Sessional Papers - 1892

PAPERS LAID BEFORE THE LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL OF HONGKONG 1892

Table of Contents

1. Blue Book

Report for 1891

2. Botanical & afforestation Department

Report for 1891

3. Criminal Statistics

For 1891

4. Duke of Clarence & avondale

Despatch Respecting Resolution of Condolence

5. Education

Reports for 1891

6. Finance Committee

Reports of Proceedings for 1892

7. Fire Brigade

Report for 1891

8. Gaol

Report for 1891

9. Harbour Master

Returns of arrivals for 1891

10. Harbour Master

Report on Junk Trade for 1891

11. Harbour Master

Report for 1891

12. Imperial institute

Correspondence Respecting Space in the

13. Legislative Council

Proceedings for 1892

14. Mauritius

Hurricane in, Correspondence Re Vote of Rs 10,000

15. Medical Department

Report for 1891

16. Observatory

Report for 1891

17. Po Leung Kuk

Report on a Petition from the

18. Police

Report for 1891

19. Post office

Report for 1891

20. Prison accommodation

Committee's Report on

21. Prison accommodation

Despatch Respecting

22. Public Loan

Committee's Report

23. Public Loan

Correspondence Respecting

24. Public Works

Report on the Progress of Public Works During First Half Year 1892

25. Public Works

Report for 1891

26. Public Works Committee

Report of Proceedings

27. Quarantine

Commissioners' Report

28. Registrar General

Report for 1891

29. Revenue and Expenditure

Statement for 1891

30. Sanitary

Reports for 1891

31. Supreme Court

Returns for 1891

32. Veterinary

Report for 1891

33. Water account

Balance Sheet for 1891

34. Water and Drainage Department

Report on Kowloon Water-Supply

35. Water and Drainage Department

Report for 1891

36. Widows' & Orphans' Fund

Report for 1891-92

 

309

No. 28

92

HONGKONG.

REPORT ON THE BLUE BOOK AND DEPARTMENTAL REPORTS FOR 1891.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor, on the 23rd May, 1892.

1.-TAXATION.

There have been no changes under this head.

2.-REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE.

The Revenue amounted to $2,025,302.51, or excluding premiums from Land Sales and Water Account to $1,907,054.43; and the Expenditure amounted to $2,419,086.26, including Extraordinary Works; excluding these, to $1,868,073.26. The revenue has been classified in conformity with the instructions of the Secretary of State for the Colonies.

The Revenue and Expenditure for the past five years have been :-

Extraordinary Expenditure, including

Water Account Water Account

Receipts. Expenditure.

Year.

Revenue.

Premia from Land.

Ordinary Expenditure.

Defensive Works.

1887,...$1,427,485.79

$155,238.02

$1,278,181.68

$744,820.38

1888,... 1,557,300.03

160,688.64

1,461,459.64

530,870.03

1889,... 1,823,549.13 154,725.60

1,459,167.16

374,551.63

1890,... 1,995,220.47

16,638.80

1,517,843.05

397,507.42

1891.... 1,907,054.43

51,761.47 1,868,073.26 514,526.39 $66,486.61 $66,486.61

3.-LOCAL REVENUES.

The Chinese inhabitants contributed in 1891, by voluntary assessment among them- selves, to the pay of the District Watchmen,

and received from the Government for the same object a grant-in-aid of.

4. ASSETS AND LIABILITIES.

.....

.$7,209.76 2,000.00

On the 31st December, 1891, the assets of the Colony exceeded its liabilities by......$231,177.51 The surplus assets in :--

1885 were

1886 the liabilities exceeded the assets by

1887 the surplus assets were

$427,692.42

$ 191,512.29

.$ 631,374.08 (a)

1888

Do.

.$ 360,649.76

1889

Do.

.$ 505,109.87

1890

Do.

.$ 309,732.25

1891

Do.

.$ 231,177.51

5.-PUBLIC DEBT.

No new loan has been raised.

Amount of present Loan, £200,000. Amount of Sinking Fund, £34,053. 8s. 3d.

6.-MILITARY EXPENDITURE,

The Military Expenditure (inclusive of the Volunteer Corps) defrayed by the Colony during the last seven years has been as follows:-

1885,

1886.

1887.

1888,

1889.

1890,

1891,.

Military Contribution, exclusive of

Defensive Works, and

inclusive of Volunteer Corps.

$117,337.00

$124,561.68

$128,815.63

$134,594.68

$134,261.12

$124,646.96

$421,002.01 (b)

Defensive Works.

$ 68,153.45

$217,901.45 $258,444.28 $ 62,115.90

Defensive Works.

£12,576.10.2.

£39,230. 0.0.

£43,710. 7.6.

£10.036. 4.0.

9.678.14.5.

£

832. 1.1.

$ 63,753.73

$ 5,082.92

$ 20,005.45

£3,102. 1.7.

(a) A loan of £200,000 having been raised during 1887 to be paid off on the 1st of March, 1907.

The Military Contribution was doubled from 1st January, 1890, and the arrears for 1890 were paid in 1891.

310

7.-GOVERNMENT BUILDINGS.

Government House.

Government House has been maintained in fairly good repair.

8.-PUBLIC WORKS.

The expenditure under this head was $93,283.55 on account of Annually Recurrent Works, and $820,279 on account of Extraordinary Public Works.

9.-LEGISLATION.

The following Ordinances were passed during the year:-

No. 1.-An Ordinance for the Naturalization of LAI SUI TONG (*).

No. 2.-An Ordinance for the Naturalization of CHOI WAI () otherwise CHOI TSUN

(蔡俊)

No. 3.-An Ordinance for the Naturalization of EDWARD JEAN MAX Paquin.

No. 4.-An Ordinance to amend The Printers and Publishers Ordinance, 1886.

No. 5-An Ordinance for the Naturalization of Lau Sai () alias LAU WAI Ch'ün

(劉渭川)

No. 6.-An Ordinance to restrict the Loading and Unloading of Cargo on Sunday in the

waters of the Colony.

No. 7.-An Ordinance entitled The Gambling Ordinance, 1891.

No. 8.-An Ordinance to provide for the making of a Table of Fees to be taken in connec-

tion with the Grant of Letters Patent in this Colony.

No. 9.—An Ordinance to give the same validity to Ordinances Nos. 18 and 19 of 1884 as if they had been proclaimed to come into force on the 23rd day of September, 1884.

No. 10.-An Ordinance entitled The Forts Protection Ordinance, 1891.

No. 11.—An Ordinance to provide against abuses connected with the erection of Public

Latrines.

No. 12.-An Ordinance to further amend The Public Health Ordinance, 1887.

No. 13.-An Ordinance to license the present Church of the Immaculate Conception for the

celebration of marriages from the time of its opening.

No. 14.—An Ordinance to amend The Women and Girls' Protection Ordinance, 1890. No. 15.-An Ordinance to amend the Law in respect of the sale of Shares in Companies registered under the Companies Ordinances 1865 to 1886 and in other Joint Stock Companies.

No. 16.-An Ordinance to authorise the Appropriation of a Supplementary Sum of Five hundred and Thirty-nine thousand One hundred and One Dollars and Eighty-three Cents to defray the Charges of the Year 1890.

No. 17.-An Ordinance to amend and consolidate the Law relating to the carriage and

possession of deadly weapons.

No. 18.-An Ordinance to amend The Widows' and Orphans' Pensions Ordinance, 1890. No. 19. An Ordinance for the Incorporation of the Senior Missionary in Hongkong of the

London Missionary Society.

No. 20. An Ordinance to amend the Law relating to Bankruptcy.

No. 21.-An Ordinance to repeal Ordinances No. 1 of 1884 and No. 17 of 1886 and to

amend the Law relating to the preparation of Opium.

No. 22.-An Ordinance to amend Ordinance No. 22 of 1887.

No. 23.-An Ordinance to apply a further sum not exceeding Six hundred and Thirty-one

thousand and Seven Dollars, to the Public Service of the Year 1891.

No. 24.—An Ordinance to apply a sum not exceeding Two Millious Four hundred and Fifty-three thousand Nine hundred and Ninety-six Dollars to the Public Service of the Year 1892.

No. 25.-An Ordinance to amend The Building Ordinance, 1889.

No. 26.--An Ordinance to consolidate and amend the laws relating to merchant shipping, the duties of the Harbour Master, the control and management of the waters of the Colony, and the regulation of vessels navigating the same.

311

10.-COUNCILS AND ASSEMBLIES.

Executive Council.-The Honourable J. H. STEWART LOCKHART, Registrar General, and the Honourable N. G. MITCHELL-INNES, Colonial Treasurer, were admitted Members of the Executive Council. The Honourable A. J. LEACH joined the Council on appointment as Acting Attorney General.

Legislative Council.-The Honourable J. H. STEWART LOCKHART, Registrar General, and the Honourable N. G. MITCHELL-INNES, Colonial Treasurer, were admitted Members of the Council. The Honourable F. A. COOPER and the Honourable W. C. H. HASTINGS joined the Council on appoint- ment as Acting Surveyor General and Acting Harbour Master respectively.

Sanitary Board.-The Honourable J. H. S. LOCKHART appointed Chairman, vice The Honourable S. BROWN. Mr. U LIN YUEN appointed vice Mr. WONG SHING, resigned.

Board of Examiners.-No changes were made.

11.-CIVIL ESTABLISHMENT.

Sir G. WILLIAM DES VEUX was absent from the Colony, by permission, from the 7th May till his retirement, and during his absence Major-General G. DIGBY BARKER, C.B., administered the Government. The Honourable FRANCIS FLEMING, C.M.G., was absent on leave from February till the end of the year.

Mr. GOODMAN acted during his absence. The Honourable W. M. DEANE, C.M.G., Captain Superintendent of Police, was pensioned.

Temporary changes occurred in various Departments owing to Officers going on or returning from leave.

12.-OFFICERS WHO HAVE GIVEN SECURITY FOR THE DISCHARGES OF THEIR DUTIES. The validity of the sureties of the various Officers was duly enquired into at the end of the year and found to be satisfactory.

13.- PENSIONS.

The following Officers retired on pension during the year-

2 Heads of Departments, 2 Turnkeys, 2 Overseers of Works, 2 Inspectors of Police and 19

Police Constables.

4

14.-EXPENDITURE OF THE DEPARTMENTS.

The amounts paid during the year on account of the Departments were :—

Payments in Great Britain in Sterling money,

Payments in the Colony in Local Currency,

15.-FOREIGN CONSULS.

No new Consulates were established in the Colony during 1891.

16.-POPULATION.

The estimated population on the 31st December, 1890,

which is 4,260 more than the estimated population at the end of 1889.

.£24,724. 6s. 8d. .$916,809.71.

.198,742

The census was taken in 1891, the population being returned as 221,441, of which 157,585 were males, and 63,856 females.

The following is the mean estimated population for the last 9 years :--

Years.

Males.

Females.

Total.

1883,

124,768

48,707

173,475

1884,

130,560

50,969

181,529

1885.

137,079

53,515

190,594

1886,

.144,550

56,440

200,990

1887

152,427

60,524

212,951

}

1888,.

154,500

61,300

215,800

1889,...

.138,033

56,449

194,482

1890.

198,742

1891,............159,969

64,845

224,814

312

The Births and deaths for the last 5 years were as follows:---

Per 1,000 of mean Population.

Years. 1887,....

Births.

Deaths.

Births.

Deaths.

....

1,705

5,317

8.01

24.97

1888,...

1,662

6,034

7.70

27.96

1889,....

1,683

4,597

8.65

23.64

1890,

.1,617

4,553

8.14

22.90

1891,...

.1,734

5,374

7.71

23.90

17.-ECCLESIASTICAL ESTABLISHMENTS.

The Colonial Chaplain was pensioned and the Office abolished.

18.-EDUCATION.

The total number of Schools subject to supervision by the Government in 1891 was 117 as against 112 in 1890, and 99 in 1889.

The total number of Scholars subject to Government supervision in the Government and Grant- in-aid Schools during the last 5 years was as follows :--

Years.

1887,

1888,

1889,

1890,

1891,

Govt.

Grant-in-aid.

Total.

....

1,814

4,160

5,974

1,933

4,325

6,258

.2,293

4,814

7,107

2,514

4,656

7,170

..2,540

5,132

7,672

The total expenditure for these Schools for the last 5 years was as follows:-

1887, (after deducting School fees),

1888, (

.);

1889, (

}}

})

),

1890,

**

;)

),

1891, (

>>

>>

),

·

$43,070.91

45,518.93

44,321.98

56,081.75

60,359.10

19.-EXCHANGE, MONEY, WEIGHTS AND MEASURES.

Exchange.

The rate of Exchange on 4 months' Bills on London was on 1st January, 1891, 3/5, it fell to 3/13 on the 3rd June, and rose to 3/33 on 6th August, and was at the end of the year 3/13.

Currency.

The law affecting currency has remained unchanged.

Bank Notes.

The Bank Notes in circulation in Hongkong during the last 5 years, as furnished by the Managers of the respective Banks, were as follows:-

Average Amount.

.$5,052,473

Years.

1887,

1888,

5,759,875

1889,

6,034,984

1890,

6,073,332

1891,

6,050,122

Money Circulation.

Specie in Reserve.

$2,362,833

2,660,000

2,552,500

2,775,833

2,650,833

The approximate amount of Coin put into circulation up to 31st December, 1891, was as follows:- Hongkong Silver and Copper Subsidiary Coins (50, 20, 10, and 5 cent pieces; and 1 Cent

and Mil pieces),

.....

Weights and Measures.

$7,216,125.

The Weights and Measures in use in the Colony are regulated by Ordinance 8 of 1885.

:

313

20.-IMPORTS AND EXPORTS.

There being no Custom House, it is not possible to furnish an account of all Imports and Exports, but a record of Raw Opium imported and exported during 1891 has been kept, and is as follows:-

Imported, Exported,

58,4192 chests. .57,9982

**

21.-SHIPPING.

Arrivals exclusive of Junks.

The total arrivals, exclusive of Junks, during the year 1891, amounted to 4,351 vessels and 5,138,627 tons, being 244,894 tons over the arrivals in 1890.

Junks.

22,806 Junks measuring 1,634,616 tons arrived in the Colony in 1891, as against 23,512 Junks and 1,795,261 tons in 1890, showing a decrease of 706 Junks and 160,645 tons.

The total arrivals for the last 5 years were—

EXCLUSIVE OF Junks.

JUNKS.

GRAND TOTAL.

Years. Number of Vessels. Tons.

Number of Vessels. Tons. Number of Vessels.

Tons.

1887,

:

1888..

4,078 3,821

4,607,914

23,521

1,793,923

27,599

6,401,837

4,536,442

;

23,958

1,863,968

27,779

6,400,410

1889,... 3,820

4,518,614

22,926

1,716,922

26,746

6,235,536

1890,....

4,114

4,893,733

23,512

1,795,261

27,626

6,688,994

1891,..

4,351

5,138,627 22,806 1,634,618

27,157

6,773,243

Immigration and Emigration from and to Ports other than in China and Japan. The following will show the number of Chinese who arrived in, and the number who departed from the Colony during the last 5 years:-

Years. 1887,

1888.

1889,

1890,

1891,

Arrived.

92,375

98,800

99,315

101,147

105,199

Departed.

82,897

96,195

47,849

42,066

45,162

22.-AGRICULTURE.

The lands of the Colony being inducement for this industry here.

limited and not favourable for agricultural purposes, there is no The produce is quite nominal, and is for local consumption only.

23.-MANUFACTURES, &C. Manufactories.

Several new Manufactories have been added to those already in existence.

Steam-Launches.

The total number of licensed

The total number of Steam-Launches built in the Colony in 1891 was 25, with a total tonnage of 2,324.03, as against 31 with a total tonnage of 2,377.10 in 1890. Steam-Launches of all descriptions, in the Colony, in 1891, were :—

Licensed to carry passengers, Private Launches,

Colonial Government Launches, War Department Launches,

.48

.44

8

5

105

24. GRANTS OF LAND.

The grants of land on lease during the last 5 years were:-

Years.

1887

No. of Grants. No. of acres sold. No. of acres re-granted.

A. R. P. 21.3.16

A. R. P.

54.0.313 59.3.135

187

....

-1888.

202

44.0.31

1889,...

65

44.1. 93

11.0. 55

1890......

29

1891,......

37

9.3.17 26.0.331

15.3.303

43.0. 51

Total No. of acres

granted.

A. R. P. 76.0. 8 104.0. 41 88 1.151

25.3. 7 69.0.38

Note.-The Returns in the Blue Book report for 1890 stated for that year lands sold by auction only viz.: -2 A. 3. R. 10 P. and did not include lands sold by way of extension to Lots already existing, the addition of the latter increasing the number of acres sold in that year to 9 A. 3 R. 17 P. as above.

314

25.-GAOLS AND PRISONERS.

On the 1st January, 1891, there were 549 prisoners in Victoria Gaol; 5,221 were admitted during the year, and 5,268 discharged; the total number of prisoners on the 31st December, 1891, was 502, of whoin 27 were Europeans.

The daily average of prisoners was 507, as against 566 in the previous year.

The number of prisoners admitted into Gaol during the last five years was as follows:--

YEARS.

No. OF PRISONERS.

TOTAL.

DAILY AVERAGE NUMBER IN PRISON.

Men.

Women.

Juveniles.

1887,

4,012

149

147

4,308

584.00

1888,

3,390

98

139

3,627

531.00

1889,

3,453

131

121

3,705

581.00

1890,

3,218

119

107

3,444

566.00

1891,

4,805

223

203

5,231

507.00

26. CRIMINAL STATISTICS.

Supreme Court.

The following is a Return of cases tried at the Supreme Court during the last five years:—

POSTPONED.

1887,

1888,

1889,

1890,

1891,

CHARGES ABANDONED.

Number Number

YEARS.

of Cases.

of

Convicted. Acquitted.

Persons.

Number of Number of

Cases. Persons.

No. of Cases.

No. of Persons.

94

155

82

36

101

186

99

47

28

17

26

1

28

40

...

92

143

64

41

24

37

59

80

43

20

32

37

26

20

*

17

9

2

2

Total,....

378

601

314

153

78

122

1

8

Average of last 5 years,

75%

120

621

303

153

24

1/1/00

Do. ending 1886,

899

1333

841

251

13

22+

#

+ho

11

Police Magistrates' Court.

The Cases before the Police Magistrates during the last 5 years were as follows:-

CASES HOW DISPOSED OF.

Total No. Total No.

YEARS.

of Cases.

of Prisoners.

Convicted and Punished. charged.

Dis-

Committed Committed

for pending Trial. Orders.

Ordered to Find Security.

Punished

for False Tes- timony.

Un-

decided.

1887,

12,015

14,182 10,679 2,779

167

32

463

14

1888,

11,647

13,309

9,932 2,849

174

109

192

1889,

8,670

10,033

6,894 2,497

167

54

337

17

1890,

9,739

10,772

7,740 2,557

102

15

318

1891,

13,676

16,382 13,972 2,040

40

12

172

4873 -

145

Total,......

55,747

64,678

49,217 12,722

650

222

1,482

38

347

Average of last 5 years,

11,149.4

Do.

ending 1886,

11,435.4

12,935.6

13,197.8

9,843.4 2,544.4

130.0

44.4

296.4

7.6

69.4

9,959.8 2,164.0

165.6

26.8

457.0

14.4

110.2

Marine Magistrate's Court.

The Cases before the Marine Magistrate's Court during the last 5 years were as follows:-

DEFENDANTS HOW DISPOSED OF.

315

YEARS.

Number of Cases.

Number of

T

Forfei-

To be dis-

Defend- Impri-

Sent

ture

Fined.

ants. soned.

of

Repri- manded.

back to

charged

Dis-

Com- mitted

from

missed.

Pay.

Duty.

Ship.

for Trial.

1887,

90

152

47

37

1888,

70

167

66

38

62

21

15

23

2

53

3

5

...

1889,

53

107

54

25

15

1

13

1890,

81

239

92

84

6

1

15

41

1891,

147

311

62

205

2

10

9

23

Total,..

441

976

321

389

16

34

107

4

105

...

Average of last 5 years,

88.2

195.2

64.2

77.8

3.2

6.8

21.4

0.8

21.0

Do. ending 1886,...

72.0

144.8

66.6

28.4

9.0

2.6

13.0

1.0

23.8

:

Police.

The Cases brought under the notice of the Police during the last 5 years were as follows:-

SERIOUS Offences.

MINOR OFFENCES.

YEARS.

Persons.

Persons.

Number of

Cases.

Number of Cases.

Convicted. Discharged.

Convicted. Discharged.

1887,

2,577

1,234

565

5,904

6,310

* 1,214

1888,

1889,

1890,

1891,

2,436

1,116

556

5,678

5,772

1,105

2,893

1,409

618

4,568

4,529

1,131

3,100

1,412

616

5,324

5,007

1,218

2,994

1,687

444

7,875

9,320

673

Total,.........

14,000

6,858

2,799

29,349

30,938

5,336

Average of last 5 years,

2,800.0

1,371.6

559.8

5,869.8

6,187.6

1,067.2

Do. ending 1886,

2,527.4

1,313.4

527.8

5,437.8

4,504.6

880.2

27.-HOSPITALS, &C..

i

Civil Hospital.

The admissions to the Government Civil Hospital during the year were as follows, as compared with 1890.

1890.

1891.

Police,

582

570

Board of Trade,

110

135

Private paying Patients,

527

464

Government Servants,

191

179

Police Cases,

264

240

Destitutes,

283

279

....

Total..

1,957

1,867

The total admissions to the Hospital and Deaths during the last 5 years were as follows:-

Years.

Admissions.

Deaths.

1887.

1,656

89

1888,

1,772

80

1889,

1,793

77

1890,

1,957

98

1891,

1,867

84

Total,

9,045

428

Average,

1,809

85.6

}

316

The admissions from the Police Force and the number of Deaths for the past five years were as follows:-

Years.

1887,

1888,

1889,

1890:

1891,

Total,

Average,

Admissions.

Deaths.

619

9

657

15

590

14

582

7

570

8

3,018

53

603.6

10.6.

The admissions of Europeans, Chinese, and Indians in 1891 were 167, 118, and 285 respectively, as against 149, 179, and 254 in 1890.

Military Hospital.

The admissions from among the troops during the past five years were as follows:-

Years.

Admissions.

Deaths.

1887,

1,749

14

1888,

1,485

21

1889,

1,732

16

1890,

1,915

15

1891,

1.251

17

Total,

8,132

83

Average,

1,626.4

16.6

Small-Pox Hospital.

The admissions during the past five years were as follows:-

Years.

Admissions.

1887,

65

1888,

99

1889,

19

1890,

2

1891,

17

Total,.....

202

Average,.....

40.4

Inquests.

The inquests held during the past five years were as follows:-

1887,

1888,

1889,

1890,

1891,

115

63

76

101

59

28.--CHARITABLE AND LITERARY INSTITUTIONS.

No fresh Institution was formed.

29.-RELIGIOUS INSTITUTIONS.

No fresh Institution was formed.

COLONIAL SECRETARY'S OFFICE,

HONGKONG, 19th May, 1892.

G. T. M. O'BRIEN,

Colonial Secretary.

347

No. 25

92

HONGKONG.

REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF THE BOTANICAL AND AFFORESTATION DEPARTMENT

FOR 1891.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor, on the 7th June, 1892.

No. 17.

BOTANIC GARDENS, HONGKONG, 25th May, 1892.

SIR,-I have the honour to submit the Annual Report on this Department for the year 1891.

2. In addition to the average number of minor changes in the staff Mr. A. B. WESTLAND, Head Gardener, who had been absent on leave since March, 1890, was, in August, 1891, while he was in England, transferred to an appointment at the Taj Mahal Gardens in India. Mr. W. J. TUTCHER was appointed from Kew Gardens to succeed Mr. WESTLAND as Assistant in this Department; he arrived in Hongkong and assumed the duties of his office on the 14th December.

3. In October the post of Watchman in the Gardens was abolished, and the post of an Assistant Clerk was created, the pay of the former, with a slight increase, being available for the wages of the latter, an arrangement which has worked well and been of much benefit to the department. The Assistant Clerk, with his education in English, is beginning to acquire a fair knowledge of plant names, which should be of considerable value to the service, as he is available occasionally for out-door services as well as indoor work.

4. The New Building, which includes accommodation for the Herbarium, Library, Offices and Store-rooms and Residence for the Superintendent was commenced in the early part-of the year and is now completed and occupied. The facilities for conducting the business of the department are thereby greatly improved, and the collection of dried plants and the library, which are accommodated in the Herbarium room, will be much better preserved than in the unsuitable building where they were pre- viously housed.

BOTANIC GARDENS.

Nursery.

5. In addition to ordinary routine work the erection of the new building on the site of the nursery occasioned a great deal of extra work, which extended through the whole year, in removing the stock of plants in pots, plant houses, sheds, &c., to a new site which had to be prepared adjacent to the old

one.

New water tanks were constructed and a new water supply system was connected with the tanks which are situated within the plant houses and throughout the nursery. The tanks are so placed that labour of water carrying is reduced as far as possible.

Surface and underground drainage for storm waters has been well provided for.

Besides the plant houses which were removed from the old to the new site, an entirely new glass- roofed house 85 feet long has been constructed for the accommodation of delicate ferns and foliage plants which could not be satisfactorily grown without such a structure to protect them from heavy rains, winds, and cold.

Another glass-roofed house 50 feet long is in course of construction, the wood-work of which is being prepared by the carpenter during time when he can be spared from other work.

All plants which are grown for sale are kept in this nursery; access to the nursery from Albany Road will be very convenient to the public when the old building is completely removed and a new approach made. The work of moving the old building is now in progress and it will be completed in a few weeks. I propose making the approach to the nursery through a fern-house to be constructed with an ornamental front abutting on Albany Road.

Lawns.

6. In October and November many lawns throughout the Colony and at Kowloon were infested with myriads of the larvæ of a small moth. The lawns in the Botanic and Government House Gardens suffered very greatly from this visitation, in many places every vestige of the green blades of grass having been completely consumed leaving large unsightly patches of bare soil. Many things were tried, including kerosene oil, sulphate of copper, lime, soapsuds, tobacco-water, corrosive sublimate, and

348

"tea-oil" cake, but all, unfortunately, without effect. Most of these things were sufficient to destroy the larvæ when they could be reached, but the larva had a habit of secluding themselves under the creeping rhizomes and leaves of grass so that the liquids could not touch them. Hand-picking of larvæ, an extremely tedious operation, was resorted to by day, and by night large numbers of moths were caught in lamps which I had made for the purpose.

Chinese Ginger.

7. Since 1887 various references have been made in my Annual Reports to this plant, there having been some doubt in England as to the identity of the plant which yields Chinese ginger. In my Report for 1890 I endeavoured to demonstrate that the ginger used for preserving in Canton and Hongkong is obtained from the true ginger plant Zingiber officinale, Linn., and not from Alpinia Galanga, Willd., as had been erroneously supposed to be its source.

8. In reference to this subject, the Kew Bulletin for January, 1892, contained letters from Pro- fessor PERCY GROOM and myself, which I reproduce here, together with the observations of the editor of the Bulletin, from which it will be seen that the question is considered as set at rest, there being no longer any doubt that the true ginger plant, Zingiber officinale, Linn., is the source of the article used for preserving.

BY THE EDITOR OF Kew Bulletin.

In the Kew Bulletin for January, 1891, p. 5, there was discussed in some detail the origin of the preserved ginger received from China. From specimens of living plants received at Kew from Mr. G. M. H. PLAYFAIR, Her Majesty's Consul at Swatow, in 1878, it was concluded that the plant yielding Chinese ginger was something different from the ordinary ginger plant (Zingiber officinale). The prominence given to the subject in the Bulletin has led to further investigation, and the fact would appear now to be established that Chinese ginger, in spite of the superficial difference in the appearance of 'the large flat finger like masses' as compared with West Indian and other commercial ginger, is undoubtedly produced by Zingiber officinale. The plants received from Mr. PLAYFAIR have been shown to belong to Alpinia Galanga, Willd.

It is probable that none of the preserved ginger received in this country is derived from the latter plant. Mr. PLAYFAIR evidently took some trouble in the matter, and he forwarded plants given him at Swatow as Chinese ginger. It is clear, however, that in some way a mistake was made in the selec- tion of the plant desired, for which Mr. PLAYFAIR himself was only indirectly responsible. The further identification of the Chinese ginger of commerce is carefully discussed in the following papers and correspondence:-

Superintendent, Botanical Department, Hongkong, to Royal Gardens, Kew.

BOTANIC GARDENS, HONGKONG, April 9th, 1891.

MY DEAR SIR, I was much interested in reading the article on Chinese ginger in the January number of the Kew Bulletin, but, with all due deference to the workers in the subject, I am afraid that the conclusion arrived at is erroneous. I have not seen anything which to me is evidence that Alpinia Galanga, Willd., is a source of Chinese preserved ginger. I have never entertained any doubt that Zingiber officinale, Linn., supplied the material solely used in the manufacture of preserved ginger at Canton. It may be that the appearance of the rhizomes is different from ordinary ginger as grown in the West Indies, but I am inclined to ascribe any difference between the two to the result of culti- vation, and not to generic or specific distinctions. I believe that Chinese ginger is much more succulent than West Indian ginger, so much, as I have been informed by a gentleman here who has interested himself for some years in ginger, that it is impossible to dry the rhizomes sufficiently to render them fit for export in the usual commercial form, or, if it had been otherwise, dried ginger would have been exported from China long ago. The ginger used for preserving is, I believe, chiefly grown in the rich alluvial lands of the Canton delta, but the same plant when grown in mountainous districts, as I myself have seen, is much smaller, and is capable of being dried for local use, the Chinese ascribing much more valuable properties to it as a drug when grown in such local- ities.

I feel compelled to dismiss Alpinia Galanga, Willd., or any other Alpinia altogether from my mind as a source of preserved ginger, and I am inclined to think that Mr. PLAYFAIR when, in 1878, he sent to England a case of roots of Alpinia Galanga, Willd., as the source of preserved ginger, was deceived by the natives who supplied the plants.

From my somewhat extended experience with Chinese in various parts of the neighbouring Empire, as well as in Hongkong, I know how little reliance is to be placed on information supplied by the ordinary Chinaman in regard to plants. I would not withhold due acknowledgment of the usefulness of the natives in helping us to get at true information, but their aid should be regarded as

349

collateral; the investigator should himself sift and verify everything of importance. As bearing on this subject, I would draw attention to a passage in Mr. PLAYFAIR'S letter of April 10th, 1885, (published in the Bulletin), where he says 'it has been established as incontrovertible by Dr. HANCE that the ginger plant never flowers.' I have no doubt that our late much lamented friend, Dr. HANCE, may have been assured by the natives over and over again that such was the case, but I have seen Zingiber officinale flower profusely in the Canton delta fields, as you have evidence of in the herbarium specimens which I sent to Kew a few years ago. I have often been amused by the insist- ance of Chinese that certain trees and plants never flowered, while not only the botanical character of the subjects alluded to contradicted my informants, but individual trees pointed out by them as never flowering have been known to me to flower regularly.

I have sent, per S.S. Glaucus, a box containing rhizomes of Zingiber officinale and of Alpinia Galanga, Willd., the former obtained from a preserving establishment in Hongkong, and the latter from a plant cultivated in these Gardens, which Dr. TRIMEN sent me from Ceylon, and which was part of a plant that had been supplied to him from Kew from the consignment which had been sent to England from Swatow by Mr. PLAYFAIR, as I understand. I am convinced that when you see these specimens you will feel assured that the Alpinia rhizomes have not sufficient resemblance to preserved ginger either in appearance or taste to warrant the assumption that they are a source of that article. I showed a piece of the Alpinia rhizome to the people in the preserving establishment, and asked if that was the article they preserved; they indignantly protested against such an inference, and said the Alpinia was only used as a drug, but not preserved. I should not place too much reliance, as I have said, on the bare affirmation of natives, but we have the evidence of our own eyes to show that the Alpinia does not resemble preserved ginger.

C

So far as I have been able to learn, preserved ginger is made at Canton and Hongkong only. The Imperial Chinese Customs Returns for last year show that in junks alone the quantity of fresh ginger exported from Canton to Hongkong was over 6,000 piculs (a picul is 133 fbs.). Preserved ginger is manufactured in Hongkong to a large extent for export to the United States. Preserved ginger as understood by us is not made in Swatow. What is preserved there is made for native consumption, to be used medicinally or for cooking, and is exported largely to the Straits Settle- ments, and never to Hongkong. This kind of ginger is called Ng Mai Keung.' This, I under- stand, is an Alpinia, but it does not resemble the Canton ginger, and is, I believe, not preserved in syrup. The rhizomes of true ginger, Alpinias and Curcumas, are all classed generically by the Chinese under the name Keung. Alpinia Galanga, Willd., is Leung Keung; Zingiber officinale, Linn., Tai Yuk Keung; and Curcuma (turmeric) Wong Keung; and so on with other species. Now, I think that the native name of Keung, and the fact that the preserved ginger under consideration is not made at Swatow-which is 200 miles from Canton where it is made-will afford a probable explana- tion of some apparent mistake made when Mr. PLAYFAIR sent home what has been called 'Chinese Ginger,' which mistake, supposing that one has been made, has resulted in the dissemination of what appears to be misleading information.

I have taken the first opportunity I have had since the receipt of No. 19 of the Bulletin of fur- nishing you with this information, which I am sure you will be glad to receive.

W. T. THISELTON DYER, Esq., C.M.G., &c., Royal Gardens, Kew.

I

am, &c.,

(Signed),

CHARLES FORD.

Percy Groom, Esq., F.L.S., to Royal Gardens, Kew.

WHAMPOA, CHINA,

November 19th, 1891.

DEAR SIR,--I thought you would be interested in having an account of some work I have done in relation to the source of Chinese ginger.

to

you

I told GARDINER some time ago that I had proved by an anatomical examination that Chinese Ginger is not Alpinia Galanga, and he may have told you-but I deferred sending information direct till I could disprove or corroborate FORD's view that Chinese ginger is derived from Zingiber officinale. There is no shadow of a doubt concerning the correctness of his views, and he certainly explains the origin of the error. All the zingiberaceous plants known to the Chinese are termed 'Keung,' which I should think would preferably be translated by some such word as 'Gingerwort.' Ordinary ginger is 'Tai Yuk Keung' (large flesh ginger); candied ginger is 'Tong Keung (sugar ginger); dried ginger is Kon Keung; Galangal is 'Leung Keung (mild ginger); Curcuma is Wong Keung (yellow ginger). In addition I find in the dictionary the following phrases which I cannot personally guarantee:- Shang Keung,' raw (edible) ginger; 'Tsz Keung,' tender shoots of

350

¿

ginger (edible). By officials whom I requested to ascertain all about the varieties of 'Keung,' I was informed the Shang Keung" and 'Tsz Keung' were the same plant, but were varieties, one being cultivated in a dry and the other in a wet soil. This is a good example of the variety of information one can extract from Chinese and from a dictionary. The dictionary gives 'Ko Leung Keung' as the zedoary.

Believe me, &c., ·

(Signed),

PERCY GROOM.

P.S.-Please utilise the information concerning Chinese ginger as you may think fit.

[Enclosure.]

Recently it has been suggested in the Kew Bulletin that Chinese ginger is the rhizome of Alpinia Galanga.

Mr. FORD, in his annual report for the Botanical and Afforestation Department of Hongkong for 1890, casts doubts on the conclusions thus arrived at.

To decide the question, I first obtained preserved ginger (dry, and in syrup), and I bought the natural ginger from street vendors. The specimens thus procured all agreed in structure, but they differed from Alpinia Galanga obtained from Mr. FORD (a cutting of the original plants sent from Swatow).

I then caused inquiries to be made concerning the manufacture of preserved ginger. The manufacturers stated that only one sort of plant rhizome was employed (Tai Yuk Keung), and no other sort of rhizome was ever mixed with it. In particular they stated that no variety of galangal rhizome (Leung Keung) was ever used in the manufacture of ginger.

Hence so far it was safe to conclude that whatever Chinese ginger might be, it could not be Alpinia Galanga.

It remained to test Mr. FORD's view that Zingiber officinale, Linn., was the source of Chinese ginger. At the end of October I ordered the head gardener of the College gardens at Whampoa to procure flowering specimens of the plant from which Chinese ginger (Tai Yuk Keung) was obtained. The flowering specimens thus obtained turned out to be a Zingiber; and Mr. FORD informs me that they are specimens of Zingiber officinale, Linn. I also had fresh ginger purchased in the market by my servants (for at that time of the year the manufacturers of preserved ginger have no fresh ginger).. This agreed precisely in structure with the zingiber rhizome; and in both these rhizomes the starch- grains were alike (flattened discoid for the most part) and utterly different from the elongated club-like, almost rod-shaped, grains of Alpinia Galanga (Hongkong specimen). These two rhizomes also agreed in structure with those obtained earlier in the year, viz., the preserved and the natural ginger.

Finally I endeavoured to purchase other sorts of fresh zingiberaceous rhizomes in October and was unable to procure any. In all cases I was informed that the medicinal zingiberaceous rhizomes, and those used in flavouring, &c., came from distant parts and that only the ginger for preserving grew in the immediate neighbourhood. But without relying on this evidence, except confirmatory, it is safe to conclude that Chinese ginger is the rhizome of Zingiber officinule, as shown by anatomical observations, inquiries from the Chinese and observations on the flower. Mr. FORD, in his report, said: "The Chinese ginger is apparently more succulent, and the rhizomes are of larger size than the West Indian article, but there is no specific difference in the plant.

It is well known that zingiberaceous rhizomes vary in structure according to the circumstances under which they are cultivated; for example, in hot-houses, the sclerenchyma in the rhizomes of Zingiber officinale and Hedychium carneum is replaced by collenchyma, and other changes are visible. Hence I can only suppose that Professor PERCEVAL WRIGHT was unaware of these variations, or did not allow sufficient margin for them, in the histological observations which he surely must have made before allowing himself to say that the large flat ginger like masses sent to this country from China differed from anything that the ordinary ginger plant (Zingiber officinale) could produce.

*

Distribution and Interchange of Plants, Seeds, &c.

9. Seeds contained in 52 boxes, bags, &c., and weighing 28 lbs., 382 living plants, and 9 birds were received. The principal donors being-.

Acclimatisation Society-Brisbane.

Boehmer, L.-Japan.

Botanic Gardens-Bangalore.

Natal.

Royal-Ceylon.

Kew.

Mauritius. Trinidad.

11

""

93

"}

>>

11

51

**

1)

>>

"2

21

11

**

""

Saharanpur. Singapore.

Cooke, Mrs.

Creagh, His Excellency C. V.-Sandakan.

Damman & Co., Messrs.-Italy.

Foster, Mrs. P.

Humphreys, J. D.

Kwong On Tsan.

Ladies' Recreation Club.

Mackenzie & Co., Messrs.-Shanghae.

Martin, Lieut.-H.B.M.S. Leander.

Police Station-West Point.

Salmon, His Excellency Sir Nowell, V.C. Stringer, C. E. W.

Wicking, Mrs.

351

10. Of plants 4,450, and of seeds 60 lbs. contained in 79 boxes, &c., were distributed. The chief recipients were-

Agri-Horticultural Society-Madras.

Brisbane.

Assistant Superintendent of Forests-Penang.

""

Arthur, H.-Taiwanfoo.

Bain, Mrs.

Bateman, Mrs.

Barker, Captain

Botanic Gardens-British Guiana.

Ceylon. Jamaica. Royal-Calcutta.

Kew.

""

"}

52

11

"}

""

""

"?

>>

"}

}}

,,

Mauritius. Trinidad.

Saharanpur. Singapore.

Croad, Captain

Cox, J. H.

Doberck, Dr.

Drummond, W. V.-Shanghai.

Foster, Mrs. P.

Goddard, Captain

Goodridge, Captain, R. N.

Humphreys, H.

Humphreys, J. D.

Judd, W.

Ladies' Recreation Club.

Layton, B.

Leigh, R. K.

Plummer, J. T.

Poate, W. H.-Shanghai. Romano, A. G.

"

>>

City Hall Museum.

Cooke, Mrs.

Watters, T.-Canton.

Wicking, Mrs.

Sale of Plants.

11. Owing to the change of sites of the nursery the maintenance of plants for sale was carried on under considerable inconvenience but about the average number, viz., 1,884, of plants were sold and they realised $343.77. In addition to the requirements of the Colony for ornamental plants orders are received from various Coast Ports of China and from Manila.

Loan of Plants for Decorative Purposes.

12. As in previous years plants for the decoration of rooms for public entertainments have been lent in almost all cases when applied for. There were 19 requests complied with and 2,746 plants were lent, an increase of about 600 plants as compared with the previous year. The plants, as a rule, were carefully handled, and there has been little to complain of in any way. There being a separate collection of plants grown for lending the general appearance of the Gardens is not interfered with when the plants are away.

Visitors.

13. On 17 days distributed throughout the year, when there were the usual number of visitors in the Gardens, the numbers of all who passed inwards through the gates were carefully taken by work- men stationed on those days at the gates. The result shows an average of Europeans of 433 and of others, 1,809, making a total of 2,242 for each day. No children or amahs were counted. The greatest number on one day shows 3,982, of these 441 were Europeans. The least number shows 992, of these 213 were Europeans. The Chinese, naturally, greatly predominate. Appendix A gives the particulars of each day's enumerations.

Herbarium and Library.

14. Beyond keeping in order the plants and books want of time prevented any material increase being made to the herbarium. There are a good many plants which have accumulated that are awaiting time for preparing and incorporating them in the general collection. So far as space for storing them is concerned there is now ample provision in the new building for many years to come for the reception of Chinese plants (to which the herbarium is chiefly confined) which may be presented or which may be acquired by other means.

15. The following additions to the library have been made, and I have to thank various con- tributors for Annual Reports and other papers connected with their establishments :—

Agricultural and Horticultural Society of Madras

Annual Meeting 4th April, 1891.

Agricultural Journal.

Agricultural Record, Trinidad.

Botanical Magazine 1891. Purchased.

Bulletin (Grenada) of Miscellaneous Information,

11

፡፡

1891.

(Kew) of Miscellaneous Information,

1891.

(Jamaica) of Botanical Department,

1891.

Chinese Jute, A. Henry. Purchased.

Economic Plants of Vegetable Kingdom in

Jamaica, Fawcett, 1891.

India Forest Reports.

Forest Administration in Ajmere Merwara for

1889-90.

Administration in the Andamans for

1889-90.

>>

Administration in Baluchistan for 1890-91. Administration in British India for

12

1888-89.

Report of Hyderabad Assigned Districts

for 1890-91.

School Dehra Dum for 1889-90.

Gardeners' Chronicle for 1891. Purchased.

">

"}

Survey Branch for 1889-90.

352

Hooker's Icones Plantarum. Vol. XI. Parts II. and III. 1891, From Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew.

Index Flora Sinensis. Vol. XXVI. Part 176. Journal of Botany, 1891. Purchased. List of Medicines Exported from Hankow and

other Yangtsze Ports. Purchased. Manual of Forestry. Schlich. Vol. II.

15

of Injurious Insects, Ormerod. Second

Edition. Purchased.

Ordinances of Hongkong. Vols. I. to IV. Port Catalogues of the Chinese Customs Collection

at Vienna Exhibition, 1893. Purchased. Proceedings of the Agri-Horticultural Society of Madras, July to Dec., 1890, Jan.-June, 1891.

Report Agricultural Conference, Brisbane, 1891.

Botanic Gardens, Ceylon, 1890.

""

,,

""

""

Natal, 1890. Singapore, 1890. Trinidad, 1890. of Agriculture Department, Capetown. of Medical Department, Hongkong. of Missouree Botanic Gardens for 1890. On Progress and Condition of Govern- ment Botanic Gardens Saharanpur and Missouree for year ending 31st March,

1891.

Suggestions for Building a Cool Dairy, Depart- ment of Agriculture, Brisbane, No. 11, Sept., 1891.

Government House Grounds.

16. On the completion of the new annex to Government House advantage was taken of the opportunity when surroundings had to be put in order of re-arranging the whole of the ground up to Albert Road. New walks and drains were made around the new building and a new approach made to the stables so that the latter, by judicious planting, was screened from view as much as possible.

FORESTRY.

17. In past years when the Island was treeless except in a few restricted areas as the Happy Valley, Little Hongkong, and Tytam, and when consequently the choice of lands possessing fairly suitable conditions for tree growth was not so circumscribed as it now is large areas could be found where soil, water, and shelter-three important conditions which must exist where trees will flourish- were present, these circumstances enabled operations of tree planting being carried out on a large scale, but, as suitable lands have become scarcer by large portions being yearly brought within the planted areas it has become necessary to begin to gradually reduce the actual planting. Planting operations are regulated by water supplies which must exist for providing young trees with water as soon as they are planted. The time of year when the regular monsoon rains commence being too late for general forest-tree planting artificial watering must be resorted to when there are no showers to naturally moisten the ground. The lands within convenient distances of perennial streams having now been mostly planted the difficulty of carrying on planting operations is greater than ever, therefore it will be necessary to limit the work very much to such as can be done when early rains afford the desired moisture. I prefer to have general planting finished by the middle of May.

ミ 18. The development of plantations will, by their increasing demands for attention in thinning and protection, absorb any time of controlling officers which may be saved by a decrease in planting works, and they will need a slight increase of expenditure in protection, but this increase will be only a small sum compared with that saving which will be effected by the decrease in planting.

The revenue derived from thinnings of plantations will more than meet the increase for protection. 19. Natural regeneration, which costs nothing but its protection, is making considerable progress now that it has been possible to exert a large controlling influence over the inhabitants who at one time were in the habit of cutting for firewood nearly everything which was worth carrying away. The natural regeneration which is going on is produced by offshoots from stumps of trees and shrubs formerly cut down, and from seeds naturally distributed.

20. Simultaneously with the filling up of treeless land, and increased difficulty of planting caused by want of water, nursery lands in which trees are reared are yearly becoming more sterile and in- capable, in spite of manuring and alternate cropping, of producing robust, healthy trees. The Govern- ment not possessing any nursery land except in one place in Hongkong and one at Kowloon it is necessary to acquire from squatters every year land in various parts of the Colony for nurseries. There being so very little cultivable land in the Island, and so little of it at all suitable for tree nurseries, or which can be rented, there has been no alternative but to use the same ground, after one or more season's rest, over and over again with the result, as I have said, of its having become almost too poor to produce vigorous trees.

21. It is rare for the Colony to escape in any year from typhoons which inflict more or less damage on trees, the year under review was not free in this respect, there being too typhoons, on July 19th and August 2nd and 3rd respectively, which laid low several large old trees, and damaged younger ones in streets and roads. On the hills some few thousands of pines and Tristaneas were forced completely over and laid on the ground, most of which were, however, saved by each being again fixed in the soil and provided with stakes, to keep them in place until new roots were formed.

353

Planting Operations.

22. Statistics are given in Appendix B of the numbers and kinds of trees planted and of the localities where they were placed. The total number planted was 115,081.

Protective Service.

23. The protection of the whole of the Colony and Kowloon has hitherto been worked with not more than 3 Forest Guards, the present number, which for some years was sufficient to stop everything except petty pilfering of branches of trees, but now that plantations have so greatly extended and provided cover there have been many attempts, notably near Kennedy Road, behind the Happy Valley cemeteries, Causeway Bay hills, and at Kowloon, to clear away entire trees, but these depredations have been kept in check by numerous arrests, and, I am pleased to say, severer penalties imposed at the Magistracy on the culprits. It is extremely difficult for the guards to capture wood-cutters even when seen, but examinations in villages have revealed quantities of accumulated branches and tree trunks, and, fortunately, charges of unlawful possession brought against numerous villagers have resulted in convictions which, for a time at least, has secured trees from further damage or destruction, but the time has arrived when the adequate protection of trees requires that the staff of Forest Guards should be strengthened, which I trust it will be possible to effect in due course.

24. Out of 79 cases brought before the Police Magistrates by the Forest Guards 77 convictions were obtained, 44 defendants were imprisoned and 33 paid fines amounting in the aggregate to $104. There were 69 convictions in the previous year and the fines amounted to $26 in that year.

Grass Fires.

25. The year has been one of the greatest immunity from fires which has been known. Only 10 fires are recorded, and most of them were confined to the destruction of grass only. Fires which occurred within plantations were confined to very small areas, only 700 trees having been destroyed. There were 64 fires and 107,000 trees destroyed in 1890. The great immunity from fires was due to vegetation being less dry at the seasons of ancestral grave worshipping in spring and autumn when, as a rule, fire has hitherto been very carelessly handled at the graves scattered over the hills, and also, in all probability, partly owing to the exercise of more care in the use of fire in consequence of worshippers having been impressed with the importance of the prevention of fires.

26. Old fire barriers to the extent of 26 miles were cleared and 20 miles of new ones made during the months of August, September, and October, the work being completed by the commencement of the dry season, during which all destructive fires arise. Every year gives evidence of the usefulness of these fire barriers in arresting the spread of fires.

27. The unburnt remains of trees destroyed by fire in 1890 were all removed and sold as quickly as possible in order to prevent the inhabitants gaining any advantage by their being able to remove them for their own uses.

Thinning of Plantations, &c.

28. Plantations situated in various parts of the Colony in which trees had reached the size when they should be thinned were carefully examined and superfluous trees marked and felled. This work continued throughout the year and found constant work for about 40 men in the employment of the contractors who bought the trees. These men have now been drilled into methods which efficiently accomplish the desired work without going beyond limits which have been arranged for their control. Careful and constant supervision is exercised to prevent irregularities of any kind being indulged in.

29. The total number of trees removed from plantations during the year was 58,991 and they realised $601.31. The total revenue for forestry products was $666.80.

30. The sizes of trees cut down in plantations made by the Government range between about 6 feet and 25 feet in height.

In older plantations, however, it has been found expedient to remove some trees much larger. 31. The addition of an Assistant Clerk has permitted, amongst other things, the statistics and accounts connected with this work being regularly attended to.

32. Appendix C gives the localities where plantations have been thinned, the numbers of trees removed, and the value for which they were sold. The trees being felled and removed by the con- tractor, the figures show net proceeds.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

CHARLES FORD, Superintendent,

Botanical and Afforestation Department.

Honourable G. T. M. O'BRIEN, C.M.G.,

Colonial Secretary,

&c.,

&c.,

&c.

354

Date.

Appendix A.

VISITORS TO GARDENS.

Europeans. Others.

Total.

1891.

January 16,

258

1,332

1,590

17.

292

""

1,810

2,102

February 4,

213

779

992

15,

441

3,541

3,982

March

20,

496

1,653

2,149

21,

473

1,727

""

2,200

April

8,

781

1,697

2,478

99

25,

595

2,482

3,077

May

20,

456

1,443

1,899

June

27,

5677

2,693

3,260

July

15,

423

1,770

2,193

29,

434

1,959

2,393

October

""

September 14,

November 11,

December

387

1,586

1,973

3,

351

1,516

1,867

396

1,535

1,931

5,

.....

375

1,586

1,961

12,

437

1,656

2,093

وو

Appendix B.

STATISTICS OF PLANTING OPERATIONS.

CHARLES FORD,

Superintendent,

Botanical & Afforestation Department.

DESCRIPTION AND NUMBER OF TREES AND AREA IN ACRES.

LOCALITY.

Pinus sinensis.

Cam- phor.

Crytome-

Trista- ria Bamboo. nea japonica.

conferta.

Celtis Miscel- sinensis. laneous.

Area in Acres.

Grand

Total

of Trees.

52,575 2,308

...

4,914

17,014

457

700 8,390 302

465

45 5 16

...

...

20,710

17

721

...

...

Aberdeen,

Mount Davis, Mount Kellet,

North Point,

Quarry Bay,

Sookunpo,

2,947

Water Fall Bay,

1,422

Tytam Filter Beds,

Near Richmond Road,

915

Victoria Peak,

749

Kowloon Roads,

Albert Road,.

Chinese Recreation Ground,

Magazine Gap Road,

Mount Gough Road,...

Bowen Road,

102

154

300

Miscellaneous,

328 150

...

1

60

88

18

21

31

سراحه

-409

...

...

49

Total,......

100,039 2,308 1,664

556 9,870

465

179

901

115,081

CHARLES FORD,

Superintendent,

Botanical & Afforestation Department.

;

Appendix C.

FORESTRY PRODUCTS SOLD.

PINE TREES.

Above Pokfoolum Road,

Mount Davis,

Mount Kellet,

Causeway Bay,

Aberdeen,

Above Bowen Road,

Above Bonham Road,

Victoria Peak,

Deep Water Bay,

Chaiwan,.

Kowloon,...

Total Number of Trees,..

Brushwood,

Tree Prunings,

Bamboos,...

Quantities.

Amount Realized.

12,429

138.60

11,622

57.32

3,109

9.32

1,314

47.36

337

3.56

242

0.72

4,674

41.46

6,336

133.62

4,361

18.82

10,568

10.00

3,999

140.53

58,991

601.31

600 piculs.

23.11

924

32.38

200

10.00

"

Total,......

666.80

355

CHARLES FORD, Superintendent,

Botanical & Afforestation Department.

1

163

No. 92

HONGKONG.

RETURNS OF SUPERIOR AND SUBORDINATE COURTS FOR 1891.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor, on the 14th March, 1892.

No. 8.

REGISTRY SUPREME COURT, HONGKONG, 7th January, 1892.

SIR,-I have the honour to forward herewith the following annual returns :--

1. Return of all sums received as Revenue in the Registry of the Supreme Court during the

year 1891.

2. Same returns as compared with the receipts of 1890.

3. Indictments and Informations in the Supreme Court of Hongkong for the

year 1891.

4. Return of Criminal cases that have been brought under the cognizance of the Supreme

Court during the last ten years.

5. Comparative table showing the number of offences, apprehensions, convictions, and

acquittals for the last four years.

6. Return of Criminal cases tried in the Supreme Court of Hongkong during the year 1891. 7. Return of Establishment.

From Returns 1 and 2 it will be seen that there is decrease in the Revenue of 1891 as compared with that of 1890 amounting to

The decrease has taken place chiefly in the following items of Revenue :-

A. Court fees (proper) paid by Stamps,.

This is owing to the fact that in 1890 140 Original Suits were entered and

1,813 Summary Suits against 126 and 1,632 in 1891.

$4,056.16

$ 986.07

B. Percentage received on Intestate Estate, this is always an uncertain item, .$2,646.18

The fees in 1890.-In one Estate alone (that of Tam Yam Yim) realised

$2,985.14.

In 1891.--The largest sum received on one Estate was $1,282.50, the average

for the last five years is $2,010.

C. Bailiff's Fees,..

This decrease was caused by the smaller number of Suits entered.

D. Interest on Registrar balance at the Bank,

In 1890 there was on deposit at the Bank about $85,000. While in 1891

this amount has been about $20,000 less.

E. Under the item "Registrar of Companies" there is an increase of $675.50. 19 New Companies with a capital of $7,622,000 have been registered.

CRIMINAL RETURNS.

These show a large decrease in the number of cases tried in the Supreme Court.

The total number in 1891 was

Average for 1st year from 1882 to 1886,

Do. 2nd

There were two maiden Sessions.

""

1887 to 1891,

......32

.89€ .75%

.$ 214.00

$ 888.41

The Honourable W. M. GooDMAN,

Acting Colonial Secretary,

&c.,

&C.,

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

&c.

EDW. J. ACKROYD,

Registrar.

164

RETURN of all sums received as REVENUE in the Registry of the Supreme Court, during the Year 1891.

Original Jurisdiction,

Summary Jurisdiction,

Bankruptcy Jurisdiction,

Probate Jurisdiction,.....

Official Administrator's Commission, .........

Official Assignee's Commission,

Official Trustee's Commission,

Appraiser's Fees,

Sheriff's Fees,

Bailiff's Fees,......

Interest on Deposit of Surplus cash, .......

Fees on Distraints,

Registrar of Companies,

Fine and Forfeitures,

........$ 4,837.88 4,681.82

849.62

938.41

2,093.83

1,233.63

312.88

2.70

318.00

1,386.50

...

4,087.39

1,960.50

3,655.50

60.50

Land Office Fees,

$26,419.16

4,324.00

$30,743.16

Registry Supreme Court, Hongkong, 7th January, 1892.

EDW. J. ACKROYD, Registrar.

RETURN of all SUMS COLLECTED in the Registry of the Supreme Court for the Year 1891, and paid into the Treasury.

1890.

1891.

REGISTRAR.-Court Fees paid by Stamps,.............

.$ 14.254.30

$13,268.23

OFFICIAL ASSIGNEE.-5% on amounts encashed paid into the Treasury, OFFICIAL ADMINISTRATOR,

1,247.16

1,233.63

4,740.01

2,093.83

OFFICIAL TRUSTEE-2 % on amount of Trust on taking over up to $10,000 above $10,000 commission 1% on further amount, 1% commission on income,

268.90

312.88

APPRAISER OF INTESTATE ESTATES.-2 % on Houses, Land, Goods, Furniture,

&c., 1 % on Cash, Banking account or Shares,

4.00

BAILIFF,

1,600.50

2.70

1,386.50

SHERIFF,

293.00

318.00

REGISTRAR OF COMPANIES,

2,980.40

3,655,50

INTEREST on Registrar's Balance at the Bank,

4,975.80

4,087.39

FINE AND FORFEITURES,

60.50

$30,364.07

26,419.16

LAND OFFICE FEES,

4,435.25

4,324.00

$34,799.32

30,743.16

Registry Supreme Court, Hongkong, 7th January, 1892.

EDW. J. ACKROYD, Registrar.

165

INDICTMENTS and INFORMATIONS in the SUPREME COURT of HONGKONG, for the Year 1891.

Including Attempts and Conspiracies to commit the several offences.

Showing how the cases tried in the

Superior Courts ended.

(Each prisoner tried, counted as a separate case; where a large number of Prisoners have been convicted together, the fact is mentioned in a note.)

Total.

Manslaughter.

Attempt at murder.

Concealment of Birth.

Abortion,

Rape.

Unnatural Crimes.

Robbery with violence.

Other offences against the Person.

Offences against Property.

Miscellaneous offences.

Murder.

...

2

1

:

Judgment for the Crown,

26

9

Judgment for the Prisoner,

Prisoner found Insane,.

Cases which fell through for want of prosecution or absence of accused, and cases thrown out by the Grand Jury. (Attorney General),

Cases postponed,.

:

:

2

:

:

:.

1

::

:

...

:..

.:.

:

:

:

:

37

2

2

:

...

...

2

:

Co

6

3

...

:..

cr.

1

...

6

:

3

...

2

10

4

:

...

...

10

5

12

...

:

H

Registry Supreme Court, Hongkong, 31st December, 1891.

EDW. J. ACKROYÐ, Registrar.

RETURN of CRIMINAL CASES that have been brought under the COGNIZANCE of the SUPREME COURT, during the last Ten Years.

Charges Abandoned.

Postponed.

Number Number

YEAR.

of

of Convicted. Acquitted. Cases. Persons.

No. of

Cases.

No. of Persons.

No. of Cases.

No. of Persons.

1882, (c.) 1883, (d.) 1884,

124

187

91

126

ឥន

124

38

70

68

101

65

1885,

91

147

103

(e.) 1886,

75

107

59

82222

15

21

1

26

14

28d

2

♡ 2

3

20

8

16

...

16

22

...

20

16

27e

1

Total,.

449

668

421

126

(f.) 1887,

94

155

82

36

1888,

(g.) 1889,

101

186

99

47

28

92

143

64

41

24

1890,

59

80

43

20

1891,

32

37

26

9

88-2

69

114

4

6

17

26

1

40

...

37

***

17

...

...

2

Total,..

378

601

314

153

78

122

1

Average of 1st

89

Period,....f

1333

841

25층

13#

22/

ka

Average of 2nd

753

120층

624

303

15

24/3/

Period,....

11

}

13

c. In one case the recognizance estreated, this case is included in the total, but not in any other of the above headings. d. In one case the recognizance estreated, and one prisoner committed suicide in the Gaol.

e. In one case the recognizance estreated.

f. In three cases the recognizances were estreated.

g. In one case the recognizance estreated, this case is included in the total, but not in any other of the above headings.

Registry Supreme Court, Hongkong, 31st December, 1891.

EDW. J. ACKROYD,

Registrar.

166

COMPARATIVE TABLE showing the NUMBER of OFFENCES, APPREHENSIONS, CONVICTIONS and Acquittals

for the last Four Years.

The Number of Convictions in the Superior Courts-

1888.

1889.

1890.

1891.

1. For Offences against the Person,.........

12

18

13

13

2. For Offences against Property, ...........

57

40

22

9

30

6

8

4

3. For other Offences,

The Number of Persons Acquitted-

2. In the Superior Courts,....

47

41

20

9

Registry Supreme Court, Hongkong, 31st December, 1891.

Number of Cases tried.

Number of Persons tried.

EDW. J. ACKROYD, Registrar.

RETURN of CRIMINAL Cases tried in the SUPREME COURT of HONGKONG during the Year 1891.

CRIMES.

Convicted.

Acquitted.

Death.

Death Recorded.

over one Year. Hard Labour

Hard Labour one Year and under.

SENTENCE.

Solitary Confinement- Number of Persons.

Number of Persons.

Privately Flogged-

No. of Cases.

No. of Persons.

No. of Cases.

No. of Persons.

DONED.

PONED.

CHARGES

CASES

ABAN-

POST-

3

1

1

111 pa

2

12

12121

Assaulting and occasioning actual bodily harm, Attempt to bribe an Inspector of Police,

Burglary,.

Embezzlement by a clerk,

Feloniously and with menaces demanding a certain

valuable security,

3 Feloniously wounding with intent to do grievous

bodily harm,

Feloniously and maliciously causing to be taken a

1212

:

1

3

certain poison,

2

1

1

7

jad just me) það það 29 Hai 19 119

2

Larceny,

Larceny and previous convictions,

2 Larceny by a servants,

Manslaughter,

2

Murder,

Piracy,

Returning from deportation,

Robbery with violence,

Unnatural offence,.

närvi: ~Ni -

1

2

...

6

Unlawfully bringing into this Colony certain woman

for the purpose of prostitution,.....................................

1

:

+

30

35

26

9

...

...

...

...

:.

1:12

2

2

pai Ni mo H

2

...

**

***

...

...

...

***

...

1

...

...

1

...

...

6

1

***

***

20

6

Of 37 Persons only

............35 were tried.

2 were not indicted which are included under the heading of "Charges Abandoned,”.

2

37 Persons.

Registry Supreme Court, Hongkong, 31st December, 1891.

...

...

...

:

1

1

***

***

***

...

1 1

...

:

6

2

2

EDW. J. ACKROYD, Registrar.

:

***

...

***

!

:

TOTAL

NUMBER

TOTAL

NUMBER

OF

OF

CASES.

PRISON-

• ERS.

Convicted

and

Punished.

M.

F. Μ. F.

M. F.

16,382

16,382 | 13,438) 534

1,906 134 40

'IV

12

F. M. F.

...

:

128

ABSTRACT of CASES under Cognizance of the POLICE MAGISTRATES' COURT during the Year 1891.

CASES, HOW DISPOSED of, and the NumbER OF MALE AND FEMALE PRISONERS UNDER EACH HEAD.

Discharged.

Committed

for Trial at

the Supreme

Court.

Committed Detained pending Orders | of H. E. the

to Prison, or

Governor.

To keep

Ordered to find Security.*

the

Peace.

૨૫ ૦૩.

of good

~K[oK

viour.

punished for

wilful false

To

answer

any

Charge.

Witnesses

falseferring

Charge

or giving

Testimony.

Undecided.

WRITS ISSUED BY THE POLICE MAGISTRATES DURING THE YEAR 1891.

Warrants.

Arrest.

Distress.

Search.

For

entering Gambling Houses.

Magis- trates' Orders.

TOTAL.

TOTAL

NUMBER

OF FIRE

ENQUIRY

HELD

DURING THE YEAR 1891.

1

M. F. M. F. M.

F.

M. F.

M.

F.

14

25

LO

5

***

1

143 2❘ 15,693

689

3,527

141

14

132

1 2,065 456

6,336

3

TOTAL MALES AND FEMALES,

.16,382

Consisting of Offenders not sentenced to Imprisonment.

167

168

THE CASES CONSISTED OF

"

don), .

"

"}

"

??

OFFENCE.

Animals-Cruelty to,..........

Arms Consolidation Ordinance-Breach of, Assault-Causing grievous bodily harm,

19

"

--Common,

-Inciting person to commit,

-Indecent,

-Indecent with intent to ravish,..

-On Excise Officers in the execution of their duty, -On Females and Boys under 14 years of age,..

-On Police in the execution of their duty, and

obstructing and resisting Police,

With intent to commit a felony,

-With wounding,

Banishment Returning after (see also Conditional Par-

Births & Deaths-Breach of Ordinance for Registration of, Boats-Demanding more than legal fare,

-Refusing to accept Hire when unemployed,........................... -Refusing to pay Hire of,

Regulations-Breach of,

Breach of the Peace;

Bribery, or attempting to bribe,

Buildings-Breach of Ordinance for,

Buildings Domestic-Occupying without certificates, Burglary,

Burial of Chinese Corpse elsewhere than in a Cemetery,.. Brothels-Allowing children above 6 and under 15 years

of age to be in a registered,

-Keeping an incorrect list of inmates of regis-

tered,

1,042 1,042

No. of CASES.

No. of PRI- SONERS.

No. or

OFFENCE.

No. of

CASES.

PRI- SONERS.

17

17

Brought forward,.

5,5115,511

81

81

Larceny-By a Servant,

5

5

222∞∞

2

"

-Common,

1,097 1,097

-from Ships or Boats in the Harbour,

20

20

2

-from the Person,

174

174

""

from the Person with violence or with wounding,

3

3

19

-in a Dwelling House,

6

6

-of Vegetables and Fruits from Gardens and

enclosed places,

5

5

93 4

93

19

Malicious Injury to Electric or Magnetic Telegraph,........

to Property,

Manslaughter,..

12

12

61

61

10

10

Marine Store Dealers-Breach of Ordinance for, Markets' Ordinance-Breach of,..........

1

456

456

24

24

Menaces-Demanding Money by,..............................

33

33

14

14

Mendicancy,

268

268

2

2

2

2

1

1

7

Merchandise Marks Ordinance-Breach of, Merchant Shipping Act of 1876-Breach of, Military Stores-Exportation of.......................... Misdemeanor-Attempting to commit,..

3

3

..

14

14

3

9

45

45

Murder,

8

4

""

12

12

1

5

2

2152

99

3

3

1

1

"

- Unregistered,.....

37

37

39

-Aiding and abetting in,.

Night-Found at, armed with Dangerous and Offensive Weapons, with Intent to break into Dwelling Houses,

-Found in Dwelling Houses by-with Intent to

commit Felony therein,

-Noises,

Nuisances-Allowing Dirt and Filth to remain on Pre-

mises or in immediate Vicinity thereof,

-Blasting Stones to the danger of Persons

1

2

2

43

...

Gp LQ

43

5

5

7

7

Cattle--Slaughtering in a place other than one set apart

and Property,

5

5

for the purpose,

4

4

99

-Blowing Whistles,

1

1

Child-Desertion of,

2

2

""

-Boarding Ships, &c., without permission,

126

126

Child Stealing,

27

27

"

-Boats mooring inshore,

219

219

""

Chinese Emigrants-Receiving or harbouring improper,.. Territory-Crimes and Offences committed in,..

3

3

99

-Boats obstructing Navigation,

166

166

13

13

32

-Breaming Boats,

10

10

Coin-Offences relating to,

19

19

"

Conspiracy to defraud,

4

Contempt of Court,

4

Convict Licence-Breach of,

2

""

Corrosive fluid-Throwing-With intent to do grievous

bodily harm,

1

1

"J

Cutting and Wounding with intent, &c.,

Dangerous Goods Ordinance-Breach of,

28

36

36

"

77

77

:

Decoying-Men or boys into or away from the Colony,

""

or imprisoning or detaining them for the

purpose of emigration or for any purpose

19

whatsoever,

14

14

サラ

-Women or girls into or away from the Colony,

14

14

>"

Defence Sketching Prevention Ordinance-Breach of,.. Desertion from British Merchant Ships,

"

Foreign Ships,

2

2

11

6

6

8

99

H. M.'s Army and Navy,

Disorderly Behaviour-Drunkenness, Fighting, &C.,....... Distraint for rent-Fraudulently removing property under, Dogs-Allowing unmuzzled ferocious, to be at large, &c.,

14

14

1,177 1,177

1

1

14

14

Embezzlement,

";

Escape of Prisoners from Chain Gang,

"

Extortion,

""

-Stealing,

Domestic Servants-Misconduct as...................

Drugs-Administering,

Drugs, &c.-Procuring to cause abortion,

by a Clerk,

by a Public Servant,

9:

from Custody of Police,

1

30

30

9

1

1

4

1

1

-Carrying or exposing Night Soil or Noxious Waters in the Streets in uncovered Buc- kets, and in open Boats along the Praya,... -Hanging wet Clothes, &c., to dry over

Public Ways,.............

-Irrigation,

-Leaving Holes and Drains unprotected in

the Streets,

-Neglecting to clean out Dust Bins, and

throwing Rubbish, &c., into the Streets,

---Obeying Calls of Nature in the Streets,

-Obstruction of Wharves by Boat People,...... --Regulations-Breach of,

---Rough Dressing, &c. of Granite in or near

a Public place,

-Throwing Rubbish into the Harbour or on

the Beach,

Obstruction of Roads and Streets, &c., by Hawkers, Chair Coolies and Shopkeepers,

Offensive Weapons-Having Possession of

Opium-Breach of Ordinances for Preparation and Sale

of prepared and raw,

Passage-Obtaining surrepticiously a................................................... Passes Chinese out at Night without,

4 Perjury, (see also Preferring false Charge and giving

wilful false Testimony),

2

2

30

30

1

10

5

92

92

57

57

23

23

10

2722

10

5

55

33

55

2,2012,201

9

9

1,757 | 1,757

2

2

95

95

1

1

1

1

Piracy,

10

10

1

1

"

with Violence,

1

1

1

1

1

1

Police-Assuming Name, Designation, &c., of Constable of,Į Police Constables-Misconduct as,

3

3

3

3

Falsification of Accounts,

Fire Arms-Discharging,

...--.

False Charge-Preferring or giving wilful false evidence,

Pretences-obtaining Goods and Money by,

Felony-Attempting to commit,

Fire Works-Discharging without permits,

Post Office-Breach of Ordinance for,

1

1

28

28 Rape.......

5

5

1

1

Receiving Stolen Goods,

36

36

23

23

Recognisances-Breach of,..

28

28

1

1

Roads and Streets-Injury to......................

1

564

564

Robbery-From the Person,...

6

Forcible keeping a person with intent to procure a benefit

for his liberation,

19

1

1

Fugitive Offenders-Offences against,

"

*

Forged Order-Uttering a for goods with intent to defraud, Forgery,

Furious Driving,

Gambling-Breach of Ordinance for Suppression of,..

in the Streets, treated as Obstruction of

Public Ways,..

Gaols-Breach of Ordinance for,

Gaol's Subordinate Officers-Misconduct of,

Harbour Dredging at Anchorage for Ships of War in the,

"

Regulations--Breach of,.....

Health Ordinance-Breach of regulations under,

House Breaking,.

Householders and Servants-Breach of Ordinance, for

1

1

""

1

-From the Person with Wounding or with

Violence,

-On the Highways with Arms or with Violence, 1 Rogues & Vagabonds--As Street Gamblers and Watch-

5

10 1

5

/

2

men to Gamblers,.

4

4

40

40

19

""

-As suspicious Characters,

60

60

1,771 1,771

99

>>

-Exposing for sale indecent Pic-

tures,

1

1

40

40

7

mmm

3

33

23

31

31

2

4.

Registration of,.........

18

TO GNCC*

"

99

-Wandering abroad and lodging

7

in the open air,

27

27

3

19

""

Indecent Exposure of Person by Bathing or otherwise,

Seamen or Apprentices-Disobedience to lawful com-

mands by British Merchant,

Ships, &c.—Carrying passengers in excess of that allowed

by licence,

-Leaving Harbour without a Clearance,.. -Neglecting to have a riding light on board,. 18 Shipwrecked Goods-Found in the possession of,

Shooting with intent to do Grievous Bodily Harm,

4

4

34

34

4

4

171

171

15

5 2

15

2

and Lewdness,............

18

18

Carried forward,..

5,511 5,511

Carried forward,..

|13,043 13,043

CASES,-Continued.

169

OFFENCE.

Brought forward,

Spirituous and fermented Liquors-Breach of Ordinance

for retail of,

Stonecutters' Island Ordinance-Breach of,

Stones and other Missiles-Discharging to Danger of

Persons and Property...........................................

No. of CASES.

No. of

PRI- SONERS.

OFFENCE.

No. of CASES.

No. of PRI-

SONERS.

|13,043] 13,043

Brought forward..............

15,942 15,942

Unlicensed-Plying of Boats,

114 114

14

14

11

-Plying of Bum Boats,

31

3

1 Unnatural Offence,

4

4

Unwholesome Provisions-Exposing for Sale, or bring-

2

2

ing into the Colony,...

19

Streams-Defiling,

12

12 Vaccination Ordinance-Breach of,

16

Streets-Noises by Hawkers,....

168

168 Vagrancy Ordinance-Breach of,

996

19

16

946

Suicide Attempting to commit,

13

Sunday Cargo-Working Ordinance-Breach of,

7

7

13 Vehicles-Offences against Public-under Licensing Con-

solidation Ordinance,

142

142

Threats-Of Violence to the Person,

Trees, &c.-Cutting and destroying,.

89

Verandahs erected on over Crown Land-Enclosing,... 89 Watchmen-Misconduct as Private,

12

Trespass on Crown Land,

416

416 Weights and Measures-Breach of Ordinance for,

59

Unlawful Possession of Property,

516

516 Wild Birds and Game-Breach of Ordinance for Preser-

"

of Trees, Shrubs, &c.,...................

82

82

vation of,

Unlicensed-Billiard Tables,

1

"

-Cargo Boats,

2

93

-Eating Houses,

1

1 Will--Uttering a forged,

2 Women and Girls Protection Ordinance-Breach of,. 1 Workmen-Intimidating,

58

NO ALOON

ཝྱཱཝས ཨཡཿཧྨས

12

99

-Hawkers,

1,574 1,574

Carried forward,..

15,912 15,942

TOTAL,....

Magistracy, Hongkong, 26th January, 1892.

16,382 16,382

ALFRED G. WISE, Police Magistrate, for the Police Magistrates.

ABSTRACT of CASES brought under COGNIZANCE at the POLICE MAGISTRATES' COURT during a period of

Ten Years, from 1st January, 1882, to 31st December, 1891, inclusive.

CASES, HOW DISPOSED OF, AND THE NUMBER of Male and FEMALE PRISONERS UNDER EACH HEAD.

Years.

Total Number of Cases.

Committed

Committed to Prison

Ordered to find Security.

Punished for Preferring

Total

Convicted and Punished.

for Trial at

or detained

Discharged.

Supreme

pending Orders of To keep the Peace,

or giving

False Charge Undecided.

Number

Court.

His Excellency

to be of Good Beha-

False

of Defendants.

the Governor.

viour, and to answer

any Charge.

Testimony.

1

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

M.

F. M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F. M.

F.

M.

F.

1882,

7,567

6,049

394 1,922 255

259

17

36

3

263

100

13

4

80

7

8,622 780

1883,

10,653 8,127 670 2,398 349

121

00

8

37

1

154

62

6

160

11

11,003 1,101

1884,

14,065 11,748 1,088

2,294 268

101

2

35

3

228

53

6

2 105

2

14,517 1,418

1885,

10,281 7,951 849

2,188 258

159

2

11

3

357

99

6

18

***

...

10,690 1,211

1886,

1887,

1888,

1889,

14,611❘ 12,081 842

12,015 10,354 325

11,647 9,700 232 2,704 145

8,670 6,626 268 2,319, 178

2,198 190

157

2

5

869

100 32

3 168

15,510 1,137

2,620 159

158

9

168

co

0000

28

4

411

52 14

48

13,633 549

98

11

177

15

3

48

2

12,898 411

157 10

44

10

303

34 17

64

3 9,530 503

1890,

9,739 7,423 317 2,406 151

16,382 13,438 534 1,906 134

102

15

259

59

3

35

2

...

10,243 529

40

12

153

19

1

143

2

15,693 689

Grand Total】

.....

for the 10 115,630 93,4975,519 | 22,955 2,087 Years,..

1,422

56 321

35

3,174

593

101

869

29

122,339 8,328

Average per

Year,

11,563-0 9,349-7 | 551-9 | 2,295-5|208-7

142.2

5.6 32-1

3.5

317-4

59.3

10-1

0+9

86-9

2.9 12,233.9 832-8

Magistracy, Hongkong, 26th January, 1892.

ALFRED G. WISE,

Police Magistrate, for the Police Magistrates.

170

MAGISTERIAL ENQUIRIES INTO DEATHS.

TABLE A.-RETURN OF ALL DEATHS REPORTED DURING THE YEAR 1891.

Buried without Formal Enquiries.

Formal Enquiries held.

NATIONALITY.

Men. Women. Boys. Girls. Total. Men. Women. Boys. Girls. decomposed;

Very much

sex not ascertainable.

Total.

Europeans and Americans,

10

Indians and Malays,.

1

...

Japanese,

...

Siamese,

Chinese,....

37

10

==

1

11

9

1

10

1

4

4

1

1

1

1

...

5

1

4

47

111

13 102

79

7

312

Total,

48

5

2

4

59

126

13

103

79

7

328

Total for 1890,

69

15

8

9

101

84

11

62

60

8

225

:

:

171

Total.

:

TABLE B.-RETURN OF FORMAL ENQUIRIES DURING THE YEAR 1891.

FINDING.

Europeans Indians

and

and

Americans. Malays.

Chinese.

Men. Boys. Men. Men. Women. Boys. Girls.

1

1

...

2

...

...

4 1

***

:

...

1

1

...

2 1

:.

:

...

2

22

1

5

1

1

1

...

2

2

3

...

1

1

...

1

1

1

:

:

:

:

::

2

1

1

1

1

...

...

...

1

1

...

...

2

1

...

...

4

...

1

:

1

1

1

I

211212

1

4

2

:

::

:

:..

:

1

1

1

1

:

:

:

:

:

:

::

:.

:

:

1

Accidental death,...

Do., RIDER:-That all launches plying in Hong- kong should be compelled to undergo a periodical survey of engines and boilers similar to that required for passenger launches,

Cause of death self-inflicted bullet wound,

Cause of death was injuries received in consequence of a fall

of a verandah,

Cause of death drowning,

Cause of death drowning and purely accidental,...

Cause of death drowning. No blame attached to the steamer,

Cause of death hanging,

Cause of death opium poisoning,

Cause of death a self-inflicted wound in the throat,.

Cause of death syncope,

Cause of death was cerebal concussion,

Cause of death abscess on the brain resulting from injuries

inflicted by some person or persons unknown,

Cause of death fracture of the skull resulting from a fall. No

blame to police,

Cause of death result of a fall caused by a blow inflicted by John Jacobson. John Jacobson committed for trial at the next Sessions,

Cause of death hemorrhage,..

Cause of death being poisoning by carbonic oxcide gas. RIDER:-That precautions were taken to prevent this unfortunate accident,.

Cause of death meningitis and effusion of blood on the brain,. Cause of death scalded,

Cause of death asphyxia,

Cause of death asphyxia-caution to contractor,

Cause of death injuries received from a fall of a stone,..

Cause of death perforation of the bowel and no blame attached

to any one,

Death from natural causes,.

Death resulted from injuries received from a falling of a wall

upon the bodies of the deceased,

Death from suffocation caused by the mouth being gagged by a piece of cloth which found its way into the gullet; this gagging being done by a party of four men in pursuance of a burglary which they were committing at the time,. Death by asphyxia occasioned by the state of his lungs and

consequent upon his attempted suicide by hanging,.

Death from inanition,

one,

.

Death from general exhaustion and no blame attached to any

Death caused by injuries resulting from a fall from the top of

a house,.

Death was caused by shock resulting from rupture of the liver occasioned by a fall from the roof of a house in Tank Lane,. Death caused by hemorrhage from a bullet wound accidentally

inflicted by one Joseph Lebury,................

Death resulting from wounds inflicted by some person or

persons unknown,

Death caused by asphyxia the result of hanging,

Found drowned

I find that the cause of death was a fracture of the base of the skull resulting from a fall from a window in the married quarters in Queen's Road East,

I find that the cause of death was fracture of the skull resulting

from a self-inflicted bullet wound,

I find that Thomas George Pocock, late master of the steamer Namoa, Lighthouse keeper Peterson, and others were wilfully murdered on the 10th December, 1890, on the ship Namoa while in Chinese waters by a gang of pirates who had taken passage on board that day from the Colony of Hongkong en route to Foochow,.

The jury unanimously find that the cause of death was an injury inflicted by a stone during the course of blasting operations,..

2

2

1

+:

...

:

:

:

:

....

...

1

1

N

:

Total,.................

I

:

:

:

:.

1

1

1

:

:

10

1

1

1

1

1

1

:

1

:

1

1

1

:

:

:

:

:

:

:.

1

:

1

1

1

37

5

1

1

:

3

4

1

59

172

TABLE C.-RETURN OF BURIALS WITHOUT FORMAL ENQUIRIES DURING THE YEAR 1891.

Reason why no Formal Enquiry was held.

Europeans

& Americans.

Men. Boys. Men.

No suspicious circumstances,...

No evidence and/or decom- posed state of Body,

Post Mortem satisfactory,

Total,..

Indians

Chinese.

and Japanese. Siamese. Very much Malays.

Women,

Boys. Girls. Men. Men.

Men.

de- composed; sex not ascertain- able.

Found on

Land.

Found on

Harbour.

Total.

Known.

Un.

known.

Known.

Un-

known.

6

1

92

11 31

11

3

1

10

71

3

:.

:

67

9

2

1

1

:

:.

157

76 42 28

11

7

155

107

48

16

11

3 2

:

Co

9

1

111

13

102

79

4

1

1

7

328 87 152 30

59

Magistracy, Hongkong, 7th January, 1892.

:

Alfred G. WISE,

Police Magistrate.

h

227

18 No. 92

HONGKONG.

DESPATCH FROM THE SECRETARY OF STATE FOR THE COLONIES ON THE RESOLUTION OF CONDOLENCE BY THE LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL

ON THE OCCASION OF THE DEATH OF THE DUKE OF

CLARENCE AND AVONDALE.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor, on the 25th April, 1892.

HONG KONG.

No. 66.

SIR,

DOWNING STREET,

15 March, 1892.

I am desired by Her Majesty the Queen and Their Royal Highnesses the Prince and Princess of Wales, before whom I duly laid the Resolution of Condolence passed by the Legislative Council, which was enclosed in your despatch No. 51 of the 9th ultimo, to request you to convey their sincere thanks to the Legislative Council for this kind expression of sympathy with them in the irreparable bereavement which they have sustained by the death of His Royal Highness the Duke of Clarence and Avondale.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient,

humble Servant,

Governor

Sir W. ROBINSON, K.C.M.G.,

&c.,

&c.,

&c.

KNUTSFORD.

135

No.

4

92

HONGKONG.

REPORT OF THE GOVERNMENT CENTRAL SCHOOL FOR GIRLS FOR 1891,

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor, on the 22nd February, 1892.

No. 6.

1

EDUCATION DEPARTMENT, HONGKONG, 13th January, 1892.

SIR, I have the honour to forward, under this enclosure, the Annual Report of the Government Central School for Girls for 1891, presented by Mrs. BATEMAN, the Headmistress.

2. The examination of this School, conducted by myself, has shewn very satisfactory results, such as testify to the efficiency of the teaching given both by the Headmistress and by the Assistant Teacher, Mrs. LEUNG. I have found clear evidence of steady progress in the attainments of the children in almost every subject. The general tone of the School and the relations existing between the scholars and the teachers are highly commendable.

3. As to the suggestion made in the enclosed report regarding the appointment of an additional pupil-teacher which even now seems much needed, I will make a recommendation in a separate docu- ment as soon as the School re-assembles after the Chinese New Year's holidays, when it will be seen more clearly what addition to the staff will be required on account of increased attendance.

I have the honour to be,

The Honourable W. M. GOODMAN, Acting Colonial Secretary.

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

E. J. EITEL,

Inspector of Schools.

REPORT, 1891.

GOVERNMENT CENTRAL SCHOOL FOR GIRLS.

SIR,-I have the honour to submit to you the Second Annual Report of the Government Central School for Girls, for the year 1891.

I.-Resumé of the School's Aims and Progress.

This School was opened on 1st March, 1890, for the purpose of providing an ordinary middle class English education for the daughters of Eurasian, European, Indian and Chinese residents in this Colony.

The staff consisted of-

(1.) An English trained certificated Mistress.

(2.) An Assistant Mistress (Chinese).

(3.) A Teacher of Chinese.

In the first month (March, 1890) 34 pupils were enrolled, and at the end of December, 1890, there were 45 children in regular attendance.

The year 1891 closed with the number of 87 scholars on the register, showing an increase of more than 50 per cent. The regularity of the attendance is most satisfactory.

Subjoined is a list of the average attendance for January to December, 1891.-

January,.. ........39.3

March, April,

May,

....56.5 ..52.5 ..55

June,............59 July,... .61

August..........58.5 September, ...51.4

October,............64 November,.........64.9

December, ...69.39

The above numbers will speak for themselves of the rapid development of the School and that it evidently supplies a need of the Colony.

In August Miss WARD resigned her duties as Headmistress of the School, and the undersigned took her place on 1st September, 1891.

136

II.-Work of the year.

The School is in two divisions-Upper and Lower. The former consists of the more advanced English-speaking girls and these are taught by the Headmistress who is now assisted by a Pupil-

teacher.

The instruction given consists of Reading, Arithmetic, English Composition, Grammar and Analysis, Geography, Map Drawing, History and Needlework.

The Lower Division is in charge of the Chinese Assistant Mistress by whom they are taught English Reading, Writing, Arithmetic and Dictation.

The study of classical Chinese, which is taught by the Chinese teacher of the Headmistress, is optional.

III.-Suggested Improvements.

Should the number of pupils continue to increase as they have done during the past year, (and there is every probability that it will be so), the present building will be quite inadequate to accom- modate a larger number, the space at the present time being very limited.

The want of a play-ground is also a great drawback, as there is no means of giving physical exercises, this being almost indispensable in giving a healthy tone to the School.

The appointment of an additional 'pupil-teacher is desirable to assist the Chinese Mistress in the Lower School, as it is impossible for one person to give efficient teaching to so large a number.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

The Honourable W. M. GOODMAN,

Acting Colonial Secretary.

ELIZABETH ANNIE BATEMAN.

¦

}

A

173

No. 10

19

92

HONGKONG.

ANNUAL REPORT OF THE HEAD MASTER OF THE VICTORIA COLLEGE FOR 1891,

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor, on the 14th March, 1892.

No. 19.

VICTORIA COLLEGE, HONGKONG, 16th February, 1892.

SIR,-I have the honour to forward the Annual Report on Victoria College for the

year 1891. 1. The total number of boys on the Roll of the College for the year was 1108. As 712 names were on the Roll in January, nearly 400 boys (including re-admissions) were admitted in the course of the year.

Of these, 269 were admitted after the Chinese New Year holidays; 39 after Tsing Ming; 57 after Mid-summer, together with 31 at various times. The number of school days is somewhat less than in 1890, the deficiency being chiefly accounted for, by the fact that three Easter holidays did not coincide with the Tsing Ming holidays, and that so many Chinese festivals did not happen to fall on Sundays.

2. The following tables will illustrate the condition of the College during the last five years :-

YEAR.

Average

Total Number of Scholars.

Number of School days.

Monthly Enrolment.

Daily Attendance.

Maximum.

Minimum.

1887,

1888,

1889,

1890,

1891,

1887,

1888,

1889,

1890,

1891,

601

234

525

417

449

634

229

536

384

467

919

233

789

466

597

1,075

236

890

683

758

1,108

231

932

712

759

YEAR.

Number of School Boys Examined.

Percentage of Passes.

School

Actual Nett

Fees.

Expenditure.

$

$

Average Expense of each Scholar per

Average Daily Attendance.

384

97.65

5,547.00

11,872.70

26.40

445

94.15

6,899.00

12,384.14

26.48

676

95.41

9,338.00

15,018.20

25.11

692

89.45

11,912.50

19,222.46

25.34

709

90.26

12,257.77

18,158.60

23.92

3. ATTENDANCE.-In spite of the great anxiety, which the Chinese continue to evince for the admission of their boys into the College, there is strong statistical evidence for the belief that a large number desire only to make an experiment of the study of English. For example, of the 269 admitted at the Chinese New Year, 72 or more than one quarter had left within three months; while of the total number admitted in the year, no fewer than 27 boys were satisfied with an experience of less than 30 days, several not presenting themselves on more than four or five occasions. This must be attributed chiefly to the age of the students. Young men, of 17 years of age and upwards, find the discipline of an English College stricter, and the drudgery of elementary study more irksome than they anticipated; and they accordingly withdraw with more or less expedition.

4. LEAVE IN ADDITION TO HOLIDAYS.-We continue the old practice, of the past thirty years, of recognising Chinese social customs, and give leave to boys on the occasion of their own marriage, or to attend a brother's wedding, to celebrate a grandfather's sixty-first birthday, or to perform funeral rites, &c. I desire however to draw the attention of the public to the magnitude, to which this practice of leave-taking has attained, in the hope that Chinese parents will protect this indulgence from abuse. In the past year, without reckoning sick leave, 20 boys had each leave for one month, 33 for three weeks, 60 for a fortnight, and 72 for one week. It should also be noted that 90 such applications were granted in the last three months of the year; which period, while it is the most important for preparation for the Annual Examination, appears to be specially favoured for Chinese ceremonies.

174

5. ANNUAL EXAMINATION.-The Head Master holds an examination of all the boys in the College not only for prize purposes, but also to discover carefully the attainments of each boy that he may be assigned to a suitable place in the following year. The Inspector of Schools also holds an examination for the purposes of the Education Department. For the sake of the boys, the two examinations have been blended for the last ten years. Writing in 1886 Dr. EITEL says in his report.

(C

"The system followed by me in examining the various classes of the Government Central School was virtually the same as that adopted in previous years, except that most of the papers set were proposed by the Head Master (for the purpose of determining the award of the annual prizes and "scholarships of the school) and consequently the questions which the scholars had to answer at this "examination were of a more searching character than I would have thought necessary.'

But previously in 1883 Dr. EITEL had written.

77

"The severity of the test applied lifts therefore the result of this examination beyond all comparison "with the results of the Grant-in-Aid examinations, even considering that at the latter examination 'two thirds of the marks possible entitle to a pass, while at the Central School I passed at this "examination all who had made half marks.'

""

By comparing then these two Reports of the Inspector of Schools we discover that the severe test of 1883 had assumed a more searching character in 1886. If further we compare the Examination Questions of 1886 with those of 1892 there is manifest in the latter a higher standard in a very marked degree. There has thus been during the past ten years a continuous steady advance in the standard of education in this institution. The first examination that I held, in January, 1882, is by the novelty of the circumstances impressed indelibly upon my memory. I am therefore in a position to state with confidence that Class III B is the highest class of Victoria College the work of which at all reminds me of what was done in 1882 by Class I of the Central School. There are now there- fore 150 boys in this College doing work of a higher standard than the highest of 1882.

-

6. RESULTS OF ANNUAL PRIZE EXAMINATION.-(f 709 boys examined 640 or 90.26 per cent. passed. Returning as I did from Europe within six weeks of the examination, I feel that I can speak more freely of the impression produced on me by the work done in this competition for Prizes and promotion. The first thing that struck me was the general high tone, in neatness of work, excellent writing, and great advance in setting down Mathematical work in a clear form. Dictation continues to prove itself a stumbling block, though the results in half the classes were very creditable. English Composition, presented by 382 boys, was pleasing in its effect. The Grammar papers, 599 in number, shewed on the whole remarkable intelligence in grasping some of the chief difficulties in the English language. The paper on Shakespeare by Class I. A simply astonished me, as it appeared to me that the replies to more than one question necessitated personal observation of actors on the stage; on enquiry I found that this was precisely the case, they had had the great advantage of witnessing a representation of the play of "Hamlet" at the City Hall. The work of the Upper School was above the average; Classes I. A and II. A maintaining a remarkably high character of work, together with excellent percentages. In the Lower School Classes IV. A. IV. C and VI. A. turned out excellent, intelligent work. The results in the Preparatory School left nothing to be desired. It must not be supposed that the masters and scholars of the remaining classes are undeserving of praise; with rare exceptions the work of classes, which have been only fairly successful gives evidence of careful instruction and the inability of boys to avail themselves of it appears to be due to the forced pro- motions, which are the natural consequence of the introduction into the College of 400 new boys, in the course of the year.

7. PUPIL TEACHERS' EXAMINATION.-The Inspector of Schools set a very stiff paper on the Theory and History of Education. Two boys obtained three-quarters marks and none of the remain- ing four failed in this subject. Mr. JONES, the Assistant Master who was in charge of the Preparatory School with its Pupil Teachers and Monitors, wrote a very careful Report in which he shows the disadvantages under which these Juniors suffer, by the necessary promotion to acting appointments when their Seniors are absent on leave. As a novel feature this

As a novel feature this year, I may note that, at Mr. JONES' suggestion, the six Pupil Teachers and Monitors gave instruction in various subjects to a class in the presence of the Inspector of Schools. This year, one of the Monitors obtained the Stewart scholar- ship, the highest distinction in the College next to the Morrison Scholarship.

8. PUPIL TEACHERS' SYSTEM.-Pupil Teachers and Monitors continue to be employed in this, as in all other large schools and colleges. To secure the continued services of the same junior teachers, the Pupil Teachers have since 1887 been articled for a period of three years. It would be a mistake to suppose that they receive their appointments in order of the Prize Lists. As careful a system of selection is observed, as the circumstances of the case permit. Monitors are appointed by the Head Master, who immediately substitutes, if necessary, another boy better suited physically, or by natural disposition, to the science and art of teaching. After the experience of a year or more, the best of these monitors who is willing to be articled, is recommended for that purpose to the Government. Since the opening of Victoria College, considerable improvements have been made in the advantages enjoyed by the three Pupil Teachers and five Monitors. An English Master is appointed to supervise the four lowest classes of the College, which are under their charge, observing their method correcting

:

175

their errors in teaching and advising them in their many difficulties. In addition to this, they receive, once a week, in the afternoon from this master, instruction on the theory, history and principles of Education. This system appears to me quite adequate for the requirements of the College, and though at present capable of considerable improvement and extension, it will, I am confident, in a few years, bring great credit to the Institution. Apart from any other consideration, the efficacy of the system is demonstrated by the efficiency of the Chinese Assistants who were thus trained, several of whom hold Oxford or Cambridge Local Certificates. That Chinese Assistants should vary in natural aptitude for teaching, and in their ability to pronounce English purely, is not surprising, as the same variety is observable in the masters of schools in England. The Central School on more than one occasion provided teachers for Government and other schools in the Colony, and I have received from the Inspector of Schools and others letters bearing quite flattering testimony to the excellence of the manner in which those young men discharged their duties. If Victoria College does not continue to provide teachers for Government Schools, the low salary offered, and the isolation of village and suburban schools are, as far as I am aware, the only causes. It cannot be expected that a boy, who can earn $40 a month in the city of Victoria, will allow himself to be exiled to Shau-ki-wan or Stanley for $25 a month.

9. NORMAL SCHOOL. In 1879, the Government made the experiment of forming a Normal School in connexion with Wantsai Government School. It was closed in 1883 on my recommendation, as Acting Inspector of Schools, for the following reasons; (1) there was no probability of the Gov- ernment being able to redeem its promise of finding the pupils employment as teachers; (2) the number of pupils, reduced by sickness and desertion made the expense of the Institution dispropor- tionate; (3) an opportunity of joining the Medical College at Tientsin made the young men willing to terminate their agreements. Mr. MAY was very successful as Principal of the Normal School, and I have no doubt that, as Second Master of Victoria College, he will have equal success in training our Monitors and Pupil Teachers.

10. NON-CHINESE PUPIL TEACHERS.-As to the employment of English, Portuguese or Indian boys as Pupil Teachers, I have never observed in English or Portuguese boys the least sign of adaptability to the profession of teaching, and have only once found an Indian capable of holding the post, which he did to my entire satisfaction. Mr. ALARAKIA subsequently ranked as a Chinese Assistant, and had therefore to be competent to speak and write Chinese with ease.

2

11. DRILL.-Drill was introduced last September; but as only one Instructor was engaged for all the Schools in the Colony, only two and a half hours a week fell to the share of this College. The result was that the squads, often numbering 130 boys, were hopelessly unwieldy and it was impossible for the instructor to correct the individual error of so many boys. There is. a general belief in the benefits accruing from this form of exercise, and a scheme has been approved to provide a separate instructor to give 12 hours a week to our 900 boys, which will afford half an hour's drill weekly for squads averaging 36 in number.

12. STAFF. Mr. MAY was in charge of the College as Acting Head Master for ten months, until my return at the end of October. Mr. JAMESON returned from leave on May 8th, and Mr. DEALY left for Europe on twelve-months' leave from September 9th. Thus the staff was short of two English Masters at the same time for six months of the year. In addition to which the work of the College suffered through the illness of two English masters, one of whom was absent for over two months, the other for one month.

13. OXFORD LOCAL EXAMINATIONS.-Last July there were from this College, one Senior and thirteen Junior Candidates, the Senior Candidate passed, and three Juniors also received certificates. There would have been four more successes, but for failures in Shakespeare, which is naturally a stiff subject for Chinese boys, and is rendered doubly so by the short time (four months) available for its preparation.

14. CAREERS OF BOYS.-During the last twelve-months 96 boys from this College obtained situations; viz.: 4 in the Colonial Service; 9 in the Chinese Imperial Service, Customs and Telegraph; 40 in Mercantile and Professional Offices in Hongkong; and 43 at the Coast Ports, in Japan, and elsewhere.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

GEO. H. BATESON WRIGHT, D.D., Oxon, Head Master.

