $1,940,260.69; and the Expenditure amounted to $1,920,523.56, including Extraordinary Works not chargeable against the new loan; excluding these, to $1,903,694.57.

Year.

:

The Revenue and Expenditure for the

Revenue. Premia from Land.

past five years have been:-

Ordinary Expenditure.

1889,...$1,823,549.13 $154,725.60 $1,459,167.16

Water Account. Water Account.

Receipts. Expenditure.

Extraordinary Expenditure, including Defensive Works.

$374,551.63

1890,... 1,995,220.47

16,638.80

1,517,843.05

397,507.42

......

1891,... 1,907,054.43

51,761.47

1892,.. 2,032,244.10 121,828.84

1893,... 1,940,260.69

62,971.08

1,868,073.26 1,882,474.49 377,502.34 1,903,694.57 (a) 16,828.99

3.-LOCAL REVENUES.

514,526.39

$66,486.61

82,860.43

$ 66,486.61 82,860.43

74,903.49

74,903.49

The Chinese inhabitants voluntarily contributed in 1893, to the pay of the District Watchmen,

and received from the Government for the same object a grant-in-aid of.

4. ASSETS AND LIABILITIES.

$7,505.28 500.00

On the 31st December, 1893, the assets of the Colony exceeded its liabilities by....$1,489,023.54 The surplus assets in :-

1886 the liabilities exceeded the assets by

1887 the surplus assets were ....

1888

Do.

1889

Do.

1890

Do.

1891

Do.

(d) 1892

Do.

1893

Do.

$191,512.29 (b)

631,374.08 (c)

360,649.76

505,109.87

309,732.25

231,177.51

35,105.87

1,489,023.54 (e)

5.-PUBLIC DEBT.

A further loan of £200,000 was raised under Ordinance 2 of 1893.

Amount of original Loan, £200,000. Amount of Sinking Fund of the original Loan, £51,768.

6.-MILITARY EXPENDITURE.

The Military Expenditure (inclusive of the Volunteer Corps) defrayed by the Colony during the last seven years

1887,

1888,

1889,

1890,

1891.

1892,

1893.

has been as follows:-

Military Contribution, exclusive of

Defensive Works, and

inclusive of Volunteer Corps.

.$128,815.63

134,594.68

Defensive Works.

$258,444.28

62,115.90

134,261.12

63,753.73

124,646.96

5,082.92

421,002.01 (ƒ)

20,005.45

269,005.27

306,744.73

Defensive Works.

£43,710. 7. 6 10,036. 4. 0 9,678.14. 5 832. 1. 1 3,102. 1. 7

(a) Exclusive of $338,315.96 chargeable against the new loan.

(b) In the years 1886-91, the liabilities on 31st December did not include salaries and local Departmental charges for the month of December. (c) A loan of £200,000 having been raised during 1887 to be paid off on the 1st of March, 1907.

(d) In 1892 there were 13 monthly payments.

(e) Including the unspent balance of the new loan.

The Military Contribution was doubled from 1st January, 1890, and the arrears for 1890 were paid in 1891.

274

*

7.-PUBLIC WORKS.

The expenditure under this head was $148,643.52 on account of Annually Recurrent Works, and $16,828.99 (exclusive of $338,315.96 chargeable against the Loan raised during the year) on account of Extraordinary Public Works.

.

8.-LEGISLATION.

The following Ordinances were passed during the year :---

No. 1.-An Ordinance to declare the terms and conditions applicable to Loans authorised

to be raised by the Government of Hongkong and to provide for the creation of Inscribed Stock.

No. 2.-An Ordinance for raising the sum of £200,000 by Loan for the purpose of defray-

ing the cost of certain Public Works.

No. 3.--An Ordinance to amend The Marriage Ordinance, 1875.

No. 4.-An Ordinance to amend The Medical Registration Ordinance, 1884.

No. 5.-An Ordinance to amend The Hongkong Code of Civil Procedure.

No. 6. An Ordinance to provide for the establishment of a Volunteer Force and to empower the Governor to raise a special force of Coast Defence Volunteers in the event of anticipated war.

No. 7.-An Ordinance to provide means for ascertaining the amounts to be paid by way of compensation in respect of the Wharves and Piers along the line of the Praya Reclamation, to fix the periods for the payment thereof and for other purposes in connection therewith.

No. 8.-An Ordinance for the Naturalization of MEYER FREDERICKS.

No. 9. An Ordinance to make provision for regulating the keeping of dogs and for the

prevention of the importation and spread of rabies.

No. 10.-An Ordinance for the establishment and incorporation of the Chinese Society for the prevention of kidnapping and for the protection of Women and Children commonly known as "The Pó Léung Kuk."

No. 11.-An Ordinance for the Incorporation of the Trustees of the Hongkong and South

China Masonic Benevolence Fund.

No. 12.-An Ordinance concerning Statutory Declarations.

No. 13.-An Ordinance for the suppression of the pernicious practice of injecting prepara-

tions of Morphine by unqualified persons.

No. 14.-An ́ Ordinance to apply a sum not exceeding Two Millions Three Hundred and Forty-seven thousand, Four hundred and Eighty-one Dollars to the Public Service of the Year 1894.

No. 15.-An Ordinance to authorise the Appropriation of a Supplementary Sum of Two hundred and Thirty-five thousand One hundred and Eleven Dollars and Ninety- three Cents to defray the Charges of the Year 1892.

9.-COUNCILS AND ASSEMBLIES.

Mr. A. M. THOMSON and Mr. E. BOWDLER were appointed provisionally to seats on both Councils during the absence from the Colony of Mr. LOCKHART, Registrar General, and Mr. CoOPER, Director of Public Works, respectively.

Sanitary Board.-Mr. RENNIE was appointed to be Acting Secretary in the place of Mr. MCCALLUM absent from the Colony on leave.

Board of Examiners.-Dr. Ho KAI was appointed a Member in succession to Mr. WONG SHING, retired.

"

10.-CIVIL ESTABLISHMENT,

275

Mr. F. H. MAY was appointed to be Captain Superintendent of Police vice Major-General GORDON deceased.

11.-OFFICERS WHO HAVE GIVEN SECURITY FOR THE DISCHARGES OF THEIR DUTIES.

The validity of the sureties of the various Officers was duly enquired into at the end of the year.

12. PENSIONS.

The following Officers retired on pension during the year :-

Sir CECIL SMITH, G.C.M.G., Governor of Straits Settlements, and formerly Registrar General in Hongkong, three Clerks in the Treasury, one Clerk in Public Works Department, three Gaol Turnkeys, one Head Turncock, Public Works Department, one Chinese Writer, Registrar General's Department, and one Messenger, Harbour Department. Police.-One European Sergeant, four European Constables, five Indians, and two Chinese.

13.-FOREIGN CONSULS.

No new Consulates were established in the Colony during 1893.

14.-POPULATION.

The estimated population on the 31st December, 1893, was......

being 7,062 more than the estimated population at the end of 1892.

238,724

The last census was taken on the 20th May, 1891, the population being returned as 221,441, of which 157,585 were males, and 63,856 females.

The following is the estimated population for the last 10 years:-

Years.

Males.

Females.

Total.

1884,

130,560

50,969

181,529

1885,

137,079

53,515

190,594

1886,

.144,550

56,440

200,990

1887,

...

.152,427

60,524

212,951

1888,

.154,500

61,300

215,800

1889,

.138,033

56,449

194,482

1890,

198,742

1891,

.159,969

64,845

224,814

1892,

.164,808

66,854

231,662

1893,

.......169,798

68,926

238,724

The Births and Deaths for the last 5 years were as follows:-

Per 1,000 of mean Population.

Years.

Births.

Deaths.

Births.

Deaths.

1889, ...........1,683

4,597

8.65

23.64

1890,

..1,617

4,553

8.14

22.90

1891,

.1,734

5,374

7.71

23.90

1892,

1,843

4,907

7.96

21.18

1893,

1,801

5,422

7.54

22.71

15.-EDUCATION. -

The total number of Schools subject to supervision by the Government in 1893 was 117 as against 122 in 1892, and 117 in 1891.

The total number of Scholars subject to Government supervision in the Government and Grant- in-aid Schools during the last 5 years was as follows:-

Years.

Govt.

Grant-in-aid.

Total.

1889,

.2,293

4,814

7,107

1890,

........2,514

4,656

7,170

1891,..

.2,540

5,132

7,672

1892.

2,622

5,655

8,277

1893,

2,356

6,250

8,606

276

The total expenditure for these Schools for the last 5 years was as follows:-

1889, (after deducting School fees),

1890, (

""

1891, (

""

1892, (

1893, (

""

.$44,321.98

""

), ),

56,081.75

60,359.10

);

... 54,819.41

),

56,826.46

16.-EXCHANGE, MONEY, WEIGHTS and Measures.

Exchange.

The rate of Exchange on 4 months' Bills on London was on 5th January, 1893, 2/87, and rose to 2/9 on the 8th February, after which it steadily declined, and was at the end of the year 2/33.

Currency.

The law affecting currency has remained unchanged.

Bank Notes.

The Bank Notes in circulation in Hongkong during the last 5 years, as furnished by the Managers of the respective Banks, were as follows:-

Specie in Reserve.

Years.

1889,

1890,

1891,

1892,

1893,

Average Amount.

$ 6,034,984 6,073,332

6,050,122

6,066,958

6,344,454

$ 2,552,500

2,775,833

2,650,833

2,701,150

2,874,583

Money Circulation.

The approximate amount of Coin put into circulation up to 31st December, 1893, was as follows:-- Hongkong Silver and Copper Subsidiary Coins (50, 20, 10, and 5 cent pieces; and 1 Cent

and Mil pieces),

.$9,720,125.00.

Weights and Measures.

The Weights and Measures in use in the Colony are regulated by Ordinance 8 of 1885.

17.-IMPORTS AND EXPORTS.

There being no Custom House, it is not possible to furnish an account of all Imports and Exports, but a record of Raw Opium imported and exported during 1893 has been kept, and is as follows:-

Imported, Exported,

""

NOTE.-Through Cargo reported in Manifests but not landed,

.39,098 chests. .43,5491

.....16,608 chests.

18.-SHIPPING.

Arrivals exclusive of Junks.

The total arrivals, exclusive of Junks, during the year 1893, amounted to 4,371 vessels and 5,266,349 tons, being 99,411 tons over the arrivals in 1892.

Junks.

23,679 Junks measuring 1,748,892 tons arrived in the Colony in 1893, as against 22,755 Junks and 1,606,251 tons in 1892, showing an increase of 924 Junks and 142,641 tons.

:

The total arrivals for the last 5 years were:-

EXCLUSIVE Of Junks.

Years. Number of Vessels. Tons. 1889,......3,820 4,518,614

JUNKS.

GRAND TOTAL.

Number of Vessels. Tons. Number of Vessels. Tons.

22,926 1,716,922

26,746 6,235,536

1890,........... 4,114

4,893,733

23,512

1,795,261

27,626 6,688,994

1891,......4,351

5,138,627

22,806 :-

1,634,616

27,157

6,773,243***

1892,......4,499

5,166,938

22,755

1,606,251

27,254

6,773,189

1893,......4,371

5,266,349

23,679 1,748,892

28,050

7,015,241

Immigration and Emigration from and to Ports other than in China and Japan.

Years.

Arrived.

Departed.

1889,

99,315

2

47,849

1890,

..101,147

42,066

1891,

.105,1991

45,162

1892,

97,971

52,143

1893, ......................................108,644

82,336

19.—AGRICULTURE.

277

The estimated extent of cultivable land in the Colony of Hongkong and in British Kowloon is 19,115 acres, of which about 810 acres are under cultivation. The produce is for local consumption only.

20.—MANUFACTURES, &C.

Steam-Launches.

The total number of Steam-Launches built in the Colony in 1893 was 42, with a total tonnage of 2,605.14, as against 22 with a total tonnage of 2,714.69 in 1892. The total number of licensed Steam-Launches of all descriptions, in the Colony, in 1893, were:-

Licensed to carry passengers,

Private Launches,..

Colonial Government Launches,

War Department Launches,

61

53

11

5

130 (a)

21. GRANTS OF LAND."

The grants of land on lease during the last 5 years were :—

No. of Grants. No. of acres sold. No. of acres re-granted.

Years.

44.1. 92

Total No. of acres

granted. A. R. P.

88.1.151

A. R. P.

A. R. P.

1889,...... (b) 1890,......

65.

29

44.0.5

9.3.17

15.3.302

25.3. 72

1891,...... 37

26.0.331

43.0.51

69.0.38

(c) 1892,...... 61

1893,......

60.3.18

9.1.28

70.1. 7

37

20.0.233

3.0.17

23.1. 02

(a) Exclusive of 1 floating Fire Engine...

(b) The Returns in the Blue Book report for 1890 stated for that year lands sold by auction only, viz. :—2 A. 3 R. 104 P. and did not includé lands sold by way of extension to Lots already existing, the addition of the latter increasing the number of acres sold in that year to 9 A. 3 R. 17 P. as above.

j

(c) 116 A. 1 R. 14 P. were granted, and 46 A. ◊ R. 7 P. were resumed, leaving 70 A. 1 R. 7 P. additional Land granted during the year.

Persons having possession of Lands or Houses previously to the Treaty, were allowed to retain them on payment of certain assessed rentals, now collected by the Treasurer; and in cases where such Lands or Houses are not leased, the occupiers are considered as Tenants at will

}

278

22.-GAOLS AND PRISONERS.

On the 1st January, 1893, there were 485 prisoners in Victoria Gaol, and on the 31st December, there were 475, of whom 18 and 27 in each case respectively were Europeans. 4,010 prisoners were admitted during the year as against 5,046 in 1892.

The daily average of prisoners was 458, as against 515 in the previous year.

The number of prisoners admitted into Gaol during the last five years was as follows:-

YEARS.

Men.

No. OF PRISONERS.

TOTAL.

Women.

Juveniles.

DAILY AVERAGE NUMBER IN PRISON.

1889,

3,453

131 ·

121

3,705

581

1890,

3,218

119

107

3,444

566

1891,

4,805

223

203

5,231

507

1892,

4.699

181

166

5,046

515

1893,

3,777

138

95

4,010

458

23.-CRIMINAL STATISTICS.

Supreme Court.

The following is a Return of cases tried at the Supreme Court during the last five

CHARGES ABANDONED.

POSTPONED.

Number Number

YEARS.

of Cases.

of

Convicted. Acquitted.

Persons.

Number of Number of Cases. Persons.

No. of Cases.

No. of Persons.

1889,

1890,

1891,

1892,

1893,

92

143

64

41

24

37

59

80

43

20

7

17

32

37

26

9.

2

2

30

44

18

17

43

57

,33

16

44

9

8.

Total,.........

256

361

184

103

Average of previous 5 years,

85

1391

81

coko

323

41

73

...

:

29

17

261

calo

Do.

last 5 years,

51층

721/

36%

203

8135

143

Police Magistrates' Court.

The Cases before the Police Magistrates during the last 5 years were as follows:-

1층

:

1

CASES HOW DISPOSED OF.

Total No. Total No.

YEARS.

of Cases.

of Prisoners.

Convicted and Punished. charged.

Dis-

Committed Committed

for pending Trial. Orders.

Ordered

to Find

Punished

for False Tes-

Security. timony.

Un-

decided.

1889,

8,670

10,033

6,894 2.497

167

54

337

17

1890,

9,739

10,772

7,740 2,557

102

15

318.

3

1891, .................

13,676

16,382

13,972

2,040

40

12

172

1

145

1892,

+

11,920

14,471

12,098 2,078

44

5

211

7

1893, .......................

10,727

...12,392

10,355 1,607

104

8

278

17

23

Total,.........

Average of last 5 years,

Do. ending 1888,

54,732

10,946.4 12,810

12,523.8 14,394.8

64,050

51,059 10,779

457

94.

1,316

45

300

10,211.8 2,155.8

91.4

18.4

263.2

9.0

60.0

11,034 2,604.8

152.8

39.6

472.2

13.2 78.2

:

i

,

Marine Magistrate's Court.

The Cases before the Marine Magistrate's Court during the last 5 years were as follows:-

DEFENDANTS HOW DISPOSED OF.

279

Number

Number of

Forfei-

To be dis-

Com-

YEARS.

of

Cases.

Defend- Impri- ants. soned.

turė

Fined.

of

Repri- manded.

Sent back to

charged from

Dis-

mitted missed. for

Pay.

Duty.

Ship.

Trial.

1889,.......

1890,

1891, .......................

1892,

1893,

53

107

54

25

15

13

...

81

239

92

84

6

1

15

41

147

311

62

205

2

10

79

178

86

80

1

සප

9

23

3

8

24

79

45

6

19

1

8

Total,.......

384

914

339

400

28

15

39

:

93

Average of last 5 years,

76.8

182.8

67.8

80.0

5.6

3.0

7.8

18.6

:

:

...

Do.

ending 1888,...

81.4

159.2

75.4

35.6

7.8

5.6

15.8

1.4

17.6

...

Police.

The Cases brought under the notice of the Police during the last 5 years were as follows:-

SERIOUS OFFENCES.

MINOR OFFENCES.

YEARS.

Persons.

Persons.

Number of

Number of

Cases.

Cases.

Convicted. Discharged.

Convicted. Discharged.

1889,

1890,

1891,

1892,

1893,

2,893

1,409

618

4,568

4,529

1,131

3,100

1,412

616

5,324

5,007

1,218

2,994

1,687

444.

7,875

9,320

673

2,983

1,728

492

6,747

8,245

729

2,725

1,391

316

6,463

7,095

661

Total,.

14,695

7,627

2,486

30,977

34,196

4,407

Average of last 5 years,

2,939

1,525.4

497.2

6,195.4

6,839.2

881.4

7

Do. ending 1888,

2,526.2

1,266.8

542.8..

5,955.6

5,397.8

970

24.-HOSPITALS, &C. -

Civil Hospital.

The admissions to the Government Civil Hospital during the year were as follows, as compared with 1892.

1892.

1893.

Police,

496

522

Board of Trade,..

157

132

Private paying Patients,

378

467

Government Servants,

168

205

Police Cases,

232

247

Destitutes,..

284..

262

Total,

1,715

1,835

The total admissions to the Hospital and Deaths during the last 5 years were as follows:-

Years.

1889,

1890,

1891, 1892. 1893.

Admissions.

Deaths.

1,793

77

1,957

98

1,867

84

1,715

68

1,835

67

Total,

9,167

394

Average, .....1,833.4

78.8

i

280

The admissions from the Police Force and the number of Deaths for the past five years were as follows:-

Years.

1889

Admissions.

Deaths.

590

14

1890,

582

7

1891.

570

8

1892,

496

7

1893,

522

6

Total,

Average,

2,760

42

552

8.4

The admissions of Europeans, Chinese, and Indians in 1893 were 134, 133, and 255 respectively as against 152, 120, and 224 in 1892.

Military Hospital.

The admissions from among the troops during the past five years were as follows:-

Years

Admissions.

Deaths.

1889.

1,732

16

1890,

1,915

15

189ly...

1,251-0.

17

1892, 1893,

2,844

31

2,927

28

Total,

Average,

10,669

107

..2,133.8

21.4

Small-pox Hospital.

The admissions during the past five years were as follows:-

!

Years.

Admissions,

1889,

19

1890,

2

1891,

17.

1892,

13

1893,

57

Total,

108

Average,

21.6

Inquest.

The inquests held during the past five years were as follows:

1889,

1890,

1891,

1892, 1893,

76

101..

59

60

67

25.-CHARITABLE AND LITERARY INSTITUTIONS.

The Pó Leung Kuk was incorporated under Ordinance 10 of 1893.

The Nethersole Hospital was opened on the 5th September, 1893, and is managed by the London Missionary Society.

26.-RELIGIOUS INSTITUTIONS.

No fresh Institution was formed.

COLONIAL SECRETARY'S OFFICE,

HONGKONG, 18th May, 1894.

J. H. STEWART LOCKHART, Acting Colonial Secretary.

x

HONGKONG.

REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF THE BOTANICAL AND AFFORESTATION DEPARTMENT FOR 1893.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor

263

No. 18

94

BOTANIC GARDENS, HONGKONG, 7th May, 1894.

SIR,-I have the honour to submit the Annual Report on this Department for the

BOTANIC GARDENS.

year 1893.

The grounds, plant-houses, buildings, fences, walks, and collections of plants have all been maintained in good order, and improvements have been effected in various directions. Some of the concreted walks are becoming a little rough by wear and weather and will need re-making before long. The smaller of the underground drains beneath level walks, in consequence of the want of steeper gradients, are subject to continual blocking by accumulations of débris within them. These should all be taken up and relaid some time when there are sufficient funds.

Improvements.

2. An additional glass-roofed plant-house 50 feet long by 12 feet wide, situated in the nursery has been completed. The wood-work has been chiefly made and fitted by our carpenter who is on the staff. The glass-houses in the nursery are now nearly sufficient for our needs for nursery purposes. One more small addition will complete the requirements.

3. Certain walks in the Botanical and Government House Gardens have been concreted. These additions now finish all that is needed in this kind of walk formation.

4. Extensions have been made to rockeries where circumstances rendered these necessary.

Lawns.

5. Towards the end of the summer the moths and caterpillars mentioned in paragraph No. 14 of my last report again appeared, but having learnt by past experience the habits of these pests their advent was anticipated, and on their first appearance remedies for their destruction were at once applied and maintained at regular intervals until the termination of their season of activity. By these means the lawns were preserved from serious injury.

Dr. A. GUNTHER, F.R.S., Keeper of the Department of Zoology, British Museum (Natural History), to whom I sent specimens of the larva, chrysalids, and moths for determination, has very kindly informed me that its name is Thialleta signifera, (Walk.). The chief injury to the grass is caused by this species, but another one which appears simultaneously with the Thialleta is also respon- sible for some damage. This one Dr. GUNTHER has also determined from specimens which I sent. It is Pharazia bicarsisatis (Walk.).

6. Children continue to run over places where grass should be, but which they have long ago As the attendants and police are unable to prevent this, it would be advisable to provide low iron fences, on the margins of walks where children chiefly congregate, of only sufficient height to prevent the children leaving the walks. The ordinary annual vote has not hitherto provided means for procuring such a fence.

7. One of the four large clumps of clipped Pittosporum Tobira on the terrace below the fountain died during the year. This causes a temporary incompleteness in the arrangement, but new plants have been put in the place of those which died. The old ones had occupied the position, as have those which remain, for about 30 years.

Excessive Cold in January.

8. On the 15th, 16th, and 17th of January Hongkong was visited by the coldest weather ever known here, when the temperature in the Gardens fell to 31° F. This was the subject of a Special Report which I submitted on February 4th, and to which there is little now to add. Within the Gardens the most regrettable losses by cold were many valuable orchids. Many inside the houses were killed, and all the plants of Phalaenopsis amabilis, P. Schilleriana, and Saccolabium giganteum growing on a tree of Ficus retusa were killed. These had been placed on the tree a few years before and were well established and beginning to be a special feature.

9. For the cultivation of beautiful and tender orchids glass-houses should be provided. Experi- ments in the nursery glass-houses have conclusively proved the great advantages to many orchids

264

which glass affords not only in the cold of winter but in the heat and rains in summer. These popular and lovely plants should now be provided for on a scale which their merits deserve. A special effort for this purpose would be amply rewarded, but this effort cannot be exerted to much further advantage unless supported by special pecuniary means.

Distribution and Interchange of Plants, Seeds, &c.

10. Exchanges for the mutual benefit of this and other establishments have been maintained; 3,089 plants and 240 lbs. seeds were received in 234 packages. The chief donors were:--- Armstrong, J. M.

་་

Geo., Manila.

Assistant Superintendent of Forests, Penang. Agri-Horticultural Society, Madras.

Botanical Department, Jamaica. Botanic Gardens, Adelaide.

""

11

Bangalore.

British Guiana.

Durban.

Hanoi.

Royal, Calcutta:

35

""

"}

""

""

""

.""

57

19

""

13

Ceylon. Kew. Trinidad.

:

15

""

Singapore.

Boehmer & Co., Yokohama.

Bourne, F. S. A., British Vice-Consul, Canton..

Cooke, Mrs.

Corner, G. E., Public Gardens, Shanghai. Danenberg, Dr. V.

Hay, Drummond, Shanghai. Hodgins, Captain, S. S. Thales. Humphreys, H.

""

Jones, W.

J. D.

Mueller, Sir F. von., Melbourne.

Newton, W., Kowloon.

Phillips, Captain, H. M. S. Pigmy.

Streich, Ivo, German Vice Consul, Swatow. Ribeiro; J.

Treseder, J. G., Sydney:

Tupper, Lieutenant, H. M. S. Wivern.. Veitch & Son, J., Chelsea.

Walker, Captain, Foochow

Watson, H. J.

11. 4,514 plants and 86 lbs. of seeds in 144 packages were distributed. Of herbarium specimens of dried plants 317 were supplied. The principal recipients were :——

Armstrong, J. M.

Geo., Manila.

Assistant Superintendent of Forests, Penang.

Botanic Gardens, Adelaide.

"?

""

""

19

""

29

""

""

""

"

""

""

Bangalore.

Jamaica.

Mauritius:

Natal.

Royal, Calcutta.

Ceylon. Kew.

Saharunpur.

Bodinier, Rev. Em.

""

""

""

Singapore.

Bourne, F. S. A., British Vice-Consul, Canton.

O'Brien, Honourable G. T. M., Colonial Secretary.

Burdon, Mrs.

Caldwell, A. B., Nova Scotia.

Chauncey, Colonel

Chan A Wan.

Clarke, Sir Fielding, Kt.

Cluke, L. H., Kowloon. Cooke, Mrs.

Department of Agriculture of Leeward Islands. Dorabjee, Nowrojee

French Convent, Wanchai.

Gamble, J. S., Imperial Forests School, India. Gardens and Forests, Singapore.

Gourdin, A. O'D.

Goddard, Captain, S. S. Haitan Government Civil Hospital.

Hay, Drummond, Shanghai.

Kopsch, H., Shanghai.

Hosken, W. E., H. M. S. Mercury.

Hodgins, Captain, S. S. Thales. Holliday, C. J.

Humphreys, H.

""

J. D.

Kennedy, J. C., Alpes Maritimes, France.

Lawrence, Sir Trevor, Bart., Dorking, England.

Lewis J. H.

Moore, Captain

Mudie, Captain, S. S. Ancona.

Musson, W.

Phillips, Captain, H. M. S. Pigmy.

Police Stations.

Rabe, Dr., Vancouver.

Rickett, J., Yokohama.

Shepherd, B.

Street, Rev. A., Kiungchow..

Streich, Ivo., German Vice-Consul, Swatow. Swettenham, Honourable J. A., Colombo. Veitch & Sons, J., London. Walker, Captain, Foochow Watson, H. J.

Plant Sales:

t.

12. Each year brings increased demands for plants. The total sold was 3,439, which realised $714.99; this is an increase of $102.42 over the amount obtained in 1892.

The number of separate orders for plants was 409.

Loan of Plants for Decoration.

13. In this service there was also increased activity, 4,087 plants were lent on 25 applications. This is an increase of 1,341 plants and 9 applications beyond the figures of the preceding year.

265

$

14

Plant Collecting.

14. One of our staff was sent to Hainan to collect living plants, and to obtain and dry specimens for the herbarium. He was absent for about seven months and was successful in sending back about 400 dried specimens, a fair proportion of them new to our collections. I have spent as much time as could be obtained in determining them, those which are indeterminable here will be forwarded to Kew for completion. there with the kind consent of the Director and assistance of the Herbarium Staff, from all of whom very valuable services are always rendered as their time will permit, when plants are sent for identification.

In addition to the dried plants about 900 living ones were sent up in good condition, besides a quantity of seeds. Amongst the plants were several orchids of a showy character which are welcome acquisitions for the orchid houses.

My best thanks are due to the Rev. A. E. STREET, of Nadoa, for having most kindly given much assistance in looking after the collector, paying his wages, and forwarding the collections to Hongkong. I have also to thank Mr. G. J. LITTON, of Canton, for having, when he was in Hainan, kindly taken the collector with him into districts which otherwise would not have been entered by the collector.

Rainfall Observations...

15. Records of rainfall observed in the Gardens are given in appendix A., and for the sake of comparison those taken at the Observatory at Kowloon are attached in appendix B. The observations at each establishment were taken at 10 a.m. I am indebted to Dr. DOBERCK för kindly supplying me with the Observatory records.

Herbarium and Library.

16. Some hundreds of plants have been mounted and incorporated in, the collections in cabinets. These collections are composed of Hongkong, Chinese and Japanese plants, and various species which have flowered for the first time in the Gardens.

17.. A collection of about 350 well preserved plants were purchased from a Japanese botanist in Japan. They were all Japanese plants.

18.. Hitherto the collection of Hongkong plants has been. incorporated throughout the General Collection, but in consequence of the large number of plants in the latter it was becoming inconvenient to retain them any longer together, therefore I have separated the General from the Hongkong Collection, so that for purposes of reference when Hongkong, plants only are wanted the work is greatly facilitated.

19. Books, journals, &c. received are here recorded: Agricultural Gazette, New South Wales; 1892 Agricultural and Livestock Returns Colony of

Cape of Good Hope, 1892-3:

Bibliography of Australian Economie Botany:

Part 1, 1892.

Bulletin (Brisbane) of the Department of Agri-

culture, 1893.

Bulletin (Jamaica) of Botanical Department, 1893.. Bulletin (Kew) of Miscellaneous Information,

1893.

Bulletin (Trinidad) of Miscellaneous Informa-

tion, 1893.

Bulletin (Brisbane) Our Stock Foods and How

to use them, 1893.

Bulletin Koloniaal Museum, Haarlam, 1892. Colonial Office List, 1893. Purchased. Chemical Papers from the Research Laboratory.

by W. R. Dunstan. From Pharm. Society. of Great Britain.

Exposição Sobre Estado e Necessidades. From

Jardim Botanico, Rio de Janeiro. Enumeratio Plantarum in Horto Botanico Flu-- minonsi Cultarum. From Botanic Gardens.

Rio de Janeiro. Economic Botany of China by AUG. HENRY.

Purchased.

Fauna of British India, Vols. I and II. Purchased. Flora of British India, Part 14. From Royal

Gardens, Kew.

Flore Forestiere de la Cochinchine Dis-Septieme

Fascicule, 1891.

From Royal Gardens, Kew.

Hooker's Icones Plantaruin, Vol. I, Parts II and III. From the Bentham Trustees, through Kew

Handbook of the Bromeliacea by J. S. BAKER,

Purchased.

Handbook of the Irideæ by J. S. BAKER. Pur-

chased.

Handbook of the Flora of New South Wales.

From New South Wales Government.

Indian Forest Reports from Indian Forest Department.

Forest Administration of the Forest Survey

Branch in India, 1891-2.

Forest Administration in Andamans, 1891-2. Forest Administration in Ajmere-Merwara 1891-

1892.

Forest Administration in Baluchistan, 1891-2. Forest Administration in Bombay Presidency in

Sindh, 1891-2.

Forest Administration in Coorg, 1891-2. Forest Administration in Hyderabad Assigned

Districts, 189T-2.

Forest Administration in Lower Province of

Bengal, 1891-2.

Forest Administration in Lower Burma, 1891-2. Forest Administration in Lower Punjab, 1891-2. Forest Administration in Provinces of Assam,

1891-2.

Forest Administration in Madras Presidency,

1891-2.

Forest Administration in Upper Burma, 1891-2.

266

Review of Forest Administration in British

India, 1891-2.

Journal of the China Branch of the Royal Asiatic

Society, No. 5, 1887. Purchased.

New Ferns, 1874-91, by J. G. BAKER. Pur-

chased.

Notes on Antigua Pine Apples, 1892-3. From Superintendent of Agriculture, Leeward Is- lands.

Provisional, List of the Indigenous and Natural-

ised Flowering Plants of Jamaica. From Director of Public Gardens and Plantations. Pluvitas Novas Cultivadas no Jardim Botanico

de Rio de Janeiro. Pharmaceutical Journal and Transactions, No.

1,190, 1893. Purchased.

Report on Missouri Botanic Gardens, 1893. Report on the Island of Formosa with special reference to its resources and Trade, by Mr. HOSIE. Purchased. Report Botanic Gardens and Forest Department,

Singapore, 1892.

Report, Colonial Herbarium, Natal, 1892. Report of the Governor, Principal, and Fellows

of McGill University, Montreal, for 1891-2. Report on an Outbreak of Shot Borer in St.

Kitts Sugar Estates, 1892-3. From Super- intendent of Agriculture, Leeward Islands. Report on Furcræa Fibre Plantations in the Lee- ward Islands, 1892-3. From Superintend- ent of Agriculture, Leeward Islands.

Report on the Progress and Condition of the Government Saharanpur and Mussoorie Gardens, 1893.

Report on the Failure of the Dominica Cacao

Crop, 1892-3. From Superintendent of Agriculture, Leeward Islands.

Report, Botanic Gardens, Grenada, 1892. Report, Botanic Gardens, Natal, 1892. Report, Botanic Gardens, Royal, Calcutta, 1892-

1893.

Report, Botanic Gardens, Royal, Ceylon, 1892. Report, Botanic Gardens, Royal, Mauritius, of

the Cyclone, 1892.

Report, Botanic Gardens, Royal, Trinidad, 1892. Report of the Department of Agriculture, Bris-

bane, 1891-2.

Report of the Government Botanical Gardens

and Parks, Bangalore, 1891.

Report of the Pomologist, Department of Agri-

culture, 1892.

Report of the Queensland Acclimatisation So-

ciety, 1893.

Report of State Forest Administration in New

South Wales, 1892.

Relatorio sobre Trabalhos do Jardim Botanico apresentado em 31 de Março de 1892. From Botanic Gardens, Rio de Janeiro. Relatorio sobre Trabalhos do Jardim Botanico apresentado em 7 de Outubro de 1890.

FORESTRY,

20. The most suitable lands for tree growth are being rapidly filled up, and in consequence of this and the yearly increase of attention which established plantations require a commencement has been made of gradually diminishing the yearly plantings. The total number of trees planted was

279,648, which I propose to further decrease to a quantity not exceeding 100,000 per annum in future. Hitherto a good deal of work has been done by sowing seeds in situ, (in little pits where no trans- planting is required); the area of land suitable for this method of cultivation is now about exhausted, therefore future work will be almost entirely confined to actual planting.

21. A very large extent of land is entirely unfitted for tree growth on account of its exposure to winds, scarcity and poverty of soil, and arid nature. This unsuitability prevails over all the hill tops, except in very few little spots, and on many wind-swept ridges and breasts on lower levels. Nearly all aspects at the eastern end of the Island where the north-east winds blow on them with their full force throughout half the year will never produce respectable trees. In past years experiments were made in many such places, and these experiments have fully demonstrated what I now state. Trees will grow for a few years, but when above the small shelter they receive from herbage and other small obstacles they dwindle away.

. 22. On the other hand where trees have been planted in sheltered ravines and on southern and western aspects where the north-east winds cannot reach them except with abated force, success has been perfect. As instances of this I may point out the stretches of land from the West Point Batteries to Pokefoolum, and round from thence to Deep Water Bay, in the Happy Valley, Causeway Bay hills, Quarry Bay, Kowloon, &c.

23. Statistics of the Planting in 1893 are given in appendix C.

Flague of Caterpillars.

24. Great difficulties have always presented themselves in effectually carrying on forestry work, but most of them have been surmounted by incessant application of watchfulness and energy.

A new foe of great power presented itself last year in the shape of a caterpillar which in millions attacked pine trees in Kowloon and on the Quarry Bay hills. This pest is the caterpillar of a large moth, Eutricha punctata, (Walk.) which was kindly determined for me by Dr. GUNTHER, F.R.S., from specimens I sent to him in different stages, at the same time as those I alluded to in paragraph No, 5 of this report.

-

*

267

The caterpillars were discovered in the latter part of the summer on trees from 3 feet to 15 feet in height which they completely stripped of all their leaves. Remedies were at once attempted, but nothing except handpicking or knocking them off the trees and then killing them while on the ground was effective, and this method of dealing with them was impracticable on account of its cost and the impossibility of discovering the caterpillars shaken off the trees when they fell in long grass. More- over coolies refused to continue the work on account of the great irritation of their skin caused by the caterpillars' hairs which found their way under loose clothing. At Quarry Bay the men also suffered so severely from fever that they could not be kept there; two men came back and died of fever after a few days spent on the hills.

:

The coolies were living in tents. Coolies employed by our contractors are generally housed in matsheds for some kinds of work. These methods of housing have to be adopted in a good deal of work in distant parts. Tents and sheds are moved from place to place as work progresses. Coolies in sheds and tents alike in many parts of the Colony are greatly subject to sickness, but in some places much more than in others. The neighbourhood of Quarry Bay is not more unhealthy than a great many other places where men have been located.

25. It was anticipated that pine trees generally could not recover after their leaves were entirely eaten away, and time has now proved the correctness of that view. At the time of now writing the removal of dead trees at Quarry Bay has just been completed, the number being 30,219.

26. This scourge, I am informed, is not unknown on the mainland, but the year before last was the first appearance of the caterpillar which I have observed in Hongkong. In that year only one small spot in Kowloon was effected.

27. While I am writing (April, 1894) another visitation of caterpillars of a different species to the two which infest lawns, and the one which has destroyed pine trees is actively at work stripping "banians" (Ficus retusa) of their leaves.. They have suddenly appeared in Kowloon, at East Point, West Point, and other places in Hongkong; many large trees having been reduced to the appearance of dead ones.

A large staff of men are being employed to beat the branches and thus knock off the caterpillars which are then swept up on the roads beneath the trees and destroyed.

This is also the first appearance of caterpillars in such vast numbers on these trees. These enormous increases of caterpillars are difficult to account for, but it is possible that the enemies of the Pinus and Ficus tree caterpillars and moths may have succumbed to the severe cold weather which was experienced in January of 1893.

Thinning of Plantations, &c.

28. The usual work has been carried on satisfactorily by the contractor throughout the year. The plantations dealt with were chiefly in the districts around Aberdeen and Little Hongkong. The number of trees cut out was 31,643.

:

29. The total income from forestry products was $577.06, of which, however, $24 was a sale of purchased seeds.

Appendix D gives the usual statistics of this work.

Transplanting Trees.

30. The completion of the section of the Praya Reclamation opposite the Cricket Ground added a piece of land to that recreation ground at its north-west corner, and this necessitated the removal of six large, so called "banian" trees,-Ficus retusa. Five of these trees were, although very large (being about 25 feet in diameter and the same in height), worth an effort to transplant them to the margin of the new ground. The trunks of the trees were about six feet in circumference.

I had the branches cut back and the trunks and large branches wrapped in straw-bands, then their roots were bared and likewise cut back. While this was being done scaffolding was erected around the tree and when the latter was carefully prepared it was lifted out of its site by means of a Weston's Block and Chain capable of raising 4 tons, then dragged to its new site by means of a winch and lowered carefully into its place by the same block and chain which had been brought and placed on scaffolding over the new hole into which the tree was placed. Each tree was treated in the saine manner, and afterwards carefully stayed and watered. The work was perfectly successful; all the trees have made vigorous shoots from the old wood, and good heads are already formed.

Camphor Trees.

31. These trees, which have been regularly planted for some years past amongst the pines in older plantations, having made very fair progress were being interfered with by pines in too close proximity, therefore the whole of the plantations were examined, all encroaching pines removed, and the camphors pruned. Camphors planted eight years ago which are in good soil are now about 14 feet high, but those of the same age in poor soil are only about 3 feet, the trees vary in height between these two measurements according to their more or less favourable environments.

268

Protective Service.

32. The Forest Guards caused 105 cases to be brought before the Magistrates; 100 convictions were obtained. This is an increase of 4 cases over those of 1892 and of 8 convictions. 23 convicted persons paid fines amounting to $126.50, a decrease of 6 persons, and an increase of $39, respectively, over the figures of the previous year. The lowest fine was 50 cents and the highest $16.

The offences consisted chiefly of cutting down trees, breaking off branches, and grazing goats and cattle in prohibited places. The number of trees surreptitiously cut down was 456 scattered over about 50 different places.

33. A good deal of damage continues to be done to the Chinese New Year shrub Enkianthus quinqueflorus when it is in flower, and increasing injury to ornamental flowering and other shrubs and trees is done by the servants of foreigners, chiefly residents at the Peak, who are sent out regularly to procure decorations for their employers' rooms. I made the attempt of rearing ornamental flowering trees and shrubs on the hills and places adjacent to roads for the purpose of improving landscape effects, but I regret to say, that the action of foreign residents, or their employees, have quite discouraged this work, as it is impossible to preserve the trees from being wrecked when in flower.

34. The number of Forest Guards was increased from three to five which has enabled a little closer supervision to be exercised over trees during the year.

Jungle Fires.

35. Only 22 fires occurred as against 63 in the previous year, but these destroyed 4,000 trees, double the quantity burnt by the 1892 fires.

36. It is impossible to obtain positive evidence of the way in which fires originate, but I have no doubt that grasscutters and those who rake up pine leaves and collect cones for fuel are greatly responsible; the careless use of matches by smokers probably being the cause. These people cannot be prevented from cutting grass and raking leaves on unenclosed lands, as their work is not illegal. The importance of preventing fires now that so many trees are jeopardised by them indicates the advisability of considering whether the existing Ordinances should not be amended in order that effective control may be exercised over the large number of people who find employment on lands where trees need better protection.

37. One of the most destructive fires of the season was, apparently, started by a picnic party at Deep Water Bay; the party, I was informed, made off in a steam launch without taking any steps to subdue or report the fire.

38. Ancestral worship at tombs takes place chiefly on particular days in spring and autumn, and this unfortunately is when vegetation (in consequence of its being the dry season) is in its most combustible state. I have taken the precaution of posting on these days the whole of the forestry staff, supported by extra coolies, amounting in all to about 80 men, all over the Island on points of vantage where they could most promptly and efficiently subdue any fires which the worshippers started near graves or cemeteries.

In addition placards in Chinese, drawn up by the Registrar General, warning people to be specially careful in the use of fire, have been distributed and posted up.

These precautions have had a most beneficial effect in diminishing the number and extent of fires.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

The Honourable J. H. STEWART LOCKHART,

Acting Coloril Secretary,

&c.,

&c.,

&c.

CHARLES FORD, Superintendent,

Botanical and Afforestation Department.

269

Oct. Nov. Dec.

Sept.

Appendix A.

RAINFALL OBSERVATIONS MADE AT THE BOTANIC GARDENS, DURING 1893.

ABOUT 300 FEET ABOVE SEA LEVEL.

99.

:

...

...

...

...

:

...

2.15

5.31

8.83.

...

...

*05

1.52

•64.

•17

:

:

...

...

...

90.

...

2.39

⚫38.

...

80.

T:.

:..

...

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

.74

96.

.:.

1.95

71

18

*59

1.51

•12

⚫04

⚫36

⚫85

⚫01

⚫32

:

:

:

98.

⚫53

•10

1.48

1.68

*48

⚫01

*03

:

⚫01

60.

:

*07

·0%

⚫01

.76

*05

:

⚫30

DATE.

Jan.

Feb. March. April. May. June. July. Aug.

⚫02

⚫01

60.

•15

⚫07

⚫02

:

:

60.

:

•26.

⚫03

69.

⚫04

1,

:..

:

:...

...

:.

:

19.

:

:

...

...

:

:

...

...

⚫30

:

:

:.

:.

·04

:

:

:.

:.

:

⠀ . ⠀

*

:

:

:

:

:.

4468

*07

10.

:

:

:

:

:

...

:

:

:

:

:

:.

:

:

1.74

•14

*03

...

...

:

1.00

•27

:

1.52

*40

⚫49

•04 1.69

:.

*57

70

1.19

...

*02

1.47

*35

*07

⚫03

...

:

*02

98.

3.28

:

⚫03

*03

•48

1.91

•14

8.09

⚫01 2.35 2.04,

:

:

⚫05

3.06

⚫33 3.71

•57

2:63

+42 2.26

*02

*28

:

:

:

•55

*55 5.18

*02

*16

•17

...

80.

19.

•63

⚫31

...

4.71

:..

11

8,

9,

10,

:..

:

:

:

11,

:..

:

12,

*03

13,

14,

•14

15,

+35

:.

:

:

16,

⚫46

17,

*45

•10

•13!

:

:

:.

:

:

:.

:

18,

·04

•07

19,

•24

1.34

⚫03

:

2,

3,

4,

5,

6,

7,

:..

...

29

•29

:

:

:

35

⚫35

⚫07

*03

*35

...

...

...

...

:

:.

...

...

:.

20,

21,

22,

23,

24,

25,

26,

27,

28,

29,

60.

:

:

:

⚫03

•13

⚫03

...

⚫54

*02

4.01 4.33

:

:..

:.

66.

⚫04

:

*55

*02 2.37

•74

*03

*36

⚫70

*03

:

18

•12

...

⚫02

80.

30,

31,

⚫01

:

10.

1.50

•70

3.15 9.48 17.37

6.97 24.62 11.46 15.84

Total inches for the year 112:29. Observations made at 10 A.M.

21.16

CHARLES FORD,

Superintendent.

*04

Botanical & Afforestation Department.

Total,......

270

Appendix B.

RAINFALL OBSERVATIONS MADE AT KOWLOON OBSERVATORY DURING 1892.

DATE.

Jan. Feb. March. April. May. June. July. Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov.

Dec.

1,

2,

3,

4,

5,

6,

7,

8,

...

:

:

*03

⚫01

*05

•24

:

⚫03

*02

⚫04

*02

*02

+22

•11

.74

*02

...

2.12

:

...

.76

⚫03

90.

1.05

3.82

:

:

:.

:

...

...

.:..

1.52

⚫04

*07

•48

1.02

⚫01

•26

⚫02

*05

1.05

*12

10.

6.48

⚫03

90.

⚫79

+25 2.59

*39

:

*07

1.32

*07

:

'56

*38

•11

...

*03

•21

·71

1.95

.:..

:.

90.

*04

⚫07

⚫36 1.10

*75

:

.:.

...

:

:

⚫04

⚫01

•10

'01

...

:

⚫07

...

...

.84

...

...

...

:

:

:

:

:

:

9,

⚫01

10,

⚫01

11,

:

12,

⚫03

13,

:

:

:

14,

•17

:

15,

⚫29

:

16,

80.

09.

17,

•25.

•11

...

18,

...

19,

...

20,

··01

:15

⚫03

⚫54

88,

...

:

...

.:.

'36

•01

:

:

:

...

:

:..

1.32

•13

:.

⚫05

*02

:

⚫72

·44

⚫30

89.

:

:

:..

⚫03

⚫92

⚫01 1.79

...

:

:

:

98.

:

...

:

:

69.

74

⚫43

⚫01

:.

:

...

...

:

1.22

⚫31

:

•11

:

:

:

•10

96.

1.45

*03

⚫01

•20

*45

*90*

:

21,

22,

23,

24,

...

:..

•12

2.18

•15 1.51

2:00

⚫34

⚫01

...

⚫29

...

⚫02

3.04

*23

4:45

1.03

:.

:

:

...

:

:

*36

2:00

•58 2.24

...

⚫43

:

...

:

:

40.

...

*52

'62

4.39

•14

60.

:..

25,

⚫01

26,

27,

...

:

*03

*35

89.

60.

.84

4.13

⚫30

•35

*02

•21

⚫01

:

⚫01

'03

⚫02

•13

⚫03

•14

:..

:

28,

29,

⚫01

...

99.

⚫01

:.

⚫01

⚫05

60.

...

3.20

4.46

⚫03

...

90.

30,

⚫04

⚫02 1.97

•70

⚫01

•37

⚫56

31,

....

⚫03

'05

:

.16

⚫42

⚫82

:.

.:.

:.

:.

:

:

*04

⚫03

.05

CHARLES FOrd, Superintendent,

Botanical & Afforestation Department.

Total,..... 154

*46

3.39 8.19 16.25 7.10 21.21 8.73 15.05 17.86

Total inches for the year-

=

99.86. Observations made at 10 a.M.

Appendix C.

STATISTICS OF PLANTING OPERATIONS.

DESCRIPTION AND NUMBER OF TREES AND AREA IN ACRES.

271

LOCALITY.

Pinus sinensis planted.

Pinus sinensis

sown

Cunning Trista-

-hamia nea

Cam-

sinensis. conferta.

phor.

Syncar- pia lamifolia

Liqui- damber.

Bamboo.

Miscella neous.

Area in Acres.

Grand Total of Trees.

in situ.

Mount Gough...............

1,131

Pokefoolum...............

21,741

Do.,

Filter Bed,.....

3,972

Quarry Bay,......

6,196

North Point,

6,620

:

:

:..

:..

:..

:.

1,763

:

:

:

:

:

3

2,435

1

18

61

5

Aberdeen,.........

28,395

Do.,

and Wanchai Road,...

24,361

958

650

74

287

50

841

814

717

61

24

221

Wongneichung Gap,

12,945

...

Tytam,

35,576

:..

:

:

204

11

*

:

:

Repulse Bay, ....

Military Sanitarium,

Deep Water Bay,

Causeway Bay,

Robinson Road,

Richmond Road,..

Lunatic Asylum,

Sookunpo,

Kennedy Town Police Station,

Stanley,

Various,

29,331

60,483

1,011

+

492

10,379

:

1,160

630

3

76

:

:

:

:.

26,113

:..

:..

:

:

:

:

:

20

20

G5

:

:

:

:

:

291

75

83

1

40

73

:

:

21

214

21

Total..........

181,139 86,596

2,810 3,811

1,083

3,765

204

106

134

232 279,648

CHARLES FORD,

Appendix D.

SALE OF FORESTRY PRODUCTS.

Locality.

PINE TREES.

Superintendent,

Botanical and Afforestation Department.

Quantity.

Amount realized.

Aberdeen, Kowloon,...

25,792

355.97

1,172

10.94

Little Hongkong,

3,465

107.70

Various places,

1,214

10.63

Total Number of Trees,.......

31,643

485.24

Tree Prunings,

Seeds,

Camphor Trees,

Cunninghamia Trees,.........

Miscellaneous,

Total Revenue for Forestry Products,.......

2,044 piculs.

61.32

14

24.00

""

20

1.25

20

1.25

4.00

577.06

CHARLES FORD, Superintendent,

Botanical and Afforestation Department.

1

283

21

No. 94.

. No. 151.

HONGKONG.

GOVERNOR'S DESPATCH TO THE SECRETARY OF STATE

WITH REFERENCE TO THE PLAGUE.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor.

1

MY LORD MArquess,

GOVERNMENT HOUSE, HONGKONG, 20th June, 1894.

I had the honour to receive from your Lordship on the 16th June the follow- ing telegram:-"Keep me informed progress of bubonic plague. Send names of "any Europeans dying or attacked reporting number of departures and what "arrangements contemplated in Chinese quarter. What will be the effect on Finances. "Did plague originate in China and if so did you take any preventive measures

against its introduction. Telegraph reply."

66.

2. I accordingly replied on the same day: "In answer to your telegram of 15ht "June total mortality to date 1,900. Latest statistical returns more satisfactory. "Ten British soldiers attacked. Two dead--Captain VESEY, Private GIBSON. Others "convalescent. Departures approximately estimated 80,000. Infected district closed "adopting necessary measures. Resumption intended. Commercial interests se- riously affected labour scarce. Assistance from Imperial Government or issue "of fresh loan necessary. Bubonic plague endemic parts of China. Originated here "after drought for 7 months. Foul Bills of Health issued 10th May. All steamer

passengers medically examined. Will telegraph later.'"

66

""

3. Your Lordship will have received my Despatches Nos. 115, 116, 121, 122, 123, 127, 128, 129 and 132, and my telegrams of the 18th May, 2nd, 4th, and 16th June, in reference to the epidemic which has been in existence in this Colony since the beginning of last May.

4. At the risk of repeating some of the statements I have made in those com- munications it may be convenient to your Lordship that I should forward to you a narrative, disjointed though it may be, of the principal incidents that have occurred in connection with the plague during the last month.

5. On my return to the Colony from Japan on the 15th May, after 8 weeks' leave of absence, I found that Major-General BARKER, who had been administering the Government since the 30th April, owing to the sudden departure on account of illness of Mr. OBRIEN, the Colonial Secretary, had issued a proclamation on the 10th May declaring Hongkong to be an infected Port in accordance with the prov- isions of The Public Health Ordinance, No. 24 of 1887.

6. A Permanent Committee of the Sanitary Board, consisting of three mem-> bers, had thereupon been appointed, and these gentlemen who, in conjunction with Dr. Lowson, Dr. PENNY, R.N., and Surgeon-Major JAMES, have since acted with extraordinary energy and efficiency, at once passed Bye-laws, and Regulations which I have already forwarded to you and which were without delay passed and confirmed by the Executive Council and ultimately legalized by the Legislative Council.

The Right Honourable

THE MARQUESS OF RIPON,

Her Majesty's Principal Secretary of State

for the Colonies,

&c.,

&c.,

&.c.

284

7. Hospitals were at once established (1) on board the Hygeia, (2) at Kennedy Town Police Station, (3) and, on the 20th May, at the Glass Works at Kennedy Town. The first two were managed by the Government doctors and the lady nurses from the Government Hospital, the latter was handed over to the Tung Wah Hospital Committee and worked by Chinese doctors under the super- vision of the Colonial Medical Staff and a Naval Doctor (Dr. PENNY). It was deemed advisable to give the Chinese doctors a free hand at first. In any case it is difficult to persuade the Chinese to report cases of sickness, and their foolish and violent prejudices against Western medical men are quite sufficient to induce them, as they certainly did for the first fortnight or three weeks of the existence of the plague, not only to secrete their sick but often to desert their plague-stricken friends and relations after death,

8. Under these circumstances the necessity for a vigorous house to house visita- tion became most apparent and the Military and Naval authorities, Major-General BARKER and Commodore BOYES, at the suggestion of the Government rendered every possible assistance in this direction. Naval and Military doctors were fur- nished and at least 300 men from the Shropshire Regiment, and officers and men from the Royal Engineers and Royal Artillery detachments were amongst others detailed for the duty of house to house visitation and for cleaning and disinfecting the houses in which cases of the plague had occurred.

9. At this time, about the 21st May, the greatest dissatisfaction was shewn by the Chinese community in regard to the methods of sanitation we were employing. Complaints were made that the privacy of women's apartments was being invaded, that women and children were being "frightened out of their wits" by the daily visits of the Military and Police, and then it began to be rumoured that the "Foreigners" had sinister and unspeakable designs on the women and children.

10. On enquiry I found that these complaints were much exaggerated and that the majority of the Chinese, after being made to understand what the object was which the Government had in view, did not object to the visitation but even assisted those deputed to search their houses and to disinfect and cleanse them when necessary. A large deputation of Chinese waited upon me nevertheless, requesting that the house to house visitation should cease and that they might take their sick away from the Hygeia and the Kennedy Town hospital altogether. As already reported in my Despatch of the 23rd May, No. 121, I had to inform these gentlemen in pretty strong terms that Hongkong was a British Colony and, as they had chosen to reside in it, they must submit to British laws and methods of sanitation, and further that, as I was responsible for the safety of the community, I must positively decline to listen to their requests. I further pointed out to them that as residents of Hongkong it was their bounden duty to aid the Government in the terrible crisis in which it was placed and not to obstruct it, or to allow their people to obstruct it, in any way whatever. Though the deputation, composed of wealthy and so called educated Chinamen, left Government House apparently satisfied, in a few days' time defamatory and libellous placards were posted up in Hongkong and later on in larger numbers in Canton attributing the most ghastly cruelties to the Eng- lish doctors, charging them in fact with cutting open pregnant women and with scooping out the eyes of children in order to make medicines for the treat- ment of plague-stricken patients.

11. Your Lordship will find it difficult to believe that after upwards of 50 years' occupation of Hongkong, and after more than 50 years of benign, not to say paternal, Government, Chinamen residents in this British Dependency could be found who were ignorant enough to believe such statements, and treacherous enough to give them currency. Such, however, is unfortunately the case.

12. As there had been some opposition to the Police in the Chinese quarter the day previously, and these statements were likely to inflame the passions of the mob, I immediately requested the Commodore to anchor a gunboat opposite to the Tung

285

Wah Hospital and Taipingshan, and Commodore BOYES at once moved the Tweed into the position I indicated. I also offered a handsome reward for any informa- tion which would lead to the arrest and conviction of the author of those disgraceful placards. There can be no doubt that these steps had a very salutary effect as no more placards have been issued here.

13. The epidemic a little later than the date of the above mentioned occurrence notwithstanding the heavy rains amounting altogether to some 23 inches was evidently on the increase. The exodus of panic-stricken Chinese was also on the increase, hongs were being emptied of their clerks, chair coolies by hundreds deserted their employers without warning, and many domestic servants applied for the amount of their wages then due to enable them to go to Canton or to join their families on the mainland. No less than 300 men left the China Sugar Factory one morn ing and crossing over to Kowloon started to walk to Swatow, a distance of 180 miles. At this time the admissions to the hospitals were 67, 70, and sometimes 80 a day, and the deaths in hospital and the dead bodies collected outside were on one occasion 109 in 24 hours.

14. When matters were at their worst I received information that the “literati,” who were doubtless in a measure responsible for the dissemination of the disgusting statements respecting the medical men in this Colony, had recommenced operations in Canton. It was currently stated that if any portion of Taipingshan was burnt down as has been suggested an attack would be made upon the Consulate at Canton, and numerous defamatory placards involving not only the medical profes- sion but the "Red-haired Barbarian" generally were being posted broad cast over that City.

15. With a view of stopping the anti-foreign feeling which was thus assuming serious proportions in Canton at the instigation probably of persons here I requested the Consul, Mr. B. BRENAN, to seek an immediate interview with the Viceroy and to demand the contradiction of these libellous and malicious placards. The Vice- roy I am bound to say with apparent readiness issued a proclamation which, as you will see from my despatch No. 125 of the 29th May, I did not consider sufficiently explicit as it was in far too general terms. I therefore requested the Consul to see the Viceroy again and to point out to him that in my opinion his proclamation was not nearly adequate to the occasion. The Viceroy thereupon issued a second proclamation which appeared more to the purpose but which coming too late had little effect on the already exasperated ruffians in his Province. The Registrar General then at my desire drew up a proclamation which was issued throughout Hongkong warning persons from giving credence to the lies which were current as to the treatment of patients and others in our hospitals, and stating in the simplest language what the treatment was, what objects the Government had in view, and how carefully and with due regard to Chinese customs (as far as the nature of the disease would admit) the corpses of their dead friends and relatives were disposed of. I have forwarded all the correspondence which has passed bet- ween the Colonial Secretary and Mr. BRENAN on these subjects as well as subsequent correspondence respecting the brutal attack by the rowdies of Canton on two American Lady Missionary Doctors to Her Majesty's Minister at Peking requesting him to lay the correspondence before the Tsung-li Yamên.

16. It is to be hoped, though I fear such hope is not likely to be realised, that some strong repressive measures will be, taken to prevent such outrageous proceedings in future in reference to the subjects of a friendly power.

17. On the 16th June the Consul informed me that the Viceroy had promised to assure the safety of the Consulates but that he could not be responsible for the conduct of the people towards foreigners in the villages, etc. outside of Canton and that therefore missionaries and foreigners had better keep themselves within doors.

Enclosure 1.

286

18. From time to time I have kept your Lordship informed of the progress of the plague, from which you will have learnt that there has been no considerable diminution in the ravages of the disease hitherto; but I am happy to state that the last returns are really more satisfactory, and sanguine hopes are generally entertained that the worst is at last over.

19. Owing to the number of persons it has been necessary to dislodge from the infected houses in the Chinese quarter, a number which is estimated at about 7,000, the Government has had to incur considerable and immediate expenditure. Nu- merous matsheds have been erected and Government has hired blocks of unoccupied buildings and godowns for the segregation and isolation of those whom it has been necessary to keep under observation. Upwards of 350 houses have already been condemned as unfit for habitation. These have been closed and walled in. A cordon sanitaire has also been established with a view of keeping persons from the infected portion of the Town-the Western District—from migrating to the Eastern District. Thousands of people, roughly estimated at 80,000 as I have stated in my telegram of the 16th June, have left the Island for the neighbouring province within the last month in every sort of marine conveyance-sampans, boats, junks and river steamers; and I am informed that persons have even walked on board the steamers at the wharves at Hongkong and have died before they reached Canton 8 or 9 hours distant.

20. Onabout the 12th of this month the Glass Works hospital under the manage- ment of the Tung Wah Committee became seriously over-crowded, there being some 200 patients in a building capable of holding about 100. Owing to the great scarcity of labour it was impossible to build refuges fast enough. The new building recently finished for a Pig and Sheep Depôt was about to be placed at the disposal of the Sanitary Board, and the staff of the Nethersole Branch of the Alice Memorial Hospital had offered its services to Government. In the meantime, however, and before these transfers could be effected the Directors of the Benevolent Hospital at Canton through the agency of the Viceroy requested that any sick Chinese subjects who might wish to go to Canton or desire in case of death to have their corpses sent to their native villages might be forwarded in specially prepared junks to that capital. Several of the compradores employing large numbers of clerks also requested that they might be allowed to move the sick wherever found to Canton, and they also gave a pledge that if that were permitted they would remain in this Colony and not take part in the general exodus. Failing that permission they would leave at once thus placing the Banks and houses of business in even à worse position than they were at the time the application was made.

21. After serious consideration I did not feel justified in acceding to these requests. It was true that the Chinese hospital was considerably over-crowded, that the Chinese doctors had not proved that they were capable of dealing with the plague, whereas there was no doubt that a compliance with the request would have more or less defeated the efficiency of the house to house visitation, and that cases of sickness would not have been reported to the Police as they were then and are now obliged to be. After consultation with my Executive Council the majority of Members agreed with me in thinking that as a tentative measure one or two large junk loads of sick Chinese subjects might be removed to the Benevolent Hospital at Canton on the following conditions:-

(1) That the case of sickness had been reported to the Police.

(2) That the patient had passed through the hospital.

(3) That the patient expressed a desire to go to Canton.

(4) That the doctors certified that the patient was fit to be moved.

(5) That the junk or junks were properly provisioned, equipped, etc., etc.,

for the comfortable conveyance of such patients to Canton.

287

22. Four small junks were sent down and towed by a Chinese steamer, and some 170 patients were sent away on Thursday and Friday, the 14th and 15th. The Consul in compliance with my wishes sent a doctor to examine and report upon these junks on their arrival at Canton, and I am glad to say that his report is very satisfactory. Only 8 of the sick, as I am informed, died on the way up, and the remainder have been visited by the European doctors and are well and comfortably housed.

23. The congested condition of the Tung Wah Glass hospital was thus relieved, and it has now been closed. In its stead the new Pig Depôt capable of holding 140 patients has been opened. The management of it has been taken over to a much greater extent than in the case of the Glass Works by European doctors, and the internal arrangements are carried on by European wardmasters and attendants.

24. It would be too much to say that the Chinese doctors are convinced their treatment of the disease is radically defective, but as our staff of medical men is about to be reinforced by two medical officers sent down by Admiral Fremantle from Japan, and by two others whose services I have secured, one from Swatow and another from Ningpo, we are now in a position to assume charge of nearly all the patients that are sent to the several hospitals.

25. The hospitals at present in existence are:-

(1) The Hygeia,

(2) Kennedy Town,

.....for 40 patients.

45

19

(3)

Convalescent,

25

وو

""

""

(4) New Pig Depôt,

140

....

19

(5) New Glass Works Matshed,

50

""

26. The last of these is under the management of Messrs. BURTON and BAILY of the Nethersole Branch of the Alice Memorial Hospital.

27. As to the origin of the plague numerous theories exist. It is true that in my Despatch No. 115 of the 17th May, I said-" Doubtless it has been introduced into Hongkong from Canton," this was the popular theory at the time, but further information leads me to the conclusion that it is impossible to speak definitely on this point and hardly safe to hazard a guess. Since the outbreak here it has been ascertained that the plague is endemic in Yunnan and Pakhoi. That it has been endemic in one or both of these places for the last seven years and that while it has been extremely severe in Canton, it has prevailed, according to His Excellency the Governor of Indo-China, all over the South of China. Hongkong receives a regular and constant supply of pigs for the use of the Chinese from Pakhoi and nearly all other articles of food are obtained from Canton with which this Colony is in hourly connection. The same may be said with regard to Macao, but it is a curious fact notwithstanding this frequent communication and notwithstanding the immigration of thousands of persons from Hongkong into Macao during the last month, not a single case of plague has occurred in that Colony. As your Lordship is perhaps aware Hongkong has recently experienced the most severe drought that has ever been known. With one exception, no rain fell between the middle of October, 1893, and the 16th May, 1894. It is, I think, very probable that the want of sufficient water-though the present storage capacity is 378,000,000 gallons-and the filthy habits of life amongst the 210,000 Chinese who reside here--though the new drainage system in course of completion was adopted as an improvement on the one formerly existing-has rendered Hongkong liable to the invasion and development of the germ of the bubonic plague. Having found a footing here the great danger is of course that, as in other parts of China, it may become endemic. In Dr. SHARP DEANE'S report of 1891 on the health of Pakhoi, I observe the following statement:-"The Chinese are of opinion that the bubonic

288

"plague emanates from the ground and is favoured by a long continuance of dry "weather when the earth becomes porous and numerous fissures appear on the surface facilitating the escape of whatever causes the disease." These conditions prevailed to an unusual extent in Hongkong during the 7 months to which I have referred.

66

28. In this connection I may mention that the Japanese experts who have been sent here to diagnose the disease claim to have discovered the Bacillus of the plague and the medical staff admit the claim.

29. As to the effect of the plague it is felt in every branch of business and the loss to the public revenue, to bankers, merchants, shipping companies, the sugar refining industry, traders, shopkeepers, owners of property and the labouring classes can never be accurately determined. On the whole perhaps the shipping interests are the most affected. At this season the emigrants to the Straits Settle- ments have hitherto been counted by thousands per month, and the movements of passengers up and down the Chinese Coast, to and from Kwangtung and through Hongkong usually amount to vast numbers. Pacific Mail steamers leaving for Vancouver, Honolulu and San Francisco refuse to take Chinese passengers. The English, French, and German Mails refuse to take native passengers and the two latter decline cargo also, or even to enter the limits of the Harbour. Irregular liners avoid calling at the port altogether.

30. Considering the great importance of Hongkong as a shipping port it is only possible to conjecture what is lost by quarantine regulations against her in every direction which drive away vessels from her harbour, and deprive all, down to the humblest labourer, of their proportion of gain from the coaling, victualling, loading and discharging of the immense fleet which ordinarily frequents these waters.

31. Chinese hong merchants have retired to the mainland leaving their premises to caretakers and their commercial engagements in abeyance until the public health shall be restored. The effect of this is much felt by merchants whose merchandize is left on their hands beyond the contract time and many have had to call on their bankers to enable them to tide over the lock up of money. The bankers under such circumstances buy and sell fewer bills and they witness the contraction of all the ramifications of trade in which they have a financial interest. The turn over in sugar and sugar refining is reckoned not by thousands but by millions of dollars, and although happily not suspended it is for the moment crippled for want of labour. Landlords in the affected districts of the City receive no rents, and the natives generally in the midst of all their troubles find their necessary articles of food 30 or even 50% above the usual price.

32. Without exaggeration I may assert that so far as trade and commerce are concerned the plague has assumed the importance of an unexampled calamity.

33. As to the "arrangements contemplated" I have to inform your Lordship that at a meeting of the Legislative Council on the 12th June, I briefly sketched the methods which the Government intended to pursue with a view of preventing a recurrence of such a catastrophe. I enclose an extract from that speech. The remedy is, as your Lordship will see, a very drastic one. It may result in the destruction and re-building of one tenth part of Hongkong. It will certainly necessitate the extension in every direction of houses fitted for Chinese occupation on improved sanitary principles. It will doubtless cause a general increase in rents, an increase in the cost of living as well as a general increase in the rate of wages. It will also necessitate the increase of the storage capacity of the Tytam Water Works so as to secure an additional supply of about 80,000,000 gallons of water. The expense to the Government of such sweeping alterations and additions it is impossible to estimate. As regards the existing drainage and water works and their completion and extension your Lordship will no doubt consult Mr. COOPER, the Director of Public Works, who is now on leave of absence in England and who can give you the fullest and most reliable information in respect to those subjects.

Enclosure 2.

289

34. In reply to my speech I may here mention that, on behalf of the Unofficial Members and the Community at large, the Senior Unofficial Member, the Honour- able C. P. CHATER, promised that the Government should be loyally supported in all its endeavours to cope with the unfortunate dilemma in which the Colony is placed. That promise will, as I have inferred, involve the Colony in an enormous outlay the amount of which it would be at present rash to predict.

35. I may remind your Lordship that in the case of Mauritius the Imperial Government, about two years ago, came to the assistance of that Colony. I have no doubt that if I should hereafter appeal to your Lordship for similar consideration it would be generously extended to this Colony which is suffering in every direction from the terrible visitation with which it has been so suddenly overwhelmed.

36. The Government and the community, as I have stated in this Despatch, as well as publicly, is deeply indebted to the Military and Naval Forces and espe- cially to the Colonel of the Shropshire Regiment for the great assistance they have rendered, and they regret the loss of one gallant officer, Captain VESEY, and at least one Private, who have fallen victims to the plague. To Mr. FRANCIS, Q.C., Mr. MAY, Mr. MITCHELL-INNES, Captain HASTINGS, Mr. CROOK, Mr. TOOKER, and many other lay volunteers the Government and public are also under great obligations; indeed, I may say that several public officers and especially the medical staff and all the staff of the Public Works Department are doing additional duty unhesi- tatingly and ungrudgingly and with a single desire to aid in the repression of a fell disease the like of which has happily never before been experienced in this hitherto prosperous Colony.

37. In conclusion I have to express a hope that your Lordship will approve of my proceedings as described in this and previous Despatches on the same subject.

I have the honour to be,

My Lord,

Your Lordship's most obedient,

humble Servant,

(Signed), WILLIAM ROBINSON.

:

ཝཱ

291

Enclosure 1.

(Notice issued by His Excellency the Governor.) .

Whereas certain bad characters have been spreading lying rumours regarding the treatment of the sick in Hongkong and the burial of the dead, this notice is issued to remove all doubts and suspicions and to bring comfort to the hearts of the people. Ever since the plague appeared in Hongkong, every effort has been made to cure the sick and many have been cured and hospitals have been established under Western and Chinese doctors, and people are free to go to what hospital they please. In the case of those who have died, they have been properly encoffined, and buried with every care in a cemetery specially selected for the purpose, where grave-stones are placed on each grave, with a number and the name of the deceased, so that his last resting-place may be easily recognised and so that his remains may not be neglected by his surviving relations. The Governor has also written to the Viceroy of Canton and some of the sick have in consequence been removed to the Canton hospital, they having expressed a wish to return to their native country. You people will, therefore, see from all these measures that my great desire is to benefit the people and to restore them if possible to health. Do not then believe lying rumours. The rascals who spread them will most certainly be severely punished. Take heed lest you also become involved in their machinations and repentance comes too late.

Enclosure 2.

(Extract from Governor's Speech to the Legislative Council.)

However, if blame is to be attached to the Government in the past I am determined at all events that it shall not be attached to the Government in the future, and with this object I have asked the Attorney General to prepare a Bill the main principle of which I will endeavour to explain to you as shortly as possible. As stated by Mr. LEACH just now, that very able and energetic member of the community, Mr. FRANCIS, Q.C., has shown the greatest ability and energy in grappling with all the correspondence and many difficulties which have arisen out of this epidemic. That learned Q.C. has promised to assist in preparing a Bill which I hope will render a recurrence of such an epidemic as the one now with us impossible in the future. This Bill will of course be of a very drastic character. It will give the Government-this is of course simply what we propose-it will give the Government power to enter into immediate possession of, and pull down, and destroy, all dwelling houses and blocks of houses unfit for human habitation. It will provide that the Government shall at once resume the possession of all land on which such dwellings are built, paying of course compensation for so doing. It will provide that the Government shall have power to enter all houses now insanitary though capable of being put into thoroughly sanitary condition. Owners will be compelled to amend all such defects in the houses as render them insanitary. The Government will have power to re-survey and re-arrange all lots so taken, and open new roads and improve the old ones. Power will also be taken to enter and inspect all Chinese houses; such houses will be numbered and classified, and a fixed number of tenants will be allotted to each house and room, and owners will be obliged to enter into a covenant that that number shall not in any case be

}

292

exceeded; any infraction of that covenant will of course be followed by heavy penalties. There are naturally and necessarily many questions of detail, questions, for instance, of providing for those removed from infected districts, questions dealing with the rights of mortgagees and lessees, and questions of awarding compensation; but roughly speaking the main features of the Bill are those I have endeavoured to describe. With an Ordinance of this sort in force I need hardly tell you that Taipingshan and a great many streets not in Taipingshan will probably be razed to the ground and re-erected on proper sanitary principles. You will understand that such a measure as this affects many existing interests and will be of a very complicated character, and necessarily the Attorney General, even with the assistance of Mr. FRANCIS, will require some considerable time in which to prepare it. I can only hope, however, that he will not keep us long in suspense, for I think that the old adage "Strike while the iron is hot" is most applicable just now. I feel also certain that when the Bill comes before you, recognising the necessity for some very strong measure and realising the dreadful effect of the plague on the best interests of the Colony in the future if any half measures should be adopted you will give it your full and ready support. There is another matter connected with the plague which I may refer to, and that is the possibility of increasing our water supply. I suppose that drought to a great measure is responsible for this epidemic, and I understand that there is a large storage capacity available both at Tytam Reservoir and at Pokfulam, if the Council were to decide that the storage capacity should be increased. I may say that in my own opinion it will be no use giving a larger supply of water to the Chinese quarter unless it is distributed in a proper manner by responsible officials. What we want, as was well said in the paper this morning, is not so much a house to house visitation as a drain to drain visitation, and unless we can flush these drains regularly I am afraid we shall not get rid of the seeds of the disease. It would be retrograde of me to say, perhaps, that the separate drainage system was a failure, but I cannot help being of opinion that the proper system if it could be carried out for China- town would be the surface system (hear, hear) which is in force in the West India Islands where I have resided. There you see everything above ground, whilst here you do not see the dead cats, the dead rats, and old rags, that fill up the drains and cause such an intolerable and dangerous nuisance. I should be glad to know what the feeling of the unofficial members is in regard to the additional water supply. I should be prepared to call for reports from experts here if they considered it advisable, and I understand that for a moderate expense-$70,000 or $80,000—we could get 70,000,000 gallons more at Tytam alone. Before sitting down I think there is one other thing I ought to say and that is that I am sure the community at large and the Government feel most deeply indebted to the Military and Naval authorities for the gallant voluntary assistance which the officers and men have given to us and are still affording to us during this plague. (Applause.) They have thrown themselves into the disgusting and filthy work required of them with true characteristic British pluck, and one gallant officer has sacrificed his life in endeavouring to assist the community. I am quite sure that when the sad history of this plague is written one of the brightest spots will be that page which records how officers and men, numbering over three hundred in all, gallantly assisted us by risking their lives, with a view to saving the lives of thousands of others from whom they could never expect recompense, gratitude or even thanks. (Applause.) I fully endorse all that the Attorney General has said with reference to Mr. FRANCIS. I appreciate his help most thoroughly. I also wish to say that the Government is indebted to several public officers and lay volunteers, though the latter are not in such numbers as I should like to see, for the courage and energy they have shown in endeavouring to grapple with this disease. I hope, therefore, gentlemen, after what I have said, that you will be prepared to give the Government your fullest and most hearty support in any measure and in any action we may take not only to stamp out this plague but to prevent a recurrence of it in the near future. (Applause.)

335

No. 25

94

:

No. 36.

HONGKONG.

REPORT ON THE CATERPILLAR PLAGUE BY THE ACTING SUPERINTENDENT, BOTANICAL AND AFFORESTATION DEPARTMENT.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor.

BOTANIC GARDENS, HONGKONG, 10th July, 1894.

SIR, --I have the honour, in compliance with your request of the 3rd instant, to forward the following report on the Caterpillar Plague.

DISCOVERY AND PREVENTION.

The caterpillar which has been attacking the Pine trees (Pinus sinensis, Lamb.) in nearly all parts of the Island and Kowloon, is the caterpillar of a large moth (Eutricha punctata, Walk.).

2. It was first seen this year towards the end of April, when the insects were not more than two or three lines in length.

3. At that time the pest had not commenced its ravages, but knowing its habits by past experience, and in view of the fact that the numbers were greatly in excess of anything seen before, as many as two and three hundred being observed on a single tree, representations were made to the Government, to the effect that the Chinese should be invited to collect them, and that all brought in should be paid for by weight.

4. The Government readily consented to the suggestion, and the Captain Superintendent of Police kindly agreed to allow the caterpillars to be brought into the Police Stations nearest to where they were collected. The Botanic Gardens' Office was also a receiving station.

5. The method of catching these pests was by shaking the trees and then picking up the insects from the ground by means of pincers, or with the fingers enclosed in cloth. A sudden shake of the tree brought most of the caterpillars down, but they soon re-gained their former positions unless prevented from doing so.

6. When the insects were brought in to the Police Stations, they were destroyed by pouring boiling water over them, or some other efficacious substance, as sea water, after which they were buried, due precautions being taken that everything was carried out satisfactorily from a sanitary point of

view.

DURATION.

7. The length of time the plague has lasted may be put down as two months-from the end of April to the end of June. The first lot brought in by the Chinese was on May 24th, and the last on June 28th. No cocoons were observed until the beginning of June, when arrangements were at once made to have them collected and paid for in the same way as the caterpillars. The first lot of cocoons brought in was on June 6th, and at the present time they are still being collected, although the quantities are becoming less and less. In all probability the cocoons would have been all collected by this time, were it not for the difficulty of getting coolies to do the work, owing to the great scarcity of labour in the Colony during the last few weeks.

QUANTITIES.

8. The quantity of caterpillars brought in and paid for, at the various Police Stations and the Botanic Gardens, was over 60,000 catties, or nearly 36 tons. Cocoons to the weight of 5,000 catties have been received up to date. There were 511 caterpillars in the particular catty counted, and the cocoons numbered 800 to the catty. This gives the enormous number of 35,000,000 insects destroyed, to say nothing of future generations.

COST.

9. The expense of getting rid of the scourge has been about $5,000, or an average of 7 cents per catty for both caterpillars and cocoons. The price paid per catty was varied according to the quantity of caterpillars and cocoons found in the several districts. From four to fifteen cents have been offered for caterpillars, although the latter price failed to attract collectors when the insects had become scarce. Cocoons have been paid for at a price varying from twenty to forty cents per catty.

336

EFFECT ON VEGETATION.

10. The caterpillars damage the trees by eating their leaves, commencing on the old leaves, and when these are consumed going on to the younger ones. When the trees have been entirely denuded of leaves, they are practically dead, as leaves are the principal organs where the conversion takes place of various inorganic substances into organic matter, for the food and building up of the plant. There are very few trees, however, which have lost all their leaves, and these few are located in various parts of the Island. There are some around Aberdeen, at Deep Water Bay, at Causeway Bay and North Point, at Shaukiwan and near Chaiwan. Many trees have been stripped of their old leaves and are consequently in a rather sickly condition. I am of opinion, however, that they will recover in time, as most of them have sufficient young leaves to enable them to make new growth, in fact, a good number of them are already starting to grow.

PREVIOUS. VISITATIONS.

11. If the Chinese are to be believed, this caterpillar has been known on the mainland for several years past, and the natives regarded it as an annual visitor with no very great destructive powers. A few leaves were eaten yearly, but no practical damage done. It was not observed in this Colony until the end of the summer of 1892. Little damage was then done to the trees, which may be explained by the fact that the number of insects was comparatively small, only two or three being seen on each individual tree. The localities which they appeared in were 'Deep Water Bay and

Kowloon.

12. The second appearance was last year, at Quarry Bay and Kowloon, towards the end of July. Their numbers had very much increased on the previous year's, as twenty or thirty were sometimes found on a single tree. At Quarry Bay upwards of 30,000 trees were killed, as the Chinese from various reasons could not be induced to collect the pest. One of the chief objections to take part in the work was the pain caused by the hairs of the caterpillars stinging their hands and feet, as well as other parts of their bodies. Another objection was the great difficulty in finding the insects after they had fallen amongst the long grass underneath the trees. Great numbers were collected by our own staff, but owing to the unhealthiness of the district the men had to be taken away, and, as it was, two of the men died from fever contracted whilst at work in that neighbourhood.

PROBABLE CAUSE OF PLAGUE.

13. The cause of the very great increase in the number of the insects this year on anything previously known is, in my opinion, as follows. The winter of 1892-93 was exceptionally severe, and it is quite probable that the natural foe of the caterpillar succumbed to the extraordinarily low tempera- ture. What its enemy is, or was, so far has not been discovered, but no doubt one existed. This idea is very much strengthened by looking at the colour and markings of the caterpillar. When it is full grown its colour closely resembles that of the Pine tree branches, and its markings correspond with the scars left on the branches after the leaves have fallen away. On account of this, in examining Pine trees, it is most difficult to see the caterpillars on them, until the trees have been very closely scrutinised for a few minutes; this too when the caterpillars have attained their maximum size, nearly three inches in length and a quarter of an inch in breadth. This close resemblance to the branches of the trees on which these insects thrive, undoubtedly points to a form of protection from some other insect or bird. Another point in favour of the above suggestion is, as mentioned before, that the caterpillar had been known on the mainland for several years past, but previous to the winter of 1892-93 it had not been known to do any damage.

14. If the enemy of the caterpillar was destroyed in the way suggested above, it is quite easy to account for the great increase in the numbers of the pest last year and the still greater increase this year. The chrysalids formed at the end of the summer of 1892 would become moths, and the female moths would probably deposit their eggs in the spring of 1893. One moth is capable of laying an enormous number of eggs, but a good percentage of these do not hatch. The caterpillars hatched in the spring of last year would, in their turn, become chrysalids about the beginning of June, and these chrysalids would become moths about the latter end of the same month. The moths would then deposit their eggs in July, and the caterpillars seen last year at Quarry Bay and Kowloon would, in all probability, be the second hatching. As previously mentioned, many of these were collected, and those which remained formed chrysalids and afterwards moths, and these moths would be the ones which deposited their eggs on the trees this spring.

15. The history of the life of the insect since the end of the summer of 1892 is based chiefly on observations made this year which are as follows:-The first eggs were laid at the end of April, and the caterpillars which escaped the collectors became chrysalids at the end of May or beginning of June, the moths appeared in the middle of June, and now they are depositing the second lot of eggs. It is very gratifying, however, to be able to state that very few eggs or caterpillars have been seen of this second lot, although the plantations have been well examined.

+

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!

1

!

.

337

:

16. Another probable reason for the very large number of the insects which appeared this spring, is the drought which prevailed at the time they were hatched. At this stage of their existence they are extremely small, being only a few lines in length and about the fiftieth part of an inch in breadth, so that it may readily be imagined what the effect of a tropical shower would be upon them at this early period of their life. On several occasions, when I was examining the plantations, it was raining very heavily, and underneath the trees full grown caterpillars were lying on the ground, in hundreds and thousands, in a half dead condition. A prolonged heavy rain would undoubtedly have killed them.

REMARKS.

17. The eggs of the moth are deposited on the upper part of the leaves, and thus the caterpillars have food to go upon as soon as they come out of the shell. The eggs are pink in colour and oval in shape, about the sixteenth of an inch in length and the twenty-fifth part of an inch in breadth. The size of the moths varies, the largest of the females being 24 inches across the wings, and 14 inches long, whilst the males are 2 inches across the wings, and an inch long. Both sexes are fawn-coloured, but the male sometimes has a few white and black markings on its wings. The chrysalids are enveloped in a stiff papery cocoon, which is fastened very firmly to the leaves or other parts of the trees. It will thus be noticed that from the time the eggs are laid until the moths are produced, the insects remain on the trees.

18. In conclusion, it is satisfactory to know that the methods employed for the extirpation of the scourge have been decidedly successful. Of the many thousands of trees which were attacked, only a very small percentage have been killed, and many of those which have had some of their leaves destroyed, are in a fair way towards recovery. The pest which at one time threatened the destruction of all the Pine trees in the Colony has, for the present at any rate, been most successfully coped with.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

W. J. TUTCHER, Acting Superintendent, Botanical and

Afforestation Department.

The Honourable

THE ACTING COLONIAL SECRETARY.

79

No. 94

HONGKONG.

RETURNS OF SUPERIOR AND SUBORDINATE COURTS FOR 1893.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency

the Governor, on the 7th March, 1894.

No. 15.

REGISTRY SUPREME COURT, HONGKONG, 16th January, 1894.

SIR, I have the honour to forward the accompanying returns :-

}

1. Return of Criminal cases tried in the Supreme Court of Hongkong during the year 1893. 2. Indictments and Informations during the year 1893.

3. Comparative Table, showing the number of offences, apprehensions, convictions and

acquittals for the last four years.

4. Return of Criminal cases that have been brought under the cognizance of the Supreme

Court during the last ten years.

5. Return of all sums received as Revenue in the Registry of the Supreme Court during the

years 1892 and 1893.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

The Honourable G. T. M. OBRIEN, C.M.G.,

&c.,

Colonial Secretary,

&C.,

&c.

وتر

ALFRED G. WISE,

Registrar.

80

Number of Cases tried.

Number of Persons tried.

RETURN of CRIMINAL CASES tried in the SUPREME COURT of HONGKONG during the Yeur 1893.

CRIMES.

wi --:

3

...

***

...

...

1

Convicted.

Acquitted.

Death.

Death Recorded.

Hard Labour

over one Year.

Hard Labour one

Year and under.

SENTENCE.

Solitary Confinement— Number of Persons.

Number of Persons.

Privately Flogged-

No. of Cases.

No. of Persons.

No. of Cases.

No. of Persons.

CHARGES

CASES

ABAN-

POST-

DONED.

PONED.

4

1

1

1

1

4

Administering stupefying drug,

Applying to goods a false trade description, Assault occasioning actual bodily harm, Attempt to commit an unnatural offence,

Demanding money with menaces,

Feloniously assaulting with intent to rob,

Feloniously assaulting with intent to do grievous

bodily harm,

Feloniously breaking and entering a dwelling house

with intent to commit a felony therein,.

1

2

Feloniously forging a certain request for delivery

of goods with intent to defraud,

Feloniously and unlawfully causing to be taken a

certain poison, called datura alba,

1

1

Feloniously uttering a certain forged bank note

with intent to defraud,

1

1

Feloniously wounding with intent to kill and

murder,

1

1

Forging a trade mark,

Fraud by an agent,

1

Indecent assault,

Larceny,

4

Larceny by a servant,

1

Larceny from a ship,

1

Larceny in the Queen's service,

1

1

Larceny in a dwelling house,

Manslaughter,

a2

N

Murder,

1

...

1

:

:

...

...

:

4

1

1

:

...

...

1

1

1

1

3

...

I

1

1

2

1

...

1

Obtaining a registered letter by means of false

pretences,

Obtaining money by false pretences,.

:

...

2

Robbery from the person,

...

Robbery with violence,..

7

Unlawfully attempting to bribe,...

1

121:1

...

...

7

...

...

Ι

...

...

Unlawfully making a false statement for the purpose

of such false statement being inserted in the Register of deaths,

1

1

1

Unlawfully and maliciously causing to be taken a

certain poison with intent to injure,

1

...

:

39

39

49

...

...

...

2

: : ܗ:

...

:

:

:

:.

...

1

1

...

1

:

***

t

...

Lii ai

1

1 1

1

33

16

1

1

19

13

:

:

:

***

...

...

...

:

00

5

4 8

49 were tried.

57 Persons.

8 were not indicted which are included under the heading of "Charges Abandoned,"... 8

Of 57 Persons only

...

...

:

...

a In one case the prisoner was found guilty of manslaughter and sentenced to Eighteen years' imprisonment with hard labour.

ALFRED G. WISE, Registrar.

Registry Supreme Court, Hongkong, 16th day of January, 1894.

G

+

81

INDICTMENTS and INFORMATIONS in the SUPREME COURT of HONGKONG for the

year 1893.

Including Attempts and Conspiracies to commit the several offences.

Showing how the cases tried in

the Superior Courts ended.

(Each Prisoner tried counts as a separate case; where a large number of Prisoners have been convicted together, the fact is mentioned in a note.)

Total.

Murder.

Manslaughter.

Attempt at murder.

Concealment of Birth.

:

:

Judgment for the Crown,

33

1

2

Judgment for the Prisoner,

16

Prisoner found Insane,

Cases which fell through for want of prosecution or ab- sence of accused, and cases thrown out by the Grand Jury (Attorney General),

Cases postponed,........

***

8

:

:

:

:

.:

57

1

2

Rape.

Unnatural Crimes.

Robbery with violence.

Other offences against the Person.

Offences against Property.

Miscellaneous offences.

Abortion.

...

:

.:.

:

:

:

:

:

Registry Supreme Court, Hongkong, 16th day of January, 1894.

7

7

1

4

:

:

:

:

:

:

1

.:.

:

16

11

:

7

:.

1

7

12

34

ALFRED G. WISE, Registrar.

1890.

1891.

1892.

1893.

COMPARATIVE TABLE showing the NUMBER of OFFENCES, APPREHENSIONS, CONVICTIONS and ACQUITTALS

for the last Four Years.

The Number of Convictions in the Superior Courts-

1. For Offences against the Person,.....

2. For Offences against Property,

22

32 23

13

13

6.

17

9

8

3. For other Offences,

8

4

16

The Number of Persons acquitted-

2. In the Superior Courts,

Registry Supreme Court, Hongkong, 16th day of January, 1894.

20

9

17

16

ALFRED G. WISE,

Registrar.

82

RETURN of CRIMINAL CASES that have been brought under the COGNIZANCE of the SUPREME Court,

during the last Ten Years.

Charges Abandoned.

Number Number

YEAR.

of Cases.

of Convicted. Acquitted. Persons.

No. of Cases.

No. of Persons.

Postponed.

No. of Cases.

No. of Persons.

1884,

68

101

65

1885,

91

147

103

(e.) 1886,

75

107

59

(f) 1887,

94

155

82

1888,

101..

186

99

Total,................

429

696

408

145

222313

20

8

16

...

16

22

20

16

27e

1

36

17

26

1

1 8

47

28

40

85

131

2

(g.) 1889,

92

143

64

41

24

1890,

59

80

43

20

1891,

32

37

26

9

1892,

30

44

18

17

1893,

43

57

33

16

47244

37

17

2

...

9

...

Total,......

256

361

184

103

41

73

:

:

Average of 1st

Period,....

854

1391

813

29

17

261

مانه

1층

Average of 2nd

Period,....

J

51층

72층

36/

20%3

81/

14층

:

e. In one case the recognizance estreated.

f. In three cases the recognizances were estreated.

g. In one case the recognizance estreated, this case is included in the total, but not in any other of the above headings.

ALFRED G. WISE,

Registrar.

Registry Supreme Court, Hongkong, 16th day of January, 1894.

:

RETURN of all SUMS RECEIVED as REVENUE in the Registry of the Supreme Court during the Year 1893.

Original Jurisdiction,

Summary Jurisdiction,

Bankruptcy Jurisdiction,

Probate Jurisdiction,........

Official Administrator's Commission,

Official Assignee's Commission,

Official Trustee's Commission,

.$ 3,675.25

4,058.65

700.20

1,312.71

2,431.34

202.94

150.97

Appraiser's Fees,

Sheriff's Fees,

70.50

Bailiff's Fees,.....

1,077.50

Interest on Deposit of Surplus Cash,

1,671.78

Fees on Distraints,

1,666.75

Registrar of Companies,

1,498.00

Fine and Forfeitures,

50.00

Land Office Fees,

Registry Supreme Court, Hongkong, 16th day of January, 1894.

83

$18,566.59

4,368.00

$22,934.59

Alfred G. WISE,

Registrar.

RETURN of all SUMS COLLECTED in the Registry of the Supreme Court for the Year 1893, and paid into the Treasury.

1893.

1892.

REGISTRAR.-Court Fees paid by Stamps,

.$ 10,977.19

$ 11,413.56

OFFICIAL ASSIGNEE.-5% on amounts encashed paid into the Treasury, OFFICIAL ADMINISTRATOR,

54.02

1,480.24

202.94

2,431.34

OFFICIAL TRUSTEE-2 % on amount of Trust on taking over up to $10,000, above $10,000 commission 1% on further amount, 1 % commission on income,.

162.94

150.97

APPRAISER OF INTESTATE ESTATES.-2 % on Houses, Land, Goods, Fur-

niture, &c., 1% on cash, Banking account or Shares,

1.60

...

BAILIFF,

1,207.50

1,077.50

SHERIFF,

181.00

REGISTRAR OF COMPANIES,

2,062.00

70.50

1,498.00

INTEREST on Registrar's Balance at the Bank,

2,864.54

1,671.78

FINES AND FORFEITURES,..........

250.00

50.00

$ 19,241.03

18,566.59

LAND OFFICE FEES,

4,976.00

4,368.00

$ 24,217.03

22,934.59

DEPOSITS UNAVAILABLE,-

Intestate Estate not claimed,.

.$

360.50

...

Unclaimed Balances, under Ordinance No. 11 of 1888,

...

Amount accruing to Government on account of illegitimacy of WM.

KEEBLE, deceased,....

1,085.43

57.09

ALFRED G. WISE, Registrar.

Registry Supreme Court, Hongkong, 16th day of January, 1894.

84

3,520

21

Abstract of CASES under COGNIZANCE of the POLICE MAGISTRATES' Court during the Year 1893.

CASES, HOW DISPOSED OF, and the Number of MalE AND FEMALE PRISONERS UNDER EACH HEAD.

Discharged.

Committed

for Trial at

the Supreme

Court.

Ordered to find Security.*

WRITS ISSUED BY THE POLICE MAGISTRATES DURING THE YEAR 1893.

Warrants.

Arrest.

Distress.

Search.

For Gambling entering Houses.

Magis- trates' Orders.

TOTAL.

TOTAL

NUMBER

OF FIRES

ENQUIRIE

HELD

DURING THE YEAR 1893.

M.

F.

M.

F. M.

F.

F.

M.

M.

F.

·M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M. F.

M.

F.

10,727

12,392 |10,049) 306

1,532

75 102

2

7

1 119

17

123

19

17

23

11,972

420

2,045

119

52

113

1

976

214

...

...

TOTAL MALES AND FEMALES,.

.12,892

TOTAL

NUMBER

TOTAL NUMBER

OF

OF PRISON-

CASES.

ERS.

Punished.

Convicted

and

• Consisting of Offenders not sentenced to Imprisonment.

!

:

85

OFFENCE.

THE CASES CONSISTED OF:-

No. of

CASES.

No. of PRI-

SONERS.

OFFENCE.

NO. OF CASES

No. of PRI- BONERS,

29

"3

"

Altering receipts for money,

Animals-Cruelty to

Arms Consolidation Ordinance-Breach of Arson,

Assault-Causing grievous bodily harm,.......

-Common

-Indecent

-On Excise Officers in the execution of their

duty, and obstructing and resisting them, -On Police in the execution of their duty, and

obstructing and resisting Police,

5

5

Brought forward,.

29

29

Furious Driving..

36

36

Gambling Ordinance-Breach of

2

3

......

3

3

613

755

"

5

House Breaking,...

8

12

55

-With intent to rob,.

10 10

61

12

""

to commit an unnatural Offence,

1

1

""

-With wounding,.

3

3

Banishment-Returning after..

Births & Deaths--Breach of Ordinance for Registration of Boats--Demanding more than legal fare,

-Offences as to the numbering of

32

32

"

11

11

Gunpowder, &c.-Causing bodily injury by.

Harbour-Dredging at Anchorage for Ships of War in the

Regulations--Breach of (see also Boats, Seamen and Ships),.

Householders-Breach of Ordinance for Registration of Indecent Exposure of Person by Bathing or otherwise,

and Lewdness,.

Insulting or threatening expression-Using before the

Magistrates

Junk-Neglecting to report arrival of .

--Using for a purpose other than that specified in

the licence,...

3 Larceny as a Bailee,

2,281

2,900

42

42

327 | 1,147

}

1

10

10

44

44

17

14

14

14

2 42

13

13

"

-By Servant,

""

-Refusing to accept Hire when unemployed,.

-Breach of the Peace,

2

""

-By public servant,

35

35

-Common

""

19

">

39

lease from the Crown,

Burglary,

""

Bribery, or attempting to bribe,

Brothels-Allowing children above 6 and under 15 years

of age to be in a registered

-Keeping an incorrect list of inmates of regis

tered

-Unregistered

-for persons other than Chinese-Permitting a

male Chinese to enter,...

Building Ordinance-Breach of

Buildings-Occupying or erecting, on land not being under

Burial of Chinese Corpse elsewhere than in a Cemetery,... Cargo-Furnishing untrue particulars regarding the ge-

neral character of,

Cattle Diseases Ordinance-Breach of.....

-Slaughtering in a place other than one set apart

for the purpose,..

7

39

-from Ships or Boats in the Harbour,.

""

-from the Person,

སསསྒྱུ༔འྲི་

892

951

10

129

Co

co co

Co

♡ ∞o

"

-from Wreck,

1

91

-in a Dwelling House,

1

2201216*1

3

17

"1

""

4

4

-of Beasts or Birds, not the subject of Larcený

at Common Law,

of fruit or vegetable production in a garden,...| -of vegetable productions not growing in gardens, Malicious Injury to Property,

2

2

3

1

1

42

42

""

to Electric or Magnetic Telegraph,

3

3

87

87 Manslaughter,

1

11

13

2

2

10

NO

2

10

ON

2

-Turned loose on Public Ways,

Child Stealing,

Chinese Territory-Crimes and Offences committed in

Coin-Offences relating to

11

Convict Licence-Breach of

EHQONO

9

2

9

15

Murder,

7

10

Corrosive fluid-Throwing with intent to do grievous

bodily harm,

19

2

2

""

Cutting and Wounding with intent to do grievous bodily

harm,...

