Sessional Papers - 1893

PAPERS LAID BEFORE THE LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL OF HONGKONG 1893

Table of Contents

1. Assessment Department

Report for 1893-94

2. Blue Book

Report for 1892

3. Botanical & afforestation Department

Report for 1892

4. Botanical & afforestation Department

Statement of Disbursements for forestry Works

5. Criminal Statistics

For 1892

6. Education

Reports for 1892

7. Finance Committee

Reports of Proceedings for 1893

8. Fire Brigade

Report for 1892

9. Gaol

Report for 1892

10. Gaol Extension

Despatch Respecting

11. Gaol Extension

Memorial Respecting

12. Harbour Master

Report for 1892

13. Legislative Council

Proceedings for 1893

14. Medical Department

Report for 1892

15. Morphine injection

Reports on

16. Observatory

Report for 1892

17. Po Leung Kuk

Commissioners' Report

18. Police

Report for 1892

19. Post office

Report for 1892

20. Public Loan

Correspondence Re Issue of

21. Public Loan

Correspondence Respecting

22. Public Works

Report for 1892

23. Public Works

Report on the Progress of Public Works During the First Half-Year 1893

24. Public Works Committee

Reports of Proceedings for 1893

25. Registrar General

Report for 1892

26. Retrenchment

Correspondence Respecting

27. Revenue and Expenditure

Statement for 1892

28. Sanitary

Reports for 1892

29. Treasury Defalcations

Commissioners' Report

30. Treasury Defalcations

Correspondence Respecting

31. Veterinary

Report for 1892

32. Widows' & Orphans' Fund

Report for Second Half-Year of 1892

33. Yellow River inundation

Despatch Transmitting Note Respecting

 

385

No. 26

93

HONGKONG.

THE ASSESSOR'S REPORT ON THE ASSESSMENT FOR 1893-94.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor, on the 17th July, 1893,

ASSESSOR'S OFFICE, HONGKONG, 19th June, 1893.

SIR,-I have the honour to submit my fourth Annual Report, on the Assessment for the year

1893-94.

2. By order of His Excellency the Governor in Council, I have made a new Valuation of the whole Colony, which comprises the City of Victoria, the Hill District, the Chinese Villages in Hongkong, Kowloon Point, and the Chinese Villages in British Kowloon.

3. The City of Victoria is divided into ten (10) rating districts, and, counting each village, &c. as an unit, there are eighty (80) rating districts, or areas, in the whole Colony.

4. The number of houses reported to be vacant, and inspected under Section 35 of the Rating Ordinance, has been about the same as in the previous year, when I estimated the number of inspections at 3,500.

5. During the period from 1st July, 1892, to 1st June, 1893, Interim Valuations were made as follows:-

In the City of Victoria.

155 new tenements with a rateable value of

54 improved tenements with a rateable value of

replacing existing assessments amounting to

In the rest of the Colony.

143 tenements with a rateable value of re-placing then current assessments of...

.$46,630

.$67,740

$51,775

.$56,962

$27,112

The total Interim Assessments for the whole Colony being 352 tenements with a gross rateable value of $171,332 less $78,887, on account of assessments cancelled, leaving an increase of $92,445.

6. The result of the new General Valuation is that the Rateable Value of the Colony as a whole has increased by $6,247 or 0.17 per cent.

7. There is a decrease in the City of Victoria of $21,761 or 0.68 per cent. accounted for firstly by a continuance of the causes affecting the rental value of property, and secondly by certain tenements having been demolished since the last Valuation, and therefore not being rateable, and by property having gone out of rating in previous years, and not yet having been replaced. These properties include the new building for the Chartered Bank adjoining the Hongkong & Shanghai Bank, the Offices at the corner of Ice House Street and Queen's Road, the new store near to Messrs. LANE & CRAWFORD'S, 52 houses in course of construction upon the site of the Godowns, Praya West, near the Sailors' Home, and several other tenements in various localities. Nearly all of the properties referred to above will become rateable during the ensuing year, and I estimate the Rateable Value to be at least $40,000.

8. I estimate the gross loss to Rateable Value in Victoria attributable to depreciation in rentals at $129,340 equal to 4.08 per cent. This shows a slight improvement on last year's return when the reduction from this cause was $145,720 or 4.44 per cent. The gain from new and improved property is $107,579, which, deducted from the above mentioned $129,320, leaves a net decrease of $21,761 on the Valuation of the City of Victoria.

9. The Rateable Value of the Hill District shews a decrease of $6,030 equivalent to 6.46. per cent. 71.31 per cent. of this arises at the Magazine Gap District, where rents generally have fallen considerably. Since the Valuation was completed, I find that, in two or three instances, houses at the "Peak" have been let at improved rents, and there are indications of better figures being obtain- able in the future.

10. In Kowloon Point there is an increase of $2,190 or 2.18 per cent. Yau-ma-ti and Hung-Hom shew increases of $1,470 (3.46 per cent.) and $929 (1.22 per cent.) respectively, Kowloon Villages, i.e., the whole of the Peninsula excluding Kowloon Point exhibit an increase in Rateable Value of $4,354 or 2.54 per cent.

11. Hongkong Villages have increased in Rateable Value $27,494 equal to 27.73 per cent. $16,822 of this is owing to the extensions at the Tai Koo Sugar Refinery at Quarry Bay. Increases are also seen at Aberdeen and Shau Ki Wan of $3,752 (19.69 per cent.) and $2,404 (20.61 per cent.) res- pectively.

Out of a total of 68 Villages in the Colony, only 9 have decreased in Rateable Value, the total reduction being $1,135 against an increase of $32,983 in the other 59 Villages.

386

12. The Village Rolls throughout the Colony have been carefully revised, and the houses wholly re-numbered. I take this opportunity to thank the Honourable the Director of Public Works for the valuable assistance rendered me by Mr. KING, the Land Bailiff, in obtaining squatters' names, and in the identification of houses where the numbers had been obliterated, or where from other causes difficulties arose.

As the Village Lists are now more complete than has been the case previously, I have the honour to suggest that an Annual Valuation of the outlying districts is not necessary. If arrangements could be made for the Land Bailiff to supply me with a periodical return, half-yearly or yearly, of all changes in ownership which come under his observation, together with a list of new dwellings, &c. and those pulled down or removed, a general revision of the country districts, excepting the more important places, such as Shau Ki Wan, Aberdeen, Hung Hom and Yau-ma-ti once in three or five years, or even less frequently, would be quite sufficient.

13. I annex Table "A" giving a comparison of the Valuations of 1892-93 and 1893-94 for the City of Victoria, the amount increased or decreased in each district, and the net decrease; Table “B” giving similar comparisons for the Hill District, Hongkong Villages, Kowloon Point and Kowloon Villages; Table "C" a summary for the whole Colony.

14. I venture to express the opinion that the result of the year's work as shewn above cannot be considered other than gratifying. It certainly proves that "the Colony as a whole is progressing."

15. Mr. LAU-HI-To, my late Interpreter, died from Beri-beri on 3rd December last, and his place has been efficiently filled by Mr. IP YUK PUI, who is employed temporarily. The Clerk to Assessor, Mr. CR'AN PUI, continues to give satisfaction.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

The Honourable N. G. MITCHELL-INNES,

Colonial Treasurer.

No.

DISTRICT.

Name.

Table A.

CITY OF VICTORIA.

ARTHUR CHAPMAN,

Assessor.

VALUATION 1892-93.

VALUATION 1893-94.

INCREASE.

DECREASE.

1

Kennedy Town,...

$ 17,225 $ 18,940 $ 1,715 $

:..

Shek Tong Tsui,

109,110

113,964

4,854

Sai Ying Pun,

637,115

640,770

3,655

4

Tai Ping Shan,

333,855

325,810

8,045

5

Sheung Wan,

418,345

412,830

5,515

6

Chung Wan,

1,288,080

1,278,005

7

Ha Wan,..........

148,270

143,815

8

Wan Tsai,

114,395

112,440

9

Bowrington,

43,210

42,710

10

So Kon Po,

57,565

56,125

:

:

:

:.

10,075

4,455

1,955

500

1,440

$ 3,167,170

$ 3,145,409 $ 10,224 $ 31,985

DEDUCT INCREASE,

TOTAL DECREASE,........

10,224

21,761

ARTHUR CHAPMAN,

Assessor.

Table B.

THE HILL DISTRICT, HONGKONG VILLAGES, KOWLOON POINT, KOWLOON VILLAGES.

LOCALITY.

387

VALUATION 1892-93.

VALUATION 1893-94.

INCREASE.

DECREASE.

$3

Hill District,

93,260

87,230

6,080

Hongkong Villages,

99,118

126,612

27,494

Kowloon Point,..........

100,080

102,270

2,190

Kowloon Villages,

171,318

175,672

4,354

ARTHUR CHAPMAN, Assessor.

Table C.

THE COLONY OF HONGKONG.

INCREASE.

DECREASE.

LOCALITY.

VALUATION 1892-93.

VALUATION 1893-94.

Amount.

Per- centage.

Amount.

Per- centage.

%

$

%

City of Victoria,....

3,167,170

3,145,409

21,761

0.68

Hill District,

93,260

87,230

6,030

6.46

Hongkong Villages,

99,118

126,612

27,494

27.73

Kowloon Peninsula,

271,398

277,942

6,544

2.41

$ 3,630,946

$ 3,637,193

$34,038

$27,791

:

27,791

...

Deduct Decrease,...

Total net Increase in the Rateable Value of the whole Colony,... $6,247

0.17

per cent.

ARTHUR CHAPMAN,

Assessor.

:

HONGKONG.

REPORT ON THE BLUE BOOK AND DEPARTMENTAL REPORTS FOR 1892.

377

No. 25

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor, on the 17th July, 1893.

1.-TAXATION.

218885

93

(1) The Assessed Rates were raised by Government Notification No. 299 to 103% in a portion of the Hill District and to 83% in Yaumati, Kowloon Point, and Hunghom.

(2) A new Scale of Fees and percentages to be taken in the Supreme Court, to come into force on 1st January, 1893, was approved by the Legislative Council on the 30th November, 1892.

(3) An alteration in the Scale of Fees to be levied in Distraints for Rents was made under Ordi- nance 15 of 1892.

2. REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE.

The Revenue amounted to $2,236,933.37, or excluding premiums from Land Sales and Water Account to $2,032,244.10; and the Expenditure amounted to $2,342,837.26, including Extraordinary Works; excluding these, to $1,882,474.49.

Year.

The Revenue and Expenditure for the past five years have been :---

1888,...$1,557,300.03

$160,688.64

Extraordinary

Expenditure, including

Water Account. Water Account.

Receipts. Expenditure.

Revenue. Premia from Land.

Ordinary Expenditure.

Defensive Works.

$1,461,459.64

$530,870.03

1889,...

1,823,549.13

154,725.60

1,459,167.16

374,551.63

1890,... 1,995,220.47

16,638.80

1,517,843.05

397,507.42

1891,... 1,907,054.43 · 51,761.47

1,868,073.26

514,526.39

$66,486.61

$66,486.61

1892,... 2,032,244.10

121,828.84

1,882,474.49 377,502.34.

82,860.43

82,860.43

3.-LOCAL REVENUES.

The Chinese inhabitants contributed in 1892, by voluntary assessment among them- selves, to the pay of the District Watchmen,..

and received from the Government for the same object a grant-in-aid of

4.--ASSETS AND LIABILITIES.

1886 the liabilities exceeded the assets by

1887 the surplus assets were

1888

Do.

1889

Do.

On the 31st December, 1892, the assets of the Colony exceeded its liabilities by. The surplus assets in:--

$ 191,512.29 (a)

$ 631,374.08 (b)

.$ 360,649.76 .$ 505,109.87

1890

Do.

.$ 309,732.25

1891

Do.

.$ 231,177.51

(c) 1892

Do.

......

$ 35,105.87

5.-PUBLIC DEBT.

$7,430.17

2,000.00

$35,105.87

No new loan was raised.

Amount of present Loan, £200,000. Amount of Sinking Fund, £42,758 7s. 7d.

6.-MILITARY EXPENDITURE.

The Military Expenditure (inclusive of the Volunteer Corps) defrayed by the Colony during the last seven years has been as follows:-

1886,

1887.

1888.

1889.

1890.

1891.

}

1892,

Military Contribution, exclusive of

Defensive Works, and

inclusive of Volunteer Corps.

$124,561.68

$128,815.63

Defensive Works.

$217,901.45 $258,444.28

$ 62,115.90

Defensive Works.

£39,230. 0.0

£43,710. 7.6

$134.594.68

£10,036. 4.0

+

$134,261.12

$ 63,753.73

£9,678.14.5

.$124.616.96

$ 5,082.92

£

832. 1.1

$421,002.01 (?) $269,005.27

$ 20,005.45

£3,102. 1.7

(a) In the years 1886-91, the liabilities on 31st December did not include salaries and local Departmental charges for the month of December. (b) A loan of £200,000 having been raised during 1887 to be paid off on the 1st of March, 1907.

(c) In 1892 there were 13 monthly payments.

(d) The Military Contribution was doubled from 1st January, 1890, and the arrears for 1890 were paid in 1891.

378

7.-PUBLIC WORKS.

The expenditure under this head was $115,689.12 on account of Annually Recurrent Works, and $460,362.77 on account of Extraordinary Public Works.

8.-LEGISLATION.

The following Ordinances were passed during the year :-

No. 1.-An Ordinance to give effect to the change in name and style of the Surveyor

General and Surveyor General's Department.

No. 2.-An Ordinance entitled The Patent Ordinance, 1892.

No. 3.-An Ordinance to make further provision as to the issue of Night Passes for Chinese.

No. 4.-An Ordinance to amend Ordinances No. 3 of 1860, No. 15 of 1885, and No. 17 of 1891 in relation to the power of the Governor in Council to grant certain licences.

No. 5.-An Ordinance to amend Ordinance No. 15 of 1888, entitled The Rating Ordinance, 1888, and Ordinance No. 16 of 1890 entitled The Waterworks Ordinance, 1890.

No. 6. An Ordinance to amend The Bankruptcy Ordinance, 1891.

No. 7.-An Ordinance to amend Ordinance No. 4 of 1865, relating to Offences against the

person.

No. 8.-An Ordinance to repeal Ordinance No. 19 of 1890 and to amend The Dangerous

Goods Ordinance, 1873.

No. 9.-An Ordinance to amend The Merchant Shipping Consolidation Ordinance, 1891. No. 10.-An Ordinance for the incorporation of the Chairman of the Committee of the

Diocesan School and Orphanage.

No. 11.-An Ordinance to provide for the due performance of divine worship and other services in accordance with the rites of the Church of England at St. John's Cathedral Church at Victoria in this Colony and elsewhere, to incorporate a Church Body, to vest the said Cathedral in such Body and for other purposes in connection therewith.

No. 12.-An Ordinance to apply a sum not exceeding Two Millions Two hundred and Fifty-six thousand, Three hundred and Seventy-five Dollars to the Public Service of the Year 1893.

No. 13.-An Ordinance to authorise the Appropriation of a Supplementary Sum of Three hundred and Sixty thousand Six hundred and Eighty-seven Dollars and Thirty- seven Cents to defray the Charges of the Year 1891.

No. 14.-An Ordinance entitled The United Kingdom Probates Ordinance, 1892.

No. 15.-An Ordinance to repeal Section 45 of Ordinance No. 8 of 1860 and to amend

Schedule A to Ordinance No. 1 of 1883.

9.-COUNCILS AND ASSEMBLIES.

Executive Council.--The Honourable G. T. M. O'BRIEN, C.M.G. joined the Council on appoint- ment as Colonial Secretary. The Honourable F. A. COOPER, Director of Public Works, was admitted a Member of the Council.

Legislative Council.-The Honourable G. T. M. O'BRIEN, C.M.G., joined the Council on appoint- ment as Colonial Secretary. The Honourable R. MURRAY RUMSEY, R.N., joined the Council on appointment as Harbour Master, vice the Honourable W. M. DEANE, Captain Superintendent of Police, retired. The Honourable E. R. BELILIOS was appointed an Unofficial Member of the Council, vice the Honourable P. RYRIE, deceased. The Honourable J. J. BELL-IRVING was appointed temporarily an Unofficial Member of the Council in the room of the Honourable J. J. KESWICK, absent on leave.

Sanitary Board.-Mr. LAU WAI-CH'UN was appointed a Member of the Board in the room of Mr. Woo LIN YUEN, resigned.

Board of Examiners.-The Revd. G. REUSCH was appointed a Member.

SA

379

10.-CIVIL ESTABLISHMENT.

Sir JAMES RUSSELL, Chief Justice, retired on pension and was succeeded by Mr. FIELDING CLARKE, Puisne Judge, Mr. E. J. ACKROYD, the Registrar of the Supreme Court, being promoted to the office of Puisne Judge. Mr. A. G. WISE, Police Magistrate, was subsequently appointed Registrar, and Mr. H. B. LETHBRIDGE was appointed Superintendent of the Gaol.

11.-OFFICERS WHO HAVE GIVEN SECURITY FOR THE DISCHARGES OF THEIR DUTIES.

The validity of the sureties of the various Officers was duly enquired into at the end of the year and found to be satisfactory.

12. PENSIONS.

The following Officers retired on pension during the year--

1 Head of Department, 1 Gaol Guard, 1 Hospital Steward, 1 Female Keeper of the Lunatic Asylum, the Sexton and Clerk of St. John's Cathedral, and 1 Assistant Inspector of Markets, 2 European and 9 Indian Police Constables.

13.-FOREIGN CONSULS.

No new Consulates were established in the Colony during 1892.

14.-POPULATION.

The estimated population on the 31st December, 1892, was..

being 6,848 more than the estimated population at the end of 1891.

231,662

The last census was taken on the 20th May, 1891, the population being returned as 221,441, of which 157,585 were males, and 63,856 females.

The following is the estimated population for the last 10 years:-

Years

Males.

Females.

Total.

1883,

.....

124,768

48,707

173,475

1884,

130,560

50,969

181,529

1885,

137,079

53,515

190,594

1886,

..144,550°

56,440

200,990

1887,

152,427

60,524

212,951

1888,

154,500

61,300

215,800

1889,

.138,033

56,449

194,482

1890,

198,742

1891,

.......159,969

64,845

224,814

1892,

164,808

66,854

231,662

The Births and deaths for the last 5 years were as follows:-

Per 1,000 of mean Population.

Years.

Births.

Deaths.

Births.

Deaths.

1888,

...1,662

6,034

7.70

27.96

1889,

.1,683

4,597

8.65

23.64

1890,....

1,617

4,553

8.14

22.90

1891,

.1,734

5,374

7.71

23.90

1892,

.1,843

4,907

7.96

21.18

15.-EDUCATION.

The total number of Schools subject to supervision by the Government in 1892 was 122 as against 117 in 1891, and 112 in 1890.

The total number of Scholars subject to Government supervision in the Government and Grant- in-aid Schools during the last 5 years was as follows:-

Years.

1888,

1889,

1890,

1891,

....

1892,.

Govt.

Grant-in-aid.

Total.

1,933

4,325

6,258

.2,293

4,814

7,107

..2,514

4,656

7,170

.2,540

5,132

7,672

.2,622

5,655

8,277

380

The total expenditure for these Schools for the last 5 years was as follows:-

1888, (after deducting School fees),

1889, (

";

29

),.

1890, (

??

>>

),

1891, ( 1892, (

""

""

},

$45,518.93

44,321.98

56,081.75

60,359.10

54,819.41

16.-EXCHANGE, MONEY, WEIGHTS AND MEASURES.

Exchange.

The rate of Exchange on 4 months' Bills on London was on 7th January, 1892, 3/13, it fell to 2/93 on the 18th August, and rose to 2/103 on 19th October, and was at the end of the year 2/9.

Currency.

The law affecting currency has remained unchanged.

Bank Notes.

The Bank Notes in circulation in Hongkong during the last 5 years, as furnished by the Managers of the respective Banks, were as follows:-

Years.

1888,

Average Amount.

$ 5,759,875

1889,....

6,034,984

1890,

6,073,332

1891....

6,050,122

1892.......

6,066,958

Money Circulation.

Specie in Reserve.

$ 2,660,000

2,552,500

2,775,833

2,650,833

2,701,150

The approximate amount of Coin put into circulation up to 31st December, 1892, was as follows :- Hongkong Silver and Copper Subsidiary Coins (50, 20, 10, and 5 cent pieces; and 1 Cent

and Mil pieces),

$8,220,125.

Weights and Measures.

The Weights and Measures in use in the Colony are regulated by Ordinance 8 of 1885.

17-IMPORTS AND EXPORTS.

There being no Custom House, it is not possible to furnish an account of all Imports and Exports, but a record of Raw Opium imported and exported during 1892 has been kept, and is as follows:-

Imported, Exported,

NOTE.--Through Cargo reported in Manifests but not landed,

18. SHIPPING.

...56,864 chests.

..52,6253

.21,144 chests.

Arrivals exclusive of Junks.

The total arrivals, exclusive of Junks, during the year 1892, amounted to 4,499 vessels and 5.166,938 tons, being 28,311 tons over the arrivals in 1891.

Junks.

22,755 Junks measuring 1,606,251 tons arrived in the Colony in 1892, as against 22,806 Junks and 1,634,616 tons in 1891, showing a decrease of 51 Junks and 28,365 tons.

4.

-

The total arrivals for the last 5 years were:-

Years.

EXCLUSIVE of Junks.

Number of Vessels. Tons.

JUNKS.

GRAND TOTAL.

Number of Vessels. Tons. Number of Vessels.

Tons.

1888,...... 3,821

4,536,442

23,958

1,863,968 27,779

6,400,410

1889,.............. 3,820

4,518,614

22,926

1,716,922

26,746

6,235,536

1890,...... 4,114

4,893,733

23,512

1,795,261 • 27,626

6,688,994

1891,...... 4,351 5,138,627

22,806

1,634,616

27,157

6,773,243

1892,...... 4,499

5,166,938

22,755

1,606,251

27,254

6,773,189

Immigration and Emigration from and to Ports other than in China and Japan.

Years.

1888,

1889,

1890,

1891,

1892,

Arrived.

Departed.

98,800

96,195

99,315

47,849

..101,147

42,066

105,199

45,162

97,971

52,143

19.-AGRICULTURE.

381

The lands of the Colony being limited and not favourable for agricultural purposes, there is no inducement for this industry here. The produce is quite nominal, and is for local consumption only.

20.-MANUFACTURES, &c.

Manufactories.

In addition to the several Manufactories previously in existence, a Paper Mill was established at Aberdeen.

Steam-Launches.

The total number of Steam-Launches built in the Colony in 1892 of 2,714.69, as against 25 with a total tonnage of 2,324.03 in 1891. Steam-Launches of all descriptions, in the Colony, in 1892, were :—

Licensed to carry passengers,

Private Launches,

Colonial Government Launches,

War Department Launches,

was 22, with a total tonnage The total number of licensed

........

51

59

12

5

}

21.-GRANTS OF LAND.

127

The grants of land on lease during the last 5 years were :—

Years.

No. of Grants. No. of acres sold. No. of acres re-granted. Total No. of acres

A. R. P.

1888,...... 1889,.

202

44.0.31

A. R. P.

59.3.13

65

44.1. 93

44.0.5

(a) 1890,......

29

9.3.17

15.3.302

1891,......

37

(b) 1892,......

61

26.0.331 60.3.18

43.0. 51 9.1.28

granted.

A. R. P. 104.0. 41 88.1.151 25.3. 73 69.0.38

70.1.7

(a) The Returns in the Blue Book report for 1890 stated for that year lands sold by auction only viz.:-2 A. 3 R. 101⁄2 P. and did not include lands sold by way of extension to Lots already existing, the addition of the latter increasing the number of acres sold in that year to 9 A. 3 R. 17 P. as above.

(b) 116 A. 1 R. 14 P. were granted, and 46 A. 0 R. 7 P. were resumed, leaving 70 A. 1 R. 7 P. additional Land granted during the year.

Persons having possession of Lands or Houses previously to the Treaty, were allowed to retain them on payment of certain assessed rentals, now collected by the Treasurer; and in cases where such Lands or Houses are not leased, the occupiers are considered as Tenants at will.

382

22.-GAOLS AND PRISONERS.

On the 1st January, 1892, there were 502 prisoners in Victoria Gaol; 5,046 were admitted during the year, and 5,080 discharged; the total number of prisoners on the 31st December, 1892, was 468, of whom 18 were Europeans.

The daily average of prisoners was 515, as against 507 in the previous year.

The number of prisoners admitted into Gaol during the last five years was as follows:--

1888,

1889, 1890, 1891, 1892,

1888,

1889,

1890,

1891,

1892,

NO. OF PRISONERS.

YEARS.

TOTAL.

Men.

Women.

Juveniles.

DAILY AVERAGE NUMBER IN PRISON.

3,390

98

139

3,627

531.00

3,453

131

121

3,705

581.00

3,218

119

107

3,444

566.00

4,805

223

203

5,231

507.00

4,699

181

166

5,046

515.00

23.-CRIMINAL STATISTICS.

Supreme Court.

The following is a Return of cases tried at the Supreme Court during the last five years :-

CHARGES ABANDONED.

POSTPONED.

Number Number

YEARS.

of Cases.

of

Convicted. Acquitted.

Persons.

Number of Number of

Cases.

Persons.

No. of Cases.

No. of Persons.

101

186

99

47

28

តនគ

92

143

64

41

59

80

43

20

32

37

26

9

30

44

18

17

24724

40

37

17

2

9

...

...

Total...............

314

490

250

134

65

105

Average of last 5 years,

624/

98

50

26층

13

21

•••

:

Do. ending 1887,

83

127/

75巷

24

143

234

4/ B

2층

Police Magistrates' Court.

The Cases before the Police Magistrates during the last 5 years were as follows:-

CASES HOW DISPOSED OF.

Total No. Total No.

YEARS.

of Cases.

of Prisoners.

Convicted and Punished. charged.

Dis-

Committed Committed

for pending Trial. Orders.

Ordered Punished

to Find

for False Tes-

Security. timony.

Un-

decided.

1888,

11,647

}

13,309

9,932 2,849

174

109

1889,

8,670

10,033

6,894 2,497

167

54

192 337

17

1890,

9,739

10,772

7,740 2,557

102

15

318

1891,

13,676

16,382

13,972 2,040

40

12

172

1892,

11,920

14,471

12,098 2,078

44

5

211

373I7

50

67

37

1

145

28

Total,.........

Average of last 5 years,

Do. ending 1887,

55,652

11,130.4 12,993.4

12,325 14,153.8

64,967 50,636 12,021

527

195

1,230

31

327

10,127.2 2,404.2

105.4

39

246

6.2

65.4

10,807 2,584.4

143.8

25.4

477

13.8

102.4

1

383

Marine Magistrate's Court.

The Cases before the Marine Magistrate's Court during the last 5 years were as follows:-

DEFENDANTS HOW DISPOSED OF.

Number

Number of

YEARS.

of

Forfei-

To be dis-

Cases.

Defend- Impri- ants. soned.

Sent

ture

Fined.

of

Repri- manded.

back to

charged

Pay.

Duty.

from Ship.

Com- Dis- mitted missed.

for Trial.

1888,.

70

167

66

38

2

1889,

53

107

54

25

15

1890,

81

239

92

84

1891,

147

311

62

205

1892,

79

178

86

80

103

621

15

6358

1

5

13

41

23

8

Total,...

430

1,002

360

432

11

16

92

I

90

...

Average of last 5 years,

86

200.4

72

86.4

2.2

3.2

18.4

0.2

18

:

Do. ending 1887,...

74.8

137.4

64.8

30.2

8.4

5.4

8.2

1.4

19.

Police.

The Cases brought under the notice of the Police during the last 5 years were as follows:-

SERIOUS OFFENCES.

MINOR OFFENCES.

YEARS.

Persons.

Number of

Persons.

Number of

Cases.

Convicted.

Cases.

Discharged.

Convicted. Discharged.

1888,

1889,

1890,

1891,

1892,

2,436

1,116

556

5,678

5,772

1,105

2,893

1,409

618

4,568

4,529

1,131

3,100

1,412

616

5,324

5,007

1,213

2,994

1,687

444

7,875

9,320

673

2,983

1,728

492

6,747

8,245

729

Total,.........

14,406

7,352

2,726

30,192

32,873

4,851

Average of last 5 years,

2,881.2

1,470.4

545.2

6,038.4

6,574.6

970.2

Do. ending 1887,

2,523.6

1,279.2

528.6

587.3

5,046.2

953.8

24.-HOSPITALS, &C.

I

Civil Hospital.

The admissions to the Government Civil Hospital during the year were as follows, as compared with 1891,

1891.

1892.

Police,

570

496

Board of Trade,

135

157

Private paying Patients,

464

378

Government Servants,....

179

168

Police Cases,....

240

232

Destitutes,

279

284

Total,

1,867

1,715

The total admissions to the Hospital and Deaths during the last 5 years were as follows:—

Years.

1888,..

1889,

1890, 1891.

1892,

Admissions.

Deaths.

1,772

80

1,793

77

1,957

98

1,867

84

1,715

68

Total,

9,104

407

Average,

1,820.8

81.4

384

The admissions from the Police Force and the number of Deaths for the past five years were as follows:-

Years.

1888,.

1889,..

1890,.

1891,.

1892,

Total,

Average,.

Admissions.

Deaths.

657

15

590

14

582

7

570

8

496

7

2,895

51

579

10.2°

The admissions of Europeans, Chinese, and Indians in 1892 were 152, 120, and 224 respectively as against 167, 118, and 285 in 1891.

Military Hospital.

The admissions from among the troops during the past five years were as follows:-

Years.

Admissions.

Deaths.

1888,.

1,485

21

1889.

1,732

16

}

1890,

1,915

15

1891,.... 1892,

1,251

17

2,844

31

Total,

9,227

100

Average,

1,845.4

20

Small-pox Hospital.

The admissions during the past five years were as follows:-

Years.

1888,

....

1889,

1890,

1891,

1892,

Admissions.

99

19

2

17

13

Total,..

150

Average,

30

Inquests.

The inquests held during the past five years were as follows:-

1888,

1889,

1890,

1891,

1892,

63

76

101

59

60

25.-CHARITABLE AND LITERARY INSTITUTIONS.

No fresh Institution was formed.

26.-RELIGIOUS INSTITUTIONS.

No fresh Institution was formed.

COLONIAL SECRETARY'S OFFICE,

HONGKONG, 26th June, 1893.

G. T. M. O'BRIEN,

Colonial Secretary.

-

147

No. 11

93

HONGKONG.

REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF THE BOTANICAL AND AFFORESTATION

DEPARTMENT FOR 1892.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor, on the 5th April, 1893.

No. 7.

BOTANIC GARDENS, HONGKONG, 28th March, 1893.

SIR, I have the honour to submit the Annual Report on the Botanical and Afforestation Department for 1892.

STAFF.

I

2. There have been no changes, except the usual number amongst the labourers, during the year, and all have been at their posts continuously, no vacation or other leave having been taken. Mr. W. J. TUTCHER arrived from England just before the end of 1891, and took up his position as Assistant. have much pleasure in recording my great satisfaction with the assiduous, patient, and able manner in which he has applied himself to and discharged his duties in the Gardens, and also, when required for special work, for about a fortnight, in supervising the counting of trees and tree-pits for Forestry work. The Chinese office and outdoor staffs have also given diligent and faithful service in the various capacities in which they have been employed.

3. The accommodation and facilities, which the new Offices provide, have enabled much more and efficient work to be performed than could be done in the old, cramped, and entirely unsuitable build- ing, which formerly had to be put up with. These indoor improvements have influenced the staff and outdoor work generally and are a great help in securing the accomplishment of superior work.

4. The usefulness of the department as a centre for the distribution of information and advice is constantly availed of by local correspondents, and others in China and all parts of the world. It is sometimes a tax to attend to the correspondence, but at all times when it is possible inquiries are cheerfully replied to, even when we gain nothing in exchange, as it would be discourteous to leave such communications unattended to.

BOTANIC GARDENS.

Improvements.

5. Alterations in the nursery consequent on the construction of the new and removal of the old buildings have been continued and are now nearly complete.

6. In my last report I mentioned that I proposed making the approach to the nursery through a plant-house abutting just opposite to the Albany on Albany Road. This house has been erected and furnished with plants, and it appears to have met with great approval, on all sides, from the Public. It was put up with material partly taken from the old building which was demolished, the ornamental front was thus put up for the very modest sum of $200. A temporary roof has been constructed until a suitable opportunity and sufficient means can be found for putting on a permanent

and more ornamental one.

7. Work and store-sheds, and a carpenter's shop have also been constructed from the material of the old building, thus supplying a want which has greatly handicapped work for years past.

8. In Glenealy Ravine, just above the Roman Catholic Cathedral, the site where two water-tanks formerly stood has been filled up and a rockery for ornamental plants made on it.

9. Another small rockery a little lower down has also been made.

10. On the south side of the new road leading from the Gardens to the Roman Catholic Cathedral the formerly untidy corner has been levelled and planted.

This new road while no doubt providing to some people easier access to the Cathedral has not improved the Gardens, especially as it has brought to the neighbourhood boys who cannot be always kept out of mischief.

11. In the old Garden the ground which had become bare under the large "banian" has had a thick covering of good soil placed on it, supported by rough stones at the circumference and the whole space has been planted with Camellias.

148

Water-Supply.

12. This has been good and uninterrupted throughout the year, except in the nursery, but an alteration in the supply pipes made by the Water and Drainage Department, has effected an improve- ment in this respect.

West Indian Times.

13. At the suggestion of His Excellency the Governor, I applied to the Trinidad Botanic Gardens for a supply of seeds of these and the Director, Mr. HART, kindly sent me a parcel from which a nice little stock of plants was raised. Some of these have been planted in the Garden and in one of the tree nurseries, the remainder having been distributed chiefly amongst Chinese market growers who have promised to cultivate the plants in their gardens. It is hoped that by this means the Hongkong Market will in time be furnished with superior limes to those now obtainable.

Lawns.

14. The serious injury done to lawns in the Colony in 1891 and recorded in my last report, has been repeated this year, the caterpillars having re-appeared about the same time of year, namely, in the latter half of September, and continued their depredations until the end of November when with the approach of colder weather they disappeared. In 1891 numerous experiments, as reported, were tried to destroy the larvæ and moths without destroying the grass, but these experiments, with the exception of handpicking of the larvæ, and trapping of the moths, were only partly successful.

Experiments were renewed, however, when the caterpillars re-appeared, and eventually a method was discovered of destroying them without injuring the grass. In the meantime handpicking was resorted to. The article which was found successful was Jey's Fluid, one part to sixty parts of water. This was applied to the grass through the coarse rose of a large water-pot, giving sufficient of the liquid to saturate all parts of the grass above ground. Dull days, or if on clear days after the sun had gone down, were chosen in order that the liquid should take as long as possible to evaporate. Applications were found to destroy most of the caterpillars and to leave the grass uninjured, but it was necessary to repeat the process after intervals of two or three weeks, the process of depositing and hatching of eggs being continued by the moths. The remedy is somewhat expensive but it is the only one which has succeeded.

It seems probable that the mischief can be stamped out by this method, but, unfortunately, when neighbours make no effort to check the insects on their own lawns, such places are nurseries for the development of moths which will, undoubtedly, find their way to the gardens of those who make efforts to get rid of the pest.

Maintenance of Buildings, Paths, &c.

15. All the plant-houses, aviaries, sheds, roads, and paths have been kept in good repair.

Workmen's Cottages and Tool-houses..

16. As originally constructed, some of them 30 years or more ago, and others upwards of 20 years ago, these buildings were and are unsuitable, both in a sanitary and other sense, for the purposes for which they are required. They are, moreover, disreputable in appearance and an eyesore to the neighbourhood besides being right in the way of the completion of the new road recently made to open up new building sites. The sites in the vicinity of these buildings would be much depreciated in value in the eyes of would-be purchasers by the presence of these old, ugly, and insanitary buildings. It would therefore in every sense be desirable to have them demolished and re-built as soon as there may be an opportunity for so doing.

Rain Gauge.

17. By direction of His Excellency the Governor a rain gauge has been obtained from England and fixed in a suitable position for measuring and recording rain-fall in the Gardens. It was in position in time for records to be commenced from January 1st of this year, and in future the records will be published in the departmental report.

18. It might be interesting and useful to supplement the rain gauge by maximun and minimum and dry and wet bull thermometers for observing temperature and atmospheric moisture.

Garden Rules.

19. Some desirable alterations being required in the Rules for the maintenance of order in, and admission of the Public to, the Gardens the Rules were revised, authorised, and published in the Government Gazette in Notification No. 473 of the 19th November, 1892.

Amongst other alterations the time for closing the gates was made a little earlier in order that they should not be open after dark, at which time the darkness afforded facilities for irregularities which could not be checked so well as in daylight.

149

Distribution and Interchange of Plants, Seeds, &c.

20. Living plants to the number of 941, and seeds of the weight of 16 lbs. in 128 packages and packets were received. The principal donors were :—

Botanical Department, Antigua, West Indies.

Gardens, British Guiana.

Grenada.

""

""

Hanoi.

""

>>

""

""

Jamaica.

Royal, Bangalore.

Calcutta.

Ceylon.

""

;)

>>

""

"}

"3

Kew.

""

"1

"1

Mauritius.

11

*

"?

""

Trinidad.

""

27

Saharunpur.

"1

""

Singapore.

Chapman, Mrs.

Dammann & Co., Napoli, Italy. Foster, Mrs. Pearce Goddard, Mrs. Hooper, A. Shelton Humphreys, H.

27

Lewis, Mrs.

J. D.

Mueller, Sir F. Von, Melbourne.

Rapp, F.

Ribeiro, J. S. V.

Shepherd, Mrs. Bruce

Skertchly, S. B. J., F.G.S.

Treseder, John G., Sydney.

Watters, T., Canton.

21. Of plants 3,675-and of seeds 58 lbs. 14 ozs. contained in 270 packages &c., were distributed. The chief recipients were:-

Acclimatisation Society, Brisbane.

Arthur, Mrs.

Barker, C. B., H. E. Major-General Digby

Barton, J.

Boehmer & Co., Louis, Yokohama.

Bird, H.

Botanic Gardens, Bangalore.

Hanoi.

""

""

British Guiana.

17

""

Ceylon.

Grenada.

17

11

Jamaica.

""

>>

Natal.

>>

>>

Port Darwin.

""

27

""

Royal, Calcutta.

31

*)

""

;)

11

95

""

Kew. Mauritius. Trinidad.

Saharunpur. Townsville.

Bowden, V. R., British New Guinea.

Burdon, Mrs.

Central Police Station.

Chapman, Mrs.

Cricket Club.

Croade, Captain

Denison, A.

Forest and Gardens Department, Penang.

Foster, Mrs. Pearce

Fraser, F. A., Hoihow.

Gardens and Forests, Singapore.

Goddard, Captain

Government Civil Hospital.

Hodgins, Captain

Hooper, A. Shelton

Humphreys, H.

J. D.

Hutchison, J. D.

Jardinero, Major, Manila. Knaggs, S. W.

Mackenzie & Co., Shanghai.

May, F. H.

Mons. de Poli, Paris.

More, Mrs.

Osborne, E.

Rapp, C. F.

Rickett, J., Yokohama. Robelin, C., Bangkok. Shepherd, Mrs. Bruce Stokes, R.

Taj Mahal Gardens, Agra. Treseder, John G., Sydney. Veitch & Sons, J., Chelsea. Watters, T., Canton.

Plant Sales.

22. Improvements in the nursery have, besides being of much advantage to the Gardens, enabled better and more work to be done in providing plants for the Public. 2,307 plants were sold, the amount realised for them and some seeds being $612.57. There are increases of, in plants 423, and in money $268.80 over the sales of the preceding year.

23. It will be remembered that the Gardens do not derive any benefit from the sale of plants, the receipts being paid into the Treasury and not credited to this department, nor is it designed that the Government should derive benefit from the transactions, those who benefit being the Public only; it is calculated that the prices charged for plants shall be about the cost of their propagation and cultiva- tion only.

Loan of Plants for Decoration.

24. Not quite so many plants were applied for as in the previous year. The number of applicants was 16 as against 19 in 1891, and the plants lent 1,688 as against 2,746 in the previous year.

150

Herbarium and Library.

25. The collections of dried plants and books were transferred to their quarters in the new building in the early part of the year. The herbarium is commodious, and well adapted for the preservation of plants, which can now be examined and studied with comfort and convenience by any one wishing to do so.

26. In consequence of pressure of other work, and of the cramped place where the plants were formerly kept work in the herbarium was almost suspended in 1891, but during the year under review a considerable number of plants were prepared and incorporated, and arrears have been mostly worked

up.

27. My thanks are due to Dr. A. HENRY for a valuable collection of 742 species of plants from his Central China collections, and to the Royal Gardens, Kew, for 127 species of miscellaneous plants. 28. Thanks are also due for the various Reports, &c., contributed and named in the following list of additions to the library

Agricultural Bulletin of Malay Peninsula, 1892.

Gazette New South Wales, 1892.

""

"

and Livestock Statistics, South Aus-

tralia, 1892.

Botanical Magazine, 1892. Purchased. Botanicum Sinicum, Botany of Chinese classics, Bretschneider, 1891. Presented by Dr. Bretschneider, St. Petersburg. Bibliography of Australian Economic Botany.

Part 1, 1892.

Bulletin (Brisbane) of the Department of Agri-

culture, 1892.

Bulletin, Agriculture in the Straits Settlements,

of Miscellaneous Information, 1892. Bulletin, (Jamaica) of Botanical Department,

1892.

Bulletin, (Kew) of Miscellaneous Information,

1892.

Bulletin, (Trinidad) of Miscellaneous Informa-

tion, 1892.

Catalago de las Plantas del Herbario, from Ma-

nila.

Flora of British India, Part 18. From Kew. Gardeners' Chronicle for 1892. Purchased. Hookers' Icones Plantarum Vol. i part. IV. Vol. ii part i, Vol. iii parts i and ii, 1892. From Kew. Hygrometrical Tables adapted to the use of the Dry and Wet Bulb Thermometer. Pur- chased.

Indian Forest Reports.

Forest Administration of the Forest Survey

Branch in India, 1890-1.

Forest Administration of Imperial School in

Dehra Dun, 1891-2.

Forest Administration in Andamans, 1891-2.

in Ajmere-Merwara, 1890-

1891.

>>

Forest Administration in Baluchistan, 1890-1.

in Bombay Presidency in-

""

cluding Sindh, 1890-1.

Forest Administration in Coorg, 1890-1.

2)

Districts, 1890-1.

in Hyderabad Assigned

Forest Administration in Lower Provinces of

Bengal, 1890-1.

Forest Administration in Lower Burma, 1890-1.

Forest Administration in Madras Presidency,

1890-1.

Forest Administration in Central Provinces of

Bengal, 1890-1.

Forest Administration in Upper Burma, 1890-1. Journal of Botany, 1892. Purchased.

Le Tagasaste (Cytisusproleferis Varietas). From

Kew.

List of Medicines exported from Hankow and

the other Yangtze ports. Purchased.

Laws of Storms in the Eastern Sea. Purchased. Manual of Injurious Insects and methods of pre-

vention. Purchased. ·

Observations on Botanical Collections made by Mr. A. E. PRATT in Western China. From Kew.

Ordinances of Hongkong Vol. i, 1844-1877, and

Vol. ii, 1879-90.

Proceedings of the Agri-Horticultural Society

of Madras, 1891. Report Botanic Gardens,

}}

>>

Grenada, 1891. Natal, 1891.

""

""

>>

""

""

>>

""

19

Cyclone of 1892.

Saharunpur, 1891-2. Royal Calcutta, 1891-2.

Ceylon, 1891. Mauritius on the

Report Botanic Gardens, Royal, Trinidad, 1891. and Forest Department

""

in the Straits Settlements, 1891. Report of the Conference of Fruit Growers, De- partment of Agriculture, New South Wales. Report of the Conference on Rust in Wheat.

,, Department of Agriculture, Bris- bane, 1890-1. Report of the Department of Agriculture, Cape

of Good Hope, 1891-2.

12

11

Report of the Government Botanical Gardens and Parks, Dewan of Mysore, 1890-1. Report of the Pomologist, United States Depart-

ment of Agriculture, 1891.

Report of the Queensland Acclimatisation So-

ciety, 1892.

Report of State Forest Administration in New

South Wales, 1891.

Statistical Register of the Province of South

Australia, 1890.

Transactions and Proceedings of South Califor-

nia Horticultural Society.

Weather Warnings for Watchers. Purchased.

151

FORESTRY.

Planting Operations.

29. In this branch of the department's operations, as in the Gardens, a great deal more work was accomplished than in the previous year. The total number of trees placed in permanent positions was 356,663 as against 115,081 in the previous year, that is upwards of three times the quantity. Appendix A. gives a tabular statement of the kinds and numbers of trees planted and the localities where they were planted.

Protective Service.

30. The number of offenders brought before the Police Magistrates by Forest Guards was 101, out of which 92 convictions were obtained. This is an increase in the number of cases of 22 and of convictions of 15 as compared with the year 1891. Out of the 92 convicted persons 29 paid fines amounting to $87.50, the remainder, 63, were imprisoned for terms ranging from three days up to two months each. The lowest fine was 50 cts., and the highest $10.

31. The service was worked with the usual number of Forest Guards, but arrangements have been sanctioned for a slight increase this year.

32. The majority of offences are in each case trivial, but if these slight offences were overlooked they would undoubtedly quickly develop into more serious damages to trees.

Grass Fires.

33. There were 63 fires recorded, which destroyed about 2,000 trees.

34. I have again to thank the Police Officers at various out-stations for valuable services in reporting and extinguishing grass fires.

35. The system of fire barriers throughout the Colony was efficiently maintained, 41 miles of old barriers having been cleared and 2 miles of new ones made just before the approach of the dry season.

36. For the purpose of repressing grass fires which to a large extent are caused by people con- ducting ancestral worship at tombs scattered all over the hills, a Register of Graves has been obtained. for the use of this department, so that in the event of the origin of fires being traced to certain graves the worshippers may have the responsibility fixed on them. The Register affords information of the locality of each grave and the address of the person or persons interested in its maintenance and accustomed to pay the annual tribute to ancestors. Tomb-worshipping takes place in the autumn and spring of each year, when this department stations men in the vicinity of cemeteries and graves to extinguish fires which may occur. The Register was obtained just before the late autumnal festival, and the people were acquainted with its object and admonished to exercise greater care in the use of fire. These efforts had a very happy result, very few, and they are insignificant, fires having taken place, which went far to prove that grass fires may be prevented with ordinary care.

37. I have to thank the Honourable the Registrar General, and the late Major-General GORDON, Captain Superintendent of Police, and the Officers acting under him, for this Register, the Officers in charge of out-stations having collected the information for me.

38. The Register records contain 1,164 graves in Hongkong and Kowloon. The localities, and number of graves in each, will be found in Appendix C.

39. Fortunately, no graves are now allowed to be made outside cemeteries, but it will be a long time before all interest has ceased in those which remain, therefore vigilance must not be relaxed in exercising efficient control over them.

Thinning of Plantations, &c.

40. The total number of trees removed from plantations during the year was 31,108 which realized $492.33. The total revenue for forestry products was $534.40. That for 1891 was $601.31.

41. Appendix B. gives the statistics of this work.

I have the honour to be,

Honourable G. T. M. O'BRIEN, C.M.G.,

Colonial Secretary, &c., &c., &C.

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

CHARLES FORD,

Superintendent,

Botanical and Afforestation Department.

:

Appendix A.

STATISTICS OF PLANTING OPERATIONS.

DESCRIPTION AND NUMBERS OF TREES AND AREA IN ACRES.

LOCALITY.

Pinus

Pinus

sinensis

sinensis

SOW11

planted.

Cunning

hamia

sinensis.

sinensis.

in situ.

Crypto- Celtes Aleurites meria

japonica.

triloba.

Camphor.

Tristanea

conferta.

Albizzia

Miscel-

Bamboos.

Lebbek.

laneous.

Area in

Acres.

Kowloon,

13,512

1,265

1,322

41

Causeway Bay,

17,200

477

1,519

North Point,

28,299

5,620

Quarry Bay,

9.061

29,988

Deep Water Bay,

30,862

Pokefoolam,

2,342

Sandy Bay,

6,380

East of Aberdeen and Wanchai Road,

12,144

520

...

Aberdeen,

9,799

Near Military Sanitarium,

3,230

...

Above Bowen Road, Happy Valley,

13,082

...

Above Pokefoolam Road,....

5,097

...

Near Mount Kellet Cemetery,

1,173

...

...

Near Tytam Reservoir,

2,358

...

...

Tytam,

Mount Davis,

Chaiwan,

89,734

...

Mount Kellet,

20,297

...

23,470

...

27,525

Richmond Road,

Robinson Road,..

Lunatic Asylum,

Magazine Gap Road,

Near Bowen Road, Miscellaneous,

{

888

38

...

...

28

131

23

24

16

*

...

28

32

...

251

...

...

22

22

49

47

20

20

...

...

12

22

24

A

51

10

CC

...

10

44

...

...

1

2

742

162

12

19

23

47

Grand

Total of

Trees.

152

154,539

197,899

1,799

1,519

599

96

45

20

36

24

87

2951 356,663

CHARLES FORD,

Superintendent,

Botanical and Afforestation Department.

Appendix B.

SALE OF FORESTRY PRODUCTS.

Localities.

PINE TREES FELLED.

Amount

Quantities.

Realized.

Mount Davis,

16,721

286.99

Chaiwan,

5,330

5.33

Aberdeen and Wanchai Road,.

8,316

86.04

Kowloon,.....

2,084

40.35

Green Island,

1,851

28.10

Sandy Bay,

1,797

43.89

Above Bowen Road,

9

1.63

Total Number of Trees,...

31,108

492.33

Piculs, Catties.

Tree Prunings, .

Pine Seeds,

282

11.47

2

20

30.60

Total Revenue for: Forestry Products.....

534.40

153

CHARLES FORD,

Superintendent,

Botanical and Afforestation Department.

Appendix C.

LOCALITIES AND NUMBERS OF GRAVES REGISTERED

OUTSIDE CEMETERIES.

Aberdeen District,

Hung Hom,

LOCALITY.

Kowloon,

Shaukiwán,

Stanley,

Wanchai,

Western District,

Total,.

Number.

519

186

s

200

20

181

50

8

1,164

CHARLES FOrv, Superintendent,

Botanical and Afforestation Department,

169

No. 13

93

HONGKONG.

STATEMENT OF DISBURSEMENTS FOR FORESTRY WORKS IN THE YEARS 1894 AND 1895.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency

the Governor, on the 25th May, 1893.

Statement showing Disbursements for Forestry Works in the years 1894 and 1895 for which contracts have been already made, and those for which contracts now require to be made.

To be disbursed in 1893.

Estimated total cost.

To be disbursed in 1894.

To be disbursed in 1895.

APPROVED BY LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL

C.S.O. No. 1161, 1892.

$ C.

$ C.

$

C.

$

C.

1. Rearing Trees in situ,

840.00

400.00

440.00

A

2.

""

""

to be planted in 1894,

960.00

600.00

360.00

3. Planting Trees being reared under No. 2,..

1,600.00

1,600.00

Contracts to be now made which require approval:-

4. Rearing Trees to be planted in 1895,

1,000.00

5. Planting the Trees to be reared under No. 4,

1,600.00

1,000.00 1,600.00

$6,000.00

1,000.00

2,400.00

2,600.00

The works under headings 4 and 5 now require the approval of the Legislative Council in order that the contracts for them may be made; those under headings 1, 2, and 3 have already been sanc- tioned and are now in progress.

CHARLES FORd, Superintendent,

Botanical and Afforestation Department.

155

No. 12

93

HONGKONG.

RETURNS OF SUPERIOR AND SUBORDINATE COURTS FOR 1892.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor, on the 5th April, 1893.

No. 44.

REGISTRY SUPREME COURT,

HONGKONG, 23rd March, 1893.

SIR,-I have the honour to forward herewith the following annual returns :--

1. Returns of all sums received as Revenue in the Registry of the Supreme Court during

the year 1892.

2. Same returns as compared with the receipts of 1891.

3. Indictments and Informations in the Supreme Court of Hongkong for the year 1892. 4. Return of Criminal cases that have been brought under the cognizance of the Supreme

Court during the last ten years.

5. Comparative table showing the number of offences, apprehensions, convictions, and

acquittals for the last five years.

6. Return of Criminal cases tried in the Supreme Court of Hongkong during the year 1892. 7. Civil cases commenced and tried in 1892,-

a. In Original Jurisdiction.

b. In Summary Jurisdiction.

Appeals commenced and tried.

8. Probates and Administrations granted in 1892.

From Returns 1 and 2 it will be seen that there is a decrease in the Revenue of 1892 as compared with that of 1891 amounting to...

This decrease has taken place chiefly in the following items of Revenue:—

A. Court Fees (proper) paid by stamps,

There was considerably less litigation in 1892. In 1891, 127 Original Suits and 1,632 Summary Suits were commenced against 71 and 1385 in 1892.

B. Official Administrator's and Official Trustee's Commissions,... C. Registrar of Companies' Fees,

In 1891 there were 19 new Companies registered with a capital of $7,622,000, and in 1892 there were only 12 new Companies registered with a capital of $2,076,000.

D. Official Assignee's Commission,

Under the new Bankruptcy Ordinance, No. 20 of 1891, which came into force on the 1st January, 1892, the office of Official Assignee in all new cases is abolished, and this Commission is now only chargeable on sums recovered in Bankruptcies prior to that date and will ultimately disappear as a source of revenue.

E. There is an increase

Under the head of Fines and Forfeitures of $189.50, and of Land Office Fees of $652.

CRIMINAL RETURNS.

.$6,526.13

Decrease. $2,291.04

763.53 1,593.50

1,179.61

The number of cases tried in the Supreme Court in 1892 were 30, or only 2 less than in 1891. The returns show a considerable reduction in the number of cases tried since the

The average for 1st five years from 1883 to 1887, was

";

2nd

There were no Maiden Sessions.

""

from 1888 to 1892, was

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

year 1889.

..83

.62층

The Honourable

COLONIAL SECRETARY,

&c.,

&c.,

&c.

Your most obedient Servant,

BRUCE SHEPHERD,

Acting Registrar.

156

RETURN of all sums received as REVENUE in the Registry of the Supreme Court, during the Year 1892.

Original Jurisdiction,

Summary Jurisdiction,....

Bankruptcy Jurisdiction,

Probate Jurisdiction, ......

Official Administrator's Commission,

Official Assignee's Commission,

Official Trustee's Commission,

$ 3,470.20

4,119.49

672.97

697.03

1,480.24

54.02

162.94

Appraiser's Fees,...

1.60

Sheriff's Fees,

181.00

Bailiff's Fees, ......

1,207.50

Interest on Deposit of Surplus Cash,.....

2,864.54

Fees on Distraints,

2,017.50

Registrar of Companies,

2,062.00

Fine and Forfeitures,

250.00

Land Office Fees,........

Registry Supreme Court, Hongkong, 23rd day of March, 1893,

$19,241.03

4,976.00

$24,217.03

BRUCE SHEPHERD,

Acting Registrar.

RETURN of all SUMS COLLECTED in the Registry of the Supreme Court for the Year 1892, and paid into the Treasury.

1891.

1892.

REGISTRAR.-Court Fees paid by Stamps,

.$ 13,268.23

$ 10,977.19

OFFICIAL ASSIGNEE.-5% on amounts encashed paid into the Treasury,

OFFICIAL ADMINISTRATOR,.

1,233.63

2,093.83

54.02

1,480.24

OFFICIAL TRUSTEE.-2% on amount of Trust on taking over up to $10,000 above $10,000 commission 1 % on further amount, 1 % commission on income, ...

312.88

162.94

APPRAISER OF INTESTATE ESTATES.-2 % on Houses, Land, Goods, Furniture,

&c., 1% on Cash, Banking account or Shares,............

2.70

1.60

BAILIFF,

1,386.50

1,207.50

SHERIFF,

318.00

181.00

REGISTRAR OF COMPANIES,

INTEREST on Registrar's Balance at the Bank,

FINE AND FORFEITURES,

3,655.50

2,062.00

4,087.39

2,864.54

60.50

250.00

LAND OFFICE FEES,

DEPOSIT UNAVAILABLE.-Intestate Estate not claimed,

Registry Supreme Court, Hongkong, 23rd day of March, 1893.

$ 26,419.16

19,241.03

4,324.00

4,976.00

$130,743.16

24,217.03

......

360.50

BRUCE SHEPHERD,

Acting Registrar.

157

INDICTMENTS and INFORMATIONS in the SUPREME COURT of HONGKONG, for the Year 1892.

Including Attempts and Conspiracies to commit the several offences.

Showing how the cases tried in

the Superior Courts ended.

(Each Prisoner tried counts as a separate case; where a large number of Prisoners have been convicted together, the fact is mentioned in a note.)

Total.

Murder.

Manslaughter.

Attempt at murder.

Concealment of Birth.

Judgment for the Crown,..........

18

:

Judgment for the Prisoner,

17

1

Prisoner found Insane,.

Cases which fell through for want of prosecution or absence of accused, and cases thrown out by the Grand Jury (Attorney General),

Cases postponed,

:.

9

1

1

2

.:.

:

...

:

44

2

Co

3

Rape.

Unnatural Crimes.

Robbery with violence.

Other offences against the Person.

Offences against Property.

Miscellaneous offences.

Abortion.

:

:

:

:.

:

:

:

:

:

.:.

...

:

:

1

سم

10

5

2

:

:

:.

:

:

:

:

:

1

00

8

4

2

1

2

:

10

5

:

00

8

19

11

Registry Supreme Court, Hongkong, 23rd day of March, 1893.

BRUCE SHEPHERD, Acting Registrar.

RETURN of CRIMINAL CASES that have been brought under the COGNIZANCE of the SUPREME Court, during the last Ten Years.

Charges Abandoned.

Postponed.

Number Number

YEAR.

of Cases.

of Persons.

Convicted. Acquitted.

No. of Cases.

No. of Persons.

No. of Cases.

No. of Persons.

(c.) 1883,

91

126

70

26

(d.) 1884,.

68

101

65

20

1885,.

91

147

103

(e.) 1886,.

75

107

59

20

(f) 1887,.

94

155

82

36

22229

14

28d

2

2

8

16

16

22

16

27e

1

1

17

26

1

8

Total,.

419

636

379

124

71

119

4

11

1888,

101

186

99

47

28

40

(g.) 1889,.

92

143

64

41

24

37

...

1890,.

59

80

43

20

17

1891,...

32

37

26

9

2

2

1892,.

30

44

18

17

9

Total,.

314

490

250

134

65

105

:

Average of 1st

834

127층

750

244

14

233

Period,....f

Average of 2nd

623

98

50

26告

13

21

Period,....

هران

21/

c. In one case the recognizance estreated, this case is included in the total, but not in any other of the above headings. d. In one case the recognizance estreated, and one prisoner committed suicide in the Gaol.

e. In one case the recognizance estreated.

f. In three cases the recognizances were estreated.

g. In one case the recognizance estreated, this case is included in the total, but not in any other of the above headings.

Registry Supreme Court, Hongkong, 23rd day of March, 1893.

BRUCE SHEPHERD,

Acting Registrar.

158

COMPARATIVE TABLE showing the NUMBER of OFFENCES, APPREHENSIONS, CONVICTIONS and ACQUITTALS

for the last Four Years.

The Number of Convictions in the Superior Courts-

1. For Offences against the Person,

2. For Offences against Property,

3. For other Offences,........

The Number of Persons Acquitted-

2. In the Superior Courts,

1889.

1890.

1891.

1892.

18

13

13

6

40

22

9

8

6

8

4

4

Registry Supreme Court, Hongkong, 23rd day of March, 1893.

Number of Cases tried.

Number of Persons tried.

a 1

1

1

1

1

01 -

2

1

2

2

41

20

9

17

BRUCE SHEPHERD,

Acting Registrar.

RETURN of CRIMINAL CASES tried in the SUPREME COURT of HONGKONG during the Year 1892.

~ 1

2

CRIMES.

Death Recorded.

over one Year.

Hard Labour

Hard Labour one

Year and under.

SENTENCE.

Solitary Confinement- Number of Persons.

Number of Persons. Privately Flogged-

No. of Cases.

No. of Persons.

No. of Cases.

No. of Persons.

DONED,

PONED.

CHARGES

CASES

ABAN-

POST-

-:

::

Convicted.

Acquitted.

Death.

Assault,

Assault and false imprisonment,. Bribery,

Burglary,

Burglary and receiving stolen goods, Conspiracy,

Escape,

Feloniously assaulting with intent to rob and being

armed with an offensive weapon,

1

Feloniously having in possession forged Bank notes, Feloniously and maliciously throwing corrosive fluid

1

with intent to do grievous bodily harm, Feloniously and maliciously wounding with intent

to do grievous bodily harm,

1

1

1

Larceny,

Larceny and receiving stolen goods,

Larceny by a servant,

Larceny from a boat in Victoria harbour,.

Larceny in a dwelling house,

Larceny of a valuable security,.

2

Making a false statement to the Registrar of deaths, Manslaughter,

1

1

1

1

26

35

Murder,

Robbery with violence,

Unlawfully and fraudulently obtaining from the Post Office certain letters the property of the Postmaster General,.............................

Wounding with intent to do grievous bodily harm,...

I

~

18

17

...

::

:

3

...

1 1

1

1

1

...

::

1

-:

9

8

:

1

::

::

:

1

:

:

1

Of 44 Persons only

35 were tried.

9 were not indicted which are included under the heading of "Charges Abandoned,"... 9

44 Persons.

a In this case the prisoner was fined $250.

Registry Supreme Court, Hongkong, 23rd day of March, 1893.

1

4

9

::

:

...

BRUCE SHEPHERD, Acting Registrar.

1892.

CASES COMMENCED.

JUDGMENT.

Settled or

No.

Debt and

withdrawn

Jurisdiction. of

Cases.

damages.

before

Plaintiff.

Trial.

Defend- ant.

Non- Suit.

Struck out,

Dismissed and Lapsed Writs.

In Dependency.

159

TOTAL CASES TRIED.

Debt and

Cascs. Damages

recovered.

Original,

71

$847,428.59

10

21

6

34

27

$86,237.63

Summary,

1,385 $181,542.77

510

554

64

1

210

46

619 $86,607.52

Registry Supreme Court, 23rd day of March, 1893.

1892.

CASES TRIED.

JUDGMENT.

BRUCE SHEPHERD,

Acting Registrar.

Jurisdiction.

No. of Cases.

Debt and Damages.

Plaintiff. Defendant.

Debt and

Struck out, Damages.

Non-Suit. Dismissed and

Lapsed Writs.

Original,

Summary,

....

39 (a) | $150,628.03

849 (b) $116,743.97

31

2

6 $137,043.24

571

66

1

211

$90,146.00

12 of these cases were pending on the 31st December, 1891. 20 of these cases were pending on the 31st December, 1891.

Registry Supreme Court, 23rd day of March, 1893.

BRUCE SHEPHERD,

Acting Registrar.

1892.

APPEALS COMMENCED,

JUDGMENT.

Respondent.

Pending.

No. of Cases.

Appellant.

5

4

Registry Supreme Court, 23rd day of March, 1893.

No. of Cases.

Appellant.

5

4

1

BRUCE SHEPHERD, Acting Registrar.

1892.

APPEALS TRIED.

JUDGMENT.

Respondent.

Pending.

Registry Supreme Court, 23rd day of March, 1893.

1

BRUCE SHEPHERD,

Acting Registrar.

160

CALENDAR of PROBATES and ADMINISTRATION granted by the SUPREME COURT of HONGKONG during the Year 1892.

Date of Grant.

Name of Testator or Intestate.

Probate, Administration

Time and Place of Death.

with Will annexed, or Administration.

Name and Description of the Executor or Administrator.

Value of Effects as

set forth in

the Commis-

sion of Ap- praisement.

1892. Jan,

154

11

"

**

""

"

4 Lam Sau (or Sow) otherwise Wing Leung otherwise In Tong,

4 Yeong Lin Fat,

Wong Leung Shi,

4 Jane Adelaide Yellop, 7 William Keeble,

22 Kung Fuk,

22 William Forbes Sharp,

Lam Hung Kwan, the eldest son and one of the executors. Power being re- served to grant the like Probate to Heung Ki, the second son,

Nam Ping Village, Heung Shan District, in the Pro- vince of Kwong Tung, China, 16th Oct., H'kong, 9th Sept.,

Probate,

1891,

65,900.00

1890,

Adm. with the Will annexed,

Chim She, the lawful widow of the de-

ceased,

275.00

Honam, in Canton,

Probate,

Wong Ip Ki, the son, and Wong Ping

1891, 1891,

Un, the grandson,

9,000.00

Do., Letters of Adm.

William Powell, the executor,

3,900.00

| Official Administrator,

600.00

Do.,

100.00

20th Feb., H'kong, 21st Dec., Luc-Nam, in Tonkin,

25th Jan., 1891,

San On District, in the Pro- vince of Kwong Tung, China, 15th Dec., 1891, Hankow, in the Empire of China, 21st April, 1891,

Adm. with Expl. of the Will annexed,

Fung A Oi, mother of the deceased,

Augustus Sharp, brother of the deceased and the duly authorised attorney of Alexander Ryrie Greeves for the use and benefit of the said Alexander Ryrie Greeves and until he shall duly apply for Probate of the Will to be granted to him,.....

1892, Administration, The Right Reverend John Timoleon Rai-

mondi, the Roman Catholic Titular Bishop of Acantha, &c.,

1,800.00

22 Giuseppe Burghignoli,

H'kong, 2nd Jan.,

2,600.00

22 Fung Tat,

Canton, 12th Dec.,

29

Feb. 10 John Edgar,

"

10 |Ng A Ngan,

H'kong, 11th Jan., H'kong, 24th Jan.,

10 Idroos Moosdeen,

H'kong, 6th Jan.,

1891, Probate, 1892, Administration, 1892, Probate, 1892, Administration,

Fung Yuk, the executor,

6,000.00

| Kwok So Yau Edgar, lawful widow,

5,000.00

Chau Cho Loong, executor.

5,200.00

Abdool Rahim Moosdeen, brother,

1,000.00

11

""

Macao, 4th Sept., H'kong, 3rd Dec.,

1890,

Do.,

Ricardo Romão Robarts,

700.00

1891,

Do.,

Marcellina Antonia de Pinna, lawful

widow,

100.00

DO.

Official Administrator,

1,100.00

10 Florencio Antonio da Cruz, 10 Eymerico Prudencio de Pinna,...

10 Alfred Charles Bowring Hance,.

15 Henry George Thomsett,

Newton, in the Colony of New South Wales, Aus- tralia, 27th Sept., 1890, Southampton, England,

20th Jan., 1892,

Adm. with the Will annexed.

""

24 Chang Fat,

H'kong, 4th Feb.,

1892,

Probate,

24 Lai Sai Kam,

Mar.

1

Thomas W. Hall,..

1

"

John William Croker,

Alfred Bulmer Johnson, the duly ap-

pointed attorney of Harry Mayes Thomsett for the use and benefit of the said Harry Mayes Thomsett and until he shall duly apply for Probate. Power being reserved of granting the like Probate to Susannah Agnes Thomsett, the executrix named in the Will,...... Chang Man, the executor. Power being reserved to grant the like Probate to Chang Yau, the eldest son when he shall attain the age of 21 years, Ip Lai Kam and Ng Lai Sheung, execu-

trixes,

35,400.00

700.00

H'kong, 5th Dec.,

1890,

Do.,

6,500.00

24 Liu Ting Yin alias Wei Sit,

28 Liu Wei Tai,

H'kong, 30th Oct., H'kong, 14th Feb., Sun Wui, near Canton,

29th Nov., 1892, Sun Chuen, in Sun Wui, in the Province of Kwong Tung, 25th Feb.,

1891, 1892,

Administration, Do., Double Probate,

Administration,

| Official Administrator,

250.00

Do.,

200.00

Liu Kam Chuen, one of the sons and

executors,

9,000,00

Liu Kam Chuen, brother of the deceased,.

7,900.00

1892,

Apr.

1 Ip Lin Kwai,

Paris, in France,

Do.,

Official Administrator,

100.00

3rd Nov.,

1891,

2 Thoorja Mahomed Arab,

H'kong, 16th Oct.,

1887,

Administration

Abdool Rahim Moosdeen,

16,000,00

de bonis non,

14 Phineas Ryrie,

H'kong, 21st Feb.,

1892,

Adm. with the Will and two Codicils annexed,

Arthur Wellesly Walkinshaw, the duly

authorised attorney of Edward Carey Smith for the use and benefit of the said Edward Carey Smith and until he shall duly apply for Probate of the Will and Codicils to be granted to him,

2,000.00

14 Tse Chung Hing alias Tse Chun H'kong, 23rd April, 1891,

Probate,

Un,

Tse Wo Chai, one of the executors. Power being reserved to grant the like Pro- bate to Tse Wing and Tse Wan Lam, the other executors, .

14 Fung Yau,

25 Yeo Leng Tow,

Canton, 25th March, 1892,

Chiang Chew Hoo,in Amoy, 29th March, 1888,

Do.,

Fung Chün, father and executor,

1,000.00

3,500.00

Administration,

May 5 Robert Graham Ogle..........

Shanghai, 21st March, 1892, Adm. with Expl.

of the Will annexed,

Joseph Rahamin Michael the duly autho- rised attorney of Lim Kin Neo for the use and benefit of the said Lim Kin Neo and until he shall duly apply for Letters of Administration to be granted to him,..... George Alexander Wood the duly autho- rised attorney of Grace Maria Ogle for the use and benefit of the said Grace Maria Ogle and until she shall duly apply for Probate of the Will to be granted to her,

400.00

3,520.00

5 Jacob Benjamin Elias,

::

5 Chan Tsun,

""

11 Alfred Christian Dorff,

H'kong, 8th March, 1892, Fat Shan, in the Empire of China, 4th Feb., 1892, H'kong, 2nd Feb., 1892,

Administration,

Emanuel Raphael Belilios,

1,000.00

"

11 Wan A Cheung,

Canton, 11th March, 1891,

Adm. with the Will annexed, Do.,

Probate,

Leung Ting, the lawful widow and relict

of the deceased,

5,000.00

Julius Kramer, Danish Consul at Hong-

kong,

22,000.00

Li Sing Tin, executor,

5,500.00

"}

161

CALENDAR of PROBATES and ADMINISTRATION, Continued.

Date of

Name of Testator or Intestate.

Time and Place of Death.

Grant,

Probate, Administration with Will annexed, or Administration.

Name and Description of the Executor or Administrator.

Value of Effects as set forth in the Commis- sion of Ap- praisement.

1892.

May 14 Alfred O'Neill Morice,

Westminister, in the County | Adm. with Expl. of Middlesex. England, of the Will

19th Jan., 1892, annexed,

14 Tsang Sau Fat alias Tsang Syu Saukewan, at H'kong,

Fat,

Probate,

3rd April, 1892,

"

14

Chan Tak Shing alias Chan Canton. 28th Sept.,

Keng Ü.

1891,

-21

"1

André Bataillard,

Hongay, in Tonkin,

Do.,

Administration,

27th July, 1891,

21

"

Simah Solomon,

H'kong, 19th April,

"}

21

Francisco Maria de Paula Hynd-

H'kong, 23rd April,

man,

June 1 Virginia Anna Roza do Rozario,.

H'kong, 18th May,

1892, 1892,

1892,

DO.,

9 Antoine Victor Musnier,

Paris, in France,

Do.,

Probate,

Administration,

ti

31st Oct., 1891,

10 Yip Chi alias Yip Chi Wo, 11 Augustus Frederic Thompson,

H'kong, 24th Aug., Shanghai, 9th April,

1890,

1892,

Probate, Adm. with Expl. of the Will

annexed,

William Wotton, the duly authorised attorney of George Knox Morice for the use and benefit of the said George Knox Morice and until he shall duly apply for Probate of the Will to be granted to him.........................

Ko Cho Sam, the widow, and Cheung Kau Mui, daughter-in-law of the de- ceased, for the use and benefit of Tsang Sham Un and until he shall attain the age of 21 years, Chan Tak Choy, brother and Executor,

Georges Gueyraud, Consul for France in Hongkong, as attorney for Alexandre Henckel for the use and benefit of the said Alexandre Henckel and until he shall duly apply for and obtain Letters of Administration, Official Administrator,

Do.,

Augusto José do Rozario and João Joa-

quim Leiria, executors, Guillaume de Champeaux the duly ap-

pointed attorney of Amelia Leontine Lucy Musnier, Victoria Amelia Fou- quet, Alfred Victor Musnier and Al- phonse Lion Musnier for the use and benefit of the aforesaid parties and until they shall apply for Letters of Administration to be granted to them,. Yip Fat, son and executor, Alfred Bulmer Johnson, the duly ap- pointed attorney of Andrew Burman for the use and benefit of the said Andrew Burman and until he shall duly apply for and obtain Probate of

same,

Administration, | Alexandrine Charlotte Mary Elizabeth

Cronon, the lawful widow,................. Chan Woon, the only son,.....

1,100.00

3,100.00 11,000.00

2,100.00 2,700.00

250.00

104,400.00

50,000.00 6,520.00

4,200.00

11

11 Andrew Bartholomeu Cronon,

H'kong, 24th May,

1892,

500.00

17 Chan Ming .................................

H'kong, 10th Jan.,

Francis Waldemar George von London, 30th April,

1892,

1892,

Do.,

Probate,

200.00

Sarah Mayhew von Stockhausen, the law-

ful widow,

300.00

Stockhausen,

27 Ching Ng She,

Koo Hok Village, in Heung Shan, in the Province of Kwong Tung, China,

9th Oct.,

Administration,

Ching Kwong Hung, son,.

4,000.00

1890.

27 Ip Siu Tam,

July 22 Roza Angelica Lopes,.............

Sha Kok, in the Tung Kun District, in the Empire of China, 28th March, 1886, Macao, 28th Feb., 1892,

Do.,

Ip Chow She, the lawful widow,

700.00

Do.,

Canton,

1st June, 1892,

Aug. 9 Cheung Shun Kai alias Cheung | H'kong, 31st May, 1892,

22 Mok Wai,

"

Kai,

9 Richard Woosnam,

"

"

9 Pang Yuk Man,.....

99

11 Wong Iú Ku alias Wong Ip,..............

#9

11 | Chiu Cho Shi alias Chow Yit,

Tyn-y-graig, in the County

of Brecon,

27th Nov., 1888,

Probate, Do.,

Adm. with Expl. of the Will and Codicil annexed,

José Maria de Castro Basto, the duly authorized attorney of Josepha Vi- cencía Lopes for the use and benefit of the said Josepha Vicencia Lopes and until she shall duly apply for and obtain Letters of Administration....... Mok Chong Po, son and executor, Cheung Yam Tsün, only son and executor,

James Jardine Bell-Irving, the duly ap- pointed attorney of Bowen Pottinger Woosnam, Richard Burgess Woosnam and Charles William Woosnam for the use and benefit of the aforesaid parties and until they shall duly apply for Probate of the Will and Codicil to be granted to them,..... Pang Yuk Tseung, brother, and Pang

1887,

Adm. with the Will annexed, Administration,

Ying Un, son,

Wong Ip Ki, brother,

Sept. 2 George Whymark,

""

2 Lo Choo,

2 Wong Wan Sze alias Wong

19

2

""

Wing Cheong,

Claus Sorensen,

2 Kwok Shing Ki,

2 Kwok Cheu Ki,

7 Arnaldo Guilherme Botelho,..

H'kong, 26th Feb.,

Lung Kai Village, Canton, 8th Aug., 1891, Shiu Shing Village, in the Province of Kwong Tung, China, 15th July, 1892, Southampton, in England,

3rd Feb., 1892,

Heung Shan, in the Province

of Kwong Tung, China,

18th July, 1892, Canton, 17th Jan., 1891,

Probate,

Adm. with Expl. of the Will annexed,

Adm. with the Will annexed,

Chiu Cheong, son,

William Wotton, the duly appointed at- torney of Susannah Whymark for the use and benefit of the said Susannah Whymark and until she shall duly apply for and obtain Probate of same, Lo Show, eldest son,

2,453.00 31,400.00 4,000.00

66,000.00

12,000.00

5,000.00

800.00

200.00 3,500.00

Probate,

Wong Him Mook, eldest son,

4,200.00

H'kong, 31st July,

H'kong, 4th July, 1892, Yaumati, H'kong,

16th Sept., 1884, H'kong, 2nd March, 1891, 1892,

Administration,

Official Administrator,

200.00

Do.,

Kwok Hi, son,

1,000.00

. Do.,

Kwok A-chuen, son,

1,000.00

Do.,

Antonio Alexandrino Botelho, brother,

600.00

162

CALENDAR of PROBATES and ADMINISTRATION,- Continued.

Date of

Name of Testator or Intestate.

Time and Place of Death.

Grant.

Probate Administration with Will annexed, or Administration.

Name and Description of the Executor or Administrator.

Value of

Effects as set forth in the Commis- sion of Ap- praisement.

1892.

Oct.

4 Josephine Isabel Ahern,

"

4 George Watson Coutts,

1

Between Yokohama and

H'kong, 2nd Aug., 1892, Shanghai, 1st Oct., 1890,

4 Elijah Hunt Mills Huntington,... Boston, Massachusetts, in

the United States of America,

16th April, 1891,

Probate,

Adm. with Expl. of the Will

annexed, Administration,

Catchick Paul Chater, executor,

Alexander George Wood, one of the exe-

cutors,.

Robert Gordon Shewan, the duly author- ized attorney of Elizabeth Quincy Huntington for the use and benefit of the said Elizabeth Quincy Hunt- ington and until she shall duly apply for and obtain Letters of Adminis- tration of same,........

Ho Shi, mother,

Too Kwok Shi, widow and relict,

25,000.00

180.00

11,000.00

4 Ü Lün,

19

4 Too Chung Pak,

"

10

George Thompson Hopkins,

H'kong, 28th March, 1892, Between H'kong & Canton, 25th June, 1892, H'kong, 2nd Sept., 1892,

Probate, Administration,

300.00

1,600.00

Adm. with the Will and two Codicils annexed,

Official Administrator,

9,000.00

Nov.

7 Domingas da Silva Rozario,

H'kong, 13th April,

1892,

Administration,

Maximiano Jesus dos Passos Rozario,

husband,

100.00

:

7 Frank Neep Jackson,

H'kong, 29th Nov.,

1891,

Adm. with Expl.

Robert Lang, executor,

1,100.00

of the Will annexed,

>

19 Leung Sing Lau,

Canton, 8th May,

1891, Administration,

Leung Wing On and Leung Wing Yin,

"

RAR

29 João Baptista Pereira,

F'kong, 20th July,

29 | Leong Cho Chim,.

H'kong, 14th Oct.,

1892, 1892,

Do.,

sons, Aurelina Pereira, widow,

500,00

1,100.00

Probate,

29 Chan Wai Jan...

Kowloon, H'kong,

19

29 Chan King Chi,

29. David Miller,

$9

29

Wan Tin Ku,

"

80

Cheang Yuk Cheung,.

"

30 Mok Lai Wo,

"

28th Nov., 1890, Kowloon, in the Empire of China, 11th Nov., ~ 1892, Between Hoihow & H'kong, 17th Jan., 1892, H'kong, 3rd Aug., 1889, Aplichow, in the Colony of H'kong, 27th Feb., 1892, Aplichow, in the Colony of H'kong, 24th Feb., 1890,

Administration de bonis non, Probate,

Leong Woon, son and executor, ....... Chan Fong Hin, second eldest son,..

9,000,00

Chan Fong Hin, uterine younger brother,.

600.00

Administration,

Official Administrator,

7,000.00

Do., Probate,

Wan Wong Shi, widow,.................... Cheang Chap Hi, executor,

1,500.00

300.00

Do.,

30 John Hendry,

30 John Scott McDonald,

H'kong, 3rd June,

1892, | Administration,

30 John William Lowson,

H'kong, 30th May, H'kong, 28th June,

1892,

Do.,

1892,

Do.,

Mok Po Yin, son and one of the execu- tors. Power being reserved of grant- ing the like Probate to Mok Lai Yin, the other executor named in the Will when he shall duly apply for same, Official Administrator,

Do., Do..

"

Dec.

5 Leandro Francisco Pereira,

H'kong, 14th Aug.,

1888,

Do.,

Clara Maria Pereira, sister,

600.00

100.00

100.00

200.00

250.00

Registry Supreme Court, Hongkong, 23rd March, 1893.

BRUCE SHEPHERD,

Acting Registrar.

TOTAL

NUMBER

ΤΟΤΑΙ.

NUMBER

OF

OF

CASES.

PRISON-

ERS.

Convicted

and

Punished.

Abstract of Cases under COGNIZANCE of the POLICE MAGISTRATES' COURT during the Year 1892.

CASES, HOW DISPOSED OF, and the NUMBER OF MALE AND FEMALE PRISONERS UNDER EACH HEAD,

Discharged.

Committed

for Trial at

the Supreme

Court.

Committed to Prison, or

Detained pending Orders | of H. E. the

Governor.

To keep

the

Ordered to find Security.*

Peace.

WRITS ISSUED BY THE POLICE MAGISTRATES DURING THE YEAR 1892.

Warrants.

Arrest.

Distress.

Search.

For entering: Gambling

Houses.

Magis- Orders.

trates'

TOTAL,

TOTAL

NUMBER

OF FIRE

ENQUIRY

HELD

DURING THE YEAR 1892.

M.

F. M.

F.

M. F. M.

F. M. F.

M. F.

M.

F.

11,920

14,471 | 11,771 327

1,927

151

40

4

5

10

121

13

67

7

3

*

M. F. M. F. M. F.

28

TOTAL MALES AND FEMALES,

13,969

502

2,600

102

27

130

1,374

423

4,656

10

.14,471

Consisting of Offenders not sentenced to Imprisonment.

163

164

THE CASES CONSISTED OF:-

No. of

OFFENCE.

NO. OF CASES.

PRI-

SONERS.

""

""

Animals-Cruelty to..............

Arms Consolidation Ordinance-Breach of Arson,

Assault-Accompanied with Damage to Property,

-Causing grievous bodily harm,.........................

-Common,

22

22

OFFENCE.

Brought forward,.

51

51

1

2

2

"

2

3

??

-in a Dwelling House,

-Indecent,

714 1,021

6

"

9

"

-Indecent with intent to ravish,..

""

""

11

-On Excise Officers in the execution of their duty, -On Police in the execution of their duty, and

14

28

"1

obstructing and resisting Police,

42

71

-With intent to commit felony,

""

Manslaughter,.

1)

to commit an upnatural Offence,

1

2

"

With wounding,

3

14

Larceny-from the Person,

-from the Person with violence or with wounding, -from the scene of fire,

of Vegetable productions not growing in

Gardens,.

-of Vegetables and Fruits from Gardens and

enclosed places,

Malicious Injury to Electric or Magnetic Telegraph,..

to Property,

Marine Store Dealers--Breach of Ordinance for. Markets Ordinance-Breach of..

31

-Refusing to pay Hire of ....

Breach of the Peace,

Banishment-Returning after

Births & Deaths-Breach of Ordinance for Registration of Boats-Offences as to the numbering of .....

-Refusing to accept Hire when unemployed,...

-Neglecting to take out an anchorage pass,

Bribery, or attempting to bribe,

Burglary,

Brothels-Allowing children above 6 and under 15 years

"}

11

of age to be in a registered........

-Keeping an incorrect list of inmates of regis-

tered

Cattle Diseases Ordinance-Breach of...

37

37

Menaces-Demanding Money by

15

15

Mendicancy,

5

Military Stores-Exportation of

3

Misdemeanour-Aiding and Abetting in.

4

"?

-Attempting to commit

Merchandise Marks. Ordinance-Breach of.

25

25

Murder,

1

12

15

10

No. of

No. of

CASES.

PRI-

SONERS.

4,347 | 6,535

170

188

5

NA

25

12

2

2

11

11

52

52

3

7

4

384

384

10

17

293

293

8

-Unregistered

53

Night-Found in Dwelling Houses by-with intent to

commit Felony therein,

-Noises by Watchmen, &c..

5 Nuisances-Allowing Dirt and Filth to remain on Pre-

mises or in immediate Vicinity thereof,

11

-Blasting Stones to the danger of Persons

and Property,

20

20

&*

290

1

2

""

-Blowing Whistles,

10.

Child Stealing,

12

24

*1

-Boarding Ships, without permission,

124

ཨསྶ

ཨཊྛསྶ

2

10

124

Chinese Territory-Crimes and Offences committed in

7

Coin-Offences relating to.

25

25

Conspiracy to rob,

1

to defraud,

Contempt of Court,

Cutting and Wounding with intent to do grievous bodily

harm,

29

38

Convict Licence-Breach of

1

Crown Land-Building or residing &c. on, not being

under lease,

71

71

Dangerous Goods Ordinance-Breach of...

90

90

11

Hongkong Police,.

British Merchant Ships,

ance,

Decoying-Women or girls into ar away from the Colony, Desertion from Foreign Ships,

Disorderly Behaviour-Fighting and creating a disturb-

Dogs-Allowing unmuzzled ferocious, to be at large, &c., Domestic Servants-Misconduct as

5

13

13

ATL82 18 ONGÕL

+1

-Boats mooring inshore, between the hours of 9 o'clock at night and gunfire in the morning,

106

106

"

-Carrying or exposing Night Soil or Noxious Waters in the Streets in uncovered Buc- kets, and in open Boats along the Praya,... -Creaking wheels,

3

1

13

3

1

-Hanging wet Clothes, &c., to dry over

Public Ways,......

26

""

22

-Keeping Pigs, &c., without a Licence... -Neglecting to clean out Dust Bins, and

7

throwing Rubbish, &c., into the Streets,

74

"

>>

-Obeying Calls of Nature in the Streets,

-Obstructing Fairways,...

77

72

""

550 1,038

9

-Obstruction of Wharves by Boat People,.. -Receiving passengers from a prohibited

Wharf,

-Regulations-Breach of.

16

7222 -8

26

7

74

77

16

3

10 00

LO CO

3

21

21

Drugs-Administering

2

-Rough Dressing, &c., of Granite in or near

a Public place,

1

1

Drunkenness,

75

75

-Throwing Rubbish into the Harbour or on

Decoying-Men or boys into or away from the Colony, or imprisoning or detaining them for the

the Beach,

35

35

purpose of emigration or for any purpose

Obstruction of Roads and Streets, &c., by Hawkers, Chair Coolies and Shopkeepers,

whatsoever,

23

27

Desertion-Assisting Royal Marine in...

Disorderly Behaviour-While Drunk,

136

136

""

Embezzlement,

6

Embracery,

3

6

""

Escape of Prisoners from Gaol,

I

9:

or attempting to escape from Custody

of Police,

3

"}

Imprisonment,

Extortion or attempting to extort under colour of office,... False Charge-Preferring-or giving wilful false evidence,

Pretences-obtaining Goods and Money by.......... Falsification of Accounts,

7

3172

Licence,

38

44

19

1

Felony-Attempting to commit

20

20

19

""

-Aiding and abetting in

2

Offensive Weapons-Having Possession of

Opium Ordinance-Breach of Prepared

Ordinance-Breach of Raw..

Passage--Obtaining surreptitiously a

-Found on board a Passenger Ship with intent

to obtain a

Passengers-Carrying in Excess of that allowed by

Passes-Chinese out at Night without.

Pawnbrokers-Breach of Ordinance for

Police-Assuming Name, Designation, &c., of Constable of

-Handing Opium, &c., to persons while in custody

of...

-Negligently allowing a prisoner to escape,...

Police Constables-Misconduct as

1,619 | 1,619

11

11

893 1,108

62

66

34

34

1

1

13

13

78

78

cod d

1

1

Fire Works-Discharging without permits,

236

236

Quarantine Regulations-Breach of

Forging a receipt for money with intent to defraud,.

1

1

Rape.........

Forged Instrument-Obtaining goods &c., by

5

5

Receiving Stolen Goods,

Bank Notes-Having possession of

2

Recognisances-Breach of

28

41

41

41

Furious Driving,

23

23

Roads and Streets-Injury to

Forcible keeping a person with intent to procure a benefit

for his liberation,

Robbery From the Person,...

2

4

"

Fugitive Offenders-Offences against

1

1

Gambling Ordinance-Breach of.

6711,837

Gaols-Breach of Ordinance for.

5

5

-From the Person with Wounding or with

Violence,

-On the Highways with Arms or with Violence, Rogues & Vagabonds-Gambling in the Street,

Gaol's Subordinate Officers-Misconduct as

1

1

Harbour-Dredging at Anchorage for Ships of War in the

Regulations--Breach of ..............

28

28

""

??

37

37

Hawker's Licence Board-Neglecting to exhibit in a

conspicuous place.....

**

"

House Breaking,.

741

7

-As suspicious Characters, -Exposing for sale indecent Pic-

tures,

85

85

1

1

-Wandering abroad and lodging

in the open air,

17

17

5

5

14

14

05 6 6 18

Householders-Breach of Ordinance for Registration of Indecent Exposure of Person by Bathing or otherwise,

and Lewdness,..

Junk-Neglecting to furnish particulars respecting cargo, Larceny-as Servant,

35

-Common,

-from Ships or Boats in the Harbour,

Carried forward,.......

4 Ships, &c.-Leaving Harbour without a Clearance...

-Leaving Anchorage during prohibited hours, -Neglecting to deposit at the Harbour Office a list of passengers within 24 hours after arrival,

1

""

>>

7

7

1

1

""

1,102 1,219

"

12 14

-Neglecting to have a riding light on board,.. -Not having certificated Master,

Shooting with intent to do Grievous Bodily Harm,

4,347 6,535

Carried forward,..........

1

171

171

1

3

9,015 11,478

2

CASES,-Continued.

165

OFFENCE.

Brought forward,

Spirit Licences Ordinance-Breach of...... Spirituous Liquors-Sale on board Ship,..

Stones and other Missiles-Discharging to Danger of

Persons and Property,

Streams-Defiling,

Streets-Noises by Hawkers,

Stolen Property-Taking a Reward for helping to the recovery of-without bringing the Offender to trial,

No. of CASES.

No. of

PRI- SONERS.

OFFENCE.

No. of

No. of PRI-

CASES. SONERS.

9,015 11,478

Brought forward,.....

9,992 12,519

9

9 Unlicensed-Auctioneer,

1

-Cargo Boats,

7

7

-Hawkers,

1,346 1,346

""

1

-Junks,

6

6

22

41

27

22

-Coffee Shop,

1

1

41

-Plying of Boats for Hire,

197

197

""

-Seamen's Boarding Houses,

3

3

"1

"

Small-Pox-Neglecting to report a Case of...

Suicide-Attempting to commit

13

13

-Using of Sand Boats,.... -Using of Boats as Dwelling Houses, 1 Unwholesome Provisions-Exposing

ing into the Colony

3

3

21

21

for Sale, or bring-

26

26

Trees, &c.-Cutting and destroying,. Trespass on Crown Land,.

123

325

123 Vehicles-Offences against Public 325 Vaccination Ordinance-Breach of

209

209

1

Tramways Ordinance-Breach of Unlawful Possession of Property,

382

"

of Trees, Shrubs, &c.,....................

49

3 Vagrancy Ordinance-Breach of 146 Watchmen-Misconduct as Fire Brigade.

49 Weights and Measures-Breach of Ordinance for

Women and Girls Protection Ordinance-Breach of

33

33

2

2

34

34

38

62

Carried forward..............

9,992 12,519

TOTAL,........

11,920 14,471

H. E. WODEHOUSE, Police Magistrate.

Magistracy, Hongkong, 17th January, 1893.

ABSTRACT of CASES brought under COGNIZANCE at the POLICE MAGISTRATES' COURT during a period of Ten Years, from 1st January, 1883, to 31st December, 1892, inclusive.

CASES, HOW DISPOSED OF, AND THE NUMBER OF MALE AND FEMALE PRISONERS UNDER EACH HEAD.

Committed to Prison or detained pending Orders of His Excellency

To keep the Peace,

TOTAL NUMBER

YEARS

OF CASES.

Convicted and Punished.

Discharged.

Committed for Trial at Supreme Court.

Ordered to find Security.

Punished for

Preferring

Total

False Charge Undecided.

Number

the Governor.

to be of Good Beha- viour, and to answer

any Charge.

or giving False Testimony.

of

Defendants.

2

3

5

6

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M. F.

M. F.

M.

F.

1883,

10,653

8,127 670

2,398

349

121

1884,

14,065 11,748 1,088

2,294 268

101

1885,

10,281

7,951 849

2,188 258

159

1886,

14,611 | 12,081 842 2,198 190

157

1887,.

12,015 10,354 325 2,620 159

158

00

8

· 37

1

154

62

Co

6

160

11

11,003 1,101

N

35

3

228

53

Co

6

2

105

2

14,517 1,418

11

3

357

99

6

18

10,690 | 1,211

~

10

5

869

100

32

3

168

15,510 | 1,137

28

4

411

52

14

48

13,633 549

Total,...... 61,625 50,261 3,774 | 11,698 1,224

696

23

116

11

2,019

366

64

5 499

13

t

65,353 5,416

Average per

Year,

|12,325-0 |10,052 2754 82,339 6244.8

139.2

4.6 23.2

2.2

403.8

732

12.8

1.0 99.8

2.6

13,070 6 (1,083.2

1888,

11,647 9,700 232 2,704 145

168

6

.1889,

8,670 6,626 268 2,319

178

157

10

888

98

11

177

15

3

48

2

12,898 411

44

10

303

34

17

64

8

9,530 503

1890,

9,739 7,423 317 2,406

151

102

115

259

59

3

35

2 10,243 529

1891,

13,676❘ 13,438 534 1,906

134

40

12

153

19

1

143

15,693 689

1892,.

11,920 11,771 327 1,927 151

40

4

10

191

20

7

28

13,969 502

Total,...... 55,652 48,958 1,678 | 11,262

759

507 20 174

21

1,083

147

31

318

Co

62,333 2,634

Average per

Year,

11,130-49,791.6 335-6 | 2,252-4151-8

101.4 4.0

34.8

4.2

216.6

29 4

6.2

63.6

18. 12,466.6 | 526·8

Grand Total 117,277 99,2195,152 22,960 1,983

for 10 Years,

1,203 43 290

32

3,102

513

95

5

817

22

127,686 8,050

Year,

Average per 11,727-79,921.9 545-2 2,296.0 198.3

120-3

4.3 29.0

3.2

310.2

51:3

Magistracy, Hongkong, 17th January, 1893.

9.5

125

30

5.0 81.7

2-2

12,768 6805.0

H. E. WODEhouse, Police Magistrate.

166

NATIONALITY.

3

MAGISTERIAL ENQUIRIES INTO DEATHS.

TABLE A.-RETURN OF ALL DEATHS REPORTED DURING THE YEAR 1892.

Europeans and Americans,

Indians and Malays,.....

Japanese,

Chinese,..

Formal Enquiries held.

Buried without Formal Enquiries.

Men. Women. Boys. Girls. Total. Men. Women. Boys. Girls.

Very much decomposed; sex not ascertainable.

9

3

1

32

#

6

Total.

9

13

3

1

cr:

5

47

2-2

1

14

1

:::

1

73

14

117

82

10

296

Total,

45

4

6

Co

5

10

60

87

14

118

82

10

311

Total for 1891,

48

5

2

4

59

126

13

103

79

I-

7

328

TABLE B.-RETURN OF FORMAL ENQUIRIES DURING THE YEAR 1892.

FINDING.

Indians and Malays.

Chinese.

167

Tota

Men.

Men.

Men. Men. Women. Boys.

Girls.

77

2

2

11

1

1

1

1

1

3.

2

6

1

:

1

1

-:

1

::

1

1

:

: :

1

1

1

...

...

4

...

:

:

:.

:

:..

1

:

1

::

:.

:

1

1

1

...

1

4:

:~:

2

1

1

1

1

...

F:

:

:

:

1

1

1

1

:

:

:.

:

:

1

1

Accidental death,

Do.,

and woman cautioned to have the bar put

across the window,...............

Accidental death by burning,

Accidental death from injuries received by fire,...................

Accidentally drowned, .....

Cause of death haemorrhage from rupture of the spleen, Cause of death haemorrhage resulting from self-inflicted wounds, Cause of death haemorrhage resulting from rupture of left formal

artery. RIDER:-That some prevention should be taken to prevent the Chinese from wandering over the rifle ranges during practice or approaching skirmishing parties, Cause of death failure of heart due to disease, Death by drowning consequent upon the capsizing of the boat in which the deceased was, the said boat coming into collision with the S.S. Pauting when attempting to cross her bows at the time that the said steamer was going dead slow and making for her buoy in Hongkong Harbour, Death from natural causes,

Death from hemorrhage resulting from rupture of the spleen.... Death from a dose of carbolic acid self-administered, Death from narcotic poisoning,...

Death from injuries consequent upon a fall from a bridge on

Kennedy Road,

Death from rupture of the intestine occasioned by injuries sustained in a fall while attempting to escape from the Police who were at the time executing a warrant on a suspected gambling house,

Death from poisoning but whether administered each to each or by one to the other there is no sufficient evidence to show, Death from syncope occasioned by a fall into the water from a

height of about fifty feet,

Death from peritonitis occurring from natural causes, Death from hanging,

Death from opium poisoning self-administered,

Death from pneumonia resulting from self-inflicted wounds in

the throat,

Death from a fall while attempting to escape from the Police

who had entered the house on a gambling warrant, Death from syncope incurred while bathing off Hung Hom

Dock in Victoria Harbour,

Death from injuries received from a blow from a stone pro-

jected from a rock during blasting,

Death occasioned from injuries received from the falling of a party wall upon No. 8, Fuk On Lane, thereby causing it to collapse and its ruins to fall upon the deceased. The falling of the party wall occasioned by the pressure of earth against it, such earth having been piled against it in order to make an approach to a new house in course of erection belonging to a woman named Chung Shi,.......... Death resulted from acute moist gangrene occasioned by injuries received from a fall while endeavouring to escape from lawful custody, .... Death resulted from injuries sustained by the plough steel rope coming against the deceased through a mistake of the pointsman at the time in charge of the points,... Death resulted from injuries received from falling into the

hold of the J. D. Bischoff,

Death resulted from injuries received from a blow on the temple supposed to have been inflicted by a man named Tsoi Yin alias Mak Yau,

Deceased died from the effects of a bullet wound self-inflicted, Found drowned,...

......

Found dead in the Harbour of Victoria floating in the water, That the deceased died from the effects of wounds inflicted by

some person or persons unknown,

That the deceased died while in Victoria Gaol on a remand warrant, such death being occasioned by asphyxia caused by the act of the deceased in hanging himself,

The deceased died from the effects of a bullet wound self-

inflicted during a temporary aberration of reasons,.

Wilful murder against person or persons unknown,

Total,.........

:

:

:

:

...

:

:

1

1

:

:

2

1

2

1

1

1

1

1

1

:

:

:

:

:

1

:

:.

9

1

:

:

:

:.

1

:21

:

3

లు

1

1

I

1

I

1

1

3

1

:

1

:

:

:

:.

1

2

4

1

4

6

5

60

1

32

122

38

TABLE C.-RETURN OF BURIALS WITHOUT FORMAL ENQUIRIES DURING THE YEAR 1892.

Reason why no Formal Enquiry was held.

› suspicious circumstances...

› evidence and/or decomposed state ofĮ

Body,

1st Mortem satisfactory,

Europeans

& Americans.

Men. Boys. Men.

Women.

Chinese.

Japanese.

Very much

de- composed;

Found on

Land.

Found on

Harbour.

Total.

Boys. Girls.

Men,

sex not ascertain- able.

3393

Known.

Un-

known.

Knowl.

Un-

known.

10

1 60

11

12

2

97

€3

13

15

1

105

80

10

201

164

1

36

...

3

00

8

2

13

:

:

:

:

10

0

Total,..

13

1

73

14 117

Magistracy, 10th January, 1893.

}

:

122

$2

1

10

311

73

178

16

44

H. E. WODehouse,

Police Magistrate.

1

75

No.

3

93

HONGKONG.

REPORT OF THE GOVERNMENT CENTRAL SCHOOL FOR GIRLS FOR 1892.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor, on the 25th January, 1893.

No. 5.

EDUCATION DEPARTMENT, HONGKONG, 20th January, 1893.

SIR,—I have the honour to submit the Annual Report of the Government Central School for Girls for the year 1892.

