Sessional Papers - 1891

PAPERS LAID BEFORE THE LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL OF HONGKONG 1891

Table of Contents

1. Births and Deaths

Returns for 1890

2. Blue Book

Report for 1890

3. Botanical & afforestation Department

Report for 1890

4. Census

Report for 1891

5. Chinese Consul

Despatch Respecting appointment of

6. Criminal Statistics

Returns for 1890

7. Education

Reports for 1890

8. Estimates, 1891

Despatch Respecting

9. Finance Committee

Reports of Proceedings for 1891

10. Financial Condition of the Colony

Governor's address on

11. Fire Brigade

Report for 1890

12. Gambling Ordinance

Petition against the New

13. Gaol

Report for 1890

14. Harbour Master'S

Report for 1890

15. Legislative Council

Questions asked By Mr. Whitehead

16. Legislative Council

Proceedings for 1891

17. Medical Department

Report for 1890

18. Military Contribution

Despatches Respecting

19. Observatory

Report for 1890

20. Police

Report for 1890

21. Post office

Report for 1890

22. Praya Reclamation

Statement as to

23. Prison accommodation

Despatches Respecting

24. Public Works

Despatch Respecting Certain

25. Public Works

Report on the Operation of

26. Public Works Committee

Report of Proceedings

27. Revenue and Expenditure

Statement for 1890

28. Salaries

Despatches Respecting increase of

29. Sale of Shares

Despatch Respecting

30. Sanitary

Report for 1890

31. Sunday Cargo-Working Ordinance

Despatches Respecting

32. Sunday Labour

Despatch Respecting

33. Veterinary

Report for 1890

34. Water and Drainage Department

Report on the Progress of Works Connected With

 

No. 17

91.

HONGKONG.

RETURNS OF BIRTHS AND DEATHS FOR THE YEAR 1890.

Presented to the Legislative Council, by Command of His Excellency the Governor, on the 30th April, 1891. RETURNS OF BIRTHS AND DEATHS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31ST DECEMBER, 1890.

+

DISTRICTS.

BRITISH AND FOREIGN COMMUNITY.

CHINESE.

GRAND TOTAL.

BIRTHS.

DEATHS.

BIRTHS.

DEATHS.

BIRTHS.

DEATHS.

Boys.

Girls. Total. Males. Females. Total. Boys.

Girls.

Total.

Males. Females. Unknown. Total.

Sex

Victoria,........

81

81

162

131

56

187

675

527

1,202

2,034

1,425

4

3,463

1,364

3,650

Kaulung,

1

4

38

27

65

266

170

437

70

437

52

Shaukiwán,

47

99

167

100

1

268

99

268

:

Aberdeen,

:.

:

I

Stanley,

TOTAL,.

DEATHS.

BRITISH AND FOREIGN COMMUNITY.

...

:

...

:

:

:

:

I

32

33

65

107

65

172

65

173

7

t-

12

19

16

9

:

:

25

19

25

82

85

167

132

56

188

804

646

1,450 2,590

1,769

6

4,365

1,617

4,553

Annual Birth-Rate Annual Death-Rate

DEATHS IN PUBLIC INSTITUTIONS.

ESTIMATED POPULATION.

per 1,000 for the Year.

per 1,000 for the Year.

Europeans, exclusive of Portuguese,... 62

Of the Deaths in Victoria, Males. Females. Total. there were in the-

British and Foreign Community,...

10,972

15.22

17.13

Portuguese,

34

Tung Wa Hospital,.

816

191 1,007

Indians, &c.,

52

Italian Convent,

128

344

472

Chinese,.

....187,770

7.72

23.25

Non-Residents,

40

Asile de la Sto. Enfance,...

195

311

506

Alice Memorial Hospital,.........

17

4

21

Whole Population,

.....198,742

8.14

22.90

TOTAL,..

188

TOTAL,.....

1,156

850

2,006

Registrar General's Office, Hongkong, 25th February, 1891.

J. H. STEWART LOCKHART, Registrar General.

"

237

:

238

RETURN SHOWING THE NUMBER OF DEATHS REGISTERED DURING THE

CAUSES.

BRITISH

AND FOREIGN COMMUNITY.

CHINESE COMMUNITY.

VICTORIA DISTRICT.

DIVISION.

I.-General Diseases.

Group A.,

B.,

29

C.,

""

D.,

""

II-Local Diseases.

Civil.

Army.

Navy.

Sokonpo.

Bowrington.

Wantsai.

36 3

1

14

17

2

1

10

1

1

3

1

1

Hawan.

Sheungwan.

Chungwan.

Táip'ingshan.

Saiyingpun.

Shektongtsui.

Kennedytown.

Harbour.

19

125 15

244

9124

73 542

ཝྱཱ༠

1

19

2269

2

11

The Nervous System,

The Circulatory System,

The Respiratory System,..

38

The Digestive System,

The Urinary System,...

BIBIT

18

9

11

2

16

1

36

14

7

The Generative System, Affections connected with

Pregnancy,

Affections connected with

Parturition,

Affections consequent on

Parturition,

The Skin,

+

III.-Morbid States and Pro-

***

י

cesses,..

:

3

:

::

:

:

I

:.

:.

1

IV.-Ill-defined & Undiag

nosed,

14

1 1

TOTAL, ALL CAUSES,... 171 14 3 52

L-General Diseases.

A.-Specific Febrile

Diseases.

Exanthemata.

:

1

+

6749

8

3

33

5

I

4

345

10

5

324

190

87

3

25

:

...

7

2

5

1

43

11

99

424

90

8

4

46

50

6

16

10

6

3

1

1

::

:

:

2

1

:

1

:

1

1

1

:

210

1

4

2

3

3

5

1

3

:

:

1

199

82

6

1

:

:

149

1

7

N

3

co

3

84

581 36

954 1,279 312

21

10

131

Measles,

1

Whooping Cough,

1

Diphtheria,

1

...

Fever, Typhus,

1

1

Typhoid,

1

Simple Continued,

4

2

1

104

2

28

6 11

Dysentery,

8

1

3

10

96 10

Vomiting and Purging,

Malarial.

Fever, Intermittent,

""

Remittent,

Beri-Beri,

Septic.

Erysipelas, Puerperal Septicemia,

12

:22

8

: co

3 1

1

1

:::

12

4

1

10

944

~

:6

~⠀⠀⠀EA: 27*

2

+4

***

...

2

4

15

378

22

1

7

17

1

1

10

54 13

ao∞

9

8

""

Fever,.. Venereal.

1

Syphilis,

1

:::

:

:

:

Total Group A,... 36 3

1

14

:

:

:

::

:

:::

:.

2

::

...

1

1

:

:

...

19

125 15

3333

73

542 79

8

3

33

4

YEAR ENDED THE 31ST DAY OF DECEMBER, 1890, AND THEIR CAUSES.

CHINESE COMMUNITY.

239

TOTAL AT THE DIFFERENT AGE PERIODS.

DISTRICT

KAULUNG SHAUKIWAN ABERDEEN STANLEY DISTRICT.

DISTRICT.

DISTRICT.

GRAND

TOTAL.

Land

Population.

Boat

Population.

Land

Population.

Boat

Population.

Land

Population.

Boat

Population.

Land

Population.

Boat

Population.

Under 1

Month.

Over 1 & under 12 Months.

Over 1 & under

5 Years.

Over 5 & under 15 Years.

Over 15 & un-

der 45 Years.

Over 45

Age

Years.

Unknown.

:

100

4

10 15

1

8

2188

72

3

3

44

H494

39

59

26

57

...

11

:::

10

5

++

4

64

101

5

===

88

14

6888

695 373

1,325

15

109

: co

3

17

5

2

34

58

1

2

53

35

91

34

19

9

6

CO

Co

8

3

1

1

49

50

21

10

22

32

3

20

28

34

39

11

::

:

:.

:.

1

how 2

1

:

1

:

:

:

223

::

:.

:.

::

1

:

:

:..

::

:

:

15

1

1

261

176

2

2

8 : : : : :

600

216

222

19

25

17

1

1,100

19

18

1

38

4

43

45

蛋和

12

19

485

484

1

1,005

18

66

75

1

248

2

3

:

:

::

:

:

6

1

::

11

1

4

:

:

:

:

3

:

22

1

6

I

1

1

2223

10

34

139

20

3

57

48

1

302

74 30

19

CO

6

59

34

+

226

00

8

730

507

426 172 1,563 1,139

16

4,553

:

::

:.

.:..

::

:

:

:

2

:

:

133 135 69

103

17

2 1

1

1

1-2

29

:::ཨ་ྲ

3 1

1

"

2

3

5

5

110

70

346

55

142

1

1

*

17

1

3

1

*:

34

19

8888

331 159

544

94

57

174

66

31

98

:

1

I

IN

:

:

2

1

3

2

1

:

:

:

3

96 41

1

3

1

2

12

32

4

56

77

1

1

3

3

9

47

93333

16

13 24

53

1

:::

:

:

::

:

:

100 44

59

72

26

57

11

:

10

4 64

101

:

888

695 373

1,325

.:

i

"

:

:

240

...

RETURN SHOWING THE NUMBER OF DEATHS REGISTERED DURING THE

CAUSES.

BRITISH

AND FOREIGN COMMUNITY.

CHINESE COMMUNITY.

VICTORIA DISTRICT.

DIVISION.

Civil.

Army.

Navy.

Sokonpo.

Bowrington.

Wantsai.

3

1

14

Brought forward,... 36

General Diseases,—Contd.

B.-Diseases dependent on Specific External Agents.

(1.)-Parasites.

Worms,

(2.)—Poisons.

Vegetable-Opium,

An obscure Drug,

Alcoholic Poisoning,

(3.)-Effects of Injuries.

Burns,

Sun-stroke,

Heat Apoplexy, Multiple Injury,

Drowning,

Strangulation,

Wounds,

Effects of Cold,

Asphyxia,

?

2

~:~

3

2 1

...

4

1

...

1

:

:

...

2

2

...

Rupture of Spleen,

Fractures and Contusions, ...

Total Group B,... 17

C.-Developmental

Diseases.

Immaturity at Birth,

Debility,

Old Age,

7

1 1

2

:

:

...

...

1

فر

1

1

...

:

...

Hawan.

19 125

1

1

Sheungwan.

Chungwan.

Táip'ingshan.

Saiyingpun.

Shektongtsui.

town.

Kennedy-

Harbour.

15

:.

73 542

:

79

8

3 33

1

1

2

13

1

1

3

16

8

-

2

1

12

2

1

2

62

3

7

:

:

1

2

...

...

5

1

:~:

2

4

+2

4

2

: ~ :

1

2

3

::

1

12

4

1

6

2

4

1

1

1

་་

:::

1

1

4

co: :

3

2

13

3:

11

7

3

1

4

4

3

19

11

9

1

1

Total Group C,... 10

D.-Miscellaneous

Diseases.

Malignant new growth, Scrofula,

Anemia Pernicious, Tubercle of Lung,

Total Group D,...

II.-Local Diseases.

The Nervous System.

Meningitis,

Abscess of Brain,

142

1

2

7.

Apoplexy,

Paralysis,

Agitans,

.

of the Insane,

Infantile Convulsions,

Tetanus,

Trismus,

Inflammation of Brain,

1

10

13

00

8

Carried forward,... 66

6

2

17

:

:

1

1

65

52

153

63

2

11

16

21 1

277

253

7

345

3 321 176

81

2

22

26

135

19 160

558

99

9

4

43

¿

:

:

:

YEAR ENDED THE 31ST DAY OF DECEMBER, 1890, AND THEIR CAUSES,—Continued.

CHINESE COMMUNITY.

241

TOTAL AT the Different ÅGE PERIODS.

KAULUNG DISTRICT.

SHAUKIWAN ABERDEEN DISTRICT. DISTRICT.

STANLEY

DISTRICT.

GRAND TOTAL.

695 373

...

1,325

Land

Population.

Boat

Population.

Land

Population.

Population. Boat

Land

Population.

Boat

Population.

Population. Land

Boat

Population.

Under 1

Month.

Over 1 & under 12 Months.

Over 1 & under

5 Years.

Over 5 & under

15 Years.

Over 15 & un- der 45 Years.

Over 45

Years.

Age Un-

known.

100

44

59

11211

72

2

:

4

26

:

4

10

57

:

6

11

10

:

3

3

4

64

101

88

:

15

4

co

15.

4

8

3

12

:

:

CO

:72

:.

2

3

1

3

T

OC co

:

00

• 10

:

:

14

: 0

:

3

~

∞ =

100

17

5

:

:

:

12

14

68

:

:

N:

to

2

6

20

13

3823

221

-

34

29

6

10

1

1

1

17

109

:

847

58

1

44

79

53

35

91

:

:

:

172

:

31

17

6

6

10

5

00

8

-

600

216 222

129

61

68

79

26

57

11

8.

21

69 107 104

A

12

6

818 457

~J

12

5

1

447

58

531

2

1,059

1,583

242

י:

2

CAUSES.

RETURN SHOWING THE NUMBER OF DEATHS REGISTERED DURING THE

BRITISH

AND

FOREIGN COMMUNITY.

CHINESE COMMUNITY.

VICTORIA DISTRICT.

DIVISION.

Civil.

Army.

Navy.

Brought forward,...| 66

Local Diseases,--Cont

Sokonpo.

Bowrington.

Wantsai.

6

2

!

17

Congestion of Brain,

The Nervous System.

Brought forward,... 13

Cerebral Hæmorrhage,

1

...

1

1

"

Softening,..

1

Embolism,

1

"

Hemiplegia,

1

1

Epilepsy,

1

...

...

Eclampsia,

Insanity,

...

Mania, (Puerperal),

Total Nervous System,... 18 3

The Circulatory System.

Aneurism,

Heart Disease,

Syncope,

182

2

2

1

1

6

:

3

...

...

Hawan.

Sheungwan.

Chungwan.

Táip'ingshan.

Saiyingpun.

Shektongtsui.

Kennedy-

town.

Harbour.

26

135 19

160

558

1-

Inflammation of Heart,

Total Circulatory System,... 11 3

The Respiratory System.

...

...

3

...

:

...

1

...

8

66

345

3

321

176

81

1

...

1

1

...

345

2

2

...

1

5

13

6

~

1

:-

1

...

::

10

5

324

190

87

3

:

4 43

...

:

22

2:::

3

25

6

2

5

1

::

7

2

10

5

1

1

1

2

48

...

...

1

****

1

2

3

1

1

...

...

...

1

::

...

6

19

13

3

...

...

...

1

...

...

...

|རྒྱུ:::

1

...

1

10

1

16

29

30

308 51

2

23

2

16

1

36

43

11

99

424

06

8

4

46

::: ∞o: 8

60

64 37

4

1

21

1

3

1

: : : :

1

...

Bronchitis, Pneumonia,

10

""

(Acute), (Pleuro),

Phthisis,

17

GOT TE

6

1

...

1

1

>>

(Chronic),

1

...

1

Pneumonic Phthisis, (Acute),

Asthma,

Pleurisy,

Congestion of Lung, Hæmorrhage of Lung,

Lung Disease,..........

H: H ∞

Total Respiratory System,... 38

The Digestive System.

Dentition,

Quinsy,

Diarrhoea,

Colic,

Cirrhosis of Liver,

Abscess of Liver, Peritonitis,

Hernia,

Throat Disease,

Noma,

.......

1

4

3

3

...

...

1

...

...

Stricture of Intestines,.

Catarrh of Hepatic Duct.,

Dyspepsia,

1

1

1

Total Digestive System.... 14

Carried forward,...|[147

...

...

1

1

3

48

...

...

1421

15

4

1

***

+4

...

5

1

...

400

1

1

1

1

1

1

...

1

10

5

1

3

50

6

16 10

...

:

14

2 50

2

74

573 35. 596

1,190 291

:

120

20

8

...

6

121

YEAR ENDED THE 31ST DAY OF DECEMBER, 1890, AND THEIR CAUSES,-Continued.

CHINESE COMMUNITY.

243

TOTAL AT THE DIFFERENT AGE PERIODS.

KAULUNG SHAUKIWAN ABERDEEN STANLEY

DISTRICT.

DISTRICT.

DISTRICT.

DISTRICT.

GRAND

TOTAL.

Land

Population.

Boat

Population.

Land

Population.

Boat

Population.

Land

Population.

Boat

Population.

Land

Population.

Boat

Population.

Under 1

Month.

Over 1 & under 12 Months.

Over 1 & under

5 Years.

Over 5 & under 15 Years.

Over 15 & un-

der 45 Years.

Over 45

Years.

129

61

68

79

26

34

17

2

34

19

3

1

3

1

...

6

6

:

10

Unknown.

Age

57

11

8

21

69

107

104

818

457

7

CO

6

6

:.

1

600 216

222

12

1

00

8

1

1

1

12

20

3

48

50

20

10

10

+

...

1

49

50

21

10

223

:

...

6

1,583

1,059

1

1

2

1

1

....

2

1

1

19

:

19

8

10

5

13

1

1

600 216 222

19

25

17

1

1,100

:

:

:

...

32

3

:

...

:

:..

15

10 00 1

3

1

1

33

18

...

...

19

18

1

888

38

1

2

1

39

1

2

...

242

51

:

94

5

8

1

18

2

1

1

1

6

208

1

181

396

1.

...

...

1

1

1

5

6

1

1

...

1

I

2

1

1

8

10

229 234

482

4

12

19

485

484

1

1,005

3

1

1

19

28

34

39

10

2

2

40

::

41

:: 29:

3

2

1

4

18

53

889

68

220

2

2

...

1

1

1

3

3

1

4

2

2

...

~

:

2

2

2

1

1

...

1

1

1

1

1

1

...

:

1

1

888

20

28

34

39

11

3

2

235

159 132 134

65 101

17

43

45

18

66 75

1

248

00

8

621

332 386

160 1,4131,051

11

3,974

YEAR ENDED THE 31ST DAY OF DECEMBER, 1890, AND THEIR CAUSES,—Continued.

CHINESE COMMUNITY.

TOTAL AT THE DIFFERENT AGE PEriods.

KAULUNG SHACKIWAN ABERDEEN STANLEY DISTRICT. DISTRICT. DISTRICT.

DISTRICT.

245

Land

Population.

Boat

Population.

Land

Population.

Boat

Population.

Land

Population.

Boat

Population.

Land

Population.

Boat

Population.

Under 1

Month.

Over 1 & under

12 Months.

Over 1 & under

5 Years.

Over 5 & under 15 Years.

Over 15 & un- der 45 Years.

Over 45

Years.

Age Un-

known.

235

:

159

132

134

65

101

17

8 621

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

-

8.

:

6

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

N

:

:

2

2

:

:

:

:

:

332

386

160

...

:

:

:

16

12

2

22

15

2

:

261

176 133 135

69 103

17

:

...

:

س

p

:

...

:

:

...

:

GRAND TOTAL.

1,413 1,051 11

3,974

21

10

2

3

6

11

:

:

:

6

1

6

J

:.

1

4

22

22

:

...

:

:

:

::

...

:

:

139

19

1

:

3

54

45

2

1

34

139

20

3

57

48

لسمر

2 +

22

1

9

10

302

74

8:3

:

9

1

10

5

55

29

4

216

74

30

19

6

59

34

4

226

00

8

730

507 426

172 1,563 1,139

16

4,553

:

:

:

:

.

:

:

246

RETURN SHEWING THE NUMBER OF DEATHS THAT ACCURRED IN THE

UNDERMENTIONED INSTITUTIONS..

The Tung Wa Hospital.

The Alice Memorial Hospital.

Canses.

Causes.

No.

No.

Dysentery,

91

Typhoid Fever,.

1

Intermittent Fever,

..363

Dysentery,

1

Beri-Beri,.

48

Beri-Beri,

3

Tubercle of Lung,.

3

Burns,

2

Apoplexy,

4

Multiple Injury,

1

Infantile Convulsions,

77

Meningitis,

1

Insanity,...

13

Paralysis, Agitans,

1

Bronchitis.

47

Malignant new Growth,

3

Pneumonia,

2

Tubercle of Lung,

1

Phthisis,..

13

Heart Disease,.

1

Lung Disease,

..256

Pleuro Pneumonia,

1

Diarrhoea,

15

Phthisis,

2

Dropsy,

75

Abscess of Liver,

1

Calculus,

2

1,007

21

The Italian Convent.

The Asile de la St. Enfance.

Causes.

No.

Causes.

Simple Continued Fever,

.... 20

Simple Continued Fever,

....

Old Age,

1

Sun-Stroke,

Trismus,.

.253

Debility,....

Tubercle of Lung,.

1

Infantile Convulsions,

Phthisis,..

2

Trismus,

Diarrhoea,

1

Lung Disease,

Atrophy (Marasmus),

.193

Phthisis...

Dropsy,

1

Diarrhoea, Ulcers,

472

No.

.101

1

4

57

.277

12

1

48

5

506

J. H. STEWART LOCKHART,

Registrar General.

Registrar General's Office, Hongkong, 25th February, 1891.

DEATH RATES IN DIFFERENT GROUPS OF AGES FOR THE YEAR 1890.

BRITISH AND FOREIGN COMMUNITY.

CHINESE.

AGES.

Deaths.

Per cent. of whole.

Deaths.

Per cent. of whole.

Under 1 month,

11

5.85

719

16.47

Over 1 and under 12 months,

15

7.98

492

11.28

:

Over 1 year and under 5 years,

7

3.72

419

9.60

:

Over 5 and under 15 years,

2.13

168

3.85

Over 15 and under 45 years,

96

51.07

1,467

33.60

Over 45 years,

49

26.06

1,090

24.97

Unknown,

6

3.19

10

.23

Total,

188

100.00

Registrar General's Office, Hongkong, 25th February, 1891.

4,365

100.00

J. H. STEWART LOCKHART, Registrar General.

HONGKONG.

REPORT ON THE BLUE BOOK AND DEPARTMENTAL REPORTS FOR 1891.

Laid before the Legislative Council, by Command of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government,

on the 19th June, 1891.

279

No. 22

91.

1.ΤΑΧΑΤΙΟΝ,

There have been no changes under this head.

2.-REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE.

The Revenue amounted to $2,011,859.27, or excluding premiums from Land Sales to $1,995,220.47; and the Expenditure amounted to $1,915,350.47, including Extraordinary Works; excluding these, to $1,517,843.05.

The Revenue and Expenditure for the past five years have been :-

Extraordinary

Expenditure, including Defensive Works.

Year.

Revenue:

Premia from Land.

Ordinary Expenditure.

1886,

$1,367,977.74

$ 34,731.59

$1,195,236.81

$825,624.84

1887. ... 1,427,485.79

155,238.02

1,278,181.68

744.820.38

1888.... 1889.

1,557,300.03

160,688.64

1,461,459.64

530,870.03

1,823,549.13

154,725.60

1,459,167.16

374,551.63

1890,...

1,995,220.47

16,638.80

1,517,843.05

397,507.42

3.-LOCAL REVENUES.

The Chinese inhabitants contributed in 1890, by voluntary assessment among 'them- selves, to the pay of the District Watchmen,

and received from the Government for the same object a grant-in-aid of

4.-ASSETS AND LIABILITIES.

..$7.266.32 1,500.00

On the 31st December, 1890, the assets of the Colony exceeded its liabilities by......$399,732.25 The surplus assets in :-

1885, were

1886, the liabilities exceeded the assets by.

1887, the surplus assets were

1888, 1889,

No new loan has been raised.

.....

Do. Do.

5.-PUBLIC DEBT.

$427,692.42

.$ 191,512.29 .$631,374.08 (a.)

..$ 360,649.76 $ 505,109.87

Amount of present Loan, £200,000. Amount of Sinking Fund, £24,752.

6.-MILITARY EXPENDITURE.

The Military Expenditure (inclusive of the Volunteer Corps) defrayed by the Colony during the last seven years has been as follows:-

Military Contribution, exclusive of

Defensive Works, and inclusive of Volunteer Corps.

Defensive Works.

Defensive Works.

$ 3,464.64

L 650. 0.4

1884.

1885,..

1886,

1887

1888.

1889,

1890,.

$114,498.78

$117,337.00

.$124,561.68

.$128,815.63

.$134,594.68

.$134,261.12

.$124,646.96

$ 68,153.45 $217,901.45 $258,444.28 $ 62,115.90

$ 63,753.73

$ 5,082.92

£12,576.10.2 £39,230. 0.0 £43,710. 7.6 £10,036. 4.0

£ 9,678.14.5

£

832. 1.1

(a.) A loan of £200,000 having been raised during 1887 to be paid off on the 1st of March, 1907.

3

:

:

"

:

:

:

}

280

1.

7.—GOVERNMENT BUILDINGS.

Government House.

Government House has been maintained in good repair and a new Wing has been added.

8.-PUBLIC WORKS.

The expenditure under this head was $53,515.26 for works and buildings, $45,299.88 for upkeep of the roads, streets and bridges; $36,861,18 for storm damages; and $5,082.92 for Defensive Works.

9.-LEGISLATION.

The following Ordinances were passed during the year :-

No. 1-An Ordinance to appoint an additional member on the Sanitary Board.

No. 2.—An Ordinance for the Naturalization of LAM NEUNGSHING otherwise LAM YUK Po. No. 3.-An Ordinance for the Incorporation of The Procureur Général, in Hongkong, of

the Society of the Missions Etrangères.

No. 4. An Ordinance to amend The Public Health Ordinance, 1887.

No. 5.-An Ordinance entitled The Vaccination Ordinance, 1890.

No. 6-An Ordinance to repeal Ordinance No. 32 of 1889 and amend Ordinance No. 14 of 1862, entitled An Ordinance for granting Patents for Inventions within this Colony.

No. 7.—An Ordinance to amend the Law with reference to the Falsification of Accounts. No. 8.-An Ordinance to amend The Hongkong Code of Civil Procedure.

No. 9.-An Ordinance to amend Ordinance No. 4 of 1865 relating to Offences against the

Person.

No. 10. An Ordinance entitled The Magistrates Ordinance, 1890.

No. 11. An Ordinance entitled The Women and Girls' Protection Ordinance, 1890.

No. 12.-An Ordinance to amend The Cattle Diseases, Slaughter-Houses, and Markets Or-

dinance of 1887.

No. 13. An Ordinance to amend the Law relating to The Official Administrator.

No. 14.-An Ordinance to amend Ordinance No. 16 of 1886, entitled The Stamp Ordinance.

?

No. 15.-An Ordinance entitled The Merchandise Marks Ordinance, 1890.

No. 16. An Ordinance entitled The Waterworks Ordinance, 1890.

No. 17.An Ordinance to amend Ordinance No. 15 of 1888, entitled The Rating Ordinance,

1888.

No. 18. An Ordinance to repeal Ordinance No. 29 of 1888 and to amend Ordinance No.

15 of 1886, entitled The Peace Freservation Ordinance, 1886.

No. 19.-An Ordinance to amend Ordinance No. 8 of 1873, entitled The Dangerous Goods

Ordinance, 1873.

No. 20.-An Ordinance to a mend The Police Force Consolidation Ordinance, 1887. No. 21.- An Ordinance to authorise the Appropriation of a Supplementary Sum of Three hundred and Forty-nine thousand Seven hundred and Twenty Dollars and Eighty-five Cents to defray the Charges of the Year 1889.

No. 22.--An Ordinance to amend the Chinese Emigration Consolidation Ordinance, 1889. No. 23.--An Ordinance to amend The Cattle Diseases, Slaughter-Houses, and Markets Or-

dinance, 1887.

No. 24.—An Ordinance to amend The Arms Ordinance, 1889.

No. 25.-An Ordinance to give further Powers to Companies with respect to the Alteration

of their Memoranda of Association.

· No. 26.-An Ordinance to amend the Public Health Ordinance of 1887.

No. 27.- An Ordinance entitled The Squatters' Ordinance, 1890.

No. 28.--An Ordinance to apply a sum not exceeding One Million Six hundred and Eighty- two thousand Eight hundred and Seventy-four Dollars to the Public Service of the Year 1891.

No. 29.-An Ordinance to repeal Ordinance No. 13 of 1860, for the Establishment of a

Civil List.

No. 30.---An Ordinance entitled The Widows' and Orphans' Pensions Ordinance, 1890.

281

i

10. COUNCILS AND ASSEMBLIES.

Executive Council.-His Excellency Major-General G. DIGBY BARKER, C.B., the Senior Military Officer, was admitted a Member of the Executive Council. The Honourable W. M. GOODMAN joined the Council on appointment as Attorney General. The Honourable A. LISTER, Colonial Treasurer and Postmaster General, died on the 14th July, 1890.

Legislative Council.--The Honourable W. M. GOODMAN, Attorney General, The Honourable Ho KAI, and the Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD were admitted Members of the Council. The Honourable N. G. MITCHELL-INNES was appointed temporarily vice the Honourable J. H. STEWART LOCKHART, on leave.

Sanitary Board.-No changes were made.

Board of Examiners.-The Honourable A. LISTER, died on the 14th July, 1890. Dr. EITEL, Inspector of Schools, and the Rev. F. E. W. HARTMANN joined the Board.

11.-CIVIL ESTABLISHMENT.

Sir G. WILLIAM DES Vœux was absent from the Colony, by permission, from the 19th February to 22nd December, and during such absence Mr. FRANCIS FLEMING, the Colonial Secretary, admi- nistered the Government. Honourable ALFRED LISTER, Colonial Treasurer and Postmaster General, died on the 14th July.

Temporary changes occurred in various Departments owing to Officers going on or returning from leave.

12.-OFFICERS WHO HAVE GIVEN SECURITY FOR THE DISCHARGES OF THEIR DUTIES.

The validity of the sureties of the various Officers was duly enquired into at the end of every quarter, and found to be satisfactory.

13.- PENSIONS.

The following Officers retired on pension during the year :-

2 Turnkeys.

12 Indian Police Constables.

14.-EXPENDITURE OF THE DEPARTMENTS.

The amounts paid during the year on account of the Departments were :—

Payments in Great Britain in Sterling money,

Payments in the Colony in Local Currency,.

15.-FOREIGN CONSULS.

No new Consulates were established in the Colony during 1890.

16.-POPULATION.

£23,068. 14s. 5d. $846,880.84.

The estimated population on the 31st December, 1889, was as follows:-

Males, Females,

.138,033

56,449

-194,482 .

which is 21,318 less than the estimated population at the end of 1888.

The last census was taken in 1881, the population being then returned as 160,402, of which 115,369 were males, and 45,033 females.

The following is the mean estimated population for the last 9 years :—-- ~-

Years.

Males.

Females.

Total.

1882,

.119,704

46,729

166,433

1883,

.124,768

48,707

173,475

1884,

.130,560

50,969

181,529

1885,

.137,079

53,515

190,594

1886,

.144,550

56,440

200,990

1887,

152,427

60,524

212,951

1888,

.154,500

61,300

215,800

1889,

138,033

56,449

194,482

1890,

198,742

X

:

:.

282

ཏཾ:

The Births and deaths for the last 5 years were as follows:-

Per 1,000 of mean Population.

Years.

Births.

Deaths.

Births.

Deaths.

1886,

1,557

5,100

7.74

25.37

1887,

.1,705

5,317

8.01

24.97

1888,

.1,662

6,034

7.70

27.96

1889,

.1,683

4,597

8.65

23.64

1890,

1,617

4,553

8.14

22.90

17.- ECCLESIASTICAL ESTABLISHMENTS.

There were no changes in these Establishments, as compared with previous years.

18.-EDUCATION.

The total number of Schools subject to supervision by the Government amounted, in 1890, to 112, as compared with 99 in 1889 and 97 in 1888.

The total number of Scholars subject to Government supervision in the Government and Grant- in-aid Schools during the last 5 years was as follows:-

Years.

1886,

1887,

1888,

1889,

1890,

Govt.

Grant-in-aid.

Total.

.1,893

3,951

5,844

.1,814

4,160

5.974

1,933

4,325

6,258

.2,293

4,814

7,107

2,514

4,656

7,170

The total expenditure for these Schools for the last 5 years was as follows:-

1886, (after deducting School fees),

),.

.$43,085.50 .. 43,070.91

1887,

""

1888,

"}

1889, (

...

**

1890, (

""

),

45,518.93

44,321.98

56,081.75

19.-EXCHANGE, MONEY, WEIGHTS AND MEASURES.

Exchange.

The rate of Exchange on 4 months' Bills on London was on 1st January, 1890, 3/2, it fell to 3/13 on the 19th March, and rose to 3/10 on 4th September, and was at the end of the year 3/5ğ.

Currency.

The law affecting currency has remained unchanged.

Bank Notes.

The Bank Notes in circulation in Hongkong during the last 5 years, as furnished by the Managers of the respective Banks, were as follows:--

Years.

1886,.

1887.

1

Average Amount,

.$4,368,705

5,052,473

1888,.

5,759,875

1889,

6,034,984

1890.

6,073,332

Money Circulation.

Specie in Reserve.

$2,138,333

2,362,833

2,660,000

2,552,500

2,775,833

The approximate amount of Coin put into circulation up to 31st December, 1890, was as follows

Hongkong Silver and Copper Subsidiary Coins (20, 10, and 5 cent pieces; and 1 Cent and

Mil pieces),

.$5,599,125.

Weights and Measures.

The Weights and Measures in usc in the Colony are regulated by Ordinance 8 of 1885.

یلر

20:-IMPORTS AND EXPORTS.

283

There being no Custom House, it is not possible to furnish an account of all Imports and Exports, but a record of Raw Opium imported and exported during 1890 has been kept, and is as follows:-

Imported, Exported,

.62,4631 5 chests. ...58,023 18

"}

21.-SHIPPING.

Arrivals exclusive of Junks.

The total arrivals, exclusive of Junks, during the year 1890, amounted to 4,114 vessels and 5,093,733 tons, being 575,119 tons over the arrivals in 1889.

Junks.

23,512 Junks measuring 1,795,261 tons arrived in the Colony in 1890, as against 22,926 Junks and 1,716,922 tons in 1889, showing an increase of 586 Junks and 78,339 tons.

The total arrivals for the last 5 years were:-

EXCLUSIVE OF JUNKS.

JUNKS.

Number of Vessels. Tons. Number of Vessels.

GRAND TOTAL.

Years. Number of Vessels. Tons. 1886,.............. 4,251 4,571,296

Ton's.

22,971 1,752,868

27,222

6,324,164

1887

4,078

4,607,914

23,521

1,793,923

27,599

6,401,837

1888,..

3,821

4,536,442

23,958

1,863,968

27,779

6,400,410

1889,..

3,820

4,518,614

22,926

1,716,922

26,746

6,235,536

1890,

4,114

5,093,733 23,512

1,795,261

27,626

6,688,994

Immigration and Emigration from and to Ports other than in China and Japan. The following will show the number of Chinese who arrived in, and the number who departed from the Colony during the last 5 years:-

Years.

1886,

1887,

18

1889,

1890,

Arrived,

Departed.

88,704

64,522

92,375

82,897

98,800

96,195

99.315

47,849

..101,147

42,066

22.-AGRICULTURE.

The lands of the Colony being limited and not favourable for agricultural purposes, there is no inducement for this industry here. The produce is quite nominal, and is for local consumption only.

23.-MANUFACTURES, &C.

Manufactories.

No new Manufactories have been added to those already in existence.

Steam-Launches.

The total number of Steam-Launches built in the Colony in 1890, was 31, with a total tonnage of 2,377.10, as against 26 with a total tonnage of 1,172.58 in 1889. The total number of licensed Steam-Launches of all descriptions, in the Colony, in 1890, were:--

Licensed to carry passengers,

Private Launches,

Colonial Government Launches,

War Department Launches,..

24.-GRANTS OF LAND.

The sales of land on lease during the last 5 years were :

:

Years.

1886,

1887.....

1888,. 1889, 1890.

.47

.53

10.

5

115

Total No. of Sales

Total No. of Acres sold.

A.

R.

P.

88

82. 2.

2. 312

187

202

65

76. 0: 8

104. 0. 41

88. 1. 154

6

2. 3. 19

:

284

ན་

25.-GAOLS AND PRISONERS.

On the 1st January, 1890, there were 549 prisoners in Victoria Gaol; 3,444 were admitted during the year, and 3,444 discharged; the total number of prisoners on the 31st December, 1890, was 549, of whom 42 were Europeans.

The daily average of prisoners was 566, as against 581 in the previous year.

The number of prisoners admitted into Gaol during the last five years was as follows :-

NO. OF PRISONERS.

TOTAL.

YEARS.

Men.

Women.

Juveniles.

DAILY AVERAGE NUMBER IN PRISON.

1886,

4,278

173

149

4,600

674.00

1887,

4,012

149

147

4,308

584.00

1888,

3,390

98

139

3,627

531.00

L

1889,

3,453

131

121

3,705

581.00

1890,

3,218

119

107

3,444

566.00

יי

26.-CRIMINAL STATISTICS.

Supreme Court.

The following is a Return of cases tried at the Supreme Court during the last five years:--

1886,

1887,

1888,

1889,

1890,

CHARGES ABANDONED.

POSTPONED.

Number Number

YEARS.

of

of

Convicted. Acquitted.

Cases.

Persons.

Number of Number of Cases. Persons.

No. of Cases.

No. of Persons.

75

107

59.

20

16-

27

1

1

91

155

82

36

17

26

1

8

101

186

99

47

28

40

92

143

64

41

24

37

...

59

80

43

20

7

17

Total,...

421

671

347

161

92

147

19

2

Average of last 5 years,

95*

143

943

29

10告

181

CNC

1

Do. ending 1885,

841

1341

693

823

182

2993

$419

1#

ران

Police Magistrates' Court.

The Cases before the Police Magistrates during the last 5 years were as follows:-

CASES HOW DISPOSED OF.

Total No. Total No.

YEARS.

of Cases.

of Prisoners.

Convicted and Punished,

Dis- charged.

Committed Committed

for

pending Trial. Orders.

Ordered Punished

to for False Find Tes- Security. timony.

Un-

decided.

1886,

1887,

1888,

1889,

1890,

14,611 16,647 12,923 2,388 12,015 14,182 10,679 2,779 11,647 13,309 9,932 2,849

8,670 10,033 9,739 10,772

159

5

969

35

168

167

32

463

14

48

174

109

192

3

50

6,894 2,497.

167

54

337

17:

67

7,740 2,557

102

15

318.

3

37

Total,...

56,682

64,943 48,168 13,070

769.

215

2,279

72

370

Average of last 5 years,

11,336.4

12,988.6

Do.

euding 1885, 10,153.8

11,870.2

9,633.6 2,614.0

8,851.6 2,356.6

153.8

43.0

455.8

14.4

74.0

181.8.

26.6

350.0

15.4

88.2

:

Marine Magistrates' Court.

The Cases before the Marine Magistrate's Court during the last 5 years were as follows:-

DEFENDANTS HOW DISPOSED of.

285

YEARS.

Number of Cases.

Number of

Forfei-

To be dis-

Com-

Defend- Impri-

Sent

ture

Fined.

ants.

soned.

of

Repri- mauded.

charged

Dis-

mitted

back to

Pay.

Duty.

from Ship.

missed.

for Trial.

1886,

58

87

43

24

1887,

90

152

47

37

1888,

70

167

66

38

662

2

1

11

...

21

15

3

23

...

2

53

5

1889,

53

107

54

25

15

13

1890,

81

239

92

84

6

1

15

::

41

Total,.

352

752

302

208

20

25

99

4

93

Do.

Average of last 5 years,

ending 1885,... 77.6

70.4

150.4

60.4

41.6

4.0

5.2

19.8

0.8

18.6

:

156.2

71.6

31.0

8.2

2.6

15.8

1.8

24.8

Police.

The Cases brought under the notice of the Police during the last 5 years were as follows:-

SERIOUS OFFENCES.

MINOR OFFENCES.

YEARS.

:.

Number of

Convicted.

Cases.

Discharged.

Number of

Convicted.

Cases.

Discharged.

.

1886,

1887,

1888,

1889,

1890,

·

2,500

1,389

472

6,336

6,457

672

2,577

1,234

565

5,904

6,310

1,214

2,436

1,116

556

5,678

5,772

1,105

2,893

1,409

618

4,568

4,529

1,131

3,100

1,412

616

5,324

5,007

1,213

Total,

13,506

6,560

2,827

27,810

28,075

5,335

Average of last 5

years,

2,701.2

1,312.0

565.4

5,562.0

5,615.0

1,067.0

Do. ending 1885,

2,493.2

1,313.6

514.6

5,044.0

4,105.0

886.2

27.-HOSPITALS, &c.

Civil Hospital.

The admissions to the Government Civil Hospital during the year were as follows, as compared with 1889.

1889.

1890.

Police,

590

582

Board of Trade,

135

110

Private paying Patients,

402

527

Government Servants,

135

191

Police Cases,

252

264

Destitutes,

279

283

Total,

1,793

1,957

The total admissions to the Hospital and Deaths during the last 5 years were as follows:-

Years.

Admissions.

Deaths.

1886.

1,623

79

1887,

1,656

89

1888,

1,772

80

1889,

1,793

77

1890

1,957

98

Total,

Average,......

8.801

423

1,760.2

$4.6

286

The admissions from the Police Force and the number of Deaths for the past five years were as follows:-

Years.

1886,

1887,

1888,

1889,

1890,

Total,

Average,..

Admissions.

Deaths.

602

14 (a.)

619

9

657

15

590

14

582

7

3,050

59

610

11.8

The admissions of Europeans were, in 1889, 466, as compared with 149 in 1890; the Chinese were 194, in 1889, as compared with 179 in 1890; and the Indians were 230 in 1889, as compared with 254 in 1890.

Military Hospital.

The admissions from among the troops during the past five years were as follows:-

Years.

1886,

1887,

1888,

1889,

1890,

Total,

Average,

Admissions.

Deaths.

1,607

9

1,749

14

1,485

21

1,732

16

1,915

15

8,488

75

1,697.6

150

Small-Pox Hospital.

The admissions during the past five years were as follows:-

Years.

Admissions.

1886,

11

1887,

65

1888,

99

1889,

19

1890,

2

•Total,

196

Average,

39.2

Inquests.

The inquests held during the past five years were as follows:-

1886,

1887,

1888,

1889, 1890,

1.20

115

63

76

101

By Ordinance 17 of 1888, the, Office of Coroner is abolished, and the duties thereof transferred to the Police Magistrates.

28.-CHARITABLE AND LITERARY INSTITUTIONS.

No fresh Institution was formed.

No fresh Institution was formed.

29.-RELIGIOUS INSTITUTIONS.

W. M. GOODMAN,

Acting Colonial Secretary.

COLONIAL SECRETARY'S OFFICE,

HONGKONG, 16th June, 1891.

(a.) In Hospital.

317

No. 26

91.

HONGKONG.

REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF THE BOTANICAL AND AFFORESTATION

DEPARTMENT FOR 1890.

Laid before the Legislative Council, by Command of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government, on the 17th July, 1891.

No. 26.

BOTANIC GARDENS, HONGKONG, 25th June, 1891.

SIR, I have the honour to submit the Annual Report on this Department for the year 1890. 2. The year, taking it all through, was one generally favourable to the gardens so far as natural phenomena were concerned. There was fortunately an absence of such violent storms of wind or rain as sometimes prove so disastrous, and the rainfall was very favourable except during the last four months of the year, which were exceptionally dry. From Dr. DOBERCK's returns I observe that only 3.335 inches of rain fell during these four months, October and November having only .025 inch. This prolonged season of drought caused much extra work in artificial watering.

3. Mr. WESTLAND, the Head Gardener, I am sorry to say, suffered severely from fever and other complaints during the early part of the year; in March he left for England on leave and has not yet returned, an extension of leave for six months having been granted him.

*

4. In June, Mr. MOOTIAN, who had become a very efficient clerk, having adapted himself to the constantly increasing work of the office, resigned. He had for some time been dissatisfied with the remuneration of his office. The salary offered to his successor, being even smaller than that which Mr. MOOTIAN received, failed to attract candidates with suitable qualifications, but the best one of those who applied was appointed on probation, at the end of which he was relieved of his duties. Candidates were again advertised for at the same salary and a student from Victoria College, having passed very creditably in the examination and having excellent certificates, but entirely without office experience and lacking some of the requirements specified in the advertisement, was appointed. How- ever good his character and abilities might have been as a scholar he was, of course, at a great disad- vantage when placed in a position which requires considerable experience and training in office work, but I have much pleasure in testifying to the satisfactory manner in which he has applied himself to the work which he is expected to do.

5. Up to the present time the department has been without European assistance for 14 months, and for 11 out of these 14 months I have been under the very great disadvantage of having to get through the work in the best way I could with clerks who were quite unequal to the requirements of the office. The result of this feeble equipment of the office has been that very much of my time had to be employed in doing work which an ordinary clerk should have done, while other important work on which I should have been engaged had of necessity to be suspended or to receive less attention than it demanded.

BOTANIC GARDENS. Water Supply.

6. The water service to the existing tanks has been all that could be desired, but more tanks and additional piping are wanted, the New Gardens being entirely without service pipes and tanks. The fountain having been connected late in the summer, the pleasant sound of its waters in the hot weather was again heard after about one and a half year's interruption. Unfortunately during the dry season water cannot be spared to keep the water in the basin clear, consequently it lies green and stagnant for several months when water is scarce.

Plant Houses.

7. These have all been repainted and colour-washed, and kept in good repair. Visitors much appreciate the general plant houses and if means were available I should be glad to extend them and improve their general design both for cultural and artistic purposes. Before any extension could be made it would be necessary to go to some considerable expense in retaining-walls and levelling to prepare a site for new houses, as there is no level ground in the only place in the gardens which is sufficiently sheltered from strong winds for these structures.

Lawns.

8. The whole of the turf on the lowermost terrace in which the flower-beds are situated had become very uneven owing to the settlement of the soil and the action of earth-worms; means having been found for the work the whole of the turf was therefore taken up, and, after the ground was levelled, relaid. In addition to the great improvement in appearance, the levelling has much facilitated the mowing of the grass.

318

9. Considerable progress has been made in the propagation of plants with which the ground beneath large trees, where the shade has killed ordinary grass, is being reclothed. The quantity of plants available will, I hope, meet the demand, and enable us to reclothe the worst of the bare places within another year. This work should properly have been started some few years ago, but there were not sufficient means available for it.

10. As an opinion prevails pretty generally that lawns here may be made or improved by sowing English lawn-grass seeds it may be useful to record the result of an experiment I made with this seed. A piece of ground was carefully prepared and sown with fresh seeds on the 2nd February, 1889, the seeds germinated perfectly and a fine crop of grass was the result, the grass was kept care- fully weeded and had generally the best of treatment, but during the succeeding summer much of it died, what remained, however, improved in health during the next cold season, but as soon as the rains and heat of the summer of 1890 began the grass suffered more than in the previous summer and it gradually dwindled away until nothing remained at the end of September; that is in 21 months after sowing all of the English grassés were dead. During no period of the experiment was the grass in suitable condition for a lawn. An experiment made some years ago of sowing English lawn-grass seed amongst the indigenous grasses proved equally unsuccessful, the native grasses having at a very early stage of the life of the English grass completely smothered the latter in the struggle.

Labelling of Plants.

11. The incompleteness of the indoor staff prevented any attention being given to the maintenance of the plant labels, which require a great deal of constant attention to keep them in position and replace broken or obliterated ones. It may be some time before the requisite attention can be given to the subject, but when an opportunity does occur I hope to be able to introduce a kind of label, which I believe can now be had at a moderate cost, that will be more permanent than wooden labels which are subject to rapid decay and destruction by white ants in this climate.

Crotons.

.

12. A collection of all the varieties of Crotons cultivated in the garden was brought together and planted at the sides of the flight of steps at the north-west entrance gate and at the western end of the lower terrace, these, and other alterations at this place, have greatly improved the appearance of the entrance. The usual amount of heavy and expensive work of removing bad soil and rocks and replacing them with better soil collected with great labour on the hills outside the gardens had to be undertaken. This difficulty of rocks and bad soil meets all operations in almost every part of the gardens when trees or shrubs have to be planted, but in spite of these difficulties very creditable results generally have been achieved, although at a considerable cost.

Walks, Drains, &c.

13. These have been maintained in good order, the walks having been kept in a state of perfect neatness, even throughout the periods of heaviest rains, a result which has not been attained in any previous year. This satisfactory condition was owing to all the walks which were not level having been concreted in the winter of 1889, as referred to in my last report, and thus preventing the scour ing away of gravel which always occurred in walks of even gentle gradients during the season of heavy

rains.

Glenealy Ravine.

1

14. The repairs of damages caused by the great Rain Storm of May, 1889, occupied much time in the early part of the year. After the very large quantity of soil which had been carried away was replaced works of turfing and replanting were carried out, another retaining-wall built, and the rockery near the gate-way reconstructed and furnished with suitable plants, advantage having been taken of the opportunity for effecting some improvements in the arrangements which existed before the storm. 15. The Government having granted an application from the authorities of the new Roman Catholic Cathedral for a short road to be made from their property to connect with the path which passes through the Glenealy Ravine the work of its construction was carried out by the Public Works Department. Although the road has no doubt been a convenience to the congregation of the Cathedral its position has not improved the appearance of the locality. No attempt has yet been made to beautify the neglected ground on the upper side of this new read, but the work will be taken in hand so soon as arrangements are completed which will permit of the stoppage of the continuous traffic across the ground by people who come to the nullah to obtain water; while this traffic continues there would be no security for the satisfactory maintenance of any improvements which might be made for artistic effect.

Chinese Ginger.

16. In my annual Report for 1886, I mentioned that in consequence of some doubt existing as to the identity of the plant which furnishes the Canton preserved ginger I had, with a view of observ- ing and studying the plants, introduced and cultivated in these gardens the different kinds which it might have been supposed were the source of Chinese ginger. In March, 1888, Dr. TRIMEN, Director

319

of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Ceylon, kindly sent me a living plant of an *Alpinia to add to our collection. This was a portion of a plant, which has given rise to considerable interest and correspond- ence and which was the subject of an article headed “Chinese Ginger" in the Kew Bulletin of February last. From this article it appears that Dr. PERCEVAL WRIGHT, Professor of Botany in the University of Dublin, as long ago as 1878 "Wrote to Kew pointing out that the large flat ginger-like masses "sent to this country from China as preserved ginger differed from anything that the ordinary ginger

plant (Zingiber officinale) could possibly produce.

(6

The Kew Bulletin goes on to say,-"At the instance of Professor PERCEVAL WRIGHT, Mr. G. H. "M. PLAYFAIR (of H. M. Chinese Consular Service) sent a Wardian case of the Chinese plant to Kew "in 1878. The plants were propagated without difficulty and largely distributed to tropical colonies. "Unfortunately this brought us no nearer the solution of the difficulty. That the plant was different "to ordinary ginger was obvious. But plants of the ginger family, as is the case with many plants "which are easily propagated by their rhizomes, are shy of flowering in cultivation, while their foliage "is all so much alike that it affords no adequate means of discrimination. The plant obstinately "refused to flower at Kew, as it also appears to have done in Ceylon, and there was nothing to do but "wait till some lucky chance as to conditions of growth in some colonial garden enabled Kew to be "furnished with the necessary material for identification

"In December, 1888, we received the first authentic flowering specimen of the "Chinese Ginger" "from the Botanical Department, Jamaica. It was grown at the Hope Gardens, by the Superintendent, "Mr. HARRIS. This proved, as suspected by Mr. WATSON, to be an Alpinia, and also identical with "the Siam plant. It is in fact nothing more than the well known Alpinia Galanga.

"Specimens received in the present year from the indefatigable correspondent of Kew in Dominica, "Dr. ALFORD NICHOLLS, F.L.S., confirm this result, and Mr. FORD, the Superintendent of the Botanical "and Afforestation Department, Hongkong, having flowered the plant in the Hongkong Botanic "Garden, arrives at the same conclusion."

""

17. From this last quotation, it appears that one of the plants sent to England from Swatow and which had been forwarded to Jamaica flowered in the Botanic Gardens of that Colony in 1888. An- other plant of the same batch forwarded by Kew to the Ceylon Botanic Gardens has refused to flower there, but a plant passed on to me from Ceylon by Dr. TRIMEN in 1888 flowered freely last year and enabled me at once to see that it was Alpinia Galanga, Willd. I communicated this information to Mr. THISELTON DYER, and an extract from my letter was published in the Kew Bulletin in the article

"Chinese Ginger" above referred to. The following is a copy of that portion of my letter.

HONGKONG, July 10th, 1890.

on

"MY DEAR SIR,―The "Chinese Ginger" which you had at Kew, and sent to Ceylon, from "which Dr. TRIMEN, at my request, sent me a piece about two years ago, has just flowered with me, "and it is setting fruit. It turns out to be Alpinia Galanga. I shall have more particulars to write "about this when the fruit has matured, when I will write fully on the subject. Dr. TRIMEN informed "me that it would not fruit in Ceylon.

"W. T. THISELTON DYER, Esq., C.M.G.'

""

Yours, &c.,

(Signed),

CHARLES FORD.

18. The conclusion arrived at in the article in the Kew Bulletin is that Chinese preserved ginger is not obtained from the ginger plant, Zingiber Officinale, Linn., but from the rhizomes of Alpinia Galanga, Willd. The evidence which has led to this conclusion seems to be that Mr. PLAYFAIR sent from Swatow to Kew a case of plants, alleged to be Chinese ginger and which have turned out to be Alpinia Galanga, Willd. This evidence, however, has, I fear, afforded nothing of value, except of a negative nature, towards proving the source of preserved ginger. In my opinion nothing is really needed as I cannot see anything in the preserved ginger which would lead me to suppose that it is anything except the rhizomes of the ordinary ginger plant, Zingiber Officinale, Linn., which is cultivated so extensively by the Chinese in the neighbouring provinces. In 1886 when travelling through the delta south of Canton, I saw ginger extensively cultivated and flowering freely in the rich alluvial lands. I obtained complete specimens for the herbarium, and they were without doubt the true ginger plant.

19. The Chinese ginger is apparently more succulent and the rhizomes are of a larger size than the West Indian article, but there is no specific distinction in the plant.

20. I cannot but think that Mr. PLAYFAIR while endeavouring to render a useful service was the innocent agent of a wrong conclusion having been arrived at through the natives who supplied him with the plants, which were sent to Kew, having brought in the wrong kind. The natives themselves were also probably innocent of any intention to deceive, a mistake possibly having arisen from the Chinese name of true ginger being a generic name applied to different species and even to different genera of plants. The rhizomes of true ginger Alpinias and Curcumas are all classed generically by the Chinese under the name "Keung." Zingiber Officinale, Linn., is "Tai Yuk Keung," Alpinia Galanga,

* A plant of this had been previously supplied (in 1886) by Kew Gardens to this establishment, but it unfortunately died on the passage out.

320

2

Willd., "Leung Keung," and Curcuma (turmeric) "Wong Keung." It is obvious, when these names are considered (as for brevity the word "Keung" only is often used), how easily a mistake may have occurred when dealing with a native engaged to procure roots. There is also another fact to show that the plants sent from Swatow would not be likely to afford evidence of much value in the investigation of the source of Chinese ginger. This article is not preserved at Swatow (which is, 200 miles in a direct line from Canton) and it is not likely that it supplies raw material for preserving in the large establish- ments of Canton and Hongkong, as there is no information to show that it is exported to these places. I believe Canton and Hongkong are the only places where this preserve is made. It is not generally known that the Hongkong preserving establishments export largely to the United States. Of fresh ginger junks alone carried from Canton to Hongkong over six thousand piculs, (357 tons) last year.

21. The information on "Chinese Ginger

Chinese Ginger" furnished by the Kew Bulletin having reached China, and, as I understand, having been accepted, it will be useful to put on record this additional informa- tion on the subject and to stimulate further inquiries by those who may have opportunities of affording authentic information and finally disposing of the question.

Distribution and Interchange of Plants and Seeds.

22. Seeds to the extent of 176 boxes, bags and packets, weighing 27 lbs., 357 living plants and 5 animals or birds were received. The principal donors were:-

Agri-Horticultural Society-Madras.

Armstrong, J. M.

Awan.

Botanic Gardens-Adelaide.

=

""

=

""

A

Bangalore.

British Guiana. Hobart Town. Melbourne. Natal.

Royal-Calcutta.

31.

""

""

""

""

??

22

**

""

""

"}

"

Kew.

""

""

Mauritius.

""

2.2

Trinidad.

""

""

99

j

""

""

وف

""

:

Ceylon.

Cook, Mrs.

Forest Department-Penang.

Gordon, Major-General. Hance, Mrs.

Harvard University.

H. E. the Governor-General-Cochin China.

Humphreys, Mrs. J. D.

Melbye, Ě. H.

Rasmusson, Mrs.

Romano, A. G.

Suzuki, M.

Saharanpur.

Singapore.

Treseder, J. G.-Sydney.

Wicking, H.

Woodin, E. L.

Zoological Gardens-Adelaide.

23. Of seeds 59 boxes and packets weighing 22 lbs., and of plants 2,864 were sent away in exchange or presented. The principal recipients were :-

Armstrong, J. M.

Bain, Mrs.

Barton, J.

Boehmer, L.-Yokohama.

Botanic Gardens-Adelaide.

Jamaica.

""

"2

Melbourne.

>>

>>

Natal.

""

Singapore. Royal, Ceylon.

Kew.

""

">

""

;;

19

""

21 Trinidad.

Bronsmiche, Mons.-Haiphong. Byron, Rev. Father-Sandakan.

Cantlie, Mrs.

Central Police Station.

Chan A Wan.

Cook, Mrs.

Cox, J. H.

Croad, Captain

Digby Barker, Mrs.

Dock Yard, H. M.

Downes, Mrs.

Forest Department-Penang.

Gordon, Major-General Gourdin, A. O.'D.

Groom, Professor-Whampoa. Gueyraud, Mons.

Hutchison, W. D. F.-Tamsui. Italian Convent.

Medley Wood, J.-Natal. Melbye, E. H.

Ost, Mrs.

Reasoner, Bros.-Florida.

Romano, A. G.

Royal Engineer's Department. Shepherd, Bruce

Zoological Gardens-Adelaide.

Sale of Plants.

24. $493.74 were collected for plants sold; this is an increase of $150 beyond the amount received in the previous year. Personally I should be glad if this branch of work did not exist, as, especially during the last year with such feeble clerical assistance as was provided, the business could not be conducted without very considerable inconvenience to myself and a loss of time which could ill be spared from other important work, and some inconvenience likewise fell upon the purchasers, but this was unavoidable and I considered it better to incur the inconvenience on all sides than entirely suspend sales, which I more than once felt strongly impelled to do. Many orders which would necessitate unusual care to properly execute, I was obliged to decline, amongst these were all orders from outside

2

3

321

the Colony. Judging from plants sold and orders received, it seems that the system of plant sales meets a want of considerable extent, and that if suitable facilities could be created to supply the public with what they require the benefits which they receive by being able to get plants would be much extended. To be able to do this, however, there must be, besides suitable arrangements for growing plants, assistants with sufficient knowledge of plants and their names to be able to attend purchasers in making selections, and an indoor staff with a sufficient knowledge of simple book-keeping to be competent to keep the necessary accounts.

Loan of Plants for Decorative Purposes.

25. There is also a considerable increase of requests preferred for the loan of plants to decorate ball-rooms, concert-rooms, &c., &c., and there is a tendency to extend their use for furnishing to private parties. It will be necessary, however, to somewhat restrict the concessions and confine the loan of plants to purely public entertainments, or to make a charge sufficient to cover the cost of growing plants for these special purposes. 24 requests for plants were complied with, 2,136 being the total number of plants lent. I should not be inclined to recommend any extension, but on the other hand would restrict the loan of plants, as there is already more work in the department than can be managed to my satisfaction with the assistance I have.

Visitors.

26. It is not generally known what a large number of visitors make use of the gardens. With a view to affording an idea of the number who frequent the gardens, I have made arrangements for having the visitors counted on two average days each month throughout this year, the result will be published with the next annual report. In the meantime I may say that the average number of visitors on one day in each month this year, so far as it has gone, has been Europeans 362, others 1,807, total 2,169. The greatest number was on April 8th, when there were 781 Europeans, and of others 3,541, total 4,322. The least number was on February 4th, when there were 213 Europeans and 779 others, total 992. The Chinese are those who attend the gardens in the greatest numbers. It appears that the number of visitors using the gardens is constantly increasing. The above numbers do not include children and their nurses.

HERBARIUM AND LIBRARY.

27. There were absolutely no opportunities for making tours, even by natives, for collecting supplies of living plants for the gardens, or of making collections for the herbarium.

There was, however, sufficient material on hand to provide work for the very little time which could be devoted to the dried collections. The work in the herbarium was confined to the drying and preservation of specimens of plants flowering in the gardens during the year for the first time, or which had not already been dried, and the mounting and incorporating in the collections in the cabinets of plants which had been on hand for some time. Of specimens put throughout their last stages and incorporated the number was 1,563.

us.

Forest Administration in Punjab, 1888-89.

Administration in Coorg, 1888-89. Administration in Central Provinces,

1888-89.

28. I have pleasure in thanking various contributors for Reports of Gardens, &c., kindly sent to The following is the list of books, &c., received:- Agricultural Gazette, New South Wales. From

Honourable Colonial Secretary. Botanical Magazine, 1890., Purchased. Bulletin (Kew) of Miscellaneous Information,

1890. Presented by Royal Garden, Kew. Catalogue of Plants in Natal Botanic Garden,

1889.

Classification and Generic Synopsis of the Wild

Grapes of North America, 1890.

Étude sur la creation d'un Jardin d'acclimatation

au Tonkin.

Forestry and Forestry Products. Purchased. Gardeners' Chronicle, 1890. Purchased. Hooker's Icones Plantarum vol. X. Parts I and

II, vol. XI. Parts I and II. Presented by Bentham Trustees.

Hand-Guide to Royal Botanic Gardens, Ceylon. Index of Porter Smith's Materia Medica. Pur-

chased.

Index Florae Sinensis, vol. II. Parts VII, VIII and IX. Presented by Royal Gardens, Kew. Index Generum Phanerogamorum. Purchased. Indian Forest Reports.

Forest Administration in Upper Burma, 1888-89. Administration in North-West Provinces

and Oudh, 1888-89.

""

17

">

Administration in Ajmere Merwara, 1888-

89.

Journal of Botany, 1890. Purchased. Manual of Forestry, Schlich, vol. I. Purchased. Manual of Orchidaceous Plants. Part 3, Dendro- bium. Part 4, Crypripedium. Purchased. Monographiae Phanerogamarum Prodromei, vol.

VI. Purchased.

Mutinus Bambusinus in Britain.

Royal Gardens, Kew.

Presented by

Proceedings of Agri-Horticultural Society of

Madras, 1890.

Report, Botanic Gardens, Bangalore, 1888-89.

Botanic Gardens and Forests, Straits

Settlements, 1889.

""

Botanic Gardens, Natal, 1889.

""

"?

A

27

}}

Adelaide, 1889.

Cinchona Plantations and Factory, Ben-

gal, 1889-90.

Conference of Fruit Growers and Vine Growers, Department of Agriculture, New South Wales, 1890. .

j

}

:

2 .

322

.

:

:

Report, Destruction of Cocoa-nut Palms by Beetles, H. N. Ridley, Singapore, 1889. Department of Agriculture, Cape Town,

1889-90.

29

22

Public Gardens and Plantations, Jamaica,

1889.

Queensland Acclimatisation Society, 1890.

Report, Royal Botanic Gardens, Trinidad, 1889.

">

""

Saharanpur, 1890.

17

Ceylon, 1889. Calcutta, 1889-

90.

Rhododendrons du Thibet, M. Franchet.

sented by Royal Gardens, Kew. GOVERNMENT HOUSE GROUNDS.

Pre-

29. Very much time has been devoted to the improvement of these grounds, which were in great need of improvement, but which funds hitherto did not provide for. As large a portion of the vote as could be spared was appropriated for the work. The soil in these grounds being so unfit for garden purposes was in several places removed, and replaced to a depth of about three feet with better material, and a large number of new plants and shrubs were afterwards planted. The grass lawns also which had become very thin and worn were relaid to a great extent.

30. The construction of the new ball-room necessitated the destruction of the finest true banian tree Ficus indica, in fact the only one of any size, which existed in the Colony, and much work in- removing shrubs, turf, and soil was imposed on us at a much shorter notice than was convenient.

FORESTRY..

31. The lack of efficient clerical assistance necessitated too much of the routine work of the office being done by myself and thus prevented adequate supervision being exercised over out-door works. Operations which had already been begun when the office staff was rendered incomplete it was imper- ative to finish even with diminished supervision. What I had not time for had to be deputed to the Chinese head forester. Under these circumstances the suspension of works which would permit of it was unavoidable. The chief amongst other things which for this cause I had to relinquish was the inspection and selection of lands for rearing trees in situ-the method of rearing trees which constitutes two-thirds of the whole number reared and planted--so that the present year, when it is reported on, will show about 400,000 trees less planted than would have been under other circumstances. For the same reason the examination and inspection of the work of the Forest Guards, and the condition of older plantations was not nearly so complete as I could have desired it to be.

32. The portions of the island on which planted trees have attained to sufficient dimensions to catch the eye from adjacent or distant roads on which the public travel have effected a most marked and beautiful effect compared with the once barren and naked appearance of the hills. Only the older residents who are of an observant nature can fully appreciate the great change which has been effected, but even those who are new to the Colony cannot fail to form a most favourable opinion of the enhanced beauties of scenery when they imagine what the treeless aspect of the hills was before re-afforestation was taken in hand.

سم

33. Besides the trees near promenades close to the town a walk of 3 miles from West Point out to Pok-fu-lam is sufficient to demonstrate to the most casual observer the very successful result of tree planting. All the trees to be seen from that road have been planted within the last 15 years, and most of them within 10 years. This is one instance out of numberless others which will illustrate the results of planting. Of course in the first days of planting a good deal of work had to be done experimentally, and for want of trained men work was naturally not so well done as could have been wished. Thus trees planted at altitudes above a zone varying, owing to exposure to wind, &c., from 700 feet to 900 feet altitude, do not encourage us to exceed those limits of elevation, while other patches show a lack of vigour owing to shallowness of soil which may be only a foot deep over solid granite. On the whole, however, where the above limits of altitude have not been exceeded the plan- tations have made very satisfactory progress, and in especially favoured localities the growth of the trees has been every thing which could be expected or desired in any place. As regards the average sizes of individual trees of which plantations are composed I may say that trees planted 18 years ago, near the Peak Road, are now 30 feet high, and 43 inches in circumference at 2 feet from the ground; trees planted 10 years ago at Causeway Bay are 23 feet high, and 24 inches in circumference, and trees planted 10 years ago near the Pok-fu-lam Road are 22 feet high, and 20 inches in circumference. The first-named plantation has been thinned twice and the two latter once each, the trees in these places now standing, without gaps, at distances of about 12 feet apart.

34. The plantations already made are composed of chiefly the common pine, Pinus sinensis, a tree which it was found to be the best kind to commence the work of afforestation with. In the first place, it is better suited to the various conditions under which it had to grow here than other trees yet tried, and its management being simpler than that of many other trees rendered it possible to deal with it in vast numbers-about half a million trees being added yearly-with a staff that, in the early days, consisted of ordinary raw coolies only. Even now the same may be said of the staff of foresters with the exception of one man who has been trained to be a foreman. Under these circumstances and with the poor material to work with, only the simpler methods of forestry could be undertaken, but now that large areas available or suitable for elementary planting have become scarce, it might be worth while to further develop forestry work, which however could only be done successfully by the improvement of the controlling staff which should possess an adequate amount of technical knowledge

ī

A

!

..

323

and have had the benefit of education and training sufficient for the work to be accomplished. With such assistance the general effect of the landscapes might be much improved by the introduction of trees of different characters to the somewhat monotonous pine.

35. The kinds of trees to be selected for this object would be species possessing foliage of as great a variety of size, form and colouring in the different shades of green while in health, and of autumn tints while deciduous trees would be shedding their leaves. It is possible that such trees might now be reared within the influence of shelter afforded by pine trees which have attained sufficient size to afford protection from winds that in the early days swept the hills and effectually prevented the growth of trees less hardy than the pine. This assistance is needed also on account of the yearly increasing distances which have to be traversed in supervision, and also by the addition of new work necessitated by the extension and development of plantations. The maintenance of upwards of 60 miles of fire barriers which have to be inspected and the work done on them measured yearly is itself a severe task, besides the marking out of new lines required each season. Annual thinnings of plantations as new ones become ready for the work each year also require the expenditure of much labour and time in direction and supervision. All these things point to the desirability of a somewhat superior equipped staff if good work is to be continued and the plantations properly maintained and improved.

Planting Operations.

36. The number of trees planted and reared on the hills was 556,982 as compared with 601,211 in the previous year. The statistics are given in the appendix. Actual planting operations were per- formed with the usual success, but a few weeks after the planting was finished Tristanea and Crypto- meria trees were attacked and suffered considerably by white ants; these attacks lasted for a few weeks only before the trees had recovered their usual vigour after having been disturbed in their removal.

Protective Service.

37. There were 85 cases brought before the Police Magistrates by the Forest Guards, as compared with 49 in the previous year, out of these 85 cases 69 convictions were obtained, 12 paying fines which amounted in the aggregate to $26, and 57 prisoners went to gaol.

38. The area of plantations has greatly extended since the 3 forest guards were established, and as offences likewise increase the number of forest guards needs augmentation to keep in check the numerous petty pilferers of trees and shrubs. When the number of forest guards can be increased it would be advisable to establish some of them in distant parts of the island, if suitable quarters can be found and arrangements made, instead of working them daily from their present quarters at the gardens as too much time is now occupied in walking to and from far away localities.

Grass Fires.

39. Fires were exceptionally numerous and the destruction of trees by them was greater than in any previous year, in fact the reported fires were more numerous than the total number of fires recorded for the previous 10 years. The number of fires recorded in 1890 is 64.

The number of fires recorded in 1890 is 64. After my return from Japan I visited the scenes of fires where trees had been destroyed or damaged and made a rough estimate of the quantity destroyed, the total number of which is 107,000 varying in size from 1 foot up to 8 feet high. On Mount Davis about 49,000, and on Mount Kellet 47,000 trees were destroyed, the remainder, 11,000, were in numerous other places scattered over the island. Although it is impossible to detect the originators of the fires, except very rarely indeed, there is no doubt whatever that the system of ancestral worshipping at tombs by the natives is the main, or almost exclusive, cause of these fires, no care whatever, apparently, being exercised to prevent the fire used from igniting the grass. The large burial places on Mounts Kellet and Davis were the reason of the exceptionally heavy losses on those hills, the smaller losses being also caused by the existence of isolated graves on smaller cemeteries near to villages. Nearly all the fires took place in October when the autumn ancestral worship takes place, and the exceptionally numerous and extensive fires were the result of the very combustible condition of the low vegetation brought about by the excessively dry weather in September and October.

40. As remedial measures for the future I propose in addition to the ordinary precautions adopted of stationing men in the vicinity of burial grounds all over the island to extinguish fires which may occur at the spring and autumn tomb ceremonies, to post during those seasons notices cautioning the people to exercise care in the use of crackers, candles, &c., and to increase the number and extent of fire barriers in plantations near large cemeteries, so that the plantations will be divided up into smaller blocks to which fires that may arise within them may be confined. Nothing connected with the origin of grass fires or of objects to be gained by them is known which might occasion any suspicion that they may have been acts of incendiarism.

Thinning of Plantations and Removal of Brushwood.

41. The brushwood in various places near the town or adjacent to roads where it had become somewhat dense was operated on throughout the year and about 1,200 piculs were removed and sold, the purchaser doing the work at his own cost and paying besides a small sum for the material removed. 42. Trees in streets and roads were systematically pruned and reduced to shape and to suitable dimensions, the prunings being likewise sold. This work, however, unlike the removal the brush- wood, can only be performed by foresters who have some acquaintance with the proper way of doing the work.

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:

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i

43. Plantations in the western districts, and near to Bowen and Kennedy Roads, in which the trees had attained sizes when permanent trees would be injured by having others growing too near them were thinned, after the trees were marked by foresters, by the contractor who bought the thin- nings. Upwards of 16,000 trees were thus removed and sold."

44. The revenue obtained from the sale of forestry products was $547.34.

45. Plantations should be thinned, as a rule, when they are about 10 years old, and as this is the eleventh year since planting was begun on a large scale, the plantations will demand each year henceforth considerable extra attention to their requirements, which, as I have said above, it will be difficult or impossible to give with the present overworked staff unless some other things which should be carried on simultaneously are permitted to suffer.

very

Burial Grounds.

46. The hygienic treatment of burial grounds being under the consideration of the Government it may serve a useful purpose to keep in prominent view the important position which arborescent and other vegetation should occupy in any scheme that may be devised for sanitary or æsthetic improve- ments of the cemeteries of the Colony.

47. The action of the roots of plants being to convert into health-giving, living, vegetable matter the decomposing animal and vegetable substances of the soil, and the functions of the leaves of plants being to absorb injurious gases which emanate from the soil, there can be no doubt that provision should be made for the encouragement of the growth of vegetation in the forms of trees, shrubs, and grass-turf around and within all burial grounds.

48. In 1876 I planted the old Chinese Cemetery near Belcher's Bay, and since that time I have planted lands wherever practicable close up to the boundaries of cemeteries, but on account of some real or imaginary objection of the Chinese to trees being planted within the grave-yards none have been placed there since 1876. However, if proper places could be found for trees, there would pro- bably not be even sentimental objections to them. Therefore in any contemplated improvements or extensions of cemeteries it would seem most desirable to include in the schemes due provision for the introduction of trees, &c., which might serve the double purpose of assimilating unhealthy matter and of screening the grounds from view from without their limits.

Planting of the Gathering Grounds of Reservoirs.

49. In C.S.O. No. 1348 I suggested that the opinion of the Honourable OSBERT CHADWICK might be obtained on the subject of planting lands within the gathering grounds of reservoirs, and at the request of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government Mr. CHADWICK submitted the opinion as follows, which I think it would be useful to record in this place:-

"1. I see no objection to the planting of Bamboos along the road leading from the Peak Tramway "to Craigieburn. Indeed, I believe that it will be beneficial to the water supply, by tending to con- "solidate the soil.

"2. I am of opinion that planting may be carried on within the gathering grounds of reservoirs "without prejudice to the quality of the water.

3. My experience in the West Indies leads me to this conclusion. The gathering ground from "which the St. George's Waterworks, Grenada, derives its supply, is a dense tropical forest; so much

so that a cutlass is required to make a way through it. Nevertheless the water is excellent.

((

(6

"4. The following is an extract from a report on the analysis of two samples of water from this source by the Professor of Chemistry and Agricultural Science at Barbados.

"5. The chemical examination shewed that both these waters are soft waters and of great purity. "The minute proportion of chlorine nitrogea in nitrites, ammonia, albuminoid ammonia and the absence "of phosphates in both samples prove that, they are not contaminated with sewage or manurial filth. "No. 2 is slightly the purer of the two being free from almost all traces of vegetable matter.

*

*

*

*

"And I consider both these waters to be of very high organic purity and well suited for a town supply. "6. I am of opinion that moderate planting within the Pok-fu-lam gathering ground will be "beneficial to the water supply by consolidating the ground and thus neutralising the evils which have "arisen from the extensive earth movements within this area.

7. The plants suitable for the purpose will be those of rapid growth having strong and compact roots which will consolidate the ground and tend to strain out clay and mud brought down by the “rain.

"8. The most suitable places for planting are:--

"a. Slopes of made-ground especially near to the toe.

"b. The margin of the rivulets and water courses which feed the reservoir.

"c. The margin of the paths, especially on the lower side, and near to the points where the

"rain flows off from their surfaces.

"9. I do not recommend planting in the immediate vicinity of the reservoir itself, where the leaves "could be blown into the water; say within 100 yards from the reservoir.

"10. Bamboos will no doubt be suitable and could be quickly established. The bamboo-grass "also might be tried. It will be well also to restore the natural dwarf scrub if it will grow again. "The ordinary fir, planted in moderation in clumps here and there, would be suitable. It would be "well to avoid trees which have large deciduous leaves.

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"11. The natural vegetation of the Tytam gathering grounds should be carefully preserved, and any operations tending to expose the soil should be avoided.

"27th May, 1890.”

The Honourable

ACTING COLONIAL SECRETARY,

&c.,

(Signed),

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

O. CHADWICK.

Your most obedient Servant,

CHARLES FORD,

Superintendent,

Botanical & Afforestation Department.

&C.,

&c.

Appendix.

STATISTICS OF PLANTING OPERATIONS.

DESCRIPTION AND NUMBER OF TREES AND AREA IN ACRES.

LOCALITY.

Pinus Cam- sinensis. phor.

Crypto-

meria Bamboo, japonica.

Tristanea Aleuritis tonferta. triloba.

Banians.

Miscel- Area in laneous.

Grand Total of

Acres.

Trees.

Waterfall Bay,

1,625

Mount Kellet,

6,162

Aberdeen Hills around, 104,451

Quarry Bay,.

18,437 2,510

:

:

:

Applichau,

47,768

...

Repulse Bay,

40,905

Stanley,

155,064

Chaiwan,

54,310

Shaukiwan,

North Point,

Aberdeen and Wanchai

Road,

Tramway,

Richmond Road,

Bowen Road,

Albert Road,........

Peak Roads,

Kowloon Roads,

Hongkong Roads,...................

Magazine Gap Road,....

80,485

:.

:

.:.

:

:

:

:.

:

7,644

:.

:

:

:

:

:.

:

:

:

F:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:.

:

:.

:

:

:

:

:

...

10,915

24,974

:

359

195

.:

:.

:

:

:

:.

:

:

:

:

197

116

127

392

:

:

:.

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:.

:.

:

:

1:

:

:.

:

444

11/

5

On

:

:

:

:

:.

:

:

87

171

393

34

129

45

6/1

67

30

:.

:

::

:

52

26

:

:

39

23

47

...

:

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:

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:

:.

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:.

:..

:

:

Miscellaneous, .

159

516,851 2,705 10,915

716 25,449

86

75

185 4631

556,982

Area of New Plantations,

Area within Old Plantations which have been filled up,...................

4491 acres

14

"3

4631

**

CHARLES FORD,

Superintendent.

Botanical & Afforestation Department.

373

No. 30

91

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HONGKONG.

CENSUS REPORT 1891.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government,

on the 17th August, 1891.

REGISTRAR GENERAL'S OFFICE,

HONGKONG, 15th August, 1891.

SIR,-With reference to my letter No. 142 of the 4th June last, forwarding the total number of the population of the Colony, ascertained by the Census taken on the evening of the 20th May last, I have now the honour to transmit the detailed returns.

2. The date fixed for taking the Census in Great Britain and its dependencies was the 5th of April. As it was known that many of the Chinese resident in Hongkong would be absent from the Colony during the month of April in order to be present at the worshipping of tombs festival in China, it was decided to take the Census in Hongkong on the 30th April. On further enquiries being made it was found that many of the absentees would not return till May, and it was also ascertained that a large number of Chinese leave the Colony every year about the end of April and beginning of May to attend a festival in honour of the Queen of Heaven held at a place on the mainland of China called Ch'ik Wán. Under these circumstances the date for taking the Census was again postponed till the evening of the 20th of May, as it was obviously undesirable to take a Census of the people at a time when many of the residents would not be in the Colony.

3. The previous Census was taken in 1881 on the 3rd April, a date which, as already indicated, is not a favourable one for enumerating the people. But as, for some reason which I have not been able to discover, five per cent. was added in the case of the Chinese resident in Victoria and the Villages and ten per cent. in the case of the boat population of Victoria to the actual numbers ascertained by the taking of the Census, it is probable that the figures of the 1881 Census are rather in excess of what was the real population than below it. On this account, therefore, the increase in the population shown by the 1891 Census is all the more striking.

4. A reference to Return I A and I B will show that the total population now amounts to 221,441, as compared with a total of 160,402 in 1881, showing an increase in ten years of 61,039 or 38.05 per cent., which is equivalent to an annual increase of 3.27 per cent.

5. Inquiry into the growth of the population of the Colony since the taking of the first Census in 1857, when the population was 77,094, up to the present year, shows that there has been a steady increase at the rate of 3.15 per cent. each year. From Return II, in which is given the result of each Census held in Hongkong, of which there have been seventeen, it will be seen that the largest annual increase took place between the years 1872-1876, viz., 3.345 per cent.

The second largest annual increase is that which has occurred between 1881-1891, viz., 3.277 per cent.

6. An examination into the European and American population (including the Military and Navy), which amounts to 8,545 as compared with 7,990 in 1881 (see Return I A and I B) shows an increase of 555, the chief increase being in the resident civil population, which is 1,155 larger than it was ten years ago, and the chief decrease being under the head of British Navy, which in 1881 was 2,437, and in 1891 only 1,356, a falling off of 1,081, owing to nearly all the men-of-war having been absent from the waters of the Colony when the Census was taken. The numbers of the Military show an increase of 225, there being a decrease under all heads except that of men, which shows an increase of 275.

7. An analysis of the numbers of the various nationalities which constitute the European and American resident population, exclusive of the British Army and Navy, is given in Return III A and III B. The chief increase is among the British, with a total of 1,448 as compared with 785 in 1881, which is equivalent to an increase of 84.46 per cent. The Portuguese population in 1881 was 1,869. It now shows an increase of 220, the total being 2,089, or an increase of 11.77 per cent. There has been a marked falling off under the head of Portuguese Boys and Girls, in the former case to the number of 137, in the latter to the extent of 68. It is believed that a great check has been given to the growth of the Portuguese population in Hongkong owing to the difficulty now experienced by the Portuguese in finding employment. Positions once open to and generally held by them are now occupied by Britishers or members of other nationalities, so that the number of Portuguese employed in European firms is fewer than it used to be and seems likely to decrease still further. The German population has increased from 188 to 208; the American from 70 to 93, and the French from 42 to 89.

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8. During the last ten years it has often been remarked that the mode of life among Europeans in Hongkong has gradually been undergoing a change. Fortunes are not made so rapidly as in the old days, and Europeans, having to live in the Colony for long periods, begin to regard it more as a permanent home, which has led to there being more of what may be called "family life" than formerly. The figures of the Census tend to support this view, at any rate, so far as the British resident popula tion is concerned. In it the male adult population has grown in ten years from 336 to 795, or more than doubled itself, and the female adult population has increased from 161 to 300, or 86.33 per cent., while the total number of boys and girls has increased from 288 to 353, or 22.57 per cent.

9. The figures of the Chinese population (see Return I A and I B) show that it has grown from a total of 150,690 to a total of 210,995, which is an increase of 60,305, or 40.01 per cent. Of the 210,995, 154,647 have been returned as natives of the Kwangtung Province, and 7,286 as natives of Hongkong, (see Return IV) whereas in 1881 the natives of Hongkong returned amounted to 3,668 only. This would seem to indicate that many of the Chinese resident here now regard the Colony as their home and do not hesitate to declare it as such. As was anticipated, the greatest increase has taken place in the city of Victoria, where the population amounts to 136,901, that is 40,045, or 41.3 per cent., more than the population of 1881, which was 96,856. In Return V will be found the population of each of the ten districts into which the city of Victoria is divided. As the population of each district was not given among the Census Returns of 1881, it is not possible to ascertain to what extent each district has grown in numbers since that year.

10. The question of overcrowding in the city of Victoria is one which has excited'attention for long, and last year an exhaustive report on the subject was submitted to Government. As to the figures representing the population contained in that report, it is stated—

"The enumeration of the people has been made by the Chinese district watchmen working "under the Registrar General. The method adopted was that of verbal inquiry of the

46

"householders. The Committee believe they are justified in assuming that the returns they have received are fairly correct, but they cannot be viewed as being absolutely "accurate as it is probable that in several instances the answers given to the district "watchmen depended in some measure on the idea which each particular person answer- "ing had as to the object of the question put."

11. In order that the figures ascertained by the Census might be compared with those con- tained in the overcrowding report, the enumerators appointed to enumerate the population of the city of Victoria were instructed to follow the division of the City into 275 blocks, made by the late Surveyor General, for the use of the Committee appointed to inquire into the question of overcrowding and adopted by them in their report, each enumerator being assigned one or more blocks according to the estimated population. A return has been drawn up (Return VI) showing the difference between the figures of the overcrowding report, which were regarded by those who collected them as being pro- bably understated, and of the Census. A comparison between these two sets of figures shows that, though there may be discrepancies between them as to the detailed population of each block, the Census Returns by their total population of the same area as is covered by the overcrowding report not only support the opinion expressed in the report as to overcrowding, but show that overcrowding generally must be even greater than the report represents it to be. The total Chinese population of Victoria given in the overcrowding report is 125,901, whereas the Chinese population of Victoria as ascertained by the Census amounts to 136,901, a difference of 11,000. This matter will, no doubt, receive the attention of the sanitary authorities, to whose notice, however, I would recommend the following passage from a recent work on Chinese Characteristics:-

(C

"Besides this, we must take account of the fact that in China breathing seems to be optional. We hear much of Chinese overcrowding, but overcrowding is the normal "condition of the Chinese, and they do not appear to be inconvenienced by it at all, or "in so trifling a degree, that it scarcely deserves mention. If they had an outfit of Anglo- "Saxon nerves, they would be as wretched as we frequently suppose them to be."

12. Great as the increase of the Chinese population during the past decade has been in Victoria, it has been proportionately greater still in the villages or outlying districts of the Colony, taken as a whole (see Return VII A and VII B). The total population in them has almost doubled itself, having grown from 16,606 in 1881 to 32,490 in 1891. Kaulung and Shanki Wán are the two districts in which the chief increase has taken place, in both of which places the population is more than double what it was in 1881; the figures being-

1881.

1891.

:

Kaulung, Shauki Wán,

9,021 3,274

19,997

6,669

13. The increase in Kaulung is due to a variety of causes, among which may be enumerated the extended operations of the Hongkong and Whampoa Dock Company; the establishment of the Pier and Godown Company, the head-quarters of which are at Kaulung, and which finds employment for a large number of people, who are engaged in handling and storing the cargoes of the numerous ocean- going steamers, which go alongside the Company's wharves: the improved communication between

375

¿

the city of Victoria and Kaulung by means of a regular service of steam-launches; the increase in the number of European-built houses, in which a large number of Chinese find employment. There has also been a great development within the last 10 years of the boat-building,and timber trade at Táikok Tsui and Mongkok Tsui. At the former place there are no less than 14 boat-building sheds, several with patent slips, and four large timber yards. At Mongkok Tsui not only is there a large boat- building trade carried on, but steamers and steam-launches are also constructed there. New soy factories have also been established at Mongkok Tsui, Hunghom, and Yaumati, and new tanneries at Mat'au Ch'ung and Tókwa Wán, while a good deal of ground has been reclaimed at Yaumati and many new houses built there. If the railway between Kaulung and Canton, which is so often talked about, becomes an accomplished fact, the growth of the Kaulung peninsula, which has already been rapid, will be still further accelerated.

14. The increase at Shauki Wán is due almost entirely to the establishment at Quarry Bay of the Sugar Works of Messrs. BUTTERFIELD & SWIRE, at which are employed from 1,500 to 2,000 hands, and which have given rise in their immediate neighbourhood to quite a flourishing community, where ten years ago there was not a single house.

15. The boat population (see Return I A and I B) now amounts to 32,035 as compared with 28,989 in 1881, which represents an increase of 3,046. The only place where there is a decrease in the boat population is at Stanley. In 1881, the boat population there was 981. It is now only 568. The largest increase is at Kaulung, where the boat population has risen from 4,472 to 6,447.

16. The number of vessels has increased from 4,226 to 5,220. In Return VIII A and VIII B will be found a description of the various vessels. From this table it would appear that trading junks have decreased from 72 to 15, but the small number returned is due to many of the junks having been absent from the Colony on the day on which the Census was taken and to some of those which were here having been confounded with some other class of boat. That there has been no great falling off in the junk trade of this Colony up to the end of 1890 is shown by a return (Return IX A) which has been kindly furnished by the Acting Harbour Master, and which shows the total number and tonnage of junks entered in the Colony from 1881 to 1890. In 1881, the junks entered numbered 28,806, and the tonnage amounted to 1,819,390; in 1890, the figures were 28,018, and 1,958,855. The number of steam-launches which was in 1881, 23, has now reached 81, a number of which few harbours can boast. To complete the statistical account of the shipping of this Colony during the past ten years, a return, IX B, also supplied by the Acting Harbour Master, is attached showing the number and tonnage of steamers and sailing vessels entered in the Colony from 1881 to 1890. The number of steamers has increased in ten years from 2,750 with a tonnage of 2,599,460 to 3,989 with a tonnage of 4,791,839, and the sailing vessels have decreased from 464 with a tonnage of 253,819 to 125 with a tonnage of 101,894.

17. One of the most interesting features in connection with the Census is the increase in the number. of Chinese families. In 1868, when forwarding the annual Census returns for the year 1867, the Registrar General, Mr. (now Sir) CECIL SMITH, wrote as follows:-

"I would next draw attention to Return No. 3 which shews that during the past year a fair "increase in the number of buildings for the Chinese, and in the number of families, "viz., 189, over the previous year, which settled in the Colony. This latter point is, I hold, "of considerable importance as evincing a gradual surmounting of old prejudices on the part of native residents-formerly deemed insurmountable by many-against bringing "their wives and families to live in a British Colony, or indeed in any place out of their

own country."

66

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To judge from the figures of the present Census, the prejudice may be said to have almost entirely disappeared, for whereas in 1881, the returns showed a total of 11,859 families, the present returns show a total of 17,349, or an increase of 5,490 families in ten years, or about 550 a year (see Return XI B). The increase in the number of women in the Chinese population also tends to show that the objection on the part of the Chinese to take their women with them when they emigrate, a point which Anti-Chinese agitators in America and Australia are ever ready to avail themselves of as an argument against Chinese immigration, does not extend to Hongkong, which may be due in a great measure to the proximity of this Colony to the mainland of China. In 1881, the women, land population, numbered 21,640; they now number 33,523, an increase of 11,883, or 54.9 per cent., and bear the proportion of 1 to 3.37 of the adult-male, land population, which amounts to 113,241.

.

19

18. In his speech on the Census of 1881, the Governor, Sir JOHN POPE HENNESSY, stated "that as "the Colony makes progress, the revenue should improve without the imposition of any new taxes. The principle laid down by Sir JONH POPE HENNESSY is fully borne out by a comparison between the figures showing the increase of the population and the growth of the revenue since 1876. No new taxes have been imposed since that date, though since 1885 the municipal rates have been fixed at 13 per cent. of the annual rateable value instead of at 12 per cent. as formerly, and since 1886 at 7 per cent. instead of 6 per cent. in the villages. This will account for some of the increase in the revenue, after 1885 and 1886, but for only a comparatively small portion, as may be seen on reference to Return

376

X A, B, C, which shows the amount of Assessment in the whole Colony from 1881 to 1891. The following are the figures of the population and revenue for 1876, 1881, and 1891. The revenue of 1891 is estimated, but at a lower figure than that of 1890--

:

Date.

1876,

1881,

1891,

Population. 139,144 160,402 221,441

....

Revenue.

871,307

1,120,796

1,952,098

An examination of these figures reveals that, between 1876 and 1881, the population increased 15.28 per cent., or 30.56 in ten years, and the revenue 28.62 in five years, or 57.24 per cent. in ten years.

Between 1881 and 1891, the population increased 38.05 per cent., and the revenue 74.17 per cent., which shows that the revenue has more than kept pace with the increasing population.

19. An attempt has been made this Census to acquire information regarding the educational statistics of the Colony. For this purpose the heading "No. attending school" was added to the Census forms, and in the Age Table (v. Return XI A.) instead of following the division of ages, 20 and under, adopted in the former Census, the ages under twenty have been divided into 3 periods, 5 and under, 6 to 16, 17 to 20. Of these periods that of 6 to 16 is regarded as the school-going age. From Return XII B it appears there are in Hongkong of persons of school-going age-

Of these--

of school-going age.

783 Europeans and Americans.

184 Nationalities other than Europeans, Americans and Chinese. 21,331 Chinese,

making a total of 22,298.

566 Europeans and Americans.

-

87 Nationalities other than European, American and Chinese. 6,720 Chinese,

making a total of 7,373, attend school, or less than of those returned as

20. The number of those returned as attending school (v. Return XII C') is evidently not accurate, which may be due to the term school having been wrongly considered by some of the Chinese to include Government schools only. Whether that be the case or not, the inaccuracy of the returns is proved by the fact that on the same day on which the general Census was held, a Census was also taken of the number of children actually attending school on that day (See Return XII A). This return shows that on the 20th May as many as 8,085 children actually attended school, though it was a rainy day such as, I am informed, keeps about 10 per cent. of children from school.

If this 10 per cent. be added, the number of children attending school may be estimated at 8,893 which sum comes near the number actually enrolled in 1890, viz., 9,681. Deducting the number of children attending school, 8,893, from the number of persons of school-going age, viz., 22,298, there would be left 13,405 persons not accounted for. Of this number some are educated by private tutors, but it would be difficult to say how many, and the remainder must be presumed to be uneducated. On this point the Inspector of Schools, Dr. EITEL, whom I have consulted, writes as follows:-

"In England and Wales somewhat over one half and in Ireland less than one half of those "children (5 to 13 years of age), who ought to attend school, actually come under "instruction bearing one language only.

"In Hongkong, where most children learn two languages (English as well as Chinese, or "English as well as Portuguese) and where, consequently, the school-going age covers "a longer period (6th to 16th year of age), the case is certainly no worse than in "England and Wales with its compulsory attendance laws.

"But the great difference is that, while in England and Wales the existing school accommo- "dation exceeds the demands of actual attendance, in Hongkong the existing accommo- "dation is hardly sufficient for the actual attendance."

21. In Return XIII will be found the number of public and private buildings in the Colony of Hongkong on the 20th May last, which shows that the number of houses assessed at and above £100 (say $600 value) amounted in Hongkong to 1,561 as compared with 983, and in Kaulung to 63 as com- pared with 4, in 1881; and that the number of shops and private dwellings assessed below £100 (say $600 value) per annum amounted in Hongkong to 7,331 as compared with 6,773, and in Kaulung to 1,665 as compared with 977, in 1881. The number of inhabited dwellings, exclusive of naval and military buildings and boats, is 10,620, with a population of 186,506, which gives an average of more than 18 persons to each house. There has also been an increase in the number of naval and military buildings. The number of unoccupied houses amounted to 230 in the city of Victoria, 150 in the Villages, and 145 in Kaulung. A return, XIV, is attached showing the number of unoccupied houses in each district from 1881 to 1891, from which it will be seen that in 1881, 1882, 1883 and 1884, the number of unoccupied houses was larger than at present, and that in 1891 there are fewer houses unoccupied than there were in 1890. In return XV will be found the occupations of the

Chinese residents.

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22. The growth of the Colony as evidenced by the Census Returns cannot but be regarded as eminently satisfactory, and I doubt whether any other Colony will be able to show during the same period a progress so solid and at the same time so rapid as that which has been made by this Colony during the last ten years.

23. In conclusion, my thanks are due to all the Members of the Staff of this Department, European and Chinese, and to the members of the Police whose services were lent, for their hearty co-operation in carrying out the work of the Census. Owing to their assistance the returns now forwarded think, be regarded as accurate as returns of such a nature can be.

I have the honour to be,

may,

I

The Honourable W. M. GOODMAN,

Acting Colonial Secretary.

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

J. H. STEWArt Lockhart, Registrar General.

RETURN I A..

CENSUS OF HONGKONG INCLUDING MILITARY AND NAVAL ESTABLISHMENTS, 20TH MAY, 1891.

Europeans and Americans Resident Civil Population,-

POPULATION.

Total.

Men.

Women.

Boys.

Girls.

Victoria,

Peak,...

Kaulung, including Stone Cutters' Island,

British, Military,

Do., Navy,

European Police,

1,496

1,120

571

111

53

95

45

1,382

59

1,307

9

95

18

ཊྛསེསྶཝཱསྶ

612

20

29

4,195

21

55

1,544

1,356

22

157

Foreign Men-of-War in the Harbour,

Prisoners,

European and American Crews of Mercantile Shipping in the

Harbour,

Temporary Residents,...

Total of Europeans and Americans,.

Nationalities other than Europeans, Americans and Chinese,... Do. Crew of Mercantile Shipping in the Harbour, ..........

740

452

9393

24

764

1

453

42

11

53

23

23

:

5,743

1,339

720

743

8,545

629

313

122

142

1,206

251

1

252

Indian, Military,

199

7

Do., Police,

217

2

42

5

215

3

224

}

Prisoners,

4

Total of Nationalities other than Europeans,

Americans and Chinese,

1,300

323

128

150

1,901

Chinese in the employ of Europeans, &c.,

4,582

635

125

45

5,387

Other Chinese,

556

150

133

201

1,040

Chinese in the employ of other Nationalities,

362

73

14

18,

467

Other Chinese,

Chinese in the employ of Mercantile Shipping,

Do. Passengers,.