24

34

Dangerous Goods Ordinance-Breach of

90

90

Markets Ordinance-Breach of.

Menaces-Demanding Money by

Mendicancy,

Merchandise Marks Ordinance-Breach of.

Merchant Shipping Act-Offences against Misdemeanour-Attempting to commit

-Inciting a Person to commit a

2 Morphine Ordinance-Breach of

-Attempting to commit

11 Night-Found in Dwelling Houses by with intent to

commit Felony therein,

-Noises by beating drums and gongs,

-Noises. by playing at the Game called Chai-Mui, Nuisances-Allowing Dirt and Filth to remain on Pre-

mises or in immediate Vicinity thereof, -Blasting Stones to the danger of Persons

856

856

10

19

465

465

8

2

2

1

23

23

3

1

13

13

15

15

16

16

B221KL 200

8

3

2

2

Decoying men or boys into or away from the Colony, or imprisoning or detaining them for the purpose of emigration or for any purpose whatsoever,

and Property,

5

19

-Blowing Whistles,

6

""

-Boarding Ships without permission,

58

27

32

-Boats mooring inshore, between the hours of

Women or girls into or away from the Colony,.

16

29

Desertion from Foreign Ships,

10

10

""

9 o'clock at night and gunfire in the morning, -Boats obstructing Fairways,

125

57

1600 250

58

57

99

H.M.'s Army and Navy,

2

2

-Breaming Boats, &c.,.....

British Merchant Ships,

12

12

"

Hongkong Police Force,

1

1

-Stealing,

??

Disorderly Behaviour-Fighting and creating a disturb-

ance,

House-Keeping a

Distraint for rent-Fraudulently removing properties

under

Distress Warrant-Imprisonment in default of insuffici-

ency of goods or chattels, .

Dogs-Allowing unmuzzled ferocious, to be at large, &c.,

Domestic Servants-Misconduct as,.

Drugs-Administering

Drunkenness,

Embezzlement,.......

473

933

""

-Carrying or expo sing Night Soil or Noxious Waters in the Streets in uncovered Buc- kets, and in open Boats along the Praya,... -Hanging wet Clothes, &c., to dry over

8

8

While Drunk,..

153

153

Public Ways,..........

3

1

99

-Keeping Pigs, &c., without a Licence,. -Neglecting to clean out Dust Bins, and

26

26

"?

1

99

12

1

59

11

by Clerk,.....

"

by Public Servant,

99.

Felony-Attempting to commit

Fire Arms-Discharging

Foreign Offenders-Temporary detention of

>>

"

"

Forgery,

by Servants,

Escape of Prisoners or attempting to escape from Custody

Extortion,

of Police,

False Charge-Preferring or giving wilful false evidence, 18

Pretences obtaining Goods and Money by

Falsification of Accounts by Public Servant,

Firemen to Government Fire Brigade-Misconduct as Fire Works-Discharging without permits,

Forged Bank Note, Cheque &c.-Uttering

Instrument-Obtaining goods or money by

-Obtaining a registered letter by

means of

Forging receipts for money,.

Fugitive Offenders Act 1881-Offences against

2184031260

throwing Rubbish, &c., into the Streets, -Obeying Calls of Nature in the Streets, -Obstruction of Wharves by Boat People,.... -Regulations-Breach of...

126

126

50

50

12

12

11

11

"

-Rough Dressing, &c., of Granite in or near

a Public place,...

2

"

-Throwing Rubbish into the Harbour or on

the Beach,

37 37

Obscene books, &c.-Exposing for sale

3

Obstruction of Roads and Streets, &c., by Hawkers,

Vehicle drivers and Shopkeepers,

913

938

Offensive Weapons-Having Possession of

3

Opium Ordinance-Breach of Prepared

858

866

ཐག

3.

26

18

184

118 © OD OD AD EN HINO

1

Ordinance-Breach of Raw

37

38

2 Passage--Obtaining surreptitiously a

18

18

18

33

Passes Chinese out at Night without Pawnbrokers-Breach of Ördinance for

56

56

2

2

9

9

18

Perjury, (see also Preferring false Charge and giving

wilful false Testimony),

1

1

3

3

3

3

Piers and Wharves-Reconstruction of-without previons sanction and authority of Governor,

1

1

184

Poison &c.-Maliciously administering so as to endanger

1

1

life or inflict grievous bodily harm,

1

2

2

6

4 Police-Rescuing or attempting to rescue Prisoners from

Custody of

1

Police Constables-Misconduct as

5

1 Prison Ordinance-Breach of,

1

1

Public Gardens-Breach of regulations for maintenance

4

of good order and preservation of

2

property in the....

18

18

Carried forward,...

2,231 2,900

Carried forward,....

7,662 9,275

86

OFFENCE.

No. of CASES.

CASES,-Continued.

NO. OF PRI- SONERS.

Brought forward,.

7,662 9,275

Quarantine Regulations-Breach of.

6

Receiving Stolen Goods,.

25

Recognisances-Breach of.

34

34 Streets-Noises by Hawkers,

Roads and Streets-Injury to

Robbery-From the Person,

"

-From the Person with Wounding or with

Violence,

19

Rogues & Vagabonds-As suspicious Characters,

-On the Highways with Arms or with Violence,...

OFFENCE.

Brought forward,.

6 Stone Cutters' Island Ordinance-Breach of 29 Streams-Defiling

3 Suicide-Attempting to commit...

2 Tramways Ordinance-Breach of

Trees, &c.-Cutting and destroying 11 Trespass on Crown Land,

1 Unlawful Possession of Property,

No. of

No. of PRI-

CASES. SONERS.

8,093 9,719

11

11

11

11

162

162

14

14

1

1

125

125

165

165

289

317

781

78

";

of Trees, Shrubs, &c.,..

34

34

"

""

""

"}

-Gambling in the Street,..

-Wandering abroad and lodging in

the open air,.............

3

3 Unlicensed-Cargo Boats,

21

-Hawkers,

1,062

1,062

11

15

15

""

-Keeping of Dogs,

42

42

Sanitary Regulations-Breach of.

40

40

""

-Plying of Boats for Hire,

145

145

Seamen-Forcing or wilfully leaving, on shore,

1

1

of Steam Launches,

3

3

>>

"

-Refusal of duty by Foreign

2

-Using of Boats as Dwelling Houses,

4

19

-Wilfully or negligently remaining in the Colony

after the departure of Ships,

Unnatural Offence-Attempting to commit

1

Ships, &c.-Carrying passengers in excess of that allowed

1 Unwholesome Provisions-Exposing for Sale, or bring-

ing into the Colony

by Licence,

22

22 Vagrancy Ordinance-Breach of

*

"

-Leaving Anchorage during prohibited hours,.. -Leaving Harbour without a Clearance, -Neglecting to have a riding light on board,

-Not having certificated Master,

18

18 Vehicles-Offences against Public

12

132

12 Watchmen-Misconduct as Private 132 Waterworks Ordinance-Breach of....

Shooting with intent to do Grievous Bodily Harm, Small-Pox-Neglecting to report Cases of.. Spirit Licences Ordinance-Breach of.... Spirituous Liquors-Sale on board Ships,

Carried forward,..

13

Weights and Measures-Breach of Ordinance for Wharf-Taking or disembarking passengers from pro-

hibited

13 Women and Girls Protection Ordinance-Breach of

2

14

14

11

11

418

423

1!

1

16

16

59

59

21

23

2223

21

28

8,093 9,719

TOTAL,.

10,727 12,392

Magistracy, Hongkong, 11th January, 1894.

H. E. WODEHOUSE, Police Magistrate.

ABSTRACT of CASES brought under COGNIZANCE at the POLICE MAGISTRATES' COURT during a period of Ten Years, from 1st January, 1884, to 31st December, 1893, inclusive.

CASES, HOW DISPOSED OF, AND THE NUMBER of Male and FEMALE PRISONERS UNDER EACH HEAD.

YEARS.

TOTAL NUMBER

OF CASES.

Convicted and Punished.

Discharged.

Committed for Trial at Supreme

Court.

Committed to Prison or detained pending Orders of His Excellency the Governor.

Ordered to find Security.

Punished for Preferring

Total

To keep the Peace, to be of Good Beha- viour, and to answer

False Charge Undecided.

Number

or giving

of

'any Charge.

False Testimony.

Defendants.

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

| F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M. F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

1884,

14,065

11,748 1,088 2,294 268

101

2

35

3

228

53

6

ลง

2

105

2

14,517❘ 1,418

1885,

10,281

7,951 849 2,188 258

159

ลง

2

11

3

357

99

6

18

...

10,690 1,211

1886,

14,611 12,081 842 2,198 190

157

2

5

869

100

32

...

3

168

...

15,510 1,137

1887,

12,015 10,354 325 2,620 159

158

28

4

411

52

14

48

13,633 549

1888,

11,647 9,700 232 2,704 145

168

6

98

11

177

15

3

48

2 12,898 411

...

Total,...... 62,619 51,834 3,836 12,004 1,020

743

.21

177

21

2,042

319

61

5

387

4

67,248 4,726

Average per

Year,

|12,523-8 |10,366 8 | 667-2 | 2,400-8 204-0 148-6 4.2

35.4

4.2

408-4

63.8

12-2

1-0

77-4

0-813,449.6 | 945-2

1889,

8,670 6,626 268 2,319 178

157

10

44

10

303

34

17

64

00

8

9,530

503

1890,

9,739 7,423

317 2,406 151

102

15

259

59

3

35 2

10,243 529

1891,

13,676 13,438 534 1,906 134

40

12

153

19

1

143

2

15,693 689

...

***

1892,

1893,

11,920

11,771 327 1,927 151

10,727 10,049. 306 1,532 75

40

LO

5

191

20

7

28

13,969

502

102

2

7

242

36

17

23

11,972 420

-

Total,...... 54,732 49,307 1,752 | 10,090 689

441

16

388383

Average per

Year,

10,946-4 | 9,861-4350-4 2,0180 | 137-8 88-2 3.2 16.6

2.2

229.6

33 6

.......

3-

9.0

11

1,148

168

45

293

7

61,407 2,643

58-6 1.4

12,281-4 528-6

:

Grand Total

for the 10 117,351 101,141 5.088 22,094 | 1,709 1,184 37 260 Years,...

-

32

3,190

487 106

5

680 11

128,655 7,369

Average per

Year,

11,735-1 10,1141 508-8 2,209-4 170-9

118.4

3.7 26.0

3.2

319.0

48.7 10.6 0.5

68.0

1-1 |12,865-5 | 736-9

Magistracy, Hongkong, 11th January, 1894.

H. E. WODEHOUSE, Police Magistrate.

87

Total.

NATIONALITY.

MAGISTERIAL ENQUIRIES INTO DEATHS.

TABLE A.-RETURN OF ALL DEATHS REPORTED DURING THE YEAR 1893.

Europeans and Americans, ...

FORMAL ENQUIRIES HELD.

BURIED WITHOUT FORMAL ENQUIRIES.

Men. Women. Boys. Girls. Total. Men. Women. Boys. Girls.

10

Very much decomposed;

sex not ascertainable.

Indians and Malays,

Chinese,

4

1

...

2

...

43

9

4

Total,

49

9

10

5

4

CO

5

1

1

2

1

:

:

:

1

:.

60

80

15

124 86

9

314

4

67

100

32

82

15

124

86

9

316

60 87

14

118 82

10

311

Chinese.

TABLE B.-RETURN OF FORMAL ENQUIRIES DURING THE YEAR 1893.

FINDING.

Europeans and Americans.

Indians.

Total for 1892,...

45

4

ㄓˇ

Accidental death,

Accidental death by burning,

Accidentally drowned,

Death by drowning,

Death by self hanging,

Death by misadventure,

Total.

Men. Boys. Men.

Men.

Women. Boys.

Girls.

1

1

18

2

1

23

...

1

: ∞

...

1

1

3

1

1

1

7

...

...

1

1

1

1

...

...

:

:::

:

:

...

...

3

1

:

:.

:

:

:

Death by opium poisoning self administered,

Death by dislocation of the spine while being executed in due process of law within the walls of the Victoria Gaol,.................... Death ensued from hemorrhage occasioned by a wound in the throat supposed to have been inflicted by a man named Li Yau,

Death from natural causes,.

Death from rupture of the spleen,

Death from rupture of the spleen occasioned by a blow or blows inflicted with the fists by one or two persons whose names are unknown but can be pointed out, Death from blood poisoning occasioned by a wound received

in the foot from a dynamite explosion, Death from injuries received from a fall from the cookhouse window of No. 26 Quarry Bay occasioned by the deceased jumping through the said window while endeavouring to effect his escape on the occasion of the entry of a European timekeeper of the Taikoo Sugar Refinery with three Indian Watchmen in order to stop some gambling that was going on in the room of No. 26 adjoining the said cookhouse, Death from injuries received from falling down the hold of the

German steamship Holstine, Death from shock and asphyxia caused by the wound in the

throat,

Death occurred from a self inflicted bullet wound, Death occasioned by the collapse of the building consequent upon initial structural defects worked upon by lapse of time, Death resulted from injuries occasioned by the collapse of a

pier in Godown known as No. 117 Praya East,.......... Found drowned,

Found dead, death according to the medical evidence having resulted from some irritant poison the presence of which in the remains of the stomach analysis has been unable to detect,

1

...

: ܗ:

3

~::

...

...

1

1

1

:

:

:

:

1

:

:

:

:

*

1

Carried forward,...........

4

:

1

1

p

1

-::

1

3

1181

1

3

14 GO

2

1

1

:

:..

:

::

:

:..

:

J

1

: :

37

7

3

1

:

1

I

5

1

*H

4

57

88

TABLE B.-RETURN OF FORMAL ENQUIRIES DURING THE YEAR 1893,—Continued.

FINDING.

Indians.

Chinese.

Boys. Men. Men. Women, Boys. Girls.

Europeans and Americans.

Men.

4

Brought forward.....................................

:

Total.

2

37

7

3

4

57

1

1

:

:

:

:..

:

:

:

1

Strangulation by hanging such hanging being the act of the

deceased, That the deaths resulted from fire or suffocation or other injuries sustained on the occasion of a fire in No. 58 Square Street the probable explanation of the deaths being that the victims. returned to the burning buildings after making their escape and that the buildings fell in with them before they again escaped,..........

The deceased came to her death by hoemorrhage occasioned by a wound on the neck inflicted by the husband of the deceased, The deceased met his death by fire in House No. 74 Aberdeen, First floor to which he had set fire by his own act while labouring under a fit of temporary insanity, The Magistrate finds that the deceased came to his death through injuries received from the inadvertent discharge of a bullet from a Nordenfelt Five barrel gun on board H.M.S. Pigmy in Hongkong waters after the conclusion of prize firing from the said gun and while it was in process of being secured,

The Magistrate finds that both the deceased died from the effects of bullet wounds shot on the evening of the 2nd day of March, 1893, at about 8 o'clock P.M. from one or other of two junks named the San Fat Li junk and the San Yau Li junk which were at the time engaged in carrying several parcels known to be raw opium which had been transferred from two small boats which had been attacked in Sandy Bay by the boat in which the two deceased were under the impression that the parcels known to contain raw opium were still on board such said boat, the two said junks thereupon returning the fire of the deceased's boat and inflicting the wounds which caused the deaths of the deceased, the said junks and the afore- said small boat and the boat of the deceased being at the time of such firing in the neighbourhood of Sandy Bay in the waters of Hongkong and not more than a few Cheungs from the shores of Hongkong. The Magistrate further finds that at the time when the shots were fired that caused the deaths of the deceased there were amongst others on board the said San Yau Li junk three Chinese named respectively Leung Un, Kwok Hing, Leung Muk Kau, and amongst others on board the said San Fat Li junk two Chinese named Kwok Lin, Leung Muk-kwai,....

Total,.....

3

1

:.

:

1

:

:

:

1

:

2

:

4

1

1

I

:.

:

:

:

4

1

2

43

9

2

4

67

Found on

Land.

Found on

Harbour,

TABLE C.-RETURN OF BURIALS WITHOUT FORMAL ENQUIRIES DURING THE YEAR 1893.

Reason why no Formal Enquiry was held.

Europeans

& Americans.

No suspicious circumstances,

No evidence and/or decomposed state of

Body,

Post Mortem satisfactory,..........

.་་

Total,...

Men.

Men.

Chinese.

Indians. Very much

Women.

sex not

de-

composed; Total.

Boys. Girls.

Men.

ascertain- able.

Un-

known.

1

71

13

10

7

1

103

54

19

25

25

10

5

8

1 114

19

79

:

211

:

176

35

...

1

1

..

:

2

2

:

...

1

80

15 124 86

1

9

316

56 195

Magistracy, Hongkong, 10th January, 1894.

25

25

40

H. E. WODEHOUSE, Police Magistrate.

I

"

HONGKONG.

RETURNS OF SUPERIOR AND SUBORDINATE COURTS FOR 1893.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor

183

No. 14

94

No. 108.

SIR,I have the honour to enclose the following Returns:-

REGISTRY SUPREME COURT,

HONGKONG, April 5th, 1894.

1. Civil Cases commenced and tried in Original and Summary Jurisdictions for the year

1893.

2. A Return of Appeals commenced and tried for the same period.

3. Probates and Administrations granted in the same year.

To the Honourable

COLONIAL SECRETARY,

&C.,

&c.,

&c.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

C. F. A. SANGSTER, Acting Registrar.

184

1893.

CASES COMMENCED.

JUDGMENT.

Settled or

No.

Debt and

withdrawn

Jurisdiction.

of

Cases.

Damages.

before Trial.

Defend- Non-

Plaintiff.

ant.

Suit.

Original,

72

$483,977.74

11

17

3

Summary, ... 1,492 $154,862.96

654

504

99

Registry Supreme Court, Hongkong, 5th day of April, 1894.

1893.

CASES TRIED.

Struck out, Dismissed

and Lapsed Writs.

JUDGMENT.

In Dependency.

TOTAL CASES TRIED.

Cases.

Debt and Damages recovered.

3

159

38

38

23

$243,329.34

73

606

$ 69,146.46

C. F. A. SANGSTER,

Acting Registrar.

Debt

Jurisdiction.

No. of Cases.

Debt and Damages.

Struck out,

and Damages recovered.

Plaintiff. Defendant.

Non-Suit. Dismissed and

Original,

Summary,

......

Lapsed Writs.

29a

$317,346.64

22

4

3

$311,348.54

7846

$ 89,769.01

515

103

3

163

$ 70,781.96

a

6 of these cases were pending on 31st December, 1892. b 28 of these cases were pending on 31st December, 1892.

Registry Supreme Court, Hongkong, 5th day of April, 1894.

C. F. A. SANGSTER,

Acting Registrar.

1893.

APPEALS COMMENCED.

JUDGMENT.

No. of Cases.

Appellant.

Respondent.

Settled.

Pending.

8.

5

1

2

Registry Supreme Court, Hongkong, 5th day of April, 1894.

C. F. A. SANGSTER, Acting Registrar.

1893.

APPEALS TRIED.

JUDGMENT.

No. of Cases.

Appellant.

Respondent.

Settled.

Pending.

5

1

2

8

Registry Supreme Court, Hongkong, 5th day of April, 1894.

:

C. F. A. SAngster,

Acting Registrar.

F

1

185

CALENDAR of PROBATES and ADMINISTRATION granted by the SUPREME COURT of HongKong during the Ÿear 1893.

Date of

Name of Testator or Intestate.

Time and Place of Death.

Grant.

Probate, Administration with Will annexed, or Administration.

Name and Description of the Executor or Administrator.

Value of Effects sa set forth in the Commis- sion of Ap praisement.

1893. Jan.

7 Arthur Barnard,

Yokohama, in the Empire of Japan, 29th Oct., 1892,

Letters of Adm. with Exempli- fication of the Will annexed,

Charles Coleman Cohen, the duly author- ized attorney of Robert Stephon Schwabe for the use and benefit of the said Robert Stephon Schwabe, and until he shall duly apply for and obtain Probate of same, Chan Woon Ho, the widow,

Philip Bernard Chenery Ayres and Grace

Fields, executor and executrix,.. William Parlane, brother,

Emanuel Raphael Belilios, the duly ap- pointed attorney of Kate Ezra for the use and benefit of the said Kate Ezra, and until she shall duly apply for and obtain Probate of same, Tsang King and Chan Yee Sham, exe.

cutor and exécutrix, Siu Yet Kai, executor, Robert Lyall, the duly authorized attor

ney of John Murray Purvis for the use and benefit of the said John Murray Purvis, and until he shall duly apply for and obtain Adminis- tration of same,

Lo Lai Wan, husband,

Official Administrator,

"

7 Chow Fat,

Ho Nam, Canton,

Probate,

#

13

24th Aug., 1892, Nettie Wilson alias Nettie Sedg- Hongkong, 25th May, 1892,

Do.,

wick,

i

19

20

Mathew Gray Parlane,

20

Isaac Ezra,

""

Hongkong, 8th Jan., 1893,

Do.. Shanghai, 8th March, 1892, | Adm. with Expl.

of the Will annexed,

20

Tsang Pat alias Tsang King San,

20

Sew Chuen alias Sew Chak Hin,

Feb.

1

George Sandilands Purvis,

Hongkong, 9th Feb., 1891,

Probate,

Canton, 5th Nov., 1892,

Do., Sand Islands, near Pesca- Administration,

dores, 10th Oct., 1892,

3,440.00

1,500.00

700.00

6,000.00

3,200.00

5,000.00

16,000.00

4,000.00

3

Quok Ah Yat,

"

25

Tam Hung Cheung,

11

Mar.

7 Marcos Antonio de Carvalho,

Canton, 23rd March, 1892, Hongkong, 22nd Nov., 1892, Hongkong, 27th Dec., 1892,

Do., Do.,

5,000.00

5,000.00

Adm. with Expl.

of the Will annexed,

Francisca Maria Gomes e Carvalho,

widow,

200.00

""

7 | Maria Adelaide de Figueiredo | Macao, 20th Dec., 1892, Administration,

Alvares,

Eugenio Marciano Alvares, husband,.

700.00

Probate,

Fung Shi and Cheung Shi, widows,

30,000.00

??

7 Ip Ki Tai otherwise Ip Sik Sau otherwise Hip A-wong other- wise Yip Wong,

7 Fan Ü Wie alias Fan Che alias

Ü Wie,

9 Robert Sands,

??

"

14 Wong Ka Tung,

"1

14 Jai Singh,

14 Chew Wai,

14 John Martin McDermott,

14 Charles Dillon,

14 Cheong A-ho,

14 Thomas Cameron, 14 Thakar Kuarji Narsi,....

24 Edward Benjamin Jorey, Apr. 1 George Rae,

4 John Moffat,

*

وو

"

**

19

*

"

Charles Edward Ross,

4 William Graham,

4 Charles Hodges Wallace,

4 Pang Sha Ti,

Honam in Canton,

18th Feb., 1893,

Tam-pin in Nam Hoi, in the Kwang Tung Pro- vince, 26th Nov., 1877, Middlesex, England,

5th Dec., 1892, Swatow, in the Empire of

China, 12th Sept., 1892,

Hongkong, 29th Sept., 1891, Bangkok, 14th Feb., 1889, Hongkong, 17th Apr., 1892, Neuilly-sur-Seine, France,

29th Apr., 1889,

Canton, 19th July, 1879,

Hongkong, 18th Dec., 1892, Bombay, 25th May, 1891,

Hongkong, 21st Jan., 1893, Hongkong, 11th Jan., 1893, Vancouver, British Colum- bia, 9th Dec., 1892,

Hongkong, 10th Mar., 1893,

Melbourne, Australia,

23rd Jan., 1892,

Adm. with Will annexed (Durante Absentiá), Probate,

Do.,

Administration, Do., Do., Adm. with Expl. of the Will annexed,

Adm. with the Will annexed, Administration, Adm. with Expl. of the Will annexed,

Administration, Do., Adm. with Expl. of the Will and Codicil annexed, Administration,

Adm. with Expl. of the Will and Codicil annexed,

Fan Hok To, during the absence abroad

of Fan U Hon, the executor,.

Alfred Bulmer Johnson,

Wong Ka Sui and Wong Chan Chi, law- ful brothers of the deceased. Power being reserved to grant the like Pro- bate to Wong Ping Kwan, the other executor,

Official Administrator,

Do., Do.,

Reverend John Baptist Martinet, the duly appointed attorney of Adrienne Tirant de Bury Dillon for the use and benefit of the said Adrienne Tirant de Bury Dillon, and until she shall duly apply for and obtain Probate of same, Cheong Hi Wing, elder brother,

Official Administrator, James Jardine Bell-Irving, the duly ap- pointed attorney of Jumnadas Narsey and Laljee Cooverjee for the use and benefit of the said Jumnadass Narsey and Laljee Cooverjee, and until they shall duly apply for and obtain Pro- bate of same,.. Official Administrator,

Do., Alexander Coutts, executor,

Official Administrator,

William Henry Ray, the duly appointed attorney of Emily Graham and the Trustees Executors and Agency Co., Limited, for the use and benefit of the said Emily Graham, and the Trustees Executors and Agency Co., Limited, and until they shall duly apply for and obtain Probate of same, Edward Fleet Alford,

Tang Ti and Ho Kam Hing, executors,

Administration,

Probate,

Administration, | Official Administrator,

Do.,

Probate,

Do.,

3,510.00

35,000.00 50,00

500,00

100.00

4,000.00

1,655.44

500.00

1,000.00

500.00

200.00

3,500.00

750.00

600.00 100.00

8,000.00

750.00

3,000.00

4,000.00

Chang Sew Cho and Chang Kin Cho,

sons and executors,

2,500.00

400.00

Alexandrino Francisco dos Remedios, Jr.,

son, Li Shi and Leung Shi, executrixes,

4 William Nathaniel Allison, 13 Alexandrino Francisco dos Re-

medios, Sr.,

19 Ho Tsung Ping otherwise Ho

Ping Chung,

19 Chang Low Shee,

Sand Island, Pescadores,

10th Oct., 1892. Hongkong, 28th Feb., 1893,

Hongkong, 28th Jan., 1893, Hongkong, 6th Jan., 1893,

Canton, China,

2nd Feb., 1892, Kai Chung Village, Heung

Shan, China,

7th Mar., 1893,

20 Alexandrino José do Rozario,.... Hongkong, 3rd April, 1893, Administration, Official Administrator,

186

CALENDAR of PROBATES and ADMINISTRATION,-Continued.

Date of

Name of Testator or Intestate.

Time and Place of Death.

Grant.

1893.

Apr. 20 Donald Fergusson,

"

25 Percy Lloyd,

27 John Riach,

"9

Probate, Administration with Will annexed, or Administration.

Name and Description of the Executor or Administrator.

Hongkong, 31st Aug., 1891, | Adm. with Expl. | Official Administrator,

Kent, England,

Notting Hill in London,

13th Dec., 1892,

20th Oct., 1892,

of the Will annexed, Probate,

Adm. with Expl. of the Will annexed,

May 4 Tsang Fat,

99

"

Hongkong, 16th Oct., 1892, | 6 Ludwig Victor Ferdinand Beer,. Hongkong, 12th July, 1892, 8 Emily Wilkinson,

Wenchow, in the Empire

of China,

15th Sept., 1892,

Administration, Do.,

Adm. with the Will annexed,

19

17 Chea Ann Liew,

Victor Hobart Deacon, attorney of Eli-

zabeth Amelia Lloyd, Alfred Bulmer Johnson, the attorney of John Prentice and Peter Ventnor Grant for the use and benefit of the said John Prentice and Peter Vent- nor Grant, and until they shall duly apply for and obtain Probate of same, Chan Sun Kew, lawful widow, Official Administrator,

Charles David Wilkinson, the attorney of William Henry Wilkinson for the use and benefit of the said William Henry Wilkinson, and until he shall duly apply for and obtain Probate of

same,

Singapore, 21st April, 1884, | Administration, William Henry Ray, the attorney of Lee

20 John Alexander Mosely,

Vienna, 11th April, 1893,

Probate,

20 Caetano José Xavier,

""

20 Bernardino de Senna Fernandes,

Count de Senna Fernandes,

35

20 Louise Nissen,

June 2 John Henry Hoar,

3 Kwok Lam Shi,

Between Haiphong & Hong- Administration,

kong, 9th June, 1893, Macao, 2nd May, 1893,

Ottensen in Germany,

8th Mar., 1881,

Do.,

Adm. with Expl. of the Will annexed,

Shanghai, 11th Mar., 1893,

Do.,

Hongkong, 28th Nov., 1884, 20 Alexander Herman Adam Gordon, Singapore, 16th Feb., 1893,

Brompton in Middlesex,

England,

""

99

20 William Manger,...........

July 7 Woo Lin Yuen,

13 Wilhelm Ludwig Martick,

17 27 James Peebles Conn,

19

"

...

27 Martin Hansen,

Chin Cheong,

28 | Chung Chik Shau,

*

28 Wong Chuen Tin,

Aug. 1 Yiu Chow,

""

1 Chan Hin Wang,..

""

11 Kwok Ping,

99

12 William Legge,

>>

15 Pang Chan Shi,

""

25 Andrew Veitch,

35

""

25 Mary King Wyllys Pomeroy,

25 Tse Yau Shun,

Sept. 4 Samuel Ashton,.

4 Samuel Speechley,

""

4 Edward Payson Thwing,

""

4 Susan Maria Thwing,..

19 José da Silva Loureiro,

11 19 Chan I Yik,

"

Oct.

2 George Hargens,

26th Feb., 1893,

Canton, 14th June,

1893,

Administration, Do., Adm. with Expl. of the Will annexed,

Probate, Hongkong, 10th Feb., 1893, | Administration, Nagasaki, Japan,

Do.,

24th June, 1893,

Hongkong, 21st July, 1893, Siu Shing Village, in the Chiu Ying District, Pro- vince of Kwong Tung, China, 5th May, 1893, Hongkong, 12th June, 1893, Pak Tun, in the District of

Pun Ü, China,

21st Jan., 1892, Hongkong, 21st May, 1893, Hongkong, 30th May, 1893, Hok Shan in Canton,

19th Sept., 1892, Hongkong, 19th July, 1893, Canton, 14th June, 1893, Yokohama in Japan,.

9th Feb., 1893,

Dinard in Brittany, in

France, 30th Nov., 1891, Tit Chuen Village, in Nam- hoi, China, 13th Apr., 1893, Hongkong, 5th July, 1893, Venango County, State of Pensylvania, in North America, 8th Jan., 1893, Canton, 9th May, 1893, Canton, 17th June, 1893, Hongkong, 1st Sept., 1893, Canton, 7th Dec., 1887, Hongkong, 4th Sept., 1893,

Joon Neo for the use and benefit of the said Lee Joon Neo, and until he shall duly apply for and obtain Let- ters of Administration of same,.. Thomas Arnold and Victor Hobart Dea- con, two of the executors. Power being reserved of granting the like Probate to Alexander Morley (late Alexander Mosely) when he shall duly apply for same, Filomena Maria Xavier, the widow,

Bernardino de Senna Fernandes, attorney of Anna Theresa Fernandes, Countess de Senna Fernandes, for the use and benefit of the said Anna Theresa Fernandes, Countess de Senna Fer- nandes, and until she shall duly apply for Letters of Administration, Heinrich Hoppius, attorney of Friederich Woldemar Agathon Nissen for the use and benefit of the said Friederich Woldemar Agathon Nissen, and until he shall duly apply for Probate, Andrew Johnston, attorney of James Ambrose for the use and benefit of the said James Ambrose, and until he shall duly apply for Probate, Kwok Chan Shi, executrix,

· Official Administrator, John Stewart Lapraik, attorney of Alfred Thomas Manger and, Thomas Dallow for the use and benefit of the said Alfred Thomas Manger and Thomas Dallow, and until they shall apply for and obtain Probate of same, Li Sing and Lai Siu Tung, executors,............ Official Administrator,

Value of Effects as

set forth in the Commis-

sion of Ap- praisement.

500.00

2,376.00

18,563.00 250.00 50.00

1,800.00

600.00

52,651.39 200.00

27,000.00

6,000.00

3,200.00 200.00 5,000.00

41,554.64

1,000.00

150.00

Elizabeth Conn, the lawful widow,...

1,500.00

Do.,

Official Administrator,

100.00

Do.,

Ng Shi, the lawful widow and relict,

2,400.00

Probate, Do., Adm. with Expl. of the Will annexed,

Marion Legge, the widow and relict, Pang Hing Yau, nephew and executor,. George Thomas Veitch, executor. Power

Probate,

Do.,

Chung Chik Hong, brother and executor,. Wong Tin Hi, son and executor,

8,000.00

700,00

Do., Administration, Do.,

Kwok Kwai, the lawful widow and relict,. Chan Yeung Shi, lawful widow and relict, Official Administrator,

66,000.00

1,300.00

400.00

100.00

8,700.00

being reserved of making the like grant to Andrew McPherson, the other executor,

2,887.00

1,045.00

Tse Tang Shi, executrix,

2,500.00

Official Administrator,

700.00

Ernest William Rutter, attorney of Mar-

garet Speechley, the executrix. Henry Pleasants having renounced Probate,. Edward Waite Thwing,..

5,527.20

302.00

Edward Waite Thwing,...

1,700.00

José Wilde Loureiro, son,

1,500.00

Chan Yin Yik, executor,

2,000.00

50.00

Probate Sealed,

Probate,

Administration, Adm. with Expl. of the Will annexed, Administration, Do., Do., Probate. Administration

Official Administrator,

"

རྩྭ

187

Calendar of PROBATES and ADMINISTRATION, -Continued.

Date of

Name of Testator or Intestate.

Time and Place of Death.

Grant.

Probate, Administration with Will annexed, or Administration.

Name and Description of the Executor or Administrator.

Value of Effects as set forth in the Commis-

sion of Ap- praisement.

1893.

Oct.

3 Byramjee Cooverjee Bhabha,

Bombay, India,

Administration,

22nd Nov., 1890,

"

9 William Forbes,

9 Mary Lane,

Hongkong, 4th May, 1892,

Lowestoff, in the County of

Suffold, England,

29th Jan., 1893,

9 Kwok Ting Yat,

At Sea, 8th Sept.,

28 Robert Jones,

At Sea, 23rd Dec.,

"

Nov. 3 Albert Schroers alias Heinrich | Yokohama, in Japan,

Albert Schroers,

11 Oh Tek Leong,.

Probate Sealed,

Adm. with Expl.

of the Will annexed,

1867, Administration

de bonis non, 1891, Adm. with Expl.

of Trust Dispo.

6th Aug., 1893,

sition and Settlements and Codicil annexed,

Administration

with copy of the Will annexed,

Penang, in the Straits Set- Administration,

tlements,

30th Jan., 1893,

11 James Langford Cox, 17 Cheung Yuk,

24 William Manger,

Hongkong, 23rd Jan., 1892, Hongkong, 4th Aug., 1872, Brompton in Middlesex,

England,

26th Feb., 1893,

Do., Do., Adm. with Expl. of the Will annexed,

24 Richard John Abbott,

"

Ware, in the County of

Hertford, England,

8th Apr., 1893,

Do.,

Probate,

Soorabjee Byramjee Bhabha, attorney of Bachoobhai Byramjee Bhabha, the lawful widow for the use and benefit of the said Bachoobhai Byramjee Bha- bha, and until she shall duly apply for and obtain Administration of same,

John Douglas Lapraik, attorney of David Robert Fenton Crawford for the use and benefit of the said David Robert Fenton Crawford, and until he shall duly apply for and obtain Probate. Power being reserved of making the like grant to Alice Lapraik Lane, the executrix,

Kwok Chan Shi, daughter-in-law,........................

Bruce Shepherd, attorney of Alexander Peggie Blyth for the use and benefit of the said Alexander Peggie Blyth, and until he shall duly apply for and obtain Letters of Administration, &c., of same, Godfrey Cornewall Chester Master, at- torney of Philipp Arnhold, for the use and benefit of the said Philipp Arnhold, and until he shall duly apply for and obtain Probate of same, Victor Hobart Deacon, attorney of Wee Kim Yam, Loh Fok and Syed Abdul- cader bin Abdul Rahman al Sagoff for the use and benefit of the said Wee Kim Yam, Loh Fok and Syed Abdulcader bin Abdul Rahman al Sagoff, and until they shall duly apply for and obtain Administration of same,

Official Administrator, Cheung Cheang Shi, widow,.... John Hughes Lewis, attorney of Alfred Thomas Manger and Thomas Dallow, for the use and benefit of the said Alfred Thomas Manger and Thomas Dallow, and until they shall duly apply for and obtain Probate of same.. Alfred Parker Stokes, attorney of Geor- giana Eliza Abbott for the use and benefit of the said Georgiana Eliza Abbott, and until she shall duly apply for and obtain Probate of same,. Lo Kam To, son and executor,....

1,800.00 1,635.00

87,583.83 200.00

6,514.24

8,100.00

7,100.00 100.00 12,000.00

41,554.64

9,100.00

500,00

39

Dec.

27 Lo Yuk,.......................................

6 Chan Ki Ming otherwise Chan

Kan otherwise Yat Lau,

14 Wan Chap Ying,.

Chiu Lin Village, in the District of Kwong Chow, in the Empire of China, 1st Mar., 1892, Canton, in the Empire of China, 10th June, 1893, At Sea, 30th Nov., 1893, Administration,

Registry Supreme Court, Hongkong, 5th April, 1894.

Do.,

Chan Kwong Tai, son and executor,

8,000.00

Li Hop I, the first lawful wife of the

deceased,

1,250.00

C. F. A. SANGSTER,

Acting Registrar.

HONGKONG.

REPORT OF THE HEAD MASTER OF THE VICTORIA COLLEGE FOR 1893.

57

1

No. 94

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor, on the 7th March, 1894.

No. 17.

VICTORIA COLLEGE, HONGKONG, 24th January, 1894.

SIR,-I have the honour to forward the annual report on Victoria College for the year 1893.

1. The total number on the College Roll for the year was 1,012. The fact that Chinese New Year fell so late accounts for the small minimum monthly enrolment, as it is difficult to induce parents to keep their sons at school after their examination is over; so that the January attendance, which is the usual minimum, was further reduced in February. If it had not been for a noticeable falling-off in the latter half of the year, there would have been a much higher average daily attendance, and a considerable increase in fees.

2. The following tables will illustrate the condition of the College during the last ten years:-

Average

1884,

1885,

1886,

1887,

1888,.

1889,

1890,

1891,

1892, 1893,

1884,

1885,

1886,

1887,

1888,

1889,...

1890,

1891,

1892,

1893,

YEAR.

Total Number of

Scholars.

Number of

Monthly Enrolment.

School days.

Maximum.

Minimum.

Daily Attendance.

558

236

462

362

411

596

238

499

382

437

610

238

507

419

446

601

234

525

417

449

634

229

536

384

467

919

233

789

466

597

1,075

236

890

683

758

1,108

231

932

712

759

1,062

237

862

700

728

1,012

238

840

639

683

Average

YEAR.

Number of School Boys Examined.

Percentage of Passes.

School Fees.

Actual Net

Expenditure.

Expense of each

Scholar

per

Average Daily

$

$

Attendance.

379

95.58

4,981.00

13,378.62

32.48

412

95.38

5,273.00

12,885.00

29.45

405

94.81

5,422.00

11,680.41

26.17

384

97.65

5,547.00

11,872.70

26.40

445

94.15

6,899.00

12,384.14

26.48

676

95.41

9,338.00

15,018.30

25.11

692

89.45

11,912.00

19,222.46

25.34

709

90.26

12,237.00

18,158.60

23.92

671

96.12

12,342.00

19,741.43

27.09

625

93.28

12,348.00

21,405.46

31.33

3. REMARKS ON PRECEDING TABLES.-We observe that the number of school-days is pretty uniformly maintained; that the number of school-boys examined is, roughly speaking, two-thirds of the total number on the Roll for the year; and that a high percentage of passes is annually sustained. The average daily attendances were proportionately better in the smaller school (73 per cent.), as might reasonably be expected; it would require an improvement of 5 per cent. in the attendance (68 per cent.) of the boys now on the Roll to equal the former average. The steady increase in fees year by year is very apparent, and the increase is out of all proportion to the corresponding increase in the number of boys on the Roll, for while the latter is barely doubled, the amount of fees is far on the way towards being trebled. In estimating the average expense of each scholar, though the present figure appears high, and only finds a parallel nine years ago, in 1885, we must not fail to remember that if Victoria College had not been built, the recent general increase of salary throughout the Service would have affected the Central School by an annual amount of $5,158, so that in 1888, the last

whats

58

complete year at the Central School, we find that for purposes of comparison with the present rate of expenditure, instead of $26.48 per head, we must take $37.56 which is evidence that Victoria College costs per head less than the Central School; and further that the actual net expenditure of 1888 would have been $17,642.54, thus showing only $3,762.92 as the increased annual cost of the larger building, with its doubled staff.

4. REGISTER ADMISSIONS.-

Average rate per annum.

February 1862 to December 1871 February 1872 to December 1881 February 1882 to June

10 years,

726

72

10

1,642

=. 165

""

1889

71

1,276

170

July

1889 to December 1893

4

"

.1,614

= 359

Total,.............

32

5,265 = 164

Thus the admissions since the opening of the new building, in July 1889, are more than double the highest figure attained at the Central School, which satisfactorily attests the need of the larger accommodation provided by the Government; even though there is no immediate prospect of the occupation of every seat.

5. EFFECT ON THE COLLEGE OF COLONIAL DEPRESSION.-Last year a pessimist letter signed "Never" appeared in one of the local papers in which was foretold with some acrimony the steady downfal of this Colony. "Ever" replied in an optimist strain exuberantly prophesying a magnificent future. Now, are we to suppose that a pre-eminently practical race like the Chinese are unaffected by their own impressions of the outlook of trade and of prospects of demand for employment? It would be exaggeration to suppose that even one-tenth of the Chinese boys who attend this College do so with the object, pure

and simple, of acquiring an English education per se; i.e., for the mental enlargement and other advantages to be derived from it. Before he can talk English plainly on any other subject, a boy at the bottom of the school will tell you, that his aim is to get dollars, to raise his market value. There is nothing poetic in this aspiration, which cannot be compared with the enthusiastic love of classical study occasionally to be met with among school-boys in England; but it clearly shows the motive power. The deduction is evident. If there is not a steady annually increasing demand for English-speaking clerks, if new hongs, factories, and enterprises of all sorts do not arise; we must not be surprised at a stagnation, nor even at an ebb, in the influx of Chinese pupils. There will be no cause for anxiety until the average daily attendance fall below 653, which is the proportion to be expected from the 700 seats estimated as the necessary accommodation in the new building.

6. SUPPLY FROM GOVERNMENT DISTRICT SCHOOLS.-There is, however, one source of supply which does not appear to satisfy anticipation. I refer to the Government Anglo-Chinese Schools, the total Roll of which in 1892 was 539 while not more than 30 of their boys sought admission to Victoria College. As the total number in 1888 was 426, the increase of 100 in four years shows that these schools have no difficulty in obtaining scholars. Nor is this a matter for surprise when it is remembered that boys in our Lower and Preparatory Schools pay a dollar a month for an elementary English education which in these schools is provided free. The Inspector of Schools has, during the last two years, assured the Government that the majority of these boys are well able to pay the fees charged in the respective classes of Victoria College. The continued annual admission of four scholars from these schools, after competitive examination, to three years' free education at Victoria College, was one of the four questions of Financial Reform discussed in 1892 by the Registrar General, the Inspector of Schools, and myself. For the first time in ten years, no candidates presented themselves in 1893, and we are driven to the conclusion that there is no boy in these schools unable to pay the fees charged here. If this be so, what is to prevent 100 or even 150 boys being annually drafted from these five schools to Victoria College, and the seats thus vacated being occupied by others anxious to obtain free English elementary education? By the present system parents, who are reported to be capable of paying fees, keep their sons for four or five years at a Government Free School, and only send them to Victoria College to complete their education. This seems to be an abuse of the charitable object of the Government in establishing free schools.

7. PROMOTION.-Of the 72 Chinese boys forming Classes IA, and IB, on 11th March, 1893, I find from the College Register that 35 per cent. or 25 boys had not exceeded five years in progressing from Class VIII. where they learned the Alphabet, to Class I., where Shakespeare and the higher subjects are taught; but again 13 of these boys took only four years, and two others actually only three years to perform the same feat. The boys themselves deserve great praise for their steady application, but the chief interest in the fact recorded is the incidental evidence it affords to the excellence of the teaching in the Lower and Preparatory Schools, without which foundation, boys so rapidly promoted would have found it impossible to pursue their studies so successfully in the Upper School. There are on the other hand manifest objections to such rapid promotion. Theoretically each boy should

:

59

spend a year in each of the seven sections, in order that the instruction he receives may be properly graduated and matured. There is no objection to clever boys being promoted after half a year's study in the lowest classes; but unfortunately, as I have had occasion to remark more than once before, the classes generally have for the last few years suffered from forced promotions. This is partly due to the transfer from the Central School, explained in the next paragraph, but also largely attributable to the number of boys who leave and are admitted every year. The only cure for the latter evil would appear to be the increased prosperity of the Colony. I need hardly point out that promotions in the Upper School are only made at the beginning of each school

year.

8. EFFECT OF TRANSFER FROM THE CENTRAL SCHOOL.-I suppose it will occur to but few people to enquire by what steps a school of 556 boys in 1883 developed in 1891 into a college of 1,108. To most it will appear as a sum in simple addition, or perhaps multiplication; but in reality the change was attended with many difficulties. In 1888 the number of the sections forming the Upper School was doubled, as I foresaw that the increased accommodation in this part of the new building would not be supplied by outside demand. After allowing a breathing space of four years, an extra section was added in 1892, another in 1893, and the remaining section will be formed next month, when the scheme devised seven years ago will be complete, and the nine class-rooms on the upper floor will constitute the Upper School. In the year 1882, the number of boys examined in the Upper School was 83 as against 190 just examined. During the last five years there has been an average of nine boys admitted annually to the Upper School from outside the College; the real increase is thus due to internal expansion. It should now be apparent that a continuous strain has been thrown on the whole establishment, by the transfer from the Central School. The strain was heaviest in 1888 and 1889, but it still reveals itself; and it will be a matter of gratification to the masters to know that there is only one more year of sustained extraordinary effort. From March 1895, we shall settle down into a more normal condition, the stage of what we may call corporal growth will be in the past, and we may hope to reap some of the benefits attendant on maturity.

9. EFFECT OF INCREASE OF UPPER SCHOOL.-I anticipate several advantages from this realisation of my day-dream; 1o, an increase in revenue from higher fees; 2°, a gradual filling up of vacant seats in the Upper School, which in two or three years should be attended by a further increase in revenue; 3o, a more normal rate of promotion throughout the College in 1895 and henceforth, as referred to in the preceding paragraph; 4°, a steady elevation in the tone of the work, by the removal of this strain; 5°, an improved attendance in the Lower School; for it is to be expected that as there will be only 528 seats available for this part of the College, instead of 660 (as in 1890) boys will be more careful to retain their places as was the case in the limited accommodation of the Central School; 6°, the gradual extinction of the Preparatory School, for we ought soon to be able to require some previous knowledge of English on admission; 7°, an improvement in the results of the Chinese School, for the present ground of complaint, that the classes are unwieldy, will be in part removed by their considerable reduction.

10. EFFECT OF OPENING VICTORIA COLLEGE UPON OTHER SCHOOLS IN THE COLONY.-It has been stated that Victoria College has unduly withdrawn non-Chinese boys from other schools in the Colony. I am happy to say that there is no evidence to support this conjecture, which naturally arose from the total increase of attendance in the present large building. The following table compares the attendances of non-Chinese boys at four schools of the Colony in the years 1888 (being the last year available for statistics at the Central School) and 1892. The figures are taken, as regards this place, from the School Roll, and as regards the other three schools from the reports of the Inspector of Schools. (Note.-Only half the number of the Diocesan boys is given, as the other half, roughly speaking, are in Chinese dress.)

School.

Diocesan School,

St. Joseph's College,.....

Victoria English School (boys),

Victoria College,

1888.

1892.

63

65

..191

199

62

163

85

107

Total non-Chinese,

401

534

The total non-Chinese attendance at these schools has increased 33 per cent.; but at Victoria College only 25 per cent.; while the Chinese attendance at Victoria College has risen 75 per cent. from 549 in 1888 to 955 in 1892. Thus the increase in numbers of our non-Chinese boys is very far from being equal in proportion to the increase observable amongst our Chinese scholars; and is actually even less than the average increase of demand on education from the non-Chinese sections of the Colonial community.

11. NAME OF THE COLLEGE.-There are no less than five schools in the Colony with the common designation of Victoria, viz., Victoria Portuguese School, Victoria English School (boys), Victoria

60

English School (girls), Victoria Home and Orphanage, and Victoria College. The first object in selecting a name for a school should be that it would be distinctive; for this purpose I recommend that this College should be re-christened Queen's (or Royal) College, names already chosen for Government Colleges in many other colonies. As a special reason for preferring the title Queen's College, I would refer to the remarks made by Sir GEORGE BOWEN, when he announced that his recommendation that the new building should be called Victoria College had been graciously approved by Her Majesty. The special ground for his recommendation was that the occupation of the College occurred just after the Queen's Jubilee, and that the name given would commemorate that event. My contention is that the present title fails to suggest such an allusion, both because at that time several schools were already known as Victoria Schools, and because Victoria being the name of the city has lost its significant force in connection with the Jubilee.

12. THE STAFF.-Several masters have been incapacitated by sickness, for various periods, varying from six days to as many weeks. Mr. DEALY returned from England on 1st May. Mr. MACHELL was confirmed, at the end of twelve months' probation, in his appointment as Assistant Master, by the Secretary of State. During the last two years several changes have taken place among the Chinese Assistants. Mr. Lo KIT resigned on account of ill-health; Messrs. CHEUNG TSOI, LO CHEUNG-SHIU, WONG FAN, and CHAN KAM-TO were transferred to other departments at higher salaries; and Mr. SHAM CHAU- FAT was dimissed. Two of these six changes were unavoidable, but the remaining four are attributed to insufficient salary. We have thus lost four excellent masters, with specially good attainments in English, who had five or six years' experience in teaching. It will take three or four years for their successors to approach their standard of qualification, if indeed they too are not transferred in the course of a couple of years. It is gratifying to know that our Chinese Assistants are appreciated as interpreters and clerks in other Departments; but it might well be asked if some system could not be devised which should secure the more lengthened services of these Chinese masters in the work for which they are specially trained. The First and Second Chinese Assistants have respectively $100 and $68 a month; then come four seniors at $40 and four juniors at $25 a month. Many boys on leaving the first class receive $20 and $30 a month immediately; while these Assistants remain at the same salary and see their juniors in enjoyment of larger emoluments elsewhere; the natural consequence is that they are on the look-out for other employment. Some increment (say $60 a year biennially, till a maximum of $600 instead of $480 per annum were attained) might act as an induce- ment to them to remain longer in the service of education. The slight extra expense would be more than compensated by the increased efficiency of the Chinese section of the staff, resulting from an improved permanence in tenure of office.

13. OXFORD LOCAL EXAMINATIONS.-This year seven Seniors and seven Juniors passed; the largest number hitherto being three Seniors and five Juniors in 1889. We sent in altogether 29 fees, but five boys did not present themselves for examination, three having obtained situations, and two being ill. Fourteen passes out of twenty-four is by no means unsatisfactory. As regards the Chinese, eight passes out of nine is a highly creditable record. The failures amongst the non-Chinese are due to the general weakness of the class and emphasise the necessity there was for the formation of a special class for their improvement. The Head of any School can, by the payment of one shilling for each candidate, obtain from Oxford detailed particulars of his own boys' work. Thus, I am able to report that OBADIAH obtained the mark "Good" in Shakespeare, HANCE and E. DANENBERG in Grammar, U HANG-KAM in Arithmetic, Algebra, and Euclid, and CHAN YAM-MING in Arithmetic and Algebra. It must be understood that the mark "Good" is next in order to "Distinguished," and that the Distinction list in Shakespeare and Mathematics is remarkably select. Altogether I am of opinion that the results should encourage the boys to further efforts, and should be a lesson to the non-Chinese boys of the great need they have of more steady application.

14. THE HALF-YEARLY EXAMINATION.-In July 1882 I instituted a half-yearly examination, to see that the work of the previous half had been fairly prosecuted, and to prevent masters and boys leaving the bulk of the year's work to be acquired in the latter half. I have found this practice most beneficial; both masters and scholars have been pleased to have their weak subjects discovered and pointed out for particular attention in the ensuing term. Many a boy, too, on leaving school between September and the close of the year has been gratified by having the higher results of the Midsummer Examination recorded on his certificate instead of his position in January. In 1893, however, the Half-yearly Examination was not held, as the Inspector of Schools objected to the Head Master's holding any examination of the College in the same term with his annual inspection. The injury thus done to the year's work is incalculable; and the enforced ignorance of the Head Master as to the condition of the College under his charge at the opening of Michaelmas Term is a serious hindrance to efficiency. It is therefore to be hoped that the Half-yearly Examination will not be permanently discontined.

15. RECREATION.-The report on the boys' sports, supplied by Mr. MACHELL, is full of interest, especially as regards cricket; for it appears that in several of the matches some four or five masters, and occasionally a few gentlemen outside the College, took an active part. There has been no observ- able advance made in drill. Sergeant BLAND, whose strict discipline combined with considerable tact in making the exercise less obnoxious to the Chinese, produced such excellent results last year, left us

ני,

A

61

in June on account of ill-health; and his regimental duties have since prevented his return. Half a dozen different instructors were in charge of physical drill during the latter half-year. From personal observation, I cannot say that I am hopeful of the success to be expected from the appointment of a private to this duty. A Public School Cadet Corps was formed at the suggestion of the Inspector of Schools; but as it, very naturally and properly, is confined to boys in non-Chinese dress, the desir- ability of forming a Chinese Cadet Corps, with simple uniform, white gaiters and red sashes, might hereafter be considered. Some of our Chinese masters would, with a little training, make excellent officers; and the desire to qualify for admission might excite a deeper interest in the physical exercises.

16. ANNUAL EXAMINATION.--The total number examined was 625, of whom 583 or 93 per cent. passed. Though the percentage is lower than last year, there is no evidence of inferiority, either of teaching or of work, which are both fully up to the average. The three sections of the College are thus represented :-

Upper School,

Lower School, Preparatory,

.....

Boys examined

Passed percentage.

1893. 1892.

1893.

1892.

.190

179

90 90

280

294

92 97

....155

198

96 100

A trite saying may be none the less true, therefore, I can only repeat, what it has been my good fortune to be able honestly to report year after year, that the whole staff, English and Chinese, deserves the highest praise for the results of the past year. I have found abundant evidence of excellent tuition in every class; and after careful enquiry have discovered that in those classes, (e.g. IV.B. VI.A.) where the number of failures at first sight appears appalling, the explanation is, either the boys have been naturally dull, or by an unfortunate concatenation of circumstances the dregs of certain classes have settled as a sediment in one class. I desire also to draw attention to those cases, chiefly in the larger sections of classes, where by careful attention to the lazy and dull boys at the bottom of the class, several failures have been creditably averted. The outlook for next year, especially as regards the Upper School, is most promising; and there is every ground for expressing confidently the expecta- tion that if the present rate of improvement continue, the reputation of the College will be considerably enhanced in the next few years.

17. The usual tables of the number of boys examined and passed in each subject, and of percent- ages of passes are here subjoined :-

TABLE I.-NUMBER OF BOYS PASSED IN EACH SUBJECT, 1893.

CLASS.

Total No. Examined.

Total No. Passed.

Colloquial.

Reading.

Arithmetic.

Dictation.

English to Chinese.

Chinese to English.

Grammar.

Geography.

Map Drawing.

Composition.

History.

Algebra,

Euclid,

General Intelligence.

Book-keeping.

Shakespeare.

Latin.

I.A.,

11

I.B.,

==

11 11 11 11 3 11

10 7 8

9

8

2

σ.

6

00

I.C.,

21

15 20 20 9 15

11 11 6 8 8 3 9 13

11 10 5 10

10

9

9

4

4

20 9 3

II.A.,

II.B.,

III.A.,

41

III.B.,

III.C.,

IV.A.,

30 27 29 30 21 21 19 21 20 39 33 40 36 25 25 23 25 24 31 31 28 31 26 24 48 46 40 47

24 23 19 29 28 23

25 27 25

25

21 20 21 21 18 36 36 40 23

17

17 17 18 11

31 22

36

32 35 23

64202

8 6 20

→ 6

9

18

5

18

17

...

...

...

...

25

24 22

25 23 25

10 24

31 27 8

...

20

29 39 42

40

32 39 45 36

IV.B.,

17 14 25

IV.C.,

V.A., V.B., V.C.,

VI.A.,

VI.B.,

30 31م

21

VII.A.,.

37 36

30 22 18 28

25 18 23 28 25 25 23 15 25 13 17 24 21 14 19 24 22 48 47 41 45 48 41 45 36 37 33 39 47 24 24 18 24 22 22 23 22 24 22 24 24 27 25 21 27 21 25 21 18 16 22 23 24 47 41 27 45 38 19 33 41 25 42 35 31 25 22 22 27 14 29 22 36 36 25 34 37 29

...

...

...

***

...

...

VII.B.,.......

31 30

VIII.A.,

29 29

VIII.B.g

41 37

30 28 29 29 27 29 29 26 29 27 24 38 40 32 33 30

Writing.

...

...

...

28

***

37

VIII.C.,

17 17

17 17 17 17 10

16

Total,.

625 | 583 | 372 | 609 518 | 478 | 492 492 380 360|240 | 353|149|122

83 66

Examined in each Subject,...(1893) 470 625 625 625 573 573 538 470 280 392 | 190 173 134 93

...(1892) | 473 | 671 671 671 | 620 620 577 | 473 294 370 | 179 | 153 | 153

Do.

do.,

:::3་c་

...

...

32

31

25

51

42

49

92

67

53 51

62

TABLE II.—PERCENTAGE OF PASSES IN EACH SUBJECT, 1893.

CLASS.

I.A.,

11

I.B.,

10 70

I.C.,

21

71

80 90 95 95

71

43 62

II.A.,

30

90

97 [100 80 77

63

93

II.B.,

21 100

90100

95 100

95 100 100 86

III.A.,

41

95

80 98

88 88

98

III.B.,

25100

92100

96 92 100 | 100

III.C.,

31 100

90100

84

77

IV.A.,

48 96

83 98

60 81

IV.B.,

30

73

60

93

57

47

IV.C.,

25 92

60 100

52

68

V.A.,

48 98

85 94100

85

V.B.,

24 100

75100

92

92

V.C.,

27 93

78 100

778 93

VI.A.,

47 87 57

96

81 40

92100 67 70 87 53

VI.B.,

31

97

68 100

81

71

VII.A.,

37

97

97

97 68

71 92100

87 45

78

VII.B.,

31

97

97 90 94 94

87 94

VIII.A.,

29 100

100

90 100 93

VIII.B.,

41 90

VIII.C.,

8%8

83

73

93 98 78 80

17 100 ... 100 100 100 100 59

Total No. Examined.

Total Percentage of Passes.

Colloquial.

gReading.

100 | 100 | 100 | 100 | 27| 100 | 100 | 100 55 20 60 80 80 30

80 43

N&FF8

Arithmetic.

Dictation.

******* 88 English to Chinese.

Chinese to English.

FOURCHINC Grammar.

77

67 81 94 75

93

76 96

77 69 81 98

92100 100

59 81 85

83

⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀

...

...

...

...

...

...

71

Geography.

Map Drawing.

gg Composition.

91 45 91

2888

History.

Algebra.

Euclid.

General Intelligence.

Book-keeping.

Shakespeare.

Latin.

100

82 82

100

40 40 60 80 60

95

43 14 19 95

60 76 24

77

83

90

83 73 60 57

...

81

81

81 86

52

54

88

78

85 56

88

100

92 100

...

77

100 87 57

...

89

89 74 94

Writing.

96

90

...

94

命感

1898,.

625

1892,..

671

3885

93 79 97

96

76

3555

83 77

98 81

888

8853

£83

8888888

86 86

83 92 93 76

2230

+22

70 77 86 90

82 93 93

88

78 70

80

68

71

18

64 71 63 74 51

283

66 70 57

53

TABLE III-CHINESE EXAMINATION, 1893.

CHINESE SCHOOL.

Percentage Table of Passes.

Class.

Total No. Examined.

Essay.

Letter.

King-ku.

Prosody.

Tui-tui.

Total Percentage Passed.

1,

58

93

84

67

2,

41

95

66

3,

54

95

50

4,

34

88

26

5,

68

92

6,

46

74

7,

54

74

8,

53

87

62

61

67

:

:..

:

2 2 2 2 2 2

76

88

72

76

77

2 2 6 8 * * * 0

89

73

67

63

84

85

78

88 88 + 8 Lo L o

95

88

87

85

88

82

85

94

85

89

81

81

58

57

72

I,

II,

Total,............

408

87

59

74

72

82

87

TABLE IV.-ANGLO-CHINESE EXAMINATION, 1893.

Anglo-Chinese Class.

Total

Division.

Total No. Copy Examined. Writing.

Reading. Dictation. Character. Translation.

Percentage

Passed.

5

100

100

100

100

100

100

7

57

100

57

71

71

71

1

63

18. REMARKS ON INDIVIDUAL SUBJECTS.

Reading Maintains its high standard. It is to be noted that more attention has been paid in the Upper School to phrasing and punctuation.

Colloquial. A much severer standard was exacted; but masters and boys had fully prepared themselves. The result was most encouraging. What pleased me most was the evident desire of each boy to exhibit himself to the best advantage; there was absolutely none of the sulky indifference with which the new subject was too often treated last year.

Dictation.-Slightly lower percentage, chiefly owing to the failure in I.A.B. to write a rather difficult passage.

Otherwise the work was fully up to the average.

Composition.-Very satisfactory, not inferior to the excellent standard of the preceding year. Grammar.—Considerable improvement, especially in the Upper School; with the exception of V.B. the work in the Lower School is accountable for the depression of total percentages in this subject. History. Generally worthy of high praise; the poor work in I.B.C. mars the general effect. Arithmetic.-Though the percentage figure is only slightly larger, the work is of a much higher order; I.A., II.B., III.B., V.A., VIII.A., being most successful.

Algebra. Very good indeed in Classes II., III., but the papers of the three sections of the First Class were most disheartening.

Euclid.-Generally very good, with the exception of I.c. where out of 21 boys, 14 failed to write a single proposition correctly.

Geography. Here again, if it had not been for the work in the First Class, I should have been able to report considerable advance.

Shakespeare. The percentage 74 against 57 in 1892 is in itself gratifying, but it is more so to note the marked increase in intelligence in coping with the questions.

Translation from Chinese.-The creditable and successful attempt in the Upper School by the boys to make independent translations, instead of reproducing the master's translation, word for word, deserves to be chronicled.

Translation into Chinese.-Very good. Here we have the best test as to whether the boys have grasped the meaning of their Reading Lessons; and as usual there is good evidence that such is the

case.

Latin. I regret that I can observe but little difference from the poor standard reported a year ago. There was a slight improvement in III.c., but the boys in I.c. on the completion of a second year's course betrayed, with two or three bright exceptions, the grossest ignorance of the most elementary knowledge, even of the use of case.

Book-keeping.-Steady improvement; though the percentage is not so high, the tone of work is

better.

General Intelligence.-Manifest improvement.

Chemistry.-Messrs. JAMESON and MACHELL report considerable advance in Practical Work, and two very good papers on stiff Theoretical.

Drawing.-Freehand, Excellent. Model, Fair.

Trigonometry.-One boy did a very good second year's paper, another a creditable first year's paper, the third knew nothing about it.

19. NON-CHINESE CLASSES.-The experience of the past year still impresses me with the great need of the separation of the senior non-Chinese boys, if any real education is to be imparted to them in this College. I fully sympathise with the English masters, whose lot it is to be in charge of these two classes; as it cannot be doubted that with less exertion their labours would be attended with more brilliant results were they in charge of Chinese classes. The results in I.c. are of a most disappointing character; about half of the papers might have been burnt unread, with little injustice to the writers. A firmer hand, and more organised Home-work, should secure better results in the next twelve months.

20. CHINESE SCHOOL.-The five native teachers who, as usual, held this examination report a steady improvement, especially in the answers to the questions on Literature; but at the same time they have drawn my attention to the absolute want of knowledge of the Chinese language among several of the newly admitted boys, whom they propose to relegate to the Anglo-Chinese Classes.

21. PUPIL TEACHERS AND MONITORS.—Of the seven reported under this head last January, only two remain, and they have acquitted themselves very well both in the Practical and Theoretical Tests. The new Monitors have only had time to learn their duties before the class.

My

22. CONCLUSION. Had I been told in January 1882, that in eleven years' time, two Chinese Assistants would be qualified to take independent charge of two sections of the Upper School, I should have thought the prophet very sanguine. However, the fact remains that in 1893 Messrs. LUK and WAN taught Classes III. A and B, in their entire course, including English Grammar, History, Composition, Geography, Algebra, and Euclid; and the total percentage obtained respectively is 93

64

and 100. The intelligence displayed in the answers of the boys and the neatness of the work have excited my astonishment and admiration. I have been so impressed by their success, and by the excellence of the tuition of several other Chinese Assistants, that the conviction has gradually dawned upon me in the last few weeks that the time has come when the Government might by degrees reduce the strength of the English portion of the staff. Here we have two Chinese actually doing admirably the work hitherto considered the monopoly of Englishmen. It is only reasonable that they should expect a higher rate of remuneration for the increased value of their services, which has been attained by steady application and study. The gradual substitution of a First Class rank of Chinese Assistants for two or three English Assistant Masters would not only provide funds for the increase of salaries to secure their retention in the cause of education, mentioned above in paragraph 12; but without diminishing the efficiency of the College would, in course of time, effect considerable retrenchment in expenditure.

;

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

GEO. H. BATESON WRIGHT, D.D. Oxon,

Head Master.

The Honourable G. T. M. OBRIEN, C.M.G.,

&C.,

Colonial Secretary, &c.,

&c.

1893.

VICTORIA COLLEGE.

Month.

Number of Scholars.

Number of

Attendances.

Number of School days.

Average Daily Attendance.

Remarks.

January,

February,

704

16,507

25

660.28

639

4,764

8

595.50

March,

840

13,564

17

797.88

April,

831

11,395

15

759.66

May,

809

17,823

24

742.62

June,

774

18,344

26

705.53

July,

735

16,986

25

679.44

August,

663

2,560

4

640.00

September,

736

14,816

22

673.45

October,

718.

15,563

24

648.46

November,

692

16,475

26

633.65

December,

676

13,806

22

627.54

Total,

162,603

238

Total Number of ATTENDANCES during 1893, Number of SCHOOL DAYS during 1893,

Average DAILY ÁTTENDANCE during 1893,

Total Number of SCHOLARS at this School during 1893, ....

.162,603 238 683.21

1,012

GEO. H. BATESON WRIGHT, D.D. Oxon,

Head Master.

AVERAGE EXPENSE of each SCHOLAR at Victoria College during 1893.

Expenditure, Deduct School Fees,

Total Expense of the College,..............

Average Expenses of each Scholar per Number on Roll,

per Average Daily Attendance,

"

"

$9

$33,753.46

12,348.00

.$21,405.46

.$21.15 31.33

GEO. H. BATESON WRIGHT, D.D. Oxon,

Head Master.

X

HONGKONG.

THE EDUCATIONAL REPORT FOR 1893.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of

His Excellency the Governor

189

No. 15

94

No. 28.

EDUCATION DEPARTMENT,

HONGKONG, 9th April, 1894.

SIR, I have the honour to forward to you the Annual Report on Education for the year 1893. 2. GENERAL EDUCATIONAL STATISTICS.-The total number of Educational Institutions of all descriptions, known to have been at work in the Colony of Hongkong during the year 1893, amounts to 277 Schools with 12,123 scholars, constituting an increase, as compared with the returns of the preceding year, amounting to 48 Schools with 1,183 scholars. This increase is, however, largely due to improved registration of Schools not under Government supervision, and particularly of the Kaifong Schools, i.e., Schools started by the Chinese community independent of Government aid and control. Since the appointment of a special School Attendance Officer, I am now able to keep a complete and accurate record of all those Schools whose existence and statistics were hitherto known to me only through the naturally incomplete und imperfect reports of the District Watchmen. No doubt the labours of this School Attendance Officer, who is daily perambulating town and villages, applying moral suasion to vagrant children and their parents and keeping a register of school attendance, has caused a certain increase of attendance. But the above mentioned increase in the number of Schools (and scholars) is principally due to the fact that hitherto many of the smaller Schools in town and villages, independent of Government supervision, had escaped registration. Of the 12,123 scholars under instruction in 277 local Schools in the year 1893, one half (6,250 scholars) attended our 102 Grant-in-Aid Schools, over one- fifth (2,596 scholars) attended 144 Kaifong Schools, nearly one fifth (2,356 scholars) attended 24 Govern- ment Schools, and the remainder (921 scholars) attended sundry unclassed, public or private, Schools which are under European supervision but exempt from the supervision of the Education Department.

3. STATISTICS OF SCHOOLS UNDER THE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT.-The total number of Schools, subject to supervision and examination on the part of the Education Department, amounted in the year 1893 to 126, as compared with 87 in the year 1883 and 36 in the year 1873. The total number of scholars enrolled in this same class of Schools, during the year 1893, amounted to 8,606, as compared with 5,597 scholars in the year 1883 and 2,280 scholars enrolled in the year 1873. In other words, there has been an increase of 51 such Schools, with 3,317 scholars, during the ten years from 1873 to 1883, and a similar increase of 39 Schools with 3,009 scholars during the ten years from 1883 to 1893.

4. SCHOOLS UNDER THE EDUCATION DepartmENT. PROGRESS during the LAST THREE YEARS. The number of Schools under the supervision of the Education Department rose, from 117 Schools in the year 1891, to 130 Schools in 1892, but was in the year 1893 reduced, by the closing of 11 badly attended Government Schools, to 126 Schools. Nevertheless, the number of scholars under instruction in these Schools rose, from 7,672 scholars in the year 1891, to 8,277 scholars in the year 1892, and to 8,606 scholars in the year 1893. There has been thus an annual increase of attendance observable, during the last three years, progressing from an increase of 502 scholars in the year 1891, to an increase of 605 scholars in the year 1892; but in the year 1893 the net increase amounted only to 329 scholars, owing to the fact that the normal increase of 595 scholars in the Grant-in-Aid Schools of the year 1893 was accompanied by an abnormal decrease of 356 scholars on the side of the Govern- ment Schools. This decrease was due to the above-mentioned closing of a number of Government Schools.

5. COMPARATIVE STATISTICS OF GOVERNMENT SCHOOLS AND GRANT-IN-AID SCHOOLS.-Referring now, once more, to those 126 Schools with 8,606 scholars under the cognizance of the Education Department, there were, in the year 1893, as many as 6,250 scholars (nearly three fourths of the whole number) attending 102 Grant-in-Aid Schools where they received a Christian education, whilst 2,356 scholars (over one fourth) attended 24 Government Schools, receiving a secular education. The secular Government Schools are free schools with the exception of Queen's College and Girls' Central School, the fees of which (covering also cost of books and stationery) are considerably below the average of fees charged in similar Voluntary Schools. All the religious Grant-in-Aid Schools offer ́Chinese instruction free of charge, but some of them require, for English instruction, school-fees ranging from one to three dollars a month, with extra charges for books and stationery. An absolu- tely free education is offered in English by 7 Grant-in-Aid Schools and 5 Government Schools, and in Chinese by 89 Grant-in-Aid Schools and 17 Government Schools. As to attendance, the secular

1

190

Government Schools, having all their expenses provided by Government, have as a rule better and roomier accommodation, superior school materials and a larger staff than the religious Grant-in-Aid Schools. Nevertheless, the latter are annually growing in public favour for the reason that the teachers of Grant-in-Aid Schools, whose salaries or promotion depend upon the efficiency and results of their teaching, are as a rule compelled by self-interest to be more painstaking in attending to the progress of each individual scholar. The attendance of some Government Schools sank of late so low that eleven Schools had to be closed on 1st January, 1893, in accordance with the rule lately established by the Government, to support no School having fewer than 25 scholars in average attendance, provided that there are in the neighbourhood_other Schools within easy reach. In the course of the year two more Government Schools were closed for the same reason, but Grant-in-Aid Schools were in each case ready to step in and fill up the gap. The subjoined Table exhibits the comparative development of Grant-in-Aid Schools and Government Schools since the starting of the Grant-in-Aid scheme of 1873.

Year.

Comparative Statistics of Voluntary and Government Schools, 1873 to 1893.

Voluntary Grant-in-Aid

Total.

Religious

Schools.

Secular

Government Departmental

Schools.

Schools.

Scholars.

Schools.

Scholars.

Schools.

Scholars.

1873,.......

1874,.

1875,.

699

442

30

1,838

36

2,280

632

30

1,931

39

2,563

679

30

1,927

39

2,606

1876,.......

11

751

30

2,171

41

2,922

1877,

14

996

30

2,148

44

8,144

1878,....

17

1,021

30

2,101

47

3,122

1879, 1880,

19

1,417

31

2,043

50

3,460

27

1,808

36

2,078

63

3,886

1881,

37

2,237

35

1,986

72

4,223

1882,..

41

3,068

39

2,114

80

5,182

1883,

48

3,517

39

2,080

87

5,597

1884.

55

3,907

35

1,978

90

5,885

1885,.

55

4,041

35

1,803

90

5,844

1886,

56

3,951

34

1,893

90

5,844

1887

61

4,160

33

1,814

94

5,974

1888,

63

4,325

34

1,933

97

6,258

1889,...

69

4,814

35

2,293

104

7,107

1890,......

76

4,656

36

2,514

112

7,170

1891.

81

5,132

36

2,540

117

7,672

1892,...

95

5,655

35

2,622

130

8,277

1893,..

102

6,250

24

2,356

126

8,606

6. LOCAL DISTRIBUTION OF SCHOOLS.-The Educational Institutions of the Colony are now so numerous and so widely and evenly distributed that, with the sole exception of the needs of the European residents on the Peak and at Tsim-sha-tsui (Kowloon), every District of the Colony is now supplied with a number of Schools, amply sufficient to meet the existing demand for elementary education. Of course, as the population increases, more elementary Schools will be called for, and the Grant-in-Aid Scheme is capable of meeting such demands in an effective and economic manner. But in future it will be rather a question of raising the standard of education in the existing Schools and seeking to create a demand for education among classes holding aloof from education, than of multiplying Schools, as hitherto, with a view to come up to the existing demand for education.

The rapid growth of the secular Chinese Kaifong Schools, running parallel with the recent enormous development of the religious Grant-in-Aid Schools, is a feature of considerable importance. Hitherto the Government considered itself bound to maintain, and pay the entire expenses of, a large number of secular Government Schools, in addition to the pecuniary aid given to an annually increasing number of religious Grant-in-Aid Schools, because the latter, though no propaganda has ever been charged against them, are virtually free to teach as much religion (in a denominational sense) as they please. It was considered necessary, therefore, to maintain in each District of the Colony a sufficient number of secular Government Schools to enable rate-payers, objecting to religious teaching, to send their children to a secular School within easy reach. Of late years the Tung-wa Hospital Committee and private persons among the Chinese community, stimulated no doubt by the extraordinary growth of the Grant-in-Aid Schools but declining to avail themselves of the proffered advantages of the Grant-in- Aid Code, have started numbers of Schools on their own account and in accordance with their own views. These Schools, though as much penetrated by religious teaching as any Grant-in-Aid School, are virtually secular Schools. The rapid growth and wide distribution of these Kaifong Schools enable the Government now to retire, gradually, from the abnormal rôle of acting the school-master and to confine itself, in time, to the more appropriate function of aiding and directing the movement of voluntary efforts for the benefit of local education. I subjoin a. Table exhibiting the distribution of secular and religious Schools throughout the Colony.

Table shewing the Local Distribution of Secular and Religious Schools in 1898.

Districts

exclusive of Peak and

Tsimshatsui.

Govern- ment.

Kaifong.

Grant- in-

Unclassed. Unclassed.

Total.

Total.

Aid.

Sec. Schools.

Scholars.

Sec. Schools.

Scholars.

Rel. Schools.

Scholars.

Sec. Schools.

Scholars.

Rel. Schools.

Scholars.

Sec. Schools.

Scholars.

Rel. Schools.

Scholars.

I & II. Kennedy Town and Shek-

tongtsui,

III. Saiyingpun,.

IV & V. Taipingshan and Sheung-

wan,.

:

2

18

3

77

3 233

23

412

19 1,122

:

F..

:

2

62

2

18

10

5

139

1

24

26

645 20 1,146

3 1,143

36

737

22 1,662

1

26

40 1,906

VI. Chungwan,

2

192 30

509

21 1,685

1

367

1

272

33 1,068

VII & VIII. Hawan and Wantsai,

3

313 15

299

12 626

1

170

18

...

...

612

2 2 2

22

1,662

22 1,957

13

796

IX & X. Bowrington and Sookon-

pou,

I

73 4

64 3 106

XI. Villages of Hongkong,.

7

232 17

252

XII. Villages of Kowloon,

5

170 17 305

9 378

13 594

:

:

5 137 3

106

24 484 9

378

22 475 13 594

Total,.............

24 2,356 144 2,596 102 6,250

2 393

10

5

528

170 5,345 107 6,778

Grand Total.....................................

:

277 Schools with 12,123 Scholars.

7. EDUCATIONAL EXPENDITURE OF THE GOVERNMENT.-The sum total of educational payments made by the Government during the year 1893 ($79,413.84 as compared with $86,627.00 in 1892) amounted, after deducting school-fees paid into the Treasury ($12,683.00 as compared with $12,857.00 in 1892) to $66,730.84 (as compared with $73,770.00 in 1892). This decrease in expenditure, amounting to $7,040.00, is however partly due to the fact that the expenditure of the preceding year had been swelled by exceptional causes. Still, retrenchments were made by me, at the request of the Government, and rigorously applied in every possible direction so far as it was found compatible with the maintenance of bare efficiency. Increase of expenditure is, however, unavoidable in the long run, as Schools must multiply and expand in proportion to the natural increase of the population. The details of educational expenses and reductions in the year 1893 were as follows:-Office of Education Department $5,273.95 (decrease of $946.40); Victoria College (not including cost or repairs of building) $22,078.42 (decrease of $2,138.40); Government Central School for Girls (including rent of building) $3,002.17 (increase of $141.98); twenty-four other Departmental Schools $7,180.38 (decrease of $1,524.23); Grant-in-Aid Schools $23,583.96 (decrease of $4,846.31, the preceding year's accounts having included Building Grants amounting to $5,500.00); Physical Training $192.00 (decrease of $147.72); Government Scholarships $4,219.96 (increase of $1,411.40); Student Inter- preters $1,200 (increase of $1,010.28). The net cost of education ($66,730.84) amounted, in 1893, 3.22 per cent. of the total Colonial revenue (as compared with 3.29 per cent. in 1892 and 3.26 per cent. in 1891). The total number of scholars educated in Hongkong in 1893, at the expense or with the aid of the Government, being 8,606, the education of each scholar cost the Government (exclusive of two Scholarships held in England) $7.75 per scholar (as compared with $8.57 in 1892, and $7.49 in 1891). In the several classes of educational institutions in the Colony, the cost, to Government, of the education of each scholar under instruction was as follows:-in Victoria College (not including cost or repairs of building owned by Government) $21.81; in Girls' Central School (including rent of hired building) $23.45; at 24 other Departmental Schools $5.90; at 102 Grant-in- Aid Schools $3.77. The Managers of those 102 Grant-in-Aid Schools, who received from the Goveru- ment in 1893, as Grants-in-Aid, based on the definite results ascertained by the individual examination of each scholar, the sum of $23,583.96, spent during the same year on those Schools, out of the resources of their respective Societies, supplemented in the case of seven Schools by school-fees, the sum of $71,266.95.

to

8. NATURE OF THE EDUCATION GIVEN IN THE SCHOOLS OF THE COLONY-As regards those 126 Schools, with 8,606 scholars, under the supervision of the Education Department in the year 1893, there were 24 Schools at work giving to 3,120 scholars of English, Portuguése, Indian or Chinese extraction an English education (combined with classical Chinese teaching in the case of 6 of these

191

192

Schools with 1,615 chiefly Chinese scholars); 4 Schools gave to 165 Portuguese children a European education in the Portuguese language; 3 Schools gave to 152 Chinese children a European education in the Chinese language; and 95 Schools gave to 5,169 children a classical Chinese education. In the 144 local Kaifong Schools with 2,596 scholars (exempt from the supervision of the Education Department), only 62 scholars received, in 8 Schools, an Anglo-Chinese education, whilst all the rest, viz., 2,534 scholars received, in 136 Schools, a classical Chinese education. As to the 7 unclassed Schools under European supervision with 921 scholars, 393 scholars received in 2 Schools a purely English education, and 528 scholars received in 5 Schools a European education in the Chinese language. To sum up, then, among 12,123 scholars under instruction, in the year 1893, in 277 local Schools, the vast majority, viz., 63.54 per cent., received in 231 Schools a purely Chinese education in the classical language of China; 29.49 per cent. received in 34 Schools an English or Anglo-Chinese education; 5.69 per cent. received in 8 Schools a European education in the Chinese and 1.91 per cent. received the same in the Portuguese language. In other words, we may say that two-thirds of all our local Schools give a Chinese and one-third a European education.

9. FEMALE EDUCATION.-In former times the most abnormal feature of the educational condition of this Colony was the general neglect of female education. But since the last ten years a steady improvement has taken place in this respect in those Schools of the Colony which are under the supervision of the Education Department. The steady increase of the proportion of girls, among the whole number of scholars under instruction in those Schools, is a most cheering fact, as it holds out a definite prospect of our attaining soon to a normal condition in this respect. It will be seen from the subjoined Table that in Schools under the Education Department the percentage of scholars, being girls, has steadily been progressing, since the year 1873 (when the Grant-in-Aid Scheme was started), from 13.33 per cent. to 37.90 per cent.

Proportion of Boys and Girls under instruction in Schools subject to the supervision of the Education Department.

Year.

Percentage of Scholars being Girls.

Scholars under instruction.

Total

Population.

of

Boys.

Girls.

Scholars.

1873,

121,985

1,976

204

2,280

13.33

1874,

2,282

281

2,563

10.96

1875,

2,177

429

2,606

16.46

1876,

139,144

2,379

543

2,922

18.58

1877,

2,520

624

3,144

19.84

1878,

2,544

578

3,122

18.51

1879,

2,850

610

3,160

17.63

1880,

160,402

3,187

699

3,886

17.98

1881,

.....

3,364

859

4,228

20.34

1882,

166,433

3,941

1,241

5,182

23.94

1883,

173,475

4,120

1,477

5,597

26.38

1884,

181,529

4,238

1,647

5,885

27.98

1885,

190,594

4,329

1,700

6,029

28.19

1886,

200,990

4,161

1,683

5,844

28.79

1887,

212,951

4,195

1,779

5,974

29.77

1888,

215,800

4,342

1,916

6,258

30.77

1889,

194,482

4,991

2,116

7,107

29.77

1890,

4,846

2,324

7,170

32.41

224,814

4,881

2,791

7,672

36.38

231,662

5,335

2,942

8,277

35.54

238,724

5,344

3,262

8,606

37.90

1891, 1892, 1893,

Encouraging, however, as the foregoing figures are, they do not contain the whole truth. In former years, I was unable to obtain complete and reliable statistics as to the attendance of local Schools not under the Education Department. I was aware that in the vast majority of those Schools (that is to say in the Kaifong Schools) female education is still almost entirely neglected. Through the efforts of the School Attendance Officer, I am now able to give exact statistics of all the Schools of the Colony. Now the percentage of scholars, being girls, is in the different classes of local Schools as follows:-Unclassed Schools (nearly all being Missionary institutions) 57.43 per cent., Grant-in-Aid Schools, 47.90 per cent., Government Schools, 15.61 per cent., Kaifong Schools, 2.42 per cent. Among a total of 12,123 scholars under instruction in Schools of all descriptions there were, during the year 1893, 8,269 boys and 3,854 girls, the latter numbering 31.79 per cent. of the whole number of scholars. The foregoing figures prove conclusively that the gradual expansion of feinale education in the Colony is principally due to the Grant-in-Aid Scheme and to the agency of local Missions and that the only class of Schools which still exhibit a shameful apathy in relation to the interests of female education are the native Kaifong Schools which are inaccessible to stimulation on the part of the Education Department.

10. ATTENDANCE IN SCHOOL AND NUMBER OF UNEDUCATED CHILDREN.-The population of Hong- kong, including, besides the Navy, also the Army which has (for soldiers' children) separate Schools not included in the returns of the Education Department, amounted in the year 1893 to about

193

238,724 souls. On the basis of the census returns of 1891, I calculate that the foregoing estimate of the population includes 31,034 children of local school-age (6 to 16 years), or 13 per cent., and that of this number, about 47 per cent., or 14,151 scholars are girls and 53 per cent., or 15,748 scholars are boys. Now, as the number of scholars under instruction in local Schools (soldiers' children excepted) amounted to 12,123, it is safe to estimate the number of those children of local school-age, who did not attend any School in 1893, to amount to 18,911. But a large proportion of these children, numbering probably more than one-half, though under 16 years of age and not attending School in 1893, may be assumed to have been previously under instruction for several years. It would be incorrect, therefore, to put down all those 18,911 children as having remained altogether untouched by educational influences. All I can say about them is, that some of them no doubt remain entirely uneducated, that others received but an imperfect education, but that a considerable proportion of them received from two to three years' schooling in the Chinese classics such as is in China considered ample provision for a working man's education. Considering that it has been stated, on good authority, that in England, in spite of compulsory school-attendance laws, barely one half of the children of school-going age attend School, the school-attendance of Hongkong is, in the absence of any compulsion, by no means discouraging, though it is not what it ought to be. I have stated in former reports that servant-girls in town and the girls of the boat-population are the principal classes of children kept out of School. I have been informed by a Committee of School-teachers as well as by the School Attendance Officer, that of late years the number of children attending no School has been greatly swelled by an Army of boys from 8 to 14 years of age, employed either as hawkers of fruit, sweet-meats, cigarettes and matches, or as watchmen for unlicensed adult hawkers to whom they signal the movement of Police Constables. But the fear was expressed at the same time, that if the Government were to interfere with the former class of boys, it would only give increased employment to the latter class. The School Attendance Officer reports that these boys are mostly recruited from the Saiyingpun District and that the vast majority of them are the children of Tungkoon people, noted for their disorderly character. As regards the boat population, some improvement in school-attendance appears to have taken place in 1893, but much of this recorded progress may be due only to improved methods of collecting statistics. I append a Table showing the provision which exists for the education of children of the boat population in those centres where these people specially congregate. It is hardly necessary to add that all other public Schools in the Colony are equally open to them.

Schools specially available for the Boat population.

Government.

Grant-in-Aid.

Kaifong.

Total.

Schools. Scholars. Schools. Scholars. Schools.

Scholars.

Schools.

Scholars.

Shaukiwan, Hunghom,

4

218

11

151

15

369

...

3

149

5

47

8

196

...

Yaumati,

1

53

3

215

93

7

361

Mongkoktsui,

1

41

34

3

75

Taikoktsui,

1

59

30

4

89

Shamshuipou,

49

1

49

Aberdeen,

1

21

1

8

2

29

Aplichau,

46

3

72

4

118

Total,

3

140

13

711

28

435

44

1,286

5

11. RESULTS OF THE ANNUAL EXAMINATIONS.-As far as the 102 Grant-in-Aid Schools are concerned, the detailed results of the annual examination of these Schools will be found summarized in Table XIV appended to this report, where the percentage of scholars passed in each School in 1893 is started and compared with the results of the preceding year, and in Table XV which records the percentage of passes gained by these Schools in each subject. As regards the 24 Departmental Govern- ment Schools, Tables III to X supply the most important particulars. I subjoin however a few additional observations with regard to these several Schools.

12. VICTORIA COLLEGE.-Some time ago I presented a detailed report on the condition of this School in the year 1893. This report is still under the consideration of the Government. The Headmaster's separate report for the year 1893 has lately been published in the Government Gazette. In future years this School will be referred to under the name of Queen's College.

13. GOVERNMENT CENTRAL SCHOOL FOR GIRLS.-In addition to the statements contained in the report of the Headmistress, which will be found appended below, I am happy to state that the annual examination of this Institution has furnished abundant evidence to show that the School is making steady progress in every respect and continues satisfactorily to supply a felt want of the community. The inconvenient and insufficient accommodation which has hitherto restrained the development of this School, has been rectified at the close of the year by the opening of the new building erected by the Honourable E. R. BELILIOS on the site of the former Government Central School. In future reports this School will be referred to as the Belilios Public School.

194

14. DEPARTMENTAL DISTRICT SCHOOLS.-The number of the Departmental Schools (outside) Victoria College and the Girls' Central School) has been reduced, in the year 1893, from 35 to 24 Schools, by the substitution of Grant-in-Aid Schools for those Government Schools the average attendance of which was persistently at a very low level. The closing of such ineffective but expensive Schools has exercised a stimulating influence on the remaining Government Schools. The Anglo- Chinese Schools at Saiyingpun, Wantsai and Wongnaichung have shown very fair results and are greatly appreciated by the people. But at Stanley and particularly at Yaumati, where the people care more for Chinese than for English teaching, there is but little progress visible. The main difficulties, however, under which all these Schools labour consist in the insufficiency or unsuitability of the accommodation and in the almost total absence of properly trained teachers.

15. GRANT-IN-AID SCHOOLS.-For some years past it was felt that the Grant-in-Aid Schools had outgrown in many respects the Code of 1873, revised in 1879 and 1883. An annually increasing demand had arisen for the addition of a seventh standard both in the Chinese and in the English Schools. In the former, there was further also a desire for the addition of Arithmetic (as well as Geography) to the ordinary pensums of a purely Chinese curriculum. In the interest of the English Schools, pressed as they were of late by a growing demand for the teaching of subjects trenching upon the sphere of secondary education, it was deemed necessary to enlarge the scope of the elementary side of the Scheme. It was felt desirable that the gradation from the lowest to the highest standard should be made more even, particularly with regard to Arithmetic and Geography. Elementary science lessons, naturally included in the reading books and in sundry-class subjects of the lower standards, had to be specially included among the examination subjects of the seventh standard. The regula- tions concerning special subjects also appeared to require revision so as to enlarge the range of the subjects open for selection whilst limiting the number of subjects to be taken up by each individual scholar. At the same time, however, financial considerations demanded that the increase of expendi- ture, particularly involved in the addition of a seventh standard of the English Schools, should be balanced by a corresponding reduction of the values of passes and of the capitation grants in the case of the comparatively inexpensive Chinese Schools. After due consultation with Managers and Head- masters, I drafted a revised Code, combining the above mentioned points. This new Code of Regula- tions for Educational Grants-in-Aid (1893), having received the approval of the Government (Gazette of 19th August, 1893), will come into force on 1st January, 1894. Elementary education having thus been dealt with, the next step will be the endeavour to promote secondary education, the need for which, though not felt by the mass of the Chinese population at all, presses from year to year more heavily on the resident European families. The practice hitherto obtaining, of sending children for purposes of secondary education to Europe, has of late become a more and more expensive, and in many cases impossible, luxury. Hence the felt need of special provision to be made for the peculiar wants of the education of European children.

16. LOCAL EXAMINATIONS.-The local Examinations held, in Hongkong, for the College of Preceptors, (January, 1893), resulted in a diploma of Association and Membership being granted to a Master of Victoria College (Mr. W. MACHELL). A London Matriculation Examination was also held here (June, 1893), and a certificate has since been issued to the successful candidate (Miss BERGER), an assistant teacher in a local Grant-in-Aid School. The results of the annual Oxford Local Examinations, held in Hongkong in July 1893, were as under:-I. Junior Division.-Honours List, none. Pass List.-Diocesan School, 4 passes; Victoria English School, 4 passes; Victoria College, 3 passes. Candidates who, having exceeded the age of 16 years, satisfied the Examiners,-Diocesan School, 3 passes; Victoria College, 3 passes; Victoria English Girls School, 1 pass. Successful candidates who obtain distinction,-in religious knowledge, Diocesan School, 1; Victoria English School, 1; in English, Diocesan School, 3. Details of examination results of Junior Division:- presented 37; examined 32; passed in preliminary subjects, 24; passed' in religious knowledge, fully 19, partly 2; passed in English, fully 27, partly 4; passed in mathematics 12; passed in drawing 4. Total of certificates issued to candidates of proper age, 11; to candidates beyond the limit of age, 9. II. Senior Division.-Honours List, none. Pass List, Victoria College, 4 passes; Diocesan School, 2 passes; High School, 1 pass. Successful candidates who, having exceeded the limit of age (19 years), satisfied the examiners, Victoria College, 3. Successful candidates who obtained distinction- in religious knowledge,-Diocesan School, 1; in English, Diocesan School, 1. Details of examina- tion results of Senior Division:-presented, 14; examined, 14; passed in preliminary subjects, 14; passed in religious knowledge, 4; passed in English, 13; passed in mathematics, 10; passed in natural science, 1. Total of certificates issued to candidates of proper age, 8; to candidates beyond the limit of age, 3. The foregoing results may be summarized thus:-Victoria College, 13 passes, no distinction; Diocesan School, 9 passes and 6 distinctions; Victoria English School, 5 passes and 1 distinction; High School, 1 pass.

17. BELILIOS MEDAL AND PRIZE EXAMINATIONS.--At the annual competitive examinations for Belilios Medals and Prizes (December, 1893), 40 picked scholars from the principal Schools of the Colony entered the lists, viz.:-11 European and Chinese boys, 11 European girls and 18 Chinese girls. These scholars represented the élite of the following Schools:-St. Joseph's College, Diocesan School, St. Paul's School, Victoria English School, Italian Convent, Belilios Public School, Berlin

195

+

#

In the

Foundling House School, Basel Mission School, and Victoria Home and Orphanage Schools. boys' division, St. Joseph's College took the 1st and 4th, and the Diocesan School the 2nd, 3rd and 5th prizes. St. Joseph's College distinguished itself by presenting, with very good results, 3 candi- dates for examination in the reporting style of short-hand and 2 in type-writing. In the European girls' division, the Victoria English School took the 1st and 2nd and the Italian Convent the 3rd and 4th prizes and the Belilios Public School the 5th prize. In the Chinese girls' division, the Belilios Public School gained the 1st prize, the Victoria Home and Orphanage School the 2nd and 4th, and the Basel Mission School the 3rd and 5th prizes.

18. PHYSICAL TRAINING.-In addition to the ordinary exercises in physical drill conducted, as in the preceding year, by a Non-commissioned Officer in 12 local Schools (including 4 Girls Schools), a Cadet Corps, consisting of 64 boys from the five principal Schools of the Colony, was formed, in April, 1893. The corps was inspected and reported upon at the close of the year by Lieutenant- Colonel ROBINSON, Commanding the Shropshire Light Infantry. The report, whilst appreciating the efforts made in this direction and the results so far obtained, indicated the need of a re-organization of the Corps. It may be interesting here to note that this Cadet Corps, a fair type of the racial composition of the non-Chinese community of this Colony, represented the following nationalities, viz. English (27), Portuguese (12), Spanish (9), Brazilian (4), German (2), Persian (2), American (1), Norwegian (1), Swedish (1), Siamese (1), Turkish (1), Anglo-Chinese (1).

19. INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION.-Arrangements were made during the year 1893 to enable the only Industrial School of the Colony, the so-called West Point Reformatory, a Roman Catholic Asylum, to come, in course of the time, under the provisions of the Reformatory Schools Ordinance (No. 19 of 1886), which had hitherto remained a dead letter.

20. MEDICAL EDUCATION.-The College of Medicine for Chinese conferred its diploma on a third of its students, Kwan King-LEUNG, one of the Belilios Medical scholars, who had completed a training extending over five years and a half. Though his qualification is not yet recognized by Government, he is certified by a court of independent examiners to be thoroughly qualified to practise medicine, surgery and midwifery. The officers and lecturers of the College, all of whom give their services gratuitously, are steadily carrying forward their philanthropic work and have at the present time over a dozen promising lads pursuing the curriculum. The Hon. E. R. BELILIOS' building scheme has not been acted upon up to the present as his stipulations regarding endowment have not yet been complied with.

21. SCHOLARSHIPS.-Careful attention was bestowed, in 1893, on the question of reforming the Government Scholarship Scheme which, as it was not connected with the local system of education nor with that of the home country, had hitherto benefitted neither the Colony as a whole nor local Schools as such but only individual scholars under private tuition. With one notable exception, the Headmasters whom I consulted objected to any but trivial changes in the old Scheme, though nearly all of them admitted the narrowness of its scope. Desiring, however, to complete the local system of education by adding to the elementary Grant-in-Aid Code a supplementary Scheme for the promotion of secondary education and to link that Scheme directly with the locally established system of Oxford and Cambridge Local Examinations and with an English University, I embodied these aims in a revised set of Government Scholarship Regulations. This new Scheme is now under the consideration of the Government. Meanwhile the two scholars, supported under the old Scheme are continuing their studies in London. The fact that one of them devoted the first year of his Scholar- ship to the preliminary work of preparing in London for the matriculation examination (at a cost of £200), indicates the radical defect of the original Scheme. As to private Scholarships, Victoria College had, in the year 1893, the benefit of 4 Belilios Scholarships, 2 Morrison and 1 Stewart Scholarship. St. Joseph's College had the benefit of one, and the College of Medicine that of 4 Belilios Scholarships.

22. I enclose the usual Tables (I to XVI) containing the educational statistics for the which, to some extent, have been summarized in the foregoing paragraphs.

