Sessional Papers - 1890

PAPERS LAID BEFORE THE LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL OF HONGKONG 1890

Table of Contents

1. Assessment

Report on the assessment for 1890-91

2. Births and Deaths

Returns for 1889

3. Blue Book

Report for 1889

4. Botanical and afforestation Department

Report for 1889

5. Criminal Statistics

Returns for 1889

6. Defalcations

Statement of amount of Defalcations By Z. M. Barradas

7. Drainage

Report on the

8. Education

Reports for 1889

9. Estimates

Despatch Respecting

10. Finance Committee

Reports of Proceedings for 1890

11. Fire Brigade

Report for 1889

12. Gaol

Report for 1889

13. Harbour Master'S

Report for 1889

14. Law Revision (Missing)

Statement Concerning Cost of

15. Legislative Counciil

Despatch approving the New Standing Rules and Orders

16. Legislative Council

Proceedings for 1890

17. Loan

Statements Concerning

18. Main Sewerage

Correspondence Respecting

19. Marquis Tseng

Correspondence Respecting the Death of

20. Medical Department

Report for 1889

21. Memoranda of association

Despatch in Connection With Companies altering their

22. Military Contribution

Despatch Respecting increased

23. Observatory

Report for 1889

24. Police

Report for 1889

25. Police force

Despatches Respecting adjutancy of the

26. Postage

Despatches Respecting Proposed Reduction of

27. Post office

Report for 1889

28. Public Works

Report on the Operations of

29. Public Works

Despatch Respecting Estimates for 1890

30. Revenue and Expenditure

Statement for 1889

31. Salaries

Despatch Respecting increase of

32. Salary

Despatch Respecting Mr. Deane's

 

HONGKONG.

THE ASSESSOR'S REPORT ON THE ASSESSMENT FOR 1890-91.

361

No. 19

90.

¿

Laid before the Legislative Council, by Command of His Excellency

The Officer Administering the Government.

ASSESSOR'S OFFICE, HONGKONG, July 21st, 1890.

SIR,-I have the honour to hand you Report on the work of the Assessment Department under my control since December last.

1. By order of His Excellency the Governor in Council, I have made an entirely new Assessment of Victoria and the Hill District.

2. The result of the new Assessment is that the Rateable Value of the tenements in Victoria has been raised from $3,062,102 to $3,342,475 shewing an increase of $280,373 or 9.15 per cent on the Rateable Value, and an increase in the Rates to be collected of $36,000.

3. I annex a tabular statement which will shew the amount increased or decreased in each District, and the net total increased.

4. The number of Rateable tenements in Victoria is 7,403 being an increase of 253 since July 1889.

5. The Assessment of the Hill District shews the Valuation to be $71,536 against $59,516, an increase of $12,020, or 20.19 per cent in Rateable Value, and $1,050 in Rates to be collected.

6. Petitions praying for a revision of the existing Assessments have been presented by the in- habitants of Stanley, Mong-kok, and Hung-hom, and by direction of the late Honourable A. LISTER, a new Valuation has been inade of the rateable tenements in these villages which I found to be much over assessed. The new Assessments shew reductions in the Rateable Value in Stanley of $845, Mong-kok $253, and lung-hom $4,315, a total diminution in the Assessment of $5,413, or in rates to be collected of $378. The existing Valuations of the other villages have been adopted for the ensuing year.

7. I have spent a considerable portion of my time in investigating the returns made by the land- lords of the rents they receive, on which I base iny Assessment and regret to state that in spite of the examples made in previous years, a number of the returns made to me are false. In 19 cases, fines were recovered amounting to $2,364.

8. The work of the Department has been satisfactorily done without the assistance of a tem- porary clerk for whom a sum of $150 was voted by Government when a general Valuation took place in previous years.

9. My clerk, Mr. CHAN PUI and Interpreter, Mr. LAU HI To have done their work with com- mendable intelligence and cheerfulness, and have been of much assistance to me in the discharge of the duties of my office since my arrival in the Colony.

10. In conclusion I hope the recent prosecutions will have a beneficial effect on the landlords, inasmuch as they will see that they cannot, without running the risk of incurring heavy penalties, make false returns of their rents to the Assessment Department,

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

The Honourable H. E. WODEHOUSE, C,M.G.,

Acting Colonial Treasurer.