Honourable W. M. Goodman,

Acting Colonial Secretary.

176

1891.

VICTORIA COLLEGE.

Number

Month.

of Scholars.

Number of Attendances.

Number of School days.

Average Daily Attendance.

Remarks.

January,.

712

16,392

24

683.

February,

March, ......................... .......

919

17,308

20

865. 4

April,

932

14,543

17

855.47

May,

891

17,984

22

817.45

June,

862

18,113

23

787.08

July,

829

19,741

26

759.26

August,...

762

4,325

6

720.83

September,

832

12,656

17

744.47

October,

803

19,893

27

736.77

November,

776

17,701

25

708.04

December,

744

16,644

24

693. 5

Total,

175,300

231

Total Number of ATTENDANCES during 1891,................... Number of SCHOOL DAYS during 1891,.

Average DAILY ATTENDANCE during 1891,

Total Number of SCHOLARS at this School during 1891,

.175,300

231

759

1,108

GEO. H. BATESON WRIGHT, D.D. OXON, Head Master.

AVERAGE EXPENSE of each SCHOLAR at Victoria College during 1891.

Expenditure,

Deduct School Fees,..........

Amounts refunded,

Total Expense of the College,..........

Average Expenses of each Scholar per Number on Roll,

"

»

""

per Average Daily Attendance,

.$12,237.00

20.77

.$30,416.37

12,257.77

.$18,158.60

.$16.38

23.92

GEO. H. BATESON WRIGHT, D.D. Oxon,

Head Master.

*

365

No. 29

92

HONGKONG.

THE EDUCATIONAL REPORT FOR 1891.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency

the Governor, on the 16th November, 1892.

No. 50.

EDUCATION Department,

HONGKONG, 30th May, 1892.

SIR,-I have the honour to present to you the Annual Report on Education in Hongkong for the year 1891.

2. GENERAL EDUCATIONAL STATISTICS.-The total number of Educational Institutions known to have been at work in the Colony of Hongkong during the year 1891 amounts to 215 Schools with a grand total of 10,119 scholars under instruction during the year. This constitutes an increase of 475 scholars as compared with the preceding year. Among those 10,119 scholars, there were 8,103 scholars attending 119 Schools under the supervision of the Government and receiving State aid in some form or other, whilst 2,016 scholars attended 96 Private Schools independent of Government supervision or aid, excepting the fact that those few of them which are not kept for private emolument are by law exempt from payment of rates and taxes.

3. GENERAL STATISTICS OF SCHOOLS UNDER THE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT.-Apart from the Police School with 361 scholars of mature age and the West Point Reformatory attended by 70 young scholars, both of which Schools are exempt from the control of the Education Department, the total number of Schools subject to supervision and examination by the Education Department amounted in the year 1891 to 117 Schools, as compared with 72 Schools under the Education Department in the year 1881 and 26 Schools in the year 1871. The total number of scholars enrolled in those 117 Schools during the year 1891 amounted to 7,672 scholars, as compared with 4,372 scholars in the year 1881 and 1,292 scholars in the year 1871. There was thus, during the decade 1871 to 1881, an increase of 46 Schools with 3,080 scholars, and a similar increase of 45 Schools with 3,300 scholars during the decade from 1881 to 1891. The population of the Colony increased, from 121,985 people in 1871, to 160,402 in 1881 and to 224,814 in 1891, showing an increase of 38,427 souls in the first decade and nearly double of that in the second decade, viz., 64,412 souls. It is clear, therefore, that the ratio of increase in schools and scholars, during the last twenty years, has been lagging far behind that of the rapidly increasing population of the Colony.

4. PROGRESS DURING THE LAST THREE YEARS.-Comparing the statistics of individual years, I find that the number of schools and scholars under the supervision of the Education Department rose from 104 Schools with 7,107 scholars in the year 1889, to 112 Schools with 7,170 scholars in 1890, and to 117 Schools with 7,672 scholars in 1891. The annual increase of scholars amounted in the year 1888 to 284 scholars, in the year 1889 to 849 scholars, in 1890 to 63 scholars and in 1891 to 502 scholars. The annual rate of increase, unusually high in the year 1889 and exceptionally low in 1890, was therefore rather good in the year 1891.

5. COMPARATIVE STATISTICS OF GOVERNMENT SCHOOLS AND VOLUNTARY SCHOOLS.-Referring now to those 117 Schools, with 7,672 scholars, which were under the supervision of the Education Department in the year 1891, there were as many as 5,132 scholars attending 81 Voluntary Grant- in-Aid Schools where they received a Christian education, whilst 2,540 scholars attended 36 Depart- mental Government Schools receiving a secular education. The secular Government Schools are all free schools with the exception of two (Victoria College and Girls' Central School), the fees of which are, however, below the average of similar Voluntary Schools. The latter offer Chinese instruction free of charge but require for English instruction school fees ranging from one to three dollars a month for each scholar, with extra charges for certain special subjects. The secular Government Schools having all their expenses provided by Government are, as a rule, better housed and have better school materials and a larger and better paid staff than the religious Voluntary Schools. Nevertheless the latter are annually growing in public favour for the reason that the teachers of Voluntary Schools, whose salaries depend upon the efficiency and results of their teaching, are as a rule compelled by self-interest to be more painstaking in attending to the progress of each individual scholar.

The subjoined Table exhibits the comparative development of Voluntary and Government Schools since the starting of the Grant-in-Aid Scheme of 1873.

"

366

Year.

Comparative Statistics of Voluntary and Government Schools.

Religious

Voluntary Grant-in-Aid Schools.

Secular

Government Departmental Schools.

Schools.

Scholars.

Schools.

Scholars.

1873,

1874,

442

30

1838

9

632

30

1931

1875,

9

679

30

1927

1876,

11

751

30

2171

1877,

14

996

30

2148

1878,

17

1021

30

2101

1879,

19

1417

31

2043

1880,

27

1808

36

2078

1881,

37

2237

35

1986

1882,

41

3068

39

2114

1883,

48

3517

39

2080

1884,

55

3907

35

1978

1885,

55

4041

35

1803

1886,

56

3951

34

1893

1887,

61

4160

33

1814

1888,

63

4325

34

1933

1889,

69

4814

35

2293

1890,

76

4656

36

2514

1891,

81

5132

36

2540

6. SITUATION OF SCHOOLS.-The local distribution of the above mentioned 119 Public Schools under the supervision of the Government and the additional 96 Private Schools is on the whole satisfactory. Where the population is densest, the Schools are indeed too closely crowded together. In such cases, a combination of every cluster of small Schools into one large School would of course be preferable, both from an educational and from an economic point of view, but the high rate of house rent and the absence of suitably constructed houses make such a measure at present impracticable. But, though the central districts of the town have Public and Private Schools inconveniently packed together, the suburbs and the villages are comparatively speaking as well supplied with Schools. And yet, in all the purely elementary Schools in town, there is hardly a vacant seat to be found and the accommodation on the whole, though annually expanding in proportion to the growing demand for education, is below the actual requirements. Happily, the elastic character of our Grant-in-Aid System is such that wherever in the Colony there is a sufficiently strong demand for a new School, an attempt will with automatic certainty be made by the people to start a Grant-in-Aid School to meet that demand. Such Schools occasionally come to grief after a year or two and collapse again if the attendance is not sufficiently large to secure a substantial Grant. But the system is clearly capable of meeting every reasonable demand in any locality, as soon as the demand is strong enough. The only portions of the Colony where there is, owing to the absence of a sufficient demand, a topographical dearth of Schools, are the Praya from West Point to East Point, Aberdeen and the Peak District. In the two former cases the almost total absence of educational demands on the part of the boat population, the scarcity of family dwellings all along the whole line of the Praya and the unhealthiness of Aberdeen, are a sufficient explanation. In the case of the Peak District, the slight but growing demand for a Mixed School is at present too discordant, in social and religious respects, to encourage the starting of a Private or Grant-in-Aid School, and too feeble yet to demand a Departmental District School. But a School will be wanted on the Peak very soon and if the Government were to grant the use of a piece of ground and building to a Committee, the School could easily be worked so as to be self-supporting. But as to the boat population, something will have to be done as soon as possible to bring them into the education net. One point in connection with the topographical distribution of our 36 Departmental, 81 Grant-in-Aid and 96 Private Schools deserves to be pointed out and that is, that, although those 81 Grant-in-Aid Schools are denominational Schools, giving a distinctly religious education, they are so widely scattered and so freely interspersed with the other Schools, that any tax-payers, objecting to religious education, will find some other School within easy distance to send their children to.

7. EDUCATIONAL EXPENDITURE OF THE GOVERNMENT.-The sum total spent by the Government, in the year 1891, for educational purposes ($72,983) amounted, after deducting the school fees $12,624) repaid into the Treasury, to $60,359. This sum is equal to 3.26 per cent. of the total revenue of the Colony and constitutes an increase of $4,277 as compared with the expenditure of the preceding year. The principal items of the educational expenditure, incurred by the Government in the year 1891, are as follows:-Grants-in-Aid to Voluntary Schools $19,960, Victoria College $18,159, Departmental District Schools $8,271, Inspectorate of Schools $5,760, Government Central School for Girls $2,855, Government Scholarships $2,269, etc. The total number of scholars educated in the Colony at the expense or with the aid of the Government, in the year 1891, being 7,672, the education of each scholar cost the Government (after excluding cost of two Government Scholarships held in England) $7.49 per scholar. In the several educational institutions the cost to Government of the

;

367

education of each scholar enrolled in 1891 was as follows:--in the Government Central School for Girls (including rent of hired building) $29.13 per scholar, in the Victoria College (not including cost of building) $16.38 per scholar, in the Departmental District Schools (including rent of hired buildings) $6.19 per scholar, in the Grant-in-Aid Schools $3.83 per scholar. The latter Schools, however, or rather the Missionary Societies conducting them, spent from their own private resources, in the year 1891, the sum of $51,444.11 on the education of 5,132 scholars, or $10.02 per scholar, receiving from the Government as Grant-in-Aid for 1891 (after deducting the bonus paid to the teachers) the sum of $16,933.03 or one third of their actual expenses, (strictly speaking 32.97 per cent.). The Grant-in-Aid system, as compared with the system of promoting education by means of Departmental Government Schools, commends itself not only by its comparative cheapness, as the above figures show, but by its being more elastic, in adopting its work to the varying needs of the people, and more in touch with their demands. A Grant-in-Aid School, for instance, cannot force unserviceable subjects upon unwilling scholars as a Government School can do, nor can a Grant-in-Aid School refuse to turn itself into a distinctly Commercial School when public needs demand it. A Grant-in-Aid School takes up secondary education at the precise time, and to the exact extent, called for by the actual demand of the public, and I have no doubt whatever but that the Grant-in-Aid system of Hongkong is capable of supplying all the educational needs of the Colony in proportion as they arise or expand. In England there are no Departmental Schools, but all departmental educational efforts of the Government are confined to giving aid to existing voluntary national schools and to encouraging the starting of such voluntary secondary schools or classes as are needed for technical, industrial or artistic purposes. This is what I desire for Hongkong in the dim future. But this cannot possibly be done here for some years to come. For the present, I think, the Government must, whilst expanding by all available means the system of aiding voluntary efforts in education, continue all or most of its Departmental Schools, all of which are really elementary. But whilst the promotion of elementary education is continued by means of both Departmental and Voluntary Grant-in-Aid Schools, the promotion of secondary education must be encouraged exclusively by the cheaper Grant-in-Aid system and not by means of Departmental Schools. What I recommend therefore is in effect to assimilate the educational system of Hongkong, so far as principles are concerned, to that of England, by expanding the system of Government Grants-in-Aid in favour of all forms of education and confining accordingly Departmental Schools strictly to their present legitimate sphere of elementary education.

In my last Report I quoted the precedent set by the Indian Government, because, like the Government of Hongkong, it had of necessity at first to start Departmental Schools. Since 1883, however, the Indian Government now seeks to correct the anomaly of the Government's assuming the schoolmaster's rôle, and endeavours by gradual and cautious steps to assimilate the educational organization of India, so far as its root principle is concerned, with that of England, by stimulating private effort in every branch of education and confining the educational work of the Government (with the exception for the present of the sphere of elementary education for which Departmental Schools are still needed) to giving Grants-in-Aid and general supervision to effective schools of all grades that require it, whilst continuing Departmental Schools for secondary education only in places where voluntary effort will not or cannot supply what public interests require, or only until such Departmental Secondary Schools can safely be handed over to private efforts.

8. NATURE OF THE EDUCATION GIVEN IN THE SCHOOLS OF THE COLONY.-As regards the 117 Schools with 7,672 scholars under the supervision of the Education Department in the year 1891, 20 Schools gave to 2,873 scholars of English, Portuguese, Indian or Chinese extraction an English education (combined with classical Chinese teaching in the case of 9 of these Schools with 1,879 scholars, mostly Chinese); 4 Schools gave to 184 Portuguese children a European education in the Portuguese language; 3 Schools gave to 171 Chinese children a European education in the Chinese language; and 90 Schools gave to 4,444 Chinese children a classical Chinese education in the local Chinese vernaculars (Punti or Hakka). In other words, among 7,672 scholars under instruction in the year 1891 in Schools under the supervision of the Education Department, 12.94 per cent. received a purely English education, 24.49 per cent. received an English education combined with instruction in the Chinese classics, 2.39 per cent. received an elementary European education in the Portuguese and 2.22 per cent. in the Chinese language, and finally 57.91 per cent. received a purely Chinese education. As all these schools were either entirely supported by the Government or aided on the basis of payment for results ascertained by examination, it may be of interest to state the proportion of public funds devoted, in the year 1891, to the support of those several branches of education. For the promotion of purely English education the Government paid in the year 1891 the sum of $6,185; for the promotion of English education combined with Chinese instruction $25,504; for the promotion of European education in the Portuguese language $1,253; for the promotion of European education in the Chinese language $1,170; and for the promotion of Chinese education (in the Chinese language only) $17,750. The English education above referred to, though mainly elementary, trends, in the higher classes of seven local schools, upon the subjects of secondary education, as including not only Drawing, Music, Latin, Algebra, Euclid and Physical Geography, but also Book-keeping, Chemistry and Animal Physiology. Two local Schools (St. Joseph's College and Diocesan School) which, as stated in my last Report, lately turned into distinctly commercial schools, in response to local needs, have added to their programme, one the subject of short-hand and the other the working of a type-writer.

368

1

9.-FEMALE EDUCATION.-Though to a certain extent still in a backward state, female education is evidently making rapid strides in Hongkong to reach a normal condition. As to the proportion of boys and girls under instruction, one could not expect hitherto to see the two sexes equally represented in the Schools of a Colony like ours, where the mass of the population (the Chinese), whilst generally appreciating the value of a scholarly education in the case of their boys, are yet to a great extent sceptics as to the good that their daughters can get by attending school, or, looking upon girls generally as destined by nature to be merely domestic slaves or drudges, dread the enfranchising effects of female education. Nevertheless the unceasing efforts made by the Government, particularly through the Grant-in-Aid Scheme, to enlarge and improve from year to year the opportunities offered to the people to get a gratuitous education (including industrial needlework teaching) for their daughters, have had good effect with the Chinese who, with all their national prejudices against female education, are too shrewd to reject advantages offered free of expense. In 1851, when the Colony was ten years old and the population amounted to 32,983 people, there were 219 scholars under instruction in Public Schools, of whom 193 were boys and 26 girls. In 1861, when the population had risen to 119,321 people, the attendance of the Public Schools rose to 1,017 boys and 251 girls. In 1871, the population numbering 124,198 souls, there were, as proved by the Census of 5th May, 1871, as many as 2,230 boys and 476 girls under instruction. Two years afterwards (1873) the Grant-in-Aid Scheme came into operation, and from that time onward the proportion of girls to boys improved rapidly, with tolerably steady regularity, as will be seen from the subjoined Table shewing the proportion of boys and girls attending schools subject to the supervision of the Education Department from 1873 to 1891. It will be observed that in 1891 there were 2,791 girls under instruction in the schools referred to. Of these 2,791 girls, as many as 2,532 attended Grant-in-Aid Schools whilst only 259 attended Government Schools. As a matter of fact, the extension of female education in the Colony is almost entirely due to the Grant-in-Aid system and to the efforts of the local Missions, which are vigorously pushing on education both in town and the villages, and latterly striving also to bring the girls of the boat population, in Yaumati, Hunghom and Shaukiwan, under the influence of education. The only portion of the population whose girls were hitherto neglected by the Missions were the Eurasians, and to supplement this defect the Education Department has of late been making special efforts by means of the new Government Central School for Girls. Female education is, however, not merely expanding as regards the number of girls gathered into schools, but the quality of the instruction given in them is also improving from year to year, and in this respect, the stimulus applied by the Belilios Medal and Prize Fund deserves special mention.

PROPORTION of Boys and GIRLS under instruction in Schools subject to the supervision of the Education Department.

Percentage of Scholars being Girls.

Scholars under instruction.

Year.

Population.

Boys.

Girls.

Total of Scholars.

1873,

121,985

1,976

304

2,280

13.33

1874,

2,282

281

2,563

10.96

1875,

2,177

429

2,606

16.46

1876,

139,144

2,379

543

2,922

18.58

1877,

2,520

624

3,144

19.84

1878,

2,544

578

3,122

18.51

1879,

2,850

610

3,460

17.63

1880,

160,402

3,187

699

3,886

17.98

1881,

3,364

859

4,223

20.34

1882,

166,433

3,941

1,241

5,182

23.94

1883,

173,475

4,120

1,477

5,597

26.38

1884,

181,529

4,238

1,647

5,885

27.98

1885,

190,594

4,329

1,700

6,029

28.19

1886,

200,990

4,161

1,683

5,844

28.79

1887,

212,951

4,195

1,779

5,974

29.77

1888,

215,800

4,342

1,916

6,258

30.77

1889,

194,482

4,991

2,116

7,107

29.77

1890,

4,846

2,324

7,170

32.41

1891,

221,441

4,881

2,791

7,672

36.38

10. ATTENDANCE AND NUMBER OF UNEDUCATED CHILDREN.-For the first time in the history of the Colony, the Census of 1891 provided, at my suggestion, the means of ascertaining the exact number of children of local school-going age (6 to 16 years) in the Colony. The result is a saddening revelation. So far as the resident civil population is concerned, the result is indeed very near to what, by a rough estimate, I annually calculated it to be. In his Census Report of 15th August, 1891, (19) the Registrar General states that on 20th May, 1891, "there were in Hongkong, of persons of school-going age (6 to 16 years), 783 Europeans or Americans, 184 nationalities other than Europeans, Americans or Chinese, and 21,331 Chinese (children), making a total of 22,298 (children of school- going age)." Referring (in § 20) to a Return, taken on the Census day, of children actually found present in School, the Registrar General further remarks, "This return shows that on the 20th May as many as 8,085 children actually attended school, though it was a rainy day such as, I am informed, keeps about 10 per cent. of children from school. If this 10 per cent. be added, the number of children

}

369

attending school may be estimated at 8,893 which sum comes near the number actually enrolled in 1891, viz, 9,681. Deducting the number of children attending school, 8,893, from the number of persons of school-going age, viz., 22,298, there would be left 13,405 persons not accounted for. Of this number some are educated by private tutors, but it would be difficult to say how many, and the remainder must be presumed to be uneducated." These statistics, referring to the children of the resident civil population, deduced from the Census of 1891, are very much what I had expected, confirming my former annual calculations, viz., that in Hongkong, as in England, about one half of the children of school-going age actually come under instruction in public or private Schools. But a careful analysis of the Census tables revealed the fact that the above given number of 22,298 children of school-going age takes no account of the children of the local boat population, in whose case the returns furnished only the number of children under 17 years of age. As we may safely assume that the proportion of boat-people's children of 5 years and under, to those of 6 to 16 years, is about the same as in the case of the resident civil population, viz., 30.45 per cent., I find that there were, among the 10,927 boat-people's children under 17 years (6,196 boys and 4,731 girls) as many as 7,601 children (4,310 boys and 3,291 girls) of school-going age (6 to 16 years). Hence we have before us the startling fact that in 1891 there were in the Colony altogether 29,899 children who ought to have come under instruction, whilst the registers of all the Schools under the Education Department in the year 1891 and the returns of the Private Schools show an enrolment of no more than 9,758 children (leaving the Police School out of the calculation). In other words, the saddening fact stares us in the face, that in spite of the existence of 215 Schools in the Colony (as proved by the Census) which are with the exception of Victoria College mostly crowded, and in spite of every effort made by the Education Department, and the Registrar General who has always most cordially assisted (by means of his District Watchmen), to stimulate school attendance, there were in 1891 as many as 20,141 children of school-going age in the Colony who attend no school. Of a total of 15,748 boys of school-going age only 6,657, or 42.27 per cent., attended school, (viz., 4,951 in Schools under Government supervision and 1,706 in Private Schools). Of a total of 14,151 girls of school-going age, only 3,101, or 21.91 per cent., came under school-instruction (viz., 2,791 in schools under the Education Department and 310 in Private Schools). The case of the boys is not bad, certainly no worse than in Ireland, as nearly one half of the boys of school-going age do attend School. But the principal defaulters in the matter of school attendance are clearly the girls, and of this point the Government has been aware all along. Of the 7,601 children (6 to 16 years) of the boat population and of the purchased servant girls (of the same age), there are at present hardly 200 or 300 coming under instruction.

Things are however not half as bad as they look. It must be understood that although our local school-age is correctly fixed, not at 5 to 13 years as in England, but at 6 to 16 years, because the majority of children in this Colony do require, for a proper education, at least 4 years at Chinese and 6 years at English studies or 10 years at Chinese classical studies and the average age observed among scholars is actually 6 to 16 years, yet of the 20,141 children of 6 to 16 years of age not attending any school in 1891, a large number had been in Chinese Schools previously for 2 to 4 years and then went into business life without finishing their education. Consequently we may, I think, safely say that of the 20,141 children of local school-going age who, in 1891, attended no school at all, a large number, possibly one half, though they must technically be classed with the uneducated, have received some sort of education, such as their parents think sufficient, and are not absolutely illiterate.

Under these circuinstances I think that, though there is indeed a danger of illiteracy increasing in Hongkong at a greater ratio than the population, still the drastic European remedy of a compulsory attendance law with its frictional working-gear of School-Tax, School-Boards, Attendance Committees and Police Court prosecutions, is neither necessary nor practicable under local circumstances. I am satisfied that the Government will sufficiently discharge its duties by giving to our local school system, which has slowly but healthily developed in the shadow of the Colony's exuberant growth, as wide and as rapid expansion as financial means allow, with a view to provide, as soon as possible, additional school accommodation for about one half of our uneducated or imperfectly educated children. In other words, what we have to aim at is to bring at least half of the number of children of school-going age, say fifteen thousand scholars, under instruction in local schools. But as we have provided at present for hardly ten thousand of them, and as the number to be taken into consideration increases from year to year, a determined effort will have to be made immediately to further the expansion of elementary education in the most economic and efficient way possible. What I think has to be done therefore is, in the first instance, to retrench expenditure in all Departmental Schools, so far as it can be done without impairing their efficiency, and secondly to make every possible effort to encourage voluntary educational enterprise and to expand in every direction the Grant-in-Aid system rather than the more expensive Departmental Schools. But, further, special efforts will have to be made to bring into the education net the children of those classes of the population which habitually deny them the privileges of education. I venture therefore to urge, as in former Reports, the advisability of compelling by law the registration and education of all purchased servant girls in the Colony. I do not know, and have no means of ascertaining, how many children of school-going age are under the local system of domestic bond-servitude. But, at a rough guess, I think there may be two thousand of them or more. Again, I would recommend once more to prohibit by law the employment, at public labour, of children apparently under thirteen years of age. Next, I think, special efforts will have to be made to apply moral pressure to the boat population to arouse them to a sense of the educational needs of their

370

children. This can be done by the appointment of a Chinese Attendance Officer, as suggested in 1889 by the Right Honourable the Secretary of State for the Colonies, and by the supply of additional Schools at Taikoktsui, Yaumati, Aberdeen and Shaukiwan. But as the foregoing measures will put an additional strain on our annually increasing educational expenditure, I venture finally to subinit for the consideration of the Government, with particular reference to the need of School-houses and Building Grants, the question whether it may not be advisable to create, in some way, a special School Fund. I find it stated on good authority that the excellent provision which the United States, in the absence of the ancient educational endowments of Europe, have made for Schools of all grades is principally due to a law made in 1785, that “in all new States thereafter to be added to the seventeen then existing a special appropriation of one sixteenth of the public land should be reserved for the purpose of supplying a School Fund." It seems to me that some similar measure is needed in Hongkong to provide for the future. To conclude this list of the most pressing of our present educational needs, I beg to point out, with reference to 14 boys of school-going age found, on the last Census day, in prison, that the present impossibility of effectively segregating and educating juvenile offenders whilst in prison, and the absence of power to forcibly detain inmates of the only local Reformatory, constitutes not only a serious educational defect, but one that is likely to create habitual criminals. The principal statistics of children remaining uneducated will be found concisely summarized in Table XVI. appended to this Report.

11.-RESULTS OF THE ANNUAL EXAMINATIONS.-As far as the 81 Voluntary Grant-in-Aid Schools are concerned. the detailed results of the annual examination of these Schools will be found summarized in Table XIV. appended to this Report where the percentage of scholars, passed in each School in 1891, is stated and compared with the results of the preceding year, and in Table XV. which records the percentage of passes gained by these schools in each subject. As regards the Departmental Government Schools, the reports of the Headmaster of Victoria College and of the Headmistress of the Government Central School for Girls have been published in the local papers and in the Government Gazette. The Departmental District Schools will be found classified and arranged in the order of their efficiency, in Table X. appended to this Report, which Table embodies the results of the annual examination of these District Schools. I subjoin, however, a few critical observations as to those examinations the results of which have not yet been sufficiently brought forward.

12. VICTORIA COLLEGE.-With a staff consisting in the aggregate of a Headmaster and thirty- eight teachers, viz.: 8 English and 10 Chinese Masters with 8 salaried pupil-teachers and monitors all available for English work, and 4 other Chinese Masters for Chinese instruction as well as 8 further Chinese Masters assisting the corresponding number of English Masters and with an enrolment of 1,108 boys, Victoria College brought only 709 boys under examination, the average attendance throughout the year being 759 boys. The examinations were conducted, as in the preceding years, by the Head- master and myself conjointly. The Headmaster set the papers for the English examination and I revised and added to them. The examination of the Anglo-Chinese Division and of the pupil-teachers training- class, as also the English reading of the whole College, was taken by myself in the presence of the Headmaster. The subjects for English composition and the whole of the papers for the examination of the Chinese Classes, were set by myself. The written answers of the boys having been marked and adjudged by the Headmaster, he announced on prize-giving day the results of this joint examination, as they appeared to him, and embodied his own views (as to results obtained in the pupil-teachers' examination, and in the several classes of the Upper, Lower, and Preparatory Schools with special reference to Mathematics, English Dictation, Composition, Grammar and Shakespeare) in his report which was read on the same occasion and published in the local papers and in the Government Gazette. I confine my remarks therefore to those subjects which the Headmaster's report passes over in silence, though it gives me pleasure to be able to say that a perusal of the boys' papers has once more impressed me with the fact that the School does really excellent work, on the whole, in the subjects of Arithmetic, Algebra, Geometry, and Mensuration. But while the School is decidedly apt to produce specialists in mathematics, the teaching of the specifically English subjects appears to be proportionately less successful. There are, however, peculiarly unfavourable circumstances surrounding the English teaching of Victoria College. The majority of the boys as well as the Masters are Chinese who seldom speak or hear a word of English outside the School. The boys who, before entering the College, have passed through four or more years' study of books written in classical Chinese have, in Victoria College, English reading books put in their hands which in no way connect with the social, moral and national environment of a Chinese brain, home or school, but plunge these boys head over heels into a sphere, congenial indeed to the English-bred school-boy, but to these Chinese lads utterly bewildering, besides presupposing an amount of knowledge of idiomatic and technical English phrases which every English school-boy has at his fingers' ends when first entering school but which are Greek to these Chinese youths even when they have spent five or six years in Victoria College. Under these circumstances, when commencing the English reading examination of the College, I told the Headmaster that I would ignore mispronunciation of any words of foreign origin and pass anything below three gross failures of simple Saxon words contained in five lines from that portion of the reading book of each class which had been read and explained in the ordinary reading lessons within the previous few months. Applying such a low standard, I expected every boy of ever so mediocre attainments to pass easily. But I was sadly disappointed. I subjoin a Table of Results which speaks for itself. It appears to me to confirm what I have pointed out in former reports, viz., that English

371

ought to be taught by Englishmen and that many classes in Victoria College are too large for an effective lesson. It is also self-apparent from the subjoined Table that when English reading is taught all the way up from Class VIII, C to III, A, in 15 out of 21 classes, by Chinese teachers to whom English is an absolutely foreign and uncongenial tongue, the result must be disappointing. It is a maxim of the theory of education that the best teaching is required in the lowest classes of a school because there the foundation for all after-work is laid, and in its highest classes because there the scholar receives the finishing impressions with which he will go into the business of life. But all the best teaching power of Victoria College appears to be confined to the highest and smallest classes, some of which the vast majority of the scholars never enter, and where the teacher of English History, Shakespeare or Chemistry is perpetually compelled to stop and teach the A B C over again. On this point, I believe I am expressing what the English Masters of the College bitterly feel to a man. Giving an English Master a general superintendence of classes for each of which after all a Chinese Master is responsible, is no remedy for the evil I refer to.

VICTORIA COLLEGE.-RESULTS OF EXAMINATION IN ENGLISH READING, 1891.

Number of Scholars enrolled-1,108.

Number of Scholars presented—697.

No.

Class.

of Scholars.

Apparent

Number Average Age Examined.

Number

Failed.

Number Passed.

Percentage Passed.

Name of Teacher.

Years.

1 I. A

17

11

0

11

100.00

R. M. Jamieson, M.A.

2

I. B.,

17

13

13

100.00

E. J. Boards.

3

II. A.,

16

35

35

100.00

J. J. Booth.

4

II.

B.,

16

31

2

29

93.54

A. J. May.

5

III. A.,

16

38

0

38

100.00

G. A. Woodcock.

6

III. B.,

15

25

25

100.00

W. C. Barlow.

7

IV. A.,

.15

52

3

49

94.23

Luk King-fo.

8

IV.

B.,

15

29

1

28

96.55

Wan Chung-iu.

9

IV. C.,

15

32

1

31

96.87

Chü Tsun-tsing.

10

V. A.,

14

49

1

48

97.95

Cheung Ts'oi.

11

V. B.,

14

28

0

28

100.00

Lo Kit.

12

V.

14

29

1

28*

96.55

Chiu Chi-tsung.

13

VI. A.,

15

56

3

53

94.64

Ng In.

14

VI. B.,

14

31

7

24

77.41

Leung Lam-fan.

15

VI. C.,

15

27

2

25

92.59

Lo Cheung-shiu.

16

VII. A.,

14

32

6

26

81.25

Tsang Chung.

17

VII. B.,........

14

30

6

24

80.00

Wong Kok-ü.

18

VII. C.,.........

14

37

2

35

94.59

Sham Tsau-fat.

Wong Wai-ho.

19

VIII. A.,

13

30

0

30

100.00

Li Man-hing.

Wong Ming.

22 23

20

VIII. B.,

13

29

2

27

93.10

Wong Lung-kim.

21

VIII. C.,

12

53

1

52

98.11

Pun Yun-fong.

Leung Kwong-hin.

TOTALS,.........

14.65

697

38

659

94.16

6 English and

18 Chinese Teachers.

I have good reason to believe that the English teaching of Victoria College does not, of late, satisfy the Chinese community, for whose particular benefit this School exists. The Chinese, as a rule, do not openly or directly complain of official establishments, but they have an ugly way of expressing their discontent by anonymous libellous epigrams. I believe they have the impression that the teaching of the College is too bookish, too theoretical, not practical enough for the average business requirements of Hongkong. I think I can understand the sub-conscious ideas underlying these views. The Chinese know even better than we do that filling the scholar's head with undigested facts and hard scientific English terms, whilst giving him a mechanical smartness in performing certain mathematical operations, is not education. At the last examination of Victoria College I had a class of big Chinese boys before me who could readily work out stiff problems in Arithmetic in precise and neat English form. But when I had an easy sum like 64,501,007 written on the black board as a test of elementary notation and asked them merely to read or write it off in Chinese, they one and all could not do it. They could write stilted Chinese prose essays and turn rhymes according to the intricate rules of antique Chinese prosody. They could easily read or write off and work fractionally in

1

372

English form sums of any number of digits: but the rudimentary principles of English and Chinese arithmetical notation were lying, side by side, in their brain cells, mutually un-amalgamated, because individually unassimilated. What I thus noticed in the case of Arithmetic, Chinese parents no doubt constantly observe in other respects. Hence their discontent.

The peculiar educational problem which Victoria College is, by its very constitution, called upon to solve is not to teach in Hongkong English as it is taught in England, but neither is it to teach English and Chinese side by side (as some worthy people in Hongkong would have it), which practically means to teach as much high class English and mathematics, side by side with as much classical Chinese, as can be stuffed into a boy's brain without manifest over-pressure. The real problem which Victoria College, as an Anglo-Chinese School, has to solve is, how to give Chinese boys an elementary English education in all its branches, the sole object being to teach them English, but so as to help them step by step to transform all English knowledge newly imparted to them into their own Chinese flesh and blood by connecting the former with the inherited and acquired mental possessions of the latter. If I am right in this, then the educative methods and whole organization of the College require a radical reform.

And now that I have for the thirteenth time conducted the annual examination and reported upon this College, I respectfully but urgently solicit Her Majesty's Government to relieve me in future from active connection with this sort of joint examination. For the last fourteen years, the unnatural but assumedly unavoidable combination of the Inspector of School's general test examination (in the interest of the public) and the Headmaster's individual result examination (for the purpose of promotion and prizes in the interest of the scholars) has produced an annually increasing train of perplex harassments crowding in upon me at the very time when the examinations of over six thousand children outside Victoria College tax body and mind most heavily. I have no desire to shirk work or duty. I am prepared at any time to examine and report upon Victoria College, as in the case of any other School included in the Education Department of which I was appointed Head in March, 1878, but I earnestly beg to be relieved from the difficulties inherent in this present anomaly of combining an examination for prize and promotion purposes which properly belongs to the Headmaster alone, with the general test examination of a public educational institution which is the natural duty of the Head of the Education Department whoever he be. The former examination must necessarily be held at the close of the school year, and if the latter were to be undertaken at some other time, say in the middle of the year, neither would then clash with the other as at present.

I subjoin the usual statistics forwarded to me by the Headmaster, representing the detailed results of the joint examination as adjudged by him.

I. VICTORIA COLLEGE.-NUMBER OF BOYS PASSED IN EACH SUBJECT, 1891.

CLASS.

623

4

Co oo

hand ✪

Total Number Examined.

Total Number Passed.

Reading.

Arithmetic.

Dictation.

English to Chinese.

Chinese to English.

Grammar.

Geography.

Map Drawing.

Composition.

Euclid.

Algebra.

History.

Latin.

General Intelligence.

Theory of Education.

Book-keeping.

Shakespeare.

P. T. S., I.A.,

6

6 6

5

5

6

4

to

6

12

12 12 12

9

10 10

12

12

11

12 12

11

13

I.B.,

10 13 8

11

12

9 8 10

11 7 7 10

10 10

10

10

12

6

1 6

II.A.,

35 35 35 34

31

32

31 27 29

32

31 28 29 29

13

II.B.,

III.A.,

37 32 37

27

16

III.B.,

25 23 25

IV.A.,

51 49 48

IV.B.,

21 43 34 30 25 29 21 21 19

24 26 23 19 32 28 20 17 11 20 23 17 21

26

34 35 21 25 13 19 7 31 35 31 28 26

29 34 10

26

21

24

IV.C.,

32 29 31 31

45 40 38 44 51

21 23 22 20 30 30 26 23 28 24 18

40

283

23 24 18 23

V.A.,

50 41 49

36

33 44 45

32 30 22 24

V.B.,

29 18 29

17

14 18 18

14 14 17

17 20

21 21 14

V.C.,

51 52 48

53 50

24 31 27 24 27 13

21

23

23

16

VI.A., VI.B., VI.C.,

VII.A.,..

VII.B.,.

VII.C.,

VIII.A.,

VIII.B.,

VIII.C.,

Total,.........

Examined in each Subject,

31 21 30 17 19 58 53 55 42 42 31 26 24 20 24 28 24 26 17 22 32 30 26 28 23 21 29 28 31 31 25 31 31 20 31 31 37 37 35 37 36 23 37 37 29 29 29 29 27 24 26

3223

28

28 26 28 28 22 26

50

Writ-

ing.

29

28 52

53 53 52 52 52 49

:

...

640 665 584 530 | 577 598|427 | 370 243|274|132|134 113 112 39 58 18

709 703 709 | 709 709 709 | 599 | 499 | 340|382 | 153 | 153 | 159 |146* 97 91 25

* Including 5 from Class LA, Special,

6

6

Co

...

:

CO

6

1,

2,

3,

4,

5,

6,

7.

8,

CLASS.

II.-VICTORIA COLLEGE-PERCENTAGE OF PASSES IN EACH SUBJECT, 1891.

Total Number

Examined.

Total per Cent. Passed,

Reading.

Arithmetic.

Dictation.

English into Chinese.

Chinese into

English.

Grammar.

Geography.

Map Drawing.

Composition.

Euclid.

Algebra.

History.

Latin.

General Intel-

ligence.

Book-keeping.

Shakespeare.

Theory of Edu-

cation.

P.T.S.,

6

100.00

I.A.,

12

I.B.,

13

II.A.,

35

II.B.,

31

III.A., 37

III.B., 25 IV.A.,

51 IV.B.,

30

IV.C.,

32

V.A.,

50

V.B.,

29

V.C.,

31

VI.A.,

58

VI.B.,

31

VI.C.,

28

VII.A., 32

[100.00

[100.00]

66.66] 91.66 100.00 100.00) 91,66100.00 83.33 | 83.33 100.00 84.61 53.84 53.84 76.92 38.46 46.15 7.69 46.15) 91.42 97.14,100.00 82.85 97.14 28.5774.28. 83.87 67.74 80.64 41.93 61.29 22.58 | 67.74 83.78 94.57 83.78 75.67 70.28 96.00 92.00, 96.00 72,00| 92.00)

66.66 50.00 100.00 100.00 83.33 83.33 100.00 100.00 100.00 75.00 83.33 83.33 100.00 100.00 76.92 100.00 | 61.53 84.61 92.30❘ 69.23 | 61.53 76.92 100.00 100.00) 97.14 88.57 91.42 88.87 77.14 82.85 90.38 93.54 | 93.54 41.93 77.47 83.87 74.19 61.29

54.05 86.48 100.00 72.97 | 43.25 86.49 75.67

45.94 92.00 100.00 | 84.00 44.00 | 80.00| 92.00 68.00| 84.00 96.07 94.40 84.31 66.66 | 88.23| 78.43| 74.51 86,27 (100,00| 78.43 83.33 96.66| 70.00| 70.00|63.33 23.33 70.00| 76.66|73.33) 66.66| 90.62 96.87 96.87 93.75 | 93.75 | 81.25| 71.87| 87.50|75.00) 56.25 82.00 98.00 72.00 66.00 | 88.00| 90.00 64.00 60.00 44.00 48.00) 62.05 100.00 58 50 48.25| 62.05| 62.05 | 27.58 48.25 | 48.25 58.50| 67.74 96.77 54.83 61.28 54.83 64.51| 29.03| 67.74 | 67,74 45.16 91.37 94.82 72.40 72.40 87.92 89.65 82.75 91.37 86.20 83.87 77.42 | 64,51 77.42 77.42 100.00 87.09 | 67 74|74.19 85.71 92.85 | 60.71 78.5685.71| 96.42| 46.42| 82.14|57,14 93.75 81.25 87.50| 71.8765.62 90.62 87.50 VII.B., 31 |100.00 | 80.64 |100.00 100.00 | 96.77 100.00 100.00 100.00 94.59 (100.00 | 97.29 62.16 100.00 100.00

Writing [100.00 100 00 98.11

|100.00 | 16.6666

8.3333

7.6923

2.8571

3.2258

2.7027

4.0000

1.9607

3.3333

SPECIAL SUBJECTS. CLASS LA.

3.1250

2.0000

Chemistry, 6 examined; 83.33 passed. Mensuration, 5

3.4482

*

; 40.00

"

3.2258

1.7241

3.2258

3.5714

3.1250

3.2258

2.7027

3.4482

3.5714

1.8867

VII.C.,

37

VIII.A...

VIII.B.,. VIII.C.,.

29 28 53

(100.00 100.00 (10.).00| 93.10 100.00 92.85 (100.00 100.00

82.75 89.65

78.56 | 92,85

100.00 98.11| 98.11| 98.11

92.45 94.33

709

90.26 94.59 82.37| 74.75 81.38 84.34 71.28 74.74 | 71.47 71.72 86.27 87.58 71.07 76.71 40.20 | 63.73 72.00|100.00

III.-VICTORIA COLLEGE.-CHINESE EXAMINATION, 1891.

CHINESE SCHOOL.

Percentage Table of Passes.

Class.

Total No. Examined.

Essay.

Letter.

Prosody.

Tuitui.

Total Percentage Passed.

8 8 8 8 9 9 8 8

50

62

57

57

56

57

62

53

≈ 8 8 8 8 8 8 8

93

92

80

42

72

89

92

90

90

91

82

:

:

:

:

82

91

87

84

87

82

75

76

89

~ ~ ~ 88 + 08 88 8

92

92

77

88

90

90

88

88

89

84

81

85

IV.-VICTORIA COLLEGE.-ANGLO-CHINESE EXAMINATION, 1891.

Anglo-Chinese Class.

Total

Division.

Total No. Examined.

Copy Writing.

Reading. Dictation. Characters. Translation. Percentage

Passed.

I...........

9

78

81

11

II.,

III.,

12

26

82

+

64

91

50

10

70

80

7 88 8

33

33

78

55

64

45

64

50

67

83

:

80

90

90

IV.,

373

374

13. GOVERNMENT CENTRAL SCHOOL FOR GIRLS.-In spite of the repeated changes that took place in the staff of this School which has had within less than two years of its existence, three successive Headmistresses, and notwithstanding the smallness of the hired School-house and the insuitability of its location, the Girls' Central School has justified its establishment. There can be no doubt now but that the School has supplied a felt, though unexpressed, educational want of Eurasians in the first and of Chinese and Europeans in the second instance. The annual examination showed satisfactory results, such as testified to the efficiency of the teaching given in the School's Upper and Lower Divisions, there being clear evidence of steady progress in the English as well as in the Chinese classes, with the exception of the Arithmetic of the Lower Division. The want of proper accommodation and the absence of a playground are sadly restraining the expansion and proper management of the School, the whole of which is now crowded, while the Lower Division urgently needs subdivision by the formation of an infant class for children under six years. The interest which Lady ROBINSON has taken in this School and the liberal offer of the Honourable E. R. BELILIOS to provide a school-house, promise a bright future for a School which is just emerging from the chrysalis state of a mere experiment but sadly needs wings and free room to expand and prosper in the sunshine of public favour. We have nothing as yet in Hongkong of the so-called "new education" with its kindergartens, form study, hand-and-eye training, manual, industrial, technical and cookery instruction. Nor have we any pressing need for any of these subjects with the exception of the first, the kindergarten. One of the best modern authorities on education, Dr. HARRIS, United States' Commissioner of Education, has stated it as his conviction, that "without a compulsory law, the period of school influence could only be extended by drawing children into school earlier. That being so, I see under our present local circumstances additional reasons for satisfying the urgent need for an infant division to be added to the Girls' Central School by the establishment of a normal kindergarten than which there is no better means in existence, nor any better adopted for the peculiarities of Hongkong, in order to draw children into school earlier. But FROEBEL'S system of educating the natural activities of child-nature, on the basis of the analogy existing between the development of humanity and that of the individual, is a thing complete in itself and cannot be applied to Hongkong in a half-hearted or partial manner. It must be taken as a whole or left alone. But I trust the Government will courageously take the lead in this respect and introduce, when the time for it is ripe, a genuine kindergarten normal school in Hongkong as a guide for the development of private effort in this direction. I have urged this measure for years upon private educationists, but none have taken it up yet.

14. DEPARTMENTAL DISTRICT SCHOOLS.-Among the 34 Departmental District Schools (outside Victoria College and Girls' Central School), there were in the year 1891 six Anglo-Chinese Schools (at Saiyingpun, Wantsai, Wongnaichung, Stanley, Yaumati and Shaukiwan) with a total of 525 scholars, as compared with 510 scholars in 1890, shewing hardly any increase, as the respective School- houses do not admit of any more boys being squeezed in, except perhaps at Wantsai. The Saiyingpun Anglo-Chinese School was moved in the course of the year into the first of those new District School- houses the building of which was resolved upon twelve years ago. Every available seat in the English class rooms of the new building was filled on the day of opening. The demand for additional opportunities for English teaching at Wantsai was so great that it became necessary there also, as at Saiyingpun, to make no more provision for teachers' quarters in these school-houses but to utilize any available space for class rooms. At Shaukiwan, however, the school-house, which had accommodation for 75 scholars, had for several years past a rapidly decreasing attendance, the house being believed by the people to be haunted by evil spirits that caused wasting disease, and by a Sanitary Committee condemned as unhealthy, which is really only another way of expressing the truth underlying that vulgar superstition. The functions of that School, which was closed in September, were virtually taken over by the London Mission, under the Rev. Dr. CHALMERS. The continued unhealthiness of the Stanley Departmental School which has for years past been sadly interfering with the health and lives of the successive alien teachers, without affecting the attendance or health of the indigenous scholars, attracted the attention of the Government and led to the resolution to erect as soon as possible a school-house there in a suitable locality, but whether this will improve the sanitary conditions of the School remains to be seen. The English teaching of these Schools is, on the whole, of a mediocre character and illustrates that sad defect of local education, the absence of a training institution. The remaining 28 Departmental Schools, with 809 scholars receiving a purely Chinese, but classical, education do not call for any remark.

15. GRANT-IN-AID SCHOOLS.-Ten new Grant-in-Aid Schools were started in the year 1891, viz., 1 by the American Board Mission under the Rev. J. R. TAYLOR, 5 by the London Mission under the Rev. Dr. CHALMERS and 3 by the Roman Catholic Mission, under the Lady Superioress of the Italian Convent, and 1 other School (the High School, under Bishop RAIMONDI) took the place of the defunct Hongkong Public School by a mere change of location and management. Three of those new London Mission Schools (at Taikoktsui, Shaukiwan and Praya Central) and those three Schools of the Sisters of the Italian Convent (at Yaumati, Hunghom and Shaukiwan) were principally intended to bring the school-shy children of the boat population under instruction. But the efforts thus energetically made have not as yet met with much success, except perhaps at Shaukiwan where the Italian Sisters and Miss JOHNSTONE of the Female Education Society are beginning to get some educational influence among the girls of the boat population. The London Mission, under the direction

.

375

of the Rev. Dr. CHALMERS, has of late years been taking an increasingly prominent position in the educational movement of the Colony, there being at the present day as many as 32 Schools under the charge of Dr. CHALMERS, assisted by a Lady manager Miss DAVIES, 18 of those Schools being Girls Schools. In all the Grant-in-Aid Schools the tendency, remarked upon in former Reports, to develop the standard of instruction in the direction of secondary education has steadily continued. The cry for a seventh standard accordingly becomes louder every year. It was my intention to make a recommendation to the Government in the course of the year to extend the scope of the Grant-in-Aid Scheme by adding a seventh standard in the case of Schools of Classes III. and IV. (giving a European education) and revising the value of passes, besides adding a seventh standard, in the case of Schools in Class I. (giving a Chinese education). But the measure involves as much financial as educational considerations, and under present circumstances, when the expansion of the elementary basis of our educational structure makes such pressing claims upon the financial resources of the Government, I deem it more urgent to continue enlarging our foundations than to build at the top, lest we be providing for the educational needs of the few to the neglect of the crying necessities of the many. The measure will have to be postponed therefore for a short time, but it will receive due attention as soon as there is a prospect of the necessary financial means being forthcoming.

The annual examinations proved satisfactorily that our Chinese as well as our English Schools are making steady progress in improving from year to year their methods and organization. The steady increase of special subjects is also a feature indicating the general vigour pervading the English teaching Schools. Special mention must be made of the Victoria English Schools as a whole and particularly of the Girls Division which has of late been taking a foremost place, so far as examination results and general thoroughness of its work is concerned, among the Girls Schools of the Colony. St. Joseph's College and the Diocesan School also continue to distinguish themselves by the alacrity and success with which they have responded to the call of the Colony for a distinctly commercial education, and by the great attention they bestow on the subjects trenching upon a secondary education in their special classes of scholars who have passed beyond the sixth standard of the Grant-in-Aid Scheme. I would specially recommend to those two Schools as well as to the Victoria English Schools, High School and St. Paul's College School to aim at the introduction of evening continuation classes for the particular benefit of former scholars who have left school but feel the need of further instruction in the rudiments of secondary, technical or scientific instruction. The Italian Convent, finally, deserves special commendation for the praiseworthy efforts made by the Sisters to develop the taste for drawing, painting and music among the boys and girls of the Colony by scientifically graded instruction in these subjects.

16. OXFORD LOCAL EXAMINATIONS.-The results of the Oxford Local Examination, held in Hongkong in July, 1891, were as follow:-I. Junior Division.-Honours List, none. Pass List:- Diocesan School, 3 passes; St. Joseph's College, 2 passes; Victoria College, 1 pass. Candidates who, having exceeded the age of 16 years, satisfied the Examiners :-Diocesan School, 3 passes; Victoria College, 2 passes; St. Joseph's College, 1 pass. Successful candidates who obtained distinction:- Diocesan School, 2 in religious knowledge. Details of examination results of Junior Division:- presented, 36; examined, 31; passed in preliminary subjects, 23; passed in religious knowledge, fully 6, partly 2; passed in English, fully (not including Shakespeare) 9, partly 6; passed in English, including Shakespeare, 13; passed in mathematics, 21; passed in drawing, 3. Total of certificates issued, 6. Total of pass certificates issued to candidates who had exceeded the limit of age, 6. II. Senior Division.-Honours List, none. Pass List:-St. Joseph's College, 3 passes; Diocesan School, 2 passes; Victoria College, 1 pass. Successful candidates who obtained distinction :-Diocesan School, 1 in English. Details of examination results of Senior Division :-presented 6; examined, 6; passed in preliminary subjects, 6; passed in religious knowledge, 2; passed in English, 6; passed in French, 1 ; passed in mathematics, 6; passed in drawing, 3. Total of certificates issued, 6. The foregoing results may be summarized thus:-Diocesan School, 8 passes and 3 distinctions; St. Joseph's College, 6 passes; Victoria College, 4 passes.

17. BELILIOS MEDAL AND PRIZE EXAMINATIONS.-The usual competitive examinations for Belilios Medals and Prizes were held at the City Hall on 22nd and 23rd December, 1891. Twenty- nine scholars of seven different local Schools took part in the competition. In the Boys Division (Composition on a subject of commercial Geography, Algebra, Mensuration and Book-keeping) St. Joseph's College gained the 1st, 3rd and 4th prizes, and the Diocesan School the 2nd and 5th prizes. In the Girls English Division (Composition, History and Physical Geography) the Victoria English School took the 1st, 2nd and 3rd prizes. In the Girls Chinese Division (Composition, Translation and Arithmetic) the Victoria Home and Orphanage School took the 1st and 4th prizes and the Basel Mission School the 2nd and 3rd prizes.

18. PHYSICAL TRAINING.-Physical drill, in accordance with the system adopted in all British Army Schools, was introduced in Hongkong in spring, 1891. The Government provided the salary of a Drill Instructor whose services were placed at the disposal of every School in the Colony. Ten Public Schools and 1 Private School (3 of the number being Girls Schools) availed themselves of the offer, and physical drill quickly became a very popular institution among Chinese as well as European scholars, and at two public prize-givings (Diocesan School and Victoria English Schools) highly

376

successful exhibitions were held, testifying of the progress made in this branch of instruction. The proposal to establish a Swimming Bath for the use of local Schools has fallen through for want of a suitable locality. A public playground has been provided, at West Point.

19. INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION.-There is no Industrial School in the Colony with the exception of the West Point Reformatory which gives to its voluntary inmates instruction in shoe-making, tailoring, book-binding and gardening. But the needlework instruction, which is an important feature in every local Girls School, has in all the Chinese Schools a distinctly industrial aspect. Thousands of girls and women among the Chinese support themselves or contribute to the support of their families by doing shoe-binding and particularly embroidery work for shops in Hongkong and Canton. In the Departmental Girls Schools and in most of the Grant-in-Aid Schools the needlework instruction is, at the desire of the parents, conducted with special regard to the industrial value of Chinese female needlework in Hongkong.

20. MEDICAL EDUCATION.-The local College of Medicine for Chinese is vigorously continuing its philanthropic work in giving several classes of Chinese students a thoroughly scientific medical and surgical education. The College is, however, in great need of a suitable building, which is likely to be provided by the munificence of the Honourable E. R. BELILIOS.

21. SCHOLARSHIPS.-The Victoria College enjoyed in 1891 the benefit of the Morrison Scholarship, the Stewart Scholarship and four Belilios Scholarships, each of the value of sixty dollars a year. St. Joseph's College had the benefit of two Belilios Scholarships of the same value. The Medical College was aided by a Government Scholarship, the Watson Scholarship and two Belilios Scholarships.

22. I enclose the usual Tables (I. to XVI.), containing the Educational Statistics for the year 1891 which, to some extent, have been analysed in the foregoing paragraphs.

;

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

The Honourable G. T. M. O'BRIEN, C.M.G.,

&c.,

Colonial Secretary,

&c.,

&c.

E. J. EITEL, M.A., PH. D. (TUBING.)

Inspector of Schools and Head of the

Education Department.

I

No.

TABLE I.—NUMBER of SCHOLARS attending Schools subject to Government Supervision during 1891.

1 2 3 4

5

6

Name of School.

American Board Mission, Bridges Street (Boys),.

"J

"

J

""

""

""

>>

19

Station Terrace, (Boys),

Hinglung Lane (Boys),

Queen's Road West (Boys), Háwán (Girls),

Graham Street (Girls),

377

Native

Victoria College.

School

Grant-in-Aid School.

Total.

(Govt.)

86

86

60

60

81

81

52

52

30

30

33

33

73

73

..

80

.80

35

35

29

29

25

25

27

27

98

98

130

130

99

99

54

54

65

65

49

49

65

65

40

40

25

25

34

34

64

64

161

161

148

148

34

34

43

43

47

47

43.

43

49

49

21

21

42

42

31

31

19

19

13

13

22

22

19

19

16

16

136

136

112

112

58

58

46

46

105

105

76

76

60

60

74

74

25

25

95

95

47

47

53

53

70

70

61

61

43

43

38

38

38

38

90

90

36

36

·

37

37

126

126

71

71

98

98

46

46

46

46

23

21

222272

23

21

22

72

7

12

12

C. M. S., St. Stephen's Chinese School (Boys),

Lyndhurst Terrace (Boys),..

Pottinger Street (Boys),.

Saiyingpun (Boys),

St. Stephen's Baxter Memorial (Girls),

Lyndhurst Terrace (Girls),

Yaumati (Mixed),

8

9

7 Aplichau (Boys),

Basel Mission High Street (Girls),

""

Shamshuipó (Boys),

10

"

Shankiwan (Boys),

11

Tókwawán,

59

12

Berlin Mission (Girls),

13

Central School (Girls),

14

15

16

""

17

"

18

""

19

20

"

Third Street (Girls),

21

22

23

24

27

25

26

27

""

28

""

29

وو

30

""

31

39

32

""

33

39

34

""

35

Hoktsui (Boys),

36

Hokun (Boys),..

Hunghom (Girls),

Victoria Home and Orphanage (Girls),..

St. Stephen's Anglo-Chinese School (Boys),

Diocesan Home and Orphanage (Mixed),

F. E. S., Bonham Road Chinese Division (Girls),

High Street (Girls),.

Queen's Road West (Girls),

Hollywood Road (Girls),

Pottinger Street (Girls),

Stanley School (Girls),.

Shaukiwan (Girls),

Tókwawán (Girls),

Bonham Road English Division (Girls),

37 Hunghóm (Boys),

38

Little Hongkong (Boys),.

39 L. M. S., Square Street (Boys),

Wantsai Chapel (Boys),.

Shektongtsui (Boys),

Saiyingpun Division I (Boys),

Hunghóm (Boys),

II (Boys),

Hospital Chapel (Boys),

Shekt'ongtsui (Girls),

Saiyingpun (Girls),

Uihing Lane (Girls),

Feltcher Street (Girls),

Tanglungchau (Boys), Shaukiwan (Boys), · Taikoksui (Boys), Square Street (Girls), Li Yuen Street (Girls),

40

""

41

""

Yaumati (Boys),

42

23

43

35

44

""

45

46

""

47

""

48

3"

49

""

50

""

51

""

52

"

53

""

54

19

55

""

56

""

57

""

Ship Street (Girls), .

58

19

Tanglungchau (Girls),

59

وو

Taipingshan Chapel (Girls),

60

""

Aberdeen Street (Girls),

61

Wantsai (Girls),

62

63

ر,

Staunton Street (Girls),..

Saiyingpun Second Street East (Girls),

64 Malauchung (Boys),

Matauts'ün (Boys),

65

66 Mongkok (Boys),...

67

New Girls School No. 2,

...

Kau-ü-fong (Girls),

...

New Village (Little Hongkong) (Boys),...

69 Pokfulám (Boys),.

Carried forward,,

4

:

398

3,488

3,886

378%

TABLE I.-NUMBER of SCHOLARS attending Schools subject to Government Supervision during 1891,—Continued.

Native

No.

Name of School.

Victoria College.

School

Grant-in-Aid School.

Total.

(Govt.)

Brought forward,

398

3,488

3,886

71

""

72

99

73

""

74

>>

"

75

""

Yaumati (Girls),

76

""

Shaukiwan (Girls),

77

*

Hunghóm (Girls),

78.

""

79

""

""

80

"

81

""

82

""

""

70 R. C. M., Cathedral School (Boys),

Bridges Street Chinese School (Girls), Hollywood Road Charitable School (Girls), Holy Infancy School Division I (Boys),

60

60

73

73

70

ΤΟ

21

21

دو

II (Girls),

39

39

46

46

80

80

48

48

83

84

>>

وو

85

!

"2

86

""

87

"

88

99

English

89

""

29

(Boys),. (Girls),

St. Joseph's College, Chinese Division (Boys),

High School (Boys),

Italian Convent, English Division (Girls),

Portuguese Division (Girls),.. Bridges Street, English Division (Girls),..

Portuguese Division (Girls),

St. Francis Portuguese Division (Girls),

English Division (Girls), Victoria Portuguese School (Mixed),

"

44

44

Enropean

""

(Boys),

205

205

40

40

212

212

25

25

60

60

80

80

39

39

19

19

40

40

132

132

51

51

91

Saiyingpun (Punti) (Boys),

92

93 Shaiwan,

94

95

(Chinese) (Boys),

112

113

"

29

114 Wongkoktsui (Boys),

115

Wongmakok (Boys),

90 Saiyingpun English (Boys),

(Hakka) (Boys),

Shaukiwan (Anglo-Chinese) (Boys), Sheko (Boys),

96 Sheungwan (Boys),

97

98

Sheungwan (Girls),.

St. Paul's College School (Boys),

99 Stanley (Anglo-Chinese) (Boys),

100 101

102

Taihang (Boys),

Taitamtuk (Boys),

Taiwongkung (Boys),

103 Tanglungchau (Hakka) (Boys,)

104

"

105 Tókwawan (Eastern Village) (Boys),

106

107

108

99.

Tsattszemui (Boys),..

Victoria College (Boys),.

109 Wantsai (English) (Boys),

110

29

111 Wesleyan Mission, Spring Gardens (Boys),

Wellington Street (Boys),

116 Wongnaichung (Anglo-Chinese), (Boys), 117 Yaumati (Anglo-Chinese) (Boys), ́

146

146

72

54

54

12

12

33

33

26

26

53

53

89

89

55

55

56

56

24

24

13

13

49

49

42

42

(Punti) (Boys),

(Western Village) (Boys),

26

26

48

48

22

22

22

22

1,108

1,108

176

176

145

34

34

120

120.

(Girls),

51

51

19

19

10

10

70

70

..

44

44

Total,.

1,108

1,432

*5,132

7,672

>

TABLE II-PROPORTION of SCHOLARS to POPULATION in the CITY of VICTORIA and in the VILLAGES in 1891.

CITY AND HARBOUR OF VICTORIA. Population as per Census of 1891.........136,901

CHILDREN IN SCHOOLS UNDER GOVERNMENT SUPERVISION,

IN THE CITY OF VICTORIA.

1. American Board Mission, Bridges Street (Boys),

VILLAGES.

379

Population, including Boat Population, as per Census of 1891...64,525

CHILDREN IN SCHOOLS UNDER GOVERNMENT SUPERVISION,

IN VILLAGES.

....

No. of Scholars.

86

No. of Scholars.

1. Aplichau,

73

2.

"}

3.

4.

5.

6.

"

Station Terrace (Boys), Hinglung Lane (Boys),

60

81

3.

""

Queen's Road West (Boys),

52

4.

"

**

Hawán (Girls),

30

Graham Street (Girls),

33

7. Basel Mission, High Street (Girls),

8. Berlin Mission, (Girls),

9. Central School, (Girls),

10. C. M. S., St. Stephen's Chinese School (Boys),

80

27

8.

,,

2. Basel Mission, Shamshuipò (Boys),

5. C. M. S., Yaumati (Mixed),..

6.

Hunghom (Boys).......

7. F. E. S., Stanley School (Girls),

Shaukiwán (Girls),

25

Shaukiwán (Boys),.. T'òkwáwán (Boys),

29

25

25

34

21

42

98

9.

T'òkwáwán (Girls),

31

130

10. Koktsui,

13

11.

??

Lyndhurst Terrace (Boys),..

99

11. Hokün,

22

12.

""

Pottinger Street (Boys),

54

12. Hunghom,

19

13.

19

Saiyingp'un (Boys),

65

13. Little Hongkong,

16

14. 15.

11

St. Stephen's Baxter Memorial (Girls),

49

99

Lyndhurst Terrace (Girls),..

65

15.

16.

19

Third Street (Girls),

40

16.

99

17.

1

"

21.

22.

""

23.

"

21.

""

25.

""

18.

Victoria Home and Orphanage (Girls),

St. Stephen's Anglo-Chinese School (Boys),

19. Diocesan Home and Orphanage (Mixed),

20. F. E. S., Bonham Road, Chinese Division (Girls),

High Street (Girls),........

Queen's Road (Girls),

Hollywood Road (Girls),

64

17.

161

18.

148

19.

34

20.

14. L. M. S., Yaumati (Boys),

Shektongtsui (Boys), (Girls),

Hunghom (Boys),.... Tanglungchau (Boys),.

(Girls),

"

Shaukiwán (Boys),

58

46

25

"

60

70

37

61

43

21.

Taikoktsui (Boys),

43

47

22. Natauchung,

23

43

23. Matautsün,

21

Pottinger Street (Girls),...

49

24. Mongkok,

22

Bonham Road, English Division (Girls),

19

27.

21

""

28.

"

29.

30.

31.

"

32.

33.

""

34.

35.

"?

36.

26. L. M. S., Square Street (Boys), !..

Wantsai Chapel (Boys),

Salyingp'un Division I. (Boys),

Saiyingp'un (Girls),..

Hospital Chapel (Boys), Ui-hing Lane (Girls), Fletcher Street (Girls),

Li Yuen Street (Girls),

136

26. Pokfulam,

(Girls),

38

112

28.

""

25. New Village (Little Hongkong),

27. R. C. M. Yaumati (Girls),

Shaukiwán (Girls),

7

12

46

80

(Girls),

98

: 29.

105

II. (Boys),

76

95

74

47

53

38

37.

"

Kau-ü-fong (Girls),

90

37.

38.

""

Ship Street (Girls),

36

"

30. Shaiwán,..

31. Shaukiwán (Anglo-Chinese),

32. Sheko,

33. Stanley (Anglo-Chinese),.......

34. Taihang,

35. Taitamtuk,

36. Tanglungchau (Hakka),

"1

38. Tòkwáwán (Eastern Village),

Hunghom (Girls),

48

12

33

26

56

24

13

42

(Punti),

23

48

39.

Taipingshan Chapel (Girls),

126

39.

"

(Western Village),

22

40.

Aberdeen Street (Girls),

71

40. Tsattszemui,

22

41.

Staunton Street (Girls),

46

41. Wongkoktsui,

19

42.

Saiyingp'un, Second Street, East, (Girls),

46

42. Wongmakok,

10

43. New Girls' School,

72

43. Wongnaichung (Anglo-Chinese),

70

45.

"

46.

59

47.

48.

49.

"

50.

""

"

""

51.

""

High School (Boys),

52,

19

44. R. C. M., Cathedral School (Boys),

Bridges Street, Chinese Division (Girls).. Hollywood Road, Chinese School (Girls), Holy Infancy School, Division I. (Boys),

,,

II. (Girls),

St. Joseph's College, Chinese Division (Boys),

European,, (Boys),

Italian Convent, English Division,

60

44. Yaumati (Anglo-Chinese),

44

73

70

TOTAL..

1,511

21

39

44

205

40

212

53.

J

"

"

Portuguese

25

54.

Bridges Street, English Division (Girls),

60

55.

"

"

""

Portuguese

(Girls),

80

56.

57.

58.

"

59.

"

60.

"

65.

"

99

27

(Girls),

62.

""

(Punti),

63.

་་

(Hakka),

(Girls),

St. Francis, Portuguese Division (Girls)......

Victoria, Portuguese School (Mixed),

English School (Boys),

61. Saiyingp'un (English),..

39

English

"

(Girls),.

19

40

132

51

146

54

68. Victoria College,

70.

99

(Chinese),

64. Sheungwan (Boys),

66. St. Paul's College School (Boys);

67. Taiwongkung,

69. Wantsai (English),

71. Wesleyan Mission, Spring Gardens (Boys),...

53

89

55

49

1,108

176

34

72.

73.

::

>>

Wellington Street (Boys),

120

"

"

"

(Girls),

TOTAL,.....

51

6,161

No.

1 Aplichau,

2 Central School (Girls),

3 Hoktsui,

4 Hokün,

• Hunghòm,

6 Little Hongkong,.

7 Matauch'ung,

8 Matantsun,

9 Mongkok,

Boys. Girls. Total.

Expenes. No.

TABLE III.—NUMBER of SCHOLARS at the GOVERNMENT SCHOOLS during 1891, and EXPENSES of each SCHOOL.

Name of School.

Name of School.

Boys. Girls. Total. Expense.

73

13

19

16

23

21

10 New Girls School,

11 New Village (Little Hongkong),

12

Pokfulam,

13 Saíyingpún (English),

146

**200*22:720

73

98

98

13

21

12

***N22222

$ 111.52

Brought forward,..

552 170

722 $6,570.06

2,855.40

120.20 20 | Sheungwán (Girls), .

89

89

660.00

121.62

21 Stanley (Anglo-Chinese),

56

56

326.85

19

121.25 22 Taihang,

24

24

120.34

16

110.20 23 Taitamtuk,..

13

13

120.53

23

120.59 24 Taiwongkung,

120.58 25 Tanglungchau (Hakka),

49

49

331.60

42

42

182.40

120.00 26

(Punti),

26

26

182.00

72

624.00 27 Tokwawan (Eastern Village),

48

48

122.20

12

15.00 28 124.19 29

Western Village),

22

22

122.04

Tsattszemui,

22

22

120.20

706.17 30

146

Victoria College,

1,108

1,108

18,158.60

14

}"

(Punti),

15

**

(Hakka),

16 Shaiwán,

17

(72)

:

Shaukiwán (Anglo-Chinese),

18❘ Shekò,

19 | Sheungwán (Boys),

26

#2328

54

54

12

33.

33

26

53

53

***

182.82 31

266.95 32

Wantsai (English),

176

947.18

*(Chinese),

176

(145)

333.00

12

110.20 33 Wongkoktsui,

19

19

122.50

198.87 34 Wongmakok,

10

10

124.13

120.50 35 Wongnaichung (Anglo-Chi.),.. 420.00 36 Yaumati (Anglo-Chinese),

70

70

...

315.27

41

44.

405.79

Carried forward,......| 552

170

722

6,570.06

TOTAL,............ 2,281

259 2,540

$29,284.75

380

TABLE IV.—AVERAGE EXPENSE of each SCHOLAR at the Government SCHOOLS and at the GRANT-IN-AID SCHOOLS during the year 1891.*

I.-EXPENDITURE OF GOVERNMENT SCHOOLS.

(Cost of working the Schools irrespective of cost of erection or repairs of Buildings).

1. VICTORIA COLLEGE,

Expenditure,

Deduct School fees, refunded,

2. GOVERNMENT GIRLS SCHOOL.

Expenditure,

Deduct School fees,

3. GOVERNMENT DISTRICT SCHOOLS.

Cost to Government (no School fees),

D

. $30,416.37 $12,257.77

-$18,158.60

$ 3,221.48 366.00

-$ 2,855.48

$ 8,270.67

.$ 19,704.14

II.—EXPENDITURE ON THE VOLUNTARY GRANT-IN-AID SCHOOLS. Total cost to Government, in 1891,

III-AVERAGE COST OF EACH SCHOLAR. (Calculated by the Enrolment).

Average Cost, to Government, of each Scholar :----

1. at Victoria College,.

2. at Government Girls School,. 3. at Government District Schools, 4. at Grant-in-Aid Schools,

$16.38

$29.13

$ 6.19

$ 3.83

IV.-AVERAGE COST OF EACH SCHOLAR. (Calculated by the Average Daily Attendance).

Average Cost, to Government, of each Scholar :-

1. at Victoria College,..

2. at Government Girls School,.

3.. at Government District Schools,.

4. at Grant-in-Aid Schools,

.$23.92

$49.17

$10.24

$ 5.58

*NOTE.-The cost of the Inspectorate of Schools ($5,760.95), being connected with both Grant-in-Aid Schools and Government Schools, is not included.

No.

TABLE V.—AVERAGE MONTHLY ENROLMENT and Daily AttendanCE at the Government Schools for 1891.

Name of School.

Average Monthly Enrolment.

Average Daily Attendance.

1234 CO

Aplichau,

Central School (Girls),

Hoktsui,

45.72

40.02

66.45

58.07

9.67

7.83

4

Hokun,

14.42

12.74

5

Hunghom,..

13.83

13.62

6

Little Hongkong,

15.42

12.94

7

Matauchung,

17.00

·

15.25

8

Mataushun,

18.08

17.12

9

Mongkok,

12.00

11.04

10

New Girls School,

40.58

29.10

11

12

13

New Village (Little Hongkong), Pokfulam,

Saiyingpun, (English),.

7.00

6.38

10.33

9.48

80.91

76.83

14

19

(Punti),

21.75

20.55

15

(Hakka),

32.17

29.44

16

Shaiwan,

8.83

5.96

17

Shaukiwán (Anglo-Chinese),

19.25

15.80

18

Shekò,

24.10

22.74

19

Shéungwán (Boys),

35.67

31.86

20

""

(Girls),

45.50

39.48

21

Stanley (Anglo-Chinese),

43.66

41.07

22

Taihang,.

17.25

13.85

23

Taitamtuk,

10.75

8.50

24

Taiwongkung,

30.58

27.05

25

Tanglungchau (Hakka),

21.75

19.95

26

>>

(Punti),

15.17

13.81

27

Tokwawan (Eastern Village),

28.42

25.36

28

(Western Village),.

13.50

12.01

29

Ts'attszemui,

12.25

9.83

30

Victoria College,

823.81

760.95

31

Wantsai, (English),

116.83

111.51

32

39

(Chinese),

79.11

72.69

33

Wongkoktsui,

12.67

10.52

34

Wongmakok,

8.83

8.81

35

Wongnaichung (Anglo-Chinese),

55.83

51.16

36

Yaumati (Anglo-Chinese),

24.00

21.41

1,786.94

1,626.66

381

TABLE VI.-MAXIMUM and MINIMUM ENROLMENT and DAILY ATTENDANCE at the Government Schools during 1891.

Maximum Daily Minimum Daily

No.

Name of School.

Maximum Monthly Enrolment.

Minimum Monthly

Attendance

Attendance

Enrolment.

(Monthly average). (Monthly average).

Aplichau,

68

23

61.04

18.78

Central School (Girls),

82

45

69.39

39.30

3

Hoktsui,

11

8

9.05

4.73

4

Hokun,

15

13

13.93

9.56

5

Hunghom,

16

4

14.73

4.00

6

Little Hongkong,

22

13

21.12

10.00

7

Matauchung,

18

13

17.00

11.00

8

Matautsun,

20

15

19.36

12.14

9

Mongkok,

16

7

15.06

5.67

10

New Girls School,

49

11

New Village (Little Hongkong),

7

12

Pokfulam,

12

13

Saiyingpun (English),

93

14

"

(Punti),

46

15

(Hakka),

38

28

16

Shaiwan,

11

17

18

Shaukiwan (Anglo-Chinese), Shekò,

27

མས་ཅ3་གལ

35

33.70

24.00

6.38

6.38

7

11.68

7.00

60

84.66 ·

55.33

16

38.27

16.00

32.46

25.96

7

7.26

4.45

14

24.33

11.20

26

22

25.56

19.27

19. | Sheungwán (Boys),

42

29

37.57

25.13

20

99

(Girls),

54

35

44.94

30.92

21

Stanley (Anglo-Chinese),

52

13

48.90

5.55

....

22

Taihang,

21

6

16.00

5.33

23

Taitamtuk,.

13

8

10.96

6.52

24

Taiwongkung,

36

23

32.57

21.66

25

26

27

Tanglungchau (Hakka),

Tòkwawan (Eastern Village),

24

20

22.94

17.00

(Punti),

17

12

· 15.81

10.35

43

9

38.18

9.00

28

""

Western Village),

15

10

14.28

10.00

4

29

Ts'attszemui,

16

10

13.12

8.00

30

Victoria College,

932

712

865.04

683.00

31

Wantsai (English),

129

83

122.60

83.00

32

(Chinese),

87

68

86.04

63.60

33

Wongkok tsui,

15

9

14.00

7.74

34

Wongmakok,

10

7

9.27

7.00

35

Wongnaichung (Anglo-Chinese),'.

63

41

57.50

39.11

36

Yaumati (Anglo-Chinese),

28

16

24.55

13.00

2,092

1,403

1909.86

1291.38

Little Hongkong,

7

8

Mongkok,

No.

Name of School.

1

6649) CTIA 00 10 --

Aplichau,

2

Central School (Girls),

3

4

Hoktsui, Hokun, Hunghòm,

Matauchung,

Matautsun,

TABLE VII-NUMBER of DAYS on which the GOVERNMENT SCHOOLS were taught during 1891.

School Days. No.

Name of School.

School Days.

243-

233

239

21

250

250

22723

19

Sheungwán (Boys),

246

20

""

(Girls),

243

236

24

251

25

Stanley (Anglo-Chinese), Taibang,

Taitamtuk,

Taiwongkung,.

Tanglungchau (Hakka),

210

250

251

250

245

239

26

""

(Punti),

244

255

27

Tokwawan (Eastern Village),

242

10

New Girls School,

243

28

""

(Western Village),

252

11

New Village (Little Hongkong),

26

29

Ts'attszemui,

248

12

Pokfulam,

248

30

Victoria College,

231

13

Saiyingpun (English),

233

31

Wantsai (English),

240

14

22

(Punti),

234

32

(Chinese),

240

15

(Hakka),

249

33

Wongkoktsui,

250

16

Shaiwán,

251

34

Wongmakok,

248

17

Shaukiwan (Anglo-Chinese),

152

35

Wongnaichung,

242

18

Sheko,

221

36

Yaumati,

243

382

Total Enrolment for the year.

TABLE VIII.—SUMMARY of ENROLMENT and ATTENDANCE at the GOVERNMENT SCHOOLS for the last twenty-five Years.

YEAR.

Minimum Daily

Attendance

Maximum Daily Attendance

(Monthly Average).

Minimum Monthly Enrolment.

(Monthly Average).

1867,

700

610

533

408

1868,

916

664

572

460

1869,

942

748

627

504

1870,

1,302

950

683

556

1871,

1,292

937

741

571

1872.

1,480

1,157

837

665

1873,

1,838

1,326

852

760

1874,

1,932

1,271

974

836

1875,

1,927

1,312

988

863

1876,

2,171

1,383

1,057

925

1877,

2,148

1,446

1,212

1,035

1878,

2,101

1,324

1,100

936

1879,

2,043

1,356

1,027

904

1880,

2,078

1,468

1,082

937

1881,

1,986

1,384

1,093

956

1882,

2,114

1,444

1,062

988

1883,

2,080

1,414

1,138

990

1884,

1,978

1,420

1,066

941

1885,

1,988

1,424

1,061

926

1886,

1,893

1,544

1,040

886

1887,

1,814

1,552

1,126

1,000

1888,

1,933

1,653

1,139

1,040

1889,

2,293

1,992

1,190

1,118

1890,

2,514

1,999

1,494

1,370

1891,

2,540

1,909

1,403

1,291

January, February,

March,

April,

May,

June,

July,

August,

September,

October,

November,

December,

Number

of Scholars.

712

TABLE IX.-ENROLMENT and Attendance at the VICTORIA COLLEGE during 1891.

Month.

Average Daily Attendance.

683.

Number of Attendances.

Number of School days.

16,392

24

M

919

17,308

20

865.04

932

14,543

17

855.47

891

17,984

22

817.45

862

18,113

23

787.08

829

19,741

26

759,26

762

4,325

6

720.83

832

12,656

17

744.47

803

19,893

27

736.77

.776

17,701

25

708.04

744

16,644

24

693.05

Total Number of ATTENDANCES during 1891,................

Number of SCHOOL DAYS during 1891,.

Average DAILY ATTENDANCE during 1891,

Total Number of SCHOLARS at this School during 1891,

..175,300

231

759

1,108

TABLE X.-GOVERNMENT SCHOOLS (outside VICTORIA COLLEGE) arranged in the order of their efficiency.

Rank I.

Saiyingpun, English School, Division I. Wantsai, English School, Division I.

Chinese Girls School, No. 2.

Wantsai School, Chinese Division.

Rank II.

Saiyingpun, English School, Division II. Wantsai, English School, Division II. Wongnaichung, English School. Sheungwan, Chinese Boys School. Chinese Girls School, No. 1.

Girls Central School, Chinese Division.

Rank II,-Continued.

Tanglungchau, Hakka School. Shekò, Chinese School. Yaumati, English School. Taiwongkang, Chinese School.

Rank III.

Saiyingpun, Punti School. Saiyingpun, Hakka School. Stanley, English School. Tanglungchau, Punti School. Aplichau, Chinese School. Hokun, Chinese School.

Rank III,-Continued.

Hunghom, Chinese School. Little Hongkong, Chinese School. Matauchung, Chinese School.

Matantsun, Chinese School.

Mongkok, Chinese School.

Pokfulam, Chinese School. Shaiwán, Chinese School. Taihang, Chinese School. Taitamtuk, Chinese School. Taiwongkung, Chinese School. Tsfattszemui, Chinese School. Wongkoktsui, Chinese School.

Wongmakok, Chinese School.

TABLE XI-NUMBER of SCHOLARS attending Schools receiving GRANTS-IN-AID (under the Provisions of the Scheme of 1883) expenses incurred and amount of Grant gained by each, in 1891.

383

Class of

Name of School.

Boys. Girls. | Total.

School

Expenses incurred in

1891.

Amount of Grant gained

for 1891.

I

American Board Mission, Bridges Street (Boys),

86

86

$ 370.57

322.63

""

""

""

Station Terrace (Boys),

60

60

284.14

234.26

""

""

39

Hinglung Lane (Boys),

81

81

349.08

295.34

""

""

""

""

17

""

Queen's Road West (Boys), Háwán (Girls),

:52

52

307.77

242.85

29

وو

99

*"

99

*

23

R 8

19

""

27

39

"J

""

""

"

""

>>

95

""

"

""

"

">

""

"2

"

"

""

"

""

""

""

39

""

19

""

""

""

Saiyingpun I Division (Boys),

Graham Street (Girls),.

Basel Mission, Shamshuipó (Boys),

Shaukiwán (Boys),

Tókwawan (Boys),

C. M. S. St. Stephen's Chinese School (Boys),...

Lyndhurst Terrace (Boys),

Pottinger Street (Boys), Saiyingpun (Boys),

St. Stephen's Baxter Memorial (Girls), Lyndhurst Terrace (Girls),

Third Street (Girls),

Yaumati (Mixed),

Hunghòm (Girls),

F. E. S. Bonham Road Chinese Division (Girls),...

High Street (Girls),

Queen's Road West (Girls),.

Hollywood Road (Girls), Pottinger Street (Girls), Stanley School (Girls), Shaukiwan (Girls), Tókwawán (Girls),

L. M. S. Square Street (Boys),

Wantsai Chapel (Boys), Yaumati (Boys),

Shektongtsui (Boys),

II

1

...

88888

30

.30

202.05

113.67

33

33

252.08

104.52

35

35

198.97

129.40

29

.29

161.51

134.49

25

25

65.63

34.51

130

130

326.0.1

408.64

99

99

411.82

262.14

54

54

.343.96

216.34

65

65

315.51

229.02

::

49

49

138.17

91.22

65

65

354.97

242.82

:

...

40

40

360.72

229.96

.20

5

25

290.20

76.97

34

3.4

197.37

123.54

...

34

34

507.00

185.03

...

43

43

192.60

143.64

...

47

47

207.00

142.00

...

43

43

211.00

165.79

49

49

.250.00

130.26

21

.21

160.00 1

78.59

42

42

175.00

132.90

...

31

31

102.70

115.69

136

136

598.63

530.53

112

112

467.13.

370.22

58

58

284.22

223.41

46

46

307.12

213.23

105

105

616.75

477.22

93

"

(Boys),....

76

76

423.00

348.57

33

*9

Hunghóm (Boys),

60

60

379.11

249.14

29

Hospital Chapel (Boys),

74

74

479.76

276.70

""

Shektongtsui (Girls),

25

25

191.83

88.72

""

وو

Saiyingpun (Girls),

95

95

335.88

285.51

92

""

""

Ui-hing Lane (Girls),

47

47

318.75

247.38

Fletcher Street (Girls),.

53

53

184.00

171.01.

""

"J

Tanglungchau (Boys),

70

70

282.79

187.42

""

""

Shaukiwan (Boys),

61

61

262.07

"

""

""

""

19

99

""

Taikoktsui (Boys),

Square Street (Girls),

Li Yuen Street (Girls),...

Kau-u-fong (Girls),

43

43

126.16

38

38

117.46

:::

38

38

127.37

90

90

390.72

290.41

""

""

Ship Street (Girls),

36

36

190.66

117.04

Tanglungchau (Girls),

37

37

215.03

71.64

"

27

Aberdeen Street (Girls),

""

""

""

"

99

">

""

"

">

39

Taipingshan Chapel (Girls),

Wantsai (Girls),

Staunton Street (Girls),

Saiyingpun Second Street East (Girls),

R. C..M. Cathedral School (Boys),.

Bridges Street Chinese Division (Girls), Hollywood Road Chinese School (Girls), Holy Infancy School I Division (Boys),

126

126

567.55

486.29

71

71

479.40

315.87

98

98

518.20

306.44

...

::8

::

99999

46

46

452.86

260.42

46

46

342.08

152.21

60

60

249.00

163.31

73

73

855.00

388.82

70

70

583.00

331.10

21

21

-11

""

"

""

95

99.

(Girls),

39

39

}

55.31

519.00

118.92

""

""

Yaumati (Girls),

46

46

91.43

39

""

"

Hunghòm (Girls),

""

21

19

99

"

III

IV

""

22

""

St. Paul's College School (Boys),

"

"S

"

"

"

">

33

"

"

""

"}

"

""

>>

>>

""

29

22

""

"

""

English

English

Shaukiwán (Girls),

Wesleyan Mission, Spring Gardens (Boys),

Wellington Street (Boys),

"

Basel Mission, High Street (Girls),

Berlin Mission, (Girls),

C. M. S. Victoria Home and Orphanage (Girls),

St. Stephen's Anglo-Chinese School (Boys),

"

F. E. S. Bonham Road, English Division (Girls), Diocesan Home and Orphanage (Mixed),

R. C. M.: St. Joseph's College, Chinese Division (Boys)

High School (Boys),..........

Italian Convent, English Division,

Bridges Street, English Division (Girls),

Portuguese,, (Girls),

St. Francis, Portuguese Division (Girls),

Victoria Portuguese School (Mixed),

80

80

106.41

48

48

......

77.35

34

34

192.00

109.97

120

120

396.00

382.10

(Girls),

9 10 009

51

51

204.00

201,54

80

80

852.79

557.24

27

1,041.73

202.98

64

64

381.27

409.70

161

161

888.84

708.70

19

19

162.70

171.22

137

11

148

11,551.46

1,053:96

5.5

55

662.49

244.72

44

44

European

وو

(Boys),

205

205

} 4,584.50

209.01

1,942.00

40

40

328.40

212

212

1.092.33

5,465.50

Portuguese,,

25

25

238.64

....

60

60

413.10

80

80

1,314.00

441.23

39

39.

271.54

دو

(Girls),

""

(Boys),

(Girls),.

::

747.00

19

19

78.25

14

26

40

1,165.00

300.74

132

132

636.25

4,867.50

51

51

362.04

2,600 2,532 5,132 $51,444.11 $22,576.97

{

384

TABLE XII.-ENROLMENT, ATTENDANCE and NUMBER of SCHOOL DAYS, at the GRANT-IN-AID SCHOOLS during 1891.

No.

Name of School.

Maximum Minimum Average Average Average

Monthly Monthly Maximum Minimum Enrol- Enrol- Daily At- Daily At-

Monthly

Enrol-

ment.

ment.

tendance. tendance.

ment.

Average Daily At- tendance for the

year.

Number

of

School Days.

1 2 3 SH

1 American Board Mission Bridges Street (Boys),

86

72

79.62

11.75

80.63

71.88

241

2

""

55

Station Terrace (Boys),

57

49

51.91

44.62

53.18 48.26 235

3

""

دو

Hinglung Lane (Boys),

81

22

75.40

20.50

63.63

59.34 254

""

99

Queen's Road, West (Boys),

52

46

49.77

42.72

30.63

46.85

234

5

19

99

Háwán (Girls),

29

18

26.87

13.86

24.90

22.17 249

6

""

"

Graham Street (Girls),

28

18

26.40

15.57

23.90

22.02 247

8

9

""

7 Basel Mission, Shamshuipò (Boys),

10 | C.M.S., St. Stephen's Chinese School (Boys),

35

9

33.52

6.11

29.36

25.40 249

Shaukiwan (Boys),

29

15

27.08

8.50

Tókwawán (Boys),

22

12

13.03

7.95

126

65

110.73

47.66

11

"

Lyndhurst Terrace (Boys),

60

46

59.60

41.16

12

""

Pottinger Street (Boys),

52

29

49.73

13

""

Saiyingpun (Boys),

65

28

59.82

28.00

....

14

""

St. Stephen's Baxter Memorial (Girls),

30

18

27.84

15.92

15

.95

Lyndhurst Terrace (Girls),

53

30

52.00

30.00

16

.99

Third Street (Girls),

38

22

30.55

20.33

17

"

Yaumati (Mixed),

25

14

23.33

18

Hunghòm (Girls),

34

25

29.88

23.66

19

F.E.S., Boham Road, Chinese Division (Girls),

27

18

25.81

26.63 24.49 251 15.33 10.51

229 97.63 90.64 260 57:33 56.14

266 24.75 45.36 42.34 238 53.09 51.02 245 24.66 22.72 269 42.91 37.82 258 33.09 27.46 13.50 21.36 18.97 31.81 17.33 23.63

248

.257 28.04 262

23.03 206

20

""

High Street (Girls),

39

14

34.77

16.16

33.45

32.64 248

21

99

Queen's Road, West (Girls),

33

25

32.30

22.20 28.91

26.50 280

22

99

Hollywood Road (Girls),

38

23

33.19

18.33

33.45

29.29

252

23

39

24

"

25

"

26

28

99

29

39

Pottinger Street (Girls),

Stanley School (Girls),

Shaukiwán (Girls),

Tókwawán (Girls),

27 L.M.S., Square Street (Boys),

Wantsai Chapel (Boys),

Yaumati (Boys),

36

10

33.46

9.00

29.16

28.26

259

20

9

17.23

9.00

16.22

14.59 210

37

16.

27.88

14.30

29.60

28

18

24.18

259 16.00 25.27 21.19 250

23.90

132

81

117.39

73.47 107.63

98.53

221

77

66

73.58

64.73

72.09

68.22

254

57

43

51.55 40.25

52.90

47.41

236

30

Shektongtsui (Boys),.

46

24

44.60

23.00

40.72

39.23 244

31

39

Saiyingpun I Division (Boys),

105

66

98.00

55.83

97.09

87.22 234

32

II

39

""

(Boys),

76

51

66.00

44.66

70.45

60.57 256

33

23

Hunghòm (Boys),

60

31

53.61 29.50

53.63 49.14 240

34

""

Hospital Chapel (Boys),

73

55

68.85

52.50

66.72

62.70

239

35

""

Shektongtsui (Girls),

25

16

24.15

12.84

22.00

20.72

251

36

99

Saiyingpún (Girls),

69

37

61.14

30.16

60.83

56.01 259

37

Ui-hing Lane (Girls),

46

31

44.42

27.22

42.72

41.38

252

""

38

99

Fletcher Street (Girls),.

43

31

39.59

26.16

38.75

36.51

275

39

""

Tanglungchau (Boys),

46

33

44.64

31.29

38.83

35.42

283

40

""

Shaukiwán (Boys),

60

32

53.88 24.92

53.10

46.07 245

41

""

Taikoktsui (Boys),..

43

33

40.64

25.88

39.18

34.16 274

42

""

Square Street (Girls),

31

15

28.44 12.50

27.36

22.96

260

44

"

45

39

43

""

Li Yuen Street (Girls),. Kau-u-fong (Girls),

Ship Street (Girls),

38

26

37.96

23.62

33.90

32.87

257

61

29

58.65

25.80

54.41

51.52 270

24

13

17.70

8.25

19.25 15.04 259

46

99

Tanglungchau (Girls),

22

14

17.12

10.25

47

Taipingshan Chapel (Girls),

101

63

87.03

54.53

48

"J

Aberdeen Street (Girls),

51

23

46.00 18.50 44.66 40.87

18.72 15.14 265 88.41

77.79 269 265

49

97

Wantsai (Girls),.

68

46

53.14

50

""

Staunton Street (Girls),

44

31

51

53

54

""

55

"

Saiyingpun, Second Street East (Girls),

52 R.C.M., Cathedral School (Boys),..

Bridges Street Chinese School (Girls),.. Hollywood Road, Charitable Sch. (Girls), Holy Infancy School, Division I (Boys)

32

17

53

35

71

59

67.42

51

29

46.92

17

11

56

25

"

II (Girls),

39

34

36.25 28.11

44.30 59.41 49.44. 43.15 30.00 40.60 38.92 27.92 15.00 30.54 24.71 53.00 33.76

49.00 47.31 266 51.66 67.50 62.82 264 25.00 46.83 41.10 255 13.87 10.56 14.50 13.31 256 37.83 32.92 267

272

242

273

57

"9

Yaumati (Girls),

38

21

33.96

19.72

58

Shaukiwán (Girls),

60

28

44.36

20.70

59

""

Hunghòm (Girls),

34

12

28.14

60

Wesleyan Mission, Spring Gardens (Boys),

34

23

30.80

61

"

""

Wellington Street (Boys),

117

87

104.83

62

"

""

(Girls),

48

17

63

Basel Mission, High Street (Girls),

75

39

44.69 68.64 26.94 64.66

9.70 20.50 30.54 27.97 238 78.79 105.80 94.10 232 16.68 39.00 35.04 242 58.24 267

32.08 28.43 288 46.41 38.15 276 27.50 22.85 282

64 Berlin Mission (Girls),

27

21

24.47 16.69

22.72

20.98 262

65

C.M.S., Victoria Home and Orphanage (Girls),.

53

40

49.46

38.09

46.66

43.70 248

66

""

68

69

St. Paul's College School (Boys),

REN

70

St. Stephen's Anglo-Ch. School (Boys),

67 F.E.S., Boham Road, English Division (Girls),

Diocesan Home and Orphanage (Mixed),

R.C.M., St. Joseph's Col. Chi. Division (Boys)

133

82

113.30

69.16

113.45

98.70 232

19

11

17.76

121

91

109.00

42

17

30

14

71

55

23

Europ.

""

(Boys), 205

183

72

""

High School (Boys), .

31

27

73

Italian Convent Eng. Divison,

168

152

4.83 81.86 39.50 17.00 23.79 11.68 188.95 155.20 31.00 26.20 153.68 134.41

16.77 15.22 196 110.30 98.96 244 33.25 32.72 241 24.08 21.01 192.66 176.00 28.90 28.40

"

212

223

269

162.63 149.33

222

74

29

""

Portug.

25

22

""

75

99

Bridges Street Eng.

""

(Girls), 57

49

76

"2

77

78

多量

Eng.

""

79

80

39

81

"

19

St. Francis Portug.

Victoria Portuguese School (Mixed),

English School (Boys), English (Girls),

Portug.

(Girls), 79

67

91

(Girls), 38

32

(Girls), 13

9

36

26

78

55

75.66 52.42

24.50 20.94 24.27 23.14 222 45.40 33.00 52.45 39.10 209 63.40 51.45 71.00 56.73 209 33.54 25.72 35.00 29.54 261 11.80 6.47 10.83 9.25 261 29.77 13.50 33.25 26.74 267 71.58 67.25 257

41

29

35.72 23.36 36.33 32.54 255

:

NAME OF SCHOOL.

1.-American Board Mission, Bridges Street, (Boys),..

I

68

65

2.-~- 3.-

"

31

4.-

5.-

"1

6.-

"

8.- 9- 歸

""

"

"

"

"

3

91

55

Station Street, (Boys),...

48

45

Hinglung Lane, (Boys),...

62

55

38 13

Queen's Road West, (Boys),.

49

45

31 9

Háwán, (Girls),

19

19

61 6

Graham Street, (Girls),

23

23

3

3

7.-Basel Mission, Shamshuipd, Boys),

27

27

4 10

Shaukiwán, (Boys), Tokwáwán, (Boys),..

29

29 12 8

13 13

2

5

10.-C. M. S., St. Stephen's, (Boys),

71

69

39 23

11.-

"

Lyndhurst Terrace, (Boys).

54

50

4 22 13

12.-

"

Pottinger Street. (Boys),...

38

38

25 11

13.- "

Saiyingp'ún, (Boys)..

45

43

8 17

13

14.- 15.- 16.- 17.-

"

99

St. Stephen's Baxter Memorial, (Girls), Lyndhurst Terrace. (Girls),.

18

18

6 5

38

36

4 17

11

"

Third Street, (Girls),

32

32

7 11

19

Yaumáti, (Mixed),.

25

21

2

11

18.

19

Hunghòm, (Girls),..

22

22

7 13

20.-

21.- 22.- 23.- 24.-

19

"

"

"

25.

26.-

"

Tokwáwán, (Girls),

19.-F. E. S., Bonham Road, (Chinese Division Girls),.

High Street, (Girls),..

Queen's Road West. (Girls),

Hollywood Road, (Girls),

Pottinger Street, (Girls),....

Shaukiwán, (Girls),

27.-L. M. S., Square Street, (Boys),

21

21

7

30 29

5 12

24 24

2

12

32

32

7 13

28

25

12

Stanley School, (Girls), .................................

16

16

3 8

28

27

10

7

22

22

3 8

87

83

19

43

28.-

"1

Wantsai Chapel, (Boys),

70

68

37

17

29.- 30. 31.-

99

Yaumáti, (Boys),.

50

42

4 18 16

11

Shekt ongtsui, (Boys),

37

36

15

19

"

Saiyingp'un Division I, (Boys),

91

87

1 48

26

32.-

15

II, (Boys),

67

66

30

21

33.

Hunghom, (Boys),

52

50

29 12

34.-

55

Hospital Chapel, (Boys),

55

49

3

30

12

35.-

Shektongtsui, (Girls),

19

16

2 3

36.-

19

37.-

"

38.-

13

39.-

14

40.-

$4

Saiyingp'ún, (Girls),

Ui-hing Lane, (Girls), Fletcher Street, (Girls), Tanglungchau, (Boys),. Shaukiwán, (Boys),

61

59

12

18

14

41

39

3

16

13

38

37

16

- es ko 15 w as epi misowo w rozs ei moo: : voawai con 01

:::::

-::::::::::::

31 18

4 28 11

Class of School.

No. of Scholars Pre-

sented.

No. of Scholars Ex- amined.

Stand. I.

Stand. II.

Stand. III.

Stand. IV,

Stand. V.

Stand. VI.

Stand. IV.

Stand. V.

Stand. VI.

TABLE XIII-RESULTS of the EXAMINATION of the GRANT-IN-AID SCHOOLS in 1891, under the

NUMBER OF SCHOLARS WHO PASSED.

Ordinary Subjects.

TOTAL Ordinary) S

NUMBER OF SCHOLARS WHO FAILED.

Special

Ordinary Subjects.

Special

Subjects.

Subjects.

Subjects. Si

Stand. J.

Stand. II.

Stand. III.

Stand. IV.

Stand. V.

Stand. VI.

Stand. IV.

Stand. V.

Stand. VI.

Passed.

Failed.