I have the honour to be,

year 1893

The Honourable G. T. M. OBRIEN, C.M.G.,

Colonial Secretary,

&c.,

&c.,

&c.

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

E. J. EITEL, (Ph. D. Tub.),

Inspector of Schools and Head of the Education Department.

196

TABLE I.-NUMBER of SCHOLARS attending Schools subject to Government Supervision during 1893.

No.

Name of Schools.

Government Grant-in-Aid Schools. Schools.

Total.

123 THE LO

American Board Mission, Bridges Street (Boys),

76

76

2

6

19

""

Station Terrace (Boys)

""

""

Hinglung Lane (Boys),

97

""

Queen's Road West (Boys),

29

Háwan (Girls),

"

Graham Street (Girls),

44

44

85

85

48

48

31

31

37

37

8

9

"9

10

"

11

12

13

14

15

16

""

17

"

18

""

19

""

20

""

21

>>

22

19

23

""

24

25

""

26

""

27

""

28

29

30

31

32

""

33

34

35

""

Stanley School (Girls),

36

"

37

99

38

19

7 Aplichau (Boys),

Basel Mission, High Street (Girls),

Shamshuipo (Boys),

46

46

94

94

49

49

Shaukiwan (Boys),

Tokwawan (Boys),

41

41

17

...

17

40

15

41

"

Yaumati (Boys),.....

42

99

43

19

44

45

""

46

II.

Hungbòm (Boys),

Matauchung (Boys),

Berlin Mission (Girls),

Central School (Girls),

C. M. S., St. Stephen's Chinese School (Boys),

""

No. 2 (Boys),

Pottinger Street (Boys),...

Saiyingpun (Boys),....

St. Stephen's Baxter Memorial (Girls), Lyndhurst Terrace (Girls),

Third Street (Girls),

Yaumati (Mixed),

Hunghòm (Girls),

Quarry Bay (Girls),

Little Hongkong (Boys), Aberdeen School (Boys),

Victoria Home and Orphanage (Girls), St. Stephen's Anglo-Chinese (Boys), Diocesan Home and Orphanage (Boys),

F. E. S., Bonham Road, Chinese Division (Girls),

High Street (Girls),

Queen's Road West (Girls), .......

Hollywood Road (Girls),

Pottinger Street (Girls),..........

Shaukiwan (Girls),

Tokwawan (Girls),

Bonham Road English Division (Girls),

39 L. M. S., Square Street (Boys),.............

Wantsai Chapel (Boys),.

Shektongtsui (Boys),

Saiyingpun I. Division (Boys),

""

30

30

20

20

...

128

128

103

103

103

103

82

82

78

78

68

68

68

68

22

22

35

35

30

30

30

30

32

32

21

21

38

38

81

81

...

124

124

46

46

27

27

49

49

35

35

43

43

44

44

47

47

30

30

29

29

137

137

92

92

90

90

38

38

65

65

...

(Boys),

101

101

82

82

47

99

48

-

49

99

50

39

51

59

52

"9

53

A

54

55

""

~

56

""

57

""

58

59

60

>>

61

"

62

""

Hospital Chapel (Boys),

Shektongtsui (Girls),

Saiyingpun (Girls),.....

Ui-hing Lane I. Division (Girls),..

""

II.

Fletcher Street (Girls),

Tanglungchau (Boys),

Shaukiwan (Boys),...

Taikoktsui (Boys), Square Street (Girls),....

Li Yuen Street (Girls), D'Aguilar Street (Girls), Third Street (Boys),

Bowrington (Girls),

(Girls),

Matauwai I. Division (Boys),

II.

"

Kau-ü-fong (Girls),...

83

83

16

16

156

156

55

55

...

36

36

41

41

...

22

22

63

63

59

59

47

47

44

44

54

54

52

52

21

21

33

33

(Girls),

12

12

78

78

63

"

Stanley Street (Girls),

33

33

64

""

Tanglungchau (Girls),

63

63

65

"

Taipingshan Chapel (Girls),

145

145

66

""

Aberdeen Street (Girls),

64

64

67

""

Wantsai Chapel (Girls),.

119

119

68

"

Staunton Street (Girls),

11

41

69

33

70

29

A

Taihang (Girls),

71

Saiyingpun, Second Street East (Girls),

Taipingshan English School (Boys),

40

40

33

33

49

49

72

Third Street

99

>

(Boys),

39

39

73

""

Lok-ying

>>

وو

(Boys),

27

27

74

"

Morrison School (Boys),

120

120

*

75 Mongkok (Boys),.............

41

41

76

Mongkoktsui (Boys),

14

14

Carried forward,......................

229

4,087

4,316

197

TABLE I-NUMBER of SCHOLARS attending Schools subject to Government Supervision during 1893.-Continued.

No.

Name of Schools.

Government Grant-in-Aid

Schools.

Total.

Schools.

Brought forward,.

229

4,087

4,316

وو

وو

77

New Girls School,

78

Pokfulam (Boys),..........

79

80

>>

81

99

82

83

84

85

86

87

88

European

89

"9

High School (Boys),

90

""

91

21

92

""

93

94

""

95

96

99

97

""

""

English

98

"

"3

99

100

""

101

102

103

104

105

106

107

108

109

110

111

64

64

10

10

R. C. M., Cathedral School (Boys),

Bridges Street Chinese School (Girls), Hollywood Road Chinese School (Girls), Holy Infancy School I. Division (Boys),

""

39

Yaumati (Girls),.

Shaukiwan (Girls),.

Hunghòm (Girls),

St. Joseph's College Chinese Division (Boys),

Italian Convent English Division (Girls),

""

Portuguese Division (Girls),

Bridges Street, English Division (Girls),

Portuguese Division (Girls), St. Francis Portuguese Division (Girls),

English Division (Girls),

"2

Victoria Portuguese School (Mixed),

64

64

59

59

75

75

41

41

II.

"

(Girls),

46

46

90

90

67

67

37

37

84

84

(Boys),

216

216

13

13.

212

212

34

34

74

74

77

77

32

32

31

31

43

43

(Boys),

29

(Girls),

150

150

59

59

113

Wantsai (English) (Boys),.

114

""

115

Saiyingpun English (Boys),

""

(Punti) (Boys),

Sheko (Boys),

Sheungwan (Boys),

Sheungwan (Girls),

St. Paul's College School (Boys),

Stanley (Anglo-Chinese) (Boys), Taitamtuk (Boys),

Taiwongkung (Boys), .

Tanglungchau (Hakka) (Boys),.. Tokwawan (Eastern Village) (Boys),

""

(Western Village) (Boys),

112 Victoria College (Boys),......

(Chinese) (Boys),..........

Wesleyan Mission, Spring Gardens (Boys),...

189

189

83

(Hakka) (Boys),

44

44

38

38

55

55

76

76

114

114

46

46

13

13

66

66

73

73

33

33

29

29

1,012

1,012

247

247

142

42

42

116

""

""

Wellington Street (Boys),

123

123-

117

$9

(Girls),

60

60

118

""

Lascar Row (Girls),

45

45

119

Wantsai (Boys),

60

60

120

"

""

Graham Street (Girls),

75

75

121

"

Lascar Row (Boys),

62

62

122

Kennedy Town (Boys),

23

23,

123

"

Wellington Street English School (Boys),

55

55.

124

Wongmakok (Boys),

11

...

11

125

Wongnaichung (Anglo-Chinese) (Boys),

68

126

Yaumati (Anglo-Chinese) (Boys);"

53

68 53

Total,,

2,356

6,250

8,606

.

.

198

TABLE IL-PROPORTION of SCHOLARS to POPULATION in the CITY of VICTORIA and in the VILLAGES in 1893.

CITY AND HARBOUR OF VICTORIA.

Population as per Census of 1891.........136,901

CHILDREN IN SCHOOLS UNDER GOVERNMENT SUPERVISION,

IN THE CITY OF VICTORIA,

1. American Board Mission, Bridges Street (Boys).

VILLAGES.

Population, including Boat Population, as per Census of 1891,...64,525 CHILDREN IN SCHOOLS UNDER GOVERNMENT SUPERVISION,

IN VILLAGES.

2

No. of Scholars.

No. of Scholars

76

2.

>>

""

Station Terrace (Boys),

44

3.

1:

19

""

Hinglung Lane (Boys),....

85

3.

""

4.

"}

"J

";

Queen's Road West (Boys),

48

4.

5.

:)

""

Háwan (Girls),

31

5.

6.

.་

""

11

Graham Street (Girls),

37

7. Basel Mission, High Street (Girls),

8. Berlin Mission (Girls),

9. Central School (Girls),

10. C. M. S., St. Stephen's Chinese School (Boys),

94

7.

20

8.

128

9.

193

10.

11.

No. 2 (Boys),

12.

31

Pottinger Street (Boys),

13.

??

Saiyingpun (Boys),

14,

15.

Lyndhurst Terrace (Girls),.

16.

19

Third Street (Girls),

17.

"

18.

103

82

12.

+1

78

13.

High Street (Girls),..

St. Stephen's Baxter Memorial (Girls),

Victoria Home and Orphanage (Girls),

St. Stephen's Anglo-Chinese School (Boys),

19. Diocesan Home and Orphanage (Boys),

20. F. E. S., Bonham Road, Chinese Division (Girls),

21.

68

68

15.

""

22

16.

**

1. Aplichau (Boys),

2. Basel Mission, Shamshuipo (Boys),

""

Shaukiwan (Boys),. Tokwa-wan (Boys),

6. C. M. S., Yaumati (Mixed),.

Hunghom (Girls), Quarry Bay (Girls).

Little Hongkong (Boys),. Aberdeen School (Boys),

11. F. É, S., Stanley School (Girls),.

"

Shaukiwan (Girls), Tokwawan (Girls),

14. L. M. S., Yaumati (Boys).

Hunghom (Boys).....

46

E

49

41

17

Matauchung (Boys),

30

35

30

30

32

21

44

47

30

90

Shektongtsui (Boys),

38

82

38

17.

""

Shektongtsui (Girls),

16

81

18.

11

Tanglungchau (Boys),...

22

--

124

19.

11

Shaukiwan (Boys),

63

46

20.

"

Taikoktsui (Boys),

59

27

21.

Matauwai I. Division (Boys),

33

22.

"

Queen's Road West (Girls),

49

22.

II.

17

19

(Girls),

12

23.

19

Hollywood Road (Girls),

35

23.

24.

19

Pottinger Street (Girls),..

43

24.

25.

Bonham Road, English Division (Girls),

29

25. Mongkok (Boys),

26. L. M. S., Square Street (Boys),

137

27.

Wantsai Chapel (Boys),

92

28.

"

Saiyingpun I. Division (Boys),

65

29.

II.

37

(Boys),

101

29.

"

30.

29

Hospital Chapel (Boys),

83

30.

"

31.

**

Saiyingpun (Girls),

156

32.

Ui-hing Lane I. Division (Girls),

55

Tanglungchau (Girls),. Taihang (Girls),

26. Mongkoktsui (Boys),

27. Pokfulam (Boys),

28. R. C. M., Yaumati (Girls),

31. Sheko (Boys),

32. Stanley (Anglo-Chinese) (Boys),

63

33

41

14

10

90

Shaukiwan (Girls),

67

Hunghòm (Girls),

37

38

46

33.

II.

19

1)

(Girls),

36

33. Taitamtuk (Boys),..

13

34.

"1

Fletcher Street (Girls),

41

34. Tanglungchau (Hakka) (Boys),.

73

35.

"

36.

"

37.

38.

19

39.

19

Square Street (Girls),

Li Yuen Street (Girls),

D'Aguilar Street (Girls),.

Third Street (Boys),

Bowrington (Girls),

47

44

36.

""

54

52

35. Tokwawan (Eastern Village) (Boys),

(Western Village) (Boys),

37. Wesleyan Mission, Kennedy Town (Boys), 38. Wongmakok (Boys),...

33

29

23

11

21

40.

23

Kau-ü-fong (Girls),

78

39. Wongnaichung (Anglo-Chinese) (Boys), 40. Yaumati (Anglo-Chinese) (Boys),..

68

53

41.

59

Stanley Street (Girls),

33

42.

"

Taipingshan Chapel (Girls),

145

TOTAL,.

1,609

48.

"1

Aberdeen Street (Girls),..

64

44.

Wantsai Chapel (Girls),

119

45.

Staunton Street (Girls),

41

46.

""

Saiyingpun, Second Street, East (Girls),

40

47.

39

Taipingshan English School (Boys),

49

48.

Third Street

"

(Boys),

39

49.

60.

53.

?>

51.

"

55.

""

56.

17

57.

"

58.

19

59.

High School (Boys),

60.

*

Lok Ying English School (Boys), Morrison School (Boys),.

51. New Girls School,

52. I. C. M., Cathedral School (Boys),

Bridges Street, Chinese Division (Girls)... Hollywood Road, Chinese School (Girls), Holy Infancy School, I. Division (Boys),

II.

St. Joseph's College, Chinese Division (Boys),

Italian Convent, English Division, (Girls),.

27

120

64

64

59

75

41

(Girls),

46

84

European

(Boys),

216

13

212

61.

11

??

Portuguese

(Girls),

34

62.

99

Bridges Street, English Division (Girls),

74

63.

19

**

Portuguese

-""

(Girls),

77

64.

"

65.

99

99

66.

"

67.

11

68.

"

99

St. Francis Portuguese Division (Girls),............

Victoria, Portuguese School (Mixed),

English School (Boys),

""

69. Saiyingpun (English) (Boys),

70.

19

71.

(Punti) (Boys),

72. Sheungwan (Boys),

73.

""

(Hakka) (Boys),...

(Girls),

74. St. Paul's College School (Boys),

75. Taiwongkung (Boys),

77. Wantsai (English) (Boys),

78.

""

79. Wesleyan Mission, Spring Gardens (Boys),....

32

English

(Girls),..

31

43

150

""

(Girls),

59

189

44

55

76

114

66

76. Victoria College (Boys),

1,012

247

(Chinese) (Boys),

42

$80.

"J

""

Wellington Street (Boys),

123

81.

""

(Girls),

60

82.

27

57

Lascar Row (Girls),

45

83.

"

>

Wantsai (Boys),

60

84.

"

Graham Street (Girls),

75

85.

19

"7

Lascar Row (Boys),

62

86.

""

29

Wellington Street Eng. Scho. (Boys),...

55

TOTAL........

6,997

199

TABLE III.-NUMBER of SCHOLARS at the GOVERNMENT SCHOOLS during 1893, and EXPENSES of each SCHOOL.

A

5

7

No.

Name of Schools.

1

Aplichau,

2

Central School (Girls),

Mongkok,

Mongkoktsui,

3

4

6

New Girls School,

Pokfulam,

7 Saiyingpun (English),

Boys.

Girls.

Total.

Expenses.

46

46

$

168.00

128

128

3,002.17

41

41

132.00

14

14

30.00

64

64

624.00

10

10

132.00

189

987.30

189

8

92

(Punti),

(83)

229.80

9

""

(Hakka),

44

44

264.00

10

Sheko,

38

38

120.00

11

Sheungwan (Boys),

55

55

332.00

12

(Girls),

76

76

660.00

13

Stanley (Anglo-Chinese),

46

:

46

318.80

14

Taitamtuk,

13

13

132.34

15

Taiwongkung,

66

66

322.00

16 Tanglungchau (Hakka),

73

73

180.00

17

Tokwawan (Eastern Village),

33

33

132.00

18

(Western Village),

29

29

132.00

19

Victoria College,

1,012

1,012

21,405.46

20

Wantsai (English),

247

1,072.30

247

21

(Chinese),

(142)

372.00

22

Wongmakok,

11

11

132.00

23 Wongnaichung (Anglo-Chinese),

68

68

24

Yaumati (Anglo-Chinese),

53

8888

305.04

53

402.80

Total,..

2,088

268

2,356

$31,588.01

TABLE IV.-AVERAGE EXPENSE of each SCHOLAR at the GOVERNMENT SCHOOLS and at the GRANT-IN-AID SCHOOLS during the year 1893.*

I.-EXPENDITURE OF GOVERNMENT SCHOOLS.

(Cost of working the Schools irrespective of cost of erection or repairs of Buildings.)

1. VICTORIA COLLEGE.

Expenditure,................

Deduct School fees, refunded,...

.$34,426.42 .$12,348.00

-$ 22,078.42

2. Government Girls SCHOOL.

Expenditure, (including house rent),

Deduct School fees, refunded,....

3. OTHER DEPARTMENTAL SCHOOLS, (no School fees).

.$ 3,337.17 335.00

-$ 3,002.17

Cost to Government,

$ 7,180.38

II.-EXPENDITURE ON THE GRANT-IN-AID SCHOOLS.

Total cost to Government, in 1893,

$ 23,583.96

III.-AVERAGE COST OF EACH SCHOLAR.

(Calculated by the Enrolment.)

Average Cost, to Government, of each Scholar:--

1. at Victoria College, (not including cost of building), 2. at Government Girls School, (including rent),.. 3. at Other Departmental Schools,

4. at Grant-in-Aid Schools,

$21.81 $23.45

$ 5.90 $ 3.77

IV.—AVERAGE COST OF EACH SCHOLAR.

(Calculated by the Average Daily Attendance.)

Average Cost, to Government, of each Scholar :-

1. at Victoria College, (not including cost of building), 2. at Government Girls School, (including rent),

3. at Other Departmental Schools,

4. at Grant-in-Aid Schools,

$32.31 $47.14 $ 8.65 .$ 5.56

* NOTE-The cost of the Inspectorate of Schools ($5,273.95), being connected with both Grant-in-Aid Schools and Government Schools, is not included.

200

TABLE V.—AVERAGE MONTHLY ENROLMENT and DAILY ATTENDANCE at the Government Schools for 1893.

Name of Schools.

Average Monthly Average Daily

Enrolment.

Attendance.

No.

12345

Aplichau,

Central School (Girls),

Mongkok,......

Mongkoktsui,

New Girls School,

Pokfulam,

Saiyingpun (English),

6

7

8

""

(Punti),

9

"

(Hakka),

10

Sheko,

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

Sheungwan (Boys),

Stanley (Anglo-Chinese),

Taitamtuk,

Taiwongkung,.

Tanglungchau (Hakka),

Tokwawan (Eastern Village),

(Girls),

18

(Western Village),

19

Victoria College,........

20

Wantsai (English)

21

99

(Chinese),

22

Wongmakok,

23

Wongnaichung (Anglo-Chinese),

24 Yaumati (Anglo-Chinese),

Total,.....

33.09

29.08

76.70

63.68

21.54

18.19

12.00

9.55

37.36

32.37

9.13

8.41

111.60

108.24

39.63

36.43

22.54

19.01

29.72

29.54

28.62

26.42

41.09

35.41

35.45

30.44

10.54

9.45

39.21

37.98

39.00

36.38

20.27

17.73

24.27

22.40

734.75

683.21

159.90

149.83

86.00

83.73

10.18

9.55

54.09

50.36

30.82

28.67

1,707.50

1,576.06

No.

Name of Schools.

Maximum Monthly Enrolment.

TABLE VI.—MAXIMUM and MINIMUM ENROLMENT and DAILY ATTENDANCE at the Government Schools during 1893.

Maximum Daily Minimum Daily

Minimum

Monthly Enrolment.

Attendance

Attendance

(Monthly average). (Monthly average).

1234 10 61

Aplichau,

43

25

35.54

19.02

Central School (Girls),

93

70

77.30

57.00

Mongkok,

29

12

27.00

10.73

Mongkoktsui,

14

10

10.00

9.50

New Girls School,

43

27

39.45

23.63

Pokfulam,

10

.8

9.23

6.84

Saiyingpun (English),

122

87

114.62

76.00

"

(Punti),

46

30

43.38

28.32

9

19

(Hakka),

30

20

25.56

14.30

10

Sheko,

35

26

34.92

21.44

11

Sheungwan (Boys),

42

27

36.12

25.15

12

""

(Girls),

47

34

40.19

29.31

13

Stanley (Anglo-Chinese),

44

32

37.20

31.00

14

Taitamtuk,

12

10

10.57

8.88

15

Taiwongkung,

47

37

39.92

34.04

16

Tanglungchau (Hakka),

42

29

40.05

24.12

17 Tokwawan (Eastern Village),

22

17

19.31

15.82

18

39

(Western Village),.

29

15

27.81

13.61.

19

Victoria College,

840

639

797.88

595.50

20

Wantsai (English),

192

132

172.79

123.57

21

""

(Chinese),

99

71

95.83

69.20

22

Wongmakok,

11

10

11.00

9.47

23

Wongnaichung (Anglo-Chinese),

58..

51

52.84

48.50

24

Yaumati (Anglo-Chinese),

34

24

30.88

22.50

Total,......

1,984

1,443

1,829.39

1,317.45

TABLE VII.-NUMBER of DAYS on which the GOVERNMENT SCHOOLS were taught during 1893.

No.

Name of Schools.

School Days. No.

Name of Schools.

School Days.

1234

Aplichau,....

253

13

Stanley (Anglo-Chinese),

244

Central School (Girls),

244

14

Taitantuk,

250

Mongkok,

254

15

Taiwongkung,

247

Mongkoktsui,

29

16

Tanglungchau (Hakka),..........

247

5

New Girls School,

240

17

Tokwa-wan (Eastern Village),

244

6

Pokfulam,

220

18

"

(Western Village),

252

7 Saiyingpun (English),

239

19

Victoria College,..

238

8

""

(Punti),

240

20

Wantsai (English),..

240

9

(Hakka),

247

21

""

(Chinese),

240

10

Sheko,

251

22

Wongmakok,

251

11

Sheungwan (Boys),

165

23

Wongnaichung (Anglo-Chinese),

227

12

"

(Girls),

245

24

Yaumati (Anglo-Chinese),...

223

Total Enrolment for the Year.

201

TABLE VIII.-SUMMARY of ENROLMENT and ATTENDANCE at the GOVERNMENT SCHOOLS for the last twenty-five years.

YEARS.

Minimum Daily Attendance

Maximum Daily Attendance.

(Monthly Average).

Minimum Monthly Enrolment.

(Monthly Average).

1869,

942

748

627

504

1870,

1,302

950

683

556

1871,

1,292

937

741

571

1872,

1,480

1,157

837

665

1873,

1,838

1,326

852

760

1874,

1,932

1,271

974

836

1875,

1,927

1,312

988

863

1876,

2,171

1,383

1,057

925

1877,

2,148

1,446

1,212

1,035

1878,

2,101

1,324

1,100

936

1879,

2,043

1,356

1,027

904

1880,

2,078

1,468

1,082

937

1881,

1,986

1,384

1,093

956

1882,

2,114

1,444

1,062

988

1883,

2,080

1,414

1,138

990

1884,

1,978

1,420

1,066

941

1885,

1,988

1,424

1,061

926

1886,

1,893

1,544

1,040

886

1887,

1,814

1,552

1,126

1,000

1888,

1,933

1,653

1,139

1,040

1889,

2,293

1,992

1,190

1,118

1890,

2,514

1,999

1,494

1,370

1891,

2,540

1,909

1,403

1,291

1892, 1893,

2,622

2,101

1,536

1,407

2,356

1,829

1,443

1,317

January,

February,

March,

April,

May,

June,

July,

August,

September,

October,

November,

December,..

TABLE IX.-ENROLMENT and ATTENDANCE at the VICTORIA College during 1893.

Month.

Number of Scholars.

Number of Attendances.

Number of School days.

Average Daily Attendance.

704

16,507

25

660.28

639

4,764

8

595.50

840

13,564

17

797.88

831

11,395

15

759.66

809

17,823

24

742.62

774

18,344

26

705.53

735

16,986

25

679.44

663

2,560

640.00

736*

14,816

22

673.45

718

15,563

24

648.46

692

16,475

26

633.65

676

13,806

22

627.51

Total,

162,603

238

Total Number of ATTENDANCES during 1893,

Number of SCHOOL DAYS during 1893,

Average DAILY ATTENDANCE during 1893,

Total Number of SCHOLARS at this School during 1893,

..162,603

238 683.21

1,012

TABLE X.-GOVERNMENT SCHOOLS (outside VICTORIA COLLEGE and GIRLS CENTRAL SCHOOL) arranged in the

Rank I.

Saiyingpun, Anglo-Chinese School. Wantsai, Anglo-Chinese School.

Wongnaichung, Anglo-Chinese School. Chinese Girls School, No. 2. Sheko, Chinese School.

Rank II.

Sheungwan, Chinese School.

order of their efficiency.

Rank II,-Continued.

Chinese Girls School, No. 1.

Tanglungchau, (Hakka) Chinese Sch. Wongmakok, Chinese School.

Rank III.

Aplichan, Chinese School. Yaumati, Anglo-Chinese School.

Rank III,- Continued.

Stanley, Anglo-Chinese School. Taiwongkung, Chinese School. Taitamtuk, Chinese School. Tokwawan, (East) Chinese School.

(West)

""

19

"

Mongkok, Chinese School.

Pokfulam, Chinese School.

Saiyingpun, (Hakka) Chinese School. Mongkoktsui, Chinese School.

202

TABLE XI.-NUMBER of SCHOLARS attending Schools receiving GRANTS-IN-AID (under the Provisions of the Scheme of 1883), expenses incurred and amount of Grant gained by each in 1893.

Class of

Expenses

Name of School.

Boys.

Girls.

Total.

incurred in

Amount of Grant gained

School.

1893.

for 1893.

I

American Board Mission, Bridges Street (Boys),

76

76

$

300.48

243.10

"

27

"

>>

"

99

Station Terrace (Boys), Hinglung Lane (Boys),

44

44

235.69

145.43

85

85

383.95

238.80

""

"

"

Queen's Road West (Boys), Háwan (Girls)..

48

48

225.54

215 07

31

31

207.48

134.42

11

19

"

22

""

"

"

""

""

99

"

"

99

13

Graham Street (Girls),

Basel Mission, Shamshuipo (Boys),

""

Shaukiwan (Boys), Tokwawan (Boys),

C. M. S. St. Stephen's Chinese School (Boys),

No. 2, (Boys),

37

37

246.50

99.31

49

49

205.02

94.87

41

41

158.76

111.39

17

17

104.08

46.97

Matauchung (Boys),

30

30

96.92

103

103

363.39

304.24

103

103

384.42

186.07

""

Pottinger Street, (Boys),

82

82

295.20

171.32

E

"J

Saiyingpun (Boys),

78

78

296.04

193.60

99

"

St. Stephen's Baxter Memorial (Girls),

68

68

265.54

213.56

**

""

Lyndhurst Terrace (Girls),

68

68

321.42

232.44

""

19

Third Street (Girls),..

22

22

206.78

107.08

>>

"

Yaumati (Mixed),

30

5

35

182.98

135.57

""

"

Hunghòm (Girls), .

30

30

189.88

53.48

21

**

"1

"

""

>>

??

"

""

""

"

"

>>

"

""

*

""

"

""

??

59

Quarry Bay (Girls),

Little Hongkong (Boys),

Aberdeen School (Boys),.

F. B. S. Bonham Road, Chinese Division (Girls),

""

71

High Street (Girls),

Queen's Road West (Girls),..

Hollywood Road (Girls), Pottinger Street (Girls), Stanley School, (Girls), Shaukiwan, (Girls),

Tokwawan (Girls),.

L. M. S. Square Street (Boys),

Wantsai Chapel (Boys),

Yaumati (Boys),

Shektongtsui (Boys),.

Saivingpun 1, Division (Boys),.

II.

30

30

149.81

52.25

32

32

64.45

21

21

54.21

46

46

631.59

240.25

27

27

212.76

60.11

49

49

235.24

148.69

35

35

230.19

162.05

43

43

272.36

141.43

A

44

44

116.07

106.00

47

47

248.11

174.83

30

30

82.57

137

137

568.54

453.50

92

92

403.65

256.57

90

90

387.56

322.08

38

38

258.04

171.15

65

65

492.25

247.40

"?

(Boys),.

101

101

357.84

447.73

99.

>>

Hunghòm (Boys),

82

82

350.07

240.75

:

37

"

Hospital Chapel (Boys),

83

83

353.17

280.39

33

""

Shektongtsui (Girls),

16

16

150.91

77.47

19

""

Saiyingpun (Girls),

156

156

481.22

506.37

"

19

Ui-hing Lane I. Division (Girls),..

55

55

304.78

238.52

II.

"

"

(Girls),.

36

36

238.16

136.22

>>

Fletcher Street (Girls),

41

41

202.55

121.83

99

""

Tanglungchau (Boys),

22

22

190.90

39.58

95

39

Shaukiwan (Boys),

63

63

280.41

230 12

"J

27

Taikoktsui (Boys),..

59

59

240.97

187.12

'99

"3

Square Street (Girls),

47

47

256.04

166.53

"}

"

Li-Yuen Street (Girls),

44

44

242.18

161.06

21

"

D'Aguilar Street (Girls),

54

54

265.12

257.15

"

Third Street (Boys),

52

52

257.89

259.99

"

Bowrington (Girls).

21

21

156.70

94.37

99

31

Matauwai 1. Division (Boys), .

33

33

85.33

II.

99

(Girls),

12

12

33.30

"

Kau-ü-fong (Girls),

78

78

406.02

272.94

19.

Stanley Street (Girls),

33

33

371.09

58.51

+91

Tanglungchau (Girls),

63

63

265.22

163.65

""

Taipingshan Chapel (Girls),

145

145

527.12

444.37

59

"

Aberdeen Street (Girls).

64

64

408.68

227,21

*45

Wantsai Chapel (Girls),

119

119

535.15

298.22

29

Staunton Street (Girls),

41

""

"

""

"}

Saiyingpun, Second Street East (Girls), Taihang (Girls),

40

33

!?

19

""

R. C. M. Cathedral School (Boys),......

Bridges Street, Chinese School (Girls), Hollywood Road, Chinese School (Girls), Holy Infancy School, I. Division (Boys),

64

59

75

41

99

""

31

32

II.

"

(Girls),

46

*

Yaumati (Girls),

90

"?

37

*

19

Hunghòm (Girls),

99

31

"

39

"

"

Shaukiwan (Girls),

Wesleyan Mission Spring Gardens (Boys),

Wellington Street (Boys),

""

67

37

42

123

"

(Girls),

""

31

Lascar Row (Girls),

""

>>

Wantsai (Boys),

60

"

""

""

Graham Street, (Girls),

11

""

""

Lascar Row, (Boys),

62

III

"?

""

Kennedy Town (Boys),

23

Basel Mission, High Street (Girls),

??

Berlin Mission (Girls),

C. M. S. Victoria Home and Orphange (Girls),

I'v

Wesleyan Mission Wellington Street, English School (Boys), C. M. S. St. Stephen's Anglo Chinese (Boys),

55

81

St. Paul's College School (Boys),

114

"

Diocesan Home and Orphange (Boys),

124

"9

F. E. S. Bonham Road English Division (Girls),.

99

Third Street

19

19

"

""

"

23

"

""

L. M. S. Taipingshan English School (Boys),

Lok-ying English School (Boys).

Morrison School (Boys),

R. C. M. St. Joseph's College Chinese Division (Boys),.

49

(Boys),

39

27

120

$4

European

"

(Boys),

*

"

High School (Boys),

216 13

#93 132 19855 : 184 :* : *&* ⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀

41

320,55

183.37

40

386.65

129.64

33

95.46

93.33

64

322.00

108.45

+

59

5,440.00

277.52

75

260.00

286.23

41

450.00

280.24

46

90

380.00

241.11

67

2,140.00

143.96

37

270.00

139.59

42

228.00

137.95

123

352.00

319.62

60

156.00

194.58

45

45

180.00

165.71

60

204.00

225.46

75

75

204.00

236.39

62

242.00

228.26

23

175.00

85.52

94

94

785.91

592.66

20

20

982.00

203.41

38

38

1,774.73

334.90

55

134.16

81

1,078.36

403.88

114

1,750.00

381.61

124

11,998.08

947.36

29

29

708.85

198.76

49

359.31

316.69

39

279.95

172.26

27

165.34

120

766.59

138.49

84

5,125.89

2,338.46

216

B

1,432.00

89.19

99

""

Italian Convent English Division (Girls),

212

212

19

"

Portuguese Division (Girls),

34

3,117.50

1,506.99

34

"

Bridges Street English

"

(Girls),

74

74

31

"" St. Francis

Portuguese

(Girls),

1,555.00

921.67

77

77

11

>>

"

(Girls),

32

32

766.00

372.90

99

"

English

(Girls),

31

31

19

"

Victoria Portuguese School (Mixed),

13

30

43

1,128.10

244.63

19

**

">

English

19

(Boys),

150

150

19

"

"

"

(Girls),

10,131.51

1,508.25

59

59

3,256

2,994

6,250

$71,266.95

$25,238.45

NAME OF SCHOOL.

XIII. RESULTS of the EXAMINATION of the GRANT-IN-AID SC

Class of School.

No. of Scholars Presented.

No. of Scholars Examined.

Stand. I.

Stand. II.

Stand. III.

Stand. IV,

Stand. V.

Stand. VI.

Stand. IV.

Stand. V.

Stand. VI.

Stand.

Stand. II.

Stand. III.

Stand. IV.

Ordinary Subjects.

Special

Subjects.

Ordinary Subj

NUMBER OF SCHOLARS WHO Passed.

NUMBER OF SC:

1.- American Board Mission, Bridges Street, (Boys),

62

60

9 36

2.-

3.-

4.--

11

5.-

6.-

8.

"

9.-

35

10.-

»

Station Terrace, (Boys),

31

31

5

14

10

Hinglung Lane. (Boys),..

64

59

12 24

12

Queen's Road West, (Boys),

43

41

7

13

17

17

Hawan, (Girls),

28

27

9

8 2

""

Graham Street, (Girls),

28

28

3

6

PORTAL

*

12.-

59

13.-

>

14.- 15.-

1)

Saiyingpun, (Boys),

7-Basel Mission, Shamshuipo, (Boys),

11.-C. M. S., St. Stephen's Chinese School, (Boys),

Pottinger Street, (Boys),

St. Stephen's Baxter Memorial, (Girls),

36

35

12

4

Shaukiwan, (Boys),..

31

30

11

11

Tokwawan, (Boys),..

14

14

3

4

:: : : : :

4

317

3

Matauchung, (Boys),

26

26 12

9 4

62

59 10 27 16

No. 2, (Boys),

43

39

10 14 10

42

39 12 17 8

.43

40

11

13 14

43

43

21

12 6

16.-

19

Lyndhurst Terrace, (Girls),.

37

37

13 12 5

17.

Third Street, (Girls),

21

20

8 8 3

19

18.

Yaumati, (Mixed),

30

30

11 6 10

*

19.-

31

Hunghom. (Girls),

10

10

3

3

2

20.-

13

Quarry Bay, (Girls),

10

10

3

6

Ι

21.-

Little Hongkong, (Boys).

19

19

7

19

22.-

21.

"

25.

"

26.

19

27.

"

28.-

29.

30.-

32.-

19

33.- 34.-

17

Yaumati, (Boys)..

""

Aberdeen School, (Boys),

23.-F. E. S., Bonham Road, Chinese Division, (Girls),

"

High Street, (Girls),

Queen's Road West. (Girls),

Hollywood Road, (Girls),

Pottinger Street, (Girls),

Stanley School, (Girls),

Shaukiwán, (Girls), Tokwawan, (Girls),.

31.-L. M. S., Square Street, (Boys),

Wantsai Chapel, (Boys),

Shektongtsui, (Boys),

19

18

10

30

29

15

15

28

28

10

I

28

26

8

I

25

24

6

30

29

13

36

35

10

13

16

13

9

ŝ

79

78

7

24 33

53

51

6 17

23

75

70

3 22 29

35

35

1

9

18

35.

""

Saiyingpun I. Division, (Boys),

57

56

8 26

12

36.-

II.

1

17

"

(Boys),

95

95 10 44 32

37.-

Hunghòm, (Boys),

56

53 11

24

10

"

38.-

"

Hospital Chapel, (Boys),

66

55 13 18

19

39.

"1

40..

11

41.

"

42.

"

43.

11

44.-

"

45.-

"

46.-

"

Shektongtsui, (Girls),..

Saiyingpun, (Girls),

»

Fletcher Street, (Girls),

Tanglungchan, (Boys),

Shaukiwan, (Boys),

Taikoktsui, (Boys),

13

12

1

+

7

102

100

17 35 26

Ui-hing Lane, I. Division (Girls),

37

31i

6

11 7.

II.

(Girls),

I

30

28

5

4

25

24

5 9

3

9

8

2

4

53

50 13

23

13

52

48

12 19

9

47.-

»

Square Street, (Girls),

37

32

17

9

48.

""

Li-yuen Street, (Girls),

32

30

10 10 7

49.-

55

D'Aguilar Street, (Girls),

40

40

7 11 10

50.-

3

Third Street, (Boys),

52

49

6

15 26

51.-

Bowrington, (Girls),

17

17

2

4

10

52.-

»

Matauwai, I. Division, (Boys),

24

21

2

8 6

53

Il.

5

"

15

(Girls),

10

10

4 3

54.

Kau-ül-fong, (Girls),

49

47

21

19

55.

*

Stanley Street, (Girls),

14

13

I

૩૦મ

:: : 00:

8

56.

לל

Tanglungchau, (Girls),

34

31

$ 13

9

57.

Taipingshan Chapel, (Girls),

84

83

26

26

58.

Aberdeen Street, (Girls),

39

36

14 7

59.-

Wantsai Chapel, (Girls),

74

73

30 21

">

60.-

Staunton Street. (Girls).

31 33 9 7

61.- 62.-

"

"

Saiyingpun Second Street East, (Girls), Taihang, (Girls),

28

26

10

11

*24

22

10 9

63.-R. C. Mission, Cathedral School, (Boys),

34 34 23

8

64.-

65.-

66.-

67.-

Bridges Street, Chinese School, (Girls), Hollywood Road, Chinese School. (Girls), Holy Infancy School, I. Division, (Boys),

II.

48

47

11 16

51

50

17 12

24

24 15 4

68.-

Yaumati, "(Giris),

35

(Girls),

34

34 11 3

2

42

42 17 7

69.-

Shaukiwan, (Girls),

32

31 17

6

70.-

55

+

Hunghòm, (Girls),

26

26 14

లు

71.-Wesleyan Mission, Spring Gardens, (Boys)..

34

32

3 14

72.-

11

"

Wellington Street, (Boys)..

77

72 24 22 20

73.-

(Girls),.

35

35 13

11 9

""

74.-

»

Lascar Row (Girls),.

30 28

75.-

"}

**

Wantsai, (Boys),

48

46

16

co co i

7 9 8

1

9

21

76.-

Graham Street, (Girls),

49

48

19

10 5

"

77.-

++

وو

Lascar Row (Boys),..

50

47

10 20 15 1

78.-

Kennedy Town, (Boys),

I 17

17

1 5 9

53

79.-Basel Mission, High Street, (Girls),

80.-Berlin Mission, (Girls),

81.-C. M. S. Victoria Home and Orphanage, (Girls),

82.-Wesleyan Mission, Wellington Street, English School, (Boys),

IV

83.-C. M. S. St. Stephen's Anglo-Chinese, (Boys),

84.-St. Paul's College School (Boys)....

IV

EEEEEE

III 72

71

16 25 17 8

III 20

18

3

5

III 34

20

84 25

5 11 19

8

CHACH: : : : : :*:::::: : : : : : :EN:*:*::

: : : : : :~MIA :* :** :::::::::** TH▸

:**N*:::~~ :: :: :50:00

3

6

1

3

4

I

::::::

IV 55

46

53 25 15 9 39 11 9

85.-Diocesan Home and Orphanage, (Boys),

IV 72 71

13 11 14

86.-F. E. S. Bonham Road. English Division, (Girls),

IV 23

23

1 4

88. 89.- 90.-

55

"

59

Third Street,

Lok-ying, Morrison School, (Boys),

87.-L. M. S. Taipingshan, English School, (Boys),..

91.-R. C. M., St. Joseph's College, Chinese Division, (Boys),

IV 45

43

23 12

(Boys),

IV 25

23

13 7

"

"

(Boys),.

IV

23

23 13 10

IV 18

18 11

IV

31

34 12 8

02.-

European

51

(Boys),

IV 166

161

26 29

36

"

03.--- 94.-

"

High School, (Boys),

IV

11

10

}

2

39

95.-

"

>>

96.

11

Italian Convent, English Division, (Girls),.

Portuguese Division, (Girls), Bridges Street, English Division, (Girls),

IV 103

100

26 18 11 25

IV 35

31

13 12

22:::::::

33 32

: 86:

2

23

5

2

97

74 19

13

IV

63

61

15 18 20

97. 08.-

>>

>>>

Portuguese Division, (Girls),

IV 42

40

14 18

St. Francis, Portuguese Division, (Girls),

IV 21

21

7 7

""

99.- 100a. 1008.- 101.-

English

>>

(Girls),

IV 25

25

G

>>>

Victoria Portuguese School, Portuguese Division, (Girls),, IV 20

19

"

English Division, (Girls),

IV

11

11

"

55

"

English School, (Boys),

IV

83

79

102.-

+

}:

(Girls),

IV

35

33

32

25 15 23

2

12

8 10

"

CHOOLS in 1893, under the provisions of the Scheme of 15th September, 1883.

CHOLARS WHO FAILED.

TOTALS.

SUMB TO WHICH THE SCHOOL 18 ENTITLED.

52

29

.2

48

11

39

82N2

23

4

13 15

21 14

26 4

10

4

25

57

26

:::::: :- :::*::::::::

:::::::~~~:::::- ::~~ :~::~~:~::::::::*

:::::::* :*:::::~::::

*::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

37

39

39

37

20

29

8

10

15

16

24

12

::::::::::::::::::::::::

14.92

32.14 12

13.83 14

12

26

25

21

25

30

13

29.11 20 36 24.54 16 28 26.72 12 36 27.21 26 41 30.03 20 52 21.75

76

2

47

4

52.88 12 68 138

55

15

29 6

49 7

88

7

50

3

53 2

12

88

12

33

32.03 2 52.91 82.66 61.68 28 68.77 26 13.70 2 92.40 36.26 12 44

96

23

28.06 10

52

20

24.42 10

36

6

11.02

2

:::::::::::::::::::::::::

49

54.13 26

92

40

49.39 24 76

30

37.01 34 36

28

35.56 20 40

37

34.51 14 44

48

46.59 12 60

16

16.07 4 16

16

7

45

20.74 4 32

9.19 R 45.17 42

36

6

12.59 2

30

1

30.88 16

71

12

79.51 52 104

35

1

60 13

25 8

24

2

26.91 20 44

22

24.94 20 36

31

3

39.88 46 32

39

8

49.65 22 64

43

55.62 34

20

28.73 30

28

38.38 22

36

52.07 34

30

26

26

66

33

25

46

36

46

15

70

18

34

19

:: www::::::::::

51

37

66

36

10 1154

8

11

68 11

33

:0623 :2H2H : 0225A-H :::

91.41

@8:::::::: _:::::::

10.50 48

63 22

30

42

40.23 138

96

22

33.24 78

56

23

21.72 78

80

17

32.53

66

32

34

4

7154

47

44.57 183.24 156

72

64

232

6 4

4

8.94

8 20

12

97 3

33 1

58

3

36

16

21

19

56

96

144

200

60

14 9

88 8

34.98 34 24

27.73 28 12 31.94 6 56

42.00

48 88

26 44

35.61 14 36 51.06 32 36

33.45 38

50.11 20 80 16.96 2 20

72.70 96 175 136

19.60 18

34.02 30 77

31.82 114 55.00 150

120

46.79 66 72

85.74 78 88

23.04 6 32

37.46 28 28

70.15 60 84 31.31 18 28

156

16

34 140 156

74.08 6 83 174

36 108

16 101

20 176 192

36

98.93 14 96 228

25.35 22 24

15.12 6 12

17.29 6 24 16.05 14 16 20 24

16

42.13 42 48

36.65 26 48 16.39 16 32

32

60.23

18

144

32.07 10 56

67.56

24 96

45.77 14 52

26.61 18 32 28.44 6 24

33.11 24 16

31.07 22 44

11.05 6 16

21.34 24

36

74.69 20 108

50.24 20

56

68

46.21 24 44.43 22 52

8

24

24

10

Stand. V.

Stand. VI.

Stand. IV.

Stand. V.

Stand. VI.

Passed.

Failed.

Passed.

Failed.

*ects.

Special Ordinary Special Subjects. Subjects.. Subjects.

Average Daily Attendance during the Year.

Stand. II.

-7: KÕN⌁§×EHÖBU: 8SHË28: CAÃ*888** ̃ˆˆ**X-AX: HELS¤*25*: *888*: *****DOKTORNO*ÖÖ„RäÖN.: ALESHCHIASONERS.EENS Stand. III.

360 324 1378 |144 |132 |222 76

143.81 156 144 110 300 182 64

30.22 78 48.68 90

45.63 64 144

20.02 42

19.80 36 24

19.40 36 72

24

89.94 12 83

40.96

6 56

60! 96

8

126

40

48

16

24

32

32

16

* ¦ ¦ :*** : : : :8o :* :* :* : : : :* :909 :********** *** :::**** : : : : :9999 : : :** :***** ::* :** :* :* :*NNO::::97808 ¦ ¦** ¦88

24

24

150 180

182

96

88888

:::::::*

56 80 24 24 40

192

50

45 92

32

28

8

10

10

8

::::: *°*::*:::::::: ~; &8: : TUNNS: 5: : : : : 8: 5: : : : : §: : : : :

:::::::: ::: &:::::::::::::::

:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ : : : : : : :** ::829::::

::::::::::::

::

20₤28.50 34

42 21.00

12 7.50

26

*4 31.50

:: :: :22 : : :* :*

16 21.00 14

20 103

* : : : : :::::::

*::::

se : : : :2

12

::::: es

Stand. IV.

Stand. V.

Stand. VI.

Stand. IV.

Stand. V.

Stand. VI.

He::::::::::::::| Very Good.

13.50

13.50

œ : : : :26

Good.

Fair.

Ordinary Subjects.

Special

Subjects.

Needle Work.

Capitation Grant.

Total Grant earned in 1893.

Amount of Reduction 8 per

cent.

Amount payable.

Amount due to Teacher.

Amount due to Manager.

45,77

28.44 107.94

60.23

264.23

21.13 243.10 60.77 32.07 158.07 12.64 145.43 67,56 259.56 20.76 238.80 233.77 18.70 215.07 10 26,61 146.11 11.69 134.42 99.31

182.33 36.35 109.0S 59.70 179.10 53.76 161.31

33.60 100.82

8.63

24.82

74.49

33,11 103.11

8.24

94.87 23.71

71.16

31.07 121.07

9.68

11.05

51.05

4.08

21.34

105 34

111.39 27.84 83.55

46.97 8.42 96.92

11.74 35.23

74.69

330.69

26.45

50.24

202 24

16.17

46.21

186.21

14.89

24.23 72.69 304.24 76.06 228.18 186.07 46.51 139.56 171.32 12.83 128.49

44.43

210.43

16.83 193.60

48.40 145.20

4215.00

42.13

232.13

18.57 213,56

53.39 160.17

1627.00

36.65 252.65

24

16.39 116.39

12.00 1

1.50

25.35 15.12

20.21 232.44 58.11 174.33

9.31 107.08 26.77 147.35 11.78 135.57 33.89

80.31

101.68

58.12

4.64

53.48 13.37

40.11

2

17.29

56.79

4.54

52.25

13.06

39.19

8

18 21.00

10.50 3

16.05 70.05 14.92 58.92 32.14 261.14 . 13.83

65.33

5.60

64.45 16.11

48.34

16

16.50 14

29.11

161.61

32

14 19.50

6

24.64

176.14

16

20

6

15.00 10

6,00 6

16

92

18.00 2

8

6

26.72 153.72 27.21 115.21 30.03 190.03 21.75 89.75

4.71 20.89 240.25 $.22 60.11 12.92 148.69 14.09

162.05 12.29 141.43 9.21 106.00

54.21 13.55

40.66

60.06

180.19

15.02

45.09

37.17

111.62

40.51

121.64

35.35 106.08

26.50

79,50

15.20

174.83

43.70

131.13

7.18

82.57

20.64

61.93

56

98.93 492.93

8

8

8

21

16

72 114

4

80

32

50

4.50 12.00 36 20 | 12.00 11

8

6 9.00 11

24

10 9.00 1

39.43 453.50 52.88 278.88 2.31 256.57 74.08 350.08 23.00 322.08 $2.03 186,03 14.88 171.15 52.91 268.91 21.51 247.40 82,66 486.66 38.93 447.73 61.68 261.68 20.93 240.75 68.77 304.77 24.38 13.70 84.20

6.73 77.47 92.40 550.40 44.03 506.37 126.59 36.26 259.26 20.74 238.52 59.63 28.06 148.06 11.84 136.22 24.42 132.42

113.37

340.13

61.14 192.43

80.52

241.56

42.78

128.37

61.85

185,55

111.93

335.80

60.18

180.57

280.39

70.09

210.30

19.36

58.11

379.78

178,89

34,05

102.17

10.59 121.83

30.45

91.38

8

11.02 43.02

3.44 39.58

9.89

29.69

54.13 250.13

20.01 230.12 16.27 187.12

57.53

172.59

24

8

230.00 8 216.50

11

56

49.39 203.39 37.01 181.01 14.48 166,53 35.56 175.06 14.00 161.06

40,26 120.80 34.51 279.51 22.36 257.15 61.28 192.87 46.59 282.59 22.60 259.99

46.78

140.34

41.63

124.90

12

64

8

10

52

48

16

20

32

20

1.50 5

7 4619,50 2 215.00 2 21.00 4 20 | 37.50 40 22 16.50 11 218.00 24 24 21.00 7

16.07 20.74 9.19 45.17 12.59 63.59

102.57

64,99 195.00 8.20 94.37 23.59 70.78

92.74

36.19

7.41 85.33 2,89 33.30

21.33

64.00

8,32

24.98

296.67

23.73

272.94

68.23

204.71

5.08

58.51

14,62

43.89

30.88 177.88

79.51 483.01

14.23 38.64 444.37

163.65

40.91

122.74

111.09

333.28

37.46 246.96

19.75 227,21 66.80

170.41

70.15 324.15

31.31 199,31

25.93 298.22 15.94 183.37 45.84 137.53

74,55

223.67

24 3.00 1

26.91 140,91

11.27

129.64 32.41

97.28

1.50

1

24.91 101.41

8.11

93.53 23.33 70.00

24

12

48

16

20

24

26 145.00 26 28,50

3

39.88 117.88 9.43

108.45 27.11 81.34 49.65 301.65 24,13 277.52 69.38

208.14

11

16

55.62 311.12 24.89 286.23 28.73 80.73

71.55

214.68

6.46 74.27

18.56

55.71

12

48

16 22.50

9

38.38 223.88 17.91 205.97

51.49

154.48

28

40

3

52.07 262.07 20.96 241.11 60,27

180.84

8

16

8

31.94

120

10

12 10 16,50

20 134.50

11

50.11

16.96

92.96

7.44

34.98 156.48 12.52 143,96 35.99 107.97 27.73 151.73 12.14 139,59 34.89 104.70

149.94 11.99 137.95 24.48 81.41 347.41 27.79 319.62 79.90 42.00 211.50 16.92 194.58 48.64 35.61 180.11 14.40 165.71 41.42 51.06 245.06 19.60 225.46 56.36 169.10 33.45

256.95 20.56 236.39 59.09 177.30 248.11 19.85 228.26 57.00 171.20

85.52 21.38

103.47 239.72

145.94

124.29

64.14

72

40

4

48

1.50

72

40

24

40 12.00

3

24

:

72

28

32 6 6 16

140132 140 112

66 96 92

60

16

30

9.00

2

16

164 21.00

72.70 644.20 51.54 592.66 148.16 19,60 221.10 17.69 203.41 50.85 34.02 364.02 29.12 834.90 83.72 31.82 145.82 11.66 134.16 33.54 55, 0 439.00 35.12 403.88 100.97 302.91 46,79 414.79 33.18 381.61 95.40 286.21 85.74 1,029.74 82.38 947.36 236.84 710.52 23.04 216.04 17.28 198.76 49.69 149.07 40.23 344.23 27.64

316.69 79.17 237.52 33.24 187.24 14.98 172.26 43.06 129.20 21.72 179.72

14.38 165.34 41.33 124.01 32.53 150.53 12.04 138.49 34.62 103.87 44.57 344.57 27,57 317.00 79.25 237.75 183.24 2,197.24

175.78 2,021.46 505.36 1,516.10 8.94 96.94 7.75 89.19 22.29 143.81 1,294.81 102.78 1,182.03

414.50

152.56

251.18

100.62

66.90

295.50

886.53

48

9.00 56 28.50 38 18.00

2

30.22 353.22 28.26 324.90

4

48.68 631.18 50.49 45.63 370.63 29.65

81.24 580.69 145.17 435.52 340.98 85.24 255.74

213.72

8

1.50

3

20.02 150.52 12.04

16 3.00

2

19.80

4.50

3

19.40

254.89 20.38 178.90

14.31

138.48 34.62 103.86 234.42 58.60 175.82 164.59

4.50

10.50 87.00

6 96

80.04

41.14 123.45 20.01 60.03

89,94 |1,080,9 1

$6.47

3019.50

6

40.96

558.46

44.68

994.47 513.78 128.44

248.61

745.86

385.34

203

NAME OF SCHOOL.

Class of School.

No. of Scholars Presented.

No. of Scholars Examined.

Stand. I.

Stand. II.

Staná. III.

Stand. IV,

Stand. V.

Stand. VI.

Stand. IV,

Stand. V.

Stand. V1.

12344

Stand..

Stand. II.

Stand. III.

Stand. IV.

Stand. V.

Stand. VI.

Ordinary Subjects.

Special

Subjects.

Ordinary Subjects.

NUMBER OF Scholars who PASSED.

NUMBER OF SCHOLARS W

હળ

1.- American Board Mission, Bridges Street, (Boys),

2.-

"

3.-

+

4.--

5.- 6.-

""

H

8.-

9.-

10.-

Station Terrace, (Boys),

31

Hinglung Lane, (Boys),..

Queen's Road West, (Boys),

Háwan, (Girls),

11

Graham Street, (Girls),

7.-Basel Mission, Shamshuipo, (Boys),

Shaukiwan, (Boys),..

"

>>

>>

Tokwawan, (Boys),..

Matauchung, (Boys),

11.-C. M. S., St. Stephen's Chinese School, (Boys),

12.-

"

"

No. 2, (Boys),

13.- 14.- 15.-

Pottinger Street, (Boys),

*

»

Saiyingpun, (Boys),

31

St. Stephen's Baxter Memorial, (Girls),

16.-

Lyndhurst Terrace, (Girls),..

17.-

Third Street, (Girls),

18.-

Yaumati, (Mixed),

19.- 20.- 21.

>

Hunghom. (Girls),

Quarry Bay, (Girls),

Little Hongkong, (Boys).

21.

25.-

26. 27.

""

24

28.- 29. 30.-

19

19

Hunghom, (Boys),

Taikoktsui, (Boys), .

ני

دو

32.-

"

83.-

>>

34.- 35.-

>>

"

36.-

""

37.-

38.-

"

39.-

"

40.-

""

41.

"

42.

II.

»

43.-

"

Fletcher Street, (Girls),

44. 45.- 46.-

17

Tanglungchan, (Boys),

Shaukiwan, (Boys),

47.-

»

Square Street, (Girls),

48.-

39

Li-yuen Street, (Girls),

49.--

"

D'Aguilar Street, (Girls),

50.-

>>

Third Street, (Boys),

51.- 52.- 53

55

+

55

II.

(Girls),

54.-

Kau-il-fong, (Girls),

55.-

"

Stanley Street, (Girls),

56.-

>>

57.

58.

Aberdeen Street, (Girls),

""

59.-

60.-

61.-

62.-

>>

Saiyingpun Second Street East, (Girls), Taihang, (Girls),

22.-

Aberdeen School. (Boys),

23.-F. É. S., Bonham Road, Chinese Division, (Girls),

High Street, (Girls),

Queen's Road West. (Girls),

Hollywood Road, (Girls),

Pottinger Street, (Girls),

Stanley School, (Girls),

Shaukiwán, (Girls),

Tokwawan, (Girls),.

31.-L. L. S., Square Street, (Boys),

Wantsai Chapel, (Boys),

Yaumati, (Boys),.

Shektongtsui, (Boys),

Saiyingpun 1. Division, (Boys),

II.

"

(Boys),

....

Hospital Chapel, (Boys),

Shektongtsui, (Girls),..

Salyingpun, (Girls),

Ui-hing Lane, I. Division (Girls),

(Girls),

2788893392820228-¤¤×88BFBAKEB88-$KAR*

62

60

9 36

31

5 14

10

64

59

12 24 12

702

43

41

7

13 17

27

9

8

28

3

6

36

35

12 4

31

30

11 11

14

14

3 4

3

26

26 12 9

4

62

59

10

27 | 16

4

43

39

10 14 10

2

42

39

12 17 8

::

43

40 11 13 11

43

43 21 12 6 37 13 12 5

21

20

8

8 3

30 11 6 10

10

10

3 3 2

10

10

3

19

19

7

19

18

10

29

6

15

15

18 10

26

6

25

24

29 13

86

35 10

5

16

13

3

78

24

33

53 51

6 17 23

70

3 22

29

35

35

1

9 18

57

56

४ 26 12 3

95

95 10 44 32

56

53

14 24 10

66

55

13 18 19

13

12

1

4

100

17 35

26

36

6 11

28

5 13

25

24

5

8

53

50

13 23

52

48

12 19

I

37

32

17 9

32

30

10 10

I 40

40

7 11 10

52

49

6 15 26

Bowrington, (Girls),

Matauwai, I. Division, (Boys),

I

17

17

2 4 10

24

21

2 8

10

10

1

3

49

47 21

9

14

13

1 2

Tanglungchau, (Girls),

Taipingshan Chapel, (Girls),

Wantsai Chapel, (Girls),

Staunton Street. (Girls).

I 34

31

$ 13

84

83 26 26

I 39

36 14 7

6

I

74

73 30 21

6

I 31

28

33 26 10

9 7

4

I 24

11 10 9

71.-Wesleyan Mission, Spring Gardens, (Boys),.

Wellington Street, (Boys),

64.

11

65.-

"

66.

>>

67.-

>

68.- 69.- 70.-

55

72.-

**

73.--

(Girls),.

"

74.

>

»

Lascar Row (Girls),.

75.

>

76.-

>>

Graham Street, (Girls),

77.-

Lascar Row (Boys),....

>>>

78.--

Kennedy Town, (Boys),

>

63.-R. C. Mission, Cathedral School, (Boys),

Bridges Street, Chinese School, (Girls), Hollywood Road, Chinese School. (Girls), Holy Infancy School, I. Division, (Boys),

II.

(Girls), Yaumati, "(Giris),

I 34

34 23 8

I

48

47 11 36 6 3

I 51

I 24

I 34

"

I

42

50 17 12 24 15 4 34 42 17

2

11 3

22 N

Shaukiwan, (Girls),

Hanghom, (Girls),

I 32

31 17

I

26

26 14

34

32 3 14

I

77

72 24 22

I

35

35 13

11

I

30

28

7 9

$

Wantsai, (Boys),

48

46

16 9

21

49

48

19

10

I

50

47 10 20

15

I

17

17

1 5 9

79.-Basel Mission, High Street, (Girls),

80.-Berlin Mission, (Girls),

81.-C. M. S. Victoria Home and Orphanage, (Girls),

82.-Wesleyan Mission, Wellington Street, English School, (Boys),

III 72

71 16

III 20

18

.com

25

::

III 34

34

4

IV 29

25

19

83.-C. M. S. St. Stephen's Anglo-Chinese, (Boys),

IV 55

53

25 15 9 2

84.-St. Paul's College School (Boys),..

IV 46

39

11 9 7 6

3 2 4

85.-Diocesan Home and Orphanage, (Boys),

IV 72

71

13 11 14 11 10

33 32 23

87.-L. M. S. Taipingshan, English School, (Boys),....

86.-F. E. S. Bonham Road. English Division, (Girls),

IV

23

23

1 4

5

IV 45

43

23 12

38.- 89.- 90.--

51

"

Third Street,

Lok-ying, Morrison School," (Boys),".

"

"

ע

(Boys)..

"

(Boys),.

91.-R. C. M., St. Joseph's College, Chinese Division, (Boys),

IV 25 IV 23 IV 18 IV 34

92.-

**

European

(Boys),

17

93.- 94.-- 95.-

>>

High School, (Boys),

27

وو

>>

96.-

97.-

Italian Convent, English Division, (Girls),..... Portuguese Division, (Girls), Bridges Street, English Division, (Girls),

Portuguese Division, (Girls),..

23 13 7 23 13 10 13 11 4 31 12 8 IV 166 161

29 26 IV 11 10

1 IV 103 100 IV 35

4

36

61

74

10

IV 63

26 18 11 25 31 13 12 3 61

13

15 18 20

IV 42

40

14 18

99.--

""

99.- 100a.- 100b. 101.- 102.-

>>

English

""

St. Francis, Portuguese Division, (Girls),

Victoria Portuguese School, Portuguese Division, (Girls),. IV

IV 21

21

7 7

(Girls),

IV

25

25

ti

13

20

19

English Division, (Girls),

IV

11

11

""

""

»

English School, (Boys),

IV 83

709

"

>>

(Girls),

IV

35

33

Do cr

23

3

8

:::::::*:

22572112

:::

4

2

2

1

w.

4

1099, unuci

VILC

NCCHU

20

Stand. V.

Stand. VI.

Passed.

Failed.

Passed.

Failed.

Special

Ordinary Special

Subjects. Subjects. Subjects.

FAILED.

TOTALS.

Average Daily Attendance

during the Year.

SUMS TO WHICH THE SCHOOL IS ENTITLED.

Ordinary Subjects.

Special Subjects.

Needle Work.

Stand. II.

52 8

60.23

18

144

42

::::::::::::

:::::::::::

29

2

32.07 10

56

60

49 11

67.56 24

96

72

39 2

45.77 14

52 102 8

23

4

26.61 18 32 12

24

13

15

21

14

28.44 6 24 6 33.11 24 16 30

24

26

4

31.07 22 44

24

10

4

11.05 6

16

18

25

57

21.34 24 36 24 74.69 20 108

96 32

36

50.24

20 56

60 16

37

46.21 24 68

48

39

37

44.43 22 52 42.13 42 36.65

26

84 8

48

20

16.39 16

36 48 30 32 30 32 18

29

25.35 22 24

60

16

8

15.12 6

12

12

10

17.29 6

24

6

15

16.05 14

16

24

16

24

12

26

25

21

25

30

2132 1 30 HO

14.99 20

24

32.14

12

8

6

13.83

14

12

12

29.11 20 36

30 16

24.64 16 28 36

26.72

12 36 12

* : : : ***::::29:*:2:2:::: ONE

12

10

Stand. IV.

Stand. V.

5: * Stand. VI.

: : : : : | Stand. IV.

明::

$

00: : :

Stand. V.

Stand. VI.

Very Good.

Good.

Fair.

Capitation Grant.

Total Grant earned in 1893,

Amount of Reduction

per

cent.

Amount payable.

Amount due to Teacher.

Amount due to Manager.

$

$

60.23

264.23 21.13 243.10 $2.07 158.07 12.64 145.43 36.35 109.08 67.56 259.56 20.76 238.80 59.70 179.10 45.77 233.7T 18.70 215.07 53.76

60.77

182.33

161.31

13.50 13.50

10 26.61 146.11

11.69 134.42

33.60

100.82

6

28.44 107.94

8.63 99.31

24.82

74.49

33.11 103.11

32

16

13

76

98.93

47

4

55

15

29

6

49

7

88

7

27.21 26 41 6 30.03 20 52 30 21.75

36 18 14 96 228 52.88 12 68 138 74.08 6 85 174 32.03 2 36 108 52.91 16 104 72 82.66 20 176 192

50

3

61.68 28 96 60

53

2

68.77 26

72 114

:∞∞∞∞∞∞*0*

16

8

56

8

8

8

21

:::::::: ::: 2::::: 80:::::::::

31.07 121.07

11.05

51.05

21.34

105 34

74.69

330.69

8.24 94.87 9.68

111.39 4.08 46.97 11.74 8.42 96.92 24.23 26.45 304.24 76.06 228.18

23.71

71.16

27.84 83.55

35.23

72.69

50.24

202 24

46.21

186.21

16.17 186.07 46.51 14.89 171.32

139.56

42.83 128.49

4215.00

16 | 27.00

10

24

42.13 232.13 36.65 252.65 16.39 116.39

44.43 210.43 16.83 193.60 18.57 213.56 20.21 232.44 58.11

48.40 145.20 53.39 160.17 174.33

25.35

147.35

9.31 107.08 26.77 80.31 11.78 135.57 33.89

101.68

12.00 1.50

15.12

58.12

4.64

53.48

13.37

40.11

2

17.29

56.79

4,54

52.25

13.06

39.19

16.05

70.05

5.60

64.45

16.11

48.34

14.02

58.92

4.71

54.21

13.55 40.66

32 20 (103

18 (21,00

4

32.14

261.!4

20.89

240.25

60.06

180.19

10,50

3

. 13.83

65.33

5.22

60.11

15.02

45.09

16.50 14

29.11

161.61

12.92

148.69

37.17

111.52

1419.50 6

24.64

176.14

14.09 162.05

40.51

121.54

20

6 15.00

10

26.72

153.72

12.29 141.43

35.35

106.08

6.00

6

27.21

115.21

9.21 106.00

26.50

79.50

22 18.00

2

30.03

190.03

15.20

174.83

43.70

131.13

6

21.75

89.75

7.18

82.57

20.64

61.93

98.93

492.93

39.43

453.50

113.37

340.18

52.88

278,88

2.31 256.57

64.14 192.43

74.08 350.08

16

16

24

::::

12

13.70

16 42

88

12

92.40

34

140 156

80

33

36.26

12

44 42

32

50

23

28.06

10

52 24

8

20

24.42

10

36 18

24

:::::::::::::::::

::::::::::::::::::::::

6

11.02

8 24

49

54.13

26

92

78

40

49.39

24

76 54

30

37.01

36 34

24

10

28

35.56

20

40

42

37

34.51

14

41

60

56

20

48

46.59

12

60 156

8

16

16.07

4

16 60

16

20.74

4

32

36

7

9.19

8

12

45

45.17

6

30

71

12

35

1

60

13

25 8

24

2

22

31

3

39

8

43

20

28

36

30

26

26

66

33

25

46

36

46

15

70

18

:::::::::::::::::::::::::::

42

36 42

64

12.59

2

8

12

10

30.88

16

52

54

79.51

52

104

42

48

60

37.46

28 28

36

48 20

70.15

60

84

30

16

20

31.31

18

28

18

32

20

26.91

20

44 12

10

24.94

20

36 18

39.88

46 32

49,65

22

64

36

24

20

12

55.62

48 34

48 16 20

24

ལ་

AND

28.73

30

16

6

38.38

22

12

36

48

20

52,07

34

28

42

40

34.98

34

24

36 8

27.73

28

12

42

16

31.94

6

91.41

48

56 48 88

8

120

42.00 26 44 54

35.61 14 36 48

8

51.06 32

36

126

33.45

38

60

40

50.11

80 20

90 8

16.96

2

20

54

72.70

96 175 136

72

19.60

18

40

34

34.02 30 77 32

72

19

31.82 114

51

*:::::::::~ !

:::::::::mi

2

37

5

66

88

14

42

22

*

23

17 1

4

36 10 1 154

34

4

7154

6

4

07

3

33

58

36

16

21

19

11

8

11

68

11

63

33

30

::::::::::::::::

::::::88

11

55.00 150 120 90 46.79

94

66 72

70

8 85.74 78 88

140 132 140 112

23.01

6

32 10 60

40.23 138

96 70

33.24 78 56 20

21.72 78 80

32.53 66 32 20

4

44.57 72 64 60 : 96

47

143.81

183.24 156

8.91

156

232

360 324 378 144

8 20 12

144 110 300 182

30.22 78 96 30

48.68

90 144 200 60

45.63 $4 144 40

20.02

56 42

20

19.80 36 24 130

24

19.40 10.50 48 24 83.94

36 72 20

24

:::::::*:*:::::Ex:: Aga:: N::::::

48

24

32

28: 16

: : : : :***⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀

32

64

83 12

150 180 182 192

40.96 6 56 80 96

80

::::::*:2*2 : : :***

: : : : : : : : : :8 :::::2:8ARAP

:****

:::****:::::****

::AR :2:

: : :**

:*****::*:** :2 :2 :7828::::::** :88

23.00 322.08

80.52

241.56

32.03 186,03 14.88 171.15 52.91 268.91 21.51 247.40 82.66 486.66 38.93 447.73 61.68

42.78

128.37

61.85

185.55

111.93

335.80

68.77

304.77

20.93 261.68

24.38

240.75 60,18

180.57

280.39

70.09

210.30

4.50

13.70

84.20

6.73

77.47

19.36

58.11

12.00

36

$2.40

550.40

44.03

506.37

126,59 379.78

20 | 12.00

11

36.26 259.26

20.74

238.52

59.63

178.29

6

9.00

11

28.06 148.06

11.84

136,22

34.05 102.17

10

9.00

1

24.42

132.42

10.59

121.53

30.45

91.38

11.02

43.02

3.44

39.58

9.89 29.69

54.13

250.13

20.01

230.12

57.53

172.59

49.39

203.39

16.27

187.12 46.78

140.34

2 | 30.00

8

37.01

216.50

11

35.56

16 121.00

14

34.51

46.59

14.48 181.01

14.00 175,065

22.36 279.51 282.59 22.60

166.53 41.63 161.06

40.26 120.80 257.15 61.28 192.87

124.90

259.99

64.99 195.00

1.50

5

16.07

102.57

8.20

94.37

23,59

46

24

26

6

66 96

::::: ai

16

92

8

122 222

:::::::82

50

45

24

24 40

::::::::89 ::::::::82

:: 22*** : 22 :9928 : : : : :842::::::::

70.78

20.74

92.74

7.41

215.00

21.00 4

20 37.50

40

16.50

11

218.00

24

24 21.00

3.00

1.50

26 45.00

26 28.50

11

16 22.50

42 21.00

12

7.50

4 131.50

10 16.50

20 34.50

20 28.50

34

1,50

40

12.00

30

2 9.00

:~~~*SERTE : : : : : 182 :# : :* :* ::::~!

85.33

21.33

64.00

7

9.19

36.19

2,89

33.30

8,32

24.98

19.50 2 45.17

296,67

23.73

272.94 68.23

204.71

2

12.59 30.88

63.59

177.88

5.08 14.23

58,51 14.62

43.89

163.65 40.91 122.74

79.51

483.01

38.64

444.37

111.09

333.28

37.46 246.96

19.75

227,21 $6,80

170.41

70.15 324.15

25.93

7

31.31

199,31

15.94

26.91

140.91

11.27

298.22 183.37 45.84 137.53 129,64

74,55

223.67

32.41 97.23

21.01 101.41

8.11

23.33 93.33

70.00

39.88 117.88

9.43

108.45

27.11

81.34

3 49.65

301.65

24.13

277,52

69.38

208.14

55.62

311.12

24.89

286.23

71,55

214.68

28.73

80.73

6.46

74.27

18.56

55.71

9

38.38

223.88

17.91

205.97

51.49

154.48

3 52.07 262,07 20.96

241.11

60.27

180.84

34.98

156.48

12.52

143.96

35.99

107.97

27.73

151.73 12.14

139,59

34.89

104.70

31.94 149.94 11.99

137.95

24.48

103.47

91.41

27.79 347,41

319.62

79.90

239.72

10

42.00 35.61

211.50 180.11

16.92 194.58

48.64

145.94

14.40 165.71 41.42

124.29

11

4

3

55. 0

17.28

51.06 245.06 19.60

225.46 56.36 33.45 256.95 20.56 236.39 59.09

248.11 19.85 50.11

28.26 92.96 16.96

7.44 85.52 21.38 72.70 644.20 51.54 592.66 148.16 444.50 19.60 221.10 17.69 203.41 50.85 152.56 34,02 364.02 29.12 334.90 83.72 251.18 31.82 145.82 11.66 134.16 33.54 100.62 439.00 35.12 403.88 100.97 302.91 414.79 46.79

33.18 381.61 82.38 85.74 1,029.74 23.04 216.04 40.23 344.23

169.10

177.30

57.06

171.20

64.14

95.40

286.21

947.36

236.84

710.59

198.76

49.69

149.07

27.54 316.69

79.17

237.52

33.24 187.24

21.72 179.72

76

32.53 150.53 844.57 44.57 183.24 2,197.24

16

164 121.00

8.94 96.94 143.81 1,284.81

7.75

48 9.00

2

30.22 353.22

56 28.50

4

48.68 631.18

3818.00

14.98 172.26 43.06 129.20 14.38 165.34 41.33 124.01 12.04 138.49 34,62 103.87 27,57 317.00 79.25 237.75 175.78 2,021.46 505.36 1,516.10 89.19 22.29 66.90 102.78 (1,182.03

295.50 $86.53 28.26 324.96

81.24 243.72 50.49 $80,69 1 45.63 370.63 29.65

340.98

145.17 435.52

85.24

255.74

8 1.50

3

20.02 150.52

12.04

138.48

34.62 103.86

16

3.00

2

19.80 254.89

20.38

234.42

58.60 175.82

4.50

19.40 178.90

14.31

164.59

41.14

123.45

4.50

10.50 87.00

6 96 80.04 20.01 60.03

92

89.94 1,080.91

30 19.50

40.96

$6.47 558.46 44.68

994.47 513.78

248.61

745.86

128.44

385.34

TOTAL,..

.$27,432.78 2,191.33 25,238,45 6,509.23 18,928.22

205

TABLE XII.-Enrolment, ATTENDANCE and NUMBER of SCHOOL DAYS at the GRANT-IN-AID SCHOOLS during 1893.

No.

Name of Schools.

Maximum Minimum Monthly Monthly Enrol- Enrol-

ment.

ment.

Average Average Maximum Minimum Daily Daily Attend- Attend-

auce.

ance.

Average Monthly Enrol-

Average Daily

Attend-

Number of School

ance for

ment.

the year.

Days.

10

1234 0 0 1-0 0o-

American Board Mission Bridges Street, (Boys),

76

54

71.72

44.04

65.90

60.23

232

"?

"1

Station Terrace (Boys),

44

32

42.00

29.56

40.30

32.07

236

17

??

"

Hinglung Lane (Boys),

85

52

76.66

37.33

77.30

67.56

245

12

Queen's Road West (Boys),

48

46

47.42

43.29

47.70

45.77

226

""

Háwan (Girls),

31

29

28.88

25.24

30.20

26.61

244

"

Graham Street (Girls),

23

27

31.93

23.97

31.50

28.44

245

8

9

"

43

Basel Mission, Shamshuipo (Boys),

Shaukiwan (Boys),

48

35

40.50

22.80

40.66

33.11

233

38

31

35.85

25.36

33.90

31.07

228

Tokwawan (Boys),

16

10

12.34

7.33

11.00

11.05

237

Matauchung (Boys),..

30

26

23.55

13.87

27.10

21.34

238

11 C.M.S., St. Stephen's Chinese School (Boys),

98

67

87.80

63.07

82.40

74.69

254

2

12

No. 2 (Boys),

64

41

61.07

40.62

53.81

50.24

279

13

Pottinger Street (Boys),

59

36

54.31

34.04

49.45

46.21

261

14

"

Saiyingpun (Boys),

58

36

49.61

30.88

49.45

44.43

238

15

St. Stephen's Baxter Memorial (Girls),

56

29

53.44

23.66

45.81

42.13

265

16

"

Lyndhurst Terrace (Girls),

48

36

44.50

33.12

42.90

36.65

264

17

"

Third Street (Girls),

22

11

20.57

8.19

18.00

16.39

261

18

""

Yaumati (Mixed),.

35

24

28.10

13.00

31.50

25.35

226

19

11

Hunghom (Girls),

25

14

20.91

11.19

19.90

15.12

245

20

""

Quarry Bay (Girls),

26

12

24.66

8.96

21.36

17.29

268

21

29

Little Hongkong (Boys),.

30

12

20.66

7.83

19.72

16.05

198

22

24

25

"

Queen's Road West (Girls),.

26

11

27

28

""

29

12

32

95

Wantsai Chapel (Boys),

33

"

Yaumati (Boys),

34

Aberdeen School (Boys),

23 F.E.S., Bonham Road, Chinese Division (Girls),

30

1

High Street (Girls),

Hollywood Road (Girls),

Pottinger Street (Girls),

Stanley School (Girls),.

Shaukiwan (Girls), Tokwawan (Girls),

31 L.M.S., Square Street (Boys),

Shektongtsui (Boys),

19

10

17.15

7.04

17.10

14.92

243

37

29

36.19

26.85

34.10

32.14

220

25

14

15.80

8.66

19.80

13.83

253

38

21.

34.07

17.12

33.09

29.11

270

33

28

27.84

22.84

31.20

24.64

241

34

21

33.66

17.24

29.27

26.72

269

39

25

33.74

22.30

33.66

27.21

264

45

31

34.14

23.27

38.63

30.03

270

30

18

26.70

15.64

27.60

21.75

241

132

79

116.35

78.55

107.80

98.93

227

65

51

64.00

49.15

56.27

52.88

257

90

57

84.42

41.59

81.70

74.08

234

38

26

34.44

22.60

35.90

32.03

217

35

Saiyingpun, 1. Division (Boys),

63

58

54.61

43.14

61.80

52.91

237

36

II.

}}

(Boys),

101

84

90.18

61.08

97.20

$2.66

245

37

"

Hunghòm (Boys),

82

61

70.57

50.95

73.70

61.68

215

38

19

Hospital Chapel (Boys),

75

65

70.88

60.08

72.10

68.77

231

39

11

Shektong-tsui (Girls),

15

14

14.69

12.12

14.40

13.70

246

40

11

Saiyingpun (Girls),

125

90

101.22

67.05

110.90

92.40

246

41

17

Ui-hing Lane, I. Division (Girls),

44

32

41.12

30.35

42.60

36.26

253

42

II.

"

+9

""

>>

(Girls),

34

28

31.53

24.59

31.60

28.06

251

43

""

Fletcher Street (Girls),

28

24

27.18

20.50

26.36

24.42

275

44

..

Tanglungchau (Boys),

21

10

16.57

9.11

13.10

11.02

249

45

11

Shaukiwan (Boys),

63

49

58.54

43.95

59.10

54.13

234

46

""

47

11

Taikoktsui (Boys),.

Square Street (Girls),

59

41

55.73

30.69

54.40

49.39

240

48

29

41.11

14.36

39.20

37.01

253

48

91

Li Yuen Street (Gir s),......

44

32

42.92

31.25

36.70

35.56

250

49

:9

D'Aguilar Street (Gilrls),

45

33

42.15

28.03

39.72

34.51

268

50

11

Third Street (Boys),

52

37

51.20

34.61

50.50

46.59

242

51

??

Bowrington (Girls),

18

12

17.70

11.16

16.75

16.07

231

52

19

Matauwai, I. Division (Boys)..

33

18

26.33

8.72

26.50

20.74

234

53

II.

""

99

(Girls),

11

9

10.25

7.10

10.30

9.19

230

54

19

Kau-ü-fong (Girls),

56

38

52.53

31.91

49.27

45.17

275

55

Stanley Street (Girls),

21

12

16.08

9.20

17.27

12.59

281

56

"

Tanglungchau (Girls),

41

29

35.28

23.22

31.65

30.88

257

57

Taipingshan Chapel (Girls),

96

85

85.38

69.20

91.81

79.51

259

58

""

Aberdeen Street (Girls),

46

35

43.22

30.95

40.45

37.46

266

59

$9

Wantsai Chapel (Girls),...

95

49

82.00

39.77

84.36

70.15

269

60

"

Staunton Street (Girls),

40

31

34.42

26.55

36.00

31.51

238

61

79

Saiying pun, Second Street East (Girls),

35

98

32.03

18.48

31.80

26.91

246

62

Taihang (Girls),.

30

24

28.00

19.35

27.80

24.94

221

63

R.C.M., Cathedral School (Boys),

46

36

43.50

33.70

42.54

39 88

260-

64

65

"J

66

??

Bridges Street, Chinese School (Girls), Hollywood Road, Chinese School (Girls), Holy Infancy School, I. Division (Boys),

55

45

52.76

42.72

51.41

49.65

265

67

37

62.30

34.45

59.33

55.62

256

40

19

32.20

13.00

32.00

28.73

270

67

II.

وو

(Girls),

45

26

43.92

18.94

41.25

38.38

272

68

99

Yaumati (Girls),

71

40

70.30

37.55

58.33

52.07

279

69

17

Shaukiwan (Girls),

52

20

49.88

16.29

40.83

34.98

261

70

Hunghom (Girls),....

34

24

31.11

19.82

30.16

27.73

272

71

Wesleyan Mission, Spring Gardens (Boys),

42

33

35.73

26.20

36.90

31.94

233-

72

"

19

Wellington Street (Boys),

117

79

109.62

75.12

98.10

91.41

233

73

"

وو

*

(Girls),

55

40

51.57

35 38

46.60

42.00

234

74

11

""

Lascar Row (Girls),

43

31

40.77

25.08

38.20

35.61

246

75

"

""

Wantsai (Boys),

59

51

54.08

43.61

56.20

51.06

232

76

"

Graham Street (Girls),..

57

21

41.29

17.00

48.08

33.45

277

77

11

"1

Lascar Row (Boys),

62

48

57.05

45.78

56.50

50.11

231

78

Kennedy Town (Boys),

23

18

20.26

13.96

19.70

16.96

250

79

Basel Mission, High Street (Girls),

91

39

81.03

34.00

75.91

72.70

252

80

Berlin Mission (Girls),

20

20

20.00

17.80

20.00

19.60

256

81

C.M.S., Victoria Home and Orphanage (Girls),..

38

34

38.00

32.22

35.09

34.02

242

82

Wesleyan Mission, Wellington St., Eng. School (Boys),...

45

25

41.40

22.43

34.00

31.82

232

83

C.M.S., St. Stephen's Anglo-Chinese School (Boys).....

69

49

66.73

40.39

60.20

55.00

230

84

St. Paul's College School (Boys),

68

43

51.92

33.08

56.70

46.79

239

85

Diocesan Home and Orphanage (Boys),

103

87

95.08

76.80

95.10

85.74

239

86

F.E.S., Bonham Road. English Division (Girls),

26

21

24.77

20.76

24.40

23.04

226

$8

""

89

19

20

91

87 L.M.S., Taipingshan English School (Boys),

Third Street English School (Boys),.

Lok-Ying English School (Boys),. Morrison School (Boys),.....

R.C.M., St. Joseph's College, Chinese Division (Boys)....

49

38

47.07

29 50

44.90

40.23

234

39

27

37.88

22.57

35.10

33.24

226

26

5

25.61

5.00

22.00

21.72

233

59

24

41.37

12.25

44.50

32.53

234

64

29

57.52

25.31

49.90

44.57

239

92

11

""

"

European Division (Boys),.

216

176

196.40

165.55

203.08

183.24

232

93

""

High School (Boys),.

13

11

20.00

6.12

19.25

8.94

262

94

"1

Italian Convent, English Division (Girls),

174

150

159.35

131.41

162.09

143.81

216

95

11

Portuguese Division (Girls),

34

32

33.50

26.53

33.45

30.22

216

96

11

97

19

Bridges Street, English Division (Girls),

Portuguese Division (Girls),

71

64

56.27

32.00

66.27

48.68

231

69

57

51.72

31.14

62.45

45.63

231

98

99

"

100

101

"1

102

"}

St. Francis, Portuguese Division (Girls),..

English Division (Girls),

Victoria Portuguese School (Mixed),

English School (Boys),

""

(Girls),

30

21

27.41

14.90

25.16

20.02

280

32

24

23.88

14.03

26.00

19 80

280

39

27

33.69

19.57

31.83

29.90

257

111

88

100.12

77.55

100.00

89.94

258

51

33

17.30

29.69

44.16

40.96

260

206

No.

TABLE XIV.- -PERCENTAGE of SCHOLARS who passed in the GRANT-IN-AID SCHOOLS during the last two Years.

27

""

Name of School.

1 American Board Mission, Bridges Street (Boys),...

2

"

3

""

"

Station Terrace (Boys), Hinglung Lane (Boys),

Queen's Road West (Boys), Háwan (Girls),.

Graham Street (Girls),

Basel Mission, Shamshuipo (Boys),..

1892.

1893.

Increase.

Decrease.

44.78

86.66

41.88

88.23

93.54

5.31

80.32

81.35

1.03

75.55

95.12

19.57

69.56

85.18

15.62

56.66

46.42

10.24

52.38

60.00

7.62

J

8

"}

"

Shaukiwan (Boys),

81.08

86.66

5.68

9

""

"

Tokwawan (Boys),

72.22

71.50

0.72

10

"

"

Matauchung (Boys),

96.50

*

11

C. M. S., St. Stephen's Chinese School (Boys),.......................

80.32

96.61

16.29

12

>

"

No. 2 (Boys),

88.00

92.30

4.30

13

י

Pottinger Street (Boys), .

75.00

94.84

19.81

14

"

Saiyingpun (Boys),

84.21

97.50

13.29

15

""

St. Stephen's Baxter Memorial (Girls),

82.35

90.00

7.65

16

>>

Lyndhurst Terrace (Girls),

88.88

100.00

11.12

17

>>

Third Street (Girls),

80.00

100.00

20.00

18

92

Yaumati (Mixed),

63.15

96.66

33.51

19

"

Hunghòm (Girls),

96.15

80.00

16.15

...

20

>>

Quarry Bay (Girls),

100.00

100.00

21

"

Little Hongkong (Boys),

78.94

4

22

"+

Aberdeen School (Boys),

88.88

23

F. É. S., Bonham Road, Chinese Division (Girls),

73.91

82.75

8.84

24

"

High Street (Girls),

100.00

80.00

20.00

25

>>

Queen's Road West (Girls),

80.95

92.85

11.90

26

Hollywood Road (Girls),

89.47

96.15

6.68

27

28

>>

29

30

31

32

"

33

Yaumati (Boys),

34

""

Shektongtsui (Boys),

35

17

Pottinger Street (Girls), Stanley School (Girls), Shaukiwan (Girls),.... Tokwawan (Girls),

L. M. S., Square Street (Boys),

Wantsai Chapel (Boys)..

Saiyingpun, I. Division (Boys),

76.47

87.50

11.03

50.00

86.20

36.20

82.50

85.72

3.22

100.00

*

95.44

97.43

1.99

*****

84.61

92.15

7.54

72.85

78.57

5.72

86.84

82.85

3.99

86.51

87.50

0.99

36

II.

99

"}

""

(Boys),

77.27

92.62

15.36

37

19

Hunghòm (Boys),..

76.92

94.34

17.42

38

""

Hospital Chapel (Boys),

87.93

96.36

8.43

39

""

Shektongtsui (Girls),

61.53

100.00

38.47

40

""

Saiyingpun (Girls),..

76.47

88.00

11.53

41

""

Ui-hing Lane, I. Division

(Girls),

86.48

91.66

5.18

42

II.

"

(Girls),

87.87

82.14

5.73

43

22

Fletcher Street (Girls),

44.82

83.33

38.51

44

""

??

13

45

46

47

48

49

""

""

"?

Tanglungchau (Boys),

Shaukiwan (Boys),.............. Taikoktsui (Boys),

Square Street (Girls),.

Li Yuen Street (Girls),.

68.75

75.00

6.25

70.49

98.00

27.51

70.20

83.33

13.13

88.46

93.75

5.29

90.47

90.33

0.14

D'Aguilar Street (Girls),

$$.09

92.50

4.11

50

""

Third Street (Boys),

51.42

97.95

46.53

51

17

Bowrington (Girls),

91.66

94.11

2.45

52

""

Matauwai I. Division (Boys),

76.19

53

II.

27

44

17

(Girls),

70.00

.....

54

>"

Kau-ü-fong (Girls),

93.83

95.74

1.91

55

97

Stanley Street (Girls),

100.00

46.15

53.85

56

25

Tanglungchau (Girls),.

93.93

96.77

2.84

57

""

Taipingshan Chapel (Girls),

70.11

85.54

15.43

58

Aberdeen Street (Girls),

95.12

97.22

2.10

59

""

Wantsai Chapel (Girls),

88.88

82.19

6.69

60

Staunton Street (Girls),

86.66

75.75

10.91

61

"1

Saiyingpun, Second Street East (Girls),

100.00

92.30

7.70

62

"

.63

R. C. M., Cathedral School (Boys),

Taihang (Girls),.

92.85

100.00

7.15

57.89

91.17

33.28

...

.64

""

.65

.66

Bridges Street, Chinese School (Girls), Hollywood Road, Chinese School (Girls). Holy Infancy School, I. Division (Boys),

84.21

82.93

1.28

78.78

86.00

7.22

69.23

83.33

14.10

.67

II.

"

99

(Girls).

75.00

82.35

7.35

.68

Yaumati (Girls),

94.11

85.71

8.40

69

"

Shaukiwan (Girls),..

93.75

96.77

3.02

70

Hunghòm (Girls),

76.19

100.00

23 81

72

"

19

73

79

>>

71 Wesleyan Mission, Spring Gardens (Boys),

Wellington Street (Boys),

(Girls),

72.22

81.25

9.03

74.67

91.66

16.99

65.51

94.28

28.77

"2

74

"

>

Lascar Row (Girls),

80.00

89.28

9.28

75

"

""

Wantsai (Boys).......

93.10

100.00

6.90

76

"

""

Graham Street (Girls),

66.66

75.00

8.34

77

J

Lascar Row (Boys),

66.03

97.87

31.84

78

""

"

Kennedy Town (Boys),

75.00

88.23

13.23

79

Basel Mission, High Street (Girls),....

96.66

98.59

1.93

80

Berlin Mission (Girls),

95.00

100.00

5.00

81

C. M. S., Victoria Home and Orphanage (Girls),

94.11

100.00

5.89

83

82 Wesleyan Mission, Wellington Street English School (Boys),

C. M. S, St. Stephen's Anglo-Chinese School (Boys),

76.00

4

93.87

96.22

2.35

84

St. Paul's College School (Boys),.................

97.67

97.43

0.24

85

Diocesan Home and Orphanage (Boys)....

97.01

92.95

4.06

86

F. E. S., Bonham Road, English Division (Girls),

90.00

60.86

29.14.

87

88

++

Third Street (Boys),

89

"

90

Morrison School (Boys),

91

L. M. S., Taipingshan (Boys),

Lok-ying English School (Boys),

R. C. M., St. Joseph's College, Chinese Division (Boys),

87.75

97.67

9.92

100.00

95.65

4.35

100.00

94.44

92

"

93

39

High School (Boys) European Division (Boys),

100.00

95.13

96.52

1.39

93.75

60.00

33.75

94

95

""

96

"

97

98

64

99

100

101

102

>>

"

"J

»

(Girls),

Italian Convent, English Division (Girls),

Portuguese Division (Girls),

Bridges Street, English Division (Girls).

31

Portuguese Division (Girls),

St. Francis, Portuguese Division (Girls),

English Division (Girls),

Victoria Portuguese School (Mixed),

English School (Boys),

93.45

97.00

3.55

100.00

97.05

2.95

92.98

95.08

2.10

***...

89.13

90.00

0.87

100.00

76.19

23.81

100.00

95.99

4.01

88.88

100.00

11.12

93.15

86.07

7.08

100.00

100.00

Class

of

School.

Name of School.

Reading, or Com- metic. position.

1.

American Board Mission, Bridges Street (Boys),.................]

90.16 85.24

TABLE XV.—PERCENTAGE of PASSES in the various subjects in which the GRANT-IN-AID SCHOOLS

were examined in 1893.

Writing Arith-

207

Repeti- Expla- | Compo- tion. nation. sition.

96.72 100.00

Gram-Geogra-

mar.

phy.

History.

"

75

Station Terrace (Boys)...

100.00

80.61

100.00

100.00

"

་་

**

Hing-lung Lane (Boys),

98.30

74.57

100.00 100.00

"

>>

""

Queen's Rd. West (Boys),

100.00

90.24

100.00

97.57 100.00

100.00

??

57

وو

Háwan (Girls)..

.100.00

85.18

100.00

100.00

100,00

"

Grabam Street (Girls),

89.28

78.56

33.33

100.00

82.87

Basel Mission, Shamshnipo (Boys).

94.28 60.00

100.00

96.66

100,00

100.00

>>

>>

"

Shaukiwán (Boys),

100.00

86.66

100.00

100.00

100,00

"

"

Tokwawan (Boys),

100.00

57.42

100.00

100.00

29

27

Matauchung (Boys),

100.00

96.15

100.00

100.00 100.00

"

C.M.S., St. Stephen's Chinese School (Boys),

100.00

89.83

100.00

100.00 100,00

No. 2.

97.43

87.17

""

100.00

100.00 100.00

Pottinger Street (Boys),

100.00

87,17

Failed.

100.00 100.00 100.00

Saiyingpun (Boys),

100.00

95.00

100.00

100.00 100.00 100.00

*

St. Stephen's Baxter Memorial (Girls),

100.00

93.02

Failed.

100.00 100.00

وو

Lyndhurst Terrace (Girls),..

100.00

100.00

100.00

100.00 100.00

100.00

17

Third Street (Girls),

100.00 100.00

100.00 100.00

"

Yaumati (Mixed),

100.00 93.33

100.00

100.00 100,00 100.00

19

>>

Hunghom (Girls),

300.00

60.00

100.00 100,00

19

37

Quarry Bay (Girls).

100.00

100.00

100.00 100,00

""

Little Hongkong (Boys),

100.00

73.68

100.00 100.00

27

99

1)

??

43

་་

وو

"

"1

29

"

Aberdeen School (Boys),...

High Street (Girls),.

Queen's Road West (Girls),

Hollywood Road (Girls),

Pottinger Street (Girls), Stanley School (Girls), Shaukiwan (Girls), Tokwawan (Girls),

L.M.S., Square Street (Boys),

100.00 83.33

100.00

F.E.S., Bonham Road, Chinese Division (Girls),.

100.00 93.33

94.73

100.00 100,00 76.92

100.00 86.66

Failed.

100.00, 100.00

100.00!

89.29

100.00

100.00 $8.88

100.00 96.15

100.00

100.00

100.00

100.00

58.33

100.00

100.00 100.00

100.00

62.02

100.00

100.00 100.00

100.00

82.85

66.66

100.00 100.00

100.00

100.00

100.00

100.00 100.00

100.00

96.15

100.00

100.00 100.00

100.00

Wantsai Chapel (Boys),

100.00

92.15

100.00

100.00

100.00

100.00

11

19

Yaumati (Boys),

100.00

92.85

100.00

100.00

97.14

100.00

??

*T

Shektongtsui (Boys),

97.14

77.14

100.00

100.00

100,00

100.00

""

Saiyingpun, 1. Division (Boys),

100.00

80.35

100.00

100.00

100.00

100.00

""

II.

99

";

(Boys),

98.94

80.10

100.00

100.00

97.29

50.00

"?

12

Hunghòm (Boys),

100.00

94.33

100.00

98.11

100.00

100.00

""

Hospital Chapel (Boys),

98.18

96.36

29

>>

Shektongtsui (Girls),

100.00 100.00

100.00 100.00 100.00

100 00

"

Saiyingpun (Girls),

100.00 86.00

92.85

100.00 97.87

62.50

"

Ui-hing Lane, I. Division (Girls),

97.22

91.66

100.00

100.00

100.00

II.

"

(Girls),

89.28

89.28

100.00

100,00 100.00-

รา

Fletcher Street (Girls),

91.66 75.00

100.00

100.00 100.00

وو

Tanglungchau (Boys),

100.00 75.00

100.00

Shaukiwan (Boys),

""

Taikoktsui (Boys),

11

Square Street (Girls),

100.00 84.00 100.00 75.00 100.00 93.75

4

100,00 100.00

100,00

100.00

100,00

83.33

Li Yuen Street (Girls),

100.00 93.33

100.00

100,00 100.00

"J

""

19

::

Third Street (Boys),

"?

7:

"

::

*

"

:1

D'Aguilar Street (Girls),..

Bowrington (Girls),

Matauwai, I. Division (Boys),

II.

Kau-ü-fong (Girls),

100.00 92.50

100.00

100,00 100.00

100.00 93.87

100.00

100.00 100.00 100.00

100.00

88.23

100.00 100.00

90.47 76.19

100.00 100.00

(Girls),.

90.00 60.00

100.00

97.87 95.74

100.00

100.00 100.00

??

Stanley Street (Girls),..

100.00 46.15

25.00

100.00

100.00

19

་་

Tanglungchau (Girls)...

100.00 90.32

100.00 100.00

""

st

Taipingshan Chapel (Girls),

100.00

77.10

100,00

100.00

92.37 100.00

>>

Aberdeen Street (Girls),

100.00 97.77

100.00

100.00

100.00

"

19

Wantsai Chapel (Girls),

94.52 78.09

100.00

98.63

87.50

19

"

Staunton Street (Girls),...

84.84

84.84

85.71

100.00

100.00 Failed.

"

"1

Saiyingpun. Second Street East (Girls), Taihang (Girls),

100.00

100.00

33.33

100.00

100.00

100.00 100.00

100.00 100.00

"

R.C.M., Cathedral School (Boys),

100.00

82.35

100,00 100.00

""

1:

Hollywood Road,

"

7+

Bridges Street, Chinese School (Girls),

Holy Infancy School, 1. Division (Boys),

100.00

78.72

80.00

100.00 100.00

100.00

(Girls),

100.00

78.00

100.00

100.00 100.00 100.00

100.00

83.33

100.00

100.00 100.00 100.00

19

II.

"7

19

"

(Girls),

100.00 82.35

100.00

100,00 100.00 100.00

*

Yaumati (Girls),

100.00

80.95

100.00

100.00 100.00

>>

51

"

Hunghòm (Girls),

Shaukiwan (Girls),

Wesleyan Mission, Spring Gardens (Boys),

100 00

96.77

100.00

100,00 100.00

100.00

100.00

100.00

100.00 100.00

.....