23

7

30

829

19

848

215

215

Do. in the employ of Foreign Men-of-War,

50

Do.

Police,

299

Do. in the employ of the Police,

128

7

တာ တ

19

69

3

305

8

147

Do. employed by the Military and Navy,

508

10

8

5

531

Do. residing in Victoria, including 515 Temporary Residents, Do. residing in Villages and Kaulung,

85,326

26,436

12,267

12,872

136,901

19.857

6,174

3,527

2,932

32,490

Do. Boat Population in Vietoria Harbour,

8,088

3,574

3,164

2,389

17,215

Do.

Do.

in Kaulung,

3,147

1,312

1,082

906.

6,447

Do.

Do.

in Shauki Wán,

1,457

928

802

641

3,828

Do.

Do.

in Aberdeen,

1,520

1,028

723

706

3,977

Do.

Do.

in Stanley,

237

127

115

89

568

Do.

Prisoners..

467

10

13

490

Do. in Police Cells,

39

1

40

Total of Chinese,..

127,690

40,492

Grand Total,

134,733

42,154

22,004 20,809

22,852 21,702

210,995

221,441

:

"

..:

£

RETURN I B.

Census of HongKong, INCLUDING MILITARY AND NAVAL ESTABLISHMENTS, 3RD APRIL, 1881, AND 20TH MAY, 1891.

POPULATION.

TOTALS.

378

Men.

Women.

Boys.

Girls.

1881.

1891.

Difference.

1881.

1891. Difference. 1881.

1891. Difference. 1881.

1891. Difference. 1881.

1891. Difference.

Europeans & Americans, Resident Civil Population:-

Victoria,

1,496

1,120

571

612

Peak,

935

111

Kaulung,

95

British Military (including Stone Cutters Island),

1,107

1,382

British Navy,

2,345

1,307

European Police,

103

95

European and American Crews of Mercantile Ship-

ping in the Harbour,

606

740

Foreign Men-of-War in the Harbour,

197

452

Temporary Residents,

158

42

Prisoners,

48

23

11++ 11+ +

767

768

53

450

699

20

86

638

45

22

275

59

25

1,038

7

8

12

18

++

1320

62

78

10

223

48

14

66

36

42

22

12

2222-2

29

21

55

+ 11+

24

3,040

4,195 + 1,155

11

1,319

1,544

3

2,437

1,356

13

134

157

+ +1+

225

1,081

23

134

11

+

11247

10

255

116

14

11

1

3

414

627

764

137

197

453

256

12

12

188

53

135

25

48

23

25

Total of Europeans and Americans,..

5,499

5,743

+

214

899

1,339

Nationalities other than Europeans, Americans and

Chinese,

426

629

Do.

Crew of Mercantile Shipping in the Harbour,

441

251

Indian Military,

98

199

Do. Police,

194

217

Prisoners,

2

4

+ 1+++

203

174

313

190

101

5

28

++

+

+

440

857

720

137

735

743 +

7,990

8,545

+

555

139

185

122

63

183

142

41

968

1,206 +

238

2

:

1

2

1 +

+

10 to

123

N

+1

1-430

445

252

193

109

215

+

106

198

224

+

26

2

2

:

:

+

2

Total of Nationalities other than Euro-

peaus, Americans and Chinese,..

1,161

1,300

+

139

181

323 + 142

191

128

63

189

150

39

1,722

1,901

+

179

Chinese in the employ of Europeans, &c.,

4,184

4,582

398

750

635

115

195

125

70

Other Chinese,

556

506

150

Chinese in the employ of other Nationalities,

362

802

73

Other Chinese,

23

23

Do.

Chinese in the employ of Mercantile Shipping,. Passengers,

782

829

47

19

++++!

400

45

355

150

183

73

14

++

133

201

14

18

++1

5.529

5.387

142

201

1,040

1,040

18

467

467

7

30

30

15

4

£

2

1

2

792

848

56

215

215

215

215

Do.

in the employ of Foreign Men-of-War,.

236

50

186

::

Do.

Police,

351

299

52

Do.

in the employ of the Police,

128

Do.

employed by the Military and Navy,

560

508

1+1

128

52

32

10

1++

22

88

00 00 00 to

1+++

19

236

69

167

3

C3

8

80

16

|+|

351

305

49

147

+ 147

11

696

531

165

Do.

residing in Victoria including 515 Tempo-

rary residents,

62,744

$5.326 + 22,582

17,258

26,436 + 9,183

8,579

12,267 + 3,688

8,280 12,872 + 4,592

96,856

136,901

+40,045

Do, residing in Villages and Kaulung,

9,328

19,857 +10,534

3,573

6,174 + 2,601

2,050

3,527 + 1,477

1,660

2,932 + 1,272

16,606

32,490

+15,884

Do.

Boat Population in Victoria Harbour,

7,635

8.088 + 453

3,440

8,574

+

134

3,061

8,164

103

2,551

2,389

162

16,687

17,215 + 528

Do.

Do.

ão.

do.

in Kaulung,

3,147

1,312

1,082

906

6,447

in Shauki Wán,

1,457

928

802

641

3,828

5,039

Do.

do.

in Aberdeen,

1,520

+ 1,322

2,961

I+ 434

2,226

1,028

723

+

496

2,076

266

+

12,302

+ 2,518

706

3,977

Do.

do.

in Stanley,

237

127

115

89

568

Chinese Prisoners, Do.

508

467

131

27

10

17

6

13 +

1

632

490

142

in Police Cells,

· 39 + 39

1 +

W

...

40 + 40

Total of Chinese,

91,452

127,690

+36.238

28,041

40,492

+ 12,451

16,209

22,004 + 5,795

14,988

20.809 + 5,821

150,690

210,995 +60,305

GRAND TOTAL,...

98,112

134,733 +36,621

29,121

42,151 +13,033 17,257

22,852

+ 5,595

15,912

21,702 +5,790

160,402

221,441 +61,039

}

RETURN II.

ČENSUS OF THE COLONY OF Hongkong, 1857-1891.

379

EUROPEANS AND AMERICANS,

CHINESE LAND.

CHINESE-BOAT.

Men. Women. Boys. Girls. Total.

Men. Women. Boys. Girls. Total. Men. Women.

Boys. Girls. Total.

OTHER NATIONALITIES.

Men. Women. Boys. | Girls. | Total.

GRAND

TOTAL.

1857,*

...

77,094

:

1858,

714 189 144

1859,

62 1,109 35,347 655 178 100 101 1,034 36,257

8,864 4,299 3,311 51,821 10,219 4,406 3,561 54,443

11,240

4,496 3,893

13,918

6,537 6,265

1860,

1861,

1,002 289 149 1,012 271 134 140 1,557 58,598

152 1,592 43,432

11,315

4,859 4,276

63,882

14,482

5,936

2,296

'4,117

5,076 3,065

21,925

530

37

71

10

648

75,503

30,837 598

18

10

6 627

86,941

:

28,559 801

15,308

6,417 5,148

1862,

961 357

140

146 1,604 63,056

14,252

6,420 5,172 88,900

85,471 15,207

16,921

7,169

5,271 3,262

6,212 5,160 3,346

30,909 | 1,286 65

ོ❁

54

9

20 884

94,917

20

31,6391,114

139

52

2 28

13 1,384

1,384 | 119,321

63 1,368 123,511

1863,

968 378 150

148 | 1,644

1,644 59,819

16,969

8,029

6,416 91,233

16,228

6,529

4,901

2,884

30,537 1,106 190

72

68 1,436 124,850

1864,

1865,

1866,

1867,

1872,

1876,

1881,

5,499 899 857 735

1891,

1,110 454 194 205 1,963 57,173 1,142 467 226 199 2,034 62,522 17,135 8,448 6,685 94,790 14,421 6,053 3,945

1 220 458 220 215 2,113 58,507 14,761 5,899 5,433 84,600 13,872 5,627 1,157 501 264 229 2,151 60,724 17,667 7,299 6,907 92,597 10,564 4,722

1868-69, 3,579 585 384 341 4,889 61,052 16,526 7,457 6,716 91,751 10,397 5,777 1870-71, 4,418 757 458 298 5,931 61,028 17,143 6,765 6,799 91,735 11,157 5,552 3,982 3,264 669 478 520 4,931 64,514 | 17,453 6,748 6,650 95,365 5,463 786 646 630 7,525 71,126 19,222 8,734 7,990 78,778 21,640 10,922 5,743 1,339 720 748 8,545118,241 33,523 16,118.

16,587

7,870

6,983 88,613

14,556

6,188

5,448

3,142

29,334 1,087

201

161

139 1,588

121,498

2,466

26,885 1,170

293

145

187 1,795

125,504

4,692

2,763

26,954 |1,154

150

75

3,558 2,479

21,323 1,183 132

48

12 000

521,431

115,098

37 | 1,400

117,471

3,494 2,861

22,5292,599

109

47

552,810

121,979

3,018

23,709 2,561 121

66 75 2,823 124,198

9,457

4,623

3,566

2,553

20,199 |1,249

92

*

82

67 1,490 121,985

8,341 107,423

10,361 | 121,701

9,899

5,165

4,241

3,440

22,745 1,049

187

74

1411,451

139,144

12,674

6,401

5,287

4,627

28,989 |1,161

181

191

189 | 1,722

160,402

16,078 178,960 14,449 6,969

5,886 4,731

82,035 1,300

323

128

150 | 1,901

221,441

* Particulars not ascertainable.

ANNUAL INCREASE PER CENT.

1857-91,

3.152

1872-76,..

3.345

1857-72,

3.106

1876-81,

2.887

1871-81,

2.591

1881-91

3.277

1871-91,...

2.933

:

-

3

380

RETURN III A.

EUROPEAN AND AMERICAN RESIDENT CIVIL POPULATION, 20TH MAY, 1891.

A

POPULATION.

TOTAL.

Men.

Women.

Boys.

Girls.

British,.

795

300

159

191

1,448

Portuguese,

563

767

374

385

2,089

German,

125

29

24

30

208

American,..

41

37

8

93

French,.

51

17

9

Italian,

12

25

1

:

Spanish, Danish, Dutch, Swiss,

Swedish,

Russian, Belgian, Austrian, Turkish, Roumanian,

Greek,

Not known,

34

15

14

1~

19

22228

12

89

38

20

88

1

16

5

N

4

3

7

:

19

:

3

4

26

30

:.

8

10 - 14

5

1

14

1

1

9

5

10

13

2

3

***

3

1,702

1,218

613

662

4,195

4

26

10

31

:

6

1

RETURN III B.

EUROPEAN AND AMERICAN RESIDENT CIVIL POPULATION, 3RD APRIL, 1881, AND 20TH MAY, 1891.

POPULATION.

MEN.

WOMEN.

Boys.

GIRLS.

TOTAL.

1881.

1891. Diff'ce.

1881.

· 1891.

Diff'ce. 1881.

1891. Diff'ce.

1881.

1891.

Diff'ce. 1881.

1891. Diff'ce.

British,

336

795 + 459

161

300 + 139

144

159 + 15

144

194 +

50

785

1,448 +

663

Portuguese,

384

563 + 179

521

767 +

246

511

374

137

453

385

68

1,869

2,089 +

220

German,

106

125 + 19

23

29 +

6

32

24

27

30+

3

188

208+

20

American,

41

41

16

37 +

21.

81+

7

1

70

93 +

23

French,

25

51 +

26

12

17+

10

2

9+

7

12 +

9

42

89 +

47

Italian,

12

12

24

25 +

1

4

1

3

40

38

2

Spanish,

4

34 +

30

1

15 +

14

:

19 +

19

20+

20

CI

88 +

83

Danish,

9

14+

5

1 +

1

1 +

1

1

1

1

10

16+

6

Dutch,....

4

5 +

1

1

2

N

8

00

7

I

1

Swiss,

5

+

2

:

:

71+

I

Swedish,

4

19+

15

3 +

CO

:

Russian,

2

8+

6

10

d

Belgian,

1

1

Austrian,

1

10+

Turkish,

1

13 +

12

Roumanian,

2+

2

Greek,...

:

3+

Co

Not known,

3+

Co

:

:

:

:

1 +

+

1

:

:

:

:

:

5+

...

4 +

4 +

10+ 10

:

:

:

:.

F:

:

:

1 +

1

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:.

:

·4+

26+

22

1

1

14+

7

:

1

:

3+

3+

26 +

23

CO

31 +

29

:

6 │+

6

1+

1

:

+

.5

3+

TOTAL,....

935

1,702 |+

767

768

1,218 + 450

699

613

86

638

662 + 24 3,040 4,195 + 1,155

381

382

RETURN IV.

PROVINCES AND COUNTRIES TO WHICH THE CHINESE RESIDENTS BELONG.

VICTORIA.

VILLAGES.

TOTAL.

Kwangtung,.

125,892

28,755

154,647

Hongkong,

4,256

3,030

7,286

Kiangsi,

8

1

9

Kiangsu,.

99

99

Fukien,

514

67

581

Hupeli,

1

1

:

Kwangsi,

10

10

2

12

:

Chekiang,

43

43

Hunan,

Shingking,

Hunan, Pecheli,

2

2

1

1

1-1

14

5

5

Yunnan,

4

5

Shantung,

1

Shansi,

1

Nganhwui,

2

Formosa,

14

Singapore,

San Francisco,

4

Penang,

23

5

Malacca,.

Madras,

Cuba,

هران

5

1

1

2

14

4

23

5

1

3

2

Siam,

Australia,

America,

Annam,

Honolulu,

12

11

3

CO

15

11

Japan,

3

Bombay....

1

India,

1

77

3

3

1

1

England,

1

1

New South Wales,

4

4

Portland,

5

Peru, ....

2

Not stated,..

5,941

632

2 6,578

GRAND TOTAL..

136,901

32,490

169,391

RETURN V.

POPULATION OF EACH DISTRICT OF VICTORIA, 20th May, 1891.

District No. 1, Kennedy Town,...

>>

""

2, Shekt'ong Tsui,.......

A

""

3, Saiyingpun,

""

""

4, T'aip'ing Shán,

25

""

">

>>

""

646

""

5, Sheung Wán,

6, Chung Wán,

7, Ha Wán,.....

8,

Wántsai,

9, Bowrington,

10, Sokonpò,

1,011

2,570

34,559

31,302

12,067

36,196

8,915

7,999

341

1,911

TOTAL,

136,901

--

:

383

Population

RETURN VI,

POPULATION OF OVERCROWDING REPORT AND CENSUS OF CITY OF VICTORIA, 1891.

Population as shown in the

Block No.

District

ascertained

No.

Report on

Over-

by Census

Difference.

Block No.

District No.

Population as shown in the Report on

Over-

Population ascertained by Census

Difference.

1891.

crowding

1891.

crowding

1890.

1890.

Brought forward,...

51,105

52,273

Kennedy Town.

1

197

1,011

+

514

78

4

53

89

1

3

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

NARA 200 ONI Co

- 2 CO #ID ON

* A ** **

2

243

191

1,376

1,330

2 46

52

79

134

112

29

80

33

1,570

1,768

33

81

51

::

47

92

>>

82

>>

73

""

88

477

407

436

387

189

225

697

1,167

684

680

"

481

483

1,129

1,020

2 & 3

647

660

3

435

367

11++1 +1 +1

70

83

467

482

>>

49

84

439

344

""

36

85

489

415

+1+++ |||

27

470

86

1,265

877

""

87

367

434

"

2

88

324

336

""

109

89

370

275

13

90

138

*

159

68

91

163

231

>>

14

58

92

""

1,722

1,442

15

3

25

93

16

729

995

266

94

""

شور

وو

563

567

*92

957

17

1,808

1,936

+

128

95

""

1,315

1,255

18

1,693

1,468.

225

96

455

""

""

609

19

2,124

1,755

369

97

942

>>

>>

916

20

1,805

1,533

272

98

547

""

627

27

1,687

1,590

97

99

""

""

1,237

1,113

28

1,751

1,207

""

29

嘭嘭

+

1,946

1,957

30

2,148

1,795

22

31

1,057

1,370

>>

32

299

295

33

638

659

34

687

780

35

36

""

37

38

وو

39

40

41

3 & 4

49

RRRRAAR TH

>>

535

625

+++ !+ !+1

514

100

933

22

1,120

11

106

1,656

1,377

353

107

1,502

1,587

313

108

1,212

1,453

4

109

636

601

21

110

· 170

468

93

111

861

832

90

112

591

540

102

113

3,168

3,359

1,073

1,192

491

449

1,171

1,115

206

461

4

702

698

50

1,155

1,332

51

693

680

"

52

647

649

""

53

1,124

1,007

54

812

1,265

وو

55

384

788

"

56

471

816

"

57

193

172

58

130

275

+ 1 + + ++++++

191

114

119

115

42

116

56

117

255

118

4

119

177

120

13

121

2

122

117

123

453

124

404

125

5 & 6

345

126

6

༽。་::;་སྐྲུ་སུ9སྐྲུ;;

735

704

333

341

341

482

415

298

372

434

306

255

375

376

170

227

311

375

209

212

352

412

382

372

670

1,828

++ !++ | + + 1 +++ 1 + 1 + + 1 + │| |++ | +1+++++ 1 +

36

22

198.

45

15

35

95

74

388

67

12

95

21

..

71

280

1,470

1,563

21

127

42

153

145

128

""

59

533

808

275

129

60

544

166

378

130

61

199

373

+ 174

131

62

390

167

223

132

63

1,919

1,999

80

133

5 & 6

64

323

523

200

134

6

RIO

AAA 20

620

569

455

421

313

302

478

372

>>

375

461

2,380

2,489

1,828

65

66

67

68

76

77

BRFNRERER

69

70

ARRA 210 +

1,852

2,101

1,361

740

135

1,319

1,292

1,380

1,082

298

136

1,044

1,073

568

563

5

137

811

">

>>

1,043

657

715

58

138

"

1,057

999.

811

1,231

420

139

"

360

560 +

200

140

"

980 1,028

1,109

1,244

71

136

172

33

72

155

98

"}

73

148

185

+1+

36

141

385

"

354

57

142

168

120

>>

37

143

323

">

""

311

74

955

942

13

144

70

"

">

65

75

462

209

253

145

"

"

129

295

352

245

107

146

118

""

>>

116

494

454

40

147

403

"}

"

411

148

""

943

886

| + | + | | | | + + 1 + + 1 + + + || !

4

165

60

154

4

80

124

:

187

279

85

241

35

298

29 54.

31

3

141

117

62

51

;

1

57

64

3

+

60

10

+ 1,158

93.

111

51

34

11

106

86

109

24

27

29

232

58

129

216

31

48

12

5

166

2

8

57

Carried forward,...

51,105

52,273

Carried forward,...

98,856

97,238

:

:

384

RETURN VI.,- Continued.

Population as shown

Block No.

District No.

in the Report on

Population ascertained

Over-

by Census

Difference.

Block No.

District No.

in the Report on

Population

as shown

Population ascertained

Over-

by Census

Difference.

:

1891.

1891.

crowding

crowding

1890.

1890.

Brought forward,... 93,856

97,238

Brought forward,... 113,519

120,567

212

7

677

372

305

149

6

203

137

66

213

716

624

92

>>

150

470

419

51

214

603

708

">

151

356

213

143

215

685

575

""

152

900

786

114

216

610

1,048

""

""

153

911

856

55

217

وو

1,401

1,854

154

264

188

76

218

34

165

وو

155

230

273

156

10

75

27

157

788

773

22

158

226

290

22

159

310

204

""

160

595

522

""

161

1,320

27

1,347

++++

43

219

65

220

R 200

23

320

8

299

194

15

221

364

147

64

222

106

223

73

224

27

225

163

31

226

...

""

164

29

228

""

165

141

184

+

43

229

22

171

195

230

...

174

6

149

$ 474

175

211

218

"

176

248

267

دو

177

923

1,289

""

178

1,095

815

""

179

912

869

""

180

794'

712

77

181

592

1,269

182

843

>>

A

1,052

++11 ++

+

325

231

"

7

232

وو

19

233

366

234

* * * R R R R RAAAAA

684

368

728

69

927

374

464

22

295

316

779

94

444

384

346

1,101

24

234

29

245

91

172

67

349

280

237

43

145

"

43

238

59

94

""

82

239

273

413

""

+++++ ||

++++ || ++++++++

105

110

438

453

131

297

105

217

360

858

90

21

685

60

758

210

216

381

282

102

35

140

677

240

227

""

209

241

369

239

183

1,058

242

331

>>

1,014

* 184

86

68

""

€185

661

906

""

- 186

261

341

++1

18

251

289

436

""

245

258

9

168

258

80

262

33

83

""

""

187

27

1,793

2,636 +

843

268

10

687

662

188

""

1,487

1,614 + 127

269

318

540

207

416

880

+ 464

270

202

323

""

208 & 208A

754

1,100

346

272

93

47

209

548

407

21

210

318

377

+1

141

271

308

339

""

+} ++|++++ |

130

683

147

90

50

25

222

121

46

31

59

Central

6

417

"J

211

788

515

273

Market.

وو

1

"

Carried forward,... 113,519 120,567

VILLAGES.

GRAND TOTAL,... 125,901

136,901 + 11,000

RETURN VII A.

CHINESE RESIDING IN THE VILLAGES, 20TH MAY, 1891.

Men.

Women.

Boys.

Girls.

Total of each Place.

Wongnai Ch'ung,

401

162

75

Coffee Field,

79

34

10

Jardine's Vegetable Garden,

242

120

75

Shauki Wán,

4,193

1,254

664

558

Sai Wán,

104

51

28

Shek-O,

179

97

61

505628

61

702

9

132

67

504

6,669

25

208

58

395

Táit'amtuk,

Stanley,

51

18

14

7

93

373

217

115

81

789

Aberdeen,

Little Hongkong,.

Pokfulam,...

Kaulung,

1,737

414

205

161

2,517

73

70

33

39

215

136

64

34

35

269

12,286

3,678

2,213

1,825

19,997

GRAND TOTAL,

19,857

6,174

3,527

2,932

32,490

1. Shauki Wan includes Sant'sün, Hungheunglò, T'unglo Wán, Tsat Tszmui, Quarry Bay, Shuitsing Win,

Wongkok Tsui, and Akungngám.

2. Shek-O includes Hok Tsui and T’óti Wán.

3. Stanley includes Táit'am and Wongmakok.

4. Aberdeen includes Apli Chau.

5. Kaulung includes Yaumati, Tsimsha Tsui, Hunghom and all the other villages in British Kaulung,

RETURN VII B.

CHINESE RESIDING IN THE VILLAGES, 3RD APRIL, 1881, and 20th May, 1891.

1881.

1891.

1881.

1891.

1881. 1891.

1881. 1891

1881.

1891.

Total of Total of

Diffice.

Diff'ce.

Diff'ce.

Diff'ce.

Difference.

each

VILLAGES.

Men.

Men.

Women. Women.

Boys.

Boys.

Girls. Girls.

Place.

each

Place.

Wonguai Ch'ung,.

239

401+ 162

152

162+ 10

72

1242

Coffee Field,.

Jardine's Vegetable Garden,

Shauki Wán,

Sái Wán,

79

34

:

:

242

120

:

:

:

:

75 +

10

75

3

66

64

2

529

702+

173

:

9

132

:

:

67

:

:

:.

504

1,777

4,193 + 2,416

740

1,254+

514

424

664 +

240

333

558+ 225 3,274

6,669 +

3,395

>

80

104 +

24.

65

51

1

14.

39

28

11

29

25

213

208

Shek-O,

139

179 +

40

120

97

23

64

61

1

3

70

58

Táit'amtuk,

39

54 +

15

23

18

10

11

14+

13

7

L

1

12

393

395+

ลง

2

86

93+

T

Stanley,

398

373

25

216

217+

1

119

115

}

96

84

12

829

789

I

40

Aberdeen,

818

1,737 +

919

236

414+

178

142

205 + 63

109

161+

52

1,305

2,517+

1,212

Little Hongkong,.

83

73

10

96

70

1

26

69

33

1

36

73

39

1

34

321

215

}

106

Pokfulam,

355

136

219

142

64

78

70

34

36

68

35

33

635

269

366

Kaulung,

5,395

12,286+ 6,891

1,783

3,673 +1,890

1,040

2,213+1,173

803

1,825+ 1,022 9,021

19,997 + 10,976

Grand Total,.

9,323

19,857 +10,534|

3,573

6,174 + 2,601

2,050

3,527 + 1,477 1,660

2,932+ 1,272

16,606

32,490 + 15,884

(1.) Shauki Wán includes Sant'sün, Hungheunglò, T'unglo Wán, Tsat Tszmui, Quarry Bay, Shuitsing Wán, Wongkok Tsui and Akungngám. (2.) Shek-O includes Hok Tsui and T'óti Wán.

(3.) Stanley includes Táit'am and Wongmakok.

(4.) Aberdeen includes Apli Chau.

.) Kaulung includes Yaumati, Tsimsha Tsui, Hunghom and all the other villages in British Kaulung.

385

..-

RETURN VIII A.

DETAILED RETURN OF THE NUMBER AND DESCRIPTION OF VESSELS ANCHORED AND PLYING IN THE HARBOUR and Bays of Hongkong and their POPULATION, 20TH MAY, 1891.

DESCRIPTION

OF

VESSELS.

SHAUKI WAN.

Adults.

STANLEY.

Adults.

M... W. B.

12

VICTORIA.

ABERDEEN.

No. of

Vessels.

Adults.

Children.

M. W. B. G.

No. of

Vessels.

Children.

M.

W. B.

G.

No, of

Vessels.

Adults.

Children.

M.

W.

B

G.

Trading Junks & Boats,... Passage Junks & Boats,.. Cargo Junks and Boats,... Fishing Junks & Boats,... Pull-away or Rowing Boats,

15 123 8

30 550 39 8263,278 | 1,363 337 655 344

455 973 689 652 540

7

10

2

1

24

96 38

28

34

53

32

1

4

8

7

2

3

NW

No. of

Vessels.

2

10

1,186

680

6

35

3

4

1

3

2

395 300

151 415

198

252

169

252

963

425

359

297

85

215

127

...

Sampans, ....

471 352

562 434 364

་་་

Water Boats,

49 87

67

54

54

ཝོ

...

Steam-Launches,

81 503

32

15

...

1

Lighters,

37 141

38 35

21

55

2

2

Yachts or Sailing Boats,..

8

Bum Boats,

18

110

23

6

15

.8

::

::

...

...

Ballast or Stone Junks

and Boats,

89 833

57

52

23

10 93

2

3

3

33

2

3

...

House Boats,

241 301

333 246

334

467

838

720

539

461

410 359

536

315

354

Hawker Boats,

4

10

3

4

10

34

· 5

Marriage Boats,

3

5

3

14

11

7

12

Religious Service Boats,...

Pilot Boats,

***

2

4

1

1

1

1

1

Dust Boats,

23. 156 20 11

12

Coal and Brick Junks

and Boats,

Old Hulk,

...

...

::

::

::

TOTAL,...

2,685 8,088 3,574 |3,164 |2,389

643 1,457

928

802

641.

717|1,520|1,028

723

706

115

:

...

TOTAL.

KAULUNG.

Children.

G.

No. of

Vessels.

Adults.

Children.

M

W.

B.

G.

No. of

Vessels.

Adults.

Children.

M. W.

B.

G.

302

28

21

22

81

...

543

75

53

64

46

47 713

46

55

35

107

578

161

151

118

89

316 1,102

384

387

9403,794 1,530 |1,344

334 |1,141 | 3,350 1,478 | 1,508 | 1,189

802

279

355

408.

254

237

...

734 1,328 1,097

906 777

2

4

1

473

356 562

435

364

20

33

19

23

17

70 122

86

77

...

14

81

1

97

...

-600

33

17

Šསྶཀ

71

3

11

5

7

6

44

207

45

43

29

5

...

...

8

7

36

2.

8

3

25

146

23

11

24

244

8

9

4

126

1,203

70.

66

31

251

279

274

;

8

14

13

...

1

10

56

.10

...

...

1

2

ཪྵཱ :7 :::

201

150 1,369

1,777 1,863 1,301

1,299

14

44

11

9

13

...

11

∙16

32 29

25

26

2

4

}

1

4

1.

1

1

24

160

10

56

:

...

:

I

NO 8,

20

11

12

རྨ ་་⇨

6

4

2

:

4,449 6,969 5,886 4,731

Victoria,

Shauki Wan,

Aberbeen,

Stanley,

Kaulung,

.

LOCALITY.

RETURN VIII B.

90 237 127 115 89 1,085 3,147|1,312 | 1,082

SUMMARY OF Return VIII A.

906 5,220

POPULATION.

Number

of

Total

Number

Adults.

Children.

Vessels.

of

Persons.

Males. Females. Males, Females.

2,685

8,088

3,574

31,64

2,389

17,215

643

1,457

928

802

641

3,828

717

1,520

1,028

723

706

3,977

90

237

127

115

89

568

1,085

3,147

1,312

1,082

906

6,447

5,220

14,449

6,969

58,86

4,731

32,035

386

RETURN IX A.

TOTAL NUMBER AND TONNAGE OF JUNKS ENTERED IN THE COLONY OF Hongkong, FROM 1881 TO 1890, INCLUSIVE.

Years.

1881.

1882.

1883.

1884.

1885.

1886.

1887.

1888.

1889.

1890.

:

Vessels. Tous. Vessels. Tons. Vessels. Tons. Vessels. Tons. Vessels. Tous. Vessels. Tons. Vessels. Tons. Vessels. Tons. Vessels. Tons. Vessels. Tons.

Junks in Foreign Trade, 24,339 1,680,025 25,231 1,805,390 24,258 1,851,239 23,473 1,687,594 23,674 1,797,222 22,971 1,752,868 23,521 1,793,923 23,958 1,863,968 22,926 1,716,922 23,512 1,795,261 Junks in Local Trade,... 4,467 139,365 5,378 175,488 5,429 177,680 5,225 164,300 4,958 162,939 4,929 157,909 4,309 141,306 4,324 136,016 4,031 135,551 4,506 163,594

Total,.

28,8061,819,35 2,028,919 26,957|1,8 28,806 1,819,390 30,609 1,980,878 29,687 2,028,919 28,698 1,851,894 28,632 1,960,161 27,900 1,910,777 27,870 1,985,229 28,282 1,999,984 26,957 1,852,478 28,018 1,958,855

|28,632|1,960,161| ,9001,910,777 870|1,985,229

10th July, 1891.

Years.

RETURN IX B.

TOTAL NUMBER AND TONNAGE OF STEAMERS AND SAILING VESSELS ENTERED IN THE COLONY OF HONGKONG, FROM 1881 TO 1890, INCLUSIVE.

1881.

1882.

1883.

1884.

1885.

1886.

1887.

1888.

1889.

1890.

Vessels. Tons. Vessels. Tons. Vessels. Tons. Vessels. Tons. Vessels. Tons. Vessels. Tons. Vessels. Tons. Vessels. Tons. Vessels. Tons. Vessels. Tons.

Steamers,

Sailing vessels,.

2,750 2,599,460 3,054 2,943,867 3,0123,215,569 2,9768,259,234 3,0843,632,051 3,9634,359,906 3,8904,468,302 3,660 4,416,000 3,669 4,398,142 3,989 4,791,839 464 253,819 383 226,976 387 234,859| 314 220,403 344 234,658 288 211,390 188 139,612 161 120,442 151 120,472 125 101,894

Total,..

42,868,2 3,170,943 3,290 3,479,687 1|4,671; 3,2142,853,279 3,437 3,170,843 3,899 3,450,428 3,290 3,479,687 3,428 3,866,709 4,2514,571,296 4,078 4,607,914

4,0784,607, 3,821 4,586, 3,821 4,536,442

8,820 4,518,61

3,820 4,518,614 4,1144,893,733

Harbour Departmeut, 11th July, 1891.

Wм. C. H. HASTINGS, Aoting Harbour Master.

387

RETURN X A.

CITY OF VICTORIA,

RETURN SHOWING THE AMOUNT OF ASSESSMENT IN EACH DISTRICT FROM 1881 To 1891.

$

$

$

388

District.

1881.

1882.

1883.

1884.

· 1885.

1886.

1887.

1888.

1889.

1890.

1891.

SA

**

No. 1 Kennedy Town,

J

11,610

12,400

13,985

13,060

12,790

....

"

2 Shekť'ong Tsui,

A

54,061

59,155

56,955

61,915

62,115

66,685

88,067

103,245

103,345

111,170

111,890

3 Saiyingpun,

B

429,697

487,765

493,780

490,321

493,912

502,225

550,895

562,770

620,825

723,056

681,283

4 Taiping Sháu,......

209,130

233,930

243,330

239,300

239,455

259,210

273,040

282,470

290,980

358,469

347,970

5 Sheung Wáu,

D

265,587

313,089

322,265

319,485

326,235

335,720

355,145

377,035

389,223

432,520

424,715

6 Chung Wáng

E

798,980

882,230

882,900

914,770

917,763

950,610

1,036,050 1,071,345

1,131,019

1,339,470

1,326,270

7 Ha Wán,

F

71,582

80,465

76,205

90,747

92,762

84,355

100,485

99,335

114,590

148,065

154,725

8 Wántsai,

وح

58,850

71,526

70,500

61,610

63,078

78,715

91,925

107,020

119,530

114,750

120,055

""

9 Bowrington,

H

11,915

11,355

20,595

26,200

27,664

32,480

43,565

42,580

42,580

43,925

42,805

10 Sòkonpò,

I

31,775

35,810

33,675

32,700

34,760

36,100

54,490

55,825

56,080

54,355

57,800

*

1,931,577

2,175,325 2,200,205

2,236,998

2,257,744

2,346,100

2,605,272 2,714,025

2,882,157

3,338,840

3,280,303

A Formerly District No. 1

C Formerly District No. 3

E Formerly District No. 5

G Formerly District No. 7

I Formerly District No. 9

B

2

D

4

F

H

8

"

"

""

"

""

>>

"

J Prior to 1887, Village.

Total,....

RETURN X B.

BRITISH KAULUNG.

RETURN SHOWING THE AMOUNT OF ASSESSMENT FROM 1881 To 1891.

Name of Village.

1881.

1882.

1883.

1884.

1885.

1836.

1887.

1888.

1889.

1890.

1891.

$

$

$

Hokün,

656

646

646

1,326

1,495

1,495

1,495

1,495

3,214

2,904

3,167

Hopui,

80

80

Hunghom,

18,694

18,801

18,801

21,516

26,065

29,665

52,360

52,360

81,505

77,190

75,837

Kaupui Shek,

72

84

84

108

24

24

24

24

100

100

60

Kun Ch'ung,

1,800

1,8:43

1,843

2,539

2,679

2,679

2,679

2,679

250

250

250

Kwolo Wán,

465

465

435

Kungkok,

10

30

30

66

66

66

66

66

Kaulung Point,

7,840

7,810

7,660

10,680

8,320

8,320

48,195

69,035

74,755

83,395

96,925

Mat'an Ch'ung,

451

451

451

574

563

563

563

563

956

956

1,068

Mat'aukok,

146

134

134

196

308

308

308

308

723

723

808

Mat'auwai,

1,129

1,211

1,211

1,312

1,336

1,336

1,336

1,336

1,991

1,991

1,902

Mati,

384

34

34

215

215

215

Mongkok,

446

458

458

348

430

430

430

418

1,074

821

846

Mongkok Tsui,

1,586

1,450

1,450

2,553

3,884

3,884

3,884

3,884

10,390

10,390

10,693

Ngamping,

20

20

20

Shamshuipo,

11,000

12,266

12,266

21,558

21,558

22,724

22,724

23,174

Shekt'ong,..

845

845

845

1,320

Tái Wán,

140

174

174

232

242

242

242

242

489

489

459

Táikok Tsui, .

11,301

11,177

11,477

1,326

1,527

1,527

1,527

1,527

4,418

4,419

5,657

Tókwa Wín,

7

Tókwa Wán Hill,

2,048

2,116}

2,854

2,919

2,919

2,919

2,919

4,218

4,218

2,116

3,782

264

264

264

264

264

545

545

465

Ts opaitsai,..

115

115

115

174

250

250

250

250

...

Un Chan,

46

46

46

48

48

48

48

48

135

135

115

Yaumati,.

23,613

21,868

21,892

22,741

31,070

33,430

30,975

30,975

37,170

44,097

42,385

TOTAL,.

.$

71,072

69,693

69,487

81,177

93,756

99,716

169,123

189,951

245,337

256,027

268,243

389

RETURN X C.

HONGKONG VILLAGES.

RETURN SHOWING AMOUNT OF ASSESSMENT FROM 1881 to 1891.

390

Name of Village.

1881.

1882.

1883.

1884.

1885.

1886.

1887.

1888.

1889,

1890.

1891.

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

Aberdeen,

20,252

20,338

20,338

20,492

20,492

17,618

17,890

17,890

18,351

18,351

Apli Chan,

3,020

3,142

3,142

3,745

3,745

3,460

3,460

4,784

4,934

4,934

19,053

4,929

Ch'ünlung,

161

161

171

Chunghom,

100

105

105

105

105

105

150

150

150

150

150

Deep Water Bay,

20

24

24

24

24

24

550

550

1,250

1,250

1,550

Hill District, (The Peak),.

10,374

18,212

13,212

17,592

18,972

20,825

34,490

43.710

59,516

71,536

101,510

Hok Tsui,

90

90

90

90

72

Henngkongtsai,

1,728

1,597

1,597

1,597

1,597

1,417

1,378

1,378

1,497

1,497

1,488

Hungheunglò (Whitfeild),

499

459

459

664

664

284

1,540

1,540

1,540

1,540

Kashin Wán,

30

36

36

36

36

Kailung Wán,..

25

28

28

28

28

28

...

Kennedy Town, (Lápsáp Wán),

4,125

4,015

805

4,613

7,133

7,133

...

Akungngám,

400

-140

449

590

590

596

671

671

531

531

516

One Tree Island,

500

500

500

Pakshui Wán, ...

15

15

15

15

15*

27

40

40

535

535

535

Pokfulam,

5,454

5,526

5,502

5,514

5,514

7,792

6,298

6,362

6,398

6,398

6,026

Quarry Bay,

15,000

17,064

20,520

32,646

32,646

32,646

32,646

34,506

Sai Wán,..

544

673

573

499

199

468

496

496

541

541

448

Saiwán Tsui,

12

12

12

12

12

Sant'sün,

710

711

711

749

749

795

773

773

590

590

590

Shanki Wán,

Shanki Wán West,

14,377

14,509

14,509

18,288

18,288

18,710

18,710

18,713

11,324

11,324

11,662

7,451

7,451

7,797

Shek-O,

1,107

1,107

1,107

1,023

1,023

881

881

1,792

1,778

1,778

1,078

Shuitsing Wán,

327

340

340

340

340

400

464

464

493

493

498

Sòkonpò, .

150

150

150

200

200

200

400

400

400

400

Stanley,

Táit'am,

Táit'amtuk,

Tóti Wáu, Tsat Tszmui, Tung'o Wáu,

Wongmakok.

3,085

3,815

3,355

3,384

3,384

2,880

2,727

2,727

2,650

1,805

1,618

268

290

290

290.

290

266

280

290

358

253

275

210

219

219

229

229

229

232

232

212

212

144

24.

25

25

25

25

25

25

25

25

25

25

452

485

485

645

645

824

844

844

801

801

811

95

112

112

120

120

· 108

108

108

108

Wongkok Tsui,

155

162

162

174

174

162

150

150

257

257

281

88

88

88

88

88

88

58

58

58

58

58

Wongnai Ch'ung,

2,550

2,726

2,702

2,959

3,061

2,796

3,000

3,000

2,185

2,260

2,290

TOTAL,......

.$

70,197

73,770

70,552

99,040

105,106

108,661

126,303

139,765

157,325

168,575

200,629

ཋཱར་

RETURN XI A.

SHOWING THE AGES OF THE RESIDENT CIVIL POPULATION, 20th May, 1891.

EUROPEANS AND AMERICANS.

391

5 and Under.

6 to 16. 17 to 20, 21 to 30. 31 to 40. 41 to 50.

51 to 60.

61 to 70.

71 to 81 to

80.

90.

91 to Not

100. given.

TOTAL:

495

783

347

982

707

492

214 ΤΟ

21

NATIONALITIES OTHER THAN EUROPEANS, AMERICANS AND CHINESE.

91

184

154

355

191

111

68

20

CHINESE.

10

:.

82

4,195

3

1

23

1,206

Victoria,... 7,049 16,650 13,302

Villages, 2,130 4,681 2,949

36,556 | 28,692 17,513 8,007 2,565 569

8,328 6,292 4,034 2,097 909

71

5

5,922 | 136,901

313 42

1

714 32,490

3

Victoria, Villages,

RETURN XI B.

NUMBER OF CHINESE FAMILIES.

14,120 3,229

Total,......

....17,319

RETURN XII A.

EDUCATIONAL STATISTICS.

NUMBER OF PERSONS ATTENDING SCHOOL ON THE 20TH MAY, 1891.

Class of School.

Government,

Roman Catholic, including Reformatory,

Hongkong Public School,

St. Paul's College, Mission,..

Church Mission Society,

Diocesan School,

The Baxter Vernacular Schools,.

London Mission,

Berlin Mission,

Basel Mission,

Wesleyan Mission,

American Board Mission,.

Victoria School,

Mrs. Hauce's School,

Private Schools

Districts 1-10,

Yaumati and Shauki Wán,

Kaulung Villages,.

15

TOTAL,......

Number of Scholars.

Number of Schools.

Total Number

Boys.

Girls.

of Scholars.

35

1,772

170

1,942

17

460

$35

1,295

22

22

1

42

10

360

200

560

1

.99

3

102

26

127

153

776

414

1,220

22

22

151

46

197

147

42

189

172

31

203

71

32

103

1

3

10

88

1,773

37

1,810

44

44

10

161

10

171

215

6.079

2,006

8,085

RETURN XII B.

NUMBER OF PERSONS OF SCHOOL-GOING AGE (6-16).

783

184

..16,65J

4,681

TOTAL,......

..22,298

Europeans and Americans,

Nationalities other than Europeans and Americans,.....

Chinese {

Victoria,

Villages,

:

392

Men.

RETURN XII C.

NUMBER OF PERSONS RETURNED AS ATTENDING SCHOOL, EUROPEANS AND AMERICANS.

Women.

18

24

Boys.

304

Girls.

Total.

220

566

NATIONALITIES OTHER THAN EUROPEANS AND AMERICANS.

Men.

Women.

Boys.

:

Girls.

Total.

ན་

5

3

49

30

87

CHINESE.

Men.

Women.

Boys.

Girls.

Total.

931

36

3,930

704

5,601

109

4

919

87

1,119

RETURN XIII.

CLASSIFICATION AND NUMBER OF PUBLIC AND PRIVATE BUILDINGS IN THE COLONY OF HONGKONG

AND BRITISH KAULUNG, 20TH MAY, 1891.

Victoria and

Peak.

Villages and Stone Cutters' Island.

Total in Hongkong.

Kaulung.

Public Offices, Barracks, Guard Rooms and other Government Buildings, Churches, Chapels and Places of Worship, British and Foreign, Government Schools, (including Grant-in-aid Schools), Mosques and Chinese Temples,

79

20

99

14

16

3

19

71

24

95

17

27

10

16

26

7

Houses and other Buildings Assessed at and above £100 per annum,

say, $600 value, occupied,

1,460

101

1,561

63

Shops and Private Buildings Assessed below £100 per annum, say, $600

5,935

1,395

7,331

1,665

value, occupied,

Houses untenanted,

230

150

360

145

Houses unfinished,

120

10

130

5

7,921

1,720

9,641

1,918

1

TOTAL,.......

MILITARY BUILDINGS.

Barracks,

Guard House and Prison,

Commissariat Buildings, Offices and Stores, &c.,

Staff and Married Quarters,

Batteries,

Nd

8

2

10

1

2

2

9

9

4

9

13

دن

TOTAL,.....

27

11

38

4

NAVAL BUILDINGS.

8

Workshops,

Offices, Quarters, Guard Rooms, Out-houses, Stores, &c., Hospital Buildings,

24

8

3

24

17

co

1

TOTAL,..

33

33

20

GRAND TOTAL,......

7,981

1,731

9,712

1,942

District.

RETURN XIV.

RETURN SHOWING THE NUMBER OF UN-OCCUPIED HOUSES IN EACH DISTRICT IN THE CITY OF VICTORIA FROM 1881 To 1891.

1881.

1882.

1883.

1884.

1885.

1886.

1887.

· 1888.

1889.

1890.

1891.

No. 1 Kennedy Town,.......

5

10

14

$4

19

2 Shekt'ong Tsui,

A

8

21

10

21

27

30

31

42

32

50

....

46

"

3 Saiyingpun,

В

55

170

110

97

38

32

4 T'aip'ing Shán,

C

9

65

.76

51

24

5 Sheung Wáng.

D

11

19

33

36

15

222

24

27

25

40

36

20

14

20

26

29

27

13

10

10

9

13

:

12

17

6 Chung Wán,

E

208

92

167

50

37

31

25

30

38

54

58

99

7 Ha Wáu,

F

28

4

32

2

2

:

10

20

24

35

29

"

8 Wántsai,.......

G

25

8

2

1

25

20

23

17

>>

9 Bowrington,

H

4

"

10 Sòkonpò,

I

1

:

:

:

3

:

4

1

2

1

2

1

2

10

1

...

1

3

6

2

TOTAL,..

349

371

444

259

146

131

127

188

196

252

230

A Formerly District No. 1

C Formerly District No. 3

E Formerly District No. 5

G Formerly District No. 7

B

2

D

4

F

6

H

""

""

""

""

""

""

""

""

I Formerly District No. 9 J Prior to 1887, Village.

393

*

394

Accountants,..

Apothecaries,

RETURN XV.

OCCUPATIONS IN VICTORIA AND VILLAGES.

Victoria. Villages. Total.

Victoria. Villages. Total.

Brought forward,

41,706

A

E

1,572

84

1,656

Earthen-ware and Porcelain Dealers,

48

1

49

12821

22

Eating House Keepers,

122

55

177

1.

19

Egg Sellers,.........

13

13

2

Engineers.

517

381

901

Excise Officers,

:

F

Architects,.

Artemisia Sellers,.

Artificial Flower Sellers,

B

Bakers,..

67

Bamboo-ware Dealers,

136

15

Farmers,

67 Fan Sellers,

151 File Cutters,

Makers,

"

Bankers,

Barbers,.

120

10

130

Fire-arm Dealers,

28

1,598

309

Betel-nut Sellers,.

Bird Sellers,

Bricklayers,

Barristers-at-Law,

Bean Curd Sellers,..........................................................................................

Birds' Nest Sellers,

Birds' Nest Cleaners,

Blacksmiths,

Boatmen,

Boat Builders,

Boat Breamers,

Boiler Menders,

Bookbinders...

Braziers,

Brick and Tile Sellers,

3

182

55

237 Fitters,

47

28 Firemen,

1,907 Firework Makers,

3 Firewood and Charcoal Sellers,

47 Fishermen,

...

****

2

2 Fish Mongers,

78

78

Fishing Hook Sellers,

41

41

Florists,

682

364

1,046

Flour Dealers,

91

100

Flower Sellers,

38

132

470

Foreign Goods Dealers,..

17

17

Fortune-tellers.

109

1,120

1,229

Frame Makers,

122

122 Fruit Dealers,

ཡཿཧྨཝཧྨ༤8བོཤྩ སྱཱ ཿཧྨ་ྲ

1,071

56

1,127

Furnace Makers,..

1,229

522

1,751

Furniture Dealers,

875

886

28

7

14

14

18

249

64

64

32

108

20

37

57

10

481

491

158

817

30

30

1

33

9

1

49

238

34

217

62

10

115

3

9

90

25

25

Fur Dealer,

1

Makers,

29

Bridal Chair Hirers,

G

Brokers,..

542

20

Brothel Keepers and Inmates,

1,154

69

Building Contractors,

72

Butchers,

56

2822

562

1,223

Gardeners,

74

Gas pipe Makers,

རྒུ་

21

37

58

1

1

...

12

68

Gelder,

1

1

Ginseng Dealers,..

16

16

Cleaners,

11.

11

c

Geomancers,

Cake Sellers,..

11

11

Glass Manufacturers,..

38

Makers,

Candle Makers,

Carpenters,

Carriage Makers,

Canvas Makers,

Carvers,..

Caulkers,

180

34

214

Glass Ornament Makers,

13

සහය

12

2

40

13

8

8

Glaziers,

14

14

4,149

1.436

5,585

Gold Dealers,

12

12

24

1

25

Gold Beaters,

88

88

5

5

Gold Rakers,

17

17

Grass Cutters,

24

75

2

77

161

49

210

Grooms,

32

$2

63

87

10

42

Chair Makers,

29

29

...

Chandlers,..

604

207

811

H

Cigar Makers,

61

61

Haberdashers,

Cinder Dealers,

1

1

Ham Dealers,

Cinnamon Dealers,

10

10

Hat Makers,.

Clerks,

1,277

19

1,296

Hawkers,

4,807

Clothiers,

43

***

43

Helmsmen,

Coal Dealers,

52

29

81

Herbalists,

Cobblers,

83

12

95 House Owners,

༤. ཀླངྒཱ ༠ སྨཱ ༢

:..

6

13

854

51 5,661

2

5

2

1

34

Coffee Shop Keepers,

8

:

Coffin Sellers,

I

1

Coffin Makers,

24.

24

:

Idol Makers,

14

Collectors of Old Wares,

123

26

149

>>

Opíum Dross,

34

34

Insurance Manager,

1

Compositors,

103

Compradores,

121

Confectioners,

Constables,

31

2 10 00

105

Agents,

3

126

Iron and Copper Dealers,

80

Iron Pan Makers,

10

34

Congee Sellers,.

22

22

Ivory Makers,

1

14

1

3

80

5

1

:

Coolies,

Coopers,

****

145 14,604 33

54

2,927

199 17,531

J

Cork Maker,

Cotton and Yarn Dealers,

Quilt Makers,

Cow Dealers,..........

Curio Dealers,

Chair Coolies, Cloth Weavers,..

1

63

38

40

66

9

1,126

31

33 Jade Stone Dealers,

63 Jinricksha Letters,

73 Joss-house Keepers, 9 Joss-paper Sellers,

1,126 Joss-paper Makers,...

35 Joss-stick Sellers,

Joss-stick Makers,

Dentists,

Detective Inspector,

Distillers,

Doctors,

Doll Makers,,

Drapers,......

Drill Instructors,..

Dried Bean Curd Seller,.

Druggists,

Dust Boat Owners,

Dyers.

65

2

:

520

83

232 188

463 Lacquer-ware Dealers,

3 Lamp Sellers,

42

107 Lantern Makers,..

2 Lard Dealers,

1 Leather Dealers,..

603

9

9

Box Dealers,.

Box Makers,..

""

92

15

107 Lemonade and Sodawater Manufacturers,

Carried forward,.

41,706

29

1

1

7

39

33

72

S

31

39

26

26

49

51

100.

255

261

D

K

9

1

10

Knife Grinders,.

5

1

1

17

17

L

387

76

29

Makers,

1

Makers,

23

17

834376

38

3

11

1

18

35

6

114

114

16

16

Carried forward,..

53,537

$

...

RETURN XV.,—Continued.

OCCUPATION IN VICTORIA AND VILLAGES.

Victoria. Villages. Total.

395

Victoria. Villages. Total.

Brought forward,..

53,537

Brought forward,..

65,367

Lime Burners,

5

62

67

Salt Bean Curd Sellers,

34

34

Linguists,

7

7

Dealers,

5

5

?"

Lodging-house Keepers,

29

2

31

Fish Dealers,

97

59

156

"

Lye Sellers,

1

"

M

1 Sandal-wood Dealers,

Sapan-wood Dealers,

21

21

Workers,

124

124

1

I

Workers,

44

44

Marble Workers,

7 Sauce Manufacturers,

25

76

101

Marine Delicacies Dealers,.

8

8 Scale Makers,

18

18

"

Store Dealers,.

56

56 School-masters,

198

61

259

Masons,

149

24

173 Seamen,

2,767

516

3,283

Mat Makers,

32

32 Servants,

6,072

778

6,850

*

Shop Keepers,

97

97 Sharks' Fin Dealers,

52

52

Bag Makers,.

782

55

837

Sheep Dealers,

15

15.

...

Bag Shop Keepers,

60

I

51

Shepherd,

1

1

***

Matshed Builders,

116

58

174

Ship Chandler,

1

1

Meat Vendors, .

364

68

432

Charterers,

17

17

"

Medicinal Pill and Powder Sellers,

3

3

"

Wine Dealer,

Merchants,

1,854

114

Midwives,

10

Milk Sellers,.

Musicians,

160

17

Money Changers,...

85

4212

Compradores,.

1 Shoe Sellers,

1,968 Shoemakers,

50

50

52

52

750

11

761

12 Shopmen,

12.803

2,419

15,222

177 Shroffs,

100

13

113

89 Silversmiths,

677

70

747

125

125

Silver Washers,.

1

1

Miners,

2

2 Slaughter-house Farmer,

1

1

Slipper Sellers,

5

5

N

Smelters,

3

1

Soap Manufacturers,

1

Newspaper Editors,..................... Nightmen,.

Night-soil Boat Owners,...

Net Weavers,

2

156

:

2

Spectacle Makers,

6

...

3

55

علم عمران

157

Spirit Merchants,

10

1

1

Stationers,

173

58

Steam-launch Owners,

6

Straw Shoemakers,.......

32

2621

12

179

33

1

Stone Farmer,

1

Dealers,..

27

79

•J

"3

"

Oakum Workers,

Oar Makers,

Oil Dealers,

Old Clothes Dealers,

Opium Farmer,

Dealers, prepared,

unprepared,

129

KONTAK

Boilers,.

Dross Sellers,

173

Overseers of Works,..

སྠཱ ༤ རྟྲྀ ཏཿ རྞ ཀྵ⌘ ཌཱུæ

2

12

14

Cutters,.

858

2,069

106 2,927

10

41

14

14

51 Story Tellers,

27 Storekeepers,

143 Sugar Dealers,.

9

9

29

68

97

8

2

10

1

Makers,

4

4

"

:..

9

40

*

Refiners,

3

23

53 Surgeons,

Sweetmeat Sellers,

48

21 50 00

2

48

7

180

23

91

T

P

Tailors,

3,344

Taouist Priests,

90

124 76

3,468

166

Paint Dealers,

2

8 Tea Dealers,

96

96

...

Gamboge Dealer,

"".

Pickers,

135

135

Painters,

750

321

1,071

"

Saloon Keepers,

27

13

40

Paper Box Makers,

34

34

Teachers of Shroffing,

10

10

...

Pawnbrokers,

60

17

77

Telegraph Operator,

1

Peppermint Oil Dealers,..

26

27

Theatre Lessee,.

1

1

Pewtersmiths,

139

139

Timber Dealers,

13

Photographers, .

61

61

Piece Goods Dealers,

213

11

Pig Dealers,

50

Keepers,

91

91 Tinkers,

""

Pilots,......

13

13

Tinsmiths,

224 Tobacconists,..

50 Tobacco Manufacturers,

Tobacco Pipe Makers,

500

77

74

4

32112

26

502

78

75

6

3

Planter,

1

1 Tooth Powder Dealers,

20

23

Play Actors,

183

183

Makers,

19

19

Plumbers,

90

2

92 Tooth Brush Makers,

1

Porcelain Menders,

45

45

Turncock..

Portrait Painters,..

153

1

154

Postmen,

36

36

Poulterers,..

197

197

Preachers,

19

Printers,

Privy Keepers,

Publican,

57

19 Umbrella Makers,.

57 Undertakers,

14

14

1

Pulley Makers...................

10

10

R

Vegetable Sellers,

Vermilion Dealers,........

U

256 21

1

14

257 35

V

80

3

3

115

115

21

6

:::

260106

82

Manufacturers,

Rattan and Rattan Chair Dealers,

90

2

92

Varnish Dealers,..

Makers,

946

946

Vocalists...

""

"

"")

Rent Collectors,

75

77

"1

Pounders......

Rice Dealers,

Roast and Dried Meat Vendors,

102

5

107

W

2,082

81

2,163

136

21

157

S

Sail and Rope Dealers, Salesmen,

Workers,

252 157

Carried forward...

18-

55

27

Ware-house Keepers,

Washermen,...

Watchmakers, .

Watchmen,

55 Water Sellers,

279 Wine Maker,

158 Wooden Box Makers,

46

46

669

37

706

91

4

95

126

17

143

230

4

234

1

1

40

40

65,367

TOTAL,

103,194

315

No. 25

91.

HONGKONG.

DESPATCH RESPECTING THE APPOINTMENT OF MR. TSO PING LUNG AS CHINESE CONSUL AT HONGKONG.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government, on the 3rd July, 1891.

HONGKONG.

No. 107.

SIR,

DOWNING STREET,

21st May, 1891.

With reference to my despatch No. 59 of the 26th of March last, I have the honour to inform you that the question of the appointment of a Chinese Consul at Hongkong has been further considered and, in view of representations made on behalf of the Chinese Minister at this Court, Her Majesty's Government have agreed to the appointment of Mr. Tso PING LUNG, at present Chinese Consul at Singapore, to be Consul at Hongkong, for one year, on the understanding that he should be withdrawn at the end of that time if the appointment should be found not to work well.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient

The Officer Administering the Government of

HONGKONG.

humble Servant,

KNUTSFORD.

..

;

:

HONG KONG.

No. 155.

403

No. 33

91

SIR,

HONGKONG.

DESPATCHES RESPECTING APPOINTMENT OF A CHINESE CONSUL AT HONGKONG.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Officer Administering the

Government, on the 15th October, 1891.

DOWNING STREET,

7 July, 1891.

I am directed by the Secretary of State to transmit to you for your information with reference to his despatch No. 107 of 21st May last the documents specified in the annexed Schedule, on the subject of the proposal to appoint a Chinese Consul at Hongkong.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient,

humble Servant,

The Officer Administering the Government of

}

HONGKONG.

(Copy.)

Date.

26 June

ROBERT G. W. HERBERT.

Description of Document.

Despatch from Foreign Office to British Embassy at Peking.

Foreign Office to Sir J. Walsham.

No. 54.

SIR,

FOREIGN OFFICE,

June 26, 1891.

With reference to my telegram No. 36 of the 24th instant, and to previous correspondence, I have to inform you that Sir HALLIDAY MACARTNEY recently called at the Foreign Office, and said that the difficulty with regard to the appoint- ment of a Chinese Consul at Hong Kong had not been removed.

He stated that the Yamen hal recommended the Emperor to refuse the offer of Her Majesty's Government to grant an Exequatur in the first instance for one year, on the ground that if it were withdrawn at the end of that period, the inci- dent would bear the appearance of a severe rebuff to the Chinese Government.

¿

:

404

"

:

Sir H. MACARTNEY asked if it would not be possible to withdraw the limita- tion, and to rely simply on the undoubted right of withdrawing the Exequatur if the Consul's conduct was found to give rise to objections.

The matter was carefully considered but it did not appear possible to with- draw the condition, which had been made with the view of meeting the objections raised to the appointment in the Colony, and of which the Governor had been offi- cially advised. Sir H. MACARTNEY was informed that Her Majesty's Government found themselves unable to depart from their previous decision and he then said that he was authorized in that case to state that the Chinese Government could not accept the condition, and would not make the appointment.

:

Sir JOHN WALSHAM, Bart.,

SIR,

&c.,

&C.,

PEKING.

&c.,

I have, &c.,

(Sd.)

SALISBURY.

DOWNING STREET,

17 July, 1891.

I am directed by the Secretary of State to transmit to you a copy of a Tele- graphic Despatch which has been sent to you this day.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient,

humble Servant,

The Officer Administering the Government of

ROBERT G. W. HERBERT.

HONGKONG.

Governor,

HONGKONG.

Chinese Consul proposal withdrawn deaconship hoddengray therefore leisurable roughdrawn contempers.

.

No.1

Despatch No. 229.

HONGKONG.

DESPATCHES RESPECTING APPOINTMENT OF A CHINESE CONSUL

AT HONGKONG.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government,

MY LORD,

on the 23rd November, 1891.

Officer Administering the Government to Secretary of State.

GOVERNMENT HOUSE, HONGKONG, 15th July, 1891.

I have the honour to acknowledge the receipt of Your Lordship's despatch No. 107 of the 21st of May stating that Her Majesty's Government had agreed to the appointinent of Mr. Tso PING-LUNG, Chinese Consul at Singapore, to be Consul at Hongkong for one year on the understanding that he shall be withdrawn at the end of that time if the appointment should be found not to work well.

X

2. With a view of making the announcement public I laid a copy of Your Lordship's despatch before the Legislative Council at its last meeting.

3. In the previous correspondence on the subject of this appointment Sir WILLIAM DES Vœux has referred fully to the objections which have always existed, and still do exist, on the part of the whole community of this Colony, and as it has nevertheless been decided to accede to the wishes of the Chinese Government I assume that what are deemed Imperial interests have in this matter over-ridden Colonial interests.

Under these circumstances I refrain from adding my adverse opinion of the advisability of the appointment to the protests which have already reached Your Lordship, and can only declare myself ready to carry out Your Lordship's instruc- tions in the matter.

4. There are, however, several points upon which I shall be glad to have Your Lordship's directions, viz.:-

The Right Honourable

(1.) What are to be the duties and powers of the Consul?

(2.) How will the position of the Registrar General be affected? Are the Chinese still to be taught to look upon him as the Protector of Chinese, or are they to be rather encouraged to place themselves under the protection of the Chinese Consul?

(3.) Is this Government to communicate in future with the Chinese Authorities through the Chinese Consul here instead of through Her Majesty's Consuls at the Treaty Ports?

At present this Government approaches the Viceroy of the Two' Kuang, resident in the neighbouring City of Canton, through Her Majesty's Consul-General at Canton, on all matters in which the assistance of the Chinese Authorities is required or on Chinese questions affecting the interests of the Colony. Similarly, the Government communicates direct with Her Majesty's Consuts at the Treaty Ports in China and with Her Majesty's Minister at Peking.

THE SECRETARY OF STATE FOR THE COLONIES.

426

4.) Under the Agreement of 1886, the Commissioner of Customs for the Kowloon District has supreme charge of the Revenue Cruisers of the Chinese preventive Service, and this Government corresponds direct with him on questions arising out of the administration of that service.

In future are such communications to be addressed to the Consul?

These are the principal points that occur to me on the moment on which are required definite instructions for the guidance of this Government.

5. I notice that the appointment of the Consul is to be on probation as it were for one year. With due deference I would suggest for Your Lordship's con- sideration whether it would not be more satisfactory to omit the mention of any limit to the time within which the appointment may be cancelled should it be found to be desirable that the Consul shall be withdrawn.

HONGKONG. No. 235.

SIR,

I have the honour to be.

My Lord.

Your Lordship's most obedient

humble Servant,

G. DIGBY BARKER.

Secretary of State to Officer Administering the Government.

DOWNING STREET,

1st October, 1891.

I have the honour to acknowledge the receipt of your despatch No. 229 of the 15th of July last, as to the proposed appointment of a Chinese Consul at Hongkong.

You are aware that the request for this appointment has at present been withdrawn by the Chinese Government, but I may state, in reply to the questions raised by you, that the duties and powers of any Chinese Consul would have been generally similar to those of the Consuls of other Nations; that the inhabitants of the Colony would still have been expected to look upon the Registrar General as the Protector of Chinese, and that the Colonial Government would have continued to communicate with the Chinese Authorities through Her Majesty's Consular Officers.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient

The Officer Administering the Government of

HONGKONG.

humble Servant.

KNUTSFORD.

223

No.

16

91.

:

HONGKONG.

RETURNS OF SUPERIOR AND SUBORDINATE COURTS FOR 1890.

Presented to the Legislative Council, by Command of His Excellency ·

the Governor, on the 30th April, 1891.

No. 43.

REGISTRY SUPREME COURT,

HONGKONG, 11th February, 1891.

SIR,-I have the honour to forward herewith the following Returns for the year 1890:-

1. Criminal Cases, &c. 2. Revenue, (Fees, &c.)

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

EDW. J. ACKROYD,

Registrar.

To Honourable F. FLEMING, C.M.G.,

Colonial Secretary,

&c.,

&c.,

&c.

RETURN of CRIMINAL CASES that have been brought under the COGNIZANCE of the SUPREME COURT, during the last Ten Years.

Charges Abandoned.

Postponed.

YEAR.

of

Number Number

of

Convicted. Acquitted.

Cases. Persons.

No. of Cases.

No. of Persons.

No. of Cases.

No. of

Persons.

:

3

2

1881,

105

154

111

1882,

124

187

124

38

(c.) 1883,

91

126

70

(d.) 1884,

68

101

65

1885,

91

147

103

88822

39

15

26

20

13486

4

21

1

28d

2

16

in wi

22

Total,

479

715

473

145

54

91.

09

3

5

(e.) 1886,

75

107

59

20

(f.) 1887,

94

155

82

1888,

101

186

99

(g.) 1889,

92

143

64

1890,

59

80

43

28442

16

27e

1

1

36

17

26

1

8

47

28

40

41

24

37

20

17

Total,

421

671

347

164.

92

147

2

Average of 1st

954

143

9433

29

10층

181

colo

1

Period, ....

Average of 2nd }

84층

134층

69/3/

32/

182

292

11

Period,....

c. In one case the recognizance estreated, this case is included in the total, but not in any other of the above headings. d. In one case the recognizance estreated, and one prisoner committed suicide in the Gaol.

e. In one case the recognizance estreated.

f. In three cases the recognizances were estreated.

g. In one case the recognizance estreated, this case is included in the total, but not in any other of the above headings.

Registry Supreme Court, Hongkong, 10th February, 1891.

EDW. J. ACKROYD,

Registrar.

.

J

-

224

SENTENCE.

RETURN of CRIMINAL CASES tried in the SUPREME COURT of HONGKONG during the Year 1890.

Number of Cases tried,

Number of Persons tried.

1

CRIMES.

:

...

...

2

...

...

...

...

...

1

1

CHARGES

CASES

ABAN-

POST-

DONED.

PONED.

1

...

2

...

1

1

1

:

:

:

...

112112

Arson, Assault,

Assault with intent to rob,

Assault occasioning actual bodily harm,

Bribery,

Conspiracy,

Demanding money,.......................................

Embezzlement,

1

Embezzlement by a servant,

Escape,

2

Feloniously assaulting,

~Hi Ni Nii Nii

2

2

2

***

...

1

...

...

2

2

Feloniously breaking and entering a dwelling house

and committing a felony therein,

1

1

...

1

1

Feloniously forging a certain order for the payment

of money with intent to defraud,

1

2

2

Feloniously obtaining goods by virtue of a forged

order,......

1

1

Feloniously setting fire to a dwelling house,

1

1

1

Feloniously shooting with intent to do grievous bodily

harm,

1

4

Feloniously and unlawfully taking away a child under

the age of 14 years,

4

3

Feloniously wounding with intent to do grievous bo-

dily harm,

3

Kidnapping,

al

foot pod pond ca pe pony food hand

Larceny,

1

1

Larceny and previous conviction,

7

8

Larceny and Receiving,

6

2

1

Larceny as a Public servant,

***

3

3

Larceny by a clerk,

1

Larceny by a servant,

1

Larceny in a dwelling house,.

...

2

Manslaughter,

1

Murder,

1

Obtaining money under false pretences,

Piracy,.

...

10

----

1

Robbery,

Robbery from the person with violence,

3

7

Stealing in a dwelling house with menaces,

1

***

1

Unlawfully being in possession of counterfeit coin, Unlawfully and maliciously inflicting grievous bo-

dily harm,

1

...

1

1

Unlawfully wounding,

1

52

63

No. of Persons.

1

...

...

1

3

3

on: ww⠀⠀⠀⠀

5

...

...

***

...

...

...

...

:

:

1

*

3

3

...

...

...

43

20

...

...

F.

...

:

:

:

1

3

1

1

...

...

...

÷

...

::

...

:

:

:

1 1

1

1

: ܩ: : :

...

1

1

...

...

...

3

1 3

:

:

...

...

...

...

...

25

18

3

7 17

80 Persons.

Of 80 Persons only

.....63 were tried.

17 were not indicted which are included under the heading of charges abandoned.......17

:

¿

EDW. J. ACKROYD, Registrar.

a. In this case the prisoner was convicted and sentenced to death, the sentence was commuted to imprisonment with hard labour for 20 years.

"

Registry Supreme Court, Hongkong, 10th February, 1891.

225

INDICTMENTS and INFORMATIONS in the SUPREME COURT of HONGKONG, for the Year 1890.

Including Attempts and Conspiracies to commit the several offences.

Showing how the cases tried in the

Superior Courts ended.

(Each prisoner tried, counted as a separate case; where a large number of Prisoners have been convicted together, the fact is mentioned in a note.)

Total.

Murder.

Manslaughter.

Attempt at murder.

Concealment of Birth.

:

Judgment for the Crown,

Judgment for the Prisoner,

Prisoner found Insane,.

Cases which fell through for want of prosecution or absence of accused, and cases thrown out by the Grand Jury (Attorney General),

Cases postponed,.

43

1

20

:

17

:

:

:

2

:

:

:

:

:

80

1

2

Abortion.

Rape.

Unnatural Crimes.

Robbery with violence.

Other offences against the Person.

Offences against Property.

Miscellaneous offences.

:..

:.

:

:..

:

:

:

:

:

:

:.

:

:

:

:

3

9 22

00

8

7

3

7

1

:

:

:

:

:

...

:.

5

4

:

.

:

8

10

17

33

17

Registry Supreme Court, Hongkong, 10th February, 1891.

EDW. J. ACKROYD, Registrar.

COMPARATIVE TABLE showing the NUMBER of OFFENCES, APPREHENSIONS, CONVICTIONS and ACQUITTALS

for the last Four Years.

The Number of Convictions in the Superior Courts,-

1. For Offences against the Person,

2. For Offences against Property,.

3. For other Offences,..

The Number of Persons Acquitted,- 2. In the Superior Courts,

}

1887.

1888.

1889.

1890.

34

12

18

13

37

57

40

22

11

30

6

36

47

41

20

EDW. J. ACKROYD, Registrar.

$ 4,686.67

5,875.97

954.85

768.31

RETURN of all sums received as REVENUE in the Registry of the Supreme Court during the Year 1890.

Registry Supreme Court, Hongkong, 10th February, 1891.

Original Jurisdiction,

Summary Jurisdiction,

Bankruptcy Jurisdiction,

.....

Probate Jurisdiction,......

Official Administrator's Commission,

Official Assignee's Commission,

Official Trustee's Commission,...........

Appraiser's Fees,.

Sheriff's Fees,

Bailiff's Fees,

Interest on Deposit of Surplus cash,

Fees on Distraints,

Registrar of Companies,

Land Office Fees,

4,740.01

1,247.16

268.90

4.00

293.00

1,600.50

4,975.80

1,968.50

2,980.40

$30,364.07

Registry Supreme Court, Hongkong, 10th February, 1891.

4,435.25

$34,799.32

EDW. J. ACKROYD, Registrar.

:

OFFICIAL ASSIGNEE.-5 per cent. on amounts encashed paid into the Treasury, OFFICIAL ADMINISTRATOR,

226

RETURN of all SUMS COLLECTED in the Registry of the Supreme Court for the Year 1890, and paid into the Treasury.

REGISTRAR.-Court Fees paid by Stamps.....

1889.

.$ 12,986.75

1890.

$14,254.30

2,737.84

1,247.16

921.30

4,740.01

OFFICIAL TRUSTEE.-2 per cent. on amount of Trust on taking over up to $10,000 above $10,000 commission 1 per cent. on further amount, 1 per cent. commission on income,..

1,993.03

268.90

Appraiser of INTESTATE ESTATES.-2 per cent. on Houses, Lands, Goods,

Furniture, &c., 1 per cent. on Cash, Banking Account or Shares,

12.00

4.00

BAILIFF,

SHERIFF,

1,436.50

1,600.50

224.50

293.00

REGISTRAR OF COMPANIES,

INTEREST on Registrar's Balance at the Bank,

FINE AND FORFEITURES,

6,370.62

2,980.40

4,299.47

4,975.80

800.00

$31,782.01

30,364.07

LAND OFFICE FEES,

5,203.00

4,435.25

$36,985.01

34,799.32

UNCLAIMED BALANCES under Ordinance 11 of 1888,

.$ 9,198.05

EDW. J. ACKROYD.

Registrar..

Registry Supreme Court, Hongkong, 10th February, 1891.

No. 113.

REGISTRY SUPREME COURT,

HONGKONG, 7th April, 1891.

SIR, I have the honour to forward herewith the following Returns for the year 1890:-

1. Probates and Letters of Administrations.

2. Bankruptcies.

3. Cases commenced and tried in Original and Summary Jurisdictions.

4. Appeals commenced and tried.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

The Honourable W. M. DEANE, C.M.G.,

Acting Colonial Secretary,

&C.,

Your most obedient Servant,

&C.,

&c.

EDW. J. ACKROYD,

Registrar.

}

227

CALENDAR of PROBATES and ADMINISTRATIONS granted by the SUPREME Court of HongKong during the Year 1890.

Date of

Name of Testator or Intestate.

Time and Place of Death.

Grant.

Probate, Administration with Will annexed, or Administration.

Name and Description of the Executor or Administrator.

Value of

Effects as set forth in the Commis- sion of Ap- praisement.

1890.

Feb.

4 Yeong Yuk Chi,

7 Li Shap,

7 Firmin Theobald Lerède,

8 Archibald MacClymont,

Canton, 7th July, 1889, Administration,

Honam. Canton,

Probate, 4th Jan., 1890, Vinto-Annam,

Administration, 16th Oct., 1888, Westminster, London,

Probate, 25th Dec., 1889,

Yeong Wong Shi, the widow, and Wong

Hi Kam, the eldest son, Wong Hin Wing, the executor,

24,000.00

2,700.00

Antonio Vizzavona, Acting Consul for

France, James Jardine Bell-Irving, one of the executors. Power being reserved of making the like grant to John Mac- Gregor, the other executor,

12,000.00

24.300.00

12 Thomas Truslow Phillips,

Mar. 4 Edward Byrne,

H'kong,

Kobe, Japan,

23rd Jan., 1890,

Do.,

Harry Haines and Alfred James Hadley,

executors,

7,712.40

Adm. with Expl.

Robert Lyall, attorney of Henry St. John

20th Nov., 1889,

>>

*

4 Cheong Tat Kwai,

Shaukiwan, Hongkong,

of the Will annexed, Probate,

Browne, the executor,

700.00

Wong Tai Kam, the widow and sole

26 Albert Jahreis,......

H'kong,

26 Marie Elise Fournier,..

H'kong,

""

28 Celestino Bartholomeo Almario,.

H'kong,

Apr. 11 Arthur Wagner,

H'kong,

13th Feb., 1890, 29th Jan., 1890, 3rd Mar., 1890, 6th Apr., 1885, 19th Mar., 1890,

executrix,

3,600.00

Administration,

| Official Administrator,

1,600.00

Do.,

Do.. Probate,

Do., Do.,

24,000.00

2,000.00

Mary Ann Wagner, the widow and sole

executrix,

10,200.00

35

19 John Wilson,

23 Thomas Ide Bowler,

Bearsden near Glasgow,

27th Oct., 1888,

99

""

26 Thomas Robert McBean,

""

30 Carl Friedrich Bertelsen,

11

30 Herrmann Paulsen,.....

May 13 Alexander Ross,

H'kong, 18th Dec., 1889, H'kong, 7th Apr., 1890. At Sea between Singapore

and Hongkong,

Do., Aberdeen, in Scotland,

19th Oct., 1888,

of the Will annexed, Administration, Do.,

Do.,

Adm. with Expl.

Official Administrator, until such time

as Mary Isable Wilson and James Wilson shall apply for Probate,

400.00

Official Administrator,

400.00

Do.,

200.00

Do.,

3,800,00

Do.,

Do.,

200.00

"}

14 Yeong A-tai....

Pak San, in China,

14 Shin Sun Hing,

Pun U, China,

19

""

14 Kaikhoorsboo Byramjee Mehta,. H'kong,

9th Feb., 1870,

23rd Mar., 1889, 27th Dec., 1889,

Adm. with Expl. of the Will annexed, Administration de bonis non, Administration,

Godfrey Cornewall Chester Master, at-

torney of John Gordon,

5,250.00

Yeong Koon Fong and Yeong Koon

Yune, sons,

30,000.00

Shiu Li She alias Li Suk, widow,

4,000.00

Do.,

Byramjee Kaikhoorshoo Mehta, eldest

son,

2,000.00

A

14 Wong Iu Chi,

Hoi Ping, Canton, in China,

Do.,

Wong A-shing, son,

300.00

20th Feb., 1883,

"

14 Wong Ping,

""

17

**

"

27 Ching Tsun,

Macao,

27 Eufemia Almario,

"

"

27 Ip Sam Tin,

July 9 Joseph Roze,

""

9 Keung Tim,

"

14 Lai Fong,

14 Lai Him King,

June 10 Ho Tsan Tz,

10 Fung U,

10 | Ng Kim Chung..

10 Nicholas Murion,

6th Apr., 1890, Canton, 20th Apr., 1890, Nam Po Villago, Canton,

6th Apr., 1890, Davington Hall in county

of Kent, England,

2nd Jan., 1890, 20th May, 1888, | Administration, H'kong,

4th Mar., 1890,

Do.. H'kong: 5th June, 1890, Probate, Tonkin, 8th Jan., 1890, | Administration,

H'kong, H'kong,

13th Apr., 1890,

Do.,

Lok A-chune, widow,...

300.00

24th Jan., 1888,

Do.,

Lai Chan Shi alias Chan Chiu, widow,

400.00

Sai Chiu, in Namhoi, China,

Do.,

Ho Pun Hing alias Ho Mun Fat,

Probate, Do.,

Hu King Tong, executor,

13,200.00

Wong She, the mother, and Ng She, the

widow, executrixes,

15,000.00

Adm. with Expl. of the Will annexed,

Charles Saner Powell, attorney of Her-

bert Murton and Daniel Addison Darling,

900.00

Sun On, China,

Do.,

Ching Oi Shan, eldest son, Joanna Matha Pinna, sister,.. Chan Shi and Lam Shi, executrixes, Thomas Henderson Whitehead, Tse A-fun, wife,

250.00

1,700.00

6,000,00

9,600.00

60.00

22 | Maximiano José d'Aquino,

H'kong, H'kong,

9th May, 1890, 19th Apr., 1890, 10th Mar., 1890,

Do., Probate,

Official Administrator,

20,000.00

João Caetano da Cunha, one of the exe- cutors; (the executrix Henduriges Fermina d'Aquino e Costa having renounced all her right and title to Probate of the Will,

40,000.00

* *

91

71

*

""

22 Francisco Sales Almario, 22 John Willmott,

26 John Wylie,

29 Lawrence Niven,..

29 Wong Tape,

Aug. 5 Alfred Lister,”.

H'kong, 1st Apr., 1890, Eastbourne, in Sussex,

England, 18th Oct., 1889, H'kong, 6th July, 1890, H'kong, 31st May, 1890,

Sun Ning, China,

6th June, 1890, Died on board S.S. Belgic,

outside the Port of Yo- kohama, 15th July, 1890, Bournemouth, Southampton,

England, 2nd July, 1889,

Administration, Adm. with Will annexed, Administration, Do.,

Probate,

Administration, | Official Administrator,

6 Alexander Newton,.....

"

6 Lee Yuen Hing,

>>

"

6 Henry Charles Haselwood,...

6 Seroomull Daulatram,

"

6 James Jones Skinner,...

H'kong,

H'kong,

Adm. with Expl. of the Will annexed, On board S.S. Tannadice, | Administration,

23rd July, 1890, Hiogo, Japan,

2nd Apr., 1888,

16th May, 1890,

12th Mar., 1890,

6 Pedro Payo, -

Adm. with Expl. of the Will annexed. Administration,

Adm. with Expl. of the Will annexed, Manila, 1st Jan., 1889, Adm. with Will

annexed limited to the Adm. of the Trust Estate of the Filipinas,

Wong King Ip, son,

Alfred Bulmer Johnson, attorney of

Henry Cecil Newton,

Li Char Shi, the lawful widow,

Godfrey Cornewall Chester Master, at- torney of Florence Ada Maria Hasel- wood,

1,100.00

Keeratmal Daulatram and Pohomall Dau-

latram, brothers,

3,800.00

George Lomer Tomlin, attorney of Arthur

William Gillingham,

500,00

nominal.

:

Alfred Bulmer Johnson, attorney of Eu-

genio Netter........................

|

Official Administrator,

2,500.00

Thomas Henry Talbot, attorney of Sarah

Ann Willmott, the widow.

6,000.00

Official Administrator,

500.00

Jeannie Groundwater,

1,000.00

4,000.00

800.00

16,400.00

400.00

:

A

228

CALENDAR of PROBATES and ADMINISTRATIONS,—Continued.

Probate, Administration

Date of

Grant.

Name of Testator or Intestate.

Time and Place of Death.

with Will annexed, or Administration.

Name and Description of the Executor or Administrator.

Value of Effects as set forth in the Commis- sion of Ap- praisement.

1890.

Aug. 18 Li Yuk Wan,

Canton,

28 Ngan Pui, .

"

28 Ho Kwai,

"

A

""

:

28 Chun Pat Nam,

28 Li A-tsat.

28 Yeung Hoi Cheung otherwise

Yeung Hoi Lit.

Sept. 8

Victor Bernard Candon,

Canton, 30th Apr., 1890,

Macao, 6th June, 1888,

Shanghai, 10th Nov., 1888,

H'kong, 26th Dec., 1889, Fuk Kin Province in China, 1st Nov., 1889, Haiphong, 9th July, 1889,

Probate,

24th Nov., 1889, Administration, Li Fung Shi, the mother of the deceased, for the use and benefit of Li A-hing, Li A-mui, and Li Sai Mui, children of the said deceased and until one of them shall attain the age of 21 years,. Ngan Pik Shan, Ngan Tsing Wa and Ip

Oi Shan,

4,000.00

14,700.00

Double Probate,

Adm. with Will annexed, Administration, Probate,

Administration,

Ho Lin Shing, Ho Lin Wong and Ho

Lin Fai, the other executors,

90,000.00

Chun Hi Hing, son and executor,

20,000.00

Official Administrator, Yeung Ki Yin, the sole executor,.

14,000.00

20,000.00

""

8 Chung Ying Choy,

Loi Su Village in the Dis- trict of Hok San, Kwong Tung Province, China,

Probate,

George Richard Stevens, person appoint-

ed to administer, Cheung Kam Tin, Leung Yuk Ming, Wong Sik Chuen and Fu Yap Lam, executors,

5,500.00

20,000.00

"

11 Lai Tong,

At Sea,

Oct.

3 | Apcar Gabriel Apcar,

H'kong,

>

8 Kwok Kai Tsung otherwise Tsze

Shut.

H'kong,

8th Jan., 1890, 19th May, 1890, 16th Sept., 1890, 16th Sept., 1890,

8

Ernest Edward Leslie Travers,... H'kong,

Administration, Do.. Adm. with Will annexed, 25th May, 1890, | Administration,

Sing Kam, the widow, Official Administrator, Kwok Kam Shing, son,

3,700.00

100,00

500.00

Arthur Kennedy Travers, attorney of

Rosamond St. Leger Shirley Travers,

the widow..

500.00

8

Chan Tso,

"

8

6th May, 1890, Tse Kwie aliás Cha Cha Kwei | Tan Tso, San Ui, in the Pro-

H'kong,

Probate, Administration,

Chan Leung Shi, the widow,

5,000.00

Official Administrator,

2,800.00

"

alias Tse Lung Wing.

8 Norman Curtis Stevens.....

vince of Kwong Tung, China, 26th June, 1890, Boston in America,

**

8 Henri Gustave,

H'kong,

13th June, 1890,

""

8 Don Antonio Pascual Casal,

Madrid in Spain,

Do.,

Do., Adm. with Will

Victor Hobart Deacon, attorney of Ellen

Maria Stevens,

2,500.00

Official Administrator,

200.00

""

14 Thomas McCracken,

21 William Buchanan,.

2nd July, 1884,

H'kong, 10th Sept., 1890, Shanghai, 16th Aug., 1890,

annexed,

Administration,

Francisco d'Assis Gomes and João Bap- tista Gomes, attornies of Don José Clavet, the executor,

3,000.00

John McCracken, son..

100.00

Do.,

Solomon Sassoon Benjamin, attorney of

Lina Buchanan, the widow,

8,200.00

""

21 Woo Young,........................

21 Lam A-cheung,

99

""

A

23 Yip Siu San,..

28 Henry Prince Tennant,

.....

Village of Sun Tsze Yuen, Hoi Ping, Kwong Tung, China, 7th Aug., 1890, On board S.S. Taichow, near Bangkok, 7th Sept., 1890, Loong Cheun Village, in the District of Wa Chau, China, 10th Feb., 1890, H'kong, 15th Sept., 1890,

Adm. with Will annexed,

Do..

Woo Kwan Shi alias Kwan Nin Tai, the

lawful widow,

2,600.00

Do.,

Ng A-ün.

250.00

Yip For Tai, son,....

8,600.00

Do.,

""

31 Joseph von Jezewski,.

31 Ho Foo...

""

**

31 Ng Chan,

Dec.

8

George Rennie Stewart,.

8

Li Sau Kiu,

":

8 Chan Kam Chuen,

11 George Kingston Barton,

H'kong,

Canton,

Drowned in the River of

Oder in Germany,

17th May, 1890, Canton, 24th Oct., 1889, Canton, 26th Aug., 1890, H'kong, 11th Oct., 1890, 17th Oct., 1890, 29th June, 1890, Fulbeck in the county of

Lincoln, England,

Administration,

Charles Stewart Sharp, attorney of Ro-

bert Richard Westall, executor, Official Administrator,

8,200,00

500.00

Probate, Administration,

Ho Kee Chu, eldest surviving son,

600.00

Ng Li Shi, the lawful widow,

500.00

Do.,

William Stewart, brother,.

1,000.00

Do., Probate,

Fan A-woon, widow,

2,300.00

Li Tak Pun, executor,

10,676.00

Adm. with Expl.

"

11

Chan Man alias Eusebio Leong,...

"

11

Maria Perpetua Reynard,

""

17 Edward George,

"

31 Dwight B. Bradley,

13th July, 1890,

On board S.S. Belgic,

13th Apr., 1890, Addiscombe, in the county of Surrey, England,

29th June, 1889,

H'kong, 7th Dec., 1890,

Northborough, Massachu- setts, in the United States of America,

3rd Sept., 1889,

of the Will annexed, Administration,

Herbert Maurice Bevis, Attorney of James Kingston Barton and Louisa Barton, executor and executrix,

18,000.00

Chan Wan Hing, nephew..

300.00

Do.,

Ernest William Rutter, attorney of Francisco Guilherme de Castro, the natural and lawful son of the de- ceased,

17,000.00

Probate,

Victor Hobart Deacon, one of the execu- tors. Power being reserved of making the like grant to Henry George, the other executor,

16,400.00

Adm. with Expl. of the Will annexed,

Joseph Anderson, attorney of Annie E.

Bradley, widow, .

2,000.00

Registry Supreme Court, Hongkong, 7th April, 1891.

EDW. J. ACKROYD,

Registrar.

:

RETURN of all BANKRUPTCIES filed in the Supreme Court of Hongkong during the Year 1890.

229

Official

Name.

Date of Adjudication.

or

Petitioner.

Creditor's Assignee.

Debts in Schedule.

Assets.

by

Official

Amount Total received amount

of debts

REMARKS.

Assignee.

proved.

Yeung Cho Chan otherwise Yeung

Sze Ching,

Luk Pak Shan,

Mak Tsun alias Mak Tsun Hing,.| Sune King alias Sune Tak Hing, Tsang Sam,

Li Chuk Kai,..

Pun Ki Kun, Ma Yau Shing and

$

13

6th Jan., 1890. 20th 1890. 24th Feb., 1890.

Creditor.

Official

>>

**

6,229.67 4,916.71

6.20

.99

Bankrupt

7,393.04 5,362.21 3,329.71

27th Feb., 1890.

Creditor Official

1,070.00 No Schedule filed.

90.89 7,097.32

1,428.67 20,990.47 No Schedule filed.

No Schedule filed. Petition dismissed.

Petition dismissed.

Fung Hing U,..

Leung Pai,

Lo Leung Hing,

Chan Chu Shan,

Up Sau Fung,

Joseph Reuben Solomon,.

Jejibhoy Cowasjee,

Wong Tsun Shing, Shiu Ling Kwong, So Lau, Chau Phi Ying, and Lok Fai Shing,....

John Francis Webber,.. Ebrahim Cassumbhoy,.

Yeung Sing Ho,

Su Chi,

Mak Yik Lam, Chan Wai Leung, Mak Kin Shu and Tsung Mong, Tam Yan Yuen alias Tam Ping

Kai,

Wong Chik Hing,.

Sung Yau Shi,

Lam Ping Shau,

James Edwards,

Hau Yuk U,

Secundino Antonio Noronha,.

William Goulbourn,..

Harry Lamb Stringer,

28th April, 1890. 28th 1890. 19th May, 1890.

"

""

11th Aug., 1890. 11th 1890. 2nd Sept., 1890. 2nd 1890.

32

6th Oct., 1890.

22nd Dec., 1890.

27th

1890.

"

"

"

Bankrupt Creditor Bankrupt Creditor Bankrupt

2,426.47 20,978.76 | No Schedule filed.

Not proceeded with.

Official

"1

13

23,534.31 15,920.50 21,168.44 7,292.13 65,270.30 | 62,107.71

376.20

551.61

3,556.23 3,257.34 34,013.01

Not proceeded with.

2,191.01

""

9th June, 1890.

Creditor

Creditors Bankrupt Creditor Bankrupt

Creditor

Official

Not proceeded with.

543.30 Adjudication against

Lok Fai Shing only.

368.26

"

1,168.80 No Schedule filed.

9,345.31 5,386.22

768.85

2,362.52

27

1,636.10 1,026.45

1,014.55

"

6,442.18. 4,109.02

137.46

3,550.06

38.81

17

1,589.03 No Schedule filed.

:)

Not proceeded with.

17th Nov., 1890.

Official

""

*

1st Dec., 1890. 8th 1890.

""

""

8th

1890.

""

Bankrupt Creditor

#9

40,638.24 10,120.00

2,167.51 14,841.17 | 24,814.02

2,200.00 No Schedule filed. 3,072.00

...

52.15

5,779.12

Not proceeded with. No Schedule filed.

""

22nd 1890. Bankrupt Official

7,233.38 8,664.68

29th

1890.

""

5,646.58 4,049.72

...

Total,......

.$ 219,099.48 |151,766.87 6,154.68 112,353.40

1890.

CASES COMMENCED.

:

JUDGMENT.

Settled or

Jurisdiction.

No. of Cases.

Debt and Damages.

withdrawn

before Trial.

Plaintiff.

Defend- Non-

ant.

or Dismis-

Suit.

Struck out,

sed or Lap- sed Writs.

In Dependency.

EDW. J. ACKROYD,

Registrar.

TOTAL CASES TRIED.

Cases.

Debt and

Damages recovered.

Original,........ 140 $555,058.74

12

35

1

3

89 39

Summary,

1,812 $406,348.80

672

645

88

98

7

318

72

122

750

$122,814.18

$114,023.54

EDW. J. ACKROYD,

Registrar.

;

;

:

:

:

--

230

1890.

CASES TRIED.

JUDGMENT.

Jurisdiction.

No. of Cases.

Debt aud Damages.

Struck out,

Plaintiff. Defendant. Non-Suit.

or

Original,

Summary,

;

Dismissed.

Debt and Damages recovered.

49a

$228,586.00

45

1

3

$132,593.64

1,096b

$165,927.60

669

102

7

318 $118,657.62

a. 10 of these cases were pending on the 31st December, 1889. b. 28 of these cases were pending on the 31st December, 1889.

1890.

EDW. J. ACKROYD, Registrar.

APPEALS COMMENCED.

JUDGMENT.

Respondent.

Pending.

No. of Cases.

Appellant.

6

4

2

No. of Cases.

Appellant.

¦

1890,

APPEALS TRIED.

EDW. J. ACKROYD,

Registrar.

JUDGMEMT.

Respondent.

Pending.

6

4

2

EDW. J. ACKROYD,

Registrar.

TOTAL

NUMBER

TOTAL

NUMBER

.OF

OF PRISON-

CASES.

ERS.

Convicted

and

Punished.

H

Discharged.

M.

F. M.

9,739 | 10,772 | 7,423| 317

F. M. F.

2,400 151 102

:

M. F.

15

...

:

Committed

for Trial at

the

Supreme

Court.

Committed

to Prison,

Detained or pending Orders [ of H. E. the

Governor.

To keep

the

Peace.

To be

of good

Beha-

viour.

Το

answer

any

ABSTRACT of CASES under COGNIZANCE of the POLICE MAGISTRATES' COURT during the Year 1890.

CASES, HOW DISPOSED OF, and the Number of Male AND FEMALE PRISONERS UNDER EACH HEAD.

Ordered to find Security.*

WRITS ISSUED BY THE POLICE MAGISTRATES DURING THE YEAR 1890.

Warrants.

Charge.

Witnesses preferring false Charge or giving

punished for

wilful false Testimony.

Undecided.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F. M.

F.

137

37

120

20

2

35

210,243 529 2,010

TOTAL MALES AND FEMALES,

* Consisting of Offenders not sentenced to Imprisonment.

.10,772

193

52

58

96

1,241

70

3,662

231

TOTAL

:

:

232

THE CASES CONSISTED OF :-

NO. OF

OFFENCE.

Animals-Cruelty to,................

Arms Ordinance-Breach of,..

Arson,

Assault-Common,

"

""

-Indecent,

-On Excise Officers,

-On Police in the Execution of their Duty, and

obstructing and resisting Police,

Brothels-Keeping an unregistered,

""

-With intent to rob,

19

to commit a felony,

"

-With wounding,

Pardon),

Banishment-Returning after (see also Conditional

Bank Note-Uttering a forged,

Births & Deaths-Breach of Ordinance for Registration of, Boats Cinder-Plying without a licence,

Boats, &c.-Leaving Harbour during prohibited hours,

-Leaving Harbour without a Clearance,

Boats-Neglecting to have the number of their licences

painted on...

"

-Refusing to accept Hire when unemployed,

Breach of the Peace,

Bribery,

Buildings-Breach of Ordinance for,

Burglary,

Building Domestic-Occupying without a certificate,

-Allowing children above 6 and under 15 years

of age to be in registered,

11

5

along the Praya,

22

22

No. OF.

No. of

CASES.

PRI-

SONERS,

OFFENCE.

CASES.

No. of

PRI-

SONERS.

15

15

Brought forward,...

3,661 4,473

49

49

Manslaughter,

7

7

3

3

Markets' Ordinance-Breach of,.....

287

287

615

3

3 Mendicancy,

2

59

1

3

1

30

ON 10 ∞ ∞ co

~ · -*- 22000 2

88

19

2

Murder,

4

1

30

845 Menaces-Demanding Money by,.

6 Milk-Adulterating,

10

10

32

Misdemeanor-Aiding and Abetting in,

Merchant Shipping Act-Breach of

Night-Found at, armed with Dangerous and Offensive Weapons, with Intent to break into Dwelling Houses,

#

-Found in Dwelling Houses by-with Intent toĮ

commit Felony therein,

>>

-Noises,

-Found in a Cabin by-With intent to commit

a Felony therein,

Nuisances-Blasting Stones to the danger of Persons

and Property,

-Breaming Boats,

-Exploding Dynamite to danger of Persons

and Property,

29

29

266

266

1

1

1

-Attempting to commit,

1

3

1

25

25

3

1

1

6

7

3

-Exposing Night-soil in the Streets in

uncovered Buckets, and in open Boats

13

13

-Hanging wet Clothes, &c., to dry over

12

12

1

1

Public Ways,....

"

Cattle-Maliciously killing of

1

1

"

Child Stealing,

14

24

>>

-Keeping Cattle without a Licence, -Leaving Holes unprotected in the Street, -Neglecting to clean out Dust Bins, and

1

1

1

1

Chinese Territory-Crimes and Offences committed in...

18

18

60

60

Coin-Offences relating to,

16

16

Conditional Pardon-Breach of......

1

I

>>

throwing Rubbish, &c., into the Streets, -Obeying Calls of Nature in the Streets, -Regulations-Breach of,

26

26

1

1

Conspiracy to accuse of Crime,

2

33

-Throwing Rubbish into the Harbour or on

to defraud the China Navigation Company (

by secreting passengers to Sydney,

the Beach,

127

127

"1

Contempt of Court,

8

""

Cutting and Wounding with intent, &c.,

26

36

-Irrigating,

--Disposal of Dead under Health Ordinance,...

Obstraction of Navigation,.