5

3

3

3

2

7

3

1

2

7

10

mai comial i

· FONDI ::

54 11

43

2

54

1

42

3

17

2

12 11

21

6

29

7

6

65

4

43

7

37

40

14

35

32

14

22

18 3

23

21

27

20

13

23

18

81

62

38

5

4

m to

34

80 7

7

9

32

32

4

9

18

51

47

2

29

16

41.-

Taikoktsui, (Boys),

32

28

11 7

7

42.

"

Square Street, (Girls),

25

25

8 6

6

43.-

"

Li-yuen Street. (Girls)...

26

20

6 8

4

44.- 45.-

>>

Kau-ü-fong, (Girls),

54

46

13 8

15

33

Spring Gardens. (Ship Street), (Girls),.

I

18

15

3 1

46.

55

Tanglungchau, (Girls),..

I

16

16

9 4

1

47.

$9

Taipingshán Chapel, (Girls),

I 84

83

34 25 12

48.-

13

Aberdeen Street, (Girls),...

I 44

43

13 9

9

49.

"

Wántsai, (Girls),

I

53

52

15 20

50.-

1

Staunton Street. (Girls),.

40

40

11 13

51.-

53

Saiyingp'ún Second Street East, (Girls),..

28

24

3 9

52.-R. C. Mission, Cathedral School, (Boys),

41

40 20 6 8

53.-

99

54.-

"

55.-

"

Bridges Street, Chinese Division, (Girls),. Hollywood Road, Chinese School, (Girls),. Holy Infancy, Division I, (Boys), .

57

54

12

11

9

46

46

15 6 10

48412:00

aai

wwww w ::::

::

3

14

14

5 2 4

56.-

H

" II, (Girls),

21

20

3 11 3

57.-

58.-

35

"J

Yaumati, [Girls),

19

19

15 4

59,-

Shaukiwán, (Girls), Hunghom, (Girls),

30

29

16 4

18

18

8 3 2

61.-

19

62.--

64.-Berlin Mission, (Girls),..

66.

60.-Wesleyan Mission, Spring Gardens, (Boys),

63.-Basel Mission, High Street, (Girls),

65.-C. M. S. Victoria Home and Orphanage. (Girls),

67.-F. E. S., Bonham Road, English Division, (Girls),....... 68.-Diocesan Home and Orphanage, (Mixed),

69.-St. Paul's College School (Boys),

26

26

1 11 6

Wellington Street, (Boys),. (Girls),.

89

86

16 29

14

I

$7

36

5 18 8

III 60

59

21 12

7

III 20

20

5

5

III

41

41

8 9 10

St. Stephen's Anglo-Chinese, (Boys),

IV

102

102

57 21 4

IV

16

16

4

5 4

IV

76

72

9 14 19 14 9 5 20

IV

27

27 10 7 6 3

70.-R. C. M., St. Joseph's College, Chinese Division, (Boys),.

IV

21

21

11 10

71-

"

European

(Boys),

IV

144

141

20 22

52 26 18 13

12: : 8:::::::::

IAN IN

::::

36

19

72.- 73. 74.- 75.- 76.- 77. 78.- 79.-

"

High School, (Boys),...

IV

29

25

1

4 9 5

"

Italian Convent, English Division,

IV 86

11

14

11

"

English

Portuguese Division,

Bridges Street, English Division, (Girls),

Portuguese Division, (Girls), St. Francis, Portuguese Division, (Girls), .

Victoria, Portuguese School, (Mixed),

IV 25

86 20 22 25 14

17 10

5

8

48

48

2

5

5

6 3

:

IV 47

47

27 16

3

IV

53

53

11 13 11 6

IV 31

31

13 8

8

80.-

"

"5

English

$1.-

19

(Girls),

"

(Boys),

"

(Girls),

IV 8

8

3 5

IV

EEE

IV

33

32

11 8 9 4

50

50

8 11

11 12

25

25

4

3

6 6

6

60

47

47

13

3

47

12

35

26

11

31

47

25

3

20

5

20

41

5

15

14

79

43

49

37

22

36

47

45

11

17

19

22

7

13

5

5

18

8

15

66

20

31

5

59

19

1

39

2

87

15

15

1

1

70 2

26

1

..

21

2 131

1 22 3

3

82

::::::::

23

46

41

12

29

8

:::

32

1

50

25

CHAN::::

10

2

DWO~~A O 10 MIA W en en was an est

Hongkong, 9th February, 1892.

6

21

48

48

20

36

erer:::::::::::::::::::::

19

:: :: :: :: :~:::::::::

5

5

: : :~~ :

1

15 2

5

10 10 10 10 H© :H : :~AGREES ::::

1

11

2

::::::::

::::::::::

:::::::::::::::::

: : : : : :" :

2 131 10 117

1 22 3

3 82

7

4 10

23

46

41

12

29

8

32

4

50

25

2-22 ::::

28

12

56.73 29.54

78 64 80

9.25 18 40

26.74 66 64 90

14 67.25 48 88 110 144

32,54 24 24 60 72

39.10

2

22

2

36

2

1

47

45

:

.

::::

::::

::::

5

Stand. IV.

Stand. V.

Stand. VI.

Stand. I.

Stand. II.

Stand. III.

Stand. IV.

Stand. V.

Stand. VI.

12132

54 43

48.26 8 112

108 66

54

59.34 6 152

78

42

46.85

124

54

17

22.17 12

24

18

12

22,02 6

12

12

21

ta

25.40 8

40

18

30

29

7

65

43

37

- NA O

6

40

2

14

35

32

14

22

18

23

21

4

27

20

13

23

18

81

13 34

62

Ỡ TO A A CU ER EN ES CD Es

:::::::::::::

24.49 24

32

54

10.51 4

20

90.64

156

138

56.14

8

42.34

100

88 66

24

78

8

51.02

16

68

78

16

22.72

12

20

18

37.82 8

68

66

30

27.46 14 44

18.97 4 44

42 6

24

30 12

28.04 14 52

12

23.03

28

32

30 48

32.64

10

48

26.50 4 48

30

8

10

29.29 14

52

30

20

28.26

,4

48

36

14.59

6 32

6

8

23.90

20 28

30

8

21.19

6

32

42

98.53

18

76

258

80

68.22

4

148

102

48

38

47.41 8 72

96

34

39.23

60

80

87.22 2 192 156

60

60.57 10 120

47

49.14 12 116

47

62,70 6 120 72

13

3

20.72 4 12

47

12

56.01

24 72

35 4

41.38

3

1

26 11

34.51

31

1

47

25

3

20

20

35.42 46,07

4 116 34.16 22 28 22.96 16 24 32.87 12 32

629

64

་ ་བང- ་བ་ལ,

114

40

126

32

72

16

42

8

84

24

78

16

10

64

54

36 108

96

42

36

24

3

41

54.41 26 32

90

40

15

14

2

79 4

43

49

15.04 6 4 15.14 18 16 77.79 68 100 72 32 40.87 26 36 54 49.44 30 80 30 32

42

30

6

30

12

#4

30 12

30 24

37

38.92 22 52 36 48

10

2471

24.71 6 36 42

16

12

47.31 44 24

48

62.82 24 44

54

48

60 36

41.10 30 24 60

48 60 24

2

11

13.31 10 8

24

32.92 6 44

18

28.43 30 16

17

19

22

13

18

8

27.97 2 44 36

66 20

31 5

94.10 32 116 84 35.04 10

72

48

59

19

39

87

15

15

1 70

2 75

26 21

1

: ::

1

com : : : :

56

58.24 126 84 56 63 70 60 20.98 30

43.70 48 63 80 36 20 72 98.70 342 168

· 15.22 24 40 40 98.96 54 112 32.72 60 21.01

6 176,00 120

8 28.40

3 149.33 120

23.14 84

80.63

10 124

$

*:::* :** : ****::*::*:*::*:*::*:****:::::*********::::: :3 :8*888* :28:2 ::*$2

48

28: : : : : : 225:

::::: 88: : 5888: ~::::::::::::

bò::::::::::: Z:::::

16 42

15

16 12 15

8

32

8

20

*:::22:55::::::53:18:28:

14 28.26 130.26

32.56

97.70

2

2

2 4.50

9.00 1 14.59 78.59 19.64 9.00 12 23.90 132.90 33.22

8 21.19 115.69

58.95

99.68

28.92 86.77

:

98.53 #30.53 68.22 370.22

132.63

397.90

47.41

223.41

92.55 277.67 55.25 167.56

39.23 213.23

53.30 159.93

87.22 477.22

119.30 357.92

60.57

348.57

87.14

261.43

49.14

249.14

62.28

186.86

62.70

276,70

69.17 207.53

10.50 15

615.00 7.50

11

20.72 56.01 285.51 41.38 247.38 3€.51 171.01

88.72

22.18 66.54

71,37 214.14

61.84 185.54

42.75 128.26

:

35.42 187.42

46.85 140.57

4.50 4.50

12

6

2

$ 15.00 25 6.00 4

2 7.50 7

20 46.50 28

20 15.00 18

:

16 25.50

9.00 22 12

38.92

2

4:50 9

14 15.00 31

10 15.00 19

55.31

4 6.00 8 6.00

118.92

11

46.41 32 16 12

22.85 16 12 12

4.50 10

40

40

40

60

12

190 168 126

12.

14

80 40 108

56 60

36

88 100

176 320 312

252

208

42 144

8 40 108

70 48

176

170 120

70 128

888

60 36

162

128 30

66

104 110 72

: #2 : : : : : :22

192

6 20

**:::::: MNS::::::::::

46,07 262.07 65.51 196.56 34.16 126.16 31.54 94.62 22.96 117.46 29.36 88.10 32.87 127.37 31.84 54.41

290.41 72.60 15.04 15.14 71.64 17.91 53.73 77.79 486.29 121.57 364.72 40.87 315.87 78.96 236.91 49.44 306.44 76.61 229.83 260.42 65.10 195.32 24 71 152.21 38.05 114.16 47.31

163.31

40.82 122.49 62.82 388.82 97.20 291.62 41.10 331.10 13.31 $2.92 28.43 46.41 22.85 77.35 19.33 $8.02 27.97 109,97 27.49 82.48

95.53

217.81 117.04 29.26 87.78

82.77 248.33

13.82

41.49

29.73 89.19

91.43 22.85

€8.58

106.41 26.60 79.81

16 7.50 13

16 15.00

10

16 12.00

14 12.00

76

::::

::: _:: 2000 to 5:

9

286,58 50.38 151.16 58.24 557.24 129.31 417.93 9,00 8 20.98 202.98 50.74 152.24 19 43.70 409.70 102.42 307.28 98.70 708.70 177.17 531.53 15.22 171.22 42.80 1 98.96 1,0-3.96 263.49

32.72 244.72

94.10 382.10 95.52 35.04 201.54

128.42

790.47

61.18

183.54

21.01

209.01

52.25 156.76

485.50 1,45,50

246.30

15 20 50 54.00

20 7.50 S 1418.00 22

20

819.25

309.83

330.93

67.88 203.66

19.56 58.69

176.00 1,942.00 28.40 328.40 149.33 1,092.33 23.14 238.64 39.10 413.10

82.10

27:.08

59.66 178.98

103.27

4 4.50 24 56.73 441.23 110.30

8 3.00

8 9.00 3 29.54 271.54 9.25 78.25 26.74 300.74

4

1413.50

TOTAL,.

12:5

75.18 225.56 67.25 636.25 159,06 477.19 32.54 362.04 90.01 271.53

.$22,576.97 5,643.94 16,933.03

** :~~ :¦¦¦¦~~~:::::::

¦ ¦ * ¦ ¦ ¦ :* :***g* :9* :49 :*

•B724IONAL : : : : ::::2007

HA

412.00 17 37.82 242.82

27.46 18.97

97.05

24.49 134.49 10.51

34.51 90.64 41:8.64 56.14 262.14

33.62

100.87

8.62 25.89 102.16

316.48

65.53 196.61

42.54 216.34

54.08 162.26

13.50

5

51.02 22.72

229.02

57.25 171.77

91.22

22.80

68.42

G0.70

182.12

2410.50

2

4.50

212.00

11

28.04 123.54

10 23.03

229.96 57.49

76.97 19.24 57.73 30.88 92.66 185.03 46.25 138.78 35.91 107.73 35.50 106.50

172.47

9.00 8 32.64 143.64 4.50 11 26.50 142.00

10.50 10 29.29 165.79 41.44 124.35

13.50 210.50

4 22.17

8

10

$

::::*

com:::: 00

46.85 242.85 60.71 182.14 113.67 28.41 85.26

22.02 104.52 26.13 78.39 25.40 129.40 32.35

சே

$

80.63

$22.63

48.26

234.26 58.56

80.65 241.98 175.70

59.34 295.34 73.83

221.51

Stand. IV.

Stand. V.

Stand. VI.

Passed,

Failed.

Passed.

Failed.

the GRANT-IN-AID SCHOOLS in 1891, under the provisions of the Scheme of 15th September, 1883.

. PASSED.

Special

Subjects.

NUMBER OF SCHOLARS WHO FAILED.

Ordinary Subjects.

Special Subjects.

TOTALS.

Ordinary Special Subjects. Subjects.

SUMS TO WHICH THE SCHOOL IS ENTITLED.

Ordinary Subjects.

Special

Subjects.

Needle Work.

Average Daily Attend-

ance

Year.

Stand. I.

Stand. II.

during the

Stand. III.

Stand. IV.

Stand. V.

Stand. VI.

Stand. IV.

Stand. V.

Stand. VI.

Very Good.

Good.

Fair.

Capitation Grant.

Total Grant carned

in 1891.

Amount due to Teacher,

Amount due to

Manager.

2

-

387

TABLE XIV.—PERCENTAGE of SCHOLARS who passed in the GRANT-IN-AID SCHOOLS during the last two Years.

No.

Name of School.

1891.

1890.

Increase.

Decrease.

1 American Board Mission, Bridges Street (Boys),

83.07

90.00

6.93

2

""

3

وو

""

Station Terrace (Boys), Hiuglung Lane (Boys),..

95.55

90.19

5.36

1

98.18

83.63

14.55

....

"

""

>>

Queen's Road West (Boys), Háwán (Girls),

93.33

98.00

89.47

100.00

دو

وو

Graham Street (Girls),

52.17

71.43

7

Basel Mission, Shamshuipò (Boys),

77.77

96.87

4.67 10.53

19.10

8

"J

""

Shaukiwán (Boys),

100.00

55.55

44.45

9

>>

Tòkwáwán (Boys),

53.84

90.90

37.06

10

C. M. S., St. Stephen's Chinese School (Boys),

94.20

88.23

5.97

11

""

Lyndhurst Terrace (Boys),

86.00

94.02

....

8.02

12

>>

Pottinger Street (Boys),

97.36

95.83

1.53

....

13

Saiyingpún (Boys),

93.02

97.50

4.48

14

""

St. Stephen's Baxter Memorial (Girls),

77.77

91.66

13.89

15

"

Lyndhurst Terrace (Girls),

97.22

97.05

0.17

16

17

18

Third Street (Girls),

100.00

93.02

6.98

355

""

Yaumati (Mixed),

66.66

96.00

29.34

Hunghòm (Girls),

100.00

100.00

19

20

"

21

22

23

24

29

25

39

26

27

F. E. S., Bonham Road (Girls),

High Street (Girls),

Queen's Road West (Girls),. Hollywood Road (Girls),

Pottinger Street (Girls),

Stanley School (Girls), Shaukiwán (Girls),

L. M. S., Square Street (Boys),

85.71

95.45

9.74

79.31

100.00

20.69

87.50

96.29

8.79

84.37

92.30

7.97

80.00

100.00

20.00

81.25

76.47

4.68

....

85.18

95.45

13.64

Tòkwáwán (Girls),

81.81

95.65

97.59

100.00

13.84 2.41

28

"}

Wántsai Chapel (Boys),

91.17

87.87

3.30

....

29

""

Yaumáti (Boys),

90.47

98.00

7.53

30

99

Shektongtsni (Boys),

94.44

53.66

40.78

31

""

Saiyingpún, Division I. (Boys),

91.95

88.17

3.78

32

"

""

II. (Boys),

90.90

87.50

3.40

....

33

"

Hunghòm (Boys),.

94.00

100.00

34

"

Hospital Chapel (Boys),

95.91

98.38

6.00 2.47

:

35

""

Shektongtsui (Girls),

81.25

94.73

13.48

36

93

37

>>

38

"

39

40

41

""

42

"

43

"

44

23

Saiyingpún (Girls),

Ui-hing Lane (Girls), Fletcher Street (Girls),

Tanglungchau (Boys),. Shaukiwán (Boys), Taikoktsui (Boys), Square Street (Girls), Li Yuen Street (Girls), Kau-u-fong (Girls),

·

79.47

85.36

5.89

89.74

95.50

5.76

70.27

86.20

15.93

96.87

85.45

11.42

100.00

89.28

80.00

0.

100.00

....

89.13

98.27

9.14

45

">

Ship Street (Girls),

100.00

81.81

18.19

46

25

Tanglungchau (Girls),

87.50

65.00

22.50

47

""

Táipingshán Chapel (Girls),

95.18

94.44

0.74

48

"

Aberdeen Street (Girls),

100.00

100.00

49

""

Wántsai (Girls),

94.23

82.69

11.54

50

>>

Staunton Street (Girls),

92.50

92.00

0.50

51

Saiyingpún, Second Street East (Girls),

91.75

100.00

8.25

....

52

R. C. M., Cathedral School (Boys),

.90.00

82.14

7.86

53

""

54

""

55

""

Bridges Street, Chinese Division (Girls), Hollywood Road, Chinese School (Girls),. Holy Infancy School, Division I. (Boys),

87.03

93.33

....

6.30

97.82

96.29

1.53

;.

78.57

70.00

8.57

56

"

""

""

II. (Girls),

85.00

100.00

15.00

57

""

Yaumáti (Girls),

100.00

58

""

Shaukiwán (Girls),

75.86

59

39

Hunghòm (Girls),

72.22

60 Wesleyan Mission, Spring Gardens (Boys),

69.23

81.00

11.77

61

""

62

وو

"

63

Basel Mission, High Street (Girls),

Wellington Street (Boys), (Girls),

76.74

94.09

17.35

86.11

90.00

3.89

100.00

100.00

64

Berlin Mission (Girls),...

95.00

81.81

13.19

65

C. M. S., Victoria Home and Orphanage (Girls),

95.12

100.00

4.88

....

66

67

68

St. Stephen's Anglo-Chinese School (Boys), F. E. S., Bonham Road, English Division (Girls). Diocesan Home and Orphanage, (Mixed),

85.29

90.65

5.36

...

93.75

80.00

13.75

97.22

87.32

9.90

69

St. Paul's College School (Boys),

96.29

81.08

15.21

R. C. M., St. Joseph's College, Chinese Division (Boys),..

100.00

96.15

3.85

71

29

33

35

European

"

(Boys),.

93.05

90.16

2.89

72

:

"

High School (Boys),

88.46

73

74

>>

""

29

75

#1

Italian Convent, English Division,

Bridges Street, English

95.34

84.93

10.41

Portuguese

92.00

88.46

3.54

""

وو

(Girls),

97.87

100.00

2.13

76

19

""

Portuguese

""

(Girls),

77.35

91.30

13.95

77

>>

St. Francis, Portuguese

وو

(Girls),

93.54

83.33

10.21

78

79

80

81

AAAA

""

English

""

(Girls),

100.00

83.33

16.67

Victoria Portuguese School (Mixed),

100.00

100.00

""

English

(Boys),

100.00

90.00

10.00

"

>>

(Girls),

100.00

100.00

.

:

388

{

TABLE XV. PERCENTAGE of PASSES in the various subjects in which the GRANT-IN-AID SCHOOLS were examined in 1891.

Class of

School.

Name of School.

Writing Reading. or Com- position.

Arith- Gram- Geogra- metic. mar. phy.

History.

Repeti- Expla- tion. nation.

I.

American Board Mission, Bridges Street (Boys),..

92.30 70.76

96.92

100.00

"

97

31

Station Terrace (Boys), Hing-lung Lane (Boys),

100.00 93.33

100.00

100.00

100.00

85.45

100.00 100,00

""

""

Queen's Road West (Boys),.

100.00

75.55

75.00

100.00

100.00

19

">

19

Háwán (Girls),

89.47

89.47

100.00

100.00

100.00

"

Graham Street (Girls),...

.69.56

52.26

100.00

100.00

100.00

"

99

Basel Mission, Shamshuipò (Boys.),.

Shaukiwán (Boys),

92.59

88.00

100.00

96.30 100.00

100.00

93.10

100.00

100.00

""

"

"

Tokwawan (Boys),

61.54

30.77

"1

C. M. S., St. Stephen's Chinese School (Boys),

100.00

81.16

100.00

100.00

100.00

"

""

Lyndhurst Terrace (Boys),

98.00

84.00

80.00

***

100.00 100.00

"

""

Pottinger Street (Boys),

100.00

97.37

50.00

100.00

100.00

"

""

Saiyingpún (Boys),

97.67

95.35

50.00

100.00 100.00

"

St. Stephen's Baxter Memorial (Girls),.

100.00

77.77

100.00 100.00

"

"

Lyndhurst Terrace (Girls).

100.00

80.55

100.00

100.00 100.00

"

??

Third Street (Girls),

100.00

87.50

100.00

100.00 100.00

"

Yaumáti (Mixed),

90.47

57.14

Failed.

100.00 100.00

...

"

"

Hunghom (Girls),

100.00

95.00

100.00 100.00

"

F. E. S., Bonham Road, Chinese Division (Girls),..

100.00

66.66

85.71

100.00 100.00

"9

"

29

"?

95

51

59

11

""

Stanley School (Girls),

"

High Street (Girls),

Queen's Road West (Girls),

Hollywood Road (Girls),

Pottinger Street (Girls),.

Shaukiwán (Girls),

100.00 72.41

100.00

100.00

100.00

...

100.00

70.83

100.00

100.00 100,00

***

93.75

65.62

66.66

93.75

100.00

100.00

72.00

100.00

81.25

75.00

100.00

93.75

100.00

96.29

74.07

50.00

100.00

100.00

19

Tókwáwán (Girls),

100.00

72.72

100.00

100.00

100.00

19

L. M. S., Square Street (Boys),

100.00 97.59

100.00

100.00 100.00

19

1J

Wantsai Chapel (Boys),

98.53

79.41

100.00

98.53 100.00

11

""

Yaumáti (Boys),

95.23

78.57

100.00

100.00

"J

""

Shektongtsui (Boys),.

94.44

90.00

100.00 100.00

99

39

Saiyingpün, Division I. (Boys),

96.55

79.31

100.00

100.00 100.00

19

99

19

II. (Boys),

98.48

89.39

83:33

100.00 96.55

Hunghom (Boys),

98.00 82.00

Failed.

100.00

100.00

19

""

Hospital Chapel (Boys),

95.91

93.87

100.00

100.00

100.00

وف

Shektongtsui (Girls),

93.75

.81.25

100:00

93.75

87:50

11

""

Saiyingpún (Girls),

100.00

62.88

100,00

100.00

100.00

$9

99

Ui-hing Lane (Girls),

97.43

82.51

100.00

97.43

100.00

"1

""

Fletcher Street (Girls),......

91.90

70.27

Failed.

100.00

100,00

13

19

Tanglungchau (Boys),

100.00

96.87

100.00 100.00

11

"

Shaukiwan (Boys),

100,00

76.59

100.00 100.00

19

"

Taikoktsui (Boys),.

100.00

85.71

100,00 100.00

""

19

11

33

"

19

13

""

:

99

93

11

19

Aberdeen Street (Girls),

11

11

Wántsai (Girls),.

"

"

99

11

"}

19

"

"

"

"

99

#1

"J

""

99

"

21

"

"

""

19

"

(Girls),

"}

IV

"

"

"}

St. Paul's College School (Boys),

"J

"

99

"

European.,

""

""

High School (Boys),

""

""

*9

"}

"

"

(Boys),

.....

Square Street (Girls),

Li Yuen Street (Girls),

Kan-u-fong (Girls),

Ship Street (Girls),

Tanglungchau (Girls),

Taipingshan Chapel (Girls),

Staunton Street, (Girls),

Saiyingpún, Second Street East (Girls),

R. C. M., Cathedral School (Boys),.......

Bridges Street, Chinese Division (Girls), Hollywood Road, Chinese School (Girls), Holy Infancy School, Division I. (Boys),. II. (Girls),.

19

Yaumati (Girls),

Shaukiwan (Girls),

Hunghom (Girls),

Wesleyan Mission, Spring Gardens (Boys),

Wellington Street (Boys),

III Basel Mission, High Street (Girls),

Berlin Mission (Girls),

C. M. S., Victoria Home and Orphanage (Girls),

""

St. Stephen's Anglo-Chinese School (Boys),. F. E. S., Bonham Road, English Division (Girls), Diocesan Home and Orphanage (Mixed),

R.C.M., St. Joseph's College Chinese Division (Boys),.

"

""

Italian Convent, English Division,

19

Portuguese Division, Bridges Street, English Division (Girls),..

Portuguese Division (Girls), St. Francis, Portuguese Division (Cirls),.

1

English

(Girls),

Victoria, Portuguese School' (Mixed),

English School (Boys),

(Girls),

100.00 98.38 100.00 91.30 100.00 100,00 93.02 100.00 100.00 100.00 88.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 97.87 100.00 100.00 83.39 56.61 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 87.09 100.00 100.00 100.00

100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 Failed.

98.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00

80.00

92.00

100.00 100.00

100.00

95.00

100.00

100.00 100.00

100.00

93.47

75.00

100.00 100.00

100.00

100.00

100.00

100.00 100.00

100.00

81.25

100.00 100,00

100.00 92.77

100.00

100.00 100.00

100.00 100.00

100.00

100.00 100.00

***

98.07 76.92 100.00 82.50 100.00 100.00 97.50 90.00 98.14 88.88 100.00 97.82 92.85 80.00 95.00 80.00 100.00 100.00

100.00

100.00

100,00

100.00

95.00

100.00

60.00

100.00 100.00

...

100.00

100.00

100.00

100.00 100.00

100.00

300.00 100.00

...

100.00 100.00

...

100.00

100.00

100.00

100.00

82.82

86.20

100.00

100.00

94.44 80.00

100.00 100.00

84.61 54.15

100.00 100.00

87.20

80.23

100.00

100.00 98.18

91.66

66.66

100.00

100.00

100.00 100.00

100.00

94.73

100.00

100.00

100.00 95.00

95.00

100.00

100.00

100.00 90.24

90.24 94.11 90.19 93.33 61.11 100.00 100.00 90.00 100.00 98.61 98.61 80.55 100.00 96.30 96.30 80.00

91.66

100.00

100.00

66.66

100.00 90.47

100.00 86.11 100.00 80.76

100,00 81.94

96.55 100.00 100.00 100.00

100.00

---

...

73.76

100.00 91.46

100.00 84.00

+

...

22

A

TABLE XVI-NUMBER of UNEDUCATED CHILDREN in the Colony in 1891.

Number of Children of local school-age (6 to 16 years) in the Colony, as per Census of 1891:-

!

Boys, Girls,

......

..15,748

.......14,151

29,899*

Number of Scholars attending Public Schools under Government:-

Boys, Girls,

4,951

2,791

7,742

Private Schools :-

Boys, Girls,

1,706

310

2,016

9,758

Remaining uneducated or imperfectly educated,

20,141

389

* NOTE.—This uumber includes 7,601 Children (of school-going age) belonging to the boat population, viz.: 4,310 Boys and 3,291 Girls, and, at a rough estimate, about 2,000 purchased servant girls (of school-going age), of which two classes of children hardly any attend School at present.

E. J. EITEL, M.A., Ph. D. (Tubing.)

Inspector of Schools.

No. 1.

C.S.O.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

.OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 25th January, 1892.

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN), Chairman. the Acting Attorney General, (ANDREW JOHN LEACH).

"}

"}

the Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART LOCKHART).

}}

the Colonial Treasurer, (NORMAN GILBERT MITChell-Innes).

the Acting Surveyor General, (FRANCIS ALFRED COOPER).

the Acting Harbour Master, (WILLIAM CHARLES HOLLAND HASTINGS). CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

""

39

Ho KAI, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

The Honourable PHINEAS RYRIE.

ABSENT:

The Committee meet at the request of the Acting Colonial Secretary.

The Minutes of the last Meeting held on the 23rd November, 1891, were read and confirmed. Read the following Minutes under the hand of His Excellency the Governor :-

85 of 1892.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to re-vote the sum of Twenty-three thousand Seven hundred and Fifty-eight Dollars and Ninety-two Cents, ($23,758.92), for the following "Extraordinary Public Works" voted for 1891.

It was not possible to finish these works during last year, so a re-vote is required. Vaccine Institute:-

Original vote, Expended in 1891,.

Additions to Government House:-

Voted for 1891,

Expended in 1891,

District School-Kowloon:-

Balance,......

$ 3,500.00 1,812.77

$ 1,687.23

$15,000.00 7,929.31

Balance,.....

7,070.69

Original vote,

Expended in 1891,

.$ 8,000.00

Nil.

Balance,

8,000.00

Repair of the rain-storm damage-Yaumati:-

Amount voted,

Expended in 1891,

$ 7,037.00 36.00

Balance,...

7,001.00

$23,758.92

C.S.O.

2929 of 1891.

Government House, Hongkong, 14th January, 1892.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Five hundred Dollars, ($500), for the purchase of Twelve Pillar Letter-Boxes to be placed about the town with a view of increasing existing Postal facilities.

Government House, Hongkong, 29th December, 1891.

.

70

C. O. Desp. 304 of 1891.

C.S.O.

2547 of 1891.

C.S.O. 2622 of 1891.

C.S.O. 2918 of 1891.

C.S.O. 2989 of 1891.

C.S.0.

2809 of 1891.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Six hundred Dollars, ($600), to cover the increase to the salary of the Attorney General, from 1st January, 1892, sanctioned by the Secretary of State.

Government House, Hongkong, 22nd January, 1892.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Six hundred and two Dollars, ($602), for the purchase of clothing, bedding and furniture for the Chinese Lunatic Asylum.

Government House, Hongkong, 14th January, 1892.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Six thousand Five hundred Dollars, ($6,500), for lighting with Gas the roads and streets in the Kowloon Peninsula.

For erection and cost of lamps,

For maintenance and lighting of lamps, per annum, ......................

Government House, Hongkong, 8th January, 1892.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

$ 3,000.00

3,500.00

$6,500.00

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One hundred and Twenty Dollars, ($120), for allowance to Chinese Teacher to Mr. WATSON, Gaol Clerk.

Government House, Hongkong, 5th January, 1892.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

·

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Two thousand Dollars, ($2,000), for Furniture for Government House.

Note. Of the sum voted in 1888, $2,057.66 was not spent. The Council is asked to re-vote $2,000 of this sum, as additional furniture is now urgently required at Government House.

Government House, Hongkong, 11th January, 1892.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to re-vote the sum of Seven thousand and five hundred Dollars, ($7,500), for "New Streets, Kennedy Town."

Voted for the year 1887,

""

27

"}

Payments to date,

1888,

Balance unexpended,.

Government House, Hongkong, 14th January, 1892.

$25,000

25,000

$50,000

.$35,059

$14,941

The Acting Colonial Secretary moved that these votes be recommended to be passed by the Council.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

The Committee is then adjourned.

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 25th February, 1892.

Read and confirmed on the 25th February, 1892.

A. M. THOMSON,

Acting Clerk of Councils.

W. M. GOODMAN,

Chairman.

No. 2.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 25th February, 1892.

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN), Chairman.

the Acting Attorney General, (ANDREW JOHN LEACH).

the Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART Lockhart).

""

""

the Colonial Treasurer, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES).

""

the Acting Surveyor General, (FRANCIS ALFRED COOPER).

"

the Acting Harbour Master, (WILLIAM CHARLES HOLLAND HASTINGS). CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

*

71

*

17

21

Ho KAI, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS.

ABSENT:

The Honourable JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

The Committee meet at the request of the Acting Colonial Secretary.

The Minutes of the last Meeting held on the 25th January, 1892, were read and confirmed. Read the following Minutes under the hand of His Excellency the Governor :-

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

C. O. Desp. 314 of 1891.

C.S.O.

316 of 1892.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Forty-four Dollars, ($44), to cover the increase to the salary of the Clerk and Interpreter to the Magistrate acting as Coroner, being 20 per cent. over his pay, from 1st February, 1892.

Government House, Hongkong, 22nd February, 1892. WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Two thousand Eight hundred and Eight Dollars, ($2,808), for the Salary and Allowance of a Temporary Surveyor, whose work is to be in connection with the surveys and information required for the Squatters Board.

Salary per annum, Allowance for Chair,

.$2,520.00 238.00

$ 2,808.00

C. O. Desp. 4 of 1892.

Government House, Hongkong, 15th February, 1892. WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Twenty-six thousand Nine hun- dred and Thirty-seven Dollars and Fifty-seven Cents, ($26,937.57), equivalent of £3,928.7.11 @2/11 per Dollar, due to the War Department out of the sum of £116,000 contributed for Defence Works.

Government House, Hongkong, 22nd February, 1892.

The Committee agreed to recommend the first two votes to be passed by the Council and to postpone consideration of the third vote till Monday, the 7th March.

The Committee is then adjourned.

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 7th March, 1892.

Read and confirmed on the 14th March, 1892.

A. M. THOMSON, Acting Clerk of Councils.

W. M. GOODMAN,

Chairman.

No. 3.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 7th March, 1892.

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN), Chairman. the Acting Attorney General, (ANDREW JOHN LEACH).

""

""

the Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART LOCKHART).

the Colonial Treasurer, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES).

"}

the Surveyor General, (FRANCIS ALFRED COOPER).

""

the Acting Harbour Master, (WILLIAM CHARLES Holland Hastings). CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

14

73

"

:

9)

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS.

ABSENT:

The Honourable JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

The Committee meet at the request of the Acting Colonial Secretary.

The Minutes of the last Meeting held on the 25th February, 1892, were read and confirmed. Read the following Minute under the hand of His Excellency the Governor :-

C. O. Desp. 4 of 1892.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Twenty-six thousand Nine hun- dred and Thirty-seven Dollars and Fifty-seven Cents, ($26,937.57), equivalent of £3,928.7.11 @2/11 per Dollar, due to the War Department out of the sum of £116,000 contributed for Defence Works.

Government House, Hongkong, 22nd February, 1892.

The Colonial Secretary moved that the Committee recommend the Council to vote a sum of £3,928.7.11 due to the War Department out of the sum of £116,000 contributed for Defence Works.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to on a division by nine votes to one, the Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD voting against the motion.

The Committee is then adjourned.

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 14th March, 1892.

Read and confirmed on the 14th March, 1892.

A. M. THOMSson, Acting Clerk of Councils.

G. T. M. O'BRIEN,

Chairman.

1

No. 4.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 14th March, 1892.

75

C.S.O.

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (GEORGE THOMAS MICHAEL O'BRIEN, C.M.G.), Chairman.

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

""

>>

**

,,

22

the Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART LOCKHART).

the Colonial Treasurer, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES).

the Surveyor General, (FRANCIS ALFRED COOPER).

the Acting Harbour Master, (WILLIAM CHARLES HOLLAND HASTINGS). CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

Ho KAI, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS.

ABSENT:

The Honourable JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

The Committee meet at the request of the Colonial Secretary.

The Minutes of the last Meeting held on the 7th March, 1892, were read and confirmed. Read the following Minutes under the hand of His Excellency the Governor :-

6 of 1892.

C.S.O.

455 and 479

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One hundred and Eighty Dollars, ($180), for the salary of a Watchman to act also as Interpreter to the Colonial Veterinary Surgeon at $20 per month, from 1st April next.

Government House, Hongkong, 7th March, 1892.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Two hundred and Fifty Dollars, of 1892. ($250), for expenses in connection with Quarantine Commission, viz.:--

Honorarium to the Secretary,

Shorthand writer, for taking a verbatim note of evidence,

$ 200.00 50.00

$ 250.00

C. O. Desp.

7 of 1892.

Government House, Hongkong, 7th March, 1892. WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One hundred and Ninety-two Dollars, ($192), to cover an increase of $96 per annum from the 1st of January, 1891, to the Second Chinese Assistant in the Victoria College, whose office was accidentally omitted from the scheme for a general increase of salaries sanctioned by the Secretary of State's Despatch No. 110 of 19th June, 1890.

Government House, Hongkong, 5th March, 1892.

The Colonial Secretary moved that these votes be recommended to be passed by the Council. The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

The Committee is then adjourned.

:

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 28th March, 1892.

Read and confirmed on the 28th March, 1892.

A. M. THOMSON, Acting Clerk of Councils.

G. T. M. O'BRIEN,

Chairman.

No. 5.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 28th March, 1892.

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (GEORGE THOMAS MICHAEL O'BRIEN, C.M.G.), Chairman.

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

""

29

the Registrar General, (JAMES Haldane Stewart LOCKHART).

""

the Colonial Treasurer, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-Innes).

::

51

>>

77

""

the Surveyor General, (FRANCIS ALFRED COOPER).

the Acting Harbour Master, (WILLIAM CHARLES HOLLAND HASTINGS). CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

Ho KAI, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS.

ABSENT:

The Honourable JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

The Committee meet at the request of the Colonial Secretary.

The Minutes of the last Meeting held on the 14th March, 1892, were read and confirmed. Read the following Minutes under the hand of His Excellency the Governor :--

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Fifteen thousand Two hundred and Seventy-two Dollars and Eighteen Cents, ($15,272.18), being the difference between the aggregate of the expenditure to 31st of December, 1891, and of the amount provided in the Estimates for 1892, and the total Estimated Cost of the undermentioned Public Works :-

Estimated Cost.

Expenditure, 31st Dec., 1891.

Provided in 1892 Estimates.

Balance.

$

$

Slaughter House, Kowloon,

6,500

837.26

3,500

2,162.74

Civil Hospital Staff Quarters,

66,000

55,485.67

6,000

4,514.33

Quarters for Superintendent, Botanical and Afforesta- Į

tion Department,

20,100

15,093.34

2,500

2,506.66

District School, Saiyingpoon,

10,000

6,911.55

Nil.

3,088.45

Repairs to St. John's Cathedral,

3,000

Nil.

3,000.00

$ 15,272.18

C.S.0.

€18 of 1892.

Government House, Hongkong, 24th March, 1892.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Two thousand Seven hundred and Thirty-three Dollars and Eleven Cents, ($2,733.11), being the difference between the aggregate of the amount spent up to the 31st of December, 1891, ($1,266.89 as against $4,000 estimated expenditure) on the Extension of the Cattle Depôt (Extraordinary Public Works No. 10) and of the amount voted for this work on the Estimates for 1892 ($6,000), and the total estimated cost of the work, viz., $10,000.

Government House, Hongkong, 19th March, 1892.

77

78

C.S.O.

485 of 1892.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Four hundred and Eighty Dollars, ($480), to defray the rent of the Mercantile Marine Office at the Sailors' Home for Twelve months from January 1st to December 31st, 1892.

Government House, Hongkong, 18th March, 1892.

The Committee agreed to recommend these votes to be passed by the Council.

The Committee is then adjourned.

Read and confirmed on the 9th May, 1892.

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 11th April, 1892.

A. M. THOMSON, Acting Clerk of Councils.

G. T. M. O'BRIEN,

Chairman.

:

No. 6.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS ·

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,.

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 9th May, 1892.

79

C.S.O.

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (GEORGE THOMAS MICHAEL O'BRIEN, C.M.G.), Chairman.

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

the Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART LOCKHART).

27

the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY).

"

17

""

the Director of Public Works, (FRANCIS ALFRED Cooper).

the Harbour Master, (ROBERT MURRAY RUMSEY).

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS.

ABSENT:

The Honourable JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

The Committee meet at the request of the Colonial Secretary.

The Minutes of the last Meeting held on the 28th March, 1892, were read and confirmed. Read the following Minutes under the hand of His Excellency the Governor :--

1004 of 1892.

C.S.0.

693 of 1892.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One hundred and Thirty Dollars, ($130), for the purchase of a new boat for the use of Swatow Postal Agent.

Government House, Hongkong, 4th May, 1892.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Fifteen hundred Dollars, ($1,500), for the purchase of furniture for the new quarters for the Nursing Staff at the Government Civil Hospital.

The expenditure will be more than covered by a surplus on the vote for the building. Government House, Hongkong, 22nd April, 1892.

The Committee agreed to recommend these votes to be passed by the Council.

The Committee is then adjourned.

Read and confirmed on the 16th May, 1892.

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 16th May, 1892.

A. M. THOMSON,

Acting Clerk of Councils.

G. T. M. O'BRIEN,

Chairman.

No. 7.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 16th May, 1892.

81

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (GEORGE THOMAS MICHAEL O'BRIEN, C.M.G.), Chairman.

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

""

ན་

the Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART Lockhart). the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY).

""

""

the Director of Public Works, (Francis Alfred Cooper).

**

99

the Harbour Master, (ROBERT MURRAY RUMSEY). CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

""

""

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS.

ABSENT:

The Honourable JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

The Committee meet at the request of the Colonial Secretary.

The Minutes of the last Meeting held on the 9th May, 1892, were read and confirmed. Read the following Minutes under the hand of His Excellency the Governor :-

0.5.0. 402 of 1892.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One thousand Nine hundred and Eighty-one Dollars, ($1,981), for repairs to Health Officer's Steam-launch Blanche, viz. :----

For general overhaul and repairs,

For providing a launch while the repairs are being executed, To caulk and re-copper her all over,...........................

New water tanks, repair to propeller blades, boiler, &c.,

....

$ 891.00

70.00

500.00

520.00

$ 1,981.00

C.S.O. 793 of 1892.

Government House, Hongkong, 6th May, 1892.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Two thousand Dollars, ($2,000), for "Drawback and refund of Revenue."

It has been the practice hitherto to pay refunds from the collections under the respective heads of receipt. As this practice is contrary to regulation and is about to be discontinued a vote is required to cover such payments.

Governinent House, Hongkong, 12th May, 1892.

The Committee agreed to recommend these votes to be passed by the Council.

The Committee is then adjourned.

Read and confirmed on the 7th June, 1892.

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 23rd May, 1892.

A. M. THOMSON,

Acting Clerk of Councils.

G. T. M. O'BRIEN,

Chairman.

No. 8.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 7th June, 1892.

83

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (GEORGE THOMAS MICHAEL O'BRIEN, C.M.G.), Chairman.

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

""

""

the Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART LOCKHART).

""

the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY).

""

the Director of Public Works, (FRANCIS ALFRED COOPER).

}}

the Harbour Master, (ROBERT Murray Rumsey).

""

29

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

""

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS.

ABSENT:

The Honourable JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

The Committee meet at the request of the Colonial Secretary.

The Minutes of the last Meeting held on the 16th May, 1892, were read and confirmed.

Read the following Minutes under the hand of His Excellency the Governor :-

C.S.O. 1314 of 1892.

C.S.O.

947 of 1892.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Fifteen hundred Dollars, ($1,500), being supplementary provision to defray incidental expenses in the Police Department.

The Department has now to pay for its water and disinfectants which were formerly supplied gratis, and the extra expenditure was not foreseen in framing the Estimates for the current year.

Government House, Hongkong, 31st May, 1892.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Five hundred and Eighty-seven Dollars, and Thirty-three Cents, ($587.33), being the difference between the amount voted in the Estimates for this year and the actual sum due to the Telegraph Company, for the cost of Telegraph Cable, aërial line and Morse instruments connecting the Gap Rock with the Harbour Office at Hongkong.

Amount due

.$87,253.33

Estimated for

86,666.00

$

587.33

C.S.O.

1323 of 1892.

Government House, Hongkong, 19th May, 1892.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Twelve hundred Dollars, ($1,200), to defray the cost of Clothing for the Gaol Staff and Prisoners not provided for in the Estimates for the current year.

Government House, Hongkong, 3rd June, 1892.

84

C.S.O.

1295 of 1892.

C.S.O.

810 of 1892.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Five thousand Dollars, ($5,000), as supplementary provision for the cost of passages and bonuses in lieu of passage, in the Police Department.

Previous to this year bonuses were paid by the Treasury out of the vote for Pensions, Retired Allowances and Gratuities.

In this year's Estimates the item "bonuses" was transferred to the Police Department and coupled with "passages," but no corresponding increase made to the latter vote.

The vote now asked for is merely to effect a matter of account, as the Treasury vote will be relieved by the amount added to the Police vote.

Government House, Hongkong, 1st June, 1892.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Three thousand Eight hundred and Sixty-eight Dollars, ($3,868), for the expenditure required for an improved system of signalling the approach of vessels to the port as follows:-

Completing direct telegraphic communication between Post Office and Gap

Rock,

Completing direct telegraphic communication between Post Office and

Kowloon,

Providing quarters at the Gap Rock,

37

at Cape D'Aguilar,

Three clerks (for 3 months),

Two signalmen (for 3 months),

Government House, Hongkong, 4th June, 1892.

The Committee agreed to recommend these votes to be passed by the Council.

$ 150.00

700.00

2,000.00

700.00

270.00

48.00

$ 3,868.00

The Committee also agreed, at the instance of the Colonial Secretary, to recommend that a sum of $171 for the purchase of flags be added to the vote for improving the signalling of the approach of vessels to the port.

The Committee is then adjourned.

Read and confirmed on the 16th November, 1892.

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 16th November, 1892.

F. H. MAY,

Acting Clerk of Councils.

G. T. M. O'BRIEN,

Chairman.

No. 9.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 16th November, 1892.

85

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (GEORGE THOMAS MICHAEL O'BRIEN, C.M.G.), Chairman.

the Acting Attorney General, (Andrew Joan Leach).

"

>>

17

"9

""

the Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART LOCKHART). the Colonial Treasurer, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHEL-INNES).

the Director of Public Works, (FRANCIS ALFRED COOPER).

the Harbour Master, (ROBERT MURRAY RUMSEY).

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS.

""

JAMES JARDINE BELL-IRVING.

>3

C.S.O.

The Committee meet at the request of the Colonial Secretary.

Read the following Minutes under the hand of His Excellency the Governor :-

1452 of 1892.

C.S.Q.

1454 of 1892.

C.S.0.

1538 of 1899.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Five hundred Dollars, ($500), as a building grant under the Grant-in-aid scheme being half the cost of new Grant-in-aid School built by the Basel Mission at Sham-shui-po which has taken the place of a Government School in the same place.

Government House, Hongkong, 25th June, 1892.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Seven thousand One hundred and Fifty Dollars, ($7,150), to meet the extra expenditure during the current year on the Government Civil Hospital votes (under-estimated in the Estimates) for the following items:-

Bedding, Médicines,

Medical comforts,

Light and Fuel,

Washing,

Incidental Expenditure,

Government House, Hongkong, 29th June, 1892.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

$ 1,250.00

1,750.00

1,200.00

2,000.00

350.00

600.00

$7,150.00

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Five thousand Dollars, ($5,000), to supplement the vote in the Estimates for maintenance of roads and bridges out of Victoria, ($15,000), the expenditure under which has been unexpectedly heavy.

There will be a corresponding saving of expenditure under the vote "maintenance of roads and bridges in Kowloon."

Government House, Hongkong, 29th June, 1892.

86

C.S.O.

1573 of 1892.

C.S.O.

1832 of 1892.

C.S.O.

1835 of 1892.

C.S.O.

1986 of 1892.

C.S.O. 2082 of 1892.

C. O. Desp. 178 of 1892.

C.S.O. ́2063 of 1892.

C.S.0, 2054 of 1892.

C.S.O. 1323 of 1892.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Fourteen thousand Dollars, ($14,000), for "Repairs to Buildings."

This additional vote has become necessary owing in a great measure to the liabilities on account of work done during the last two years, but paid out of this year's vote.

Government House, Hongkong, 1st July, 1892.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Six hundred Dollars, ($600), to meet the charges made by the Water and Drainage Department for the supply of water to the Gaol during the current year.

The water was formerly supplied free, but since this year has been charged for, and paid from the vote for "Incidental Expenses."

Government House, Hongkong, 26th July, 1892.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Two hundred and Sixty Dollars, ($260), as an additional sum required for the Governor's Department to meet the expenses for repairs of Public Furniture at Government House, and Incidental Expenses.

Government House, Hongkong, 26th July, 1892.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One thousand Dollars, ($1,000), for the repair of the main sewer in Robinson Road, Kowloon, damaged by the roots of the trees planted along the sides of the road.

Government House, Hongkong, 15th August, 1892.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Five thousand Dollars, ($5,000), to cover the cost of Stationery for 1892, the requisitions for which arrived too late to be included in the 1891 Account.

Government House, Hongkong, 24th August, 1892.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One hundred thousand Dollars, ($100,000), in order to provide for the payment before the end of the year, as prescribed in rules 63 and 77 of the Financial Instructions, of the salaries for the month of December and other authorised charges properly chargeable against the votes of the year.

The salaries for December, 1891, and certain other charges were paid in January of this year, in accordance with the practice which has hitherto prevailed in this Colony.

In order to carry out the object referred to above, it will therefore be necessary to exceed the Estimates for the current year by the amount (approximately stated above) of the salaries and charges of one month.

Government House, Hongkong, 31st August, 1892.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Four thousand and Eighty-three Dollars and Thirty Cents, ($4,083.30), to cover the cost of certain additional works on the Reclamation from the sea at Kennedy Town, which were unforeseen when the Contract for the Reclamation was entered into.

Government House, Hongkong, 9th September, 1892.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Five hundred Dollars, ($500), being additional sum required to defray the cost of Clothing, Bedding, &c., for the Gaol Staff and Prisoners.

(Supplementary sum voted in June last for Sheeting Material and Blankets, $1,200. Actual cost of these articles amounted to £245, or something over $1,700.)

Government House, Hongkong, 13th September, 1892.

87

C.S.O.

2329 of 1892.

C.S.O.

1980 of 1892.

C.S.O. 336 of 1892.

C.S.O.

2392 of 1892.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Fourteen thousand Five hundred and Fifty Dollars and Forty-three Cents, ($14,550.43), for Military Contribution, being excess caused by lower rate of exchange than estimated for.

Government House, Hongkong, 28th September, 1892.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Two thousand Six hundred and Eighty-five Dollars and Twelve Cents, ($2,685.12), to cover the cost of the prolongation of storm water drains in Centre and Eastern Streets.

Government House, Hongkong, 29th September, 1892.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Three hundred and Twenty Dollars, ($320), to meet the charges made by the Water and Drainage Department for the supply of water to the Botanical and Afforestation Department during the current year. The water was formerly supplied free, but since this year has been charged for. Government House, Hongkong, 8th October, 1892.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Three thousand Dollars, ($3,000), as additional vote required to cover the total expenditure on the repairs of St. John's Cathedral Church.

Government House, Hongkong, 13th October, 1892.

The Committee agreed to recommend these votes to be passed by the Council.

C.S.O. 1303 & 1350

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One thousand Three hundred of 1892. and Four Dollars, and Seventy-three Cents, ($1,304.73), viz.:—

For a special Chronograph fitted with electrical control, battery, &c., for the Observ- atory, £114.0.1 @2/10d. $804.73. The instrument was ordered in 1889, but was only received in the Colony this year.

For additional expenditure under "Laboratory expenses" and "Office Contingencies,"

$500.00, the votes for current year having been under-estimated.

Government House, Hongkong, 14th June, 1892.

The Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD objected to the vote and the Committee divided with the following result :-

Aye.

Honourable E. R. BELILIOS.

No.

Honourable J. J. BELL-IRVING.

the Harbour Master.

T. H. WHITEHEAD.

""

""

the Director of Public Works.

HO KAI.

""

the Colonial Treasurer.

C. P. CHATER.

""

>>

the Registrar General.

"}

the Acting Attorney General.

""

the Colonial Secretary.

The Committee is then adjourned.

Read and confirmed on the 21st November, 1892.

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 21st November, 1892.

F. H. MAY,

Acting Clerk of Councils.

:

G. T. M. O'BRIEN,

Chairman.

No. 10.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 21st November, 1892.

89

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (GEORGE THOMAS MICHAEL O'BRIEN, C.M.G.), Chairman. the Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART LOCKHART).

""

"1

the Colonial Treasurer, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-Innes).

;;

19

""

""

""

the Director of Public Works, (FRANCIS ALFRED Cooper).

the Harbour Master, (ROBERT MURRAY RUMSEY).

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHitehead.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS.

JAMES JARDINE BELL-IRVING.

ABSENT:

The Honourable the Acting Attorney General, (Andrew John LEACH).

The Committee meet at the request of the Colonial Secretary.

The Minutes of the Meetings held on the 7th June and 16th November, 1892, were read and confirmed.

The Colonial Secretary invited the opinion of Honourable Members as to whether the Government should elect to pay the Military Contribution for 1893 in sterling or at the Treasury rate of exchange.

After some discussion it was agreed that the matter should be taken again into consideration at the next meeting of the Finance Committee.

ESTIMATES, 1893.-The Honourable C. P. CHATER proposed that the consideration of the Esti- mates for 1893 be postponed until next meeting.

The Honourable Ho KAI seconded.

It was agreed to postpone consideration until Friday, the 25th instant, at 2.30 P.M. SUPPLEMENTARY ESTIMATES, 1891.-The Committee then proceeded to consider the Supple- mentary Appropriation Bill of $360,687.37 to defray the charges of the year 1891.

The Committee agreed that the votes be passed.

The Committee then adjourned till Friday, the 25th November, 1892, at 2.30 P.M.

Read and confirmed on the 25th November, 1892.

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 30th November, 1892.

F. H. MAY, Acting Clerk of Councils.

G. T. M. O'BRIEN,

Chairman.

No. 11.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 25th November, 1892.

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (GEORGE THOMAS MICHAEL O'BRIEN, C.M.G.), Chairman.

the Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART LOCKHART).

the Colonial Treasurer, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES).

>>

""

the Director of Public Works, (FRANCIS ALFRED COOPER).

";

the Harbour Master, (ROBERT MURRAY RUMSEY).

??

""

""

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

Ho KAI, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS.

JAMES JARDine Bell-IrvING.

ABSENT:

The Honourable the Acting Attorney General, (ANDREW JOHN LEACH).

The Committee met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 21st instant, were read and confirmed.

The Committee then proceed to consider the Bill to apply a sum not exceeding Two Millions Three Hundred and Sixteen thousand Six hundred and Eleven Dollars for the service of the year 1893.

Items 1-Charges on account of Public Debt"--and 2-" Pensions"--were agreed to without amendment.

Item 3.-"Governor and Legislature."-The Honourable C. P. CHATER moved, as an amendment,-

That the salaries (included in the item) which have been increased under the general scheme of

increase be reduced to what they were before the sitting of the Committee of 1890.

The Honourable Ho KAI seconded. Question put.

The Committee divided.

For.

Honourable J. J. BELL-IRVING.

E. R. BELILIOS.

""

";

""

T. H. WHITEHEAD.

HO KAI.

C. P. CHATER.

The Chairman did not vote.

The amendment was carried by a majority of 1.

Against.

Honourable Harbour Master.

>>

""

Director of Public Works. Colonial Treasurer.

>>

Registrar General.

Item 4.-"Colonial Secretary's Department."-The Honourable C. P. CHATER moved, as an amendment,

--

That the salaries (included in the item) which have been increased under the general scheme of increase be reduced to what they were before the sitting of the Committee of 1890, and that the item be further reduced by a sum of $7,200 on account of Passed Cadets.

Honourable Ho KAI seconded.

Question put.

The Committee divided.

For.

Honourable J. J. BELL-IRVING.

E. R. BELILIOS.

>>

T. H. WHITEHEAD.

>>

Η ΚΑΙ.

""

C. P. CHATER.

>>

The Chairman did not vote.

The amendment was carried by a majority of 1.

Against.

Honourable Harbour Master.

Director of Public Works.

"}

Colonial Treasurer.

""

>>

Registrar General,

>

91

92

Item 5.--" Audit Department."-The Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD moved, as an amendment,—

That the item be struck out of the Bill.

The Honourable Ho KAI seconded.

Question put.

The Committee divided.

For.

Against.

Honourable J. J. BELL-IRVING.

Honourable Harbour Master.

E. R. BELILIOS.

""

""

Director of Public Works. Colonial Treasurer.

Registrar General.

""

T. H. WHITEHEAD.

HO KAI.

C. P. CHATER.

The Chairman did not vote.

The amendment was carried by a majority of 1.

Item 6.-"Treasury."- The Honourable C. P. CHATER moved, as an amendment,-

That the salaries (included in the item) which have been increased under the general scheme of

increase be reduced to what they were before the sitting of the Committee of 1890.

The Honourable Ho Kar seconded.

Question put.

The Committee divided.

For.

Honourable J. J. BELL-IRVING.

E. R. BELILIOS.

T. H. WHITEHEAD. HO KAI.

Against.

Honourable Harbour Master.

""

Director of Public Works. Colonial Treasurer. Registrar General.

""

C. P. CHATER.

""

The Chairman did not vote.

The amendment was carried by a majority of 1.

Item 7.—“Public Works Department."-The Chairman moved,---

That instead of the words "Foreman Mason," on page 18 of the Estimates for 1893, the word "Ditto" be substituted, and that the second asterisk on the same page be removed and the word "Ditto" opposite it be printed in Roman characters.

The Honourable Director of Public Works seconded.

The motion was agreed to.

The Honourable C. P. CHATER moved, as an amendment,

That the salaries (included in the item) which have been increased under the general scheme of

increase be reduced to what they were before the sitting of the Committee of 1890.

The Honourable HO KAI seconded.

Question put.

The Committee divided.

For.

:

Against.

Honourable J. J. BELL-IRVING.

Honourable Harbour Master.

E. R. BELILIOS.

>>

T. H. WHITEHEAD.

""

HO KAI.

""

C. P. CHATER.

""

The Chairman did not vote.

""

Director of Public Works. Colonial Treasurer. Registrar General.

:

The amendment was carried by a majority of 1.

Item 8." Post Office."-The Honourable C. P. CHATER moved, as an amendment,-

That the salaries (included in the item) which have been increased under the general scheme of

increase be reduced to what they were before the sitting of the Committee of 1890. ·

The Honourable HO KAI Seconded.

Question put.

The Committee divided.

For.

Honourable J. J. BELL-IRVING.

E. R. BELILIOS.

T. H. WHITEHEAD.

HO KAI.

""

>>

C. P. CHATER.

Against.

Honourable Harbour Master.

Director of Public Works. Colonial Treasurer.

""

};

Registrar General.

The Chairman did not vote.

The amendment was carried by a majority of 1.

x

93

Item 9.-" Registrar General's Office."-The Honourable C. P. CHATter moved,—

That the salaries (included in the item) which have been increased under the general scheme of

increase be reduced to what they were before the sitting of the Committee of 1890,

The Honourable Ho KAI seconded.

The Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD moved, as a further amendment,—

That the item be struck out of the Bill.

Motion not seconded.

The original amendment was put.

The Committee divided.

For.

Against.

Honourable J. J. BELL-IRving.

Honourable Harbour Master.

E. R. BELILIOS.

;)

"}

T. H. WHITEHEAD.

Director of Public Works. Colonial Treasurer.

>>

""

""

Registrar General.

HO KAI.

C. P. CHATER.

The Chairman did not vote.

The amendment was carried by a majority of 1.

Item 10.-"Harbour Master's Department."--The Honourable C. P. CHATER moved, as an amendment,-

That the salaries (included in the item) which have been increased under the general scheme of

increase be reduced to what they were before the sitting of the Committee of 1890.

The Honourable HO KAI seconded.

The Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD moved, as a further amendment,-

That the item be also reduced by the salary of the Assistant Harbour Master.

Motion not seconded.

The original amendment was put. The Committee divided.

For.

Honourable J. J. BELL-IRVING.

E. R. BELILIOS.

""

T. H. WHITEHEAD.

>"

HO KAL

""

C. P. CHATER.

""

Against.

Honourable Harbour Master.

>>

Director of Public Works, Colonial Treasurer.

">

"}

Registrar General.

The Chairman did not vote.

The amendment was carried by a majority of 1.

Item 11.--"6.

"Lighthouses."-The Honourable C. P. CHATER moved, as an amendment,

That the salaries (included in the item) which have been increased under the general scheme of

increase be reduced to what they were before the sitting of the Committee of 1890.

The Honourable HO KAI seconded.

Question put.

The Committee divided.

For.

Against.

Honourable J. J. BELL-IRVING.

Honourable Harbour Master.

E. R. BELILIOS.

""

T. H. WHITEHEAD.

Director of Public Works. Colonial Treasurer.

;)

HO KAI.

">

""

Registrar General.

C. P. CHATER.

The Chairman did not vote.

The amendment was carried by a majority of 1.

Item 12.---"Observatory."-

"The Chairman moved,-

That the item of £50 ($364), as payment to the Eastern Extensim Telegraph Company for

working the cable at their end, be re-inserted in the Estimates.

The Honourable Director of Public Works seconded.

Motion agreed to.

!

94

The Honourable C. P. CHATER moved, as an amendment,-

That the salaries (included in the item) which have been increased under the general scheme of

increase be reduced to what they were before the sitting of the Committee of 1890.

The Honourable Ho KAI seconded.

Question put.

The Committee divided.

For.

Honourable J. J. BELL-IRVING.

E. R. BELILIOS.

29

Honourable Harbour Master.

Against.

Director of Public Works. Colonial Treasurer.

""

Registrar General.

""

27

T. H. WHITEHEAD.

HO KAI.

C. P. CHATER.

The Chairman did not vote..

The amendment was carried by a majority of 1.

Items 13-"Stamp Office"-and 14-"Botanical and Afforestation Department." The Honourable C. P. CHATER moved, as an amendment,

That the salaries (included in the items) which have been increased under the general scheme of

increase be reduced to what they were before the sitting of the Committee of 1890.

The Honourable HO KAI seconded.

Question put.

The Committee divided.

For.

Honourable J. J. BELL-IRVING.

E. R. BELILIOS.

""

T. H. WHITEHEAD.

HO KAI.

""

C. P. CHATER.

"2

Against.

Honourable Harbour Master.

""

""

Director of Public Works. Colonial Treasurer.

Registrar General.

The Chairman did not vote.

The amendment was carried by a majority of 1.

Item 15.-"Legal Departments."-The Chairman moved,—

That the sum of $5,400 be inserted in the Estimates, instead of the sum of $6,480, as the salary

of the Registrar of the Supreme Court.

The Honourable Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Motion agreed to.

The Honourable C. P. CHATER moved, as an amendment,-

That the salaries (included in the item) which have been increased under the general scheme of

increase be reduced to what they were before the sitting of the Committee of 1890.

The Honourable Ho KAI seconded.

Question put.

The Committee divided.

For.

Honourable J. J. BELL-IRVING.

E. R. BELILIOS.

""

T. H. WHITEHEAD.

"}

HO KAI.

"

C. P. CHATER.

Honourable Harbour Master.

Against.

Director of Public Works. Colonial Treasurer.

""

Registrar General.

The Chairman did not vote.

The amendment was carried by a majority of 1.

Item 16.-"Ecclesiastical Department."

Item agreed to without amendment.

Item 17.-" Education."--The Honourable C. P. CHATER moved, as an amendment,-

That the salaries (included in the item) which have been increased under the general scheme of

increase be reduced to what they were before the sitting of the Committee of 1890.

The Honourable HO KAI seconded.

Question put.

The Committee divided.

For.

Honourable J. J. BELL-IRVING.

E. R. BELILIOS.

""

T. H. WHITEHEAD.

"}

HO KAI.

C. P. CHATER.

""

The Chairman did not vote.

The amendment was carried by a majority of 1.

Against.

Honourable Harbour Master.

Director of Public Works. Colonial Treasurer. Registrar General.

:

95

Item 18.- Medical."-

"The Honourable C. P. CHATER moved, as an amendment,--

That the salaries (included in the item) which have been increased under the general scheme of

increase be reduced to what they were before the sitting of the Committee of 1890.

The Honourable HO KAI seconded.

Question put.

The Committee divided.

For.

Honourable J. J. BELL-IRVING.

E. R. BELILIOS.

""

19

T. H. WHITEHEAD.

HO KAI.

C. P. CHATER.

The Chairman did not vote.

The amendment was carried by a majority of 1.

Against.

Honourable Harbour Master.

""

Director of Public Works. Colonial Treasurer.

""

">

Registrar General.

Item 19.-"Magistracy."-Honourable HO KAI moved, as an amendment, ----

That the salaries (included in the item) which have been increased under the general scheme of increase be reduced to what they were before the sitting of the Committee of 1890, and that the item be further reduced by the salary of one Police Magistrate.

The Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD Seconded.

Question put.

The Committee divided.

For.

Honourable J. J. BELL-Irving.

">

>>

E. R. BELILIOS.

T. H. WHITEHEAD.

HO KAI.

C. P. CHATER.

Against.

Honourable Harbour Master.

>>

Director of Public Works, Colonial Treasurer.

;"

Registrar General.

The Chairman did not vote.

The amendment was carried by a majority of 1.

Item 20.-"Police."--The Honourable C. P. CHATER moved, as an amendment,--

That the salaries (included in the item) which have been increased under the general scheme of

increase be reduced to what they were before the sitting of the Committee of 1890.

The Honourable HO KAI seconded.

Question put.

The Committee divided.

Y

For.

Honourable J. J. BELL-IRVING.

E. R. BELILIOS.

T. H. WHITEHEAD.

HO KAI.

Against.

Honourable Harbour Master.

""

""

Director of Public Works. Colonial Treasurer.

Registrar General.

""

C. P. CHATER.

""

The Chairman did not vote.

The amendment was carried by a majority of 1.

Item 21.--"Gaol."

Item 22.-"Fire Brigade."

Item 23.-"Sanitary Department."

The Honourable C. P. CHATER moved, as an amendment,-

That the salaries (included in the items) which have been increased under the general scheme of

increase be reduced to what they were before the sitting of the Committee of 1890.

The Honourable HO KAI seconded.

Question put.

The Committee divided.

For.

Honourable J. J. BELL-IRVING.

>>

E. R. BELILIOS.

T. H. WHITEHEAD.

HO KAI

Against.

Honourable Harbour Master.

Director of Public Works. Colonial Treasurer.

""

""

Registrar General.

C. P. CHATER.

The Chairman did not vote.

The amendment was carried by a majority of 1,

96

Items 24-"Charitable Allowances "-and 25-" Transport."

Agreed to without amendment.

Item 26.-"Miscellaneous Services."-The Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD moved-

That the vote for subscription to REUTER'S telegrams be struck out

Motion not seconded.

Item agreed to.

Item 27.-"Military Expenditure."-The Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD moved-

That the item "Expenses of Volunteers" be reduced to what it was in 1891.

Motion not seconded.

Item agreed to.

Item 28.-" Public Works Recurrent."-The Honourable Director of Public Works moved--

That the second vote and the last but one in the item, for telegraphs, be amalgamated.

The Chairman seconded.

Motion agreed to.

The item was agreed to.

Item 29.-"Public Works Extraordinary."-The Chairman intimated that the vote for "Gaol Extension was withdrawn.

""

Item agreed to.

It was decided by the Committee, Mr. WHITEHEAD dissenting, to recommend that the Military Contribution for 1893 be paid at the Treasury rate of Exchange.

The Committee is then adjourned.

Read and confirmed on the 30th November, 1892.

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 30th November, 1892.

F. H. MAY, Acting Clerk of Councils.

1

G. T. M. O'BRIEN,

Chairman.

No. 12.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 30th November, 1892.

97

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (GEORGE THOMAS MICHAEL O'BRIEN, C.M.G.), Chairman.

the Acting Attorney General, (ANDREW JOHN LEACH).

"}

39

>>

15

the Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART LOCKHART).

the Colonial Treasurer, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-Innes).

the Director of Public Works, (FRANCIS ALFRED COOPER).

the Harbour Master, (ROBERT MURRAY RUMSEY).

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS.

ABSENT:

The Honourable JAMES JARDINE BELL-IRVING.

The Committee meet at the request of the Colonial Secretary.

The Minutes of the last Meeting held on the 25th November, were taken as read and were confirmed. Read the following Minute under the hand of His Excellency the Governor :-

C.S.O. 983 of 1892.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One thousand Three hundred and Thirty-eight Dollars and Twenty-five Cents, ($1,338.25), to meet the charges made by the Water and Drainage Department against the Sanitary Department, for the supply of water to various Markets, during the current year.

Government House, Hongkong, 25th November, 1892.

The Colonial Secretary moved that this vote be recommended to be passed by the Council,

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question--put and agreed to.

The Committee is then adjourned.

Read and confirmed on the 11th January, 1893.

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 14th December, 1892.

F. H. MAY,

Acting Clerk of Councils.

G. T. M. O'BRIEN,

Chairman.

#

101

No. 12

1.

92.

HONGKONG.

REPORT OF THE ACTING SUPERINTENDENT OF FIRE BRIGADE FOR 1891.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor, on the 25th January, 1892.

No. 4.

FIRE BRIGADE DEPARTMENT,

HONGKONG, 6th January, 1892.

SIR,-I have the honour to submit for the information of His Excellency the Governor the follow- ing report on the Government Fire Brigade for the

year 1891. Fires, &c.

1. During the year there were 81 fires and alarms of fire; and the value of the property destroyed is estimated at $33,320.

2. The following table shews the number of fires at which the services of the Brigade were required, each year, during the last ten years.

1891,... 1890,.... 1889.

1888,

8 fires.

1886,

.16

""

1885,

..21

""

1884,

··45

.35

"

1883, 1882,

..11 fires. ....11

"

....18

**

......11

8

""

1887,

3. In my report for the year 1888 I attributed the enormous increase in the number of fires to the effects of " Cheap Fire Insurance," and I think the great decrease during the last three years is due, in great measure, if not entirely, to the action of the Fire Insurance Companies and to the pro- ceedings under the Fire Enquiry Ordinance (No. 23 of 1888).

4. Of the fires that took place during the year three only were the subject of official enquiry under the Ordinance, and no prosecution was instituted.

5. I am glad to be able to report, that no casualty whatever occurred at any of the fires.

6. The fires on the 5th and 6th May last, both occurred close to the Electric Light lines and shewed clearly the disadvantages of the present system of overhead Electric Light wires. In the first case, the line was damaged by the fire, and the firemen, in consequence, ran additional risk to life and limb, and in the second, to avoid accidents, the current was shut off, thereby plunging part of the City into almost total darkness.

The Brigade.

7. No change was made in the numerical strength of the Brigade during the year. The present Establishment consists of:

Chinese.

Superintendent,...

European.

1..

Assitant Superintendent,

1..

Engineer,

1...........

Assistant Engineer,

· 1...........

Clerk,..

1

Engine Drivers,

4.........

3

Assistant Do.,

3.........

Stokers,.

..10

Overseer of Water Works, ....

1.

Inspector of Dangerous Goods,

1.

Assistant to Do.,

1

Foremen,

3...

Assistant Foremen,

Firemen,

Chinese Contingent,.

Seamen,

Watchmen,

5...

.28.....

.22

4

2

....15

Total,...

49

58

102

8. I am pleased to be able to report, that the conduct of the men has been good. The engines, stores, and gear generally, have been carefully attended to by Mr. CAMPBELL, the Assistant Engineer. 9. The laying of the new water mains throughout the City has nearly been completed, and I am of opinion that during the current year, the number of Manual Engines may safely be reduced, and a saving to the Government thus effected.

10. I enclose a report by Mr. KINGHORN, the Engineer, on the present state of the engines; and also a return of fires and alarms of fire during the year.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

The Honourable W. MEIGH GOODMAN,

Acting Colonial Secretary.

GEO. HORSPOOL,

Acting Supt., Fire Brigade.

HONGKONG, 6th January, 1892.

SIR,-I have the honour to forward herewith a report on the state of the Government Fire Engines for the year ending 31st December, 1891.

STEAMER NO. 1.

(Floating Engine) by Messrs. Merryweather & Co.

This Engine has been 24 years in service. In the month of October last, the Launch, Engine Boiler and Pumps, received a general overhaul and were put in good order. The time occupied by these repairs was 14 days. During the year this Engine has not been disabled at a fire, and is now

in good working order.

STEAMER NO. 2.

(Land Engine) by Messrs. Merryweather & Co.

This Engine has been 23 years in service. During the year it has not been used at a fire, has been kept in reserve and only used at drill for drivers, it is now laid up for a general overhaul and the repairs are not yet completed.

STEAMER No. 3.

(Land Engine) by Messrs. Shand & Mason.

This Engine has been 12 years in service. During the year it has worked well, has not been disabled at a fire, and is now in good order.

STEAMER No. 4.

(Land Engine) by Messrs. Shand & Mason.

This Engine has been 9 years in service. During the year it has not been disabled at a fire, has been examined and tested, and is now in good working order.

STEAMER No. 5.

(Land Engine) by Messrs. Shand & Mason.

This Engine has been 5 years in service, it is now in good working order.

STEAMER No. 6 (late Volunteer).

This Engine has been 12 years in service, (9 years in Volunteer Brigade). During the year it has done some good work, has not been disabled at a fire and is now in good order.

Manual Engines (9) all in good working order.

The Assistant Engineer and Engine drivers have given every attention to their duties and have always attended promptly to the calls on the Fire Department.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

JOHN W. KINGHORN, Engineer, Government Fire Brigade.

TO GEO. HORSPOOL, Esquire,

Acting Superintendent, Government Fire Brigade.

FIRES AND ALARMS, 1891.

No. of

BUILDINGS

No.

DATE.

TIME.

SITUATION OF FIRE.

DESTROYED.

DAMAGE.

CAUSE.

REMARKS.

Wholly. Partly.

"

3

""

>>

""

""

""

3,

4,

4,

8,

11,

15,

7 p.m.

11 p.m.

7 a.m.

7 a.m.

1

Jan.

1,

2

1.50 a.m.

7.30 p.m.

Grass on billside near Lyeemun Fort, Godowns of Jardine, Matheson & Co., East Point, House No. 145, Queen's Road East,..

Nil

Unknown.

...

Slight

Do.

Do.

Incendiarism,

Chimney of the Hongkong Dispensary,

Nil

Unknown.

Houses Nos. 170 and 172, Third Street,

5

$3,000

Do.,

Chimney of House No. 10, Pokfulam Road,

Nil

Do.

A bottle of kerosine was found burning on the staircase.

Insured in Messrs. Reuter, Brockelmann & Co. for $3,000.

Chimney of the Stag Hotel,

Slight

Do.

28,

""

5.50 p.m.

House No. 6, Fuk Sau Lane,

Trifling

Do.

9

30,

""

8.45 p.m.

A stack of grass at Tai Hang Village,

Do.

Do.

...

10

30,

J+

9 p.m.

11

Feb.

8,

5.15 a.m.

A quantity of rubbish lying in Tank Lane, House No. 353, Queen's Road West,..

Nil

Do.

1

2

$700

Accidental upsetting of a lamp,

No Insurance.

12

235

8,

4 a.m.

Victoria Barracks,

$20

Unknown.

:

13

9,

"

2 p.m.

House No. 8, Ice House Street,..

$10

Do.

14

11,

""

5.30 p.m.

15

12,

7.40 p.m.

House No. 20, Hollywood Road,

16

13,

2.30 p.m.

17

39

16,

1 p.m.

Grass on the hillside above Wong Nei Chung,

Lo Tsz Hing's Coal Godowns, No. 13, Praya East,...

Grass on hillside at Deep Water Bay,

Nil

Do.

...

Trifling

Breaking of a kerosine lamp.

18

22,

7 p.m.

A Hut at Aplichau,....

19

24,

11.45 a.m.

Grass on North side of Mount Davis,

""

20

24,

99

1.30 p.m.

21 March 1,

7.45 p.m.

Grass on hillside above Bowen Road, House No. 39, East Street,

...

22

11,

""

4.30 p.m.

British S.S. Arratoon Apcar,

23

13,

""

4.50 p.m.

House No. 9, Queen's Road Central,..

24

15,

Chimney of House No. 43, Elgin Street,

25

18,

5 p.m.

House No. 57, East Street,

26

26,

"

3 p.m.

27 | April 5,

2.50 a.m.

28

7,

5.10 a.m.

""

29

17,

4 a.m.

A Boiler-house in Hung Hom Dock,..

""

30

19,

5.40 p.m.

31

32

26,

6 p.m.

House No. 38, Lower Lascar Row,

29,

Midnight.

Grass on hillside near Tai Tam Tuk,

House No. 41, Hillier Street,..

The Hongkong & China Bakery, Morrison Hill Road,

House No. 19, Kan U Fong,.

House No. 18A, Tai Kok Tsui, British Kowloon,

33

29,

2.15 p.m.

House No. 117, Second Street,

"

34

29,

Grass on hillside at Kai Lung Wan,

""

35

29,

Grass on hillside at Aberdeen,

...

""

36 May

37

38

39

40

""

2,

11 a.m.

وو

5,

5,

وو

7 p.m.

6,

,

41

>>

42

House No. 4, Arsenal Street,

19,

4.30 a.m.

1.20 a.m.

3.50 a.m.

4 a.m.

12.30 a.m.

House No. 14, Jubilee Street,

A stack of Grass at Tai Tam,

House No. 331, Queen's Road Central, House No. 35, Queen's Road West, House No. 280, Queen's Road Central,..

House No. 73, Jervois Street,

...

2

2

Nil

Unknown.

...

$12

Do.

Nil

***

Do.,

Nil

Do.,

Nil

Do.

Unknown

Do.

...

Slight

Nil

Unknown.

...

...

...

Trifling

Do.

***

...

1

Nil

$1,500

Do.

Do.

1

$1,000

Overheating of a flue,

Trifling

Unknown.

Insured in the China Fire Insurance Com- pany.

Nil

Do.

Trifling

Do.

Do.

Do.

...

Do.

Do.

...

Nil

Do.

...

...

Nil

Do.

Trifling

Unknown Spontaneous combustion of coal.

Overheating of a stove pipe.

A great number of trees burnt.

A number of young trees destroyed.

$6

$11,500

Do.,

...

Nil

$12,000

Nil

Do.

...

Nil

...

Burning of joss paper. Unknown.

Burning of joss paper.

Unknown.

Supposed attempted arson,

Insured in Messrs. Schellhass & Co. for $10,500.

Insured in Messrs. Sander & Co. for $10,000.

Kerosine was found on the stairs.

>>

103

FIRES AND ALARMS, 1891,—Continued.

104

No. of

BUILDINGS

No. DATE.

TIME.

SITUATION OF FIRE.

DESTROYED.

DAMAGE.

CAUSE.

REMARKS.

Wholly. Partly.

43 May 25,

7 p.m.

House No. 30, Gage Street,

$1.50

44

26,

4 a.m.

Registered Brothel No. 153 in West Street,

Nil

Breaking of a kerosine lamp. Attempted arson,

""

45

31,

9 p.m.

Chimney of House No. 252, Queen's Road Central,...

Nil

Unknown.

46 July 2,

2.10 p.m.

West of Government Civil Hospital,

Nil

Do.,

A piece of cloth saturated with kerosine oil was found in the cook-house.

False alarm.

...

47

7,

9.30 a.ro.

S.S. Decima in Victoria Harbour,.

Trifling

Do.

...

""

48

11,

12.20 a.m.

House No. 72, Station Street, Yaumati,

1

$1,800

Overheating of an oven,

No Insurance.

49 Ang. 7,

5.30 p.m.

House No. 5, D'Aguilar Street,.

Trifling

Capsizing of a stove.

50

15,

"

9 p.m.

House No. 1, St. Francis Street,

Nil

Breaking of a kerosine lamp.

...

51

24,

5 p.m.

Chimney of House No. 343, Queen's Road Central,..

Nil

Unknown.

...

...

Nil

52

28,

""

8 p.m.

House No. 106, Third Street,

Upsetting of a kerosine lamp.

...

Nil

53 Sept.

6,

11 p.m.

Stall No. 39, Hung Hom Market,

Unknown.

54

A

16,

11.30 p.m.

House No. 141, Battery Street, Yaumati,

...

Trifling

Burning of joss paper.

55

""

22,

11 a.m.

Chimney of House No. 120, Praya West,

Do..

Unknown.

...

56 Oct.

24

1.30 a.m.

57

14,

5 a.m.

House No. 4, Hillside Street, Hung Hom, House No. 41, First Street,

Nil

Do.

...

...

$5

Do.

>>

58

19,

3.15 a.m.

House No. 26, Pokfulam Road,

...

Trifling

Do.

59

25,

""

1.50 p.m.

Chimney of House No. 206, Hollywood Road,

Nil

Do.

...

60

28,

"

8 p.m.

House No. 8, Queen's Road West,..

Nil

Do.

...

61 Nov. 4,

62

"9

5 p.m.

7,

8.10 p.m.

Matshed at the Brick Manufactory, Little Hongkong, Coal Godown of Messrs. Blackhead & Co. at Tsim

$100

Do.

Unknown

Do.

Shatsui,

63

64

65

"?

"}

10,

21,

2 p.m.

A Hut at Tai Kok Tsui,..

$90

Do.

17,

9.30 p.m.

House No. 45, Wing On Street,

Trifling

Do.

10.45 a.m.

House No. 117, Market Street,

Do.

Do.

">

66

25,

""

9.15 p.m.

Wicker-work Covers for Boats at the back of Yaumati,]

Do.

Do.

67

29,

3.30 a.m.

A stack of Grass on the hillside above Ship Street,..

$5

Do.

""

10.05 p.m.

6,

""

72

73

74

75

76

77

78

79

68 | Dec. 3,

>>

10,

13,

17,

8.30 p.m.

9.a.m.

4 a.m.

2 a.m.

7.10 p.m.

House No. 35, Aplichau,

House No. 57A, Wanchai Road,

House No. 29, A-kung Ngam,

A Kerosine Junk lying off Praya West,

Unknown

Do.

Nil

Do.

៩៨៨៦

25,

4 p.m.

69

71

""

""

19,

""

22,

7 a.m.

22,

>>

7 p.m.

House No. 92, First Street,

Midnight.

House No. 89, Shankiwan,.............

>>

25,

House No. 40, Station Street, Yaumati,

>>

""

25,

"

80

26,

""

81

29,

"

House No. 28, Possession Street,

House No. 1, Kung San Lane,

$30

Coal Godown No. 80, Praya East,

Nil

...

Trifling

Do.

1

$600

$10

Lamp placed too near a wooden par-

Unknown.

Incense sticks left burning on the floor. | Unknown.

[tition.

Nil

...

Upsetting of a lamp.

...

2

$900

Unknown,

No Insurance.

23,

6.50 p.m.

9.30 p.m

2 a.m.

A Matshed in Hung Hom Docks,

Grass on the hillside near Deep Water Bay, House No. 69, Tokwawan,..

The Steam-launch Tilley, in Victoria Harbour,

Fire Brigade Department, Hongkong, 6th January, 1892.

Trifling

Falling of a lighted candle upon some

Do.

Sparks from heated rivets.

[paper.

Nil

Unknown.

..

...

$30

Trifling

Falling of a lighted candle on some Unknown.

[hay.

GEO. HORSPOOL,-Acting Supt., Fire Brigade.

ས་གན

!!

157

No. 8

92

HONGKONG.

REPORT OF THE ACTING SUPERINTENDENT OF VICTORIA GAOL FOR 1891.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor, on the 25th February, 1892.

No. 18.

SuperintendenT'S OFFICE, VICTORIA GAOL,

HONGKONG, 22nd January, 1892.

SIR, I have the honour to forward for His Excellency's information the Annual Report on the Prison for 1891.

2. I took over charge of the Prison from Major-General GORDON on the 1st April, on which date he proceeded to England on leave of absence.

3. The conduct of the Gaol Staff during the year has, with some exceptions, not been particularly good, but I hope with the engaging of some reliable men in England it may be improved in the future.

4. There has been a decrease in the average number of prisoners confined in the Gaol, the number being 507 as compared with 566 in 1890.

This, however, has been accompanied by a large increase in the number of admissions, the numbers being 5,221 and 3,444 respectively, from which it may be inferred that the number of short sentence prisoners is increasing and the number of long sentence prisoners is decreasing.

The daily maximum for the year was 590.

5. During the year there were 25 prisoners sentenced for returning from banishment. In view of the frequency of these convictions I have laid it down that such prisoners are to be treated more severely than hitherto in the matter of hard labour, of course, consistently with the rules for the management of the Gaol.

6. Nothing has been done during the past year to introduce the separate system of confinement on a general plan.

It is, in the absence of flogging, the only effective system of imprisonment.

Extra room is required for officers' quarters, in which no dining or recreation rooms are provided; the Warden should live in the Gaol, and the present arrangement of the Female Prison is in many ways a most objectionable one.

In the absence of proper yard accommodation the rules as to the classification and separation of prisoners cannot be carried out, while the general needs of the Prison as to store-rooms, &c., have not been sufficiently attended to.

With the present cramped space at command effective supervision is impossible.

7. During the year there have been 11,714 prison offences committed by a daily average of 507 prisoners, being over 23 offences by each prisoner as compared with 20 in 1890.

I append the usual comparative returns of the most common of those offences.

8. There has been an increase in industrial earnings during the year, the total being $4,248.55, as compared with $3,488.39 in 1890. The usual returns are appended.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

The Honourable W. M. GOODMAN,

Acting Colonial Secretary.

A. M. THOMSON, Acting Superintendent.

158

MONTH.

(A.)

VICTORIA GAOL.

Return of Reports for talking, &c., in the years, 1888, 1889, 1890 and 1891.

1888.

1889.

Daily average number Daily average number

in Prison, 531.

in Prison, 581.

1890.

in Prison, 566.

1891.

Daily average number | Daily average number

in Prison, 507.

January,

355

105

196

252

February,

320

150

181

116

March,

362

132

243

227

April,........

380

142

212

202

May,

402

278

290

257

June,

296

205

260

313

July,

258

220

520

427

August,

225

167

349

473

September,

220

219

304

489

October,....

222

130

243

397

November,..

328

118

135

441

December,

277

220

157

469

Total,.....

3,645

2,086

3,090

4,063

January,

February,

March,

April,

May,

June,

July,

August,

(B.)

Return of Offences reported of Prisoners fighting with or assaulting each other, or Officers, for the years 1888, 1889, 1890 and 1891.

1888.

MONTH.

Daily average number in Prison, 531.

1889.

1890.

1891.

Daily average number Daily average number Daily average number

in Prison, 581.

in Prisou, 566.

in Prison, 507.

September,

October....

November,......

December,

14

1

20

12

21

10

10

10

19

11

10

11

6

16

27

5

9

19

12

9

11

5

6

8

13

6

17

18

16

13

5

6

11

5

5

7

19

12

20:737T : HTT

5

7

7

Total,.........

185

92

115

(C.)

86

Return of Offences of Prisoners having Tobacco, for the years 1888, 1889, 1890 and 1891.

1888. Daily average number Daily average number

in Prison, 531.

in Prison, 581.

1889.

1891.

1890. Daily average number Daily average number

in Prison, 566.

in Prison, 507.

MONTH.

January,

74

32

53

17

February,

35

50

24

24

March,

48

55

21

30

April,....

25

21

47

20

May,

.61

45.

40

16

June,

27

33

11

21

July,

34

24

47

31

August,

22

35

52

25

September,

30

51

25

26

October,..

35

November,....

34

December,

17

653

67

29

22

15

28

12

59

16

10

Total,...........

442

487

393

254

(D.)

Comparative Return of Prisoners confined in Victoria Gaol on 31st December, 1888, 31st December, 1889, 31st December, 1890 and 31st December, 1891.

CONVICTION.

1888.

1889.

1890.

1891.

1st,

367

466

394

373

2nd,

43

59

67

50

3rd,

35

22

26

25

4th,

13

14

23

20

5th,

16

16

16

15

6th,

13

8

10

7th,

4

2

4

...

8th,

8

9

4

9th,

1

10th,

2

1

11th,

1

12th,

1

13th,

1

22:2

2

4

1

I

2

1

Total,

503

600

549

502

(E.)

ABSTRACT OF INDUSTRIAL LABOUR, VICTORIA GAOL, FOR THE YEAR 1891.

Dr.

OAKUM.

1891.

To Stock on hand, 1st January, 1891,

198.70 1891.

39

Cost of Paper Stuff purchasedĮ

during the year,...

Profit,.

807.45

1,014.16

$

2,020.31

COIR YARN.

1891.

To Stock on hand, 1st January, 1891,

Cost of Material purchased during

33

339.13 1891.

588.36

the year,...

Profit,........

545.93

Total,..........$

1,473.42

159

Cr.

""

>>

""

By Oakum picked for Naval Yard

during the year-Cash received, f Oakum sold during the year,

issued for Gaol use,

$341.20

768.40 6.71

Stock on hand, 31st December, }

1891,

904.00

j

Total,...

.$

2,020.31

By Matting, &c., sold during the year, $ 1,001.00

Articles made for Gaol use,.............

95.

35

Stock on hand, 31st December,

1891,-

Manufactured Articles,...$ 56.00

Material,...

21.42

395.00

451.00

1,473.42

Total,........

RATTAN WORK.

By Chairs, Fenders, &c., sold during

the year,...

Articles made for Gaol use,

1891.

To Stock on hand, 1st January, 1891,

Cost of Material purchased during

$ 188.30

103.25

1891.

the year,...

Profit,.....................

84.01

Total,.

375.56

*

""

Stock on hand, 31st December,

1891,-

Manufactured Articles, ...$154.50

Material,

$

161.81

39.25

20.00

174.50

Total,...$

375.56

:

.

.

160

NET-MAKING.

1891.

""

To Stock on hand, 1st January, 1891, $ Cost of Material purchased duringĮ

19.20 1891.

By Nets sold during the year,

$

37.74

30.60

Stock on hand, 31st December,

""

22.00

the year,.

1891,

Profit,......

9.94

Total,...$

59.74

Total,............

59.74

WASHING.

1891.

To Stock on hand, 1st January, 1891, $. 15.92

Cost of Material purchased during

1891.

503.70

the

year,

""

Profit............

837.51

""

1891.

Total,............$

1,357.13

To Stock on hand, 1st January, 1891, Cost of Material purchased during Į

the

year,...

Profit,..........

SHOE-MAKING.

By Value of Washing done during the year, Prison Clothing at one cent a piece,

Cash received for clothes washed, Stock on hand, 31st December,

$ 1,313.46

33.67

1891,-

Coal, &c.,.......

10.00

Total,...$

1,357.13

$

72.56

1891.

424.40

By Estimated Value of Shoes to Pri-

soners and Repairs,

46.45

""

176.55

""

""

Two Issues Summer and Win-

ter Uniform to Prison Officers, f Sale to Prison Officers, &c.,................. Stock on hand, 31st December,

287.00

285.48

1891,-

Material,.

$25.58

Value of New Shoes,. 29.00

54.58

Total,.......

673.51

Total,............$

673.51

CARPENTERING.

1891.

To Stock on hand, 1st January, 1891, $ 61.28

;, Cost of Material purchased during

1891.

137.02

the year,...

Profit,......

By Estimated value of Articles made Į $3 for Gaol use during the year,.......

Work done for Prison Officers

155.64

24.29

and charged for,

29.13

Stock on hand, 31st December,

""

1891,-

Material, Wood, &c., ......$29.50 Manufactured Articles, 18.00

C

47.50

Total,............$

227.43

TIN-SMITHS' SHOP.

Total,............$

227.43

1891.

To Stock on hand, 1st January, 1891,

Cost of Material purchased during

4.05 1891. 50.67

By Estimated value of Articles made

of Articles

$

68.27

the

year,..

وو

Cash received for sale of Articles, Stock on hand, 31st December, I

6.68

3.80

Profit,.....

24.03

1891,

Total,............$

78.75

Total,............$

78.75

*

}

161

1891.

""

Cost of Material purchased during

the year,...

Profit,.......

To Stock on hand, 1st January, 1891, $

66.40 1891.

86.51

718.84

PRINTING AND BOOK-BINDING.

By Estimated value of Printing done for Public Offices and Gaol Staff during the year (free), 116,640, forms,

Estimated value of books bound

$

555.54

""

33

15

for Prison use during the year,. Cash received for books bound, ,, Cash received for Printing done,... Stock on hand, 31st December,

1891,

36.98

168.56

42.27

68.40

1891.

Total,...

871.75

TAILORING.

To Stock on hand, 1st January, 1891, $779.55

Cost of Material purchased during

the year,..

Profit,...........

1891.

756.52

774.82

>>

Total,.......

2,310.89

Total,...$

871.75

""

By Estimated value of Prisoners' Clothing made during the year Work done for Gaol Officers,

Police, and charged for, ....... S Stock on hand, 31st December,

1891,-

$ 1,366.38

153.75

Material,.

Manufactured Articles,

$235.30 555.46

790.76

Total,............$

2,310.89

GRASS MATTING.

1891.

To Stock on hand, 1st January, 1891, $ 24.08 1891.

By Issue for Prison use during the

year,

$

11.16

""

Cost of Material purchased during

105.69

the year,..

Profit......

.39

Matting sold during the year,

131.54

38.63

""

Stock on hand, 31st December,

1891,-

Total,....... ...$

163.40

RECAPITULATION.

Manufactured, .........$ 2.70 Material,

18.00

20.70

Total,...$

163.40

1891.

Oakum, Coir Yarn, Rattan Work, Net Making,

$1,014.16 545.93

1891.

By Surplus,

$ 4,248.55

84.01

9.94

Washing,

$37.51

Shoe-making,

176.55

Printing and Book-binding,

718.84

Tailoring,

774.82

Carpentering,

29.13

Tinsmiths,

Grass Matting,

24.03

....

33.63

Total,............$

4,248.55

Total,.....

4,248.55

:

:

XX

137

No. 2

5

92

HONGKONG.

REPORT ON THE JUNK TRADE FOR 1891.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor, on the 22nd February, 1892.

No. 20.

H. O. No. 330 of 9th July,

1891.

HARBOUR Department, HONGKONG, 11th January, 1892.

SIR,-In continuation of former correspondence marginally noted, I have the

H. O. No. 342 of 15th July, honour to furnish herewith statistics of the junk trade.

1891.

I. E. 0. No. 14 of 15th

August, 1891.

H. O. No. 529 of 15th

October, 1891.

2. These remarks and statistics are not included in the "Annual Report" in which being a document usually for publication it might be considered inexpedient that they should appear.

tached to Memo, dated

3. The favourable geographical position of this Colony renders it a great distributing centre; the Extract from Table 7 at- large trade focussing here reaches its terminal markets partly in coasting steamers 27th July, 1891, in and partly in junks. Of the 2,753 European constructed vessels visiting the port C.S.O. 1,474 of 1891. in 1890, fifteen hundred and twenty-eight or considerably more than half and this half nearly double the size in tonnage ship for ship of the other moiety were vessels visiting the port twelve times or less, i.e., craft bringing trade acting as feeders to the Colony not as distributing agents that necessary part being performed by the remaining 1,235 smaller vessels plying to the port more than 12 times in the year. In the same year 23,343 junks in foreign trade with a total tonnage of 1,786,038 (or roughly speaking half the figures shown in paragraph 3 of the Annual Report those quoted there being the total in and out) assisted in the distribution of trade from this centre, taking the totals of the Report of 93 millions tons about two-thirds or 6 millions were the feeders and one- third or 34 millions the distributors assisted by 3 millions tons of junks. The European vessels being for the most part steamers of course carried by far the largest portion of the trade. The year 1890 was a bad one for the rice trade as was also 1891 and in the first named the number of small European steamers competing with junks became very marked and has not decreased.

4. In the year 1890, eight thousand two hundred and nineteen European constructed vessels with a total of 9,771,741 tons passed through the port giving employment to 46,686 junks aggregating 3,572,079 tons in foreign trade and 9,082 junks making up 332,473 tons in local trade, i.e., the ports

of the island.

5. In 1891, the corresponding numbers are European vessels 8,707 measuring 10,279,043 tons or an increase of 488 ships with 507,302 tons and junks in foreign trade 45,403 with a total tonnage of 3,263,118 tons or a decrease in numbers of 1,283 junks representing 308,961 tons at the same time the junks in local trade run up to 11,930 equivalent to 463,537 tons or an increase over the previous year numbering 2,848 junks aggregating 131,064 tons. It is not credible that the increase of the local traffic satisfactorily accounts for the increased volume of trade and the decrease

of the foreign junk trade.

Table I.

Table II.

6. Attention is now invited to Table II a comparative statement for the past five years of Licensed Junks and Licensed Fishing Junks; the numbers and the revenues derived from the junk trade are as follows:-

1887,

1888,

1889,

1890,

1891, .................

Year.

Total Junks licensed.

Total Licence Fees.

Special Permit Fees. $

Total Revenue for Licensed Junks.

Total Junk Revenue.

2,424

8,198

619.75

8,817.75

19,997.75

2,570

8,018

604.75

8,622.75

19,761.25

2,692

7,785

569.25

8,354.25

19,402.00

2,977

9,387

569.00

9,956.00

22,397.75

3,332

10,091

730.25

10,821.25

22,602.50

7. Special Permits are the monthly renewals of licences exempting the holders from reporting on each separate occasion of arriving taken out by licensed junks when in the waters of the Colony. Fishing junks under 100 piculs are further allowed to take these licences every six months only. The

1

i

138

average for the three years 1887-1889 inclusive, it will be seen, is licensed vessels 2,562, the revenue derived directly therefrom in licences $8,000.25 and in permits $597.75, a total of 8,598 out of a grand total of $19,720.

8. For the average of three years 1887 to 1889 inclusive and the years 1890 and 1891 the tions are therefore as follows:-

propor-

'87-'89. '90. '91.

Licensed Junks.

2,562

2,977

3,332

Revenue for Do. Total Junk Revenue.

8.598 9,956 10,821.25

19,720 22,397.75

22,602.50

9. The proportion of revenue derived from unlicensed junks, therefore, it will be seen, by no means increases pro rata as that from licensed junks taking the years 1890 and 1891 as examples the tonnage returns also bear this out. It may be said as more junks are licensed there are fewer unlicensed ones to take out Anchorage Passes, Clearances, &c., but comparison of the years of 1889 and 1890 disposes of that theory.

10. In 1890, 285 more vessels were licensed than in 1889, the revenue increased $3,000, and the foreign junk trade rose 154,748 tons, and the local 49,103 directly, no doubt, due to an increase in European tonnage of 799,751 tons.