100.00 78.06

100.00

100.00 100,00 100.00

"1

"

Wellington Street (Boys).

98.61

93.05

100.00

100,00 100,00

""

(Girls),

97.14 85.71

100.00

100.00 100.00

""

Lascar Row (Girls),

100.00

89.28

100.00

100.00 100.00

Wantsai (Boys),

100.00 95.65

100.00

100.00

""

1

Graham Street (Girls),

100.00 79.16

94.44

100.00

96.55 Failed.

11

**

11

Lascar Row (Boys),..............

100.00 95.74

100.00

100.00

100.00

100.00

III.

Kennedy Town (Boys),

100.00 82.35

100.00

100.00

Basel Mission, High Street (Girls),

100.00 91.55 95.77

92.30

100.00 100.00

..

Berlin Mission (Girls),

100.00 83.33 100.00

100 00

100.00

C.M.S., Victoria Home and Orphanage (Girls),

100.00 100.00 91.17

100.00 83.33

100.00

iv.

11

,,

St. Paul's College School (Boys),

17

Wesleyan Mission, Wellington St., Eng. Sch. (Boys).

Diocesan Home and Orphanage (Boys),

100.00

C.M.S., St. Stephen's Anglo-Chinese School (Boys),...

98.11

100.00

94.36

92.00 88.00 96.22 98.11 94.87 97.43 94.36 92.95

92.00

??

17

F.E.S., Bonham Road, English Division (Girls),.. L.M.S., Taipingshan, English School (Boys),

78.23

+9

}:

Third Street,

19

"

Lok-ying

15

""

(Boys),

(Boys),

70

Morrison School (Boys),

>>

"

"

High School (Boys)

European Div. (Boys)...

R.C.M., St. Joseph's College, Chinese Div. (Boys), .

100.00 100.00 80.00 60.00 60.00 60.00

100.00

99.37

52.17 65.21 97.67 97.67

97.67 100.00 95.65 95.65 95.65 100.00 100.00 95.65 95.65 100.00 88.89 83.33 97.05 100.00 95.03 96.27

100.00

94.44 90.90 100.00 85.10 94.82 100.00 61.54 88.88 100.00

100.00

....

100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00

92.55 98.55 100.00

91

1

37

"1

Italian Convent, English Division (Girls),.

Portuguese Division (Girls),

Bridges Street, English Division (Girls),

Portuguese Division (Girls)..

St. Francis, Portuguese Division (Girls),

English Division (Girls),

Victoria Portuguese School (Mixed),

English School (Boys),

11

"

$1

(Girls),

99.00 92.00

78.00 99.00 99.00 100.00

100.00

88.23

100.00 100.00 88.52 93.44 100.00 100.00 100.00 92.50 75.00 100.00 100.00 66.66 31.25 100.00 100.00 56.00 92.00 100.00 100.00 84.20 94.73 100.00 98.73 81.01 91.13 96.77 100.00 97.05 100.00 96.15

64.70 100.00

100.00

94.73

100.00

93.33 94.44

100.00

100,00

208

TABLE XVI.-NUMBER of UNEDUCATED CHILDREN in the Colony, in 1893. Estimated Number of Children of local school-age (6 to 16 years) in the Colony, in 1893 :-

Boys,.........

Girls,..

Number of Scholars in Schools of all descriptions in 1893 :--

3 "

..... 16,448

.14,586

31,034

Boys.

Girls.

Total.

Government Schools,

2,088

268

2,356

Grant-in-Aid Schools,..

3,256

2,994

6,250

Kaifong Schools,........

2,533

63

2,596

Unclassed Schools,

392

529

921

12,123

.18,911

Uneducated or imperfectly educated Children in the Colony,...

E. J. EITEL, Ph. D. (Tub.),

Inspector of Schools and Head of the

Education Department.

*

No. 1.

1

49

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 27th August, 1894.

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART LOCKHART), Chairman.

""

"

99

""

""

""

""

the Acting Attorney General, (ANDREW JOHN LEACH, Q.C.).

the Colonial Treasurer, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES).

the Harbour Master, (ROBERT MURRAY RUMSEY, R.N.).

EDWARD BOWDLER.

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS, C.M.G.,

ALEXANDER MCCONACHIE.

ABSENT:

The Honourable JAMES JOHNstone Keswick.

The Committee met at the request of the Acting Colonial Secretary.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 13th December, 1893, were read and confirmed. (1) Read the following Minute under the hand of His Excellency the Governor :--

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

C.S.O. 779, 923, and

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Twenty thousand Dollars, 1918 of 1894. ($20,000), being the amount of the building grant to the Pó Léung Kuk.

C.S.O.

(The money has already been paid to the Pó Léung Kuk under authority of Ordinance No. 10 of 1893, section 16.)

Government House, Hongkong, 9th August, 1894.

The Committee unanimously agreed to recommend that the vote be passed.

(2) Read the following Minute under the hand of His Excellency the Governor :—

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

1918 of 1894.

C.S.O.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One hundred thousand Dollars, ($100,000), to meet extraordinary expenses incurred in connection with the epidemic of plague.

Government House, Hongkong, 9th August, 1894.

The Committee unanimously agreed to recommend that the vote be passed.

(3) Read the following Minute under the hand of His Excellency the Governor :-

1142 of 1894.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Five thousand Dollars, ($5,000), to meet extraordinary expenditure by the Botanical and Afforestation Department in con- nection with the recent caterpillar plague.

Government House, Hongkong, 9th August, 1894.

The Committee unanimously agreed to recommend that the vote be passed.

(4) Read the following Minute under the hand of His Excellency the Governor :--

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

C.S.O. 1549 of 1894.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Six thousand Dollars, ($6,000), for refunds of Revenue.

(A refund of $14,000 has already been made in the matter of the estate of the late J. S. LAPRAIK.)

Government House, Hongkong, 9th August, 1894.

The Committee unanimously agreed to recommend that the vote be passed.

***

50

(5) Read the following Minute under the hand of His Excellency the Governor :-

C.S.O. 1918 of 1894,

and C.S.O.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One thousand Two hundred Dollars, 30 ($1,200), for the expenses of the Medical Department, as follows:--

2124 of 1894.

Medicines, Light and Fuel,

$700 .$500

(Medical expenditure in connection with the plague is not included in the above, but will be defrayed from the Plague Vote.)

Government House, Hongkong, 15th August, 1894.

The Committee unanimously agreed to recommend that the vote be passed.

The Committee then adjourned.

Read and confirmed on the 28th November, 1894.

J. G. T. BUCKLE,

Acting Clerk of Councils.

J. H. STEWART LOCKHART,

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 3rd September, 1894.

Chairman.

:

1

No. 2.

51

C.8.0.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 28th November, 1894.

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART LOCKHART), Chairman.

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

"

»

""

""

""

""

""

the Colonial Treasurer, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES).

the Director of Public Works, (FRANCIS ALFRED COOPER).

the Harbour Master, (ROBERT MURRAY RUMSEY, R.N.). CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS, C.M.G.

ALEXANDER MCCONACHIE.

The Committee met at the request of the Acting Colonial Secretary.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 27th August, 1894, were read and confirmed. Read the following Minutes under the hand of His Excellency the Governor :-

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

2650 of 1894.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Eight thousand Five hundred Dollars, ($8,500), for the purpose of erecting the Statue of H. M. The QUEEN on the reclaimed land in front of the City Hall.

Government House, Hongkong, 2nd November, 1894.

The Committee unanimously agreed to recommend that the vote be passed.

C. O. Telegram

1894.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends for the consideration of the Council the vote of a sum of No. Eighty thousand Dollars, ($80,000), in respect of compensation for the fall in the Exchange value of the dollar to Officers domiciled in the United Kingdom and other gold using countries.

Government House, Hongkong, 19th November, 1894.

Mr. CHATER moved that the Committee recommend that the vote be passed, and addressed the Committee.

C.S.O.

Mr. KESWICK seconded and addressed the Committee.

Dr. Ho KAI addressed the Committee.

Mr. MCCONACHIE addressed the Committee.

The Colonial Treasurer addressed the Committee.

The Harbour Master addressed the Committee.

The Attorney General addressed the Committee.

The Acting Colonial Secretary addressed the Committee. Question-put and agreed to unanimously.

2765 of 1894.

C.S.0.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One thousand Dollars ($1,000), to meet part of the expense of a new boiler for the Floating Fire Engine. (Total estimated cost $1,550; balance will be paid out of surplus on vote for Repairs to Engines, &c.)

Government House, Hongkong, 2nd November, 1894.

The Committee unanimously agreed to recommend that the vote be passed.

2390 of 1894.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Six thousand Five hundred Dollars, ($6,500), to cover certain expenses in connection with the Gap Rock Lighthouse.

Government House, Hongkong, 27th September, 1894.

The Committee unanimously agreed to recommend that the vote be passed.

The Committee then adjourned sine die.

Read and confirmed on the 12th December, 1894.

J. G. T. BUCKLE, Acting Clerk of Councils.

J. H. STEWART LOCKHART,

Chairman.

7

No. 3

53

C.S.O.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG, On the 12th December, 1894.

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART LOCKHART), Chairman.

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

the Colonial Treasurer, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES).

the Director of Public Works, (FRANCIS ALFred Cooper).

**

the Harbour Master, (ROBERT MURRAY RUMSEY,

R.N.).

>"

وو

>"

55

>>

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

Ho KAI, M.B., C.M.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS, C.M.G.

ALEXANDER MCCONACHIE.

The Committee met pursuant to notice.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 28th November, 1894, were read and confirmed. Read the following Minute under the hand of His Excellency the Governor :-

:

2843 of 1894.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Nine hundred and Forty Dollars and Five Cents, ($940.05), on account of a deficiency in Stamps and Postal Notes as shewn in the accounts of the late Postal Agent at Ningpo, now deceased.

Government House, Hongkong, 8th December, 1894.

Dr. Ho KAI and Mr. CHATER asked certain questions.

The Acting Colonial Secretary replied.

The Committee unanimously agreed to recommend that the vote be passed.

The Committee then proceeded to consider the Bill to apply a Sum not exceeding Two Millions Four hundred and Twenty thousand, Five hundred and One Dollars to the Public Service of the Year

1895.

The Chairman moved the adoption of the several items on the Bill.

At the suggestion of the Director of Public Works the following items were amended :--

Public Works Department from $87,496 to $88,696 (being an addition of $1,200 for the services of a Clerk rendered necessary by the amalgamation of the posts of Correspond- ence Clerk and Office Accountant).

Public Works Extraordinary from $45,000 to $53,500 being an addition of $8,500 to cover the cost of erecting the Statue of Her Majesty The QUEEN. (See report of the Finance Committee, No. 2, of the 28th November, 1894.)

Mr. CHATER moved as a further amendment that the item for " Military Expenditure" be omitted. Dr. Ho KAI seconded.

The Committee divided.

For the amendment.

Honourable C. P. CHATER.

**

J. J. KESWICK.

Dr. KO KAI.

E. R. BELILIOS.

A. MCCONACHIE.

Against the amendment.

The Acting Colonial Secretary. The Attorney General.

The Colonial Treasurer.

The Director of Public Works. The Harbour Master.

An equal number of votes being recorded on each side, the Chairman gave his casting vote against the amendment.

Amendment lost by a majority of 1.

A discussion ensued regarding the casting vote of the Chairman, and it was agreed that a definite ruling on this point should, if possible, be laid down for future guidance.

Mr. CHATER requested that the attention of His Excellency the Governor might be specially directed to the question of Military Expenditure with a view to obtaining a definite decision from the Secretary of State on the subject.

Mr. BELILIOS moved as a further amendment that the item for Tytam Water Works Extension be reduced from $104,000 to $60,000, the sum agreed to by the Public Works Committee.

Question--put and agreed to.

The several items on the Bill, subject to the amendments agreed to above, were unanimously passed, making a total of $2,386,201.

The Committee then adjourned.

Read and confirmed on the 26th February, 1895.

J. G. T. BUCKLE,

Acting Clerk of Councils.

J. H. STEWART LOCKHART,

Chairman.

.

131

No. 10

94

HONGKONG.

REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF FIRE BRIGADE FOR 1893.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor, on the 15th March, 1894.

No. 5.

FIRE BRIGADE Department,

HONGKONG, 31st January, 1894.

SIR,-I regret to have to report a large increase in the number of Fires occurring in 1893 as compared with previous years. In hardly any of them was the origin of the fire explained, in many of them the origin was demonstrably suspicious, and in most of them apparently suspicious.

The decline and rise in the number of fires appears to keep pace with the care or negligence displayed in the insuring of effects in Chinese houses.

These policies are for the most part effected by agents acting for companies in Europe, such agents receiving a commission on the policies and having no other personal interest in the matter. They act through Chinese agents or compradores, and it is highly probable that these compradores in securing business for their employers enlarge upon the great advantage of being insured in bad times when an accidental fire will clear off in a moment at fair profit stocks that it might otherwise have been difficult to realize. It is quite possible too that such accidents might occur at a time when the original stocks upon which the policy was effected were depleted, the probable destruction of the house and of the books making the actual state of the stock at the time of the fire a matter of conjecture only. In this way the insurer might not only eat his cake but have it.

There appears to be a notion that under the double safeguard of a fire enquiry and the probable speedy extinction of a fire if it occurs the same caution in the administration of fire policies is not so necessary as it once was.

To a certain extent this notion is not without foundation as I think experience has shown that the Brigade may be relied upon to extinguish fires with reasonable despatch under normal conditions, but it is easy to imagine a state of things in which a fire might get out of hand and a repetition of the 1878 disaster be possible.

Every effort is made to minimize this possibility and the whole training of the Brigade and the arrangements in connection with it have as their central object the limitation of the area to be controlled and the provision beforehand of all such arrangements as are likely to save time and confu- sion upon the occurrence of a fire.

The first of these and one to which I attach particular importance is the running out more hose than is required to reach the scene of the fire. The first impulse of a fireman is to run out the hose up to the fire to attach the branch pipe and turn on water. If then he is ordered to take the hose upstairs say of the adjoining house which has just caught fire in the upper storey, he finds that he has not enough hose to enable him to do so. It then becomes necessary to obtain another length and to stop the water supply, an operation which always takes time and causes confusion and valuable time is thereby lost. All the firemen are therefore drilled to run out a considerable margin of hose bringing it round to the fire in a sweep, so that if it is required to go upstairs it can be done without any dislocation of the arrangements. Of all the provisions that can be made beforehand I consider this one of the most important, and it is now thoroughly understood by the Brigade and is always carried out.

Another important point is to constantly inspect from the inside the adjoining buildings. This duty is entrusted to the foremen who are told to do this from time to time and to report what they find to the Superintendent or Senior Officer present.

Further precautions are taken in having in readiness reserves of hose, and duplicates of all the more important appliances that are usually brought into use, and lastly in order to be prepared to meet as far as possible the danger arising from fresh fires occurring through the fall of sparks carried by the wind to a distance, a couple of fire despatch boxes are taken down and kept in readiness to be taken to any spot where they may be required.

With regard to these latter they have during the past year been slightly modified in the direction. of making them much lighter, and they have also been increased in number. They owe their origin to the desire to take advantage of the excellent water pressure obtained from the hydrants, and it has been found possible to gradually extend their presence all over the Colony without encroaching on the normal vote for stores.

132

To myself as Superintendent it is an immense relief to feel that a ready and practicable method of dealing with fires on the upper levels is now available through the instrumentality of these appliances made possible through our excellent water pressure. The highest level at present supplied with them is Queen's Gardens, and one has only to imagine how difficult it would be to tackle with a fire in that neighbourhood from the harbour to realize the great advantage that the existing water supply gives to the operations of the Brigade.

I have before now drawn attention to the fact that there exists no means of extinguishing fires at the Peak. Peak residences are now so numerous having amongst thein extensively fitted up Hotels and the summer residences of His Excellency the Governor and all the leading European residents of the Colony, that as a fireman I do not like the idea of these places being at the mercy of accident, and I think money would be well spent in taking advantage of the water system of the Peak District by making it available for the use of fire extinguishing appliances.

I attach a list of fires for the last ten years with the estimated amount of property destroyed in each case and also a list of incipient fires during the past year put out without calling out the Brigade.

2

Mr. HORSPOOL having returned from leave has relieved Mr. MATHIESON of his duties as Acting Assistant Superintendent of the Fire Brigade. This latter Officer performed his duties to my entire satisfaction. Mr. CAMPBELL and Mr. KINGHORN Continue to carry out their duties with the same care and discretion as they have invariably shown and Mr. Chau Shau remains the same exemplary Clerk as before.

All the firemen of the Brigade have worked well and zealously at their duties.

I attach copy of report froin Mr. KINGHORN regarding the state of the Engines. The suggestions made in his letter will be dealt with separately.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

The Honourable G. T. M. OBRIEN, C.M.G.,

Colonial Secretary.

Your most obedient Servant,

H. E. WODEHOUSE, Superintendent, Fire Brigade.

-

HONGKONG, 19th January, 1894.

SIR,-I have the honour to forward my report on the state of the Government Fire Engines for the year ending 31st December 1893.

STEAMER No. 1.

(Floating Engine by Merryweather & Sons).

This Engine has been 27 years in service and is in good order. The Boiler is very much worn and-considering its age-I cannot recommend it to be repaired; the pressure has been reduced, for safety, to the lowest useful limit and I would strongly recommend a new Boiler to be obtained for this Engine at an early date, as it is the only Floating Engine in the Brigade and might be called upon to do some heavy work.

STEAMER No. 3.

(Land Engine by Shand & Mason).

This Engine has been 15 years in service, it has been kept as reserve engine during the year, regularly tested at the monthly drills for drivers, and is now in good order and condition.

STEAMER No. 4.

.

This Engine has been 12 years in service, it has not been disabled at a fire, has required no repairs, and is now in good order and condition.

STEAMER No. 5.

(Land Engine by Shand & Mason).

This Engine has been 8 years in service, during the early part of the year it did some good work at fires, and was 23 times under steam, it has not been disabled, and is now in good order and condition.

STEAMER No. 6.

(Land Engine by Shand & Mason).

This Engine has been 15 years in service (9 years in Volunteer Brigade), it has been regularly tested during the year at the monthly drill for drivers, the Boiler is much worn and is under reduced pressure, otherwise the Engine is in good order and condition.

i

I

>

r

¡

133

MANUAL ENGINES, HOSE, REELS, &C.

Nine Manual Engines and fittings are all in good order. The Hose, Reels and Supply Carts, ladders and gear are all in good order and condition.

The Assistant Engineer and Engine drivers have done their work, during the year, to my satis faction, and are very attentive to their duties.

Three, out of the seven men, who applied to learn Engine driving, at the beginning of the year, have attended drill and passed their examination successfully, the other four failed to pass. NOTE: In the event of a conflagration of any magnitude occurring between Wing Lok Street and West Point Wharf the Engines can be of very little service on account of the Reclamation Works going on, it is impossible to place them near the water in the harbour, and if it could be arranged at a small cost, I would recommend that wells be made, at intervals of 100 yards, just inside of the Old Praya wall, until the reclaimed ground is passable for the Engines.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

JOHN W. KINGHORN,

Engineer,

Government Fire Brigade.

H. E. WODEHOUSE, ESQ., C.M.G.,

Superintendent,

Government Fire Brigade.

No.

DATE.

FIRES, 1884.

SITUATION OF FIRE.

No. of BUILDINGS

DESTROYED.

Wholly. Partly.

ESTIMATED AMOUNT

OF PROPERTY DESTROYED,.

455 HP. 09. 2. Hand

3

January May July

23

No. 95, Praya Central,

1

19

No. 62, Queen's Road West,.

1

1

$ 3,000

31

No. 1, Upper Lascar Row,

1

4

September 5

No. 231, Queen's Road West,

4

1

800 20,000

19

No. 5, Chin Kwong Street, ......

1

1

15,000

19

""

No. 292, Queen's Road West,

2,000

23 The 1 Wo Passage Boat No. S.H. 259 in Victoria Harbour,

...

23,000

8

October 19

No. 11, Bonham Strand Central,

2

8,000

9

November 4

No. 353, Queen's Road Central,

1

· 3,000

10

13

94

No. 15, Sai Woo Lane,

2

1

2,500

11

21.

99

No. 84, Praya Central,"

2

1,500

12

December

3

Bakery in Morrison Hill Road, East Point,

1

. 1,000

13

7

No. 45, Boubam Strand West,

4

1

52,000

14

11

""

An Opium Divan at Hung Hom,

22

8

1,000

15

19

16

Hung Hom Village,

100

5,000

16

""

17

"

18

288

27 No. 69, Bonham Strand Central,

1

1

2,000

28

No. 10, Wyndham Street,

28 No. 14, Station Street,

1

20

1

250

99

No.

DATE.

FIRES, 1885.

SITUATION OF FIRE.

* ON CO SE LO CO

1

January

8

No. 198, Aberdeen Village,

2

17

No. 39, Market Street,

""

3

February

8

No. 243, Queen's Road Central,

4

March

27

No. 46, Square Street,

5

April

3

No. 15, Jervois. Street,

6

May

15

No. 117, Hollywood Road,

7

October 2

Queen's Road West,

8

December 8

No. 237, Queen's Road West,

9

15

A grass stack at Aplichau,

10

17

No. 7, Wanchai Road,

"

11

27

Victoria Hotel Buildings, Queen's Road Central,

""

DESTROYED.

Wholly. Partly.

NO. OF BUILDINGS

ESTIMATED AMOUNT

OF PROPERTY

DESTROYED.

2

$1,200

200

1

100

1

1

1,500

1

5,000

700

...

1

3,000

5

3,800

2,500

1

200

.

134

No.

DATE.

FIRES, 1886.

SITUATION OF FIRE.

1 February 2

No. 186, Hollywood Road,

May

Matsheds at Belchers Battery near Pokfulam Road,

No. 3, Wing Fung Street,....

No. 84, Queen's Road East,

2

March

11

3

"9

17

6

September 17

No. 41, Saltfish Lane,

October 22 November 24

8

9

10

32

December

19

11

""

15

17

19

No. 3, Tak Hing Lane,

Horse Repository, Garden Road, No. 106, Queen's Road West, No. 91, Queen's Road West,..... No. 223, Queen's Road West, No. 67, Bonham Strand West,

No. OF BUILDINGS DESTROYED.

Wholly. Partly.

The whole of the Po Lok Theatre Buildings des- troyed.

ESTIMATED AMOUNT OF PROPERTY

DESTROYED.

7

...

$

200

1

1,200

1

1

3,500

2

12,000

270

10

1

40,000

4

2

19,000

3

...

16,000

1

2

18,000

No.

DATE.

FIRES, 1887.

SITUATION OF FIRE.

No. of BUILDINGS

DESTROYED.

Wholly. Partly.

ESTIMATED AMOUNT

OF PROPERTY DESTROYED.

1

January 12

No. 16, Sai Woo Lane,

1

2

13

""

No. 142, Second Street,....

2

3

15

19

No. 48, Queen's Road West,....

4

22

39

Man Mo Temple, Hollywood Road,.

25

No. 63, Wellington Street,

26

""

No. 59, Queen's Road West,.

1

February 10

No. 3, Bonham Strand,

1

...

8

17

No. 129, Queen's Road West,

]

1

9

March

9

No. 15, Tsz Mi Lane,

...

$ 1,400 14,000 23,000

25 3,000 12,000 2,900

19,000

10

10

No. 76, Jervois Street,

11

23

No. 17, Wing Kat Street,

2,500

12

24

No. 34, Bonham Strand,

1,800

13

April

5

Blackhead & Co.'s Godowns at Tsimshatsui,

...

14

30

""

No. 273, Queen's Road Central,

2

8,000

15

May

4 No. 35, Battery Road,

1

...

60

16

June

14

A Carpenter's Shed at Kennedy Town,

1

200

17

July

No. 28, Tank Lane,

1

300

18

25

No. 185, Queen's Road West,

15

4

26,000

19

August

20

23

September 15

No. 311, Queen's Road Central,

2

2,000

No. 39, Wing Lok Street,..

1

1,200

21

99

21

No. 76, Queen's Road West,.

2

1

4,000

22

October

No. 9, In Kee Lane,

1

1,500

23

7

No. 5, Gage Street,

1

1

3,000

24 November

5

No. 9, Sheung Fung Lane,

1

100

25

"

16

No. 253, Queen's Road Central,

24

10

90,000

26

24

"9

No. 13, Triangle Street,

1

150

27

"9

27

No. 1, Nullah Lane,

1

190

28

28

No. 107, Wellington Street,

2

1,000

29

""

29

No. 163, Queen's Road East,

150

30

29

No. 165, Queen's Road East,

...

150

31

30

No. 40, Wing On Street,

7

3

16,000

32 December

1

No. 31, Pound Lane,

33:

11

"

No. 15, Morrison Street,

34

20

No. 5, Kau Ú Fong,"

35

28 No. 56, Bonham Strand,

200

...

2

1,800

4

1,500

16..

30,000

:

No.

DATE.

135

FIRES, 1888.

SITUATION OF FIRE.

No. of BUILDINGS

DESTROYED.

Wholly. Partly.

ESTIMATED AMOUNT OF PROPERTY

DESTROYED.

123410 ©

January

1

No. 147, Queen's Road West,

1

2

500

17

No. 77, Praya West,

1

700

28

No. 93, Bonham Strand,

1

5,500

February 10

No. 151, Hollywood Road,

1

12

وو

No. 7, Ship Street,.......

1

6

29

No. 229, Queen's Road West,

7

March

12

No. 139, Queen's Road Central;

8

14

99

No. 21, Centre Street,

9

22

29

No. 3, Gilman Street,

10

April

3

No. 201, Queen's Road West,

5

11

13

"

No. 29, Graham Street,..

12

24

""

No. 186, Wing Lok Street,

13

27

""

No. 89, Queen's Road West,.

14

May

11

No. 81, Jervois Street,

1

15

12

""

No. 9, Chinese Street,

16

18

No. 55, Queen's Road West,....

4

17

31

29

No. 15, Ship Street,

18

June

11

No. 58, Wing Lok Street,....

19

21

""

No. 339, Queen's Road Central,

1

20

29

""

No. 114, Jervois Street,

- - --~-- ~ ----⠀⠀

500

200

22,000

35,000

9,000

2

11,500

400

4,000

200

16,000

400

4

300

500

1,000

21

July

6

No. 42, Queen's Road West,

2

2

25,000

22

23

A

No. 138, Second Street,..

1

11

6,000

23

24

Nos. 6 & 8, Peel Street,

2

2,000

...

24

26

19

No. 17, Jervois Street,

1

1

10,000

25

27

No. 19, Tank Lane,

1

200

26

August

15

No. 2, Cochrane Street,..

1

20

27

17

Jubilee Street,

4

14,000

""

28

19

""

29

28

30

31

32

""

33

October

4

34

4

"

35

22

""

September 26

30

30

No. 86, Hollywood Road, No. 18, Lyndhurst Terrace, No. 388, Queen's Road Central, No. 110, Queen's Road Central,

No. 112, Queen's Road Central, No. 21, Chung San Lane, West, No. 171, Queen's Road West, No. 114, Queen's Road Central,

1

2

2,000

12

80,000

1

1

5,500.

1

2

7,500

3

27,500

1

500

3

1

10,000.

8,000

""

36

30

No. 217. Queen's Road West,

3,000

37 November 3

No. 46, Praya Central,

1

2

8,000

38

8

""

No. 18, Albany Street,

100

39

11

""

No. 53, East Street,

1,000

40

15

No. 99, Queen's Road East,

800.

41

17

No. 103, Bonham Strand Central,

10,000

دو

42

17

>>

No. 39, Praya, Yaumati,

1,800

43

17

99

Aberdeen Village,

1

150

44

18

No. 83, Jervois Street,

2

25,000

45

December 21

No. 115, Praya West,

1

4,000

FIRES, 1889.

No.

DATE.

SITUATION OF FIRE.

NO. OF BUILDINGS

DESTROYED.

Wholly. Partly.

ESTIMATED AMOUNT

OF PROPERTY

DESTROYED.

1 January

"

3 No. 1, Rozario Street,

7 No. 197, Queen's Road West,

2

1

1

1

February

6

No. 92, Wing Lok Street,....

1

1

$ 1,000 2,000 20,000

April

12

No. 292, Queen's Road West,

20

...

May

5

No. 145, Bonham Strand,

1

300

9

No. 10, Wilmer.Street,

1

10,000

29

9

22

June July

4 No. 227, Queen's Road West,

August 24 No. 95, Hollywood Road,

No. 242, Queen's Road West,

2

3,000

1

1,300

400

10

26

No. 174, Third Street,

1

1,500

""

11

September 16

No. 203, Queen's Road Central,

1

2,000

12

21

No. 1, Wing Wo Street,

1

1,200

13

21

No. 112, Queen's Road Central,

2

4,000

14

25

""

No. 220, Queen's Road Central,

3

15

29

No. 9, Hellier Street,....

99

16

October

10

17

30

99

No. 42, Battery Street, Yaumati, No. 154, Queen's Road Central,

1

1,500

1

1

8,000

18

19

5

20

November 4

"

December 23

No. 334, Queen's Road Central,

No. 7, Nullah Lane,

1,000

No. 55, Queen's Road West,..

16,000

5,000

21

30

""

No. 17, Bonham Strand,

4

20,000

136

No.

DATE.

FIRES, 1890.

SITUATION OF FIRE.

12840 CO E

January

5

No. 7, Station Street,

7

"

3

18

99

26

No. 33, Tung Man Lane, No. 229, Praya West,

No. 8, Lyndhurst Terrace,

.....

39

5

28

No. 23, Bonham Strand,

""

6

February 10

No. 18, Gage Street,

7

14

No. 8, St. Francis Street,

""

8

May

2

No. 68, Bonham Strand,

9

19

""

The Hongkong Dispensary,

10

23

""

11

my

12

13

""

July

September 9

22

14 November 11

15 16

"

15 December 15

No. 12, Kwong Un Street, East, No. 32, Square Street,

Blackhead & Co., Praya Central, No. 38, Gilman Bazaar,. No. 47, Bonham Strand, No. 69, Upper Station Street, No. 112, Queen's Road Central,

2

:

No.

DATE.

No. OF BUILDINGS

DESTROYED.

Wholly. Partly.

3

...

ESTIMATED

AMOUNT OF PROPERTY

DESTROYED.

$ 1,000 500

1

1

1

8,000

1

10,000

1

400

:

300

1

550

4

2

41,000

...

...

1

~ --- -:

1

100,000 3,000

:

500

1

30,000

1

100

1

2,000

250

2

6,000

FIRES, 1891.

SITUATION OF FIRE.

NO. OF BUILDINGS

DESTROYED.

Wholly. Partly.

5

1

2

Ni

ESTIMATED AMOUNT

OF PROPERTY

DESTROYED.

$ 3,000

1224t

3

January February

April

39

8

No. 353, Queen's Road West,

5

No. 41, Hillier Street,

7

00 00 10 1–

8 Nos. 170 and 172, Third Street,

The Hongkong and China Bakery, Morrison Hill Road,

East Point,

5678

May

5

No. 331, Queen's Road Central,

6

No. 280, Queen's Road Central,

99

July

December 19

No. 72, Station Street, Yaumati,

No. 57A, Wanchai Road,

No.

DATE.

1

FIRES, 1892.

SITUATION OF FIRE.

2211

700

1,500

1

1,000

11,500

12,000

1,800

600

No. of BUILDINGS

DESTROYED.

ESTIMATED AMOUNT

OF PROPERTY

DESTROYED.

A

Wholly. Partly.

1

January

10

2

13

No. 9, Queen's Road Central, Bonham Strand,

}

$40,000

3

...

""

8,000

3

16

"

No. 528, Queen's Road West,

1

6,000

21

No. 81, High Street,

1

100

April

1

No. 26, Sai Wo Lane,

1

1,000

10

99

No. 17, Queen's Road West,

1

400

11

No. 104, Queen's Road West,

1

1,500

8

May

22

No. 17, Tank Lane,

1

250

9

June

21

No. 29, Centre Street,

1

! 100

10

July

3

No. 91, Wing Lok Street,

1

5,000

11

12

13

August 18

No. 49, Queen's Road West,.. 21 No. 48, Queen's Road West,..

September 15

14 December 8

No. 80, Queen's Road West,..

1.

300

1

3,000

No. 333, Queen's Road Central,

+1

4

2

4,000

2

5,000

16

15

"

99

2203

No. 14, Jubilee Street,

No. 16, East Street,

1

300

1

1

600

མ ། ་ ས ་བ ད ་ ་ ༄ ། ཥ

No.

DATE.

FIRES, 1893.

SITUATION OF FIRE.

137

NO. OF BUILDINGS DESTROYED.

Wholly. Partly.

ESTIMATED AMOUNT OF PROPERTY

DESTROYED.

1

January

7

2

11

No. 73, Hollywood Road, No. 79, Nullah Lane,....

""

3

18

No. 2, Square Street,...

1

.$

13

وو

6

March

22

"

February 11

No. 68, Jervois Street,

No. 101, Wing Lok Street,.

No. 22, Holland Street,.

: : :

800 300

1

10

2

1

10,000

1

6,000

1

1

40,000

26

No. 301, Queen's Road West,.

1

2

8,000

""

.8

April

13

No. 87, Jervois Street,

1

2,000

9

25

No. 15, West Street,

1

800

10

27

No. 1, In On Lane,

2

1

19,000

""

11

May

13

No. 344, Queen's Road Central,

1

2,000

12

June

16

No. 406, Queen's Road West,.

1

2,000

13

16

No. 28, Tsz Mi Lane,

1

700

""

14

July

3

No. 191, Hollywood Road,

1

1,500

15

14

""

No. 19, Gough Street,

150

16

19

No. 280, Queen's Road West,

1

1

1,000

""

17

20

No. 12, Tung Loi Lane,

4

20,000

18

August

16

19

17

""

20

25

""

21

22

""

23

""

24

25

26

September 5

October

18

30

12

November 11

11

No. 337, Queen's Road West, No. 32, Queen's Road West,. No. 155, Second Street,..... No. 7, Ezra Lane,

No. 248, Hollywood Road, No 127, Bonham Strand, No. 14, Li Shing,....

1

300

....

1

2,800

1

20,000

400

4,000

.....

5,000

1

5,500

No. 115, Praya West,

3

1

20,000

No. 58, Square Street,

2

1

3,000

"}

27

16

No. 5, Pau Kwai Lane,

1

1,000

"

28

21

No. 9, Tannery Lane,

1

40

""

29

23

No. 314A, Queen's Road Central,..

1

8,000

""

30

26

No. 22, Tsz Mi Lane,

1

1

5,500

"

31

32

33

34

35

36

December

"

4

No. 31, Wing Fung Street,.

1

10

5

No. 131, Bonham Strand,

2

2,000

RRRRR

9

No. 11, Bonham Strand,

2

5,000

10

No. 240. Queen's Road West,

i

9,000

13

No. 99, Praya West,

1

400

25

No. 100, Queen's Road West,.

1

2,000

H. E. WODEHOUSE,

Supt. Fire Brigade.

No.

DATE.

TIME.

INCIPIENT FIRES DURING THE YEAR 1893.

No. of

BUILDINGS

Destroyed.

DAMAGE.

SITUATION OF FIRE.

Wholly. Partly.

CAUSE.

REMARKS.

138

9 Feb.

10

11

12

""

19

""

3 p.m.

11.45 a.m.

2

1 2 ∞ SÍ LO CO

Jan.

""

8 p.m.

2.10 p.m.

5.45 p.m.

4

""

1.30 p.m.

11

""

2 p.m.

18

""

18

39

19

""

9 a.m.

2.30 p.m.

A Stack of Grass at Quarry Bay, House No. 77, Praya East,,... House No. 13, Hillier Street, Grass on Hillside at Deep Water Bay, A Stack of Grass above Ship Street,.. Matshed at Coffee Plantation,...... Grass on Hillside near Mountain Lodge, Grass on Hillside at Tsimshatsui,

Matshed at Tanglungchau,

Grass on Hillside near North Point Battery, House No. 12, Li Un Street, West,).

...

...

$5

Unknown.

...

Trifling

Do.

...

Chimney on fire.

Unknown,.

A number of trees destroyed.

...

$2

Do.

$30

Burning of Joss paper.

...

...

...

Unknown.

9

1.30 a.m.

House No. 33, Praya, Yaumati,.

......

13

11

13

3 p.m.

Tang Man Hing's Coal Godown at Yaumati,

14

March 4

7.45 p.m.

15

11

"

16

12

17

12

Matshed at Wongneichung,

A Stack of Grass on the Hillside at Shaukiwan, Grass on Hillside at the Rifle Range, British Kowloon, House No. 70, Stanley Street,

18 April 10

9.40 p.m.

House No. 42, Lyndhurst Terrace,

Do.

...

...

$150

Do.

...

Do.

...

Trifling

Do.

Wooden partition close to a lighted

Unknown.

[lamp caught fire.

...

...

Spontaneous combustion of coal.

...

$175

Carelessness with lighted match.

$4

Unknown.

Do.

...

Trifling

Capsizing of a kerosine lamp.

...

Bursting of a kerosine lamp.

6 matsheds destroyed and 15 pigs burnt.

19

13

1 p.m.

Grass on the Hillside at Stanley,

...

20

15

Grass on the Hillside at Deep Water Bay,

...

...

21

16

9.30 a.m.

House No. 134, Third Street,.

$1

22

20

8 p.m.

House No. 93, Wing Lok Street,

...

...

23

23

4.30 a.m.

House No. 12, Upper Lascar Row,

...

Unknown.

24 May 12

10.30 p.m.

House No. 62, First Street,

...

25

13

5.55 a.m.

House No. 93, Station Street, Yaumati,

"

26

19 2.25 a.m.

""

27 June

5

28

5

1O 1O

4 a.m.

A certain House (unnumbered) in Chuk Hing Lane, House No. 123, Second Street,

Do.

...

$100

""

12.30 p.m.

House No. 93, First Street,

...

Trifling

29

30

31

283

7

""

3 p.m.

House No. 9, Bonham Strand, West,

$5

...

9

10.45 a.m.

>>

23

1 a.m.

House No. 24, Praya, Kennedy Town, House No. 32, Stanley,

...

Trifling

Do.

Unknown.

Do.

A. coat hanging above a lighted lamp

caught fire.

Chimney caught fire.

Upsetting of a kerosine lamp.

A mosquito curtain caught fire. Unknown.

Incendiarism,

A wooden partition caught fire from a lamp.

A bamboo screen caught fire from a Unknown.

[charcoal furnace.

Supposed to have been set on fire by one Li Yau.

...

...

""

32

27

"

10.30 p.m.

House No. 4, Holland Street,....

33 July 30 34 Aug. 4

12.15 a.m.

House No. 310, Queen's Road Central,...

$2

Trifling

$100

Do.

Do.

11 p.m.

House No. 5, Cleverly Street,

Carelessness with lighted Joss-sticks.

Chimney caught fire.

35

10

12 Noon.

House No. 6, George, Lane,

$4

99

36

12

4 a.m.

House No. 30, Taipingshan Street,

...

...

""

37

13

""

6.30 p.m.

House No. 74, Aberdeen,

1

Unknown.

Trifling

Upsetting of a lamp.

$100

Incendiarism,

38

29

""

7.30 p.m.

House No. 27, Mosque Junction,

...

...

39 Sept.

7

2.45 p.m.

House No. 9, Duddell Street,

40

11

"9

3.30 p.m.

House No. 40, Lyndhurst Terrace,

...

Unknown.

Upsetting of a lamp.

Chimney caught fire.

Set on fire by one Chan Chau who was

insane.

No. DATE.

TIME.

INCIPIENT FIRES DURING THE YEAR 1893,—Continued.

No. of

BUILDINGS

SITUATION OF FIRE.

DESTROYED.

DAMAGE.

Wholly. Partly.

CAUSE.

REMARKS.

41 Sept.

12

6 p.m.

42

18

11.20 p.m.

""

43

23

5.45 p.m.

House No. 102, Second Street,

House No. 187, Queen's Road West,. House No. 19, Wing Wo Street,

...

::

...

"

44

26

House No. 237, Hollywood Road, ....

...

""

45 Oct.

16

3 a.m.

House No. 36, Third Street,

46

17

A European House at Pokfulam,

47

18

12 Noon.

""

48

25

7 a.m.

""

49

Nov.

Smith's Villas, Magazine Gap,

50

House No. 38, Hollywood Road,

99

51

5.30 p.m.

House No. 14, Tung Loi Lane,

...

7.20 p.m.

Grass on the Hillside near Salt Water Bay,

Store of Messrs. Blackhead & Co., Praya Central,

...

...

***

...

***

...

...

...

Trifling

...

...

A bed quilt caught fire from lighted Joss-sticks.

Incendiarism,

A wooden partition caught fire from lighted Joss-sticks.

Incendiarism, ..

Upsetting of a kerosine lamp.

Chimney caught fire.

Unknown.

Some straw caught fire.

Some tar while being heated caught

Chimney caught fire.

Some waste paper caught fire.

[fire.

Kerosine and lighted paper were found on

the stair.

A tin of kerosine oil and paper torch were found on the stair.

...

55

52

5

9.40 p.m.

House No. 314, Queen's Road Central,

...

Some charcoal caught fire.

***

...

...

53

6

11.15 p.m.

House No. 6, Market Street,

...

...

Attempted arson,

54

11

""

A

55

14

56

16

""

57

16

"}

58

17

1.15 a.m.

2 p.m.

4.50 p.m.

6 p.m.

House No. 5, Sui Hing Lane,..

House No. 110, Third Street,................ House No. 16, Western Street,

House No. 10, Station Street, House No. 6, Lok Hing Lane,

...

Trifling

...

""

59

18

.4 p.m.

Hluse No. 125, Praya East,

...

39

60

19

10.15 a.m.

House No. 13, First Street,

...

[a kerosine lamp.

""

61

19

62

23

""

63

88885

26

5.50 p.m.

Grass on the Hillside near Stanley, Grass on the Hillside at Chaiwan Gap, House No. 117, Third Street,.-

...

...

99

64

27

5 p.m.

Ko Shing Theatre,

...

65

**

29

66 | Dec.

67

24

3.30 p.m.

3.30 p.m.

7.30 p.m.

Grass on the Hillside at Stanley,

...

Grass on the Hillside at Wongmakok, House No. 45, Temple Street, Yaumati,

Do.

68

8

9 a.m.

House No. 27, Caine Lane,.....

...

:.

69

11

8 p.m.

A Matshed at Yaumati,

70

71

72

73

74

75

76

""

""

12

8.20 p.m.

12

??

8.15 p.m.

A House-boat on the foreshore at Taikoktsui, Room No. 21, Victoria Hotel,...............

...

...

15

4 p.m.

Grass on the Hillside at Taitamtuk,

17

4 p.m.

""

23

1 a.m.

Grass on the Hillside near Chaiwan, House No. 133, Hollywood Road,

...

...

...

...

...

25

28

3.40 a.m.

""

77

31

12.30 p.m.

Grass on the Hillside near Tytam Beservoir, House No. 160, Queen's Road Central, Grass on the Hillside near Tytam Reservoir,

...

...

***

...

Trifling

...

Trifling

Do.

Trifling

Do.

Do.

Breaking of a kerosine lamp.

A bed curtain caught fire from a Chimney caught fire.

Upsetting of a kerosine lamp.

Careless use of matches.

Overheating of a stove pipe.

[lamp.

A wooden partition caught fire from Unknown.

Do.

Upsetting of a kerosine lamp.

False alarm.

Unknown.

Do.

Joss-paper caught fire from the snuffings of a lamp.

Carelessness while burning Joss-

paper.

Carelessness with lighted match.

Carelessness with lighted Joss-sticks.

Unknown.

Do.

Do.

Carelessness with lighted candle. Unknown.

Some shavings caught fire. Unknown.

Kerosine oil was found on the stair.

...

""

H. E. WODEHOUSE,-Supt. Fire Brigade.

139

·

89

No. 94

:

:

HONGKONG.

REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF VICTORIA GAOL FOR 1893.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor, on the 7th March, 1894.

No. 51.

Superintendent'S OFFICE, VICTORIA GAOL,

HONGKONG, 27th January, 1894.

SIR,----I have the honour to forward, for the information of His Excellency the Governor, the Annual Report on the Victoria Gaol for 1893.

2. I am glad to be able to report a very considerable decrease in the number of admissions which reached a total of 4,010 as compared with 5,046 in 1892. The daily average number confined in the Gaol was 458 being a satisfactory decrease on previous years. The daily maximum number was 518.

3. There were 5,108 prison offences committed during the year being about 11 offences to each prisoner as compared with 14 in 1892. The attached comparative returns show the most common of those offences.

4. The most serious offences committed during the year were 5 assaults on Officers-1 on the Superintendent and 4 on Turnkeys. The first of these was, I believe, occasioned by the changes made in the routine of the Gaol with a view to improve discipline. One of the assaults on Turnkeys was committed by a prisoner out of revenge, the officer having reported him on the previous day for idleness. The other assaults, as well as that on the Superintendent, were committed close upon each other and at a time when the staff was exceptionally weak.

5. The conduct of the staff during the year has, with some exceptions, been most unsatisfactory.. 2 second class and 15 third class Turnkeys, 2 second class Guards and 2 Nurses of the Female Prison have been dismissed for misconduct and 1 third class Turnkey deserted. 1 Junior Head Turnkey was reduced to the rank of third class Turnkey and 1 first class Guard to second class Guard.

6. There has been a marked spirit of discontent among the European portion of the staff which has been expressed in some instances in a manner amounting almost to insubordination. I know that some of the officers have committed themselves purposely with a view to being dismissed and I regret that among these are included 2 of the second class Turnkeys who were engaged in England in 1892.

7. The record of casualties further shows that 1 first class, l' second class and 7 third class Turnkeys and 1 Nurse resigned their appointments, while the services of 3 third class Turnkeys and 1 Nurse were dispensed with being found useless.

8. No less than 31 Turnkeys joined the service during the year, yet on the 31st December there were 3 vacancies in the staff. Of the 17 third class Turnkeys serving on that date 6 of them had an average of less than 4 months service and 9 of them had not completed the probationary period of 3 months.

9. At one period the staff was so far below strength, I was compelled to ask for the services of some Non-Commissioned Officers of the Garrison to act as Turnkeys. The 3 Non-Commissioned Officers, whose services were lent for one month, are not included in the 31 Turnkeys taken on the staff during the year.

10. From the foregoing remarks it will be seen that throughout the year the majority of the staff consisted of inexperienced officers. The dangers which this weakness might give rise to are obvious.

11. The health of the staff would appear to have been most indifferent. The returns show that 36 European Turnkeys and 10 Indian Guards have been admitted to the Government Civil Hospital once during the year, while 10 of these men have been admitted twice, 6 of them three times and 2 of them four and five times. On one day there were 8 of the staff in hospital.

12. I have stated that there is much discontent among the officers and it follows that they perform their duties in a half-hearted manner, not having any real interest in their work, and all who are not bound by their agreements to remain on in the service look for other employment as soon as possible.

pay of th

13. The chief causes of their discontent are (1) the number of hours on duty (2) the inadequate junior ranks (3) the want of a proper mess room and entire absence of any recreation room (4) the frequency with which officers are called upon to perform extra duty. In each respect the officers of the Gaol staff are at a disadvantage as compared with the Police and their discontent is but

3

90

די

natural when they compare the nature of their duties and the number of hours that they are on duty with those of the Police. I hope that when the separate cells are completed they will afford sufficient accommodation for the greater number of prisoners and that I may then be able to make a slight alteration in the number of hours on duty by the divisions taking a short and long day alternately. I have already during the year made certain recommendations for placing the staff on a more satis- factory footing in which I dealt with the question of pay. I have also asked that proper mess and recreation rooms, with a Billiard Table, may be provided for the European staff. At the present time officers coming off duty have no means of recreation provided in their quarters, consequently they seek these in the town which is often the cause of their getting into trouble. The frequency with which officers are called upon to go on extra duty is caused by the perpetual vacancies occurring in the staff and the number of officers in hospital at one time. This is extremely hard on and is keenly felt by those officers who discharge their duties conscientiously.

t?

14. All the Turnkeys who joined during the year were engaged locally and most of them have proved to be useless. There is a great deal to be said both for and against obtaining Turnkeys from England. I am of opinion that, at any rate, a percentage of the staff should be engaged and trained in England.

15. I must again bring to notice the insufficient yard space. I hoped that more space would have been provided by the Gaol Extension, but I find that when the two blocks of cells and other necessary buildings are erected the yard space on the new site will make no appreciable difference.

16. Owing to the limited number of Turnkeys available for duty I have not been able to send out the chain-gang, which is usually employed on public works, since the month of August.

+

17. The industrial labour account for 1893 shows a profit of $2,726.76. The decrease in the year's profits is chiefly due to the increased cost of paper stuff for Oakum picking and coir yarn for mat making. I must however again point out that industrial work is greatly hampered by want of space.

18. It is to be regretted that accommodation for female prisoners is not included in the scheme for the Extension of the Gaol. The unsuitableness of the building in which they are now located is well known. There are only 2 associated wards and 2 punishment cells so that, in order to keep prisoners on remand separate from convicted prisoners, all classes of convicted prisoners must be placed together in one ward. The only place where the prisoners can exercise in the open air is 24 feet long and 9 feet wide, a totally inadequate space for the purpose.

19. I forward herewith the usual returns.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

1

The Honourable

THE COLONIAL SECRETARY.

(A.)

H. B. LETHBRIDGE,

Superintendent.

VICTORIA GAOL.

Return of Reports for talking, idling, short oakum picking, &c., in the years, 1890, 1891, 1892 and 1893.

1890.

1891.

MONTH.

Daily average number in Prison, 566.

Daily average number in Prison, 507.

1892.

1893.

Daily average number Daily average number

in Prison, 515.

in Prison, 458.

January,...

196

252

237

264

February,

181

116

316

150

March,

243

227

351

330.

April,

212

202

253

240

May,

290

257

142

198

June,

260

313

129

138

?

July,

520

427

96

242

I

August,

349

473

224

211

September,.

304

489

142

204

October,.......

243

397

108

79

November,

135

441

129

94

December,

157

469

259

132

Total,....

3,090

4,063

2,386

2,282

*

(B)

Return of Offences reported of Frisoners fighting with or assaulting each other, or Officers, for the years 1890, 1891, 1892 and 1893.

MONTH.

91

1890.

1891.

1892.

in Prison, 515.

Daily average number Daily average number Daily average number | Daily average number

in Prison, 566.

in Prison, 507.

1893.

in Prison, 458.

13

20

12

13

January,.

February,

10

10

9

March, ......

10

16

April,

16

7

8

12

May,

9

5

35529

9

3

6

3

June,

July,

6

7

5

13

6

17

20

1

August,

September,..

16

9

11

October,

6

11

11

7.

5

November,

December,

7

7

...

Total,

115

86

114

105

(C.)

Return of Offences of Prisoners having Tobacco, for the years 1890, 1891, 1892 and 1898.

1890.

1891.

MONTH.

Daily average number Daily average number

in Prison, 566.

in Prison, 507.

1892.

1893.

Daily average number Daily average number

in Prison, 515.

in Prison, 458.

January,.................................

53

17

16

23

February,

24

24

19

15

March,

21

30

46

11

April,

47

20

18

10

5

May,

40

16

8

June,

11

21

15

15

July,

47

31

23

17

August,

52

25

10

10

September,..

25

26

33

6

October,

29

22

58

3

November,

28

12

36

13

December,

16

10

25

23

Total,

393

254

307

141

(D.)

Comparative Return of Prisoners confined in Victoria Gaol on 31st December, 1890, 31st December, 1891, 31st December, 1892, and 31st December, 1893.

CONVICTION.

1890.

1891.

1892.

1893.

18t,

394

373

297**

324

2nd,

67

50

56

65

3rd,

26

25

27

27

4th,

23

20

19

22

5th,

16

15

11

7

6th,

......

7th,

8th,

9th,

10th,

11th, ******

12th, 13th,

Total,

∞44221:2

8

10

12

7

6

5

2

4

2

4

5

4

.1

1

2

1

1

549

502

441

467

92

Dr.

(E.)

ABSTRACT OF INDUSTRIAL LABOUR, VICTORIA GAOL, FOR THE YEAR, 1893.

OAKUM.

1893.

To Stock on hand, 1st January, 1893,

"

Cost of Paper Stuff purchased

$ 672.70 1,240.69

1893.

during the year,.........

Profit,......

680.15

Total,............$

2,593.54

COIR.

By Oakum sold during the year-

Cash received,

""

Oakum used for Gaol,

Stock in hand, 31st December,

1893,

Cr.

$ 2,194.26

13.32

385.96

Total..................

2,593.54

1893.

To Stock in hand, 1st January, 1893,

"

Cost of Material purchased during

$ 261.49

357.40

1893.

99

By Matting, &c., sold during the year, $ 961.14

Articles made for Gaol use,

33.47

the year.......

Profit,.....

""

Stock in hand, 31st December,

1893,-

529.25

Material,....

101.39

Manufactured Articles,......

52.14

Total,..........$

1,148.14

NET-MAKING.

Total,....

1,148.14

1893.

To Stock in hand, 1st January, 1893, $

2.50

1893.

"

Cost of Material purchased during

43.39

By Nets and Netting sold and re-

paired,

80.86

the year,..............................

Profit,................

Stock in hand, 31st December,

1893,-

36.28

Material,.

1.31

Total,............................$

82.17

Total,........

82.17

TAILORING.

1893.

To Stock in hand, 1st January, 1893,

Cost of Material purchased during

$1,888.07 1893.

1,056.88

By Articles sold and repaired,

Work done for Gaol,..............

$ 147.15 1,284.68

"

the year,.

Profit,.........

""

:

Value of Material returned to

Storekeeper,

1,610.62

101.19

19

Stock in hand 31st December,

1893,-

Material,...

1893.

Total,......

..$ 3,046.14

To Cost of Material purchased during

the year,..

Profit,.......

PRINTING.

1893.

$ 18.50

""

""

426.73

Total,............$ 445.23

3.69

Total,............$ 3,046.14

By Printing done for outside,

Printing done for Gaol,

Stock in hand 31st December,

1893,―

Material,.

$ 100.50 ..338.78

5.95

Total,............$

445.23

3

1893.

BOOK-BINDING.

To Stock in hand, 1st January, 1893, $ 38.95

Cost of Material purchased during

the year,....

Profit........

93

1893.

133.82

By Book-binding and repairing done

for outside......

176.69

""

Book-binding and repairing done |

for Gaol,

71.75

94.22

"

Stock in hand, 31st December,

1893,-

Material,.

18.55

Total,....... ..$

266.99

Total,....... ...$

266.99

TIN-SMITHING.

1893.

"J

To Stock in hand, 1st January, 1893,

Cost of Material purchased during

5.50

1893.

By Work done for outside,.........................................

$ 3.06

12.20

""

the year,..

Profit,....

""

Work done for Gaol,................. Stock in hand, 31st December,

1893,--

28.94

15.73

Material,....

1.43

Total,........ .$

33.43

Total,.... ..$

33.43

SHOE-MAKING.

41.65 1893. By Articles sold and repaired during Į

1893.

""

To Stock in hand, 1st January, 1893,

Cost of Material purchased during

34.80

the year,..

the year,......

Profit,....

Work done for Gaol,......................

$

42.72

61.69

"

39

Stock in hand, 31st December,

40.79

1893,-

Material,...

2.92

Manufactured Articles,......

10.00

Total,......

117.24

Total,........

117.24

WASHING.

1893.

To Stock in hand, 1st January, 1893,

$

5.00

1893.

"

Cost of Material purchased during

the year,.....

527.86

وو

Profit,.....

762.06

"

1893.

Total,...

..$ 1,294.92

CARPENTERING.

To Stock in hand, 1st January, 1893, $ 35.08

Cost of Material purchased during

128.27

the year,....

Profit,....

Total,.....$

3.22

166.57

By Washing done for Prison Officers, &c., at I cent per piece, Washing Prisoners' Clothing at

1 cent per piece,

Stock in hand, 31st December,

1893.

""

$ 477.12

803.48

1893,-

Material,

14.32

Total,............$ 1,294.92

By Articles sold and repaired,

Work done for Gaol,.............. Stock in hand, 31st December,

1893,-

GRASS MAT-MAKING.

$

20.03

141.75

Material,.....

4.79

Total,.........$

166.57

1893.

"9

To Stock in hand, 1st January, 1893,

Cost of Material purchased during

$29.50

73.26

1893.

""

the year,....

"

By Matting sold during the year, ...... $

Matting made for Gaol use,.. Stock in hand, 31st December,

69.21 65.60

Profit,..........

37.14

1893,-

Material,..

5.09

Total,......

139.90

Total,.......

139.90

*.

94

RATTAN.

1893.

To Stock in hand, 1st January, 1893, $. 67.00

1893.

"

Cost of Material purchased during

By Articles sold during the year,

Articles made for Gaol use,

.....

60.94 11.18

22.11

1893.

Oakum, Coir,

Net-making,

Tailoring,..

Printing,

Book-binding,

Tin-smithing,

Shoe-making,

Washing,

Carpentering,

Grass Mat-making,

Rattan Work,

Total,............$

89.11

"7

Stock in hand, 31st December,

1893,-

Material,........

Manufactured Articles,......

RECAPITULATION.

680.15 1893. By Surplus,

529.25

36.28

101.19

426.73

94.22

15.73

40.79

762.06

3.22 37.14

8.44

8.55

Total,...$

89.11

$ 2,726.76

Total,...$

2,726.76

Total,............$

2,726.76

:

1

HONGKONG.

REPORT OF THE HARBOUR MASTER FOR 1893.

141

No. 1

94

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government, on the 12th April, 1894.

No. 70.

HARBOUR DEPARTMENT, HONGKONG, 12th February, 1894.

SIR,-I have the honour to forward the Annual Returns for this Department for the year ending 31st December, 1893.

I. Number, Tonnage and Crews of Vessels entered.

II. Number, Tonnage and Crews of Vessels cleared.

III. Number, Tonnage and Crews of Vessels of each Nation entered. IV. Number, Tonnage and Crews of Vessels of each Nation cleared.

V. Total Number, Tonnage and Crews of Vessels entered at each Port. VI. Total Number, Tonnage and Crews of Vessels cleared at each Port. VII. Return of Junks entered from Macao.

VIII. Return of Junks cleared for Macao.

IX. Return of Junks entered at each Port from China and Formosa.

X. Return of Junks cleared at each Port for China and Formosa.

XI. Grand Total Number of Junks entered at each Port.

XII. Grand Total Number of Junks cleared at each Port.

XIII. Return of Junks (Local Trade) entered.

XIV. Return of Junks (Local Trade) cleared.

XV. Summary of Arrivals and Departures of all Vessels.

XVI. Return of Vessels registered.

XVII. Return of vessels struck off the Register.

XVIII. Amount of Fees received under Table B of Ordinance 26 of 1891.

XIX. Return of Chinese Passenger Ships cleared by the Emigration Officer.

XX. Return of Vessels bringing Chinese Passengers to Hongkong from places out of

China.

XXI. Return of Marine Cases tried.

XXII. Diagram of Tonnage of Vessels entered.

XXIII. Return of the work performed by the Government Marine Surveyor.

XXIV. Return from Imports and Exports (Opium) Office.

SHIPPING.

2. The total of arrivals and sailings amounted to 14,349,122 tons, or an increase on 1892 of 196,273 tons. There were 32,983 arrivals with a tonnage of 7,177,025 tons and 32,858 departures of 7,172,097 tons.

The increase in tonnage in European constructed vessels is 241,707 tons, the numerical decrease is 216, paradoxical as this appears it is in accordance with the growth of shipping all the world over, the tendency being to increase the size of ships, (and by the aid of labour-saving appliances to decrease the crews, improved machinery also economising fuel).

There is an increase in the Foreign Junk Trade of 2,007 Junks representing 295,931 tons, against which must be set a decrease in the Local Junk Trade of 8,630 vessels aggregating 341,365

tons.

142

3. The following statement shows how this amount of shipping is apportioned :-

1892.

1893.

INCREASE.

DECREASE.

Ships. Tonnage. Ships. Tonnage. Ships. Tonnage Ships. Tonnage

British,.

6,376 7,576,323 | 6,128|| 7,732,195

155,872 248

Foreign,

Junks in ForeignĮ

Trade,.

2,598 2,717,829 | 2,630 | 2,803,664 32 85,835

|45,190| 3,192,076 47,197 | 3,488,007|2,007 | 295,931

Total,....... 54,164 | 13,486,228 55,955 | 14,023,866

Junks in Local

Trade,...

18,516

666,621 | 9,886 325,256

:

:

:

8,630 341,365

Grand Total,...[72,680 | 14,152,849 65,841 | 14,349,122 2,039 537,638 8,878 341,365

NET,.....

196,273 6,839

4. The 1,682 British Ships, exclusive of River Steamers, that entered the port in 1893, carried 11,876 British Officers and 147 Foreigners as follows:-

British, Americans,

.11,876 70

Danes,

2

Germans,

15

Swedes,

23

Portuguese,. Norwegians,

21

...

16

12,023

126 of the British Officers belonged to the Royal Naval Reserve 23 of them being Engineers.

The 1,310 Foreign Ships, exclusive of River Steamers that entered in 1893, carried 1,200 British Officers :--

5

In American Ships,

Hawaiian

""

""

""

Chinese Japanese

3

1,116

76

1,200

5. The number of European constructed vessels, exclusive of River Steamers, that entered the port during the year is shown in the following table, distinction being drawn between (1) those that entered eight times and less, or on an average at intervals of six weeks; (2) those that entered from nine to twelve times, i.e., on an average once a month, and (3) those that entered thirteen times and oftener, or more frequently than once a month.

EIGHT TIMES AND UNDER.

:

TOTAL.

Steam

NINE TO TWELVE.

THIRTEEN TIMES AND OVER.

FLAG.

Ships.

No. of times enter- ed.

Steam Total Tonnage.

Ships. enter-

No. of times

ed.

Sail Total Ships. Tonnage

No. of times enter- ed.

Steam Total Tonnage.

Ships.

No. of times enter- ed.

Steam Total Tonnage.

No. of times

Ships. enter-

ed.

and Sail

Total Tonnage.

British, American,

199 720

1,232,439

4

16

31 40,519 24

39 28

35,133 31 325 388,857 30,600

27

598 602,225

2881,682

28

44

2,258,654 71,119

Austrian,

23

54,514

7

...

23 54,514

Chinese,..

5

13

8,568

3

32 30,255

Danish,

1

2

1,192

1,158

3

161 188,357 15 103

45,661

10 10

209

227,180

5

106

48,011

Dutch,

4

18

22,756

4

18

22,756

French,

20

56 109,531

3

54

43,146 23

110

152,677

German,

47

178

248,179 15

16

10,096

13

143 122,615

14

327

285,004

89

664

665,894

Italian,

4

12

18,543

794

5

13

19,337

Japanese,

9

20

25,287

524

16

24,336

11

37

50,147

Norwegian,

31

38,649

577 10

33 32,628

14

65

71,854

Russian,

1

2,005

1

2,005

Spanish,

5

5

2,254

9 5,886

6

14

8,140

Siamese,

Hawaiian,

Peruvian,

:::

1,886

21

2,505 398

...

INN

3

1,886

21

2,505 398

Total,...... 3091,095 1,804,436

79

93

9

33333

83,671

58

542 580,241 55 1,262 | 1,188,729

501 2,992 3,657,077

.

143

6. In European constructed vessels the general import trade, as represented by the amount of shipping entering, amounted to 1,651,290 tons from places other than China and adjacent countries, while the imports, judged by the same standard, but from places in and adjacent to China, amounted to 3,615,059 tons, making a total import tonnage in European constructed vessels of 5,266,349 tons.

7. Again, the general export trade, still judged as before, amounted to 1,298,435 tons to places other than China and adjacent countries, while to those places it amounted to 3,971,075 tons, making a total of export tonnage in European constructed vessels of 5,269,510 tons.

Analysing the above and comparing with 1892, we get as follows:-

Import tonnage.

From places other than China, &c.,

Increase.

128,739

Decrease.

From China and adjacent places,..

29,328

Net Increase,

99,411

Export tonnage.

To places other than China, &c.,.

Increase.

.127,155

Decrease.

To China and adjacent places,.

...

15,141

Net Increase, .......

.142,296

or in European constructed vessels a net increase of Import tonnage of 99,411 tons and a net increase of Export tonnage of 142,296 tons making a net increase of trade, as represented by tonnage of European constructed vessels, of 241,707 tons.

JUNKS.

8. Compared with the average of the past three years, the Foreign Junk Trade shows an increase of 145,583 tons, and 1,438 vessels, whilst the Local trade for the same period has decreased 162,288 tons with 3,290 vessels.

9. The Foreign Junk Trade for 1893 shows an increase over the previous year of 295,931 tons, largely due to a brisk rice trade, also probably to the increased size of Ocean Steamers employing more distributing tonnage.

10. The decrease of 341,365 tons in the Local Junk trade for 1893, from that of 1892, is chiefly the result of the cessation of work on the Praya Reclamation.

GENERAL.

11. 4,278 steamers, 93 sailing vessels, and 28,612 junks arrived during the year giving an average of 90 vessels arriving daily in the waters of the Colony as against 99 the year before; for European constructed vessels alone the average daily entries would be respectively 1892, 12.3 vessels and 1893, 11.97 vessels: of the steamers 70.64 per cent. were British and 32.3 were river craft all of which latter were British.

12. From the foregoing it will be seen that Hongkong once again shows an increase of a quarter of a million of tons of shipping (European constructed) frequenting the port.

TRADE.

13. An attempt has been made to gauge the trade of the Colony by Import and Export Returns. In the absence of a Custom House it has not been possible to tabulate such returns with absolute correctness, but by the courtesy of the ship Agents and Masters, returns of the bulk of cargo "Imported," "Exported" and "in transit" have been rendered possible, the general correctness of which there is no reason to doubt, though a tendency to under-estimate probably obtains.

From the Mail lines monthly returns are rendered on printed Forms supplied by this department, the River steamers also supply a monthly return, based presumably on freight receipts. The "coasters" and "tramps" have supplied the required information on arrival to the Boarding Officers and when clearing at the Harbour Office. The Merchant Shipping Ordinance of 1891 authorizes the Harbour Master, if necessary, to require the deposit of a copy of the manifest on which document the

144

cargo is accurately entered, but generally described in parcels, bundles, &c., the ship master or Agent on the other hand is aware of the bulk measurement carried each voyage, and thus the more useful information can be obtained from their reports; but the information from these sources is somewhat approximate and it would appear at times to be inaccurate; as an instance I would point to one article, Flour; 6,320 tons is the total amount returned as the import of this article of food supply for 1893. There can be little doubt I think that this is a very much under-estimated return, for it appears from the Return of the Imperial Chinese Maritime Customs of former years that the "export" of flour from Hongkong can be fairly estimated at at least 6,000 tons annually, and thus there would have been little or nothing left last year for local consumption. In the case of coal I am of opinion that the returns are more accurate than of any other article named (except perhaps Kerosine) and yet they would appear to be sometimes below the mark.

1893 inaugurated a new trade-Kerosine oil in bulk-for which there appears to be great possi- bilities judging by the fact that before the arrival of each oil steamer the Depôt is usually empty, but that as yet the bulk oil is largely used in the Colony is not apparent. This trade is returned with considerable accuracy. I may remark that these returns regarding trade compare very favourably- registered tonnage to cargo carried--with the latest or any other returns I have access to; the following tabular statement is explanatory.

TRADE OF THE Port of Hongkong for 1893.

TONS.

Bunker

Nos. of Ships.

Discharged. Shipped. In Transit. Coal

Total.

Shipped.

Passengers Registered carried.

Tonnage.

Remarks.

British,

Foreign,.

River Steamers

(British.)

3,400 1,669,760 852,151

2,602 1,048,150 633,004

2,756 141,966 128,487

861,273 235,624 3,618,808

473,991 150,977 2,306,122

20,199 290,652

4,517,089 305,915

2,803,664

112,129

3,215,106 | 1,177,631

Total,

8,758 2,859,876 1,613,642

|

|

1,335,264 406,800 6,215,582

10,535,859 1,595,675

Junks in Foreign 47,197

Trade.

379,326 845,177

1,224,503

3,488,007

222,173

Total,

| | 55,955 3,239,202 2,458,819 1,385,264 406,800 7,440,085

|

14,023,866 | 1,817,848

Junks in Local

Trade.

9,886 104,400

13,730

118,130

325,256

9,890

Per Choy Sang April 15th to June 29th.

Prior to 15th April no returns.

Packages Hongkong 2,858. Packages In Transit 17,526.

18 Entries 21,492

tons no returns.

Grand Total,.... 65,841 | 3,343,602 2,472,549 | 1,335,264 406,800 7,558,215

E

14,349,122 | 1,827,738

14. During the year 8,758 European constructed vessels aggregating 10,535,859 tons carried 1,595,675 passengers, and 6,215,582 tons, the latter made up as follows:-

.2,859,876 tons.

Import cargo, Export

1

""

Transit

77

Bunker coal shipped,

Total,.

1,613,642

.1,335,264

""

406,800

..6,215,582

IMPORTS (EXCLUDING RIVER TRADE).

2,899 measuring 3,573,406 tons.

Steamers,

Sailing Ships,...........

Total, ......2,992

93

""

83,671

*

3,657,077,,

imported.

ཐཱ

2,717,910 tons made up as follows:--

Beans,

Bones,

Bricks,

Coal,

....

7,070

870

100

507,993

Cotton,

Flour,

Fruit,

Hemp, Iron, Kerosine,

Lead, Oil,. Rice,.

2,300

6,320

60

600

650

66,939

700

240

762,374

Salt,

200

Sandal Wood,

790

Sugar,

168,816

Tea.

988

Timber,

26,938

General,

1,163,962

2,717,910

Transit,

1,335,264

Total,

4.053,174 by arrivals.

EXPORTS (EXCLUDING RIVER TRADE).

,2,922 measuring 3,585,072 tons.

Steamers,

Sailing Ships,.

88

"

Total,

3,010

78,604

25

3,663,676,, exported.

145

1,485,155 tons of general cargo.

These 2,922 steamers also shipped 386,601 tons of Bunker Coal.

15. Junks in Foreign Trade imported 379,326 tons and exported from the Colony 845.177 tons, European constructed vessels imported 1,246,234 tons in excess of exports, Junks exported 465,851 tons in excess of what they imported reducing the total excess of imports to 780,383 tons, from this must be deducted 406,800 tons of bunker coal leaving a balance of 373,583 tons consumed, manufac- tured, and in stock in the Colony or unaccounted for.

RIVER STEAMERS.

16. 2,756 River steamers measuring 3,215,106 tons imported 141,966 tons of cargo exporting 128,487 tons, shipped 20,199 tons of bunker coal and conveyed 1,177,631 passengers.

Junks in local trade discharged in various parts of the Colony 104,400 tons of which 99,777 were earth and stones, clearing from Victoria with 13,730 tons of which 1,757 were earth and stones; they would seem therefore to have transported 11,973 tons of the surplus imports to various parts of the Colony.

PASSENGERS TRAFFIC.

17. The passengers traffic of Hongkong during 1893 deserves notice.

British vessels arriving carried

154,665

9.9

31

departing (excluding Chinese Passenger ships) carried ....... 140 Chinese Passenger ships carried

92,118

59,132

305,915

Foreign vessels arriving carried

54,335

""

29

departing (excluding Chinese Passenger ships) carried 68 Chinese Passenger ships carried...

34,590

23,204

112,129

146

River steamers arriving carried

""

departing,,

603,975

573,656

1,177,631

Junks in Foreign trade arriving carried

112,478

departing

,,

109,695

222,173

Macao Launches arriving.

11,349

""

departing

12,406

23,755

Launches other places arriving

departing.

216,008

225,943

441,951

Total arrivals,

.1,152,810

*1

departures,...

.1,048,408

2,201,218

Emigrants,

82,336

2,283,554

Junks in local trade arriving carried

5.940

11

99

departing

""

3,950

9,890

Launches in Waters of Colony arriving

2,249,021

37

""

departing

.2,252,875

4,501,896

Total local arrivals,

2,254,961

>>

departures,

.2,256,825

4,511,786

Grand Total arrivals,

.3,407,771

"

departures including Emigrants, ...............

.3,387,569

6,795,340

Difference,+.............

20,202

REVENUE.

18. The total revenue collected by the Harbour Department during the year was $195,821.02, an increase of $14,763.17 over the previous year, and compared with the average of the last five years it shows an increase of $55,870.84.

1. Light Dues,

2. Licences and Internal Revenue,

3. Fees of Court and Office,

.$ 96,064.09

29,347.35

70,409.58

$195,821.02

147

STEAM LAUNCHES..

19. On the 31st December there were 130 Steam Launches employed in the Harbour, of these 61 were licensed for the conveyance of passengers, 53 were privately owned, 11 were the property of the Colonial Government, also a floating Fire Engine, and 5 belonged to the Imperial Government in the charge of the Military Authorities.

5 Launches are laid up.

All these launches except those which belonged to Her Majesty or any Foreign Government are required to have a certificated Master and Engineer; whose certificates are liable to suspension or cancellation should they prove negligent or incompetent. Eight Master's certificates were suspended during the year for various periods from 4 months to 14 days, and one Master was reprimanded and cautioned.

EMIGRATION.

20. A substantial revival in Emigration took place during the year the number amounting to 82,336 being an increase of 30,193 over 1892.

During the year 513 ships reported having brought to Hongkong 108,644 Chinese passengers from various places to which they had emigrated.

REGISTRY OF SHIPPING.

21. During the year 5 vessels of 2,032 tons were registered under the provisions of the Merchant Shipping Act 1854, and 2 Certificates of Registry with a total of 1,532 tons were cancelled. Return No. XVII shows the remainder of the work done in this branch.

MARINE MAGISTRATE'S COURT.

22. 24 cases were heard in this Court with 79 Defendants. Refusal of duty (13) and assault (5) were the principal offences in the case of ships. Plying for hire without a Licence (2) in the case of boats.

EXAMINATIONS FOR THE POSTS OF MASTERS, MATES AND Engineers

UNDER SECTION 15 OF ORDINANCE 26 OF 1891..

23. The following table shows the number of Candidates examined for Certificates of Competency distinguishing those who were successful and those who failed :—

DECK OFFICERS.

ENGINEERS.

NATIONALITY.

Grade.

Passed.

Failed.

Total.

Grade.

Passed.

Failed.

Total.

Grade.

British,..

British Indian,

American,

Dane,

German,

2 2

13

6

19

16

3 19

:

Master.

:

Q

A

:

:

:

1

First Mate.

Japanese,

النمط

1

Norwegian,

1

1

Portuguese,

Swede,

:

...

:

:

:

:

:

...

Passed.

GRAND TOTAL.

| Failed.

Total.

Grade.

Passed.

Failed.

Total.

Grade,

Passed.

Failed.

Total.

Grade.

Passed.

Failed.

Total.

:

1

...

:

1

:

Only Mate.

1

:

Second Mate.

8 3 11

14

1

15

28 212 40

104

1

:

:

:

:

...

:

:

***

:

:

:

:

:

First Class Engineer.

:

:

:

1

3

:

مصر

bod

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

Second Class Engineer.

1

1

4

:

1

2

2

+4

6

:

...

1

:

:

1

1

1

1

+

:

8 3 11

ลง

15 2

17

32

TOTAL ENGINEERS,..

:..

:

:

>

15

:

122

2

2

1

47

126

64

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

British, River

German, Steamer

1

1

1

-

1

...

1

:

1

:

GRAND TOTAL,.......

19 6 25

20

TOTAL DECK OFFICERS,

10

5

25

1

and

:

:

:

...

1

:

:

1

:

62

148

Since 1st January, 1884, when under the Order in Council of 31st December, 1893, Certificates of Competency issued at Hongkong were made of equal value to those issued by the Board of Trade, 937 Certificates of all grade have been issued.

The details are shown in the following table :-

Grade.

1884 1885 1886 1887 1888 1889 1890 1891 1892

1893 Total.

Master, First Mate,

Only Mate,

Second Mate,

21

249

14

5

10

පසපදා

10

10

17

3

6715

10

22:4

20

25

39

32

12

14

31

29

26

18

3

2

3

3

10

1

9

10

332-8

19 217

20

191

1

22

8

74

Total,...

50 33 3

29

38

47

59

80

68

52

48

504

1st Class Engineer,

19

2nd

Do.,

23

2223

11

14

21

11

18

15

11

15

157

20

20

15

19

28

33

31

49

32

270

:

:

31

29

40

39

51

46

60

47

427

:.

6

to

92

75

60

67

87

98 131 114 112

95

937

122224

:

Total,......

42

Certificates renewed,

Grand Total,...

:.

MARINE CASES UNDER SECTION 13 OF ORDINANCE 26 of 1891.

24. The following Courts have been held during the year:-

1. On the 18th March,-Inquiry as to the loss of the Barque Penshaw Official No. 68,930 of Hongkong, on a reef near Palupari Island on the Pacific Coast (Philippine Islands) on the morning of 19th February. The Master's (JOHN SPEECHLY) Certificate of Competency was returned to him.

2. On the 13th April,-Inquiry respecting certain charges of misconduct brought against ROBERT SIMPSON, Second Mate, and JOHN HENRY VERRALL, Third Mate, of the British S.S. Cape Colonna Official No. 96.138 of Newcastle, by HUGH JONES ALSTON, Master of the said vessel. The Certificates of Competency of the second and third mates were suspended for six months.

SUNDAY CARGO-WORKING ORDINANCE 1891.

25. During the year 55 Permits were issued, of these 9 were not availed of owing to it being found unnecessary for the ship to work cargo on the Sunday, the fee paid for the permit was refunded in each case.

4 Permits were granted free of charge in accordance with the instructions received that certain Mail Steamers, not having Hongkong as a terminal port, should be exempt from payment of the fee.

The amount of fees received was $7,900.

SFAMEN.

26. 14,274 seamen were shipped and 15.216 discharged at the Shipping Office and on board ships during the year, the discrepancy is owing to the number of seamen shipped at the Consulates of which we have no record.

27. 257 distressed seamen were received during the year, of these 57 were sent to the United Kingdom, 1 to Sydney, 1 to Melbourne, 1 to Bombay and 2 to Calcutta, 3 died and 192 obtained employment.

On the 31st December, 1893, 6 were in Government Civil Hospital, 1 in Lunatic Asylum. $5.474.15 were expended by the Board of Trade in the relief of these men and $1,077.30 by the Colony.

MARINE SURVEYOR'S SUB-DEPARTMENT.

28. Return No. XXIII shows the work performed in this branch of the Harbour Department, and in forwarding this I desire to record my appreciation of the manner in which the work of this Sub-Department is carried out.

¿

LIGHTHOUSES.

29. The amount of dues collected was as follows:-

Class of Vessel.

Rate per ton.

Tonnage.

Total fees collected.

Ocean Vessels paying full dues,

2 cents

3,660,790 | 91,520.51

:

Launches paying full dues,

do.

8,465 212.62

·

River Steamers (Night Boats),

& cent

646,424 4,309.49

L

Launches plying exclusively to Macao.....

do.

River Steamers (Day Boats),.

Free.

3,220

962,848

21.47

Total,...

5,281,747 96,064.09

149

30. The Stations were maintained as usual during the year and nothing of special note occurred with the exception of the damage to the Gap Rock Light by the Typhoon of the 5th October, when four of the large panes of the glazing of the lantern were smashed by the sea the debris therefrom completely destroying 2 of the lenses as well as severely injuring 4 others, and the burner.

The damage was done at about 1 P.M., but the light was displayed as usual that night, two table lamps being focused as a substitute for the damaged burner.

Temporary repairs were executed and by the 3rd November the light was showing its full range though, on account of the damage to the lenses, the intervals were irregular. New lenses are shortly expected to arrive from England.

Communication with the Gap Rock has been kept up by means of the tug Pilot Fish and the reliefs have been made regularly, though sometimes with difficulty, and on more than one occasion not without accident.

31. Telegraphic and Telephonic communication has also been kept up with the Gap Rock and Cape d'Aguilar during the year. From the former Station 512 vessels have been reported as passing, and in addition 251 messages were received and 1,882 sent, including the daily weather report for the Observatory.

From Cape d'Aguilar 987 vessels were reported, and in addition 70 messages were sent and 123 received.

GOVERNMENT GUNPOWDER DEPÔT.

32. During the year 1893 there has been stored in the Government Magazine, Stone Cutters' Island.

No. of Cases, &c.

Approximate Weight.

lbs.

!

Gunpowder, privately owned,

Do., Government owned,

17,191

256,537

Cartridges, privately owned,...............................

Do., Government owned,.

633

113,235

176

19,510

Explosive Compounds, privately owned,..

462

35,680

Do..

Government owned,

36

2,166

Total,......

18,498

427,128

150

On the 31st December, 1893, there remained as under :—

No. of Cases, &c.

Approximate

Weight.

ibs.

3,377

69,777

i

Gunpowder, privately owned,

Do., Government owned,

Cartridges, privately owned,....

Do., Government owned,.

Explosive Compounds, privately owned,......

...

163

32,560

72

5,958

185

10,816

Do.,

Government owned,

28

1,759

Total,............

3,825

120,870

IMPORTS AND EXPORTS (OPIUM) OFFICE:

33. The Return shows that during the year the amount of Opium reported was as follows:-

Imported,

Exported,

1892.

1893:

.....56,864

39,098

Decrease. 17,766 chests.

.52,625

43,54912

9,0761

>>

16,60812

4,536

Through cargo reported } 21,144§

but not landed,

י,

The general decrease is, I am informed, greatly owing to short crops both in the Bengal and Persian Opium; with regard to Malwa the adverse exchange between India and China, caused by the closing of the Indian Mints, has affected it considerably, the enhanced price rendering it now less able to compete with the native drug in the North.

+

21,738 permits were issued from this Office, being a decrease of 1,025 as compared with 1892.

A daily Memo. of Exports to Chinese Ports was during the year supplied to the Commissioner of Imperial Maritime Customs at Kowloon.

Surprise visits were paid to 97 Godowns during the year.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

The Honourable G. T. M. OBRIEN, C.M.G.,

Colonial Secretary,

&c.,

&on

R. MURRAY RUMSEY, Retd. Comd., R.N.,

Harbour Master, &c.

❖c.

L

BRITISH.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

COUNTRIES WHENCE ARRIVED.

TOTAL

WITH CARGOES.

I-NUMBER, TONNAGE, and CREWS of Vessels ENTERED at Ports in the Colony of Hongkong from each Country in the Year 1893.

TOTAL.

IN BALLAST.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tons. Crews. Vessels. Tons.

FOREIGN.

IN BALLAST.

Tons.

Crews. Vessels.

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOES.

TOTAL.

Crews. Vessels.

Tons.

Crews. Vessels.

Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

!

British North Borneo,......................................................

1

48

46,476 2,019 45,045 3,145 1 17 18,782 789 385 11 1,576|1,920,361 68,051 84 106,822 2,999 19 '33,405 723 141 267,476 8,006 137 193,876 9,446 216 369,272 11,594

...

Australia and New Zealand,

British Columbia,...............................

Cape of Good Hope,......

Coast of China

and

Formosa,..

Cochin-China,

Continent of Europe,

Great Britain,

India and Singapore,

Japan,

Java and other Islands in the Indian Archi-

45

pelago,

Mauritius,

Масао,

North Pacific,

Philippine Islands,

Ports in Hainan and Gulf of Tonquin,

Sandwich Islands,..........................................................................................

Siam,

United States of America,

66,646 1,896 374 338,692 17,541 3

J00

...

...

...

...

98

86,758 4,793

23

34,935 864

1

2

982 28

...

158 156,918 6,001

480 12

62 126,908 4,451

TOTAL,......

3,005 8,808,714 142,369

56

36

36

...

15

948 19 16

46,476 2,019 45,993 3,164)

1,679 66

...

...

...

17 13,782 789

...

1,486 31 49,408 1,782

7:

i

::

1

3,336

38

1,827

49

:

::

...

1,844|

...

...

79

...

863

...

24 29,472 1,084 124 191,008 5,836

25 25,857

504 75,994 13,235

812

...

1,742

72

5:

382

371

98

86,758 4,793|

42

30,410 1,652

21

24

35,798 885

250

145,466 6,819|

2

982 28

883

12

158 156,913 6,001

82]

73,057 2,310|

4801 12

1,192 26

62 126,908 4,451

36 68,800 2,330

1,016

30

25

124

25

:

206

20,624 2,368

710

1,871 42

1,624 1,969,769 69,833 13,990 1,402,182 169,529 9,453 761,297 114,063 23,443 2,163,429 283.592 15,566 3,322,493 237,580 9,501

84 106,322 2,999 19 33,405 723 141 267,476 8,006 138 197,212 9,484 217 371,099 11,643| 45 66,646 1,896 377 340,036 17,620

144 141,114) 4,209]

89 170,513 7,925

1

748] 15

144 141,114 4,209 228 247,436) 7,208]

810,705 115,845 25,067 4,133,198 353,425

108 203,918 8,648.

...

1,679 €6 38 48,155 2,085 15 45,045 3,145 17 13,782 789 385 11

...

...

38

48,155 2,085

948

19

16

45,993 3,164

17

13,782| 789

1,486 31

2 1,871 42

228 247,436 7,208

89 170,513 7,925

108 203,918 8,648

748

15

142 268,224 8,021

:::

142 268,224 8,021

30,488 1,114

161

223,348| 10,530)

191,008 5,836||

340

560,280 17,430|

4,352 68 1,827 49.

168 227,700 10,598

841 562,107 17,479

25,857 812

70

92,503 2,708

70 92,508 2,708

96,618 15,603

878

414,686 30,776)

209

21,968 2,447 1,087 436,654 33,223

::

::

1,742

72

1,742 72

2

1,742] 72

51

382 87

51

3821 37

5

2,057

81

45

32,467 1,738

140

2,422

101

...

277 183,686 7,805 3 1,315

240 229,970 8,311

3 1,672 58

98 195,708 6,781

59,212 2,019 8,061 8,867,926 144,388 15,823 2,859,899 215,969 9,666 787,416 116,648 24,989 8,147,315 382,612 18,328 6,168,613 358,338 9,722 846,628 118,662 28,050 7,015,241 477,000

253 147,888 6,920

1

82

338 12 78,057 2,310

36

2 1,192 26 68,800 2,330

117,168 6,445

273 180,401 7,683 3 1,315 40 240 229,970 8,311|| 3 1,672)

38

98 195,708 6,781

...

2,057 81 3,285 122

143

382 37 119,225 6,526.

40

4

151

152

II.-NUMBER, TONNAGE, and CREWS of Vessels CLEARED at Ports in the Colony of Hongkong for each Country in the Year 1893.

TOTAL.

BRITISH.

COUNTRIES TO WHICH departed.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL

WITH CARGOES.

FOREIGN.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOES.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tons. Crews. Vessels. Tons. Crews. Vessels, Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tons. Crews. Vessels,

Tons. Crews. Vessels.

IN BALLAST.

Tons. Crews. Vessels.

TOTAL.

Tons. Crews.

Australia and New Zealand,

25

36,727 2,215

4,417

92

29 41,144 2,807

British Columbia,.

2

1,896 41

British North Borneo,..................................................................

16

13,284 887

::

2 1,896 41

16

13,284 887

Cape of Good Hope,.

1 1,486 82

1 1,486 32

1,324 39

...

251 36,727 2,215) 2 1,896 41 16 13,284 887 1 1,486 821

4,417 92

29

41,144 2,307

Coast of China and Formosa,

1,921 2,363,792 91,548

47

Cochin-China,

33] 41,407 1,169

54

54,747 1,868 1,968 2,418,539 98,411|| 16,622 1,864,398 217,057 6,720 66,773 1,817| 87 108,180 2,986] 111 101,498| 3,150|

58

Continent of Europe,

52 116,768 6,499

52 116,768 6,499

...

...

Great Britain,

Macao,

India and Singapore,

Japan,

Java & other Islds. in the Indian Archipelago,

North Pacific,

Philippine Islands, .

Ports in Hainan and Gulf of Tonquin,

46 101,135 5,655] 210 352,096 10,634

...

118 204,156 7,599

54

15 22,975 661

4,073 96 86,063 2,162| 3,594 105

18

387 360,288 18,758||

816 53

389

1,905 50

46 101,135 5,655 215 356,169 10,630 172 290,219| 9,761| 26,569 766 361,054| 18,811| 1,905 50

1

488 11 77 104,789 3,328||

1

488

11

...

3

87 129,121 4,558 46

3,547 65 65,904 1,572|

80

108,336 3,393

133

2,164 69

1

1,104 26

6651

92,905 14,993

37

4,663

515 702

195,025 6,130| 3,268 95 97,568 15,508

1,052

433 56

1

781 25

1,164 81

6

...

1,324 39 361,724 65,307 23,342 2,226,122 282,364 18,543 4,228,190 308,600 6,767 57,483 1,675 169 158,981 4,825| 144 142,905) 4,319) 112 52 116,768 6,499 47 101,623 5,666 287 456,885 13,862|| 206 333,277|12,157|| 17 25,139 780 453,143| 33,751|

433

1,896 41 1,324 39 18 14,608 926 1 1,486 32 416,471 67,175 25,3104,644,661| 375,775 124,256 3,492 256 267,161| 7,811 -

52 116,763 6,499 47 101,623 5,666 295 464,505 14,023 305 485,244 15,891 21 29,837 861 458,622 34,319 3,069 131

2

...

**

39

56

7,620 161 100 151,967 3,734 4,698 131 5,479 568 1,091 2,636 75

8

14 12,868 714

12

14,546 312

26

7 7,021 259

18

27,900 653 25

27,414 1,026 | 34,921 912

13

244

8,029 424

7

8,136 178

201

16,165 602

27

20,897 1,138

19

22,682 490

46]

137,180| 6,288

14

12,311 372

258

149,491 6,660|

251

144,201 6,547

321

40,211 1,025||

283

43,579 1,628 184,412 7,572

Russia in Asia,..

Sandwich Islands,

Siam,.......

South America,

2 2,633

95!

2,633 95

21

2,633 95

2 2,633 95

...

...

982 30

982 30

1

619 14

619

14

31

1,601| 44

-

...

48

50,594 1,972||

10

11,021 362 58

United States of America,.

953

13,364

26

194

8,440 51

10

*NO

61,615 2,334

26

22,919 7271

15 12,613 383

41

35,532 1,110]

74

73,513 2,699

25

23,634 745

99

1,601 44 97,147 3,444

2

953

26

4,738

92

4,738 92

5,691 118

8

5,691 118

16,804

245

19

26,134|

377

::

19

26,134 377

27

39,498 571

2 3,440 51

29

42,938

622

TOTAL,..

2,855 3,584,97 2,855 8,584,974 142,289

212 279,295 7,621 3,067 3,864,269 149,910 | 17,934 2,614,816 257,738 6,904 529,540 70,157 24,838 8,144,366 827,895 20,789 6,199,790 400,027 7,116 808,835 77,778 27,905 7,008,625 477,806

A

III.-NUMBER, TONNAGE and CREWS of Vessels of each Nation ENTERED at Ports in the Colony of Hongkong

in the Year 1893.

153

ENTERED.

NATIONALITY

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

OF

VESSELS.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tons.

Crews. Vessels. Tons.

Crews.

American,

42

69,386

2,356

2

1,733

30

44

Austrian,

23

54,514

1,339

23

71,119 54,514 1,339

2,386

British,

3,005

3,808,714 | 142,369

56

59,212

Chinese,

205

224,177 10,326

4

3,003

2,019 200

3,061 | 3,867,926 |144,388

209

227,180 10,526

Chinese Junks,

14,059

996,474 | 161,380

9,620

752,418 | 115,304

23,679

1,748,892 276,684

Danish,

104

46,819

2,159

2

1,192

100

106

48,011 2,259

Dutch,

17

22,084

698

1

672

25

18

22,756

723

French,

109

151,803

10,986

1

874

62

110

152,677

11,048

German,

635

643,608

21,705

29

22,286

740

664

665,894

22,445

Hawaiian,

2

2,505

37

2

2,505

37

Italian,

13

19,337

800

13

19,337

800

...

Japanese,

36

49,511

1,913

1

636

Norwegian,

59

67,252

1,511

6

4,602

140

25

42

37

50,147

1,955

65

71,854

1,651

Peruvian,

1

398

9

1

398

9

...

Russian,

1

2,005

78

1

2,005

78

Siamese,

3

1,886

56

3

1,886

56

Spanish,

14

8,140

616

14

8,140

616

TOTAL,.......

18,328 6,168,613 358,338 9,722

846,628 118,662 28,050 7,015,241 477,000

IV.-NUMBER, TONNAGE and CREWS of Vessels of each Nation CLEARED at Ports in the Colony of Hongkong

in the Year 1893.

CLEARED.

NATIONALITY

OF

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

VESSELS.

Vessels. Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tons. Crews, Vessels. Tons.

Crews.

American,

Austrian,

British,

Chinese,

41 24 2,855 211

66,041 2,245 56,274 1,416

5

5,254

88

...

Chinese Junks,

16,778

Danish,

105

3,584,974 142,289

227,463 11,105 1,386,177 206,209

47,415 2,159

...

212

279,295

7,621

3,067

6,740

352,938

65,344

46

71,295 2,333 24 56,274 1,416

3,864,269 | 149,910 211 227,463 11,105

23,518 | 1,739,115 |271,553

1

596

44

106

48,011 2,203

Dutch,

15

19,843

618

3

2,913

104

18

22,756

722

French,

109

151,949

10,848

1

739

31

110

152,688

10,879

German,

571

579,937

19,705

93

85,304

2,585

661

665,241 22,290

Hawaiian,

1

989

16

1

1,516

21

2

2,505

37

Italian,

13

19,337

918

13

19,337

918

Japanese,

19

24,509

1.139

19

Norwegian,

27

22,879

660

40

28,423 51,169

815

38

52,932

1,954

1,081

67

74,048

1,741

Peruvian,

1

398

10

...

1

398

10

Russian,

1

2,005

78

..

...

1

2,005

78

Siamese,

3

1,886

56

:

3

1,886

0.00

56

Spanish,

15

7,714

556

688

44

16

8,402

600

TOTAL,... 20,789

20,789 6,199,790 400,027 7,116 808,835 77,778 27,905 7,008,625 477,805

V.-TOTAL NUMBER, TONNAGE AND CREWS OF VESSELS ENTERED AT EACH PORT IN THE COLONY OF HONGKONG, IN THE YEAR 1893.

TOTAL.

154

BRITISH.

FOREIGN.

NAMES

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

OF PORTS.

Vis.

Tons. Crews.

Vis.

Tons. Crews. Vis.

Tons.

Crews. Vls.

Tons.

Crews.

Tons.

Aberdeen,

Hunghòm,

660

26,203 6,545

...

671

11,033 3,137|

Vis.

254 914

8,904 3,033 31,756 5,217 1,217|

546

Crews. Vls,

Tons. Crews.

Vls.

Tons.

Crews.

Vls.

Tons. Crews. Vis.

Tons.

Crews.

35,167 9,578

660

26,263 6,545

254

42,789 8,354

671

11,033 3,137|

546

8,904 3,033] 914 31,756 5,217 1,217|

35,167 9,578 42,789 8,354

Shaukiwán,.

609

24,591 5,048|

...

Stanley,

197

7,363 1,614

34

231

Victoria,

3,005 3,808,714142,369

56

Yaumáti,.

...

59,212| 2,019 3,061 3,867,926|144,388 11,736 2,138,196 184,289 1,450 152,453 15,336

4,485

3,409

Total,.

tal,..... 3,005 3,808,714 142,869

56)

53,929 8,434 1,547 78,520 13,482 313]

884

8,247 1,927 517,342 62,086 19,2826,464,252 388,744 233,813 39,579 4,850 386,266 54,915

59,212 2,019 3,061 3,867,926 144,388 15,323 2,359,899 215,969 9,666 787,416 116,648 24,989 8,147,815 882,612 18,328 6,168,613 858,338 9,722 846,628118,662 28,050 7,015,241 477,000

78,520 13,482

53,929| 8,434| 1,547|

938 24,591| 5,048|

313

884 7,363 1,614

8,247 1,927 458,130 60,067 16,221 2,596,326|244,356|14,741| 5,946,910|326,658 4,541 233,813 39,579 4,859 386,266 54,915 1,450 152,453 15,336 3,409

6091

938

197

34

231

VI.-TOTAL NUMBER, TONNAGE AND CREWS OF VESSELS CLEARED AT EACH PORT IN THE COLONY OF HONGKONG, IN THE YEAR 1893.

BRITISH.

FOREIGN.

TOTAL.

NAMES

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

WITH CARgoes.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

WITH-CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

OF PORTS.

Vis.

Tons. Crews. Vis.

Tons. Crews.

Tons. Crews,

Vis.

Vls.

Tons.

Crews. Vis.

Crews.

Vls.

Aberdeen,

322

8,099 2,205

592

***

...

Hunghòm,

454

26,806 3,304]

771

*

...

Shaukiwán,.

Stanley,.

Victoria,

Yaumáti,.

848

...

86

50,531| 6,620|

6,245

630

865

145

231

...

...

...

...

2,855 3,584,974|142,289|

...

...

212 279,295 7,621 3,067 3,804,269 149,910 13,939 2,855,164 223,270 4,273 2,285 167,971 21,474 2,493

Tons.

914

27,068) 7,373| 16,150| 5,088| 1,225| 26,060| 6,417| 1,478| 2,002 1,062| 246,512 18,780 16,212 2,601,676 242,050 16,794 5,940,188 865,559 211,748 31,437 4,778 379,719 52,911 2,285 167,971 21,474

Tons. Crews.

Vis.

Tons. Crews.

Vls,

Tons. Crews. Vls.