3

2

2

188

188

"

"

H. M.'s Army and Navy,

under,.

Embezzlement,

Embracery,

""

Convict Licence-Breach of,

Dangerous Goods Ordinance-Breach of,

Decoying Persons into or away from the Colony,

Desertion from Foreign Ships,

Disorderly Behaviour-Drunkenness, Fighting, &C..........

Disorderly House-Keeping a,

Dogs-Allowing unmuzzled ferocious, to be at large, &c., Domestic Servants-Misconduct as,.

Drugs-Administering,

Distraint for Rent-Fraudulently removing property

Escape of Prisoners from Chain Gang,

Extortion or Attempt to extort,.

Embezzlement by a Public Servant,

False Charge-Preferring or giving wilful false evidence,

Pretences-obtaining Goods and Money by,

-Aiding and abetting in,

Fire-Removing property from the scene of without the

orders of the Magistrates,

Gambling-Breach of Ordinance for Suppression of,..

-in the Streets, treated as Obstruction of

Public Ways,...........

1

77

22

22

12

16

of Roads and Streets, &c., by Hawkers,

Chair Coolies and Shopkeepers,. of Wharves by Boat People,

1,078 | 1,144

120 120

6

6

16

16

517

867

Opium Ordinances 1884 and 1887-Breach of, Passage-Obtaining surrepticiously a........

Passengers-Carrying in Excess of that allowed by

1,387|1,468

10

10

3

3

4

4

Licence,

43

14

132

11

11

Passes-Chinese out at Night without,

56

43

Pawnbrokers-Breach of Ordinance for,.

Pawning-Illegally,

Piracy,

Police-Rescuing Prisoners from Custody of,

22.14 t

Procession-Organising, Equipping or taking Part in-

without a permit,

Excise Officer-Without lawful authority assuming to

1

act as,

Quarantine Regulations-Breach of,

4 Rating Ordinance-Breach of,.

40

40

Rape,......

Felony-Attempting to commit,

36

36

Receiving Stolen Goods,

4

4

Recognisances-Breach of,.

"

Fire Arms-Discharging,

3

3

Robbery From the Person,.

Fire Works-Discharging,

332

332

Forgery,

Furious Driving,

Police Constables-Misconduct as,

Proclamation or Notice-Posting or Exhibiting in Chinese without Permission of Registrar Ge- neral,

CHLO

56

1

1

1

1

3

19

2

5

1

1

1

11

62

35

-From the Person with Violence, or with

Wounding,

Rogues & Vagabonds-As Street Gamblers and Watch-

FO-21 1

IL

--

62

1

20

20

35

3

6

8

19

19

222-

4

17

17

51

88

117

117

J

Gaol-Breach of Ordinance for,

2

2

Harbour Dredging at Anchorage for Ships of War in the,

Regulations--Breach of,.....

12

12

2

2

House Breaking,.

11

11

4

and Lewdness,.

Householders and Servants-Breach of Ordinance, for

Registration of,

Indecent Exposure of Person by Bathing or otherwise,

Larceny as a Bailce,

9

రా

Sanitary Regulations-Breach of,

3

22

22

Ships, &c.-Neglecting to have a riding light on board.... Shooting with intent to Murder,.

129

129

2

*2*

1

""

Police with intent to prevent lawful appre-

1

1

""

-By a Clerk,

6

6

hension,

"

-By a Public Servant,.

3

Spirit Licences Ordinance-Breach of

11

11

易多

-Common,

1,1161,219

Stamp Ordinance-Breach of............................

4

4

-from Ships or Boats in the Harbour,..

16

27

-from the Person,

185

178

**

-in a Dwelling House,

9

15

Streams-Defiling,

Stones and other Missiles-Discharging to Danger of

Persons and Property,.

6

29

29

-of Beasts or Birds, not the subject of Larceny)

9:

12

Streets-Noises by Hawkers,

76

76

at Common Law,

Ships-Leaving Harbour without a Certificated Mate,

1

1

??

-of Vegetables and Fruits from Gardens and

enclosed places,

6

6

Trees, &c.-Cutting and destroying,

108

108

Trespass on Crown Land,..

93

93

Letters-Wrongfully delivery of,

2

Tramways Ordinance-Breach of,

4

4

Malicious Injury to Property,

23

23

Unlawful Possession of Property,..

296

340

"

to Electric or Magnetic Telegraph,

1

"

of Trees, Shrubs, &c.,

58

58

Carried forward............................

3,6614,473

Carried forward,...

8,501 9,526

men to Gamblers,

"

-As suspicious Characters,

87

87

""

-As Vagrants,

14

14

"

-Wandering abroad and lodging

in the open air,

10

10

وو

争要

-Exposing for sale indicent Pic-

tures,

1

1

Recreation Ground at Taip'ingshan-Breach of Regu-

lations for the Maintenance of Good Order at the,

CASES,- Continued.

233

Unlicensed-Hawkers,

OFFENCE.

Brought forward,

No. op CASES.

No. of PRI- SONERS.

No. of

OFFENCE.

No. of CASES,

PRI-

SONERS.

8,501 940

9,526

Brought forward,..

9,531 10,556

940 Vehicles-Breach of Ordinance for,

106

106

"

-Passage Broker,...

2

2 Watchmen--Misconduct as Private.

3

3

"

-Plying of Boats for Hire,

76

Unwholesome Food-Keeping, Selling or exposing for Sale, or bringing into the Co- lony,

12

12

76 Weights and Measures-Breach of Ordinance for,

Women and Female Children-Breach of Ordinance)

for protection of, Workmen-Intimidating,

74

74

20

28

5

5

Carried forward,..

9,53110,556)

TOTAL,...

9,739 10,772

Magistracy, Hongkong, 12th January, 1891.

H. E. WODEHOUSE,

Police Magistrate, for the Police Magistrates.

ABSTRACT of CASES brought under COGNIZANCE at the POLICE MAGISTRATES' COURT during a period of

Ten Years, from 1st January, 1881, to 31st December, 1890, inclusive.

CASES, HOW DISPOSED OF, AND THE NUMBER OF MALE AND FEMALE PRISONERS UNDER EACH HEAD.

Years.

Total Number of Cases.

Convicted and Punished.

Discharged.

Committed. for Trial at Supreme Court.

Committed to Prison

Ordered to find Security.

Pu nished for

Preferring

Total

or detained

pending Orders of To keep the Peace,

False Charge Undecided.

His Excellency

or giving

to be of Good Beha-

False

Number of Defendants.

the Governor.

viour, and to answer

any charge.

Testimony.

1

2

3

4

5

6

8

9

10

11-

12

13

14

15

16

17

M.

F.

M.

F.

. M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M. F.

M.

F.

1881,

8,203 7,049 333 1,678

173

192 48

369

65 34

6

53

ها

5

9,379 630

1882,

7,567 6,049 394 1,922 255

259

17

36

263

100

13

4 80

7

8,622 780

1883,

10,653 8,127 670 2,398 349

121

8

37

1

154

1884,

14,065

1885,

11,7481,088 2,294 268

10,281 7,951 849 2,188 258

101

19

2

35

3

228

26

62

6

Co

160

11

***

11,003 1,101

53

6

2

105

2

14,517 1,418

159

N

11

CO

357

99

18

10,690 1,211

1886,

14,611❘ 12,081 842

2,198 190

157

2

5

869

100 32

122

3

168

...

15,510 1,137

1887,

12,015 10,354 325

2,620 159

158

9

28

H

411

52

1222

14

48

...

13,633 549

1888,

11,647 9,700 232 2,704 145

168

6

98

11

177

15

3

48

2

12,898 411

1889,

1890,

8,670 6,626 268 2,319 178

157

10

44

10

303

34

17

64

3 9,530 503

9,739 7,423 317 2,406 151

102

15

259

59

3

:

35

2 10,243 529

Grand T-tai

for the 10 107,451 | 87,108 5,318 22,727 2,126 Ye.rs,

Average per

Year,

1,574

104

313

35

3,390

639

134 15779 32116,025 8,269

10,745.1 8,710.8 531.82,272.7 212.6

157.4

10.4

31.3

3.5

339.0

63.9 15.4

1.5 77.9 3.2 11,602.5 826.9

Magistracy, Hongkong, 7th January, 1891.

H. E. WODEHOUSE, Police Magistrate, for the Police Magistrates.

234

י

MAGISTERIAL ENQUIRIES INTO DEATHS.

TABLE A.-RETURN OF ALL DEATHS REported duriNG THE YEAR 1890.

Formal Enquiries held.

Buried without Formal Enquiries.

NATIONALITY.

Very much

Men. Women. Boys. Girls. Total. Men. Women. Boys. Girls. decomposed,

Total.

sex not ascertainable.

Europeans and Americans,

11

11

8

Japanese,..

1

7

8

23

10

1

1

2

West Indians,

1

Indians and Malays,....

1

1

2

3

Armenian,

1

1

Chinese,.....

54

8

8

9

79

75

8

61

58

8

210

Total,

69

15

8

9

101

84

11

62

60

Total for 1889,

58

7.

6

LO

LO

5

76 114

16

65

62

10

225

5

262

-

:

A

TABLE C-RETURN OF BURIALS WITHOUT FORMAL ENQUIRIES DURING THE YEAR 1890.

Europeans

& Americans.

Reason why no Formal Enquiry was held.

Men.

Women.

Men.

Chinese.

Women.

Boys. Girls.

Japanese.

Women.

Indians.

and Very much

Malays.

Boys.

Men.

Girls.

de-

composed; Total.

sex not ascertain-

able.

Found on

Land.

Known.

No suspicious circumstances,...

No evidence and/or decom- posed state of Body,

Post Mortem satisfactory,

5

20

1

66

2

:

3

1

7

Total,..

8

со

.

2

75

8 26

35

20

338

:

1

:

:

***

1

2

co

:

130

609

83

12

10

Found in Harbour.

32

46

365

:

17

:

:

21

126

37

co

8

61 58

1

1

1

2

8

225

70

78

17

58

Magistracy, Hongkong, 7th January, 1891.

H. E. WODEHOUSE, Police Magistrate.

¿

i

TABLE B.-RETURN OF FORMAL Enquiries DURING THE YEAR 1890.

FINDING.

Accidental death,

Do.,

-The Jurors consider that the officials in charge

of the work were to blame in allowing so much earth to be placed against the wall,

Accidental drowning,

Congestion of the lungs,.

Death by drowning,

Death from hemorrhage,

Death from natural causes,

Men.

Men.

Men.

Wo-

men.

Men.

Men.

...

Death from syncope,

Death from strangulation,

Death from injuries received from a fall or other causes,

Death by misadventure,

Death from hanging, the deceased having hanged himself by his

own wilful act,

Death from burning or from injuries received during a fire in No. 68, Bonham Strand West from which they were unable to escape,.. Death resulted from injuries, received from an accidental fracture

on the leg,

Death from accidental explosion of a six pounds Hotchkiss shell; as to the possession of which by the deceased there is no satisfactory evidence forthcoming,.. Death from the collapse of a wall underneath which the deceased

was buried,

Death from blood poisoning occasioned by a wound on the foot, Death resulted from a wound in the head occasioned by a shot from a fowling piece, self inflicted during a temporary aberration of the reason, Deceased met with his death from haemorrhage occasioned by

ruptured spleen which was caused by a kick,

Deceased died from hemorrhage of the arterios in front of the brain which pressed upon the brain and produced compression such haemorrhage resulting from a mortal gunshot wound wilfully inflicted upon the deceased by himself, Deceased died from the effects of a wound self inflicted while under

treatment for an attack of ague on board H.M.S. "Meeanee,”. Deceased died from the effects of a fall occasioned by her throwing

herself out of the window in a state of insanity,

...

...

...

:

:

...

Men.

Chinese.

235

Wo-

men.

Boys.

Girls.

17

10

1 5

3 1

1

Total.

++

4

29

1

:

1

I 2

4

1

1

7

7

1

1

1

1

...

1

...

1

:

:.

:

1

::

:

:

::

:.

:

:

:

:.

::

:..

:

:

:

:

::

:

::

:

:

:

:.

:

:

::

1

:

:

1

2

1

-:

1

1

2

1

1

1 1

1

:

:

:

:

***

:

:

:

:

:

:

...

:

:

:

:

::

:

:

1

3

1

...

1

2

2

Died while bathing.

1

Died from the effects of a fall in Hung-Hom Docks while painting

a ship,

Death from suffocation,

1

Do.

Felo de se,

Found drowned,

1

While in an unsound state of mind,

3

The deceased on the 6th day of July in the year 1890 did feloniously

kill and slay himself,

1

...

The deceased died by cutting her own throat,

The deceased died by cutting his own throat,

The deceased met with his death by hanging, such hanging being

the act of his own hand wilfully committed,

The deceased died from the effects of an explosion on board a Chinese Junk at Cap-Shui-moon while being searched by the Chinese Customs officials in Chinese waters,

The jury found that deceased died from dysentery and were of opinion that the continued deprivation of proper food to which in their opinion the deceased was subjected greatly aggravated the disease from which he died,................

Wilful murder against some person or persons unknown, Wilful murder against one Tsang Li,

:

:::

1

1.

1

1

...

Total,...

11 1

:::

::

3

::

7

1 1

1 54

::

1

1

...

1

1

1

...

8

5

...

...

2

:

:.

:

:

CC

8

1

10

-1

1

1

1

131

3

8 9101

:

1

به

147

No.

01.

HONGKONG.

REPORT OF THE GOVERNMENT CENTRAL SCHOOL FOR GIRLS FOR 1890.

Presented to the Legislative Council, by Command of His Excellency the Governor, on the 10th April, 1891.

No. 6.

EDUCATION Department, HONGKONG, 17th January, 1891.

SIR, -I have the honour to forward the Report of the Government Central School for Girls, and to inquire if His Excellency the Governor considers the School of sufficient importance to sanction a public prize giving and, in that case, to honour the School by presiding on the occasion with Lady DES VEUX, considering that the first establishment of this School is due to His Excellency.

2. I enclose the Report of the Head Mistress Miss WARD, and whilst fully endorsing her remarks, beg to add that the result of the examinations which I conducted was highly satisfactory in all respects, and that the recommendations which Miss WARD makes will be attended to by me and submitted to the Government in specific form as soon as an opportunity offers for improving the location of the School without exceeding the Estimates for the year. Although the School has certainly prospered during the first year of its existence and under adverse circumstances, it would be premature at present to say that the School had ceased being a mere experiment and to pronounce it an accomplished success with sufficient confidence to warrant for the present any increase of expenditure for house accommodation.

3. The Estimates for 1891 provide the sum of $15 for prizes and this sum will be distributed among the most deserving children in the form of presents as the Head Mistress may deem best. But I beg to be informed whether the School which now consists of 45 girls, some Europeans, many Eurasians (in European dress) and a few Chinese, is considered by His Excellency of sufficient import- ance to justify the School being honoured by His Excellency or Lady DES Vœux, presiding on prize giving day, or whether the prize giving should be held in private until the School has assumed larger dimensions.

I have the honour to be,

The Hon. F. FLEMING, C.M.G.,

Colonial Secretary.

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

E. J. EITEL, Inspector of Schools.

REPORT. 1890.

GOVERNMENT CENTRAL SCHOOL FOR GIRLS.

To His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government.

SIR,-I have the honour to submit to you the First Annual Report of the Government Central School for Girls, for the year 1890.

I.-Resumé of the School's Aims and Progress.

This School was opened on March 1st, 1890, for the purpose of providing an ordinary middle class English education for the daughters of European, Indian and Chinese residents in this Colony.

The staff consisted of:-

1. An English trained certificated Mistress.

2. An Assistant Mistress (Chinese).

3. A Teacher of Chinese.

In the first month 34 pupils were enrolled, and at the end of December there were 45 children in regular attendance, shewing a net increase of 11 during the ten months, March to December inclusive,

1

148

The average attendance in March was 27, whilst that for December was 40, which shows a greater improvement in the regularity of the attendance than in the increase of pupils.

Subjoined is a list of the averages for March-December.

March,

April,

May,

June,

.27

.29

.29 ...38

July, August, September,

..34 ......31

.36

October, November, December,

...39

....42

..40

In August Miss MANN resigned her duties as Head Mistress of the School. Steady though slow progress has been made throughout the year and we may confidently look forward to a large increase of numbers at the new year.

I-Work of the Year.

The School is in two divisions, Upper and Lower. The former consists of the more advanced English-speaking girls and these are taught by the Head Mistress, receiving instruction in :-Reading, Arithmetic, Composition, Grammar, History, Geography, Drawing and Needlework.

The study of Chinese is optional.

The Lower Division is in charge of the Chinese Assistant Mistress by whom they are taught English Reading, Writing and Arithmetic.

II.-Suggested Improvements.

The surroundings of the present School premises militate strongly against the chances of success in attracting the daughters of Europeans. The school is situated in an uninviting neighbourhood, sur- rounded by Chinese houses it is inconspicuous, and has no open space which can be utilised as a play ground.

Internally the premises also are inconvenient: it is difficult for the Head Mistress to supervise the younger classes, as they are on a lower floor, and the upper classes under her direct training are in separate rooms, which is an unsatisfactory arrangement. If two large rooms on the same level in a better neighbourhood could be obtained, there is no doubt that the number of pupils would quickly increase, and the work of the School could be carried on with greater efficiency.

2. Although the present staff is quite adequate for the scholars now in attendance, it is advisable that an English girl should be obtained as a pupil teacher who could be trained to assist in the work of the school while at the same time continuing her own education.

A girl brought up in the school would be a much more valuable teacher than one unaccustomed to school routine.

3. In English schools, increasing attention is now paid to physical training and exercises, and in nearly all the large Board schools some system of drill is in use. If the suggestion as to more convenient school premises can be carried out, it would be practicable to take up a modified form of Swedish drill, such as is given in the London Board schools, and which forms a pleasant change from the ordinary routine of school work, at the same time counteracting the tendency to stoop, induced by long hours in a sitting position. In the present building, such exercises can not be given, owing to lack of space, but there is no doubt that, if the school is removed to more convenient premises, some system of drill can be introduced, which will add to the happiness and well-being of the children and the popularity of the school.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your obedient Servant,

MARY E. WARD.

149

No.

8

91.

HONGKONG.

ANNUAL REPORT OF THE ACTING HEAD MASTER OF THE VICTORIA COLLEGE

FOR 1890.

Presented to the Legislative Council, by Command of His Excellency the Governor, on the 10th April, 1891.

No. 12.

VICTORIA COLLEGE,

HONGKONG, 22nd February, 1891.

SIR,-I have the honour to forward the Annual Report on this College for 1890.

1. The total number of boys on the Roll during the past year was 1,075, being 156 more than the previous year. The number of days during which the school was opened was 236. This is three days more than the previous year, and considering that two extra days were granted by His Excellency The Administrator at the usual Tsing Ming holidays on account of the visit of Their Royal Highnesses, THE DUKE DUCHESS of CONNAUGHT, and further that the school had to be closed one day in July owing to inclement weather, this number may be considered good.

2. The following tables will illustrate the condition of the school during the last five years :-

1

1886, 1887,

1888,

1889, 1890,

1886,

1887,

1888,

1889,

1890,

YEAR.

Total Number of Scholars.

Number of School Days.

Monthly Enrolment.

Average

Daily Attendance.

Maximum.

Minimum.

610

238

507

419

446

601

234

525

417

449

634

229

536

384

467

919

233

789

466

597

1,075

236

860

683

758

YEAR.

Number of School Boys Examined.

Average

Percentage of Passes.

School

Actual Nett

. Fees.

Expenditure.

$

Expense of each Scholar per Average Daily Attendance.

.405

94.81

5,422.00

11,680.41

26.17

384

97.65

5,547.00

11,872.70

26.40

445

94.15

6,899.00

12,384.14

26.48

676

95.41

9,338.00

15,018.20

25.11

692

89.45

11,912.50

19,222.46

25.34

3. During the last year there were on the Roll 941 Chinese and Eurasians, 23 English, 8 Hebrews, 10 Japanese, 37 Mahometans, 45 Portuguese, 2 Parsees, 3 Germans, 5 Spaniards and 1 Siamese. These different races are mingled together in the various classes, and notwithstanding the great variety of creeds and races, the harmony of the school is very seldom disturbed by any differences between them.

4. In accordance with the notification mentioned in the Head Master's Report last year, the curriculum of the First Class has been somewhat altered. General Reading, more Grammar and Composition lessons were introduced into the Time Table, and Latin, Chemistry, Drawing, Book- keeping, Mensuration and Trigonometry were made Optional subjects. Of these subjects Mensuration, Drawing, and Book-keeping were taught hour on Mondays and Thursdays during morning school and the other subjects during the afternoon-Chemistry being taught on Mondays and Thursdays, Trigonometry on Wednesdays and Latin on Fridays. Of the subjects taught during the morning, the majority of boys chose Book-keeping; only four took Mensuration and two drawing. As I could

i

150

not give the services of one master to teach two boys drawing, I was compelled to withdraw this subject and the two boys joined the Book-keeping class. Of the four who took up Mensuration only two returned after the Mid-summer holidays, and another change was necessary. As I considered Mensuration of more practical use than Trigonometry, I discontinued the latter, and a class for Men- suration was held during the afternoon on the same day that that for Trigonometry had been held. Thus Book-keeping only was taught during the morning, and that to the whole class.

5. It was stated last year that gymnastic appliances would, in the course of the year, be erected in the covered play-ground to give the boys an opportunity of developing their physique. There is however I think a certain amount of danger attached to the use of gymnastic appliances without the supervision of an instructor, and so those appliances have not been put up. I hope however that some kind of drill will be instituted this year which will be of greater benefit to the whole school than gymnastic appliances which I fear would be but very little used by the Chinese.

6. A slight change has been made in the staff during the year. Mr. HASELDEN resigned and Mr. G. A. WOODCOCK was appointed to fill the vacancy. In April last, the Head Master, Mr. WRIGHT, went home on leave to take a well-earned holiday; and in June Mr. JAMESON also had leave of absence; and thus we have been working with a reduced staff of European Masters for half the year.

7. With reference to the Pupil Teachers, two of the three have, since June, been acting as Chinese Assistant Masters, and so have not been able to attend any class of instruction-save that on school management-yet one of them, LEUNG LAN-FAN, has passed the Oxford Local, and obtained the title of Associate in Arts.

As the Monitors are not articled, they are frequently leaving for more lucrative employment, and thus there are constant changes in the Normal class, which make good results in an examination an impossibility, and further, as Mr. JONES who has had charge of this class has pointed out to me, these changes make the teaching a thankless task.

}

8. This year nine pupils went in for the Senior Oxford Local, of whom three passed. Two being under the age of 19 years were declared Associates in Arts, and the other one gained his certificate.

9. The following are the results of Examinations just held. There were 692 boys examined of whom 619 passed, which gives a percentage of 89.45, and though this is lower than in previous years, yet considering that many promotions were made after the Mid-summer Vacation to allow new boys to enter, and as thus very many boys had only six months to get up their work in, I consider the results on the whole satisfactory. To particularise, the work done in classes IA, IIB, IIIA, and the Preparatory School in general, deserves special mention; while that of IB, and IIIB is far below the

average.

10. Of the boys who have left during the past year, 3 have entered the Colonial Service, 11 the Chinese Imperial Customs' Service, 38 have obtained employment in the various firms and private offices in the Colony, and 25 have gone, under Foreign employ, to the Coast Ports. A good many boys have left school without assigning any reason, but from what I can gather the two chief causes seem to be inability to pay the fees, and change of residence. Unless a boy is leaving to go into some office, for which he requires a certificate, it is a very difficult matter to get from the Chinese the actual cause of a boy's leaving.

11. In conclusion I must take up the strain of Mr. WRIGHT's last year's Report and express the gratitude of the Masters and the boys to all who have so generously provided prizes for the encourage- ment of our scholars.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

The Honourable F. FLEMING, C.M.G.,

Colonial Secretary, &c., &c., &c.

Your most Obedient Servant,

ALFRED J. MAY,

Acting Head Master.

!

January, February, March,

April,

May,

June,

July,

August,

September,

October,....

November,..

December,

1890.

VICTORIA COLLEGE.

Number

Month.

of Scholars.

Number of Attendances.

Number of School Days.

151

Average Daily Attendance.

683

6,617

10

661. 7

890

11,683

14

834. 5

881

20.336

25

813.44

867

12,016

15

801.06

857

19,776

25

791.04

820

17,964

24

748. 5

785

18,422

25

.736.88

756

5,122

7

731.71

818

13,237

17

778.64

809

19,482

26

749.31

775

17,993

25

719. 6

752

16,326

23

709.81

Total,........

178,974

236

Total Number of ATTENDANCES during 1890, Number of SCHOOL DAYS during 1890,

Average DAILY ATTENDANCE during 1890,

Total Number of SCHOLARS at the School during 1890,

.178,974 236

.758*364

1,075

AVERAGE EXPENSES of each SCHOLAR at Victoria College during 1890.

Expenditure, Deduct School Fees,....

Total Expenses of the College,

Average Expenses of each Scholar per Number on Roll,

"

""

per Average Daily Attendance,

ALFRED J. MAY,

Acting Head Master.

$31,134.96 11,912.50

·

$19,222.46

.$17.88 25.34

ALFRED J. MAY,

Acting Head Master,

:

:

i

:

:

287

HONGKONG.

THE EDUCATIONAL REPORT FOR 1890.

No. 23

Laid before the Legislative Council, by Command of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government,

on the 19th June, 1891.

91.

No. 57.

EDUCATION DEPARTMENT,

HONGKONG, 30th May, 1891.

year 1890.

SIR, I have the honour to present herewith the Annual Report on Education for the

2. GENERAL EDUCATIONAL STATISTICS.--The total number of Educational Institutions of all descriptions, known to have been at work in the Colony of Hongkong during the year 1890, amounts to 223 Schools with a grand total of 9,644 scholars, constituting a decrease of 37 scholars as compared with the preceding year. More than three-fourths of the whole number of scholars, that is to say 7,659 scholars, attended Schools (114 in number) subject to Government supervision and receiving Government aid in some form or other. The remainder, viz. 109 Schools with 1,985 scholars, are Private Institutions entirely independent of Government supervision or aid, except that those few which are not kept for private emolument are by law exempt from payment of rates and taxes.

3. GENERAL STATISTICS OF SCHOOLS UNDER THE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT.-Apart from the Police School with 390 scholars (viz. 31 Europeans, 217 Indians and 142 Chinese,) and the West Point Reforinatory with 99 scholars (72 Chinese and 27 non-Chinese), both of which Schools are exempt from the control of the Education Department, the total number of Schools, subject to Government supervision and examination, amounted in the year 1890 to 112, as compared with 63 in 1880, and 24 in 1870. The total number of scholars, enrolled in these Schools during the year 1890, amounted to 7,170 as compared with 3,886 in 1880 and 1,302 in 1870. It appears therefore that the number of Schools and scholars under examination by the Inspector of Schools has been nearly doubled within the last ten years. There has been an increase of 39 Schools and 2,584 scholars during the ten years from 1870 to 1880, and an increase of 49 Schools and 3,284 scholars during the ten years from 1880 to 1890. We have therefore evidence of a satisfactorily steady increase of Schools and scholars from decade to decade, which increase followed in the wake of the annual increase of the population.

4. PROGRESS DURING THE LAST THREE YEARS. Applying the same comparison to the last few years, it appears that the number of Schools and scholars under the supervision of the Education Department rose from 97 Schools with 6,258 scholars in 1888, to 104 Schools with 7,107 scholars in 1889 and to 112 Schools with 7,170 scholars in 1890. It will be seen from these figures that, although there was a steady increase of Schools under Government supervision from year to year, yet the annual increase of scholars has fallen off, from 849 in 1888 to 63 in 1890, that is to say the attendance was unusually bad in 1890. The peculiar unhealthiness of the year, and especially the prevalence of influenza at the beginning of spring and the long continuance of fever among children, are the principal- causes of this extraordinary decrease of attendances.

5. COMPARATIVE STATISTICS OF GOVERNMENT SCHOOLS AND VOLUNTARY SCHOOLS.-Of the 7,170 scholars in 112 Schools under examination by the Inspector of Schools, as many as 4,656 scholars attended 76 Voluntary Schools established by the local Missions, both Protestant and Catholic, whilst 2,514 scholars attended 36 secular Government Schools. The latter are so distributed all over the Colony that in every district there is at least one secular Government School within easy reach of any parent objecting to send his children to denominational Christian Schools. Such objections are, how- ever, extremely rare, for, as a general rule, the Chinese, indifferent as to the religious influences of the Voluntary Schools, look to the personal character and scholastic competency of the teacher rather than to the christian or secular character of the School.

6. SITUATION OF SCHOOLS.-The above-mentioned 112 Schools under the supervision of the Education Department are scattered over all parts of the Colony. In the District of Victoria, there are 71 Schools with 5,856 scholars. The villages of Hongkong are provided with 24 Schools attended by 789 scholars, whilst in the villages of Kowloon there are 17 Schools with 525 scholars. Where the population is densest, as in Saiyingpun, Sheungwan and Chungwan, the Schools are placed most closely together, but even in the Village Districts there is no hamlet, be it ever so small, that has not a School within easy reach. Every village with a population sufficient to send 20 children to School has a school of its own. The only drawback is that the School-houses are, with rare exceptions, badly suited for the purpose and do not afford sufficient accommodation for the number of children who ought to go to school.

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7. EDUCATIONAL EXPENDITURE OF THE GOVERNMENT.-The sum total spent by the Government in the year 1890 for educational purposes ($68,194.75), amounted, after deducting the school fees ($12,113.00) paid into the Treasury, to $56,081.75. The principal items included in this sum are the following:-Victoria College $19,222, Grants-in-aid (including Building Grant) $19,332, Government District Schools $7,046, Government Girls School $2,459, Inspectorate of Schools $4,377, Govern- ment Scholarship $1,187, Student Interpreters $520, etc. The foregoing expenditure, compared with the expenditure of the preceding year, constitutes a moderate increase, caused principally by additions to the salaries of the staff of Victoria College, by the establishment of a new Girls School, and by increase of Grants given to Voluntary Schools. But this whole increase has its deepest source in the natural extension of the educational movement which is irresistibly pushed forward by the urgent demands of a growing population, increasing from year to year in its appreciation of the value of education as well as in sheer numbers. The total educational expenditure of the year 1890 amounts to $7.34 per scholar, so far as the Government is concerned. But Schools like St. Joseph's College, the Italian Convent, the Diocesan School, the Hongkong Public School, the Church Mission Home and Orphanage, the Berlin Mission and other Mission Schools, doing sound educational work for the benefit of the community, incurred additional educational expenditure, not included in the foregoing figures, and amounting (as will be seen from Table XI appended to this Report) to $60,646.51, that is to say to $41,909.39 over and above the Grants-in-Aid ($18,737.12) paid to those Schools by the Government in February, 1890. The cost to Government of the education provided by the various classes of Schools under the supervision of the Government varies widely. Each scholar in average attendance educated in Victoria College cost the Government in 1890, $25.34, at the Government Girls School (being in its first year and charging only half fees) $70.49, at the Government District Schools $8.88, at the Grant-in-Aid Schools $5.62. Nothing can be plainer than the fact that the system of payment by results, as applied to the Grant-in-Aid Schools of Hong- kong, is very much cheaper, whilst equally effective, and to parents more satisfactory, than the system of Government Schools. The Grant-in-Aid system of Hongkong, essentially differing in some points from the scheme in force in England, commends itself, by the smoothness, cheapness and effectiveness of its working, more and more, from year to year. In view of the annual increase (by immigration from the mainland) of our population, and the consequent annual increase of our educational needs and expenditure, a definite policy concerning educational expenditure is an absolute necessity. I am decidedly of opinion, and I have continuously urged it upon the Govern- ment during the last eight years, that we ought to follow in Hongkong the leading principles adopted in 1883 by the Indian Government, which, declaring the elementary education of the mass of the people the principal object of the Education Department, offered to hand over any of its Colleges or Schools (devoted to secondary education) in suitable cases to bodies of local educationists willing to undertake their management under the provisions of the Grant-in-Aid system. The Royal Commis- sion on Indian Education (1883), made the following suggestions, clearly applicable to Hongkong. "Secondary education in any district should be left to the Grant-in-Aid system" (Report, p. 414): "No direct departmental effort should be made in the field of secondary education" (Report, p. 415). "The discontinuance of any general system of education, entirely provided by Government (that is by Government Schools) is anticipated with the gradual advance of the system of Grants-in-Aid, but the progress of education is not to be checked in the slightest degree by the abandonment of a single school to probable decay." (Indian Education Dispatch, 1854, quoted in Report, p. 23.) "All Directors of Public Instruction should aim at the gradual transfer to local (native) management of Government Schools giving secondary instruction," (Report, p. 596). "The fact that any (Government) School giving secondary education raises more than 60 per cent. of its entire expenditure from fees, should be taken as affording a presumption that the transfer of such school to local management can be safely effected." (Report, p. 467.) "A periodically increasing provision should be made in the educational budget for the expansion of Aided Institutions." (Report, p. 583.) The proportion of educational expenditure to general revenue is an important consideration. I find that in 1881 to 1882, (no later data being at hand), the Government of Bombay spent on education (after deducting all school-fees, but including cost of school-buildings), 23.2 per cent., Madras, 14.3 per cent., and Bengal, 6.98 per cent. of its total revenues. In 1889, the Colony of Mauritius, with a revenue of Rs 87,44,864, spent on education (exclusive of Buildings) Rs 4,05,021 or 4.6 per cent. The Government of the Straits Settlements devoted, in 1888, out of a revenue of $3,858,108, the sum of $143,109, or 3.7 per cent. to the current expenses of the Education Department (cost of Buildings not included). The Colony of Hongkong, having a revenue of $1,995,220, spent in the year 1890, as above stated, the sum of $56,081 on the ordinary purposes of education (exclusive of Buildings), being 2.8 per cent. of the total revenue.

8. NATURE OF THE EDUCATION GIVEN.-We have in Hongkong the following distinctions. There are, in the first instance, Schools giving a Chinese education in the Chinese classical language. In 1890, there were as many as 86 such Schools at work under the Education Department, (28 Government Schools and 58 Grant-in-Aid Schools), giving to a total of 3,955 scholars, the kind of education which an ordinary Village School anywhere in the Empire of China gives, but with the addition (in the case of 28 Government Schools with 862 scholars) of the rudiments of Arithmetic and Geography, and (in the case of the 58 Grant-in-Aid Schools with 3,093 scholars) with the further addition of Christian teach-

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ing. The teachers of these Schools are all Chinese and have not had any professional training. We have further a few Schools (in 1890, 3 Schools with 219 scholars), which give to Chinese children a Euro- pean Christian education in the Chinese language, (Hakka and Punti). The instruction given in these Schools, which partly avail themselves of the use of the Romanized system of writing Chinese, adds, to the subjects taught in the preceding class of Schools, the further subjects of Arithmetic (up to decimal fractions) and Ancient History. These Schools are partly taught by Europeans and partly by Chinese teachers who have had a European training. A third class of Schools (in 1890, four in number, with 280 scholars) are devoted to giving a Christian education in the Portuguese language to Portuguese children. These Schools, taught by European ladies, who (with one or two exceptions) hold certificates of some European Government, teach, in the Portuguese language, the ordinary subjects of an elementary English education. The next class of Schools consists of 8 English Schools with exactly 700 scholars, all under the Grant-in-Aid Scheme. These Schools give to English and Portu- guese children (including a few Chinese), by the instrumentality of trained European teachers, an elementary English education in the English language, but the highest class or classes in each of these Schools superadd the principal subjects of an English secondary School, viz.: Algebra, Physical Geo- graphy, Music and Needlework in the Girls Schools, and Physical Geography, Algebra, Euclid, Lite- rature, Mensuration and Book-keeping in the Boys Schools. Some Schools add to the foregoing list of secondary subjects special lessons, as for instance Latin (Hongkong Public School), French and Geometrical Drawing (St. Joseph's College), French and Freehand Drawing (Victoria English Schools). Finally we have a class of Schools which combine with the aim of giving an elementary English education in the English language the endeavour to keep up also the previous attainments of their scholars in the classical Chinese language, giving thus an Anglo-Chinese education by English methods of tuition. In 1890, we had 14 Schools of this class, attended by 2,016 scholars of Chinese or Eurasian extraction. Three of these Anglo-Chinese Schools (with 364 scholars) are Mission Schools, the remainder (with 1,652 scholars) are Government Schools, but only three out of these fourteen Schools (Diocesan School, Victoria College and Government Girls School) are taught by trained teachers. The Vietoria College and the Diocesan School are the only Anglo-Chinese Schools which combine, like the above mentioned English Schools, with the advanced subjects of a secondary English education, also the ordinary subjects of elementary English and elementary Chinese Schools. To the ordinary sub- jects of a secondary English School, the Diocesan School adds Animal Physiology, Geometrical and Prospective Drawing and Book-keeping, whilst the Victoria College adds Latin, Mensuration, Chemistry and Book-keeping. The Victoria College, St. Joseph's College, Diocesan School, Hongkong Public School and the Victoria English School prepare candidates for the Oxford Local (both Junior and Senior) Examinations. There has been a visible tendency of late, in the case of St. Joseph's College, Diocesan School and Victoria English Boys School, to turn the secondary education they are giving into the distinct channel of a commercial education, whilst the Victoria College and the Hongkong Public School seek to combine commercial and classical teaching.

9. FEMALE EDUCATION.-Three causes have hitherto been at work retarding the expansion of female education in the Colony and preventing its keeping pace with the education of boys. In the first instance, the Chinese population of the Colony consisted for three or four decads of our Colonial history almost exclusively of men whose families (if any) were left on the mainland of China. In the second instance, the Chinese, though anxious to have their boys taught to read and write, because aware of the commercial value of such knowledge, did not until lately see why their daughters should go to school at all. In the third instance, there is a large class of purchased servant-girls (of school- going age) and Eurasian girls whom servitude and the stigma of want of respectability, combined with popular prejudice, seek to keep out of the education net. These three factors, hostile to the spread of female education, are to a certain extent still at work in the Colony, but year by year their effect becomes weaker. It is still a fact that the main body of our population consists of working men, either unmarried or having their families on the mainland, but the number of Chinese families. permanently settled in Hongkong increases steadily from year to year. It is still true that most Euro- pean families, that can afford the expense, send their children to Europe to be educated there, but the number of those that cannot afford it is on the increase. As to Chinese indifference to the value of school-education for their daughters, it is rapidly vanishing, as the needlework instruction, gratui- tously added to the programme of the Girls Schools, has introduced a commercial value. But whilst freely sending their sons to English Schools and gradually learning to appreciate the value of the education given in Chinese Girls Schools, they cannot as yet see why their daughters should learn English. Finally, as regards the pariahs of local society, the Registrar General has of late made valuable efforts to bring home to the Chinese families, in which purchased servant girls are employed, their moral obligation of providing these girls with an education, and the establishment of the Government Central School for Girls has given a first impetus to the education of Eurasian girls. The net result of this general movement in the matter of female education is exhibited by the subjoined Table, shewing the proportion of boys and girls under instruction, in schools subject to the supervision of the Government, during the last ten years. It will be seen from this Table that, while there was in the year 1890 but a very slight increase of scholars (63) as compared with the year 1889, and a decrease of boys (145), ` there was an increase of 208 girls under instruction in the year 1890, and that, whilst in 1880, among every

hundred scholars under instruction, there were only 18 girls, there were, in 1890, 32 girls in every hundred scholars in school. This is nothing to boast of, for it shews that female education is

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still in a backward condition, but it is clear that there is steady progress and room for the hope that the proportion of boys and girls under instruction will soon attain to its normal figure.

PROPORTION of Bors and GIRLS under instruction in Schools under the supervision of the Government, 1880 to 1890.

!

Year.

1880,

1881,

1882,

1883,

1884,

1885,

1886,

1887,

1888,

1889,

1890,

}

Boys.

Girls.

Total.

3,187

699

3,886

3,364

859

4,223

3,941

1,241

5,182

4,120

1,477

5,597

4,238

1,647

5,885

4,329

1,700

6,029

4,161

1,683

5,844

4,195

1,779

5,974

4,342

1,916

6,258

4,991

2,116

7,107

4,846

2,324

7,170

10. SCHOOL ATTENDANCE.-The rule in force in Hongkong, as regards the number of attendances required to entitle Schools to receive a grant from Government, has been changed at the close of the year 1890. The rule, taken from Foster's Education Act of 1870, was that each scholar for whom a grant is to be paid must have gained at least 200 daily attendances of four hours each. This rule was changed in England within a few years after its introduction, as it was found to leave an insufficient margin for sickness and other natural causes always interfering with the regularity of attendance at school. But in Hongkong this rule remained in the Code in spite of repeated protests, until 1890. The rules at present enforced in England require that each School should be open 200 full days, and each scholar should attend for 22 weeks (say 132 days). The Grant-in-Aid Scheme of Ceylon states that no grant will be allowed for any scholar, who shall have received less than nine months' instruc- tion during the twelve months immediately preceding the examination in the School in which he is. examined and who shall have made less than 100 attendances. The rule at present in force in Sin- gapore is that the School shall have met not less than 200 times in the course of the school-year and that no scholar can be presented who has attended less than 100 days in the course of the school- year. The former Hongkong rule, which pressed hardly on European girls and on Portuguese scholars, owing to the trying climate of Hongkong, and which made it impossible for the Grant-in-Aid Scheme to be applied to the fishing population (the children of which go to sea during the fishing seasons), has been changed by the literal adoption of the rule in force in Singapore. The consequence of this. change is that the principal incentive to falsification of the daily attendance list has been removed, that there is hardly any temptation now to bring undue pressure to bear upon weakly children to compel them to make up 200 attendances at the expense of their health, and that Grant-in-Aid Schools have now a definite prospect of success among the village and boat population.

11. RESULTS OF ANNUAL EXAMINATION.-As far as the 76 Grant-in-Aid Schools are concerned, the detailed results of the annual examination of these Schools will be found summarized in Table XIV appended to this Report, where the percentage of scholars passed in each School in 1890, is stated and compared with the results of the preceding year, and in Table XV, which records the percentage of passes gained by those Schools in each subject. As regards the Government Schools, the reports of the Acting Headmaster of Victoria College, and of the Headmistress of the Government Central School for Girls have been published in the Government Gazette, and the Government District Schools will be found classified and arranged, in the order of their efficiency, in Table X, appended to this Report, which Table embodies the results of the annual examination of these District Schools. I subjoin, how- ever, some critical observations as to those examination results which have not yet been sufficiently brought forward.

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12. VICTORIA COLLEGE.-The Acting Headmaster has pointed out in his report that the percent- Lage of passes

obtained at the last examination (89.45) was lower than in previous years, that the work done by Classes I. B and III. B was far below the average, but that the work of Classes I. A; II. B; III, A and that of the whole Preparatory School deserves special mention. Although I do not attach very much importance to the average of passes, considered by itself, as it is influenced from year to year by varying special circumstances, I agree with the Acting Headmaster, in view of other things I noticed in the course of the examination and especially after comparing the examination papers of Victoria College with those of other Anglo-Chinese and English Schools, which compete with the College, that the general result of last year's examination has not been altogether satisfactory. Con- sidering that Victoria College has decidedly the best and largest staff in the Colony, the best and largest accommodation, abundance of school materials (provided at a cost of over $2,000 a year), and that it is, by its independence as to the matter of school-fees, in a better position to enforce strict dis- cipline than private institutions whose existence largely depends on the fees and favour of scholars and parents, one might expect that the results obtained by Victoria College should be above those which I find from year to year in similar Anglo-Chinese and English Schools. I believe that Victoria College is on the whole still the best School of its kind in the Colony, but I also see indications which make me believe that it is in great danger of falling behind in the keen race of competition now going-

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on in Hongkong, and that, unless the staff of Victoria College make a special effort and put on a spur, St. Joseph's College and the Diocesan School and perhaps even one or two other competing institu- tions will outstrip the Victoria College in the matter of efficiency and results. My reasons for this fear are as follows. The English Reading, which was very good in one or two classes of Victoria College, was, at the last examination in quite a number of classes below the average of similar Anglo-Chinese Schools, and some of the classes are moreover too large to admit of the possibility of giving an all round effective reading lesson. The Composition papers of the whole College were hardly equal to the average results of similar Anglo-Chinese Schools in the Colony. Now, Reading and Composition results, taken together, are the only means we have of forming an estimate of what the attainments in English Speaking probably are in the case of the scholars. A gentleman, who for the last twenty-five years has taken a prominent place in the educational movement in India, visited lately the several classes of Victoria College, and, comparing its methods with those of similar institu- tions in India, pointed to the apparent insufficiency of efforts in the direction of imparting a command of conversational English as the principal defect of Victoria College. Another point which I noticed in comparing the examination papers of Victoria College, with those of other Schools is that the hand- writing of Victoria College is decidedly inferior and indicates a deficiency as to the time and attention devoted to the subject of Copy writing, which has a strong practical bearing on the future commercial usefulness of the scholars of Victoria College. I am aware that the foregoing defects almost disappear from sight when contrasted with the excellent results obtained at the last examination of the College in most of the higher subjects (among which the Chemistry papers stand out most prominently), shewing solid and effective teaching in the majority of classes. There is, however, a further point which I think it my duty to draw attention to, in order to stimulate the energies of the staff of Victoria College. A School like this, which is so splendidly equipped, which can draw upon the publ'e exchequer to the extent of over $30,000 a year, and upon which the Government has annually been spending as much money (even apart from cost of buildings) as on the whole of the 76 Grant-in-Aid Schools, such a School surely ought to take a foremost place in all the public educational competitions of the Colony. When Governor BOWEN established that magnificent Government Scholarship, worth £200 per annum for four years. it required an effort to dissuade him from confining competition for that scholarship to scholars of Victoria College, because he assumed that it would furnish competitors enough. Now, the first Government Scholarship was indeed gained by Victoria College in 1884, but at the contest for the second Scholarship in 1886, Victoria College failed, and in the third and fourth competitions conducted by the Cambridge Syndicate in 1888 and in 1890, Victoria College took no share at all. Again, at the last annual public competition for BELILIOS Prizes and Medals, in Decem- ber 1890, where, in the boys division, St. Joseph's College, the Diocesan School, the Hongkong Public School and the Victoria English School competed for honours, the scholars of Victoria College took no part. At the Oxford Local Examination held in July, 1890, Victoria College presented nine competitors in the senior division, but only three of them passed, and not one of the 1,075 scholars of Victoria College was presented for examination in the junior division. I bring these points thus publicly forward with some reluctance, but I believe I am performing a public duty in doing so. I subjoin the usual Statistical Tables, which indicate, in detail, the progress made in the year 1890, by the several divisions and classes of the College.

I. VICTORIA COLLEGE.-NUMBER OF BOYS PASSED IN EACH SUBJECT IN 1890.

CLASS.

Total Number:

Chemistry.

Book-keeping.

Latin.

7

8

9

16

7

out of out of out of out of

∞∞

15

9

:

2:3

29

00

8

21

17

28

I.A.,

I.B.,

H.A.,

II.B.,

III.A., III.B.,

-I

7

7

7

6

7. 7

7

7 7

2222

18

14 18

27

2833

11 3 12 18 13 13

24 27 21 22 18 24 22 22

21 20 21 18 14 15 20 14 16

31 31 30 31 23 25

15 15 14 12

22 17 24 22 12

17 20 21 17 11

29 30 27 29

7

29 31 31

20 12 20 12 5

7

13 12 10

12 12 13 4

IV.A.,

52 47 52 37 37

46

21 49 46 40

41

IV.

V.B.,

33 27 30 21 19

27

15 31 27 15

13

IV.C., V.A.,

30 24 28 26 18

19

54 48 52 35

27

49

20 28 19 39 48 45

16

20

42 45

V.B.,

36 25 35 21 20

26

29 23 28 22 22

V.C.,

33 26 29 25 17

27

28 28 22 22 31

VI.A.,

56 51 52 28

38

44

VI.B., VI.C.,

35 32 35 30 24

29

23 23 22 21

13

46 32 30 25 29 19 23 20 14 20

38 54 42

VILA.,

28 25 24

VII.B.,

19 29 28 27 27

21

22 23 25

11 22 16 23

VII.C., VIII.A., VIII.B., VIII.C.,

50 49 44 44 49 41

26 23 26

8888

27 26 27 27

99225

2286

56 51 55 44 46 51 51 39 ing.

Writ-

48

32

19

21

23

...

24

25

26

...

...

...

⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀

...

...

...

...

...

;

8

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292

CLASS.

II.-VICTORIA COLLEGE. PERCENTAGE OF PASSES IN EACH SUBJECT IN 1890.

Composition.

Ilistory.

Euclid,

Algebra.

General Intel-

ligence.

Shakespeare.

Mensuration.

Chemistry.

Book-keeping.

Latin.

I.A... 1.B.. II.A.,

7

18

27

II.B.,

21

IL.A.,.

31

[[I.B.,...

20

JV.A..

52

IV.B..

BB

IV.C..

30

V.A.,

56

V.B.,

36

V.C.. VI.A.,

33

56

VI.B.,

35

VI.C.,

VII.A., VII.B., VII.C.,

VIII.A... 50 VIII.B.,. 26

86.92] 40.38 94.23 81.81 45.45 93.93

|100.00 [100.00|100.00 $100.00 100.00 [109.00|

83.33 83.33 77.78 72.22 44.44 16.67 53.33:00.00 51.72 88.80 81.48 | 62.96| 88.88|81,48 44.44 80.95 | 95,24|100.00) 80,95) 52.38 93.55 96.77 87.10 93.55 60.00 | 60,00 65.00|20.00|

86.92|76.92 78.85 81.81 45.45] 39.39 63.33|53.33 65.52 83.33 | 77.78 85.19 77.77 61.11) 61.11 66,66 | 66 66] 93.93

100.00 100.00 100.00 | 85.71 85.71 100.00 100.00 100.00 77.78 100 00 61.11 16.67| 66.67|100.00| 72,22 | 72.22 88.88 [100.00 | 77.77 | 81.48 66.66 88.88 81.48 | 81.48 95.24 100.00 85.71 66.67 | 71.43| 95.24 66.67 76.19 100.00 | 96.77 100.00 74.20 83.87 93,55 100.00 100.00 60.00 100.00 60.00 25.00 35.00 65.00 60.00 50.00 90.88 100.00 71.15 71.15 81.81 90.90 63.63 75.75 80.00 93.33| 86.66 | 60,00 83.33 63,33| 93,10| 88.89 94.44| 64.83| 50.02| 90.74|72.23 88.89 75.00 97.22 | 58.33| 55.55 | 72,22 | 80.55.63.88 78.78 87.87 75.75 51.51 81.81 84.84| 84.84] 91.07 92.86|50.00| 67.86 78.57 67.86 96.43 75.00 | 80,36| 91.42 100.00 | 85.71 | 68.57 82.85 91.42 85.71 71-43 81.81 23 190.00 95.65 91.30 56.52 82.60 100.00 86,95 | 60.86 | 86.95] 28 89.28 85.71 67.86 75.00: 78.57 82.14| 89,28 29 96.55 93.10 93.10 44.82 75.86| 65.17| 79.31 56 91.07 98.21 78.58 82.15 89.79 91.07 69.65

98.00 88.00| 88.00 98.00 82.00| 96.00 88.46 100.00 100.00 | 84.61 73.07❘ 80.77 96.29 100.00 100.00 | 92.59 | 88,89 | 92.59

VIII.C.,. 27

III. VICTORIA COLLEGE.-CHINESE EXAMINATION. PERCENTAGE OF PASSES IN EACH SUBJECT IN 1890.

I..........

II.,

III.,

IV.,

1,

2,

3,

£,

ૐ,

....

6,

7,

*

8,

Division.

Anglo-Chinese Class.

Total No. Examined.

Copy Writing.

Reading. Dictation. Characters.

Transla- tion.

Total Percentage

Passed.

16

87.50

93.75

93.75

75

87.50

10

:

100.00

90.00

100.00

100

100.00

14

100

64.28

92.85

64.28

92.85

15

80

93.33

100.00

86.66

93.33

IV.—VICTORIA COLLEGE.-CHINESE SCHOOL, 1890.

Class.

Total No. Examined.

Essay.

Letter.

Total

Prosody.

Tui-Tui.

Percentage

Passed.

61

61

64

3 3 0 0 0 0 0 0

86.88

95.08

70.49

88.52

83.61

91.80

65.57

90.16

88.36

76.56

82.81

76.56

87.50

57

84.81

56.14

84.81

78.95

58

89.65

46.55

50.00

74.13

82.76

59

71.18

72.88

59.32

71.18

63

80.95

74.60

79.36

82.54

58

87.93

27.58

67.24

65.52

13. GOVERNMENT CENTRAL SCHOOL FOR GIRLS.-This School, the need of which, in the absence of any voluntary effort in this particular direction, I explained in my Report for the year 1888, was established by the courageous decision of His Excellency Sir W. DES VOUX. The Governor decided upon the establishment of this School in the face of influential opposition and popular prejudice, from a desire to provide the Eurasian female population of the Colony, for whose education no unsectarian provision had ever been made before, with the means of obtaining a liberal Anglo-Chinese education. it is also hoped that eventually, when the Chinese begin to appreciate the value of an Anglo-Chinese education for their daughters, this School will promote among the Chinese female population a know- ledge of the English language and social principles which will tend to diminish the gap still existing in the Colony between the education of Chinese men and women. This is, however, a matter of the future. Meanwhile the School has been commenced as an experiment, on the 1st March, 1890. It had been prophesied by some that the School would obtain no scholars at all, but it commenced with an attendance of 27 scholars, which rose by the end of the year to 40 scholars (mostly Eurasian) in

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293

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average attendance.

At the close of the school-year there was a prospect of the attendance rising to over 60 scholars, which warrants the expectation of steady development in the near future. The School has had hard up-hill work in its first year of existence, and has been considerably hampered by changes in the superintendence and by the unsuitability of its location and narrowness of accommoda- tion. For a few years to come, this School will be an abnormally costly institution until larger attend- ances and a raising of the fees balance to some extent the costliness of house-rent and staff.

:

14. GOVERNMENT DISTRICT SCHOOLS.-The Anglo-Chinese District Schools, situated respectively at Saiyingpun, Wantsai, Wongnaichung, Stanley, Yaumati and Shaukiwan and attended in 1890, by 510 scholars have, with one exception, done good work and enjoy the confidence of the people evidenced by the fact that they are overcrowded and in some cases have had to refuse admission to numbers of intending scholars for want of accommodation. The erection of one new District School- building, the first on the list of five new buildings sanctioned in 1882, has been commenced, in the autumn of 1890, at Saiyingpun, and promises to be a good model of a District School-building. The Anglo-Chinese School at Shaukiwan does not meet with the favour of the villagers and is so poorly attended that it seems hardly worth while to continue it as a Government School. The principal objections of the villagers are that the School-building is unhealthy, that one school-master cannot satisfactorily teach both English and Chinese because as a general rule proficiency in one of these languages is accompanied by incompetency in the other, and that the Government ought to provide one teacher for English instruction, one for the Hakka and Hoklo, and one for the Punti dialect to please all the parents. This is out of the question. The better plan will be to work the School under the Grant-in-Aid Scheme, which leaves room for the villagers or private educationists making efforts of their own to secure a school or schools according to their own notions and receiving from the Government such aid as the results ascertained by examination will justify. The other Government District Schools, giving a purely Chinese education in the Chinese language and attended in 1890 by 862 scholars, distributed over 28 Schools in town and in the villages of Hongkong and Kowloon, have been continuing their work in a manner calling for no special remark. But the question of fees con- nected with some of these Schools, viz. those hitherto designated by the term " Aided Village Schools," has been definitely settled in 1890, it having been resolved by the Governor, Sir W. DES Vœux to abolish school-fees in these elementary Schools, to provide the school furniture and to raise the salaries of the Masters, by converting these Aided Schools, hitherto nominally in charge of the respective village communities, into ordinary Government Schools. Accordingly the old furniture of the former Govern- ment Central School was distributed among these Schools, and the payment of fees ceased in all the villages at the beginning of 1890. An elementary Chinese education throughout the six Standards and elementary Anglo-Chinese education up to Standard IV is therefore now within reach of the people, in town and villages, free of any charge (so far as the existing house accommodation goes), and all elementary Government Schools, with the exception of Victoria College and the Government Central School for Girls, are now free schools. Some years ago, Mr. JOHN RUSSELL, a great advocate of free education for the poor, published, in connection with the Indian and Colonial Exhibition at South Kensington, a report on "the Schools of Greater Britain," in which he remarked, with reference to the educational system of Hongkong, that "from an English stand point the system of Government education (in Hongkong) would probably be condemned as reaching only the middle classes whose educational requirements should be met by private enterprise and missing the poorer classes whose necessities are more imperative." All cause for the blame, thus deservedly laid on our educational system six years ago, has now been removed, so far as circumstances admit of it.

"1

15. GRANT-IN-AID SCHOOLS.-The general movement in the direction of raising the standard of the education given in all the various Grant-in-Aid Schools (76 in number and attended in 1890 by 4,656 scholars), to which I referred in my last Report, has continued in 1890. There is on all sides a demand for a Seventh Standard to be added to the provisions of the Grant-in-Aid Scheme. There can be no doubt, from an educational point of view, that this demand is sound and will, if complied with, have the effect of inducing most parents to leave their children in school for a year longer than has hitherto been customary, the result of which measure would be greater solidity and permanence in the practical results of the whole course of education. But the proposed measure has a financial aspect and requires for its execution an increase in that annual vote for Grants-in-Aid which, in the experience of the past, has again and again been insufficient to provide for the payment of the ordinary grants earned under the Grant-in-Aid Scheme, and necessitated, in the case of the Grants earned in 1890, a pro rata reduction of 10.5 per cent. Unless the Legislative Council is willing periodically to increase the sum annually voted for Grants-in-Aid at a rate higher than that hitherto adopted, the addi- tion of a Seventh Standard would only add to the disappointment so frequently caused by those vexa- tious pro rata reductions.

The annual examination of the Grant-in-Aid Schools exhibited fair progress made in most of the Schools, both in elementary and secondary subjects, but the advances made in the teaching of Grammar in the case of the Italian Convent Schools (both in English and in Portuguese), Composition in the case of St. Joseph's College and the Diocesan School and of almost every subject in the Victoria English School (Girls Division) stood out most prominently. The number of scholars brought for- ward for examination in the special subjects of Algebra, Euclid, Physical Geography, Book-keeping, Animal Physiology and Latin, has been greater than in any previous year. The subjoined table exhibits the results of the examination in those special subjects.

294

NUMBER OF SCHOLARS PASSED IN SPECIAL SUBJECTS, 1890.

SCHOOL.

NUMBER OF SCHOLARS.

Examined.

Failed.

Passed.

St. Joseph's College,..

121

35

86

Diocesan School,

100

24

76

Victoria English School, (Boys),

31

10

21

Do.

Do.,

(Girls),..

30

12

18

Hongkong Public School,...

12

12

St. Stephen's Anglo-Chinese School,

5

10

5

Total,...........

299

86

213

16. OXFORD LOCAL EXAMINATIONS.--The results of the Oxford Local Examination held in Hongkong in July, 1890, are as follows. Junior Division, Honours List, none. Pass List :-Diocesan School, 4 passes; St. Joseph's College, 3 passes; Hongkong Public School, 3 passes. Candidates, who, having exceeded the age of 16 years, have satisfied the Examiners:-Diocesan School, 1 pass; Hongkong Public School, 1 pass; St. Joseph's College, 1 pass. Candidates who obtained distinction in individual subjects :-Diocesan School, 1 in Religious Knowledge, 2 in English. Senior Division, Honours List, none. Pass List:-Victoria College, 2 passes; Diocesan School, 1 pass; Hongkong Public School, 1 pass. Candidates who, having exceeded the age of 19 years, have satisfied the Examiners: Victoria College, 1 pass. Candidates who have shown sufficient merit to be excused from Responsions, none. Candidates who obtained distinction in individual subjects, none.

17. PHYSICAL TRAINING.-In a thoughtful and independent criticism of the educational system of Hongkong, published in the China Review in April, 1890, the reviewer (Mr. C. S. ADDIS), whilst giving high praise to the principles and methods embodied in the educational policy of the Govern- ment of Hongkong, justly pointed out as a prominent defect (next to our shortcomings in the matter of school accommodation) the absence of any provision for physical training. Desultory attempts have been made by several Headmasters to encourage school-sports, but apart from an annual com- petition and prize-giving for athletic sports confined to the principal Boys Schools in the Colony, no methodical effort has been made to encourage or practice systematic physical training, except in the case of the Diocesan Home and Orphanage School. The military drill, introduced in this School several years ago and gradually improved and extended, was, in 1890, very conspicuous by its having given the boys of this School an appearance of orderliness, smartness and alacrity, which is very pleasing and which exhibited itself also in their dealing with their examination papers in a style and spirit contributing much to the successful results of the examinations. The discipline of the School, perfect as it is, appears to be fallen in with on the part of the boys in such a cheerful spirit that the font ensemble produces no impression of harshness, stiffness or artificiality. For some fifteen months past, the Government has had under consideration a definite scheme for introducing in the Schools of the Colony a simple form of systematic school drill by the instrumentality of a Military Drill In- structor, and a small sum has been included for this purpose in the Colonial Estimates for 1891. The establishment of a Public Swimming Bath for the benefit of all the Schools of the Colony was favour- ably reported upon by a Committee in summer 1890, but is still under consideration.

18. INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION. The only Industrial School in the Colony is the Roman Catholic West Point Reformatory, which gives to Chinese and Portuguese boys instruction in shoe-making, tailoring, book-binding and gardening. As all the industries of the Colony are in the hands of the Chinese, who neither require nor are accessible to the special stimulus which in England is required to support English industry in its competition with the industries of foreign countries, neither industrial nor technical Schools are required by the general interests of Hongkong. The only section of the commu- nity for which some special provision, to assist them in the struggle of life, might be desirable, are the poorer classes of the Portuguese community. Clerkships are at present the only sphere of occupation resorted to by young Portuguese of Hongkong, and such posts do not increase in number, nor in accessibility, in proportion as the Portuguese population of Hongkong increases. For the ordinary industries the Portuguese have no taste nor does the competition of the physically stronger and thriftier Chinaman leave them any chance of success. If any art-industry or technical employment could be found for which Portuguese would have inclination and which would not admit of Chinese competition, it would meet a growing difficulty which is likely to trouble the poorer classes of the Portuguese community in the near future.

19. MEDICAL EDUCATION.-The College of Medicine for Chinese, which is unconnected with the Government scheme of education, except that the Government has established a Medical Scholarship

:

295

for the benefit of the College, is the only Medical School in the Colony. Its object is to spread among Chinese practitioners of medicine and surgery a knowledge of European principles and methods. An endowment, created by Mr. E. R. BELILIOS, is specially intended to encourage Chinese scholars of the Victoria College to take up the study of European medicine. There is also a Watson Scholarship connected with this College.

20. SCHOLARSHIPS AND EXHIBITIONS.-The Government Scholarship was competed for, in Octo- ber, 1890, by 3 Candidates (2 from the Hongkong Public School, and 1 from the Diocesan School), and the Examiners (Cambridge Syndicate) gave the first place to F. SOUTHEY, of the Diocesan School. The only Schools in the Colony favoured in the way of endowed Scholarships are the Victoria College, which has a Morrison Scholarship, a Stewart Scholarship, and a Senior and Junior Belilios Scholar- ship, each of the value of $60 a year, to offer to its scholars, and St. Joseph's College, which enjoys the benefit of a Senior and Junior Belilios Scholarship of the same value. Another Belilios Trust Fund provides medals and prizes for the scholars of any Boys' or Girls' School in the Colony, with a view to encourage education, and annual competitions are held for this purpose both in English and Chinese subjects of instruction.

21. I enclose the usual Tables (I to XVI), containing the Educational Statistics for the year 1890, which to some extent have been analysed in the above paragraphs.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

.

E. J. EITEL, M.A., Pн. D. (TUBING.) Inspector of Schools and Head of the Education Department.

The Honourable W. M. DEANE, C.M.G.,

Acting Colonial Secretary.

No.

TABLE I.-NUMBER of SCHOLARS attending Schools subject to Government Supervision during 1890.

Name of School.

OLIA CO NÚ

2

21

1 American Board Mission, Bridges Street (Boys),.

"

Station Terrace (Boys)

3

"

Hinglung Lane (Boys),

""

33

Queen's Road West (Boys),.

""

59

Háwán (Girls),..

6

"

Fletcher Street (Girls),

7

""

Market School (Girls),

8

9

10

11

""

"

Aplichau,

Basel Mission, High Street (Girls),

Shamshuipó (Boys),

Shaukiwan (Boys),

12

Tókwáwan (Boys),

13

Berlin Mission (Girls),

14

Central School (Girls),

15

16

17

""

18

Pottinger Street (Boys),

19

Saiyinp'ún (Boys),

20

21

22

""

23

>>

24

25

"

26

""

27

35

28

""

29

30

C. M. S., St. Stephen's I Division (Boys),

Victoria Home and Orphanage (Boys), Lyndhurst Terrace (Boys),

St. Stephen's Baxter Memorial (Girls),

Lyndhurst Terrace (Girls),

Third Street (Girls),

Yaumáti (Mixed),

(Girls),...

Hunghóm (Boys),

""

Victoria Home and Orphanage (Girls),

Diocesan Home and Orphanage (Mixed),

F. E. S., Bonham Road Chinese School (Girls),

(Girls),.

St. Stephen's Anglo-Chinese (Boys),

31

>>

High Street

"

(Girls),

32

Queen's Road

>>

(Girls),

33

Hollywood Road

"

""

(Girls),

34

""

Pottinger Street

""

(Girls),

35

Stanley School

(Girls),

""

36

Shaukiwán

""

39

(Girls),

37

Tókwáwan

99

""

(Girls),

38

99

Bonham Road English School (Girls),.

39

Hoktsui,

Carried forward,...................

Native

Victoria

School

Native Grant-in- School

Aid

College.

Total.

(Govt.)

(Aided.)

School.

93

93

i

63

63

80

80

54

54

19

19

:

44

:

44

13

13

55

55

99

99

38

38

35

35

18

18

22

22

67

67

114

114

18

18

80

80

61

61

60

60

62

69

69

50

50

33

33

24

24

28

28

42

53

53

163

163

138

138

30

30

48

48

36

36

56

56

30

30

33

33

30

30

30

30

12

12

10

10.

+

67

65

1,878

2,010

296.

TABLE I.-NUMBER of SCHOLARS attending Schools subject to Government Supervision during 1890,-- Continued.

No.

Name of School.

Victoria College.

Native School

Native Grant-in School

Aid (Govt.) (Aided.)

Total.

School.

Brought forward,

67

65

1,878

2,010

40

Hokün.

21

21

41

Hongkong Public School (Boys),

50

50

42

Hunghom,....

23

23

48

Little Hongkong......................

29

29

...

44

45

""

46

""

47

**

48

,,

49

"

50

""

51

L. M. S., Square Street (Boys),......................

Wantsai (Boys),

Yaumati (Boys),

Shekt'ongtsui (Boys),.

Saiyingp'un I Division (Boys)

"

II

Hunghom (Boys),

Hospital Chapel (Boys),

114

...

114

86

...

86

60

60

49

49

96

96

""

(Boys),

82

82

...

41

41

87

87

...

52

""

53

,,

Shekt'ongtsui (Girls),

Saiyingp'un (Girls),

25

25

...

54

54

54

""

55

39

56

93

57

58

::

""

59

"

60

Aberdeen Street (Girls),

61

62

""

63

""

65

66

Mongkong,

67

New Girls School,

68

New Village (Little Hongkong),

69

Pokfúlam,

70

71

72

73

19

74

""

75

""

76

""

77

""

.78

25

79

""

80

"

81

59

82

83

">

84

Kau-ü-fong (Girls),

Ship Street (Girls),

Ui-hing Lane (Girls),

Tanglungchau (Boys),

(Girls),

Taipingshan Chapel (Girls),

L. M. S., Wantsai (Girls),

Staunton Street (Girls),..

Saiyingp'un, Second Street East (Girls),

64 | Matauchung,

Mátauts'ün,

69

69

...

38

...

...

38

50:

...

...

50

80

80

36

...

36

97

97

69

69

...

79

:: 282199

77

77

42

30

30

26

26

30

30

23

23

79

10

10

10

10

وو

">

R. C. M. Cathedral School (Boys),

12

Bridges Street Chinese School (Girls), Hollywood Road Charitable School (Girls), Holy Infant School I Division (Boys),

"9

""

(Girls),

St. Joseph's College, Chinese Division (Boys),..

Italian Convent, English Division,

Portuguese Division,

Bridges Street, English Division (Girls),..******

Portuguese Division (Girls),

St. Francis Chapel Portuguese School (Mixed), Victoria Portuguese School (Mixed),

Victoria English School (Boys),

Victoria English (Girls),

85 Saiyingpun (English),

58

58

...

75

75

63

63

21

21

II

39

45

45

75

75

European

(Boys),...

205

205

153

153

90

90

23

23

100

100

54

54

36

36

...

86

87

88

Shaiwán,

89

90

Shekó.....

91

92

93

(Punti),..

(Hakka),

96

78

95

Taihang,

96

99

"

Shaukiwan (Anglo-Chinese),

Shéungwán (Boys),

Shéungwán (Girls),

St. Paul's College, Anglo Chinese (Boys),

94 Stanley (Anglo-Chinese),

Táit'amtuk,

97 Taiwongkung,

98 Tanglungchau (Hakka),

100 Tókwawán (Eastern Village),.

72

22

....

...

105

""

104 Wantsai (English),

106 Wesleyan Mission, Spring Gardens (Boys),

107

"

108

""

(Punti),..

101

(Westeru Village),

102

Ts'attszemúi

103

Victoria College.

(Chinese),

Wellington Street (Boys),

55

>>

39

(Girls),

....

11825 INNOR IN : :02:⠀⠀

138

138

44

44

...

;

96

81

17

17

72

22

60

...

60

89

63

63

52

16

16

22

22

68

68

38

29

...

29

32

32

18

18

22

22

1,075

...

1,075

187 182

...

113

∙111

112

109 Wongkoktsui,

110 Wongmákok,.

Wongnaichung (Anglo-Chinese),

Yaumati (Anglo-Chinese),

21 11

:;

187

60

60

113

30

30

21

11

6.5 38

65

38

Total,......

1,075

1,043

396

4,656

7,170

:

No. of Scholars.

93

"

23

Station Terrace (Boys),.

63

*9

99

Hinglung Lane (Boys),....

80

""

Queen's Road West (Boys),

54

19

Háwán (Girls),

19

"

""

Fletchers Street (Girls),

44

>>

91

Market School (Girls),

13

99

22

67

114

18

""

13.

80

""

14.

61

"}

15.

"

Saiyingp'un (Boys),

60

297

TABLE II.—PROPORTION of SCHOLARS to POPULATION in the CITY of VICTORIA and in the VILLAGES in 1890.

CITY AND HARBOUR OF VICTORIA. Population as per Census of 1881.

CHILDREN IN SCHOOLS UNDER GOVERNMENT SUPERVISION,

IN THE CITY OF VICTORIA.

1. American Board Mission, Bridges Street (Boys),

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

7.

8. Basel Mission, High Street (Girls),

9. Berlin Mission, (Girls),

10. Central School, (Girls),

11. C. M. S., St. Stephen's I Division (Boys),

12.

Victoria Home and Orphanage (Boys), Lyndhurst Terrace (Boys),.

Pottinger Street (Boys),

VILLAGES.

Population, including Boat Population, as per Census of 1881. CHILDREN IN SCHOOLS UNDER GOVERNMENT SUPERVISION, IN VILLAGES.

No of Scholars.

2. Basel Mission, Shamshuipò (Boys),

""

Shaukiwán (Boys),.. T'òkwáwán (Boys),

5. C. M. S., Yaumati (Mixed),..

"

Hunghom (Boys),

(Girls),

(Girls),...

9. F. E. S., Stanley School (Girls),

Shaukiwán (Girls),

T'òkwáwản (Girls),

1. Aplichau,

55

38

3.

35

4.

18

33

6.

21

??

7.

28

";

8.

42

33

10.

30

""

11.

30

12. Koktsui,

10

13. Hokün,

21

14. Hunghom,

23

15. Little Hongkong.

29

16.

*

17.

""

St. Stephen's Baxter Memorial (Girls), Lyndhurst Terrace (Girls),.........

62

.....་་་ ་་་

16. L. M. S., Yaumati (Boys).

60

69

17.

Hunghòm (Boys),....

41

18.

97

19.

+9

23.

2+.

25.

""

26.

""

30.

""

31.

"

32.

""

33.

""

34.

99

35.

""

20.

19

Third Street (Girls),

Victoria Home and Orphanage (Girls), St. Stephen's Anglo-Chinese (Boys), 21. Diocesan Home and Orphanage (Mixed), 22. F. E. S., Bonham Road (Girls),.

27.

19

High Street (Girls),........ Queen's Road (Girls), Hollywood Road (Girls), Pottinger Street (Girls),... Bonham Road (Girls),...

28. Hongkong Public School. (Boys),

29. L. M. S., Square Street (Boys),

Wantsai (Boys),

Saiyingp'un I Division (Boys),

II

??

11

Hospital Chapel (Boys),

Saiyingp'un (Girls),.

Kau-ü-fong (Girls),

50

18.

53

19.

Shektongtsui (Boys), (Girls),

49

25

163

20.

""

138

21.

י

Tanglungchau (Boys)...

(Girls),

80

36

30

22. Matauchung.

26

48

23. Matautsün,

30

36

24. Mongkok,

23

56

25. New Village (Little Hongkong),

10

30

26. Pokfulam,

10

12

27. Shaiwán,...

17

50

28. Shaukiwán (Anglo-Chinese).

72

114

29. Shekò,

22

86

30. Stanley (Anglo-Chinese)..

52

96

...

31. Taibang,

16

(Boys),

$2

32. Taitamtuk,'

22

87

54

34.

"

69

36.

19

Ship Street (Girls),

38

36.

19

33. Tanglungchau (Hakka),

35. Tokwáwán (Eastern Village),

(Western Village),

38

(Punti),

29

37.

"

Ui-hing Lane (Girls),

50

37. Tsittszemui.

38.

""

Taipingshan Chapel (Girls),

97

38. Wongkoktsui,

21

39.

""

Aberdeen Street (Girls),

69

39. Wongmakok,

11

40.

??

Wantsai (Girls),

77

40. Wongnaichung (Anglo-Chinese),

65

41.

3:

42.

11

45.

46.

""

47.

"

48.

49.

">

50.

""

51.

52.

"

53.

54.

55.

"

56.

57.

58.

"

""

""

21

60.

61.

63.

(Punti),

(Hakka),

(Girls),

68.

11

Staunton Street (Girls),

43. New Girls' School,

44. R. C. M., Cathedral School (Boys),

Bridges Street, Chinese School (Girls), Hollywood Road, Charitable School (Girls), Holy Infant School I Division (Boys),

St. Joseph's College, Chinese Division (Boys),

Italian Convent, English Division,

Bridges Street, English Division (Girls),

St. Francis Chapel, Portuguese School (Mixed),... Victoria, Portuguese School (Mixed),

English School (Boys),

59. Saivingp'un (English),

62. Sheungwan (Boys),

64. St. Paul's College, Anglo-Chinese (Boys),

65. Taiwongkung,

66. Victoria College,

67. Wantsai (English),

(Chinese),

69. Wesleyan Mission, Spring Gardens (Boys),....

42

41. Yaumati (Anglo-Chinese),

38

Saiyingp'un, Second Street, East, (Girls),

30

79

TOTAL,

1,314

58

75

63

21

II

"

(Girls),

45

75

European

(Boys),

205

153

Portuguese

90

23

Portuguese

(Girls),

100

54

36

138

""

(Girls),

44

96

81

60

89

63

68

1,075

187

60

70.

19

Wellington Street (Boys),

71.

"

""

"

(Girls),

TOTAL,........

113

30

5,856

TABLE III.-NUMBER of SCHOLARS at the GOVERNMENT SCHOOLS during 1890, and EXPENSES of each SCHOOL.

No.

Name of School.

1 Aplichau,

Central School (Girls),

3 Hoktsui,

4 Hokün,

5 Hunghom,

6 Little Hongkong,..

7

8

Matanch'ung,

Matautsun,

9 Mongkok,

10 New Girls School,

11

12

New Village (Little Hongkong),

Pokfulam,

13 Saiyingpún (English),.

14

""

(Punti),

15

17

(Hakka),

16 Shaiwán,

17

Shaukiwán (Anglo-Chinese),

18 | Shekò,

19 | Sheungwán (Boys),

Carried forward,...

Boys. Girls.

Total.

Expense. No.

Name of School.

Boys. Girls. Total.

Expense.

(78)

* 19722888 (AA8@ZENN8

55

$ 108.00

Brought forward................

663 146 731

$5,609.04

67

67

2,459.49

10-

61.20 20 | Sheungwan (Girls),

89

89

660.00

21

26

30

23

7*****299 8 72NG

60.00

21 Stanley (Anglo-Chinese);

52

52

320.59

23

60.00

22 Taihang,

16

16

69.00

61.00

23 Taitamtuk,..

22

22

61.00

60.00

24 Taiwongkung,

68

68

322.00

61.00

25 Tanglungchau (Hakka),

38

38

180.00

60.00 26

(Punti),

29

29

180.00

624.00

27 Tokwáwán (Eastern Village),

32

32

60.00

10

60.00 28

(Western Village),

18

18

60,00

10

72.00 548.25 30

29

Tsattszemui,

22

22

60.00

Victoria College,

1,075

1,075

19,222.46

96

157.00

31 Wantsai (English),

187

763.46

187

81

264.20 32

(Chinese),

(182)

302.20

17

60.00 292.30

33 Wongkoktsui,

21

21

72.00

34 Wongmakok,

11

11

72.00

22

60

120.60 420.00

35 Wongnaichung (Anglo-Chi.),.. 36 Yaumati (Anglo-Chinese),

65

65

320.19

38

38

403.05

663

146

731

5,609.04

TOTAL,......

2,279

235

2,514

$28,728.99

:

:

"

!

:

298

TABLE IV.—AVERAGE EXPENSE of each SCHOLAR at the Government Schools and at the GRANT IN-ÁID SCHOOLS during the year 1890.*

I.-EXPENDITURE OF GOVERNMENT SCHOOLS.

(Cost of working the Schools irrespective of cost of erection or repairs of Buildings).

1. VICTORIA COLLEGE.

Expenditure,

Deduct School fees,

2. GOVERNMENT GIRLS SCHOOL.

Expenditure,

Deduct School fees,

3. GOVERNMENT DISTRICT SCHOOLS.

Cost to Government (no School fees),

$31,134.96 .$11,912.50

-$ 19,222.46

$ 2,659.99 200.50

-$ 2,459.49

.$ 7,046.04

..$18,737.12

II.—EXPENDITURE ON THE VOLUNTARY GRANT-IN-AID SCHOOLS.

Total cost to Government, in 1890,.............

III.--AVERAGE COST OF EACH SCHOLAR. (Calculated by the Enrolment).

Average Cost, to Government, of each Scholar :-

1. at Victoria College,..

2. at Government Girls School,.

3. at Government District Schools,

.$17.88 $36.70 $ 5.86

.$ 4.02

IV.—AVERAGE COST OF EACH SCHOLAR.

(Calculated by the Average Daily Attendance).

4. at Grant-in-Aid Schools,

1. at Victoria College,..

2. at Government Girls School,

3. at Government District Schools,

4. at Grant-in-Aid Schools,

.$25.34 .$70.49

.$ 8.88

.$ 5.62

* NOTE.--The cost of the Inspectorate of Schools ($4,377.05), being connected with both Grant-in-Aid Schools and Government Schools, is not included in the above figures.

TABLE V.—AVERAGE MONTHLY Enrolment and DAILY ATTENDANCE at the Government Schools for 1890.

No.

Name of School.

Average Monthly Enrolment.

Average Daily Attendance.

1

Aplichau,

36.00

33.52

2

Central School (Girls),

41.70

34.89

3

Hoktsui,

9.00

7.63

Hokün,

13.83

12.78

Hunghòm,

15.75

12.83

Little Hongkong,

23.92

22.45

!

Mátauchung,

23.67

19.85

8

Mátautsün,

23.75

21.99

9

Mongkok,

13.75

13.03

10

New Girls School,

42.58

37.79

11

:

12

Pokfúlam,

13

New Village (Little Hongkong),

Saiyingpún, (English),

5.83

5.72

9.33

8.18

71.16

67.92

:

14

""

(Punti),

34.25

32.32

15

(Hakka),

48.42

43.43

16

Shaiwán,

13.25

9.86

17

Shaukiwán (Anglo-Chinese),

38.33

24.53

:

18

Shekò,

18.09

12.48

:

19

20

21

22

23

Shéungwán (Boys),

Taihang,

Táitámtuk,

(Girls),

35.33

31.34

48.33

41.93

Stanley (Anglo-Chinese),

45.00

39.30

15.25

13.13

10.25

9.29

24

Táiwongkung,

37.50

34.32

25 Tanglungchau (Hakka),

21.75

20.32

26

"

(Punti),

14.08

12.72

27

Tòkwáwán (Eastern Village),

18.50

16.43

28

(Western Village),

15.16

13.09

29

Ts'attszemúi,

17.42

14.98

30

Victoria College,

807.66

758.36

31

Wántsai, (English),/

120.66

110.94

32

"

(Chinese)

120.08

108.78

33

Wongkoktsui,..

15.75

12.57

34

Wongmákok,

7.83

7.74

35

Wongnaichung (Anglo-Chinsese),

49.50

43.19

36

Yaumáti (Anglo-Chinese),

25.66

22.61

1

1,908.32

1,732.24

299

TABLE VI.—MAXIMUM and MINIMUM Enrolment and DAILY ATTENDANCE at the Government Schools during 1890.

Maximum Daily Minimum Daily

No..

Name of School.

Maximum Monthly Enrolment.

Minimum Monthly Enrolment.

Attendance

Attendance

(Monthly average.) (Monthly average.)

1234

Aplichau,...

52

15

49.23

11.69

Central School (Girls),

49

31

42.00

27.36

Hoktsui,

9

9

8 50

6.50

Hokün,

15

14.65

8.00

Hunghòm,

19

16.52

5.33

6

Little Hongkong,

26

22

25.21

15.46

Mátauchung,

26

15

24.07

12.38

8

Matautsün,

26

18

24.33

16.00

9

Mongkok,

18

8

17.68

7.26

10

New Girls' School,....

53

40

44.88

22.42

11

New Village (Little Hongkong),

7

5

6.07

4.71

12

Pokfúlam,

10

9.08

6.80

13

Saiyingpun (English),

77

58

74.00

53.33

14

(Punti),

48

22

36.14

22.00

15

(Hakka),

56

38

51.27

34.07

16

Shaiwán,

15

10

13.23

6.42

17

Shaukiwán (Anglo-Chinese),

52

26

42.00

20.00

18

Shekò,

20

14

16.00

9.52

19

Sheungwán, (Boys),

41

30

34.04

27.33

:

20

29

(Girls),

55.

32

48.54

28.55

21

Stanley (Anglo-Chinese),

49

41

44.55

36.00

22

Taihang,

17

11

15.77

9.67

23

Táitámtuk,

11

9

10.80

7.33

24

Táiwongkok,

46

30

39.84

27.87

25

Tanglungchau (Hakka),

23

15

22.00

14.20

.

26

(Punti),

22

7

20.71

6.40

27 Tókwáwán, (Eastern Village),

24

15

22.27

13.00

28

""

(Western Village),

17

12

15.74

10.07

29

Tsattszemúi,

20

11

18.60

10.13

30

Victoria College,

890

683

834.05

661.07

31.

Wántsai (English),

139

87

132.00

85.20

32

""

(Chinese),

138

83

129.00

81.20

33

Wongkoktsui,

18

10

15.07

9.73

34

Wongmákok,

9

7

9.00.

7.00

35

Wongnaichung (Anglo-Chinese),

52

40

46.61

32.40

36

Yaumáti, (Anglo-Chinese),

31

18

25.92

13.93

2,180

1,494

1,999.37

1,370.33

No.

TABLE VII.-NUMBER of DAYS on which the GOVERNMENT SCHOOLS were taught during 1890.

Name of School.

School Days. No.

Name of School.

School Days.

1 2 3 4 5 6

1

Aplichau,

Central School (Girls),

255

19

Shéungwán (Boys),

243

213

20

"

(Girls),

243

7

8

3

Hoktsui, Hokün, Hunghòm,

Mátauchung,

Mátautsün,...

241

21

249

22

Stanley (Anglo-Chinese), Taihang,

235

244

258

23

Táitámtuk,

249

Little Hongkong,

252

24

Táiwongkung,

237

251

25

Tanglungchau (Hakka),

244

248

26

,

(Punti),

247

9

Mongkok,.....

255

27

Tòkwáwán (Eastern Village),.

250

10

New Girls School,

236

28

""

(Western Village),

250

11

New Village (Little Hongkong),

249

29

Tsattszemúi,

247

12

Pokfulam,

249

30

Victoria College,

236

13

Saiyingpún (English),

245

31

Wantsai (English),

243

14

""

(Punti),

243

32

">

(Chinese),...

243

15

(Hakka),..

252

33

Wongkoktsui,

251

16

Shaiwán,

250

34

Wongmakok,

254

17

Shaukiwán (Anglo-Chinese),

245

35

Wongnaichung (Anglo-Chinese),

231

18

Shekò,

225

36

Yaumáti,

243

!

Total Enrolment for the year.

300

TABLE VIII.—SUMMARY of ENROLMENT and ATTENDANCE at the Government SchOOLS for the last Twenty-five Years.

Years.

Minimum Daily Attendance

Maximum Daily Attendance

Minimum Monthly Enrolment

(Monthly Average)).

(Monthly Average).

1866,

623

572

435

337

1867,

700

610

533

408

1868,

916

664

572

460

1869,

942

748

627

504

1870,

1,302

950

683

556

1871,

1,292

937

741

571

1872,

1.480

1,157

837

665

1873,

1,838

1,326

852

760

1874,

1,932

1,271

974

836

1875,

1,927

1,312

988

863

1876,

2,171

1,383

1,057

925

1877,

2,148

1,446

1,212

1,035

1878,

2,101

1,324

1,100

936

1879,

2,043

1,356

1,027

904

1880,

2,078

1,468

1,082

937

1881,

1,986

1,384

1,093

956

1882,

2,114

1,444

1,062

988

1883,

2,080

1,414

1,138

990

1884,

1,978

1,420

1,066

941

1885,

1,988

1,424

1,061

926

1886,

1,893

1,544

1,040

886

1887,

1,814

1,552

1,126

1,000

1888,

1,933

1,653

1,139

1,040

1889,

2,293

1,992

1,190

1,118

1890,

2,514

1,999

1,494

1,370

January, February,

March,

April,

May,

June, July, August,

September,

October,....

November,.

:

December,

Number

of Scholars.

TABLE IX--Enrolment and ATTENDANCE at the VICTORIA COLLEGE during 1890.

Month.

Average Daily Attendance.

Number of Attendances.

Number of School Days.

683

6,617

10

661.07

890

11,683

14

834.05

881

20,336

25

813.44

867

12,016

15

801.06

857

19,776

25

791.04

820

17,964

24

748.05

.785

18,422

25

736.88

756

5,122

7

731.71

818

13.237

17

778.64

808

19,482

26

749.31

775

17,993

25

719.06

752

16,326

23

709.81

Total Number of ATTENDANCES during 1890,

Number of SCHOOL DAYS during 1890,

Average DAILY ATTENDANCE during 1890,

Total Number of SCHOLARS at the School during 1890,

....178,974

236

.758.364

1,075

TABLE X.-GOVERNMENT SCHOOLS (outside VICTORIA COLLEGE) arranged in the order of their efficiency.

Rank. I.

Saiyingpún, Anglo-Chinese School. Girls' School, No. 2 Chinese School. Wántsai, Chinese School. Wántsai, Anglo-Chinese Divison I.

Rank II,

Wántsai, Anglo-Chinese, Division II. Stanley, Anglo-Chinese School. Wongnaichung, Anglo-Chinese School. Yaumati, Anglo-Chinese School. Shaukiwán, Anglo-Chinese School. Sheungwán, Chinese School..

Rank II.-Continued.

Sheungwán, Girls' School. Taiwongkung, Chinese School. Saiyinpún, Hakka School. Little Hongkong, Chinese School. Shaiwán, Chinese School.

Rank III.

Saiyinpún, Punti School. Tanglungchau, Hakka School.. Tanglungchau, Punti School. Aplichau, Chinese School.

Rank III.-Continued.

Mongkok, Chinese School. Mátautsün, Chinese School. Wongkoktsui, Chinese School. Tsattszemúi, Chinese School. Hoktsui, Chinese School.

Mátauchung, Chinese School. Tókwáwán, (East) Chinese School.

Tókwáwán, (West) Chinese School.

Wongmákok, Chinese School.

Hokün, Chinese School.

Pokfulam, Chinese School.

Hunghòm, Chinese School.

Taihang, Chinese School.

Class

of

School.!

TABLE XI-NUMBER of SCHOLARS attending Schools receiving GRANTS-IN-AID (under the Provisions of the Scheme of 1883), Expenses incurred and amount of Grant gained by each, in 1890.

301

Name of School.

Expenses Boys. Girls. Total. incurred in

1890.

Amount of Grant gained for 1890.

C.

1

American Board Mission, Bridges Street (Boys),....

""

Station Terrace (Boys),

""

""

""

Hinglung Lane (Boys),

80

>>

""

""

Queen's Road, West (Boys),

3883

93

93

376.50

316.28

63

63

255.14

224.56

80

373.23

236.35

54

54

324.26

227.10

""

""

وو

""

Háwán (Girls),..

19

19

212.43

72.20

""

95

19

19

99

""

Fletcher Street (Girls),

Basel Mission, Shamshuipó (Boys),

""

Shaukiwán (Boys),

C. M. S., St. Stephen's I Division (Boys),

44

44

138.96

Market School (Girls),..

13

13

36.34

38

38

103.53

153.32

35

35

107.28

46.29

Tókwáwán (Boys),

18

18

29.91

114

114

535.83

326.04

Victoria Home and Orphanage (Boys),...

18

18

924.30

27.47

""

Lyndhurst Terrace (Boys),

80

80

327.32

321.51

29

"

Pottinger Street (Boys),

61

61

335.42

216.06

""

""

Saiyingp'ún (Boys),.....

60

60

275.66

207.25

""

St. Stephen's Baxter Memorial (Girls),

62

62

202.00

125.65

99

و"

Lyndhurst Terrace (Girls),...

69

69

284,20

219.10

""

""

Third Street (Girls),

50)

50

206.61

268.63

AAA

59

"

""

99

""

19

29

""

""

95

"?

99

12

""

"

"

59

""

""

*

29

19

وو

""

""

""

""

"

"

Saiyingpún (Girls),

Kau-ü-fong (Girls),

>>

Ship Street (Girls),

"

Yaumáti (Mixed),

Hunghóm (Boys), (Girls),

""

F. E. S., Bonham Road (Girls),.

High Street (Girls),....... Queen's Road (Girls), Hollywood Road (Girls),. Pottinger Street (Girls), Stanley School (Girls), Shaukiwán (Girls), Tókwáwán (Girls),

L. M. S., Square Street (Boys),.

Wantsai (Boys),

Yaumáti (Boys),

Shekt'ongtsui (Boys),

Saiyingp'ún I. Division (Boys),

II.

Hunghóm (Boys),

"

Hospital Chapel (Boys),

Shektongtsui (Girls),

.....

25

8

33

117.02

137.77

(Girls),

24

24

35.78

28

28.

135.63

61.04

42

42

145.49

119.19

:::

30

30

533.95

177.66

48

48

216.82

151.13

36

36

233.87

153.25

...

56

56

210.40

145.34

30

30

235.46

120.68

33

33

185.66

77.24

8888888

30

30

206.39

106.99

30

30

156.70

115.42

114

114

621.01

426.42

86

86

438.27

331.36

60

60

253.21

321.46

(Boys),

دو

""

""

""

"

""

""

13

""

:

"

19

"

"2

"

""

(Girls),

III.

Basel Mission High Street (Girls),

""

""

IV.

F. E. S. Bonham Road (Girls),

19

99

"

St. Paul's College Anglo-Chinese (Boys),.

Ui-hing Lane (Girls),

Tanglungchau (Boys),.

......

(Girls)......

Táipingshan Chapel (Girls),

Aberdeen Street (Girls),.. Wántsai (Girls),

Staunton Street (Girls),

Saiyingpún, Second Street, East (Girls),

R. C. M., Cathedral School (Boys),

Bridges Street, Chinese School (Girls), Hollywood Road Charitable School (Girls), Holy Infant School I. Division (Boys),. II.

(Girls),

99

Wesleyan Mission, Spring Gardens (Boys),

Wellington Street (Boys),

""

28075 : : : : : 0

49

309.40

190.53

96

502.54

430.31

82

394.57

292.95

41

373.46

168.46

87

556.57

331.05

...

25

25

213.02

127.34

54

54

360.05

225.54

69

69

473.61

365.11

38

38

305.24

100.30

50

50

477.83

269.91

80

80

248.56

36

36

268.21

80.67

97

97

392.77

276.69

69

69

431.29

250.79

77

538:16

273.10

42

42

544.31

238.47

30

30

227.53

152.42

:8

58

58

233.00

95.64

...

75

75

624.00

391.18

63

21

45

8.13

63

564.00

373.67

21

34.21

45

96.56

""

60

60

216.00

179.61

113

113

384.00

299.29

...

""

""

J

"1

""

"J

99

""

""

""

"

"J

>>

""

""

""

Berlin Mission (Girls),

C. M. S. Victoria Home and Orphanage (Girls),

St. Stephen's Anglo-Chinese (Boys),..

Diocesan Home and Orphanage (Mixed),

Hongkong Public School (Boys),

R. C. M., St. Joseph's College, Chinese Division (Boys),

Italian Convent, English Division, (Girls),

"

Portuguese Division (Girls),

Bridges Street, English Division, (Girls),................

St. Francis

Victoria, Portuguese School (Mixed),

2828

30

30

216.00

107.82

99

99

864.99

692.97

22

716.00

205.93

53

53

2,013.35

381.27

163

163

985.82

733.84

12

121

17

27

12

85.24

138

13,254.17

881.33

63

63

690.95

249.99

50

50

5,700.71

284.61

75

75

204.83

European

(Boys),

205

205

5,696.42

1,394.17

243

243

705.70

...

3,198.00

476.99

23

23

166.02

English

>>

Portuguese Division (Girls),

School (Mixed),

""

(Boys), ...

(Girls),

::;

1,136.00

100 100

773.46

22

32

54

648.00

220.17

16

20

36 1,074.00

294.32

138

138

441.11

7,528.95

44

44

373.59

2,567 2,089 4,656 $60,646.51 $19,704.17

302

TABLE XII.-ENROLMENT, ATTENDANCE and NUMBER of SCHOOL DAYS, at the GRANT-IN-AID SCHOOLS during 1890.

No.

Name of School.

Average Average Daily Number Monthly Attend-

Enrol-

Maxi- Mini-

mum Monthly Monthly Enrol- Enrol--

ment. ment.

Average Average Maxi- Mini-

mum

mum

mum

of

Daily

Daily Attend- Attend-

ance

School

ment.

ance.

ance.

for the Year.

Days.

1

American Board Mission Bridges Street (Boys),

93

2

>>

>>

Station Terrace (Boys),

60

3

29

Hinglung Lane (Boys),

80

888

78

86.79

66.36

87.63

79.38 246

56

55.88

48.80

57.36

52.90 253

66

73.44

50.25

75.45

66.07 263

"

>>

Queen's Road, West (Boys),

54

51

53.64

48.93

53.72

51.74

233

""

وو

Háwán (Girls),

15

5

12.24

2.93

10.81

9.16

276

6

""

""

Fletcher Street (Girls),

40

23

35.29

16.72

31.00

28.26

282

"

Market School (Girls),

10

6

9.90

4.41

9.00

8.11

226

8

Basel Mission, Shamshuipò (Boys),

38

31

36.36

15.25

34.54

31.30

258

9

Shaukiwán (Boys),

34

19

29.62

10

Tókwáwan (Boys),

18

11

17.56

9.00 6.69 11.63

30.18 23.72

266

13.41

260

11

C.M.S., St. Stephen's I Division (Boys),

110

70

105.40

67.40 90.81

84.28 272

12

"

Victoria Home and Orphanage (Boys,)

18

8

14.23

3.42 11.35

10.69 229

13

25

Lyndhurst Terrace (Boys),

80

64

76.12

60.18 71.63

69.22 260

14

Pottinger Street (Boys),

59

53

53.40

38.00 56.81

47.40 265

15

"

Saiyingpun (Boys),

60

42

56.85

.