2. I entirely concur with the observations of the Headmistress, Mrs. BATEMAN, to whose patient industry and wise discretion the success so far obtained is largely due. The Annual Examination has shewn satisfactory results as stated in the enclosed report. Good progress has been made in both the English and Chinese classes, and the moral tone of the whole School has been considerably raised.

3. The School is in urgent need of enlarged accommodation and a corresponding increase in the staff, but, I am afraid, both these wants will have to remain unsatisfied until the close of the present year when the building, now in course of construction at the expense of the Honourable E. R. BELILIOS, will become available.

I have the honour to be,

The Honourable G. T. M. O'BRIEN, C.M.G.,

Colonial Secretary, &c., &c.

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

E. J. EITEL, Ph. D., Inspector of Schools.

GOVERNMENT CENTRAL SCHOOL FOR GIRLS, HONGKONG, 20th January, 1893.

SIR, I have the honour to forward the Third Annual Report of the Government Central School for Girls.

At the close of the year 1892, there were 93 children in regular attendance. The present building is too small to accommodate more children without positive over-crowding. Teachers and scholars alike are therefore eagerly anticipating the comfort and advantages they will derive in the near future from the commodious and handsome new building now so rapidly nearing completion.

As many as 139 children have been entered on the Register during the year and attended for some time. Some, however, remained in the School but a short period. This is chiefly owing to the fluctuating character of that portion of the population of Hongkong for which this School is specially intended. The attendance of those whose parents remain in the Colony has been most regular, and their diligence very satisfactory. The School is periodically visited and annually examined by the Inspector of Schools, and the results of the examination have been pronounced satisfactory, particularly in English Grammar, Composition, Arithmetic and History. The Chinese classes, attendance at which is optional, have been appreciated by the parents, but it is difficult to find suitable teachers for girls. The needlework classes, for both English and Chinese work, have been well attended and special tuition has been secured for Chinese embroidery for which there is great demand.

It is evident that the School has made some progress in its several divisions, and particularly in the infant department. Judging from the fact that all classes of the community are now represented among the scholars and that the attendance is on a level with the capabilities of our accommodation and staff, I am satisfied that the School is popularly appreciated as answering a public want. Nevertheless I feel that the development of the School has been somewhat interfered with by various difficulties it encountered during the year. There have been several changes in the teaching staff. In April Mrs. LEONG, Assistant Mistress of the Lower School and MILLY LEONG pupil teacher of the same, resigned their positions. These vacancies were most ably filled by Mrs. DAVIS and LIZZIE TURNER respectively. In December, greatly to my regret, Mrs. DAVIS also resigned in order to accept an appointment in Singapore which had been offered to her and which, she felt, gave her a wider sphere of usefulness. Mrs. TUTCHER, a Certificated Infant Mistress, has been appointed to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of Mrs. DAVIS. Similar changes have occurred also in the Chinese department of the School. The progress and expansion of the Institution has naturally been impeded by these

I have the honour to be,

fluctuations in the Staff and in the attendance of the School.

The Honourable G. T. M. O'BRIEN, C.M.G.,

Colonial Secretary, &c., &c.

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

*

E. A. BATEMAN,

Headmistress.

HONGKONG.

REPORT OF THE HEAD MASTER OF THE VICTORIA COLLEGE FOR 1892.

101

No.

8

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor, on the 8th March, 1893.

93

No. 17.

VICTORIA COLLEGE, HONGKONG, 8th February, 1893.

SIR,-I have the honour to forward the Annual Report on Victoria College for the year 1892.

1. The total number on the College Roll for the year was 1,062; the greatest number present on one day being 852, (as opposed to 905 in 1891). In spite of this decrease, the attendance continues to be far in excess of the 700 estimated by the late Dr. STEWART in 1881, and of the 770 estimated by myself in 1887 as the probable accommodation required in the new building. The number of school days, 237, shows a gain of a week on last year's statistics, and is the highest figure reached

since 1885.

2. The following tables will illustrate the condition of the College during the last five years :--

YEAR.

Average

Total Number of Scholars.

Number of

Monthly Enrolment.

School days.

Daily Attendance.

Maximum.

Minimum.

L

1888, 1889,

1890, 1891, 1892,

1888,

1889,

1890, 1891,

1892,

634

229

536

384

467

919

233

789

466

597

1,075

236

890

683

758

1,108

231

932

712

759

1,062

237

862

700

728

Average

Number

YEAR.

of School Boys Examined.

Percentage

School

Actual Nett

of

Fees.

Expenditure.

Passes.

$

$

Expense of each

Scholar per Average Daily Attendance.

445

94.15

6,899.00

12,384.14

26.48

676

95.41

9,338.00

15,018.20

25.11

692

89.45

11,912.50

19,222.46

25.34

709

90.26

12,257.77

18,158.60

23.92

671

96.12

12,342.00

19,741.43

27.09

3. Attendance.-As my remarks on this head last year were misunderstood, as relating quite a new experience, I must explain that, though I first drew attention to this point last year, the short school-life of too many of our scholars has always been a matter of regret. Take for example, at random, the year 1885; out of a total number of 596, there were 205 admissions and 210 departures, ie., roughly speaking, one-third of the scholars was changed, precisely as was the case last year. The natural consequence is that at the end of the year we can only present for examination the remaining two-thirds; which has been the average for the last ten years, as a glance at the figures in paragraph 2 of my Reports will testify. Few boys stay more than a year in the highest class, while owing to the higher education now given in the Second and Third Classes, many boys are able to obtain situations without entering the First Class at all.

4. EDUCATIONAL EMULATION.--Five years ago I uttered a note of warning on this subject. (Gazette, 1888, p. 159., par. 11.). A certain amount of emulation amongst scholars may be healthful, but emulation among masters (even in the same school) is prejudicial to the interests of education. Sympathy and affectionate interest are the mainspring of true education. Schoolmasters are but human; if the results of competitions are the only test of success in education, it cannot but be that the quiet judicious training of each boy will, in the excitement of contest, be sacrificed to the working np of a machine to the highest point of tension. No two schools in the Colony work under the same conditions; I would go further and say that no two years does the same school find itself in a precisely

102

similar situation as to advantages or hindrances. The greater success of one year does not transform the more average attainments of succeeding years into failure. This being so, all comparisons between schools should be avoided on principle. Every school in the Colony is doubtless doing its best to further education, and no man or institution can do more. Let it be granted that all the schools stand upon this common platform of excellence and no particular school on a solitary pinnacle. The successes of one school may one year appear to suggest that it is absolutely the best, but this hasty judgment is checked by the above consideration of varying conditions. During the last few years there has been some indication of a decrease of harmony among the various schools of this Colony. This is not due to the introduction of the Government Scholarship, Local Examinations, Belilios Medals, &c., but to the unwise application of the results of these as a criterion whereby the system of each school, the energy and ability of each master, is to be adjudged as above or below the standard of competency. The only sense in which a school should admit fighting to be a duty incumbent upon it, is that every school is a company belonging to the vast army that battles all over the world against ignorance and crime. If the great victory is to be achieved it will surely not be by means of petty jealousies and internecine conflicts among the various regiments of the army.

the various regiments of the army. Let them fight side by side and not turn their swords against each other.

5. EDUCATIONAL THEORIES.--It is a trite and true saying that an ounce of practice is worth a ton of theory. Left in charge of a nephew and niece of tender years, the profound philosopher HERBERT SPENCER found his theory of education impracticable even for a few hours. The chief error of theorists on education would appear to be relegating to the schoolmaster the influence of parents, and the duty of developing the infantile mind which was assigned by nature to the mother. As regards Victoria College its singular conditions require a system of its own. With boys of 14 to 20 years of age at admission, who only stay in school from four to six years, the Head Master is unable to adopt ready made theories of FROEBEL, RAUB or other celebrated educationists, whose systems postulate a curriculum of 10 to 15 years and a commencement of school-life about the age of seven.

6. COST OF BUILDING.-Neither Dr. STEWART nor myself is responsible for the excessive outlay in the erection of this College. We were both advocates for a plain commodious building. Such items as $10,000 for a lead roof and $7,000 for monolith pillars formed no part of our conception of neces- sities for a school-building. It should also not be forgotten that the estimated value (at least $80,000 in 1888) of the old Central School should be deducted from the gross cost of the new building, as it was always understood that on the evacuation of the Central School the site was to be sold to partially cover the cost of its substitute.

7. COST OF ESTABLISHMENT.-A rate of per cent. on the house rental of the Colony would defray the expenses of Victoria College, whereas a Board School rate of 5 per cent. is very common in England, which is additional to the grant-in-aid paid out of the taxes. It is sometimes urged that Victoria College is chiefly for the benefit of the Chinese and that its maintenance falls heavily on the ratepayers of Hongkong. In the first place per cent. is not a heavy rate, and secondly the argument overlooks the large preponderance of Chinese ratepayers in the Colony. As one-ninth of the scholars are non- Chinese it would appear that the cost of maintenance is pretty equitably distributed among the rate- payers; for though Europeans possess one-third of the rateable property in the Colony a large portion of this European property is occupied by Chinese who are the real ratepayers, their European landlords of course recovering all rates from their tenants.

8. COST OF SCHOOL MATERIAL.-The charge of fees during the holiday months of February and August was specially made in 1884 to cover this expense, and has ever since amply effected its object, with a balance in favour of the Treasury.

9. STAFF. The number of masters, English and Chinese, now on the staff was recommended by me in a special report to the Government in 1887, and approved as absolutely necessary by a Commission consisting of Dr. STEWART, Dr. EITEL, and myself. During the past year Messrs. BOOTH and BOARDS returned to England at the end of their three years' agreement; and Messrs. MACHELL and Watts were appointed provisionally as their successors. Mr. MACHELL is an enthusiast in matters connected with education, and labours in and out of school hours for the good of his boys and the prestige of the College. Mr. DEALY was absent on leave throughout the year.

10. NON-CHINESE BOYS.-I have long observed that non-Chinese boys have suffered great disadvantage in being placed in large classes of Chinese boys, generally five years or more older than themselves. They felt disheartened by their inability to cope on equal terms with their seniors, and being in a small minority were, in spite of the best intention of their masters, liable to be overlooked. In the Central School their numbers did not justify me in forming special classes for their behoof. At the opening of this school-year, however, I formed two sections, Classes I. C and III. C, composed entirely of boys not in Chinese dress, and the benefits accruing from this arrangement are already evident.

11. COLLOQUIAL ENGLISH.-Three years ago in my report (Gazette, 1890, p. 426, par. 8) I pointed out that the great need in the College was some stimulus without which boys, who are only day-scholars and never speak a word of English out of school-hours, cannot be expected to acquire the art of speak ing

>

103

A

English. On my arrival, in 1882, I found the subject, colloquial English, set down on the time table for one hour a week on Saturdays. I looked forward to it with interest, but discovered that even in the able hands of Mr. FALCONER the so-called conversation was a lecture, occasionally varied by the interjection on the part of the pupils of affirmative or negative monosyllables. When the Time Table was remodelled this hour was allotted to other subjects, as the object intended did not appear to be attained. This year, however, I hope I have discovered the needed stimulus both for scholar and master, in making colloquial English a subject of examination for prize purposes. When a boy finds himself, say fifth, in a class where but for loss of marks in conversation he would have been first, there can be no doubt that all ambitious boys will awake to the necessity of speaking English. The sixth class is the lowest in which boys can attempt making spoken English sentences; here then we begin, and each boy is required after reading a passage to reply to questions and suggestions upon what he has been reading. This custom, previously in vogue as an exercise of intelligence, is now definitely employed as a channel for leading to conversation. High marks are only given where rarer intelligence is displayed in the form and nature of the replies. In the higher classes the questions roam widely over any field within the range of thought of the scholars. As evidence of the thoroughness of the examination it is well to state that ten days are absorbed in assigning marks to this subject jointly with Reading.

12. CHINESE EXAMINATIONS.-Chinese essay-writing may be compared to Latin or Greek verse at English schools. Neither of them is in itself of real service in daily after-life, the exercise is mecha- nical, and the pupils who develop talent over it are few; it still remains a test of scholarship and of knowledge of rules of composition, and as such is considered part of a gentleman's training. There would, however, appear to be no searching test of the bulk of the work done in the year. I therefore enquired of my Chinese assistants whether there were nothing in Chinese examinations corresponding to a literature or Shakespeare paper, at the local examinations. The result of my enquiry has been the introduction of a few test questions (King Ku) on the classical Chinese which they have read

in the course of the year, but which has hitherto remained untested.

13. DISCIPLINE.---The discipline in English school continues exemplary; the cane is but rarely requisitioned, and that chiefly in the Preparatory school, where newcomers are unaccustomed to laws of sudordination. The cheerful happy spirit that pervades the classrooms is made subject of congra- tulation by every casual visitor. In Chinese school, too, the maintenance of discipline seems to have as nearly reached perfection as can be expected. Any old master, who can with me remember the old days at the Central School, when an audible "hush," often initiated by the Chinese master, announced the approach of the English master in charge suddenly checking the murmur of conversation and laughter in the classroom, would be astonished at the decorum and orderliness now prevalent, whenever a surprise visit is made.

14. COMMERCIAL EDUCATION.-Victoria College has not ignored the modern tendency in this direction. For three years Bookkeeping, with lessons on commercial phraseology, has formed a part of the annual work, in addition to commercial arithmetic (discount, interest, exchange, shares, &c.) which has never been neglected. Last March over 120 boys were attending lessons in bookkeeping, and last July a Chinese boy from this College was one of the few, out of all England, that passed in this subject at the Oxford Local Senior Examinations. As regards Shorthand, I am opposed to its introduction simply on the ground that the phonetic principle involved would cause irreparable confusion in the minds of boys to whom the eccentricities of English spelling are still a sufficient difficulty. Typewriting can from the nature of the case never become a class subject.

15. OXFORD LOCAL EXAMINATIONS.-Six out of the eight candidates from this College passed last July. As the three Chinese candidates all passed, I hope that larger numbers will offer in the future; the chief hindrance is the entrance fee, $7.50, which is a serious consideration to most of our aspirants.

16. RECREATION.--A considerable improvement is noticeable in the drill this year. Understanding the great interest His Excellency the Governor takes in this matter, the senior boys (or rather men) have to some extent overcome their national prejudice to physical exercise, which they view as undig- nified. The juniors have, however, taken to it con amore; and in two or three years' time, drill may be expected to have become universally popular throughout the College. Through Mr. MACHELL'S energy the former spasmodic efforts at cricket and football have been systematised. Mr. BARLOW organised some excursions by land and water, including a visit to the City Hall Museum. The advantages derived by this lively interest in scholars out of school-hours cannot be over-estimated, both for its effect on developing intelligence, and for its moral influence.

17. ANNUAL EXAMINATION.--In accordance with the suggestion of the Inspector of Schools in his report of last year, his annual inspection of the College has been transferred to the month of July. The annual examination, thus left under the sole control of the Head Master, has been conducted strictly on the same lines as in the past ten years. Half marks constitute a pass in any single subject; a class pass consists of passing in at least half the subjects offered by the class. The number of class subjects thus offered is as follows :-Preparatory School, six; Lower School, ten; Upper School,

104

fourteen.

A boy must pass in three, five, and seven subjects respectively to secure a pass, which is by no means a lenient requirement. It must be understood that a considerable proportion pass in every subject offered, while minimum passes are very rare. The total number present for examination was 671, of whom 645, or 96 per cent., passed, which is the highest percentage since 1887. The three sections of the College are thus represented :--

Upper School 179 boys examined,

294

29

Lower Preparatory 198

>>

90% passed

97%

.........100%

19

22

As the corresponding passes last year were respectively 92, 84, and 99, it will be seen at once that the great gain is in the Lower School. Nor is this to be wondered at, the failure of 30 boys last

year in the three sections of Class V. has now been succeeded by the remarkably good result of only three failures. I attribute the great improvement this year to the fact that masters have devoted more direct attention to the weaker portions of their classes, the necessity of this having been emphasised by last year's results.

years.

The whole staff, English and Chinese, deserves the greatest credit for the excellent work presented.

To particularise, the work of the Preparatory School has maintained the high level of previous As just stated, the success of the Lower School has entirely removed the disgrace of last year's failure in Class V.; each class has done excellently, but Classes IVA, IVB, and Vв are conspicuous above the rest, for high tone of work as well as high percentages. In the Upper School IA, IĨA, and IIIA have sustained the excellent reputation of last year; IIIB has done as well as its material (the lowest boys promoted from Class IV) will admit of; Ic, and IIIc, the new classes of non-Chinese boys, have had great difficulties to contend with, and the upper sections have done very well, while the half dozen boys at the head of Ic have distinguished themselves by thoughtful papers and neat work; the lower sections of these classes and IB appear, however, to have suffered from an attempt to drag them up to the level of their seniors, which has resulted in an inability to cope with even easy questions.

18. The usual tables of number of boys examined and passed in each subject, also of percentages of passes, are here subjoined; the bottom line of figures on Table II. gives the total result of last year, making the advance of this year very observable.

TABLE I.-NUMBER OF BOYS PASSED IN EACH SUBJECT, 1892.

CLASS.

Total No. Examined.

Total No. Passed.

Reading.

Arithmetic.

Dictation.

English to Chinese.

Chinese to English.

Grammar.

Colloquial,

Geography.

Map Drawing.

I.A., I.B.,

10

18

O∞

9

10 6 8 9

I.C.,

II.,

III.A.,

40

III.B.,

16 17 7 15 25 19 24 8 17 39 38 39 26 28 35 38 40 33 36 39 21-19 20 8 18 21

97

8 10 10

10 3

9

8

18 17 8 16 11

17

1 15

15

III.C.,

26 22

26 18 22

10 23 13 38 35 37 26 33 26 34 31 18 12 12 13 5 20 21

20 18 12 16 13

38 35 35 31 40 35 26 32 20 12 12 20

Co

Algebra.

Euclid.

History.

Latin.

General Intelligence.

:: Book-keeping.

Shakespeare.

9

8

8

17

17

14

27

22

24

20 14

...

...

...

IV.A.,

39 39

39 34 33 36

39

30 27 33 37

37

...

...

...

IV.B.,

24 24 23

IV.C.,

30 29

V.A.,

28 42 40 41 37 28

21 20 24 22 27

24

20 22 21 23 22

28

29

22 23 25

38

37

32 16 36 39

V.B.,

27 27 27 25 22

25

26 27 18 25

V.C.,

VI.A.,

VI.B.,

VI.C.,

VII.A.,

VII.B.,

VII.C.,

43 43 40

29 28 29 25 26

28 45 43 42 34 28 37 42 34 27 44 25 24 24 18 23 24 23 18 33 32 32 28 29 33 33 29 35 35 35

33 33 33 32 35 26 26

26

25 23 23 26 26 40

27

24 26 26

27 32

VIII.A.,

49

49

48

39 33

37 39 49 44 38

46

Writing. N

21 22 23

49

*******~::::

...

30 30

...

36

...

...

24 24

23 27

...

43

32

Trigonometry,

Drawing,-

...

Model, .......17

17

Chemistry,.....

9

8

3

2

SPECIAL SUBJECTS.

Exd. Passed.

Free-hand, ...42 35

VIII.B.,

35

35 35 35 35 35

30

VIII.C.,

10 10 10 10 10 10

8

34 10

Total,.......

671 645| 655 541 | 558 | 573| 575|440 || 359 389 | 274 345|104|109|142|27|

:: 8

61

47 30

Examined in each Subject,

...

671 671 671|671620|620 | 577 | 473 | 473|294|370|153153179) 51

92

67 53

1,

2,

3,

TABLE II.—PERCENTAGE OF PASSES IN EACH SUBJECT, 1892.

105

Class.

I.A.,

10

90100

60

80

90

90

80100100

I.B.,

18

89

94 39 83 100

94 44 89

I.C.,

25

76

96 32 68

40

92

II.,

39

97 100 67 72 90.

97

90

III.A.,

40

95 100 82 90 97 82 65

III.B.,

21 90 95

38

86 100

86

57 57

III.C.,

26 85 100

69

85

19 77 81

IV.A.,

39 100 100

88

85

92100

77 70 85 95

IV.B.,

24. 100 96

87

83 100 100

83

92

Total No. Examined.

Total per Cent. Passed.

Arithmetic.

888 Reading.

Dictation.

Translation to Chinese.

3 Translation to English.

Grammar.

Colloquial.

Geography.

Map Drawing.

Composition.

Algebra.

::: 888 Euclid.

...

...

...

...

...

77

54

::

...

8482

90

80 90

44 94 39

52 68

79 56

...

History.

Latin.

General Intelligence.

Book-keeping.

Shakespeare.

100

30

90

80

61

94 5 83

83

52

80 72

48

64

67

97

90

90 80

717

100

87

80

...

62

95

57

95

92

95

...

87 96

92

IV.C.,

30 97 93

73

90 93 97

73

77

83

100 100

...

...

V.A.,

42

95 98

88

66

90

88 76

38

86 93 86

...

V.B.,

27 100 100

92

81

92

96 100

67

92

89

89

...

...

...

V.C.,

29 96 100 86

90

93

96 83

90

90

79

93

...

VI.A.,

VI.B.,

VI.C.,

VII.A.,...........

VII.B.,.......

45 95 93 25 96 96 72 33 97 97 85 35100 100.94 26 100 100 96

75

62 82

93 75

66

98 95

...

...

92 96 92 88 100 100 88 94 94 91 100

72

84 88 92

...

...

***

82

97

97

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

89

VII.C.......

43 100 93 91

77

89 100 100 93 86 91

VIII.A.,

VIII.B.,

VIII.C.,

49 100 98 100 90 7. 94 35 | 100 | 100 100 100 100 86 10 100 | 100 | 100 | 100 | 100

80

1892,

671

1891,

709

95

96

98

90

88333

81 83 92 93 76 76 94 82 75. 81 84 71

8888

100 97 100

...

...

...

82

93 93

75 71 72

: : : : : : 8 5

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

68

71

80 53

66 70

86

71

77

40

64 72

བ།:

...

4,.

5,

6,......

TABLE III-CHINESE EXAMINATION, 1892.

CHINESE SCHOOL. Percentage Table of Passes.

Total No.

Class.

Examined.

Essay.

Letter.

King-ku.

Prosody.

Tui-tui.

Total Percentage Passed.

* 5 5 8 7 8

58

91

57

88

67

91

52

81

57

91

53

81

53

75

63

70

7,

8,

Total,........

460

a y a 2 2 2 2 8

88

64

60

77

90

72

63

35

58

80

78

31

40

53

79

52

44

23

81

73

61

51

70

38

72

37

55

8 8 2 14

59

70

86

:

58

70

:

...

70

82

43

...

59

83

64

3533

40

63

77

TABLE IV.-ANGLO-CHINESE EXAMINATION, 1892. Anglo-Chinese Class.

Division.

Total No. Examined.

Copy Writing.

Reading.

Dictation.

Characters.

Translation.

Total Percentage Passed.

I,

12

100

100

92

100

92

100

II,

11

100

91

73

82

91

:

106

Remarks on individual subjects:

Reading. Very good indeed, more attention requires to be paid to phrasing, punctuation, and expression in the highest classes.

Colloquial.-473 boys were examined and 76 per cent. passed. As this is a new departure, the success is satisfactory.

Dictation.-Considerable improvement in both spelling and writing, much higher percentage of

passes.

Composition. A very marked advance. Many boys intelligently employed their imaginations to grasp the situations in the stories and used very appropriate phrases of their own selection to provide details suggested but not related; so that there was very little of the usual style of exercise com- pounded of dictation and memory work.

Grammar.-Excellent work in Lower School, and very good in Upper School. More attention in the First class requires to be paid to parsing and analysis. The order to parse fully is not carried out by a style of parsing that would scarcely pass in the fourth class.

History.-Very successfully taught; foolish answers suggestive of inattention and a futile attempt to cram, very rare.

Mathematics.-Arithmetic same percentage as the total pass last year. Algebra very weak in IB. Euclid, generally good.

Geography-Well taught, including excellent maps from memory.

Shakespeare.—Good papers by several boys in the three sections of Class I.

Translation from and to Chinese.-Very good, specially the latter.

Latin-Only taught in the non-Chinese classes, has attained but a poor standard.

Book-keeping. Very marked improvement on last year.

General Intelligence.—This paper consists of questions on subjects that do not form part of actual class work, but on which every intelligent boy is supposed to have some ideas from conversation or general reading. The considerable improvement observed is doubtless due to the attention paid to colloquial.

Special Subjects.-Chemistry shows distinct improvement; this is the first time in the history of the College that a practical examination has been held in this subject. Drawing was introduced this year with very good results. Trigonometry offered by three boys was not well done by any, though two passed.

19. PUPIL TEACHERS AND MONITORS.-Three of the monitors came out at the head of the Poll; one of them is therefore Morrison Scholar, quite a rare event during the last few years. The rest passed a satisfactory examination in the usual subjects, including a paper on the theory and history of education. In the test of practical work before the class, the four who had more than a year's experience gave their orders and instruction in a highly satisfactory manner. The remaining four, who had been accustomed to teach only during the last few months, taught very creditably, with one exception. Great care was taken over reading and spelling, but I observed that in every case the teacher was of opinion that the dictation lesson was over when the number of mistakes on each boy's slate (marked by another boy) was reported by himself; there was no inspection to criticise hand- writing or discover omitted mistakes. Lessons in early stages of arithmetic were not sufficiently simple.

20. SCHOLARSHIPS.-As the marks obtained at the competition for the Government scholarship have not yet been published, we are ignorant of how our two candidates fared, beyond the fact that neither is at the head. The Trustees of the Morrison scholarship have instituted a junior scholarship of $25 a year for three years, to be awarded to the head boy of the Lower School, as the Senior is gained by the dux of the College. The Stewart Scholarship wsa this year gained by the head boy of the junior section of the first class. The Belilios Trustees have enhanced the value of these two scholarships by the addition of Shakespeare to the senior subjects, and History to the junior. The Bain Engineering scholarship has been withdrawn, as no candidate has offered since its foundation. Two students have been nominated Belilios Medical scholars in connexion with the College of Medicine,

21. PRIZES. In thanking the many generous contributors to our prize fund, I would draw attention to the yearly increasing contributions from the Chinese residents, which, as the Inspector of Schools remarked with truth at the distribution of prizes to the Government Central School for Girls, is the most reliable evidence of their full confidence in the management of the institution.

I have the honour to be, Sir,

The Honourable G. T. M. O'BRIEN, C.M.G.,

Colonial Secretary.

Your most obedient Servant,

GEO. H. BATESON WRIGHT, D.D., Oxon.,

Head Master.

1892.

VICTORIA COLLEGE.

Number

Month.

of Scholars.

Number of Attendances.

Number of School days.

Average Daily Attendance.

January,

756

9,953

15

663.53

February,

856

7,434

9

826.

March,

862

21,700

27

803.70

April,

833

10,764

14

768.85

May,

809

17,904

24

746.

June,....

781

17,533

24

730.54

July,

747

18,374

26

706.69

August,

700

2,705

4

676.25

September,

786

16,775

23

729.34

October,

771

17,112

24

713.

November,

755

16,972

24/

707.16

December,

730

15,425

23

670.65

Total,...

172,651

Total Number of ATTENDANCES during 1892,

237

Number of SCHOOL DAYS during 1892,..

Average DAILY ATTENDANCE during 1892,................

Total Number of SCHOLARS at this School during 1892,..

...172,651

237

728

1,062

Remarks.

107

GEO. H. BATESON WRIGHT, D.D., Oxon, Head Master.

AVERAGE EXPENSE of each SCHOLAR at Victoria College during 1892.

Expenditure, .......

Deduct School Fees,.......

Amounts refunded,

Total Expense of the College,.......

Average Expense of each Scholar per Number on Roll, ....

""

99

per Average Daily Attendance.

$32,168.43

$12,342.00

85.00

$12,427.00

$19,741.43

.$18.58

.....27.09

GEO. H. BATESON WRIGHT, D.D., Oxon,

Head Master.

355

No. 23

93

HONGKONG.

THE EDUCATIONAL REPORT FOR 1892.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor, on the 19th June, 1893.

No. 37.

EDUCATION DEPARTMENT,

HONGKONG, 6th May, 1893.

SIR,-I have the honour to forward to you the Annual Report on Education for the year 1892.

2. GENERAL EDUCATIONAL STATISTICS.-The total number of Educational Institutions of all descriptions, known to have been at work in the Colony of Hongkong during the year 1892, amounts to 229 Schools with a grand total of 10,940 scholars, constituting an increase, as compared with the preceding year, of 14 Schools and 821 scholars. More than three-fourths of the whole number of scholars under instruction in the Colony attend Schools under the supervision of the Education Depart- ment, viz., 130 Schools with 8,277 scholars. The remainder, viz., 99 Schools with 2,663 scholars, consists, with the exception of the Police School (with 371 scholars) and the Roman Catholic Reform- atory (with 75 scholars), of Private Schools, entirely independent of Government supervision and receiving no aid from public funds unless it be that a few of them (as Charitable Institutions) are exempt from payment of rates and taxes.

3. GENERAL STATISTICS OF SCHOOLS UNDER THE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT.-The total number of Schools, subject to supervision and examination on the part of the Education Department, amounted, in the year 1892, to 130 as compared with 80 Schools in the year 1882 and with 30 Schools in the year 1872. The total number of scholars enrolled in this same class of Schools during the year 1892 amounted to 8,277 as compared with 5,182 scholars in the year 1882 and 1,480 scholars in the year 1872. In other words, there has been an increase of 50 Schools and 3,702 scholars during the ten years from 1872 to 1882 and a like increase of 50 Schools and 3,095 scholars during the ten years from 1882 to 1892.

4. PROGRESS DURING THE LAST THREE YEARS.-Comparing the statistics of Schools under the Education Departinent with regard to individual years, it appears that the number of Schools rose from 112, in the year 1890, to 117 Schools in the year 1891 and 130 Schools in 1892, while the number of scholars under instruction in these same Schools rose from 7,170, in the year 1890, to 7,672 scholars in the year 1891 and 8,277 scholars in the year 1892. There has been thus a steady annual increase observable during the last three years, progressing from an increase of 63 scholars in the year 1890, to an increase of 502, scholars in the year 1891 and an increase of 605 scholars in the year 1892.

*

5. COMPARATIVE STATISTICS OF GOVERNMENT SCHOOLS AND VOLUNTARY SCHOOLS.-The Schools under the general supervision of the Education Department may be divided into Government Schools and Voluntary Schools. Under the term Government Schools are included all Schools established and maintained by the Government. Under the term Voluntary Schools are included all those Public Schools, established and maintained by private educationists, which have been voluntarily placed by their respective Managers under the provisions of the Grant-in-Aid Scheme (established in the year 1873 and revised in 1879 and 1883) and consequently under inspection and examination by the Inspector of Schools. In the case of the Government Schools all expenses are provided by the Govern- ment, and the salaries of the teachers, who are members of the Civil Service or Government employees entitled to pension, are paid irrespective of results ascertained by examination. In the case of the Voluntary Schools, the respective Managers provide all expenses but annually receive from the Govern- ment a Grant-in-Aid the amount of which depends, in the case of each School, on the definite results ascertained by an annual examination of each individual scholar, and the paid teachers receive one- fourth of that Grant as a personal reward of their tuitional effectiveness. These two classes of Schools are further characterized by the fact that the Government Schools, as above defined, are virtually secular Schools whilst the aforementioned Voluntary Schools are all Christian (either Protestant or Catholic) Institutions. Referring now to the 8,277 scholars under instruction in the year 1892 in 130 Schools under the supervision of the Education Department, there were as many as 5,655 of these scholars attending 95 Voluntary Schools where they received a religious (Christian) education, whilst 2,622 scholars attended Government Schools receiving a secular education. The subjoined Table exhibits the comparative growth of both classes of Schools since the starting of the Grant-in-Aid Scheme of 1873, which was revised in 1879 and 1883.

356

Year.

Comparative Statistics of Voluntary and Government Schools.

Religious

Voluntary Grant-in-Aid Schools.

Secular

Government Departmental Schools.

Schools.

Scholars.

Schools.

Scholars.

1873,

6

442

30

1,838

1874,

9

632

30

1,931

1875,

9

679

30

1,927

1876,

11

751

30

2,171

1877,

14

996

30

2,148

1878,

17

1,021

30

2,101

1879,

19

1,417

31

2,043

1880,

27

1,808

36

2,078

1881,

37

2,237

35

1,986

1882,

41

3,068

39

2,114

1883,

48

3,517

39

2,080

1884,

55

3,907

35

1,978

1885,

55

4,041

35

1,803

1886,

....

56

3,951

34

1,893

1887,

61

4,160

33

1,814

1888,

63

4,325

34

1,933

1889,

69

4,814

35

2,293

1890,

76

4,656

36

2,514

1891,

81

5,132

36

2,540

1892,

95

5,655

35

2,622

6. SITUATION OF SCHOOLS.-The above mentioned 99 Private (and mostly Confucian) Schools, the 35 Government Schools (giving a secular education) and the 95 Christian Mission Schools, at work in the Colony during the year 1892, are happily so interspersed that, with the exception of three places, every village, and in town every district and even every considerable street, had some school or other. The exceptions are the Praya where family dwellings are comparatively rare, the Peak district where the residents do not care yet sufficiently for a Public School, and the village of Aberdeen where malarial fever has some years ago necessitated temporary closing of the School.. Numerous, well- distributed and conveniently intermingled as the various classes of local Schools are, the school-houses are ill-suited for the purpose, there being, among the 229 Schools of the Colony, hardly 16 Schools that can be said to have proper accommodation. The high prices which Managers have to pay for house- rent constitute the principal cause of this state of things. The rarity and costliness of building sites in town, suitable for educational purposes, also hinder Managers erecting school-houses with the aid (under the Building Grant Regulations) which the Government would be willing to furnish.

7. EDUCATIONAL EXPENDITURE OF THE GOVERNMENT.-The sum total of educational payments made by the Government during the year 1892 ($86,627 as compared with $72,983 in 1891) amounted, after deducting all educational refunds ($12,857 as compared with $12,624 in 1891), to $73,770 as compared with $60,359 in 1891. The increase of expenditure ($13,411) was caused principally by the rare occurrence of two building grants, by the naturally increasing cost of Victoria College, by the gradual expansion of the Voluntary School system, and by the fact that the financial year 1892 includes 13 months. The detailed items of expenditure were as follows:- Office of Education Department, $6,220.35; Victoria College (not including repairs of building), $24,216.82; Government Central School for Girls (including rent of building), $2,860.19; thirty-two other Departmental Schools, $8,704.61; Grants-in-Aid to Voluntary Schools, $28,430.27 (viz., ordinary Grants-in-Aid to 95 Schools $22,930.27 and Building Grants to 2 Schools, $5,500.00); Physical Training in all Schools, $339.72; Government Scholarship, $2,808.56; Student Interpreters, $189.72. The net cost of education ($73,770.24) amounted, in 1892, to 3.29 per cent. of the total Colonial revenue (as compared with 3.26 per cent. in 1891). The total number of scholars educated in Hongkong in 1892, at the expense or with the aid of the Govern- ment, being 8,278, the education of each scholar cost the Government (after excluding cost of two Government Scholarships held in England) $8.57 per scholar (as compared with $7.49 per scholar in 1891). In the several educational institutions of the Colony the cost, to Government, of the education of each scholar was as follows:-in Victoria College (not including repairs of building owned by Government) $22.80 per scholar; in Girls Central School (including rent of hired building), $20.57; at 32 other Departmental Schools, $6.12; at 95 Grant-in-Aid Schools (not including Building Grants), $4.39. The Managers of those 95 Grant-in-Aid Schools, who received from the Government, in 1892, as Grants-in-Aid, based on the definite results ascertained by the individual examination of each scholar, the sum of $22,576.97, spent during the same year on those Schools, out of the resources of their respective Societies supplemented, in the case of 6 Schools, by school fees ranging from $1 to $3 per mensem for each scholar, the sum of $59,394.13.

8. Nature of THE EDUCATION GIVEN IN THE SCHOOLS OF THE COLONY.-As regards those 130 Schools, with 8,277 scholars, under the supervision of the Education Department in the year 1892, there were 22 Schools at work, giving to 3,024 scholars of English, Portuguese, Indian or Chinese

357

extraction an English education (combined with classical Chinese teaching in the case of 6 of these Schools with 1,601 scholars, mostly Chinese); 4 Schools gave to 186 Portuguese children a European education in the Portuguese language; 3 Schools gave to 146 Chinese children a European education in the Chinese language; and 101 Schools gave to 4,921 Chinese children a classical Chinese educa- tion. In other words, among 8,277 scholars under instruction in the year 1892 in 130 Schools under the supervision of the Education Department, 17.19 per cent. received in 16 Schools a purely English education; 19.34 per cent. received in 6 Schools an English education combined with Chinese classical teaching; 2.24 per cent. received in 4 Schools an elementary European education in the Portuguese language and 1.67 per cent. in 3 Schools a European education in the Chinese language; but the vast majority, viz., 59.45 per cent. received in 101 Schools a purely Chinese education. Comparing the foregoing figures with those of preceding years, say with the year 1887, (when the percentages were, in the above order, 11.51, 19.41, 3.74, 1.64, 63.64), it is evident that since the last six years purely English teaching has made rapid strides; Anglo-Chinese teaching (adhered to nowhere but in Govern- ment Schools) has remained almost stationary; purely Portuguese Schools have been losing ground; Chinese Schools giving a European education have barely maintained their position and purely Chinese teaching has changed but little. But the most noteworthy feature as to the forward movement of English education in the Colony is the fact that among the 1,423 scholars in 16 purely English Schools, the girls number 507 or 35.63 per cent. This proportion, though by no means satisfactory yet, is a very great advance on the condition of things a few years ago. The English education given in those Schools trenches from year to year more and more upon the ground of secondary education, and in this respect also it is observable that female education in the Colony is decidedly progressive, as is evidenced by the fact that, for the first time in the history of the Colony, some girls competed (and that successfully) with boys at the Local Oxford Examinations, and some are now preparing for the senior division of the same Examinations.

9. FEMALE EDUCATION.-The total of girls enrolled during the year 1892 in Schools of all descriptions, under the supervision of the Education Department, amounted to 2,942 or 35.54 per cent. of the total number of scholars enrolled in those Schools, as compared with 36.38 per cent. in 1891 and 32.41 per cent. in 1890. That the slight falling off in the proportion of girls under instruc- tion in 1892, as compared with the number of the preceding year, does not indicate more than that the increase of boys in 1892 was somewhat greater than the increase of girls, will be seen from the subjoined Table exhibiting the proportion of boys and girls under instruction in those Schools during the last twenty years. During the last three years the annual increase or decrease of scholars was as follows:-1890, decrease of 145 boys and increase of 208 girls; 1891, increase of 75 boys and 467 girls; 1892, increase of 454 boys and 151 girls.

PROPORTION Of Boys and GIRLS under instruction in Schools subject to the supervision of the Education Department.

L

Scholars under instruction.

Year.

Population.

Total of Scholars.

Boys.

Girls.

Percentage of Scholars being Girls.

1873, 1874, ....

121,985

1,976

304

2,280

13.33

***

2,282

281.

2,563

10.96

1875,

2,177

429

2,606

16.46

1876,

139,144

2,379

543

2,922

18.58

1877,

2,520

624

3,144

19.84

1878,

2,544

578

3,122

18.51

1879,

2,850

610

3,460

17.63

1880,

160,402

3,187

699

:

3,886

17.98

· 1881,

3,364

859

4,223

20.34

1882,

166,433

3,941

1,241

5,182

23.94

1883,

173,475

4,120

1,477

5,597

26.38

1884,

181,529

4,238

1,647

5,885

27.98

1885,

190,594

4,329

1,700

6,029

28.19

1886,

200,990

4,161

1,683

5,844

28.79

1887,

212,951

4,195

1,779

5,974

29.77

1888,

215,800

4,342

1,916

6,258

30.77

1889,

194,482

4,991

2,116

7,107

29.77

1890,

4,846

2,324

7,170

32.41

1891,

224,814

4,881

2,791

7,672

36.38

1892,

231,662

5,335

2,942

8,277

35.54

10. ATTENDANCE IN SCHOOL AND NUMBER OF UNEDUCATED CHILDREN.-The population of Hongkong amounted, in the year 1892, according to the Registrar General's estimate, to 231,662 souls. The number of children of local school-age (6 to 16 years) consisted, in 1892, of about 30,987 children, viz., 16,322 boys and 14,665 girls. One-third of the whole number of the children of school-going age actually came under instruction during the year 1892, viz., 10,940 scholars, 8,723 of whom attended Public Schools and 2,217 attended Private Schools. The remaining two-thirds, or 20,047 children under 16 years of age may be put down as imperfectly educated, but at least one-half of them, though under 16 years of age and not attending any School in 1892, are probably children who, having from

358

their seventh to their tenth or twelfth or fourteenth year attended a Chinese School, were withdrawn from school to be apprenticed to some trade or industry or to contribute towards the support of their respective families in some way or other. I believe, however, that there may be about 10,000 children in the Colony who never attend school at all and most of them are, no doubt, girls and among the girls it is chiefly the purchased servant-girls and the daughters of the boat-population who receive no education whatever.

11. RESULTS OF THE ANNUAL EXAMINATIONS.-As far as the 95 Voluntary Grant-in-Aid Schools are concerned, the detailed results of the annual examinations of these Schools will be found summar- ized in Table XIV, appended to this Report, where the percentage of scholars, passed in each School in 1892, is stated and compared with the results of the preceding year, and in Table XV which records the percentage of passes gained by those Schools in each subject. As regards the Depart- mental Government Schools, the reports of the Headmaster of Victoria College and of the Headmistress of the Government Central School for Girls have been published in the Government Gazette and the Departmental District Schools will be found classified and arranged, in the order of their efficiency, in Table X. I subjoin, however, a few general observations with regard to these several Schools.

12. VICTORIA COLLEGE.-In my report for the preceding year I suggested that the educative methods and whole organization of the College require a radical reform. No material change, with the exception of more attention devoted now to the teaching of English Colloquial, appears to have been made as yet; but a Committee, consisting of the Registrar General (as representing the Chinese com- munity), the Head of the Education Department and the Headmaster of the College, has repeatedly met, during the year 1892, considering questions of reform and taking some evidence. As regards the question of the conduct of the annual examination of the College, I am thankful to say that the recommendations of my last report have been approved and the general test examination, which is the natural duty of the Head of the Education Department, has been separated now from that annual examination, at the end of each year, which properly belongs to the Headmaster alone.

13. GOVERNMENT CENTRAL SCHOOL FOR GIRLS.-Cramped by want of space, hampered by unpro- pitious situation and injured by several sudden changes in the Staff, the Girls Central School bravely held its own, raised its standard of teaching, and materially improved in moral tone. I am happy to say the example, which the Government set (in 1890), in opening this School with particular refer- ence to the neglected Eurasian girls in the Colony, has had the effect of stimulating private education- ists to make some efforts (in 1892), in bringing more Eurasian children under the influence of education. The wholesome competition which has thus arisen in 1892, has happily somewhat reduced the number of children attending the Girls Central School which was rather overcrowded. Once more the author- ities of the School have been laid under obligation by the interest which Lady ROBINSON takes in, and the encouragement thus afforded to, the promotion of female education in the Colony.

14. DEPARTMENTAL DISTRICT SCHOOLS.-The number of the Departmental District Schools (out- side Victoria College and Girls Central School) has been considerably reduced with the close of the year 1892. During the preceding year the Shauki-wan Anglo-Chinese School and the San-ts'ün Chinese School were closed owing to the falling off of the attendance. In June 1892, the Government decided that Departmental Schools having fewer than 25 scholars in average attendance should be closed unless there should be no other School in the immediate neighbourhood. In accordance with this resolution, 10 Departmental District Schools were abolished at the close of the year 1892, viz., the Schools at Little Hongkong, Hok-tsui, Shai-wan, Wongkok-tsui, Tsat-tsze-mui, Taihang, Hung- hom, Hok-ün, Matau-chung and Matau-wai. But as at the same time measures were taken to ensure the immediate opening of a number of new Grant-in-Aid Schools to replace the closed Departmental Schools in places where there was urgent need for them, this seemingly drastic measure will prove beneficial. The two Departmental Schools at Tokwawan, though badly attended, have not been closed for the present, pending the erection by a Manager of a suitable building for which a site has been granted by the Government. The Punti Division of the Tanglungchau Departmental School being badly attended, the Master was transferred to Mongkoktsui, whereupon a private School at once took the place of the Departmental School at Tanglungchau without any expense to the Government. As regards the Anglo-Chinese Schools of the Government, four of them (those at Saiyingpun, Wantsai, Wongnaichung and Stanley) have done very efficient work and enjoy very good attendance; but the Yaumati School has exhibited rather poor results, and the School does not appear to be much appre- ciated by the neighbourhood.

15. GRANT-IN-AID SCHOOLS.-Fourteen new Grant-in-Aid Schools were started at the commence- ment of the year 1892, viz. :-3 English Boys Schools, 7 Chinese Girls Schools and 4 Chinese Boys Schools. The annual examinations of all the 95 Grant-in-Aid Schools shewed satisfactory progress in almost all the branches of Chinese and English teaching, and in many cases there is now a strong tendency to superadd the main features of a secondary education to the curriculum of Schools which were formerly purely elementary. There is at present no strictly speaking secondary School in the Colony, but there are six Schools the highest or special classes of which are now devoting their energies entirely to secondary education. This natural development has led to renewed demands on the part of Managers for a corresponding revision of the Grant-in-Aid Scheme. The addition of Arithmetic to the pensum of Schools giving a purely Chinese education, the addition of elementary science teaching in the case of Schools giving a European education in the Chinese language, and a revision of the gradation of both class subjects and special subjects in the case of English Schools, were, next to the

359

demand for a seventh standard in all the three classes of Schools, the principal desiderata recognized by all interested. As the Managers consented to my suggestion that a revision, with these ends in view, should be constructed on the principle that the expenditure of the Government should not be increased by the changes to be made, I communicated to the Managers at the close of the year 1892 the details of a scheme of revision which is likely to reconcile the interests of both the Government and the Managers in a manner which may be expected to result in enlarging the scope of and intensi- fying the educational stimulus afforded by our local Grant-in-Aid Scheme.

16. LOCAL EXAMINATIONS.-Arrangements were made during the year 1892, both with the Senate of London University and with the College of Preceptors in London, to recognize the Government Offices, Hongkong, as a centre for local examinations in connection with those Examining Bodies. An examination for the teachers' diploma of membership of the College of Preceptors was accordingly held in Hongkong, in July 1892, but the proposed London University Matriculation Examination had to be postponed. The results of the annual Oxford Local Examinations, held in Hongkong in July 1892, were as under :-I. Junior Division.-Honours List, none. Pass List. Diocesan School, 4 passes; Victoria College, 2 passes; Victoria English School (Girls), 2 passes. Candidates, who, having exceeded the age of 16 years, satisfied the Examiners,-Victoria College, 1 pass; High School, 1 pass; Victoria English School (Girls), 1 pass. Successful candidates who obtained distinction,— in English, Diocesan School, 1; Victoria English School (Girls), 1. Details of examination results of Junior Division:-presented 22; examined 20; pass in preliminary subjects, 16; passed in religi- ous knowledge, fully 10, partly 2; passed in English, fully 16, partly 4; passed in mathematics, 8; passed in drawing, 6. Total of certificates issued, 10. Total of pass certificates issued to candidates who had exceeded the limit of age, 3. II. Senior Division.-Honours List, none. Pass List, Victoria College, 3; Diocesan School, 2; High School, 1. Successful candidates who obtained distinction, none. Details of examination results of Senior Division:-presented, 7; examined, 7; passed in preliminary subjects, 7; passed in religious knowledge, 4; passed in English, 7; passed in natural science, 6; passed in book-keeping, 2. Total of certificates issued, 6. The foregoing results may be summarized, thus:-Diocesan School, 6 passes and 1 distinction; Victoria College, 6 passes; Victoria English School, 3 passes and 1 distinction; High School, 2 passes.

17. BELILIOS MEDAL AND PRIZE EXAMINATIONS.-At the annual competitive examinations for Belilios Medals and Prizes (December, 1892), 19 scholars of 7 different local Schools took part in the competition. In the Boys' Division, the Diocesan School gained 4 prizes (2nd, 3rd, 4th and 5th). In the Girls' English Division, the Victoria English School took 2 prizes (1st and 3rd), and the Italian Convent 1 prize (2nd). In the Girls' Chinese Division, the Victoria Home and Orphanage School gained the 1st and 2nd, and the Basel Mission School the 3rd and 4th prizes.

18. PHYSICAL TRAINING.-The British Army School drill was continued during the year in 12 local Schools, including 4 Girls Schools. To exhibit to the public the nature and results of this form of physical drill, a public inspection and parade of a select number of boys from 5 Public Schools was held (14th November, 1892) in the presence of His Excellency the Governor, who expressed his appreciation of the results so far achieved.

19. INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION.-Apart from the industrial classes of the Roman Catholic Reform- atory School, the only industrial teaching given in local Schools consists of the needlework instruction given in all the Girls Schools of the Colony and particularly in the Chinese Schools (which form the majority). The embroidery work, taught in the latter Schools, has a distinctly commercial value, highly appreciated particularly by the poorer classes of parents, as it enables the girls, at a compara- tively early age, to contribute towards the support of their families by doing embroidery work for Chinese shops.

20. MEDICAL EDUCATION.-The College of Medicine for Chinese issued, in July 1892, its two first graduates after a five years' training. Though their qualification is not yet recognised by Govern- ment, they are certified by a court of independent examiners to be thoroughly qualified to practice medicine, surgery and midwifery. The officers and lecturers of the College, all of whom give their services gratuitously, are steadily carrying forward their philanthropic work, and have at the present time over a dozen promising lads pursuing the curriculum. The Honourable E. R. BELILIOS's build- ing scheme has not been acted upon up to the present, as his stipulations regarding endowment have not yet been complied with.

21. SCHOLARSHIPS.-The Government Scholarship for the study of law, medicine or engineering in the United Kingdom (£200 per annum, for 4 years) was competed for, in October 1892, by 5 can- didates (from Victoria College, St. Joseph's College, Diocesan School and High School respectively) and gained by G. A. YVANOVICH, a scholar of St. Joseph's College. This College had never before taken part in these biennial competitions (established in 1884). The next competition (due in 1894) has been postponed. This temporary pause gives time for reconsideration, welcome because the work- ing of this Scholarship has clearly failed to fulfil the precise purposes for which it was established. Although the expenditure involved (£400 per annum) is small in proportion to the means of the Colony, it is serious when viewed in the light of the fact that the aid given by Government to element- ary Schools has so frequently to be subjected to pro rata reductions for want of funds. Neither has this educational prize met with sufficient appreciation on the part of the local Schools or afforded a palpable educational stimulus. None of the Schools, which have had the privilege of competing for this magnificent Scholarship, ever sent up for it more than one or at the utinost two candidates at any

360

one time. Of the four successful candidates sent to England, one only belongs to a bona fide resident family of Hongkong, and none is bound to return to the Colony. As to other local Scholarships, enjoyed by local Schools, during the year 1892, Victoria College had the benefit of 3 Belilios Scholar- ships, 2 Morrison Scholarships and 1 Stewart Scholarship; St. Joseph's College and the College of Medicine had each 1 Belilios Scholarship.

22. I enclose the usual Tables (I to XVI), containing the Educational Statistics for the year 1892 which, to some extent, have been analysed in the foregoing paragraphs.

I have the honour to be,

The Honourable G. T. M. O'BRIEN, C.M.G.,

Colonial Secretary, &c., &c., &c.

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

E. J. EITEL, Ph. D. (Tub.),

Inspector of Schools and Head of the Education Department.

TABLE I.-NUMBER of SCHOLARS attending Schools subject to Government Supervision during 1892.

No.

Name of School.

1 American Board Mission, Bridges Street (Boys),.............

2

3

5

6

""

""

""

7 Aplichau (Boys),

""

99

""

Station Terrace, (Boys), Hinglung Lane (Boys), Queen's Road West (Boys), Háwán (Girls),.

Graham Street (Girls),

Basel Mission High Street (Girls),

">

Shamshuipó (Boys),

Native

Victoria

Grant-in-Aid

School

Total.

College.

School.

(Govt.)

...

70

6000: ANSIAJ

79

79

45

45

78

78

49

49

29

29

45

45

70

83

83

51

51

38

38

28

28

23

23

139

139

116

116

92

92

77

77

60

60

59

59

70

70

29

29

41

41

44

44

30

30

40

40

141

141

130

130

...

.36

36

29

29

29

29

27

...

27

36

36

39

39

...

56

56

16

16

25

25

12

12

22

22

31

31

25

25

118

118

...

74

74

82

...

82

44

44

106

106

75

75

82

82

79

...

79

18

18

...

104

104

55

55

43

43

57

57

41

41

85

85

60

60

299

2,893

3,192

8

9

10

"

Shaukiwan (Boys),

11

""

Tókwawán (Boys),

12

Berlin Mission (Girls),

13

15

"J

16

""

17

"

18

19

""

Central School (Girls),

C. M. S., St. Stephen's Chinese School (Boys),

Lyndhurst Terrace (Boys),....

Pottinger Street (Boys),

Saiyingpun (Boys),

St. Stephen's Baxter Memorial (Girls),

Lyndhurst Terrace (Girls),

20

"

Third Street (Girls),

21

59

Yaumati (Mixed),

22

""

Hunghóm (Girls),

23

""

Quarry Bay (Girls),

24

وو

25

39

26

27

28

93

29

""

30

""

Victoria Home and Orphanage (Girls),

St. Stephen's Anglo-Chinese School (Boys),

Diocesan Home and Orphanage (Boys),

F. E. S., Bonham Road Chinese Division (Girls),

High Street (Girls),..

Queen's Road West (Girls),

Hollywood Road (Girls),.......

31

Pottinger Street (Girls),

32

""

Stanley School (Girls),

33

Shaukiwan (Girls),

34

""

35

Tókwawán (Girls),

Bonham Road English Division (Girls),

36 Hoktsui (Boys),

37

Hokun (Boys), ....

38

Hunghóm (Boys),

39

40

Little Hongkong (Boys),.....

L. M. S., Square Street (Boys),.

41

Wantsai Chapel (Boys),

42

""

Yaumati (Boys),

43

"

14

19

Shekt'ongtsui (Boys),

Saiyingpun Division I (Boys),

45

39

وو

II (Boys),.

46

19

Hunghóm (Boys),

47

"

Hospital Chapel (Boys),

48

99

49

""

50

""

51

"

52

"

53

54

Shaukiwan (Boys),

""

55

""

Taikoktsui (Boys),

Shekt'ongtsui (Girls),

Saiyingpun (Girls),.

Uihing Lane Division I (Girls),

39

"

Fletcher Street (Girls),

Tanglungchau (Boys),

Carried forward,.....

II (Girls),

...

361

TABLE I.-NUMBFR of SCHOLARS attending Schools subject to Government Supervision during 1892,—Continued.

Native

Victoria

109

110

111

112

113

114

115

116

Victoria College (Boys),

117

118

>>

119

120

22

121

122

""

123

29

124

""

125

"

""

Lascar Row (Boys),

126

""

127

Wongkoktsui (Boys),

128

Wongmakok (Boys),

129

130

98

33

99 Saiyingpun English (Boys),

100

101

102

103

104

105

106

وو

""

(Punti) (Boys),

(Hakka) (Boys),

Shaiwan (Boys),

Sheko (Boys),

Sheungwan (Boys),

Sheungwan (Girls),

St. Paul's College School (Boys),

107 Stanley (Anglo-Chinese) (Boys),

108 Taihang (Boys),

Taitamtuk (Boys),

Taiwongkung (Boys),

Tanglungchau (Hakka) (Boys),

(Punti) (Boys),

Tókwawan (Eastern Village) (Boys),

(Western Village) (Boys),

Tsattszemui (Boys),...................

Wantsai (English) (Boys),.........

(Chinese) (Boys),........

Wesleyan Mission, Spring Gardens (Boys),

Wellington Street (Boys),

دو

Lascar Row (Girls),

Wantsai (Boys),

Upper Graham Street (Girls),

Kennedy Town (Boys),

Wongnaichung (Anglo-Chinese) (Boys),

Yaumati (Anglo-Chinese) (Boys),..

No.

Name of School.

Brought forward,.

56

57

L. M. S., Square Street (Girls),

Li Yuen Street (Girls),

58

"}

D'Aguilar Street (Girls),

59

""

60

""

61

"

62

"

63

64

Third Street (Boys),

Bowrington (Girls),... Kau-ü-fong (Girls), Stanley Street (Girls),

Tanglungchau (Girls),

Taipingshan Chapel (Girls),

65

Aberdeen Street (Girls),

66

""

Wantsai Chapel (Girls),

67

68

"

69

""

70

وو

71

39

72

""

73 774

75 Mongkok (Boys),....

76

77

78

Pokfulam (Boys),.....

79

80

22

81

""

82

""

83

""

84

>>

85

99

86

59

87

99

88

39

European

""

(Boys),

89

""

High School (Boys),

90

91

92

ور

93

94

95

96

ני

97

""

English

35

School

College.

Grant-in-Aid School.

Total.

(Govt.)

299

2,893

3,192

36

36

35

35

51

51

41

41

12

12

77

77

27

27

58

58

142

142

79

79

88

88

Staunton Street (Girls),

Saiyingpun Second Street East (Girls),

Wongnaichung (Girls),

Taipingshan English School (Boys), Third Street

Stewart English School (Boys),

Matauchung (Boys),

Matauts'ün (Boys),

Mongkoktsui (Boys),

New Girls School,

R. C. M., Cathedral School (Boys),

Bridges Street Chinese School (Girls), Hollywood Road Charitable School (Girls), Holy Infancy School Division I (Boys), II (Girls),

""

Yaumati (Girls),

Shaukiwan (Girls),

Hunghóm (Girls),

St. Joseph's College, Chinese Division (Boys),

34

34

35

35

31

31

...

...

64

64

(Boys),

29

29

...

29

29

29

29

33

33

...

26

26

16

16

68

68

16

16

...

83

83

64

64

59

59

22

22

40

40

""

52

52

...

64

64

32

32

33

33

199

199

35

35

Italian Convent, English Division (Girls),

Portuguese Division (Girls),...

Bridges Street, English Division (Girls),

Portuguese Division (Girls), St. Francis Portuguese Division (Girls),

English Division (Girls), Victoria Portuguese School (Mixed).

200

200

30

30

69

69

70

70

42

42

20

20

44

44

">

(Boys),

"

(Girls),

163

163

54

54

151

151

117

45

45

15

15

28

28

2021 22

65

65

76

76

93

93

47

47

37

37

13

13

58

58

57

57

9

9

46

46

25

25

35

35

1,062

1,062

223

223

137

25

25

117

117

(Girls),

49

49

45

45

...

39

39

48

48

...

79

79

24

24

14

14

11

11

73

73

45

45

Total,......

1,062

1,560

5,655

8,277

362

:

TABLE II.-PROPORTION of SCHOLARS to POPULATION in the CITY of VICTORIA and in the VILLAGES in 1892.

CITY AND HARBOUR OF VICTORIA.

Population as per Census of 1891.......................136,901

CHILDREN IN SCHOOLS UNDER GOVERNMENT SUPERVISION,

IN THE CITY OF VICTORIA.

1. American Board Mission, Bridges Street (Boys),

VILLAGES.

Population, including Boat Population, as per Census of 1891,...64,525 CHILDREN IN SCHOOLS UNDER GOVERNMENT SUPERVISION,

IN VILLAGES.

No. of Scholars.

No. of Scholars.

79

2.

"

Station Terrace (Boys),

45

3.

}:

+2

??

Hinglung Lane (Boys),.

78

3.

""

4.

"}

>>

>

Queen's Road West (Boys),

49

4.

5.

17

"

>>

Háwán (Girls),

29

6.

"

"

>>

Graham Street (Girls),

45

6.

7. Basel Mission, High Street (Girls),

8. Berlin Mission, (Girls),

9. Central School, (Girls),

83

7.

23

139

9.

,,

11.

10. C. M. S., St. Stephen's Chinese School (Boys),

Lyndhurst Terrace (Boys),..............

116

10.

92

12.

""

Pottinger Street (Boys),

77

12. Hokün (Boys),

13.

""

Saiyingp'un (Boys),

60

13. Hunghòm (Boys),

14.

99

15.

St. Stephen's Baxter Memorial (Girls), Lyndhurst Terrace (Girls),..

59

70

16.

11

Third Street (Girls),

29

16.

17.

**

Victoria Home and Orphanage (Girls);

40

17.

1. Aplichau (Boys),

2. Basel Mission, Shamshuipò (Boys), Shaukiwán (Boys),.. T'òkwáwán (Boys),

5. C. M. S., Yaumati (Mixed),.

"?

Hunghòm (Girls), Quarry Bay (Girls),

8. F. E. S., Stanley School (Girls),

::

Shaukiwán (Girls),

T'òkwáwán (Girls),

11. Hoktsui (Boys),..

14. Little Hongkong (Boys),

15. L. M. S., Yaumati (Boys).

Shektongtsui (Boys),

(Girls),

70

51

38

28

41

44

30

39

56

16

12

22

31

25

82

44

18

18.

31

St. Stephen's Anglo-Chinese School (Boys),

19. Diocesan Home and Orphanage (Boys),

20. F. E. S.,

141

18.

Hunghom (Boys),....

82

130

19.

Tanglungchau (Boys)...

41

21.

"

Bonham Road, Chinese Division (Girls), High Street (Girls),..

36

20.

29

21.

22.

Queen's Road West (Girls),

29

22.

17

23.

19

Hollywood Road (Girls),

27

23.

24.

11

Pottinger Street (Girls),...

36

(Girls),

Taikoktsui (Boys), Wongnaichung (Girls),

24. Mátauchung (Boys),

་.

58

Shaukiwán (Boys),

85

60

31

29

25.

Bonham Road. English Division (Girls),

25

25. Matautsün (Boys),

33

27.

28.

29.

30.

31.

"

13

>>

??

17

26. L. M. S., Square Street (Boys),

Wantsai Chapel (Boys),

118

26. Mongkok (Boys),

26

(Girls),

36

27. Mongkoktsui (Boys),

16

74

28. Pokfulam (Boys),

16

(Girls),

88

Saiyingp'un I. Division (Boys),

29. R. C. M., Yaumati (Girls),

52

106

30.

22

Shaukiwán (Girls),

64

II.

11

::

(Boys),

75

31.

""

Hunghom (Girls),

32

32.

i

Saiyiügp'un (Girls),..............

104

32. Shaiwán (Boys),

15

33.

Hospital Chapel (Boys),

79

33. Shekò (Boys),

28

34.

Ui-hing Lane I. Division (Girls),

55

34. Stanley (Anglo-Chinese) (Boys),

47

35.

II.

"

(Girls),

43

35. Taihang (Boys),.

37

36.

"1

Fletcher Street (Girls),

57

36. Taitamtuk (Boys).......................

13

37.

38.

39.

""

40.

Li Yuen Street (Girls),

Third Street (Boys),

Bowrington (Girls),

35

37. Tanglungchau (Hakka) (Boys),

67

DAguilar Street (Girls),

51

38.

(Punti) (Boys),

9

41

12

40.

41.

19

Kau-ü-fong (Girls),

77

42.

27

Stanley Street (Girls),

27

43.

::

Taipingshan Chapel (Girls),

142

44.

Aberdeen Street (Girls),

39. Tókwáwán (Eastern Village) (Boys),

""

(Western Village) (Boys),

41. Tsattszemui (Boys).

42. Wesleyan Mission, Kennedy Town (Boys), 43. Wongkoktsui (Boys),

46

25

35

24

14

79

44. Wongmakok (Boys),..

11

45.

""

Staunton Strect (Girls),

34

46.

Saiyingp'un, Second Street, East (Girls),

35

47.

Taipingshan English School (Boys),

45. Wongnaichung (Anglo-Chinese) (Boys), 46. Yaumati (Anglo-Chinese) (Boys),..

73

45

64

48.

Third Street

(Boys),

29

TOTAL,.

49.

""

72.

52.

,,

53.

54.

11

55.

11

56.

57.

31

11

58.

"

High School (Boys),

59.

#!

60.

"

"

Portuguese

61.

"

62.

Portuguese

63.

11

64.

English

65.

66.

67.

""

++

(Girls),

68. Saiyingp'un (English) (Boys),

69.

70.

(Hakka) (Boys),...

(Girls),

34

Stewart English School (Boys),

50. New Girls School,

51. R. C. M., Cathedral School (Boys),

Bridges Street, Chinese Division (Girls),. Hollywood Road, Charitable School (Girls), Holy Infancy School, I. Division (Boys),

II.

St. Joseph's College, Chinese Division (Boys),

European

Italian Convent, English Division, (Girls),..............

Bridges Street, English Division (Girls),

St. Francis Portuguese Division (Girls),..............

Victoria, Portuguese School (Mixed),

English School (Boys),

1,751

29

68

83

64

59

22

(Girls),

40

33

""

(Boys),

199

35

200

(Girls),..

30

69

(Girls),

70

42

19

(Girls),

20

44

163

54

151

75. Victoria College (Boys),

77.

"

(Chinese) (Boys),

(Punti) (Boys),

71. Sheungwan (Boys),

73. St. Paul's College School (Boys),

74. Taiwongkung (Boys),

76. Wantsai (English) (Boys),

78. Wesleyan Mission, Spring Gardens (Boys),...

45

65

76

93

58

1,062

223

25

79.

*

Wellington Street (Boys),

117

80.

>:

>>

**

""

(Girls),

49

81.

*

Lascar Row (Boys),

79

82.

་་

12

11

(Girls),

45

83.

**

Wantsai (Boys),

39

81.

**

Upper Graham Street (Girls),

48

TOTAL........

6,526

No.

363

TABLE III.—NUMBER of SCHOLARS at the GOVERNMENT SCHOOLS during 1892, and EXPENSES of each SCHOOL.

Name of School.

Boys.

Girls.

Total.

Expense.

1

Aplichau,

2

Central School (Girls),

3 Hoktsui,

4

Hokun,

5

Hunghom,

6

Little Hongkong,

7

Matauchung,

70

70

$

139

139

168.00 2,860.19

12

12

132,00

22

22

132.00

31

31

132.00

25

25

120.96

29

29

8 Matautsun,

33

9

Mongkok,

10

Mongkoktsui,

11

New Girls School,

12

Pokfulam,

13

14

15

(Punti),. (Hakka),

16

Shaiwan,

17

Sheko,

18

Sheungwan (Boys),

19

99

(Girls),

20

21

Taihang,

22

Taitamtuk,

26

16

: : : :

132.00

33

137.68

26

132.00

16

165.00

68

68

624.35

16

16

132.06

Saiyingpun (English),

151

:

:

997.62

151

(117)

231.50

45

45

265.86

15

15

120.05

28

28

120.00

65

65

420.00

76

76

660.00

25

26

Stanley (Anglo-Chinese),

23 Taiwongkung,

24 Tanglungchau (Hakka),

Tokwawan (Eastern Village),

47

47

321.31

37

37

133.05

13

13

132.00

58

58

324.00

57

57

199.20

(Punti),

9

9

15,00

46

46

132.00

27

""

(Western Village),

25

25

132.00

28

Tsattszemui,

35

35

132.00

29

Victoria College,

1,062

1,062

19,741.82

30

Wantsai (English),

223

995.08

223

31

"

(Chinese),

(137)

375.30

32

Wongkoktsui,

14

14

132.00

33

Wongmakok,

34 Wongnaichung (Anglo-Chinese),

11

11

132.00

73

73

325.41

35

Yaumati (Anglo-Chinese),

45

45

401.18

Total,...

2,339

283

2,622

$ 31,306.62

TABLE IV.—AVERAGE EXPENSE of each SCHOLAR at the GOVERNMENT SCHOOLS and at the GRANT-IN-AID

SCHOOLS during the year 1892.*

I.-EXPENDITURE OF GOVERNMENT SCHOOLS.

(Cost of working the Schools irrespective of cost of erection or repairs of Buildings.)

1. VICTORIA COLLEGE.

Expenditure,.....

Deduct School fees, refunded,....

2. GOVERNMENT GIRLS SCHOOL.

Expenditure,......

Deduct School fees,

3. OTHER DEPARTMENTAL SCHOOLS, (no School fees).

Cost to Government,

.$36,643.82

.$12,427.00

-$24,216.82

.$ 3,290.69

.$

430.50

2,860.19

.$ 8,704.61

II-EXPENDITURE ON THE VOLUNTARY GRANT-IN-AID SCHOOLS.

Total cost to Government, in 1892,

.$ 22,576.97

* NOTE.-The cost of the Inspectorate of Schools ($6,220,35), being connected with both Grant-in-Aid Schools and Government Schools, is not included.

364

No.

III.-AVERAGE COST OF EACH SCHOLAR.

(Calculated by the Enrolment.)

Average Cost, to Government, of each Scholar :----

1. at Victoria College, (not including cost of building),

2. at Government Girls School, (including rent),

3. at Other Departmental Schools,

4. at Grant-in-Aid Schools,........

IV.—AVERAGE COST OF EACH SCHOLAR.

(Calculated by the Average Daily Attendance.)

Average Cost, to Government, of each Scholar:-

1. at Victoria College, (not including cost of building),

2. at Government Girls School, (including rent),

3. at Other Departmental Schools,

4. at Grant-in-Aid Schools,

.$22.80

$20.57

$6.12

$ 4.39

$33.24

$36.95

$ 8.82

$6.39

TABLE V.-Average MonthLY ENROLMENT and DAILY ATTENDANCE at the Government Schools for 1892.

Name of School.

Average Monthly Enrolment.

Average Daily Attendance.

Little Hongkong,

7

1 2 3 4 5 N

Aplichau,

2

Central School (Girls),

3

Hoktsui,

Hokun,...

Hunghon,

Matauchung,

41.27

36.35

89.18

77.40

7.63

5.63

15.19

14.73

16.36

15.28

15.54

13.16

24.63

22.72

8

Matautsun,

27.45

24.52

9

Mongkok,

14.81

13.90

10

Mongkoktsui,

11.18

10.75

11

New Girls School,

35.90

24.35

.12

Pokfulam,

11.00

9.48

13

Saiyingpun, (English),

115.81

111.03

14

(Punti),

50.81

49.14

15

(Hakka),

25.63

22.21

16

Shaiwan,

10.45

7.49

17

Sheko,

25.00

24.42

18

Sheungwan (Boys),

37.36

28.35

19

(Girls),

46.90

40.89

20

Stanley (Anglo-Chinese),

40.90

38.91

21

Taihang,

23.81

19.48

22

Taitamtuk,

10.90

9.46

23

Taiwongkung,.

24 Tanglungchau (Hakka),.

33.00

31.23

32.63

30.44

25

"

(Punti),

26

Tokwawan (Eastern Village),

27

Western Village),

28

Tsattszemui,

29

Victoria College,.

30

Wantsai (English),..

31

27

(Chinese),

32

33

34

35

Yaumati (Anglo-Chinese),.............

9.00

7.70

30.72

28.02

15.63

14.36

28.90

22.92

782.16

728.48

151.91

141.40

* 73.63

70.72

Wongkoktsui,

Wongmakok,

Wongnaichung (Anglo-Chinese),

11.63

10.25

9.72

9.41

57.66

52.30

27.36

25.87

Total,....

1,961.66

1,792.75

365

TABLE VI.-MAXIMUM and MINIMUM ENROLMENT and DAILY ATTENDANCE at the Government Schools during 1892.

No.

Name of School.

Maximum Monthly Enrolment.

Minimum Monthly Enrolment.

Maximum Daily

Attendance

Minimum Daily Attendance

(Monthly average). (Monthly average).

1

Aplichau,

70

10

61.61

10.00

2

Central School (Girls),

102

74

86.50

57.30

3

Hoktsui,

10

5

8.00

2.80

4

Hokun,

17

13

16.80

12.02

Hunghòm,

19

12

18.15

12.00

6

Little Hongkong,

23

11

19.04

9.01

7

Matauchung,.

31

12

29.51

12.00

8

Matautsun,

31

14

29.75

12.08

9

Mongkok,

20

10

20.00

7.08

10

Mongkoktsui,

15

4

14.23

4.00

11

New Girls School,

45

27

39.15

19.50

12

Pokfulam,

13

11.21

7.21

13

Saiyingpun (English),

123

83

119.33

75.94

14

"

(Punti),

62

86

53.80

36.00

15

>>

(Hakka),

28

20

25.50

19.77

16

Shaiwan,

12

9

8.65

5.31

17

Shekò,..

27

19

26.40

18.50

18

Sheungwan (Boys),

45

25

41.50

20.21

19

(Girls),

56

37

49.80

33.92

20

Stanley (Anglo-Chinese),

43

38

41.23

31.28

21

Taihang,

26

18

21.07

13.02

22

Taitamtuk,

12

9

10.62

7.50

23

Taiwongkung,

39

25

34.95

20.20

24

Tanglungchau (Hakka),

40.

18

36.30

17.08

25

(Punti),

9

9

7.70

7.70

99

26

Tokwawan (Eastern Village),

38

14

34.30

13.10

27

"9

(Western Village),

17

12

15.70

11.45

28

Ts'attszemui,

30

13

27.04

10.01

29

Victoria College,

862

700

826.00

663.53

30

Wantsai (English),

174

109

174.00

108.27

31

"

(Chinese),

88

50

84.08

50.00

32

Wongkok-tsui,

12

9

10.96

9.00

33

Wongmakok,

11

9

11.00

8.50

34

Wongnaichung (Anglo-Chinese),.

64

52

58.45

43.22

35

Yaumati (Anglo-Chinese),

32

21

29.58

19.00

Total,.....

2,246

1,536

2,101.91

1,407.51

TABLE VII.-NUMBER of DAYS on which the GOVERNMENT SCHOOLS were taught during 1892.

No.

Name of School.

School Days.

No.

Name of School.

School Days.

1

Aplichau,

244

19

Sheungwán (Girls),

240

2

Central School (Girls),

234

20

3

Hoktsui,

247

21

Taihang,

Hokun,

251

22

Hunghòm,

252

23

Stanley (Anglo-Chinese),

Taitamtuk,

Taiwongkung,

232

248

253

244

Little Hongkong,

244

24

Tanglungchau (Hakka),

245

....

7

Matauchung,

252

25

""

(Punti),

17

8

Matautsun,

246

26

Tokwawan (Eastern Village),

245

9

Mongkok,

253

27

(Western Village),

251

10

Mongkoktsui,

231

28

Ts'attszemui,

249

11

New Girls School,

236

29

Victoria College,.

237

12

Pokfulam,

243

30

Wantsai (English),

241

13

Saiyingpun (English),

237

31

(Chinese),

241

14

""

(Punti),

238

32

Wongkoktsui,

251

15

"

(Hakka),

249

33

Wongmakok,

250

16

Shaiwán,

256

34

Wongnaichung (Anglo-Chinese),

242

17

Shekò,

249

35

Yaumati (Anglo-Chinese),...

232

18

Sheungwán (Boys),

246

Total Enrolment for the Year.

366

TABLE VIII.-SUMMARY of ENROLMENT and ATTENDANCE at the GOVERNMENT SCHOOLS for the last twenty-five years.

YEARS.

Minimum Daily Attendance

Maximum Daily Attendance

Minimum Monthly

Enrolment.

(Monthly Average).

(Monthly Average).

1868,

916

664

572

460

1869,

942

748

627

504

1870,

1,302

950

683

556

1871,

1,292

937

711

571

1872,

1,480

1,157

837

665

1873,

1,838

1,326

852

760

1874,

1,932

1,271

974

836

1875,

1,927

1,312

988

863

1876,

2,171

1,383

1,057

925

1877,

2,148

1,446

1,212

1,035

1878,

2,101

1,324

1,100

936

1879,

2,043

1,356

1,027

904

1880,

2,078

1,468

1,082

937

1881,

1,986

1,384

1,093

956

1882,

2,114

1,444

1,062

988

1883,

2,080

1,414

1,138

990

1884,

1,978

1,420

1,066

941

1885,

1,988

1,424

1,061

926

1886,

1,893

1,544

1,040

886

1887,

1,814

1,552

1,126

1,000

1888,

1,933

1,653

1,139

1,040

1889,

2,293

1,992

1,190

1,118

1890,

2,514

1,999

1,494

1,370

1891,

2,540

1,909

1,403

1,291

1892,

2,622

2,101

1,536

1,407

January,

February,

March,

April,...

May,

June,

July,

August,

September,

October,

November,

December,

TABLE IX.-ENROLMENT and ATTENDANCE at the VICTORIA COLLEGE during 1892.

Month.

Number of Scholars.

Number of Attendances.

Number of School Days.

Average Daily Attendance.

756

9,953

15

663.53

856

7,434

9

826.00

862

21.700

27

803.70

833

10,764

14

768.85

809

17,904

24

746.00

781

17,533

24

730.54

747

18,374

26

706.69

700

2,705

4

676.25

786

16,775

23

729.34

771

17,112

24

713.00

755

16,972

730

15,425

**

24

707.16

23

670.65

Total,.....

172,651

237

Total Number of ATTENDANCES during 1892, Number of SCHOOL DAYS during 1892,.

Average DAILY ATTENDANCE during 1892,.

Total Number of SCHOLARS at this School during 1892,.

..172,651 237 728.485 1,062

TABLE X.-GOVERNMENT SCHOOLS (outside VICTORIA COLLEGE and GIRLS CENTRAL SCHOOL) arranged in the

Rank I.

Saiyingpun, English School. Wantsai, English School.

Wongnaichung, English School. Wantsai School, Chinese Division.

Rank II.

Chinese Girls School, No. 2. Sheungwan, Chinese School. Stanley, English School. Sheko, Chinese School. Chinese Girls School, No. 1.

Tanglungchau (Hakka) Chinese School.

order of their efficiency.

Rank II,-Continued.

Saiyingpun (Hakka) Chinese School.

Rank III.

Yaumati, English School. Taiwongkung, Chinese School. Saiyingpun, (Punti) Chinese School. Aplichau, Chinese School. Pokfulam, Chinese School. Wongmakok, Chinese School. Little Hongkong, Chinese School. Tokwawan (East), Chinese School.

Rank III,--Continued.

Matauchung, Chinese School. Taitamtuk, Chinese School. Hunghom, Chinese School. Mongkokts'un, Chinese School. Hok-un, Chinese School. Matau-wai, Chinese School. Mongkok-tsui, Chinese School. Shaiwan, Chinese School.

Tokwawan (West), Chinese School. Tsattszemui, Chinese School. Mongkok-tsun, Chinese School. Wongkok-tsui, Chinese School.

367

TABLE XI.—NUMBER of SCHOLARS attending Schools receiving GRANTS-IN-AID (under the Provisions of the Scheme of 1883), expenses incurred and amount of Grant gained by each in 1892.

Class of

Name of School.

Boys.

Girls.

Total.

School.

Expenses incurred in 1892.

Amount of Grant gained for 1892.

$ c.

$ c.

1

21

""

,,

I

American Board Mission, Bridges Street (Boys),

"

:>

**

Station Terrace (Boys),

"

"

Hinglung Lane (Boys),

Queen's Road West (Boys), Háwan (Girls),

"

""

11

争吵

"}

""

ני

-39

""

14

>>

>:

:1

25

92

"

77

""

99

19

:)

"J

::

>>

24

22

19

Stanley School (Girls),.

*1

1)

9:

"

""

Yaumati (Boys),....

>>

25

Graham Street (Girls),

Basel Mission, Shamshuipó (Boys),

Shaukiwán (Boys),

Tókwawan (Boys),

C. M. S. St. Stephen's Chinese School (Boys),

Lyndhurst Terrace (Boys),

Pottinger (Wellington) Street (Boys), Saiyingpun (Boys),

St. Stephen's Baxter Memorial (Girls).. Lyndhurst Terrace (Girls),

Third Street (Girls),.

Yaumati (Mixed),...

Hunghóm (Girls),

Quarry Bay (Girls),

F. E. S. Bonham Road, Chinese Division (Girls),

High Street (Girls),

Queen's Road West (Girls),.

Hollywood Road (Girls),

Pottinger Street (Girls),

Shaukiwan (Girls), . Tokwawan (Girls),

L. M. S. Square Street (Boys),

Wantsai Chapel (Boys),

Shektongtsui (Boys),

116

92

2: : : 2285882: : AJAJ

79

352.15

187.94

45

267.56

154.79

78

78

423.73

279.79

49

345.71

210.18

29

29

221.41

105.94

45

45

281.13

94.50

51

188.73

120.94

38

180.54

136.09

28

77.39

63.45

116

108.64

293.38

92

392.08

263.05

77

324.73

161.81

60

317.80

180.76

59

59

155.64

168.74

70

70

364.80

222.48

29

29

328.52

123.13

34

7

41

199.13

64.38

44

44

207.25

133.92

30

30

51.45

36

36

764.68

198.38

29

29

203.11

117.06

29

29

225.07

143.37

27

27

232 95

112.76

36

36

261.56

101.46

39

39

167.15

77.11

56

56

211.42

186.46

16

16

132.92

118

118

672.50

481.78

74

71

490.03

318.61

82

82

268.85

314.27

44

44

254.20

203.39

">

Saiyingpun I Division (Boys),

106

106

557.67

434.41

II

"

19

*

(Boys),

75

75

437.22

295.36

""

Hunghom (Boys),

82

82

399.28

292.29

""

Hospital Chapel (Boys),

79

79

361.87

293.69

31

"

Shektongtsui (Girls),.......

18

18

171.30

66.47

"1

步步

Saiyingpun (Girls),

104

104

367.92

387.27

27

"

Ui-hing Lane I Division (Girls),

55

55

304.78

234.35

II

""

??

"

13

29

Fletcher Street (Girls),

(Girls):

43

43

185.44

57

57

215.65

98.20

"S

Tanglungchau (Boys),

41

267.80

67.63

"

""

Shaukiwan (Boys),

85

85

347.51

245.67

"

"

Taikoktsui (Boys),

60

60

351.54

151.88

"

""

Square Street (Girls),

36

36

383.24

132.19

و.

Li-Yuen Street (Girls),.

35

35

232.29

113.65

""

D'Aguilar Street (Girls),

51

51

242.08

""

Third Street (Boys),

41

41

115.97

Bowrington (Girls),

12

12

58.83

Kau-u-fong (Girls),

77

77

361.01

324.10

***

*

وو

Stanley Street (Girls),

27

27

288.56

132.70

Tanglungchau (Girls),

58

58

218.50

186.39

"1

Taipingshan Chapel (Girls),

142

142

678.25

361.17

"}

Aberdeen Street (Girls),

79

79

497.79

277.02

"J

Wantsai Chapel (Girls),

88

88

556.07

247.12

...

Staunton Street (Girls),

34

34

458.17

152.62

"

39

Saiyingpun Second Street East (Girls),

35

35

381.27

154.96

59

Wongnaichung (Girls),..........

31

31

63.84

R. C. M. Cathedral School (Boys).......

83

...

83

171.00

105.64

:)

"

>>

"

""

"

""

Bridges Street, Chinese School (Girls),......... Hollywood Road, Charitable School (Girls), Holy Infancy School I Division (Boys),

64

64

365.00

241.49

59

59

390.00

205.30

22

22

316.00

130.31

II

"

37

""

11

(Girls),

40

40

>>

Yaumati (Girls),"

52

52

209.00

166.82

11.

Shaukiwan (Girls),

64

64

389.00

143.74

""

Hunghom (Girls),

32

32

255.00

83.60

""

15

19

"

Wesleyan Mission Spring Gardens (Boys),

Wellington Street (Boys),

25

25

204.00

72.08

117

117

434.00

313.19

>>

11

"

"

"

(Girls),

19

49

216.00

132.30

Lascar Row (Girls),.

45

45

148.44

"

Wantsai (Boys),

39

39

129.47

4

3

Upper Graham Street (Girls),

48

48

252.62

""

Lascar Row (Boys),

79

79

217.44

19

59

Kennedy Town (Boys),

24

24

84.21

III

Basel Mission, High Street (Girls),

83

83

801.13

504.05

Berlin Mission (Girls),

23

23

982.00

228.05

C. M. S. Victoria Home and Orphanage (Girls),...

10

40

419.34

313.59

IV

St. Stephen's Anglo-Chinese School (Boys),

141

141

724.01

""

St. Paul's College School (Boys),

93

93

1,658.28

401.23

"}

Diocesan Home and Orphanage (Boys),

130

130

11,976.72

1,088.74

**

F. E. S. Bonham Road English Division (Girls),

25

25

244.50

234.62

:

I. M. S. Taipingshan (Boys),

64

64

170.24

"

*

Third Street (Poya),

29

29

113.20

*

Stewart English School (Boys),

R. C. M. St. Joseph's College Chinese Division (Boys),

29

29

7.16

33

33

5,241.89

1,974.29

""

15

"

European

"}

11

High School (Boys),

(Boys),.....

199

199

35

35

1,525.40

241.08

وو

1:

>>>

29

St. Francis

**

"

Portuguesc

"}

English

Italian Convent English Division (Girls),

Portuguese Division (Girls), Bridges Street English

Victoria Portuguese School (Mixed),

200

200

30

5,350.00

1,514.11

30

>>

'(Girls),

69

69

*2,143.00

929.14

>>

(Girls),

70

70

**

(Girls),

42

42

657.00

364.87

*

(Girls),

20

20

12

32

11

1.243.00

294.86

ور

#

English

"

"

**

>>

(Boys), (Girls),

163

163

7,443.80

1,396.23

54

54

2,951

2,704

5,655

$54,394.13

$23,512.79

368

TABLE XII.-ENROLMENT, ATTENDANCE and NUMBER of SCHOOL DAYS, at the GRANT-IN-AID SCHOOLS during 1892.

Maximum Minimum Average Average

No.

Name of School.

Monthly Enrol- ment.

Attend-

Maximum Minimum Monthly

Enrol- Daily Daily

Attend-

Average

Monthly

Average Daily At- tendance

Enrol-

Number of School

for the

ment.

ment.

ance.

ance.

Year.

Days.

2

"

3

""

"

1 American Board Mission Bridges Street, (Boys),

Station Terrace (Boys), Hinglung Lane (Boys),

39

7

8

"

9

10

"

Basel Mission, Shamshuipò (Boys),

"

C.M.S., St. Stephen's Chinese School (Boys),

Queen's Road West (Boys), Háwán (Girls),

Graham Street (Girls),

Shaukiwán (Boys),

Tókwawán (Boys),

108

11

"

Lyndhurst Terrace (Boys),

CON

79

45

78

49

29

41

51

**KAN**

50

74.41

44.91

71.45

65.83

245

36

42.55

33.54

39.81

36.93

244

28

72.38

21.90

68.27

60.51

265

46

47.76

43.30

48.63

45.24

245

18

25.72

17.14

25.09

22.51

259

27

39.87

21.13

35.18

31.59

253

23

44.44

8.80

15.36

39.30

250

38

22

36.07

15.16

36.27

33.25

257

27

16

23.55

9.18

22.09

16.78

261

76

102.00

66.82

94.00

86.82

271

72

54

69.70

52.61

62.58

60.89

259

12

Pottinger Street (Boys),

51

37

46.92

29.35

44.91

42.82

267

13

Saiyingpún (Boys),

57

40

49.47

29.64

47.90

42.27

247

14

St. Stephen's Baxter Memorial (Girls),

17

18

41.50

16.91

37.50

34.62

275

15

""

Lyndhurst Terrace (Girls),

47

30

46.04

25.00

42.08

36.68

255

16

JJ

Third Street (Girls),

26

17

20.76

9.84

22.27

17.61

273

17

11

Yaumati (Mixed),

28

22

22.42

11.33

25.50

17.76

272

18

""

Hunghom (Girls),

44

32

37.15

26.85

40.09

32.96

275

19

Quarry Bay (Girls),

26

13

22.78

12.20

19.54

16.65

261

20

F.E.S., Bonham Road, Chinese Division (Girls),

28

22

27.90

19.72

25.90

25.32

208

21

""

High Street (Girls),

25

17

23.33

9.18

22.90

20.72

240

22

"

Queen's Road West (Girls),

27

22

26.00

20.21

25.45

23.41

269

23

"

Hollywood Road (Girls),

27

15

25.16

11.46

23.36

20.69

265

24

}:

25

"1

26

95

27

Pottinger Street (Girls),

Stanley School (Girls), Shaukiwán (Girls), Tókwawán (Girls),

28 L.M.S., Square Street (Boys),

24

17

23.27

14.14

19.91

18.29

265

34

14

29.73

10.00

29.27

22.66

238

52

24

39.68

21.42

36.83

35.77

260-

14

6

9.88

4.12

12.90

8.06

238

112

91

105.93

79.23

102.5+

97.13

238

29

"

Wantsai Chapel (Boys),

72

62

69.80

56.22

69.00

65.37

240

30

"

Yaumati (Boys),

82

53

77.00

40.78

77.00

68.81

237

31

"

Shektongtsui (Boys).

44

29

41.68

26.23

40.45

38.09

245

32

}}

Saiyingpun, I. Division (Boys),

106

62

89.12

35.35

101.00

81.27

243

33

II.

"

32

(Boys),

75

57

67.03

51.85

70.63

62.90

255

34

"?

Hunghòm (Boys),

82

48

74.37

10.92

74.55

67.67

240

35

"9

Hospital Chapel (Boys),

79

62

76.20

56.58

75.18

71.14

237

36

""

Shektongtsui (Girls),

18

12

17.34

11,60

15.72

14.96

263

37

39

Saiyingpun (Girls),

96

64

83.55

57.57

88.72

77.65

247

38

>>

Ui-hing Lane, I. Division (Girls),

52

39

50.26

37.47

46.90

44.68

242

39

II.

"

97

""

(Girls),

43

18

41.00

18.00

37.45

35.20

275

40

"

Fletcher Street (Girls),

40

30

35.60

25.52

35.16

31.86

278

41

39

Tanglungchau (Boys),

26

11

26.00

11.00

18.08

17.18

271

42

"

Shaukiwan (Boys),

71

39

72.23

36.50

67.54

62.60

236

43

93

44

"

Taikoktsui (Boys),.

Square Street (Girls),

60

28

53.36

21.00

51.72

45.87

245

31

25

29.53

23.07

29.51

26.64

275

45

"1

Li Yuen Street (Girls),.

35

24

34.44

22.52

29.90

29.13

272

46

#

D'Aguilar Street (Girls),

49

34

45.61

26.00

44.45

37.82

268

47

37

Third Street (Boys),

41

34

37.76

24.07

37.70

34.07

225

48

"?

Bowrington (Girls),

12

10

11.91

9.28

11.30

10.92

227

49

"

Kau-u-fong (Girls),

58

38

55.33

33.76

52.91

50.15

273

50

19

Stanley Street (Girls),

25

9

20.07

6.15

21.54

17.68

266

51

">

Tanglungchau (Girls),

50

22

38 11

18.69

39.33

31.70

275

52

}}

Taipingshan Chapel (Girls),

106

73

90.28

53.61

96.08

82.17

270

53

17

Aberdeen Street (Girls),

48

29

46.84

26.00

43.66

41.10

265

54

";

Wantsai Chapel (Girls),...

56

41

48.00

35.42

51.75

41.62

275

55

93

Staunton Street (Girls),

34

30

32,96

21.84

32.54

30.15

264

56

"

Saiyingpun, Second Street East (Girls),

30

14

28.00

9.83

26.27

24.11

258

57

Wongnaichung (Girls),..

30

15

26.50

10.76

20.41

16.20

256

58 R.C.M., Cathedral School (Boys),

61

42

58.60

42.00

55,75

49.20

267

59

60

11

61

Bridges Street, Chinese School (Girls), Hollywood Road, Charitable School (Girls), Holy Infancy School, I. Division (Boys),.

56

31

50.74

24.56

47.91

42.20

270

46

26

43.34

23.23

37.91

35.10

260

16

12

16.00

11.66

14.08

13.28

256

62

II.

63

*

Yaumati (Girls);

"

(Girls),

40

35

38.90

28.70

38.08

32.38

254

47

28

39.76

24.50

42.50

36.60

287

64

Shaukiwán (Girls),

47

27

42.84

22.87

40.83

35.30

282

65

Hungbom (Girls),..

27

20

25.70

10.61

24.00

19.00

277

66

67

1:

3

Wesleyan Mission, Spring Gardens (Boys),

Wellington Street (Boys),

23

13

19.88

11.55

20.45

17.87

235

113

87

104.32

71.92

100.86

91.67

248

68

י

"

(Girls),

46

31

42.04

22.91

39.09

35.26

246

69

**

Lascar Row (Girls),

45

17

41.74

- 16.83

38.36

36.25

259

70

"

"}

Wantsai (Boys),

38

28

36.04

23.91

35.18

32.28

256

71

19

وو

Upper Graham Street (Girls),...

48

19

42.67

13.80

40.63

35.41

270

72

Lascar Row (Boys),

77

57

70.75

48.69

68.17

60.88

239

73

Kennedy Town (Boys),

24

13

23.07

10.33

22.18

20.64

247

74 Basel Mission, High Street (Girls),

70

65

64.75

51.57

68.36

61.07

259

75

Berlin Mission (Girls),

23

23

23.00

21.92

23.00

22.55

267

76

C.M.S., Victoria Home and Orphanage (Girls),..

37

32

34.92

30.61

34.09

33.59

244

77

་་

St. Stephen's Anglo-Chinese School (Boys),.

.126

89

114.00

71.73

111.09

98.11

243

78

St. Paul's College School (Boys),

71

22

64.36

19.14

55.75

54.34

235

79

Diocesan Home and Orphanage (Boys),

103

81

95.29

75.33

94.54

87.04

233

80

F.E.S., Bonham Road. English Division (Girls),

24

18

23.38

16.70

21.72

20.96

199

81 L.M.S., Taipingshan (Boys),

43

24

33.08

14.36

36.18

29.19

259

82

+1

Third Street (Boys)...

25

16

.24.00

13.00

20.63

19.15

255

83

Stewart English School (Boys),.

14

6

10.22

5.07

9.36

7.53

248

84 R.C.M., St. Joseph's College, Chinese Division (Boys)...

33

18

28.00

12.00

25.00

20.00

190

European Division (Boys),.

199

176

186.77

160.00

190.08

176.20

227

86

High School (Boys),.

32

20

32.00

19.60

24.91

21.76

270

87

Italian Convent, English Division (Girls),

164

151

154.54

133.00

158.27

143.69

217

88

"

55

Portuguese Division (Girls),

30

29

28.70

26.14

29.63

27.60

217

$9

*

90

??

>

91

>>

92

>>

12

93

94

""

"}

Bridges Street, English Division (Girls).

Portuguese Division (Girls),

St. Francis, Portuguese Division (Girls),.

English Division (Girls),

Victoria Portuguese School (Mixed),

English School (Boys),

66

22

53.56

13.00

58.90

43.42

232

62

54

48.55

27.60

56.81

43.62

232

კე

30

32.20

24.03

35.58

28.98

259

19

14

15.68

9.60

16.66

13.08

259

41

26

32.27

15.00

37.25

30.87

261

105

66

94.30

57.01

90.66

81.80

276

95

#

"

(Girls),

49

35

45.48

32.40

40.66

37.41

274

NAME OF SCHOOL.

i

XIII.-RESULTS of the EXAMINATION of the GRANT-IN-AID SCHOOLs in 1892, under th

Class of School.

No. of Scholars Presented.

No. of Scholars Examined.

Stand. I.

Stand. II.

Stand. III.

Stand. IV.

Stand. V.

Stand. VI.

Stand. IV.

Stand. V.

Stand. VI.

Stand. I.

Stand. II.

Stand. III.

Stand. IV.

Stand. V.

Stand. VI.

Stand. IV.

Stand. V.

Stand. VI.

Passed.

Failed.

Ordinary Subjects.

Special

Ordinary Subjects.

Special Ordinary

Subjects.

Subjects.

Subjects.

NUMBER OF SCHOLARS Who Passed,

NUMBER OF SCHOLARS WHO FAILED.

ΤΟΥ

2.-

"

3.-

>>

4.-

>

33

5.- 6.-

"

19

"

8.- 9.-

19

++

1.- American Board Mission, Bridges Street, (Boys)..........

21

Station Terrace, (Boys),

I

69 67

3

18

9

36 34

3 21

6

5

24

6

3

1

Hinglung Lane. (Boys),..

65

61

1 29

18

Queen's Road West, (Boys), Háwan, (Girls), Graham Street, (Girls),

46

45.

19

12

23

23

5

5

30 87

30 4

49 12

34 11

16 7

32

30

8

17 13

7.-Basel Mission, Shamshuipo, (Boys),

Shaukiwan, (Boys), Tokwawán, (Boys),...

10.-C. M. S., St. Stephen's Chinese School, (Boys),

45

42

3 16

3.8 37

13 10

28

19

18

4 6

3

22 20 20 7 13 5

65

61

37 11

49 12

11.- 12.- 13.-

97

Lyndhurst Terrace, (Boys).

55

50

28 12

44

6

"

Pottinger Street, (Boys),.........

41

36

1

17

7

27

9

59

Saiyingp'ún, (Boys),

40

38

2

19 10

32

6

14.-

St. Stephen's Baxter Memorial, (Girls),

34

34

15

8

5

28

15.-

Lyndhurst Terrace, (Girls),..

36

36

9

10

32

16.-

19

Third Street, (Girls),

20

20

4

4

3

2

16

17.- 18.-

19

Yaumáti, (Mixed),.......

22

19

1

9

2

19

Hunghom. (Girls),..

27

26

11

11 3

19.

Quarry Bay, (Girls),

11

9

3

5

21.

"

22.- 23.- 24.- 25.-. 26.-

*1

"

19

99

27.-

"

High Street, (Girls),..

Tòkwáwán, (Girls),

20.-F. É. S., Bonham Road, Chinese Division, (Girls),

Queen's Road West, (Girls),

Hollywood Road, (Girls),

Pottinger Street, (Girls),..

Stanley School, (Girls), Shaukiwán, (Girls),

28.-L. M. S., Square Street, (Boys),

23

23

18

18

12

22

21

5

21

19

5

17

17

3 5

28

28

9

41

40

15 10

5

:323

::::::::

12

25

9

17

6

18

17

4

17

2

13

4

14 14

33

7

89

88

13 29 34

84 4

29.-

Wántsal Chapel, (Boys),

70

65

3 24 28

55 10

30.-

Yaumáti, (Boys)..

71

70

1 21 28

51

19

81.-

Shekt'ongtsui, (Boys),

38

38

11 22

33 5

32.-

19

Sairingpún I Division, (Boys),

93

89

1

43 32

77 12

33.-

II

99

99

(Boys),

66

66

3

25

21

2

13

51 15

34.-

Hunghom, (Boys),..

71

65

2

29 16

3

3

50

15

35.-

Hospital Chapel, (Boys),

68

58

35 15

2

3

51

7

36.- 37.- 88.-- 39.-- 40.-. 41.----

Shektongtsui, (Girls),

13

13

4

3

8 5

91

Saiyingpin, (Girls),

86

85

14 33

16

3

5

65 20

91

Ui-hing Lane, I Division (Girls),.

39

37

4

14

7

32

5

»

"

II

(Girls),.

35

33

9

12

29

4

"

Fletcher Street, (Girls),

29

29

2

;

13 16

Tanglungchau, (Boys),..

17

16

6

Co

5

11

5

42.-

43.-

44.-

"

45.-

13

46.-

"

47.- 48.-

"

33

49.-

+

50.-

51.- 12.--- 53.-

55

Shaukiwán, (Boys),

Taikoktsui, (Boys),

Square Street, (Girls),

Li-yuen Street, (Girls),...

D'Aguilar Street, (Girls),

Third Street, (Boys),

Bowrington, (Girls),

Kau-il-fong, (Girls),

Stanley Street, (Girls),...

Tanglungchau, (Girls),..

62

61

4

24

14

43

18

47

47

12 18 3

33

14

26

26

10

4 7

2

23

3

21

21

7

2 1

19 2

42

42

8 14

13 2

37

5

35

35

4 3

10

8

18

17

12

12

2

9

11

1

50

48

17

21

21

9

34

33

8 15

Taipingshan Chapel, (Girls),

87

87 28 39

"

Aberdeen Street, (Girls),..

43

41

9 12

4359 N

17

6

4.

5

8

54.-

"

Wántsai Chapel, (Girls),

47

45

13 14

6

622768

2

2

55.-

Staunton Street, (Girls),.