Tons.

Crews.

35,167 9,578 42,956| 8,392|

322 592

8,009 2,205

454 771

26,806 3,304|

848 630

76,591| 13,037| 50,531| 6,620| 8,247 1,927 86 6,245 145

865

914

27,068 7,373 16,150 5,088 1,225 26,060| 6,417| 1,478| 2,002 1,062

35,167 9,578

42,956| 8,392

76,591| 13,037

231 8,247 1,927

2,485

2,493

525,807 26,401 19,279 6,466,945 891,960 211,748 31,437 4,778 379,719 52,911

Total,....

2,855| 3,584,974|142,289|

212 279,295 7,621 3,067 3,864,260 143,910 17,934 2,614,816 257,738 6,904 520,540 70,157 24,838 8,144,356 327,885 20,780 6,199,790 400,027 7,116 808,895 77,778 27,905 7,008,625 477,805

+

:

VII. Total Number, Tonnage, Crews and Passengers of Junks ENTERED from Macao, during the Year ending 31st December, 1893.

155

CARGO.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Passen- gers.

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Passeu-

gers.

Victoria,

503 75,399 13,222

2

206

20,624 2,368

1

709

96,023 15,590

3

Total,... 503 75,399 13,222

2

206

20,624 2,368

1

709

96,023 15,590

3

VIII.-Total Number, Tonnage, Crews and Passengers of Junks CLEARED for Macao, during the Year

ending 31st December, 1893.

CARGO.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Passen- gers.

Vessels. Tons.

Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Passen-

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

gers.

Victoria,

664 90,630

14,881

5

36

4,068

502

15

700

94,698 15,383

20

Total,... 664

90,630 14,881

10

5

36

4,068

502

15

700

94,698 15,383

20

IX.-Total Number, Tonnage, Crews and Passengers of Junks ENTERED at each Port in the Colony of Hongkong, from Ports on the Coast of China and Formosa, during the Year ending 31st December, 1893.

CARGO.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Vessels.

Tons.

Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Vessels.

Passen-

Tous, Crews.

gers.

Aberdeen,

660 26,263 6,545

317

254

8,904 3,033

32

914

35,167 9,578

349

Hunghòm,

671

11,033

3,137

101

546

31,756

5,217

42

1,217

42,789

8,354

143

Shaukiwán,..

609

24,591

5,048

83

938

53,929

8,434

9

1,547

78,520

13,482

92

Stanley,

197

7,363

1,614

116

34

884

Victoria,

9,969 699,372

116,478

88,965

4,233

402,508

313 56,360

231

8,247

1,927

116

22,678

14,202 | 1,101,880 | 172,838

111,643

Yaumáti,......

1,450

152,453

15,336

31

3,409

233,813 39,579

101

4,859 386,266 54,915

132

Total,... 13,556

921,075 | 148,158

89,613

9,414

731,794 112,936 22,862

22,970 | 1,652,869 |261,094 |112,475

X.-Total Number, Tonnage, Crews and Passengers of Junks CLEARED at each Port in the Colony of Hongkong, for Ports on the Coast of China and Formosa, during the Year ending 31st December, 1893.

Cargo.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Passen- gers.

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Passen- gers.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Aberdeen,

322

8,099 2,205

62

592

27,068 7,373

82

914

35,167 9,578

144

Hungbom,

454

26,806

3,304

73

771

16,150

5,088

40

1,225

42,956 8,392

113

Shaukiwán,.

848

50,531

6,620

52

630

26,060

6,417

7

1,478

76,591 13,037

59

Stanley,..

86

6,245

865

114

145

2,002

1,062

231

Victoria.

12,119

Yaumáti,...

2,285

167,971 21,474

50

2,073 65,842 2,493 211,748

1,035,895 | 156,860 | 105,955

Total,... 16,114 1,295,547 191,328 106,306 6,704 348,870 64,842

!

3,369 22,818 | 1,644,417256,170 109,675

13,465

3,228

31,437

12

14,192 4,778

1,101,737

8,247 1,927 170,325

114

109,183

379,719 52,911

62

156

XI.-Grand Total Number, Tonnage, Crews and Passengers of Junks ENTERED at each Port in the Colony of Hongkong (exclusive of Local Trade), during the Year ending 31st December, 1893.

CARGO.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Vessels.

Tons.

Crews.

Passen- gers.

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Aberdeen,

660

26,263 6,545

317

254

8,904

3,033

32

914

Hunghom,...

671

11,033 3,137

101

546

31,756

5,217

42

1,217

35,167 9,578 42,789

349

8,354

143

Shaukiwán,..

609

24,591

5,048

'83

938

53,929

8,434

9

1,547

78,520 13,482

92

Stanley,

197

7,363

1,614

116

34

884

313

231

Victoria, Yaumáti,..... 1,450

10,472

774,771 129,700

88,967

4,439

423,132

58,728

22,679

152,453 15,336

31

3,409

233,813

39,579

101

4,859

8,247 14,911 | 1,197,903 386,266

1,927

116

188,428 |111,646

54,915

132

Total,..

14,059

996,474 | 161,380 89,615 9,620

752,418115,304

22,863

23,679 | 1,748,892 | 276,684 | 112,478

XII.—Grand Total Number, Tonnage, Crews and Passengers of Junks CLEARED at each Port in the Colony of Hongkong (exclusive of Local Trade), during the Year ending 31st December, 1893.

Cargo.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Passen- gers.

Passen-

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

gers.

Aberdeen,

322

8,099 2,205

62

592

27,068. 7,373

82

914

Hunghòm,

454

26,806

3,304

73

771

16,150

5,088

40

1,225

35,167 9,578 42,956

144

8,392

113

Shaukiwán,...

848

50,531

6,620

52

630

26,060

6,417

7

1,478

76,591 13,037

59

Stanley,

86

6,245

865

114

145

2,002

1,062

231

8,247 1,927

114

Victoria,

12,783

1,126,525 171,741 | 105,960

2,109

69,910

13,967

3,243

Yaumáti,...... 2,285

167,971 21,474

50

2,493

211,748

31,437

12

14,892 4,778

1,196,435 185,708 |109,203

379,719 52,911

62

Total,... 16,778 1,386,177206,209 106,311

6,740

352,938

65,344

3,384 23,518 1,739,115 271,553 109,695

XIII.—Return of Junks (Local Trade) ENTERED at the Port of Victoria from the Out-stations of the Island and the Villages in British Kaulung, during the Year ending 31st December, 1893.

CARGO.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels.

Tons. 'Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Passen- gers.

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Victoria,...... 3,454 119,301 40,097 2,313 1,479

42,483 10,984

3,627 4,933 161,784 51,081 5,940

Total,... 3,454 119,301 40,097 2,313 1,479

42,483 10,984

3,627. 4,933 161,784 51,081 5,940

XIV.-Return of Junks (Local Trade) CLEARED from the Port of Victoria for the Out-stations of the Island and the Villages in British Kaulung, during the Year ending 31st December, 1893.

CARGO.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Passen- gers.

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Victoria,

2,193 55,297 15,827 3,647 2,760 108,175 35,432

303 4,953 163,472 51,259 3,950

Total,... 2,193 55,297 15,827 3,647 2,760 108,175 35,432

303 4,953 163,472 51,259

3,950

Į

157

XV.-SUMMARY.

FOREIGN TRADE.

No. OF VESSELS.

TONS.

CREWS.

British Vessels entered with Cargoes,

Do.

do. in Ballast,

3,005 56

3,808,714 59,212

142,369

2,019.

Total,

3,061

3,867,926

144,388

British Vessels cleared with Cargoes,

Do.

do. in Ballast,..

2,855 212

3,584,974.

142,289

279,295

7,621

Total,

3,067

3,864,269

149,910

Total of all British Vessels entered and cleared,

6,128

7,732,195

294,298

Do.

Foreign Vessels entered with Cargoes,.

do. in Ballast,

15,323

2,359,899

215,969

9,666

787.416

116,643

Total,

24,989

3,147,315

332,612

Foreign Vessels cleared with Cargoes,.

17,934

2,614,816.

257,738

Do.

do. in Ballast,

6,904

529,540

70,157

Total,..

24,838

3,144,356

327,895

Total of all Foreign Vessels entered and cleared,

49,827

6,291,671

660,507

Total of all Vessels entered with Cargoes,

Do.

18,328 6,168,613

358,338

do. in Ballast,

9,722

846,628

118,662

Total of all Vessels entered,

28,050

7,015,241

477,000

Total of all Vessels cleared with Cargoes,

20,789

6,199,790

400,027

Do.

do.

in Ballast,

7,116

808,835

77,778

Total of all Vessels cleared,.

27,905

7,008,625

477,805

do.

do.

Total of all Vessels entered and cleared with Cargoes,

Do.

Total of all Vessels engaged in Foreign Trade only, entered and cleared, .................

in Ballast,.

39,117 16,838.

12,368,403

758,365

1,655,463

196,440

55,955 14,023,866

954,805

LOCAL TRADE,

Total of all Vessels entered,

4,933

161,784

51,081

Do.

cleared,..

4,953

163,472

51,259

Total of all Vessels engaged in Local Trade only, entered and cleared,

9,886

325,256

102,340

Do.

Total of all Vessels engaged in Foreign Trade only, entered and cleared,

do. in Local Trade only,

do.

55,955 | 14,023,866

*9,886

954,805

325,256

102,340

Grand Total of all Vessels entered and cleared,.

65,841 14,349,122

1,067,145

158

XVI-RETURN of VESSELS REGISTERED at the Port of Hongkong, during the Year 1893.

Name of Vessel.

Official Number.

Regis- tered Tonnage.

Horse Power.

Rig.

Built of

Where built and when.

Remarks.

Chin Shan, str.,

Kwong Hoi, str

Tai Ping, str.,.........

Dragon, str.,

Propontis, str.,

95,862 84.91

33

73,794 440.80

95,863 77.22

95,864 39.16

50,485 1,389.99

400

Schooner

None

25 None

35 None Steel

250 Schooner Iron

Wood Mongkok, Hongkong, 1892.

Iron

Clyde, 1875.

Formerly Ooryia.

Wood Mongkok, Hongkong, 1893.

Kowloon, Hongkong, 1893.

Govan, 1864.

XVII.—RETURN of REGISTRIES of VESSELS cancelled at the Port of Hongkong, during the Year 1893.

Name of Vessel.

Official

Number.

Regis- tered Tonnage.

Date of

Registry.

Penshaw,....

68,930

729.33 1887

Kitty,

85,926 802.90 1888

Horse Power.

Rig.

Built of

Where built and when.

Reasons of Cancellation.

:

...

Barque

Wood Southwick, Durham, Lost near Palupari Island,

1875.

Philippine Group.

Barque

Iron

Amsterdam, 1856,... Sold to Foreigners.

XVIII. AMOUNT of FEES received under the Merchant Shipping Act, 1855, and Table B of Ordinance No. 26 of 1891, in the Harbour Department, during the Year 1893.

Matter or Duty in respect of which Fee taken.

Number. Fee.

Amount.

Remarks.

Alteration in Agreements with Seamen,

1

1

Certifying Desertion, ...

76

1

76

Declaration of Ownership,

6

2

12

Endorsement of change of Master,

34

1

34

Endorsement of change of Ownership,

2

2

Endorsement of change in Tonnage,

1

2

Granting Certificate of Imperial Registry,...

15

75

Inspection of Registry,....................................

5

1

5

Recording Mortgage of Ship,

3

5

15

Recording Discharge of Mortgage, ....

1

5

5

Recording Sale of Ship,

2

5

10

Total.........

239

:

159

XIX.-RETURN of CHINESE PASSENGER SHIPS cleared by the Emigration Officer, Hongkong, during the Year ending the 31st day of December, 1893.

NATION-

ADULTS.

CHILDREN.

No.

DATE CLEARED.

SHIP'S NAME.

TONS.

ALITY OF SHIP.

MASTER'S NAME.

WHITHER BOUND.

TOTAL.

M.

F.

M. F.

1 January | Chelydra, str.

1,574 British

R. Cass

Straits Settlements

763

72

12

2

""

7 Borneo, str.

1,490 | Dutch

H. Klein

290

16

"

10

Thibet, str.

1,665 British

E. P. Bishop

471

42

14

"J

""

10

""

Lightning, str..

10

China, str.

2,124 2,401

gg

J. G. Spence

244

75

12

2542

15

862

312

532

333

**

""

"

13 Prometheus, str.

7

8

9

""

17 Bormida, str.

""

18

Victoria, str.

1,492 1,499 Italian 1,992 British

""

"

W. B. Seabury J. K. Webster F. G. Ansaldo

J. Panton

San Francisco

136

140

Straits Settlements

149

149

518

53

13

15

599

19

Victoria, B.C.

58

110

Tacoma, U.S.A.

52

18

Kutsang, str.

1,495

W. H. Jackson

Straits Settlements

472

45

535

""

Honolulu

· 103

10

10

O

23

A

19 Belgic, str.

2,695

W. H. Walker

217

">

San Francisco

93

7

1

11

12

13

14

15

16

19

20

23

24

25

26

28

29

30

31

33

31

35

36

37

38

F2 = 12*2**27* * * * 2N223-⠀⠀± 8 8 8 8 97**** * **985 8 8 46858 8 8788888688 2 2

""

24 Catherine Apcar, str.

1,734

J. G. Olifent

Straits Settlements

301

1

351

دو

24 Gwalior, str.

1,648

""

F. Speck

272

28

10

>

25 Empress of China, str.

3,003

$2

R. Archibald{

Victoria, B.C.

93

Vancouver, B.C.

207

26

12

Orion, str.

28

Peru, str..

وو

31 Nanking, str.

"J

31 Kong Beng, str.

1,760 Austrian 2,540 American

835 | Norwegian 862 British

G. Wallusching W. Ward

N. Sorensen

J. B. Jackson

Straits Settlements

173

57

C

310

300

245

San Francisco

37

:

:

:

37

Straits Settlements

512

19

538

479

75

16

18 February 3 | Wing Sang, str.

1,517

d'A. de Ste. Croix

379

127

12

""

>

"J

7 Lombardy, str..

1,571

F. Cole

280

19

621

571

12

530

3

303

""

""

9 Palinurus, str..

1,536

T. S. Jackson

153

153

""

""

""

9 Oceanic, str......

2,440

W. M. Smith

San Francisco

44

44

""

"

9 Arratoon Apcar, str.

1,392

J. E. Hansen

Straits Settlements

108

31

142

Victoria, B.C.

46

""

14 Tacoma, str.....

1,662

J. R. Hill

110

""

Tacoma, U.S.A.

64

14 Bisagno, str.

1,499 Italian

C. Barbaro

Straits Settlements

199

16

217

39

22 Empress of India, str..

3,003 British

O. P. Marshall

Victoria, B.C.

49

Vancouver, B.C.

304

255

28 Lightning, str..

2,124

"

J. G. Spence

Straits Settlements

374

31

414

27 March

2 Gaelic, str.

2,691

W. G. Pearne

San Francisco

116

161

">

""

4

Thibet, str.

1,665

E. P. Bishop

Straits Settlements

259

270

""

4 Glenfruin, str.

1,892

E. Norman

157

14

179

""

""

7 Kutsang, str.

1,495

W. H. Jackson

264

27

302

"

8 Gisela, str.

2,643 Austrian

G. Nicolich

127

12

140

27.

""

9 Achilles, str..

1,488 British

T. Bartlett

148

:

:

148

""

11 Bormida, str.

""

""

14 Catherine Apcar, str.

1,499 Italian 1,734 British

F. G. Ansaldo

629

28

"

J. G. Olifent

737

35

COLO

665

783

"

""

16 Mogul, str.

1,827

"2

T. Golding

""

18 Nizam, str..

1,615

F. N. Tillard

Victoria, B.C. Tacoma, U.S.A. Straits Settlements

17

249

1,044

42

""

21 | Wing Sang, str.

1,517

d'A. de Ste. Croix

755

41

""

""

21 China, str.

2,401

W. B. Seabury

39

"

22 Empress of Japan, str.

3,003

Geo, A. Lee

Honolulu San Francisco Victoria, B.C.

$9

654

574

101

""

Vancouver, B.C.

900

40

24 Shantung, str.

27 Gwalior, str...

1,835 1,648

32

H. C. D. Frampton

Straits Settlements

997

""

F. Speck

1,118

30

"J

42

""

28

China, str.

43

30

Belgic, str.

"

44

30 Holstien, str.

1,113 Gerinan 2,695 British

985 German

P. Voss

677

W. H. Walker

San Francisco

560

J. Bruhn

Straits Settlements

662

""

45 April 1 Arratoon Apcar, str.

1,392 British

J. E. Hansen

707

69

10

46

"}

4 Victoria, str.

1,992

J. Panton

Victoria, B.C.

59

""

Tacoma, U.S.A.

364

::

::

:

:

:

::

266

1,097

807

674

1,001

1,010 1,158 689 571

662

792

423

47

""

5 Myrmidon, str.

1,815

48

27

6 Glenorchy, str.

1,822

49

""

8 Peru, str. ................

50

8 Maria Teresa, str.

8 Bisagno, str.............

1,499 Italian

2,540 American 1,922 Austrian

R. Nelson J. Ferguson W. Ward R. Deperis C. Barbaro

Straits Settlements

884

31

4

924

1,040

42

11

11!

1,104

27

San Francisco

114

122

Straits Settlements

394

72

13

10

489

622

18

650

29

52

11 Borneo, str.

1,490 Dutch

Singapore

6601 24

J.T. Thermissen

774

>>

Bangkok

82

53

""

12 Empress of China, str..

3,003 British

R. Archibald

Victoria, B.C.

82

886

Vancouver, B.C.

804

12 Chelydra, str.

1,574

""

99

55

14 Glenogle, str.

2,399

""

""

""

15 Lightning, str..

57

18 Loo Sok, str.

""

19 Bantam, str.

"

59

"

20 Oceanic, str..

60

61

62

63

64

65

66

ས བ བ བ སྤུ་ ར་ བ

"9

22 Kutsang, str.

»

""

""

68 May

69

">

70

32

3 Empress of India, str.

71

"J

4 Independent, str......................

72

"3

6 Tacoma, str...................

25 | Phra Chula Chom Klao,str.

25 Ardgay, str.

27 City of Rio de Janeiro, str.

28 Catherine Apcar, str.

28 Nanking, str.

29 Tai Yick, str.

29 Orestes, str.

2 Lombardy, str.

2 China, str.

2,124 1,020 1,457 Dutch 2,440 | British 1,495 1,012 97 1,081 2,275 American 1,734 British

""

835 Norwegian 903 German 1,279 British 1,571 1,113 German

3,003 British

""

W. M. Smith

G. H. Bowker J. A. Morris J. Thom J. T. Smith J. G. Olifent N. Sorensen N. H. Emke E. S. Rawlings F. Cole P. Voss

O. P. Marshall

W. J. Schafer

J. R. Hill

R. Cass W. E. Duke J. G. Spence

Straits Settlements

639

36

10

852

53

12

""

801

51

0 200

693

923

869

>>

A. Benson

765

26

11

803

55

"3

[C. J. van der Bergh

977

18

999

""

Honolulu

123

13

San Francisco

412

263

:

Straits Settlements

720

53

667

26

""

648

52

""

San Francisco

171

Straits Settlements

687

97

501

""

597

310

""

575

29

539

**** *23*

12

791

7

704

15

11

726

1

:

177

8

18

810

561

33

12

50

18

6262

637

325

637

562

Victoria, B.C.

931

871 German

Vancouver, B.C. Straits Settlements Mauritius

356

28

:::

449

366

335

73

""

6 Wing Sang, str.

1,662 British

1,517

Victoria, B.C.

43

'138

Tacoma, U.S.A.

95

74

6 Maria Valerie, str.

2,644 Austrian

d'A de Ste. Croix A. Mitis

Straits Settlements

633

129

23

22

807

43

87

142

""

"

Carried forward,...... 132,783

Carried forward,...... 34,887 2,087

397

265

37,636

160

RETURN of CHINESE PASSENGER SHIPS cleared by the Emigration Officer, Hongkong,—Continued.

No.

DATE CLEARED.

SHIP'S NAME.

TONS.

NATION-

ALITY OF SHIP.

ADULTS.

CHILDREN.

MASTER'S NAME.

WHITHER ROUND.

TOTAL.

M. F. M. F

F.

Brought forward,..

132,783

Brought forward, 34,887 2,087|

397

265 37,636

85

91

99

100

* C** 8 78 8 ** * * *88** 8 **85 8 8

75 May

8

Gaelic, str.

76

9

Bormida, str.

77

""

11

Shantung, str.

2,691 British 1,499 Italian 1,835 British

Honolulu

95

17

13

5

W. G. Pearne

F. Ansaldo

571

San Francisco

436

1

Straits Settlements

747

59

8

820

H.C.D. Frampton

719

31

24

776

"

78

""

16

Thibet, str.

79

""

16

Arratoon Apcar, str.

1,665 1,392

C. T. Denny

973

74

1,062

1

27

J. E. Hansen

543

148

21

18

730

"9

80

""

18

City of Peking, str.

3,129 American

Honolulu

14

9

R. R. Searle

134

San Francisco

91

13

:

""

18 Bantam, str.

82

23 Zambesi, str.

1,457 Dutch 1,565 British

C. J. van der Bergh

Straits Settlements

657

19

679

G. J. Edwards

808

12

825

83

A

24 Empress of Japan, str.

3,003

""

Geo. A. Lee Vancouver, B.C.

Victoria, B.C.

83

204

::

287

84

24 |Phra Chula Chom Klao, str.

1,012

J. A. Morris

Straits Settlements

490

""

"J

25 | Chelydra, str.

1,574

R. Cass

763

888

48

99

11

72

7

551

881

""

>>

86

""

27 Mogul, str.

1,827

""

T. Golding

Victoria, B.C.

22

63

Tacoma, U.S.A.

41

:

87

""

30

China, str.

2,401

W. B. Seabury

Honolulu

70

10

404

San Francisco

303

6

88 June

2 Lightning, str.

2,124

33

J. G. Spence

Straits Settlements

671

143

18

17

849

89

3

""

Tai Yick, str.

903

German

R. Schuldt

523

23

552

""

90

6

Bisagno, str.

1,499 Italian

C. Barbaro

607

81

13

13

714

""

6 Teheran, str.

1,670 British

92

6

China, str.

1,113 German

T. Leigh P. Voss

593

64

667

23

313

9

Honolulu

33

10

93

""

8 Belgic, str.

2,695 British

W. H. Walker

San Francisco

173

7

94

""

8

Glucksburg, str.

95

""

8

Fidelio, str.

96

9

Kutsang, str.

97

14

98

""

""

Taichiow,

str.

14

Empress of China, str.

918 German 742 1,495 British

862

3,003

P. Thomsen P. Nissen

Straits Settlements

317

Bangkok

93

""

G. H. Bowker

Straits Settlements

518

R. Unsworth

409

ལ ཆབ

14

::

::

324

233

333

2

12

87

10

מכא

107

13

8

33

628

441

"2

35

R. Archibald

Victoria, B.C.

75

269

Vancouver, B.C.

194

Honolulu

17

Peru, str....

2,540 American

W. Ward

82

San Francisco

79

""

17

Victoria, str.

1,992 British

Victoria, B.C.

3

J. Panton

29

Tacoma, U.S.A.

26

101

"

17

Catherine Apcar, str.

1,734

102

"

17 Ardgay, str.

1,081

J. Thom

"

103

35

22 Bantam, str......

104

24 Shantung, str.

105

""

106

"

24 Wing Sang, str.

27 Oceanic, str.....

1,457 Dutch 1,835 British 1,517

"

2,440

J. G. Olifent

C. J. van der Bergh] H. C. D. Frampton d'A de Ste. Croix

W. M. Smith

Straits Settlements

331

124

12

476

287

43

337

21

213

1

221

""

245

3

280

32

329

97

18

452

Honolulu

16

:

"

San Francisco

227

107

""

A

27 Gwalior, str...

108

109 July 1 Tai Yick, str.

30 Arratoon Apcar, str.

1,648 1,392

F. Speck

Straits Settlements

640

41

10

""

??

J. E. Hansen

523

113

23

15

903 German

N. H. Emke

363

10

3585

}}

258

698

679

381

27

110

""

4 Borneo, str.

1,561 Dutch

J. S. Thermissen

436

19

2

457

22

-111

5 Empress of India, str.

3,003 British

O. P. Marshall

Victoria, B.C.

68

112

""

5 Palamed, str.

113

""

5 Dardanus, str.

114

115

""

A

6 City of Rio de Janeiro, str.

""

116

""

117

""

118

""

11 Chelydra, str.

119

27

120 121

"

13 Telemachus, str.

""

122

""

7 Protos, str.

8 Bormida, str.

8 China, str.

12 Donar, str.

17 Glucksburg, str.

18 Tacoma, str........

1,489 1,491 2,275 American 1,150 German 1,499 Italian 1,113 German 1,574 British 1,015 German 1,397 British

J. T. Smith

B. Grundmann J. Barwise P. Thomson

C. Jackson

Vancouver, B.C. Straits Settlements

199

}}

267

100

100

""

22

T. Purdy

100

100

""

Honolulu

5

4

San Francisco

119

10

H. Johannsen F. G. Ansaldo. P. Voss R. Cass

Straits Settlements

332 .38

288

96

13

218

141

8

379

14

411

Bangkok

82

82

Straits Settlements

521

70

17

276

17

""

142

17

"

918 German 1,662 British

275

22

7231

7523

615

300

3

164 301

""

J. R. Hill

Victoria, B.C.

22

...

Tacoma, U.S.A.

15

::

37

[] Honolulu

33

5

123

35

19 Gaelic, str.

124

19

""

Lightning, str..

2,691 2,124

W. G. Pearne

37

San Francisco

185

J. G. Spence

Straits Settlements

512

189

16

25

125

22

"

Phra Nang, str.

1,021

W. H. Watton

244

19

8

2242

237

742

273

19

126

37

26

Empress of Japan, str.

3,003

F. G. Monsarrat

Victoria, B.C.

53

وو

Vancouver, B.C.

176

::

Honolulu

19

127

وو

27

City of Peking, str..

3,129 American

128

129

130

133

""

5 Gisela, str.

134

""

9 China, str............

135

""

9 Mogul, str.

""

27 Kutsang, str.

27 Wuotan, str...

31 Deuteros, str.

Catherine Apcar, str.

131 August 1

132

5 Borneo, str.

1,495 British 1,016 German 1,198

1,734 British, 1,561 Dutch 2,643 Austrian 2,401 British 1,827

W. A. Dinse J. G. Olifent J. T. Thermissen F. Kessovich W. B. Seabury T. Golding

R. R. Searle

G. H. Bowker A. Ott

San Francisco

59

Straits Settlements

316

49

288

8

::

82

229

93

379

299

"2

99

7

106

وو

221

96

10

16

343

""

169

40

10

8

227

"2

120

59

4

10

193

27

San Francisco

221

12

233

...

Victoria, B.C.

29

"

32

Tacoma, U.S.A.

60

31

136

د,

9 Bisagno, str.....

137

""

9 Wing Sang, str..

1,499 Italian 1,517 | British

E. De Negri d'A de Ste. Croix

Straits Settlements

104

56

248

59

97

167

323

138

""

16 Empress of China, str.

3,003

139

""

17 Belgic, str.

2,695

ގ

140

17

""

Arratoon Apcar, str.

1,392

141

""

18 Hongay, str..............

1,564

""

142

29

22 Douar, str.

143

وو

23 Chelydra, str..

144

""

26 Cyclops, str..

145

26

""

Peru, str.

146

26

Protos, str..

1,015 German 1,574 British 1,363 2,540 American 1,150 German

"

R. Archibald

W. H. Walker J. E. Hansen J. Young B. Grundmann R. Cass

W. Asquith

D. E. Friele

Victoria, B.C.

11

Vancouver, B.C. San Francisco

107

::

118

66

73

Straits Settlements

235

111

11

11

368

154

30

7

2

199

19

2691

30

7

5

311

""

208

44

3

7

262

""

136

136

12

San Francisco

76

2

78

H. Johannsen

Straits Settlements

254

36

34

328

""

Carried forward,..

258,698

Carried forward,..

838 57,372 4,735

609

63,554

RETURN of CHINESE PASSENGER SHIPS cleared by the Emigration Officer, Hongkong,—Continued.

161

No.

DATE CLEARED.

SHIP'S NAME.

TONS.

NATION- ALITY OF SHIP.

ADULTS.

CHILDREN.

MASTER'S NAME.

WHITHER Bound.

TOTAL.

M: F.

M.

F.

Brought forward,..............] 258,698

|Brought forward, .57,372 4,735

838 609 63,554

147 August 29 | Victoria, str...

148

31 China, str.

3.

149 Sept. 150

151

2 Bormida, str.

""

5

Lightning, str......

1,992 British 1,113 German 1,499 Italian 2,124 British

Victoria, B.C.

14

"

5

Oceanic, str.'

2,440

J. Panton

P. Voss F. G. Ansaldo J. G. Spence W. M. Smith

Tacoma, U.S.A.

10

...

::

24

Straits Settlements

*441

41

350

46

"

275

86

12

"

""

152

6

Empress of India, str..

153

11

Orion, str.

154

12

Kuisang, str.

""

155

"

14

City of Rio de Janeiro, str.

156

22

157

"

158

19

""

Borneo, str.

159

""

21

160

"

12 | Phra Chula Chom Klao, str.

19 Ardgay, str.

City of New York, str.

23 Catherine Apcar, str.

3,003 1,760 Austrian 1,495 British 2,275 American 1,012 British

G. H. Bowker J. T. Smith

O. P. Marshall

A. Orlando

Honolulu San Francisco Victoria, B.C. Vancouver, B.C. Straits Settlements

83

16

11

2721

491

407

12

385

230

112

1

21

118

::

...

:::

139

196

47

251

513 104

13

14

644

J. A. Morris

San Francisco Straits Settlements

53

555

1,081 1,561 Dutch 1,964 American 1,734 British

J. Thom

281

**

"

J. T. Thermissen

361

-3333

1

54

5

598

42

334

35

16

417

F. H. Johnston

San Francisco

32

32

J. G. Olifent

Straits Settle:nents

471

121

11

12

615

161

>

27 | Hupeh, str.

1,846

T. Quail

188

1

198

32

""

162

""

28 Gaelic, str.

2,691

W. G. Pearne

San Francisco

161

168

163

"

28 Tacoma, str..

1,662

J. R. Hill

Victoria, B.C.

35

48

""

Tacoma, U.S.A.

13

164

29

30 | Wing Sang, str.

1,517

d'A. de Ste. Croix] Straits Settlements

321

114

14

456

165

Oct.

4 Empress of Japan, str.

3,003

G. A. Lee

Victoria, B.C.

34

195

""

Vancouver, B.C.

161

166

""

5

Propontis, str.

167

,,

6

City of Peking, str........

168

""

6

Marquis Bacqueham, str..

169

7

""

Arratoon Apcar, str.

170

""

12 | Giava, str.

171

""

14 Ixion, str......

172

173 174

175

17

China, str.

29

"

17

Deuteros, str.

"

24

Lightning, str.

"

26

Belgic, str.

2,695

176

""

26

Titan, str..

177

28

Borneo, str.

""

178

"

30 Donar, str.

179

Nov.

1 Empress of China, str...

180

""

4 Peru, str.

181

""

4 Kutsang, str.

182

""

183

7

""

4 | Phra Chula Chom Klao, str.

Maria Valerie, str.

1,390 3,129 American 2.740 | Austrian 1,392 British 1,818 Italian 2,299 British 2,401

""

1,198 German 2,124 British

1,525 1,561 Dutch 1,015 German

2,540 American 1,495 British 1,012

25

2,644 Austrian

W. H. Farrand R. R. Searle G. Wallusching J. E. Hansen F. Susini H. Nish

W. Ward

W. A. Dinse

J. G. Spence W. H. Walker R. J. Brown J. T. Thermissen

B. Grundmann

R. Archibald

D. E. Friele G. H. Bowker J A. Morris

Straits Settlements

3691

69

San Francisco

69

Straits Settlements

94

61

113

31

303

:

84588

451

74

7

166

195

10

377

>>

229

229

"J

:

Honolulu

84 10

3

190

San Francisco

78

8

Straits Settlements

2911

14

::

...

306

623

220

27

19

889

,

San Francisco

61

1

65

Straits Settlements

119

28

10

3

155

"

539

481

9

11

607

32

1

2

321

Mauritius

275

3

7

3,003 British

Victoria, B.C.

18

Vancouver, B.C.

162

San Francisco

26

Straits Settlements

451

362

"

184

25

8 Teheran, str.

1,684 British

G. Costanzo F. Cole

190

29

126

**GOR

::

180

34

73

18

46

76

22

""

185

9 Catherine Apcar, str.

1,734

J. G. Olifent

200

47

86282

79

Victoria, B.C.

46

186

9 Victoria, str.

1,992

J. Panton

"

Tacoma, U.S.A.

16

::

23525

::

12

554

417

278

153

259

62

Honolulu

55

7

187

A

14 Oceanic, str...

2,440

W. M. Smith

146

""

San Francisco

74

3

188

22

14 Stura, str.........

189

""

21 Mongkut, str.

190

""

22 Wing Sang, str.

1,416 Italian 859 British 1,517

A. Serrati

Straits Settlements

897

48

10

10

C. Stonham

385

38

""

191

""

22 City of Rio de Janeiro, str.

192

25 Propontis, str.

""

2,275 American 1,390 British

d'A. de Ste. Croix J. T. Smith

344 60

059

465

437-

421

San Francisco

25

:

:

28

193

""

28 Arratoon Apcar, str.

1,392

W. H. Farrand J. E. Hansen

Straits Settlements

391

46

230

67

13

do 00

81

451

314

""

""

194

""

29 Empress of India, str.......

3,003

O. P. Marshall

Victoria, B.C.

28

162

""

Vancouver, B.C.

134

195

Dec.

2 Kong Beng, str.

196

2 Thisbe, str.

197

5 Choy Sang, str.

198

""

199

200

"J

201

""

14

202

""

14 City of Peking, str..

7 Gaelic, str.

9 Vindobona, str.

12 Giava, str.

Lightning, str...

862 1,789 Austrian 1,194 British

2,091

21

2,688 Austrian 1,818 Italian 2,124 British

3,129 American

J. B. Jackson G. P. Covacich R. C. D. Bradley W. G. Pearne P. Mersa

F. Susini

J. G. Spence

R. R. Searle

Straits Settlements

212

6

"

134

17

""

297

37

CONN

221

153

340

San Francisco

188

192

Straits Settlements

317

81

14

288

43

10

19

305

41

14

19

Honolulu

42

7

4043

10

422

3

344

366

174

San Francisco

117

203

""

A

18 Shantung, str.

1,835 British

H. C. D. Frampton

Batavia

88

34

122

...

204

20

;་

Kutsang, str.

1,495

W. H. Jackson

Straits Settlements

623

96

10

733

دو

205

27

"

Empress of Japan, str.

3,003

Geo. A. Lee

Victoria, B.C.

19

136

""

Vancouver, B.C.

117

206

""

27 | China, str.

2,401

Wm. Ward

"2

207

28

""

Hupeh, str.

1,846

T. Quail

San Francisco Straits Settlements

70

...

70

744

34

14

""

208

""

29 Catherine Apcar, str.

1,734

J. G. Olifent

556

71

10

СА

794

643

""

TOTAL TONS,

378,762

TOTAL PASSENGERS,

73,227

865 7,045 1,199

82,336

ADULTS. CHILDREN.

TOTAL.

SUMMARY.

M.

F. M. F.

257

2

14

وو

دو

""

Batavia,

""

""

Mauritius,

San Francisco, U.S.A.,

""

Straits Settlements,

Tacoma, U.S.A.,

,, Victoria,

To Bangkok, Siam,

Honolulu, Sandwich Islands,

88

34

273 122

866

108

92

33

1,099

610

3

10

623

5,209 204

221

15

5,450

59,905 6,694 1,061|

817

68,477

976

976

...

Vancouver, British Columbia,

4,094

1,222

4,094 1,222

Do.,

TOTAL PASSENGERS,..........

73,227| 7,045| 1,199|

865

82,336

162

XX.-RETURN of VESSELS bringing CHINESE PASSENGERS to the Port of Victoria, Hongkong, from Places out of the Chinese Empire, during the Year ending the 31st day of December, 1893.

No.

DATE ARRIVED.

SHIP'S NAME.

TONS.

NATION-

ALITY OF SHIP.

ADULTS.

CHILDREN.

MASTER'S ΝΑΜΕ.

WHERE FROM.

TOTAL.

M.

F.

M.

F.

123

19

"}

4

Oceana, str.

4

1 January 1 Mongkut, str.

4 Lightning, str.

4 Empress of China, str.

859 British 2,124

"

Deans Spence

Bangkok

47

47

Straits Settlements

306 21

4

331

1,628 German

Behring

210

2

212

3,003 British

Archibald

Victoria, B.C.

75

Vancouver, B.C.

274

}

349

10

11

12

B07802

5 Aden, str.

""

6 Telemachus, str.

2,517 1,397

Wibmer

>>

Straits Settlements

191

191

Barwise

""

200

"}

204

19

7 Bormida, str.

1,499 Italian

Ansaldo

137

·142

""

19

9 Glenfruin, str.

1,892 British

Norman

236

""

4

250

9 Devawongse, str.

1,057

Anderson

Bangkok

76

76

11

10 Nam Yong, str.

984

Smith

Straits Settlements

525

28

6

2

561

11

Kut Sang, str.

1,495

Jackson

476

23

507

"J

11 Keemun, str.

1,985

Castle

19

98

100

"}

Port Darwin

17

Thursday Island

Cooktown

13

"

=

12 Menmuir, str.

1,287

Craig

Panton

New Zealand

Townsville

80

Sydney

27

...

23

...

Melbourne

...

14

""

12 Victoria, str.

15

13 Belgic, str.

16

13 Gwalior, str.

17

16 Independent, str.

18

17 Protos, str.

19

"

18 Catherine Apcar, str.

1,992

Victoria, B.C.

73

""

Tacoma, U.S.A.

186

110

2,695

Walker

San Francisco

333

2

339

1,648

871 German

Speck Schall

Straits Settlements

143

Mauritius

105 6

24

148

4

2

117

1,150

Johannsen

""

Bangkok

22

22

1,734 British

Olifent

Straits Settlements

540

15

5

10

2

562

Dilly, Timor

Port Darwin

15

Thursday Island

1

20

20

"

18 | Airlie, str.

1,492

Ellis

Cooktown

*

*

Cairns

104

15

...

Brisbane

Sydney

43

2

4

2

Adelaide

21

19

19 | Palinurus, str.

1,536

Jackson

Straits Settlements

427

""

7

3

437

22

15

19 Monmouthshire, str.

1,871

53

Cuming

30

30

>>

23

99

20 Diamond, str.

24

20 Loo Sok, str.

1,030 1,020

Thow

300

""

Benson

"

Bangkok

106

...

25

19

20 Peru, str.

26

23 Preussen, str.

2,540 American

2,573 German

Ward

San Francisco

261

1

Hagemann

Straits Settlements

400

10

10

27

5

314

106

...

264

2

419

11

27

17

23 Tai Wan, str.

1,109 British

Anderson

55

55

...

28

25 | Phra Chula Chom Klao,s.

1,012

19

29

26 Lombardy, str.

1,571

"9

80

27 Palamed, str.

1,489

Morris Cole Jackson

Bangkok

50

50

...

Straits Settlements

113

3

2

119

135

140

>>

"}

31

""

27 Cheang Hock Kian, str....

956

Dinsdale

227

"

4

3

240

82

""

30

Gisela, str.

83

"1

30 Peshawur, str......

34

35

30 Wing Sang, str.

30 Salatiga, str.

2,643 Austrian

2,158 British 1,517 1,640 German

*"

Nicolich

265

99

Jephson

25

::

265

25

Ste. Croix Hildebrandt

546

44

11

211

3

84

10

608

>>

3

221

Port Darwin

6

Thursday Island

2

Cooktown

5

36

30 Changsha, str............................

1,463 British

Williams

Townsville

14

Brisbane

14

162

...

Sydney

31

New Zealand

4

...

Melbourne

77

3

3

3

37

11

30 Fidelio, str.

38

39

30 | Phra Chom Klao, str.

30 Nanshan, str.

742 German 1,012 British

Nissen Fowler

Bangkok

40

24

805

Blackburn

34

""

""

:::

:::

40

24

34

40

31 Cheang Chew, str.

1,213

Kunath

Straits Settlements

259

4

""

41 Feb.

1 Kaisow, str.............

1,934

""

Gray

260

10

42

1 Chow Fa, str.

1,055

""

Phillips

Bangkok

79

5

...

4 20

50 10

7

276

5

280

79

..

Honolulu

45

43

1 Oceanic, str.

2,440

Smith

**

San Francisco

343

+ 447-2852 *

44

"J

1 Empress of India, str....

3,003

Marshall

Victoria, B.C.

24

Vancouver, B.C.

132

2212

54

403

...

161

...

19

2 Frigga, str.

1,295 German

Nagel

Straits Settlements

135

139

46

19

4 Taksang, str.

977 British

Freeman

251

259

:)

""

4 Arratoon Apcar, str.

1,392

Hansen

492

3

546

;;

"9

6 Bisagno, str.

1,499 Italian

Barbaro

132

""

3

4

145

49

19

6 Devawongse, str.

1,057 British

Anderson

Bangkok

90

90

50

""

8 Coloma,

51

$9

8 Manila, str.

814 American 2,711 British

Noyes

Lendon

Portland, Oregon

21

21

...

Straits Settlements

208

208

37

9 Laertes, str....

1,353

Scale

47

47

""

:>

53

""

9 Benlomond, str.

1,752

Thomson

148

"

2

1

157

54

99

9 Tacoma, str.

1,662

Hill

Victoria, B.C.

2

19

Tacoma, U.S A.

67

65

Port Darwin

2

...

Queensland

28

55

"

10 Guthrie, str.

1,494

Helms

19

3

Sydney

17

.77

New Zealand

10

Melbourne

20

...

288*28

56

10 Priok, str.

"

57

19

10 Bylgia,

1,637 German

333

58

"

11 Siam, str...

992 British

Madsen Plogar Nicol

Straits Settlements

113

113

Honolulu

50

2

3

...

55

Straits Settlements

48

59

""

11

Moyune, str.

60

??

11 Chelydra, str.

61

"

11

City of Rio de Janeiro, str.

1,714 1,574 2,275 American

""

De la Parrelle Cass Smith

48

"

::

...

48

48

297

6

3

5

311

""

San Francisco

132

Ι

...

133

...

Carried forward.........................

96,172

Carried forward...

11,253 319

111

61

11,744

*

RETURN of VESSELS bringing CHINESE PASSENGERS to the Port of Victoria, Hongkong,-Continued.

163

No.

DATE ARRIVED.

SHIP'S NAME.

TONS.

NATION- ALITY OF SHIP.

ADULTS. CHILDREN.

MASTER'S NAME.

WHERE FROM.

TOTAL.

M.

F.

M. F.

Brought forward.............. 96,172

Brought forward... 11,253 319 111

61

11,744

233

62 Feb.

13

Rohilla, str.

2,175 British

!

63 64

""

16

Tantalus, str.

2,299

Nantes Jones

Straits Settlements

34

34

143

7

6

156

""

16

Gaelic, str.

2,691

Pearne

San Francisco

86

1

...

87

65

18

Loo Sok, str.

1,020

Benson

"

Bangkok

105

105

66

18 Cyclops. str.

1,363

Asquith

Straits Settlements

110

3

117

67

20 Neckar, str

11

68

20 Taicheong, str.

1,492 German

828

Schmaclder

65

65

Spiresen

Medan, Sumatra

44

***

44

69

11

70

71

"

21 Telamon, str.

22 Lightning. str.

22 Nanking, str.

2,124

1,555 British

12

Jackson

Straits Settlements

44

44

Spence

**

163

3

166

72

"

23 Whampoa, str.

835 Norwegian 1,109 British

Sorensen

25

25

">

Hutchison

Batavia

98

26

124

...

73

"

24 Macduff, str.

1,882

Porter

Straits Settlements

""

54

...

54

...

74

""

27 Carthage, str.

2,454

De Horne

""

211

3

24

75

27 Velocity,

491

Martin

Honolulu'

"9

160 15 11

9

195

76

27 Myrmidon, str.

1,816

Nelson

Straits Settlements

}}

58

58

77 March 1 Kut Sang, str...

1,495

Jackson

""

143

"}

6

2

2

153

Port Darwin

3

...

...

Thursday Island Cooktown

4

...

***

78

2 Chingtu, str.

Townsville

1,459

Innes

2

>>

Sydney

63

16

New Zealand

11

...

Adelaide

4

.

Melbourne

18

••

81

96

28 * ***87888 - MALUot

79

3 Diamond, str.

1,030

>>

80

3 Daphne, str.

19

4 Bormida, str.

1,291 German 1,499 Italian

Thow Voss

Straits Settlements

553

7

"

271

CYO N

3

1

564

4

...

275

Ansaldo

"1

263

...

263

82

""

4 Empress of Japan, str.

3,003 British

Lee

Victoria, B.C.

Vancouver, B.C.

53

47

83

""

4

Mathilde, str.

600 German

Moos

Bangkok

22

22

84

7

Nizam, str. ....

1,615 British

Tillard

Straits Settlements

174

2

177

85

7 Glenogle, str.

2,399

Duke

""

23

་་་

23

86

??

7 Chingwo, str.

1,556

Grattan

"

211

211

19

8 Catherine Apcar, str..

1,734

Olifent

33

595

26

4

10

5

630

>>

8 Devawongse, str.

1,057

Anderson

""

Bangkok

63

89

9 Radnorshire, str.

1,889

Davies

Straits Settlements

19

30

90

11 Tailee, str.

828 German

Calender

Bangkok

40

91

11 China, str.

2,401 British

Honolulu

Seabury

33

San Francisco

101

92

13 Cheang Hye Teng, str,

923

Scott

Straits Settlements

>>

617

226

:::

...

63

30

40

20 22 20

22

150

6

629

93

""

13 Bombay, str.

2,048

Roche

"}

259

259

94

""

13

Energia, str.

2,064

Stokes

>>

""

165

3

2

170

95

"

14

Teresa, str.

"

16

Sachsen, str.

753 2,575 German

Slaker

"

Bangkok

33

Ι

34

Supmer

Straits Settlements

229 17

97

16 Wing Sang, str.

98

"}

16 Oanfa, str.

99

"}

16 Maria Teresa, str.

100

"?

16 Agamemnon, str.

1,517 British 1,970

""

1,922 Austrian

1,491 British

Ste. Croix

709 44

Shaw

11

,,

161

4

Deperis

676

35

65

7614

259

764

166

9

724

Williams

19

217

10

2

229

101

>

17 | Phra Chula Chom Klao, S.

1,012

Morris

??

Bangkok

26

...

26

102

"

18 Nam Yong, str.

103

"

18 Krimhild, str.

984 1,709 German

Hector

Straits Settlements

99

604

9

7

620

Foerck

230

59

...

230

104

20 Gwalior, str.

1,648 British

Speck

173

10

CY

>>

7

193

105

11

20 Phra Nang, str.

1,021

Watton

"}

Bangkok

27

27

Port Darwin

8

4

Cooktown

1

***

106

E

21 Tai Yuan, str....

1,459

Nelson

Brisbane

**

Sydney

18

Melbourne

10

200

46

107

22 Belgic, str.

2.695

19

108

"}

24 Cheang Chew, str.

1,213

Walker Webb

San Francisco

81

Straits Settlements

272

""

15

63 1.3

109

""

25 Victoria, str.

1,992

Panton

""

Tacoma, U.S.A.

20

110

""

25 Canton, str.

2,044

"9

111

25 Ixion, str.

2,299

""

112

27 Arratoon Apcar, str.

1,392

Field Nish Hansen

Straits Settlements

410

8

""

156 18 592

">

""

74

496

∞ ∞0 -H

3

1

85

12

11

310

20

422

4

187

672

...

Dilly, Timor Port Darwin

113

"

28 Catterthun, str.

1,406

Shannon

Cairns

9

42

""

Brisbane

Sydney

18

Melbourne

114

28 Taicheong, str.

828 German

Spiesen

Bangkok

33

33

115

""

29 Chow Fa, str.

1,055 British

Phillips

42

42

116

""

29 Peru, str.

2,540 American

Ward

San Francisco

55

CO

3

1

63

117

""

30 Carmarthenshire, str.

1,776 British

Clarke

Straits Settlements

30

30

118

30 Empress of China, str.

3,003

Archibald

"}

Vancouver, B.C.

49

49

119

April

1 Polyphemus, str.

1,813

120

"

1 Denbighshire, str.

121

"

1 Diamond, str.

122

99

1 Bisagno, str.

123

""

1 Lawang, str.

124

"

4 Chelydra, str.

125

19

126

"

5 Borneo, str.

127

13

5 Priam, str,

128

"}

5 Lombardy, str.

129

5 Sikh, str.

4|Phra Chom Klao, str.

1,663 1,030 1,499 Italian

1,578 German 1,574 British

"

1,012 1,490 Dutch 1,803 British 1,571 1,736

Barbaro Binzer

Cass Fowler

11

Lee Vyvyan Thow

Straits Settlements

75

75

30

30

651

18

"

277

11

4

"

400 30

12

""

""

676

15

7322

685

295

450

696

Bangkok

70

70

Thermissen

40

40

Thompson Cole

Straits Settlements

210

4

93

NN

2

216

2

""

99

"

Rowley

""

""

30

....

30

Carried forward..

206,270

Carried forward......

23,600 763

264

149

24,776

i

164

RETURN of VESSELS bringing CHINESE PASSENGERS to the Port of Victoria, Hongkong,-Continued.

ADULTS. CHILDREN.

No.

DATE ARRIVED.

SHIP'S NAME.

TONS.

NATION- ALITY OF SHIP.

MASTER'S NAME.

WHERE FROM.

TOTAL.

M.

F

M. F.

Brought forward...... 206,270

Brought forward... 23,600| 763

261 149 24,776

Port Darwin

41

Cooktown

2

Townsville

6

130 April

5❘ Tsinan, str.

1,460 British

Ramsay

New Zealand

3

33223

63

Sydney

29!

Melbourne

19

131 132

6 Glenartney, str.

1,944

McGregor

Straits Settlements

130

21

151

7 Niobe, str.

1,440 German

120

Pfaff

133

8

Oceanic, str.

2,440 British

Smith

San Francisco

96

31

123

1

98

134

10 Devawongse, str.

1,057

Anderson

Bangkok

101

101

135

10 Lightning, str.

2,124

Spence

Straits Settlements

273 36

309

136

10

Orestes, str.....

1,279

Rawlings

145

...

145

13

"J

137

35

11

Benvenue, str.

1,468

Thomson

141 3

GN

2

146

>>

138

12

Maria Valerie, str.

2,644 Austrian

Mitis

315

315

17

139

12

Loo Sok, str.

1,020 British

Benson

Bangkok

45

45

"}

140

??

13

Oldenburg, str.

3,405 German

Gathemann

Straits Settlements

125

30

141

142

19

14

Cheáng Hock Kian, str.

956 British

512

Dinsdale

"?

17

Ningchow, str.

1,735

Allen

207

693

6

165

+

4

2

527

210

·

19

Port Darwin

1

Cooktown

1

Cairns

143

"

17 Menmuir, str.

1,287

""

Craig

Townsville

2

42

Sydney

20

New Zealand

5

Melbourne

12

144

17

Kut Sang, str.

1,495

Jackson

Straits Settlements

315

28

343

""

145

18 Titan, str.

1,525

Brown

187

12

200

39

146

18 | Phra Chula Chom Klao, S.

1,012

Morris

Bangkok

35

35

+

19

147

19 City of Rio de Janeiro, str.

2,275. American

Smith

San Francisco

59

59

"J

148

""

19 Kong Beng, str.

862 British

Jackson

Straits Settlements

31

34

122

149

19 Thibet, str.

1,665

Denny

122

>

""

150

13

19 Namyong, str...

984

Hector

366 22

5

397

"

151

21

Glengarry, str.

1,925

""

Selly

180

4

3

187

27

17

152

21

Catherine Apcar, str.

1,734

Olifent

271

30

11

2

314

""

33

153

""

22

Pathan, str........

1,762

Wright

401

""

:

40

154

22

Phra Nang, str.

1,021

Watton

Bangkok

42

42

""

"

155

22

Bellona, str.

1,722 German

Jaeger

Straits Settlements

72

72

"

156

"

24

Ping Suey, str,

1,982 British

Jaques

131

131

""

157

24 Ancona, str..

1,888

Mudie

44

44

"J

"1

99

158

""

25 Empress of India, str.

3,003

Marshall

Vancouver, B.C.

114

3

2

123

"1

159

25 Breconshire, str.

1,648

Parsons

Straits Settlements

101

101

وو

160

26 Cheang Chew, str.

1,213

Webb

439 23

10

481

"

15

161

27 Lok Sang, str.

979

Moncur

180

10

200

"

162

29 Wing Sang, str.

1,517

""

""

163

29 Taichiów, str.

862

Ste. Croix Unsworth

399 21

17

446

59

Bangkok

51

51

23

Honolulu

98

164 May

1 Gaelic, str.

2,691

Pearne

99

San Francisco

146

10

NO

2

3

5

267

3

Port Darwin

3

Thursday Island

1

Townsville

165

"

1 | Changsha, str................

1,463

Williams

Brisbane

12

66

Wellington, N.Z.

16

Sydney

17

Melbourne

11

166

99

1 Holyrood, str.

1,777

Rethie

Straits Settlements

149

149

167

"

1 Taicheong, str.

828 German

Spiesen

Medan, Sumatra

341

34

168

2 Chow Fa, str.

1,055 British

Phillips

Bangkok

150

150

169

2 Ajax, str.

1,477

Heath

Straits Settlements

250

250

"

170

"

3 Cheang Hye Teng, str.

923

Scott

330

7

11

171

3 Diamond, str.

1,030

Snow

417

23

57

345

7

453

172

3 Bormida, str.

1,499 Italian

Ansaldo

136

136

173

4 Glenogle, str.

2,399 British

Duke

312

10

326.

1

Port Darwin

Thursday Island

Cooktown

174

5 Airlie, str.

1,492

Ellis

33

Townsville

Brisbane

Sydney

17

175

5 Bengloe, str.

1,183

>>

176

6 Glenfalloch, str.

177

6 Donar, str.

178

8 City of Peking, str.

179

9 Arratoon Apcar, str:

180

9 Pakling, str.

181

وو

9 Mongkut, str.

99

??

182

9 Preussen, str.

99

183

9 Electra, str..

1,434 命多 1,015 German 3,129 American 1,392 British 1,911

859

2,573 German 1,162

Sarchet Darke

Searle

Long Stonham Hagemann

Straits Settlements

107

3

110

75

75

Grundmann

Bangkok

28

28

San Francisco

37

37

Hansen

Straits Settlements

258

54

323

70

70

""

Bangkok

35

35

Straits Settlements

116

30

Hildebrandt

150

12

༠༠ ི:

10

8

164

165

"

""

184

11 Devawongse, str.

1,057 British

Anderson

Bangkok

103

103

19

185

13 Namyong, str........

984

Hector

Straits Settlements

442

6.

8

6

462

"

186

15 Ulysses, str....................................

2,299

17

Lapage

240

7

247

"

187

15 Cheang Hock Kian, str....

188

15 Loo Sok, str.

956 1,020

Dinsdale

23

11

435

5

440

"

Benson

Bangkok

41

41

:

>>

189

15 Thisbe, str.

190

""

16 Empress of Japan, str.

191

16 China, str.

*2,401

""

192

16 Nanshan, str.

805

1,789 Austrian 3,003 British

Lee

Seabury

Blackburn

Costanzo

Straits Settlements

258

6

Vancouver, B.C.

58

1

San Francisco

217

6

413

4

6

274

60

1

227

Bangkok

26

26

وز

22

193

""

17 Glamorganshire, str.

1,843

Jackson

Straits Settlements

140

142

19

194

17 | Java, str.

2,632

Tilard

183

183

>>

""

19

195

17 Omega,

480

Brown

Callao, Peru.

60

60

19

19

196

18 | Mogul, str.

1,627

Golding

Tacoma, U.S.A.

100

100

"

Carried forward.

313,992

Carried forward...........

34,397 1,207

390

225

36,219

RETURN of VESSELS bringing CHINESE PASSENGERS to the Port of Victoria, Hongkong,-Continued.

CHILDREN.

105

No.

DATE ARRIVED.

SHIP'S NAME.

TONS.

NATION- ALITY OF SHIP.

ADULTS.

MASTER'S NAME.

WHERE FROM.

TOTAL.

M.

F.

M. F.

Brought forward...... 313,992

.197 | May. 18 | Phra Chula Chom Klao, s.

1,012 British

Morris

Brought forward.....| 34,397] 1,207 Bangkok

390 225 36,219

28

28

198

19

18 Gerda, str.

2,111 German

Ehlers

Straits Settlements

190

190

199

""

20 Chelydra, str.

1,574 British

Cass

538

6

14

9

567

19

200

??

23 Mathilde, str.

600 German

Moos

Bangkok

83

201

""

23

Rohilla, str......................

2,175 British

Nantes

Straits Settlements

27

::

83

27

202

99

23

Ardgay, str..

1,081

Thom

275

>>

"

2

203

"

23

Saint Asaph, str.

1,199

Wood

423

23

10

69

298

456

**

"

201

1:

24

Diomed, str.

1,432

Dickens

150

150

وو

205

>"

24 Argyll, str.

1,886

Williamson

96

96

""

206

39

27 Prometheus, str.

1,492

Hannah

96

7

107

""

207

27 Lightning, str.

2,124

Spence

708

59

22

789

??

208

27 Bisagno, str.

1,499 Italian

Barbaro

66

66

"

209

27

Siam, str.

992. British

Nicol

Bangkok"

29

29

210

29

Tai Yick, str.

903 German

Emke

47

47

211

30

Oopack, str.......

1,730 British

Davies

Straits Settlements

30

30

212

31 Glenshiel, str.

213

31 Benlawers, str.

214

وو

31

Cheang Chew, str.

2,240 1,484 1,215

Jones

370

6

-7

4

1

381

""

11

"

Webster Webb

105

105

513 36

26

575

""

215

11

31

Decima, str.

965 German

Christensen

Bangkok

421

42

...

216

31

China, str.

1,113

217 June

I

Chow Fa, str.

1,155 British

Voss Phillips

66

66

"

""

139

139

218 219

"

1

Glucksburg, str.

918 German

Thomsen

Straits Settlements

143 3

146

...

""

2

Diamond, str.

1,030 | British

Snow

485 23

11

519

220

19

3

Kut Sang, str...

1,495

Bowker

241 10

8

10

269

99

221

3

Oceana, str.

1,628 German

Behrens

160

160

222

5 Dardanus, str...

1,507 British

Purdy

210

12

7

1

230

223

17

5 Victoria, str.

1,992

Panton

Tacoma, U.S.A.

294

294

224

"

6 Empress of China, str.

3,003

Archibald

Vancouver, B.C.

276

276

225

6 Devawongse, str.

1,057

Anderson

Bangkok

146

.146

226

6 Aden, str..

2,517

Wibmer

Straits Settlements

175

176

227

94

6 Peru, str.

2,540 | American

Ward

San Francisco

60

60

Port Darwin

11

Thursday Island

Townsville

9

228

=

""

6 Guthrie, str.

1,494 | British

Helms

Brisbane

101

Sydney

46

New Zealand

14

Melbourne

10

229 230

??

7 Tai Cheong, str.

"}

7 Lok Sang, str.......

828 German 979 British

Spiesen

Bangkok

105

Moncur

Straits Settlements

150

105

150

Port Darwin

Cooktown

231

8 Chingtu, str.

1,459

Innes

Townsville

81

...

Brisbane

Melbourne

68

232

??

9 Vindobona, str.

2,688 Austrian

Mersa

Straits Settlements

490

7

7

233

10 Mongkut, str.

859 British

Stonham

Bangkok

63

234

12 Pembrokeshire, str.

1,717

Gedye

Straits Settlements

30

235

12 Teucer, str.

1,803

Riley

160

".

236

12 Catherine Apcar, str....

1,734

Olifent

464

28

13

10

""

New Zealand

237

11

12 Tai Yuan, str..................

1,459

Nelson

"

Sydney

8

Melbourné

15

I

238

"

13 Tak Sang, str..................

977

Smith

Straits Settlements

54

508

63

30

164

5

510

28

54

:

239

""

14 Peninsular, str.

2,712

Loggin

34

34

240

"

14 Nam Yong, str.

984

Hector

677

47 12

12

""

241

19

14 Loo Sok, str.

1,020

Benson

27

Bangkok

210

10

242

"

15 Oceanic, str.

2,440

Smith

San Francisco

112

6

44

26

""

243

"

16 | Phra Chula Chom Klao, s.

1,012

Morris

??

Bangkok

50

244

"

16 Palamed, str.

1,489

Jackson

Straits Settlements

92

??

245

??

17 Wing Sang, str.

1,517

Ste. Croix

318 15

17

""

"

246

.་

17 Cheang Hock Kian, str....

956

12

247

19 Gwalior, str.

1,648

"

Dinsdale Speck

490

10

*

79!

7

248

"

19 Salatiga. str.

1,640 German

Christiansen

217

10 1 1, 10

·426

15

>

249

20 Ghazee, str..

1,764 British

Scotland

196

""

250

22 Telemachus, str..

1,397

Barwise

184

""

251

22 Phra Nang, str.

11

1,021

Watton

Bangkok

137

252

"

23 Arratoon Apcar, str.

1,392

Hansen

Straits Settlements ·

457

52

co

253

23 Kintuck, str.

2,312

Kemp

161

"J

254

"}

24 Nierstein, str.

731 German

Pankow

Bangkok

66

255

??

26 | Phra Chom Klao, str.

1,012 British

Fowler

70

"

256

33

26 City of Rio de Janeiro, str.

2,275 American

Smith

San Francisco

58

257

27 Palinurus, str................

"}

1,536 British

Jackson

Straits Settlements

183

Victoria, B.C.

23

258

"

27 Empress of India, str.............

3,003

Marshall

748

230

122

-50

92 365

505

89 237

200

184

137

8

517

170

66

70

62

183

77

Vancouver, B.C.

51

282

Dilly, Timor

Port Darwin

¿

Thursday Island

259

19

28 Catterthun, str.

1,406

Shannon

Cooktown

58

""

Townsville

Brisbane

Sydney

260

28 Glengyle, str.

261

29 Bormida, str.

262

29 Diamond, str.

263 July

1 Malwa, str.

264

39

265

1 Pyrrhus, str.

266

29

3 Frigga, str.

267

"9

3 Mongkut, str.

2,244

1,499 Italian 1,030 British

Gasson Ansaldo

Straits Settlements

Snow

33 269 21 164 595 40

督導

5

295

164

...

...

10

650

وو

1,694

Blackburn

31

31

1 Cheang Hye Teng, str.

923 2,299

Scott

194

198

>>

39

Batt

165

165

1,295 German

859 British

Voltmer

Stonham

Bangkok

152 11

58

5

7

175

58

...

Carried forward.....

422,765

Carried forward.....

47,882 1,686

598

325

50,491

166

RETURN of VESSELS bringing CHINESE PASSENGERS to the Port of Victoria, Hongkong,—Continued.

CHILDREN.

No.

DATE ARRIVED.

SHIP'S NAME.

TONS.

NATION- ALITY OF SHIP.

ADULTS.

MASTER'S NAME.

WHERE FROM.

TOTAL.

M.

F.

M. F.

Brought forward......| 422,765

Brought forward... 47,882 1,686

598 325 50,491

268 July 269 270

4 Devawongse, str.

""

4

City of New York, str.

1,057 British 1,964 American

Anderson

Bangkok

202

202

19

4 Taicheong, str.

271

19

4 Chelydra, str.

272

"J

5 Cheang Chew, str.

1,213

828 German 1,574 | British

"

Johnston Duhme Cass

San Francisco

19 4

Medan, Sumatra

44

:::

23

44

***

Straits Settlements

510

6

518

Webb

670

""

273

5 China, str.

1,113 German

Voss

Bangkok

45

274

19

7 Braunschweig, str.................

1,971

Kohlenbeck

Straits Settlements

303

22:20

...

10

10

710

45

27

12

5

847

99

275

19

8 Taichiow, str.

862 British

Unsworth

Bangkok

301

30

276

39

8

Siam, str.....

992

Nicol

44

""

29

277

"

10

Kong Beng, str.

862

Jackson

A

25

"}

""

278

10 Gaelic, str.

2,691

Pearne

99

San Francisco

:::

44

25

107

279

10 Loo Sok, str.

1,020

Benson

"

Bangkok

210

NO

110

40 28

22

300

Port Darwin

Cooktown

3 1

...

Townsville

280

""

12 Tsinan, str.

1,460

Ramsay

...

67

Brisbane

Sydney

40

...

Melbourne

17

281

"

12 Glucksburg, str.

282

""

12 | Achilles, str.

918 German 1,488 British

Thomsen

Bangkok

46

46

Bartlett

Straits Settlements

33

33

283

"J

12 | Gisela, str.

284

"}

12 Independent, str.

285

""

13 Priok, str.

2,643 Austrian

871 German 1,637

Kossovich

429

429

17

Schafer

Mauritius

134

145

19

Madsen

Straits Settlements

229

CK H

4

1

237

286

"

13 Nestor, str.

1,269 British

Pottinger

33

33

""

287

"

13 | Phra Chula Chom Klao, 8.

1,012

Morris

Bangkok

65

65

288

289

14 Keemun, str.

14 Lightning, str.

1,985

Castle

Straits Settlements

63

JJ

2,124

19

Spence

454

49

"

290

""

15 Manila, str.

2,616

Lendon

25

99

35

291

15

39

Surat, str. ......

1,677

Hill

36

1→ 10

64

6

1

510

29

2

1

44

"

292

19

15 Monmouthshire, str.

1,871

293

""

15 Namyong, str......

984

Cuming Hector

30

"

:

30

608

21

294

27

295

29

296

"

18 Cheang Hock Kian, str....

18 City of Peking, str.

18 Empress of Japan, str.

3,003 British

956

Dinsdale

284

18

RO 20

6

3

638

2

307

"

3,129 American

Searle

San Francisco

33

34

Monsarrat

Vancouver, B.C.

97

1

98

297

""

19 | Phra Chom Klao, str.

1,012

Fowler

"

Bangkok

30

30

...

...

298

""

19 Nanshan, str.

805

Blackburn

Straits Settlements

25

25

**

299

"9

21 Namkiang, str.

999

Witte

192 8

204

"}

...

300

""

21 Kut Sang, str.

1,495

Bowker

625 50

30

20

99

301

24 Glenearn, str.

1,410

11

302

"7

24 Catherine Apcar, str..

1,734

"J

303

""

24 Telamon, str.

1,555

59

301

"J

24 Tai Yick, str.

305

33

25

Mongkut, str.

903 German 859 British

Murray Olifent Jackson Emke

297

13

""

403

45

9

14

074

725

325

471

39

290

10

""

...

800

Bangkok

81

81

Stonham

141

...

...

A

141

306

26

19

Nizam, str.

307

27

""

Irene, str...........................................

308

27 Decima, str..

309

99

27

China, str.

310

31 China, str.

311

"

31 Strathleven, str.

"J

2,207 German

31

965 2,401 British

1,113 German

1,615

Cole

Straits Settlements

811

11

Schüder

245

ότι το

3

7

102

5

256

Christensen

Bangkok"

200

...

200

Honolulu

110

8

7

6

Seabury

272

San Francisco

134

6

Voss

Bangkok

160

...

160

1,588 British

Cormack

Straits Settlements

112

112

...

...

312

??

31 Tantalus, str.

2,299

Jones

233

18

4

255

313

"1

31 Bombay, str.

2,048

Sleeman

190

10

314

91

31 | Wing Sang, str.

1,517

Ste. Croix

270

40

20

10

315 Aug.

1 | Bisagno, str.

1,499 Italian

De Negri

172 10

C

KOM

5

211

340

3

191

316

1 Kong Beng, str. ..................................

862 British

Jackson

Bangkok

30

...

...

30

Port Darwin

Cooktown

...

Townsville

317

""

1 Changsha, str.

1,463

Williams

...

34

"

Brisbane

Sydney

10

...

Melbourne

10

}

318

2 Devawongse, str.

1,057

Anderson

11

Bangkok

210

25

10

319

"

2 Oldenburg, str.

320

دو

3 Loo Sok, str.

3,405 German 1,020 British

Garthemann

Straits Settlements

200

23

ON

2

Benson

Bangkok

195

321

4 Chow Fa, str.

1,055

Phillips

75

19

322

"

5 Cheang Chew, str.

1,213

11

323

29

5 Cyclops, str.

1,363

"

324

""

8 Moray, str.

1,411

"

325

""

8 Belgic, str.

2,695

Webb Asquith Thomson Walker

Straits Settlements

884

w::

201

*

267

13

San Francisco

171

6734

7

252

5

230

195

75

36

14

9

943

5

215

14

10

301

184

10

::

7204

326

""

8 Empress of China, str. ...

3,003

Archibald

Victoria, B.C.

14

"

Vancouver, B.C.

82

66

2

327

"

8 | Phra Chala Chom Klao, 8.

1,012

Morris

"

Bangkok

330

...

330

Port Darwin

4

...

•*.

...

Cairns

4

..

...

328

9 Menmuir, str.

1,287

59

Craig

Townsville

2

...

...

38

Brisbane

1

***

Sydney

27

329

11 Arratoon Apcar, str.

1,392

Hansen

Straits Settlements

507

28

...

10

...

6

551

99

330

11 Glucksburg, str.

918 German

Thomsen

69

$9

...

69

331

"

11 Aglaia, str.

1,556

Petersen

310

36

19

332

"

14 Glenfruin, str.

1,892 British

Norman

239

**

4

10

2

...

9

365

19

...

245

333

"

14 Orion, str.

1,760 Austrian

Orlando

223

21

...

14.

223

334

19

14 Myrmidon, str.

1,816 British

Nelson

193 18

37

335

99

16 Saint Asaph, str.

1,199

Wood

581 30 15

CA IQ

6

2

219

14

640

336

"

16

Peru, str.

2,540 American

Friele

San Francisco

82 7

1

90

337

"

19 Phra Nang, str.

1,021 British

Watton

Bangkok

45

45

338

"

19 Chelydra, str.

1,574

Cass

Straits Settlements

697

70

45

30

842

12

339

"

21

Victoria, str.

340

99

21

Oanfa, str.

1,992 1,970

Panton

Tacoma, U.S.A.

34

2

36

+

>>

Shaw

Straits Settlements

150

...

::

150

"

341

21 Cheang Hock Kian, str.

956

Dinsdale

99

"

585 13

1

599

Carried forward.......................] 538,011

Carried forward..

63,178 2,443

923 541

67,085

X

"

1

x

RETURN of VESSELS bringing CHINESE PASSENGERS to the Port of Victoria, Hongkong,—Continued.

ADULTS. CHILDREN.

167

NC.

DATE ARRIVED.

SHIP'S NAME.

TONS.

NATION- ALITY OF SHIP.

MASTER'S NAME.

WHERE FROM.

TOTAL.

M. F. M. F.

Brought forward......] 538,011

Brought forward...] 63,178| 2,443 923 541 67,085

342 Aug. 21

Daphne, str,

1,291 German

343

"

23 Agamemnon, str.

1,491 British

}

344

23

Canton, str.

2,044

Voss Williams Field

Straits Settlements

50

:

200

200

"

225

3

1

??

""

"

!

345

23

Kong Beng, str..

862

Jackson

""

Bangkok

30

8888888

50

234

30

Port Darwin

6

...

K

Townsville

2

346

"

25 Airlie, str.

1,492

Ellis

Sydney

Melbourne

14

333333

Tasmania

1

Adelaide

347 348

""

26

Kriemhild, str.

1,709 German

28

Rosetta, str..............

2,039 British

"?

$49

""

28

Bormida, str.

1,499 Italian

Fonck Gadd Ansaldo

Straits Settlements

210

:

210

37

37

**

248 10

4

6

268

"1

350

28 Oceanic, str.

2,440 British

Smith

(Honolulu

361

*203

"

> San Francisco

154

8

3

2

351

352

353

28 Decima, str.

29 Laertes, str.................

965 German 1,351 British

Christiansen

Bangkok

84

84

""

Rawlings

Straits Settlements

323

7

7

3

340

*

99

A

30 Empress of India, str..

3,003

Marshall

Victoria, B.C.

21

""

Vancouver. B.C.

110

} 131

354 Sept.

1 Formosa, str.

2,616

""

355

"

1

Lightning, str.

2,124

""

Bishop Spence

Straits Settlements

63

63

727

56

9

3

795

"

356

99

1

Gera, str.

3,406 German

357

2

Ixion, str.

2,299 British

358

2 Glenavon, str...

1,912

29

Schukmann

Nish

Jacobs

113

113

19

301

30

99

260

99

359

99

4

Moyune, str.

1,714

De la Parrelle

146

74

13

11

291

150

29

"

360

39

4

Nestor, str.

1,269

19

Pottinger

43

43

"

361

362

"

5

Kut Sang, str...

1,495

Bowker

333

17

3

5

358

15

"

5

Loo Sok, str.

1,020

Benson

Bangkok

35

35

...

??

363

"

7

City of Rio de Janeiro, str.

2,275 American

Smith

San Francisco

111

111

364

"

7 Namyong, str..

984 British

Hector

Straits Settlements

458

15

..

2

481

Dilly, Timor

18

Port Darwin

365

11

8 Guthrie, str.

1,494

Helms

Thursday Island

55

"

Townsville

Sydney

17

New Zealand

11

366

367

99

9 Lawang, str.

+

11

Rohilla, str........

1,578 German 2,175 British

Binzer

Straits Settlements

194

194

...

Nantes

32

32

"

368

"

11

Cheang Chew, str.

369

"1

12

Macduff, str.

1,213 1,882

Webb

694

24

10

**728

19

Porter

81

81

""

39

370

"

12

Marquis Bacquehem, str..

2,710 Austrian

Walluschnig

266

17

10

"9

7

300

371

12 Borneo, str.

1,490 Dutch

Theunissen

Bangkok

31

31

Port Darwin

Thursday Island

1

Cooktown

2

372

17

12 Tai Yuan, str....................................

1,459 British

Nelson

Townsville

12

52

***

Brisbane

1

...

C

Sydney

14

...

Melbourne

16

373

19

13

City of New York, str.

374

19

13 Shanghai, str.

1,964 American 2,044 | British

Johnston

San Francisco

24

Street

Straits Settlements

250

26

3

4

3

en as

3

32

263

375

"1

14 Titan, str.

1,525

Brown

93

93

"

376

14 Orestes. str.

1,279

Harvey

97

2

"}

...

99

377

"

14 | Phra Chom Klao, str.

1,012

Fowler

Bangkok

96

103 96

378

"

15 Catherine Apcar, str.

1,734

Olifent

Straits Settlements

309 29

5

""

379

""

18 Gaelic, str.

2,691

Pearne

San Francisco

250

13

*1

880

#

19 Empress of Japan, str.

3,003

Lee

Vancouver, B.C.

180

132

7

73

350

273

182

...

381

21 | Donar, str.

1,015 German

11

382

"

21 Devawongse, str.

1,057 British

Grundmann

Anderson

Bangkok

72

72

57

57

"

883

21 | Tacoma, str.

1,662

Hill

Tacoma, U.S.A.

28

28

...

59

384

22 Denbighshire, str.

1,663

Davies

Straits Settlements

29

29

385

22 Wing Sang, str.

1,517

Ste. Croix

643

76 33

12

19

386

22 Bellona, str.............

1,722 German

Jager

4711

20

6

19

387

23 Saint Asaph, str.

1,199 British

Wood

638

24

388

25 Diamond, str.

1,030

389

19

25 Cheang Hock Kian, str....

956

99

19

390

13

25 Pakling, str.

1,911

Ellis Dinsdale Long

447

22

15

5841 9

""

340

10

99

391

26 Preussen, str.

??

392

11

26 City of Peking, str.

393

+9

28 Polyphemus, str.

395

2 Protos, str.

396

""

397

""

398

""

394 October 2| Arratoon Apcar, str.

" 4 Loo Sok, str.

4 Mongkut, str.

4 Giava, str.

2,977 German

3,129 American 1,813 British 1,392

1,150 German

Hansen Johannsen Benson

Hagemann

130

15

23 6 1

49

764

500

674

489

597

360

162

"

Searle Scale

San Francisco

64

65

Straits Settlements

398

15

14

433

263

15

2

1

281

"

19

Bangkok

30

30

1,020 British

859

47

47

""

Stonham

401

40

1,818 Italian

Kusini

Straits Settlements

125

125

...

399

>>

Java, str. .........................

2,632 | British

Tillard

350

350

400

"

6 Clyde, str.

2,198

Parfitt

دو

و,

24

24

...

401

""

6 Niobe, str,

1,440 German

Pfaff

202

10

"

402

99

403

Chelydra, str. China, str.

1,574 British

Cass

487

15

O LO

Go to

8

5

225

6

509

2,401

Ward

""

San Francisco Port Darwin

439

438

*

...

13

...

Cairns

12

Townsville

6

...

...

404

"

Catterthun, str.

1,406

Shannon

"}}

Brisbane

Sydney

8

80

10

Melbourne

14

Adelaide

1

New Zealand

16

Carried forward...... 648,135

Carried forward..............

75,950 2,899 | 1,122

648 80,619

168

RETURN of VESSELS bringing CHINESE PASSENGERS to the Port of Victoria, Hongkong,-Continued.

No.

DATE ARRIVED.

SHIP'S NAME.

TONS.

NATION- ALITY OF SHIP.

ADULTS. CHILDREN.

MASTER'S NAME.

WHERE FROM.

TOTAL.

M. F. M. F

Brought forward........ 648,135

Brought forward... 75,950 2,899 1,122 648 Cooktown

80,619

2

***

Townsville

2

405 October 6 | Tṣinan, str.

1,460 British

Ramsey

Brisbane

2

...

34

Sydney

11

...

Melbourne

17

***

...

406 407

39

7| Phra Chula Chom Klao, S.

1,012

Morris

Bangkok

40

...

***

"}

7 Priam, str.

1,803

""

Thompson

Straits Settlements

93

408

39

9 Namyong, str.......

989

""

409

"J

10 Glenartney, str.

1,944

"3

Hector McGregor

740

33

29

105

4

LO CO

4

782

88

40 93

3

112

410

11 Empress of Chiņa, str.

3,003

Archibald

Victoria, B.C.

481

...

19

Vancouver, B.C.

202

4

263

411

11 Mogul, str.

1,827

Golding

Tacoma, U.S.A.

22

...

22

412

11 Ningchow, str.

1,735

Grattan

Straits Settlements

112

112

19

413

15

12 Maria Valerie, str..

2,644 Austrian

Costanzo

495 24 10

414

19

16

Belgic, str.

2,695 British

Walker

San Francisco

228

415

19

16

Velocity,

491

Martin

Honolulu

72

444

7

536

1

233

3

1

80

""

416

13

16

Taicheong, str.

828 German

Duhne

Bangkok

66

66

417

19

17 Cheangchew, str.

1,213 British

Webb

Straits Settlements

853 38 18

418

19

18

Lightning, str.

2,124

"9

Spence

725

65

19.

419

420

421

"}

20

Gerda, str.

2,111 German

Ehlers

209

299

00 00

913

8

3

801

216

""

19

20

Kong Beng, str.

862 British

Jackson

Bangkok

41

...

41

""

21

Radnorshire, str.

1,889

Davies

Straits Settlements

157

157

""

422

23 Oolong, str.

2,308

Allen

127

127

29

"

423 424

99

23 Decima, str.

965 German

Christiansen

Bangkok

82

82

...

99

24 Sutlej, str.

2,103 British

Worcester

Straits Settlements

32

32

Thursday Island

Cooktown

Townsville

425

25 Changsha, str..........

1,463

Brisbane

Williams

50

Auckland

1

...

Adelaide

1

Sydney

25

Melbourne

12

426

17

25 Peru, str.

2,540 American

Firele

San Francisco

185

185

427

"?

25

Benledi, str.

1,481 British

Farquhar

Straits Settlements

190

190

428

19

26

Bayern, str.

3.435 German

429

""

26

Cheang Hock Kian, str....

956 British

Schmolder

Dinsdale

3021

302

""

457

17

7

485

"}

430

19

26

Ajax, str.

1,477

Barr

115

...

115

99

""

431

27

Teheran, str.

1,684

Cole

137

6

5

1

149

"

432

27 Ulysses, str................

2,299

433

??

434

"}

28 Diamond, str.

28 Devawongse, str.

1,030

Lapage Ellis

""

132 2

134

19

300 10

6

4

320

1,057

Anderson

Bangkok

78

78

435

"

28

Tailee, str.

828 | German

Calender

Medan, Sumatra

427

...

1

...

428

436

""

30 Kut Sang, str............ .............

1,495 British

Bowker

Straits Settlements

525

22

13

10

570

437

"

31

Aden, str....

2,517

Wibmer

99

318

438 Nov.

1 Phra Chula Chom Klao, 8.

1,012

Morris

Bangkok

25

439

"7

3 Victoria, str.

1,992

Panton

Tacoma, U.S.A.

72

440

59

3

Stura, str.

1,228 Italian

Serrati

Straits Settlements

160

441

""

3 Catherine Apcar, str...

1,734 British

Olifent

348

27

::

2∞

27

::

318

25

3

10

SO LO LO

77

173

385

442

3

99

Loo Sok, str.

1,020

Benson

Bangkok

26

26

443

""

6 Palamed, str.

1,489

Jackson

Straits Settlements

801

*

80

444

""

6 Oceana, str..

1,628 German

Behrens

183

183

...

19

445

6 | Phra Chom Klao, str.....

1,012 British

Fowler

Bangkok

32

446

""

7 Glengarry, str.

1,925

Selby

Straits Settlements

270

10

t-

7

32 290

447

"

8 China, str.

1,113 German

Voss

Bangkok

35

· 35

Honolulu

72

448

"3

8 Oceanic, str.

2,440 British

Smith

445

San Francisco

373

...

449

"

8 Empress of India, str.

3,003

Marshall

Victoria, B.C.

378

***

425

Vancouver, B.C.

47

450

451

452

39

10 Nam Yong, str. ..........................

11 Chow Fa, str. .................................. 13 Vindobona, str.

984

Hector

Straits Settlements

663

20

4

3

690

1,055

Phillips

Bangkok

50

...

50

2,688 Austrian

Mersa

Straits Settlements

746 17

7

4

774

453

13 City of Rio de Janeiro, str.

2,275 American

Smith

San Francisco

274

7

1

282

Port Darwin

Thursday Island

454

n

15 Menmuir, str.

1,287 | British

Craig

Cooktown

7

12

54

Townsville

Sydney

14

New Zealand

21

...

...

455

""

15 Oopack, str.......................................

1,730

Davies

Straits Settlements

140

140

:

***

...

""

456

15 Rio, str.

1,109 German

457

99.

17 Mongkut, str.

859 British

458

19

18

Wing Sang, str.

1,517

459

11

18 Japan, str.

2,796

Davidson Stonham Ste. Croix Hall

422

10

5

4

ลง

2

433

"

Bangkok

26

26

...

Straits Settlements

497

52 10 12

571

386

8

5

399

""

460

21

99

Benvenue, str..............................

1,468

461

"?

21 Siam, str......

992

Thomson Messer

193

4

2

1

200

39

""

Bangkok

40

40

...

462

463

""

22 Dardanus, str..................................

23 Arratoon Apcar, str.

...

1,507

""

464

"

23 Salatiga, str.

465

""

25 Oldenburg, str.

1,392 1,640 German 3,405

Purdy Hansen

Straits Settlements

357

...

357

...

344

17

""

Christiansen

205

8

Gathemann

383

43 22

":

Dilly, Timor

39

35 10 23 10

364

10

304

221

458

Port Darwin

18

Thursday Island

3

Cairns

16

1

...

Cooktown

• •

Townsville

18

466

28 Airlie, str.

1,492 British

Ellis

188

Rockhampton

...

Brisbane

...

New Zealand

12

Sydney

33

Melbourne

16

2

1

Adelaide

4

...

Carried forward....... 752,195

Carried forward..

| 90,704 3,363 | 1,298

743

96,108

RETURN of VESSELS bringing CHINESE PASSENGERS to the Port of Victoria, Honghong,—Continued.

169

No.

DATE ARRIVED.

SHIP'S NAME.

TONS.

NATION- ALITY OF SHIP.

ADULTS.

CHILDREN.

MASTER'S NAME.

WHERE FROM.

TOTAL.

M. F.

M. F.

Brought forward, ....

752,195

Brought forward..... 90,704 3,363 1,298

743

96,108

467 Nov.

29

Devawongse, str.

1,057 British

Curtis

Bangkok

250

250

468

""

29

Gaelic, str.

2,691

""

469

29

Diamond, str.

1,030

Pearne Ellis

San Francisco

492 13

3

Straits Settlements

438 4

6

4

AN

2

510

452

470

30

Cheang Hock Kian, str..

956

Kunath

555

555

29

471 Dec.

1 Glenogle, str.

2,399

Duke

292

t-

6

4

309

"

>:

472

""

1 Afghan, str.

1,439

Burton

132

132

""

"

...

473

""

1 Chelydra, str.

1,574

Cass

605 13

619

12

22

474

"

1 Lothair,

794 Italian

Cafranga

Callao, Peru

95

7

11

7

120

475

""

4

Giava, str.

1,818

Susini

Straits Settlements

72

72

>>

476

4 Rohilla, str................

2,175 British

Nantes

28

::

28

"

...

477

""

4 Telemachus, str.

1,397

Barwise

344

??

99

478

"

5 Malacca, str.

2,616

Case

220

~~

3

7

NO

6

357

2

1

230

""

479

5 Cassius, str................

1,504 German

Unruh

97

97

"

...

480

5

Chow Fa, str.

1,055 British

Phillips

Bangkok

70

70

481

6

City of Peking, str.

3,129 American

Searle

San Francisco

400

400

482

6

Loo Sok, str.

1,020 British

Benson

Bangkok

46

46

483

""

6 Tacoma, str.

1,662

Hill

""

Tacoma, U.S.A.

88

1

93

484

6 Empress of Japan, str.

3,003

Lee

Victoria, B.C.

47

486

"

Vancouver, B.C.

436

2

Cooktown

7

Townsville

11

485

486

"1

7 Tai Yuan, str..

1,459

Tilburn

""

Sydney

341

888

68

---

Melbourne

16

...

""

9

Kintuck, str.

2,312

""

Kemp

Straits Settlements

1201

120

...

487

"

9

Lightning, str.

2,124

""

Spence

442

27

488

""

11

Manila, str.

2,711

Lendon

290

12

2

+3

473

4

296

""

489

11

Carmarthenshire, str.

وو

1,776

"

Vyvyan

30

30

"

490

"}

13

Palinurus, str.

1,536

""

Jackson

46

""

::

46

491

"

15

Cheang Chew, str.

1,213

Webb

606

28

"

492

15

Nam Yong, str.

493

""

15

Kut Sang, str...

984 1,495

""

494

16

Gisela, str.

495

وو

18

Priok, str.

1,637 German

2,643 Austrian

Madsen

Hector Bowker Kossovich

307

17

""

506

21

"

10

620

3

643

326

7

544

562

562

""

141

141

>>

496

18

Ping Suey, str.

1,982 British

Jacques

78

78

Honolulu

129

6

497

19

18

China, str.

2,401

Ward

San Francisco

568

co Q

7

730

498

11

19

Phra Nang, str.

1,021

Watton

Bangkok

40

40

499

20

""

Rio, str.

1,109 German

Davidsen

Straits Settlements

283

7

6

4

300

500

20 Glenshiel, str.

2,240 British

Jones

294

13

501

""

22 Sachsen, str.

2,575 German

Supmer

330

18

"2

502

""

22 Frigga, str.

503

22 Taicheong, str.

504

99

22

Mogul, str.

1,295 828 1,827 British

""

Nagel

173

300 6

3

310

:

11

363

189

""

Duhne

19

Bangkok

61

64

Golding

Victoria, B.C.

10

Tacoma, U.S.A.

58

46

505

"}

23

Catherine Apcar, str..

1,734

Olifent

Straits Settlements

575

29

19

506

""

24

Pyrrhus, str.

2,299

Batt

125

13

"

507

25 Belgic, str.

2,695

Walker

San Francisco

297

2276

ww

3

3

610

135

302

""

508

25 Guthrie, str.

1,494

Helms

Sydney

84

84

509

27 Chow Fa, str.

1,055

Phillips

Bangkok

80

80

510

29 Propontis, str.....

1,390

Farrand

Straits Settlements

266

14

281

""

511

11

30 Devawongse, str.

1,057

Curtis

*2

Bangkok

45

45

512

11

31 Wing Sang, str.

1,517

Ste. Croix

Straits Settlements

461

10

5

485

12

513

"1

31

Bombay, str.

2,048

Sleeman

290 11

6

307

""

"

TOTAL TONS..

833,971

TOTAL PASSENGERS

102,767 3,649 |1,416 812 108,644

X

From Bangkok, Siam,

WHERE FROM.

""

Batavia,

99

Callao, Peru,

"J

Dilly, Timor,

"

23

Honolulu, Sandwich Islands,

Mauritius,

11

Medan, Sumatra,

*

Melbourne,

""

New South Wales Ports,

"}

New Zealand Ports,

39

Portland, Oregon, U.S.A.,

"

Queensland Ports,

""

San Francisco, U.S.A.,

South Australian Ports,

وو

Straits Settlements,

Tacoma, U.S.A.,

"J

Tasmania,

99

Vancouver, British Columbia,

**

Victoria, British Columbia,..

SUMMARY.

ADULTS.

CHILDREN.

VALUE

OF

M.

F.

M. F.

TOTAL. TREASURE

BROUGHT.

6,921 76 98 26

42 35

7,074

124

155

7

11

7

180

71

80

D

805

44

43

30

922

$

239 10

11

262

549

550

404

8

422

$

667

4

675

1,400

6,280 $1,302,160

149

149

21

21

391

393

$ 281,571

6,582

127

45

33

6,787 | $7,590,200

1591

4

163 $

75,633

81,816 3,320 | 1,221

688

87,045

879 10

3

893

1

1

2,139 15

17

6

2,177

$ 10,832

721

4

1

726

TOTAL PASSENGERS,

102,767 3,649 1,416 102,767

812 108,644 | $9,268,076

170

XXI.-RETURN of MARINE CASES tried at the MARINE MAGIstrate's CourT, during the year 1893.

DEFENDANTS HOW DISPOSED of.

NATURE OF Charge.

:

No. of Cases.

No. of De-

fendants.

Imprisoned with Hard

Labour.

Imprisoned in default

of Fine.

Assault,

5

5

Found stowed away,

1

1

1

Harbour Regulations-Breach of (Junk),

1

1

Leaving Harbour during prohibited hours (Junk),

1.

2

:..

Plying for hire without a Licence (Boat),

2

N

Refusal of Duty,

13

66

43

Throwing Ballast, &c., into the Harbour,.

1

2

:

Fined.

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

Forfeiture

of pay.

Reprimand-

ed.

Dismissed.

1

2

:

:

:

2

:

19

1

1

1

:

:

10

5

Amount of Fines.

:

:

:

:

GO

3

es

1

3

5

2

25

Total,....

24

79

44

1

6

19

1

8

34

XXIII.-RETURN of WORK performed by the GOVERNMENT MARINE SURVEYOR'S DEPARTMENT.

Years.

Passenger Cer-

tificate and

Inspection of

Bottom.

Emigration.

Tonnage for Registration.

British Tonnage.

Foreign Vessels. Certificate for

Inspection of

Crew space,

Lights and Markings.

Minor Inspec- tion.

Survey of Licen- sed Passenger Steam-launches.

Survey of Boilers under Construction.

Inspection of Government

Launches.

Examination

of Engineers.

Examination of

Chinese Engi-

neers for Steam- launches.

Estimated total number of visits in connection with for-

eign Inspection.

9 months in 1881,...

1882,.

95

67

154

127

1883,.

144 102

1884,.

200 141

1885,

153 113

1886,

149 76

1887,

153 101

1888,.

161 97

1889,.

130

73

1890,.

112 77

1891,

108

38

1892,....

122

51

1893,

136

74

10.00 1000NM ±±±

5

5

6

2

3

9

4

5

4

3

4

•O ∞ ∞ ✪ CO ICO — ∞ © ∞ 6 a

1

10

4

35

1

284

3

8

9

2575

1

15

1

20

:::

6

46

6

472

6

57

1

461

26

33

6

55

8

699

6

6

60

33

8

50

29

737

1

11

2

69

16

9

36

16

870

6

9

1

72

15

14

42

31

930

1

2

80

I

6

42

36

1,042

3

1

80

1

39

36

1,127

2

84

1

61

19

986

3

1

73

3

16

44

19

1,615

1

85

1

94

20

10

16

60

96

1,678

20

19

64

25

1,659

XXIV.-IMPORTS AND EXPORTS OFFICE.

IMPORTS.

MALWA. PATNA. BENARES. PERSIAN. TURKISH.

CHINESE.

TOTAL.

chests.

chests.

chests.

chests.

chests.

chests.

chests.

1892,......

13,118

23,041

13,431

7,171

103

56,864

1893,.......

9,803

17,935

6,674

4,684

2

39,098

C

Increase,

:

Decrease,

3,315

5,106

6,757

2,487

101

17,766

EXPORTS.

MALWA. ΡΑΤΝΑ. BENARES.

PERSIAN.

chests.

chests.

chests.

chests.

TURKISH. chests.

CHINESE.

TOTAL.

chests.

chests.

1892, 1893,.......

Increase,.

Decrease,

11,947

19,948

12,882

7,7371

111

52,625

10,695

18,196

7,894

6,690

73

43,549

1,252

1,752

4,988

1,046

38

9,0761

Through Cargo reported in Manifests, but not landed, 1892,

1893,

21,144 chests. 16,608

39

Decrease,...

4,536 chests,

TONS.

7,000,000

6,900,000

XXII.-DIAGRAM of Tonnage entered at Hongkong, from 1867 to 1893, inclusive.

RED LINE represents British Shipping Tonnage only.

BLUE LINE represents Foreign Shipping Tonnage only,

GREEN LINE represents British and Foreign Shipping Tonnage.

YELLOW LINE represents Junk Tonnage only, excluding Local Trade.

THICK BLACK LINE represents entire Trade in British and Foreign Ships and Junks.

1867.

1868.

1869.

1870.

1871.

1872.

1873.

1874.

1875.

6,800,000

.6,700,000

6,600,000

6,500,000

6,400,000

6,300,000

6,200,000

6,100,000

6,000,000

5,900,000

5,800,000

}

5,700,000

5,600,000

5,500,000

5,400,000

5,300,000

1876.

1877.

1878.

1879.

1880.

1881.

1882,

1883.

1884.

1885.

1886.

1887.

'8381

pround

5,300,000

5,200,000

5,100,000

5,000,000

4,900,000

4,800,000

4,700,000

4,600,000

4,500,000

4,400,000

4,300,000

4,200,000

4,100,000

4,000,000

3,900,000

3,800,000

3,700,000

3,600,000

3,500,000

3,400,000

3,300,000

3,200,000

3,100,000

3,000,000

2,900,000

2,800,000

2,700,000

2,600,000

2,500,000.

2,400,000

2,300,000

2,200,000

માં

3;༧--}༧

2,900,000

2,800,000

2,700,000

2,600,000

2,500,000

2,400,000

2,300,000

2,200,000

2,100,000

2,000,000

1,900,000

1,800,000

1,700,000

1,600,000

1,500,000

1,400,000

1,300,000

1,200,000

1,100,000

1,000,000

900,000

800,000

700,000

600,000

500,000.

400,000

300,000.

1868.

1869.

1870.

1871.

1872.

1873.

1874.

1875.

1876.

XII.-DIAGRAM of Tonnage entered at Hongkong, from 1867 to 1893, inclusive.

RED LINE represents British Shipping Tonnage only.

1877.

1878.

1879.

1880.

BLUE LINE represents Foreign Shipping Tonnage only,

GREEN LINE represents British and Foreign Shipping Tonnage. YELLOW LINE represents Junk Tonnage only, excluding Local Trade.

THICK BLACK LINE

represents entire

Trade in British and Foreign Ships and Junks.

1881.

1882.

1883.

1884.

1885.

1886.

1887.

*8381

1889.

1890.

1891.

1892.

1893.

7,000,000

.6,900,000

6,800,000

6,700,000

-6,600,000

6,500,000

6,400,000

6,300,000

6,200,000

6,100,000

6,000,000

5,900,000

5,800,000

5,700,000

5,600,000

5,500,000

5,400,000

TONS.

6,000,000

5,900,000

5,800,000

5,700,000

5,600,000

5,500,000

5,400,000

5,300,000

5,200,000

5,100,000

5,000,000

4,900,000

4,800,000

4,700,000

4,600,000

4,500,000

4,400,000

4,300,000

4,200,000

4,100,000

4,000,000

3,900,000

3,800,000

3,700,000

3,600,000

3,500,000

3,400,000

3,300,000

3,200,000

3,100,000

3,000,000

-2,900,000

3,000,000

2,900,000

2,800,000

2,600,000

2,500,000

2,400,000

2,300,000

2,200,000

2,100,000

2,000,000

1,900,000

1,800,000

1,700,000

1,600,000

1,500,000

1,400,000

1,300,000

1,200,000

1,100,000

1,000,000

900,000

800,000

700,000

600,000

500,000

400,000

300,000

171

1

NUMBER OF PERMITS, &c. ISSUED.

173

1892.

1893,

Increase.

Decrease.

Landing Permits,... Removal Permits,

477

404

78

.13,165

12,439

726

Export Permits,

8,837

8,553

284

...