16

St. Stephen's Baxter Memorial (Girls),

46

25

44.08

17

>>

Lyndhurst Terrace (Girls),

59

28

55.44

40.29 51.63 24.90 36.25 25.00 47.75

47.62 253

18

19

Third Street (Girls),

50

43

46.62

34.15

19

""

20

""

.99

21

22

""

24

"

25

>>

26

""

27

28

29

30

97

31

Yaumáti (Mixed),

Hunghòm (Boys),

23 F.E.S., Bonham Road (Girls),

High Street (Girls), Queen's Road (Girls), Hollywood Road (Girls), Pottinger Street (Girls), Stanley School (Girls), Shaukiwán (Girls), Tókwáwán (Girls),

L.M.S. Square Street (Girls),

33

7

31.20

6.66

(Girls),

17

4

14.64

3.60

34.89 278 43.30 266 47.54 43.14 267 29.25 27.43 268 13.45 10.97 267

28

18

26.29

13.86 25.54

22.20 253

(Girls),

42

20

37.63

16.22 39.00

32.17 290

27

16

25.45

16.00

24.50

24.00

39

9

36.62

9.00

31.33

249 30.35 273

36

29

33.01

27.18

52

31

41.88

24.04

:

29

16

24.73

12.41

34.27 31.22 263 40.36 32.88 260 23.45 20.83 269

29

21

25.20

18.00

24.18

21.80

261

LOG

28

13

27.11

11.81

24.45

22.04

263

30

26

27.60

20.60 27.90

24.46 250

113

76

104.56

32

Wantsai (Boys),

83

67

79.80

33

Yaumati (Boys),

60

42

54.10

34

99

Shektongtsui (Boys),

49

35

47.64

70.47 95.54 88.44 247 65.50 75.18 72.23 257 36.95 55.81 48.61 32.50 45.45 42.88

254

253

35

""

Saiyingpún I Division (Boys),

96

86

90.11

68.90

94.27 80.79

259

36

"

""

II

""

(Boys),

82

71

68.90

61.16

37

19

Hunghòm (Boys),

41

31.

38.92 24.00

38

39

40

"

Hospital Chapel (Boys),

Shektongtsui (Girls),

Saiyingpún (Girls),

87

68

84.50

66.16

25

13

24.56 12.72

77.54 65.31 38.72 .36.22 248 80.00 75.88 23.27

271

244

21.77

* 262

54

41

48.34 33.31 47.18

41.49

263

41

99

Kau-ü-fong (Girls),

68

56

65.12

42

Sheep Street (Girls),

38

30

33.90

46.24 64.90 22.10 36.18

60.44

265

30.06 277

43

Ui-hing Lane (Girls),

50

40

47.94

38.63 45.40

43.73 246

44

"

Tanglungchau (Boys),

75

59

72.43

53.88 66.81

63.71 269

45

""

(Girls),

28

20

26.45

15.75 24.27 22.13 272

46

Taipingshán Chapel (Girls),

71

51

60.84

43.82 62.50 56.14

283

47

"9

Aberdeen Street (Girls),

53

35

49.56

31.09 45.16 42.71

281

48

Wantsai (Girls),

75

59

65.24

46.32 69.63 57.63 274

49

""

Staunton Street (Girls),

41

28

40.18

26.62 37.45 36.44 268

50

Saiyingpún Second Street, East (Girls),

29

26

27.59

52

"9

53

"

54

55

57

27

99

51 R.C.M., Cathedral School (Boys),

56

Bridges Street Chinese School (Girls),. Hollywood Road, Charitable Sch. (Girls), Holy Infant School I Division (Boys),. (Girls),.

Wesleyan Mission, Spring Gardens (Boys), ...... Wellington Street (Boys), ...

40

30

39.38

75

43

70.76

63

41

59.12

18

15

16.10 12.36

17.50 28.45 25.30 272 20.83 36.33 34.85 261 42.36 70.91 63.07 257 39.81 58.08 56.00 264

·16.28 14.22 265

II

""

45

31

35.64

29.87 36.72

32.38 252

""

56

44

50.84

35.17 52.54

46.68 248

112

71

101.55

63.88 90.00

80.40 256

58

""

وو

""

""

(Girls),...

30

15

28.75

13.42 25.63

24.46 269

59

Basel Mission, High Street (Girls),

94

79

89.34

58.09

87.16

81.26 269

60

Berlin Mission (Girls),

22

20

22.00

19.40

21.81

21.58

261

61

C.M.S., Victoria Home and Orphanage (Girls),...

49

40

46.04

36.70

45.41

42.49

266

62

""

St. Stephen's Anglo-Chinese (Boys,)

149

116

131.20

83.47

130.72

113.93

255

63

F.E.S., Bonham Road (Girls),

12

10

11.55

9.78

10.90

10.73

213

:

64

Diocesan Home and Orphanage (Mixed),

108

93

100.48

87.83

102.00

94.72

248

65

66

:

68

99

""

69

""

73

75

ļ

76

PENRERE

70

St. Paul's College Anglo-Chinese (Boys), Hongkong Public School (Boys),

67 R.C.M., St. Joseph's Col. Chi. Division (Boys),

Europ. Italian Convent Eng.

>>

56

35

55.68

31.81

47.45 45.31

248

45

30

45.00 28.92 37.09

36.00 241

60

27

51.54 18.14 43.75 38.86 233

""

(Boys), 205

171

183.60

157.32

188.58 171.73 235

211

181

197.73

161.15

197.09 182.93 236

33

Portug.

22

71

Bridges Street Eng.

">

(Girls), 23

72

""

Portug.

""

(Girls), 98

74

St. Francis Chapel Portug. Sch. (Mixed), Victoria Portuguese School (Mixed), ...

"

ور

>>

English School (Boys),

English

29

(Girls),

28855

17

21.33

46

87.42

44

38

39.15

36

28

97

61

$4.95

37

27

35.30

15.10 22.16 19.49 254 43.00 90.58 78.20 254 20.40 40.66 32.99 282 32.15 22.60 33.25 27.06 268 61.37 83.00 76.86 249 26.47

253

32.91 30.42

NAME OF SCHOOL.

Class of School.

No. of Scholars Pre-

sented.

No. of Scholars Exam- ined.

Standard I.

Standard II.

Standard III.

Standard IV.

Standard V.

Standard VI.

Standard I.

Standard II.

Standard III.

Standard IV.

Standard V.

Standard VI.

Total Passed.

Total Failed.

TABLE XIII.-RESULTS of the EXAMINATION of the GRANT-IN-AID SCHOOLS in 1890, unde

Number of Scholars who

Passed.

No. of Scholars who Failed.

ance during School

| Average Daily Attend-

Year.

>>

1. American Board Mission, Bridges Street, (Boys),.

2.- 3.

"

Station Terrace, (Boys),

70

69 10 31 19

2

53

61

2

35

9

19

Hinglung Lane, (Boys),..

55

55

3 33

10

>>

Queen's Road West, (Boys), .

49

47

2

34- 9

281.

62

5

19

"

Háwán, (Girls),

10

10

1 3

1

5

"

Fletcher Street, (Girls),

31

29

7

10

7

7.-

*

8.-Basel Mission, Shamshuipò, (Boys),

Market School, (Girls),..

9

7

2

1 2

33

32

10

7 10

8.~

99

Shaukiwán, (Boys),

26

18

6

10.-

#

Tokwáwán, (Boys),..

11

11

10

11.-C. M. S., St. Stephen's I Division, (Boys),

70

68

42

16

12.-

Victoria Home and Orphanage, (Boys),

4

4

2

2

13.-

71

Lyndhurst Terrace, (Boys),

67

67

12 26

19

14.- 15.-

#

Pottinger Street, (Boys),..

51

48

10 23

11

"

Saiyingp'ún, (Boys),.

40

40

6 17

12

::::::

16.

19

St. Stephen's Baxter Memorial, (Girls),

24

24 10

9

2

17.-

Lyndhurst Terrace, (Girls),..

34

34

9

10

8

18. 19.- 20.- 21.- 22.-

17

Third Street, (Girls),

44

43

12 13

6

Yaumáti, (Mixed),.

28

25

18

6

39

*

(Girls),

8

8

4

*

19

+5

Hunghòm, (Boys),

23.-F. E. S., Bonham Road, (Girls),.

17

13

7

(Girls),

26

23

9

23

22

24.- 25.

"

High Street, (Girls),...

27

26

9

9

31

Queen's Road, (Girls),

27

27

4

13

1.

26. 27. 28.--

"

Hollywood Road, (Girls),

28

26

9 9

"

Pottinger Street, (Girls),.

19

18

2. 11

""

Stanley School, (Girls),

17

17

7

29.-

"

Shaukiwán, (Girls),

22

22

6

30.-

"

Tòkwáwán, (Girls),

25

23

6 12

31.-L. M. S., Square Street, (Boys),

75

74

9 20

35

10

32.-

19

Wántsai, (Boys),

70

66

2 28 21

33.

"

Yaumáti, (Boys).

51

48

5 26 16

34.-

"

Shekt'ongtsui, (Boys),

43

41

2 16 17

35.

39

Saiyingp'ún I Division, (Boys),

93

93

48 32

2

36.

II

"

(Boys),

68

64 8 22

37.-

"3

Hunghom, (Boys),.

38

36

5

38.

Hospital Chapel, (Boys),

66

62

9

NNN.

25

24

24

22

39.

Shektongtsui, (Girls',

19

19

4 4 9

40,

Saiyingp'ún, (Girls),

42

41

7 14 9

41.-

95

Kau-ü-fong, (Girls),

58

58 13

18 18

42.-

"

43.-

"

44. 45.-

99

"

*

46.

"

47.-

48.

"

Wántsai, (Girls),

49.

"9

50.--

52,-

53.-

54.-

55.-

57.-

58.--

"

14

"

"

99

31

"1

English

Ship Street, (Girls),

Ui-hing Lane, (Girls), Tanglungchau, (Boys),.

(Girls),.

Taipingshán Chapel, (Girls),.

Aberdeen Street, (Girls),.

Staunton Street, (Girls),

Saiyingp❜ún Second Street East, (Girls),.

51.-R. C. Mission, Cathedral School, (Boys),

35

Bridges Street, Chinese School, (Girls), Hollywood Road, Charitable School, (Girls),. Holy Infant School I Division, (Boys),

II "

(Girls),

Wellington Street, (Boys).. (Girls),.

56.—Wesleyan Mission, Spring Gardens, (Boys),

50.-Basel Mission, High Street, (Girls),

60.-Berlin Mission, (Girls),.

61.-C. M. S. Victoria Home and Orphanage, (Girls), 62.-

St. Stephen's Anglo-Chinese, (Boys),

55

63.-F. E, S., Bonham Road, (Girls),

64.-Diocesan Home and Orphanage, (Mixed), 65.-St. Paul's College, Anglo-Chinese, (Boys), 66.-Hongkong Public School, (Boys),

67.—R. C. M., St. Joseph's College, Chinese Division, (Boys),

68.-

"

69.- 70.-

"

$5

71.-

29

72.

55

73.- 74.-

"

*5.-

76.-

11

"1

19

European

""

(Boys),

Italian Convent, English Division,

11

Portuguese Division, Bridges Street, English School, (Girls),..

Portuguese School, (Girls),..

St. Francis Chapel, Portuguese School, (Mixed), Victoria, Portuguese School, (Mixed),

25

22

3 9 4

41

40

1 20 14

3

59

55

34 13

I

"2

(Boys),

"

(Girls),

2598♪~*8BAHERZENI2* * * • • - ****** * * 75 8 2 2 ****A* * *

72

IV 30

IV 28

24

IV 49

IV

20

20

3

9

54 21

20

3

43 17

11 11

56

52 IS

10

7

37

37

8 13

27

26

5 15

4

28 14

60

60 17

5 4 11 14

: : : : : : : :YN:

10

55

54 16 6 14

11

10

2

5

3

comi mi to co somni ai i wai:

2

Ntai ki mi -H

1

: : : : :* :::*

17

11 3 3

44

42

75

65

20

76

22

IV

---EEEER E E E E E BREERR E E

IV 116

IV 10

10

40 11 6 10 107 58 21 13 1 4 2

1

IV

IV

IV

IV

73

71 8

14 18 11

38 37 15

30

30 1

8 4

26 11 8 6

00 * on

8

4

* ∞ ** 20 15 100

4 1

2

21

11

17 26 14

4

5 8 5

76 18 14 16

14

4 5

:::

10

9 2 3

ง ::

7

'

2

137

122

12

31 26

IV

73

73

14

19

IV

52

23

10

:28

IV

18

3

15 20 18 7 12

15 9

: : : :

17 19 5

12

2

4

11

8

6

9 11 5 1 4 2

1

1

3 4 2 4 2 9

41 A

:

:::::

46 46

46

7597

52.90 66,07

1

51.74

10

9.16

25

4

28.26

5

2

8 11

31

31.30

10

8

23.72

10

13.41

60

8

84.28

4

10.69-

63

4

69.22

46

2

47.40

39

47.62

22

34.89

33

43.30

2

40

3

43.14

24

27.43

$

10.97

10

22.20

23

32.17

2

22

24.00

26

30.35 ]

26

31.22

24

32.88 1

18

20.83

13

21.80 1

21

22.04 1

22

24.46 1

74

88.44

1

#8

8

72.23

47

1

48.61 1.

35

6

42.83

82

11

80.79

56

8

65.31

1

36

36.22 1

61

75.88 ]

18

21.27

35

6

41.49 1.

57

1

60.44 221

18

4

30.06

1

38

2

43.73

47

8

63.71

13

7

22.13

51

3

56.14 4:

43

42.71 3

43

9

57.63 3'

34

3

36.44 10

26

25.30 14

23

34.85

2t

56

63.07

52

56.00

7

14.22

17

31

74

32.38

8

46.68

61

4 80.40 3:

3

1

1

1

1

2 1

1 2

2

3

co

: : : co: ::

18

2

24.46 10

76

81.26 108

3

18

40

21.58

..

42.49 66

97

10 113.93 348

8

2

10.73

(

:

2 2

1

4

* * * * 28977** * *

::

9

94.72 48

30

7

8

25

45.31

36.00 1 38.86

90

66

110

12 171.73 72

11

6

2

106.99 75.94 19.49 108

138

78.20

4

32.99 90 27.06

ធំគឺស្ម័ទី១២

84

90

66

4 76.86 3€

24

30.42 18

79.38

3,037 * Special subject. † Needlework Grant forfeited to Government. ‡ Teacher's bonus for

77

Standard I.

Standard II.

Standard III.

Standard IV.

Standard V.

Standard VI.

Standard I.

Standard II.

Standard III.

Standard IV.

Standard V.

Standard VI.

Total Passed.

Total Failed.

ance during School

Average Daily Attend-

Year.

XAMINATION of the GRANT-IN-AID SCHOOLS in 1890, under the provisions of the Scheme of 15th September, 1883.

Number of Scholars who

Passed.

No. of Scholars who Failed.

Sums to which the School is entitled.

223237

35

10

31 19

3 33

2

9

10

34

9

1

3

1

5

10

7

2

2

10

10

4

6

wani ai HOBA

4

2

1

62

2

1

5

10

42

16 2

2

2

12

26

19

6

10 23 11

2

6

17 12

4

10 9

2

9

10 8

4

12

13

6

7

18 6

4

7

9

2

9

9

4

13

1.

9

9

2

11

5

7

9

6

6 12

9 20

35

10

2

28

21 7

5

23

16

2

16

17

48

32

2

8

22

25

5

24

5

9

24

22

4

4

9

7 14

9

13

18

18

3

3

9

4

1

20

14

3

34

13

3

9

1

21

20

5

17

11

11

18

10

7

8

13

5

15

4

1

14

5

4

THE INHON : :*** :*

::::::::::::::::::::: G

::::::::::

::::::::::** :

46

46

46

7691

5

79.38 52.90 06.07

51.74

10

9.16

25

£8.26

5

8.11

31

31.30

10

23.72 12

10

13.41

60

84.28

10.69

63

69.22

46

47.40 20

39

47.62

22

34.69 20

33

43.80

2

40

43.14

24

27.43

: :

to cr

si comari: NAG ::

3

:::::::::::::::::::::::::::

*I purpuris | 2***2±2: *

Standard II.

$

20 124

114

4 140

54

6 132

60

4

136

54

12

G

14

40

42

4

4

12

20

28

60

16

20

168

96

8

12

24

104

114

92

66

12

68

72

36

12

18

40

48

24

52

36

72

36

8

10.97

8

16

10

22.20

18

18

23

32.17 24

30

12

22

24.00

14

24

26

30.35

18

36

18

26

31.22

8

52

30

24

32.88

18

36

12

18

20.83

4

44

18

13

21.80

10

28

6

21

22.04

18

24

36

22

24.46

12

48

24

74

88.44

18

80

210

#8

8

72.23

4

112 126

47

48.61

10

104

96

35

G

42,83

4

64

102

82

11

80.79

192 192

56

8

65.31

16

88 150

36

36.22

10

96

30

61

75.88

A

18

96 132

18

21.27

8

16

54

35

41.49

14

56

54

57

60.44

26

72

108

18

30.06

6

36

24

38

43.73

2

80

84

47

63.71

136

78

13

22.13

6

51

56.14 42

43

42.71 34

43

9

57.63 36

2

::

34

3

36.44 16

26

25.30 10

4

23

5

34.85 28

17

11

14

10

16

6

14

11

52

63.07 34 44 56.00

32

2

5

3

7

3 14.22

4

11

3

3

2

21

11

17

26

14

4

5

8

5

18

14

16

14 11

J.

4

5

11 6

10

j

58

21

13

5

10

1 4

2

1

:::22

:::::

8

14

18 11

15

8

4 1

1

4

11

8

00 to

8 4

→ 2 3

9

7

4

3 1

5

2

4

6

1

:::

2

1

12 31

26

17

19

5

6

1

2

2

1 110

?

14

19

15

12

}

23

10 5

8

}

18

3

..

2

15

20

18

12

2::2

2

3

2 4

1

15

9 2

4

11 8 5

6

9 11 5

1

4 2

1.

1

:

3

4

2

4

2

9

..

..

CATEG** 8 2 2 * 2 897ER 2

34

8

32.38 46.68

22

4

61

4 80.40

34 104

18

24.46

10

76

81.26

108

18

4

21.58

40

42.49

66

* 8 ** £8ã **AN CANT

36

6

80 30

44

66

40

42

52

42

60

24

20

24

84

24 84

88

20

12

18

81

66

8+

32

30

98

128

126

28

40

9

42

80

18

97

10

113.93

348

168 130

8

2

10.73

6

32

20

12

132

62

94.72

48

112

130

58*

30

7

45.31

90

64

40

22

8

36.00

6

32

80

A MOONOK 5: :::**:.~NER:: NTE.*5.¦::::::::::&&,SHA: H::: x∞:: 5* Standard IV.

:::

:::::::::::::::::::

::::::: *:::: ~E::

** 2:2

GO

Standard V.

Standard VI.

Needle Work.

Very

Good.

Good.

Fair.

Capitation Grant.

Total Grant earned in 1890.

Amount of Reduction.

10 per cent.

Amount Payable.

Amount due to Teacher.

Amount due to Manager.

* : : : : :ES

✪ : : :

$

79.38

35.1.38

37.10 316.28 79.07 237.21 52.90 250.90 26.4 224,56 56.14 66.07 264.07 27.72 51.74 253.74

26.64

168.42

236.35 59.08

177.27

227.10

56.77

170.33

10

7.50 6.00 1.50

4

9.16

80,66

8.46

72.20

18.05

54.15

28.26

155.2

16.30

138,96 34.74

104.22

8.10

40,60

4.26

36.34 9.03 27.26

31.30

171.30

17.98

153,32 38.33

114.99

23.72

51.72

5.43

46.29 11.57

34.72

13.41

33 41

3.50

29.91

7.47 22.14

84.28

364,28

38.24

326.04 81.51

244,53

10.69

30.69

3.22

27.47 6.86 20.61

69.22

359,22

37.71

321.51

80.37

241.14

47.40

241.40

25.3+

216.06 54.01

162.05

22.50

2

28.50

26

39.00

4.50

13 4 14

:

5

6

15.00

40

24

22.50

6

22.50

4

12

14

8

19.50 12 18.00 2 19.50 1 4 10.50 5

14.15

47.62 231.62 24.37 207.25 51.81 34.89 140.39 14.74 125.65 31.41 43.30 244.80 25.70 219.10 54.77 164.33

300.14 43.14

31.51 26.63 67.15 201.48 27.43 153.93 16.16 137.7.7 34.44 103.33 10,97 39.97 4.19 35.78 8.94 22.20 68.20 7.16 61.04 15.26 45.78 32.17 133.17 13.98 119,19 29.79 89.40 24.00 198.50 20.84 177.66 44.41 133.25 30.35 168.85 17.72 151.13 37.78 113.35 31.22 171.22 17.97 153.25 38.31 114.94 32.88 162,38 17.4 145.34 36.33 109.01 20.83 134.83

155.44

94.24

26.84

120,68 30.17 90.51

21.80 86.30

9.06

77,24 19.31 57.93

22.04

119,54

12.55

106.99

4 13.50

3

24.46

128.96

13.54

::

32

3.00

115.42 88,44 476.44

50.02 426.42 106.60 319.82 72.23 370.23 38.87 331.36 82.84 48.61 258.61 27.15 231.46 57.86 42.88 212.88 22.35 190.53 47.63 80.79 480.79 50.48 430.31 107.57 65.31

34.36 327.31

73.23 292.95 36.22 188.22 19.76 75.88 369.88 38.83 21.27 142.27 14.93

26.74 80.25 28.85 86.57

248.52

178.60

142.90

322.74

219.72

168.46 42.11

126.35

331.05

82.76

249.29

127.34

31.83

95.51

28.50 14

41.49

251.99 26.45

225.54

56.38

169.16

30

30

12

24

40

12

20

10

40

32

50

110

36

10

20 84

90

24

:*:*::** :** :22 :::::88:

8 40.50 23

60 44

4.50+ 7t

37.50

·

20

4 21.00 30

34.50 11 25.50 28

50 18.00

24

9.00

48.00

55,59

:::::*

30.06

301.23 43.73

42.83 407.94 112.06 11.76 31.62

365.11

91.27

273.84

100.30 2.5.07

75.23

269.61

67.40

202.21

63.71

277.71

29.15

248.56

62.14 186.42

22.13

309.14 56.14

280,21 42.71 57.63

90,13

36.44

9.46 32.45 29.42

62.69 305.13 22.03 273.10 68.27 266,44 25.30 170,30

80.67

20.16

60.51

276.69 69.17 250.79

207.52

188.10

204 83

27.97 17.88

238.47 59.61

178.86

152.42

38.10

114,32

34.85

106.85

11.21

95.64

23.91

71.73

63.07

437.07

45.89

391.18

97.79

293.39

56.00

417.50

43.83

373.67

93.41

280.26

14.22

38.22

4.01

34.21

8,55

25.66

19.50

32.38

107.88

11.32

96.56

24.14

72.49

46.68

200.68

21.07

179.61

44.90

134.71

18.00

6

30

57.00 16.50

24 34.50

13.50

80.40 334.40 35.11 120.46 24.46 81.26 774.26 21.58 230,08 24.15 205.93 51.48 42.49 425.99 44.72 381.27 95.31 113.93 819,93 86.09 9.99 10.73

95.23

293.29

74.82

224.47

12.64

107.82

26.95

80.87

81.29

692.97 173.24

519,73

154.45

285.96

733.84

183.46 85.24 21.31 63.93

550.38

126

112

4

6.010

1

94.72

984.72

103.39

881.33 220.33

661.00

81*

80*

28

45.31

279.31 29.32

249.99

62.49

187,50

42

32

::

36.00

318.00

33.39

284.61

71.15

213.46

18*

24*

25

1

38.86

66

64

60

38.86

228.86

24.03

204.83

51.20

152.63

12

171.73

72

248

260

204 266

80

30* 174** 52*

62

11

106.99

84

152

150

144

28

74

46

6

75.94

138

80

50

96

:

21

2

19.49

108

24

49.50 60 33,00 10 18.00

72

78.20

90

160

180

84

168

18

6 72.00 14

171.73 1,557.73 106.99 788.49

75.94 19.49

163.56

1,394.17 348.54 1,045.63

582.94 185.49

82.79 705.70 176.42 55.95

529.28

476.99

119.24

357.75

19.47

166.02

41.50

124.52

78.20

864.20 90.74

773.46

193.36

580.10

26

4

32.99

00

72

20

2

15.00

14

32.99

25.82 245.99

220.17

55.04

165.18

28

27.06 66

64

50

48

8

10.50

5

27.06

278.56 20.24 249.32

62.33

186.99

60

14

64

36

4

76.86

36

72

110

76.86

492,86 51.75

441.11 110.27

330.84

22*

6*

32*

48

28 144

24

30.42

18

32

20

26

15.00

30.42 417.42

43.83

14*

6*

36*

:.

93.39 373.59

280.20

* Special subject. † Needlework Grant forfeited to Government. Teacher's bonus forfeited to Manager. See C.S.O. 35 of 1891.

..$22,015.46 2,311.29 19,704.17 4,925.74 14,778.48

¡

7

TABLE XIV. PERCENTAGE of SCHOLARS who passed in the GRANT-IN-AID SCHOOLS during the last two Years.

305

No.

Name of School.

1890.

1889.

Increase.

Decrease.

1234

American Board Mission, Bridges Street (Boys),

90.00

75.30

14.70

""

Station Terrace (Boys),.

.90.19

100.00

9.81

""

Hinglung Lane (Boys),.

83.63

80.76

2.87

""

Queen's Road West (Boys),

98.00

92.15

5.85

5

""

Háwán (Girls),

100.00

100.00

6

""

Feltcher Street (Girls),

86.20

7

Market School (Girls),

71.43

8

9

""

10

39

""

11

Basel Mission, Shamshuipò (Boys),

Saukiwán (Boys),.

C. M. S., St. Stephen's I. Division (Boys),

96.87

63.15

33.72

55.55

92.30

36.75

Tòkwáwán (Boys),

90.90

......

88.23

92.53

4.30

12

99

Victoria Home and Orphanage (Boys),

100.00

90.00

10.00

13

Lyndhurst Terrace (Boys),

94.02

85.10

10.92

14

Pottinger Street (Boys),

95.83

91.02

4.81

15

59

Saiyingpùn (Boys),

97.50

95.55

1.95

16

""

St. Stephen's Baxter Memorial (Girls),

91.66

100.00

8.34

17

Lyndhurst Terrace (Girls),

97.05

92.30

4.75

18

Third Street (Girls),..

93.02

88.88

4.14

19

20

21

"

99

22

""

23

Yaumáti (Mixed),

Hunghóm (Boys),

F. E. S., Bonham Road (Girls),

96.00

91.66

4.34

(Girls),

100.00

76.92

100.00

23.08

(Girls),

100.00

85.71

14.29

95.45

100.00

4.55

24

""

High Street (Girls),

100.00

100.00

25

""

Queen's Road (Girls),

96.29

85.71

10.58

26

"

Hollywood Road (Girls),

92.30

92.30

27

"

Pottinger Street (Girls),

100.00

95.45

4.55

28

""

Stanley School (Girls),.

76.47

75.00

1.47

29

""

Shaukiwán (Girls),

95.45

86.66

8.79

19

30

32

L. M. S., Square Street (Boys),

Tòkwáwán, (Girls),

95.65

94.73

0.92

100.00

97.36

2.64

""

Wántsai (Boys),..

87.87

90.76

2.89

33.

"

Yaumáti (Boys),

98.00

80.39

17.61

34

دو

Shektongtsui (Boys),

53.66

95.74

42.08

35

Saiyingpún I Division (Boys),

88.17

88.05

0.12

36

II

33

(Boys),

87.50

89.23

1.73

37

Hunghòm (Boys),

100.00

93.75

6.25

38

""

Hospital Chapel (Boys),

98.38

96.00

2.38

39

""

Shektongtsui (Girls),

94.73

100.00

5.27

40

39

Saiyingpún (Girls),

85.36

91.66

6.30

41

""

42

""

Ship Street (Girls),

43

""

44

""

45

"

46

99

47

""

48

99

49

50

"

51

52

53

54

55

""

57

Kau-ü-fong (Girls),

Ui-hing Lane (Girls),

Tanglungchau (Boys),

"

(Girls).

Taipingshán Chapel (Girls),

Aberdeen Street (Girls),

Wántsai (Girls),...

Staunton Street (Girls),

R. C. M, Cathedral School (Boys)

Bridges Street Chinese School (Girls), Hollywood Road, Charitable School (Girls), Holy Infant School I Division (Boys),

29

56 Wesleyan Mission, Spring Gardens (Boys),

Wellington Street (Boys),.

98.27

93.93

4.34

81.81

81.48

0.33

95.50

90.00

5.50

85.45

65.00

80.00

15.00

94.44

86.04

8.40

100.00

90.90

9.10

82.69

91.22

8.53

92.00

84.09

7.91

Saiyingpún Second Street East (Girls),

100.00

93.75

6.25

82.14

88.23

6.09

93 33

92.98

0.35

96.29

100.00

3.71

70.00

II

(Girls),

100.00

81.00

79.06

1.94

94.09

84.79

9.30

58

""

"

(Girls),

90.00

85.71

4.29

59

Basel Mission, High Street (Girls),

100.00

100.00

60

Berlin Mission (Girls),

81.81

90.90

9.09

61

62

C. M. S., Victoria Home and Orphanage (Girls),

St. Stephen's Anglo-Chinese (Boys),

100.00

96.66

3.34

90.65

90.62

0.03

63

F. E. S., Bonham Road (Girls),

80.00

64

Diocesan Home and Orphanage (Mixed),

87.32

94.54

7.22

65

St. Paul's College. Anglo-Chinese (Boys),

81.08

97.27

16.19

66 Hongkong Public School (Boys),....

73.33

77.77

4.44

67

R. C. M., St. Joseph's College, Chinese Division (Boys),...

96.15

92.45

3.70

68

92

European

(Boys),...

90.16

84.48

5.68

69

"

70

""

"

"

71

""

Italian Convent English Division..

Bridges Street English Division (Girls),

84.93

97.75

12.82

Portuguese

55

88.46

88.00

0.46

100.00

90.12

9.88

72

35

Portuguese

""

(Girls),

91.30

90.12

1.18

73

""

74

""

St. Francis Chapel Portuguese School (Mixed),....... Victoria Portuguese School (Mixed),

83.33

88.23

4.90

100.00

95.24

4.76

75

""

"

English

76

""

17

وو

(Boys), (Girls),

90.00

85.71

4.29

100.00

94.44

5.56

306

TABLE XV. PERCENTAGE of PASSES in the various subjects in which the GRANT-IN-AID SCHOOLS

were examined in 1890.

Class of

School.

Name of School.

Writing Arith-

Gram- Geogra- Reading. or Com-

metic. mar, phy. position.

History.

Repeti- Expla- Compo- tion. nation. sition.

I.

American Board Mission, Bridges Street (Boys.)................[

91.30 91.30

100.00

98.69 100.00 100.00

""

79

Station Terrace (Boys),

100.00

65.29

100.00 100.00

>>

19

""

**

Hing-lung Lane (Boys),

70.90

87.27

100.00

93.33

"

>>

H

Queen's Road West (Boys).

97.87

69.38

100.00

100.00

100.00

""

Háwán (Girls),

100.00

100.00

100.00

100.00 100.00

"

>>

12

"3

Fletcher Street (Girls),

93.10

93.10

"

"

Market School (Girls),.

77.77

55.55

100.00

100.00

>>

""

"

;)

;)

""

**

"

27

>>

"7

Saiyingpún (Boys),

"

22

Basel Mission, Shamshuipò (Boys),

Shaukiwán (Boys), Tokwáwán (Boys),

C. M. S., St. Stephen's I. Division (Boys)......、

Victoria Home and Orphanage (Boys),.

Lyndhurst Terrace (Boys),

Pottinger Street (Boys),

St. Stephen's Baxter Memorial (Girls)..

96.87

100.00

100.00

100.00

100.00

92.36 54.16

96.15

80.00

...

90.90 90.90

100.00

100.00 83.82

40.00

100.00 100.00

100.00

100.00 100.00

100.00 100.00

100.00

94.02

100.00 100.00

100.00

100.00 91.66

100.00

100.00 100.00 100.00

100.00

92.50

100.00

100.00 100.00

100.00

91.66

50.00

100.00 | 100.00

:

Lyndhurst Terrace (Girls),

100.00 91.17

85.71

97.05 100,00

"

17

Third Street (Girls),

100.00 95.34

83.33

100.00

100.00

Yaumáti (Mixed),

100.00

88.00

Failed.

100.00 100.00 Failed

11

33

(Girls),.

100.00

100.00

100.00

#: *

"

Hunghòm (Boys),

>>

F. E. S., Bonham Road (Girls),

92.30

61.53

76.92 100.00

(Girls),

100.00 100.00

100.00

100.00

100,00 100.00

100.00

100.00 100.00 100.00

21

15

High Street (Girls),

100.00 100.00

100.00

100.00 100.00

59

""

Queen's Road (Girls).

100.00 74.07

100.00

100.00 100.00

100.00

ť

11

33

Hollywood Road (Girls),

100.00

80.76

100.00

100.00

100.00

2

Pottinger Street (Girls),.

100.00

100 00

100.00

100.00 100.00

::

Stanley School (Girls),

100.00

52.94

100.00

109.00

100.00

"

>>

Shaukiwán (Girls),

100.00

95.45

100.00 100.00

**

Tòkwáwán (Girls),

100.00

82.35

100.00

100.00

32

L. M. S., Square Street (Boys),

100.00

100.00

100 00

100.00

100.00

"

>>

Wántsai (Boys),

95.31

75.00

100.00

96.66

100.00 33.33

"J

";

Yaumáti (Boys),

97.91

61.25

100.00

100.00)

>>

21

Shektongtsui (Boys),.

97.50

70.00

97.50

100.00

"

""

Saiyingpún, I. Division (Boys),

92.47

58.06

100.00

93.54

100.00

11.

>>

""

>>

(Boys),

98.43

89.06

100.00

...

100.00 100.00 25.00

:)

""

Hunghòm (Boys).

100.00

97.22

100.00

100.00

>>

""

Hospital Chapel (Boys),

98.38

95.16

100.00

100.00 100.00

100.00

1

Shektongtsui (Girls),

94.73

94.73

50.00

100.00 100.00

Saiyingpún (Girls),

92.68

90.24

100.00

97.56

100.00

37

Ship Street (Girls).

77

"

Kau-ü-fong (Girls),

Ui-hing Lane (Girls),

Tanglungchau (Boys),

""

100.00

100.00

100.00

81.81

81.81

97.50

85.00

100.00

94.54

67.27

(Girls),

90.00

60.00

33.33

3)

Taipingshan Chapel (Girls),

100.00

92.72

100.00

""

17

Aberdeen Street (Girls),

100.00

97.67

100.00

100.00 96.15

$6.36

100.00 100.00 100.00

100.00 100.00

100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00

100.00

100.00 100.00

"}

""

Wántsai (Girls), .

94.54

76.36

$2.00

100.00 100,00

')

"

77

Staunton Street, (Girls),

94.64

93.33

100.00

100.00

100.00

27

Saiyingpun, Second Street East (Giris),

100.00

100.00

100.00

100 00

100.00

,,

R. C. M., Cathedral School (Boys)....

85.71

82.14

100.00

100,00

"

""

"

""

27

">

Bridges Street, Chinese School (Girls),.. Hollywood Road, Charitable School (Girls), Holy Infant School, I. Division (Boys),

II.

(Girls),

100.00

93.33

100.00

100.00 100.00

98.14

98.14

100.00

100.00 100.00

70.00

100.00

103.00

...

100.00 100.00

100.00

100.00

"

Wesleyan Mission, Spring Gardens (Boys),

Wellington Street (Boys),

82.75 69.31

96.55

96.96 92.42

100.00 100.00 80.00

III. Basel Mission, High Street (Girls),..

(Girls),

95.00 90.00

95.00 100.00

100.00

98.68 100,00

Berlin Mission (Girls),

100.00 68.18

77.27

IV.

C. M. S., Victoria Home and Orphanage (Girls),

St. Stephen's Anglo-Chinese (Boys),

100.00

97.77 100,00

100.00

F. E. S., Bonham Road (Girls),

100.00

100.00

,,

Diocesan Home and Orphanage (Mixed),

98.59

89.00 90.00 100.00

60.00 100.00 100.00

92.97 90.14 88.88 96.87 100.00

100.00 100.00 66.66 100.00 100.00 90.90

40.00

">

St. Paul's College Anglo-Chinese (Boys),

100.00

97.29 86.48

""

Hongkong Public School (Boys),

93.33

66.66 70.00

""

R.C.M., St. Joseph's College Chinese Division (Boys),

100.00

92.30

77.77 75.00 85.71 96.15 100.00

66.66 100.00

""

""

European

(Boys),

100.00

"

Italian Convent, English Division,

100.00

"

"

""

Portuguese Division,

100.00

17

29

**

"2

""

""

"7

"

"

""

"}

Victoria, Portuguese School (Mixed),

English School (Boys),

"

""

"

多多

(Girls),

90.90 91.78 97.22 100.00 64.38 84.94 87.50 100.00 100.00 96.15 78.86 88.88 100.00 Bridges Street, English Division (Girls),...... 100.00 100.00 78.26

Portuguese Division (Girls),.| 100.00 100.00 97.27 100.00 100.00 St. Francis' Chapel, Port. School (Mixed),..

100.00 100.00 83.33 100.00 100.00 100.00 92.85 100.00 95.74 91.48 100.00 100.00 100.00

85.24

-

100.00 100.00

89.69 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00

TABLE XVI.-NUMBER of UNEDUCATED CHILDREN in the Colony in 1890.

Number of Scholars of local school-age (6 to 16 years) in the Colony in 1890, (about 9 per cent.

of the population roughly estimated at 215,000), say,

Number of Scholars attending Public Schools under Government in 1890, Number of Scholars attending Private Schools in 1890,

Number of Uneducated Children in the Colony in 1890, about:.......

19,350

7,659 1,985

9,644

9,706

E. J. EITEL, M.A., Ph. D.,

Inspector of Schools.

HONGKONG.

No. 39.

275

No. 21

91.

HONGKONG.

DESPATCH RESPECTING ESTIMATES FOR 1891.

Laid before the Legislative Council, by Command of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government,

on the 5th June, 1891.

DOWNING STREET,

27 February, 1891.

SIR,

I have the honour to acknowledge the receipt of Mr. FLEMING's despatch No. 449 of 22nd December last, submitting the Estimates for 1891.

2. I am glad to observe that these Estimates have been drawn up in general accordance with the model form, which accompanied my Circular despatch of 4th February, 1890, with one exception, namely, that "temporary offices and offices "filled by persons.........................................ineligible for the ordinary superannuation allowance are not distinguished as such, but on this point I will address you hereafter.

"

3. The proposed Estimates of Expenditure would, if the Extraordinary Works were carried out in full, almost exhaust the existing Balances, and it seems desir- able that the state of the finances of the Colony should be carefully reviewed at an early date, so as to ascertain whether the necessity of resorting to a loan is within measurable distance. If, in the course of the year, such necessity should become apparent, you should report fully to me at some period before the usual period for drawing up next year's Estimates.

4. As regards the details of the general scheme of increased salaries on the present Estimates, I will address you separately in reply to Mr. FLEMING'S despatch No. 438 of 15th December last. I approve the proposed increases of emolument to Chinese members of the Fire Brigade referred to in the 3rd paragraph of the despatch under acknowledgment, but I would observe that it would perhaps have been better, in view of audit requirements, if the distribution of this additional sum had been shewn, instead of being voted as a lump sum under the designation of "Extra pay to Chinese......... $1,170."

5. I notice, with regret, that the vote for the Audit Department was objected to by the Un-official Members of the Council, but I consider that the recent discov- ery of serious defalcations in the Post Office showed the need for efficient audit, and that the system lately introduced affords the best security against losses and irregularities, and I do not doubt that when it has had a fair trial, this will be recognised in Hongkong.

6. Before sanctioning the vote of $19,200 for Electric Lighting of the Streets referred to in paragraph 4 of the despatch under acknowledgment, I shall be glad to be informed how far it is proposed to substitute electricity for gas in lighting the Streets, in what parts of the town, and what will be the total increase in the annual expenditure, if any, ultimately involved.

SIR G. W. DES VEUX, K.C.M.G.,

&C.,

S.C.,

&c.

Governor

}

{

A

:

* 1.

276

7. Since writing your despatch under acknowledgment, you will have received my despatches Nos. 273 and 274 of 21st November last, regarding the proposed extension of the Gaol, and I shall await the result of the action which you are therein directed to take.

8. As regards the Extraordinary Public Works for which votes have been taken on these Estimates, I have to remind you that in my despatch on last year's Estimates I limited my approval to those works "to which the Colony is already committed and to those which are deemed to be of urgent necessity," but Mr. FLEMING'S despatch No. 313 of 28th August last, forwarding a Memorandum on the Public Works in execution or contemplation, did not clearly indicate what works were already begun or were regarded as of such urgent necessity that it was necessary to proceed with them or commence them during last year. I gather, however, from the last column but one on page 38 of the 1891 Estimates that a considerable number of new Public Works were begun during 1890, which must therefore be taken to have been sanctioned by the qualified approval referred to above as given in my despatch No. 67 of 18th April last.

9. I proceed to refer to some of the works, placed on the present Estimates, in order of relative importance, according as they were lettered A, B, or C, in the Memorandum enclosed in Mr. FLEMING'S despatch of 28th August last.

As regards (Item 1) the Central Market, (Item 10) Cattle Depôt Extension and (Item 11) Slaughter House, &c., I trust that it will be found possible to carry out the strong recommendations of the Un-official Members of the Council, (in enclosure 8 to despatch under acknowledgment), as to reducing the estimated cost of these works, and before committing the Colony to the proposed expenditure, I request you to furnish me with a special report as to the possibility of some ap- preciable reduction in regard to each of them.

10. I have also to request you to report whether you cannot adopt the sug- gestion of the Un-official Members, that a portion of the Hospital Staff Quarters (Items 15 and 16), which are said to be on too large and extravagant a scale, should be converted into an addition to the Hospital, and whether, in that case (Item 17) the vote for Alterations and Additions to the Hospital cannot be dis- pensed with. In the meantime I will suspend my sanction to this vote.

11. I am prepared to approve the vote for (Item 27) Magazines for Explosives and Pier at Stone Cutters' Island, if it is really of primary and immediate import- ance to proceed with them this year, but if not, one or both of them should be postponed, in view of the considerable number of other works in hand. The ex- penditure on these two works should apparently have been voted separately. I gather from the letter referred to in my despatch No. 3 of the 3rd ultimo that the new Pier is to cost about $6,300, so that I presume the estimated cost of the Magazine is over $11,000.

12. With reference to (Item 8) "Improvements-Recreation Ground," I am prepared to sanction the completion of the sanitary improvements already begun, (as I understand), around the site of the Race Course, but I am unable to sanction the remaining portion of this vote apparently amounting to $24,000, (which should have been taken separately), intended for alteration and extension of the Race Course, at any rate pending further information as to the necessity for this work, which would hardly seem to be justified until at least other more pressing works have been executed.

13. I observe that (Item 12) Slaughter House, Kowloon, is set down at $6,500 whereas its cost last year was only estimated at $3,000, and I request you to inform me why this increase is considered necessary.

14. I approve the commencement of the Public Laundries (Item 13) if you are satisfied that it can be undertaken by the Public Works Department this year

:

277

without putting a check upon works already begun, but otherwise it would be better to postpone this work, which though desirable does not seem to be one of immediate

urgency.

15. I approve the proposed erection of Police Station at Quarry Bay (Item 20) and am glad to observe that the Estimate has been reduced from $9,000 (as voted last year) to $7,000.

16. I will defer sanctioning the reconstruction of the Governor's Peak resi- dence (Item 25) pending the receipt of the plans and estimates of the proposed new building.

17. In the absence of further information as to its urgency, I withhold my sanction from (Item 29)

Sháukiwán Market Extension, which might probably be postponed without serious inconvenience.

18. I am glad that your Government adopted the recommendation of the Un-official Members of the Council to omit the proposed vote for new Government Offices and Law Courts, as not being of pressing necessity, and I have to express my concurrence generally in the views set forward in their Memorandum of the 20th of December, especially as regards the desirability of pushing to completion all works already begun, before entering upon any new works unless absolutely necessary, and also as regards the impropriety of sanctioning and commencing any works before detailed drawings and estimates have been prepared.

I

agree in the opinion expressed in the concluding portion of this Memoran- dum as to the importance of consulting the Un-official Members of Council before committing the Colony to any serious expenditure.

19. Subject to the above remarks and to the remarks contained in my sepa- rate despatch as to the increased salaries, I approve the Estimates for the current year.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient,

humble Servant,

KNUTSFORD.

:

No. 1.

{

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 30th January, 1891.

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (FRANCIS FLEMING, C.M.G.), Chairman.

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

""

>>

>>

the Captain Superintendent of Police, (WALTER MEREDITH DEANE, C.M.G.). the Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART Lockhart).

">

the Surveyor General, (SAMUEL BROWN).

C.S.O.

3081 of 1890.

C.S.O. 3070 of 1890.

""

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

>>

""

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

""

ABSENT:

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

The Honourable PHINEAS RYRIE.

The Committee meet at the request of the Colonial Secretary.

Read the following Minutes under the hand of His Excellency the Governor :—

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Two hundred and Forty Dollars, ($240), as an allowance to the Steward of the Civil Hospital for collecting Hospital Bills, at the rate of $20 per month, during the current year.

Government House, Hongkong, 14th January, 1891.

G. WILLIAM DES VOUX.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Three hundred Dollars, ($300), being allowance in lieu of quarters to six teachers of Government Schools.

Government House, Hongkong, 29th January, 1891.

After explanation by the Colonial Secretary, the Committee recommend that the amount be voted.

The Committee is then adjourned sine die.

2

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 16th February, 1891.

Read and confirmed on the 16th February, 1891.

A. M. THOMSON, Acting Clerk of Councils.

F. FLEMING,

Chairman.

83

No. 2.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 16th February, 1891.

85

PRESENT :

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (FRANCIS FLEMING, C.M.G.), Chairman.

the Colonial Treasurer, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES).

;;

the Captain Superintendent of Police, (WALTER MEREDITH DEANE, C.M.G.). the Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART LOCKHART).

:)

>>

the Surveyor General, (SAMUEL BROWN).

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

;;

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

;"

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

??

C.S.O.

2677 of 1890.

C.S.O.

183 of 189!.

C.S.O.

267 of 189).

ABSENT:

The Honourable the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

;;

PHINEAS RYRIE.

Ho KAI, M.B., C.M.

The Committee meet at the request of the Colonial Secretary.

Read the following Minutes under the hand of His Excellency the Governor :-

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Two hundred and Nine Dollars, ($209), for general overhaul and repairs to Health Officer's Steam-launch Blanche, and provid- ing a launch while the repairs are being executed.

Government House, Hongkong, 30th January, 1891.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

The Governor recommends the Council to re-vote a sum of Two thousand Dollars, ($2,000), being the balance on account of work done for the improvement of the piece of Land known as the Chinese Recreation Ground."

Amount voted in 1890,

Do. paid in 1890,.

Paid in 1891,

Government House, Hongkong, 31st January, 1891.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX,

$6,000.00

4,000.00

$2,000.00

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One thousand and Two hundred Dollars, ($1,200), for commission to other countries on Postal Notes and Money Orders.

(In former years all the payments for commission used to be deducted from the amount of commission received, and the balance only paid into the Treasury as revenue. According to the new system of accounts all commissions received are to be paid into the Treasury as Revenue, and all payments for commission to be treated as Post Office expenditure.)

Government House, Hongkong, 31st January, 1891.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One hundred and Sixty Dollars, ($160), as a compassionate allowance to Mrs. ROZARIO, in consideration of the service of the late Mr. HENRI GUSTAVE, alias HENRIQUE DO ROZARIO, 4th Clerk in the Colonial Secretary's Office.

Government House, Hongkong, 3rd February, 1891.

86

C.S.O.

257 of 1891.

C. O. Desp. 1 of 1891.

G. WILLIAM DES VOUX.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Sixty-six Dollars and Sixty-six Cents, ($66.66), being a portion of the amount required to purchase Private HARDWICK'S discharge from the Army Medical Corps, and join the Colonial Service as Junior Wardmaster in the Civil Hospital.

Government House, Hongkong, 10th February, 1891.

G. WILLIAM DES Vœux.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One hundred Dollars, ($100), being increased salaries of two Cadets, Messrs. THOMSON and BREWIN, from 1st November to 31st December, 1890, at the rate of $25 per month, sanctioned by the Secretary of State.

Government House, Hongkong, 12th February, 1891.

After explanation by the Colonial Secretary, the Committee recommend that these amounts be voted.

The Committee is then adjourned till Wednesday, the 25th February.

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 25th February, 1891.

Read and confirmed on the 25th February, 1891.

A. M. THOMSON, Acting Clerk of Councils.

F. FLEMING,

Chairman.

>

:

No. 3.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 25th February, 1891.

87

:

C. O. Desp. 281 of 1890

and

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (FRANCIS FLEMING, C.M.G.), Chairman.

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

"}

""

""

""

""

""

the Colonial Treasurer, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES).

the Captain Superintendent of Police, (WALTER MEREDITH DEANE, C.M.G.). the Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE STEWAart Lockhart).

the Surveyor General, (SAMUEL Brown).

PHINEAS RYRIE.

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

Ho KAI, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

The Committee meet at the request of the Colonial Secretary.

Read the following Minutes under the hand of His Excellency the Governor :- G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Nine hundred and Thirteen d. Dollars, ($913), to cover the Salaries and Allowances to the two Inspectors in the Registrar 336 of 1891. General's Department, in accordance with instructions from the Secretary of State.

C.S.O.

The sums required for 1891 are :—

Salaries, $1,440 and $1,200,

Allowances in lieu of Police Bonus, Medal Money, Coal, Brooms, and Oil,...

Amount provided for in the Estimates for 1891,

Sum to be voted,....

Government House, Hongkong, 11th February, 1891.

=$ 2,640.00 198.00

$ 2,838.00

1,925.00

$

913.00

After explanation by the Colonial Secretary and the Registrar General, the Committee recommends that this amount be voted.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

The Governor desires to submit to the Council that in the Estimates for this year, the salary of the Governor has not been inserted in the manner proposed by the Secretary of State. In his Despatch No. 108 of the 18th of June, 1890, the Secretary of State proposed that the Governor's salary should be voted on the Estimates at the rate of $32,000 inclusive of entertainment allowance, although when on half pay or vacation leave the Governor will receive salary at the rate of $12,500 and $25,000 respectively.

The reason for fixing the actual salary at $32,000 is, as mentioned by the Secretary of State, to better secure the position of the Governor as an Officer in charge of a First Class Government under the Governor's Pension Acts.

The Governor therefore recommends the Council to amend the Estimates in the direction indicated.

Government House, Hongkong, 17th February, 1891.

After explanation by the Colonial Secretary, the Committee recommends that the Estimates be so amended.

!

,་[ས་

:

:

.

:

88

C. O. Teleg. of 13th Feb.,

1891.

G. WILLIAM DES VOEUX.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One hundred and Twenty-three thousand, Eight hundred and Seventy Dollars and Ninety-six Cents, ($123,870.96), being the moiety of the Military Contribution of the Colony for the year 1890-£20,000 @ 3/23 per $.

Government House, Hongkong, 17th February, 1891.

The Colonial Secretary moved that this amount be recommended to be voted by the Council.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

The Honourable P. RYRIE moved the adjournment of the consideration of this vote pend- ing the receipt of a Despatch from the Right Honourable the Secretary of State for the Colonies in reply to the protest from the Un-official Members dated 1st December, 1890, addressed to His Excellency the Officer then Administering the Government and the Honourable Members of this Council.

The Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD seconded.

The Committee divided on the amendment with the following result :-

For.

Honourable P. RYRIE.

Against.

Honourable the Surveyor General.

C. P. CHATER.

>>

J. J. KESWICK.

HO KAI.

""

T. H. WHITEHEAD.

""

the Registrar General.

**

the Captain Superintendent of Police.

the Colonial Treasurer.

24

"

the Attorney General.

The Chairman gave his casting vote against the amendment and the Committee agreed to

recommend the vote.

The Committee is then adjourned till Thursday, the 5th March.

W. M. DEANE,

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 5th March, 1891.

Read and confirmed on the 5th March, 1891.

A. M. THOMSON, Acting Clerk of Councils.

Chairman.

བ * *

$

No. 4.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 19th March, 1891.

89

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (WAlter Meredith DEANE, C.M.G.), Chairman.

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

":

the Colonial Treasurer, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-Innes).

the Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART LOCKHART).

C. O. Desp. 22 of 1890.

**

"}

the Surveyor General, (SAMUEL BROWN).

""

PHINEAS RYRIE.

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

""

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

The Committee meet at the request of the Acting Colonial Secretary.

Read the following Minutes under the band of His Excellency the Governor :-

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One thousand Eight hundred and Thirty Dollars, ($1,830), being increment to the salaries of Masters of Victoria College, as under :-

2nd Master from $2,880 to $3,000,

3rd

"

2,160 2,370,

4th

""

>>

":

2,160 2,370,

5th

;)

2.160 2,370,

6th

;"

7th

:)

17

""

""

1.800 2,070,

1.800 2,070,

8th 9th

>>

**

""

1,800 2,070,

"

1,800 2,070,

.increase $

120.00

210.00

27

210.00

>>

210.00

**

270.00

1

270.00

J*

270.00

**

270.00

$1,830.00

0.5.0. is of 1891.

C. O. Desp No. 4 of 5th

3rd to 9th Masters' Salary to rise by $60 yearly to the Maximum of $2,430, which is the equivalent of 35 per cent over the 1875 rate.

Government House, Hongkong, 16th February, 1891.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX,

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Nine hundred and Sixty Dollars, ($960), for the salary of two Student Interpreters, under Section II of the Scheme published in Government Notification, No. 209, of the 4th May, 1889, at the rate of $40 per month each.

Government House, Hongkong, 26th February, 1891.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Two thousand and Eight hundred Jan, 18. Dollars, ($2,800), as supplementary vote for "Peak Water Supply," being additional expendi- ture consequent on modifications recommended by Mr. CHADWICK in the Hydraulic Motor and Pump required for the Peak Water Works.

Government House, Hongkong, 3rd March, 1891.

:

:

90

C.S.O.

394 of 1891.

C.S.O.

2759 of 1890.

C.S.O.

2597 of 1890.

633 of 1891.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Six hundred Dollars, ($600), as a compassionate allowance to the widow and children of the late Inspector SWANSTON of the Hongkong Police Force.

Government House, Hongkong, 25th February, 1891.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Eight hundred and Forty Dollars, ($840), as an allowance for Quarters for the Postmaster General during the current year.

For one year at $70 a month, $840.

Government House, Hongkong, 25th February, 1891.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Five hundred and Thirty-six Dollars and Eighty-four Cents, ($536.84), as the equivalent of £85. @ 3/2d. per $ for defraying the cost of analyzing the Observations and Readings of Tides of Hongkong for 1887-88, and the results made available for future predictions.

Governinent House, Hongkong, 11th March, 1891.

G. WILLIAM DES VOUX.

C.S.0. The Governor recommends the Council to re-vote the sum of Two thousand Five hundred and Seventy-seven Dollars, and Forty-two Cents, ($2,577.42) to cover payments for the under- mentioned works not completed before the 31st December last, and no provision made in this year's Estimates.

EXTRAORDINARY PUBLIC WORKS.

Main Drainage and Sanitary.

Re-drainage of the Government Civil Hospital-balance due,.

Construction of a Storin Water Drain in Jubilee Street--balance due.............

119.82 2,457.60

$ 2,577.12

.$19.263.35

C.S.O.

453 of 1891.

C.SO.

245 of 1891.

C.S.0.

2450 of 1890.

Unexpended balance in 1890,

Government House, Hongkong, 12th March, 1891.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Two thousand and Five hundred Dollars, ($2,500), to provide permanent moorings for the new Hospital Ship Hygeia.

Government House, Ilongkong, 13th March, 1891.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

The Governor recommends the Council to re-vote the sum of Twenty-nine thousand and Three hundred Dollars, ($29,300), being the two last instalments to be paid for the building of the Hospital Hulk.

Government House, Hongkong, 10th March, 1891.

G. WILLIAM DES VOUX.

C. The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One hundred and Eighty-eight Dollars, ($188), being undrawn salary of the 3rd Bailiff of the Supreme Court from 1st May to 22nd September, 1890, at $40 per mouth, lapsed into the Treasury, to be given to the 1st and 2nd Bailiffs in such proportions as recommended by the Registrar.

C.S.O. 633 of 1891.

Government House, longkong, 11th March, 1891.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

CSO The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Three thousand Seven hundred and Forty Dollars, ($3,740), to cover payment of balance due for the construction of Pokfoolum Filter Beds and Reservoir, which was not completed before the 31st December last, and no provision made in this year's Estimates.

EXTRAORDINARY PUBLIC WORKS. Filter Bed, Pokfoolum Reservoir.

Unexpended balance in 1890, Excess over estimated cost,

$ 3,254.41 485.59

$ 3,740.00

Government House, Hongkong, 12th March, 1891.

-C.S.O.

377 of 1991.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Eight hundred and Eighty-eight Dollars, ($888), as a compassionate allowance to the widow and children of the late H. L. MATHER, Second Lighthouse Keeper.

Government House, Hongkong, 12th March, 1891.

After explanation by the Acting Colonial Secretary, the Committee unanimously agreed to recommend these votes with the exception of the one for the increment to the salaries of the Masters at the Victoria College, on which a division was taken with the result that it was carried by a majority of 6 votes to 3.

The Committee is then adjourned.

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 25th March, 1891.

Read and confirmed on the 22nd May, 1891.

A. M. THOMSON, Acting Clerk of Councils.

W. M. DEANE,

Chairman.

91

No. 5.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 22nd May, 1891.

93

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (WALTER MEREDITH DEANE, C.M.G.), Chairman.

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

""

""

the Colonial Treasurer, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES).

;;

the Registrar General, (JAMES Haldane Stewart LOCKHART).

C.S.0.

the Surveyor General, (SAMUEL Brown).

PHINEAS RYRIE.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

11

21

""

Ho KAI, M.B., C.M.

27

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

The Honourable CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

$80 of 1891.

C.5.0.

253 of 1891.

C.5.0.

820 of 1891.

C.5.0.

779 of 1891.

ABSENT:

The Committee meet at the request of the Acting Colonial Secretary.

Read the following Minutes under the hand of Their Excellencies the Governor and the Officer Administering the Government :-

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Nineteen thousand Nine hundred and Eighty Dollars, ($19,980), for the Peak Water Supply.

The materials for this work having arrived too late last year and the work could not be commenced before this year, the vote for 1890 was not expended, and a re-vote is now required.

Government House, Hongkong, 23rd April, 1891.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One thousand Two hundred and Twenty-nine Dollars, ($1,229), for general repairs to the Police Steam Launch No. 2, and providing a launch while the repairs are being executed.

Government House, Hongkong, 21st April, 1891.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Ninety Dollars, ($90), for an allowance for a Chinese teacher to Mr. WAGGOTT, one of the Student Interpreters, appointed under Section II of the Scheme published in Government Notification No. 209 of 4th May, 1889, at the rate of $10 per month.

Government House, Hongkong, Sth April, 1891.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Ninety Dollars, ($90), for an allowance for a Chinese teacher to Mr. NOLAN, one of the Student Interpreters, appointed under Section II of the Scheme published in Government Notification No. 209 of 4th May, 1889, at the rate of $10 per month.

Government House, Hongkong, 16th April, 1891.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Eighty Dollars, ($80), to provide a Chinese teacher for Miss McINTOSH, one of the European Nurses at the Civil Hospital, at the rate of $10 per month.

Government House, Hongkong, 21st April, 1891.

:

:

:

94

C.S.O. 2121 of 1890.

C.S.O.

1579 of 1890.

C.S.O. 878 of 1891,

C. O. Desp. 281 of 1890,

and

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Sixty-nine Dollars and Thirty- five Cents, ($69.35), being half salary of Miss WARD, Head Mistress of the Central School for Girls, during her voyage from England to Hongkong, from 20th July to 31st August, 1890, at $50 per month.

Government House, Hongkong, 30th April, 1891.

G. DIGBY BARKER.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Nine hundred Dollars, ($900), for the purchase of 200 brass Padlocks from CH UBB & SONS, for Victoria Gaol.

Government House, Hongkong, 13th May, 1891.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One thousand and One hundred Dollars, ($1,100), for general overhaul and repairs to Harbour Department Steam Launch Daisy.

Government House, Hongkong, 21st April, 1891.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Eight hundred and five Dollars. ($805), to cover the Salaries and Allowances to the two Inspectors in the Registrar 336 of 1891. General's Department, in accordance with instructions from the Secretary of State.

C.S.O.

C.S.O.

650 of 1891.

The sums required for 1891 are:-

Salaries, one Inspector at $1,200, and another at $960, Allowance in lieu of Rent,

Allowances in lieu of Police Medal Money, Coal, Brooms, and Oil,

Amount provided for in the Estimates for 1891,

Sum to be voted,....

Government House, Hongkong, 11th February, 1891.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

=$2,160.00

480.00

90.00

$2,730.00

1,925.00

*$ 805.00

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Nine hundred and Eighty Dollars, ($980), as a compassionate allowance to the widow and daughters of the late Mr. F. V. RIBEIRO, Clerk in the Audit Office, in consideration of her husband's twenty-one years' service.

Government House, Hongkong, 25th March, 1891.

The Acting Colonial Secretary moved that these votes be recommended by the Committee.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

The Committee is then adjourned sine die.

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 5th June, 1891.

W. M. GOODMAN,

Chairman.

Read and confirmed on the 19th June, 1891.

TM

A. M. THOMSON, Acting Clerk of Councils.

:

:

No. 6.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 19th June, 1891.

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN), Chairman. the Acting Attorney General, (ANDREW JOHN LEACH).

11

;)

the Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART LOCKHART).

""

the Colonial Treasurer, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES).

>>

the Surveyor General, (SAMUEL BROWN).

PHINEAS RYRIE.

""

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

""

""

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

95

C.5.0.

27

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

ABSENT:

The Honourable the Captain Superintendent of Police, (WALTER MEREDITH DEANE, C.M.G.).

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

1266 of 1891.

21

The Committee meet at the request of the Acting Colonial Secretary.

Read the following Minute under the hand of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government:-

G. DIGBY BARKER.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Three thousand Dollars, ($3,000), to provide for the cost of extending the works of "Peak Water Supply" to Magazine Gap.

Government House, Hongkong, 10th June, 1891.

The Acting Colonial Secretary moved that this vote be recommended to be passed by the Council.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

The Committee is then adjourned.

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 17th July, 1891.

Read and confirmed on the 3rd July, 1891.

A. M. THOMSON, Acting Clerk of Councils.

W. M. GOODMAN,

Chairman.

:

No. 7.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 3rd July, 1891.

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN), Chairman. the Acting Attorney General, (ANDREW JOHN LEACH).

97

""

>>

the Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART LOCKHART).

>>

""

the Colonial Treasurer, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES). the Surveyor General, (SAMUEL BROWN).

""

""

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

27

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

The Honourable PHINEAS RYRIE.

C. O. Desp. 71 of 1891.

C.S.O.

1321 of 1891.

**

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

ABSENT:

The Committee meet at the request of the Acting Colonial Secretary.

Read the following Minutes under the hand of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government :-

G. DIGBY BARKER.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Five thousand Six hundred and Forty Dollars, ($5,640), to cover certain increases to salaries, in excess of the Estimates for 1891, as per list annexed.

Government House, Hongkong, 24th June, 1891.

G. DIGBY BARKER.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Two thousand Eight hundred Dollars, ($2,800), being amount required for the printing and binding of 200 copies of a concise edition of Ordinances of Hongkong, from 1844 to 1890.

For printing and binding,

To Mr. LEACH,

.$2,200.00

600.00

$2,800.00

Government House, Hongkong, 24th June, 1891.

The Acting Colonial Secretary moved that these votes be recommended to be passed by the Council.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

The Committee is then adjourned.

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 17th July, 1891.

Read and confirmed on the 17th July, 1891.

A. M. THOMSON, Acting Clerk of Councils.

W. M. GOODMAN,

Chairman.

}

No. 8.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 17th July, 1891.

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN), Chairman. the Acting Attorney General, (ANDREW JOHN LEACH).

99

C.S.O.

""

>>

the Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART LOCKHART).

""

the Colonial Treasurer, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES).

21

the Surveyor General, (SAMUEL Brown).

""

>>

Ho KAI, M.B., C.M.

>>

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

The Honourable PHINEAS RYRIE.

1536 & 1539

29

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

ABSENT:

The Committee meet at the request of the Acting Colonial Secretary.

Read the following Minute under the hand of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government :-

G. DIGBY BARKER,

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of of 1891. Forty-eight Dollars, ($48), for the Salaries of two Coolies, one for Saiyingpoon, and the other for Wanchai School, at $6 per month, from 1st September to 31st December of the current

year.

Government House, Hongkong, 13th July, 1891.

The Acting Colonial Secretary moved that this vote be recommended to be passed by the Council.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

The Committee is then adjourned.

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 24th July, 1891.

Read and confirmed on the 15th October, 1891.

A. M. THOMSON, Acting Clerk of Councils.

W. M. GOODMAN,

Chairman.

:

No. 9.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 15th October, 1891.

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN), Chairman. the Acting Attorney General, (Andrew JOHN LEACH).

· 101

C.S.O.

;;

the Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART LOCKHART).

""

the Colonial Treasurer, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES).

""

the Acting Surveyor General, (FRANCIS ALFRED COOPER). PHINEAS RYRIE.

""

"}

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

The Honourable CATCHICK PAUL CHAter.

2152 of 1891.

C.S.O.

2085 of 1891.

C.S.O. 1866 of 1891.

C.5.0.

1562 of 1891.

C.S.O. 1704 of 1891.

ABSENT:

The Committee meet at the request of the Acting Colonial Secretary.

The Minutes of the last Meeting held on the 17th July, were read and confirmed.

Read the following Minutes under the hand of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government :--

G. DIGBY BARKER.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Three hundred and Twenty Dollars, ($320), as a Compassionate Allowance to the Widow and children of CHEONG LOI, late First Shroff in the Colonial Treasury.

Government House, Hongkong, 6th October, 1891.

G. DIGBY BARKER.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of One thousand and Ninety-two Dollars, ($1,092), as a Compassionate Allowance to the children of the late Mr. A. M. PLACÉ, Senior Marine Officer in the General Post Office, in consideration of their father's twenty-one years' service.

Government House, Hongkong, 16th September, 1891.

G. DIGBY BARKER.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of One thousand and Six hundred Dollars, ($1,600), for general repairs to the Government Marine Surveyor's Launch Hilda, and providing a launch while the repairs are being executed.

Government House, Hongkong, 29th August, 1891.

G. DIGBY BARKER.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Three thousand Dollars, ($3,000), for the repair of St. John's Cathedral Church.

Government House, Hongkong, 11th August, 1891.

G. DIGBY BARKER.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Seven thousand and Thirty-seven Dollars, ($7,037), for the repairs to damages caused by the Storm on the 18th and 19th instant, to the Praya wall and roadway in Yaumati, in front of Lots Nos. 215 and 218.

Government House, Hongkong, 29th August, 1891.

102

C.S.O.

120 of 1891.

G. DIGBY BARKER.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Three thousand and Five hundred Dollars, ($3,500), for building the Vaccine Institute.

Government House, Hongkong, 2nd October, 1891.

The Acting Colonial Secretary moved that these votes be recommended to be passed by the Council.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

The Committee is then adjourned.

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 19th October, 1891.

Read and confirmed on the 19th October, 1891.

A. M. THOMSON, Acting Clerk of Councils.

}

W. M. GOODMAN,

Chairman.

F

·

No. 10.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG, On the 19th October, 1891.

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN), Chairman. the Acting Attorney General, (ANDREW JOHN LEACH).

>>

>>

17

>>

the Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART LOCKHART). the Colonial Treasurer, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES). the Acting Surveyor General, (FRANCIS ALFRED COOPER). JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

Ho KAI, M.B., C.M.

""

ABSENT:

103

C.S.O.

The Honourable PHINEAS RYRIE.

2292 of 1891.

C.S.O. 2016 & 2292

""

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

The Committee meet at the request of the Acting Colonial Secretary:

The Minutes of the last Meeting held on the 15th October, were read and confirmed. Read the following Minutes under the hand of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government:-

G. DIGBY BARKER.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Fifty thousand Dollars, ($50,000), being Government share for the Praya Reclamation.

(Amount already paid $50,000.)

Government House, Hongkong, 13th October, 1891.

G. Digby BARKER.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Seven of 1891. thousand Six hundred Dollars, ($7,600), for the Construction of Quarters for the Superin-

tendent, Botanical and Afforestation Department.

C.5.0.

1605 of 1891.

C.O. Desp. 20 6 of 1891.

Government House, Hongkong, 13th October, 1891.

G. DIGBY BARKER.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Two hundred and Forty Dollars, ($240), for Conveyance Allowance to the Superintendent, and First Clerk of the Imports and Exports Office. From 1st March to 31st December, 1891, at the rate of $12 per month, each.

Government House, Hongkong, 14th October, 1891.

G. DIGBY BARKER.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Two hundred and Eighty-eight Dollars, ($288), to cover the increase to the Salary of the First Clerk and Accountant in the Police Department, being 35 % instead of 20% over his pay, as previously sanctioned.

Government House, Hongkong, 14th October, 1891.

The Acting Colonial Secretary moved that these votes be recommended to be passed by the Council.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

The Committee is then adjourned.

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 26th October, 1891.

Read and confirmed on the 26th October, 1891.

A. M. THOMSON, Acting Clerk of Councils.

W. M. GOODMAN,

Chairman.

T

:

C

No. 11.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG, On the 26th October, 1891.

105

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN), Chairman. the Acting Attorney General, (ANDREW JOHN LEACH).

the Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART LOCKHART). the Colonial Treasurer, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES). the Acting Surveyor General, (FRANCIS ALFRED COOPER). PHINEAS RYRIE.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

The Honourable CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

C.S.O.

2287 of 1891.

ABSENT:

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

The Committee meet at the request of the Acting Colonial Secretary.

The Minutes of the last Meeting held on the 19th October were read and confirmed.

Read the following Minutes under the hand of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government:----

G. DIGBY BARKER.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Six hundred and Seventy-nine Dollars and Twenty-nine Cents, ($679.29), for the purchase of a Nordenfelt Gun on tripod mounting, and 1,000 rounds of ammunition.

Government House, Hongkong, 26th October, 1891.

G. DIGBY BARKER.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Six hundred and Forty Dollars, ($640), to provide for the Salaries and Uniform for 4 Chinese Constables for Cemeteries-omitted in the Estimates for 1891.

SANITARY DEPARTMENT.

Personal Emoluments.

4 Chinese Constables for Cemeteries,.

Other Charges.

Uniform for 4 Chinese Constables,

$

528.00

112.00

$

640.00

Governinent House, Hongkong, 23rd October, 1891.

The Acting Colonial Secretary moved that these votes be recommended to be passed by the

Council.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

The Committee is then adjourned.

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 2nd November, 1891.

Read and confirmed on the 2nd November, 1891.

A. M. THOMSON, Acting Clerk of Councils.

W. M. GOODMAN, Chairman.

No. 12.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 2nd November, 1891.

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN), Chairman. the Acting Attorney General, (ANDREW JOHN LEach).

""

2)

""

""

the Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART LOCKHART). the Colonial Treasurer, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES). the Acting Surveyor General, (FRANCIS ALFRED COOPER). HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

107

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

The Honourable PHINEAS RYRIE.

C. O. Desp. 207 of 1891.

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

ABSENT:

""

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

"

The Committee meet at the request of the Acting Colonial Secretary.

The Minutes of the last Meeting held on the 26th October were read and confirmed. Read the following Minute under the hand of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government:-

G. DIGBY BARKER.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Six hundred Dollars, ($600), to cover the increase to the salary of the Harbour Master, so as to bring his salary from $4,800 to $5,400 per annum, from 1st January last, as approved by the Secretary of State.

Government House, Hongkong, 27th October, 1891.

The Acting Colonial Secretary moved that this vote be recommended to be passed by the Council.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

The Committee is then adjourned.

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 9th November, 1891.

Read and confirmed on the 9th November, 1891.

A. M. THOMSON, Acting Clerk of Councils.

W. M. GOODMAN,

Chairman.

No. 13.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG, On the 9th November, 1891.

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN), Chairman. the Acting Attorney General, (ANDREW JOHN LEach).

the Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART LOCKHART).

?

""

the Colonial Treasurer, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES).

""

the Acting Surveyor General, (FRANCIS ALFRED COOPER).

;;

the Acting Harbour Master, (WILLIAM CHARLES HOLLAND HASTINGS). PHINEAS RYRIE.

""

109

""

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

Ho KAI, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

ABSENT:

The Honourable JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

The Committee meet at the request of the Acting Colonial Secretary.

The Minutes of the last Meeting held on the 2nd November were read and confirmed.

The Committee considered the Estimates of Expenditure for 1892, and agreed to recommend the

following votes to be passed by the Council, viz. :-

Charge on account of Public Debt,

Pensions,

Governor and Legislature,..

Colonial Secretary's Department,

Audit Department,

Treasury,...

Water and Drainage Department,.

Post Office,

Registrar General's Department,

Harbour Master's Department,

Lighthouses,

Observatory,

Stamp Office,

Botanical and Afforestation Department,

Legal Departments,

Education,

Medical Departments,

Magistracy,

Police,

Gaols,

Fire Brigade,

Sanitary Department,.

Charitable Allowances,

Transport,

Public Works, Recurrent,

$ 96,860

65,200

40,879

35,616

10,000

27,376

27,366

118,976

25,490

58.811

14,648

12,852

4,318

21,842

71,308

84,120

75,648

25,124

227,284

57,682

20,482

59,504

5,000

4,500

115,060

The Committee divided on the vote for the Audit Department when it was agreed to recommend the vote by six to four votes.

It was also agreed to recommend a sum of $252 for 3 extra Scavengers at $84 per annum each, under the heading "Sanitary Department," and a sum of $1,000 extra on account of Gas lighting under the heading "Miscellaneous Services."

The Committee is then adjourned.

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 16th November, 1891.

Read and confirmed on the 16th November, 1891.

A. M. THOMSON, Acting Clerk of Councils.

W. M. GOODMAN,

Chairman.

-

·

No. 14.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG, On the 16th November, 1891.

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN), Chairman.

the Acting Attorney General, (ANDREW JOHN LEACH).

the Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART LOCKHART). the Colonial Treasurer, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES).

"

;;

??

""

the Acting Surveyor General, (FRANCIS ALFRED COOPER).

"

the Acting Harbour Master, (WILLIAM CHARLES HOLLAND HASTINGS). CATCHICK PAUL CHATER..

111

19

Ho KAI, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

The Honourable PHINEAS RYRIE.

ABSENT:

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

The Committee meet at the request of the Acting Colonial Secretary.

The Minutes of the last Meeting held on the 9th November were read and confirmed. The Committee again considered the Estimates of Expenditure for 1892, and agreed to recommend the following votes to be passed by the Council, viz. :—

Surveyor General's Departinent,

Miscellaneous Services,

Military Expenditure,

Public Works, Extraordinary, viz.:—

$ 72,760

124,802

264,632

Central Market,

$ 60,000

Gap Rock Lighthouse,

15,000

Praya Reclamation, (Government Contribution),

90,000

Contribution to Reclamation in front of Marine Lot 95-98 & IC5,

11,525

Praya Reclamation, Site for proposed Western Market,

13,000

Training Albany Nullah and Branches,

10,000

Improvements-Recreation Ground, Happy Valley,

15,000

Slaughter-House, and Sheep and Pig Depôts,

50,000

Public Laundries,

Stores Account,..........

12,000

15,000

Telegraph Cable to Gap Rock,

86,666

Kowloon New Roads,

10,000

Reconstruction of Governor's Peak Residence,

10,000

Minor. Works,.

93,887

Water and Drainage Department.

New Water Mains and Distributory System of Victoria

Water Works,

Sewerage of Victoria,

Do. of Yaumati,

Water Supply of Kowloon,

Minor Works,..

Stores Account,

25,000

80,000

12,000

30,000

11,000

20,000

On the vote for Military Expenditure Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD moved a reduction of £20,000. Honourable C. P. CHATER seconded. The Council divided when the motion was lost by six 'to three votes, all the Un-official Members present voting in favour of it.

The Committee is then adjourned.

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 20th November, 1891.

Read and confirmed on the 20th November, 1891..

F. H. MAY,

Acting Clerk of Councils.

W. M. GOODMAN,

Chairman.

:

i

;

No. 15.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG, On the 21st November, 1891.

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN), Chairman. the Acting Attorney General, (ANDREW JOHN LEACH).

14

"

::

>

the Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART LOCKHART). the Colonial Treasurer, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES).

the Acting Surveyor General, (FRANCIS ALFRED Cooper).

the Acting Harbour Master, (WILLIAM CHARLES HOLLAND HASTINGS). PHINEAS RYRIE.

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

""

Ho KAI, M.B., C.M.

113

ABSENT:

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

The Honourable JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

""

The Committee meet at the request of the Acting Colonial Secretary.

The Minutes of the last Meeting held on the 16th November were read and confirmed.

The Committee considered The Further Appropriation Ordinance for 1891, and agreed to recom- mend the following votes to be passed by the Council, viz. :-

PUBLIC WORKS, EXTRAORDINARY, VIZ.:-

Surveyor General's Department.

Central Market,

$ 26,822

Gap Rock Lighthouse,

52,640

Praya Reclamation (Ordinance 16 of 1889), Government Contribution, Praya Reclamation site for proposed Western Market,

100,000

29,469

Training Albany Nullah and Branches,

18,000

Slaughter-house, and Sheep and Pig Depôts,

12;875

Public Laundries,

13,000

Civil Hospital, Staff Quarters,

18,999

Police Station, Aberdeen,

21,031

Quarters for Superintendent of Botanical and Afforestation Department, Minor Works, (under $10,000),

16,000

84,354

Water and Drainage Department.

New Water Mains and Distributory System of Victoria Water Works,

65,000

Peak Water Supply,

30,000

Sewerage of Victoria,..

60,000

House Service Account,

12,000

Stores Account,

Minor Works, ..

50,000

20,817

Total,....

$631,007

The Committee is then adjourned.

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 23rd November, 1891.

Read and confirmed on the 23rd November, 1891.

A. M. THOMSON, Acting Clerk of Councus.

W. M. GOODMAN,

Chairman.

No. 16.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 23rd November, 1891.

PRESENT:

The Ilonourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN), Chairman. the Acting Attorney General, (ANDREW JOHN LEACH).

the Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE STEWArt Lockhart).

the Colonial Treasurer, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES).

""

""

the Acting Surveyor General, (FRANCIS ALFRED COOPER).

>>

""

the Acting Harbour Master, (WILLIAM CHARLES HOLLAND HASTINGS). CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

"

Ho KAI, M.B., C. M.

""

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

The Honourable PHINEAS RYRIE.

ABSENT:

99

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

115

The Committee meet at the request of the Acting Colonial Secretary.

The Minutes of the last Meeting held on the 21st November were read and confirmed.

The Committee considered the Estimates of Expenditure for 1892, and agreed to recommend the following votes to be passed by the Council, viz. :—

Ecclesiastical.

Gaol Extension,....

$ 5,490 .$10,000

The Committee divided on the vote for Gaol Extension when it was agreed to by six to three votes, all the Un-official Members present voting against it.

The Committee is then adjourned.

Read and confirmed on the 25th January, 1892.

A. M. THOMSON,

Acting Clerk of Councils.

W. M. GOODMAN,

Chairman.

1

لا

:

.

177

HONGKONG.

GOVERNOR'S ADDRESS ON THE SUBJECT OF THE FINANCIAL CONDITION OF THE COLONY,

Laid before the Legislative Council, on the 30th April, 1891.

Before proceeding to the Orders of the Day I deem it right to refer to a letter which I received a few days ago from the Un-official Members, informing me of their intention to memorialise the Secretary of State to the effect that the Colony is not now in a position to pay the increased salaries of officials which recently passed the Council, and requesting me to notify the Secretary of State by telegraph of this intention, and of their wish that he should withhold his sanction of these increased salaries until their memorial shall be received.

In reply I caused a letter to be addressed the Un-official Members to the effect that I hoped within a few days to be able to inform them of the course which I should

pursue after giving this important matter my full consideration.

In reply to a further communication on the subject from the Honourable Mr. RYRIE, I informed him of the substance of the grounds on which I felt bound to decline sending such a telegram, and I now proceed to state them in full.

As to the first reason, viz.: that from a despatch already received from the Secretary of State it may be expected that the decision on the subject of Salaries will be received very shortly, and that therefore any telegram of the kind would arrive too late, it is unnecessary to say anything further, but as to the other-the second reason-further information may seem to be required.

It is scarcely necessary for me to remind you that during the year 1889, there was appointed a Committee of the Council for the purpose of enquiring into the Salaries of the public officers, and that that Committee, composed (with the exception of the Chairman) exclusively of Un-official Members, eventually recom- mended unanimously a large increase of the salaries of a great many officers, and votes generally in accordance with that recommendation, but on a different prin- ciple specially authorised by the Secretary of State, were in October last, during my absence from the Colony, unanimously passed by this Council. In view of the apparent unanimity of the Council that these increases were only a matter of justice to the officers concerned, and in view of the fact that the Secretary of State had not disapproved the principle of a general increase, there would seem to be a great probability that His Lordship will sanction at least a part of the recom- mended increase in the majority of cases, and I think it not at all unlikely that some of the officers concerned have made arrangements in anticipation of this sanction, and would have ground of very serious complaint if those who have made to them what was practically a conditional promise should, by now deprecating the sanction of the Secretary of State, endeavour to preclude the condition which is alone required to render that promise binding. As the Estimates which contain these increased salaries are only voted for one year, the Council will, of course, be at full-liberty to reconsider the position with reference to the Estimates of 1892, and public officers will understand that though these salaries may be fixed at a given amount for this year, it does not follow that they will remain at that figure for next or any subsequent year, should the circum- stances of the Colony require a reduction. But for this year I regard their remu- neration, in so far as action on the part of the Council is concerned, as definitely fixed, and any attempt to lessen it now would seem to me something very like the repudiation of a contract. And I of course use here the word "contract" not in its strict legal sense, but in the sense of moral obligation. It is, I trust, needless for me to express my utter disbelief that the Honourable Member who originated, or those who supported, this movement would have had any part in it, if they had

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regarded it in this light; and yet I am bound to say that if the extremely lugubrious picture which the Honourable Member has painted of the condition and prospects of the Colony were a correct one, there would be at least ground for arguing the exist- ence of the condition which would justify-I will not say repudiation-but breach of a legal contract, viz.: inability to pay other equally binding obligations in full. I am sure that the Honourable Member had no intention of this kind; and I gather that his object was simply to show our inability to pay these increased salaries in permanence in the absence of additional taxation. But whatever may have been the Honourable Member's intention, the effect likely to be created by his speech if unanswered, is far beyond this; and as I regard injury to the credit of the Colony as likely to inflict greater loss upon the Colonists than that involved in these increased salaries, even when coupled with the increased Military Contribution, I have deemed it my duty to examine this subject calmly and deliberately in all its various bearings with a view to determine whether the picture of our position as drawn by the Honourable Member is a correct one, and I must now make a short further trespass upon your time in the endeavour to present to you the result of that examination.

In approaching the subject of the Honourable Member's speech, I am bound to bear testimony to its ability, and to admit that the painstaking research of which it bears evidence, has brought forward facts well worthy of reflective con- sideration; but on the other hand as the result of my examination of the question I find it impossible to regard it otherwise than as the address of an advocate which, to say the least, makes the most of the facts adduced in favour of his view, and entirely ignores all those which tell in favour of the other side. In order to heighten the effect of the gloomy picture which (whatever his motive) it has pleased him to draw, he has instituted a contrast between the present, (as he would seem to allege) abject, position of the Colony, with that portrayed by my so-called "brilliant" despatch of October 1889, and he unmistakeably conveys the inference, though he does not actually say so, that the description there given was incor- rect. In one passage if correctly reported he alleges himself to be almost quoting my very words when he says that I referred to a vast commerce "in a healthy state of progress with prosperity extraordinary and prospects magnificent." Now any one hearing or reading these words "prospects magnificent" (which by-the-bye I never used) as contrasted with his subsequent representation of the depressed condition of the Colony, would infer that I had dealt largely in prophecy as regards the immediate future, and that such prophecy had been falsified by the event, whereas this is not only not true but in one important respect the exact opposite of the truth. I indeed referred to a trade as apparently in a healthy condition of progress, despite the restrictive measures against Chinese in the United States and Australia, and the decline of the Tea Trade the full effects of which I mentioned as having not then been fully felt-and this reference I shall presently give reasons for believing correct-while I expressed no doubt that land would in the course of time become more valuable than it was then, and this I have still stronger reason to believe now. But, with reference to the immediate future 1. most distinctly expressed doubts whether speculation had not unduly raised. the prices both of shares and of land, and plainly intimated the possibility of reaction and consequent distress to all those who had been speculating beyond their means. So far from partaking largely in prophecy whether about the immediate or distant future, my despatch dealt almost exclusively with facts, not one of which in so far as I know has ever been impugned; and the only passage other than those referred to in which the future was touched upon at all was the following:-"As far as is known all, or nearly all, of these Companies especially those whose field of operations is Hongkong, have good, some of them excellent, prospects of success." And even here I am not expressing my own opinion, but fas is shewn from the words "as far as is known") the opinion of the community, and that I was entitled to infer from the prices of the shares and the fact that no note of warning had anywhere been sounded. It is true that I expressed no

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dissent from this opinion, because I had no reason to do so, and it would have been presumptuous for me with regard to purely mercantile matters to express opinions opposed to those of a mercantile community. But even if the anticipation had been my own, I am by no means sure, despite the Honourable Member's statements, that I should have much cause to regret it. For I find some 26 out of the 35 Companies referred to are not only carrying on business with a paid-up capital of 6 millions, but appear to be on a sound footing. From the present value of the shares,. the greater portion of the capital mentioned appears to have been well invested, while others of these Companies though their shares at this time of depression are at a discount cannot be yet said to be a failure as they have not yet had time to fully test their capabilities of success. It is no doubt true that 7 of the Companies referred to, not “many as stated by the Honourable Member, are in liquidation, but even as regards these as well as some of the others which have not yet been successful it might very possibly have been said, not without a certain correctness, on their being launched, that their prospects were good, as their failure or comparative failure may have been due to faults of inanagement or insufficiency of capital. And in confirmation of this view it may be observed that the enterprises of some of these Companies in liquidation, as for instance the Borneo Planting Companies have, I am informed, only quite recently found persons outside the Colony who sufficiently believe in their prospects to pay a considerable sum for their properties. Mentioning these things by the way as furnishing some justification, not of my own, but what I intended to convey as the public view of the prospects of these Companies, I must now point out that the aggregate capital of the Companies referred to which have failed or the shares of which are at a heavy discount, is extremely insignificant as compared with the total paid-up capital of local Joint Stock Companies which are at a premium and for the most part at a very high premium.

Taking up the list of local enterprises published in the Daily Journals I find that the shares of the Hongkong and Shanghai Bank with a paid-up capital of $9,300,000, backed as it now is by a reserve fund of over a million sterling, are worth now

in the aggregate about $28,000,000. The shares of the two local Fire Insurance Companies with an aggregate paid-up capital of $800,000 are quoted in the one case at 500 in the other at 300 per cent. premium. The shares of the local Marine Insurance Companies with aggregate capital of $1,350,000 are quoted at nearly 300 per cent., 150 per cent. and 100 per cent. premium, respectively. Carrying my eye down the list I find the Hongkong and Whampoa Dock Company shares (with a paid up capital of 1 million dollars) are at 98 per cent. premium, while those of the Hongkong and Kowloon Wharf and Godown Company on which an aggregate of $1,000,000 is paid up are now worth over $1,590,000; the China and Manila Steam Navigation Company's shares with paid-up capital of $175,000 are at about 150 per cent.; and the $1,600,000 paid-up capital of the Hongkong, Canton and Macao Steam-boat Company is worth $2,660,000. Similarly the shares of seven other Companies (China Sugar Company, Hongkong Land Investment Company, Société des Charbonnages du Tonkin, Hongkong Hotel Company, Humphreys Estate and Finance Company, A. S. Watson & Co., Hongkong Ice Company) principally owned in Hongkong on which was originally paid $6,223,000 are now worth $12,940,000, which added to the figures repre- senting the paid-up capital and present market value of the Hongkong Bank and 6 Companies just mentioned give a total of $22,010,500 paid in respect of shares which are now worth $56,177,500. This, however, gives only a partial view of the situation. A more complete view is furnished by the following statements and figures supplied to me by the Registrar of Public Companies.

"At the end of the year 1887 there were 26 public companies whose shares "were dealt in in the Hongkong Market having an aggregate paid-up capital of $26,233,000 and the market value of which was then $46,870,125. In 1888 3 of "these Companies went into liquidation and a fourth reduced its capital by

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$175,000 and at the end of the same year the 23 remaining Companies represented a "paid-up capital of $25,158,000 and a market value of $48,355,325, or an increase "in the market value of the 23 Companies for the year 1888 of $2,021,200. In "the same year the shares of 13 additional Companies were placed on the Hongkong "Market representing a paid-up capital of $3,709,640 and a market value at the "end of 1888 of $5,596,000 giving an increase for the year of 10 Companies, “$2,634,640 in paid-up capital and $7,081,200 in market value. Thus at the end “of 1888, there were 36 Companies with an aggregate paid-up capital of $28,867,640, "the market value of which was $53,951,325. Two of these Companies (with a "total paid-up capital of $200,000) are now being wound up, but the aggregate "values of the shares of the remaining 34 amount at present to $64,421,050 shewing "an increase (after deducting $1,715,000 net increase to capital) of $8,874,725 as compared with December, 1888. In addition to the above 34 Companies "there are 20 new Companies registered since December, 1888, whose shares "are dealt in in the Hongkong Market. The total paid-up capital of these 20 'Companies is $13,692,310 and the aggregate market value of this capital "is $12,779,500 shewing a depreciation in the value of these new Companies "of $912,810 as compared with the paid-up capital. A further analysis shews "that of these 20 Companies the aggregate market value of the shares of 5 of them is $4,809,940 in excess of their total paid-up capital, while in 14 of "the 20 there is a depreciation to the extent of $5,722,750 below the paid- up capital. Of the 14 latter Companies 7 are new Companies engaged in purely local business, the shares of which are depreciated below paid-up capital to the "extent of $596,000 only, and the remaining 7 Companies whose shares show a depreciation of $5,126,750 below paid-up capital are Companies whose businesses "or enterprises are situated entirely outside the Colony. There are now therefore "54 Public Companies with a paid-up capital of $44,074,950 and a market value “of $77,200,550 as against 26 Companies in 1887, with a paid-up capital of $26,233,000 and a market value of $46,870,125 and 36 Companies in 1888 with "a paid-up capital of $28,867,640 and a market value of $53,951,525 shewing an "increase in the last 3 years of 28 Companies, $17,841,950 paid-up capital, and

$30,330,425 market value."

Compared therefore either with what may be called the figures of special success, or with the figures of all Companies successful or unsuccessful, the figures of failure, or threatening failure, are puny indeed, and it is to be borne in mind that the present is a time when owing to losses in speculation all such securities are probably under their normal value. Now notwithstanding the fact that the shares of most of these Companies were in 1889 driven up by speculation to a price considerably higher than at present, I venture to think that from the point of view of the share market, there is nothing pointing to any serious or permanent decline of prosperity indeed after a careful survey of the position at this critical period I believe that any competent and impartial judge would say with confidence that the business of the Colony in so far as it is conducted by Joint Stock Companies is generally in a very sound condition.

Happily there are indications pointing in the same direction from several other quarters. Though the absence of returns renders it impossible to speak with certainty as regards Exports and Imports, it is satisfactory to find that the shipping statistics of last year point to an increasing rather than a decreasing trade. For according to the recent report of the Harbour Master, the tonnage of vessels entering, and clearing from, Hongkong reached in 1890, the enormous figure of 133 million tons-or considerably higher than those of any former year and exceeding by 1,000,000 tons those of 1889. It would thus appear that my anticipation of 1889 is shewing itself to be correct, and that trade in other directions is compensat- ing for the deficit caused by the decaying tea export, and the stoppage of emigration to Australia and the United States. And while on the subject of Emigration, I may mention that the accounts recently received of the condition of the Chinese in

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Mexico are so favourable, that if they should be confirmed I think it only right that the Government should encourage the emigration thither which it is desired to conduct from Hongkong. If it is true, as I am informed, that Mexico will welcome all the free Chinese which can be sent there, I shall expect that in no long time the trade which will spring up with that rich country,-rich I mean in its soil and its minerals-will not only equal but surpass all that has been lost by the restrictive laws in the United States and Australia. But, however, this may be the correctness of the indication from tonnage that the volume of trade is increas- ing was signally confirmed only the other day, since I began the examination of this question, by the statistical report of the Chinese Customs for the last year (for a copy of which I am indebted to the kindness of Sir ROBERT HART and the local Commissioner). Though I have not had time as yet to examine care- fully all the figures, it suffices for my purpose to take the figures shewing the value of the general trade between China and Hongkong which are Taels 122,358,507 for 1888, Taels 118,046,381 in 1889 and Taels 125,844,901 for 1890. Thus the value of our trade with China actually increased last year by more than Taels 3,000,000 as compared with 1888 and by over Taels 7,000,000 (or about £1,750,000 sterling) as compared with 1889. As also indicating that the volume of trade is not decreasing I may mention that from a return furnished by the Registrar General, it appears that in the first three months of this year 174 Chinese shops were closed, and 236 opened shewing a favourable balance of 62, and though owing to my being unable to get the similar return for former years I do not count this balance as proof of increase, I think the figures at least suggest the probability that Chinese trade is not falling off.

Turning now to the matter of Bank deposits I see as little reason for alarm or despondency. Having requested information on the subject from the four British Banks in the Colony, the answers obtained from three of them shew that as regards them, there has been not a decrease but an increase of deposits to the extent of over $800,000. The only one of the four which returns a decrease, the amount of which is not stated, is the Bank under the management of the Honourable Member, who in replying to my letter as Manager reiterates his statement made as Member of Council in respect of the decrease of "millions of dollars," but in this instance limits it to Chinese Banks. Now on this matter of Chinese Banks I have made enquiries from high authorities Banking and others as well as from the Registrar General. The estimates thus received vary considerably in amount, but I am most inclined to that of Mr. WEI YUK, Compradore of the Chartered Mer- cantile Bank, not only because it is the result, I understand, of careful enquiries at each of the Banks referred to but because it represents a mean between the extreme estimates on either side. According to his calculation the aggregate decrease of deposits in the Chinese Banks as compared with 1889 is about $1,000,000, the figures being $6,000,000 for 1889 and $5,000,000 for this year. Deducting from this decrease the $800,000 increase in the British Banks, there is left $200,000- so that there requires the large decrease of $1,800,000 in some unaccountable quarter to make up the two millions which would be the minimum amount to justify the Honourable Member's indefinite statement as to "millious" of decrease.

I should mention that the Registrar General in forwarding his estimate of Chinese Bank deposits accompanies it with the statement that despite all losses, money is at present plentiful among the Chinese, and that the rate of interest among them just now is 42 cents per month per $100-this being scarcely over 5 per cent. per annum and is even lower than the rate among Europeans.

Now as regards Land which the Honourable Member says has fallen greatly in value, I do not doubt that as regards a considerable area of the less valuable land of the Colony, there has been considerable depreciation by comparison with the inflated prices of 1889, but I question whether there has been any depreciation at all as regards what is of incomparably greater importance, viz.: the large area of specially valuable land in Victoria. For though a seller of such land might not

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as readily obtain the same price as in 1889, I have reason to doubt whether, unless under exceptional circumstances, the price to a buyer would be any less now than then. On this point I will read what is said to me by a gentleman, whose position is one likely to render him specially well acquainted with the subject:-" The "value of Marine and Inland Lots has not in my opinion declined since 1888. The "intrinsic values of town and suburban lots have increased within the last two years "to the extent of $2,000,000 at the least by new buildings and improvements. "Even where no improvements have been effected no house property in Victoria can be purchased now, under ordinary circumstances, at a less price than in 1888. "House property in the villages has increased in value particularly at Yaumati, "and the only apparent depreciation is in suburban property which is occasioned solely from over-building. A great increase in rentals took place in 1888-89, owing to the great number of two-storied houses which were then pulled down "for the purpose of building houses of three stories in their place. During the period of pulling down and re-building there was a dearth of house accommodation "and many families left the Colony not being able to pay the higher rates demanded. "I find that Chinese tradesmen formerly paying at the rate of $35 were compelled "to pay $50 a month for rent or leave and lose their business. Then came the "over-building, upwards of 700 new houses being built to meet a demand for about "150 houses. The reduction of rents followed of course, but I do not find that rents in Victoria have decreased except in cases where they had been previously “raised to an almost prohibitive extent, and there is no general appearance of "reduction in capital values."