11. In 1891, with an increase of half a million tons, 355 more junks were licensed with a gain to the Treasury of $204.75, a decrease in the foreign junk trade of three hundred thousand tons and an increase in the local junk trade of 130,000 or a net loss of 170,000 tons, to say nothing of the money thereby put out of circulation.

12. That there was no loss to the carrying trade, of course, is patent rather a gain to steamers, but hitherto gain to both ships and junks has gone on side by side with profit to the Colonial Treasury from both; consolidating the earnings of one or other means proportionate loss to the revenue.

13. In the years under review the conditions have been the same; a steady increase in Ocean borne traffic, bad rice trade (taking the years through), and increasing competition from small steam vessels, but under ordinary circumstances the increase of the great source of supply the Ocean trade was sufficient to preserve the equilibrium. In the 3rd quarter of 1891, indeed as is shown in letter No. 529 dated 15th October, not alone was the rice trade good, but a fictitious impetus had been given to the junk trade by the quarrels of the Chinese Custom Houses, native and foreign.

14. In that quarter there is a loss as shown in the statement attached (Table V) of $28.75 though all conditions save the preventible one were favourable.

Tables III to VI.

15. Tables III to VI represent quarterly statements of the junk trade, the total amounts for 1890 and 1891 are respectively $22,559.50 and 22,700.00, the apparent discrepancy between that and the amounts heretofore given as the junk revenue for the years under review is accounted for by the fact that the collections from out-stations for December are only received four or five days after the end of each year and so are reckoned in the following year.

Table VII.

16. Table VII is the monthly comparative statement for December and also the yearly one for 1890 and 1891.

17. The only controllable causes of the depression of the junk trade are the suppression of the system of espionage established by the Chinese Customs in Hongkong, and the preservation of the neutrality of British waters.

I have the honour to be,

Honourable W. M. GOODMAN,

Acting Colonial Secretary,

S.C.,

&c.,

&c.

Sir,

Your obedient Servant,

W. C. H. HASTINGS,

Acting Harbour Master, &c.

TABLE I.

COMPARATIVE SHIPPING RETURNS FOR 1890 AND 1891.

1890.

1891.

Increase.

Decrease.

Ships. Tonnage. Ships. Tonnage. Ships. Tonnage. Ships. Tonnage.

European vessels,

Junks in foreign trade, ...

Junks in local trade,

constructed

8,219 9,771,741 8,707 10,279,043

46,686 3,572,079 45,403 3,263,118

9,082 332,473 11,930 463,537 2,848

488

507,302

1,283

308,961

131,064

LICENSED FISHING JUNKS.

2nd Class.

3rd Class.

Free or duplicate.

Table II.

RETURN OF LICENSED JUNKS AND LICENSED FISHING JUNKS.

888

89 90 91 87 88 89 90 91

3 2 2

co

:

7

:

:

:

...

:

64

165 152 141 122 158|117 | 137 | 117|128|132412424 367 403 436|17| 22 | 20 | 46 60

Co

1 13 21 12 75121 144 | 171 | 111 || 135 | 168 207 | 195 | 148

11

13

}

18. 28 32 249 257 | 267 | 273 | 290|460 | 480 | 567 | 595|735

:

:

:

:

2 27

14

2 2

35

...

PLACE.

1st Class Special.

2nd Class Special. 3rd Class Special.

Free or duplicate Special.

1st Class.

87

88 89 90 91 87 88 89 90 9187888990918788 89 90 91 87 88

89 90

91

87

88

89 90 91 87

LICENSED JUNKS.

Victoria,

120 110 97120 121|67| 616193 94 86 70|52|66|82| 1 1 2 2 2 13 2

4

7 66

12 4 6 38,445 356 437 413| 455 |

Hunghom,

4 7 23

23

66

74 140 168

136 119 182 290

:

:

Shaukiwan,

:

:

:

:

:

:

..

:

.:.

:

:

:..

:

:

:..

:.

:

:

120|110| 97 | 120121|67|61|61| 93 | 948670|52|66|82| 1 1 22 2192 172 179 198 232 507 593 606 718 739 1,452 1,564 1,697 1,788 2,064 20 24 26|75| 180

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

...

:.

:

÷

:

:

:

:

Stanley,

Aberdeen,

TOTAL,

139

L

A-T

Table III.

QUARTER ENDING 31ST MARCII, 1891.

140

Trading Licence.

Fishing Licence.

Date.

STATION.

Anchorage Special Pass. Permit.

Clearance. Total Fees.

Remarks.

$20.

$15.

$10.

$5.

$3.

$1.

Victoria.

$

1890,

16

1891,

Increase,

Decrease,

***:

14

17

19

8

15

3

6

7:53

NN:

2

2

♡ com:

3

72

6

75

3

22:

1,712

2,269

1,698

1,542

1,991

1,570

2,028.75

2,200.75 Trading Licences only issued at Victoria.

3

170

278

128

172.00

Shaukiwan.

1890,

1891,

...

Increase,

Decrease,

23-

12

22

54

276

735

272

500.75

13

11

44

319

791

307

496.25

1

...

43

56

35

...

...

11

10

4.50

Aberdeen.

1890,

1891,

+4

...

Increase,

Decrease,.

...

co:

972:

16

98

226

753

226

482.25

31

119

225

760

222

533.75

15

21

7

51.50

3

1

4

...

Stanley.

1890,

1891,

Increase,

Decrease,..

Ni ∞ cr

2:58

38

66

166

509

166

415.25

25

47

144

435

144

317.75

...

...

2

13

19

22

74

22

97.50

Yaumati.

1890,

...

1891,

...

Increase,

805

472

795

518.00

...

914

666

894

618.50

No Licences issued at this Station.

...

...

109

194

99

100,50

Decrease,.

...

...

...

Hunghom.

1890,

1

17

11

...

1891,

6

16

18

...

...

Increase,

...

...

Decrease,.

1

HRT:

272

404

272

304.00

254

524

253

353.75

7

120

Arrivals only.

Increase Ocean going Vessels 18. 49.75 Aggregating 38,327 tons.

18

19

...

...

TOTAL.

1890,

1891,

19

Increase,

Decrease,.

698:

16

14

17

8

15

3

6

22:2

25

96

28

89

3

88:5

301

303

ཚེས:

3,457

5,142

3,429

3,398

5,167

3,390

4,421.00

4,348.75

25

...

59

39

72.25

Table IV.

QUARTER ENDING 30тH JUNE, 1891.

Fishing Licence.

Trading Licence.

Date.

STATION.

Anchorage

Pass.

Special

Permit.

Clearance. Total Fees.

Remarks.

$20.

$15.

$10.

$5.

$3.

$1.

Victoria.

$

1890,

40

1891,

4.5

Increase,

Decrcase,.

Patê

11

22

11

===

16

29

13

**

4

10

4.

HOD:

1

56

2,092

2,654

2,057

125

1,779

2,360

1,744

3,165.75

2,884.75 Trading Licences only issued at Victoria.

9

69

281.00

...

313

294

313

...

...

Shaukiwan.

1890,

1891,

Increase,

**

Decrease,.

~: 08

44

33

161

326

942

302

872.50

47

31

159

393

1,086

370

949.25

3

67

144

68

76.75

2

Aberdeen.

1890,

1891,

Increase,

Decreasc,...

10 109:

824:

5

68

232

296

932

281

838.25

15

72

269

256

895

255

911.50

37

73.25

...

40

37

26

Stanley.

1890,

...

1891,

...

Increase,

Decrease,.

i co co :

16:

29:

5

31

46

126

46

100.50

3

40

50

166

50

139.50

3

4

40

4

39.00

88

Yaumati.

1890,

1891,

Increase,

Decrease,

...

1,164

803

1,056

1,025

785

1,006

139

18

50

51.75

755.75 No Licences issued at this 704.00 Station.

Hunghom.

1890,

1891,

Increase,

...

Decrease,...

*4:4

30

33

334

543

306

458.75

Arrivals only.

40

65

283

616

278

499.25

10

32

73

40.50

51

28

...

Increase Ocean-going Vessels 51, Aggregating 68,607.

...

...

TOTAL.

1890,

40

11

16

1891,

45

22

29

Increase,

5

11

Decrease,

222:

57

137

513

4,258

6,000

4,018

5,910.50

73

159

658

3,786

5,908

3,703

6,369.25

13

16

22

145

458.75

472

92

345

141

Table V.

QUARTER ENDING 30TH SEPTEMBER, 1891.

142

Trading Licence.

Fishing Licence.

Anchorage

Special

Date.

STATION.

Clearance. Total Fees.

Remarks.

Pass.

Permit.

$20.

$15.

$10.

$5.

$3.

$1.

Victoria.

$

1890,

29

1891,

33

Increase,

Decrease,...

...

88:

45

36

4

2008:0

17

18

18-

I

170

1,366

2,213

1,385

1

17

131

1,022

1,825

1,035

2,537.50

2,859.00 Trading Licences only issued at Victoria.

16

9

3

39

344

388

350

321.50

Shaukiwan

1890,

1891,

Increase,

64

41

126

335

876

334

955.25

70

49

150

416

1,076

408

1,122.00

6

8

24

81

200

74

166.75

...

...

Decrease,.

Aberdeen,

1890,

1891,

...

Increase,

...

Decrease,

aa ::

100

149

255

844

253

832.00

9

95

185

290

879

293

880.50

36

35

35

40

48.50

5

Stanley,

1890,

...

1891,

...

Increase,

Decrease,

7

23

18

61

18

78.25

14

20

31

108

31

104.50

7

13

47

13

26.25

2

3

...

58+

Yaumati.

1890,

...

1891,

...

Increase,

Decrease,.

1,052

728

1,038

704.50

990

763

987

685,00

35

62

51

19.50

No Licences issued at this Station.

...

Hunghom.

1890,

1891,

Increase,

...

...

Decrease,..

...

8582

14

75

76

326

675

328

703.25

Arrivals only.

11

90

124

271

763

266

774.00

15

48

88

70.75

Increase Ocean-going Vessels 24, Aggregating 33,234 tons.

3

55

62

TOTAL.

1890,

29

1891,

33

Increase,

Decrease,..

28:

45

17

93

36

18

91

4

6:

1

...

2:00

224

544

3,352

5,397

265

610

3,020

5,414

3,356

3,020

6,132.25

6,103.50

41

66

17

332

336

28.75

Table VI.

QUARTER ENDING 31ST DECEMBER, 1891.

Trading Licence.

Date.

STATION.

$20.

$15.

$10.

$3.

Victoria.

1890,

35

23

16

1891,

24

28

2J

Increase,

4

154

Decrease,.

11

Fishing Licence.

Anchorage Special Pass. Permit.

Clearance. Total Fees.]

Remarks.

$5.

$1.

115

1,580

2,283

1,558

2,678.25

124

1,326

1,959

1,330

2,392.75

Trading Licences only issued at Victoria.

9

254

324

228

285.50

Shaukiwan.

1890,

1891,

Increase,

Decrease,..

28:

22:

12

32

62

413

890

405

645.00

28

41

83

509

1,050

494

859.25

16

9

21

96

160

89

214.25

...

...

Aberdeen.

1890,

1891,

Increase,

Decrease,.

74:3

8**

89

116

317

826

320

783.75

92

162

327

905

328

848.00

3

46

10

79

8

64.25

...

...

Stanley.

1890,

1891,

...

Increase,

Decrease,.

46:8

283333

14

121

75

80

612

80

701.00

66

41

82

565

82

2

34

47

ONN

:

451.25

249.75

Yaumati.

1890,

1891,

Increase,

...

1,203

846

1,196

1,240

958

1,224

37

112

28

811.25 No Licences issued at this 855.50 Station.

44.25

Decrease,.

Hunghom.

1890,

1891,

Increase,

:~~

╗:

Decrease,

18

62

385

664

393

2

22

83

286

681

284

476.50

471.75

Arrivals only.

2

4

21

17

...

...

99

109

4.75

Increase Ocean-going Vessels 71, Aggregating 71,876 tons.

...

TOTAL.

1890,

35

23

16

33

261

430

3,978

6,121

3,952

1891,

24

28

20

40

226

493

3,770

6,118

3,742

6,095.75

5,878.50

Increase,..

4

63

Decrease,..

11

35

208

210

217.25

143

Table VII.

MONTHLY COMPARATIVE RETURN OF LICENCES, &c., ISSUED UNDER SECTION XXXVIII OF THE MERCHANT SHIPPING CONSOLIDATION ORDINANCE, 8 OF 1879, HONGKONG.

SPECIAL PERMITS.

CLEARANCES.

Junk

Licences.

Fishing Anchorage Licences. Passes.

Monthly. Temporary. (White.) (Blue.)

Day.

Night.

Total

Documents

Issued.

Total

Receipts.

REMARKS.

$

Total Return for Month of Dec., 1890,...

24

146

1,350

217

1,772

1,347

Do.

do.

do., 1891,...

24

194

1,233

254

1,782

1,261

:

White Permits.

4,928

1,812.00

1890.

1891.

4,820

1,790.50

January,

124

243

February,

149

173

March,

202

256

Increase,

Decrease,.

:

:

48

117

37

10

...

:

...

:

April,..

190

236

May,

170

245

...

:

:..

86

108

21.50

:

Total Return from 1st January, 1890, to 31st December, 1890,

281

2,779

15,088 2,276

20,448 14,831

:

:

...

June,

161

257

July,

189

268

August,

217

242

September,

184

233

October,

243

276

56,546

22,559.50

November,.

230

238

December,.....

217

254

Do.

do.,

1891,

299

3,215

14,024

2,921

19,867

13,902

***

55,125

22,700,00

TOTAL,

2,276 2,921

Increase,

Decrease,.....

Hongkong, 5th January, 1892.

18

436

645

:

1,064

581

...

929

:

...

...

140.50

Increase.

1,421

...

European constructed vessels, 488.

Aggregating 507,302 tons.

WM. C. H. HASTINGS, Acting Harbour Master, &c.

144

145

No. 92

6

HONGKONG.

RETURNS OF ARRIVALS FOR THE YEAR 1891.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor, on the 22nd February, 1892.

No. 15.

HARBOUR Department, HONGKONG, 7th January, 1892.

SIR,-I have the honour herewith to forward in advance of the Annual Report certain returns of arrivals for the year ended 31st December last.

The increase of arrivals, ocean-going vessels, in 1891 over 1890 was 164 ships aggregating 212,054 tons composed as follows:-

British steamers increased in number 37, with a total of 75,324 tons. British sailing ships decreased in number 16, with a total of 10,831 tons. Aggregate British increase 64,493 tons.

Foreign steam-ships increased 126 in number, with a total of 130,971 tons. Foreign sailing ships increased 17 in number, with a total of 16,590 tons.

Aggregate Foreign increase 147,561 tons.

Table I. shows all arrivals including river steamers for the year under their respective flags.. Table II. the same for the quarter ending 31st ultimo.

Table III. quarterly comparison of the year 1890-1891.

The arrivals of 1890 exceeded 1889 by 128 vessels aggregating 163,077 tons.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your obedient Servant,

WM. C. H. HASTINGS,

Honourable W. M. GOODMAN,

Acting Colonial Secretary,

&c.,

&c.,

&c.

I.

ARRIVALS, 1891.

Acting Harbour Master, &c.

Steamers.

Sailing Vessels. River Steamers.

Total.

Steamers and Sailing Vessels, 1890.

Flag.

No. Tonnage.

No.

Tonnage. No. Tonnage. No.

Tonnage.

No. Tonnage.

Exclusive of River Steamers.

British,

1,497

American,

10

Austrian,

15

1,963,096 51 27,020 44 25,079

37,689 1,308 1,592,438 2,856 48,020

3,593,223

1,527, 1,936,292

54

75,040

49

69,225

15

25,079

12

24,063

Chinese,.

195

218,167

141

146,380

336

364,547

160

190,477

Danish,

72

28,759

1

785

73

29,544

71

27,167

Dutch,

25

31,429

25

31,429

7

8,457

French,

95 141,288

95

141,288

85

145,137

German,

749

712,827 21

Italian,

11

16,489 1

Japanese,

32

50,564

Norwegian,

46

56,503

13,899 794

6,413

770

726,726

737

675,196

12

17,283

12

17,988

32

50,564

39

59,817

53

62,916

9

9,835

2

Peruvian,

642

Russian,.

2

3,819

2

3,819

4

8,726

2

Siamese,

Spanish,

27

17,116

1

53

28

17,169

22

1,286 13,447

TOTAL, 2,776 3,292,156 126

|

107,653 1,449 1,738,818 4,351

5,138,627 2,738 | 3,187,755

Exclusive of River Steamers the arrivals of 1891 exceed those of 1890 by 164 vessels aggregating 212,054 tons.

146

II.

ARRIVALS.-OCTOBER-DECEMBER, 1891.

Steamers and

Steamers.

Sailing Vessels.

River Steamers.

Total.

Sailing Vessels,

Oct.-Dec., 1890.

Flag.

No.

Tonnage.

No. Tonnage. No. Tonnage.

No.

Tonnage.

No. Tonnage.

Exclusive of River Steamers.

British,

365

472,682

13

American,

2

5,374

14

9,609 13,884

353

417,947 731

900,238

381 483,400

16

19,258

15

17,524

Austrian,

5

7,220

5

...

7,220

3

6,548

Chinese,.

61

63,982

39

40,170

100

104,152

35

41,971

Danish,

19

7,647

19

...

7,647

21

7,833

Dutch,

11

12,201

11

12,201

2

2,980

French,

22

34,971

22

34,971

20

32,011

German,

201

187,952

4

Italian,

3

4,497

1

2,196 794

205

190,148

188

173,146

4

...

5,291

3

4,497

Japanese,

10

18,308

10

18,308

10

16,281

Norwegian,

16

19,330

3

2,610

19

21,940

5

5,360

Peruvian,

1

397

Russian,...

1

1,814

1

...

...

1,814

2

4,667

Siamese,

1

636

...

...

Spanish,

11

6,672

11

...

6,672

4

2,616

TOTAL,

727

842,650 35

29,093 392 458,117 1,154 1,329,860

691 799,867

Exclusive of River Steamers the arrivals of 1891 exceed those of 1890 by 71 vessels aggregating 71,876 tons.

III.

OCEAN TRADERS.

1890.

1891.

Increase.

Quarter.

No.

Tonnage.

No.

Tonnage.

No.

Tonnage.

First,......

624

730,699

642

769,026

18

38,327

Second,

707

818,652

758

887,259

51

68,607

Third, .

716

838,537

740

871,781

24

33,244

Fourth,

691

799,867

762

871,743

71

71,876

TOTAL,.

2,738

3,187,755

2,902

3,399,809

164

212,054

COMPARATIVE SHIPPING RETURN FOR 1890–91.

1890.

1891.

Increase.

Decrease.

Ships. Tonnage. Ships. Tonnage.

Ships. Tonnage.

Ships. Tonnage.

British,

5,524 6,994,919

Foreign,

Junks in Foreign Trade,.

5,719 | 7,190,589

2,695 2,776,822 2,988 3,088,454

46,686 3,572,079 45,403 3,263,118

195 195,670

293 311,632

1,283

308,961

Junks in Local Trade,

54,905 | 13,343,820

9,082 332,473

54,110 13,542,161

198,341

795

:

11,930 463,537

2,848 131,064

GRAND TOTAL,..................

63,987 13,676,293

66,040 | 14,005,698

3,336 638,366

1,283

308,961

NETT,

2,053

329,405

263

No. 20

92

HONGKONG.

THE ACTING HARBOUR MASTER'S REPORT FOR 1891.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor, on the 9th May, 1892.

.

#

I

No. 50.

HARBOUR DEpartment, HONGKONG, 21st January, 1892.

year ending

SIR,-I have the honour to forward the Annual Returns for this Department for the 31st December, 1891.

I. Number, Tonnage and Crews of Vessels entered.

II. Number, Tonnage and Crews of Vessels cleared.

III. Number, Tonnage and Crews of Vessels of each Nation entered. IV. Number, Tonnage and Crews of Vessels of each Nation cleared.

V. Total Number, Tonnage and Crews of Vessels entered at each Port. VI. Total Number, Tonnage and Crews of Vessels cleared at each Port. VII. Return of Junks entered from Macao.

VIII. Return of Junks cleared for Macao.

IX. Return of Junks entered at each Port from China and Formosa.

X. Return of Junks cleared at each Port for China and Formosa.

XI. Gross Total Number of Junks entered at each Port.

XII. Gross Total Number of Junks cleared at each Port.

XIII. Return of Junks (Local Trade) entered.

XIV. Return of Junks (Local Trade) cleared.

XV. Summary of Arrivals and Departures of all Vessels, and of all Chinese Passengers. XVI. Return of Vessels registered.

XVII. Return of Vessels struck off the Register.

XVIII. Amount of Fees received under Section 3 of Ordinance 8 of 1879.

XIX. Return of Chinese Passenger Ships cleared by the Emigration Officer.

XX. Return of Vessels bringing Chinese Passengers to Hongkong from Places out of

China.

XXI. Return of Marine cases tried.

XXII. Diagram of Tonnage of Vessels entered.

XXIII. Return of the work performed by the Government Marine Surveyor.

XXIV. Return from Imports and Exports (Opium) Office.

XXV. Return of Entry of European constructed Vessels.

XXVI. Comparative Table of Revenue 1887-91.

XXVII. Return of Junk Fees, collected at the Stations.

SHIPPING.

2. The shipping returns show an advancement in the trade of the Colony, the total tonnage of arrivals and sailings amounting to 14 millions of tons, the highest figures yet reached and over a quarter of a million more than the previous year when the increase was phenomenal. There were 33,080 arrivals with a tonnage of 7,001,829 tons, and 32,960 departures of 7,003,869 tons, making a grand total of 66,040 vessels, and 14,005,698 tons. The increase in European constructed vessels numbers 488 of 507,302 tons against a decrease in the foreign junk trade of 1,283 vessels measuring 308,961 tons and an increase in the local junk trade, ie. ports of the Colony 2,848 vessels aggregating 131,064 tons or a net decrease in junks of 177,897 tons. The net increase of the trade of the port being 2,053 vessels measuring 329,405 tons.

:

264

3. The following statement shows how this amount of shipping is apportioned

1890.

1891.

INCREASE.

DECREASE.

Ships. Tonnage. Ships. Tonnage. Ships. Tonnage. Ships. Tonnage.

British,.

Foreign,

Junks in Foreign

Trade,

5,524 6,994,919| 5,719| 7,190,589

195 195,670

2,695 2,776,822 2,988|3,088,454

293 311,632

|46,686| 3,572,079 45,403|3,263,118

1,283 308,961

Total,...... 54,905 | 13,343,820 54,110 | 13,542,161

198,341 795

Junks in Local

Trade,

9,082 332,473 11,930

463,537 2,848 | 131,064

Grand Total,...163,987 | 13,676,293 66,040 14,005,698|3,336|638,366 1,283 308,961

NET,

2,053 329,405

4. Compared with 1890, there has been an increase of British Tonnage amounting to 195,670 tons, and an increase of Foreign tonnage of 311,632 tons. A comparison with the average of the last three years shows an increase in 1891, of 433 British ships representing 533,878 tons, and of vessels under Foreign flags an increase of 478 ships, measuring 495,028.

5. The 1,548 British ships, exclusive of River Steamers, that entered the port in 1891, carried 10,938 officers as follows::

British,

10,748

American,

60

Austrian,

1

Belgian,

2

Dane,

21

Dutch,

10

French,

2

German,.

57

Japanese,

1

Norwegian,

14

Portuguese, Swedes,

14

8

10,938

95 of the British Officers belonged to the Royal Naval Reserve.

6. The 1,354 Foreign ships, exclusive of River Steamers, that entered in 1891, carried 969 British Officers, all in American, Chinese, and Japanese owned ships.

7. 2,902 European constructed vessels entered the port in the year, of these 442 ships entered 1,529 times, measuring 2,109,366 tons, being twelve times and under, i.e. to make a broad distinction class- ing them as ocean traders or feeders to the Colony. 61 ships entered 1.373 times or 13 times each and upwards, aggregating 1,290,443 tons and may be described as local traders, or distributors of the ocean borne traffic. 149 ships entered once only, one British ship entered thirty eight times, one foreign 37 times and two 36 each.

8. Examination of the following statement shows that the bulk of the ocean traffic is in British bottoms, whilst rata very

pro

much the largest share of the distributing trade is under foreign flags. The German ships are shown separately to the foreigners, the total of the German tonnage being more than that of all the other foreigners put together, and exceeding one-third of the British:-

*

European-constructed Vessels exclusive of River Steamers.

No. of

No. of

FLAG.

TIMES IN

TOTAL.

TONNAGE.

VESSELS.

PORT.

British,

267

Twelve

978

1,430,565

German,

67

and

277

323,637

Other Foreigners,

108

under.

274

355,164

Total,..

442

1,529

2,109,366

British,

27

Thirteen

570

570,220

German,

21

and

493

403,089

Other Foreigners,

13

over.

310

317,134

Total,.........

61

1,373

1,290,443

Grand Total,......

503

2,902

3,399,809

265

The average

of

entry is therefore 5.8 per ship.

9. The general trade, as represented by the amount of shipping from and to the various countries, shows a slight decrease generally-large in the Siam, Cochin China and Macao trade, with a marked increase in that to the Coast of China and Formosa, India and Singapore. In foreign bottoms there is a decided general increase; a very marked decrease is, however, apparent in the Coast of China and Formosa, Cochin China and Siam trades, attributable to the shrinkage in the Junk trade, and the failure of the rice-crops in Siam and Cochin China. Junks cause the total numerical decrease, whilst there is shown an increase of tonnage.

JUNKS.

10. As shown in the foregoing tables, the Junk trade for 1891, amounted to 3,726,655 tons, being a decrease from the previous year of 177,897 tons, although there is an increase numerically of 1,565 Junks. The shrinkage is in the oreign Junk Trade and amounts to 1,283 vessels aggregating 308,961 tons, against which is to be placed an increase in Junks in Local Trade numbering 2,848 vessels measuring 131,064 tons. The causes of this shrinkage have been indicated in previous corres- pondence. Compared wit' the average of the past three years, the Junk trade of 1891 shows a decrease of 301,254 tons in the Fogn trade, and an increase of 162,919 tons in the Local trade, with a total increase of 2,015 vessels.

11. The recurring subject of the interference of the Chinese Revenue Cruizers with the Junk trade of the Colony, was only once brought officially forward in the past year, on the occasion of an alleged violation of British Waters when a Hongkong licensed trading junk was boarded, searched and a revolver found thereon confiscated. As usual the exact position of the vessel being subject to the conflicting evidence of interested parties, with an absence of European testimony on the part of the Junk, the question of within or without British Waters was not capable of legal proof.

12. 4,225 steamers, 126 sailing vessels and 28,729 junks arrived during the year, giving an average of 90 vessels arriving daily in the waters of the Colony as against 88 the year before.

Of the steamers 66 per cent. were British, a falling off of 2 per cent. from 1890, of these 52 per cent, were "Ocean going" as against 54 the year before, and of the Foreigners 11 per cent. were river craft an increase of two per cent. on the previous year.

STEAM-LAUNCHES.

13. On the 31st December, there were 100 steam-launches in the Harbour, of these 48 were licensed for the conveyance of passengers, 44 were privately owned, 8 were the property of the Colonial Govern- ment, besides three Police launches and a steam floating fire engine. There were in addition 5 launches, the property of the War Department. During the year 8 launches were sold, one sunk and one con- demned.

EMIGRATION.

14. There has been a slight increase in the numbers of Chinese leaving the Colony for ports other than those of China and Japan. The numbers to Honolulu have nearly trebled, increased to Mauritius, the Straits Settlements and Vancouver, decreased 25 per cent. to San Francisco and totally ceased to Deli.

1885.

1886.

1887.

1888.

1889. 1890. ! 1891.

57,517

64,522 82,897 96,195 47,849 42,066 45,162

F

:

:

266

Immigration.

1885.

1886.

1887.

1888.

1889.

1890.

1891.

80,773 88,704

92,375

98,800

99,315 101,147 105,199

REGISTRY OF SHIPPING.

15. During the year 4 vessels of 2,629 tons were registered under the provisions of the Merchant Shipping Act 1854, and 5 certificates of Registry with a total of 1,156 tons were cancelled. Return No. XVIII shows the remainder of the work done in this branch.

MARINE MAGISTRATE'S COURT.

16. 147 cases were heard in this Court with 311 defendants. Refusal of duty (15) and obtain- ing fraudulent passage i.e. stowaways (7) were the principal offences in the case of ships. Breach of Harbour Regulations (34) and leaving without clearance (15) in the case of junks. A number of cases of "Anchoring in prohibited places" (Junks) have been tried in the Police Court. The number of cases of "Carrying excess of passengers (Steam-Launches) 10 was heavy. Three certificates of steersmen were suspended for six months each.

EXAMINATIONS FOR THE POSTS OF MASTERS, MATES AND ENGINEERS UNDER SECTION 15 OF ORDINANCE No. 8 OF 1879.

17. The following table shows the number of candidates examined for certificates of competency, distinguishing those who were successful and those who failed

NATIONALITY.

British,

British Guiana,

British India,

America,

Dane,

Grade.

Master.

Passed.

Failed.

22

1

1

:

:

Total.

22

22

posted

Gradc.

First Mate,

Passed.

DECK OFFICERS.

Failed.

Total.

Grade.

Passed.

20

4

3

:

:

:

24

75

3

:

Only Mate.

Failed.

Total.

Grade.

Passed.

:

1

4

1

:

German,

3

:

Norwegian,

3

:

Swede,

1

3

1

2

:

:

1

2

1

1

:

:

British,

:{

First Mate River Steamer.

} 1

1

2

:

GRAND TOTAL,.......

32

H

32

26

10

5

31

3 2

:

10

Second Mate.

Failed.

N

Total.

Grade.

Passed.

6

10

:

:

:

:

~

:

:

:

:

:

:

2

01

:

First-class Engineer.

H

:

Failed.

ENGINEERS.

Total.

Grade.

Passed.

Failed.

Total.

4 14

22 7 29

:

~

3 1

H

:

:

2223

:

:

5

7 2 9

15 7

Second-class Engineer,

:

CYD

3

:

2

:

...

***

5

10

2

1

3

4

1

5

1

...

31

12 43

TOTAL DECK OFFICERS,

77.

TOTAL ENGINEERS,...... 65.

18. Since 1st January, 1884, when under the Order in Council of 31st December, 1883, certificates of competency issued at Hongkong were made of equal value to those issued by the Board of Trade 724 certificates of all grades have been issued. The details are shown in the following table:

GRADE.

1891.

Total.

Master, First Mate, Only Mate,

21 10 6

14

5

3

Second Mate,

Total,......... 50 33

First-class Engineer, Second-class Engineer,

19

22

23 20 20

Total,..... 42

42

REQ

292 29

10 17 12

10 10 5 4 10

22:4

14

Scott &

20 25 39

3

2

1

****

32 175

31 29 26 153

3

20

56

29 38 47 59

11 14

15

OT F

31 29 40

229

21

19 28 33 31

888

68

104

11 18 15

131

189

39 51 46

320

Grand Total,... 92 75 60 67 87 98 131 114

724

..

.

267

MARINE COURTS UNDER SECTION 13 OF ORDINANCE No. 8 OF 1879.

19. The following Court has been held during the year :--

1. On the 9th April, 1891, inquiry as to the stranding and loss of the British steam-ship Nanzing, Official No. 60,462 of Shanghai, on the South side of Ye Chow Island, China Sea, on the morning of the 20th March. The Master's (JOSEPH HOGG) certificate of competency was returned to him.

THE SUNDAY CARGO-WORKING ORDINANCE, 1891.

20. Ordinance No. 6 of 1891 prohibiting the working of cargo in connection with vessels of European construction or design within the waters of the Colony came into force on the 1st August last, and has proved a boon to the classes whose condition it was intended to ameliorate.

21. The total of fees collected for "Sunday Permits" to 31st December last, amounted to $2,150 representing 11 exemptions.

22. A flaw was found in the Ordinance on the 30th October last, when the Police Magistrate ruled in the case of a ship that had coaled on a Sunday without a permit that "coal, water, provi- sions, stores and equipment" were not cargo and, therefore, not within the letter of the Ordinance. Since that date two vessels have availed themselves of this technicality to evade the Ordinance.

1

SEAMEN.

23. 11,782 seamen were shipped and 12,099 discharged at the Shipping Office and on board ships during the year, this discrepancy is owing to the number of seamen shipped at the various Consulates of which we have no record.

24. 295 distressed seamen were received during the year, of these 69 were sent to the United Kingdom, 10 elsewhere, 3 died, and 199 obtained employment. On the 31st December, 1891, 13 were in the Government Civil Hospital, and 1 in the Lunatic Asylum. $4,367.64 were expended by the Board of Trade in the relief of these men, and $17.25 by the Colony.

MARINE SURVEYOR'S SUB-DEPARTMENT.

25. Return No. XXIII shows the work performed in this branch of the Harbour Department.

LIGHTHOUSES.

26. The amount of dues collected was as follows:-

Class of Vessel.

Rate.

No. Tonnage.

Total Fees Collected.

Perseverance and Wing Un,

Ocean Vessels paying full dues, 2 cents per ton.

2,895 | 3,403,466 | 85,086.62

Launches,

}

352

15,916

397.90

"

691 625,826

4,172.17

per ton.

Free.

758 1,112,992

River Steamers (Night Boats),.cent

Do. (Day Boats),...)

Total,............... 4,696 5,158,200 89,656.69

27. The three Lighthouse Stations have been maintained as usual during the year.

The principal light-keeper and engineer's services being required at the Gap Rock Lighthouse, for the light now approaching completion there, the second light-keeper was transferred to Cape D'Aguilar Lighthouse, the third to Green Island, and a temporary third light-keeper employed whose salary is debited to the cost of the erection of the Gap Rock Lighthouse.

28. The second lighthouse keeper died on 15th January last; the post has since been satisfactorily filled by the Officer now in charge at D'Aguilar.

29. The third light-keeper on probation on 31st December last, resigned on the 9th January, and his successor resigned on 31st May. The Officer now in charge of Green Island Light has been confirmed in the appointment of third light-keeper.

268

30. Higher pay on an incremental system is gradually producing a better class of Chinese assist- ant light-keepers. I would be glad to see Police Pensioners come forward as applicants for the posts shortly to be filled amongst the assistants at the Gap Rock.

BOKHARA Rock.

31. The buoy marking this rock broke adrift once, but was speedily replaced with the assistance of a diver from H. M. S. Victor Emanuel.

GOVERNMENT GUNPOWDER DEPÔT.

32. During the year 1891, there has been stored in the Government Magazine, Stone Cutters' Island.

No. of Cases, &c.

Approximate Weight.

lbs.

Gunpowder, privately owned,

Do., Government owned,

Cartridges, privately owned,

Do., Government owned,

Do.,

Explosive Compounds, privately owned,......

17,067

342,680

632

63,200

411

68,560

228

23,996

1,406

80,716

Government owned,.

12

585

Total,.....

19,756

579,737

On the 31st December, 1891, there remained as under:-

No. of Cases, &c.

Approximate Weight.

ibs.

Gunpowder, privately owned,

3,560

72,340

Do., Government owned,

Cartridges, privately owned,

316

52,713

Do., Government owned,

173

19,613

Explosive Compounds, privately owned,......

480

31,945

Do.,

Government owned,.

12

655

Total,.......

4,541

177,266

Since the issue of the proclamation prohibiting the export of munitions of war to China very large quantities of gunpowder privately owned have been transferred to Macao.

The

33. The condition of the Magazine is good, a new roof having been put on during the year. new wharf is completed. The subject of the exclusion of the public from the precincts of the Magazine is one which has been brought prominently forward for the last two years successively. At present, this is the only portion of Stone Cutters' Island where the public can land without special "Permit and when it is considered with what care such like premises are generally guarded, the omission in this case seems to call for speedy correction.

34. The Gunner resigned on the 15th September, and his successor on the 19th November, the post was filled on the 20th November last by an Officer on probation-since confirmed.

IMPORTS AND EXPORTS (OPIUM) OFFICE.

35. The Return shows that during the year the amount of Opium reported as follows:-

1890.

Imported, Exported,

.62,4631 35 440 58,0231

but not landed,

Through cargo reported 1890,

1891.

Decrease.

58,4192 4,0431 35 57,998

40

25 12

.......16,004 chests 1891, ......18,256 do.

Increase,............ 2,252 chests

22,186 permits were issued from this office being an increase of 1,742 over 1890.

40

A daily Memo. of Export Permits was during the year sent to the Chinese Customs Office in

Victoria.

36. Surprise visits were paid to 114 godowns. One case of deficiency (one chest) was detected, prosecuted and the owner fined $100. Sundry technical breaches of the Opium Ordinance were found.

269

66

REVENUE.

37. Table XXVI is a comparative statement of revenue for the past five years.

In the course of

correspondence appearing in the public prints last year certain items of revenue collected from European constructed vessels" were referred to as evidence that European shipping was more heavily taxed than junks the inference being that the ship-owner paid the heavier fees. Examination of these items will show that the inference is most misleading, and the illustrations inaccurate.

It is a

1st. "Emigration Brokers" in 1891, $1,200, were paid by 6 individuals who find $10,000

security each. The licences are issued for the protection of ships and owners. trade license as much as a pawn-broker's or public house licence, and there appears no more reason why it should be considered a charge on shipping, it might as easily be paid direct into the Treasury as the others are, and not appear in the collection of this Department at all.

2nd. Shipping seamen $11,782. Hitherto not one cent of this has been paid by the ship- owner, $1 for shipping, and 25 cents for discharging have been the charges legally and carefully deducted from the seaman's wages. Unless a seaman signs Articles before a Shipping Master, the owners have no legal control over him. These dues are paid all the world over save in England. They are a distinct benefit to owners and as much general revenue as stamp duty.

3rd. Examination of Masters, Mates and Engineers $1,900. These fees are paid by the individuals who come up for examination. The multiplication of certificated officers is of the greatest convenience to ship-owners, the law (and also Insurance Companies) requiring certain certificated officers to be on board. Were officers unable to obtain certificates abroad on production of satisfactory proof of competency and service, they would be debarred from rising in their profession (or materially retardel), and ship- owners would be put to great delay and inconvenience in filling up vacancies caused by death, misconduct, &c., and until such vacancies were filled up it must be remembered the ships could not be run. The fees from the Victoria College might with equal pro- priety be claimed as properly creditable to "Shipping."

4th. Survey of Steamships $8,643.77. These surveys are carried out for the protection of

the public and although the fees charged fall against shipping, they can only be looked upon as trade licences. The certificates are signed by the Governor and are a distinct benefit to owners, as without them they could not carry passengers, and there would be great difficulty in effecting insurance. If these fees were not paid here, they would have to be paid elsewhere.

5th. Registry fees $275. These fees are paid to acquire a national character; as a legal document confer ownership; also for changing the name of the Master on the Register where it must appear by Imperial law and Colonial Ordinance. These fees have to be paid somewhere; there is nothing to prevent owners running their ships under other flags if they think it would be cheaper.

6th. Medical fees for Inspecting Emigrants $14,435.50. This examination is a distinct benefit to shippers and emigrants alike it naturally follows, therefore, to shipping and ship-owners. Without it emigrants could not be obtained in any number and shippers would lose the passage money. It is the hall mark of British supervision and justice. It means only voluntary emigration and prevents mutinies aboard ships. It should be noted that the Registrar General's staff are also employed in the regulation of emigra- tion at the examination on shore, the actual medical examination on board ship, the name under which the fee is collected, being but a very small proportion of the whole process, it however insures the ship against contagious disease, and humanly speaking against quarantine detentions and loss of money at the end of her voyage. If, however, the burdens are excessive and the benefits not an adequate equivalent, there is no reason why the trade should be confined to this centre.

7th. Licences Steam-Launches $462.50. An ordinary trade licence to carry passengers of precisely the same nature as that of a Jinricksha or Chair licence, and there appears no more reason why Ocean steamers should be credited with the one than with the other. 8th. Survey Certificates for Steam-Launches $1,055. For the protection of the public an ordinary Board of Trade examination to which passenger launches are subjected every half year in the same way as are locomotives in England or penny steam boats on the Thames. Shipping have no more claim to them than to the fees for the testing of the Peak tramway. The explosion and loss of life on board the steam-launch Wing Shing on the 7th May last, (a towing launch) demonstrated how necessary is a periodical Government examination of all launches not only for the protection of those on board but in a crowded harbour like Victoria to safeguard passers-by.

!

270

It is patent that for all these direct taxes, a direct return in full is made, the grounds therefore on which ship-owners endeavour to establish a claim to consideration for the revenue derived therefrom, are not very clear.

9th. Light-dues $89,656.69; for this sum 3,419,382 tons of shipping paying full rates 2

cents a ton, and 625,826 tous of river steamers paying reduced rates of a cent a ton entered the waters of the Colony in addition to which 1,112,876 tons of river steamers day boats entered free of charge. By Order in Council dated 30th March, 1875, "River "Steamers entering by day and all Chinese Junks are exempt from payment of Light "Dues." Junks are not allowed by Ordinance to leave by night and as a matter of fact few arrive by night, 1,863,202 tons of junks entered in 1891, of these, only one- seventh are Ocean going in the sense of European constructed vessels; the rest plying on the Canton river as day boats and to the ports of the island without leaving the waters of the Colony, were they on the same footing, therefore, with regard to Light- Dues, but 266,172 tons would have been taxed i.e., 4,045,208 tons of European Shipping pay $89,656.69 2.2 cents a ton, and 266,172 tons of Junks pay $22,602.50-8.5 cents a ton. The assumption, therefore, that Junks are more lightly taxed than European constructed vessels it will be seen is baseless.

10th. Cargo-boats $1,177, these are fees for measuring of Cargo-boats, the registry and licensing are done by the Registrar General's Department, which has machinery at its disposal for the investigation of the securities offered by 2,500 individuals and upwards,

inclusive of boats.

11th. Medical fees for distressed British seamen, these are paid by the Board of Trade, for- merly they were paid into the Treasury and therefore appeared as revenue, but now the Shipping Master pays the Government Civil Hospital directly.

12th. The last reference it is proposed to make to the correspondence of last year is to explain that the upkeep of the different establishments besides Victoria said to be for the "almost exclusive use of native craft" are five Police Stations. The Officer-in-Charge receives $11 a month for the extra work, and a boat and crew are kept to pull him about. Table XXVII shows the cost of upkeep and the receipts from them; the total cost amounts to $2,616, and the Returns therefrom to $12,574.50 nearly 500 per cent. sound paying business.

QUARANTINE.

38. During the past year, Swatow alone has been proclaimed, Government Notification No. 311 dated 18th July till the 5th September, when it was declared clear during that time, Junks and European constructed vessels arrived from that port as shown below :—

!

No.

Tons. Crew. Passengers.

European-constructed Vessels, 29

27,485

1,269

5,064

Junks,

00

8

1,875

150

Honourable W. M. GOODMAN,

Acting Colonial Secretary,

&C.,

&c.,

&c.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your obedient Servant,

WM. C. H. HASTINGS,

Acting Harbour Master, &c.

I.--NUMBER, TONNAGE, and CREWS of Vessels ENTERED at Ports in the Colony of Hongkong from each Country in the Year 1891,

COUNTRIES WHENCE ARRIVED.

Australia and New Zealand,

British Columbia.......

British North Borneo,..

Coast of China and Formosa,.

Cochin-China,

Continent of Europe,

Great Britain,

16

25,234 488 80 145,998 7,415]

India and Singapore,

Japan,

Java and other Islands in the Indian Archi-

pelago,

Macao.

Mauritius,

North Pacific,

Philippine Islands,

Ports in Hainan and Gulf of Tonquin,

Russia in Asia..

Sandwich Islands,.

Siam,

167 259,971 8,653| 24. 23601,407 $32) 377 840,786 17,286

::

::

181 314,479 10,459|| 7 10,115 187 155 193,883 9,455| 38 48,358 1,596

167 259,971 8,633||

117

172,819 5,111|

Tons. Crews. Vessels.

56,212 2,032 17 37,812 2,110 1,274 24 18 13,983 840

BRITISH.

FOREIGN.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST,

TOTAL.

With CargOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOES.

Vessels.

Tons Crews. Vessels.

Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tons. Crews. Vessels. Tons. Crews, Vessels.

Tons.

Crews. Vessels.

45,940 1,855

36

37,812 2,110]

12.709. 816

1,463|1,925,448. 67,000] 88 78

93,681; 3,390)

16 25.234 488)

179 311,632 10,383)

155; 198,888 9.455

2

17

45,940 1,855] 7 10,272 177 87,812|| 2,110]

Tons. Crews Vessels.

10,272 177 43

...

16

12,709 816

2 1,274

a

TOTAL.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Tons.

Crews. Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

43)

17

...

...

56,212| 2,032 37,812 2,110 18 13,983 840

24 60,263 2,645 1,551 1,985,711 69,645 14,178 1,672,138 189,616 8,664 627,859 96,233 22,842 2,299,997 285.849 15,641 6,597,586 266,616 8,752 688,122 98,878 24,393 4,285,708 355,494 78 93,681 3,390) 115 98,355 3,172|

:

2,847 76

:::

98,355 3,172 193 192,036 6,562

193 192,036 6,562

96 171,232 7,903

115

80

145,998 7,415

7

570

13

25 $1,327 945

39

45,550 1,360

21

528

38

378 341,814 17,324|

626

94,988 15,982

931

828

2,031 62

1,599 54

14,253 1,352]

29

39

2,C58 89

96 171,232 · 7,903) 10,115 187 186 321,747 10,570} 49,186 1,625| 198 242,241|11,051f 118 174,850 5,173 284 432,790 13,744|| 41 47,154||||1,414 63 76,812 2,292 719 109,2417,334 1,003] 435,774|33,268|| 2,658 891

2,847

828

76

188 324,594 10,646

29

194 243,069 11,080

2,031

62

285 434,821 13,806

3

94

2,169 67 661 78,481 2,359 14,781 1,390 1,097 450,555 34,658

3

2,658 891

3

...

}

440

12

.449 . 12

4

2281 27

228 27

5

6771 39

...

86

60,067 3,882||

86

60,067 3,882

53

34,062 1,876|

::

213

122,549 6,234]

4,401 201 61 3,319] 113 218

38,463 2,077||

139

94,129 5,758

125,868 6,847

213) 122,549 6,234]

4,401 201 147 3,319 113]

218

2,658 89

677

98,530 5,959 125,868 6,347

39

3,819 150

3,819 · 150

2

3,819 150

2

3,819) 150

#

98.

South America,

South Pacific....

United States of America,

1,555 4.4 93.520 - 3,689)

48 95,571 ,459

1,555 44

592

€8

1,084

38

3,676

101

61

4,147 107

1,084 38

5,231

145

981

93,520 3,689]

2,790

182

2,790 132

103

96,310 8,821

...

103 96,310 8,821

794

17

794

17

794

17

***

802

9

48

95,571 3,459 31 ,980 1,609

::

TOTAL,..

2,764-8,529,015)

92)

9

302 79 150,551 5,068)

79 150,551 5,068

64,208 2,772 2,856 3,593,223 136,206 15,5242,523,852 234,829 8,777 656,168 98,099 24,301|3,180,020 332,028 18,288 6,052,867 368,263 8,869 720,376 100,871 27,157 6,773,243 469,184

302)

9

1

7941 17

302

9

31 54,980 1,609

271

II.-NUMBER, TONNAGE, and CREWS of Vessels CLEARED at Ports in the Colony of Hongkong for each Country in the Year 1891.

7

TOTAL.

BRITISH.

COUNTRIES TO WHICH DEPARTED.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL

WITH CARGOES.

FOREIGN.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAĻ.

WITH CARGOES.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews, Vessels.

Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tons. Crews. Vessels. Tons. Crews Vessels.

Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tons.

IN BALLAST. Crews. Vessels. Tons. Crews. Vessels.

TOTAL.

Tons. Crews.

Australia and New Zealand, .

21

29,880 1,425

British Columbia,.

***

British North America,

122

1,526

1,482

19

28

28

22

31,406 1,444

21

29,880, 1,425

1,526

· 19

22

21

1,482

28

891

21

891

21]

...

British North Borneo,

Coast of China and Formosa,

Cochin-China,.

Continent of Europe,

Creat Britain,

Russia in Asia,..

Sandwich Islands,

Siam,......

South America,

United States of America,

India and Singapore,

Japan,

Java & other Islds. in the Indian Archipelago,|

Масао,

North Pacific,

Philippine Islands, .

Ports in Hainan and Gulf of Tonquin,

15 11,884

1,801|2,267,962| 83,753||

341

27,525 978

1] 1,198Į 17 70,016 5,200 211 332,785 10,842|

127 218,585 8,616)

5 6,557 286]

376||| 341,168 17,262)

15) 12,762 723

11) 10,765 511

3 1,785 44

43,994 1,717

2 1,274 29 15,686) 234

10

643

15

...

11,884 643

1 1,497 26 478 14

32]

23

33]

56

1,198 17

46)

97,128 5,901)

15 11,884 643

35,842 1,286 1,833 2,303,804|85,039 ||14,885|1,885,702 209,850 7,777 411,561 73,415 22,662 2,297,263 283,265| 16,686 4,153,664 293,603 7,809 43,119 1,355 70,644 2,333 67) 56,469 1,801 48 42,525 1,355 115]

47

31 2,388

47

473 141 16 12,357 657

447,403 74,701 |24,495 4,601,067 368,304

***

1,482

.28

31,406 1,444 1,482 28

1

1,497 26 473 14

2,388

46

........

97,128 5,901 47

98,994 3,156 90 83,994 2,779 98,326 5,918

81

85,644 2,710| 171 169,638 5,489

471

98,326 5,918

60

=

222 20

5,929 101 83,543 1,989Į

34

216

70,016) 5,200

34

70,016 5,200

34

70,016 5,200

338,714 10,943 |

61

92,201 3,099)

7,981 154

69 100,182 3,253

272

424,986 13,941

13

13,910 255

285

438,896 14,196

187 302,12810,605 |

95

152,477 7,343]

56

85,546 1,967

151 238,023 9,310

222

371,062 15,959|

116

169,089 3,956||

338

540,151 19,915

10,751Į

272

12

17,308 558

4,849| 121

5,420 128

9 10,269 249

9

11,406 -407

12

16,171| 400

21 27,577 807

376)

341,168 17,262 |

674 105,46816,702||

45

6,122 651

719

2,250 76

2

2,250] 76

5

550 46

8,898 104 10

111,590 17,353|| 1,050 4,448 150

446,636 33,964||

451

550 46

7

6,148 180

14,743

328

28

27,505 1,051

30

1,854

93

13

12,619 604

19,314] 926 220) 128,764 6,239)

12,858 201

39

32,172 1,127

45

32,076 1,649

22]

27,601 529

12

9,451 334

232

138,215 6,573}

231

139,529 6,750 14

11,305) 427

...

...

1,785 44

4,645) 117 859 25

::

4,645 117

4,645 117

859 25

2,644 69

47

1,610

91

49

45,604 1,838

2

::

::

::

1,274 29

672 17 2,199 45

1,617

23]

2,289

40

44,666 1,734

6,122 651 1,095 452,758 34,615

3,227 114

12

6,698 226

67 59,677 2,178 245 150,834 7,177 5 4,645 117

اة

10

15,686) 234

24 31,306) 471

...

::

2,199 45 31,306 471

34

3,473| 74 46,992| 705)

::

2,644 69

51 47,893 1,848

3,473 74

34

46,992

705

TOTAL,....

2,702|3,393,826|132,280||

588,949 78,872 24,09

18,824|5,976,429|| 161 203,540 5,659| 2,863|3,597,366|137,939||16,122 2,582,603 252,703 7,968 588,949 78,372 24,090 3,171,552 331,075 18,824 5,976,429 384,088 8,129 792,489 84,031 26,9536,768,918 469,014

殿

C

272

1

III-NUMBER, TONNAGE and CREWS of Vessels of each Nation ENTERED at Ports in the Colony of Hongkong

in the Year 1891.

NATIONALITY

OF

VESSELS.

273

ENTERED.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels.

Tons.

Crews. Vessels.

Tons.

Crews. Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

American,

48

69,204

1,825

6

5,836

94

54

Austrian,

14

24,318

706

1

761

23

15

British,

2,764

3,529,015

133,434

92

:64,208

2,772

2,856

75,040 1,919 25,079 3,593,223 136,206

729

Chinese,

326

356,663

16,272

10

7,884

473

336

Chinese Junks,

14,158

1,077,750

175,114

8,648

556,866

94,375

22,806

22,806

Danish,

65

25,258

1,393

8

4,286

371

73

|

364,547 16,745 1,634,616 269,489 1,634,616269,489

29,544 1,764

Dutch,

23

30,085

1,089

2

1,344

44

25

31,429 1,133

French,

95

141,288

10,800

95

141,288

10,800

German,

681

657,494

22,969

89

69,232

2,382

770

726,726

25,351

......

Italian,

11

16,489

751

1

794

17

12

17,283

768

Japanese,

31

48,533

1,396

1

2,031

62

32*

50,564

1,458

Norwegian,

Russian,

Spanish,

44

56,371

1,154

9

6,545

202

53

62,916

1,356

2

3,819

150

2

3,819

150

26

16,580 1,210

2

589

56

28

17,169

1,266

TOTAL,............ 18,288 6,052,867 368,263

8,869

720,376 100,871 27,157 6,773,243 469,134

IV.—NUMBER, TONNAGE and CREWS of Vessels of each Nation CLEARED at Ports in the Colony of Hongkong

in the Year 1891.

CLEARED.

NATIONALITY

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

OF

VESSELS.

Vessels. Tons.

Crews. Vessels. Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tons.

Crews.

American, Austrian,

36 15

54,985

1,678

16

17,192

273

52

25,079

British,

2,702

3,393,826

739 132,280

15

72,177 25,079

1,951

739

Chinese,

337

367,689 16,871

161 2

Chinese Junks,

14,817

1,244,854 | 195,078

7,780

203,540 784 383,648

5,659 54 73,017

2,863

339

3,597,366 137,939

368,473 16,925

22,597 | 1,628,502 |268,095

Danish,

73

29,544 1,717

73

29,544

.1,717

Dutch,

23

30,085 1,184

2

1,344

44

25

31,429 1,228

French,

95

142,755 10,744

1

533

24

96

143,288

10,768

German,.

654

617,006

21,480

113

103,228

3,061

767

720,234

24,541

Italian,

13

18,782

890

13

18,782

890

Japanese,

8

14,569

453

25

38,025

1,088

33

52,594

1,541

Norwegian,

22

16,943

500

27

43,123

734

Peruvian,

1

398

13

Russian, Spanish,

2

3,819

150

26 16,095 1,206

N

1,072

77

91288

49

60,066

1,234

398

13

3,819

150

17,167

1,283

TOTAL....

18,824 5,976,429 384,983 8,129 792,489 84,031 26,953 6,768,918 469,014

274

V.-TOTAL NUMBER, TONNAGE AND CREWS OF VESSELS ENTERED AT EACH PORT IN THE COLONY OF HONGKONG, IN THE YEAR 1891.

TOTAL.

BRITISH.

FOREIGN.

NAMES

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

OF PORTS.

VIs.

Tons.

Crews. Vis.

Tous,

Crews. Vls. Tons. Crews. Vls.

Tons. Crews.

Vis.

Aberdeen,

Hunghom,

Shaukiwán,

Stanley,

Victoria,

Yaumáti,

:

2,764|3,529,015|133,434|| 92

478

609 20,735 4,411] 1,106| 9,474| 2,210| 64.208 2,772 2,856 3,593,223 136,206 12,126 2,294,693 202,709 3,868 1,510 165,059 17,748 2,660

620

20,231 5,25]]

485

13,660| 2,505|

532

251

Tons.

23,057 6,622|| 1,098|| 33,315 5,591|· 1,094| 68,305|11,153| 1,638

[Crews. Vis.

56

Total,.......

2,7643,529,015|133,484 92

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Tons. Crews.

VIS.

Vls.

Tons. Crews. Vls.

Tons. Crews.

478

20,231 5,251 13,660 2,505 609 20,735|4,411| 1,106| 56

9,474|| 2,210) 5,823,708 336,143 3,960 165,059 17,743 2,660

Tons. Crews.

43,288 11,873|| 620 46,975 8,096, 485 89,040 15,564| 532

1,587 506 307 251

11,061 2,716| 370,288 44,321 15,994 2,661,981 247,030 14,890 159,616 29,906 4,170 324,675 47,649 1,510

43,28811,873 46,975 8,096 89,040|15,564 11,061| 2,716

23,057 6,622 1,098| 33,315 5,591| 1,094| 68,305 11,153 1,638 1,587| 506 307 434,496 47,093 18,850 6,258,204 383,236 159,016 29,906 4,170 324,675 47,649

64,208 -2,772 2,850 8,593,228 156,206 15,524 2,523,852 284,829 8,777 656,168 98,099 24,501 3,180,020 8,180,020 832,928 ,928|18,288) 6,052,867 2,867 368,268 8,869 720,376 100,871 27,157 6,773,248 469,184

VI.-TOTAL NUMBER, TONNAGE AND CREWS OF VESSELS CLEARED AT EACH PORT IN THE COLONY OF HONGKONG, IN THE YEAR 1891.

BRITISH.

FOREIGN.

TOTAL.

NAMES

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

OF PORTS.

Vis.

Tons. Crews. VIs.

Tons. Crews. Vls.

Aberdeen,

...

Hunghom,

Shaukiwán,

Stanley,.

Victoria,

2,702 3,393,826 132,280

Yaumáti,.

Tons. Crews. Vls.

5,096 1,104 922 30,406) 3,442 634 58,248| 7,364] 651 7,707 1,305| 128 161 203,540 5,059 2,863 3,577,360|187,939| 12,437 2,325,461 217,486 3,476 1,054 155,685 22,002 2,157

Tons. Crews. Vls.

176

447

929

179

...

Total,.

2,702 3,393,826|132,280; 161 203.540 5,659

2,863|3,577,366

38,19210,769|| 1,098| 43,288|11,873 16,117 4,564) 1,081) 46,523 8,006 30,250 7,907 1,580 88,498 15,271 3,354 1,411 307 11,061 2,716 537,909 34,471 18,776 6,257,196 384,237 166,667 24,900 4,111 322,359|46,911

3,577,366 137,989 16,122 2,562,603 252,703 7,908 588,949 78,372 24,090 3,171,552 $81,078 18,824 5,976,429 384,963 8,120 782,480 84,031 26,953 6,768,918 469,014

Tons Crew7. Vls. Tons. Crews. Vis. Tons. Crews. Vis. 38,192 10,769|| 1,098 43,288, 11,873 176 5,096| 1,104| 922 16,117 4,564) 1,081| 46,523 8,006] 447 634

30,406 3,442]

30,260 7,907| 1,580 88,498|15,271) 929 58,248 7,364| 651 3,354 1,411 307 11,061 2,716) 179 7,707 1,805 128 334,369 28,812 15,913 2,659,830 246,298|15,139 5,719,287 349,766 3,637 166,667 24,909 4,111 322,352 46,911 1,954 155,685 22,002 2,157

Tons. Crews. Vls. Tons. Crews.

"

VII.-Total Number, Tonnage, Crews and Passengers of Junks ENTERED from Macao, during the Year

ending 31st December, 1891.

275

CARGO.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

1

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Passen- gers.

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Passen- gers.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Victoria,

624

94,045 15,934

16

85

9,704 1,157

2

709 103,749 17,091

18

Total,...

624

94,045 15,934

16

85

9,704

1,157

A

709 103,749 17,091

18

VIII.—Total Number, Tonnage, Crews and Passengers of Junks CLEARED for Macao, during the Year

ending 31st December, 1891.

CARGO.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Passen- gers.

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Victoria,...... 665 100,368 16,498

241

43

4,106

598

Passen- gers.

228

Vessels.

Tons.

Crews.

Passen-

gers.

708

104,474 17,096

469

Total,...! 665 100,368

16,498

241

43

4,106

598

228

708 104,474 17,096

469

IX.-Total Number, Tonnage, Crews and Passengers of Junks ENTERED at each Port in the Colony of Hongkong, from Ports on the Coast of China and Formosa, during the Year ending 31st December, 1891.

CARGO.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Passen- gers.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Passen- gers.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Aberdeen,

Hunghom, ...

620 485 13,660

20,231 5,251

8

478

2,505

211

609

Shaukiwán,...

532

20,735

4,411

78

1,106

23,057 6,622 33,315 5,591 68,305

6

169 1,098 1,094

43,288 11,873

177

46,975

8,096

217

Stanley,

251

9,474

2,210

55

56

Victoria,

10,136

754,546 | 127,060 | 101,331

3,654

1,587 261,282

11,153 506 39,440

21

1,638

89,040

15,564

99

307

11,061 2,716

63

Yaumáti,......

1,510

165,059 17,743

27

2,660

159,616 29,906

32,100 35

13,790 4,170

1,015,828166,500 133,431

324,675 47,649

62

Total,... 13,534 983,705 159,180 | 101,710 8,563

547,162 93,218 32,339

22,097 | 1,530,867 |252,398 |134,049

X.-Total Number, Tonnage, Crews and Passengers of Junks CLEARED at each Port in the Colony of Hongkong, for Ports on the Coast of China and Formosa, during the Year ending 31st December, 1891.

Cargo.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Passen- gers.

Vessels. Tous. Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Aberdeen,

Hunghòm, ...

176 447

5,096 1,104

101

922

38,192 10,769

71

1,098

43,288 11,873

172

30,406 3,442

192

634

16,117

4,564

32

1,081

46,523

8,006

224

Shaukiwán,..

929

58,248

7,364

117

651

30,250 7,907

20

1,580

88,498

15,271

137

Stanley,....... 179

7,707 1,305

68

128

3,354 1,411

3

307

11,061 2,716

71

Victoria,

10,467

887,344 143,363 | 114,362

Yaumáti,..

1,954

155,685 22,002

72

3,245 2,157

124,962 22,859 17,141 166,667 24,909 359

13,712 4,111

1,012,306166,222 | 131 503

322,352 46,911

431

Total,... 14,152 | 1,144,486 178,580 |114,912

7,737 379,542 72,419 17,626

21,889 | 1,524,028 | 250,999 | 132 538

276

XI.-Grand Total Number, Tonnage, Crews and Passengers of Junks ENTERED at each Port in the Colony of Hongkong (exclusive of Local Trade), during the Year ending 31st December, 1891.

CARGO.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Passen- gers.

Passen-

Vessels.

T'ons. Crews.

gers.

Aberdeen,

620

20,231 5,251

8

478

23,057

6,622

169 1,098

43.238 11,873

177

Hunghom,

485

13,660

2,505

211

609

33,315

5,591

6 1,094

46,975

8,096

217

Shaukiwán,..

532

20,735

4,411

78

1,106

68,305

11,153

21

1,638

89,040

15,564

99

Stanley,

251

9,474

2,210

55

56

1,587

506

8

307

11,031 2,716

63

Victoria,

10,760

848,591142,991 | 101,347

3,739

270,986

40,597

32,102

Yaumáti,

1,510

165,059 17,743

27

2,660

159,616 29,906

35

14,499 4,170

1,119,577 |183,591

133,449

324,675 47,649

62

Total,... 14,158 | 1,077,750 175,114 |101,726

8,648

556,866 94,375 32,341

22,806 1,634,616 | 269,489 | 134,067

XII.-Grand Total Number, Tonnage, Crews and Passengers of Junks CLEARED at each Port in the Colony of Hongkong (exclusive of Local Trade), during the Year ending 31st December, 1891.

CARGO.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Passen- gers.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Passen- gers.

Passen-

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

gers.

Aberdeen,

176

5,096

1,104

101

922

38,192 10,769

71

1,098

43,288

11,873

172

Hunghòm, ...

447

30,406

3,442

192

634

16,117

4,564

32

1,081

46,523

8,006

224

Shaukiwȧn,.......

929

58,248

7,364

117

651

30,250

7,907

20

1,580

88,498

15,271

137

Stanley,

179

7,707 1,305

68

128

3,354

1,411

3

307

11,061

2,716

71

Victoria,

11,132

987,712 159,861114,603

3,288

129,068

23,457

17,369

Yaumáti,..

1,954

155,68522,002

72

2,157

166,667

24,909

359

14,420 | 1,116,780 |183,318 | 131,972

4,111

322,352 46,911

431

Total,... 14,817 | 1,244,854 |195,078 |115,153

7,780

383,648 73,017

17,854

22,597 1,628,502 268,095 133,007

XIII-Return of Junks (Local Trade) ENTERED at the Port of Victoria from the Out-stations of the Island and the Villages in British Kaulung, during the Year ending 31st December, 1891.

CARGO.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels. Tous. Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Passen- gers.

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Victoria,...... 4,393 181,759 51,931 2,472 1,530 46,827 14,211 3,144

5,923

228,586 66,142 5,616

Total,... 4,393

181,759 51,931 2,472 1,530

46,827 14,211

3,144 5,923 228,586 66,142 5,616

XIV.-Return of Junks (Local Trade) CLEARED from the Port of Victoria for the Out-stations of the Island and the Villages in British Kaulung, during the Year ending 31st December, 1891.

CARGO.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels.

Tons.

Crews.

Passen- gers.

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Passen- gers.

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Passen- gers.

Victoria,

2,224 59,849 18,848 4,745 3,783 175,102 48,058

279 6,007

234,951 66,900 5,024

Total,... 2,224 59,849 18,848 4,745 3,783

175,102 48,058

279 6,007 234,951 66,906 5,024

277

XV.-SUMMARY.

FOREIGN TRADE. ·

No. of VESSELS.

TONS.

CREWS.

British Vessels entered with Cargoes,..

Do.

do. iu Ballast,

2,764 92

3,529,015 64,208

133,434

2,772

Total,....

2,856

3,593,223

`136,206

British Vessels cleared with Cargoes.....

2,702

3,393,826

132,280

Do.

do. in Ballast,

161

203,540

5,659

Total,.......

2,863

3,597,366

137,939

Total of all British Vessels entered and cleared,..

5,719

7,190,589

274,145

Do.

Foreign Vessels entered with Cargoes,

do. in Ballast,.

15,524

2,523,852

234,829

8,777

656,168

98,099

Total,......

24,301

3,180,020

332,928

Foreign Vessels cleared with Cargoes,.

16,122

2,582,603

252,703

Do.

do. in Ballast,..

7,968

588,949

78,372

Total,.

24,090

3,171,552

331,075

Total of all Foreign Vessels entered and cleared,...

48,391

6,351,572

664,003

Total of all Vessels entered with Cargoes,....

18,288

6,052,867

368,263

Do.

do. in Ballast,

8,869

720,376

100,871

Total of all Vessels entered,

27,157

6,773,243

469,134

Total of all Vessels cleared with Cargoes,

18,824

5,976,429

384,983

Do.

do. in Ballast,

Total of all Vessels cleared,

8,129

792,489

84,031

26,953

6,768,918

469,014

Total of all Vessels entered and cleared with Cargoes,

37,112

12,029,296

753,246

Do.

do.

do. in Ballast,

16,998

1,512,865

184,902

Total of all Vessels engaged in Foreign Trade only, entered and cleared,

54,110

13,542,161

938,148

LOCAL TRADE.

Total of all Vessels entered,

5,923

228,586

66,142

Do.

cleared,

6,007

234,951

66,906

Total of all Vessels engaged in Local Trade only, entered and cleared,

11,930

463,537

133,048

Total of all Vessels engaged in Foreign Trade only, entered and cleared,

Do.

do. in Local Trade only,

54,110

13,542,161

938,148

do.

11,930

463,537

133,048

Grand Total of all Vessels entered and cleared,

66,040

14,005,698

1,071,196

SUMMARY OF ALL CHINESE PASSENGERS.

NAMES OF PLACES.

From Ports other than in China or Japan,

Do.

in China and Japan,

Do.

in Macao,

Do.

in Villages of the Colony,...

105,199

792,755

52,984

5,616

Total Arrivals,................

956,554

Left for Ports other than in China or Japan,

45,162

Do.

in China and Japan,

849,249

Do.

in Macao,......

51,584

Do.

in Villages of the Colony,.

5,024

Total Departures,..........

951,019

Excess of Arrivals over Departures,..

5,535

Grand Total of Arrivals and Departures,.

1,907,573

278

XVI-RETURN of VESSELS REGISTERED at the Port of Hongkong, during the Year 1891.

Official Regis- Horse

Name of Vessel.

Number.

tered Tonnage.

Power.

Rig.

Built of

Where built and when.

Remarks.

Kian Yang, str.,......... 95,856 70.21

35 Schooner

Wood Hongkong, 1891.

Sebastian Bach,

95,857 823.29

Barque

Wood Bremerhaven, 1868.

Foreign Bach.

name

Sebastian

Tai On, str.,

95,858 769.64

88

80 None

Steel Hongkong, 1891.

Esmeralda, str.,

95,859 963.31

148 Schooner Steel Port Glasgow, 1891.

Name of Vessel.

XVII.—RETURN of REGISTRIES of VESSELS cancelled at the Port of Hongkong, during the Year 1891.

Official

Number.

Regis- tered Tonnage.

Date of

Registry.

Horse Power.

Rig.

Built of

Where built and when.

Reason of Cancellation.

Nile,.....

10,243 297.55 1867

:

Fei Yan, str.,

...

50,698 27.58 1870 15

One,

Formosa, str.,

Waterwitch,

64,120 94.19 1875

31,233 458.30 1875 154

50,656 279.00 1877

...

Barque Wood Arbroath, Forfar,

1855. Schooner Iron Whampoa, 1870.

Lorcha Wood Hongkong, 1859.

Schooner Iron

Glasgow, 1852.

Barque Teak Calcutta, 1855.

Sold to Foreigners at Borneo.

Sold to Foreigners at Canton.

Broken up.

Converted into Hulk.

#

Lost in the Wenchow River.

XVIII.-AMOUNT of FEES received under the Merchant Shipping Act, 1855, and Section III. of Ordinance No. 8 of 1879 in the Harbour Department, during the Year 1891.

Matter or Duty in respect of which Fee taken.

Number.

Fee.

Amount.

Remarks.

Alteration in Agreements with Seamen,

1

1

Certifying Desertion,

102

1

102

Declaration of Ownership,

8

Endorsement of change of Master,.

34

Endorsement of change of Ownership,.

4

Granting Certificate of Imperial Registy,

15

Inspection of Registry,

Recording Mortgage of Ship,

3

Recording Discharge of Mortgage,

3

Recording Sale of Ship,

4.

212 110 10 10

16

34

8

60

4

5

15

5

15

20

Total,.

275

}

XIX.-RETURN of CHINESE PASSENGER SHIPS cleared by the Emigration Officer, Hongkong, during the Year ending the 31st day of December, 1891.

ADULTS.

CHILDREN.

279

No.

DATE CLEARED.

SHIP'S NAME.

TONS.

NATION-

ALITY

MASTER'S NAME.

WHITHER BOUND,

TOTAL.

OF SHIP.

M.

F. M.

F.

1

January 3

City of Rio de Janeiro, str.

2,275 American

2

""

3

Venetia, str.............

1,551 British

W. Ward T. F. Creery

San Francisco

30

Straits Settlements

286

8

""

6

Bormida, str.

8

Parthia, str..

""

8

Miike Maru, str.

""

10 | Gaelic, str.

15 Thibet, str.

...

17 Kutsang, str.

"

دو

1,499 Italian 2,035 British 2,054 | Japanese 2,691 British 1,665 1,495

C. Gavazzo

J. Panton

351

HT

33

44

387

:

38

428

406

Vancouver, B.C.

83

83

:

J. B. Macmillan

W. G. Pearne

W. L. Brown

Straits Settlements San Francisco Straits Settlements

286

10

298

37

617

79

18

W. O. M. Young

2971

50

53

9

"

21 | Melpomene, str.

1,943 Austrian

A. Mitis

367

34

1889

45 616

356

419

"

10

""

22 China, str.

2,401 British

W. B. Seabury

San Francisco

36

42

11

""

28 Lombardy, str.

1,571

·

">

J. F. Jephson

Straits Settlements

415

25

449

12

"

31 Arratoon Apcar, str.

1,392

J. G. Spence

156

17

178

13 February 5 | Batavia, str..

1,662

J. R. Hill

**

14

6

Wing Sang, str.

1,517

d'A. de Ste. Croix

Vancouver, B.C. Straits Settlements

68

126

29

15

"

17

Japan, str.

1,865

J. G. Olifent

51

==

12

68 139

...

11

65

"

""

16

24

"

Benlomond, str.

1,752

A. W. S. Thomson

70)

70

17

25 Pandora, str.

1,781 Austrian

وو

18

19

20 March

26 Oceanic, str........

28 Kutsang, str.

2,440 British

G. Mettel

W. M. Smith

196

10

3

209

"

San Francisco

28

1

29

:

1,495

W. H. Jackson

Straits Settlements

207

17

3

21

229

5 Glenartney, str.

21

17

7 Bormida, str.

22

11

Nizam, str.

""

29

14

24

""

25

26

"

27

23

Gaelic, str.

28

29

City of Rio de Janeiro, str.

17 Patroclus, str.

17 Arratoon Apear, str.

19 Tetartos, str. ...................

25 Teheran, str.

26 Melpomene, str.

1,944

1,499 | Italian 1,615 British

""

2,275 American 1,386 British 1,392 1,578 German 2,691 British 1,670 1,943 Austrian

"

E. Crewe

">

"

P. Brass

238

244

>>

C. Gavazzo

484

29

505

""

410

25

443

**

W. Ward

San Francisco

26

26

:

J. Pulford

Straits Settlements

148

5

155

J. G. Spence

354

21

6

382

32

W. Breitung

362

16

5

384

""

W. G. Fearne

San Francisco

63

1

71

C. D. Sams

Straits Settlements

440

27

473

A. Mitis

261

28

3

297

"J

30

26

Wing Sang, str.

1,517 British

d'A. de Ste. Croix)

447 44

]]

505

"

31 April

I Venetia, str......

1,551

""

T. F. Creery

525

16

6

551

32

33

34

37

39

39

40

41

42

43

44

45

46

48

50

51

52

53

57

⠀⠀*****8** * *** * ******BARBEA ♬ 8:8888868827~** * 828887%

27

1

Glenogle, str.

2,399

W. E. Duke

195

8

I

:

204

""

39

11

2

China, str.

2,401

**

W. B. Seabury

San Francisco

991

11

19

3 Japan, str.

1,865

J. G. Olifent

Straits Settlements

288

49

34

117

349

""

7 Empress of India, str.

3,003

"1

7 Bisagno, str.

وو

14 Prometheus, str.

""

15

Belgic, str.

"

17

15

Kutsang, str.

21

"9

Maria Teresa, str.

24

""

Dardanus, str.

"">

25 City of Peking, str..

1,499 Italian 1,538 British 2,695 1,495 2,011 Austrian 1,507 British 3,129 American

O. P. Marshall G. Orengo J. K. Webster W. H. Walker W. H. Jackson

R. Deperis T. Purdy R. R. Searle

Vancouver, B.C. Straits Settlements

349

349

:

372

27

276

14

53

19 19

406

295

11

San Francisco

121

2

129

Straits Settlements

567

40

11

623

608

67

11

13

699.

150

150

""

Honolulu

266

75 39

20

473

San Francisco

68

"

25 | Amigo, str.

25 Thibet, str.

29 Gwalior, str.

37

30 Zambesi, str.

771 German 1,665 British 1,648

1,565

>>

C. G. Kreidner W. L. Brown J. F. Jephson

S. J. G. Parsons

Mauritius

257

8

272

Straits Settlements

7311

59

11

812

760

72

61 13

851

""

Victoria, V.I.

86

**

Portland, Oregon

2

::

88

47 May

4 Nizam, str...

1,615

">

"9

5 Parthia, str.

2,035

G. L. Langborne J. Panton

Straits Settlements

345

32

8

386

"7

Vancouver, B.C.

310

310

49

""

5 Bormida, str.

C. Gavazzo

""

7 Oceanic, str.................

""

8 Wing Sang, str.

""

""

9 Falkenburg, str.

12 Catterthun, str. ...

.99

54

""

12 Lombardy, str.............

J. W. B. Darke F. Cole

55

""

16 Arratoon Apear, str.

37

"

J. G. Spence

56

""

19 City of Rio de Janeiro, str.

W. Ward

21 Teheran, str.

V. W. Hall

58

21 | Thisbe, str.

G. Costanzo

59

26 Batavia, str..

60

30 Gaelic, str.

"

61

63 June

64

""

30 Decima, str.

وو

30 Kutsang, str.

2 Empress of Japan, str.

"

2 Japan, str.

65

5 Bisagno, str..

66

9 Laertes, str.

965 German 1,495 British 3,003 1,865 1,499 Italian 1,351 British

"

1,499 Italian 2,440 British 1,517

988 Germau 1,406 British 1,571 1,392

2,275 American

1,670 British

1,848 Austrian 1,662 British 2,691

J. R. Hill

W. G. Pearne C. Christensen W. H. Jackson G. A. Lee J. G. Olifent

"

Vancouver, B.C. Straits Settlements

W. M. Smith d'A. de Ste. Croix H. Frerichs

Straits Settlements San Francisco Straits Settlements

503

71

19

7

600

274

277

639 95

13

15

762

141

7

148

97

**

296

25

408

32

12

">

585

96

13

to to to

9

336

455

698

""

San Francisco

94

7

101

Straits Settlements

270

24

388

114

17

دو

Victoria, V.I.

141

Portland, Oregon San Francisco Straits Settlements

2

227 10 326 23

6

628

97

17

318

:

226

41

G. Orengo

310)

58

T. Bartlett

106

9

224

:

:.

:

ལྟ་

302

527

143

239

357

17

759

318

277

377

118

29

"

11 China, str.

2,401

>>

W. B. Seabury

San Francisco

179

11

196

"

11 Chelydra, str.

1,574

J. Thom

Straits Settlements

168

58

238

"

69

13 Thibet, str.

1,665

L. M. Wibmer

113

38

161

""

"

70

39

16 | Lightning, str..

2,124

71

S

19 Ardgay, str.

1,081

G. B. Pallett

R. Cass

236

"

56

298

163

16

186

""

19 Elektra, str.

2,095 Austrian

C. Bellen

162

120

11

13

306

"

39

73

>>

23 | Wing Sang, str.

1,517 British

d'A. de Ste. Croix

477

90

13!

588

""

74

""

24 Belgic, str.

2,695

W. 11. Walker

17

75

27 Sussex, str.

1,620

H. F. Holt

""

76

27 Venetia, str...

1,551

""

77

39

30 Empress of India, str.

3,003

91

78 July

1 Arratoon Apcar, str.

79

4 Bormida, str.

1,392 1,499 Italian

""

80

""

4 Nizam, str.

1,615 British

81

7 City of Peking, str..

22

27

9 Chelydra, str.

3,129 American 1,574 British

T. F. Creery O. P. Marshall J. G. Spence C. Gavazzo

G. L. Langborne R. R. Searle R. Cass

San Francisco Victoria, V.I. Portland, Oregon Straits Settlements Vancouver, B.C. Straits Settlements

2301

236

78

84

5

411

43

5

402

423)

423

357

75 10) 10)

458

263 65

8

342

""

221

13

3

240

San Francisco

106

110

Straits Settlements

482

35

11

534

Carried forward,...

150,658

Carried forward,...... 23,251| 2,382 434

293 26,360

:

280

RETURN of CHINESE PASSENGER SHIPS cleared by the Emigration Officer, Hongkong,—Continued.

ADULTS.

CHILDREN.

No.

DATE CLEARED.

SHIP'S NAME.

TONS.

NATION- ALITY OF SHIP.

MASTER'S NAME.

WHITHER BOUND.

TOTAL.

M.

F.

M.

F.

Brought forward,...... 150,658

Brought forward,|23,251] 2,382 434 293 26,360

83 July

13

Glengyle, str.

84

15

Japan, str.

85

18

Oceanic, str..

""

2,244 British 1,865 2,440

**

K. J. Gasson J. G. Olifent

Straits Settlements

"}

219

44

10

279

242

31

4.

285

86

"

20

Thisbe, str.

87

21

Parthia, str.

1,848 Austrian 2,035 British

W. M. Smith G. Costanzo

San Francisco Straits Settlements

231

315

46

J. Panton

88

""

24 Kutsang, str.

1,495

>>

89

27 Diomed, str.

1,432

""

"

W. II. Jackson E. G. Dickens

Vancouver, B.C. Straits Settlements

82

4341

140

:

:

:

:

237

8

376

82

57

16

12

519

"1

140

90

27 | Glenavon, str.

1,912

A. J. Jacobs

89

30

""

122

91

"

30

City of Rio de Janeiro, str.

2,275 American

W. Ward

San Francisco

47

51

92

30 Oxford, str.

1,892 British

W. Jones

Straits Settlements

57

33

97

93 August 1 | Teheran, str...

1,670

V. W. Hall

109

3"

22

139

94

"

Lightning, str..

2,124

G. B. Pallett

190

31

J

229

95

96

97

98

99

""

6

Jason, str.....

1,412

W. Towell

101

17

32

:

120

""

8

Wing Sang, str.....

1,517

d'A. de Ste. Croix

""

""

177

50

11

241

"

11

Empress of Japan, str.

3,003

G. A. Lee

Vancouver, B.C.

232

:

232

:

"

12

Gaelic, str.

2,691

W. G. Pearne

San Francisco

"3

124

"

12

Bisagno, str...

1,499 Italian

L. Baccerini

Straits Settlements

143

27

100

19

Gwalior, str......

"

1,648 | British

J. F. Jephson

149

36

101

19 Arratoon Apear, str.

1,392

دو

J. G. Spence

""

212

102

103

22

104

""

21 Pandora, str.

21 Batavia, sir..

1,781 Austrian

G. Mettel

144

28220

131

86

57

6549

181

199

319

210

1,662 British

Victoria, V.I,

48

J. R. Hill

Portland, Oregon

12

China, str.

105

235

""

25 | Chelydra, str.

2,401 1,574

""

W. B. Seabury

San Francisco

91

R. Cass

Straits Settlements

"

264)

28

106

""

29 Thibet, str.

1,665

>>

L. M. Wiber

183

19

:::

''

60

93

297

211

107 Sept.

1 Empress of China, str.

3,003

A. Tillett

""

Vancouver, B.C.

105

:

105

108

"3

1

Glenogle, str.

2,399

W. E. Duke

Straits Settlements

218

27

255

109

"

1

Japan, str.

1,865

J. G. Olifent

""

165

44

221

110

35

3

Belgic, str.

2,695

39

W. H. Walker

Honolulu

501

73

50

San Francisco

20

691

41

5

:

111

112

5 Venetia, str.

8 Bormida, str.

1,551

23

T. F. Creery

Straits Settlements

258

26

31

289

1,499 Italian

F. Susini

"

235

38

10

7

290

113

10 Kutsang, str.

1,495 British

W. fl. Jackson

221

46

13

286

114

""

16

City of Peking, str.

3,129 American

R. R. Scarle

San Francisco

34

2

36

115

37

19

Lightning, str.

2,124 British

G. B. Pallett

Straits Settlements

216

59

5

285

116

""

21

Thisbe, str.

1,848 | Austrian

A. Lussich

3.3

40

355

117

"

22

Empress of India, str.

118

""

23 Nizam, str.

}"

119

26 Oceanic, str..

"9

120

77

26 Tetartos, str.

121

22

29 Sussex, str.

122 October 3 Cyclops, str.

1,363

3,003 British

"

1,615 2,440 1,578 German 1,620 British

W. M. Smith

W. Breitung

H. F. Holt

H. Nish

O. P. Marshall G. L. Langborne

Victoria, V.I.

143

143

:

Straits Settlements

243

39

San Francisco

122

Straits Settlements

131

820

7

292

1

126

142

Victoria, V.I.

54)

Portland, Oregon

2

}

56

Straits Settlements

136

136

123

"

3 Wing Sang, str.

1,517

d'A. de Ste. Croix

494

114

17

13

124

وو

7 Teheran, str.

1,670

22

125

8 City of Rio de Janeiro, str.

126

8 Bisagno, str.

127

9 Arratoon Apcar, str.

"

1,499 Italian 1,392 British

2,275 American

V. W. Hall

W. Ward

L. Baccerini

>>

196

29

*&

638

2

230

San Francisco

66

:

74

Straits Settlements

189

26

J. G. Spence

137

47

а

25

222

198

128

>

13 Empress of Japan, str.

3,003

G. A. Lee

""

Victoria, V.I.

162

:

162

{

129

"

14 Lombardy, str..

1,571

F. Cole

Straits Settlements

دو

269

130

""

16 Chelydra, str.

1,574

R. Cass

""

"

341

co co

37

37

131

16 Wuotan, str.

132

21 Gaelic, str.

133

21 Japan, str.

134

22 Orion, str.

""

1,016 German 2,691 British 1,865 1,833 Austrian

>>

W. G. Pearne

J. G. Olifent A. Orlando

A. Ott

Mauritius

390

San Francisco

699

2515

316

387

400

:.

65

71

Straits Settlements

226

179

80

10

15

133

259

284

Honolulu

135

دو

22 Zambesi, str.

1,565 British

G. J. Edwards

Victoria, V.I.

38

51

Portland, Oregon

136

""

31

China, str.

137

22

31

Kutsang, str.

138

""

31 Miike Maru, str.

139

""

31

Bellerophon, str.

"2

2,401 1,495 2,054 Japanese 1,356 British

W. H. Jackson J. B. Macmillan J. Rorison

W. B. Seabury

San Francisco

521

55

Straits Settlements

493

36

11

548

"

379

51

448

""

87

10

:

99

140

Nov.

3 Glenorchy, str...

141

""

6 Achilles, str..

1,822 1,488

""

J. Ferguson

""

147

24

176

R. Day

39

148

148

142

7 Bormida, str.

>>

1,499 Italian

F. Susini

""

130

41

184

143

""

10 Empress of China, str.

3,003 British

A. Tillett

Victoria, V.I.

149

144

""

10 Laertes, str.

1,351

R. F. Scale

Straits Settlements

"

135

145

"

12 | Belgic, str.

2,695

W. H. Walker

San Francisco

12

56

:::

:::

149

135

56

146

""

17 Wing Sang, str.

147

"J

19 Myrmidon, str.

1,517 1,816

d'A. de Ste. Croix

Straits Settlements

""

327

117

10

20

474

"

148

""

21 Melpomene, str.

149

23 Batavia, str.

1,662 British

150

22

25

City of Peking, str.

151

"

25

Glengarry, str.

152

27

""

Arratoon Apcar, str.

1,392

153

28 Gwalior, str.............

""

1,648

.154

Dec.

3 Chelydra, str.

1,574

155

J

8 Empress of India, str.

3,003

""

1,943 Austrian

3,129 | American 1,956 British

R. Nelson A. Mitis

J. R. Hill

R. R. Searle F. Selby G. B. Pallett J. F. Jephson R. Cass O. P. Marshall

106

39

153

"J

149

40

198

Honolulu

14

Victoria, B.C.

45

64

Portland, Oregon

أة

Straits Settlements

17

22

"7

140

""

130

"

133

27

329

173

196

169

285

72

11

375

Victoria, V.I.

94

94

156

8 Oceanic, str.

>>

157

""

8 Lightning, str.

158

""

15 Bisagno, str.......

2,440 2,124 1,499 Italian

W. M. Smith

San Francisco

27

""

>>

32

J. G. Spence

Straits Settlements

311

65

10

392

159

"

16 Japan, str.

1,865 British

L. Baccerini J. G. O ifent

287

36

1

328

""

214

3

266

160

""

19 City of Rio de Janeiro, str.

161

*

37

22 Glengyle, str.

2,275 American 2,244 British

W. Ward

K. J. Gasson

Honolulu San Francisco Straits Settlements

384

43

15

520

13

:

164

21

~

3

190

Carried forward,

304,084

Carried forward,..

37,800 4,587

847 620

43,854

RETURN of CHINESE PASSENGER SHIPS cleared by the Emigration Officer, Hongkong,-Continued.

ADULTS.

CHILDREN.

281

No.

DATE CLEARED.

SHIP'S NAME.

TONS.

NATION-

ALITY OF SHIP.

MASTER'S NAME.

WHITHER BOUND.

TOTAL.

M. F. M.

F.

"Brought forward,...... 304,084

|Brought forward,. 37,800 4,587

847 620 43,854

162

Dec.

22

Maria Teresa, str.

163

""

24

Venetia, str...

164

24

Kutsang str.

165

"

28 Bantam, str.

166

"

31 Gaelic, str.

1,922 | Austrian 1,551 British 1,495 1,457 Dutch 2,691 British

R. Deperis T.F. Creery W. H. Jackson

Straits Settlements 239

421

102

24

23

158! 22

"?

"J

L. Van der Valk

178

14

"?

W. G. Pearne

San Francisco

74

11

167

""

31 | Ardgay, str.

1,081

J. Thom

Straits Settlements

209

17

2222 19 0

292

128

194

197

:

87

230

**

168

31 | Ajax, str. .........................

1,477

}}

E. S. Rawlings

175

5

:

180

"

TOTAL TONS,..

315,758

To Honolulu, Sandwich Islands,

Mauritius,

"C

Portland, Oregon, U.S.A.,

"} San Francisco, U.S.A.,

39

,, Straits Settlements,

Vancouver, British Columbia,..

""

,, Victoria,

Do.,

SUMMARY.

TOTAL PASSENGERS,

38,935 4,722

869 636

45,162

ADULTS.

CHILDREN.

M. F. M. F.

TOTAL.

1,172 191 150

55

647

5

17

3

1,568 672

34

2,678 31,396 4,385

1,970 1,038

I

...

35

141

12

27

2,855

1069

550

37,021

...

1,970 1,038

869 636 45,162

TOTAL PASSENGERS,.

38,935 4,722

:

282

XX.-RETURN of VESSELS bringing CHINESE PASSENGERS to the Port of Victoria, Hongkong, from Places out of the Chinese Empire, during the Year ending the 31st day of December, 1891.

No.

DATE ARRIVED.

SHIP'S NAME,

TONS.

NATION ALITY OF SHIP.

ADULTS.

CHILDREN.

MASTER'S NAME.

WHERE FROM.

TOTAL.

M.

F.

M.

F.

1423

1 January 3 Chow Fa, str.

33

3 Gaelic, str.

1,055 British 2,691

Phillips Pearne

Bangkok

42

...

San Francisco

8071

10

9

4

830

11

3 Coloma....

814 American

Noyes

Honolulu

63

...

8888888

Port Darwin

2

Cooktown

2

Townsville

81

3 Chingtu, str.

1,459 British

Hunt

78

Brisbane

10

...

Sydney

44

Melbourne

12

...

5

J

5 Phra Nang, str.

1,021

Watton

Bangkok

71

71

5 Denbigshire, str..

1,663

Gedye

Straits Settlements

182

5

187

19

5 Namchow, str.

1,109

Colonna

630

30

7

"

2

669

5 Lennox, str.

1,327

Swinnerton

150

150

"

>>

6 Thibet, str.

1,665

Brown

76

2

78

"

++

10

7 Ganges, str.

2,111

Alderton

73

73

}}

11

7 Chusan, str.

623 German

Wendt

Honolulu

150

4

154

12

10 Velox, str.

636

Johannsen

་་

Bangkok

122

122

13

12 Kong Beng, str.

862 British

Jackson

42

42

14

13 Diomed, str..

1,432

Bartlett

Straits Settlements

439

15

"

13

Siam, str.............

992

Tulloch

213

""

16

>>

14 Else, str.

747 German

Jebsen

74

"

17

""

14

Kut Sang, str.

1,495 British

Young

379

18

14

Diamond, str..

1,030

Snow

530

20

>>

19

";

19

21

23

2222****NA...

15

Cheang Chew, str.

1,213

Webb

257

11

11

431526

2

448

216

75

...

384

3

560

-5

5

268

20

"

15 Somdetch Phra Nang, str.

1,057

Jones

""

Bangkok

115

115

11

16 China, str.

2,401

>>

Seabury

San Francisco

751 15

10

3

782

11

16 Independent, str.

11

16

24

11

25

""

Priam, str.

17 Namkiang, str.

17 Melpomene, str.

26

"

19 Lombardy, str.

871 German

1,803 British

999

19

1,943 Austrian 1,571 British

Wilding

Hasenwinkel

Straits Settlements

149

149

150

"1

...

150

Wooldridge

167

...

167

""

Mitis

370

7

377

""

Jephson

94

2

96

*

27

19

19 Ningchow, str.

1,735

Allan

88

""

21

28

21 | Phra Chula Chom Klao, s.

1,012

Morris

Bangkok

$2

::

88

...

82

29

22 Lydia, str.

1,170 German

Foerck

Straits Settlements

297

3

300

30

23 Benledi, str.

1,481 British

Clark

199

1

200

31

23 Gleneagles, str.

1,838

Park

301

30

82

23 Tongshan, str...

1,111

Young

Bangkok

32

32

Dilly, Timor

3

Port Darwin

Cooktown

Cairns

S

83

333

,, 24 Guthrie, str.

1,494

Shannon

Townsville

15

86

Brisbane Sydney

New Zealand

1

34

...

2

Melbourne

12

84

17

24

Bayern, str.

2,877 German

35

26

Wm. Branfoot, str..

1,323 British

Mergell Brown

Straits Settlements

365

32

95

"

36

39

26 Laju, str...

1,246

"

Palfrey

473

"1

37

""

26 Agamemnon, str.

1,491

Williams

396

10

13

"

4

38

26 Devawongse, str.

1,057

Loff

""

Bangkok

130

365 32

473

410

130

Port Darwin

12

Cooktown

}

Townsville

6

39

"

27 Tai Yuan, str..

1,459

Nelson

110

""

Brisbane

14

Sydney

24

Melbourne

53

40

"J

28 Belgic, str.

2,695

Walker

San Francisco

498

10

N

41

32

28 Batavia, str.

1,662

Hill

Vancouver, B.C.

2481

3

23

512

254

42

"

28 Sarpedon, str.

1,571

Barwise

Straits Settlements

82

"

43

"

28 Arratoon Apcar, str.

1,392

Spence

580

3:0

82-

30

4

615

39

44

29 Chow Fa, str.

""

1,055

45

30 Gwalior, str.

""

1,602

46

"

30 Glenartney, str.

1,944

Phillips Cole Brass

Bangkok

51

51

Straits Settlements

205

205

150

150

??

47

31 Tailee, str.

"

48

"

31 Niobe, str.

49 Feb.

50

51

52

""

53

2 Wing Sang, str.

2 Pemptos, str.

2 Bisagno, str.

3 Bengal, str.

3 Harrow, str.

"

828 German 1,666 1,517 British 1,541 German 1,499 Italian

Calender

211

211

""

Thomsen

251

251

,,

Ste. Croix Johannsen

171

171

>>

73

"

Orengo

73

73

"}

2,377 British

Barratt

60

1,702

Broker

781

78

19

****

73

60

Port Darwin

Thursday Island

Cooktown

Darke

=

Townsville

64

""

3 Catterthun, str.

1,406

41

Sydney

29

Adelaide

55

""

3 Pakshan, str.

835

Jenkins

"

Bangkok

56

4 | Phra Chom Klao, str.

1,012

Fowler

reci

35

35

34

34

57

"

4 Bombay, str.

2,048

Bason

??

Straits Settlements

312

812

58

12

6 Keemun, str.

1.985

Durdin

>>

881

88

59

11

6 Doris, str.

771 German

Rabin

Medan in Deli, Sumatra

124

124

60

11

7 Queen Elizabeth, str.

1,628 British

Wilson

Straits Settlements

100

100

61

**

7 Cenisio, str.......

2:18:5

62

12

10 Nestor, str.

927 1,269

Petersen

212

212

""

""

"

Thompson

136

136

63

19

11 City of Peking, str.

3,129 American

Searle

San Francisco

120

120

64

""

11 Phra Nang, str.

1,021 British

Watton

Bangkok

38

38

65

>"

13 Japan, str.

1,865

Olifent

Straits Settlements

"3

97

97

66

""

14 Canton, str.

2,044

""

67

16 Oceanic, str.

"

2,440

Angus Smith

224

224

>>

San Francisco

156

2

158

Carried forward..

99,315

Carried forward........

12,945 169 50

25

13,189

RETURN of VESSELS bringing CHINESE PASSENGERS to the Port of Victoria, Hongkong,—Continued.

283

No.

DATE ARRIVED.

SHIP'S NAME,

TONS.

NATION- ALITY OF SHIP.

ADULTS.

CHILDREN.

MASTER'S NAME.

WHERE FROM.

TOTAL.

M.

F

M. F.

Brought forward........

99,315

68 Feb. 16

Somdetch Phra Nang, str.

69

"1

16

Patroclus, str.

1,057 British 1,386

Jones

Brought forward..... 12,945 169 Bangkok

50

25

19,189

25

25

Pulford.

Straits Settlements

"

700

70

70

17

""

Else, str.

71

21

Namkiang, str.

72

21

Pandora, str.

747 German 999 British 1,781 Austrian

Jebsen

Medan in Deli, Sumatra

31

34

Wooldridge

Straits Settlements

130

130

""

73

23

Neckar, str. ....

74

24 Nizam, str.

1,870 German 1,615 British

75

"

24 Tongshan, str.

1,111

"

76

""

24 Glenogle, str. ..............

2,000

Metteľ Supmer Crewe Young Duke

34

34

"}

144

144

971

3

100

""

147

147

212

212

99

77

""

25 Hampshire, str.

1,700

Kermish

97

97

"

78

22

25 Kutsang, str.

1,495

""

Young

79

19

25 | Phra Chula Chom Klao, s.

1,012

Morris

19

"

27

Bangkok

112

112

Sol

80

80

31

26

Laju, str.

1,266

81

27 Teucer, str.

1,803

99

88

82

11

27 Bormida, str.

83

27 Devawongse, str.

1,499 Italian 1,057 British

Palfrey Riley Gavazzo

Straits Settlements

362

3

365

45

45

102

102

"

Loff

84

""

28 Tsinan, str.

1,460

Allison

Bangkok Thursday Island Cooktown Townsville

301

30

21

1

3

53

13

Sydney

12

Melbourne

35

10088888

85 March 2 | Benlarig, str.

1,453

Le Boutellier

Straits Settlements

197

3

200

"

86

2 Telemachus, str.

1,397

"9

87

88

89

90

91

92

93

94

95

96

"

""

2

Chow Fa, str.