30

30 13 8

56.-

57.-

"

Saiyingp❜ún Second Street East, (Girls),. Wongnaichung, (Girls),

27

27 11

15

14

5

58.-R. Ĉ. Mission, Cathedral School, (Boys),..

39

38

14

59.-

11

60.- 61.- 62.- 63.-

"3

}}

Bridges Street, Chinese School, (Girls), Hollywood Road, Charitable School, (Girls), Holy Infancy School, I Division, (Boys),

42

38

11

4

33

33

10

13

13

6

2

>>

II

31

11

Yaumáti, "(Girls),.

(Girls),

16

16

5

34

34

16

13

64.-

19

Shaukiwán, (Girls),

32

32

16

65.

"

Hanghom, (Girls),

21

21

12

66.-Wesleyan Mission, Spring Gardens, (Boys),

19

18

2

3728

2

6 5

:::::: www.

:

4

67.-

31

Wellington Street, (Boys)..

80

79

18

26 11

68.- 69.- 70.- 71.- 72.-

>

(Girls),.

31

29

4

13

*

Lascar Row (Girls),

33

30

6

14

»

"

Wantsai, (Boys),..........

31

29

9

11 7

"

Upper Graham Street, (Girls),

45

45

7

14

55

"

Lascar Row (Boys),

58

53

7

8

19

73.-

"}

55

Kennedy Town, (Boys),..

22

20

7 6

13

4

35

"

85.-

11

$6.

87.-

11

88,-

"

89.-

24

90.-

>>

91.

92.

93.- 94.

"1

92

95,-

"

وه

74.-Basel Mission, High Street, (Girls),

75.-Berlin Mission, (Girls),..

76.-C. M. S. Victoria Home and Orphanage, (Girls), 77.-

St. Stephen's Anglo-Chinese, (Boys),

78.-St. Paul's College School (Boys),

78.-Diocesan Home and Orphanage, (Boys),...

80.-F. E. S. Bonham Road, English Division, (Girls),

81.-L. M. S. Taipingshan, (Boys),..

82.-

Third Street, (Boys), 83.-

Stewart English School, (Boys), 84.-R. C. M., St. Joseph's College, Chinese Division, (Boys),

European

High School, (Boys), Italian Convent, English Division, (Girls),

Portuguese Division, (Girls),. Bridges Street, English Division, (Girls),

Portuguese Division, (Girls),

St. Francis, Portuguese Division, (Girls),.

Victoria Portuguese School, (Mixed),

III 60

60

27 12

8

TII

23

20

5

5

III 34

34

11

7

IV

99

98

$3 24

13

2

IV 49

43

17 9 7 3

6

IV

69

67

12 7 13 10 10 13 36

31

42

JV 21

20

1

2 8 5 2

IV 24

24

10 10

IV

16

15

10 5

IV

4

2

-i mimi ni

4

::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::** :

46

2

21

31

2

61

26

39

40

26

254

27

13

1

22

16

32

6

26

7

9

4

12 4

32

2

30

16

5

13 5

59

20

19

10

24

6

27

2

20

15

35

18

15

5

68

2

19

1

72

$2

42

10

€5

18

21

3

15

2

IV

"

(Boys),.

IV 146

144

16 29 28 30

20 14 53

42

17

14 137

IV 16 IV

109

16 107

1

3

6 5

15

IV 30

30

IV

57

57

26 18

8 14 24

4 11

27 16 10

7

8

13 2

IV 46

46 17 13 11

IV

26

26

6

14

English

(Girls),

English

"

(Boys),

>>

(Girls),

14

IV

13

13

IV

IV

ददद

36

ས་

5

2

36 11 8 6

to to co

6

79

73

9 9 12 17

40

19

35

35

7

7

5

:::::::::

100

30

53

41

26

13

32

22

68

35

Education Department, 30th January, 1893.

* Less Reduction 5 per cent.

+ $31.49 Forfeited to Government.

* Deducted $24 by C.S.O. 849 of 1892.

See C.S.O. 2864 of 189%

GRANT-IN-AID SCHOOLS in 1892, under the provisions of the Scheme of 15th September, 1883.

3

1

8

8

5

24

3

2

:::::::

742-732+

65.83

3062

Stand. V.

Stand. VI.

Stand. I.

Stand. II.

Stand. III.

Stand. IV.

Stand. V.

Stand. VI.

Stand. IV.

Stand. V.

Stand. VI.

Passed,

Failed.

Passed,

Failed.

›ecial

bjects.

Ordinary Subjects.

Special Subjects.

Ordinary Special Subjects. Subjects.

Average Daily Attendance

during the Year.

Stand. I.

SSED.

NUMBER OF SCHOLARS WHO FAILED.

TOTALS.

SUMS TO WHICH THE SCHOOL 18 ENTITLED.

30

30

49

12

34 11

16

17

13

22

20

20

18

5

49 12

44

6

27

32

28

32

16

12

25

9

3

17

க.

18

17

17

2

13

4

14 14

33 7

84 4

55 10

61 19

33

5

77 12

13

51

15

50

15

3

51

7

8

5

65

20

32 5

29

4

3

13 16

11

5

****:*:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

36.93

60.51

84 26 116

108

8

45.24

76

72 8

22.51 10 20

24

31.59 16

30 32

39.30 6

64

18

33.25

26

40

36

16.78 8

24

18

£6.82

148

60.89

112 72 32

42.32 2

49.27 4

G8 76

60

24.62 30 $2 36.08 18 36 17.61 8 16 17.76 2 36 12 32.96 22 44 18 16.65 6 20 6

30

25.32 2

20.72 6 48 6

30

23.41 4 20 20.69 10 32 18.29 6 20 22.66 18 12 35.77 30

42 24

40 30

..

97.13 26 65.37 6 68.81 2 38.09

116

204

96 168 84 168

44 132

81.27

2 172 192

62.90 6 100 126

67.67 4 116

71.14

140

14.96

16 18 8

77.65 28 132 96 8 10

43

18

33

14

45.87 24 72

23

3

48 24 32

31.86 4 20 30 8 17.18

62.60 8 96 84 8

26.64 20 16 42 16

44.68 8 56 42 40 20 35.20 18

24 30

18

19

2

29.13 14 32 12 8 10

37

5

37.82 16 56 78 16

7

2

18 17

11

34.07 8 12 60

10.92 4 36

46

2

21

*0.15 34 16 102 48 20 17.68 18 12 36 16

31

31.70 16 60 24 16 20

61

26

82.17 56 76 30 56

39

41.10 18 48 49 48 30

40

41.62 26 56 36 24 20

2

26

30.15 26 32 18

27

13

1

22

16

24.11 22 24 42 16.20 10 32 49.20 28 28

6

32

42.20 22 36 24 32 20 24

26

35.10 20 16 24 32

HINN1240

9

12

32

442

30

16

5

13.28 12 &

32.18 10 12 24

36,60 32 52 18

35,30 32 28 42 19.00

24

6

8 12

13 5 59 20 19 10

17.87 4 24 30 91.67

36 104 66 32

35.26 8 52 12

24 6

36.25 12 56 24

$::::::::

Hi Hi mi mami: ut mi

27

20

15

35

18

2 12 00

32.28 18 44 42

35.41 14

84

60.88 14 32 114

15

5

58 2

19

1

::

$2

2

20.04 4 28 36 61.07 162 22.55 33.59 66 42

84

64

35

$2

6

98.11 818 192

130 24

6

42

1

2

4

9 10 C5

2 109

23

18

21

3

15

2

17

14 187

15

15

30

లు: :::

Awi wi

100

3

30

53

41

26

13

32

4

22

5

1

68

62

35

23:

28

14

:∞∞∞∞∞∞ : : : : :*

:*:*:**

• 2 0 0 2 2 2 2 2 NAAIAIA¤S :8*******:-**°*°**88****288 :888882 :::8MEGA 98222

42 16

བས་

8

60 16 20

18 16 20 12

8

12 24

16

24

64

8

10

16

96 24

90 8

8

20

24

30

#¦ ¦¦Âæ::::::::82 : : :8 19 ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ 19 ::::22 :::::: : : :& 1&ZARA :::&M ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀::

8

66 8

.00

20

20

72

54

Stand. III.

Stand. IV.

Stand. V.

Stand. VI.

:::::::: Stand. IV.

Stand. V.

Stand. VI.

⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀⠀ ⠀ :: Very Good.

6.00

815.00

::::

Good.

~*!::: | Fair.

Ordinary Subjects.

Subjects.

Special

Needle Work.

WOHNGA | Capitation Grant.

Total Grant earned in 1892.

Amount of Reduction cent.

per

Amount payable.

Amount due to Teacher.

Amount due to Manager.

$

65.83

197.83

9.89

36.93 162.93.

187.94 8.14 154.79 38.69

46.98 140.96

116.10

60.51

294.51

14.72 279.79 69.94

209.85

45.24

221.24

22.51

111.51

11.06 5.57

210.18 52,54

157.64

31.59 132.62

6.63

105.94 125.99 t..

26.48

79.46

94.50

39.30

127.30

6.36 120.94 30.23

90.71

33.25

143.25

7.16 136.09

34.02

102.07

16.78

66.78

3.33 63.45

15.86

47.59

£6.82

308 82

15.44 293.38

73.34 220.04

60.59

276.89

42.32 170.32 42.27 190.27

90

24

24

10

12

:::::::::::::::::::::::

40 14 19.50

9.00

34.62

177.62

14

36.68

234.18

11.70

13.84 263.05 65.76 197.29 8.51 161.81 40.45 121.36 9.51 180,76 45.19 135.57 8.88 168.74 42.18 126.56 222,48 55.62 166,86

16 6.00

17.61

129 61

6.48

17.76

€7.76

3.38

123.13 64.38

30.78 92.35

16.09 48.29

15.00 9

32.96

140.96

7.04

133.92

33.48 100.44

1.50 4

J6.65

54.15

18 16.50 3

8 7.50

25.32

208.82

3

8 19.50 4 1418.00

16 10.50

10.50

2

10 19.60

7

20.72 123.22 23.41 150.91 20.69 118.69 18.29 106.79 22.66

81.16 35.77 196.27

2.70 51.45 12.86 38.59 10.44 198.38 49.59 148.79

6.16 J17.06 29.26

7.54 143.37 5.93 112.76

87.80 35.84 107.53 28.19 84.57

5.33 101.46 25.36 4.05 77.11 9.81 186.46

76.10

19.27

57.84

46.61

139.85

..

2 9.00

2 8 33.00 15 6 18.00 12 621.00 11 4.60 5

10 12

::::::2:22*:::INA!

13.50 5

4 7.50 3 433.00 14

34.07 122.07

9.00

36 (27.00

2 2

10.92 61.92

50.15

12

4 18.00 6

17.68

12

24

6 16.50 6 212.00 44 6 28.50 12 19.50 13 413.50 17 12 12.00 3 3.00

341.15 17.05 139.68 31.70 196.20 82.17 380.17

6 16.20

30.15 160.65 24.11 163.11 67.20

12

1821.00 14 | 24.00

15

• LO C

49.20 111.20 42.20

9

8 15.00

13.50 6 218.00 17 6 6.00 2 2

19.00 88.00

6 12.00

14 9.00 19

48 30

8

36

45

50

45

24

:::

70 72

888888

54.34 102 72

70 36 84

87.04 72 56 130 120 140 208

20.96 6 16 80 60 28

29.19 60 80 10

19.15 60 40

7.53

176.20 96 232 280 360 280 224 106 156 168

24.76 6

143.69 156 144 270 192 140 48

27.60 48 88 40 84

43.42 84 192 130

43.62 102 104 110

28.98 36 112 €0

13.08 30 16 60

30.87 66 64

81.80 54 72 120 204 238

37.41 42 56 70 60

21 32

84 48 10 18 12 1028.50

:: 23:::: MEX:

:::: : : :

1000::::

30 48

48

20 12

72

$4 80

58::::::::

64 80 57

*:::::::::::::::::::::

12 | 22.50

20

93 168

BE::::::::::::::::

2419.50 38 1,50 30 122.50

2

26 9,00

·

7.53

0.37

17.87 75.87 91.67 329.67 35.26 139.26

132.30 23.07 99.23 36.25 156.25

7.81 148.44 37.11 111.33 32.28 136.28 6.81 1:9.47 32.86 97.11 35.41 265.91 13.29 252.62 63,15 189.47 60.88 228.88 11.44 217.44 54.36 163.08 20.04 88.64 4.43 84.21 21.05 63.16 61.07 530,57 26.52 22.55 240.05 12.00 33.59 330.09 16.50

98.11

762.11 38.10 54.34 422.34 87.04 1,146.04 20.96 246.96 29.19 179.19 19.15 119.15

7.53

105.64 26.41 79.23

241.49 60.37 181.12 35.10 216.10 10.80 205.30 51.32 153.98 13.28 39.28 1.96 $7.32 9.33 27.99 32.38 97.88 4.89 92.99 23.24 36.00 175.60 35.30 151.30

69.75 8.78 166.82 41.70 125,12 7.56 143.74 35.93 107,81 4.40

$3.60 20.90 62.70 3.79 72.08 18.02 54.06 16.48 313.19 78.29 234.90

6.96

97.13 507.13 25.35 65.37 335.37 16.76 318.61 68.81 330.81 16.54 314.27 78.56 38.09 214.08 10.70 203.39 50.84 81.27 457.27 22.86 434.41 108.60 62.90 310.90 15.54 295.36 73.84 67.67 307.67

15.38 292.29 73.07 219.22 71.14 309.14 15.45 293.69

73.42 220,27 14.96 69.96 3.49 66.47 16.61 49.86 77.65 407.65 20.38 387.27

$6.81 290.46 44.68 246.68 12.33 234.35 58.58 175.77 35.20 195.20 9.76 185.44 46.36 139,08 $1.86 103.36 5.16 98.20 24.55

73.65 17.18 71.18

3.55 67.63 16.90 50.73 62.60 258.60 12.93 245.67 61.41 184.20 45.87 159.87 7.99 151.88 37.97 113.81 26.64 139.14 6.95 132.19 33.04 99.15 29.13 119.63 5.98 113.65 28.41 85.24 37.82 254.82 12.74 242.08 60.52 181.56 6.10 115.97 28.99 86.98 3.09 58.83 14.70

44.13 324.10 81.02 243.08 6.98 132.70 33.17 99.53 9.81 186,39 46,59 139.80 19.00 361,17 90,29 270,88 41.10 291.60 14.58 277,02 69.25 -207.77 41.62 260.12 13.00 247.12 61.78 185.34 8.03 152.62 38.15 114.47 8.15 154.96 38.74 116.22 3.36 63,84 15.96 47.88 5.56 254.20 12.71

481.78

120.44

361.34

79.65 238.96

235.78

152.53

325,81

221,52

504,05 126.01 228.05

378,04

57,01

171.04

313.59 78 39

235.20

724.01

181.00 21.11 401.23 100.30

57.0 1,088.74 272.18 816.56

12.54 234,62 58.65 175,97 8.95 170.24 42.56 127.68 5.95 113.20

543.01

300.93

28.30 84.90

7.16

1,79

5.37

176.20 2,078.20

103.91 1,974.29

493.7 1,480.72

94 63.00 12 1819.50 6 50 39.00 1 18 36.00 1

24.76 258.76 12.68 241,08 143.69 1,262.69 63.1 1,199.56

60.27

180.81

6

4.50

12

4.50

7.50

11

* Less Reduction 5 per cent.

+ $31.49 Forfeited to Government.

‡ Deducted $24 by C.S.O, 849 of 1892.

See C.S.O. 2854 of 1892,

TOTAL,..

899.67 27.60 331.J0 16.55 314,55 78.63 235,92 43.42 56::.42 28.17 $35,25 133.81 401.44 43.02 414.62 20.73 393.89 98.47 295.42 28.98 247.48 12.37 235.11 58.77 176.34 13.08 136.58 6.82 129.76 32.44 0.32 30.87 310,37 15.51

294.86 73.71 221.15 81.80 982.80 49.14 933.66 233.41 700.25 37.41 486.91 24.34 462.57 115.64 346.93

$24,783.03 1,238.75 23,544.28 5,854.24 17,658.55

299.89

371

TABLE XIV.--PERCENTAGE of SCHOLARS who passed in the GRANT-IN-AID SCHOOLs during the last two Years.

No.

Name of School.

1892.

1891.

Increase.

Decrease.

123 H10 CO 1-∞ ©

American Board Mission, Bridges Street (Boys),.

44.78

$3.07

38.29

11

""

Station Terrace (Boys),

88.23

95.55

7.32

13

Hinglung Lane (Boys),

80.32

98.18

17.86

19

Queen's Road West (Boys),

75.55

93.33

17.78

8

**

10

11

";

12

">

";

Basel Mission, Shamshuipò (Boys),..

::

Tokwáwán (Boys),

C. M. S., St. Stephen's Chinese School (Boys),.

Lyndhurst Terrace, (Boys),

Pottinger Street (Boys),

Háwán (Girls),

69.56

89.47

19.91

Graham Street (Girls),

56.66

52.17

4.49

52.38

77.77

25.39

Shaukiwán (Boys),

81.08

100.00

18.92

72.22

53.84

18.39

80.32

94.20

13.88

88.00

86.00

2,00

75.00

97.36

22.36

13

""

Saiyingpún (Boys),

84.21

93 02

8.81

14

""

St. Stephen's Baxter Memorial (Girls),

$2.35

77.77

4.58

15

27

Lyndhurst Terrace (Girls),

88.88

97.22

8.34

16

97

Third Street (Girls),

80.00

100.00

20.00

17

""

Yaumati (Mixed),

63.15

66.66

3.51

18

,,

Hunghom (Girls),

96.15

100.00

3.85

19

Quarry Bay (Girls),

100.00

......

20

F. E. S., Bonham Road, Chinese Division (Girls),

73.91

85.71

11.80

21

""

High Street (Girls),

100.00

79.31

20.69

22

23

24

1/25

26

"

Queen's Road West (Girls),

80.95

87.50

6.55

29

Hollywood Road (Girls),

89.47

84.37

5.10

"

Pottinger Street (Girls),

76.47

80.00

3.53

19

"

27

28

29

""

30

31

32

""

33

""

Stanley School (Girls),

Shaukiwán (Girls),.. Tókwáwán (Girls),

L. M. S., Square Street (Boys)..

Wántsai Chapei (Loys),.. Yaumáti, (Boys),

Shektongtsui (Boys),

Saiyingpún, I. Division (Boys),

"

II.

"

50.00

81.25

31.25

82.50

85.18

2.68

81.81

95.44

97.59

2.15

84.61

91.17

6.56

72.85

90.47

17.65

86.84

94.44

7.60

86.51

91 95

5.44

(Boys),

77.27

90.90

13.63

34

"?

Hunghòm (Boys),.

76.92

94.00

7.08

35

""

Hospital Chapel (Boys),

87.93

95.91

7.98

36

""

Shektongtsui (Girls),

61,53

81.25

19.72

37

99

Saiyungpún (Girls),

76.47

79.47

3.00

38

11

Ui-hing Lane, I. Division

(Girls), .......

86.48

89.74

3.26

39

11.

11

**

(Girls),

87.87

40

*

41

""

42

"}

43

44

"

"

45

"

46

??

47

29

48

"

49

3"

50

"

51

""

52

""

53

11

Aberdeen Street (Girls),

54

55

56

>>

57

22

58

59

"

60

??

61

97

62

""

63

""

64

65

67

">

68

""

Fletcher Street (Girls), Tanglungchau (Boys), Shaukiwán (Boys),... Taikok-tsui (Boys),.... Square Street (Girls),.......... Li Yuen Street (Girls), D'Aguilar Street (Girls), Third Street (Boys), Bowrington (Girls), Kau-u-fong (Girls),

Stanley Street (Girls),

Tanglungchau (Girls),.

Taipingshán Chapel (Girls),

Wántsai Chapel (Girls),

Staunton Street (Girls),

R. C. M., Cathedral School (Boys),

Bridges Street, Chinese School (Girls), Hollywood Road, Charitable School (Girls), Holy Infancy School, I. Division (Boys),

"

Yaumati (Girls),..... Shaukiwan (Girls),....

Hunghòm (Girls),

66 Wesleyan Mission, Spring Gardens (Boys),

Wellington Street (Boys),

""

44.82

70.27

25.45

68.75

96.87

28.12

70.49

100.00

29.51

70.20

89.28

19.08

88.46

80.00

8.46

90.47

100.00

9.53

88.09

51.42

14

91.66

93.83

89.13

4.70

100.00

93.93

87.50

6.43

70.11

95.18

25.07

95.12

100.00

4.88

88.88

94.23

5.35

86.66

92,50

5.84

Saiyingpún, Second Street East (Girls); Wongnaichung (Girls),

100.00

91.75

8.25

92.85

57.89

90.00

32.11

84.21

87.03

2.82

78.78

97.82

19.04

69.23

78.57

9.34

II.

25

(Girls):

75.00

85.00

10.00

94.11

100.00

5.89

93.75

75.86

17.89

76.19

72.22

3.97

72.22

69.23

2.99

74.67

76.74

2.07

""

(Girls),

65.51

86.11

20.60

69

"

"

Lascar Row (Girls),

80.00

70

"

"

Wantsai (Boys).....

93.10

71

19

11

Upper Graham Street (Girls),.

66.66

72

Lascar Row (Boys),

66.03

Ka

73

""

Kennedy Town (Boys),

75.00

74

Basel Mission, High Street (Girls),..

96.66

100.00

3.34

75

Berlin Mission (Girls),

95.00

95.00

76

C. M. S., Victoria Home and Orphanage (Girls),

94.11

95.12

1.01

77

St. Stephen's Anglo-Chinese School (Boys),

93.87

85.29

8.58

78

St. Paul's College School (Boys),,

97.67

96.29

1.38

79

Diocesan Home and Orphanage (Boys),....

97.01

97.22

0.21

80

F. E. S., Bonham Road, English Division (Girls),

90.00

93.75

3.75

81

L. M. S., Taipingshan (Boys),

87.75

82

**

Third Street (Boys),

100.00

$3

Stewart English School (Boys),

Failed

84

་་

>>

>>

86

High School (Boys)..

87

88

19

89

.

90

་་

91

92

"

93

"

94

95

*

::

""

R. C. M., St. Joseph's College, Chinese Division (Boys),

Italian Convent, English Division (Girls),

Bridges Street, English Division (Girls),.....

St. Francis' Portuguese Division (Girls),

English Division (Girls),

Victoria Portuguese School (Mixed),

English School (Boys),

100.00

European Division (Boys),

95.13

93.05

2.08

93.75

88.46

5.29

93.45

95.34

1.89

Portuguese Division (Girls),

100.00

92.00

8.00

92.98

87.87

5.11

Portuguese Division (Girls),

89.13

77.35

11.78

100.00

93.54

6.46

100.00

100.00

88.88

100.00

11.12

93.15

100.00

6.85

(Girls),

100.00

100.00

372

TABLE XV. PERCENTAGE of PASSES in the various subjects in which the GRANT-IN-AID SCHOOLS were examined in 1892,

Class of

School.

Name of School.

Writing Arith- Reading. or Com- position.

metic.

Gram- Geogra mar. phy.

History.

Repeti- Expla- tion. nation.

>>

11

21

+1

29

??

3

"1

"

>>

"

"

I

American Board Mission, Bridges Street (Boys),.

"

Station Terrace (Boys), Hing-lung Lane (Boys), Queen's Road West (Boys).. Hawán (Girls),

Graham Street (Girls),..

Basel Mission, Shamshuipò (Boys),

C. M. S., St. Stephen's Chinese School (Boys),

71.01

43.47

...

Failed.

98.55 94.11

100.00

85.29

100.00

100.00

96.72 77.04

100.00

96.72

100.00

97.77 62.22

100.00

100.00

100.00

86.98

82.60

100.00

100.00

$7.50

90.00

63.03

66.66

100.00

100.00

73.80

45.23

100.00

92.85

60.00

Shaukiwán (Boys),

100.00

59.45

100.00

100.00

100.00

Tokwáwán (Boys),

94.44

61.11

100.00

100.00

100.00

73.77

100.00

100.00 100.00

Lyndhurst Terrace (Boys),

98.00

88.00

100.00

100.00

100.00

13

Pottinger Street (Boys),

100.00

72.22

100.00

100.00 100.00

""

Saiyingpún (Boys),

97.36 73.68

100.00

100.00 100.00

""

"}

St. Stephen's Baxter Memorial (Girls),.

100.00

76.47

Failed.

100.00 100.00

Lyndhurst Terrace (Girls),

100.00

86.11

100.00

100.00

100.00

??

Third Street (Girls),

100.00

75.00

85.71

100.00

100.00

31

11

Yaumáti (Mixed),

84.21

47.36

94.73

100.00

Hunghom (Girls),

100.00

96.15

100.00

100.00

Quarry Bay (Girls),

100.00

100.00

100.00 100.00

"

F. E. S., Bonham Road, Chinese Division (Girls),

100.00

78.26

92.85

95.65

»

»

High Street (Girls),

100.00

100.00

100.00

100.00/

95.45

100.00

!!

Queen's Road West (Girls),

100.00

85.71

66.66

100.00

90.00

"

"

"?

99

Hollywood Road (Girls),

Pottinger Street (Girls),. Stanley School (Girls), Shaukiwán (Girls), Tokwáwán (Girls),

L. M. S., Square Street (Boys),

100.00 89.47

100.00 100.00

100.00 64.70

100,00

100.00 100.00

75.00

57.14

100.00

100.00 100.00

100.00

65.55

$5.71

100.00 100.00

98.96

98.96

90.00

100.00

100.00

Wantsai Chapel (Boys),

96.92

83.07

100.00

98.46 100.00

#1

";

Yaumáti (Boys),

92.85

71.42

60.00

95.71

80.00

19

"

Shektongtsui (Boys),.

97.36

86.84

100.00

100.00

...

,,

"

Saiyingpún I Division (Boys),

98.87

89.88

33.33

100.00

100.00

(Boys),

96.96

66.66

100.00

100.00 100.00

Hunghom (Boys),

93.84

72.30

100,00

100.00 100.00

Hospital Chapel (Boys),

91.37

93.10

100,00

100.00 100.00

$1

"

Shektongtsui (Girls),

100.00

53.84

100,00

100.00

100.00

19

19

Saiyingpún (Girls),

100.00

74.11

100.00

100.00

96.66

19

21

Ui-hing Lane I Division (Girls),

94.59

81.08

100,00

97.29

100.00

II

"

(Girls),

96.96

87.87

$0.00

100.00

100.00

??

Fletcher Street (Girls),.

93.10 41.37

33.33

100.00

100.00

"

Tanglungchau (Boys),

81.25

62.50

100.00 100.00

"

33

Shaukiwan (Boys),

96.72

70.89

66.66

100.00 100.00

12

Taikoktsui (Boys),

100.00

57.44

100.00 100.00

99

39

Square Street (Girls),

100.00

80.76

100.00

100.00

100.00

19

19

Li Yuen Street (Girls)....

100.00 76.19

100.00

100.00

100.00

""

25

D'Aguilar Street (Girls),

100.00

90.48

$0.00

94.73

100.00

Third Street (Boys);

94.28

48.57

100.00

100.00

100.00

}:

Bowrington (Girls),

100.00

66.66

100.00

39

Kau-u-fong (Girls),

100.00

97.91

90.00

100.00 100,00

Stanley Street (Girls),

100.00

90.47

100.00

100.00 100.00

11

Tanglungchau (Girls),

100.00

93.93

100.00

100.00

100.00

19

Taipingshán Chapel (Girls),

94.25 74.71

100.00

100.00

92,59

""

Aberdeen Street (Girls),

100.00

92.68

100.00

100.00

100.00

11

>>

Wantsai Chapel (Girls),

97.77

84.14

100.00

100.00 100.00

11

Staunton Street, (Girls),

100.00

83.33

100.00

100.00 100.00

">

"

Saiyingpún, Second Street East (Girls),

100.00

100.00

100.00

100.00 100.00

"

Wongnaichung (Girls),

100.00 92.85

100.00

"

R. C. M., Cathedral School (Boys),..

97.36

50.00

100.00 100.00

>>

19

>>

+

"

Bridges Street, Chinese School (Girls),.................... Hollywood Road, Charitable School (Girls),. Holy Infancy School, I Division (Boys),...

97.36

76.31

100.00

100.00 100.00

100.00

78.78

100.00

100.00 100.00

92.30

53.84

Failed.

100.00

100.00

II

99

9)

"}]

(Girls),

100.00

62.50

100.00

100.00

"

Yaumati (Girls),

94.11

100.00

100.00 100.00

""

19

11

"

Hunghom (Girls), .

"}

"T

17

"

Shaukiwan (Girls),

Wesleyan Mission, Spring Gardens (Boys),

Wellington Street (Boys),

77

93.33

93.33

100.00 100.00

100.00

71.42

100.00 100.00

88.88 66.66

94.44

97.46

70.88

100.00

100.00

91.30

(Girls),

82.76

62.07

100.00

11

11

Lascar Row (Girls),.

100.00

76.66

100.00

100.00

100.00

وو

}}

"J

Wantsai (Boys),......

100.00

89.65

100.00

"

Upper Graham Street (Girls),

95.55 73.33

92.85

97.77 100.00

??

Lascar Row (Boys),........

100.00 62.26

50.00

19

"?

IV

??

St. Paul's College School (Boys),

"

III Basel Mission, High Street (Girls),

Berlin Mission (Girls),

St. Stephen's Anglo-Chinese School (Boys),

Diocesan Home and Orphanage (Boys),

Kennedy Town (Boys),

100.00 70.00

100.00 100.00

100.00

100.00

100.00 93.33 98.33

100.00

100.00

...

100.00 80.00

95.00

100.00

90.00

95.23 100.00

C. M. S., Victoria Home and Orphanage (Girls),

100.00

100.00

"

F. E. S., Bonham Road, English Division (Girls),

""

L. M. S. Taipingshan (Boys),

Third Street (Boys),

D

**

11

"3

++

":

European,

17

High School (Boys),

!!

و

33

":

"1

""

"

+9

17

>>

17

**

وو

Stewart English School (Boys),

R.C.M., St. Joseph's College Chinese Division (Boys),..

Italian Convent, English Division (Girls),.

Portuguese Division (Girls), Bridges Street, English Division (Girls),....

Portuguese Division (Girls),.

St. Francis, Portuguese Division (Girls),.

English.

""

Victoria, Portuguese School (Mixed),

English School (Boys),

Failed

94.11 94.11 85.29 89.79 89.79 97.33 93.02 93.75 100.00 97.01

98.50 95.83 100.00 90.00 95.00 81.25 100.00 100.00

87.75 100.00 100.00 93.33 100.00

50.00 Failed Failed

100.00

100.00

94.11

100.00

100.00

97.05

100.00

...

100.00

...

...

...

(Boys),.

100.00

93.0%

91.66

100.00

93.75

96.93 100.00 93.75 87.50 100.00

99.06

85.98

85.98

100.00 100.00

86.66

100.00 84.30 100.00 93.47

100.00

100.00 100.00

100.00

100.00 100.00 94.91 100.00 100.00 100.00 94.73 100.00 78.26 100.00

100.00

(Girls),

100.00 100.00

100.00

100.00

97.22 88.88 91.66

100.00

100.00

100.00

19

(Girls),

100.00

97.26 100.00

93.15 100.00

91,55 100.00 100.00 100.00

100.00 100.00

TABLE XVI.-NUMBER of UNEDUCATED CHILDREN in the Colony in 1892.

Estimated Number of Children of local school-age (6 to 16 years) in the Colony

Boys,

Girls,

....16,322

.14,665

30,987

Number of Scholars attending Public Schools under Government :-

Boys,

Girls,

5,781

2,942

8,723

Number of Scholars attending Private Schools, about :-

Boys,

Girls,

1,868

349

2,217

10,940

Remaining uneducated or imperfectly educated,....................

20,047

373

No. 1.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 11th January, 1893.

49

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (GEORGE THOMAS MICHAEL O'BRIEN, C.M.G.), Chairman.

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

"

the Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART LOCKHART).

""

the Colonial Treasurer, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-Innes). the Director of Public Works, (FRANCIS ALFRED COOPER).

>>

"

""

""

3

25

the Harbour Master, (ROBERT MURRAY RUMSEY).

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS.

JAMES JARDINE BELL-IRVING.

The Committee meet at the request of the Colonial Secretary.

The Minutes of the last Meeting held on the 30th November, 1892, were read and confirmed. Read the following Minute under the hand of His Excellency the Governor :-

C.S.O. 2874 of 1892.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of £500 to cover the cost of show cases, the pay of an attendant to arrange exhibits, and other expenses, in connection with a proposed representation of the resources of Hongkong at the Imperial Institute to be opened in May next.

Government House, Hongkong, 3rd January, 1893.

The Committee unanimously agreed that the vote be passed.

The Committee is then adjourned sine die.

Read and confirmed on the 5th April, 1893.

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 25th January, 1893.

ARATHOON SETH,

Clerk of Councils.

G. T. M. O'BRIEN,

Chairman.

No. 2.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 5th April, 1893.

51

C.S.O.

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (GEORGE THOMAS MICHAEL O'BRIEN, C.M.G.), Chairman.

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

X

>>

""

the Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART LOCKHART).

the Colonial Treasurer, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES).

the Director of Public Works, (FRANCIS Alfred Cooper).

the Harbour Master, (ROBERT MURRAY RUMSEY, R.N.). CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

""

>>

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

""

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS.

The Committee met at the request of the Colonial Secretary.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 11th January, 1893, were read and confirmed. Read the following Minute under the hand of His Excellency the Governor :-

2935 of 1892.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Nineteen thousand, Three hundred and Nineteen Dollars and Forty-eight Cents, ($19,319.48), for the construction of new roads at Kowloon.

This item is made up as follows:-

Re-vote of unexpended balance of last year's vote of $10,000,.....$ 4,319.48 Additional vote asked for,

... 15,000.00

$19,319.48

Government House, Hongkong, 1st April, 1893.

The Committee unanimously agreed that the vote be passed.

The Committee is then adjourned sine die.

Read and confirmed on the 25th May, 1893.

ARATHOON SETH, Clerk of Councils.

G. T. M. O'BRIEN,

Chairman.

No. 3.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 25th May, 1893.

53

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (GEORGE THOMAS MICHAEL O'BRIEN, C.M.G.), Chairman.

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

""

>>

the Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART LOCKHART).

>>

the Colonial Treasurer, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES). the Director of Public Works, (FRANCIS ALFRED COOPER).

**

**

**

the Harbour Master, (ROBERT MURRAY RUMSEY, R.N.). HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS.

The Honourable CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

">

ABSENT:

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

The Committee met at the request of the Colonial Secretary.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 5th ultimo, were read and confirmed.

Read the following Minute under the hand of His Excellency the Governor

C.S.O.

738 of 1893.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sun of Thirteen thousand Dollars. ($13,000), for the extension of MacDonnell and Austin Roads at Kowloon.

Government House, Hongkong, 15th April, 1893.

The Committee unanimously agreed that the vote be passed.

The Committee is then adjourned sine die.

Read and confirmed on the 19th June, 1893.

ARATHOON SETH, Clerk of Councils.

W. M. GOODMAN,

Chairman.

No. 4.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 19th June, 1893.

t

55

C.S.O.

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN), Chairman.

the Acting Registrar General, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON). the Colonial Treasurer, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHEll-Innes).

>>

77

19

";

"9

19

the Director of Public Works, (FRANCIS ALFRED COOPER).

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS.

ABSENT:

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (GEORGE THOMAS MICHAEL O'BRIEN, C.M.G.).

the Harbour Master, (ROBERT MURRAY RUMSEY, R.N.).

The Committee met at the request of the Attorney General.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 25th ultimo, were read and confirmed. Read the following Minute under the hand of His Excellency the Governor :-

1224 of 1893.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to re-vote the sum of Six thousand Dollars, ($6,000), being the unexpended portion of the Government contribution to the reclamation in front of Marine Lots Nos. 95, 98 and 105.

Government House, Hongkong, 5th June, 1893.

The Committee unanimously agreed that the vote be passed,

The Committee then adjourned.

Read and confirmed on the 29th August, 1893.

ARATHOON SETH, Clerk of Councils.

G. T. M. O'BRIEN,

Chairman.

No. 5.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 29th August, 1893.

57

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (GEORGE THOMAS MICHAEL OBRIEN, C.M.G.), Chairman.

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

C.S.O.

""

""

the Colonial Treasurer, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES).

""

the Director of Public Works, (FRANCIS ALFRED COOPER).

>>

the Harbour Master, (ROBERT MURRAY RUMSEY, R.N.).

11

,,

""

19

"?

the Acting Registrar General, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON). CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

JAMES JOHNStone KESWICK.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD. EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS.

The Committee met at the request of the Colonial Secretary.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 19th June last, were read and confirmed.

(1) Read the following Minute under the hand of His Excellency the Governor.

1717 of 1893.

C.S.O.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Six hundred Dollars, ($600), being the cost of furniture for Government House.

Government House, Hongkong, 27th July, 1893.

The Committee unanimously agreed that the vote be passed.

(2) Read the following Minute under the hand of His Excellency the Governor.

1603 of 1893.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to re-vote the sum of Eighty thousand Dollars, ($80,000), being part of the sum voted in 1892, as the Government Contribution to the Praya Reclamation Fund.

Government House, Hongkong, 10th August, 1893.

The Committee unanimously agreed that the vote be passed.

(3) Read the following Minute under the hand of His Excellency the Governor.

C.S.O. 1813 of 1893.

C.S.O.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Five thousand Dollars, ($5,000), for repairs to Public Buildings.

Government House, Hongkong, 11th August, 1893.

The Committee unanimously agreed that the vote be passed.

(4) Read the following Minute under the hand of His Excellency the Governor.

1813 of 1893.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One thousand and Five hundred Dollars, ($1,500), for repairs of Roads in Kowloon.

Government House, Hongkong, 11th August, 1893.

The Committee unanimously agreed that the vote be passed. The Committee then adjourned.

Read and confirmed on the 13th December, 1893.

ARATHOON SETH,

Clerk of Councils.

G. T. M. OBRIEN,

Chairman.

i

No. 6.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 13th December, 1893.

59

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (GEORGE THOMAS MICHAEL OBRIEN, C.M.G.), Chairman.

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

">

">

the Colonial Treasurer, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES).

>>

the Harbour Master, (ROBERT MURRAY RUMSEY, R.N.).

the Acting Registrar General, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON).

י,

وو

EDWARD BOWDLER.

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

""

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS.

27

ABSENT:

The Honourable THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

The Committee met pursuant to notice.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 29th August last, were read and confirmed. The Committee then proceeded to consider the Bill to apply a sum not exceeding Two Millions Three hundred and Forty-seven thousand, Two hundred and Forty-five Dollars to the Public Service of the Year 1894.

At the suggestion of the Chairman, the following items were amended :

Registrar General's Department,

Harbour Master's Department,

...from $24,906 to $24,726. ...........from $60,791 to $60,707.

The several items on the Bill, subject to the above amendments, were unanimously agreed to, making a total of $2,346,981.

The Committee next proceeded to consider the Bill to authorise the Appropriation of a Supple- mentary Sum of Two hundred and Thirty-five thousand One hundred and Eleven Dollars and Ninety-three Cents to defray the Charges of the Year 1892.

The several items on the Bill were unanimously agreed to.

The Committee then adjourned.

Read and confirmed on the 27th August, 1894.

J. G. T. BUCKLE, Acting Clerk of Councils.

J. H. STEWART LOCKHART,

Chairman.

95

No.

my

93

HONGKONG.

REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF FIRE BRIGADE FOR 1892.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency. the Governor, on the 8th March, 1893.

No. 3.

FIRE BRIGADE DEPARTMENT,

HONGKONG, 1st February, 1893.

:

SIR,I have the honour to present the following report of the Fire Brigade Department for the year 1892.

The Brigade was called out for the extinction of fires on sixteen occasions. This number though not excessive was double that of the year before. None of the fires attained very serious proportions, though in one instance property to the extent of about forty thousand dollars was destroyed.

In addition to the fires requiring the attendance of the Brigade, there were eighty-three alarms, the fires in such cases being either non-existent or extinguished before headway was made.

Ten of the sixteen fires were made the subject of Magisterial enquiries. I am of opinion that these enquiries continue to have a wholesome deterrent effect and check the great temptation to arson held out by the insuring facilities of the Colony.

Advantage has been taken of the supply of water afforded by the street hydrants to gradually introduce a change into the tactics of the Brigade as regards the general arrangements for the suppres- sion of fires, and to place reliance upon the street hydrants rather than upon the steam fire engines.

The appliance at present in use for this purpose is known as the Fire Despatch Box, its merits consisting in its handiness which enables it to be worked by one man at the same time that it is supplied with three hundred feet of hose and all the appliances necessary for immediate use of the street hydrants.

They have during the year been gradually increased in number without extraordinary expenditure, and now number fourteen. They are situated in the following places:

No. 1 Police Station.

Engine-house in Wanchai Road. Royal Naval Yard.

Clock Tower.

Central Police Station.

No. 9 Police Station,

Engine-house in Hollywood Road.

Man Mo Temple.

Government Civil Hospital.

No. 7 Police Station.

-

Nam Pak Hong Engine-house in Bonham Strand.

The Gas Works Premises.

Central Fire Brigade Station.

Their number is being further added to as opportunity offers.

For fire purposes the Town is divided into three districts: Western, Central and Eastern; the Western extending eastwards as far as the Harbour Office, the Central extending eastwards as far as the City Hall, and the remainder of the Town forming the Eastern District.

The particular district in which a fire has broken out is notified to the Brigade by the Fire bells; three strokes signifying the Western District, two strokes the Central District, and one the Eastern District.

In order to obviate the possible danger that might arise from denuding the Central District of its firemen and fire appliances, upon the occasion of a fire in the Eastern District, special arrangements are made for fires in the latter district according to which a certain number of men are told off each month for the purpose of attending at fires at Wanchai, the remainder being kept in the Central District unless the exceptional magnitude of the fire requires their attendance.

Although it is a long time since a fire of extraordinary magnitude took place I do not disguise from myself the possibility of its occurrence and circumstances might arise which would extend the area of the flames beyond the control of the limited number of men that belong to the Brigade. Promptitude in attendance and care in having in readiness the necessary arrangements for extending the operations are the best preventives against the spread of a fire.

The Assistant Superintendentship of the Fire Brigade has, during the past year, been mainly filled by Mr. Chief Inspector MATHIESON who has proved himself a valuable acquisition to the Brigade.

The thanks of the Brigade are also due to Mr. KINGHORN, the Engineer, under whose supervision the engines are kept in excellent order, and to Mr. CAMPBELL, Assistant Engineer, who has the important work of generally superintending the up-keep of the gear and of attending to the proper carrying out of the orders in force for the general arrangements that have been made for the guidance of the Brigade.

The clerical work of the Department, which requires considerable care and attention, has been admirably performed by Mr. CHAU SHAU, than whom it would be impossible to find a more painstaking and trustworthy officer.

The conduct of the Brigade throughout the year has been satisfactory.

I have the honour to enclose Mr. KINGHORN's report on the state of the Engines together with the Return of Fires and Alarms.

I have the honour to be,

The Honourable G. T. M. O'BRIEN, C.M.G.,

Colonial Secretary.

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

H. E. WODEHOUSE, Superintendent, Fire Brigade.

HONGKONG, 19th January, 1893.

SIR,-I have the honour to forward my report on the state of the Government Fire Engines for the year ending 31st December, 1892.

STEAMER No. 1.

(Floating Engine) by Merryweather & Sons.

This Engine has been 26 years in service, during the year it has not been disabled at a fire, but on the 2nd December, while testing the Boiler under Hydraulic pressure, the tubes gave way, and they had all to be renewed, and the Boiler repaired, the time occupied by these repairs was ten days, and the Engine and Boiler are now in good order.

STEAMER NO. 3.

Land Engine by Shand & Mason.

This Engine has been 14 years in service, during the year it has been carefully overhauled, and has done its work well; it has not been disabled at a fire and is now in good order.

STEAMER No. 4.

This Engine has been 11 years in service, during the year it has been overhauled and put in good order; it has not been disabled at a fire and is now in good working order.

STEAMER No. 5.

Land Engine by Shand & Mason.

This Engine has been 7 years in service, it has been carefully overhauled during the year, and required no repairs; it has not been disabled at a fire and is now in good order and condition.

STEAMER No. 6.

This Engine has been 14 years in service, (9 years in Volunteer Brigade), during the year the Boiler has been carefully overhauled and the working pressure reduced; it has not been disabled at a fire and is now in good order.

MANUAL ENGINES.

Nine Manual Engines are all in good order.

The Assistant Engineer and Engine drivers have done their work during the year to my satisfac- tion, and have promptly attended the calls on the Fire Department.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

H. E. WODEHOUSE, Esq., C.M.G.,

Superintendent,

Government Fire Brigade.

JOHN W. KINGHORN, Engineer, Government Fire Brigade.

1

No.

DATE.

TIME.

SITUATION OF FIRE.

FIRES AND ALARMS, 1892.

No, of

BUILDINGS

DESTROYED.

DAMAGE.

Wholly. Partly.

Trifling

Accidental.

Unknown.

CAUSE.

REMARKS.

1 Jan.

2

""

""

"

5

10,

""

10,

257700

....

House No. 32, Hollywood Road, Grass on hillside near Mountain Lodge,

....

Trifling

7,

....

12.30 p.m.

House No. 14, Burd Street,.

House No. 78, Queen's Road West,

·

6 a.m.

House No. 9, Queen's Road Central, House No. 34, Praya Central,

Do.

A bed curtain caught fire.

$40,000

Trifling

""

7

10,

"

8 p.m.

House No. 16, Tsz Mi Lane,

8

11,

1.30 p.m.

House No. 4, Ezra Lane,.

12,

""

2 p.m.

10

13,

4.30 a.m.

House No. 28, Battery Street, Yaumati, House No. 146, Bonham Strand,

$8,000

11

15,

"

7 p.m.

12

15,

"

11.30 p.m.

13

16,

2.30 a.m.

14

16,

3.30 p.m.

A stonecutter's matshed at Kennedy Town, House No. 140, Third Street,.

House No. 528, Queen's Road West,. House No. 41, Staunton Street,

$100

.

$6,000

Trifling

""

15

16,

3.20 a.m.

16

21,

4.15 p.m.

A certain house in Western District, House No. 81, High Street,

A bed curtain accidentally caught fire. Unknown, ....

Do.

....

Overheating of a stove.

Overheating of a stove pipe,

A basket of coffee beans accidentally caught fire.

Old bags accidentally caught fire. Upsetting of a kerosine lamp.

Unknown Spontaneous combustion of coal.

Trifling

Unknown, Supposed arson.

Wooden partition accidentally caught fire.

Unknown,

Insured in Messrs. Reuter, Bröckelmann & Co. for $45,000.

Insured in Messrs. Hewett & Co. for $10,000.

Insured in the Hongkong Fire Insurance Company for $12,000. False alarm.

··

1

$100

Do.

17

24,

2.40 p.m.

S.S. Haiphong in Victoria Harbour,

$25

Do.

"9

18

28,

5.30 a.m.

House No, 54, Jardine's Bazaar,.

Slight

19

31,

3 p.m.

20 Feb. 21,

2 a.m.

Houses Nos. 28 and 29, Battery Street, Yaumati, House No. 24, Wellington Street,

A bed curtain caught fire.

Spontaneous combustion of coal.

Trifling

Unknown.

21

23,

11.40 p.m.

A house (unnumbered) in Mong Kok,

Do.

Do.

""

22

25,

11.50 p.m.

A matshed at the Naval Camp, Kowloon,

Do.

Do.

23

29,

8 p.m.

A stack of grass at Shaukiwan,

$50

Do.

24 | March 3,

7.30 p.m.

12.30 p.m.

A matshed at the Naval Range, Stone Cutters' Island,

$60

Do.

A

25

4,

26

6,

4 p.m.

27

6,

4.30 a.m.

"

28

13,

....

"

29

""

13,

30

13,

1 a.m.

""

31

14,

""

4 p.m.

32

20,

26,

No. 7, Central Market,

Trifling

Do.

33

34

""

""

"

2::

27,

7.45 p.m.

10 a.m.

4.40 p.m.

8.15 p.m.

....

35

30,

""

36 | April 1,

37

4,

38

5,

39

10,

10.40

"

p.m.

A room in the D Block Military Barracks,

Grass on hillside at Magazine Gap,

House No. 95, Queen's Road West,

No. 34, Square Street,.

Grass on hillside at Mount Kellett,

House No. 368, Queen's Road West,

A matshed in Coffee Plantation,... Chimney of House No. 23, Centre Street, House No. 26, Sai Woo Lane,.

Grass on hillside at Tai Tam Tuk, Grass on hillside above Deep Bay,..

House No. 17, Queen's Road West,

House No. 78, Jardine's Bazaar,

Do.

Overheating of a boiler.

$200

Unknown.

Do.

Trifling

Do.

House No. 16, Chinese Street,

Slight

Overheating of a furnace for drying

A bed curtain caught fire. [tobacco.

Unknown.

Do.

Trifling

Do.

$200

Accidental.

Unknown.

$1,000

Upsetting of a lamp,

....

::

Unknown.

Firing of crackers while worshipping

at the tombs.

$400

Unknown,

Insured in Messrs. Schellhass & Co. for $3,000.

Insured in Messrs. Hewett & Co. for $2,500.

97

FIRES AND ALARMS, 1892,—Continued.

No. of

98

No.

DATE.

TIME.

40 April 11,

.9.20 p.m.

41.

15,

BUILDINGS

SITUATION OF FIRE.

DESTROYED.

DAMAGE.

Wholly. Partly.

House No. 104, Queen's Road West,.

House No. 37, Kennedy Street, Yaumati,

1

$1,500

Unknown.

CAUSE.

REMARKS.

""

42

23,

"

9.45 p.m.

A matshed in Tung Lo Wan,

$60

$300

43

27,

3.30 a.m.

House No. 26, West Street,.

Trifling

Burning of Joss paper.

44 May

2,

6.30 p.m.

House No. 8, Fuk Tsun Heung,.

i

$100

Bursting of a kerosine lamp,

45

3,

House No. 148, Third Street,

Trifling

Supposed arson,

46

47

བ་ ཆུ བ

5,

9,

"

10 p.m.

11.45 p.m.

48

18,

11 p.m.

"

49

18,

""

50

22,

House No. 17, Tank Lane,

""

*

51

52 June 21,

23,

2.15 a.m.

10 a.m.

8.50 p.m.

A Fishing Junk lying in Aberdeen Harbour,

House No. 16, Station Street,

A stack of grass at Shaukiwan,

A stack of grass at Hung Hom,

Chimney of House No. 29, Graham Street,.

$5

Unknown.

Carelessness with lighted match.

Mosquito curtain accidentally caught

fire.

One man was burnt to death and 2 others injured.

Papers saturated with kerosine oil found in different parts of the house.

were

Upsetting of a kerosine lamp.

$30

Unknown.

$10

Do.

$250

Do.,

Not insured.

Trifling

Do.

1.30 p.m.

House No. 29, Centre Street,

1

$100

Do.,

Not insured.

53

28,

""

6 p.m.

54 July

3,

2.15 a.m.

House No. 15, Station Street, Yaumati,.. House No. 91, Wing Lok Street,

Do.

....

....

$5,000

+

""

""

55

56

57

58 Aug. 6,

3,

Grass on hillside at Magazine Gap,

6,

11.30 p.m.

House No. 324, Queen's Road Central,

17,

9.45 p.m.

House No. 31, Praya, Kennedy Town,

1.45' a.m.

Messrs. Marinburk & Co's Furniture Store, at Wanchai,

59

10,

9 a.m.

House No. 87A, Praya East,

$10

Trifling

Do.

39

60

18,

"

10.40 p.m.

House No. 49, Queen's Road West,

$300

61

21,

12.05 a.m.

House No. 48, Queen's Road West,

62

31,

....

House No. 76, Praya East,

63 Sept. 15,

64

15,

.""

65

18,

66

67

"

19

23,

2 a.m.

28,

"

8 p.m.

68 Oct. 6,

6.30 a.m.

69

11,

7 p.m.

70

11,

5.20 p.m.

1.05 a.m.

11.10 a.m.

11.30 a.m.

A matshed at Kun Chung, British Kowloon,.. A wooden hut No. 86, Ma Ti, British Kowloon, British S.S. Tai On in Victoria Harbour,..

House No. 43, West Street,.

House No. 325, Queen's Road Central,

A stack of straw at Tin Wan, Aberdeen, House No. 80, Praya East,

House No. 80, Queen's Road West,

:

$3,000

4

2

$4,000

$475

$5

Trifling

Carelessness while baking cakes,.. Playing with burnt grass by a child. Accidental with lighted candle while

A

searching for opium.

Do.

Breaking of a kerosine lamp.

Do.

Unknown.

Overheating of a stove for drying

tobacco,

Unknown,

Bursting of a kerosine lamp. Unknown.

Do.

Spontaneous combustion of coal. Unknown,

Upsetting of a kerosine lamp, Spontaneous combustion of coal. Unknown,

Insured in Messrs. Reuter, Bröckelmann & Co. for $5,000.

Insured in Messrs. Kruse & Co. for $1,200. Insured in the Commercial Union Fire In- surance Office for $3,000.

Insured in the Economic Fire Insurance Company for $4,000.

-

girl of 4 years of age and 13 pigs were burnt to death. 11 huts and 11 pigsties were destroyed.

Do.

Do.

71

13,

7 p.m.

House No. 48, Stanley Street,..

Upsetting of a kerosine lamp.

72

30,

6.30 p.m.

House, No. 150, Shaukiwan,

Trifling

Unknown.

73 Nov.

2,

2.45 p.m.

House No. 41, Praya Central,..

Accidental with lighted candle.

74

10,

3 a.m.

House No. 71, Queen's Road Central,

$10

Unknown.

75

""

14,

1 a.m.

Chimney of House No. 25, Possession Street,

Do.

76

""

17,

Midnight.

Grass on hillside at Aberdeen,.

Do.

No. DATE.

TIME.

FIRES AND ALARMS, 1892,-Continued.

No. of

BUILDINGS

SITUATION OF FIRE.

DESTROYED.

DAMAGE.

Wholly. Partly.

CAUSE.

REMARKS.

77

Nov. 18,

4.45 p.m.

78

18,

11.50 p.m.

""

79

19,

8.30 p.m.

A haystack at Yaumati,

""

80

19,

Midnight

""

81

27,

4.30 p.m.

""

82

Dec.

1,

2 p.m.

83

1,

11.30 p.m.

""

84

1,

"}

3.30 p.m.

Grass on hillside at Wong Nei Chung,

Grass on hillside above Magazine Gap, The Hongkong and Shanghai Bank,

House No. 82, Station Street, Yaumati,.

Grass on hillside at Tokwawan,

A haystack at Tso Pai Tsai, British Kowloon,. Wellington Barracks Wharf,

....

$28

Unknown.

$10

Trifling

Trifling

....

Unknown.

Overheating of chimney.

Accidental while worshipping. Unknown.

Playing with matches by boys. Unknown.

Do.

85

8,

8 a.m.

"

86

8,

11.20 p.m.

House No. 333, Queen's Road Central,

House No. 20, Fuk Sing Lane, Yaumati,

2

$200

Do.

Insured in Messrs. Kruse & Co. for $5,000.

1

2

$5,000

Do.,

""

87

13,

5.20 p.m.

A matshed at back of Wong Nei Chung Village,

$40

Playing with fire by a girl.

Unknown,

Several fir trees were destroyed.

88

14,

3 p.m.

Grass on hillside at Aberdeen,

Do.

>>

89

90

14,

5 p.m.

Grass on the Rifle Ranges, British Kowloon,

18,

>>

1 p.m.

91

20,

"

20,

7 a.m.

9.30 p.m.

22,

2.40 a.m.

6 a.m.

92

93

94

95

96

97

98

99

""

""

"

""

""

93.

"

""

24,

25,

28,

28,

30,

31,

6 p.m.

7 p.m.

3.15 p.m.

A Matshed at Yaumati,

A matshed at Tai Hang Village,.

Grass on hillside above Richmond Road,

A matshed at the Military Camp, British Kowloon,.

House No. 14, Jubilee Street,.

Do.

$10

Do.

$300

Do.

$600

Do.,

House No. 4, East Street,

House No. 18, Stanley Street,. House No. 7, Ezra Lane,.

Playing with matches by children. Upsetting of a kerosine lamp.

Unknown.

Insured in the Economic Fire Insurance Co. for $800.

:

Grass on hillside at British Kowloon, Grass on hillside at Wong Ma Kok,

Do.

Do.

$580

Do.,

19 matsheds and 4 pigstyes were destroy ed and 15 pigs burnt to death.

H. E. WODEHOUSE, Superintendent, Fire Brigade.

99

HONGKONG.

REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF VICTORIA GAOL FOR 1892.

87

No.

5

200

93

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor, on the 8th February, 1893.

D. L. No. 15.

SUPERINTENDENT'S OFFICE, VICTORIA GAOL, HONGKONG, 18th January, 1893.

SIR,-I have the honour to forward, for the information of His Excellency the Governor, the Annual Report on the Victoria Gaol for 1892.

2. During the year there were 5,231 admissions, the average number of prisoners confined in the Gaol being 515 which is a slight increase on the previous year. The daily maximum number was 595.

3. There have been 7,494 prison offences committed during the year being about 14 offences to each prisoner as compared with over 23 in 1891. The comparative returns attached show the number of the most common of these offences.

4. Nine officers have been dismissed for misconduct during the year, but the conduct of the remainder of the Gaol Staff has been satisfactory.

5. The officers' quarters are devoid of necessary comforts. There is no mess room or recreation room, and, under the existing circumstances, it is almost impossible for an officer employed on night.... duty to get proper rest during the day, he being constantly disturbed by those on day duty who are compelled to use the same room.

6. The necessity for introducing the separate system generally has been frequently urged and I would most strongly recommend its adoption. At present from the time prisoners are locked up in the evening until they are unlocked in the morning and again during the officers' meal hours, it is impossible with a limited staff to exercise proper supervision in the corridors so as to prevent prisoners communicating with each other. It is unnecessary for me to mention the incalculable amount of harm which this must do and how the deterrent effect of imprisonment is lessened thereby.

7. Extra store-room and bath accommodation are required. The latter is so limited bathing cannot be conducted properly.

8. The insufficient yard accommodation has also been repeatedly pointed out. This I regard as one of the most serious deficiencies in the Gaol and makes it a matter of the utmost difficulty to keep the various classes of prisoners separate when at work. If this were increased many more prisoners could be employed at useful and remunerative labour.

9. The female prison is badly situated. The average number of females in prison during the year was 27, and, owing to the inadequate accommodation, it frequently happens that remand prisoners have to be placed in the same ward with convicted prisoners.

10. I forward herewith the usual returns.

The Honourable

THE COLONIAL SECRETARY.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

H. B. LETHBRIDGE, Superintendent.

88

January, February,

March,

April,

MONTH.

May, June, July, August,

September,

October,.....

November,.........

December,

Total,...

(A.)

VICTORIA GAOL.

Return of Reports for talking, &c., in the years, 1889, 1890, 1891 and 1892.

1889.

1890.

Daily average number Daily average number

in Prison, 581.

in Prison, 566.

1891.

1892.

Daily average number | Daily average number

in Prison, 507.

in Prison, 515.

105

196

252

237

150

181

116

316

132

243

227

351

142

212

202

253

278

290

257

142

205

260

313

129

220

520

427

96

167

349

473

224

219

304

489

142

130

243

397

108

118

135

441

129

220

157

469

259

2,086

3,090

4,063

2,386

(B.)

Return of Offences reported of Prisoners fighting with or assaulting each other, or Officers, for the years 1889, 1890, 1891 and 1892.

MONTH.

1889.

1890.

1891.

in Prison, 507.

1892.

in Prison, 515.

Daily average number Daily average number | Daily average number Daily average number

in Prison, 581.

in Prison, 566.

Jannary,

1

20

February,

10

10

12 10

13

March,

11

10

April,

6

16

...

7

16

8

May,

5

9

5

39600

June,

12

9

3

July,

5

6

7

August,

13

6

17

20

September,

7

16

9

October,.....

5

6

11

9

November,...

December,..

12

12

5

7

7

5

7

10

5

Total,...

92

115

86

114

(C.)

Return of Offences of Prisoners having Tobacco, for the years 1889, 1890, 1891 and 1892.

MONTH.

1889.

1890.

1891.

1892.

in Prison, 515.

Daily average number | Daily average number | Daily average number Daily average number

in Prison, 581.

in Prison, 566.

in Prison, 507.

January,

32

53

17

16

February,

50

24

24

19

March,

55

21

30

46

April,

21

47

20

18

May, June,.

July,

45

10

16

8

33

11

21

15

24

47

31

23

35

51

67

228

15

59

August,

September,

October,

November,

December,.

Total,..........

487

393

254

307

52

25

10

25

26

33

29

22

58

28

16

122

36

10

25

(D.)

Comparative Return of Prisoners confined in Victoria Gaol on 31st December, 1889, 31st December, 1890, 31st December, 1891, and 31st December, 1892.

CONVICTION.

1889.

1890.

1891.

1892.

1st,

2nd,

466

394

373

297

59

67

50

56

3rd,

22

26

25

27

4th,

14

23

20

19

5th,

16

16

15

11

6th,

8

8

10

7th,

2

....

8th,

9

9th,

10th,

11th,

12th, 13th,

.....

1

1

+221 :2

- --PN: Z

12

6

4

4

5

3

1

Total,............

600

549

502

441

:

(E.)

ABSTRACT OF INDUSTRIAL LABOUR, VICTORIA GAOL, FOR THE YEAR, 1892.

89.

Dr.

OAKUM.

Cr.

1892.

To Stock on hand, 1st January, 1892, $ 904.00 1892.

By Oakum picked for Naval Yard

""

Cost of Paper Stuff purchased

1,131.55

during the year,.......

**

ور

Profit,...

511.38

during the year-Cash received, Oakum sold during the year Do., Stock on hand, 31st December,

1892,

$

103.95

1,770.28

672.70

Total,...........$

2,546.93

Total,...............$

2,546.93

COIR.

1892.

"

To Stock on hand, 1st January, 1892, $ 451.00 1892.

Cost of Material purchased during

299.57

the year,.

Profit,.....

637.81

Total,...............$

1,388.38

RATTAN WORK.

By Matting, &c., sold during the year, $ 1,078.84

Articles made for Gaol use,.......

48.05

29

Stock on hand, 31st December,

1892,-

Manufactured Articles, ...$122.55 Material,.

138.94

261.49

Total,...............$

1,388.38

1892.

To Stock on hand, 1st January, 1892,

"

Cost of Material purchased during

the year,....

$174.50

1892.

78.63

","

"

By Articles sold during the year, Articles made for Gaol use,.... Stock on hand, 31st December,

1892,-

$ 174.08

15.66

Profit,.....

3.61

Manufactured Articles,...$ 65.00 Material,

Total,..

.$

256.74

2.00

67.00

Total,......... ..$

256.74

90

NET-MAKING.

1892.

To Stock on hand, 1st January, 1892, $

22.00

1892.

Cost of Material purchased during

"

the year,....

}

57.13

Profit,.................

42.06

Total,.........

.$

121.19

TAILORING.

By Nets and Netting sold during $ 118.69

""

the year,..

Stock on hand, 31st December,

2.50

1892,

Total,...............$

121.19

1892.

To Stock on hand, 1st January, 1892, $ 790.76 1892.

Cost of Material purchased during

2,000.54

the year,...

""

By Estimated Value of Prisoners Clothing made during the year, Work done for which cash was

received,

$ 1,381.91

112.34

Profit,......

591.02

Stock on hand, 31st December,

"

1892,-

Manufactured Articles,.$ 277.45 Material,

1,610.62

1,888.07

Total,...............$

3,382.32

Total,..............$

3,382.32

PRINTING.

1892.

To Cost of Material purchased during

the year,....

} 21.03

1892.

Profit,...

345.04

Total,...............$

366.07

BOOK-BINDING.

By Estimated Value of Printing done

during the year,.......... Work done for which cash was

received,......

""

$ 97.44

268.63

Total,...............$

366.07

1892.

To Stock on hand, 1st January, 1892,

31

Cost of Material purchased during

$ 65.40 1892.

130.80

By Estimated Value of Book-bind-

ing done for Gaol during the

$

37.66

the year,....

Profit,.......

year,

Work done for which cash was

""

154.15

34.56

received,

""

Stock on hand, 31st December,

1892,-

Total,........

.........$

230.76

TIN-SMITHING.

Manufactured Articles, ...$ 5.00 Material,.

33.95

38.95

Total,..... .$

230.76

1892.

To Stock on hand, 1st January, 1892,

1.87

1892.

""

Cost of Material purchased during

20.69

the year,......

"

Profit,.....

17.37

""

By Estimated Value of Work done (

for the Gaol during the year,. Sale of Articles and Work done ( for which cash was received,. Stock on hand, 31st December,

1892,

$

31.50

2.93

5.50

Total,.........$

39.93

Total,...............$

39.93

SHOE-MAKING.

91

1892.

To Stock on hand, 1st January, 1892, $ 54.58

1892.

"

Cost of Material purchased during

312.87

the year,..

"

Profit,..........

144.99

By Estimated Value of new Shoes issued to Gaol Officers and Prisoners, and Repairs,....... Sales and Repairs for which cash

was received,

338.99

131.80

"

Stock on hand, 31st December,

1892,- Manufactured Articles, Material,

.$27.50

14.15

41.65

Total,...............$

512.44

WASHING.

1892.

To Stock on hand, 1st January, 1892,

Cost of Material purchased during

10.00 1892.

525.56

the year,....

Profit,........

""

780.67

""

Total,.....$

512.44

By Value of Washing done during the year,--Prison Clothing at one cent per piece,................. Cash received for clothes washed, Stock on hand, 31st December,

1892,

$ 1,290.50

20.73

5.00

Total,...............$

1,316.23

Total,..........$

1,316.23

CARPENTERING.

1892.

""

To Stock on hand, 1st January, 1892,

Cost of Material purchased during

$

47.50

167.03

1892.

the year,.

Profit,........

"

By Estimated value of Articles made for Gaol use during the year,....... Sales and Repairs for which cash

was received,

$

114.96

68.75

4.26

"

Stock on hand, 31st December,

1892,--

Total,.........$

218.79

Manufactured Articles, ..$14.24 Material,

20.84

35.08

Total,...............$

GRASS MAT-MAKING.

By Estimated value of Matting made för Gaol use during the year,... Matting sold for which cash was

received,

1892.

""

Cost of Material purchased during

the year,......

To Stock on hand, 1st January, 1892, | $ 20.70

1892.

102.91

Profit,........

9.77

""

19

Stock on hand, 31st December,

1892,

1892.

Total,...............$

133.38

RECAPITULATION.

$

218.79

9.00

115.98

8.40

Total,...............$

133.38

Oakum, Coir,

Rattan Work,

Net-making,..

Tailoring,

$ 511.38 637.81 3.61

1892.

By Surplus,

$ 3,122.54

42.06

591.02

Printing,

345.04

Book-binding,

34.56

Tin-smithing,

17.37

L

Shoe-making,

144.99

Washing,

780.67

Carpentering,

4.26

Grass Mat-making,.

9.77

Total,............$

3,122.54

Total,.........$

3,122.54

Profit,...........

$3,122.54.

71

No. 98

HONGKONG.

MEMORIAL RESPECTING GAOL EXTENSION.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor, on the 25th January, 1893.

SIR,

""

HONGKONG, 6th January, 1893.

We beg most respectfully to thank you for having given us an opportunity to express our views on the question of the Gaol extension-an opportunity which we gladly avail ourselves of inasmuch as we and the overwhelming majority of the other members of the Chinese community are strongly opposed to the Gaol being extended in any way for the following reasons:-

1. Because the accommodation provided by the existing buildings is ample, so much so that the prisoners have more space allowed them than they have ever had when not in prison. In a word, they are far better off in gaol than out of it.

2. Because the Gaol is already looked upon as a paradise by many a rascal, and situated as we are within a stone's throw of the Chinese territory, any exten- sion of the Gaol will certainly lead to an influx of bad characters from China.

3. Because we differ from the view of those who allege that the separate system will act as a deterrent to Chinese prisoners. We have no hesitation in saying that such an opinion must be formed through ignorance of the habits of the Chinese criminals who will be in no way deterred by having to live in separate

cells.

4. Because the gaols in China, to which the Chinese criminals who come to Hongkong have always been accustomed, cannot be in any way compared with the Gaol in Hongkong. They are so arranged that bad characters are afraid of committing crimes in case they may be lodged in them. The present Victoria Gaol does not inspire much fear, and it would inspire still less if made more com- fortable which would most certainly lead to an increase of crime, as criminals will

have no dread of entering it.

5. Because we are of the opinion that the most efficacious way to prevent persons from committing crimes in the Colony is not to enlarge the Gaol but to use more freely the power of banishment and the rattan, and to make the prisoners' life not so much a life of ease as it is at present.

Honourable J. H. STEWART Lockhart,

Registrar General.

72

In conclusion, we beg to point out that being Chinese ourselves, it is not likely that we would discourage the Government from doing anything for the real benefit of our own countrymen, which would be of advantage to the Chinese community generally. But, in the present instance, being convinced that the extension of the Gaol would bring harm to the community, and would lead to a large influx of criminals into the Colony, and a great increase in crime, we feel compelled to sincerely state our views, which, we trust, His Excellency the Governor may be pleased to consider favourably.

We have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servants,

WEI A YUK, J.P. LAU WAI CHUN, J.P.

SEUNG SZ KAI, J.P.

IP JUCK KAI.

HO FOOK, J.P.

CHAN PAN POO.

LAW YAM CHUEN.

C. CHEE BEE, J.P.

POON PONG.

HO KAI, J.P., M.L.C. CH'AN A FOOK, J.P.

WONG SHING, J.P.

CHOW PENG, J.P.

CHEN QUAN EE, J.P.

KAW HONG TAKE, J.P.

WOO LIN YUEN, J.P.

HỌ TUNG, J.P.

J

251

No. 19

93

HONGKONG.

DESPATCH RESPECTING GAOL EXTENSION.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor, on the 1st June, 1893.

HONGKONG,

No. 53.

SIR,

DOWNING STREET,

24th March, 1893.

I have the honour to acknowledge the receipt of your despatch No. 340 of the 13th of December enclosing the Report of a Committee which you had appointed with a view to working out a scheme of Prison extension on the principles laid down in my predecessor's despatch of the 7th July, together with a protest from the Unofficial Members of Council against the measures proposed.

I have also received and considered your despatch No. 16 of the 20th of January, enclosing a representation from leading members of the Chinese Community, in which, as I understand, they argue that no extension of the Gaol should be undertaken. As these gentlemen take a different, and somewhat stronger line than the Unofficial Members of Council, it may be convenient that I should deal with their representation first.

I have perused their remarks with interest, but am unable to accept their views, and would most emphatically point out, that in urging the extension of the Gaol, Her Majesty's Government have not been influenced by any desire to lessen the punitive character of imprisonment. They have pressed for prison extension, mainly because, while objecting to the evils inherent to the association system, they believe that the cellular system is the only practicable basis of a deterrent prison discipline.

As regards the protest of the Unofficial Members of Council, and the Report of the Committee on which it is based, I would observe, that my predecessor's despatch appears to have been somewhat misunderstood, and to have been thought to involve larger extension than his Lordship had in mind. If his despatch is referred to, it seems plain that he would have been content with a prison accommo- dating 546 persons, of whom not all would have been in separate confinement. But the Committee have put forward a scheme providing for 612, and it is rather against this scheme than against my predecessor's despatch, that the protest must be taken to be directed. If I rightly understand the 12th paragraph of the protest, the Unofficial Members themselves are willing to concur in a very appreciable extension of the Prison accommodation, and this being so, it appears to me that they, and my predecessor, were more nearly in accord than they assumed. Further, the gratifying decrease in the average prison population during the last two years, seems to justify me in making some reduction in the minimum of 546 laid down by my predecessor. I am anxious as far as possible, consistently with the public interest, to meet the views of the Memorialists on this question of prison accommoda- tion; and the following scheme appears to me to be adequate for the necessities of the case, and will, I hope, be generally accepted as a compromise, and be received in the friendly spirit in which it is offered :-

(1) The 92 existing separate cells should continue to be primarily available for European prisoners, of whom there is an average of over 40, the rest being used for Chinese criminals.

(2) 51 of the existing three-prisoner cells should be divided off into 102 separate cells. (3) A new site should be acquired adjoining the Gaol, on which should be built a three-

storey block containing about 150 separate cells.

(4) Separate accommodation being thus provided for 344 prisoners of the more criminal types, 60 three-prisoner cells, or small wards, would remain for the accommodation of 180 miscellaneous prisoners of the less criminal types. I note that according to the figures for 1891 the prison population was divided into,

Criminal,

..333

Non-criminal or petty criminal,

.176

Total average,

...509

252

The scheme which I propose leaves therefore some small margin in the case of each class.

Further, I consider that it would be advantageous in the case of the remaining associated cells, that where possible, two or three of them might be thrown into one, thus facilitating supervision by night, and possibly increasing their practical capacity for accommodation of prisoners at times of exceptional pressure.

Subject to the requirements which I have indicated, I leave all questions as to the re-arrangement and improvement of buildings and other structures on the existing site, to the discretion of your Government. I cannot of course but regret that the Unofficial Members of Council have felt unable to assent to the policy of my predecessor, but, as there seems reason to hope that the proposals which I now make will meet with general assent from the Members of Council, I refrain from entering on controversial matter.

I agree with the opinion expressed in the 5th paragraph of your despatch No. 340, that the suggested free emigration of ex-convicts to newly explored or thinly peopled countries is quite impracti- cable, and I await with interest your further report on the question of transferring the juvenile inmates of the Gaol to the Roman Catholic Reformatory, as recommended by the Unofficial Members of Council.

You may communicate this despatch to those gentlemen, either, by laying it before Council or otherwise as you may see fit.

I have the honour to be,.

Sir,

Your most obedient,

Governor

Sir W. ROBINSON, K.C.M.G.,

&c.,

&c.,

:

&c.

humble Servant,

RIPON.

171

No. 14

93

HONGKONG.

THE HARBOUR MASTER'S REPORT FOR 1892,

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor, on the 25th May, 1893.

No. 96.

HONGKONG, 23rd March,

HARBOUR DEPARTMENT,

16th February, 1893.

{

SIR,-I have the honour to forward the Annual Returns for this Department for the 31st December, 1892.

I. Number, Tonnage and Crews of Vessels entered.

II. Number, Tonnage and Crews of Vessels cleared.

III. Number, Tonnage and Crews of Vessels of each Nation entered. IV. Number, Tonnage and Crews of Vessels of each Nation cleared.

V. Total Number, Tonnage and Crews of Vessels entered at each Port. VI. Total Number, Tonnage and Crews of Vessels cleared at each Port.

VII. Return of Junks entered from Macao.

VIII. Return of Junks cleared for Macao.

IX. Return of Junks entered at each Port from China and Formosa.

X. Return of Junks cleared at each Port for China and Formosa.

XI. Gross Total Number of Junks entered at each Port.

XII. Gross Total Number of Junks cleared at each Port.

XIII. Return of Junks (Local Trade) entered.

XIV. Return of Junks (Local Trade) cleared.

1893.

year ending

XV. Summary of Arrivals and Departures of all Vessels, and of all Chinese Passengers.

XVI. Return of Vessels registered.

XVII. Return of Vessels struck off the Register.

XVIII. Amount of Fees received under Table B of Ordinance 26 of 1891.

XIX. Return of Chinese Passenger Ships cleared by the Emigration Officer.

XX. Return of Vessels bringing Chinese Passengers to Hongkong from places out of

China.

XXI. Return of Marine Cases tried.

XXII. Diagram of Tonnage of Vessels entered.

XXIII. Return of the work performed by the Government Marine Surveyor.

XXIV. Return from Imports and Exports (Opium) Office.

SHIPPING.

2. The total of arrivals and sailings amounted to 14,152,849 tons or an advance on 1891 of 147,151 tons. There were 36,470 arrivals with a tonnage of 7,104,888 tons, and 36,210 departures of 7,047,961 tons. The increase in European constructed vessels numbers 267, aggregating 15,109 tons. There is a decrease in the foreign junk trade of 213 junks representing 71,042 tons, against which may be set an increase in the local junk trade of 6,586, vessels measuring 203,084 tons.

172

3. The following statement shows how this amount of shipping is apportioned:-

1891..

1892.

INCREASE.

DECREASE.

Ships. Tonnage. Ships. Tonnage. Ships. Tonnage. Ships. Tonnage.

British,.

Foreign,

Junks in Foreign (

Trade,

5,719 7,190,589 6,376 7,576,323

2,988 3,088,454 2,598 2,717,829

657 385,734

45,403 3,263,118 45,190 3,192,076

:

:

390 370,625

213

71,042

Total,......54,110 | 13,542,161 54,164 | 13,486,228

657 385,734

603 441,667

Junks in Local |

Trade,..

11,930 463,537 18,516 666,621 | 6,586 | 203,084

:

Grand Total, ... 66,040 | 14,005,698 72,680 | 14,152,849 | 7,243 | 588,818

NET.......

6,640 147,151

603 441,667

4. The substantial increase in British shipping is represented to a great extent by a number of new vessels which found employment during the year, such as the Argus (1 trip), Aden (4), Argyle (2), Baron Douglas (1), Chelydra (9), Camelot (2), Catherine Apcar (3), Charters Tower (17), City of Belfast (1), Glenesk (4), Hupeh (10), Hongay (4), Java (1), Kongsee (1), Loksang (17), Malacca (4), Ocampo (2), Ooryia (1), Palmas (2). Pekin (14), Shantung (8), Strathesk (1), Taksang (12), Ulysses (2), also a number of old vessels that have been absent for years have re-appeared, viz. :—the Energia (2), Ethiope (2), Kowshing (14), Lunedale (1), Norna (1), Port Adelaide (1), Port Phillip (1), Recorder (1), Strathavon (1), Strathallan (1), Strathdee (1), Teresa (7), Torrington (4), Victoria (2), Wakefield (1). Some of these craft have undoubtedly replaced other vessels, but the bulk are competing with some of the old lines or are additions to other old lines; averaging 1,800 tons a ship.

5. The considerable decrease in foreign shipping is due chiefly to shipwreck, and sale.

The Ashington, sold to the Japanese in 1892, called at Hongkong 5 times as against 23 times in 1891. Amoy, sold to Japanese in 1892, entered 10 times and in 1891, 35 times.

Peking, lost; 10 entries in 1892 against 32 times in 1891.

Aron, Norwegian Barque, lost; Escort, American Barque, lost. The Chinese river-boat Kiang Kwan taken off the run in February, 1891.

None of these craft have been replaced by others.

6. The 1,670 British ships, exclusive of River steamers, that entered the port in 1892 carried 11,606 British Officers and 166 Foreigners, as follows:-

British,

Americans,

.....11,606

74

Danes,

10

Dutch,.

2

Germans,

28

Norwegians,

18

Portuguese, Swedes,

16

18

11,772

98 of the British Officers belonged to the Royal Naval Reserve.

7. The 1,275 Foreign ships, exclusive of River steamers, that entered in 1892, carried 1,101 British Officers, all in American, Chinese and Japanese owned vessels.

173

8. The numbers of European constructed vessels, exclusive of River steamers, that entered the port during the year are shown in the following table, a distinction being drawn between those that entered once a month or less often, and those that entered more frequently than once a month:-

TABLE of OCEAN TRADERS and Coasters, STEAM and SAIL.

TWELVE TIMES AND UNder.

THIRTEEN TIMES AND OVER.

FLAG.

Steam.

Sail.

Steam.

Ships.

No. of times entered.

Total tonnage.

No. of times

Ships.

entered.

Total tonnage.

No. of times

Ships.

entered.

Total tonnage.

British,

211

953

1,445,524

39

47

36,288

30

670

688,789

American,

3

11

29,825

28

32

37,824

Austrian,

23

43,948

Chinese,

39

33,706

170

194,076

Danish,

6

3,576

96

42,270

Dutch,.

3

26

38,502

1

14

9,408

French,

12

53

109,556

1

27

...

23,598

German,

59

259

314,784

13

15

12,514

18

388

307,862

Italian,

2

11

16,489

2

2

2,229

Japanese,

6

15

21,548

1

21

31,941

Norwegian,.

13

29

35,365

4

6

4,127

...

Russian,

1

1

2,005

...

Siamese,

656

Spanish,

4

9

3,936

...

Total,..

331

1,435

2,098,664

87

103

21

13,734

93,638 62 1,407

1,311,678

9. In European constructed vessels, the general import trade, as represented by the amount of shipping entering, amounted to 1,522,551 tons, from places other than China and adjacent countries; while the imports, judged by the same standard, but from places in and adjacent to China, amounted to 3,644,387 tons, inaking a total import tonnage in European constructed vessels, of 5,166,938 tons.

10. Again, the general export trade, still judged as before, amounted to 1,171,280 tons, to places other than China and adjacent countries; while, to those places, it amounted to 3,955,934 tons making a total of export tonnage in European constructed vessels of 5,127,214 tons.

Analysing the above and comparing with 1891, we get as follows

From places other than China, &c., From China and adjacent places,....

IMPORTS.

- Increase.

Decrease.

.12,298

16,013

To places other than China, &c.,...............

To China and adjacent places,.....

Net Increase,..

28,311

...

EXPORTS.

103,414

..90,212

Net Decrease,

...13,202

.28,311 tons ..13,202

""

or, in European constructed vessels, a net increase of Import tonnage of . and a net decrease of export tonnage of

JUNKS.

11. Compared with the average of the past three years, the Foreign Junk Trade shows a shrinkage of 154,391 tons and 482 vessels, whilst the Local trade for the same period has increased 306,828 tons with 8,768 vessels.

12. The Foreign Junk trade for 1892 shows a falling off of 71,042 tons from that of 1891. The principal decreases are to Macao where, doubtless, the launches Perseverance and Wing Yuen, regularly plying thither, have "cut into" them; also the Kwong Mo (now up for sale). The decrease on the Pearl River is probably due to bad rice seasons and foreign competition.

13. The large increase shown in the Local Junk trade for 1892 over that of 1891 is chiefly due to the Merchant Shipping Consolidation Ordinance (No. 26 of 1891); all ballast boats employed on the Praya Reclamation as Junks, being now licensed, as well as all the other craft that previously claimed exemption, but over which it was desirable that some supervision should be kept.

174

GENERAL.

14. 4.396 steamers, 103 sailing vessels and 31,971 junks arrived during the year, giving an average of 99 vessels arriving daily in the waters of the Colony as against 90 the year before; of the steamers 71 per cent. were British, an increase of 5 per cent. from 1891; of these, 51 per cent. were Ocean-going" as against 52 the year before, and of the Foreigners, 2 per cent. were river craft, a decrease of 9 per cent. on the previous year.

46

15. From the foregoing it will be seen that, Hongkong in 1892 still held its place in the shipping world, a comparison showing once more an increase of shipping frequenting the Port.

16. The extent of the trade of the Colony, unfortunately, cannot be analysed by Import and Export Returns, and the only practical way of making a comparison, year by year, is by means of the amount of tonnage entering and clearing, and no erroneous deduction need be drawn from such a comparison, for, in no shipping Return, the wide world over, could any sane person conclude that, the figures show- ing the tonnage of shipping frequenting the Port, professed to represent also the number of tons of merchandize landed and shipped at that port.

17. But in the absence of actual figures to tell us exactly how our import and export trade pro- gresses we may, I think, with the materials at hand draw a fair inference from the experience of other

countries.

Of the United Kingdom as well as of 21 British Possessions, large and small, in various parts of the world, from the Dominion of Canada down to Fiji, I find, on reference to statistics for the 10 years 1881-1890, that in each case increased tonnage entering and clearing carried with it increased value of imports and exports.

I am also fortunately able to carry my investigations beyond the United Kingdom and British Possessions, and from the statistics published by the Imperial Maritime Customs of China to obtain a result similar to the above in a comparison of the trade of China for the 5 years 1888-1892.

In 1888 the total tonnage entered and cleared under the cognizance of the Imperial Maritime Customs was 22,307,859 with a total trade value of 546,581,188 Haikwan Taels.

In 1892 when the tonnage had increased to 29,440,575, this increase had been accompanied an increase in the value of the trade to 654,391,478 Haikwan Taels.

The inference which I draw from this is that, tonnage can in a great measure be reasonably construed as an indication of trade, and that, if an increase in tonnage means elsewhere an increase in trade, it probably has the same meaning in Hongkong also.

The inference is materially strengthened by the following figures for which I am also indebted to the published Reports of the Imperial Maritime Customs and which exhibit the growth of the Hong- kong share in the distribution of the trade with China during the last four years:----

Year.

Total Imports of China.

Total Exported Imported Exports of China.

from Hongkong. Hongkong.

to

Total of Hongkong trade with

China.

1888,

....

Haikwan Taels. | Haikwan Taels. Haikwan Taels. | Haikwan Taels. | Haikwan Taels.

124,782,893 92,401,067 81,092,295 41,266,212 122,358,507

1889,.... 110,884,355 96,947,832 74,598,236 | 43,448,145 | 118,046,381

1890,.... 127,093,481 87,144,480 84,324,395 41,520,506 125,844,901

1891,.... 134,003,863 100,947,849 81,204,029 45,142,707 | 126,346,736

1892, .... 135,101,198 102,583,525 80,700,034 48,273,785 128,973,819

Here then we have undeniable proof of the gratifying circumstance that so far as regards our most important market, China, our trade has considerably increased during the last four years.

18. It is true also that a great number of the vessels calling at Hongkong do not make any long stay, but the period of their stay cannot be considered as a standard to judge of the trade of the Colony. It is nothing new to learn that Hongkong is merely a "distributing centre"; it always has been such, and it is not more so now than it was ten or even twenty years ago (except in so far as the amount to be distributed has increased) so that the raison d'être of a large proportion of the tonnage of the port must of necessity be, as it always has been, "transhipment and branch line requirements," and there has been no suggestion to the contrary in the Returns annually issued by this Department. But, seeing that our communication with the outside world can only be carried on by means of ships, it is somewhat remarkable to find this fact of Hongkong being a "distributing centre" being used as an argument to prove that the tonnage of the port is no indication of the amount of trade.

175

19. That the number of steamers entering 13 times and over during the year-that is to say more than once a month-has increased, might, I think, be considered as indicating that their employment is not unprofitable to their owners; all these are engaged in the "coasting" or "distributing" trade, or in other words, in the "transhipment of cargo and branch line requirements", and from the fact of there being no falling off in the number and tonnage of these, (but rather the contrary) one might reasonably conclude that there is still a considerable amount of trade arriving, and requiring distribu- tion; and, seeing that this latter trade occupied 963 vessels aggregating 1,522,551 tons trading between Hongkong and places other than China and adjacent countries, we can be well content that our ship- ping trade is, in so far a flourishing state as not to necessitate steamers being laid up for want of profitable work, as has been the case at Home for instance, but rather that their employment is suffi- ciently remunerative to admit of increased dividends being paid, and substantial sums carried forward to the current half-year, as for instance in the case of the Hongkong, Canton and Macao Steamboat Company. (Vide report published in local papers 31.1.93.)

20. Moreover, from whatever cause ships come to Hongkong, whether it be to land goods or to tranship them, the result on the Revenue of the Colony is the same, as the only direct tax on shipping is "light dues," which increase in direct proportion to the increase of tonnage inwards, and it is worthy of note that, notwithstanding the depression in the shipping trade all over the world, our tonnage inwards slightly increased last year, which-if only so far as the Revenue is concerned-cannot be considered as anything but satisfactory.

REVENUE.

21. The total Revenue collected by the Harbour Department during the year was $181,057.85. This is an increase of $16,485.93 over last year, and compared with the average of the last 5 years it shows an increase of $53,549.24.

It was made up as follows:-

1. Light Dues,

$ 92,309.62

2. Licences and Internal Revenue,

3. Fees of Court and Office,

29,939.70 58,808.53

$ 181,057.85

STEAM-LAUNCHES.

22. On the 31st December, there were 137 steam-launches employed in the Harbour, of these 51 were licensed for the conveyance of passengers, 59 were privately owned, 11 were the property of the Colonial Government together with a floating Steam Fire Engine, and 5 belonged to the Imperial Government, in the charge of the Military Authorities. All these launches, except those which belong to Her Majesty or to any Foreign Government, are obliged to have a certificated Master and Engineer; the Certificates of these men are liable to suspension or cancellation should they prove negligent or incompetent. One Master's Certificate was suspended during the year for a period of one month.

EMIGRATION.

23. The promise held out in 1891 of a revival of Emigration has to some extent been realised, the numbers last year amounted to 52,143, being an increase of 6,981 over the previous year. Until however new fields are opened, we cannot hope for any substantial revival in this branch of trade.

During the year 476 ships reported having brought to Hongkong 97,991 Chinese passengers returning from various places to which they had emigrated.

REGISTRY OF SHIPPING.

24. During the year 4 vessels of 2,146 tons were registered under the provisions of the Merchant Shipping Act 1854, and 5 Certificates of Registry with a total of 3,592 tons were cancelled. Return No. XVIII shows the remainder of the work done in this branch.

MARINE MAGISTRATE'S Court.

25. 79 cases were heard in this Court with 178 defendants. Refusal of duty (17) and assault (7) were the principal offences in the case of ships; Breach of Harbour Regulations (12) and Leaving without Clearance (12) in the case of Junks.

176

EXAMINATIONS FOR THE POSTS OF MASTERS, MATES AND ENGINEERS

UNDER SECTION 15 OF ORDINANCE 26 OF 1891.

26. The following table shows the number of candidates examined for Certificates of Competency distinguishing those who were successful and those who failed :---

DECK OFFICERS.

ENGINEERS.

NATIONALITY.

British,

British Indian,

American,

Dane,

French,

German,

Norwegian,

Portuguese,

Russian,

Swede,

Grade.

Passed,

Failed.

Total.

Master.

Grade.

Passed.

Failed.

Total.

Grade.

Passed.

Failed.

22

6 28

14

:

:

:

:

1

1

:

1

1

1

***

:

...

:

...

:

First Mate.

4 18

:

:

:

...

:

1

1

1

N

Only Mate.

:

:

:

1

1

1

British,

Portuguese,

(First Mate

River steamer.

...

:

GRAND TOTAL,...]

23 8 31

:

TOTAL DECK OFFICERS,...

18 5

10

:

:

:

:

:

:

1

1

...

:

:

:

:

Second Mate.

:

:

:

23

1

1

8

1

Total.

T

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

Ι

***

Grade.

Passed.

Failed.

00

Total.

First-class Engineer.

1

Grade.

Passed.

1 8

1

14

4

:

:

:

1

:

...

1

1 1 2

:

...

:

:

1

1

Second-class Engineer.

:

...

H

:

10

1

11

11 2 13

49

Failed.

Total.

Grand Total.

10

5

:

:

...

...

...

49 112

4

...

مصر

1

:

:

:

...

:

-

***

...

...

...

:

:

:

:

...

5

2

1

1

4

2

2

1

1

1

1

LO

5

54

133

.66.

TOTAL ENGINEERS,.........67.

Since 1st January, 1884, when under the Order in Council of 31st December, 1883, Certificates of Competency issued at Hongkong were made of equal value to those issued by the Board of Trade, 841 Certificates of all grades have been issued. The details are shown in the following table :-

Grade.

Master, First Mate,

1884. 1885. 1886.

1887. 1888. 1889. 1890. 1891. 1892. Total.

21

10

6

22

14

10

17

12

22

20

25

39

32

23

198

14

31

29

26

18

171

5

3

1

· 3

2

3

3

1

21

10

10

5

4

10

1

7

10

66

Only Mate,

Second Mate,

Total,...........

50

33333

29

38

47

59

80

68

52

456

2nd

1st Class Engineer,

Do.,

19

93

23

22203

=20

11

14

21

11

18

15

11

142

20

15

19

28

33

31

49

238

=

Total,.......

42

42

31

29

40

39

51

46

60

380

Certificates renewed,

:

10

5

Grand Total,.........

92

75

60

67

87

98

131

114

112

841

MARINE COURTS, UNDER SECTION 13 OF ORDINANCE 26 OF 1891.

27. The following Courts have been held during the year :-

:

1. On the 27th January,-Inquiry as to the loss of the British S.S. Namchow, Official No. 63,588 of Penang, in the vicinity of Breaker Point, China Sea, on the morning of the 8th January. All the Officers were lost.

2. On the 24th June, 1892,-Inquiry as to the stranding of the British ship John McLeod, Official No. 90,742 of St. John, New Brunswick, on the South-West edge of the Pratas Shoal, China Sea, on the morning of the 28th May. The Master's (OSCAR HILL HENDERSON) Certificate of Competency was returned to him.

177

3. On the 15th July, 1892,-Inquiry as to the loss of the British S.S. Haiphong, Official No. 88,838 of Hongkong, on the rocks about two miles West of Iro-osaki Light, Japan, on the morning of the 28th June. The Master's (WILLIAM YOUNG HUNTER) Certificate of Competency was suspended for two months.

4. On the 21st October, 1892,-Inquiry as to the loss of the British S.S. Bokhara, Official ·

No. 68,397 of Greenock, on Sand Island, Pescadores, China Sea, on the night of the 10th October. The only surviving Officers being the Chief Officer, 3rd and 4th Officers. The Court was of opinion that the Master (CHARLES DAWSON SAMS) committed an error of judgment, and no blame was attached to any of the other Officers.

THE SUNDAY CARGO-WORKING ORDINANCE, 1891.

28. 31 Permits were issued during the year aggregating $4,800 in fees.

SEAMEN.

29. 12,769 seamen were shipped and 13,449 discharged at the Shipping Office and on board ships during the

year, the discrepancy is owing to the number of seamen shipped at the Consulates of which we have no record.

30. 378 distressed seamen were received during the year; of these, 90 were sent to the United Kingdom, 7 to Sydney, 6 to Vancouver, 16 to Bombay and 2 to Calcutta, 4 died and 253 obtained employment. On the 31st December, 1892, 6 were in Government Civil Hospital, 1 in Lunatic Asylum, and 1 on board Hygeia (Small-pox Hospital). $6,599.50 were expended by the Board of Trade in the relief of these men, and $57.28 by the Colony.

-

MARINE SURVEYOR'S SUB-DEPARTMENT.

31. Return No. XXIII shows the work performed in this branch of the Harbour Department, and in forwarding this I desire to record my appreciation of the manner in which the work of this Sub- Department is carried out.

LIGHTHOUSES.

32. The amount of dues collected was as follows:-

Class of Vessel.

Rate, per ton.

No.

Total Fees: Tonnage. Collected...

Ocean Vessels paying full dues, 2 cents 2,936 | 3,492,382 | 87,309.54

Launches paying' full dues,

560

22,244

556.10

"

River Steamers (Night Boats),.

cent

661

666,597

4,443.98

Do.

(Day Boats),...!

Free.

893

996,361

Total,..

5,050 | 5,177,584 | 92,309.62.

33. The Gap Rock was established as a Lighthouse Station during the year, the light being exhibited for the first time on the 1st April. The European Lightkeepers selected by the Trinity House Corporation arrived and assumed their duties on the 13th June. Some difficulty was experienced with the "Douglass Burners" sent out for use at this Station, these have now been replaced by 6 wicked "Trinity House Burners" with satisfactory results. The Fog Signal Apparatus was also erected during the year but to 31st December there had not been occasion to make use of it.

up

34. Telegraphic communication has been established between the Gap Rock and the Post Office, from whence a branch telephone is taken to the Harbour Office and other places.

35. There is also communication fortnightly with the Rock for the purpose of changing the keepers and supplying stores. The tug Pilot Fish, belonging to the Dock Company, is hired for this purpose. Landing on the Rock on these occasions has never been absolutely prevented by the weather though on some occasions it has been attended with difficulty, and it was thought advisable on these occasions not to attempt to land such stores as required to be handled with care.

36. The other Lighthouse Stations remain as before and there is nothing that calls for remark concerning their working.

37. The establishment, however, of a Lighthouse on Waglan Island by the Chinese Authorities will render D'Aguilar Light unnecessary. I would recommend its being removed to Green Island, where, being a long distance light, it would "cut in" with the Gap Rock Light, and a vessel after getting hold of the latter would have a leading light right up to the Harbour. If this change were made, I would further recommend the present Green Island Light being placed at Cape Collinson, and the Cape Collinson Light, with a slight modification, placed as a Harbour Light on Kowloon Point. These changes would, I think, be a great improvement to the Lighting of Hongkong.

:

.

178

SIGNALLING OF VESSELS.

38. Owing to the representation of various Mercantile Firms an addition has been made in the system of signalling vessels arriving at the Port, these are now telegraphed to the Post Office from Gap Rock direct, and from Cape d'Aguilar, by telephone and telegraph through Shaukiwan and the Central Police Station, the information is posted at the Post Office and is forwarded to Kowloon Point where the necessary signals indicating the arriving vessels are made with flags. I am not aware how much benefit accrues to the mercantile community from the establishment of these signals at Kowloon, but, if I may express an opinion, I should say not much, and I think the disestablishment of the Peak Signal Station would be a great loss and inconvenience to the general community, whose interest lies in the Mail steamers only, and who are not concerned with the arrival of any others.

GOVERNMENT GUNPOWDER DEPÔT.

39. During the year 1892, there has been stored in the Government Magazine, Stone Cutters' Island-

No. of Cases, &c.

Approximate Weight.

Ibs.

Gunpowder, privately owned,

Do., Government owned,

Cartridges, privately owned,

8,367

398,879

681

116,233

Do., Government owned,

49

4,215

Explosive Compounds, privately owned,..

181

10,786

Do..

Government owned,.

38

2,228

Total,...........

9,316

532,341

On the 31st December, 1892, there remained as under :-

No. of Cases, &c.

Approximate Weight.

lbs.

Gunpowder, privately owned,

Do., Government owned,.

63

2,248

Cartridges, privately owned,..

187

30,409

Do., Government owned,

176

19,510

Explosive Compounds, privately owned,..

171

11,070

Do.,

Government owned, .

32

2,007

Total,.......

629

65,244

IMPORTS AND EXPORTS (OPIUM) OFFICE.

40. The Return shows that during the year the araount of Opium reported as follows:-

Imported,. Exported,

1891. 58,4192

1892. 56,864

.57,998

52,625

Decrease.

1,5554 chests. 5,3722

33

Through cargo reported

1891,

18,256 chests.

but not landed,.

1892,.

.21,144

27

Increase,

2,888 chests.

22,763 permits were issued from this Office, being an increase of 577 over 1891.

A daily Memo. of Exports Permits to Chinese Ports was during the year supplied to the Com- missioner of the Imperial Maritime Customs at Kowloon.

Surprise visits were paid to 139 Godowns during the year.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your obedient Servant,

R. MURRAY RUMSEY, Retd. Comd., R.N.,

Harbour Master, &c.

Honourable G. T. M. O'BRIEN, C.M.G.,

Colonial Secretary,

&c.,

&c.

&c.

COUNTRIES WHENCE ARRIVED.

!

I.-NUMBER, TONNAGE, and CREWS of Vessels ENTERED at Ports in the Colony of Hongkong from each Country in the Year 1892.

BRITISH,

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST,

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOES.

FOREIGN.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tons.

Crews. Vessels. Tons.

Crews. Vessels.

Tons.

Crews. Vessels.

Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

41

47,503 2,054

41

...

16

46,665 3,147

16

...

47,503) 2,054| 5] 6,611 126 46,665 3,147

...

...

...

15 12,303 782

15

12,303 782

1

634 14

6,611 126

634 14

46

16

46

...

"

...

54,114 2,180 46,665 3,147

Australia and New Zealand,

British Columbia,.............

British North Borneo,............................................................

Coast of China and Formosa........................................

Cochin-China,

Continent of Europe,

Great Britain,

India and Singapore,

Japan,

Java and other Islands in the Indian Archi-

1,639 2,069,150| 75,007 |

97 110,747 3,707|

12 20,097] 587 150 266,417| 7,993] 151| 208,643] 10,894|

36

188 295,558 9,401| 46,069 1,455 518 361,797 20,479

97

2

...

...