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Now though this gentleman may possibly be somewhat over-sanguine in his views, I myself have reason to believe them by no means far from the truth, and I know them to be correct as to the increased value of land in the villages. In any case they make clear that some of the causes of depreciation are entirely consistent with the absence of any general decline of prosperity.

To sum up the situation. While it must be admitted (1) that a large sum of money has been lost to the Colony in outside enterprises (2) that owing to the great building operations of recent years, the supply of houses is now considerably in excess of the demand and (3) that the value of land has consequently fallen below what I not indistinctly intimated as the inflated values of 1889. Yet on the other hand there are: (1) in the prosperous condition of all our leading enterprises and industries, (2) in the increased quantity of shipping at a time of unusual depression all over the world, (3) in the increase of the regular trade of the Colony as evidenced by the Imperial Customs returns-and considering all things (4) even in the small decrease, if there be any decrease, in the Bank deposit accounts-there are, I say, in all these things indications of distinctly favourable promise for the future, and such, I venture to think, as give strong grounds for the belief that any depression that exists is merely temporary, and as on many former occasions in the history of Hongkong is only the precursor of still further increase of prosperity at no distant time. It may be judged therefore from what I have said that I do not at all share the gloomy anticipations of the Honourable Member. You no doubt have frequently observed that the organisers of Chinese processions, in order to make a more imposing show of followers, will engage coolies whose labour-soiled rags are barely hidden by coats thrown over them resplendent in gold and colour. Now it seems to me that the Honourable Member has reversed this process, and has succeeded for the moment, but only I trust for the moment, in throwing a squalid covering over the brilliant uniform in which Hongkong usually appears to the outside world, and which I shall still venture to believe is rightly belonging to her.

Before coming to the financial position of the Colony, which the Honourable Member regards as so unsatisfactory, I think it right, however invidious may be the duty, of touching on another subject, akin to it, respecting which the Honour-

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able Member's statements, if left without criticism, would do a serious injury to the credit of the Colony if, as is probable, it should shortly become necessary to raise a loan for Public Works.

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After giving various reasons why the Revenue was likely to dwindle, and why presumably if confined to its present sources, it would be insufficient to meet existing charges on it, he proceeds to say that the taxes are already very high, and that though rates at 13 per cent. on the rental appear moderate, they are in reality heavy inasmuch as rents are here about three times as high as in England; in fact he gives the impression to the outside world that the taxation of the Colony is already exceedingly burthensome and that the Government relations with the people of Hongkong are analogous to those of a landlord with rack-rented tenants. I venture to think that in this matter he has given a very wrong impression; and in fact, speaking from experience which is by no means a narrow one, I state the confident belief that with probably the single exception of the people of the Straits Settlements, if that be an exception, the people of Hongkong are less taxed, and probably far less taxed, than any other equally or more important community in the whole world having a pretention to civilised Government. There are indeed within my experience very few cases where an urban population has not to pay other heavy direct or indirect taxes, besides all the rates and taxes in an equal or greater degree which are paid by the people of Hongkong. To take the case of the mother country with which the Honourable Member has instituted a comparison in the matter of rents. There are few if any important commercial or manufacturing towns in England where the rates are less than 6/– in the £ or 30% on the rateable value, and this independently, where it has not been commuted, of some -/9 in the £ inhabited house tax on the actual rental; and I was informed only the other day by a proprietor of houses in the City of Norwich that the rates there were 18/- in the £ (90°。) on the rateable value, or some 80 per cent. on the actual rental. I do not forget what the Honourable Member alleges as to rents here being about three times as high as in England, but there as in other passages of his speech I am disposed to think that he has unwittingly used the language of hyperbole. No doubt there may be found places in England where houses are cheaper by 3rds than here, but on the other hand I know well that there are other places where they are not only not cheaper but considerably dearer than here, and judging from what I have learned from a gentleman specially experienced in this matter, I apprehend that the case would certainly not be understated if rents here are estimated at double those of England for houses of equal size in equally favourable situations as regards similarly important centres of business. The mere rates of Hongkong independently of the inhabited house tax are therefore certainly not above, and probably below, the average rates of commercial towns in England, and considerably less than half those mentioned in the case of Norwich; and in this view it is scarcely necessary to point out that the rate-payer of Hongkong is in an incomparably more advantageous position than the English rate-payer. For the latter has to pay in addition to his local rátes not only all other taxes that are paid here in an equal or greater degree, but he has also to pay income tax, property tax, (in addi- tion to the inhabited house tax before mentioned) servants' tax, succession duties, sometimes tithe rent charge, besides heavy duties on his wine, spirits, tobacco and tea, from all of which the Hongkong rate-payer is entirely exempt. Indeed if it were fully understood here how heavy are the burthens on people in England in similar positions with those of the people of Hongkong, I am unable to conceive that there would be the same display of opposition to the increased Military Con- tribution. For however unpleasant it may be to be asked to pay for what has hitherto been obtained free or for a comparatively small payment, I do not think there would be begrudged a contribution, which is after all but a small proportion of the cost of defence, if it were understood that our fellow-country men at home are far more heavily taxed than we are, and it were borne in mind that they arc alone paying the debt which enabled Great Britain and her people all over the

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world to maintain their independence of foreign domination, and bear moreover not only the whole cost of their own defence but in a very large proportion the cost of Colonial defence also.

And now as regards the financial position. When I read the Honourable Member's speech I at first intended to supply in detail the results of an exhaustive examination of this subject; but this is now impossible consistently with the performance of work absolutely necessary to be done in the short time before my departure, and any regret I might feel on this score is much lessened by the con- sideration that for reasons above given a general discussion on the financial position, is only to an extremely limited extent pertinent to this subject of salaries, and that it had for other reasons be better postponed until the consideration of the Estimates for 1892. I am able, however, to say enough to render it clear that our financial position though not wholly satisfactory is not one which gives any more reason for alarm and despondency than the general condition of the Colony. I observe the Honourable Member states that according to the latest official information there will at the end of the year be a deficit in our finance of $100,000. Presuming him correct, or as I think very possibly under the mark, I need scarcely say that such a statement without explanation gives a very wrong impression to the outside world; inasmuch as it leaves entirely out of sight not only the enormous sums which have in the last few years been expended out of Revenue upon public works, elsewhere ordinarily provided for by Loan, but also omits to notice (which is for the purpose more important) that $820,000 of this year's expenditure which is estimated to cause this deficit, is also for Extraordinary Public Works. Allowing for a considerable falling off in certain items of Revenue (as to which however I should mention that the great fall in assessed taxes anticipated by the Honourable Member is I understand in fact not likely to exceed 2 per cent.) allowing however I say for a considerable falling off in certain items of Revenue, and in the matter of expenditure for the increased Mili- tary Contribution, and for the payment under the new instructions during the current year of December salaries (amounting to some $90,000) which in previous years have been paid in the following January, I am of opinion, as previously stated, that the deficit will at the end of this year be considerably more than the $100,000 mentioned by the Honourable Member, if the full amount of $820,000 were to be expended on Extraordinary Public Works. But judging from the rate at which the Department works I am disposed to think that this estimate of expenditure would have been considerably beyond the mark in any circun- stances. And in view of the fact that some new works, such as Governor's Peak Residence (the prosecution of which I abandoned immediately after my return to the Colony) will not be proceeded with for the present, and that there has been a temporary cessation of all new public works in consequence of the recent telegram from the Secretary of State, I question whether at the end of the year there will be more than a very small deficit, even if, as I scarcely antici- pate, the whole increase of salaries voted by the Council should be approved by the Secretary of State. As on the other hand there is likely to be little or none left of our surplus balances, there would in all probability be a considerable deficit by the end of next year, if we continue to defray out of Revenue the great drainage and water distribution works now in progress. This however is not likely, and there is every reason to believe that the Secretary of State, when he has been placed in a position to estimate the condition of affairs, will sanction a loan for public works such as in every one of the larger dependencies of the Crown would have been raised long ago. What should be the amount of such a loan I will not undertake to estimate. It of course depends on the extent of the Public Works which it may be determined to undertake. But I may mention that from statistics furnished to me, I estimate at $50,000 the increased Revenue from the New, Central Market, from the new or extended depôts for cattle, sheep and swine and from the public laundries and at $11,000 that from the New Water Distribution

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Works; making together $61,000; so that from these sources alone there would be sufficient to pay interest and 1 per cent. sinking fund on a Loan of $1,220,000 at 4 per cent.

All things considered therefore though I am by no means sure that some of the increases of salaries do not require re-consideration, I am completely satisfied that with a very moderate loan for public works and in the absence of circum- stances impossible to foresee, there is every reason to believe that the Ordinary Revenue from its present sources will be sufficient to cover the salaries, as increased by the vote last October, as well as the increased Military Contribution.

As regards the future, though there may be expected some loss in the next sale of the Opium Farm as compared with the large sum obtained for it under exceptional circumstances in 1889 (being some $246,000 per annum higher than previously), there is good reason for anticipating advances in other directions: (1) If at this time of exceptional depression (from which the facts above referred to seem to indicate the beginning of improvement), the assessed taxes should prove to have fallen off as estimated only 2 per cent., I venture to think in view of the increasing general trade that there is good reason for believing that this loss will be very quickly com- pensated by return to a normal condition, even if there should not be, as I con- fidently anticipate, a further upward progress in prosperity. (2) The revenue from profit in subsidiary coinage, so far from shewing any signs of diminution tends steadily to increase. Owing to the exceptional demand for these coins, not- withstanding the institution of the Canton Mint I have been compelled to raise from $1,000,000 to $1,500,000 the annual requisition upon the Crown Agents; and if the Mint should be able to supply us with the amount, I anticipate that the revenue from this source for this year will be at least $90,000. (3) Rent from Land must continue to increase in amount as further Land is sold, and will even make a considerable advance this year. Indeed the permanent revenue from this source will mount very rapidly, if, as I most sincerely hope the policy should be maintained of permitting the commuta- tion for increased rent of a considerable portion of the premiums. There will always be a strong temptation to abandon such a policy at a time like the present, when the current account is running low; but I am confident that it is the only sound policy, and that, if steadily maintained, it will in the course of not many years render it possible to considerably diminish the weight of taxation. And while refer- ring to this matter of taxation, I think it well on the eve of my departure to correct an impression which I may have given in a recent speech, as to the possibility that any substantial increase of taxation would, by driving trade away, cause this Colony to meet the same fate as the West Indian Island of St. Thomas.

From further enquiry into this question (which I may mention only suggested itself to me on the spur of the moment), I have been led to believe that any appre- hension on this score may be entirely dismissed. Without troubling you with all the reasons which have induced this more favourable view I may mention the principal one as being that the large size of the steamers which are ordinarily required to bring goods from Europe and America, would render it impossible for them to conduct coasting work on any large scale at a profit, and that consequently a distributing centre, such as Hongkong and for which no other port would afford anything like equal facilities, is an absolute necessity. And I am further told and believe that the present tonnage dues night be very considerably increased, and might be made something much more nearly approaching the average of other ports, and yet all, or nearly all, the vessels which now come here would still have to come here, inasmuch as their not coming here would cause them a loss considerably greater than the increased tax. Whether this, view is completely correct, I cannot say; but I believe there is at all events sufficient truth in it to suggest the consideration whether additional revenue might not be raised, or whether with the revenue remaining at the same amount the incidence of tax-

3

186

ation might not be more fairly distributed to the relief of the rate-payers. Attention was lately drawn by the Chairman of the Chamber of Commerce and by a question in Council of the Honourable Mr. WHITEHEAD, to the supposed necessity of a Harbour Board, chiefly on account of the fact that in former years the funds raised for Light Dues had been more than sufficient for the maintenance of the lights, and because on the completion of the Gap Rock Lighthouse this would probably occur again; and it is evident that the President of the Chamber of Commerce (from the point of view of what I may call the non-local shipowners) would like the cost of Lights as well as all Harbour expenses to be paid from the rates. But as regards the alleged surplus revenue from Lights, it seems to be forgotten that besides Lighthouses there are other costly services, such as the Harbour Master's Establishment, Harbour Launches, Harbour Police, and the Observatory, involving an aggregate expenditure of some $80,000 per annum, which are maintained for the benefit of the shipping, and which are prin- cipally maintained out of the ordinary taxation of the Colony. If the above view is correct as to the improbability of shipping being driven away by the small tax that would be necessary for the purpose, I think it to be well worth consideration whether it should not be imposed to the relief of other forms of taxation. If, on a principle which I understand is in force at Shanghai, vessels should be exempted from payment more than once in three months, I apprehend that the new tax would fall lightly or not at all on the local vessels which contribute. proportionately by far the larger benefit to the Colony, and would be felt as little or nothing by the people of this community. I throw out this as possibly a useful suggestion for the future, and I may add that any advantage which might otherwise accrue from a Harbour Board, would be increased if it were empowered and required to raise from ships all the funds which have to be expended for their benefit.

And now having touched on all the points of this question which appear to demand attention, I commend these remarks to the careful consideration of the Council and the Community, with the sincere expression of my pleasure that I am able on the eve of my departure from the Colony to take, as I venture to think on very sufficient grounds, so favourable a view of its condition and prospects.

:

7

413

No. 35

91

HONGKONG.

REPORT OF THE ACTING SUPERINTENDENT OF FIRE BRIGADE FOR 1890.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government, on the 9th November, 1891.

No. 16.

FIRE BRIGADE Office, HONGKONG, 27th October, 1891.

SIR, I have the honour to submit the following report on the Government Fire Brigade for the year 1890, called for in your C.S.O. No. 2469 of the 24th instant.

1. The Superintendent of the Brigade, (Honourable H. E. WODEHOUSE, C.M.G.) was in command during the whole of the year, with the exception of a few days (25th March to. 3rd April) when he was granted sick leave.

2. During the year there were 124 fires and alarms of fire as compared with 98 during the

previous year.

3. The following table shows the number of fires at which the Brigade has been engaged each year, during the last ten years.

1890,.

1889,. 1888,

1887,

1886,.

....

.16 fires.

1885,...

....21

""

1884,

...45

""

..35 .11

>>

1883. 1882,.. 1881,

*

#

11 fires. .18

.11

>>

8

8

4. The great decrease in the number of fires, during the last two years, may, I think, be attributed entirely to the greater caution on the part of the Fire Insurance Companies in the issue of Fire Policies, and to the effect of the Fire Enquiry Ordinance (No. 23 of 1888).

5. During the year there were eleven Fire Enquiries held under the provisions of this Ordinance, with a result that in two cases, prosecutions were instituted. Both cases were committed for trial at the Criminal Sessions of the Supreme Court. In one case the defendant was tried and acquitted, and in the other a nolle prosequi was entered.

6. Unfortunately, in two cases during the year, the fire has been attended with loss of life.

(a) In the first case, a very old woman, who was blind, was burned to death in a cabin of a

trading junk, in the Harbour.

(b) In the other, two men who had escaped from the burning building,, entered it again in search of some property, when their escape was cut off through the staircase having caught fire.

7. There has been a great improvement in the arrangements for the supply of fresh water for fire extinguishing purposes, but much still remains to be done, more particularly in the Western District.

The. "Fire Despatch boxes" introduced last year by Mr. WODEHOUSE have been found to be very handy, and no doubt will prove very useful.

8. No change was made in the numerical strength of the Brigade, during the year.

9. No accident occurred to any member of the Brigade while engaged at a fire.

10. Early in the year the Brigade lost the valuable services of Mr. WAGNER, the Engineer, who I regret to say, died after only a few days' illness. He had been attached to the Brigade four years and had proved a very efficient officer. The vacancy was filled by the appointment of Mr. KINGHORN to the post.

11. I enclose Mr. KINGHORN's report on the state of the Engines.

They have been kept in excellent order by Mr. CAMPBELL, the Assistant Engineer, under Mr. KINGHORN's supervision.

I cannot recommend the purchase of a land steamer to replace the No. 2, but I am strongly of opinion that the question of providing a second floating fire engine should receive the early attention of the Government.

12. I also enclose a return of fires and alarms of fire during the year.

13. The Chinese Volunteer Brigades are entitled to our thanks for their assistance at the different fires, and it gives me pleasure to testify to the creditable manner in which the members of the Government Brigade have performed their duties.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

The Honourable W. MEIGH GOODMAN,

Acting Colonial Secretary.

Your most obedient Servant,

GEO. HORSPOOL, Acting Supt., Fire Brigade.

..

}

414

HONGKONG, 26th October, 1891. SIR,I have the honour to forward herewith a report on the state of the Government Fire Engines for the year ending 31st December, 1890.

STEAMER No. 1.

(Floating Engine) by Messrs. Merryweather & Co.

This Engine has been 23 years in service. In December last, the Launch, Engine, Boiler and Pumps received a general overhaul and were put in good order, the time occupied for these repairs was 15 days and since then it has done good service.

During the year the Engine has not been disabled at a fire, and is now in good working order.

STEAMER No. 2.

(Land Engine) by Messrs. Merryweather & Co.

This Engine has been 22 years in service. During the year it has not been disabled at a fire, it has been kept in reserve, and only used at drill for drivers. The Engine is in need of a thorough overhaul and the Boiler requires some extensive repairs to fire-box, but, as this Engine is of an obsolete type for land purposes, and cannot be relied upon to work efficiently under full power, I would recom- mend it to be replaced with one of SHAND & MASON's powerful Pumps similar to No. 5.

STEAMER NO. 3.

(Land Engine) by Shand & Masoń.

This Engine has been 11 years in service. During the year it has not been disabled at a fire; it has done good service, was examined and tested in May last, and is now in good working order.

STEAMER No. 4.

(Land Engine) by Shand & Mason.

This Engine has been 8 years in service. During the year it has worked satisfactorily, and is now in good working order.

STEAMER No. 5.

(Land Engine) by Shand & Mason.

This Engine has been 4 years in service.. It has not been disabled at a fire, and is now in good working order.

STEAMER No. 6 (late Volunteer.)

(Land Engine) by Shand & Mason.

This Engine has been 11 years in service, (9 years in Volunteer Brigade). In April last the Boiler was fitted with new Injector, and the Engine and Pumps were carefully overhauled, the time occupied for these repairs was 7 days. During the year it has done good service, has not been disabled at a fire and is now in good working order.

Manual Engines (9) all in good working order.

During the year the calls on the Brigade have been few, compared with former years, and the Engines and Boilers, have been carefully examined and tested. There has been a new system of drills for drivers introduced. Instructions for their guidance have been printed in the form of questions and answers containing information that they ought to be in possession of; and drills held twice a week, those drivers proving themselves efficient have received Certificates.

3

Additional pumping power is much required in the Harbour and at Kowloon, and I would respectfully suggest that another floating Engine be supplied, as being the most useful for attacking a fire on board Ship, or on shore at Kowloon or assisting the other Engines..

The Assistant Engineer and the Engine Drivers have given every attention to their duties, and have always attended promptly to the calls on the Fire Department.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

JOHN W. KINGHORN, Engineer, Government Fire Brigade.

TO GEO. HORSPOOL, Esquire,

Acting Superintendent, Government Fire Brigade.

.

·

FIRES AND ALARMS, 1890.

No. of

BUILDINGS

No.

DATE.

TIME.

SITUATION OF FIRE.

DESTROYED.

DAMAGE.

CAUSE.

REMARKS.

Wholly. Partly.

1230 + 10 CO 1 ∞ o

Jan.

Chimney of House No. 32, Chinese Street,

Nil

>>

""

4.05 p.m.

4.30 p.m.

House No. 7, Station Street,

3

$1,000

Grass on hillside at Stanley,

Unknown.

Burning of crackers by children, No Insurance. Unknown.

Matshed in the Mau Lam Garden, Yaumati,

5.50 p.m.

A Shed in High Street,

Grass on hillside near Military Sanitorium,

Grass on hillside at Aplichau,

""

10

* A

3 p.m.

11

"

12

16,

""

13

18,

1.30 p.m.

12.20 p.m.

7.40 p.m.

14

18,

""

16

21,

16

26,

11 a.m.

Midnight.

""

17

23,

18

29,

1.30 p.m.

19 Feb. 1,

20

5.30 a.m.

1,

10 a.m.

4 p.m.

10 p.m.

6 a.m.

House No. 34, Station Street, House No. 33, Tung Man Lane,

Grass on hillside near Stanley,

Grass on hillside at Stanley, Matshed at Kung Chung Bay, House No. 229, Praya West,

Chimney of House No. 5, Caine Lane, House No. 178, Queen's Road Central, House No. 8, Lyndhurst Terrace,

House No. 23, Bonham Strand,

Matsheds at Mount Gough,

House No. 61, Wellington Street,.....

Grass in the Cemetery at Mount Davis,.

$4,000

worshipping tombs.

""

$150

21

1

Midnight.

Matsheds at Mount Parker,

""

18,

19,

31

20 00 00 00 00 C

25,

,,

22

23

24.

25

26

27

28

29

30

""

""

""

""

""

??

""

""

10,

11.

11,

13,

14,

10.15 p.m.

2.30 a.m.

House No. 216, Hollywood Road,

Trifling

$300

Unknown.

1.20 a.m.

House No. 18, Gage Street,

Unknown

Do.

S.S. Verona,

Nil

Do.

11 a.m.

House No. 48, Peel Street,.

9.45 a.m.

Chimney of House No. 3, Ng Kwai Fong,

Nil

Do.

Nil

Do.

1.30 p.m.

House No. 8, St. Francis Street,

6.30 p.m.

House No. 36, Peel Stroet,..

Slight

Falling of a kerosine lamp.

Unknown.

6.30 p.m.

Chimney of House No. 35, Pottinger Street,

Do.

5 p.m.

Chimney of House No. 40, Hollywood Road,

28,

.6 a.m.

House No. 37, Second Street,

Trifling

Do.

"

32

28,

39

10.15 p.m.

33 March 2,

34

35

13,

27,

36 | April 4,

1.30 p.m.

The San Tsoi Li Junk, in Victoria Harbour, House No. 38, I Woo Street,

$70

Do.

Unknown

Do.

House No. 16, Pottinger Street,

Trifling

Accidental.

4 p.m.

9 p.m.

Chimney of House No. 27, Jardine's Bazaar,

House No. 12, Tank Lane,..

Nil Unknown.

$1.00

Accidental.

Trifling

Do.

Nil

Do.

Nil

Do.

Slight

Do.

Nil

Accidental.

$500

Unknown,

No Insurance.

Ni!

Do.

Nil

Do.

Slight

Do.

1.

1

$8,000

Do.

Nil

Do.

Ni

Accidental.

...

1

$10,000

Unknown,

1

$400

Do.

Trifling

Nil

Carcless use of fire while cooking: Unknown.

Burning of joss paper while

Unknown.

Burning of joss paper.

Insured in the Northern Insurance Office for $8,000.

Insured in the Hongkong Fire Insurance Company for $10,000.

Insured in Messrs. Naudin & Co. for $3,000 and Messrs. Norton & Co. for $1,000.

An old woman was burnt to death.

Insured in Messrs: Siemssen & Co. for $1,500.

P

415

:

No.

DATE.

TIME.

SITUATION OF FIRE.

FIRES AND ALARMS, 1890, Continued.

NO. OF

BUILDINGS

Destroyed.

DAMAGE.

CAUSE.

Wholly. Partly.

REMARKS.

416

Do.

Unknown Carelessness while worshipping About 200 young trees destroyed.

Do.

[tombs,

Do.

Do.

Nil

Unknown.

:

Trifling

Nil

Do.

Carelessness while worshipping tombs.

2

$41,000

Unknown,

Insured in 3 Offices for $41,000. Two men burnt to death.

Nil

Upsetting of a kerosine lamp.

· Nil

Unknown.

Nil

Do.

Nil

Trifling

Nil

Trifling Unknown,

I

$100,000 Do.,

Falling of a kerosine lamp.

Accidental while burning joss paper. Incendiarism,.....

Trifling Explosion of powder that was

thrown into the house.

Spontaneous combustion of coal.

3.

Unknown.

Unknown

1

$3,000

Unknown,

Nil

Do.

Nil

Accidental.

Nil

Nil

A bunch of burning joss sticks was found on the staircase.

Several trees destroyed..

Insured in the Hongkong Fire Insurance Office.

Insured in the Office of Norton & Co. for $3,000.

$500

1.

Trifling

Nil

Falling of a kerosine lamp.

Unknown.

Upsetting of a lamp by a child No Insurance. who was trimming it,

Falling of a lamp.

Do.

Unknown Unknown.

:

37 April April · 5,

38

5,

39

40

6,

""

41

20,

,,

42

30,

43 May

2,

1.30 a.m.

Grass on hillside at Aplichau and Little Hongkong,

1 p.m.

Grass on hillside near Chai Wan,

3.30 a.m.

Grass on hillside near Stanley,

Grass on hillside near Whitfeild, House No. 67, Queen's Road West, Grass on hillside at Kai Lung Wan, House No. 68, Bonham Strand,

">

49

"

44

45

46

47

48

>>

""

""

3,

3,

11,

7.30 p.m.

Midnight.

House No. 9, Albany Street,

A Matshed at Old Magazine,.

Chimney of House No. 46, Lower Lascar Row,

7.40 p.m.

House No. 16, Fat Hing Street,

10,

5 p.nl.

House No. 7, Wing Shing Street,

11 p.m.

House No. 10, Sui Hing Lane,

50

15,

6 a.m.

Grass on hillside near Pokfulam Road,

51

19,

""

52

53

54

55

བྱམཚEE P

19,

11 p.m.

""

2015

21,

21,

23,

4 p.m.

9.05 p.m.

56

28,

1.50 a.m.

Store of the Hongkong Dispensary,

Honse No. 26, Bukley Street, Yaumati,

House No. 15, Li Yuen Street,

House No. 61, Praya East,..

House No. 12, Kwong Yuen Street, East,

Grass on hillside at Mount Davis,..

""

57

June

13,

12.30 a.m.

House No. 19, Albany Street,

58

13,

10.15 p.m.

House No. 290, Queen's Road West,

59 July

4,

1 p.m.

House No. 33, Nullah Lane,

و,

""

60

61

""

62 | Aug.

63

64

65

""

}}

66 Sept.

67

22,

23,

7,

12.20 p.m.

House No. 32, Square Street,..

20,

2,

7.45 p.m.

12,

5 p.m.

5.40 p.m.

7.30 p.m.

Honse No. 43, Second Street,

House No. 136, Wellington Street,

Coal Godown of Messrs. Blackhead & Co. at Tsim Sha-tsui,

Coal Godown No. 60, Praya East,..

5 p.m.

House No. 22, Gough Street,..

I,

House No. 223, Hollywood Road,.

*****

8,

9.30 p.m.

House No. 16, Wyndham Street,

69

69

9,

7.50 p.m.

Messrs. Blackhead & Co., Praya Central,..

10,

12.30 a.m.

House No. 218, Queen's Road West,.

70

22,

""

1.30 p.m.

House No. 38, Gilman's Bazaar,

:

...

...

Do.

Do.

Trifling

Nil

Trifling

$30,000

Incendiarisın.

A Japanese lantern caught fire. Accidental.

Unknown.

Trifling

$100

Do.

Careless use of fire while search- ing for money.

· FIRES AND ALARMS, 1890,- Continued.

No. of

BUILDINGS

No. DATE.

TIME.

SITUATION OF FIRE.

DESTROYED.

DAMAGE.

CAUSE.

REMARKS.

Wholly. Partly.

71 Sept. 27,

72

Oct.

6,

8.40 p.m.

6.30 a.m.

73

6,

4.30 p.m.

وو

""

74

76

77

78

79

80

81

82

""

""

""

""

,,

""

وو

20,

21,

6,

6.30 p.m.

6,

11.15 p.m.

7,

6.40 p.m.

11,

6.45 p.m.

13,

14.

18,

18,

12.55 a.m.

7.20 p.m.

5.15 p.m.

6.30 p.m.

House No. 12, Wing Lok Street, House No. 481, Queen's Road West, Grass on hillside at Mount Davis, House No 3 Third Street........

Dust Cartecardy Street,. House No. 12, Graham Street,

House No. 4, Kan U Fong,

House No. 4, Pokfulam Road,

$100

Unknown.

Trifling

Do.

Do.,

A large number of young trees destroyed.

$10

Accidental.

Nil

Unknown.

Nil

Bursting of a kerosine lamp.

Nil

Accidental.

Nil

Bursting of a kerosine lamp.

House No. 110, First Street, Grass on hillside at Quarry Bay, House No. 47, Wellington Street, Grass on hillside at Mount Davis,

Trifling

Accidental.

Unknown.

Nil

Bursting of a kerosine lamp.

Unknown.

Grass on hillside above Tai Hang Village,

Coal Godown No. 57, Praya East, Grass on hillside at Mount Davis,

...

Unknown

Do.

· Do.

Do.,

Do.

Burning of joss paper while

worshipping graves,

A number of young fir trees destroyed.

A number of young trees destroyed,

83

""

6 p.m.

84

21,

11 p.m.

85

22,

86

87

3588

22,

22,

Grass on hillside at Little Hongkong,

Grass on hillside at Mount Davis,

""

88

22,

""

89

22,

""

90

22,

""

91

""

92

23,

""

93

23,

""

94

23,

95

23,

""

96

97

98

26,

5.30 a.m.

""

26,

8 p.m.

26,

23,

Grass on hillside at Shek O,

Grass on hillside at Yaumati,.

Grass on hillside above Robinson Road, Grass on hillside at Aberdeen,

Grass on hillside at Deep Water Bay, Grass on hillside at Stanley,

Grass on hillside at Wong Nei Chung,

Empty Kerosine Cases in Fuk Luk Lane,

House No. 38, Praya East,....................

Grass on hillside at Pokfulam,

House No. 57, Queen's Road West,

""

99

>>

100

29,

""

101

29,

28,

1 p.m.

Grass on hillside at Pokfulam,

Grass on hillside at Stanley;

Grass on hillside at Little IIongkong,

102

29,

""

7 p.m.

House No. 10, Shelley Street,

103

31,

5 p.m.

Grass on hillside at Hung Hom,

104 Nov.

1,

3 p.m..

Grass on hillside near Tso Pa Tsai, British Kowloon,

105 |

3,

Grass on hillside.above the Filter Tanks,.

步步

106

8,

10.30 p.m.

Machinery Godown in Cross Street, Wanchai,.

107

11,

Grass on hillside at Aberdeen,

""

108

""

109

11,

11,

6.35 p.m.

House No. 47, Bonham Strand,.

Grass on hillside at Chai Wan,

Do:

Do.

Unknown.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.,

A number of young trees destroyed.

Trifling

Do.

Do.

Do.

Nil

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Unknown

Do.,

About 2,000 young fir trecs destroyed.

...

$5

Upsetting of a kerosine lamp.

Unknown.

...

...

Do.

Do.

Nil

Do.

Do.

...

Do.

...

1

$2,000

Do.,

Insured in Messrs. Dunn, Melbye & Co. for $4,000.

417

No. DATE.

TIME..

FIRES AND ALARMS, 1890,-Continued.

REMARKS.

418

$250

Unknown,

A number of young trees destroyed.

Accidental while cooking food | No Insurance.

with wood shavings,

Nil

Attempted arson,

$20

Accidental.

Trifling

Unknown.

$5

Do.

Incendiarism,

A man named Fung Kwan was arrested and senteneed to 2 years' imprisonment with hard labour by the Supreme Court.

SITUATION OF FIRE.

No. of

BUILDINGS

DESTROYED.

DAMAGE.

CAUSE.

Wholly. Partly.

-:

:

110 Nov. 12,

*111

112

15,

4.45 p.m. 7.30 a.m.

Grass on hillside above Tai Hang Village, House No. 69, Upper Station Street,

"

20,

1.15 a.m.

House No. 35, Bridges Street,

113

29,

6.30 p.m.

114 Dec.

2,

10.15 p.m.

115

8,

8.50 p.m.

116

117

>>

118

119

120

""

""

""

39

11,

13,

15,

15,

17,

5 a.m.

7 p.m.

5 a.m..

4.15 p.m.

6.15 p.m.

5.30 a.m.

121

122

24,

7 p.m.

123

124

26,

10 a.m.

31,

House No. 72, Bonham Strand West, House No. 324, Queen's Road Central, House No. 5, Wing Kat Street,.. House No. 324, Queen's Road Central,. Chimney of House No. 42, Lyndhurst Terrace, Chimney of House No. 68, East Street,

The Ko Shing Theatre,

House No. 112, Queen's Road Central,..

House No. 321, Queen's Road Central,......

Grass on hillside at Tso Pa Tsai, British Kowloon, Chimney of House No. 72, Bonham Strand West, Grass on hillside at Aberdeen,

Fire Brigale Department, Hongkong, 27th October, 1891.

ཡི་

:

:

Unknown.

Do.

Do.,

Do.,

Incendiarism,

Unknown.

Do.

Do.

Kerosine Oil was poured on the staircase.

False alarm.

Insured in the Northern Fire Insurance Office for $15,000.

Kerosine Oil was poured on the staircase.

$6,000

Slight

Nil

݂ܕ

GEO. HORSPOOL,

Acting Superintendent, Fire Brigade.

123

No. 2

91.

HONGKONG.

PETITION AGAINST THE NEW GAMBLING ORDINANCE.

Presented to the Legislative Council, by Command of His Excellency the Governor, on the

25th February, 1891.

To His Excellency Sir GEORGE WILLIAM DES VEUX, K.C.M.G., Governor and Commander-in-Chief of the Colony of Hongkong and its Dependencies, and Vice-Admiral of the same.

The petition of the undersigned Chinese Justices of the Peace, merchants and residents of Hongkong

RESPECTFULLY SHOWETH.

1. That quite recently a Bill entitled The Gambling Ordinance, 1890, has been introduced and read a second time in the Legislative Council of this Colony.

2.-That your petitioners fully sympathise with and strongly support the Government in their endeavour to suppress public gambling and the numerous illicit gambling houses that unfortunately do exist in the Colony.

-

3. Your petitioners have met together and gone very carefully through the new Ordinance. It was explained to them clause by clause by their representative in Council, and after mature deliberation, they are humbly of opinion that the proposed new law, though containing many drastic and stringent provisions, fails in dealing with the evil in an effective way, but on the other hand it may be so carried out as to affect seriously the many residents who are not gamblers but who occasionally may indulge in a social game for amusement in their own houses or properly constituted clubs.

4. Some time ago some of your petioners had the honour of conferring with the Registrar General on the very subject in question, and they then after much consideration recommended, as they do now, that a certain system of registration of Chinese clubs should be enforced and that the Registrar General and a certain number of the Chinese Justices of the Peace should be constituted into a Board of Enquiry and Registration. The object of this is not, as has been stated in some quarters, to license gambling to any extent within the walls of the registered clubs, but to distinguish the good from the evil and the legitimate from the illicit. Your Excellency will have no difficulty in seeing the difference between the playing of a game of chance and skill within the precincts of a respectable Chinese club for a low stake or for a nominal wager, more for amusement than otherwise, and the reckless gambling for gain in a gambling house. However, Section 4 of the new Ordinance clearly makes no distinction.

5.-It has been stated by a high official of your Excellency's Government to the effect that a law providing for the registration of respectable Chinese clubs would savour much of a class legislation and that it is to be avoided. But your petitioners humbly submit that such a law is scarcely of the nature of a class legislation, since any club, whether it be the club of the rich or of the poor, can be registered if the Board of Enquiry and Registration is satisfied that it is not a club for gambling and is properly constituted and managed. Your petitioners further submit that it is but just and fair that the law-abiding and respectable Chinese

124

merchants and residents in this colony should receive more favourable considerations from the Government than the roughs and scums whose only object here is for the sake of making money from opening gambling houses and gambling.

6.-It is the firm belief and opinion of your petitioners that gambling in this Colony can materially be lessened and finally suppressed altogether by a judicious system of registration of Chinese clubs and a rigid enforcement of the existing law, and this sentiment your petitioners believe is shared by several members of your Excellency's Government who have studied this subject for some time past.

7. Your petitioners beg to commend their observations on the new Ordinance. for your Excellency's favourable consideration. They are as follows:-

(a.) In all Chinese gambling houses only games of chance such as Fantan, Po Tse and dices, &c., are played, whereas in a proper Chinese club or private house mixed games of chance and skill such as cards, dominoes, and chess, &c., are mostly resorted to. In a proper Chinese club or private house certain games such as Pai Kow are usually played; in these games a bank is kept by one or more of the players exclusively of the other or others (Section 2).

(b.) Gambling (if construed to include any game played for money, wager, or stake however little or small) is in fact one of the main and principal objects of even a proper Chinese club. Having no such games as billiards, bowling, &c., the Chinese generally spend their evenings in a game at cards, dominoes, or the like. In most cases a small amount of money, wager, or stake is played for, the object of which is two-fold. (1.) To give more excitement and make the players more attentive to the game. (2.) To obtain and apply the whole or part of the winnings in defraying the expenses of the club or in providing for a dinner or other enjoyments to entertain the players and other members of the house (Section 3). (c.) Among the Chinese boys and women a game at cards, dominoes, or the like is usually played for nothing but amusement at their own houses (Section 5).

(d.) It is impossible for the owner of any house to prevent the tenants from playing at any game in the house, and it is also difficult for him to prove that he does not know it, because such games as cards, dominoes, and the like are played so commonly among the Chinese and in almost every Chinese house (Section 6).

And your petitioners can assure your Excellency that if a search were to be instituted, cards, dice, dominoes, &c., all or some of them, would be found in every Chinese shop or dwelling. That being the case every house in this Colony would be presumed to be a common gaming house until the contrary is made to appear, which in many cases is rather a difficult task to perform. (Section 12).

8. Your petitioners are perfectly aware and in fact publicly assured by a member of the Government that it is not the intention of the Legislature to affect respectable Chinese clubs or private residences, but at the same time they cannot help apprehending that through spite, extortion, or other corrupt motives the Chinese in this Colony will be subjected to constant annoyance and inconvenience by the Police and their informers.

Your petitioners therefore pray that your Excellency may be pleased to direct such amendment of the Bill as would remove all misgivings and apprehensions from the mind of your petitioners and their fellow-citizens.

And your petitioners will ever pray, &c.

Hongkong, 1st January, 1891.

.

.

*

HONGKONG.

REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF VICTORIA GAOL FOR 1890.

157

No. 10

91.

Presented to the Legislative Council, by Command of His Excellency the Governor, on the 10th April, 1891.

·

No. 13.

GAOL SUPERINTENDENT'S OFFICE,

HONGKONG, 13th January, 1891.

SIR,-I beg to forward herewith Annual Statistical Return of Victoria Gaol for the year 1890. 2. During ten months of this year the duties of Superintendent were performed by Major DEMPSTER.

and a

3. There has been a small decrease in the average number of Prisoners during the

year very large proportionate increase in the number of Prison Offences, but this increase is due to petty offences of which talking, short oakum picking and irregularities at shot-drill are the principal. The number of serious Prison Offences has not increased.

Subordinate Staff.

4. The conduct of the Subordinate Staff during the year has been satisfactory.

Prison Buildings.

5. The Prison Buildings remain unchanged. My annual urgent recommendations for Gaol enlargement and introduction of the separate system appear to be but wearisome and useless re- iterations. A recent vote of the Finance Committee of Council having decided that no money is to be spent for such purposes, it seems to be doubted by the Committee whether the experience of other countries as to the deterrent effects of this system would be applicable to Chinese prisoners. The question of the reformatory facilities of the system appears not to have been considered nor has any reference been made to the monstrous evils of the present Gaol system in this Colony. As far back as 1886 I brought to notice of Government in a special Report the scandalous state of overcrowding of this Gaol. An influential Committee was appointed to enquire into and report on this subject in the spring of 1886 but no steps have yet been taken to improve the state of matters then reported. There were then and are now in this Gaol 95 associated cells occupied many of them day and night. These are crowded to such an extent that the Prisoners have on an average rather less than 200 cubic feet of air each. They sleep on the floors packed together covered by their blankets; it is impossible to prevent their conversing at night under the blankets. It is needless to speak of morality or decency. I will only observe that these Prisoners are many of them day and night in a state of overcrowding which even by night alone in the city of Victoria is declared by law to be a nuisance. They breathe in about one-third less cubic space than is by law permitted for night lodging-houses. Were the Superintendent of the Gaol a lodging-house keeper he would be liable to a fine of $50 for every one of 95 associated cells in Victoria Gaol. (See Ordinance 24 of 1887, sections 67 to 75.) This Ordinance refers only to sanitary matters but the moral aspect of this state of things is far graver. Victoria Gaol is, in my opinion, simply a school of vice and crime. The unfortunate man previously not a criminal who finds his way to Gaol perhaps for a breach of opium laws, a street fight or any other petty offence, runs a risk of contamination which it is difficult to escape, many emerge well instructed in crime. The evil influence extends beyond the Gaol; they promise to visit the friends of their prison comrades and are not improved by the contact. It is true indeed that every effort is made to avoid contamination by keeping different classes apart-boys from men, old offenders from first offenders, &c.,--but this is of little use.

In a cell full of 8 or 9 new offenders, it must often happen that one or more though new offenders as regards this Gaol are old criminals from other places who devote themselves to corrupting the more innocent. Hongkong is well known to be full of pirates, burglars, thieves and criminals of every description many of whom are associated in Triad Societies. I am aware that at one time (and probably now) upwards of one hundred members of the Triad Society were in Gaol and recruits to this society were largely obtained from discharged prisoners. The present associated system of this Gaol lends extraordinary facilities to the extension of these criminal organizations and whatever money may be saved to the Public, by refusing to build the Gaol accommodation which health, decency and criminal reform require will probably have to be paid in increased Police expenses and increased

**

-L

"

158

insecurity to life and property in the Colony and neighbouring waters.

The Chinese prisoners in this Gaol while exposed to all these evil influences have on the other hand nothing done for their improve- ment. The little that is done is to teach some of the confirmed criminals honest trades. This cannot be done for all; there is no space for proper workshops. The bulk of the Prisoners have to be employed in the monotonous and profitless labour of shot and stone carrying varied by oakum picking. Nothing is done to expand or elevate their minds; no tuition of any sort is provided; no one is appointed to visit them and encourage them with kindly words of human sympathy. A native Missionary indeed preaches in Chinese on Sundays in the yard-this is all.

With such a state of matters would it not appear to be the duty of the Colony at least to provide for its prisoner a building fit to preserve the health, decency and morality of the inmates, to save them from the fatal and corrupting influence of the worst criminals and to give a reasonable prospect of weaning them from crime and teaching them self-respect and industry.

Prisoners and their Discipline.

6. During the year there have been 11,756 Prison Offences to an average of 566, giving a little over 20 offences for each Prisoner. The great proportion of Prison Offences are committed by short sentence Prisoners. Prisoners entitled to earn remission are generally careful to avoid Prison Offences. On the last day of the year, of 287 Prisoners sentenced to 6 months' imprisonment or over, 93 have been clear of punishment for more than three months and of these 13 had been clear for upwards of a year.

7. I append as usual Returns showing the number of the most common offences committed by Prisoners, similar Returns for the last three years being shown alongside for the sake of comparison.

Industrial Labour.

8. There has been a decrease in the industrial earnings during the year owing chiefly to the increased cost of paper stuff for oakum picking, but industrial work is greatly hampered by absolute want of space. The usual Returns are appended.

I have the honour to be,

The Honourable FRANCIS FLEMING, C.M.G.,

Colonial Secretary.

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

A. GORDON,

Superintendent.

(A.)

VICTORIA GAOL.

Return of Reports for talking, &c., in the years, 1887, 1888, 1889 and 1890.

1887.

1888.

1889.

MONTH.

Daily average number | Daily average number | Daily average number

in Prison, 584.

in Prison, 531.

in Prison, 581.

1890. Daily average number in Prison, 566.

January,

February,

March,

April,..

May, June,

July,

August,

September,

October,

November,.......

December,

146

355

105

196

75

320

150

181

97

362

132

243

408

380

142

212

963

402

278

290

918

296

205

260

500

258

220

520

530

225

167

349

558

220

219

304

429

222

130

243

184

328

118

135

113

277

220

157

Total,..

4,921

3,645

2,086

3,090

A. GORDON,

Superintendent.

:

(B.)

Return of Offences reported of Prisoners fighting with or assaulting each other, or Officers, for the years 1887, 188, 1889 and 1890.

1887.

1888.

1889.

MONTH.

Daily average number Daily average number Daily average number

in Prison, 584.

in Prison, 531.

in Prison, 581.

159

1890. Daily average number in Prison, 566.

January,

February,

March,

April,..

May,

June,

July,

August,

September,

October,...

November,..................

December,

21

14

1

20

21

10

20

10

11

19

11

10

29

11

41

27

33

19

31

11

39

8

26

18

27

13

18

5

10

19

12

162537 18 19 2

16

9

9

6

6

16

5

6

5

7

Total,.....

306

185

92

115

(C.)

A. GORDON,

Superintendent.

Return of Offences of Prisoners having Tobacco, for the years 1887, 1888, 1889 and 1890.

1887.

1888.

1889.

in Prison, 581.

1890.

in Prison, 566.

Daily average number Daily average number | Daily average number Daily average number

in Prison, 584.

in Prison, 531.

MONTH.

January,

14

74

February,

10

35

March,

20

48

2853

32

53

50

24

55

21

April,...

27

25

21

47

May,

39

61

45

40

June,

34

27

33

July,

57

34

24

11 47

August,

40

22

35

52

September,

58

30

51

25

71

32

33

October,....

November,....

December,

Total,.....

435

442

487

35

67

29

34

15

28

17

59

16

393

(D.)

A. GORDON,

Superintendent.

Comparative Return of Prisoners confined in Victoria Gaol on 31st December, 1887, 31st December, 1888, 31st December, 1889 and 31st December, 1890.

CONVICTION.

1887.

1888.

1889.

1890.

1st,

436

367

466

394.

2nd,

30

43

59

67

3rd,

34

35

22

26

4th,

15

13

14

23

5th,

20

16

16

16

6th,

15

13

8

8

7th,

10

4

2

4

8th,

10

8

9

9th,

1

1

10th,

3

2

11th,

2

1

1

12th.

1

+221:2

4

13th,

Total,...

576

503

600

549

A. GORDON,

Superintendent.

:

4

:

:

160

(E.)

OAKUM.

ABSTRACT OF ACCOUNT OF INDUSTRIAL LABOUR, VICTORIA GAOL, FOR THE YEAR 1890.

Dr.

Cr.

1890.

To Stock on hand, 1st January, 1890, $ 507.35 1890.

By Oakum sold during the year,

$ 2,505.37

""

during the year,

Profit,...............

Cost of Paper Stuff, purchased}

1,551.35

"

Oakum issued for Gaol HospitalĮ

7.50

use,

35

652.87

Stock on hand, 31st December,

1890,-

Paper Stuff, Oakum,

$130.20

68.50

198.70

Total,.......

2,711.57

Total,.......

2,711.57

COIR YARN.

1890.

99.

To Stock on hand, 1st January, 1890, Cost of Material purchased during Į

$ 641.38 1890.

305.19

the year,..

Profit,...

612.21

Total,............$

1,558.78

RATTAN WORK.

1890.

39

To Stock on hand, 1st January, 1890,

Cost of Material purchased during

$ 159.20 1890.

221.56

the year,...

Profit,............

159.39

1890.

Total,...$

540.15

NET MAKING.

29.65

By Matting sold during the year,......$ 1,190.00

Issue for Prison use during the year, Stock on hand, 31st December,

1890,-

Manufactured, ....$127.13 Material,..

212.00

339.13

Total,............$

1,558.78

By Chairs, Fenders, &c., sold during

the year,..

Articles made for Gaol use, Stock on hand, 31st December,

$

342.96

8.89

1890,-

Manufactured Articles,...$165.30 Material,

23.00

188.30

Total,...........$

540.15

To Stock on hand, 1st January, 1890,

Cost of Material purchased during

the year,..

39.00 1890.

107.90

By Nets sold during the year,

$ 149.21

""

"9

Nets made for Gaol use, (value),..... Stock on hand, 31st December,

1890,-

27.05

Profit,.

48.56

Material,

Total,............$

195.46

19.20.

Total,............$

195.46

GRASS MATTING.

1890.

39

To Stock on hand, 1st January, 1890,

Cost of Material purchased during

18.01 1890.

131.21

By Issue for Prison use during the

the year,.

Profit,........

39.

39

20.25

1890,-

year,

Matting sold during the year, .......

Stock on hand, 31st December,

Manufactured, $15.00 Material,

Total,......

169.47

$

14.08

131.31

9.08

24.08

Total,...... ..$

169.47

:

Dr.

1890.

To Stock on hand, 1st January, 1890,

25

Cost of Material purchased during

the year,.

Profit,..

WASHING.

By Value of Washing done during)

the year, Prison Clothing at one cent a piece,

Cash received for Clothes washed,

Stock on hand, 31st December,

10.00 1890.

530.02

""

1,017.14

>3

Total,..$

1,557.16

SHOE-MAKING.

161

Cr.

$ 1,483.59

57.65

1890,-

Coal, &c.,

15.92

Total,......

1,557.16

1890.

To Stock on hand, 1st January, 1890, Cost of Material purchased during I

$

71.41

1890.

677.41

By Estimated value of Shoes to Pri-

soners and Repairs,

57.19

the year,

$

""

,, Profit,........

171.29

Two Issues-Summer and Win- ter Uniform Shoes to Prison Officers,

299.00

""

39

Sale to Prison Officers, &c., Stock on hand, 31st Dec., 1890,—

491.36

Material,

..$49.01 Value of New Shoes,. 24.55

72.56

Total,........

920.11

Total,...

920.11

PRINTING AND BOOK-BINDING.

1890.

To Stock on hand, 1st January, 1890, $ 29.32

Cost of Material purchased during

1890.

By Estimated value of Printing done

187.88

the year,..

for Public Offices during the year (160,702 forms),

$

593.66

Estimated value of books bound

>>

15.04

""

Profit,....

691.92

for Prison use,

13

Cash received for books bound,

192.11

>>

""

Cash received for Printing done,... Stock on hand, 31st December, 1890, Book-binding material,.

42.91

65.40

Total,.......

909.12

Total,...........$

909.12

1890.

To Stock on hand 1st January, 1890, $ 466.32 1890.

Cost of Material purchased during }

the year,

Profit,....

1,315.21

TAILORS' SHOP.

By Estimated value of Prisoners' Clothing made during the year,

846.00

دو

55.47

""

Work done for Prison Officers,

Police, &c., and charged for,... ) Stock on hand, 31st December,

1890,-

Flannel, Serge, Can-

211.45

vas, &c.,...............................

} $555.10

1890.

Total,....

1,837.00

Manufactured Articles, 224.45

Total,.....................

779.55

1,837.00

To Value of Stock on hand, 1st Ja-

nuary, 1890,

Cost of Material purchased during

the year,..

Profit,......

1893.

27.95

CARPENTERS' SHOP.

$

By Estimated value of Articles made

for Gaol use during the year,.. Work done for Prison Officers

$

159.74

>>

and charged for,........................... Stock on hand 31st December,

115.27

40.21

29.07

1890,-

Material, Wood, &c.,....$ 34.50 Manufactured Articles,

26.78

61.28

Total,............$

216.76

Total,............$

216.76

162

Dr.

1890.

To value of stock on hand, 1st Ja-

nuary, 1890,

Cost of material purchased du-

ring the year,....

Profit,...........

1890.

Oakum, Coir Yarn,

TIN-SMITHS' SHOP.

$

1890.

11.94

138.42

30.22

By Estimated value of Articles made for Gaol use during the year,. Sale of Articles to Prison Officers, Stock on hand, 31st December,

دو

1890,-

Value of Manufactured

Articles,

Total,............$

180.58

RECAPITULATION.

652.87 1890. By Surplus,

612.21

Net Making,

48.56

Rattan Work,

159.39

Grass Matting,

20.25

Washing,

1,017.14

Shoe-making,

171.29

Printing and Book-binding,

691.92

Tailoring,....

55.47

:

Carpentering,

29.07

Tin Work,

30.22

%

Total,....

3,488.39

Profit,

$3,488.39

Victoria Gaol Office, Hongkong, 13th January, 1891.

Cr.

168.90

7.63

4.05

Total,............$

180.58

3.488.39

Total,.....$ 3,488.39

A. GORDON,

Superintendent.

HONGKONG.

THE HARBOUR MASTER'S REPORT FOR 1890.

195

No. 15

01.

Presented to the Legislative Council, by Command of His Excellency the Governor, on the 30th April, 1891.

No. 53.

HARBOUR DEPARTMENT, HONGKONG, 5th February, 1891.

SIR,---I have the honour to forward the Annual Returns for this Department for the year ending 31st December, 1890.

I. Number, Tonnage and Crews of Vessels entered. II. Number, Tonnage and Crews of Vessels cleared.

III. Number, Tonnage and Crews of Vessels of each Nation entered. IV. Number, Tonnage and Crews of Vessels of each Nation cleared.

V. Total Number, Tonnage and Crews of Vessels entered at each Port. VI. Total Number, Tonnage and Crews of Vessels cleared at each Port. VII. Return of Junks entered from Macao.

VIII. Return of Junks cleared for Macao.

IX. Return of Junks entered at each Port from China and Formosa. X. Return of Junks cleared at each Port for China and Formosa.

XI. Gross Total Number of Junks entered at each Port.

XII. Gross Total Number of Junks cleared at each Port.

XIII. Return of Junks (Local Trade) entered.

XIV. Return of Junks (Local Trade) cleared.

XV. Summary of Arrivals and Departures of all Vessels, and of all Chinese Passengers. XVI. Return of Vessels registered.

XVII. Return of Vessels struck off the Register.

XVIII. Amount of Fees received under Section 3 of Ordinance 8 of 1879.

XIX. Return of Chinese Passenger Ships cleared by the Emigration Officer.

XX. Return of Vessels bringing Chinese Passengers to Hongkong from Places out of

China.

XXI. Return of Marine Cases tried.

XXII. Diagram of Tonnage of Vessels entered.

XXIII. Return of the work performed by the Government Marine Surveyor.

XXIV. Return from Imports and Exports (Opium) Office.

SHIPPING.

2. The Shipping Returns show a marked advancement in the trade of the Colony, the total tonnage of Arrivals and Sailings amounting to 13 million tons, the highest figures yet reached and over a million more than in the previous year. There were 32,132 Arrivals with a tonnage of 6,852,588 tons, and 31,855 Departures of 6,823,705 tons, making a grand total of 63,987 vessels, and 13,676,293 tons.

3. The following statement shows how this amount of shipping is apportioned :—

1889.

1890.

Increase.

Ships. Tonnage. Ships. Tonnage.

Ships. Tonnage.

British, Foreign,

Junks in Foreign Trade,

Junks in Local Trade,

5,212 6,500,869 2,876 2,471,121 45,568 3,417,331

53,156 12,389,321 8,232 283,370

5,524 6,994,919

312 494,050

2,695 2,776,822 46,686 3,572.079

319

305,701

1,118

154,748

54,905 13,343,820 9,082 332,473

1,749

850

Grand Total,...

61,388 | 12,672,691

63,987 13,676,293

954,499 49,103

2,599 1,003,602

:

196

4. Compared with 1889, there has been a general increase of British tonnage amounting to 494,050 tons and an increase of Foreign tonnage of 365,701 tons. A comparison also with the average of the last three years shows an increase in 1890 of 136 British ships representing 397,499 tons, and of vessels under Foreign flags an increase of 307 ships and 224,842 tons.

+

5. The general trade as represented by the amount of shipping from and to the various countries does not show on the whole much alteration, though there is a general increase in British bottoms most marked with regard to Cochin-China, Japan, The Philippines and Siam. In the case of Foreign vessels, the increase is still greater with Cochin-China and Siam. There is also a considerable revival of the Junk trade.

6. With Great Britain and the Continent of Europe, the amount of trade does not differ materially from 1889, being indeed nearly stationary. There is a slight increase in arrivals under the British flag and a decrease under Foreign flags..

JUNKS.

7. As shown in the foregoing tables, the Junk trade for 1890 amounted to 3,904,552 tons being an increase over the previous year of 1,968 Junks and 203,851 tons. The trade with Macao shows a falling off from 1889, but with this exception, the Foreign Junk trade has increased. The chief increase in Junks, however, is in the Local trade (by which is to be understood, the trade between places within the Waters of the Colony) in which the Returns show that it amounts to 850 vessels and 49,103 tons. Compared also with the average of the past three years, the Junk trade of 1890 still shows an increase of 11,758 tons in the Foreign trade and 44,054 tons in the Local trade.

8. The subject of the interference of Chinese Revenue Cruizers with the Junk trade of the Colony was brought somewhat prominently forward during the past year, and more than one report was made from the Out-stations of visits paid by these Cruizers or their boats to the Junk Anchorages on the south side of the Island, also of Junks having been stopped and boarded. In one case from the evidence of the Junk people and the Officer-in-Charge of the Station, it would seem that the interference took place in Stanley Bay, but in others, the exact positions of the vessels being subject to the conflicting evidence of the interested parties, the question of within or outside of British Waters was not provable. During the greater part of the year, a Chinese Cruizer has been anchored off Lamma Island.

9. In September, two armed Junks were found anchored in a small bay on the south side, just out of sight of Aberdeen; they stated that they were on the look-out for smugglers. Acting under my orders, the Officer-in-Charge at Aberdeen seized them and I had them towed round to Victoria where after taking from them certain flags and other articles to be used for the purpose of future identification, they were released and the matter reported.

10. I should be glad to see a regular and systematic patrol of the south coast by armed Govern- ment vessels established.

11. 3,989 steamers, 125 sailing vessels and 28,018 Junks arrived during the year, giving an average of 88 vessels daily arriving in the Waters of the Colony. Of the steamers 68 per cent. were British, and of these, 54 per cent. were "Ocean going," of the Foreigners, 9 per cent. were river craft.

STEAM-LAUNCHES.

A

12. On the 31st December, there were 110 Steam-launches in the Harbour, of these, 47 were licensed for the conveyance of passengers, 53 were privately owned, 10 were the property of the Colonial Government. There were in addition 5 launches, the property of the War Department.

EMIGRATION.

13. There has been a further falling off in the number of Chinese leaving the Colony for Ports other than those in China and Japan.

:

1886.

1887.

1888.

1889.

1890.

64,522

82,897

96,195

47,849

42,066

Chinese Exclusion Acts in America, Australia and the Sandwich Islands, reduced wages, and inability to procure employment in the Straits Settlements, and probably the want of confidence alluded to in my last Report, are the principal causes of the falling off.

197

:

:

14. Direct emigration to Deli is now established and as well understood as to any other port and there has been no repetition of the outbreaks which occurred on board these vessels in 1889.

REGISTRY OF SHIPPING.

15. During the year, 7 vessels of 4,071 tons were registered under the provisions of The Merchant Shipping Act, 1854, and 8 Certificates of Registry were cancelled. Return No. XVIII shows the remainder of the work done in this branch.

MARINE MAGISTRATE'S COURT.

16. 81 cases were heard in this Court during the year. Refusal of duty (13), and Assault (11), were the principal offences in the case of ships, and Leaving without Clearance (15), and Breach of Harbour Regulations-" Anchoring in prohibited places" in the case of Junks.

EXAMINATIONS FOR THE POST OF MASTERS, MATES AND ENGINEERS UNDER SECTION 15 OF ORDINANCE No. 8 OF 1879.

17. The following table will show the number of candidates examined for Certificates of Com- petency, distinguishing those who were successful, and those who failed:-

GRADE.

Masters, ...

First Mates,

Only Mates,

Second Mates,

PASSED.

FAILED.

39

29

1

3

1

Total,......

80

2

First Class Engineers,

18

CO I

3

Second Class Engineers,

33

Total,.....

51

10

18. Since 1st January, 1884, when under the Order in Council of 31st December, 1883, Certifi- cates of Competency issued at Hongkong were made of equal value to those issued by the Board of Trade, 610 Certificates of all grades have been issued. The details are shown in the following table:--

GRADE.

1884. 1885. 1886. 1887. 1888. 1889. 1890. Total.

Master,

First Mate,

Only Mate,

21

10

6 22

20 25 39 143

14 10

17 12

14

31 29

127

5

3

1

0

3

2

3

17

Second Mate,

10

10

5

4

10

1

9

49

Total,.

50

33

29

38

47

59

80

336

First Class Engineer,... 19 22

Second Class Engineer, 23 20

*

Total,

42 42

222

11 14 21 11 18

116

20

15 19 28 33

158

31 29 40 39 .51

274

Grand Total,

92 75 60 67

87 98 131 610

MARINE COURTS UNDER SECTION 13 OF ORDINANCE No. 8 of 1879.

19. The following Courts having been held during the year:-

1. On the 30th May, 1890. Inquiry as to the stranding of the British Steamship Felbridge,

Official No. 95,455 of London, on the North Shoal, Paracel Group, on the morning of the 3rd May. The Master's (JOHN RUTHEN) Certificate of Competency was suspended for three months. The time of suspension was shortened by His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government by a few days, the Certificate being returned on 13th August, 1890.

1

:

.

:

198

2. On the 5th November, 1890. Inquiry as to the loss of the British Yacht Nyanza, Official No. 56,809 of Glasgow, on the reef, on the North side of the Island of Ponapé, Caroline Group, on the morning of the 29th July. The Master's (JOHN CARRINGTON) Certificate of Competency was returned to him.

3. On the 8th December, 1890. Inquiry as to the stranding of the British Steamship Pembrokeshire, Official No. 85,171 of London, ou the Shoal off the Island of Wung Cum near Macao, on the night of the 15th November. The Master's (JAMES DANCASTER) Certificate of Competency was suspended for six months.

SEAMEN.

20. 10,830 seamen were shipped and 11,022 discharged at the Shipping Office and on board ships during the year, the discrepancy is owing to the number of seamen shipped at the various Consulates of which we have no record.

21. 314 distressed seamen were received during the

year. Of these, 73 were sent to the United Kingdom, 37 elsewhere, and 192 obtained employment. On the 31st December, 1890, 10 were in the Government Civil Hospital and 2 in the Lunatic Asylum. $4,890.99 were expended by the Board of Trade in the relief of these men, and $42.69 by this Colony. The Colony also paid $542.54 for the relief at Honolulu of the shipwrecked crew of the Barque Wandering Minstrel.

MARINE SURVEYOR'S SUB-DEPARTMENT,

22. During the past year the Colony has lost the valuable services of Mr. BREWER, Marine Surveyor and Mr. WAGNER, Assistant Marine Surveyor. Mr. BREWER went Home in very bad health in August, 1888, and died in England in December, 1889; and a few months later Mr. WAGNER, who had been performing the duties of Marine Surveyor, died in Hongkong. Previous to the arrival from England of the Officers there appointed to fill the vacancies, the duties were performed first by Mr. ANDREW JOHNSTON, and on his leaving for England, by Mr. JOHN W. KINGHORN. In September, the Officers appointed from England arrived: Mr. GEORGE PEEBLES and Mr. ROBERT DIXON. Return No. XXIII shows the work performed in this branch of the Harbour Department.

LIGHTHOUSES.

23. The three Lighthouse Stations have been maintained as usual during the year. The Light- vessel on Kellett's Bank was removed on 1st June, the result of an examination of the bank showing that no silt had taken place over the stone-laden junks sunk as an experiment, and that the Junks had broken up and disappeared in the soft deposit at the bottom.

24. The third Light-keeper's services were dispensed with on account of misconduct, the post is now filled by an Officer on probation. An increased rate of pay having been sanctioned for the Chinese Assistant Light-keepers, I hope to be able for the future to secure a better class of men with increased efficiency to the service.

BOKHARA Rock.

25. The suggested operations at the Bokhara Rock proving too costly were abandoned, and the danger is still marked with a buoy. It was found necessary during the year to renew the moorings, accordingly two anchors and 60 fathoms of chain were purchased and the moorings relaid at a total cost of $945.87. .

..

GOVERNMENT Gunpowder DEPÔT.

26. During the year 1890, there has been stored in the Government Magazine at Stone Cutters' Island

No. of Cases, &c.

Approximate Weight, ibs.

:

Explosive

Gunpowder, Privately owned,

Government owned,

Cartridges, Privately owned,

"

Compounds} Privately owned,

14,139

289,175

175

237

3,500 62,346

[

Government owned;.

64

4,800

767

44,139

Government owned,.

12

22

Total,.....

15,394

585

404,545

:

On the 31st December, 1890, there remained as under :-

No. of Cases, &c.

Approximate Weight,

Ibs.

Gunpowder, Privately owned,

3,537

74,214

Government owned,.

632

63,323

""

Cartridges, Privately owned,

245

56,314

Government owned,

147

11,396

Explosive Compounds

Privately owned,

755

40,800

Government owned,

12

585

""

Total,..

5,328

246,632

199

27. The condition of the Magazine is much improved, extensive repairs have been carried out making good ravages of white-ants, &c., but the tiled roof requires to be replaced.

A new Wharf is being built and is nearly completed.

The subject of excluding the public from the precints of the Magazine is one which, I submit, should receive consideration. At present, this is the only portion of Stone Cutters' Island where the public can land without special "Permit" and when it is considered with what care such like premises are generally guarded, the omission in this case seems to call for remark.

IMPORTS AND EXPORTS (OPIUM) OFFICE.

28. The Return shows that during the year the amount of Opium reported was as follows:-

Imported, Exported,

...62,463 35 chests.

....

..58,023 18

..16,004

"

""

Through cargo reported but not landed,

20,444 Permits were issued from this Office being an increase of 1,117 over last year, this is chiefly attributable to removers being now required to state the hour of removal, so that if two chests are to be removed at different hours, two Permits are now required.

A daily Memo. of Export Permits was during the year sent to the Kowloon Customs Office. By this means, we are able to verify that every chest for which an Export Permit is issued has really been exported.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

R. MURRAY RUMSEY, Ret. Com., R.N.,

Harbour Master, &c.,

:

....

I.-NUMBER, TONNAGE, and CREWs of Vessels ENTERED at Ports in the Colony of Hongkong from each Country in the Year 1890.

FOREIGN.

TOTAL.

BRITISH.

COUNTRIES WHENCE ARRIVED.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews. yessels.

Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Australia and New Zealand,

British Columbia,.

British North Borneo,..............................

Cape of Good Hope,

Coast of China and Formosa,..

Cochin-China,

Continent of Europe,

Great Britain,

India and Singapore,

Japan,

Java and other Islands in the Indian Archi-

pelago,

Масао,

Mauritius,

9

1,272|1,712,592| 60,788)

100 127,295 3,897 201 31,177

192 322,246) 11,284| 123 163,384 8,344

166|| 259,574 9,820,

38,822 1,310 453| 418,752 17,599]||

...

42

49,463 2,004)

42

49,463 2,004||

...

Tons. Crews. Vessels.

3,274 59

Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tons.

Crews Vessels.

Tons. Crews. Vessels. Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

...

4

3,274

591

46

52,737 2,063

46]

52,737 2,063

16

31,759 1,834}

16

31,759 1,334

16

31,759 1,334

16

...

31,759 1,334

...

23

17,027

954

23

17,027

1

232

1

232

954

9

2

1,084

28

2

...

1,084

28

251

18,111

982

25

1

232

9

1

18,111

232

982

9

...

...

...

38

2

...

635

20

...

31,177

635

83 148,971 7,425|

38,808 1,495 1,310 1,751,400 62,278 12,862 1,528,271 179,336 10,588 100 127,295 3,897 158 136,561 4,394|

777,047 127,694 23,445 2,305,318 307.230 14,184 3,240,863 240,319 10,621 1,030 160 137,591 4,434|

40

83 148,971 7,425

...

...

815,855 129,189 24,755 4,056,718 369,508

1,055

40

193 323,301 11,324|

51

6,635

132

677

56

124 164,061 8,400

- 46

50,366 1,884

4

7,741

193

170 267,315 10,013]|

110

151,109 4,915

3,731

30

30

...

38,822 1,310

16

19,023 534

2

1,395

63

453 418,752 17,599|

566

86,180 14,622

91

16,499 1,312

23 2

62]

18 20,418

132

6,635 46 56,366 1,884 113 154,840 4,977

597

258 263,856 8,291 103 180,148 8,060)| 19 328,881 11,416) 169 219,750 10,228

21

1,030

40

260 264,886 8,331

103 180,148 8,060

1,055

40

677

56

276

410,688 14,735

11,472

255

46

57,845 1,844

1,395

63

657

102,679 15,934 1,019

504,982 32,221|

91

170 320,427 10,284 288 422,155 14,990 59,240 1,907 16,499 1,312 1,110 521,481 33,533

198 329,936 11,456

48

871

34]

871

34

871

34

1

871

34

འ་*,

North -Pacific,

Philippine Islands,

Ports in Hainan and Gulf of Tonquin,

Russia in Asia,....

Sandwich Islands,...

Siam,

South America,

South Pacific,..........

21

609

63,973 3,934.

19

...

7

2,765

159

971

31

2

98

609

63,978 3,934

19

486

25

486

25

5

1,095

44

5

1,095

44

401

25,414 1,468

2

1,278 52

42

26,692 1,520)

138

89,387 5,402]

1,278

52

140

90,665 5,454

1,668

32

4,433

191

180

99,651 4,789

180

99,651 4,789 187

102,416 4,898]

1,668

32

188

104,084 4,930

...

2,524 124

1,821

144

3

4,345

268

2

2,524

124

1,821

144

3}

4,845 268

:..

491

14

3

143 140,928 5,388

1,462

143 140,928 5,388

45

2

1,609

26

960

14

3

2,569

40

4

2,580

57

1,451

28

61

4,031

85

63

60,520 1,748

63

60,520 1,748

206

201,448 7,136

206 201,448 7,186

...

1

397 12

1

397

12

397

12

1

397

12

...

...

1

224

1

224

1

224]

8

1

224

8

...

United States of America,

36

75,936 2,832

TOTAL,..

2,726 3,457,505 130,836) 46

36 75,936 2,832

24

48,118 1,430

A

.

60 124,054 4,262

50,440 1,830 2,7728,507,945 182,166 14,169 2,377,288 223,143 10,685 803,761 129,381 24,854 3,181,049 352,524 16,895 5,834,793 353,479 10,781 854,201 131,211 27,626 6,688,994 484,690

24

48,118 1,430 60 124,054 4,262)

200

II.-NUMBER, TONNAGE, and CREWS of Vessels CLEARED at Ports in the Colony of Hongkong for each Country in the Year 1890.

TOTAL.

BRITISH.

COUNTRIES TO WHICH DEPARTED.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOES.

FOREIGN.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels. Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tons. Crews. Vessels. Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tons.

Crews. Vessels.

Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tons.

Crews. Yessels.

Tons. Crews.

Australia and New Zealand,

British Columbia, .

***

British North America,

British North Borneo,

Cape of Good Hope,......

Coast of China and Formosa,

Cochin-China,

Continent of Europe,

Great Britain,

27

40,311 1,657

27

40,311

1,657

27

40,311| 1,657,

27

:

:.

...

Macao,

India and Singapore,

Japan,

Java & other Isilds. in the Indian Archipelago,

North Pacific,

Philippine Islands,

23

1]

18,681 1,071

232

1,4861,939,505) 70,369) 16 19,399 565 2 1,757 34 74,798 4,598

34

189 280,766 11,477|| 164 280,462] 11,853| 8 11,933

451 417,409 17,536]

221

1,654 30

1,654) 30

2,275| 108

3,098

48

1,420

25

2

∙1,420 25

1,348

19

81 20

24 18,762 1,091

::

637 12

5,3731 156

1,348

637

1

2,275j 108

19

4,752] 78

2,768

12

23

18,681 1,071

44

718 32

40.311 1,657

617027

2,768 44

25 19,399 1,103

186

9

1

232

9

2321

1

232

9

...

...

...

...

35 36,616 1,365 83 104,991 3,181

1,521 1,976,121 71,734 15,848 1,903,734 228,263 7,277 99 124,390 3,746

71

57,781 1,693] 100

396,562 75,812 28,125 2,300,296 304,075 17,334 3,843,239 298,682 7,312 92,188 2,991 171 149,964 4,884

87

77,180 2,458)

183]

433,178 77,177 24,646 4,276,417 375,809 197,174 6,172) 270 274,354 8,680

:

...

34

2 1,757 34 74,798 4,598

43

89,033 5,759

43

...

89,033 5,759

451

90,790 5,793}

45

***

90,790 5,793

2,266 35

2,266 35

36

77,064 4,633

361

77,064 4,633

8,923 215

40] 60,632 1,384

378

17

22,769 665

198 289,689 11,692 204|| 341,094 13,237| 25 34,702 1,043

65

36,842 3,202}

11;

14,629 328

76 111,471 3,530|

254

377,608 14,679)

201

23,552 543]

274

401,160 15,222

88

122,362 4,506

43

56,179 1,644

131

4,553 163

6!

7,240 177

10

178,541 6,150 11,793 342

252

402,824 16,359)

83

116,811 3,028

335

519,635 19,387

12

16,486 543

23

30,009 842

35

46,495 1,385

451 417,409 17,536|

:.

633

101,189 15,631

34

4,919 568

667 106,108 16,199

1,084

518,598 33,167

34]

4,919 568 1,118

523,517 33,735

420

31

28,8273 1,234|

12

5,072 167 15,627 244 43]

6

5,072 167 39,454 1,478

5

968 36

1,947 81

16

10,664 480

2,501 89

Ports in Hainan and Gulf of Tonquin,

20

18,946 750

20

18,946 750

200

113,801 5,159,

.6111

17

Russia in Asia,....

1 1,969

34

1,969 34

7,979 213

7 2,915 117 201 13,165 569 201 114,412 5,176| 7,979 213

5

968 361

8

7,019

248

13

7,987|

284

47

34,491 1,714

16

18,128|

333

63

52,619 2,047

220

132,747 5,909

11

611

17

221

133,358 5,926

9,948 247

7

9,948 247

Sandwich Islands,

4

1,999 63

1,999 63

1,306| 38

Siam,......................

54

52,762 2,086

14

18,569|

477

68

71,331 2,563

22

22,017 627

15 18,897

423

37

2 1,306 38 40,914 1,050

6

3,305 101

6 3,305 101

76

74,779 2,713

29

37,466] 900

105] 112,245 3,613

South America,

4

3,542]

66

:

:

United States of America,.

14

18,739 318

3,583

51

4 3,542 66 16]

22,322 369

23

30,331 458

::

4 3,542

661

4

3,542

66

23 30,331 453

37 49,070 771

3,583 51 39

52,653

822

TOTAL,...

2,529 3,207,037 124,098||

223 279,937 7,824 2,752 8,486,974 131,922 | 17,029 2,567,101 266,568 7,498 600,751 82,209 24,527 3,167,852 348,777 19,558 5,774,138 890,666 7,721 880,688 90,033 27,279 6,654,826| 480,699

201

i,

202

III.—NUMBER, TONNAGE and CREWS of Vessels of each Nation ENTERED at Ports in the Colony of Hongkong,

in the Year 1890.

NATIONALITY OF

VESSELS.

ENTERED.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels.

Tons.

Crews. Vessels.

Tons.

Crews. Vessels.

Tons.

Crews.

American,

44

65,177

1,725

6

4,688

88

50

69,865

1,813

Austrian,

.12

24,063

614

12

24,063

614

British,

2,726

3,457,505 | 130,336

46

50,440

1,830

2,772

3,507,945

132,166

Chinese,

271

303,460 13,466

8

8,463

407

279

311,923 13,873

Chinese Junks,

12,910

1,052,191168,667

10,602

743,070

127,051

23,512 | 1,795,261 |295,718

Danish,

64

24,782 1,385

7

2,485

140

71

27,267 1,525

Dutch,

:7

8,457

354

7

8,457

354

French,

86

136,617

10,024

86

136,617

10,024

....

German,

678

639,754

22,252

60

42,606

1,534

738

682,360 23,786

Italian, Japanese, Norwegian, Peruvian, Russian,

12

17,988

755

12

17,988

755

47

71,944

2,282

47

71,944

2,282

9

10,575

237

1

628

17

10

11,203

254

Siamese,

Spanish,

~~22

642

24

***

3

6,905

293

1,821

144

1,286

39

13,447

1,026

22

~+22

642

24

4

8,726

437

1,286

39

13,447 1,026

TOTAL,..

16,895 5,834,793 353,479 10,731

854,201 131,211 27,626 6,688,994 484,690

IV.-NUMBER, TONNAGE and CREWs of Vessels of each Nation CLEARED at Ports in the Colony of Hongkong,

in the Year 1890.

CLEARED.

NATIONALITY

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

OF

VESSELS.

K

Vessels.

'Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tons. Crews, Vessels. Tons.

Crews.

American,

Austrian,

39 11

58,840 22,287

1,652 612

19

20,364

315

58 11

79,204 22,287

1,967 612

British,

2,529 3,207,037 124,098

Chinese,

275

Chinese Junks,

15,889

307,982 13,674 1,396,609 216,590

223 3

7,285

279,937 1,958 380,209

7,824 130 75,530

2,752

3,486,974 131,922

278

309,940 13,804 23,174 | 1,776,818 | 292,120

Danish,

69

Dutch,

5

French,

80

25,730 1,440

5,803 129,050

2

951

71

71

26,681 1,511

252

2

2,654

118

7

8,457

370

9,694

6

6,443

157

86

135,493

9,851

German,

610-

565,087 20,028

131

118,990

3,644

741

684,077

23,672

Italian,

14

20,511

964

14

...

20,511

964

Japanese,

10

13,698

491

36.

56,183

1,683

46

69,881

2,174

Norwegian,

5

4,255

93

6

8,208

173

11

12,463

266

Russian,

2

4,660

189

1

1,821

144

3

6,481

333

Siamese,. Spanish,

2

1,286

39

2

1,286

39

18

11,303

850

2,970

244

25

14,273 1,094

TOTAL,

19,558 5,774,138 390,666

|

7,721

-880,688 90,033

27,279 6,654,826 480,699

+

.

V. TOTAL NUMBER, TONNAGE AND CREWS OF VESSELS ENTERED AT EACH PORT IN THE COLONY OF HONGKONG, IN THE YEAR 1890.

BRITISH.

FOREIGN.

TOTAL.

NAMES

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST,

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

OF PORTS.

Vls. Tons. Crews.

Vis.

Tons. Crews. Vls. Tons. Crews. Vls.

Tons. Crews, Vls,

Tons. Crews. Vls.

Tons. Crews. Vis.

Aberdeen,

496

...

Hunghom,

513

Shaukiwán,,

367

Stanley,

267

18,157 4,321 598 18,627 2,847 804 14,509 3,108|| 11,547 2,964

985

27,675 8,224 1,094 43,441 8,315 1,317| 61,115 10,279 1,352

45,832 12,545||

62,068 11,162

75,624 13,387||

43

1,227 387 310

196

513

367 12,774 3,351), 267

Tons. Crews. Vis.

18,157| 4,321| 598 18,627 2,847| 804 14,509 3,108] 985

11,547 2,964|

Tons. Crews. Vls.

Tons. Crews.

13

27,675 8,224 1,094|| 43,441 8,35 1,317 61,115 10,279 1,352 1,227 387 310

45,832 12,545 62,068|11,162 75,624 13,387

12,774 3,351

Vietoria,

2,726 3,457,505,130,336|

Yaumáti,.

46 50,440 1,880 2,772 3,507,945 132,166 11,415 2,162,824 195,329 5,142 1,111 151,624 14,574 3,113

Total,.......

2,7263,457,505|130,336|

539,714 66,963 19,329 6,160,043 392,628 181,029 37,043 4,224 332,653 51,617

50,440 1,880 2,772 3,507,945 182,166 14,169 2,877,288 228,148 10,685 803,761 129,881 24,854 8,181,049852,524 16,895 5,884,798 353,479 10,731 854,201 181,211 27,6266,688,994 184,690

489,274 65,133 16,557 2,652,098 260,462 14,141 5,620,329 325,665 5,188 181,029 37,043 4,224 332,653 51,617 1,111 151,624 14,574 3,113

VI.—TOTAL NUMBER, TONNAGE AND CREWS OF VESSELS CLEARED AT EACH PORT IN THE COLONY OF HONGKONG, IN THE YEAR 1890.

BRITISH.

FOREIGN.

TOTAL.

NAMES

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOES,

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

OF PORTS.

Vls. Tons. Crews.

Vls. Tons. Crews. Vls. Tons. Crews. Vis.

Tons. Crews. Vls.

Aberdeen,

Hunghom, Shaukiwán,..

227

518

...

726

...

Stanley,.

159

6,292 1,542 853 36,154 3,947| 781 48,182 5,903) 589| 8,792 1,392 151|

Victoria,

2,529 3,207,087|124,098

Yaumáti,..

...

...

***

223 279,937 7,824 2,7523,486,974|131,922|13,371 2,811,992 281,188 3,067 155,680 22,596 2,057

2,028

Tons. Crews. Vls.

39,150 10,861 1,080 25,413] 7,070) 1,299 26,527 7,252 1,315 3,982| 1,959 310 333,437 28,003 16,438 172,242 27,064 4,085

Tons. Crews. Vis.

45,442 12,403|| 227 61,567] 11,017] 518 74,709 13,155 726 12,774 3,351 159 2,645,429 259,191 15,900 327,931 49,660 2,028

Tons. Crews. Vls.

Tons. Crews. Vls.

Tons, Crews.

6,292 1,542 36,154 3,947]

853

39,150 10,861| 1,080

45,442 12,403

781

25,413 7,070] 1,299|

61,567 11,017

48,182 5,903 8,792 1,392 5,519,029 355,286 155,689 22,596

589

20,527 7,252 1,315

74,709 13,155

151

3,290

2,057

3,982 1,959 310 12,774 3,351 613,374 35,827 19,190 6,132,403 391,113 172,242 27,064 4,085 327,931 49,660

Total,.............

2,529 3,207,037 124,098

228 279,937 7,524 2,7523,486,074 131,922 17,029 2,567,101 266,568 7,498 600,751 82,209 24,527 8,167,852 348,777 19,558 6,774,188 890,666 7,721 880,688 90,033 27,279 6,654,826 480,699

.

203

:

204

VII.-Total Number, Tonnage, Crews and Passengers of Junks ENTERED from Macao, during the Year

ending 31st December, 1890.

CARGO.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Passen- gers.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Passen- gers.

Passen-

Vessels. Tous. Crews.

gers.

Victoria,

565

85,825 14,593

37

75

8,763

948

10

640

94,588 15,541

47

+

Total,... 565

85,825 14,593

37

75

8,763

948

10

640 94,588 15,541

47

VIII.-Total Number, Tonnage, Crews and Passengers of Junks CLEARED for Macao, during the Year

ending 31st December, 1890.

CARGO.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Passen- gers.

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Passen- gers.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Victoria,

613 91,654 15,152

163

32

3,822

495

164

645

9.5,476 15,647

327

Total,... 613 91,654

15,152

163

32

3,822

495

164

645

95,476 15,647

327

IX.-Total Number, Tonnage, Crews and Passengers of Junks ENTERED at each Port in the Colony of Hongkong,

from Ports on the Coast of China and Formosa, during the Year ending 31st December, 1890.

CARGO.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Vessels.

T'ons. Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Passen-

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

gers.

Aberdeen,

Hunghòm,

496 513

18,157 4,321

266

598

27,675 8,224

10

18,627

2,847

73

804

43,441

8,315

11

1,094 1,317

45,832 12,545 62,068 11,162

276

84

Shankiwán,... 367

14,509 3,108

29

985

61,115

10,279

109

1,352

75,624

13,387

138

Stanley,

267

11,547

2,964

73

43

Victoria,

9,591

751,902

126,260

99,219

4,984

1,227 419,820

387 61,855

310

12,774 3,351

73

Yaumáti,......

1,111

151,624

14,574

35

3,113

181,029

37,043

43,289 56

14,575 4,224

1,171,722 188,115 | 142,508

332,653 51,617

91

Total,... 12,345 966,366 154,074 99,695

10,527

734,307 | 126,103- 43,475

22,872 1,700,673 280,177 |143,170

X.-Total Number, Tonnage, Crews and Passengers of Junks CLEARED at each Port in the Colony of Hongkong, for Ports on the Coast of China and Formosa, during the Year ending 31st December, 1890.

Cargo.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Vessels. Tous. Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Aberdeen,

227

6,292

1,542

185

Hunghom, .

518

36,154

3,947

66

853 781

39,150 10,861 25,413 7,070

20

1,080

45,442 12,403

205

2

1,299

61,567

11,017

68

Shaukiwán,

726

48,182

5,903

121

589

26,527 7,252

183

1,315

74,709

13,155

304

Stanley,..

159

8,792

1,392

77

151

3,982

1,959

...

Victoria,

11,618

1,049,846

166,058 | 126,519

2,822

109,073

20,829

11,530

Yaumáti,.

2,028

155,689

22,596

96

2,057

172,242

27,064

930

310 14,440 4,085

12,774 3,351

77

1,158,919 327,931

186,887 | 138,049

49,660

1,026

Total,... 15,276 | 1,304,955 |201,438 127,064

7,253

376,387 75,035

12,665

22,529 1,681,342 |276,473 | 139,729

206

XV.-SUMMARY.

FOREIGN TRADE.

No. of VESSELS.

TONS.

CREWS.

British Vessels entered with Cargoes,.

Do.

do. in Ballash,

2,726 46

3,457,505

180,336

50,440

1,830

Total.....

2,772

3,507,945

132,166

British Vessels cleared with Cargoes,...

2,529

3,207,037

124,098

Do.

do.

in Ballast,

223

279,937

7,824

Total,.............

2,752

3,486,974

131,922

Total of all British Vessels entered and cleared,

5,524

6,994,919

264,088

Foreign Vessels entered with Cargoes,.

14,169

2,377,288

223,143

Do.

do.

in Ballast,

10,685

-803,761

129,381

Total,......

24,854

3,181,049

352,524

Foreign Vessels cleared with Cargoes,

17,029

2,567,101

266,568

Do.

do.

in Ballast,

7,498

600,751

82,209

Total,..

24,527

3,167,852

348,777

Total of all Foreign Vessels entered and cleared,

49,381

6,348,901

701,301

Total of all Vessels entered with Cargoes,

·

Do.

do. in Ballant,

16,895

5,834,793

353,479

10,731

854,201

131,211

Total of all Vessels entered......

Total of all Vessels cleared with Cargoes,

27,626

6,688,994

484,690

19,558

5,774,138

390,666

Do.

do.

in Ballast,

Total of all Vessels cleared,...

7,721

880,688

90,033

27,279

6,654,826

480,699

Do.

do.

Total of all Vessels entered and cleared with Cargoes,

Total of all Vessels engaged in Foreign Trade only, entered and cleared,....

36,453

11,608,931

744,145

do. in Ballast,

18,452

1,734,889

221,244

54,905

13,343,820

965,389

LOCAL TRADE.

Total of all Vessels entered,.

4,506

163,594

48,678

Do.

cleared,

4,576

168,879

49,221

:

Total of all Vessels engaged in Local Trade only, entered and cleared,.....

9,082

332,473

97,899

Total of all Vessels engaged in Foreign Trade only, entered and cleared,

Do.

do. in Local Trade only,

do.

54,905 9,082

Grand Total of all Vessels entered and cleared,

63,987

13,343,820 332,473

13,676,293

965,389

97,899

1,063,288

SUMMARY OF ALL CHINESE PASSENGERS.

NAMES OF PLACES.

From Ports other than in China or Japan,

Do.

in China and Japan,....

Do.

in Macao,.....

Do.

in Villages of the Colony,

101,147

700,318

57,223

6,742

Total Arrivals........

865,430

Left for Ports other than in China or Japan,

42,066

Do.

in China and Japan,...................

755,607

4

Do.

in Macao,...

54,408

Do.

in Villages of the Colony,.

6,275

Total Departures,.....

858,356

Excess of Arrivals over Departures,

7,074

Grand Total of Arrivals and Departures,

1,723,786

'

205

XI.-Grand Total Number, Tonnage, Crews and Passengers of Junks ENTERED at each Port in the Colony of

Hongkong (exclusive of Local Trade), during the Year ending 31st December, 1890.

CARGO.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Passen- gers.

Vessels..

Tons. Crews.

Passen- gers.

Passen-

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

gers.

Aberdeen,

496 18,157 4,321

266

598

27,675 8,224

10

1,094

45,832 12,545

276

-Hungbom,

513

18,627 2,847

73

804

43,441

8,315

11

1,317

62,068 11,162

84

Shaukiwán,.

367

14,509

3,108

29

985

61,115

10,279

109

1,352

75,624 13,387

138

Stanley,

267

11,547 2,964

73

43

1,227

387

310

12,774 3,351

73

Victoria,

10,156

837,727 140,853

99,256

5,059

428,583

62,803

43,299

15,215 | 1,266,310 |203,656 |142,555

Yaumáti,.

1,111

151,624 14,574

35 3,113

181,029

37,043

56

4,224 332,653 51,617

91

Total,... 12,9101,052,191 |168,667 99,732 10,602

743,070 127,051

43,485

23,512 1,795,261 295,718 [143,217

XII.-Grand Total Number, Tonnage, Crews and Passengers of Junks CLEARED at each Port in the Colony of Hongkong (exclusive of Local Trade), during the Year ending 31st December, 1890.

CARGO.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Passen- gers.

Vessels.

Tous. Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Aberdeen,

227

6,292 1,542

185

853

39,150 10,861

20 1,080

Hunghòm,

518

36,154 3,947

66

781

25,413

7,070

2 1,299

45,442 12,403 61,567 11,017

205

68

Shaukiwán,..

726

48,182

5,903

121

589

26,527

7,252

183

Stanley,

159

8,792

1,392

77

151

3,982

1,959

Victoria,

12,231 | 1,141,500

181,210 126,682

2,854

112,895

21,324

11,694

Yaumáti,

2,028

155,689 22,596

96

2,057

172,242

27,064

930

1,315 310 15,085 4,085

74,709 13,155

304

12,774 3,351

77

1,254,395 |202,534 138,376

327,931 49,660

1,026

}

Total,... 15,889 1,396,609 216,590 127,227

7,285

380,209 75,530 12,829

12,829 | 23,174 | 1,776,818 |292,120 140,056

.

XIII.-Return of Junks (Local Trade) ENTERED at the Port of Victoria from the Out-stations of the Island and the Villages in British Kaulung, during the Year ending 31st December, 1890.

CARGO.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Passen- gers.

Vessels.

Tons.

Crews.

Passen- gers.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Passen- gers.

Victoria,...... 3,281 123,583 37,186 3,247. 1,225

40,011 11,492 3,495 4,506

163,594 48,678

6,742

Total,... 3,281 123,583 37,186 3,247 1,225

40,011 11,492 3,495

4,506

163,594 48,678

6,742

XIV. Return of Junks (Local Trade) CLEARED from the Port of Victoria for the Out-stations of the Island and the Villages in British Kaulung, during the Year ending 31st December, 1890.

CARGO.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels. Tons.

Passen- Crews.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

gers.

Passen- gers.

Passen -

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

gers.

Victoria,

1,799 51,398 15,457 5,288

2,777 117,481 33,764 987 4,576

168,879 | 49,221

6,275

Total,...

1,799 51,398 15,457 5,288

2,777

117,481 33,764

987 4,576

168,879 49,221

6,275

.

"

.

:

XVI.-RETURN of VESSELS REGISTERED at the Port of Hongkong, during the Year 1890.

207

Name of Vessel.

Official Number.

Regis- tered Tonnage.

Horse Power.

Rig.

Built of

Where built and when.

Remarks, &c.

Avochie, str.,

88,860 1,033.71

200

Schooner Iron

Avochie, str.,

88,860 1,055.74

200

Schooner

Iron

Low Walker on Tyne,

1884.

Low Walker on Tyne,

1884.

Since registered de novo in consequence of alteration in Tonnage.

San Bernardino, str.,....

95,854 42.80

Heung Shan, str., William Le Lacheur,... 50,201 573.05

95,855 1,055.09

30

344 None

Schooner

Wood Hongkong, 1887. Steel Leith, 1890.

Since sold to Foreigners at

Manila.

Barque

Wood Guernsey, 1864.

Dorothy,

49,660 310.47

Barque

Wood Gloucester, 1864.

XVII.-RETURN of REGISTRIES of VESSELS cancelled at the Port of Hongkong, during the Year 1890.

Name of Vessel.

Official

Number.

Regis- tered Tonnage.

Date of

Registry.

Horse Power.

Rig.

Built of

Where built and when.

Reason of Cancellation.

Antoinette,

75,452

883.72 1883

Barque

Canton, str.,

81,640 1,110.00 1885 250 Schooner Iron

Soochow, str.,......................

48,331 326.59 1886 95

Fook Ching, str.,

88,849 76.69 1888 24

Fame, str.,

19,498 140.49 1888 | 74

Lady Harewood,...... 60,867 381.85 1889

Avochie, str.,

88,860 1,033.71

1890 200

Schooner

Iron

Wood Skelleftea, Sweden, Transferred to Liverpool.

1878. Newcastle on Tyne, Transferred to London.

1880.

Schooner Iron Cork, 1858.

Schooner Wood Hongkong, 1888.

None Iron South Shields, 1857.

Barque Wood Plymouth, Devon,

1868.

Low Walker on

Tyne, 1884.

San Bernardino, str.,. 95,854 42.80 1890 30 Schooner

Wood Hongkong, 1887.

Stranded at Ching Mai Point near Kiung Chow. Transferred to Penang.

Sold to Hongkong Colonial

Government.

Transferred to Port Louis,

Mauritius.

Registered de novo in con- sequence of alteration in Tonnage.

Sold to Foreigners at

Manila.

XVIII.—AMOUNT of FEES received under the Merchant Shipping Act, 1855, and Section III. of Ordinance No. 8

of 1879 in the Harbour Department, during the Year 1890.

Matter or Duty in respect of which Fee taken.

Number.

Fee.

Amount.

Remarks.

Certifying Desertion,

48

Copy from Registry Book,

1

Declaration of Ownership,

8

Endorsement of change of Master,..

48

Endorsement of change of Ownership,

3

Endorsement of change in Tonnage,

1

Granting Certificate of Imperial Registry,

6

15

Inspection of Registry,

1

Recording Mortgage of Ship,

1

Recording Discharge of Mortgage,

1

Recording Sale of Ship, ...

10

Registering Certificate of Sale,

1

110212 N 10 H10 10 10 N

48

5

5

16

48

6

2

90

1

5

5

50

2

2

+

Total,.

278

+3

:

208

XIX.- -RETURN of CHINESE PASSENGER SHIPS cleared by the Emigration Officer, Hongkong, during the Year ending the 31st day of December, 1890.

No.

DATE CLEARED.

SHIP'S NAME.

TONS.

NATION- ALITY

ADULTS.

CHILDREN.

OF SHIP.

MASTER'S NAME.

WHITHER BOUND.

TOTAL.

M.

F.

M.

F.

9

1234 LO

1 January 3 Nizam, str.

3 Kiel, str.

6 Dardanus, str..

7 Bormida, str.

1,615 British

T. F. Creery

Straits Settlements

193

851 German

M. W. Krutzfildt | Medan in Deli Sumatra

259

City of Rio de Janeiro, str.

""

9 Batavia, str...........

""

10 Melpomene, str.

17 Chowchowfoo, str.

,1

30

Arratoon Apcar, str.

10 February 6

Abyssinia, str.

11

12

""

6

Wing Sang, str.

"

10

Bisagno, str.......

13

""

12

Peninsular, str.

2,346 1,517 1,499 Italian 2,712 British

1,491 British 1,499 Italian 2,275 American 1,662 British 1,943 Austrian

796 German 1,392 British

W. Ward

J. C. Williamson E. Perini F. Clausen J. G. Olifent G. A. Lee

T. Purdy

Straits Settlements

53

22

::

22

216 259.

53

E. De Negri

162

"

24

24

192.

San Francisco

32

41

Vancouver, B.C.

42

43

"}

d'A. de Ste. Croix

Straits Settlements Medau in Deli Sumatra Straits Settlements Vancouver, B.C. Straits Settlements

79

21

106

277

277

45

29

76

93

96

92

8

1

102

G. F. Valle

224

20

}

246

-+

14

15

16-

22

13

Belgic, str.

2,695

W. J. Webber W. H. Walker

551

55

"

""

14

"

Kiel, str.

15

Japan, str.

17

18

22

Poseidon, str.

18

18

51

Devonhurst, str.

19

20

Diomed, str..............

22

95

Chi Yuen, str.......