1,055

Jones Phillips

32

Bangkok

241

388888

32

Port Darwin

2

2 Menmuir, str.

1,287

Helms

Townsville

4

Sydney

13

New Zealand

16

""

2

Cheang Chew, str.

1,213

Webb

Straits Settlements

927

14

19

""

2 Daphne, str.

1,395 German

Voss

389

15

3

Oriental, str.

2,712 British

Stewart

63

:)

4

Oopack, str.

1,730

"

Kemp

236

10

""

""

4 Diamond, str.

1,030

Snow

330 12

""

29

"

4

Abyssinia, str.......

2,346

Williamson

39

Vancouver, B.C.

60

3

442

35

941

391

63

250

350

66

4

Phra Chom Klao, str.

1,012

Fowler

"1

Bangkok

431

:

43

5

Teheran, str.

1,671

Sams

Straits Settlements

145

>>

97

11

9 Namyong, str...

984

Smith

460

40

""

98

99

100

101

102

103

104

"1

9 Glenfalloch, str.'.

1,431

""

McGregor

431

"

"

9

Bellona, str.......

1,722 German

Schuder

335

22

20

10

15

.96

145 510

469

356

""

9

William Le Lacheur

573 British

Auld

Honolulu

61

64

21

"

10

City of Rio de Janeiro, str.

2,275 American

Ward

San Francisco

60

62

39

10

Kong Beng, str.

862 British

Jackson

Bangkok

40

40

"

10

Changsha, str...

1,463

Williams

Sydney

17

40

Melbournė

.23

!!

11

Tailee, str.

828 German

Calender

Straits Settlements

161

105

"

12

Arratoon Apcar, str.

1,392 British

Spence

576 40

පස

164

9

631

,,

106

13

Thibet, str.

1,665

Brown

741

74

""

107

17

13

Dardanus, str.

1,507

""

Purdy

70

70

27

108

13

14

Phra Nang, str.

1,021

Watton

Bangkok

65

65

109

11

16

Gaelic, str.

2,691

Pearne

San Francisco

186

o

1

190

13

110

16

Glaucus, str.

1,382

Hannah

Straits Settlements

74

74

"

51

111

99

17

Cheng Wo, str.

1,556

Parelle

274

3

280

"

112

""

17

Clyde, str.

2,198

Parfitt

42

42

>>

"}

113

""

18

Wing Sang, str. ......................

1,517

Ste. Croix

469

51

13

>!

"

10

543

114

??

18

Macduff, str.

1,882

Porter

155

155

??

}}

115

"1

19

Somdetch Phra Nang, str.

1,057

Jones

Bangkok

104

104

116

11

20 Sachsen, str.

2,874 German

Goessel

Straits Settlements

174

117

"

20 Aglaia, str.

1,666

Christensen

214

IM

189

264

""

118

23 Melpomene, str.

1,943 Austrian

119

23 China, str....

2,401 British

120

23 Devawongse, str.

1,057

91

121

23 Cheang Hock Kian, str....

956

Mitis Seabury Loff Dinsdale

226

22

250

零售

San Francisco

115

118

Bangkok

35

35

""

Straits Settlements

534

10

6

554

122

24 Empress of India, str.

3,008

Marshall

114

114

""

""

123

24 Breconshire, str.

1,648

Jackson

224

15

249

""

"2

124

24 Miike Maru, str..

2,054 Japanese

McMillon

Sydney

40

40

125

25 Venetia, str.

1,551 British

Creery

Straits Settlements

185

185

126

25 Prometheus, str.

4.

1,492

Webster

350

350

??

127

26 Moyune, str.

128

26 | Phra Chula Chom Klao, S.

1,714 1,012

17

Hogg Morris

140

140

"

"

Bangkok

87

87

129

28 Glenfruin, str.

1,936

Norman

Straits Settlements

271

10

276

"

130

""

28 Oceana, str..

1,628 German

Behrens

3371

337

131

31 Chow Fa, str.

1,055 British

Phillips

""

Bangkok"

60

60

132

"

31 Japan, str.

1,865

Olifent

Straits Settlements

357

61

429

133

31 Diamond, str.

1,030

Snow

651 27

13

700

"

;}

134

"

31 Malwa, str.

1,694

Preston

36

36

:

135

31 Taicheong, str.

828 German

Duhme

Medan in Deli, Sumatra

27

27

136

April

1 Bisagno, str.

1,499 Italian

Orengo

Straits Settlements

97

97

137

3+

3 Cheang Hye Teng, str.

́923 British

Scott

222

222

Port Darwin

13

Townsville

16

138

3:

6 Airlie, str. 1.

1,492

Ellis

Sydney

47

"

New Zealand

86

31

Melbourne

Adelaide

139

6 Namchow, str.

1,109

Colonna

Straits Settlements

17

611

""

140

17

6 Belgic. str.

2,695

Walker

San Francisco

173

173

141

6|Phra Chom Klao, str,

1,012

Fowler

"

Bangkok

$3

83

97

142

"J

7 Kong Beng, str.

862

Jackson

50

19

19

50

143

12

7 Achilles, str.

1,488

144

>>

7 Lombardy, str.

1,571

Day Cole

Straits Settlements

431

451

136

"

"}

:

136

Carried forward............

215,541

Carried forward..............

26,956

578 162

95

27,791

284

RETURN of VESSELS bringing CHINese Passengers to the Port of Victoria, Hongkong,—Continued.

No.

DATE ARRIVED.

SHIP'S NAME.

TONS.

NATION-

ALITY OF SHIP.

ADULTS.

CHILDREN.

MASTER'S NAME.

WHERE FROM.

TOTAL.

M. F.

31.

F.

Brought forward.

99,315

Brought forward... 12,945

169

50

25

13,189

145 April 10 Carmarthanshire, str.

1,776 British

Clark

Straits Settlements

120

120

Port Darwin

1

Townsville

3

146

19

10 Chingtu, str.

1,459

Hunt

Brisbane

7

35

Sydney

15

Melbourne

147

"}

11 Kutsang, str.

1,495

Jackson

Straits Settlements

517

5

3

525

11

148

13 Bokhara, str.

1,697

19

149

13 Kaisow, str..........

1,934

Weighell Castle

33

33

GO

60

"J

29

150

"

13 Albany, str............

1,489

Wood

99

99

>>

11

Port Darwin

Cooktown

Townsville

151

"}

13 Guthrie, str.

1,494

Shannon

47

Rockhampton

16

Sydney

17

New Zealand

7

152

"1

14 Glenshiel, str..

2,240

Jones

Straits Settlements

120

120

153

"

14 Flintshire, str...

1,871

Droyer

63

63

11

154

??

14

Electra, str.

1,162 German

Hildebrand

87

87

11

155

"

14

Maria Teresa, str.

156

"

15

Somdetch Phra Nang, str.

157

16

Sury Wongse, str.

513 German

2,011 Austrian

1,057 British

Vil

Deperes

103

7

12

122

Jones

Bangkok

86

301

::

86

30

158

19

16

Preussen, str.

2,880

Reimkasten

Straits Settlements

160

4

2

172

159

29

16

Laju, str.

1,246 British

Palfrey

552

13

566

160

16 Bantam, str.

1,457 Dutch

Vander Valk

76

""

161

99

18 Myrmidon, str.

1,815 British

Nelson

81

::

76

81

>>

162

""

20

Cheang Hock Kian, str..

956

Dinsdale

440

449

19

"

163

20

Gwalior, str.

1,648

""

Jephson

79

83

164

99

20

Khio, str.

1,552

17

Tyson

61

61

་་

165

97

20

Orestes, str................

1,279

Barr

129

129

"

166

20 Devawongse, str.

1,057

Loff

"

Bangkok

100

100

167

"J

23 Nam Yong, str. .................

984

Smith

Straits Settlements

235

235

"

168

19

24 Arratoon Apcar, str.

1,392

Spence

155

32

10

12

204

19

169

99

24 | Phra Chula Chom Klao, s.

1,012

Morris

Bangkok

50

50

170

*

25 Pathan, str.

........... ........

1,762

Roy

Straits Settlements

50

50

171

"

25 Shanghai, str.

2,044

Tillard

414

9

!!

"

172

**

25

Frigga, str. ...............................

1,400 German

173

**

27

Oanfa, str.

1,970 British

Nagel Shaw

254

11

00 w

3

8

426

273

"

52

52

174

""

27

Bormida, str.

1,499 Italian

Gavazzo

74

175

"

27

Diamond, str.

1,030 British

Snow

551

42

62

17

27-

82

19

629

""

176

*

27

Nizam, str.

1,615

""

Langborne

80

80

35

177

"3

27

Chow Fa, str.

1,055

"

Phillips

Bangkok

56

56

178

""

28

Siam, str.

992

Tulloch

67

67

"

179

""

28

Oceanic, str.

2,440

Smith

San Francisco

175

8

ap

3

10

191

"

180

11

28 Thames, str...................

2,101

Seaton

Straits Settlements

40

40

181

13

28 Tailee, str.

828 German

Calender

353 12

7

3

375

19

182 May

2 Glenorchy, str.

1,822 British

Ferguson

390

23

7

420

:)

4

183

19

2 Phra Nang, str.

1,021

Watton

""

Bangkok

84

84

Townsville

11

184

2 Tai Yuan, str............

1,459

Nelson

Brisbane

5

97

Sydney

201

90

Melbourne

54

185

186

187

188

189

⠀⠀ * * *

19

4 Batavia, str.

1,662

11

""

4 Nam Chow, str.

1,109

Hill Colonna

Vancouver, B.C.

40

40

...

Straits Settlements

420

20

5

99

4 Wing Sang, str.

1,517

Ste. Croix

378

75

25

18

11

""

1000

5

450

496

6 Cheang Hye Teng, str.

923

"

Bellerophon, str....

1,356

Scott Guthrie

36

36

27

219

33

2

254

"

...

Dilly, Timor

3

Cooktown

9

190

""

7 | Catterthun, str.

1,406

Duke

Townsville

4

36

>>

Newcastle, N.S.W.

12

Sydney

S

191

""

8 Kong Beng, str.

862

192

}}

9 Tartar, str.

1,568

Jackson Bailey

Bangkok

40

40

Straits Settlements

811

81

...

193

"

9 Monmouthshire, str.

1,871

11

Cuming

150

150

194

"

9 Polyhymnia, str.

1,053 German

Voltmer

180

180

195

"

11 Somdetch Phra Nang, str.

1,057 British

Jones

Bangkok

138

138

196

13

11 | Phra Chom Klao, str..

1,012

Fowler

551

55

91

197

11 Glengarry, str.

1,956

19

198

""

13 Japan, str.

1,865

Silby Olifent

Straits Settlements

230

230

352

"}

""

888

38

7

3

400

199

11

13 Polyphemus, str..

1,813

Lee

110

110

多多

11

200

14 Teheran, str.

1,671

Hall

126

*

::

126

201

14 City of Rio de Janeiro, str.

2,275 American

Ward

San Francisco

214

6

6

3

229

Port Darwin

3

Thursday Island

1

202

35

15 Menmuir, str.

1,287 British

Craig

Cooktown

4

35

Townsville

12

Sydney

15

203

"

15 Stuttgart, str.

201

12

15 Thisbe, str.

3,467 German 1,848 Austrian

Schuckmann Costanzo

Straits Settlements

144

16

co t

14

10

184

251

7

265

J

205

1)

19 Cheang Hock Kian, str....

956 British

Dinsdale

431

206

12

19 Moray, str.

1,411

""

207

??

19 Laertes, str.....

1,351

Duncan Bartlett

120

118

19

:::

431

120

118

208

*1

19 Laju, str.

1,246

99

Nainby

543

17

4

to

6

570

209

19 Köningin Emma, str..

1,659 Dutch

Soomer

35

35

"

210

99

19 Gaelic, str.

2,691 British

Pearne

211

99

19 Devawongse, str.

212

"

20 Benvenue, str................

213

"

21 Pakling, str.

1,057 1,468 1,911

Loff

"

San Francisco Bangkok

205

...

4

209

50

50

17

214

21 Hesperia, str.

1,123 German

Thomson Long Matheson

Straits Settlements

"

150 175 171

150

...

175

+

171

...

***

Carried forward..............

322,506

Carried forward...

38,437 975 310 181

39,903

RETURN of VESSELS bringing CHINESE PASSENGERS to the Port of Victoria, Hongkong,-Cotinued.

285

No.

DATE ARRIVED.

SHIP'S NAME.

TONS.

NATION-

ALITY OF SHIP.

ADULTS.

CHILDREN.

MASTER'S NAME.

WHERE FROM.

TOTAL.

M.

F.

M. F

Brought forward...... 322,506

Brought forward..... 38,437

975

310

181

39,903

215 May 216

21 | Chow Fa, str.

1,055 British

99

22 Venetia, str.

1,551

""

Phillips Creery

Bangkok

220

220

Straits Settlements

103

103

217 218 219

220

""

23

Sutlej, str.

37

26

Diamond, str.

2,103 1,030

Worcester

291

29

"

Snow

671

6

679

11

11

26

Empress of Japan, str.

3,003

Lee

211

211

19

19

26

Tailee, str.

828 German

Calender

453

11

7

471

1"

221

""

26 Kutsang, str.

1,495 British

Jackson

321

7

330

13

222

"

26 Mongkut, str.

223

"

27❘ Velocity

224

"1

28 Bisagno, str.

859 491 1,499 Italian

Anderson

Bangkok

90

90

...

**

Martin

Honolulu

311

31

Orengo

Straits Settlements

84

3

3

90

225

29 Palinurus, str........

1,536 British

Jackson

220

220

""

"1

226 227

"

29

Empress of India, str..

3,003

Marshall

Vancouver, B.C.

111!

5

122

30

19

China, str.

2,401

"

Seabury

San Francisco

129

14

6

153

228 June 1

Namchow, str.

1,109

Colonna

Straits Settlements

577

30

17

13

637

229

"

1

Brindisi, str.

2,129

Street

340

20

8

368

*

230

"?

I

Phra Nang, str.

1,021

Watton

Bangkok

109

109

"

231

"

2 Glenavon, str...

1,912

Jacobs

Straits Settlements

279

12

4

6

301

15

232

4

Kong Beng, str.

862

Jackson

Bangkok

50

50

19

233

5 Iphigenia, str.....

1,059 German

Magleby

Straits Settlements

209

3

234

5

Cheang Hye Teng, str.

923 British

Scott

301

9

""

235

"

6 Lightning, str.

2,124

Pallett

300

12

19

236

"

6

Ping Suey, str.

1,982

"}

Jaques

205

7

7477

2

221

316

320

219

237

238

239

19

8

Thibet, str.

1,665

Wibmer

61

2

63

"J

""

*

8

Peshawur, str...

2,137

Wheler

421

42

++

21

8

Phra Chula Chom Klao, s.

1,012

Morris

Bangkok

79

79

"1

Port Darwin

11

Thursday Island

240

33

8 Tsinan, str. ..........

1,460

Allison

Sydney

68

211

"

Melbourne

120

3

Adelaide

3)

241

??

10 Diomed, str.

1,432

Dickins

Straits Settlements

25

::

25

37

242

""

11 Cardiganshire, str..

1,623

Jenkins

204

3

207

19

243

19

12 Bayern, str.

2,877 German

Mergell

21

21

**

244

1

12

Bantam, str.

1,457 | Dutch

Volk

198

198

...

"

245

??

13 Belgic, str.

2,695 British

Walker

San Francisco

164

11

3

180

246

11

13 Somdetch Phra Nang, str.

1,057

Jones

Bangkok

130

130

"3

247

"

15

Elektra, str.

2,095 Austrian

Bellen

Straits Settlements

240

248

*

15

Gwalior, str.

1,648 British

Jephson

681

""

249

15 Priam, str.

1,803

29

Wilding

130

"

250

"?

16 Wing Sang, str.

1,517

Ste. Croix

202

31

11

"

251

16 Cheang Hock Kian, str....

956

Dinsdale

540

19

723-0

3

250

70

133

247

574

31

252

99

18 Benlawers, str.

1,484

253

"

19

Glengyle, str.

2,244

Webster Gasson

52

52

:

230

10

250

"

"

Dilly, Timor

3

Port Darwin

6

Townsville

30

254

11

19 Airlie, str.

1,492

Ellis

121

19

Newcastle, N.S.W.

26

Melbourne

28

New Zealand

28

255

"?

20

Nizam, str.

1,615

"

Langborne

Straits Settlements

67

67

256

22 Pekin, str.

2,134

Harris

30

30

257

22 Diamond, str.

1,030

Snow

""

""

635 30

26

691

258

""

22 Devawongse, str.

1,057

"

259

"

23 Ningchow, str.

1,735

Loff Allan

Bangkok

160

...

160

Straits Settlements

711

71

...

260

"

25 Arratoon Apcar, str.

1,392

Spence

372

50

13

3

438

""

261

25 Afghan, str.....

1,439

Golding

100

100

"?

262

26 Ajax, str.

1,477

263

26 Bormida, str.

1,499 Italian

Rawlings Gavazzo

159

6

1

166

931

7

4

1

105

Port Darwin

Thursday Island

3

Cooktown

3

264

26 Changsha, str.

1,463 British

Williams

Townsville

19

Brisbane

Sydney

14

Melbourne

13

Adelaide

1

265

26 Parthia, str..

2,035

Panton

Vancouver, B.C.

37

37

266

27 Taicheong, str.

828 German

Duhme

Straits Settlements

$1

267

97

27 Loo Sok, str.

1,020 British

Benson

Bangkok

48

:::

81

48

268

27 City of Peking, str.

3,129 American

Searle

San Francisco

110

5

269

270

99

29 Laju, str.

29 Namchow, str.

1,246 British

Nainby

Straits Settlements

275

30

17

1,109

Colonna

540 25

22

12

0 10 2

3

120

327

599

""

271 July

2 Glenlyon, str.

1,410

272

2 Niobe, str.

1,440 German

Murray Thomsen

400

400

>>

230 17

3

255

95

273

4 Chelydra, str.

1,574 British

Cass

218

218

J

274

4 Mongkut, str.

859

Anderson

Bangkok

85

85

275

6 Kaisar-i-Hind, str.....

2,386

276

"

6 Kintuck, str.

2,312

">

277

"

6 Teheran, str.

1,671

278

"

6 Nestor, str.

1,269

279

??

7 Cheang Hye Teng, str.

923

Atkinson Thomson Hall Thomson Scott

Straits Settlements

30

30

111

3

114

>>

131

3

134

19

41

41

19

450

15

12

14

491

"

280

57

9 Phra Nang, str.

1,021

Watton

Bangkok

52

52

281

"

10 Lydia, str.

1,170 German

Forck

Straits Settlements

136

136

282

"

10 Ardgay, str..........

1,081 British

Thom

200

200

99

283

"

10 Sachsen, str.

2,874 German

284

"

10 Oceanic, str.

2,440 British

Supmer Smith

132

25

19

San Francisco

387

12

W5

166

406

Carried forward..

433,783

Carried forward..

51,620 1,432

532

279 53,863

·

286

RETURN of VESSELS bringing CHINESE PASSENGERS to the Port of Victoria, Hongkong,—Continued.

No.

DATE ARRIVED.

SHIP'S NAME,

TONS.

NATION- ALITY OF SHIP.

ADULTS.

CHILDREN.

MASTER'S NAME.

WHERE FROM.

TOTAL.

M. F.

M F.

Brought forward...... 433,783

Brought forward..... 51,620 1,432 532 279 Port Darwin

53,863

7

Thursday Island

1

Townsville

285 July 11 Chingtu, str.

1,459 British

Hunt

Brisbane

46

3

Sydney Melbourne

15

11

Townsville

2

286

11 | Guthrie, str.

1,494

Helms

12

Sydney

6

Melbourne

14

287

11 Japan, str.

1,865

Olifent

Straits Settlements

273

34

308

288

13 Radnorshire, str.

1,889

Davies

30

2 888

22

:

30

289

14 Namkiang, str.

999

Wooldridge

549

30 17 12

290

14 Thisbe, str.

1,848 Austrian

Costanzo

158

291

15 Jason, str.

1,412 British

Tawell

170

""

17

11

292

"

16 Cheang Hock Kian, str.

956

Dinsdale

2471

6

*

293

""

16 Canton, str.

2,044

Baker

149

11

"}

""

294

""

16

Nanshan, str.

805

Blackburn

Bangkok

72

??

295

33

17 Kutsang, str.

1,495

Jackson

Straits Settlements

158

16

""

296

"

18

Gleneagles, str.

1,838

Summers

139

10

7212 MO

10 t

608

165

3

201

255

163

72

182

2)

7

160

297

19

18 Tongshan, str.

1,111

Jenkins

60

??

"

60

298

"

18

Daphne, str.

1,395 German

Voss

170

""

170

299

97

18

Kong Beng, str.

300

301

302

303

"?

21

Borneo, str.

862 British

1,490 Dutch

Jackson

Bangkok

701

70

Klein

Straits Settlements

36

36

??

23

Empress of Japan. str.

3,003 British

Lee

Vancouver, B.C.

90

91

"?

23

City of Rio de Janeiro, str.

2,275 American

Ward

San Francisco

99

3

5

109

"}

23

Patroclus, str.

1,386 British

Pulford

Straits Settlements

85

85

301

"

25

Mogul, str.

1,827

Johnson

390

10

11

29

400

***

305

"?

27 Lombardy, str.

1,571

""

306

13

27 Lightning, str.

2,124

Pole Pallett

236

99

236

450

39

"

53

10

7

520

Port Darwin

Cooktown

307

??

27 Catterthun, str.

1,406

Darke

Brisbane

24

Sydney

10

308

11

27 } Phra Chom Klao, str.

1,012

Fowler

Bangkok

129

129

309

28 Bellona, str...............

1,722 German

Schüder

Straits Settlements

174

185

310

"J

28 Denbighshire, str.

1,663 British

Gedge

70

70

:

311

"

31 Gaelic, str.

2,691

312 Aug.

1 Wing Sang, str.

1,517

Pearne

Ste. Croix

San Francisco

193

Straits Settlements

"

554 56

313

";

4 Keemun, str.

1,985

De la Parelle

212

"J

""

10 106

5

202

3

203

36

651

220

314

"

4 Peninsular, str.

2,712

21

Loggins

701

""

70

...

315

"

4 Benlomond, str. ..........

1,752

Thomson

185

185

19

316

""

5 Teucer, str.

1,803

Riley

60

60

317

"

5 Bisagno, str.

1,499 Italian

Baccerini

120

120

318

"

5

Chow Fa, str.

1,055 British

Phillips

Bangkok

120

120

319

""

7 Namchow, str.

320

??

7 Telemachus, str. ...............

1,109 1,397

Bronen

Straits Settlements

715

715

"

Jones

38

38

""

...

321

13

8 Preussen, str.

2,573 German

Reimkasten

#

155)

...

16

5

Б

161

Port Darwin

9

Thursday Island

1

Cooktown

2

322

8 Tai Yuan, str........

1,459 British

Nelson

Townsville

4

109

...

Brisbane

11

...

Sydney

64

...

Melbourne

18

323

10 China, str.

11

324

10 Gwalior, str.

2,401 1,648

"

"}

Seabury Jephson

San Francisco

136

Straits Settlements

77

325

19

10 Glenogle, str. ...................

2,399

Duke

"

390

326

12 Bantam, stṛ. ..........................

1,457 Dutch

Valk

"}

66

327

19

12

Arratoon Apcar, str.

1,392 British

Spence

""

333

' e os ∞o cos'

2

3

147

80

12

1

4

623

416

75

365

328

"

12

Oopack, str............................................

1,730

Davies

$9

46

46

329

""

12

Phra Nang, str.

1,021

Watton

Bangkok

112

112

330

14

Pandora, str.

1,781 Austrian

Mettel

Straits Settlements

140

"

3

150

331

99

14

Aglaia, str.

1,666 German

Christiansen

"

194

198

332

"

15

Glenartney, str.

1,944 British

Brass

31

106

106

333

19

17 Thibet, str.

1,665

Wibmer

:

841

84

334

17 Diamond, str.

1,030

11

335

18 Yorkshire, str.

1,426

11

336

19 Cheang Hock Kian, str.....

956

337

19 Chelydra, str.

1,574

338

20 Titan, str.

1,525

Snow Arnold Dinsdale Cass

Brown

33

653

20

Yo

7

685

""

32

32

:

""

521

14

"}

273

122

12

00 1.0

8

547

297

"

86

86

339

""

21 Empress of India, str...

3,003

Marshall

Vancouver, B.C.

"

120

2

122

340

"

22 Kong Beng, str.

862

Deans

97

Bangkok

90

90

341

??

22 Empress of China, str.

3,003

Tillett

Straits Settlements

200

200

342

11

24 Ching Wo, str.

1,556

Gratton

90

90

343

17

24 Taicheong, str.

341

"

24 Belgic, str.

828 German 2,695 British

Duhme

Medan in Deli, Sumatra

34

34

Walker

San Francisco

189

A

205

Port Darwin

10

Thursday Island

4

Cooktown

Townsville

345

25 Menmuir, str.

1,287

"

??

Craig

Brisbane

61

New Zealand

Sydney

11

Melbourne

12

346

"

25 Venetia, str.

347

26 Japan, str.

348

27 Oceana, str.

349

350

>>

351

1,551 1,865

"

Creery Olifent

Straits Settlements

169

""

279

37

13

1,628 German

Behrins

">

138

7

23 1

182

332

+

150

29 Bormida, str.

31 Cheang Hye Teng, str.

31 | Glenfalloch, str.

1,499 Italian

Susini

92

92

...

923 British 1,434

19

Scott McGregor

225

Carried forward...

544,025

Carried forward...

10 198 10

63,381) 1,902

247

3

211

691 400

66,374

RETURN of VESSELS bringing CHINESE PASSENGERS to the Port of Victoria, Hongkong,-Continued.

CHILDREN.

287

No.

DATE ARRIVED.

SHIP'S NAME.

TONS.

NATION-

ALITY OF SHIP.

ADULTS.

MASTER'S NAME.

WHERE FROM.

TOTAL.

M. F.

V. F.

Brought forward...... 433,783

Brought forward... 51,620 1,432

532

279

53,863

352 Aug.

31 Cathay, str.

1,873 British

353 351

31 Colonist, str.

31 Tongshan, str...

1,467 1,111

Symons Mars

Straits Settlements

31

31

301

30

!!

Jenkins

**

Bangkok

75

355 Sept.

356

357

358

359

360

361

362

5 ARRRERA

1 Namyong, str.

984

Smith

Straits Settlements

541

61

12

$9

2 Dardanus, str.

1,507

Purdy

179

2 Kutsang, str.

1,495

Jackson

363

20

E-21.00

7

621

189

398

19

>>

3 Darmstadt, str.

3,933 German

Radeker

189

>>

:

189

+ Continental, str..

Cyclops, str.

Haukow, str.

Chowfa, str....

672 Dutch

Schall

Bangkok

31

34

1,363 British

Nish

Straits Settlements

122

122

2,332

West

204

12

231

1,055

Phillips

Bangkok

130

130

Thursday Island

Cooktown

Cairns

363

**

8 Tsinan, str.

1,460

Allison

"

Townsville

Brisbane Sydney

10

75

16

Melbourne

31

364

11

City of Peking, str.

365

11

Loo Sok, str.

366

12 Parthia, str..

3,129 American 1,020 British 2,035.

Searle

San Francisco

359)

co

6

co

380

Benson

Bangkok

103

103

Panton

Vancouver, B.C.

47

47

367

*1

12 Electra, str.

1,162 German

Hilderbrandt

Straits Settlements

1231

123

368

>>

14 Namchow, str.

1,109 British

Bremner

671

11

1

688

369

14 Shanghai, str. .......

2,041

Tillard

161

2

172

??

22

370

371

95

372

14 Lightning, str.

14 Clifton, str. .............

14 Diamond, str.

2,124

Pallett

441

448

";

29

1,338

Bowen

274

300

>>

>>

1,030

Snow

673

14

692

373

14 Borneo, str.

1,490 Dutch

Klein

89

89

374

***

14 Thisbe, str.

1,848 Austrian

Lussich

80

80

375

15 Sussex, str.

1,620 British

Holt

Victoria, V.I.

50

50

376

16 Oceanic, str.

"

2,440

Smith

San Francisco

222

10

228

#

377

11

16} Phra Clom Klao, str.

1,012

Fowler

D

Bangkok

$3

$3

378

17 Nizam, str.

1,615

>>

Langborne

Straits Settlements

203

210

379

19 Telamon, str.

1,555

Jackson

352

20

12

16

400

+

380

19

19 Palamed, str.

1,489

Jackson

126

126

27

**

381

21 Hampshire, str.

1,700

Kerrnish

258

+

6

275

""

39

382

21 Glenearn, str,

1,410

:

Glegg

2501

250

"

Dilly, Timor

26

:

Port Darwin

10

Cooktown

383

22 Guthrie, str.

1,494

Helms

53

Brisbane

Sydney

B

Newcastle

384

22 Orient,

385

23 Carmarthenshire, str.

461 German 1,776 British

Guntard Clark

Honolulu

102

102

Straits Settlements

31

**

31

386

23 Wing Sang, str.

1,517

Stc. Croix

528

62

18

10

618

:1

387

24

Cheang Hock Kian, str.

956

Dinsdale

430

430

";

"

388

24 Mongkut, str.

859

Anderson

Bangkok

99

99

389

26 Rohilla, str.................

2,175

19

Tocque

Straits Settlements

121

121

390

11

26 Frigga, str.

1,400 German

391

28

Kaisow, str..

1,934 British

Nagil Castle

17

1

22

,,

337

12

360

>>

Cooktown

392

13

28 Changsha, str.....

1,463

Williams

Brisbane

43

Sydney

30

393

"

30 City of Rio de Janeiro, str.

2,275 American

Ward.

San Francisco

146

146

394

30 Benledi, str.

1,481 British

Clark

Straits Settlements

133

150

395

30 Teheran, str.

1,671

Hall

131

131

";

396 October 1 Empress of Japan, str.

397

""

2 | Bellerophon, str.

398

"

2 Esang, str.

3,003 1,356 1,127

Lee

""

Vancouver, B.C.

237

237

Rorison

Straits Settlements

360

360

"J

Carmichael

36

36

**

399

>>

2 Bisagno, str.

1,490 Italian

Bacccrini

89

89

>>

400

17

2 Bayern, str.

2,577 German

Mergell

240

210

"

401

3 Arratoon Apcar, str.

1,392 British

Spence

326

48

3

379

"

402

;)

3 Devawongse, str.

1,057

"

403

"

5 Cheang Hye Teng, str.

923

Loff Scott

Bangkok

115

115

Straits Settlements

2101

N

24

12

14

260

95

404

32

6 Breconshire, str......

1,648

Jackson

134

3

150

""

"

405

25

8 Kong Beng, str.

406

??

9 Gaelic, str. ......

407

"5

9 Lombardy, str.

862 2,691 1,571

Deans

>>

Pearne

Bangkok San Francisco

40

40

223

232

"

Cole

Straits Settlements

73

73

408

#

9 Achilles, str.

1,488

Day

314

::

314

>

409

>>

9 Polyhymnia, str.

947 German

Voltmer

170

177

"}

410

::

9 Somdetch Phra Nang, str.

1,057 British

411

"

10 Glenorchy, str.

1,822

412

"

10 Chelydra, str.

1,574

413

::

10 Zambesi, str.

1,565

Jones Ferguson Cass Edwards

Bangkok

23

23

Straits Settlements

30

30

549

20

12

6

587

11

414

12 | Chowfa, str................

1,057

Phillips

Portland, Oregon Bangkok

401

40

70

70

415

12 Haverton, str............

1,645

Peters

Straits Settlements

60

60

416

12 | Ravenna, str.

1,916

Crewe

48

48

>>

417

12 Bautam, str.

1,457 Dutch

Valk

158

158

::

418

12 Namchow, str.

1,109 British

Bremner

413

10

446

419

13 Oanfa, str.

1.970

Shaw

77

77

420

13 Laertes, str.......

1,351

Scale

196

196

421

:)

15 Loo Sok, str.

1,020

Benson

Bangkok

48

48

422

59

16 Japan, str.

1,865

Olifent

Straits Settlements

276

20

2

299

423

:>

16 | Orion, str.

1,833 Austrian

Orlando

154

154

22

:

Carried forward.................

657,282

Carried forward......

76,799 2.325

$40

523 80,487

288

RETURN of VESSELS bringing CHINESE PASSENGERS to the Port of Victoria, Hongkong,-Continued.

No.

DATE ARRIVED.

SHIP'S NAME.

TONS.

NATION- ALITY OF SHIP.

ADULTS.

CHILDREN.

MASTER'S NAME.

WHERE FROM,

TOTAL.

31.

F

V. F.

Brought forward...... 657,282

Brought forward... 76,799 2,325 Port Darwin

840 523

80,487

Thursday Island

424 Oct.

17 Chingtu, str.

1,459 British

Hunt

Cooktown

80

Brisbane

15

Sydney

33

Melbourne

15

425

19 Diamond, str.

1,030

Snow

Straits Settlements

10

535

426

""

19 Brindisi, str.

2,129

Street

184

多多

10

1

215

427

"

19 Gwalior, str.

1,648

}}

Jephson

71

71

428

*

19 | Phra Chom Khao, str.

1,012

Fowler

Bangkok

50

50

429

J

19 China, str.

2,401

>>

Seabury

San Francisco

277

3

3

283

430

21 Phra Nang, str.

1.021

Watton

99

Bangkok

42

42

431

22 Flintshire, str.

1,871

>>

Droyer

Straits Settlements

400

400

432

29

22 Myrmidon, str.

1,816

Nelson

236

236

11

433

24 Hesperia, str.

1,123 German

Madsen

125

125

་་

434

24 Kutsang, str.

1,495 British

Jackson

301

39

**

349

435

26 Namyong, str....

984

Smith

377

377

"J

**

436

26 Cheang Hock Kian, str..

956

Dinsdale

"

776

776

437

26 Mongkut, str.

859

Anderson

Bangkok

72

72

438

"

26 Lothair,

794 Italian

Schiaffino

Callao

279

279

439

"

27 Peshawur, str................

2.137 British

Wheeler

Straits Settlements

77

77

440

27 Sikh, str.

441

""

27 Glenshiel, str.

1,736 2,240

"

Rawley

""

73

73

Jones

30

30

39

442

""

28 Empress of China, str.

3,003

Tillett

Vancouver, B.C.

273

273

443

29 Bormida, str.

1,499 Italian

Susini

Straits Settlements

103

103

444

29 Tangshan, str.....

1,111 British

Jenkins

80

80

";

445

"

30 Sachsen, str.

2,874 German

Supmer

165

165

446

"5

31

Port Fairy, str.

1,645 British

Starkey

30

30

447

19

31

Pakling, str.

1,911

32

Lang

145

145

??

448 Nov.

2 Thibet, str.

1,665

Wibmer

166

166

")

449

2

Palinurus, str...

1,536

Jackson

227

242

"

Port Darwin

11

Townsville

4:

Rockhampton

15

Brisbane

1

450

"

2 Catterthun, str.

1,406

Darke

88

""

Sydney

New Zealand

30

Melbourne

24

Adelaide

451

??

3 Lightning, str.

2,124

Pallett

Straits Settlements

726

726

Port Darwin

452

11

3 Menmuir, str.

1,287

Craig

Townsville

23

Sydney

18

453

""

3 Nanslian, str.

805

Blackburn

"

Bangkok

29

454

}}

5 Belgic, str.

2,695

Walker

San Francisco

833

833

455

""

5 Tai Yuan, str..............

Port Darwin

19

1,459

Nelson

Melbourne

288888

55

36

456

7 Kong Beng, str.

862

Jackson

Bangkok

50

50

457

9 Devawongse, str.

1,057

Loff

"

"

100

100

458

9 Glengarry, str.

1,956

"

Selby

Straits Settlements

450

450

459

9 Rosetta, str...

2,039

Gadd

"

371

37

460

>>

10 Benlarig, str.

1,453

Le Boutillier

"

40

40

461

??

10 Cheang Chew, str.

1,213

Webb

:*

$39

20

865

462

11 Wing Sang, str.

1,517

""

Ste. Croix

**

256

31

304

463

11 Batavia, str...................

1,661

Hill

??

Portland, Oregon

57

63

464

"

12 Somdetch Phra Nang, str.

1,057

Jones

Bangkok

37

37

465

99

13 Polyphemus, str.

1,813

Lee

Straits Settlements

194

194

466

16 Iphigenia, str..........

1,059 German

Magleby

111

111

27

467

19

16 Venetia, str.

1,551 British

468

""

17 Melpomene, str.

1,943 Austrian

Creery Mitis

29

200

200

214

12

242

469

""

17 Empress of India, str,

3,003 British

Marshall

Vancouver, B.C.

296

296

470

""

17 City of Peking, str.

3,129 American

Searle

San Francisco

340

340

471

"

18 Cheang Hye Teng, str.

923 British

Scott

Straits Settlements

128

128

472

"

20 Diamond, str.

1,030

Snow

"

"

610

G10

473

"1

20 Ping Suey, str.

1,982

Jaques

159

159

474

21 Arratoon Apcar, str.

1,392

Spence

23

310

320

475

23 Ghazee, str..

1,764

Scotland

**

130

130

476

39

23 Chowfa, str.............

1,055

Phillips

Bangkok

601

60

477

""

24 Loo Sok, str.

1,020

Benson

73!

73

*

478

??

24 Taicheong, str.

828 German

Dubme

Medan in Deli, Sumatra

486

486

479

"

24 Priam, str.

1,803 British

Wilding

Straits Settlements

235

12

రా

257

480

25 Namyong, str..

984

Smith

33

19

258

258

481

25 Pekin, str.

2,134

Harris

501

50

11

**

482

25 Cheang Hock Kian, str....

956

Dinsdale

316

316

"

""

483

??

26 Ingraban, str.

894 German

Piper

45

45

**

484

"3

27 Bombay, str. .................

2,048 British

Bason

114

114

12

485

28 | Phra Chom Klao, str..

1,012

Fowler

"

Bangkok

37

37

486

30 | Oceanic, str.

2,440

487

"

30 Chelydra, str.

1,574

Smith Cass

San Francisco

$16

831

Straits Settlements

407

421

488

30 Namchow, str.

1,109

Lee

229

"

"

18

C

277

489

30 Preussen, str.

490

30 Bisagno, str.

491

Dec.

1 Glengyle, str.

2,573 German 1,499 Italian 2,244 British

Reimkasten

:

165

165

Baccerini

SO

80

Gasson

378

378

492

""

3 Jason, str.

493

99

3 Monmouthshire, str.

1,412 1,871

Towell

"?

"

370)

870

**

Cunning

28

28

};

494

5 Ajax, str.

1,477

""

Rawling

32

32

"1

495

"

5 Kreimhild, str.

496

5 Japan, str..

1,709 German 1,865 British

Ehlers

214

214

Olifent

293

293

""

497

5 Mongkut, str.

498

7 Ning Chow, str.

859 1,735

Anderson

"

Bangkok

127

127

Allen

Straits Settlements

150

150

Curried forward...

775,518

Carried forward...

93,291 2,530 926

582

97.329

*

RETURN of VESSELS bringing CHINESE PASSENGERS to the Port of Victoria, Hongkong,—Continued.

CHILDREN,

289

No.

DATE

ARRIVED.

SHIP'S NAME.

TONS.

NATION- ALITY OF SHIP.

ADULTS.

MASTER'S NAME.

WHERE FROM.

ΤΟΤΑΙ.

M. F.

M. F.

Brought forward.......... 499 Dec. 8 Peninsular, str.

657,282

2,712 British

Brought forward,.............. 76,799 2,325

810

523 80,487

Loggin

Straits Settlements

63!

10

70

Port Darwin

Thursday Island

Cooktown

Cairns

11

500

"1

8 Tsinan, str.

1,460.

Allison

Townsville

167

*

Brisbane

Dunedin, N.Z. Sydney

Melbourne

74

Dilly, Timor

29!

00

Port Darwin

12:

Thursday Island

1:

Townsville

20.

501

S Airlie, str.

1.492

Ellis

Brisbane

12

201

**

New Zealand

53

Sydney

34

Melbourne

11

Adelaide

502

503

""

11

Empress of Japan, str.

3,003

Lee

37

Vancouver, B.C.

335

336

19

12

Glucksburg, str.

918 German

Thomsen

Straits Settlements

218

14

275

504

}:

14

Phra Nang, str.

1,021 British

Watton

Bangkok

181

181

505

15

City of Rio de Janeiro, str.

2,275 American

Ward

San Francisco

295

300

506

15 Agamemnon, str.

507

15 Maria Teresa, str.

508

16 Cheang Chew, str.

509

**

16 Kutsang, str.

1,495

39

1,191 | British

1,922 Austrian 1,213 British

Deperis Webb Jackson

Williams

Straits Settlements

645

645

376

17

405

22

£54

27

12

508

4961 16

510

"

18

Cheang Hye Teng, str.

923

Scott

230

17

67

520

247

"

511

18

Diomed, str.

1,432

Dickens

101

101

>>

512

21

Glenfruin, str......

""

513

21 Bengloe, str.

1,890 1,183

Norman

299!

299

""

Farquhar

106

106

27

514

21 Velocity,

491

Martin

Honolulu

215

215

!:

515

22 Lydia, str.

1,170 German

Forck

Straits Settlements

SO

80

516

23 Ravenna, str.

1,916 British

Crewe

386

.386

11

517

23 Gaelic, str.

2,691

Pearne

San Francisco

721

721

>>

518

24 Pathan, str..

1,762

519

"

24 Taicheong, str.

828 German

520

28 Nestor, str.

1,269 British

Ray Duhme Thompson

Straits Settlements

40

40

Medan in Deli, Sumatra

274

274

Straits Settlements

205

12

4

227

521

19

28 Stuttgart, str.

3,452 German

Schuckmann

374

27

413

15

¿

522

28 Wustan, str.

1,016

Ott

155

"}

Mauritius

140

523

29 Namyong, str..

984 British

Smith

Straits Settlements

513!

15

S

543

524

29 Teucer, str.

525

29 Chowfa, str...

1,803 1,055

99

Riley

24

21

:>

:

Phillips

Bangkok

110

110

526

وو

30 Cheang Hock Kian, str..

527

31 Moyune, str.

956 1,714

>>

Dinsdale Kemp

Straits Settlements

294

3

311

80

:

TOTAL TONS.......

822,055

TOTAL PASSENGERS

100,876 2,689 1,004 630

105,199

From Adelaide, South Australia,

WHERE FROM.

19

Bangkok, Siam,

"

Brisbane, Queensland,

99

Cairns, Queensland,

22

Callao, Peru,

#1

Dilly, Timor,

39

#1

Cooktown, Queensland,

Honolulu, Sandwich Islands,.

Mauritius,

Medan, Sumatra,

"

Melbourne,

""

"1

New Zealand,...........

>

"1

**

??

??

Newcastle, N.S.W.,

Port Darwin, South Australia,

Portland, Oregon, U.S.A.,

Rockhampton, Queensland,

San Francisco, U.S.A.,........

Straits Settlements,

Sydney,

Thursday Island, Queensland,

39

Townsville, Queensland,

"

Vancouver, British Columbia,

+9

Victoria, British Columbia,...

SUMMARY.

ADULTS.

CHILDREN.

VALUE OF

TOTAL. TREASURE

M.

M.

F.

BROUGHT.

18 5,680

117

18 5,680 117

23

23

279

279

65

65

641

625

SO TH

80

629

140

140

979

979

613

621

40

40

148

148

162

163

97

1

103

...

31

31

9,102

160 77

52

9,391 $ 5,929,904

79,818 2,501

902

566

83,787

722

1

20

189

725 20 189

...

1,894)

14

50

1,921 50

::

$1,505,886

TOTAL PASSENGERS,

|100,876| 2,689 | 1,004

630 105,199 $7,435,790

Value of Treasure imported from Australian Ports,

;

290

NATURE OF CHARGE.

་་

XXI.-RETURN of MARINE CASES tried at the MARINE MAGISTRATE'S COURT, during the Year 1891.

DEFENDANTS HOW DISPOSED of.

No. of Cases.

No. of De-

Fined.

FINES.

AMOUNT OF

Launch),

Desertion,

Absent from Ship without leave,

Arrival without Report, (Junk),....

Assault,

Carrying excess of Passengers, (Steam

Disorderly Behaviour,

5

7

4

M94

::

1

1

2

...

10:

2

$ 50.00 70.50

10

10

2

3

3

8

False Particulars, Giving-(Junk),

4

Found stowed away,

7

10

1

Harbour Regulations, Breach of—(Junk),

81

Junk, Breach of conditions of Licence

and Special Permit, .... Leaving the Harbour during prohibited

hours, (Junk),

3

3

:

10

5

12

Leaving without Clearance (Junk),

15

16

Obstruction of Fairways......

13

50

Plying for hire without a Licence, (Boat), Refusal of Duty,

14

46

15

37

Throwing Ballast, &c., into the Harbour, Wilfully remaining behind,

3

3

2OOO74*

26

10

540.00

Gai wii

1

3

1

5.00

4

75.00

6

3

54.00

15

59

526.00

3

:

:

:

30.00

10

2

73.00

1

14

1

212.00

45

99.00

46

147.00

1

25.00

3

TOTAL,..

147

311

31

31

205

2

10

9

23

1,906.50

XXIII-RETURN of Work performed by the GOVERNMENT MARINE SURVEYOR'S DEPARTMENT.

9 months in 1881,.

95

67

....

1882,........

154

127

1 1

10

35

1

284

15

6

472

1883,

144

102

20

57

461

1884,

200

141

26

33

8

699

1885,...

153

113

60

33

50

29

737

1886,

149

76

11

69

16

9

36

16

870

:

1887,

153

101

9

1

72

15

14

42

31

930

.

1888,..

161

97

1

80

1

6

42

36

1,042

1889,....

130

73

1

80

1

1890, 1891,

112

77

2

84

1.

108

38

3

1

::

73

3

5::

39

36

1,127

61

19

986

16

44

19

1,615

2578

242888N;

: : :

466

Years.

Passenger Certificate

and Bottom.

Emigration.

Tonnage for

Registration.

British Tonnage

Certificate for Foreign Vessels.

Inspection of Crew space, Lights and

Markings.

Minor Inspec- tions.

Survey of Licen- } sed Passenger

Steam-Launches.

Survey of Boilers under Construction.

Inspection of Government

Launches.

Examination of Engineers.

Examination of Chinese Engi-

ucers for Steam-

Launches.

Estimated total

number of visits in

connection with fore-

going Inspections,

XXIV.-IMPORTS AND EXPORTS OF OPIUM.

IMPORTS.

MALWA. Chests.

PATNA.

BENARES.

PERSIAN.

1890,

.13,684

1891,

12,420

Chests. 25,232,476 24,520

Chests.

Chests.

TURKISH. Chests.

16,38328

7,1021

61

15,435

5,925

119

TOTAL. Chests. 62,46348 58,419

57

Increase,

Decrease,

1,2643

7124%

94828

1,176

4,0431 25

EXPORTS.

MALWA.

PATNA.

BENARES.

Chests.

Chests.

Chests.

PERSIAN. Chests.

TURKISHI. Chests.

1890, 1891,

Increase, Decrease,

13,409

24,1922

14,76328

5,553

105

TOTAL. Chests. 58,023, 13

2

.11,829

24,440

15,654

5,978

96

57,998!

/

24718

89013

425

1,5791

8/1/2

2513

Through Cargo reported in Manifests but not lauded, 1890,.

23

29

>>

1891,.........

.16,004 chests. .18,256

35

Increase,....

2,252 chests.

1869.

1870.

1871.

1872.

1873.

IAGRAM of Tonnage entered at Hongkong, from 1867 to 1891, inclusive.

RED LINE represents British Shipping Tonnage only.

3LUE LINE represents Foreign Shipping Tonnage only

represents entire

REEN LINE represents British and Foreign Shipping Tonnage. "ELLOW LINE represents Junk Tonnage only. "HICK BLACK LINE

Trade in British and Foreign Ships and Junks.

1874.

1875.

1876.

1877.

1878.

1879.

1880.

1881.

1882.

1883.

1884.

1885.

1886.

1887.

1888.

1889.

1890.

1891.

TONS.

7,000,000

6,900,000

6,800,000

6,700,000

6,600,000

6,500,000

6,400,000

6,300,000

6,200,000

6,100,000

6,000,000

5,900,000

5,800,000

5,700,000

5,600,000

5,500,000

5,400,000

5,300,000

6,100,000

6,000,000

5,900,000

5,800,000

5,700,000

5,600,000

5,500,000

5,400,000

5,300,000

5,200,000

5,100,000

5,000,000

4,900,000

4,800,000

4,700,000

4,600,000

4,500,000

4,400,000

4,300,000

4,200,000

4,100,000

4,000,000

3,900,000

3,800,000

3,700,000

3,600,000

3,500,000

3,400,000

3,300,000

3,200,000

3,100,000

3,000,000

پر

2,900,000

2,800,000

2,700,000

2,600,000

2,500,000

2,400,000

2,300,000

2,200,000

2,100,000

2,000,000

1,900,000

1,800,000

..1,700,000

1,600,000

1,500,000

1,400,000

1,300,000

1,200,000

1,100,000

1,000,000

900,000

800,000

700,000

600,000

500,000

400,000

300,000

7,000,000

6,900,000

6,800,000

6,700,000

6,600,000

6,500,000

6,400,000

6,300,000

6,200,000

6,100,000

6,000,000

5,900,000

5,800,000

5,700,000

5,600,000

5,500,000

5,400,000

5,300,000

TONS.

1867.

1868.

1869.

1870.

1871.

1872.

1873.

1874.

1875.

XXII-DIAGRAM of Tonnage entered at Hongkong, from 1867 to 1891, inclusive

RED LINE represents British Shipping Tonnage only,

BLUE LINE represents Foreign Shipping Tonnage only

GREEN LINE represents British and Foreign Shipping Tonnage.

YELLOW LINE represents Junk Tonnage only.

THICK BLACK LINE

represents entire Trade in British and Foreign Ships and Junks

1876.

1877.

1878.

1879.

1880.

1881.

1882.

1883.

1884.

1885.

1886.

1887.

1888.

1889.

5,200,000

5,100,000

5,000,000

4,900,000

4,800,000

4,700,000

4,600,000

4,500,000

4,400,000

4,300,000

4,200,000

4,100,000

4,000,000

3,900,000

3,800,000

3,700,000

3,600,000

3,500,000

3,400,000

3,300,000

3,200,000

3,100,000

3,000,000

2,900,000

2,800,000

2,700,000

2,600,000

2,500,000

2,400,000

2,300,000

2,200,000

2,100,000

2,900,000

2,800,000

2,700,000

2,600,000

2,500,000

2,400,000

2,300,000

2,200,000

2,100,000

2,000,000

1,900,000

1,800,000

1,700,000

1,600,000

1,500,000

1,400,000

1,300,000

1,200,000,

1,100,000

1,000,000

900,000

800,000

700,000

600,000

500,000

400,000

300,000

NUMBER OF PERMITS, &c. ISSUED.

1890.

1891.

Increase.

Decrease.

Landing Permits,

Removal Permits,.

250

344

94

.12,232

12,995

763

...

Exports Permits,

7,586

8,479

893

Permits to Chinese Customs' Hulk .......

376

368

Memo. of Exports sent to the Commissioner of Chinese Customs,

510

510

:

SUMMARY OF EXPOPTS, 1891.

293

Malwa Chests.

Patna Benares Persian Chests. Chests. Chests,

Turkish "Chests.

Total Chests.

Total in piculs.

By Steamers to Amoy,

Bombay,.....

British Columbia,

British North Borneo,

Bunder Abbas,

4

266

19

3,560

603

6

844

:

:

10

:

:

Hankow,

Hoihow,

Kobe,

Macao,

Pakhoi,

Philippine Islands,

10

35

Canton,

2,118

6,104

2,766

1

Chefoo,

11

1

4

Foochow,

2,523

1,246

443

386

Formosa,

399

4,6361

Haiphong,

340

71

26

5

323

30

:

:

:

:

:

:

:.

4,448

5,178.875

10

10.15

844

1,012.8

10

35

12.

35.875

10,989

12,763.525

16

17.

4,598

4,945.45

5,035

5,231.2125

1

:

:

4,082

43

157

703

203

109

:

:

:.

:

:.

:

:

:

340

408.

98

103.4

:

:

:

358

428.6

3

3.6

961/2

4,3351

5,183.3

746

895.2

San Francisco,

10

Shanghai,

3,366

8,062

5,543

172

Straits Settlements,

315

24

9

Swatow,

3,248

2,243

1,487

116

Tientsin,

By Junks to various adjacent

Ports in China,

216

922

78

:..

.:..

:

:

:

:

:

312

374.4

10

10.25

17,143

19,868.8

348

416.025

7,094

7,843.4

4

4.8

1,220

1,420.1

TOTAL,

11,829

24,440

15,654 5,978

96

57,998 61,666.7625

The information in column 7 above is on the following assumption,--

Patna and Benares per chest,

Malwa and Turkish per chest,

Persian per chest,................

.1.20 piculs.

..1.00

**

.1.025

22

;

294

XXV.-Return of ENTRY of EUROPEAN CONSTRUCTED VESSELS during the Year 1891.

BRITISH SHIPS.

GERMAN SHIPS.

No. of Vessels.

No. of Times

Total.

in Port.

Total Tonnage.

No. of Vessels.

No. of Times in Port.

Total.

Total Tonnage.

69

1

69

93,564

17

1

17

18,804

46

2

92

138,172

15

30

42,152

28

3

84

128,382

5

15

18,285

43

4

172

270,772

10

4

40

56,501

30

LO

5

150

254,945

6

5

30

32,060

15

6

90

146,608

2

6

12

34,506

10

70

101,652

7

21

22,547

8

64

77,448

4

9

36

36,450

5

9

45

43,539

2

10

20

13,940

3

10

30

37,460

11

44

33,176

8

11

88

102,179

1

12

12

15,216

2

12

24

35,844

267

978

1,430,565

67

:

27**

323,637

3

13

39

50,817

2

13

26

34,008

3

14

42

47,390

2

16

32

27,696

1

15

15

14,835

3

17

5.1

42,432

2

17

34

38,250

1

18

18

16,164

3

18

54

53,082

1

20

20

13,100

19

38

46,227

1

21

21

13,251

A

20

40

37,560

1

23

23

18,607

1

21

21

17,220

2

2

24

48

32,376

1

2

25

50

39,875

1

19 19 19

25

50

40,575

26

26

18,304

27

27

18,198

1

27

27

21,141

1

30

30

20,250

1

28

28

24,164

1

32

32

30,528

1

30

30

15,270

2

33

1

31

31

36,673

1

35

385

66

54,054

35

28,490

1

1

8888888

35

35

38,150

1

36

36

27,432

38

38

57,190

:

1

27

294

:

:

570

570,220

21

493

403,089

1,548

2,000,785

88

770

726,726

RETURN of ENTRY of EUROPEAN CONSTRUCTED VESSELS during the Year 1891,—Continued.

OTHER FOREIGN SHIPS.

No. of VESSELS.

NO. OF TIMES IN PORT.

TOTAL.

TONNAGE.

63

12

8267672-~~~-

1

63

76,591

2

24

30,352

3

18

19,386

28

39,088

5

5

25

55,050

6

42

75,574

14

8,876

1

8

8

11,656

1

9

9

13,410

10

20

11,510

1

11

11

8,371

1

12

12

6,300

108

274

355,164

1

13

13

21,307

1

16

16

11,472

3

18

54

50,454

1

19

19

13,357

1

20

20

26,780

1

25

25

38,025

1

26

26

22,724

1

29

29

10,295

1

35

35

52,780

:

1

36

36

14,292

1

37

37

55,618

13

310

317,134

121

584

672,298

XXVI.-Comparative Table of Revenue, 1887 to 1891.

295

DESCRIPTION OF FEES.

1887.

1888.

1889.

1890.

1891.

c.

C.

$

C.

$

C.

$

C.

Cargo Boats' Certificates, under Section 39 of

Ordinance 8 of 1879, .............

782.00

1,131.00

1,211.00

1,190.00

1,177.00

Emigration Brokers' Licences, under Ordinance 1

of 1889,......

1,200.00

1,400.00

1,400.00

1,400.00

1,200.00

Examinations of Masters and Engineers of Steam- launches, under Section 7 of Ordinance 8 of 1879,

121.50

145.00

Examinations of Masters, Mates and Engineers, under Section 15 of Ordinance 8 of 1879,

1,310.00

1,290.00

137.50

1,350.00

85.00

90.00

2,050.00

1,900.00

Fines and Fees of Court,.....................

Licences, Passes, &c., for Junks, Section 38 of

Ordinance 8 of 1879,

206.00

19,997.75 19,761.25

217.00

104.00

19,402.00

270.50

22,397.75

1,906.50

22,602.50

Licences for Steam-launches, under Section 7 of

Ordinance 8 of 1879, .

Licences for Chinese Passenger Ships, under Ordi-

nance 1 of 1889,

450,00

535.00

467.50

Light Dues, under Section 34 of Ordinance 8 of

1879,

33,003.57

Medical Fees for inspecting Emigrants, under

Ordinance 1 of 1889,

23,706.00

500.00

32,056.28

26,472.00

397.50

390.00

422,50

462.50

335.00

260.00

31,898.46 72,028.33

14,408.25 13,096.75

89,656.69

14,435.50

Permits for working Cargo on Sundays, under

Ordinance 6 of 1891,

2,150.00

Registry Fees, &c., under M. S. A. and Section 3

of Ordinance 8 of 1879,

373.85

362.00

279.00

278.00

275.00

Sale of Printed Forms,

1,360.50

1,496.75

1,229.75

1,265.00

1,420.00

Shipping Seamen, under Section 16 of Ordinance

8 of 1879,

9,458.00

10,061.00

9,822.00

10,830.00

11,782.00

Storage of Gunpowder, under Section 37 of Ordi-

nance 8 of 1879,

11,686.38

6,112.68

2,838.68

5,098.26

5,555.46

Surveyor's Certificates for Steam-launches, under

Section 7 of Ordinance 8 of 1879,

1,190.00

1,145.00

985.00

995.00

1,055.00

Surveys of Steam-ships, under Section 5 of Ordi-

nance 8 of 1879,

11,300.49

10,120.30

9,244.01

9,060.87

8,643.77

Medical Treatment of Distressed British Seamen,...

2,169.00

2,388.25

Totals,..............

118,850.04 115,126.01

2,095.00

98,192.15

140,802.96 164,571.92

XXVII.—Return of Junk Fees collected at the Stations during the Year ending, 31st December, 1891.

296

Trading Licence.

Fishing Licence.

Anchorage

Date.

STATION.

Pass.

Special

Permit.

Clearance. Total Fees.

Remarks.

$20.

$15.

$10.

$5.

$3.

$1.

Victoria.

$

1890,

120

93

66

1891,

121

94

82

Increase,

1

1

16

888

473

6

413

6,750

9,419

6,698

38

455

5,669

8,135

5,679

10,124.75

10,622.75❘ Trading Licences only issued at Victoria.

32

42

...

...

Decrease,.

...

...

1,081

1,284

1,019

498.00

Shaukiwan.

1890,

132

128

403

1,350

3,443

1,313

2,973.50 Upkeep $420.

1891,

158

· 132

436

1,637.

4,003

1,579

3,426.75

Increase,

26

4

33

287

560

266

3453.25

Decrease,...

Aberdeen.

1890,

1891,

88888

Increase,

...

28

273

595

1,094

3,355

1,080

32

290

735

1,098

3,439

1,098

2,936.25 | Upkeep $756. 3,173.75

4

17

140

4.

84

18

237.50

Decrease,.

Stanley.

1890,

21

1891,

12

...

Increase,

Decrease,.

...

~2:-

171

195

310

1,308

310

111

148

307

1,274

307

1,295.00 Upkeep $420. 1,013.00

9

60

47

3

34

3

...

282.00

Yaumati.

1890,

1891,

Increase,

...

Decrease,..

Hunghom.

1890,

...

1891,

...

Increase,

Decrease,.

...

4,224

2,849

4,085

2,789.50 | No Licences issued

at this

...

4,169

3,172

4,111

2,863.00

Station.

323

26

73.50 Upkeep $420.

55

23

140

182

1,317

2,286

23

168

290

1,094

2,584

1,299

1,081

1,949.50 Upkeep $600.

2,098.75

28

108

298

156.25

223

218

...

TOTAL.

1890,

120

93

66

1891,

121

1

94

82

82

208

718

1,788

232

739

2,064

15,045

13,974

22,660 14,785 22,607 13,855

Increase,

1

16

24

21

276

22,559.50

22,700.00

140.50

Decrease,..

1,071

53

930

...

469

No. 92

35

HONGKONG.

CORRESPONDENCE RESPECTING SPACE IN THE IMPERIAL INSTITUTE ALLOTTED FOR EXHIBITS FROM HONGKONG.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor, on the 14th December, 1892.

SIR,

IMPERIAL INSTITUTE

OF THE UNITED KINGDOM, THE COLONIES AND INDIA.

IMPERIAL INSTITUTE ROAD, LONDON, S.W., 28th October, 1892.

Sir FREDERICK ABEL, the Secretary of the Imperial Institute, has shewn me a copy of a letter which was addressed to your Excellency by him on the 6th February last, No. 521, and of the printed matter, photographs, &c. which accom- panied it, giving full information respecting the nature of the space in the Imperial Institute Buildings preliminarily allotted for the reception and display of specimens of the produce of Hongkong.

In view of it being understood that Her Majesty The QUEEN, who laid the Foundation Stone in 1887, will formally open the Imperial Institute in May or June next, I take the opportunity of urging upon your Excellency the importance of immediate action in order to secure a representation of the resources of the Colony at the time mentioned.

In order that your Excellency may be acquainted to some extent with the importance and usefulness of the Imperial Institute, I may mention that, although up to the present time a part only of the buildings has been (informally) thrown open, over 3,000 persons, many of them being of considerable political and social standing, have become Fellows of the Imperial Institute. Certain of the greater Colonies have formed so high an opinion of the usefulness to their Communities of due representation at the Imperial Institute that their Governments have already made special Votes of money to be applied not only to the preparation of carefully arranged and classified collections, but also to the payment of a skilled Curator and the necessary Assistants at the Institute, and to the purchase of suitable Show Cases, &c. for the reception and display of such collections.

I trust that your Excellency and your Government and Legislature will agree that if the resources of the Colony of Hongkong are to be represented at the Im- perial Institute, it is highly desirable that the space allotted to it should not be unoccupied when public attention is so powerfully drawn to the Collections as it will be by their official opening to the public by the QUEEN, and by the Ceremonies connected therewith.

It will be recollected that the Hongkong Court attracted great attention at the Colonial and Indian Exhibition of 1886, and that it is important that the Colony should be also permanently represented in a similar manner at the Institute.

To His Excellency THE GOVERNOR,

HONGKONG.

470

I would venture to suggest that Sir FREDERICK ABEL should be authorised by telegram to purchase Show Cases such as those indicated in the photographs for- warded to you by him (the cost of which would not exceed £100) and that, before February next, he may receive a collection of samples of the local industries, with other exhibits, for display therein; and also a sum of money (not exceeding £25) to be devoted to the remuneration of an experienced Officer, whom the Executive Council of the Institute will provide, to place the Collection in order.

I may add that I shall be glad to bring before the Governing Body the names of any gentlemen resident in, or connected with, Hongkong, who may be desirous of becoming Fellows of the Institute. The particulars of Fellowship are shewn in a Memorandum which, together with a Pamphlet descriptive of the Institute, will be forwarded to you by Sir FREDERICK ABEL.

In conclusion, I would only add that the warm interest which I shall always feel in all projects calculated to promote the welfare and increase the reputation of Hongkong will at once explain and justify my addressing your Excellency on this subject.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your Excellency's obedient Servant,

G. F. BOWEN, Representative of Hongkong on the Governing Body of the

Imperial Institute.

!

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 1.

MONDAY, 25TH JANUARY, 1892.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(Sir WILLIAM ROBINSON, K.C.M.G.).

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

the Acting Attorney General, (ANDREW JOHN LEACH).

""

14

"

""

""

the Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART Lockhart).

the Colonial Treasurer, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES).

the Acting Surveyor General, (FRANCIS ALFRED COOPER).

the Acting Harbour Master, (WILLIAM CHARLES HOLLAND HASTINGS). CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

The Honourable PHINEAS RYRIE.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

ABSENT:

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 7th December, 1891, were read and confirmed. His Excellency moved the following address of condolence :-

1

"We the Governor and Legislative Council of Hongkong desire to express our heartfelt sympathy with Her Majesty the Queen and the Prince and Princess of Wales in the irrepar able bereavement they have sustained by the death of Prince ALBERT VICTOR, Duke of Clarence and Avondale."

Honourable C. P. CHATER seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

His Excellency addressed the Council as follows:---

HONOURABLE GENTLEMEN.-As this is the first time we have met for the transaction of public business, I think that before we deal with the orders of the day I may very properly make some remarks in reference to the position and prospects of the Colony. Doubtless you expect me to do so. As a preface to these remarks I would mention that I am happy to find myself associated in Council with gentlemen several of whom have for a long time devoted their energies to the service of the Colony. I am certain that I shall receive from both official and un-official members that support and assistance which you are so well able to give, and which have invariably been extended by this Council to a Governor who has, as I claim to have, the true interests of the community at heart. I shall always be ready to receive any advice and suggestions you may tender to me, and to weigh such advice most carefully and respectfully. Our relations will, I trust, be ever of the most harmonious character and the proceedings of the Council conducted with due dignity and decorum. Having only been in the Colony for six weeks I must claim your indulgence if I should appear in any way to fail to appreciate correctly the position of its affairs. The first public document which attracted my attention was naturally the address delivered in this chamber on the 15th of October last, and the Colonial Estimates for 1892 which had been sent home before my arrival. I at once conveyed to the Secretary of State an expression of my opinion that, in one particular at all events, those estimates were framed in far too sanguine a spirit. The principal item which struck me as over-estimated was a most valuable portion of our revenue, namely, the yield of the Opium Farm. There may, of course, have been an object in over-estimating this amount. The figures, I understand, were arrived at in the following manner:-1892, January and February, at the reduced amount agreed upon in 1891, namely, $35,800 per month, equal to $71,600; ten months at the original amount of tender, $39,800 equal to $398,000, making $469,600; add 1891 ten months' arrears at $5,000 per month equal to $50,000, making a total of $519,600. The highest tender which has been received for the next three years is at the rate of $340,000 a year, and therefore the receipts for 1892 will be as follows:-1891, ten months' arrears, at $5,000 per month, $50,000; 1892, January and February at reduced amount, $35,800, $71,600; 1891, ten months' at $28,400 per month, $284,000, making a total of $405,600 and leaving a deficit on the estimated revenue for 1892 of $114,000 and a prospect of $340,800 only from the Opium Farm for 1893 and 1894. It is hardly possible at this

>

2

moment to state what the actual revenue and expenditure of 1891 have been, but I am informed that the amount collected was $2,019,136 instead of $2,052,098 as estimated. The difference is owing to the fact that land sales realised only $55,325 out of an estimate of $100,000. The total expenditure of 1891 will be as nearly as possible $2,357,488 instead of $2,416,626 the estimated amount. The expenditure therefore for 1891 will have been $338,352 in excess of the revenue. You will of course notice that those figures do not agree with the revised estimates for 1891, which are embodied in the Colonial Estimates issued in October, but they are compiled from the latest returns in the Colonial Treasury. The balance of assets over liabilities on the 31st December was, it is said, about $150,000. This is not a very large sum and points to the necessity of economy in the future. It will be my duty to prevent any ordinary expenditure therefore which is not absolutely necessary. There are some satisfactory features in the returns for 1891. For example, stamps were estimated to yield $179,356; there have been collected $193,959, showing an excess over the estimate of $14,603. The revenue from this source in 1890 was $203,160, an excessive yield which can easily be explained. In the Registrar General's department there has been an increase of $7,138; in the Supreme Court a decrease of $4,000. In the returns of that Court there is one most gratifying feature, namely, a remarkable decrease in the number of criminal cases tried. They amounted in 1891 to only 32, whereas the average from 1882 to 1886 was 87, and the average from 1887 to 1890 73 per annum. There is only one other item to which I would call special attention, and that is the tonnage of shipping in and out during 1891. My predecessor in one of his able and elaborate speeches stated that the total tonnage in and out in 1890 was 13 million tons, and he regarded it as phenomenal; but it may surprise you to learn that notwithstanding a slight shrinkage in the foreign junk trade, which is principally owing to the river steamers having absorbed the carriage of kerosine and matches, the shipping in and out last year represented no less than 14,005,698 tons.

Some very interesting and lucid returns from the Acting Harbour Master in reference to this stupendous traffic will shortly be published. During the last six weeks I have visited nearly every public institution and every public department. No stranger coming to Hongkong can fail to be struck with the magnificent works which have been and are being carried out by the Public Works department; the water and drainage works, Bowen Road, the great Reclamation Scheme, and the Central Market are and will be lasting monu- ments of the energy and ability of that department as well as of the liberality of the Legislative Council. But there are other works which have been recently executed or are nearing completion which might, in view of diminishing assets, have fairly been postponed until more prosperous times. With regard to the future, it is evident that if the public works extraordinary described in pages 43 and 44 of the Estimates are to be carried out, and I assume for the moment that their necessity with perhaps very few exceptions is admitted, the revenue will not be able to bear the expenditure without a considerable increase of taxation. To my mind it is both unfair and illogical to tax the present generation for public improvements which will be of more benefit to posterity than they can be to existing taxpayers, and the only way of proceeding with these undertakings is by a loan, the Council having previously approved of the detailed estimates and designs as the case may be in respect of each of those works. I am sure that you will give me a patient hearing if I deal with this question at some length on the assumption that a loan must be contracted, and that with little delay. Before doing so I would remark with regard to the proposed expenditure in 1892 that it is possible that a saving can be effected under item 9, improvement of the Recreation Ground. The lowering of Queen's Road West has been abandoned. The re-construction of Governor's residence at the Peak cannot be undertaken. The house is in a most dilapidated condition, and according to the report of the Surveyor-General practically unfit for occupation. It would be unsafe to attempt to repair it. Doubtless the Council will not object to a revote of a portion of the $10,000 voted for the repair of Mountain Lodge for the hire of a residence for the Governor and his family if necessary. As to the contemplated Gaol extension I have asked the Secretary of State to allow me to postpone it for a short time in the hope that more economical arrangements can be made than those which have been proposed. This matter is engaging my most anxious consideration, but no doubt a large expenditure for additional accommodation will be required. The revenue for 1892, owing to the diminution by $114,000 of the opium farm receipts, will be $2,030,178 instead of $2,144,178, and the ordinary expenditure $1,773,918, leaving an estimated surplus of $256,260. The balance of assets over liabilities is said to be $150,000, making, with that surplus, $406,260. The proposed expenditure for 1892 on public works extraordinary is $680,000, which may perhaps be reduced to $640,000. The total sum required for all the public works extraordinary in contemplation is say $2,680,000. Of this sum upwards of $900,000 was expended to the 31st December last, leaving a balance of $1,780,000 to be provided in 1892 and subsequent years. Assuming that $640,000 is spent during 1892 the surplus and assets amounting to $406,260 will be swallowed up and a further sum of over $233,000 will have to be found before the 31st of December, 1892. From the correspondence which took place previous to the loan of 1881 the Secretary of State for the Colonies is clearly averse to raising a fresh loan

*

i

until there is no escape from that obligation. From a glance at the figures I have quoted it is evident that the time has arrived when this matter must be grappled with, and if these works are to be undertaken Government must be in a position to supply funds for their completion within the next three or four years. By the end of the year it is possible that the Colony will be in debt to the Crown Agents, it may be to the extent of $233,000. This sum the Crown Agents could borrow at a reasonable rate, provided that in the meantime an Ordinance was passed by the Council authorising the issue of a loan. If this could be arranged the raising of the loan might be postponed until the end of the year. Before that time arrives, however, it must be settled what amount will be required, what form the loan should take, whether it is to be raised by lump sum or by instalments, and whether it shall be a gold or a silver loan. As to the amount, you will see that if $640,000 is spent in 1892, the Colony will owe the Crown Agents $233,000, and there will remain a balance of $1,140,000 to be provided in 1893 and future years, making a total liability of some $1,373,000-say $1,400,000. This sum, (there or thereabouts,) may therefore be taken as the amount of the loan required; and the Ordinance should give power to borrow up to that amount. As to the form of the loan, the Government in my opinion cannot do better than issue it in the same way as the existing one, viz., by the sale of debentures, with a sinking fund sufficient to redeem in twenty years, with the option of paying it off at any time after five years. With regard to borrowing in a lump sum or by instalments, it is manifest that if the Colony could get equally good terms it would be desirable to adopt the latter alternative. In 1866-7 the Crown Agents borrowed $138,000 for the Colony in this way, at an average rate of 34 per cent., pending the issue of debentures. Application might be made at once to the Secretary of State as to the rate the Colony would have to pay for such temporary convenience. From the Colonial Hansard it appears that in 1886-7, and indeed much more recently, the question of a silver loan as against a gold loan was discussed. Unless silver can be borrowed on the same terms in regard to interest as gold, a gold loan would be more advantageous than a silver one. The Crown Agents have large gold payments to make for the Colony, and if a silver loan was raised the whole amount would have to be remitted to the Crown Agents in the course of two or three years, and the Colony would have to take the risk of an adverse exchange. If a gold loan is raised none of it need be remitted to England, as it might be absorbed in meeting gold payments at home, and the Colony would be relieved for a time of the cost of transferring money to England to meet the requirements of the Crown Agents. In such a case there could be no difficulty in meeting any objection that might arise in reference to the loan account not being kept distinct from the general financial transactions of the Colony. It would be simply "a matter of account,

a matter of account," as it is called, and full information on the subject could be published every month or every quarter by the Treasurer, as the Council might desire. Judging from the state of the share market at home, a loan could be raised at home at 33 or 4 per cent. at the outside, whilst here it would cost at least 4 per cent.

Had a silver loan been raised in 1888 in precisely the same form as the gold one, it would have cost the Colony up to September last $69,000 more than the remittances for the gold loan. The equivalent of the $1,400,000 which the Colony will most likely have to borrow is at the present time, at say 3s., equal to £210,000. Members of the Council will doubtless concur in the opinion that an Ordinance similar to that of 1886 (No. 10) should be introduced, authorising the borrowing of a sum not exceeding £210,000 at the end of 1892, or at any time after 30th June, 1892, should the state of the market be favourable. I have already stated that the estimated surplus of revenue over ordinary expenditure for 1892 will be about $256,260, and there appears no reason to doubt, notwithstanding the decrease in the opium revenue, that a similar amount will be available in future years, if the expenditure is carefully watched. It must not be forgotten that considerable additions to the revenue will be derived at no very distant date from the new Central Market and the depôts for slaughtering cattle, so that looking to these and other sources of revenue, I do not think that by borrowing £210,000 a too heavy burden would be imposed upon the revenue of the Colony. That it should have fallen to my lot in my first address to the Council to suggest that it should consent to an increase of the public debt is to be regretted, but I cannot flinch from the responsibilities of my office, and I anticipate that the Council will be prepared to share this responsibility, as my views as to the necessity of such a course coincide with those of some of my predecessors, as well as those of several honourable members. The question is one of great urgency, however inadequately and imperfectly it may have been brought before you. In speaking of the loan I should say I have adopted throughout the use of round numbers, as being least confusing, and the amounts I have quoted must be regarded as approximate only. It would, in my opinion, be most satisfactory to the com- munity if a Committee were appointed to consider the subject fully and in all its bearings. Should the Council agree in that view, I would nominate the following gentlemen to be a Com- mittee for that purpose, feeling sure that they will readily place their valuable services at the disposal of the Government:-The Honourables the Registrar General, the Colonial Treasurer, C. P. CHATER, J. J. KESWICK, and T. H. WHITEHEAD. In order to assist them I would appoint the Clerk of Councils as Secretary, giving him authority to lay before

3

4

the Committee any official papers and returns that may be called for or may tend to throw light on the financial position or the future prospects of the Colony. Before concluding I should like to say that, having regard to the history of the past, and notwithstanding the somewhat gloomy picture my financial statement presents, I have every confidence in the future of Hongkong. It is true that the Colony has passed and is passing through a period of severe depression, but there are distinctly favourable and promising indications of better times to come. I have been very much struck by the peaceful, sober, and industrious habits of the Chinese. I hope the leading members of that community fully understand that they and their compatriots will have in me a Governor, a friend, and a supporter in all their reasonable aspirations. It is my most anxious desire to see greater attention paid in our elementary and secondary schools to the teaching of the English language, and this matter I hope to take up before the end of the vacation. The establishment and recent extension of sugar refineries, dock accommodation, brick and cement and rope works are healthy signs, and indicate the advantages which would accrue to the population generally from a further encouragement of local industries. The community may rely upon my aid and assistance in fostering in every legitimate way the development of such enterprises. It will also be my

endeavour to cultivate harmonious and friendly relations with the Government author- ities of the mainland of China, with which we are so closely connected geographically and commercially. I am afraid, gentlemen, that my remarks have been somewhat prolix, and that I may have been guilty of repetition, but the occasion is undoubtedly an important as well as an interesting one, and that must be my excuse if I have erred in those directions. I thank you for your forbearance, and in claiming your confidence and support. I can honestly assert that during my tenure of office I shall try by every means in my power to promote as far as possible the well-being of the community, and to maintain the efficiency of the public service.

PAPERS LAID ON THE TABLE.-The Acting Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the Report of the Acting Superintendent of the Fire Brigade for 1891, the Surveyor General's Report for 1891, and the Report of the Water and Drainage Department for

1891.

VOTES REFERRED TO THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Acting Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following Financial Minutes and moved that they be referred to the Finance Committee, viz. :-

C.S.O.

85 of 1892.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to re-vote the sum of Twenty-three thousand Seven hundred and Fifty-eight Dollars and Ninety-two Cents, ($23,758.92), for the following "Extraordinary Public Works" voted for 1891.

It was not possible to finish these works during last year, so a re-vote is required.

Vaccine Institute:

Original vote,

Expended in 1891,.

Additions to Government House:-

Voted for 1891,...

Expended in 1891,

District School-Kowloon:

Original vote,

Balance,........

Expended in 1891,.

Repair of the rain-storm damage-Yaumati:-

Amount voted,

Expended in 1891,

$ 3,500.00 1,812.77

.$ 1,687.23

$15,000.00 7,929.31

Balance,......

7,070.69

..$ 8,000.00

Nil.

Balance,..

8,000.00

$ 7,037.00

36.00

Balance,.....

7,001.00

$23,758.92

Government House, Hongkong, 14th January, 1892.

Y

;

5

C.S.O.

2929 of 1891.

C. O. Desp.

301 of 1891.

C.S.O.

2547 of 1891.

C.S.O. 2622 of 1891.

C.S.O. 2018 of 1891.

C.5.0.

2980 of 1891.

C.S.0. 2809 of 1891,

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Five hundred Dollars, ($500), for the purchase of Twelve Pillar Letter-Boxes to be placed about the town with a view of increasing existing Postal facilities.

Government House, Hongkong, 29th December, 1891.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Six hundred Dollars, ($600), to cover the increase to the salary of the Attorney General, from 1st January, 1892, sanctioned by the Secretary of State.

Government House, Hongkong, 22nd January, 1892.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Six hundred and two Dollars, ($602), for the purchase of clothing, bedding and furniture for the Chinese Lunatic Asylum.

Government House, Hongkong, 14th January, 1892.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Six thousand Five hundred Dollars, ($6,500), for lighting with Gas the roads and streets in the Kowloon Peninsula.

For erection and cost of lamps,

For maintenance and lighting of lamps, per annum,

Government House, Hongkong, 8th January, 1892.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

....$ 3,000.00

3,500.00

$6,500.00

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One hundred and Twenty Dollars, ($120), for allowance to Chinese Teacher to Mr. WATSON, Gaol Clerk.

Government House, Hongkong, 5th January, 1892.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Two thousand Dollars, ($2,000), for Furniture for Government House.

Note. Of the sum voted in 1888, $2,057.66 was not spent. The Council is asked to re-vote $2,000 of this sum, as additional furniture is now urgently required at Government House.

Government House, Hongkong, 11th January, 1892.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to re-vote the sum of Seven thousand and five hundred Dollars, ($7,500), for "New Streets, Kennedy Town."

Voted for the year 1887,

>>

""

Payments to date,

1888,

Balance unexpended,..........................

Government House, Hongkong, 14th January, 1892.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

.$25,000

25,000

$50,000

$35,059

$14,941

BILL ENTITLED (6 AN ORDINANCE TO CONSTITUTE AND INCORPORATE A CHURCH BODY OF THE MEMBERS OF THE CHURCH OF ENGLAND IN HONGKONG AND TO DEFINE THE DUTIES AND Powers of SUCH BODY".-The Council agreed to postpone the first reading of the Bill.

:

6

BILL ENTITLED CC

AN ORDINANCE FOR THE INCORPORATION OF THE CHAIRMAN OF THE COMMITTEE OF THE DIOCESAN SCHOOL AND ORPHANAGE.-The Honourable J. J. KESWICK moved the first reading of the Bill.

The Honourable C. P. CHATER seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned sine die.

Read and confirmed, this 25th day of February, 1892.

!

A. M. THOMSON, Acting Clerk o Councils.

WILLIAM ROBINSON,

Governor.

*

:

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 2.

THURSDAY, 25TH FEBRUARY, 1892.

7

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(Sir WILLIAM ROBINSON, K.C.M.G.).

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

the Acting Attorney General, (ANDREW JOHN LEACH).

""

.",

""

""

"}

the Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART LOCKHART).

the Colonial Treasurer, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES).

the Acting Surveyor General, (FRANCIS ALFRED COOPER).

the Acting Harbour Master, (WILLIAM CHARLES HOLLAND HASTINGS). CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

Ho KAI, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS.

ABSENT:

The Honourable JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 25th January, 1892, were read and confirmed. NEW MEMBER.-The Honourable EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS took the Oath of Allegiance on his appointment provisionally to a seat on the Council.

PAPERS LAID ON THE TABLE.-The Acting Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency. the Governor, laid on the table the following Sessional Papers, viz.:-

Report on the Junk Trade for 1891. (No. 5 of 1892). Returns of Arrivals for the year 1891. (No. 6 of 1892). Report of the Acting Captain Superintendent of Police for 1891. Report of the Acting Superintendent of Victoria Gaol for 1891. Report of the Government Central School for Girls for 1891. and the Report of the Commission appointed to consider the system of Quarantine and Quarantine

Regulations as applicable to the Port of Hongkong.

(No. 7 of 1892). (No. 8 of 1892). (No. 4 of 1892).

VOTES REFERRED TO THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Acting Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following Financial Minutes and moved that they be referred to the Finance Committee, viz. :-

C. O. Desp. 4 of 1892.

C.S.O.

316 of 1892.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Twenty-six thousand Nine hun- dred and Thirty-seven Dollars and Fifty-seven Cents, ($26,937.57), equivalent of £3,928.7.11 @2/11 per Dollar, due to the War Department out of the sum of £116,000 contributed for Defence Works.

Government House, Hongkong, 22nd February, 1892. WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Two thousand Eight hundred and Eight Dollars, ($2,808), for the Salary and Allowance of a Temporary Surveyor, whose work is to be in connection with the surveys and information required for the Squatters Board.

Salary per annum, Allowance for Chair,

.$2,520.00 238.00

$ 2,808.00

C. O. Desp. 314 of 1891.

Government House, Hongkong, 15th February, 1892.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Forty-four Dollars, ($44), to cover the increase to the salary of the Clerk and Interpreter to the Magistrate acting as Coroner, being 20 per cent, over his pay, from 1st February, 1892.

Government House, Hongkong, 22nd February, 1892.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

}

VOTES PASSED BY THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Acting Colonial Secretary, laid on the table the Report of the Finance Committee, dated the 25th January, (No. 1), and moved that the following Votes referred to therein be passed, viz. :---

C.S.O.

85 of 1892.

of

A sum of Twenty-three thousand Seven hundred and Fifty-eight Dollars and Ninety-two

Cents, for the following "Extraordinary Public Works" voted for 1891 :—

Vaccine Institute,

Additions to Government House,

District School-Kowloon,

Repair of the rain-storm damage—Yaumati,

.$ 1,687.23

7,070.69

8,000.00

7,001.00

$23,758.92

9925 1891. A sum of Five hundred Dollars, for the purchase of Twelve Pillar Letter-Boxes

to be placed about the town with a view of increasing existing Postal facilities, $

304 of 1891.

C.O. Desp. A sum of Six hundred Dollars, to cover the increase to the salary of the Attorney

General, from 1st January, 1892, sanctioned by the Secretary of State,

C.S.O.

2547 of 1891.

A sum of Six hundred and two Dollars, for the purchase of clothing, bedding

and furniture for the Chinese Lunatic Asylum, .

2622 of 1991. A sum of Six thousand Five hundred Dollars, for lighting with Gas the roads and

streets in the Kowloon Peninsula,

500.00

600.00

.$ 602.00

$ 6,500.00

C.S.0. 2918 of 1891.

A sum of One hundred and Twenty Dollars, for allowance to Chinese Teacher to

Mr. WATSON, Gaol Clerk,.

.$ 120.00

C.S.O.

2989 of 1891.

C.S.O.

2809 of 1891.

A sum of Two thousand Dollars, for Furniture for Government House,

..$ 2,000.00

A sum of Seven thousand and Five hundred Dollars, for "New Streets, Kennedy

Town,"

$ 7,500.00

:

:

The Colonial Treasurer seconded. Question-put and agreed to.

Votes passed.

The Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD asked the following question:

Will the Government lay on the table copies of the correspondence connected with the alteration in

the position of the Attorney General by which he was deprived of private practice?

His Excellency replied and laid on the table the correspondence referred to.

BILL ENTITLED

"AN ORDINANCE TO CONSOLIDATE AND AMEND THE LAW RELATING TO THE GRANT IN THIS COLONY OF LETTERS PATENT FOR INVENTIONS."-The Acting Attorney General moved the first reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE TO MAKE FURTHER PROVISION AS TO THE ISSUE OF Night PassES FOR CHINESE."-The Acting Attorney General moved the first reading of the Bill.

The Registrar General seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

>>

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND ORDINANCE No. 3 OF 1860, No. 15 OF 1885, AND No. 17 OF 1891 IN RELATION TO THE POWER OF THE Governor in COUNCIL TO GRANT CERTAIN LICENCES.' The Acting Attorney General moved the first reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded. Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

JURY LIST FOR 1892.-The Council considered in private the lists of Special and Common Jurors for 1892.

The Acting Colonial Secretary moved that the lists as amended be approved of. The Acting Attorney General seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

ADJOURNMENT.--The Council then adjourned till Monday, the 14th March, 1892.

Read and confirmed, this 14th day of March, 1892.

A. M. THOMSON,

Acting Clerk of Councils.

WILLIAM ROBINSON,

Governor.

i

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 3.

MONDAY, 14TH MARCH, 1892.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR (Sir WILLIAM ROBINSON, K.C.M.G.).

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (GEORGE THOMAS MICHAEL O'BRIEN, C.M.G.).

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

the Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART LOCKHART).

""

32

the Colonial Treasurer, (NORMAN GILBERT MITChell-Innes).

>>

the Surveyor General, (FRANCIS ALFRED COOPER).

وو

>>

""

"}

the Acting Harbour Master, (WILLIAM CHARLES HOLLAND HASTINGS). CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS.

ABSENT:

The Honourable JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 25th February, 1892, were read and confirmed. NEW MEMBER.-The Honourable G. T. M. O'BRIEN took the Oath of Allegiance on taking his seat on the Council as Colonial Secretary.

PAPERS LAID ON THE TABLE.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following Sessional Papers, viz.:-

Annual Report of the Head Master of the Victoria College for 1891. (No. 10 of 1892). Report on a Petition from the Pó Léung Kuk or Society for the Protection of Women and

Children. (No. 11 of 1892).

Returns of Superior and Subordinate Courts for 1891. (No. 9 of 1892).

VOTES REFERRED TO THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following Financial Minutes and moved that they be referred to the Finance Committee, viz. :-

C.5.0.

6 of 1892.

C.S.O.

455 and 479

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One hundred and Eighty Dollars, ($180), for the salary of a Watchman to act also as Interpreter to the Colonial Veterinary Surgeon at $20 per month, from 1st April next.

Government House, Hongkong, 7th March, 1892.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Two hundred and Fifty Dollars, of 1899. ($250), for expenses in connection with Quarantine Commission, viz.:-

Honorarium to the Secretary,

Shorthand writer, for taking a verbatim note of evidence,

200.00

50.00

$ 250.00

C. O. Desp.

7 of 1892.

Government House, Hongkong, 7th March, 1892. WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One hundred and Ninety-two Dollars, ($192), to cover an increase of $96 per annum from the 1st of January, 1891, to the Second Chinese Assistant in the Victoria College, whose office was accidentally omitted from the scheme for a general increase of salaries sanctioned by the Secretary of State's Despatch No. 110 of 19th June, 1890.

Government House, Hongkong, 5th March, 1892.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

9

10

VOTES PASSED BY THE FINANCE COMMITTEE. The Colonial Secretary laid on the table the Reports of the Finance Committee, dated the 25th February and 7th March, (Nos. 2 and 3), and moved that the following Votes referred to therein be passed, viz. :

314 of 1891.

GO.Desp. A sum of Forty-four Dollars, to cover the increase to the salary of the Clerk and Interpreter to the Magistrate acting as Coroner, being 20 per cent. over his pay, from 1st February, 1892, .

C.S.O.

316 of 1892. A sum of Two thousand Eight hundred and Eight Dollars, for the Salary and Allowance of a Temporary Surveyor, whose work is to be in connection with the surveys and information required for the Squatters Board,

4 of 1892.

A sum of Three thousand Nine hundred and Twenty-eight Pounds Seven Shillings and Eleven Pence, due to the War Department out of the sum of £116,000 contributed for Defence Works,

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put as regards the first two votes and agreed to.

44.00

.$ 2,808.00

.£3,928.7.11

The Council divided on the vote of £3,928.7.11 when it was passed by Nine votes to One (Hon. T. H. WHITEHead).

The Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD gave notice that at the next Meeting of Council he would ask the following questions:-

1. Does the Government intend to give effect to the opinions expressed in the Report (dated Hongkong, 20th February, 1892,) of the Commission appointed to consider Quarantine, and Quarantine Regulations, by amending that part of the Merchant Shipping Ordinance of 1891, which deals with Quarantine, and if so when does it propose to do so.

2. With reference to the Honourable the Acting Harbour Master's Report on the Junk Trade of Hongkong for 1891, dated 11th January last, and more particularly to paragraph 17 thereof, which reads as follows:-

"The only controllable causes of the depression of the Junk trade are the suppression of the system of espionage established by the Chinese Customs in Hongkong, and "the preservation of the neutrality of British waters,"

will the Government lay on the table copies of the former correspondence referred to in the said report, and any further information or reports in his possession on the subject of the system of espionage established by the Imperial Chinese Customs in Hongkong, etc.

The Honourable C. P. CHATER asked the following question :-

"Whether it is a fact that the Acting Harbour Master, the Honourable Mr. Hastings, has received

the appointment of Acting Postmaster General during the absence of Mr. Travers."

His Excellency replied.

BILL ENTITLED " AN ORDINANCE TO GIVE EFFECT TO THE CHANGE IN NAME AND STYLE OF THE SURVEYOR GENERAL AND SURVEYOR GENERAL'S DEPARTMENT."-The Attorney General moved the first reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded. Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED

AN ORDINANCE TO CONSOLIDATE AND AMEND THE LAW RELATING TO The grant

IN THIS COLONY OF LETTERS PATENT FOR INVENTIONS."-The Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed and Bill reported with amendments.

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE TO MAKE FURTHER PROVISION AS TO THE ISSUE OF NIGHT PASSES FOR CHINESE."-The Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill.

The Registrar General seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed and Bill reported with amendments.

:

11

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND ORDINANCE No. 3 of 1860, No. 15 or 1885, and No. 17 of 1891 IN RELATION TO THE POWER OF THE GOVERNOR IN COUNCIL TO GRANT CERTAIN LICENCES.' The Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed and Bill reported without amendment.

:

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned till Monday, the 28th March, 1892.

Read and confirmed, this 28th day of March, 1892.

A. M. THOMSON,

Acting Clerk of Councils.

:

WILLIAM ROBINSON,

Governor.

:

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 4. .

MONDAY, 28TH MARCH, 1892.

13

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(Sir WILLIAM ROBINSON, K.C.M.G.).

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (GEORGE THOMAS MICHAEL O'BRIEN, C.M.G.).

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

""

""

""

* * * * R **R

the Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART LOCKHART).

the Colonial Treasurer, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-Innes).

the Surveyor General, (FRANCIS ALFRED COOPER).

the Acting Harbour Master, (WILLIAM CHARLES HOLLAND HASTINgs). CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

Ho KAI, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS.

ABSENT:

The Honourable JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 14th March, 1892, were read and confirmed.

VOTES REFERRED TO THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following Financial Minutes and moved that they be referred to the Finance Committee, viz. :—

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Fifteen thousand Two hundred and Seventy-two Dollars and Eighteen Cents, ($15,272.18), being the difference between the aggregate of the expenditure to 31st of December, 1891, and of the amount provided in the Estimates for 1892, and the total Estimated Cost of the undermentioned Public Works:-

Estimated Cost.

Expenditure, 31st Dec., 1891.

Provided in 1892 Estimates.

Balance.

$

$3

Slaughter House, Kowloon,

6,500

837.26

3,500

2,162.74

Civil Hospital Staff Quarters,

66,000

55,485.67

6,000

4,514.33

Quarters for Superintendent, Botanical and Afforesta- Į

tion Department,

20,100

15,093.34

2,500

2,506.66

District School, Saiyingpoon,

10,000

6,911.55

Nil.

3,088.45

Repairs to St. John's Cathedral,

3,000

Nil.

3,000.00

$ 15,272.18

C.S.O.

618 of 1892.

Government House, Hongkong, 24th March, 1892.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Two thousand Seven hundred and Thirty-three Dollars and Eleven Cents, ($2,733.11), being the difference between the aggregate of the amount spent up to the 31st of December, 1891, ($1,266.89 as against $4,000 estimated expenditure) on the Extension of the Cattle Depôt (Extraordinary Public Works No. 10) and of the amount voted for this work on the Estimates for 1892 ($6,000), and the total estimated cost of the work, viz., $10,000.

Government House, Hongkong, 19th March, 1892.

1

14

C.S.O.

485 of 1892.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Four hundred and Eighty Dollars, ($480), to defray the rent of the Mercantile Marine Office at the Sailors' Home for Twelve months from January 1st to December 31st, 1892.

Government House, Hongkong, 18th March, 1892.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

VOTES PASSED BY THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Colonial Secretary by command of His Excellency the Governor laid on the table the Finance Committee Report dated the 14th March, (No. 4), and moved that the following Votes referred to therein be passed, viz.:

C.S.O.

6 of 1892.

C.S.O.

and

A sum of One hundred and Eighty Dollars, for the salary of a Watchman to act also as Interpreter to the Colonial Veterinary Surgeon at $20 per month, from 1st April next,

4550479 A sum of Two hundred and Fifty Dollars, for expenses in connection with

Quarantine Commission,

of 1892.

7 of 1892.

CO. Dep. A sum of One hundred and Ninety-two Dollars, to cover an increase of $96 per annum from the 1st of January, 1891, to the Second Chinese Assistant in the Victoria College,.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded. Question-put and agreed to.

.$ 180.00

$ 250.00

..........$ 192.00

PAPER LAID ON THE TABLE.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the Report of the Committee of the Legislative Council appointed to consider the advisability of raising a public loan.

The Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD gave notice that at the next Meeting of Council he would ask the following question :-

Referring to Dr. Eitel's report on the Government Central School for Girls and to the Statement therein, that the Government were about to appropriate a site for a new School, will the Government lay upon the table any papers or correspondence on the subject, and state if the Government intend to take the opinion of this Council on the subject before making any appropriation either in money or land in connection therewith.

The Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD asked the following question:

Does the Government intend to give effect to the opinions expressed in the Report (dated Hongkong, 20th February, 1892,) of the Commission appointed to consider Quarantine, and Quarantine Regulations, by amending that part of the Merchant Shipping Ordinance of 1891, which deals with Quarantine, and if so when does it propose to do so.

The Colonial Secretary replied.

BILL ENTITLED “AN ORDINANCE TO GIVE EFFECT TO THE CHANGE IN NAME AND STYLE OF THE SURVEYOR GENERAL AND SURVEYOR GENERAL'S DEPARTMENT.'

."-The Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed and Bill reported without amendment.

The Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

À

15

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE TO CONSOLIDATE AND AMEND THE LAW RELATING TO THE GRANT IN THIS COLONY OF LETTERS PATENT FOR INVENTIONS."-The Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE TO MAKE FURTHER PROVISION AS TO THE ISSUE OF NIGHt Passes FOR CHINESE."--The Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND ORDINANCES No. 3 of 1860, No. 15 or 1885, and No. 17 OF 1891 IN RELATION TO THE POWER OF THE GOVERNOR IN COUNCIL TO GRANT CERTAIN LICENCES. The Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

ADJOURNMENT.—The Council then adjourned till Monday, the 11th April, 1892.

Read and confirmed, this 11th day of April, 1892.

A. M. THOMSON,

Acting Clerk of Councils.

WILLIAM ROBINSON,

Governor.

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 5.

MONDAY, 11TH APRIL, 1892.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR (Sir WILLIAM ROBINSON, K.C.M.G.).

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (GEORGE THOMAS MICHAEL O'BRIEN, C.M.G.).

"

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

the Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART LOCKHART).

""

the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY).