54,114 2,180) 46,665 3,147|| 16] 12,937 796

114 99,826 3,139] 211

93 163,150 8,116||

210,573 6,846||

104 182,655 8,687 152 268,099 8,049

16]

16 12,937 796

43,449 1,778 1,736 2,112,599 76,780 14,443 1,501,220 182,176 8,217 598,656 95,734 22,660 2,099,876 277,910 16,082 3,570,370 257,183 8,314 642,105 97,507 24,396 4,212,475 354,690 97 110,747 3,707|| 114 99,826 3,139 12 20,097 587 92 162,558 8,100 152 268,696 8,083 2 1,682 56 151 208,648 10,894|| 27 34,170 1,234 184 297,118 9,432 118 172,030 5,328 36 46,069 1,455 23 29,086 1,059 520 362,373 20,523| 571

2,279 901

1,560

576

...

31

44

461

...

89,992 14,745

}

...

...

871

24]

6961 56

3

377 27

106

96,683| 5,025||

67

45,657 2,350)

5

5,384 140

228 126,776 6,027||

491

14

...

71

64,550| 2,467]

6

1

480

12

54 106,712 3,890|

33

...

152

4,447

794

61,608 1,743

17

...

211 210,578 6,846

1

592 16

592

16

...

1,429 201 28 1,707 281 119 41 3,312 120 27 89 15,041 1,260 660

1

::

3

377 27

1,682 56 35,599 1,254 173,737 5,356|| 301 32,398 1,179 59 105,033 16,005 1,089 871 24] 1 4 1,073 83

178 242,813| 12,128|| 467,588 14,729

75,155 2,514,

451,789 35,224 871 24.

2

4

91

2,279| 90

1,429 20

3,267 59

3,312 120

15,617 1,804

105 183,247 8,703 154 270,378 8,139 179 244,242 12,148 303 470,855 14,788 63 78,467 2,634 1,180 467,406 36,528

1

871

24

321

1,921

91

70

47,578 2,441|

1,829

49

230

128,605 6,076

231

173 142,340 7,375

130,045 6,121

1,921]

91

4 1,073 83 176 144,261 7,466

4

3,944

95

8901

13)

1

890

13

1

4911 14

890

13

235 133,989 6,216 2

1,381

27

::

...

4,447

152

77 68,997 2,619]

1

...

1

1,664

22

34|

794

63,272 1,765|

17

2 1,274 29

::

87 168,320 5,633||

100

...

1,664

22

77 68,997 2,619

88 169,984 5,655

1,274 29

::

pelago,

Масао,

Mauritius,

...

...

North Pacific,

11

696

56

Philippine Islands,

106

96,683 5,025

...

Ports in Hainan and Gulf of Tonquin,

3.

3,269 94

N

Sandwich Islands,..

1

491

14

...

2,115

---

Siam, ....

71

64,550 2,467

...

South America,.

1

480

12

United States of America,

54 106,712 3,890]

...

TOTAL,.

3,095 8,757,830 147,064

104

49,979 1,984 3,1993,807,809 149,048 15,735 2,338,339 226,317 8,320 627,041 97,353 24,055 2,965,380 323,670 18,830 6,096,169 373,381 8,424 677,020| 99,337|27,254 6,773,189 472,718

179

II.-NUMBER, TONNAGE, and CREWS of Vessels CLEARED at Ports in the Colony of Hongkong for each Country in the Year 1892.

TOTAL.

180

BRITISH.

COUNTRIES TO WHICH DEPARTED.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOES.

FOREIGN.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tons.

rews. Vessels.

Tons. Crews. Vessels, Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tons.

Crews. Vessels.

Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tons.

Crews.

Australia and New Zealand,.

23

33,330 1,868

British Columbia,..

1

948 22

1,794)

394

27 24,

35,124 1,895]

23

12

2

1,342 34

::

...

33,330 1,868

1

948

22

1,794

394

27 24

35,124 1,895

12

...

British North Borneo,

151

13,044 8631

...

Cape of Good Hope,..

1 1,486 27

...

15 13,044) 863 1,486 27

1,268 291

1,268 29

15

13,044

863

1,268

I

1,486

27

29 17

1

...

...

Coast of China and Formosa, ......

1,997 2,438,538| 93,968||

361

Cochin-China,.

39

45,259 1,496

49

Continent of Europe,

410

Great Britain,.

361

76,265 4,784

India and Singapore,

Japan,

Java & other Islds. in the Indian Archipelago,

Macao,

North Pacific,

Philippine Islands,

Ports in Hainan and Gulf of Tonquin,

190 308,717| 9,926

112 189,347 7,578||

51

2,787 651 82,786 1,924

9

10,027) 342]

9

13,327 304)

529 377,783 21,295}

...

1

336

9

1

361 76,265 4,784 195 311,504 9,991 163 272,133 9,502 18] 23,354 646 529 377,783 21,295 336

41,492 1,365 2,033 2,480,030 95,333 15,258 1,700,077 201,408 7,103 59,542) 1,703) 88 104,801) 3,199| 74 66,118) 2,312] 43 44 91,990 5,695 1 1,808 21 67 102,922 3,684,

414,276 73,542 22,361 2,114,353 274,950 17,255 4,138,615 295,276 7,139 35,114 1,265) 117 101,227 3,577 113 111.372) 3,808)

921

1,342

14,312 892 1,486 27 455,768 74,907 24,394 4,594,3×3 370,283 94,656 2,968 205 206,028) 6.776

2

34

44

91,990 5,695

44

91,990 5,695)

44

91,990 5,695

1 1.808 21

37

78,073 4,805

37

***

78,073 4,805

3

74

115,235 4,216

58

3,696 56 80,304 2,046

70 106,618 3,740

257

411,639| 13,610]

8

132 195,539 6,262

186

304,582 11,794

109

6,483 121 163,090 3,970]

265

418.122) 13,731

295

467,672 15,764

9

10,027 342)

...

651

109,236 16,035

24

2,694

3641

9

469 45

1

3551

201

675 111,930 16,399 5

1,180

487,019 37,330

24

2,694]

364

824 65

4

469

451

691

291

...

15

14.303 710

15

18,248

3831

30

32,551 1,093

22

13,947) 777

24

23,553)

577 46 37,500 1.354

37

28,250 1,487

30

41,801

960

1,667| 77

2

1,667 77

233

130,167 5,953||

10

6,764

263]

243

136,931 6,216|

235

131,834 6,030

10

6,764]

263

9 13.327 304 18

23,354 646

1,204 489,713 37,694

6 1,160 74 76) 70,051 2,447 245 138,598 6,293

Russia in Asia,.....

Sandwich Islands,

...

...

1,981| 46

:

1,981

46

21

1,981

461

2 1,981

46

Siam,...

South America,

United States of America, .

982

22,879 814 2,316| 58 10,566 149

28

982

26 22,879

28

333

12

::

333

121

1,315

401

3

1,8/5 40

351

814

2,316 68 10,917 157

3,814

121

2,054

35

24

34,374

508

2

::

1,981

401

5,795

166

32|

26,693

9351

1,981

45

34

28.674

980

::

2,054 35

4,3701

931

6

4,370

93

24 34,374 508

311

44,940

6571

351

8

32

45,291

665

TOTAL,..

3,008|3,547,457|144,005||

8,177|3,768,514| 7,270 570,005 169 221,057 5,800 3,177 3,768,514 149,805 16,463 2,374,520 240,868 7,270 570,005 78,207 23,738 2,944,525 319,075 19,471 5,921,977 884,873 7,439| 791,062 84,007, 26,910 6,713,039 468,880

III.-NUMBER, TONNAGE and CREWS of Vessels of each Nation ENTERED at Ports in the Colony of Hongkong

181

in the Year 1892.

ENTERED.

NATIONALITY

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

OF

VESSELS.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews. Vessels. Tons.

Crews. Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

American,

39

Austrian,

23

63,543 1,803 43,948 1,321

4

4,106

67

43

67,649

1,870

23

43,948

1,321

British,

3,095

3,757,830 | 147,064

104

49,979

1,984

3,199

3,807,809

149,048

Chinese,

232

251,844 12,076

2

1,688

86

234

253,532 12.162

Chinese Junks,

14,501

1,030,708171,728

8,254

575,543

95,722

22,755

1,606,251 267,450

|

Danish,

100

44,857 2,238

2

989

36

102

45,846 2,274

Dutch,

39

47,238

1,750

1

672

23

40

47,910

1,773

French,

80

133,154

10,315

80

133,154

10,315

German,

610

594,446

20,521

52

40,714

1,323

662

635,160

21,844

Italian,

13

18,718

738

Japanese,

36

53,489

1,732

::

13

18,718

738

36

53,489

1,732

Norwegian,

32

36,445

768

3

3,047

54

35

39,492

822

Russian,

1

2,005

78

1

Siamese,

1

656

18

::

2,005

78

1

656

18

Spanish,

888

28

17,288

1,231

2

282

42

30

17,570

1,273

TOTAL,............ 18,830 6,096,169 373,381

| |

8,424

677,020 99,337

27,254 6,773,189 472,718

IV.-NUMBER, TONNAGE and CREWS of Vessels of each Nation CLEARED at Ports in the Colony of Hongkong

in the Year 1892.

CLEARED.

NATIONALITY OF

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

VESSELS.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tons. Crews. Vessels. Tons.

Crews.

American,

Austrian,

British,

Chinese,

Chinese Junks,

Danish,

Dutch,

French,

German,

Italian,

Japanese,

......

Norwegian,

Russian,.....

Siamese,

Spanish,

D

37

22

60,131 42,188

1,859

8

10,265

147

1,266

3,008 | 3,547,457

144,032

169

229 249,132

12,135

1

15,344 | 1,198,811

1,198,811

189,568

7,091

99

44,498

2,130

2

35

42,914 1,675

221,057 938 387,014 752 3,506

5,800 50 72,924

45 22 3,177 230

70,396 2,006 42,188 1,266

3,768,514 |149,832

250,070 12,185

22,435

1,585,825 | 262,492

39

101

45,250 2,169

122

39

46,420 1,797

80

133,154

10,069

80

133,154

10,069

555

538,542

19,161

112

101,107

3,109

667

639,649

22,270

12

19,924

819

12

19,924

819

15

21,548

817

9

6,308

181

222

21

31,941

922

36

53,489

1,739

25

31,624

663

34

37,932

844

1

2,005

74

1

2,005

74

1

654

18

1

...

654

18

24

14,711

1,069

6

2,858

231

30

17,569

1,300

TOTAL,............ 19,471 5,921,977 384,873

| |

7,439

791,062 84,007

26,910 | 6,713,039 | 468,880

V.—TOTAL NUMBER, TONNAGE AND CREWS OF VESSELS ENTERED AT EACH PORT IN THE COLONY OF HONGKONG, IN THE YEAR 1892.

TOTAL.

182

BRITISH.

FOREIGN,

NAMES

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

OF PORTS.

Vls. Tons. Crews.

Vis.

Tons. Crews. Vls. Tons.

Aberdeen,

...

...

Hunghom,

Shaukiwán,

Stanley,

Victoria,

Yaumáti,.

3,095 3,757,830 147,064

104

...

Tons. Crews. Vls.

321

26,190 5,469] 10,920| 2,665 541 526 20,502 4,493|| 1,219|| 151 5,773 1,171 27 49,979 1,984 3,199 3,807,809 149,048 12,029 2,097,404189,519 3,200 1,899 177,550 23,000 3,012

Crews. Vls.

Tons. Crews. Vis.

575

555

896

14,670 4,270| 31,133 5,415| 1,096| 74,450 12,075 1,745

738 341 178 291,179 37,448 15,229 214,871 37,804 4,911

Total,.

3,095 3,757,830 147,064

104

9226,817

3,304 392,421 60,804 1,899 177,550 23,000 $,012

49,979 1,984 3,199 3,807,809 149,048 15,735 2,338,339 226,317 8,320 627,041 97,358 24,055 2,965,880 328,670 18,830 6,096,169 373,881 8,424||

Tons. Crews. Vls.

14,670|| 4,270| 896 31,183 5,415| 1,096| 74,450|12,075| 1,745||

Tons. Crews.

40,860 9,739 42,053 8,080 94,95216,568 738 341 178 6,511 1,512 341,158 39,432 18,4286,196,392 376,015 214,871 37,804 4,911| 392,421 60,804

46,773 677,020|99,337| 27,254 6,773,189472,718

Tons, Crews. Vls.

Tons. Crews. Vis. 40,860 9,739|| 575 26,190 5,469 321 42,053 8,080 555 10,920 2,665| 541 94,952 16,568 526 20,502 4,493 1,219 6,511 1,512 151 5,773 1,171] 27 2,388,583 226,967 15,124 5,855,234 336,583

VI.-TOTAL NUMBER, TONNAGE AND CREWS OF VESSELS CLEARED AT EACH PORT IN THE COLONY OF HONGKONG, IN THE YEAR 1892.

BRITISH.

FOREIGN.

TOTAL.

NAMES

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL..

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

OF PORTS.

Vls.

Tons. Crews. Vls.

Tons. Crews. Vls.

Tons. Crews. Vis.

Aberdeen,

Hunghom,

Shaukiwán,.

Stanley,

Victoria,

Yaumáti,.

Total,..

3,008 3,547,457 144,

231

...

...

362

...

...

...

945

...

...

...

Tons. Crews. Vls.

5,807 1,660 665 24,925 2,832 732 59,043 7,502|

...

74

5,065 723

...

...

3,008 3,547,457|144,005|

...

...

169 221,057 5,800 3,177 3,708,514 149,805 12,238 2,098,811 202,460 2,613 180,869 25,671

731

104

2,890

2,148

Tons. Crews. Vls.

896

35,053 8,059 17,115 5,240)||| 1,094|| 33,750 8,636 1,676 789

1,446 178 6,511) 1,512| 74 283,301 24,146 15,128 2,882,112 226,606 15,246 199,340 31,337 4,761 380,209 57,008 2,613

Tons. Crews. Vls.

40,860|| 9,739) 42,040 8,072|

231

362

92,793 16,138

945

Tons. Crews. Vis.

5,807 1,680 665 24,925| 2,832| 732 59,043 7,502 731 5,065 723 104 5,646,268 346,465 3,059 180,869 25,671 2,148

Tons. Crews. Vls. Tons. Crews.

35,053 8,059| 896 17,115 5,240 1,094 33,750 8,636 1,676 1,446 789 178 504,358 29,946 18,305 6,150,626 376,411 199,340 31,337 4,761 380,209 57,008

40,860 9,739

42,040 8,072 92,793 16,138

6,511| 1,512

,457 144,005

169 221,057 5,800 3,177 3,768,514 149,805 16,463|2,374,520 240,868 7,270 570,005 78,207|23,733 2,944,525 319,075 19,471 5,921,977 384,873 7,439 791,062 84,007 26,910 6,713,039 468,880

5768,514 149,8

570,005

VII.-Total Number, Tonnage, Crews and Passengers of Junks ENTERED from Macao, during the Year

ending 31st December, 1892.

183

CARGO.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Passen- gers.

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Passen- gers.

Passen-

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

gers.

Victoria,

*....

565

86,022

14,600

10

80

9,514 1,048

82

645

95,536 15,648

92

Total,... 565 86,022 14,600

10

80

9,514 1,048

82

645

95,536 15,648

92

VIII.—Total Number, Tonnage, Crews and Passengers of Junks CLEARED for Macao, during the Year

ending 31st December, 1892.

CARGO.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Passen- gers.

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Passen-

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

gers.

Victoria,

634

94,070 15,438

75

24

2,694

364

2

658

96,764

15,802

77

Total,... 634 94,070

15,438

75

24

24

2,694

364

2

658 96,764 15,802

77

IX.—Total Number, Tonnage, Crews and Passengers of Junks ENTERED at each Port in the Colony of Hongkong, from Ports on the Coast of China and Formosa, during the Year ending 31st December, 1892.

CARGO.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Passen- gers.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Aberdeen,

575 26,190 5,469

303

321

14,670 4,270

27

896

40,860

9,739

330

Hunghòm,

555

10,920 2,665

163

541

31,133

5,415

11

1,096

42,053

8,080

174

Shaukiwán,...!

526

20,502

4,493

274

1,219

74,450

12,075

53

1,745

94,952

16,568

327

Stanley,

151

5,773

1,171

73

27

Victoria,

10,230

703,751

120,330

80,024

3,054

Yaumáti,..

1,899

177,550 23,000

80

3,012

738 230,167 214,871

Total,... 13,936

944,686 | 157,128 80,917

8,174

341 34,769 $7,804

566,029 94,674 28,303

178

6,511

1,512

73

28,148 64

13,284 4,911

933,918 | 155,099 108,172

392,421

22,110 | 1,510,715 |251,802 |109,220

60,804

144

X.—Total Number, Tonnage, Crews and Passengers of Junks CLEARED at each Port in the Colony of Hongkong, for Ports on the Coast of China and Formosa, during the Year ending 31st December, 1892.

Cargo.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Aberdeen,

231

5,807

1,680

201

665

35,053

8,059

Passen-

gers.

168

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Passen-

gers.

896

40,860 9,739

459

Hunghom, ...

362

24,925 2,832

200

732

17,115

5,240

17

1,094

42,040

8,072

217

Shaukiwán,..

945

59,043

7,502

115

731

33,750

8,636

53

1,676

92.793

16,138

168

Stanley,

74

5,065

723

63

104

1,446

789

1

178

6,511

1,512

64

Victoria,

10,485

Yaumáti,..

2,613

829,032 135,722 | 106,422 180,869 25,671

2,687

97,616

18,499

197

2,148

199,340

31,337

6,641 13,172 698 4,761

926,648

154,221113,063

380,209

57,008

895

Total,... 14,710 | 1,104,741 174,130 107,288

7,067

384,320 72,560 7,578 | 21,777

1,489,061246,690 114,866

184

XI.-Grand Total Number, Tonnage, Crews and Passengers of Junks ENTERED at each Port in the Colony of

Hongkong (exclusive of Local Trade), during the Year ending 31st December, 1892.

CARGO.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Passen- gers.

Passen-

Passen-

Vessels.

Tons.

Crews.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

gers.

gers.

Aberdeen,

575

26,190 5,469

303

321

14,670

4,270

27

896

40,860 9,739

330

Hunghom,

555

10,920

2,665

163

541

31,133

5,415

11

1,096

42,053 8,080

174

Shaukiwán,..

526

20,502

4,493

274

1,219

74,450

12,075

53

1,745

94,952

16,568

327

Stanley,

151

5,773

1,171

73

27

738

341

178

6,511

1,512

73

Victoria,

10,795

789,773 134,930

80,034

3,134

239,681

35,817

28,230

13,929

1,029,454 | 170,747 | 108,264

Yaumáti,......

1,899

177,550 23,000

80 3,012

214,871

37,804

64

4,911

392,421 60,804

144

Total,... 14,501 | 1,030,708 |171,728 80,927

8,254

575,543 95,722

28,385

22,755 | 1,606,251 | 267,450 |109,312

XII.-Grand Total Number, Tonnage, Crews and Passengers of Junks CLEARED at each Port in the Colony of

Hongkong (exclusive of Local Trade), during the Year ending 31st December, 1892.

CARGO.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Passen- gers.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Passen- gers.

Passen-

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

gers.

Aberdeen,

231

5,807 1,680

291

665

35,053 8,059

168

896

40,860 9,739

459

Hunghom,

362

24,925 2,832

200

732

17,115

5,240

17

1,094

42,040 8,072

217

Shaukiwán,... 945

59,043

7,502

115

731

33,750

8,636

53

1,676

92,793 16,138

168

Stanley,

Victoria,

74 11,119

5,065

723

63

104

1,446

789

1

178

6,511 1,512

64

923,102 151,160 106,497

2,711

100,310

18,863

6,643

13,830

Yaumáti,...... 2,613 180,869 25,671

197

2,148

199,340

31,337

698

4,761

1,023,412 | 170,023

380,209 57,008 895

113,140

Total,... 15,344 1,198,811 189,568 107,363 7,091

387,014 72,924

7,580

22,435 1,585,825262,492114,943

XIII-Return of Junks (Local Trade) ENTERED at the Port of Victoria from the Out-stations of the Island and

the Villages in British Kaulung, during the Year ending 31st December, 1892.

CARGO.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Passen- gers.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Passen- gers.

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Passen- gers.

Victoria, ......

7,977 293,537 96,814 2,737 1,239

38,162 10,555

3,222

9,216

331,699 107,369 5,959

Total,... 7,977 293,537 96,814 2,737 1,239

38,162❘ 10,555

3,222 9,216

331,699 107,369 5,959

XIV.—Return of Junks (Local Trade) CLEARED from the Port of Victoria for the Out-stations of the Island and

the Villages in British Kaulung, during the Year ending 31st December, 1892.

Victoria,

CARGO.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Passen- gers.

......

2,373 55,409 17,404 3,867 6,927 279,513 90,395

6 9,300

334,922 107,799 5,873

Total,... 2,373

55,409 17,404 3,867 6,927 279,513 90,395

6

9,300

334,922 107,799

5,873

185

XV.-SUMMARY.

FOREIGN TRADE.

No. OF VESSELS.

TONS.

CREWS.

British Vessels entered with Cargoes,..

3,095

3,757,830

147.064

Do.

do. in Ballast,

104

49,979

1,984

Total,.

3,199

3,807,809

149,048

British Vessels cleared with Cargoes,.

3,008

3,547,457

144,005

Do.

do. in Ballast,

169

221,057

5,800

Total,

3,177

3,768,514

149,805

Total of all British Vessels entered and cleared,

Foreign Vessels entered with Cargoes,

6,376

7,576,323

298,853

15,735

2,338,339

226,317

Do.

do

in Ballast,.....

Total,..

8,320

627,041

97,353

24,055

2,965,380

323,670

Foreign Vessels cleared with Cargoes,

16,463

2,374,520

240,868

Do.

do. in Ballast,

7,270

570,005

78,207

Total,...........

23,733

2,944,525

319,075

Total of all Foreign Vessels entered and cleared,................

47,788

5,909,905

642,745

Total of all Vessels entered with Cargoes,..

18,830

6,096,169

373,381

Do.

do. in Ballast,

8,424

677,020

99,337

Total of all Vessels entered,

27,254

6,773,189

472,718

Total of all Vessels cleared with Cargoes,

19,471

5,921,977

384,873

Do.

do.

in Ballast,

7,439

791,062

84,007

Total of all Vessels cleared,

26,910

6,713,039

468,880

Total of all Vessels entered and cleared with Cargoes,.

38,301

12,018,146

758,254

Do.

do.

do. in Ballast,

15,863

1,468,082

183,344

Total of all Vessels engaged in Foreign Trade only, entered and cleared,

54,164

13,486,228

941,598

LOCAL TRADE.

Total of all Vessels entered,

9,216

Do.

cleared,

9,300

*

Total of all Vessels engaged in Local Trade only, entered and cleared,

18,516

331,699

107,369

334,922

107,799

666,621

215,168

Total of all Vessels engaged in Foreign Trade only, entered and cleared,

Do.

do. in Local Trade only,

54,164

13,486,228

941,598

do.

18,516

666,621

215,168

Grand Total of all Vessels entered and cleared,

72,680

14,152,849

1,156,766

SUMMARY OF ALL CHINESE PASSENGERS.

NAMES OF PLACES.

From Ports other than in China or Japan,

Do.

in China and Japan,

Do.

in Macao,

Do.

in Villages of the Colony,..

97,971

646,120

53,612

5,959

Total Arrivals,......

803,662

Left for Ports other than in China or Japan,

52,143

Do.

in China and Japan,

686,710

Do.

in Macao,......

50,486

Do.

in Villages of the Colony,

5,873

Total Departures,......

795,212

Excess of Arrivals over Departures,

8,450

Grand Total of Arrivals and Departures,

1,598,874

186

XVI-RETURN of VESSELS REGISTERED at the Port of Hongkong, during the Year 1892.

Name of Vessel.

Official Number.

Regis- tered Tonnage.

Horse Power.

Rig.

Built of

Where built and when.

Remarks.

Pekin, str.,

95,860 118.38

40

Schooner

Wood Mongkok, Yaumati, 1891.

Kwong Mo, str.,.................

Maroon,

95,861 102.15

80

Fore & aft Schooner

Hongay, str.,

6,947 361.62

70,670 1,563.55 220

Barque Wood Bristol, 1855.

Schooner Iron

Composite Whampoa, China, 1889. Foreign name Kwong Mo.

Since lost near Fusan, Korea.

Middlesbro, 1874,

Late Torrington.

XVII.-RETURN of REGISTRIES of VESSELS cancelled at the Port of Hongkong, during the Year 1892.

Name of Vessel,

Official

Number.

Regis- tered Tonnage.

Date of

Registry.

Horse Power.

Rig.

Built of

Where built and when.

Reason of Cancellation.

Kiu Kiang, str.,

Diamante, str.,

Haiphong, str.,

Dorothy,

Maroon,

50,662 1,284.22 1867 300 None

77,448 514.13 1879 120 Schooner

Iron

....

88,838 1,121.95 1885 170 Schooner

49,660 310.47 1890

Barque

6,947 361.62 1892

Barque

Iron

Low Walker, Newcastle-

on-Tyne, 1885. Wood Gloucester, 1864.

Wood Bristol, 1855.

Wood New York, 1864.

Aberdeen, Scotland,

1878.

Sold to be broken up at Canton.

Sold to Foreigners at Hiogo,

Japan.

Stranded near Iroosaki Light,

Coast of Japan.

Sold to be broken up at Canton.

Lost near Fusan, Korea.

XVIII.—AMOUNT of FEES received under the Merchant Shipping Act, 1855, and Table B of Ordinance No. 26

of 1891, in the Harbour Department, during the Year 1892.

Matter or Duty in respect of which Fee taken.

Number. Fee. Amount.

Remarks.

€0

$

Alteration in Agreements with Seamen,

1

1

Certifying Desertion,

71

Copy from Registry Book,

Declaration of Ownership,

152

71

10

2

12

Endorsement of change of Master,

30

Ι

30

Endorsement of change of Ownership,

1

Granting Certificate of Imperial Registry,

15

Inspection of Registry,...

Recording Mortgage of Ship,

Recording Discharge of Mortgage,

Recording Sale of Ship,

1

Registering Certificate of Sale, ......

21 ON

2015 10 10 N

2

60

25

Total,......

225

187

XIX. RETURN of CHINESE PASSENGER SHIPS cleared by the Emigration Officer, Hongkong, during the Year ending the 31st day of December, 1892.

No.

DATE CLEARED.

SHIP'S NAME.

TONS.

NATION- ALITY OF SHIP.

ADULTS.

CHILDREN.

MASTER'S NAME.

WHITHER BOUND.

TOTAL.

M.

F. M.

F.

1

January 5 Empress of Japan, str.

3,003 British

G. A. Lee

Victoria, B.C.

185

185

>>

5 Agamemnon, str.

1,491

O. P. Williams

Straits Settlements

270

43

27

""

9 Wing Sang, str.

1,517

d'A. de Ste. Croix]

477

96

999559

7

5

325

12

15

600

32

4

21

12 Diomed, str....

1,432

E. G. Dickens

142

142

""

95

:

5

13 | China, str.

2.401

W. B. Seabury

San Francisco

38

46

6

14 Arratoon Apear, str.

1,392

J. E. Hansen

Straits Settlements

200

67

272

19

7

20 Nestor, str.

1,269

J. S. Thompson

166

15

1

186

23

Belgic, str.

2,695

W. H. Walker

San Francisco

23

41

30

9

33

25 Chelydra, str.

10

26 Melpomene, str.

11 February 2❘ Empress of China, str.

1,943 Austrian 3,003 British

R. Cass A. Mitis

H. Pybus

1,574

Straits Settlements

175

13

193

*

791

15

100

Victoria, B.C.

236

236

:

12

8 Teheran, str.

1,670

17

J. F. Jephson

Straits Settlements

140

143

13

""

14

A

9 Kutsang, str.

9 Zambesi, str.

1,495

W. H. Jackson

82

96

"

1,565

G. J. Edwards

Victoria, B.C.

71

78

17

Portland, Oregon

7

15

""

17 Japan, str.

1,865

J. G. Olifent

Straits Settlements

221

25

""

19

20

24

25

26

27

29

30

31

32

33

31

35

36

37

39

C22272** * **22*-*8*88************* * **SABBEDSST8 8 88 8

16

18

"

""

19

Oceanic, str......

2,440

W. M. Smith

Honolulu

226

12

11

""

San Francisco

එය වේ.

255

337

23 Dardanus, str.

23 Choysang, str.

1,507 1,194

T. Purdy

Straits Settlements

150

150

**

R. C. D. Bradley

203

13

دو

24

Elektra, str.

"

24

Argus, str.

1,996 Austrian 1,822 British

C. Bellen

218

21

23

E. Johnson

74

**

228

244

79

21 March

23

1

Empress of India, str.

3,003

O. P. Marshall

"

Victoria, B.C.

293

294

""

2 Lombardy, str.

1,571

F. Cole

Straits Settlements

558

36

>"

"

5

Arratoen Apear, str.

1,392

J. E. Hansen

693

3833

606

11

10

774

"

""

""

5 Continental, str.

672 Dutch

C. Scharl

13!

131

""

8

Batavia, str...

1,662 British

Victoria. B.C.

42

J. R. Hill

47

Portland, Oregon

"

10

Gaelic, str.

2,691

W. G. Pearne

San Francisco

205

وو

:

10

""

Thibet, str.

1,665

L. M. Wibmer

Straits Settlements

310

12

"1

""

12

Chelydra, str.

1,574

R. Cass

342

30

"

**

12

Bormida, str.

1,499 Italian

F. Susini

321

24

""

""

15

Cyclops, str...

1,363 British

H. Nish

294

34

دو

18 Gwalior, str...

1,648

""

19 Lightning, str..

2,124

""

F. Speck

J. G. Spence

252

12

""

373

201

124

621352

209

330

378

346

6

Co

337

269

398

23 China, str.

2,401

W. B. Seabury

San Francisco

202

10

214

23

26 Orestes, str.

1,279

J. Barr

Straits Settlements

112

112

"

28 Brindisi, str.

2,129

E. Street

378

16

27

وو

29 | Kutsang, str.

1.495

W. H. Jackson

696

67

""

""

35

5

399

20

8

791

""

29 Empress of Japan, str.

3,003

G. A. Lee

27

Victoria, B.C.

516

38 April

1 Borneo, str.

1,490 Dutch

23

2 Venetia, str.

1,551 British

40

5 Belgic, str.

2,695

29

5 Bellerophon, str.

1,356

19

42

5 Japan, str.

1,865

"J

43

6 Berenice, str.

J

44

35

8 Achilles, str...................

45

""

9 Bisagno, str.

1,633 Austrian 1,188 British 1,499 Italian

H. Klein

T. F. Creery W. H. Walker W. E. Guthrie J. G. Olifent P. Mersa

Straits Settlements

333

15

281

23

San Francisco

205

11

3241

519

356

1

309

1

218

Straits Settlements

131

193

181

16

225

20

""

R. Day

148

>>

:

:

:

28

:

200

1

252

148

L. Baccerini

147

24

172

"

46

""

13

Wing Sang, str.

1,517 British

d'A. de Ste. Croix]

516

62

15

"

47

""

14

Nizam, str..

1,615

G. L. Langborne

376

48

14 Laertes, str.

1,351

R. F. Scale

110

101024

601

408/

118

وو

49

16 Empress of China, str.

3,003

R. Archibald

""

Victoria, B.C.

3601

360

50

""

16 City of Peking, str..........

3,129 American

R. R. Searle

Honolulu

569

31

17

792

San Francisco

152

12

51

"2

20 Arratoon Apear, str.

52

"

26 Thisbe, str.

53

26 Myrmidon, str.

1,392 British 1,789 Austrian 1,815 British

J. E. Hansen

Straits Settlements

735

69

828

F. Kossovich R. Nelson

531

105

705

623

20

655

54

33

28 Oceanic, str.

2,440

W. M. Smith

San Francisco

286

297

21

55

22

30 Chelydra, str.

1,574

R. Cass

Straits Settlements

605

83

719

"

56 May

3 Thibet, str.

1,665

L. M. Wibmer

502

36

13

555

"J

3,

>>

7 Empress of India, str.

3,003

O. P. Marshall

21

Victoria, B.C.

450

2

452

58

""

7 Lightning, str....

2,124

**

J. G. Spence

Straits Settlements

396

57

14]

14

481

59

"

10 City of Rio de Janeiro, str.

2,275 American

60

11 Bormida, str.

61

""

13 Lombardy, str...

62

"

14 Kutsang, str.

1,499 Italian 1,571 British

1,495

W. Ward

F. Susini

F. Cole

San Francisco

250

252

Straits Settlements

413

41

461

270

10

6

289

W. H. Jackson

22

35

532

541

10

600

311

63

3

17 Independent, str..

871 German

J. Scharl

Mauritius

150

64

""

18 Teheran, str.

1,670 British

65

60

59

688272222222

69

70

71

74

75

RRRR * * * *

وو

73 June

21 Gaelic, str.

21 Phra Nang, str.

26 Maria Teresa, str.

28 Empress of Japan, str.

28| Gwalior, str.....

31 Wing Sang, str.

31 Siam, str.

2 | China, str.

4 Agamemnon, str..

2,691

>"

1,021

""

24 Japan, str.

1,865

C. H. S. Tocque W. G. Pearne

W. H. Watton

A. G. Hamiltou

Straits Settlements San Francisco

480

69

262

***

474

3

567

276

Victoria, B.C.

61

Tacoma, U.S.A.

74

13

Straits Settlements

522

45

97

1,922 Austrian

R. Deperis

227

55

3,003 British

G. A. Lee

1,648

F. Speck

"BC. Victoria, B C. Straits Settlements

376

:

189

10

1,517

d'A. de Ste. Croix

142

53

""

""

1920 1919

574

201

379

3

205

213

992

J. M. Tulloch

155

169

.་་་

دو

2,401

W. B. Seabury

San Francisco

149

161

1,491

O. P. Williams

Straits Settlements

207

10

219

7 Venetia, str..

1,551

T. F. Creery

341

26

375

33

7 Arratoon Apear, str.

1,392

J. E. Hansen

228

65

310

"

27

Honolulu

77

**

10 Palmas, str.

1,560

23

W. Taylor

17

Victoria, B.C.

41

24

""

11 Batavia, str.......

1,662

J. R. Hill

Victoria, B.C.

35

"

Tacoma, U.S.A.

55

20

Carried forward,.............. 142,536

Carried forward,..............|22,470||| 1,776

353

224

24,823

188

RETURN of CHINESE PASSENGER SHIPS cleared by the Emigration Officer, Hongkong,-Continued.

ADULTS.

CHILDREN.

No.

DATE CLEARED.

SHIP'S NAME.

TONS.

NATION-

ALITY OF SHIP.

MASTER'S NAME.

WHITHER BOUND.

TOTAL.

M. F.

M. F.

Brought forward,....... 142,536

Brought forward,|22,470 1,776 353 224

24,823

R*** 8 * 38588818 8 1

79 June

11

Bisagno, str..

80

14

19

Belgic, str.

1,499 Italian 2,695 British

L. Baccerini

Straits Settlements

417

37

457

W. H. Walker

San Francisco

247

247

81

14

Kongsee, str.

696

27

II. McGill

Straits Settlements

188

82

15

Che ydra, str.

1,574

>>

R. Cass

567

2008

190

88

10

27

19

(81

83

""

18

Empress of China, str.

3,003

Victoria, B.C.

113

22

R. Archibald

Vancouver, B.C.

158

274

Co

81

86

87

""

وو

18

Loo Sok, str.

1,020

Victoria, BC.

20

A. Benson

Tacoma, U.S.A.

43

23

21

Nizam, str.

1,615

G. L. Langborne

Straits Settlements

438

32

14

485

37

24

Lightning, str...

2,124

94

25

City of Peking, str.

>>

25

Melpomene, str.

89

30

21

Bantam, str...

90 July

2 Glenorchy, str..

91

""

2

Else, str.

92

""

5 Kutsang, str.

3,129 American

1,943 Austrian 1,457 Dutch 1,822 British

747 | German 1,495 British

J. G. Spence R. R. Searle

190

42

239

San Francisco

841

90

A. Mitis

Straits Settlements

212

811

L. Vander Valk J. Ferguson

198

18

23

115

26

6583

307

226

37

150

93

A

7 Oceanic, str....

2,440

"2

C. Christensen W. H. Jackson

W. M. Smith

116

6

I

29

124

272

Gol

22

11

348

94

9 Empress of India, str.

3,003

>>

O. P. Marshall

95

""

9 Devawongse, str...

1,057

Honolulu San Francisco Victoria, B.C. Vancouver, B.C. Victoria, B.C.

294

35!

31

13

108

486

97

101

198

14

""

G. Anderson

Tacoma, U.S.A.

22

36

96

97

98

99

100

""

9 Shantung, str. ...

1,835

W. B. Hardinge

Straits Settlements

242

45

""

12

Bormida, str.

>>

12

Lombardy, str..

1,499 Italian 1,571 British

F. Susini

214

41

""

14

Ardgay, str.

1,081

F. Cole

J. Thom

199

29

"J

138

27

30 10 10 10

294

264

;

"

19

City of Rio de Janeiro, str.

2,275 American

J. M. Cavarly

San Francisco

56

235

174 59

101

J

20

Wing Sang, str..

1,517 British

d'A. de Ste. Croix

Straits Settlements

329

12

102

"

21

Thibet, str.

1,665

22

L. M. Wibmer

190

23

""

103

23

Teheran, str.

12

1,670

"

C. H. S. Tocque

143

"

104

26

Arratoon Apcar, str.

1,392

""

105

26

""

Elektra, str.

1,996 Austrian

106

""

28

Gwalior, str.

1,648 British

J. E. Hansen

G. Mariani

F. Speck

110

67

129

""

154

""

107

29

Borneo, str.

1,490 Dutch

H. Klein

841

19

29 460 2 IN O

430

218

155

188

184

180

"

107

108

""

30

Empress of Japan, str.

3,003 British

G. A. Lee

Victoria, B.C.

44

Vancouver, B.C.

77

::

123

109

30

Gaelic, str.

2,691

وو

W. G. Pearne

San Francisco

165

2

168

110 August 3

Chelydra, str.

1,574

111

1

4

Venetia, str.................

1,551

112

""

4

Hupeh, str. ..............

1,846

113

J

11

Bisagno, str.

1,499 Italian

R. Cass T. F. Creery

T: Quail

L. Baccerini

Straits Settlements

193

30

135

16

"

116

"

34

231

84

"J

114

11

25

Glenfruin, str.

1,892 British

E. Norman

107

39

""

115

13

22

Lightning, str................

116

16

Nizam, str.

117

18

27

Telemachus, str.

2,124 1,615 1,397

>>

J. G. Spence

180.

56

"

""

F. N. Tillard

247

"2

16

H. Jones

143

32

""

"J

NA∞A nă

7

4

118

""

20

Empress of China, str.

..

3,003

31

R. Archibald

Victoria, B.C.

51

Vancouver, B.C.

90

GIQ 500843

::

230

155

155

327

159

252

271

180

141

119

""

20

China, str.

Honolulu

2,401

77

11

11

""

W. B. Seabury

120

22

23

Kutsang, str.

121

>>

23

Shantung, str..

1,495 1,835

27

"

122

دو

26 Berenice, str.

123

27 Bantam, str.

1,633 Austrian 1,457 Dutch

W. H. Jackson W. B. Hardinge P. Mersa

San Francisco Straits Settlements

196

81

7

299

50

358

144

17

29

178

>>

166

57

13

240

L. Vander Valk

82

"

86

124

30 Belgic, str.

2,695 British

125

31 Catherine Apear, str.

1,734

"

126 Sept.

3 Lombardy, str........

1,571

W. H. Walker

J. G. Olifent F. Cole

San Francisco

53

66

Straits Settlements

346

36

398

299

"

23

329

127

""

7 Palamed, str.

1,489

C. Jackson

""

148

27

162

128

29

7 Wing Sang, str.

1,517

22

129

"2

8 Peru, str....

130

"

10 Empress of India, str.

3,003 British

2,540 American

O. P. Marshall

d'A. de Ste. Croix W. Ward

180

""

57

13

257

San Francisco

25

29

Victoria, B.C.

131

10

"

Bormida, str.

1,499 Italian

132

14

Arratoon Apcar, str.

1,392 | British

133

>>

19 Palinurus, str..

1,536

""

134

"

20

Oceanic, str....

2,440

F. Susini J. E. Hansen T. S. Jackson W. M. Smith

Vancouver, B.C. Straits Settlements

114

92

230

283

دو

477

75

9

10

571

132

22

157

San Francisco

79

73

2

83

135

23

""

Borneo, str.

136

""

24

Chelydra, str.

137

""

26

Achilles, str..

138

"

26

Thishe, str.

139

28

""

Thibet, str.

140

"J

29

City of Rio de Janeiro, str.

2,275 American

1,490 Dutch 1,074 | British 1,488

""

1,789 Austrian 1,665 British

R. Cass T. Battlett F. Kossovich

J. T. Smith

H. Klein

Straits Settlements

244

13

261

329

32

375

123

23

149

129

22

59

198

L. M. Wibmer

270

""

50

10

336

San Francisco

48

50

141

"

30 Lightning, str.

2,124 British

J. G. Spence

Straits Settlements

285

84

11

142 Oct.

4 Zambesi, str.

1,565

G. J. Edwards

Victoria, B.C.

41

39

Tacoma, U.S.A.

47

:..

::

387

88

143

7 Malacca, str.

2,616

P. W. Case

Straits Settlements

278

19

302

144

""

8 En press of Japan, str. ....

3,003

G. A. Lee

Victoria, B.C.

700

>>

Vancouver, B.C.

134

} 208

145

11 Kutsang, str.

1,495

W. H. Jackson

Straits Settlements

"

395

100

14

13

522

146

""

11 Laertes, str...................

1,351

R. F. Scale

""

"J

186

10

3

199

147

12Gaelic, str.

Honolulu

2,091

211

W. G. Pearne

25

17

148

""

12 Gwalior, str...

1,648

""

F. Speck

San Francisco Straits Settlements

85

352

51

252

34

295

149

""

15 Bisagno, str..

350

""

15 Cyclops, str.

1,499 Italian 1,363 British

L. Baccerini

"}

198

26

226

H. Nish

"

97

9

109

151

29

20 | Catherine Apcar, str.

1,734

J. G. Olifent

2811

22

13

298

152

20

""

Iantam, str.

1,457

153

""

22 City of Peking, str....

Dutch 3,129 | American

L. Vander Valk R. R. Searle

209

10

222

San Francisco

61

61

Carried forward,.

281,882

Carried forward,...

37,135 3,876

697 493

42,201

RETURN of CHINESE PASSENGER SHIPS cleared by the Emigration Officer, Hongkong,-Continued.

ADULTS. CHILDREN.

189

No.

DATE CLEARED.

SHIP'S NAME.

TONS.

NATION- ALITY OF SHIP.

MASTER'S NAME.

WHITHER BOUND.

TOTAL.

M.

F. M. F.

Brought forward,...... 281,882

Brought forward,.[37,135| 3,876 697 493 42,201

154 Oct. 155 156

24

Glenartney, str.

1,944 British

26

""

Maria Teresa, str.

1,922 Austrian

29

Agamemnon, str..

1,491 British

J. McGregor R. Deperís O. P. Williams

Straits Settlements

242

18

219

57

221

38

974

3

272

287

264

157 Nov.

1

China, str.

2,401

""

W. B. Seabury

San Francisco

67

71

158

""

2 Empress of China, str...

3,003

R. Archibald

Victoria, B.C.

26

Vancouver, B.C.

118

89

2

159

160

161

162

163

>"

""

""

3 Victoria, str......

1,992

J. Panton

Victoria, B.C.

46

1

3 Wing Sang, str.

1,517

Arratoon Apear, str.

1,392

d'A. de Ste. Croix J. E. Hansen

Tacoma, U.S.A. Straits Settlements

56

::

102

599

111

13

731

271 111

10

396

>>

94

8

Independent, str.

871 German

J. Schall

22

Mauritius

174

9

::

280

"

9

Teheran, str.

1,670 British

C. H. S. Tocque

Straits Settlements

226

31

61

268

164

27

10

Belgic, str.

165

>>

11

Polyphemus, str.

2,695 1,813

W. H. Walker

San Francisco

56

61

""

W. Lee

Straits Settlements

281

33

319

""

166

""

15

Bormida, str.

1,499 Italian

167

"

16

Chelydra, str.

168

19

Nestor, str. ....

1,574 British 1,269

F. G. Ansaldo R. Cass

265

38

10

319

""

""

294

32

3.

333

169

19

Peru, str.

170

12

23

Lightning, str.......

171

26

Maria Valerie, str.

172

>>

29

Kutsang, str.

2,540 American 2,124 British 2,644 Austrian 1,495 British

J. S. Thompson W. Ward

J. G. Spence A. Mitis

148

21

179

San Francisco

52

:

57

Straits Settlements

357

Co o

457

79

140

"

W. H. Jackson

4971

47

15

569

او

173

30

Empress of India, str..

3,003

O. P. Marshall

Victoria, B.C.

125

321

Vancouver, B.C.

191

5

174 Dec.

1

Tacoma, str.....

1,662

J. R. Hill

Victoria, B.C.

42

75

Tacoma, U.S.A.

33

175

176

177

AAA

1 Shantung, str.

1.835

""

H. C. D. Frampton

Straits Settlements

273

26

304

178

179

""

180

""

181

17

2 Oceanic, str.

7 Gouverneur Generaal's

Jacob, str.

8 Catherine Apcar, str.

8 Woosung, str.

10 City of Rio de Janeiro, str.

Bisagno, str.

1,784 British 1,109

""

2,275 American

2,440

W. M. Smith

San Francisco

98

4

:

104

1,569 Dutch

A. J. de Blinde

Straits Settlements

320

17

1

340

J. G. Olifent

221

53

13

11

"

L. Dawson

151

10

Honolulu

175

16

14

123

298

164

J. T. Smith

252

San Francisco

41

3

:

...

:

1,499 Italian

L. Maccerini

Straits Settlements

308

631

182

17 Wing Sang, str.

1,517 British

d'A. de Ste. Croix)

415

10

183

""

20 Hupeh, str.

1,846

T. Quail

225

9

>"

""

609

7

384

474

296

184

>>

20❘ Gaelic, str.

2,691

W. G. Pearne

San Francisco

75

78

185

""

28 Empress of Japan, str.

3,003

G. A. Lee

Victoria, B.C.

23

Vancouver, B.C.

81

::

::

104

186

""

28 | Phra Chom Klao, str.

1,012

J. Fowler

Straits Settlements

571

31

9

613

"

187

""

29 Arratoon Apcar, str.

1,892

J. E. Hansen

145

56

4

6

211

17

188

"

29 Bantam. str...

1,457 Dutch

L. Vander Valk

212

38

7

261

"J

189

""

29 Nanking, str.

835 Norwegian U. Sorensen

106

1

107

>>

:

190

""

30 Elektra, str.

1,996 Austrian

G. Mariani

132

50

189

""

191

37

30 Flintshire, str.

1,871 British

W. Dwyer

Victoria, B.C.

42

Tacoma, U.S.A.

32

}

74

192

22

31 City of Peking, str...

3,129 American

R. R. Searle

San Francisco

62

6

1

1

70

TOTAL TONS,..

355,613

TOTAL PASSENGERS,.

45,593 5,035

894 621

52,143

ADULTS.

CHILDREN.

SUMMARY,

TOTAL.

M.

F.

M. F.

Mauritius,

"5

19

"

San Francisco, U.S.A.,

>>

Straits Settlements,

, Tacoma, U.S.A.,

"

,, Victoria,

To Honolulu, Sandwich Islands,

Portland, Oregon. U.S.A.,

1,569 130

324 12

105 15

37 1,841

346

12

3,393 148

31

16

3,588

35,612 4,749

718 567

41,646

246

246

Vancouver, British Columbia,.

Do.,

1,013 3,424

13

1,027

I

12

3,437

TOTAL PASSENGERS,

45,593 5,035 894 621

52,143

190

XX. RETURN of VESSELS bringing CHINESE PASSENGERS to the Port of Victoria, Hongkong, from Places out of the Chinese Empire, during the Year ending the 31st day of December, 1892.

No.

DATE ARRIVED.

SHIP'S NAME.

TONS.

NATION- ALITY OF SHIP.

ADULTS.

CHILDREN.

MASTER'S NAME.

WHERE FROM.

TOTAL.

M.

F

M.

F

1 January 4 Canton, str.

2,044 British

Baker

Straits Settlements

218

2

1

221

Port Darwin

10

Thursday Island

5

2

4 Guthrie, str.

Cooktown

1,494

Helms

3

>>

Townsville

72

11

Sydney

36

Melbourne

7

4 Niobe, str.

4

"

Wing Sang, str.

1,440 German 1,517 British

Thomsen Ste. Croix

Straits Settlements

211

12

263

"

412

412

Port Darwin

Cooktown

4 Changsha, str........

1,463

Williams

Townsville

"

86

Sydney

Melbourne

27

??

5 China, str.

2,401

*

7

>>

5 Namchow, str.

1,109

Seabury Lee

San Francisco

593

Straits Settlements

329

ON TH

8

6 Cardiganshire, str.

1,623

9

7 Glenavon, str....

1,912

Parsons Jacobs

30

"

318

12

??

10

9 Arratoon Apcar, str.

1,392

Hansen

319 22

*

11

12

9 Empress of China, str.

3,003

+

Pybus

Vancouver, B.C.

289

2

7377

3

616

2

341

30

3

340

2

348

3

301

Townsville

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

""

"

"

23

13

Chingtu, str.

1,459

Hunt

Sydney

13

69

62

Melbourne

38

14

Prometheus, str.

1,492

Webster

Straits Settlements

601

99

15

Belgic, str.

2,695

??

16

Sussex, str.

1,620

Walker Holt

San Francisco

305

99

Victoria, B.C.

162

:

16

19

Nizam, str.

1,615

99

Langborne

Straits Settlements

122

16

+

Kintuck, str.

2,312

Thomson

45

97

"

:

18

??

Benalder, str..

1,294

McIntosh

"

261

18 Chelydra, str.

1,574

Cass

509

"

20

"

18 Mongkut, str.

859

Anderson

Bangkok

362

21

"

22

"

18 Glucksburg, str.

18 Melpomene, str.

23

""

20 Khedive, str.

***72287***

24

93

20

25

19

21

Cheang Chew, str. Bellona, str.

918 German

2,132 British 1,213

Thomsen

Straits Settlements

301

1,848 Austrian

Mitis

190

Moule

29

Webb

410

"

11

12

7

1,782 German

Schüder

396

19

26

Titan, str.

29

19

23 Bayern, str.....

25

25 Ardgay, str.....

26 Lightning, str.

2,576

Engelbart

""

156

10

1,525 British

Brown

272

55

6

1,081

Thom

179

"

**

Co

01 ∞

:

:

60

308

162

6

132

45

11

279

2

615

362

301

193

29

435

409

172

2,124

??

Spence

128

??

30

26 Gleneagles, str.

1,838

Sommer

241

p in

3

"

31

28 Benlawers, str.

1,484

Webster

71

"

32

29 Telemachus, str.

1,397

33 Feb.

1 Oopack, str.....

1,730

"

34

""

1 Chow Fa, str.

1,055

"

Jones Davies Phillips

35

234

27

""

Bangkok

76

290

179

136

248

71

37

6

250

76

Dilly, Timor

4

Port Darwin

12

35

*

1 Catterthun, str.

1,406

Shannon

Cooktown

12

وو

Brisbane

83

Sydney

24

New Zealand

23

36

37

38

39

40

41

42

43

44

45

* * ****** * O***

******

1 City of Peking, str. 1 Taicheong, str.

2 Dardanus, str......

3 Kut Sang, str.

3,129 American 828 German 1,507 British

Searle

San Francisco

92

Dubme

Straits Settlements

165

1,495

Purdy Jackson

44

"1

234

"!

OT LOH H

00-

3

97

170

46

241

3 Radnorshire, str.

1,889

Davies

35

22

"

35

4 Palamed, str.

1,489

Jackson

55

"

""

55

5 Zambesi, str.

37

1,565

Edwards

Victoria, B.C.

10

.

Portland, Oregon

31

21

5 Empress of India, str..

3,003

Marshall

Vancouver, B.C.

63

63

9 Cyclops. str.

1,363

Nish

Straits Settlements

55

;;

55

46

འ;

11 Shanghai, str.

2,044

Hall

108

108

12 Japan, str.

1,865

Olifent

178

47

12 Oceanic, str.

2,440

Smith

San Francisco

151

~ H

182

159

48

12

15 Rohilla, str.........

2,175

Tocque

Straits Settlements

26

26

49

"

15 Bantam, str.

1,457 Dutch

95

Van der Valk

>>

Batavia

3

98

50

""

16 Elektra, str..

51

16 Oceana, str.

??

52

"

16 Glenlyon, str.

1,996 Austrian 1,628 German 1,410 British

Bellen

Straits Settlements

122

122

Behrens

222

>>

222

Murray

195

3

29

198

53

""

19 Lombardy, str.

1,571

54

"

19 Ching Wo, str.

1,556

Cole Grattan

147

"

147

158

"

55

"1

20 Wing Sang, str.

1,517

Ste. Croix

655

22

c++

3

165

4

2

683

56

}}

20 | Phra Chula Chom Klao, s.

1,012

Morris

"

Bangkok

100

100

Port Darwin

7

Cooktown

Cairns

57

>>

22 Tai Yuen, str....

1,459

Nelson

Townsville

83

Sydney

10

Melbourne

43

Adelaide

9

8823828**

58

22 Cheang Chew,

str.

1,213

Webb

Straits Settlements

844

14

3

2

863

39

29

22 Telamon, str.

1,555

Jackson

169

19

:

175

60

??

22 Neckar, str..

61

23 Diamond, str....

""

1,492 German 1,030 British

Röben

267

14

Snow

337

62

24 Nam Yong, str.

984

Smith

392

16

324

292

352

"

419

??

63

"

25 Glenfalloch, str.

1,434

Darke

203

4

11

207

64

""

25 Arratoon Apcar, str.

1,392

Hansen

427

6

440

65

""

26 Tartar, str.

1,568

13

Bailey

95

95

66

77

29 Clyde, str.

2,198

Parfitt

54

""

54

Carried forward..

109,691

Carried forward..

13,401 252

136

58

13,847

RETURN of VESSELS bringing CHINESE PASSENGERS to the Port of Victoria, Hongkong,—Continued.

CHILDREN.

191

No.

DATE ARRIVED.

SHIP'S NAME.

TONS.

NATION- ALITY OF SHIP..

ADULTS.

MASTER'S ΝΑΜΕ.

WHERE FROM.

TOTAL.

M.

F.

M. F.

Brought forward...... 109,691

67

Feb.

29

Berenice, str.

1,633 Austrian

68

March 1

Electra, str..........

...

1,162 German

69

3

Thibet, str.

1,665 British

70

4

Gaelic, str.

2,691

71

5

""

Chow Fa, str.

1,055

17

72

""

5

Chelydra, str.

1,574

Mersa Hildebrandt Wibmer Pearne Phillips Cass

Brought forward... 13,401] Straits Settlements

252 136

5$

13,847

449 18

11

9

487

164

164

"

180

180

:

San Francisco

186

7

6

204

12

73

??

74

99

7 Orestes, str...................

7 Teresa, str.

1,279

Barr

753

Slaker

"

Bangkok

Straits Settlements:

"

"

160

:

160

401 11

3

424

390

390

301

12

10

:

318

75

7 Glenartney, str.

1,944

76

19

7 Brindisi, str.

2,129

77

19

7 Kaisow, str.

1,934

McGregor Street

Castle

??

2001

200

21

21

"

81

>>

81

78

27

8 Empress of Japan, str.

3,003

19

79

12

8 Carmarthenshire, str.

1,766

Lee Clark

Vancouver, B.C.

27

27

Straits Settlements

167

3

170

80

11 Cheang Hock Kian, str...

956

Dinsdale

515

3:

7

81

27

12 Gwalior, str.

1,648

Speck

248

"

7

42

526

261

83

****8*888

82

12 | Pekin, str.

2,134

Harris

""

"

47

47

""

14 China, str.

2,401

""

Seabury

San Francisco

158

9

170

84

93

14 Laju, str.

1,246

Smith

Straits Settlements

32

"

32

85

14 Lightning, str.

2,124

86

""

16 Macduff, str.

1,882

Spence Porter

619

84

""

718

91

7

""

105

87

""

17 Sachsen, str.

2,874 German

Supmer

152 21

7

184

""

18 Palinurus, str..

1,536 British

Jackson

""

343 21

375

89

19 Frigga, str.

1,400 German

Nagel

135

""

15

11

161

90

19 | Phra Chula Chom Klao, s.

1,012 British

Morris

Bangkok

150

150

Port Darwin

Thursday Island

3

Townsville

91

21 Tsinan, str.

1,460

Allison

35

Brisbane

Sydney

Melbourne

13

92

95

"

21

Glucksburg, str.

"

21

Nizam, str.

918 German 1,615 British

Thomsen

Straits Settlements

67

Langborne

165

99

94

23

Diamond, str.

12

95

24 Kutsang, str.

1,030 1,495

Snow

575

30

""

""

""

96

97

"2

24 Chusan, str......

26 Laertes, str................

98

26 Thorndale, str.

1,971

623 German

1,351 | British

27

Jackson Wendt Scale

5851

පරිස

3

2

10

15

23

8

507

""

Bangkok

25

Straits Settlements

239

Etherington

80

"

67

170

630

623

25

239

80

Dilly, Timor

8

Port Darwin

3

66

99

65

26 Airlie, str.

1,492

Ellis

Cairns

Brisbane Greymouth Wellington Auckland Sydney Melbourne

10

7

1

10

118

60

11

100

28 Venetia, str.

1,551

Creery

Straits Settlements

112

112

">

27

101

37

28 Namyang, str................

984

Smith

489

""

15

""

10

521

102

""

28 Hesperia, str.

1,123 German

Madsen

65 4

69

103

29 Belgic. str.

2,695 British

Walker

San Francisco

158*

1

161

104

11

30 Loo Sok, str.

1,020

Benson

Bangkok

131

131

105

30 Glenesk. str.

2,275

Webster

Straits Settlements

278

7

289

106

30 Oanfa, str.

1,970

Shaw

65

""

107

108

"

31

111

59

109 April

110

30 Thisbe, str.

Japan, str.

2 Myrmidon, str.

2 China, str.

2 Empress of China, str.

1,865 British

1,816

11

1,113 German 3,003 British

1,789 Austrian

Kossovich

193

""

Olifent

"

331

58

0 10

278

67

210

395

Nelson

143

143

"1

Voss

337

1

13

00

8

7

365

Archibald

Vancouver, B.C.

45

:

45

Port Darwin

1

Thursday Island

1

Townsville

112

1J

2 Changsha, str.

1,463

Williams

3

Brisbane

29

1

Sydney

12

Melbourne

11

113

""

4 Bisagno, str.

1.499 Italian

Baccerini

Straits Settlements

83

83

114

1

4 Cheang Hye Teng, str.

923 British

Scott

""

220

220

115

19

5

Choy Sang, str.

1,194

Bradley

411

"J

17

5

435

116

"J

6 Chow Fa, str.

1,055

Phillips

Bangkok

110

110

117

"

8 Lennox, str.

1,327

Ward

Straits Settlements

130

130

118

"}

8 Cheang Hock Kian, str.

956

Dinsdale

,,

"

305

305

119

""

9 Polyhymnia, str.

947 German

Voltmer

128

128

120

""

9 Presto, str.

655

Jessen

Bangkok

30

30.

121

"

11

City of Peking, str.

3,129 American

Searle

San Francisco

84

5

LA

96

122

""

11 Ravenna, str.

1,916 British

Crewe

Straits Settlements

32

:

32

123

""

11 Polyphemus, str..

1,813

Lee

"2

14

44

124

11 Namkiang, str.

125

29

12 Arratoon Apcar, str.

999 1,392

Witt

213

"

??

10

3

230

Hansen

"

450

19

8

రా

476

126

13 Preussen, str.

2,573 German

Hogemann

99

87

20

117

127

13 Bantam, str.

1,457 Dutch

Van der Valk

254

22

N

265

128

"}

16 Lombardy, str.

1,571 | British

Cole

100

""

113

129

"

19 Mogul, str.

1,827

Johnson

121

"7

""

130

"}

19 Diamond, str.

1,030

Snow

581

""

""

20

24

130

613

131

19 | Phra Chula Chom Klao, s.

1,012

Morris

""

Bangkok

168

168

132

""

19 Chusan, str.................

623 | German

Wendt

"

:74

74

133

19 | Oceanic, str.

2,440 British

Smith

San Francisco

136

10

2

150

134

"

20 | Glenshiel, str.

2,240

Jones

Straits Settlements

"

330

330

135

"7

21 Malacca, str.

2,616

Case

149

19

149

136

39

21 Moyune, str.

1,714

Hogg

""

65

65

137

وو

22 Priam, str.

1,803

12

138

23 Chelydra, str.

1,574

Wilding Cass

48

""

48

"

431

17

8

1

460

Carried forward.....

226,399

Carried forward..

27,663 756

335 173

28,927

192

RETURN of VESSELS bringing CHINESE PASSENGERS to the Port of Victoria, Hongkong,-Continued.

No.

DATE ARRIVED.

SHIP'S NAME,

TONS.

NATION- ALITY OF SHIP.

ADULTS.

CHILDREN.

MASTER'S NAME.

WHERE FROM.

TOTAL.

M.

F.

M.

F.

Brought forward...

226,399

139 April 25 Benlomond, str.

1,752 British

140

"

141

* A

25 Flintshire, str...

1,871

""

"

25 Glucksburg, str.

918 German

Thompson Dwyer Thomsen

Brought forward... 27,663|||| 756 Straits Settlements

335

173

28,927

34

34

102

102

"1

241

3

250

Thursday Island

10

Cooktown

9

142

19

26 Chingtu, str.

1,459 British

Hunt

Townsville

Brisbane

10

100

12

Sydney

30

5

3

Melbourne

12

143

"

27 Thibet, str.

1,665

"9

144

+

28

Daphne, str.

1,395 German

Wibmer Voss

Straits Settlements

61

219

233

93

145

>>

28

Taichiow, str.

862 British

Unsworth

Bangkok

711

146

147

99

28

City of Rio de Janeiro, str.

2,275 American

Ward

San Francisco

87

""

28

Empress of India, str.

3,003 British

Marshall

Vancouver, B.C.

63

82282

87

63

Port Darwin

Townsville

25

148

??

29 Guthrie, str.

1,494

Helms

New Zealand

17

89

Sydney

11

Melbourne

28

1

149 150

29

Namyang, str..

984

Smith

Straits Settlements

321

11

340

30

Maria Teresa, str.

1,922 Austrian

Deperis

139

14

166

"

151 May

2

Cheang Hye Teng, str.

923 British

Scott

231

242

>>

152

2 Lightning, str.

2,124

""

Spence

420

47

.484

153

""

2 Gwalior, str.

1,648

""

Speck

102

7

111

"

154

23

2 Benledi, str.

1,481

Clark

148

2

150

155

"

3 Bormida, str.

1,499 Italian

Susini

51

51

156

4 Loo Sok, str.

1,020 British

Benson

Bangkok

2321

232

157

5

Ping Suey, str.

1,982

39

Jaques

Straits Settlements

70

70

158

6 Ajax, str.

1,477

Rawlings

25

25

""

159

160

Kreimhild, str.

Omega,.....

1,709 German

Ehlers

224

240

480 British

Brown

Callao

49

1

56

161

19

9 Devawongse, str.

1,057

Loff

"

Bangkok

75

75

162

"2

9 Kutsang, str.

1,495

163

9 Teheran, str.

1,671

"

Jackson Tocque

Straits Settlements

371

45

14

14

444

79

79

164

"

9 Zambesi, str.

1,565

Edwards

Honolulu

115

123

""

Portland, Oregon

165

27

10 Bayern, str...

2,576 German

Engelbart

Straits Settlements

168

:ཨ

21

201

Port Darwin

166

10 Catterthun, str.

1,406 British

Shannon

Thursday Island

59

Sydney

29

Melbourne

22

167

"

11 Gaelic, str.

2,691

Pearne

San Francisco

124

3

135

168

11 Shantung, str...

1,835

Park

Straits Settlements

231

235

169

13 Borneo, str.

1,490 Dutch

Klein

163

167

170

??

13 Brindisi, str. ...............

2,129 British

Street

35

35

171

""

14 Chow Fa, str.

1,055

11

Phillips

Bangkok

165

165

172

""

16 Chow Chow Foo, str.....

796 German

Clausen

Straits Settlements

102

102

173

33

17 Japan, str.

1,865 British

Hamilton

436 15

16

471

174

"J

17 Diamond, str.

1,030

Robinson

660 20

10

699

"

"

175

"J

18 Agamemnon, str.

1,491

Williams

167

6

3

176

""

"

176

13

1S | Phra Chula Chom Klao, S.

1,012

""

177

"

19 Empress of Japan, str.

3,003

Morris Lee

Bangkok

50

50

33

Vancouver, B.C.

37

1

1

39

178

">

19 Glenorchy, str.

1,822

""

Ferguson

Straits Settlements

30

30

179

"3

19 Nestor, str.

1,269

""

Thompson

148

11

159

180

>>

21

Energia, str.

2,064

Stokes

143

4

3

150

""

19

181

"

21

Lydia, str.

1,170 German

Forck

186

186

""

182

"1

21

Wing Sang, str.

1,517 British

Ste. Croix

253

54

9

4

320

11

183

""

23 Rohilla, str....

2,175

""

Jephson

35

35

"

184

23 Glamorganshire, str.

1,843

Davies

130

130

"

185

23 China, str.

2,401

35

Seabury

San Francisco

151

12

CO

173

Port Darwin

4

Cooktown

5

Townsville

12

186

24 Tai Yuan, str..

1,459

Nelson

95

Brisbane

10

Sydney

6

Melbourne

58

187

24 Ningchow, str.

1,735

">

188

"

24 Venetia, str.

1,551

"

Allan Curry

Straits Settlements

1401

144

98

104

189

99

24 Ooryia, str.

419

2

Daly

28

28

190

26 Prometheus, str.

""

1,492

""

191

""

28 Namkiang, str.

999

Webster Witt

235

235

467 23

16

11

517

>>

1

192

"?

30 Teresa, str.

753

Slaker

260 10

9

10

289

""

"

193

"

30 China, str.

1,113 | German

194

"}

30 Melpomene, str.

195

30 Arratoon Apcar, str.

1,848 Austrian 1,392 British

Voss Mitis Hansen

413

16

14

11

454

"

240

7

247

114

14

8

7

443

Dilly, Timor

3

Port Darwin

7

Cooktown

2

196

30 Menmuir, str. .........................

1,287

>>

Craig

Brisbane

45

Sydney

15

New Zealand

4

Melbourne

12

...

197

92

31 Glengyle, str.

2,244

97

Glegg

Straits Settlements

30

30

198 June

1 Cheang Hye Teng, str.

923

Scott

256

""

33.

199

31

2 Niobe, str.

1,440 German

Pfaff

178

so as

264

19

189

77

200

"

3 Devawongse, str.

1,057 British

Loff

Bangkok

270

270

201

""

4 Cathay, str.

1,873

19

Symons

Straits Settlements

581

58

202

7 Belgic, str.

2,695

Walker

San Francisco

131

139

"

203

"

7 Empress of China, str.

3,003

Archibald

"J

Vancouver, B.C.

491

51

204

"

7 Chelydra, str. ..........

1,574

Cass

"

Carried forward....

331,627

Straits Settlements

Carried forward........

352

I

361

38,599 1,174

320

295

40,588

RETURN of VESSELS bringing CHINESE PASSENGERS to the Port of Victoria, Hongkong,-Continued.

CHILDREN.

193

No.

DATE ARRIVED.

SHIP'S NAME.

TONS.

NATION- ALITY OF SHIP:

ADULTS.

MASTER'S NAME.

WHERE FROM.

TOTAL.

M.

F

M. F.

Brought forward....

331,627

205 June

7

Bisagno, str.

1,499 Italian

Baccerini

206

8

Loo Sok, str.

1,020 British

Benson

Brought forward... 38,599 1,174 Straits Settlements Bangkok

520 295 40,588

194

194

83

83

207

19

9

Diomed, str.

1,432

Dickens

Straits Settlements

236

3

4

250

""

208

11

9

Cheang Hock Kian, str..

956

Dinsdale

577

30 17

627

""

}}

209

#1

13

Guy Mannering, str.

1,829

Ford

54

54

"

"7

:

210

""

13

Nizam, str.

1,615

"

Langborne

80

80

211

""

13

Cheang Chew, str.

1,213

Kunath

336

12

10

99

5

356

212

""

13

Phra Chom Klao, str.

1,012

Fowler

""

Bangkok

24

24

213

"

13

Nurnberg, str...

2,007 German

Heintz

Straits Settlements

141

::

145

214

"

14

Teucer, str.

1,803 British

Riley

153

165

11

215 216

11

14

Glenfruin, str.

1,892

Norman

201

6

3

217

"

""

"

14

Bantam, str.

217

"

14

City of Peking, str.

218

"

15

Bellona, str....

219

""

16

Chow Fa, str.

1,055 British

220

18

Malwa, str.

1,694

1,457 | Dutch

3,129 American

1,722 German

Searle

Jager Stonham Preston

Van der Valk

250

250

San Francisco

74

80

Straits Settlements

100

50

3

1

154

Bangkok

109

109

Straits Settlements

24

::

24

221

18 Oopack, str..

1,730

Davies

184

7

5

200

11

>>

222

20 Benlarig, str.

1,453

Le Boutillier

34

34

223

20 Phra Chula Chom Klao, S.

1,012

Morris

Bangkok

76

76

***

224

20

11

Chow Chow Foo, str...

796 German

Clausen

Straits Settlements

265

4

275

225

J

20

Lightning, str.

2,124 British

Spence

27

510 12

13

10

545

226

""

21

Shanghai, str.

2,044

227

""

22

Titan, str.

1,525

21

228

??

23 Monmouthshire, str.

1,871

Hall Brown Cuming

196

4

204

""

160

160

39

301

30

""

..

229

24 Teresa, str.

753

>>

"

Slaker

432

17

3

458

230

99

25

Pathan, str.

1,762

Wright

160

165

>>

231

"1

25

Siam, str...............

992

Tulloch

""

288

7

ہے

305

Port Darwin

Cooktown

Townsville

232

>>

25 Tsinan, str.

1,459

Allison

Brisbane

.87

""

New Zealand

Sydney

6

Melbourne

52

233

27 Kutsang, str.

1,495

Jackson

Straits Settlements

397

34

19

7

457

234

་་

27 Thibet, str.

1,665

""

Wibmer

129

2

131

235

27 Empress of India, str..

3,003

Marshall

Vancouver, B.C.

132

132

:

236

وو

27 Oceanic, str.

2,440

Smith

San Francisco

118

3

132

237

27

Kong Beng, str..

862

>>

Jackson

Bangkok

50

...

50

238

"

28 Devawongse, str.

1,057

Loff

75

75

239

""

29

Elektra, str.

1,996 Austrian

Mariani

Straits Settlements

284

284

240

30

Aglaia, str.

241 July

2 Cheang Hye Teng, str.

242

2 Dardanus, str..

1,666 German

923 British

1,507

Christensen

328 11

Scott

- 3

12

497 13

26

3

354

8

524

""

梦梦

Purdy

62

""

243

"

2 Mongkut, str.

859

"

Deans

Bangkok

36

::

62

36

244

4 Bormida. str.

1,499 Italian

Susini

Straits Settlements

70

8

80

>

245

4 Kintuck, str.

2,312 British

Thomson

159

12

171

33

"

Port Darwin

1

Cooktown

Townsville

Brisbane Graymouth

246

"

4 Airlie, str.

1,492

Ellis

Dunedin

85

Wellington

11

Christchurch

2

Auckland

1

Sydney

46

:

Adelaide

3

247 248

6 Lombardy, str.

"

7 Namyang, str..

1,571 984

"1

Cole Smith

Straits Settlements

75

5

80

593

12

13

3

621

>>

249

7 Japan, str.

"1

1,865

Sundberg

376 36

3

418

""

250

""

8 Cardiganshire, str.

1,624

"

Parsons

30

30

"

251

9 City of Rio de Janeiro, str.

22

2,275 American

Cavarly

San Francisco

111

111

252

19

9| Phra Chom Klao, str.

1,012 British

Fowler

Bangkok

90

90

253

19

11 Sachsen, str.

2,874 German

Supmer

Straits Settlements

143

23

11

8

185

254

*

11

Cheang Hock Kian, str..

956 British

Dinsdale

450

450

19

255

12

Wing Sang, str.

"}

256

12

Orestes, str.

"

257

12 Teheran, str.

258

14 Borneo, str.

19

1,517 1.279 1,671 1,490 Dutch

*

Ste. Croix

>

375 35

14

433

""

"

Barr Tocque Klein

160

160

66

66

179

11

259

16 Telemachus, str.

11

1,397 British

Jones

135

11

260

18 Surat, str.....................

1,677

27

Sleeman

30

3

co as an

198

149

38

27

Port Darwin

Cooktown

261

18 Changsha, str.

Brisbane

1,463

19

Williams

38

Sydney

26

Melbourne

2

Adelaide

1

262

18 Arratoon Apcar, str.

1,392

Hansen

Straits Settlements

399

263

18 Keemoon, str.

1,985

Kemp

70

264

"

18 Empress of Japan, str.

3,003

Lee {

Victoria, B.C.

23

Vancouver, B.C.

47

265

19 Chow Fa, str.

1,055

Stonham

""

29

Bangkok

100

Q

:

:..

3

404

70

76

100

Honolulu

68

3

266

وو

21

Gaelic, str.

2,691

Pearne

་་

San Francisco

221

145

2

3

267

""

22

Sikh, str.

1,736

268

25 Teresa, str.

753

1

269

"

25 Cheang Chew, str.

1,213

Rowley

Slaker

Kunath

Straits Settlements

189

3

200

292 18

5

??

389

5

10

270

271

27 Independent, str.

27 Telamon, str.

871 German

Schall

Mauritius

176

3

2

w w w

3

318

3

407

3

184

1,555 British

Jackson

Straits Settlements

100

3

1

104

Carried forward....

437,168

Carried forward..

50,927 1,613

729

391

53,663

194

RETURN of VESSELS bringing CHINESE PASSENGERS to the Port of Victoria, Hongkong,—Continued.

No.

DATE ARRIVED.

SHIP'S NAME.

TONS.

NATION- ALITY OF SHIP.

ADULTS.

CHILDREN.

MASTER'S NAME.

WHERE FROM.

TOTAL.

M. F.

M.

F.

Brought forward..

437,168

272 July

28

Hupeh, str.

1,846 British

273

28 Salatiga, str.

1,640 German

274

??

28 Angers, str.

2,077 British

Quail Hildebrandt Pinkham

Brought forward... 50,927 1,613 Straits Settlements

729 394

53,663

89

3

98

158

6

""

5

177

26

26

275

276

29 Chelydra, str.

29 Berenice, str.

1,574

Cass

300

8

99

2

315

1,633 Austrian

Mersa

45

45

Dilly, Timor

2

Port Darwin

4

277

""

29 Guthrie, str.

1,494 British

Helms

Wellington

2

37

Sydney

201

Melbourne

9

278 279

11

30 Kong Beng, str.

862

11

30

Glengarry, str.

1,925

Jackson Selby

Bangkok

481

Straits Settlements

76

10

48

90

280 Aug.

2 Phra Nang, str.

1,021

"ያ

Watton

Victoria, B.C.

3

Tacoma, U.S.A.

2

10

281

>:

2❘ China, str.

2,401

282

"

3 Bisagno, str.

1,499 Italian

Seabury Baccerini

San Francisco

177

8

N

Co

Straits Settlements

83

283

""

3 Namyang, str.

984 British

Smith

518

22

284

"

5 Oldenburg, str.

3,405 German

Gathemann

153

35

""

285

"

5 Mongkut, str.

859 British

British

Bangkok

67

286

6

Ching Wo, str.

1,556

Gratton

39

Straits Settlements

136

287

6

Cheang Hye Teng, str.

923

17

288

8 Lightning, str.

2,124

"

Scott Spence

229

19

416 40

පසය

3

3

10 CO

47

190

83 546

200

:

13

289

8 Radnorshire, str.

1,889

Davies

34

21

""

290

??

9

Empress of China, str.

3,003

""

Archibald

291

??

11

Benvenue, str.........

1,468

Thomson

"

292

"

12 Bantam, str.

1,457 Dutch

Van der Valk

293

"

12 Chingtu, str.

1,459 British

Vancouver, B.C. Straits Settlements

""

Port Darwin

Townsville Brisbane

64

67

140

236

463

34

65

85

55

2

14

Hunt

97

Sydney

33

Melbourne

40

Adelaide

1

294

295

""

13

Frigga, str.

1,295 German

Nagel

Straits Settlements

130

5

3

138

"

15

Cathay, str.

1,873 British

Symons

43

43

""

296

"

15

Cheang Hock Kian, str.

956

Dinsdale

570

10

580

297

19

15

Velocity,

491

Martin

Honolulu

97

97

298

";

16

Glenearn, str.

1,409

Murray

Straits Settlements

52

1

53

299

16 Kutsang, str.

1,495

Jackson

17

118

53

300

"

17 Palamed, str.

1,489

Jackson

216

""

27

75

15

7

189

5

253

19

301

17 Taicheong, str.

828 German

Spiesen

Medan, Sumatra

74

74

302

18 Nanshan, str.

805 British

Blackburn

Bangkok

87

::

87

303

11

20

Belgic, str.

2,695

29

301

"

20

Kaisow, str....

1,934

""

305

306

??

22

Catherine Apcar, str..

1,734

Walker Gray Olifent

San Francisco

225

6

4

239

Straits Settlements

239

10

15

264

6701

""

30

9

11

720

*

24

Kong Beng, str.

862

Jackson

"

Bangkok

64

64

307

""

25

Hesperia, str.

1,123 German

Witt

Straits Settlements

168

188

308

P1

26

Palinurus, str.

1,536 British

Jackson

322

11

3

340

309

"

26

Electra, str......

1,162 German

Madsen

123

130

17

310

""

27 Ghazee, str.

1,764 British

Scotland

148

164

"}

Port Darwin

12

Thursday Island

3

311

"

29 Catterthun, str.

1,406

Thomson

"

Cooktown

32

Townsville

312

29 Tai Yuan, str...

1,459

Nelson

"

Sydney Brisbane

Cooktown

Sydney

15

31

4

52

21

Melbourne

16

313

??

29 Peru, str.

314

>>

29 | Phra Chula Chom Klao, 8.

315

"

29 Bokhara, str.

316

??

30 Empress of India, str.....

2,540 American 1,012 British 1,697 3,003 British

Ward

San Francisco

194

00

203

Morris

Bangkok

70

70

Sams

99

Straits Settlements

19

22

Marshall

Vancouver, B.C.

113

113

317

"

30 Bayern, str.

318

""

30 Wing Sang, str.

319

""

31 Achilles, str.

1,488

#1

320

"

31 Namyang, str........

984

29

2,576 German 1,517 British

Hogemann Ste. Croix Bartlett Smith

Straits Settlements

107

:ཨེ

20

316

45

~✯

136

12

380

""

58

58

472

18

""

502

321 Sept.

1 Cheang Chew, str.

1,213

Kunath

5001

""

10

6

520

322

A

1 Moyune, str.

1,714

Perrelle

.42

99

:

42

323

""

2 Thisbe, str.

1,789 Austrian

Kossovich

750

*

750

324

"2

2 Carmarthenshire, str.

1,776 British

Clark

24

""

24

325

"1

2 Mongkut, str.

859

Deans

Bangkok

40

40

326

**

3 Bormida, str.

1,499 Italian

Susini

Straits Settlements

45

45

327

??

5 Taichiow, str.

862 British

Unsworth

Bangkok

30

30

328

"

6 Priok, str.

329

19

7 Glenartney, str.

1,637 German 1,944 British

Petersen

Straits Settlements

135 8

3

147

McGregor

190

330

8 Cheang Hye Teng, str.

331

"

9 Arratoon Apcar, str.

923 1,392

"

Scott Hansen

??

>>

199

217 28

2

253

422

15

4

441

332

9 Borneo, str.

1,490 Dutch

Klein

Batavia

34

34

333

12 Oceanic, str.

2,440 British

Smith

San Francisco

410 12

424

334

>>

12 Rosetta, str...

2,039

Gadd

Straits Settlements

50

50

335

99

12 | Argyll, str.

1,886

Williamson

105

"7

"

2

107

336

"

14 Thibet, str.

1,665

Wibmer

232

""

**

232

337

"

15 Chelydra, str.

1,574

Cass

499

""

"

11

510

338

*

19

Laertes, str......

1,351

Scale

369

"

""

22

5

400

339

19

13

Oanfa, str.

1,970

Shaw

172

"

97

4

176

340

"

19 Nanshan, str.

805

Blackburn

>>

Bangkok

21

21

341

342

"

343

M

20 Kong Beng, str.

20 City of Rio de Janeiro, str.

20 Cyclops, str.

2,275 American

Nish

862

Jackson

65

19

59

65

Smith

San Francisco

150

152

1,363 British

Straits Settlements

95

95

344

"

20 Cheang Hock Kian, str. .

956

Dinsdale

449

11

5

3

3

460

Carried forward......... 551,684

Carried forward..............

63,641 2,136

909

487

67,173

A

RETURN of VESSELS bringing CHINESE PASSENGERS to the Port of Victoria, Hongkong,-Continued.

CHILDREN.

195

No.

DATE ARRIVED.

SHIP'S NAME.

TONS.

NATION- ALITY OF SHIP.

ADULTS.

MASTER'S NAME.

WHERE FROM.

TOTAL.

M. F.

M.

F

Brought forward...... 551,684-

Brought forward..... 63,641 2,136

909 487

67,173

345 Sept. 20

Denbighshire, str.

1,663 British

Vyvyan

Straits Settlements

178

12

4

200

346

"

21

Empress of Japan. str....

3,003

Lee

Victoria, B.C.

30

122

>>

Tacoma, U.S.A.

90

347

22 Chowfa, str...............

1,055

Stonham

Bangkok

72

72

""

348

"

24 Lightning, str.

2,124

Spence

Straits Settlements

394

25

422

349

26 Daphne, str,

1,291 German

Voss

139

112

""

350

19

26 China, str.

1,113

Voss

491

16

7

517

"

"

351

>"

27 | Phra Chula Chom Klao, s.

1,012 British

Morris

Bangkok

501

50

352

"

28

Myrmidon, str.

1,816

Nelson

Straits Settlements

367 13

380

353

29

""

Maria Teresa, str.

1,922 Austrian

Deperis

270

7

4

6

287

""

354

""

29

Mongkut, str.

859 British

Deans

Bangkok

60

60

355 356

"

29

Gaelic, str.

2,691

Pearne

San Francisco

242

10

"

30

Neckar, str..

1,492 German

Schmoelder

Straits Settlements

156

14

11

10 CO

263

6

187

Port Darwin

16

:

Thursday Island

1

Cooktown

7

357

"1

30 Tsinan, str.

1,460 British

Townsville

4

Allison

82

Brisbane

13

New Zealand

Sydney

3

Melbourne

35

358 October 3 Kutsang, str.

359

4 Gwalior, str.

1,495 1,648

Jackson

Straits Settlements

354

46

12

10

422

"

Speck

1811 11

4

196

"

"

360

""

6 Namyang, str...

984:

Smith

557

36

12

16

621

""

""

361

6

Ping Suey, str.

1,982

Jaques

96

96

...

"2

362

6 Kriemhild, str....

1,709 German

Ehlers

191

6

4

2

203

363

""

6 Taichiow, str.

$62 British

Unsworth

Bangkok

401

40

...

364

,,

7 Agamemnon, str.

1,491

Williams

Straits Settlements

226

??

365

8 Bisagno, str.

1,499 Italian

Baccerini

57

366

""

10

Priam, str.

1,803 British

Wilding

61

737

6

4

243

3

60

7

68

#

367

10

Ravenna, str.

1,916

Browne

39

39

??

,,

368

11

11 Empress of China, str.

3,003

Archibald

Victoria, B.C.

11

179

"

Vancouver, B.C.

168

369

39

11 Tartar, str.

1,568

??

Bailey

Straits Settlements

200

200

Dilly, Timor

28

10

7

370

11 Airlie, str.

1,492

??

Ellis

Port Darwin

Thursday Island

Cooktown

Townsville

Rockhampton

Brisbane

Dunedin

22OON-

...

152

Wellington

Sydney

47

Melbourne

Adelaide

371

""

12 Bombay, str.

372

}}

12 Diamond, str.

2,048 1,030

Blackburn Thom

Straits Settlements

100

100

503

33

9

"?

373

"

374

*

13 Taicheong, str.

14 City of Peking, str.

828 German

Speisen

Medan, Sumatra

281

Straits Settlements

9

3,129 American

Searle

San Francisco

190

375

35

14 | Phra Chom Klao, str.

1,012 British

Fowler

Bangkok

50

Q

::;

5

10

554

37

5

210

50

376

#

15 Catherine Apcar, str..

1,734

Olifent

Straits Settlements

549 39

22

4

614

""

377

:

17 Devawongse, str. ...........

1,057

Anderson

""

Bangkok

267

267

:

378

18 Glenfalloch, str.

1,434

379

18 Cheang Hye Teng, str....

923

Darke Scott

Straits Settlements

190

473

79

210

2

199

5

487

Townsville

10

Brisbane

10

380

25

19 Changsha, str...

1,463

Williams

60

Sydney

30

Melbourne

10

381

20

Teresa, str.

753

Slaker

Straits Settlements

306

12

11

"?

382

19

21

Lawang, str.

383

""

22

Kong Beng, str.

1,578 German 862 British

Schüder

176

26

324

1

183

""

Jackson

Bangkok

90

90

Honolulu

194

384

19

24 China, str.

2,401

Seabury

12

456

San Francisco

245

385

""

386

步步

24 Nestor, str.

387

24 Surat, str.

""

388

24 Cheang Hock Kian, str....|

25 Chowfa, str..................

956

Dinsdale

Straits Settlements

466

10

482

19

1,269

19

1,677

Thompson Sleeman

180

4

""

3

187

67

2

69

""

1,055

Stonham

""

Bangkok

141

10

15

16

182

389

27 Teheran, str.

1,671

+

11

390

">

28 Wing Sang, str.

1,517

"

391

""

29 Breconshire, str..

1,648

"

392

29 Sachsen, str.

393

11

31 Ningchow, str.

1,735 British

394

31 Moray, str.

1,411

2,575 German

Tocque Ste. Croix

Jackson

Supmer Allen Couche

Straits Settlements

421 17

6

2

446

590

63

21

10

684

"

50

50

دو

171

171

>>

>>

19

~

21

63

63

11

395

31 Ajax, str.

1,477

"J

Rawlings

219

11

231

""

396

31 | Phra Chula Chom Klao, s.

1,012

Morris

29

Bangkok

144

CO

160

397 Nov.

2 Arratoon Apcar, str.

1,392

Hansen

Straits Settlements

253

260

"

398

""

2 Canton, str.

2,044

Field

110

3

113

""

399

""

2 Belgic, str.

2,695

Walker

San Francisco

411

12

3

430

33

400

"}

3 Mongkut, str.

859

Deans

Bangkok

54

54

"

401

3 Maria Valerie, str.

2,644 | Austrian

Mitis

Straits Settlements

320

17

15

10

362

27

Port Darwin

10

Cooktown

Townsville

Brisbane

Christchurch

402

""

4 Guthrie, str.

1,494 British

Helms

Greymouth

75

Carried forward.................

644,020

Dunedin Sydney

Melbourne

20

18

5

Adelaide

1

Carried forward..

75,762 2,6451,124

616

80,147

196

RETURN of VESSELS bringing CHINESE PASSENGERS to the Port of Victoria, Hongkong,—Continued.

No.

DATE ARRIVED.

SHIP'S NAME,

TONS.

NATION- ALITY OF SHIP.

ADULTS.

CHILDREN.

MASTER'S NAME.

WHERE FROM.

TOTAL.

M.

F. M.

F.

Brought forward..........| 644,020

403 Nov.

5

Niobe, str.

1,440 German

Pfaff

Brought forward... 75,762 2,645 | 1,124 Straits Settlements

616

80,147

229

6

243

404

7

Benledi, str.

1,481 British

Clarke

30

30

405

7 Namyong, str..............

984

Smith

""

599 12

7

624

406

8 Empress of India, str.

3,003

Marshall

Victoria, B.C.

47

""

Vancouver, B.C.

291

343

5

407

""

8 Ganges, str.

2,149

Alderton

Straits Settlements

50

50

408

"7

8 Bormida, str.

1,499 Italian

Ansaldo

129

5

22

6

N

409

"

10

Taichiow, str.

862 British

Unsworth

Bangkok

130

410

"}

11

Peru, str.

2,540 American

Ward

San Francisco

280 6

411

"

11

Chelydra, str.

1,574 British

Cass

Straits Settlements

472 28

12

412

*1

11 Diomed, str.

1,432

Dickens

1841 10

""

413

23

12

Diamond, str.

1,030

Thom

431

21

14

PANK

10

840

142

130

288

8

520

202

476

Port Darwin

1

:

Thursday Island

414

??

12 Chingtu, str.

1,459

""

Hunt

Cooktown

Townsville

Brisbane

80

Sydney

40

Newcastle

1

Melbourne

18

415

""

15 Titan, str.

1,525

Brown

Straits Settlements

167

3

170

Victoria, B.C.

18

416

"J

16 Loo Sok, str.

1,020

Perkes

""

Seattle, U.S.A.

5

37

Tacoma. U.S.A.

14)

417

"

16 Glamorganshire, str.

1,843

Davies

""

Straits Settlements

112

3

115

418

"

16 Glenorchy, str.

1,822

99

Ferguson

190

4

200

...

419

"

17 Lightning, str.

2,124

Spence

399 35

1

435

420

18

"

Formosa, str.

2,616

12

421

"

18

Pakling, str.

1,911

19

422

423

??

18

Kong Beng, str.

862

Baker Lang Jackson

192

198

...

116

4

"

120

""

Bangkok

109

109

...

"

21

Oceanic, str.

2,440

Smith

Honolulu

98

7

San Francisco

477

590

5

1

424

??

21

Sutlej, str.

2,103

Worcester

""

Straits Settlements

34

***

34

425

"

21

Teresa, str.

753

Slaker

146

4

3

"3

1

154

426

,,

21

Cheang Chew, str.

1,213

Kunath

568 15

7

""

"

596

427

""

23 Kutsang, str.

1,495

Jackson

379 21

4

>>

4

408

428

23

22

Chow Fa, str.

1,055

Stonham

29

Bangkok

130

130

429

""

25

Darmstadt, str.

3,405 German

Schuckmann

Straits Settlements

260

8

10

430

"2

25

Ulysses, str......................

2,299 British

Lapage

370

3

10 M

283

""

3

380

431

22

26

Peiyang, str.

952 German

Voltmer

52

4

56

"

432

39

28 Cheang Hock Kian, str....

956 British

Dinsdale

275

10

8

299

433

""

28 Bellona, str......................

1,722 German

Jager

90

90

434

"3

29 Siam, str.................

992 British

Nicol

Bangkok

23

435

""

30

Tailee, str.

828 German

Calender

Medan, Sumatra

254

:::

23

258

436 Dec.

1

City of Rio de Janeiro, str.

2,275 American

Smith

San Francisco

369

12

437

"

2 Catherine Apcar, str.....

1,734 British

Olifent

Straits Settlements

542

35

438

""

5

Cheang Hye Teng, str.

923

Scott

15

287

439

""

5 Electra, str......

440

19

5 Mongkut, str.

1,996 Austrian 859 British

Mariani

309

2577

4254

3

388

10

589

299

320

Deans

Bangkok

80

80

Port Darwin

Thursday Island

Cooktown

141

"

5 Tai Yuan, str......................

1,459

Nelson

""

Townsville

16

55

Brisbane

1

Sydney Newcastle

10

3

+

Melbourne

12

442

15

5 Empress of Japan, str.

3,003

??

443

6 | Phra Chula Chom Klao, s.

1,012

>>

444

6 Shanghai, str.

2,044

Lee

Morris Hall

Victoria, B.C.

46

Vancouver, B.C.

336

382

***

Bangkok

251

2

27

...

Straits Settlements

2001

4

4

2

210

445

7 Taichiow, str.

862

Unsworth

Bangkok

37

37

...

Dilly, Timor

22

}

Port Darwin

2

446

15

9 Catterthun, str.

1,406

Shannon

Sydney

561

""

New Zealand

120

26

Melbourne

13

Adelaide

1

447

"1

9 Namyong, str....

984

>>

448

9 Oopack, str....

1,730

"}

Smith Davies

Straits Settlements

521

16

00

11

546

170

170

449

99

9

Prometheus, str..

1,492

21

Webster

217

3

220

450

"

10 Loo Sok, str.

1,020

??

Benson

Bangkok

50

50

451

""

12 Gaelic, str.

2,691

"

Pearne

San Francisco

585

452

19

12 Bisagno, str.

1,499 Italian

453

19

14 Pembrokeshire, str.

454

"

14 Wing Sang, str.

1,717 British 1,517

Baccerini Geddye

Straits Settlements

78

72

3

2

597

80

36

:>

::

36

""

Ste. Croix

538

47

ད;

co

8

601

455

""

456

14 Lothair,

457

11

14 Kong Beng, str.

15 Diamond, str.

458

16 Java, str.

2,631

459

"J

16 Tsinan, str.

1,460

19

460

21

"J

Verona, str.

1,876

""

862

794 Italian

1,030 British

Jackson

Gordella

Thom. Bason

Allison

Seymour

Sydney

Bangkok

34

34

Callao, Peru

137

2 11 22

222

172

Straits Settlements

4041

404

378

380

"

Townsville

7

Brisbane

...

44

16

...

Melbourne

14

Straits Settlements

19

22

461

"

23

Bayern, str.

2,576 German

Engelbart

282

282

462

23

JJ

Phra Chom Klao, str.

1,012 British

Fowler

Bangkok

66

...

86

463

""

27

Glengyle, str.

2,244

Gasson

Straits Settlements

29

206

11

220

464

19

27 Dardanus, str..........................

1,507

"

Purdy

255 10

270

465

32

27 Arratoon Apcar, str.

1,392

Hansen

"?

392 35

2

435

""

Carried forward...........

745,016

Carried forward..

90,0103,0741,284

738

95,106

I

Return of Vessels bringing CHINESE PASSENGERS to the Port of Victoria, Hongkong,—Continued.

197

No.

DATE ARRIVED.

SHIP'S NAME.

TONS.

NATION- ALITY OF SHIP.

ADULTS.

CHILDREN.

MASTER'S NAME.

WHERE FROM.

TOTAL.

M.

F. M.

F.

Brought forward,............ | 745,016

Brought forward... 90,010| 3,074 |1,281

738! 95,106

466 Dec. 27

Aglaia, str.

1,556 German

Christensen

Straits Settlements

303 18

330

467

"

27

City of Peking, str.

3,129 American

Searle

San Francisco

393

11

3

408

468

27

Phra Nang, str.

1,021 British

Watton

Bangkok

72

72

469

28 Namkiang, str.

999

Witt

Straits Settlements

509

25

20

10

564

""

470

>>

30 Chelydra, str.

1,574

Cass

453 10

469

">

"

Honolulu

140

471

30 China, str.

2,401

"

Seabury

545

San Francisco

371

472

19

31

Thibet, str.

1,665

Bishop

Straits Settlements

122

122

473

31

Mirzapore, str.

2,168

Carvey

26

26

474

31

Kintuck, str.

2,312

Kemp

78

78

#

475

31

Teviot, str.

1,349

Ferrier

50

50

476

31 | Orion, str.

1,760 Austrian

Walluschnig

201

201.

TOTAL TONS....

764,950

TOTAL PASSENGERS

92,731 3,149 1,334

757

97,971

From Bangkok, Siam,

11

Batavia,

19

Callao, Peru,

11

Dilly, Timor,

""

71

Honolulu, Sandwich Islands,

Mauritius,

Medan, Sumatra,

""

Melbourne,

19

New South Wales Ports, .........

New Zealand Ports,

"}

":

Portland, Oregon, U.S.A.,

Queensland Ports,

"

San Francisco, U.S.A.,

Seattle, U.S.A.,

"

Straits Settlements,

""

19

Tacoma, U.S.A.,

South Australian Ports,

Vancouver, British Columbia,

" Victoria, British Columbia,...

""

SUMMARY.

ADULTS.

CHILDREN.

VALUE OF

WHERE FROM.

TOTAL. TREASURE

M. F.

M. F.

BROUGHT,

5,108

16

21

22

5,167

...

37

37

186

16

23

228

67

10

81

712

5:

1,090

27

12

755

176

2

181

356

360

512

3

1

517

672

17

698 $1,391,362

172

172

:

29

29

417

3

421

$ 21,883

7,526

210

88

5

5

158

1

74,418 2,860 1,152

635

79,065

106

2

1,724

11

9

3501

108 1,747 355

$

7,879 $7,647,742

160 $ 32,851

4

795 53,500

}

TOTAL PASSENGERS,

92,731 3,149 1,334 757 97,971

$9,149,223

1.

198

XXI.-RETURN of MARINE CASES tried at the MARine Magistrate'S COURT, during the year 1892.

DEFENDANTS HOW DISPOSED OF.

NATURE OF CHARGE.

Absent from Ship without leave,

Assault,

Carrying excess of Passengers, Steam-launches, Desertion,

False Particulars-Giving (Junk),

Found stowed away,

Harbour Regulations,-Breach of (Junk),

Leaving the Harbour during prohibited hours,

(Junk),

Leaving without Clearance, (Junk),

Leaving without Clearance, (Steam-launch),

Neglecting to exhibit a light, (Steam-launch),

Obstruction of Fairways,

Plying for hire without a licence, (Boat), Refusal of Duty,

No. of Cases.

3

12

16

2

12

19

17

74

1

1

114

222222

1

Fined.

*

Amount of Fines.

::

1

4

5

1

15.00

13.00

64.00

4

N:

1

2

15

5.00

1.00

...

91.00

20.00

3

1

40.00

1

5.00

2

30.00

19

100.00

22

94.00

3

...

Years.

Passenger

Certificate

and Bottom.

Emigration.

Tonnage for

Registration.

British Tonnage.

Foreign Vessels Certificate for

Inspection of

Crew space,

Lights and

Markings.

Minor Inspec- tions.

Survey of Licen- | sed Passenger Steam-launches.

Survey of Boilers under Construction.

Inspection of Government

Launches.

Examination

of Engineers.

Examination of Chinese Engi-

neers for Steam- launches.

Estimated total number of visits in

connection with fore-

ign Inspections.

Steam-launch, Breach of Condition of Licence, Throwing Ballast, &c. into the Harbour, Wilfully remaining behind,

Total,.......

79 178

81

4

10

5

80

1

3

::

XXIII.—RETURN of WORK performed by the GOVERNMENT Marine Surveyor's Department.

Co

488.00

:

10.00

9 months in

1881,.....

95

67

1882,.

154

127

1883,.

144 102

1884,.

200 141

10

1885,

153 113

6

1886,.

149

76

1887,

153

101

1888,.

161

97

1889,.

130

1890,

112

1891,

108

1892,.....

122

1785

73

77

38

00 00 00 ✪ CO ICO I ∞ ∞ ∞ CO

10100023 AHU CO

3

3

8

9

6

:2575

10

4

35

}

284

1

15

6

20

6

26

33

6

60

33

8

1

11

69

16

9

တတ်

46

6

472

57

1

461

55

8

699

50

29

737

36

16

870

6

9

72

15

14

42

31

930

1

80

1

6

42

36

1,042

3

80

1

3

84

I

1

73

3

16

1

85

10

16

18578

39

36

1,127

61

19

986

44

19

1,615

60

96

1,678

XXIV.-IMPORTS AND EXPORTS OFFICE.

IMPORTS.

MALWA.

PATNA.

BENARES.

PERSIAN.

Chests.

Chests.

Chests.

Chests.

TURKISH. Chests.

TOTAL.

Chests.

1891,................. 1892,......

.12,420

24,520

15,435

5,925

119

58,4193

...13,118

23,041

13,431

7,171

103

56,8641

Increase,

698

1,2451

Decrease,

1,479

2,004

16

1,5551

EXPORTS.

MALWA.

ΡΑΤΝΑ,

BENARES.

Chests.

Chests.

Chests.

PERSIAN. Chests.

TURKISH.

TOTAL.

Chests.

Chests.

1891.