2

25

27

28

29

30

31

32

33

35

36

37

40

41

:

********888*38-88*********DEAS RangRecc6666 5 222122422

25

Sutlej, str.

"

20

"

20

21

22

23

"J

19

24 March

22 Chowchowfoo, str.

26

City of Peking, str..

1 Benvenue, str.

1 Kutsang, str.

4 Choysang, str.

German

851 1,865 British 2,510 Austrian 1,164 Dutch 1,432 British 1,211

796 German 2,103 British

3,129 American 1,497 British

P. Houthoff

M. W. Krutzfildt

T. S. Gardner

San Francisco Medan in Deli Sumatra Straits Settlements

31

2

3291

:

:

34

329

.214

L. Lemesich

348

22

10

24

อง

232

380

83

83

""

T. Bartlett

170

21

Q

:

193

Chinese

C. R. Null F. Clausen

140

140

Medan in Deli Sumatra

171

171

1,495

1,194

W. D. Worcester J. M. Cavarly A. W. S. Thomson W. O. M. Young W. E. Sawer

Straits Settlements

153

153

San Francisco Straits Settlements

132

6

141

411

14

429

454

27

488

197

210

""

5 Laertes, str.

1,391

R. F. Scale

98

98

:

"

""

6 Parthia, str.

2,035

F. H. Wallace

"

7 Bormida, str.

1,499 Italian

E. De Negri

Vancouver, B.C. Straits Settlements

314

319

402

18

422

10 Glenfinlas, str..

1,409 British

??

11

Massilia, str...

2,742

R. D. Jones

C. Fraser

129

129

"

270

::

270

"

13

Oceanic, str...

2,440

W. M. Smith

Honolulu

82

18

8

323

San Francisco

202

7

17

Arratoon Apcar, str.

1,392

32

J. G. Olifent

Straits Settlements

516

54

574

:

3+

39

42 | April

2;: ུ་ཎྞཱ་

19

Almora, str.

1,719

T. J. Grier

209

2

212

20 Medusa, str.

1,776 Austrian

G. Mettel

200

17

221

22

Wing Sang, str.

22 Chowchowfoo, str.

26 City of Rio de Janeiro, str.

25 Pekin, str.

28 Thibet, str.

2,275 | American

2,133 British

P. Harris

1,517 British

d'A. de Str. Croix

329

731

418

796

German

F. Clausen

Medan in Deli Sumatra

91

91

:

W. Ward

San Francisco

123

2

126

Straits Settlements

210

210

1,665

W. L. Brown

372

10

389

,,

""

20 Stentor, str.

1,278

99

S. Milligan

187

15

210

""

2

Japan, str.

1,865

T. S. Gardner

558

26

595

"J

y

43

""

3 Batavia, str......................

1,662

J. C. Williamson

Vancouver, B.C.

44

44

44

""

5

Gaelic, str.

...

2,691

W. G. Pearne

27

San Francisco

257

257

45

""

5 Goalpara, str.

1,355

M

A. Houghton

Straits Settlements

273

13

298

46

"

.9

Bisagno, str.

1,499

Italian

G. F. Valle

377

36

426

>>

47

48

49

50

51

52

53

54

55

56

"

9

Mirzapore, str.

2,168 British

R. Harvey

212

212

22

"

15

Kutsang, str.

"

17

China, str.

1,495 2,401

""

W. O. M. Young

631

82

724

W. B. Seabury

San Francisco

138

99

18

Orion, str.

1,833

Austrian

B. Vidos

Straits Settlements

534

53

21

Agamemnon, str.

""

""

23 Deuteros, str.

27

26 Abyssinia, str.

23 Kaisar-i-Hind, str.

1,491 British 2,385

1,198 German 2,346 British

W. A. Dinse G. A. Lee

J. W. Hutchinson G. W. Atkinson

309

26

17

154

:

:

141

595

355

154

?

""

335

23

365

*

Vancouver, B.C.

114

114

وو

26 Nizam, str..

1,615

E. G. Andrews

""

Straits Settlements

316

44

""

29 Tannadice, str..

1,408

P. T. Helms

242

22

""

"

57

29

29 Belgic, str.

2,695

W. H. Walker

""

San Francisco

125

9

:

:

2

364

265

58

30 Arratoon Apcar, str.

1,392

33

J. G. Spence

Straits Settlements

308

102

59 May

1 Gwalior, str....

1,602

F. Cole

247

23

71

""

6 Bormida, str.

7 Wing Sang, str.

13

""

Fidelio, str.

""

14

Thames, str.

60

27

15 Parthia, str..

67

68

"2

17 Japan, str.

69

""

17 Thisbe, str.

70

""

22 Oceanic, str..

71

22 Almora, str.

·60

61

62

63

64

65

27

10 City of Peking, str..

13 Airlie, str.

15 Independent, str.

1,499 Italian 1,517 British 3,129 American 1,492 British

853 German 2,101 British 2,035

871 German

1,865 British 1,848 Austrian 2,440 British

W. Ellis

H. Brown W. A. Seaton J. Panton

A. Hasenwinkel

T. S. Gardner

E. Perini W. M. Smith J. J. Grier

E. De Negri

375

39

d'A. de Ste. Croix]

358

59

J. M. Cavarly

San Francisco

82

:

Straits Settlements

381

31

MONIONY

5969

136

421

278

421

430

89

422

Medan in Deli Sumatra

216

216

Straits Settlements

205

205

وو

Vancouver, B.C.

146

146

{

Singapore

158

381

Mauritius

216

7

Straits Settlements

350

31

10

274

30

ථ ඌ

394

313

፡፡

San Francisco

147

5

153

72

24 Thibet, str.

1,719 1,665

"

Straits Settlements

253

40

"7

W. L. Brown

237

41

73

24 Jason, str..

1,412

""

J. Milligan

202

18

29

74

99

27 Yuen Sang, str. ....

1,106

J. Slessar

201

26

13

က

295

283

221

51

235

""

29 Rohilla, str.

2,175

76

2"

29 Deucalion, str..

1,374

""

M. De Horne

W. Asquith

51

51

104

19

1

125

37

77

وو

31 Kutsang, str.

1,495

78 June

3 City of Rio de Janeiro, str

79

""

6 Glaucus, str.

80

""

7 Bisagno, str.

81

>>

7 Glengarry, str.....

1,499 Italian 1,956 British

82

"

7 Teheran, str.

1,670

2,275 American

1,381 British

W. T. Hamuah

G..Orengo

R. Webster

C. D. Sams

W. O. M. Young W. Ward

322

80

5

9

416

San Francisco

62

62

Straits Settlemen's

94

8

108

251

43

298

19

145

152

27

188

21

12

202

83

13 Arratoon Apear, str.

1,392

J. G. Spence

395 112

522

39

84

J

13 Lombardy, str.

85

14

22

Gaelic, str.

1,571 2,691

"

G. L. Langborne

364

30

7

407

W. G. Fearne

22

San Francisco

167

5

172

86

29.

17 Melpomene, str.

1,943 Austrian

G. Walluschnig

Straits Settlements

214

32

7

258

Carried forward,. 149,682

Carried forward,..............] 19,505 1,595

243

135

21,478

RETURN of CHINESE PASSENGER SHIPS cleared by the Emigration Officer, Hongkong, Continued.

209

No.

DATE CLEARED.

SHIP'S NAME.

TONS.

NATION-

ALITY OF SHIP.

ADULTS.

CHILDREN.

MASTER'S NAME.

WHITHER BOUND.

TOTAL.

M.

F.

M.

F.

Brought forward,.

888

87 June 20

Nizam, str.

88

21

Wing Sang, str.

89

26

China, str.

90

91

92

93 July

26

Batavia, str..

149,682

1,615 British 1,517 2,401 1,662

Brought forward,19,505 1,595 2451 135

21,478

J. T. Jephson

Straits Settlements

82

17

d'A. de Ste. Croix

160

47

""

W. B. Seabury

San Francisco

211

262

2

101

218

215

""

""

>"

""

27

Gwalior, str..

1,602

J. C. Williamson

F. Cole

Vancouver, B.C.

125

125

Straits Settlements

130

21

155

""

28

Achilles, str..

1,488

C. Anderson

112

15

20

147

>>

1

Japan, str.

1,865

T. S. Gardner

190

02

272

"}

.94

#28538

3

""

Straits of Belle Isle, str.

1,586

G. Grigs

Vancouver, B.C.

98

:

· 98

71

95

Bormida, str.

1,499 Italian

(. Gavázzo

""

96

8

Belgic, str.

2,695 British

W. H. Walker

""

97

12

Venetia, str...

""

98

,,

16 | Abyssinia, str.

99

""

18 Kutsang, str.

1,551 2,346 1,495

C. Gadd

Straits Settlements San Francisco Straits Settlements

364

86

Je

11

471

170

13

7:

191

557

38

3

604

"

G. A. Lee

W. O. M. Young

100

19

22

City of Peking, str.

3,129 American

J. M. Cavarley

101

23

23

Benlawers, str.

1,513 British

A. Webster

102

24

Parthia, str....

2,035

11

103

27

24

Bellerophon, str.

1,396

32

104

26

Choy Sang, str.

1,194

J. Panton W. E. Guthrie

W. E. Sawer

Vancouver, B.C. Straits Settlements Victoria, B.C. San Francisco Straits Settlements

110

:

110.

573

68

658

62

...

320

249

5

118

11

131

Vancouver, B.C. Straits Settlements

106

106

257

60

322

250

30

284

"

:>

105

"

28

Melpomene, str.

1,943 Austrian

G. Walluschnig

217

24

247

""

106

29

"

Arratoon Apcar, str.

1,392 British

J. G. Spence

154

57

227

""

>>

107 108

"

109 August 2❘ Thibet, str.

31

Oceanic, str....

2,440

W. M. Smith

San Francisco

391

15

410

31

Tannadice, str..

1,408

P. T. Helms

Straits Settlements

98

5

2-2-

1,665

W. L. Brown

102

::

105

110

2.5

22

110

""

6

Bisagno, str.

1,499 Italian

G. Orengo

177

58

249

111

25

8

Wing Sang, str..

1,517. J. British

d'A. de Ste. Croix!

232

74

6

317

""

112

"2

14

Ajax, str.

1,524

E. S. Rawlings

152

152

"J

113

"

15

Japan, str.

1,865

T. S. Gardner

114

50

""

114

16

Sussex, str.

1,620

H. F. Holt

Vancouver, B.C.

129

:

TO

:

171

129

29

115

18

Medusa, str.

1,776 Austrian

G. Castanzo.

""

116

19

Mongkut, str.

859 British

G. Anderson

117

19 Avochie, str...................

1,056

T. Rowin

Straits Settlements Vancouver, B.C. Straits Settlements

212

61

31

114

23

:

583

282

31

3

144

دو

118

22

City of Rio de Janeiro, str.

2,275

American

D. S. Austin

Victoria, B.C.

79

298

San Francisco

215

119

""

22

Lombardy, str.

120

23

Gaelic, str.

1,571 British 2,691

J. F. Jephson

Straits Settlements

170

W. G. Pearne

San Francisco

167

27

121

>>

27

Pemptos, str.

122

124

""

123 Sept.

27 Deuteros, str.

2 Kutsang, str.

4 China, str.

125

27

4 Batavia, str.

126

""

5 | Bormida, str.

127

17

13 Arratoon Apcar, str.

1,541 German 1,198 1,495 British

2,401

1,662 1,499 Italian 1,392 British

U. Johannsen W. A. Dinse

Straits Settlements

136

124

25

""

W. O. M. Young

350

""

Honolulu

226

******

28

12

32

3

73

2

43215

205

185

175

131

430

54

12

15

39

128

">

13 Nizam, str.

1,615

""

129

99

15

Sarpedon, str.

1,591

W. B. Seabury

J. C. Williamson C. Gavazzo

J. G. Spence C. Gadd

J. Barwise

435

San Francisco

108

12

I

Vancouver, B.C.

78

80

Straits Settlements

311

186

21

313

""

114

130

""

16

Belgic, str.

2.695

131

18

Straits of Belle Isle, str.

1,586

W. H. Walker G. Grigs

San Francisco

551

Vancouver, B.C.

59

132

22

19 Melpomene, str.

133

20 Wing Sang, str.

134

""

27 City of Peking, str..

135

19

29 Abyssinia, str

136

"

29 Gwalior, str...........

137

29 Tetartos, str.

139

""

7 Japan, str.

138 October 4 Teheran, str.......

1,517 British

3,129 American 2,346 British 1,602

""

1,578 German 1,670 British

G. Walluschnig d'A. de Ste Croix!

J. M. Cavarley G. A. Lee F. Cole

W. Breitung C. D. Sams T. S. Gardner

1,943 Austrian

Straits Settlements

259

265

882 78

:

59

12

390

33

227

48

372

11

130

22

~

83

59

21

86

12

San Francisco

104

Vancouver, B.C.

80

:

Straits Settlements

350

92

277

26

??

140.

""

8 Teucer, str.

141

""

9 Oceanic, str..

1,865 1,803 2,440

195

"

22

"

J. Riley

86

W. M. Smith

San Francisco

108

142

""

9 Bisagno, str..

1,499 Italian

143

11 Parthia, str.

2,035 British

144

15 | Hainan, str...

""

145

16 Bokhara, str.

29

146

17 Kutsang, str.

دو

147

20 Telemachus, str.

""

148

22 Elektra, str.

""

149

""

25

150

23

28 Arratoon Apear,

City of Rio de Janeiro, str.

str.

151

"

31 Venetia, str..

وو

152

31

Picciola, str.

153

Nov.

3

Gaelic, str.

154

""

3 Glaucus, str.

2,691 1,381

""

155

""

6 Wing Sang, str.

1,517

156

32

8 Bormida, str.

1,499 Italian

157

""

8 Independent, str.

1.58

""

8 Chusan, str.

**

159

160

13 China, str.

15 Tetartos, str.

.161

18 Batavia, str.

29

162

""

19 Japan, str.

163

""

20 Melpomene, str.

164

29

25 | Belgic, str.

165

27

26 Nizam, str.

1,615

648 | German 1,696 British 1,495 1,421 2,095 Austrian

2,275 American

1,392 British

1,551

875 German

British

871 German

719 2,401 British 1,578 German 1,662 British 1,865 1,943 Austrian 2,695 British

""

G. Orengo J. Panton J. Samuelsen P. W. Case W. O. M. Young H. Jones

G. Mahorcich W. Ward

J. G. Spence

T. F. Creery T. Nissen

W. G. Pearne W. T. Hannah d'A. de Ste. Croix C. Gavazzo

H.Hasenwinkel

W. Wendt W. B. Seabury W. Breitung A. J. Coleman T. S. Gardner G. Walluschnig W. H. Walker C. Gadd

:

Mauritius

Honolulu

Straits Settlements

167

21

188868

23

59

28

* 2-

might

20254

3

5

288

11

374

3

112

80

380

103

311

271

120

123

196

Vancouver, B.C.

63

63

Bangkok

120

120

Straits Settlements

100

...

100

382

96

O

10

497

"

142

142

208

44

5

266

"J

San Francisco

28

28

Straits Settlements

Bangkok

229

76

342

(Hired)

26

...

238

25

273

32

82

San Francisco Straits Settlements

79

6

Q

88

71

78

265

33

306

22

280

21

305

53

212

176

::

396

15

3

18

San Francisco

61

5

66

Straits Settlements

236

20

262

Vancouver, B.C. Straits Settlements

85

85

:

181

31

216

70

San Francisco

50

5

:

:

:

222

303

50

Straits Settlements

257

26

288

166

""

26 Nanshan, str.

!

167

Dec. 5 Kutsang, str.

.805 1,495

J. Blackburn

88

8

99

""

22

W. O. M. Young

259

40

309

>>

168

""

5 Titan, str......

*1,554

R. J. Brown

138

16

159

21

}}

169

:

""

6 Bisagno, str.

170

53

171

2"

10 Gwalior, str.......................

Carried forward,.

6 City of Peking, str.

1,602 British

297,143

1,499 Italian 3,129 | American

G. Orengo

435

506

25

R. R. Searle

San Francisco

23

27

F. Cole

Straits Settlements

143

100

Carried forward,......... 35,078 3,721,

542

392

30,728

:

210

:

RETURN of CHINESE PASSENGER SHIPS cleared by the Emigration Officer, Hongkong,—Continued.

No.

DATE CLEARED..

SHIP'S NAME,

TONS.

NATION-

ALITY OF SHIP.

ADULTS.

CHILDREN.

MASTER'S NAME.

WHITHER BOUND.

TOTAL.

.M.

F.

M.

F.

Brought forward,...

297,443

172❘ Dec. 173

10

Glengarry, str.

11

""

Arratoon Apcar, str.

174 175

"J

17

Pemptos, str,

19

18

Poseidon, str.

176

177

178

179

19 Oceanic, str...

22 Abyssinia, str.

23 Wing Sang, str.

24 Teheran, str.

1,956 British 1,392 1,541 German 2,510 Austrian 2,440 British

R. Webster J. G. Spence

Brought forward,. 35,073 3,721| 542 392

Straits Settlements

39,728

89 206

--

"2

"

2,346 1,517

""

U. Johannsen L. Lemesich

W. M. Smith

J. C. Williamson d'A. de Ste. Croix

163

""

218

43

""

Honolulu

58

San Francisco Vancouver, B.C. Straits Settlements

41

27-312

2

105

3

250

9

2

175

269

19

142

99

::

99

331

65

""

1,670

C. D. Sams

198

22

180

""

27 | Palamed, str.

1,489

C. Jackson

195

14

181

""

29 | Ardgay, str.

1,081

R. ('ass

114

182

"

31 Japan, str.

1,865

J. E. Hansen

272

అత

29

44

30 31 30 29 J

410

209

231

128

1

320

TOTAL TONS,

$17,250

TOTAL PASSENGERS,

37,057 3,997

594 418

42,066

SUMMARY.

To Bangkok, Siam,........

19

29

Honolulu, Sandwich Islands,

Mauritius,

Medan in Deli, Sumatra,.......

San Francisco, U.S.A.,

39 Straits Settlements,

"

99

""

دو

Victoria

Do.

(Hired),

Do.,

Vancouver, British Columbia,.

152

:

152

381

92

392

==

36

39

25

537

111

1,343

::

403

1,943

3,558 169 23

48

3,798

29,248 3,736

510 350

26

1,816

11

141

:

33,870 1,827 141

TOTAL PASSENGERS,...............................

37,057 3,997

594

418 42,066

:

......

XX.-RETURN of VESSELS bringing CHINESE PASSENGERS to the Port of Victoria, Hongkong, from Places out of the Chinese Empire, during the Year ending the 31st day of December, 1890.

211

No.

DATE ARRIVED.

SHIP'S NAME.

TONS.

NATION- ALITY OF SHIP.

ADULTS.

CHILDREN.

MASTER'S NAME.

WHERE FROM,

TOTAL.

M.

F

M.

F

1 January 2

Chow Fa, str.

1,055 British

"

2

City of Rio de Janeiro, str.

2,275 American

Phillips Ward

Bangkok

23

23

San Francisco

5671

17

11

13

608

??

3

Oanfa, str.

1,970 British'

Thomson

Straits Settlements

319

1

320

"

3

Frigga, str.

1,400 German

Ehlers

286

290

:1

4 Teheran, str.

21

7 Melpomene, str.

"

6 | Phra Chom Klao, str.

7 Wing Sang, str.

1,671 British

1,012

Sams

148

16

2

155

Watton

Bangkok

78

78

1,943 Austrian

Perini

Straits Settlements

114 3

3

122

1,517 British

Ste. Croix

240

3

250

9

8

Taichiow, str.

862

Morris

Bangkok

31

31

>>

10

9

Gaelic, str.

2,691

Pearne

San Francisco

312

11

12

22

13

14

41

9 Amigo, str.

10 Diamond, str.

10 Diomed, str..

11 Gleneagles, str.

771 German

Bruhn

Straits Settlements

140

1,030 British

Lampert

692

23

1,432

Bartlett

210

>>

"

1,838

Parks

459

72915 10

2

లు లా

5

329

145

ลงค

:

701

217

3

168

"

15

11

11 Mongkut, str.

859

Fowler

Bangkok

147

147

""

16

17

18

"2

13

Bellerophon, str...

1,356

Guthrie

Straits Settlements

117

7

125

??

""

13

Fidelio, str.

852 German

Brorsen

89

89

"

14

Shanghai, str.

2,044 British

Tillard

105

19

14 Cheang Hye Teng, str.

923

Scott

146

10 10

110

151

"J

20

15 Bengloe, str.

1,158

"}

21

35

16 Glenlyon, str.

1,410

23

22

16

China, str.

2,401

>>

23

"

17 Abyssinia, str.

2,346

Farquhar Sommers Seabury Lee

175

175

31

245

3

260

San Francisco

140

150

Vancouver, B.C.

72

72

"

24

"

17 Breconshire, str.

1,648

29

25

26

>>

20

Kashgar, str.

1,555

Jackson Brown

Straits Settlements

30

30

100

110

""

20

Hector, str.

1,590

""

Thompson

339

348

""

27

""

20 Benlawers, str.

1,513

Webster

188

190

""

28.

20 Devawongse, str.

1,057

Loff

+2

Bangkok

54

...

Port Darwin

28

Thursday Island

3

1

Cooktown

6

Cairns

ΙΟ

29

20 Tannadice, str.

*

1,408

Helms

Townsville

18

1

234

Brisbane

14

Sydney

71

Melbourne

80

Adelaide

2

30

"

32

31

>>

22 Hesperia, str. ... 23 Titan, str.

1,123 German

1,525 British

32

24 Devonhurst, str.

1,164 Dutch

Madeen Brown Houthoff

Straits Settlements

88

90

213

215

60

61

Port Darwin

7

Cooktown

17

33

15

24 Airlie, str.

1,492 British

Ellis

Townsville

37

Sydney

Melbourne

34

35

"

36

37

38

RARRA

27 Glenfinlas, str.

27 Arratoon Apcar, str. 28 Omega

29 Braunschweig, str..

31 Oxus, str........

1,809 1,392 480 2,150 German 2,422 French

Jones

Straits Settlements

50

99

Olifent

211

13

"}

22

Brown

Honolulu

130

7

His Ň

Meier

Straits Settlements

401

De La Croix

44

50

226

144

40

44

Thursday Island

Townsville

Brisbane

39 Feb.

1 Tai Yuan, str...

1,459 British

Nelson

Sydney

24

51

Adelaide

1

Melbourne

11

40

"}

3 Belgic, str.

2,695

Walker

San Francisco

76

75

152

41

3 Moray, str.

1,411

Duncan

Straits Settlements

56

1

57

::

42

3 Nestor, str.

1,269

"

43

3 Sutlej, str.

2,103

::

Elder Worcester

83

84

39

23

23

44

Lombardy, str.

1,571

Langborne

108

5

113

22

45

25

4| Phra Chom Klao, str.

1,012

Watson

Bangkok

25

25

"

46

5 Chow Fa, str.

1,055

""

Phillips

39

39

"

47

"

5 Kriemhild, str.

1,638 German

Schaefer

Straits Settlements

296

3

310

48

5 Glenavon, str.

1,936 British ·

Jacobs

201

201

"3

49

7 Cyclops, str.

1,363

Nish

66

::

66

;;

"

50

8 Diamond, str.

1,030

Slow

5971

Co

607

"

79

??

51

8 Mongkut, str.

859

Fowler

Bangkok

28

28

>>

52

11 Japan, str.

1,865

Gardner

Straits Settlements

677

24

};

53

12 Palinurus, str.............

1,536

Jackson

312

4

10 -

710

320

"}

>>

54

12 Cheang Hock Kian, str.

956

Grenfell

638

""

55

56

57

58

61

62

**2J8828**3828****:

12 China, str.

648 German

Bruhn

Medan in Deli, Sumatra

86

640 86

13 Bombay, str.

2,047 British

Weston

Straits Settlements

29

14 Melbourne, str.

2,482 French

14 Poseidon, str.

59

15 Cheang Chew, str.

2,510 Austrian 1,213 British

60

17 Flintshire, str.

1,871

Vimont Lemesich Webb Davies

63

""

619

12

640

"}

363

270

21 20

368

273

17❘ Ajax, str.

1,477

رو

17 Devawongse, str.

1,057

Riley Loff

100

100

""

Bangkok"

105

105

37

63

17 | Fidelio, str.

64

18 Massilia, str.

852 German 2,742 British

Brorsen

Medan in Deli, Sumatra

99

2

101

Fraser

Straits Settlements

65

65

65

18 Namchow, str.

1,109

Colonna

540

12

2

560

11

??

66

19 Kong Beng, str.

67

19 Lydia, str.

68

21 Sachsen, str.

69

22 City of Peking, str.

862 1,170 German 2,874 3,129 American

Jones

""

Bangkok

30

:

30

Foerck

Straits Settlements

375

10

Gossee

291

20

20

10 10

397

336

""

17

Cavarley

San Francisco

48

33

70

22 | Phra Chula Chom Klao, S.

1,012 British

71

24 Thibet, str.

1,671

Benson Preston

Bangkok

30

::

.48

30

Straits Settlements

160 7

167

72

24 | Palamed, str.

25

73

24 Else, str.

1,489

747 German

""

19

Jackson

407

14

425

Jebsen

Medan in Deli, Sumatra

123

123

Carried forward.

111,864

Carried forward...............

13,750

343

115

53

14,261

212

RETURN of VESSELS bringing CHINESE PASSENGERS to the Port of Victoria, Hongkong,-Continued.

CHILDREN.

No.

DATE ARRIVED.

SHIP'S NAME.

TONS.

NATION- ALITY OF SHIP.

ADULTS.

MASTER'S NAME.

WHERE FROM.

TOTAL.

M. F.

M. F.

Brought forward..............] 111,864

.76

79

PREBROD.XX

74 Feb. 75

25

Ning Chow, str.

1,735 British

"J

26

Kutsang, str.

.....

1,495

"

""

27

Glenfruin, str.

1,936

??

Durdin Young Norman

Brought forward... 13,750 343 Straits Settlements

115 53 14,261

344

344

420 10

431

""

240

240

"

77

"

27

Cheang Hye Teng, str.

923

Scott

282

""

282

78

28

Oceanic, str.

2,440

Smith

>>

San Francisco

170

10

4

186

March 1

Bormida, str. .....

1,499 Italian

80

19

1

Orestes, str.......

81

""

3

Chow Fa, str.

1,279 British 1,055

De Negri Barr

Straits Settlements

126

137

:

401

401

>>

:

11

Phillips

Bangkok

43

43

82

4

Niobe, str.

83

5 Pekin, str.

1,666 German 2,134 British

Pfaff

Straits Settlements

290

2

d

292

Harris

56

56

>"

Port Darwin

24

Thursday Island

84

5 Chingtu, str..

Townsville

22

1,459

*

Hunt

Brisbane

102

8

Sydney

42

Melbourne

5

85

"

6 Almora, str...

.86

7 Diamond, str.

1,718 1,030

Grier

Straits Settlements

207

Show

703

""

""

87

"

10 Arratoon Apcar, str.

1,392

Olifent

569

2:

59

88

11 Stentor, str.

1,278

!

""

Milligan

214

106084

5

2

1

215

709

9

10

656

89

.90

91

92

93

94

95

96

97

11 | Phra Chom Klao, str.

1,012

29

Watton

Bangkok

59

::

218

59

"

13 Brindisi, str.

2,129

Street

99

Straits Settlements

132

9

146

13

13 Glenartney, str.

1,944

Brass

290

290

22

"

19

14

Sarpedon, str.

1,495

Barwise

107

107

"

39

11

15

Bellona, str....

1,722 German

"

15

Cheang Hock Kian, str....

956 British

Haesloop Grenfell

120

120

480

15

500

M

1)

17

Moyune, str.

1,714

12

Hogg

161

161

"

+

""

17

Wing Sang, str.

1,517

19

Ste. Croix

983

17

10

"

1,014

17

City of Rio de Janeiro, str.

2275 American

Ward

San Francisco

57

57

98

"

17 Mongkut, str.

859 British

Fowler

Bangkok

70

9

2

81

99

"

18

Medusa, str....

1,776 | Austrian

Mettel

Straits Settlements

200

50

29

20

299

100

20

Kong Beng, str.

862 British

Jones

Bangkok

32

32

...

101

"

21

Agamemnon, str.

1,453

""

Hutchinson

Straits Settlements

203

203

...

102

""

21

Preussen, str.

103

104

"5

22

Nizam, str.

2,880 German 1,615 British

Pohle

233]

15

~

255

31

Creery

110

110

21

"

22

Batavia, str.

1,612

"

Williamson

Vancouver, B.C.

37

37

Port Darwin

6

...

Thursday Island Cairns

3

...

105

13

22 Guthrie, str.

1,494

Green

10

>>

5

47

106 107

"

24 Gaelic, str.

2,691

"1

24 Cheang Chew, str.

1,213

Pearne Webb

Cooktown Townsville Sydney

Melbourne

San Francisco

...

153

3

156.

Straits Settlements

552 16

2

570

108

"

25 Anchises, str.

1,264

Lapage

""

2951 19

314

109

??

26 | Phra Chila Chom Klao, S.

1,012

Benson

Bangkok

31

110

99

27 Japan, str.

1,865

Gardner

11

Straits Settlements

26

::

31

26

111 112

27 Chi Yuen, str...

1,211 Chinese

Null

413

17

430

29 Daphne, str.

1,395 German

Voss

97

8

10

2

112

113 April

1 Bisagno, str.

1,499 Italian

Valle

""

12

108

108

114

1 Kaisar-i-Hind, str....

2,386 British

Atkinson

73

115

1 Venetia, str.

1,551

Gadd

228

>>

""

116

1 China, str.

1-17

1

Chow Fa, str.

2,401 1,055

22

Seabury

"?

Phillips

San Francisco Bangkok

186

47

118

1 Sorachi Maru, str.

1,101 Japanese

Brotherton

25

""

119

"

2 Ulysses, str.

1,493 British

Butler

Straits Settlements

300

120

5 Canton, str.

2,044

Angers

95

>>

121

5 Devonhurst, str.

1,164 Dutch

Houthoff

Batavia

45

122

5 Oopack, str.

1,730 British

Kemp

Straits Settlements

120

123

8 Diamond, str.

1,030

Snow

550

Port Darwin

56

;::::::;:སླཊ

73

228

13

2

201

...

47

25

300

95

45

*

120

...

24

574

124

8 Catterthun, str.

1,406

Darke

Townsville

7

Sydney

10

...

...

حلم

75

125

9 | Phra Chom Klao, str.

1.012

Watton

Bangkok

36

36

126

9 Mogul, str.

1,827

Johnson

Straits Settlements

250

250

127

""

9 Telemachus, str..

1,881

Jones

188

11

19

3

202

128

10 Polybymnia, str.

129

11 Kutsang, str.

1,053 German 1,495 British

Behrens

32

32

Young

467

467

??

Port Darwin

13

Townsville

13

130

"

11 Tsinan, str.

Brisbane

8

1,460

Allison

Sydney

101

501

Melbourne

19

Adelaide

1

131

132

17

12 Orion, str.

14 Benlarig, str.

1,833 Austrian 1,448 British

Vidos

Straits Settlements

248

248

Le Boutellier

50

60

""

133

39

14 Kweiyang, str.

1,062

Barnes

180

180

";

134

34

14 Mongkut, str.

859

Fowler

""

Bangkok

80

5

3

88

135

"

16 Devawongse, str.

1,057

Loff

108

108

.91

136

16 Patroclus, str. ...............

1,386

Pulford

Straits Settlements

216 12

11

248

27

137

""

18 Jason, str.

1,412

**

· 138

""

18 Cheang Hock Kian, str....

956

P. 139

18 Bayern, str.

2,877 German

140

.99

18 Abyssinia, str. ..................

141

21 Belgic, str.

142

21 Taichiow, str.

862

19

143

""

21

Exe, str.

1,368

"

144

多多

21

Gwalior, str.

1,603

2,346 British 2,695

Milligan Grenfell Mergell

Lee

Walker Unsworth

Watson

Cole

128

128

357 16

373

218 12

12

6

248

Vancouver, B.C.

250

250

San Francisco

343

13

10

361

Bangkok

85

85

Straits Settlements

30

30

132

132

""

145

23 Singan, str.

1,052

Chalton

262

262

Carried forward.....

222,773

Carried forward...

28,414 733

243 113 29,503

RETURN of VESSELS bringing CHINESE PASSENGERS to the Port of Victoria, Hongkong,—Continued.

CHILDREN.

213

No.

DATE ARRIVED.

SHIP'S NAME.

TONS.

NATION- ALITY OF SHIP.

ADULTS.

MASTER'S NAME.

WHERE FROM,

TOTAL.

M.

F. M. F.

146 | April 23 | Antenor, str.

147

39

Brought forward

23 | Aglaia, str.

222,773

1,376 British

Grier

Brought forward....... 28,414 Straits Settlements

733

243 113

29,503

185

5

190

1,666 German

Christiansen

183

8

2

4

197

""

Dilly, Timor Port Darwin

8

10

2

1

Townsville

1

148

23 Tannadice, str. .

1,408 British

Helms

Brisbane

2

.47

"

Sydney

1

Melbourne

19

Adelaide

2

Townsville

3

149

"

23 | Changsha, str.

1,463

Williams

Sydney

15

78

Melbourne

60

150

25 Kong Beng, str. ...

151

26 Glenfalloch, str.

862 1,434

Jones

Bangkok

40

40

McGregor

Straits Settlements

460

460

152

28 Bormida, str.

1,499 Italian

De Negri

137

11

2

150

1

153

""

28 Rohilla, str...................

2,175 British

De Horne

32

"}

:

32

...

154

21

28

Arratoon Apcar, str.

1,392

"

Spence

341

9

350

155

28

Glaucus, str.

1,344

Hannah

98

98

>>

"

11

156

28

Nam Chow, str.

1,109

Colonna

539

21

560

19

19

157

"}

158

159

30 Monmouthshire, str.

30 City of Peking, str.

30 | Phra Chula Chom Klao, S.

1,871

""

Cuming

30

:

30

3,129 American

Cavarley

San Francisco

102

*108

1,012 British

Benson

Bangkok

46

46

160

May

Sorchi Maru, str.

161

>>

2

Wing Sang, str.

1,101 Japanese 1,517 British

Brotherton

40

...

40

Ste. Croix

Straits Settlements

371

41

18

14

444

162

""

3 Yunnan, str.

1,054

Peacock

200

200

11

163

""

3

Diamond, str.

1,030

Snow

421

430

92

164

5 Glenogle, str.

2,000

Duke

232

12

244

19

11

165

>>

5

Cheang Hye Teng, str..

923

Scott

136

139

11

?!

166

""

5

Oceana, str.

1,628 German

Petersen

156

156

,,

Cooktown

5

Townsville

10

167

5 Tai Yuan, str.

1,459 British

Nelson

Brisbane

12

62

Sydney Melbourne

29

6

168

""

5 | Phra Chom Klao, str.

1,012

Fowler

开车

Bangkok

68

169

"

5 Doris, str........

771 German

Raben

21

21

888

68

I

""

Port Darwin

8

170

??

6 Airlie, str.

1,492 British

Ellis

Cooktown

2

39

Sydney

6

Melbourne

23

171

"

6 Lombardy, str.

1,571

""

Langborne

Straits Settlements

45

4

3

52

.

172

""

7 Almora, str..............

1,719

Grier

65

65

""

J!

173

19

7 Parthia, str..

2,035

29

174

>>

8 Oceanic, str.

2,440

"}

175

"

9 Devawongse, str.

1,057

Wallace

Smith Loff

Vancouver, B.C.

52

52

San Francisco

143

11

3

157

Bangkok

102

102

176

11

12 Ayochie, str. ....

1,056

Rowen

41

41

>1

19

177

>>

12

Mongkut, str.

859

Anderson

40

2

4

46

11

178

12

""

Deucalion, str.

1,374

Asquith

Straits Settlements

247 3

250

179

"

13

Japan, str.

1,865

Gardner

420

37

17

11

485

"

"

180

19

15 Namkiang, str.

181

""

15

Afghan, str.......

999 1,439

Hamlin

438 12

450

"

"

Golding

30

30

***

182

19

15

Thisbe, str.

1,848 American

Perini

312

9

321

183

"1

184

185

15 Nantes Le Havre, str.

16 Taichiow, str.

16 Neckar, str....

1,182 French

Jeffrey

Bangkok

40

40

862 British

Unsworth

29

29

1,870 German

Supmer

Straits Settlements

187

10

4

210

186

17 Pembrokeshire, str.

1,717 British

Dancaster

32

32

-

187

""

17 Velox, str.

636 German

Johannsen

188

""

17 Tongshan, str.

1,111 British

Young

Medan in Deli, Sumatra Bangkok

30

30

...

46

46

189

""

20 Thibet, str.

190

""

20 Dardanus, str..

191

""

192

""

21

20 Achilles, str.

Kong Beng, str.

1,665 1,507 1,488

Brown

Straits Settlements

103

103

وو

""

Purdy

352 10

2

346

**

Anderson

157)

157

"

862

Jones

»

Bangkok

45

45

193

99

22 Electra, str.

194

19

23 Cheang Hock Kian, str....

1,162 German

956 British

Möller

Straits Settlements

87

87

Grenfell

340

6

350

""

195

1

23 Glenshiel, str.

2,240

Donaldson

274

19

300

"

"}

196

>>

23 Picciola, str.

875 German

Nissen

Bangkok

40

40

197

"

23 City of Rio de Janeiro, str.

2,275 American

Ward

San Francisco

69

2

73

:

198

**

27 Chow Fa, str.

1,055 British

Phillips

Bangkok

104

104

199

27 Malwa, str.

1,694

Nantes

Straits Settlements

39

*

::

39

200

19

27 Menelaus, str.

1,263

Nelson

161

5

166

201

27 Namchow, str.

1,109

Colonna

480

17

3

500.

202

27

27 Glucksburg, str.

916 German

Schultz

54

203

""

27 Kutsang, str.

1,495 British

Young

3831

3:38

51

35

13

10

441

204

11

28 Hankow, str.

205

""

29 Diamond, str.

2,332 1,030

West

30

""

Snow

400 40

""

""

206

19

29 Peking, str.

954 German

Schulz

Bangkok

70

207

";

29 | Phra Chom Klao, str..

1,012 British

Fowler

43

: ;;

30

12

456

70

43

19

208 June

2 Gaelic, str. .....

2,691

Pearne

San Francisco

127

1

129

19

209

2 Teheran, str.

210

""

2 Bisagno, str.

211

"

2 Frigga, str.

1,671 1,499 Italian 1,400 German

Sams

Straits Settlements

70

70

19

Orengo Nagel

137

4

>

253

19

7

24

147

283

93

212

"

2 | Phra Chala Chom Klao, S.

1,012 | British

213

""

3 Fidelio, str.

214

"

4 Mongkut, str.

852 German 859 British.

Benson Brorsen

Bangkok

101

Medan in Deli, Sumatra

45

::

101

45

Anderson

Bangkok

47

47

215

"

9 Arratoon Apcar, str.

1,392

""

216

"

9 Nizam, str.

1,615

217

9 Clyde, str.

2,198

218

ל

9 Telamon, str.

1,555

219

9 Cheang Hye Teng, str.

923

Spence Jephson Parfitt Jackson Scott

Straits Settlements

513

50

22

585

21

21

99

56

15

71

""

491

8

506

19

309

17

11

3

340

"

"

220

10 Pathan, str.

1,762

"

Roy

40

40

59

Carried forward.............

329,459

Carried forward..

40,214 1,189

400 174

41,977

:

E

214

RETURN of VESSELS bringing CHINESE PASSENGERS to the Port of Victoria, Hongkong,—Continued.

No.

DATE ARRIVED.

SHIP'S NAME.

TONS.

NATION- ALITY OF SHIP.

ADULTS. CHILDREN.

MASTER'S NAME.

WHERE FROM.

TOTAL.

M.

F. M. F.

Brought forward...

329,459

Brought forward....... 40,214 1,189 400 174 41,977

221

June

10

Prometheus, str........

1,492 British

222

002

*

11

Batavia, str.

19

11

Devawongse, str.

1,662 1,057

29

Webster Williamson Loff

Straits Settlements

141

146

Vancouver, B.C.

59

59

">

Bangkok

120

120

224

12

"

Guthrie, str.

1,494

Shannon

Sydney

37

2

10

99

??

Melbourne

55

225

"

12 Melpomene, str.

1,943 Austrian

Walluschnig

Straits Settlements

360 12

10

390

226

""

13 Braunschweig, str.

2,150 German

Meier

198

198

227

14 Denbighshire, str.

1,663 British

228

14 China, str.

2,401

>>

229

27

16 Titan, str.

1,525

Rickard Seabury Brown

79

::

79

San Francisco

219

18

15

9

261

Straits Settlements

77 3

80

230

16 Wing Sang, str.

1,517

Ste. Croix

280

10

290

+1

231

16 Gwalior, str.

1,602

232

"

17 Iphigenia, str..

233

18 Bellerophon, str..

1,059 German 1,356 British

Cole Voltmer Guthrie

30

30

121

6

135

145

10

2

3

160

234

18 Tongshan, str.

1,111

";

Young

Bangkok

44

44

Port Darwin

22

Thursday Island

Cooktown

235

18 Catterthun, str.

1,406

Darke

58

"

Townsville

Rockhampton

17

Melbourne

7

236

""

20 Velocity

237

20 Taichiow, str.

491 862

Martin Unsworth

Honolulu

32

32

Bangkok

21

21

Port Darwin

36

Thursday Island

Cairns

Townsville

238

21 Chingtu, str.

1,459

Hunt

131

>>

Brisbane

Sydney

52

Melbourne

17

Adelaide

2

239

240

""

21

Benledi, str.

1,454

Clark

Straits Settlements

220

""

23

"

Lien Shing, str.

1,048

Waddilove

265

10 TH

5

225

4

269

፡፡

241

23

Hector, str.

1,590

Thompson

94

94

"

:

22

242

243

23

Rome, str.

2,421

Adamson

81

94

33

!)

""

23

Shanghai, str.

2,044

Tillard

30

""

244

"

23

Cheang Hock Kian, str...

956

Grenfell

191

22

""

245

23

Iser, str.

1,415

Marshall

24

4237

85

34

195

.

31

"

??

"

246

>;

23

Peking, str.

954 German

Schultz

Bangkok

96

96

247

"}

24 Nam Chow, str.

1,109 British

Colonna

Straits Settlements

640

20

3

670

248

24 | Phra Chom Klao, str.

1,012

Fowler

""

Bangkok

231

23

249

25 Abyssinia, str...

2,346

Lee

>>

Vancouver, B.C.

31

31

250

25 Diamond, str.

1,030

Snow

Straits Settlements

420

18

10

5

447

""

251

25 Bormida, str.

1,499 Italian

Gavazzo

97

5

102

252

253

19

254

255

256 July

26 Japan, str.

27 | Phra Chula Chom Klao, s.

28 Tillie Baker,

28 Belgic, str.

1 Chow Fa, str.

1,865 British

Gardner

467

41

"

12

CO

526

1,012

Benson

Bangkok

211

21

267

Cyclops, str.

683 American 2,695 British 1,057 1,363

Carty

Honolulu

40

Walker

San Francisco

101

10 00

45

104

:

}}

Phillips

Bangkok

32

32

Lee

Straits Settlements

280

280

"

258

"?

3 Pakling, str.

259

"

3 Hesperia, str.

260

"

4 Nestor, str.

1,911 British 1,123 German 1,269 British

Machugh

171

171

**

Madsen

201

22

>>

20

ཙ་

7

250

Elder

86

86

261

4 Devawongse, str.

1,057

Loff

"?

Bangkok

68

68

262

11

4 Mongkut, str. ̈.

859

Anderson

32

32

"

11

263

Venetia, str.

1,551

Gadd

Straits Settlements

129

129

""

??

264

21

5 Yuen Sang, str.

1,106

Slessar

280

??

22

265

7 Benalder, str.

1,289

McIntosh

101

>>

*

266

8 Cheang Chew, str.

1,213

Webb

372

:2:2

14

4

320

101

12

>>

12

11

9

404

267

8 Sutlej, str.

2,103

31

268

""

9 Kong Beng, str.

862

Browne Jones

82

82

Bangkok

60

60

269

"J

10

Palamed, str.

270

>>

11 Glenlyon, str.

1,489 1,410

Jackson

Straits Settlements

338 3

8

1

350

"

Sommers

369 9

12

10

400

271

""

12 Kriemhild, str.

1,709 German

Ehlers

821

82

"

:

272

"

14 Sachsen, str.

2,874

13

Goessel

190

10

>>

22

222

273

>>

14 Kutsang, str.

1,495 British

Young

379

379

**

274

>>

14 City of Peking, str.

3,129 American

Cavarley

San Francisco Port Darwin

203

203

Cooktown Cairns

275

>>

14 Tsinan, str.

1,468 British

Arthur

Townsville

Brisbane Sydney

105

10

Melbourne

57

:..

276

"

15 | Phra Chom Klao, str..

1,012

Fowler

Bangkok

42)

42

??

277

"

17 Ajax, str.

1,477

Rawlings

Straits Settlements

374

21

12

411

278

"

18 Breconshire, str.

1,648

Jackson

59

59

:>

279

>>

18 Diamond, str.

1,030

Snow

534

20

554

"

**

280

19 Peking, str.

954

Schulz

Bangkok

200

200

...

281

**

19 Parthia, str...

2,035

Panton

27

Vancouver, B.C.

32

33

282

**

21

Oceanic, str.

2,440

283

13

21 Namchow, str.

1,109

284

27

21 Nam Yong, str.

984

285

"

21. Cheang Hock Kian, str.

956

>>

286

"

21 Alberta, str.

2,214

Smith

Colonna

Wooldridge

Grenfell

Nelson

San Francisco

158 11

3

175

Straits Settlements

370

12

...

387

301

30

280

280

150

150

>>

287

"

21 Taichiow, str.

862

Unsworth

Bangkok

24

24

"1

Sydney

14

288

19

22 Airlie, str.

289

23 Ping Suey, str.

1,492

1,982

Ellis

85

"

Melbourne

571 1

290

24 Melpomene, str.

Carried forward...

1,943 Austrian

Jaques Walluschnig

Straits Settlements

271

8

00 m

1

280

82

*82

433,317

Carried forward....

51,497 1,525

585

249 53,856

RETURN of VESSELS bringing CHINESE PASSENGERS to the Port of Victoria, Hongkong;—Continued.

215

No.

DATE ARRIVED.

SHIP'S NAME.

TONS.

NATION-

ALITY OF SHIP.

ADULTS. CHILDREN.

MASTER'S NAME.

WHERE FROM.

TOFAL.

M. F.

M.

F.

291 July 25

292

""

Brought forward..... Arratoon Apcar, str. 25 Independent, str.

433,317

Brought forward.....51,497 1,525

585 249

53,856

1,392 British

Spence

Straits Settlements

330

6

871 German

Hasenwinkel

Singapore

10

202

Mauritius

192

Port Darwin

17

293

294

99

26 Taunadice, str.

1,408 British

Helms

Thursday Island

2

.25

Cooktown

3

Townsville

3

"

28

Palinurus, str...

1,536

Jackson

Straits Settlements

268

12

7

Q

289

295

"

29 Thibet, str.

1,665

Brown

176 .6

182

""

296

"

29 Priam, str.

1,803

Wilding

151

155

""

297

"

29 | Phra Chula Chom Klao, s

1,012

Benson

Bangkok

51

51

298 299 300

""

30 Yuen Sang, str.

1,106

Slessar

.40

240

"

"

30

Bisagno, str.

1,499 Italian

Orengo

Straits Settlements

100

7

5

∙112

11

31 Carmarthenshire, str.

1,776 British

Clark

78

378

301 Aug.

302 303

1

Wing Sang, str.

1,517

Ste. Croix

""

""

393 .55

}:

1

Mongkut, str.

859

Anderson

Bangkok

41

2:

2

City of Rio de Janeiro, str.

2,275 American

Austin

San Francisco

86

5

301

"

2

Lydia, str.

1,170 German

Foerk

Straits Settlements

68

::ཡཾ;

22

27

497

A

12

9

112

68

305

""

5

Glenorchy, str.

1,822 British

Ferguson

137

$10

!!

3

180

306

"

5

Bombay, str.

2,048

Roche

118

1

149

93

307

"

5 Orestes, str..

1,279

Barr

315

1

616

::

"

308

"

6

Devawongse, str.

1,057

Loff

"

Bangkok

55

56

309

**

7 Anchises, str.

1,278

Lapage

Straits Settlements

170

170

310

""

8 Ningchow, str.

1,735

Allen

233

:9

11

250

311

>>

8 Glenavon, str.....

1,936

Jacobs

60

760

22

312

""

8 Preussen, str.

2,880 | German

Rennkasten

184

16

20

G

226

313

12

8 Tailee, str.

828

Schuldt

162

168

""

314

315

316

**

11

Lombardy, str.

1,571 British

Jephsen

62

2

64

"

11

Sarpedon, str.

1,570

Barwise

50

60

""

"

11

Japan, str.

1,865

Gardner

160 26

"7

3

192

317

"

11

Namkiang, str.

999

Hamlin

450 18

472

>>

>>

318

11

Phra Chom Klao, str.

·

1,012

Fowler

Bangkok

30

30

"

319

320

12 Thorndale, str.

13 Sydney, str...

1,971

>>

Etherington

Straits Settlements

29

29

321

13 Medusa, str.

322

13 | Gaelic. str.

፡፡

323

#

14 Niobe, str.

2,139 French

1,776 Austrian 2,691 British 1,666 German

Pearne

Vaquier Costanzo

277

277

1

217 3

220

San Francisco

181

10

192

Thomsen

Straits Settlements

394

7

401

324

15 Cheang Chew, str.

1,213 British

Webb

417

16

433

""

325

"

16 Peking, str..

954 German

Schultz

Bangkok

115

115

Port Darwin

26

Thursday Island

1

326

18 Changsha, str.......................

1,463 British

Williams

Townsville

1

55

Sydney

li

Melbourne

13

327

**

18 Bokhara, str.

328

"

18 Agamemnon, str.

1,697 1,491

Case

Straits Settlements

46

"

199

Williams

276

"

329

"

19 Namchow, str.

1,109

"

330

29

20 Diamond, str.

1,030

Colonna Snow

623

*

44

===

11

11

94

300

4

6

644

13

"1

19

331

"

20

Chow Fa, str.

1,055:

22

Phillips

Bangkok

40

332

21 Cheang Hock Kian, str..

956

Grenfell

Straits Settlements

219

"

333

"

22 Gwalior, str.

1,602

Cole

122

""

>>

334

22 Flintshire, str.

1,871

Dwyer

329

""

335

25 Bellona, str.

336

25 | Ashington, str.

1,722 German

809

Haesloop

120

Zindel

Bangkok

40

337

"

.25 | China, str.

2,401 British

Seabury

San Francisco

227

11

9

4

338

7:

26 Moyune, str.

1,714

""

Hogg

Straits Settlements

40

339

?>

26 Teucer, str.

1,803

""

Ríly

115

""

340

27 Altonower, str.

1,611

Barnet

67

""

";

341

"}

27 Bormida, str.

1,499 Italian

Gavazzo

83

**

342

27 Pakshan, str.

$35 British

Jenkins

Bangkok

30

343

28 Batavia, str.

1,662

Williamson

Vancouver, B.C.

65

344

28 Kutsang, str.

1,495

"

345

19

30 Stentor, str................

1,278

346

**

30 Menmuir, str.

1,287

"

Craig

347

30 Sishan, str.

845

""

348 Sept.

1 Devawongse, str.

1,057

Stovell Loff

Young Hutchinson

{

Straits Settlements

Batavia Bangkok

396

31

8

10

97

93

"

5

401

116

4

""

??

840

1 | Phra Chula Chom Klao, s.

1,012

Benson

85

"

350

1 Ganges, str............

2,111

Alderton

Straits Settlements

57

""

851

"

1 Nestor, str.

1,269

Elder

-80

"

"

352

1 Canton, str.

2,044

"}

Angers

30

"

353

:

1 Glenfruin, str...

1,936

Norman

255

">

$859228594588835 8 1285883

46

57

40

120

40

30

:

204

""

Port Darwin

16

Cooktown

Cairns

11

354

21

2 Catterthun, str.

1,406

Darke

Townsville

15

109

"

Brisbane Sydney

12

¿

26

Melbourne

27

355

#

356

+ | Phra Chom Klao, str.

Tongshan, str...

1,012

Fowler

Bangkok

40

40

1,111

Young

Straits Settlements

62

62

357

5 Bayern, str..

2,877 German

Mergell

188

11

188

358

6 Arratoon Apcar, str.

1,392 British

Spence

273

27

"

359

6 Belgic, str.

360

8 Nizam, str.

361

9 Tailee, str.

362

9 Daphne, str.

2,695 1,615

828 German 1,395

"

""

Walker Gadd Schuldt Josso

San Francisco

252

3 6

10

306

6

1

264

Straits Settlements

55

+

$55

261 12

277

110

.8

5

123

19

363

12 Namkiang, str.

364

12 Straits of Belle Isle, str..

999 British 1,586

Hamlin

310

15

325

Grigs

Vancouver, B.C.

45

17

365

13 | Oopack, str...

1,730

19

Kemp

Straits Settlements

203

7

5

215

Carried forward.................

546,866

Carried forward..

63,025 1,955

732 322

66,034

216

RETURN of VESSELS bringing CHINESE PASSENGERS to the Port of Victoria, Hongkong,-Continued.

No.

DATE ARRIVED.

SHIP'S NAME.

TONS.

NATION- ALITY

ADULTS. CHILDREN.

:

OF SHIP.

MASTER'S NAME.

WHERE FROM,

TOTAL.

M. F.

M.

F.

Brought forward......] 546,866

366 Sept. 15

Peshawur, str....

2,137 British

367

"

15

Wing Sang, str.

1,517

Wheler Ste. Croix

Brought forward..... 63,025| 1,955 Straits Settlements

732

322

27

66,034 27

95

268

5

เง

368

15

Taichiow, str.

862

Unsworth

"

Bangkok

50

279

50

369

15 Chingtu, str.

1,459

Brisbane

13

Hunt

"

Sydney

28

}

41

370

16 Diamond, str.

1,030

Snow

Straits Settlements

540

20

3

3

566

371

16 Patroclus, str.......

1,386

Pulford

99

99

372

17 Melpomene, str.

1,943 Austrian

Walluschnig

194

6

2

202

373

18 Kara, str.".

374

"

375

376

""

377

""

378

""

379

18 Telemachus, str.....

18 City of Peking, str.

18 Chow Fa, str.

20 Cardiganshire, str..

23 Polyhymnia, str.

25 Abyssinia, str..

1,507 British 1,397

3,129 American 1,055 British 1,623

1,053 German

2,346 British

Jones

D'Ath

34

34

174

Cavarley

San Francisco

143

10 00

179

8

3

154

Phillips

Bangkok

100

100

Dowling

Straits Settlements

29

29

Behrens

116

6

3

125

22

Lee

Vancouver, B.C.

128

128

"

380

26 Teheran, str.

1,670

Sams

Straits Settlements

199

199

""

381

"

27 Japan, str.

1,865

Gardner

430

43

"

11

382

>

383

>>

384

"

385

??

386

>>

387

""

388

29 Fidelio, str.

>>

389

390

>>

391

""

392

393

1 Oceanic, str.

"

394

395

396

27 Jason, str.

29 Rohilla, str..

29 Namchow, str.

29 Hongkong, str.

29 Glengarry, str.

29 Deucalion, str.

29 | Phra Chula Chom Klao, 8.

30 Ching Wo, str.

30 Bisagno, str.

October 1 Devawongse, str.

3 Antenor, str.

4 Sishan, str.

6 Neckar, str...

1,412

Powell

237

GA DO

4

3

480

8

5

250

""

2,175

JA

Speck

25

25

2

1,109

11

Colonna

626

30 12

7

675

,,

2,046

""

Walkins

63

:

63

29

:

1,956

""

Webster

300

300

29

1,374

Asquith

157

157

852 German

Brorsen

Medan in Deli, Sumatra

40

40

1,012 British

Benson

Bangkok

43

43

1,556

Staintor

Straits Settlements

150

150

1,499 Italian

Orengo

130

130

""

1,057 British

Loff

Bangkok

901

90

2,440 1,376

Smith

""

San Francisco

652

25

19

18

714

Grier

""

Straits Settlements

216

17

845

Stovell

300

76

9

250

306

""

"

1,870) German

"?

Supmer

266

266

""

397

6 Parthia, str..

398

8 Aglaia, str.

2,035 British

1,666 German

Panton

Vancouver, B.C.

65

65

Christensen

Straits Settlements

206

6

221

399

""

9 Kong Beng, str.

862 British

Jones

Bangkok

56

56

400

11

22

Phra Chom Klao, str.

1,012

Fowler

49

49

"

401

11

Kutsang, str.

1,495

""

Young

Straits Settlements

441

441

402

11

Glaucus, str.

1,382

""

Hannah

481

17

498

"

403

11

Pemptos, str.

1,541 German

Johansen

129

129

""

404

13 Thibet, str.

1,665 British

Brown

45]

4

50

""

??

405

**

13 Glamorganshire, str.

1,843

""

Davies

160

160

"

Port Darwin

2

***

Cooktown

Townsville

406

*

;;

13 Airlie, str.

1,492

Ellis

#

Brisbane Newcastle

36

2

...

Sydney

1

Melbourne

12

407

13 Siam, str..

992

Talloch

37

Bangkok

30

30

408

14 Namkiang, str.

999

Wooldridge

Straits Settlements

619

20

10

10

5

654

409

""

15 Dardanus, str...

1,507

Purdy

160

160

!!

410

""

15 Rosetta, str...

3,410

Crew

67

67

""

411

15

Kaisow, str...

1,934

Castle

80

80

412

""

15

Tailee, str.

828 German

Calender

320 17

3

340

413

""

15

Chow Fa, str.

1,055 British

Phillips

Bangkok

45

---

45

414

16

Tritos, str.

"

415

"?

17

Elektra, str.

416

"?

18

Glenearn, str,

417

18

City of Rio de Janeiro, str.

418

20 Yorkshire, str.......

419

20 Velox, str.

420

21 Nanshan, str.

421

22 Venetia, str.

37

1,268 German

2,095 Austrian 1,410 British 2,275 American

1,426 British

636 | German 805 British 1,551

Iwersen

Murray Ward Arnold

30

30

""

Mahorcich

Straits Settlements

370 18

3

391

32

32

San Francisco

170

170

Straits Settlements

100

6

106

Johannsen

35

35

""

Blackburn

Bangkok

41

41

Creery

Straits Settlements

157

157

422

23 Oceana, str.

1,628 German

Petersen

200

5

205

"

423

:

23 Arratoon Apcar, str.

1,392 British

Spence

470

20

9

1

500

"

424

27 Menelaus, str...

1,263

"

11

Gregory

150

150

:

""

425

27 Mogul, str.

1,827

19

Johnson

101

101

""

426

19

27 Gaelic, str.

2,691

Pearne

""

San Francisco

605

10

5

པ་

620

427

""

28 Clyde, str.

2,198

Parfitt

Straits Settlements

57

57

428

28 Port Jackson, str.

1,728

Buddy

336

in

5

2

343

"

429

29 Bormida, str.

1,499 Italian

Gavazzo

150

150

"

430

31 Namchow, str.

1,109 British

Colonna

2:

431

31 Guy Mannering, str.

1,829

Ford

681 31 100

9

7

728

100

""

432

31 Myrmidon, str.

1,815

Nelson

>>

433

";

31 Braunschweig, str.

434 435 Nov.

19

31 Devawongse, str.

1 Wing Sang, str.

2,150 German 1,057 British 1,517

Muir Loff

643 20 165 30

12

12

∞ co

681

213

Bangkok

75

75

Ste. Croix

";

Straits Settlements

364

42

6

Co

418

436

"

1 Fidelio, str.

437

">

4 Benlomond, str.

853 German

1,752 British

Brorsen Thomson

Medan in Deli, Sumatra

365

365

Straits Settlements

126

126

438

:>

4 Sussex, str.

1,620

17

439

4 China, str.

2,401

";

440

22

5 Lombardy, str.

1,571

"

441

27

6 Namyong, str................

984

Holt Seabury Jephson Smith

Vancouver, B.C.

103

103

San Francisco

459

459

Straits Settlements

59

60

160

160

19

12

442

27

6 Sikh, str.

1,736

92

Rowley

101

101

443

7 Glengyle, str.

2.244

Gasson

217

3

220

"

444

7 Chow Fa, str.

1,055

95

Phillips

Bangkok

100

100

445

8 Prometheus, str...

1,492

Webster

"

Straits Settlements

230

230

446

22

10 Mirzapore, str.

2,168

"

447

10 Antonio, str.

1,214

39

448

"2

11 Electra, str........

1,162 German

Harvey Marshall Moller

23

23

??

92

92

113

116

??

Carried forward............ 676,563

Carried forward..

79,059 2,395

876

394 82,724

RETURN of VESSELS bringing CHINESE PASSENGERS to the Port of Victoria, Hongkong,—Continued.

CHILDREN.

217

No.

DATE ARRIVED.

SHIP'S NAME.

TONS.

NATION- ALITY OF SHIP.

ADULTS.

MASTER'S NAME.

WHERE FROM.

TOTAL.

M. F.

M. F

Brought forward...... 676,563

449 | Nov.

12

Batavia, str..

1,662 British

450

14

Titan, str.

·

451

15

Japan, str.

452

17 Tailee, str.

1,525 1,865 828

"

Williamson Brown Gardner Calander

Brought forward... 79,059 2,395 Vancouver, B.C.

876 394 82,724

155

1

Straits Settlements

3981

::

156

398

321 26

3

354

ور

144

144

453

"J

17 Melpomene, str.

1,943 Austrian

Walluschnig

246

11

9

266

454

17 Tritos, str.

1,268 German

Henrischsen

Bangkok

50

50

"

Thursday Island

11

Cooktown

43

455

17 Catterthun, str.

1,406 British

Darke

Townsville

36

192

Sydney

73

Melbourne

29

456

""

18 Belgic, str.

2,695

??

457

18 Japan.

458

";

18 Namkiang, str.

397 Peruvian 999 British

Walker Yanela

San Francisco

689

14

2

1

706

Callao

140

140

Wooldridge

Straits Settlements

450

20

3

2

475

459

19

Laju, str.

1,264

7)

Palfrey

4291

436

460

19 Pembrokeshire, str.

1,717

Dancaster

30

30

27

""

461

""

19 Nizam, str.

1,615

Gadd

108

114

""

Port Darwin

38

Cooktown

9

Cairns

462

19 Tai Yuan, str. .........................

1,459

Nelson

Townsville

30

2

"7

་་

121

Brisbane

10

...

Sydney

24

Melbourne

2

463

464

20

27

Hector, str. .....

1,590

**

"

20

Frigga, str.

465

""

21

Oanfa, str...

****

1.400 German 1,970 British

Batt Nagel

Straits Settlements

250

250

78

78

""

Thomson

252

8

260

466

467

21

Somdetch Phra Nang, str.

1,057

Morris

:

""

Bangkok

92

92

39

""

24

Palamed, str.

468

24

Radnorshire, str.

1,489 1,890

"7

Jackson Davies

Straits Settlements

374

374

216

216

22

"

21

469

24

Velox, str.

636 German

Johannsen

268

268

22

470

""

25

Thames, str.

2,101 British

Seaton

30

30

***

""

471

>>

25

Picciola, str.

875 German

Nissen

Bangkok

25

25

472

""

26

Velocity,

491 British

Marten

Honolulu

161

161

473

"2

26 Achilles, str.

1,488

??

Day

Straits Settlements

206

3

209

474

""

27 | Phra Chula Chom Klao, S.

1,012

475

??

28 Devawongse, str.

1,057

Benson Loff

Bangkok

40

40

40

***

40

***

""

476

""

28 Telamon, str.

1,555

Jackson

Straits Settlements

220

...

220

2:

477

28 Kutsang, str.

1,495

""

Young

412 30

10

5

10

5

452

"

478

28 Gwalior, str.

1,648

Cole

158

158

??

479

**

480

""

483

484

""

485

486

""

487

32

4

488

5 Abyssinia, str........

491

5 Shanghai, str.

2,346 2,044

481

482 Dec.

489

" 490

28 Sachsen, str.

29 Bisagno, str.

29

City of Peking, str.

1 Benlawers, str.

1 Namchow, str.

1 Borneo, str.

1 Doris, str.

4 Cyclops, str.

Chow Fa, str.

4 Hainan, str.....

4 Kwei Yang, str.

1,499 Italian`

3,129 American 1,483 British

""

1,109 1,490 Dutch

771 German 1,363 British

1,055

??

648 German 1,062 British

Klein

Nish Phillips Samuelsen Outerbridge

Bangkok

19

Vancouver, B.C.

Straits Settlements

2,874 German

Gaessel

180 20

26

io

236

"

Orengo

141

7

2

150

Searle

San Francisco

440

7

4

2

453

Webster

Straits Settlements

175

Coluna

601

228

180

20

10

635

29

501

50

**

Raben

40

40

294

294

""

50

50

311

31

Wellington, N.Z.

90

90

""

Lee Tillard

393

459

""

492

""

6 Arratoon Apcar, str.

1,392

""

Spence

448

32 6

404

464

479

""

493

"

6 Iphigenia, str......

1,059 German

Voltmer

230

230

>>

494

*

8 Bellerophon, str.

1,356 British

495

8 Ghazee, str..

1,764

Guthrie Scotland

163

165

70

70

21

**

4.96

8|Phra Chom Klao, str.

1,012

Fowler

""

Bangkok

70

70

497

9 Sutlej, str.

2,103

""

498

10 Oceanic, str.

2,440

Worcester Smith

Straits Settlements San Francisco

50

50

1,016

15

1,044

""

499

"

11

Glenlyon, str.

1,410

Sommer

Straits Settlements

187

4

194

"}

500

11

Cheang Chew, str.

1,213

501

11

Else, str.

747 German

Webb Jebsen

417

428

>>

97

104

":

25

502

35

11

Pemptos, str.

1,541

Johannsen

80

80

??

"

:

503

"

13 Polyphemus, str.

504

27

13 Poseidon, str.

505

22

15 Pakling, str.

1,813 British 2,510 Austrian 1,911 British

Lee Lemesich Machugh

237

237

>>

354

"

159

6

364 165

37

Port Darwin

2

Thursday Island

Cooktown

11

506

A

>:

15 Menmuir, str.

1,287

";

Craig

Townsville

13

54

Brisbane

Sydney

19

Adelaide

3

507

29

16 Wing Sang, str.

1,517

Ste. Croix

Straits Settlements

196

21

10

508

509

17 Teheran, str.

1,671

17 Diamond, str.

1,030

Sams Snow

133

21

480

17

223

133

497

"+

Thursday Island

Cooktown

5

Cairns

510

""

18 Changsha, str...

1,463

Williams

76

""

Townsville

14

Sydney

46

Melbourne

4

511

18 Somdetch Phra Nang, str.

1,057

";

""

512

19 Brindisi, str.

2,129

Morris Street

Bangkok

148

148

Straits Settlements

261

261

22

"

513

"

19 Ajax, str.

1,477

99

Rawlings

400

12

412

22

514

19 Parthia, str....

2,035

Panton

Vancouver, B.C.

317

2

324

515

""

20 Tsinan, str.

1,460

Allison

Sydney

47

47

516

""

22 Namyong, str...................

984

Smith

Straits Settlements

183

183

517

"

22 Hesperia, str.

1,123 German

Madsen

240

240

"

Carried forward...

779,337

Carried forward.......

94,409 2,698

984 443

98,531

218

RETURN of VESSELS bringing CHINESE PASSENGERS to the Port of Victoria, Hongkong,—Continued.

No.

DATE ARRIVED.

SHIP'S NAME.

TONS.

NATION- ALITY OF SHIP.

ADULTS.

CHILDREN.

MASTER'S NAME.

WHERE FROM.

TOTAL.

M.

F M. F.

Brought forward,

779,337

518

Dec.

23

Pekin, str.

2,134 British

539

24

"J

Devawongse, str.

1,057

Harris Loff

Brought forward,..

Straits Settlements Bangkok

94,409, 2,698 984 443

98,534

50

50

105

105

520

27

Venetia, str.

1,551

""

22

Creery

Straits Settlements

153

153

521

27

19

Laertes, str.

1,351

Scale

300 8

27

>>

522

27

27

Laju, str.

1,264

22

Palfrey

470 12

"

523

19

27

Japan, str.

1,865

Hansen

141 14

*2***

317

1

489

160

**

524 525

19

27

Bormida, str.

1,499 Italian

Gavazzo

100

100

#

.་

27 Preussen, str.

2,880 German

Reimkasten

236

236

步步

Port Darwin

12

Cooktown

2

526

27 | Airlie, str.

1,492 British

Ellis

Rockhampton

18

104

Sydney

1

Melbourne

71

527

>>

29 Pingsuey, str.

1,982

Jaques

Straits Settlements

45

45

528

"

29

Palinurus, str..

1,536

Jackson

68

68

>>

529

22

29

Tailee, str.

828

Calander

68

68

530 531

30

"

Kriemhild, str.

1.709 German

31

City of Rio de Janeiro, str.

2,275 American

Ehlers Ward

250

3

.253

San Francisco

462

3

465

TOTAL TONS.................

802,760

TOTAL PASSENGERS

96,961 2,738

997 451

101.147

ADULTS.

CHILDREN.

VALUE

OF

TOTAL. TREASURE

:

SUMMARY.

M.

F.

M.

F.

BROUGHT,

:

11

From Adelaide, South Australia,

Bangkok, Siam,

Brisbane, Queensland,

Batavia, Java,

11

11

...

5,035

20

9

5,064

103

1.03

50

50

;"

Cairns, Queensland,

59

59

21

Callao, Peru,

140

140

:"

Cooktown, Queensland,

129

10

5

134

""

Dilly, Timor,

:&

8

19

Honolulu, Sandwich Islands,

365

12

4

3

382

""

Mauritius,

192

192

Medan, Sumatra,

788

2

790

Melbourne,

583

1

8

4

596

53

:

29

.

>

99

Newcastle, N.S.W.,

Port Darwin, South Australia,

Rockhampton, Queensland,

San Francisco, U.S.A.........

Straits Settlements,

Sydney,

Thursday Island, Queensland,

2

2

332

5

1

2

340

35

35

8,556 304 130

72

9,062 $ 6,057,819

77,769 2,381

$25

364

81,339

652 4

32

Townsville, Queensland,

Vancouver, British Columbia,

""

Wellington, New Zealand,.

228

3

1,804

9

5

6

90

662 33 231 1,824 $ 90

27,166

Value of Treasure imported from Australian Ports,

$ 1,173,672

TOTAL PASSENGERS,..

96,961 2,738

997

451101,147 $ 7,258,657

:

-

:

!

6,800,000

6,700,000

6,600,000

6,500,000

6,400,000

6,300,000

6,200,000

6,100,000

6,000,000

5,900,000

5,800,000

5,700,000

5,600,000

5,500,000

5:400,000

5,300,000

5,200,000

5,100,000

5,000,000

4,900,000

4,800,000

4,700,000

4,600,000

4,500,000

4,400,000

4,300,000

4,200,000

TONS.

1867.

1868.

1869.

1870.

1871.

1872.

1873.

XXII.-DIAGRAM of Tonnage entered at Hongko

BLUE LINE represents Junk Tonnage only.

RED LINE represents Foreign Shipping Tonnage

THICK BLACK LINE represents entire Trade in

1874.

1875.

1876.

1877.

1878.

1879.

1880.

1001

?

1877.

1878.

1879.

1880.

:

1881.

entered at Hongkong, from 1867 to 1890, inclusive.

Tonnage only.

in Shipping Tonnage only.

esents entire Trade in Foreign Ships and Junks.

1882.

1883.

1884.

1885.

1886.

1887.

1888.

1889..

1890.

6,800,000

-6,700,000

--6,600,000

-6,500,000

-6,400,000

**** 6,300,000

6,200,000

6,100,000

6,000,000

5,900,000

5,800,000

5,700,000

5,600,000.

5,500,000

5,400,000

5,300,000

5,200,000

5,100,000

5,000,000

4,900,000

4,800,000

4,700,000

4,600,000

4,500,000

4,400,000

4:300,000

4,200,000

4,100,000

TONS

4,700,000

4,600,000

4,500,000

4,400,000

4,300,000

4,200,000

4,100,000

4,000,000

3,900,000

3,800,000

3,700,000

3,600,000

3,500,000

3,400,000

3,300,000

3,200,000.

3,100,000

3,000,000

2,900,000

2,800,000

2,700,000

2,600,000

2,500,000

2,400,000

2,300,000

2,200,000

2,100,000

2,000,000

1,900,000

1,800,000

1,700,000

1,600,000

1,500.000

1,400,000

1,300,000

1,200,000

1,100,000

1,000,000

4,400,000

4;300,000

4,200,000

4,100,000

4,000,000

3,900,000

3,800,000

3,700,000

3,600,000

3,500,000

3 400,000

3,500,000

3,200,000

3,100,000

3,000,000

2,900,000

2,800,000

2,700,000

2,600,000.

2,500,000

2,400,000

2,300,000

2,200,000

2,100,000

2,000,000

1,900,000

1,800,000

1,700,000

1,600,000

1,500,000

1,400,000

1,300,000

1,200,000

1,100,000

1,000,000

XXI-RETURN of MARINE CASES tried at the MARINE MAGISTRATE'S COURT, during the Year 1890.

DEFENDANTS, HOW DISPOSED OF

NATURE OF CHARGE.

Arrival without Report, (Junk),

1

Assault,......

11

12

False Particulars, Giving, (Junk),.

Found stowed away,

Harbour Regulations, Breach of, (Junk),

Junk, Breach of conditions of Licence

and Special Permit,

Leaving the Harbour during prohibited

hours, (Junk),

1

1

10

5

38

15

32

N

1

:

:

1

:

:

Fined.

32

N

6

1

1

23

:

:

:

:.

:

:

10

5

19

Leaving without Clearance, (Junk),

15

16

:

:

Obstruction of Fairways,...

7

24

Refusal of Duty,

13

80

47

Throwing Ballast into the Harbour,

1

8

Wilfully remaining behind, ....

5

10

5

2

Years.

ลง

2

1

:

11

13

23

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:.

:

TOTAL, ........

81 239

58

34

84

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:.

:

CO

6

221

AMOUNT OF

FINES.

*

C.

2.00

10

5

39.50

.50

2

20.00

9

31.50

"

25.00

:

64.00

:

3

52.00

1

36.00

15

12

:

:

15

41

$270.50

XXIII-RETURN of Work performed by the GOVERNMENT MARINE SURVEYOR's Department.

9 months in

Certificate

and Bottom.

Emigration.

Tonnage for

Registration.

British Tonnage

Certificate for

Foreign Vessels.

Inspection of

Crew space,

Lights and

Markings.

Minor Inspec-

tions.

Survey of Licen-

Steam-Launches.

sed Passenger

Boilers under

Survey of

Construction.

Inspection of Government

Launches.

Examination of Engineers.

Examination of Chinese Engi-

neers for Steam-[

Launches.

Estimated total

number of visits in

connection with fore-

going Inspections.

Passenger

2 2 2 8 8 8 8 8

10

+

:

15

to

6

46

20

6

26

60

ယင်း

33

33

69

16

9

13915133

I

284

6

472

57

1

461

55

8

699

50

29

737

36

16

870

:

72

15

14

42

31

930

80

1

6

42

t

36

1,042

80

1

39

36

1,127

84

1

61

19

986

1881,

95

10

1

67

1

1882,

154

127

00

CO

1

1883,

144

102

10

8

5

1884,

200

141

10

9

1885,

153

113

6

6

5

6

1886,.

149

76

1

11

2

1887,

153

101

00

6

9

1888,

161

97

1

4

1889,

130

73

1890,

112

77

RE

5

4

10

1

XXIV.-IMPORTS AND EXPORTS OF OPIUM DURING 1890.

IMPORTS.

MALWA. Chests. 13,6841

PATNA. Chests. 25,23246

BENARES.

PERSIAN.

Chests. 16,38328

Chests. 7,1021

TURKISH. Chests. 614

TOTAL. Chests. 62,46310

EXPORTS.

MALWA.

PATNA.

BENARES.

PERSIAN.

Chests.

Chests.

Chests.

13,409

24,1922

14,7633

Chests. 5,553

TURKISH.

Chests.

105

58,023 +

TOTAL. Chests.

12

Through Cargo reported in Manifests but not landed,

....16,004 chests.

222

E

NUMBER OF PERMITS, &c. ISSUED DURING 1890.

Landing Permits, Removal Permits,....

Export Permits,

Permits to Chinese Customs' Hulk,

Memo. of Exports sent to the Commissioner of Chinese Customs, Kowloon,

2

:

SUMMARY OF EXPORTS, 1890.

250

.........12,232

7,586

376

510

Malwa Chests.

Patna. Benares Chests. Chests.

Persian Chests.

Turkish

Chests.

Total Chests.

Total in

piculs.

By Steamers to Amoy,

British Columbia,

Bunder Abbas,

Bushire,..

447/3/

12

4,284

650

908

:

:

:

10

71

Cantou,

1,714

6,17027

2,34130

3

Chefoo,

16

1

Foochow,

2,739

1,408

293

349

:

Formosa,

5

560

4,328

Haiphong,

330

...

:.

Hankow,

129

37

:

:

Hoihow,

6

450

3

Kiukiang,

683

:

London,..

5,3931

6,268.95

910

1,091.65

10

10.25

7

7.6875

17

10,229 11,932.41

22

23.2

4,789

5,137.925

1,893

5,113.2

330

396.

166

173.4

459

549.6

68/1/

68.5

73

73

74.825

102

:

:

4,947 37

5,917.11

2

2.

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

821

985.2

298

357.6

46

55.2

31

31.775

15,7351

17,880.875

359

6,866 18

430.8

7,602.14

39

40.8

10

10.

1,516

1,792.8

Macau,

Newchwang,

Pakhoi,

Philippine Isles,

Sandakan,

San Francisco, ........

:.

4,70037

145

113

708

:

260

38

46

:

31

:.

Shanghai,

5,002

6,066

4,660

7

Straits Settlements,

250

109

Swatow,

3,107

2,463

1,2002

96

Tientsin,

30

9

Wuhu,

10

"

By Junks to various adjacent }

Ports in China,

132

1,344

40

TOTAL,

13,409

24,19224 14,76328 5,553

105

58,023313 65,953.8975

The information in column 7 above is on the following assumption:

Patna and Benares per chest,

Malwa and Turkish per chest,

Persian per chest,......

.1.20 piculs.

.1.00 ""

..1.025

SURVEYOR GENERAL'S STAFF.

(8.) Will the Government lay on the table a nominal return of all officers and others now employed in the Honourable the Surveyor General's Department, with the dates of engagement, terms, and conditions of service, rate of salary, rate of increase and allowances, if any, and a detailed statement of the duties performed by each.

Name.

Office.

Date

of

Terms and

Rate of Conveyance

Appointment.

Conditions of Salary per Service. Month.

Rate Allowance of Annual

per Increase, Month. if any.

**

$

Duties of Office.

Surveyor General,..

Vacant,

Assist. Surveyor General,...

Vacant,

C. C. Malsch,

Land Surveyor,..

1st May, 1884, Permanent,

250

24

...

W. Chatham,

Executive Engineer,..

10th April, 1890,

3 years,

300

24

J. R. Mudie,

H. P. Tooker,.

R. F. Drury, J. T. H. Sample, Lawrence Gibbs, E. M. Hazeland,.. C. H. Gale,.. J. Prosser,

A. H. Rennie,.

D. Wood,

M. Gutierrez, J. G. Gutierrez,

F. M. Franco, Wong Lai Sang,.

Li King-pan,

Lo Tsz-lam,

Sing Qua, Chan Sing Fong, Cheung Yow, G. J. W. King,

Do.,

Do.,

Chief Draftsman,

Assistant Land Surveyor,. Correspondence Clerk, Accountant,

First Clerk,

Second Clerk, Third Clerk,

Fourth Clerk, Fifth Clerk,

Land Bailiff,

Do.,

Do.,

1st Oct., 1889,

3 years,

275

24

15th Mar., 1890,

3 years,

250

24

Assistant Engineer,

1st Dec., 1887,

3 years,

200

24

Do.,

25th Dec., 1888,

3 years,

175

24

20th Sept., 1890, 1st Aug., 1889, |

3 years,

194

24

Provisional,

90

18

20th Sept., 1890, 19th Sept., 1889, 30th Jan., 1890,

3 years,

194

24

3 years,

150

24

Permanent,

200

...

3rd Mar., 1891,

3 years,

200

12

7th April, 1864,

Permanent,

184

18th June, 1877,

Do.,

118

None.

Vacant,

28th Jan., 1890, Permanent,

40

do.

Copying Clerk.

21st May, 1889,

Do.,

30

Chinese Clerk & Interpreter, Assistant Do. do.,

29th Aug., 1884,

Do.,

60

Do.,

Do.,

50

Chinese Draftsman,

1st June, 1870,

Do.,

90

Chinese Tracer,

14th May,

1890,

Do.,.

25

Second Do.,

25th July, 1889,

Do.,

30

...

6th Jan., 1881,

Do.,

120

24

W. Beavin,

Overseer,

4th Nov., 1889,

Do.,

130

12

S. T. Moore,

Do.,

30th Dec., 1887,

Provisional,

115

28

A. Cronon,

Do.,

16th May, 1889,

Permanent,

70

18

J. Wildey,

Do.,

Do.,

17th April, 1889, Vacant,

3

years,

121.66

18

R. E. Eagar,

Do.,

D. Haywood,

Do.,

12th June, 1890, 4th May, 1884,

Permanent,

70

15

Do.

Do.,

60

Do.

...

A. H. Nimmo,

Foreman of Works, Hill

1st Mar., 1886,

Do.,

40

General Supervisor of Department and Adviser on all matters relating to Public Works and Crown Lands.

Supervisor of Routine Work and responsible for the carrying out of the Surveyor General's Instructions in matters of detail. Charge of Land Surveys and Sale of Crown Lands and Preparation of Lease Plans.

In charge of Extraordinary Public Works.

Do. of Gap Rock and Harbour Work other than Praya Reclamation. Do. of Government Buildings, Streets, Roads, and all works in connection with improvements of same throughout the Colony. Absent on leave. Surveys for Public Works.

Supervisor of all Works carried on under the Building Ordinance. Assistant to Engineer in charge of Extraordinary Public Works.

Do. to Engineer in charge of Govt. Buildings, Streets and Roads. In charge of Drawing Office and Preparation of Contract Drawings. Land Surveys.

In charge of Correspondence and Clerical Staff.

Do. of Accounts and Stores.

Assistant Accountant and Book-keeper.

Do.

Stores Clerk.

Land Bailiff's Clerk.

do.

Copying Clerk, Interpreter and Translator.

Do.

do.

Draftsman in Drawing Office.

Tracer in Drawing Office.

Do. in Land Surveyor's Office.

do.

In charge of all lands held under Squatter's Licence and Crown Lands in the Villages.

Overseer in charge of Maintenance of Government Buildings.

Do. of Roads outside the City.

Do. for the purpose of carrying into effect the Constructive Regulations under the Building Ordinance.

Overseer of Roads and Streets within the City.

Do. of Roads outside the City.

of Government Buildings.

do.

do.

Overseer of Roads and Crown Lands in the Hill District.

...

District,

247

:

7

Date

Terms and

Rate of

Rate

Conveyance Allowance of Annual

Name.

Office.

· of

Conditions of Salary per

Appointment.

Service.

Month.

per

Increase,

Month.

if any.

$

E. Thompson,.

Overseer, Public Cemetery,. 20th Sept., 1873,

Permanent,

40

1st Dec., 1884,

Do.,

40

16

J. M. A. da Silva,

Electrician,

C. Marande,

D. Fraser,

T. H. Girling,.

R. Moscrip,..

J. Coyle,

Foreman Mason,

31st Dec., 1887, Provisional,

135

12

22nd Mar., 1890,

Do.,

120

Overseer,

16th April, 1890,

Do.,

100

15

Do.,

9th Jan., 1890,

Do.g

100

Do.,

5th Nov., 1890,

Dodg

:80

Do.,

11th Mar., 1891,

Do.,

80

Do.,

S. Ferrier,

P. J. d'Almeida,

Assistant Foreman,

1st Dec., 1886,

Do.,

40

J. Cotta,

C. Grant,.....

Thos. Abraham, J. F. Abraham,

A Liu,

Ting Sung Fat,

Li Fook,

Foo A-lung, Low A-po,

Do., Assistant Overseer,

Do.,

10th Aug., 1889,

Do.,

35

Do.,

1st Sept., 1886,

Do.,

30

Do.,

27th Aug., 1879,

Do.,

20

...

14th Aug., 1891,

Do.,

10

15th Sept., 1890,

Do.,

25

Watchman at Recreation

4th Aug., 1891,

Doig

12

Ground,

Native Foreman,

5th Aug., 1891,

Do.,

10

Do.,

Do.,

28th Feb., 1875, 1st Jan., 1874,

Do.,

Do.,

29

Four Office Coolies,

1 at $8 and 3 at $7,

28005

...

37

Six Survey Coolies,

1 at $7 and 5 at $6,

None.

Duties of Office.

In charge of Protestant Cemetery.

Do.

of Government Telegraphs and Telephones. Foreman Mason on Extraordinary Public Works. Overseer at Gap Rock Lighthouse.

Do on Extraordinary Public Works.

Do.

do.

do.

Do.

do.

do.

Do.

do.

do.

On Roads within the City.

Do.

outside the City.

Do.

within the City.

Do.

outside the City.

Do.

do.

On Extraordinary Public Works.

Watchman at Recreation Ground, Wong-nei-chong.

On Roads within the City.

Do.

Do.

outside the City.

do.

Office Coolies and Messengers and Caretakers.

For Engineers and Surveyors.

10

·248

Name.

Captain and Crew of

"Fame:

S. McIsaac,.

Alex. Crawford,

Wang Tai,

Ah Kau,

Kwai Fook,.

Wong Su,

Ah Kwai,

Chu Kun,

Chu Shing,

Wong Fuk,

Leung Shing, Chung Kui,...

Date

Terms and

Office.

of

Appointment.

Conditions of

Service.

Rate of

Salary per

Month.

Conveyance Allowance

per

Month.

Rate

of Annual

Increase,

if any.

Captain,

Engineer,

Pilot,

Steward,.

28th Sept., 1891, Provisional,

150

17th July, 1890,

Do.,

130

Oct., 1889,

Do.,

25

...

12th April, 1890,

Do.,

18

· Do.,

15

...

Quarter Master,.. Do.,

Do.,

15

Do.,

10

...

Sailor,

Do.,

10

Do.,

Do.,

No. 1 Oiler, No. 2 Oiler,

Do.,

10

www

Oct., 1889,

Do.,

20

Do.,

· 18

Do.,

15

Fireman,.

Do.,

Do.,

15

Do.,

15

...

Pang Yau,

Too Tsat,

Do.,

Crew of Dredger:

E. F. Griffin,

Master,

8th Jan., 1890, Provisional,

100

Ah Ty,

Engineer,

1st Mar., 1890,

Do.,

16

A Look,

Firemau,...

1st Feb., 1890,

Do.,

9

Alex. Crawford,

Engineer for Disinfector, ... 17th July, 1890,

Do.,

20

...

None.

#

Duties Performed.

Maintaining and navigating S.S. Fame..

Maintaining and working Government Dredger.

249

(In C. S. O. 24).

251

No. 17a.

91.

HONGKONG.

QUESTIONS ASKED BY HON. T. H. WHITEHEAD IN COUNCIL ON THE 30TH APRIL, 1891, AND THE ANSWERS THERETO.

Question :-

1. Will the Honourable the Colonial Treasurer give the Council some inform- ation regarding the various items aggregating Millions of Dollars under the heads of Receipts and Payments in the Statement dated the 6th instant, and laid before the Council on the 10th idem, and further

2. An explanation as to the decrease in expenditure against the name of the Postmaster General as appears in said Statement under the heads of Establish- ments and Services Exclusive of Establishments.

HON. COLONIAL TREASURER.

24th April, 1891.

HONOURABLE ACTING COLONIAL SECRETARY.

1. Information within.

W. M. DEANE, Acting Colonial Secretary.

2. I find that this Statement was only inserted for the first time in 1881. As it has to do with the Treasury books, and is not in any way essential, I propose to discontinue it.

27th April, 1891.

RECEIPTS.

N. G. MITCHELL-INNES.

1. Deposits Available,--Premia on Land Sales, ...$ 16,638.80

2.

Other Deposits,

3. Deposits not Available,

1,106,000.00

$1,122,638.80 1,511.00 29,678.04

4. Advance Account,

5. Family Remittances,..

6. Subsidiary Coins,..

7. Money Order Account,

8. Exchange Account,..

9. Crown Agents' Account,.

10. Crown Agents, Bills Outstanding,

11. Purchase of Marine Lot No. 18,..

12. Praya Reclamation,

13. Suspense Stores Account,

Cash in hand, 1st January, 1890,

.....

1. Premium on Land Sales during 1890.

24,079.90

1,154,757.43

132,479.23

4,842.71 1,915,881.98

206,000.00

185,461.64

688.06

93,804.10

134,653.28

2. Silver Coins issued during the year, by Treasury order to Hongkong &

Shanghai Bank.

3. Sikh Police Fund, Police Fine Fund, Intestate Estate, &c., received.

4. Advances recovered.

5. Family Remittance-Drafts issued during 1890.

6. Silver Coins Account, received from England during 1890, $1,150,000 ;

Surplus Silver returned, $4,757.43.

!

:

252

:

:

i

:

:

7. Money Order Account, issued during 1890, $80,334.62; Miscellaneous Ser- vices transferred, $50,681.06; Refunded by Crown Agents, amount overpaid, $1,463.55.

8. Loss in Exchange on Family Remittance.

9. & 10. Crown Agents, transactions with this Colony.

11. Land for New Central Market-Payments made by Mr. CHATER for a portion

of land purchased by him.

12. Amount received, from that account, for expenses incurred in England in 1889. 13. Stores issued to Water and Drainage Department.

PAYMENTS.

1. Deposits Available,-Premia on Land Sales, ...$

2.

Other Deposits,

3. Deposits not Available,

4. Advance Account,

5. Family Remittances,

6. Subsidiary Coins,... 7. Money Order Account,

8. Crown Agents' Account,

9. Crown Agents, Bills Outstanding, 10. Purchase of Marine Lot No. 18,.

11. Suspense Storès Account,

Cash in hand, 31st December, 1890,

34,314.45 1,150,000.00

$1,184,314.45

1,165.36 59,623.53

29,519.35 1,257,233.32

81,811.90

1,956,929.91

184,000.00

51,571.92

136,305.80

143,870.63

1. Purchase of Baxter's House for Police Station, $34,000; Expenses of new

Lots for Sale, $314.45.

2. Silver Coins deposited in the Hongkong & Shanghai Bank, to order of the

Treasury.

3. Sikh Police Fund, Police Fine Fund, Intestate Estates, &c., paid out.

4. Advances to be recovered.

5. Family Remittance Drafts, paid in England by Crown Agents.

6. Paid Crown Agents, $1,167,015.45; Profit, transferred to General Revenue

$90,217.87.

7. Money Order paid in England.

8. & 9. Crown Agents transactions with this Colony.

10. Land for New Central Market-Paid to P. & O. Company, cost of the lot.

11. Stores paid in England for the Water and Drainage Department.

Postmaster General-Establishment, 1889-1890,-

Do.

Decrease,

Exclusive of Establishment, 1889-1890,-

Decrease,

In 1889-Paid cost of a Steam-Launch for the Post Office,..

.$ 3,342.13

.$44,387.00

.$ 5,296.46

:

Outstanding Account of 1886-1888,...

$36,656.29

:

In 1889-More paid for Postal Convention,

10,000.00

:

$46,656.29

În 1889-Refund of Postage to France,-

Question:-

Will the Government lay on the table a report on the present state of the Tytam Reservoir, and state-

(a.) The quantity of water in the Reservoir on 1st August last; (b.) The quantity delivered daily through the tunnel;

(c.) The estimated flow into the Reservoir between 1st August last and

now;

(d.) The quantity now left in the Reservoir;

A

:

!

253

(e.) The cause of the difference, if any, between the quantity passed out of the Reservoir as shewn by its contents then and now, including the estimated flow into it, and the quantity delivered through the tunnel?

T. H. WHITEHEAD.

24th April, 1891.

(a.) The quantity of water in the Tytam Reservoir on the 1st of August

last, was 307,650,000 gallons.

(b.) Quantity of water delivered daily through the tunnel, see attached

table.

(c.) The estimated approximate flow into the Reservoir between the 1st of August last and now, neglecting evaporation, is 94,606,600, which gives a daily average of 355,000 gallons. The Honourable J. M. PRICE in his report dated the 1st of November, 1885, estimated the daily flow during the months between October and March, at 150,000 gallons. Mr. JAMES ORANGE in his paper read before the Institution of Civil Engineers in 1889, estimated the dry weather flow at 200,000 gallons per diem.

(d.) The Reservoir is practically empty.

April 24th, 1891.

The following table shews the Quantity of Water in gallons delivered daily through the tunnel from the Tytam Reservoir :-

1890.

Gallon per diem.

""

5th,

""

6th, 16th, 26th, 31st,

19

19th, 25th,

Aug. 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 17th, 18th,

2,057,000

1,512,000

1,676,000

2,248,000

Total for the month,....

58,082,000

September 1st, 2nd,

1,676,000

""

3rd, 30th,..

1,868,400

Total for the month,..

55,667,200

October 1st, 6th,

1,868,400

>>

7th, 11th,.

1,676,000

""

12th, 28th,

1,512,000

""

29th, 31st,

1,676,000

Total for the month,....

50,322,400

November,

1,676,000

:

Total for the month,...

50,280,000

39

December 1st, 30th,

31st,

1,676,000

1,512,000

Total for the month,....

51,792,000

1891.

January 1st, 12th,.

1,512,000

""

13th, 31st,

1,676,000

Total for the month,....

49,988,000

8

February 1st, 11th,

12th, 16th,

1,676,000

1,337,000

"

17th, 28th,

1,015,000

Total for the month,....

37,301,000

March 1st, 23rd,

24th, 31st,

April 1st, 6th,

7th, 23rd,. 24th,

....

1,015,000

729,000

Total for the month......

29,177,000,

729,000

870,000

483,000

Total for the month,....

19,647,000

:

!

402,256,600

:

:

:

:

254

Question:-

Will the Government lay on the table a Statement shewing the present position of the Lighthouse Works on Gap Rock, the amounts actually expended to the 31st March last, and the sums then due although not actually paid, and an estimate of the monies still required to complete the work.

Answer:

A full description of the progress made at the Gap Rock is given in Honour- able Surveyor General's Annual Report dated 28th February, 1891, which is in the hands of Printers.

The expenditure incurred on account of the Gap Rock Lighthouse to 30th November, 1890, was...

$107,874.14

add to 31st March, 1891,.

Total to 31st March,

16,587.38

$124,461.52

All accounts due to 31st March have been passed for payment.

The estimated total cost of the work is that given in the Estimates for 1891, viz. :-$180,000--less $30,000--estimated value of Steam Tender on the comple- tion of the work.

Unexpended balance available for completion of work, $55,538.48.

14th April, 1891.

(Signed),

S. BROWN,

Surveyor General.

:

Question:-

Will the Government lay on the table a statement shewing the actually cost to date of the S. S. Fame; the monthly expenditure for wages and running expenses, interest, &c.; the number of trips she has made to the Gap Rock, and the cost per trip to and from the Gap Rock.

Answer:--

:

Cost of Fame,..

..$45,000.

Average Monthly Expenditure for 6 months ending 28th February.

Wages,

$447

Stores Average,

348

Repairs, &c. average,

90

Total,

.$885

Average cost per trip during above months,................

$129

Number of trips made to Gap Rock to 21st 95

March, 1891,

The average cost per trip does not include the Insurance of the Fame which is a heavy item, viz. :--10 per cent per annum on $45,000.

14th April, 1891.

(Signed),

S. BROWN,

Surveyor General.

Question:-

Will the Government lay on the table a complete statement of the cost to date of the Tytam Reservoir and works connected therewith including the Service Reservoir also a statement of the cost of the works to date for the distribution of the Tytam water, and the estimated further sum required to complete the distribu- - tion works?

Cost of Tytam Reservoir and works connected therewith $1,133,000 (Mr. O. CHADWICK'S Memorandum on the Water Works Ordinance, page 4.)

:

255

3

Cost of works for the distribution of Tytam and Pokfulam Water to the 31st of March last, $122,032.95. Estimated further sum required to complete the dis- tribution works $77,967.05.

As the mains are common to both supplies it is impossible to proportion their cost to the Tytam and Pokfulam works respectively.