17

>>

A

the Director of Public Works, (FRANCIS ALFRED COOPER).

the Harbour Master, (ROBERT MURRAY RUMSEY).

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELIlios,

ABSENT:

The Honourable JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK,

The Council inet pursuant to adjournment.

NEW MEMBERS.-The Honourable F. H. MAY, Acting Colonial Treasurer, the Honourable F. A. COOPER, Director of Public Works, and the Honourable R. MURRAY RUMSEY, Harbour Master, took the Oath of Allegiance on taking their seats on the Council.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 28th March, 1892, were read and confirmed.

VOTES PASSED BY THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Colonial Secretary by command of His Excellency the Governor laid on the table the Finance Committee Report dated the 28th March, (No. 5), and moved that the following Votes referred to therein be passed, viz.: -

A sum of Fifteen thousand Two hundred and Seventy-two Dollars and Eighteen Cents, being the difference between the aggregate of the expenditure to 31st of December, 1891, and of the amount provided in the Estimates for 1892, and the total Estimated Cost of the under- mentioned Public Works:

Estimated Cost.

Expenditure, 31st Dec., 1891.

Provided in 1892 Estimates.

Balance.

$$

Slaughter House, Kowloon,

6,500

837.26

3,500

2,162.74

Civil Hospital Staff Quarters,

66,000

55,485.67

6,000

4,514.33

Quarters for Superintendent, Botanical and Afforestá-

tion Department,

20,100

15,093.34

2,500

2,506.66

District School, Saiyingpoon,

Repairs to St. John's Cathedral,

10,000

3,000

6,911.55

Nil.

3,088.45

Nil.

3,000.00

$ 15,272.18

C.S.O.

618 of 1892.

A sum of Two thousand Seven hundred and Thirty-three Dollars and Eleven Cents, being the difference between the aggregate of the amount spent up to the 31st of December, 1891, ($1,266.89 as against $4,000 estimated expendi- ture) on the Extension of the Cattle Depôt (Extraordinary Public Works No. 10) and of the amount voted for this work on the Estimates for 1892 ($6,000), and the total estimated cost of the work, viz., $10,000,

..$ 2,733.11

(.5.0.

183 of 1892.

A sum of Four hundred and Eighty Dollars, to defray the rent of the Mercantile Marine Office at the Sailors' Home for Twelve months from January 1st to December 31st, 1892,

.$ 480.00

The Attorney General seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

18

PAPERS. The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following Sessional Papers, viz. :—

Statement showing the total Revenue and Expenditure for the year 1891, and a comparative statement of the Revenue and Expenditure of the Colony in 1890 and 1891. (No. 13 of 1892).

The Sanitary Superintendent's Report for the year 1891. (No. 14 of 1892).

The Sanitary Surveyor's Report for the year 1891. (No. 15 of 1892).

The Colonial Veterinary Surgeon's Report for the year 1891. (No. 16 of 1892).

The Balance Sheet of Water Account for 1891. (No. 17 of 1892).

The Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD gave notice that at the next Meeting of Council he would ask the following questions, viz. :-

(1.) With reference to the Notification No. 289 in the "Government Gazette" of 29th June, 1891, notifying the appointment of Commander W. C. II. Hastings as Superintendent

of the Water Police," will the Government inform the Council,~

66

1. If Commander Hastings has yet assumed the duties of that Office.

2. If not, has Commander Hastings received any emoluments pertaining to the

Office in addition to free residential quarters, Tsim Tsha Tsui, &c.

3. If so, what do they amount to, and what is the estimated value of the free

quarters, &c.

4. Is Commander Hastings still drawing any emoluments in respect of the Office,

and if so how much.

5. If Commander Hastings has not yet assumed the duties of the Office, what does

Government intend to do in respect of the post.

6. Will the Government lay on the table any papers pertaining to the creation of the appointment, and the non-performance of the duties of the Office by Commander Hastings.

(2.) With reference to the grant of $3,000 for Protestant Chaplains, &c., for 1892, voted by the Council in November-December, 1891, will the Government inform the Council, if the Secretary of State has approved of the vote, or any portion of it, if so how much, how is the money to be divided, and what is the principle on which the division is to be made. (3.) With reference to the Memorial and Petition of Bankers, Merchants, Brokers, Traders, and others carrying on business in the Colony of Hongkong, addressed to the Right Honourable Lord Knutsford, Secretary of State for the Colonies, in connection with the Bill entitled “ An Ordinance to amend the Law in respect of the sale of Shares in Com- panies registered under the Companies Ordinances 1865 to 1886, and in other Joint Stock Companies," will the Government lay on the table a copy of any reply thereto, which may have been received.

(4.) Will the Government revert to the conrenient system obtaining in former years, of appen ling to the printed draft of each new Bill statement or memorandum of the objects and reasons for its introduction.

The Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD gave notice that at the next meeting of Council he would move the following resolution, viz. :-

That in consequence of the constantly increasing cost of the Administrative Staff of the Govern- ment of Hongkong, it having risen from $547,650 in 1887, to nearly $800,000 in 1892, exclusive of $65,200 for pensions, and that the Colony's Revenue in the near future is more likely to decrease than expand, Government appsint a Commission selected from the Un- Official Members of Councils, and the general community, with the Honourable Mr. O'Brien, the Colonial Secretary, as Chairman, with full powers to enquire into and report with a view to retrenchment on the working of all the Departments of the Government, and as to the desirability or otherwise of the redistribution of work, the amalgamation of certain offices, the increasing of the hours of the official day, privileges in the way of leave, &c., &c. The Honourable C. P. CHATER gave notice that at next meeting of Council he would ask the following question :-

Will the Government lay upon the table a copy of any reply received to the petitions addressed to the Secretary of State for the Colonies by European and Chinese Bankers, Merchants, Shipowners and Traders residing in the Colony, praying for the repeal of the Ordinance to restrict the Loading and Unloading of cargo on Sunday in the Waters of the Colony,

19

The Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD asked the following question

Referring to Dr. Eitel's report on the Government Central School for Girls and to the Statement therein, that the Government were about to appropriate a site for a new School, will the Government lay upon the table any papers or correspondence on the subject, and state if the Government intend to take the opinion of this Council on the subject before making any appropriation either in money or land in connection therewith.

The Colonial Secretary replied.

6

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND ORDINANCE No. 15 or 1888, ENTITLED 'THE RATING ORDINANCE, 1888,' AND ORDINANCE No. 16 OF 1890 ENTITLED THE WATERWORKS ORDINANCE, 1890. "The Colonial Secretary moved the first reading of the Bill.

The Attorney General seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

6

BILL ENTITLED " AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE BANKRUPTCY ORDINANCE, 1891.'"--The Attorney General moved the first reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE TO PROVIDE FOR THE DUE PERFORMANCE OF DIVINE WORSHIP AND OTHER SERVICES IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE RITES OF THE CHURCH OF ENGLAND AT ST. JOHN's CATHEDRAL CHURCH AT VICTORIA IN THIS COLONY AND ELSEWHERE, TO INCORPORATE A CHURCH BODY, TO VEST THE SAID CATHEDRAL IN SUCH BODY AND FOR OTHER PURPOSES IN CONNECTION THEREWITH.” The Attorney General moved the first reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED

P

"AN ORDINANCE FOR THE ESTABLISHMENT AND INCORPORATION OF THE CHINESE SOCIETY FOR THE PROTECTION OF WOMEN AND CHILDREN COMMONLY KNOWN AS THE Pó Léung KUK.'"-The Registrar General noved the first reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned till Monday, the 25th April, 1892.

Read and confirmed, this 25th day of April, 1892.

A. M. THOMSON,

Acting Clerk of Councils.

WILLIAM ROBINSON,

Governor.

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 6.

MONDAY, 25TH APRIL, 1892.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(Sir WILLIAM ROBINSON, K.C.M.G.).

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (GEORGE THOMAS MICHAEL O'BRIEN, C.M.G.).

""

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

the Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART LOCKHART).

17

the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (FRANCIS HENRY May).

21

3

2.2

22.

the Director of Public Works, (FRANCIS ALFRED COOPER).

the Harbour Master, (ROBERT MURRAY RUMSEY).

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

HO KAI, M.B., C. M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELIlios.

ABSENT:

The Honourable JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 11th April, 1892, were read and confirmed.

1

PAPERS. The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following Sessional Papers, viz. :-

Despatch No. 66 of the 15th March, 1892, from the Secretary of State for the Colonies on the resolution of condolence by the Legislative Council on the occasion of the death of the Duke of Clarence and Avondale. (No. 18 of 1892).

The Registrar General's Report for the year 1891. (No. 19 of 1892).

The Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD gave notice that at the next Meeting of Council he would ask the following question :-

Will the Government lay on the table copy of the following papers:—

1. Petition to Government from Fung Ming Shan and other Chinese, dated about 9th November, 1878, for permission to form an Anti-Kidnapping Association with power to employ detectives.

2. Report or recommendations of the Committee (consisting of Messrs. C. V. Creagh, J. J. Francis, W. M. Deane, and E. J. Eitel) appointed by the Government to investigate the matter, and the Statutes drafted by Mr. J. J. Francis.

3. Correspondence from the Government to Lord Kimberley, Secretary of State for Colonies,

in connection with the subject, and Secretary of State's Despatches in reply.

4. Any further correspondence between the Government and the Secretary of State for the Colonies in connection with the Pó Leung Kuk, and the giving of legal status and power to the Society.

The Honourable E. R. BELILIOS gave notice that at the next Meeting of Council he would ask the following question:

Will the Government acquaint the Council with the number of convictions made and the descrip- tion of punishments inflicted in regard to the buying and the selling of Manila Lottery Tickets in this Colony since the recently enacted Gambling Ordinance has been in force.

The Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD asked the following questions:-

(1.) With reference to the Notification No. 289 in the "Government Gazette" of 29th June. 1891, notifying the appointment of Commander W. C. H. Hastings as "Superintendent of the Water Police," will the Government inform the Council,-

1. If Commander Hastings has yet assumed the duties of that Office.

2. If not, has Commander Hastings received any emoluments pertaining to the

Office in addition to free residential quarters, Tsim Tsha Tsui, &c.

22

3. If so, what do they amount to, and what is the estimated value of the free

quarters, &c.

4. Is Commander Hastings still drawing any emoluments in respect of the Office,

and if so how much.

5. If Commander Hastings has not yet assumed the duties of the Office, what does

Government intend to do in respect of the post.

:

6. Will the Government lay on the table any papers pertaining to the creation of the appointment, and the non-performance of the duties of the Office by Commander Hastings.

(2.) With reference to the grant of $3,000 for Protestant Chaplains, &c., for 1892, voted by the Council in November-December, 1891, will the Government inform the Council, if the Secretary of State has approved of the vote, or any portion of it, if so how much, how is the money to be divided, and what is the principle on which the division is to be made. (3.) With reference to the Memorial and Petition of Bankers, Merchants, Brokers, Traders, and others carrying on business in the Colony of Hongkong, addressed to the Right Honourable Lord Knutsford, Secretary of State for the Colonies, in connection with the Bill entitled "An Ordinance to amend the Law in respect of the sale of Shares in Com- panies registered under the Companies Ordinances 1865 to 1886, and in other Joint Stock Companies," will the Government lay on the table a copy of any reply thereto, which may have been received.

(4.) Will the Government revert to the convenient system obtaining in former years, of appending to the printed draft of each new Bill statement or memorandum of the objects and reasons for its introduction.

The Colonial Secretary replied and laid on the table the papers referred to in questions 1 and 3. The Honourable C. P. CHATER asked the following question:-

Will the Government lay upon the table a copy of any reply received to the petitions addressed to the Secretary of State for the Colonies by European and Chinese Bankers, Merchants, Shipowners and Traders residing in the Colony, praying for the repeal of the Ordinance to restrict the Loading and Unloading of cargo on Sunday in the Waters of the Colony.

The Colonial Secretary replied and laid on the table the despatches referred to.

{

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE FOR THE ESTABLISHMENT AND INCORPORATION OF THE CHINESE SOCIETY FOR THE PROTECTION OF WOMEN AND CHILDREN COMMONLY KNOWN AS THE PÓ LEUNG KUK.'"-His Excellency addressed the Council and it was agreed to postpone further consideration of the Bill.

BILL ENTITLED <<

AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND ORDINANCE No. 4 of 1865, RELATING TO OFFENCES AGAINST THE PERSON."-The Attorney General moved the first reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

THE

BILL ENTITLED 16 AN ORDINANCE TO REPEAL ORDINANCE No. 19 OF 1890 AND TO AMEND (( DANGEROUS GOODS ORDINANCE, 1873."-The Attorney General moved the first reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

6

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND ORDINANCE No. 15 OF 1888, entitled 'THE RATING ORDINANCE, 1888,' AND ORDINANCE No. 16 OF 1890 ENTITLED THE WATERWORKS ORDINANCE, 1890.'"The Colonial Secretary moved the second reading of the Bill.

The Attorney General seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council in Committee on the Bill,

Council resumed and Bill reported without amendment.

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND 'THE BANKRUPTCY ORDINANCE, 1891."—The Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed and Bill reported with amendments.

23

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE TO PROVIDE FOR THE DUE PERFORMANCE OF DIVINE WORSHIP AND OTHER SERVICES IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE RITES OF THE CHURCH OF ENGLAND AT ST. JOHN'S CATHEDRAL CHURCH AT VICTORIA IN THIS COLONY AND ELSEWHERE, TO INCORPORATE A CHURCH BODY, TO VEST THE SAID CATHEDRAL IN SUCH BODY AND FOR OTHER PURPOSES IN CONNECTION THEREWITH. The Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed and Bill reported with amendments.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned till Monday, the 9th May, 1892.

"

Read and confirmed, this 9th day of May, 1892.

A. M. THOMSON, Acting Clerk of Councils.

WILLIAM ROBINSON,

Governor.

295

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 7.

MONDAY, 9TH MAY, 1892.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(Sir WILLIAM - ROBINSON, K.C.M.G.).

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (GEORGE THOMAS MICHAEL O'BRIEN, C.M.G.).

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

the Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART LOCKHART).

the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY).

""

>>

the Director of Public Works, (FRANCIS ALFRED Cooper).

95

the Harbour Master, (ROBERT MURRAY RUMSEY).

""

2

>>

2)

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

Ho KAI, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS.

ABSENT:

The Honourable JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 25th April, 1892, were read and confirmed. PAPERS. The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following Sessional Papers, viz. :-

The Acting Harbour Master's Report for 1891.. (No. 20 of 1892.)

The Postmaster General's Report for 1891. (No. 21 of 1892.)

VOTES REFERRED TO THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following Financial Minutes and moved that they be referred to the Finance Committee, viz. :-

C.S.0.

1004 of 1892,

C.S.O.

693 of 1892.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One hundred and Thirty Dollars, ($130), for the purchase of a new boat for the use of Swatow Postal Agent.

Government House, Hongkong, 4th May, 1892.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Fifteen hundred Dollars, ($1,500), for the purchase of furniture for the new quarters for the Nursing Staff at the Government - Civil Hospital.

The expenditure will be more than covered by a surplus on the vote for the building. Government House, Hongkong, 22nd April, 1892.

The Attorney General seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

The Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD asked the following questions

1. Will the Government lay on the table copy of the following papers:

(a) Petition to Government from Fung Ming Shan and other Chinese, dated about 9th November, 1878, for permission to form an Anti-Kidnapping Association with power to employ detectives.

(b) Report or recommendations of the Committee (consisting of Messrs. C. V. Creagh, J. J. Francis, W. M. Deane, and E. J. Eitel) appointed by the Government to investigate the matter, and the Statutes drafted by Mr. J. J. Francis.

(c) Correspondence from the Government to Lord Kimberley, Secretary of State for Colonies,

in connection with the subject, and Secretary of State's Despatches in reply.

(d) Any further correspondence between the Government and the Secretary of State for the Colonies in connection with the Pó Leung Kuk, and the giving of legal status and power to the Society.

1

26

2. Will the Government lay on the table a statement shewing-

(a) The number of convictions for offences against the Opium Ordinance from the date of

the commencement of the existing Opium Farm to 30th September last;

(b) The amount of fines levied;

(c) The amount of fines collected ;

(d) The number of persons imprisoned in default of payment of fine with the periods of

their imprisonment and the cost to Government of their detention in Gaols;

(e) The number of persons now in prison for such offences; and

(f) The quantity of opium seized and confiscated during the same period and how disposed of. The Colonial Secretary replied and laid on the table the statement referred to in question 2. The Honourable E. R. BELILIOS asked the following question

Will the Government acquaint the Council with the number of convictions made and the descrip- tion of punishments inflicted in regard to the buying and the selling of Manila Lottery Tickets in this Colony since the recently enacted Gambling Ordinance has been in force. The Colonial Secretary replied and laid on the table a return in answer to the question. The Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD moved the following resolution:-

That in consequence of the constantly increasing cost of the Administrative Staff of the Govern- ment of Hongkong, it having risen from $547,650 in 1887 to nearly $800,000 in 1892, exclusive of $65,200 for pensions, and that the Colony's Revenue in the near future is more likely to decrease than expand, Government appoint a Commission selected from the Un- Official Members of Councils, and the general community, with the Honourable Mr. O'Brien, the Colonial Secretary, as Chairman, with full powers to enquire into and report with a view to retrenchment on the working of all the Departments of the Government, and as to the desirability or otherwise of the redistribution of work, the amalgamation of certain offices, the increasing of the hours of the official day, privileges in the way of leave, &c., &c.

The Honourable C. P. CHATER seconded.

The Council divided when there voted--

}

For the motion.

Honourable E. R. BELILIOS.

"}

T. H. WHITEHEAD. HO KAI.

C. P. CHATER.

The motion was therefore lost.

Against the motion.

The Harbour Master.

The Director of Public Works. The Acting Colonial Treasurer. The Registrar General. The Attorney General. The Colonial Secretary. His Excellency.

The Honourable E. R. BELILIOS moved the following resolution :-

That the Government shall take early and effective steps to put a final stop to the sale and purchase of Manila Lottery Tickets in this Colony and in the event of the provisions of the Gambling Ordinance dealing with this question being found insufficient for the purpose the law shall be so amended as to secure the complete abolition of this evil.

The Honourable Ho KAI seconded.

After discussion the motion was withdrawn.

BILL ENTITLED " AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE MERCHANT SHIPPING CONSOLIDATION ORDINANCE, 1891.'"The Attorney General moved the first reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE FOR THE INCORPORATION OF THE CHAIRMAN OF THE COMMITTEE OF THE DIOCESAN SCHOOL and ORPHANAGE.-The Council agreed to postpone further consideration of the Bill till next meeting.

BILL ENTITLED " AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND ORDINANCE No. 4 OF 1865, RELATING TO OFFENCES AGAINST THE PERSON."-The Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resuined and Bill reported without amendment.

27

1

*

BILL ENTITLED " AN ORDINANCE TO REPEAL ORDINANCE No. 19 OF 1890 AND TO AMEND THE DANGEROUS GOODS ORDINANCE, 1873.'"-The Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill. Dangerous

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed and Bill reported with amendments.

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND ORDINANCE No. 15 OF 1888, ENTITLED 'THE RATING ORDINANCE, 1888,' AND ORDINANCE No. 16 OF 1890 ENTITLED THE WATERWORKS ORDINANCE, 1890.'"The Colonial Secretary moved that the Bill be re-committed.

The Director of Public Works seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed and Bill reported with amendment.

The Colonial Secretary moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Director of Public Works seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND 'THE BANKRUPTCY ORDINANCE, 1891.'"-The Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

BILL ENTITLED 66 AN ORDINANCE TO PROVIDE FOR THE DUE PERFORMANCE OF DIVINE WORSHIP AND OTHER SERVICES IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE RITES OF THE CHURCH OF ENGLAND AT ST. JOHN'S CATHEDRAL CHURCH AT VICTORIA IN THIS COLONY AND ELSEWHERE, TO INCORPORATE A CHURCH BODY, TO VEST THE SAID CATHEDRAL IN SUCH BODY AND FOR OTHER PURPOSES IN CONNECTION THEREWITH.' The Attorney General moved that the Bill be re-committed.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question--put and agreed to.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed and progress reported.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned till Monday, the 16th May, 1892.

Read and confirmed, this 16th day of May, 1892.

A. M. THOMSON,

Acting Clerk of Councils.

WILLIAM ROBINSON,

Governor.

1

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 8.

MONDAY, 16TH MAY, 1892.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(Sir WILLIAM ROBINSON, K.C.M.G.).

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (GEORGE THOMAS MICHAEL O'BRIEN, C.M.G.).

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

29

""

"1

the Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART Lockhart).

>>

>>

>1

""

>>

the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY).

the Director of Public Works, (FRANCIS ALFRED COOPER).

the Harbour Master, (ROBERT MURRAY RUMSEY).

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS.

ABSENT:

The Honourable JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 9th May, 1892, were read and confirmed.

VOTES REFERRED TO THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following Financial Minutes and moved that they be referred to the Finance Committee, viz. :-

C.S.O.

402 of 1892.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One thousand Nine hundred and Eighty-one Dollars, ($1,981), for repairs to Health Officer's Steam-launch Blanche, viz. :~~

For general overhaul and repairs,

For providing a launch while the repairs are being executed, To caulk and re-copper her all over,

New water tanks, repair to propeller blades, boiler, &c.,

$ 891.00

70.00

500:00

520.00

$ 1,981.00

C.$.O. 799 of 1892.

Government House, Hongkong, 6th May, 1892.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Two thousand Dollars, ($2,000), for "Drawback and refund of Revenue."

It has been the practice hitherto to pay refunds from the collections under the respective heads of receipt. As this practice is contrary to regulation and is about to be discontinued a vote is required to cover such payments.

Governinent House, Hongkong, 12th May, 1892.

The Attorney General seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

VOTES PASSED BY THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the Report of the Finance Committee dated the 9th May, (No. 6), and moved that the following Votes referred to therein be passed, viz. :

1004 of 1892.

C.S.O. A sum of One hundred and Thirty Dollars, for the purchase of a new boat for the

use of Swatow Postal Agent,

C.5.0.

of

.$ 130.00

.......$ 1,500.00

6992. A sum of Fifteen hundred Dollars, for the purchase of furniture for the new quarters

for the Nursing Staff at the Government Civil Hospital,..

The Attorney General seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

.30

PAPER.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the Supreme Court Returns for 1891. (No. 22 of 1892.)

The Colonial Secretary moved the following resolution :---

The Council having considered the following statement by the Superintendent of the Botanical and Afforestation Department resolves that it is expedient to incur the liability therein proposed

to be incurred in 1894.

Statement showing Disbursements for Forestry Works in the years 1893 and 1894 for which contracts have been already made, and those for which contracts now require to be made.

Estimated Total Cost.

To be disbursed in

1892.

To be disbursed in

1893.

To be disbursed in

1894.

Approved by Legislative Council, C.S.O. No. 1240 of

1891:-

1. Rearing trees in situ,

2. Rearing trees to be planted in 1893,

$

2,800

1,500

1,400 750

1,400

750

1

3. Planting the trees reared under No. 2,

2,400

Contracts to be now made which require approval:-

4. Rearing trees in situ,

900

5. Rearing trees to be planted in 1894, 6. Planting the trees to be reared under No. 5........

900

1,600

$

7,700

2,150

4,550

900

900

1,600

3,400

The works under headings 4, 5 and 6 now require the approval of the Legislative Council in order that contracts for them may be made, those under headings 1, 2 and 3 have already been sanctioned and are now in

progress.

CHARLES FORD,

Superintendent, Botanical and Ãfforestation Department.

The Attorney General seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

The Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD asked the following question :---

Will the Government publish in the "Government Gazette" or lay on the table a list of the Wharves, public and private, in respect of which a sum of $180,000 was added by the Government to the cost of the Praya Reclamation, as appears from the Colonial Secretary's letter of the 19th February, 1889, to the Honourable C. P. Chater, and state the amount of compensation assessed in respect of each.

The Colonial Secretary replied.

The Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD gave notice of the following resolution :—

That the Government publish in the "Government Gazette" or lay on the table a list of the Wharves, public and private, in respect of which a sum of $180,000 was added by the Government to the cost of the Praya Reclamation, as appears from the Colonial Secretary's letter of the 19th February, 1889, to the Honourable C. P. Chater, and state the amount of compensation assessed in respect of each.

BILL ENTITLED

"AN ORDINANCE TO PROVIDE MEANS FOR ASCERTAINING THE AMOUNTS TO BE PAID BY WAY OF COMPENSATION IN RESPECT OF THE WHARVES AND PIERS ALONG THE LINE OF THE PRAYA RECLAMATION, TO FIX THE PERIODS FOR THE PAYMENT THEREOF AND FOR OTHER PURPOSES IN CONNECTION THEREWITH."-The Attorney General moved the first reading of the Bill.

The Honourable C. P. CHATER seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED)

"AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE MERCHANT SHIPPING CONSOLIDATION ORDI- NANCE, 1891.'"-The Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed and Bill reported with amendinents.

31

BILL ENTITLED

AN ORDINANCE FOR THE INCORPORATION OF THE CHAIRMAN OF THE COMMITTEE OF THE DIOCESAN SCHOOL AND ORPHANAGE."-The Honourable C. P. CHATER moved the second reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed and Bill reported with amendments.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO PROVIDE FOR THE DUE PERFORMANCE OF DIVINE WORSHIP AND OTHER SERVICES IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE RITES OF THE CHURCH OF England at St. John's CATHEDRAL CHURCH AT VICTORIA IN THIS COLONY AND ELSEWHERE, TO INCORPORATE A CHURCH BODY, TO VEST THE SAID CATHEDRAL IN SUCH BODY AND FOR OTHER PURPOSES IN CONNECTION THERE- WITH. "-Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed and Bill reported with amendments.

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND ORDINANCE No. 4 of 1865, RELATING TO OFFENCES AGAINST THE PERSON."-The Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

·

BILL ENTITLED " AN ORDINANCE TO REPEAL ORDINANCE No. 19 OF 1890 AND TO AMEND THE DANGEROUS GOODS ORDINANCE, 1873.'"-- -The Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question--put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

ADJOURNMENT.—The Council then adjourned till Monday, the 23rd May, 1892.

Read and confirmed, this 23rd day of May, 1892.

A. M. THOMSON,

Acting Clerk of Councils.

WILLIAM ROBINSON,

Governor.

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 9.

MONDAY, 23RD MAY, 1892.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(Sir WILLIAM ROBINSON, K.C.M.G.).

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (GEORGE THOMAS MICHAEL O'BRIEN, C.M.G.).

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

the Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART LOCKHART).

""

>>

""

the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY).

2)

the Director of Public Works, (FRANCIS ALFRED COOPER).

33

2)

the Harbour Master, (ROBERT MURRAY RUMSEY). CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS.

ABSENT:

The Honourable JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 16th May, 1892, were read and confirmed.

VOTES PASSED BY THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the Report of the Finance Committee dated the 16th May, (No. 7), and moved that the following Votes referred to therein be passed, viz.:—

402 of 1892.

C.S.O. A sum of One thousand Nine hundred and Eighty-one Dollars, for repairs to Health

Officer's Steam-launch Blanche,

..$ 1,981.00

A sum of Two thousand Dollars, for "Drawbacks and refunds of Revenue,"

....$ 2,000.00

C.S.O.

793 of 1892.

The Attorney General seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

PAPERS. The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the Blue Book for 1891 together with the Report on the Blue Book and Departmental Reports for 1891, and the Report of the Director of the Observatory for 1891.

PETITION.-Read a petition from the Hongkong, Canton and Macao Steam-boat Company, Limited, the Douglas Steam-ship Company, Limited, and the China Navigation Company, Limited, praying to be heard by Counsel on the second reading of the Bill entitled An Ordinance to provide means for ascertaining the amounts to be paid by way of compensation in respect of the Wharves and Piers along the line of the Praya Reclamation, to fix the periods for the payment thereof and for other purposes

in connection therewith.

The Council agreed that the petition lie on the table.

The Honourable C. P. CHATER asked the following question :-

•" Unless per-

Referring to Government Notification No. 204 of the 4th May, 1892, reading:

mission from the Government has been first obtained riding over that part of the Wongnei- chung Recreation Ground which is enclosed within the Race Course and the training track is prohibited until further notice," will the Government state whether this notification is in consequence of their intention to complete forthwith the preparation for purposes of recreation of the ground mentioned, or if not what is proposed to be done in the matter of putting this ground in order.

The Colonial Secretary replied.

The Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD moved the following resolution :--

That the Government publish in the "Government Gazette" or lay on the table a list of the Wharves, public and private, in respect of which a sum of $180,000 was added by the Government to the cost of the Praya Reclamation, as appears from the Colonial Secretary's letter of the 19th February, 1889, to the Honourable C. P. Chater, and state the amount of compensation assessed in respect of each.

The Honourable C. P. CHATER seconded.

The Colonial Secretary replied, and the matter dropped.

34

The Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD moved the following resolution :-

That with reference to the Honourable the Acting Harbour Master's Report for 1891, dated 21st January last, and laid before the Council on the 9th instant, the Government lay on the table a copy of the Despatches in connection with the Junk trade, received from Mr. J. McLeavy Brown, the Commissioner of the Chinese Imperial Maritime Customs for Kowloon, dated 10th and 14th March last.

The Honourable Ho KAI seconded.

The Colonial Secretary replied and the motion was withdrawn.

BILL ENTITLED " AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND 'THE MERCHANT SHIPPING CONSOLIDATION Ordinance, 1891.'"-The Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

BILL ENTITLED " AN ORDINANCE FOR THE INCORPORATION OF THE CHAIRMAN OF THE COMMITTEE OF THE DIOCESAN SCHOOL AND ORPHANAGE."-The Honourable C. P. CHATER moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

BILL ENTITLED

"AN ORDINANCE TO PROVIDE FOR THE DUE PERFORMANCE OF DIVINE WORSHIP AND OTHER SERVICES IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE RITES OF THE CHURCH OF ENGLAND AT ST. JOHN'S CATHEDRAL CHURCH AT VICTORIA IN THIS COLONY AND ELSEWHERE, TO INCORPORATE A CHURCH BODY, TO VEST THE SAID CATHEDRAL IN SUCH BODY AND FOR OTHER PURPOSES IN CONNECTION THEREWITH.' The Attorney General moved that the Bill be re-committed.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed and Bill reported with amendment.

The Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

"

The Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD moved that the Bill be read a third time that day six months. The Honourable C. P. CHATER seconded.

The Council divided when the amendment was lost by three to seven votes.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO PROVIDE MEANS FOR ASCERTAINING THE AMOUNTS TO BE PAID BY WAY OF COMPENSATION IN RESPECT OF THE WHARVES AND PIERS ALONG THE LINE OF THE PRAYA RECLAMATION, TO FIX THE PERIODS FOR THE PAYMENT THEREOF AND FOR OTHER PURPOSES IN CONNECTION THEREWITH."-The Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

The Honourable C. P. CHATER moved that further consideration of the Bill be postponed to a date to be fixed by His Excellency.

The Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD seconded.

The Council agreed to the amendment.

The Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD moved that on the second reading of the Bill the owners and occupiers of piers and wharves be heard by Counsel.

The Honourable HO KAI seconded.

The President ruled the motion out of order.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned till Monday, the 6th June, 1892.

Read and confirmed, this 7th day of June, 1892.

A. M. THOMSON,

Acting Clerk of Councils.

WILLIAM ROBINSON,

Governor.

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 10.

TUESDAY, 7TH JUNE, 1892.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR (Sir WILLIAM ROBINSON, K.C.M.G.).

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (GEORGE THOMAS MICHAEL O'BRIEN, C.M.G.).

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

">

the Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART LOCKHART).

the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY).

the Director of Public Works, (FRANCIS ALFRED Cooper).

"

""

};

the Harbour Master, (ROBERT MURRAY RUMSEY).

""

""

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS.

ABSENT:

The Honourable JAMES Johnstone KeSWICK.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 23rd May, 1892, were read and confirmed.

The Honourable E. R. BELILIOS took the Oath of Allegiance on the confirmation of his appoint- ment as a Member of the Council.

VOTES REFERRED TO THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following Financial Minutes and moved that they be referred to the Finance Committee, viz. :-

C.S.O.

1314 of 1892.

C.S.0.

810 of 1892.

C.S.O.

947 of 1892.

-

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Fifteen hundred Dollars, ($1,500), being supplementary provision to defray incidental expenses in the Police Department.

The Department has now to pay for its water and disinfectants which were formerly supplied gratis, and the extra expenditure was not foreseen in framing the Estimates for the current year.

Government House, Hongkong, 31st May, 1892.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Three thousand Eight hundred and Sixty-eight Dollars, ($3,868), for the expenditure required for an improved system of signalling the approach of vessels to the port as follows:-

Completing direct telegraphic communication between Post Office and Gap

Rock,

Completing direct telegraphic communication between Post Office and

Kowloon,

Providing quarters at the Gap Rock,

>>

at Cape D'Aguilar,

Three clerks (for 3 months),

Two signalmen (for 3 months),

Government House, Hongkong, 4th June, 1892.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

$ 150.00

700.00

2,000.00

700.00

270.00

48.00

$ 3,868.00

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Five hundred and Eighty-seven Dollars, and Thirty-three Cents, ($587.33), being the difference between the amount voted in the Estimates for this year and the actual sum due to the Telegraph Company, for the cost of Telegraph Cable, aërial line and Morse instruments connecting the Gap Rock with the Harbour Office at Hongkong.

Amount due

Estimated for

.$87,253.33 86,666.00

35

Government House, Hongkong, 19th May, 1892.

$ 587.33

36

C.3.0.

1323 of 1892.

I.C.S.O.

1295 of 1892.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Twelve hundred Dollars, ($1,200), to defray the cost of Clothing for the Gaol Staff and Prisoners not provided for in the Estimates for the current year.

Government House, Hongkong, 3rd June, 1892.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Five thousand Dollars, ($5,000), as supplementary provision for the cost of passages and bonuses in lieu of passage, in the Police Department.

Previous to this year bonuses were paid by the Treasury out of the vote for Pensions, Retired Allowances and Gratuities.

""

In this year's Estimates the item "bonuses was transferred to the Police Department and coupled with "passages," but no corresponding increase made to the latter vote.

The vote now asked for is merely to effect a matter of account, as the Treasury vote will be relieved by the amount added to the Police vote.

Government House, Hongkong, 1st June, 1892.

The Attorney General seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

PAPERS.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the Report of the Superintendent of the Botanical and Afforestation Department for 1891. (No. 25 of 1892.)

1

The Director of Public Works laid on the table the Report of the Public Works Committee, dated the 23rd May (No. 1), and moved that it be adopted by the Council.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

The Honourable E. R. BELILIOS asked the following question :-

Will the Government state whether the subject of establishing a branch observatory at the Peak has been under consideration, and if so, for what reason the work has been deferred or abandoned.

The Colonial Secretary replied.

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE TO PROVIDE MEANS FOR ASCERTAINING THE AMOUNTS TO BE PAID BY WAY OF COMPENSATION IN RESPECT OF THE WHARVES AND PIERS ALONG THE LINE OF THE PRAYA RÉCLAMATION, TO FIX THE PERIODS FOR THE PAYMENT THEREOF AND FOR OTHER PURPOSES IN CONNEC- TION THEREWITH."-The Council agreed to postpone consideration of the second reading of the Bill.

His Excellency addressed the Council.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned sine die.

Read and confirmed, this 14th day of June, 1892.

A. M. THOMSON,

Acting Clerk of Councils.

WILLIAM ROBINSON,

Governor.

:

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 11.

TUESDAY, 14TH JUNE, 1892.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(Sir WILLIAM ROBINSON, K.C.M.G.).

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (GEORGE THOMAS MICHAEL O'BRIEN, C.M.G.).

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

""

the Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART LOCKHART).

""

the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (FRANCIS HENRY MAY).

""

the Director of Public Works, (FRANCIS ALFred Cooper).

>>

the Harbour Master, (ROBERT MURRAY RUMSEY).

37

"}

""

";

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS.

ABSENT:

The Honourable JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

The Council met pursuant to notice.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 7th June, 1892, were read and confirmed.

His Excellency the Governor proposed that the Council should give a tangible proof of its sym- pathy with Mauritius in the misfortune which had overtaken it in consequence of the recent hurricane which had caused such destruction to life and property, and requested the Colonial Secretary to move a resolution to the effect that Rs 10,000 should be voted for that purpose.

The Colonial Secretary then moved the following resolution :-

That a vote be passed by this Council for such a sum as would produce Rs 10,000 in Mauritius

for the relief of the sufferers from the recent calamity in that island.

The Honourable C. P. CHATER seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

ADJOURNMENT.--The Council then adjourned sine die.

Read and confirmed, this 16th day of November, 1892.

F. H. MAY,

Acting Clerk of Councils.

WILLIAM ROBINSON,

Governor.

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 12.

WEDNESDAY, 16TH NOVEMBER, 1892.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR (Sir WILLIAM ROBINSON, K.C.M.G.).

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (GEORGE THOMAS MICHAEL O'BRIEN, C.M.G.).

the Acting Attorney General, (ANDREW JOHN LEACH).

""

""

>>

the Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART LOCKHART). the Colonial Treasurer, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-Innes).

the Director of Public Works, (FRANCIS ALFRED COOPER).

39

""

>>

""

the Harbour Master, (ROBERT MURRAY RUMSEY).

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS.

JAMES JARDINE BELL-IRVING.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 14th June, 1892, were read and confirmed. NEW MEMBERS.-The Honourable A. J. LEACH, Acting Attorney General, and The Honourable J. J. BELL-IRVING took the oath of allegiance on their appointment to a seat on the Council.

His Excellency then addressed the Council as follows:

HONOURABLE GENTLEMEN OF THE LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL,

I have much pleasure in meeting you again for the transaction of public business, after a vacation which you have doubtless enjoyed.

I must confess, however, that it is not an unmixed pleasure, as I have to lay before you and to endeavour to explain a state of affairs, so far as Finance is concerned, which cannot be considered entirely satisfactory.

On the 25th January last, adopting the Estimates for 1892 as handed down to me, and making allowance for a loss of $114,000 on the Opium Farm, I remarked that the anticipated Revenue of $2,144,178 would not be secured, but that we might expect about $2,030,178. The ordinary expenditure was estimated at $1,773,918 leaving a possible surplus of $256,260. It appears likely that the total receipts for 1892 will be about $2,067,216. Of this sum, however, at least $50,000 is due to the reduction of the arrears of taxes outstanding at the end of 1891, through their energetic collection by the Treasurer's Department during the current year. $20,000 has also been received from the Military Authorities for the Lazaretto. These sums,

the latter being purely a casual receipt, cannot be regarded as Actual Revenue, though they come within the year's receipts. The same may also be said of the deferred. payments of the Opium Farmer; but deducting the two first items from the $2,067,216 before mentioned, we find that the true Revenue of 1892 will be $1,997,216, approximately, or $33,000 less than was estimated by me on the 25th January last.

The Estimate of Expenditure for 1892 was as follows:-

Ordinary Expenditure $1,773,918, Public Works Extraordinary $680,078, making a total of $2,453,996.

The Ordinary Expenditure will be about $1,782,000 and Public Works Extraordinary $583,000, making a total of $2,365,000. Supposing $2,067,216 to be the actual receipts. of 1892 and $2,365,000 the total Expenditure, Ordinary and Extraordinary, we have a deficit on the year's transactions of $297,784. On the other hand, allowing that the Ordinary Revenue, as distinct from Receipts, is $1,997,216 and the Ordinary Expenditure $1,782,000, we find that there is an excess of $215,216 of Ordinary Revenue over Ordinary Expenditure. This surplus unfortunately, however, is subject to further reduction for the following reasons.

A practice has been in force here for many years past in dealing with the public funds, which without full explanation must always have rendered the annual statement of the financial position of the Colony more or less unintelligible, if not misleading, to Honourable Members.

1

40

It has been usual to pay the charges for Establishments for the month of December and other Expenditure incurred towards the close of the year from the respective votes for the following year.

As regards the charges for Establishments the amount does not probably vary much from year to year, but the "Other Expenditure" always varies. The result has been, as you will easily understand, that the position of the Colony in regard to its finances has never in recent years been as correctly presented to Honourable Members as it might have been,

In the accounts which will be laid before you in future you will find that the Expend- iture will, as far as possible, be brought to account against the votes of the year in which it was incurred.

The adjustment will increase the Ordinary Expenditure of the current year by an amount which is estimated at $100,000, and the estimated surplus of Revenue over Ordinary Expenditure will be accordingly reduced from $215,216 to $115,216. If, as might fairly be done, the opium arrears were deducted from Revenue and dealt with as a casual receipt, the estimated surplus would be still further reduced from $115,216 to $65,216.

I now lay on the table the Estimates for 1893. They have been very carefully prepared. The Estimate of Revenue is $1,906,396, and the Estimate of Expenditure, i.e. Ordinary Expenditure, $1,899,611, leaving a possible surplus of $6,785. This Expenditure, however, includes a new item of $40,000 to which I will presently refer.

It is evident from these figures that as I premised in January, a Loan has become an absolute necessity. In the absence of such assistance, the only alternative will be to stop all further execution of Extraordinary Public Works.

Many of them are in progress and when completed will prove directly remunerative. Some will tend to develop the Colony and thus indirectly augment the revenue.

Others are works of necessity. None can be suspended without entailing additional expenditure whenever they are resumed, as ultimately they must be. For these reasons the idea of their temporary abandonment should not for a moment be seriously entertained. This opinion will, I anticipate, be concurred in by Honourable Members, for on the 13th October, 1890, it was authoritatively stated by an influential Councillor that it was the "unanimous wish" of the taxpayers and ratepayers that a Loan should be raised to meet the cost of Public Works Extraordinary. Shortly after my arrival I referred the matter to a Committee of this Council. They reported, and apparently overlooking the "unanimous wish" of the taxpayers, suggested that instead of raising a Loan the Government should obtain the funds it might require from time to time by overdrawing its account at the Bank. This course did not recommend itself to me, as it would certainly be a most extravagant one, seeing that Government could borrow money in London at a much lower rate than it would have to pay for overdrafts.

The existence of available assets in the shape of Crown Lands was also mentioned as a reason against raising a Loan. But, whilst I can quite understand the natural hesitation of Honourable Members to increase the indebtedness of the Colony, it must be evident that the existing commercial depression entirely precludes the realization of large assets by the sale of land. From whatever point of view, therefore, the matter is regarded, the only logical conclusion that can be arrived at is that further postponement in regard to raising a Loan is impossible.

In acknowledging the report of the Committee, I stated that though I did not agree in its recommendations, yet, looking to the ability and experience of its members, I would not proceed further in the matter at that moment. Nevertheless I asked the Secretary of State to permit me to contract a Loan if the financial position did not improve; and by a despatch dated 29th July I received that permission, sanctioning a Loan not exceeding £200,000. The works which his Lordship considers most urgently necessary are the completion of the Central Market, the Praya Reclamation, the Water and Drainage undertakings, and the improvement in Gaol accommodation.

He does not consider that any works beyond these should be charged to the Loan, but he consents to its also bearing the expense for such works which may have been incurred during the current year.

The Secretary of State has decided that the amount of £200,000 shall be raised by Inscribed stock, and not by Debentures, as was the case with the first Loan.

Ordinances to give effect to this decision will accordingly be laid before you. As the public works to be constructed will not be immediately remunerative, the contribution to a sinking fund will be deferred, and these contributions will probably commence three years from the date on which the interest on the amount raised begins to accrue.

A

41

The Loan Ordinance will be accompanied by a schedule setting forth all the public works upon which the money will be expended. It is to be hoped that the Loan will be allowed to run for 50 years as thereby better terms would be secured by borrowing for that time than for a shorter period. On this and other points further instructions will be sent to me by the Secretary of State before the end of this month, and when received they will be immediately communicated to you.

In the Draft Estimates a sum sufficient to meet the interest on the Loan and other charges which will have to be paid in 1893 has been inserted. It has been estimated that $40,000 will be required for that purpose, and this is the new item I referred to at the commencement of my speech. With this addition the Estimates show a surplus of $6,785 of Revenue over Ordinary Expenditure.

Assuming your ready concurrence in these proposals, I shall, in accordance with the wish expressed by the un-official members of Council in their memo. of the 20th December, 1890, afford every possible information in regard to these works, and whenever and wherever practicable, designs, drawings and plans of them will be submitted to you.

If Honourable Members desire it a Standing Public Works Committee with the Director of Public Works as Chairman might be appointed to superintend and to control the expenditure of the amounts raised under the proposed Loan Ordinance.

In the memo. to which I have just referred a hope was expressed by Honourable Members that the vote of $40,000, which they considered as merely guesswork, for the construction of a residence at the Peak for the Governor would not be exceeded later on. In the Esti- mates drawn up by the Director of Public Works a sum of $55,000 is inserted for that object. It may be possible to reduce that amount, but, if reduced, I am informed that it will necessitate considerable alteration in the plans that have already been prepared, and possibly an abandonment of the new site selected. In reference to this work the Secretary of State requires to be furnished with a report as to its urgency and necessity, and no step will be taken towards commencing it until the plans, &c., have been approved by the Council and his Lordship.

There is one other point to which it is desirable to refer, and that is the comparative. advantage of borrowing in gold in England, rather than in silver locally.

This question was fully discussed in 1886 and 1887 and special reference was made to it in

my address of 25th January last. An interesting and important despatch on the subject from Lord STANLEY, dated 2nd February, 1886, was also laid before the Council, and to these documents I would venture to direct your careful attention.

The possibility of effecting retrenchment in the public service has naturally engaged my most anxious consideration. In that service vested interests cannot be disregarded, and all retrenchment consequently must be more or less of a prospective nature. I have publicly stated that when opportunities arise I will take advantage of them, but time is required to effect all such reforms. The Civil Service is to a certain extent over officered, and the salaries of the Clerical service are capable of reduction as vacancies occur. There is no doubt also that the cost of the Police is extremely heavy, and that in future by extending the term of service which qualifies Indian and Chinese constables for pensions considerable savings may be effected.

As there exists in our midst an industrious and generally honest Portuguese community, and as many respectable Chinese are qualifying for public employment, there will be no necessity, except in rare cases, to recruit the Clerical service, as distinct from the Civil Service proper, by the appointment into it of Englishmen hereafter. I propose therefore a reorgani- zation of the Clerical Establishment, and a division of that Establishment into 6 classes, with salaries ranging from $360 per annum in the lowest to $2,400 per annum in the highest class. It will be found on comparison that the average salaries to be paid under this scheme will exceed the average paid in Singapore, Mauritius, and Ceylon, and will be more liberal than the salaries paid by the best private firms in Hongkong.

For Portuguese and Chinese clerks these salaries will be found sufficient. These officers do not labour under the disadvantages that Europeans do. As they have not as a rule to remit money to Europe, as they are domiciled here and acclimatized, they can live less expensively, with less risk, and far more comfortably, than Englishmen occupying corres- ponding positions. This reorganization will ultimately effect a saving of between $25,000 and $30,000 a year. In arriving at this conclusion and making this statement, I wish it to be fully understood that I do not in any way undervalue the services of the Portuguese officers now employed in the Departments of Government. They are trustworthy and industrious public servants, and several of them have satisfactorily and faithfully fulfilled their duties for a quarter of a century and upwards.

1

1

42

With regard to the Civil Service proper, I have suggested to the Secretary of State several important changes, in the way of abolition and amalgamation of appointments and also reduction of salaries as opportunities occur, by which, if agreed to, a further saving of from $25,000 to $30,000 a year will be secured. To some of these recommendations his Lord- ship has already consented.

The strength of the Military Forces now stationed in Hongkong and the peaceable and orderly conduct of the population generally render it possible to diminish the cost of the Police. The growth of that force, and the concurrent growth of the Pension list, have in recent years been very remarkable. In 1882 the cost of Pensions was $9,000 and in 1891 $22,000. The time has arrived when they can safely be checked and I hope permanently reduced. The Captain Superintendent has materially assisted the Government by suggesting economies amounting in the whole to $15,000 a year, and these will be effected by a slight alteration in the composition of the Force and by the exercise of greater care in regard to the issue of clothing and stores. This reduction is irrespective of that which I propose in regard to Pensions in the future.

If you will add these figures together, taking the lowest of them you will see that a prospective saving of at least $65,000 a year is contemplated. Retrenchment in several directions has, as I have indicated, already commenced, whilst year by year the amount saved will, on the occurrence of vacancies, increase until the extreme limit is reached.

one.

The question of the erection of a new Gaol has for several years been a very burning Soon after my assumption of the Government I made a representation to the Secretary of State on the subject. I urged his Lordship to reconsider the view which he had previously expressed that a new Prison should be built, block by block, on a site different to that occupied by the existing Prison. I am glad to say that my representation has not been altogether unsuccessful. The Secretary of State has agreed to forego the construction of a new Prison on condition that the "glaring deficiencies," as he describes them, in the present Gaol are removed, and that provision is made for the confinement of Criminal Prisoners on the separate system. This will necessitate the acquisition of additional space, which is available in the neighbourhood of the Gaol, and the remodelling of the cells now used as associated cells. It will of course be necessary for me to satisfy his Lordship that these conditions are not only capable of fulfilment, but will be fulfilled. When that is done the question may be considered as finally, and, I trust, satisfactorily, settled. I appointed a Committee to go thoroughly into the matter and it has just reported. The cost of the proposed works will be $250,000, whereas $600,000 at least would have been required for the construction on an open site of a new cellular prison. I strongly recommend you to accept this solution of the difficulty and, by agreeing to the Report of the Committee and by consenting to the Loan, to give me power to carry out without unnecessary delay the suggested improvements.

With regard to the general condition of the Colony it is hardly necessary to point out that it has not fully recovered from the commercial crisis of exceptional severity through which it has recently passed. Business of nearly every description is still unfortunately somewhat depressed and it will be more or less disorganized throughout the East so long as the existing uncertainty as to the future of silver continues.

The value of land and house property is very low, and the price of shares in most of the local Companies and enterprises has fallen so heavily that large sums of money are locked up and cannot be realized except at a ruinous loss. While the legitimate business of the Colony has not fallen off, a large portion of its capital has been transferred to other countries by somewhat reckless and certainly regrettable speculation.

Though there may be no immediate prospect of rapid improvement, we may look forward to the future hopefully.

The value of land and rents has begun to have an upward tendency. The large volume of trade which is ensured by the unique geographical position of the Colony is increasing. The population, perhaps one of the most industrious in the world, is growing daily, and the public Revenue, although it is not of a very elastic character, must be directly benefitted by the completion of the Praya, the Central Market, and other depôts which will at once be accelerated by the issue of the new Loan.

The frequent fluctuations in silver and eastern exchange are naturally creating great difficulties, and indeed consternation, in countries in which the silver standard is in force, as well as in one of the largest and wealthiest counties in England. It is sincerely to be hoped that the Monetary Conference which is about to meet will decide on some sort of bimetallism which will at all events give a fixity of value to silver coin, which appears to be the first consideration. If such should be the case the effect would be immediately felt by the energetic business community of this well-favoured Island.

x

43

The question of preferential duties in favour of Chinese Junks and to the detriment of European ships and steamers in the Canton River has been, as you are aware, satisfactorily settled at least for the present.

I had the pleasure of discussing this matter and the more important one, perhaps, of the contemplated Telegraph Convention with Her Majesty's Minister Plenipotentiary at Peking, Mr. O'CONOR, when he passed through Hongkong at the beginning of the month. I think we may safely anticipate that His Excellency will do all that he possibly can to prevent the ratification of that Convention.

The propriety of reorganizing and re-establishing the Volunteer Force was referred by me in May last to a representative Committee of citizens. They have reported strongly in favour of it, and have attributed the complete failure that has hitherto attended each successive effort to establish a permanent and effective Volunteer Force in Hongkong, to a want of inducement, encouragement, and sufficient liberality on the part of the Government. The scheme proposed by the Committee would involve an additional expense of at least $8,000 a year if adopted in its entirety. I propose to refer the matter to the Finance Committee by suggesting a specific grant of about $10,000 for the initial cost and $13,000 for the annual maintenance of the Corps. This appeal for support comes at a most inopportune moment, but some of the recommendations of the Committee are undoubtedly good, and others can be accepted with modifications. The Volunteer Force is entitled to favourable consideration on account of its past services. If it were to cease to exist it is possible that the Imperial Government might insist upon some pecuniary contribution in lieu of it. I therefore advise its maintenance on more liberal terms than now exist, if, by the 31st December next, 150 men have in writing stated that they are ready and willing to join the force and fulfil the conditions to be imposed upon them.

With reference to Education it is gratifying to observe that steady progress is being made. Over 10,000 scholars are under instruction. The Government in conjunction with a member of this Council, who is noted for his princely munificence in aid of this cause, is about to provide educational facilities for the hitherto neglected Eurasian girls, and when the New Girls' Central-School is completed, it will at once be occupied by about 250 pupils, of whom 110 will be Eurasians, and 140 Chinese. Owing to the action of the Government, local missions are also bestirring themselves in the same direction. Out of a total of about $84,000 to be expended this year by the Government on education, Victoria College is responsible for no less a sum than $19,000. During 1893, I trust it will be possible for the Headmaster and Committee of the College to suggest a reduction in this charge, and also that the Chinese inhabitants of Hongkong, whose children principally benefit by this excel- lent Institution, will not be averse to the payment of a rather higher fee than that now imposed.

It

may

also be possible to reduce the expenditure in other ways.

Much remains to be done by Government in respect to elementary education, for which at present there are not sufficient funds.

There are, I regret to say, some 20,000 children who attend no school whatever. The grant-in-aid system, which is a most admirable one, has been extended during the course of the year. No less than 14 new grant-in-aid schools have been started, indicating an extra- ordinary increase in the demand for education. These 14 new schools include 2 English schools, 6 Chinese girls' schools, 5 Chinese boys' schools, and 1 Chinese mixed village school. Only once before has there been a similar increase, namely, in 1881 when 13 new schools were opened by managers. The average annual increase has been 6 only. There are now 95 grant-in-aid schools at work.

It is my desire in the interests of the general community to encourage voluntary educa- tional enterprise, and to extend in every direction the grant-in-aid system.

With regard to physical drill, a very important matter, the successful parade which was held last Monday on the Cricket Ground, and which was attended by upwards of 500 scholars, will prove to those interested in Education that the physical not less than the mental development of the boys has been attended to.

-

The number of Criminal cases in the Supreme Court this year does not show any striking contrast with the number last year, but the returns for 1891 and 1892, taken together, exhibit a marked diminution in crime as compared with previous years. The number of cases tried up to date is only 27. In 1891, the number was 32. The average annual number of cases between 1887 and 1890 was 86. A considerable portion of this decrease is of course owing to the increased power given to Magistrates in 1891, to deal summarily with indictable offences. Notwithstanding this, it may fairly be said that the condition of the Colony with regard to crimes of the more serious kind is satisfactory.

44

*

There have been no trials for extensive embezzlement and theft, though certainly two most flagrant cases occurred, the culprits escaping from the Colony. There has been only one trial for murder, and no charges of Piracy during the year. It is a matter for congra- tulation that within recent years serious robbery by armed bands, with violence, which used in former days to be a very common offence has ceased to exist. This is no doubt owing to the deportation of criminals, a policy which is much appreciated by and enlists the sympathies of the respectable Chinese residents in the Colony.

.

Cordially acknowledging the assistance which the Chinese community affords the Government in the suppression of crime, I trust that this aid will be continued, and that the policy of the Government. in ridding the Colony of well-known dangerous characters will be supported and diligently persevered in.

The total tonnage in and out in 1891 was 14,005,698 tons, but it seems probable that that return will be eclipsed by the entries and clearances of this year. Up to the 31st October they amounted to 11,703,851 against 11,661,446 tons for the corresponding period last year. There has also been a slight revival in emigration. Up to the 31st October 43,024 emigrants have left for various ports, against 39,360 for the same period in 1891. The action of Canada, the United States, and of the Australian Colonies renders it impossible that emi- gration should ever again assume the proportions it attained some years ago.

The Colony has been mercifully preserved from storm and pestilence during the last ten months. The neighbouring coasts, however, have not been exempt from these dire visitations. Though Hongkong itself has been spared, we have nevertheless to regret the loss of several members of this community owing to the wreck of the mail steamer Bokhara on 10th October. Tragedies of this nature, and the attendant suspense, until the true facts are ascertained, are at all times terrible, but they are doubly so, when as in this case, many of the victims were residents in the Colony, young and promising members of their several professions, and all so well known and deservedly respected.

I am not guilty of exaggeration when I say that the widest and deepest sympathy has been aroused by this disaster, which in the history of Hongkong is unparalleled.

The tangible proofs of this sympathy which will be offered by this Community and that of Shanghai and Canton to the relatives of those lost, will doubtless be appreciated by them, not for their intrinsic value, but as testimony to the worth and character of those who have been taken from them.

The Pó Léung Kuk Committee has not completed its enquiries. The institution has been and is a very valuable one, and I trust that its sphere of usefulness may be safely extended, rather than contracted.

It is possible not to say probable that the Marine Lot holders and others interested in the Praya Reclamation may appeal to the Government for some temporary assistance. Such an appeal if it is made will, I can assure you, receive my most careful consideration. I am most anxious to facilitate in every way the completion of the reclamation, which will ultimately amongst other things be of great advantage to the General Revenue.

In the coming session I do not propose to trouble members with much fresh Legislation. Of course there will be the usual Appropriation Ordinances and also the Loan Ordinance, Amendments will be proposed in the Vagrancy, Medical, Probate and Marriage Ordinances. and there may perhaps be one or two private Bills.

With your hearty co-operation in carrying these measures through Council, we may therefore anticipate a short and comparatively uneventful session.

In conclusion, gentlemen, I have only to express an earnest hope that there may be a revival of prosperity in the fortunes of the Colony during the year 1893, and that under

any circumstances, you will assist me in endeavouring to promote, as far as possible, the welfare and happiness of all classes of Her Majesty's subjects in Hongkong.

STANDING COMMITTEES :- His Excelleney appointed the Finance Committee to consist of all the Members of Council, except the Governor, with the Colonial Secretary as Chairman; the Law Com- mittee to consist of the Attorney General as Chairman, the Registrar General, Honourable HO KAI, Honourable E. R. BELILIOS and Honourable J. J. BELL-IRVING; and the Public Works Committee to consist of the Director of Public Works as Chairman, the Colonial Treasurer, Honourable C. P. CHATER, Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD and Honourable E. R. BELILIOS.

PAPERS LAID ON THE TABLE.-The Colonial Secretary, by direction of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following papers, viz.:—

Report on the progress of the Public Works during the first half-year 1892. (No. 26 of 1892.) Report on the Widows' and Orphans' Fund for the year 1891-92. (No. 27 of 1892.)

1.

{

1

45

Correspondence re Vote of Rs 10,000 in aid of the sufferers by the recent Hurricane in

Mauritius. (No. 28 of 1892.)

The Educational Report for 1891. (No. 29 of 1892.)

The Colonial Surgeon's Report for 1891. (No. 30 of 1892.)

Report on Kowloon Water Supply. (No. 31 of 1892.)

Committee's Report on Prison Accommodation. (No. 32 of 1892.)

Rules and Regulations made by the Governor in Council under The Dangerous Goods Ordi-

nance, 1873.

BYE-LAWS AND ORDER.--The Colonial Secretary laid on the table Bye-laws, made by the Sanitary Board:-(a) For the regulation of Common Lodging-Houses; (b) for the regulation of Bake-houses; and (c) in reference to the Water Closets of private dwellings, and an Order as to the Fees and percentages to be taken in the Supreme Court; and gave notice that he would move their adoption at the next meeting of Council.

VOTES REFERRED TO THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following Financial Minutes and moved that they be referred to the Finance Committee, viz. :-

C.S.O.

1452 of 1892.

C.S.O.

1454 of 1892.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Five hundred Dollars, ($500), as a building grant under the Grant-in-aid scheme being half the cost of new Grant-in-aid School built by the Basel Mission at Sham-shui-po which has taken the place of a Government School in the same place.

Government House, Hongkong, 25th June, 1892.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Seven thousand One hundred and Fifty Dollars, ($7,150), to meet the extra expenditure during the current year on the Government Civil Hospital votes (under-estimated in the Estimates) for the following items:-

Bedding, Medicines,

Medical comforts,

Light and Fuel,

Washing,...

Incidental Expenditure,

Government House, Hongkong, 29th June, 1892.

$1,250.00

1,750.00

1,200.00

2,000.00

350.00

600.00

$7,150.00

C.S.O.

1538 of 1892.

C.S.O. 1573 of 1892.

C.S.O.

1832 of 1892.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Five thousand Dollars, ($5,000), to supplement the vote in the Estimates for maintenance of roads and bridges out of Victoria, ($15,000), the expenditure under which has been unexpectedly heavy.

There will be a corresponding saving of expenditure under the vote "maintenance of roads and bridges in Kowloon.'

""

Government House, Hongkong, 29th June, 1892.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Fourteen thousand Dollars, ($14,000), for "Repairs to Buildings.

"3

This additional vote has become necessary owing in a great measure to the liabilities on account of work done during the last two years, but paid out of this year's vote.

Government House, Hongkong, 1st July, 1892.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Six hundred Dollars, ($600), to meet the charges made by the Water and Drainage Department for the supply of water to the Gaol during the current year.

The water was formerly supplied free, but since this year has been charged for, and paid from the vote for "Incidental Expenses.'

72.

Government House, Hongkong, 26th July, 1892.

:

46

C.S.O.

1835 of 1892.

C.S.O.

1986 of 1892.

C.S.O.

2082 of 1892.

C. O. Desp. 178 of 1892,

C.S.O. 7063 of 1892.

C.S.O. 2054 of 1892.

C.S.O. 1323 of 1892.

C.S.O. 2329 of 1892.

C.S.O.

1980 of 1892,

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Two hundred and Sixty Dollars, ($260), as an additional sum required for the Governor's Department to meet the expenses for repairs of Public Furniture at Government House, and Incidental Expenses.

Government House, Hongkong, 26th July, 1892.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One thousand Dollars, ($1,000), for the repair of the main sewer in Robinson Road, Kowloon, damaged by the roots of the trees planted along the sides of the road.

Government House, Hongkong, 15th August, 1892.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Five thousand Dollars, ($5,000), to cover the cost of Stationery for 1892, the requisitions for which arrived too late to be included in the 1891 Account.

Government House, Hongkong, 24th August, 1892.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One hundred thousand Dollars, ($100,000), in order to provide for the payment before the end of the year, as prescribed in rules 63 and 77 of the Financial Instructions, of the salaries for the month of December and other authorised charges properly chargeable against the votes of the year.

The salaries for December, 1891, and certain other charges were paid in January of this year, in accordance with the practice which has hitherto prevailed in this Colony.

In order to carry out the object referred to above, it will therefore be necessary to exceed the Estimates for the current year by the amount (approximately stated above) of the salaries and charges of one month.

Government House, Hongkong, 31st August, 1892.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Four thousand and Eighty-three Dollars and Thirty Cents, ($4,083.30), to cover the cost of certain additional works on the Reclamation from the sea at Kennedy Town, which were unforeseen when the Contract for the Reclamation was entered into.

Government House, Hongkong, 9th September, 1892.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Five hundred Dollars, ($500), being additional sum required to defray the cost of Clothing, Bedding, &c., for the Gaol Staff and Prisoners.

(Supplementary sum voted in June last for Sheeting Material and Blankets, $1,200. Actual cost of these articles amounted to £245, or something over $1,700.)

Government House, Hongkong, 13th September, 1892.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Fourteen thousand Five hundred and Fifty Dollars and Forty-three Cents, ($14,550.43), for Military Contribution, being excess caused by lower rate of exchange than estimated for.

Government House, Hongkong, 28th September, 1892.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Two thousand Six hundred and Eighty-five Dollars and Twelve Cents, ($2,685.12), to cover the cost of the prolongation of storm water drains in Centre and Eastern Streets.

Government House, Hongkong, 29th September, 1892.

47

C.S.O.

336 of 1892.

C.S.O.

$392 of 1892.

C.S.O.

1303 & 1350

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Three hundred and Twenty Dollars, ($320), to meet the charges made by the Water and Drainage Department for the supply of water to the Botanical and Afforestation Department during the current year.

The water was formerly supplied free, but since this year has been charged for. Government House, Hongkong, 8th October, 1892.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Three thousand Dollars, ($3,000), as additional vote required to cover the total expenditure on the repairs of St. John's Cathedral Church.

Government House, Hongkong, 13th October, 1892.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One thousand Three hundred of 1892. and Four Dollars, and Seventy-three Cents, ($1,304.73), viz.:—

For a special Chronograph fitted with electrical control, battery, &c., for the Observ- atory, £114.0.1 @2/10d.=$804.73. The instrument was ordered in 1889, but was only received in the Colony this year.

For additional expenditure under "Laboratory expenses" and "Office Contingencies,"

$500.00, the votes for current year having been under-estimated.

Government House, Hongkong, 14th June, 1892.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

:

VOTES PASSED BY THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the Report of the Finance Committee dated the 7th June, (No. 8), and moved that the following Votes referred to therein be passed, viz.:---

C.S.O. 1314 of 1892.

C.S.O.

947 of 1892.

C.S.O. 1393 of 1892.

}

A sum of Fifteen hundred Dollars, being supplementary provision to defray

incidental expenses in the Police Department,

A sum of Five hundred and Eighty-seven Dollars, and Thirty-three Cents, being the difference between the amount voted in the Estimates for this year and the actual sum due to the Telegraph Company, for the cost of Telegraph Cable, aërial line and Morse instruments connecting the Gap Rock with the Harbour Office at Hongkong,

.$ 1,500.00

587.33

A sum of Twelve hundred Dollars, to defray the cost of Clothing for the Gaol Staff

and Prisoners not provided for in the Estimates for the current year,..........$ 1,200.00

C.S.O.

1995 of 1892.

A sum of Five thousand Dollars, as supplementary provision for the cost of passages

and bonuses in lieu of passage, in the Police Department

$ 5,000.00

C.8.0.

810 of 1892.

A sum of Three thousand Eight hundred and Sixty-eight Dollars, for the expendi-

ture required for an improved system of signalling the approach of vessels to

the port,

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Votes passed.

BILL ENTITLED

.$ 3,868.00

AN ORDINANCE ENACTED BY THE GOVERNOR of Hongkong, WITH THE ADVICE and consent of the LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL THEREOF, TO APPLY A SUM NOT EXCEEDING TWO MILLIONS THREE HUNDRED AND SIXTEEN THOUSAND, SIX HUNDRED AND ELEVEN DOLLARS TO THE PUBLIC SERVICE OF THE YEAR 1893.-The Colonial Secretary moved the first reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

48

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE ENACTED BY THE GOVERNOR OF HONGKONG, WITH THE ADVICE AND CONSENT OF THE LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL THEREOF, TO AUTHORISE THE APPROPRIATION OF A SUP- PLEMENTARY SUM OF THREE HUNDRED AND SIXTY THOUSAND SIX HUNDRED AND EIGHTY-SEVEN DOLLARS AND THIRTY-SEVEN CENTS TO DEFRAY THE CHARGES OF THE YEAR 1891."-The Colonial Treasurer moved the first reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded. Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND 'THE VAGRANCY ORDINANCE, 1888.'"-Consideration of the Bill was postponed.

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND 'THE MARRIAGE ORDINANCE, 1875."-The Acting Attorney General moved the first reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED

AN ORDINANCE TÓ PROVIDE FOR THE RECOGNITION IN THE COLONY OF PROBATES AND LETTERS OF ADMINISTRATION GRANTED IN THE United Kingdom."-The Acting Attorney General moved the first reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded. Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED “AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE MEDICAL REGistration ORDINANCE, 1884.' The Acting Attorney General moved the first reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE TO REPEAL SECTION 45 OF ORDINANCE No. 8 OF 1860 AND TO AMEND SCHEDULE A TO ORDINANCE No. 1 OF 1883."-The Acting Attorney General moved the first reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned till Monday, the 21st November, at 3 P.M.

Read and confirmed, this 21st day of November, 1892.

F. H. MAY,

Acting Clerk of Councils.

¦

WILLIAM ROBINSON,

Governor.

49

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 13.

MONDAY, 21ST NOVEMBER, 1892.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(Sir WILLIAM ROBINSON, K.C.M.G.).

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (GEORGE THOMAS MICHAEL O'BRIEN, C.M.G.).

the Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART LOCKHART).

"}

"

""

>>

";

$2

the Colonial Treasurer, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES).

the Director of Public Works, (FRANCIS ALFRED COOPER).

the Harbour Master, (ROBERT MURRAY RUMSEY).

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

Ho KAI, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS.

JAMES JARDINE BELL-IRVING.

ABSENT:

The Honourable the Acting Attorney General, (ANDREW JOHN LEACH).

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 16th November, 1892, were read and confirmed.

VOTES PASSED BY THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the Report of the Finance Committee dated the 16th November, (No. 9), and moved that the following Votes referred to therein be passed, viz.:— 14521892. A sum of Five hundred Dollars, as a building grant under the Grant-in-aid scheme being half the cost of new Grant-in-aid School built by the Basel Mission at Sham-shui-po which has taken the place of a Government School in the same place,

C.S.O.

1454 of 1892.

C.S.O.

1538 of 1892,

C.S.O.

1573 of 1892.

C.S.O.

1832 of 1892.

C.S.O.

1835 of 1892.

C.S.O.

1986 of 1892.

C.S.O.

2082 of 1892.

178 of 1892.

$ 500.00

A sum of Seven thousand One hundred and Fifty Dollars, to meet the extra ex-

penditure during the current year on the Government Civil Hospital.............$ 7,150.00

A sum of Five thousand Dollars, to supplement the vote in the Estimates for

maintenance of roads and bridges out of Victoria,

A sum of Fourteen thousand Dollars, for "Repairs to Buildings,

>>

$ 5,000.00

A sum of Six hundred Dollars, to meet the charges made by the Water and Drainage Department for the supply of Water to the Gaol during the current

year,......

A sum of Two hundred and Sixty Dollars, as an additional sum required for the Governor's Department to meet the expenses for repairs of Public Furniture at Government House, and Incidental Expenses,

A sum of One thousand Dollars, for the repair of the main sewer in Robinson Road, Kowloon, damaged by the roots of the trees planted along the sides of the road...

$14,000.00

.$ 600.00

$ 260.00

$ 1,000.00

A sum of Five thousand Dollars, to cover the cost of Stationery for 1892, the

requisitions for which arrived too late to be included in the 1891 Account,. .$ 5,000.00

C. O. Desp. A sun of One hundred thousand Dollars, in order to provide for the payment before the end of the year, as prescribed in rules 63 and 77 of the Financial Instructions, of the salaries for the month of December and other authorised charges properly chargeable against the votes of the year,

C.S.O.

2063 of 1892.

C.S.O.

2054 of 1892.

of

..........$100,000.00

A sum of Four thousand and Eighty-three Dollars and Thirty Cents, to cover the cost of certain additional works on the Reclamation from the sea at Kennedy Town,.......

........$ 4,083.30

A sum of Five hundred Dollars, being additional sum required to defray the cost

of Clothing, Bedding, &c., for the Gaol Staff and Prisoners,.

23291892. A sum of Fourteen thousand Five hundred and Fifty Dollars and Forty-three

Cents, for Military Contribution,.

.$ 500.00

.$14,550.43

.

50

C.S.O.

1980 of 1892.

C.S.O.

336 of 1892.

A sum of Two thousand Six hundred and Eighty-five Dollars and Twelve Cents, to cover the cost of the prolongation of storm water drains in Centre and Eastern Streets,....

...$ 2,685.12

A sum of Three hundred and Twenty Dollars, to meet the charges made by the Water and Drainage Department for the supply of water to the Botanical and Afforestation Department during the current year,

2392 of 1892. A sum of Three thousand Dollars, as additional vote required to cover the total

expenditure on the repairs of St. John's Cathedral Church,

13091350 A sum of One thousand Three hundred and Four Dollars, and Seventy-three Cents,

C.S.O. &

of 1892.

viz.:-

320.00

.$ 3,000.00

For a special Chronograph fitted with electrical control, battery, &c, for

the Observatory,

£114.0.1 @2/10d.=$ For additional expenditure under "Laboratory expenses" and "Office

Contingencies,"

804.73

500.00

$ 1,304.73

.

:

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

The Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD moved as an amendment the rejection of the report. The Honourable C. P. CHATER seconded.

The Colonial Secretary replied.

The amendment was then withdrawn.

Question-that the Report be adopted by Council put and agreed to.

Votes passed.

BILL ENTITLED

(C

AN ORDINANCE ENACTED BY THE Governor of HONGKONG, WITH THE ADVICE And consent of the LegislaTIVE COUNCIL THEREOF, TO APPLY A SUM NOT EXCEEDING TWO MILLIONS THREE HUNDRED AND SIXTEEN THOUSAND, SIX HUNDRED AND ELEVEN DOLLARS TO THE PUBLIC SERVICE of the Year 1893."-The Colonial Secretary moved the second reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

The Colonial Secretary moved that the Council do resolve into Committee.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-that the Council do resolve into Committee put and agreed to.

In Committee the Colonial Secretary moved that the Bill be referred to the Finance Committee. The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

BILL ENTITLED " AN ORDINANCE ENACTED BY THE GOVERNOR OF HONGKONG, WITH THE ADVICE AND CONSENT OF THE LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL THEREOF, TO AUTHORISE THE APPROPRIATION OF A SUP- PLEMENTARY SUM OF THREE HUNDRED AND SIXTY THOUSAND SIX HUNDRED And Eighty-SEVEN DOLLARS AND THIRTY-SEVEN CENTS TO DEFRAY THE CHARGES OF THE YEAR 1891."-The Colonial Treasurer moved the second reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded. Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

The Colonial Treasurer moved that the Council do resolve into Committee. The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question that the Council do resolve into Committee put and agreed to.

In Committee the Colonial Treasurer moved that the Bill be referred to the Finance Committee. The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned till Wednesday, the 30th November, at 3 P.M.

Read and confirmed, this 30th day of November, 1892.

F. H. MAY,

Acting Clerk of Councils.

:

WILLIAM ROBINSON,

Governor.

A

51

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 14.

WEDNESDAY, 30TH NOVEMBER, 1892.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(Sir WILLIAM ROBINSON, K.C.M.G.).

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (GEORGE THOMAS MICHAEL O'BRIEN, C.M.G.).

the Acting Attorney General, (ANDREW JOHN LEach).

the Registrar General, (JAMES Haldane Stewart Lockhart).

the Colonial Treasurer, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-Innes).

""

"}

the Director of Public Works, (FRANCIS ALFRED COOPER).

"}

the Harbour Master, (ROBERT MURRAY RUMSEY).

""

""

19

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS.

ABSENT:

The Honourable JAMES JARDINE BELL-IRVING.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 21st November, 1892, were read and confirmed. PAPERS LAID ON THE TABLE.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following papers, viz. :-A despatch from the Secretary of State for the Colonies, dated the 7th July, 1892, respecting Prison Accommodation; and a letter from the Crown Agents for the Colonies dated the 20th of October, 1892, regarding the proposed loan.

VOTE REFERRED TO THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following Minute and moved that it be referred to the Finance Committee, viz. :—

C.S.O. 983 of 1892.

WILLIAM ROBINSON.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One thousand Three hundred and Thirty-eight Dollars and Twenty-five Cents, ($1,338.25), to meet the charges made by the Water and Drainage Department against the Sanitary Department, for the supply of water to various Markets, during the current year.

Government House, Hongkong, 25th November, 1892.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

REPORTS OF THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the Reports of the Finance Committee dated respectively the 21st and 25th of November, (Nos. 10 and 11 of 1892).

BYE-LAWS AND ORDER.--The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, moved the adoption of the following Bye-laws, made by the Sanitary Board:-(a) For the licensing and regulation of Common Lodging-Houses; (b) for the regulation of Bake-houses; and (c) for the proper construction, etc., of Water Closets of private dwellings. And of an Order as to Fees and Percentages to be taken in the Supreme Court.

The Acting Attorney General seconded.

Question put-that these Bye-laws and Order do pass.

Bye-laws and Order passed.

BILL ENTITLED " AN ORDINANCE ENACTED BY THE GOVERNOR OF HONGKONG, WITH THE ADVICE and consent of THE LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL THEREOF, to apply a SUM NOT EXCEEDING TWO MILLIONS THREE HUNDRED AND SIXTEEN THOUSAND, SIX HUNDRED AND Eleven Dollars tO THE PUBLIC SERVICE OF THE YEAR 1893."-Council in Committee on the Bill.

Item 1 (Section 1).--"Charges on account of Public Debt."-The Colonial Secretary moved,—

That this item do stand part of the Bill.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

The motion was agreed to, and the item declared by the President to stand part of the Bill. Item 2.-"Pensions."-The Colonial Secretary moved,—

That this item do stand part of the Bill.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

The motion was agreed to, and the item declared by the President to stand part of the Bill.

52

Item 3.-"Governor and Legislature."-The Colonial Secretary moved,-

That this item do stand part of the Bill.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

The Honourable C. P. CHATER moved, as an amendment,-

That the salaries (included in the item) which have been increased under the general scheme of

increase be reduced to what they were before the sitting of the Committee of 1890.

The Honourable HO KAI Seconded.

The Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD supported the amendment.

The Honourable Colonial Secretary replied.

Question put.

A division was taken when there voted

For the amendment.

Honourable E. R. BELILIOS.

>>

T. H. WHITEHEAD. HO KAI.

C. P. CHATER.

""

The amendment was lost by a minority of 2.

Against the amendment. Honourable Harbour Master.

>>

>>

""

Director of Public Works. Colonial Treasurer. Registrar General.

Acting Attorney General. Colonial Secretary.

The original motion that the item do stand part of the Bill was then put. A division was taken when there voted

For the motion.

Honourable Harbour Master.

Director of Public Works. Colonial Treasurer.

Registrar General.

""

Acting Attorney General.

""

Against the motion. Honourable E. R. BELILIOS.

3 3

""

T. H. WHITEHEAD. HO KAI.

C. P. CHATER.

Colonial Secretary.

The motion was carried by a majority of 2, and the item declared by the President to stand part of the Bill.

Item 4.-" Colonial Secretary's Department."-The Colonial Secretary moved,—

That this item do stand part of the Bill.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

The Honourable C. P. CHATER moved, as an amendment,-

That the salaries (included in the item) which have been increased under the general scheme of increase be reduced to what they were before the sitting of the Committee of 1890, and that the item be further reduced by a sum of $7,200 on account of Passed Cadets.

Honourable Ho HAI seconded.

Question put.

A division was taken when there voted

For the amendment.

Honourable E. R. BELILIOS.

Against the amendment. Honourable Harbour Master.

T. H. WHITEHEAD.

""

,,

HO KAI.

""

""

Director of Public Works. Colonial Treasurer.

C. P. CHATER.

"}

""

Registrar General.

The amendment was lost by a minority of 2.

""

Acting Attorney General. Colonial Secretary.

The original motion that the item do stand part of the Bill was then put. A division was taken when there voted

For the motion.

Honourable Harbour Master.

Against the motion.

Honourable E. R. BELILIOS.

T. H. WHITEHEAD. HO KAI.

""

Director of Public Works. Colonial Treasurer.

,,

"}

""

Registrar General.

C. P. CHATER.

>>

Acting Attorney General.

""

Colonial Secretary.

The motion was carried by a majority of 2, and the item declared by the President to stand part of the Bill.

Item 5.-" Audit Department."-The Colonial Secretary moved,―

That this item do stand part of the Bill.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

The Honourable HO KAI moved, as an amendment,-

That the item be struck out of the Bill.

The Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD seconded.

A division was taken when there voted

For the amendment.

Honourable E. R. BELILIOS.

Against the amendment.

Honourable Harbour Master.

T. H. WHITEHEAD.

>"

Η ΚΑΙ.

Director of Public Works. Colonial Treasurer.

""

""

C. P. CHATER.

""

""

Registrar General.

??

Acting Attorney General. Colonial Secretary.

The amendment was lost by a minority of 2.

The original motion that the item do stand part of the Bill was then put. A division was taken when there voted

" For the motion.

Honourable Harbour Master.

Against the motion.

Honourable E. R. BELILIOS.

Director of Public Works. Colonial Treasurer.

T. H. WHITEHEAD.

"

HO KAI.

""

Registrar General.

C. P. CHATER.

""

Acting Attorney General.

53

""

Colonial Secretary.

The motion was carried by a majority of 2, and the item declared by the President to stand part

of the Bill.

Item 6.—" Treasury."-The Colonial Secretary moved,

That this item do stand part of the Bill.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

The Honourable C. P. CHATER moved, as an amendment,—

That the salaries (included in the item) which have been increased under the general scheme of

increase be reduced to what they were before the sitting of the Committee of 1890.

The Honourable Ho KAI seconded.

A division was taken when there voted

For the amendment.

Honourable E. R. BELILIOS.

Against the amendment.

Honourable Harbour Master.

""

T. H. WHITEHEAD. HO KAI.

"

"

""

Director of Public Works. Colonial Treasurer.

C. P. CHATER.

""

""

>>

Acting Attorney General.

The amendment was lost by a minority of 2.

Registrar General.

Colonial Secretary.

The original motion that the item do stand part of the Bill was then put. A division was taken when there voted

For the motion.

Honourable Harbour Master.

Against the motion.

Honourable E. R. BELILIOS.

Director of Public Works. Colonial Treasurer.

""

T. H. WHITEHEAD.

HO KAI.

""

3.9

Registrar General.

J9

C. P. CHATER.

""

Acting Attorney General.

""

Acting Colonial Secretary.

The motion was carried by a majority of 2, and the item declared by the President to stand of the Bill.

part

54

19

Item 7.-" Public Works' Department." -The Colonial Secretary moved,-

That this item do stand part of the Bill.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

The Honourable C. P. CHATER moved, as an amendment,—

That the salaries (included in the item) which have been increased under the general scheme of

increase be reduced to what they were before the sitting of the Committee of 1890.

The Honourable Ho Kar seconded.

Question put.

A division was taken when there voted

For the amendment.

Honourable E. R. BELILIOS.

T. H. WHITEHEAD.

""

HO KAI.

""

C. P. CHATER.

""

Against the amendment.

Honourable Harbour Master.

Director of Public Works. Colonial Treasurer.

""

""

>>

Registrar General. Acting Attorney 'General. Colonial Secretary.

The amendment was lost by a minority of 2.

The original motion that the item do stand' part of the Bill was then put. A division was taken when there voted.

For the motion.

Honourable Harbour Master.

Against the motion.

Honourable E. R. BELILIOS.

Director of Public Works.

T. H. WHITEHEAD.

""

Colonial Treasurer.

HO KAI.

""

"1

Registrar General.

C. P. CHATER.

""

Acting Attorney General.

""

Colonial Secretary.

The motion was carried by a majority of 2, and the item declared by the President to stand part of the Bill.

Item 8.-" Post Office."-The Colonial Secretary moved,-

That this item do stand part of the Bill.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

The Honourable C. P. CHATER moved, as an amendment,-

That the salaries (included in the item) which have been increased under the general scheme of

increase be reduced to what they were before the sitting of the Committee of 1890.

The Honourable Ho Kar seconded.

Question put.

A division was taken when there voted

For the amendment.

Honourable E. R. BELILIOS.

Against the amendment.

Honourable Harbour Master.

""

T. H. WHITEHEAD. HO KAI.

""

Director of Public Works. Colonial Treasurer.

""

C. P. CHATER.

""

Registrar General.

""

""

Acting Attorney General. Colonial Secretary.

The amendment was lost by a minority of 2.

The original motion that the item do stand part of the Bill was then put. A division was taken when there voted

For the motion.

Honourable Harbour Master.

Against the motion.

Honourable E. R. BELILIOS.

>"

Director of Public Works. Colonial Treasurer.

""

T. H. WHITEHEAD. HO KAI.

""

""

Registrar General.

C. P. CHATER.

""

"1

Acting Attorney General.

""

Colonial Secretary.

The motion was carried by a majority of 2, and the item declared by the President to stand part of the Bill.

Y

X

55

Item 9.-" Registrar General's Department."-The Colonial Secretary moved,—

That this item do stand part of the Bill.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

The Honourable C. P. CHATER moved, as an amendment,-

That the salaries (included in the item) which have been increased under the general scheme of

increase be reduced to what they were before the sitting of the Committee of 1890.

The Honourable Ho KAI seconded.

Question put.

A division was taken when there voted

For the amendment.

Honourable E. R. BELILIOS.

Against the amendment.

Honourable Harbour Master.

T. H. WHITEHEAD.

""

""

HO KAI.

Director of Public Works. Colonial Treasurer.

""

,,

C. P. CHATER.

>>

""

Registrar General.

"J

Acting Attorney General. Colonial Secretary.

The amendment was lost by a minority of 2.

The original motion that the item do stand part of the Bill was then put. A division was taken when there voted

For the motion.

Honourable Harbour Master.

Against the motion.

Honourable E. R. BELILIOS.

""

Director of Public Works. Colonial Treasurer.

T. H. WHITEHEAD.

""

HO KAI.

""

""

""

Registrar General.

C. P. CHATER.

17

Acting Attorney General.

""

:

Colonial Secretary.

The motion was carried by a inajority of 2, and the item declared by the President to stand part of the Bill.

Item 10.-" Harbour Master's Department."-The Colonial Secretary moved,-

That this item do stand part of the Bill.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

The Honourable C. P. CHATER moved, as an amendment,—

That the salaries (included in the item) which have been increased under the general scheme of

increase be reduced to what they were before the sitting of the Committee of 1890.

The Honourable HO KAI seconded.

Question put.

A division was taken when there voted

For the amendment.

Honourable E. R. BELILIOS.

27

T. H. WHITEHEAD. HO KAI.

C. P. CHATER.

>>

Against the amendment. Honourable Harbour Master.

""

Director of Public Works. Colonial Treasurer.

Registrar General.

"9

Acting Attorney General. Colonial Secretary.

The amendment was lost by a minority of 2.

The original motion that the item do stand part of the Bill was then put. A division was taken when there voted

For the motion.

Honourable Harbour Master.

کمر

Against the motion.

Honourable E. R. BELILIOS.

Director of Public Works. Colonial Treasurer.

>>

T. H. WHITEHEAD. HO KAI.

""

>>

""

Registrar General.

C. P. CHATER.

??

Acting Attorney General.

Colonial Secretary.

The motion was carried by a majority of 2, and the item declared by the President to stand part of the Bill.

}

56

Item 11.-"Lighthouses."-The Colonial Secretary moved,

That this item do stand part of the Bill.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

The Honourable C. P. CHATER moved, as an amendment,-

That the salaries (included in the item) which have been increased under the general scheme of

increase be reduced to what they were before the sitting of the Committee of 1890.

The Honourable HO KAI seconded.

Question put.

A division was taken when there voted

For the amendment.

Honourable E. R. BELILIOS.

Against the amendment.

Honourable Harbour Master.

""

99%

T. H. WHITEHEAD. HO KAI.

""

".

Director of Public Works. Colonial Treasurer.

C. P. CHATER.

17

""

Registrar General.

"}

Acting Attorney General. Colonial Secretary.

The amendment was lost by a minority of 2.

The original motion that the item do stand! part of the Bill was then put. A division was taken when there voted

For the motion.

Honourable Harbour Master.

وو

Director of Public Works. Colonial Treasurer.

Against the motion.

Honourable E. R. BELILIOS.

T. H. WHITEHEAD. HO KAI.

>>

}}

Registrar General.

""

Acting Attorney General.

""

Colonial Secretary.

C. P. CHATER.

"}

The motion was carried by a majority of 2, and the item declared by the President to stand part of the Bill.

Item 12.-"Observatory."-The Colonial Secretary moved;--

That this item be altered to $12,716 and as altered do stand part of the Bill.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

The Honourable C. P. CHATER moved, as an amendment,-

That the salaries (included in the item) which have been increased under the general scheme of

increase be reduced to what they were before the sitting of the Committee of 1890.

The Honourable HO KAI seconded.

Question put.

A division was taken when there voted

For the amendment.

Honourable E. R. BELILIOS.

Against the amendment.

Honourable Harbour Master.

T. H. WHITEHEAD. HO KAI.

""

Director of Public Works. Colonial Treasurer.

""

"}

C. P. CHATER,

Registrar General.

""

Acting Attorney General. Colonial Secretary.

The amendment was lost by a minority of 2.

The original motion that the item as altered do stand part of the Bill was then put.. A division was taken when there voted

For the motion.

Honourable Harbour Master.

Against the motion.

Honourable E. R. BELILIOS.

igg

Director of Public Works. Colonial Treasurer.

T. H. WHITEHEAD.

""

Η ΚΑΙ.

""

Registrar General.

C. P. CHATER.

""

Acting Attorney General..

""

Colonial Secretary.

The motion was carried by a majority of 2; and the item as altered declared by the President to stand part of the Bill.

A

:

57

Item 13.-" Stamp Office."-The Colonial Secretary moved,—

That this item do stand part of the Bill.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

The Honourable C. P. CHATER moved, as an amendment,-

That the salaries (included in the item) which have been increased under the general scheme of

increase be reduced to what they were before the sitting of the Committee of 1890.

The Honourable HO KAI seconded.

Question put.

A division was taken when there voted

For the amendment:

Honourable E. R. BELILIOS.

Against the amendment.

Honourable Harbour Master.

T. H. WHITEHEAD.

""

HO KAI.

>>

C. P. CHATER.

""

The amendment was lost by a minority of 2.

""

Director of Public Works. Colonial Treasurer.

""

Registrar General.

Acting Attorney General. Colonial Secretary.

The original motion that the item do stand part of the Bill was then put. A division was taken when there voted

For the motion.

Honourable Harbour Master.

Director of Public Works.

"}

Colonial Treasurer.

""

Registrar General.

"}

Acting Attorney General.

""

Against the motion.

Honourable E. R. BELILIOS.

T. H. WHITEHEAD. HO-KAI.

C. P. CHATER.

""

:

Colonial Secretary.

The motion was carried by a majority of 2, and the item declared by the President to stand part of the Bill.

Item 14.-"Botanical and Afforestation Department."-The Colonial Secretary moved,-

That this item do stand part of the Bill.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

The Honourable C. P. CHATER moved, as an amendment,--

That the salaries (included in the item) which have been increased under the general scheme of

increase be reduced to what they were before the sitting of the Committee of 1890.

The Honourable Ho KAI seconded.

Question put.

A division was taken when there voted

For the amendment.

Honourable E. R. BELILIOS.

Against the amendment.

Honourable Harbour Master.

"1

T. H. WHITEHEAD. HO KAI.

""

Director of Public Works. Colonial Treasurer.

"}

""

C. P. CHATER.

""

"}

Registrar General.

Acting Attorney General.

"

Colonial Secretary.

The amendment was lost by a minority of 2.

The original motion that the item do stand part of the Bill was then put. A division was taken when there voted

For the motion.

Honourable Harbour Master:

Against the motion.

Honourable E. R. BELILIOS.

Director of Public Works.

T. H. WHITEHEAD.

""

>>

Colonial Treasurer.

HO KAI.

#

"}

Registrar General.

C. P. CHATER.

"}

>"

Acting Attorney General

}:;

Colonial Secretary.

The motion was carried by a majority of 2, and the item declared by the President to stand part of the Bill.

58

Item 15.-"Legal Departments."-The Colonial Secretary moved,--

That this item be altered to $70,508 and as altered do stand part of the Bill.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

The Honourable C. P. CHATER moved, as an amendment,--

That the salaries (included in the item) which have been increased under the general scheme of

increase be reduced to what they were before the sitting of the Committee of 1890.

The Honourable HO KAI Seconded.

Question put.

A division was taken when there voted

For the amendment.

Honourable E. R. BELILIOS.

Against the amendment.

Honourable Harbour Master.

T. H. WHITEHEAD. HO KAI.

""

Director of Public Works. Colonial Treasurer.

""

""

C. P. CHATER.

??

"}

Registrar General.

""

Acting Attorney General. Colonial Secretary.

The amendment was lost by a minority of 2.

The original motion that the item as altered do stand part of the Bill was then put. A division was taken when there voted.

For the motion.

Honourable Harbour Master.

Director of Public Works. Colonial Treasurer.

Against the motion.

Honourable E. R. BELILIOS.

T. H. WHITEHEAD. HO KAI.

""

>>

Registrar General.

""

Acting Attorney General.

""

Colonial Secretary.

C. P. CHATER.

""

The motion was carried by a majority of 2, and the item as altered declared by the President to stand part of the Bill.

Item 16.—“ Ecclesiastical Department."-The Colonial Secretary moved,-

That this item do stand part of the Bill.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Motion agreed to and the item declared by the President to stand part of the Bill.

Item 17.-" Education."--The Colonial Secretary moved,-

That this item do stand part of the Bill.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

The Honourable C. P. CHATER moved, as an amendment,-

That the salaries (included in the item) which have been increased under the general scheme of

increase be reduced to what they were before the sitting of the Committee of 1890.

The Honourable Ho KAI seconded.

Question put.

A division was taken when there voted

For the amendment.

Honourable E. R. BELILIOS.

ዓን

T. H. WHITEHEAD. HO KAI.

C. P. CHATER.

""

Against the amendment. Honourable Harbour Master.

Director of Public Works. Colonial Treasurer.

>>

""

Registrar General.

""

""

Acting Attorney General. Colonial Secretary.

The amendment was lost by a minority of 2.

The original motion that the item do stand part of the Bill was then put. A division was taken when there voted

For the motion.

Honourable Harbour Master.

Against the motion.

Honourable E. R. BELILIOS.

T. H. WHITehead. HO KAI.

Director of Public Works.

"1

"}

Colonial Treasurer.

"}

""

Registrar General.

C. P. CHATER.

"}

""

Acting Attorney General.

""

Colonial Secretary.

The motion was carried by a majority of 2, and the item declared by the President to stand of the Bill.

part

59

Item 18.-" Medical."-The Colonial Secretary moved,-

That this item do stand part of the Bill.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

The Honourable C. P. CHATER moved, as an amendment,

That the salaries (included in the item) which have been increased under the general scheme of

increase be reduced to what they were before the sitting of the Committee of 1890.

The Honourable HO KAI seconded.

Question put.

A division was taken when there voted

For the amendment. •

Honourable E. R. BELILIOS.

Against the amendment. Honourable Harbour Master.

T. H. WHITEHEAD. HO KAI.

""

""

91

C. P. CHATER.

"}

"

""

""

The amendment was lost by a minority of 2.

Director of Public Works. Colonial Treasurer.

Registrar General.

Acting Attorney General. Colonial Secretary.

The original motion that the item do stand part of the Bill was then put. A division was taken when there voted

For the motion.

Honourable Harbour Master.

Against the motion.

Honourable E. R. BELILIOS.

""

Director of Public Works. Colonial Treasurer.

""

T. H. WHITEHEAD. HO KAL.

""

"

""

Registrar General.

C. P. CHATER.

""

>>

Acting Attorney General.

>>

Colonial Secretary.

The motion was carried by a majority of 2, and the item declared by the President to stand part of the Bill.

Item 19.-" Magistracy."-The Colonial Secretary moved,—

That this item do stand part of the Bill.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

The Honourable C. P. CHATER moved, as an amendment,-

That the salaries (included in the item) which have been increased under the general scheme of

increase be reduced to what they were before the sitting of the Committee of 1890.

The Honourable HO KAI seconded.

Question put.

A division was taken when there voted

For the amendment.

Honourable E. R. BELILIOS.

T. H. WHITEHEAD.

Η ΚΑΙ.

""

C. P. CHATER.

""

Against the amendment. Honourable Harbour Master.

Director of Public Works. Colonial Treasurer.

Registrar General.

**

"}

""

Acting Attorney General. Colonial Secretary.

The amendment was lost by a minority of 2.

The Honourable HO KAI moved, as a further amendment,-

That the item be reduced by the salary of one Police Magistrate.

The Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD seconded.

The Colonial Secretary replied.

The amendment was withdrawn.

The original motion that the item do stand part of the Bill was then put. A division was taken when there voted

Honourable Harbour Master.

Against the motion.

Honourable E. R. BELILIOS.

For the motion.

Director of Public Works.

"}

"1

Colonial Treasurer.

""

T. H. WHITEHEAD. HO KAI.

""

Registrar General.

C. P. CHATER.

">

Acting Attorney General.

";

Colonial Secretary.

The motion was carried by a majority of 2, and the item declared by the President to stand part of the Bill.

1

!

60

Item 20.-"Police."-The Colonial Secretary moved,

That this item do stand part of the Bill.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

The Honourable C. P. CHATER moved, as an amendment,-

That the salaries (included in the item) which have been increased under the general scheme of

increase be reduced to what they were before the sitting of the Committee of 1890.

The Honourable Ho KAI seconded.

Question put.

A division was taken when there voted

For the amendment.

Honourable E. R. BELILIOS.

Against the amendment.

Honourable Harbour Master.

""

T. H. WHITEHEAD. HO KAI.

""

Director of Public Works. Colonial Treasurer.

"}

">

C. P. CHATER.

""

Registrar General.

""

>>

Acting Attorney General. Colonial Secretary.

The amendment was lost by a minority of 2.

The original motion that the item do stand part of the Bill was then put. A division was taken when there voted

For the motion.

Honourable Harbour Master.

Against the motion.

Honourable E. R. BELILIOS.

Director of Public Works. Colonial Treasurer.

T. H. WHITEHEAD.

"}

HO KAI.

Registrar General.

C. P. CHATER.

""

""

Acting Attorney General.

""

Colonial Secretary.

The motion was carried by a majority of 2, and the item declared by the President to stand part of the Bill.

Item 21.-"Gaol."-The Colonial Secretary moved,—

That this item do stand part of the Bill.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

The Honourable C. P. CHATER moved, as an amendment,-

That the salaries (included in the item) which have been increased under the general scheme of

increase be reduced to what they were before the sitting of the Committee of 1890.

The Honourable Ho KAI seconded.

Question put.

A division was taken when there voted

For the amendment.

Honourable E. R. BELILIOS.

Against the amendment.

Honourable Harbour Master.

""

T. H. WHITEHEAD. HO KAI.

"

Director of Public Works. Colonial Treasurer.