11,8291

24,440

15,654

5,978

96

57,998

1892,

.11,947

19,948

12,882

7,7371

111

52,6252

Increase,

118

<

1,7582

14

Decrease,

M

4,492

2,772

5,3722

Through Cargo reported in Manifests but not landed, 1891,......

1892,..

.18,256 chests. .21,144

"

22

"

Increase,.

2,888 chests.

TONS.

7,000,000

6,900,000

6,800,000

6,700,000

6,600,000

6,500,000

6,400,000

6,300,000

6,200,000

6,100,000

6,000,000

5,900,000

5,800,000

5,700,000

5,600,000

5,500,000

5,400,000

5,300,000

5,200,000

5,100,000

5,000,000

4,900,000

4,800,000

4,700,000

4,600,000

4,500,000

4,400,000

4,300,000

4,200,000

4,100,000

4,000,000

3,900,000

3,800,000

3,700,000

3,600,000

XXII-DIAGRAM of Tonnage entered at Hongkong, fi

RED LINE represents British Shipping Tonnage only.

BLUE LINE represents Foreign Shipping Tonnage only

GREEN LINE represents British and Foreign Shipping

YELLOW LINE represents Junk Tonnage only, excludir

THICK BLACK LINE represents entire Trade in Britis:

1867.

1868.

1874.

1875.

1882.

ed at Hongkong, from 1887 to 1892, inclusive.

pping Tonnage only.

hipping Tonnage only,

and Foreign Shipping Tonnage.

Tonnage only, excluding Local Trade.

entire Trade in British and Foreign Ships and Junks.

1884.

1885.

1886.

1887.

1888.

1889.

1890.

1891.

1892.

TONS.

7,000,000

6,900,000

6,800,000

6,700,000

6,600,000

6,500,000

6,400,000

6,300,000

6,200,000

6,100,000

6,000,000

5,900,000

5,800,000

5,700,000

5,600,000

5,500,000.

5,400,000

5,300,000

5,200,000

5,100,000

5,000,000

4,900,000

+,800,000

4,700,000

4,600,000

4,500,000

4,400,000

4,300,000

4,200,000

4,100,000

4,000,000

3,900,000

3,800,000

3,700,000

3,600,000

4,300,000

4,200,000

4,100,000

4,000,000

3,900,000

3,800,000

3,700,000

3,600,000

3,500,000

3,400,000

3,300,000.

3,200,000

3,100,000

3,000,000

2,900,000

2,800,000

2,700,000

2,600,000

2,500,000

2,400,000

2,300,000

2,200,000

2,100,000

1,000,000

1,900,000

1,800,000

1,700,000

1,600,000

1,500,000

1,400,000

1,300,000

1,200,000

1,100,000

1,000,000

900,000

800,000

700,000

600,000

500,000

400,000

300,000

4,300,000

4,200,000

4,100,000

4,000,000

3,900,000

3,800,000

3,700,000

3,500,000

3,500,000

3,400,000

3,300,000

3,200,000

3,100,000

3,000,000

2,900,000

2,800,000

2,700,000

2,600,000

2,500,000

2,400,000

2,300,000

2,200,000

2,100,000

2,000,000

1,900,000

1,800,000

1,700,000

1,600,000

1,500,000

1,400,000

1,300,000

1,200,000

1,100,000

1,000,000

900,000

800,000

700,000

600,000

500,000

400,000

300,000

.3

NUMBER OF PERMITS, &c. ISSUED.

201

1891.

1892.

Increase.

Decrease.

Landing Permits,

Removal Permits,

344

477

133

.12,995

13,165

170

Export Permits,

8,479

8,837

358

:

Permits to Chinese Customs' Hulk,

368

284

RR

84

Memo. of Exports sent to the Commissioner of Chinese Customs, }

510

539

29

:

SUMMARY OF EXPORTS, 1892.

Malwa

Chests.

Patna Chests.

Benares Persian Chests. Chests.

Turkish Chests.

Total Chests.

Total in

piculs.

By Steamers to Amoy,

Bombay,...

Bunder Abbas,

Bushire,

British Columbia,

British North Borneo,

Cairo,

:

165

199

2,479

1,814

3

4,657

5,237.95

:

3

.

...

:.

:

12

29

:

12

12.3

29

29.725

954

:

:

:.

4

26

3

Cantoul,

1,814

4,959

2,507

1

Chefoo,.

6

1

Foochow,.

2,562

1,066

345

8624

Formosa,

157

4,296

Haiphong,

450

7

Hankow,

62

29

Hoihow,

4

158

6

Macao,

3,642

159

Pakhoi,

Philippine Islands,

84

483

174

79

San Francisco,

1

D

Shanghai,.

4,023/1/

6,014

4,510

166

Straits Settlements,

9

410-

332

210

Swatow,

3,026

1,763

1,311

302

By Junks to various adjacent

Ports in China,

2721

495

55

9

:

:

:

:

:.

954

1,144.8

30

31.45

3

3.075

9,281

10,774.225

11

12.

4,8352

5,139.50625

4,453

4,591.8

457

547.175

91

96.8

168

200.8

110

3,911

4,671.2

:

567

680.4

253

303.6

...

1

1.2

1

14,714

16,823.45

:

:

:

961

1,114.65

6,402

7,024.35

831

941.725

TOTAL,..

11,947

19,948

12,882 7,7371

111

52,625

59,385.18125

The information in column 7 above is on the following assumption :---

Patna and Benares per chest,

Malwa and Turkish per chest,

Persian per chest,....

.1.20 piculs.

.1.00 23

...1.025

";

1

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 1.

WEDNESDAY, 11TH JANUARY, 1893.

1

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(Sir WILLIAM ROBINSON, K.C.M.G.).

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (GEORGE THOMAS MICHAEL O'BRIEN, C.M.G.).

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

>>

the Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART LOCKHART).

1}

the Colonial Treasurer, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES).

>>

the Director of Public Works, (FRANCIS ALFRED COOPER).

37

""

35

""

the Harbour Master, (ROBERT MURRAY RUMSEY).

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS.

JAMES JARDINE BELL-IRVING.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 14th December, 1892, were read and confirmed.

VOTE REFERRED TO THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of Ilis Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following Minute and moved that it be referred to the Finance Committee, viz. :--

C.S.O. 2874 of 1892.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of £500 to cover the cost of show

cases, the pay of an attendant to arrange exhibits, and other expenses, in connection with a proposed representation of the resources of Hongkong at the Imperial Institute to be opened in May next.

Government House, Hongkong, 3rd January, 1893.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

BILL ENTITLED 66 AN ORDINANCE TO DECLARE THE TERMS AND CONDITIONS APPLICABLE TO LOANS AUTHORISED TO BE RAISED BY THE GOVERNMENT of HongkonG AND TO PROVIDE FOR THE CREATION OF INSCRIBED STOCK."-The Colonial Treasurer moved the second reading of the Bill.

The Attorney General seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council went into Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed and Bill reported with amendment.

The Colonial Treasurer moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Attorney General seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

BILL ENTITLED

“AN ORDINANCE FOR RAISING THE SUM OF £200,000 by Loan FOR THE PURPOSE OF DEFRAYING THE COST OF CERTAIN PUBLIC WORKS."-The Colonial Treasurer moved the second reading of the Bill.

The Attorney General seconded.

Honourable C. P. CHATER moved, as an amendment, that the second reading of the Bill be post- poned for six months.

Honourable E. R. BELILIOS seconded.

Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD supported the amendment.

The Colonial Secretary replied.

2

A division was taken when there voted

For the amendment.

Honourable E. R. BELILIOS.

Against the amendment.

Honourable J. J. BELL-IRVING.

T. H. WHITEHEAD.

Harbour Master.

""

C. P. CHATER.

22

>>

Colonial Treasurer.

""

>"

AA

Director of Public Works.

Registrar General.

Attorney General. Colonial Secretary.

The Honourable Ho KAI did not vote.

The amendment was lost by a minority of 4. The original motion was then put.

A division was taken when there voted

For the motion.

Honourable J. J. BELL-IRVING.

,,

Harbour Master.

Against the motion.

Honourable E. R. BELILIOS.

T. H. WHITEHEAD.

""

Director of Public Works. Colonial Treasurer.

C. P. CHATER.

""

""

Registrar General.

""

Attorney General. Colonial Secretary.

The Honourable HO KAI did not vote.

The motion was carried by a majority of 4. Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council went into Committee on the Bill.

Honourable T. II. WHITEHEAD moved that the consideration of the Bill be adjourned until the Despatches to and from the Secretary of State in connection with the loan shall have been made public.

Honourable C. P. CHATER seconded.

The Colonial Secretary replied.

The motion was not pressed to a division.

Honourable Ho KAI moved as an amendment that the last item in the schedule, viz., "Extension and Improvement of the Gaol," be omitted.

Honourable C. P. CHATER seconded. The Colonial Secretary replied.

A division was taken when there voted

For the amendment.

Honourable J. J. BELL-IRVING.

E. R. BELILIOS.

11

T. H. WHITEHEAD.

??

>>

HO KAI.

C. P. CHATER.

The amendment was lost by a minority of 1.

Against the amendment,

Honourable Harbour Master.

Council resumed and Bill reported without amendment.

Director of Public Works. Colonial Treasurer.

""

??

Registrar General.

Attorney General.

""

Colonial Secretary.

The Colonial Treasurer moved the third reading of the Bill. The Attorney General seconded.

A division was taken when there voted

For the motion.

Honourable Harbour Master.

Against the motion.

Honourable J. J. BELL-IRVING.

Director of Public Works.

E. R. BELILIOS.

>>

>>

Colonial Treasurer.

""

""

Registrar General.

T. H. WHITEHEAD.

HO KAI.

Attorney General.

19

">

C. P. CHATER.

>>

Colonial Secretary.

The motion was carried by a majority of 1.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

1

:

3

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE MARRIAGE ORDINANCE, 1875."-The Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE MEDICAL REGISTRATION ORDINANCE, 1884."- Council in Committee on the Bill.

The Attorney General addressed the Council.

Council resumed and Bill reported with amendment.

The Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned till Wednesday, the 25th January, at 3 P.M.

J

Read and confirmed, this 25th day of January, 1893.

F. H. MAY,

Acting Clerk of Councils.

$

WILLIAM ROBINSON,

Governor.

5

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 2.

WEDNESDAY, 25TH JANUARY, 1893.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR (Sir WILLIAM ROBINSON, K.C.M.G.).

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (GEORGE THOMAS MICHAEL O'BRIEN, C.M.G.).

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

""

""

the Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART LOCKHART). the Colonial Treasurer, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-Innes).

""

A

>>

"

""

the Director of Public Works, (FRANCIS ALFRED COOPER).

the Harbour Master, (ROBERT MURRAY RUMSEY). CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHItehead.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS.

""

JAMES JARDINE BELL-IRVING.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 11th January, 1893, were read and confirmed.

PAPERS LAID ON THE TABLE.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following papers, viz. :—Memòrial respecting Gaol Extension; Corres- pondence respecting the proposed Loan; and the Report of the Government Central School for Girls for 1892.

REPORT OF THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the Report of the Finance Committee dated the 11th of January, (No. 1 of 1893).

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO PROVIDE FOR THE ESTABLISHMENT OF A VOLUNTEER FORCE AND TO EMPOWER THE GOVERNOR TO RAISE A SPECIAL FORCE OF COAST DEFENCE VOLUNTEERS IN THE EVENT OF ANTICIPATED WAR."-The Attorney General moved the first reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE HONGKONG CODE OF CIVIL PROCEDURE.' ”. Attorney General moved the first reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

-The

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO PROVIDE MEANS FOR ASCERTAINING THE AMOUNTS TO BE PAID BY WAY OF COMPENSATION IN RESPECT OF THE WHARVES AND PIERS ALONG THE LINE OF THE PRAYA RECLAMATION, TO FIX THE PERIODS FOR THE PAYMENT THEREOF AND FOR OTHER PURPOSES IN CONNEC- TION THEREWITH."-The Attorney General, in moving the second reading of the Bill, addressed the Council.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Discussion ensued.

The Council agreed to postpone the second reading of the Bill until the 8th February, 1893. ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned till Wednesday, the 8th February, 1893.

WILLIAM ROBINSON,

Governor.

די

Read and confirmed, this 8th day of February, 1893.

F. H. MAY,

Acting Clerk of Councils.

7

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 3.

WEDNESDAY, 8TH FEBRUARY, 1893.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

Sir WILLIAM ROBINSON, K.C.M.G.).

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (GEORGE THOMAS MICHAEL O'BRIEN, C.M.G.). the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

the Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART LOCKHART).

""

"

""

the Colonial Treasurer, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES).

""

the Director of Public Works, (FRANCIS ALFRED COOPER).

""

the Harbour Master, (ROBERT MURRAY RUMSEY). CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

""

7

ང་

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS.

""

""

JAMES JARDINE BELL-IRVING.

""

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 25th January, 1893, were read and confirmed.

PAPERS LAID ON THE TABLE.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following papers, viz. :-Report of the Captain Superintendent of Police for 1892 and the Report of the Superintendent Victoria Gaol for the same year.

QUESTIONS.-Honourable C. P. CHATER gave notice that at the next meeting he would ask the following questions:-

*

1. What is the total amount so far as has been ascertained to date of the loss occasioned to the

Treasury through the defalcations of A. F. Alves, late Clerk and Accountant therein?

2. Over what period of time have these defalcations extended so far as is at present known? 3. Was the defaulter guaranteed in any way, and if so how, by whom, and to what amount? 4. When were the defalcations first discovered and when were any steps taken for the arrest of the defaulter? Is it a fact as stated in the newspapers that Alves was allowed time during which he was able to make away with the books and accounts incriminating him and to escape from the Colony?

Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD also gave notice that at the next meeting he would ask the follow- ing question:-

Will the Government appoint a commission composed in the main of persons unconnected with the Government Service to investigate and report publicly on the management of the Treasury Department and on the circumstances connected with A. F. Alves' defalcations?

BILL ENTITLED (C

AN ORDINANCE TO PROVIDE FOR THE ESTABLISHMENT OF A VOLUNTEER FORCE AND TO EMPOWER the GOVERNOR TO RAISE A SPECIAL FORCE OF COAST DEFENCE VOLUNTEERS IN THE EVENT OF ANTICIPATED WAR."-The Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council went into Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed and Bill reported with amendments.

Procedure.'

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE HONGKONG CODE OF CIVIL PROCEDURE." "-The Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council went into Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed and Bill reported without amendment.

The Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE TO PROVIDE MEANS FOR ASCERTAINING THE AMOUNTS TO BE PAID BY WAY OF COMPENSATION IN RESPECT OF THE WHARVES AND PIERS ALONG THE LINE OF THE PRAYA RECLAMATION, TO FIX THE PERIODS FOR THE PAYMENT THEREOF AND FOR OTHER PURPOSES IN CONNEC- TION THEREWITH."-The Council on the suggestion of the Attorney General, agreed to postpone the second reading of the Bill.

ADJOURNMENT.—The Council then adjourned till Wednesday, the 8th March, 1893.

WILLIAM ROBINSON,

Governor.

Read and confirmed, this 8th day of March, 1893.

F. H. MAY,

Acting Clerk of Councils.

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 4.

WEDNESDAY, 8TH MARCH, 1893.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(Sir WILLIAM ROBINSON, K.C.M.G.).

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (GEORGE THOMAS MICHAEL O'BRIEN, C.M.G.).

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

">

the Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE STEWArt Lockhart).

the Colonial Treasurer, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES).

the Director of Public Works, (FRANCIS ALFRED COOPER).

""

9

the Harbour Master, (ROBERT MURRAY RUMSEY).

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

""

>>

Ho KAI, M.B., C.M.

"2

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS.

JAMES JARDINE BELL-IRVING.

ABSENT:

The Honourable THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 8th February, 1893, were read and confirmed.

PAPERS LAID ON THE TABLE.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following papers, viz. :-Report of the Sanitary Surveyor for 1892; Report of the Superintendent of Fire Brigade for 1892; and the Report of the Head Master of the Victoria College for 1892.

RESOLUTION.-The Registrar General gave notice that he would move the following resolution at the next meeting :-

Whereas, by section 20 of Ordinance 11 of 1890, it is enacted that Part II. of "The Women

and Girls' Protection Ordinance, 1890," should only continue in operation for a period of two years from the coming into operation of that Ordinance or such further period or periods as might, from time to time, be determined by Resolution of the Legislative Council. And whereas the said Ordinance came into operation on the 6th day of April, 1891, by virtue of a Proclamation duly issued under section 34 of the said Ordinance by the Officer then administering the Government, which Proclamation was published in the Gazette of the 4th April, 1891.

And whereas it is desirable to further extend the period during which the said Part II. of the

said Ordinance shall be in operation. It is this day resolved by the Legislative Council of Hongkong that Part II. of "The Women and Girls' Protection Ordinance, 1890,” shall continue in operation until further notice.

QUESTIONS.-The Honourable C. P. CHATER, pursuant to notice, asked the following questions:--- 1. What is the total amount so far as has been ascertained to date of the loss occasioned to the

Treasury through the defalcations of A. F. Alves, late Clerk and Accountant therein?

2. Over what period of time have these defalcations extended so far as is at present known? 3. Was the defaulter guaranteed in any way, and if so how, by whom, and to what amount? 4. When were the defalcations first discovered and when were any steps taken for the arrest of the defaulter? Is it a fact as stated in the newspapers that Alves was allowed time during which he was able to make away with the books and accounts incriminating him and to escape from the Colony?

The Colonial Secretary replied.

Honourable C. P. CHATER, asked the following question on behalf of the Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD, absent by permission.

Will the Government appoint a commission composed in the main of persons unconnected with the Government Service to investigate and report publicly on the management of the Treasury Department and on the circumstances connected with A. F. Alves' defalcations?

The Colonial Secretary replied.

10

BILL ENTITLED (( AN ORDINANCE TO PROVIDE MEANS FOR ASCERTAINING THE AMOUNTS TO BE PAID BY WAY OF COMPENSATION IN RESPECT OF THE WHARVES AND PIERS ALONG THE LINE OF THE PRAYA RECLAMATION, TO FIX THE PERIODS FOR THE PAYMENT THEREOF AND FOR OTHER PURPOSES IN CONNEC- TION THEREWITH."-The Attorney General moved the first reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO PROVIDE FOR THE ESTABLISHMENT OF A VOLUNTEER FORCE AND TO EMPOWER THE GOVERNOR TO RAISE A SPECIAL Force of COAST DEFENCE VOLUNTEERS IN THE EVENT OF ANTICIPATED WAR.”—The Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do

pass.

Bill passed.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned till Wednesday, the 22nd March, 1893.

Read and confirmed, this 22nd day of March, 1893.

ARATHOON SETH, Clerk of Councils.

WILLIAM ROBINSON,

Governor.

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 5.

WEDNESDAY, 22ND MARCH, 1893.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(Sir WILLIAM ROBINSON, K.C.M.G.).

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (GEORGE THOMAS MICHAEL O'BRIEN, C.M.G.).

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

"

"}

>>

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the Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART LOCKHART). the Colonial Treasurer, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES). the Director of Public Works, (FRANCIS ALFRED COOPER).

"}

the Harbour Master, (ROBERT MURRAY RUMSEY).

11

11

">

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS.

ABSENT:

The Honourable JAMES JARDINE BELL-IRVING.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 8th instant, were read and confirmed.

PAPERS LAID ON THE TABLE.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the Report of the Director of Public Works for 1892.

The Director of Public Works laid on the table the Report of the Public Works Committee, dated 8th March, 1893, (No. 1) and moved that it be adopted by the Council.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

RESOLUTION.-The Registrar General, pursuant to notice, moved the resolution for extending the operation of Part II. of The Women and Girls' Protection Ordinance, 1890.

The Honourable the Harbour Master seconded.

After some discussion, in which the Honourable C. P. CHATER, and the Honourable Dr. Ho KAI took part, the Council adopted the following resolution :—

Whereas, by section 20 of Ordinance 11 of 1890, it is enacted that Part II. of "The Women and Girls' Protection Ordinance, 1890,” should only continue in operation for a period of two years from the coming into operation of that Ordinance or such further period or periods as might, from time to time, be determined by Resolution of the Legislative Council. And whereas the said Ordinance came into operation on the 6th day of April, 1891, by virtue of a Proclamation duly issued under section 34 of the said Ordinance by the Officer then administering the Government, which Proclamation was published in the Gazette of the 4th April, 1891. And whereas it is desirable to further extend the period during which the said Part II. of the said Ordinance shall be in operation. It is this day resolved by the Legislative Council of Hongkong that Part II. of "The Women and Girls' Protection Ordinance, 1890,” shall continue in operation for the period of one year from the 6th day of April, 1893.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO PROVIDE MEANS FOR ASCERTAINING THE AMOUNTS TO BE PAID BY WAY OF COMPENSATION IN RESPECT OF THE WHARVES AND PIERS ALONG THE LINE OF THE PRAYA RECLAMATION, TO FIX THE PERIODS FOR THE PAYMENT THEREOF AND FOR OTHER PURPOSES IN CONNEC- TION THEREWITH."-The Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill.

The Honourable E. R. BELILIOS seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

The Council went into Committee on the Bill...

Council resumed and progress reported.

ADJOURNMENT.—The Council then adjourned till Wednesday, the 5th April, 1893.

Read and confirmed, this 5th day of April, 1893.

ARATHOON SETH, Clerk of Councils.

a

WILLIAM ROBINSON,

Governor.

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 6.

WEDNESDAY, 5TH APRIL, 1893.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(Sir WILLIAM ROBINSON, K.C.M.G.).

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (GEORGE THOMAS MICHAEL O'BRIEN, C.M.G.).

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

the Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART LOCKHART).

13

19

""

">

the Colonial Treasurer, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES). the Director of Public Works, (FRANCIS ALFRED COOPER).

77

the Harbour Master, (ROBERT MURRAY RUMSEY, R.N.). CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

37

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD. EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 22nd ultimo, were read and confirmed.

PAPERS LAID ON THE TABLE.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following papers :--

1. Report on the Widows' and Orphans' Fund for the second half-year of 1892. (No. 19.) 2. 'Report of the Superintendent of the Botanical and Afforestation Department for 1892.

(No. 3.)

3. Returns of Superior and Subordinate Courts for 1892. (No. 1.)

VOTE REFERRED TO THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following Financial Minute and moved that it be referred to the Finance Committee :--

C.S.O.

2935 of 1892.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Nineteen thousand, Three hundred and Nineteen Dollars and Forty-eight Cents, ($19,319.48), for the construction of new roads at Kowloon.

This item is made up as follows:

Re-vote of unexpended balance of last year's vote of $10,000,.. Additional vote asked for,

.$ 4,319.48

15,000.00

$19,319.48

Government House, Hongkong, 1st April, 1893.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

BILL ENTITLED แ AN ORDINANCE TO PROVIDE MEANS FOR ASCERTAINING THE AMOUNTS TO BE PAID BY WAY OF COMPENSATION IN RESPECT OF THE WHARVES AND PIERS ALONG THE LINE OF THE PRAYA RECLAMATION, TO FIX THE PERIODS FOR THE PAYMENT THEREOF AND FOR OTHER PURPOSES IN CONNEC- TION THEREWITH."-Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed and Bill reported with amendments.

The Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Honourable C. P. CHATER seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

BILL ENTITLED " AN ORDINANCE FOR THE INCORPORATION OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE HONGKONG AND SOUTH CHINA MASONIC BENEVOLENCE FUND.-The Honourable C. P. CHATER moved the first reading of this Bill.

The Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned sine die.

Read and confirmed, this 25th day of May, 1893.

ARATHOON SETH,

Clerk of Councils.

WILLIAM ROBINSON,

Governor.

}

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 7.

THURSDAY, 25TH MAY, 1893.

15

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(Sir WILLIAM ROBINSON, K.C.M.G.).

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (GEORGE THOMAS MICHAEL O'BRIEN, C.M.G.).

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

""

""

the Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART LOCKHART).

""

the Colonial Treasurer, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES).

=

}}

the Director of Public Works, (FRANCIS ALFRED COOPER).

""

51

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the Harbour Master, (ROBERT MURRAY RUMSEY).

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS.

ABSENT:

The Honourable CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

""

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 5th ultimo, were read and confirmed.

VOTE REFERRED TO THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following Financial Minute, and moved that it be referred to the Finance Committee:-

C.S.O.

738 of 1893.

WILLIAM ROBINSON,

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Thirteen thousand Dollars, ($13,000), for the extension of MacDonnell and Austin Roads at Kowloon.

Government House, Hongkong, 15th April, 1893.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

REPORT OF THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the Report of the Finance Committee dated the 5th April, 1893, (No. 2 of 1893).

REPORT OF THE PUBLIC WORKS COMMITTEE.-The Director of Public Works laid on the table the Report of the Public Works Committee, dated 5th April, 1893, (No. 2), and moved that it be adopted by the Council.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

PAPERS LAID ON THE TABLE.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following papers :-

1. Statement of disbursements for Forestry Works for the years 1894 and 1895. (No. 8.) 2. Harbour Master's Report for 1892. (No. 1.)

3. Sanitary Superintendent's Report for 1892, and Colonial Veterinary Surgeon's Report

for 1892. (Nos. 19 & 1.)

4. Acting Postmaster General's Report for 1892. (No. 13.)

5. Report of the Committee appointed to enquire into the Pó Léung Kuk.

6. Report of the Commission on the Defalcations in the Treasury.

7. Statement of Revenue and Expenditure for 1892.

MOTION.-The Colonial Secretary moved the following resolution :

That "the Council having considered the following statement by the Superintendent of the Botanical and Afforestation Department resolves that it is expedient to incur the liability proposed to be incurred in 1895.”

7

16

Statement showing Disbursements for Forestry Works in the years 1894 and 1895 for which contracts have been already made, and those for which contracts now require to be inade.

To be disbursed

Estimated total cost.

To be disbursed in 1893.

in 1894.

To be disbursed in 1895.

APPROVED BY LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL C.S.O. No. 1161, 1892.

C.

C.

..

C.

1. Rearing Trees in situ,

840.00

400.00

440.00

2.

""

to be planted in 1894,

960.00

600.00

3. Planting Trees being reared under No. 2,....

1,600.00

360.00 1,600.00

Contracts to be now made which require approval:--

4. Rearing Trees to be planted in 1895,

1,000.00

5. Planting the Trees to be reared under No. 4,

1,600.00

$6,000.00

1,000.00

1,000.00

1,600.00

2,400.00

2,600.00

The works under headings 4 and 5 now require the approval of the Legislative Council in order that the contracts for them may be made; those under headings 1, 2, and 3 have already been sanc- tioned and are now in progress.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded. Question-put and agreed to.

CHARLES FORD, Superintendent,

Botanical and Afforestation Department.

NOTICE OF QUESTION.--The Honourable E. R. BELILIOS gave notice that at the next meeting of Council he would ask the following question:

Will the Government state whether in connection with the erection of the new lighthouse on Waglan Island there was any understanding or agreement between the Chinese "Government and the Imperial British Government or between the Chinese Imperial Maritime Customs and the Colonial Government of Hongkong; also whether there was any special reason for the light- ing of the Eastern approach to the port of Hongkong being undertaken by the Chinese Imperial Maritime Customs.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE FOR THE ESTABLISHMENT AND INCORPORATION OF THE CHINESE SOCIETY FOR THE PREVENTION OF KIDNAPPING AND FOR THE PROTECTION OF WOMEN AND CHILDREN COMMONLY KNOWN AS THE PÓ LÉUNG KUK."-The Honourable the Registrar General moved the first reading of this Bill.

6

The Honourable Dr. Ho KAI seconded.

The Colonial Secretary addressed the Council.

The Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD moved, as an amendment,

that the first reading of the Bill

be postponed until after the publication of the reports of the Special Committee appointed to investigate and report on certain points connected with the Bill and of the evidence taken by that Committee, and until Members of Council have had time to read and consider the same."

The Honourable E. R. BELILIOS seconded. Question put.

A division was taken when there voted

For the amendment.

The Honourable E. R. BELILIOS.

"}

Against the amendment.

The Honourable Ho KAI.

T. H. WHITEHEAD.

The Harbour Master.

#

The Director of Public Works.

The Colonial Treasurer.

22

2:

The Registrar General.

25

The Attorney General.

>>

The Colonial Secretary.

The amendment was lost by a majority of 5.

The Bill was then read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED << AN ORDINANCE FOR THE INCORPORATION OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE HONGKONG AND SOUTH CHINA MASONIC BENEVOLENCE FUND."-Owing to the absence, through indisposition, of the Honourable C. P. CHATER, the second reading of this Bill was postponed.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned until Thursday, the 1st proximo, at 3 P.M.

Read and confirmed, this 2nd day of June, 1893.

ARATHOON SETH,

Clerk of Councils.

WILLIAM ROBINSON,

Governor.

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 8.

FRIDAY, 2ND JUNE, 1893.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(Sir WILLIAM ROBINSON, K.C.M.G.).

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (GEORGE THOMAS MICHAEL O'BRIEN, C.M.G.).

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

the Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART LOCKHART).

17

97

29

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the Colonial Treasurer, (NORMAN GILBERT MITChell-Innes). the Director of Public Works, (FRANCIS ALFRED COOPER).

""

the Harbour Master, (ROBERT MURRAY RUMSEY).

""

""

""

";

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS.

ABSENT:

The Honourable CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 25th ultimo, were read and confirmed. PAPERS LAID ON THE TABLE.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following papers:—

1. Secretary of State's Despatch No. 53, of March 24th, 1893, on the subject of Gaol

Extension. (No. 19.)

2. Registrar General's Report for 1892. (No. g.)

3. Correspondence with the Secretary of State on the subject of Retrenchment, and the Memorial of the Unofficial Members of the Legislative Council dated 12th January, 1893. (No. 3.)

REPORT OF THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the Report of the Finance Committee, dated the 25th May, 1893, (No. 3 of 1893).

REPORT OF THE PUBLIC WORKS COMMITTEE.-The Director of Public Works laid on the table the Report of the Public Works Committee, dated the 25th May, 1893, (No. 3 of 1893), and moved that it be adopted by the Council.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

RETRENCHMENT COMMITTEE.-The Governor intimated that, pursuant to the Secretary of State's Despatch No. 71 of the 21st April last, His Excellency purposed appointing a Committee consisting of the following gentlemen for the purpose of enquiring into possible retrenchment and reduction of offices in the Civil Service of the Colony, viz.:-

His Honour the Chief Justice, (Chairman).

The Honourable R. MURRAY RUMSEY, R.N., (Harbour Master).

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.་

C. P. CHATER.

J. J. KESWICK.

T. H. WHITEHEAD.

H. E. WODEHOUSE, C.M.G., Esquire, (Police Magistrate).

F. H. MAY, Esquire, (Captain Superintendent of Police).

NOTICES OF MOTIONS.-The Colonial Secretary gave notice that he would move the following motion standing in his name, at the next meeting of Council, viz. :—

That this Council do agree to the expenditure of a sum not exceeding $147,500 on providing

additional Gaol accommodation.

The Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD gave notice that at the next meeting of Council he would

move-

That a small Commission be appointed to investigate and report on the working of the Gap Rock Lighthouse, the telegraph communication therewith, and the methods of reporting and signal- ling generally the arrival of ships and steamers in the waters of the Colony.

18

NOTICES OF QUESTIONS.-The Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD gave notice that at the next meeting of Council he would ask the following questions:-

1. If the correspondence between the Government and myself on the subject of the appointment of the Honourable the Registrar General as Chairman of the Special Committee appointed by His Excellency the Governor to investigate and report on certain points connected with the Bill for the incorporation of the Pó Léung Kuk has been forwarded to the Right Honourable the Secretary of State for the Colonies, and if the Secretary of State has expressed any opinion as to the propriety or otherwise of that appointment.

2. Have the Government taken any steps, and if so what steps, to recover from the persons named in the report of the Commissioners appointed by His Excellency the Governor to enquire into and report on the Treasury defalcations, and from their sureties, the amounts of the money lost to the Government during the periods in which they respectively held office, and if not does the Government intend to take any action?

QUESTION.--The Honourable E. R. BELILIOS, pursuant to notice, asked the following question:-

Will the Government state whether in connection with the erection of the new lighthouse on Waglan Island there was any understanding or agreement between the Chinese Government and the Imperial British Government or between the Chinese Imperial Maritime Customs and the Colonial Government of Hongkong; also whether there was any special reason for the light- ing of the Eastern approach to the port of Hongkong being undertaken by the Chinese Imperial Maritime Customs.

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary replied.

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE FOR THE NATURALIZATION OF MEYER FREDERICKS."-The Honourable the Colonial Secretary moved the first reading of this Bill.

The Honourable the Attorney General seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED

AN ORDINANCE TO MAKE PROVISION FOR REGULATING THE KEEPING OF DOGS AND FOR THE PREVENTION OF THE IMPORTATION AND SPread of rabies.”—The Honourable the Attorney General moved the first reading of this Bill.

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED (6 AN ORDINANCE FOR THE ESTABLISHMENT AND INCORPORATION OF THE CHINESE SOCIETY FOR THE PREVENTION OF KIDNAPPING AND FOR THE PROTECTION OF WOMEN AND CHILDREN COMMONLY KNOWN AS THE PÓ LÉUNG KUK.'"-The Honourable the Registrar General moved the second reading of this Bill, and addressed the Council.

The Honourable Dr. Ho KAI seconded, and addressed the Council.

The Honourable E. R. BELILIOS addressed the Council.

The Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD addressed the Council.

1

The Honourable the Attorney General addressed the Council. Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Section 5.-The Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD moved that this section be amended by striking out at the beginning thereof the words "the Registrar General who shall be ex officio the President and also."

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary seconded. Question put.

A division was taken when there voted

For the amendment.

The Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD.

Against the amendment.

The Honourable E. R. BELILIOS.

21

>>

2

Η ΚΑΙ.

J. J. KESWICK.

The Harbour Master.

i

The amendment was lost by a majority of 7. Bill reported with other amendments. Council resumed.

32

The Director of Public Works.

>>

The Colonial Treasurer.

"}

The Registrar General.

>>

The Attorney General.

>

The Colonial Secretary.

{

19

BILL ENTITLED " AN ORDINANCE FOR THE INCORPORATION OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE HONGKONG AND SOUTH CHINA MASONIC BENEVOLENCE FUND."-Owing to the absence, through indisposition, of the Honourable C. P. CHATER, the second reading of this Bill was further postponed.

ADJOURNMENT.—The Council then adjourned until Monday, the 19th instant, at 3 P.M.

WILLIAM ROBINSON,

Governor.

Read and confirmed, this 19th day of June, 1893.

ARATHOON SETH,

Clerk of Councils.

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 9.

MONDAY, 19TH JUNE, 1893.

21

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(Sir WILLIAM ROBINSON, K.C.M.G.).

The Honourable the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

1,

2)

""

""

13

51

**

the Acting Registrar General, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON). the Colonial Treasurer, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES).

the Director of Public Works, (FRANCIS ALFRED COOPER). CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS.

ABSENT:

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (GEORGE THOMAS MICHAEL O'BRIEN, C.M.G.).

the Harbour Master, (ROBERT MURRAY RUMSEY).

"}

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 2nd instant, were read and confirmed.

FINANCIAL MINUTE.-His Excellency the Governor, in the absence of the Honourable the Colonial Secretary through indisposition, laid on the table the following Financial Minute, and moved that it be referred to the Finance Committee:-

C.S.0. 1924 of 1893.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to re-vote the sum of Six thousand Dollars, ($6,000), being the unexpended portion of the Government contribution to the reclamation in front of Marine Lots Nos. 95, 98 and 105.

Government House, Hongkong, 5th June, 1893.

The Attorney General seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

PAPERS LAID ON THE TABLE.-His Excellency the Governor laid on the table the following papers:

1. The Colonial Surgeon's Report for 1892. (No. 3.)

2. The Educational Report for 1892. (No. 3.)

3. Correspondence re Issue of Loan under Ordinance No. 2 of 1893. (No. 24.)

MOTION.-The Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD, pursuant to notice, made the following motion and addressed the Council.

That a small Commission be appointed to investigate and report on the working of the Gap Rock Lighthouse, the telegraph communication therewith, and the methods of reporting and signal- ling generally the arrival of ships and steamers in the waters of the Colony.

The Honourable J. J. KESWICK seconded and addressed the Council.

His Excellency the Governor addressed the Council, and intimated that he purposed appointing a Committee, consisting of:-

The Honourable the Harbour Master.

The Captain Superintendent of Police.

H. H. JOSEPH, Esquire.

E. F. ALFORD, Esquire.

J. H. SCOTT, Esquire.

H. HOPPIUS, Esquire.

G. B. DODWELL, Esquire.

to investigate and report on the working of the Gap Rock telegraph and the methods of reporting and signalling the arrival of vessels in the waters of the Colony.

+

22

QUESTIONS.-The Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD, pursuant to notice asked the following ques-

tions:

1. If the correspondence between the Government and myself on the subject of the appointment of the Honourable the Registrar General as Chairman of the Special Committee appointed by His Excellency the Governor to investigate and report on certain points connected with the Bill for the incorporation of the Pó Leung Kuk has been forwarded to the Right Honourable the Secretary of State for the Colonies, and if the Secretary of State has expressed any opinion as to the propriety or otherwise of that appointment.

2. Have the Government taken any steps, and if so what steps, to recover from the persons named in the report of the Commissioners appointed by His Excellency the Governor to enquire into and report on the Treasury defalcations, and from their sureties, the amounts of the money lost to the Government during the periods in which they respectively held office, and if not does the Government intend to take any action?

His Excellency the Governor replied to each of the questions.

The Honourable E. R. BELILIOS, pursuant to notice, asked the following question :--

Will the Government state whether in connection with the erection of the new lighthouse on Waglan Island there was any understanding or agreement between the Chinese Government and the Imperial British Government or between the Chinese Imperial Maritime Customs and the Colonial Government of Hongkong; also whether there was any special reason for the light- ing of the Eastern approach to the port of Hongkong being undertaken by the Chinese Imperial Maritime Customs.

His Excellency the Governor replied.

The Honourable E. R. BELILIOS gave notice that at the next Meeting of Council he would move-

That the Secretary of State be requested by telegraph to come to an early decision on the question of an expenditure of $60,000 for the erection of a residence at the Peak for His Excellency the Governor.

BILL ENTITLED "THE STATUTORY DECLARATIONS ORDINANCE, 1893."-The Honourable the Attorney General moved the first reading of this Bill.

The Honourable Dr. Ho KAI seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE FOR THE NATURALIZATION OF MEYER FREDERICKS."--The Honourable the Attorney General moved the second reading of this Bill, and addressed the Council.

The Honourable the Acting Registrar General seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed and Bill reported without amendment.

The Honourable the Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Honourable Dr. Ho KAI seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE TO MAKE PROVISION FOR REGULATING THE KEEPING of dogs and FOR THE PREVENTION OF THE IMPORTATION AND SPREAD OF RABIES."-The Honourable the Attorney General moved the second reading of this Bill, and addressed the Council.

The Honourable J. J. KESWICK seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed and Bill reported with amendments.

Standing Orders suspended on the motion of the Honourable the Attorney General.

The Honourable the Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Honourable J. J. KESWICK seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass. Bill passed.

23

7

BILL ENTITLED " AN ORDINANCE FOR THE INCORPORATION OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE HONGKONG AND SOUTH CHINA MASONIC BENEVOLENCE FUND."-The Honourable C. P. CHATER moved the second reading of this Bill, and addressed the Council.

The Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD Seconded.

The Honourable the Attorney General addressed the Council.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council in Committee on the Bill. Council resumed.

Bill reported with amendments.

BILL ENTITLED (C AN ORDINANCE FOR THE ESTABLISHMENT AND INCORPORATION OF THE CHINESE SOCIETY FOR THE PREVENTION OF KIDNAPPING AND FOR THE PROTECTION OF WOMEN AND CHILDREN COMMONLY KNOWN AS 'THE PÓ LÉUNG KUK.'"-The Honourable the Acting Registrar General moved the third reading of this Bill.

The Honourable Dr. Ho KAI seconded.

The Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD opposed the third reading of the Bill and moved its rejection. Motion not seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned until Monday, the 17th proximo, at 3 P.M.

Read and confirmed, this 17th day of July, 1893.

ARATHOON SETH,

Clerk of Councils.

WILLIAM ROBINSON,

Governor.

25

PROCEEDINGS

of a Special Meeting of the Legislative Council, held in the Council Chamber, Hongkong, on Wednesday, the 5th July, 1893.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(Sir WILLIAM ROBINSON, K.C.M.G.).

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (GEORGE THOMAS MICHAEL O'BRIEN, C.M.G.).

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

the Colonial Treasurer, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES).

31

>>

>>

the Director of Public Works, (FRANCIS ALFRED COOPER).

>>

ܳܕ

3)

the Harbour Master, (ROBERT MURRAY RUMSEY, R.N.). CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHItehead.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS.

MARRIAGE OF HIS ROYAL HIGHNESS THE DUKE OF YORK

AND

HER SERENE HIGHNESS THE PRINCESS VICTORIA OF TECK.

HIS EXCELLENCY said-Gentlemen, I am afraid that it may have been rather inconvenient to some of you to attend this special meeting this morning, but I will not detain you very long, and I am quite sure that you will not begrudge the few minutes that you will remain here when I tell you, as perhaps you already know, that the object of this special meeting is to consider the propriety of send- ing some congratulatory message to Her Majesty the Queen and the Royal Family in reference to the approaching marriage of His Royal Highness the Duke of York and Her Serene Highness the Princess Victoria of Teck. His Royal Highness is known to many gentlemen in the colonies, and probably to some in this Colony also. It is a little more than two years ago that I had the honour of entertaining him at Government House, Trinidad. I think that we all know that he is possessed of the most charming manner, amiable characteristics, and manly qualities. In all probability he will be the future King of England, and we all hope that he will be a worthy successor not only to his father but to Her Majesty the Queen, who has occupied the throne of Great Britain so incomparably for over fifty years. In regard to Her Serene Highness the Princess Victoria, we know that she is a charming English girl, daughter of one of the most popular Princesses in England, the Princess Mary of Cam- bridge, now the Duchess of Teck, and she seems to be as "sweet as English air can make her." If report is true she would seem fully to realise the dream of Tennyson in being "Queen Rose of the rosebud garden of girls."

Gentlemen, I am quite sure that to-day and to-morrow messages will be flashing along the tele- graph lines from India, Mauritius, and Ceylon, and from other Eastern colonies congratulating the Royal Family on this auspicious event, and I am also quite sure that the Unofficial Members of this Council and the community of Hongkong will wish that their congratulations should arrive at the Royal Throne at the same time as the others do.

In conclusion His Excellency moved the following resolution :-

"From the Governor of Hongkong to the Marquess of Ripon.

"The Council and Community of Hongkong ask your Lordship to convey to Her Majesty the Queen and the Royal Family their respectful congratulations on the marriage of the Duke of York and Princess Victoria of Teck."

The Honourable C. P. CHATER, in seconding the motion, said-Sir, during the period that I have been the Senior Unofficial Member of this Council no pleasanter duty has fallen to my lot than that of having the honour to second the resolution just proposed by your Excellency. Though colonists of one of the most distant outposts of the Empire, I may venture to say that we are second to none either in personal loyalty to the Throne or in those feelings of devotion and affection to the Royal Family which it is the happy privilege of all citizens of the British Empire to feel. The marriage of the son of the heir to the Royal and Imperial Crown to an English Princess specially appeals to us in both ways, and it is therefore both as Her Majesty's loyal subjects and in our capacity as private citizens that it is our duty and our delight to transmit to-day to the Royal Family our most respectful congratula- tions on this marriage, which it is our earnest hope will fulfil its auspicious promises.

Motion put and carried unanimously.

ADJOURNMENT.-His Excellency then adjourned the Council.

i

ARATHOON SETH, Clerk of Councils.

-|

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 10.

MONDAY, 17TH JULY, 1893.

27

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(Sir WILLIAM ROBINSON, K.C.M.G.).

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (GEORGE THOMAS MICHAEL O'BRIEN, C.M.G.).

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

55

the Acting Registrar General, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON).

""

the Colonial Treasurer, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES).

"}

the Director of Public Works, (FRANCIS ALFRED COOPER).

the Harbour Master, (ROBERT MURRAY RUMSEY, R.N.).

""

""

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 19th ultimo, were read and confirmed. PAPERS LAID ON THE TABLE.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following papers :-

1. The Blue Book for 1892, and the Report thereon. (No. 2.)

2. The Assessor's Report on the Assessment for 1893-94. (No. §.)

REPORT OF THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Colonial Secretary, by direction of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the Report of the Finance Committee, (No. 4).

QUESTIONS.-The Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD gave notice that at the next meeting of Council he would ask the following questions:-

1. Has the attention of the Government been directed to a letter in the "China Mail"

Saturday, 15th instant, on the subject of the lighthouse keepers at Gap Rock? Have the lighthouse keepers complained to the Harbour Master or to the Government direct in respect of their pay and position? Is there any connection between these complaints and the unsatis- factory condition of the working of the Gap Rock signalling arrangements? If any such complaints exist, will the Government direct the Commission appointed by His Excellency the "Governor on 19th June last to investigate and report on the working of the Gap Rock Lighthouse, the telegraphic communication therewith, &c., &c., also to investigate and report on these complaints?

2. What is the net amount in sterling which has been received by the Crown Agents in London in respect of the recent Hongkong Gold Loan? Has any portion been remitted to Hongkong, or drawn for by the Colonial Government, and if so, at what rates of exchange? How is the balance in the hands of the Crown Agents invested? If invested, what rate of interest is it earning? And what instructions have the Colonial Government sent to the Crown Agents since the closing of the Indian Mints to the free coinage of silver as to the disposal of the balance of the loan?

MOTION.-The Honourable E. R. BELILIOS, pursuant to notice, made the following motion, and addressed the Council:-

That the Secretary of State be requested by telegraph to come to an early decision on the question of an expenditure of $60,000 for the erection of a residence at the Peak for His Excellency the Governor.

28

The Colonial Secretary seconded and addressed the Council, suggesting at the conclusion that the motion be amended so as to read as follows:-

That an expenditure of $60,000 for the erection of a residence at the Peak for His Excellency

the Governor is desirable when funds to meet it are conveniently available.

A division then took place on the motion as amended.

For.

The Honourable E. R. BELILIOS.

Dr. Ho KAI.

Against.

The Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD.

""

C. P. CHATER.

The Harbour Master.

""

>>

The Director of Public Works. The Colonial Treasurer.

""

The Acting Registrar General.

**

The Attorney General.

The Honourable J. J. KESWICK and the Colonial Secretary did not vote.

Carried by a majority of 5.

BILL ENTITLED "THE STATUTORY DECLARATIONS Ordinance, 1893."-The Attorney General moved the second reading of this Bill.

The Honourable Dr. Ho KAI seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed, and Bill reported with amendments.

BILL ENTITLED " AN ORDINANCE FOR THE INCORPORATION OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE HONGKONG AND SOUTH CHINA MASONIC BENEVOLENCE FUND."-The Attorney General moved the re-commitment of the Bill.

The Honourable C. P. CHATER seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill re-committed.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed.

Bill reported with some verbal amendments.

The Attorney General then moved that the Bill be read a third time.

The Honourable C. P. CHATER seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

·Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

ADJOURNMENT.—The Council then adjourned sine die.

Read and confirmed, this 29th day of August, 1893.

ARATHOON SETH, Clerk of Councils.

WILLIAM ROBINSON,

Governor.

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 11.

TUESDAY, 29TH AUGUST, 1893.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR (Sir WILLIAM ROBINSON, K.C.M.G.).

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (GEORGE THOMAS MICHAEL O'BRIEN, C.M.G.).

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

وو

""

21

>>

*

the Colonial Treasurer, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES).

the Director of Public Works, (FRANCIS ALFRED COOPER).

the Harbour Master, (ROBERT MURRAY RUMSEY).

the Acting Registrar General, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON).

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS.

The Council met pursuant to notice.

29

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 17th ultimo, were read and confirmed. FINANCIAL MINUTES.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of the Governor, laid on the table the following Financial Minutes, and moved that they be referred to the Finance Committee:-

C.S.O. 1717 of 1893.

C.S.O.

1603 of 1893.

C.S.O. 1813 of 1893.

C.S.O. 1813 of 1893.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Six hundred Dollars, ($600), being the cost of furniture for Government House.

Government House, Hongkong, 27th July, 1893.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to re-vote the sum of Eighty thousand Dollars, ($80,000), being part of the sum voted in 1892, as the Government Contribution to the Praya. Reclamation Fund.

Government House, Hongkong, 10th August, 1893.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Five thousand Dollars, ($5,000), for repairs to Public Buildings.

Government House, Hongkong, 11th August, 1893.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One thousand and Five hundred Dollars, ($1,500), for repairs of Roads in Kowloon.

Government House, Hongkong, 11th August, 1893.

The Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

PAPERS LAID ON THE TABLE.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of the Governor, laid on the table the following papers :-

1. Report of the Director of the Observatory for 1892. (No. 23.)

2. Report on the progress of Public Works during the first half-year, 1893. (No. 8.)

3. Despatch from the Secretary of State transmitting copy of a note from the Chinese

Minister with reference to the Yellow River Inundation in 1887. (No. 29.)

4. Despatch from the Secretary of State conveying Her Majesty's thanks for the congratula- tions on the marriage of His Royal Highness the Duke of York and Her Serene Highness the Princess Victoria of Teck. (C. O. D. 108).

93

30

QUESTIONS.-Mr. WHITEHEAD, pursuant to notice, asked the following questions:-

on

1. Has the attention of the Government been directed to a letter in the "China Mail"

Saturday, 15th instant, on the subject of the lighthouse keepers at Gap Rock? Have the lighthouse keepers complained to the Harbour Master or to the Government direct in respect of their pay and position? Is there any connection between these complaints and the unsatis- factory condition of the working of the Gap Rock signalling arrangements? If any such complaints exist, will the Government direct the Commission appointed by His Excellency the Governor on 19th June last to investigate and report on the working of the Gap Rock Lighthouse, the telegraphic communication therewith, &c., &c., also to investigate and report on these complaints?

2. What is the net amount in sterling which has been received by the Crown Agents in London in respect of the recent Hongkong Gold Loan? Has any portion been remitted to Hongkong, or drawn for by the Colonial Government, and if so, at what rates of exchange? How is the balance in the hands of the Crown Agents invested? If invested, what rate of interest is it earning? And what instructions have the Colonial Government sent to the Crown Agents since the closing of the Indian Mints to the free coinage of silver as to the disposal of the balance of the loan?

The Colonial Secretary replied.

NOTICE OF MOTION.-Mr. WHITEHEAD gave notice that at the next Meeting of Council he would move the following resolution :-

That before proceeding with the second reading of the Morphine Ordinance of 1893 the Govern- ment lay on the table copies of any reports received from the Sanitary Board and the Medical Department on the subject of the consumption of Morphine and the practice of administering or injecting preparations of Morphine by unqualified persons.

BILL ENTITLED "THE MORPHINE ORDINANCE, 1893."-The Attorney General moved the first reading of this Bill.

Dr. Ho KAI seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED "THE STATUTORY DECLARATIONS ORDINANCE, 1893."-The Attorney General moved the recommitment of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill recommitted.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed.

Bill reported with some verbal amendments.

The Attorney General then moved that the Bill be read a third time.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned till Tuesday, the 12th proximo, at 3 P.M.

Read and confirmed, this 12th day of September, 1893.

ARATHOON SETH,

Clerk of Councils.

WILLIAM ROBINSON,

Governor.

:

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 12.

TUESDAY, 12TH SEPTEMBER, 1893.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR (Sir WILLIAM ROBINSON, K.C.M.G.).

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (GEORGE THOMAS MICHAEL O'BRIEN, C.M.G.).

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

the Colonial Treasurer, (NORMAN GILBERT MITChell-Innes).

31

››

""

""

the Director of Public Works, (FRANCIS ALFRED COOPER).

>>

the Harbour Master, (ROBERT MURRAY RUMSEY).

""

the Acting Registrar General, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON). CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

""

""

>>

>>

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD. EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 29th ultimo, were read and confirmed.

PAPERS LAID ON THE TABLE.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of the Governor, laid on the table the following papers :—

1. Correspondence on the subject of the recent defalcations in the Treasury. (No. 3.) 2. Correspondence on the subject of Morphine injections. (Nos. 30 & 31.)

93

3. Report of the Finance Committee (No. 5). MOTION.-Bill entitled The Morphine Ordinance, 1893.-Mr. WHITEHEAD, pursuant to notice, moved the following resolution, adding that the second reading of the Bill be postponed until next meeting

That the Government lay on the table copies of any reports received from the Sanitary Board, the Medical Department, the Honourable the Registrar General's Department, or any other Department, and the Captain Superintendent of Police, on the subject of the consumption of Morphine and the practice of administering or injecting preparations of Morphine by unqualified persons, as well as a copy of any Petition or Memorial received from the Opium Farmer, and the correspondence which has recently passed between the Opium Farmer, his Agents or Attorneys, and the Government on the subject of the Morphine question, the pre- parations of Morphine, and their sale and administration, before proceeding with the second reading of the Morphine Ordinance, 1893.

Mr. CHATER Seconded, and addressed the Council.

The Colonial Secretary addressed the Council.

Council divided on the motion for postponement of second reading.

For.

Mr. WHITEHEAD.

Mr. KESWICK.

Mr. CHATER.

Against.

Mr. BELILIOS.

Dr. Ho KAI.

The Acting Registrar General.

The Harbour Master.

The Director of Public Works.

The Colonial Treasurer.

The Attorney General.

The Colonial Secretary.

Motion lost by a majority of 5.

Bill read a second time, on the motion of the Attorney General seconded by the Colonial Secretary. Council in Committee on the Bill.

Bill reported with amendments.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned till Monday, the 18th instant, at 3 P.M.

Read and confirmed, this 18th day of September, 1893.

ARATHOON SETH,

Clerk of Councils.

WILLIAM ROBINSON,

Governor.

:

33

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 13.

MONDAY, 18TH SEPTEMBER, 1893.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(Sir WILLIAM ROBINSON, K.C.M.G.).

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (GEORGE THOMAS MICHAEL O'BRIEN, C.M.G.).

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

>>

""

>>

""

""

>>

**

the Colonial Treasurer, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES).

the Director of Public Works, (FRANCIS ALFRED COOPER).

the Harbour Master, (ROBERT MURRAY RUMSEY).

the Acting Registrar General, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON). CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 12th instant, were read and confirmed. MOTION. The Colonial Secretary gave notice that at the next Meeting of Council he would move the following resolution :-

That this Council do agree to the expenditure of a sum not exceeding $96,000 on Gaol extension. BILL ENTITLED "THE MORPHINE ORDINANCE, 1893."-The Attorney General moved the third reading of this Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put--that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned till Monday, the 25th instant, at 3 P.M.

I

Read and confirmed, this 25th day of September, 1893.

ARATHOON SETH,

Clerk of Councils.

WILLIAM ROBINSON,

Governor.

!

35

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, NO. 14.

MONDAY, 25TH SEPTEMBER, 1893.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(Sir WILLIAM ROBINSON, K.C.M.G.).

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (GEORGE THOMAS MICHAEL OBRIEN, C.M.G.).

the Colonial Treasurer, (NORMAN GILBERT Mitchell-Innes).

>>

""

the Director of Public Works, (Francis Alfred COOPER).

>>

the Harbour Master, (ROBERT MURRAY RUMSEY).

"}

}}

>>

the Acting Registrar General, (Alexander MacDONALD THOMSON). CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 18th instant, were read and confirmed.

The Colonial Secretary, pursuant to notice, moved the following resolution, and addressed the Council:-

That this Council do agree to the expenditure of a sum not exceeding $96,000 on Gaol extension. Mr. CHATER seconded and addressed the Council.

Mr. WHITEHEAD addressed the Council.

Question-put and agreed to.

QUESTION.-With His Excellency's permission, Mr. WHITEHEAD asked the following question

Is there any truth in the report that the Postmaster General at Singapore is about to be appointed to the Colonial Treasurership, Hongkong; and, if so, will His Excellency the Governor move the Secretary of State to refrain from making any new appointment until this Council has had an opportunity of considering and reporting on the question whether it is advisable to continue the office on its present footing.

His Excellency replied.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned sine die.

Read and confirmed, this 4th day of December, 1893.

ARATHOON SETH,

Clerk of Councils.

WILLIAM ROBINSON,

Governor.

L

:

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL. No. 15.

MONDAY, 4TH DECEMBER, 1893.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(Sir WILLIAM ROBINSON, K.C.M.G.).

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (GEORGE THOMAS MICHAEL OBRIEN, C.M.G.).

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

the Colonial Treasurer, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES).

the Harbour Master, (ROBERT MURRAY RUMSEY).

the Acting Registrar General, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON).

EDWARD BOWDLER.

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

;;

""

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELilios.

ABSENT:

The Honourable THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

The Council met pursuant to summons.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 25th September last, were read and confirmed.

NEW MEMBER. EDWARD BOWDLER, Esquire, Special Engineer in charge of the Praya Reclama- tion Works, took the oath of allegiance on his appointment to a seat on the Council in the room of the Director of Public Works absent on leave.

His Excellency then addressed the Council as follows:-

HONOURABLE GENTLEMEN OF THE LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL,

In meeting you again for the resumption of our legislative duties I am not in a position to announce to you any very marked improvement in the financial condition of the Colony. In November last year I expressed a hope that there might be a revival of prosperity in the fortunes of Hongkong during 1893, but although there are not wanting unmistakeable signs of better times in the future, that hope has not been realized to the extent that I anticipated. The Indian Silver Act and the proceedings of the United States Senate in reference to the Sherman Act have naturally affected the business of this Community as well as the business of the entire East. The dollar has fallen to an unprecedentedly low value, and the loss by Exchange in many of the transactions of this Government has, of course, been considerable.

Recently we have certainly not been troubled by many fluctuations in the rate of Exchange, and with the dollar at 2/4 or thereabouts, as it has been for the last 3 or 4 months, we may hope that silver has "touched bottom," and that a permanent rise in value may be the next change. But with the uncertainty that still surrounds this intricate and difficult question we cannot look for any early influx of capital into the Colony, or for any great increase in business unless some fixed international ratio should be established.

As the President of the United States recently observed, "what we want is good, sound "and stable money and a condition of confidence which will keep it in use." As the standard of value in a portion of the world is silver, and in the other part is in gold, commerce requires a steady par of Exchange between Gold and Silver.

There is, however, one point in connection with this subject to which I would call particular attention, and that is, that the fall of silver and the action of the Indian Govern- ment in regard to it, besides having improved the position of the tea-grower and exporter, has put new ventures, and profitable ones, within the reach of capitalists in China and Japan, as well as in this Colony. The Chinese are slow to begin anything new, but if the present state of affairs continues they will be compelled to produce and export many articles which they have hitherto imported from European and other countries.

The Japanese are quite alive to the situation so far as it concerns them, and are not only erecting new Cotton Mills, to the number of 20 it is said, but are about to take the Import Duty off Raw Cotton. It is possible therefore that we may soon see Japan, for a time, supplying China with goods which she formerly obtained from Europe or India. It seems anomalous that whilst England should be striving to extend her commerce and com- mercial relations in China on the one hand, she should on the other be countenancing measures which apparently have the effect of creating competition against herself and her own produc- tions in the East.

Under these circumstances the attention of the Community should be directed to the desirability of establishing Cotton Mills in Hongkong. The Government is in possession of several eligible sites, and if only capitalists, either European or Chinese, will come forward and invest their capital in such enterprises I will endeavour that so far as the acquisition of land is concerned they shall be treated with exceptional liberality. The success which has attended other efforts of this nature in Hongkong ought, under these favourable circum- stances, to lead to the introduction of additional local Industries, such as Cotton Spinning and Weaving, and no more fitting time than the present seems likely to occur. This matter is worthy therefore of the earnest consideration not only of this Community, but of capitalists in the neighbouring provinces in China.

In connection with the fall of silver and the scarcity of the circulating medium in Hong- kong and elsewhere in the East, it is probable, unless the Japanese Yen is made a legal tender, that action will shortly be taken in the direction of the coinage of a British Dollar. I under- stand that some of the Banks are in favour of this step, and that they have arrived at their conclusion in consequence of the lengthened period during which the Mexican Exchange has been unable to adapt itself to the fall in the price of silver. Should any application from the Banks in Hongkong urging the coinage of, and introduction into the Colony, of a British Dollar be received by the Government, I will use all my influence with the Home Government in support of that request.

I now lay upon the table the Estimates for 1894 and will briefly refer to their leading features.

The Estimated Revenue for 1893 was $1,906,396.

The Estimated Ordinary Expenditure $1,899,375, leaving a surplus of only $7,021. So far as can be judged the Revenue for 1893 will be about $2,050,000 and the Ex- penditure, exclusive of Extraordinary Expenditure chargeable against the Loan, will be about $1,940,000.

It will thus be seen that the Revenue of 1893 will probably be about $110,000 in excess of the Ordinary Expenditure, and consequently about $140,000 in excess of the Estimate.

This surplus is nearly accounted for by an increase in the amount of fees received for the Examination of Emigrants, and the profit on an increased import of Subsidiary Coins, which profit was $56,000 over the Estimate. Ample supplies of these Coins will be ordered as required; but absolute reliance cannot, of course, be placed on them as a source of steady Revenue.

The Estimated Revenue for 1894 is $2,007,210 and the Estimated Ordinary Expenditure $1,982,745. To this Expenditure must, however, be added $16,000 expended on Roads in Kowloon, and new streets in Kennedy Town which is chargeable against Current Revenue bringing the total Expenditure up to $1,998,745. These Estimates have been framed with the greatest possible caution, and show a probable Surplus of Revenue over Expenditure at the end of 1894 of $8,465. As in 1893 it may perhaps be found that the Revenue has been under-estimated, but it would not be safe to count upon such a contingency.

On an examination of the Estimates you will observe that the increased Expenditure of 1894 over that of 1893 is principally accounted for by the following items :—

Public Debt Military ...

Post Office

Pensions

Police

$30,236

37,647

15,880

6,860

6,992

Making a total of.......................$97,615

Owing to the fall in Exchange the provision for the Military Contribution alone in 1894, exceeds that of 1893 by $37,647. In 1891 the Colony found $228,572 for that pur- pose, it now has to find $320,000.

It is in a measure satisfactory that the Colony has not yet been, and I trust will not be hereafter, called upon to raise additional taxation to meet the many additional charges imposed upon it by the falling value of silver.

When the Appropriation Bill is moved the Public Officers specially concerned there- with will doubtless give you fuller information in regard to these items if you should desire

it.

.

1

39

At the close of last Session the vexed question of Gaol Extension was happily settled. I take this opportunity of repeating that the Government as well as the tax-payers are indebted to the Unofficial Committee appointed by me for their assistance in this matter which enabled a fair and reasonable compromise to be effected. In November 1892, when it was stated that the work would probably cost $250,000, it ought to have been explained that this was simply a rough estimate. The amount which was ultimately voted was based on carefully prepared specifications and estimates. But the difference between the two amounts, I should add in justice to our able Director of Public Works, was largely due to the Secretary of State having on my recommendation reduced his original requirements between November 1892 and the date on which the final vote was taken.

.

The Returns respecting the trade and shipping of this Port will, when completed and published, be found exceedingly interesting, not to say remarkable.

During the 10 months ending the 31st October last, there arrived in and sailed from Hongkong 7,243 European-constructed Vessels measuring 8,733,823 tons and 47,525 Junks measuring 3,191,068 tons making a total of 54,768 vessels and 11,924,891 tons.

These vessels carried 6,307,703 tons of cargo (discharged, shipped and in transit), and no less than 1,551,833 passengers.

The figures for the same period in 1892 were 59,380 vessels and 11,703,851 tons.

This large number of vessels with a lesser amount of tonnage was mainly due to the employment of numerous small Junks in the local trade connected with the Praya Recla-

mation.

The Returns for 1893 up to date show an increase of 109,000 tons in British ships and of 87,000 tons in Foreign ships of European construction. They also exhibit an increase in the Foreign Junk Trade of 290,000 tons.

During the past 10 months, i.e., from the 1st January to 31st October, Emigration has considerably improved. The number of Emigrants has been 73,265 as against 43,024 during the same period in 1892.

I am, as you are probably aware, anxious that a well organized system of Emigration to certain countries friendly with England should be adopted.

Such a scheme would be of great advantage not merely to this Colony but to thousands of industrious persons in China who have now but little opportunity of making a living, or of even obtaining the barest necessaries of life. It is unfortunate that the Chinese Government do not seem to view the matter in this light and no doubt recent events in a neighbouring Colony will tend to confirm them in the opinions they are believed to entertain on this subject.

The Revenue collected by the Harbour Department up to the 31st October was $164,231 ----showing an increase of $13,970 over the sum collected for the same period in the previous year.

With reference to Crime I may mention that the number of cases tried in the Supreme Court this year was a little above the average of the two preceding years. In 1891 there were 32 cases, in 1892 only 30 cases, the lowest record during the past 10 years. Up to the 30th September last there were 32 cases sent for trial. Two of these were especially serious, viz., that of ALVES for the Treasury defalcations in which the sentence passed was 6 years' imprison- ment with hard labour, and a murder case in which the sentence of death was passed and carried out. Until this penalty was exacted there had been no execution within the Colony for upwards of 10 years.

Amongst the 32 cases there was also one of wounding with intent to murder and 3 of robbery with violence. Out of these 32 charges, however, there was a verdict of acquittal, or no information, or a nolle prosequi in 14 instances, and out of the 47 prisoners brought up

for trial 21 were discharged.

During 1893 as in 1892 there was an absence of charges involving offences of a piratical character which is an encouraging feature in the Criminal statistics.

You will be pleased to be assured that owing to past legislation and the efforts of the Police, public gambling in the Colony has practically ceased to exist.

There has also been a great falling off in the number of cases of kidnapping of women and robbery with violence. So far as the Magistrates are able to judge they are of opinion that the Government is to be felicitated on the conspicuous absence of serious crime' in ilongkong.

On the other hand I regret to state that during the last few months there have been an unusual number of larcenies of money and valuables by servants from their masters' houses.

40

This I attribute in a great measure to losses sustained by servants in the Gambling Houses at Sham Shui Po and Kowloon City. I have addressed the Viceroy of Canton several times on this subject without much effect and am at this moment in correspondence with Her Majesty's Minister at Peking in regard to it. If the Chinese Government refuses to act this Government will be bound to consider whether some restrictions should not be placed on the owners of launches who are known to carry hundreds of gamblers daily between this City and the opposite coast. I shall hope that the Community in general would thoroughly support the Government if such a step should be decided upon.

With regard to Education I have to inform you that in addition to the ten Government Schools which were closed owing to insufficient attendance at the beginning of this year, two other Government Schools have been closed for the same reason. Seven of the less expensive and more popular Grant-in-Aid Schools have taken the place of the Schools thus closed.

Special attention has been bestowed on the educational needs of the Boat Population. For long years this class has been somewhat neglected. The extent of School accommoda- tion for them is now ample. It consists of 38 Private and 8 Public Schools in working order. The total number of Scholars is 1,578. Aberdeen has been supplied with a Grant-in-Aid School. I have recently appointed a Chinese School Attendance Officer with a view of stimulating the attendance at Schools of the Boat children in particular, and of Chinese children in general.

In the matter of additional accommodation local school managers have of late been particularly active. The Berlin Foundling House, the Roman Catholic Mission at Shauki- wan and the Basel Mission at To-kwa-Wan have this year provided new and suitable school buildings for the Chinese poor.

The Code of Regulations for Educational Grants-in-aid has been revised with the aim of raising the standard of Education.

Arrangements have been made by the Government to bring the West Point Reformatory under the provisions of Ordinance No. 19 of 1886 as a Certified Reformatory School for the reception of juvenile offenders. I trust that this will have the effect of reducing the gaol population and of preventing the contamination of the young which is certain to occur when they are brought into contact with the old offenders.

For the benefit of the Government Central School for Girls a Member of this Council has erected a handsome three-storied building which will soon be handed over to the Go- vernment.

Physical Drill, which was introduced a short time since in 11 schools, has during this year been carried a step further by the superaddition of a Cadet Corps subject to inspection by the military authorities. This Corps is popular, and in many ways and especially so far as physique and discipline are concerned will prove of great benefit to those who belong to it, or who may hereafter join it.

The need of a fixed standard of Chinese orthography in connection with local examin- ations has long been recognized. At the suggestion of the Government it has at last been supplied by the Revd. Dr. CHALMERS whose work in this, as in other cases, is admitted, by those who are capable of judging, to be a monument of learning and industry.

Examinations have been held for the Diploma of the College of Preceptors, and for London matriculation purposes. In addition to the Oxford Local Examinations provision has been made for the re-introduction into Hongkong of Cambridge Local Examinations.

These facts indicate not only progressive movement, but prove that as far as circum- stances will admit local Education is being assimilated to the system in force in the Educa- tional Institutions of the Mother Country.

I referred just now to the Cadet Corps, and some mention of the Volunteer Force should not be omitted. It numbers about 90 and every effort has been made to increase its numbers but without much result. It can therefore only be said that whilst it forms a most valuable nucleus, its practical utility depends upon its further expansion.

The Officers and especially the Commandant have done all in their power to ensure its being a success and active preparations are being made for its taking part in the mobilization of the Garrison in January. The new head quarters are nearing completion and will be a great convenience to members of the Force. I much wish that the Volunteer movement was looked on with greater favour, and received greater support from the Community generally than it appears to do at present.

There is every probability of Hongkong being shortly put into telegraphic communica- tion with the outer world, independently of connection with any Foreign territory. This is a subject of congratulation.

:

41

So far as I am aware it will not be necessary to trouble you with legislation of importance in the near future so that we may anticipate an unusually short session.

any

I am in communication with the Viceroy of Canton and Her Majesty's Plenipotentiary in Peking in reference to the opening up of the West River to Foreign trade, and also in regard to the question of preferential duties granted on junk carried tea to the detriment of Foreign shipping. These are two weighty matters affecting existing trade and its possible extension. A favourable solution of them would be hailed with great satisfaction by me in consequence of the undoubted benefits which would accrue therefrom to the Mercantile Community of Hongkong.

And here, Gentlemen, it is not inappropriate for me to refer to the happy relations which for the last two years have existed between the Government and the Chamber of Commerce and which it will always be my endeavour to maintain unimpaired.

We have to be thankful for exemption from serious epidemic or destructive storms in 1893. In the late typhoon it is true that Gap Rock Light was considerably injured and that costly repairs will have to be effected; but otherwise thanks to the timely warnings issued from the Observatory the damage done to property was infinitesimal, and little or no loss of life occurred.

The general behaviour of the Chinese during the past year has been most exemplary, and the criminal class has largely decreased.

In conclusion, Gentlemen, I shall not lay myself open to the charge of being over-sanguine when I assert that there is distinct evidence that the condition of the Chinese Community is improving, that business is more settled, and that the prospects are better than they have been at any time during the past three years. It is my earnest desire, in which you will cordially join, that still brighter and happier times may be at no distant date in store for all classes of Residents in this important and progressive Colony.

Council Chamber, 4th December, 1893.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

6;

RULES UNDER THE SUPREME COURT ORDINANCE, 1873."-The Colonial Secretary laid on the table certain "Rules made by the Chief Justice, under Section 24 of The Supreme Court Ordinance, 1873, (No. 12 of 1873), for the taxing of costs in the Summary Jurisdiction of the Supreme Court, and gave notice that at the next meeting of Council he would move their revision and approval.

27

APPROPRIATION BILL, 1894.-The Colonial Secretary gave notice that at the next meeting of Council he would move the first reading of a Bill entitled An Ordinance to apply a sum not exceeding Two Millions Three hundred and Forty-seven thousand, Two hundred and Forty-five Dollars to the Public Service of the Year 1894.

SUPPLEMENTARY APPROPRIATION BILL, 1892.-The Colonial Treasurer gave notice that at the next meeting of Council he would move the first reading of a Bill entitled An Ordinance to authorise the Appropriation of a Supplementary Sum of Two hundred and Thirty-five thousand One hundred and Eleven Dollars and Ninety-three Cents to defray the Charges of the Year 1892.

Mr. CHATER acknowledged the interest with which the Council had heard His Excellency's address.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned until 3 P.M. to-morrow, the 5th instant.

Read and confirmed, this 5th day of December, 1893.

ARATHOON SETH,

Clerk of Councils.

WILLIAM ROBINSON,

Governor.

:

40

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 16.

TUESDAY, 5ȚII DECEMBER, 1893.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(Sir WILLIAM ROBINSON, K.C.M.G.).

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (GEORGE THOMAS MICHAEL OBRIEN, C.M.G.). the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

3

""

""

the Colonial Treasurer, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES).

the Harbour Master, (ROBERT MURRAY RUMSEY).

the Acting Registrar General, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON). EDWARD BOWDLER.

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

""

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

"

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS.

ABSENT:

The Honourable THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held yesterday, were read and confirmed.

RULES UNDER "THE SUPREME COURT ORDINANCE, 1873."-The Colonial Secretary, pursuant to notice, moved the approval of certain Rules made by the Chief Justice on the 24th ultimo under Section 24 of The Supreme Court Ordinance, 1873, (No. 12 of 1873), for the taxing of costs in the Summary Jurisdiction of the Supreme Court.

The Attorney General seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Rules approved.

APPROPRIATION BILL, 1894.-The Colonial Secretary, pursuant to notice, moved the first reading of a Bill entitled An Ordinance to apply a sum not exceeding Two millions Three hundred and Forty-seven thousand, Two hundred and Forty-five Dollars to the Public Service of the Year 1894.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

SUPPLEMENTARY APPROPRIATION BILL, 1892.-The Colonial Treasurer, pursuant to notice, moved the first reading of a Bill entitled An Ordinance to authorise the Appropriation of a Supplementary Sum of Two hundred and Thirty-five thousand One hundred and Eleven Dollars and Ninety-three Cents to defray the Charges of the Year 1892.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned until 3 P.M. on Wednesday, the 13th instant.

Read and confirmed, this 13th day of December, 1893.

ARATHOON SETH,

Clerk of Councils.

WILLIAM ROBINSON,

Governor.

40

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 17.

WEDNESDAY, 13TH DECEMBER, 1893.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR (Sir WILLIAM ROBINSON, K.C.M.G.).

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (GEORGE THOMAS MICHAEL OBRIEN, C.M.G.).

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

the Colonial Treasurer, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES).

""

""

""

the Harbour Master, (ROBERT MURRAY RUMSEY).

""

""

"

""

the Acting Registrar General, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON). EDWARD BOWDLER.

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK. HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS.

ABSENT:

The Honourable THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 5th instant, were read and confirmed. STANDING COMMITTEES.-His Excellency appointed the following Committees :-

(a) Finance Committee,-

The Colonial Secretary, Chairman.

All the Members of Council, except the Governor.

(b) Law Committee,-

The Attorney General, Chairman.

The Registrar General.

The Honourable J. J. KESWICK.

The Honourable Ho KAI.

The Honourable E. R. BELILIOS.

(c) Public Works Committee,

The Honourable E. BOWDLER, Chairman.

The Colonial Treasurer.

The Honourable C. P. CHATER.

The Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD.

The Honourable E. R. BELILIOS.

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE TO APPLY A sum not exceeding Two MILLIONS THREE HUNDRED AND FORTY-SEVEN THOUSAND, TWO HUNDRED AND FORTY-FIVE DOLLARS TO THE PUBLIC SERVICE OF THE YEAR 1894."-The Colonial Secretary moved the second reading of this Bill.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

The Colonial Secretary moved that the Council do resolve into Committee.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question--that the Council do resolve into Committee-put and agreed to.

In Committee the Colonial Secretary moved that the Bill be referred to the Finance Committee. The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

BILL ENTITLED (6

AN ORDINANCE TO AUTHORISE THE APPROPRIATION OF A SUPPLEMENTARY SUM OF TWO HUNDRED AND THIRTY-FIVE THOUSAND ONE HUNDRED and EleveN DOLLARS AND NINETY-THREE CENTS TO DEFRAY THE CHARGES OF THE YEAR 1892."-The Colonial Treasurer moved the second reading of this Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

The Colonial Treasurer moved that the Council do resolve into Committee.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-that the Council do resolve into Committee-put and agreed to.

In Committee the Colonial Treasurer moved that the Bill be referred to the Finance Committee. The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned sine die.

Read and confirmed, this 21st day of December, 1893.

ARATHOON SETH,

Clerk of Councils.

WILLIAM ROBINSON,

Governor.

.

7

4/

C.O.D.

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL,

COUNCIL, No. 18.

THURSDAY, 21ST DECEMBER, 1893.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(Sir WILLIAM ROBINSON, K.C.M.G.).

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (GEORGE THOMAS MICHAEL OBRIEN, C.M.G.).

the Colonial Treasurer, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES).

""

""

""

"}

"1

the Harbour Master, (ROBERT MURRAY RUMSEY).

the Acting Registrar General, (ALEXANDER MACDONALD THOMSON). EDWARD BOWDLER.

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK. HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS.

The Council met pursuant to notice.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 13th instant, were read and confirmed.

178 of 1893.

RETRENCHMENT COMMITTEE.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency, read a Despatch from the Right Honourable the Secretary of State for the Colonies expressing his regret that the Colonial Government and the Unofficial members of this Council had not been able to agree to the composition of this Committee, but hoping at a later date to be able to make proposals for a mixed Committee, composed partly of Official members and partly of Unofficial members which will be accept- able to the Colony generally.

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE TO APPLY A SUM NOT EXCEEDING TWO MILLIONS THREE HUNDRED AND FORTY-SEVEN THOUSAND, TWO HUNDRED AND FORTY-FIVE DOLLARS TO THE PUBLIC SERVICE OF THE YEAR 1894."-The Colonial Secretary moved that the Council resume Committee on the Bill.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put .d agreed to.

Council in Comittee on the Bill.

On the motion of the Colonial Secretary, seconded by Mr. CHATER, an item of $500 was added to the vote for Miscellaneous Services, as a Grant-in-aid of the Band of the Hongkong Regiment.

Council resumed, and Bill reported with amendments.

The Colonial Secretary moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

BILL ENTITLED " AN ORDINANce to authoriSE THE APPROPRIATION OF A SUPPLEMENTARY SUM OF Two Hundred AND THIRTY-FIVE THOUSAND ONE HUNDRED AND ELEVEN DOLLARS AND NINETY-THREE CENTS TO DEFRAY THE CHARGES FOR THE YEAR 1892."-The Colonial Treasurer moved that the Council resume Committee on the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed, and Bill reported without amendments.

The Colonial Treasurer moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned.

Read and confirmed, this 7th day of March, 1894.

ARATHOON SETH,

Clerk of Councils.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

Governor.

No. of

Deaths.

750

800

Mean

Temperature.

January.

February.

600

90

590

888

580

86

570

84

560

82

550

80

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530

76

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74

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72

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68

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66

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64

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56

420

54

410

52

400

50

390

-48

380

46

.370

44

360

42

350

40

325

300

March.

April,

May.

HIGHEST,

TEMPER-

ATTRE

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78

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89 90

89 91

85

78

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65

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70 78 87: 89

64 60 69

88: 83 93 88 90 91

70 79 76 73

68 (1

Can 71'on salgo 04

1887.

DEATHS FROM ALL CAUSES FO

June.

July.

August.

September.

October.

November.

December.

January.

February.

March.

April.

May.

1883.

August.

September.

October.

November.

December.

:

7

10

5

556 45

45

212

78 74 72 70 78. 87: 89 88 90 91 88 83 83

12

75 68 76 7

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92 90, 90

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DEATHS FROM ALL CAUSES FOR THE FIVE YEARS ENDING 31ST

1888.

I 1889.

April.

May.

Jung.

July.

August.

September.

October.

November.

December.

January.

February.

March.

April.

73 68

76

53

NDING 31ST DECEMBER, 1891.

1890.

December.

January.

February.

March.

April.

May.

June.

July.'

September.

August.

October.

November.

December.

January.

February.

38 20

82

33

222

225

49 60 72

50 1530 15'30 (12 30 65 '99 er lan 21 en 25 100 F0

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1891.

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April.

May,

June.

July.

August.

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October.

November.

December.

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5

6

10

8

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17

16

15

11

13

19

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26

365

25

21

23

223

ra

No. of

Deaths.

750

Mean

Temperature.

January.

600

90

590

888

580

86

570

84

560

82

550

80

540

78

530

76

520

71

510

72

500

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41

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42

350

40

325

300

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70%

LOWEST,

49

43

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BAROMETER

MEAN.

February.

March.

April.

May.

1887.

June.

July.

August.

September.

October.

November.

December.

January.

February.

March.

April.

May.

78: 82 88

2

89

88

90 89 91 85 78

5+

56

67

73

74 73

73 65

88888

a

56

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2

212

70 78

45

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87: 89 88 · 90; 91

79 76 54 60 69 70

88 83

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78 68

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NOTE.-Plain line indicates the nur

1983.

• "

"SUNT"

August.

September.

October.

November.

December.

13.

1

I 1889.

1890.

August.

September.

Octobor.

November.

December.

January,

February.

March.

April.

May.

Juño.

July.

September.

October.

August.

November.

December.

Jundary,

February.

March.

April.

May.

June.

July.'

August.

September.

October.

November.

December.

88 90: 91

88; 83

*

70 79 76 73 68

93 75) 68\ 76 77 81

=

53 52 43 54 61

69

2

90. 92: 90 90 87 78

74 78

76

8490 92.9090

73 68 76

76. 70 63 53

6/ 49

60

+3

22

91 94 83

355

3333

72 72 72 66

66

55

29 68 29.69 29.71 29.89 30 043010 30.1480 19 30.15 30.08 29.93 29.85 29 78 20.74 29 74 29 83 99.90 30 05 30 15 30 15:30 08:30 05 29 95 29.84 29.77 29.73 29.77 29.80 29.08 30.46

E.—Plain line indicates the number of deaths, the Curved line mean temperature, and the Dotted line rain-fall in inches.

tted line rain-fall in inches.

f

68 76

22 25

220

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N

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18

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Jased

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*

6

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6

11

10

«{

1890.

January.

February,

March.

April.

May.

June.

July.

August.

September.

October.

November.

December.

January.

February.

March.

April.

May.

June.

1891.

July.

September.

August.

October.

November.

December,

Inches.

26

25

21

23

22

21

20

19

18

17

16

15

14

13

FALL.

313

No. 22

93-

HONGKONG.

THE COLONIAL SURGEON'S REPORT FOR 1892.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor, on the 19th June, 1893.

GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL,

HONGKONG, 9th May, 1893.

SIR,-I have the honour to forward my annual Report for the year 1892, of the work done in the different Establishments under my supervision together with the reports of the Superintendent of the Government Civil Hospital, the Medical Officer in charge of the Gaol and the Government Analyst.

POLICE.

The admissions to Hospital show a decrease of 74, being 496 as compared with 570 in 1891. The deaths were 7, the same as the two previous years. Three died in Hospital, one European and two Indians, the cause of death in all three of these cases was Phthisis. One Indian and two Chinese died while away on leave, and one Chinese was found drowned, his boat was on the praya, but how he got into the water, there was no evidence to show.

The admissions to Hospital from the various sections of the Force for the past ten years are given in the following table :-

Europeans.

Indians.

Chinese.

Admissions to Hospital, 1883,

.113.....

Do.,

1884,

87......

246...... 224....

239

........175

Do.,

1885,

...124....

Do.,

1886,.

.138.....

Do.,

1887,.....

..........139.

Do.,

1888, ...........147.

208..

...

......163

.243...............221

293

279...........

..187 ...231

Do.,

1889,.....

............166..

.230...............194

.254.

179

Do.,

.285...............118

Do.,

224...............120

Do.,

1890,. .............149.

1891,...............169.

1892,...............152..........

From this it will be seen that there is a decided decrease in sickness amongst the Europeans, 17 admissions less than in 1891, and the rate of sickness amongst this portion of the Force is even better than is shown in this table as there were 11 more Europeans in the Police Force than in 1891, the number being 128 as compared with 117.

The Indian portion of the Force shows a still greater improvement, showing a decrease of 41 admissions, with only a decrease of 1 on the strength, 227 in 1891, and 226 in 1892.

The Chinese show an increase of 2 admissions with a decrease of 8 on the strength, being 350 in 1891, and 342 in 1892, but their average rate of sickness shows a very great decrease as compared with former years.

Table I shows the sickness and mortality in the Force for the different months of the year.

Table II gives the average strength rate of sickness and mortality.

Table III shows the admissions to Hospital from the different stations and districts in each month of the year.

Aberdeen and Pokfulum for the first five months only sent in one case, but from June to November were as bad as ever, in spite of the improvements. Stonecutters' Island and No. 1 Station at Jardine's Gates are the sanitariums at present. No cases have come in from them for two years.

The Peak Stations, Gap and Mountain Lodge, don't seem to agree with either Europeans or Indians, the Chinese got off much better than in 1891.

314

The following table gives the total admissions to Hospital, and deaths in the Force for the last ten years:-

1883,

1884,

1885,

1886,

1887,

....

1888,

1889,

1890,

1891,

1892,

Admissions.

Deaths.

599

10

486

7

495

9

.. 602...

14

619

9

657 ...

15

590

14

582

7

570

7

496

7

TROOPS.

There was a very great increase in the number of Troops in the Colony last year, 42 added to the White troops, and 764 to the Black troops, due chiefly to the arrival of the new Hongkong Regiment. There was a good deal of sickness amongst this Regiment during their first summer, but they have greatly improved and now for a long time have suffered very little from climatic causes. The Europeans still suffer very much and the average of sickness and deaths among them increase year by year.

Table IV gives the average strength, sickness and mortality amongst White and Black Troops. The accommodation for the troops has not increased in proportion to their numbers. The barracks are mostly old, and the additional accommodation seems to consist of Chinese houses that have been renovated and improved in the lower levels; though many additional out-stations have been added and a Sanitarium at the Peak. The new Regiment are in a camp composed of matsheds at Kowloon. The following table gives the sickness and mortality among the troops for the past ten years :-

1883,

1884,

Admissions.

1,105...... .1,097.

Deaths.

..10

...12

1885,

.1,190....

24

1886,

....1,607.

9

1887,

.1,749.

.......14

1888,

.1,485...

.21

1889,

.1,732....

.16

1890,

1,915......

.15

1891,

.1,851.....

....17

1892,

2,844...

....31

The addition of 812 unacclimatized troops have to be considered and I think there will be a considerable improvement in 1893. The average strength for 1891 was 1,552 men, for 1892, 2,370.

GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL.

The Superintendent in his report brings to notice some deficiencies in the Hospital accommodation which I hope will in part be remedied during the present year. I would greatly prefer to have had an entirely new Hospital as was at first intended, but in the old days those who knew the requirements of the peculiar climate of Hongkong were not allowed any voice in the matter, a plan for a new Hospital was sent out from Home at a cost of $250,000. The plan of the Hospital was quite unsuit- able for our sickliest season, the summer months, and the cost beyond our means. We were, therefore, obliged to meet the emergency as best we could. My predecessors had been fighting for a new Hospital for five years before I came and had not Providence helped by blowing down the old Hospital and burning down its substitute, we might have still been in a great deal worse condition than we are

now.

The accommodation in the old building used for a Hospital was not equal to that of the wing now used for Fever and Venereal cases. The admissions were about half the number and the deaths considerably more.

315

The nursing staff has been all that could be desired with the exception of the Junior Wardmasters, with whom we have had the usual trouble and are still seeking a remedy.

Mr. LUCAS, the Apothecary, had given notice of his wish to retire on the expiration of his three years' engagement to my great regret as he was a very superior Officer, and during the illness and absence on leave of Mr. CROW, the Government Analyst, did his duties tnost satisfactorily; but as he leaves for a better appointment at Home, he is to be congratulated and will, I am sure, give the same satisfaction to his new employers as he has done during his whole term of service here.

The Superintendent's report is a most exhaustive one and I agree entir ly with all he has said. His work has very much increased with the absence of Dr. Lowson on duty at the Hygeia, the new Small-pox Hospital Hulk, stationed on the other side of the Harbour. The latter Officer's marvellous escape from the wreck of the Bokhara was a great source of congratulation to us, and the more so that he escaped with but trifling injuries and was soon able to resume his duty. He has done good work on the Hygeia and has had a considerable amount of trouble in organizing the arrangements for the patients and staff of the new Hulk, a duty he has performed most satisfactorily and successfully.

The past year was notable, as far as the Hospital was concerned, for the great diminution in the severer types of climatic disease.

The following table shows the number and classification of those brought to Hospital for the past ten years:-

1883. 1884. 1885. 1886. 1887. 1888. 1889. 1890. 1891. 1892.

Police,......

599

486

495

602

619

657

590

582

570

496

Board of Trade,

110

60

100

132

103

153

135

110

135

157

Private paying Patients,...

260

259

283

381

324

313

402

527

464

378

Government Servants,..

105

96

124

144

147

159

135

191

179

168

Police Cases,

227

231

238

142

208

242

252

264

240

232

Destitutes,

201

222

270

222

255

248

279

283

279

284

1,502 1,354 1,510 1,623 1,656

1,772

1,793 1,957 1,867 1,715

This table is most satisfactory in showing a decrease of sickness amongst the Police and Govern- ment servants also a small diminution of Police cases.

The percentage of deaths to admissions is the lowest with one exception in the past ten years, 3.96. See Table VI. Of the 68 deaths, 27 were in a hopeless condition when admitted, 23 dying within 24 hours, and 4 within 48 hours.

The following table gives the admissions and deaths in this Hospital for the past ten years:-

1883,

1884,

1885,

1886,

1887,

1888,

1889,

1890,

1891, 1892,

Admissions.

1,502.....

Deaths.

..70

.1,354..

.50

1,510......

.....76

1,623..

...79

1,656....

..89

1,772..............

...80

..1,793..

............77

..1,957........

..98

1,

.,867.....

...84

..1,715............

....68

The Superintendent's exhaustive report and appendix shows no diminution in the interest and energy expendled in the performance of his duties which were more than usually heavy this year as Dr. Lowson, the Assistant Superintendent, was away on leave for a considerable portion of the summer months.

SMALL-POX HOSPITAL AND HULK HYGEIA.

There were thirteen cases of Small-pox treated, six in Small-pox Hospital, and seven on the Hygeia, of these two died. Seven cases were Europeans, of whom one died. Three Coloured cases, no deaths. Three Asiatics, one death. See Table VII.

PUBLIC MORTUARY.

Table VIII gives the returns of dead bodies sent to the Mortuary for examination. The total number was 131, of these 54 were found to be caused by disease, 51 Accidental, 19 Suicidal, and 7 Homicidal deaths.

316

VICTORIA GAOL.

The following table gives the number of admissions to the Gaol and the daily average number of prisoners for the past ten years :—

Total No. admitted to Gaol.

3,486..

Daily average No. of Prisoners.

542.15

1883,

1884,

4,023.

552.00

1885,

...3,610......

....530.00

1886,

..4,600.........

....674.00

1887,

4,302.

....584.00

1888,

.3,627

.531.00

1889,

..3,705....

.581.00

1890,

.3,444..

.566.00

1891,

..5,231..

....507.00

1892,

5,046...

......515.00

There is a decrease in the admissions to Gaol of 185 as compared with 1891, but an increase in the daily average number of prisoners in Gaol of 8. The great increase in the admissions to Gaol on the past two years is due to the Gambling Ordinance entirely. That is to say that an increase of about 1,700 prisoners for a week or fourteen days each, 80 per cent. of whom gamble to the extent of 10 cash at a time, (less than a third part of a penny), $1—2/9 or 1,030 cash, compared with whom boys at home tossing for half pence in the gutters are opulent gamblers. Most of them are miserable wretches and have added largely to the increase of patients in the Gaol Hospital and out-patients in the cells, getting no work or very little to do, medical treatment and extra diet. In any case less work and better food than they get outside for the great majority of these prisoners.

Even with this great increase of sickness compared with former years, 1,035 cases treated in and out of Hospital there were only six deaths. One of these was an Opium smoker, death caused by rupture of a duodenal ulcer and peritonitis setting in, this death can hardly be put down to the Opium habit.

LUNATIC ASYLUMS.

The European Lunatic Asylum was unusually full this year, Sixteen cases were received and one death occurred. Four coloured lunatics were admitted, no deaths occurred.

In the Chinese Asylum, thirty-one cases were admitted and three deaths occurred.

TUNG WAH HOSPITAL.

The number of cases admitted to the Hospital during the year was 2,455. Of these 1,365 were discharged, 1,090 died; among these deaths were 353 received in a moribund condition and dying within 24 hours. 112 remained in Hospital at the end of the year.

In the Small-pox Wards there were 50 cases admitted, 12 were discharged, 38 died, the majority of these deaths were young children.

2,227 Vaccinations were performed. Of these 230 were done in the out-stations by the visiting vaccinators of the Hospital. Calf lymph from the Vaccine Institute was supplied to this Hospital by my Department.

VACCINE INSTITUTE.

This was first opened in the spring to supply Calf Lymph for the use of the new troops that arrived for the Hongkong Regiment. During the summer, Mr. LADDS, who was appointed Super- intendent of the Institute, conducted a series of experiments and the real work began in October. I cannot report satisfactorily till next year as real work only began in the last three months of 1892. The calf lymph supplied is good and I calculate the expenses should be $50 a month when it is in full working order and its earning power be at least $150 a month, as there has been a great demand from the local Dispensaries and also from the Coast Ports.

Mr. LADDS has been appointed Superintendent, but his time is fully occupied by his duties as Veterinary Surgeon to the Sanitary Board and he has to do the most part of this work in his leisure hours often after dark; and as the Institute ought to be a very paying business, I do not think he should be called upon to do this work gratuitously as at present. It is work that was never contem- plated in his original appointment and his own particular duties have increased very much since he was originally appointed.

Moreover, the work is not in his own Department under the Sanitary Board, but he is called upon to do work in my Department gratuitously as we have no one capable of doing this work able to give sufficient time to it.

LOCK HOSPITAL.

317

This name is a misnomer now, it had better be altered to Women's Hospital for Venereal Disease. There is no Lock now, the patients that can leave their beds during the day go out to visit their friends, those who come into Hospital and are confined to their beds receive visits from their friends. None of them are compelled to stay in Hospital against their will.

Under the Lock system when the Contagious Diseases Ordinance was enforced the women of the different houses were notified by the Inspectors to attend at the Hospital on certain dates and the Inspector and his Interpreter were there to see that they did attend. Now, they attend when they please receiving no notification. No Police are allowed at the Hospital. The Matron keeps the record of those that attend and the women are all well aware that there is no compulsion in the matter.

Last year, 314 women attended Hospital as compared with 276 in 1891. 12,215 examinations were made. 57 women were admitted to Hospital. There is an increase in the number of women who came to Hospital this year, 38 more than last year, a decrease in the number of examinations made of 498 as compared with 1891. There were 12,215 voluntary submissions to examination. If these 314 women had been under compulsory examination, the lowest total of examinations made would have been 16,330 probably over 18,000 and we should have had considerably more than 100 patients in Hospital.

Many of the women are half-casts and speak English well. I can always find fluent interpreters among them when wanted, all of them can speak Pidgin-English more or less well, some of them speak several Continental languages.

Amongst the Military though there is an increase in the number of venereal cases generally, the number that contracted constitutional disease was 58 as compared with 82 in 1891.

In the Police there was a decrease of general venereal disease and of the constitutional form 3 cases as compared with 5 in 1891.

In the Government Civil Hospital, the number of venereal cases show a small decrease, the number of cases of constitutional disease was 15 as compared with 12 in 1891.

HEALTH OF THE COLONY.

The percentage of deaths among the Foreign Residents is slightly higher this year being 1.79 as compared with 1.36 in 1891, but is very much lower than any of the previous years. See Table XVI. A glance at the two following tables for the European and Chinese communities shows a great improvement every year owing to improved sanitation of the Colony.

DEATHS AMONG EUROPEANS (BRITISH AND FOREIGN).

FEVERS.

VOMITING

YEARS.

DIARRHEA. Cholera. AND

TOTAL.

Enteric.

Simple Continued. Typhus.

PURGING.

1873,

1874,

1

1875,

1

64 10

2

17

25

4

17

26

18

24

1876,

1

14

24

1877,

5

8

1878,

3

15

22

10

...

27

9

29

1879,

3

21

1880,

1.

12

1881,

2

17

::

14

38

1

10

24

10

29

.1882,

10

13

1

13

37

1883,

1

9-

9

...

19

1884,

7

4

12

23

1885,

7

11

9

19

46

1886,

5

8.

5

18

1887,

10

6

2

25

1888,

5

4

16

25

50

.....

1889,

2

3

10

1

16

1890, 1891,

4

4

4

12

5

1

4

5

15

1892,

1

6

7

318

YEARS.

DEATHS AMONG CHINESE.

FEVERS.

VOMITING

DIARRHEA. CHOLERA. AND

TOTAL.

PURGING.

Enteric.

Simple Continued.

Typhus.

1873, 1874,

12

96

16

195

:

319

125

46

...

231

402

1875,

31

291

288

612

1876,

94

343

259

696

1877,

145

370

·

1878,

89

481

33

1879,

116

733

21

1880,

309

373

1881,

438

168

38

1882,

679

71

1883,

262

571

1884,

132

600

1885,

105

755

1886,

9

772

1887,

9

441

1888,

2

299

1889,

1

363

1890,

342

NNN5: NW: 8: 18∞

311

834

701

1,304

608

1,478

348

1,030

435

1,079

465

1,215

660

1,496

2

301

1,035

561

7

176

1,604

10

326

19

1,136

25

276

13

764

2

361

17

236

917

180

7

551

216

1

562

1891,

6

427

329

9

771

1892,

446

231

677

Choleraic Diarrhoea 1.

The Government Analyst's report is a very satisfactory one and is very interesting as regards the Bread, Milk and Water supplies.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your obedient Servant,

The Honourable G. T. M. O'BRIEN, C.M.G.,

Colonial Secretary.

PH. B. C. AYRES,

Colonial Surgeon.

POLICE.

1

Table I.-Shewing the ADMISSIONS into and DEATHS in the GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL during each Month of the Year 1892.

MONTHS.

EUROPEANS.

INDIANS.

319

CHINESE.

TOTAL TOTAL Admissions. Deaths.

Deaths.

Admissions. Deaths. Admissions. Deaths. Admissions.

Remaining on the 1st Jan.,

1892,

6

9

18

January,.

11

22

42

February,

11

14

33

March,

13

16

31

April,

11

7

21

May,

9

13

11

33

June,

11

25

10

46

July,.

16

21

15

52

August,

17

21

17

55

September,

8

19

9

36

October,

11

17

16

44

...

November,

12

1

20

8

40

December,

16

20

9

45

Total,......

152

1

224

:

2

120

:

496

Co

3

J. M. ATKINSON, Superintendent.

Table II.-Shening the RATE of SICKNESS and MORTALITY in the POLICE FORCE during the Year 1892.

AVERAGE STRENGTH.

TOTAL SICKNESS.

TOTAL DEATHS. RATE OF SICKNESS.

RATE OF MORTALITY.

European. Indian.

Chinese.

Total. European. Indian. Chinese. European. Indian.

Chinese.

European. Indian. Chinese.

Egr-pean. Indian.

Chinese.

128

226 342 696

152

224

120

1

3

3

118.75 99.10) 35.08

0.78 1.32 0.87

Months.

Remaining

on 1st Jan., 1892, January, February, March, April, May, June,

July,. August, September, October,. November, December,..

Total,

....

1 European died in Hospital. 2 Indians

17

2 Chinese

and 1 in India. ;; Victoria and 1 was drowned.

22

J. M. ATKINSON, Superintendent.

Table III.-POLICE RETURN of ADMISSIONS to HOSPITAL from each District during the Year 1892.

GOVERNMENT

ISLAND.

WATER POLICE STATIONS MOUNTAIN TSIMSHATSUI,

LODGE.

WHITFEILD.

CENTRAL

No. 5

8

12

HOUSE No. 2

No. 1 STONE CUTTERS'

GAP No. 6

9

??

"

3

TSATTSZMUI, SHAUKIWAN,

SHEKO.

POKFULAM. ABERDEEN.

STANLEY

YAUMATI,

AND

No. 7.

HUNGHOM.

TAITAMTUK.

10

11

8

11

12 5

10

11

81 131

31 10 14

3

~7 00 00 ** 18 07 00 0 2 2 00 10 N

11

14

2

16

European,

Indian.