Permits to Chinese Customs' Hulk,

284

342

58

Memo of Exports sent to the Commissioner of Chinese

Customs Kowloon,

}

539

525

14

Total in piculs.

By Steamers to Adelaide,

Amoy,

Bombay,

British Columbia,..

British North Borneo,

Bunder Abbas,

SUMMARY OF EXPORTS, 1893.

Malwa Patna Benares Persian Turkish. Chinese Total Chests. Chests. Chests. Chests. Chests. Chests. Chests.

:

1

131

63

2,317

1,434

4

787

3

~H

:

:

4

15

3

Cio

:

:

:

*

:

:

:

:

:

Canton,

1,575 4,735 1,436

:

Chefoo,

12

1

2

Foochow,

2,246 1,211

188

917

Formosa,

124

3,795

Haiphong,

290

. Hankow,

43

30

Hoihow,

6

80

:

:

London,

:

30

:.

:

:

1

1.2

3,945

4,456.85

4

4.0

787

944.4

22

23.775

3

3.075

7,746

8,980.7

15

15.6

4,562

4,865,225

3,919

4,038.675

290

348.0

73

79.5

86

102.0

76

76.750

3,960

4,747.0

327

392.4

393

471.6

9,918

11,170.525

973

1,117.1375

5,639

6,180.95

7

7.175

:

:.

:

:

:

.:.

:

:

:

:

:

:

46

Macao,

3,932

3

25

25

Pakhoi,

161

166

Philippine Islands,

301

92

:

Shanghai,

...........

3,651

4,096

2,166

5

Straits Settlements, ...

429

256

285

2

Swatow,

2,762

1,838

845

194

Suez,

7

By Junks to various adjacent Ports

in China,

:

:.

5

10

10

263

528

5

TOTAL,..

10,695 18,196

7,894 6,690

73

The information in column 8 above is on the following assumption :-

Patna and Benares per chest,

Malwa and Turkish,

Persian per chest,

Chinese

""

8011

908.225

43,549 48,934.7625

1.20 piculs.

........1.00

25

...1.025

""

...1.00 "

HONGKONG.

No. 152.

125

No. 7

94

HONGKONG.

DESPATCH FROM THE SECRETARY OF STATE RESPECTING THE

DRAWING OF HALF SALARIES IN STERLING AT 3/-,

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor, on the 7th March, 1894.

SIR,

DOWNING STREET,

25th September, 1893.

I have the honour to enclose, for your consideration, an extract from a despatch to the Governor of the Straits Settlements, in which it is suggested that the officers of that Government, who are not domiciled in the Colony, shall be paid when on leave at 3/- to the dollar, and shall in lieu receive a non-pensionable allowance while on active service so as to make up half their salary to the rate of 3/- to the dollar.

I am prepared to sanction the same course under precisely the same limita- tions in the case of Hongkong.

I have the honour to be.

Sir,

Your most obedient,

humble servant,

Governor

SIR W. ROBINSON, K.C.M.G.,

&c.,

&c.,

&c.

(Copy.)

RIPON.

Extract from a despatch from the Marquess of Ripon to the Officer Administering the Government of the Straits Settlements. 25th September, 1893.

*

2. It seemed to me that, with little additional expense to the Colonial Govern- ment, the position of those officers who are not domiciled in the Colony, and who therefore suffer most acutely from the fall of exchange, may be improved, by granting an allowance in compensation for loss on exchange in accordance with the Indian precedent, in return for a reduction of the rate at which the leave salary is paid. I have accordingly suggested that the future rate for leave salary shall be, in the case of the officers in question, 3/- to the dollar, and that the pay, while on service, shall, up to half the amount, be also calculated at 3/-; the compensation allowance, i.e., the difference between half salary at 3/- and half salary at the market rate of exchange not being pensionable, but the pension on the salary as it now stands being left to be calculated at the existing rate.

3. I am prepared to sanction these proposals if they are adopted by the Legislative Council and accepted by the officers, in whose interests they have been suggested.

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 1.

(SPECIAL MEETING.)

TUESDAY, 20TH FEBRUARY, 1894.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR.

(Sir WILLIAM ROBINSON, K.C.M.G.).

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (GEORGE THOMAS MICHAEL OBRIEN, C.M.G.).

the Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART Lockhart).

7.

the Colonial Treasurer, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES).

""

the Harbour Master, (ROBERT MURRAY RUMSEY, R.N.). CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

">

13.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

""

1

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS, C.M.G.

The Council met pursuant to notice.

JURORS LIST, 1894.-There being no strangers present, the Council proceeded to consider the Jurors List for 1894.

The List was duly revised, corrected, and Special Jurors designated in terms of Section 8 of Ordinance 18 of 1887.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned sine die.

Read and confirmed, this 7th day of March, 1894.

ARATHOON SETH,

Clerk of Councils.

{

WILLIAM ROBINSON,

Governor.

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LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 2.

WEDNESDAY, 7TH MARCH, 1894.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR (Sir WILLIAM ROBINSON, K.C.M.G.).

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (GEORGE THOMAS MICHAEL OBRIEN, C.M.G.).

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

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the Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART LOCKHART).

the Harbour Master, (ROBERT MURRAY RUMSEY, R.N.). CATCHICK PAUL Chater.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITehead.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS, C.M.G.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

The Council met pursuant to notice.

His Excellency informed the Council that the Treasurer was absent through indisposition. The Minutes of the Meeting held on the 21st December last, and of the Special Meeting held on the 20th ultimo, were read and confirmed.

PAPERS.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following papers :-

1. Report of Finance Committee, No. 6.

2. Widows' and Orphans' Fund Account for 1893.

3. Report of Head Master, Victoria College, for 1893.

4. Report of the Captain Superintendent of Police, for 1893.

5. Returns of the Superior and Subordinate Courts, for 1893.

6. Report of the Superintendent of Victoria Gaol, for 1893.

7. Report of the Sanitary Surveyor, for 1893.

8. Report of the Acting Registrar General, for 1893.

3

9. Despatch from the Secretary of State for the Colonies respecting a conditional offer of a

non-pensionable allowance to certain Members of the Hongkong Civil Service.

NOTICE OF MOTION.-The Colonial Secretary gave notice that at the next Meeting of Council he would move the following resolution :-

"That it is desirable to give effect to the suggestion of the Secretary of State for the Colonies that, in view of the fall in exchange, those of the Civil Servants who are domiciled in the United Kingdom or other countries having a Gold Currency, and are willing to draw their salaries when on leave at the rate of 3/- to the dollar, should be granted such a non-pensionable allowance as will make the half of their salaries while on active service equivalent to the half of their present salaries calculated at the rate of 3/- to the dollar."

NOTICE OF QUESTIONS.-Mr. WHITEHEAD gave notice that at the next meeting of Council he would ask the following questions:-

NEW DRAINAGE SEPARATE SYSTEM.

Will the Government furnish the Council with a return shewing—

(1) The extent to which the new drainage scheme on the separate system as designed

by Mr. Osbert Chadwick, C.M.G., has been carried out,

(2) The departures, if any, from Mr. Chadwick's designs,

(3) The total amount of moneys expended on the new scheme up to 31st December,

1893,

(4) The quantity of work remaining to be done,

(5) The estimated cost of completing the same,

(6) The cost of the deep sewer, commencing at the Murray Barracks Nullah, running down Arsenal Street, and along the Praya to its outfall about Fenwick's Yard, and (7) What amount of the cost of this deep sewer, running through and draining pro- perty, nearly one half of which belongs to the Imperial Government, has been paid or will be refunded by the Military Authorities,

and further, will the Government state whether in the opinion of the responsible authorities the separate system has worked satisfactorily up to date, and if not, what are the reasons for its failure, and the remedial measures, if any, it is proposed to adopt.

4.

HONGKONG POST OFFICE.

Will the Government lay upon the table a statement shewing the gross income, and the gross expenditure of the Post Office for the years 1890, 1891, 1892 and 1893, separately, and any liability still outstanding connected with those years, also separately.

POST OFFICE, TREASURY, COURT HOUSE, LAND OFFICE, &C.

Will Government procure and lay upon the table an estimate of what money these premises would probably realise if exposed to auction, and what would be the probable cost of erecting a suitable Post Office, and Court House, including a Land Office, &c., on Government ground on the new Praya Reclamation.

OPIUM ORDINANCES.

Will the Government lay upon the table a copy of the Petition, dated 12th December, 1893, to The Right Honourable The Marquis of Ripon, Her Majesty's Principal Secretary of State for the Colonies, from the Hongkong, Canton and Macao Steam-boat Company, Limited, and the China Steam Navigation Company, Limited, praying for Government assistance in their efforts to suppress smuggling on board their steam-ships by causing such amendments to be made in the Hongkong law as may be thought necessary and effectual, &c., &c., and a copy of any reply which may have been received thereto.

CROWN AGENTS.

In view of the West Indian Colonies, including British Honduras and British Guiana, having recently passed Resolutions through their Legislatures condemning the Crown Agency system as an expensive and wasteful medium for the transaction of their business, and as a like feeling obtains amongst a large number of ratepayers in this Colony, will the Government lay

upon the table at the earliest possible date, a copy of the Parliamentary Paper C. 3075 of which is said to contain full ́information as to the arrangements existing between the Colonial Office, and the Crown Agents.

PÓ LEUNG KUK.

Will the Government lay upon the table a copy of the Despatch No. 204 of 22nd December last, from the Right Honourable the Marquis of Ripon, Her Majesty's Principal Secretary_of State for the Colonies, in connection with my Memorial, dated 27th June, 1893, praying His Lordship to return Ordinance No. 10 of 1893 to Hongkong for amendment in the directions indicated therein, and to recommend to the Colonial Government, either to remove the Registrar General from the governing body of the Po Leung Kuk, or to invest him with powers adequate to his duties and responsibilities to the Women and Girls under his care, under Ordinance No. 11 of 1890.

FINANCES.

Will the Government inform the Council,-

SV

(1) What moneys were expended by the Crown Agents in England, on account of the

Colony, during 1893,

(2) How much of these were defrayed out of the proceeds of the Colony's recent Gold

Loan,

(3) What amount, if any, of our revenue during 1893 has been remitted to, or drawn for by the Crown Agents, from the Colony, to defray their expenses, and the rates of exchange, if any,

(4) Have any moneys derived either from revenue in 1893, or from Supreme Court, or Reclamation Deposits, been remitted to England, or withdrawn from the Colony during the past nine months, for any purpose other than to defray necessary expenditure in England on account of the Colony.

(5) If so, what amount, from what funds derived, at what rates of exchange remitted, how employed in England, and at what rates of interest, under what authority have such remittances been made, and for what reasons,

and (6) What amount of the Colonial Government's funds now remain in England, how much thereof is derived from revenue, how much from deposits, and how much from the proceeds of the recent Gold Loan.

QUESTIONS.-Mr. CHATER, with His Excellency's permission, asked the following questions:—

1. Has any portion of the new Gold Loan been remitted to the Colony, or drawn for, and if so,

at what rate of exchange?

2. Has any answer been received from the Secretary of State to the Governor's despatch recom-

mending a reduction of the Military Contribution?

3. Has anything been done to give effect to the recommendation of the Un-official Members of

Council that the amount of the Military Contribution be fixed in dollars and at the rate at which the first instalment was paid when the contribution was raised from £20,000 to £40,000?

The Colonial Secretary replied.

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1.

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BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND 'THE PÓ LÉUNG KUK INCORPORATION ORDINANCE, 1893.'"-The Attorney General moved the first reading of this Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE JURY CONSOLIDATION ORDINANCE, 1887. "— The Attorney General moved the first reading of this Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED " AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE SUPREME COURT Summary JURISDICTION ORDI- NANCE, 1873. "The Attorney General moved the first reading of this Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

SILVER WEDDING OF THE EMPEROR AND EMPRESS OF JAPAN.- His Excellency addressed the Council and moved that the following telegram be sent to Her Britannic Majesty's Minister at Tokio :-

We the Governor and Legislative Council of Hongkong on our own behalf and on behalf of the community generally ask Your Excellency to convey to their Majesties the Emperor and Empress of Japan our respectful congratulations on the celebration of their Majesties Silver Wedding. We trust that His Majesty and His Imperial Consort may long be spared to direct the destinies of their beautiful and flourishing Empire and to reign for many more years over its industrious and progressive people.

Mr. CHATER seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned till Thursday, the 15th instant, at 3 P.M.

Read and confirmed, this 15th day of March, 1894.

ARATHOON SETH,

Clerk of Councils.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

Governor.

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LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 3.

THURSDAY, 15TH MARCH, 1894.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(Sir WILLIAM ROBINSON, K.C.M.G.).

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (GEORGE THOMAS MICHAEL OBRIEN, C.M.G.).

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

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the Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART LOCKHART).

the Colonial Treasurer, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES).

the Harbour Master, (ROBERT MURRAY RUMSEY, R.N.).

EDWARD Bowdler.

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS, C.M.G.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

7

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 7th instant, were read and confirmed. PAPERS.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following papers :-

1. Despatch from the Secretary of State on the subject of The Pó Leung Kuk Ordinance,

1893. (No. 204 of 1893.)

2. Report of the Superintendent of the Fire Brigade for 1893.

The Colonial Secretary also by command of His Excellency read the following telegram from Her Britannic Majesty's Minister at Tokio in reply to the one sent to him on the 7th instant :—

"The Emperor desires to convey to Your Excellency his thanks for the congratulations of yourself and Government and to express the pleasure with which he has received them." NOTICE OF QUESTION. --Mr. BELILIOS gave notice that at the next meeting of Council he would ask the following question :--

In view of the condition of the Staff of Victoria Gaol, as disclosed by the annual report of the Superintendent, what steps the Government intend taking to reconstruct the said Staff or otherwise to render it efficient?

The Colonial Secretary, by permission of His Excellency, waived the usual notice, and replied to the question.

NOTICE OF MOTION.-Mr. WHITEHEAD gave notice that at the next meeting of Council he would move the following resolution :-

1

That in view of the fact that the present Opium Farm expires on the 28th February, 1895, and that tenders for the new farm must be sent in not later than 30th November, 1894, it is expedient that a Commission be appointed forthwith, with the amplest powers to investigate and report within four months on the working of the Farm in the past; the terms and conditions upon which and the time for which the new Farm, if any, is to be granted; the defects, if any, in the existing Opium Ordinances, and the amendments to be made therein with a view to the prevention of the smuggling of Opium, raw or prepared, from the Colony, in breach of our Treaties and engagements with the Government of China, and to the protection from risk of forfeiture and fine, through the operations of smugglers, of ships and steamers trading from this port to China and Cochin-China; and with a view to the prevention of the annoyances and indignities in flirted upon Chinese residents and travellers by the perquisitions of the officers of excise appointed by the Farmer under Ordinance.

QUESTIONS:-Mr. WHITEHEAD, pursuant to notice, asked the following questions:

REGISTRAR GENERAL'S DEPARTMENT.

Will the Honourable the Registrar General inform the Council whether he concurs in the recommendations made by Mr. A "M. Thomson in the last paragraphs of the Acting Registrar General's Report for 1893, laui before the Legislative Council at its last meeting, in favour of retrenchment in the Registrar General's Department, amounting to close upon $5,000 per annum, and if so, has he at any time called the attention of the Government to the propriety of effecting such an annual saving, and if so, where, and when, and if not, why not?

Co

$

NEW DRAINAGE SEPARATE SYSTEM.

Will the Government furnish the Council with a return shewing—

(1) The extent to which the new drainage scheme on the separate system as designed

by Mr. Osbert Chadwick, C.M.G., has been carried out,

(2) The departures, if any, from Mr. Chadwick's designs,

(3) The total amount of moneys expended on the new scheme up to 31st December,

1893,

(4) The quantity of work remaining to be done,

(5) The estimated cost of completing the same,

(6) The cost of the deep sewer, commencing at the Murray Barracks Nullah, running down Arsenal Street, and along the Praya to its outfall about Fenwick's Yard, and (7) What amount of the cost of this deep sewer, running through and draining pro- perty, nearly one half of which belongs to the Imperial Government, has been paid or will be refunded by the Military Authorities,

and further, will the Government state whether in the opinion of the responsible authorities the separate system has worked satisfactorily up to date, and if not, what are the reasons for its failure, and the remedial measures, if any, it is proposed to adopt.

HONGKONG POST OFFICE.

Will the Government lay upon the table a statement shewing the gross income, and the gross expenditure of the Post Office for the years 1890, 1891, 1892 and 1893, separately, and any liability still outstanding connected with those years, also separately.

POST OFFICE, TREASURY, COURT HOUSE, LAND OFFICE, &C.

Will Government procure and lay upon the table an estimate of what money these premises would probably realise if exposed to auction, and what would be the probable cost of erecting a suitable Post Office, and Court House, including a Land Office, &c., on Government ground on the new Praya Reclamation.

OPIUM ORDINANCES.

Will the Government lay upon the table a copy of the Petition, dated 12th December, 1893, to The Right Honourable The Marquis of Ripon, Her Majesty's Principal Secretary of State for the Colonies, from the Hongkong, Canton and Macao Steam-boat Company, Limited, and the China Steam Navigation Company, Limited, praying for Government assistance in their efforts to suppress smuggling on board their steam-ships by causing such amendments to be made in the Hongkong law as may be thought necessary and effectual, &c., &c., and a copy of any reply which may have been received thereto.

CROWN AGENTS.

In view of the West Indian Colonies, including British Honduras and British Guiana, having recently passed Resolutions through their Legislatures condemning the Crown Agency system as an expensive and wasteful medium for the transaction of their business, and as a like feeling obtains amongst a large number of ratepayers in this Colony, will the Government lay "upon the table, at the earliest possible date, a copy of the Parliamentary Paper C. 3075 of 1881, which is said to contain full information as to the arrangements existing between the Colonial Office and the Crown Agents.

PÓ LEUNG KUK.

Will the Government lay upon the table a copy of the Despatch No. 204 of 22nd December last, from the Right Honourable the Marquis of Ripon, Her Majesty's Principal Secretary of State for the Colonies, in connection with my Memorial, dated 27th June, 1893, praying His Lordship to return Ordinance No. 10 of 1893 to Hongkong for amendment in the directions indicated therein, and to recommend to the Colonial Government, either to remove the Registrar General from the governing body of the Pó Leung Kuk, or to invest him with powers adequate to his duties and responsibilities to the Women and Girls under his care, under Ordinance No. 11 of 1890.

FINANCES.

Will the Government inform the Council,-

(1) What moneys were expended by the Crown Agents in England, on account of the

Colony, during 1893,

(2) How much of these were defrayed out of the proceeds of the Colony's recent Gold

Loan,

(3) What amount, if any, of our revenue during 1893 has been remitted to, or drawn for by the Crown Agents, from the Colony, to defray their expenses, and the rates of exchange, if any,

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(4) Have any moneys derived either from revenue in 1893, or from Supreme Court, or Reclamation Deposits, been remitted to England, or withdrawn from the Colony during the past nine months, for any purpose other than to defray necessary expenditure in England on account of the Colony.

(5) If so, what amount, from what funds derived, at what rates of exchange remitted, how employed in England, and at what rates of interest, under what authority have such remittances been made, and for what reasons,

and (6) What amount of the Colonial Government's funds now remain in England, how much thereof is derived from revenue, how much from deposits, and how much from the proceeds of the recent Gold Loan.

The Colonial Secretary replied. MOTION.--The Colonial Secretary, pursuant to notice, moved the following resolution and addressed the Council:-

“That it is desirable to give effect to the suggestion of the Secretary of State for the Colonies that, in view of the fall in exchange, those of the Civil Servants who are domiciled in the United Kingdom or other countries having a Gold Currency, and are willing to draw their salaries when on leave at the rate of 3/- to the dollar, should be granted such a non-pensionable allowance as will make the half of their salaries while on active service equivalent to the half of their present salaries calculated at the rate of 3/- to the dollar.'

27

The Colonial Treasurer seconded, and addressed the Council.

Mr. CHATER addressed the Council, and moved as an amendment:-

That the consideration of this question be postponed until the Retrenchment Commission asked for in the memorial of the Unofficial Members of Council, dated 12th January, 1893, to the Right Honourable the Secretary of State for the Colonies, has been appointed, and until the Council has had an opportunity of carefully considering the report of such Commission.

Mr. KESWICK seconded, and addressed the Council.

Mr. BELILIOs addressed the Council,

Dr. Ho KAI addressed the Council.

The amendment was then put and carried nem. con., the Official Members abstaining from voting. RETRENCHMENT COMMITTEE.--The Governor informed the Council that at His Excellency's sugges- tion the Right Honourable the Secretary of State had been pleased to approve of the appointment of the following gentlemen as a Committee to enquire into the expenditure of the Colony, viz. :-

His Honour Mr. Justice ACKROYD, (Chairman),

The Honourable C. P. CHATER,

The Honourable J. J. KESWICK, and N. J. EDE, Esquire.

His Excellency further intimated that he proposed to appoint an Official Secretary to the Com- mittee and that he had selected Mr. T. SERCOMBE SMITH for the office.

BILL ENTITLED “AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE PÓ LEUNG KUK INCORPORATION ORDinance, 1893,'"-The Attorney General moved the second reading of this Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Dr. Ho KAI addressed the Council. Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council went into Committee on the Bill.

Bill reported with the addition of a clause.

The Attorney General moved that the Bill be read a third time.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put--that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

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BILL ENTITLED " AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE SUPREME COURT SUMMARY JURISDICTION ORDI- NANCE, 1873.'"The Attorney General moved the second reading of this Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council went into Committee on the Bill.

Bill reported without amendment.

The Attorney General moved that the Bill be read a third time.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

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BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE JURY CONSOLIDATION ORDINANCE, 1887.'". The Attorney General moved the second reading of this Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council went into Committee on the Bill.

Clause 3.-Mr. WHITEHEAD moved that "29" be inserted between the figures "23" and the word "of."

Dr. Ho KAI Seconded.

The Council divided :-

For.

Mr. WHITEHEAD.

Against.

Mr. BELILIOS.

Dr. Ho KAI.

Mr. KESWICK.

Mr. CHATER.

Motion lost by a majority of 1.

Bill reported without amendment.

Mr. BOWDLER.

The Colonial Treasurer. The Attorney General. The Colonial Secretary.

The Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do Bill passed.

pass.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned sine die.

Read and confirmed, this 12th day of April, 1894.

J. G. T. BUCKLE, Acting Clerk of Councils.

G. T. M. OBRIEN,

Officer Administering the Government.

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LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 4.

THURSDAY, 12TH APRIL, 1894.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE OFFICER ADMINISTERING THE GOVERNMENT (GEORGE THOMAS MICHAEL OBRIEN, C.M.G.).

The Honourable the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

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the Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART LOCKHART). the Colonial Treasurer, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-Innes).

the Harbour Master, (ROBERT Murray Rumsey, R.N.).

EDWARD Bowdler.

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS, C.M.G.

The Council met pursuant to summons.

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The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 15th ultimo, were read and confirmed. PAPER.-- His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government laid on the table the following paper :--

Report of the Harbour Master for 1893.

MOTION.--The Registrar General, pursuant to notice, moved the following resolution and addressed the Council:--

Whereas by Section 20 of Ordinance 11 of 1890 it is enacted that Part II of "The Women and Girls' Protection Ordinance, 1890," should only continue in operation for a period of two years from the coming into operation of that Ordinance or such further period or periods as might from time to time be determined by resolution of the Legislative Council, and whereas the said Ordinance came into operation on the 6th day of April, 1891, by virtue of a Proclamation duly issued under Section 34 of the said Ordinance by the Officer then Administering the Government which Proclamation was published in the Gazette of the 4th April, 1891, and whereas it was resolved by the Legislative Council of Hongkong on the 22nd March, 1893, that the said Part II of the said Ordinance shall continue in operation for a period of one year from the 6th April, 1893, and whereas it is desirable to further extend the period during which the said Part II of the said Ordinance shall be in operation: It is this day resolved by the Legislative Council of Hongkong that Part II of "The Women and Girls' Protection Ordinance, 1890,” shall continue in force until further notice.

Dr. Ho KAI Seconded.

Mr. WHITEHEAD moved that the words "for a further period of five years," be substituted for "until further notice.”

The Attorney General seconded.

The motion as amended was then put and carried unanimously.

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BILL ENTITLED " AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE PREPARED OPIUM ORDINANCE, 1891.'"-The Attorney General moved the first reading of the Bill.

The Registrar General seconded.

Mr. CHATER addressed the Council on the subject of the Bill.

Mr. WHITEHEAD addressed the Council.

Dr. Ho KAI addressed the Council.

The Attorney General addressed the Council.

Question-put and carried by 7 to 3.

Bill read a first time.

MOTION.-Mr. WHITEHEAD moved that the Standing Orders be suspended.

Question put and carried unanimously.

MOTION. Mr. WHITEHEAD moved that the Opium Farmer be heard by Counsel before the Council at the second reading of the Bill.

Dr. Ho KAI seconded.

Question put and carried nem. con.

His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government directed that the Opium Farmer should be so informed.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned until Monday, the 16th instant, at 2.30 P.M.

Read and confirmed, this 16th day of April, 1894.

J. G. T. BUCKLE,

Acting Clerk of Councils.

G. T. M. OBRIEN, Officer Administering the Government.

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LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 5.

MONDAY, 16TH APRIL, 1894.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE OFFICER ADMINISTERING THE GOVERNMENT (GEORGE THOMAS MICHAEL OBRIEN, C.M.G.).

The Honourable the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

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the Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART LOCKHART). the Colonial Treasurer, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES).

the Harbour Master, (ROBERT MURRAY RUMSEY, R.N.).

EDWARD Bowdler.

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS, C.M.G.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 12th instant, were read and confirmed.

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PAPER. His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government laid on the table the follow- ing paper :-

Statement showing Disbursements for Forestry Works in the years 1895 and 1896, for which contracts have been

already made, and those for which contracts now require to be made:

To be disbursed in 1895.

To be disbursed in 1896.

C.

$. c.

C.

1,000.00

1,600.00

Estimated total cost.

To be disbursed in 1894.

APPROVED BY LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL,

C.S.O. No. 9873.

$

C.

$

1. Rearing Trees to be planted in 1895,

1,000.00

2. Planting Trees being reared under No. 1,......

1,600.00

Contracts to be now made which require approval:-

3. Rearing Trees to be planted in 1896,

1,000.00

***** •

4. Planting Trees to be reared under No. 3,.....

1,400.00

5,000.00

1,000.00

1,400.00

2,600.00

2,400.00

MOTION.-The Registrar General moved the following resolution :-

That" the Council having considered the above statement by the Superintendent of the Botanical and Afforestation Department resolves that it is expedient to incur the liability proposed to be incurred in 1896."

The Attorney General seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

QUESTIONS.--Mr. WHITEHEAD, pursuant to notice, asked the following questions:-

JUDICATURE ACT OF 1873.

1. With reference to the Statement of the Honourable the learned Attorney General at the Meeting of the Legislative Council on 23rd November, 1891, to the effect that the Government had then under consideration the introduction into this Colony of Sub-section 6, Section 25 of the Judicature Act of 1873, Will the Government inform the Council whether it is proposed to amend the law by introducing the provisions in the said Sub-section 6, and if so, when.

OBSERVATORY.

2. Have the Government obtained from the Members of the late Observatory Commission or from any others interested in the subject, any suggestions for the improvement of the system of compiling and issuing meteorological reports, and furnishing weather forecasts, and if not, what steps do they propose to take, before the typhoon season is on us, to render the Observatory in its meteorological branch more useful than it has been in the past.

EXPENDITURE.

3. Has a sum of $537 been paid out of the Treasury to W. Logan, Detective in the employ of the Hongkong, Canton and Macao Steam-boat Company, Limited; and if so, on what authority; and why has no application been made in the ordinary course to this Council for its sanction and approval of that payment.

His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government replied.

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BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE PREPARED OPIUM ORDINANCE, 1891'."— Pursuant to a resolution passed at the last meeting, Mr. J. J. FRANCIS, Q.C., Counsel for the Opium Farmer, addressed the Council on the subject of the Bill.

The Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill, and addressed the Council.

Mr. BELILIOS Seconded, and addressed the Council.

Dr. Ho KAI addressed the Council.

Mr. CHATER addressed the Council.

Mr. WHITEHEAD addressed the Council.

His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government replied to Mr. CHATER.

The Attorney General replied on the whole question.

Question-put and agreed to unanimously.

Bill read a second time.

The Council went into Committee on the Bill.

Section 3, sub-section 1.-Mr. WHITEHEAD moved that the word "steamer" be substituted for the word "ship."

The Council divided :-

For.

Mr. WHITEHEAD.

Against.

Mr. BELILIOS.

Mr. KESWICK.

Mr. CHATER.

Mr. BOWDLER.

The Harbour Master.

The Colonial Treasurer.

The Registrar General. The Attorney General.

<<

Motion lost by a majority of 7, Dr. Ho KAI abstaining from voting.

Mr. WHITEHEAD moved that the words "exceeding 2 taels in weight" be inserted after the word Opium" in the above sub-section.

The Council divided:-

For.

Mr. WHITEHEAD.

Dr. Ho KAI.

Mr. CHATER.

Mr. BOWDLER.

The Colonial Treasurer.

Against. Mr. BELILIOS.

Mr. KESWICK.

The Harbour Master. The Attorney General.

Motion carried by a majority of 1, the Registrar General abstaining from voting.

Section 3, sub-section 3.-Mr. WHITEHEAD moved that after the word "forfeiture" the following words be inserted, "prosecute the guilty party to conviction, or otherwise if there is no person capable of being proceeded against."

Mr. BELILIOS seconded.

The Council divided :—

For.

Mr. BELILIOS.

Mr. WHITEHEAD.

Against. Mr. KESWICK.

Mr. CHATER.

Mr. BOWDLER.

The Harbour Master.

The Colonial Treasurer.

The Registrar General. The Attorney General.

Motion lost by a majority of 5, Dr. Ho KAI not voting. Mr. CHATER moved that a suspending clause be added to the Bill. The Council divided :--

For.

Mr. WHITEHEAD.

Dr. Ho KAI.

Against. Mr. BELILIOS. Mr. KESWICK.

Mr. CHATER.

Mr. BOWDLER.

The Harbour Master.

The Colonial Treasurer. · The Registrar General. The Attorney General.

Motion carried by a majority of 6. Bill reported as amended in Committee. The Council resumed.

;

MOTION.-The Attorney General moved the suspension of the Standing Rules and Orders.

Mr. CHATER seconded.

Question--put and agreed to unanimously.

The Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill.

Mr. CHATER seconded.

Question-put and carried unanimously.

Bill read a third time and passed.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned sine die.

Read and confirmed, this 11th day of June, 1894.

J. G. T. BUCKLE,

Acting Clerk of Councils.

WILLIAM ROBINSON,

Governor.

15

17

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 6.

MONDAY, 11TH JUNE, 1894.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(Sir WILLIAM ROBINSON, K.C.M.G.).

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary and Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE

STEWART LOCKHART).

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19

the Acting Attorney General, (ANDREW JOHN LEACH, Q.C.). the Colonial Treasurer, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES).

the Harbour Master, (ROBERT MURRAY RUMSEY, R.N.).

EDWARD BOWDLER.

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS, C.M.G. ALEXANDER MCCONACHIE.

The Council met pursuant to summons.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 16th April, were read and confirmed.

NEW MEMBER.-Mr. MCCONACHIE took the Oath of Allegiance on his provisional appointment to a seat in the Council.

PAPERS. The Acting Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following Sessional papers :--

1. Statement showing the total Revenue and Expenditure in the year 1893.

2. Report of the Special Engineer on the Praya Reclamation Works for 1893.

3. Returns of Superior and Subordinate Courts for 1893.

4. The Educational Report for 1893.

5. Report of the Acting Director of Public Works for 1893.

6. Report of the Director of the Observatory for 1893.

7. Report of the Superintendent of the Botanical and Afforestation Departinent for 1893.

8. Report on the Blue Book and Departmental Reports for 1893.

9. Colonial Veterinary Surgeon's Report for the year 1893.

BILL ENTITLED

AN ORDINANCE TO REMOVE DOUBTS AS TO THE VALIDITY OF CERTAIN BYE-LAWS MADE BY THE SANITARY BOARD AND FOR OTHER PURPOSES."-The Acting Attorney General moved the first reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to nem. con.

Bill read a first time.

MOTION. The Acting Attorney General moved the suspension of the Standing Rules and Orders. The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to unanimously.

The Acting Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill, and addressed the Council. The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to nem. con.

Bill read a second time.

The Council went into Committee on the Bill.

Bill reported as amended in Committee.

The Council resumed.

The Acting Attorney General inoved the third reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to nem. con.

Bill read a third time, and passed.

His Excellency the Governor then addressed the Council as to the future intentions of the Government.

Mr. CHATER replied.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned sine die.

Read and confirmed, this 27th day of August, 1894.

J. G. T. BUCKLE,

Acting Clerk of Councils.

WILLIAM ROBINSON,

Governor.

19

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 7.

MONDAY, 27TH AUGUST, 1894.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(Sir WILLIAM ROBINSON, K.C.M.G.).

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary and Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE

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STEWART LOCKHART).

the Acting Attorney General, (ANDREW JOHN LEACH, Q.C.).

the Colonial Treasurer, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-Innes).

the Harbour Master, (ROBERT MURRAY RUMSEY, R.N.).

EDWARD BOWDLER.

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS, C.M.G.

ALEXANDER MCCONACHIE.

ABSENT:

The Honourable JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

The Council met pursuant to summons.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 11th June, were read and confirmed.

VOTES REFERRED TO THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Acting Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following Financial Minutes and moved that they be referred to the Finance Committee:--

C.S.O.

779, 923, and

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Twenty thousand Dollars, 1918 of 1894. ($20,000), being the amount of the building grant to the Pó Léung Kuk.

C.S.O.

1913 of 1894.

C.S.O. 1142 of 1894.

C.S.O.

1549 of 1894.

C.S.O.

1918 of 1894,

and

c.so.

2124 of 1894.

(The money has already been paid to the Pó Léung Kuk under, authority of Ordinance No. 10 of 1893, section 16.)

Government House, Hongkong, 9th August, 1894.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One hundred thousand Dollars, ($100,000), to meet extraordinary expenses incurred in connection with the epidemic of plague.

Government House, Hongkong, 9th August, 1894.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Five thousand Dollars, ($5,000), to meet extraordinary expenditure by the Botanical and Afforestation Department in con- nection with the recent caterpillar plague.

Government House, Hongkong, 9th August, 1894.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Six thousand Dollars, ($6,000), for refunds of Revenue.

(A refund of $14,000 has already been made in the matter of the estate of the late J. S. LAPRAIK.)

Government House, Hongkong, 9th August, 1894.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One thousand Two hundred Dollars, ($1,200), for the expenses of the Medical Departinent, as follows:-

Medicines, Light and Fuel,

....

.$700

.$500

(Medical expenditure in connection with the plague is not included in the above, but

will be defrayed from the Plague Vote.)

Government House, Hongkong, 15th August, 1894.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

20

PAPERS. The Acting Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following Sessional Papers :

1. Governor's Despatch to the Secretary of State with reference to the Plague.

2. The Assessor's Report on the Assessment for 1894-95.

3. The Acting Sanitary Superintendent's Report for 1893.

4. The Acting Postmaster General's Report for 1893.

5. Report on the Caterpillar Plague by the Acting Superintendent, Botanical and Afforesta-

tion Department.

6. Report on the Progress of the Public Works during the first half-year 1894.

7. Reports on the Hongkong Volunteer Corps.

8. Parliamentary Paper explanatory of the functions of the Crown Agents for the Colonies. BYE-LAWS.-The Acting Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, moved the adoption of the following Bye-laws, made by the Sanitary Board:-

BYE-LAWS

Made by the Sanitary Board under Section 13, Sub-sections 13, 14, and 16 of "The Public Health Ordinance, 1887,” to give effect to Section 30 of the said Ordinance.

Bye-law No. 5 of the Bye-laws made by the Sanitary Board under the above mentioned section on the 11th day of September, 1889, in relation to the licensing and keeping of cattle, swine, sheep and goats, and approved by the Legislative Council on the 20th day of November, 1889, is hereby revoked and in lieu thereof the following bye-law is substituted :--

5 (a) Each sheep and goat shall have at least 8 square feet of standing room and 90 cubic

feet of air space.

(b) Each pig shall have at least 8 square feet of standing room, and every pig sty shall be not less than 4 feet in height at its lowest part, and shall be thoroughly ventilated to the satisfaction of the Board.

The Acting Attorney General seconded.

Question put-that these Bye-laws do pass.

Bye-laws passed.

QUESTIONS.--Mr. MCCONACHIE, pursuant to notice, asked the following questions

(a) Will the Government inform the Council what steps they intend to take or are now taking for increasing the water supply to the city? What will be the estimated additional storage, the probable cost, and description of the proposed new works, and how long they will take to complete?

(b) Is it contemplated to raise the height of the Tytam Dam, if so, how much?

(c) If any, and what provision, is being made (temporary or otherwise) for increasing the water

supply to the city during the coming dry season?

(d) Does the "Water Authority" anticipate there will be any necessity to curtail the daily water

supply during the coming dry season as has been done regularly for the last few years? The Acting Colonial Secretary replied.

Mr. CHATER, pursuant to notice, asked the following question

I would beg to call His Excellency's attention to the constant complaints that are being made as to the state of the roads, and the inconvenience and danger arising from their continually being taken up in the most crowded thoroughfares, and to ask whether any steps are being taken permanently to remedy this state of things?

His Excellency the Governor replied.

NOTICE OF QUESTION.--Mr. CHATER gave notice that at the next meeting of Council he would ask the following question:-

As the plague is now virtually stamped out, the deaths and admissions during the last week having been very few, is it contemplated to withdraw the Proclamation declaring Hongkong to be an infected port, and if so when?

6

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE WOMEN AND GIRLS' PROTECTION Ordinance, 1890,' AND ORDINANCE No. 14 OF 1891, ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE WOMEN AND GIRLS' PROTECTION ORDINANCE, 1890."-The Acting Attorney General moved the first reading of the Bill

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to nem, con.

Bill read a first time.

-

21

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE FOR THE SUMMARY RESUMPTION OF CERTAIN CROWN LANDS SITUATE IN THE TAIPINGSHAN DISTRICT OF THE CITY OF VICTORIA AND FOR OTHER PURPOSES. -The Acting Attorney General moved the first reading of the Bill, and addressed the Council.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Mr. CHATER addressed the Council on the subject of the Bill.

Question-put and agreed to nem, con.

Bill read a first time.

ÅDJOURNMENT.—The Council then adjourned till Monday, the 3rd September.

Read and confirmed, this 3rd day of September, 1894.

J. G. T. BUCKLE,

Acting Clerk of Councils.

WILLIAM ROBINSON,

Governor.

23

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 8.

MONDAY, 3RD SEPTEMBER, 1894.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(Sir WILLIAM ROBINSON, K.C.M.G.).

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary and Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE.

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STEWART LOCKHART).

the Acting Attorney General, (ANDREW JOHN LEACH, Q.C.). the Colonial Treasurer, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES).

the Harbour Master, (ROBERT MURRAY RUMSEY, R.N.).

EDWARD BOWDLER.

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

Ho KAI, M.B., C.M.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS, C.M.G.

ALEXANDER MCCONACHIE.

ABSENT:

The Honourable JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 27th August, were read and confirmed.

REPORT OF THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Acting Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the Report of the Finance Committee dated. the 27th August, (No. 1 of 1894), and moved that it be adopted.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question--put and agreed to nem. con.

QUESTION.-Mr. CHATER, pursuant to notice, asked the following question :-

As the plague is now virtually stamped out, the deaths and admissions during the last week having been very few, is it contemplated to withdraw the Proclamation declaring Hongkong to be an infected port, and if so when?

The Acting Colonial Secretary replied.

NOTICE OF QUESTION.-Mr. BELILIOS gave notice that at the next meeting of Council he would ask the following question :-

Is it a fact that a certain and not inconsiderable proportion of the amount voted by this Council as a contribution to the maintenance of the Garrison and which is paid in sterling at the rate of the day is spent by the Military authorities locally and in silver dollars, and, if so, will not the War Office consent to receive such contribution or its average amount in dollars calculated at the rate of exchange prevailing at the date the contribution was increased to £40,000 sterling?

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE TO AUTHORISE THE APPROPRIATION OF A SUPPLEMENTARY SUM OF TWO HUNDRED AND TWELVE THOUSAND FIVE HUNDRED AND FORTY-SEVEN DOLLARS AND Ninety- TWO CENTS TO DEFRAY THE CHARGES OF THE YEAR 1893."-The Colonial Treasurer moved the first reading of the Bill.

The Acting Attorney General seconded. Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED " AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND

6

4

THE WOMEN AND GIRLS' PROTECTION ORDINANCE, 1890," AND ORDINANCE No. 14 OF 1891, ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE WOMEN AND GIRLS' PROTECTION ORDINANCE, 1890.'"-The Acting Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill and addressed the Council.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Mr. CHATER opposed the motion and addressed the Council.

Dr. Ho KAI opposed the motion and addressed the Council.

Mr. MCCONACHIE opposed the motion and addressed the Council.

The Council divided.

For the second reading.

The Acting Colonial Secretary. The Acting Attorney General. The Colonial Treasurer. The Harbour Master. Honourable E. BOWDLER.

Motion carried by a majority of 1. Bill read a second time.

Against the second reading.

Honourable C. P. CHATER. Honourable Ho KAI.

'Honourable E. R. BELILIOS.

Honourable A. MCCONACHIE.

:

24

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Bill reported without amendment.

The Acting Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill. The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Mr. CHATER moved, as an amendment,-

That the third reading of this Bill be postponed to this day twelve months.

Dr. Ho KAI seconded.

The Council divided.

For.

Honourable C. P. CHATER. Honourable Ho KAI.

Honourable E. R. BELILIOS.

Honourable A. MCCONACHIE.

Amendment lost by a majority of 1.

Against.

The Acting Colonial Secretary. The Acting Attorney General. The Colonial Treasurer.

The Harbour Master. Honourable E. BOWDLER.

The Acting Attorney General moved that the Bill be read a third time.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE FOR THE SUMMARY RESUMPTION OF CERTAIN CROWN LANDS SITUATE IN THE TAIPINGSHAN DISTRICT OF THE CITY OF VICTORIA AND FOR OTHER PURPOSES."-The Acting Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill, and addressed the Council.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council in committee on the Bill.

ADJOURNMENT.-His Excellency adjourned the Council till Monday, the 17th September.

Read and confirmed, this 17th day of September, 1894.

ARATHOON SETH,

Clerk of Councils.

WILLIAM ROBINSON,

Governor.

25

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 9.

MONDAY, 17TH SEPTEMBER, 1894.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(Sir WILLIAM ROBINSON, K.C.M.G.).

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary and Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE

STEWART LOCKHART).

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the Acting Attorney Gencral, (ANDREW JOHN LEACH, Q.C.).

the Colonial Treasurer, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES).

the Harbour Master, (ROBERT MURRAY RUMSEY, R.N.).

EDWARD Bowdler.

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS, C.M.G.

ALEXANDER MCCONACHIE.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 3rd instant, were read and confirmed.

:

PAPERS.-The Acting Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the Report of the Committee to enquire into the expenditure of the Colony and to suggest what economies can be effected without sacrifice to efficiency in the Public Service together with the evidence taken before the Committee, and Departmental Reports, Returns, &c.

QUESTION. Mr. BELILIOS, pursuant to notice, asked the following question

Is it a fact that a certain and not inconsiderable proportion of the amount voted by this Council as a contribution to the maintenance of the Garrison and which is paid in sterling at the rate of the day is spent by the Military authorities locally and in silver dollars, and, if so, will not the War Office consent to receive such contribution or its average amount in dollars calculated at the rate of exchange prevailing at the date the contribution was increased to £40,000 sterling?

The Acting Colonial Secretary replied.

WITHDRAWAL OF MOTION.-The Acting Colonial Secretary, with His Excellency's permission, withdrew the motion standing in his name.

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE TO MAKE PROVISION WITH REGARD TO CERTAIN HOUSES IN THE CITY OF VICTORIA CLOSED DURING THE PREVALENCE OF THE BUBONIC PLAGUE AND TO MAKE FURTHER AND BETTER PROVISION FOR THE HEALTH OF THE COLONY."-The Acting Attorney General moved the first reading of this Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Mr. KESWICK addressed the Council.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED “AN ORDINANCE TO AUTHORISE THE APPROPRIATION OF A SUPPLEMENTARY SUM OF TWO HUNDRED AND TWELVE THOUSAND FIVE HUNDRED AND FORTY-SEVEN DOLLARS AND NINETY- TWO CENTS TO DEFRAY THE CHARGES OF THE YEAR 1893."-The Colonial Treasurer moved the second reading of this Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council went into Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed and Bill reported without amendment.

The Colonial Treasurer moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

26

"The

BILL ENTITLED "ÅN ÖRDINANCE FOR THE SUMMARY RESUMPTION OF CERTAIN CROWN LANDS SITUATE IN THE TAIPINGSHAN DISTRICT OF THE CITY OF VICTORIA AND FOR OTHER PURPOSES. Acting Attorney General moved that this Bill be re-committed.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Council went into committee on the Bill.

Council resumed and Bill reported with amendments.

The Acting Attorney General moved that the Bill be read a third time.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question- put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

MOTION. Mr. CHATER, pursuant to notice, made the following motion: -

That a commission be appointed to enquire into and report to the Government upon the question of what portion of the buildings situated on the land to be resumed under the provisions of the Taipingshan Resumption Bill should be destroyed, and what portion should not.

Mr. MCCONACHIE seconded and addressed the Council.

His Excellency addressed the Council,

The Acting Attorney General addressed the Council.

The Colonial Treasurer addressed the Council.

The Harbour Master addressed the Council.

Dr. Ho KAI addressed the Council.

Mr. BELILIOS addressed the Council.

The Acting Colonial Secretary addressed the Council. The Council divided.

For.

The Honourable A. McCONACHIE.

E. R. BELILIOS.

J. J. KESWICK,

>>

C. P. CHATER.

The Harbour Master.

Motion lost by a majority of 1.

"}

Against.

The Honourable Dr. 110 KAI.

E. BOWDLER. Colonial Treasurer. Acting Attorney General. Acting Colonial Secretary.

33

"}

His Excellency the Governor.

ADJOURNMENT.-His Excellency adjourned the Council till Monday, the 8th proximo.

WILLIAM ROBINSON,

Read and confirmed, this 28th day of November, 1894.

J. G. T. BUCKLE, Acting Clerk of Councils.

Governor.

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 10.

WEDNESDAY, 28TH NOVEMBER, 1894.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(Sir WILLIAM ROBINSON, K.C.M.G.).

27

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary and Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE

STEWART LOCKHART).

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

""

the Colonial Treasurer, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES).

""

the Director of Public Works, (Francis Alfred Cooper).

""

the Harbour Master, (ROBERT MURRAY RUMSEY, R.N.). CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

""

:

3

}

""

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS, C.M.G.

ALEXANDER MCCONACHIE.

The Council met pursuant to summons.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 17th September, were read and confirmed. PAPERS. The Acting Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following Papers :--

(1) The Colonial Surgeon's Report for 1893.

(2) Statement of Water Account 1893.

(3) Correspondence relative to the Conversion of part of the 4 per cent. Debenture Loan of

£200,000 of 1886 into 3 per cent. Stock.

VOTES REFERRED TO THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Acting Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following Financial Minutes and moved that they be referred to the Finance Committee:-

C.S.O.

2850 of 1894.

C. O. Telegram

of 10th

1894.

C.S.O.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Eight thousand Five hundred Dollars, ($8,500), for the purpose of erecting the Statue of H. M. The QUEEN on the reclaimed land in front of the City Hall.

Government House, Hongkong, 2nd November, 1894.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends for the consideration of the Council the vote of a sum of Nor. Eighty thousand Dollars, ($80,000), in respect of compensation for the fall in the Exchange value of the dollar to Officers domiciled in the United Kingdom and other gold using countries.

Government House, Hongkong, 19th November, 1894.

2755 of 1894.

C.3.0.

2890 of 1894.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One thousand Dollars ($1,000), to meet part of the expense of a new boiler for the Floating Fire Engine. (Total estimated cost $1,550; balance will be paid out of surplus on vote for Repairs to Engines, &c.)

Government House, Hongkong, 2nd November, 1894.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Six thousand Five hundred Dollars, ($6,500), to cover certain expenses in connection with the Gap Rock Lighthouse.

Government House, Hongkong, 27th September, 1894.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

":

28

NOTICE OF QUESTION.-Mr. BELILIOS gave notice that at the next meeting of Council he would ask the following question :-

Have the Government, in view of the statements and recommendations contained in the recently received letter from Mr. Osbert Chadwick on the water supply of this Colony, decided to consider the expedience of putting meters in all the houses to which it is laid on for the purpose of pre- venting waste?

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE TO SECURE, IN CERTAIN CASES, THE RIGHTS OF PROPERTY IN TELEGRAPHIC MESSAGES." -Mr. MCCONACHIE gave notice that at the next meeting of Council he would introduce and move the first reading of the Bill.

His Excellency then addressed the Council as follows:-

HONOURABLE GENTLEMEN OF THE LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL,

your

T propose to lay the Estimates for 1895 and the Appropriation Bill before Council on the 3rd or 6th December which day may be most convenient to the Unofficial Members. As I am in a position to do so, I propose this afternoon to explain the financial position of the Colony to you and to open the session of 1894-5 in the usual manner. If you will refer to "Hansard" you will see that at the close of my speech to you on the 4th December last, said "It is my earnest desire, in which you will all cordially join, that still brighter and happier times may, at no distant date, be in store for all classes of residents in this Colony." Well, the brighter and happier times which we all then hoped for have certainly not yet dawned upon the Colony or upon us. As a matter of fact the year 1894 is not likely to be soon forgotten by the community by reason of the disasters which occurred within it. It was ushered in by a rapid fall in the value of silver. From 2/4 the dollar fell to 1/112, a violent fluctuation which was most detrimental to business and which seriously affected the public revenue, which had been estimated on a 2/6 rate. No sooner had a certain amount of stability been established on a low basis of exchange than the Colony was visited with pestilence in the shape of the bubonic plague. The incidents connected with this calamity are so fresh in the minds of all that it is not necessary to do more than to refer to them cursorily. Besides carrying off over 2,500 victims in the island alone, this scourge caused an unparalleled exodus from our shores of some 50,000 or 60,000 Chinese. The effect was felt in every branch of business, and, as I have stated in another document on the subject, the loss to the public revenue, to bankers, merchants, traders, shipping companies, the owners of property, and the labouring classes can never accurately be determined. Hongkong was, as it were, "boycotted" in every direction. The quarantine restrictions imposed against us by some other ports were unnecessarily severe, due, no doubt, to exaggerated accounts of the plague, which, after all, was not proved to be highly infectious except in the case of those living in unhealthy sur- roundings. Vessels were by such means driven as it were from the harbour, and all concerned with shipping interests down to the humblest labourer must have suffered, at all events temporarily, considerable pecuniary loss.

Then, gentlemen, when the plague had ceased, war unhappily broke out between China and Japan. In consequence of the outbreak of hostilities between these powers, it was antici- pated that there might be a revival and an increase of our trade, but I believe I am justified in saying that that expectation has not been realized to any great extent as yet.

The Colony has also been visited by several typhoons, one of which, viz., that of the 4th and 5th October, being of great severity, did a considerable amount of damage to property, though it was unattended with any serious loss of life. These misfortunes, followed by the premature death of the Lady holding the highest position in the Colony, will cause the year 1894 to be remembered on all sides as one of the saddest and most disastrous in the records of the history of Hongkong.

It is not surprising, therefore, that I am obliged to present you with a somewhat unfavourable statement of our financial position. It is not, however, nearly so unfavourable as might have been expected. There is, undoubtedly, a marvellous recuperative power in this small but valuable possession of the Crown, for had it not been for the actual expenditure on account of the plague-some $150,000-and the fall of silver below 2/6, the rate at which the Estimates for 1894 were prepared, which is accountable for another $150,000, I should have had to announce to you a probable surplus of revenue over expenditure in 1894 of some $200,000. I am not, however, able to do so, and some additional taxation is consequently unavoidable.

The Estimated Revenue for 1894 at 2/6 was $2,007,210 and the Expenditure $1,998,745, showing a probable surplus of $8,465.

1

29

From the latest returns the following will approximately be the amounts:

Revenue $2,186,506, $179,000 more than the estimate. Expenditure $2,252,912, deficit $66,406. Of the above Expenditure $150,000, as I have said, was spent in grappling with the plague; $150,000 is owing to depreciation from 2/6 to 2/1 the dollar, and about $22,000 is owing to loss of Rates, Crown Rents, &c., caused by the plague.

For 1895 I have taken 2/1 as the probable average value of the dollar, and the Estimated Returns will be as follows :—

Revenue $1,999,076. Expenditure $2,041,637,-showing a deficit of $42,561. On account of Public Works Extraordinary a further sum of $24,670 will be required, making the deficit $67,231. This deficit is nearly accounted for by the falling off in the Opium Revenue, which shows a decrease of $54,800. The farm will be let from the 1st March, 1895, at $286,000 a year instead of $340,800.

I propose to meet the deficit of $67,231 in the following way :-

(1) By an increase of stamp duties, which is expected to yield $40,000 a year; (2) By an increase in fees to be paid for spirit licences, estimated to yield $16,500 per annum ;

and (3) By an increase in pawnbrokers' fees, yielding $23,950 a year. These sums amount altogether to $80,450, so that the additional taxation will not only cover the deficit but leave a surplus of about $13,200. I have already submitted these proposals to you, gentlemen, the Unofficial Members of Council, and you have expressed your concurrence in them. I may remind you that at the same time you expressed yourselves not averse to still further taxation by way of an increase in rates, a small tax on European shipping, and one also on kerosine if it was necessary to impose them. I am very glad indeed to say that these additional imposts will not now be necessary. For the assistance that you rendered to the Government on the occasions of our meeting to discuss these matters I beg to return you my grateful thanks. When such happy relations exist between the Official and Unofficial Members as now obtain, the duties of a Governor are rendered far less laborious and irksome than they would otherwise be.

The chief liability which the Colony has been obliged to incur in connection with the plague has been that which will arise out of proceedings under the Taipingshan Resumption Ordinance. That Act is now in operation, and during the ensuing year arrangements will have to be made for covering the expenses thrown upon the Colony by its provisions.

The object of the Ordinance is, as you are aware, to permit the resumption by the Crown of a certain prescribed area of the City of Victoria which was one of the filthiest and most overcrowded spots in the Colony, and consequently the centre of the plague. The necessity of the resumption was apparent. According to the best advice available to the Government, the houses in the neighbourhood were infected. Many of the buildings were small, dark, badly drained and ventilated, and many quite unfit for human habitation. It is obvious that whether the wholesale or partial destruction of the buildings and realignment of the streets is eventually decided upon, the work must be under one controlling power, and that power must be the Government.

The resumption of the property, and the consequent provision for compensation for such resumption, was therefore obligatory.

The area comprises, roughly speaking, 400,000 square feet, or 10 acres of land, and the amount of compensation has been roughly estimated at between $700,000 and $800,000. This sum, together with the incidental expenses of the Arbitration Board and its officers, will have to be provided hereafter. It will probably be advisable to raise a loan for that purpose, and in that case I hope that the Colony will be able to meet the interest on it out of the excess of income over expenditure which will accrue from year to year. For the moment, no doubt, this expenditure seems very heavy, but if the steps taken in regard to the resumed area prevent, as it is confidently hoped they may, a recrudescence or recurrence of the disease, no expenditure of money and no sacrifice of time can be deemed too costly or too great.

On the other hand we may certainly look in the future if not for a complete reimbursement of the sums expended, at any rate for a considerable reimbursement by the readjustment of premia and Crown rent on the sale of the property resumed.

Until the survey of the area which is now proceeding is completed, and a definite line of action decided on, it is impossible to give any precise figures as to the amount the property will bring in on its resale.

+.

30

Whatever may be the result of the resumption and the operations connected therewith which I have endeavoured to describe we shall feel that we have done our best honestly to rehabilitate a neighbourhood hitherto pre-eminent for its filth and unhealthiness, and we may be sure that the money expended will not have been expended in vain.

I will now explain the intentions of the Government in respect to Taitam Reservoir. An insufficient supply of water is considered to rank among the several defects of sanitation with which we have had to deal. To meet this defect the Government proposes as soon as possible to raise the existing Reservoir Dam at Taitam by 12 feet 6 inches. We propose also to construct a weir 10 feet above the level of the existing one and to surmount the same by a moveable sluice capable of raising the top water level of the reservoir to a height of 12 feet 6 inches above its present level. It is anticipated that these works under normal conditions will increase the storage capacity of the Reservoir by 78,000,000 gallons, and possibly by the use of the sluice by 98,000,000 gallons. The total storage capacity of Taitam Reservoir alone will then be 400,000,000 gallons. The cost of these works is estimated at $60,000, an amount which can be fairly charged against the Loan of 1892. This matter will be laid before the Public Works Committee of this Council this afternoon.

I take the opportunity of laying on the table a report on the subject of the Water Supply by the Consulting Engineer, Mr. CHADWICK, and I think you will find his remarks in reference to the evils of the intermittent system and the necessity of preventing unne- cessary waste instructive and apposite to the circumstances of Hongkong.

I now come to an extremely interesting question and that is the construction of the Sanitary Board. I need not say that this subject has engaged the most earnest consideration of the Government, and I have consulted you, Gentlemen, and have obtained your written opinions in regard to it. You will remember that the Retrenchment Committee, after a searching enquiry into all the departments of the public service, directed my special attention to the Sanitary Board. The Committee suggested that the whole sanitary system should be placed on a different basis; that all sanitary arrangements and powers should be placed in the hands of one thoroughly competent officer who should be personally responsible to Government for all matters connected with the health of the Colony and for carrying out all sanitary laws and regulations. The majority of the Unofficial Members of this Council appear to concur in that view, and favourable as I am personally to municipal and repre- sentative institutions where they can be safely established, I am bound to say that I consider that their opinion is one that should, in this instance, be acted upon. So far as my experience goes, this Colony stands on quite a different footing, in regard to sanitary matters, from other Colonies with which I am acquainted. The really great difficulty in connection with matters of sanitation in Hongkong arises out of the customs of the Chinese population. You can neither make people sober nor clean by Act of Parliament, and sanitary arrange- ments in this Colony with its 200,000 Chinese inhabitants must be subject to constant supervision and superintendence by a large staff of officers working under a head, who must give his whole time and energies to the duties of his office. That a Sanitary Board, meeting once a fortnight, could properly control and direct such a staff, I do not believe, and that four or five independent gentlemen could be found who have the time and inclination to devote several hours daily to such a task is beyond the bounds of possibility. I hope shortly to be in a position to inform you definitely what steps it has been decided to take to place the Sanitary Board on a new basis.

The Government is indebted to the Retrenchment Committee for its valuable report on the expenditure of the Colony and the possibility of effecting economies in its administration. I have forwarded the report to the Secretary of State, and have submitted most of the recom- mendations of the Committee for his Lordship's favourable consideration.

Gentlemen, there are one or two other matters connected with trade, education, crime, and exchange compensation, to which I feel bound to refer, but I will do so as briefly as possible.

Trade, as represented by shipping and emigration, received, as I have already stated, a severe check in the spring and summer of this year. Emigration was practically stopped for four months and trade to the adjacent ports was disorganised by the quarantine restric- tions imposed and by the absence of numerous Chinese merchants who fled from the Colony. Notwithstanding these hindrances, however, vessels with a total tonnage of no less than 11,813,136 tons passed in and out of the waters of Hongkong during the ten months ending the 31st October last. The cargoes of those vessels aggregated 6,209,191 tons, being a difference of 111,755 tons of shipping and 98,512 tons of cargo as compared with the same period in 1893. If we exclude the junk trade from this calculation, and it was naturally most affected by local causes, the difference between the first ten months of 1894 and 1893 would be 24,000 tons of cargo in favour of 1893.

The revenue collected by the Harbour Department to the 31st October last was $4,000 less than that collected during the same period in the previous year.

1

31

An endeavour was

The educational work of the Colony was also temporarily paralysed. made to counteract the panic that set in at first by keeping the schools at work in spite of the diminished attendance caused by the removal of Chinese families from the Colony. Since September, the schools throughout the city are filling again by the return of fugitives, and in a few months more the decadence will be made good by the recuperative force which is evidently inherent in the educational movement.

For reasons connected with retrenchment, three Government schools have been perma- nently closed. Of the grant-in-aid schools 9 were closed, but 7 new schools have taken their place. Queen's College will, I believe, shortly be placed under the direction of a Governing Body, and the Police School has come under the inspection of the Education Department.

There are now 21 Government schools and 100 grant-in-aid schools at work in the Colony in addition to a considerable number of private schools.

In regard to crime I may observe that there has been a marked decrease in the number of serious offences brought to the notice of the Magistrates.

Larcenies, burglaries, kidnapping offences against the Women and Girls' Protection Ordinance, all show a decline up to the 31st October as compared with 1893. Many of the offences that did occur were directly attributable to the plague and its attendant circum- stances, whilst, on the other hand, much of the decrease is doubtless owing to the existence of that scourge and the flight of the criminal population. Nevertheless, during every month of the year (to the end of October), crime appears to have been at a satisfactorily low ebb. Within the last three weeks, I regret to say, there have been several most serious cases which, we may be sure, will be dealt with rigorously.

With the exception of a new Public Health Ordinance, it will not be necessary to trouble you with much legislation during the ensuing session. This is an announcement which you will receive with gratification.

The question of exchange compensation is one of some difficulty not to say delicacy. You are aware that it has been granted in Ceylon and the Straits Settlements and the Retrenchment Committee suggested that when a favourable opportunity occurred, it should be extended to the Civil Service of Hongkong. The MARQUIS OF RIPON has agreed to terms which, not being so favourable as those granted to the Straits Settlements, the majority of the Hongkong Civil Service have at present declined to accept, whilst others, to the number of about 55, have agreed to accept them. You will be asked by the Senior Unofficial Member to vote $80,000 on this account, a sum sufficient to cover the compensation to be awarded to all the officers entitled to it. Not nearly the whole of that amount will be required unless the officers who now reject the offer agree later on to accept it. For this year the cost can be paid out of balances, which stand, in round numbers, at the very satisfactory figure of $600,000, exclusive of all monies derived from loans. The compensation is as follows future half of an officer's salary while on active service will be calculated at 3/-, and his salary when he is on leave of absence will be paid at the same rate. In the Straits Settlements 4/- is to be granted to officers on leave.

-In

The majority of public officers in Hongkong consider that they are being treated in this respect less favourably than their brother officers in the Straits. They have, consequently, memorialised the Secretary of State, and it is hoped that his Lordship will reconsider his decision in the matter, as the principle of higher remuneration has been recognised in the other Eastern Colonies and the amount involved is only about £1,400 a year.

In conclusion, Gentlemen, I thank you for the attention with which you have listened to my somewhat lengthy statement. In these very critical times it would be rash to attempt to forecast the future, but it seems quite possible, if not probable, that one of the results of the present war will be an expansion of commerce. In that case it is not too much to hope that Hongkong will have its full share in any such development.

I shall faithfully co-operate with you in any measures having for their object the public good, whilst on the other hand I shall rely upon you to assist the Government in all matters which may be conducive to the welfare of the community.

War with its attendant horrors still overshadows the North of China, Corea, and Japan, and the clouds of the recent pestilence in our midst cannot yet be said to be thoroughly dispersed.

Whilst we trust that Great Britain and the other Western powers may not be involved in the former we hope for the merciful preservation of Hongkong from a recurrence of the latter.

Whatever happens, however, we must be prepared at any cost to do our best to guard the public health from danger, to meet any difficulties that may arise, and above all to protect, cherish, and, if possible, develop the large and valuable commerce of this important Colony.

32

STANDING COMMITTEES.-His Excellency appointed the following Committees:-

(a) Finance Committee,-

The Colonial Secretary, Chairman.

All the Members of Council, except the Governor.

(b) Law Committee,--

The Attorney General, Chairman.

The Registrar General.

The Honourable J. J. KESWICK.

The Honourable HO KAI.

The Honourable E. R. BELILIOS.

(c) Public Works Committee,

The Director of Public Works, Chairman.

The Colonial Treasurer.

The Honourable C. P. CHATER.

The Honourable E. R. BELILIOS.

The Honourable A. McConaCHIE,

ADJOURNMENT.—The Council then adjourned till Thursday, the 6th December, 1894.

Read and confirmed, this 6th day of December, 1894.

J. G. T. BUCKLE, Acting Clerk of Councils.

WILLIAM ROBINSON,

Governor.

$

33

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 11.

WEDNESDAY, 6TH DECEMBER, 1894.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(Sir WILLIAM ROBINSON, K.C.M.G.).

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary and Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE

STEWART LOCKHART).

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

"}

the Colonial Treasurer, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES.)

>>

the Director of Public Works, (FRANCIS ALFRED COOPER).

19

the Harbour Master, (ROBERT MURRAY RUMSEY, R.N.). CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

;;

""

""

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

Ho KAI, M.B., C.M.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS, C.M.G.

ALEXANDER MCCONACHIE.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 28th November, were read.

The Acting Colonial Secretary moved that the Minutes be amended by the addition of the Colonial Treasurer's name to the list of the Public Works Committee.

The Director of Public Works seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

The Minutes were then confirmed as amended.

PAPERS. The Acting Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the Report of the Finance Committee dated the 28th November, 1894, (No. 2), and moved that it be adopted by the Council.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to nem, con.

The Director of Public Works laid on the table Reports of the Public Works Committee dated 25th September, 1893, and 28th November, 1894, (Nos. 5 of 1893 and 1 of 1894 respectively), and moved that they be adopted by the Council.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

His Excellency the Governor laid on the table a Despatch from the Secretary of State for the Colonies dated the 23rd October, 1894, respecting the extinction of the plague.

MOTION.-The Acting Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, moved the adoption of the following Resolution made by the Sanitary Board :—

RESOLUTION

Of the Sanitary Board fixing, pursuant to Bye-law 17 of the 21st July, 1892, the day on which certain Bye-laws for licensing and

regulating Common Lodging-Houses shall

come into force.

"That the 1st day of January, 1895, be fixed by this Board, under Bye-law No. 17 made on the 21st day of July, 1892, and approved by the Legislative Council on the 30th day of November in the same year, as the day upon which shall come into force the Bye-laws for liceusing and regulating Common Lodging-Houses made under sub-section 12 of section 13 of Ordinance No. 24 of 1887, and sub-section (d) of section 1 of Ordinance No. 26 of 1890."

Sanitary Board Room, Hongkong, 20th September, 1894. The Attorney General seconded.

Question--put and agreed to nem. con.

E. A. RAM, Acting Secretary, Sanitary Board.

34

BYE-LAWS.-The Acting Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, moved the adoption of the following Additional Bye-laws made by the Sanitary Board :-

ADDITIONAL BYE-LAWS

Made by the Sanitary Board under Section 13, Sub-section 6. of Ordinance 24 of 1887.

1. The removal of excretal matters from premises other than those from which such matters are removed by the night-soil contractor, shall be carried out by night-soil carriers registered by and holding a licence from the Sanitary Board.

2. Licences shall be issued in the first instance to the existing private night-soil carriers, and no additional licences shall be granted unless and until the necessity for their issue shall have been shewn to the satisfaction of the Sanitary Board.

3. Licences to night-soil carriers shall be issued annually and shall expire on the 31st of Decem- ber of the year in which they are issued.

4. Licences shall be issued free of charge. In the event of the loss of a licence a duplicate shall be issued on payment of a fee of 25 cents.

5. Every night-soil carrier licensed under these bye-laws shall, for the purposes of his work, use a bucket of such pattern as may from time to time be approved by the Sanitary Board.

6. Every night-soil carrier licensed under these bye-laws shall remove at least once in every 24 hours all excretal matters from the premises from which he shall have undertaken to remove such

matters.

7. No night-soil carrier licensed under these bye-laws shall convey excretal matters along any public street or road except between the hours of 1 a.m. and 7 A.M.

8. The night-soil carriers licensed under these bye-laws shall elect yearly out of their number a Committee of not more than 12 in number to represent them.

9. Such Committee shall assist the Sanitary Board in exercising a strict supervision over the licensed night-soil carriers, and in such other matters connected with the carrying out of these bye- laws as it may be called upon to do by the Board.

10. Any licensed night-soil carrier, being convicted of a second offence against these bye-laws, shall forfeit his licence in addition to any penalty inflicted under section 83 of the Public Health Ordinance.

Made by the Sanitary Board on the 18th day of October, 1894.

The Attorney General seconded. Question-put and agreed to nem. con.

EDWARD A. RAM, Acting Secretary.

QUESTION. Mr. BELILIOS, pursuant to notice, asked the following question :-

Have the Government, in view of the statements and recommendations contained in the recently received letter from Mr. Osbert Chadwick on the water supply of this Colony, decided to consider the expedience of putting meters in all the houses to which it is laid on for the purpose of pre- venting waste?

The Acting Colonial Secretary replied.

BILL ENTITLED CC AN ORDINANCE TO APPLY A SUM NOT EXCEEDING TWO MILLIONS FOUR HUNDRED AND TWENTY THOUSAND, FIVE HUNDRED AND ONE DOLLARS TO THE PUBLIC SERVICE OF THE YEAR 1895."-The Acting Colonial Secretary moved the first reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

6

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE CATTLE DISEASES, SLAUGHTER-HOUSES, AND MARKETS ORDINANCE, 1887."-The Attorney General moved the first reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

{

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE STAMP ORDINANCE, 1886.'"--The Attorney General moved the first reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded. Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

!

35

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE POST OFFICE ORDINANCE, 1887."-The Attorney General moved the first reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE SPIRIT LICENCES ORDINANCE, 1886.' "--The Attorney General moved the first reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question- put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE TO SECURE, IN CERTAIN CASES, THE RIGHTS OF PROPERTY IN TELEGRAPHIC MESSAGES "--Mr. MCCONACHIE moved the first reading of the Bill.

Mr. KESWICK seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

ADJOURNMENT.-His Excellency adjourned the Council till Wednesday, the 12th instant, at 3 P.M.

*

Read and confirmed, this 12th day of December, 1894.

J. G. T. BUCKLE,

Acting Clerk of Councils.

Y

WILLIAM ROBINSON,

Governor.

...

37

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 12.

WEDNESDAY, 12TH DECEMBER, 1894.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(Sir WILLIAM ROBINSON, K.C.M.G.).

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary and Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE

STEWART LOCKHART).

"}

""

19

"">

>>

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

the Colonial Treasurer, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-Innes).

the Director of Public Works, (FRANCIS ALFRED Cooper).

the Harbour Master, (ROBERT MURRAY RUMSEY, R.N.). CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK,

Ho KAI, M.B., C.M.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS, C.M.G.

ALEXANDER MCCONACHIE.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 6th December, were read and confirmed.

FINANCIAL MINUTE.-The Acting Colonial Secretary laid on the table the following Financial Minute, and moved that it be referred to the Finance Committee:-

C.S.O. 2843 of 189i,

WILLIAM Robinson.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Nine hundred and Forty Dollars and Five Cents, ($940.05), on account of a deficiency in Stamps and Postal Notes as shewn in the accounts of the late Postal Agent at Ningpo, now deceased.

Government House, Hongkong, 8th December, 1894.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

BILL ENTITLED " AN ORDINANCE TO APPLY A SUM NOT EXCEEDING Two MILLIONS Four hundred AND TWENTY THOUSAND, FIVE HUNDRED AND ONE DOLLARS TO THE PUBLIC SERVICE OF THE YEAR 1895."-The Acting Colonial Secretary moved the second reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question--put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

The Acting Colonial Secretary moved that the Bill be referred to Finance Committee for con- sideration.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

BILL ENTITLED

"AN ORDINANCE TO SECURE, IN CERTAIN CASES, THE RIGHTS OF PROPERTY IN TELEGRAPHIC MESSAGES."-Mr. MCCONACHIE moved the second reading of the Bill, and addressed the Council.

Mr. KESWICK seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

ADJOURNMENT.—His Excellency the Governor adjourned the Council until Monday, the 17th December, 1894, at 3 P.M.

Read and confirmed, this 17th day of December, 1894.

J. G. T. BUCKLE, Acting Clerk of Councils.

WILLIAM ROBINSON,

Governor.

39

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 13.

MONDAY, 17TH DECEMBER, 1894.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(Sir WILLIAM ROBINSON, K.C.M.G.).

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary and Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE

STEWART LOCKHART).

""

""

""

""

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

the Colonial Treasurer, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES.)

the Director of Public Works, (Francis Alfred Cooper).

the Harbour Master, (ROBERT MURRAY RUMSEY, R.N.). CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

JAMES JOHNStone Keswick.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS, C.M.G.

ALEXANDER MCCONACHIE. -

The Council met pursuant to adjournment. (The hour of Meeting having been changed from 3 P.M. to 2.30 P.M. by command of His Excellency the Governor.)

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 12th instant, were read and confirmed.

REPORT OF THE FINANCE COMMITTEE. The Acting Colonial Secretary by command of His Excellency the Governor laid on the table the report of the Finance Committee dated 12th December, 1894, (No. 3 of 1894), and moved that it be adopted.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

BILL ENTITLED " AN ORDINANCE TO APPLY A SUM NOT EXCEEDING TWO MILLIONS FOUR HUNDRED AND TWENTY THOUSAND, FIVE HUNDRED AND ONE DOLLARS TO THE PUBLIC SERVICE OF THE YEAR 1895."-Council in Committee on the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary moved the amendments of the several items in the Bill recom- mended by the Finance Committee.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Dr. Ho KAI moved that the item of $396,000 for Military Expenditure be omitted from the Bill. Mr. BELILIOS seconded.

Mr. KESWICK Supported the amendment, and addressed the Council.

His Excellency the Governor replied.

Mr. CHATER addressed the Council.

The Council divided.

For the amendment. Hon. A. McCONACHIE. Hon. E. R. BELILIOS. Hon. Dr. Ho KAI. Hon. J. J. KESWICK. Hon. C. P. CHATER.

Amendment lost by a majority of one. Bill reported as amended in Committee.

The Council resumed.

Against the amendment. The Harbour Master.

The Director of Public Works. The Colonial Treasurer. The Attorney General. The Acting Colonial Secretary. His Excellency the Governor.

The Acting Colonial Secretary moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

1

Y

Bill passed.

40

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE STAMP ORDINANCE, 1886. "--The Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill and addressed the Council.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded and addressed the Council.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

6

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE SPIRIT LICENCES ORDINANCE, 1886.'"--The Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill, and addressed the Council.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Bill reported as amended in Committee.

The Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time and passed. -

6

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE POST OFFICE ORDINANCE, 1887.'"-The Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded. Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

The Attorney General moved certain amendments in the title of the Bill and in sections 1 and 3. The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Amendments agreed to.

Section 2. Dr. Ho KAI moved as an amendment the elimination of the words contains or" in the third line.

Mr. BELILIOS seconded.

The Colonial Treasurer supported the amendment.

The Council divided.

For the amendment. Hon. E. R. BELILIOS. Hon. Dr. Ho KAI.

The Colonial Treasurer.

Amendment lost by a majority of four. Bill reported as amended in Committee.

The Council resumed.

Against the amendment. Hon. A. MCCONACHIE. Hon. J. J. KESWICK.

Hon. C. P. CHATER.

The Harbour Master.

The Director of Public Works. The Attorney General.

The Acting Colonial Secretary.

The Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time and passed.

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE CATTLE DISEASES, SLAUGHTER-HOUSES, AND MARKETS ORDINANCE, 1887.'"-The Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Bill reported as amended in Committee.

The Council resumed.

The Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time and passed.

:

I

.

145

41

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE TO SECURE, IN CERTAIN CASES, THE RIGHTS OF PROPERTY IN TELEGRAPHIC MESSAGES."--Council in Committee on the Bill.

The Attorney General stated that the Bill had been re-cast since the last meeting, and moved the adoption of certain amendments in clauses 3 and 4 of the Draft Bill now before the Council.

Mr. MCCONACHIE seconded.

Amendments agreed to.

Dr. Ho KAI moved that clause 6 be amended by the addition of the words "or to a fine not exceeding $500" after the words "twelve months" at the end of the first paragraph.

Mr. CHATER seconded.

The Council divided.

For the amendment.

Hon. Dr. HO KAI. Hon. C. P. CHATER.

Against the amendment.

Hon. A. McCONACHIE. Hon. E. R. BELILIOS.

The Colonial Treasurer.

Hon. J. J. KESWICK.

Amendment lost by a majority of four.

Bill reported as amended in Committee.

The Council resumed.

The Harbour Master.

The Director of Public Works. The Attorney General. The Acting Colonial Secretary.

ADJOURNMENT.-His Excellency the Governor adjourned the Council till Thursday, the 20th instant, at 3.30 P.M.

Read and confirmed, this 20th day of December, 1894.

J. G. T. BUCKLE, Acting Clerk of Councils.

WILLIAM ROBINSON,

Governor.

1

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 14.

THURSDAY, 20TH DECEMBER, 1894.

43

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(Sir WILLIAM ROBINSON, K.C.M.G.).

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary and Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE

STEWART LOCKHART).

:)

>>

27

17

,

}}

13

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

the Colonial Treasurer, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES).

the Harbour Master, (ROBERT MURRAY RUMSEY, R.N.).

JAMES JOHNSTONE. KESWICK.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS, C.M.G.

ALEXANDER MCCONACHIE.

ABSENT:

The Honourable the Director of Public Works, (FRANCIS ALFRED COOPER).

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

>>

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 17th instant, were read and confirmed.

His Excellency the Governor stated that the Director of Public Works was excused from attend-

ing the meeting, being engaged at a meeting of the Sanitary Board.

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE STAMP ORDINANCE, 1886.'"-Bill reported as amended in Committee.

The Council resumed.

The Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time and passed.

BILL ENTITLED 66

AN ORDINANCE TO SECURE, IN CERTAIN CASES, THE RIGHTS OF PROPERTY IN TELEGRAPHIC MESSAGES."-The Attorney General moved the addition of a suspending clause in view of objections to the Bill raised by certain parties, which were about to be embodied in a memorial to the Secretary of State.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Mr. MCCONACHIE moved the third reading of the Bill as amended in Committee, and subject to the addition of a suspending clause.

Mr. KESWICK seconded.

Bill read a third time and passed.

ADJOURNMENT.--His Excellency the Governor adjourned the Council until Saturday, the 22nd instant, at 2 P.M.

Read and confirmed, this 22nd day of December, 1894.

J. G. T. BUCKLE, Acting Clerk of Councils.

WILLIAM ROBINSON,

Governor.

45

:

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 15.

SATURDAY, 22ND DECEMBER, 1894.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(Sir WILLIAM ROBINSON, K.C.M.G.).

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary and Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE

STEWART LOCKHART).

"

>>

35

""

>>

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

the Colonial Treasurer, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES).

the Director of Public Works, (FRANCIS ALFRED COOPER).

the Harbour Master, (ROBERT MURRAY RUMSEY, R.N.). CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

Ho KAI, M.B., C.M.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS, C.M.G.

ALEXANDER MCCONACHIE.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting held on the 20th instant, were read and confirmed.

BILL ENTITLED

AN ORDINANCE TO MAKE PROVISION WITH REGARD TO CERTAIN HOUSES CLOSED DURING THE PREVALENCE OF THE BUBONIC PLAGUE AND TO MAKE FURTHER AND BETTER PROVISION FOR THE HEALTH OF THE COLONY."-The Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill and addressed the Council.

The Director of Public Works seconded and addressed the Council.

Dr. Ho KAI addressed the Council.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council in Committee on the Bill,

ADJOURNMENT.-His Excellency the Governor adjourned the Meeting till Monday, the 24th instant, at 3 P.M.

Read and confirmed, this 24th day of December, 1894.

J. G. T. BUCKLE, Acting Clerk of Councils.

<

WILLIAM ROBINSON,

Governor.

424

7

47

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 16.

MONDAY, 24TH DECEMBER, 1894.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(Sir WILLIAM ROBINSON, K.C.M.G.).

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary and Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE

STEWART LOCKHART).

AA

27

""

"

""

>>

""

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

the Colonial Treasurer, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES).

the Director of Public Works, (FRANCIS ALFRED COOPER). the Harbour Master, (ROBERT MURRAY RUMSEY, R.N.). CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

Ho KAI, M.B., C.M.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS, C.M.G. ALEXANDER MCCONACHIE.

ABSENT:

The Honourable JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 22nd December, were read and confirmed. His Excellency the Governor stated that Mr. KESWICK was excused from attending the Meeting. BILL ENTITLED

"AN ORDINANCE TO MAKE PROVISION WITH REGARD TO CERTAIN HOUSES CLOSED DURING THE PREVALENCE OF THE BUBONIC PLAGUE AND TO MAKE FURTHER AND BETTER PROVISION FOR THE HEALTH OF THE COLONY."-Council in Committee on the Bill.

Bill reported as amended in Committee.

The Council resumed.

The Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time and passed.

His Excellency the Governor addressed the Council.

Mr. CHATER briefly responded.

ADJOURNMENT.-His Excellency the Governor adjourned the Council sine die.

Read and confirmed, this 26th day of February, 1895.

J. G. T. BUCKLE,

Acting Clerk of Councils.

WILLIAM ROBINSON,

Governor.

357.

:

No. 2

28

i

HONGKONG.

THE COLONIAL SURGEON'S REPORT FOR 1893.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor.

GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL,

HONGKONG, 11th July, 1894.

SIR,-I have the honour to forward my Annual Report for the year 1893, of the work done in the different Establishments under my supervision together with the reports of the Superintendent of the Government Civil Hospital, the Superintendent of the Epidemic Hulk Hygeia, the Medical Officer in charge of the Gaol, the Superintendent of the Vaccine Institute and the Government Analyst. I regret that this report has not been sent in before, but it has been delayed by the outbreak of the Plague which has kept me at work day and night for the past two months.

POLICE.

The total number of admissions to Hospital was 26 more than in 1892. The total number of deaths in the Force was 6 as compared with 7 in 1892. The number of European Police admitted to the Hospital was 134 as compared with 152 in 1892, the number of Indian Police 255 as compared with 224 in 1892, the number of Chinese Police 133 as compared with 120 in 1892. A decrease of admissions of Europeans of 18, an increase of Indians of 31, an increase of Chinese of 13 as compared with 1892. Three of the deaths occurred in Hospital, one Indian and two Chinese. One European died of small-pox on board the Hygeia. One Indian was drowned and one Chinese died while away in his own country on leave. The Indians suffered worse at Aberdeen Station this year than at any other. This year 30 were admitted from that station as compared with 10 in 1892, and this station alone, small as it is, accounts for two thirds of the increase of sickness among them this year they were fairly frightened of being sent there and changes had to be made frequently. The fever there was of a bad type though none of them died, they were many days on the sick list.

The admissions to Hospital from the various sections of the Force for the past ten years are given in the following table:-

Admissions to Hospital, 1884,

Europeans. 87.....

Indians.

Chinese.

Do.,

1885,

....124..

224...... .208.

...175

163

Do.,

1886,

...138...

.243........

.221

Do.,

1887.

...139.

Do.,

1888,

.147

.293.. .279....

..187

..231

Do.,

1889,

...166

Do.,

1890,..

..149.....

.230................

.254...............179

..........194

Do.,

1891,

169.....

.285...............118

Do.,

1892,..

152..... 134.....

224................120

255...

Do.,

:

1884,

1893, ........... 134.

...........133

This table compares very well with former years as regards Europeans and Chinese and fairly well as regards the Indians. The prevailing disease has been fever of a malarial type.

The following table gives the total admissions to Hospital, and deaths in the Force for the last ten years:-

Admissions.

.....486..

Deaths.

7

I

1885,

..495...

9

1886,

...602...........

....14

1887,

.619.......

9

1888,

657....

...15

1889,

590....

.14

1890,

1891,

1892,

1893,

...582

.570. ...496....

..522

7

7

7

6

Only three deaths.

year's

have been better as regards sickness and none so good as regards the number of

358

TROOPS.

The average number of Troops in Garrison last year was 2,718 as compared with 2,370 in 1892. There was an increase of only 32 in the number of White Troops, yet there was an increase of admis- sions to Hospital of 252 as compared with 1892.

There was an increase of 316 in the numbers of Black and Chinese Troops, yet there was a decrease in the number of admissions to Hospital of 169 as compared with 1892.

Among the White Troops there was an increase of 1 in the number of deaths here as compared with 1892. Among the Black and Chinese Troops there was a decrease of 4 in the number of deaths here as compared with 1892, but six deaths occurred among men of the Hongkong Regiment away on leave. Some of these may be attributed to Hongkong as possibly some went on sick leave. Notwith- standing that while the White Troops suffer more and more every year, there is a great improvement in the health of the Coloured portion as I predicted last year there would be as they became acclimatized. In the total number of Troops there is a considerable improvement in both the number of admissions and the number of deaths but this, as I have shown, is due principally to improvement in the general health of the Coloured Troops.

The following table gives the sickness and mortality among the Troops for the past ten years:—

1884,

1885,

1886,

1887,

1888,

1889,

1890,

1891,

1892,

1893,

....

Admissions.

1,097..... .1,190..

..1,607..

..1,749..

.1,485..

.1,732.

.1,915..

....

.1,851....

2,844....

2;

,718.....

Deaths.

...12

..24

9

.14

..21

.16

.15

....17

.31

..28

As will be seen in Table IV the total numbers of White Troops for the year averaged 1,414; their admissions to Hospital were 2,015, deaths 17.

The total number of Coloured Troops averaged 1,304, their admissions to Hospital 912, deaths 11. So that with only an excess in the total average number of 110 over the Coloured Troops they exceeded them in admissions to Hospital by 1,103; in fact they showed more than double the amount of sickness by 191.

The majority of the Coloured Troops are housed in mat huts. The majority of White Troops are housed in old barracks and Chinese houses converted into barracks; originally the drainage of the old barracks in 1874 was very bad indeed, and by quoting my reports at the time the Department of Royal Engineers obtained a vote of £5,000 to remedy this as far as possible, but as I pointed out in those reports the main drainage of the town was itself defective and though a great improvement in the health of the troops was apparent for a time, this improvement did not continue and, as is shown by the preceding table, has been steadily going from bad to worse for the past ten years. At the time of writing the Barracks have just been all connected with the new drainage system and it remains to be seen if that will produce any improvement.

GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL.

The Superintendent's report for this year is very satisfactory in every respect with a considerable increase in admissions from disease; there is a decrease in the deaths, also a considerable increase in the cases requiring surgical operations with a decrease in deaths. A considerable increase in the number of private paying patients shows that the nursing staff are fully appreciated and in most years now we have more applicants for private wards than we can accommodate. Though the charges for this accommodation have been increased this year 25 per cent. the demand is not diminished and the charge is, I think, still too small being barely the ordinary charge for a room in a hotel less airy and not more comfortably furnished with no charges for coals, gas, extras, medical attendance or nursing. The private patient has food brought to his own room, all the wine, spirits, milk, extracts of beef, &c., requisite for his case, nursing such as he could not procure better in his own house in Europe, medical attendance at least as good as any he can get here for the sum of $4 per diem or $120 a month. Then the patient gets board, lodging and attendance in his own room which cannot be procured at an hotel for the same price, and in addition medical attendance, medicines, nursing and other extras, each of which would have to be paid for separately under any other circumstances. Accommodation of this sort is becoming every year more necessary when so many people live in hotels, apartments, and messes where it is impossible in serious cases for them to get proper attendance.

The Superintendent's report is so complete that there is little to add except as regards his recommendations. The necessity of a permanent structure for cases that require segregation being

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359

afflicted with contagious and infectious disease cannot be too strongly represented. The wooden house used for this purpose for over ten years is not only wanting in proper accommodation, especially for private paying patients, but it has been damaged by fire and is in such a state of decay that it is not worth repairing. Sanction has been given for a permanent structure and plans drawn up, and I hope by next year it will be in use.

An operating theater is also another great want and this has also been sanctioned, this also I hope will be in use before the end of the year.

There was an increase of 70 in the admissions from Malarial Fevers as compared with last year. In 1892, 286 were admitted, in 1893, 356, but last year as in 1892 all were of a mild type compared with previous years; there have been no deaths among these cases for two years.

This year 13 cases of Typhoid Fever were under treatment the largest number admitted for many years; however only five of them were contracted in this Colony, of the 13 cases 2 died.

There were 50 cases of Dysentry under treatment, of that number one died.

Of 153 on whom operations were made six died.

Of the 67 deaths that occurred in the Hospital, 32 of the patients were brought in in a moribund condition, 23 dying within 24 hours and 9 within 48 hours.

The following table shews the number and classification of those brought to Hospital for the past 10 years—

Police,

1884. 1885.

1886.

1887. 1888. 1889. 1890.

1891. 1892. 1893.

486

495

602

619

657

590

582

570

496

522

Board of Trade,

.....

60

100

132

103

153

135

110

135

157

132

Private paying Patients,

259

283

381

324

313

402

527

464

378

467

:

Government Servants,

96

124

144

147

159

135

191

179

168

205

Police Cases,

231

238

142

208

242

252

264

240

232

247

Destitutes,

222

270

222

255

248

279

283

279

284

262

1,354 1,510 1,623 1,656 1,772 1,793

1,957 1,867 1,715 1,835

There is a slight increase in the number of admissions from the Police Force, a large increase in the number of private paying patients, and a considerable increase in admissions among Government servants. Of the 205 admissions from the last class 84 were Gaol Officers, in the other classes the difference is but slight. The majority of the subordinates in Government employ are compelled to live in houses built for Chinese owing to high rents charged for more suitable accommodation. This class of house is entirely unsuited for the use of Europeans, very draughty and cold in winter with no means of heating the rooms, as the only fire-place in a Chinese house is in the kitchen. With Chinese living in a crowded state in the other stories of the building, as is frequently the case, it is no wonder in this class the cases show a pretty steady increase of late years. There is no other accommodation obtainable in the central districts of the town for any single European drawing pay of $50 or under, or any married man with a family drawing $100 or under per mensem.

The percentage of deaths to admissions (3.65) is the lowest in the last ten years. See Table VI. The following table gives the admissions and deaths in this Hospital for the past ten years :----

1884,

1885,

1886,

1887,

1888,

1889,

1890,

1891,

1892,

1893,

Admissions.

Deaths.

..1,354....

..50

.1,510..

..76

.1,623...

.79

1,656.......

.....89

1,772....

...80

.1,793.

...77

.1,957.

98

.1,867.

.84

.1,715..

·.68

.1,835...

...67

Only in one year has the number of deaths been smaller, but in that year (1884) the admissions were nearly 500 less.

Only in two years have the numbers of admissions been larger, 1890-91, and in those years the number of deaths in proportion to admissions was much larger.

Fees from paying patients in the Hospital and Lunatic Asylum amounted to $18,239.73, the largest sum ever taken in fees in one year. All of the staff have worked well and the services of the Matron, Miss EASTMOND, and her staff of Nursing Sisters have been invaluable. Dr. ATKINSON has gone home on a well earned leave, and I regret that the histories of certain patients he alludes to as being in his appendix are not given, as Dr. LowsoN now acting for him, owing to the great amount of work entailed by the epidemic of Plague, has not had time to write them up for him.

:

3

360.

LUNATIC ASYLUMS.

In the European Lunatic Asylum there were seven cases remaining over from 1892 and nine new admissions making a total of 16 under treatment during the year, the same as in 1892. This is the largest number we have ever had under treatment in one year and much in excess of former years. One death occurred among them.

One Coloured Lunatic remained over from 1892 and two more were admitted this year, making a total of 3 under treatment. No deaths. Ten Chinese lunatics were left over from 1892 and 11 more admitted, making a total of 21 under treatment during the year. Among these there were 4 deaths.

The majority of the Lunatics of all classes have either been discharged cured or sent to their own country.

SMALL-POX HUT AND HULK HYGEIA.

In these two places 61 cases were admitted, 10 in the wooden hut attached to the Government Civil Hospital and 51 on board the Hulk Hygeia. All the deaths occurred among the patients on the Hygeia. There were 25 Europeans among the admissions; of whom 3 died, 11 coloured of whom one died, and 25 Asiatics of whom 4 died. Dr. Lowson, Superintendent in charge of the Hulk Hygeia, has written a very interesting report of the working on board and makes some recommendations. With regard to the establishment of a steam pinnace I think this will not be required. The Hulk Hygeia has been removed over to the main Island for the accommodation of Plague patients during the present epidemic and I see no reason why she should not remain where she is; she is just as near the quarantine station for vessels as she was in her old location.

I quite agree with Dr. Lowson that the Hygeia is no place for suspected cases, as isolation on board is impossible; a lightly boarded portion from the main ward and with doors opening into it can in no sense be called isolation, and I very much regret that we were compelled to receive such cases on board. I hope it may not occur again, as the small-pox wooden hut attached to the Government Civil Hospital is now very old, it was erected about twelve years ago, and has been last year partially destroyed by fire. A temporary matshed has been built for use pending the erection of a permanent building plans for which have been drawn up and sanctioned. With his recommendations as regards the reception of small-pox Chinese patients in the wards provided by the Tung Wa Hospital I also concur not only for the reason that this Establishment under Chinese supervision and treatment is in the Central District of the City, but also because I believe that the mortality would be considerably less among them. As it was considered advisable that they should not have charge of lunatics and a special asylum had to be built for the Chinese lunatics under European supervision I see no reason why Chinese small-pox cases should not be isolated on board the Hygeia for the reasons given, especially if the Hygeia remains about 100 yards from shore where she now is instead of being two miles away.

The question of segregating a large number of Asiatic passengers is a very difficult one now that Stone Cutters' Island is wholly taken up by the Military. Even when we had that to fall back upon it was a troublesome business besides a very expensive one; the difficulty consisting of preventing escape from isolation. The ground would have to be walled round like a Gaol and a heavy guard required to prevent an outbreak amongst them such as twice occurred on Stone Cutters' Island when they threatened to murder those who were in attendance on them.

PUBLIC MORTUARY.

Table VIII gives the returns of dead bodies sent to the Mortuary for examination. The total number was 139. Of these 4 were European male adults, 99 Chinese male adults, 22 female adults, 5 male children and 8 female children. Other nationalities 1 male adult. Of these 38 were found to have died of disease, 74 Accidental, 21 Suicidal and 6 Homicidal deaths.

VICTORIA GAOL.

The following table gives the number of admissions to the Gaol and the daily average number of prisoners for the past ten years :-

1884, 1885,

1886,

1887,

1888,

1889,

1890,

1891,

1892,

1893,

Total No. admitted

to Gaol.

4,023.... .3,610.. 4,600. ..4,302.

.3,627. .3,705.. .3,444.

....

..5,231........... ..5,046.....

4,010.............

Daily average No.

of Prisoners.

...552.00 .530.00 ...674.00

...584.00

...531.00

.581.00 ...566.00 ...507.00

.515.00

458.00

1

361

t

!

=

There is a decrease in the admissions to Gaol of 136 as compared with 1892 with a decrease in the daily average number under detention of 57. This year the daily average is 458, the smallest daily average since 1877 when the daily average was 395.22.

The number of prisoners admitted to the Gaol Hospital was 272 as compared with 312 in 1892 a decrease of 40. The number of prisoners treated in their cells was 523 as compared with 723 in 1892, a decrease of 200. Of those treated in their cells 119 had contusions, the result of floggings, as com- pared with 181 in 1892, a decrease of 62. From the same cause 40 cases were admitted to Hospital for treatment as compared with 32 in 1892, an increase of 8.

The chief causes of admissions to Hospital are Anemia and General Debility. The chief causes for the treatment of patients in their cells are Ringworm and Itch.

There were 10 Opium Smokers admitted to Hospital. None died.

There were only two deaths from disease among the 4,010. One man hanged himself in his cell and one man was hanged by order of the Supreme Court making a total of four deaths in all or less than 1 per 1,000 or counting only those who died from disease less than 1 for every 2,000 prisoners. Very few Gaols can beat that in any country and according to the report of Dr. MARQUES, the Medical Officer, some of the prisoners were kept alive by being in Gaol, the two that died were only sent in for one week's imprisonment. One died from Phthisis and the other from Edema of the lungs coupled with General Debility so that they were almost moribund when sent into Gaol.

There were 64 Opium Smokers admitted to Gaol. Of these 10 were taken into the Hospital for

treatment.

Table IX gives the age, number of years addicted to the habit, how much each consumed per diem, weight on admission to Gaol and for the first four weeks of detention. One man smoked 5 mace per diem and had been a smoker for ten years, weighed 129 lbs. on admission, and decreased to 123 lbs. at the end of the first month, he was never in hospital when in Gaol. Another who used 4 mace per diem had been a smoker for seven years, weighed 127 on admission, increased to 130 lbs. in the first week of detention, but in the following three weeks decreased to 125 lbs.; he was in Hospital while detained in Gaol suffering from Anæmia. One man who smoked 1 mace per diem, weighed 126 lbs.