""

C. P. CHATER.

"

The amendment was lost by a minority of 2.

"}

Registrar General.

Acting Attorney General. Colonial Secretary.

The original motion that the item do stand part of the Bill was then put. A division was taken when there voted

For the motion.

Honourable Harbour Master.

Against the motion.

Honourable E. R. BELILIOS.

T. H. WHITEHEAD.

Director of Public Works.

""

Colonial Treasurer.

HO KAI.

""

"1

""

Registrar General.

C. P. CHATEr.

""

Acting Attorney General.

Colonial Secretary.

The motion was carried by a majority of 2, and the item declared by the President to stand part of the Bill.

L

61

Item 22.-"Fire Brigade."-The Colonial Secretary moved,-

That this item do stand part of the Bill.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

The Honourable C. P. CHATER moved, as an amendment,-

P

That the salaries (included in the item) which have been increased under the general scheme of

increase be reduced to what they were before the sitting of the Committee of 1890.

The Honourable Ho Kar seconded.

Question put.

A division was taken when there voted

For the amendment.

Honourable E. R. BELILIOS.

""

T. H. WHITEHEAD.

HO KAI.

C. P. CHATER. ·

Against the amendment.

Honourable Harbour Master.

"}

Director of Public Works. Colonial Treasurer.

""

>>

Registrar General.

"}

Acting Attorney General. Colonial Secretary.

The amendment was lost by a minority of 2.

The original motion that the item do stand part of the Bill was then put. A division was taken when there voted

For the motion.

Honourable Harbour Master.

Against the motion.

Honourable E. R. BELILIOS.

>>

Director of Public Works. Colonial Treasurer.

T. H. WHITEHEAD.

>>

HO KAI.

>>

21

Registrar General.

29

C. P. CHATER.

""

Acting Attorney General.

>>

Colonial Secretary.

The motion was carried by a majority of 2, and the item declared by the President to stand part of the Bill.

Item 23.-" Sanitary Department."-The Colonial Secretary moved,—

That this item do stand part of the Bill.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

The Honourable C. P. CHATER moved, as an amendment,——

That the salaries (included in the item) which have been increased under the general scheme of

increase be reduced to what they were before the sitting of the Committee of 1890.

The Honourable Ho KAI seconded.

Question put.

A division was taken when there voted

For the amendment.

Honourable E. R. BELILIOS.

Against the amendment.

Honourable Harbour Master.

17

T. H. WHITEHEAD. HO KAI.

39

Director of Public Works. Colonial Treasurer.

""

""

C. P. CHATER.

""

""

Registrar General.

""

Acting Attorney General.

>>

Colonial Secretary.

The amendment was lost by a minority of 2.

The original motion that the item do stand part of the Bill was then put. A division was taken when there voted

For the motion.

Honourable Harbour Master.

Against the motion.

Honourable E. R. BELILIOS.

Director of Public Works.

T. H. WHITEHEAD.

""

""

Colonial Treasurer.

HO KAI.

""

""

57

Registrar General.

C. P. CHATER.

Acting Attorney General.

"}

Colonial Secretary.

The motion was carried by a majority of 2, and the iten declared by the President to stand part of the Bill.

62

Item 24.-"Charitable Allowances."-The Colonial Secretary moved,―

That this item do stand part of the Bill.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question put.

Motion agreed to and the item declared by the President to stand part of the Bill.

Item 25.-"Transport."-The Colonial Secretary moved,--

That this item do stand part of the Bill.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question put.

Motion agreed to and the item declared by the President to stand part of the Bill.

Item 26.-" Miscellaneous Services."-The Colonial Secretary moved,--

That this item do stand part of the Bill.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question put.

Motion agreed to and the item declared by the President to stand part of the Bill.

Item 27. Military Expenditure."-The Colonial Secretary moved,

That this item do stand part of the Bill.

}

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

The Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD moved, as an amendment,-

That the vote for " Expenses of Volunteers

Expenses of Volunteers" be reduced to what it was in 1891. Amendment not seconded.

:

Original motion put and agreed to, and the item declared by the President to stand part of the Bill. Item 28. "Public Works, Recurrent."-The Colonial Secretary moved,-

That this item do stand part of the Bill.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question put.

Motion agreed to, and the item declared by the President to stand part of the Bill. The Colonial Secretary moved,--

That the figures representing the total of the above appropriations be altered in accordance with

the amendments to $1,899,375.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

The Honourable C. P. CHATER moved, as an amendment,-

That the said figures be reduced by a reduction of the salaries (included in the items) which have been increased under the general scheme of increase to what they were before the sitting of the Committee of 1890.

The Honourable Ho KAI seconded.

Question put.

A division was taken when there voted

For the amendment.

Honourable E. R. BELILIOS.

Against the amendment.

Honourable Harbour Master.

"}

T. H. WHITEHEAD,

'HO KAI.

""

C. P. CHATER.

""

""

>>

Director of Public Works. Colonial Treasurer.

"}

Registrar General.

""

Acting Attorney General.

""

The amendment was lost by a minority of 2.

Colonial Secretary.

The original motion that the total as altered do stand part of the Bill was then put. A division was taken when there voted

For the motion.

Honourable Harbour Master.

Against the motion.

Honourable E. R. BELILIOS.

Director of Public Works. Colonial Treasurer.

>>

T. H. WHITEHEAD.

HO KAI.

";

""

""

Registrar General.

""

C. P. CHATER.

Acting Attorney General.

Colonial Secretary.

The motion was carried by a majority of 2, and the total as altered declared by the President to stand part of the Bill.

}

63

Item 29.-" Public Works, Extraordinary."--

The Colonial Secretary moved,---

That the vote for the Central Market do stand part of the Bill.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question put.

Motion agreed to and the vote declared by the President to stand part of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary moved,-

That the vote for the Praya Reclamation (Government Contribution) do stand part of the Bill. The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question put.

Motion agreed to and the vote declared by the President to stand part of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary moved,-

That the vote for the Drainage of Recreation Ground, Happy Valley, do stand part of the Bill. The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question put.

Motion agreed to and the vote declared by the President to stand part of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary moved,-

1

That the vote for the Slaughter-House and Sheep and Pig Depôts do stand part of the Bill. The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question put.

Motion agreed to and the vote declared by the President to stand part of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary moved,---

That the vote for Gaol Extension be struck out of the Bill.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question put.

Motion agreed to and the vote declared by the President to be struck out of the Bill. The Colonial Secretary moved,-

That the vote for New Water Mains do stand part of the Bill.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question pnt.

Motion agreed to and the vote declared by the President to stand part of the Bill. The Colonial Secretary moved,-

That the vote for Sewerage of Victoria do stand part of the Bill.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question put.

Motion agreed to and the vote declared by the President to stand part of the Bill. The Colonial Secretary moved,-

That the vote for Water Supply of Kowloon do stand part of the Bill.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question put.

Motion agreed to and the vote declared by the President to stand part of the Bill. The Colonial Secretary moved,-

That the vote for Tytam Reservoir, Clear Water Channel, do stand part of the Bill. The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question put.

Motion agreed to and the vote declared by the President to stand part of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary moved,-

That the figures representing the total of the appropriations for Public Works Extraordinary be

altered to $357,000.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Motion agreed to and the total as altered declared by the President to stand part of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary moved,-

That the figures representing the total of the appropriations be altered, in accordance with the

amendments, to $2,256,375.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

64

The Honourable C. P. CHATER moved, as an amendment,-

That the said figures be reduced by a reduction of the salaries (included in the item) which have been increased under the general scheme of increase to what they were before the sitting of the Committee of 1890.

The Honourable HO KAI seconded.

Question put.

A division was taken when there voted

For the amendment.

Honourable E. R. BELILIOS.

Against the amendment.

Honourable Harbour Master.

T. H. WHITEHEAD. HO KAI.

"}

Director of Public Works. Colonial Treasurer.

""

,,

C. P. CHATER.

""

Registrar General.

,,

""

Acting Attorney General. Colonial Secretary.

The amendment was lost by a minority of 2.

The original motion that the total as altered do stand part of the Bill was then put. A division was taken when there voted

For the motion.

Honourable Harbour Master.

Against the motion.

Honourable E. R. BELILIOS.

Director of Public Works.

T. H. WHITEHEAD.

"

Colonial Treasurer.

HO KAL

">

"}

""

Registrar General.

C. P. CHATER.

"}

17

Acting Attorney General.

""

Colonial Secretary.

The motion was carried by a majority of 2, and the total as altered declared by the President to stand part of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary moved,--

That in section 1 the words enumerating the total expenditure be altered to the words "Two millions

Two hundred and fifty-six thousand Three hundred and seventy-five.”

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

The Honourable C. P. CHATER moved, as an amendment,--

That the words enumerating the total expenditure be altered so as to agree with a total diminished by a reduction of the salaries (included in the total expenditure) to what they were before the sitting of the Committee of 1890.

Question put.

A division was taken when there voted

For the amendment.

Honourable E. R. BELILIOS.

T. H. WHITEHEAD. HO KAI.

C. P. CHATER.

"

Against the amendment.

Honourable Harbour Master.

99.

Director of Public Works. Colonial Treasurer.

""

Registrar General.

Acting Attorney General.

"}

Colonial Secretary.

The amendment was lost by a minority of 2. The original motion was then put.

A division was taken when there voted

For the motion.

Honourable Harbour Master.

Director of Public Works. Colonial Treasurer.

Against the motion.

Honourable E. R. BELILIOS.

T. H. WHITEHEAD. HO KAI.

,,

""

Registrar General.

C. P. CHATER.

Acting Attorney General.

>>

Colonial Secretary.

The motion was carried by a majority of 2, and the words last referred to therein declared by the President to stand part of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary moved,--

That in the preamble the words enumerating the total expenditure be altered to the words "Two

millions Two hundred and fifty-six thousand Three hundred and seventy-five.”

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

į

65

The Honourable C. P. CHATER moved, as an amendment,-

That the words enumerating the total expenditure be altered so as to agree with a total diminished by a reduction of the salaries (included in the total expenditure) to what they were before the sitting of the Committee of 1890.

Question put.

A division was taken when there voted

For the amendment.

Honourable E. R. BELILIOS.

Against the amendment.

Honourable Harbour Master.

T. H. WHITEHEAD.

>>

HO KAI.

Director of Public Works. Colonial Treasurer.

""

C. P. CHATER.

"}

""

35

Registrar General.

Colonial Secretary.

Acting Attorney General.

The amendment was lost by a minority of 2.

The original motion was then put.

A division was taken when there voted

For the motion.

Honourable Harbour Master.

Against the motion.

Honourable E. R. BELILIOS.

21

Director of Public Works. Colonial Treasurer.

T. H. WHITEHEAD.

1)

HO KAI.

"9

"}

>>

Registrar General.

C. P. CHATER.

""

""

Acting Attorney General.

""

Colonial Secretary.

The motion was carried by a majority of 2, and the words last referred to therein declared by the President to stand part of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary moved, -

That in the title the words enumerating the total expenditure be altered to the words "Two millions

Two hundred and fifty-six thousand Three hundred and seventy-five."

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

The Honourable C. P. CHATER moved, as an amendment,-

That the words enumerating the total expenditure be altered so as to agree with a total diminished by a reduction of the salaries (included in the total expenditure) to what they were before the sitting of the Committee of 1890.

Question put.

A division was taken when there voted

For the amendment.

Honourable E. R. BELILIOS.

Against the amendment.

Honourable Harbour Master.

"}

T. H. WHITEHEAD. HO KAI.

21

Director of Public Works. Colonial Treasurer.

""

"}

`C. P. CHATER.

""

""

Registrar General.

""

Acting Attorney General.

""

Colonial Secretary.

The amendment was lost by a minority of 2. The original motion was then put.

A division was taken when there voted

For the motion.

Honourable Harbour Master.

Against the motion.

Honourable E. R. BELILIOS.

Director of Public Works.

""

"}

Colonial Treasurer.

T. H. WHITEHEAD. HO KAI.

""

Registrar General.

C. P. CHATer.

"}

Acting Attorney General.

""

Colonial Secretary.

The motion was carried by a majority of 2, and the words last referred to therein declared by the President to stand part of the Bill.

Council resumed and Bill reported with amendments.

The Colonial Secretary moved the third reading of the Bill, The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

66

:

The Honourable C. P. CHATER moved, as an amendment,-

That the total expenditure provided in the Bill be reduced by a reduction of the salaries (included in the total) which have been increased under the general scheme of increase to what they were before the sitting of the Committee of 1890.

The Honourable Ho KAI seconded.

Question put.

A division was taken when there voted

For the amendment.

Honourable E. R. BELILIOS.

"}

"?

·

T. H. WHITEHEAD.

Η ΚΑΙ.

C. P. CHATER.

Againt the amendment.

Honourable Harbour Master.

Director of Public Works. Colonial Treasurer.

>>

Registrar General.

""

"}

Acting Attorney General. · Colonial Secretary.

The amendment was lost by a minority of 2.

The original motion was then put.

A division was taken when there voted

For the motion.

Honourable Harbour Master.

Director of Public Works. Colonial Treasurer.

Registrar General.

Against the motion.

Honourable E. R. BELILIOS.

T. H. WHITEHEAD.

>"

HO KAI.

??

C. P. CHATER.

"}

Acting Attorney General. Colonial Secretary.

The motion was carried by a majority of 2.

Bill read a third time.

Question put that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

The Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD gave notice that a protest would be laid before the Council in connection with the Bill.

BILL ENTITLED " AN ORDINANCE ENACTED BY THE GOVERNOR OF HONGKONG, WITH THE ADVICE AND CONSENT OF THE LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL THEREOF, TO AUTHORISE THE APPROPRIATION OF A SUP- PLEMENTARY SUM OF THREE HUNDRED AND SIXTY THOUSAND SIX HUNDRED AND EIGHTY-SEVEN DOLLARS AND THIRTY-SEVEN CENTS TO DEFRAY THE CHARGES OF THE YEAR 1891."-Council in Committee on the Bill.

The Colonial Treasurer moved,-

That Section 1 and the items of expenditure enumerated therein aggregating in the total

$360,687.37 do stand part of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Motion agreed to and the section and items declared by the President to stand part of the Bill.

Council resumed and Bill reported without amendment.

The Colonial Treasurer moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Motion agreed to.

Question put-that this Bill do pass..

Bill passed.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned until Wednesday, the 14th of December, at 3 P.M.

Read and confirmed, this 14th day of December, 1892.

F. H. MAY,

Acting Clerk of Councils.

WILLIAM ROBINSON,

Governor.

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 15.

WEDNESDAY, 14TH DECEMBER, 1892.

67

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(Sir WILLIAM ROBINSON, K.C.M.G.).

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (GEORGE THOMAS MICHAEL O'BRIEN, C.M.G.).

the Acting Attorney General, (ANDREW JOHN LEACH).

""

the Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART LOCKHART). the Colonial Treasurer, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES).

>>

""

the Director of Public Works, (FRANCIS ALFRED COOPER).

"}

the Harbour Master, (ROBERT MURRAY RUMSEY). CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

">

""

">

">

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

EMANUEL RAPHAEL BELILIOS.

ABSENT:

The Honourable JAMES JARDINE BELL-IRVING.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 30th November, 1892, were taken as read and confirmed.

PROTEST AGAINST THE APPROPRIATION ORDINANCE, 1893.-The Honourable C. P. CHATER, pur- suant to notice, laid on the table a protest from the Unofficial Members of the Council against the Appropriation Ordinance for 1893.

The protest was read by the Acting Clerk of Councils.

PAPERS LAID ON THE TABLE.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following paper, viz. :-Correspondence respecting space in the Imperial Institute allotted for Exhibits from Hongkong.

REPORT OF THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the Report of the Finance Committee dated the 30th of November, (No. 12 of 1892).

RESOLUTION.-The Colonial Secretary moved the following Resolution, viz.:-

That the percentages on the valuation of tenements in Yaumati and Kowloon Point at present payable as rates under " The Rating Ordinance, 1888," be altered from 83 per cent. to 107 per cent.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

BILL ENTITLED

66

AN ORDINANCE TO DECLARE THE TERMS AND CONDITIONS APPLICABLE to Loans AUTHORISED TO BE RAISED BY THE GOVERNMENT OF HONGKONG AND TO PROVIDE FOR THE CREATION OF INSCRIBED STOCK."-The Colonial Treasurer moved the first reading of the Bill..

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED " AN ORDINANCE FOR RAISING THE SUM OF £200,000 BY LOAN FOR THE PURPOSE OF DEFRAYING THE COST OF CERTAIN PUBLIC WORKS."-The Colonial Treasurer moved the first reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

The Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD moved as an amendment that the Bill be read 3 months hence. The Honourable Member was ruled by the President to be out of order.

Original motion-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

:'

68

BILL ENTITLED

C

"AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE MARRIAGE ORDINANCE, 1875.'"-The Acting Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council went into Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed and Bill reported with amendments.

BILL ENTITLED

AN ORDINANCE TO PROVIDE FOR THE RECOGNITION IN THE COLONY OF Probates AND LETTERS OF ADMINISTRATION GRANTED IN THE UNITED KINGDOM."-The Acting Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded. Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council went into Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed and Bill reported without amendment.

The Acting Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded,

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE MEDICAL REGISTRATION ORDINANCE, 1884. ". The Acting Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed and progress reported.

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE TO REPEAL SECTION 45 OF ORDINANCE No. 8 of 1860 and to AMEND SCHEDULE A TO ORDINANCE No. 1 OF 1883."-The Acting Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

of

Council went into Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed and Bill reported without amendment.

The Acting Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Colonial Secretary in moving the adjournment addressed the Council.

The Council then adjourned till Wednesday, the 28th December, at 3 P.M.

Read and confirmed, this 11th day of January, 1893.

F. H. MAY,

Acting Clerk of Councils.

WILLIAM ROBINSON,

Governor.

HONG KONG, No. 205.

Governor

363

No. 92

28

HONGKONG.

CORRESPONDENCE RE VOTE OF Rs. 10,000 IN AID OF THE SUFFERERS BY THE RECENT HURRICANE IN MAURITIUS.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor, on the 16th November, 1892.

SIR,

DOWNING STREET,

4th August, 1892.

I have the honour to acknowledge the receipt of your despatch No. 217 of the 18th of June, and to convey to you my approval of the vote of Rs 10,000, which has been passed by the Legislative Council in aid of the sufferers by the recent hurricane in Mauritius.

It has given Her Majesty's Government much pleasure to note both the sympathy which has been so warmly expressed towards the Colony of Mauritius under this heavy calamity, and the assistance which has been on all sides so readily and generously extended to relieve the distress of the sufferers, and there can be no doubt that that sympathy and assistance will be fully appreciated by the Government and community of Mauritius.

SIR W. ROBINSON, K.C.M.G.,

No. 1849.

46

His Excellency

&c.,

&c.

&C.,

I have, &c.,

(Signed),

KNUTSFORD.

SIR,

GOVERNMENT HOUSE, MAURITIUS, 11th August, 1892.

I have the honour to acknowledge the receipt of Your Excellency's letter No. 102 dated the 25th June last, informing me that, on the 14th June, you despatched a telegram addressed to me as follows:-

Hongkong sympathises sincerely in the misfortune of Mauritius. Draw on

this Government for Rupees 10,000.

2. In accordance with your request, I have the honour to inform you that the Receiver General of the Colony has, by to-day's mail, drawn on the Treasurer of Hongkong in favour of the Mauritius Commercial Bank, on demand, the sum of Rs 10,000, and to state that the draft has been countersigned by the Acting Colonial Secretary.

3. I avail myself of this opportunity to express to Your Excellency how deeply touched the people of Mauritius have been by the generous sympathy shown to them by the Colony under your Government, and how gratefully I tender to you, in their name, my thanks for the liberal contribution of the Colony of Hongkong.

(Signed),

I have, &c.,

HUBERT E. H. JERNINGHAM, Acting Governor.

THE GOVERNOR OF HONGKONG,

&c.,

&c.,

&c.

391

No. 30

92

HONGKONG.

THE COLONIAL SURGEON'S REPORT FOR 1891,

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency. the Governor, on the 16th November, 1892.

GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL,

HONGKONG, 21st June, 1892.

SIR, I have the honour to forward my annual Report for the year 1891 of the work done in the different Establishments under my supervision, and to forward reports from the Superintendent of the Government Civil Hospital, to which is attached as an appendix an address to the Medical Association on his researches in Malarial Fever; the report of the Medical Officer in charge of Victoria Gaol; and that of the Government Analyst, to which he has added this year for the first time a report on the working of the Government Civil Hospital Pharmacy.

POLICE.

The admissions to Hospital show a decrease of 12, being 570 as compared with 582 in 1890; the deaths were the same as last year. Five of these occurred in Hospital: 2 Europeans, 2 Indians, and 1 Chinese. One Indian died in India while home on leave, and 1 Chinese in China while at home on leave; 7 in all.

The admissions to Hospital from the various sections of the Force for the last ten years are given in the following Table :-

1

Admissions to Hospital, 1882,

Do.,

1883,....

Europeans.

92...... .113..

Indians.

Chinese.

..230......

.227

.246..

239

....

Do.,

1884,

87..

.224.

...175

Do.,

1885.

.124..

.208.

..163

Do.,

1886,

138..

.243..

...221

Do.,

1887,...

.139...

293.

..187

Do.,

1888,

147..

279.

231

Do.,

1889,

..166..............

..230.....

..194

Do.,

Do.,

1890, 1891,.....

149..

.169...

.254.... .285....

.179 ..........118

By this it will be seen that the Europeans have suffered more severely than in any year in the previous nine years. It must be remembered that this does not show the entire sickness amongst the Europeans, as Inspectors and Sergeants who are married men are attended in many cases by me in their own quarters. The Indians and Chinese go to Hospital in nearly every case. The Indians this year have also suffered more heavily than in previous years, while the sickness amongst the Chinese has never been so small.

Table I shows the sickness and mortality in the Force for the different months of the year: Table II gives the average strength, rate of sickness and mortality.

Table III shows the admissions to Hospital from the different Stations and Districts in each month of the year. It is rather curious to note that the Peak Stations considering the small number of men stationed there have so large a number of sick. While Aberdeen, Pokfulam and Stanley show a much better state of health than they have done for a number of years. The new Station at Aber- deen has probably a great deal to say to this, as in previous years Aberdeen was one of the worst Stations.

The following Table gives the total admissions to Hospital and the deaths in the Police Force for the last ten years :-

Admissions.

Deaths.

1882,

1883,

.549.. ....599....

8

.10

1884,

....486..

7

1885,

..495..

9

1886,

..602...

....14

1887,

..619...........

1888,

...657.....

9 ....15

1889,

.590....

1890,

.....582...

14

7

1891,

.570................

7

392

TROOPS.

There is a considerable decrease as regards sickness among the Troops this year, the admissions to Hospital being 1,851 against 1,915 in 1890. The death rate shows a slight increase, being 17 as compared with 15 in 1890. The following Table gives the sickness and mortality for the last ten years. The former has only been exceeded once, and the latter only twice in that time so that there is much room for improvement and better accommodation is evidently very much wanted :-

Deaths.

1882, 1883,

1

Admissions.

.1,019.......... .1,105...

1884,

1,097

9

..........

.10

12

1885,

.1,190.....................24

1886,

..1,607.

1887,

1,749....

1888,

.... 1,485..

1889,

1,732..

1890,

1,915......

1891,

1,851.....

9

.........14

.21

.16

.15

......17

GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL.

The Superintendent's report is a very satisfactory one as regards the working of this institution, and the improvements nearly completed and those sanctioned will very much increase its efficiency.

The Staff with one exception have worked very satisfactorily, the exception is the Junior Ward- masters. We do not seem to be able to get over the trouble we have always had with them and the changes are nearly as frequent as ever.

The Nursing Sisters' work has been all that could be desired of them, and they have been the greatest acquisition to the Hospital. Of all the improvements none have been more important than their introduction.

It is with great regret that I have to mention the loss of Mr. ROGERS, the late Steward. He was the first to hold this appointment and no one could have done the work more satisfactorily. He well earned the respect and esteem of all who knew him, and I am very sorry he had to retire on account of ill health. Still I am glad to report that we have found an efficient substitute in Mr. CHAPMAN to take his place.

The admissions to Hospital show a decrease of ninety, the decrease is partly satisfactory as it is amongst the Police, Government Servants, Police Cases, and Destitutes. The decrease amongst the paying patients has been principally because the wards have always been full and applicants have had to be refused, but the increase of accommodation that has been sanctioned will, I hope, in another year obviate the troubles we have had in accommodating this class of patients. They do not, as a rule, come in unless they are in pretty bad case, and most of them require to remain for a very long time. Many that desired first class accommodation, that is a ward to themselves, have had to be put on the second class list, that is with one other patient in the ward. The old system of having junior messes at every Bank and Mercantile House having been nearly done away with, and most young men now living in chambers and messing at the Clubs, or the Hotels, has greatly increased this demand, as will be seen in the Table below when comparing the first three years with the last three years of the ten given.

The following Table shows the number and classification of those brought to Hospital for the past ten years:-

1882.

1883.

1884.

1885.

1886. 1887. 1888. 1889.

1890. 1891.

Police,

549

599

486

495

602

619

657

590

582

570

Board of Trade,

116

110

60

100

132

103

153

135

110

135

Private paying Patients,

268

260

259

283

381

324

313

402

527

464

Government Servants,

88

105

96

124

144

147

159

135

191

179

Police Cases,

207

227

231

238

142

208

242

252

264

240

Destitutes,

230

201

222

270

222

255

248

279

283

279

1,458

1,502 1,354 1,510 1,623

1,656 1,772 1,793 1,957 1,867

The percentage of deaths to admissions compares favourably with former years-4.49. Only twice in the last ten years has it been as low as this, see Table VI. Of the 84 deaths, 25 occurred within 24 hours of admission, and 32 within 48 hours, all being in a moribund condition.

393

The following Table gives the admissions and deaths in this Hospital for the past ten years :-

Admissions.

Deaths.

....68

1882,

1883,

1884,

1885,

1886,

1887,

1888,

1889,

1890,

1891,

..1,458.....

1,502..

..70

.1,354.......

....50

1,510.....

.76

1,623.

.79

1,656.....

..89

1,772.....

..80

..1,793..

....77

1,957

..98

1,867...

.84

The Superintendent's Report is a very full one, has been very carefully considered, and shows, together with the appendix he has given, how earnestly he has worked to render the establishment of which he has charge thoroughly efficient.

SMALL-POX HOSPITAL AND EPIDEMIC HULK HYGEIA.

There were seventeen cases of small-pox treated in this Hospital and the Hulk Hygeia, of which only one died. The Hygeia is rather an expensive investment. She was only used for the first time in the autumn and has already cost a considerable sum for repairs though she was only launched in the beginning of the summer, and to make her in a fit condition she needs another large expenditure. She has to be anchored about three miles off the town for safety and even under the lee of Stone Cutters' Island in a gale last year she drifted some distance from her moorings. If she was stationed nearer the town in the event of bad weather she would have to be towed into safe quarters and towed back again, that would be a great expense and there is absolutely no site within the Colony. Now that Stone Cutters' Island is in the occupation of the Military that can be used for the purpose of a Quarantine Station.

Table VIIA shows the number, nationality, and duration of the cases of small-pox treated, those marked with an * were treated on board the Hygeia in charge of Dr. Lowson.

PUBLIC MORTUARY.

Table VIII gives the return of dead bodies sent to the Mortuary for examination. The total number was 138.

Of these 52 were found to have died from disease, 69 were accidental deaths and 17 suicides; there were none sent in this year homicidal deaths.

VICTORIA GAOL.

The following Table gives the number of admissions to the Gaol and the daily average number of prisoners for the past ten years:

1882,

Total No. admitted

to Gaol.

3,498...

Daily average No. of Prisoners.

622.00 .....542.15

1883,

1884,

1885,

1886,

1887,

1888,

1889, 1890,

1891,

.3,486..

4,023....

....552.00

3,610......

..530.00

.4,600..............

674.00

4,302.....

3,627 ....

+

3,705.......

.3,444..

...

5,231..

.........

584.00

,531.00

......581.00

.....566.00

....507.00

This Table shows that there was a larger number of admissions than in any of the previous nine years, an increase compared with 1890 (which has the smallest number recorded in the past ten years) of 1,787. The Opium and Gambling Ordinances are responsible for the greater portion of this increase of admissions. It is, however, satisfactory to note that in spite of the increase of admissions the daily average number of prisoners in Gaol is considerably less than all the previous nine years, showing a large diminution in absolute crime and the very large proportion of short-term prisoners. Opium-smoking and gambling will never be eradicated from the Chinese by law. If on the same

394

.

:

principle everybody in England in possession of alcoholic liquor and were caught gambling were imprisoned or fined, the gaols would not hold them. Yet opium-smoking does not do 1,000th part of the harm to either the individual or his family that alcohol does at home. As for the gamblers not one in a hundred is investing more than a few cents at a time and crime does not appear to be more rampant in Macao where gambling is licensed than it is here.

In spite of all that has been said about the accommodation in the Gaol, I doubt if any gaol in England can show as small a rate of sickness and mortality as the Victoria Gaol. To remove the Gaol to a new site would enormously increase both the sickness and mortality as there is no other site without opening up new ground, and for many years this would be a great source of trouble. The Table above shows that the daily average of prisoners is on the decrease and but for the Gambling Ordinance being enforced more thoroughly during the past year there would have been a much larger decrease. The expense of a new gaol for the building itself would be enormous and the upkeep would be more than doubled when removed from its central position. I see nothing to be gained by a removal and a new gaol, but a great monetary loss to the Colony, and bodily harm to the prisoners. The Western theories as regards sanitation are in many cases at a discount as regards the Chinese, and the overcrowding theory is amongst them. Of their own free will they will not bear what to European ideas is considered most beneficial to their health. In Sir ARTHUR KENNEDY'S time a new set of quarters on sanitary principles were built for the Chinese servants at Government House. The Chinese servants immediately on taking possession reduced the amount of ventilation very considerably, and on being told that the obstructions could not be permitted, they said they preferred to leave, and His Excellency was reduced to the choice of having no servants or abandoning the European theory of ventilation as far as they were concerned. As regards the town and overcrowding the Sanitary Board have been completely nonplussed, the first attempt to carry out the Health Ordinance as far as this was concerned raised such a commotion that it was found all business would be stopped, the excitement among the Chinese at the enormous increase of cost it would entail on them for rent was immense. Until the new drainage system is completed and the new water-supply also, no reliable statistics can be made as regards overcrowding on the health of the population. Under the circumstances I have described in former annual reports and Mr. CHADWICK has reported on concerning house- building, house-drainage and water-supply, the mortality among the Chinese according to European ideas of sanitation has been exceptionally low. When the present accommodation for them has been otherwise rendered as healthy as possible, it will then be time to consider the question of overcrowding. As far as ventilation is concerned Chinese houses are very detrimental to many Europeans who inhabit them and cannot afford the rent of a European-built house. In the cold weather it is impossible to keep out of a draught in a Chinese house, and children and adults suffer terribly from chest and bowel complaints in consequence. In the hot weather the Chinese houses are seldom overcrowded, for you will see the inhabitants sleeping in the streets by the thousand. In the Chinese quarter it is difficult sometimes to make your way through a street at night without treading on some one. habits and customs of the Chinese are entirely different from Europeans. In cold weather the loose clothing and the number of coats they wear, wrap them in many layers of hot air. In hot weather a loin cloth or a pair of pyjamas is enough for them. The European with his tight clothing and no decent fire-place in the house, for no ordinary Chinese house has a fire-place except in the kitchen, suffers from the cold and draughts in winter, and his ideas of decency compell him to suffer from the heat in summer ten times more than any Chinaman would. On account of overcrowding and for the above reasons, I am of opinion it would be a terrible mistake and misfortune to the Colony if a new gaol is built. The proposed alterations that have been sent home, I think, will meet all the requirements of the Colony as regards gaol accommodation. The number of cases admitted to Hospital is a little over 14 per thousand of admissions to the Gaol, and the deaths from sickness are a little under 14 per thousand. There were seven deaths from disease, none of them due to the confinement in the Gaol, and one death from suicide, the man did not die immediately after hanging himself but a few hours after from the effects of the attempt to hang himself. As a matter of fact the Chinese prisoners in Gaol as regards health are far better off than out of it and in a good many other things: food, lodging and clothing, &c., in the majority of cases.

The

Dr. MARQUES is to be congratulated on being able to give such a good report of the health of the prisoners in spite of the overcrowding.

Table XIB and XIc give, respectively, the numbers, age, weight on admission and at the end of a month, with the quantity smoked, of opium smokers in the Gaol, and the number that required medical treatment, with the cause.

There were 56 prisoners who reported themselves as opium smokers to the extent of one mace per diem or over, of these 10 were placed under medical treatment. Of these 5 increased in weight, 4 had slightly decreased in weight at the end of the month, one remained the same. Of the healthy ones the majority increased in weight. The decrease of weight in all the cases recorded was very slight. The average weight of a Chinaman is about 110 lbs.

I have tested this in the Gaol for the use of the New York Insurance Society, when I took the weight of several hundreds of those at work in the different classes of labour. It is a rare thing to find a Chinaman that will top 10 stone. My chair coolies are well known for their speed and endurance and size, the heaviest of them is only a little over 130 lbs.

395

A Chinaman must be very muscular and fat to top 140 lbs., their bones are so small in comparison with other races as also their average height in the Southern parts of China. In the 56 opium smokers there are only 9 men who reach 120 lbs. or over, one reached 135 lbs.

The cost of one mace of opium is 10 cents, so that all these men spent $3 or more a month in smoking the drug.

As so much has been said in Parliament lately I will give a brief resumé of my 18 years' experience of opium smokers in the Gaol and the different tests I have made myself and caused to be made with the view of finding out what harm it does physically and mentally.

When I first took charge of the Gaol in 1873 I found that every prisoner that reported himself as an opium smoker was put on extra diet, a mixture that contained Laudanum, three times a day, a Quinine pill three times a day, and 2 oz. of Gin. As I had no experience of opium smoking I kept all these cases under observation with the result that in three months' time I saw no necessity for this treatment of opium smokers and abolished it altogether treating them as all the other prisoners without regard for the habit, and this has been done ever since and the opium habit ignored. I could find no set of symptoms that was common to the opium smokers only or justified any exceptional treatment. The result was much fewer men reported themselves as opium smokers, as there was nothing to be gained by it. For the first few years I did little more than this as my attention was wholly occupied in my spare time with the sanitation of the Colony which at that time devolved entirely upon me with two Inspectors for assistants. Afterwards I began to keep these records of every opium smoker. In the eighteen years there have been over 1,000 of those addicted to the habit in the Gaol and among them only one death has occurred which had no relation whatever to the habit. I have not been able to find that the habit affected them in any way physically or mentally. I recorded in my annual report for 1877 the case of an opium smoker whose consumption had averaged 8 oz. a day for 19 years. This man was in Gaol for embezzlement of $40,000 and had been a wealthy merchant in Singapore, in his case the habit was entirely ignored, for the first few days he suffered from want of sleep but it was from anxiety more than any thing else, for he had been told that if he gave up the habit suddenly he would die and he was proportionally disgusted when nothing happened, as he said if he had known it would cost him so little he would have given up the habit long ago. He was a stout, strongly built man of about fifty years of age and the largest consumer of the drug we have had in the Gaol. During his three months' detention here before being sent back to Singapore he was in good health and never required a single dose of medicine. I tried opium smoking myself and could make nothing of it though I smoked more than two mace at a single sitting; it had no effect upon me whatever. Dr. MANSON was of opinion that I did not use the drug properly or such would not have been the case, so I had him, Sir W. MARSH, Mr. PRICE and some others interested in the matter to dinner one night, and after dinner smoked in his presence having an old opium smoker to load the pipe for me and a fresh box of the Opium Farmer's opium. Dr. MANSON watching me all the time. He was satisfied that-the opium was properly and fairly used but could find no effect as indeed I felt none myself. But he declared I should before morning, they all left at midnight, and half an hour afterwards I was called out to attend a child in convulsions which occupied me nearly three hours before the child was sufficiently recovered to be left. At nine o'clock next morning I met Dr. MANSON on my rounds and told him how I had passed the night and so far I had felt no effects from the smoking whatever.

In 1881 I requested Mr. HUGH MCCALLUM, who was at that time the Government Analyst, to make some experiments, and he sent me in a report dated March 6th, 1881., He afterwards embodied this report in an article he sent to the China Review ("On Opium and Opium Smoking") 1883, Volume 11, No. 5, page 278. This report, I think, should be printed for information and recorded, and I enclose it as an appendix to my report as the Home Government are anxious to obtain all the inform- ation they can on the habit of opium smoking.

But

As a habit I cannot find it is so injurious as tobacco smoking is in some cases. I am an inveterate tobacco smoker myself, and as far as I am concerned it has never done me any harm, but I have seen many cases of its evil effects on other people. I have not been able to find even this much in the case of the opium smoker. Very few people have got through their first pipe or cigar without feeling very sick even if they have not had a violent attack of vomiting; but I have tried opium smoking on many novices and could find nothing approaching the effect of tobacco, though the smoker does not inhale the smoke of tobacco the effect of the nicotine in the case of a novice is visible to any one. though the opium smoke is always inhaled deep into the lungs no effects of Morphine are visible at all, and I doubt very much if this principle ever reaches the lungs at all. As will be seen in Mr. MCCALLUM's report there is about 6 to 7 per cent. of Morphia in the opium sent out by the Opium Farmer, yet the old opium smoker, who has had the habit for over 30 years and was one of the best Chinese Government servants in my Department, could not detect the difference between the Opium Farmer's opium containing 7 per cent. of Morphia the same opium with an additional 15 per cent. of Morphia added, and the Opium Farmer's opium with all the Morphia abstracted. The opium expert, attached to the Opium Farmer's firm, condemns his employer's opium and with 15 and 25 per cent. of Morphia added says it has no taste or smell at all. The old opium smoker is a pensioner now, he was the Senior Chinese Wardmaster at the Hospital, his habit never rendered him unfit for duty, he

396

was one of the most intelligent, trustworthy and active men we have had in my Department and I very much regretted his loss when old age compelled him to resign after 30 years' service. No European was a better dresser or better post mortem assistant and many of the trained Europeans we have had were not his equal; for a man of his age he is in good health now, possesses all his faculties and his intelligence, but is as inveterate a smoker as ever. I am in no way in favour of opium smoking, to me it is a ridiculous, lazy habit. To smoke opium you must devote your entire attention to it and to it only and I can't find any pleasure in it or the reason for its fascination ainongst the Chinese. In all the description of opium dens in European countries alcoholic drinks come in as well. But amongst the Chinese no liquor is taken at or about the time of smoking. The dens in European countries or colonies devoted to opium are mostly devoted to general debauchery as well. In China the houses where opium is smoked are devoted to that alone, and no such scenes as are described in European dens are to be found among them; for I have visited them in different parts of China as well as in this Colony. Opium smoking is also indulged in in Chinese brothels, but even in them such rowdy scenes never take place as in the similar places where Europeans congregate. General debility accounted for all the 5 cases admitted from the 82 opium smokers in the Gaol to Hospital in 1890, but as three of them were 58 years of age had they not been opium smokers they would probably have been put on the sick list as suffering from age. Then as many of the opium smokers in Gaol are of the lowest class of Chinese and pinch their bellies for the luxury. They are probably on a par with habitual drunkards at home, who earn this character for 6 pennyworth of gin or less a day on an empty stomach, when the same amount of alcohol has no effect on the well-fed consumer. There is one more test which I hope the Government Analyst will be able to make this year with the convenience of the new laboratory, and that is how much morphia enters the mouth and lungs of the opium smoker with the smoke or the other less pernicious constituents of opium. The introduction of alcoholic drinks by Europeans to otherwise temperate nations has done more barm a thousand fold than ever opium has done among the Chinese, but then that would affect the people at home, but there is only one India to be abused and no European nationality is affected. The palaver about opium eating in India has only been taken up because of opium being introduced into China. What Society has thought it worth its while to take up the questions of Indian hemp smoking and eating in India a very much more deleterious habit both to mind and body? Better men than myself have taken up the gauntlet for the opium eater; but my five years' service in Assam and Bengal gave me considerable experience of that and I have had personal experience as well having eaten over an ounce of opium a day for months that I can understand the fascination for and the pleasure in it, but I found no difficulty in leaving it off, beyond a few sleepless nights and a considerable amount of irritability caused by its cessation. Khalassees, or Indian seamen, largely employed in all the Indian trade are to be seen in every seaport in Europe, and yet I am considerably under the mark in saying at least 15 per cent. of these men are opium eaters, and I have done many long voyages with them; better seamen with finer physique for their size cannot be found. You will never see a vessel put to sea with a third of them incapable of doing duty for days from the effect of this habit, but you can any time see a vessel set sail from an English crew more than a third incapable from drink when going down the stormy English Channel. To abolish the opium trade in India will do a good thing for China. India and Ceylon are running her hard in the tea trade competition, but do away with the Indian opium trade and she will grow opium for all the world. Every Consular Report shows the rapid and extensive increase of the growth of opium in China, and if it is made worth his while John Chinaman will soon improve his manufacture of the drug, and it will be smuggled into India wholesale.

LUNATIC ASYLUMS.

In November this year the Chinese Lunatic Asylum was first opened. There were already two Chinese, one male and one female, in the European Asylum, as there was nowhere else to put them.

On the 1st of January there were three European lunatics, one Coloured lunatic, and one Chinese in the European Asylum. There were five European lunatics, one Coloured, and one Chinese admitted during the year. Most of these have been sent to their own countries.

The two Chinese were transferred from the European Lunatic Asylum to the Chinese Asylum, when it was opened in November.

Five cases were transferred from the Tung Wa Hospital at the same time to the Asylum. One fresh case was admitted during the ensuing two months.

TUNG WA HOSPITAL.

The number of admissions to this Hospital during 1891 was 2,514, of these 1,159 died in the Hospital, 331 were moribund when admitted. As I have often stated the majority of the cases admitted into this Hospital are in a hopeless condition on admission, this is patent to any one walking round the wards without any medical education.

the

Of out-patients there were 99,446 who attended the Hospital during this year. At the end of year

there were 112 still in the Hospital.

A

$

397

There were 22 cases of small-pox admitted, of which 15 died and 7 were discharged. Most of these are unvaccinated cases, and the majority infants.

1,875 people were vaccinated, 1,782 at the Hospital and 93 in the Out-Stations. A free supply of calf lymph is sent to this Hospital every year by me.

LOCK HOSPITAL.

This work has been carried on for the past year in the buildings temporarily hired for the pur- pose; but, in the course of another month, it will be removed to its permanent quarters which have so long been occupied by the Nursing Staff of the Government Civil Hospital, both buildings being very inappropriate for the purpose for which they were in use but the best temporary arrangement that it was possible to make as I have before reported.

Mrs. ACKERS, the Matron, returned this year from her well-earned leave in England, much to the delight of her little patients.

I am happy to report that the benefits these women receive from the Hospital are appreciated more and more every year since the Contagious Diseases Ordinance was abolished in 1887, the voluntary attendance on the examinations has improved year by year since that date. No coërcion whatever is used to make them attend the examinations or to make them stay in Hospital when found to be diseased.

The following Table shows the number of registered women for the last seven years, the number of examinations made, the attendance being once a week, the number of examinations supposing every woman attended once a week, and defect in attendance compared with the real number of examinations made, and the amount of disease found amongst them :-

1885, 1886,

1887*,

1888,

1889,

1890, 1891,

YEAR.

No. of WOMEN ON REGISTER.

No. of

No. of EXAMINATIONS.

DEFECT

EXAMINATIONS EVERY WOMAN

IN

MADE.

ATTENDING

ONCE A WEEK.

ATTENDANCE.

DISEASE

FOUND AND

HEALED.

272

13,532

14,344

812

416

272

13,425

14,344

919

414

272

12,223

14,344

1,765

143

269

10,924

13,988

3,064

66

269

10,924

13,988

3,064

83

260

11,914

13,520

1,606

82

276

12,788

14,352

1,564

80

* September 1, 1887, Compulsory attendance abolished.

No woman is examined when her monthly discharge is on, and allowance has to be made besides for ordinary sickness. The deficit amounts to a little over 5 attendances for each woman in a year not much when the above causes for absence are allowed for. The deficit is the smallest since 1886, the last whole year when compulsory attendance was enforced.

The number of registered women has increased by 16. The number of admissions to Hospital was 80 as compared with 82 in 1890. There were some half dozen very bad cases which from their long stay in Hospital very considerably raised our average of days under treatment; one of these cases was of a Phagedenic type which is rarely seen.

No returns are now sent in by the Navy which is much to be regretted as it has upset the statistics of many years and their Tables showed better, in conjunction with the Police, the amount of disease attributable to the registered women.

The Military are unreliable, for it is noticeable that every year a Regiment remains here the amount of disease increases. Their knowledge of the town increases and they distribute their favours more among unregistered women. The Naval seamen go to the places most readily to be found. The Police confine themselves more to the Registered Houses as they find them safer; they are better paid than the soldiers and their stoppages are heavy when off duty from their own indiscretions. The ordinary seamen treated in Hospital do not afford any comparison, as many of them contract the disease in other Ports, and doubtless disease contracted in this Port is not discovered until after they have left in many cases.

The Military show an increase of 33 cases from all causes, being 452 as compared with 419 admissions to Hospital in 1890. There is an increase of 29 cases of constitutional disease, being 82 admissions this year as compared with 53 in 1890.

In the Police there is a decrease of disease of 12, there were 57 admissions this year from all causes as compared with 69 in 1890. A decrease of 1 in the admissions from constitutional disease, there being 5 admissions from this cause compared with 6 in 1890.

398

The cases treated in the Civil Hospital show a decrease in the total of 29, there being 129 admis- sions compared with 158 in 1890. The cases of constitutional disease show an increase of 6, being 15 as compared with 9 in 1890.

HEALTH OF THE COLONY.

The number of deaths among the European and American residents was 57 as compared with 95 last year. The Census shows an increase of 1,155, being 4,195 as compared with 3,040 for the previous ten years. The percentage of deaths 1.36 the lowest percentage in the last 10 years. See Table XVI.

There has been no epidemic form of disease during the past year.

DEATHS AMONG EUROPEANS (BRITISH AND FOREIGN).

FEVERS.

VOMITING

YEARS.

DIARRHEA. Cholera. AND

TOTAL.

Enteric.

Simple Continued.

PURGING.

Typhus.

1873,

6

1874,

1

4

P4

2

17

25

4

17

...

26

1875,

1

18

...

24

1876,

1

9

14

24

1877,

5

8

1878,

3

15

+2

10

27

9

29

1879,

3

21

14

38

1880,

1

12

1

10

24

1881,

2

17

10

29

1882,

10

13

1

13

37

1883,

1

9

9

19

1884,

7

4

12

...

23

1885,

1886,

1887,

1888,

1889,

76752 HO

11

9

19

46

8 10

5

18

6

...

...

25

16

25

50

10

...

1

16

4

12

15

1890, 1891,

The deaths from the classes of disease shown in the above Table among Europeans show an increase of 3, and with the exception of last year shows the lowest total for the last 19 years amongst Europeans; 5 deaths are reported from cholera which in this Colony has been mostly of a sporadic type. In my opinion always, but in that I am not borne out by my confrères. These five deaths are reported from the European Hospitals.

DEATHS AMONG CHINESE.

FEVERS.

VOMITING

YEARS.

DIARRHEA. Cholera. AND

TOTAL.

Enteric.

Simple Continued.

PURGING.

Typhus.

1873,

1874,

125

223

12

96

16

46

1875,

31

291

1876,

94

343

1877,

145

370

1878,

89

481

33

1879,

116

733

21

1880,

309

373

1881,

438

168

38

1882,

679

71

1883,

262

571

1884,

132

600

1885,

105

755

1886,

9

772 -

1887.

9

1888,

1889,

1890,

1891,

2116

441 299

25

363

342

427

22:02 :* :** :OR~ : ~ :

195 231

319

402

288

612

259

696

8

311

834

701

1,304

608

1,478

348

1,030

435

1,079

465

1,215

3

660

1,496

2

301

1,035

561

7

176

1,604

10

326

19

1,136

276

13

764

2

361

17

236

917

180

7

551

2

216

1

562

329

771

399

The above Table gives the deaths from similar causes among Chinese. This shows an increase on the total compared with the previous year of 109, there being 771 cases compared with 562 in 1890.

Nine deaths are reported from vomiting and purging. Mr. MCCALLUM and myself inspected the bodies in these cases, some of them never had any vomiting and purging; two cases were from heart disease, and one from disease of the lungs. In a boat at Yaumati five cases of vomiting and purging were reported and one death among them. We went across to inspect them. The man that died had been suffering from Malarial Fever for nearly a month, two of the others bolted when they saw us coming, and the two that remained were suffering from high fever at the time. They had all suffered from the usual bilious vomiting and purging at the onset of the attack.

Mr. CROW's analytical report is of great interest as giving a full account of the water-supply to the Colony from the different sources, and it is satisfactory to know that we are far better off than most towns at Home and quite as well off as any of them in this respect.

Mr. LUCAS, the Assistant Apothecary, did the analytical work for Mr. CROW while he was away on leave in a most satisfactory manner and deserves great credit for a careful and voluminous report he made on the Taitam Water-supply.

In conclusion, it is satisfactory to note steady improvement in this Department generally with the yearly increasing demands made upon it.

I have the honour to be,

The Honourable G. T. M. O'BRIEN, C.M.G.,

Colonial Secretary.

Sir,

Your obedient Servant,

PH. B. C. AYRES,

Colonial Surgeon.

APPENDIX.

Mr. H. McCallum's Report on Opium and Opium Smoking.

GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL,

HONGKONG, 6th March, 1881.

SIR,-With reference to your request that I should estimate the Morphine value of the different preparations of opium used for smoking purposes and furnish you with what information I could relative thereto, I have the honour to lay before you the following remarks.

The Morphine value of the different preparations of opium depend chiefly on the amount of extract yielded by and the percentage of Morphine present in the crude opium from which they were prepared. Now as opium varies considerably in this respect the preparations thereof will vary accordingly. There is also more or less loss of Morphine during the preparation of smoking extract the loss being greater the longer it is submitted to moist heat and the higher the temperature. Making due allowance for variations from these causes, the results obtained from the different kinds examined and stated below, may be taken to fairly represent their average percentages of Morphine.

Indian opium average Morphine value of...................

5 to 8 per cent. quantity of smoking extracts yielded by ........70 to 80 ""

1st Quality of prepared opium from Hongkong opium farm yielded 5.86 per cent. Morphine. 2nd Quality of prepared opium from Hongkong opium farm yielded 7.30 per cent. Morphine. Cake prepared opium from a coolie smoking-house said to have been prepared from opium dross yielded 6.28 per cent. Morphine.

Opium Dross (scrapings from opium pipe) yielded 4.76 per cent. Morphine. Opium Dross average quantity of extract yielded by 65 to 70 per cent.

It is generally assumed that the effect of smoking opium is similar to that of eating it and that this is principally due to the Morphine it contains; this assumption appears very problematical when the following facts are taken into consideration :---

1st. That Indian opium is the kind most prized by smokers and it is characterised by its

usually low percentage of Morphine.

2nd. That the Chinese estimate the value of opium according to flavour and the quantity of

extract it yields.

3rd. The mode of preparing smoking extract tends to the destruction of Morphine.

4th. The large quantity which can be smoked without any apparent toxie effect not only by

habitual smokers but also by beginners.

5th. There is no authentic case of acute poisoning from opium smoking.

An experiment has been made bearing on this point and although not conclusive it is confirmatory of the idea that Morphine is not the active agent which gives pleasure to the opium smoker.

400

The following tabulated statement explains and gives the result of experiment:

Description of Samples

of

Prepared Opium

submitted for trial.

Opinion of a Chinese Expert in one of the Opium Firms, Hongkong.

Opinion of a nine years' Opium Smoker.

No. 1. Prepared Opium from Is fairly good, is a mixture of Bengal Opium and something

Opium Farm.

else.

No. 2. Prepared Opium minus Is black and coarse, smell fairly good, is not Opium.

Morphine.

No. 3. No. 1 with 10 per

cent. Morphine added.

No 4. No. 1 with 20 per

cent. Morphine added.

Good.

Not very good.

Coarse but can be smoked, contains Opium with some other Same as No. 1.

mixture, is not so good as No. 1.

Very coarse and black, burns like charcoal, contains no Opium.

Fairly good but not so good

as No. 1 and No. 3.

The prepared opium minus Morphine was made from Patna opium having as little as possible of the other opium constituents removed with the Morphine.

The samples were submitted without any remark beyond desiring an opinion as to quality. A second trial was made with similar results.

Description of Samples

of

Prepared Opium submitted for trial.

Opinion of a Chinese Expert in one of the Opium Farms, Hongkong.

Opinion of a nine years'

Opium Smoker.

No. 1. Opium Farm Prepar- ed Opium contains 7 per cent. Morphine.

No. 2. No. 1 with 15 per

cent. Morphine added.

No. 3. No 1 with 25 per

cent. Morphine added.

Appearance coarse and when burnt becomes black and hard, Very good.

it is Bengal drug but not pure, it is mixed with some other stuff and has no taste.

Burns very quick and has no taste or smell of Opium at all. Colour red and coarse when burnt, gives out plenty of smoke and leaves simply ash and no Opium to smoke.

Just like No. 2, only a shade better.

No. 4. Prepared Opium minus When applied to the light burns like Opium, but in a moment

Morphine.

it burns quite black and the dross leaves a bad smell, when burning gives out strong smoke.

Same as No. 1.

Not good.

Same as No. 1.

It will be observed that the Chinese expert bases his opinion on the physical appearance of the extract, its behaviour in the flame of the lamp and its smell, not on its effect when smoked. The nine years' opium smoker apparently judged of its quality in a somewhat similar manner, but as he actually smoked a considerable quantity of each, viz., nearly a quarter of an ounce of each of those to which Morphine had been added and over two ounces of No. 4 in the second Table, his opinion is considered of most value. At my request he got some of his friends to try No. 4, in the second Table and they agreed with him that it was good. On one occasion in about twelve hours he smoked a quantity of opium 'to which Morphine had been added equal to at least twenty grains of Morphine.

If the effects of opium smoking are similar to those of opium eating and Morphine the active agent it can only be said regarding the former mode of using the drug that a more elaborate, troublesome, wasteful and expensive method could scarcely be devised to obtain a minimum of effect from a maximum of power.

In connection with the above I may mention that I have visited a number of opium-smoking houses of different classes, but have not as yet been fortunate enough to see that profound sleep with beautiful dreams, &c, which has been so graphically described. In the coolie houses I have seen men asleep after their evening pipe and also most probably a hard day's work they having taken up their quarters there for the night. However, a slight shake with the sight of a ten-cent piece and they were very soon wide awake.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

Pu. B. C. AYRES, Esq., M.R.C.S. &c.,

Colonial Surgeon and Inspector of Hospitals.

HUGH MCCAllum.

POLICE.

Table I.-Shewing the ADMISSIONS into and DEATHS in the GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL during each Month of the Year 1891.

EUROPEANS.

INDIANS.

CHINESE.

1891,

·

MONTHS.

Remaining on the 1st Jan.,

January, February, March,

Admissions. Deaths. Admissions.

Deaths. Admissions.

Deaths.

TOTAL TOTAL Admissions. Deaths.

Madada wa maen

8

1

9

7

24

1

24

26

19

23

13

9

17

April,

6

15

May,

16

20

фон со со

8

58

55

...

8

...

44

June,

16

38

12

66

July,.

14

28

14

56

August,

13

16

12

1

41

September,..

16

21

12

49

October,

11

29

10

...

November,

8

1

24

4

December,

7

19

6

388

50

36

1

32

Total,......

167

r

2

285

2

118

1

570

5

J. M. ATKINSON, Superintendent.

Table II.-Shewing the RATE of SICKNESS and MORTALITY in the POLICE FORCE during the Year 1891.

AVERAGE STRENGTH.

TOTAL SICKNESS.

TOTAL DEATHS. RATE OF SICKNESS. RATE OF MORTALITY.

European. Indian.

Chinese.

Total. European. Indian. Chinese. European. Indian.

Chinese.

European. Indian.

Chinese.

European. Indian.

Chinese.

117 227 350

694

167 285 118 4

3.41 0.88 0.57

2 |142.73 125.55 33.71

J. M. ATKINSON, Superintendent.

Table III.-POLICE RETURN of ADMISSIONS to HOSPITAL from each District during the Year 1891.

CENTRAL No. 5

GOVERNMENT

8

HOUSE No. 2

No. 1 STONE CUTTERS'

GAP No. 6 MOUNTAIN

""

WATER POLICE STATIONS TSIMSHATSUI,

TSATTSZMUI SHAUKIWAN

STANLEY

POKFULAM.

ABERDEEN.

AND

No. 7.

9

3

""

ISLAND.

LODGE.

SHEKO.

WHITFIELD.

TAITAMTUK.

Months.

June, ...... July,.

August,

September,

October,.

November,

December,..

6

26

6 20

8 7

10

12

8

21

3 14

·

3

14

Total,

104 179

35

5 9

6

12 14

48165 NUO

Remaining

on 1st Jan., 1891,..

3

January,

18 18

February,

15

13

March,

5

April,

12

May,

European.

Indian.

Chinese.

European.

i wii multe pe

Indian.

Chinese.

:

::::::::

::::

European.

:

Indian.

:

Chinese.

Hi wi Tip N

European.

Indian:

Chinese.

imi pri Hi HANNA

Chinese.

European.

Indian.

22621 FILE COH:

European.

Indian.

2*

Chinese.

European.

Indian.

Chinese.

3

2

2

8

8

11 16 45

13 7

4

imii wi

:::: _::::::

RAH ::::

European.

Indian.

Chinese.

European.

Indian.

Chinese.

European.

3

4

6

YAUMATI,

HUNGHOM.

Chinese.

European.

Indian.

Chinese.

1

24

58

• 55

2 1 34

25

44

2

66

56

2 41

1

49

-

50

56

1

32

28 12 11 17

6 570

J. M. ATKINSON,

Superintendent.

Table IV.-Shewing the RATE of SICKNESS and MORTALITY of the TROOPS serving in HONGKONG during the Year 1891.

AVERAGE STRENGTH.

ADMISSIONS INTO HOSPITAL.

DEATHS.

White. Black. Total. White. Black. Total. White. Black.

AVERAGE DAILY RATE OF SICKNESS.

RATE OF MORTAL- ITY PER 1,000 OF THE STRENGTH.

Total.

White. Black. White. Black.

1,334 224 1,558 1,651 200 1,851 12

5

17

72.17 5.70 8.99 22.32

H. F. PATERSON, Surgeon Colonel, M.S., Principal Medical Officer,

China.

TOTAL

401

402

DISEASES.

Table V.-Shewing the ADMISSION and MORTALITY in the GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL during the Year 1891.

ADMISSIONS.

DEATHS.

I.-General Diseases.

A. Diseases dependent on Morbid Poisons,-

Sub-Group 1,

2,

""

"

3,..........

4,

"

"

5,

...

Europeans.

...

Indians.

Chinese.

Total.

Europeans.

Indians.

Chinese.

79

54

19

152

7

3

1

11

148

136

76

360

1

1

2

4

2

4

6

1

1

171

32

27

230

1

1

B. Diseases dependent on external agents other than Morbid

Poisons,- Sub-Group 1,

4

2

3

9

...

2,*

ور

""

3, 4,

C. Developmental Diseases,

D. Not classified,

1

::

...

...

1

28

2

1

4

29

20

225

32

4

9

...

3

3

54

II.-Local Diseases.

1.

Nervous System,

19

2

Eye,

20

3

Ear,

282

11

10

6

15

3

242

40

2

1

3

6

41

7

4

6

8

9

10

Diseases of the

Nose,

Circulatory System,

Respiratory,

Digestive,

Lymphatic, Thyroid Body,

Supra Renal Capsules, Urinary System,... Generative System, Female Breast, Male

""

Organs of Locomotion,

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

III.

Poisons,

IV.

Injuries.

V.

Surgical Operation,†

Under Observation,

Connective Tissue,............. Skin,

...

25

21

...

...

19

4

10

33

51

45

11

107

81

44

16

141

5

10 40 00

142

73

5

6

5

16

3

10

5

2

2

9

...

:..

...

8

...

*H 00

4

33

6

2

8

8

37

...

Total,..

...

55

20

86

161

1

1

16

12

12

40

15

17

22

54

...

::

::

...

2

2

23

27

27

18

169

214

1

∞ ∞

8

8

8

...

16

25

29

70

...

837

471

559 1,867

29

14

41

84

* Vide III Poisons. † Table Va.

J. M. ATKINSON, Superintendent.

Total.

403

Table Va.--Shewing the ADMISSIONS and MORTALITY in the GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL during the Year 1891.

ADMISSIONS.

DEATHS.

SURGICAL OPERATIONS.

Europeans.

Indians.

Chinese.

Total.

Europeans.

Indians.

Chinese.

Removal of Tumours,-

Buboes (Scraping),

""

(Excision),

Cervical Glands (Scraping), Sebaceons Cysts....

Removal of Foreign Bodies,-

From Knee-joint (Bullet),

11

1312

1

ون

3

1

2412

ير

1

1

""

Hip

1

1

>>

Leg

1

1

"

39

(Brass Commutator Electric Machine),

:

Total.

Opening of Abscesses (deep),-

Head and Neck,

1

1

Mastoid Abscess,

1

Perineal,

2

Gluteal,

1

1

Thigh,

1

Liver,

2

N–NNIN

1

2

...

2

Operations on the Eye and its Appendages,-

Foreign Body in cornea, Extraction,

1

Extraction of Lens,

Entropion,

Excision of Eyeball,

1

:~::

1

1

1

1212

...

Operations on Head, Face and Mouth,

Staphylloraphy,

1

1

Abscess of Antrum,

1

1

Trephining (Ligature of middle Meningeal artery),

1

Elevation of Depressed Bone,

3

3

Epulis (Removal),

1

Severe Injury to Face,

1

1

Operations on Respiratory Organs,--

Paracentesis Thoracis,

Empуæma (Incision, &c.,

Tracheotomy,

Operations on Digestive Organs,--

Hæmorrhoids,

Stricture of Rectum,

Fistular in Ano, .....

4

1

-:-

1

1

1

10 2 2

5

-::

::

1

1 1

1

2

3

...

1

1

1

3

4

1

8

Abdominal Wounds (Severe),

Operations on Urinary Organs,

Stricture Urethra (Dilatation),

Urethral Calculus,

Operations on the Generative Organs,--

I.-MALE.

:

2

2

2

1: 2

1

7

7

:-

1

1

Circumcision,

Phimosis,

Paraphimosis,

Castration,

Hydrocele (Radical Cure),....................

"

(Tapping and Injection),.

II.-FEMALE.

13

4

1

1

1

1

4

2

2

1

:

:

822144

::

:.

::

:

::

Uterine Fibroid,

Operations on Organs of Locomotion,-

(a) Removal of Sequestra-From Ilium,

1

:

1

1

Tibia,

Careous Vertebral,

(b) Amputations-Forearm,

Fingers and Hand,

Knee,

Leg,

Toes,

(c) Excisions-Hip (disease),

(d) Suture of Patrella (wire),

ララ

Operations on Fingers,

Severe wound of Thigh,

Aspiration of Knee,

(Bullet Smash),

Elbow Injury,..

(Mayo Robson),

1

1

...

...

1

1

1

...

1

1

126

9

2

1

1

2

1

1

2

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

...

1

1

2

1

320:

}

...

Total,

71

21

50 142

4

I

7

12

J. M. ATKINSON, Superintendent.

404

GENERAL DISEASES.

Table Vb.-Shewing the ADMISSIONS and MORTALITY in the GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL during the Year 1891.

ADMISSIONS.

DEATHS.

Euro-

peans.

Indians.

Chinese.

Total.

Euro-

peans.

Group A.-Sub-Group 1.

1. Small-Pox, (transferred to Small-Pox Hospital),

2. Cow-Pox,

3. Chicken-Pox,

4. Measles,

5. Epidemic Rose-rash, (Rotheln),.

6. Scarlet Fever,

7. Dengue,

8. Typhus,

9. Plague,

10. Relapsing Fever,.

11. Influenza,

...

1

3

3

2

...

...

...

19

13

2

12. Whooping Cough,

13. Mumps,

...

...

...

...

14. Diphtheria,

...

15. Cerebro-spinal Fever,

16. Simple-continued Fever,.

15

4

10

17. Enteric Fever, Synonyms, Typhoid Fever, (Typhomalarial

7

Fever),

18. Cholera, Synonyms, Asiatic Cholera, Epidemic Cholera, 19. Sporadic Cholera, Synonyms, Simple Cholera, Cholera

Nostras,

2

20. Epidemic Diarrhoea,

21. Dysentery,

8::~:: ∞ ~:: :: ∞ ¦ ¦ ¦ ¦ ¦ ∞ : --:

34

8

1

1

29

8

4

2

: : : :

2

Total,.....

...

Indians.

Chinese.

...

...

...

2

...

33

31

5

69

2

1

4

79

54

19

152

7

3

1

J. M. ATKINSON, Superintendent.

Table Vc.-Shewing the ADMISSIONS and MORTALITY in the GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL during the Year 1891.

ADMISSIONS.

DEATHS.

GENERAL DISEASES.

Group A.-Sub-Group 2.

1. Malarial Fever,-

a. Intermittent, Synonyms, Ague,

b. Remittent,

c. Malarial Cachexia,

2. Beri-Beri,.

Monthly Table of Malarial Fever Cases amongst the Police,

INTERMITTENT.

REMITTENT.

MONTHS.

Europeans.

Indians.

Chinese.

Deaths.

Europeans.

Indians.

Chinese.

Deaths.

Total Number of

Cases.

Total Number of

Deaths.

1 1

17.

January, February, March, April, May, June,.. July,

10 10

5

5

10

1

602240

+46

1

3

3

2

2

1

3

...

...

August,

3

September,

5

October,

1

November,

3

1

3 4

2

:

NAL:: wi Ni

2

December,

Total,..

33 79 31

9 16

3

...

:

26

3

5

...

13

17 24

1

14

16

19

17

:

2

10

5

:

173

148 136

Europeans.

Indians.

Chinese.

Total.

Europeans.

Indians.

Chinese.

111 111

34 18 11 63

54 276

2 6 2

1 1

9

*==

1

2

10

...

11

76 360 1 1 2

J. M. ATKINSON, Superintendent.

4

4

:::

...

Total.

...

5

Total.

1. Phagedoena,

2. Erysipelas,

3. Pycemia,...

4. Septicemia,

DISEASES.

DISEASES.

Table Ve.-Shewing the ADMISSIONS and MORTALITY in the GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL during the Year 1891.

ADMISSIONS.

DEATHS.

Group A.-Sub-Group 3.

Total,........

2

Europeans.

Indians.

Chinese.

1

2

3

...

1

2

:

4

6

co::

Total.

Table Vf.-Shewing the ADMISSIONS and MORTALITY in the GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL during the Year 1891.

Europeans.

Indians.

ADMISSIONS.

Group A.-Sub-Group 4.

1. Syphilis, Synonyms, Pox,

a. Primary,

b. Secondary,

24

5

1

48

8

8

c. Tertiary Syphilis,

13

1

10

2. Gonorrhoeal, including Chancres Molles,

83

18

8 109

Gonorrhoeal Rheumatism,.

3.

888

30

64

24

3

...

Total,....

171

32

27

230

1

DISEASES.

Chinese.

Total.

Table Vg.-Shewing the ADMISSIONS and MORTALITY in the GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL during the Year 1891.

ADMISSIONS.

DEATHS.

1. Hydrophobia,.

2. Glanders,

3. Horse-pox,.... 4. Splenic Fever,

Group A.-Sub-Group 5.

Total,.....

:

Europeans.

Indians.

Chinese.

Total.

:

Europeans.

:.

J. M. ATKINSON,

Superintendent.

Indians.

:

...

Europeans.

:

:.

J. M. ATKINSON, Superintendent.

Chinese.

Total.

Indians.

1

Europeans.

Indians.

3

1

1

J. M. ATKINSON, Superintendent.

DEATHS.

Chinese.

1

Total.

Chinese;

Total.

405

406

Table VI.-Shewing the RATE of MORTALITY in the GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL. during the last 10 Years.

Rate to Total Number of Rate to Number of Europeans Rate to Number of Coloured Rate to Number of Chinese

Admitted.

Admissions.

Persons Admitted.

Admitted.

1882, 1883,

Per cent.

4.66

Per cent.

Per cent.

Per cent.

1882,

4.35

1882,

4.38

1882,

5.24

..

4.66 1883,

4.37

1883,

3.01

1883,

6.08

1884,

3.69

1884,

3.15

1884,

1.24

1884,

6.08

1885.

5.03

1885,

4.65

1885,

3.06

1885,

7.01

1836,

4.86

1886,

4.25

1886,

4.66

1886,

5.73

1887,

5.37

1887.

4.50

1887,

4.56

1887,

6.96

1888,.

4.51

1888,

3.96 | 1888,

4.70 1888,

4.98

1889,

4.29

1889,

3.37

1889,

4.13

1889,

5.41

1890,

5.00

1890,

2.38

1890,

5.30

1890,

7.80

1891,.

4.49

1891,

3.46

1891,

2.97

1891,

7.33

J. M. ATKINSON, Superintendent.

Table VII.-Shewing the ADMISSIONS into and DEATHS in the GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL during each Month of the Year 1891.

EUROPEANS.

COLOURED.

CHINESE.

MONTHS.

Total Admissions.

Total

Deaths.

Admissions. Deaths. Admissions. Deaths. Admissions. Deaths.

Remaining on the 1st

January, 1891,

...

January,

February,

March,

April,.

May,

June,

July,

August,

September,

October,

November,

December,.

*888*85878887

44

99

83

69

48

68

67

62

44

66

66

50

71

+QO1Q? — QHQI∞∞I

21

1

31

1

96

44

1

41

1

184

38

1

39

160

2

48

140

6457

7

2

22

1

46

8

116

11

1

31

1

43

}

142

3

52

52

4

41

0

43

38

1

45

3

46

6

45

1

25

HHHQO

1

45

1

48

1.

51

2

34

38

KHCNQIQ

3

171

7

1

146

5

6

127

9

7

159

2

163

1

129

2

134

Total,

837

29

471

14

559

41

1,867

84

J. M. ATKINSON, Superintendent.

Table VIIa.-ADMISSIONS into and DEATHS in SMALL-POX HOSPITAL, and "HYGEIA" 1891.

No.

Sex.

Nationality. Age.

Date of Admission.

Date of Discharge.

No. of Days in Hospital.

Description of Patient.

Result.

12345O CO

· Male

Norwegian Scotch

33

3rd February

25th February

22

Private Paying

Recovered.

42

59

">

6

>>

""

Female

7 Male

A

American Indian English Chinese

47

16th 28th 4th March

9th March

21

27

""

""

""

28th April

59

Prisoner

97

13th March

9

Private Paying

20 ōth

>>

25th April

51

Died. Recovered.

"

3 6th

16th March

10

""

Daughter of Govt.

Greek

42 9th

20th

11

>>

""

8

Arabian

24

24th

""

28th April

35

Destitute [Servant Private Paying

""

""

""

9

Female

English

35

25th

1st

7

""

""

""

""

*10

Male

47

1st October

31st October

30

""

""

""

*11

Scotch

20

1st

31st

30

""

""

""

""

*12

29 1st

31st

""

""

""

وو

30

""

""

""

*13

""

*14

English Irish

29 2nd

14th

12

>>

"

""

""

""

28 3rd

31st

28

""

"

""

""

"}

*15

""

*16

""

17

""

English Chinese English

22 2nd

16th

14

""

27

""

"

"}

20 26th

2nd November

7

Destitute

""

">

27 9th

24th December

15

""

Private Paying

""

* Cases treated on board the hospital hulk Hygeia.

J. M. ATKINSON, Superintendent.

10

4

20

45

50

Fever Cases.

Rainfall.

Number. Inches.

Table Vd.-DIAGRAM showing CASES of MALARIAL FEVER occurring every Month amongst the POLICE FORCE,

the MEAN MONTHLY TEMPERATURE and the MONTHLY

RAINFALL during the Year 1891.

407

January.

February.

March.

April.

May.

June.

July.

August.

September.

October.

30

60°

25

50°

Red Wave,.. Blue Wave,

Green Wave, Black Wave,

Intermittent Fever Cases.

...Remittent

""

39

...Monthly Rainfall in inches.

Mean Monthly Temperature in Degrees Fahrenheit.

J. M. ATKINSON,

Superintendent.

10°

20°

30°

40°.

70°

November.

50°

December.

Mean

Monthly

Temperature.

Degrees

Falır.

90°

100°

Table VII-MONTHLY AGGREGATE NUMBER of PATIENTS visited in the HOSPITAL daily for 1891, 1890, 1889, 1888, and 1887.

409

Months.

1891.

1890.

1889.

1888.

1887.

January, February, March, April, May, June,

2,977

2,431

2,260

1,799

1,629

2,541

2,315

1,983

1,614

1,413

2,677

2,148

2,103

1,763

1,495

2,275

2,013

2,114

1,674

1,448

2,430

2,399

2,356

1,880

1,681

2,519

2,256

2,617

2,258

- 1,847

July,

2,406

2,404

2,720

2,125

1,787

August,

1,986

2,588

2,866

2,025

1.908

September,

1,425

2,304

2,338

2,243

1,987

October,

2,508

2,374

2,354

1,911

2,024

November,

2,382

2,636

2,844

1,983

1,879

December,

2,350

3,065

2,402

2,194

2,570

Total,

28,476

28,933

28,457

23,469

21,668

J. M. ATKINSON, Superintendent.

t

POLICE.

Table VIIc.-Shewing the HOURS OF DUTY of the Cases of MALARIAL FEVER admitted in each Month of the Year 1891.

EUROPEANS.

INDIANS.

CHINESE.

-

MONTHS.

Day

Night duty 6 p.m. to 12

duty.

p.m. or

Day and Night duty.

Day duty.

12 p.m. to 6 a.m.

Night Day and

duty (10 p.m. to 6 a.m.)

Day

Night duty.

duty.

Night duty (10 p.m. to 6 a.m.)

Day and Night

Total Admissions.

duty.

January,

1

1

6

1

February,

5

2

10

1

+6

1

17 26

March,

1

2

April,

1

4

May,

3

3

2

2

2

13

June,

4

1

10

2

17

July,

3

13

3

24

August,

3

3

4

1

14

...

September,.

2

5

1

2

.16

October,

November,

December,

221

1

3

19

3

17

1

2

Total,

6

35

1

19

73

»

3

4

30

2

173

J. M. ATKINSON, Superintendent.

÷

Table VIII-RETURN of DEAD BODIES brought by the POLICE to the PUBLIC MORTUARY during each Month of the Year 1891.

EUROPEANS AND AMERICANS.

OTHER NATIONAL-

CHINESE.

ITIES.

CAUSE OF DEATH: REPORTED PROBABLE OR ASCERTAINED BY EXAMINATION.

ACCIDENTAL.

SUICIDAL.

410

:

December,

Total,..................................

10

:

:

...

:

***

:

...

98

21

February,

:.

March,

April,

I

May,

June,

July,

August,

1

September,

1

October,

November,

1

...

January,

:

:

:

:

:

...

:

:

:.

:

:

:

:

10 3

Co

...

11

...

2

:

...

4

6

Co

...

4 5

8

9

:

:

:

...

:

...

1

7

:

:

2

...

3

:

52 41 1 2 7

:

:.

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

D

:

:.

:.

:D

:

...

:

:.

:

:

I

:

:

:.

9

:

2

8

1

4

1

С

1

1

:

:

...

15 4

11

...

I

00

8

4

1

8

3

1

1

2 1

1

...

:..

10 3

...

6

4

4 5

-

:

2

:

:.

:.

:

::

...

1

1

1

...

:

10

I

:

:

77

2

...

6

4

:

:.

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

4

1

15

TD.

13

:

:.

14

:

Τ

5

:

:

1

14

:.

...

3

1

2

6

8

1 1

1

138

:

:.

:

:

:

:.

I

e

2

:

:

:.

...

:

1

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

...

P:

:.

:

:

:

:.

:

...

:.

:

1

2

3

11

1

2

...

:

:

-

2

6

8

6

6

:

سر

:

CJ

2

:.

12

Male.

Female.

Male.

Female.

Male.

Female.

Male.

Female.

Male.

Female.

Male.

Female.

MONTHS.

Adults. Children. Adults. Children. Adults. Children.]

From Disease.

Drowning.

Scalding.

Asphyxia caused by carbo-

nic oxide gas.

Asphyxia caused by land- slips, fall of buildings and stones.

Hæmorrhage from right lung produced by a bul- let wound.

ture of skull and limbs, Cerebral concussion, frac-

&c., caused by a fall.

men and laceration of right external iliac artery.

Contused wounds of abdo-

and scalding caused by Fracture of skull and limbs explosion of a steam- launch boiler.

Rupture of viscera and

peritonitis.

by bricks and stones fall- Fracture of skull caused

ing upon.

Opium poisoning.

Hanging.

Drowning.

incised wounds of throat.

Hæmorrhage caused by

head. Gun-shot

wound of

TOTAL.

J

L. P. MARQUES,

Medical Officer in charge of Post Mortem Examinations.

411

Table IX.-K.-Shewing the ADMISSION into HOSPITAL in VICTORIA GAOL, and MORTALITY during the Year 1891.

DISEASES.

ADMISSIONS.

DEATHS.

Europeans.

Coloured Persons.

Chinese. TOTAL. Europeans.

Coloured Persons.

Chinese. TOTAL.

Remaining under treatment 1st January 1891,

I.-

Febricula,

Intermittent Fever,

Remittent

and Bronchitis,.

""

and Anæmia,.

"

Perforation of intestines from Typhoid ulcer,.

Variola,

II-

Chronic Rheumatism,

Lumbago,

III.-

Meningitis,

1

12

14

3462*21

3

*+22*2:

3

4

1

12

15

1

::

12

1

1 2

1

***

...

4

1

...

***

1

...

*1

1

1

1

1

1

28

4

...

1

Unsound mind,

Monomania,

Dementia,

Nasal Polypus and Unsound mind,

Cerebral softening,

Anemia and Emphysema,

Hemiplegia,

Locomotor ataxy,

Conjunctivitis,

Keratitis,

Trichiasis and Anæmia,

IV.—

Anæmia,

};

"

(ópium smoker),

and Bronchitis (opipm smoker), and Chronic Rheumatism,

Aortic Patency and Remittent Fever,

"

39

and Mitral regurgitation,

};

and Diarrhoea,

Hypertrophy of Heart,....

and Anæmia,

General Debility and Fatty Heart, Oedema of face and General Debility,

of Lower limbs.

27

V& vi

of Feet,

Sympathetic Bubo, Left groin,

VII.—

Asthma,

Chronic,

Bronchitis,

and Anæmia,

and Intermittent Fever,

""

and General Debility (opium smoker),

"

Broncho-Pneumonia,..

Hæmoptysis,

Phthisis Pulmonalis,..

Influenza,

VIII.-

Fissure of the Lips,

Jaundice,...

""

and Anæmia,

Cerebral Embolism,

Ascites,

and Cirrhosis of Liver,

"

Colic,

Diarrhoea,

and Anæmia,.

"

悲常

Dysentery,

and Bronchitis,.

Hæmorrhoids,..

Prolapsis Ani,

Anal Fistula,

Rectal Abscess,

IX & X-

Albuminuria,

and Anal Fistula..

...

1

1212

...

...

1

1

1

1

1

1

...

1

5

7

1

1

1

1

4

5

14

...

~

and Anasarca,

and Bronchitis...

>>

and Oedema of face,

19

of feet,

(Venereal),

Bubo of both groins and Gonorrhoea,

and soft Chancre,

of Left

J)

:

Hæmaturia,.

Orchitis,

Penile Fistula,

l'hagedenic chancre of l'enis and Bubo of Left

groin,

Phagedenic Chancre,

Soft sore of Penis,

and Bubo;

·་ and Eczema of feet,

Stricture of Urethra and Anæmia,

Carried forward,

...

2

2

::

:

1

1

**

1

1

1

2

...

12

14

...

1

1

1

1

1

***

***

***

::

:

8

8

1

1

...

1

∞TITA-NINA -

2

2

...

1

1

1

1

...

*1

...

:

1

...

1

...

...

...

*A

***

...

15

7

172

194

7

7

* Suicidal.

412

Table IX.-K.-Shewing the ADMISSION into HOSPITAL in VICTORIA GAOL, and MORTALITY during the Year 1891,-Continued.

DISEASES.

ADMISSIONS.

DEATHS.

Europeans.

Coloured Persons.

Coloured

Chinese.

TOTAL. Europeans.

Chinese. TOTAL.

Persons.

Brought forward,...

15

7

172

194

1

1.

Synovitis of Right knee-joint,..

II.-

XIL-

Carbuncle,

Abscess of upper lip,...............................

17

Neck,

Scrofulous abscess of Neck and Left axilla,..

Abscess of Axilla,

**

Left fore-arm,

Right hand,.

Left

Right ankle-joint and Left leg,

"

""

19

foot,

""

"

""

plantar surface,

Left

و

11

""

Both

Boil of Right lumbar region,

19

leg,

Ulcer of Left cornea and Rectal abscess, Erysipelas of face and Conjunctivitis,

"

Right ear,

Both ears,

Eczema of Left foot,.....

Chronic bursitis of Left thumb,

Cyst of Left ear, external,

Sinus of Gluteal region,

Scalding of Neck,

Perineal fistula,

Inflammation of Left fore-arm,

Wounds and Injuries.-

Contused wounds of Head,

and Anæmia,.....................

*

*?

??

of Left foot and necrosis of toes,

toe,

from flogging,

Contusion of Lumbar region,

Sprain of Right ankle-joint,

Sprain of Left ankle-joint,

Compound Fracture of Left Radius and Ulna..........

Gluteal abscess after flogging,

Unclassed.-

***

:

:..

:

I

1

1

1

1

...

2

1

2

2

1

1

***

1

I

1

2

1

1

...

1.

1

...

1

...

1

1

1

1

1

I

1

1

1

1

1

3

56

59

1

1

...

པ་

1

1

...

***

1

...

1

...

3

34

35

General Debility,

I

(Old age),

(Opium smoker),

Unknown or unrecognized.—

Observation,

1

1

20

22

TOTAL,...

17

11

336

364

...

:

:

:

8

7

7

*

..

***

...

L. P. MARQUES, Medical Officer.

:

00

***

1

Table IXa.-M.-Shewing the NUMBER and PERCENTAGE of PRISONERS ADMITTED into VICTORIA GAOL HOSPITAL, on the First Examination by the Medical Officer, during the Year 1891.

Sick in Hospital.

Admitted to Hospital on First Medical Examination,

Percentage of Hospital cases on First Medical

Examination.

Percentage of Hospital cases on First Medical Ex.

Europeans. Chinese.

Total number of Prisoners

admitted to Gaol.

Europeans.

Indians.

Chinese.

Total.

5,231

17

11 336

364

Europeans.

:

Indians.

Chinese.

2

20

Total.

223

To total Gaol

admissions.

To total Hospital

cases.

To total Hospital

cases.

To total Hospital

cases.

4.205 6.043

5.952

L. P. MARQUES, Medical Officer.

:

413

Table X.-N-Shewing CASES not ADMITTED to HOSPITAL, treated by the MEDICAL OFFICER, during the Year 1891.

DISEASES.

Remaining under treatment 1st January, 1891,

I-

Febricula,

Remittent Fever,

II-

Lumbago,

III.-

Europeans.

Coloured Persons.

Chinese.

TOTAL.

:

1

Trichiasis of both Eye-lashes,.

right

Conjunctivitis,

Albugo of both Corneas,

""

Opacity and ulcer of left Cornea,

""

of both Corneas,.

Ulcer of left Cornea,

...

...

Otorrhoea (left Ear),

IV

Unsound Mind,..

Anæmia,

Aortic Patency,

V & VI-

Bubo, Sympathetic,

Adenitis of right Groin,

VII.-

VIII-

Bronchitis,..

Alveolar Abscess,..........

Caries (extraction of Teeth),

Stomatitis,....

Aphtæ of the Mouth,

Fissure of the Lips,

Cynanche Tonsillaris,

Epistaxis,

External Hæmorrhoids,

Inguinal Hernia, reducible (left side), Anal Fistula,

IX & X.-

Balanitis,

Gonorrhoea,

Gleet,.....

Stricture of Urethra,

Phimosis,

Paraphimosis,

Soft sore of Penis,

Bubo, (Venereal),

Condylomata,

...

:

::

:

::

:.

Syphilitic ulcer of Nose,

Ecthyma (Syphilitic),

Necrosis of bones of Head (Tertiary Syphilis),

Warts of Penis,

Tuberculous Sarcocele of testicles,

Sore of Penis (Non-Venereal),

Hæmaturia,

Partus Naturalis,

6

6

*1

*2

:

18

1

*2

1

9

9

3

3

t8

1

1

*1

1

1

1

1

...

2

2

*1

*1

::

::

...

2

1

21

2

Jd N

2

2

1

1

1

1

1

2

...

-1

*1

*1

122∞ ∞

3

3

9

9

2

1

1

*1

2381

2..

3

8

1

...

NO

2

2

9

11

1

: 10

5

7

1

1

1

9

9

+4

t5

1

*1

*1

1

t2

1

1

1

1

Carried forward,

9

1

111

121

* Females.

† One of them is a Female.

414

XI,-

Table X-N-Shewing CASES not ADMITTED to HOSPITAL, treated by the MEDICAL OFFICER, during the Year 1891.—Continued.

DISEASES.

Brought forward....................................

Necrosis of right Radius,.........

Caries of Ileum,

XII,-

Europeans.

Coloured Persons.

Chinese.

TOTAL.

1

111

121

1

1

111

Abscess of right Foot (plantar surface),

1

16

17

I

1

"J

""

left

29

39

37

59

""

" (plantar surface),

1

12

13

...

4

..

""

""

""

59

""

"

"

right Leg, left Leg,

Thigh, Hand,

Palmar Surface,

Axilla,

left Arm,

1

1

3

3

1

1

2

2

...

1

1

1

1

2

2

31

""

""

Blisters of fingers of right Hand,

دو

""

""

both Hands,

left Hand,

right

Shoulder,

1

1

1

1

3

3

2

1

1

...

left Foot,

2

2

Boil of left Arm,

""

Neck,

Chronic ulcer of left Leg,

""

Foot,

Cyst of left Ear (external),..

19

Sacral region,

Excoriation of fingers caused by lime,

Favus,

Eczema of left Leg,

Herpes Zoster (Right thoracic region), Ringworm,

Scabies,.

Sinus of left Groin (Venereal),

Foot,

Ulceration of left Hand,

Ulcer of Neck,

1

1

*1

*1

...

2

1

1

1

1

1

1

.....

N:

2

2

i

1

2

2

::

3

3

32

34

117

118

1

1

...

1

1

1

1

1

Whitlow,

Unclassed,-

Right Leg,..

both Legs, Right Foot,

both Feet,

General Debility,

Wounds and Injuries,-

Gluteal abscess,

Contused wounds of Head,

99

(Scrofulous),

99

Left Thigh,

"

99

Leg,

99

19

"3

Left

"

99

99

1

1

1

I

3

3

...

2

2

1

1

1

1

1

1

...

1

1

...

1

1

....

...

:

+4

""

35

""

left Hand, from flogging,

""

""

""

(from Canton),

Extraction of gun-shots in the forehead,

Unknown or Unrecognized,-

1

1

...

4

4

1

1

1

181

182

1

1

::

...

1

1

Observation, .....

TOTAL,

1

*1

...

16

* Females. † One of them is a Female.

†2

10

5

537

558

L. P. MARQUES,

Medical Officer.

415

Table XI.-0.-Shewing the RATE of SICKNESS and MORTALITY in VICTORIA GAOL, during the Year 1891.

Daily

Percentage

Total No. of Prisoners admitted to Gaol.

Total

Total

Average

Sick

number of Prisoners.

in

Hospital.

Sick, Total Trifling Deaths.

Cases.

of Serious

Sickness to Total.

5,231

507

336

558

Rate of Sickness.

To Total No. of Admissions to Gaol.

Rate of Mortality.

To Total No. of

Admissions to Gaol.

To Daily Average.

To Daily Average.

00

8

6.423

1.709

4.668

1.529

1.577

L. P. MARQUES, Medical Officer.

Table XIa.-L.-CASES admitted to VICTORIA GAOL HOSPITAL, at the first MEDICAL EXAMINATION by the MEDICAL OFFICER, during the Year 1891.

SENTENCE.

No.

Years. M'ths. Days.

DISEASE.

DATE OF ADMISSION,

1891.

DATE OF DISCHARGE,

1891.

REMARKS.

1234 10 CO 10

4:24

7

General Debility,

21

"

Old Age,

Observation,

General Debility,

Oedema of Face and General Debility,

8th Jan. 14th 20th 14th Mar. 14th

15th Jan.

3rd Feb.

وو

24th Jan.

On Remand.

.39

20th March

21st

22

6

12

General Debility,

10th April

16th April

Died.

Dementia,

26th May

3rd June On Remand.

8

27th June

29th

99

21

9

Unsound Mind and Nasal Polypi,

27th July

1st Aug.

"

10

Observation,

30th

11

Monomania,

3rd Aug.

6th >> Eth 99

""

39

12

42

Contused wound of head and anæmia,

21st

22nd Sept.

13

Observation,

25th

30th

14

Diarrhoea,

7th Sept.

11th

15

Observation,

16

Remittent Fever,

17

14

Bubo and Gonorrhoea,

18

...

Dementia,

14th 20th Oct. 27th 30th

17th

On Remand.

""

*

2nd Nov.

9th

39

2nd

On Remand.

وو

93

19

6

20

21

22

10 14

Carbuncle,

Compound Fracture of left Radius and Ulna, General Debility,

وو

...

Bubo Venereal, left Groin,

3rd 1st Dec.

9th

22nd

""

33

3rd Nov.

13th "" 13th

9th Dec.

""

L. P. MARQUES,

Medical Officer.

Table XIC.-P.-Shewing OPIUM SOMEXRS admitted into HOSPITAL and treated by the MEDICAL OFFICER,

during the Year 1891.

DISEASE.

Remaining under treatment 1st January, 1891, .........................

Albuminuria, No. 1, .....

Observation, No. 10,....

Contused wound of left Toe, No. 28,

General Debility, Nos. 30, 46, 47,

Boil of Right lumbar region, No. 34,

Diarrhoea, No. 48,

Anemia, Nos. 44, 56,......................

TOTAL,.......

ADMISSION.

Coloured

Europeans.

Chinese.

Total.

Persons.

:

F:..

1

1

1

1

1

1

3

3

1

1

1

1

2

2

10

10

L. P. MARQUES, Medical Officer.

416

Table XI6.-Q.-Shewing the WEIGHTS of PRISONERS (OPIUM SMOKERS), for the First Four Weeks' Confinement in VICTORIA GAOL, during the Year 1891.

No.

AGE.

LENGTH OF TIME OPIUM SMOKER.

CONSUMPTION

per diem.

WEIGHT WHEN ADMITTED.

WEIGHT FIRST FOUR WEEKS.

REMARKS.

.

12 12 1 1 0✪

40

10 Years.

Mace.

119

lbs.

120

118 119 120

56

26

115

114

119 118

...

""

""

"

3

42

20

11

110

119

120

119

"

""

50

10

1

116

112

112

114

113

27

27

""

40

10

101

99

99

99

>>

"

23

46

10

""

11/

135

134

134

135 135

""

""

7

66

40

2

95

93

101

103

103

>>

22

"2

8

35

20

2

120

119

118

117

117

""

""

9

22

12

39

1/1/2

95

94

94

95

96

10 38

20

2

95

93

93

94

95

}}

>>

11

56

10

>>

12

50

7

""

13

48

10

---

108

106

105

105

105

""

19

131

129

127

126

125

77

"3

120

120

118

118

19

""

14

32

8

106

106

105

108

""

""

15

37

20

"

11

90

90

89

88

""

16

41

15

2

116

116

116

114

119

"

17

46

10

14

»

18

31

10

1/

"}

19

36

5

1

>>

20

44

10

21

62

30

""

22

28

10

23

27

8

1층

RRRRRRR *

""

92

92

93

92

95

"}

100

104

104

105

105

"

116

116

114

113

112

22

105

102

107

107

106

"}

88

88

92

94

95

37

105

105

104

103

""

95

95

94

97

96

""

"

24

34

10

1층

131

130

130

130

130

"

"

25

46

7

1

125

123

125

124

123

""

""

22

26

32

7

124

122

122

120

121

""

??

""

27

45

10

104

102

113

110

108

""

97

""

28

33

10

115

114

114

114

116

29

49

30

30

39

18

31

36

7

RRR:

""

105

104

103

103

103

""

""

""

2

82

82

85

86

86

>>

118

122

126

125

127

"2

32

23

5

1

113

113

119

118

116

29

""

>>

33

24

1

112

112

113

112

111

""

""

"

34 32

1

117

115 117

116

114

29

">

""

35

55

3

100

96 99

100

98

"

27

86

58

20

104

107

106 104

105

"

22

37

52

30

2

105

105

104

104

107

"

"}

38

53

20

114

112

110 112

111

"9

99

39

31

20

2

112

109

109 110

110

>>

??

40

43

10

146

146

144

145

144

"

"}

41

40

11

116

114

113

115 115

""

""

42

44

10

130

128

128

130 129

}}

27

43

54

10

106

107 110

110

108

""

"

22

44

60

30

2

96

94

96

102

102

"

27

45

50

5

104

103

103 103 103

"

27

46

38

10.

2

119

118

125

125

114

""

47

57

40

2

115

">

وو

""

112,

114

114

115

48

45

10

1

130

128

128

128 128

"

""

27

49

52

10

2

116

115

118

118 116

""

50

53

10

""

12

115

114

112

111

112

"

""

51

24

5

1

109

110 110 109

111

**

""

""

52

30

10

2

120

118

118 120

120

""

وو

29

53

35

12

2

100

103

99 100

102

54

42

2

1

110

109

108

108 108

">

"J

">

55

30

7

101

104

108 106 106

"

""

56

36

10

101

101

104 104 104

"2

99

417

Table XId.-Shewing the NUMBER and DESCRIPTION of PATIENTS treated in the GOVERNMENT EUROPEAN and

CHINESE LUNATIC Asylums, during the Year 1891. ·

No.

Native of

Sex. Age.

Disease.

Date of Admission.

Date of Discharge.

No. of Days in Asylum.

12 8TH LO CO D

3

Barbadoes, China, Italy,

F.

Portugal,

F.

5

Germany,

Sweden,.

7

America,

8

England,

9

Scotland,

10

China,

11

Malaya,

*M.

12

Ireland,.

F.

*13

China,

*14

"J

*15

+9

*16

*17

F.

""

18

FREEEEEEEEEEEEEEE

M.

33

Mania,

1st Jan.

365

Description of Patients.

The Board of Trade,

33

Unsound mind,

365

Destitute.

??

""

M. 35

General Paralysis of Insane,

365

Destitute.

"

""

52

Dementia,

7th Jan.

>>

""

M.

25

Epilepsy,

24th

23

"

M.

32

Mania,

26th March.

2nd April.

7

Destitute.

Private Paying.

The Board of Trade.

M.

33

General Paralysis of Insane,

7

"

"

""

""

M.

25

Imbecile,

M. 24

Mania,

13th April. 27th

6th July.

84

Private Paying.

Destitute.

""

17th Aug.

112

Destitute, (Ex P. C. 62).

M. 20

Dementia,

60

Monomania,

8th July. 15th Aug.

177

Destitute.

28th Nov.

105

M.

M.

M.

M.

1885 28

44

Suicidal Mania,

18th Sept.

105

26

Melancholia,.......

2nd Nov.

39

Mania,.

99 99

(a) Dysentery, (b) General

22

Melancholia,

36

Paralysis of Insane,

Mania,

21st Nov.

"1

"}

""

"2

99

"

M.

41

i Traumatic Delirium, ii

Melancholia,

16th Dec.

:

5 385 8898

Destitute.

Private Paying.

60

Destitute.

60

Destitute.

19

Destitute.

60

Destitute.

60

Destitute.

16

Police Case.

Remaining in Hospital 31st Dec., 1890.

* Cases transferred from the Tung Wa Hospital.

J. M. ATKINSON, Medical Officer in charge.

Table XII.-STATISTICS relating to the TUNG WA HOSPITAL, during the Year 1891.

Admitted during the year 1801.

No. of Cases Treated in the Hospital, 1891.

No. of Patients Discharged during the year 1891.

Died during the year 1891.

No. of Out-Patients Treated during the year 1891.

Moribund Cases,

1891.

Remaining in Hospital, 31st Dec.,

1891.

103 13 116 2,151 363 2,514 2,151

363 2,514 1,211 | 148 |1,359| 943

216 1,159

99,446 51,148 150,594 219

112 331

99

86

13 112

Table XIII.-CASES of SMALL-Pox treated at the TUNG WA HOSPITAL, during the Year 1891.

Remaining in Hospital Admitted during 1891.

31st December, 1890.

Discharged 1891.

Died 1891.

Remaining in Hospital 31st December, 1891.

Male. Female. ] Total. Male. Female. Total. Male. Female. Total. Male. Female. Total. Male. Female. Total.

Nil. Nil. Nil. 14

8

22

5

2

7

9

6

15 Nil. Nil. Nil.

Table XIV.-VACCINATION performed during the Year 1891 by TRAVELLING VACCINATORS

of the TUNG WA HOSPITAL.

In the City of Victoria.

1,782

In Out-Districts.

93

Total.

1,875

:

418

Table XV.-LOCK HOSPITAL.

TABLE A

SHEWING the ADMISSIONS into the GOVERNMENT LOCK HOSPITAL, during the 34 Years of its Existence, with the Number of DIETS issued

and the AVERAGE Length of TREATMENT.

ADMISSIONS.

NUMBER OF DIETS ISSUED.