Chinese.

European.

Indian.

Chinese.

1

European.

:

Indian.

Chinese.

European.

-8 9 3 19

Indian.

1

Chinese.

2

European.

Indian.

Chinese.

European.

Indian.

Chinese.

European.

Indian,

Chinese.

European.

Indian.

:::

Chinese.

European.

Indian.

Chinese.

European.

Indian.

Chinese.

European.

Indian.

Chinesc.

TOTAL.

18

42

1

33

31

21.

com

33

46

2722

ལ:

12

55

} 36

1

44

40

3

45

5

41

6

11 2

3 4

12

10

21

4 4

1

2

23 9

13

8 406

J. M. ATKINSON,

Superintendent.

320

Table IV.-Shewing the RATE of SICKNESS and MORTALITY of the TROOPS serving in HONGKONG during the Year 1892.

AVERAGE STRENGTH.

ADMISSIONS INTO

DEATHS.

HOSPITAL.

AVERAGE DAILY RATE OF SICKNESS.

RATE OF MORTAL- ITY PER 1,000 OF THE STRENGTH.

White. Black. Total. White.

Blåck. Total.

White. Black.

Total.

White. Black. White. Black.

1,382 988 2,370

1,763

1,081

2,844

16

15

31

83.06

34.37 11.58

15.18

}

Does not include Officers.

Table V.Shewing the ADMISSION and MORTALITY in the GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL during the Year 1892.

DISEASES.

I.—General Diseases.

4. Diseases dependent on Morbid Poisons,-

Sub-Group 1,

""

""

2,

3,

39

4, 5,

>>

B. Diseases dependent on external agents other than Morbid

Poisons,- Sub-Group 1,

2,*

""

">

3, 4,

>>

C. Developmental Diseases,

D. Not classified,

Europeans.

Indians.

ADMISSIONS.

Asiatics.

Total.

Europeans.

H. F. PATERSON,

Surgeon Colonel, A.M.S., Principal Medical Officer, China and Hongkong.

Indians.

DEATHS.

Asiatics.

48

33

17

98

19

2

3

5

119

100

91

310

1

1

2

1

3

168

40

24

232

1

1

1

:

1

1

1

4

1

1

6

CO

7

1

10

18

46

2 48

4

1

3

277

13

18

58

∞∞∞∞

8

8

.9

10

11

12

Diseases of the

II.-Local Diseases.

Nervous System,

Eye,

Circulatory System,

Ear, Nose,

Respiratory, Digestive,

Lymphatic,

Thyroid Body,

Supra Renal Capsules,

25

6

16

47

13

14

33

4

4

2

10

1

1

11

4

15

64

21

27

112

76 22 20

118

7

3

2

12

p

2

4+2

257

+9

4

6

3

12

9

Urinary System,

Generative System,

13

Female Breast,

14

Male

·

... •

15

Organs of Locomotion,

16

Connective Tissue,

17

Skin,

III.

Poisons,

IV.

Injuries,

V.

Surgical Operation,

Under Observation,

E' GLEBAL I

25

37

5

21

2

10 42

5

CO LO

2

2

2

15

90

148

1

9

16

45

18

23

51

1

3

5

37

9

144

190

2

16

5

1

2

:

14

46

79

ar

Total,

788

335

592 1,715

23 11

34 68

* Vide III. Poisons, † Table Va,

J. M. ATKINSON,

Superintendent.

Total.

321

Table Va.--Shewing the ADMISSIONS and MORTALITY in the GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL during the Year 1892.

SURGICAL OPERATIONS.

Removal of Tumours,-

Buboes (Scraping), (Excision),

Cervical Glands (Scraping),

Fatty Tumour,

Tumour of Thigh (Adenoma),

Gun-shot Wounds,-

Ligature of Femoral for*

Extraction of Pellet from Legs*

Excision of Hip-Removal of Bullet, Extraction of Bullet from Groin,.

"J

Forehead,

Removal of Smashed Radius for

Removal of Foreign Bodies,--

Removal of Loose Cartilage from Knee,.

""

Impacted Food in Gullet,.

Operations on the Eye,-

Enucleation of Eye,

For Pterygium,

Iridectomy,

Extraction of Lens,

Operations on Head, Face and Mouth,-

For severe injury to Face,

Trephining and elevating depressed Bone,

Operations on Respiratory Organs,-

Empyema (Incision and Drainage), Exploration for Stab of Chest,

Tracheotomy,.

Paracentesis Thoracis,

Operations on Digestive Organs,-

Hæmorrhoids,

Fistular in Ano,. Liver Abscess,

Exploring Liver,

Operations on Urinary Organs,-

For Stricture of Urethra,

For External Urethrotomy,

Operations on the Generative Organs,-

Circumcision,

I.-MALE.

:

Amputation of Penis (Epithelioma),

Paraphimosis,

Hydrocele,

""

(Radical Cure),

Ovariotomy,

Version,

Forceps,

II.-FEMALE.

ADMISSIONS.

Europeans.

Indians.

Operations on Organs of Locomotion,-

For Necrosis and Periostitis,

Amputations-Thigh,

Leg,

Forearm,

Both Forearms,

Fingers or Toes,

For Fractured Patella,-

Mayo Robson's Method, Suture,

For Deep Abscess of Scalp,.

Exploration of Elbow Joint for Injury,

of Knee Joint,

Asiatics.

Total.

DEATHS.

Europeans.

Indians.

732

i

2

1

5

3

15

3

4

21:

1

I

1

1

1

2

1

Total,...

1

::

1

2

21

21

1

10 O

5

2

I- TICO GO

7

1

2

10

4

1

2

3

3

0733

11

1

11

1

Asiatics.

: : :

3

21134

6

to

3

3

12

1

1

3

- 3D GO

122

1

1

1:

1

3

NONN-O

::

Total.

:1

i i

3

:

2

N

122

432217

1

1

65

18

53 136

* Cause of death-Hoemorrhage before admission,

CO

3

:

7

10

J. M. ATKINSON,

Superintendent.

322

Table Vb.-Shewing the ADMISSIONS and MORTALITY in the GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL during the Year 1892,

ADMISSIONS.

DEATHS.

GENERAL DISEASES.

Group A.-Sub-Group 1.

1. Small-Pox, (transferred to Small-Pox Hospital),

2. Cow-Pox,

3. Chicken-Pox,..

4. Measles,

5. Epidemic Rose-rash, (Rotheln),

6. Scarlet Fever,

7. Dengue,

8. Typhus,

9. Plague,

10.

Relapsing Fever,

11. Influenza,

12. Whooping Cough,

13. Mumps,

14. Diphtheria,

15. Cerebro-spinal Fever,

16. Simple-continued Fever,

17. Enteric Fever, Synonyms, Typhoid Fever, (Typhomalarial

Fever),

18. Cholera, Synonyms, Asiatic Cholera, Epidemic Cholera, 19. Sporadic Cholera, Synonyms, Simple Cholera, Cholera

Nostras, . 20. Epidemic Diarrhoea, 21. Dysentery,

Europeans.

Indians.

Asiatics.

6

21

1

Ni

10

:9

9

21

4

4

::

1

1

19

15

Total,..

48

....

3333

:

40

Total.

2

-

17

98

2

Europeans.

Indians.

Q

3

Asiatics.

J. M. ATKINSON, Superintendent.

Table Vc.-Shewing the ADMISSIONS and MORTALITY in the GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL during the Year 1892.

GENERAL DISEASES.

1. Malarial Fever,-

Group A.— Sub-Group 2.

a. Intermittent, Synonyms, Ague,

b. Remittent,.

c. Malarial Cachexia,

2. Beri-Beri,

Monthly Table of Malarial Fever Cases amongst the Police.

INTERMITTENT.

REMITTENT.

MONTHS.

Europeans.

Indians.

Asiatics.

1 15 4

572

3

January,

February,

2

March,

April,

3

May,

2

June,

1

July,

August,

September,

October,

November,

December,

Total,..

10

8

30

72

1223

45

4

:

Deaths.

Europeans.

Indians.

Asiatics.

Deaths.

Cases. Total Number of

Total Number of

Deaths.

::

~ :

6

21 12

5

14

19

15

13

25

19

14

14

Co

6

6

165

ADMISSIONS.

Europeans.

Indians.

Asiatics.

Total.

Europeans.

90 87 69 246

24

8:

:

010000

4488

8

5

5

199

40

17

7

DEATHS.

Indians.

Asiatics.

Total.

: : :

119 100 91310

1

1

J. M. ATKINSON,

Superintendent.

:::

1

: **

3

ما

5

Total.

1

:

10

19

-20

35

40

45

Fever Cases.

Table Vd.-DIAGRAM showing CASES of MALARIAL FEVER occurring every Month amongst the POLICE Force,

the MEAN MONTHLY TEMPERATURE and the MONTHLY

RAINFALL during the Year 1892.

323

Rainfall.

Number! Inches.

-50-

January.

February.

March.

April.

May.

June.

July.

August.

September.

October.

30

60°

|_25

50°

Red Wave, Blue Wave, Green Wave,

Black Wave,....

...Intermittent Fever Cases.

.Remittent

.....Monthly Rainfall in inches.

..Mean Monthly Temperature in Degrees Fahrenheit.

J. M. ATKINSON,

Superintendent.

10°

20°

30°

40°

November.

70°

December.

Fahr.

Degrees

Mean

Monthly

Temperature.

80°

90°

100°

325

Table Ve.Shewing the ADMISSIONS and MORTALITY in the GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL during the Year 1892.

ADMISSIONS.

DEATHS.

DISEASES.

1. Phagedoena,

Group A.-Sub-Group 3.

2. Erysipelas,..

3. Pycemia,

4. Septicemia,

Total,.....

2

Europeans.

Indians.

Asiatics.

1

1

2

2

:

1

3

Total.

Europeans.

Indians.

:

J. M. ATKINSON, Superintendent.

Table Vf-Shewing the ADMISSIONS and MORTALITY in the GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL during the

year 1892.

DISEASES.

ADMISSIONS.

DEATHS.

Group A.-Sub-Group 4.

1. Syphilis, Synonyms, Pox,

13

4

19

a. Primary, ....

b. Secondary,....

24

27

c. Tertiary Syphilis,.

33

9

50

1

...

1

2. Gonorrhoeal, including Chancres Molles,

98

28

10

136

Gonorrhoeal Rheumatism,

Total,...

168

40

24

232

1

1

:

J. M. ATKINSON, Superintendent.

Table Vg.-Shewing the ADMISSIONS and MORTALITY in the GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL during the Year 1892.

ADMISSIONS.

DEATHS.

DISEASES.

1. Hydrophobia,

2. Glanders,

3. Horse-pox, 4. Splenic Fever,

Group A.-Sub-Group 5.

Total,.....

:

Europeans.

1

1

Indians.

:

Asiatics.

1

Total.

Europeans.

1

1

:

Indians.

:

J. M. ATKINSON, Superintendent.

Asiatics.

-

Total.

Asiatics.

Total.

326

Table VI.-Shewing the RATE of MORTALITY in the GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL during the last 10 Years.

Rate to Total Number of Rate to Number of Europeans Rate to Number of Coloured Rate to Number of Asiatics

Admissions.

Admitted.

Persons Admitted.

Admitted.

1883, 1884,

1885,.

Per cent.

4.66 1883, 3.69 1884,

Per cent.

Per cent.

Per cent.

4.37

1883,

3.01

1883,

6.08

3.15

1884,

1.24

1884,

6.08

5.03 1885,

4.65

1885,

3.06

1885.

7.01

1886,

4.86

1886,

4.25

1886,

4.66

1886,

5.73

1887,.

5.37 1887,

4.50

1887,

4.56

1887.

6.96

1888,

4.51

1888,

3.96

1888,

4.70

1888,

4.98

1889,

4.29

1889,

3.37

1889,

4.13

1889.

5.41

1890,

5.00

1890,

2.38

1890,

5.30

1890,

7.80

1891,.. 1892,

4.49

1891.

3.46

1891.

2.97

1891,

7.33

3.96 1892,

2.92 1892,

3.28

1892,

5.74

J. M. ATKINSON, Superintendent.

Table VII.-Shewing the ADMISSIONS into and DEATHS in the GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL during each Month of the Year 1892.

EUROPEANS.

COLOURED.

ASIATICS.

MONTHS.

Total Admissions. Deaths.

Total

Admissions. Deaths. Admissions. Deaths. Admissions. Deaths.

Remaining on the 1st

January, 1892,

49

1

14

23

86

1

January,

62

1

25

30

117

2

February,

48

4

19

44

3

111

7

March,.

56

24

46

1

126

1

April,.

51

6

14

38

103

7

May, June,.

July,

65

28

54

147

10

58

35

44

1

137

3

67

31

61

159

August,

68

28

2

64

160

September,

75

26

50

3

151

October,

69

26.

53

148

November,

58

2

32

42

132

December,.

62

33

43

138

299680 |

5

7

Total,.

788

23

335

11

592

34

1,715

68

888

J. M. ATKINSON, Superintendent.

Table VIIa.-MONTHLY AGGREGATE NUMBER of PATIENTS visited in the HOSPITAL daily for

1892, 1891 and 1890.

Months.

1892.

1891.

1890.

January, February, March, April,

2,372

2.977

2,431

·

2,045

2,541

2,315

2,073

2,677

2,148

2,106

2,275

2,013

May, June,

2,583

2,430

2,399

2,401

2,519

2,256

July,

2,585

2,406

2,404

August,

2,948

1,986

2,588

September,

2,714

1,425

2.304

October,

2,473

2,508

2,374

November,

2.171

2,382

2,636

December,

2,320

2,350

3,065

Total,.

28,791

28,476

28,933

J. M. ATKINSON, Superintendent.

Table VII.-Shewing the ADMISSIONS into and DEATHS in the GOVERNMENT EUROPEAN and CHINESE

LUNATIC ASYLUMS during each Month of the Year 1892.

327

MONTHS.

EUROPEANS.

COLOURED.

ASIATICS.

Remaining on the 1st

January, 1892,

Admissions. Deaths. Admissions. Deaths. Admissions. Deaths.

2

1

1

1

January,

February,

March,.

April,.

May,

June,

July,

August,

September,

FJ

October,

November,

જાર કર

December,

Total,.

16

1

TH

Total

Total Admissions. Deaths.

7

10

1

10

1

1

1

1

31

Co

3

PANOBABAHOA : 15

1

77

3

3

1

2

1

J. M. ATKINSON, Superintendent.

Table VIIC.-Shewing the ADMISSIONS into and DEATHS in the GOVERNMENT HOSPITAL HULK Hygeia

and SMALL-POX Hur during each Month of the Year 1892.

MONTHS.

EUROPEANS.

COLOURED.

ASIATICS.

Remaining on the 1st

Admissions. Deaths. Admissions. Deaths. Admissions. Deaths.

January, 1892,

January,

February,

+

March,.

April,.

May, June, July, August,

September,

October,...

November,

December,.

Total,

3

1

1

Total Admissions. Deaths.

Total

3

3

1

1

1

1

2

1

3

3

1

13

2

J. M. ATKINSON,

Superintendent.

.

October,

November,

December,.

Total,... 12

:

...

January,

February,

MONTHS.

Adults. Children. Adults. Children. Adults.

Male.

: Female.

:

Male. Female.

Male.

Female.

Children.

Table VIII.-RETURN of DEAD BODIES brought by the POLICE to the PUBLIC MORTUARY during each Month of the Year 1892.

EUROPEANS AND

OTHER NATIONAL-

CHINESE.

AMERICANS.

ITIES.

Cause of DEATH: REPORTED, PROBABLE OR ASCERTAINED BY EXAMINATION.

ACCIDENTAL.

SUICIDAL.

HOMICIDAL.

:

: : :

:

:

:

:

...

:

:..

:

:

:

:

:

...

:

:

:

Male.

Female.

From Disease.

Drowning.

Fracture of Cervical Ver-

tebræ.

Fracture of Skull, Spine, and Cerebral Concussion.

:

:

:

:

: :

:

: F.

:

Male.

Female.

:..

:

Male.

F.

:.

:.

:..

Female.

7

6

3

2

9

19

2

:

: :

:

1

1

13

5

10

8

2

ΟΙ

6

2

11

3

1

89

16

5

N

3

...

:

N

6

1

CO

:

:

:

:

:

:

7

1

4

4

1

قسم

1

3

:

3

4

:

:. :

:.

:

:

: :

:

...

:.

:

:

...

:

: :.

:

:

...

:

8 3

:

31 1

4

7

2

~

:

:

3

2

1

T

Burnt in a Fire.

:

:

:

:.

:..

:

Shock from Lightning.

:

:

Asphyxia from Landslip.

:

:

:

:

mill's Engine.

:.

:

:

:

: :

:

:..

Strangulation by a Paper-

Shock and Hæmorrhage

from a Fractured Leg.

Syncope caused by Jump-

ing into the Water.

1

2

I

1

:.

:

:

:

:

:..

:..

...

:

:

...

...

:

:

:

:

54 28

2

10

1

4

1

• The deceased was of unsound mind.

:

:

...

:

:

:

N

:

T:

:

:

-

1

2 63

+ Involuntary.

...

:

N

:

:

Wounds and Laceration of

Right Lung.

Poisoning by some Nar-

cotic Substance.

Opium Poisoning.

Hanging.

Drowning.

Incised Wounds of Abdc-

men and Neck.

Concussion and Fracture of Skull caused by Jump-

ing from a House.

Bullet Wounds of Temples

and Forehead.

Hemorrhage from Rup-

tured Spleen.

Incised Wounds of Neck,

&c.

Hemorrhage from Stab- bing into the Right Lung and from Incised Wounds

of Head, Neck, &c.

Incised Wounds of Head

and Neck, &c.

Compound Depressed Frac-

ture of Skull.

Syncope from Blows inflict-

ed in the Abdomen.

TOTAL.

:..

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

2

:

:.

:

J

2

...

:

:

*

:

T

:

:

:

:

I

:

:.

...

:

I

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:.

:

:

:

:

:

: :

:.

...

:.

:

:

:

:

:

: :

:.

:

:

F.

:.

:.

*

:

:

F:

: E :

: : :.

:

: :.

:

:

:

:

F:..

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

12

8

10

3

11

16

10

11

14

11

:

Ift

18

G.>

3

2†

1

1

1

1† 131

L. P. MARQUES,

Medical Officer in charge of Post Mortem Examinations.

328

:

329

Table IX.-K.-Shewing the ADMISSION into HOSPITAL in VICTORIA GAOL, and MORTALITY during the Year 1892.

ADMISSIONS.

DEATHS.

DISEASES.

Europeans.

Coloured Persons.

Chinese. TOTAL. Europeans.

Coloured Persons.

Chinese.

TOTAL.

Remaining under treatment 1st January 1892,.

I.-

Febricula,

:

Intermittent Fever,

Remittent Fever,

3

18

20

***

Fever and Erythema of left cheek..........

...

11

Fever and Diarrhoea,

Fever and Anæmia,

Intermittent Fever and Anæmia,

Febricula and Constipation,

Rheumatism,

Conjunctivitis,

Keratitis.....

Keratitis of right cornea and Synechia anterior,

Opacity of both cornea caused by trichiasis,

Conjunctivitis and Remittent Fever,...

Otorrhea of left ear,.....

Unsound mind and Anæmia,

11-

111-

1

1

:

"" and Abrasion of lumbar re-

...

13

gion,

19

Fracture of front teeth,

Cerebral Concussion facture of front teeth and

Contusion of right ankle-joint,

Cerebral Compression from attempted suicide

by hanging,

Hemicrania,

Beri-beri,

IV.—

Anæmia,

"

and General Debility,

"

11

""

(opium smoker),

(oedema of feet and ascites),

and Conjunctivitis (opium smoker),.. General Debility (opium smoker),

Emaciation,

31

(opium smoker),

""

and Otorrhea of right car,

and Aphthee of tongue,

Aortic Regurgitation and Anæmia,

Tricuspid Obstruction,

V & VI-

Bubo, Sympathetic (of right groin),

#

of both groins,

VII-

Bronchitis,

"

and General Debility,

*

and Anæmia (opium smoker),

and Aortic Obstruction,

"

...

::

:

...

...

Chronic Emplysema and Pulmonary Congestion,

Hæmoptysis,

Phthisis Pulmonalis,.

Pleuresy of left side and Pneumonia of inferior

lobe of right lung, 、

Asphyxia from attempted suicide by hanging, .

VIII-

Dyspepsia,

Ulcer of stomach,

...

...

1

1

1

1

1

...

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

2

33

33

28

28

3

1

...

::

7

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

}

1

1

-:

1

1

3

3

...

1

...

...

Jaundice,

Peritonitis,

from perforation of a duedenal ulcer,

Ascites, Diarrhoea,

وو

(opium smoker),

and Anæmia,..

Dysentery,

Lumbrici,

External Hæmorrhoids,

1X & X.-

Orchitis (of both testicles),

呵呵

(of right testicle),

of left testicle and Anæmia,

Stricture of Urethra (Anæmia and Orchitis of

left testicle),

Retention of Urine caused by stricture of

urethra,

Gonorrhoea,

Ulcer of Scrotum and Bubo of left groin,

(Venereal),

Soft Sore and Bubo of right groin,

Bubo of right groin and gleet,

X1.-

Phagedenic Chancre, Bubo of right groin and ulceration of legs (Secondary Syphilis),........

Synovitis of right knee-joint,

1

1

1

and Erysipelas of

"

right leg,.

Carried forward,.

...

::

:::

***

...

....

...

...

...

...

1

***

...

1 1

1

1

...

9

...

11

12

***

***

1

1

121

1

1

:-

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

9

5

190

201

:

:

::

:

:

:

5

***

...

...

..

...

LQ

5

Total number of Prisoners

admitted to Gaol.

330

TABLE IX.-K.-Shewing the ADMISSION into HOSPITAL in VICTORIA GAOL, and MORTALITY during the Year 1892,—Continued.

DISEASES.

ADMISSIONS.

DEATHS.

Europeans.

Coloured Persons.

Chinese.

TOTAL. Europeans.

Coloured Persons.

Chinese. TOTAL.

Brought forward,...

9

5

190

204

5

5

XII.-

Oedema of face and lower limbs,

:

>>

of left leg,

of feet and Anæmia,

11

::

of feet and Scrotum,

Erysipelas of face,....

??

of left arm (after vaccination),

Abscess of left axilla,

of left arm after vaccination,

- 1 2 - ✪

1

1

1

1

2

2

1

1

2

2

1

1

1

1

1

of arm and Diarrhoea,

1

1

:)

of left arm,

2

2

*

of left hand, dorsal surface,

1

1

>

of left knee-joint,

1

1

"

of right leg,

1

I

""

of left leg,

1

1

...

11

of right foot, plantar surface,

4

4

7+0

of left foot,

2

""

...

""

of feet (plantar surface),

1

19

of right foot,

1

1

1

...

1

Chronic Ulcer of right leg,

Adenitis of left groin,

19

of right thigh...

Boil of right Gluteal region,

of left foot......

""

Carbuncle of right lumbar region,.

Fibrous Tumour of perinæum (extirpated),.

Unclassed.-

General Debility,

""

(opium smoker),

Alcoholism,

Wounds and Injuries.—

Sun-stroke,

Hæmorrhage from ruptured spleen,

Punctured wound and Erysipelas of left ankle-

joint,.......

Incised wound of left thumb,

JJ

wounds of left ear, neck, right wrist

and right finger,

4

Incised wounds of left leg,

"

wound of left foot,

Contused wound of right leg,

"

Erysipelas,

Contused wound from flogging,

Gluteal Abscess after flogging,

13

of left foot,

of little-toe of left foot and

19

Unknown and Unrecognized.-

Observation,

TOTAL,......

1

***

1

:::

- 22:

1

12

13 2

1

::

1

1

1

1

1

1

...

I

1

1

1

1

25

26

6

6

1

17

18

14

5

293

312

Another death occurred by a Chinese hanging himself in his cell.

:

1

::

:::

Table IXa.-L.-Shewing the NUMBER and PERCENTAGE of PRISONERS ADMITTED into VICTORIA GAOL

HOSPITAL, on the First Examination by the MEDICAL OFFICER, during the Year 1892.

Sick in Hospital.

Admitted to Hospital on First Medical Examination.

Percentage of Hospital cases on First Medical

Examination.

Percentage of Hospital cases on First Medical Ex.

Europeans. Chinese.

5,046

14

Europeans.

Indians.

Chinese.

10

5

293

Total.

Europeans.

Indians.

312

2

34

Chinese.

Total.

To total Gaol

admissions.

To total Hospital

cases.

To total Hospital

cases.

L. P. MARQUES, Medical Officer.

To total Hospital

cases.

39

0.772 1.250 1.242

1.160

L. P. MARQUES, Medical Officer.

-:

1

::

:

1

1

331

Table X.-N-Shewing Cases not ADMITTED ∞ HOSPITAL, treated by the MEDICAL OFFICER, during the Year 1892.

DISEASES.

Remaining under treatment 1st January, 1892,...

I-

Febricula,

Intermittent Fever,

Anæmia (Opium smoker),

Phagedenic chancre bubo and ulcer of both legs (Secondary

Syphilis),

Condylomata,

Ulcer of right leg, (Syphilitic),

Ulceration of craneal bones (Tertiary Syphilis),

Ulcers of left thigh, (Tertiary Syphilis),

II.-

Lumbago,

III-

Trichiasis of both eye-lashes, Conjunctivitis of right eye,.

""

"

of left eye,

of both eyes,

Keratitis of right eye,

of left eye,..

39

Opacity of cornea,

>>

of right cornea and ulceration of left cornea,

of left cornea,

Photophobia,

Ulcer of both cornea, Unsound Mind,

IV.-

Anæmia,

**

[

""

and cardiac palpitation,

"

and Mitral regurgitation,

..

Coloured

Europeans.

Chinese.

TOTAL.

Persons.

17

17

1

1

1

1

1

I

1

1

*1

1

5

5

5

1

2

2

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

*2

1

1

I

1

1

1

+

2

1

1

Mitral and Aortic regurgitation,.

Cardiac palpitation,

VII.-

Anæmia and Diarrhoea, (opium smoker),

Bronchitis,

Pulmonary phthisis,

Asthma,.

VIII.-

Parotitis, (left side),.

Fissures of lips,

Caries of molar teeth, (Extracted),.

Gumboil,

Pharyngitis,

Diarrhoea,

General Debility and ascites,

Ascites and Elephantiasis Arabum of right leg,

Inguinal hernia, reducible, (right side),

""

Prolapsus Ani,

External Hæmorrhoids,

29

"

Anal fistula, (operated),

IX & X.-

Gonorrhoea,

99

(left side),

and abscess of right plantar surface,

and soft chancre,

condylomata,

...

Gleet,

Balanitis,

Orchitis,

Stricture of Urethra,

Abrasion of Penis,

""

of Prepuce,

Oedema of

prepuce,

Warts of penis,

"

of scrotum,

Bubo of left groin and Gleet,

of right groin, (Syphilitic),

Soft sore of Penis, Leucorrhoea,

a

1

+4

*2

HAN

1

6

3

2

6

+2

*}

2

2

6

7

5

5

1

I

:2

4

1

1

1

1

3

12

16

1

1

1

2

6

1

1

3

4

1

3

Carried forward, ·

14

* Females.

2

1

2

2

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

12

14

*1

*1

130

150

† Oue of them is a Female,

332

XI.

TABLE X.-N.-Shewing Cases not ADMITTED to HOSPITAL,-Continued,

DISEASES.

Europeans.

Coloured Persons.

Chinese.

TOTAL.

Brought forward,,

14

130

150

Necrosis of right ulna,

"

of left foot,

Contracted muscles of left hand,.

1

1

1

1

1

1

XII.

Herpes labialis,.....

1

Ι

circinatus of neck,

I

1

Eczema,

$12

of left leg and Chronic ulcer of both plantar surfaces,

1

1

Ringworm,

2

$24

$26

Scabies,

+89

†89

Fibrous tumour of perinæum, (extirpated),

1

1

Ulceration of left shoulder,

1

1

Ulcer of right thigh and right fore-arm,

1

1

""

of right leg,

29

of left leg,

1

1

8

8

19

of both legs,

of scrotum,

Chronic ulcer of right leg,

1

1

1

1

6

"3

of left leg,

""

of right foot,

"

11

of left foot,

of feet,

Oedema of feet,..

Scald of right arm,

Boils of head,

Boil of neck,

of right shoulder,

of left shoulder,

of right axilla,

of right arm,.

23

of left arm,

of abdomen,

>>

of scrotum,

وو

of right leg,

of left leg,..

Adenitis of left axilla,

11

of right thigh,

**

of left thigh,

Bubo of right groin, (symp.),

Carbuncle of neck,

29

of right hip,

Abscess of head,

""

""

A

of left superciliary region,..

of superior palpebra of left eye, of neck,

of left axilla,

of right shoulder,

of right breast,

of right arm,

of right hand,

23

,,

>>

of left arm, (after vaccination),

of left hand,

"1

""

of right thigh,

"

of right leg,

of left leg,

"

of right ankle joint,

19

of left ankle-joint,

of right foot,

25

of left foot,

>"

33

of right foot, (plantar surface),.

of left foot, (

"

of both plantar surfaces,

Chronic abscess of left thigh,

of both thighs,

Scrofulous abscess of neck,

Malignant growth of inferior maxilla,

* Females.

Carried forward,..

*

† One of them is a Female.

2

I

1

3

2

3

1

6

1

3

1

1

2

4

2

2

2

∞∞0 31 ∞ IO IN CO O 10 paid pond QH ON ON ON — 24

2

2

3

3

2

3

161Q ∞ ∞ -

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

·

1

1

3

3

2

2

1

1

*1

1

1

4

1

Ι

3

3

1

1

2

2

2

3

6

26

26

16

16

2

222-30PON

1

6

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

21

00

417

446

§ Two of them are Females.

Wounds and Injuries.

TABLE X.-N.- Shewing CASES not ADMITTED to HOSPITAL,—Continued.

DISEASES.

Brought forward,..

Simple fracture of right humerus,

of left radius,

Dislocation backwards of left radius and ulna and Colle's fracture of left wrist and Pott's fracture of right ankle- joint,

Old dislocation of right shoulder,

Abrasion of right shoulder,

"2

of left arm,

of left hand,

of both hands,

"

>>

of right leg,

of left leg,..

""

of right ankle-joint,

""

of right foot,.

"

دو

"

of left foot,

of feet,

of left foot, plantar surface,.

of right foot, plantar surface, of both plantar surfaces,

Blister of right hand,

of left hand,

""

39

of right foot, (plantar surface),

of left foot, (plantar surface),

of feet,

Sprain of left ankle-joint,

Incised wound of head, and right fore-arm and hand,

of left hand,

of left foot,

of right foot,

Contusion of face,...

29

of right shoulder,

>>

of right humerus,

27

of right elbow-joint,

35

of right hand,

""

of left hand,..

of left ankle-joint,

>

of left leg,

of left foot,

""

of right foot,

""

""

13

Contused wound of head,..

of right cheek,

of left arm,

of right hand,

""

of left hand,

...

29

of left leg,...

19

of right leg,

of left foot,

99

"

of right foot,.

...

of feet,

"

• •

Contused wounds of the back, &c.,...

Unclassed.

دو

from flogging,.

Alcoholism,

Delirium Tremens,

Unknown or unrecognised.

Observation,

333

Europeans.

Coloured Persons.

Chinese.

TOTAL.

1276

TOTAL,...

* Female.

8

417

446

1

1

11

1

1

1

1

7

1

1

1

i

1

i

1

1

I

1

1

4

2

3

3

1

2

2272 10 N 00 20 -- OD

2

2

1

2

2

3

1

2

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

*1

1

3

3

1

1

2

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

2

2

1

1

2

2

1

1

1

1

4

4

7

7

2

2

1

1

6

1

1

1

1

1

1

181

181

3

1

:

*2

36

9

678

723

L. P. MARQUES,

Medical Officer.

334

Table XI.-O.-Shewing the RATE of SICKNESS and MORTALITY in VICTORIA GAOL, during the Year 1892.

Rate of Sickness

Rate of Mortality.

Total No. of Prisoners admitted to Gaol.

Daily Average number of Prisoners. Hospital.

Total

Total

Sick

in

Sick, Total Trifling Deaths.

Cases.

Percentage of Serious Sickness to

Total

To Total No. of

Admissions to Gaol.

To Daily Average.

To Total No. of

Admissions to Gaol.

To Daily Average.

5,046

515

312

723

6

6.183

2.051

5.572

1.189

1.165

L. P. MARQUES, Medical Officer.

Table XIa.-M.-CASES admitted to VICTORIA Gaol Hospital, at the first MEDICAL EXAMINATION by the

MEDICAL OFFICER, during the Year 1892.

SENTENCE.

No.

Years. M'ths. Days.

DISEASE.

DATE OF ADMISSION.

DATE OF DISCHARGE.

REMARKS.

નવા dd

Observation, Jaundice,

4

5

Dysentery,

Gonorrhoea,.

...

Observation,

15th Jan. 18th 21st

25th Jan. 13th Feb.

On Remand.

19.

9th

""

5th Feb.

8th

On Remand.

""

22nd

26th

*

*

"

14

8

General Debility, Unsound mind,

Dysentery,

4th March

8th March

7th 16th

"1

10th 23rd

On Remand.

وو

>>

""

9

42

Jaundice,

10

17

Anæmia,

5th April 6th

13th May 12th April

11

7

Diarrhoea,

12

14

Chronic ulcer of right leg,

13

14

Observation,

11th 21st 30th

""

وو

18th

""

4th May 2nd

""

>>

14

Bronchitis,

30th

5th

>>

""

15

Unsound mind,

3rd May

9th

On Remand.

17

16

17

18

19

20

col : : :

21

Incised wound of left foot, Anæmia,

4th

6th

22

"

""

4th

25th

>>

39

14

Alcoholism,

13th

7

Anæmia, (Opium smoker), Anæmia,

21st

23rd " 27th

• •

17.

27th

30th June

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

:::::2:

14

7 Abrasion of lumbar region,

Anæmia, (Opium smoker),

27th

2nd

19:

""

15th June

22nd

28th

7

>>

14 Incised wound of left leg,

25th July

7

Diarrhoea,

12

Anæmia,

*

28

6

29

30

42

31

32

33

3

34

35

36

37

38

H~~:::: $::::

Unsound mind and Anæmia,

Anæmia and G. Debility, (0. smoker),

27th

7th Sept.

Anæmia and Emaciation,.

16th

"

Anæmia, (Opium smoker),

26th

""

22nd: 12th July 27th

""

9th Aug.

1st Aug. 18th Oct.

2nd Sept. On Remand. 26th 39 17th 20th Oct.

On Remand.

""

Conjunctivitis and Remittent Fever, Unsound mind,.

29th

24th

29

10th Oct.

20th

On Remand.

""

Anæmia, (Opium smoker),

21st

Observation,

24th

""

21

11th Nov. 31st Oct.

On Remand.

General Debility, (Opium smoker),

28

Dysentery,

Observation,

14

39

Anæmia, (Opium smoker),

Incised wound of left ear and right wrist

and finger of right hand,

28th "3

4th Nov. 22nd 14th Dec. 16th

9th Nov.

""

5th Dec. 15th "3 23rd

""

""

L. P. MARQUES, Medical Officer.

335

Table XIb.—Q.—Shewing the WEIGHTS of PRISONERS (OPIUM SMOKERS), for the First Four Weeks' Confinement in VICTORIA GAOL, during the Year 1892.

No. AGE. TIME OPIUM

LENGTH OF

SMOKER.

CONSUMPTION WEIGHT WHEN

per diem.

WEIGHT FIRST FOUR WEEKS.

REMARKS.

ADMITTED,

Years.

Mace.

ibs.

Ibs.

ibs. ibs.

ibs.

10

11

12

TQDHONITO=2;

1

50

28

56

18

44

12

59

20

40

15

62

20

55

12

8

30

10

9

36

15

28

10

51

20

37

10

13

50

20

14

50

20

15

55

20

16

45

15

17

55

25

18

36

10

19

43

10

20

47

20

21

40

15

22

33

10

36

10

30

10

25

39

10

26

36

10.

27

50

10

02:00 – 02 pat 62 pond pool pro QQ med 1 Q2 Q3 Q2 1 Q2 H H 07 02 Hood proved good and past 62.

114

109

107 106

109

3

115

109

109 113 115

117

118

117

119

117

106

106

107 106

106

98

85

89. 90

134

130

133 128

130

I

98

94

93

93

95

1

96

96

90

95

96

1.

100

99 102

103

103

2

81

88

89

90

90

1

95

98

98.

100

107

1

115

111

110

109

115

115

116

118

118

106

106

108

108

72

72

76

76

74

81

80

80

80

78

106

111

108

106

107

1

99

93

95

97

100

91

90

93

90

2

80

78

82

87

87

102

101

103

103

103

1

117

117

119

115

114

1

88

84

84

85

1

79

79

85

85

90

1

92

92

91

91

1

96

99

99

100

102

100

92

94

97

98

28

48

16

2

114

107

112

116

116

29

35

10

1

89

89

89

93

93

30 33

8

1

90

87

88

86

31

44

10

1

96

95

96

96

100

32

26

6

102

102

100

101

53

.20

103

100

107

104

104

34

34

10

94

94

104

106

103

35

35

10

36 50

22

37 52.

38 50

20

39 50

21

40 28

4

41

50

20

42 28

6

43 49

20

44

40

20

45 36

10

46

69

40

47

36

10

48

61

20

49 32

8

50 47

10

( Q QI M QI Q7 − 02 H 62 Q2 HQ HQ HO

102

106

107

107

105

101

102 102

102

102

102

98 101

103

102

104

102

103

102

103

97

96

92

97

97

100

93

96

97

100

104

103

103

104

107

110

108

105 106

106

101

98

103

105

105

92

91

90

91

90

89

91

94

99

97

2

93

95

95

93

89

89

88

88

89

89

2

109

110

109

110

110

84

83

81

82

83

85

84

Died.

51

47

22

113

112

112 116

116

52

45

20

1

120

118

119

117

117

53

40

20

1

115

111

108

110

110

54 22

2

1

95

97 100

99

97

55 34

1

123

123

118

114

56 57

20

1

106

102

101 103

103

57

27

10

1

98

99

95

99

96

58

32

8

1

116

117

118 115 123

59

39

10

1

110

x07 108 107

110

60 50

22

61 23

7

62 35

15

1

63 51

22

64 64

25

65 32

10

66 54

22

67 40

20

68 42

15

69

50

20

70 62

25

71

31

10

1

72

29

10

1

73

44

20

74

40

16

75

24

8

1

76 30

77

78

79

80

189885

12

40

20

32

15

29

10

47

27

નાર

62 HH Q3 Q2 - 0) —— QQHHHHHHHQ2 TH C2

104

102 104 104

105

110

110

111

111

109

90

86

90

91

90

104

98 105

107

109

106

115

118 118 116

103

106 105 105

110

110 112 114 117

118

105 106 110

110

114

109

111 108

112

114

116 115 115

118

104

104

107

107 108

83

78

79

80

83

72

76

84

88

86

1층

109

110

108

112

112

105

98

99

99

100

95

92

93

92

91

Ho

112

109 114

119

115

96 102

92

94

92

94

97

102

101

102

95

100

100 100 100

108

105

110

110

102

336

Remaining in Hos- pital 31st Dec., 1891.

Table XII.-STATISTICS relating to the TUNG WA HOSPITAL, during the Year 1892.

No. of Cases Treated in the Hospital, 1892.

No. of Patients Dis- charged during the year 1892.

Died during the year 1892.

No. of Out-Patients treated during the year 1892.

Moribund Cases,

1892.

Remaining in Hos- pital 31st Dec.,

1892.

*d[vudg

Total.

99 13

112

2,063 392 2,455 1,212 155 1,365

880

210 1,090

37,199 | 19,430 56,629 243 110 353

85 27 112

Table XIII.-CASES of SMALL-Pox treated at the TUNG WA HOSPITAL, during the Year 1892.

Remaining in Hospital Admitted during 1892.

31st December, 1891.

Discharged 1892.

Died 1892.

Remaining in Hospital 31st December, 1892.

Male. Female. Total. | Male. Female. Total. Male. Female. Total. Male. Female. Total. Male. Female. Total.

Nil.

Nil. Nil. 28

22

50

8

4

12

20

18

38

Nil. Nil. Nil.

Table XIV.-VACCINATION performed during the Year 1892 by TRAVELLING VACCINATORS

of the TUNG WA HOSPITAL.

In the City of Victoria.

1,997

In Out-Districts.

230

Total.

2,227

Table XV.-LOCK HOSPITAL.

TABLE A.

SHEWING the ADMISSIONS into the GOVERNMENT LOCK HOSPITAL, during the 55 Years of its Existence, with the Number of DIETS issued

and the AVERAGE Length of TREATMENT.

ADMISSIONS.

NUMBER OF DIETS ISSUED.

Average NUMBER OF DAYS TREATED.

1858. 1859,

124

162

1858,.. 1859,..

4,797

1858..

43.8

5,389

1859....

30.8

1860.

361

1860..

9,107

1860,

23.7

·

1861,

442 1861.

10,778

1861.

23.4

1802,

485 1862

12,193

1862,

22.0

1863,

420 1863,

11,707

1863,

23.7

1864,

442 1864,

11,940

1864,

27.0

1865,

390 1865.

11,303

1865.

28.0

1866.

406

1866,

13,060

1866.

28.6

1867,

434

1867,

1867,

25.5

1868,

579

186x,

16,462

1868,...

23.6

1870,

1869, ***

546 1869,

16,779

1869..

24.8

722

1870,

18,382

1870,.

23.1

1871,

593

1871,

12,308

1871.

185

1872,

656

15,103

1872,

20.9

1873,

500

1878,

11,219

1873,

19.5

1874,

345 1874,

6,814

1874,

18.6

1875,

134 1875,

2,916

1875,

18.7

1876

168

1876,

2,730

1876,

14.3

1877,

177

1877.

3,069

1877,

16.6

1878,

105

1878,

2,242

1878,

19.0

1879,

129

1879,

2,199

1879,.

13.6

1880

57

1880,

1,300

1880,..

14.7

1881

44

1881,

1,330

1881,

21.7

1882

99

1882,

1,831

1882.

15.5

1883

273

1883,..

3,451

1888,

12.0

1884

325

1884,

5,174

1884,

13.1

1885

411 1885,

6,161

1885.

15.6

1886'

401

1886,

4,837

1886.

12.2

1887

144

1887,.

2,014

1887,

13.9

1888

66

1888.

1,616

1888,

24.4

1889

84

1889,,

1,540

1889.

.8.3

1890

82

1890,

1,660

1890.

20.0

189:

80

1891,

2,041

1891

25.5

1892,

65

1892,..

2,392

1892,

36.8

Every day, Sundays and Government holidays excepted.

Number of

Beds in Lock Hospital.

Number admitted

to Hospital on Certificates of Visiting Surgeon.

32

65

337

TABLE B.

CONTAGIOUS DISEASES.

KETURN of the NUMBER of PROSTITUTES during the Year 1892.

Total Number brought under the Provisions of the Ordinance.

Total Number of Examinations made during the Year.

Total Number of Examinations made when no Disease was found.

NUMBER DISCHARGED FROM HOSPITAL.

No. discharged free from Disease who still follow their former Pursuits.

Number who have returned to their Friends or Emigrated.

Total Number Discharged.

Number

who submitted voluntarily.

314

314

12,215

12,148

TABLE C.

CONTAGIOUS DISEASES RETURN for the Year 1892.

57

TOTAL NUMBER OF MEN DISEASED

Total No.

ADMITTED INTO

AVERAGE NUMBER OF MEN IN GARRISON AND PORT (per month).

of Females

admitted

into Lock Military Naval Police Civil

Hospital. Hospital. Hospital. Hospital. Hospital.

Total No. of Men Diseased.

Soldiers. Seamen. Police.

Mer- chant Seainen.

Average Average No. of Men Percentage in Garrison, of Men

and Port Diseased (per month). (per month).

REMARKS.

65

583

54

127

764

2,436

696

12,865 15,997

0.397

TABLE D.

RETURN OF WOMEN examined and treated in the Government Lock HOSPITAL during the Year 1892.

EXAMINATION.

HOSPITAL.

DISCHARGED.

DISEASES.

———-“----

Primary Syphilis, uncomplicated,

do.,

Do. and Primary Syphilis, combined,

Gonorrhoea,

12,215

65

12,148

Secondary Syphilis.

Gonorrhoea and Secondary Syphilis, combined,

Primary and Secondary Syphilis and Gonorrhoea,.......

DISEASES.

Primary Syphilis, including Chancres Molles,

Gonorrhoea, uncomplicated,.

Do.,

and Primary Syphilis, combined,

Secondary Syphilis,

Gleet,

Gonorrhoea and Secondary Syphilis, combined,

Primary and Secondary Syphilis and Gonorrhoea,

4..

TOTAL,.........

TABLE E.

CONTAGIOUS DISEASES RETURN for the Year 1892.

No. remaining in

Hospital, 31st December, 1891.

Admitted.

Total Treated.

Cured.

No. remaining in

Hospital, 31st December, 1892.

48

3

62

65

57

8-13

50

44

5

1

9

Military

Naval

Hospital.

Hospital.

Police Hospital.

Civil Hospital.

295

230

58

No returns sent.

19

47

32

65

15

TOTAL,..

TOTAL,

TOTAL,.....

TOTAL,.

.....1892,..............

583

54

127

.1891,....

452

57

129

. 1890,......

419

69

153

.1889..

452

65

132

Not contracted in the Colony :-Primary Syphilis,

.3 cases.

Gonorrhoea,

2

>>

57

338

TABLE E 2.

CONTAGIOUS DISEASES ORDINANCE.

TABLE shewing the number of MILITARY MEN admitted into MILITARY HOSPITAL, during the Year 1892.

SECONDARY SYPHILIS.

Months.

Contracted in Hongkong.

Contracted elsewhere.

Total.

January,.

11

February,

March,

April,

May,

11

4

3

3

7

7

5

NA

June,

Co

3

CA

3

July,

August,

5

5

September,

4

October,

November,

4

6

6

December,

6

6

Total Number,.

58

Table XVI.-Shewing the rate of MORTALITY among the FOREIGN RESIDENTS in Hongkong during the last 10 Years

Years.

Number of European and American Residents.

Deaths.

Percentage of Deaths to Number of Residents.

1883,

3,040

81

2.06

1884,

3,040

1885,

3,040

99

==

94

3.09

3.25

1886.

3,040

103

3.38

1887,

3,040

108

3.55

1888,

3,040

122

4.01

1889,

3,040

93

3.06

1890,

3,040

1891,

4,195

29

95

3.12

57

1.36

1892,

4,195

75

1.79

Average of 10 Years,....

32,710

927

2.83

Enclosure 1.

Report of the Superintendent of the Civil Hospital.

339

GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL,

HONGKONG, 18th March, 1893.

SIR,-I have the honour to forward you my annual Report for the year 1892 with the Hospital Statistics.

I-THE HOSPITAL BUILDINGS.

year.

1. No alterations of any importance have been made to the existing buildings during the past

2. The office store and laundry accommodation as well as that for private paying patients mentioned in my last annual Report still remain necessary additions to this Institution if it is in the future to meet the public requirements of the Colony.

3. At no distant date it will, in my opinion, be necessary to provide further accommodation for female patients, and also increased facilities for the carrying out of surgical operations; they should, instead of being conducted as at present in the Wards, be performed in a separate semi-detached building as is the case in most well-conducted Hospitals.

4. The foregoing considerations, together with the continued increase of Chinese dwellings accom- panied by the night noises of the natives referred to in my last annual Report, seem to point to the advisability of reserving a new site in the vicinity of the Hospital Staff Quarters and Lunatic Asylums for the future construction of an entirely new Hospital, furnishing the increased accommodation required, and arranged in accordance with the best modern practice.

II-LUNATIC ASYLUMS.

5. In accordance with instructions contained in C. S. Letter 1,505 of 1891, the European and Chinese Lunatic Asylums have been under my charge during the past year.

6. The European Lunatic Asylum provides accommodation for 9 cases with adequate day room accommodation which in cases of emergency can be utilised for the treatment of patients not requiring separate accommodation.

There are also quarters for one European Wardmaster.

The building is provided with bath-rooms, kitchens, store accommodation, and the necessary out- buildings.

7. The Chinese Lunatic Asylum, situated in premises adjoining those of the European_Lunatic Asylum, includes quarters for a European Wardmaster, a Chinese Interpreter and attendant, one Chinese amah, in addition to accommodation for isolating sixteen separate patients, and as in the case of the European Lunatic Asylum should necessity arise further accommodation in the day room can be temporarily arranged.

8. The want of sufficient room and privacy is much felt for the satisfactory treatment of such class of patients.

III.-SMALL-POX HOSPITAL AND HYGEIA.

9. The temporary Small-pox buildings have been maintained and occupied by six patients.

10. The hospital ship Hygeia, moored off the north of Stonecutters' Island, has been called into requisition for the treatment of seven small-pox cases during the past year.

Of these three arrived by H.M.S. Orontes during the month of January, one by the S.S. Verona during the month of February, another during the same month from S.S. Teviot, one in October from the S.S. Tartar and one from the S.S. Flintshire during the month of December.

11. As this ship now forms a portion of the Hospital accommodation of the Colony the following short description of the arrangements on board will, doubtless, be of general interest.

12. The hospital ship Hygeia is 185 feet in length, 30 feet in breadth at water line, and has a draft of 8 feet, it consits of two Decks: the Upper and the Lower or Main Deck.

340

i

On the Upper Deck are situated six Private Wards, a Dispensary, Medical Officer's quarters, four bath-rooms, kitchen, scullery and servants' quarters; the dimensions of which are given in the following plan:-

Name or Number

of each

Room, Ward, W.C., &c.

Length in feet.

Breadth in feet.

Height in feet.

Cubic Space.

Number of Beds.

Ventilating Openings.

Doors and Windows,

Sliding

Shutters, &c., Ports, &c.,

sq. feet.

feet.

feet.

feet.

sq. feet.

Ward I., (Private),.............

16.0

13.4

8.0

1,707

62

39

II., (

),.........

16.0

13.4

8.0

1,707

2

62

III., (

),........

14.6

13.6

8.0

1,566

2

IV., (

),........

14.6

13.6

8.0

1,566

2

""

V., (

15.6

13.6

8.0

1,674

2

29

""

VI., (

""

),.......

15.6

13.6

8.0

1,674

N N N N N

Dispensary,

10.0

11.6

8.0

920

35

Bath-rooms (4) each,

4.9

11.6

8.0

437

28

average

Upper Deck,

59.0

37.0

15.0

32,745*

24

251†

average

Servants' Quarters,.......

31.0

20.0

8.0

4,960

228

...

Lower or Main Deck,

147.0

31.0

10.6

47,848

32

175

Water Tank Room,

Store Rooms,

Ventilating Shaft Diameter. Down and Up.

The Lower or Main Deck contains accommodations for 32 patients, quarters for two Native attendants and the Water Tank Room.

13. From the attached plan it will be seen that the accommodation is as follows:--

Private patients 12 beds.

Third class patients 56 beds.

Ventilation is very good throughout the ship during the winter months.

In the summer season if it is necessary to occupy the Lower Deck for cholera patients large square ports will have to be substituted for the present small round port holes.

On emergency over 110 patients could be accommodated, giving each 600 cubic feet on the Upper Deck and 900 cubit feet on the Lower Deck, which with the satisfactory ventilation is liberal.

14. It will be noticed that the ship is unprovided with a disinfector and suitable store accom- modation, both of which are very necessary adjuncts to a hospital ship for the treatment of infectious diseases.

15. The distance of her moorings from the City has proved to be a source of considerable inconvenience.

IV.-ADDITIONAL OFFICERS' QUARTERS.

16. This building was completed and occupied in June 1892, and the advantages, which I anticipated in my last annual Report would be derived from this important addition to the Hospital premises, have been fully realised.

17. On the completion of this building that temporarily occupied by the Officers reverted to the use of the Colonial Surgeon.

V.-HOSPITAL PREMISES.

18. These have been maintained in as satisfactory condition as the funds available will permit; no alterations have been made.

* This, of course, does not include the large air space above the private wards and Dispensary, passages, &c.

Including sliding shutters above private wards. In addition to all there is an open space of 4 inches between the side and roof of

ship all round.

VI. HOSPITAL AND NURSING STAFF.

341

19. Mr. ROBERT WHITE, Junior Wardmaster, dismissed on 13th March, was succeeded by Mr. SAMUEL PEPPER who was seconded to this Department for six months from the Police. 512/92.)

(C.S.O. No.

Miss M. A. THOMPSON (Sister MARY) resigned on the 25th March, and was succeeded by Miss G. BROOKES (Sister ANNIE). (C.S.O. No. 772/92.)

Mr. ROGERS, Steward, mentioned in: my last Report as being on leave, resigned on 31st March on pension, after 12 years' service, and was succeeded by Mr. CHAPMAN.

Mrs. SIMMONS, Nurse to the European Lunatic Asylum, resigned on the 18th April on pension, after 17 years' service, and was succeeded by Miss WALKER (Sister CAROLINE). (C.S.O. No. 772/92.)

Miss MACKINTOSH (Sister CATHERINE) was away on leave from 7th May to 18th June.

I have much pleasure in recording that in August this Sister passed the second Government Examination in the Cantonese dialect with great credit.

Dr. Lowson was away on leave from July 7th to September 9th, and again from 26th September to October 19th. It is with much thankfulness that I record his marvellous escape from the sad disaster of the wreck of the P. & O. S.S. Bokhara.

It is my agreeable duty to record my appreciation of the able assistance afforded me by the several members of the Hospital Staff and of their attentiveness to the work of the Institution.

VII.-WORK DONE DURING THE YEAR.

20. Attached to this Report are the following tables :-

GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL.

I.-Shewing the admissions into and deaths in the Government Civil Hospital during each

month of the year, of the Police.

II.-Shewing the rate of sickness and mortality in the Police Force during the III.—Police return of admissions to Hospital from each district during the year. V.-General return of the sick treated in the Hospital.

Va.-Surgical operations performed during the year. Vb.-Zymotic Diseases, sub-group 1.

Vc.-

""

""

2.

year.

Vd.-Diagram shewing number of cases of Malarial Fever occurring amongst the Members

of the Police Force admitted in each month of the year.

Ve.-Zymotic Diseases, sub-group 3.

Vf.- Vg.-

17

>>

4.

5.

VI.-Shewing the rate of mortality in the Government Civil Hospital during the last 10

years.

VII.-Shewing the admissions into and deaths in the Government Civil Hospital during

each month of last year.

VIIa. The aggregate monthly number of patients visited in the Hospital daily for the last

three years.

VIIb.-Table of admissions into and deaths in the Lunatic Asylums during the year. VIIC.-Table of admissions into and deaths in the Small-pox Hospital and Epidemic Hulk

Hygeia during the year.

21. The total number of cases treated during the year was 7,783, as against 8,698 in 1891; of these 6,068 were out-patients.

22. The number of in-patients during the year was 1,715, a decrease of 152 as compared with that of the previous year. The total number of deaths was 68, of these 27 were in a moribund condition when admitted, 23 dying within 24 hours, and 4 within 48 hours of their admission.

23. The average daily number in the Hospital was 78.8, and the percentage of deaths to total treated 3.96, as against 4.49 in 1891.

year.

24. Of the total number of in-patients 163 were females, an increase of 39 on that of the previous

14 of these were obstetric cases as against 6 in 1891.

342

25. The following diseases caused the greatest number of admissions :---

Diseases.

Cases.

Fevers:-

Simple continued (Febricula)

21

Enteric......

4

Intermittent

246

Remittent

40

311

232.

148

119

112

48

40

183 admissions.

Venereal ....

Organs of Locomction Digestive System... Respiratory Alcoholism.

Dysentery

""

Injuries of various kinds caused

....

26. Of the 68 deaths 8 were from Phthisis, 4 from Liver Abscess, 4 from Heart Disease, 3 from Dysentery, 3 from Bright's Disease, 14 from Injuries (9 of these being from Fracture of the Skull) and the rest singly from other diseases.

27. POLICE.-The total number under treatment was 74 less than in the previous year. With regard to the different nationalities there was a decrease of 15 amongst the European members of the Force, a decrease of 61 amongst the Indians and an increase of 2 amongst the Chinese.

There were 3 deaths during the year: one European dying of Phthisis, one Indian of Tubercular Peritonitis and another Indian of Acute Tuberculosis.

This is the smallest number of deaths amongst the Police Force for years, and it is to be noted that there were no deaths from diseases incident to the Colony.

Aberdeen, notwithstanding its new Police Station, sends in more Police suffering from Malarial Fevers than any other station.

28. Influenza.-There were 21 cases under treatment during the

year.

29. TYPHOID FEVER.-There were 4 cases under treatment during the year, all of which recovered. Two of the cases occurred in the Colony, one being admitted from Kowloon and the other from Elgin Street. In the third case the disease was contracted in Canton and in the fourth somewhere in Japan.

30. CHOLERA.-There were two cases under treatment during the year with one death.

A European sailor was admitted on 28th June, at 9.50 a.m.; he stated that diarrhoea and vomiting had commenced at 11 p.m. the previous night and had continued up to the time of admission. He was then in a state of semi-collapse, temperature 97° F. and complaining very much of cramp in his legs. Shortly after admission he passed a typical rice-water stool, under treatment he rallied and was discharged cured on 5th August.

The fatal case was that of a destitute Chinaman admitted at 8.55 p.m. on 23rd August, with incessant diarrhoea and vomiting; he rallied that evening but had a relapse the next day and died at 6.10 p.m. on the 24th August.

These were evidently cases of Choleraic Diarrhoea (Sporadic Cholera).

31. DYSENTERY.-There were 40 cases under treatment with 3 deaths, one of these occurring from the severe form of dysentery "Gangrenous Colitis," as proved by the post mortem examination.

32. MALARIAL FEVERS.-The total number of cases under treatment was 286, as compared with 339 in 1891. Of these cases 246 were of the Intermittent and 40 of the Remittent type. There were no deaths during the year. This disease was neither so prevalent nor so fatal as in previous years.

I have no doubt that this is to a great extent due to the improved sanitary condition of the Colony, and when the new drainage system is completed we may expect a still further diminution in this class of diseases.

There were two cases of Hyperpyrexia occurring in the course of Remittent Fever, in one case the temperature reached 108° F. and in the other 106°.8 F.; they both recovered.

33. BERI-BERI.—There were seven cases under treatment, all of whom recovered; they of the dry variety (Beriberia atrophia).

were all

34. VENEREAL DISEASES.-232 patients were under treatment during the year as against 230 in 1891; there is a distinct diminution in the number of cases of Primary and Secondary Syphilis, the numbers being 46 as against 94 in 1891.

There were 136 cases of Gonorrhoea, including Chancres Molles, admitted as against 109 in the previous year. Many of these cases developed peculiarily indolent buboes; in our experience the best treatment for these cases is excision of the affected glands or when this is not possible, as is frequently the case owing to the glands having already broken down, to enucleate or scrape away as much of the diseased tissue as possible.

343

It is a good practice to anesthetise the patient as unless this removal of the diseased gland tissue is done systematically and thoroughly the parts which are left will be very slow to subside and may cause considerable trouble by burrowing under the surrounding healthy skin. The attempt to procure absorption by the application of pressure has been found quite useless.

35. HYDROPHOBIA.--One case of Hydrophobia was admitted during the year, the patient was a schoolboy from the Diocesan Home who was bitten by a stray dog on 27th February; he was brought to the Hospital on the same day, treated for the dog bites and discharged cured on 12th March. He was re-admitted on the 4th April, complaining of neuralgic pains in the region of the bites. On the 6th instant further well-marked symptoms of Hydrophobia developed and he died of this disease on the 7th instant.

36. INJURIES.--190 are returned under this heading. The most important point to note is the increase in the number of dog bites, no less than twelve patients were admitted from this cause during the year. Undoubtedly this is due to the large number of stray dogs that are allowed to run loose in the Colony.

In addition to the case of Hydrophobia noted above I am informed that three deaths from this disease have occurred at the Alice Memorial Hospital, and one at Quarry Bay, during the past year.

Two patients (Chinese) were admitted on 13th July who were seriously injured in the Peak Tramway accident.

They had both sustained very severe injuries to their legs. In one case the limb was so smashed that amputation had to be performed, in the other case there was a compound fracture of the Tibia and Tibula, after removing part of the Tibia the bones were set and ultimately the patient recovered with free use of the affected leg.

The first case made a good recovery and was discharged with a wooden leg.

37. SURGICAL OPERATIONS.-The total number of operations performed during the year was 136 with 10 deaths as against 142 with 12 deaths in the previous year.

AMPUTATIONS. In the fatal case the patient, a Chinainan, was severely injured in a machinery accident at East Point Refinery, the thigh was practically amputated before the patient was admitted, he never recovered from the shock but died a few hours after admission.

Notes of some of the more interesting operations are given in the Appendix.

HEPATIC ABSCESS.-I regret to have to record the death of Surgeon-Captain SMYTHE of the Army Medical Staff from this disease.

Two other cases of Liver Abscess were operated on during the year and died, in both cases post mortem examination revealed the presence of numerous abscesses, in one case there was a distinct history of dysentery.

FRACTURES AND DISLOCATIONS.-In addition to those operated on (in List of Operations) the following fractures and dislocations were treated :-

Skull,

Superior and Inferior Maxillæ,

Inferior Maxilla,

Rib or Ribs,

Simple.

Compound.

.3

7

..0

1

0

.4

0

Spine,

Humerus,.....

Radius,

Ulna,

Radius and Ulna,

Metacarpal,

Femur,

3

3

.3

1

..1

1

0

7

Tibia,

.2

0

Fibula,

1

Tibia and Fibula....

.0

Tibia, Fibula and Spine,....

.1

Both Radii, ...

....1

Tibia, Radius and dislocation of elbow,..

1

Dislocation of shoulder joint,

2

0

Dislocation of Acromio-Clavicular joint,

...........2

38. ALCOHOLISM.-There were 48 cases, with one exception, that of a Chinaman, these were European sailors.

39. POISONING.-There were only 5 cases under treatment during the year, in each the poisonous agent was opium; two proved fatal.

344

40. SMALL-POX.-There were thirteen cases under treatment with 2 deaths.

41. VACCINATIONS.-Two hundred and seventeen (217) vaccinations were performed during the year with the following result :-

Primary cases, Re-vaccinations,

....

Successful. ....76

Unsuccessful. 8

84

..96

37

=133

217

Since October we have been supplied with calf lymph from the local Vaccine Institute, and have found it very satisfactory.

42. LUNATIC ASYLUMS.-There were 51 cases under treatment during the year with 4 deaths. The nationality of these cases is given in Table VIIb.

43. POST MORTEM EXAMINATIONS.-35 were performed during the year.

44. In an Appendix are the notes of some cases of medical and surgical interest.

45. The fees received from the patients in the Government Civil Hospital during the year amounted to $12,269.10; of this the Board of Trade paid $3,100.92, and the police $883.75.

Those received from the Lunatic Asylums amounted to $1,017.92 and those from the Small-pox patients $338.66 giving a total of $13,625.68.

Before concluding I wish to thank the Naval and Military Surgeons who are, and have been, on this Station, and the Civil Doctors for their valuable assistance, frequently rendered, especially at operations.

GIFTS OF FLOWERS, NEWSPAPERS, &c.-The patients have been much indebted to several ladies of the Colony for frequent gifts of flowers, newspapers, &c.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your obedient Servant,

Dr. PH. B. C. AYRES,

Colonial Surgeon.

J. M. ATKINSON, M.B., (London),

Superintendent.

Appendix A.

GUN-SHOT WOUNDS.

+

The gun-shot wounds during the year were various. The most interesting case was that of the Chinese boy, age 13, who was shot at Kowloon during the manoeuvring of a squad of blue-jackets from H.M.S. Impérieuse. The boy was running about in front of the squad probably seeing how close to the rifles he could go when he was observed to full. Surgeon HUGHES, R.N., was close by and found him suffering from a wound in the left groin from which there was considerable hemorrhage. He at once applied a firm pad to the wound and brought him to Hospital about 12 a.m. Dr. ATKINSON found him suffering from a wound in the groin just below Poupart's ligament, about the size of a shilling, over the course of the femoral artery which had been shot through. He was blanched from the serious haemorrhage. The two ends of the artery were tied, no bullet could be found at the time of operation. When I saw him late in the afternoon he had rallied to some extent and could tell his name. About 7 p.m., however, he again became unconscious and although transfusion was attempted, he rapidly sank and died. At the post mortem examination it was found that about an inch of the femoral artery had been shot away. The wound passed down through the muscles on the inside of the neck of the femur and there ended blankly, no bullet or any other foreign body being found. There was very little charring about the wound, which would point to the rifle being some distance off when fired. The suggestion that possibly a stone had been either put in the rifle or knocked up off the ground and then hit the boy was negatived by the fact that really nothing was found in the wound.

The boy's clothing was carefully examined and there were simply the small round holes in his garments corresponding to the place of the wound no charring or burning about them. The same afternoon Fleet Surgeon MAHON and Lieut. HALL and self made various experiments with blank cartridge and found that, if the muzzle of the rifle was held within a couple of inches of the clothing simply a hole was made without any charring. At a distance of about six inches a considerable and scattered charring took place. On shooting into a turnip at a distance of one to three inches a condition of affairs was found closely simulating the wound in the boy ending blankly at about a

·345

distance of three inches or so in the turnip. Taking all-together the conclusion I came to was that the rifle had been held quite close to or practically touching the boy's clothes and the absence of charring was due to the above fact and probably also to the copious hemorrhage which took place immediately. If the rifle had been further away there would have been charring and greater laceration in the clothing and also a larger, more superficial wound in the boy's groin.

Another case of a boy shot at Kowloon came in early in the year. He was one of the crowd of boys who hover round the targets hunting for lead. Whether the boy was hit direct or by a deflected bullet is not known, but he was admitted to Hospital with a wound over the great trochanter of the left femur. The upper third of the bone was found to be smashed into three large pieces and several smaller ones. The smaller pieces were removed and a drainage tube was inserted. The bullet could not be found in spite of careful search, although a track existed running down between the gluteal muscles. The boy's condition otherwise than the local injury was satisfactory. During the following week in spite of antiseptic precautions the wound got dirty with copious suppuration and it was resolved to cut down on the joint and, if thought necessary, excise it. This was done and after it he recovered without a bad symptom. The bullet was again looked for during the second operation but could not be found. However, a fortnight later a hard swelling formed in the buttock and on cutting into this the bullet was found-evidently a Martini-Henry bullet considerably flattened. The boy was discharged with only 24 inches shortening; a very good result seeing that practically the upper third of the femur had been removed.

A third interesting case was that of P. C. GODFREY who went out to hunt the "Tytam tiger." While scrambling through the bush his carbine went off and the bullet entered his right arm in front of the wrist and emerged two inches below the elbow on the extensor surface of the forcarm, smashing about 2 inches of the radius on its way. The shattered piece of radius was removed in about thirty-five pieces and a drainage tube put along the track of the wound. As is frequently the case in gunshot wounds there was a considerable amount of inflammation afterwards, but thanks to the patient's pluck the arm has been saved and is improving day by day. The flexor tendons are adherent to the anterior cicatrix but it is possible that by an operation to try and free then he may yet have a very useful hand and arm.

A CASE OF SEVERE INJURIES.

Severe injuries to a Chinaman had a peculiar causation. He was working on the Praya and fell a distance of about 16 feet landing on his face on the edge of an iron tank. When brought to Hospital at 3 p.m. he was a horrid sight-his lower jaw bone being smashed to pieces and the lower half of his face was lying on his chest. Almost all the blood vessels in the neck were divided except the carotids. Some projecting substance had passed through the neck and caused a wound at the back of the neck about an inch from the middle line at the level of the second and third cervical vertebra. All visible torn vessels were tied and the large face wound closed up, several drainage tubes being left in the wounds. There was some more hemorrhage (after he had rallied slightly) which soaked the dressing. A fresh dressing was applied and, as his pulse had improved, it was resolved to tie the left common carotid should it continue. This was not necessary however. Owing to the lower jaw having disappeared with the exception of part of the two rami, it was necessary to keep the tongue pulled well forward. The following morning at 6.30 a.m. as I found him seriously collapsed I transfused him, injecting nineteen ounces of neutral saline solution.

His condition improved wonderfully but he again sank two hours later. He was again transfused at 10 a.m., twelve ounces of fluid being injected and he again improved. At noon as his breathing was very laboured tracheotomy was performed by Dr. ATKINSON but he never rallied again and died at 2.30 p.m. A post mortem examination was not allowed. Query.-Had he a fractured skull or severe abdominal injury as well ? It was naturally difficult to get any information from him, but he complained of pain in the abdomen. The collapse, of course, might have been due solely to the haemorrhage from the wound; but the marvellous way in which he rallied after transfusion and the rapid sinking pointed to some further loss of blood. Improvement after transfusion, I am aware, is often transitory but although the injuries and external hemorrhage in this case were severe they were scarcely sufficient to account for death in such a strong and otherwise healthy man.

TRACHEOTOMIES.

The European death was from diphtheria, the first case recorded in the Hospital for years. The patient was sent in on 3rd July, at 3 p.m., by Dr. BELL. He had well-marked diphtheritic exudation on his tonsils and pharynx. As far as I can make out he must have been infected in Singapore. At 10.30 p.n. he was much worse with symptom of asphyxiation. Tracheotomy was quickly performed, but although he improved somewhat after it he died about 2 a.m. following morning. Post mortem diphtheritic membrane was found to extend half way down the trachea whilst the inflammation extended down to the bronchi. Another of the cases where this operation was necessary the patient had tried an original method of suicide. He had first cut through the superficial structures with a razor and then he systematically proceeded to stab his trachea with a pair of scissors. When admitted there had evidently been a considerable amount of hæmorrhage as coarse rales could be heard all over

346

both lungs. One of the thrusts had pierced the cricothyroid membrane and after dissecting down, this opening was enlarged downwards and a tube inserted. He died of pneumonia four days after- wards. The other death after tracheotomy was in the case of a Malay suffering from Bright's Disease where the operation was performed for relief in a case of a gangrenous cervical cellulitis the man dying of septicemia three days afterwards. The other cases of tracheotomy were performed for suicidal cut-throat; these recovered.

LOOSE CARTILAGE IN KNEE-JOINT.

The loose cartilage in knee mentioned in the list of operations was cut down upon and removed by Dr. ATKINSON. It was oval in shape the long diameter being about two inches and the short diameter one inch. The wound healed by first intention, result perfect.

EMPY EMA.

The case of empyema mentioned in the operation list did exceedingly well after operation, his weight at time of operation being 113 bs. and three months later when he left for Australia his weight was 124 lbs. While in Australia he developed Phthisis and again came back to Hospital here and died in the early part of this year (1893).

BUBOES.

In several of the operations on buboes severe hemorrhage was met with from enlarged branches of superficial circumflex iliac and superficial epigastric arteries. It is of little use trying to stop this until one has thoroughly removed out the diseased gland then the artery can be seized and securely tied.

TETANY.

JAS. A. LowSON.

An Indian boy, aged 16 years, was admitted on the 16th November from the P. & O. S.S. Formosa. He stated that ten days before admission he was suddenly attacked with stiffness in the arms, this soon extended to the muscles of the chest and neck so much so that his chin was drawn down towards his chest; after lasting for a few hours this would pass off only however to return again, at the onset before the spasms set in there was distinct pain in the muscles affected.

On admission there was well-marked rigidity of the muscles of both upper and lower extremities, in the upper extremity there was extension of the phalanges on the metacarpal bones, flexion of the wrist and elbow, and adduction of the arm, in the lower extremity the rigidity was most marked in the extensor muscles of the thigh, so that he walked as if his knees were stiff, the sterno-cleido- mastoids were both firmly contracted, approximating the chin to the chest, the masseters were so firmly contracted that it was with great difficulty that his mouth could be opened and the muscles of the back stood out like firm boards.

His temperature on admission was 100° F., after this it never rose above 99° F.

This spasm did not come on in paroxysms but was continuous, a tonic rigidity of the affected muscles lasting for some hours and only passing off during sound sleep. I could find out no cause for this condition.

He was given first of all chloral and bromide, five grains of the former and ten of the latter thrice daily; this was increased to ten grains of the chloral with ten grains of the bromide every four hours, but with very little benefit. On the 29th November as his condition had not materially improved Extract Physostigmatis gr. was given in the form of a pill every two hours.

The Sister reported "that after the first, but more especially after the second pill, there was complete relaxation of all the affected muscles but in the course of half an hour the rigidity returned."

On the 2nd December the pills were increased to gr. 4 of the Extract and given every two hours. Soon after this there was decided improvement, the muscles relaxed and the spasms returned much less frequently. On the 11th the Extract Physostigmatis was discontinued as there had been no rigidity for 24 hours. There was no return and he was discharged cured on the 19th December.

At no time was there any anesthesia. On the 19th November there is a note that the muscles of the back were so strongly contracted that the back was quite bowed (emprosthotonus) with the concavity backwards.

:

Diagnosis. At first I was considerably puzzled over this case and thought the boy was suffering from tetanus-the favourable issue and the condition of the muscles affected distinguish it from this disease; the bilateral condition and the absence of other symptoms usually met with distinguish it from hysteria.

SEVERE INJURIES TO A CHILD AT WONG-MA-KOK.

A Chinese girl, aged 9 years, was admitted from Wong-ma-kok on the 29th October, 1892, in a state of collapse suffering from the following wounds said to have been inflicted by some wild animal:-

i. A severe lacerated wound of the right forearm extending from the inner part of the arm just above the elbow downwards and outwards. The hand, with the exception of part of the thumb which

347

was simply attached by means of the extensor tenders, was completely gone, the wrist and lower third of the forearm were also missing, the whole limb below the elbow being dreadfully mangled, the skin severely torn and the muscles hanging down in shreds.

ii. The hands, wrist and lower third of the left forearm were completelyb itten off leaving a clean wound with the lower ends of the bones exposed.

joint.

iii. There was a punctured wound of the right knee passing through the patella into the knee

iv. A punctured wound of the left foot on the inner side of the dorsum injuring the bone.

v. A superficial wound of the lower third of the right thigh at the inner side, some two inches long.

vi. There was also a slight wound of the forehead and two of the central incisor teeth of the upper jaw were missing, evidently the result of a fall on the face.

On admission she was in a very critical state suffering from the effects of shock and haemorrhage. Under the influence of chloroform the wounds were dressed, as much of the bones of the forearms were saved as possible, and the child ultimately made a very good recovery.

The wound of the right knee caused the most trouble, suppuration occurring in the joint necessitating incision and free drainage, when she was discharged on the 25th February last there was still some stiffness in the right knee, but this was every day becoming less.

From the appearance of the wounds and the description given by the child and her friends, it appears that on the morning of the 29th October she was attacked by some wild beast whilst tending cattle near Wong-ma-kok, the animal, which she described as being yellow with brown stripes and the size of a small cow, rushed at her, knocked her down and mauled her in the way described,

She then ran back to her friends who conveyed her to the Police Station at Stanley whence she was brought here in an ambulance.

As her mother did not wish to take her back saying that she would not be able to earn her living, Miss JOHNSTONE kindly took charge of her, and she is now an inmate of “Fairlea.”

The Government have sanctioned the necessary expenditure, so that she will be provided with two artificial hands as soon as the condition of the stumps will admit.

DYSENTERY.

Herewith notes of four cases of Acute Dysentery treated with the Saturated Solution of Sulphate of Magnesia :-

I-NABI BUX, Indian Police Constable, cet. 24.

This man was admitted on the 4th of August with a history of two days diarrhoea, the faces containing blood and mucus, during the preceding twelve hours the bowels have been open seven times, this is the first attack of dysentery the patient has had.

He was placed on congee and milk diet and that afternoon the ordinary treatment was prescribed, namely, 30 grains of Pulv Ipecacuanha Ver preceded by a draught containing fifteen minims of Tinctura Opii, his temperature that evening was 100.4°, as the bowels had been open three times, at 11 p.m. the Opium and Ipecacuanha were repeated.

On the 5th instant the patient was decidedly better bowels only acting thrice in the 24 hours; as there was a relapse on the 6th instant in the evening, the Opium and Ipecacuanha were again repeated with temporary improvement, this was maintained until the evening of the 8th instant when the bowels were again frequently moved and the temperature rose to 102.8° F., as there was no improve- ment on the morning of the 9th, the bowels having been moved seven times in the night and the temperature being 101.4° F., the following mixture was prescribed :-

Re Sat. Sol. Magnes. Sulphatis,..........................31.

Acid Sulph dil,

Aq. ad

.mx.

.3i omne horã sumendum.

During that day seven doses of this mixture were given and the bowels were opened nine times.

August 9th 6 a.m. temperature 99° F., bowels were moved thrice during the night.

Four hourly doses of the Magnesia Sulphatis mixture were given, from 12 noon to 3 P.M., during this day the bowels were only opened twice, in the evening the temperature was 99.2° F. and the following mixture was given :-

Re Liq Extract Belœ,...

Mist Creta Aromat, Aqua Cinnamoni ad

this was repeated once during the night.

.3 ss.

3 ss.

i.

August 10th morning temperature 98.6° F., bowels open once during the night the Chalk and Baël mixture was continued every 4 hours, temperature in the evening was normal and bowels had only been open once during the day and were now slightly formed.

From this date the patient continued to improve, on the 14th instant low diet was ordered, and he was placed on full diet on the 15th instant, and discharged cured on the 18th.

348

:

II.-RAM SINGH, Indian Police Constable, at, 28.

This patient was admitted to the Hospital on the 9th August with a history of four days diarrhoea from his description the stools were evidently dysenteric, he stated that he had ten motions during that day. His temperature on admission at 4.30. p.m. was 103.8° F.

;

The Sulphate of Magnesia mixture was ordered and four hourly doses were given between 5 p.m. and 8 p.m. that evening.

10th August the following note occurs :-temperature at 6 a.m. 101° F., bowels have been open thrice during the night, the same mixture was given four times between 12 noon and 3 p.m. that day, at 8 p.m., his temperature was 101.4° and the bowels had been open five times since the morning.

11th August:-8 a.m. temperature 99° F., the faces this morning were still liquid but decidedly bilious and contained no blood; four more doses of the mixture were given this day, and at 4 p.m. this evening, the Chalk and Baël mixture was given and ordered to be continued every four hours, all this time the patient was taking nothing but congee and milk, temperature at 8 p.m. 100° F.

12th August temperature at 8 a.m. 98.6° F., bowels open five times during preceding night, as at mid-day the stools contained blood and mucus and there was considerable tenesmus the Sulphate of Magnesia mixture was ordered and continued in hourly doses until 4 p.m. in the evening, at 8 p.m. the following note occurs:-"bowels open six times since the morning, and on examination the fæces were found to contain mucus and were slightly tinged with blood, less tenesmus, temperature 99.8° F."

The Chalk and Baël mixture was substituted and ordered to be given every four hours. August 13th:-8 a.m. temperature 99.2° F., bowels open thrice during the night, the same treat- ment was continued and during that day the bowels were only open twice, in the evening the temper- ature was 99° F.

August 14th bowels only open twice during preceding night, were slightly formed, temperature at 6 a.m. 98.6° F., on this day he was placed on low diet.

August 15th temperature at 8 a.m. 97.8°, F., bowels open once during the night, from this date he steadily improved, the Chalk and Baël mixture was given thrice daily, on the 17th instant he was placed on full diet and discharged cured on the 18th instant.

III.-W. O.,æt. 29, German. Officer on board Mercantile Steamship.

Admitted to the Hospital on 12th August with history of dysentery of two days standing; he stated that the previous day his bowels had been opened forty times.

He was at once placed on the Sulphate of Magnesia mixture and after that he had four hourly doses between 4.30 p.m. and 7.30 p.m. His temperature at 4.30 p.m. was 101° F. At 9 p.m. the following note occurs :-"bowels open six times since admission, fæces liquid contain mucus but only tinged with blood." The Sulphate of Magnesia mixture was discontinued and the Chalk and Baël mixture ordered to be given every four hours.

August 14th 8.30 a.m. temperature 99.2° F., bowels open four times during the night, fæces bilious. Diet since admission: Milk, Soda Water and Ice. At 8.15 p.m. temperature 98.8° F., bowels only open twice since the morning, same treatment continued.

August 15th temperature at 6.30 a.m. 98.8° F., bowels not open during the night, placed on low diet with cornflour in the evening.

August 16th as the bowels had not been open an ounce of Hunyadi Janos water was given and the medicine ordered to be given thrice daily. Evening (8 p.m.) temperature normal, bowels open From this date improvement was maintained; on the 16th he was placed on fish diet; on the 18th in full diet; and he was discharged cured on the 21st instant.

once.

IV.-T. H., t. 15, English. Schoolboy.

Admitted at 9.45 a.m. on 17th December with a history of dysentery of three days standing, bowels having been open six times during preceding night, temperature 100.4° F.

He was placed on milk and congee, and ordered twenty grains of Pulv Ipecacuanha Ver, preceded by a draught containing ten minims of Tincture of Opium, at noon his temperature was 101° F., and in the evening as the bowels had been moved six times since the morning the Ipecacuanha was ordered to be repeated.

77

December 18th temperature 6.30 a.m. 100° F., and the following note occurs :—“

-"patient was very sick after the powder, and the bowels have been moved nine times during the night.' At noon the Sulphate of Magnesia mixture was ordered and four doses were given between 12 noon and 3 p.m.; at 8.30 p.m. temperature 100.4° F., bowels moved six times since the morning the fæces are now liquid but slightly tinged with blood and contain very little mucus.

December 19th temperature 8 a.m. 98° F., bowels open five times during the night, fœces are now distinctly bilious, still liquid, but contain no mucus or blood, a pill containing one-third of a grain of Opium and three grains of Quinine was ordered to be given thrice daily. At 8 p.m. temperature was normal, bowels open thrice during the day still liquid.

December 20th bowels open thrice to-day, temperature normal.

349

December 21st at the bowels were still liquid, the Mist Crete ĕ Bela was ordered to be given thrice daily.

December 22nd bowels not open during the night, low diet was ordered and, as he felt so much better in the evening he was discharged from the Hospital but kept under observation for a few days, the Chalk and Baël mixture was continued and in two days he was quite well again.

REMARKS.

Undoubtedly in some cases of Acute Dysentery Sulphate of Magnesia given in the way described is decidedly beneficial in the treatment of the disease; it increases the flow of serum from the blood- vessels of the engorged and inflamed intestinal mucus membrane, thus washing away the products of inflammation from the dysenteric ulcers and relieving the fever. As soon as the stools became bilious the Sulphate of Magnesia is discontinued and an astringent mixture prescribed. Undoubtedly Ipeca- cuanha is still our sheet anchor in this disease, but in two of these cases the Sulphate of Magnesia was successful after the Ipecacuanha had seemingly failed. There is another great advantage that the distressing vomiting, which is so often an accompaniment of the administration of Ipecacuanha, is by giving the Sulphate of Magnesia obviated.

J. M. ATKINSON.

Enclosure 2.

Report from the Medical Officer in charge of Gaol Hospital.

GAOL HOSPITAL, HONGKONG, 17th March, 1893.

SIR,-I have the honour to forward the report together with statistical tables of the work done in this Hospital in 1892.

2. During the past year 312 patients were admitted into the Hospital, 18 of whom were for observation including, under this class, seven men sent by the Magistrates for certificates as to sanity. Of this number, five were found to be of unsound mind.

3. The diseases from which all these patients were suffering are described in Table K.

4. Tables L. and M. show the number and percentage of prisoners that were admitted on the first medical examination and the nature of their complaints.

5. The cases that were treated, without being admitted into Hospital, are recorded in Table N. They amounted to 723, a larger number than in 1891; but all these cases were of a trifling nature, a great percentage consisting of boils, abscesses and contusions.

6. From the time that the late Major-General GORDON caused, on medical recommendation, the rough surfaces of the yards to be smoothed, there has been a remarkable decrease of plantar abscess. Since the beginning of last year, by order of His Excellency the Governor, the well-conducted short- sentenced prisoners are sent daily out to work in the chain-gangs, and, as it was to be expected, there was again an increase of cases of plantar abscess, but not so much, as when the prisoners had to walk on the rough grounds of the Gaol yards.

7. Mr. A. M. THOMSON, while Acting Superintendent of the Gaol, bought, on medical suggestion, a new set of hats with broader brims for chain gang prisoners. It might be that owing to this fact that these prisoners are better protected now from sunheat, there has been very little sickness observed amongst them. There were many cases of remittent fever in this Gaol, but not one chain-gang man had suffered from it. Another advantage which this new hat has, I think, is that it hides better the convicts' faces from gaze of the public.

The prisoners are anxious to be called to serve in the chain-gang, as they then get more food and are employed in less arduous and monotonous work, than that of shot drill and carrying stones around the yard.

8. The rate of sickness and mortality are given in Table O. There were seven deaths amongst the prisoners from the following causes:Jaundice, the result of obstruction in the hepatic ducts. The gall-bladder was full and greatly distended, its walls were thin at the lower end. The liver was enlarged; Hæmorrhage from rupture of spleen which was hypertrophied; Suicide by hanging himself at the door of his cell with one of his garments. This man was on remand. He had been already convicted three times; Perforation of a Duodenal ulcer. Dr. CANTLIE, who made the autopsy in this case, has published an account of it in the Indian Medical Gazette, No. 1, Vol. XXVIII.; Ulcer of stomach and cancer of pancreas; Acute tuberculosis of lungs; Pulmonary congestion in consequence of bronchitis and chronic emphysema.

9. An Indian Gaol guard, shortly after he was relieved from his duty on the 23rd March at 12.30 a.m., shot himself with his revolver through the palate. The bullet was found flattened under the left temporal muscle. It was only three days before that he had left the Government Civil Hospital, where he had been treated for Bronchial Catarrh.

10. .Three male and three female prisoners, all of them Chinese, were released on medical recom- mendation after having served part only of their sentence.

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A Chinese woman, 72 years of age, a beggar, weak and emaciated, was recommended to the Magistrate for the Tung Wah Hospital.

Two lepers were sent to Canton.

11. Fewer patients were admitted into Hospital last year than in the previous one. This does not necessarily imply that the sanitary condition of the Gaol, which has always been good, has improved still more; but is accounted for, I believe, by the healthier constitution of the prisoners generally.

12. Some interesting cases were treated in this Hospital.

A Chinaman, who was on remand pending extradition, tried to escape over the wire netting which is spread above the wall of one of the yards. After reaching the top of the wall, he fell down in Old Bailey Street. He was picked up in a precarious state, the front teeth were fractured, the face was swollen and greatly disfigured. He was delirious, but gradually recovered. Two Chinese both old offenders, who were put to crank labour, attempted to commit suicide by hanging themselves in their cells. I found one of them in an unconscious state with convulsions. After bleeding from the right median basilic, he slowly recovered, but his brain showed signs of the injury received for a long time afterwards. Another old convict, who was sentenced to twelve months' hard labour for returning from deportation, had several deep incised wounds on the neck, his left external ear was divided. He said that he was wounded in Chinese territory five days before he came back to Hongkong. All the divided parts were joined with silver wire sutures, and although some days had elapsed from the time that those wounds were inflicted the operation proved very successful.

13. I have continued to treat, with marked advantage, certain forms of dysentery by means of enema of Ipecacuanha, as I have stated in my report last year.

14. There were, amongst the female prisoners, some cases which required great care in nursing. Mrs. M. NOLAN, the Matron, has proved to be very trustworthy and kind to the patients.

15. Dr. ATKINSON, the Superintendent of the Government Civil Hospital, sent me last November, six tubes containing lymph prepared at the Vaccine Institute of this Colony. A certain number of the prisoners was vaccinated with it by me and Warder FLORES. The result was satisfactory, the percentage of the successful vaccination being high. After a short time, arm-to-arm vaccination was established.

16. The Chinese prisoners, as a rule, are not the best subjects for experiment of this kind; for as I have stated in one of my former reports, that contrary to the old and prevailing notion, I have found that almost all the prisoners have been properly vaccinated in the arms and some inoculated when very young in their homes.

17. The subjoined are the results of the work and enquiry regarding the vaccination of the long- sentenced prisoners:-

Year.

Total number of vaccination and re-vaccination.

Taken.

Failed at first vaccination and re-vaccination.

Total number of those who have been vac- cinated or inoculated outside the Gaol.

1888,

2,051

1,354

697

1,951

1889,

2,060

1,445

615

2,057

1890,

1,736

1,024

712

1,722

1891,

2,836

1,090

1,346

2,521

1892,

2,625

1,985

640

2,618

18. The number of opium smokers that were received into Hospital and the disease which they had, are given in Table P.

19. Table Q. shows the weight of opium smokers for the first four weeks of confinement. It was compiled, as usual, by Warder FLORES and Assistant Warder HAMED, who have been very attentive to their duty, particularly Warder FLORES who is of great assistance to me.

I believe that incarceration in this Gaol for a period of twelve months or more, is the most efficacious way of curing the opium smokers of their habit.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

DR. PH. B. C. AYRES,

Colonial Surgeon,

J'c.,

&c.,

ye.

L. P. MARQUES,

Medical Officer,

351

Enclosure 3.

Report of the Government Analyst.

GOVERNMENT LABORATORY,

HONGKONG, 7th May, 1893.

SIR,-I have the honour to submit a statement of the work done in the temporary laboratory of this Hospital during the year 1892.

TOXICOLOGICAL.

2. Under this head 4 investigations embracing the analysis of 17 articles were conducted. In one case that of a European male adult, chloral was detected in portions of the viscera forwarded for analysis. In the second case, that of two Chinese adults, an alkaloid was isolated from the contents of the stomachs which did not answer to any chemical tests. Accordingly, solutions for hypodermic injection into small animals were prepared and handed over to the Superintendent of the Civil Hospital for physiological observation. Dr. ATKINSON certified as follows:-

"As the results of experiments made with the liquids handed to me by the Government Analyst, I am of opinion that B. contained a convulsive neurotic poison. A Guinea-pig was injected with twenty minims of this liquid and died in five minutes, death being preceded by strong tetanic convulsions.”

"The same result occurred with a rabbit similarly injected, but in this case death was not induced until twenty minutes after the injection of the poison."

Negative results were obtained with the liquid A.”

(Signed) J. M. ATKINSON, Superintendent Government Civil Hospital.

3. The solution marked A. was prepared from the alkaloid isolated from stomach contents measuring only a few drachms. B. was prepared from similar viscera measuring about two fluid ounces. In both cases with general alkaloidal reagents a marked indication of the presence of an alkaloid was obtained especially in the case of B. The negative physiological results in the case of A. may be attributed to the small amount of material available for analysis. This investigation is of interest in demonstrating the value of "life-tests" in cases where the poison does not respond to any specific chemical test.

4. In the other cases no poison was found.

MILK.

5. Thirty-two analyses of milk were made during the year-24 for the Superintendent of the Civil Hospital, 7 for the Sanitary Board, and 1 for the Deputy Inspector-General, R. N. Hospital.

6. The Civil Hospital specimens were analyzed with a view to controlling the quality of the supplies furnished by the Government Contractor, and the proximate percentage composition of samples from both morning and evening deliveries collected at irregular intervals of about a month will be found in the following tables :-

MILK ANALYSIS.

CIVIL HOSPITAL DELIVERIES.

Morning Samples.

Temperature

Date.

Specific Gravity.

• Fah.

Solids not fat.

Fat.

Total solids.

Ash.

(By hydrometer.)

January

15,.......

1,030

65

9.2

3.1

12.6

.71

February

9,....

1,029

63

8.5

3.8

12.3

.59

March

8,.

1,028

65

8.9

5.2

14.1

.58

April

5,..

1,028

72

8.6

3.9

12.5

.70

May

17,

1,029

72

9.4

3.5

12.9

.72

June

29,.

1,027

83

9.2

3.4

12.6

.70

July

25,..

1,027

83

9.3

3.6

12.9

.60

August 22,...

1,028

81

9.3

4.0

13.3

.63

September 28,

1,026

84

8.7

4.0

12.7

.66

November 8,..

1,028

76

9.2

4.4

13.6

.63

December 10,...............

1,030

31,.

"J

1,030

699

65

9.0

3.6

12.6

.61

69

8.8

3.8

12.6

.64

Average,......

1,029

73

9.0

3.9

12.9

.65

352

MILK ANALYSIS.

CIVIL HOSPITAL DELIVERIES.

Evening Samples.

Specific

Temperature

Solids

Date.

Gravity.

Fat.

Total solids.

Ash.

• Fah.

not fat.

(By hydrometer.)

January 14,..

1,030

70

9.3

4.3

13.6

.68

February

8.........

1,030

63

9.3

3.9

13.2

.65

March

1,031

· 64

9.0

3.9

12.9

.69

April

4,...

1,029

70

9.0

4.1

13.1

.71

May

16,

1,027

76

8.8

4.6

1.3.4

.68

June

28,..

1,026

86

9.1

3.9

13.0

.64

July

25,

1,028

83

9.3

2.9

12.2

.60

August

22,....

1,026

83

8.9

4.6

13.5

.62

October 3

1,028

81

8.9

3.0

11.9

.68

November

7,......

1,030

76

9.3

2.8

12.1

.67

December

9,......

1,029

71

9.0

4.3

13.3

.65

""

30,.

1,029

70

8.9

4.5

13.4

.67

Average,..

1,029

74

9.1

3.9

13.0

.66

7. I have frequently been spoken to by Medical men and Dentists as to the quality of the milk produced in this Colony. The above tables will, I trust, satisfy all those interested as to the nutritive qualities of this valuable and indispensable article of diet. The percentages quoted are the results arrived at by the Somerset House method of analysis. In every case the solids have been "dried to constant weight." I may say in one sentence that better Dairy milk could scarcely be obtained in England: the above averages compare most favourably with the results of the analyses of the best Dairy milks in Great Britain.

8. The Sanitary Board samples were collected by District Inspectors of Nuisances from retail vendors. The following are the results of the analyses :-

MILK ANALYSIS.

Sanitary Board Samples.

No.

Specific Gravity. Temperature

O

Solids not fat.

Fat.

Total solids.

Ash.

(By hydrometer.)

Fah.

1,

1,018

2,

1,033

3,

1,024

4,

1,029

5,

1,025

6,

1,029

≈ 7 8 9 28

66

8.1

12.0

20.1

.65

65

10.3

4.1

14.4

.75

67

7.5

3.3

10.8

.46

69

8.9 *

4.0

12.9

.64

79

8.0

2.9

10.9

.64

79

9.4

4.2

13.6

.77

7,

1,030

84

11.1

4.8

15.9

.81

9. In only one case (No. 3) was I able to certify that the sample contained added water (12 per cent.). No. 5 was certainly a suspicious specimen, but I could not declare against it in view of the percentages of fat and mineral constituents. No. 7 was from the same Dairy as No. 5 and was collected at a subsequent period. The improvement in the quality of the milk after the purchase of a sample by the District Inspector is suggestive to say the least.

}

10. The sample of milk from the Royal Naval Hospital was found to be of normal composition.

BREAD.

11. The 3 samples of bread, forwarded by the Sanitary Board, were of good quality and very even in composition. The inorganic constituents ranged from .46 to .51, and the moisture from 41.2 to 42.6 per cent. None of the samples contained alum.

SAND.

12. Seven specimens of sand were analyzed at the request of the Director of the Public Works Department. The lime salts, chiefly carbonates, present ranged from 1.6 to 53 per cent. The finest

353

specimens contained the largest amount of matter soluble in Hydrochloric Acid. There appears to be no objection to the use of Calcareous sand for the filtration of the public water supplies. From the sand at present used calcium carbonate to the extent of about one grain per gallon is taken into solution in the process of filtration.

WATER.

13. Seventy-seven analyses of water were made for the following

Director, Public Works Department.......... Sanitary Board

The Commodore, H.M.S. Victor Emanuel The Colonel Commanding, Royal Engineers

...48

8

..19

2

77

14. All the samples of water analyzed for the Director of the Public Works Department were derived from the Pokfulam and Taitam services. These analyses-one each month of the water both before and after filtration-were continued in order to obtain exact information as to the efficiency of the filtering operations.

15. In the following table will be found the results of the monthly analysis of the water from both sources as supplied to the City of Victoria and the Hill District.

ANALYSIS OF POKFULAM WATER.

Results expressed in grains per imperial gallon (1 in 70,000).

1892.

* Appearance

in 24-in. tube.

Total solid matter dried at 212° F.

Chlorine.

Hardness.

Saline ammonia.

Albuminoid ammonia.

Oxygen absorbed.

January,

m. yellow

4.2

.6

February,

c.; p. y.

4.2

.6

March,

C.

b. p. y.

4.1

April,

c.; p. y.

3.9

May,..

C.

b. p. y.

3.9

66677

1.9

None

.0021

.005

1.9

.0042

.013

>>

1.9

.0035

.013

""

.7

2.0

.0014

.013

""

2.1

.0014

.018

J

June,

c. b. ; f. y.

4.5

.7

1.9

.0014

.008

27

July,

c. b. f. y.

4.8

.7

2.0

.0042

.016

""

August,

4.5

.7

2.0

.0014

.027

""

""

22

September,

4.2

.7

1.9

.0014

.015

>>

55

October,

c.; p. y.

November, December,

...

f. c. b.

Paci

AA

4.2

.7

1.9

.0014

.015

32

y.

3.4

.7

1.9

.0042

.010

3.9

1.9

.0014

.012

25

""

>>

ANALYSIS OF TAITAM WATER.

Results expressed in grains per imperial gallon (1 in 70,000).

1892.

* Appearance

in 24-in. tube.

Total solid matter dried at 212° F.

Chlorine.

Hardness.

Saline ammonia.

Albuminoid ammonia.

Oxygen absorbed.

January,

clear; p. y.

4.5

.6

February,..

clear; f. y.

4.2

.6

March,

c. b. ; p. y.

4.2

.6

April,

C. i

3.6

May,.

c. :

3.4

""

June,

C.;

4.2

>>

July,...

C. j

4.2

27

August,

c. & b.

; f. y.

3.4

September,

c. & b.

f.

y.

3.9

October,

3.9

>>

"}

November,

3.6

17

""

December,

3.1

aaaaala ira i às is

1.7

None

.0014

None

1.7

.0014

.003

15

1.8

.0014

None

""

.6

1.9

.0021

.011

رو

.7

1.9

.0021

.017

""

.6

1.8

.0028

.008

""

1.7

.0042

.018

59

.6

1.8

.0014

.021

.6

1.7

.0014

.007

"J

.6

1.7

.0014

.009

"}

.6

1.9

None

.009

33

.6

1.9

.008

""

31

""

19

* Abbreviations :-c.-clear; b.-bright; y.-yellow; p.-pale; f.-faint; d.-deposit; t.-turbid; fi-flocculent; s.-slight; m.-milky.

16. The above results are eminently satisfactory. The Colony is certainly to be congratulated on the excellent quality of the public water supplies.

17. On the recommendation of the Sanitary Board analyses were made of water drawn at monthly intervals in the Hill District (Mount Gough Police Station). The water in this district is pumped from the Station in Bonham Road to a tank near the Victoria Peak Signal Station and distributed therefrom to houses in that vicinity and to houses in the Mount Gough, Mount Kellett, and Magazine Gap districts. The wrought-iron pipes used for this service appear to have been coated internally

354

with a tarry composition which imparted a slight yellow colour to the water for some months. There is no reason to suppose that the value of the water from a dietetic point of view was in any way affected by this colouration. A slight increase in the amount of oxygen absorbed was the only noticeable analytical feature. All inconvenience, however, in this respect has now disappeared, the sample analyzed in December was not found to differ from a specimen of Pokfulam water collected in the City. The other samples of water analyzed for the Board were from the new public Laundries. Complaints had been made by the washermen that the water was unsuitable for Laundry purposes. The analyses did not, however, support their views. The water was found to differ in no important particular from water collected from streams on the hill slopes of the Island.

18. Nineteen samples of water were analyzed for the Royal Naval Authorities during the year. This service was instituted in 1891 at the request of Commodore E. CHURCH. The results of the analyses of samples taken from the Contractor's tank alongside H.M.S. Victor Emanuel are set forth in the following table and may be taken as indicating the quality of the water supplied to the British Royal Navy.

WATER ANALYSIS.

H.M. S. "Victor Emanuel.”

1892.

*

Appearance. Total solids. Chlorine.

Saline ammonia.

Albuminoid ammonia.

Oxygen absorbed.