11⁄2 on admission, increased at the end of a month to 131 tbs.; he had been a smoker for six years. One man aged 52 had been a smoker for thirty years, consumed 24 mace per diem, was 121 tbs. on admission, and increased his weight to 126 lbs. at the end of the month; he was in Hospital for General Debility and Anæmia. There were 4 men who had smoked for thirty years, all increased in weight at the end of the month. One man, aged 64, who had smoked 2 mace for forty years increased his weight from 80 lbs. to 83 during his three weeks' detention; he was in Hospital for General Debility. Another man aged 62 a smoker of 2 mace for forty years lost 2 lbs. during three weeks' detention, but he was never in Hospital. Now all these men spent from $4 to $12 a month for opium so it is more than probable they had better food outside than they got in the Gaol even when in Hospital. When a man of 62 who has been a smoker for forty years and suffers nothing but the loss of 2 tbs. weight when deprived of it for three weeks there cannot be much harm in this very vicious habit; he consumes three times as much opium as the average Indian opium-eater using 20 grs. of prepared opium against the 6 or 8 grs. of crude opium of the Indian opium-eater. There are very few Indian opium-eaters that can afford to spend Rs-8 a month. I see one of the Indian witnesses on the late Commission represented the children being quiet at night when their father was at home smoking his opium pipe but fractious when he was away from home at night and attributes it to the atmosphere caused by the smoke. There is no smoke in a divan full of smokers of opium but half a dozen tobacco smokers would thicken the atmosphere of a room pretty well. Neither does morphia travel in the atmosphere any distance as any chemist could tell him. I doubt from my experiments and experience of twenty years and more whether any morphia gets as far as the smokers' lungs let alone being thrown out of them again and so I very much doubt if the vapour from their fathers' pipe had anything to do with quieting the children, in fact I am quite sure it had not. The smoke from an opium smoker vanishes immediately it is ejected from the mouth. It does not go curling and streaming about as the smoke does from a tobacco smoker. I have smoked many hundreds of pipes of opium in my time with inveterate old opium smokers, and I am an inveterate tobacco smoker and have been for over forty years so I ought to have some experience in the matter.

TUNG WAH HOSPITAL.

The number of patients treated in this Hospital during the year was 2,255. Of these 1,625 were discharged, 1,239 died. Out patients 135,608 were treated. 442 moribund cases were admitted to this Hospital during the year and there remained in Hospital 105 at the end of the year. See Table XII.

There were 66 cases of Small-pox admitted to the segregated wards of this Hospital during the year. 25 were discharged cured, 41 died.

There were 2,639 vaccinations done in the City of Victoria, 141 in the out-districts. Total 2,780.

WOMEN'S HOSPITAL.

Thus described on the door plate of this establishment for the past year but mentioned in all my previous Annual Reports as the Lock Hospital.

362

This is the last return I shall make under this heading, as by order of the Secretary of State all medical examination of women has been abolished and the wards have now become the Venereal Wards for women attached to the Government Civil Hospital. For the last six years as I have shown in my reports the examination of the women has been voluntary and they have only been admitted to Hospital at their own request, who if their condition allowed went out for a few hours daily or if not their female friends had free admissions to visit them. As all of them can make themselves understood in English there has been no need for interpreter. Last year the order came from the Secretary of State that all inedical examination was to be abolished within six months.

At the request of the women I wrote a letter to Government explaining matters in full, that they had learnt the benefits they received from examination and requesting its continuance. This report was sent home and an answer was received a few months ago confirming the previous order from the Secretary of State. The women then offered the nurse if she would leave the Government service, to pay her a better salary, furnish a house for her so that two rooms could be used as wards, if she would attend on them and I would take medical charge and examine them as usual offering also to pay me for doing so; but to their great disappointment I explained this could not be done.

This institution had worked since the beginning of 1858 as Table XV shows, 28 years under the Contagious Diseases Ordinance, and six years as a voluntary attendance Venereal Hospital for women. How carefully it had been worked when enforced by law is shewn by the ready attendance of the women at their own request for six years after the law was abolished. The Justices of the Peace have visited the Hospital once a week and never had a single complaint made. It seems very hard that their wishes should not be complied with as very many women do not know they are diseased till they are accused of having diseased others or till discomfort or pain sets in, and I think after forcing it on them for 28 years not to permit their voluntary attendance when they have learnt the value of it is hardly just and is a severe blow to the health of the Colony. The largest number detained in Hospital in one year when the law was in force was in 1870 when there were 722 admissions, the smallest number detained while the law was in force was in 1881, when there were only 44 admissions. That also was the smallest number in the 20 years I have been here. The largest number in the last 20 years detained was 411.

This year there were 63 admissions and 11,603 examinations made, there are 279 registered women who attend voluntarily, allowing that each woman missed the examination 12 times in the year when she was unfit from natural causes and was not compelled to be examined when the law was in force, the voluntary attendance was very regular each woman reckoning by the numbers missed from other causes only twice, then allowance has to be made for ill health or absence from the Colony for a time. And in the six years of the voluntary attendance it has been very little less regular than could have been enforced by law. So that I consider these women have a very fair cause for complaint against the Government at Home that forced them to learn the benefits of the examination for 28 years and then denies that benefit when they desire it. There were 2,718 men in Garrison this year; of these 73 contracted constitutional disease and 523 were otherwise afflicted with milder forms of venereal disease.

The average strength of the Police Force for the year was 660; of these 5 contracted constitutional disease and 39 suffered from other causes.

The Garrison in proportion to strength suffered less than last year from all causes and so did the Police.

There was an increase of 47 male patients admitted to the Government Civil Hospital suffering from all causes of venereal disease, being 174 admissions as compared with 127 in 1892.

These cases are mostly seamen who contracted the disease elsewhere.

VACCINE INSTITUTE.

This establishment, though it began its work in 1892, was not in full working order until the beginning of this year and, therefore, is still in its infancy, but, so far, has given very satisfactory results. Mr. LADDS, who has been appointed Superintendent of the Institute, has furnished a very interesting report. It has furnished the Government with reliable vaccine lymph for the supply of all the Hospitals in the Colony for the use of the Victoria Gaol for the vaccination of prisoners most of whom have not previously been vaccinated, all recruits for the Police are now vaccinated or revac- cinated if it has been done before and not recently.

Supplies have also been purchased by all the Local Dispensaries for distribution and by Chinese Merchants for use in the interior of China the amounts thus obtained have more than defrayed the cost of the actual working expenses of the Institute and it has saved the Government the cost of purchase of vaccine lymph from outside sources most of which had been found unreliable. The Superintendent, Mr. LADDS, has by this addition to his other duties to work in many cases after dark and it is to be remembered that his office hours begin very early in the morning and often last till daylight finishes, his office hours not being a 10 to 4 arrangement, and I hope that, in the future, this Institution being found to be a profitable speculation by the Government, the post of Superintendent may become a paid one and not as it is now an honorary appointment.

A

7

363

HEALTH OF THE COLONY.

Table XVI shews the rate of mortality among the foreign residents in Hongkong for the past ten years. There is again a rise in the percentage of deaths, it being 2.22 as compared with 1.79 in 1892, and 1.36 in 1891. But it compares favourably with the preceding seven years. Still the slow but steady rise in the past three years must be looked upon with suspicion.

The following two tables shew the number of deaths among the European and Chinese commun- ities from diseases that may be attributed to filth.

DEATHS AMONG EUROPEANS (BRITISH and Foreign).

FEVERS.

VOMITING

YEARS.

DIARRHEA. CHOLERA. AND

PURGING.

TOTAL.

Enteric.

Simple Continued.

Typhus.

1873,

:

6

1874,

1875,

1

1

24

17 17

18

748

25

26

24

1876,

1

14

24

1877,

5

8

10

27

1878,

15

9

29

1879,

3

21

14

38

1880,

1

12

1

10

24

1881,

2

17

10

29

1882,

10

13

1

13

37

1883,

1

9

9

19

1884,

7

4

12

28

1885,

7

11

9

19

46

1886,

5

8

18

1887,

10

6

2

25

1888,

5

16

25

50

1889,

3

10

1

16

1890,

4

4

12

1891,

1

4

15

1892,

1

6

7

1893,

5

1

11

17

Choleraic Diarrhea 1.

DEATHS AMONG CHINESE.

FEVERS.

VOMITING

YEARS.

DIARRHEA. CHOLERA.

AND

TOTAL.

PURGING.

Enteric.

Simple Continued.

Typhus.

1873,

12

96

16

195

319

1874,

125

46

231

402

1875,

31

291

2

288

612

1876,

94

343

259

696

1877,

145

370

311

834

1878,

89

481

33

701

1,304

1879,

116

733

21

608

1,478

1880,

309

373

348

1,030

1881,

438

168

38

435

1,079

1882,

679

71

465

1,215

1883,

262

571

660

1,496

1884,

132

600

301

1,035

1885,

105

755

561

176

1,604

1886,

9

772

10

326

19

1,136

1887,

9

441

25

276

13

761

1888,

2

299

2

361

17

236

917

1889,

1

363

180

7

551

1890,

1

342

2

216

1

562

1891,

6

427

329

771

1892,

446

231

677

1893,

448

294

742

364

There have been many complaints of the stenches from the drains in the public press this year and much abuse of the new drainage system. It was announced in Council that the new system was complete as far as regards the western portion of the City; that was correct as far as it related to the public drains but not ten per cent. of the house drains have been connected with the new system, the majority still draining into the sub-soil and a great number into the old water-courses, and these latter are the cause of the abominable and sickening stenches that arise in the dry season.

The laws as regards the new drainage system are not retrospective and only owners of new buildings can be compelled to connect their drains with the new system, the owners of old buildings cannot be compelled unless they cause a nuisance or are proved to be dangerous to their neighbours. It will thus be a very long time before the new system can in any way be called complete or can be fairly judged on its merits. But even the new system has already been a cause of trouble in Chinese houses; the traps have been broken and the drains choked, and, owing to the construction of the houses, the drains from the back premises run right under the house to be connected with the new drain in the street, which is bad in itself, and this occurs also in very many European houses. Then the water supply is still insufficient for the flushing of the drains even if all the houses were connected with the new system and even if the water supply was amply sufficient, it is impossible to keep the old houses clean, the upper floors of these houses in the majority of cases not admitting of washing without the water dropping through on the people below; in very many cases the basements are still mud floors, as I reported twenty years ago. In the month of September I laid a complaint before the Sanitary Board of the offensive stenches caused by fat boiling being carried on in the neighbourhood of the Government Civil Hospital causing great discomfort and annoyance to the patients. There were many houses to the west of the Hospital in High, First, Second and Third Streets. Mr. EDE and Mr. HUMPHREYS, unofficial members of the Board, inspected these premises and sent in a report in which they said :-"Nearly the whole of the houses are "in a most dilapidated condition. The floors were reeking with filth. The drainage was very bad, "smell abominable. In some of the houses were dark holes in which there were quantities of decom- "posing and putrid meat, fat and bones, and one of them filled with maggots. The stench from these "places was unbearable. I inspected these houses also and found them in the same condition I had reported twenty years ago; fat boiling was going on there, but, with the assistance of the Registrar General, I had them cleared out and suppressed that business in the neighbourhood of the Hospital. It had begun again of late years and I have often reported them before with result that the nuisance has abated for a time. When this report was read before the Board I stated that these houses were in as disgusting a condition as many of the houses in the worse slums of the Central District of Tai-ping- shan, independently of the fat boiling, that many other houses in the same streets where no fat boiling was done were in the same filthy and insanitary condition, and that these houses were, in my opinion, unfit for human habitation. The Board then recommended :-"That the tenants should be called upon "to abate the nuisance, "-which was done.

-which was done. The Board also recommended:-"That the landlords

"should be notified to put these houses in proper order." That the notices were served is proved by the papers attached to the documents which had been before the Board, but there is no record to show that the landlords paid any attention to the notification and no further steps appear to have been taken in the matter. But though hundreds of houses in the same condition exist all over the City and in spite of the state of things I have so often called attention to, there is no question that of late

years the health of the Colony has very much improved and so my remarks on the insanitary state of existing things are now received as a standing "chestnut" and only afford amusement for the public press. for, like the shepherd in the old story, I am regarded as crying wolf where no wolf exists, still the trail of the wolf is seen in this report. There were 13 cases of typhoid fever treated in the Civil Hospital 6 of which were contracted in the Colony, there are 5 deaths recorded from Typhoid Fever in tables at the head of this section and 1 from Continued Fever among the European community, there were 442 deaths from Continued Fever among the Chinese population, all these deaths are to be attributed to insanitary conditions. But this is like the Tytam tiger which many were reported to have seen and a good many went out to hunt for and never found, still the brute left his traces for a child of seven years old had both his hands bitten off above the wrist one night in one of the villages which was sufficient evidence of some savage beast being in the neighbourhood; even a big dog could not make such an injury as that. In the appendix I have attached to this report reviewing many of the things I have brought to notice in the past twenty years, it will be seen that very many of my recommendations for the well being of the Colony have been acted upon to the great benefit of all concerned. The report from the Govern- ment Analyst shows the work done in his Department and shows that the water supply, though for the last two years found insufficient for the needs of the City, is excellent in character. There is no stint in the milk supply in the Colony, three very large and excellent dairies are supported besides other smaller ones. And that supplied to the Hospital is very satisfactory. The petroleum brought in to the Colony for the first time in tank steamers is satisfactory. The Government Analyst also supplied a very excellent report on the use of hypodermic injections of Morphia that had begun among the Chinese community this year. Two or three Chinamen came into Hospital covered with hundreds of marks from the use of the hypodermic syringe, at the same time a report was forwarded to me from the Police that many small shopkeepers were administering hypodermic injections of Morphia ostensibly for the cure of opium smoking and that they had learnt the method from a pupil of Dr. KERR's in Canton. Specimens of the solutions and of the drug used were obtained from one of the shops by the Hospital Compradore, and Mr. CROW visited these places and procured other

7

rf

=

(6

365

specimens and saw a number of Chinamen treated. The drug used was the Hydrochlorate of Morphia, the solution used contained 2.3 per cent. The injections made were equal to a grain each time. The patients began with two injections a day, and, after a month or two, increased the dose to four or five injections a day. The cost of each injection was one cent. It was evident therefore that there was no attempt at curing the habit of opium smoking except by the introduction of a very much worse habit of Morphia injection. To quote Mr. Crow's report :-"The Chinese even buy Hydrochlorate "of Morphia locally at $2.50 per ounce. From this quantity 875 injections each containing half a "grain of Morphia Hydrochlorate could be prepared. This would leave a profit of $6.25 on each ounce "at a charge of one cent for each injection. If only a of a grain were used at each injection the 'profit could be about $10.00." On this report and one from myself being sent in, the Government at once passed an Ordinance to put a stop to this state of things, and the heavy fines inflicted took. away all the profits and soon put a stop to this new industry. I heard of a Chinese School Master who proposed to set up in this business, had sent home for 6 lbs. of Morphia with the appliances which would enable him to work the business at much greater profit and was greatly disgusted at his scheme being rendered abortive. I hear from the Chinese Customs that many thousands of ounces of Morphia are being imported at all the Coast Ports yearly. One mace a day is about the smallest consumed by opium smokers; it costs from 8 to 10 cents so the Chinese have learnt they can produce much greater effect much cheaper and get a large profit out of the business and for this information they are indebted from the mode of cure for the opium habit used at the Mission Hospitals. Wholly unnecessary, as I have shown by the Gaol reports for years that nothing is required to cure the habit and that without the smallest danger or inconvenience to the patient. It is evident from what has taken place here, many of these shops having set up in a few months, that this practice is taking root in China but I have seen no outcry about it as there has been about opium smoking which bar the expense it entails is a perfectly innocent habit and more so to my mind than tobacco smoking. The pay of the Assistant Analyst is very small and this is the reason for their all leaving directly there term is up. When applying for the appointment of an Analyst originally, I showed that the Government when requiring an analysis has to pay from £50 to £100 for a single case to an outside

chemist.

The answers given to the questions forwarded by the Indian Opium Commission by Dr. ATKINSON, Dr. Lowson, Mr. CROW and myself are attached to this report.

One thing I wish to call attention to is the dangers of the yearly increasing wheeled traffic, for which no regulations have been made and from which year by year an increasing number of injuries are admitted into the Hospital within the last nine years. Rickshaws and one horse gharries plying for hire have been introduced, these are licensed but with the exception of the gharries pay no attention to the rule of the road, empty rickshaws plying for hire move about all over the street impeding the traffic and occasionally making rushes at any one who they think want them, without paying the slightest attention to the traffic round them, which is a frequent cause of collisions and accidents. But a new, more dangerous, and, as far as I know, unlicensed traffic in wheeled vehicles has enormously increased in the last twelve months, these are two and four wheeled hand barrows carrying heavy loads of bales of goods, furniture, large beams of wood, &c., &c., in charge of from three to six or eight coolies, which have been a frequent cause of very serious accidents, they pay no attention whatever to the rule of the road and the coolies in charge often rush them along at such a pace that they have lost all control over the vehicle and every one is obliged to clear out of the way or suffer injury. Daily these barrows are to be seen dashing down the hilly side streets into the broad and level thoroughfare of Queen's Road or the Praya at a pace that the coolies in charge have no control over and those pulling in front are bound to dash on or be run over by the vehicle themselves yet little or no notice is taken of them and no attempt made to put a stop to this dangerous practice; when some- body is smashed up the coolies are given in charge and a penalty is inflicted on them but with no further effect. This is in a sort a considerable danger to the public health and unless some lady in her chair or some one equivalent to a Bishop at home is smashed up and public indignation excited it seems likely to continue. In Shanghai the wheeled traffic is much greater, yet there seems no difficulty in regulating it most satisfactorily.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your very obedient Servant,

PH. B. C. AYRES, C.M.G.,

Colonial Surgeon.

Acting Colonial Secretary.

The Honourable J. H. STEWART LOCKHART,

366

POLICE.

Table I.-Shewing the ADMISSIONS into and DEATHS in the GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL during each Month of the Year 1893.

EUROPEANS,

INDIANS.

CHINESE.

MONTHS.

Admissions. Deaths. Admissions. Deaths. Admissions. Deaths.

TOTAL Admissions. Deaths.

TOTAL

Remaining on the 1st Jan.,

1893,.

77

3

January,..

9

14

February,

9

12

March,

12

15

April,

12

LO LO CI CO

5

15

1

28

1

23

29

6

25

May,

27

19

1

54

1

June,

20

11

40

July,

18

28

12

58

August,

10.

31

18

59

September,.

15

25

18

58

October,

14

1

16

55

1

November,

10

24

9

43

December,

6

19

10

35

Total,......

134

:

255

133

02

522

3

J. M. ATKINSON, Superintendent.

Table II.-Shering the RATE of SICKNESS and MORTALITY in the POLICE FORCE during the Year 1893.

AVERAGE STRENGTH.

TOTAL SICKNESS.

TOTAL DEATHS. RATE OF SICKNESS.

RATE OF MORTALITY.

European. Indian.

Chinese.

Total.

European.

Indian.

Chinese. European. Iudian. Chinese.

European. Indian.

Chinese. European.

Indian.

Chinese.

110 220 330 660

134

255

133

1*

2+

3+

121.81 115.90 40.30

0.90 0.90 0.90

* On board Hygeia.

Months.

† One in Hospital and one was drowned. + Two

>>

at his native place.

J. M. ATKINSON, Superintendent.

Table III.-POLICE RETURN of ADMISSIONS to HOSPITAL from each District during the Year 1893.

GOVERNMENT HOUSE

CENTRAL No. 5

8

No. 2

No. 1 STONE CUTTERS' ISLAND, ONE TREE

GAP No. 6 MOUNTAIN

WATER POLICE STATIONS TSIMSHATSUI,

TSAT-TSZ-MUI, SHAURIWAN,

POKFULAM, KENNEDY

STANLEY

ABERDEEN.

AND

No. 7.

YAUMATI,

HUNGHOM.

SHEKO.

ΤΟΥΝ.

TAITAMTUK.

9

3.

39

**

ISLAND.

LODGE.

WHITEFILD,

European.

Indian.

Chinese.

European.

Indian.

Chinese.

European.

Indian.

Chinese.

European.

Indian.

Remaining

on 1st Jan., 1893,..

January,' February, 5

8

March, April,

4 13

6

9

May,

3 20

June,

4 10

July,.

9 14

August,

7 16

September, 9 9

October,

10 9 November, 7 14 December,... 4 · 9

::::::::

122 ~72672

Total,

79 140

33

3 12

وب

2

Hai to w no

2

Chinese.

European.

Indian.

5

2 1

2

14

6 50

Chinese.

::

2

·

::::

:::: : :- :-

:::::

::::

European.

Indian.

Chinese.

European.

Indian.

Chinese.

European.

Indian.

Chinese,

European.

40

18

2 3

co

LO

30

9

2 1

Indian.

Chinese.

European.

Indian.

Chinese.

European,

Indian.

Chinese.

TOTAL.

15

1

28

23

2

29

25

1

54

2 1 40

58

1 59

1 10 19 16 11 12

J. M. ATKINSON,

Superintendent.

2 58

55 2 43

2 35

10 522

:

Table IV.-Shewing the RATE of SICKNESS and MORTALITY of the TROOPS serving in HONGKONG

during the Year 1893.

367

ADMISSIONS INTO

AVERAGE STRENGTH.

DEATHS.

HOSPITAL.

AVERAGE DAILY RATE OF SICKNESS.

RATE OF MORTAL- ITY PER 1,000 OF THE STRENGTH.

Black

Black

White. and Total. White. and Total. White.

Chinese.

Chinese.

Black and Chinese.

Total.

Black White. and

Chinese.

Black

White. and

Chinese.

1,414 1,304 2,718

2,015 912 2,927 17

11

28

115.97 38.17

12.02 8.44

N.B.-Six deaths occurred in the Hongkong Regiment which are not included in the above as they took place out of the Colony.

A. F. PRESTON, Surgeon Colonel, A.M.S., Principal Medical Officer, China and Hongkong.

Table V.-Shewing the ADMISSION and MORTALITY in the GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL during the Year 1893.

ADMISSIONS.

DEATHS.

DISEASES.

1.-General Diseases.

A. Diseases dependent on Morbid Poisons,-

Sub-Group 1,

2, 3,

4,

""

5.

""

Europeans.

Indians.

Asiatics.

Total.

Europeans.

Indians.

Asiatics.

Total.

64

135 130

186

88:8

29

10

103

3

3

117

382

1

1

1

1

1

1

38

28

252

1

1

:

1

:

B. Diseases dependent on external agents other than Morbid

Poisons,- Sub-Group 1,

2

1

3

2,*

1

1

3,

14

2

15

31

>>

4,

25

1

Co

3

29

""

C. Developmental Diseases,

2

D. Not classified,

40

21

84

::::::

4

II.-Local Diseases.

9

10

IC? OP HONO Q

1

(Nervous System,

2

Ear,

Nose,

Eye,

Circulatory System,

Diseases of the

11.

12

13

14

Male

15

16

17

( Skin,

III.

Poisons,

IV.

Injuries,

V.

Surgical Operation, t..

Under Observation,

Respiratory,

Digestive, Lymphatic,

Thyroid Body,

Supra Renal Capsules,

Urinary System,

Generative System,

Female Breast,

Organs of Locomotion,

Connective Tissue,.

33

8

24

65

1

5

11

5

13

29

2.

4

3

9

1.

1

3

9

9

21

50

27

99

12

.98

39

186

1

4

4

11

12

1

3

19

21

120

5

26

18 43

1623

30558

20 104

11

15

13

102

:22=82

177

12

33

11 33

24

137

8

37

:::~ROAH :HA : : : :ON ::

6

1

1

Total,.

828

391

613 1,835

13

9 45

67

* Vide III. Poisons. † Table Va.

J. M. ATKINSON, Superintendent.

Table Va.-Shewing the ADMISSIONS and MORTALITY in the GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL during the Year 1893.

368

SURGICAL OPERATIONS.

Removal of Tumours,-

Buboes (Scraping),

(Excision),

Cyst of Neck...

Tumour of Ear,

of Thigh,

Sebaceous Cyst,

Gun-shot Wounds,-

Of Abdomen and Thigh, Of Leg,

Of Hand,

Operation on Eye,-

Suture of Conjunctiva, &c.,

Opérations on Head and Neck,-

Hare-lip,..

Deep Abscess of Neck,

For Severe Head Injuries,

Parotid Abscess,

Compound Fracture of Skull (Depressed),

Necrosis of Jaw,

Compound Fracture of Skull and Suture of Scapula,

Dentigerous Cyst,

Extensive Wound of Face,

Operations on Respiratory Organs,-

For Cut-throat,

Tracheotomy,

Empycemia,

Paracentesis Thoracis,

Perforating Wound of Thorax,

Operations on Digestive Organs,

Stab in Abdomen,

Hernia (Taxis),

Strangulated Hernia,

Hæmorrhoids,

Foreign body near Anus,

Fistula-in-ano,

Paracentesis Abdominis (frequent),

Operations on Genito-Urinary Organs,-

Male. Stricture of Urethra (Rapid Dilatation),

""

(Gradual),

External Urethrotomy,

Lithotomy,

Urethral Calculus,

Urethral Fistula,

Periurethral Abscess,

Paraphimosis,

Circumcision,

Hydrocele (Radical Cure), (Tapping, &c.),

For Gangrene of Scrotum,

Female.-Ruptured Perineum,

Forceps,.

Version,

Uterine Fibroid (Removal),

Operations on Organs of Locomotion,—

For Purulent Synovitis Shoulder Joint,

...

For Breaking up Adhesions Shoulder Joint,

For Wound of Forearm,

Suture of Tendons,

....

Caries of Wrist,..

Foreign body in Hand,

Necrosis of Phalanges,

Amputation of Fingers,

Excision of Hip,

Fractured Patella (Mayo Robson's method),

Fractured Tibia and Fibula,.

Psoas Abscess,

Abscess in Loin,

Tumour of Foot (Fibroma),

Evulsion of Toe-nail,

Amputation of Foot,

Amputation of Toes,

ADMISSIONS.

DEATHS.

Europeans.

Indians.

Chinese.

Total.

Europeans.

Indians.

Chinese.

Total.

12 2 1 15

2=

11

1

12

BR8III

1 1

Ι

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

02

1

2

:

co: : :

:

5

1

1

1

II∞ Id ☹? pony proved panel prezrad

2

બેનન

1

02-02 mong

1

1

14

6

6

2

1

1

1

1

1

12

14

2

1

1

1

1

1

C2

1

1

1

4

2

Total,...

79

26 48 153

* Tetanus, &c.

Fractured Skull.

..

:

2

4

J. M. ATKINSON, Superintendent.

I

3

:

CO

6

i

I

R

GENERAL DISEASES.

369

Table Vb.-Sheming the ADMISSIONS and MORTALITY in the GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL during the Year 1893.

ADMISSIONS.

DEATHS.

Group A.-Sub-Group 1.

1. Small-Pox, (transferred to Small-Pox Hospital),

2. Cow-Pux,

3. Chicken-Pox,

4. Measles,

5. Epidemic Rose-rash, (Rotheln),

6. Scarlet Fever,

7. Dengue,

8. Typhus,

9. Plague,

10. Relapsing Fever,

11. Influenza,

12. Whooping Cough,

13. Mumps,.

14. Diphtheria,

15. Cerebro-spinal Fever,

16. Simple-continued Fever,

...

Fever),

17. Enteric Fever, Synonyms, Typhoid Fever, (Typhomalarial

18. Cholera, Synonyms, Asiatic Cholera, Epidemic Cholera, 19. Sporadic Cholera, Synonyms, Simple Cholera, Cholera

Nostras.

20. Epidemic Diarrhoea,

21. Dysentery,

13

Europeans.

Indians,

Asiatics.

2

1

1

∞1Q

3

2

* 10

9

Q:

2

1

13

1

:

1

10

1

1

31

16

: :00

::

50

5:0

::

: to

2

:

::

:

Total.

Europeans.

Indians.

::

Total,...

64

29 10 103

3

3

:

J. M. ATKINSON, Superintendent.

Table Vc.-Shewing the ADMISSIONS and MORTALITY in the GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL during the Year 1893.

GENERAL DISEASES.

Group A.—Sub-Group 2.

1. Malarial Fever,-

a. Intermittent, Synonyms, Ague,

b. Remittent,

c. Malarial Cachexia,

2. Beri-Beri,

Monthly Table of Malarial Fever Cases amongst the Police.

INTERMITTENT.

REMITTENT.

MONTHS.

January, February,. March, April, May,

June, July, August, September, October,

6

3

November,

6

December,

31 O) CO CD 10 10 30 AEuropeans.

Indians.

IONQONN

3 2

2

Asiatics.

Deaths.

Europeans.

Indians.

Asiatics.

Deaths.

Total Number of

Cases.

Total Number of

Deaths.

C)

7

18

14

6

25

12 7

29

11 10

37

29

14

2

Total,..

33 68 40

19 26 10

196

:

Europeans.

ADMISSIONS.

Indians.

Asiatics.

98 95 82 275

Total.

DEATHS.

Europeans.

Indians.

Asiatics.

34 32

15

81

4

9

16

17

1

135 130 117 332

1

1

J. M. ATKINSON,

Superintendent.

Total.

2

Asiatics.

Total.

5

10

15

20

35

40

45

Fever Cases.

Rainfall.

370

Table Vd.-DIAGRAM showing CASES of MALARIAL FEVER occurring every Month amongst the POLICE FORCE,

the MEAN MONTHLY TEMPERATURE and the MONTHLY

RAINFALL during the Year 1893.

Number Inches.

50

January.

February.

March.

April.

May.

June.

July.

August.

September.

October.

November.

30

60°

25

50°

Red Wave, Blue Wave, Green Wave, Black Wave,..

................... Intermittent Fever Cases.

.Remittent

""

""

Monthly Rainfall in inches.

Mean Monthly Temperature in Degrees Fahrenheit.

10°

3

*

20°

30°

40°

70°

December.

80°

Mean

Mouthly

Temperature.

Degrees

Fahr.

90°

100°

1

7

i

371

Table Ve.-Shewing the ADMISSIONS and MORTALITY in the GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL during the Year 1893.

ADMISSIONS.

DEATHS.

1. Phagedona,

2. Erysipelas,

3. Pycemia,

4. Septicœmia,

DISEASES.

Group A.-Sub-Group 3.

Total,.

:

Europeans.

Indians.

Asiatics.

1

1

1

1

Total.

Europeans.

:

:

Indians.

1

Table Vf.-Shewing the ADMISSIONS and MORTALITY in the GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL during the Year 1893.

DISEASES.

Group A.-Sub-Group 4.

b. Secondary,

c. Tertiary Syphilis,.

1. Syphilis, Synonyms, Pox,

a. Primary,

2. Gonorrhoeal, including Chancres Molles,

Gonorrhoeal Rheumatism,

Total,..

ADMISSIONS.

Europeans.

Indians.

Asiatics.

121

32

52 ཤ |

14

15

1

7

26 10

157

ឥតគិត

4

4

186

38 28

252

Total.

Europeans.

Indians.

J. M. ATKINSON, Superintendent.

DEATHS.

Asiatics.

1

1

J. M. ATKINSON, Superintendent.

Table Vg.-Shewing the ADMISSIONS and MORTALITY in the GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL during the Year 1893.

ADMISSIONS.

DEATHS.

DISEASES.

1. Hydrophobia,

2. Glanders,

3. Horse-pox,

4. Splenic Fever,

Group A.-Sub-Group 5.

Total,.

1

Europeans.

Indians.

Asiatics.

Total.

1

1

:

:

1

1

Europeans.

Indians.

:

J. M. ATKINSON,

Superintendent.

Asiatics.

1

1

Total.

:::

Total.

Asiatics.

Total.

3.72

Table VI.-Shewing the RATE of MORTALITY in the GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL. during the last 10 Years.

Rate to Total Number of Rate to Number of Europeans Rate to Number of Coloured Rate to Number of Asiatics

Admissions.

Admitted.

Persons Admitted.

Admitted.

1884, 1885,

1886,

1887.

1888, 1889,

1890, 1891. 1892, 1893,

Per cent.

3.69

Per cent.

Per cent.

Per cent.

1884,

3.15

1884,

1.24

1884,

6.08

5.03 1885,

4.65

1885,

3.06

1885,

7.01

4.86 1886,

4.25

1886,

4.66

1886,

5.73

5.37 1887,

4.50

1887,

4.56

1887.

6.96

4.51

1888,

3.96

1888,

4.70

1888,

4.98

4.29

1889,

3.37

1889,

4.13

1889,

5.41

5.00 1890,

2.38

1890,

5.30

1890,

7.80

4.49 1891,

3.46 1891,

2.97

1891,

7.33

A

3.96

1892,

2.92

1892,

3.28

1892,

5.74

3.65

1893,

1.57

1893,

2.28

1893,

7.34

J. M. ATKINSON, Superintendent.

Table VII.-Shewing the ADMISSIONS into and DEATHS in the GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL during each Month of the Year 1893.

EUROPEANS.

COLOURED.

CHINESE.

MONTHS.

Total Admissions.

Total

Deaths.

Admissions. Deaths. Admissions. Deaths. Admissions. Deaths.

Remaining on the 1st

January, 1893,

34

9

...

January,

66

February,

40

March,

51

...

April,.

50

་་

May, June, July, August,

89

73

::::

34

77

4

26

34

6

126

11

1

20

28

88

3

23

49

123

6

16

30

96

1

31

51

7

171

7

45

51

3

169

4

95

47

2

44

186

55

1

47

2

62

6

164

September,

82

1

28

67

7

177

October,

70

2

38

67

4

175

November,

56

32

59

147

2

December,..

67

1

37

136

6

Total,

828

13

394

9

613

45

1,835

67

J. M. ATKINSON, Superintendent.

Table VIIa.-MONTHLY AGGREGATE NUMBER of PATIENTS visited in the HOSPITAL daily for

1893, 1892 and 1891.

Months.

1893.

1892.

1891.

January, February,

2,447

2,372

2,977

2,107

2,045

2,541

March,

2,298

2,073

2,677

April,

1,912

2,106

2,275

May,

2,426

2,583

2,430

June,

2,674

2,401

2,519

July,.

2,593

2,585

2,406

August,

2,689

2,948

1,986

September,

2,811

2,714

1,425

October,

2,597

2,473

2,508

November,

2,491

2,171

2,382

December,

2,786

2,320

2,350

Total,.

29,831

28,791

28,476

J. M. ATKINSON, Superintendent.

:

:

:

Table VII.—Shewing the ADMISSIONS into and DEATHS in the GOVERNMENT EUROPEAN and CHINESE

LUNATIC ASYLUMS during each Month of the Year 1893.

373

.EUROPEANS.

COLOURED.

ASIATICS.

MONTHS.

Total Total Admissions. Deaths.

Admissions.

Deaths. Admissions.

Deaths. Admissions. Deaths.

Remaining on the 1st

January, 1893,

~

1

10 2

18 2

January,

February,

1

Q

March,

April,.

May,

June,

July,

August,

September,

October,

1

1

November,

1

1

3

1

1

3

1

4

1

1

December,

Total,.

16

1

3

21

4

40

10

5

J. M. ATKINSON, Superintendent.

Table VIIC.-Shewing the ADMISSIONS into and DEATHS in the GOVERNMENT HOSPITAL HULK Hygeia

and SMALL-Pox HUT during each Month of the Year 1893.

MONTHS.

Remaining on the 1st

January, 1893,

January,

February,

March,

April,.

...

May,

June,

July,

August,

September,

October,.

November, December,.

Total,

EUROPEANS.

COLOURED.

ASIATICS.

Total

Total

Admissions. Deaths.

Admissions. Deaths. Admissions. Deaths. Admissions. Deaths.

1

2

10

3 1

: 0:

2

1 12

7

14

13

zw. vi

3

3

D

1

25

3

11

1

25

4

61

8

* One of these was in attendance.

+ Two

were

"

J. M. ATKINSON,

Superintendent.

Table VIII.—RETURN of DEAD BODIES brought by the POLICE to the PUBLIC MORTUART during each Month of the Year 1893.

EUROPEAN'S AND ́ AMERICANS.

$

OTHER NATIONAL!

CHINESE.

ITIES.

CAUSE OF DEATH: REPORTED, PROBABLE OR ASCERTAINED BY EXAMINATION.'

ACCIDENTAL.

SUICIDAL.

HOMICIDAL.

MONTHS.

374

4

:

:

:

:

N

:

:

:

:

11

Female.

From Disease.

Drowning.

Fracture of Skull.

Fracture of Skull and

Ribs.

Fracture of Skull

and com-

plicated Fracture of left Elbow Joint.

Fracture of Spine.

Shock from Protusion and

Rupture of Abdominal

Viscera.

Cerebral Concussion,

Rupture of Spleen.

Burns.

Asphyxia caused by

fall of a House.

Asphyxia from Char-

coal Fumes.

-

Lightning Strokes.

Opium Poisoning. Poisoning by some un-

'known substance.

Incised Wound of

Drowning.

Hanging.

Throat.

Bullet Wound of

Right Temple.

Bullet Wounds of Heart,

Lungs and Liver.

Incised Wound; of

Neck.

Rupture of Spleen.

Drowning.

TOTAL.

Adults. Children. Adults. Children. Adults. Children.

Male.

Female.

January,

February,

March,

Male.

Female..

Male.

Female.

Male.

Female.

Male.

Female,

Male.

6

11

:

13

11

14

16

17

1*

13

:.

:

:

2

...

:.

:

:

:.

OPP

%

:

:

:.

:

:

:

-

:.

:

:

:

:

1

:.

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:.

:

Q

:

...

1

:

:

...

:

:

...

:

:

:

:

:.

:

:

:.

:

:

TD.

:.

:.

:

:

:

...

:

:.

4

...

:

:

:

1

DD.

:

:.

:

:

:

:

:

:

:.

:

:

:

:.

:

:

:

:.

:

:.

:.

*:

":

:.

1

:.

:.

:.

:

1

F

:.

:

:

3 1 1

6

1

1

5 2

:.

:.

3

-

2

3

3

6

7 5

10

1

2

4

1

(

2

3

I

···

:

2

38 35

1

22

:

:

:.

:

:.

:

:.

:

:

:

:

:

:

:.

.:.

:

:.

:

FO.

I

:

:

:.

1

:

:

5

:

:

:

7

8

LO

...

7 4

6

o

2

2 1

13

2

1

12

1

8

3

7

1

6

1

:..

2

...

:

:..

:

:

:

:.

:

:

:

:.

:

...

::

:

:

...

:.

:.

:

:

:

:

:

:.

D.

:

:

April, ......

May,

June,

July,

August,

...

September,

October, ...

November,

December,

2

1

Total,... 4

R

...

5 2

66

22

22

:.

...

8

ཡཿར ཐ°

...

~

1

1

1

1

1

* Involuntary!

9

I

...

2

...

...

:

...

:

2

110

1

4

:

N

8

12

7

:

...

1

1

1

2 | 2

139

L. P. MARQUES,

Medical Officer in charge of Post Mortem Examinations.

!

!

375

Table IX.-K.-Shewing the ADMISSION into HOSPITAL in VICTORIA GAOL, and MORTALITY during the Year 1893.

DISEASES.

Remaining under treatment 1st January, 1893,

ADMISSIONS,

DEATHS.

Europeans.

Coloured Persons.

Chinese. TOTAL. Europeans.

Coloured Persons.

Chinese.

TOTAL.

I-

+

Febricula,

Intermittent Fever,

and Anæmia,

""

E

+

II.-

111.

Remittent Fever,

Remittent Fever and Bubo of left groin..

Rheumatism and Hemiplegia,.

Abscess of right hand, anal fistula and ulcera-

tion of skin (syphilitic,)

Ulceration of muscles of neck and thighs, and

caries of ribs, (Tertiary Syphilis),

Conjunctivitis,

Keratitis and ecchymosis of right 'sclerotic and

Conjunctivitis of left eye...

Unsound mind,

(mania),

Epileptiform fits,

Hemiparaplegia (left limb),

Locomotor ataxy,.

2

1

11

11

3

19

23

5

8

00 00 05 10

...

1

1

1

1

1

:

2

2

IV.-

Anæmia,

1

""

(opium smoker),

21

and General Debility,

...

...

}}

and General Debility (opium simoker),

"

and Bronchitis,

Syncope from General, Debility,.

Hypertrophy of Heart and Anæmia,.

35

V. & VI

"

"

Bronchitis,.

VII.

Sympathetic Bubo of left groins,

"

of both groins and Adenitis

of inferior maxilla,

Adenitis of right groin,....

Lymphangitis of right thigh,

Bronchitis,

Chronic Bronchitis,

Bronchitis and Anæmia (opium smoker),

Tubercules of lungs,

of left lung,.

Edema of lungs and General Debility,

VIII

Dyspepsia,

Fissures of tongue,.............

Ascites,.....

Diarrhoea,

1

:

...

...

+

:

:

:

***

23

HEARD: *****

7

100

***

...

****

TH

...

...

24

10

10

4

2

1

1

I

pdf pdf

...

...

...

...

***

...

1

1

:

:

:

1

1

1

***

-1

-1

11

11

1

...

**

6

...

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

***

1

...

***

3

3

1

3

4

1

...

...

3

...

***

***

...

1

...

...

1

1

...

1

1

...

...

1

...

1

***

D

""

(opium smoker),

and Anæmia........................

Dysentery,

2

and Abscess of left Plantar surface,

Internal Hæmorrhoids,...........................

Constipation,

1X & X.-

Albumenuria,

Hæmaturia and Chyluria,

Phimosis,

Epithelioma of penis,

Orchitis of left testicle,..

...

Orchitis and Anæmia,

Orchitis and Adenitis of both thighs,

Orchitis of left testicle, Anæmia and Bronchitis,

Abscess of Scrotum,

Bubo of right groin and gleet,

...

***

...

...

...

...

...

...

soft chancre and chro-

""

"1

"}

"} nic ulcer of left leg,

19

"1

>1

,, erysipelas,

XI,-

::

of left ear,

Carbuncle of left shoulder,

Inflammation of right knee-joint,

ankle-joint,......

Sprain of left ankle-joint,

XII-

Gangrene of both feet from frost bite and

incised wound of right ankle-joint,

Eczema,

Erysipelas of face,

1

1

1

...

1

1

1

1

:::

...

:::

1

1

...

1

...

...

2

2

***

1

1

1

1

...

Whitlow,

Edema of face and feet,.

1

1

1

1

...

of face and General Debility,

1

1

"

...

...

of feet,

1

1

...

3"

...

of face and Anæmia,

...

1

1

...

***

of feet and Anæmia,

...

1

1

...

...

...

"

of left foot,

Abscess of neck (superficial),

Chronic abscess of neck,

1

1

...

1

of neck (deep),

1

...

1

...

1

1

Carried forward,.

12

1

174

187

:

2

376

TABLE IX.—K.-Shewing the ADMISSION into HOSPITAL in VICTORIA GAOL and MORTALITY during the Year 1893,—Continued.

DESEASES.

XII.—Continued.

ADMISSIONS.

DEATHS.

Europeans.

Coloured Persons.

Chinese.

TOTAL. Europeans.

Coloured Persons.

Chinese. TOTAL.

Brought forward,...........

12

1

174

187

Abscess of right thigh,

19

of left foot,

knee-joint,

99

""

heel,

»

plantar surface,

"

of right,

"

of both plantar surfaces,

1-2 & 10 10 01

1122010 2

...

6

:

***

***

...

...

6 1

6

1

3

1

1

...

...

1

1

44

1

1

1.

37

37

***

:

1

1

Unclassed.—

General Debility,

29

""

Alcoholism,

""

(opium smoker),

and emaciation,

Wounds and Injuries,—

Burn of left foot,

Compound fracture of left little-toe,

Incised wound of right foot,

Contusion of feet,

Contused wound and inflammation of right

eyelid,

Contused wounds from flogging,

""

11

and Hypertrophy

of heart,

Contused wounds from ficgging, cerebral con- cussion and contusion of right eyelid and superciliary region (from a fall),

Gluteal Abscess from flogging,

Unknown or Unrecognized.—

Observation,

TOTAL,..........

...

2

1

...

2

2

7

15

1

256

272

Other deaths 1 Chinese hung himself in his cell.

"

:

:

:

:

2

::

1

2

2

7

executed by order of the Supreme Court.

L. P. MARQUES, Medical Officer.

፡፡

2

377

Table X.-N.-Shewing CASES not ADMITTED to HOSPITAL, treated by the Medical Officer, during the Year 1893.

DISEASES.

Europeans.

Coloured Persons.

Chinese.

TOTAL.

Remaining under treatment 1st January, 1893,

11

11

I

:.

:

II.-

Rheumatism,

3

Lumbago,

1

3

1

Condylomata,

Syphilitic ulceration of thoracic muscles and caries of ribs,.. Ulcers of legs (Tertiary Syphilis),

Conjunctivitis,

III.-

""

of left eye,

and sore penis,

""

Opacity of both cornea,

23

of right cornea,

"

of left cornea,

Keratitis of right cornea,

Ulcer of left cornea, Cataract of both eyes, Wound of right cornea, Warts of right sclerotic, Trichiasis of both eye-lids, of right eye-lid,

15

of left

Unsound Mind,.

Epileptiform fits,

IV.-

Anæmia,

Cardiac palpitation,

""

4

·

Aortic regurgitation and Hypertrophy of heart,

Mitral regurgitation,

V & VI.—

Tonsilitis,

Adenitis of right groin,

Sympathetic bubo of right groin,

VII.-

Pulmonary phthisis,

VIII.-

Bronchitis,...

Aptha of tongue,

1

...

...

...

1

1

1

*1

1

1

1

1

1

1

2

2

1

1

1

1

2

2

3

3

...

1

1

1

1

1

1

4

4

1

1

1

1

*1

*1

2

2

1

21

2

121

::

:::

::

}

1

1

1

1

1

1

༠༧ .*

3

3

†4

Pharyngitis,

Dyspepsia and irritable tongue,

Caries of Molar teeth (Extracted),

Gumboil,.

Diarrhoea,..

Internal Hæmorrhoids,

External

1 •

Reducible inguinal hernia of right side,

12

2

1

1

...

13

15

1

1

...

*1

*1

...

1

1

...

1

5

6

9

9

IX & X.-

Gonorrhoea,..

""

and Warts of Penis,

"9

and Scabies,

39

and contused wound of left leg,

1

Balanitis,.

Gleet,

12

14

1

1

...

1

1

1

1

1

2

1

1

...

Edema of Penis,

Abrasion and Edema of Prepuce,

1

1

1

1

...

...

XI.-

Warts of Penis,..

Soft chancre,

and Bubo of right groin,

""

""

""

"

and chronic ulcer of left leg,

Bubo of right groin,.

"

of left groin,

Orchitis of left testicle, Leucorrhoea,

Ulcer of chest,

2

2

1

11

12

2

2

1

...

1

5

5

2

2

...

*1

1

1

...

3

3

of right leg,.

""

""

of left leg,

of left foot,

of both plantar surfaces,

Inflammation of left leg,

• ·

Carried forward,...

* Female.

3

3

1

1

1

1

15

137

152

†Three of them are Female.

378

XII.-

TABLE X.-N-Shewing CASES not ADMITTED to HOSPITAL,-Continued.

DISEASES.

Europeans.

Coloured Persons.

Chinese.

TOTAL.

Brought forward,.

15

Abscess of head,.

of neck,.

...

of right hand,..

>>

of left hand,

...

of both hands,

""

of left thumb,.

"

"J

of pointing finger of right hand,

29

of little finger of left hand,.

"

of middle finger of left hand,

1

>>

of left thigh,

""

of right leg,

of left leg,

""

of right foot,

of left foot,

""

""

of toe of right foot,

of toe of left foot,

19

"

""

دو

of right plantar surface,. of left

""

of both plantar surfaces,

Chronic abscess of neck,

""

99

Whitlow,

of left foot,

of left plantar surface,

Cystic tumor of pointing finger of left hand, Blister of right thumb, . .

>>

of pointing finger of left hand,

"

of little finger of left hand,..

"

of fingers,

of left hand,

Inflammation of left thumb,.

Chronic ulcer of neck,

99

of right leg,

"2

of left leg,

of both legs,

""

of left plantar surface,.

...

Boil of head,

of neck,

of chest,

""

of right shoulder,

of left

""

of right axilla,

39

of left fore-arm,

"

of left hip,..

"

of right thigh,

"

of left thigh,.

of right leg,

of left leg,..

Impetigo of head and contused wounds from flogging,

Eczema,.

Pruritus,

Ringworm,

Scabies,

Erysipelas of left eye-lid,.

Gangrene of big toe of left foot from frost-bite,

"

of toes of right foot from frost-bite,

of toes of left foot from frost-bite,

Wounds and Injuries.

Abrasion of fingers of both hands,

"

of right hand,

"

of both hands,.

of pointing finger of right hand,

??

of right shoulder,

""

of left shoulder,

""

of right leg,..

25

of right foot,

of left foot,

...

"

""

of left plantar surface,

of right plantar surface,.

Carried forward,.

....

7

:

137

152

1

1

4

4

...

2

2

*

...

1

1

...

1

1

3

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

2

1

1

4

4

3

3

...

1

1

...

13

13

10

10

1

1

1

1

...

1

I

...

1

1

2

2

...

1

1

...

1

1

1

1

!

1

1

3

2

1

1

...

*1

...

...

...

9

1

1

3

1

3

4

1

2

...

1

1

...

1

1

...

1

...

1

1

2

2

2

2

1

...

1

2

1

1

1

1

1

...

4

5

...

1*

1*

3

16

19

1

68

69

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

...

...

...

221171

3

2

1

C

7

1

....

1

1

1

...

1

1

*1

2

1

1

1

1

28

1

353

382

!

:

TABLE X.-N.—Shewing CASES not ADMITTED to HOSPITAL,—Continued.

DISEASES.

379

Europeans.

Coloured Persons.

Chinese.

TOTAL.

Brought forward,.

28

1

353

382

Incised wound of neck,.

of right fore arm,.

of right hand,

"

of left thumb,

وو

of fingers of right hand,

of right toe,

Contusion of right thumb,

of middle finger of left hand,

""

of lumbar region,

"

of right foot,

of left foot,

Punctured wound of right leg,.

Gun shot of right temple (Extracted),

Contused wound of head,

""

""

وو

of upper lip,

of chest,

of fingers,

D •

of right thumb,.

of middle finger of right hand,

of middle finger of left hand,

"

of right knee-joint,

17

of right leg,

of right foot,.

of second toe of left foot,

""

of left foot,

Burn of left foot,

from flogging,

from flogging and chronic ulcer of left leg

Unclassed.

Alcoholism,

TOTAL,..

...

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

...

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

I

1

1

1

1

1

1

...

4

...

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

2

2

...

1

1

1

1

118

...

118

1

1

...

1

1

2

:

32

1

490

523

L. P. MARQUES, Medical Officer.

Table XI.-0.-Shewing the RATE of SICKNESS and MORTALITY in VICTORIA GAOL, during the Year 1893.

Total No. of Prisoners admitted to Gaol.

Daily

Total Total

Average

Sick

number of Prisoners.

in

Hospital.

Sick, Total Trifling Deaths.

Cases.

of Serious

Percentage Sickness to

Total.

To Total No. of Admissions to Gaol.

Rate of Mortality.

To Total No. of Admissions to Gaol.

To Daily Average.

Rate of Sickness

To Daily Average.

4,010

458

272

523

6.783

1.982

5.266

0.498

13.10

L. P. MARQUES, Medical Officer.

Table XI-P-Shewing OPIUM SMOKERS ADMITTED into HOSPITAL and TREATED by the MEDICAL OFFICER during the Year 1893.

DISEASE.

Remaining under treatment 1st January, 1893,—

Anæmia. Nos. 6, 35, 55,

General Debility and Anemia. Nos. 16, 17,

Abscess of right thigh.

Diarrhea and Anæmia.

Bronchitis and Anæmia.

No. 19,

No. 47,

No. 50,

Diarrhoea. No. 52,

General Debility. No. 60,

TOTAL,.....

ADMISSION.

Coloured Europeans. Persons.

Chinese.

Total.

:

co :

3

2

2

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

10

10

L. P. MARQUES,

Medical Officer.

4,010

Total number of Prisoners

admitted to Gaol.

15

Europeans.

1

Indians.

Chinese.

380

Table XIa.-M.-CASES admitted to VICTORIA GAOL HOSPITAL, at the first MEDICAL EXAMINATION by the

MEDICAL OFFICER, during the Year 1893.

SENTENCE.

No.

DISEASES.

DATE OF ADMISSION.

DATE OF DISCHARGE.

REMARKS.

Years. M'ths. Days.

1

28

÷

Gangrene of both feet, (from frost-bite), Į

and incised wound of right ankle-joint,

2

3

68-19 CI W N

Unsound mind,

14

Bronchitis,...

18th Jan.

22nd Feb. 22nd March

10

Edema of face and General Debility,

25th

Unsound mind,

30th

13th Feb.

27th

3rd April 1st "" 5th

On Remand.

29

On Remand.

"

7

Bronchitis,.....

14

Sprain of left ankle-joint,.

Anæmia (Opium smoker),

Unsound mind,

10

11

14

Remittent Fever,

Contusion of feet,.

14th April 15th 25th

9th May 19th 19th

وو

27

20th >> 28th " 20th May

10th

On Remand.

"3

1st June

""

3rd July

12

:

Unsound mind,

14th June

23rd June On Remand.

13

1

Epithelioma of penis,

28th

26th July

"

14

14

Alcoholism,

1st July

6th "

15

7

Anæmia (Opium smoker),

1st

5th

""

16

14

Observation,

3rd

4th

17

42

Bronchitis and Anæmia (Opium smoker),

10th

""

7th Aug.

18

9

Bubo (Sympathetic) of left groin,

21st

6th Sept.

19

20

21

22 72*.

21

Bronchitis,......

29th

""

16th Aug.

7

Ulceration of muscles of neck and thighs,

and caries of ribs, (Tertiary Syphilis),

12th Aug.

14th

Pulmonary Phthisis,...

16th

18th ""

22

7

Ascites,

29th

2nd Sept.

23

...

Unsound mind,

1st Sept.

11th

On Remand.

""

24

42

Carbuncle of left shoulder,

5th

27th

"

25

26

27

28

29

30

31

32

33

34

Unsound mind............

5th

13th

On Remand.

""

""

Observation,

7th

15th

>>

...

1

...

Constipation,...

11th

7

Ascites,

16th

14th 22nd

""

وو

""

14

Incised wound of right foot,

19th

27th

""

""

...

Unsouud mind,

19th

27th

On Remand.

""

""

Observation,

25th

Do.,

5th Oct.

1

7

...

35

36

37

38

39

...

:::

Bronchitis,

Anæmia and General Debility,

Ulceration of muscles }

and caries of ribs (Tertiary Syphilis), Unsound mind,

Observation,

23rd

28th -13th Oct. 25th

""

وو

31st

وو

3

Abscess of right hand,.......

14

17th Nov. 18th 24th

4th Dec.

24th

""

4th Nov.

On Remand.

30th

""

""

2nd Dec.

On Remand.

29

Bronchitis and Anæmia,

6th

18th Dec.

""

Table XI.-L.-Shewing the NUMBER and PERCENTAGE of PRISONERS ADMITTED into VICTORIA GAOL HOSPITAL, on the First Examination by the MEDICAL OFFICER, during the Year 1893.

Sick in Hospital.

Admitted to Hospital on First Medical Examination.

Percentage of Hospital cases on First Medical

Examination.

Percentage of Hospital cases on First Medical Ex.

Europeans. Chinese.

Total.

256 272

3

Europeans.

:

Indians.

Chinese.

Total.

To total Gaol

admission.

To total Hospital

cases.

To total Hospital

cases.

36

39

0.972 14.33

2.000 14.06

L. P. MARQUES, Medical Officer.

.

To total Hospital

cases.

L. P. MARQUES, Medical Officer.

·

381

Table XIc.-Q.-Shewing the WEIGHTS of PRISONERS (OPIUM SMOKERS), for the First Four Weeks' Confinement

in VICTORIA GAOL, during the Year 1893.

LENGTH OF

CONSUMPTION

WEIGHT WHEN

No. AGE. TIME OPIUM

WEIGHT FIRST FOUR WEEKS.

REMARKS.

SMOKER.

per diem.

ADMITTED.

Years.

}

Mace.

Ihs.

Ibs. ths. Ibs.

ibs.

10

12 + 10 ON ∞ σ o

57

10

5

129

128

126 123

123

35

7

43

4

33

4

36

12

6

36

10

7

49

20

8

48

10

+NN ON CO ON GO

4

127

130

128

127

125

2

116

117

115

116

114

2

106

110

111

112

112

126

121

118

116

114

3.

90

88

86

88

2

133

133

130

128

127

3

97

96

92

90

87

9

25

6

126

128

129

130

131

40

20

11

30

10

12

96

100

98

100

...

2

94

90

88

84

85

12

28

7

110

110

110

112

113

13

45

11

2

119

116

118

116

14

39

10

2

99

98

96

95

95

15

$

42

13

1

95

96

98

101

99

16

31

17

3

114

110

108

107

17

52

30

2호

121

119

123

126

126

18

30

10

114

114

112

108

19

55

20

119

115

113

116

115

20

39

20

3

117

118

118

118

119

21

33

20

3

118

116

114

111

114

22

48

10

104

105

103

103

23

28

14

101

100

96

96

...

24

20

5

113

112

111

111

25

30

12

119

119

118

116

114

26

51

18

2/1/

85

82

80

81

83

27

40

21

3

110

110

111

109

109

28

29

10

1

100

101

100

96

100

29

32

10

2

110

109

108

108

109

30 46

20

2

110

109

107

108

107

31

50

30

3

97

96

102

100

102

32

40

20

1

126

126

120

120

122

33

28

10

3

120

120

121

120

121

34

32

5

1

119

118

118

115

115

35

55

30

4

104

101

104

110

109

36

36

20

2

114

112

110

106

109

2

37 32

5

3

110

104

106

111

112

38

29

10

3

108

111

113

113

115

39

30

5

1 1/2

120

120

119

113

115

40

33

17

1

102

101

101

101

· 102

41

31

10

11/2

73

72

70

71

73

42

65

40

1

129

129

130

129

129

43

22

3

44

20

1

макар

95

94

95

99

98

115

113

112

112

112

45

37

12

114

110

109

110

109

i

46

29

5

95

92

90

88

85

47

25

5

1

102

100

103

101

48

32

3

2

105

102

105

104

104

49

56

10

96

99

99

99

102

50

53

12

2

104

102

104

109

111

51

52

10

2

101

99 102

104

105

52

32

10

1

130

131

130

131.

136

53

28

8

2

111

109

110

111

110

54

26

1골

86

88

91

89

87

55

45

4

3

92

84

91

95

56

24

2

1

122

121

120

119

57

21

I

101

100 104

103

58

30

11

11

96

90

94

95

59

38

20

2

105

104

106

110

116

60 64

40

2

80

82

83

83

61

36

12

105

99

97

97

96

:

62

50

30

92

92

93

96

95

63

62

40

100

100

99

98

64

38

10

99

99

98

97

382

Table XII.-STATISTICS relating to the TUNG WA HOSPITAL, during the Year 1893.

Remaining in flos- pital 31st Dec.,

1892.

No. of Cases Treated in the

Hospital, 1893.

No. of Patients Dis- charged during the year 1895.

Died during the year 1893.

No of Out-Patients treated during

Moribund Cases,

1893.

Remaining in Hos- pital 31st Dec.,

the year 1893.

1893.

:

85 27

112 2,467 390 2,857

1,456 1691.625 1.011 228 1,239

Male.

Female.

Total.

94,519 11,089 135,608 310 132 442

*}{1}}}

3853

Female.

Total.

20 105

Table XIII.-CASES of SMALL-Pox treated at the TUNG WA HOSPITAL, during the Year 1893.

Remaining in Hospital Admitted during 1893.

31st December, 1892.

Discharged 1893.

Died 1893.

Remaining in Hospital 31st December, 1893.

Male. Female. Total. Male. Female. Total. Maio. Female. Total. Male. Female. Total. Male. Female. Total.

Nil.

Nil. Nil. 42

24

66

16

9

25

26

15

41 Nil. Nil. Nil.

Table XIV.-VACCINATION performed during the Year 1893 by TRAVELLING VACCINATORS

of the TUNG WA HOSPITAL.

In the City of Victoria.

2,639

In Out-Districts.

141

Table XV.-LOCK HOSPITAL.

TABLE A.

Total.

2,780

SHEWING the ADMISSIONS into the GOVERNMENT LOCK HOSPITAL. during the 36 Years of its Existence, with the Number of DIETS issued

and the AVERage Length of TREATMENT.

ADMISSIONS.

NUMBER OF DIETS ISSUED.

AVERAGE NUMBER OF DAYS TREATED.

124

1858,

1858...

4,797

1858.

43.8

1859,

162

1859,

5.389

1839.

30.8

1860,

361

1860

9.107

1860,..

23.7

1861,

442

1861

10.778

1861

23.4

1862,

485

1862.

12.193

1862,

22.0

1863,

420

1863,

11.707

1863,

23.7

1864,

442

1864,.

11.940

1864,

27.0

1865,

390

1865.

11.303

1865.

28 0

1806,

406

1866.

13.060

1866.

28.6

1867,

434

1867,

13,120

1867,

25 5

1868,

579

1865.

16.462

1868..

23 6

1869,

546

1869.

16.779

1869,

24.8

1870, ...

722

1870.

18,3×2

1870,

23.1

1871,

593

1871.

12,308

1871,

185

1872,

656

1872,.

15.103

1872,

20.9

1873,

500

1878.

11,219

1873,.

195

1874,

3-15

1874.

6.814

1874..

18.6

••

1875,

134

1875,.

2.916

1875..

18.7

1876,

168

1876.

2.730

1876,

14.3

1877,

177

1877.

3,069

1877.

16.6

1878,

105

1878..

2,242

1878..

19.0

1879,

129

1879.

2.199

1879,

13 6

1880,

57

1880,.

1,800

1880,

147

1881,

44

1881.

1.230

1881.

1882,

99 1882

1,831

1882,

15.5

1883,

273

1883..

3451

1883.

12.0

1884,

325

1884.

5,174

1884,

18.1

1885,

411

1885,

6.161

1885.

15.6

1886.

401

1886.

4,837

1885,

12.2

1887,

144

1887,

2.014

1887.

13.9

1888,

66

1888..

1.616

1888.

24.4

1889,

84 1849.

1,540

189...

83

1890,

82

1890.

1,660

1890.

20.0

1891,

80

1891.

2.041

189'

25 5

1892,

65

1892.

2 392

1892.

36 8

1893,

63

1893.

1,568

1893,.

24.8

=

Every day, Sundays and Government holidays excepted.

:

Number of

Beds in

Number admitted į

to Hospital one:tificates of

Number who submitted

Lock Hospital.

Visitin surgeon.

32

63

383

TABLE B.

CONTAGIOUS DISEASES.

KETURN of the NUMBER of PROSTITUTES during the Fear 1893.

volunta.i.y.

279

Total Number brought nuder the Provisi us of the Ordinance.

Total Number of Examinations made an ing the Year.

279

11,603

Total Number of Examin tions made when no Disease was found.

11.545

NUMBER Discharged fROM HOSPITAL.

No. discharged free from isease who still follow their former l'uislits.

60

Number who have returned to their Friends or Emigrated.

Total Number Discharged.

60

TABLE C.

CONTAGIOUS DISEASES RETURN for the Year 1893.

TOTAL NUMBER OF MEN DISEASED

Total No.

ADMITTED INTO

of Females

AVERAGE NUMBER OF MEN IN GARRISON AND PORT (per month).

admitted

into Lock Military Naval Police ‹ ivil

Hospital. Hospital. Hospital. Hospital. Hospital.]

Total No. of Men Diseased.

Soldiers. Seamen. Police.

Average Average No. of Men Percentage in Garrison. of Men Mer-

and Port Diseased chant Seamen. per month). (per month).

REMARKS.

63

596

44

174

814

2,718

.:.

660

13,186 16,564

0,409

EXAMINATION.

TABLE D.

RETURN OF WOMEN examined and treated in the GOVERNMENT LOCK HOSPITAL during the Year 1893.

DISEASES.

No. remaining in Hospital, 31st December, 1892.

HOSPITAL.

Admitted.

Total Treated.

DISCHARGED.

Cured.

No. remaining in

Hospital, 31st

December, 1893.

Primary Syphilis, uncomplicated,

onortho,

do..

6

42

48

46

1

6

1. uro. rhœa...................

Abscess

11,603

55

11,545

Secondary syphi is...........................................

1

***

TOTAL.......

8

55

63

60

3

DISEASES.

TABLE E.

CONTAGIOUS DISEASES RETURN for the Year 1893.

Primary Syphilis, including Chancres Molles,

Gonorrhoea, uncomplicated,

Do., and Primary Syphilis, combined,

Secondary Syphilis,

Gonorrhoea and Secondary Syphilis,.............................

Primary and Secondary Syphilis and Gonorrhoea,

Gleet,..

Military Hospital.

Naval

Hospital.

Police Hos ital.

Civil

Hospital.

*263

†260

73

No returns sent.

18

21

5

22 19:

79

79

16

***

...

TOTAL,.....

......1893,..

596

44

174

TOTAL,...

.1892,......

583

54

127

TOTAL,............

TOTAL,.....

.1891,......

452

57

129

..1890,......{

419

...

69

153

* 3 Not contracted in the Colony.

† 1

"

??

""

:

384

TABLE E 2.

CONTAGIOUS DISEASES ORDINANCE.

TABLE shewing the number of MILITARY MEN admitted into MILITARY HOSPITAL during the Year 1893. SECONDARY SYPHILIS.

Months.

Contracted in Hongkong.

Contracted elsewhere.

Total.

+

January,

February,

March,

4

11

4

11

8

April,

12

12

May,

6

6

i

June,

3

3

July,

August,

September,

October,

November,

December,

10

5

63

CO

8

5

6

10 10 co

3

3

8

4

73

Total Number,

Table XVI.-Shewing the rate of MORTALITY among the FOREIGN RESIDENTS in Hongkong during the last 10 Years.

Years.

Number of European and American Residents.

Deaths.

Percentage of Deaths to Number of Residents.

1884,

3,040

94

3.09

1885,

3,040

99

3.25

1886,

3,040

103

3.38

j

1887,

3,040

108

3.55

1888,

3,040

122

4.01

1889,

3,040

1890,

3,040

1891,

4,195

1892,

4,195

1893,

4,195

8 6 5 2 88

93

3.06

95

3.12

57

1.36

75

1.79

93

2.22

Average of 10 Years,......

33,865

939

2.88

:

}

385

Appendix A.

ROYAL COMMISSION ON OPIUM.

+

Questions regarding opium consumption and opium revenue in the Colonies and

Dependencies of Singapore, Penang and Hongkong.

(1) Is opium commonly consumed by people of Chinese, Malay, or other Asiatic race in your

Colony ?

(2) What proportion should you conjecture of the adult males of each race are consumers? Do

women consume opium to any extent? Do children?

(3) What have you observed to be the effects of opium moral, physical and social, on its consumers? Is the effect the same on consumers of each race, or can you draw distinctions between the effects on consumers of different races ?

(4) Do consumers chiefly smoke, or do they eat opium? or do they drink a decoction of opium? If

opium is taken in two or all of these forms, can you distinguish between the effects of each ? (5) Do the great majority of opium consumers become slaves to the drug and eventually become opium sots," or do you find the majority, or a considerable proportion, of consumers to be moderate consumers?

(6) Is it correct to say that there cannot be such a thing as moderation in the consumption of opium? Do you know any or many cases of consumers who have taken their opium for years without harm to themselves? If so, please give description of one or two of such cases in detail.

(7) Do a majority of the labourers, or of the merchants, or of the artizans, belonging to any Asiatic race with which you are conversant, consume opium? If so, what is generally the effect of the opium habit on their efficiency in their calling?

If possible give details and examples in reply to this question.

(8) How does the use or abuse of opium among any Asiatic races with which you are conversant compare with the use or abuse of alcohol among such races, in regard to the effect on consumers? (9) Is the habit of consuming opium condemned as degrading, or injurious, by the general opinion of the Chinese, Malay, or other Asiatic race? How would such races regard the opium habit as compared with the alcohol habit?

(10) Can and do opium consumers break themselves of the opium habit?

(11) If the supply of Indian opium were to be cut off, what would be the effect on opium consumers, and on the Asiatic population of your neighbourhood? Would they supply themselves with opium from elsewhere? or would they take to alcohol or to some narcotic other than opium? or would they abstain altogether?

(12) What proportion of your Colony's revenue accrues from opium? If the opium revenue were extinguished, could your Colony raise the needful revenue otherwise? What would the people say to the loss of the opium revenue and the obligation to make up the deficit?

13) Do people of European race contract the opium habit in any numbers? If not, why not? And

what inakes Asiatics more liable to contract the habit ?

(14) How are opium consumers led to use the drug? Do they usually or often take it in the first instance to allay physical pain? Is opium, within your knowledge, a prophylactic against fever, or rheumatism, or malaria? Or is it so regarded commonly by any Asiatic race with which you are conversant ?

(15) Do opium consumers themselves usually desire to get free of the opium habit?

(16) Is there among any Asiatic race in your Colony a feeling of hostility against England for allowing

opium to be exported from India? If so, how does that feeling display itself.

(17) Have you any other remark to make in regard to opium consumption among the people around

you?

N.B.-It is desired that gentlemen who kindly undertake to deal with these questions should answer

as many as they can.

October, 1893.

By Order of

THE ROYAL COMMISSION ON OPIUM.

Answers regarding opium consumption and opium revenue in Hongkong.

QUESTION NO. 1.-Opium is not consumed by Chinese except through the pipe. I have heard of only two or three cases, but have not seen a Chinese opium-eater. The habit must be very rare amongst them. Opium-eaters are known amongst the sea-faring Indian population here. Khalasses and other resident Indians-the Indian Police and the Indian soldiers and Malays-I know nothing about.

386

QUESTION NO. 2.-Women of China do not use the opium pipe. If they ever do, it must be a very rare case. I have never seen or heard of one in this Colony.

I know of several European women of a certain class who have become addicted to the use of the opium pipe in this Colony. No others.

QUESTION NO. 3.-The only physical effect of opium eating is contraction of the pupil of the eye and sluggish and incomplete dilitation. This does not occur at all in opium smoking. The starved appearance, if any, is caused by the opium, but by pinching the belly to procure the drug this occurs in both opium-cater and opium smoker. In the well or fairly well-to-do no such effect is ever seen in either case. Socially it makes no difference at all in manner or temperament. An opium-eater to excess wakes up feeling dull and heavy, but half an hour after his first dose is quite recovered. That this does not occur with moderate opium-eaters I am sure, as I have watched Khalasses on board ship in long voyages who were opiuin-eaters and they were always among the smartest of the crews and seemed to bear fatigue and long hours on duty better than the others. I was at the time doing long voyages in Indian coolie ships and had ample opportunities of observing the opium-eaters. my surprise they all seemed to have their limit which they had used daily for years which varied from three or four grains to half a dram of crude opium daily, and were apparently regulated by their means,

Το

All Eastern races who use it in this way are moderate when compared with the European who can stand much heavier doses, and no European cater that I have seen is content with so little.

QUESTION NO. 4.--In Hongkong and China Chinese that use opium use it for smoking only as a rule with comparatively few exceptions. There is no effect whatever observable in opium smoking as I have proved by observation and personally, (see Annual Report in triplicate enclosed with these answers). At the time mentioned there I consumed in one sitting nearly 3 mace (58 grains to a mace) or more than an average opium smoker consumes in one day. In the opium eater the only effect observable is the action of the iris of the eye before mentioned. This is the only difference to be detected between the two forms of consuming opium-eating opium and drinking solution or tinctures- the effect is practically the same.

QUESTION NO. 5.-Yes; the majority in both forms of consuming opium among Asiatics become slaves to its use if it can be called slavery in such moderate doses as the great majority consume. I should rather put it that they become habituated to its use. In my experience in Assam and Bengal of opium-caters, excess is the exception and comparatively rare among Asiatics. With opium smokers there is no such thing as becoming a sot. I was present in Canton at a large Chinese dinner party composed of wealthy Government Officials, Bankers and Merchants, during the intervals and after dinner there were some half dozen or more who smoked opium; the entertaiment began at nine in the evening and I left at four in the morning. One opium smoker I devoted especial attention to; he had a very handsome and costly pair of pipes with him and from watching him he must have smoked at least six mace of the very best opium, without any effect observed on him whatever; he was chatty and lively the whole time. I smoked myself the same evening between two or three mace without feeling any effect whatever. I have smoked hundreds of times in the last twenty years I have been in China and never felt any effect at all. (See my Annual Report with the Government Analyst's Report on experiment made at my request which is added as an appendix.) I do not believe that morphine ever reaches the smoker, the length of the pipe is about 18 inches and before the morphine in the smoke reaches the smoker's lips it is thrown down out of the smoke on to the stem.

QUESTION NO. 6.-Certainly not. The great majority of opium-eaters and smokers are very moderate in their consumption. See my Annual Report where I have given two cases one of an excessive and one of a moderate opium smoker.

QUESTION NO. 7.-No. It is a minority in all cases and a very small minority at that, and it has no effect whatever on their calling and they are just as keen as a non-consumer in looking after their own interests.

QUESTION NO. 8.-There is no comparison as any Merchant in the East could tell. A drunken Asiatic is as untrustworthy and as great a nuisance as a drunken European. An opium smoker is no more untrustworthy than a non-smoker, and is never a nuisance in any way.

QUESTION NO. 9.-The consumption of opium is certainly not looked upon by any Asiatic race, as far as I am aware of, as degrading or injurious. The consumption of alcohol in excess is regarded by them all with contempt.

QUESTION NO. 10.-Not often without assistance. The opium-eater, as a rule, believes in it as a prophylactic against fever and bowel complaints. Opium-eaters are chiefly to be found in malarial districts or among seamen liable to prolonged exposure and wetting against the effects of which it is undoubtedly a prophylactic and a powerful stimulant as well.

The opium smoker has the same idea, also that it is beneficial in lung troubles.

Then he is afraid to leave it off for it is a general belief amongst them that if they do so they will die.

$

=

387

QUESTION NO. 11.-Certainly they would supply themselves with opium from elsewhere. They are not likely to take alcohol either in European forms or in the form of their own spirit samshu. But opium they will have. Cut down the Indian opium so that it becomes unprocurable in China and too expensive in India, and China will grow opium sufficient for all Eastern nations and Europe too if it can make a profit on it, and they are rapidly even now improving their own growth and manufacture of opium..

Make opium too expensive for consumption in India and it will be smuggled wholesale over the Chinese and Persian borders. For China, if it sees a chance of profit, will rapidly comply with all demands, improvement in manufacture, &c.

Even now the soluble preparations of morphine are being largely imported into China and the Chinese have learnt from the Missionary Doctors the uses and benefits of the hypodermic syringe. An Ordinance against the use of hypodermic injections of morphine except by qualified Medical men had to be introduced into the Colony this year, as dozens of petty shop-keepers were using it at one cent the half grain injection, and they soon had hundreds of clients who found it was cheaper than opium smoking and the effect was much greater.

No other drug is likely to supersede opium or its extractives.

QUESTION NO. 12.-Only the latter portion of this question can be answered by me. Certainly the loss of revenue from this source would excite general indignation as the decrease in this source of revenue has already. It is a tax on a luxury used by a minority. The estimate put on the number of opium smokers to population in China is put by the Chinese Customs returns at 2 per thousand, and my Annual Reports show that among the Criminal Population in this Colony the opium smokers are under 2 per thousand. Can any European country show that among its criminal population that habitual drunkards are under 2 per thousand, I am not talking of ordinary consumers of alcoholic liquors?

QUESTION NO. 13.-The only European contracting the habit of opium smoking that have come under notice have been two or three women in the European brothels in this Colony as I mentioned in answer to question 2. The reason is not very far to seek. Europeans have no belief and no general knowledge of its medicinal efficiency. The excessive amount of trouble in preparing a pipe and the time it takes for the pleasure of three or four inhalations at most is against its becoming a European vice. With the cigar pipe or cigarette the smoker can ride, walk, read and write, and talk and pursue his ordinary avocations while enjoying the pleasure. It is for this reason that the Eastern modes of consuming tobacco in the Narghili Hooka or Chibouk have not been taken to by Europeans.

In smoking opium your whole attention must be given to the pipe and that only you can talk while you are preparing the load, but you can do nothing else; it is the same with the Eastern methods of smoking tobacco: you can talk but you must support the pipe; you cannot move about with it and there is a loss of freedom.

QUESTION NO. 14.-Generally it begins by a recommendation for the relief of some physical ill either by a friend or doctor. Opium smoking is rarely taken to from the force of example.

Certainly opium is of benefit as a prophylactic in malarious districts and to bowel complaints from exposure and chills in my experience, and it is so regarded by Indians and Chinese.

QUESTION NO. 15.-I have treated a good many cases, very few desire to get rid of the habit. I have talked with hundreds and rarely heard that desire expressed.

QUESTION NO. 17.-There are one or two things I would draw attention to. I have often been asked by Europeans if their servants or employees were, in my opinion, addicted to opium smoking, the man being brought before me looking dull and stupid forgetting what he is told, bringing the wrong thing, &c., denies that he ever smoked opium. Often a servant is set down by a master for these causes as being an opium smoker. These are the effects among the Chinese of a night in a brothel and over-copulation, but neither the servant nor his friends, the other servants, will tell the cause.

Certainly these effects are well known among the Chinese and on the returns of deaths by Chinese doctors on the deceased's friends received by the Registrar General every year some dozen or so of cases are returned as deaths from excessive copulation. The patient when brought in for examination looks very often as if he were on the verge of having a fit. Another thing accounts for many wonderful stories, that an Asiatic when interrogated by a European will seek to know the reason and what is wanted and is always anxious to make his opinions coincide with the views of his questioner and if possible gain his approbation, so long as it in no way interferes with his own interest and he has nothing to gain or lose by differing.

In conclusion, I have sent in with these answers, my Annual Report for 1891 in triplicate which gives a full account of my experience of opium smokers in the Victoria Gaol with experiments by the Government Analyst, Mr. MCCALLUM, shewing the value of native opinions as to the quality and the effects of opium.

PH. B. C. AYRES, Colonial Surgeon.

Government Civil Hospital, 19th December, 1893.

**

388

}

Appendix B.

This will show the work done in twenty years' service in the Medical Department of this Colony, and also much that remains to be done to remedy evils reported as existing twenty years ago.

In 1873 the duties of the Colonial Surgeon and Inspector of Hospitals were, the supervision of the Medical Department generally, also the Government Civil Hospital, the superintendence of the Lock Hospital and the examination of women under the Contagious Diseases Ordinance, the supervision of the Registered Brothels for Europeans and Chinese with the assistance of three Inspectors of Brothels. He was Medical Officer in charge of Victoria Gaol, Superintendent of Meteorological Reports with the assistance of Mr. DE SOUZA, Apothecary of the Lock Hospital, the instruments being arranged in the Lock Hospital compound, and sanitary supervision of the Colony with the assistance of two Inspectors of Nuisances. He had to give medical attendance gratis to subordinate officers, their wives and families, drawing pay of $2,000 or under per annum. In addition to this he was allowed private practice, £200 being deducted from his salary for this privilege.

GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL.

This building was one of the oldest in the Colony originally built for a private house; it was a two storied bungalow originally containing four rooms on each storey with spacious halls and wide verandahs all round the house on each storey. These had been divided up so as to provide five wards above and one on the ground floor, with small wards constructed in the verandah above for the use of private patients or the segregation of infectious cases, accommodation for the European staff consisting of the Surgeon Superintendent, the Apothecary and one European Wardmaster. The Superintendent had two rooms on the ground floor facing China town, the rest were provided with verandah rooms one each. The five wards were supposed to furnish accommodation for fifty patients and often had to provide room for more; in reality they could only provide reasonable room for thirty patients at the outside. The floors were of China pine planks painted and very unevenly laid and were difficult to be kept clean. The lavatories, latrines and urinals, were in verandah rooms of a very primitive and unwholesome description, the pipes leading out of them continually getting out of order and becoming very offensive. As a Hospital the building was everything it should not be. The Superintendent had arrived from home and taken charge in the beginning of the year. He was the only qualified man on the staff and was very naturally disgusted with the condition of things. The Apothecary, a Portuguese, considering that he had picked up his education here and in Macao, had a very good knowledge of his work; his duties were no sinecure as he acted in the capacity of Apothecary, Steward, Storekeeper and Clerk. He was a most efficient and trustworthy officer. The European Wardmaster was without training of any kind, this post being filled by discharged soldiers, seamen or any European in search of a job who could furnish a decent character. They seldom held the post for more than a few months at a time. If they were good men they soon found something better; others were discharged for drunkenness, neglect of duty, &c., &c. Two Wardmasters who were employed when the staff was increased after this Hospital was burnt down, were Portuguese. Mr. CARNEIRO and Mr. XAVIER who were at work for many years till illness obliged them to retire, and they were among the best men we ever had on this portion of the staff. The nursing staff was composed of untrained Chinese coolies headed by a Chinese Wardmaster who had been long in the service and was a most skilful dresser, post mortem assistant, and interpreter. He was a valuable acquisition to the staff. The Chinese nursing staff, like the European Wardmasters, was continually changing. They were accommodated in a wooden building of one room outside the Hospital. The cook house was a broken-down brick building, the cook room on the ground floor and room on the floor above it for the Chinese Wardmaster and Cooks. Attached to this building were the latrines for the Chinese staff, a disgusting and offensive hole, even with the most careful super- vision. The Hospital dietary was extremely unsatisfactory. The medical comforts under which head come wine and spirits were of the cheapest brands, wholly unfit for the use of invalids. The Hospital armoury was worthless. There was hardly a decent instrument in the whole collection fit for service. Under these conditions the Superintendent, Dr. WHARRY, with the assistance of the Apothecary, Mr. BOTELHO, and the Chinese Wardmaster, CHEUN A LOK, the only members of his staff on whom he could rely, had to run the working of the Hospital which no one entered as a patient except under compulsion or dire necessity.

There had been a correspondence going on for three years concerning the necessity for a new Hospital, and, as there was no doubt upon this matter, it had to be energetically continued, but it was not until the matter was settled by its providential destruction that a new Hospital was decided upon.

The state of the Hospital staff also furnished the Colonial Surgeon and Superintendent with much work in the necessity of continual reports on its unsatisfactory condition for years.

:

I

389

The matter of the dietary was at once very forcibly reported, and a commission of enquiry appointed under the Presidency of Mr. MAY, the Chief Magistrate, with the result that everything of the best was to be supplied and the dietary revised as recommended by the Colonial Surgeon and Superintendent.

With difficulty, aft series of reports, the Colonial Surgeon obtained a grant of £80 for im- mediate expenditure for instruments, and £20 yearly for their repair and the purchase of new ones, and until these could be obtained he loaned the use of his own instruments of which fortunately be had a good supply.

In 1874 the typhoon of September settled the question of the necessity of a new Hospital, as far as the building then in use and above described was concerned, by reducing it to ruins, the patients and staff passing a terrible night crowded into one room on the ground floor, while the roof above and the verandahs around them were falling.

A large building then to let, the Hotel d'Europe, extending from Old Bailey Street to Pottinger Street and immediately in front of the Central Police Station, was temporarily taken up for use as the Government Civil Hospital. This was a great improvement, being very much larger and affording greater accommodation for patients and much better accommodation for the staff, but it was still not a suitable building for a Hospital, being in a very central position and having no open space around it for exercise for convalescents; so the correspondence concerning the new Hospital still went on till 1878 when the great fire beginning on Christmas Day settled the question of this building's suitability by burning it down. The patients, all who could be, were hurriedly dismissed, the very serious cases being removed to the Gaol Hospital.

No other building being obtainable fit for the purpose, the Lock Hospital was made use of, the patients and staff of that building being removed to other temporary quarters.

.

The question concerning a new Hospital was thus disposed of after eight years' correspondence, Providence being apparently as dissatisfied with the condition of things as ourselves. Plans for a new Hospital were sent out from home, and, when received, it was found would cost $250,000 besides being most unsuitable for the climate, none of the buildings being protected with verandalis. They would be perfectly uninhabitable in hot weather, even with punkas going day and night, a thing inad- missible in a hospital as many patients could not be exposed to such treatment. This state of things was represented by the Colonial Surgeon who suggested that the Lock Hospital should be increased in size and all the waste land about it taken up for the increased accommodation necessary, recreation ground, &c. This could be done at less cost and would provide room for further increase of accoin- modation if necessary in the future. Plans were at once drawn up by the Surveyor General, which received sanction from the Home Government for the building as it now stands. Though still not affording the accommodation required in many essentials as far as it goes it is fitted with all modern requirements and is superior to any in our Eastern possessions East of Bombay and can be much improved in future. At the same time plans were sanctioned for a new Lock Hospital on the site of the Old Government Civil Hospital that had been blown down in 1874.

With the new Hospital improvement in the staff began. Mr. BOTELHO, the Apothecary, resigned. in 1879, after over thirty years of faithful and very arduous service, and Mr. McCALLUM, a properly qualified Analyst and Apothecary, was appointed from Home. As the work of his department in the Hospital increased, sanction was obtained for the assistance of two Chinese Student Apothecaries who were educated under his supervision. In 1883, Mr. MCCALLUM was appointed Secretary and Super- intendent of the Sanitary Board, and Mr. CROW, the present Government Analyst, came out to take his place at the Hospital. Increased assistance becoming necessary in this part of the Hospital staff, a European Assistant was sanctioned, and Mr. WATSON, a duly qualified Apothecary and Analyst, was appointed to the new post from Home in 1887. He resigned in 1890 for private reasons and is now a partner in a firm in this Colony. Mr. LUCAS was then appointed from Home in his place but resigned in 1893 for private reasons, being offered a better appointment at Home, and Mr. BROWNE, the present incumbent, came out to take his place. All these appointments have been most satisfactory, and those who have left us have been parted with with regret. As regards the staff, this Department of the Civil Hospital is now in good working order, but as regards the Laboratory, although we have got a new one, the money for fitting it up has not yet been sanctioned and it has now for two years been lying useless and we are wanting in store space for dispensary purposes, the space required being at present fitted up as a

up as a Laboratory in a very primitive way.

··

In 1878 we were granted a Chinese Clerk, and in 1889 we were granted an assistant clerk, neither before they were wanted, and in this part of the staff we have some trouble. Our clerks have been very good ones but their hours of work are long, and, like nearly every one of the Hospital staff, they never know when they may be called upon to work even far into the night. In consequence of this, when they have become thoroughly efficient, a vacancy in some other Office better paid with shorter hours turns up, and of course they apply for it. I have to certify to their merit and as there has been no question about that we loose a valuable servant and have to take another who as a rule is fresh from school and has everything to learn.

390

In 1877 we were granted another much needed servant, a Steward and Storekeeper, but this appointment was never efficiently held until the appointment of Mr. ROGERS in 1883. Much to the regret of all the staff he was compelled to retire on pension in 1892. On his retirement in the same year Mr. CHAPMAN was appointed and has proved a most efficient successor to Mr. ROGERS in this very arduous post.

In 1887 the Superintendent, Dr. WHARRY, retired on pension and our present Superintendent, Dr. ATKINSON, was appointed. He joined at a moment of very serious trouble among the Hospital staff, the Senior Wardmaster, formerly a non-Commissioned Officer in the Army, and the Junior Wardmaster, formerly a Policeman, were both under arrest, the former for embezzling the property of a deceased patient in the Hospital, the latter for aiding and abetting him. The Senior Wardmaster was sent- enced to five years' imprisonment, the latter was discharged and left the Colony. These were the last of the untrained Wardmasters. Their successors were appointed, trained men from the Army Medical Staff Corps, but still there has been trouble. Some have been dismissed, some have been dissatisfied and resigned, until at present only one remains, other arrangements having been made to supply the place of the other two.

In 1889 strong representations being made of the necessity of improvement in the nursing staff of the Hospital, consisting up to the present of Chinese coolies, and the increasing needs of the Hospital in this respect, six French Sisters of Mercy accustomed to Hospital work were appointed, one as Matron and the rest as Nurses. Though a very great improvement in many respects, it was found that they did not meet our requirements, and, in 1890, English Nurses, educated in the London Hospitals, were procured, and our present Matron, Miss EASTMOND, with five nursing Sisters, was appointed in 1892. The Matron of the European Lunatic Asylum having resigned on pension, an additional nursing Sister was sent out and that appointment merged in the nursing staff of the Hospital. Two more nursing Sisters have lately come out to join the nursing staff in the place of the two Wardmasters whose appointments were abolished. Of the efficient and untiring work of the Matron, Miss EASTMOND, and her staff of nursing Sisters it is impossible to speak too highly.

In 1889 also the necessity of an Assistant Superintendent to the Hospital was recognized by Government. Dr. TooGOOD, M.D., of London, was appointed and came out, but declined to take up the appointment on the ground that it had been misrepresented to him by the Home Office and returned by the next mail. It was then offered to Dr. Lowson who happened to be on the spot and who accepted it.

This completes the staff as it is at present, and, with few exceptions, Dr. ATKINSON, the Superin- tendent, by whose assistance much of the work has been done, has reason to be proud of the establish- ment and the staff of subordinates under him all of whom are now provided with comfortable and airy quarters, instead of the miserable state of things described as existing in 1873.

This, though a long description, gives but a faint idea of the difficulties that had to be surmounted, the discomfort that had to be endured both by patients and attendants before the present so far satis- factory stage was arrived at. Though not by any means perfect, there are prospects of this Hospital becoming as nearly so as possible in the future.

VICTORIA GAOL.

In taking over medical charge of this Establishment the first thing to be noticed was the num- ber of dyspeptic cases amongst the European and Chinese prisoners that daily reported themselves and, on inspection of the diet list, this was not to be wondered at as day after day, with the smallest possible variation, the same diet was presented to them resulting in a great waste of food they were unable to eat, and what they did eat they were unable to digest. In the case of the Chinese prisoners six to eight baskets representing the same number of piculs of cooked rice were rejected at each meal. This was taken over by the Compradore at small cost and on which he made a large profit as he contracted to supply coolie gangs and got the rice cooked for him for nothing besides having purchased it at much below cost price. This state of things being reported, a Commission was appointed and a scale of diet much reduced in quantity but greatly improved in quality, varying from day to day during the week both in cooking and variety of food and costing much less, which the Colonial Surgeon drew up was recommended by them and adopted. Even this reduction was found too much, and, on the Colonial Surgeon's report, another Commission, a few years later still, further reduced the scale, but adhered to the variety in food and cooking before recommended. This reduced the sick list very considerably.

An accidental inspection at a very early hour in the morning revealed the horrible stench in the corridors caused by the bucket system, each cell being provided with a bucket in which during the night from five to seven prisoners deposited their stools and urine. This, on the Colonial Surgeon's representation, was very greatly mitigated by the introduction of the dry earth system. The buckets being divided so that the urine was deposited separate from the stool and a pan of dry earth provided to throw over the latter as soon as deposited. Unfortunately alluvial soil is not obtainable and so the suppression of the offensive smell is not so complete as in Indian prisons.

تیم

391

Another improvement his Indian experience enabled the Colonial Surgeon to effect was in the floggings administered by order of the Courts or as punishment. These were effected by the cat-o- nine-tails with very disastrous and permanent effect on the health of the prisoners subjected to these punishments. On the Colonial Surgeon's report of the effects produced by the cat, the evils of which had long ago been recognised in India when applied to Asiatics whose backs as a rule are far from muscular and therefore inry to the internal organs of the chests being much more liable to occur, a Commission was appointed and they found that the cat in use was very much heavier and more formidable than had ever been in use either in the Army or Navy, and were shown long sentenced prisoners whose health had been permanently injured and lives shortened by its use. The Colonial Surgeon recommended that the cane on the breech should be used instead, the same as in India, pointing out that no permanent injury to health need result and that although the prisoner was marked for life the same as in the use of the cat the marks need not be seen when at labour after his release, being covered by his breech cloth or trousers, yet he could strip to the waist without informing the world he had been a gaol bird if he wished to reform, and this change recommended was sanctioned for the future.

There was a class of prisoners that also attracted his attention on his first taking charge. These were the Opium Smokers. When admitted to Gaol they were put into Hospital, had Hospital diet, an allowance of two ounces of gin, a dose of quinine three times a day, and lastly laudanum was given them in daily decreasing doses. So they became for a time consumers of alcohol and opium and two vices were introduced to their notice in a small way to cure the one they already had. A very careful inspection of many new arrivals of this class of prisoners could not enable him to find any one symptom peculiar to all that were addicted to this habit or any set of symptoms peculiar to all. The opium treatment was then abolished, next the gin was omitted as not needed, and, no evil effects occurring, all treatment was abolished and opiuin smokers passed for diet and work on their physical merits the same as all other prisoners, the habit being entirely ignored. Still a record of their age and weight on admission was kept, what amount of opium they were accustomed to smoke daily, and a record of their weight every week for the first month of their detention in the Gaol. No evil effects were noticed from the use of the drug or the deprivation of it and so, as far as prison discipline was concerned, the habit was entirely ignored for the future. Of the hundreds of prisoners that have been under detention during the past twenty years that have owned to this habit, only two have died in Gaol and they have not been found to be on the sick list more often than any of the prisoners that do not use opium.

LUNATIC ASYLUM.

In 1873 no such Government Institution existed. Chinese Lunatics were sent to the Tung Wa Chinese Hospital. European Lunatics were confined in the Gaol till they could be sent to their native places.

At the end of 1874 a European Female Lunatic was sent into the Gaol. This young person was very noisy and slept little, day and night her singing, laughter and shouting were to be heard if she was in good temper which she usually was, but if she was not her howling and screaming was some- thing appalling. This kept most of the prisoners awake who had to work hard all day, an additional punishment to which they were not sentenced, not only this but it annoyed the whole neighbourhood among others two unofficial members of Council who lived close by and who very forcibly in council backed up my representations that the Gaol was not a fit place for the detention of Lunatics. So the half of a building consisting of two semi-detached houses was fitted up as a Lunatic Asylum. This building was in a very ruinous condition and in the event of any severe blow coming on, the Lunatics had to be transferred to the Police cells till it was over, the staff dispersing to their homes for safety. This was opened the 1st day of 1875 and remained in use for about five years. It faced the south side of Hollywood Road on part of the site of the present Victoria College. This site being wanted the building had to come down, so the Lunatic Asylum was transferred to the half of a deserted old Chinese School house which stood on the site of the new wing of the Government Civil Hospital, where it remained till 1886 when the present European Lunatic Asylum was built and ready for occupation.

In 1891 it was decided to build a Lunatic Asylum for Chinese under European supervision. In 1873 Chinese Lunatics were confined in dark and dreary cells in the Tung Wa Hospital under Chinese native doctors' supervision, and those who were violent were chained up in those cells like wild beasts. I represented their evil case and the Government directed that they should build wards well lighted and ventilated which was done and the Chinese doctors visited the European Lunatic Asylum and were shown the more humane methods of restraint used there, and patterns of the various appliances were given to them for use, but they relapsed into their old methods of restraint and so Government decided that they should not be permitted to have violent lunatics or any that required restraint in their charge, and an Asylum for Chinese Lunatics was built on a site below the European Lunatic Asylum and the poor creatures are now properly housed and cared for under European supervision. The Asylum was opened November, 1891.

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392

SMALL-POX HOSPITAL.

In 1873 the only accommodation for cases of this disease among Europeans were in small verandah wards of the Government Civil Hospital and strong representations were made as to the dangers of such cases being admitted into this establishment. In 1875 so many cases occurred that the question was settled by the accommodation being insufficient, and the or half of the ruinous old building (one half of which was already occupied as a Lunatic Asylum) was hastily fitted up as a Small Pox Hospital and was so used till 1877. In spite of all representations of its danger to a Central District of the Town, its bad accommodation, &c. However some cases occurred late in the year when the typhoon season was setting in and it was represented that such cases could not be removed to the Police cells as the Lunatics were, so the lower storey of the ruin of the Government Civil Hospital blown down in 1874 was fitted up for the purpose and used till 1879 when the site was wanted for a New Lock Hospital. Then a matshed was built on the site of the Garden of the present Hospital and later a wooden hut with two small wards and one large one was built and still remains, but as this building is very old and has been partially destroyed by fire, a permanent building has been sanctioned and will, let us hope, be finished before a year is out as an isolated ward with smaller wards for private patients, is much needed for infectious cases attached to the Government Civil Hospital. At present inost cases of small pox are treated on board the Hospital Hulk Hygeia.

VACCINE INSTITUTE.

Considerable trouble had for long been experienced in obtaining vaccine in the Colony and I reported on this matter soon after arrival. A monthly supply was secured from home but most of it spoilt on the way out owing to the heat and long voyage by the English Mail route. It was then, at my suggestion, sent via America and by that route arrived in good condition but the vaccine sent was taken from the arm at home and we could not obtain a sufficient supply of calf-lymph. The arm to arm vaccination was unsatisfactory. A calf-lymph Institute had been set up in Japan, so for some years we had a good supply of good lymph procured from Japan, but that, from some cause or another, began to deteriorate and it was decided to have a calf-lymph Institute of our own.

This was opened in 1892 under the superintendence of Mr. LADDS, Government Veterinary Surgeon, and the supervision of Dr. ATKINSON, Superintendent of the Government Civil Hospital. Since then we have had an excellent supply of good calf-lymph sufficient for all our needs and large quantities have been sold for the use of the Coast Ports and the Chinese in the interior, sufficient to make this Establishment self-supporting.

SANITATION.

In 1873, on my arrival, there was on my office desk a Government letter three months old ordering an enquiry concerning an outbreak of Typhoid Fever in the Chinese Brothels. As a private practi- tioner was acting as Colonial Surgeon this enquiry was put off pending the arrival of the new Colonial Surgeon who was expected by every mail. Learning that cases of this disease were continually occurring, an inspection of nearly five hundred Registered Brothels was begun at once. So with the three Inspectors of Brothels a house to house visitation was made and the state of each house reported upon. This discovered first that the Inspectors had no instructions other than what was required by the Registrar General who was also Protector of Chinese, which related only to the women admitted into the brothels, their treatment, &c. They did not concern themselves about the houses or the accom- modation provided. It was found that they were all of them overcrowded, the majority of them filthy in the extreme, many of them wholly unfit for the purpose they were used and quite a number unfit for human habitation at all. Each Brothel was specially reported upon, what required to be done to put it into a sanitary condition, the number of inmates that should be allowed in each house, &c. The construction of these houses, the state of the drainage, the latrine arrangements, the awful state of filth and overcrowding were a revelation. It took six weeks working every afternoon from two o'clock till dark to get through the inspection, to inform the Inspectors what would in future be re- quired of them, to arrange that no new houses should be opened or licensed without previous inspection by the Colonial Surgeon and his reporting as to its fitness and how many inmates should be permitted. The report on each house as it was visited was sent in to the Registrar General every day. At the end of the enquiry a special full report was sent in to the Government, the cause of the outbreak of typhoid being fully represented.