AVERAGE NUMBER OF DAYS TREATED.

1858,

124

1858,

4,797

1858,....

43 8

1859,

162

1859,

5,389

1859,.

30.8

1860,

361

1860.

9,107

1860,

23.7

1861,

1861.

10,778

1861

23.4

1862,

485

1862,

12,193

1862,

22.0

1863,

420

1863,.

11,707 1863,

23.7

1864,

442

1864,

11,940

1864,

27.0

1865,

390

1865.

**

11,303

1865,

28.0

1866,

406

1866.

13,060 1866,

28.6

1867,

434

1867

13,120 1867,

25.5

1868,

579

1868,

16,462

1868,

23.6

546

1869,

16,779

1869,

24.8.

1870,

722

1870,

18,382

1870,

23.1

1871,

593

1871

12,308

1871,.

18.5

1872,

656 1872,

15,103

1872,

1873,

500

1873

11,219

1873,

20.9 19.5

1874,

345

1874,..

6,814

1874,.

18.6

1875,

134

2,916

18.7

1876,

168

1876,.

2,730

1876,

14.3

1877,

177

1877.

3,069

1877,

16.6

1878,

105

1878,

2,242

1878,.

19.0

1879,

129

1879,

2,199

1879,.

13.6

1880,

57

1880,

1,300

1880,

14.7

1881,

44

1881,

1,330

1881,

21.7

1882,

99

1,831

1882,

155

1883,

273

1883.

3,451

1883,

12.0

1884,

325

1884,

5,174

1884,.

13.1

1885,

411

1885,

6,161

1885,

15.6

1886,

401

1886,

4,837

1885,

12.2

1887, ............................................................................................................................... 144

1887,.

2,014

1887,

13.9

1888,

66

1888.

1,616

1888,

24.4

1889,

84

1889

1,540

1889,

18.3

1890,

82

1890.

1,660

1890,.

20.0

1891,

80

1891.

2,041

1891.

25.5

Number of

Beds

Number admitted to Hospital

in

on Certificates of

Lock Hospital. Visiting Surgeon.

Number who submitted voluntarily.

32

80

276

80

452

TABLE B.

CONTAGIOUS DISEASES.

RETURN of the NUMBER of PROSTITUTES during the Year 1891.

Total Number brought under the Provisions of the Ordinance.

Total Number of Examinations made during the Year.

276

12,788

Total Number of Examinations made when no Disease was found.

12,713

NUMBER DISCHARGED FROM HOSPITAL.

No. discharged free from Disease who still follow their former Pursuits.

77

Number who have returned to their Friends or Emigrated.

Total Number Discharged.

77

TABLE C.

CONTAGIOUS DISEASES RETURN for the Year 1891.

TOTAL NUMBER OF MEN DISEASED

Total No. of Females admitted

into Lock Military Naval Police Civil

Hospital. Hospital. Hospital. Hospital. Hospital.|

ADMITTED INTO

Total No. of Men Diseased.

Soldiers. Seamen. Police.

AVERAGE NUMBER OF MEN IN GARRISON AND PORT (per month).

Mer- chant Seamen.

Average Average No. of Men Percentage in Garrison of Men

and Port Diseased (per month).(per month).

REMARKS.

:

57

129

638

1,571

694

12,607 14,872 0.357

Madalyanda mendapat.

TABLE D.

RETURN of WOMEN examined and treated in the GOVERNMENT LOCK HOSPITAL during the Year 1891..

EXAMINATION.

- HOSPITAL.

DISCHARGED.

Average No. of

days per month on which Exami- nations were held.

Total Number of

Examinations

made during the

year.

Number admitted

to Hospital.

Total Number of

Examinations made when no Di-

Every day, Sundays and Government holidays excepted.

12,788

80

sease was found.

DISEASES.

12,713

Primary Syphilis, uncomplicated, Gonorrhoea,

do..

Do. and Primary Syphilis, combined, Primary and Secondary

do.,

do.,

Gonorrhoea and Secondary do.. do.,

Primary and Secondary Syphilis and Gonorrhoea,...

TOTAL,.........

No. remaining in

Hospital, 31st December, 1890.

Admitted.

Total Treated.

Cured.

4

63

a.|

70

5

5-

...

1j8

68

5

SAG

7.

73

80

37

op

No. remaining in Hospital, 31st December, 1891.

N

TABLE E.

CONTAGIOUS DISEASES RETURN for the Year 1891.

419

DISEASES.

Primary Syphilis, including Soft Sores,.

and Primary Syphilis, combined, Primary and Secondary Syphilis, combined,

Gonorrhoea,..

Do.,

Gonorrhoea and

Secondary Syphilis,

do.,

do.,

82

Gleet,

TOTAL,....

TOTAL,..

TOTAL,...

TOTAL,

.1891,......

452

Military

Hospital.

Naval Hospital.

Police Hospital.

Civil Hospital.

203

167

No returns sent.

14

38

8]: E: &: 28

30

75

15

57

129

.........1890,......

419

69

153

.1889,......

452

65

132

46

68

.1888,......

401

TABLE E 3.

CONTAGIOUS DISEASES ORDINANCE.

TABLE shewing the number of MILITARY MEN admitted into MILITARY HOSPITAL, during the Year 1891.

SECONDARY SYPHILIS.

January, February,

March,

April,

May,

June,

July,

August,

September,

*****

October,

November, December,

Months.

Contracted in Hongkong.

Contracted elsewhere.

Total.

10

10

9

9

6

6

3

3

11

11

1

I

.

5

5

7

7

9

8

4

9

Total Number,........

82

Table XVI.-Shewing the rate of MORTALITY among the EUROPEAN and AMERICAN fixed RESIDENTS in Hongkong during the last 10 Years.

1882,

1883, 1884,

1885, 1886,

1887, 1888,

1889,

Number of European and

Years.

American Residents.

Deaths.

Percentage of Deaths to Number of Residents.

3,040

55

1.80

3,040

81

2.06

3,040

94

3.09

3,040

99

3.25

3,040

103

3.38

3,040

-108

3.55

3,040

122

4.01

3,040

93

3.00

3,040

95

3.12

4,195

57

1.36

1890,

1891,

Average of 10 Years,......

31,555

907

28.68

*

:

420

Enclosure 1.

Report from the Superintendent of the Civil Hospital.

GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL,

HONGKONG, 11th April, 1892.

SIR,—I have the honour to forward you my Annual Report for the year 1891 with the Hospital Statistics.

I-THE HOSPITAL BUILDINGS.

1. The Main portion of this Hospital has remained unaltered.

2. A covered way has been constructed connecting the New Wing with the rest of the Hospital increasing the convenience of the communication between the buildings.

3. The New Barracks for the Chinese attendants have been completed and are now occupied. These provide accommodation for the whole of the Chinese attendants.

On the completion of this building, the old quarters were removed. Since the occupancy of these New Barracks it is satisfactory to record a marked improvement in the health of the Chinese staff which now appears to be satisfactorily accommodated.

4. The increased Office and Store accommodation still remains to be done. In connection with this it has been decided that it is desirable to increase the accommodation for private paying patients. Plans and estimates have been prepared, and provision has been made to defray the cost of the same in the Estimates for this year.

A complete system for the distribution of hot water throughout the Main building and the New Wing has been completed and meets a long needed want. Hot water being available on every floor at all hours of the day considerably facilitates internal management.

The question of improved laundry accommodation still remains undecided, it being hoped that the New Public Laundries recently constructed by the Colonial Government will have the desired effect of improving the hitherto very unsatisfactory methods of conducting laundry operations by the native washermen.

5. The number of private paying patients has been maintained in the case of the first and second classes as the following statistics will show :-

1888.

1889.

1890.

1891.

First Class patients,

6.

17.

38.

39.

Second Class patients, .........12.

32.

162.

156.

In the third class I have to record a diminution, the total number of private paying patients in 1891 being 464 as compared with 313 in 1888, 402 in 1889, and 527 in 1890.

The necessity for the increased accommodation above referred to (paragraph 4) requires early attention. It is, however, hoped that, now the project has assumed a definite shape, I shall be able before long to report its completion and the consequent improved means at our disposal for meeting this public requirement especially important in a Colony situated as this is.

The temporary arrangements referred to in my last Report have during the year continued to be used no other means being available, though I regret to say that my experience during the past year does not enable me to view it in a more satisfactory light than I did at the date of my last Report.

6. The continued increased accumulation of Chinese dwellings in the neighbourhood of the Hospital and the possible extension of building operations in the vicinity renders it more desirable than ever that some steps should be taken not only to close the Hospital Road to traffic between the hour of 8 P.M. and 8 A.M., but also existing regulations should be more stringently enforced to prevent a continuance of unnecessary disturbance in the streets adjoining the Hospital in the early hours of the morning.

II.-SMALL-POX HOSPITAL,

7. The temporary Small-Pox buildings have been maintained.

8. The Hospital ship Hygeia was taken to her moorings to the North of Stone Cutters' Island on 4th May, but was not occupied except by caretakers until September 30th when the S.S. Bellerophon arrived in the harbour with six cases of Small-Pox on board. These were at once

removed to the Hygeia and arrangements made for their medical treatment.

The Hygeia was required on one other occasion, the S.S. Peshawur arriving on 26th October with one case of Small-Pox on board.

421

No necessity has arisen during the past year for utilising the Hygeia for the few isolated cases of Small-Pox that have occurred within the limits of the City.

The ship is now well appointed for meeting all probable contingencies that are likely to arise requiring the actual treatment of cases of epidemic disease, and from the experience gained during the past year she appears well adapted for the special requirements which led to her construction.

There is, however, one drawback in the distance of her moorings from the City. Though convenient for the reception of imported cases such as those that have had to be contended with during the past year, being near the quarantine anchorage, should she at any time be required for the reception of cases occurring on shore considerable advantage would accrue on the increased facilities afforded for the removal of patients and their subsequent medical treatment if an anchorage nearer the City could be obtained.

III.--ADDITIONAL OFFICERS' QUARTERS.

9. It is with some regret that I am unable at present to record the occupancy of this Building, but it is much to be hoped that this improved accommodation will be available before we enter on another summer. Not only will the large space available add to the comfort and the health of the officers, but this building, being situated away from the noisy thoroughfare of Queen's Road on which the present temporary quarters abut, will secure that necessary rest and quiet so conducive to the maintenance of good health.

IV.-HOSPITAL PREMISES.

10. There is nothing of any importance to record with regard to the Hospital premises though I may here mention that, towards the latter end of the year, the whole of the premises were supplied with water by meter. The cost of the water will in future have to be defrayed by this Department.

V.-HOSPITAL AND NURSING STAFF.

11. I regret to have to report that Mr. ROGERS' health completely broke down in the early part of the summer. He went away for a short sea trip in September, but not benefitting by the change, he left on a three months leave of absence in October.

I am much obliged to the Sisters for the able way in which they have performed their duties, their care and attention to the patients is beyond all praise.

I have much pleasure in reporting that one of them, Sister CATHERINE has undertaken the study of the Chinese language, and in December last passed the first Government Examination on the Cantonese dialect with great credit.

I have again to record my thanks to Dr. Lowson and to the entire staff for their able and efficient assistance rendered during the past year.

A few changes of minor importance have taken place in the subordinate staff of the Hospital.

VI.-WORK DONE DURING THE YEAR.

12. Attached to this report are the following tables :-

I.-Shewing the admissions into and deaths in the Government Civil Hospital during

each month of the year, of the Police.

II.-Shewing the rate of sickness and mortality in the Police Force during the year. III.-Police return of admissions to Hospital from each district during the year.

V.-General return of the sick treated in the Hospital.

Va.-Surgical operations performed during the year.

Vb.-Zymotic Diseases, sub-group 1.

Vc.-

""

""

2.

Vd.-Diagram shewing number of cases of Malarial Fever occurring amongst the

Members of the Police Force admitted in each month of the year.

Ve.-Zymotic Diseases, sub-group 3.

Vf.- Vg.-

""

11

"

4.

5.

VI.-Shewing the rate of mortality in the Government Civil Hospital during the last

10 years.

VII.--Shewing the admissions into and deaths in the Government Civil Hospital during

each month of last year.

422

VIIa. Table of admissions into and deaths in the Small-pox Hospital.

VIIb. The aggregate monthly number of patients visited in the Hospital daily for last

four years.

VIIC.-Table giving the hours of duty of the Malarial Fever cases occurring amongst

the Police.

From the foregoing it will be seen :-

(i.) That the number of in-patients under treatment during the year was 1867, a decrease of 90 as compared with that of the previous year; the total number of deaths was 84, a percentage of 4.49 as compared with a percentage of 5 in 1890; there were of moribund cases dying within

24 hours,..................................

48

""

..25

......32

(ii.) Out of the total number of in-patients 136 were females, an increase of 12 on that of previous year. Six of these were difficult obstetric cases.

(iii.) Six thousand eight hundred and thirty-one (6,831) out-patients were attended to during the year.

(iv.) POLICE. The total number under treatment was 12 less than in the previous year. With regard to the different nationalities there was an increase of 18 amongst the European Members of the Force, an increase of 31 amongst the Indians, and a decrease of 61 amongst the Chinese.

There were five deaths during the year, two Europeans, two Indians and one Chinese. The cause of death in two cases was Bright's disease, in other two cases Remittent Fever, and in the fifth Pneumonia.

(v.) INFLUENZA.-There were 34 cases under treatment during the year. 25 of these were admitted during the months of January and February. Seven of the cases in January came from the Gaol, the first case being admitted on the 9th instant, the second on the 17th, three on the 23rd instant, and one each on the 24th and 25th instant. These men were all Turnkeys and were sent in to this Hospital by the Medical Officer of the Gaol, their symptoms were very similar:-- the attack commencing with marked fever, temperature rising to 103° or 104° F. and accompanied by pains in the back and limbs and especially over the eyeballs, sore throat was complained of, and in most cases slight coryza and nasal catarrh were present. In a few hours these symptoms were aggravated by the presence of a troublesome cough, some thick viscid mucopurulent phlegm with difficulty being expectorated; and on the third or fourth day in all these cases there was a distinct pleuritic rub to be heard at the base of one or both lungs.

In only one case did Pneumonia supervene, and that ran a normal course.

There were no deaths and the disease was not communicated by these cases to any patients who were then under treatment in the same wards.

In my opinion they were cases of the ordinary endemic Influenza always to be met with here in the cold months of the year, a little more severe perhaps than usual, for, as a rule, it has not been found necessary to admit such cases into the Hospital. I certainly do not think they can be classed with that aggravated form of the disease the epidemic type.

(vi.) TYPHOID FEVER.--There were 8 cases under treatment during the year with five deaths. Two of these cases were admitted from Canton, and the remaining six come direct to the Hospital from different ships, these all being Board of Trade patients. Three of them died within three days of their admission to the Hospital.

There was no case of Typhoid Fever under treatment in which the disease had been contracted in this Colony.

(vii.) CHOLERA.-There were only two cases under treatment during the year, both of these proved fatal.

The first case was that of an officer in the service of the Canton and Macao Steam-Boat Company. He was admitted at 1.25 P.M. on the 29th August, in a state of collapse. Notwithstand- ing all that was done for him he rapidly sank and died at 10 P.M. that same evening.

1)

He stated that the diarrhoea and vomiting had only commenced at 5 A.M. that morning. Post Mortem EXAMINATION.--Decided congestion of the stomach and small intestine, especially of the serous coat. The bowels contained "rice-water' fluid. Bladder was quite empty. Cultivations were made of the fæces, some sterilised gelatine being inoculated with a small quantity of the stools passed before death, a distinct growth took place, the gelatine being liquefied all along the track of the needle, on staining the growth and examining it microscopically, a number of bacilli were seen, the rods being thicker than those of the comma bacillus, indeed in their microscopic appearance and in the manner of the test tube cultivations they resemble the "Spirillum Finklerii."

423

The second case was that of a seaman from the S.S. Bellerophon, this was on her homeward journey from Japan.

He was admitted at 12 o'clock on the 29th October, having evidently contracted the disease in Japan. He died some thirty hours after admission.

The Post Mortem appearances were very similar to those in the previous case, there being well marked congestion of the stomach, duodenum and jejunum.

year.

(viii.) DYSENTERY.-There were 69 cases under treatment as compared with 106 in the previous

During the

year

four deaths occurred.

This marked diminution in the number of cases coincident with a reduction in the number of Malarial fever cases (see paragraph IX) under treatment is to me a clear sign of the more general healthiness of last year.

An extended series of trials in the treatment of this disease by the administration of Arsenite of Copper has proved somewhat disappointing, and although in some cases it has been useful it is still on Ipecacuanha that we mainly depend for the successful treatment of this disease.

(ix.) MALARIAL FEVER.--The total number of cases under treatment was 339 as compared with 374 in 1890.

With reference to the Diagram Vd., instead of taking the whole number of cases under consideration I have limited the figures in this table to those occurring amongst the members of the Police Force. A great many of the cases admitted suffering from these fevers are sailors and others who have contracted the disease elsewhere, and, as this table is given with the idea of, if possible, ascertaining at which periods of the year this fever is most prevalent in the Colony, we cannot do better than confine ourselves to a fixed body of men like the Police, who are of necessity residents in the Colony, and from the nature of their occupation are constantly exposed to this disease.

During the past year note has been kept of the hours of duty of these men on their admission to the Hospital. The result of these observations is given in Table VIIc. From this it will be seen that 138 out of 173, or a ratio of 79.7 per cent., evidently contracted Malarial fever during the night. There is no doubt that the hours between sunset and sunrise are those in which the Malarial poison is most rife.

As any information with reference to this class of fevers is of great importance and interest, I give in the appendix a paper on the Remittent Fevers of Hongkong read by myself before the Hongkong and China Branch of the British Medical Association. This gives the result of our experience at this Hospital during the past four years.

(x.) BERI-BERI.-There were eleven cases under treatment all of whom recovered.

(xi) VENEREAL DISEASES.--Although there is a diminution in the total number of cases under treatment during 1891 as compared with 1890, viz., 230 as against 266, on examining Table Vf., it will be seen that there has been a great increase in the number of cases of Primary and Secondary Syphilis, the numbers being 94 as against 43 in 1890, an increase of 118 per cent.

The one death was that of a delicate German sailor who was under treatment for Secondary Syphilis. He developed Pneumonia in the course of this disease, and his constitution was so undermined that he could not withstand this complication.

(xii.) INJURIES.-There is a considerable diminution in this class of cases, there being only 214 as against 363 in the previous year.

SURGICAL OPERATIONS.

xiii.) HEPATIC ABSCESS. There were two cases operated on during the year, one being a Marine Officer in the Post Office, and the other a Turnkey at the Gaol. They both died. In only one were we enabled to have a post mortem examination, and in this case the abscess in the right lobe of the liver, which had been opened, had almost healed; there were numerous other abscesses in the right lobe, and one large one in the left lobe..

In one of these cases there was a previous history of Dysentery.

TREPHINING. The result of the trephining was perfectly successful, the cause of death being the subsequent formation of an abscess in the opposite half of the brain.

TRACHEOTOMY.-The object of this was simply palliative, the patient suffering from advanced tubercular perichondritis.

AMPUTATIONS.-Herewith notes of the two fatal amputations :

(1.) Fracture of upper end of Tibia and dislocation of Fibula in a man æt. 64.

From the first it was evident that the popliteal artery was either pressed on or injured by one of the pieces of bone, and, anastomotic circulation not being established, gangrene set in. Amputation at the knee joint was performed.

424

The wound had almost healed and the patient was in high spirits, when one morning five weeks after the operation, at 5 A.M., he was found dead in bed.

Post mortem examination showing extensive disease of the heart valves and vessels, death evidently having occurred from syncope.

(2.) Compound fracture of leg. This was the case of a native woman æt. 60 in a feeble condition from want of nourishment, who was injured in a junk collision during a heavy gale. The leg was completely crushed and she was almost moribund. Amputation at the knee joint was rapidly performed, but the patient never rallied

and died within 36 hours.

EXCISIONS.-In the case of excision of the elbow this was one of severe injury giving rise to profound shock leading one to suspect some abdominal lesion, and, at the post mortem examination, a rupture of the liver was found to be the cause of death.

(xiv.) The following fractures were treated in addition to those on which operations were performed :-

Skull,

Nasal Bones,

Ribs,

Scapula,

Clavicle,

Humerus,

Radius,

Radius and Ulna,..

.....

Carpus, Tarus Phalanges, &c.,

Femur,

Tibia and Fibula,

Simple.

.3

Compound.

9

.2

0

3

.1

0

.2

0

.0

3

2

.2

..5

.........0

HOONO-

1

0

0

2

0

1

Three cases of Compound Fracture of the skull died within 24 hours after admission.

(xv.) POISONING.-There were 27 cases under treatment with 8 deaths. In each of the fatal cases the poisonous agent was opium.

I have to record that for the first time a conviction was obtained in the Supreme Court of the Colony in a case of Datura Poisoning.

Eight men were admitted on the 22nd October, presenting all the symptoms of Datura Poisoning. (Vide Report for 1888, Appendix C). Emetics, Apomorphia and Sulphate of Zinc were administered and in the vomit parts of the leaf and petals of the Datura alba were found.

13. SMALL-POX.-There were ten cases under treatment in the temporary Small-Pox Hospital with one death. This latter was a native of Zanzibar. He was admitted from the P. & O. S.S. Bengal, with the confluent variety, the disease evidently having been contracted in Japan.

14. VACCINATIONS.-Two hundred and thirty-four (234) were vaccinated with the following result:-

Primary cases,.. Re-vaccinations,

Successful. 77

Unsuccessful.

.125

7 84

25-150

15. POST MORTEMS.-Forty-nine Post Mortem Examinations were held during the past year. 16. The paper on the Remittent Fevers of Hongkong before referred to (paragraph 12, sub-section IX) will be found in the Appendix.

The fees received from the patients in the Government Civil Hospital during the year amounted to the sum of $14,849.99; of this the Board of Trade paid $2,623.75, and the Police $1,136.17 Those received from the Lunatic Asylum amounted to $417, and those from the Small-pox patients to $478.75, giving a total of $15,745.74.

I take this opportunity of thanking those who have during the past year visited the patients in this Hospital and those who have kindly remembered them by forwarding flowers, books, periodicals, &c., for their use.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your obedient Servant,

J. M. ATKINSON, M.B., (London).

Superintendent.

Dr. PH. B. C. AYRES,

Colonial Surgeon, fc., &c., &c.

425

Appendix A.

THE REMITTENT FEVERS OF HONGKONG.

The subject of this paper, viz., the Remittent Fevers of Hongkong, is doubtless one of paramount interest to all of us.

It will be seen from the facts I now propose to lay before you that in this Colony violent and fatal remittent fevers have often appeared, indeed, it seems due to this cause and to this alone that Hongkong derived the unenviable excessively unhealthy reputation which at any rate it had in the early years of the Colony's History.

I purposely limit the scope of my paper to the Remittent Fevers of Hongkong, as it would be impossible in the short time at my disposal to consider the various types of Malarial Fevers that from time to time come to our notice.

Remittent Fever has been very prevalent during the last three years, and, in considering it, I will at the outset define what is meant by the term "Remittent Fever.'

Definition.

>>

"A paroxyomal fever of malarial origin in which the paroxysms do not intermit, but only as the name implies remit (MACLEAN)."

I will now direct your attention to what I may term the Historical aspects of the disease in this Colony.

In perusing the Medical records of the early years of the Colony's history I have obtained much valuable information from the Annual Medical Report of the Colonial Surgeons.

Next I intend to discuss the etiology of the disease concluding with the symptoms treatment and termination of the disease as it has been observed during the past four years at the Government Civil Hospital.

History before 1842.

Dr. MACLEAN, formerly Professor of Military Medicine in the Army Medical School at Netley, who was encamped in Hongkong before it was ceded to the British Government, states :-"that at that time the soil was but little disturbed and the troops did not suffer; but when excavations were made at a subsequent period for the construction of the City of Victoria a fatal form of remittent fever appeared which caused great mortality."

1844.

From the Colonial Surgeon's report for 1844 we learn that Remittent Fever was then the most fatal malady.

1845.

In 1845, Dr. DILL, Colonial Surgeon, states :-" That there were 6 cases of deaths from Remittent Fever:-five of these occurring amongst the Police and Overseers of Roads. It is recorded that one Government Officer at the Supreme Court died of low Remittent Fever, and another Constable who died at Stanley, though not treated by the Colonial Surgeon, presumably succumbed to malarial fever. The death rate this year amongst the Europeans and Portuguese is given was 1 in 18.3 or 54 per

1,000."

1846..

Dr. YOUNG, in his report of 1846, records 16 deaths from Intermittent, Remittent Fevers, and Dysentery, including that of Dr. DILL, the Colonial Surgeon, owing to whose death these diseases were not differentiated.

The death rate amongst the Europeans and Portuguese in this year is given as 1 in 13.2 or 75 per 1,000. These numerical statements cannot lay claim to great accuracy yet they will afford, it is hoped, a very fair criterion of the state of health and disease in the Colony.

!

1847.

Dr. MORRISON, Colonial Surgeon, in 1847 states that :-"There can be no doubt that the first colonization of this Island was attended with disastrous consequences to our countrymen and soldiers, and the ravages of Hongkong Fever were as fearful as similar visitations have been in other parts of the world."

There is no classification of the different diseases in his report for 1847, but the death rate of the Europeans and Portuguese is entered as 35 per 1,000.

1848 seems to have been a very fatal year.

1848.

Dr. MORRISON reports of this year that six deaths from Remittent Fever occurred :-

"The first being that of a Policeman whose illness was of six days duration commencing with dysentery, it became complicated with symptoms of Remittent Fever, lastly the periods of exacerbation became indistinct and the disease assumed the form of continued fever with Gastro-enteritic irritation, death was not preceded by delirium. This man who had suffered previously from repeated attacks of fever was brought to Victoria from Stanley."

426

"In the second case, that of a strong healthy young man of temperate habits admitted from

Aberdeen, the disease ran through precisely the same stages.

"The third case was that of a young man of most robust frame, active intellect and temperate habits. In this instance the disease was of seven days duration and death was preceded by symptoms of stupor and low delirium.”

I mention these cases as they agree in their characteristics with those I will describe later on as having occurred during the past few years. It will be observed that in the last case but one, there is a note that no delirium was noticed.

There were three other fatal cases that year amongst the European Police from this disease. Seven other European Police were noted as convalescent recovering from Remittent Fever. But they were unfortunately drowned in the month of August whilst on a cruise in an armed Police boat with some other convalescent patients.

During this year the average number of Policemen employed was :-

Europeans.

50

Indians.

130

Chinese.

28

Deaths.

35

Percentage of Deaths to persons 14.28 per cent. so that altogether in the Police Force amongst fifty Europeans, we have six deaths from Remittent Fever giving a percentage of 12, in addition to the seven convalescents who were drowned during the typhoon.

The death rate this year was as follows:-

No. of Europeans.

963

No. Deaths.

125

A percentage of 12.90, (129 per 1,000.)

This is furnished by statistics from the Registrar General's Department.

In this year many deaths occurred in the 95th Regiment, concerning these Dr. GORDON, Staff Assistant Surgeon, states :-

"A large majority of the cases and the most fatal came from the South or rear range of the Barracks. The disease was first observed about the first week in May slightly increasing in June, in July a considerable increase in the number and severity of the cases took place, this continued during August, but sensibly decreased during September, the average duration of the disease being about 56 hours. Death generally occurred about the third day, though in many instances it occurred a few hours after admission."

The disease was called by Dr. GORDON "Febris Remittens," and described as congestive and malignant. Dr. MORRISON, the Colonial Surgeon, considers this disease as nearly identical with the "Yellow Fever" of the West Indies which is said never to occur in the East, although indeed the earliest name of the "Yellow Fever" received was "Maladie de Siam." He states "I was always of the opinion that although the fever of last summer was probably endemic it was not peculiar to this place." In illustration of this opinion he places in juxta-position with a case and his remarks given by Dr. GORDON, a case recorded in JOHNSTONE'S work on "Tropical Climates" by Mr. SHIELDS, which occurred in Batavia in the month of August 1800, together with that gentleman's remarks.

Mr. SHIELD's statement :-"Never was there a disease so deceitful as this Fever. I have frequently seen instances where every symptom was so favourable that I could have almost pronounced my patient out of danger when all at once he would be seized with restlessness, black vomiting, delirium, and convulsions, which in a few hours would hurry him out of existence."

Case.

"This was the case with Mr. BROUGHTON, Purser of the Daedalus, who died of the Batavian epidemic at the Edam Hospital. On the seventh day of his illness he took a change for the better and everything was promising. The morning before he died he expressed himself greatly relieved and called for some mutton broth and sago, both of which he ate with a good appetite spoke rationally and was in good spirits. Towards evening the delusion vanished, restlessness, black vomiting, delirium and convulsions supervened and carried him off before morning.'

Dr. GORDON, states :--" The Fever was of a very malignant and insidious character, the symptoms changing for the worse suddenly and without warning either to the medical attendant or to the patient himself. Although often visited and apparently much improved both in feeling and appearance, half-an-hour previous to his death he would suddenly became strongly convulsed, his skin intensely hot and dry, the surface asserting a livid hue, and thus the scene would close case.'

"Colour Sergeant STALEY, a stout healthy young man, was admitted on the morning of the 17th June, in the cold stage of Intermittent Fever, and in about six hours had gone through all the stages of the disease. When the intermission occurred, Quinine was administered. On the 18th he declared himself as feeling quite well and was apyretic, his pulse not even indicating the slightest constitutional irritation.

"About 4 A.M. on the 19th, I was called to see him and found him comatose and convulsed, with lividity, intense heat and dryness of the skin. Death closed the scene in a few minutes.”

427

Note the difference between these two cases. I have no doubt in my own mind that these so ably described by Dr. GORDON were cases of what I term "Malignant Remittent Fever." Similar in almost the minutest detail with cases which have come under treatment in the Government Civil Hospital during the three years 1889, 1890 and 1891.

The symptoms of the Batavian case are, I think you will agree with me, plainly those of Yellow

Fever.

1849.

In the Colonial Surgeon's report for 1849, the following extract from the work done at the Government Civil Hospital appears :--

In

(C

:

Amongst the diseases, fevers of various types, and of these the remittent is the chief, are

the most numerous."

every instance the malignant fever which has appeared in the Colony has been described to be of the remittent form, and certainly it is the prevailing disorder.

In the 95th Regiment, the large number of 94 deaths is stated to have arisen from "Intermittent Fever," it may be reasonably suspected that some of these, if not the greater number, were from the Remittent type, as it appears very rarely that a death occurs from the Intermittent variety.

The following table shows the fixed European population in Hongkong during the year 1849, and the proportion of deaths :--

No. of Europeans. Deaths.

987

Proportion of Deaths.

64 6.48 p.c. or 64.80 per

1,000. (Military and Naval forces not included). I think I have gone sufficiently into the early records of the medical history of this Colony to show that undoubtedly Remittent Fever was one of the main causes of the enormous fatality which then prevailed.

I cannot but express my obligation to those who have, with great care, handed down the history of these cases and the valuable records made nearly half a century ago together with the details of their clinical history, which we even now, with our increased facilities for closer and more detailed observation, have not been able to scientifically formulate.

CAUSATION (Etiology.)

Remittent Fever is undoubtedly a non-contagious disease; it is strictly an endemic affection, and is found whenever its specific cause is generated in sufficient concentration.

Whatever that specific cause may be there is no doubt that in the experience of Hongkong when soil which has long been untouched is upturned, either by the process of excavation for building purposes, or by natural agencies, then does the fever become more rife and fatal.

There can be no doubt that freshly upturned earth is here a point of considerable importance in relation to the causation of this disease.

I might here introduce evidence in favour of this:-See the Report of the Fever Commission of 1888, the memo by Dr. YOUNG in my report for 1889 concerning an outbreak of Malarial Fever at Kowloon Point caused by the extensive earth cutting required in the preparation of the site for the New Water Police Station at Tsim Tsa Tsui in the summer of 1878, or again Dr. PIKE's cases at North Point Battery as narrated by him in his paper on "Malarial Fevers " read before the Hongkong Medical Society in 1885, and appearing in the Transactions of that Society.

On this point I think there is no difference of opinion.

According to TOMMASI CRUDELI (Lancet, November 1st, 1884), three conditions are necessary for the production of the Malarial poison :-

1st. A temperature of not less than 68° F.

2nd. A certain humidity of the soil.

3rd. The free action of the air on the soil which contains the ferment

In the summer months from May-September these conditions exist in this Colony.

As to the intimate cause of malaria Professor A. LAVERAN gave an account before the International Health Congress last year of the hæmatozoa described by him in 1880:-

The Etiology of Malaria.

Professor A. LAVERAN, gave an account, illustrated by lantern demonstrations, of the hœmatozoon described by him in 1880. It had, he said, since that date been recognised by many other observers. Its morphology was now well known. The chief forms which it assumed were described, namely 1. The spherical bodies. 2. The flagella. 3. The cruciform bodies. 4. The rosette-like bodies. The flagella could only be demonstrated in fresh blood; the other forms, however, were well seen in preserved blood. The blood in paludism was easily studied by rapid drying and fixation of the specimen by heat, followed by staining with a concentrated solution of methyl blue or gentian violet; a double staining could be effected by successively immersing the specimen of dried blood in concentrated aqueous solutions of eosin and of methyl blue, whereby the red cells assumed a rosy hue, and the leucocytes, together with the parasitic bodies, were coloured blue. Nuclei had been observed in both

428

the spherical and the cruciform bodies. Two, and even three, different varieties of this hœmatozoon had been described (polymorphism). Similar hæmatozoa had been found in different animals-frogs, lizards, marsh-tortoises, birds. In many species of birds there was to be found a hæmatozoon so similar to that of paludism, that most observers regarded the two forms as identical. The similarity was very marked, yet several points of difference existed: thus-in the blood of birds the cruciform bodies were not found; the parasitic elements were endoglobular, and never became free, as was often the case with the true paludic hematozoon; and the amoeboid movements of the spherical bodies were much less notable in the case of the organism found in birds' blood. On the other hand, this latter hæmatozoon had been observed in birds living in non-marshy regions; it frequently caused no inconvenience to its host, and the inoculation of blood containing this hæmatozoon had given only negative results.

Yet, the study of this organism might be expected to throw light upon many obscure points in the life-history of the true hæmatozoon of paludism, with which it presented so many points of similarity.

Professor CROOKSHANK said that the evidence was in favour of the bodies described by M. LAVERAN being the cause of malaria, but it must not be forgotten that bodies of a similar nature had been met with in healthy animals.

Under the microscopes you will see specimens of what I consider to be the "hæmatozoa" Laveran describes, they were prepared in exactly the same way, as described by him, but we must not forget that these hoematozoa may simply be a concomitant of the disease, and not its cause. (See Plate A. in Appendix.*)

Before proceeding to consider the Clinical History, I will now place before you the monthly tables of the Malarial Fever admissions to the Government Civil Hospital during the years 1888, 1889 and 1890.

From these it will be seen that in 1888 there were:-

Intermittent Fever, Remittent Fever,

In 1889:-

Intermittent Fever, Remittent Fever,

In 1890:-

Intermittent Fever,

Remittent Fever,

Cases.

Deaths. 340 with 1

30

2

""

370

384

""

3

0

37

**

9

421

9

""

325

1

49

3

374

4

""

1889 is evidently the most fatal year and also that in which the greatest number of cases were admitted. Eight of the nine deaths in this year occurred after the great rain storm of May 29th, this enormous downpour of rain :-consisting of 33'.11 inches, from 3 A.M., on the 29th May, to 5 P.M. on the 30th, (thirty-eight hours in all), washed down great quantities of alluvial soil from the many land- slips on the hill sides and undoubtedly must have set free the Malarial poison to an abnormally great extent, or in a more virulent form than had existed for some years.

The remittent cases in the last six months of this year were of a particularly malignant type. (See Diagram B. in Appendix.)

Four of these virulent cases occurred amongst the European Police and were briefly as follows :-

1889.

I. ANGUS MCAULAY, P. Sergeant, æt. 34. Admitted 3rd June from Hung Hom Police Station,

died on the 10th at 4.30 a.m.

II. JOHN HAMILTON, P.Ç., æt. 25, (only in Colony for a few months).

6th June, and died 2.35 A.M. on the 7th June.

Admitted 9.50 p.m.

Temperature rising to 107°.4 shortly before death. He had been engaged on duty by the bridge over the Nullah Kennedy Road.

III. HUGH PARKER, P.C., æt. 23, Yaumati Station. Admitted 11th August, died 15th

August.

IV. D. McDONALD, P.S., æt. 33. Central Station. Admitted 20th September, died 26th

September.

(The notes and chart of HUGH PARKER's case are given in the Appendix A.)

In 1890, there were at least six cases of the severe or malignant type of Remittent Fever, two of which proved fatal.

* Not printed.

*

*AON

400

*ados

Dec.

Diagram B.

1889.

Aug.

"=60° F.

Jan.

-1":

cases.

Feb.

July

June

Mar.

:

April

Black-Mean monthly temperature.

Red-Monthly rainfall.

Green-Monthly number of Malarial Fever cases.

429

:

:

431

The Clinical History of these cases reminds one forcibly of the severe remittents which are recorded as occurring in the early years of the Colony's history.

CLINICAL HISTORY OF THESE CASES OF MALIGNANT REMITTENT FEVER.

Invasion.

The premonitory symptoms are the same as in all febrile disorders, namely, pains in the back and limbs, a feeling of lassitude, tenderness about the joints, nausea and headache.

As a rule these are of very short duration lasting only for a few hours, the onset of the fever paroxysm being very sudden and generally accompanied by distressing bilious vomiting.

Symptoms.

The patient at the first appears quite prostrated, countenance pinched and flushed, tongue generally foul and dry, bowels constipated, and complaining chiefly of headache, and distressing vomiting. On taking his temperature it will generally be found as high as 102° to 105° F., as a rule he is very restless and anxious.

In this condition the patient will remain for three or four hours or perhaps longer, then as a rule the urgent symptoms will to some extent subside, the temperature will fall two or three degrees, the skin becomes more moist, and the vomiting either ceases or becomes much less: this is the remission.

In some cases, however, where the patient is more severely attacked by the disease, no remission occurs, but the temperature will gradually but surely rise, despite every means taken to lower it, the skin remains dry and hot, the vomiting continues, rapid respiration sets in, the patient soon becomes delirious, the delirium passes on to coma, and death may occur, in a few hours.

This was the case with P.C. HAMILTON, admitted on 6th June at 9.50 P.M.

He had been on duty that evening near the Bridge over the Kennedy Road, and, feeling ill, came into the Hospital. His temperature on admission was 105° F, antipyrin was given, and, by 11 P.M., the temperature had fallen to 104°.5 F., however, it soon rapidly rose from this point notwithstanding that he was wet packed and antipyrin administered but not retained, it continued rising, the patient soon became delirious coma supervened, and he died at 2.35 A.M. next morning, his temperature just before death being 107°.8; after death it registered 110°. F. in the rectum.

On admission this patient simply complained of distressing pains in the limbs accompanied by vomiting.

This man had only been in the force for some five months, and it is undoubtedly the case that new comers seem to be more liable to this malignant type of the disease.

The only case of severe remittent fever that has ended fatally in the Government Civil Hospital this year amongst Europeans is that of a gentleman who had only been in the Colony for a few months and this was his first attack of fever; he was not smitten down quite so suddenly, but he succumbed after a week's severe illness. (Temperature chart attached).

In cases where remission occurs it will last from 2 to 10 hours and then the exacerbation supervenes, the temperature probably rising some two or three degrees higher than in the initial attack.

The urine is acid, high coloured and generally contains a trace of albumen.

As the temperature rises during the exacerbation, all the symptoms become more severe, as a rule drugs are now quite useless as the stomach rejects everything, the patient soon becomes delirious, and unless active measures are taken to lower the temperature, coma sets in and death in a short time may occur.

Duration.

Is from a few hours to as many weeks. MACLEAN states "that death is rare before the eighth day," but in some of the cases I have named death has occurred in a few hours.

Varieties.

There are at least three varieties of Remittent Fever met with here :-

1st. The Malignant type in which the patient seems to be quite overcome by the virulence of the poison, this resists all the modes of treatment we know of at present, and proves fatal generally under a week. (See case of HUGH PARKER in Appendix.)

2nd. The purely Remittent, in which the onset is sudden and severe followed by exacerbations and morning remissions ultimately ending in recovery generally under a fortnight. (See case of LOCKHEAD in Appendix.)

3rd. The mixed type, in which at first the patient is suffering from Intermittent Fever, the temperature falling to normal in the morning, but in a few days the remittent type sets in and runs its course as before described. (See case of WELTZ in Appendix.) 4th. The so called "Typho-Malarial" fever, I think this term should be blotted out of our nomenclature, there are so far as I can ascertain no such diseases as a hybrid of enteric fever and malaria or a transformation of malaria into enteric. The disease to which this name has been applied by authors is either a severe form of remittent fever with marked nervous prostration, or else enteric fever occurring in a patient who has pre-

:

432

viously suffered from Malaria, and in which the latent malarial poison is roused into activity and considerably modifies the existing disease. We see this every day in malarial patients with surgical injuries, the fever consequent on such injuries often takes on an intermittent or remittent type and unless this is borne in mind grave errors in diagnosis if not in treatment may take place.

Complications and sequela.

Occasionally tetanoid spasms and epileptiform seizures have been met with, more frequently a low form of Pneumonia has occurred. In more than one case retention of the urine has been met with, and is probably due to the direct action of the poison on the nervous system.

Treatment.

In the milder cases of Remittent Fever, it is our custom to first of all open the bowels with some aperient, a modification of Livingstone's powder being preferred, viz:-Calomel grs. iv, Quinine grs. v, Pulo Rhei or Japapæ Co ad 3i.

After that has been given according to the temperature either Phenacetin or Antipyrin is prescribed, the former in mild cases in doses of iv grains-x grains administered every 4 hours, and the latter in twenty grain doses repeated hourly for the first two hours, if the temperature has not fallen by this time two further hourly doses of ten grains each are given.

As a rule antipyrin will lower the temperature. When the remission occurs Quinine is given in 5 grain doses hourly until the temperature rises to 101° F. or 102° F., after that it is useless to give it as the stomach nearly always rejects the drug.

In the severer cases where antipyrin and phenacetin prove useless, as soon as the temperature rises to 106° F., which it will do very rapidly even in the first exacerbation, ice-packing is applied, by this I mean that the patient is placed on a mackintosh sheet covered with a sheet dipped in ice-cold water, ice being packed all over his body and an ice-bag applied to his head.

A

It is simply marvellous to see the beneficial effect of such treatment in these severe cases. patient who previous to it is violently delirious soon begins to calm down, and as the temperature falls he regains consciousness, his pulse becomes quieter and less rapid, and all fears of a sudden fatal termination are at an end. See notes on LOCKHEAD's case.

In an hour the temperature has been reduced by this means 10° F.

Having effected this the patient is replaced in bed and the hypodermic solution of the acid hydrobromate of Quinine is injected, the favourite sites being either the Deltoid or the muscles of the

calf.

During the ice packing the patient must be carefully watched as symptoms of collapse may set in, when stimulants must be administered.

The patient generally falls into a short sleep and has some hours respite the temperature, however, frequently rises again. When the next exacerbation occurs a wet sheet applied over the body will often suffice to control the fever. See LOCKHEAD's case.

Morphia has been found very useful calming the mental anxiety, inducing sleep and probably acting as is supposed by many as an anti-periodic.

Pathological anatomy.

Congestion of the mucus membrane of the stomach.

Intestines frequently congested no ulceration, simply inflammation of mucus membrane, rosy-red appearance. Most important changes are found in the Spleen and Liver, these viscera being frequently enlarged.

It has been recorded that in Malarial fever as met with in Hongkong, the spleen is not enlarged (vide Dr. PIKE's paper).

However, the following are results of some of the post mortem examinations performed in the Government Civil Hospital :-

1. Chinaman Ho YUNG, died 31st December, 1889, cause of death Remittent Fever. Spleen

weighed 17 ounces, very soft and diffluent.

2. Indian KOSHAL SINGH, I.P.C. 589, admitted 14th April, 1891, suffering from Remittent Fever, died 13th June, 1892. Post Mortem :-Spleen weighed 20 ounces, very soft indeed, the splenic tissue under the capsule was quite diffluent.

3. Chinaman YEUNG TSO-SHING, admitted 3rd August, 1891, suffering from Remittent Fever, died 7th August. Post Mortem :-Spleen weighed 14 ounces, soft and friable. Liver weighed 68 ounces.

4. Indian NUTTA SINGH, died 3rd August, 1890, cause of death Remittent Fever. Post

Mortem :-Spleen weighed 39 ounces, fibroid enlargement.

This enlargement of the spleen and liver is not confined to Indians and Chinese as it is also met with in the case of Europeans suffering from Malarial Fever.

We have never met with the pigmented condition of the spleen so frequently described in Medical Text Books.

Appendix B.

CASE OF REMITTENT FEVER; HIGH TEMPERATURE; DEATH.

433

H. P. æt. 23, Scoth, Police Constable.

Admitted to Hospital at 8 P.M. 11th August, 1889. Temperature on admission 102°.8 F., the following medicine was ordered :-

Re Antipyrin, Aq. ad,

..grs. x. ..zi. 2 horis sdm.

Temperature fell during the night and at 8 A.M. on the 12th was 99°.8, 5 grains of quinine were now ordered every hour, at midday the temperature was 100°.2 F. One dose of antipyrin was substituted for the quinine and at 2 P.M. the temperature was 99°, in the afternoon the temperature had risen to 99°.4, and at 8 P.M. it was 102° F., at 9 P.M. it had risen to 106°.2 F., notwithstanding the administration of antipyrin, Dr. TOOGOOD now saw the patient and ordered the following medicine :—

Re Antipyrin,..

....

Tr. Jaborandi,

....

..grs. xx.

mxxx.

Mist. Diaphoret ad, ...............zi.

to be given at once and another dose in an hour's time as the skin was very dry and hot, at 9.45 P.M. the temperature had risen to 107°.6 he was now placed in a bath temperature 98° F. this was cooled down by ice to 76° F. in 10 minutes his pulse began to intermit and became weaker in strength, he was removed from the bath and 3i. brandy was given; his temperature was now 101°.4 F.

At 11 p.m. it had risen to 105°.6, rt 11.30 P.M. it was 106° F., at 12.25 A.M. (13th) 107°.4 and at 12.45 A.M. 108°.6 F. ice-packing was at once commenced; at 1 A.M. temperature was 107°.6 twenty grains of quinine were now given. At 1.23 A.M. it was 107°, as the temperature did not seem to fall notwithstanding the wet-packing another twelve grains of quinine were given. At 1.33 A.M. temperature was 105°.2 F., at 2.15 A.M. 104°.8, at 3.05 A.M. 101°.4 F., and at 3.35 A.M. it registered 100°.8, all during this time the pulse was quick and weak, small doses of iced champagne were frequently administered. Ice-packing was now discontinued; at 3.45 A.M. after he had been placed in bed, sixty minims of the hydrobromate solution of quinine were injected hypodermically and 5 grains of quinine were ordered every hour in the form of a pill. At 5 A.M. it had, however, risen to 101°.7, half an ounce of Warburg's Tincture was now given, at 6.30 A.M. it had risen to 104°.2 F., and at 7 A.M. 105°. At 7.45 A.M. 105°.8 F. was registered, wet-packing was again commenced and continued to 10 A.M. when it was 102°.2 this was now discontinued ten minims of the hypodermic solution of quinine were administered, the temperature, however, steadily rose again, and at 4.45 P.M. was 106°.6 F., wet-packing was again used and continued to 7.30 P.M. when the temperature had fallen to 99°.8 F., quinine was given as before, but notwithstanding that this was persevered with every hour the temperature steadily arose again, and at 4 A.M. on the 14th registered 108° F. Recourse was again had to wet-packing and the temperature by this means was lowered seven degrees by 7 A.M.

As will be seen from the chart (No. 3.) the temperature rose twice again that day to over 105° F. when the same treatment was used, this last time at 12 midnight the temperature fell in half an hour three and a half degrees. It arose again steadily that day (15th) until 6.45 A.M. when it was 105°.2 F. wet-packing was again commenced, and continued until 8.45 A.M. when temperature was 100°.6 F.

In the evening (7.30 P.M.) as the temperature had again risen to 105.8° and the skin was very dry two-thirds of a grain of pilocarpin was injected hypodermically and although in few minutes it produced profuse perspiration this was only temporary. The temperature fell in 20 minutes to 105.4° the skin, however, soon became dry again and at 9.55 P.M. registered 108° F., wet-packing was again commenced and notwithstanding this at 10.10 P.M. the temperature was 108.8°, at 10.25 P.M. it had fallen to 106.8°, as he was now in a state of collapse, pulse almost imperceptible, he was placed back in bed a hypodermic of brandy was now given, his temperature soon rose again, at 11.20 P.M. it was 108°, and at 11.35 P.M. the patient died, shortly after death the temperature (per rectum) was 110° F.

Remarks. This was one of those peculiarly malignant cases of remittent fever in which quinine seems to have no effect.

434

Appendix C.

CASE OF REMITTENT FEVER; HIGH TEMPERATURE; RECOVERY.

JAMES L.-

Æt. 35.

Admitted to the Hospital 18th June, 1890, at 8.30 A.M.

On admission patient stated the fever had commenced the day previous (17th instant,) about 10 A.M.; from his account the attack was a typically 'aguish' one. His temperature, on admission, was 99° F.; he was placed on low diet with two pints of milk daily; soda and ice, and was ordered ten grains of quinine every half hour. Notwithstanding this, his temperature gradually rose, and, at 6.20 P.M., registered 103.4° F.; two minims of tincture of aconite were now ordered every ten minutes; at 8.40 P.M. his temperature had risen to 104° F., and thirty grains of antipyrin were given; at 10.10 P.M. his temperature had fallen to 102.8° F., and ten more grains of antipyrin were now ordered, but as this made him vomit, the aconite was recommenced; at 12 midnight his temperature was 105° F., thirty grains of antipyrin were again given and this brought his temperature down to 103° in half an hour.

The aconite was continued during the night when he was awake.

19th instant, 7 A.M. temperature 103.6° F.; as the temperature at 10 A.M. was still 103° F., twenty grains of antipyrin were given; 11.30 A.M. temperature 105.4° F., the patient was now placed in a bath, temperature of water being 96° F.; he was kept in for an hour, the temperature of the water in the meantime being reduced to 80° F.; at 12.30 P.M. his temperature was 102.2° F., and at 12.40 P.M. 100.8°; he was kept in the bath until 1 P.M., by which time his temperature had fallen to 98.6° F. After being taken out of the bath he slept for an hour. At 2 P.M., ten grains of quinine were given hypodermically; he now slept until 3.40 P.M. when his temperature was found to be 101° F., as his skin was now dry, the following mixture was ordered :-

....

Re Tr. Aconiti

Mixt. Diaphoretic Aquam ad

m. ii. .3ii.

3ss.

To be given every 15 minutes, notwithstanding this his temperature gradually rose as will be seen from the following observations :-

4.30 P.M.

6.00 P.M.

7.00 P.M.

8.00 P.M.

9.00 P.M.

9.40 P.M.

10.25 P.M.

11.00 P.M.

..102° F.

...103° F.

104° F.

105.6° F.

.105.6° F.

...106° F.

....107° F. .108° F.

.....

As the patient was now delirious he was ice-packed; at 11.54 P.M. his temperature had fallen to 105° F. and he became sensible and was conscious of what was transpiring around him.

The ice-packing was continued, and at 12.15 A.M. his temperature had fallen to 101°-sixty minims of the hypodermic solution of the acid hydrobromate of quinine (10 grains) were now injected and at 12.30 A.M. his temperature had fallen to 99.8°; the ice-packing was now discontinued and he was replaced in bed and 10 grains more of the acid hydrobromate of quinine were injected. At 1.15 A.M. his temparature was 99° F., and another ten grains of the quinine were injected. He now slept for a few hours and; as on awaking at 4.30 A.M. his temperature was found to be 101.8° and skin dry, the aconite and diaphoretic mixture was now given every half hour; profuse perspiration set in, but his temperature, however, rose slightly and at 5.30 A.M. was 102.4°.

Distressing vomiting now commenced and at 6. A.M. a mustard plaster was applied to the epigastrium ; this controlled the vomiting, but the temperature still continued to rise, and at 7.30 A.M. was 104°. Wet sheets were now applied, the aconite still being given; at 9.20 A.M. his temperature was 103.6°, and at 10.30 a.m. 102.8°, by 1.30 P.M., it had fallen to 101° when sixty minims of the hypodermic solution of the acid hydrobromate of quinine were injected. At 4 P.M. his temperature was 100.6°; at 5.30 P.M. another ten grains were injected, the wet-sheet still being applied, at 7.15 P.M. his temperature was 101° F., and at 10.30 P.M., it having fallen to 99° F., ten grains more of the quinine were injected.

He now slept until 2 A.M. (21st) when his temperature was 100° F., and the wet-sheet was continued; he slept on and off during the night, at 5.40 A.M. his temperature being 100° F. His temperature this day did not rise above 101.2° (6 P.M.); at 11.30 A.M. 10 grains of the acid hydrobro- mate of quinine were injected and a similar injection was given at 10 P.M.

22nd instant:-This morning his temperature fell to 99.6° (7.5 A.M.) and five grains of quinine in the form of a pill was now ordered to be given every hour. As at 3 P.M. his temperature had risen to 102.4° this was discontinued and the aconite mixture substituted. At 8 P.M. his temperature had

435

fallen to 101.8°, and at 11 P.M. it was 100° F.; ten grains of quinine were now injected hypodermically and during that night his temperature did not rise above 100° F.

23rd instant, 6 A.M. temperature registered 99° F., ten gains of quinine were injected hypoder- mically and a five grain quinine pill was ordered every hour; the wet-sheet was discontinued this morning, it having been applied continuously for seventy-six hours. This day the highest temperature

was 100.4°.

In the evening as patient was suffering from retention his urine was drawn off.

24th, urine had to be drawn off again this morning; the quinine pill was still given every hour excepting when patient was asleep; his temperature only rose above 100° F., at 6 P.M. when it was 100.2°.

From this date he continued to improve; the retention continuing until the 26th instant, after which he passed his urine normally.

On the 25th, the following medicine was ordered in addition to the quinine pill :-

Re Liquoris Strychniæ

Aqua Chloroformi Aquæ aã

..m. iv.

.3ss.

ter die sdm.

On the 26th instant, the quinine pill was reduced to once every two hours, and on the 27th instant to once every four hours; on this latter date he was placed on half diet, and a mutton chop was added to his diet on the 29th. He was discharged cured on the 7th July.

REMARKS.

This is a typical case of the most severe form of what is termed "Hongkong Fever."

The type is really that of unusually malignant Remittent Fever, the onset is very sudden and the tendency is for the fever paroxysin to be excessive i.e. the temperature rises as high as 107° or 108° F. and can only be reduced by the application of external cold by the use of the graduated bath, the wet-sheet, or "ice-packing in the extreme cases.'

77

There is generally distressing bilious vomiting and the nervous system is much more affected than in the milder cases of Malarial Fever.

In this case the fever was reduced in the first instance by the graduated bath; however, this reduction was only temporary, and the temperature that day rose again. No active measures were taken for some time with the hope that the crisis marked by profuse perspiration would set in tinct. Aconite in small doses frequently repeated in a diaphoretic mixture were given with the object of promoting this.

However, as this did not occur it was found useless to delay matters any more, and with the temperature registered (in the axilla) 108°, ice-packing was commenced and by this means in an hour and a half, the patient's temperature was reduced 8.2°, the hydrobromate of quinine was then injected hypodermically, as much as thirty grains being injected, during the following hour.

A rise above 104° F. occurred that day, but this was controlled by the continuous application of the wet-sheet for seventy-six hours.

In several of these severe cases retention has been met with, in this case it occurred on the 23rd June, (seventh day of illness) the question arises whether this is due to the fever or to the large doses of quinine given, as in these cases the retention is cured by small doses of strychnine, I am led to the conclusion that this is due to the direct effect of the malarial poison on the spinal cord.

Great care is taken to use a fresh solution of the hydrobromate of quinine (1 in 6), and the syringe is provided with a platinum needle.

In this case there was slight stiffness of some of the muscles of the forearm, which disappeared in a short time evidently due to the direct irritation of the muscle fibres by the hypodermic solution. The places selected for the injections are the calves of the legs, the shoulders (deltoid muscles) or the muscles of the forearm.

I attach to this a temperature chart of the case.

Appendix D.

CASE OF MALARIAL FEVER.

Mixed Intermittent and Remittent; High Temperature; Recovery.

A. W.

-ET. 22, Sailor.

Admitted August 5th, 1889, 10.45 a м.

On admission patient stated that he had been feeling unwell for the last two days, his temperature was 103.2° F., the following was prescribed :-

Re Tr. Aconit

Mixt. Diaphoret

.m. iv.

3i. 4 horis sdm.

436

Low diet, milk and soda water was ordered; his temperature rose that evening to 105.6° F. the medicine was continued every four hours, during the night profuse perspiration set in and the next morning (the 6th) at 6 A.M. his temperature had fallen to 98.4°, a five grain dose of quinine was then administered, at 9 A.M. his temperature was 98.5°, ten grains of quinine were now ordered every two hours and his temperature that day rose only to 99° F. (8 P.M.)

The next morning his temperature rose to 99.6° F., and in the evening at 8 P.M. was 101° F. The quinine was now discontinued and the aconite mixture given every four hours, the next morning the temperature fell to 99° F. the quinine was again given every two hours in 10 grain doses that evening the temperature rose to 100° F., the next morning (8th), it was down to 97.8° the quinine was given as before, a mutton chop was ordered and the highest temperature recorded that day was 98.5° F., the following day it was normal and as the patient felt quite well, at his own request he was discharged from the Hospital.

Temperature Chart (No. 1), appended.

This patient was re-admitted on August 28th, at 7.50 A.M. with a temperature of 105° F., he said he had been well since his discharge from the Hospital until the previous day when the fever came on again. The following prescription was ordered as his skin was very dry :-

Re Antipyrin,

Tr. Jaborandi, Mixt. Diaphoret ad,

...grs. xv.

.mxxx.

.zi.

2 horis sdm.

with low diet, milk and soda water, 8 P.M. his temperature had fallen to 101.6°, 12 midnight temperature 102°; 29th August, 6.30 A.M. temperature 102.8°, as his bowels had not been opened for the previous 24 hours, the following powder was ordered :-

Re Calomel, Quinine,

Pulv. Rhei Co. ad,..

....gr. iv.

.gr. v.

grs. xv. st. sdm. medicine as before,

midday temperature 105° F., 2.15 P.M. temperature 106.2° patient now vomited everything, so the medicine was discontinued; at 3 P.M. his temperature was 108° F., and at 3.45 P.M. it had risen to 108.2°.

As patient was now comatose and skin very dry, ice-packing was at once cominenced he being placed on a mackintosh sheet covered with a sheet dipped in ice-cold water which was changed every few minutes and ice-packed all over his body, at 4.15 his temperature had fallen to 104.2°, 20 minims of the acid hydrobromate solution of quinine (1 in 6) was now injected hypodermically, ice-packing being continued, for the next few hours his temperature was as follows:---

4.50 P.M.,.. 5.15 P.M.,... 5.45 P.M.,.

6:30 P.M.,....

103° F. .....102° F. ........100° F. 99° F.

The ice-packing was now discontinued and as he was slightly collapsed, hot water bottles were applied and brandy administered internally. At 6.45 P.M. his temperature was 98.2°. Ten grains of quinine were now ordered every two hours which was retained, at 9 P.M. temperature 101.4°, 30th, 6.45 A.M. temperature 101.6°; 9 A.M. temperature 102.4° :-

Re Antipyrin, Aq. ad,

J

grs. xv. 31.

2 horis sdm.

That evening it rose to 102.8° and fell during the night to 100.8°. 31st, temperature in morning 102.6° and 8 P.M. 103° F., during the night it fell to 100°. Grains viii of quinine were now given every 2 hours in place of the antipyrin, as temperature rose next morning, (1st September), to 103° the antipyrin was substituted that evening temperature fell to 101° F. and registered 100.4°, at 8. A.M. on the 2nd, only rising to 101.4° this day, two doses of antipyrin were given, and it again fell. One pint of chicken broth was now added to his diet.

The after course of the case will be seen from the Chart (No. 2,) by the 10th the temperature had fallen to normal, and fish diet was now given, it took the patient some time to regain his strength.

On the 12th, full diet and the following medicine was prescribed :—

Re Eastonii Syrupi,

Aq. ad,........

He was discharged cured on the 20th September.

REMARKS.

3ss. 3i. tdsdm.

The first attack was evidently one of intermittent fever, the second being of the remittent type. In these severe cases I an firmly of opinion that the only way to combat the fever is by the application of external cold and administering quinine hypodermically as soon as the temperature falls, it being useless to give it by the mouth as the stomach will not retain anything.

i

GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL.

437

:

Patient's Name,.........Hugh Parker.

Age,.......................23.

Occupation,......

.........................Police Constable.

Disease........... ..Remittent Fever.

Ward,............. ..X.

MONTH

DAY

AUGUST.

11th 12th 13th 14th 15th

MONTH

DAY

DAY OF DISEASE

DAY OF DISEASE

F

ME

ME ME ME ME

ME

ME ME

ME

ME ME ME ME ME

ME ME

10

109°

108°

107°

106°

105°

104°

1032

102

101

100

992

98

972

960

Died.

-42°

-41°

-40°

-39°

-38°

-37°

-36°

MONTH

GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL.

Patient's Name,................ J. L.

Disease,...

Age,.....35.

Occupation,......... Sugar Boiler.

Remittent Fever.

Ward,...........

.... VIII.

JUNE, 1890.

DAY

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

DAY OF DISEASE

2

3

10

5

6

7

F

M

E M

E M

..

W..

E

Σ..

M

w...

E

111°

110°

109°

108°

107°

106°

105°

i

104°

103°

102°

101°

100°

99€

989

97°

96°

M

PULSE

E

M

RESPn.

E

B.O.

AMOUNT OF URINE

SP. GR.

ALBUMEN

SUGAR

REACTION

1015/A.M

C

GRADUATED BATH

ICE-RACKING

....

WETSHEET

Σ

....

E

ไป

M E

:

W ..

M

E

M..

439

MONTH

25

25

DAY

9

DAY OF DISEASE

E

:

-43°

-42°

--41°

-40°

-39°

MA

-38°

Recovered.

-37°

-36°

.

MONTH

GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL.

Patient's Name,.........ALBERT WELTZ.

:

Disease,..

AUGUST.

Age,.........22.

Occupation,..........................Sailor.

....Intermittent Fever.

Ward,..........

...X.

441

MONTH

DAY

10

5

6

7

9

10

DAY

DAY OF DISEASE

2nd 3rd 4th

5th 6th 7th

DAY OF DISEASE

1

170

ME

ME

ME

ME ME ME

ME ME ME ME ME ME ME

ME

ME

ME

(၈

109°

108°

107°

106°

105°

104°

103

102°

101°

100°

99°

98°

97°

Discharged

96°

-42°

:

-41°

-40°

39°

-38°

-37°

-36°

GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL.

Patient's Name,.........ALBERT WELTZ.

Disease,.

Age,.........22.

Occupation,.........Sailor.

.Remittent Fever.

Ward,...

...XI.

443

MONTH

AUGUST.

SEPTEMBER.

MONTH

1

DAY 28th 29th 30th 31st

1st

2nd

3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 9th 10th 11th

12th

DAY

DISEASE

DAY OF 2nd 3rd 4th

5th

6th

7th

8th

9th 10th

12th 11th

13th 14th 15th

16th 17th

DAY OF DISEASE

F

ME ME

ME

ME

ME

ME

ME ME ME ME ME ME

:

ME

ME

ME ME

(10

109°

108°

-42°

107°

106°

·41°

:

105°

104°

-40°

103°

102°

-39°

101°!

:

-38°

100°

99°

98°

Recovered.

-37°

97°

-36°

96°

MONTH

DAY

DAY OF DISEASE

GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL.

445

Age,.........30.

Remittent Fever.

Ward,..............

Occupation,......... School Master.

VIII.

Patient's Name,.........F. W. HALL.

Disease,..........

F

111°

M

Σ..

110°

109°

108°

107°

106°

105°

}

104°

103°

102°

101°

100°

99°

98°

72223

OCTOBER.

23

24

25

LLJ

E

M

E

M

E

M

E

:

.

MONTH

26

27

28

29

DAY

M

E

M E

Σ..

M

E

Σ..

เป

E

DAY OF DISEASE

C1°

-43°

-42°

--41°

-40°

"Dies

-39°

-38°

-37°

.97°

-36°

:

:

:

:

:

96°

M

PULSE

E

M

KESPN.

E

B.O.

AMOUNT OF URINE

SP. GR.

ALBUMEN

SUGAR

REACTION

Enclosure 2.

Report from the Medical Officer in charge of Gaol Hospital.

GAOL HOSPITAL,

447

HONGKONG, 1st March, 1892.

SIR,-I have the honour to forward the annual report together with tables of the work done in this Hospital in 1891.

2. During the past year, 364 men were admitted into Hospital, 22 of whom were for observation. In this class are comprised 8 men that were sent by order of the Magistrate for medical certificate as to sanity.

3. The diseases from which these patients were suffering are described in Table K.

4. Tables L and M show the number and percentage of prisoners that were admitted on the first medical examination and the nature of their complaints.

5. The cases that were treated without being received into Hospital, are recorded in Table N. They amounted to 558, including a woman and a man that were put under observation.

6. In an establishment like this, there are frequent occasions for performing minor surgical operations, which I do not think it is of any importance to enumerate here.

7. Abscess of foot, which used to be very common, has sensibly decreased from the time that Major- General GORDON, who was then Superintendent of this Gaol, directed on my recommendation, that the rough surface of the yard in which the prisoners work daily, should be smoothed.

8. Abscess of legs and ankle-joints have almost disappeared, since it has been made the rule for short-sentenced prisoners to wear also, for protection of their skin, canvas girdles under the fetters.

9. Two children were born in the Gaol in the months of July and August. The first one was a premature child and survived only a few hours. The mother was in a weak state, and had been imprisoned only seven days before she gave birth. The other child was nursed and thrived well in the Gaol, until his mother completed the term of her sentence.

10. The matron Mrs. M. NOLAN, who acts also as a nurse whenever there is any sick female prisoner, is very attentive to her duties, and by her tact, has been very successful in persuading the women to obey the rules of the Gaol.

11. There have been eight deaths amongst Chinese prisoners, from the following causes: Cerebral embolism (in a debtor), Fatty heart, Catarrahl Pneumonia, General Debility, Meningitis, Emphysema and Cerebral ancemia from attempted suicide by hanging, and two cases of perforation of intestines by typhoid fever in its healing stage.

12. All these men, with the exception of the debtor who had no work to do, were excused from hard labour, and those whose sentences did not exceed fourteen days imprisonment were told to pick only a few ounces of oakum instead of one pound and a half, which constitutes the full task according to the regulations. Some of them had been more than once in this Gaol. The one who died of general debility was so weak and emaciated with a big ulcer over the sacrum, that Warden FLORES who saw him in the receiving cell shortly after he was sentenced, thought it prudent to remove him into the Hospital.

13. The Magistrate at the request of the friends of the debtor, did not order an autopsy on the body of the deceased. This man had also been in this Hospital two months previously, with paraplegia and articular rheumatism from which attack he completely recovered.

14. The rate of sickness and mortality are given in Table 0. Although two more deaths occurred last year than in the preceding year, the number of admissions into Hospital was four less than in 1890, and there was a considerable diminution of cases that were treated without being detained in Hospital.

There have been eight cases of albuminuria.

The greater proportion of sickness was due to anemia and general debility, and there has been also an increase of trifling affections, as scabies and tinea circenata.

15. All the physicians are aware that ipecacuanha, which is the best known specific for certain forms of dysentery met with in the tropics and subtropical climates, cannot be swallowed in big doses by every patient, however well prepared it is, without producing some unpleasant effects.

From the observation made at the post mortem examinations on the bodies of those who had succumbed to acute dysentery, I noticed that the lower portion of the large intestines was chiefly affected.

I began in 1890 to prescribe for the dysenteric patients, enema of ipecacuanha to be administered twice daily. To relieve at the same time the tenesmus, a little opium draught was ordered to be taken every eight hours. The experiments made on various patients were most satisfactory. I found that by adopting this method, the cure was more rapid and the patients get the full benefit of the drug, without feeling any of its drawbacks.

:

448

16. The following are the results of the work and enquiry regarding the vaccination of the long- sentenced prisoners:-

1888,

1889,

1890,

Year.

Total number of vaccination and

Failed at first vaccination

Taken.

and re-vaccination.

re-vaccination.

2,051

1,354

697

2,060

1,445

615

1,736

1,024

712

2,836

1,090

1,346

Total number of those who have been vac- cinated or inoculated

outside the Gaol.

1,951

2,057

1,722

2,521

1891,

17. The number of opium smokers that were received into Hospital and the diseases which they had, are given in the Table P.

18. Table Q shows the weight of opium smokers for the first four weeks of confinement. This work was done as usual, by warden FLORES and assistant warden HAMED.

19. The house which is occupied by female prisoners is very small and does not possess proper accommodation. The same thing can be said of the quarters in which the debtors are lodged.

20. My longer experience in dealing with prisoners, does not change the belief which I have stated in the previous reports, that the best and the simplest remedy for overcrowding, is to favour free emigration of ex-convicts to newly explored or thinly populated country such as Borneo, where there is great need of cheap labour. This enterprise could be undertaken by a private Company, and it would prove both philanthropic and remunerative. Those men could be placed for better security, under Police supervision.

21. A large number of prisoners are in this Gaol, because they cannot get food outside.

22. According to the report of Mr. A. M. THOMSON, the acting Superintendent of the Gaol, twenty five prisoners had returned last year from deportation.

23. From enquiries made, I am of opinion that many old convicts either impelled by hunger or the temptation of a vagabond life, and unable to obtain honest occupation, are not deterred by the recollection of previous punishment, but frequently return to their former criminal mode of life committing robberies and assaults.

There are, no doubt, dangerous characters, men of criminal types in this Gaol, but they are few. 24. Adequately severe punishment, in some case, would be barbarous. Many prisoners who deserve to be put on hard labour, escape it owing to enfeebled health or to old age.

25. This Gaol is also a kind of workhouse for the destitute and mendicants. I am not aware of the existence of any soctety in this Colony for helping the Chinese who are in the circumstances above described.

I have the honour to be,

Sir

Your most obedient Servant,

Dr. PH. В. C. AYRES,

Colonial Surgeon,

&c.,

&C.,

fc.

Enclosure 3.

Report of the Government Analyst.

L. P. MARQUES,

Medical Officer.

GOVERNMENT LABORATORY, HONGKONG, 3rd May, 1892.

SIR, I have the honour to submit a statement of the work done in the temporary Laboratory of this Hospital during the year 1891.

TOXICOLOGICAL.

2. Under this head nine investigations were conducted. Of these six were for the Police Magistrates, two for the Superintendent of the Civil Hospital and one for H. B. M's Consul in Canton.

3. The Magisterial cases included a search for poison in the viscera of five persons, as to the cause of whose deaths enquiries were being held. In three instances Opium was detected, and in two cases no poison was found. In the sixth Magisterial enquiry application was made for the examination of two

449

specimens of Chinese medicine (pills and powder) with a view to ascertaining whether or not they came within the scope of section 54 of Ordinance No. 4 of 1865. Both these medicines were recommended to be used for procuring abortion. The powder was intended as an external application to the pit of the stomach and was found to consist of chalk coloured with a small percentage of vermilion. The pills consisted chiefly of vegetable substances but did not contain any recognizable organic principle. A minute quantity of vermilion had been used to give them a reddish appearance.

4. The contents of the stomachs of two patients who had died in the Civil Hospital were examined at the request of the Superintendent of the Civil Hospital. Opium was detected in both instances.

5. In the investigation made at the request of H. B. M's Consul in Canton, chloral and sulphonal were detected in the contents of the stomach of a European male adult who had died in that city.

GENERAL.

6. The work under this section included the quantitative analysis of 24 samples of Milk and 63 samples of Water.

7. The milk analyses were made on the requisition of the Superintendent of the Civil Hospital with a view to controlling the quality of the supplies furnished by the Government contractor. The process adopted in each case was that devised by Dr. JAMES BELL, F.R.S., the Principal of the Somerset House Laboratory; and the results of the analyses of a monthly sample from both a morning and evening delivery were forwarded to the Superintendent for his information.

8. There were no analyses of milk made for the Sanitary Board or the Magistrates during the year. 9. Applications for the analysis of water were made from the following:

Resident Engineer, Water and Drainage Department

Sanitary Board.....

Captain Superintendent of Police

H. B. M's Consul, Amoy

The Consul for Portugal, Hongkong

The Commodore H.M.S. "Victor Emanuel

The Deputy Inspector General, R.N. Hospital

No. of samples.

.50

1

1

1

1

4

5

63

10. Of the 50 samples of water for the Water and Drainage Department, 48 were derived from the Pokfulam and Taitam services. These analyses one each month of the water both before and after filtration-were undertaken on the application of the Resident Engineer in order to obtain exact information as to the efficiency of the filtering operations.

11. In the following table will be found the results of the monthly analysis of the Pokfulam water as supplied to the City. The samples were collected by an Officer of this Department at a fountain in Bonham Road near the Pumping Station:-

i.

Table A.

ANALYSIS OF POKFULAM WATER.

Results expressed in Grains per Imperial Gallon (1 in 70,000).

V.

ii.

iii.

iv.

vi.

vii.

1891.

Appearance in 24-in. Tube.

Total solid matter dried

Chlorine.

Hardness.

at 212° F.

Saline Ammonia.

Albuminoid Oxygen

Ammonia.

absorbed.

January, February, March,

P. y.; f. t.

4.7

.6

P. y. ; s. t.

5.0

""

; C.

4.9

667

2.1

None

.0028

.012

.6

2.0

.0042

.004

"

.7

2.1

.0028

.009

>>

April,

""

; s. m.

4.8

.7

1.9

.0042

.022

""

May,

وو

; s. m.

2.7

.7

1.9

.0042

.031

99

June,

"

; C.

4.2

.8

2.0

None

None

July,

P. y. "

4.5

.7

2.0

.005

""

August,

p. y. "

4.4

.8

September,

p. Y.; "

3.1

October,

4.4

November, December,

; "

"" ; "

4.2

f. y.

3.9

87966

1.2

.003

1.2

.004

39

2.0

.009

"

99

1.7

.0021

.014

29

1.6

None

.009

"

""

Mean.....

4.2

.7

1.8

.0017

.010

Abbreviations:-p., pale; y., yellow; f., faint; t., turbid; c., clear; s., slightly; m., milky.

450

12, With the exception of the samples collected in January, February, April and May the specimens were found to be clear when observed in a column 24 inches long. It is, however, only right to mention that, in the early part of the year, the filter beds could scarcely be expected to show the best results. They had not been in working order many days when the first samples were collected; and, until after the first considerable fall of rain in May, had not been fully tested with an abundant supply of water. Moreover, owing to the long drought, water at the lowest levels of the reservoir containing a large amount of suspended matter, had to be utilized.

13. This consideration, however, only affected the appearance of the water during four months of the year and then only to a slight extent. From June onwards the samples left but little to be desired in this respect.

14. Throughout the year there was a complete absence of free ammonia, and on no occasion did the albuminoid ammonia and oxygen absorbed reach higher figures than .0042 and .031 respectively.

15. The results given in columns ii to vii, whether viewed collectively or singly, are eminently satisfactory. At any period of the year the Pokfulam water as supplied to the consumer may be classed as a water of great organic purity.

16. In the following table will be found the results of the analyses of filtered water from the Taitam service. The samples were collected at a fountain at the lower end of the Peak road :—

Table B.

ANALYSIS OF TAITAM WATER.

i.

Results expressed in Grains per Imperial Gallon (1 in 70,000).

ii.

iii.

iv.

V.

vi.

vii.

1891.

Appearance in 24-in. Tube.

Total solid matter dried at 212° F.

Chlorine.

Hardness.

Saline Ammonia.

Albuminoid Oxygen Ammonia. absorbed.

January, February,

p. y. ; c.

4.2

""

; s. t.

4.1

March,

; c.

3.9

April,

وو

; s. t.

5.3

May,

J.; t.

8.7

June,

p. y. ; s. m.

4.5

July,

; c.

3.9

August,

"

;"

2.6

.6

September,

3.9

""

October,

""

; s. m.

4.3

.8

November,

;

3.5

.6

December,

; C.

3.6

.6

666767600000

.6

1.8

None

.0042

.010

.6

1.8

.0028

.025

.6

2.1

.0028

2

.008

.7

1.9

.0028

.019

""

.6

1.7

.0007

.0112

.041

.7

1.7

None

None

.002

.6

1.6

.0042

99

.017

1.2

None

""

.002

.6

1.2

""

.005

""

1.8

.0028

"J

.006

1.6

None

.004

1.6

"

""

.004

11 months' mean excluding May,.

4.0

.6

1.7

.0018

.009

Abbreviations:-Vide foot note to Table A.

17. The only unsatisfactory feature in this table is the abnormal character of the water recorded in May. In this instance the water was collected a few days after a very heavy fall of rain. In the last week of April the Taitam supply was nearly exhausted, and, with the first downpour, a large quantity of earthy matter was washed down the exposed slopes of the reservoir which had the effect of making the water exceedingly turbid. On the 19th, the day on which the May samples were collected, the water contained, by the time it reached the beds, fully 8 grains per gallon of suspended matter. In paragraph 5 of his Annual Report for 1891, the Resident Engineer gives 800 gallons per square yard per diem as the maximum rate of filtration. The removal of this quantity of suspended matter therefore involved the deposition of about one pound of clayey matter on each square yard of the filtering medium or one ton on the surface of the 6 beds during the first twenty-four hours. This had the effect of rapidly reducing the rate of filtration, and in a few days only an insignificant quantity of water was able to pass through. In this emergency the beds were overtaxed and a considerable quantity of unfiltered water had to be run into the service tank for several hours in order to keep up the supply pending the cleansing of the filters. If, however, excluding the figures recorded under May, a mean be calculated on the results of the analyses in the remaining 11 months, it will be found that the filtration of the Taitam water has been during that period as efficiently conducted as that from the Pokfulam area. For practical purposes the means may be said to correspond.

451

18. With regard to the remarks in column i, it will be seen that the appearance of the Taitam water on the whole was scarcely so satisfactory as that from Pokfulam. This will no doubt continue to be the case until bye-passes, similar to the one in operation at Pokfulam, are constructed round the reservoir to intercept practically clear water from the streams after a heavy fall of rain. In point of fact, to the absence of this provision may be attributed the turbid or whitish appearance of the water in May and some of the succeeding months. To demonstrate the usefulness of the bye-pass constructed round the Pokfulam reservoir in 1890 it is only necessary to compare the results of the examination of unfiltered samples from both sources in May. The Taitam water contained 13 grains per gallon of solids in solution and suspension against 2.5 grains the amount contained in the Pokfulam water.

19. On the 3rd July a report was called for on the whitish appearance of the Taitam water, public attention having been drawn to the matter at a meeting of the Sanitary Board.

20. During my absence in Australia an investigation was conducted by Mr. E. W. LUCAS, the Acting Government Analyst. The interesting report he submitted to Government on this subject, dated the 11th of September, will be found in full in the section of the Blue Book returns for 1891 devoted to the Resident Engineer of the Water and Drainage Department.

21. In view of the fact that there has been during the past year a feeling of uneasiness in the public mind with regard to the Government water supply, I should be wanting in my duty if I refrained from recording my conviction that such uneasiness has been wholly without foundation.

22. In an important commercial centre like Hongkong too much publicity cannot be given to the fact that no exception on hygienic grounds can be taken to the quality of the public water supplies. It is no exaggeration to say that never in the previous history of the Colony has such a good water in every respect been supplied to the City of Victoria as was the case last year. From a point of view of either inorganic or organic purity, the Hongkong water supplies will compare favourably with the best water supplies of Great Britain. Indeed I cannot point to any water supply at home yielding such admirable results as those found in tables A and B in this report. And what to the mind of any sanitarian is a matter of still greater importance are the exceptional conditions under which the waters are collected. In the Taitam water-shed pollution with animal excreta is out of the question; and in the case of the Pokfulam gathering ground elaborate precautions have been adopted to divert into other channels any sewage from houses situated therein.

23. Neither the Pokfulam nor Taitam waters are as bright as I should like to see them, and, in this respect, their

appearance is not so good as that of many well waters. This ought not, however, to induce residents to have recourse to shallow wells for a supply of clear and bright water for table purposes. I have good reason to believe that this practice largely prevails. In 1887 I reported to the Sanitary Board on the quality of the water from 328 wells in the City of Victoria. Of these 199 or 60 per cent. contained an excessive amount of free ammonia and 223 or 68 per cent. afforded evidence of the existence of nitrites, in many instances in considerable quantity. In waters of this type the occurrence of nitrites is regarded as unmistakable proof of the presence of fresh decomposing sewage. Only 51 or 15 per cent. contained less than 2.0 grains of Chlorine per gallon. In the absence of chemical evidence as to purity the extreme desirability of residents abandoning the use for dietetic purposes of water from shallow wells in the City would therefore appear to be very evident.

24. The other waters alluded to in par. 9 of this report do not call for any special remarks.

25. In concluding this the eighth annual report I have had the honour to submit to the Government of this Colony I am glad to be able to state that the make shift arrangements which I have hitherto been compelled to put up with will in the course of two or three months be a thing of the past.

26. The construction of the new building at the corner of High Street and Eastern Street, which includes, in the wing at the western end, a spacious laboratory, is now practically completed. The preparation of the drawings for the internal arrangements is in progress; and if sufficient time is placed at my disposal it will be possible before the close of the present year to undertake several important investigations of Chinese poisons which have been so long delayed.

27. I avail myself of this opportunity to convey to Mr. E. W. LUCAS the assistant apothecary of the Civil Hospital my best thanks for the conduct of the Government analytical work during my absence or leave.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

W. EDWARD CROW,

Government Analyst.

452

Enclosure 4.

Report of the Apothecary.

CIVIL HOSPITAL,

21st May, 1892. SIR, I have the honour to submit the following report on the work in the Hospital Pharmacy during 1891.

2. Out-patients.-A reference to the following table will show that the increase of work in this section, alluded to in my last annual report, has been fully maintained during the year under

review:-

Year.

New

Renewed prescriptions. prescriptions.

Total.

1880,

697

1881,

761

1882.

910

1883, 1884,

1,399

1,719

1885,.

2,441

1886, 1887,

2,386

1,674

4,060

2,410

1,705

4,115

1888,

1889.

1890,

1891,

3,009

1,667

4,676

3,103

2,161

5,264

3,731

2,601

6,332

3,917

2,914

6,831

3. In-patients.-1,867 in-patients were supplied with medicines in 1891 against 1,957 in the previous year. There is thus a slight falling off under this head. A great saving of both time and money has been effected by establishing in each wing of the Hospital a supply of the medicines in common use for administration by the nurses and wardmasters.

4. Issue of Medical Stores.-In the following table will be found a statement of the number of requisitions for Medical Stores which have been received during the past year :-

Service.

Number of Requisitions.

Italian Convent, Gaol Hospital,.. Police Stations,

Small-pox Hospital,

Lunatic Asylums,.

Lock Hospital,

Hospital ship Hygeia,

46

65

228

50

3228

15

20

.....

Observatory, Schools, Magistracy, &c.,.

These requisitions are for miscellaneous medicines in bulk, prepared for the most part in this Department, and do not include the prescriptions of departmental or other physicians. With the exception of $150 provided in the estimates for the Lock Hospital, the charges for these services are borne by this Department.

5. Manufacture of Pharmacopoeial preparations.-The resources of the Hospital in this connexion have been utilized to the fullest extent and a large saving to Government has been effected by the manufacture of preparations which it was the custom in former years to procure from the Crown Agents for the Colonies.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

Dr. P¤. В. С. AYRES,

Colonial Surgeon and Inspector of Hospitals.

W. EDWARD Crow,

Govt. Apoth. and Analyst.

:

&

317

No. 24

92

:

HONGKONG.

REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE OBSERVATORY FOR 1891.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor, on the 23rd May, 1892.

HONGKONG OBSERVATORY, 15th April, 1892.

SIR,-I have the honour to submit my annual report for 1891 to His Excellency the Governor. My seventh volume of observations and researches was published last summer and the eight volume is in the printers' hands. It contains the observations made in 1891.

2. The staff recommended by the Observatory Commission as a minimum, below which this institution could not be expected to do justice to the immense shipping interests in this great port, has now been appointed, but it is to be regretted that in the meantime the staff was so utterly inadequate. The work done during the past two years has unfortunately suffered in consequence, and no amount of expense now could possibly remedy the loss. Once a certain phenomenon has passed unrecorded the opportunity for observing it can never arise again, the same conditions being never repeated in the physical world.--Mr. F. G. FIGG returned to the Observatory at the end of October after two years absence on sick-leave, very much improved both in strength and experience, and lost no time in going over all the adjustments of instruments, revising reports, seeing them through press, &c. He has been overworked during the past six months, but has now succeeded in getting the work fairly up to date with the exception of information relating to typhoons and storm-warnings, which is several years in arrear.

3. The branch Observatory at the Peak, suggested by General PALMER, in 1881, declared necessary for storm-warnings by the Observatory Commission in 1890, and upon which improvements in local storm-warnings mainly depend, has not yet been constructed.

4. The China Coast Meteorological Register, based on information received from the Eastern Extension and Great Northern Telegraph Companies, was issued as usual and the stations in southern China are at present being visited and inuch needed improvements effected by Mr. F. G. FIGG and myself.

5. Telegraphic connection with Victoria was interrupted on the 11th January, 1891, from 1 P. to 3 P., on the 13th February in the afternoon, on the 21st July from 4 P. to 9 P., on the 27th July from 7 P. to 8 P., and on the 17th September from 3.30 P. to 3.30 P. on the 18th. Interruptions occurred, therefore, on 6 days and, of course, also during thunderstorms.-Telephonic connection between the look-out on the Peak and the Central Police Station in Victoria (for transmitting observations to the Observatory) was interrupted from the 21st till the 26th of May, from the 29th till the 30th June, from the 19th till the 22nd July, from the 3rd till the 4th August, and on the 30th August. Inter- ruptions occurred, therefore, on 15 days.

6. Telegrams giving information about typhoons were issued on 40 days. The Red Drum was hoisted 3 times, Red Ball 2, Red Cone (upwards) 1, Red Cone (downwards) 3, Black Drum 2, Black Ball 2, Black Cone (upwards) 2, Black Cone (downwards) 1, Lanterns (vertically) 3, Lanterns (horizontally) 2, Gun fired one round 2, and Gun fired two rounds 1 times.

7. During 1891, in addition to meteorological registers kept regularly at about 40 stations on shore, 213 ship-logs with entries during typhoons were copied. A number of log-books have of course been looked through without entries bearing on typhoons having been found. 15 were received through the Harbour Master's Office, 34 direct from the Captains or Owners, and 164 were copied on board ship in the harbour. For the latter purpose I am now using a pilot cutter which is fully as suitable and less expensive than a steam-launch. The ship-logs received in 1891 were thus distributed: for 1888, 3 logs; for 1889, 11 logs; for 1890, 31 logs; for 1891, 168 logs. But the information. concerning typhoons in 1888, 1889, 1890 and 1891 is not yet complete. The following number is still wanted for 1888, 17 logs; for 1889, 29 logs; for 1890, 28 logs; and for 1891, 71 logs. These figures refer to the 1st January, 1892, since which date a number has been collected, All the observations made at noon each day during the typhoon season are being reduced and tabulated at present, and are to serve in the construction of weather-maps, on the basis of which the typhoons will be investigated and their paths constructed.

8. As stated in the "Instructions for making Meteorological Observations, &c.," meteorological instruments forwarded by observers, who regularly send their registers to the Observatory, are verified here free of cost. During the past year, 22 thermometers and 5 barometers were verified.-Messrs. KELLY & WALSH have published a third edition of the "Instructions."

The mean

9. The following table shows the spectroscopic rain-band observed daily at 10 A. value for the year was 2·6.

318

1

Table I.

Rainband in Hongkong in 1891,

Date.

Jan.

Feb. Mar.

Apr.

May.

June. July. Aug. Sept. Oct. Νου.

Dec.

1,

2,

Co

3,

1

4,

N N

5,

2

3

4

3

4

4

co co

3

2

1

3

3

3

1

N

1

*2

3

2 2 20

3

10

5

2

2

3

*

-

6.

w

10

Co

to co

3

3

3

W

2

2

OI O N

2

2

3

3

0

7,

w

8,

9,

1

4

4

1

1

Co

3

3

حت

3

30

4

1

2

2

10

*

10,

4

11,

12,

1

00: 00

3

3

CO

2

CO

CO N

2

2

N

15

10 10.10

2

2

3

A

1

1

:

3

~

Co

09

N

13,

14,

3

-

3

3

3

3

3

15,

3

3

16,

3

17,

2

3

4

Co

2

2

N

w

1

2

N

18,

19,

4

4

3

4

2 3

2

3

3

3

2

1

2

2

1

1

1

20,

3

3

4

3

3

4

21,

22,

1

2

3

23,

ลง

දය

3

2

24,

1

2

2

1

10

10 10

100

3

2

3

25,

26,

w

2

2

4

3

Co

~

3

2

2

3

~N 1 -

2

~

1

1

N

3

2

N

1

3

3

0

2

2

3

1

27,

2

2

19

28,

29,

:

3

2

10

3

4

A

3

w

3

30,

31,

~

2

CO

2

10 00 00 10 10

3

Means,......

1.5

2.7

3.1

2.7

3.1

3.7

2.9

2.8

2.8

2.7

2.2

1.7

10. The following table exhibits the rainfall in Hongkong for about 40 years. The observations were, from January 1853 till March 1862 made by the Royal Engineers. From January till April 1853 the gauge was 20 feet above M. S. L. and very near the ground. From May 1853 till April 1855 it was 20 feet above the ground. From May 1855 till October 1857, it was 100 feet above M. S. L. and very near the ground. In November and December 1857 no observations were made. Mean values have been entered. From January 1858 till March 1862 it was 35 feet above M. S. L. and 20 feet above the ground. From April 1862 till December 1864 and also in September 1874 the observations were made in the Government Civil Hospital. From 1865 till 1883 they were made by the Army Medical Department, and from 1884 till 1891 at the Observatory. From January 1865 till May 1877 the gauge was very near the ground and 43 feet above M. S. L. From June 1877 till December 1883 it was 18 feet above M. S. L. and very near the ground. Since 1884 it was a foot above ground and 108 feet above M. S. L.-If the figures were accurate the value of this table would

be great. It appears that there is a little more rain when there are many spots on the Sun than when

there are few, but the difference is too slight to be of any practical importance. After the end of April. there is always plenty of rain up to the end of August, but then the rainfall decreases quickly as a rule, and as it is moreover extremely variable during September and October, these months should be watched. When rainfall is defective in both months a drought may occur during the following six months, though it is sometimes prevented by heavy winter rains:-

Table II. MEAN RAINFALL IN HONGKONG, (1853-1891 INCLUSIVE).

319

Year.

Jan.

Feb. March. April. May. June. July. Aug. Sept. Oct.

Nov. Dec. Year.

1853,

0.35

0.88

54,

0.09

1.64

55,

0:05

1.81

1.74

56,

0 61

1.61

2.70

3:05

0.31 .1.15 5.95 9.23 28.65 0.58 18-54

2.53 4.53 17.44 16:30 7.17 16.86 16.66

2.78 2.84 30.09 16.12 19.54 24.83

6.85 19.94

2.97 10-59 3.12 81.62

12 33

0-00

0.44 95.99

5.74

3-16

0.85

109.55

48.66

19.09

12:01

3 63

0.81

0-46

119.42

57,

0-25

0.33

0.27

11:29

0.62 21.37

6.26

7.68

20.06

11:50

*1.06

*0.99

81 68

58,

227

2.95

5.24

7:30

11-06

18.98 4.54

6:60

3 64

0.05

0:00

0 12

62.75

59,

0.08

0.18

4.19

0.35

201

7.70

17.24

11.06

23.69

11.79

0.10

0 53

78.92

1860,

1·10

0.00

0.91

1.68 10.79

8.16

13 55

16 09

6.53

0.56

0-23

0-12

59.72

61,

2.50

2.16

0.42

6 40

15-47

13.10

14.28

5.16

10 28

2.26

087

304

75.94

62,

0.86

0.00

0.11

0.68

9.73

11.63 30.89

23.04

6.90

2-85 5.55

0.15

92 39

......

63,

1.80

0.00

1.99

0:43

4:40

29.75

5.96

64,

0.32

0.00

5:00

8.15

5:54

25.76

21.43

65,

0.13

1-12

0.64

854

11.89

12 51

12.84

i5 91 20.12

17.28 3.91 5.76

11.81

..3.61 1-08

2.20

87.80

0.43

0.50

94.08

66,

0:07

1.11

3 07

5.42

17.96

16.10 9.57

67,

1.03

0:30

8.30

3.17

10.67

9.50

24.70

8.80

16.50

7-19 7.83 0:47

19-26

1.06

76.03

0.52 0.04

0.12 77.10

18.54

9.45

0.00 0.00

102-16

68,

0.57

0.38

2.80

6.65

9-45

37.10

7.11 14.79

8.37

9.31

1 38

1.02

98.93

69,

0.21 4.32

5.50 5.46

13.00

11 50

6.81 10.50 15.10

5.38

0.00 0.16 77.94

1870, ......

0.00 0:00

8-71

1.24

19.80

5.92

5.82 14.48

71,

0:05

3.13

0:31

0.36 14-01

23.86

10.21

15.23

22.11 18.93 10.13

3.90

0.69

0.00

70.79

0.47

0.00

104.17

72,

0:05

0.81

0:29

1.03 8.69

21.19

17.89 12.30 10.29 9.80

0.07

0.36

82.77

73,

0-76 0:07

0.29

2.59 17:30

74,

0-30 2.00

4:41

75,

3.46 0.37

76,

1-20

0.23

77,.....

0.02

78,

0.78

1.74 2-96

2.10

11.20 27.03

7:07 39-76 10.54 9.87 11.68

2.98 6.74 14.40 14:57 18.36

2:50

1107 5.32 11:02 7.23 22.51 34.35

1.85 1.10 11.96 5.75

5.57 3.14 20.58

17.04 17.90

0.78

0 89

0.75

97.20

14.77

4.20

0-11

0.19

104.96

14 06

4.24

0.35

2.94

84.97

6:00 1-17

1.34

4.08

105-52

10:36

14:56 14.82 14.24 1-52 0.73

1.47

78.38

15.69

5.78 16:31 1.95

16.18

0.00

0.04

89 94

4.61

5.89

5:39

12.26

18:43

16:43 19.25

4:56

1.86

0.05

91.61

1880, ......

2.28 1.91

0.24

3.62 15.58

27.85

12.03

11.56

17·16 15.61 0:00

1.14

109-08

81,

0.00 0.21

2.02

14 50

4.50

6.91

23.38

27.38

6 09

10-43

2.43 1.10

98.95

82,

0.46

1.00

0.64

4.13

14 68

10.55

17:09

17.53

5.40 1.29 0:50

0.09

73.36

83,

0 25

0.11

9.77

5 23

15.88

11.28

16-20

84,

0.00 3.42

5.83

5.26 9.04 11.03 13.08

85,

86,

87,

8.43

88,......

0.18

89,

0.73

0.72

1890,

2.39

91,

32.56 0.51 2.28 0.31

10.81 12.37 3.09 1.49 0.00 75-42

0.87 2•70 2.47 14.89 4.86 31.36 13.54 27.87 5.84 2.51 0.76 1.25 108.92

2.01 1.54 2.59 5.67 1.78 10.62 28.24 9.08 3 00 2.81 0.05 1.78

1.89 2.95 5.64 2.05 5:47 12.08 13.15 1096 2.03 0.79 0.85

397 10.43 6.95 19.53 23.86 10.55 13.32 6.41 4.52 0.77

2:49 12.27 48.84 9.72 4.57 18.14 11.80 872 1.54

1.48 4.15 1.96 11:23 14.84 22.60 8.95 194 0.01 0.01 1.37

0.04 0.24 2:58 3.15 28.00 21.32 23.10 16.79 11.43 6:21 2:30 1.96

26 28

120.66

69.17

66.29

4.09

104.58

0.18

119-72

70 93

117-12

Mean,

0.98 1.32 3.24 5.27 12.54 15.81 15.98 14.85 12.65 5.36 1.17 1.00 90-17

* Interpolated.

11. The differences between each single month's mean values of the meteorological elements and the mean-monthly values taken from the 5-yearly report, printed as Appendix A, were taken and the following probable deviations determined by aid of the well-known formula:

Barometer ± 0·022 ins, Barometric tide ± 0·004 ins, Temperature 0°90, Humidity + 3 p... Vapour Tension + 0028 ins, Sun-shine 64 p.c., Rainfall +2.76 ins, or in percentage of the respective fall 0·43, Wind velocity + 124 miles, Wind-direction + 9°, Cloud-amount 64 p.c. These figures furnish also a description of the amount of sameness of the weather in different years in Hongkong for comparison with other places, the figures relating to which might be calculated in the

same manner.

320

with those

12. Comparing months when the value of an element is very much above the avera where it is much below it, we obtain certain information which is exhibited in the following table :--

Table III.

Results of Comparison of Mean Monthly Meteorological Elements with 5-yearly Means.

Extremes only, (1884-1889) 6 Years.

Element.

Extreme.

No. of Months used in the

Barometer.

Vapor Temper-

Rainfall ature. Tension. (actual).

Rainfall Velocity Direction Amount (propor- of

of

of tional). Wind. Wind. Cloud.

Mean.

Barometer,

High, Low,

18 21

in. +0.039 -0.7 -0.043 +0.8

O

in. -0.013 +0.036

in.

in. -0.01 -0.16 -0.1 +2.11 +0.45 +0.4