Question

Will the Honourable the Colonial Treasurer lay on the table a Statement of- (1) The particulars of the expenditure under the head of "Miscellaneous Services" in the Statement of Receipts and Payments for 1890; (2) The assessed taxes refunded for void. or empty houses in the years

1888, 1889, 1890; and

(3) The assessed taxes for first quarter of 1889, of 1890 and of 1891, and the taxes refunded for void or empty houses in each of these quarters?

HONOURABLE COLONIAL TREASURER.

24th April, 1891.

W. M. DEANE.

-

EXPENDITURE IN 1890 UNDER THE HEAD OF MISCELLANEOUS

SERVICES.

Lighting Street Lamps,

Expenses of the Clock Tower,

Commission to Crown Agents,

Telegraph Services,

Subscriptions to Reuter's Telegrams,.

Printing Government Gazette,

Do. Estimates,

Do. Blue Book, &c.,

Do. Forms, and Documents for all Departments,

Stationery for Offices and for Printing,

Coals for Offices,

Loss in Exchange on Family Remittances, &c.,

Grant to City Hall,

Subscription to Strangers Home for Asiatics (£10.10),

Grant to Royal Naval Seamen's Club,

28,466.55

391.64

1,457.33

7,024.01

1,572.00

2,755.07

75.00

633.50

9,302.00

i

4,970.43

1,591.72

4,870.02

1,200.00

62.35

300.00

Law Revision,....

1,425.00

Visit of Duke and Duchess of Connaught,

14,334.01

Reward for the arrests of deporters, returned from banishment,.. Expenses incurred for blasting of Bokhara Rocks and New moorings

to Bokhara Rocks supplied from the Royal Naval Yard, Balance of gratuity to BRUCE SHEPHERD for compilation and printing

305:00

1,524.76

of the Index to Streets, &c.,

250.00

Reward to P. C. MCAULY for rescuing W. BLAKE of H.M.S. Orontes

from drowning,

Relief of distressed British seamen ex Hongkong registered ship, Compassionate Allowance to several relatives of late Government

25.00

592.16

Officers,

1,880.00

Carried forward,........

.$ 85,007.55

<

256

Brought forward,..

Cost of an iron chest for safe custody of the security of the Hongkong

and Shanghai Bank, deposited against their note issue, Amount paid to J. L. Cox for services rendered as shorthand writer

to the Observatory Commission,

Honorarium to T. SERCOMBE SMITH, for services rendered as Secretary

to the Observatory Commission,

$ 85,007.55

67.00

126.00

75.00

.

Expenses incurred on the occasion of His Excellency the Acting

Governor's visit to Canton,

120.59

Advertising for removal of Old Cemetery, Wanchai,

685.47

Balance of claim in connection with M. J. D. STEPHEN's claim against the Government for compensation and damages for loss of area in Marine Lot 184,

Taxed cost of the Hongkong and China Gas Company of their appeal

under Rating Ordinance, 1888,...

Amount of Judgment debt and costs in the matter of a writ of execu- tion issued by ATUCK V. A. G. APCAR, misappropriated by a Bailiff of the Supreme Court,

3,345.60

178.50

963.25

7

Amount of prisoners property embezzled by Turnkey NG KAM FUK

employed as Receiving Officer in Victoria Gaol, Printing and binding 200 copies new Edition Ordinances of Hongkong, Amount short paid into Treasury to meet money Orders on the Crown

Agents,

273.40

3,000.00

50,681.06

Amount of defalcation by Z. M. BARRADAS of the Money Order Office,

7,821.76

Refund of Squatters Rent overpaid in 1888-89,

22.70

Refund of Verandah Rent overpaid in 1889, Inland Lot 493,

70.08

Refund of Rates for void houses account 1889,

3,463.47

Advertising for Schoolmistress, Apothecary, &c.,

79.65

Agreement with Miss MANN and others,

62.56

Medical fees of W. LUCAS and W. DIXON,

31.17

Syndicate fees due, Cambridge Local Examination

219.80

Freight on certificate for Cambridge Local Examination,

1.55

Fee for selecting Schoolmistress Miss MANN,

31.17

Professional charges in relation to claims against the Oriental Bank

Corporation in liquidation,.......

19.54

Case, &c., for Catalogues,

6.80

Brokerage on Sale of Drafts in England,

1,075.07

Refund of Trade Marks fees paid in 1889,

50.00

$157,478.74

2 Refunded for void or empty houses in the year 1888,

$35

Do.

Do.

do. do.

do.

1889,

""

do.

1890,

8,229.65 10,718.39 17,025.02

""

3 Assessed Taxes for 1st Quarter of 1889,

96,394.04

Do.

Do.

do. do.

1890,

107,798.03

1891, ......

Refunded for void or empty houses, 1st Quarter, 1889,

Do.

Do.

do. do.

do.

do.

....

1890, 1891, (probable),

113,815.78

29.

2.9

3,079.59

5,748.66

""

4,097.94

H

409

No. 34b.

91.

HONGKONG.

QUESTIONS ASKED, BY HON, T. H. WHITEHEAD IN COUNCIL ON THE 26TH OCTOBER, 1891, AND THE ANSWERS THERETO

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government, on the 26th October, 1891.

NEW CENTRAL MARKET.

(1.) In view of the statement, made by His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government, at the last Meeting of Council, to the effect that further delay in the matter of the proposed New Central Market involves large and continual loss to the Revenue such delay must certainly be avoided, will the Government lay upon the table a report shewing the amount of work done to the said proposed New Market since 17th August last to 30th September, 1891, and its present condition, and inform the Council-

(1.) The amount of work done in the construction of the New Central Market between the 17th of August and the 30th September was the preparation of about 2,000 cubic feet of granite for the superstructure.

(1) If plans and designs for the proposed New Central Market have been decided upon;

(1) Plans and designs have been decided on.

(2) If so, which have been selected-whether those of the Honourable the Surveyor General which were disapproved of by Sir Wm. Des Voeux, or those of the professional Architect (Mr. H. W. Wills) sent out from England to Hongkong at the request of this Govern- ment by the Crown Agents, prepared by him at the special request of Sir Wm. Des Vœux ;

(2) The plans prepared by the Surveyor General with slight' modifications including the suggestion of the Public Works Committee have been selected. The Government is not aware that Sir WILLIAM DES Vaux expressed disapproval of Mr. BROWN'S plans, as regards which he stated in Legislative Council on 12th February, 1890, that "his impressions were all in their favour."

·(3) Has Chang Kee's tender referred to in the Resolution of the Honourable J. J. Keswick of

21st July last, or the tender of any other contractor for the superstructure or building of the proposed New Central Market over the foundations been accepted;

(4) If so, what is the amount of the tender accepted?

As negotiations are not yet completed it is considered inexpedient to reply to these

questions at present.

(5) Whether the plans and detailed statements have been prepared for the whole building complete in every respect, or whether the objectionable system has again been followed of preparing plans, etc., for only a part or portion and leaving the additional aggregate cost a totally unknown quantity.

(5) Plans and Elevations of the building have been completed but the details of the

internal fittings, such as, stalls, &c., are not yet ready.

(2.) Will the Government lay on the table a complete statement or return of the amount of monies expended

to 30th September, 1891, and the sums then due although not expended-

(1) In the purchase of the site for the proposed New Central Market;

(1) Reply will be found in the attached tabular statement.

(2) In the preparation of the ground and foundations;

(2) Reply will be found in the attached tabular statement.

410

AI (3) Of all other expenditure including the cost of bringing out from London to Hongkong

and the salary of the Architect (Mr. H. W. Wills'), the return to shew the dates of disbursements and the loss in interest to the Rate-payers on the respective amounts to 30th ultimo, also an estimate of the total monies still required to complete the work, and the probable date of

fano expenditure impresion.

The incurred for the services of Mr. WILLS as Architectural Assistant who was not engaged exclusively for the Central Market but to assist in connection with Government buildings generally is as follows:-

Agreement,...

Passage to Hongkong,*

*The question as to the refund of this is under consider-

ation.

Half salary during voyage,...

Salary from 1st March to 30th June,

£ 10.9A. £45. 0.0

£45.10.9 $ 287.63

189.51 1,087.17

Total, $1,564.31

The estimate of the total monies still required to complete the work is shewn in the tabular statement.

CAP

CIVIL HOSPITAL STAFF QUARTERS.

(3.) With reference to the statement of the Honourable the Surveyor General at a meeting of the Finance Committee on the 11th December, 1890, to the effect that the Civil Hospital Staff Quarters or the residence for the Assistant Surgeon, Apothecary, Nursing Staff and others connected with the hospital, though being built on a larger scale than is perhaps necessary, but then (about ten months ago) nearly completed, will the Government lay on the table a statement or return shewing when the building was completed; if not yet completed, why not; if not completed, the probable date when it will be ready for occupation, the total amount of monies expended to 30th September, 1891, and the sums then due although not actually paid-

3.

-

(1) In the purchase of the site for the building;

(2) In the preparation of the ground and foundations; and

(3) Of all other expenditure in connection with the building;

also an estimate of the total monies still required, if any, to complete the work.

The Civil Hospital Staff Quarters are not yet completed.

not yet completed. Some difficulty has been experienced in getting the Contractor to proceed with the work as rapidly as was anticipated.

Replies to the remainder of this question will be found in the tabular statement attached.

(4.) Is it intended to utilise or convert any portion of the Civil Hospital Staff Quarters building or palace into an addition of the Civil Hospital, and if so, how much, as recommended by the Un-official Members in their Memorandum addressed to His Excellency the Officer Administering the Govern- ment regarding the Estimates for Public Works extraordinary for 1891, and dated 20th December,

1890.

(4.) After careful consideration and communication with the Colonial Surgeon it has been found impracticable to convert any portion of the Civil Hospital Staff Quarters into an addition to the Civil Hospital for the direct treatment of patients.

sila bu dedah nda vid bundysna LUNATIC ASYLUM FOR CHINESE.

".

(5.) With reference to the Honourable the Surveyor General's statement at the meeting of Finance Committee held on 11th December last, to the effect that the building to be used as the Lunatic Asylum for Chinese was well advanced, will the Government lay on the table a statement shewing when the building was completed; if not completed, why not; and when it will be completed; if completed, when was it occupied; if not occupied, why not; and the total amount of monies expended to 30th Septem- ber, 1891, in the purchase of the site and the cost of the building, also the sums then due although not actually paid, and an estimate of the further amount, if any, still required to complete the building. (5.) This building is completed and was occupied on the 26th of September, the patients having been transferred from the European Asylum during the carrying out of repairs to that building. The replies as to expenditure will be found in the tabular statement attached.

3

411

LIGHTHOUSE ON GAP ROCK.

(6.) Will the Government inform the Council-

(1) Whether the cable to connect the Lighthouse on Gap Rock-with Hongkong has been ordered: (2) If so, when will it be laid;

(3) What is the total amount of monies actually expended including the cost of the "Fame," in connection with the construction of the Lighthouse works on Gap Rock to 30th September, 1891;

(4) The sums due on 30th ultimo although not actually paid; and

:

(5) An estimate of the further amount of money still required to complete the work and the

probable date of completion.

(6.) The cable has not yet been ordered.

1

For answers to the rest of this question see tabular statement.

SLAUGHTER-HOUSE, SHEEP AND PIG DEPÔTS, &c.

(7.) Will the Government lay upon the table a statement shewing the actual total amount of money expended to 30th September, 1891, in the purchase of the site, the preparation of foundations, and the con- struction of the Slaughter-House and Sheep and Pig Depôts, the sums then due although not actually paid, and an estimate of the further amount of money still required to complete the building, also the probable date of completion; and

Will the Government give the Council similar information and particulars regarding the following

works:-

Site for proposed New Western Market;

Shaukiwan Market;

Cattle Depôt Extension;

Public Laundries;

· Public Latrines ;

Police Stations at Aberdeen;

;)

at Quarry Bay;

at Kennedy Town ;

District Schools;

Quarters for the Superintendent of the Botanical and Afforestation Department ; ̈

Training Albany Nullah and New Roads and Preparatory Work Kennedy Road Sites ;

The reconstruction of the Praya Bridge over Bowrington Canal and improvements on Recreation

Ground, Happy Valley.

(7.) See tabular statement.

2 J

.

.

1

;

*

TABULAR STATEMENT OF EXTRAORDINARY PUBLIC WORKS REFERRED TO IN QUESTIONS 2, 3, 5, 6 & 7.

Approxi-

Question.

Sub-section.

Public Works Extraordinary.

· Purchase of site.

Preparation of foundations.

Money expended to 30th Sept.

Money due 30th Sept.

Further amount re- quired to complete,

mate probable date of completion.

2

Central Market,........

$158,058.00 $32,037.18 $190,095.18

4,236.36 | $239,962.82 | Dec., 1893.

3

Civil Hospital, Staff Quarters,

13,272.00 50,734.24

5,668.00

8,844.76 Mar., 1892.

5

Lunatic Asylum for Chinese,.

17,017.53

1,680.09

Completed.

6

Gap Rock Lighthouse, including cost

of the Fame,

152,327.95

9,652.78

19,000.00 Mar., 1892.

*

6

7

7

7

7

Cattle Depôt Extension,

7

Public Laundries,

7

Public Latrines,.......

7

Police Station, Aberdeen,..

Do.,

Quarry Bay,......

7

Do.,

Kennedy Town,

7

District Schools,

7

1 Cable to Lighthouse on Gap Rock,......

Slaughter House, Sheep & Pig Depôts,

Site for Proposed New Western Market,

Shau-ki-wan Market,

*

86,666.00

10,620.29

10,620.29

1,724.39

77,652.32

*

...

:.

30,876.54

75,160.83

8,400.00

7,439.17 Dec., 1891.

3,000.00

****

660.00

660.00

1,800.00

7,540.00 | Apr., 1892.

550.00

5,845.01

3,048.49

12,106.50

*

4,807.60

63.00

617.00

*

4,615,00

24,930.54

3,321.83

3,862.63 | Dec., 1891.

5,568.33

624.89

Completed.

:

5,978.89

40,940.30

360.50

Completed.

5,858.81

1,168.97

8,000.00

*

7

7

7

7

Improvements on Recreation Ground,

Happy Valley,

Quarters, Superintendent, Botanical &

Afforestation Department,.

Training Albany Nullah,

New Roads and Preparatory Work,

Kennedy Road Sites,....

Reconstruction Praya Bridge over

Bowrington Canal,....

:

9,512.66

21,293.72

1,766.82

2,976.91

8,820.52 Jan., 1892.

13,729.37

3,114.33

1,578.20 10,307.47

*****

3,944.23

3,055.77 | Jan., 1892.

13,272.25

26,727.75

*

* NOTE. It is impossible to give with any degree of certainty the approximate dates of completion.

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 1.

FRIDAY, 30TH JANUARY, 1891.

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (FRANCIS FLEMING, C.M.G.).

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

~

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Captain Superintendent of Police, (WALTER MEREDITH DEANE, C.M.G.). the Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART LOCKHART).

29

the Surveyor General, (SAMUEL BROWN).

1

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

";

"

"}

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

ABSENT:

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

His Excellency the Governor Sir G. WILLIAM DES VEUX, K.C.M.G.

The Honourable PHINEAS RYRIE.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Colonial Secretary informed the Council that His Excellency the Governor was unable to be present through indisposition, and that he as Senior Member present had therefore to preside under clause 17 of the Royal Instructions of the 19th of January, 1888.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 22nd December, 1890, were read and confirmed.

NEW MEMBER.-Honourable J. H. STEWART LOCKHART took the oath of allegiance on his appointment to a seat on the Council.

VOTES REFERRED TO THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-Read the following Minutes by His Excellency the Governor :-

C.S.O.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Two hundred and Forty Dollars, 30810:890. ($240), as an allowance to the Steward of the Civil Hospital for collecting Hospital Bills, at

the rate of $20 per month, during the current year.

C.S.O.

3070 of 1890.

Government House, Hongkong, 14th January, 1891.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Three hundred Dollars, ($300), being allowance in lieu of quarters to six teachers of Government Schools.

Government House, Hongkong, 29th January, 1891.

The Attorney General moved that these Minutes be referred to the Finance Committee. The Captain Superintendent of Police seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

BILL ENTITLED " AN ORDINANCE FOR THE NATURALIZATION OF EDWARD JEAN MAX PAQUIN."- The Attorney General moved the first reading of the Bill..

The Captain Superintendent of Police seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE FOR THE NATURALIZATION OF LAI SUI TONG."-The Council went into Committee on the Bill.

Bill reported with amendment.

The Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Captain Superintendent of Police seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

.

2

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE FOR THE NATURALIZATION OF CHOI WAI OTHERWISE CHOI TSUN."-The Council went into Committee on the Bill.

Bill reported with amendment.

The Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Captain Superintendent of Police seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE LAW RELATING TO BANKRUPTCY."-The Attorney General moved that the Bill be referred to the Law Committee for report.

The Captain Superintendent of Police seconded.

Question--put and agreed to.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned till Monday, the 16th February, at 3 P.M.

Read and confirmed, this 16th day of February, 1891.

A. M. THOMSON, Acting Clerk of Councils.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX,

Governor.

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 2.

FRIDAY, 16TH FEBRUARY, 1891.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR (SIR G. WILLIAM DES VEUX, K.C.M.G.).

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (FRANCIS FLEMING, C.M.G.).

35

""

the Colonial Treasurer, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES).

the Captain Superintendent of Police, (WALTER MEREDITH DEANE, C.M.G.). the Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART LOCKHART).

the Surveyor General, (SAMUEL BROWN).

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

ABSENT:

The Honourable the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

PHINEAS RYRIE.

3

""

""

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 30th January, 1891, were read and confirmed. NEW MEMBER.-Honourable N. G. MITCHELL-INNES took the oath of allegiance on taking his seat on the Council as Colonial Treasurer.

VOTES REFERRED TO THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-Read the following Minutes by His Excellency the Governor :-

C.S.O.

2677 of 1890.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Two hundred and Nine Dollars, ($209), for general overhaul and repairs to Health Officer's Steam-launch Blanche, and provid- ing a launch while the repairs are being executed.

Government House, Hongkong, 30th January, 1891.

The Colonial Secretary moved that this Minute be referred to the Finance Committee. The Captain Superintendent of Police seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

The Governor recommends the Council to re-vote a sum of Two thousand Dollars, ($2,000), being the balance on account of work done for the improvement of the piece of Land known as the Chinese Recreation Ground."

Amount voted in 1890,

Do. paid in 1890,.

Paid in 1891,..

.$6,000.00

4,000.00

$2,000.00

C.S.O.

183 of 1891.

C.S.O.

267 of 1890.

Government House, Hongkong, 31st January, 1891.

G. WILLIAM DES VŒUX.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One thousand and Two hundred Dollars, ($1,200), for commission to other countries on Postal Notes and Money Orders.

(In former years all the payments for commission used to be deducted from the amount of commission received, and the balance only paid into the Treasury as revenue. According to the new system of accounts all commissions received are to be paid into the Treasury as Revenue, and all payments for commission to be treated as Post Office expenditure.)

Government House, Hongkong, 31st January, 1891.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One hundred and Sixty Dollars, ($160), as a compassionate allowance to Mrs. ROZARIO, in consideration of the service of the late Mr. HENRI GUSTAVE, alias HENRIQUE DO ROZARIO, 4th Clerk in the Colonial Secretary's Office.

Government House, Hongkong, 3rd February, 1891.

4

C.S.O. 257 of 1891.

C. O. Desp.

1 of 1891.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Sixty-six Dollars and Sixty-six Cents, ($66.66), being a portion of the amount required to purchase Private HARDWICK'S discharge from the Army Medical Corps, and join the Colonial Service as Junior Wardmaster in the Civil Hospital.

Government House, Hongkong, 10th February, 1891.

G. WILLIAM DES VŒUX.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One hundred Dollars, ($100), being increased salaries of two Cadets, Messrs. THOMSON and BREWIN, from 1st November to 31st December, 1890, at the rate of $25 per month, sanctioned by the Secretary of State.

Government House, Hongkong, 12th February, 1891.

The Colonial Secretary moved that these minutes be referred to the Finance Committee. The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

VOTES PASSED BY THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Colonial Secretary, by direction of His Excel- lency the Governor, laid on the table the Report of the Finance Committee, dated the 30th January, (No. 1), and moved that the following votes referred to therein be passed, viz.:----

C.S.O.

3081 of 1890.

C.S.O.

5070 of 1890.

Allowance to the Steward of the Civil Hospital for collecting Hospital Bills, at the rate of $20 per month, during the current year,

Allowance in lieu of quarters to six teachers of Government Schools,

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

.$ 240.00

300.00

The Colonial Secretary laid on the table Bye-laws for regulating Public Latrines made by the Sanitary Board on the 28th of November, 1890, under sub-section 5 of section 13 of Ordinance No. 24

of 1887.

The Surveyor General moved that these Bye-laws be approved of.

The Captain Superintendent of Police seconded.

Question--put and agreed to.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE FOR THE NATURALIZATION OF EDWARD JEAN MAX PAQUIN.-The Colonial Secretary moved the second reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

JURY LIST FOR 1891.-The Council then considered the Jury List for the current year.

Question that the list as amended do stand-put and agreed to.

The Colonial Secretary moved that the Honourable J. H. STEWART LOCKHART be appointed a Member of the Law Committee in room of the Honourable N. G. MITCHELL-INNES whose appointment to a seat on the Council ceased on the 22nd of December last.

The Captain Superintendent of Police seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned till Wednesday, the 25th February, at 3 P.M.

Read and confirmed, this 25th day of February, 1891.

A. M. THOMSON, Acting Clerk of Councils.

G. WILLIAM DES Vœux,

Governor.

:

5

LO

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No: 3.

WEDNESDAY, 25TH FEBRUARY, 1891.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR (SIR G. WILLIAM DES VEUX, K.C.M.G.).

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (FRANCIS FLEMING, C.M.G.).

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

??

""

>.

""

""

>>

the Colonial Treasurer, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES).

the Captain Superintendent of Police, (WALTER MEREDITH DEANE, C.M.G.). the Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART LOCKHART),

the Surveyor General, (SAMUEL BROWN).

PHINEAS RYRIE.

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

**

"}

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

";

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 16th February, 1891, were read and confirmed. The Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD gave notice that at next meeting of the Council he would ask the following question :--

}

Have any steps been taken by Government towards the establishment of a Lighthouse Board referred to at the Meetings of this Council of 12th February and 23rd June last year, and in the Chamber of Commerce letter dated 24th June, 1890, to the Honourable The Colonial Secretary.

If so, will the Government lay on the table their proposals.

If not, does the Government intend to take any steps in the matter.

VOTES REFERRED TO THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-Read the following Minutes by His Excellency the Governor :-

C. O. Desp. 282 of 1890.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

The Governor desires to submit to the Council that in the Estimates for this year, the salary of the Governor has not been inserted in the manner proposed by the Secretary of State. In his Despatch No. 108 of the 18th of June, 1890, the Secretary of State proposed that the Governor's salary should be voted on the Estimates at the rate of $32,000 inclusive of entertainment allowance, although when on half pay or vacation leave the Governor will receive salary at the rate of $12,500 and $25,000 respectively.

The reason for fixing the actual salary at $32,000 is, as mentioned by the Secretary of State, to better secure the position of the Governor as an Officer in charge of a First Class Government under the Governor's Pension Acts.

The Governor therefore recommends the Council to amend the Estimates in the direction indicated.

Government House, Hongkong, 17th February, 1891.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One thousand Eight hundred and Thirty Dollars, ($1,830), being increment to the salaries of Masters of Victoria College, as under :-

2nd Master from $2,880 to $3,000,

25

2,160 2,370, 2,160 2,370,

11

3rd

>>

4th

>>

5th

>>

>"

19

2,160 2,370,

6th

})

""

1,800 2,070,

7th

;)

??

1,800 2,070,

....

8th

""

"}

11

1,800 2,070,

9th

""

""

1,800,,

2,070,

.increase $

120.00

210.00

"}

210.00

""

210.00

39

270.00

270.00

>>

270.00

"}

270.00

$1,830.00

3rd to 9th Masters' Salary to rise by $60 yearly to the Maximum of $2,430, which is the equivalent of 35 per cent over the 1875 rate.

Government House, Hongkong, 16th February, 1891.

:

:

:

C. O. Teleg. of 13th Feb., 1891.

C. O. Desp. 281 of 1890

and

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One hundred and Twenty-three thousand. Eight hundred and Seventy Dollars and Ninety-six Cents, ($123,870.96), being the moiety of the Military Contribution of the Colony for the year 1890-£20,000 @ 3/22 per $.

Government House, Hongkong, 17th February, 1891.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Nine hundred and Thirteen Dollars, ($913), to cover the Salaries and Allowances to the two Inspectors in the Registrar 336 of 1891. General's Department, in accordance with instructions from the Secretary of State.

C.S.O.

The sums required for 1891 are:- Salaries, $1,440 and $1,200,

Allowances in lieu of Police Bonus, Medal Money, Coal, Brooms, and Oil....

Amount provided for in the Estimates for 1891,

Sum to be voted.............

Government House, Hongkong, 11th February, 1891.

$ 2,640.00 198.00

$ 2,838.00 1,925.00

-

$$

The Colonial Secretary moved that these Minutes be referred to the Finance Committee. The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

913.00

BILL ENTITLED " AN ORDINANCE FOR THE NATURALIZATION OF EDWARD JEAN MAX PAQUIN."- The Council went into Committee on the Bill..

Council resumed and Bill reported without amendment.

The Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

ADJOURNMENT.—The Council then adjourned till Thursday, the 5th March, at 3 P.M.

Read and confirmed, this 5th day of March, 1891.

A. M. THOMSON,

Acting Clerk of Councils.

:

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX,

Governor.

WW

.

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 4.

THURSDAY, 5TH MARCH, 1891.

7

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR (SIR G. WILLIAM DES VEUX, K.C.M.G.).

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (WALTER Meredith Deane, C.M.G.). the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

the Colonial Treasurer, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-Innes).

""

11

the Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART LOCKHART).

>>

the Surveyor General, (SAMUEL BROWN).

""

PHINEAS RYRIE.

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

JAMES JOHNStone Keswick.

""

""

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

""

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 25th February, 1891, were read and confirmed.

PAPERS LAID ON THE TABLE.-The Acting Colonial Secretary, by direction of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the Police Departmental Report for 1890.

VOTES REFERRED TO THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-Read the following Minutes by His Excellency the Governor :-

C.S.O.

394 of 1891.

C.S.O. 18 of 1891.

C.S.O. 2759 of 1890.

C. O. Desp. No. 4 of 5th

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Six hundred Dollars, ($600), as a compassionate allowance to the widow and children of the late Inspector SWANSTON of the Hongkong Police Force.

Government House, Hongkong, 25th February, 1891.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Nine hundred and Sixty Dollars, ($960), for the salary of two Student Interpreters, under Section II of the Scheme published in Government Notification, No. 209, of the 4th May, 1889, at the rate of $40 per month each.

Government House, Hongkong, 26th February, 1891.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Eight hundred and Forty Dollars, ($840), as an allowance for Quarters for the Postmaster General during the current year.

For one year at $70 a month, $840.

Government House, Hongkong, 25th February, 1891.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Two thousand and Eight hundred Jan., 1891. Dollars, ($2,800), as supplementary vote for "Peak Water Supply," being additional expendi- ture consequent on modifications recommended by Mr. CHADWICK in the Hydraulic Motor and Pump required for the Peak Water Works.

Government House, Hongkong, 3rd March, 1891.

The Acting Colonial Secretary moved that these Minutes be referred to the Finance Committee. The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

VOTES PASSED BY THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Acting Colonial Secretary, by direction of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the Reports of the Finance Committee, dated the 16th and 25th February, (Nos. 2 and 3), and moved that the following votes referred to therein be passed, viz.:-

C.S.O.

2677 of 1890.

A sum of Two hundred and Nine Dollars, ($209), for general overhaul and repairs to Health Officer's Steam-launch Blanche, and providing a launch while the repairs are being executed,

$ 209.00

,

A sum of Two thousand Dollars, ($2,000), being the balance on account of work done for the improvement of the piece of Land known as the "Chinese Recrea- tion Ground."

C.S.O.

Amount voted in 1890, Do. paid in 1890,..

....

Paid in 1891,

-

183 of 1891. A sum of One thousand and Two hundred Dollars, ($1,200), for commission to

other countries on Postal Notes and Money Orders,

287 of 1890. A sum of One hundred and Sixty Dollars, ($160), as a compassionate allowance to Mrs. ROZARIO, in consideration of the service of the late Mr. HENRI Gustave, alias HENRIQUE DO ROZARIO, 4th Clerk in the Colonial Secretary's Office,

C.S.O. 257 of 1891.

1 of 1891.

A sum of Sixty-six Dollars and Sixty-six Cents, ($66.66), being a portion of the amount required to purchase Private HARDWICK's discharge from the Army Medical Corps, and join the Colonial Service as Junior Wardmaster in the Civil Hospital,

G.O. Desp. A sum of One hundred Dollars, ($100), being increased salaries of two Cadets, Messrs. THOMSON and BREWIN, from 1st November to 31st December, 1890, at the rate of $25 per month, sanctioned by the Secretary of State,

181 of 1890

CO. Desp. A sum of Nine hundred and Thirteen Dollars, ($913), to cover the Salaries and Allowances to the two Inspectors in the Registrar General's Department, in accordance with instructions from the Secretary of State,

and C.S.O.

336 of 1891.

A sum of Thirty-two thousand Dollars being the amended salary of His Excellency

the Governor,

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

$6,000.00 4,000.00

$2,000.00

$ 1,200.00

.$

160.00

66.66

100.00

$913.00

.$32,000.00

The Acting Colonial Secretary also moved that the following vote referred to in the Report of the Finance Committee dated the 25th February be passed, viz. :--

C. 9. Felag. A sum of One hundred and Twenty-three thousand, Eight hundred and Seventy Dollars and Ninety-six Cents, ($123,870.96), being the moiety of the Military

of 13th Feb.

1891.

Contribution of the Colony for the year 1890–£20,000 @ 3/23 per $,.........$123,870.96

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

The Honourable P. RYRIE moved as an amendment that the consideration of the vote be post- poned until a despatch be received from the Secretary of State in reply to the protest of the Un-official Members of Council in December last.

The Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD Seconded.

After some remarks by His Excellency, it was agreed to postpone consideration of the motion and the amendment till next meeting.

The Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD asked the following questions:-

(a.) Have any steps been taken by Government towards the establishment of a Lighthouse Board referred to at the Meetings of this Council of 12th February and 23rd June last year, and in the Chamber of Commerce letter dated 24th June, 1890, to the Honourable The Colonial Secretary.

If so, will the Government lay on the table their proposals.

If not, does the Government intend to take any steps in the matter.

(b.) Will the Government lay on the table copy of the Colonial Office Despatch to the War Office dated 22nd October, 1890, forwarding copy of the Despatch dated 10th September, 1890, from the Officer Administering the Government of Hongkong to the Right Honourable Lord Knutsford regarding the Military Contribution, and a copy of the instructions received by Government requiring the increased Military Contribution to be now paid to the War Authorities.

His Excellency replied.

BILL ENTITLED "THE GAMBLING ORDINANCE, 1891."-The Attorney General moved that the Council go into Committee on the Bill.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

After some remarks by His Excellency and Honourable Members, it was agreed to postpone consideration of the motion till next meeting.

ADJOURNMENT.—The Council then adjourned till Wednesday, the 11th March, at 3 P.M.

Read and confirmed, this 19th day of March, 1891.

A. M. THOMSON, Acting Clerk of Councils.

G. WILLIAM Des Vœux,

Governor.

11

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 5.

THURSDAY, 19TH MARCH, 1891.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(SIR G. WILLIAM DES VEUX, K.C.M.G.).

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (WALTER MEREDITH DEANE, C.M.G.). the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

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25

the Colonial Treasurer, (NORMAN GILBERT MITChell-Innes).

35

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A

the Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE STEwart Lockhart).

Brown).

the Surveyor General, (SAMUEL BROWN).

PHINEAS RYRIE.

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 5th March, 1891, were read and confirmed.

PAPERS LAID ON

Papers Laid on THE TABLE.-The Acting Colonial Secretary, by direction of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table Colonial Office Despatch No. 33 of the 13th February respect ng the Military Contribution, and the Report on the Progress of Works connected with the Water and Drainage Department for 1890.

VOTES REFERRED TO THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-Read the following Minutes by His Excellency the Governor :-

633 of 1891.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

C.S.O. The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Three thousand Seven hundred and Forty Dollars, ($3,740), to cover payment of balance due for the construction of Pokfoolum Filter Beds and Reservoir, which was not completed before the 31st December last, and no provision made in this year's Estimates.

EXTRAORDINARY PUBLIC WORKS. Filter Bed, Pokfoolum Reservoir.

Unexpended balance in 1890,

Excess over estimated cost,

$ 3,254.41

485.59

$ 3,740.00

C.S.O.

377 of 1991.

245 of 1891.

Government House, Hongkong, 12th March, 1891.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Eight hundred and Eighty-eight Dollars, ($888), as a compassionate allowance to the widow and children of the late H. L. MATHER, Second Lighthouse Keeper.

Government House, Hongkong, 12th March, 1891.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

C.S.0. The Governor recommends the Council to re-vote the sum of Twenty-nine thousand and Three hundred Dollars, ($29,300), being the two last instalments to be paid for the building of the Hospital Hulk.

2480 of 1890.

Government House, Hongkong, 10th March, 1891.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

C.S.O. The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One hundred and Eighty-eight Dollars, ($188), being undrawn salary of the 3rd Bailiff of the Supreme Court from 1st May to 22nd September, 1890, at $40 per month, lapsed into the Treasury, to be given to the 1st and 2nd Bailiffs in such proportions as recommended by the Registrar.

Government House, Hongkong, 11th March, 1891.

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453 of 1891.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

C.S.O. The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Two thousand and Five hundred

Dollars, ($2,500), to provide permanent moorings for the new Hospital Ship Hygeia.

2597 of 1890.

Government House, Hongkong, 13th March, 1891.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

C.S.O. The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Five hundred and Thirty-six Dollars and Eighty-four Cents, ($536.84), as the equivalent of £85, @ 3/2d. per $ for defraying the cost of analyzing the Observations and Readings of Tides of Hongkong for 1887-88, and the results made available for future predictions.

C.S.O.

of

Government House, Hongkong, 11th March, 1891.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

633891. The Governor recommends the Council to re-vote the sum of Two thousand Five hundred and Seventy-seven Dollars, and Forty-two Cents, ($2,577.42) to cover payments for the under- mentioned works not completed before the 31st December last, and no provision made in this year's Estimates.

EXTRAORDINARY PUBLIC WORKS.

Main Drainage and Sanitary.

Re-drainage of the Government Civil Hospital-balance due, Construction of a Storm Water Drain in Jubilee Street-balance due,...

$ 119.82 2,457.60

$ 2,577.42

$19,263.35

Unexpended balance in 1890,

Government House, Hongkong, 12th March, 1891.

The Acting Colonial Secretary moved that these Minutes be referred to the Finance Committee. The Colonial Treasurer seconded. Question-put and agreed to.

Council,

Legislative VOTE PASSED BY THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Council then resumed consideration of No. 4, 5th the motion and the amendment on the vote of $123,870.96 the moiety of the Military Contri- bution of the Colony for the

year 1890.

March, 1891.

On a division there voted on the amendment,-

Honourable PHINEAS RYRIE.

Against.

His Excellency the Governor.

Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary.

For.

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

21

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

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the Attorney General.

""

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

the Colonial Treasurer.

""

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

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29

the Registrar General.

""

the Surveyor General.

A division was then taken on the motion that the vote be passed when there voted.

For.

His Excellency the Governor.

Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary.

"J

the Attorney General,

the Colonial Treasurer.

""

the Registrar General.

""

the Surveyor General.

Against.

Honourable PHINEAS RYRIE.

*

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK. HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHitehead.

The vote was then passed.

Honourable P. RYRIE gave notice of protest against the vote.

The Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD, with His Excellency's permission, asked the following question,-

Are the Government Officials now drawing the enhanced rates of pay recommended by the Special or Select Committee of this Council, or are they still drawing the old rates of pay and allow- ances pending the Secretary of State's approval?

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary replied.

.

1.

13

The Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD then gave notice that at next meeting of Council he would move the following resolution :-

That in consequence of the enhanced Military Contribution still demanded by the Imperial Government, this Colony is not in a position to pay the increased Salaries recently recom- mended by the Un-officiul Members and that the Secretary of State be requested by telegram to withhold his sanction.

BILL ENTITLED " AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE Printers and PUBLISHERS Ordinance, 1886.”- The Attorney General moved the 1st reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question--put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE FOR THE NATURALIZATION OF LAU SAI alias LAU WAI CH'ÜN.”— The Attorney General moved the first reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED "THE GAMBLING ORDINANCE, 1891."-After some remarks by His Excellency, it was agreed to go into Committee on the Bill at next meeting of Council.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned till Wednesday, the 25th March, at 3 P.M.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX,

lead and confirmed, this 25th day of March, 1891.

A. M. THOMSON,

Acting Clerk of Councils.

Governor.

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 6.

WEDNESDAY, 25TH MARCH, 1891.

15

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR (SIR G. WILLIAM DES VEUX, K.C.M.G.).

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (Walter MEREDITH DEANE, C.M.G.).

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

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the Colonial Treasurer, (NORMAN GILBERT Mitchell-Innes).

>>

the Registrar General, (JAMES Haldane Stewart Lockhart).

23

the Surveyor General, (SAMUEL BROWN).

PHINEAS RYRIE.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

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Ho KAI, M.B., C.M.

ABSENT:

13

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

The Honourable CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 19th March, 1891, were read and confirmed.

VOTES PASSED BY THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Acting Colonial Secretary, by direction of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the Report of the Finance Committee, dated the 19th March, (No. 4), and moved that the following Votes referred to therein be passed, viz. :—

292 of 1890,

CO. Desp. A sum of One thousand Eight hundred and Thirty Dollars, ($1,830), being incre-

ment to the salaries of Masters of Victoria College,

C.S.O.

18 of 1891.

A sum of Nine hundred and Sixty Dollars, ($960), for the salary of two Student

Interpreters,

c. o. Desp. A sum of Two thousand and Eight hundred Dollars, ($2,800), as supplementary

vote for "Peak Water Supply,"

No. 4 of 5th Jan., 1891.

C.S.O.

394 of 1891.

..$1,830.00

$ 960.00

$ 2,800.00

A sum of Six hundred Dollars, ($600), as a compassionate allowance to the widow

and children of the late Inspector SWANSTON of the Hongkong Police Force, $ 600.00

2759 of 1890. A sum of Eight hundred and Forty Dollars, ($840), as an allowance for Quarters

for the Postmaster General during the current year,

C.S.O.

C.S.O.

of

2597-1890. A sum of Five hundred and Thirty-six Dollars and Eighty-four Cents, ($536.84), as the equivalent of £85, @ 3/2d. per $ for defraying the cost of analyzing the Observations and Readings of Tides of Hongkong for 1887-88,

C.S.O.

633 of 1891.

C.S.0.

453 of 1891.

C.S.O.

245 of 1891.

A sum of Two thousand Five hundred and Seventy-seven Dollars, and Forty-two Cents, ($2,577.42), to cover payments for the undermentioned works not com- pleted before the 31st December last.

EXTRAORDINARY PUBLIC WORKS.

Main Drainage and Sanitary.

Re-drainage of the Government Civil Hospital-balance due,.

Construction of a Storm Water Drain in Jubilee Street-balance due,.............

$ 840.00

.$

536.84

A sum of Two thousand and Five hundred Dollars, ($2,500), to provide permanent

moorings for the new Hospital Ship Hygeia,

A sum of Twenty-nine thousand and Three hundred Dollars, ($29,300), being the

two last instalments to be paid for the building of the Hospital Hulk,..

119.82 2,457.60

$ 2,577.42

$ 2,500.00

$29,300.00

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1.

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C.S.Ò. 2480 of 1890.

C.S.O.

635 of 1891.

A

sum of One hundred and Eighty-eight Dollars, ($188), being undrawn salary of the 3rd Bailiff of the Supreme Court from 1st May to 22nd September, 1890, at $40 per month, lapsed into the Treasury,

A sum of Three thousand Seven hundred and Forty Dollars, ($3,740), to cover payment of balance due for the construction of Pokfoolum Filter Beds and Reservoir, which was not completed before the 31st December last.

EXTRAORDINARY PUBLIC WORKS.

Filter Bed, Pokfoolum Reservoir.

Unexpended balance in 1890,

Excess over estimated cost,

$

188.00

$ 3,254.41 485.59

$ 3,740.00

C. S. O.

377 of 1891.

A sum of Eight hundred and Eighty-eight Dollars, ($888), as a compassionate allowance to the widow and children of the late H. L. MATHER, Second Light- house Keeper,

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

$ 888.00

The Council divided on the vote of $1,830 the increment to the salaries of the Masters of Victoria College, with the result that it was carried by a majority of six votes to four.

The other votes were agreed to without a division.

PAPER LAID ON THE TABLE.-The Honourable P. RYRIE laid on the table the following protest against the vote of $123,870.96 the moiety of the Military Contribution for 1890:-

We, the undersigned, the Un-official Members of the Legislative Council of Hongkong, desire to place on record our emphatic protest against the Re-vote of the sum of $123,870.96 originally voted by this Council on the 26th day of March, 1890, as an addition to the Mili- tary Contribution payable by the Colony for the year 1890, and which, not having been disbursed within the financial year, has necessarily been again submitted to the Council before payment can be constitutionally authorized or made.

We protest against this Re-vote on the following anong other grounds:

1. That this addition to the Military Contribution was originally demanded on the sole ground that the garrison of the Colony was about to be largely increased. No other grounds for the increase were even hinted at in the Secretary of State's despatch and he goes so far as to explain how the additional amount demanded had been arrived at, solely by a comparison of the numbers of the then existing and of the intended future garrison.

2. That the additional Military Contribution was proposed in this Council, discussed and voted solely on the ground that an increased military force was required for the efficient defence of the Colony, and that the amount asked for was reasonable in view of the proposed increase.

3. That, however deferentially the Resolutions were worded, the additional military contribution was granted by this Council upon the faith of an express promise that the garrison should be increased and upon the condition that the money should not be demanded or paid unless there was an increase in the strength of the Military forces stationed here, and in proportion to that increase. 4. That, as evidenced by the published despatches, the Officer Administering the Government and the Right Honourable the Secretary of State for the Colonies accepted the vote as conditional and as based on the promise of and dependent on the presence of a largely increased garrison.

5. That, during the year 1890, there was no addition made to the strength of the force stationed in Hongkong; no preparations for such increase; no evidence of any real intention ever to grant the increase and no reason is now assigned. for the failure of Her Majesty's Government to keep the promise made to the Colony.

6. That the promise not having been kept, the condition not having been observed, the vote fell to the ground and the non-payment of the money voted was just and proper and to be approved of by this Council.

7. That if Her Majesty's Government had frankly recognised the right of the Council to treat the vote of last year as inoperative for the reasons above stated and had applied to the Council for an additional Military Contribution for 1890, on general grounds and irrespective of any increase in the Garrison, the Un-official Members would have given every consideration to the appeal and would have impartially examined the question from the point of view presented by His Excellency the President in his address to the Council on the 19th March instant.

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17

8. That this very proper and reasonable course has not been adopted; that the Right Honourable the Secretary of State for the Colonies in his telegram and despatch of the 13th February last demands payment as of money due on the footing of the original vote; that the matter was brought before the Finance Committee of this Council as a re-vote and that all discussion was stifled and all time for considération refused on the ground that it was only a re-vote and that further discussion, if not absolutely forbidden, was a mere waste of time; that the re-vote, (carried in the Financial Committee simply by the casting vote of the Chairman), came before this Council for confirmation on the same footing, and that the Un-official Members are within their right in refusing now to allow the vote to be supported on grounds other than those on which it was originally granted.

9. The Un-official Members therefore protest against this re-vote, forced through Council in opposition to their views and to the views and opinions of the vast majority of the Colonists and they protest against the payment of the money so voted and against the action of the Imperial Government in demanding the money when the promises on the faith of which it was granted have not been fulfilled.

P. RYBIE.

C. P. CHATER. J. J. KESWICK. HO KAI.

T. H. WHITEHEAD.

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL CHAMBERS,

HONGKONG, 19th March, 1891.

The Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD gave notice that at the next meeting of Council he would ask the following questions :-

1. What was the total expenditure of the Government under the head of salaries for the years 1887, 1888, 1889, and 1890, and what is the estimated total expenditure for the current year under the same heading on the basis of the increased pay and allowances recommended by this Council?

2. What was the total expenditure on the Public Works Department in the years 1887, 1888, 1889, and 1890, for salaries and wages, and what is the estimated expenditure under the same heading for the current year on the Public Works Department and Water and Drainage Department combined?

3. How is it that there has been no meeting of the Public Works Committee appointed in October

last?

4. Does the Government intend to give effect to the recommendation of the Un-official Members in their addendum of the 20th December, 1890, to submit to the Public Works Committee full details and estimates of all Public Works?

5. What arrangements have been made for examining and checking accounts sent to the Treasury for payment, and have any difficulties arisen, since the new system of audit was introduced, in checking and examining accounts for payment?

6. What are the duties of the Treasury Department and the Treasurer, under the new organization

of that department?

Honourable J. J. KESWICK asked the following question :-

Will the Government inform the Council whether in view of the piracy of the "Namoa" in December last any steps have been taken for special Police supervision of native passengers embarking on steamers, and if not is it the intention of the Government to adopt any measures whatever?

The Acting Colonial Secretary and His Excellency replied.

Consideration of the resolution to be proposed by the Honourable T. H. WHITEHead of which notice had been given at the previous meeting of Council was, with His Excellency's permission, post- poned till next meeting.

BILL ENTITLED" AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE Printers and PUBLISHERS Ordinance, 1886.' The Attorney General moved that this Bill be read a second time.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

The Council then went into Committee on the Bill.

Bill reported without amendment.

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The Attorney General then moved that the Bill be read a third time.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE FOR THE NATURALIZATION OF LAU SAI alias LAU WAI CH'ÜN.”— The Attorney General moved that this Bill be read a second time.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

The Council then went into Committee on the Bill.

Bill reported with amendment.

The Attorney General then moved that the Bill be read a third time.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

BILL ENTITLED "THE GAMBLING Ordinance, 1891."-The Council went into Committee on the Bill.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council resumed and adjourned till Friday, the 3rd April, at 3 P.M.

Read and confirmed, this 10th day of April, 1891.

A. M. THOMSON,

Acting Clerk of Councils.

W. M. DEANE, President.

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LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 7.

FRIDAY, 10TH APRIL, 1891.

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (WALTER MEREDITH DEANE, C.M.G.). the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

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the Colonial Treasurer, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES).

the Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART Lockhart).

the Surveyor General, (SAMUEL BROWN).

PHINEAS RYRIE.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

Ho KAI, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

ABSENT:

His Excellency the Governor (SIR G. WILLIAM DES VEUX, K.C.M.G.).

The Honourable CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Acting Colonial Secretary presided as Senior Member present in the absence of His Excellency through indisposition.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 25th March, 1891, were read and confirmed. PAPERS LAID ON THE TABLE.-The Acting Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following Sessional Papers, viz. :-

Despatches from the Secretary of State respecting Prison accommodation. (No. 1 of 1891). The Postmaster General's Report for 1890. (No. 6 of 1891).

Report of the Government Central School for Girls for 1890. (No. 7 of 1891).

Annual Report of the Acting Head Master of the Victoria College for 1890. (No. 8 of 1891). Colonial Veterinary Surgeon's Report for the year 1890. (No. 9 of 1891).

Report of the Superintendent of Victoria Gaol for 1890. (No. 10 of 1891).

The Sanitary Superintendent's Report for 1890. (No. 11 of 1891).

Statement of the Revenue and Expenditure of the Colony for 1890. (No. 12 of 1891.) Crown Agents' Account:-Payments on Account of Public Works during 1890.

The Honourable P. RYRIE gave notice that at the next meeting of Council he would ask the following questions:-

1. To ask the President, if, when he asked me at the meeting of Council on the 25th March last, if the Protest I then laid on the table was a perfectly respectful protest, he meant to imply that I was likely to present or the Un-official Members to concur in a protest that was not perfectly respectful.

2. To ask the Honourable the Colonial Treasurer, if the arrears of the Military Contribution for the year 1890, payment of which was authorized by this Council on the 19th March last, has been paid, and if paid on what date, or dates, it, or any portion of it, was paid, and if so upon what authority.

Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD asked the following questions:--

1. What was the total expenditure of the Government under the head of salaries for the years 1887, 1888, 1889, and 1890, and what is the estimated total expenditure for the current year under the same heading on the basis of the increased pay and allowances recommended by this Council?

2. What was the total expenditure on the Public Works Department in the years 1887, 1888, 1889, and 1890, for salaries and wages, and what is the estimated expenditure under the same heading for the current year on the Public Works Department and Water and Drainage Department combined?

3. How is it that there has been no meeting of the Public Works Committee appointed in October

last?

4. Does the Government intend to give effect to the recommendation of the Un-official Members in their addendum of the 20th December, 1890, to submit to the Public Works Committee full details and estimates of all Public Works?

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5. What arrangements have been made for examining and checking accounts sent to the Treasury for payment, and have any difficulties arisen, since the new system of audit was introduced,. in checking and examining accounts for payment?

6. What are the duties of the Treasury Department and the Treasurer, under the new organization

of that department?

7. Can His Excellency the Governor inform the Council whether the Audit System recently introduced in Hongkong is in force in Singapore, Ceylon, or any other Crown Colony, and if not for what special reasons has it been introduced in this Colony?

8. Will the Government lay on the table a statement showing the present position of the Light- house Works on Gap Rock, the amounts actually expended to the 31st March last, and the sums then due although not actually paid, and an estimate of the monies still required to complete the work?

9. Will the Government lay on the table a statement showing the actual cost to date of the S.S. "Fame"; the monthly expenditure for wages and running expenses, interest, &c.; the number of trips she has made to the Gap Rock, and the cost per trip to and from the Gap Rock?

10. Have the plans for the construction of the sea-wall of the Praya Reclamation as designed by the late Surveyor General and approved by Sir John Coode been altered in any respect since the commencement of the work?

11. If they have been altered in any respect, what is the nature of the alteration? What addi- tional expense (if any) does it entail beyond the sum mentioned in the Government Gazette of the 6th July, 1889?

12. With reference to Government Notification No. 139 of the 28th March, 1891, from which it appears that there are various cases of default in the performance of Covenants entered into on the purchase of Crown Lands, will Government lay on the table a detailed list of the Lands referred to in that Notification, specifying as regards each lot,—the date of sale, the name of the purchaser, the name of the successive Assignees and of the present tenant, the area, the premium, the annual Crown rent, and the nature of the covenants unperformed.

The Acting Colonial Secretary replied.

The Acting Colonial Secretary moved that the Honourable HO KAI be appointed a Member of the Public Works Committee in room of the Honourable C. P. CHATER absent on leave.

The Attorney General seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD moved the following resolution :-

That in consequence of the enhanced Military Contribution still demanded by the Imperial Govern- ment, this Colony is not in a position to pay the increased Salaries recently recommended by the Un-official Members and that the Secretary of State be requested by telegram to withhold his sanction.

The Honourable P. RYRIE seconded.

The Honourable J. J. KESWICK moved as an amendment :-

That in consequence of the increase to official salaries being greatly in excess of what was con- templated by the Committee specially appointed to consider the subject, of the ever growing Government Establishments to which the increase would apply; and in view of the fact that the declining Revenues of this Colony will not be equal to so great a strain upon them for the enormous public works in progress, besides the other impending and urgent necessities of the Colony, and of the increased Military contribution, it is desirable that the Secretary of State be asked by telegraph to withhold his sanction to the proposed increase until the amount of it be reconsidered.

The Honourable Ho KAI seconded.

On a division there voted on the amendment,--

For

Honourable PHINEAS RYRIE.

Against.

Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary.

25.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK. Ho KAI, M.B., C.M.

the Attorney General.

the Colonial Treasurer.

"}

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

""

the Registrar General.

the Surveyor General.

21

A division was then taken on the resolution when there voted.

For.

Honourable PHINEAS RYRIE.

Against.

Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

""

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

""

""

the Attorney General.

the Colonial Treasurer.

""

""

the Registrar General.

the Surveyor General.

The resolution was therefore lost by a majority of five votes to four.

BILL ENTITLED " AN ORDINANCE TO PROVIDE for the MAKING of a TABLE OF FEES TO BE TAKEN IN CONNECTION WITH THE GRANT OF LETTERS PATENT IN THIS COLONY."-The Attorney General moved the first reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED "THE GAMBLING ORDINANCE, 1891."-Further consideration of the Bill in Committee was postponed till next meeting of Council.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned sine die.

Read and confirmed, this 30th day of April, 1891.

A. M. THOMSON, Acting Clerk of Councils.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX,

Governor.

.

:

23

X

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 8.

THURSDAY, 30TH APRIL, 1891.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

SIR G. WILLIAM DES VEUX, K.C.M.G.).

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (WALTER MEREDITH DEANE, C.M.G.). the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

>>

"}

"1

""

"

""

">

""

the Colonial Treasurer, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES).

the Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART Lockhart).

the Surveyor General, (SAMUEL BROWN).

PHINEAS RYRIE.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

Ho KAI, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

ABSENT:

The Honourable CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

The Council met pursuant to notice.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 10th April, 1891, were read and confirmed.

PAPERS LAID ON THE TABLE.-His Excellency laid on the table an address on the subject of the financial condition of the Colony.

The Acting Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following Sessional Papers, viz. :—

Report on the operations of the Public Works for the year 1890. (No. 13 of 1891.) Despatch from the Secretary of State respecting Military Contribution. (No. 14 of 1891.) The Harbour Master's Report for 1890. (No. 15 of 1891.)

Returns of Superior and Subordinate Courts for 1890. (No. 16 of 1891.)

Returns of Births and Deaths for the year 1890. (No. 17 of 1891.)

The Honourable P. RYRIE asked the following questions

1. Whether the President, when he asked me at the meeting of Council on the 25th March last, if the Protest I then laid on the table was a perfectly respectful protest, meant to imply that I was likely to present or the Un-Official Members to concur in a protest that was not perfectly respectful.

2. Whether the arrears of the Military Contribution for the year 1890, payment of which was authorized by this Council on the 19th March last, has been paid, and if paid on what date, or dates, it, or any portion of it, was paid, and if so upon what authority.

His Excellency replied.

Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD asked the following questions:--

1. Will the Government lay on the table a report on the present state of the Tytam Reservoir, and

state

(a.) The quantity of water in the Reservoir on 1st August last;

`(b.) The quantity delivered daily through the tunnel ;

(c.) The estimated flow into the Reservoir between 1st August last and now;

(d.) The quantity now left in the Reservoir;

(e.) The cause of the difference, if any, between the quantity passed out of the Reservoir as shewn by its contents then and now including the estimated flow into it, and the quantity delivered through the tunnel.

2. Is there a leak in the Tytam Reservoir dam, if so what is the nature of the leak and if there

is leakage what is the estimated cost of making the Reservoir water-tight?

3. Assuming that the Reservoir was full what is the estimated quantity of water which would be

lost per diem by the leakage if there be any?

4. Will the Government lay on the table a complete statement of the cost to date of the Tytam Reservoir and works connected therewith including the Service Reservoir; also a statement of the cost of the works to date for the distribution of the Tytam water and the estimated further sum required to complete the distribution works?

5. Will the Government state the original estimated cost of the Tytam Reservoir and works connected therewith including the Service Reservoir; and the original estimated cost of the works for the distribution of the Tytam water?

:

:

24

6. Does the Government Notification No. 139 of the 28th March last, refer to covenants in leases granted before the year 1883 or to breaches of agreements for leases issued subsequent to that date?

7. Will the Honourable the Colonial Treasurer lay on the table a statement of-

(1.) The particulars of the expenditure under the head of Miscellaneous Services in the

statement of Receipts and Payments for 1890;

(2.) The assessed taxes refunded for void or empty houses in the years 1888, 1889,

1890; and

(3.) The assessed taxes for first quarter of 1889, of 1890 and of 1891 and the taxes

refunded for void or empty houses in each of these quarters?

8. Will the Honourable the Colonial Treasurer give the Council some information regarding the various items aggregating Millions of Dollars under the heads of Receipts and Payments in the statement dated the 6th instant and laid before the Council on the 10th idem; and further—an explanation as to the decrease in expenditure against the name of the Postmaster General as appears in said statement under the heads of Establishments and Services Enclusive of Establishments?

9. If the full Military Contribution of £40,000 for 1890 had been paid on or before 31st. December last, would there not have been a deficiency in Revenue as compared with actual expenditure in 1890, and if so how much would have been the deficiency?

10. Will the Government lay on the table the papers and correspondence relating to the closing

of the thoroughfare leading from Arsenal Street eastward along the Praya, now blocked. to carriage traffic since November last to the great inconvinience of the public, and state when there is any probability of the road being again open to traffic?

"}

11. Has the attention of the Government been called to the leading articles in the "Daily Press

of the 17th March and "China Mail" of the 20th instant, referring to the unsatisfactory state of Queen's Road Central, and will the Honourable the Surveyor General state what steps are being taken to put it in proper order?

12. Have the Government issued any instructions recently for the more stringent enforcement of

the Opium Ordinance 1887, and for the more frequent examination of Opium Godowns?

If such instructions have been issued, has it been done on the application or complaint of the Chinese Government or of the Officers of that Government?

13. With reference to His Excellency the Governor's statement in Council on 18th December, 1889, viz.: "I was given to understand last year that in consideration of our having under- taken the work of the Gap Rock Light, the Imperial Chinese Maritime Customs would undertake the Lighthouse on Waglan," will the Government state whether the Chinese Govern- ment have commenced the erection of the very necessary Lighthouse on Waglan, and if not when operations are likely to be commenced?

The Acting Colonial Secretary replied and laid on the table the statements referred to in questions 1, 4, 7, and 8, and in questions 8 and 9 asked by the Honourable Member at the Meeting of Council held on the 10th April.

17

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE TO RESTRICT THE LOADING AND UNLOADING OF CARGO ON SUNDAY IN THE WATERS OF THE COLONY."-The Attorney General moved the first reading of the Bill.

Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question--put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED "THE GAMBLING ORDINANCE, 1891."-The Council went into Committee on the

Bill reported with amendment.

The Honourable P. RYRIE gave notice that at the next Meeting of Council he would ask the following question,

Will the Government state definitely when the new Merchant Shipping Ordinance will be

introduced?

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned sine die.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX,

Read and confirmed, this 5th day of May, 1891.

A. M. THOMSON,

Acting Clerk of Councils.

Governor.

:

}

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 9.

""

TUESDAY, 5TH MAY, 1891.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(SIR G. WILLIAM DES VEUX, K.C.M.G.).

The Honourable the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

the Colonial Treasurer, (NORMAN GILBERT Mitchell-Innes). the Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART LOCKHART). the Surveyor General, (SAMUEL BROWN).

"

"}

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

25

""

Ho KAI, M.B., C.M.

ABSENT:

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (WALTER MEREDITH DEANE, C.M.G.).

""

";

PHINEAS RYRIE,

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

The Council met pursuant to notice.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 30th April, 1891, were read and confirmed.

In the absence of the Honourable P. RYRIE the Honourable J. J. KESWICK asked the following question,-

Will the Government state definitely when the new Merchant Shipping Ordinance will be introduced? The Attorney General replied.

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE TO RESTRICT THE LOADING AND UNLOADING OF CARGO ON SUNDAY IN THE WATERS OF THE COLONY."-The Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

The Council went into Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed.

Bill reported with amendments.

The Attorney General moved the suspension of the standing orders.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

The Attorney General moved that the Bill be read a third time.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

BILL ENTITLED "THE GAMBLING ORDINANCE, 1891."-The Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned sine die.

Read and confirmed, this 22nd day of May, 1891.

A. M. THOMSON,

Acting Clerk of Councils.

G. DIGBY BARKER, Officer Administering the Government.

:

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 10.

FRIDAY, 22ND MAY, 1891.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE OFFICER ADMINISTERING THE GOVERNMENT Major-General G. Digby Barker, C.B.

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (WALTER MEREDITH DEANE, C.M.G.). the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

27

""

,,

the Colonial Treasurer, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES).

""

the Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART LOCKHART).

""

*)

the Surveyor General, (SAMUEL BROWN).

PHINEAS RYRIE.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

>>

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

ABSENT:

""

The Honourable CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 5th May, 1891, were read and confirmed.

The Acting Colonial Secretary, by direction of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government, laid on the table Bye-laws for licensing and regulating Common Lodging-Houses made by the Sanitary Board under sub-section 12 of section 13 of Ordinance No. 24 of 1887 and sub-section Ď of section 1 of Ordinance No. 26 of 1890; and moved that these Bye-laws be approved of.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

VOTES REFERRED TO THE FINANCE COMMITTEE. Read the following Minutes by their Excellencies the Governor and the Officer Administering the Government :-

C.S.O. 880 of 1891.

C.S.0.

253 of 1991.

C.8.0. 820 of 1891.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Nineteen thousand Nine hundred and Eighty Dollars, ($19,980), for the Peak Water Supply.

The materials for this work having arrived too late last year and the work could not be commenced before this year, the vote for 1890 was not expended, and a re-vote is now required.

Government House, Hongkong, 23rd April, 1891.

G. WILLIAM DES Vœux.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One thousand Two hundred and Twenty-nine Dollars, ($1,229), for general repairs to the Police Steam Launch No. 2, and providing a launch while the repairs are being executed.

Government House, Hongkong, 21st April, 1891.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Ninety Dollars, ($90), for an allowance for a Chinese teacher to Mr. WAGGOTT, one of the Student Interpreters, appointed under Section II of the Scheme published in Government Notification No. 209 of 4th May, 1889, at the rate of $10 per month.

Government House, Hongkong, Sth April, 1891.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Ninety Dollars, ($90), for an allowance for a Chinese teacher to Mr. NOLAN, one of the Student Interpreters, appointed under Section II of the Scheme published in Government Notification No. 209 of 4th May, 1889, at the rate of $10 per month.

Government House, Hongkong, 16th April, 1891.

:

:

:

28

().

C.S.O.

779 of 1891.

C.S.0.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Eighty Dollars, ($80), to provide a Chinese teacher for Miss MCINTOSH, one of the European Nurses at the Civil Hospital, at the rate of $10 per month.

Government House, Hongkong, 21st April, 1891.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

2121 of 1890. The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Sixty-nine Dollars and Thirty- five Cents, ($69.35), being half salary of Miss WARD, Head Mistress of the Central School for Girls, during her voyage from England to Hongkong, from 20th July to 31st August, 1890, at $50 per month.

C.S.O.

1579 of 1890.

C.S.O. 878 of 1891.

C. O. Desp. 281 of 1890,

and

Government House, Hongkong, 30th April, 1891.

G. DIGBY BARKER.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Nine hundred Dollars, ($900), for the purchase of 200 brass Padlocks from CHUBB & SONS, for Victoria Gaol.

Government House, Hongkong, 13th May, 1891.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of One thousand and One hundred Dollars, ($1,100), for general overhaul and repairs to Harbour Department Steam Launch Daisy.

Government House, Hongkong, 21st April, 1891.

G. WILLIAM DES VŒUX.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Eight hundred and five Dollars, ($805), to cover the Salaries and Allowances to the two Inspectors in the Registrar 336 of 1801. General's Department, in accordance with instructions from the Secretary of State.

C.S:0.

The sums required for 1891 are:-

Salaries, one Inspector at $1,200, and another at $960, Allowance in lieu of Rent,

Allowances in lieu of Police Medal Money, Coal, Brooms, and Oil,

Amount provided for in the Estimates for 1891,

Sum to be voted,.....................

$2,160.00

480.00

90.00

1

$2,730.00

1,925.00

$ 805.00

C.3.0.

650 of 1891.

Government House, Hongkong, 11th February, 1891.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote a sum of Nine hundred and Eighty Dollars, ($980), as a compassionate allowance to the widow and daughters of the late Mr. F. V. RIBEIRO, Clerk in the Audit Office, in consideration of her husband's twenty-one years' service.

Government House, Hongkong, 25th March, 1891.

The Acting Colonial Secretary moved that these Minutes be referred to the Finance Committee. The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

A Petition from the Stock and Share Brokers Association was presented by the Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD and read to the Council praying for the postponement of the second reading of the Bill entitled An Ordinance to amend the Law in respect of the sale of Shares in Companies registered under the Companies Ordinances 1865 to 1886 and other Joint Stock Companies.

The Honourable P. RYRIE laid on the table the following protest against the payment of the moiety of the Military Contribution for 1890, on the 21st of February last:-

Whereas at a meeting of this Honourable Council held on the 26th day of March 1890 past, a vote was taken for the payment out of the Colonial Treasury to the Military chest of a sum of Twenty thousand Pounds Sterling (£20,000), or its equivalent in dollars, as ad- ditional Military Contribution for and in respect of the year 1890 ;

29

And Whereas no portion of the monies voted was disbursed during the year ending the 31st December last ;

And Whereas for the payment out of such monies or any portion thereof after the said 31st day of December a Vote or Revote by this Council was requisite and His Excellency the Governor had no authority, except perhaps, in a case of extreme necessity to issue his warrant for, or in any way authorise such payment without such Revote;

And Whereas at the meeting of Council held on the 30th day of April last His Excel- lency the Governor, Sir GEORGE WILLIAM DES Vœux, in his place in Council, stated in reply to a question that he had on the 21st February last on his own responsibility and without the authority of this Council by his Warrant, directed payment out of the Colonial Treasury of this said sum of Twenty thousand Pounds Sterling, additional Military Contribution in respect of the year 1890

And Whereas it has not been shown to this Council that any adequate or any urgent necessity existed for the payment of the said monies on that date without the authority of this Council, and no sufficient reason has been assigned or explanation given for not calling together this Council and obtaining a Revote of the Money ;-

Now therefore, we the undersigned Unofficial Members of Council, in our places in Council, as the Representatives of the public interest and as the lawfully constituted Guar- dians of the public purse, and for the preservation of the rights of this Honourable Council, solemnly protest against the action of His Excellency the Governor in issuing his warrant, without the authority of this Council, for the payment of the said sum of Twenty thousand Pounds Sterling, additional Military Contribution and against the payment of the said

monies.

We have further most earnestly to protest against the action of His Excellency the Governor in concealing from this Council until its meeting on the 30th April last, and until a question had been put on the subject, the fact that this money had been paid, on his autho- rity, on the 21st of February last; in laying on the Council table, on the 25th February last, a Minute recommending the Revote of the Council, of this additional Military Contribution for 1890, the Minute being silent as to the payment of the money; in permitting this Council to discuss, in Finance Committee on the 25th February, and in full Council on the 5th and 19th March in his own presence, the question whether this money should or should not be revoted, the Council being deliberately left in ignorance of the fact that the money had already, on the 21st February, been paid out of the Colonial Treasury, and that it was beyond recall.

:

We pray that this our Protest may be recorded on the Minutes of this Council and may be forwarded to the Right Honourable the Secretary of State for the Colonies.

Legislative Council Chamber,

Hongkong, 7th May, 1891.

P. RYRIE.

Η ΚΑΙ.

T. H. WHITEHEAD.

The Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD gave notice that at next meeting of Council he would ask the following questions :

With reference to the explanation given by His Excellency Sir G. William Des Voeux at the Council Meeting held on the 30th April last, in connection with the payment of the arrears of the Military Contribution for 1890 without the sanction of the Council, will the Govern- ment lay upon the table a copy of the telegram or telegrams from the Secretary of State on the authority of which the money was paid?

Will the Government lay upon the table a copy of the Despatches, referred to in the Acting Colonial Secretary's letter of 13th instant to the Honourable P. Ryrie, received from the Right Honourable the Secretary of State for the Colemies, conveying His Lordship's views and instructions in regard to the increased salaries voted in the 1891 Estimates, and state the date on which the same were received, also a copy of Governor Sir G. William Des Vœux's telegram dated 25th ultimo to the Secretary of State referred to in the said letter together with a copy of the telegram received from the Secretary of State in reply?

.

Will the Government lay upon the table a copy of the despatch dated 2nd September last of His Excellency the Officer then Administering the Government to the Right Honourable, the Secretary of State for the Colonies in connection with the proposed Share Sale Regul ition Bill, and a copy of the Secretary of State's despatch in reply?

་ཆ་

30

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE TO GIVE THE SAME VALIDITY TO ORDINANCES Nos. 18 AND 19

OF 1884 AS IF THEY HAD BEEN PROCLAIMED TO COME INTO FORCE ON THE 23RD DAY OF SEPTEMBER, 1884."-The Attorney General moved the first reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question--put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED "THE FORTS PROTECTION ORDINANCE, 1891."-The Attorney General moved the first reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANce to provide AGAINST ABUSES CONNECTED WITH THE ERECTION OF PUBLIC LATRINES."-The Attorney General moved the first reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED " AN ORDINANCE TO FURTHER AMEND THE PUBLIC HEALTH ORDINANCE, 1887."- The Attorney General moved the first reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED

"AN ORDINANCE TO PROVIDE FOR THE MAKING of a TABLE OF FEES TO BE TAKEN IN CONNECTION WITH THE GRANT OF LETTERS PATENT IN THIS COLONY."-The Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

The Council went into Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed and Bill reported without amendment.

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE LAW IN RESPECT OF THE SALE OF SHARES IN COMPANIES REGISTERED UNDER THE COMPANIES ORDINANCES 1865 TO 1886 AND IN OTHER JOINT STOCK COMPANIES."-Further consideration of the Bill was postponed till next meeting of Council.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned sine die.

Read and confirmed, this 5th day of June, 1891.

A. M. THOMSON,

Acting Clerk of Councils.

G. DIGBY BARKER, Officer Administering the Government.

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 11.

FRIDAY, 5TH JUNE, 1891.

31

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE OFFICER ADMINISTERING THE GOVERNMENT Major-General G. Digby Barker, C.B.

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (WILLIAM MEIGH Goodman).

the Acting Attorney General, (ANDREW JOHN LEACH).

19

the Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART Lockhart).

"}

the Colonial Treasurer, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES).

A

>>

the Surveyor General, (SAMUEL BROWN).

PHINEAS RYRIE.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

")

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

>>

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

ABSENT:

The Honourable the Captain Superintendent of Police, (WALTER MEREDITH DEANE, C.M.G.).

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

"}

The Council met pursuant to notice.

The Honourable A. J. LEACH took the oath of allegiance as a Member of the Legislative Council. The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 22nd May, 1891, were read and confirmed.

PAPERS LAID ON THE TABLE.-The Acting Colonial Secretary, by direction of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government, laid on the table the Report of the Director of the Observatory for 1890.

VOTES PASSED BY THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Acting Colonial Secretary, by direction of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government, laid on the table the Report of the Finance Committee, dated the 22nd May, (No. 5), and moved that the following Votes referred to therein be passed, viz. :-

·

880 of 1891.

C.S.O. A sum of Nineteen thousand Nine hundred and Eighty Dollars, ($19,980), for

the Peak Water Supply,

C.s.o.

253 of 1991.

C.S.O.

820 of 1891.

C.S.O. 779 of 1891.

of

A sum of One thousand Two hundred and Twenty-nine Dollars, ($1,229), for general repairs to the Police Steam Launch No. 2, and providing a launch while the repairs are being executed,

A sum of Ninety Dollars, ($90), for an allowance for a Chinese teacher to Mr. WAGGOTT, one of the Student Interpreters, appointed under Section II of the Scheme published in Government Notification No. 209 of 4th May, 1889, at the rate of $10 per month,

A sum of Ninety Dollars, ($90), for an allowance for a Chinese teacher to Mr. NOLAN, one of the Student Interpreters, appointed under Section II of the Scheme published in Government Notification No. 209 of 4th May, 1889, at the rate of $10 per month,

$19,980.00

$ 1,229.00

A sum of Eighty Dollars, ($80), to provide a Chinese teacher for Miss MCINTOSH,

one of the European Nurses at the Civil Hospital, at the rate of $10 per month, $

2121-1890. A sum of Sixty-nine Dollars and Thirty-five Cents, ($69.35), being half salary of Miss WARD, Head Mistress of the Central School for Girls, during her voyage from England to Hongkong, from 20th July to 31st August, 1890, at $50 per month,

C.5.0.

1579 of 1890.

C.S.O.

878 of 1891.

}

A sum of Nine hundred Dollars, ($900), for the purchase of 200 brass Padlocks

from CHUBB & SONS, for Victoria Gaol,

A sum of One thousand and One hundred Dollars, ($1,100)), for general overhaul

and repairs to Harbour Department Steam Launch Daisy,

90.00

90.00

80.00

69.35

.$ 900.00

$1,100.00

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:

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281 of 1890,

and

CDs, A sum of Eight hundred and Five Dollars, ($805), to cover the Salaries and Allowances to the two Inspectors in the Registrar General's Department, in accordance with instructions from the Secretary of State,

C.S.O.

336 of 1891.

C.S.O.

650 of 1891.

A sum of Nine hundred and Eighty Dollars, ($980), as a compassionate allowance to the widow and daughters of the late Mr. F. V. RIBEIRO, Clerk in the Audit Office,

805.00

.$

980.00

The Acting Attorney General seconded the motions with regard to the first two of these Votes, and the Colonial Treasurer seconded the motions with regard to the remainder.

Questions-put and agreed to.

Votes passed.

The Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD asked the following questions, viz. :-

1. With reference to the explanation given by His Excellency Sir G. William Des Voeux at the Council Meeting held on the 30th April last, in connection with the payment of the arrears of the Military Contribution for 1890 without the sanction of the Council, will the Govern- ment lay upon the table a copy of the telegram or telegrams from the Secretary of State on the authority of which the money was paid?

2. Will the Government lay upon the table a copy of the Despatches, referred to in the Acting Colonial Secretary's letter of 13th instant to the Honourable P. Ryrie, received from the Right Honourable the Secretary of State for the Colonies, conveying His Lordship's views and instructions in regard to the increased salaries voted in the 1891 Estimates, and state the date on which the same were received, also a copy of Governor Sir G. William Des Voeux's telegram dated 25th ultimo to the Secretary of State referred to in the said letter together with a copy of the telegram received from the Secretary of State in reply?

3. Will the Government lay upon the table a copy of the despatch dated 2nd September last of His Excellency the Officer then Administering the Government to the Right Honourable the Secretary of State for the Colonies in connection with the proposed Share Sale Regulation Bill, and a copy of the Secretary of State's despatch in reply?

4. Has the attention of the Government been directed to the result of the enquiry into the cause of the death of the Engineer and Fireman belonging to the Steam launch which was blown up on the 7th May, and to the rider added to their verdict by the Jury to the effect that all launches plying in Hongkong harbour whether for passenger traffic or otherwise should be compelled to undergo a periodical survey, and if so will the Government state whether it is intended to legislate rendering compulsory periodical surveys of all launches in Hongkong Waters? 5. With reference to the telegram from Her Majesty's Government directing the Colonial Government to stop all Public Works not yet begun, and referred to in Sir G. W. Des Vœux's speech in this Council on 5th March last, will the Government lay on the table a copy of the Despatch or Despatches received from the Right Honourable the Secretary of State in confirmation of the said telegram, or having reference to the stoppage of Public Works to which the Colony is not already actually committed?

6. Will the Government state whether the Memorandum dated the 20th December, 1890, addressed to His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government of Hongkong, signed by all the Unofficial Members of Council and dealing with the Estimates for Public Works Extraor- dinary for 1891 was forwarded to the Secretary of State for the Colonies and if so on what date. Have any communications been received from the Secretary of State on the subject of that Memorandum and if so will the Government lay copies of them on the table?

The Acting Colonial Secretary replied and laid on the table the copies of the telegram and despatches referred to in Questions 1, 3, 5 and 6.

The Honourable J. J. KESWICK gave notice that at the next meeting of Council he would ask the following question:-

Whether it is a fact that Members of the Legislative Council are precluded from either voting for or nominating any canditate for election to the Sanitary Board, although such Members are Ratepayers?

The Standing Orders having been suspended, the Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD moved the following resolution :---

That the Share Brokers Association be heard by their Counsel immediately prior to the motion for the second reading of the Bill entitled "An Ordinance to amend the Law in respect of the Sale of Shares in Companies registered under the Companies Ordinances 1865 to 1886 and in other Joint Stock Companies."

The Honourable HO KAI seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

X.

..

33

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE TO GIVE THE SAME VALIDITY TO ORDINANCES Nos. 18 AND 19 OF 1884 AS IF THEY HAD BEEN PROCLAIMED TO COME INTO FORCE ON THE 23RD DAY OF SEPTEMBER, 1884."-The Acting Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question--put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council went into Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed and Bill reported with amendments.

BILL ENTITLED "THE FORTS PROTECTION ORDINANCE, 1891."-The Acting Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded. Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council went into Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed and Bill reported with amendments.

BILL ENTITLED << AN ORDINANCE TO PROVIDE AGAINST ABUSES CONNECTED WITH THE ERECTION OF PUBLIC LATRINES."-The Acting Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council went into Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed and Bill reported with amendments.

BILL ENTITLED " AN ORDINANCE TO FURTHER AMEND THE PUBLIC HEALTH ORDINANCE, 1887.”— The Acting Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council went into Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed and Bill reported with amendments.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO PROVIDE FOR THE MAKING of a TABLE OF FEES TO BE TAKEN IN CONNECTION WITH THE GRANT OF LETTERS PATENT IN THIS COLONY."-The Acting Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned till Friday, the 19th instant, at 3 P.M.

Read and confirmed, this 19th day of June, 1891.

A. M. THOMSON,

Acting Clerk of Councils.

G. Digby Barker, Officer Administering the Government.

1

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7

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 12.

FRIDAY, 19TH JUNE, 1891.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE OFFICER ADMINISTERING THE GOVERNMENT Major-General G. DIGBY BARKER, C.B.

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

29

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the Acting Attorney General, (ANDREW JOHN LEACH).

35

the Captain Superintendent of Police, (WALTER MEREDITH DEANE, C.M.G.). the Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART LOCKHART).

the Colonial Treasurer, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES).

the Surveyor General, (SAMUEL BROWN).

PHINEAS RYRIE.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

ABSENT:

The Honourable CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

The Council met pursuant to notice.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 5th June, 1891, were read and confirmed. PAPERS LAID ON THE TABLE.-The Acting Colonial Secretary, by direction of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government, laid on the table the following Sessional Papers, viz. :-

Report on the Blue Book and Departmental Reports for 1890.

The Educational Report for 1890. (No. 23 of 1891.)

(No. 22 of 1891.)

Despatches respecting Increase of Salaries of Public Officers. (No. 24 of 1891.)

VOTE REFERRED TO THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Acting Colonial Secretary by command of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government, laid on the table the following Minute and moved that it be referred to the Finance Committee:

C.S.O. 1266 of 1891,

G. DIGBY BARKER.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Three thousand Dollars, ($3,000), to provide for the cost of extending the works of "Peak Water Supply" to Magazine Gap.

Government House, Hongkong, 10th June, 1891.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

The Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD gave notice that at the next meeting of Council he would move the following resolutions, viz. :—

1. That the existence of gambling houses in Chinese Kowloon and the toleration of gambling by the authorities there is, and has been for some time past, a very serious cause of annoyance and injury to the inhabitants of this Colony and tends to render inoperative recent legislation in Hongkong against gambling.

2. That the Government be requested to move the Chinese authorities with a view to the entire

suppression of public gambling, and gambling houses at Chinese Kowloon.

The Honourable J. J. KESWICK asked the following question :-

Whether it is a fact that Members of the Legislative Council are precluded from either voting for or nominating any canditate for election to the Sanitary Board, although such Members are Ratepayers?

The Acting Colonial Secretary replied.

BILL ENTITLED

"AN ORDINANCE TO LICENSE THE PRESENT CHURCH OF THE IMMACULATE CONCEP- TION FOR THE CELEBRATION OF MARRIAGES FROM THE TIME OF ITS OPENING."-The Acting Attorney General moved the first reading of this Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded. Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

:

:

36

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE WOMEN AND GIRLS' PROTECTION ORDINANCE, 1890."-The Acting Attorney General moved the first reading of this Bill,

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE TO GIVE THE SAME VALIDITY TO ORDINANCES Nos. 18 and 19 of 1884 as if THEY HAD BEEN PROCLAIMED TO COME INTO FORce on the 23rd DAY OF SEPTEMBER, 1884."-The Acting Attorney General moved that the Bill be read a third time.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question--put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

BILL ENTITLED "THE FORTS PROTECTION ORDINANCE, 1891."-The Acting Attorney General moved that the Bill be read a third time.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

BILL ENTITLED

AN ORDINANCE TO PROVIDE AGAINST ABUSES CONNECTED WITH THE ERECTION OF PUBLIC LATRINES."-The Acting Attorney General moved that the Bill be read a third time.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

BILL ENTITLED “AN ORDINANCE TO FURTHER AMEND THE PUBLIC HEALTH ORDINANCE, 1887.”- The Acting Attorney General moved that the Bill be read a third time.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

BILL ENTITLED 66 AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE LAW IN RESPECT OF THE SALE OF SHARES IN COMPANIES REGISTERED UNDER THE COMPANIES ORDINANCES 1865 TO 1886 AND IN OTHER JOINT STOCK COMPANIES."-Counsel for the Hongkong Sharebrokers' Association addressed the Council on the Bill.

Honourable J. J. KESWICK moved that the Bill be read a second time.

The Honourable P. RYRIE seconded.

The Acting Colonial Secretary moved that further consideration of the Bill be postponed till next meeting of Council.

The Acting Attorney General seconded.

Question put that further consideration be postponed and agreed to.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned till Friday, the 26th June, at 3 P.M.

Read and confirmed, this 3rd day of July, 1891.

A. M. THOMSON,

Acting Clerk of Councils.

G. Digby Barker, Officer Administering the Government.

X

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 13.

FRIDAY, 3RD JULY, 1891.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE OFFICER ADMINISTERING THE GOVERNMENT Major-General G. DIGBY BARKER, C.B.

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

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""

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""

""

""

the Acting Attorney General, (ANDREW JOHN LEACH).

the Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART LOCKHART).

the Colonial Treasurer, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-Innes). the Surveyor General, (SAMUEL BROWN).

PHINEAS RYRIE.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

ABSENT:

The Honourable CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

The Council met pursuant to notice.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 19th June, 1891, were read and confirmed.

37

PAPERS LAID ON THE TABLE.-The Acting Colonial Secretary, by direction of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government, laid on the table a Despatch from the Secretary of State, (No. 25 of 1891), on the subject of the appointment of Mr. Tso PING LUNG, to be Chinese Consul in Hongkong.

VOTES REFERRED TO THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Acting Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government, laid on the table the following Minutes and moved that they be referred to the Finance Committee :-

C. O. Desp.

71 of 1891,

1321 of 1891.

G. DIGBY BARKER.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Five thousand Six hundred and Forty Dollars, ($5,640), to cover certain increases to salaries, in excess of the Estimates for 1891, as per list annexed.

Government House, Hongkong, 24th June, 1891.

G. DIGBY BARKER.

C.S.O. The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Two thousand Eight hundred Dollars, ($2,800), being amount required for the printing and binding of 200 copies of a concise edition of Ordinances of Hongkong, from 1844 to 1890.

For printing and binding,

To Mr. LEACH,

Government House, Hongkong, 24th June, 1891.

.$2,200.00 600.00

$2,800.00

The Acting Attorney General seconded the motion with regard to the former of these votes, and the Colonial Treasurer seconded the motion with regard to the latter.

Question-put and agreed to.

The Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD asked the following questions:-

1. What is the total Estimated Expenditure of the Government under the head of Salaries for the year 1891 on the basis of the increased pay and allowances sanctioned by the Right Honourable the Secretary of State's Despatches dated 3rd April last, and 7th ultimo.

2. Will the Honourable the Surveyor General lay upon the table a statement shewing what has been done, and how much money has been spent up to date in connection with the recon- struction of the Praya Bridge over Bowrington Canal, and improvements on Recreation Ground at Happy Valley, for which the Council voted $32,000 in the Estimates for Extraordinary Public Works for 1891.

3. Will the Government lay upon the table a copy of their letter conveying the thanks of the Hong- kong Government for the services rendered by the Chinese Admiral Fong and his Officers in tracking and bringing to trial and condign punishment the "Namoa" pirates.

The Acting Colonial Secretary replied.

:

38

The Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD moved the following resolution :-

That the existence of gambling houses in Chinese Kowloon and the toleration of gambling by the authorities there, is and has been for some time past, a very serious cause of annoyance and injury to the inhabitants of this Colony and tends to render inoperative recent legislation in Hongkong against gambling.

The Honourable P. RYRIE seconded.

The Acting Colonial Secretary moved as an amendment that it is inexpedient that this resolution be passed by the Council.

The Registrar General seconded.

The Council divided when the amendment was carried by six to four votes.

The Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD moved the following resolution :—

That the Government be requested to move the Chinese authorities with a view to the entire

suppression of public gambling, and gambling houses at Chinese Kowloon.

Honourable P. RYRIE seconded.

The Acting Colonial Secretary moved as an amendment that this resolution is not necessary and is inexpedient.

The Registrar General seconded.

The Council divided when the amendment was carried by eight to two votes. The Acting Colonial Secretary moved the following resolution :-

The Council having considered the following statement from the Superintendent of the Botanical and Afforestation Department concerning the planting and rearing of trees in the years 1892 and 1893 resolves that it is expedient that the liability for this work be incurred.

Statement shewing Disbursements for Forestry Works in the years 1892 and 1893 for which Contracts are already made, or now required to be made.

SANCTIONED BY LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL

Estimated total cost.

To be disbursed in

1892.

To be disbursed in 1893.

C.

$

C.

C.

26TH JUNE, 1890.

1. For trees being now reared,

2. Planting above trees,.

1,400.00

1,400.00

2,400.00

2,400.00

REQUIRING SANCTION. Contracts to be now made.

3. Rearing trees in situ,.

2,800.00

1,400.00

4.

>"

دو

to be planted in 1893,

1,500.00

750.00

1,400.00 750.00

Contract to be made in 1892.

5. Planting the trees to be reared under No. 4,...........

2,400.00

10,500.00

2,400.00

5,950.00

4,550.00

The sums under items 1 and 2 were approved by the Legislative Council in June last year, but they have now been again introduced in order to show together with 3 and 4 the total amount to be disbursed in 1892 under contracts to be now provided for.

CHARLES FORD, Superintendent, Botanical and Afforestation Department.

The Honourable P. RYRIE seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

BILL ENTITLED "THE SUPPLEMENTARY APPROPRIATION BILL, 1890."-The Acting Colonial Secretary moved the first reading of the Bill.

The Acting Attorney General seconded.. Question--put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED

"AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE WIDOWS' AND ORPHANS' PENSIONS ORDINANCE, 1890."-The Acting Attorney General moved the first reading of the Bill..

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question--put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

ተ.

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39

BILL ENTITLED 65 AN ORDINANCE to license THE PRESENT Church of the IMMACULATE CONCEP- TION FOR THE CELEBRATION OF MARRIAGES FROM THE TIME OF ITS OPENING.' The Acting Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

The Council went into Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed and Bill reported without amendment.

The Acting Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE WOMEN AND GIRLS' PROTECTION ORDINANCE, 1890."―The Acting Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill.

The Registrar General seconded:

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

The Council went into Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed and Bill reported with amendments.

66

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE LAW IN RESPECT OF THE SALE OF SHARES IN COMPANIES REGISTERED UNDER THE COMPANIES ORDINANCES 1865 TO 1886 AND IN OTHER JOINT STOCK COMPANIES."-The Council resumed consideration of the motion that the Bill be read a second time.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned till Friday, the 17th July, at 3 P.M.

Read and confirmed, this 17th day of July, 1891.

A. M. THOMSON,

Acting Clerk of Councils.

G. DIGBY BARKER, Officer Administering the Government.

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1

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LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 14.

FRIDAY, 17TH JULY, 1891.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE OFFICER ADMINISTERING THE GOVERNMENT Major-General G. DIGBY BARKER, C.B.

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

the Acting Attorney General, (ANDREW JOHN LEACH).

41

","

the Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART Lockhart).

""

the Colonial Treasurer, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES).

>>

""

""

the Surveyor General, (SAMUEL BROWN).

PHINEAS RYRIE.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

ABSENT:

The Honourable CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 3rd July, 1891, were read and confirmed. PAPERS LAID ON THE TABLE.-The Acting Colonial Secretary, by direction of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government, laid on the table the following Sessional Papers, viz. :—

The Report of the Superintendent of the Botanical and Afforestation Department for 1890.

(No. 26 of 1891).

The Report of the Colonial Surgeon for 1890. (No. 27 of 1891).

VOTE REFERRED TO THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Acting Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government, laid on the table the following Minute and moved that it be referred to the Finance Committee :-

C.S.Q. 1536 & 1539

G. DIGBY Barker.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of of 1891. Forty-eight Dollars, ($48), for the Salaries of two Coolies, one for Saiyingpoon, and the other for Wanchai School, at $6 per month, from 1st September to 31st December of the current year.

Government House, Hongkong, 13th July, 1891.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

VOTES PASSED BY THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Acting Colonial Secretary, by direction of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government, laid on the table the Reports of the Finance Committee, dated the 19th June and 3rd July, (Nos. 6 and 7), and moved that the following Votes referred to therein be passed, viz. :—

C.S.O.

of

126-091. A sum of Three thousand Dollars, ($3,000), to provide for the cost of extending

the works of" Peak Water Supply" to Magazine Gap,....

$ 3,000.00

71 of 1891.

CO. Desp. A sum of Five thousand Six hundred and Forty Dollars, ($5,640), to cover certain

increases to salaries, in excess of the Estimates for 1891,

$ 5,640.00

C.S.O.

1321 of 1831.

A sum of Two thousand Eight hundred Dollars, ($2,800), being amount required for the printing and binding of 200 copies of a concise edition of Ordinances of Hongkong, from 1844 to 1890,

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

...

.$ 2,800.00

The Council divided on the vote of $5,640 to cover certain increases to salaries when it was carried by seven to three votes.

Question-that these votes be passed-put and agreed to.

The Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD gave notice that at next meeting of Council he would move the first reading of a Bill entitled An Ordinance to amend the Sunday Cargo-Working Ordinance, 1891.

.

:

7

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42

The Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD gave notice that at next meeting of Council he would ask the following questions, viz. :-

1. Is the Government aware of, and if so, did it sanction the blasting of rock which took place in the drain in the comparatively narrow thoroughfare of Queen's Road Central, opposite the Hongkong Hotel, where the life of the city concentrates, on Monday 13th, Wednesday 15th, and Thursday 16th July to the serious danger of life and property?

2. Will the Government inform the Council in regard to the position of the matter of the general extension and sanitary improvement of the Public Recreation Ground in the Happy Valley, including the extension of the Race Course, and state whether it is intended to proceed with the scheme for which the money was voted by the Council in the estimates for this year. 3. Will the Government inform the Council whether the seven years' lease is to be issued of that piece of ground at the Race Course to the east of the Bowrington Canal, known as the Public Gardens, as granted to the Hongkong Athletic Club in the Honourable the Colonial Secretary's letter, No. 1094 of 31st May, 1890, addressed to Mr. W. H. Young, and if not to be issued will the Government state the reasons for its not fulfilling the promise made to the Athletic Club as above stated.

The Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD asked the following question :-

Will the Government lay upon the table copies of all recent correspondence on the subject of the appointment of a Chinese Consul to Hongkong, and also copies of the correspondence on the same subject in the years 1868 to 1876?

His Excellency replied.

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE LAW IN RESPECT OF THE SALE OF SHARES IN COMPANIES REGISTERED UNDER THE COMPANIES ORDINANCES 1865 To 1886 AND IN OTHER JOINT STOCK COMPANIES."-The Council went into Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed and Bill reported with amendments.

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE WIDOWS' AND ORPHANS' PENSIONS ORDINANCE, 1890."-The Acting Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

The Council went into Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed.

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE WOMEN AND GIRLS' PROTECTION ORDINANCE, 1890."-The Acting Attorney General moved that the Bill be re-committed.

The Registrar General seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed and Bill reported with amendments.

The Acting Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Registrar General seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

BILL ENTITLED "THE OPIUM ORDINANCE, 1891."-The Council agreed to postpone consideration of the question of the first reading of the Bill.

BILL ENTITLED "THE SUPPLEMENTARY APPROPRIATION BILL, 1890."-The Acting Colonial Secretary moved the second reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD moved that consideration of the question be postponed.

Honourable HO KAI seconded.

The Council divided on the amendment when it was lost by eight to two votes. Question-that the Bill be read a second time-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

The Council went into Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned till Friday, the 24th July, at 3 P.M.

Read and confirmed, this 24th day of July, 1891.

A. M. THOMSON,

Acting Clerk of Councils.

G. DIGBY BARKER, Officer Administering the Government.

.

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 15.

FRIDAY, 24TH JULY, 1891.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE OFFICER ADMINISTERING THE GOVERNMENT Major-General G. DIGBY BARKER, C.B.

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

the Acting Attorney General, (ANDREW JOHN LEACH).

the Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART LOCKHART).

**

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the Colonial Treasurer, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES).

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the Surveyor General, (SAMUEL BROWN).

PHINEAS RYRIE.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

ABSENT:

The Honourable CATCHICK PAUL CHATEr.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

43

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 17th July, 1891, were read and confirmed. PAPERS LAID ON THE TABLE.-The Acting Colonial Secretary, by direction of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government, laid on the table the Report of Proceedings of the Public Works Committee at Meetings held on the 11th and 22nd of June and the 21st of July, 1891.

VOTE PASSED BY THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Acting Colonial Secretary, by direction of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government, laid on the table the Report of the Finance Committee, dated the 17th July, (No. 8), and moved that the Vote referred to therein be passed,

viz. :

C.S.O.

1536 & 1539

of 1891.

A sum of Forty-eight Dollars, ($48), for the Salaries of two Coolies, one for Sai- yingpoon, and the other for Wanchai School, at $6 per month, from 1st Sep- tember to 31st December of the current year,

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Vote passed.

The Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD asked the following questions :—

$48.00

:

1. Is the Government aware of, and if so, did it sanction the blasting of rock which took place in the drain in the comparatively narrow thoroughfare of Queen's Road Central, opposite the Hongkong Hotel, where the life of the city concentrates, on Monday 13th, Wednesday 15th, and Thursday 16th July to the serious danger of life and property?

2. Will the Government inform the Council in regard to the position of the matter of the general extension and sanitary improvement of the Public Recreation Ground in the Happy Valley, including the extension of the Race Course, and state whether it is intended to proceed with the scheme for which the money was voted by the Council in the estimates for this year. 3. Will the Government inform the Council whether the seven years' lease is to be issued of that piece of ground at the Race Course to the east of the Bowrington Canal, known as the Public Gardens, as granted to the Hongkong Athletic Club in the Honourable the Colonial Secretary's letter, No. 1094 of 31st May, 1890, addressed to Mr. W. H. Young, and if not to be issued will the Government state the reasons for its not fulfilling the promise made to the Athletic Club as above stated.

*

The Acting Colonial Secretary and His Excellency replied.

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE LAW IN RESPECT OF THE SALE OF SHARES IN COMPANIES REGISTERED UNDER THE COMPANIES ORDINANCES 1865 TO 1886 AND IN OTHER JOINT STOCK COMPANIES."-The Honourable J. J. KESWICK moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Honourable Ho KAI Seconded.

The Honourable P. RYRIE moved as an amendment that the Bill be recommitted.

The Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD seconded.

The Council divided on the amendment when it was rejected by eight to two votes.

The Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD moved as an amendment that the Bill be read that day three months.

This motion was not seconded.

Question-that the Bill be read a third time and passed-put and agreed to on a division by a majority of nine to one.

Bill read a third time and passed.

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44.

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE WIDOWS' AND ORPHANS' PENSIONS ORDINANCE, 1890."-The Council agreed to postpone further consideration of the Bill in Committee.

BILL ENTITLED "THE OPIUM ORDINANCE, 1891."-The Acting Attorney General moved the first reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED " AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE SUNDAY CARGO-WORKING ORDINANCE, 1891."- The Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD moved the first reading of the Bill.

The Honourable P. RYRIE seconded.

Question--put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED "THE SUPPLEMENTARY APPROPRIATION BILL, 1890."-The Council resumed consideration of the Bill in Committee.

Council resumed and Bill reported without amendment.

The Acting Colonial Secretary moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Acting Attorney General seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned till Friday, the 31st July, at 3 P.M.

Read and confirmed, this 31st day of July, 1891.

A. M. THOMSON,

Acting Clerk of Councils.

G. DIGBY BARKER,

Officer Administering the Government.

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LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 16.

FRIDAY, 31ST JULY, 1891.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE OFFICER ADMINISTERING THE GOVERNMENT Major-General G. DIGBY BARKER, C.B.