Nitrites.

January

""

February 11,

"}

March

April

May

">

June July

**

August 22,...

7,..

f. y. d. op.

3.4

1.0

None

.0028

.001

None

2891

.8

.0028

.027

""

""

"9

"

p. y. d. t.

3.9

.9

.0021

.0112

.020

""

A

+

27.

.9

None

.0056

.016

""

""

>>

16.....

clear; p. y.

3.6

.8

.0014

.0021

.010

8.......

p.y. d. t.

3.6

.9

None

.0042

.020

26,

4.4

.9

.0014

.0035

.023

29

??

13,...

y. d.

t.

3.9

.9

None

.0042

.025

"

30,......

p. y. fl. dep.

3.9

.9

.0049

.0042

.031

>>

18,..

p. y.

.7

.0014

.0056

.060

>>

دو

8.......

p.y.

3.6

.8

.0014

.0042

.026

"

"

30,....

P.y. clear

.9

.0014

.0028

.010

p. y. fl. dep.

1.1

None

.0028

.033

September 12,. October

f. y.; el.

4.5

1.7

.0007

.0028

.027

"

3,.

P. y. s. d.

.8

.0028

.0042

.026

"

24,.

""

November

f. y. cl.

3.9

1.1

.0035

.0021

.018

""

8,......

turbid

.9

.0014

.0084

.035

December 5,..... p. y. ; s. t.

"

در

.9

.0014

.0028

.015

* Abbreviations :-c.-clear; b.-bright; y.-yellow; p.-pale; f.-faint; d.-deposit; t.-turbid; fl.-flocculent; s.-slight; m.-milky.

19. It will be seen that the water has been fairly constant in composition throughout the year. The water is of good quality but the appearance might be improved by careful filtration through sand.

20. The specimens of water analyzed for the Colonel Commanding, the Royal Engineers, were from wells in the Kowloon peninsula from which supplies had been obtained for the use of the Hongkong Regiment. One of the waters was unmistakably polluted. It is to be hoped that the time is not far distant when residents in the Kowloon peninsula will not have to rely on shallow wells for a supply of water for dietetic purposes.

MISCELLANEOUS.

21. Fourteen gravimetric determinations of sugar in the urine of patients suffering from diabetes were made during the year at the request of the Superintendent of the Civil Hospital.

22. A specimen of alleged medicated wine, which was having a large sale among the Chinese as an invigorating tonic, was examined at the request of the Police Magistrate with a view to ascertaining whether or not it came within the scope of the Spirits Ordinance, No. 21 of 1886.

As this was mainly a legal question I could not assist the Court further than submitting an analytical statement. The following are the results of the analysis expressed in percentages by weight :-Alcohol 19.5 ; Extract 10.26; Mineral matter .16; Saccharoid matter 8.95; (Sucrose 5.22, glucose 3.73).

23. There was a case similar to this in 1889. In both instances the charge of selling an intoxicating liquor without a licence was not sustained.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

THE COLONIAL SURGEON,

&c.,

&C..

&c.

W. EDWARD Crow, Government Analyst.

521

No. 30

98

HONGKONG.

REPORTS ON MORPHINE INJECTION.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor, on the 12th September, 1893.

Colonial Surgeon to Colonial Secretary.

GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL,

HONGKONG, 14th July, 1893.

Enclosure No. 1.

Enclosure No. 2.

SIR,

In accordance with instructions contained in your minute of the 26th ultimo, I requested Dr. ATKINSON to give me a report of a case of Morphia injection by Chinese that came under his notice in the Government Civil Hospital and also requested Mr. CROW, Government Analyst, to ascertain, if possible, the preparation of Morphia used and the strength of the solutions from the samples forwarded, and also to procure samples direct for himself, if possible, and get all the information he could generally as to the practice of Morphia injection among the Chinese. These reports I now forward. Mr. CROW's report is a very complete one and leaves no doubt upon the subject.

The dose used as it appears quite commonly of gr. of Morphia in solution is a very full one and very rarely used by a medical practitioner; to allay even very acute pain ato of a grain are the doses most commonly used. It will be seen by this that the dose used among the Chinese is a very full one.

This supposed cure for Opium smoking is the introduction of an undoubtedly pernicious habit for one that, as I have proved, is a very doubtful one and easily cured with no evil effects to the patient by complete deprivation at once. To deprive these men of the habit at once of using Morphia injections will cause much suffering, not only nervous exhaustion for want of the stimulant, but in the majority of cases it will result in an attack of profuse diarrhoea very difficult to control and will result in a sort of Cholera scare.

Morphia injection is used ostensibly for the cure of Opium smoking, but from the evidence given there is no attempt whatever to decrease the strength of the injections; but on the contrary the number of doses taken appears to increase and the evidence points to the introduction of a habit well known to be an undoubtedly pernicious habit for one that is to say the most of it a very doubtfully pernicious

one.

The profit side of the question is the only one likely to be looked upon by those who conduct the cure. It is shown to be from 200 to 400 per cent., and as long as they make such a profit there is little chance of their patients being cured.

I am of opinion that it is of little use striking at the sale of the drug or the instruments used as there are European Agencies for these in all the principal Chinese towns. The only way will be to strike at the shops in which it is practised, the same as gambling houses, and the punishments should be severe and refer only to the keepers.

At the same time provisions will have to be made to meet the evils which will arise from this stoppage amongst those that have contracted the habit which might be done by a notification by the Registrar General that medicines can be obtained from the European hospitals and dispensaries and also from Police Stations the same as has been done in regard to Cholera Cases.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your obedient Servant,

PH. B. C. AYRES,

The Honourable

THE COLONIAL SECRETARY.

Colonial Surgeon.

522

No. 12.

Enclosure No. 1.

Government Analyst to Colonial Surgeon.

GOVERNMENT LABORATORY,

HONGKONG, 1st July, 1893.

SIR,

My attention was first called to the practice of Morphine injecting among the Chinese about a month ago by Dr. ATKINSON, when handing me a bottle of liquid alleged to have been prepared for subcutaneous injection which on analysis proved to be a solution of Hydrochlorate of Morphine.

2. At my request our Compradore, Mr. Hoo A CHOO, brought me, about a month ago, a victim of this pernicious habit who volunteered the following state-

2

ment :-

"My name is CHU A YEE. I am a barber, and am 28 years of age. The marks on my arms and thighs are caused by a needle used for insert- ing medicine. I took the medicine for the first time in this way in October last. At first I had two injections daily, one in the morn- ing and one in the evening. Afterwards, when I had diarrhoea and pains in the stomach, I had one or two injections more.

After using the injections for three months, my arm used to be very stiff at night. I am now having four or five injections daily. Have had two this morning (12 noon). At first I paid two cents for each injection. I now only pay one cent. I had the injections in the first place because I was told by many people that they would cure me of the opium habit. Have not smoked any opium since October 1892. Up to that date I had been an opium smoker for more than a year. I felt better when I smoked opium than I do now. I used to get medicine injected at the Chun Tak-tong, drug shop, Wyndham Street. They were made this morning by CHAN MUI YUK, Queen's Road Central."

3. I may mention that the man on that date weighed 112 lbs. somewhat dazed.

He appeared

4. Thinking it would be useful to have some information as to the strength of the Morphine solution I requested Mr. Hoo A CHOO to obtain a supply. He forwarded it to me on Sunday last. I then requested him to send the actual purchaser to my Office. The man came on the 29th ultimo. He was the barber referred to in paragraph 2. His appearance had certainly not improved.

Weight 107 lbs. a loss of 5 lbs. within a month. He said that he had had three injections that day.

5. He made the following statement :-

66

'On the 25th June, Mr. Hoo A CHоо gave me $1.30 to buy some medicine. I went to Tsing Lok Hin, 87, Queen's Road West, and saw the man who had given me injections on a former occasion. I asked him to let me have some of the medicine he uses. He filled the bottle (one fluid ounce) I had with me and charged 20 cents for it. I handed the bottle to MAK KAU."

6. MAK KAU informed me that he handed this bottle to Mr. Hoo A CноO personally.

7. Submitted to analysis this solution yielded 2% of Morphine-2.5 % of the Hydrochlorate or Muriate, the commonest commercial salt of this alkaloid.

8. The solid preparation handed to me by Dr. ATKINSON a few days ago proved to be Hydrochlorate of Morphine.

9. It appeared to me desirable to have ocular proof of this practice. Accord- ingly accompanied by Mr. CHAU KAM-TSÜN, one of my assistants, I went to No. 87, Queen's Road West, yesterday morning. I directed him to go upstairs and ask the man in charge if he would allow me to visit his establishment. No objection being offered, I entered and observed three men asleep on mats, and about 12 or 15 standing in the verandah. Some of the men, I was informed, had just had injections; the others were waiting their turn. There were numerous puncture scars on their arms. I saw two operations performed. In one case about 15 minims, and in the other case about 20 minims were injected. The operator informed me that there was a limit as to the number of minims he injected and that the quantity used depended on the amount of opium his patients had been in the habit of smoking. The Syringe used was a good instrument of American manufacture. The operation was performed in the usual way and after each injection the needle was wiped with a dirty rag. The operator said, he prepared the solution himself from a powder purchased at a European Pharmacy and showed me an empty bottle labelled "Muriate of Morphine, Poison."

10. I may here mention that this injecting business is a profitable undertaking. I understand the Chinese can buy Hydrochlorate of Morphine locally at $2.50 per ounce (437.5 grains). From this quantity 875 injections each containing half a grain of Morphine Hydrochlorate could be prepared. This would leave a profit of $6.25 on each ounce of Morphine at a charge of 1 cent for each injection. Îf 3rd of a grain were used at each injection the profit would be about $10.00.

11. There can be no two opinions as to the baneful nature of this practice, and no effort should be spared to stop it forthwith.

12. The Ordinance should be made as sweeping as possible. A saving clause in favour of practitioners registered under Ordinance No. 6 of 1884 would, I presume, be necessary. Native practitioners holding diplomas granted by the College of Medicine for Chinese should not be exempted from the operation of the Bill. Having regard to the profitable character of the business, as set forth in paragraph 10, the temptation to take up the practice of injecting Morphine would be great indeed.

13. At the same time something should, I think, be done to relieve the sufferings of those now having injections if the practice is made illegal. These men will be in a terrible state when the injections are discontinued.

14. Would it not be possible to supply from this Department some powerful stimulant and tonic such as Cinchona and Aromatic Spirit of Ammonia to all victims of the injection habit on application?

""

15. These wretched creatures will not be able to satisfy the inevitable craving by a return to opium smoking. I said to the man CHU A YEE on the 29th ultimo

"Why don't you stop it? You will die if you go on at this rate.

He replied "How can I? I am a poor man and can't afford to buy opium for smoking. If I smoke opium again it will cost me twice as much as it did before."

91

16. Poverty on the one hand and the exorbitant charge made by the Opium Farmer for the smoking extract on the other are in my opinion the chief causes of the introduction of this practice.

:

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

The COLONIAL SURGEON,

&c.,

&c.,

&c.

W. EDWARD CROW, Government Analyst.

524

SIR,

Enclosure No. 2.

Superintendent Government Civil Hospital to Colonial Surgeon.

GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL, HONGKONG, 3rd July, 1893.

I have the honour to report that on the 31st May last, I interviewed a Street Coolie who was sent to me by Mr. MCCALLUM. His statement was as follows:

"My name is Fú A-KWAN. I am 43 years old and live at No. 7, Tai Loi Lane, First Street. I am a Street Coolie. For the past twenty years I have been in the habit of smoking opium, the daily amount being three

mace.

"A little over two months ago I was told that I could be cured of this habit by having some medicine inserted into my arm.

"Twice daily I have had this done at the Hung Cheung Shop (crockery ware shop) Morrison Street, for which I have paid one cent each injection. It is much cheaper than smoking opium and I get the same satisfaction out of it.

"I know of ten Chinese Doctors who each treats 50 to 100 men daily with this medicine.'

""

The man had a number of marks on both arms evidently produced by punc- tured wounds.

His weight was 120 lbs.

I received from the Honourable Colonial Treasurer about this date a liquid in a small bottle which he informed me was the medicine used by these Chinese Doctors for this purpose.

I handed it over to the Government Analyst to analyse. About the 20th ultimo I received a solid preparation from the same gentleman which I also handed over to Mr. CROW for purposes of analysis.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your obedient Servant,

J. M. ATKINSON,

گھر

Superintendent.

DR. PH. B. C. AYRES, C.M.G.,

Colonial Surgeon,

&c.,

&c.,

&c.

525

No. 93

31

HONGKONG.

REPORTS ON MORPHINE INJECTION.

(In continuation of No. 30 of 1893.)

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor, on the 12th September, 1893.

(Opium Farmers to Colonial Treasurer.)

HONGKONG, 24th May, 1893.

SIR,

The Prepared Opium Ordinance of 1891, section 10, provides for the preparation and sale of prepared opium, and the word "preparation" by the interpretation clause in the Ordinance is stated thus: "the subjecting of opium of any kind to any degree of artificial heat, for any purpose whatever shall be taken to be the preparing of such opium."

In the latter part of section 10 it is provided "that no medical practitioner, chemist or druggist, not being a Chinese, or being such and having a European or American diploma, shall be prevented from preparing or selling opium bond fide for medical purposes."

Within the last few months a number of establishments have been opened in Hongkong, to which those who have acquired the habit of opium-smoking have been induced to resort for the purpose of having a preparation of opium adminis- tered by means of subcutaneous injections. As the charge made for each injection is very small, large numbers of Chinese have been induced to frequent these houses, and, we believe, that a considerable diminution in the receipts of the Farm arising from the sale of prepared opium for local consumption has been owing to this cause. Under these circumstances we would ask you to be good enough to suggest to the Government either some modification of the law with reference to the sale of preparations of opium, or else that a law might be passed making the subcutaneous injection of drugs, except under certain restrictions and by a duly qualified medical man, a punishable offence.

We are informed that a large number of persons have been seriously injured in their health by having recourse to the places above mentioned, and as the practice is at the same time likely to affect permanently the revenue of the Colony as well as the present Opium Farmers, we feel justified in urging you to bring the matter to the serious attention of the Colonial Government.

We have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servants,

HAU FOOK COMPANY, Opium Farmers.

The Honourable N. G. MITCHELL-İNNES,

Colonial Treasurer,

&c.,

&c.,

St.

526

(Minute by Assistant Registrar General.)

HONOURABLE REGISTRAR GENERAL,

Apparently the practice of injecting Morphia has arisen only within the last few months.

Injections can be obtained at the following places

312, Queen's Road West.-A branch open about a month. 50 or 60

people go there a day.

1, New Street.-Opened a fortnight. Plenty of patronage.

1st floor, 2, East Street.-Opened 2 weeks. 60 or 70 a day. Fee at

above places, 1 cent an injection.

Fee, 2 cents.

2nd floor, 18, Taipingshan Street.--Opened 3 weeks. 2nd floor, 10, Kwaiwa Lane.-Opened in November. Number increased

from 10 to 40 a day. Fee reduced from 2 to 1 cent.

367, Queen's Road Central.-Opened in March. Number of patients

increased from 20 to 60.

98, Bonham Strand.-Opened 1 months. 40 or 50 a day.

41, Stanley Street.-Branch of Kwaiwa Lane establishment. About 60. 179, Queen's Road East.-Opened 2 months.

104, Bonham Strand.

85, Bonham Strand.

65, Third Street.

91, Queen's Road West.

50, Praya West.

* Attached is a notice by a hospital, in Canton, recommending the adoption of the injection of Morphia.

The numbers given above cannot be relied on.

The ostensible reason for taking Morphine is to get rid of the craving for opium; but even if a man doesn't want to do so he naturally prefers spending 3 or 4 cents on Morphia to 15 or 20 on opium.

The coolie class patronise these places. I should say that we won't be able to judge of the extent of this practice for another month or so. The writers put the number of people at between 1 and 2,000, who were no doubt all habitual opium smokers.

5th June, 1893.

* Not printed.

A. W. BREWIN.

(Report by the Police.)

CENTRAL POLICE STATION, 19th June, 1893.

CAPTAIN SUPERINTENDENT,

In accordance with instructions received from you and Mr. BUCKLE we have made inquiries regarding the use of Morphia injections.

The injections of Morphia are made with the object of curing persons of their opium-smoking habits and the method is said to have been instituted by one of Dr. KERR's students in Canton. It was commenced in Hongkong on a small scale last year, but it is only within the last two or three months that it has attained to its present extensive use. There are in the Colony, including Aberdeen,

527

Shaukiwan and Yaumati, about eighteen places in which about one thousand persons receive injections twice a day. There are a few, who no longer use it, who claim to have been completely cured of their opium-smoking habits by it; but others have tried it and afterwards gone back to opium-smoking.

A coolie who would smoke 5 or 6 cents' worth of opium a day only pays 1 cent for each injection, so that he saves 3 or 4 cents a day and obtains an equal effect, while at the same time he is getting cured of the opium smoking.

The Morphia used is purchased at the dispensaries as a powder at $40 a fb., by one or two men, who dissolve it in water and sell the solution to the injectors. These inject the liquid under the skin, at the muscles of the arms, with small hypodermic syringes, which are also purchased at the dispensaries. The operator begins on a patient with a big dose, which he decreases daily, or once in two days, for about a month, when the cure should be effected.

Few of those making the injections are even Chinese medical practitioners and none of them have had training under foreigners. The unrestricted use of such a drug by reckless and unqualified practitioners must be a great danger to the community and, like the unrestricted sale, seems to call for the imposition of some restriction as a safeguard. Whether Morphia in the shape of a powder comes under the Ordinance as a preparation of opium may be a question for the law officers to decide, or if the Opium Farmer wishes, he could take up a case as a

test case.

W. STANTON,

W. QUINCEY,

Inspectors.

(Minute by the Captain Superintendent of Police.)

Honourable COLONIAL TREASURER,

Report in accordance with your request.

19.6.

F. H. M.

?

HONGKONG.

REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE OBSERVATORY FOR 1892.

'389 No. 27

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor, on the 29th August, 1893.

HONGKONG OBSERVATORY, 29th March, 1893.

93

SIR,---I have the honour to submit my annual report for 1892 to His Excellency the Governor. My eighth volume of observations and researches was published last summer and the ninth volume is in the printers' hands. It contains, in addition to this report, investigations of the typhoons of 1892, the meteorological observations made every hour in 1892, and also hourly readings of tides in 1889, observations on the duration of sunshine in Formosa and on rain-fall in China during the years 1890, 1891 and 1892.

2. The branch Observatory at the Peak, suggested by General PALMER, R.E., in 1881, declared necessary for storm-warnings by the Observatory Commission in 1890, and upon which improvements in local storm-warnings mainly depend, has not yet been constructed, but a self-recording anemograph has been ordered from London. When this is properly worked at the Peak and the readings correctly and immediately telegraphed every hour to the Observatory across the harbour, it is estimated that its value will amount to about half the value of the branch Observatory, the construction of which has been so long delayed. Observations are now also made every three hours at the Gap Rock lighthouse and cabled (during the day-time only) to the Observatory. If these observations are made and transmitted properly, they will be of considerable assistance to weather-forecasts and storm-warnings. The observations at Victoria Peak were found not to be made in a sufficiently honest or careful manner and His Excellency ordered them to be discontinued last year and the instruments to be removed. Pending the arrival of the anemograph, the direction and force of the wind is estimated every hour from 7 a. to 7 p. and telegraphed to the Observatory, but the information is not always trustworthy and at times misleading.

3. The China Coast Meteorological Register, based on information received from the Eastern Extension, and Great Northern Telegraph Companies, and Chinese Telegraph Administration, was issued as usual, and since the 1st July a short provisional account of the typhoons has been printed at the end of every month in the Gazette by order of His Excellency the Governor. The positions of the typhoon-centres are given for every day on which warnings were issued and the accuracy of the latter may be inferred from the former. The stations at Swatow, Amoy, Foochow and Anping were visited last year by Mr. F. G. FIGG, and the stations at Macao, Hoihow and Haiphong by myself. Some very necessary improvements were effected, and the stations at Bolinao, Pakhoi and Cape St. James should be visited next. Telegrams from one or two ports between the latter station and Haiphong are urgently required.

4. The telegrams are frequently received too late for insertion in the daily weather-reports. That this requirement is fully recognised everywhere else in the Empire and properly provided for may be seen e.g. from the following extract from the Report on the Administration of the Meteorological Department of the Government of India in 1887-88 (Page 16, §7): "In order to facilitate and expedite the working of these arrangements, the Telegraph Department has granted the privilege of precedence urgency to telegrams referring to stormy weather and the hoisting of storm-signals between the Meteorological Reporter of Calcutta and the Port Officers and Meteorological Superintendents of Cocanada, Gopalpur, Madras, Masulipatam, Negapatam and Vizagapatam. The names of other officers will be added to this list as found necessary for the proper working of the system. Instructions for the preparation and dispatch of the telegrains in proper form, in order to secure priority of transmission to ordinary urgent messages, will be sent by the India Meteorological Office to the various officers permitted to send them."

5. Telegraphic connection with Victoria was interrupted on the 8th January, 1892, from 6 p. to 10 p., on the 20th April, from 7 a. to 10.40 a., on the 27th August, from 3.45 p. to 4.32 p., and on the 3rd November from 10 a. to 4.23 p. Interruptions occurred therefore on 4 days and, of course, also during thunderstorms. Telephonic connection between the look-out on the Peak and the Central Police Station in Victoria (for transmitting observations every hour to the Observatory) was interrupte l from the 16th June at 7 a. to the 23rd June at 2 p., and also from 10 a. to 4 p., on the 4th August, i e. on 9 days as well as during thunderstorms.

6. Telegrams giving information about typhoons were issued on 61 days. The Red Drum was hoisted 4 times, Red Ball 1, Red North Cone 1, Red South Coue 2, Black Drum 3, Black Ball 1, Black North Cone 2, Black South Cone 3, Lanterns (horizontally) 3, and Lanterns (vertically) 1 times. The Gun was not fired in 1892.

390

2

7. During 1892, in addition to meteorological registers kept regularly at about 40 stations on shore, 558 ship-logs with entries during typhoons were copied. 157 were forwarded by the Captains or Owners, and 401 were copied on board ship in the harbour. The ship-logs received in 1892 were thus distributed: for 1888, i log; for 1889, 8 logs; for 1890, 10 logs; for 1891, 52 logs; for 1892, 487 logs. But the information concerning typhoons during these years was not yet complete on the 1st January, 1893. The following number was still required: for 1888, 12 logs; for 1889, 14 logs ; for 1890, 13 logs; for 1891, 17 logs; for 1892, 41 logs. The total number of ships, whose log-books have been made use of, was 270. The total number of days' observations was 5278. This number might with advantage be increased. The difficulty is that we are all so closely engaged in the Observatory, that no more than one of us at a time can be spared for visiting ships in the harbour, and he can devote only half his hours of duty to work afloat. Every vessel entering the harbour ought to be boarded, and every log-book found to be properly kept ought to be copied. That would be useful for storm-warnings.

a

8. The following is a list of ships from which logs have been obtained in 1892; those to which * is prefixed having been communicated directly by their respective Captains, and the remainder have been copied on board the several vessels. The majority are steam-ships and the others are distinguished as follows:-b, barque; s, ship; sch., schooner.

Albania (b), Achilles, *Activ, Aden, Aglaia, *U.S.S. Alert, Altair (b), *Alwine, Airlie, Amicitia, Ancona, Angers, Argyll, Aron (b), Arratoon Apcar, Asagao, Ashington, Avochie, Bantam, Batavia,* Bayern, Belgic, Belle of Bath (s), Bellona, Benalder, Bengloe, Benlarig, Bittern (b), *Bombay, Bormida, Borneo, Breconshire, Bylgia (b), Carmarthen- shire, *Calédonien, Cambusdoon (b), Camelot, Canton, Cardiganshire, Carl Friedrich (s), Cathay, Catherine Apcar, Catterthun, Changsha, Charger (s), Charmer (s), Charon Wattana (b), Charters Tower, Cheang Chew, Cheang Hock Kian, Cheang Hye Teng, Chelydra, *Chelydra, China,* Chingtu,* Chiyuen, Chowfa,* Choysang, Chusan, Cicero, City of Pekin, City of Rio de Janeiro, Colonist, Constance (s), Continental, Cosmopolit, Crown of Arragon, Cyclops, Dardanus, Decima, Denbighshire, Deuteros, Devawongse, Diamond, *Djemnah, Donar, Don Juan, Doris, Dorothea (b), Electra, Else, Empress of China, *Empress of India, Empress of Japan, Enos Soule (b), *Esang, Esmeralda, Ethiope,* K. K. F. Fasana,* H.M.S. Firebrand, Florence Treat (b), *Fokien, Fooksang, Formosa, Frejr, Frigga, Fuping, Fushun, Gaelic, Ganges,* General Werder, Ghazee, Glamorganshire, Glenartney, Glenavon, Gleneagles, Glenearn, Glenfruin, Glengarry, Glengyle, Glenogle, Glenorchy, Glenshiel, Guthrie,* Gwalior, *Hailoong, Haiphong, Haitan, Harward (b), Heinrich (b), Hesperia, Higo Maru, Hiroshima Maru,* H. J. M. S. Hiyei,* Holstein, Hongay, Hupeh, Inconstant, Independent, Ingraban, J. D. Bischoff (s), Jenny (sch.), Jessonda (b), J. Y. Robbins (s), Kaisow, Keemun, Kiel, Kitty (b), *Kong Beng, Kowshing, Kriemhild, *Kutsang, Kwanglee, Kweilin, Kwongsang, *U.S. F. Lancaster, Lavinia (b), *Lennox, Levuka (b), Lightning, Loksang, Loosok, Lunedale, Lyee- moon, Macduff, Malacca, Marabout (s), Mathilde, *Meefoo, *Melbourne, Melpomene, *Memnon, *Menmuir, Michael Jebsen, Mongkut, Moyune, Namoa, *Namyong, Nanchang, Nanshan, Nanyang, *Natal, *Neckar, Nicoya (b), *Ningpo, Nizam, N. S. de Loreto, *Nürnberg, Oceana, Oceanic, Omega (b), Orestes, *Orion, *Uxus, *Pakshan, Palinurus, *H.M.S. Pallas, Paoting, Pathan, Pekin, Pembrokeshire, Penshaw (b), *Petersbourg, Phra Chom Klao, Phra Chula Chom Klao, Phra Nang, Picciola, H.M.S. Plover, Polyhymnia, *H.M.S. Porpoise, Port Philip, Presto, Propontis, Protos, Radnorshire, Ravenna, Richard Parsons (b), Rio, Rohilla, Rosetta, Sachem (s), Sachsen, Salatiga, Salazie, Santa Clara (s), *Santa Cruz (sch.), *Sea Swallow (sch.), *H.M.S. Severn, Shanghai, Sikh, Singan, Soochow, St. Andrews, Sterling (s), Strathesk, Strathleven, Sungkiang, Surat, Swatow, Sverre, Sydney, Taicheong, *Taichiow, Taisang, Taiyick, Taiyuan, Taksang, Tarapaca (b), Telamon, Teresa, Tetartos, Teucer, *Thales, Thermopyle (b) *Thibet, *Thisbe, Toonan, Torrington, Tsinan, Triumph, Vagabond (b), Velocity (b), *Venetia, *Verona, *Vorwaerts, Warrior (s), Wingsang, Wm. J. Rotch (b), Wm. Le Lacheur (b), *Woosung, Wosang, Xenia (b), Yangtse, Yarra, Yik- sang, Yuensang, Yungching, Yungping, *Zafiro.

9. All the observations made at noon each day during the typhoon seasons of the

past five years have been reduced and tabulated and have served for the construction of weather-maps on the basis of which the typhoons that occurred during the past five years will be investigated.

10. With the view of enabling masters of vessels to know before-hand the weather that may be expected on voyages and to select the most favourable routes during the different months of the year, all the observations hitherto collected are being distributed according to degrees of latitude and longitude, the twelve months being treated separately. Means will be taken as soon as sufficient data are entered and they will serve for the construction of maps showing the most probable values of the meteoro- logical elements in each square degree between Singapore and 180° E. Gr., and between 0° and 45° latitude. Owners, agents and captains having access to old log-books have been invited to forward

J

3

391

them to me in order that the observations may be utilised, after which the log-books will be returned. The routes followed by those lines of steamers that supply most information will, of course, be supplied with the most trustworthy information concerning the weather.

11. Unfortunately there is no prospect of additional clerical help for a purpose so useful to the shipping as this undoubtedly is. The immense bulk of records from stations on shore is not utilised for anything beyond investigations of typhoons.

12. Copies of the China Coast Meteorological Register with weather-forecasts for the following 24 hours are sent daily to the newspapers in time for insertion in the extra-number issued by each of them about noon. None of the papers prints it regularly before evening or even next morning, whereby of course their subscribers lose any benefit they might derive from the weather-forecasts. Moreover they all print the register very incorrectly. They issue news about typhoons which are derived from various sources and which are as a rule incorrect. Such items are mixed up with information supplied from the Observatory and tend to mislead the public. Although the meteorological signals and storm- warnings are issued in the interest of the shipping, and intelligent seamen are not so easily deceived as the public at large, it would still be a great improvement to have the China Coast Meteorological Register printed daily without delay and in a correct form. The subscriptions are sure to cover the expense. The cost of printing a daily weather-report is provided for by the Government in connection with every other Meteorological Office in the Empire. The information issued in 1892, concerning typhoons, is printed below (Appendix 4.). The amount of accuracy obtained may be ascertained by comparison with the report on typhoons in 1892 (Appendix B.).

13. As stated in the "Instructions for making Meteorological Observations, etc.," (KELLY AND WALSH, 1892), meteorological instruments forwarded by observers, who regularly send their registers to the Observatory, are verified here free of cost. During the past year, 11 barometers, 2 aneroids, and 66 thermometers were verified. A couple of hundred aneroids or marine barometers on board ship were also compared with the Observatory standard.

14. The following table shows the spectroscopic rain-band observed daily at 10 a. value for the year was 2.33.

The mean

Table I.

Rainband in 1892.

Date.

Jan.

Feb. Mar.

Apr.

May. June. July.

Aug. Sep. Oct.

Nov.

Dec.

4

2

4

2

3

3

3

4

2

3

3

3

3

3

2

4

3

4

3

3

3

3

3

COH 6s en co on CO Q1 T H co co co co H en co co Ti on an co co co co co co co co co

3

4

3

2

2

3

2

2

2

3

2

3

2

3

2

3

2

3

2

3

1

3

1

3

2

3

2

3.