Then came the question, as the Colonial Surgeon was responsible for the sanitation of the Colony, if these houses, which were specially under Government supervision, were in such a very dread- ful condition, what was the rest of the town like, and were his two Sanitary Inspectors as ignorant of their duties as the Inspectors of Brothels were of what ought to be theirs. While inspecting some houses the drainage specially came under notice and I wrote to the Surveyor General who like myself had only arrived in the Colony in 1873 and asked if I could see any plans of the town drainage at his office and his reply was that no plans could be found, that he was as much in the dark as myself on the matter.

4

393

As was expected I found my Sanitary Inspectors as ignorant of their duties as were the Inspectors of Brothels. They had received no definite instructions from any one, they knew enough to summons a householder for throwing garbage into the street and that was about all. Pigs, sheep, goats and cows were kept in ordinary Chinese dwelling houses. The cows were only to be found in the base- ments, but pigs, sheep and goats were to be found on any floor, pigs and sheep were kept till they were wanted for slaughter, goats and cows for dairy purposes. The goats were led round from house to house and milked at the house doors. Cows the same way sometimes; one dairy supplying most of the houses in Caine Road was in the basements of the houses in Mosque Junction between Shelley Street and Peel Street, a small gully leading out of Shelley Street led to these basements which were no better than cellars and the only light and air that came into them were from the doors and windows in the gully. Lamps had to be used when the cows were milked or attended to. These cows had never been out of these dens since the time they were led in as young. When a cow died she was taken out piece meal. To get the cows out I had to have the walls broken down. In Aberdeen Street, from Ĉaine Road to Bridges Street, the houses were full of goats. These formed the principal dairies for the in- habitants of the best quarter of the City. Beef and mutton principally used for food by Europeans was killed over night and whole sheep, halves and quarters of cattle hung in Chinese houses during the night in cold weather to be ready for the morning market. In one case I found a quarter of beef hanging over the bed of a man who was in the last, stage of small-pox. The markets, Central, West- ern, and Taipingshan, were filthy in the extreme. Coolies slept on the stalls at night where meat, fish and vegetables were exposed for sale during the day and their lousy bedding hung over the provisions in the day time. In the Central market the thirteen scavenging coolies employed slept in a room over the latrines, through the apertures between the boards of the floor the proceedings in the latrines could be seen, and it did not occur to any one that it was anything out of the way that eleven out of the thirteen had died within the year. The drainage in the markets was as bad as anywhere else. I sent in a full report of the state of the Chinese houses, drains, water supply, &c., in May 1874.

In my Annual Report for that year I dwelt on matters relating to Chinese only omitting any comment on the food supply for the Foreign population, but my remarks on sanitation were considered too alarming and unfit for publication and were struck out.

In 1879 the existing Government published this report in full and it has since been continually referred to in the Public Press. In the winter of 1874, a commission consisting of the Surveyor General, Mr. R. G. ALFORD, a private architect in practice in the Colony, and the Colonial Surgeon were appointed to verify the truth of the Colonial Surgeon's report sent in in May. We began our labours in October, 1874, and spent every week-day afternoon from 2 P.M. till dark in these investigations till the end of April, 1875. Mr. ALFORD spoke Cantonese fluently so we were not dependent on the interpreters. At the end of March the Surveyor General was too much out of sorts to go on with the work. This was not to be wondered at, as we all nearly every day vomited our tiffins before we had been at work an hour and when he got home he could eat no dinner. Mr. ALFORD and the Colonial Surgeon continued the investigation till completed.

At the end of April the joint report was sent in more than verifying the Colonial Surgeon's report, and the beginning of May the Colonial Surgeon having spent the best hours of the day for two winters in slumming helped to prove his case by going down with typhoid fever and occupying a private ward in the Hospital. Six medical men on the 5th of June having given their opinion that he could not live through the night, the Surveyor General did him the honour of having a special grave dug for him which happily proved unnecessary. In this survey it was found that few house- drains were connected with any main-drain of any kind but ended under the pavement of the street and the drainage soaked into the sub-soil. That very few public drains existed and that most of them were old water courses composed of rough cut-granite blocks with wide interstices between them working well enough during the rainy season when fully flushed but in the dry season allowing the liquid portion of the sewage to soak into the sub-soil. Many of them it was found had been cut-off owing to the streams having been diverted and had since developed into cesspools, allowing the liquid portion of the sewage to sink into the sub-soil and becoming filled with thick black putrid matter, some of these were of gigantic proportions containing many hundred tons of putrid filth. Whole streets had been built without any preparation, the roadway filled with the rough granite blocks sticking out of the ground as nature had made it, no roadway or sidepaths made, no surface channels and no sewers laid down, the house-drains running into the sub-soil. High Street, First, Second and Third Streets each about a quarter of a mile long running between Bonham Road and Queen's Road were in this condition till five years ago when the streets were laid out and the main-drains laid down, but to this day most of the house-drains remain unconnected draining into the sub-soil, the New Building Ordinance not being retrospective except in the case of old drains being found a public nuisance, and so not ten per cent. of the existing houses are connected with the new drainage system.

The next great want was the water supply, no supply existed West of the Hospital or East of the Barracks, even then few but European houses were supplied with water and not all of them. The rest depended on coolies who brought water in buckets from the public hydrants at 5 cents a bucket. The poorer population could not afford this and had to wait until the stalwart coolies who thronged the hydrants and often fought for their turn had been supplied, often before this had been

394

done the water had been cut off, and so hundreds of women and children were to be seen daily collecting water from foul wells, side channels, or the mountain streams. Hundreds of wells existed more than two thirds of which have on analysis been condemned, the water being unfit for drinking. Thus the poorer quarters of the town were condemned, the houses overcrowded with human beings and animals for their faulty construction, drainage, their filthy condition the want of water for cleansing purposes; though indeed the cleansing of the houses was impossible from their construction an attempt to wash the upper floors would have nearly drowned the people below, and the basement floor being composed of mud could not be washed. In this condition a very large proportion of these houses remain to this day.

Up to 1879 things were, if slowly, gradually being improved but in that year a grave difference of opinion occurred between the Surveyor General and the Colonial Surgeon on the one side and the Government on the other on the subject of sanitation, a portion of the Chinese and European property owners combining and objecting to proposed new arrangements and the Government upholding them. This put a stop to the contemplated improvements approved of by the better educated of the Chinese and the more liberal of European landowners, and it culminated, in 1881, by the Surveyor General and Colonial Surgeon appealing to the Secretary of State. Mr. CHADWICK was sent out in 1882 with a Royal Commission to enquire and report on the sanitary state of the Colony. A Blue Book containing his report and recommendations was issued in 1882. In this report full confirmation was given of everything the Colonial Surgeon had reported for the past ten years and one of the recommendations was that a Sanitary Board should be formed relieving the Colonial Surgeon of the horrible responsibility, except as one of the members of the Board, that he had been labouring under for ten years, during which from the very first month of his arrival he had done his utmost for the good of the Colony. In all that time and in spite of the trouble he had in many cases been compelled to give them he met nothing but courtesy and kindness from the Chinese who often appealed to him for protection and assistance which they have always received when it was in his power to give.

Besides the continuous reports on the Sanitation of the Colony generally, the Colonial Surgeon has had to make many on Government Institutions. Reports on the Central School and other Chinese Government Schools, their badly situated, overcrowded and insanitary state has resulted in the new buildings on better and more airy sites. Reports on the Police Stations and the accommodation for the married men and their families have procured many and great improvements but in this case much remains to be done. Reports on the Markets, the accommodation for cattle and their slaughtering, the necessity for an experienced Veterinary Surgeon and better arrangements for the food supply, have also had good results.

Many of these improvements have cost the Colony an unnecessarily large outlay for these wants were pointed out when land was cheap and money also, when dollars were dollars. Many oppor- tunities have been lost notably after the great fire of 1872, when to his disgust the Colonial Surgeon saw the same old insanitary Chinese houses rebuilt more crowded than ever. At the moment

of writing the terrible visitation of the Plague has given the Colony a very severe lesson and a great opportunity and there are hopes that the Colony may become in the near future a model English settlement.

The Colonial Surgeon is thankful to acknowledge the many kindnesses and great assistance he has received in the course of his labours from all in the Government Service, from the Subordinates in his own Department and from every one in the Colony, European or Chinese to whom it has been neces- sary to apply for information or assistance. He desires to acknowledge the hearty and kindly recog- nition of his services in his capacity of Medical Attendant by the Subordinates of the Civil Service and their families.

In this review of the Sanitation of the Colony for the past twenty years he has but slightly touched upon the information given in the Colonial Surgeon's Annual Report for 1874 and the much fuller information given in Mr. CHADWICK'S Blue Book of 1882.

?

PH. B. C. AYRES, C.M.G., Colonial Surgeon.

395

Enclosure 1.

Report of the Superintendent of the Civil Hospital.

GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL,

HONGKONG, 28th February, 1894,

SIR,-I have the honour to forward you my annual Report for the year 1893 with the Hospital Statistics.

I. THE HOSPITAL BUILDINGS.

.

i

1. The main portion of this Hospital has remained unaltered with the exception of improved lavatory accommodation and a few minor alterations.

2. During the past year three drying rooms have been fitted up in the Main Building of the Hospital, the space occupied by the old hand-lift being utilised for this purpose. These have proved

of considerable advantage especially during the seasons that fever is most prevalent.

3. As it seems practically impossible to add to the present buildings a scheme was drawn up last

year for improving the present accommodation by providing an operating room and two more private wards; this obtained the sanction of the Government and will, I trust, be accomplished during the ensuing year.

There has been a slight improvement in the way the Hospital washing has been done during the past year, this having been performed at one of the New Public Laundries as surmised in my Report

for 1891.

There is, however, great room for improvement in this respect and the date is, I trust, not far distant when a Laundry attached to this Hospital exclusively for the use of the Medical Department will be provided.

4. The question of reserving a suitable site for a new Hospital in the future, as pointed out in my Report for 1892, should not be lost sight of.

II.-LUNATIC ASYLUMS.

5. It was found necessary to build a new roof to the European Lunatic Asylum owing to the ravages caused by the depredations of white ants, but this did not necessitate the removal of the inmates.

6. It is to be regretted that the present Lunatic Asylums admit of little privacy for the inmates nor is there any accommodation for their useful employment, a most necessary provision for the satisfactory treatment of many cases of this class.

II.-SMALL-POX HOSPITAL AND HYGEIA.

7. The temporary small-pox buildings were considerably injured by the typhoon of last September and also by the ravages caused by white ants. I am of opinion that the time has now arrived for the removal of these temporary buildings and the erection in their stead of a permanent building which could be utilised as small-pox hospital during that season of the year when it is impracticable to use the Hygeia, or as an isolation hospital for the observation and treatment of certain classes of infectious disease which up to the present have had to be treated in the Government Civil Hospital; the diseases I refer to are :--

1. Chicken Pox,

2. Rötheln (Epidemic Rose Rash),

3. Scarlet Fever,

4. Diphtheria,

5. Cholera, and

6. Erysipelas.

8. I have carefully considered our needs in this respect and am of opinion that we should have a building with accommodation for at least 14 patients, six of them being females and eight males. There should be at least three private wards (I & II class wards). The site is an admirable one for the purpose, we shall require a kitchen, store-room, accommodation for one European Wardmaster and say four Chinese attendants, a small disinfecting chamber, lavatories, bath-rooms and the usual out-buildings.

9. During the past year 57 cases have been treated in the Small-pox Hospital and the Hygeia; of these five were under observation, four were suffering from Varioloid (modified small-pox) and two from Varicella (Chicken-pox) and one from Secondary Syphilis. There were eight deaths; in four of these cases the patient was suffering from the Hæmorrhagic variety of small-pox, and four from the confluent type.

:

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·

306

The nationality of these patients is given in table VIIC.

Of these in the month of January-Six arrived by the S.S. Tai Yuan, (Messrs. BUTTERFIELD & SWIRE), two by the S.S. Tsinan, (Messrs. BUTTERFIELD & SWIRE), and one from the French Mail Melbourne.

In February-One from the S.S. Lennox, (Messrs. DODWELL, CARI & Co.), one from the U. S. Flagship Lancaster, two from the German Mail Nürnberg, (Messrs MELCHERS & Co.), and three from the S.S. Strathelyde, (Messrs. DODWELL, CARLILL & Co.).

In March :-Two from the French Mail Sydney, (The Compagnie des Messageries Maritimes), and one from S.S. Yiksang, (Messrs. JARDINE, MATHESON & Co.).

In April:-One from S.S. Lightning, (Messrs. D. SASSOON, SONS & Co.),

In August:-One from S.S. Fellus, (MITSUI BUSSAN KAISHA).

In December:-Four from S.S. Giava, (Messrs. CARLOWITZ & Co.) and one from S.S. Glengarry, (Messrs. JARDINE, MATHESON & Co.). A Chinese destitute, infant aged 6 months and two from the Army Authorities under observation.

10. The Hygeia has been re-painted throughout, and new store accommodation furnished, a small disinfecting chamber has been fitted up by utilising one of the servants' rooms.

:

IV-MEDICAL STAFF QUARTERS.

11. These have been maintained in a satisfactory condition practically without any expenditure.

V. HOSPITAL PREMISES.

·

12. These have been maintained in as satisfactory condition as the money available would permit and a few minor improvements have been introduced during the

year.

VI. HOSPITAL AND NURSING STAFF.

13. Mr. E. W. LUCAS, Assistant Apothecary and Analyst, left on expiration of agreement on 31st

January, (C.S.O. No. 3,027 of 1892), and was succeeded by Mr. F. BROWNE, on 13th August, (C.S.O.

No. 170 of 1893, and C.S.O. No. 1,880 of 1893).

Miss B. S. TAYLOR, (Sister BERTHA), resigned on 31st March, (C.S.O. No. 473 of 1893), and was succeeded by Miss E. M. PALMER, (Sister EVELYN), on 15th May, (C.S.O. No. 709 of 1893, and C.S.Q. No. 1,104 of 1893).

Mr. S. PEPPER, Junior Wardmaster, who returned to the Police Department on the 25th July, 1892, (C.S.O. No. 572 of 1892), was succeeded by Mr. L. E. BRETT on the 13th August, (C.S.Ø. No. 542 of 1893, and C.S.O. No. 1,880 of 1893.)

Mr. J. MYERS, Assistant Wardmaster, Lunatic Asylums, resigned on the 15th December, (C.S.O. No. 2,602 of 1893, and

C.S.L. No. 1,709 of 1893).

Mr. J. STEVENSON, Senior Wardmaster, resigned on 31st December, (C.S.O. No. 2,839 of 1893). Mr. Lo CHEUNG-IP, Senior Clerk, resigned on the 31st December, (C.S.O. No. 2,896 of 1893). The following Officers were away on leave, viz.:

20%!

Miss E. G. IRELAND (Sister GERTRUDE), from 3rd May to 26th June, (C.S.O. No. 872 of

1893).

:

Miss E. F. HIGGIN, (Sister FRANCES), from 3rd May to 26th June, (C.S.O. No. 873 of

1893).

Miss C. EASTMOND, from 5th July to 28th August, (C.S.O. No. 1,512 of 1893).

Miss C. WALKER, (Sister CAROLINE), from 16th August to 9th October, (C.S.O. No. 1,824

of 1893).

Dr. J. A. Lowson, from 3rd June to 31st July, (C.S.L. No. 766 of 1893).

Miss MCINTOSH, (Sister CATHERINE), passed in June the third Government Examination

in the Chinese Dialect "with great credit" (C.S.O. No. 1,376 of 1893).

It is my agreeable duty again to record my appreciation of the able and efficient assistance afforded to me by the several members of the hospital and nursing staff and of their attentiveness to the work of the institution.

VIL-WORK DONE DURING THE YEAR.

14. Attached to this report are the following tables :-

GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL.

I.-Shewing the admissions into and deaths in the Government Civil Hospital during each

month of the year, of the Police.

II.-Shewing the rate of sickness and mortality in the Police Force during the year. III. Police Return of admissions to Hospital from each district during the year. V.-General Return of the sick treated in the Hospital.

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397

Va.-Surgical operations performed during the year.

Vb.-Zymotic Diseases, sub-group 1.

Vc.-

2.

Vd.-Diagram shewing number of cases of Malarial Fever occurring amongst the members

of the Police Force admitted in each month of the year.

Ve.-Zymotic Diseases, sub-group 3.

Vf.- Vg.-

4.

>>

""

""

5.

VI. Shewing the rate of mortality in the Government Civil Hospital during the last 10

years.

VII.-Shewing the admissions into and deaths in the Government Civil Hospital during

each month of last year.

VIIa. The aggregate monthly number of patients visited in the Hospital daily for the last

three years.

VII.-Table of admissions into and deaths in the Lunatic Asylums during the year.

VIIC.-Table of admissions into and deaths in the Small-pox Hospital and Epidemic Hulk

Hygeia during the year.

15. The total number of cases treated during the year was 7,556, as against 7,783 in 1892, a decrease of 227; of these 5,721 were out-patients; I have not included in these numbers 32 cases of minor surgical injuries such as dog-bites, scalp-wounds, &c., which were treated in the receiving ward and not admitted.

16. The number of in-patients during the year was 1,835, an increase of 120 as compared with that of the previons year. The total number of deaths was 67, a percentage of 3.65 as compared with 3.96 of the previous year, this is the smallest death rate in the past 10 years, see Table VI. Of these 32 were in a moribund condition when admitted, 23 dying within 24 hours, and 9 within 48 hours of their admission.

17. The average daily number in the Hospital was 79'93, as against 78'8 in 1892.

18. Of the total number of in-patients 164 were females, an increase of one in that of the previous year.

12 of these were obstetric cases as against 14 in 1892.

19. The following diseases caused the greatest number of admissions :---

Diseases.

Cases.

Fevers :-

Simple continued (Febricula) Enteric

9

13

Intermittent

..275

Remittent....

81

378

Venereal....

Organs of Locomotion

Digestive System

Respiratory System Alcoholism

Dysentery

252

177

86

99

29

50

.....

Injuries of various kinds

137

20. Of the 67 deaths 13 were from Lung Disease, 9 from Heart Disease, 3 from Bright's Disease, 2 from Typhoid, and the rest singly from other diseases.

21. POLICE.-The total number under treatment (see Table I) was 26 more than in the previous Of the different nationalities there was a decrease of 18 amongst the European members of the Force, an increase of 31 amongst the Indians and a decrease of 13 amongst the Chinese. There were 3 deaths during the year, one Indian dying of Hodgkin's disease (Lymphadenoma), one Chinese Constable of Heart and another Chinese Constable of Malignant Abdominal Disease.

22. GAOL OFFICERS.-There were 84 under treatment during the year as follows:--

Head Turnkeys. Hospital Warder

Turnkeys

Guard Sergeants

Guards

2

1

62

2

17

398

The diseases they were suffering from are classified thus:-

Venereal...

.....

Dyspepsia (generally alcoholic)

Influenza

....

Malarial Fever

Dysentery

and the rest singly from other diseases.

14 10

8

7

2

In the one fatal case the cause of death was Tubercular Disease of the lungs and intestines. The Influenza cases all occurred in the months of October, November and December.

23. INFLUENZA.--There were 17 cases under treatment during the year, all of the endemic variety. 24. TYPHOID FEVER.-There were 13 cases under treatment during the year with 2 deaths, of these one was carried forward from the previous year, of the remainder 5 contracted the disease in Victoria, one at Kowloon, one in Canton, one in Japan, and the other four were admitted from ships. This is by far the largest number of cases of Typhoid admitted to this hospital for years.

25. CHOLERA.-There were only 2 cases under treatment during the year, these both recovered. One, a European sailor, was admitted from the S.S. Tellus, on 19th July, with a history of cramps, incessant diarrhoea and vomiting for the past twenty-four hours. He was in a critical condition for a few days, but eventually recovered and was discharged cured on 8th August. The second case, also a sailor, was admitted on 16th September, with a much milder attack. He was discharged cured on the 19th September.

26. DYSENTERY.-There were 50 cases admitted suffering from this disease with 1 death.

27. MALARIAL FEVERS.-The total number of cases under treatment was 356, as compared with 286 in 1892, of these 275 were of the Intermittent Type, and 81 of the Remittent Type. As I had the satisfaction of reporting last year there was again no death from this class of diseases in 1893.

Two of the most severe cases are reported in Appendix 1, both these occurred amongst the European members of the Police Force, when convalescent they were sent at the expense of the Government to Japan in order to recruit their health.

28. BERI-BERI.-There were 17 cases during the year with one death.

29. VENEREAL DISEASES.-252 patients were admitted as against 232 in the previous year. There were 48 cases of Primary Syphilis and 20 of Secondary Syphilis as against 19 and 27 respectively in 1892. It must be borne in mind, however, that in many of these cases the disease is contracted out of the Colony, a large number undoubtedly originate in Japan.

30. HYDROPHOBIA.-One case of Hydrophobia, an employee at the Dock, was admitted on 5th January and died on the 8th January. From the history of this patient it appears that he was bitten by a fox terrier pup six months previously, the wound was promptly cauterised at the time. On the 5th January, he complained of pains about the limbs and joints and was admitted to the Hospital; on the following day, the 6th, undoubted symptoms of Hydrophobia developed, curare and morphia were injected subcutaneously and at first seemed to control the paroxysms, but as these proved futile recourse was had to the administration of Chloroform the strength of the patient being meanwhile maintained by nutrient enemata. Notwithstanding all that was done the patient rapidly became worse and died early on the morning of the 8th January, syncope probably induced by spasms of the heart being the immediate cause of death.

During the first three months of the year no less than eleven cases of dog-bite were brought to the Hospital. One a Chinese boy æt. 11, was admitted on the 1st January, and discharged cured of the bites on the 12th January; enquiries were made as to the future history of this case and it was ascertained that he was sent to the Tung Wah Hospital, and from the particulars given by the authorities there I have no doubt that he died of Hydrophobia. Another case, a Chinawoman aged 62, was admitted on the 6th January suffering from severe dog-bites and discharged cured on the 24th January. She was taken to the Tung Wah and died there on the 4th February of Hydrophobia. On the 7th January, I wrote in officially drawing the attention of the Government to these facts and recommending that all stray dogs should be destroyed and suggesting the advisability of some such law being passed with reference to the importation of dogs into the Colony as is in force at Singapore (see my letter No. dated 7th January, 1893).

As a result of the Ordinance enacted by the Governor making provision for regulating the keeping of dogs and for the prevention of the importation and spread of rabies, I have the pleasure to report that during the later half of the year there has been no case of Hydrophobia either in this hospital or in any other institution of the kind in the Colony, and the number of cases of dog-bites has consider- ably decreased. During the first six months of the year there were 15 cases of dog-bites treated as against 5 in the latter six months of the year.

31. INJURIES.-There was a considerable diminution in this class of cases, the numbers being 137 with 7 deaths, as against 190 with 8 deaths in the previous year.

32. SURGICAL OPERATIONS.-There were 153 operations performed during the year with 6 deaths as against 136 with 10 deaths in 1892.

399

5

F

33. FRACTURES AND DISLOCATIONS.-In addition to the operations the following Fractures and Dislocations were treated not necessitating operative interference:-

Clavicle,

Humerus,

Humerus and Ulna (both compound), Radius,...

Radius (compound),

Radius and Ulna,

Ulna,

Metacarpals or Phalanges,

Femur,

Femur (compound),

Femur and Radius,

Base of Skull,

Skull (compound),

Base of Skull and Femur,

Inferior Maxilla,

....

Rib or Ribs,...... Dislocation of Shoulder,

Dislocation of Elbow,

25

1

5

1

3

3

3

6

1

]

5

5*

1

5

2

1

34. ALCOHOLISM.-There was a decided decrease as compared with 1892, the numbers being 29 as against 48 in 1892.

35. POISONING.-No less than 24 cases of poisoning were admitted during the year. In 11 of these the poisonous agent was Datura with I death, this fatal case presented all the symptoms of datura poisoning, but as there was no post mortem examination ordered there is some doubt as to the cause of death. There were 10 cases of Opium poisoning with 4 deaths, the other three were suffering from Sulphuretted Hydra. g. poisoning and occurred in the hold of the sunken steam-ship Amigo. Notes of these cases are given in Appendix A.

36. SMALL-POX.-A separate report is given by Dr. Lowson on those suffering from this disease. 37. VACCINATIONS.-Three hundred and forty-seven (347) vaccinations were performed during the year with the following results:-

܀

Primary cases, Re-vaccinations,

Successful. 85

Unsuccessful.

15

-100

177

70

-247

347

:

:

*.

:

38. LUNATIC ASYLUMS.-As will be seen from Table VIIc, there were 40 cases under treatment

during the year with 5 deaths, of these 18, including 7 Europeans, 1 Indian, and 11 Chinese, were

carried over from last year.

39. POST MORTEM EXAMINATIONS.-28 were performed during the year.

40. APPENDICES.--In Appendix A are notes on some cases of interest occurring during the year. Appendix B is a copy of the answers to the questions propounded by the Royal Commission on opium giving the results of my experience at this Hospital since 1887.

41. The fees received from the patients in the Government Civil Hospital during the year amounted to $15,990.93. Of this the Board of Trade paid $2,947.79, and the Police $1,034.82. The fees received from the patients in the Lunatic Asylums amounted to $818.00, those from the Small-pox patients $1,430.80, giving a grand total of $18,239.73 an increase of $4,614.05 on that of the previous year. This is by far the largest amount yet received in fees at this institution in any one year.

42. I take this opportunity of thanking the Naval and Military Surgeons, who are and have been

on this station and the Civil Doctors for their valuable assistance especially at operations.

43. GIFTS OF FLOWERS, NEWSPAPERS, &c.--The patients have been much indebted to several residents of the Colony for frequent gifts of flowers, newspapers, &c.

Dr. PH. B. C. AYRES, C.M.G.,

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your obedient Servant,

J. M. ATKINSON, M.B., (Lond.), Superintendent.

1

Colonial Surgeon.

* Of these one died.

400

Appendix A.

Owing to the occurrence of the Plague before I had concluded writing notes on cases, none are put in an appendix as in former years. These had been left for me to write for Dr. ATKINSON.

J. A. L.

Appendix B.

ROYAL COMMISSION ON OPIUM.

Questions regarding opium consumption and opium revenue in the Colonies and Dependencies of Singapore, Penang and Hongkong.

(1) Is opium commonly consumed by people of Chinese, Malay, or other Asiatic race in your Colony ? (2) What proportion-should you conjecture-of the adult males of each race are consumers? Do

women consume opium to any extent? Do children ?

(3) What have you observed to be the effects of opium moral, physical and social, on its consumers? Is the effect the same on consumers of each race, or can you draw distinctions between the effects on consumers of different races?

(4) Do consumers chiefly smoke, or do they eat opium ? or do they drink a decoction of opium? If

opium is taken in two or all of these forms, can you distinguish between the effects of each? (5) Do the great majority of opium consumers become slaves to the drug and eventually become "opium sots," or do you find the majority, or a considerable proportion, of consumers to be moderate consumers'?

(6) Is it correct to say that there cannot be such a thing as moderation in the consumption of opium? Do you know any or many cases of consumers who have taken their opium for years without harm to themselves? If so, please give description of one or two of such cases in detail. (7) Do a majority of the labourers, or of the merchants, or of the artizans, belonging to any Asiatic race with which you are conversant, consume opium? If so, what is generally the effect of the opium habit on their efficiency in their calling? If possible give details and examples in reply to this question.

(8) How does the use or abuse of opium among any Asiatic races with which you are conversant compare with the use or abuse of alcohol among such races, in regard to the effect on consumers? (9) Is the habit of consuming opium condemned as degrading, or injurious, by the general opinion of the Chinese, Malay or other Asiatic race? How would such races regard the opium habit as compared with the alcohol habit?

(10) Can and do opium consumers break themselves of the opium habit ?

(11) If the supply of Indian opium were to be cut off, what would be the effect on opium consumers, and on the Asiatic population of your neighbourhood? Would they supply themselves with opium from elsewhere? or would they take to alcohol or to some narcotic other than opium? or would they abstain altogether?

(12) What proportion of your Colony's revenue accrues from opium? If the opium revenue were extinguished, could your Colony raise the needful revenue otherwise? What would the people say to the loss of the opium revenue and the obligation to make up the deficit ?

(13) Do people of European race contract the opium habit in any numbers? If not, why not? And

what makes Asiatics more liable to contract the habit?

(14) How are opium consumers led to use the drug? Do they usually or often take it in the first instance to allay physical pain? Is opium, within your knowledge, a prophylactic against fever, or rheumatism, or malaria? Or is it so regarded commonly by any Asiatic race with which you are conversant ?

(15) Do opium consumers themselves usually desire to get free of the opium habit?

(16) Is there among any Asiatic race in your Colony a feeling of hostility against England for

allowing opium to be exported from India? If so, how does that feeling display itself. (17) Have you any other remark to make in regard to opium consumption among the people around

you?

N.B.-It is desired that gentlemen who kindly undertake to deal with these questions should answer

as many as they can.

October, 1893.

By Order of

THE ROYAL COMMISSION ON OPIUM.

2

1

401

1. Opium is commonly consumed by people of the Chinese, Malay, Indian, and Eurasian races in this Colony.

Amongst the Chinese all classes are included. With reference to Malays those we see here are mostly sea-faring men, the Indians, who consume opium, are principally Sikh destitutes who come here with the hope of obtaining.employment and a few of the Sikh and Mahomedan Indian Police, the Indians chiefly eating the drug, they do not smoke. I am also informed that some of the men of the Hongkong Regiment consume this drug. The Eurasians I refer to are of three classes, first the offspring of Europeans and Chinese, secondly the offspring of Portuguese and Chinese and thirdly the offspring of Indians and Chinese.

2. Of the Chinese at least 60 per cent. of the whole community are consumers.

Women very rarely consume opium to any extent. I have heard of a few cases in which they have been in the habit of smoking small quantities of the drug.

Children never do so.

3. When smoked in moderation I have observed no ill effects from its use; on the other hand I consider that to many it is decidedly beneficial. When taken in excess it is undoubtedly an evil, all moral sense disappears, the person addicted to the habit will commit any crime to obtain the drug, physically these victims to the habit are to be known at once by their attenuated bodies, their wizened yellow skin and their lethargic habit, socially all family ties and those of friendship are severed. Chinamen have been known to sell even their own children to obtain the drug.

The effects are much the same on consumers of every race.

4. Consumers chiefly smoke opium, a very few eat it and they are principally Sikhs (Indians). Some Chinamen also take the opium in the form of pills, these are chiefly those who are so fully employed that they have not time to indulge in smoking the drug they are indeed too busy to go through all the tedious processes involved in smoking and to obtain the stimulant and sustaining effect of the drug they swallow or eat opium in the form of small pills.

I have never heard of a decoction being drunk.

Lately a practice has sprung up in this Colony of injecting morphine (one of the alkaloids of opium) subcutaneously. For full information with reference to this see C.S.O. No. 1454/93.

5. Not in my experience, the greater majority are moderate consumers.

6. (a) Most certainly not.

(b) I know many consumers who have taken opium for years without it having done them any

appreciable harm..

Description of cases :- Vide Appendix C.

7. Amongst the Chinese all classes are addicted to this habit, labourers, merchants, and artizans. With regard to the Malays as I have stated before, in this Colony, our experience is with the sailors only of this race.

The Indians who take the drug are a few Sikh and Mahomedan members of the Indian Section of the Hongkong Police Force, and the Sikh and Mahomedan destitutes. These all eat the opium in the form of small pills made at Chinese drug stores. The only Indians who smoke the drug are the half cast Malay Indians.

With regard to the Eurasians they are of every class and principally smoke.

8. There is no comparison, in my opinion alcohol is much the greater evil in its results on those who take it to excess.

It is quite a mistaken idea that Asiatics do not drink. I have had many cases of alcoholism pure and simple under treatment in the Government Civil Hospital during the past six years and they have proved much more unmanageable and difficult to cure than the few cases of inveterate opium eaters whom I have had to treat.

Effect of the habit when consumed in moderation is certainly not injurious and in many cases in my opinion is decidedly beneficial. See Appendix C.

cannot help thinking that there is in the Chinese an hereditary toleration, if not a craving, for opium. It is not necessary for Europeans to take opium to withstand the ill effects of the climate, as for one reason we are not so much exposed to the climate as the Chinese from our manner of living, occupations &c. and alcohol in moderation fulfils the same purpose.

9. (a) The habit of consuming opium to excess by healthy men is certainly looked upon by the Chinese as degrading and injurious. In moderation for those who work hard there is no harm in smoking a few pipes, the general idea and I think the true one is that it does good by removing the feeling of fatigue and affording rest and also acting as a prophylactic in some diseases e. g. malaria, and a decidedly remedial agent in other diseases.

(b) It is difficult to answer this question as Asiatics are not a race addicted to excess in alcohol.

It is only in Chinamen who have been brought into contact with Europeans and have acquired some of their bad habits that the evils of alcoholism are seen.

402

10. Very rarely. I know personally of three cases. The general opinion amongst Chinese appears to be that if they leave off the habit they will die. Even leaving it off for a day brings on severe diarrhoea and I can easily understand this proving fatal if not properly treated, not to mention the mental disquietude &c. and the other symptoms brought on by suddenly discontinuing the drug.

11. They would in all likelihood obtain Chinese opium from Yunnan, this although inferior and cheaper than Indian opium is, I am given to understand, already consumed here, or take to the hypodermic injection of the drug, or swallow it in the form of pills obtained from European dispensing firms or Chinese drug stores. The Chinese know of no substitute for opium. The craving seems to be so great, the habit having been once established, that they would do anything to obtain it in one form or the other.

12. (a) $389,900 was the amount in 1891 obtained from the Opium Farmer for monopoly of selling opium in this Colony.

13. Some few do. I have had three cases under treatment in this Ilospital during the past six years.

There is in my opinion an hereditary tendency amongst Asiatics to contract this habit. They are more liable to contract it also from the sake of example and by the teachings of their so called Doctors.

14. (a) First by seeing that it is the usual custom amongst their fellow countrymen at a certain age to take to this habit, and secondly at the advice of their Doctors.

(b) Yes frequently.

(c) It is in my opinion a prophylactic amongst Chinese living in Malarial Districts against Malarial fevers, and not only a prophylactic but an antiperiodic and by this means a distinct remedial agent in Malarial fevers of every type.

It is so regarded by the Chinese. See Appendix C.

15. No, not as long as they have enough money to purchase the drug, if they have not they will take it in any other form than smoking e. g. by means of hypodermic injections, if they can obtain it cheaper in that way; they must have the appetite satisfied.

17. The information herein contained has been obtained from many sources amongst which I may mention the frequent visits I have made to the opium divans in this Colony to study this question. Inspector QUINCY of the Hongkong Police Force and Messrs. Lo CHEUNG IP and UI KA of this department have kindly acted as my Interpreters.

I have also had considerable practical experience as Superintendent of this Hospital during the past six years of the effects of opium and alcohol on the Chinese and other native races and the conclusion I have come to is that neither of these drugs taken in moderation, even regularly, are injurious but on the other hand are frequently decidedly beneficial, when taken to excess alcohol is much the more serious and deplorable in its effects and is by far the greater evil.

J. M. ATKINSON, M.B. (Lond.), Superintendent.

Appendix C.

Case I-Chan A Lock æt. 67 at present living in Hongkong and in receipt of a pension

from the Colonial Government.

Family History.-Indefinite, remembers however that his father was troubled with a severe cough. Previous History.-Patient was born at Macao and came to Hongkong shortly after the British settled here. He was employed first as a cook's mate at a Chinese house, after having been in this situation some years he entered the service of the Government Civil Hospital as a coolie, this would be as far as he can recollect about 1853, he remained a coolie for some 4 or 5 years and was in Dr. COCHRANE'S time appointed Chief Chinese Wardmaster, which appointment he held until 1889 when he was pensioned off on account of old age.

He first contracted the habit of smoking opium when 17 years of age the reason being that he did so at the advice of a Chinese Doctor whom he had consulted as he was then suffering from hæmorrhage from the lungs accompanied by cough.

This Doctor told him that opium smoking would cure him and heal his lungs.

He first commenced with 2 candareens a day and the Doctor told him he must gradually increase the dose until he was smoking 3 mace a day= 30 candareens. Since then he has never been troubled with blood spitting.

He has been an opium smoker for fifty years now and on an average has smoked 2 to 3 mace a day, the opium used always being the Opium Farmer's first quality, now he is only smoking 1 mace a day as he cannot afford more, this costs him 25 cents, formerly it only cost about 19 cents.

403

A LOK states:-"that he is sure that if he can get good opium, by this he means very old opium, it will cure him of Malarial fever. He says it has frequently done so.

The most he has ever smoked in a day is 5 mace.

Amongst the Chinese opium is believed to have the property of curing diarrhoea and dysentery, malarial fevers, haemorrhages from the lungs, heart-pain (by this is probably meant dyspepsia and indigestion), and to relieve pain.

He thinks that healthy men who work hard benefit by smoking a little opium after their day's work, say not more than 1 mace a day.

If consumed in a larger quantity than this it is injurious. Of the two evils drink he thinks the worse. Dr. WHARRY, my predecessor, advised him to try and give up the habit, telling him at the same time that he would give him some medicine to cure him of it. A LOK tried for one day and had such severe diarrhoea that he had to give up the experiment and he has never attempted it since."

Present condition.-I examined him on the 18th instant and found him a fairly well preserved man for 67 years of age. All his organs seem sound and healthy-lungs no sign of any consolidation, and in my opinion he is likely to live another ten years if careful.

As our Senior European Wardmaster is leaving us at end of this year I think so highly of A Lok that I intend recommending that the Government allow us to employ him again until the successor to the Senior Wardmaster can be obtained from England.

Personally I have known A Lok for over six years and have always found him ready for any emergency whether at day time or in the middle of the night, he very frequently has been called up in the middle of the night to receive accidents &c. and for a man of his station in life he is wonderfully intelligent and capable.

His knowledge of the Chinese and their habits was very useful, he had in addition a certain practical knowledge of surgery which he had acquired here and which rendered him very dexterous in the application of splints, surgical dressings, &c. In conclusion I may add that I have made the acquaintance of many Chinese Doctors but in my opinion CHAN A LOCK far excelled them all. It was with great regret that we received his resignation.

If time would admit I could give the notes of three other cases but as this is the most complete and seems to bear most the subject in all its details I have given it at some length.

Enclosure 2.

Report from the Medical Officer in charge of Gaol Hospital.

GAOL HOSPITAL, HONGKONG, 26th March, 1894.

SIR,-I have the honour to forward the annual report and statistics of the work done in this Hospital in 1893.

2. The number of admissions continues steadily to decrease. Last year they amounted to 272 patients, consisting of 12 Europeans, 1 Coloured man, and 173 Chinese. The various diseases from which they were suffering are shown in Table IX-K.

3. By order of the Police Magistrates, 13 men and 1 woman were sent for observation as to mental condition. Ten were found to be of unsound mind.

4. At the first medical examination, 39 men were admitted into Hospital. These cases are given in Table XIa.-M. and the percentage, in Table IXa.-L.

5. Those that were treated without being received into Hospital are described in Table X-N. Of this class there was also a great decrease.

6. The rate of mortality and sickness are shown in Table XI-0. There were only two deaths from disease. One Chinaman succumbed in consequence of oedema of lungs and general debility and another from tubercles of lungs. Both were sentenced to seven days' imprisonment for mendicancy and, on account of the state of their health, did no work and were also excused from penal diet. One China- man committed suicide by hanging himself in his cell, and one was executed by the order of the Supreme Court.

7. I believe that the rate of mortality is the lowest yet recorded. A glance at the before mentioned tables will show that a much higher rate might have been expected.

The decease of several of the prisoners was probably prevented by allowing them extra diet and taking other precautionary measures.

Many for want of proper food would not, very likely, survive long their discharge from Gaol.

8. I have often heard that old convicts prefer long imprisonment, knowing by experience that they then get a more ample diet. As a rule, it is the short sentenced prisoners that demand greater care, especially if they have to serve two terms of less than six months. They become very thin under such an ordeal. Very seldom are prisoners sentenced to this kind of punishment.

404

9. Zymotic diseases for sometime back have appeared less frequently and are losing much of this virulency. Last year, there were only a few erysipelatous inflammations of a very mild type. Probably this is in part due to the extensive hygienic measures adopted by Captain LETHBRIDGE, the Superintendent of the Gaol, in ordering the white-washing of the whole building and chipping of stones of the walls and grounds.

10. The health of the prisoners was remarkably good during the last winter.

Chinese prisoners do not wear so thick clothes as the European prisoners, nor have better nourish- ment and are barefooted; notwithstanding all these, they stood wonderfully well the cold weather of the month of January, when the water in the buckets which were left in the yards were found frozen in the morning. This proves, I think, that the Chinese are a hardy race and by taking a little care will thrive well both in hot and cold countries.

But the frosty weather must have told severely on many indigent Chinese. Three prisoners on admission to the Gaol, were suffering from gangrene of toes caused by frost-bite. Two of them stated that they belonged to Yaumati, and another to Taipinshan district. One was subsequently committed again to Gaol. His left foot had not yet quite healed.

11. Long sentenced prisoners were still vaccinated with the lymph prepared by the Colonial Veterinary Surgeon, which is of an excellent quality.

12. The following is the number of the prisoners vaccinated since it was first started:-

Year.

Total number of vaccination and re-vac- cination.

Taken.

Failed at first vaccination and re-vac-

cination.

Total number of those who have been vaccinated or inoculated outside the Gaol.

1888,

1889,

1890,

1891,

1892,

1893,

2,051

1,354

697

2,060

1,445

615

1,736

1,024

712

2,836

1,090

1,346

2,625

1,985

640

1,417

763

654

1,951

2,057

1,722

2,521

2,618

1,325

..

!

13. The supply of the lymph ran short for a few weeks, and this is the reason why last year's return shows a total much smaller than usual, of the prisoners vaccinated.

This interruption was not of serious consequence. The vaccination in this Gaol is an extra precautionary measure. The majority of the Chinese have been well vaccinated in the arms and a few inoculated when very young while in their homes.

14. The weights of opium smokers during the first four weeks of confinement in the Gaol are recorded in Table IX-B-2 and the diseases which some of them had in Table P.

15. Warder FLORES and assistant warder AHMED have continued to work diligently and the matron, Mrs. M. NOLAN, has also rendered valuable aid as a nurse to female prisoners.

16. The Police sent eight Chinese supposed to be affected with leprosy for medical examination. With the exception of one who stole eight pounds of sugar, all the others were arrested for begging. They were found to be lepers. It appears that one returned to this Colony and was again committed for the same offence.

They all came from Chinese Kowloon or from that neighbourhood, attracted by the fame of Euro- pean skill in medicine.

17. I believe that if a dispensary is open at Yaumati, not only will the lepers cease frequenting this city, but it will be largely attended and be the means of curing and alleviating innumerable patients who live in the mainland and who for want of money or for other reasons, are unable to come to Hongkong for treatment.

18. Although the number of female prisoners, comparatively speaking, has never been large, the house which they occupy is so limited, that in case of sickness, there is no separate room for the patients. 19. With regard to female prisoners the same remarks might be applied as to male prisoners. The majority of them are in Gaol for want of a work-house, asylum or decent employment.

Many on account of loss of sight, old age, or impaired health, were exempted on medical ground, from doing the full penalty to which they were condemned.

If some philanthropists would seriously think of establishing proper institutions for those who were born or had been residing for a considerable period of their life in this Colony and to make arrangement for others to return to their former homes, or to go to places where they could get a living, the number of the prisoners will no doubt be greatly reduced.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

?

Dr. P. B. C. AYRES, C.M.G.,

Colonial Surgeon,

&c.,

&C.,

&c.

L. P. MARQUES,

Medical Officer.

:

405

Enclosure 3.

Report of the Government Analyst.

GOVERNMENT LABORATORY,

HONGKONG, 17th July, 1894. SIR, I have the honour to submit a statement of the work done in the temporary laboratory of this Hospital during the year 1893.

TOXICOLOGICAL, &c.

2. Under this head 3 investigations embracing the analysis of 6 articles (post mortem material &c.) were conducted. In one case, that of a German male adult, sulphonal and blood were detected on the singlet on which the deceased had vomited. The enquiry as to cause of death in this case was prolonged over a considerable period. Neither the vomit on the singlet or the stomach yielded evidence of the presence of any poisonous principle. No foreign substance was detected in a box of sulphonal lozenges found in the room of the deceased. It was suggested that in the admittedly weak state of the stomach the introduction of a salt only slightly soluble at ordinary temperatures like sulphonal, might have acted as an irritant and produced violent vomiting and hemorrhage to an extent sufficient to account for death. Only one lozenge containing 16 grains of sulphonal had apparently been taken. An open verdict was returned in this case.

3. In the second and third cases the active principle of Datura was detected in the material sent for analysis. These cases of mydriatic poisoning do not call for any special remarks,

4. In the case in which a Chinese male adult was hanged for the murder of a little girl I was unable to detect any blood stains on the two swords and razor forwarded by the Captain Superintendent of Police. The weapons were much rusted and the razor appeared to have been subjected to considerable heat.

MILK.

5. Seven analyses of milk were made during the year-4 for the Superintendent of the Government Civil Hospital, 2 for the Sanitary Board and 1 for the Deputy Inspector-General, R. N. Hospital. The Sanitary Board samples were found in both instances to be skim milk. The milk forwarded by Doctor TURNBULL, R.N. was very rich in fat: the analysis seemed to indicate that the cream had been allowed to rise before collecting the sample. Samples of milk from both the morning and evening deliveries of the Government contractor are tested daily by Mr. R. CHAPMAN, the steward of the Civil Hospital. On only one occasion was the milk observed to have a low specific gravity. The results of the analysis fully confirmed the suspicions of the steward. The attention of the contractor was duly called to the matter and as the possibility of the milk being tampered with during transport from the Dairy to the Hospital was admitted directions were issued for the tins to be duly sealed. These precautions have been followed by highly satisfactory results.

WATER.

6. Fifteen analyses of water were made during the year-12 for the Director of the Public Works Department, 2 for the Commodore H.M.S. Vietor Emanuel and 1 for the Gas Company.

7. During the year, owing to the short handed state of this section of the Medical Department, it was only possible to make analyses of the Public Water supplies at irregular intervals. I have nothing to add to the remarks made in former annual reports as to the excellent quality of the water from the Pokfulam and Taitam services.

THE MORPHINE ORDINANCE 1893.

8. In appendix A to this report will be found the results of the investigations made by your directions concerning the practice of injecting morphine hypodermically which had been introduced the Chinese ostensibly as an antidote for the opium smoking habit.

9. As soon as the new Ordinance had received the assent of the Governor on the 23rd of September a large number of the victims of the injection habit applied to the Police Stations for the medicine which had been issued from this Department for free distribution. The following is the composition of each dose of the mixture:-

Sulphate of Copper,..

Tincture of Cinchona,

Aromatic Spirit of Ammonia,

Syrup of Orange,

Water to,

•64 grain.

1 drachm.

.....of each drachm.

1 fluid ounce.

10. The Chinese did not take this mixture for any length of time. From the reports which have reached me I am inclined to the belief that the majority of those addicted to the injection habit had finally recourse either to the opium pipe or to doses of morphine internally by the mouth.

11. In five prosecutions under this Ordinance a large number of exhibits were forwarded to this Laboratory for examination. Hydrochlorate of morphine was detected in several instances. Only qualitative determinations were required by the Magistrate.

406

THE DANGEROUS GOODS ORDINANCE 1873.

12. On the 6th May the first steamer with Petroleum in bulk from Batoum arrived in Hongkong. The testing of the oil was not necessary in this case as the master was provided with a certificate under the hand of the Government Analyst of Penang stating the flashing point of the oil in each tank.

13. Sixteen samples of oil from the tanks of two subsequent arrivals were tested. All were found to give off inflammable vapours at temperatures considerably above the 73° F. limit laid down in the Rules and Regulations made by the Governor in Council on the 7th December 1892 under the provisions of this Ordinance.

MISCELLANEOUS.

14. In appendix B to this report will be found the observations I had the honour to make on certain of the points included in a series of questions issued by order of the Royal Commission on Opium.

15. In the course of the operations to recover the S.S. Amigo which had foundered in the harbour after being in collision with another steamer a number of men went down one of the holds to remove the cargo of rice and were almost immediately asphyxiated. An analysis of the Gas, with which the salt water remaining in the hold was saturated, was made. Carbon dioxide (choke damp) and organic compounds belonging to the class of compounds known as "Mercaptans" were isolated which sufficiently explained the suffocation of the workmen. A large quantity of oxygen was prepared for inhalation by the men when under treatment in the Civil Hospital. None of the cases terminated fatally.

16. On the 31st of January Mr. E. W. LUCAS returned to England having completed the three years' service for which he had signed an agreement with the Crown Agents and an interval of six months elapsed before the arrival of his successor. The additional work in the Hospital Pharmacy caused by this vacancy devolved on the two Chinese Assistants and myself. This is the second time within ten years that the Department has been left in the lurch in this manner. There is obviously a reason for it. The question has been gone into in a report (appendix C) submitted to the Government on the subject of an enquiry by the Governor of the Straits Settlements as to the working of the analytical section of this Department. Having regard (a) to the nature and extent of the duties in respect of the Hospital Pharmacy, (b) to the emoluments attached to the office, and (c) to the position incumbents are compelled to occupy in the Department, men with the scientific training necessary to enable them to act as Government Analysts, will not in future be found to take up these appointments. I am of opinion that the duties of analyst and apothecary should be completely dissociated, and that the Government Analyst should be allowed to devote his whole time to the work of the Laboratory. In 1890 a proposal that the duties of the Government Analyst in respect of the Hospital Pharmacy should be confined to general supervision was submitted to and approved by Government but the scheme did not come into operation. A change from the existing arrangement would therefore appear to be the only remedy. If, however, this cannot be effected it would be better to abandon the idea altogether of fitting up a Laboratory adequate for the service of the Government and to have recourse to other means outside the service for the conduct of any analytical work which may be urgently required. The maintenance of a Laboratory would not be a burden to the Colony. A scale of fees, charges &c. could be instituted to cover the cost of maintenance. In course of time the actual cost to Government would probably be less than the miserable amount (£100) the Colony now pays for its analytical work.

17. In a new Colony such as Hongkong many investigations of the greatest importance to its health and prosperity are urgently needed and have year by year to be neglected. Nine years ago I pointed out how necessary it was for the purpose of procuring convictions in cases of criminal poisoning to make a complete investigation of a Chinese poisonous plant the deadly properties of which had recently been demonstrated in a case of alleged murder. That same necessity still exists, and will continue as long as the dual office exists and the Government Analyst is compelled to undertake in connection with the various Hospitals of the Department duties for which an extensive scientific training is not necessary.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

THE COLONIAL SURGEON,

&c.,

&c.,

&c.

W. EDWARD Crow,

;

Government Analyst.

Appendix A.

REPORT ON THE MORPHINE INJECTING HABIT AMONG THE CHINESE.

"Gazette" 1893 pp. 968 and 969.

i

407

Appendix B.

ROYAL COMMISSION ON OPIUM.

Answers by the Government Analyst of Hongkong to some of the questions regarding opium issued by order of the Royal Commission in October 1893.

(1) Q. Is opium commonly consumed by people of Chinese, Malay, or other Asiatic race in your Colony?

A. Yes, by the Chinese.

(2) What proportion-should you conjecture-of the adult males of each race are consumers? Do women consume opium to any exetent? Do children?

A. The census returns give no information as to opium smoking. 18,000 has been stated as the number of opium smokers in this Colony. Children do not smoke opium. Women do, but only to a limited extent.

(3) What have you observed to be the effects of opium moral, physical and social, on its consumers? Is the effect the same on consumers of each race, or can you draw distinctions between the effects on consumers of different races ?

A. As to the moral, physical and social effects of opium smoking I have had no experience of any race other than the Chinese. With the exception to be alluded to under question No. 7 an opium smoker appears to be as good a man morally, physically and socially as a non-smoker.

(4) Do consumers chiefly smoke, or do they eat opium? Or do they drink a decoction of opium? If opium is taken in two or all of these forms, can you distinguish between the effects of each?

A. The Chinese chiefly smoke opium. There are cases in which opium and morphine are taken internally by those who find the smoking habit too costly. The Chinese do not eat opium, neither do they drink a decoction of opium. When taken internally it is usually in the form of pills. An aqueous solution of the smoking extract is a common agent in suicidal poisoning. The attention of the Royal Commission might here be drawn to the morphine injection practice which has recently sprung up. Vide attached printed copies of the papers laid before the Legislative Council of Hongkong on the 12th September 1893. The confirmed opium smoker has a craving for his pipe: a small dose of opium or morphine or a hypodermic injection of a solution of morphine appears to satisfy that craving: but in course of time the internal dose by the mouth or the hypodermic injection has to be increased in strength. The man who takes his pipe of opium regularly does not appear to suffer in health. The man who has regular morphine injections unquestionably does. I cannot believe that the regular taking by the mouth of doses of opium or morphine is harmless.

66

(5) Do the great majority of opium consumers become slaves to the drug and eventually become opium sots," or do you find the majority, or a considerable proportion, of consumers to be moderate

consumers?

"",

A. The Chinese who habitually smoke opium are slaves to the drug; they do not, however, eventually become "opium sots.' The majority enjoy their opium pipe and endeavour to keep the daily number within the limits defined by their incomes.

(6) Is it correct to say that there cannot be such a thing as moderation in the consumption of opium? Do you know any or many cases of consumers who have taken their opium for years without harm to themselves? If so, please give description of one or two such cases in detail.

A. It is not correct to say that there cannot be such a thing as moderation in the smoking of opium. I have frequently met Chinese who have been opium smokers for years without any apparent harm to themselves. I met the other day a very intelligent Chinese gentleman whom I have known for more than 10 years. Height 5' 10", weight 143 lbs., age 42. He has been a regular opium smoker for more than 3 years. Previous to that he used to smoke only occasionally when discussing business with his friends. He assured me that he felt stronger now than he did 3 years ago. He is certainly a rather fine looking man. He is moreover an exceedingly smart man of business. At the same time he candidly told me that he would be very glad if he could abandon the habit not on account of the expense but through fear that in course of time his health might suffer. He further explained that the necessity of having a pipe to satisfy the craving was beginning to interfere with his business habits. This man appeared to be thoroughly sincere in his answers to the questions put to him.

(7) Do a majority of the labourers, or of the merchants, or of the artizans belonging to any Asiatic race with which you are conversant, consume opium? If so, what is generally the effect of the opium habit on their efficiency in their calling?

If possible give details and examples in reply to this question.

A. Merchants, labourers, and artizans smoke opium but in the absence of statistics it is impossible to say what proportion is addicted to the habit. As far as my experience will enable me to deal with

408

this question I cannot say that their efficiency is in any way affected except in the case of the lower class of Chinese. A Chinaman who is in a position financially to smoke opium does not stint himself of the necessaries of life. A poor coolie does; consequently his health suffers and therefore in many cases his efficiency is not as good as it would be had he not acquired the smoking habit. Then again too many of the ignorant poor fly to small doses of opium or morphine internally or to an injection of a solution of morphine. These are cheaper habits than smoking and unquestionably very serious evils arising from the smoking of opium. The baneful nature of these two habits i. e. the taking of opium or morphine internally and the injecting of morphine is not open to questions. If the Chinese could obtain the opium smoking extract at as reasonable a price as the British workman procures his weekly supply of tobacco there would be no such thing as regular morphine injections or internal doses by the mouth of opium or morphine. I am informed that the quantity of morphine imported into China is something enormous. It is unfortunate that statistics are not available. These evils arising from the use of opium may be attributed to the fact that the drug is overburdened for the purpose of revenue, not only in Hongkong

but also in China.

(8) How does the use or abuse of opium among any Asiatic races with which you are conversant compare with the use or abuse of alcohol among such races, in regard to the effect on consumers?

A. There is no abuse of alcohol among the Chinese. The majority take samshu (rice spirit) regularly at their principal daily meal.

(9) Is the habit of consuming opium condemned as degrading, or injurious by the general opinion of the Chinese, Malay or other Asiatic race? How would such races regard the opium habit as compared with the alcohol habit?

A. The Chinese do not regard the smoking of opium as degrading or injurious provided the smoker can afford to pay for it. I have frequently heard my servant object to a candidate for the post of house coolie on the ground that he was an opium smoker. He did not mean that he regarded the habit as bad but that it was undesirable to have a man about the house whose pay was obviously insufficient for such a luxury. Moreover an opium smoker might want his pipe when required by his master for house- hold duty. He might also find it necessary to steal articles from time to time in order to meet the drain on his purse. The latter consideration would weigh heavily in the mind of any good native head

servant or boy.

The Chinese would regard the smoking of opium in a very favourable light when compared with the alcohol habit as displayed by the Europeans with whom they are brought in contact.

(10) Can and do opium consumers break themselves of the opium habit?

A. I have heard of cases of opium smokers breaking themselves of the habit in its early stages. If a reference is made to the Victoria Gaol statistics it will be seen that prisoners confirmed opium smokers, improve in health when the supply of opium is cut off. I am of opinion that only very strong minded men could break themselves of the smoking habit without the aid of internal doses of morphine.

(11) If the supply of Indian opium were to be cut off, what would be the effect on opium consumers, and on the Asiatic population of your neighbourhood? Would they supply themselves with opium from elsewhere? or would they take to alcohol or to some narcotic other than opium? or would they abstain altogether?

A. The cutting off of the supply of Indian opium would mean in some parts of China increased cultivation of the poppy and increased use of the native opium derived therefrom.

There

It is also highly probable that supplies would reach China from some new outside source. is every reason to suppose that Smyrna or Constantinople opium, the finest opium in the world, could be produced in quantity sufficient to meet the demands of China. Persian opium finds its way to China now and could obviously be produced and imported thereto in increased quantity. In this connection it would be as well to bear in mind the position of the neighbouring Portuguese Colony of Macao in respect of the foreign trade with China.

It would, I feel sure, force the price of the drug to a fabulous figure and intensify the evils referred to in my answer to question No. 7. The Chinese are driven to the internal use of morphine now they will be all the more inclined to acquire this dreadful habit if owing to scarcity of the drug they are not able to buy opium extract for their pipes.

I am of opinion that the Chinese would not be likely to take to drink or to abstain from opium smoking altogether.

(13) Do people of European race contract the opium habit in any numbers? If not, why not? And what makes Asiatics more liable to contract the habit?

A. European do not contract the opium habit for the simple reason that the practice of opium smoking is an Asiatic and not a European custom, and Europeans naturally do not go abroad and adopt the customs and manners of the Asiatics with whom they are brought in contact.

(14) How are opium consumers led to use the drug? Do they usually or often take it in the first instance to allay physical pain? Is opium, within your knowledge, a prophylactic against fever, or rheumatism, or malaria? or is it so regarded commonly by any Asiatic race with which you are conversant?

409 A. Speaking generally the Chinese do not take to the opium pipe in the first instance to allay physical pain. They regard it as a luxury suitable for introduction on special occasions. A merchant has some business to transact and visits the "hong" or business house of a friend. Details are discussed and while this is going on the opium pipe is introduced and used by any of the party who may accept the invitation to smoke. In point of fact the practice may be compared to that which prevails among our own countrymen when visiting each other. The non-teetotaler who remarks when receiving a friend, "Have a drink?" or the teetotaler who in similar circumstances enquires "Won't you take a cup of tea?" are extending a civility which may justly be compared to the Chinese custom of offering the opium pipe.

An occasional pipe may be smoked in this way for a considerable time until the opium neophyte finds he can not do without it and that it is necessary to have a pipe regularly to satisfy the craving.

It is within my experience that opium is regarded as a prophylactic in North Lincolnshire where very large quantities are annually consumed, chiefly by women, in the marsh districts. It is taken internally in the form of pills and in liquid form as laudanum. Many of these creatures are noted for their haggish appearance and great age. There is however no evidence to show that the drug is similarly regarded by the Chinese in Hongkong.

(15) Do opium consumers themselves usually desire to get free of the opium habit?

A. Yes, undoubtedly. The best proof of this is to be found in the large scale of morphine for internal use as an alleged anti-opium medicine.

(16) Is there among any Asiatic race in your Colony a feeling of hostility against England for allowing opium to be exported from India? If so, how does that feeling display itself?

A. There is no feeling of hostility against England. I have heard intelligent Chinese say that it would be a good thing if Great Britain would stop the introduction of opium but they also say that of course this is out of the question unless the two countries, Great Britain and China, co-operate for that object.

(17) Have you any other remarks to make in regard to opium consumption among the people around you?

A. Some stress has been laid in the foregoing answers to the pernicious practice of morphine taken in lieu of or as an antidote to the opium pipe. No reference is made to this habit in the series of questions I have had the honour to consider it may therefore be assumed that the Commissioners were not in possession of any information on the subject. There is every reason to suppose that the practice of morphine injecting has been practically stamped out in this Colony, an Ordinance having been introduced to effect that object. The Chinese are, however, still free to use morphine for ordinary internal use. I respectfully submit that the morphine vice cannot reasonably be dissociated from the opium question.

W. EDWARD CROW,

Hongkong, 22nd December, 1893.

Government Analyst.

Appendix C.

Report on the cost of the working of the analytical section of the Hongkong Civil Medical Department.

SIR-Referring to your instructions I have the honour to submit the following remarks on the question of the cost of the working of the analytical section of this Department.

2. The only analytical officers are the Assistant Apothecary and Analyst and myself. The Apothecaries' Assistants have no connexion with the Laboratory. Their duties are confined to the Pharmacy. There is no Laboratory attendant; when coolie labour is needed a requisition is made on the Pharmacy.

3. The cost of the Government Analytical work cannot be considered without a reference to the number of analyses conducted. The time spent in the Laboratory depends on the calls for the services of either or both of the analysts in the Hospital Pharmacy. During the last few years, owing to the increase of work in the Hospital, only the most necessary analyses for the Government have been conducted so that the attached report for 1892 must not be taken as setting forth all that would have been done had more time been at the disposal of the analyst.

4. The amount voted for Chemical Apparatus &c. is $100. To this should be added at least $100 for Chemicals &c. obtained from the Pharmacy. Taking of the full salaries of the Apothecary and

ૐ Analyst and Assistant Apothecary and Analyst also a coolie, I estimate the cost of working the Laboratory at $1,443 exclusive of the cost of gas and water. This is a very low figure indeed having regard to the number of analyses performed.

410

5. Since the submission of the report for 1892 the only additional Laboratory work has been in connexion with the Regulations under the Dangerous Goods Ordinance in relation to Petroleum in bulk. The revenue derived under this head amounts to about $350 per annum. This brings the actual post of working the Laboratory to about $1,100.

6. The general arrangement under which a Government Analyst's responsibilities are combined with those of an Apothecary of a Medical Department may be regarded from two points of view. The question of its being a satisfactory one must be considered in connexion with the number, variety and character of the analyses required to be conducted. It is without doubt a very economical one, but even in this Colony it cannot be said to be a success. Both the Assistant Analysts appointed from home have not remained longer than the periods for which they signed agreements to serve, the result being that the Department has been left in the lurch for more than half a year in each case. Competent men will not undertake the responsibility attached to the Office of Assistant Apothecary and Analyst at the pay now offered no matter what the rate of exchange may be. The Crown Agents may be able to fill vacancies as they occur by securing men unacquainted with the conditions of Colonial life and the nature of the duties they will be called upon to perform; but the inevitable result will be that the incumbents will relinquish their appointments at the end of their three years' agreement or before if they are able to find more remunerative employment outside the service. It is an established rule in Downing Street that Apothecaries shall receive considerably lower pay than the most subordinate Surgeon in the Department; but as long as this rule is applied to Analyst who also serve as Apothecaries the dual office can only in rare cases be regarded as a successful arrangement.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your obedient Servant,

W. EDWARD Crow,

Apothecary and Analyst.

Enclosure 4.

Report of the Medical Officer, in charge of the Hospital Hulk" Hygeia."

GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL,

HONGKONG, 13th February, 1894.

SIR,-I have the honour to forward you a short report on the working of the Hygeia during the year 1893.

On December 31st, 1892, 1 patient was still on board. During 1893, 51 cases of Small-pox (almost all from ships arriving in harbour) were admitted. In addition 4 persons were admitted in attendance on patients, while 2 supposed cases were received from the Army Medical Authorities for isolation, and 1 other suspected case was on board for a few days. Of the 52 cases on board 8 died, 4 from Hæmorrhagic Small-pox and 4 from Confluent Small-pox. 3 of those who died from the hæmorrhagic variety of the disease were Japanese, 2 of whom had never been vaccinated whilst the other had only been vaccinated during the incubation period of the disease. The European (Scotch) who died did not know whether he had ever been vaccinated or not, there were no vaccination marks to be seen when he was examined. 1 European policeman died of Confluent Small-pox. He had been vaccinated in infancy, but had not been re-vaccinated when he joined the force here. A European sailor who died had two small marks on his arm, if they were vaccination marks they were very bad ones. 1 Indian and 1 Chinese who died also from Confluent Small-pox had never been vaccinated.

No cases of Cholera were admitted during the year.

The worst cases were brought down from Japan and were Japanese. They arrived here on the China Navigation boats Taiyuan and Tsinan under circumstances which show the great necessity of having some building for isolation and observation purposes.

After the removal of the infected cases from the Taiyuan the remainder of the Japanese passengers were landed in Victoria and sent to several boarding houses. Cases subsequently developed in these houses, but owing to our keeping a sharp look-out these were spotted early and the Sanitary Board Officials took prompt and efficient means for disinfecting the premises. From a public health point of view the present Quarantine Ordinance is not a good one, notwithstanding the fact that it was practically drawn up by the Quarantine Commission of two years ago, and what I have said above goes a long way to make proof positive of A crowd of Japanese landing off a small-pox ship five days out from Japan would be the very thing to start an epidemic here and I think that in future (if the present Ordinance is to be retained) arrangements ought to be made whereby a daily inspection of the men landed in similar circumstances

this.

:

**

411

might be carried out. This is the least that ought to be done. On this occasion these Japanese were through passengers for Australia and the ship's people had the satisfaction of having heavy expenses in Australia saved by foisting the men on the Colony of Hongkong at a cost of practically nil. Fortunately for Hongkong vaccination is proceeding apace and although not by the greatest stretch of imagination can the Colony be called "protected" by vaccination yet in twenty-five or thirty years I expect that the entire Chinese population will have found out what a remarkable thing it is when they see that small-pox is practically harmless if proper measures are taken for efficient vaccination being carried out.

Tracheotomy was performed on one case, owing to obstruction in the larynx. The man moribund at the time, but after the operation had been rapidly performed he rallied in a wonderful manner for twenty-four hours, but then sank. The more I see of some of these bad cases the more do I think that their extreme discomfort and anxiousness arise from the constant feeling of being choked and not so much as is sometimes supposed from the effect of the poison on the nervous system. I, therefore, think that in some cases tracheotomy or intubation (either by Dwyer's tubes or catheter) might be tried at an earlier stage. Morphia is of the utmost value in these cases during the first few days, but about the seventh or eighth day in the smallest doses it is a poison. The Bromides, Chloral, Paraldehyde, Sulphonal, &c. are practically useless. I am now alluding to these cases where the laryngeal symptoms although not extreme are well marked and where the cedema and inflammation has rather more to do with the actual obstruction than spasm. Some European patients who have been in this condition have assured me both at the time (if able to do so) and after recovery that the feeling of being choked is what prevents them from getting any rest and that they would give anything for "a good breathful of fresh air." From what I have seen in the larynx post mortem I should say tracheotomy is preferable to intubation. An earlier tracheotomy in some of these cases I am convinced would give the patient a much better chance of recovery, if done as a remedial measure and not merely as a palliative one.

The suspected Army cases afford another proof of the necessity for an observation building. The necessity for having good isolation wards at the Government Civil Hospital always ready for occupation is pressing, as no one can tell when small-pox and cholera may be present in the Colony at the same time and moreover there is no isolation possible on the Hygeia if small-pox is there. I also think that the Government Medical Officers should have full and absolute power as to whether cases are to be received on the Hygeia or not. My present instructions in this respect are unique in the history of infectious hospitals and I hope that it will be in your power to change these soon.

The ship is at present in first class condition. In October, owing to leakage through roof, &c., repairs were necessary. A new covering of canvas was put on the roof and the outside and inside of the vessel re-painted. Several minor improvements were also carried out.

One question at present which requires solution is that of communication with the vessel. As I have already informed you I consider that the continuous use of steam communication is absolutely necessary when small-pox patients are on board. This is expensive; but I think the cheaper way to do this is to have a small steam pinnace built for the purpose rather than hire a launch to be ready day and night. During the last few months this question has come up again in an aggravated form so far as I am concerned, as on several occasions when patients have been seriously ill I have been unable to obtain outside launches at night and have had to go over to Stonecutter's Island in my own boat, which I submit I ought not to have to do. I trust you will see your way to get this matter settled in a proper manner. If the ship must lie over behind Stonecutter, surely proper communication ought to be provided. I see no reason why the Health Officer's launch should not be at my disposal from sunset to sunrise at least and something extra added to the wages of the crew when the services of the launch are wanted.

A considerable sum of money had to be spent at the beginning of the year for furniture, bedding, fittings, &c. which were not provided when the ship was launched. Had it not been for this the expense of keeping the ship open would have practically been covered by the amount received in fees $1,430.80. The few cases which we had during December proved expensive, especially the above mentioned army cases, which occasioned a considerable expenditure. When I say that the ship practically covered expenses I do not take into account the amount which it was necessary to expend in October on painting the ship and putting the roof in good condition; nor do I take into account the public vaccinator's salaries which ought not to be included under Hygeia expenses at all.

I would call attention to another subject, the question of removing Chinese patients suffering from small-pox from the Tung Wah Hospital to the Hygeia. I know this cannot be accomplished all at once, but I think that renewed efforts should be made by the Registrar General to bring about a better state of affairs. If the Registrar General has any influence with the Tung Wah authorities and the Chinese population of Hongkong it ought to be used to try and get these small-pox patients removed to the Hygeia. The Tung Wah Hospital is all right in a certain very small way and although small- pox patients are better in that place than running about the streets, still, they ought to be removed if possible to a properly isolated hospital. I don't know that Hongkong will ever be a modern Utopia from a sanitarian's point of view, but too much importance cannot be given to some of these so-called minor questions.

412

Finally I wish to state that P.C. JAS. MCKILLOP, who acted as Wardmaster on the Hygeia, and all the staff performed their far-from-pleasant duties in a most satisfactory manner.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Dr. P. B. C. AYRES, C.M.G., Colonial Surgeon, &c.

Your obedient Servant,....

JAMES A. Lowson,

Medical Officer, in charge of the Hospital. Hulk "Hygeia."

Enclosure 5.

Report of the Superintendent of the Government Vaccine Institute.

Government VACCINE INSTITUTE,

HONGKONG, 21st May, 1894.

SIR,-I have the honour to submit herewith my report upon the work done at the Vaccine Institute for the

year 1893.

As this is the first annual report of the Institute I propose to give a short history of the facts which led to its establishment.

During the small-pox epidemic in Hongkong of 1887-88, there was no vaccine lymph available in the Colony and it being found that the calf lymph which had hitherto been supplied from outside sources. was deteriorating in quality, His Excellency Sir G. W. DES Vaux decided that it was expedient that an Institute should be established in Hongkong for the cultivation of vaccine lymph which would. render the Government independent of outside supplies.

The question was taken up by the Sanitary Board and I was directed to make enquiries as to the possibility of procuring suitable animals, etc. Upon my favourable report the matter was referred to the Colonial Surgeon who requested me to make a series of exhaustive experiments in the cultivation of vaccine lymph in conjunction with Dr. ATKINSON, Inspector of Vaccination, and it was upon the results. obtained that the Sanitary Board acting upon the advice of the Colonial Surgeon forwarded a recom- mendation to the Government that a Government Vaccine Institute should be established for the benefit of the Colony and be conducted under my guidance and direction.

Upon consideration the Government decided to give effect to the views of the Board and a suitable building was erected upon the Kennedy Road.

The Institute was opened under my superintendence in 1892 to supply a demand for vaccine lymph from the Military Authorities for the vaccination of the newly arrived Hongkong Regiment. This was supplied, but as the whole of the necessary instruments had not then arrived from England, the estab- lishment was not in thorough working order until January 1893.

Looking upon the undertaking as a commercial enterprise (apart from the medical benefits which accrue from such an Institute owing to fresh vaccine lymph being always upon hand) it has proved a distinct success as after paying all working expenses there remained a profit upon the year's profit and loss account of over 4 per cent. upon the original capital invested.

The lymph produced at the Institute has met with favourable notice from the medical profession generally, and the local dispensaries have freely availed themselves of the opportunity afforded to procure fresh active lymph at reasonable rates.

Seeing that the birth-rate of the Colony averages about 2,000 births per annum and that compulsory vaccination is strictly enforced the value of a local Vaccine Institute cannot well be over-estimated especially when it is explained that vaccine lymph imported from a distance is very often found upon arrival to be inert.

During my visit to Saigon in December last, through the kindness of Dr. PINEAU, Director of the Institut de Microbiologie, I was permitted to see the whole of the work which is carried on at that splendid institution: which includes the Pasteur system of inoculation against rabies, the cultivation of vaccine lymph, and much other scientific work, Dr. PINEAU himself taking the greatest trouble to explain each process in detail.

I I hope in my next report to be able to show far better results, but it must be borne in mind that the tedious nature of the work involves the expenditure of a considerable amount of time, the process of cultivation and collection being of such an important and delicate kind that it would not do to leave it to subordinates. Were I to devote my whole time to the Institute instead of doing a greater part of the work after office hours I could turn out a very large supply of vaccine lymph.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

1

2

.

THE COLONIAL SURGEON.

C. VIVIAN LADDS,

Superintendent.

:

.:

HONGKONG.

REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE OBSERVATORY FOR 1893.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor

227

No. 17

94

229

HONGKONG OBSERVATORY,

26th April, 1894.

SIR,-I have the honour to submit my annual report for 1893 to His Excellency the Governor. 2. My ninth volume of observations and researches was published last summer and the tenth volume is now being printed. It contains in addition to this report, the meteorological observations made every hour in 1893, investigations of the typhoons of 1888 and 1889 and a report on the ten years' observations made at this Observatory during the years 1884 to 1893 inclusive (Appendix B) the latter arranged in such a form as to render it complete for purposes of harmonic analyses of the various meteorological elements, whereby constants may be calculated, by aid of which, single obser- vations, made at any hour, may be reduced to daily and monthly means.

3. The present appears to be an appropriate time for comparing the Observatory as now finally arranged with the scheme advocated by the late General H. S. PALMER, R.E., in his report of 17th July 1881 which was printed in the Government Gazette of the 3rd September of the same year.

4. In the astronomical and meteorological departments his suggestions have all been fully carried out, except in so far as regards the thermograph, in the latter branch. He proposed to erect this instrument in a detached hut whereas it was mounted in the main building. The introduction of the rotating thermometers in 1885 made, however, the observations of temperature and humidity independent of the position of the former apparatus. A King's barograph would be a useful addition to the meteorological recording instruments, as the record would be at once available whereas the photographic curves from the present barograph cannot be utilized until after three days. This necessitates the reading of the barometer hourly by the staff by night as well as day during the typhoon season. An anemograph was erected at Victoria Peak during the course of last summer as recommended by General PALMER.

5. With regard to magnetism his scheme included a complete set of continuously recording instruments which would have made our magnetic as complete as our meteorological returns, but only absolute magnetic observations are made at present. But in view of the fact that an immense material consisting of unreduced magnetic records has accumulated at several other Observatories, it would be, perhaps, of doubtful advantage to multiply such observations-the practical utility of which is probably as yet far distant-before the existing records have been discussed in an exhaustive manner and published by scientific authorities so much more as our time is fully occupied with more valuable work connected with typhoons and storm-warnings.

6. Tidal observations were also included in General PALMER'S scheme and these have been carried out during the three years (1887, 1888, 1889) by aid of Sir W. THOMSON's autographic gauge. The instrument-since handed over to the Imperial Maritime Customs of China-has now been erected by them at Whampoa and when thirteen consecutive months' record has been obtained there, data will be available for studying the tides in the Canton or Pearl River after the methods devised and adopted by the late Sir George BIDDELL AIRY with regard to the Thames.

7. The Observatory building is considerably smaller than that proposed to be erected under General PALMER's scheme and although the staff has been increased, no further office accommodation has been provided. As a consequence the work is hampered and much inconvenience and loss of time results. An extension of the main building is urgently required.

8. The staff of this department is remunerated on a lower scale than that suggested by General PALMER and, moreover, the salaries were not increased in 1890 at the time general increases of about thirty-five per cent. were awarded to officials in other Government Departments. In the event of a vacancy arising, from any cause, amongst the foreign staff, it will be quite impossible to efficiently fill it on the present salary scale.

9. The China Coast Meteorological Register was issued as usual and since October 14th it has been printed daily at the Observatory by aid of a small fount of type and press.

More copies are, therefore, now available than was formerly the case, and several spare copies are forwarded to the Harbour Office for the use of shipmasters who require them. Copies are generally affixed to the notice boards and distributed in the city by 11.30 a. Information regarding storms is telegraphed to and exhibited on the notice boards in Hongkong at other hours and as often as such information can be justified by the observations received. Any information issued or observations received too late to be embodied in the China Coast Meteorological Register will be supplied to shipmasters on application to the Observatory, so that they may thus obtain the latest available information before sailing.

10. With reference to para. 4 of my last annual report, I am now able to state that "Precedence Urgency" has recently been granted for meteorological telegrams supplied to this department by the Eastern Extension and Great Northern Telegraph Companies, free of all expense. This valuable concession on the part of the Companies cannot be too highly appreciated. The telegrams from some of the most important reporting stations come through the lines of the Chinese Telegraph Adminis- tration, and it is a matter for regret that such telegrams continue to be received too late, as a rule, to be of much service. (The Chinese Telegraph Administration granted "Precedence Urgency" & few days ago.) Victoria Peak and Gap Rock are not yet in direct communication with the Observatory, but it is probable that this improvement will be effected shortly. The important messages from these two stations, on which local warnings mainly depend, are often received too late.

230

2

11. Telegraphic connection with Victoria was interrupted on the 15th May, 1893, from 10.57 a. to 6.50 p.; from the 16th May at 1 p. to the 17th May at 7.30 a.; on the 20th May, from 2.15 p. to 4.30 p.; on the 16th July, from 1 p. to 4.20 p.; on the 29th September, from noon to 6 p.; from the 2nd October at 7 a. to the 6th October at 1.30 p. Interruptions occurred therefore on 11 days and, of course, also during thunderstorms. Telephonic connection between the look-out on the Peak and the Post Office in Victoria (for transmitting observations every hour to the Observatory) was interrupted from the 11th August at 2 p. to the 13th August at 3 p.; from the 29th September at 6 a. to the 30th September at 6 a.; from the 2nd October at 6 a. to the 14th October at. 6 a.; from 11 a. to 6 p. on the 25th October; from 11th November at 9 a. to the 12th November at 6 a., from 24th November at 9 a. to the 26th November at 6 a., and from 27th December at 5 p. to the 28th December at 9 a., i.e., on 26 days as well as during thunderstorms.

12. Telegrams giving information about typhoons were issued on 87 days. The Red Drum was hoisted 7 times, Red Ball 2, Red North Cone 6, Red South Cone 2, Black Drum 2, Black Ball 3, Black North Cone 2, Black South Cone 4, Lanterns (vertically) 1. The Gun was fired one round 4 times, and two rounds 1 time.

13. During 1893, in addition to meteorological registers kept at about 40 stations on shore, 672 ship-logs with entries during typhoons have been received. 284 were forwarded by Captains, 388 were copied on board ship in the harbour. The ship-logs, collected in 1893, were thus distributed: for 1891, 1 log; for 1892, 16 logs; for 1893, 655 logs. The total number of ships, whose log-books have been made use of, was 289. The total number of days' observations was 8174. This number might with advantage be increased. The difficulty is, that we are all so closely engaged in the Observatory, that no more than one of us at a time can be spared for visiting ships in the harbour, and he can devote only half his hours of duty to work afloat. Every vessel entering the harbour ought to be boarded, and every log-book found to be properly kept ought to be copied. That would be useful for storm-warnings.

14. The following is a list of ships from which logs have been obtained in 1893; those to which* is prefixed have been communicated directly by their respective Captains, and the remainder have been copied on board the several vessels. The majority are steam-ships and the others are distinguished as follows:-b, barque; s, ship; sch., schooner; bqt., barquentine.

*Activ, *Aden, Adolph, Aglaia, Airlie, Alfred Hawley (s), *Alwine, Amigo, Amoy, Ancaios, *Ancona, Angers, Argus, Arratoon Apcar, Asagao, Assyria (b), Athole, Avochie, Bangalore (s), Basuto (b), Bayern, Belgic, *Benalder, Bengloe, Benlarig, Benlawers, Benlomond, Berlin (s), Bittern (bqt.), *Bombay, Bormida, Borneo, Bua Pan (b), *Canton, Cape Colonna, Cardiganshire, H.M.S. Caroline, Catherine Apcar, Catterthun, Centennial (s), Changsha, Charon Wattana (b), Charters Tower, Cheang Hock Kian, Chelydra, China, Chingping, *Chingtu, *Chi Yuen, *Chow-fa, *Choy-sang, Chusan, Cicero, Cimbria (b), *City of New York, City of Peking, City of Rio de Janeiro, *Clyde, Com- merzienrath Rodbertus (b), Continental, Cosmopolit, Creedmoor (s), Cromarty, Crown of Arragon, Daphne, Dardanus, Deuteros, Devawongse, Diamond, Dona Barthola (sch), Donar, Don Juan, Doris, *H.M.S. Egeria, Elax, Elizabeth Ahrens (b), Else (bqt.), Emilie (b), Emily F. Whitney (s), Empress of China, *Empress of India, Empress of Japan, *Esang, *Esmeralda, Falls of Clyde (s), Fanny Skolfield (b), Feichung, *Fei Lung, Fidelio, *Fokien, Foohng Suey (b), Fooksang, *Formosa, Freeman (b), Frejr, Frigga, Frojner, Fuping, Fushun, Galveston (b), *Ganges, George Stetson (s), Georgietta (b), Gera, Ghazee, Glamorganshire, *Glenartney, Glenavon, Glengarry, Glenshiel, *Glengyle, Glücksburg, Golden Fleece (sch), Guthrie, *Gwalior, Habitant (s), Hailoong, Haiphong, *Haitan, Hangchow, Hankow, Hanoi, Helen Brewer (s), Henry Failing (s), Hesperia, Hiogo Maru, Holstein, Hongay, *Hongkong, Hsiu Fung, Hupeh, Iceberg (s), *H.M.S. Imperieuse, *Independent, *Irene, Iron Duke (b), Ixion, Jacob Diederichsen, Japan (b), *Japan, *Java, Johann Adolph (b), John R. Kelly (s), Kaisow, Keemun, Kiel, Kingsland, Kintuck, Kitty (b), *Kong Beng, Kungpai, *Kutsang, Kwanglee, Kweilin, Kweiyang, Kwongsang, Lawang, *H.M.S. Leander, Lennox, Libelle, Lightning, Loksang, Loosok, Lothair (b), Lucy A. Nichols (b), *Lyeemoon, *Malacca, *Malwa, *Manila, Martha Bockhahn (b), Mary Blair (b), Mathilde, McMillan (s), *Meefoo, *Memnon, Menmuir, Mogul, Mongkut, *Moray, Moyune, Namoa, *Namyong, *Nanchang, Nanshan, *Nanyang, Nicoya (b), Nierstein, *Nijni Nov- gorod, Ningchow, *Ningpo, Niobe, Nizam, *Nürnberg, Océanien, Omega (b), *Oanfa, Oldenburg, Oopack, Orange Grove (b), Orient (b), Orion, *Oxus, Pakling, Pakshan, *Palamed, *Papa (b), Palinurus, Paramita (s), H.M.S. Peacock, Pembrokeshire, *Peninsular, Peru, *Peshawur, *Peiyang, *Phra Chula Chom Klao, Paoting, *Phra Nang, *H.M.S. Pigmy, Pollux, Polyphemus, *Preussen, Principality (s), Prometheus, Propontis, Protos, *Ravenna, *Rohilla, *Rosetta, *Sachem (s), *Saghalien, Saigon, Salatiga, *Salazie (s), *Sea Swallow (sch), Sepia (b), *H.M.S. Severn, Sichan, Shanghai, Shantung, Sikh, Sin Kolga (b), *Somali (4 m.s.), Soochow, Spinaway (bqt), Stanfield (s), *Sungkiang, *Surat, *Sutty, *Swatow, Tacoma, Taicheong, Taichiow, Taisang, Taiwan, Taiyick, Taiyuan, *Taksang, Tamsui, Tantalus, Tarapaca (b), Tetartos, Teheran, Tellus, Thales, Thermopyla (b), *Thibet, Thisbe, Toonan, *Torridon, Triumph, *Tsinan, Ulysses, Velocity (b), *Verona,

?

3

231

Victoria, Whampoa, Wingsang, Wm. J. Rotch (b), *Wm. Le Lacheur (b), Wolf (German gunboat), Woosung, Wosang, Wuotan, Yarra, Yiksang, Yuensang, Yungping, *Zafiro. 15. The entry of observations in degree squares for the area named in my last annual report has been continued and 31260 observations, distributed as shown by the following table, have been so entered during 1893. It is to be regretted that more time cannot be spent on this work. At the present rate of progress, it is not expected that sufficient data for the construction of pilot charts will have been collected and made available until the expiration of another five years. By aid of such charts, when constructed, a shipmaster will know the normal conditions as regards wind, weather and pressure in the latitude and longitude his vessel inay at the time happen to be situated in, and this, combined with a knowledge of the "Law of Storms in the Eastern seas", should be of great assistance to him and enable him to so navigate his vessel as to avoid typhoons. They will, in fact, serve to some extent in lieu of storm warnings at sea, besides being valuable as shewing the most favourable routes at all times.

Table I.

Meteorological Observations entered in 10° Squares in the year 1898.

Square

number.

January.

Feb.

March.

April.

May. June.

July. August.

Sept. October.

Nov.

Dec.

2878***ANDONO8858:

19

20

21

041

0

0

0

2

2

0

10

0

22

0

12

0

23

61

85

20

9

24

88

104

119

87

19

48

9

14

18

26

230

180

281

362

578

SHAGGOO

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

12

9

0

0

0

4

2

8

0

63

48

23

13

8

96

239

201

164

106

150

27

40

37

21

49

49

592

667

761

648

683

467

0

0

0

1

1

0

0

1

0

55

0

5

10

6

0

0

56

0

7

6

10

1

11

11

14

4

0

0

1

5

1

5

22

4

26

11

5

1

0

5

59

28

20

33

1.

27

20

27

12

1

26

16

០០០០០០០០៩

0

5

0

0

77

147

38

356

0

24

60

49

57

58

27

42

97

151

89

36

33

44

45

61

254

220

322

359

589

647

784

780

795

612

509

387

62

120

134

170

182

386

363

375

361

355

266

157

144

63

0

0

1

3

1

1

0

1

91

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

92

0

0.

0

0

0

0

0

93

0

0

0

0

9

94

8

0

1

0

0

0

0

8

0

95

18

12

23

21

10

13

2

2

15

18

96

310

271

261

238

398

441

546

554

498

521

292

293

97

85

60

87

86

144

192

183

186

177

153

127

95

98

10

14

13

41

40

32

19

37

33

42

28

11

127

0

0

0

0

0

5

0

0

128

0

0

0

0

0

18

129

0

0

0

21

130

14

14

131

97

68

132

140

77

133

0

134

0

163

6

164

12

12

165

15

17

166

167

168

169

170

199

.200

1

318

JONOONGA20000mmOc

8

23

20

73

47

64

60

110

101

145

183

198

255

0

7

7

3

0

Q

0

7

4

9

13

29

12

19

16

40

15

22

25

52

7

5

17

9

វនទី១ ០០

0

0

0

0

1

0

0

0

55

46

36

28

7

115

83

96.

66

53

264

287

245

137

106

10

3

5

1

0

0

0

0

34

35

80

9

11

43.

48

41

12

12

41

36

21

10

11

18

10

7

0

1

1

7

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

5

3

10

1

6

3

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

319

0

320

0

0

0

0

0

0

321

0

322

323

38

324

23

325

14

OMMON

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

6

7

7

37

48

47

68

28

61

35

66

56

48

32

0

22

0

17

0

6

3

3

7

15

1

24

18

29

45

14

78

52

21

30

26

24

1655

1487

1750

1832 2900

3147

3898

3770

3455

3187

2275

1904

TOTAL........

31260

232

i

16. During last summer two lectures on Typhoons have been given before the British Mercantile Marine Officers' Association of Hongkong. These lectures have been very extensively reprinted and quoted in Europe and elsewhere, and a second edition will shortly be issued. Storm warnings cannot of course reach those at sea but by means of these lectures in conjunction with observations made on board according to the "Instructions for making meteorological observations in China" and a comparison of the warnings issued from the Observatory on arrival in port, much experience of navigating during the typhoon season may be gained by mariners.

17. Tri-hourly observations have been made by the keepers at the Gap Rock lighthouse, which is situated about 32 miles to the SSW of Hongkong Observatory, since the end of 1892. The following table exhibits the monthly means of these observations. The first column gives the difference of barometric pressure, Observatory minus lighthouse, reduced to M.S.L., and appears to indicate that the daily variation is less at the lighthouse than at the Observatory. The second column shows the direction of the wind which has a greater annual variation than at the Observatory being more northerly in winter and more southerly in summer. The third column exhibits the wind force to decimals of Beaufort's scale. It is on an average twice as great as at the Observatory, but has a much smaller annual variation than in Hongkong. The fourth exhibits the sea disturbance (0-9). It varies as the wind force.

Table II.

Observations made at Gap Rock in 1893.

1 a.

4.

718.

Month.

Bar.

Wind.

Sea.

Bar.

Wind.

Sea

Bar.

Wind.

Sea.

January, February, March,

+015 E 53° N

4.2 2.8

+007

.:. . . . هرهه ....

+023

E 45 N

4.7 3.3

+ 012

E 50° N E 41 N

4.7 3.0 +019

E 47° N

4.5 2.9

4.8 3.3 +028

E 36 N

5.0 3:3

+ 1013

E 38 N

4.0 2.7

⚫002

E 23 N

4.1 2.8 +011

E 25 N

4.3 2.8

April,

+011

E 8 S

3.5 2.3

⚫011

E 4 S

3.6 2.4 +001

E 1 N

3.4 2.2

May,

000 E 10 S

4.1 2.8

004

E 9 S

4.0 2.9+008

E 9 S

4.2 2.8

June,

+ 007

S 20 E

3.8 2.5

001

S 16 E

July,

+010

S 6 W

3.5 2.3 + ·003

S 14 W

Angust,..

+016

S 21 E

3.5 2.0 + *009

S 23 E

September,

+ 1008

E 21

N

4.0 2.5

⚫005

E 27 N

3.9 2.51 +005 3.5 2.4 +'005 3.4 2.01 +015 .4.0

S 10 E

3.7 2.4

S 20 W

3.3 2.8

S 41 E

3.2 1.9

2.6 +010

E 34 N

3.9 2.4

October,

+080

E 11

N

4.5 3.0

019

November,

+ 012

E 15

N

4.0 2.5

+ ·009

E 14 N E 18 N

4.9 3.1027

E 15 N

4.9 3.2

4.0 2.5 +019

E 19 N

4.3 2.6

December,...

+016

E 29 N

3.8 2.3 ++ *008

E 28 N

Year,..

+1013 E 3 S

4.0

2.6

+005

E 5 S

4.0 2.4 +018 4.1 2.7

E 31 N

4.0 2.3

+·014

E 3 S

4.1 2.6

10 a.

1 p.

4 p.

Month.

Bar.

Wind.

Sea.

Bar.

Wind.

[Sea.

Bar.

Wind.

Sea.

January, February, March, April, May,

June,

+021

E 49° N

+029

E 41 N

+014

E 25 N

4.8 3.1 5.0 3.3 4.3 3.0

—·003 +'008 -'008

E 40° N

4.9 3.1

⚫000

E 42° N

4.4 2.9

E 40 N

5.0 3.4

⚫000

E 41 N

4.2 3.2

E 23 N

4.1 2.9

+004

E

3.4 2.2

-*013

E 9 S

3.5 2.3:

-'007 -014

E 23 N

4.0 2.8

E 14 S

3.6 2.4

+010 E 5° N

4.6 2.9

-*005

E 3 N

+'009 S 19 E

3.4 2.4

July,

+009

S 27 W

August,.

+016

S 51 E

September,

+005

E 38

October,

+023

E.21 N

November,

+013

E 25 N

December,..

+009

E 29 N

Year......

+013

E

-006 3.3 2.3

+'002 3.4 2.0 -'001 4.A 2.5 -'003 5.1 3.4 +'009 4.4 2.6 3.9 2.2 4.1 2.7

$ 17 E S 24 W S13 E E 31 N

4.3 2.9 -'006 3.6 2.3 -⚫007 3.2 2.2 3.5 2.1

E 3 S

4.5 3.0

S 21 E

3.6 2.4

-·002 +·002

S 17 W

3.5 2.3

S 9 E

3.4 2.1

4.1 2.6 ⚫000

E 26 N

4.0 2.1

E 18 N

-010 -·007 -'003

E 26 N E 29 N E 5 S

4.9 3.3+004 4.3 2.7 -.015 3.7 2.3 4.1 2.7

E 18 N

4.7 3.3

E 18 N

4.1 2.6

-.011 -.005

E 29 N

3.6 2.3

E 7 S

4.02.6

7 p.

10 p.

Mean

Month.

Bar.

Wind.

Sea.

Bar.

Wind.

Sea.

Bar.

Wind.

January,

February,

March,

April,

--

May,

June,

+010 +1007 -*003

··004 - $005 -·003

E 42° N E 87 N E 19 N E 16 S

E 5 S

S 21 E

4.3 2.8'020 4.1 3.2 +023 3.8 2.5 +010 3.5 2.4 +012 4.4 2.9 +011 3.6 2.4 +018

E 44° N E 38 N E 23 N E 9 S E 14 S S 13 E

July,

+'002

S 8 W

August,.

+011

S 25 E

September,

+:005

October,

+011

November,

+:007

E 5 N E 8 N E 14 N

December,..........

+008

E 28 N

Year,..

+004

E 8 S 3.8

3.4 2.3 +'020 3.1 2.0 +'022 3.8 2.5 +014 4.5 3.1

+'026 3.8 2.5 +'016 3.5 2.2 +013 2.6·017

S 1 E

S 23 E E 26 N E 6 N E 17 N E 29 N E 6 S

4.3 2.8 +011 4.33.2 +·016 3.6 2.6 +004 3.8 2.5 -·002 4.5 2.9 +·001 3.7 | 2.4 +003 3.4 2.4 +006 3.1 1.9 +011 3.8 2.5 +006

E 46° N

4.5 2.9

E 40 N

4.6 3.3

E 25 N

4.0 2.8

E 7 S

3.5 2.8

E 5 S

4.8 2.9

S 17 E

3.7 2.4

S 14 W

3.4 2.3

S 26 E

3.3 2.0

E 26 N

4.0 2.5

4.5 3.1 +019

E 13 N

4.7 3.2

3.7

2.5+:006

E 18 N

4.1 2.6

3.5

2.2 +007

E 29 N

3.8 2.3

3.9

2.6+007

E 5 S

4.0 2.6

233

5

18. As stated in the "Instructions for making Meteorological Observations, etc.," (Kelly and Walsh, 1892) meteorological instruments forwarded by observers who regularly send their registers to the Observatory, are verified here free of cost. During the past year, 2 barometers, 3 aneroids, 13 thermometers and 1 raingauge were verified. In addition a large number of marine barometers and aneroids on board ship were compared, indirectly, with the Observatory standard.

19. The following table shows the spectroscopic rainband as observed daily at 10 a. value for the year was 2.6:

The mean

Table III.

Rainband in 1893.

Date.

Jan. Feb.

Mar.

Apr.

May. June. July. Aug. Sept. Oct.

Nov.

Dec.

4+

4

3

3

3+

3

3+

3-

+

4-

4

3-

#244 WANNANWA IA CO CO COIF

+1 11+

2+

2+

4+

3

3+

4.

4-

2+

3

2

2

5

4

3

2+

1+

3

3

3

4

3+

3. 3

3

3

3

4.

3+

1

3

3+

1+

4

3

3

3+

3

3

4

3

4

2+

4

3+

3+

∞∞ CD CD CD CD iki 00 00 00 00 10 00 00 ca

3+

4

3-

3+

3+

3

3+

3+

3

3

4-

3+

4.

4

4+

3

4+

3

4+

++11 +

COCO THE CO ON ∞ co co +++

E að THI CO an an Han TH TH AD I GO THI VỚ THI CO IH CE

3+

3+

4

4.

3

1

3

3+

2

4.

4

1

3+

4-

4+

3

3

3

3+

2+

4

4

3

4

3-

4

2+

4

2+

3

3+

3+

4-

4.

1 +++I

4

4

4

3+

.4.

4.

4

3+

3+

+

4

4

4.

4+

3

3

4+

3

GO GO THE CO O ON 6ð að eða að NN NN IN INNNN--~~—-—N N

++

3+ 3+

2

1

2-

1+

4-

1+

1

3-

2

1+

3-

2

1

2+

2

0

2+

2+

1-

3

2

0+

3

1

1

3-

3

2+

+1│

1+

1

1

1+

2

1

1+

2

+11

1

2

1

2

1+

1