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

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the Acting Attorney General, (ANDREW JOHN LEACH).

the Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART LOCKHART). the Colonial Treasurer, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES ). the Surveyor General, (SAMUEL BROWN).

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

The Honourable PHINEAS RYRIE.

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ABSENT:

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

}

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 24th July, 1891, were read and confirmed. The Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD asked the following questions:—

Will the Government lay upon the table copies of Lord Knutsford's despatch, dated 16th October last, to the Officer Administering the Government on the subject of inserting in all Govern- ment contracts a provision that work under such contracts shall not be carried out on Sundays except in very urgent cases, copies of the Honourable F. Fleming's despatch in reply, and copies of Sir Wm. Des Voeux's despatch to the Right Honourable the Secretary of State, dated 20th February last, on the same question?

His Excellency replied and laid on the table Secretary of State's Despatch No. 234 of the 16th October, 1890.

The Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD moved the following resolution :-

That in view of His Excellency Governor Des Voeux's Minutes, dated the 3rd and 14th April, 1891, and of the opinions expressed therein, and as it is impossible for non-professional men to decide between the designs of the Honourable the Surveyor General and the designs of Mr. H. W. Wills, or to determine as to the best method of dealing with a work of such im- portance as the proposed New Central Market, a Commission be appointed with full power to call for papers, to examine professional and other witnesses, and to report to the Council on the whole subject.

The resolution was not seconded.

BILL ENTITLED "THE ARMS CONSOLIDATION ORDINANCE, 1891."-The Acting Attorney General moved the first reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED "THE MERCHANT SHIPPING CONSOLIDATION ORDINANCE, 1891."-The Acting Attorney General moved the first reading of the Bill.-

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE WIDOWS' AND ORPHANS' PENSIONS ORDINANCE, 1890."-The Council agreed to postpone further consideration of the Bill till next meeting.

BILL ENTITLED "THE OPIUM ORDINANCE, 1891."-The Council agreed to postpone further con- sideration of the Bill till next meeting.

BILL ENTITLED " AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE SUNDAY CARGO-WORKING ORDINANCE, 1891."- The Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD moved the second reading of the Bill.

The Honourable HO KAI seconded.

The Council divided when the motion was rejected by seven to two votes.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned till Monday, the 17th August, at 3 P.M.

Read and confirmed, this 17th day of August, 1891.

A. M. THOMSON,

Acting Clerk of Councils.

G. DIGBY BARKER, Officer Administering the Government.

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LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 17.

MONDAY, 17TH AUGUST, 1891.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE OFFICER ADMINISTERING THE GOVERNMENT (Major-General G. DIGBY BARKER, C.B.).

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

the Acting Attorney General, (ANDREW JOHN LEACH).

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the Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART LOCKHART).

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the Colonial Treasurer, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES).

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the Surveyor General, (SAMUEL Brown).

PHINEAS RYRIE.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

ABSENT:

The Honourable CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 31st July, 1891, were read and confirmed. PAPERS LAID ON THE TABLE.-The Acting Colonial Secretary, by direction of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government, laid on the table the following papers, viz.:-

Despatch from the Secretary of State No. 144 of the 1st July, 1891.

The Census Report, 1891.

The Honourable HO KAI gave notice that at next meeting of Council he would move the first reading of a Bill entitled An Ordinance for the Incorporation of the Senior Missionary in Hongkong of the London Missionary Society.

The Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD asked the following question :-

Will the Government lay upon the table copies of the Reports of the Honourable the Surveyor General and of Mr. H. W. Wills in re the proposed new Central Market Building, copies of the Minutes of His Excellency Governor Sir G. W. Des Voeux dated 3rd and 14th April, 1891, and copies of the replies of the Honourable the Surveyor General to the said minutes and to the Reports of Mr. Wills.

His Excellency replied.

BILL ENTITLED "THE ARMS CONSOLIDATION ORDINANCE, 1891."-The Acting Attorney General moved that the Bill be read a second time.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded. Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council went into Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed and Bill reported without amendment.

The Acting Attorney General moved that the Bill be read a third time.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do

Bill passed.

pass.

BILL ENTITLED "THE MERCHANT SHIPPING CONSOLIDATION ORDINANCE, 1891."-The Acting Attorney General moved that the Bill be read a second time.

The Honourable P. RYRIE seconded.

Question--put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

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BILL ENTITLED

"AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE WIDOWS' AND ORPHANS' PENSIONS ORDINANCE, 1890."-Council went into Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed and Bill reported with amendments.

The Acting Attorney General moved that the Standing Orders be suspended. The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

The Acting Attorney General moved that the Bill be read a third time.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

ADJOURNMENT.—The Council then adjourned till Monday, the 5th October, at 3 P.M.

Read and confirmed, this 15th day of October, 1891.

A. M. THOMSON, Acting Clerk of Councils.

G. DIGBY BARKER,

Officer Administering the Government.

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 18.

THURSDAY, 15TH OCTOBER, 1891.

49

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE OFFICER ADMINISTERING THE GOVERNMENT (Major-General G. DIGBY BARKER, C.B.).

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

the Acting Attorney General, (ANDREW JOHN Leach).

the Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART LOCKHART).

the Colonial Treasurer, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES).

the Acting Surveyor General, (FRANCIS ALFRED COOPER). PHINEAS RYRIE.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

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HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

ABSENT:

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

The Honourable CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Honourable F. A. COOPER, Acting Surveyor General, took the oath of allegiance on his appointment to a seat on the Council.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 17th August, 1891, were read and confirmed. His Excellency then addressed the Council as follows:--

HONOURABLE Gentlemen,

We meet again to-day to resume our common labours in the interests of this Colony, and though the time is probably short during which I shall retain the privilege of co-operating with you, there are several measures demanding early con- sideration which I hope we may succeed in passing and, in doing so, further the good of this Community.

This Council, and, I feel sure the community at large, will regret with me the sad death of one of our Members who has been so suddenly cut off in the midst of his career.

In the late Surveyor General the Colony possessed a zealous and hard- working official, and his kindness of heart secured for him the friendship of many during his comparatively brief connection with Hongkong.

Since we last met a change has taken place in the Governorship, and I think that

Vœux you will all agree with me that in losing Sir WILLIAM DES VEUX this Colony has lost the able services of one who was thoroughly imbued with the desire to promote the best interests of the Colony, and who achieved at least as large a measure of success in that direction as any of his predecessors—if not larger.

You all join with me, I know, in hoping that the change to an invigorating climate will restore to him that health the failure of which unfortunately compelled him to relinquish this Government.

Of the measures to which I have alluded a few have already been under your consideration, others have been prepared and will be immediately introduced, while some are still in course of preparation.

As regards the Opium Ordinance, which was read a first time shortly before our vacation, circumstances have since shown the desirability of continuing to keep separate as heretofore the law as regards Raw and Prepared Opium respectively, which it was proposed by the Bill to amalgamate.

That Bill will therefore be withdrawn and two new Ordinances will be at once introduced dealing separately with these two matters-a course which will, I hope, facilitate the rapid passing of both measures which it is important should become law at an early date.

I have every reason to hope that if the Government is supported in its efforts to stop the smuggling of prepared opium into this Colony, the revenue on this head will not only be maintained but may be largely increased.

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The Ordinance to amend the law relating to Bankruptcy passed its second reading as long ago as last December. It has since received the careful consideration of the Law Committee to whom it was referred, and is now ready to be dealt with by you.

The Merchant Shipping Consolidation Bill, which was read a second time at our last meeting, will doubtless have received during the recess the close attention of those who are specially affected by its provisions; and, as it is important that no more delay than is necessary should take place in passing it, it will be placed before you again immediately.

Of the Bills which have been prepared to be brought before you perhaps none is more desirable in the commercial interests of the Colony than the Chinese Emigration Consolidation Ordinance.

The continuous flow of emigration through this Colony is a large factor in the prosperity of the Port, and it is to be regretted that it has been from various circumstances so much checked of late.

I am informed by Officers of the Government who have given attention to the subject, that this is in a large extent due to the absence of satisfactory arrangements for the proper treatment of Emigrants from the time of their leaving their native homes to the time of their return to China.

The measure which will be placed before you has as its object the improvement of the status of the Emigrant, so far as the Government of this Colony can improve it, and it is hoped that, by placing Emigration on a satisfactory footing, it will benefit the Commerce of the Port.

Other measures which will be brought before you are:---

1. A Patent Ordinance for amending the Law relating to the grant in

this Colony of Letters Patent for Inventions.

2. An Ordinance for the Incorporation of the Senior Missionary in Hong-

kong of the London Missionary Society.

3. An Ordinance to amend the Building Ordinance.

4. A St. John's Church Ordinance for providing for the future maintenance and administration of the Cathedral, consequent upon the abolition of the post of Colonial Chaplain and the altered status of the Church of England in this Colony.

5. A Volunteer Ordinance.

The defence works of the Colony being now practically completed and armed, the question of increasing the force of Volunteers and placing them on a more effi- cient and satisfactory footing has become urgent.

The Machine Guns ordered from England have arrived, and I shall have to invite the revival of the interest of the residents in the Colony in the matter of auxiliary defence, about which enthusiasm has recently flagged. The difficulties in arranging for the promised reinforcement of regular troops have now been got over, and there is every reason to believe that the Garrison will soon be completed to its full establishment, but the need for an efficient system of Volunteers is still great.

With regard to the question of affording further space for the interment of Chinese which has occupied the attention of the Government for some time past, and at which the present Colonial Treasurer, while acting as Registrar General, and the Registrar General since his return from leave, have worked with much energy, it has at last been found possible to devise means to carry out this very necessary object by resorting to the Chinese practise of exhumation and "urning" of the bones.

I have not ceased to use my best endeavours to induce the High Chinese Authorities of the neighbouring Province to suppress gambling in the Chinese towns and villages on our borders, which has increased with the diminution of the vice in this Colony produced by the Gambling Ordinance which you recently passed.

My representations have been met by the Chinese authorities with a laudable desire to co-operate, and stringent measures have been taken by them to attain the desired object, but I regret to say that the main difficulty in totally suppressing the evil there, arises from the shelter and facilities afforded to the gamblers by the neighbourhood of Hongkong and the easy means of transport. The earnest attention of the Government is being directed to this phase of the matter.

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On the other hand it may interest you to learn that from a report furnished me by the Police Magistrate, the effect of the new Gambling Ordinance here has been most satisfactory, as evidenced not only by the total suppression of the gambling houses but by the consequent diminution of all classes of crime.

The Commission appointed under the Squatters Ordinance is continuing the labours of the Commission appointed, previous to the Ordinance, to enquire into the claims of the original Squatters in this Colony, but recent experiences have shewn that not only the question of original Squatters but that of Squatters in general, requires immediate attention, and the whole subject is under the consider- ation of the Government.

The construction of the Gap Rock Lighthouse has satisfactorily progressed, and I hope that in a few months it will reach completion. In the meantime arrangements have been made for establishing a temporary light on the rock which is already in operation.

At the instance of the Chamber of Commerce a proposal has been submitted to the Secretary of State for the Colonies for connecting the Lighthouse with Victoria by a telegraph cable. It is expected that definite arrangements will shortly be concluded for carrying out this work, which, with the concurrence of the Inspector General of Chinese Imperial Customs, is considered to be an essential adjunct to the Lighthouse, and you will then be asked to approve of the continuance of the special Gap Rock Light Dues for such period as will be necessary to cover the cost of it which is estimated at about $86,000.

A further improvement in the lighting of the approaches to this Harbour is to be looked for in the near future in the erection of a Lighthouse in the Island of Waglan. Steps have been already taken with that object in view by the Chinese Government.

From despatches which have been already laid before you, you have been made aware of the decision to commence the construction of a New Gaol, which is rendered necessary by the extremely overcrowded state of the existing Prison.

Great difficulty has been experienced in selecting a site for a wing of what will ultimately be an entirely new Gaol. As the new Prison must be built with a view of serving its purpose for a great many years to come, it is not easy to find a site which is at once easy of access from the town, large enough to admit of future extensions, which will inevitably become necessary with the growth of population, and free from sanitary objections. It is, moreover, of course desirable to avoid placing such a building in a position where it would be likely to interfere with the extension of the residential suburbs of the town.

I have given this matter much consideration, and I hope soon to be in a position to settle the question.

A public work which though small in itself is still one of very considerable importance has lately been commenced in the Vaccine Institute.

You are all aware how important a precaution against epidemic disease vaccination is in a Colony like this, and it was the failure of the supply of lymph in 1887 which first drew the attention of Sir WILLIAM DES VEUX to the subject of the desirability of establishing in the Colony a permanent source of vaccine lymph supply. Much time and labour was spent by the Colonial Veterinary Surgeon in making experiments with a view to the cultivation in the Colony of vaccine lymph, and these were so successful that the Sanitary Board strongly recommended the establishment of a Vaccine Institute.

A site having been selected on the recommendation of the Sanitary Board, work on the building-which, with furniture, &c., is estimated to cost $3,500-was commenced a short time ago, further delay being very undesirable as it is necessary that the Institute should be in working order by November as the lymph can only be cultivated in the cool season.

A detailed statement of all the works which it is proposed to undertake in the ensuing year will shortly be submitted to you in connection with the Estimates.

I may mention one of these which is likely to be of special interest to you inasmuch as it will prove a boon to the Community at large. I allude to the proposed extension of the accommodation at the Civil Hospital for private paying patients.

The able management of the Hospital and the high efficiency of the trained Nursing Staff have rendered the Institution deservedly popular.

A limit has at the same time been placed on the amount of such accommoda- tion to be offered, and the question of increasing the fees is under consideration.

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Proposals will also be submitted to you for the construction of new roads both in this Island and in Kowloon.

I have received by telegraph the approval of the Secretary of State of the scheme for the extension of the Recreation Ground and Sanitary Improvements at the Happy Valley, and this work which is calculated to prove of great advantage to the public will be at once taken in hand.

Sanction of the Secretary of State has also been obtained for proceeding with the construction of the Central Market.

I have, in consultation with the Executive Council, been recently considering the method by which the licensing of Jinrickshas has hitherto been conducted, and a change is in contemplation by which, I believe, not only will considerable improve- ment be introduced into the vehicles themselves and the regulation of their traffic, but a considerable increase to the revenue will result, while the interests of existing licensees will be duly protected.

The Estimates for the coming year are in an advanced state of preparation and will be shortly laid before you. I think I may say that the financial position of the Colony is hopeful as indicated by the statistics which they will afford.

You will learn with satisfaction that as far as can be foreseen at present the ordinary Revenue of the current year together with Premia on Land sales will fully realize the original estimate, while the probable expenditure (ordinary and extraordinary) will fall short of the estimated sum by about $200,000. The originally estimated deficit, on the year, of $451,000 is therefore reduced to $250,000, a sum which so far as present estimates show can be defrayed out of existing balances.

It is a matter of congratulation that not only has the revenue of the year thus been sufficient to cover the ordinary expenditure, including the increased Military Contribution both for this year and last year, and the increased salaries, but also to leave a balance of $250,000 towards defraying the cost of Extraordinary Public Works, now estimated to amount for the year to $500,000. I should mention that the probable revenue for the current year is now estimated at $2,039,042 or an increase of over $27,000 on that of the year 1890.

It has been advocated for a considerable time past that, in view of the large number of Public Works in progress or in immediate contemplation, to the cost of which future residents in the Colony might be fairly required to contribute, e.g. the New Central Market, the New Gaol, New Roads, &c., a Loan should be raised, and the Secretary of State for the Colonies has intimated his readiness to consider the question. I have, therefore, fully considered the matter with this result.

The cost of the Public Works which are likely to be urgently required to be constructed during the next five years may be roughly estimated at two million and a half of dollars, or an expenditure of $500,000 a year, which is also, I have ascertained, about the limit which the Public Works Department have on the average the means of carrying out, though for various reasons it is often necessary to exceed that total in estimating for the year's services.

With a revenue already yearly increasing and likely to be considerably increased by works now in course of erection, or about to be erected, which will be of a remunerative character, as well as from causes which I have already touched upon, we may fairly assume from the experience of the present year that a con- siderable proportion of this extraordinary expenditure may be defrayed out of the ordinary revenue and premia on land sales. What that proportion may be, or whether indeed the whole may not be so met, depends very much on the develop- ment of events during the next few months.

I, therefore, think it well to postpone taking any immediate action in this direction.

The returns of shipping for the past nine months show a satisfactory progress. Although last year was phenomenal in the activity displayed in the shipping trade, the returns being the largest yet made since the Colony has been in existence, and the total of arrivals and departures having exceeded by a million tons the corresponding figures for 1889, yet the arrivals in Ocean trade alone during the first nine months of this year have exceeded those of the corresponding period of 1890 by 86 ships with a registered tonnage of 134,545 tons.

In conclusion, I congratulate you on such trustworthy evidence of the increas- ing prosperity of this Colony, as is furnished by these statistics as well as by the remarkable results of the Census to which I previously invited

your attention."

May our efforts in this Council ke always aimed at, and be successful in secur- ing, a continued increase of that prosperity and the welfare of all.

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PAPERS LAID ON THE TABLE.-The Acting Colonial Secretary, by direction of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government, laid on the table the following papers, viz. :—

Despatches from the Secretary of State Nos. 175 and 178 of 1891, on the subject of the Military Contribution and No. 155 of 1891 together with copy of telegraphic despatch dated the 17th July, 1891, on the subject of the appointment of a Chinese Consul in Hongkong.

VOTES REFERRED TO THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Acting Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government, laid on the table the following Minutes and moved that they be referred to the Finance Committee:---

C.S.O.

2152 of 1891.

C.S.O. 2085 of 1891.

C.S.O.

1866 of 1891.

C.S.O.

1562 of 1891.

C.S.O. 1704 of 1891.

C.S.O.

120 of 1891.

G. DIGBY BARKER.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Three hundred and Twenty Dollars, ($320), as a Compassionate Allowance to the Widow and children of CHEONG LOI, late First Shroff in the Colonial Treasury.

Government House, Hongkong, 6th October, 1891.

G. DIGBY BARKER.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of One thousand and Ninety-two Dollars, ($1,092), as a Compassionate Allowance to the children of the late Mr. A. M. PLACE, Senior Marine Officer in the General Post Office, in consideration of their father's twenty-one years' service.

Government House, Hongkong, 16th September, 1891.

G. DIGBY Barker.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of One thousand and Six hundred Dollars, ($1,600), for general repairs to the Government Marine Surveyor's Launch Hilda, and providing a launch while the repairs are being executed.

Government House, Hongkong, 29th August, 1891.

G. DIGBY BARKER.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Three thousand Dollars, ($3,000), for the repair of St. John's Cathedral Church.

Government House, Hongkong, 11th August, 1891.

G. DIGBY BARKER.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Seven thousand and Thirty-seven Dollars, ($7,037), for the repairs to damages caused by the Storm on the 18th and 19th instant, to the Praya wall and roadway in Yaumati, in front of Lots Nos. 215 and 218.

Government House, Hongkong, 29th August, 1891.

G. Digby BARKER.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Three thousand and Five hundred Dollars, ($3,500), for building the Vaccine Institute.

Government House, Hongkong, 2nd October, 1891.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

The Acting Attorney General laid on the table the Report of the Law Committee upon a Bill entitled An Ordinance to amend the Law relating to Bankruptcy, and gave notice that at next Meeting of Council he would move that the Bill be read a third time.

STANDING COMMITTEES :-His Excellency appointed the Finance Committee to consist of all the Members of Council, except the Governor, with the Colonial Secretary as Chairman; the Law Com- mittee to consist of the Attorney General as Chairman, the Colonial Secretary, the Registrar General, Honourable J. J. KESWICK, and Honourable Ho Kar; and the Public Works Cominittee to consist of the Surveyor General as Chairman with other members to be named at next Meeting of Council.

Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD asked the following questions:-

(1.) Will the Government luy on the table a statement shewing,--

(1) The amount of monies received from Marine Lot holders and others on account

of the Praya Reclamation Fund;

(2) Mode of investment of the fund;

(3) The payments thereout to 30th ultimo and on what specific accounts, particu-

larizing:-

a. Payments to Contractors;

b. Payments for plant, materials, Sc.; also a detailed report shewing

the progress of and the actual condition of the work.

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The Acting Colonial Secretary replied.

(2.) Have contracts been entered into for the execution of work on any sections other than those now in hand, and if not, is it intended to proceed with any other sections within the ensu- ing year.

The Acting Surveyor General replied.

(3.) Will the Government lay on the table a copy of Lord Knutsford's Despatch of 26th March, 1891, to His Excellency Governor Sir William Des Voeux in connection with the appoint- ment of a Chinese Consul in Hongkong, and a copy of Governor Sir Wm. Des Voeux's reply thereto, also a copy of Lord Knutsford's Despatch of 7th July, 1891, as well as a copy of His Lordship's Despatch confirming his telegram to His Excellency The Officer Administering the Government received here on 18th July last, intimating that the proposed probationary appointment of a Chinese Consul for this Colony had been with- drawn.

(4.) Will the Government lay on the table a copy of any correspondence which may have been received from the Right Honourable the Secretary of State for the Colonies in connection with the Protest of the Un-official Members of this Honourable Council against the action of His Excellency Governor Sir Wm. des Voeux in issuing his warrant without the authority of this Council on the 21st February, 1891, for the payment of the equivalent of £20,000 sterling additional Military Contribution exacted from this Colony for the year 1890.

His Excellency replied.

The Registrar General laid on the table "Bye-laws made by the Sanitary Board on the 6th August, 1891, under sub-section 18 of section 13 of Ordinance No. 24 of 1887, as amended by Ordinance No. 12 of 1891," and moved that they be approved by the Council.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

BILLS ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE TO REPEAL ORDINANCES No. 1 OF 1884 AND No. 17 OF 1886 AND TO AMEND THE LAW RELATING TO THE PREPARATION OF OPIUM,” AND AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND ORDINANCE No. 22 or 1887."-The Acting Attorney General moved the first reading of these Bills.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bills read a first time.

The Acting Attorney General moved the suspension of the Standing Orders.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

The Acting Attorney General moved the second reading of these Bills.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bills read a second time.

BILL ENTITLED " AN ORDINANCE FOR THE INCORPORATION OF THE SENIOR MISSIONARY IN HONG- KONG OF THE LONDON MISSIONARY SOCIETY."-The Honourable HO KAI moved the first reading of the Bill.

The Honourable P. RYRIE seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED "THE MERCHANT SHIPPING CONSOLIDATION ORDINANCE, 1891."-Committee on the Bill was postponed till next meeting of Council.

ADJOURNMENT.—The Council then adjourned till Monday, the 19th October, at 3 P.M.

Read and confirmed, this 19th day of October, 1891.

A. M. THOмson, Acting Clerk of Councils.

G. DIGBY BARKER, Officer Administering the Government.

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LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 19.

MONDAY, 19TH OCTOBER, 1891.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE OFFICER ADMINISTERING THE GOVERNMENT (Major-General G. DIGBY BARKER, C.B.).

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

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the Acting Attorney General, (ANDREW JOHN LEACH).

the Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE STEWart Lockhart). the Colonial Treasurer, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES). the Acting Surveyor General, (FRANCIS ALFRED COOPER). PHINEAS RYRIE.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

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2)

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

ABSENT:

The Honourable CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 15th October, 1891, were read and confirmed. His Excellency named the Members of the Public Works Committee as follows:-

The Surveyor General, (Chairman)..

The Colonial Secretary.

Honourable C. P. CHATER.

Honourable J. J. KESWICK.

Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD.

PAPERS LAID ON THE TABLE.-The Acting Colonial Secretary, by direction of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government, laid on the table Despatch from the Secretary of State, No. 212 of 1891, on the subject of the Sunday Cargo-Working Ordinance, and a Statement on the subject of the Praya Reclamation.

VOTES REFERRED TO THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Acting Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government, laid on the table the following Minutes and moved that they be referred to the Finance Committee:-

C.S.O.

2292 of 1891.

C.S.0.

2016 & 2292

G. DIGBY BARKER.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Fifty thousand Dollars, ($50,000), being Government share for the Praya Reclamation.

(Amount already paid $50,000.)

Government House, Hongkong, 13th October, 1891.

G. DIGBY BARKER.

2

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Seven of 1891. thousand Six hundred Dollars, ($7,600), for the Construction of Quarters for the Superin-

tendent, Botanical and Afforestation Department.

C.S.O.

1605 of 1891.

C.O. Desp. 20% of 1801.

Government House, Hongkong, 13th October, 1891.

G. DIGBY BARKER.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Two hundred and Forty Dollars, ($240), for Conveyance Allowance to the Superintendent, and First Clerk of the Imports and Exports Office. From 1st March to 31st December, 1891, at

the rate of $12 per month, each.

Government House, Hongkong, 14th October, 1891.

G. DIGBY BARKER.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Two hundred and Eighty-eight Dollars, ($288), to cover the increase to the Salary of the First Clerk and Accountant in the Police Departinent, being 35% instead of 20% over his pay, as previously sanctioned.

Government House, Hongkong, 14th October, 1891.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question--put and agreed to.

56

VOTES PASSED BY

Votes passed by THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Acting Colonial Secretary, by direction of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government, laid on the table the Report of the Finance Committee, dated the 15th October, (No. 9), and moved that the following Votes referred to therein. be passed, viz. :-

C.S.O.

2152 of 1891.

C.S.O.

2085 of 1891.

C.S.O.

1866 of 1891.

C.S.O.

1562 of 1891.

C.S.O.

1704 of 1891.

C.S.O.

A sum of Three hundred and Twenty Dollars; as a Compassionate Allowance to the Widow and children of CHEONG LOI, lafe First Shroff in the Colonial Treasury,

A sum of One thousand and Ninety-two Dollars, as a Compassionate Allowance to the children of the late Mr. A. M. PLACÉ, Senior Marine Officer in the General Post Office,

A sum of One thousand and Six hundred Dollars, for general repairs to the Government Marine Surveyor's Launch Hilda, and providing a launch while the repairs are being executed,

320.00

$ 1,092.00

$ 1,600.00

A sum of Three thousand Dollars, for the repair of St. John's Cathedral Church,...$ 3,000.00 -

A sum of Seven thousand and Thirty-seven Dollars, for the repairs to damages caused by the Storm on the 18th and 19th instant, to the Praya wall and roadway in Yaumati,.in front of Lots Nos. 215 and 218,...

120 of 1891. A sum of Three thousand and Five hundred Dollars, for building the Vaccine

Institute,

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.*

$ 7,037.00

$ 3,500.00

Question-put and agreed to.

Votes passed.

The Honourable P. RYRIE in the absence of the Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD asked the follow- ing questions:-

(1.) In view of the continued existence of public gambling houses in Chinese Kowloon, which have •

been for a considerable time and still are a very serious cause of annoyance and injury to the inhabitants of this British Colony and tend to render inoperative recent legislation in. Hongkong against gambling, will the Government lay upon the table a copy of their correspondence with the Imperial Chinese Government on the subject of Public Gambling in Chinese Kowloon.

(2.) Is it true that the Government have remitted the fines inflicted by the Police Magistrate on the Contractor who had on divers days during last month in certain Streets-The Praya, Queen's Road, and Ice House Lane placed or caused to be placed large quantities of stones whereby the Queen's common highways were obstructed, and if such fines have been remitted on what grounds has it been done.

(3.) Is it correct as stated in the "Daily Press of the 29th September last, that the Military Authorities take over full control of Stonecutters' Island at the beginning of next month (October 1891), after which date no Civilians will be in charge of or employed at any Department on the Island as has been the case hitherto, if so, who is now in charge of the Government Gunpowder Depôt on Stonecutters' Island.

(4.) Has the place formerly set apart to be a Lazaretto viz.: "That part of the northern shore of

Stonecutters' Island which is bounded and contained by a line of yellow posts" been abandoned; if so what place if any has been substituted therefor; or what provision has Government made for the suitable detention and seclusion of passengers and other persons arriving in the waters of the Colony in vessels subject to Quarantine.

The Acting Colonial Secretary replied.

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE FOR THE INCORPORATION OF THE SENIOR MISSIONARY IN HONG- KONG OF THE LONDON MISSIONARY SOCIETY."-The Honourable Ho KAI moved the second reading of the Bill.

The Honourable P. RYRIE seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council went into Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed.

57

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE LAW RELATING TO BANKRUPTCY."-The Acting Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded. Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

-

Question put that this Bill do Bill passed.

pass.

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE TO REPEAL ORDINANCES No. 1 of 1884 AND No. 17 OF 1880 AND TO AMEND THE LAW RELATING TO THE PREPARATION OF OPIUM.”—Council went into Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed.

BILL ENTITLED

"AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND, ORDINANCE No. 22 of 1887."-Council went into Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed and Bill reported with amendments.

·

BILL ENTITLED "THE MERCHANT SHIPPING CONSOLIDATION ORDINANCE, 1891. the Bill was postponed.

1891."

Committee on

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned till Monday, the 26th October, at 3 P.M.

Read and confirmed, this 26th day of October, 1891.

A. M. THOMSON,

Acting Clerk of Councils.

G. DIGBY BARKER, Officer Administering the Government.

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 20.

MONDAY, 26TH OCTOBER, 1891.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE OFFICER ADMINISTERING THE GOVERNMENT (Major-General G. DIGBY BARKER, C.B.).

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

2,

""

""

""

the Acting Attorney General, (ANDREW JOHN LEACH).

the Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART LOCKHART). the Colonial Treasurer, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES).

the Acting Surveyor General, (FRANCIS ALFRED COOPER). PHINEAS RYRIE.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

ABSENT:

The Honourable CATCHICK PAUL CHATer.

25

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 19th October, 1891, were read and confirmed.

59

VOTES REFERRED TO THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Acting Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government, laid on the table the following Minutes and moved that they be referred to the Finance Committee:-

C.5.0.

2237 of 1891.

G. DIGBY BARKER.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Six hundred and Seventy-nine Dollars and Twenty-nine Cents, ($679.29), for the purchase of a Nordenfelt Gun on tripod mounting, and 1,000 rounds of ammunition.

Government House, Hongkong, 26th October, 1891.

G. DIGBY BARKER.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Six hundred and Forty Dollars, ($640), to provide for the Salaries and Uniform.for 4 Chinese Constables for Cemeteries-omitted in the Estimates for 1891.

SANITARY DEPARTMENT.

Personal Emoluments.

4 Chinese Constables for Cemeteries,..

Uniform for 4 Chinese Constables,

528.00

Other Charges.

112.00

....

""

640.00

Government House, Hongkong, 23rd October, 1891.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

VOTES PASSED BY THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Acting Colonial Secretary, by direction of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government, laid on the table the Report of the Finance Committee, dated the 19th October, (No. 10), and moved that the following Votes referred to therein be passed, viz.:-

C.S.O.

2292 of 1891. A sum of Fifty thousand Dollars, being Government share for the Praya Re-

clamation,

.$50,000.00

C.S.0.

2016 & 2292 of 1891.

A sum of Seven thousand Six hundred Dollars, for the Construction of Quarters

* for the Superintendent, Botanical and Afforestation Department,

$ 7,600.00

· C.5.0.

1605 of 1891.

A sum of Two hundred and Forty Dollars, for Conveyance Allowance to the

Superintendent, and First Clerk of the Imports and Exports Office,

240.00

C.O. Desp.

206 of 1891.

A sum of Two hundred and Eighty-eight Dollars, to cover the increase to the Salary of the First Clerk and Accountant in the Police Department, .................

288.00

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Votes passed.

י

60.

:

The Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD asked the following questions:-

(1.) In view of the statement, made by His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government, at the last Meeting of Council, to the effect that further delay in the matter of the proposed New Central Market involves large and continual loss to the Revenue such delay must certainly be avoided, will the tiovernment lay upon the table a report shewing the amount of work done to the said proposed New Market since 17th August last to 30th September,. 1891, and its present condition, and inform the Council-

(1) If plans and designs for the proposed New Central Market have been decided

upon;

(2) If so, which have been selected-whether those of the Honourable the Surveyor General which were disapproved of by Sir Wm. Des Voeux, or those of the professional Architect (Mr. H. W. Wills) sent out from England to Hong- kong at the request of this Government by the Crown Agents, prepared by him at the special request of Sir Wm. Des Voeux;

(3) Has Chang Kee's tender referred to in the Resolution of the Honourable J. J. Keswick of 21st July last, or the tender of any other contractor for the superstructure or building of the proposed New Central Market over the foundations been accepted;

(4) If so, what is the amount of the tender accepted; and

(5) Whether the plans and detailed statements have been prepared for the whole building complete in every respect, or whether the objectionable system has again been followed of preparing plans, etc., for only a part or portion and leaving the additional aggregate cost a totally unknownì quantity.

(2.) Will the Government lay on the table a complete statement or return of the amount of monies expended to 30th September, 1891, and the sums then due although not expended—

(1) In the purchase of the site for the proposed New Central Market; (2) In the preparation of the ground and foundations ; ànd .

(3) Of all other expenditure including the cost of bringing out from London to Hongkong and the salary of the Architect (Mr. H. W. Wills), the return to shew the dates of disbursements and the loss in interest to the Rate-payers on the respective amounts to 30th ultimo, also an estimate of the total monies still required to complete the work, and the probable date of completion.

(3.) With reference to the statement of the Honourable the Surveyor General at a meeting of the Finance Committee on the 11th December, 1890, to the effect that the Civil Hospital Staff Quarters or the residence for the Assistant Surgeon, Apothecary, Nursing Staff and others connected with the hospital, though being built on a larger scale than is perhaps necessary, but then (about ten months ago) nearly completed, will the Government lay on the table a statement or return shewing when the building was completed; if not yet completed, why not; if not completed, the probable date when it will be ready for occupation; the total amount of monies expended to 30th September, 1891, and the sums then due although not actually paid-

(1) In the purchase of the site for the building;

(2) In the preparation of the ground and foundations; and

(3) Of all other expenditure in connection with the building;

also an estimate of the total monies still required, if any, to complete the work.

(4.) Is it intended to utilise or convert any portion of the Civil Hospital Staff Quarters building or palace into an addition of the Civil Hospital, and if so, how much, as recommended by the Un-official Members in their Memorandum addressed to His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government regarding the Estimates for Public Works extraordinary for 1891, and dated 20th December, 1890.

(5.) With reference to the Honourable the Surveyor General's statement at the meeting of Finance Committee held on 11th December last, to the effect that the building to be used as the Lunatic Asylum for Chinese was well advanced, will the Government lay on the table a statement shewing-when the building was completed; if not completed, why not; and when it will be completed; if completed, when was it.occupied; if not occupied, why not; and the total amount of monies expended to 30th September, 1891, in the purchase of the site and the cost of the building, also the sums then due although not actually paid, and an estimate of the further amount, if any, still required to complete the building.

61

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C

2

(6.) Will the Government inform the Council→

(1) Whether the cable to connect the Lighthouse on Gap Rock with Hongkong has :

been ordered;

(2) If so, when will it be laid;

4

(3) What is the total amount of monies actually expended including the cost of the "Fame," in connection with the construction of the Lighthouse works on Gap Rock to 30th September, 1891;

(4) The sums due on 30th ultimo although not actually paid; and

(5) An estimate of the further amount of money still required to complete the work,

and the probable date of completion.

(7.) Will the Government lay upon the table a statement shewing the actual total amount of money expended to 30th September, 1891, in the purchase of the site, the preparation of founda- tions, and the construction of the Slaughter-House and Sheep and Pig Depôts, the sums then due although not actually paid, and an estimate of the further amount of money still required to complete the building, also the probable date of completion; and

Will the Government give the Council similar information and particulars regarding the following works:-

Site for proposed New Western Market;

Shaukiwan Market;

Cattle Depôt Extension.;

Public Laundries ;

·Public Latrines ;

Police Stations at Aberdeen;

at Quarry Bay;

at Kennedy Town;

· District Schools;

Quarters for the Superintendent of the Botanical and Afforestation Department;

Training Albany Nullah and New Roads and Preparatory Work Kennedy Road Sites; The reconstruction of the Praya Bridge over Bowrington Canal and improvements on

Recreation Ground, Happy Valley.

(8.) Will the Government lay on the table a nominal return of all officers and others now employed in the Honourable the Surveyor General's Department, with the dates of engagement, terms, and conditions of service, rate of salary, rate of increase and allowances, if any, and a detailed statement of the duties performed by each.

(9.) Will the Government lay upon the table the petition received from the Indian members of the Police Force asking for an increase of pay, and state on what grounds a reasonable increase has been refused seeing that no increase has been granted the Indian portion of the force since it was raised, while the European members have had three increases and the Chinese one increase.

The Acting Colonial Secretary replied.

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE ENACTED BY THE GOVERNOR OF HONGKONG, WITH THE ADVICE AND CONSENT OF THE LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL THEREOF, TO APPLY A SUM NOT EXCEEDING ONE MILLION Seven hundrED AND FIFTY-FIVE THOUSAND ONE HUNDRED AND NINETY-NINE DOLLARS TO THE PUBLIC SERVICE OF THE YEAR 1892."-The Acting Colonial Secretary moved the first reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE FOR THE INCORPORATION OF THE SENIOR MISSIONARY IN HONG- KONG OF THE LONDON MISSIONARY SOCIETY."-Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed and Bill reported without amendment.

The Honourable HO KAI moved the third reading of the Bill.

Honourable P. RYRIE seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE TO REPEAL ORDINANCES No. 1 OF 1884 AND No. 17 of 1886 AND TO AMEND the Law RELATING TO THE PREPARATION OF OPIUM.”—Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resurned and Bill reported with amendments.

:

5

4

62

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND ORDINANCE No. 22 OF 1887."-The Council agreed to postpone the third reading of the Bill.

BILL ENTITLED "THE MERCHANT SHIPPING CONSOLIDATION ORDINANCE, 1891."—Consideration of the Bill was postponed till next meeting.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned till Monday, the 2nd November, at 3 P.M..

+

Read and confirmed; this 2nd day of November, 1891.

A. M. THOMSON,

Acting Clerk of Councils.

G. DIGBY BARKER, Officer Administering the Government.

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 21.

MONDAY, 2ND NOVEMBER, 1891.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE, OFFICER ADMINISTERING THE GOVERNMENT (Major-General G. DIGBY BARKER, C.B.).

J

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

">

"S

>>

""

the Acting Attorney General, (ANDREW JOHN LEACH).

the Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART Lockhart). the Colonial Treasurer, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES). the Acting Surveyor General, (FRANCIS ALFRED COOPER). PHINEAS RYRIE.

Ho KAI, M.B., C.M:

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

ABSENT:

The Honourable CATCHICK PAUL CHATer.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 26th October, 1891, were read and confirmed.

63

VOTE REFERRED TO THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Acting Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government, laid on the table the following Minute and moved that it be referred to the Finance Committee :-

c. 0. Desp. 207 of 1891,

G. DIGBY BARKER.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Six hundred Dollars, ($600), to cover the increase to the salary of the Harbour Master, so as to bring his salary from $4,800 to $5,400 per annum, from 1st January last, as approved by the Secretary of State.

Government House, Hongkong, 27th October, 1891.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question--put and agreed to.

VOTES PASSED BY THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Acting Colonial Secretary, by direction of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government, laid on the table the Report of the Finance Committee, dated the 26th October, (No. 11), and moved that the following Votes referred to therein be passed, viz. :-

A sum of Six hundred and Seventy-nine Dollars and Twenty-nine Cents, for the purchase of a Nordenfelt Gun on tripod mounting, and 1,000 rounds of ammu- nition,

.$ 679.29

C.S.O.

2237 of 1891.

A sum of Six hundred and Forty Dollars, to provide for the Salaries and Uniform

for 4 Chinese Constables for Cemeteries,.

$ 640.00

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Votes passed.

The Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD gave notice that at next meeting of Council he would move the following resolution :--

That in view of the opinions expressed at the meeting of the International Congress of Hygiene and Demography held in London on 11th August last the Government appoint a Commission composed of medical men to investigate and report on the whole subject of Quarantine and Quarantine Regulations and as to the advisability or otherwise of retaining Section 25 in the proposed new Ordinance to consolidate and amend the laws relating to Merchant Shipping. The Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD gave notice that at next meeting of Council he would ask the following questions :-

1. As the place formerly set apart to be a Lazaretto viz. "That part of the northern shore of

Stone-cutlers' Island which is bounded and contained by a line of yellow posts" has been abandoned, the hulk" Hygeia" having as stated in this Council by the Honourable the

:

:

64

Acting Colonial Secretary on 19th October, 1891, been completed and substituted for it, in accordance with arrangements made last year with the concurrence of the Secretary of State, but as this arrangement does not provide for the removal from ships of persons other than these actually suffering from infectious or contagious disease, will the Government inform the Council what provision Government has made, or what provision does Government propose to make, if any, for the suitable detention of passengers and other persons arriving in the waters of the port in vessels subject to Quarantine.

2. Is it the fact that a reduction has been made in the Opium Farmer's monthly payments under existing contracts, and if so to what amount, from what date, and on what grounds has this reduction been made?

3. Referring to Government Notification 384 of 12th September, 1891, under the authority of

what Ordinance or law is the Government proceeding in establishing a Jinricksha Farm Monopoly.

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE ENACTED BY THE GOVERNOR OF HONGKONG, WITH THE ADVICE

·AND CONSENT of the LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL THEREOF, TO APPLY A SUM NOT EXCEEDING TWO MILLIONS FOUR HUNDRED AND TWENTY-SEVEN THOUSAND SEVEN HUNDRED AMD TWENTY-ONE DOLLARS TO THE PUBLIC SERVICE OF THE YEAR 1892."-The Acting Colonial Secretary moved the first reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded. Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE TO REPEAL ORDINANCES No. 1 OF 1884 AND No. 17 OF 1886 AND TO AMEND THE LAW RELATING TO THE PREPARATION OF OPIUM."-The Acting Attorney General moved that the Bill be recommitted.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed and Bill reported with amendments.

The Acting Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

The Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD moved that the Bill be rejected.

The Honourable P. RYRIE seconded.

The Council divided when the motion for the third reading was carried by 6 to 3 votes. Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

BILL ENTITLED “AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND ORDINANCE No. 22 of 1887."-The Acting Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

BILL ENTITLED "THE MERCHANT SHIPPING CONSOLIDATION ORDINANCE, 1891."-Consideration of the Bill was postponed till next meeting.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned till Wednesday, the 4th November, at 3 P.M.

Read and confirmed, this 9th day of November, 1891.

A. M. THOMSON,

Acting Clerk of Councils.

G. DIGBY BARKER, · Officer Administering the Government.

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65

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 22.

MONDAY, 9TH NOVEMBER, 1891.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE OFFICER ADMINISTERING THE GOVERNMENT (Major-General G. DIGBY BARKER, C.B.).

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

""

97

17

the Acting Attorney General, (ANDREW JOHN LEACH).

the Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART LOCKHART).

the Colonial Treasurer, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES).

the Acting Surveyor General, (FRANCIS ALFRED COOPER).·

the Acting Harbour Master, (WILLIAM CHARLES HOLLAND HASTINGS). PHINEAS RYRIE.

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

""

">

""

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

ABSENT:

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

The Honourable JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Acting Harbour Master took the oath of allegiance on his appointment, provisionally, to a seat on the Council.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 2nd November, 1891, were read and confirmed. PAPERS LAID ON THE TABLE.-The Acting Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government, laid on the table the Report of the Acting Superintendent of the Fire Brigade for 1890. (No. 35 of 1891.)

The Registrar General laid on the table and moved that the Council approve of Bye-laws made by the Sanitary Board, under Sub-section 12 of Section 13 of Ordinance No. 12 of 1887, and Sub- section (d.) of Section 1 of Ordinance No. 26 of 1890, and amended by the Board on the 6th of November,

1891.

Honourable Ho Kar seconded. Question-put and agreed to.

VOTE PASSED BY THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Acting Colonial Secretary, by direction of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government, laid on the table the Report of the Finance Committee, dated the 2nd November, (No. 12), and moved that the following Vote referred to therein be passed, viz.:-

of 1891.

200. Dep. A sum of Six hundred Dollars to cover the increase to the salary of the Harbour Master, so as to bring his salary from $4,800 to $5,400 per annum, from 1st January last, as approved by the Secretary of State,....

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Vote passed.

The Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD moved the following resolution:

600.00

That in view of the opinions expressed at the meeting of the International Congress of Hygiene and Demography held in London on 11th August last the Government appoint a Commission composed of medical men to investigate and report on the whole subject of Quarantine and Quarantine Regulations and as to the advisability or otherwise of retaining Section 25 in the proposed new Ordinance to consolidate and amend the laws relating to Merchant Shipping. Hon. P. RYRIE seconded.

His Excellency addressed the Council and the resolution was withdrawn. The Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD asked the following questions:-

""

1. As the place formerly set apart to be a Lazaretto, viz., "That part of the northern shore of

"Stone-cutters' İsland which is bounded and contained by a line of yellow posts has been abandoned, the hulk "Hygeia" having as stated in this Council by the Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary on 19th October, 1891, been completed and substituted for it, in accordance with arrangements made last year with the concurrence of the Secretary of State, but as this arrangement does not provide for the removal from ships of persons other than those actually suffering from infectious or contagious disease, will the Government inform the Council what provision Government has made, or what provision does Government propose to make, if any, for the suitable detention of passenger's and other persons arriving in the waters of the port in vessels subject to Quarantine.

4

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2. Is it the fact that a reduction has been made in the Opium Farmer's monthly payments under. existing contracts, and if so to what amount, from what date, and on what grounds has this reduction been made.?.

3. Referring to Government Notification 384 of 12th September, 1891, under the authority of

what Ordinance or law is the Government proceeding in establishing a Jinricksha Farm Monopoly,

The Acting Colonial Secretary replied.

BILL ENTITLED

AN ORDINANCE ENACTED BY THE GOVERNOR OF HONGKONG, WITH THE ADVICE AND CONSENT of the LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL THEREOF, TO APPLY, A. SUM NOT EXCEEDING TWO MILLIONS FOUR HUNDRED AND TWENTY-SEVEN THOUSAND SEVEN HUNDRED AND TWENTY-ONE DOLLARS TO THE PUBLIC SERVICE OF THE YEAR 1892."-The Acting Colonial Secretary moved the second reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

The Acting Colonial Secretary moved that the Bill be referred to the Finance Committee for consideration and report.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question put and agreed to.

BILL ENTITLED "THE MERCHANT SHIPPING CONSOLIDATION ORDINANCE, 1891."-Consideration of the Bill was postponed.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council' then adjourned till Monday, the 16th November, at 3 P.M..

Read and confirmed, this 16th day of November, 1891.

A. M. THOMSON, Acting Clerk of Councils.

G. DIGBY BARKER, Officer Administering the Government;

67

LEGISLATIVE

COUNCIL, No. 23.

MONDAY, 16TH NOVEMBER, 1891.

PRESENT:

HIIS EXCELLENCY THE OFFICER ADMINISTERING THE GOVERNMENT (Major-General G. DIGBY BARKER, C.B.).

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

the Acting Attorney General, (ANDREW JOHN LEACH).

:)

*

the Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART LOCKHART).

*"

the Acting Surveyor General, (FRANCIS ALFRED Cooper).

>>

the Colonial Treasurer, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES).

the Acting Harbour Master, (WILLIAM CHARLES HOLLAND HASTINGS).. CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

The Honourable PHINEAS KYRIE.

"9

ABSENT:

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK,

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 9th November, 1891, were read and confirmed.

PAPERS LAID ON THE TABLE.-The Acting Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government, laid on the table despatch from the Officer Administering the Government, No. 266, of the 10th August, 1891, on certain Public Works, and despatch from Secretary of State, No. 239, of the 6th October, 1891, in reply.

The Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD gave notice that at next meeting of Council he would ask the following questions:-

1. As it seems only reasonable that the public should have an opportunity of judging of the work done by the Registrar General's Department, will the Government lay on the table copies of the Registrar General's last annual report in the same way as is done with the reports of other departments, and as was formerly done in regard to the department in question?

2. With reference to the following paragraph in the address of His Excellency Governor Sir Cecil

Smith to the Legislative Council of Singapore last month —.

"The Estimates for 1892, which are now submitted to you are as follows:

66

"Revenue,

Expenditure,

$3,629,316 3,820,806

"The above Estimates of Revenue, as compared with the Revenue actually brought to "credit in the last completed year, viz.: 1890, show a falling off of $639,810.

Nearly the whole of this large sum is to be accounted for by the decrease of $440,000 under the head of Licenses and of $138,000 under the head of "Interest. As the farms have been re-let for the usual term of three year's, it may "be taken that the estimated Revenue for 1892 will also be about the same for the years 1893 and 1894. Before that period expires, the Secretary of State has "intimated that the Farming system ought to be considered with a view, if prac- ticable, to its-modification, and the adoption of a system of Licenses to be issued at high rates-the object being to diminish the evils of the Opium traffic without seriously crippling the Revenue,

66

66

17

Will the Government lay upon the table a copy of any despatch received from the Secretary of State within the past few months intimating that the Farming system before the new three years lease about to be granted expires, should be considered with a view if practicable to its modification, and the adoption of a system of Licenses to be issued at high rates,—the object being to diminish the evils of the Opium traffic without seriously crippling the revenue. 3. Is it correct as stated in the "China Mail" of 12th November, 1891, that in the course of the Bankruptcy proceedings in the Supreme Court on that date it was revealed that there is no provision in the law of the Colony to assign debt, and if so will the Government take steps to amend the law in that respect.

4. With reference to the Honourable the Colonial Secretary's letter of 22nd July, 1890, to the Chamber of Commerce to the effect that Government will consider how far it is possible to separate the Lighthouse dues from the general revenue of the Colony, will the Government inform the Council what progress has been made by Government in the matter.

:

68

The Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD gave notice that on Monday next he would move the following resolutions :-

1. That in future two copies of all papers to be laid upon the Council table be forwarded direct to the Un-official Members at their private address if possible 24 hours before the Meeting of Council or longer.

2. That the Government lay on the table a return shewing,-.

1. The number of Police beats, and the arrangement of such beats.

2. The number of European Police on day duty and the number on night duty, and

their distribution during the day as well as during the night.

3. The number of Indian Police on day duty and the number on night duty, and their

distribution during the day as well as the night.

*

4. The number of Chinese Police on day duty and the number on night duty, and their

distribution during the day as well as the night.

5. The number of Constables and Officers on duty at fixed points by day and by night.

6. The number of Constables and Officers detailed for the regulation of traffic.

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE ENACTED BY THE GOVERNOR OF HONGKONG, WITH THE ADVICE AND CONSENT OF THE LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL THEREOF, TO APPLY A FURTHER SUM NOT EXCEEDING SIX HUNDRED AND THIRTY-ONE THOUSAND AND SEVEN DOLLARS, TO THE PUBLIC SERVICE OF THE YEAR 1891."-The Acting Colonial Secretary moved the first reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE BUILDING ORDINANCE 1889."-The Acting Attorney General moved the first reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED "THE MERCHANT SHIPPING CONSOLIDATION ORDINANCE, 1891."-Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council résumed and progress reported.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned till Friday, the 20th November, at 2.30 P.M.

Read and confirmed, this 20th day of November, 1891.

F. H. MAY, Acting Clerk of Councils.

G. Digby BARKER, Officer Administering the Government.

.

}

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 24.

FRIDAY, 20TH NOVEMBER, 1891.

PRESENT:

*HIS EXCELLENCY THE OFFICER ADMINISTERING THE GOVERNMENT (Major-General G. DIGBY BARKER, C.B.).

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

the Acting Attorney General, (ANDREW JOHN LEACH).

""

""

the Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART LOCKHART).

""

the Colonial Treasurer, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-Innes).

""

the Acting Surveyor General, (FRANCIS ALFRED COOPER).

69

the Acting Harbour Master, (WILLIAM CHARLES HOLLAND HASTINGS). CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

"}

""

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

ABSENT:

The Honourable PHINEAS RYRIE.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

}"

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 16th November, 1891, were read and confirmed.

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE ENACTED BY THE GOVERNOR OF HONGKONG, WITH THE ADVICE AND CONSENT OF THE LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL THEREOF, TO APPLY A FURTHER SUM NOT EXCEEDING SIX HUNDRED AND THIRTY-ONE THOUSAND AND SEven Dollars; TO THE PUBLIC SERVICE OF THE YEAR 1891."--The Acting Colonial Secretary moved the second reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

The Acting Colonial Secretary moved that the Bill be referred to the Finance Committee. "Question-put and agreed to.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned till Saturday, the 21st November, at 11 a.m.

Read and confirmed, this 21st day of November, 1891.

F. H. MAY, Acting Clerk of Councils.

G. DIGBY BARKER,

Officer Administering the Government,

A

:

་་་་་

:

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 25.

SATURDAY, 21ST NOVEMBER, 1891.

71

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELĻENCY THE OFFICER ADMINISTERING THE GOVERNMENT (Major-General G. DIGBY BARKER, C.B.).

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

>>

>"

""

>>

""

*

27

the Acting Attorney General, (ANDREW JOHN LEACH).

the Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART LOCKHART).

the Colonial Treasurer, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHEll-Innes).

the Acting Surveyor General, (FRANCIS ALFRED COOPER).

the Acting Harbour Master, (WILLIAM CHARLES HOLLAND HASTINGS). PHINEAS RYRIE.

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

Ho KAL, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

ABSENT:

The Honourable JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 20th November, 1891, were read and confirmed.

The Acting Attorney General moved that the Council resolve itself into Committee to resume consideration of The Merchant Shipping Consolidation Bill, 1891.

The Acting Harbour Master seconded.

The Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD moved as an amendment that the Council adjourn to Monday, the 23rd instant.

The Honourable P. RYRIE seconded the amendment.

The amendment was put and lost by 7 votes to 2, the Honourable Ho Kai not voting.

The original motion to go into Committee was then carried.

BILL ENTITLED "THE MERCHANT SHIPPING CONSOLIDATION ORDINANCE, 1891."-Considered in Committee.

Council resumed and progress reported.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned till Monday, the 23rd November, at 2 P.M.

Read and confirmed, this 23rd day of November, 1891.

A. M. THOMSON,

Acting Clerk of Councils.

G. Digby BarKER, Officer Administering the Government.

:

!

74.

(1

"The above Estimates of Revenue, as compared with the Revenue actually brought to "credit in the last completed year, viz.: 1890, shem a falling off of $639,810.

Nearly the whole of this large sum is to be accounted for by the decrease of $440,000 under the head of Licenses and of $138,000 under the head of "Interest. As the farms have been re-let for the ușual term of three years, it may "be taken that the estimated Revenue for 1892 will also be about the same for the years 1893 and 1894. Before that period expires, the Secretary of State has "intimated that the Farming system ought to be considered with a view, if prac- ticable, to its modification, and the adoption of a system of Licenses to be issued at high rates the object being to diminish the evils of the Opium traffic without seriously crippling the Revenue,"

66

Will the Government lay upon the table a copy of any despatch received from the Secretary of State within the past few months intimating that the Farming system before the new three years lease about to be granted expires, should be considered with a view if practicable to its modification, and the adoption of a system of Licenses to be issued at high rates,—the object being to diminish the evils of the Opium traffic without seriously crippling the revenue.

The Acting Colonial Secretary replied.

The Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD moved the following resolution:-

1. That in future two copies of all papers to be laid upon the Council table be forwarded direct to the Un-official Members at their private address if possible 24 hours before the Meeting of Council or longer.

2. That the Government lay on the table a return shewing,

1. The number of Police beats, and the arrangement of such beats.

2. The number of European Police on day duty and the number on night duty, and

their distribution during the day as well as during the night.

3. The number of Indian Police on day duty and the number on night duty, and their

distribution during the day as well as the night.

4. The number of Chinese Police on day duty and the number on night duty, and their

distribution during the day as well as the night.

5. The number of Constables and Officers on duty at fixed points by day and by night. 6. The number of Constables and Officers detailed for the regulation of traffic.

Honourable P. RYRIE seconded.

His Excellency addressed the Council and the resolutions were withdrawn.

The Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD gave notice that on that day fortnight he would move the following resolution :-

In consequence of the fact that the cost of the Administrative Staff of the Government of Hongkong is constantly increasing, having risen from $547,650 in 1887, to the enormous amount of $758,139 in 1891 and to the still larger estimated sum of about $800,000 for 1892 exclusive of $65.200 for Pensions for 1892 it is incumbent on the Un-official Members of Council, who being the lawfully constituted guardians of the public purse, to earnestly consider and strenuously urge upon the Government the necessity for retrenchment in every possible direction more especially when it is remembered that the Colony's financial position is not strong, that we are threatened with a shrinkage in its revenue in the near future, and that our position with reference to Opium, and the revenue derived therefrom is precarious, that Government appoint a Commission composed of Members cxclusive of Government Officials with full powers to enquire into and report on the working of all the Departments of the Government with the view to retrenchment, and to the desirability or otherwise of the redistribution of work, the amalgamation of certain offices, the increasing of the hours of the official day, privileges in the way of leave, &c.

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE BUILDING ORDINANCE, 1889."-The Acting Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill.

The Acting Surveyor General seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed and Bill reported with amendments.

...

73

:

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 26.

MONDAY, 23RD NOVEMBER, 1891.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE OFFICER ADMINISTERING THE GOVERNMENT (Major-General G. DIGBY BARKER, C.B.).

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

""

the Acting Attorney General, (Andrew John Leach).

the Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART LOCKHART).

the Colonial Treasurer, (NORMAN GILBERT MITChell-Innes).

"1

the Acting Surveyor General, (FRANCIS ALFRED COOPER).

19

the Acting Harbour Master, (WILLIAM CHARLES HOLLAND HASTINGS).. PHINEAS RYRIE

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

"J

""

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

""

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

ABSENT:

The Honourable JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 21st November, 1891, were read and confirmed.

PAPERS LAID ON THE TABLE.-The Acting Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government, laid on the table despatch from the Officer Administering the Government, No. 229, of the 15th July, 1891, on the appointment of a Chinese Consul at Hong- kong, and despatch from Secretary of State, No. 235, of the 1st October, 1891, in reply.

The Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD asked the following questions:

1. Is it correct as stated in the "China Mail" of 12th November, 1891, that in the course of the..

Bankruptcy proceedings in the Supreme Court on that date it was revealed that there is no provision in the law of the Colony to assign debt, and if so will the Government take steps to amend the law in that respect.

The Acting Attorney General replied.

2. Will the Government lay on the table a list of--

(1.) The number of convictions for offences against the new Gambling Ordinance since

the date it came into force to 30th September last.

(2) The amount of fines levied.

(3.) The amount of fines collected.

(4.) The number of persons imprisoned in default of payment of fine with the periods

of their imprisonment and the cost to Government of their detention in Gaol.

(5.) The number of persons now in prison for such offences.

3. With reference to the Honourable the Colonial Secretary's letter of 22nd July, 1890, to the Chamber of Commerce to the effect that Government will consider how far it is possible to separate the Lighthouse dues from the general revenue of the Colony, will the Government inform the Council what progress has been made by Government in the matter.

4. As it seems only reasonable that the public should have an opportunity of judging of the work done by the Registrar General's Department, will the Government lay on the table copies of the Registrar General's last. annual report in the same way as is done with the reports of other departments, and as was formerly done in regard to the department in question?

5. With reference to the following paragraph in the address of His Excellency Governor Sir Cecil

Smith to the Legislative Council of Singapore last month-

"The Estimates for 1892, which are now submitted to you are as follows:-

бы

Revenue,

((

Expenditure,

$3,629,316 3,820,806

1

75.

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE ENACTED BY THE GOVERNOR OF HONGKONG, WITH THE ADVICE AND CONSENT OF THE LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL THEREOF, TO APPLY A FURTHER SUM NOT EXCEEDING SIX HUNDRED AND THIRTY-ONE THOUSAND AND SEVEN DOLLARS, TO THE PUBLIC SERVICE OF THE YEAR 1891."-Council in Committee on the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary laid on the table the Report of the Finance Committee, dated the 21st November, (No. 15), on the Bill.

Council resuined and Bill reported with amendments.

The Acting Colonial Secretary moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

BILL ENTITLED "THE MERCHANT SHIPPING CONSOLIDATION ORDINANCE, 1891."-Council in Committec on the Bill.

Council resumed and progress reported.

ADJOURNMENT.—The Council then adjourned till Monday, the 30th November, at 2.00 P.M.

Read and confirmed, this 30 day of November, 1891.

A. M. THOMSON, Acting Clerk of Councils.

G. DIGBY Barker, Officer Administering the Government.

:

:

:

+

:

:

-

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 27.

MONDAY, 30TH NOVEMBER, 1891.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE OFFICER ADMINISTERING THE GOVERNMENT (Major-General G. DIGBY BARKER, C.B.).

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

the Acting Attorney General, (ANDREW JOHN LEACH).

the Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART LOCKHART).

25.

""

""

11

the Acting Surveyor General, (FRANCIS ALFRED Cooper).

the Colonial Treasurer, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES).

31

11

19

11

*

""

the Acting Harbour Master, (WILLIAM CHARLES HOLLAND HASTINGS). CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK,

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

The Honourable PHINEAS RYRIE.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

ABSENT:

77

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 23rd November, 1891, were read and confirmed. PAPERS LAID ON THE TABLE.-The Acting Colonial Secretary, by command of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government, laid on the table the Reports of the Finance Committee dated the 9th, 16th, and 23rd of November, (Nos. 13, 14 and 16), on the Estimates of Expenditure for 1892.

The Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD asked the following questions:-

(1.) Will the Government inform the Council whether it has yet appointed a Commission to enquire into the question of Quarantine, and if so will it furnish a list of the Members nominated on such commission.

The Acting Colonial Secretary replied.

(2.) Will the Government lay on the table the commission issued to certain persons to enquire into the selection of a Site for the proposed New Gaol, and a copy of any report which the Committee may have made on the subject, and copies of the Reports and Proceedings of recent commissions on Gaol accommodation.

His Excellency replied.

(3.) Will the Government lay on the table a list of the Excise Officers appointed by the Governor

under section 5 of the Opium Ordinance, 1884.

The Acting Colonial Secretary replied,

The Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD moved the following resolution :-

That Government lay upon the table at the first meeting of Council, or as soon thereafter as possible, in each half-year, a return shewing particulars of progress of all Public Works

during the previous half-year, in the form made use of by the Government in the sessional paper relating to the New Central Market, Civil Hospital Staff Quarters, &c., laid on the. Council table on 26th October last.

The Honourable C. P. CHATER seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE BUILDING ORDINANCE, 1889."-The Council agreed to postpone further consideration of the Bill for one week.

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE ENACTED BY THE GOVERNOR OF HONGKONG, WITH THE ADVICE AND CONSENT OF THE LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL THEREOF, TO APPLY A SUM NOT EXCEEDING TWO MILLIONS FOUR HUNDRED AND TWENTY-SEVEN THOUSAND SEVEN HUNDRED AND TWENTY-ONE DOLLARS TO THE PUBLIC SERVICE OF THE YEAR 1892."-Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed and Bill reported with amendments.

BILL ENTITLED "THE MERCHANT SHIPPING CONSOLIDATION ORDINANCE, 1891."-Council in Commitee on the Bill.

Council resumed and progress reported.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned till Friday, the 4th December, at 3.30 P.M.

Read and confirmed, this 4th day of December, 1891.

A. M. THOMSON,

G. DIGBY Barker,

*

Officer Administering the Government.

Acting Clerk of Councils.

.

#

79

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 28.

FRIDAY, 4TH DECEMBER, 1891.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE OFFICER ADMINISTERING THE GOVERNMENT (Major-General G. DIGBY BAKKER, C.B.).

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

J

",

15

19

*

35

*

339

5%

the Acting Attorney General, (ANDREW JOHN LEACH).

the Registrar General, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART Lockhart). the Colonial Treasurer, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHell-Innes). the Acting Surveyor General, (FRANCIS ALFRED COOPER).

the Acting Harbour Master, (WILLIAM CHARLES HOLLAND HASTINGS). PHINEAS RYRIE.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

ABSENT:

The Honourable CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 30th November, 1891, were read and confirmed.

BILL ENTITLED “AN ORDINANCE ENACTED BY THE GOVERNOR OF HONGKONG, WITH THE ADVICE AND CONSENT OF THE LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL THEREOF, TO APPLY A SUM NOT EXCEEDING TWO MILLIONS FOUR HUNDRED AND FIFTY-THREE THOUSAND NINE HUNDRED and Ninety-SIX DOLLARS TO THE PUBLIC SERVICE OF THE YEAR 1892."-Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD moved that the Bill be recommitted.

Honourable HO KAI seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed and Bill reported without amendment.

The Acting Colonial Secretary moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

BILL ENTITLED "THE MERCHANT SHIPPING CONSOLIDATION ORDINANCE, 1891."-Council in Committee on the Bill.

• Council resumed and Bill reported with amendments.

ADJOURNMENT.—The Council then adjourned till Monday, the 7th December, at 2.30 P.M.

Read and confirmed, this 7th day of December, 1891.

A. M. THOMSON,

Acting Clerk of Councils.

G. Digby BaRKER, Officer Administering the Government.

:

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 29.

MONDAY, TH DECEMBER, 1891.

81

::

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE OFFICER ADMINISTERING THE GOVERNMENT

(Major-General G. DIGBY BARKER, C.B.).

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary; (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

""

· 39 ·

11

17

وو

the Acting Attorney General, (ANDREW JOHN LEACH).

the Registrar. General, (JAMES HALDANE STEWART LOCKHART). the Colonial Treasurer, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES).

the Acting Surveyor General, (FRANCIS ALFRED COOPER).

the Acting Harbour Master, (WILLIAM CHARLES HOLLAND HASTINGS). PHINEAS RYRIE.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

11

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

"1

THOMAS HENDERSON WHitehead.

ABSENT:

The Honourable CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 4th December, 1891, were read and confirmed. The Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD moved the following resolution :-

In consequence of the fact that the cost of the Administrative Staff of the Government of Hongkong is constantly increasing, having risen from $547,650 in 1887, to the enormous amount of $758,139 in 1891 and to the still larger estimated sum of about $800,000 for 1892 exclusive of $65,200 for Pensions for 1892 it is incumbent on the Un-official Members of Council, who being the lawfully constituted guardians of the public purse, to earnestly consider and strenuously urge upon the Government the necessity for retrenchment in every possible direction more especially when it is remembered that the Colony's financial position is not strong, that we are threatened with a shrinkage in its revenue in the near future, and that our position with reference to Opium, and the revenue derived therefrom is precarious, that Government appoint a Commission composed of Members exclusive of Government Officials with full powers to enquire into and report on the working of all the Departments of the Government with the view to retrenchment, and to the desirability or otherwise of the redistribution of work, the amalgamation of certain offices, the increasing of the hours of the official day, privileges in the way of leave, &c.

Honourable P. RYRIE seconded.

The Council divided and the resolution was rejected by seven to three votes.

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE BUILDING ORDINANCE, 1889."-The Acting Attorney General moved that the Bill be recommitted.

The Acting Surveyor General seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed and Bill reported with amendments.

The Acting Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Acting Surveyor General seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

::

*

.

!

82

:

BILL ENTITLED "THE MERCHANT SHIPPING. CONSOLIDATION ORDINANCE, 1891."-The Acting Attorney General moved that the Bill be recommitted.

The Acting Harbour Master seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Council resumed and Bill reported with amendments.

The Acting Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Acting Harbour Master seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned sine die.

Read and confirmed, this 25th day of January, 1892.

A. M. THOMSON,

Acting Clerk of Councils.

:

WILLIAM ROBINSON,

Governor.

:

i

327

No. 21

91

:

:

HONGKONG.

THE COLONIAL SURGEON'S REPORT FOR 1890.

Laid before the Legislative Council, by Command of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government,

on the 17th July, 1891.

GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL,

HONGKONG, 15th June, 1891.

SIR, I have the honour to forward my Annual Report for the year 1890, and regret the unavoid- able delay caused by the difficulty in making up some of the returns. This report, with the Tables attached, shows the work done in the Medical Department under my supervision; also I forward reports from the Superintendent of the Government Civil Hospital, the Medical Officer in charge of the Gaol and the Government Analyst.

POLICE.

The admissions to Hospital show a small decrease, being 582 as compared with 590 in 1889. The deaths are 7 as compared with 14 in 1889; of this number 5 died in Hospital: 1 European, 2 Indians and 2 Chinese. Two died out of Hospital. 1 European was found drowned off Government Wharf during the night. 1 Indian was using an old shell as a chopping block; the shell was loaded and exploding blew him to pieces severely injuring another Indian Constable who was looking on.

The admissions to Hospital from the various sections of the Police Force for the last ten years are given in the following table :-

Admissions to Hospital, 1881,

Europeans.

88..

Indians.

Chinese.

212...

..198

Do.,

1882,

Do.,

1883.

92... ..113........

230..

.227

........246.............

...239

Do.,

1884,

87....

.224...

....175

Do.,

1885,.

*

124...

..208.

...163

Do.,

1886,

138.

.243..

..221

Do.,

1887.

Do.,

1888,

Do.,

1889.

139... .147.

....166..

293....

....187

.279.....

....23.1

.230. .........194

Do.,

1890,

....149..

.254...............179

Table I shows the sickness and mortality in the Force during the different months of the year.

Table II gives the average strength, rate of sickness and mortality.

Table III the admissions to Hospital from the different Stations and Districts in each month of 1890.

The following table gives the total admissions to Hospital and deaths in the Force for the last ten years :-

Admissions.

1881, 1882,

.498..

Deaths.

...10

.549..

8

1883,

599.

....10

1884,

486..

7

1885,

.495....

9

1886,

..602.....

..14

1887,

.619.

9

1888,

..657...

.15

1889,

.590....

....14

1890,

...582.

7

TROOPS.

There is a large increase in the admissions to Hospital among the Troops this year with a slight decrease in the average strength. The deaths show a decrease of one. In spite of an unusually healthy year among the general population, Europeans and Chinese, the sickness amongst the Troops is

·

328

much in excess of the previous nine years, and the number of deaths has only been exceeded three times as is shown in the following table :-

1881,

1882,

1883,

Admissions. .1,116..

1,019..... .1,105.

Deaths.

4

9

..10

....

1884,

1,097...

...12

1885,

1,

,190.....

...24

1886,

1,607

9

1887,

.1,749.

.14

1888,

1,485..

.21

L

1889,

1890,

1,732... .1,915.

.16

...

..15

Table IV gives the average strength, rate of sickness and mortality amongst the Troops for the year 1890.

GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL.

The Superintendent furnishes a very able report on the working of this Institution and too much eredit cannot be given to him for the many improvements he has carried out and for the very efficient and energetic performance of his arduous duties.

I have much pleasure in saying he has now a really good working staff to assist him. Dr. Lowson, the new Assistant Superintendent, has proved himself to be a very able, energetic and willing Officer in the performance of his duties.

The arrival of the new Nursing Staff has also proved a great boon to the Hospital. Miss EASTMOND, the Matron, with five trained Sisters do the greatest credit to the Hospitals from which they came and by their skill and kindness have earned the good-will of all with whom they came in contact ; they have all been most diligent and willing in the performance of their duties so far.

The new Senior Wardmaster, Mr. STEVENSON, and two trained Wardmasters all of whom were obtained from the Military Department stationed in this Colony, have proyed themselves thoroughly capable Officers. This portion of the staff has been a source of considerable trouble in past years, but is now, I hope, established on a satisfactory basis.

With the above supervision we have had much less trouble with the Chinese portion of the Nursing Staff.

Mr. CROW, Senior Apothecary and Government Analyst, has ably carried out his duties and assisted by Mr. LUCAS, the new Assistant Apothecary, effected many improvements in the Hospital Dispensary. It has been a source of great satisfaction to me that we have so capable a successor to Mr. WATSON, the late Assistant Apothecary. The two Chinese Student Apothecaries have worked diligently and will be and are now of very great assistance in this Department.

Mr. ROGERS, the Steward, has returned from a well-earned leave. His place was not easily filled and his absence very much felt. His substitute, the late Mr. WYLIE, whose unfortunate death was much regretted was a most willing and energetic, trustworthy Officer and in spite of his inexperience carried out the duties very well, with the help of the two Chinese Clerks who are thoroughly good at their work.

The quarters for the European Nursing Staff are not yet finished and that for the Chinese is only just being handed over. All of them have suffered considerably from sickness during the past year due to the want of proper accommodation. I hope the end of this year will see us out of these troubles.

The admissions to Hospital show a very considerable increase this year, and this is nearly entirely due to the great increase in private paying patients and the demand is greatly in excess of the capacity of this portion of the Establishment. To supply very many who would have been glad to be in the first class of paying patients have had to be content with second class accommodation, and many have had to be turned away. The thoroughly efficient trained Nursing Staff has greatly increased this demand. Many people, who under the former system of half-trained European and Chinese Nurses would never have thought of applying for accommodations, are now anxious to be received.

The following Table shows the number and classification of those brought to Hospital for the past nine years :—

1882. .1883.

Police,

...549

599

Board of Trade,

.116

110

Private paying Patients,

..268·

260

259 283

1884. 1885. 1886. 1887. 1888. 1889. 1890.

486 495 602 619 657 590

60 100 132 103 153 381 324 313

582

135

110

402

527

Government Servants,

88.

105

96

124.

1.44

147

159

135

191

Police Cases,

..207

227 231

238

142

208

242

252 264

Destitutes,

.230

201

222

270

222

255 248 279 283

1,458

1,502

1,354 1,510 1,623 1,656 1,772 1,793 1,957

The percentage of deaths to total admissions (5.00) is a little above the average of the past ten years and is due to the number of cases of fatal injuries received and moribund cases.

The total amount of fees received was $16,115.32, an increase of $4,670.83 as compared with last year (1889).

329

The following Table gives the admissions and deaths in this Hospital for the past ten years :-

Deaths.

1881,

1882,

1883,

1884,

1885,

1886,

1887.

1888,

1889,

1890,

Admissions.

.1,236.....

.49

1,458.....

..68

1,502....

..70

.1,354........

..50

.1,510..

..76

.1,623.

.79

.1,656..

...89

.1,772..

....80

J

1,793....

.1,957.....

.77 .98

The Superintendent's Report contains some very interesting remarks concerning his experiences in the treatment of Malarial Fever and Dysentery, and he has earnestly entered into the study of the diseases that are common to this climate.

The necessity of increased accommodation for private paying patients has led to several proposals. First. One from the Unofficial Members of Council that a portion of the New Quarters for the Medical and Nursing Staff should be applied to this purpose.

This building has been much reduced from its original plans as far as accommodation is concerned and only barely meets the requirements of the present staff. It has been costly but I regret to say only as regards outside show. The huge finely-cut granite verandahs and retaining walls which must have cost nearly two-thirds of the expenditure on this building add nothing to either its comfort or security, and there would have been an equal amount of both with an expenditure of less than half the money for material and labour if retaining walls of the foundations had been rough-cut granite and the verandahs had been brick.

Supposing there was some room to spare, as I wished, in case of necessity for increase in the staff in the future, it would be most undesirable to employ it for that purpose. It is most desirable that the staff when off duty, though close at hand if their services are wanted, should be entirely removed from the Hospital atmosphere which would not be the case if wards were made in this building. And in the hot months when the work is hardest we have had at least a third of the Staff, European and Chinese, down with sickness. It was to obviate this that these quarters were sanctioned and also quarters for the Chinese Staff which are now finished.

Again, this building is 290 yards from the main Hospital Buildings, which would require for wards in them a separate Nursing Staff, European or Chinese, cooks and coolies for cleaning, this would mean a great increase in expenses as necessary addition to the Nursing Staff, &c.

The second proposal which Dr. ATKINSON makes in his report has also much to be said against, that is, to make private wards in the new Lock Hospital. This is another building whose external adornements have very much increased its expense without in any way adding to its comfort or secu- rity. It was built entirely with a view to accommodate native patients. Behind it towers the main building of the Government Civil Hospital, its roof rising to a level with the basement of that building. On the other three sides, it is surrounded with Chinese houses whose roofs rise to a level with its base- ment. It is therefore not so airy or so cool as any other of the Hospital buildings, and the odours from the Chinese houses are sometimes appalling especially when shark-fins and other fish, &c. are being dried on their roofs. This would in no way incommode the native patients for whom it was intended but would disgust any European especially in ill health. I regret to say that the new staff of Nursing Sisters have their temporary quarters in this building and have suffered very much from the inconveniences described. Therefore I cannot recommend it being diverted from the uses for which it was intended and for which it is much wanted though now no longer Lock Hospital but for voluntary patients.

The proposal Dr. ATKINSON and myself have since made will be, in all ways, the most economical. Buildings of one storey high have been sanctioned for much needed store rooms, compradores' rooms, &c., and we have recommended that two stories should be added to these buildings for private wards; this would not interfere with the circulation of air in the other building, would be airy and pleasant itself, would require hardly any increase of staff and would cost very little more than alterations in the other buildings and I sincerely hope this recommendation may be granted. I may here state the Medical Departinent is in no way responsible for the costly establishments I have described. We are only consulted on accommodation required, and our opinions have often been over-ridden to the ultimate increase of cost to Government.

SMALL-POX HOSPITAL.

Only two cases were admitted this year, and both recovered. See Table VII.

For some weeks this winter, there was a dearth of vaccine lymph in the Colony both the supplies from Home and Japan were delayed. Our proposed Vaccine Establishment for the production of calf lymph has not been constructed, the site was only selected a few weeks ago; but I hope it will be in working order next winter.

·

-

3

330

PUBLIC MORTUARY.

Table VIII shows the number of bodies brought to the Mortuary for examination, and the cause of death.

This year 146 bodies were brought in: Europeans. 10, Chinese 130, other nationalities 6. Of these 55 were found to have died of disease, 24 accidental deaths, 21 suicidal, 10 homicidal.

VICTORIA GAOL.

The following Table gives the number of admissions to the Gaol and the daily average number of prisoners for the past ten years:—

Total No. admitted to Gaol.

Daily average No.

1881,

4,150........

1882,

3,498...

1883,

...3,486.

1884,

4,023...

1885,

.3,610.

1886,

.4,600.

1887,

.4,302.

1888,

.3,627.

1889,

1890,

3,705..... .3,444.

of Prisoners.

666.00

.622.00

.542.15

..552.00 ·

.530.00

...

...674.00 .584.00

....531.00

..581.00 ....566.00

There is a considerable decrease in the number of admissions, 3,444, compared with 3,705 admis- sions in 1889, with a decrease of 15 in the daily average of prisoners in the Graol. The mendicant class and petty offences furnishing the chief course of admission.

Table IX shows the number of prisoners admitted to Hospital.

Table XI shows the rate of sickness and mortality among the prisoners. There were 362 admis- sions to Hospital as compared with 244 in 1889, and six deaths, there were two other deaths occur- ring in the cells, 2 Chinese committed suicide by hanging.

Table XIA shows the number of Opium Smokers admitted during the year, their ages, the length of time they have controlled the habit, the daily consumption of the drug, their weights on admission and during the first month of detention. The habit is entirely ignored, and no special treatment given for a cure.

LUNATIC ASYLUM.

There were 12 patients admitted during the year: 9 Europeans, 2 Coloured and 1 Chinese.

TUNG-WA HOSPITAL.

The number of cases admitted in this Hospital during the year was 2,260, of these 1,022 died, of the admissions 254 were in a moribund condition.

tion.

No cases were admitted to the Small-pox Wards of this Hospital.

2,515 Vaccinations were performed successfully by the Public Vaccinator attached to this Institu-

The number of out-patients treated was 173,720.

LOCK HOSPITAL. .

This establishment is still in the two houses hired for the purpose pending the completion of the building in progress for the Government Civil Hospital Nursing Staff, &c. as already described.

The rent of these building cost $840 a year, besides very considerable expenses to render them at all suitable for the purposes, for incessant repairs, for redrainage, &c., &c., so I shall be very glad when this is removed to the New Hospital which has so long been built and used for other

purposes for which, as I have described, it is not at all appropriate.

I regret that the Matron was absent on leave this year at the same time as the Steward of the Hospital was absent on leave. The consequence of which the table of attendances for this year are not quite reliable, many mistakes were unavoidably made by people entirely new to the work. Mrs. FOORD, who was Acting Matron, was most zealous and willing in the performance of her duties, cannot in any way be held responsible and I have much pleasure in recording that there were no complaints. Her little patients always being in good humour and satisfied with her kind treatment of them.

The attendance has been better at the Voluntary examinations and I think even better than has been recorded.

The following Table shows the attendance, deficit in attendance, amount of disease, and number of registered women for the last six years, that is, two years before the abolition of the Contagious

+

331

Diseases Ordinance, the year of its abolition 1887, and the three years since of voluntary attendance and submission to treatment.

1890,

1889,

1888,'.

1887*

1886,

1885,

YEAR.

No. of WOMEN ON REGISTER.

No. of

No. of EXAMINATIONS.

DEFECT

EXAMINATIONS EVERY WOMAN

IN

MADE.

ATTENDING

ATTENDANCE.

DISEASE

FOUND AND

HEALED.

ONCE A WEEK.

260

11,914

14,560

2,646

82

269

10,924

13,988

3,064

83

269

10,924

13,988

3,064

66

272

12,223

14,344

1,765

143

272

13,425

14,344

919

414

272

13,532

14,344

812

416

:

* September 1st, 1887-The Compulsory attendance was abolished.

The number of registered women under the Protection of Women's Ordinance in the registered houses has slightly increased. The attendances at Hospital at the voluntary examinations have been more regular in proportion than in any year since the abolition of compulsory attendance, and I think was even better than these returns indicate for the reasons previously mentioned.

The number of cases admitted to Hospital were 82 as against 83 in 1889, and were all of a mild type. Several of the women, discharged from Hospital at their own request with sores only just healed, returned to Hospital because the mistress of the brothel desired them to receive visitors.

Three of the registered women, who were suffering from attacks of Malarial fever, preferred to be treated in this Hospital rather than in the General Female Ward of the Government Civil Hospital as they had friends among the other patients and as they could have a separate ward there was no objection. All this shows confidence and appreciation of the treatment they receive. They are no longer ordered to attend. No one sees them except the Matron, and the Amah who acts as interpreter as well as general attendant, and myself at my daily morning visit when both Matron and Amah are present. No returns are now sent in by the Navy, which is to be regretted as it upsets the statistics of many years.

The Military Hospital shows a decrease int he admission of venereal cases of 33 as compared with 1889. The Police, an increase of 4.

The Government Civil Hospital, an increase of 21. -

Table E gives the admissions to the male wards of the different Hospitals of venereal cases of different classes of disease, with the totals of the

past four

years for

for comparison. Table E 3 gives the number of the Military suffering from constitutional form of venereal disease. There were 53 as compared with 72 in 1889, a decrease of 19.

HEALTH OF THE COLONY.

The number of deaths among the European and American residents was 95 as compared with 93 in 1889. This raises the percentage from 3.06 in 1889 to 3.12 in 1890.

There has been no epidemic form of disease during the past year.

DEATHS AMONG EUROPEANS (BRITISH AND FOREIGN).

FEVERS.

VOMITING

YEARS.

DIARRHOEA. CHOLERA.

Enteric.

Simple Continued.

AND PURGING.

TOTAL.

Typhus.

1873,

6

1874,

...

1

OTH

2

17

25

17

26

1875,

1

18

24

1876,

1.

9

14

24

1877,

4

10

27

1878,

15

2

9

29

1879,

21

14

38

-

1880,

1

12

10

24

1881,

2

17

10

29

1882,

10

13

13

37

1883,

1

9

9

19

1884,

7.

4

12

23

1885,

11

9

19

46

1886,

8

5

18

1887,

10

6

25

1888,

4

16

25

30

1889,

3

1890,

4

10 4

16

13

The deaths from the classes of disease shown in the above Table show a slight decrease, and the lowest total for the past eighteen years among Europeans.

332

DEATHS AMONG CHINESE.

FEVERS.

:.

YEARS.

DIARRHEA. CHOLERA.

Enteric.

Simple

Continued. Typhus.

VOMITING

AND PURGING.

TOTAL.

1873,

12

96

1874,

125

46

1875,

31

291

1876,

94

343

1877,

145

370

1878,

89

481

1879,

116

733

1880,

309

373

1881,

438

168

1882,

679

71

1883,

262

571

1884,

132

600

1885,

105

755

1886,

9

2772

~ to co∞ ∞ ä

16

195

.:.

319

231

402

2

288

612.

259

696

311

834

33

701

1,304

21

608

1,478

348

1,030

38

435

1,079

465

1,215

660

1,496

301

1,035

561

176

1.604

10

326

19

1,136

1887,

9

441

25

276

13

764

1888,

299

361

17

236

917

1889,

1

363

180

7

551

1890,

342

2

216

1

562

-

7

The above Table is a similar one and shows the deaths from the same classes of disease amongst the Chinese for the same period (eighteen years), both these tables illustrate the improved condition of things as regards sanitation in the Colony.

One thing more I desire to draw attention to as regards the Medical Department is a comparison of the work required of its Staff as compared with that of all other Departments, and the benefits received by them as compared with the Officers of other Departments.

Every other Department has its stated hours of work for its Officers not increased unless in very exceptional circumstances which are of very rare occurrence. The Medical and many other Officers of this Department are liable and are continually being called upon at all hours night and day, and can call no hour their own. The work done is three times greater all round in this Department than it was when I joined eighteen years ago.

In every other Department an Officer can find a substitute to do his duty when away on leave without any very extra hardship for the substitute and greatly to his benefit by increased pay. For short leave, as there are only five Medical Officers, this can be managed but the substitute has a very considerable increase of work and anxiety and no benefit whatever. For long leave an outsider has to be found to the considerable loss of the Officer taking leave. None of the Medical Officers are capable of acting for any Officer in other Departments or obtaining the benefits received by doing so in increased pay. For instance, I have seen since I have been in the Colony one Officer holding the following acting appointments at different times:-" Acting" Magistrate, Harbour Master, Registrar General, Captain Superintendent of Police, Superintendent of Victoria Gaol, Colonial Secretary and Administrator, and by these acting appointments adding very considerably to his pay, not possible to a Medical Officer.

The Medical Officers are compelled to live in the Central District of the town as near as possible to their duties and cannot derive any benefits from residence on the upper levels or at the Peak.

When the increase of salaries for the different Departments was under consideration this year, the Secretary of State was of opinion, owing to alterations, new appointments, &c., no increase of pay was necessary in this Department, but at my representation, individual Officers were allowed to pre- sent their cases to the Secretary of State for further consideration.

As a fact many of the Officials though newly appointed are not paid in proportion to the increased work they have to do and the pay their predecessors received for much less work. As the oldest Officer in this Department, I am $3,000 a year worse off than when I joined this Service. What I have said has no reference whatever to the lowered rates of exchange of late years.

The Doctor, without reference to the many hours he has been on duty, is expected to present an alert and cheerful appearance, to be sympathetic, courteous and kindly in his manner, gentle and skilful in the handling of his patients. When he has probably been many hours over the twenty-four without sleep and in much anxiety and mental worry over many cases he has in charge, yet from Government downwards when it comes to pay, the Doctor is the last person to be considered. Though when he is wanted no one is more anxiously looked for or is received with greater delight and relief.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

The Honourable W. M. GOODMAN,

Acting Colonial Secretary.

Your obedient Servant,

PH. B..C. AYRES,

Colonial Surgeon.

+

POLICE.

I.-TABLE shewing the ADMISSIONS into and DEATHS in the GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL

during each Month of the Year 1890.

333

EUROPEANS.

INDIANS.

CHINESE.

MONTHS.

TOTAL TOTAL Admissions. Deaths.

Admissions.

Deaths. Admissions. Deaths. Admissions. Deaths.

Remaining on the 1st Jan.,

1890,.

5

2

6

January,

11

4

13

13 28

February,

10

10

30

50

March,

9

21

19

49

April,

16

17

40

May,

6

16

29

June,

19

28

14

61

1

July,

18

49

7

74

August,

7

29

19

55

1

September,..

9

24

20

53

October,

12

21

10

43

November,

15

14

14

43

December,

12

19

13

44

Total,......

149

1

254

2

179

582

20

J. M. ATKINSON, Superintendent.

II.-TABLE shewing the RATE of SICKNESS and MORTALITY in the POLICE FORCE during the Year 1890.

AVERAGE STRENGTH.

TOTAL SICKNESS.

TOTAL DEATHS.

RATE OF SICKNESS.

RATE OF MORTALITY.

.

European. Indian. Chinese.

Total. European. Indian. Chinese.

Europeau. Indian. Chinese.

European. Indian.

Chinesc.

Europeau.

Indian.

Chinese.

120 227 350 697 149 254 179

3

2

124.16 111.89 51.14

1.66 1.32 0.57

J. M. ATKINSON, Superintendent.

III.—POLICE RETURN of ADMISSIONS to HOSPITAL from each District during the Year 1890:

CENTRAL

GOVERNMENT

No. 5

HOUSE

""

No. 2

No. I STONE CUTTERS'

9

3

ISLAND.

GAP WATER POLICE No. 6

STATIONS

MOUNTAIN'STSIMSHATSUI,

LODGE.

WHITFIELD.

SHAUKIWAN.

YAUMATI,

STANLEY

PORFULAM.

ABERDEEN.

AND

No. 7.

HUNGHOM.

TAITAMTUK.

November, 6 7

March,

April,

May,

3

10

June,

19

July,.

13 35

August,

5 15

September,

8 14

October,

6 11

Remaining on

1st Jan., 1891, January, February,

Months.

જ. હ રો :

10

5 13 10

12 15

6

European.

1203

Indian.

∞ co

Chinese.

European.

Indian.

Chinese.

European.

Indian.

Chinese.

:::::

Cool HHN:

European. ·

Indian.

5

6. 18

2

Chinese.

European.

Indian.

Chinese.

December,

6 9 5

Total,..

88 164 58

14 5

:

61

:

4

7

6

32 12 82

:

European.

Indian.

Chinese.

European.

Indian.

Chinese.

12

:::

:

:::

European.

::: HN: coco:::::

Indian.

Chinese.

European.

:::--:::: Indian.

:ས:

:::::

::

Chinese.

European.

Indian.

Chinese.

European.

Indian.

Chinese.

TOTAL.

13

28 1 50

49

40

29

61

74

55

53

43

2

43

2

2

44

IN

2 10

2 4 10 J 2 11

6 582

1 2 3 2 9 9 8

J. M. ATKINSON, Superintendent.

IV. TABLE shewing the RATE of SICKNESS and MORTALITY of the TROOPS serving in HONGKONG

during the Year 1890.

AVERAGE STRENGTH.

ADMISSIONS INTO HOSPITAL,

DEATHS.

White. Black. Total. White. Black. Total. White. Black.

AVERAGE DAILY RATE OF SICKNESS.

RATE OF MORTAL- ITY PER 1,000 OF THE STRENGTH.

Total. White. Black. White. Black.

1,365 200 1,565

1,688 227

1,915

10

15

69.10 6.85

7.32

25

W. S. PATERSON, Deputy Surgeon General, Principal Medical Officer, China & Hongkong.

"

:..

:

334

V.-TABLE shewing the ADMISSIONS and MORTALITY in the GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL during the Year 1890.

ADMISSIONS.

DEATHS.

DISEASES.

1.-General Diseases.

A. Diseases dependent on Morbid Poisons,-

Sub-Group 1,

""

""

2,

3,

""

4,

5,

"

Europeans.

Indians.

Chinese.

Total.

Europeans.

67

148

182

ོཎྜཡཿསྶ ;

༄ཝཱནྡྷསྨཱ ;

37 23

127

3

3

106

155

409

2

*

4

6

42

266

:

Indians.

434

B. Diseases dependent on external agents other than Morbid

Poisons,- Sub-Group 1,

2,*

""

3, 4,

C. Developmental Diseases,.

13

D. Not classified,

40

∞ HOG

8

1

64

16

1 ::~~6

5

12

25

1

2

8

74

3

2

18

20

76

1

II.-Local Diseases.

2.

123410 ON∞JO·

Nervous System,

13

3

23

1.

1

4

Eye,.....

15

3

22

40

Ear,

2

3

2

7

Nose,

1

1

Circulatory System,

9

10

11

12

Diseases of the

Respiratory,

Digestive,

Lymphatic,

Thyroid Body,

Supra Renal Capsules,

Urinary System,...

Generative System,

13

Female Breast,

14

Male

|

""

15

Organs of Locomotion,

16

Connective Tissue,.......

17

Skin,

III.

Poisons,

E:

IV.

Injuries,

V.

Surgical Operations,t... Under Observation,

7

3

6

16

2

3

45

48

38

131

2

10

21

72

31

40

143

5

77

4

24

3

co::

34

1

6

11

17

1 2

1

2

5

3

4.

12

27

14

14

55

14

4

11

29

1

}

19

21

1

10

il

69

25

269

363

6

1

18.

25

10

24

25

59

Total,.........

* Vide table III. † Table Va.

837

377

743

1,957

20

20 58

98

J. M. ATKINSON, Superintendent.

-

:

Chinese,

10

7

4

Total.

335

Va.-TABLE shewing the ADMISSIONS and MORTALITY in the GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL during the Year 1890.

ADMISSIONS.

DEATH.

SURGICAL OPERATIONS.

Removal of Tumours from Parts,-

Bursal Tumour (olecranon) Excision, Fibro-fatty Tumour (arm)

""

*"

(scalp)

29

""

Lipoma (shoulder)

Paracentesis of Fluid Tumours,-

Hydrocele (radical cure) Incision and Drainage,.

Removal of Foreign Bodies,-

Gun-shot Wound of Leg

(Ballet),....

of Fore-arm

"3

دو

of Wrist

"

29

""

99

of Thigh

>>

of Ilip

of Skull

"

39

of Hand

"

""

of Lung

""

Opening of Abscess,-

Perineal (Incision),

Ischio-rectal

Neck

"

""

Hepatic Abscess, Aspiration (Incision),

Operations on the Eye and its Appendages,-

Excision of the Eyeball,

Operations on Hand and Face including the Mouth,—

For Harelip,

Raising Depressed Bone,

Operations on the Respiratory Organs,-

Paracentesis of Pleura, Effusion (Aspiration),

Operations on the Digestive Organs,-

Application of Stomach-pump,

Europeans.

Indians.

Chinese.

Total.

1

...

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

:.

1

2

1

1

1

1

1

2

1

1

1

: ~ :

2

3

Europeans.

Indians.

1

2

1

121

1

42

2

2

4

...

1

...

1

1

:

12

1

:

~:

:

:

:

1

1

1

4

Abdominal Fistula (Injury),

1

Fistula in Ano,

3

2

Hæmorrhoids (Ligature and Abscision),

3

3

10 — 10 GO

5

...

1

5

...

6

Operations on the Urinary Organs,-

Urethral Calculus,

Stricture of Urethra :-

By Forcible Dilatation,

Rupture of Urethra,

Operations on the Generative Organs,-

2

N

1

1

قلم

1

I.-MALE.

Penis.

Phimosis,...

10

1

Paraphimosis,

co

3

Scrotum and Testis.

Hydrocele,

Castration,

~ -

II-FEMALE.

Obstetric Operations,-

Application of Forceps,.

Version,

Operations on the Organs of Locomotion,-

Removal of Sequestra,

On Bones.

On Limbs.

Flap-Thigh (Disease of Knee Joint),

Flap-Legs (Injury),.

Flap-Toe,

Flap-Forearm,

Flap-Finger,......

+2

106

15

2

21

2

2-

2

1

1

1

2

3

1

1

4

4

1

23

1

4

1

...

::

Chinese.

:

Total,......

44

9

51 104

3

...

Total.

...

...

...

-:

...

...

:

...

::

:

::

...

:

:

Fin

2

2

1

•1

3

6

J. M. ATKINSON, Superintendent,

““

336

Vb.—TABLE shewing the ADMISSIONS and MORTALITY in the GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL during the Year 1890.

GENERAL DISEASES.

Group A.Sub-Group 1.

1. Small-Pox, (transferred to Small-Pox Hospital),

2. Cow-Pox,

3. Chicken-Pox,

4. Measles,

5. Epidemic Rose-rash, (Rotheln),

6. Scarlet Fever,

7. Dengue,

8. Typhus,

9. Plague,..

10. Relapsing Fever,.

11. Enfluenza,

12. Whooping Cough,

13. Mumps,

14. Diphtheria,

15. Cerebro-spinal Fever,.

16. Simple-continued Fever,

17. Enteric Fever, Synonyms, Typhoid Fever, (Typhomalarial

Fever),

18. Cholera, Synonyms, Asiatic Cholera, Epidemic Cholera,.. 19. Sporadic Cholera, Synonyms, Simple Cholera, Cholera

Nostras,

20. Epidemic Diarrhoea,

21. Dysentery,

: N

2

6

ADMISSIONS.

::

13

DEATHS.

10 H

5

5

3

1

2

: co

3

+

Total,......

::815

1

1

59

30

17

106

co::

::

3

4

67

37

23

127

3

3

4

10

J. M. ATKINSON, Superintendent.

1

Vc.—TABLE shew