3

3

3

3

2

1

44 HOD

4

3

4

2

~~~~~~∞ co co co on en el en co or on 30 M 2 NNNN~-

2

1

2

1

2

1

2

2

2

2

2

2

3

3

3

3

3

2

3

OOOOONNWO ∞ bet pand broad

1

1

2

3

:.

0

1

1

1

1

:

2

1

1,

2,

3,

4,

5,

1

2

1

3

6,

2

7,

8,

9,

...

4

1

3

10,

11,

12,

13,

14,

15,

16,

17.

18,

19,

20,

1

21,

2

22,

1

23,

24,

1

1

2

.1

2

2

2

3

2

3

3

3

25,

3

26,

27,

3

2

3

28,

29, 30,

31,

Means,..

2

2

::

∞ ∞ ∞ NNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNN∞ ON CO O C ∞ ∞ ∞

HHQ- ∞ Q ∞ ∞ ∞ H~~--~~~ CO ∞ NI CO CO CO 2 ~~~

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

3

2

3

2

3

3

2

2

3

CONTAI∞∞∞ ∞ co o co ~~~N~ ~ ~ ~ CO 10 60 60 N N N Y N ∞

3

3

2

4

3

2

2

3

3

5

2

2

2

3

4

Coco A co co co co 19 CS 10 09 01 CO IP ON 00 ∞ ∞ ∞ N N NNW CO 1A 1 C9 os ca.

3

3

3

2

1.71

2.07 2.16

2.37

2.94 2.97 3.16 3.26 2.69 1.87 2.07 0.81

392

4

15. The tide-tables for 1893 are based upon the analysis of the hourly readings of tides in 1887 and 1888. The hourly readings for 1889 are now published. The harmonic analysis will be done in England under the supervision of Professor G. H. DARWIN. The readings for Mean Sea Level in 1889 were as follows:-January 6.00, February 5.81, March 5.55, April 5.68, May 5.72, June 5.56, July 5.37, August 5.52, September 6.05, October 6.29, November 6.79, December 6.20. Year 5.88. Average of three years 5.86.

The highest readings in 1889 were as follows:-January 10.05, February 10.65, March 9.20, April 9.35, May 9.55, June 10.15, July 10.00, August 9.55, September 9.80, October 10.65, November 10.60, December 10.50.

The lowest readings in 1889 were as follows:-January 1.35, February 2.10, March 2.25, April 1.75, May 1.55, June 1.60, July 1.25, August 1.40, September 1.90, October 2.30, November 1.85, December 1.25.

The highest reading during the three years was 10.65 and the lowest 1.10.

16. The number of transits observed in 1892 was 389, and the inclination of the axis was deter- mined 141 times. The rates of the standard clocks are exhibited in the following tables. They are compared with the rates calculated from the formulæ exhibited at the head of the tables. Both clock- rates show the existence of waves. In case of Dent's clock the periods and amplitudes are larger, which make the errors appear to be twice as large as in case of Brock's clock, where the periods are shorter. The probable deviation of each ten-day rate from the preceding rate is 0.08 in case of Dent's clock, and 0.07 in case of Brock's. When it is taken into account that the former was cleaned and re-started later than the latter, it appears that one goes just as well as the other and equal weight is therefore given to them every morning when they are compared with the time-ball clock for setting the latter to correct time. Sir HOWARD GRUBB's chronograph is working extremely well.

Period.

Table II.

Rate of Dent Standard Sidereal Time Clock in 1892.

7.⇒+23.01 −03.063 (7-70°)

[arc=3° 9'+1']

Observed rate

Temp.

Calculated rate

T

S.

O

S.

S.

December, 27-January,

+ 1.24

66.0

+ 2.26

January,

6--- 16-

16,.

+ 1.44

65.4

+ 2.30

26...

39

+ 1.61

65.3

+ 2.30

""

26-February,

5,..

+ 1.57

66.5

+ 2.23

February,

5- 15--

15,.

""

+ 1.79

65.8

+ 2.27

وو

25,..

+ 1.85

66.1

+ 2.25

"

99

""

March,

April,

31

May,

""

""

June,

25-March,

6- 16-

26-April,

5- 15-

25-May,

5- 15-

25-June,

6,

+ 2.00

66.2

+ 2.25

0.25

16,.

+ 2.15

66.3

33

+ 2.24

0.09

"

26,

+ 2.34

66.8

+ 2.21

+ 0.13

5,.

+ 2.48

66.2

+ 2.25

+ 0.23

15,..

+ 2.38

69.5

+ 2.04

+ 0.34

25,.

+ 2.38

71.8

"

+ 1.89

+ 0.49

5,

+ 2.04

75.3

+ 1.68

+ 0.36

""

15,.

+ 2.03

74.5

+ 1.73

+ 0.30

"

25,.

+1.97

74.6

+ 1.72

+ 0.25

4,..

+ 1.53

82.2

+ 1.24

+ 0.29

4- 14-

14,..

+1.48

80.8

+ 1.33

""

+ 0.15

""

""

24,.

+ 1.35

81.5

+ 1.28

+ 0.07

"

""

99

July,

24-July,

4- 14-

24-August,

4,.

+ 1.22

81.9

+ 1.26

0.04

""

14,.

+ 1.13

82.9

+ 1.20

0.07

""

24,.

+ 0.97

83.5

+ 1.16

0.19.

3,.

+ 0.94

82.2

+ 1.24

- 0.30

August, 3-

13,...

+ 1.01

83.9

+1.14

0.13

13-

23.......

+ 1.01

83.3

+ 1.17

-0.16

23-September, 2,

+ 1.05

80.7

+ 1.34

0.29

September, 2-

12,

+ 1.03

80.7

+ 1.34

0.31

"

October,

12-

"

22-October,

2-

12-

22,.

+ 1.14

81.2

++.31

0.17

2,.

+ 1.27

78.6

+ 1.47

0.20

وو

12,

+ 1.40

78.0

+1.51

0.11

39

22,

+ 1.52

77.0

+ 1.57

0.05

29

22-November,

1,

+1.67

73.5

+ 1.79

0.12

November, 1

11,

+ 1.74

74.1

+ 1.76

0.02

""

11

35

""

21,

+1.71

73.3

+ 1.80

0.09

"

21-December,

December, 1

1,.

+ 1.83

71.7

+ 1.90

0.07

11.

+ 2.08

68.7

+ 2.09

0.01

39

11

""

""

21,...

+ 2.46

64.9

+ 2.33

+ 0.13

21-

"

"

31,....

+ 2.32

65.6

+ 2.28

+ 0.04

Period.

5

Table III.

Rate of the Brock Standard Mean Time Clock in 1892.

T+23.60-03.075 (T-75°) +0.0020 (t-July 1)

Observed rate

To

Temp.

Arc.

a

393

Calculated rate.

To--Te

S.

!!

S.

S.

"

December, 27-January,

January, 6-

16-

26-February,

6,

+ 2.48

72.8

4 12

36

+ 2.41

+ 0.07

>>

16,

+ 2.77

70.1

4 12

18

+ 2.63

+ 0.14

26,

+ 2.87

70.6

4 12 6

+ 2.61

+ 0.26

5,

+ 2.51

71.7

4 11

18

+ 2.50

+ 0.01

February,

5-

"9

15,

+ 2.68

70.6

4

9

48

+ 2.65

+ 0.03

+

15-

>>

25,

+ 2.54

70.7

4

9

30

+ 2.66

- 0.12

"J

March,

25-March,

6,

+ 2.49

71.5

4

8

42

+ 2.62

6-

16,

+ 2.47

71.0

4

9

6

+ 2.68

0.13

- 0.21

16-

""

27

26,

+ 2.62

71.5

4

CO

8

36

+ 2.66

-

0.04

"

April,

26-April,

5,

+ 2.63

71.9

00

8

.0

+ 2.65

- 0.02

"

15,

+ 2.41

74.9

4

8 48

+ 2.45

0.04

15-

وو

""

25,

+ 2.25

77.1

4

8

36

+ 2.30

0.05

25-May,

5,

+ 2.05

79.9

4

8 36

+ 2.11

- 0.06

May,

5-

""

15,

+ 2.07

80.7

4

8 42

+ 2.07

0.00

15-

""

25,

+ 2.13

79.9

8 6

+ 2.15

- 0.02

25-June,

4,

+ 1.85

85.8

4

H

4

0

+ 1.73

+ 0.12

June,

4-

""

14,

+ 2.07

84.6

3 57 48

+ 1.84

+ 0.23

14-

19

*

22

24,

+ 1.97

85.0

3 58 12

+ 1.83

+ 0.14

35

July,

24-July,

4,

+ 1.97

85.2

3

57 48

+ 1.83

+ 0.14

4-

99

14,

+ 1.97

86.3

3 58

0

+1.77

+ 0.20

14-

""

55

24,

+ 1.76

86.9

3 57 54

+ 1.75

+ 0.01

"

24-August,

3,

+ 1.82

86.0

3 58 12

August,

3-

"9

13,

+1.87

86.7

3

57

2 6

+ 1.84

0.02

+ 1,80

+ 0.07

13-

"

"3

23,

+ 1.78

85.2

3 58 42

+ 1.93

0.15

""

23-September, 2,

+ 1.86

83.3

4 0 6

+ 2.10

0.24

"

October,

September, 2-

12-

22-October,

12,

+ 1.93

83.0

3 59 0

+ 2.14

0.21

22.

"

+ 1.97

83.5

3 58 48

+ 2.12

- 0.15

2,

+ 2.16

81.0

3

2.

""

12,

+ 2.29

81.5

12-

S

"

"

22,

+ 2.58

79.2

3

སྐྱ་པ་པ

57 48

+ 2.33

· 0.17

3 57 42

+ 2.31

0.02

55 48

+ 2.50

+ 0.08

22-November,

November, 1-

1,

+ 2.79

75.2

3

55 36

+ 2.82

0.03

11,

+ 2.88

75.2

3

55 24

+ 2.85

+ 0.03

11-

21,

ود

+ 2.71

78.6

3

55 12

+ 2.63

+ 0.08

19

21-December, 1,

+ 2.87

76.1

3

54 54

+ 2.82

+ 0.05

December, 1-

11,

""

+ 3.23

71.5

3 57 24

+ 3.18

+ 0.05

11-

21,'

99

+ 3.95

69.5

3 57 12

21-

31,

"

+ 3.84

70.0

3 58 0

+ 3.35

+ 3.34

17. As stated in the time-ball notice published in the Government Gazette on the 10th January, 1885, the time-ball is not dropped on Sundays or on Government holidays. It was, however, dropped also on Sundays in 1892, except when any assistant was sick or absent on duty or leave. On the 3rd, 4th and 5th of March, the apparatus was under repair and the ball was not hoisted. On the 22nd April, a thunderstorm raged in the neighbourhood. On the 2nd May, a wire in the lock was found fused by lightning. On the 11th of May, the line was out of order. On the 16th June, a thunderstorm was raging. On the 8th of August, the key of the tower was forgotten. On these days the ball was not hoisted. On the 23rd November, the ball failed to drop, the tooth of the lock being so worn that the piston would not rest on it. The ball was therefore dropped 345 times, and failed once in 1892:-

394

Table IV.

Errors of Time Ball in 1892.

means too late.

+ meaus too early.

Date.

Jan.

Feb. Mar.

Apr.

May.

June. July.

Aug.

Sept.

Oct. Nov. Dec.

1,

:.

0.1

0.1

-0.5

0.1

2,

0.1

.0.3

-0.5

3.

+0.2

0.1

0.1

-0.2

4,

+0.2

0.1

0.1

0.1

2222

0.1

0.1

0.1

-0.2

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

-0.3

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

-0.2

0.1

-0.5

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

-0.3

-0.3

0.1

5,

+0.4

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

-0.4

0.1

0.1

6,

0.1

P

-0.2

- 1.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

-0.5

0.1

0.1

7,

-0.3

...

- 1.3

0.1

0.1

-0.4

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

8,

0.1

0.1

- 1.4

0.1

+0.2

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1.

9,

0.1

0.1

- 1.5

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

+0.2

0.1

0.1

0.1

10,

0.1

-0.2

- 1.6

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

+0.2

0.1

0.1

0.1

11,

0.1

0.1

....

-1.7

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

12,

0.1

0.1

— 1.7

+0.2

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

-0.2

-0.2

-0.2

0.1

13,

0.1

0.1

0.1

+0.2

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

-0.3

-0.3

-0.2

-0.3

14,

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

-0.4

0.1

-0.3

-0.2

15,

0.1

0.1

-0.2

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

-0.5

0.1

-0.3

-0.6

16,

0.1

0.1

-0.5

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

-0.2

0.1

www

-0.9

17,

0.1

0.1

-0.7

0.1

0.1

+0.2

0.1

0.1

0.1

-0.3

0.1

0.1

18,

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

+0.3

0.1

0.1

-0.2

0.1

0.1

0.1

19,

0.1

+0.2

G

-0.2

0.1

0.1

+0.4

0.1

+0.2

-0.3

0.1

0.1

-0.2

20,

0.1

+0.2

-0.3

0.1

0.1

+0.4

+0.2

0.1

-0.3

0.1

0.1

0.1

21,

0.1

-0.5

0.1

+0.2

0.1

0.1

0.1

-0.4

+0.2

0.1

0.1

22,

0.1

+0.3

-0.2

+0.2

0.1

0.1

-0.2

-0.4

+0.2

0.1

0.1

23,

0.1

0.1

0.1 +0.4

+0.2

0.1

0.1

0.1

-0.2

0.1

0.1

24,

0.1

0.1

0.1

+0.3

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

-0.5

-0.2

+0.3

25,

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

+0.4

26,

+0.2

0.1

0.1

+0.3

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

-0.2

0.1

+0.5

0.1

27,

+0.2

0.1

0.1

+0.6

0.1

+0.2

0.1

-0.3

0.1 -0.5

+0.2

28,

0.1

0,1

-0.3

0.1

-0.3

0.1

+0.2

0.1

0.1

0.1

-0.4

0.1

29,

0.1

0.1

-0.4

0.1

-0.3

0.1

+0.2

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

30,

31,

0.1

::

-0.4

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

-0.2

0.1

0.1

-0.2

-0.3

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

18. An extension of the main-building is urgently required as the Observatory is not nearly of the dimensions recommended by General H. S. PALMER, R.E., twelve years ago. In fact, the building was not hitherto properly finished, the pendant to the west to correspond to the transit-room towards the east not yet having been built. There is a drawing of it in the Office of Public Works, constructed by Mr. J. M. PRICE, the architect, who built the Observatory. Besides my private apartments and the laboratories, most of which are too small, there is only one office for the accommodation of the whole staff. It is 13 feet broad and 20 feet long. The telegraph and telephone apparatus are in the same room. There are often six officials working together, the same room being occupied almost constantly day and night. In a climate like this such overcrowding is undesirable. In other depart- ments the different foreign officials have each a separate office apart from the natives. In order to carry out the investigations printed in Appendix B I had to give the assistants the use of my dining- room, although that caused me very grave inconvenience and some expense.

19. Some of the principal duties of the staff are distributed as follows, the number of hours during which each official attended during the year being added in parenthesis:-

Mr. J. I. PLUMMER, Chief Assistant, (1853 hours), makes astronomical and magnetic observations, the latter under Mr. FIGG's superintendence,-regulates clocks and copies ship-logs.

Mr. F. G. FIGG, First Assistant, (2047 hours), attends to storm-warnings and investigations of typhoons. He teaches all the other assistants and does any work which is too difficult

for them.

Miss A. DOBERCK, Assistant Meteorologist, (883 hours in half a year) issues weather-forecasts and daily meteorological registers, and attends to meteorological observations and tabulations.

Mr. HO TOSHANG, Second Assistant, (1936 hours), hoists and sets the time-ball and attends to the continuous records and the construction of the monthly and annual reports, in which he is assisted by two native clerks, one (2048 hours), of whom besides attends to electric, and the other (2083 hours), to photographic work.

20. Observations of magnetic declination and horizontal force were made with the unifilar mag- netometer, Elliott Brothers, No. 55, and the dips were observed with dip-circle, Dover No. 71. Some deflections which were badly observed were excluded and are printed in parenthesis.

The methods adopted in making the observations and in determining and applying the corrections are explained in Appendix G. of Observations and Researches made in 1885: "On the verification of

7

395

72

the unifilar magnetometer, Elliott Brothers, No. 55." The value of log K was 3.44955 at 25°. The value of P was + 8.732. The mean value of the magnetic moment of the vibrating needle was 0.46028 in English Units and 600.93 in C.G.S. Units.

The times of vibration exhibited in the table are each derived from 12 observations of the time occupied by the magnet in making 100 vibrations, corrections having been applied for rate of chrono- meter and arc of vibration.

The observations of horizontal force are expressed in C.G.S. units (one centimeter, one gramme, one second), but the monthly synopsis exhibits X, the horizontal, as well as Y, the vertical, and the total forces, which have been computed by aid of the observed dips, and their values are also given in English units (one foot, one grain, one second) and in Gauss's units (one millimeter, one milligram, one second).

21. The cisterns of the barograph and standard barometers are placed 109 feet above M.S.L. The bulbs of the thermometers are rotated 108 feet above M.S.L., and 4 feet above the grass. The solar radiation thermometer is placed at the same height. The rim of the rain-gauge is 105 feet above M.S.L., and 21 inches above the ground.

22. The monthly Weather Reports are arranged as follows:-

Table I. exhibits the hourly readings of the barometer reduced to freezing point of water, but not to sea level, as measured (at two minutes to the hour named) from the barograms.

Tables II. and III. exhibit the temperature of the air and of evaporation as determined by aid of rotating thermometers. Table II. exhibits also the extreme temperatures reduced to rotating thermo- meter. Table III. exhibits also the solar radiation (black bulb in vacuo) maximum temperatures reduced to Kew arbitrary standard.

Table IV. exhibits the mean relative humidity in percentage of saturation and mean tension of water vapour present in the air in inches of mercury for every hour of the day and for every day in the month calculated by aid of Blanford's tables from the data in Tables II. and III.

Table V. exhibits the duration of sunshine expressed in hours from half an hour before to half an hour after the hour (true time) named.

Table VI. exhibits the amount of rain (or dew) in inches registered from half an hour before to half an hour after the hour named. It exhibits also the estimated duration of rain.

Table VII. exhibits the velocity of the wind in miles and its direction in points (1-32). The velocity is measured from half an hour before to half an hour after the hour named, but the direction is read off at the hour.

Table VIII. exhibits the amount (0-10), name (Howard's classification) and direction whence coming of the clouds. Where the names of upper and lower clouds are given, but only one direction, this refers to the lower clouds.

Table IX. exhibits for every hour in the day, the mean velocity of the wind reduced to 4 as well as to 2 directions, according to strictly accurate formulæ, and also the mean direction of the wind.

Below this is printed a list of phenomena observed.

23. The following annual Weather Report for 1892, is arranged as follows:-

Table V. exhibits the mean values for the year (or hourly excess above this) obtained from the monthly reports. The total duration of rain was 996 hours. There fell at least 0.01 inch of rain on 141 days.

Table VI. exhibits the number of hours during portion of which at least 0.005 inch of rain (or dew) was registered.

Table VII. exhibits the number of days with wind from eight different points of the compass. The figures are obtained from the mean daily directions in Table VII. of the monthly reports.

Days with wind from a point equidistant from two directions given are counted half to one of these and half to the other e.g., half of the days when the wind was NÑE are counted as N, and the other half as

NE.

Table VIII. exhibits the number of days on which certain meteorological phenomena were registered, and also the total number of thunderstorms noted in the neighbourhood during the past year. A slight earthquake was noticed about 10 a. on the 22nd April. Afterglows stronger than usual were noticed since the 15th December.

The extremes of humidity and vapour

Table IX. shows the frequency of clouds of different classes. Table X. is arranged nearly the same as in previous years. Table XI. exhibits the monthly and annual extremes. tension are only approximate as the hourly values are not calculated.

Table XII. contains five-day means.

Tables XIII., XIV. and XV. contain magnetic observations.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

To the Honourable G. T. M. O'BRIEN, C.M.G.,

Colonial Secretary, &c., &c., &c.

W. DOBERCK,

Director.

Pressure,

Temperature,..

Diurnal Range,

Humidity,

Vapour Tension,

Sunshine (Total),

Rainfall, (Total),

Hours of Rain (Total),

Intensity of Rain,. Wind-Velocity,

Wind-Direction,

Cloudiness,

Solar Radiation,

Excess of do. do.,

1 a.

2 a.

Table V.

Mean Values and Hourly Excess above the Mean of Meteorological Elements in 1892.

5 a.

6 a.

7 a.

8 a.

9 a.

10 a.

11 a. Noon.

1 p.

2 p.

3 p. 4 p.

5 p. 6 p.

7 p.

8 p.

9 p.

10 p.

11 p.

Midt.

3 a.

4 a.

Mean or

Total.

+.004 -.006 1.5 1.7

...

+ 4+

-.014-017-011+.001

1.9 2.0

P

2.1 2.1

+.017+.032 1.5 0.4

+.043 +.046 +.036 +.015 + 0.6 +1.4 + 2.3 +2.8

-.009 .029 +3.0 + 2.9

.042 -.045 + 2,5 + 1.9 +0.9

-.041

032-017-001

+.013 +.021

0.0

0.4 0.6

0.7 0.9

+.021

1.1

.014 |

1.3

29.840

719.0

99.1

...

...

:

...

...

5 + 5 +

+.003 +.001

+.000

6 +

-.002

-.005

5+ 5

-.005

+

4 +

1

2

4

6

8

.000 +.002

.001 -.004

.003 .004

7.3

75.9 149.2

1.620 3.485

2.705

4.035

4.570

6.195

6.675

5.390

6.990

38 38

39

51

54 51

59

52

0.043

0.092

0.069

0.079

0.085

0.121

0.113

0.104

0.9

1.2

1.4

K

1.1

1.2

1,2

1.1

0.1

50

7° 6°

70

go

-

6o go

+ 1

+ 3

162.7 178.4

5.635

52 43

0.134 0.131 0.9 +0.8

60 + 2o

+ 2

192.1 192.5

4.030

37

0.109 0.119 + 2.2+ 1.8 + 4° + 9°

4,520

38

8

..003 ..001 198.6 192.4

2.755

39

0.071 0.049

7

6

5

p

.000 +.002

3

.002

+

1 +

2

+

2 + 3

+ 4 +

4

77

.000

.000

.000

+.003 +.006

+.009 +.007

0.619

180.8 162.8

97.8 12.0

1802.5

...

1.845

38

2.435

27

4.515

35

3.230

3.630

3.340

2.215

0.090 0.129

+2.0 + 2.0

+130 +120

0

+ 1.7 + 1.3 + 90 + 80

41

0.079

+ 0.5

+ 80 +

35

0.104

38

30

2.950

34

3,205

2.050 2.950

90.970

33

39

32

973

0.088

0.074

0.087

0.097

0.053

0.092

0.093

0.4

GURA 3

1.1

1.2

0.8

0.4

S

P

0.6 0.7

12.8

3o + 1°

50

50

4

5

40

6o

E 4° N

65

1259.3

...

49°,1

Table VI.

Number of Hours during portion of which it rained, for each Month in the Year 1892.

396

Month.

1 a.

2 a.

3 a.

4 a.

5 a.

6 a.

7 a.

8 a.

9 a.

10 a.

11 a. Noon. 1 p.

2 p.

3 p.

4 p.

5 p. 6 p.

7 p.

8 p.

9 p.

10 p. 11 p. Midt.

Total.

January,

February,

2

March,

1

1

5

11

April,

May,

June,

July,

August,

6

6

September,

5

3

October,

1

1

November,

1

December,

2

2

2

3

C4H67600 :**

Q10 11 10 C07::*

124667 :22

6948ZONI 00

:047B66HEL :~

2126 ∞ O N 10 C0 1 1 O

1

1

1

1

1

3

3

1

11

5

9

6 10

10

11

8

6

5

...

...

3

1

HOOT ::

3

7

9

9

6

6

8

4

5

1

...

...

3

4

2

3

3

2

2

1

12367&*

12234OMO♡ :: pod

2:23667∞ :--

1

1

2

9

3

...

...

1

3

I

2124842::2

1

2

3

6

3

9

10

6

4

5

5

4

...

1

1

:32387

1216467SD:1:

1

21

...

I

2

4

3

8

4

6

1

1

-2

I

1

2

1204626+ :-:

32

64

128

105

179

130

138

110

4.

1

15

47

Total....... 38

38

39

51

54

51

59

52 52

43 37

38

39 38

27

35

336

41

35

38

30

34

33

39

32

22

973

January,

February,

March,

April,

May,

June,....

July,...

August,...

September,

October,

Month.

9.

Table VII.

Number of days with wind from eight different points of the Compass during each month of the year 1892.

W.

N.

NE.

E.

SE.

S.

SW.

NW.

January,

February,

March,

5

6

18

1

1

10

2

19

1

1

1

3

10

18

1

3

1

April,

1

23

3

1

May,

2

18

2

3

3

1

June,

I

7

7

12

1

July,

1

1

17

6

3

1

2

August,

13

1

1

September,

4

October,

7

CO

20

223

12

1

1

CO

4

November,

4

5

19

December,

10

9

9

:

:

1

1

1

...

1

1

1

Sum,......

40

43

193

17

20

29

14

10

Table VIII.

Total Number of Days on which different Meteorological Phenomena were noted and Total Number of

Thunderstorms during each month of the year 1892.

Month.

11

:

Fog.

Electric

Phenomena.

Dew.

Rainbows.

Lunar Halo.

Corona.

Lunar

Solar Halo.

Corona.

Solar

10

:.

:

12

6

1

:

:

:

10

5

2

1

10

5

1

8

10

5

:

1

11

1

Co

6

8

2

1

:

:.

:

6

:

1

2

1

2

:

:

12

11

6

4

ลง

2

1

4

2

16

16

6

1

2

9

4

18

153

10

5 11

6

8

11

12

:

.::.

:

:

20

19

11

16

5

3

2

9

100

5

1

6

1

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

12

4.

1

2

10

3

4

1

:

2

4

3

3

9

7

:

2

1

1

2

Co

6

:

4

:

1

November,

December,

Sums,......

45

81 72 46

17

3833

93

42

16

23

70

32

10

397

398

10

Table IX.

Total Number of Times that Clouds of different Forms were observed in each month of the

Month.

year

1892.

C.

c-str.

c-cum. sm-cum.

cum. cum-str. str. R-cum. cum-nim.

nim.

January,....

N

10

5

68

64

10

12

22

8

February,

March,

1

6

43

85

:

18

32

48

:.

3

4

27

88

15

52

42

...

38

April,

9

12

66

86

:

3

17

28

49

May,

30

9

49

127

1

24

20

50

June,

6

48

41

23

159

1

5

21

49

July,

88

89

65

26

174

2

8

2

23

31

August,

7

52

51

34

142

5

4

19

44

September,....

34

26

78

99

10

18

20

35

October,

19

18

November,

25

10

39889

70

119

1

1

2

69

87

December,

3

10

5

63

35

:

:

27

7

13

9

23

Sums,........

23

320

248

616

1265

81

189

243

392

Table X.

Baro-

Mean Diurnal Variabi-

Weight of water

RAINFALL.

vapour

Month.

metric

Tide.

lity of

in troy

Hourly Intensity

MEAN DIRECTION OF CLOUDS WHENCE

NUMBER OF DAYS

WITH

COMING.

CLOUDS BELOW.

Temper-

grains in Mean. 1892.

of Rain.

ea, cubic

ature.

ft. of air.

Lower. Upper.

Cirrus. 2,000 ft. 1,000 ft.

ins.

ins.

ins.

ins.

January,

0.118

1.96

4.14

0.98

0.520

0.021

E 7° NW 30° S

CH

2

February,

0.108

3.86

5.16

1.32

1.250

0.009

E 17° S W 1° S

W

22

13

March,

0.110

3.99

5.00

3.24

3.900

0.038

E 11 SW 16° S

:

April,......... 0.092

2.07

6.74

5.27

1.595

0.083

E 33° S W 8° S

2223

24

6

23

12

May,

0.084

2.12

7.91

12.54

8.575

0.075

June,

0.073

1.21

9.14

15.81

34.375 0.240

July,

0.068

0.97

9.63 15.98

August,

0.075

1.07

⚫9.04 14.85

S 37° E W 5° N N 4° E

S 15° W N 11° W N 23° W

10.785 0.169 S 20° E N 8° WN 39° W

12.090 0.153 S 2o E E 17° NE 36° NĮ 10

22 23

22 23

7

19

4

September,

0.078

2.13

8.01

12.65

7.005 0.079

E 8° NE 38° N

1

10

1

October,... 0.100

1.15

5.82

5.36

0.020 0.005

E 23° N N 19° W

:

November,...... 0.108 1.89

5.87

1.17

December,...... 0.110 1.77

3.35

1.00

0.340 0.008 E 6° N S 22° W

0.515 0.009 E11 NW 36° S

10

2

2

:

Mean,...... 0.094

2.02

6.65

90.17

90.970

0.074

E 27° S W 32° N N 19° W

169

50

11

Table XI.

Monthly Extremes of the Principal Meteorological Elements registered during the year 1892.

399

BAROMETER.

TEMPERATUre.

HUMI-

DITY.

VAPOUR TENSION.

RAIN.

WIND VELOCITY. TION.

RADIA-

·

MONTH.

Max.

Min.

Max.

Min.

Min.

Max.

Min.

Daily Hourly Max. Max.

Sun

Max.

Max.

January..... 30.367 29.845

75.6

46.5

31

0.617 0.169

0.350 0.155

46

137.2

7

February,

30.222 29.568

78.8

48.9

42

0.726

0.230 0.430

0.420

42

139.1

March,....

30.143 29.552

80.3

46.3

44

0.779

0.244 1.800

0.320

46

136.1

April,........ 30.098 29.642

84.1

57.0

20

0.891

0.182

3.995 1.800

36

146.5

May,

30.015 29.571

87.9

64.1

35

0.999

0.344

3.615

2.085

38

152.0

June,

29.817 29.531

90.2

70.0

60

.1.001

0.680 10.845 2.150

39

154.9

July,...

29.830 29.304

90.0

74.2

66

1.045

0.778 2.020 0.705

33

159.6

August,

29.834

29.523

91.1

73.7

53

0.968

0.716 1.305

0.805

35

152.8

September,...... 29.903

29.317

93.9

65.6

37

0.985

0.381 1.690

1.145

32

150.7

October,

30.084 29.528

87.6

64.0

22

0.819

0.177 0.015

0.005

31

146.0

November, 30.227 29.595

83.0

52.1

32

0.762

0.192 0.220

0.110

35

143.3

December,

30.328 29.918

73.2

44.2

18

0.549

0.069 0.180

0.040

32

130.2

Year,

30.367 29.304

93.9

44.2

18

1.045

0.069 10.845

2.150

46

159.6

400

12

Table XII.

Five-Day Means of the Principal Meteorological Elements observed at Hongkong in 1892.

FIVE-DAY PERIODS. Barometer.

Temper-

Humidity.

ature.

Vapour

Wind Tension. Velocity.

Nebulosity. Sunshine.

Rain.

January

1- 5

30.137

60.6

75

0.397

9.0

8.9

2.7

0.005

6-10

.122

56.2

59

.271

10.1

3.1

7.2

0.000

11-15

29.975

59.1

64

.326

13.6

1.5

94

0.000

"

.16-20

30.075

57.9

72

.348

11.8

6.7

4.2

0.000

39

.21-25

.184

59.8

68

.356

13.7

4.7

5.5

0.000

""

.26-30

.001

63.0

90

.521

15.6

8.1

1.3

0.099

J

.31- 4

29.967

65.6

79

.499

10.3

2.9

8.1

0.001

""

February

5- 9

30.063

57.2

74

.348

18.3

9.5

1.7

0.031

..10-14

29.935

64.3

86

.521

10.9

6.5

8.6

0.000

.15-19

30.021

56.5

82

.378

15.2

9.8

00

0.024

**

.20-24

29.731

65.3

94

.587

17.1

9.6

1.0

0.121

.25- 1

.805

60.6

91

.483

22.8

9.5

0.5

0.061

March

2- 6

.715

68.1

83.

.584

11.1

9.1

2.9.

0.094

7-11

.917

59.3

82

.415

21.9

9.9

0.0

0.007

"

...12-16

.946

55.8

80

.367

11.9

9,8

0.2

0.000

.17-21

.959

59.0

79

.401

16.1

9.2

1.7

0.003

33

.22-26

.888

64.7

86

.526

18.7

8.2

4.6

0.020

.27-31

.971

60.1.

85

.441

22.2

9.6

0.9

0.656

53

April

1- 5

30.006

66.5

54

.344

11.2

6.4

4.6

0.015

6-10

29.846

69.8

85

.622

14.8

7.5

3.3

0.252

.11-15

.847

66.9

82

.547

14.8

8.9

‚1.7

0.127

.16-20

.799

69.9

87

.644

17.9

9.2

1.1

0.488

.21-25

.743

74.1

95

.803

13.3

7.5

4.4

1.424

.26-30

.827

74.5

90

.775

17.3

7.7

4.1

0.013

""

May

1- 5

.870

72.8

80

.650

10.5

6.2

5.4

0.291

6-10

.750

75.5

88

.776

12.8

8.3

2.9

0.767

>

.11-15

.784

72.6

*777

.614

18.3

8.9

2.8

0.000

16-20

29.778

72.0

81

.632

17.0

7.8

3.5

0.056

"

.21-25

.671

77.3

88

.825

12.5

9.0

2.2

0.560

...26-30

.689

81.2

85

.900

11.7

8.2

4.4.

0.041

""

.31- 4

.707

83.5

77

.893

10.2

5.6

9.8

0.045

June

5- 9

.618

77.6

84

.795

16.5

8.0

5.2

0.973

.10-14

.599

82.1

77

.851

10.7

6.5

8.4

0.032

"

.15-19

.600

78.2

92

.882

13.2

9.8

0.8

4.739

33

.20-24

.685

82.2

81

.887

12.4

8.1

5.0

0.111

-25-29

.704

81.1

84

.885

11.5

7.0

5.9

0.563

"3

.30- 4

.718

80.5

86

.893

14.6

8.5

0.8

0.699

"

July

5-9

.754

82.0

83

.908

5.1

6.3

7.3

0.000

10-14-

.703

81.4

83

.891

5.8

7.1

5.1

0.470

32

15-19

.619

82.0

83

.906

12.0

7.2

6.6

0.323

""

..20-24

.417

81.6

84

.905

12.6

7.8

4.6

0.343

20

.25-29

.588

79.7

91

.921

6.4

7.8

1.5

0.727

39

30- 3

.655

81.6

84.

.902

7.3

5.6

6.4

0.470

August

4-8

.749

83.4

76

.874

9.4

3.4

10.7

0.177

9-13

.740

81.9

78

.851

4.9

4.0

9.2

0.233

""

.14-18

.686

82.3

79

.877

9.1

4.3

9.0

0.042

,,

19-23

.711

78.5

86

.835

10.8

7.3

5.0

0.404

33

24-28

.727

78.5

88

.855

8.5

7.6

3.2

0.582

""

.29- 2

*.620

777.7

90

.857

-10.9

8.7

1.5

0.824

September

3- 7

.504

81.1

72

.758

7.0

5.5

8.2

0.123

8-12

.515

78.9

78

.769

7.8

4.8

6.9

0.083

29

.13-17

.705

81.5

68

.725

14.4

3.5

9.7

0.022

"

.18-22.

.691

76.9

83

.775

12.8

9.6

1.0

0.848

""

.23-27

.774

77.1

76

.712

6.1

6.4

4.8

0.000

""

.28-2

.842

75.6

73

.659

14.2

6.7

4.3

0.018

"3

October.

3- 7

.846

77.3

71

.666

16.3

4.7

8.4

0.000

8-12

.728

77.5

50

.474

11.9

3.2

9.9

0.000

>>

.13-17

.930

75.3

70

.616

17.1

2.4

9.8

0.000

""

.18-22

.980

73.4

70

.579

14.7

4.3

8.5

0.004

""

.23-27

.954

71.3

63

.487

14.6

2.5

8.7

0.000

.28- 1

.896.

71.4

54

.412

12.4

0.5

9.7

0.000

November.

2- 6

.903

71.0

72

.550

16.9

1.7

9.4

0.000

7-11

.906

72.8

85

.689

17.4

7.9

1.7

0.009

"

12-16

.990

70.1

78

.578

13.7

8.1

2.7

0.059

17-21

.895

72.4

777

.614

16.5

6.4

5.3

0.000

*3

22-26

.894

69.1

69

.511

9.7

4.5

5.8

0.000

.27- 1

30.155

60.5

51

.270

9.1

3.6

8.2

0.000

December

2- 6

.131

63.2

67

.389

12.0

9.2

1.3

0.009

7-11

.029

61.1

78

.419

8.8

9.9

0.2

0.074

"

12-16

.224

52.8

43

.175

11.3

4.3

6.5

0.020

33

.17-21

.178

53.9

36

.152

13.0

0.7

8.4

0.000

""

..22-26

.026

60.3

67

.354

9.2

0.7

8.9

0.000

..27-31

.040

61.1

61

.330

10.5

1.4

8.5

0.000

13

Table XIII.

Observations of Magnetic Declination and Dip.

401

1892.

H.K.M.T.

Declination East.

Observer.

H.K.M.T.

Dip North.

Needle.

Observer.

January,

14a 2h. 49m. p.

0° 36'

6"

J.I.P.

15 3h 33m p.

32° 6'.37

3

J.I.P.

6.45

وو

February,

17 2 56 p.

35 3

15

3 39 p.

8.55

6.99

11

"

91

March,....

17 3 3 p.

32 39

15 3 50 P.

4.77

3.10

35

"

April,

15 2 33 p.

35 11

12 3 40 P.

1.27

99

4.17

>>

16 3 38 p.

31

29

~~

32 1.38

"J

58.38

19

May,

June,

17 2

55

p.

31

39

13

"}

3 40 p.

32 0.92

17 3

55

P.

32 43

3.86

""

""

"

17 3

p.

33

1

14

3 51

29

P.

1.27

"J

0.03

>>

July,

16 2

58 P.

30 52

14 3 54 P.

5.51

4.73

و"

August,

16 2 44 p.

33 34

F.G.F.

15

3 46 P.

4.76

F.G.F.

7.13

**

September,

13 2 47 p.

32 45

14

>>

3 33 P.

2,50

2.44

33

35

16

3

35 P.

4.60

1

0.96

39

">

October,

14 2 42 p.

November,

December,

16 2 53 p.

16 2 48 p.

32 40

34 25

34 15

17

95

4 15 P.

3.05

*5

32

5.96

19

J.I.P.

14

3

51 p. 31

59.38

J.I.P.

32

· 1.45

14 S

33

49 P.

31

59.67

3

59

32 2.49

"

DATE.

1892.

H.K.M.T.

Time

of one Vibra- tion.

Table XIV.

Observations of Horizontal Magnetic Force.

Tem-

perature Log mX.

Cent.

Value of

m.

Distance in

Tem-

H.K.M.T.

meters.

Centi- perature Deflection. Log

Cent.

mi

X.

Value of X.

Obser.

ver,

January 13,... 2h. 35m. p.

3o. .5837

February 16,... 2 42 p.

March

March

April

16,...

18....

13,...

2 51 p.

4 28 p.

169.85 2.34152

3 .5842 14 .9 2.34099 604.37

3.5852 15 .8 2.34080 602.93

3.5920 23 .1 2.34034 602.87

605.22

3h. 28m. p.

30

179.5

40

7° 6′42′′.5 2 59 24

3 47 P.

30

15 .4

7 650

3.22230

3.22162

0.36275 J.I.P.

40

2 59 4

3 50 p.

30

16 .9

5 55

3.21974

0.36281

0.36352

"

"

40

2 57 42.5

3 57 p.

30

23 .5

7 137.5

3.22011

0.36317

"}

40

2 57 35

2 44 p. 3 .5937 20 .2 2.33944 601.61

3 35 p.

30

21 .0

7 3 12.5

3.21921

0.36316

"

40

2 57 49

May

16,...

June

15,...

July

2 52 p.

2 48 p.

15.... 2 56 p.

August 16,...

September 13,...

October 14,... 3 17 p. 3 .6048 28 .4

November 15,.... 2 50 p. 3 .6062

December 15.......... 2 50 p. 3 .5965

3 19 p.

3 24 p. 3 .6054 30.5 2.33906 600.15

2.33864 600.30

26 .8 2.33796 598.27

18 .0 2.33869 597.82

3 .5965 23 .4

3 .6024 29 .6

3 .6065 30 .4

3 .6078 33 .15 2.33897 600.21

2.33916 600.69

2.33902 599.97

2.33819 599.65

3 42 p.

30.

23.55 7 149

3.21813

0.36351

"

40.

3 39 P.

30

40

3

41 p.

30

30.4

40

3 56 p.

30

31 .8

2 57 7.5 29.15 7 011

2 56 12.5 7 046 2 56 5 7 0 1

3.21723

0.36383

.་

3.21762 0.36331

3.21764 0.36363 F.G.F.

7:

40

2 5611

3 56 P.

30

29 .85

7 016

40

2 56 15

3 52 p.

30

27 .2

7 144

40

2 56 34

3 41 p.

30

26 .0

6 59 27 .5

40

[2 54 9]

3 51 p.

30

16 .6

7

119

3.21716 0.36375

3.21809 0.36331

3.21585

3.21445 0.36485

""

"}

0.36397 J.I.P.

""

40

2 55 21

402

14

Table XV.

Results of Magnetic Observations in 1892.

MAGNETIC FORCE.

Decli-

Dip

MONTH.

nation East.

ENGLISH UNITS.

METRIC UNITS.

C. G. S. UNITS.

North.

X.

Y.

Total.

X.

Y.

Total.

X.

Y.

Total.

1892.

January,

0° 36′ 6′′ 32′ 6′ 25′′

7.8674.

4.9366

9.2880

3.6275

2.2762

4.2825

0.36275

0.22762 0.42825

February,

35 3

7 46

7.8677

4.9417

9.2918

3.6281

2,2785

4.2843

March,

32 39

3 56

7.8803

4.9367

9.2991

3.6335

2.2763

4.2877

0.36335 0.22763

0.36281 0.22785 0.42843

0.42877

April,......

35 11

1 18

7.8762

4.9258

9.2896

3.6316

2.2712

4.2833 0.36316 0.22712 0.42833

May,

32 11

2 23

7.8839

4.9310

9.3006

3.6351

2.2750

4.2883 0.36351

-0.22750 0.42883

June,

33 1

0 39

7.8908

4.9328

9.3058

3.6383

2,2741

4.2907 0.36383

0.22741 0.42907

July,

30 52

5 7

7.8795

4.9400

9.3000

3.6331

2.2778

4.2880 0.36331

0.22778 0.42880

August,

33 34

5 57

7.8861

4.9470

9.3096

3.6363

2.2810

4.2925 0.36363 0.22810 0.42925

September,

32 45

2 37

7.8890

4.9379

9.3070

3.6375

2.2768

1.2913

0.36375 0.22768 '0.42913

October,

32 40

4 30

7.8795

4.9380

9.2990

3.6331

2.2768

4.2877

0.36331 0.22768 0.42877

November,

34 25

0 25

7.8937

4.9338

9.3087

3.6397

2.2749

4.2921

0.36397

0.22749 0.42921

December,...

34 15

1 5

7.9130

4.9480

9.3328

3.6185

2.2814

4.3032

0.36485

0.22814 0.43032

Mean....... 0 33 33

32 3 31

7.88395

4.9377

9.3027

3.6352

2,2767

4.2893

0.36352

0.22767 0.42893

:

Appendix A.

INFORMATION ISSUED IN 1892, CONCERNING TYPHOONS.

June 7th.-The following notice was issued at 1 p. on the 6th:-"6.10 a. strong NE wind expected in northern part of China Sea." Barometer falling. Gradients moderate for E winds. Weather: cool and wet. (Issued at 10.48 a.)

June 26th.-At 4 p. on the 25th, the following notice was issued: "typhoon E of Luzon," and at 10 a. on the 26th, "small depression SW of Luzon."-Barometer rising. Gradients slight for NE winds. Weather: clear, warm and dry.

July 17th.-Barometer rising at Amoy, falling at Bolinao. Gradients moderate for E winds. Weather: hot and cloudy. (Issued at 10.33 a.)

July 18th.-At 2.15 p. on the 17th, the following notice was issued: "typhoon in China Sea West of Luzon," and directions to hoist the Red South Cone. Barometer steady. Gradients moderate for NE winds. Weather warm and fine. (Issued at 10.45 a.)

July 19th-At 10.0 a. directions were given to hoist the Black South Cone, and at 10.20 a. the following notice was issued: "typhoon South of Hongkong moving Northwestward in the direc- tion of Hainan. Weather: wet and squally. (Issued at 10.25 a.)

July 20th.--At 7.10 p. directions were issued to hoist two lanterns vertically.

"The typhoon appears to have recurved and to be now rather near to and SE of Hongkong. Bad weather but no great storm is expected in the neighbourhood." (Issued at 11.20 a.)

July 21st.-At 4.20 a. directions were issued to take down the Black South Cone, at 9.30 a. to hoist the Black North Cone and the following notice: "it is blowing hard in the Formosa Channel.” The centre of the typhoon appears to be situated in the southern part of the Chanel moving northwards. (Issued at 10.36 a.)

7

15

403

July 22nd.-At 8.45 p. the Red North Cone was hoisted. "The typhoon appears to be situated near the North Coast of Formosa." Barometer rising slowly. Gradients moderate for W winds. Weather: hot and rather dry. (Issued at 11 a.)

July 23rd.—At 2.50 p. on the 22nd directions were given to take down the Red North Cone. Barometer rising slowly. Gradients very moderate for SE winds.

moderate for SE winds. Weather: cloudy, hot and rather dry. (Issued at 10.42 a.)

July 25th.-At 10.30 a. on the 24th, the following notice was issued: "typhoon South of Hongkong," and directions given to hoist the Red South Cone, and at 4.15 p. on the 24th, the following notice was issued: "the typhoon appears to be moving towards WNW." Barometer falling. Weather: wet and unsettled. (Issued at 10.58 a.)

-

July 26th.-At noon on the 25th, directions were given to take down the Red South Cone. Barometer rising except in Haiphong. Gradients moderate for SE winds. Weather: warm and showery. (Issued at 10.27 a.)

July 27th.-At 4 p. on the 26th, the following notice was issued: "the typhoon is raging in the Gulf of Tongking." Last night the centre crossed Haiphong without causing any damage. Barometer rising. Gradients moderate for SE winds. Weather: warm, cloudy and damp. (Issued at 10.21 a.)

July 30th.-At 4 p., the following notice was issued: "there appears to be a typhoon in the Pacific NE of Bolinao. Severe earthquake in Hoihow yesterday morning." Barometer steady. Gradients slight. Weather: cloudy, warm and showery. (Issued at 10.27 a.)

August 2nd.--At 10:30 a. on the 1st, the following notice was issued: "there is a depression in the China Sea SE of Hongkong," and at 10.20 a. on the 2nd: "the depression is moving Northwards." Barometer rising. Strong SW wind.

Strong SW wind. Weather: squally and wet. Issued at 11.8 a.

August 3rd.-At 4.15 p., the following notice was issued: "the depression has entered the mainland." Barometer rising. Gradients moderate for SW winds. Weather: warm and cloudy. (Issued at 10.30 a.)

August 13th.-At 5.10 p., the following notice was issued: NEastward." Barometer rising.

Barometer rising. Gradients slight for SE winds. (Issued at 10.32 a.)

"typhoon NE of Formosa moving Weather: cloudy, warm and damp.

August 16th.--"Typhoon in the Pacific East of Formosa." Barometer falling. Gradients slight for SW winds. Weather: clear, hot and rather dry. (Issued at 10.25 a.)

August 17th.-"The typhoon has entered the mainland between Amoy and Foochow." ceasing to fall. Gradients moderate for SW winds. Weather: fine and dry.

Barometer

(Issued at 11.35 a.)

August 18th.-At 4.11 p. on the 17th, the following notice was issued: "the typhoon appears to be moving North-Westward." Barometer rising. Gradients moderate for SW winds. Weather: warm and showery, possibly thunderstorms. (Issued at 10.27 a.)

August 21st.-At 1 p. on the 20th, the following notice was issued: "there appears to be a depression NE of Cape S. James moving Westward." Barometer rising. Gradients moderate for E winds. Weather: cloudy, rather cool, perhaps showery. (Issued at 10.51 a.)

August 24th.—Barometer falling at Bolinao probably owing to another depression. Gradients moderate for NE winds. Weather: warm and showery. Issued at 10.37 a.)

very

August 31st.-At 4 p. on the 30th, the following telegram was issued: "depression West of Bolinao. At 10.45 a. on the 31st, orders were given to hoist the Black South Cone, and the following notice was issued: "the typhoon appears to be moving Westward." Barometer falling. Weather: wet and squally. (Issued at 10.45 a.)

September 1st.-At 5.15 a., orders were given to take down the Black South Cone and hoist the Black Ball. At 10.45 a., orders were given to take down Black Ball and hoist Red Ball, and the following notice was issued: "the typhoon appears to have approached the Gulf of Tongking." Barometer steady. Gradients moderate for SE winds. Weather: rather cool and wet. (Issued at 10.49 a.)

September 2nd.-At 10.25 a., orders were given to take down the Red Ball. steady here, but falling at Haiphong and Amoy. Gradients moderate for S winds. and showery. (Issued at 10.28 a.)

September 5th.-"There is a depression in the China Sea." Weather: hot and dry. (Issued at 11.13 a.)

September 6th.-At 10 a. directions to hoist the Red Drum. Formosa." Strong N winds in the northern part of the China Sea.

September 7th.-At 10.30 a. directions to hoist the Black Drum, approaching Swatow.' Falling barometer. Moderate NW wind. at 11.58 a.)

Barometer almost Weather: warm

Barometer falling at all stations.

"There is a typhoon near southern Weather: fine. (Issued at 10.50 a.) and the following notice: "typhoon Fine and very dry weather. (Issued

September 8th. At 6 p. on the 7th, notice was issued: "it is blowing hard between Swatow and Foochow," at 6.15 p. directions to hoist the Black North Cone, at 12.20 a. on the 8th to hoist two lanterns horizontally, at 10.50 a. to hoist the Black Drum in place of the Cone.-Falling barometer, increasing NW wind and rain. (Issued at 10.57 a.)

404

16

September 9th.-At 4 p. on the 8th, the following notice was issued: "centre of typhoon about 100 miles E of Hongkong, nearly stationary," at 6 p., "the centre of the typhoon is South of Hong- kong moving Westward," and directions to hoist Black South Cone.-Baronieter rising. Moderate E winds. Weather: cloudy and squally. (Issued at 10.32 a.)

September 10th.-At 10.15 a., orders were given to take down the Black South Cone. Barometer rising. Gradients slight for SE winds. Weather: cloudy and dry. (Issued at 11.55 a.)

September 17th.-At 5.8 p. on the 16th, the following notice was issued: "typhoon near southern Formosa," and at 9.30 a. on the 17th, directions to hoist the Black Drum, and at 10.20 a. the follow- ing notice: "typhoon approaching SE coast." Barometer falling. Strong N wind probable. Weather: cloudy, hot and dry. (Issued at 10.24 a.)

September 19th.-At 4 p. on the 17th the notice: "bad weather in the Formosa Channel," at 7 p. directions to hoist two lanterns horizontally, at 10.50 a. on the 18th the notice: "typhoon now approaching coast between Amoy and Swatow," at 4 p. the notice: "typhoon near Swatow approach- ing coast between Hongkong and Swatow," at 6.20 p. to hoist two lanterns horizontally, and, at 5.15 a. on the 19th to take down the lanterns and the Drum. Barometer rising. Gradients moderate for SE winds. Weather: cool, gloomy and slight rain. (Issued at 10.45 a.)

September 22nd.-There is a depression in the China Sea SE of Hongkong. Barometer falling. Gradients moderate for N winds. Weather: cloudy, cool and rather dry. (Issued at 10.35 a.)

September 27th.-At 4.53 p. on the 26th, the following notice was issued: "depression between Shanghai and Formosa. Barometer rising. Gradients very gentle. Weather: clear, hot and dry.

(Issued at 10.24 a.)

}

October 10th.-At 10.24 a. on the 9th, the following notice was issued: "typhoon East of Bolinao," and at 4 p.: "in the China Sea strong NNW gale," and at 10.30 a. on the 10th, "typhoon near Bashee Channel moving NW-ward at present," and directions to hoist the Red Drum. Barometer falling. Fresh to strong NW wind. Weather: cloudy, hot and very dry. (Issued at 10.50 a.)

October 11th.-At 4 p. on the 10th, the following notice was issued: "typhoon approaching coast near Amoy," and at 9 p. directions to take down the Drum. Barometer rising. Moderate NW winds. Weather: cloudy, warm and very dry. (Issued at 10.37 a.)

October 12th. The following notice was issued at 4 p. on the 11th: "the typhoon has recurved and is now NE of Formosa." Barometer rising. Gradients very moderate for N winds. Weather: clear, warm and very dry. (Issued at 10.25 a.)

October 28th.-"Typhoon East of Bolinao." Bolinao. Gradients rather steep for N winds. October 29th.-The following notice was Luzon, apparently moving NWestward at present. hoist the Red Drum,

Barometer rising in southern China, falling at Weather: clear, warm and dry. Weather: clear, warm and dry. (Issued at 10.45 a.) issued at 8 a. on the 29th: "typhoon raging in northern Strong N gales in China Sea," and directions to

October 31st.-At 10.40 a. on the 30th, the have recurved near northern Luzon and to have down the Red Drum. Barometer rising slightly. warm and very dry. (Issued at 10.57 a.)

following notice was issued: "typhoon appears to moved NEward" and orders were given to take Gradients moderate for N winds. Weather: clear,

November 14th.-At 10.45 a. on the 13th, the following notice was issued: "there appears to be a depression in the China Sea East of Annam, moving Westward." Barometer almost steady. Gradients moderate for NE winds. Weather: overcast and cool with light rain. (Issued at 10.51 a.) November 20th.-Barometer steady in southern China, falling at Bolinao. Gradients rather steep for NE winds. Weather: cloudy, warm and rather dry. (Issued at 11.10 a.)

November 21st.-At 10.10 a. the following notice Barometer falling. Gradients rather steep for N winds. (Issued at 10.57 a.)

"

was issued: "typhoon East of Bolinao." Weather: cloudy, warm and rather dry.

November 22nd.-At 10.40 a. the following notice was issued: "the typhoon appears to be East of Bashee Channel, moving Northwards at present. Barometer falling. Moderate NW winds. Weather: clear, warm and rather dry. (Issued at 10.55 a.)

November 23rd.-At 4 p. on the 22nd, the following notice was issued: "typhoon in southern Formosa," and orders given to hoist the Red Drum. At 10.40 a. orders given to take down the Red Drum and the following notice issued: "typhoon has recurved and is moving NEward." Barometer rising. Light W winds. Weather: hot and settled fine. (Issued at 10.46 a.)

December 1st.--At 10.45 a. the following notice was Barometer steady. Gradients rather steep for NE winds. at 10.45 a.)

Sea."

+

issued: "Strong NE gales in China Sea." Weather: clear, cool and dry. (Issued

December 3rd.-The following notice was issued at 10.30 a.

Barometer almost steady. Gradients steep for NE winds. (Issued at 10.30 a.)

"NE gales continue in the China Weather: overcast, cold and damp.

405

17.

Appendix B.

THE TYPHOONS IN 1892.

By W. Doberck and F. G. Figg.

It appears that typhoons in the China Sea originate in elongated slight depressions, which some- times but rarely lie across the Philippines as well as the China Sea, but usually exist only over the sea. To the north of them it blows moderate NE breezes and south of them somewhat less strongly from the SW. The NE breezes reach generally only as far as northern Formosa in summer, but in autumn the NE (and farther north the NW) monsoon blows much farther north. Sometimes the SW breezes to the south of the axis of the depression are stronger than the NE breezes to the north of it, and extend apparently down to the equator and are probably a continuation of the SE trade. To the E of these depressions in the Philippines there are light S and SE breezes. In Annam it probably blows from the N. In summer these depressions begin with rising pressure in the interior of China. In autumn it seems the pressure rises slightly near the equator and SW winds extend gradually northward over the China Sea. In January and February depressions do not occur. During the rest of the year they occur about once a month on an average. During the summer months and in autumn they usually give rise to a typhoon or a small circular depression. The troughlike depression then ceases to exist. In spring they do not alter into typhoons but cease to exist owing to the NE monsoon filling them and spreading to the southward.

The depressions have their major axes lying E and W, or ENE and WSW. Their average latitude from June to September is 16° N, later more southerly, and in November perhaps 10° N. They do not appear to move at all, and they may be traced for 3 or 4 days. The barometer is read little more than a tenth of an inch lower in the axis than along the coasts all round them. Along these coasts light winds circulate against the hands of a watch. In such depressions the weather is squally and wet, and the wind variable,-frequently in heavy squalls with great downpour of rain, but thunder is seldom heard. It appears that in such squalls S wind happens to extend itself northwards and N wind south- wards, and revolving storms are thereby generated. If this occurs in the middle of the China Sea, it is likely to give rise to a typhoon. Of course, it more often happens that a circular storm originates near the E and W corner of the elongated depression as the winds there already revolve as in a rotary storm except to the W or E of the centre forming, so that the N or respectively S squalls need only gain ground on one side, but in such cases only minor circular depressions or very small typhoons are originated.

The heavy rain is, of course, not the cause of the phenomena, for the rain itself is caused by the air rising in the axis of these depressions, also the water vapour condensing gives out heat and thus in the first instance makes the mercury rise in the barometer before a squall, but there cannot be any doubt that the quantity of water-vapour condensed to form perhaps 10 inches of rain per day, and whose pressure is thus abstracted from the barometric pressure of the air, causes the permanency of the depressions. It is different with the rainfall in the SW monsoon. That is spread over a large area and does not give rise to a low pressure in one spot surrounded by higher pressures.

It is rather difficult to say whether a depression in the China Sea, when its existence has been ascertained, is a typhoon or only a minor disturbance, but if the indications explained in the "Law of Storms in the Eastern Seas" (Hongkong 1886) are observed exactly as laid down in the pamphlet, then it is certain to be a typhoon. A minor depression gives signs less well marked and more confused.

When the wind rises in a typhoon it blows in gusts and the mercury heaves in the barometer. When the wind has reached force 11 it blows in fierce squalls of sometimes from 10 to 15 minutes duration, while the mercury heaves up and down as much as a tenth of an inch. The mercury often gives a jump upwards as the wind begins to veer in a squall. Then it drops down and gives another jump upward as the wind comes back to nearly its old direction. During these squalls an enormous quantity of rain falls in a few minutes. The temperature falls and rises a fraction of a degree a more. The wind does not return to quite the former direction, except just in front of the centre. At the time when the centre is nearest, a fierce squall is usually felt and in that squall the direction of the wind changes considerably and the barometer begins to rise. The squalls appear to be caused by an up-and-down movement of the air. As the air comes rushing down, the raindrops tend to evaporate in the hotter stratum near the earth's surface and owing to the increased tension of water-vapour, the barometer (after a fall caused by the cold of evaporation) begins to rise. The wind veers towards the direction of the wind above, which latter is known from the motion of the clouds. Then the air starts to rise with a deluge of rain, caused by the condensation of vapour arriving at the cooler stratum above, while the barometer (after a rise caused by the heat of liquefaction) drops down owing to the cessation of the pressure of water-vapour condensed into the rain fallen, and the wind resumes the direction determined by the central depression; for the latter is so great in a typhoon and gradients so steep near the centre, that subsidiary depressions have never occurred in the China Sea.

Within 75 miles of the centre of a typhoon, or within 50 miles in case of a small typhoon, the angle between the direction towards which the wind is blowing and the direction in which the centre is

406

situated is 50° in the northern part of the The centre bears 12 points from the wind. the centre the wind does not blow in a circle canes elsewhere.

18

China Sea and in the southern part of the sea it is 40°. North of Formosa it bears 10 points from the wind. Near round the centre as is sometimes stated concerning hurri-

About on an average 150 miles from the centre the incurvature in front and in the dangerous semi-circle is 3 points, i.e. the centre bears 11 points from the wind. In the manageable semi-circle it is 4 points, i.e. the centre bears 12 points from the wind. In rear it is 5 points, i.e. the centre bears 13 points from the wind. It will be remarked that the wind blows across the path in front and helps a vessel to run across the path in front of the centre keeping the wind on the starboard quarter 3 points from the stern. In rear the wind blows more straight in towards the centre.

At places farther from the centre the wind's incurvature towards the centre is greater e.g. at a distance of 200 miles the centre bears on an average 13 points from the wind. At distances above 300 miles the centre bears about 15 points from the wind. On the weather maps the light winds at a dist- ance from the centre appear to blow almost straight towards the typhoon. It is only when the wind- velocity increases that the rotation of the earth and subsequently centrifugal force cause the air particles to deviate from the straight line from high to low pressure.

The prevailing wind carries the centre along with it and combines with the rotary storm causing the wind in the right-hand (the dangerous) semi-circle to be stronger and to blow more nearly round the centre, than in the left (the manageable) semi-circle, where the wind is more moderate and has greater

incurvature.

In the daily tables of observations made at noon at the stations the first column shows the readings of the barometer (corrected and reduced to sea level), the second column shows their change since noon on the previous day (+ means a rise, - a fall). The third and fourth columns show direction and force of wind, and the fifth the weather. In the observations made at noon and taken from ship logs the first column is the latitude, the second the longitude, the third the barometer reading (with all corrections applied as accurately as possible in each case), the fourth and fifth wind direction and force, and the sixth weather. The bearing of the ship and its distance in miles is sometimes given after the second column, and for the stations the same is sometimes given before the first column."

Plates I, II and III exhibit the paths of the typhoons in 1892 except the typhoon in the beginning of November in the Gulf of Siam. There were 21 in all. The positions of the centres are given at noon (local time) for the date marked. Where the curves are dotted, they are only approximately

correct.

Plate IV exhibits six figures. Figure 1 shows a typhoon from July 20th at noon to the 22nd at noon inclusive. The isobars for 29.20, 29.30, 29.40, and 29.50 are drawn. The wind-directions are shown by aid of continuous curves. The forces are shown in figures, and the direction of the motion of the centre is shown by a barbed arrow. Figure 2 shows a typhoon from August 16th at 9 p. to the 17th at 9 p. inclusive. The isobars for 29.30, 29.40, and 29.50 are drawn. Figure 3 shows a typhoon from September 6th at noon to the 8th at 6 a. inclusive. The isobars for 29.00, 29.10, 29.20, 29.30, and 29.40 are drawn. The motion of the centre is shown by a barbed arrow. The arrows in the lower part of the figure shows the directions of divergent winds. Figure 4 shows a typhoon from October 10th at 9 a. to the 11th at noon inclusive. There are no isobars in this figure. Figure 5 is a weather-map for noon of the 17th August. The isobars for 29.30, 29.40, 29.50, and 29.60 are drawn. The wind-direc- tions and forces observed on shore and on board ship are shown. The arrows fly with the wind. Figure 6 is a weather-map for noon on the 18th September. The isobars for 29.30, 29.40, 29.50, and 29.60 are drawn. The wind is shown the same as above. The top of the plate is N and the bottom is S. A scale of 100 miles is shown in figure 4. That applies to all the figures on plate IV.

LIST OF OBSERVING STATIONS.

Longi- Latitude

Station.

North.

tude East.

Station.

Latitude North.

Longi- tude East.

Station.

Latitude North.

Longi-

tude East.

Yuensan,

Taku,

Newchwang,

40° 35' 39 09 127 33 Ningpo,

122° 00'

Steep Island,

30° 12′

122° 36'

Lamocks,

23° 15'

117° 18'

29 58

121 44

Canton,

23 07

113 17

38 55 117 51

Kiukiang,

29 43

116 07

Anping,

22 59

120 13

Howki,

38 04

120 39 Wenchow,

28 00

120 35

Breaker Point,

22 56

116 28

Chefoo,

37 34

121 32 Foochow,

26 08

119 38

Takow,

22 36

120 16

Chemulpo,

37 29

126 37 Middle Dog,

25 58

119 02

Hongkong,.

22 18

114 10

N.E. Shantung Py,... 37 24

122 42 Turnabout,

25 26

119 59

South Cape,

21 55

120 51

Fusan,

35 05

129 06 | Tamsui,

25 10

121 25

Pakhoi,

21 29

109 06

Chinkiang,

32 12

119 30 |Keelung,

25 08

121 45

Haiphong,

20 52

106 40

Woosung,

31 35

121 27 Ockseu,

24 59

119 28

Hoihow,

20 03

110 20

Wuhu,

31 22

118 22 Amoy,

24 27

118 04

Bolinao,

16 24

119 55

North Saddle,

30 52

122 40

Hankow,

30 33

114 20

Ichang,

30 12 111 19

Chapel Island, Fisher Island, Swatow,.

24 10 118 13 23 33 23 20

Manila,

14 37

120 57

119 28 116 43

Cape St. James,

IO 20

107 04

19

JUNE.

407

On the 4th and 5th June, 1892, the barometer was falling generally on the China Coast and in Luzon and light to moderate SW winds were prevalent. On the 6th a recovery of pressure took place along the China Coast particularly in the North and the wind became chiefly NE light to strong breezes. Two vessels in the neighbourhood of the northern entrance of the Formosa Channel reported fresh NE gales. The weather was chiefly overcast on the South Coast with light rain at most stations and tem- perature had decreased. At Hongkong there had been a slight thunderstorm during the early morning hours. Vessels in the northern part of the China Sea had light variable winds and steady barometer. Farther South the S. S. Chingtu had a falling barometer and light SE breezes. The S. S. Ingraban had light variable airs, squally weather and swell. The S. S. Memnon still farther South had a steady barometer, fresh SW breeze and squally weather. At Cape St. James there was a strong SW breeze, squally weather and a swell.

The following are some of the observations for the 6th June at noon:-

COAST STATIONS.

Bolinao, South Cape,

.29.77

Hoihow,

.03 .81 + .01 .74 .01

SSW

NE ENE

Hongkong,

.78 + .03

E

Breaker Point,

.80 + .03

NE

Lamocks,

.82 + .05

NE

Chapel Island,

.85 + .09

N

Turnabout,

Steep Island,

.88 + .04 .96 + .11

NNE

NE

QQ CI 10 10 10 CO 10 00

5

C.

C.

0.

8

op.

od.

C.

op.

C.

VESSELS.

S.S. Memnon, S.S. Chingtu, S.S. Ingraban, S.S. Rio,

.12° 18' 117° 09′

29.78

SW

q.

.......15 51 118 40

.67?

SE

C.

..16 02 110 13

.73

Var.

q.

swell.

..19 56 112 33

.77

S

2

S.S. Alwine,

...20 03 110 20

Var.

S.S. Choy Sang,.

at Matsou

.84

NNE

8

or.

Sch. Sea Swallow,

.24 40 118 56.

83

NE

7

It appears, therefore, that there was an area of deficient pressure across the China Sea, perhaps between the parallels of 14° and 18° N where the barometer was falling and light variable winds pre- vailed. On the Northern side of this area NE light to strong breezes were blowing and on the Southern side fresh SW breezes. Probably a disturbance was forming at this time.

Towards evening on the SE coast, the barometer commenced to fall, the weather was wet generally and fresh NE breezes continued. At Hoihow there were heavy NE squalls with thunder and lightning. At Hongkong heavy rain was falling, the lower clouds coming from East. North of Foochow it was dry, but cloudy.

On the 7th June the barometer was still falling slowly on the SE coast and much the same wind and weather prevailed as on the previous evening except that the rain was less heavy. The barometer was also falling in Luzon with light S breezes and cloudy weather. At Cape St. James there was a strong SW breeze. Those vessels in the neighbourhood of Hainan were experiencing N to NE moderate gales with rain squalls and high sea. The S. S. Rio farther South had SŴ to NW moderate breezes and showery weather.

Conditions were almost unchanged during the latter part of the day. Observations at noon on the 7th June:-

Bolinao, South Cape,

COAST STATIONS.

...29.73

Hoihow,

.04 .75 .00 .68 .06

$

C.

NNE

4

C.

NNE

C.

Hongkong,

.74 .04

E

0.

Breaker Point,

.77

.03

NE

op.

Lamocks,

.77 .05

NNE

om.

Chapel Island,

.80 .05

NE

od.

Turnabout,

.86

.02

N

od.

Steep Island,

.96

00

E

C.

VESSELS.

S.S. Nizam,

7° 32′ 108° 20′

29.82

SSW

2

r.

S.S. Memnon,

9 07 116 58

.74

SW

cross sea.

S.S. Presto,

17 54 107 58

.71

N/W

6

or

high sea.

S.S. Ingraban,

19 14 112 05

.68

NNE

S.S. Alwine,

20 21 110 55

.62

NE

8

S.S. Rio,

16 01 110 28

.65

W

4

op.

408

20

On the 8th June the weather on the SE coast had improved somewhat, there was no rain and it was less cloudy on the whole. The barometer was, however, falling slightly and NE light to moderate breezes prevailed. In Hoihow the barometer was rising and fresh NE breezes were blowing, weather cloudy. In Luzon the barometer was falling with light S breezes and overcast weather. At Cape St. James the weather was squally with a strong W breeze. Vessels in the China Sea to the East of Cochin China and Annam had moderate to fresh W and SW breezes while those to the NE of Hainan and South of Hongkong had fresh breezes to moderate gales from the NE with cloudy squally weather.

The following observations are for noon of June 8th:-

COAST STATIONS.

Bolinao, South Cape,

..29.71

.72 .03

.02

SE

2 0.

P

NNE

Hoihow,

.72 + .04

NE

Hongkong,

.73 .01

E

3

Breaker Point,

.76

.02

NE

5

ó ó ó ó ó

0.

C.

C.

C.

Lamocks,

.74

.03

NE

cm.

Chapel Island,

.73

.07 ?

NE

4

C.

Turnabout,

.85

.01

NNE

4

om.

Steep Island,

.92

.04

NEE

3

C.

VESSELS.

S.S. Cheang Chew, S.S. Nizam,

10° 28′ 109° 25'

WSW

S.S. Donar,

.11 3 110 46

.11 42 109 16

29.70

SW

.70

W

S.S. Venetia,

.19 46 114 32

.67

NE

S.S. Alwine,

.21 5 112 31

.66

NE

S.S. Ingraban,

.21 37 113 25

.72

NE

a ~ ~ co if C

5

b.

4

0.

3

5

0.

7

6

38

high sea. swell, high sea.

The Venetia at 8 p.m. in 18° 23', 114° 12′ had barometer (29.61) falling, NE 4, and rain squalls. The Nizam steering about NNE had at midnight WSW 4, barometer 29.71 confused swell from NW and SW and lightning was noted in the NE.

It appears that on the 7th and 8th there was no well defined centre, but a diffused depression existing around the position 16° to 17° N and 115° E.

By noon on the 9th June a great change may be remarked. The barometer had fallen very considerably at Bolinao and at S. Cape; less so on the SE coast while it was rising in Hainan and the Gulf of Tongking. The wind had again freshened from the NE in Southern China. In Northern Luzon light SE breezes blew. Weather was cloudy for the most part, and it was raining at S. Cape. In Hoihow the sky had cleared. At Hongkong the direction of the lower clouds which had been from E on the 8th backed to NE on the morning of the 9th. The centre of Typhoon I. was perhaps in 18°, 117° moving NEward at noon on June 9th.

The observations for June 9th at noon were as follows (the approximate bearing and distance in miles of the observer seen from the centre is added after the name of the station or the place of the vessel):-

COAST STATIONS.

Bolinao,

Hoilow,

SE

WNW 400

200

29.63 .08 .76 + .04

SE

0.

NE

3

b.

Hongkong,

NNW 300

.70 .03

A

Ε

1

C.

Breaker Point,

N

300

.70

.05

NE

5

C.

South Cape,

NE

330

.64

A

.08

NNE

3

or.

Lamocks,...

N

310

.71

.03

NNE

5

cm.

Chapel Island,

N

350

.71

.02

NE

6

C.

Turnabout,

NNE

500

.79 .0.5

N

6

om.

Steep Island,

NNE

950

.91

.01

NE

2

b.

VESSELS.

S.S. Cheang Chew,..

S.S. Donar,....

S.S. Nizam,...

S.S. Venetia,

WSW 450

WSW 450

SW 300

WSW 250

14° 5'

·14 45

14 53

16 3

110° 20'

110 16

112 57

29.60

W

.71?

NW

swell.

.61

113 24

.64

WSW NW

fine.

3 0.

cross sea.

S.S. Zafiro,.

SE

180

16 0

119 0

.61

SW

4

or.

S.S. Sungkiang,

N

300

23 5 116 44

.71

NE

0.

S.S. Esmeralda,

N

300

Breaker Point

ENE

5

21

409

During the evening the barometer continued to rise slowly in Hainan with light variable airs and fine weather. At Hongkong the barometer was steady with E 2 and cloudy sky. The lighthouses in the Formosa Channel had strong NE breezes and in some instances a moderate gale, weather cloudy and barometer steady.

In Southern Formosa, the barometer was falling moderately fast (S. Cape 200 miles NE of centre at midnight, 29.60) with NE 5 overcast sky and at S. Cape drizzling rain. At Bolinao, 180 miles SE of centre, the barometer (at 9 p. 29.58) was falling, the wind SSE 2 with heavy rain. The lower clouds came from SE.

The S. S. Zafiro steering about NW by N had the wind veering from SW 4 at noon, to NW 6 at 10 p.m. with high confused sea and squally weather. The barometer fell 0.11 between noon and midnight and at the latter hour read 29.50. On the 10th at 4 a. she had the barometer lowest (29.45) with N 6, rain squalls and a high sea. Her complete log for the 9th to 11th is appended. The centre appears to have crossed in front of her course about noon on the 9th. The Venetia was at midnight on the 9th in 13° 46', 112° 34', (SW 400) the barometer was rising (29.69) wind W 4 and weather wet with thunder and lightning. H.M.S. Porpoise at anchor in Manila Bay had SW 4 and wet squally weather during the afternoon and evening.

On the 10th June the barometer was still falling at all stations in the neighbourhood of the Formosa Channel particularly at S. Cape. Winds were chiefly NE light to strong breezes with cloudy squally weather and rain in S. Formosa. In Hongkong and to the Westward the barometer was steady and light airs were prevalent. At Bolinao there were light S breezes with wet weather and a rising barometer. At sea, South East of Hainan, light to moderate N breezes prevailed with high sea and swell and in the district to the East of Annam moderate SW breezes with squally weather. The Zafiro about 120 miles West of the centre had NNW 6, wet squally weather and heavy sea. The barometer was rising as she was then steering away from the depression. The centre at noon on the 10th was in 1910, 119°.

Observations for the 10th June at noon:

COAST STATIONS.

Bolinao,

South Cape,

NE

SSE 200

170

29.64 + .01

S

or.

.59 .05

NNE

od.

Hoihow,

WNW 500

.76

.00

NNE

2

C.

Hongkong,

NW

350

.70

.00

WSW

C.

Breaker Point,

NW

250

.70

.00

NE

3

cm.

Lamocks,

NNW

250

.68

.03

NNE

C.

Chapel Island,

NNW

300

.67

.04

N

C.

Turnabout,

N

350

.78

.01

NNE

8

cm.

Steep Island,

NNE

650

.91

.00

NE

3

b.

VESSELS.

S.S. ·Teucer,

SW

750

S.S.

Venetia,

SW 600

S.S. Kong Beng, S.S. Yiksang,

SW 700

H.M.S. Porpoise,

S.S. Don Juan,....

S.S. Cheang Chew,

SSE 300 SSE 300 S 170 WSW 500

11o 6' 12 35 111 43

12 49 109 32 outside Manila

109° 48′

SW

3 fine.

29.71

W

4 pg.

.72

S

4 fine.

.73

SSW

Manila Bay

.74

SW

0.

high cross sea.

16 36

119 13

.78

var.

...

17 17

110 59

.64?

N

3 fine.

S.S. Donar,

WSW 370

17 39

111 11

.70

N

4 N swell.

SS. Nizam,

WSW 300

S.S. Zafiro,

W 120 NW 250

18 5

19 17 22 55 116 31

114 2

.62

+

117 2

.56

.65

S.S. Paoting,................

NNE

NNW

5 fine; high NE sea.

6 orq. high sea, ENE 5 0.

At Hongkong during the evening the barometer was rising slightly with light variable airs and fine but cloudy weather. The lower clouds came from NNE, but the direction of the upper (c-str) clouds could not be obtained. At the stations on the SE coast the barometer was steady with light to moderate NE breezes and cloudy weather. At the lighthouse stations in the Formosa Channel, it was blowing a moderate to fresh NE gale with cloudy weather. At some stations north of the Channel the barometer was rising slightly with light winds and fine weather. At S. Cape (at 9 p. NE 120) the barometer showed a rise (at 9 p. 29.63), wind NE 4 with rain squalls. At Bolinao (§ 270) the barometer was rising, wind S 2 with rain at 4 p.m. and the lower clouds from SW.

The Sungkiang at midnight (NNW 90 miles) in about 22°, 119° had strong NE wind overcast weather, high sea and barometer (29.71) falling rapidly. She was bound southward having left Amoy for Manila in the morning and was advancing almost directly towards the centre. The Esmeralda which left Amoy for Manila at 4 p.m. had at midnight NE 6, high sea, barometer falling rapidly, (reading uncertain). The Zafiro had the barometer rising during the evening (29.66 at 8 p.) with N 4 and heavy sea. The Yiksang in 15°, 120° at 8 p.m. had the barometer slightly rising (29.75), SW 6 and high sea. The Paoting proceeding ENE from her noon position had at midnight ENE 6 overcast sky and barometer (29.72) falling. The Nizam proceeding Northwards had NNE 5 at midnight, high but decreasing sea barometer (29.65) rising.

410

22

On the 11th June the barometer was slowly rising at Hongkong, there was a light W air and the sky was partially clouded. The lower clouds came from W. At Hoihow the barometer was also rising with light variable airs and fine weather. On the SE coast and at the stations in the Formosa Channel the barometer had fallen a little for the most part and farther north the fall was more decided. In the Channel the NE winds had for this reason decreased somewhat in force. The weather was chiefly overcast. At the Formosa stations there had been on an average a slight increase of pressure since noon of the previous day, but the weather had become very wet and squally at Anping and Fisher Island as well as at S. Cape.

From the log of the Sungkiang, which is annexed, it will be seen that during the early morning hours the barometer was falling quickly and the wind increasing in force (at 6 a.m. NË 7). An attempt to heave the ship to at this time met with failure. After the direction backed gradually still increasing in force, at 8 a.m. a strong N gale was experienced with the lowest reading of the barometer shortly after (at 8.30 a.m. 29.26). The barometer rose slightly during the following two hours (at 10 a. 29.29) and the wind backed to NW by N force 9. There was heavy rain and high confused sea. Later the barometer rose quickly, (at 2 p.m. 29.56) and the wind continued to back towards W at the same time decreasing in force. The centre must have been within 30 miles to the E of the ship's position at 9 a.m. and was at the time moving NNEward.

The Esmeralda was hove to some time during the early morning, the barometer falling rapidly and the NE wind increasing in force. At 7 a.m. she was estimated to be in 22°02′, 118°38' or about NW/W 80 miles from the centre. At 8 a.m. she had a NNE gale with heavy rain squalls and swell. The main trysail was set to steady the ship. The lowest reading of the barometer was registered at this. time but as two barometers were read and entered in the log the readings cannot be made use of. The barometer had risen at noon but the wind continued a NNĚ gale with thick rainy weather. At 4 p.m. the wind backed to N and moderated and the vessel was put on her course to the Southward. At noon this vessel was about 90 miles NW by W of the centre. The Yiksang and Porpoise, off the coast of Luzon to the West of Bolinao, had rising barometer, moderate to strong SW breezes, squally weather with thunder and lightning. They were just over 250 miles SSW of the centre.

On the 11th at noon the centre was in 21°30', 119°15'. The depression had increased much in intensity during the previous 24 hours and at the centre there was now a pressure of at least 0.5 inch below the normal.

The following are the noon observations for the 11th June:--

COAST STATIONS.

Bolinao, South Cape,

S

300

29.77 + .13

SE

2

0.

ENE

90

.66 + .07

ESE

4

or.

Anping,

NE

90

.63 + .05

NNE

3

0.

Fisher Island,........

N

120

.66 + .03

NNE

6

omg.

Hoihow,

W

520

.76 .00

var.

1

b.

Hongkong,

W

250

.73 + .03

WSW

1

0.

Breaker Point,

WNW

170

.70

.00

NE

3

C.

Lamocks,

NW

150

.68

.00

NE

5

cm.

Chapel Island,

NNW

170

.65

.02

NNE

6.

C.

Turnabout, ...........

N

220

.76

.02

N

7

om.

Steep Island,

NNE

520

.87

<

.04

ES

2

C.

VESSELS.

H.M.S. Porpoise,

SSW 250

17° 0'

118° 5'

29.71

SW

4

c. N swell.

S.S. Yiksang,

SSW 250

17 6

118 17

.77

SSW

5

ogrlt.

S.S. Kriemhild,.

WSW 500

17 52

111 39

.75

S

S.S. Donar,

WSW 350

20 4

112 50

.74

N

S.S. Nizam,

W 280

21 42

114 9

.69

W

S.S. Zafiro,

W 160

20 53

116 20

.68

NNW

4

S.S. Sungkiang,

SW

60

20 58

118 46

S.S. Esmeralda,

(7a. 22

2

118 38)

NW NNE

S.S. Paoting,.......

NW

160 23 58

117 51

.65

་ ....

WSW swell.

moderate sea. increasing swell.

c. high sea.

r. wind and sea decreasing.

r. blowing a gale.

NE/E 5 0.

During the evening of the 11th the barometer was steady at Hongkong with light SW to W airs and cloudy weather. At the stations on the SE coast the barometer was almost steady and the winds were chiefly light NE airs with cloudy weather. At Lamocks at 9 p.m. the barometer read 29.72 with NE 3 cloudy. At the lighthouses towards the Northern part of the Formosa Channel it was blowing from NNE a strong breeze to moderate gale, the barometer was falling and the sky clouded. In N Formosa the barometer was falling with light airs and calms at Keelung and passing showers.

The sky

At Fisher Is., Anping, Takow, and S. Cape the barometer was falling sharply. At Fisher Is. at 9 p.m. 29.61 NE 7. At Anping 29.60 NE 4. At Takow 29.59 SE 2. At S. Cape. 29.61 S 7. was overcast with drizzling rain at Fisher Is., rain at Takow, showery and squally at S. Cape. At the latter station the wind had gradually veered since morning and increased in force. At Anping there was a heavy WSW swell.

23

411

On the 12th June at Takow the barometer attained the lowest reading (29.27) at 2.30 a.m. It had been falling rapidly during the past few hours. At 3 a.m. it also read 29.27 but by 4 a.m. it had risen rapidly (29.45). Unfortunately the wind and weather were not noted, the remark beside the hourly readings of the barometer being merely "Typhoon from NE". Anping had at 3 a.m. N 9 barometer 29.46 with gloomy sky. The lowest reading was at 4 a.m. 29.43 with the wind backing. At 9 a.m. the wind had backed as far as WNW 6 rain was falling and the barometer had risen to 29.74. At this time Takow had 29.74 NW 5 and rain. S. Cape had the lowest barometer reading (29.57) at 3 a.m. with SSW 8 and rain squalls. The wind gradually veered to WNW at noon and blew a fresh gale the whole time with rain squalls, barometer at 9 a.m. 29.69. At the Lamocks the lowest barometer was at 3 a.m. (29.67) with W 2 and sky partially clouded. Later the wind became SW 2. On the SE coast the barometer was almost steady with light S and SW airs and fine weather for the most part. The barometer had further fallen at Keelung (reading doubtful) and at the lighthouse stations at the N entrance to the Channel. At the former station the weather was wet and squally with a light NW air increasing to a moderate breeze at noon. Tamsui, a few miles distant from Keelung, had gentle to strong SW breeze during the middle of the day. Southerly winds were spreading quickly Northwards to the East coast where the barometer was falling considerably. In N Luzon light to moderate S and SW breezes with rising barometer prevailed.

The only vessel in the vicinity of the depression was the S.S. Paoting. She was at noon on the 11th in 23°58′, 117°51' bound for Anping, and at midnight had a strong NNE breeze and heavy sea barometer 29.55. At 4 a.m. on the 12th she had a fresh NNW gale increasing, with heavy S sea barometer 29.46 and at this time the ship was "turned back for shelter." It is estimated that she was then within 50 miles WNW of the centre.

The Yiksang and Porpoise had the wind veering as they proceeded NWward, and during the morning they had W and NW light airs and breezes; the weather was fine but there was a heavy Northerly swell.

Observations for the 12th June at noon:-

COAST STATIONS.

Bolinao,

SSW 420

29.83 + .06

S

Hongkong,

WSW

450

.74 + .01

WSW

Breaker Point,

W

320

.69 + .01

SW

C & N

2

C.

2

b.

Lamocks,...

W

270

.73 + .05

SW

South Cape,

SW

90

.68 + .03

WNW

Takow,

WSW

90

.75 + .13

N

3

C.

cm.

omd.

rg.

Anping,

W

90

.75 + .12

WNW

3

T.

Fisher Island,..

WNW

140

.73 +.07

SW

2

cm.

Chapel Island,

WNW 220

.67 + .02

S

3

C.

Turnabout,

NW 180

.69 .07

WNW

3

om.

Tamsui,

NNW 120

.68 + .01

SW

C.

Keelung,

Steep Island,

NNW

N

120

.59 .14?

NW

4

od.

420

.72 .15

SE

1

c.

VESSELS,

S.S. Sungkiang,

SSW

S.S. Esmeralda,

SW

380 17° 11' 119° 42′ 29.81

300 19 0 119 10.

S

5

S

1

S.S. Yiksang,

SW

H.M.S. Porpoise,

WSW

360 19 52

290 20 22

116 15

.85

W

2 C.

high N swell.

115 38

.75

SW

2 c.

99

S.S. General Werder,... WSW

S.S. Paoting,

S.S. Woosung,

WNW

NW

360 22 26

140 23 35 119 39

170 24 37 119 32

115 23

.73

SW

1

b.

high E swell.

.69

SSW

3

0.

-

.65

SW

3

0.

The centre passed almost over Takow about 3 a.m. moving Eastwards and crossed Formosa during the morning. At noon it was perhaps in 23,° 122°.

During the afternoon and evening the barometer rose at the S. Formosa stations, and at Takow and Anping winds became light variable airs. At S. Cape the wind continued to blow from about W a moderate breeze during the evening. The weather improved at all these stations. At Keelung the barometer was rising with fine weather and light NW air.

The depression cannot be traced after the 12th but it probably moved NEward in the Pacific. No observations to the Eastward of Formosa are available, this portion of the Pacific being out of the regular track of vessels and this is at all times a great drawback in the investigation of typhoons passing in the neighbourhood of Formosa.

12th June

11th June

412

24

The depression appears to have been forming between the 6th and 8th and it was not until the 9th that it attained to any considerable development. The diameter of the inner area, ie., area of strong winds and a considerably diminished pressure, was at all times very small and the depression at the centre scarcely exceeded 0.5 inch. It has been already shown (comp. "Law of Storms in the Eastern Seas" by W. Doberck) that strong NE winds blow in the Formosa Channel while a typhoon is yet at a considerable distance to the SWestward and in this depression this was again noticed to be the case. sea there was thunder and lightning to the S and SW of the centre. Takow had the greatest rainfall, 8.30 inches, which fell during the 24 hours previous to 9 a.m. on the 12th.

Detailed observations:-

At

COAST STATIONS.

S. Cape.

Takow.

3a.

Bar. Temp. Wind. Weather Rainfall Bar. Temp. 29.63 78 ENE 5 or

Wind Weather Bainfall

6a.

.63 78 E 4 or

9a.

noon

.66 80 ESE

.66 79 ENE 5 o

4 or

2.53 29.65 79 NNW 1r

0.26

3p.

.59 81 SE

5 oq

.60 78 NE 4 r

.66 79 calm

ogp 0.04

.60 77 NNE 5 o

6p.

.60 80

S

6 p

9p.

.61 79

S

7 09

.59 77 SE 2 r

I midt.

.59 77 S

8 rq

.47

3a.

.57 76 SSW 8 rq

6a.

9a.

noon

.65 76 WSW 8 rq

.69 78 WNW 8 od

.69 76 WNW 8 rq_4.64

74 76 NW 5 r

.27 Typhoon from NE .65

8.30

.60 76 NE 40

.46 76 N 9 g

Anping.

Bar. Temp. Wind Weather Rainfall 29.61 75 NE 20

Fisher Island.

Bar. Temp. Wind Weather Rainfall

29.63 73 NNE 6 cmg

.59 74 NNE 6 cmg

.64 75 NNE 6 omg 0.00 .66 75 NNE 6 omg .65 73 NE 6 orq .59 73 NE 6 omd .60 73 NE 7 om .56 72 NE 8 omg .53 72 NNW 8 omq

.59 73 NW 8 omq

74 77 WNW 6 r

1.89

.72 75 .73 76

3p.

.70 78 WNW 7 o

.76 78 NE 1g

6p.

.71 78 W 4 0

9p.

midt.

.73 78 WNW 4 cq .74 78 WSW 4 c

.77 76 NE 1 c

.79 77

.76 80 calm

S

0

W

4 cm SW 2 cm

.69 78 SW 3 cm

0.40

.68 77 SSE 3 cm

1 c

.72 77 SSE 4 cm

.73 77 SSE 3 cm

VESSELS.

S.S. SUNGKIANG.

June 10 midt. 120 miles S 9° E of Chapel Island. 29.71

NE

high sea.

11 2a.

.64

NE

""

.56

NE

4a.

"

.51

NE

7

6a.

35

tried to heave to, but could not.

N

9 or

8a.

""

8.30a.

.26

""

10a.

.29 NW N 9

noon 20° 58' 1180

46'

NW

irregular sea.

heavy rain, wind and sea decreasing.

.56 WNW

2p.

4p.

.64 WNW 5

nasty sea.

.66 WNW

6p.

8p.

10p.

.71 W

.77 W

5 0

cross sea.

midt.

.79

SW

12 noon

17° 11' 119° 42'

S.S. ESMERALDA.

.81

5 op

S swell.

moderate S sea.

June 10 4p.

left Amoy for Manila.

NE

Sp.

high sea ship rolling heavily.

11

midt.

NE

6

53

وو

42.

NE

6 oq heavy swell

"

7a.

22° 02' 118° 38'

NNE

8a.

NNE

I

noon

4p.

N

NW

blowing a gale, main trysail set, drifting WNW.

thick, rainy.

shift of wind to N and moderating put ship head to southward,

barometer rising gradually.

7p.

9p.

10p.

var.

W

WSW

midt.

12 noon

19°

0' 119°

10'

S I

25

S.S. YIKSANG.

413

June 10 noon midt.

left Manila for Hongkong

29.75

11 4a.

SW 50 .70 SSW 6

high following sea.

8a.

.75 SSW 5 0

noon

17° 6' 118°

17'

.77 SSW 5

frequent squalls of heavy rain, thunder and lightning.

similar weather.

.73 SW 5

4p.

heavy N swell.

8p.

.80 WNW 5

.85 WNW 3;b

midt.

99

12 4a.

.81 NW 2

"}

8a.

.85 var.

2 b

>"

noon 19°

52'

116°

15'

.85

W

""

June 9 noon (16°

0'

119°

0') ?29.61

4p.

8p.

midt.

10 4a.

8a.

S.S. ZAFIRO.

SW 4 or

.52 SW 5 or

.50 WNW 4

.50 NNW 5 q .45 N 6 orq .52 NW/N 6

slight N swell. high confused sea. high sea.

"9

noon

19° 17' 117° 2'

.56 NNW 6

57

4p.

.56 NNW 5

heavy sea.

8p.

11

48.

8a.

noon 20° 53'

116° 20'

95

5

""

4.c

high sea.

S.S. PAUTING.

June 10 noon

22°

55'

116° 31'

29.65 ENE 5 o head sea.

midt.

.67 ENE 6 oq

.66 NNW 3

.62 N 5 op .66 N .68 N

11 noon 23° 58' 117° 51'

midt.

12 4a.

8a.

noon Ponghou harbour (Pesca-

dores).

.65 NEE 5 0

.55 NNE 6

.46 NNW 8 .67 NW/N .69 SSW 3 0

hazy, heavy sea, ship rolling heavily.

wind increasing; heavy S sea; turned back for shelter.

After the 12th of June SW winds light to moderate in force prevailed in Southern China, but the barometer was falling again on the 13th and 14th. There was, however, on the 15th a rise at the stations north of the S entrance to the Formosa Channel, but moderate S and SW breezes blew over the entire coast between Pakhoi and Foochow until the evening. At Hongkong the barometer was steady and there was a fresh SW breeze during the day. Later the wind fell light and the direction became SE for a few hours. At this time heavy rain with thunder and lightning commenced, the clouds coming from SW. Winds in the N part of the Formosa Channel had become NE 4.

On the 16th heavy rains with thunderstorms spread over the entire SE coast lasting until the 20th. There appears to have been a trough of slightly low pressure moving up from the southward, to the N of which, the wind was NE and E and in the rear SW on an average. After the passage northwards of this area of slightly diminished pressure SW winds became general over the greater part of the coast and the rains ceased.

The greatest fall for the periods stated in the table given below was received at Hongkong (23.7 inches). Pakhoi, which has rather high land to the eastward, had somewhat less. Hoihow, on the N coast of Hainan, was the exception to the general rainfall though the weather was very squally with threatening rainy appearance. The mountainous district to the southward may account for this. The fall diminished greatly in amount at the stations on the SE coast in the Formosa Channel and in Formosa, -with the exception of Fisher Island (21.6 inches) an exposed situation near the S entrance to the Channel-and appears to have ceased entirely a little to the northward of Foochow. S. Cape received a

small amount as compared with other districts:-

very

Period.

Pakhoi, Hoihow,

Period.

ins. .....June 16-19, inclusive 17.6

15-19,

nil.

""

Hongkong,

15-19,

23.7

""

ins. Fisher Island,.........June 16-20, inclusive 21.6 Chapel Island,

16-21, Amoy,

16-21,

7.3

""

3.9

"

">

Canton,

15-19,

وو

Breaker Point,

16-21,

""

""

""

7.4

Ockseu,

16-21,

7.2

""

""

16.4

Turnabout,

16-20,

6.9

""

""

>>

Swatow,

16-21,

9.8

Middle Dog,

16-20,

8.7

22

""

""

Lamocks,....

16-21,

6.8

Foochow,

16-20,

5.4

""

"J

"">

""

South Cape,

15-20,

1.2

""

>>

Takow,

15-20,

10.0

""

""

Tamsui, Keelung,

16-20,

7.0

""

"

وو

16-20,

12.2

"

Anping,

15-20,

9.3

39

""

414

26

After the 20th June SW winds blew more or less steadily on the China Coast and in the China Sea until the 25th when there was a tendency for winds to become more easterly with falling barometer on the SE Coast. In Luzon the fall in the barometer was more marked. At Manila, the wind was NNE 1 with drizzling rain. Vessels in the northern part of the China Sea had mostly SE light and moderatə breezes with the direction backing. The S. S. Amicitia was bound from Iloilo to Hongkong and on the evening of the 24th experienced a moderate NW breeze with wet squally weather and barometer (at midnight 29.81) falling. On the 25th she had N and NW fresh breezes, barometer at midnight 29.73. The weather was improving. There may possibly have been a depression in about 12°, 121°, but this is

very uncertain.

Observations for the 25th June at noon:-

COAST STATIONS.

Manila, Bolinao,

.29.77 .06

NNE

1 0.

.78 .05

var.

2

b.

South Cape,.

.83

.06

NE

C.

Hoihow,

.74

.05

ENE

oltq.

Hongkong,

.82 .00

S

1

C.

Breaker Point,

.82

.01

SSE

2

C.

Lamocks,...

Turnabout,

.84 .01

SSE

C.

.86

.02

SW

1

C.

VESSELS.

S.S. Devawongse,

.12° 13'

109° 24' 29.82

NE

S.S. Amicitia,.

15 0

119 9

.77

N

S.S. Thibet,

.15 44 113 2

.83

E

Bk. Nicoya,

.16 47

113 13

var.

S.S. Memnon,

.19 32

115 2

.79

SSE

.....

Sh. Sterling,

.19 48

121 27

Sh. Belle of Bath, .........21 34

113 58

ESE

30

001 200 10

2

b.

88

0.

b.

fine.

2

b.

On the 26th June in the northern part of the China Sea and on the S Coast the wind was chiefly light E airs and breezes, the weather cloudy but fine and the barometer showed a slight rise for the most part since noon of the previous day. At Cape St. James, there was a NW gentle breeze. On the SW coast of Luzon light to fresh SE breezes prevailed with overcast skies and rising barometer.

The following information is from the log books of the Memnon and Picciola:-

S.S. MEMNON.

June 26

Noon 15° 42′ 6 p. S 15° E

116° 2′ 29.76

57 miles .71

...

8 p.

- 9.5

.71

NW

19

.70

WNW

""

19

.68

W

"">

9.8

.66

W/S

"2

9.8

.65

WSW

""

3 a.

9.8

.63

SW

27

10 p. Midt.

1 a.

2 a.

""

35

وو

::

4 a.

9.5

.67

SSW

6 a.

19

.70

SW

...

""

8 a.

19

.76

SW

...

Noon 12° 29′ 117° 14′

.76

SW

Light variable breeze sky overcast. Sky densely overcast.

Moderate breeze lightning NW and SE. Wind increasing with occasional squalls.

Incessant lightning with heavy rain and strong squalls. Wind increasing, sea comparatively smooth, lightning

all round.

Squalls more frequent and heavier.

Moderate gale with very heavy squalls lasting about 15 minutes. Lightning appeared to be close to and all round the vessel, thunder one continuous roll, very little sea.

Weather improving, squalls less frequent and severe. Moderate breeze SW steady.

Clear weather with moderate breeze, heavy bank of

clouds to N and NW.

Fine weather with moderate breeze.

S.S. PICCIOLA.

June 26

Noon 15° 21′ 118° 54′ 29.74

SE

5

0.

4 p.

.70

SE

6 orq.

High wild sea.

8 p.

.69

SE

8 orq.

Increasing sea.

27

4 a.

.76

SSE

6 org.

Sea decreasing.

Noon 13° 27' 120° 12'

...

.76

S

3

Fine.

4 p.

The Amicitia at midnight had E 5, (barometer 29.77), the Nicoya NE 2, and clear weather. Both vessels were steering to the North.

The centre at noon on the 26th June may have been in about 13 118°3. At 8 p.m. it was in 14° 118° moving WNWard, the Picciola being at the time about 90 miles to the Eastward and the Memnon about the same distance to the Westward of the centre. It was approaching but passing to

Northward of the Memnon.

27

The following are the noon observations for the 26th:-

415

COAST STATIONS.

Pt. Santiago,

Manila,

ENE

120 29.82

NE

140

.81+.04

SSE ESE

Bolinao,

NNE

180

.77-.01

SE

S. Cape,

NNE

530

.84+.01

NE

Hoihow,

NW

650

.81+.07

ESE

Hongkong,

NW/N

580

.84+.02

E

Breaker Pt,

NNW

600

.85+.03

NE

Lamocks,....

N/W

600

.86+.02

ENE

10 N N 00 00 — pad

5

0.

cm.

2 C.

2

C.

3

0.

3

0.

1

C.

1

C.

Turnabout,

N

700

.87+.01

WSW

1

VESSELS.

S.S. Aglaia,

.10° 49'

109° 10'

WSW

580

29.79

N

S.S. Kiel,

.14 27

110 12

W/N

500

N

S.S. Lightning,

.15 29

112 43

WNW

380

.84

SW

S.S. Picciola,

.15 21

118

54

N

120

.74

SE

S.S. Memnon,

..15 42

116

2

NW

210

.76

var.

Bq. Nicoya,

..17

10

114 20

NW

330

N

3225 N N

b.

b.

Öö

clear.

S.S. Amicitia,

...17 44

117 14

NNW

270

.74

calm

Sh. Sterling,

.19 20

118 38

N

350

ESE

b. C. fine.

S.S. Thibet,

.19 50

113 44

NW

480

.81

NNE

S.S. Esmeralda,.

.22 39 115 15

NNW

550

ENE

WN

2 0.

3

fine.

At the stations in S. China on the 27th June fine weather and light E breezes chiefly prevailed, the barometer being almost steady. In SW Luzon the barometer had risen somewhat since the previous day and the weather was fine with light to moderate SE breezes. The Memnon now had a moderate SW breeze and fine weather, and the Picciola light S breezes barometer at 4 p. 29.76, weather fine. In the district of the China Sea to the south of Hongkong several vessels had E to NE moderate breezes. The barque Nicoya and ship Sterling had squally showery weather. To the East of Annam light variable airs and calms prevailed. The Kiel and Electra had light N breezes and the barometer had fallen slightly since the previous day.

There was a distinct cyclonic circulation of winds around the centre of the China Sea, but not well marked on the western side, and possibly the central area of depression may have been in about 15°, 116°. No ship log has been received within 200 miles of this position.

Observations for 27th June at noon:-

Pt. Santiago, Manila, .......

Bolinao, S. Cape, Hoihow,

Hongkong, Breaker Pt.,

3 Å 3 3 3 3 6 3 8

om.

29.83+.01 .81 .00 .80+.03 .84 .00

ESE

4

C.

SE

2

b.

S

C.

NE

C.

.81 .00

ENE

.83-.01

E

.82-.03

NE

2

Lamocks,..

.86 .00

calm

Turnabout,

.85 .02

var.

om.

VESSELS.

S.S. Lightning,

.11° 52'

S.S. Memnon,

12 29

110° 43' 117 14

29.79

SW

3

b.

.76

SW

4

fine.

S.S. Picciola,

.13 27

120 12 (4p. .76

S

3)

fine.

S.S. Rio,

.15 25

110 11

.78

SE

1

S.S. Electra,

.15 30

113

.86

N

3

S.S. Aglaia,

.15 3

110 22

.76

calm

b.

S.S. Holstein,

.16 41

110 23

.80

var.

fine.

Bq. Nicoya,

.18 47

113 50

E

4

q.

Sh. Sterling,

.19 6

116 41

ENE

4

p. heavy showers.

S.S. Devawongse,

.20 13

112 34

.82

NE

b.

S.S. Amicitia,

.20 26

115 44

.77

ESE

3

On the 28th June the barometer had fallen slightly in S. China since the previous day. Light E iars and breeze prevailed with cloudy and in some cases showery weather. At Hongkong the weather was showery with thunder and lightning. During the two previous days c-str and c-cum clouds had been observed coming from N, the lower clouds were from E and ESE. In Luzon there was a slight increase of pressure with light variable airs and breezes and fine weather. To the East of Cochin China several vessels had light Sairs and calms with fine weather. To the SE of Hainan moderate to strong NE breezes with squally weather prevailed. West of the Bashee Channel light to moderate ESE breezes. The centre may possibly have been in about 16. 11210. This is, however, very uncertain. During the evening of the 28th the wind at Hoihow backed to NE 3, and heavy clouds were passing over from the SE. The barometer remained steady. The Actir, a few miles W of Hoihow, had a fresh E breeze with steady barometer. At Hongkong the barometer was steady and light E airs with showery weather prevailed. On the 29th at noon the barometer (29.72) at Haiphong showed a fall of 0.09 since the previous day, the sky was cloudy with a gentle SE breeze. The barometer had fallen slightly at Hoihow with moderate E breeze and clear sky. There was a light SW breeze at Cape St. James.

:

416

28

Possibly the depression moved Westward about a hundred miles to the south of the entrance to the Gulf of Tongking.

Observations for noon on the 28th June:-

COAST OBSERVATIONS.

Bolinao,

.29.82 + .02

SSW

C.

South Cape,.

.82 .02

NNE

C.

Hoihow,

.79 .02

ENE

3

b.

Hongkong,

.83 .00

E

2

Breaker Point,

.83 + .01

ENE

1

op.

Lamocks,

.86 .00

ENE

1

c.

Turnabout,

.87 + .02

calm

C.

VESSELS.

S.S. Dardanus,

8° 30'

108° 59' 29.75

calm

S.S. Lennox,

.10 11

107 18

SE

1

b.

S.S. Mongkut,

.10 28

108 8

.76

S

fine.

S.S. Sverre,

.10 54

110 41

SSW

1

0.

S.S. Holstein,

12 44

109 31

.77

calm

S.S. Aglaia,

.18 20

111 30

,75

NE

S.S. Kiel,

.19 17

112 47

NE

S.S. Elecktra,..

19 32

113 34

NE

S.S. Activ,

.20 28

107 40

.83

E

S.S. Alwine,

..20 21

110 55

.76

ENE

S.S. Sungkiang,

.21 12

119 3

.83

ESE

S.S. Esmeralda,

..21 16

118 57

.80

SE

Sh. Sterling,

.20 53

115 16

E

HOQ3+;

q. NE swell.

2

fine.

At noon on the 29th the barometer at Hongkong showed the same reading as at noon on the previous day and was in fact rising for two or three hours about this time instead of showing the usual daily fall. At 2 p. it read the same as at 10 a. which, allowing for daily variation, shows a distinct rise of 0.04 inches. The barometer did not commence to fall until late in the evening. The wind was from about ESE during the morning hours of force 2. At 10 a. it was E 4. About 12.30 p. the wind suddenly flew round to SSE in a sharp squall of wind and rain, but it backed to E/N at 4 p. force 4 and continued from about that direction for the remainder of the evening. The lower clouds came from SE and some higher clouds from SSE. The mean temperature for the day was 79°. At Victoria Peak the direction of the wind was from SE 4 to 5 the whole day. At Macao light SSW breezes blew during the middle of the day and towards evening a light E breeze. The weather was showery during the day; cloudy in the evening. On the whole the barometer was falling slightly. At Hoihow fine weather prevailed.

The sky was clear the whole day and the wind from E force 4, lightning was observed to the S during the evening. The barometer showed a slight fall since the previous day, but it read the same at 3 p. as at 9 a. (29.76) and was thus rising at this time. Allowing for daily variation the rise between 9 a. and 3 p. would be about 0.05 inch. On the SE coast the barometer was almost steady, perhaps slightly rising and the wind which was chiefly light NE airs and breezes in the morning became more Easterly towards evening. The weather was fine generally with detached clouds.

Vessels in China Sea West of Bolinao had moderate SSE breezes. The Esmeralda reported a high SW swell. To the East of Annam the weather was fine with light variable airs. The Aglaia and the Alwine, a few miles to the SSW of Hongkong, had a strong ESE breeze with rain and a rough sea. The Presto, which left Hongkong for the SWard at 6 a., had a strong S breeze and squally weather with high S sea and SE swell. The Activ left Hoihow for Hongkong about 2 a.m. She experienced a gentle to moderate ENE breeze during the morning hours. A heavy bank of clouds was noticed in the SE and towards noon she had a SE swell. The barometer (4 a. 29.77, 10 a. 29.82) was not falling at this time.

During the evening the Canton and Taichiow, which left Hongkong bound East in the afternoon, had E and ESE gentle to moderate breezes with overcast showery weather and a heavy S swell. The Presto had the barometer (at 8 p. 29.75, midnight 29.71) falling during the evening and the direction of the wind S 5 at 4 p. had become E 5 at 8 p. and E 7 at midnight. At the latter hour the weather was thick with rain and there was a tremendously high sea from E. The Activ had now the barometer falling and the wind had backed from E 5 during the afternoon to ENE 6 at night. There was a heavy swell from SSE at midnight.

The following are the observations for June 29th at noon :-

Bolinao, South Cape, Hoihow,

C.

COAST STATIONS.

..29.83 + .01 .85 + .03

E

1 C.

NNE

1

.76 .03

E

Haiphong,

.72

.09

SE

Hongkong,

.83

.00

E

Breaker Point,

.84 + .01

NNE

Lamocks,

.86 .00

NE

b.

0.

0.

C.

C.

Turnabout,

.88 + .01

N

2

3 3 2 6 6 6 6 6

29

VESSELS.

S.S. Dardanus,

.12° 3'

111° 28′

29.77

SSE

2

S.S. Lennox,

.13 22

109 42

.78

var.

2

fine.

clear smooth sea.

S.S. Sverre,

..13 43

112 38

S

1

b.

S.S. Mongkut,

.14 21

110 16

.78

var.

1

fine.

S.S. Esmeralda,

..16 54

119 36

S

S.S. Sungkiang,

.17 6

119 33

.80

S.S. Activ,

.? (20 45

111 30)

.80

S.S. Alwine,

......21 57

113 46

.76

S.S. Aglaia,

S.S. Presto,

.21 57 ..?(21 50 113 35)

113 52

.81

.83

28288

SSE

4

NE/E

4

SE swell.

ESE

7

ESE

6

r. rough sea.

S

6

oqr. high S sea.

417

Taking all the information into consideration it seems that a very small area of low pressure entered the coast from the southward about 60 miles to the WSW of Hongkong on the 29th June at noon. It appears that the cyclone which followed next day was formed in the rear of this small area of squally and wet weather. But all the ships that reported squally weather had it from SE. There are no data on the other side of the centre, so there may not really have been any low surrounded by closed isobars.

During the early morning hours of June 30th the barometer was falling (at 4 a. 29.71) at Hong- kong the direction of the wind being ENE force 4. At 1 a.m. the sky was clear, at 4 a. partially clouded. At 4.30 a. the direction veered very suddenly to SSE in a heavy squall of wind and rain, the barometer rose 0.05 in. in a few minutes (at 5 a. 29.77) and the temperature fell 7°. From this time the wind gradually backed (at 9 a. E 4), the force diminishing from 6 to 4. The barometer was falling. A few minutes before 10 a. the wind again suddenly veered from E to SSE in another squall of wind and rain-but less severe than at 4.30 a.-and the barometer rose quickly for a short time. Thereafter it fell until 7 p. when it commenced to rise. The wind after 10 a.m. was from between SE and SSE and it increased from force 5 at 1 p. to 7 at 7 p., the weather being wet and squally the whole time. The lower clouds came from SSE all day. After midnight the wind moderated and the direction became S force 4 at 1 a. on the 1st July with rising barometer (1 a. 29.75) and showery weather. At Victoria Peak on the 30th June the direction of the wind was SE from 7 a. to 4 p. increasing in force from 5 at the former to 7 at the latter hour. At 7 p. it was SSE 7, at 10 p. SW 7 between 10 a. and 10 p. no rain fell. On the morning of 1st July the wind was SW 6, and the weather rainy.

At Macao the barometer on the 30th June was falling again in the evening. At 4 a. there was a light E breeze. SSE the force increasing to 5 at 4 p. At 10 p. it was S 5. to force 2. The weather was wet and squally.

rather rapidly during the day, but rose Towards midday the direction veered to At 4 a. on the 1st July it had moderated

At Canton light ESE airs with sky partially clouded prevailed during the morning hours of the 30th with slightly falling barometer. Between 3 p. and 9 p. the fall became rapid and the wind which was SE 5 at the former hour had backed and was E 6 at 9 p. The sky had become overcast and it was squally. On July 1st at 3 a. the wind was still E 6 with wet squally weather and the barometer was on the point of rising. At 9 a. the wind was S 3 the weather rainy and the barometer had risen.

At Hoihow on the 30th the barometer had fallen since the previous night but between 9 a. and 3 p. it was rising. A gentle to moderate NW breeze prevailed during the day. At 5.45 p. the wind shifted to WSW with a light rain squall. At 9 p.m. it was SE 2. The weather was very fine all day with the exception of the slight squall above mentioned,

On the SE coast on June 30th the barometer showed a slight fall since the previous day. Light variable airs, chiefly Easterly, and calms prevailed with weather cloudy but fine.

5

p.m.

Vessels in the China Sea to the SE of Hainan on June 30th had light and gentle S and SSW breezes and fine weather, but towards evening the weather became showery and the wind slightly increased in force. The Lennox reported a confused sea. The Bantam left Hongkong for the South at and at midnight experienced a strong S breeze overcast sky and high sea. The Presto NE of Hainan had a fresh NE breeze during the early morning and later a moderate gale from N by E. The weather was wet and squally. At noon in Hainan Straits she had a light SW breeze with fine weather. Later as she proceeded Westward she had a fresh SW breeze. The centre was at noon on June 30th in 21° 10′, 112° 20'.

The following are the noon observations for June 30th:-

COAST STATIONS.

Bolinao, S. Cape,

SE

530

E/N

470

29.82-.01 .85-.00

var.

NNE

Hoihow,

Pakhoi,

WSW

130

.78+.02

NW

3

WIN

180

.75-.08

SSE

Canton,

NNE

130

.74-.09

ESE

Hongkong,

ENE

120

.75-.08

SSE

Breaker Pt.,

ENE

250

.82-.02

var.

Lamocks,....

ENE

300

.84-.02

ENE

Turnabout,

NE

510

.87+.01

NNE

~ 221 20 10 03-

2

0.

cdt.

b.

C.

0.

5

0.

b.

1

C.

1

CV.

418

30

rough sea.

VESSELS.

S.S. Dardanus,

S.S. Sverre,

...16° 3'

113° 33'

SSE

320 29.77

2

fine.

.16 44

113 57

SSE

290

S

1

b.

S.S. Lennox,.

....

.17 27

111 23

S/W

230

.78

S

3

S.S. Mongkut,

.18 22

111 33

S/W

180

.75

SSW

3

S.S. Presto,

Hainan Straits

WSW

130

.71

SW

2

S.S. Activ,

......21 44 112 44

NE/N

35

.50

E/S

9

..23 09 117 20

ENE

300

.86

E

2

C.

S.S. Canton,

clear. sea smoking.

swell.

The log of the S.S. Activ shows that the centre of a small cyclone passed across St. John's harbour at 3 p. on the 30th June. The wind scarcely reached typhoon force. There was no rain to speak of till after the centre had passed. Captain HYGOм, who observed the phenomena carefully as is to be seen from the log printed below, has given us the following particulars in addition. They are of great value as we had hitherto no observations of the motion of clouds above the bull's eye, where it is usually so difficult to make observations.

"Before the centre passed the clouds came from 1 point south of the wind, but not very fast. They continued from that direction during the first part of the central calm. The fleck of clear sky moved slowly about NEward. The sea calmed down perfectly with the wind for an hour and a half. The clouds came from SE in the bull's eye, then from S, and then the wind burst from the opposite quarter to where it blew from before. Another clearing in the clouds were noticed to the SE. After the calm the rain was seen to come up like a wall from about 5 miles towards W."

From this we may conclude that this little typhoon originated in the evening of the 29th June or during the following night a short distance S by W of St. John's harbour. That it was not fully established till the centre was above St. John's harbour and that it there quickly ceased to blow as the centre entered the mainland.

After entering China the depression moved NNWward.

HONGKONG.

MACAO.

Bar. to

WIND.

Date.

Hour. 32° & Sea Temp. Level.

Weather.

Rain- fall.

Dir. Force.

Bar, to 32° & Sea Temp.

Level.

WIND.

Weather.

Rain- fall.

Dir. Force.

June 29,...

1 a.

29.80

79

SE by E

2

4 a.

.79

79

ESE

2

7 a.

.82

81

E by S

2

10 a.

.82

82

E

1 p.

.84

78

S by E

4 p.

.78

E by N

7 p.

.79 77

E by S

10 p.

.81 77

30,...

1 a.

.76 78

4 a.

.71 79

7 a.

.76

77

ENE ENE ENE E by S

10 a.

.78

76

1

P.

.73 83

SSE SE by S

4

p.

.67 80

SE by S

7 p.

.66 82

10 p.

.70

81

SSE SE by S

July

1....

1 a.

.75

78

S

4 a.

.71

80

SSW

7 a.

.77

80

SSE

10 a.

.82

80

S by E

NANT CD CD COH HO ONTHON LO CO

C

d

...

.80 79

.74 79

c

o q

o p q

og

...

E

2

c

.75 84

SSE

2

c q r

.69

83

SSE

са

o p q

.60

81

SSE

e q

o p q

.68

orq

or

.72

3

or

Or

.80

1287822 *** F 12 12

润润

29.78

79

.83 85 SSW

с

.74

SSW

2

cr

.73

80 ESE

2

cr

E

2

с

79

79

SSW

Ni Ni ci GAN: NN: ~~- -:

...

cr

o q

5

o q r

2

2

or

or

HOIHOW.

CANTON.

Bar. to

WIND.

Date.

Hour. 32° & Sea Temp.

Weather.

Rain- fall.

Level.

Dir. Force.

Bar, to 32° & Sea Temp.

Level.

WIND.

Rain-

Weather.

fall.

Dir.

Force.

June 29,...

3 a. 9 a.

29.78

79

.85

3 p.

9 p.

.81 77 .82 77

30,...

3 a.

.74

9 a.

.78

3 p.

.71 82

9 p.

.66 77

July

1,...

3 a.

.67

9 a.

.78

POKERKOFRE

ENE

2

С

80

calm

o d

0.90

29.76

S

1

.76 85

SE

.84

76

SE

78

76

10 60 60 ♡

77

...

1.14

.71

83

NW

3

.75

89

NW

4

o

q

.83

82

SE

r

q

r

1.07

.74

****** :*

84

83

WEEE

85

: 02

∞ NAC AAW:

3

3

200000 ; 0

...

يوم

31

LOG OF S.S. “ACTIV.”

REMARKS.

Heavy bank of clouds to SE.

Swell from SE.

"

""

419

rql

""

""

Heavy swell from SSE.

Rain squalls with perfectly clear intervals and

heavy bank to SE. Lightning.

At 11 a. changed anchorage.

Sea smoking.

A little less wind.

A speck of clear sky.

Not much wind, fine rain.

Wind increasing fast. Changed anchorage. Heavy rain.

""

Lat. Long.

WIND.

Barometer

Day.

Hour.

or

corrected.

Weather.

Course and Dist.

Dir.

Force.

June 28,... 29,...

Midt.

Outside Hoihow

29.80

E

4

4 a.

ENE 15 miles

.77

3

...

8 a.

33

.81

ENE

""

10 a.

NE

E 16

.82

NE/E

Noon

NE

16

.80

2 p.

p.

8 p. ENE 15 10 p. NE/ELE 13

16

.78

E

...

16

.75

15

.76

35

...

.77

ENE

""

...

.77

Midt.

NE/E 12

.75

""

30,... 2 a.

10

.74

""

4 a.

SE

4

.67

E

99

6 3.

West Coast of

.68

Haucheun

8 a.

21° 47' 112° 47'

.70

10 a.

.66

Noon 21° 44′ | 112° 44′

.50

E by S

66700

779

1 p.

.45

1 p.

.35

...

ka

2

2

3

31/p.

.31

.27

ESE

.26

972

.27

S

4 p.

21° 40' 112° 41'

.29

W by S

4. p.

.30

9

...

.40

11

p.

.47

W

11

.55

9

.61

SW

.63

rl

.65

8

9 p.

11 P. Midt.

.67

.68 SSW

.75

.74

July 1,... 2 a.

.74

4 a.

Left St. John's

.70

8 a.

From Wizard

ENE

13 miles

.79

Noon

Sharp Island

.80

3 p. Arrived at Hongkong.

TO TO LO LO CO TO H

.3

4

r

r2

rl

::

5 2

5

- O

Lightning. Less rain.

Heavy rain.

39

""

""

Rain and lightning.

Rain.

Dry but cloudy.

JULY.

During the first half of the month of July the weather on the China Coast and in the China Sea was fine. On the Coast between Hainan and Shanghai the general direction of the wind between the 1st and 15th was chiefly SEasterly. In the Southern part of the China Sea the SW monsoon was blowing steadily but not very strongly. About the 15th it increased in strength and moved further north to about 15° latitude with wet and squally weather and the winds on the China Coast became somewhat more Southerly. On the 17th the barometer rose in China particularly on the E Coast and gradients were established for E winds on the Coast and in the N part of the China Sea. South of 15° latitude fresh W and SW winds were blowing and at the time there appears to have been a trough of low pressure across the China Sea in about 15° to 16° latitude. The barometer was falling rather sharply in Luzon. At Manila there was a gentle SW breeze and overcast weather.

The central area of depression appears to have been in about 16°, 114° almost stationary but perhaps moving a little towards WNW.

Observations for 17th July at noon :----

Manila, Bolinao, Hoihow,

3

om.

C.

3

b.

C.

0.

C.

C.

C.

CV.

COAST STATIONS.

South Cape,

Hongkong,

.29.77 .07 .74 .04 .73 + .04 .74 .02 .76 .00

SW

SSE

NE

NNE

E

Breaker Point,

.77 + .02

NE

Lamocks,

Swatow,

Fisher Island,

Amoy, Turnabout, Steep Island,

North Saddle,..

"

.80 + .03 .80 + .03 .77 .01 .81 + .02

ENE

ENE NNW

NE

.82 + .02

NNE

.86 + .05

.82 + .06

SSE SE

∞ 1 CO GE C∞ Q Q Q 1ILBL

b.

cm.

3

CV.

C.

420

32

VESSELS.

S.S. Sikh,

4° 49'

106° 39'

29.78

SE

S.S. Cheang Chew,....................

.10 1

110 1

.70

SW

S.S. N. S. de Loreto,

.11 28

120 12

...

S.S. Namyong,

.11 29

110 29

.73

W SW/W

Sh. J. D. Bischoff,

.14 50

114 39

.65

var.

Sh. Carl Friedrich,

14 48

113 15

.63

W

S.S. Michael Jebsen,

.14 43

110 11

.70

W

Q2 50 10 2QHH;

fine.

oqlr.

oqr.

0.

og.

Bq. Heinrich,..

15 11

113 31

WNW

qr.

Bq. Vagabond,

.17 27

114 48

.65

E/N

P.

rising sea.

S.S. Gwalior,

S.S. Chonfa,

S.S. Activ,

S.S. Memnon,

.19 .19 3

1.

113 55

.65

E

c.

112

0

.69

ENE

C.

.19 6

108 16

.73

ENE

C.

.19 57

115

9

.68

SE

clear.

S.S. Kowshing,

S.S. Zafiro,

.20 39

118 49

.76

E

C.

.22 39 : 115 49

.75

E

orq.

On the 18th July the barometer had on the whole fallen slightly on the S and SE Coasts but had risen on the East Coast. Winds over these districts were light to moderate E breezes on the S coast, fresh NE breezes on the SE coast, and light SE breezes on the East coast. In the latter district the weather was fine. On the SE and S coasts cloudy weather prevailed with drizzling rain at some stations. In Luzon the barometer had risen slightly with light S winds and cloudy skies. At Cape St. James there was a strong SW breeze and squally weather. Vessels south of Hongkong and in the N part of the middle of the China Sea had strong E to NE breezes and squally weather. West of Bolinao the Kowshing and the Memnon had strong SSW and SSE breezes respectively with squally weather and showers in the case of the Kowshing. The Michael Jebsen, to the S of Hainan, had a moderate N gale while the Cheang Chew to the East of Annam had a fresh WNW gale with rain squalls and high sea. The Sikh to the East of Cochin China had SW 5 and the wind veering to W with falling barometer as she progressed northwards.

At noon on the 18th July the centre was in about 16°, 113° and shortly afterwards it re-curved. It thus appears that the origin of the depression which subsequently developed into a typhoon may be traced to a spot with squally and wet weather in the midst of a district with rather low barometer in the China Sea round which light variable winds following the coast lines gyrated against the sun.

Observations for the 18th July at noon:-

COAST STATIONS.

Manila,

ESE

400

29.79 + .02

Bolinao,

E

350

.75 + .01

i ca

S

¿

0.

0.

Hoihow,

NW 300

.73

.00

ENE

C.

Hongkong,

N/E

400

.75

.01

E

C.

South Cape,..

NE

550

.77 + .03

NE

cg.

Breaker Point,

NNE

450

.75 .01

E

om.

Lamocks,......

-

.75 .05

NE

5

omd.

Fisher Island,....

NE

550

72

J

.05

SSE

Amoy,....

NNE 600

.78

.03

NE

Turnabout,

NE 700

.81

- .01

NE

cm.

C.

cm.

Steep Island,

North Saddle,

NNE NNE

950

.87 + .01

SSE

CV.

950

.85 + .03

SE

C.

VESSELS.

S.S. Sikh,

8° 15'

109° 9'

SW

500 29.88

SW

0.

>>

Namyong,

.10 30

107 50

SW

450

.79

WSW

1.

,, Cheang Chew,.

.12 55

109 48

SW

300

.67

WNW

գ.

high sea.

""

N. S. de Loreto,.

..13 30

118 19

SE

300

WNW

0.

Kowshing,

.16 20

119 39

E

350

.75

SSW

oqp.

Sh. Carl Friedrich,

.16 26

113 8

NW

50

.54

NE

oq.

S.S. Memnon,

.16 38

116 13

E'N

150

.68

SSE

q.

Sh. J. D. Bischoff,

.17 16

114 45

NE

100

.62

ENE

oqr.

Bq. Heinrich,..

.17 36

114 21

NNE 120

E/N

q.

heavy sea.

S.S. Michael Jebsen,

.17 24

111 7

NW 150

.68

N

Bq. Vagabond,

.19 57

" Nicoya,

.20 23

114 20 114 26

NNE 250 NNE 275

NEE

.77

E

op.

moderate sea.

On the 19th July, at noon, the barometer had fallen about 0.07 inch since noon of the previous day on the S Coast, less so on the SE Coast. In Hoihow and Hongkong the wind was a NE gentle to moderate breeze and the weather showery with thunder and lightning in the afternoon at Hoihow. On the SE Coast light to moderate NE breezes prevailed with cloudy and, in some cases, showery weather. At S. Cape (Formosa) there was a slight fall in the barometer with NNE 3 and cloudy sky. On the East Coast pressure had given way considerably and light SE breezes prevailed with fine weather. In Luzon the barometer showed a slight rise with overcast sky and light to moderate S and SW breezes. At Cape St. James it was overcast and there was a strong SW breeze. The sailing vessels J. D. Bischoff and Heinrich, N of the centre, in about 20°, 114° had NE and ENE strong breezes increasing in force and backing towards evening with heavy rain squalls and irregular sea.

33

421

The barometer was falling quickly (J. D. Bischoff 29.45 at midnight 19th NE 7 backing and increasing). The centre was at noon moving about NE by N and approaching those vessels. The Barquentine Vagabond at noon about 50 miles S of Hongkong had the wind backing to NE during the evening and increasing to a fresh gale with hard squalls and a fast falling barometer. Her commander, sus- pecting a typhoon, took down the royal yards. The Michael Jebsen NW of the centre had the baro- meter falling (8 p. 29.56) the wind backing to NNE and increasing to a fresh gale with very high cross sea. The Nicoya and Carl Friedrich were about 100 miles WSW of the centre. The latter had a fresh WNW breeze increasing and backing with rain squalls, a threatening appearance to NE and a very high cross sea. The vessel was hove to at 4 p. At midnight, 19th July, the barometer read 29.53 and had ceased falling, wind W 5. The Nicoya noted the wind as a fresh NW gale at noon 19th. Fresh W breezes blew on the Coast of Annam. East of Cochinchina fresh SW breezes. N of Palawan the Memnon had strong SW breezes with rain squalls and high sea. She was about 350' SE of the centre. The N. S. de Loreto also SSE of the centre distant about 250 miles had a strong NW breeze according to the log book but this appears to be wrong probably SW should have been written. West of the Bashee Channel the Zafiro NE by E of the centre had SE 4 with heavy rain. She was steering S/E and towards evening the wind became S 3 with heavy S swell rain squalls and lightning to SW.

The centre was, at noon on the 19th July, in 18°15', 113°45′ moving NE by N and the depression was evidently increasing in intensity.

Observations for noon of July 19th:-

increasing sea.

COAST STATIONS.

Bolinao,

ESE

360

29.76 + .01

S

Hoihow,

NW

250

.69 .04

NE

3

Hongkong,

N

250

A

.68 .07

NE

South Cape,.

NEE

450

.75 .02

NNE

Fisher Island,.

NE

450

.75 + .03

NW

Breaker Point,

NNE

.

340

.72 .03.

ENE

Lamocks,

NNE

380

.74

.01

NE

Amoy,....

NE/N

450

.76

.02

NE

Turnabout,

NE

600

.79

.02

ENE

Steep Island,

NE

900

.81 .06

SE

North Saddle,....

NE

940

.78 .07

SE

01420 + HQ2 Q2 Q1

0.

clt.

0.

3

C.

نن

gmd.

mr.

C.

C.

cm.

bm.

VESSELS.

S.S. Namyong,

""

Camelot,

Sikh,

7° 21' 8 35 11 10

106° 29'

108 4

SW/S 800 SW/S 700

29.88

SW

4

SW

5 orl.

...

111 33

SSW

450

.81

W

5

Memnon,

13 42

117 21

SE/S

350

.76

SSW

6 orq.

""

""

Sungkiang,

14 30

120 16

SE

430-

.76

SW

5 q.

N. S. de Loreto,

14 45

116 15

SSE 250

? NW

6 0.

""

""

Cheang Chen,.

16 5

108 42

WSW 330

Sh. Carl Friedrich,

17 3)

112 22

WSW 100

Bq. Nicoya,

17 30

112 20

WSW 100

S.S. Michael Jebsen,

19 44

112 34

NW/N

120

Sh. J. D. Bischoff,

19 49

113 57

N

100

Bq. Heinrich,

19 50

114 20

NNE

100

S.S. Alwine,

20 21

110 55

NW

220

""

Zafiro,

21 11

118 51

NE/E

330

Bq. Vagabond,

21 26

114 1

N

200

S.S. Chusan,

21 45

113 30

N

230

Activ, Gaelic,

?(22

0

113 30)

N

240

24 24

118 52

NE

460

:88:85:87856%

.62

WNW 4 WNW

.60

NW NNE

5 rq. rq.

NE

ENE

NE

SE ENE

4

NE

NE

3

orq.

.82

NE

3 op.

or.

6 rq. 3 orq.

high sea.

fine sultry.

cross sea.

increasing sea.

heavy cross sea.

choppy sea. hard rain squalls.

sultry.

During the evening of the 19th July, the barometer at Hongkong was falling fast (at 8 p. 29.62). The wind was a fresh to strong ENE breeze, there was occasional drizzling rain and the clouds were of the R-cum type from ENE. At Victoria Peak the wind was NE 6, the direction having backed from E since the morning. At Hoihow the barometer was falling slightly during the evening with NE 3 detached clouds and thunder and lightning, but no rain fell. In S Formosa the barometer was falling (S. Cape 9 p. 29.72), the wind was ESE 2 with cloudy sky. On the SE coast, the barometer was falling moderately fast in the S part of the district with ENĚ and NE 4 and occasional rain showers. In the north part the barometer fell less quickly, the ENE wind was somewhat lighter in force, and the weather fine. On the E coast the barometer was falling slightly with SE light breezes and fine weather. At Bolinao, the barometer was steady (at 6 p. 29.72) with light S and SSE breezes and overcast weather. The clouds came from SSW.

On July 20th, during the morning hours, the barometer continued to fall at Hongkong and the wind backed through NE to N force 3. The weather was overcast, and, between 3 and 4.30 a., a slight thunderstorm passed East of the Colony appearing in the NE and disappearing in the SE. The direction of the lower clouds had backed with the wind. The lowest reading of the barometer occurred at 3 p. (29.42 actual, 29.45 corrected for daily variation). At the time it was almost calm, the anemo- graph only recording a velocity of 6 miles between 2.30 and 3.30 p. the direction being N by W. The latter, however, rapidly backed to WNW and increased to a velocity of 23 miles per hour at 8 p.

422

34

(barometer 29.49 actual). Later it backed still further and the velocity decreased, at midnight WSW 9 miles per hour, (barometer 29.50 actual). The direction of the lower clouds also backed from NE at. 1 p. to N at midnight.

The weather during the afternoon and evening had a threatening appearance, but with the excep- tion of a few spots of light rain occasionally and a slight shower about 7 p., no rain fell. The atmos- phere was unusually clear during the latter part of the day and distant objects were very distinctly seen. At Victoria Peak, the direction of the wind, which had been NE 5, backed to NW 3 between p. and 7 p., and at 10 p. it was also NW 3. The mean temperature for the 20th July was 80°.1, this being 1°.4 lower than the mean of 5 years.

4

Considering that the centre was at noon only 100 miles to the SE of the Colony the light winds recorded may appear remarkable, but the high land to the northward has at all times a great effect in diminishing the strength of N winds in the Colony and it frequently happens that a moderate N gale is blowing at sea a short distance to the Southward when only light to moderate breezes are experienced in the Colony.

At Hoihow, the barometer was falling, there was a light SE breeze during the morning, but the direction veered to SW 4 just after noon and became NW 3 in the evening. The weather was fine and lightning was seen at night. At Canton, the barometer was falling during the day. The wind was ESE 2 at 3 a. backing to NE 2 at 9 p. with detached clouds. At 3 P. it was E 6 with overcast sky and passing showers and towards evening WSW 2, detached clouds. The strong E breeze at 3 does not agree with the bearing of the centre of the typhoon at that time. The direction is probably influenced to a great extent by the situation of the observing station.

In Southern Formosa moderate SSE breezes prevailed chiefly on the 20th with showery weather and falling barometer.

p.

In Luzon cloudy weather with moderate to fresh SW breezes prevailed and the barometer was inclined to fall a little. At Bolinao, there was a light SE breeze the lower clouds coming from the same direction. On the SE coast, during the morning hours of the 20th July, moderate to strong E and NE breezes blew with drizzling rain and showers in the South part, and in the North part light and gentle NE breezes with cloudy but fine weather. The barometer was falling rapidly in the whole district. The weather towards evening on this part of the coast will be described in detail later on. The weather experienced by vessels during the morning hours of July 20th was as follows:-

The Chi Yuen off Amoy and NE of the centre had ENE 4 with thick drizzling rain and falling barometer (4 a. 29.69, 8 a. 29.65). The Glengyle off Swatow had the wind variable and squally force 4 with rain squalls and a moderate S and SW sea. Towards noon the wind settled down at ENE and increased to force 6 with gloomy sky. The Oceana in about the same position had at 4 a. NE 7 increasing and vivid lightning was observed to the SE and SW. The Ningpo bound for Hongkong and about half way between Swatow and the former port had SE 3 up to 5 a. (barometer 29.54 falling) with squally wet weather and lightning to SW. There was a SE and later a S swell. About 6 a. the wind backed to NNE force 2 to 3. This vessel was at first NNE and later N of the centre. The Gaelic approaching Hongkong from the Eastward had ESE 4, barometer (4 a. 29.58) falling, heavy rain squalls, rough sea and SE swell.

On the morning of the 20th July, the wind veered to SSE and SE force 5 at Lamocks, and two or three vessels at the time between that station and Hongkong also had the wind SE and variable and squally weather just before they entered the area of strong winds.

46

The Michael Jebsen, WNW of the centre and approaching Hongkong, had at 4 a. N by E 7 (barometer 29.48), at 8 a. N by W 8 (barometer 29.48) with very high NNE sea, at 6 a. the atmos- phere was noted as very clear." Thereafter the wind and sea decreased at noon N by W 6 with barometer inclined to rise. The J. D. Bischoff, W of the centre, had a strong N backing gale at 4 a. (barometer 29.45), at 8 a. NNW 9 (barometer 29.48). The barque Heinrich, SW of the centre, had at noon a fresh WNW gale with heavy squalls and high sea. The barque Vagabond had run to the SW since the previous day and was to the WSW of the centre during the morning. She experienced at 4 a. a strong WNW gale backing and decreasing with heavy squalls. The top gallant masts were taken down at 4 a. West of Bolinao, the Sungkiang and Zafiro, SE of the centre had strong SW and S breezes with heavy cross sea and squally showery weather. East of Annam S to W moderate to strong breezes prevailed. The centre at noon on July 20th was situated in 21° 0′, 115° 45′, moving NE ward.

The following are the noon observations for July 20th:--

COAST STATIONS.

Bolinao, Hoihow,

SE

370 29.75 .01

SSE

2

0.

WSW

330

.60

.09

SE

3

C.

Hongkong,

NW

100

.47

.21

N

3

Canton,

NW

190

.51

.13

ENE

4

cg.

Breaker Point,

NE

110

.48

-

.14

E

7

omgr.

Swatow,

NE

150

.49

.16

NE

4

oqr.

Lamocks,

NE/N

190

.57

-

.17

ESE

3

omr.

S. Cape,

EN

300

.66

.09

SSE

4

cp.

35

COAST STATIONS,

Takow,

ENE

300

.65

.13

SE

8?

g.

Anping,

ENE

300

.62

.13

SSE

3

opq.

Fisher Island,

NE

280

.62

.13

SE

3

omr.

Chapel Island,

NEN

260

.58? .14

E

3

omr.

Amoy,

NEN

270

.63

.13

NE

Turnabout,

NEN

370

.67

.12

NNE

3

C.

Middle Dog,

NE/N

410

.62

G

.12

N

1

c.

Foochow,

NE/N

420

B

.66 .10

var.

1

C.

Tamsui,

NE

380

.69

Ging

.06

NW

1

b.

Keelung,

NE

400

.66 .II

NE

2

Steep Island,

NEN

670

.68

My

.13

SSE

1

5 3 3 3 3 3 3

or.

North Saddle,.

NEN

700

.65

.13

SSE

2

bm.

VESSELS.

S.S. Memnon,

.10° 54'

118° 2'

SE 600 29.78

SW

29

Camelot,

.12

9

110 52

SSW

600

WSW

15

Sikh,

.15 10

113 27

SSW

390

.68

S

663

Bk. Nicoya,

16 12

111 18

SW

390

S

S.S. Sungkiang:

.17. 35

118 11

SSE

250

.56

SW

6 or.

"

N. S. de Loreto,

.17 44

115 28

S/W

200

WNW

6 0.

Zafiro,

17 51

119 49

SE

310

.68

S

0.

Sh. Carl Friedrich,

.18 19

112 34

S.W

260

.58

W/S

3

Bk. Heinrich,

.19 37

114 21

SW

120

WNW 8 q.

or.

fine.

fine clear mod. sea. fine.

heavy beam sea.

cross sea.

cross sea.

increasing sea.

S.S. Cheang Chew,

.19 22

107

45

WSW 480

.56

SW 6

Bk. Vagabond,

..20 10

113 22

WSW 140

.37?

WNW 8

Sh. J. D. Bischoff,

.......20

5

113 16

WSW 150

.52

NW

6 rq.

S.S. Michael Jebsen,.. ..21

29

113 20

WNW 130

.48

N/W

6

Alwine,

.21

35

112 44

WNW

160 .50

N

5

""

Charters Tower,

""

......22

18

114 40

NNW

90

.46

NE

5 qr.

,, Ningpo,

.22

25

114 50

NNW

90

.43

NE

4 orq.

19

Oceana,

.22 42

116 34

NNE

100 · .49

NNE

8

orq.

""

Glengyle,

.22 56

116 41

NNE

120

.55

ENE

6 g.

decreasing sea. swell.

S. swell. confused sea.

increasing wind.

""

City of Rio de Janeiro,23

21

117 40

NE

170 .55

SE

6 oq.

19

Kilmoon,..

.23 57

118 15

NE

200

.58

NE

5 orq.

59

Chi Yuen,

off Amoy

NE N

220

.67

E

4

od.

-""

Electra,

.25 54 120 31

NEN

400

.63

E

""

Benlarig,

Continental,

.26 30 .26 20 120 35

120 30

NEN

420

.66

ENE

NE/N 410

.69

NE

423

high NE swell.

The Glengyle and the Oceana were off the coast in the vicinity of Breaker Point at noon on 20th July the centre of the typhoon being at that time about 100 miles SSW of their position. The former vessel had a strong ENE increasing breeze with barometer falling sharply and a gloomy threatening appearance. At 12.30 p.m. her commander seeing indications of an approaching typhoon made for Swatow and there at the outer anchorage rode out the storm. The Oceana noted the wind at noon as a fresh NNE gale with rapidly falling barometer and confused sea. This vessel was hove to just after 4 p. and during the evening experienced a strong N backing to NW gale with heavy rain squalls. The lowest reading of the barometer was at 9 p. (29.21). The typhoon passed, perhaps, 50 miles E of her about that time it having advanced towards her position during the afternoon. This vessel was the only one at sea in the vicinity of the centre during the evening of the 20th, and during the passage of the typhoon across the Formosa Channel no vessel encountered the full force of it.

Vessels lying at the Coast Ports remained at anchor, warnings having been received from the Hongkong Observatory, and those at sea quickly sought shelter. Some vessels from Japan bound to Hongkong ran into bad weather on the 21st in the northern part of the Channel.

For determining the track of the typhoon in this part of its course the observations at the light stations and Coast Ports around the Channel are fortunately sufficient.

At 6 p.m. on July 20th the centre was situated in 22° 10′, 117° 05′ and at midnight in 22° 52′, 117° 40'.

During the evening of the 20th July NE gales with rain squalls were felt at Breaker Point, Swatow and Lamocks with quickly falling barometer. In the northern part of the Formosa Channel the wind was from E and ENE force 2 to 3, and the weather cloudy. At Fisher Island and the SW coast of Formosa the wind was SE 3 to 4 with overcast sky, passing showers and lightning. The barometer was falling moderately fast. At Lamocks the wind had backed and was at 9 p. N 9, the barometer at the time was falling very rapidly. By midnight the wind had increased to N 10 and the barometer (29.05) had fallen 0.2 inch since 9 p. There were very heavy squalls of wind and rain. At 1 a. July 21st the barometer read 28.95 the wind being N 11, at 2 a. the same reading of the barometer and similar wind and weather. At 2.30 a. the lowest reading of the barometer (28.93) was recorded and the wind backed to NW 11. At 3 a, the barometer (28.99) had risen a little, the wind continuing at NW of storm force with continuous squalls of wind and rain. The barometer thereafter rose quickly (6 a. 29.17) and the wind backed to WNW but was still of force 10. The centre passed about 30 miles to the Eastward of this station at 2.30 a. July 21st.

At Swatow 37 miles to the Westward of Lamocks at 2 a. July 21st the wind was N of force 5 only, the barometer 29.27 (lowest reading). The same reading of the barometer was registered at 3 a. ̧ but the wind had backed and was NW 4. After this time the barometer commenced to rise. The

424

36

weather was gloomy with slight rain. These are the observations made at the Custom House. On board the Fokien at anchor in the river the wind direction was noted as NW/W, the barometer reading 29.29 (lowest reading) at which point it remained until 5 a. when the wind was observed as NW/W 8 with frequent heavy squalls. After 5 a. the wind quickly moderated with rising barometer.

By reference to the log of the Glengyle at anchor about 4 miles to the Eastward of Swatow Custom House, it will be seen that a whole NE backing to NW gale was experienced during the evening of the 20th and early morning of July 21st with furious squalls and much rain. The lowest reading of the barometer was 29.18 at 5 a. July 21st.

Probably the force of wind was over estimated on board the Glengyle though it must be remarked that the gradient from Swatow Eastward to Lamocks was extremely steep during this time corres- ponding to a gradient of 0.13 in 15 miles at 2.30 a. July 21st.

The lowest reading of the barometer at Breaker Point was at 9 p. July 20th (barometer 29.56), the wind being at the time NNE 8 with rain squalls. The centre was then about 60 miles to the ESE of the station. The same wind and weather is noted at midnight but the barometer showed then a rise of 0.02 inch since 9 p. By 3 a. July 21st the wind had backed to W 6 (barometer 29.30). Thereafter the barometer rose quickly and the weather improved.

The rainfall measured for the 24 hours ending July 21st at 9 a. was, at Lamocks 6.70, Breaker Point 2.85, and Swatow 1.69 inches.

The typhoon was advancing in a NE by N direction between midnight of July 20th and 6 a. of July 21st almost directly upon Chapel Island. At that station the wind had increased from NE 4 at 9 p. July 20th to NE 7 at midnight (barometer 29.41 midnight). The weather was wet and gloomy. Thereafter the wind continued to increase in force preserving the same direction and the barometer to fall quickly. At 5 a. July 21st the wind veered to ENE force 10 (barometer 29.18) the centre of the typhoon bearing at the time S by W 50 miles. At 6 a. the wind direction backed to NE. At 7 a. it was NNE 11 which direction it maintained until 11 a. the greatest force being registered at 9 a. and 10 a. as 11 to 12. The lowest barometer reading occurred at 9 a. (29.13) the centre of the typhoon then bearing SSE 40 miles. The rainfall for the previous 24 hours measured at 9 a. July 21st was 4.96 inches.

On July 21st at 6 a. at Amoy there was strong NE wind and wet squally weather (barometer 29.33). At the lighthouse stations in the north part of the Channel there was a moderate ENE increasing breeze with a threatening appearance and in some cases drizzling rain and the barometer falling.

At

At Fisher Island the barometer fell very sharply after 9 p. of July 20th and the wind which had been ESE 6 at 9 p. veered to SE at 1 a. July 21st and increased to force 8, the centre bearing WSW 100 miles at the latter hour. The weather was wet and squally and so continued. The wind direction continued practically steady in direction but increasing in force, at noon it was SE 10, centre of typhoon bearing W 30 miles distant. The barometer continued to fall rapidly (July 21st 6 a. 29.30, noon 29.15). The barometer at Chapel Island had risen 0.09 inch since 9 a. and read at noon July 21st 29.22, the wind at the latter hour being N 10. At Lamocks the barometer had continued to rise quickly (9 a. 29.27, noon 29.37) and the wind was at noon July 21st W 7, the weather continuing very wet and squally. The bearing of the centre was then ENE 95 miles. At Anping, on July 21st, at 3 a., the wind was SW 6 (barometer 29.50) which agrees badly with the bearing of the centre at that time, which was W/N 130 miles. At 8 a. it was S 7 (barometer 29.46), at noon SW 9 (barometer 29.36). The weather was very squally and showery. At Takow the wind during the morning hours of the 21st July was a fresh breeze to moderate gale from S and SSE. At noon S 8 with barometer reading at 6 a. 29.50, at noon 29.42 with the centre at the latter hour bearing NW 95 miles. The weather was wet and squally and lightning had been observed during the early morning. It may be mentioned that at Anping "two shocks of earthquake lasting 3 seconds N to S were felt at 11.20 a.m." Takow the shock was also felt the time given being 11.17 a.m., duration 10 seconds. On this part of the Formosa Coast, earthquake shocks are of rather frequent occurrence. S Cape had the wind SSW increasing from force 3 at 3 a. (barometer 29.49) to 6 at noon July 21st (barometer 29.48) when the centre bore NW 145 miles. The wind had veered a little since the previous evening. The weather was showery, squally, and thunder was heard. The temperature was rather high during the early morning hours of the 21st July being at 3 a. 82°.8. At Tamsui and

At Tamsui and Keelung on the North Coast of Formosa light SE airs and breezes and cloudy but fine weather prevailed at noon on July 21st with falling barometer, and at the lighthouse stations near the northern entrance to the Channel moderate to strong ENE and NE breezes with squally weather and falling barometer. At Hongkong the barometer had risen but slightly and remained practically steady all day on July 21st. Temperature was rather high, the mean of the 24 hours being 82.8. The wind was a moderate SSW breeze at 3 a. (barometer 29.49), but after 5 a. the wind veered to about WNW and continued this direction with force 1 to 2 until noon (barometer 29.51), during the afternoon it backed to about SW and increased a little in force, but towards evening it became calm. The weather was fine but hazy with lightning in the evening. The lower clouds came from NW in the morning but backed to W in the evening. C-cum cloud came from NW. At Victoria Peak there was a moderate W breeze all day. The bearing of the centre from Hongkong was ENE 270 miles at noon July 21st and E by N 340 miles at midnight.

In Luzon on the 21st July at noon moderate SW winds prevailed and the barometer had fallen slightly since the previous day. At noon on July 21st several vessels to the Southward of Hong-

37

425

kong had fresh W breezes and fine weather. The Asagao, 25 miles ENE of Lamocks, had a strong WNW breeze, rainy weather and confused sea. The Oceana, about 45 miles SSW of Lamocks, had also WNW 6 with confused sea. This vessel it will be noticed had allowed the typhoon to pass her on the previous evening and was now following it up keeping at a safe distance by steaming at reduced speed. The Chi Yuen lying at the Amoy outer anchorage had a strong NE gale during the morning of July 21st with hard squalls and rain. The Benlarig passed into the N entrance of the Channel during the evening of the 20th July bound for Hongkong, and at 2 a. July 21st had a fresh ESE breeze increasing. About 5 a., the wind and sea rising and the barometer falling rapidly, the vessel was hove to heading E. Later the wind increased and at noon she had a fresh NE by E gale, the barometer being steady at 29.32. At this time she must have been only about 50 miles N by E of the centre if her position as entered in the log can be relied on. The Continental also off Ockseu at 2 a. July 21st bound South had at 4 a. a strong ENE gale with rain squalls and high confused sea. She sustained some damage on deck and at 8 a. the cargo shifted.、 At 10 a. she had a very hard gale

from ENE and the lowest reading of the barometer 29.42. At noon the vessel was taken into Haitan Bay for shelter and in consequence of a list. She was at 6 a. July 21st about NE of the centre 100 miles. The Electra was even closer to the centre at noon July 21st. Her position is given as 23° 44', 118° 18′ and she was proceeding Southward. During the early morning hours of the 21st she had a NE increasing breeze with rapidly falling barometer (6 a. 29.55). At noon she had a strong NE gale (barometer 29.23). She was then 40 miles WNW of the centre. Thereafter

"7

the barometer rose quickly and the wind backed and decreased in force, at 6 p. NW 6, (barometer 29.39).

Át 6 a.m. on July 21st the centre of the typhoon was in 23° 30′, 118° 10′ and until this hour as before stated, it had been advancing in a NE by N direction and appeared likely to move up the Channel, but at this time its course was deflected and it moved ENEward for a short time then Eastward and at the latter end of the day SEward. The cause of the very unusual path of this typhoon: recurvature in the China Sea in July (cases in November have occurred) and motion NE ward across Formosa, was probably connected with another typhoon, which was at this time ENE of Formosa. Typhoons have a tendency to approach the tracks of their predecessors. The centre at noon on July 21st was situated in 23° 35', 118° 55'.

2.

The following are the observations for July 21st at noon:-

COAST STATIONS.

Bolinao,

S/E

450

29.71

Hoihow,

WSW

520

.59 - .01

Hongkong,

WSW

270

Breaker Pt.

WSW

140

.47

Swatow,

W/S

130

.39

Lamocks,..

WSW

95

Chapel Island,

NW

60

.22

Amoy,....

NW

80

.33

| | | | |+1|

.04

S

2

0.

NNW

3

C.

.51 + .01

W

2

C.

.01

W

3

omp.

- .10

NW

3

ogd.

.37 .20

W

7

mrq.

.36

N

10

omd.

.30

NNE

6

odg.

Ockseu,

NNE

85

NE

4

omd.

Turnabout,

NNE

130

.45

1

.22

ENE

omq.

Middle Dog,

NNE

160

.47

.15

NE

4

cmq.

Foochow,...

N/E

150

.48

.18

ENE

or.

Steep Island,

ENE

450

.66

.02

NE

2

CV.

North Saddle,

NNE

480

.60

.05

E/S

C.

Tamsui,

NE

165

.47

-

. .22

Calm

C.

Keelung,

NE

180

.48 .18

ESE

2

C.

Fisher Island,

E

30

.15

.47

SE

10

omrq.

Anping,

ESE

80

.36

.26

SW

9

opq.

Takow,

SE/E

95

.42

.23

S

8

rq.

S. Cape,

SE

140

.48 .18

SW/S

6

rqt.

VESSELS.

S.S. Memnon,

до

0'

116° 45'

S/W 700 29.79

SW

fine clear.

""

Zafiro,

Bk. Nicoya,

.14 55

120 3

"

""

39

23

Decima,

S.S. Sikh,

N. S. de Loreto,

Sh. Carl Friedrich,

S.S. Sungkiang,

Cheang Chew,

Wingsang,

...

.16 .19 16 19 51 19 56 ..20 4

1

109 ·45

S/E SW 700

520

.73

SSW

3

or.

SSW

orq.

114 13

SW 360

.66

S

114 34

SW 330

.58

W

113 24

115 57

.20 3

110 20

.21 26

114 0

.21 36

113 38

SW/W 370 .56

SW/S

260 WSW 530 .53 SW 6 WSW 300 .46 WSW 310

W

.51

SW

W

WSW 5

Bk. Heinrich,..

S.S. Thales,

..21 39

114 37

WSW 270

...22 30.

Oceana,

"

""

Asagao,

Electra,

""

""

Benlarig,

.22 28 23 28 23 44 ...24 20

114 45 117 3 117 41 118 18 119 14

W/S 240 .51

WSW 120

WIS WNW NE

13

W W

THE CO CO LO CO CO KO KO

4

fine.

3

C.

3

5

ö

6 b.

5 1.

Å ÖZ

0.

high sea.

moderate sea. moderate sea. high sea.

4

0.

SSW swell.

.41

70

WNW WNW 40 .23? NE

6

6 or.

55

.32

NE/E

high sea.

confused sea.

moderating.

Mathilde,

.25

56

120 14

NNE

160

.50

SE

""

12

City of Rio Janeiro, ...26 24

121 48

NNE 220

.50

ENE

orq.

Fushun,

.27

5

121 0

* Tsinan,

..27 18

29

Bengloe, Kilmoon,

..27 21

.....

..27 37

122 21 122 0 121 32

NNE 240 NNE 290 .58 NNE 270 NNE 280

ENE

4 q.

clear.

ENE

fine clear.

E

4

ö

.54

NE

426

38

During the afternoon, between 4 and 4.30 p.m., the centre passed South of Fisher Island and probably within 10 miles of the station. The lowest reading of the barometer was 28.75 at 4.30 p.m. (it had fallen 0.4 since noon) the wind being from NE of full typhoon force with heavy squalls and torrents of rain. By referring to the observations printed elsewhere it will be seen how quickly the wind direction changed. It had been steady at SE up to 2.30 p.m. but had increased in violence from force 9 at 11 am. to force 11 at 2.30 p.m. At 3 p.m. it was ESE 11, 3.30 p.m. E 12, 4 p.m. NE 12, 4.30 p.m. NE 12, 5 p.m. N 12 at which direction it remained till after 9 p.m. though the force of course decreased. The typhoon was moving away from the station in a SEasterly direction.

From the Fisher Island and Anping observations alone the centre can be very accurately deter- mined and at 6 p.m. 21st July was situated in 23° 20′, 119° 40′. At the latter station the barometer had been falling very rapidly since noon and the wind direction had backed from SW to S and increased to force 10. At 6 p.m. the barometer read 28.98, it had fallen 0.38 since noon. There was very heavy rain and squalls. At Takow the barometer had fallen from 29.42 at noon to 29.23 at 6 p.m. and from the observations made on H.M.S. Firebrand, which was at anchor in Takow harbour it is seen that the wind remained steady in direction from SSW but increasing in force. The weather had been very wet and squally the whole day. At 6 pm. SSW 8 was observed on the Firebrand. At the Custom House at 3 p.m. the wind is entered as WSW of force 10. The wind forces observed at the Custom House for the previous day and up to this time as compared with the adjacent stations are doubtless over estimated. This is seen from the wind observations at S Cape and Anping together with those of the Firebrand for the 20th. Moreover had it not been for presence of the Firebrand at Takow, the wind observations would not have been put on record as although frequent observations of the baro- meter were made at the Custom House, no observations of wind were recorded between 9 p.m. of the 21st and 9 a.m. of the 22nd between which hours the centre of the typhoon passed over the port.

At S Cape the barometer had fallen 0.14 since noon and at 6 p.m. read 29.34. The wind had veered since the former hour and increased in force, it was now from SW of force 7, the weather being squally, showery and gloomy.

""

On the other side of the Channel on July 21st at 6 p. Lamocks, Swatow and Breaker Point had light to gentle W & SW breezes with overcast weather barometer 29.43 at the latter station and Lamooks. The Fokien near Breaker Point having left Swatow for Hongkong about noon reported "moderate W to SW winds with rain and heavy cross swell to port." The barometer was rising. At Chapel Island there was a moderate NNW gale, barometer 29.29 and cloudy weather. The Benlarig had at 8 p.m. a strong W gale with increasing sea. At 6 p.m. "brilliant yellow sunset was noted. At the lighthouse stations in the N part of the Channel the wind was backing and increasing somewhat in force, the weather being cloudy and squally. Turnabout and Middle Dog both had the barometer reading at 6 p.m. 29.37 this being the lowest recorded and wind being NE 6 and ENE 6 respectively. At Ockseu it was NNE 5. The Mathilde close to Ockseu at 8 p.m. experienced a fresh NNE gale and high sea, barometer 29.35 (lowest).

Since 6 p.m. the barometer at Anping had been falling very rapidly the wind remaining Southerly of force 10 the heavy squalls being of full typhoon force. At 9 p.m. the barometer attained its lowest point and read 28.62 the wind at the time being somewhat less strong. The centre passed W of the port distant about 10 miles at this time. At 9.15 p.m. the wind backed to SE for 5 minutes in a very heavy squall. At 9.30 p.m. the direction was again South and the barometer had risen 0.10 since 9 p.m. At 10 p.m. it had backed to ESE and was of force 10. At 10.30 p.m. the same wind. At 11 and 11.30 p.m. it was NE of force 8. Mr. STRANGMAN, the observer, has a note "11.15 p.m.- 0.15 a.m. wind lessened in force, a lull compared with what preceded and followed." At 11 p.m. the barometer read 29.17 having risen no less than 0.55 inch since 9 p.m. At this time the rise was checked for 1 hour, the reading being 29.16 at 11.30 p.m. and 29.17 at midnight. At the latter hour the wind had backed to NNW a strong gale. It was overcast and squally, but the heavy rain had ceased. Mr. STRANGMAN adds: "Enormous amount of damage to life and property ashore and afloat, the shipping suffering severely. Three big Amoy junks being blown into a sweet potatoe field. The sea rose 2 feet above the highest water known here for some time.

""

At Takow at 6 p.m. July 21st the barometer reading was 29.24, the wind being from SSW of force 8 with heavy rain squalls. The barometer was falling very rapidly and the wind increasing in force the direction remaining constant at SSW according to the observations on board the Firebrand. The Custom House observations give the wind at 9 p.m. as WSW force 10. The force at that hour agrees with the Firebrand observations, but the directions are 4 points asunder. The reading of the baro- meter was 29.02, a fall.of 0.22 since 6 p.m. Between 9 and 10 p.m. the barometer fell 0.29 according to the Custom House observations and 0.35 by the Firebrand readings, the readings being 28.73 and 28.675 respectively. The latter was the lowest reading recorded on the Firebrand, but the Custom House observations were made every quarter of an hour and we have from them the lowest reading at 10.45 p.m. 28.69. At 10 p.m. the wind was from SSW of force 10 to 12. On the Firebrand an aneroid was used and up to 9 p.m. the readings agree very well with those of the Custom House where a standard mercurial barometer is used. The aneroid of the Firebrand appears to have become deranged and read too high after the passage of the centre. The readings of the Customs House barometer are therefore afterwards alone used.

39

427

The following remarks are from the register of the Firebrand :-

6.00 p.m. Very heavy squalls, with heavy rain.

8.00 p.m. Tremendously violent squalls, with heavy rain. 10.00 p.m. Blowing a hurricane.

10.30 p.m. Calm, barometer commenced to rise.

10.50 p.m. Blowing tremendously from NNW.

11.00 p.m. Blowing WNW 10 to 12 with much rain.

Midnight. Blowing very hard from WNW.

At 11 p.m. the barometer read 28.96, it had risen 0.27 in a quarter of an hour. At midnight it read 29.22 or 0.53 higher than at 10.45 p.m. The wind was at midnight from WNW of force 8 to

10.

The centre passed therefore over Takow at 10.45 p.m. The exact duration of the central calm we do not know unless we assume from the Firebrand observations that it fell calm at 10.30 p.m. exactly in which case it must have been of about 20 minutes duration and would correspond to a diameter of 4 miles, the rate of motion at the time being about 12 miles per hour. The state of the sky was not recorded unfortunately and we therefore do not know whether there was any partial. clearing of the sky during the passage of the calm centre.

Previous to striking the coast the typhoon was moving in a SEasterly direction, but it then appears to have been deflected almost at a right angle and to have moved NË for a short time and it also at once commenced to fill up rapidly. It will be seen by reference to the Anping observations that the barometer ceased rising at 11 p.m (29.17) and in fact read 0.01 lower at 11.30 p.m. (29.16). At midnight it was (29.17) and thereafter it rose, but not very quickly. The wind at 11 and 11.30 p.m. was from NE of force 8, but at midnight it was from NNW of force 9. The reading at Takow at midnight was 29.22 the wind being from WNW of force 9, and the rain squalls still continued.

At S. Cape the wind had increased in force since 6 p. July 21st. At 9 p.m. it was SW of force At midnight SW 9 with rain squalls the whole evening. The barometer had in the meantime fallen from 29.34 at 6 p.m. to 29.29 at midnight.

8.

At midnight July 21st vessels off the coast near Hongkong had moderate to fresh W and WSW breezes. At the coast stations and light houses between Breaker Point and Chapel Island gentle W breezes chiefly prevailed. At Lamocks it was SSW of force 3. The weather was cloudy but fine. From Chapel Island to the northern entrance to the channel the winds ranged from moderate N gales in the southern part of the area (the Benlarig had a fresh N by W gale with rain squalls) to strong NE and ENE breezes in the northern part, the weather being squally over the entire area. On the N coast of Formosa, at Tamsui at 9 p. July 21st the wind was NE of force 2 and the weather cloudy. At Keelung a few miles to the Eastward of the former station the wind is recorded as SE 3 the weather being showery and gloomy. The lowest recorded readings of the barometer occurred at this time. Neither of these stations had strong wind though at 6 p.m. the centre was only about 150 miles distant. The intervening range of mountains may account for this. At midnight July 21st the centre was situated in 22° 53', 120° 33'. After midnight the barometer at S. Cape continued to fall, but very slowly, when the daily variation is allowed for, and attained the minimum at 6 a. July 22nd, the reading being 29.24 after which it commenced rising. The wind had, in the meantime, veered to W at 3 a., at 6 a. W the force being 10 at the latter hour. There were rain squalls at 3 a., but at 6 a. the rain had ceased. The barometer read at 9 a. 29.32, at noon 29.35 the wind direction having veered to W by N of force 9 at the latter hour and the weather being squally and showery. The rainfall for the 24 hours ending at 9 a. July 22nd was 5.30 inches. At Takow at 1 a. the wind was from W of force 8 to 12 after which hour it remained steady from the same quarter of force 9 on an average till 6 a. with continuous rain squalls the whole time. At 7 a. the wind veered to NW and continued this direction for the remainder of the day. The force is given as 7 to 8 at 7 a. At 9 a. the average force was 5, at noon 4. The weather continued squally after 7 a., but the continual rain ceased and was now intermittent. Lightning was observed at 11 a. The barometer at 9 a. read 29.38, at noon 29.43. The rainfall for the previous 24 hours measured at 9 a, July 22nd was 5.00 inches.

At Anping the barometer commenced rising again after midnight of July 21st, at 1 a. July 22nd it read 29.22, at 2 a. 29.26 and it then remained steady at 29.27 till 6 a., at 9 a. it read 29.36, at noon 29.41. The wind at 1 a. was NW force 7 thereafter it continued the same direction until 8 a. but the force increased to 10 at 3 a. After 5 a. it decreased, the force at 6 a. being 9, at 7 a. 8. At 9 a. the wind veered to NNW, and from 10 a. until noon it was from NW by N. The weather was overcast with frequent squalls the whole night but no rain fell. At 10 a. there was some clearing of the sky. The rainfall for the 24 hours ending at 9 a. July 22nd was 7.36 inches.

At Fisher Island there was still a whole gale from NW at midnight July 21st and the heavy squalls of wind and rain continued. The barometer was rising slowly. At 3 a. July 22nd it read as at midnight which, allowing for daily variation, is a slight rise and the wind was then a whole gale from WNW. At 6 a. the direction was NW but the force had decreased to a fresh gale. At 9 a. it was NNW force 8 the rain squalls had ceased and the sky was no longer overcast, some blue sky being visible. At noon there was only a strong NW breeze. The barometer read 29.30 at 6 a., 29.41 at 9 a., 29.44 at noon. The rainfall for the previous 24 hours measured at 9 a. July 22nd was 4.65 inches. At 6 a. on the 22nd light to moderate W and SW breezes were blowing on the SE coast S

428

40-

of Amoy, the weather being cloudy but fine. At noon the wind in this district had become more southerly and very light. The weather was generally fine with clear sky in some places. At the northern entrance of the channel the wind had backed somewhat since midnight and at 6 a. July 22nd there blew chiefly moderate to strong N breezes, the weather was squally and showery. The barometer was rising. At noon much the same weather prevailed in this district. The only vessel's log calling for special remark is that of the Bengloe which was at noon in 25° 03', 119° 46′.° A fresh NNE gale with rain squalls and high cross sea was experienced, the wind having backed during the early morning hours and increased in force. The high confused sea was general in the channel all that day. At Tamsui and Keelung in Northern Formosa gentle NE breezes prevailed at 9 a. July 22nd, the weather being cloudy and at Keelung showery. Keelung had received 0.74 inches of rain during the previous 24 hours. At Bolinao (Luzon) light and gentle S breezes with. squally wet weather prevailed on the afternoon of the 21st, barometer 29.66 at 4 p. but during the early morning hours of the 22nd the wind veered to SW and blew a gale with thunder and lightning and heavy rain, barometer 29.68 at 6 a. Late in the afternoon the wind veered to W, a moderate breeze, and the weather continued wet and squally. The barometer read 29.67 at 6 p. and was rising slightly. The centre on the 22nd at 6 a. was situated in about 22° 45', 121° 25'. It must have crossed the high mountain range running North and South through Formosa, about ESE of Anping and passed out to sea again. It appears likely that it then moved a little to the S of E for some time. There was some veering of the wind at all the S Formosa stations about this hour and the lowest reading of the barometer was recorded at S Cape at 6 a., the reading being lower than those either of Takow or Anping. At noon the probable position of the centre was in 22° 40′, 122° 30'. Fresh SW monsoon was blowing at the time over the greater part of the China Sea, unfortunately no logs of vessels to the Eastward and Southward of Formosa are available and the position of the centre is laid down with reference only to the stations to the Westward of the typhoon.

The following are the observations for July 22nd at noon:-

Bolinao,

Hoihow,

SSW 410 WSW 700

Hongkong,

W/S 450

COAST STATIONS.

29.69 .02 .60 + .01 .54 + .03

SW

ESE

W

Breaker Point,

W

340

.51 + .04

SW

Swatow,

WIN

330

.53 + .14

SSW

Lamocks,

WIN 290

.52 + .15

SSW

01 ∞ ∞ IN

0.

Oq•

0.

cm.

b.

C.

Chapel Island,

WNW

260

.50 + .28

calm

C.

Amoy,

WNW 280

.50 + .17

W

Ockseu,

NW/W 220

N

Turnabout,

NW 220

.50 + .05

N

Middle Dog,

NW/N 240

.48 + .01

N

Foochow,

NW

260

.50 + .02

NE

Steep Island,

N

450

.59

.07

NNE

North Saddle,

N

480

.58

.02

ENE

Tamsui,

NNW

160

.42

.05

NE

Keelung,

NNW 160

.43

.05

NE

Fisher Island,.

WNW 180

.44 + .29

NW

Anping,

WIN

130

.41 + .05

Takow,......

W

130

.42

.00

NW/N NW

4

South Cape,

WSW

100

W

.35 .13

W/N

148430 C7 H 00 07 CO OO HO

C.

C.

omp. C.

cq.

CV.

C.

3

C.

cp.

cm.

C.

tremendous sea.

orq.

9

qgd.

VESSELS.

S.S. Phra Chom Klao,

..11° 39'.

109° 16'

SW 1000

29.74 SSW

4

clear.

. Bk. Nicoya,

.15 15

109 40

SW/W

850

SW

Kitty,

.18 3

107 57

WSW

880

SSW

S.S. Decima,

.18 52

111 33

WSW

650

.54

SW

"

Wingsang,

.18 4

114 21

SW/W

530

.58

SW

"

Ganges,

.18 15

113 0

WSW

590

.52

SW

Thibet,

.19 39

112 19

WSW

580

.57

WSW

>>

Camelot,

.20 21

113 19

WSW 520

SW

""

Electra,

.22 19

114 55

W

430

.53

W

13

دو

Esmeralda,

22 19

115 13

W

120

var.

"

Yungping,

.22 20

115 14

W

420.

calm.

""

Taisang,

22 25

115 20?

W

420

.47

WSW

"

Fushun,

.23 58

117 58

WNW 270

var.

""

Benlarig,

.23 57

118 48

WNW 230

42

W.

""

Tsinan,

.24 6

118 26

WNW 260

.48

W

Oceana,

.24 20

118 54

WNW 230

.57

NNW

A1001m: 101010 or or orari i

ó ó ó ó

3

q.

0.

"

"9

Bengloe,

.25 3

119 46

NW 210

NNE

"

Asagao,

.25 23

119 42

NW/N

230

NNE

8 & 8

Lennox,

.26 38

121 24

NNW

260

.47

NE

5

moderate sea.

do.

SW swell. moderate sea.

SW swell.

fine swell.

confused sea. heavy S sea. fine. NE swell.

dull threatening.

"" Canton,

.27 34

121 36

N/W 300

.62 NE

fine S swell.

"J

"

City of Rio Janeiro, ...28 49 126 8 NNE 420

.53 ENE 3

The average isobars, wind forces and directions from noon on the 20th to noon on the 22nd are represented in Fig. 1. The following table exhibits the distance in miles from the centre in different directions at which different barometric pressures were registered:

29.20 29.30 29.40 29.50

29.20 29.30 29.40

29.50

N

25

50

100

200

S

35

60

100

150

NE..

30

50

90

160

SW

35

70

120

220

E

40

70

100

150

W

40

70

160

290

SE

40

70

110

150

NW

30

55

130

270

41

429

It should be remarked that the above are average results as pressure decreased near the centre till it struck the coast of Formosa.

The average angles between the direction of the wind and the radius are shown in the following table. The first column shows the bearing from the centre. The first line the distances in miles between which the angles were obtained :-

0-50

50-100

100-150

150-250

> 250

NNE

59°

48°