· ARTHUR CHAPMAN,

Assessor.

3.62

-

:

TABLE shewing AMOUNT INCREASED or DECREASED in each DISTRICT and the NET TOTAL INCREASED.

Amount

increased

from

from

DISTRICT.

Original Total.

Interim

Assess-

Assess- ments being

ments up

cancelled

Amount Rateable decreased Value

of Tenements New

in Valuation. Victoria,

Increase. Decrease.

to April,

up to April, in April,

.1890.

1890.

1890.

No. 1.-Kennedy Town,

13,985

360

190

14,155

13,060

1,095

No. 2.-Shek-tong Tsui,

103,145

2,970

106,115

112,160

6,045

No. 3.-Sai-ying-pun,

620,825

21,390

17,690

624,525

721,876 97,351

No. 4.-Tai-ping-shan,

290,980

28,000

7,525

311,455

357,744

46,289

No. 5.-Sheung Wan,

389,223

3,690

1,300

391,613 431,425

39,812

No. 6.-Chung Wan,

No. 7.-Ha-wan,

No. 8.-Wan-tsai,

114,610

119,530

1,130,799 155,215

19,665

26,110 | 1,259,904 | 1,345,315

85,411

134,275

147,865

13,590

3,510

123,040 114,750

8,290

No. 9.-Bowrington,

42,580

42,580

43,925

1,345

No. 10.-So-kon Po,

56,080

80

1,720

54,440

54,355

85

$ 2,881,757

234,880

54,535 | 3,062,102 || 3,342,475 289,843

9,470

DEDUCT DECREASE,......

..$

9,470

NET TOTAL INCREASE,

.$ 280,373

ARTHUR CHAPMAN,

Assessor.

6

No. 90.

HONGKONG.

RETURNS OF BIRTHS AND DEATHS FOR THE YEAR 1889.

Presented to the Legislative Council, by Command of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government. RETURNS OF BIRTHS AND DEATHS FOR THE YEAR 1889.

DISTRICTS.

BRITISH AND FOREIGN COMMUNITY.

CHINESE.

GRAND TOTAL.

BIRTHS.

DEATHS.

BIRTHS.

DEATHIS.

BIRTHS. DEATHS.

Boys.

Girls.

Total. Males.

Females. Total.

Boys.

Girls.

Total. Males. Females.

Sex

Unknown.

Total.

Victoria,..

89

88

177

132

54

186

681

596

1,277

2,068

1,481

2

3,551

1,454

3,737

2

4

47

22

69

299

203

3

505

73

506

Kaulung,

Shaukiwán,

Aberdeen,

57

45

102

120

75

195

102

196

:

:

:

:

:

1

2

19

15

34

80

53

:

:

9

11

20

9

14

:

:

:

133

31

135

23

20

28

:

:

Stauley,

TOTAL,

DEATHS.

BRITISH & FOREIGN COMMUNITY.

91

90

181

135

55

190

813

689

1,502

2,576

1,826

DEATHS IN PUBLIC INSTITUTIONS.

ESTIMATED POPULATION.

10

4,107

1,683

4,597

Annual Birth-Rate |Annual Death-Rate

pr 1,000 for the Year.

per 1,000 for the Year. ·

Europeans, exclusive of Portuguese,... 57

Of the Deaths in Victoria, Males. Females.. Totul. there were in the-

British and Foreign Community,....

10,832

16.71

17.54

Portuguese,

36

Italian Convout,

140

369

509

Indians, &c.,

41

Asile de la Ste. Enfance,...

204

341

545

Chinese,

.183,650

8.18

21.00

Non-Residents,

56

Tung Wa Hospital,.....................

797

197

994

Alice Memorial Hospital,.......

21

8

29

Whole Population,

.194,482

8.65

28.61

TOTAL,.

190

TOTAL,

1,162

913

2,077

Registrar General's Office, Hongkong, 4th March, 1890.

N. G. MITCHELL-INNES, Acting Registrar General.

183

GRAND

YEAR ENDED THE 31ST DAY OF DECEMBER, 1889, AND THEIR CAUSES.

CHINESE COMMUNITY.

185

TOTAL AT THE DIFFERent Age Periods.

DISTRICT.

KAULUNG SHACKIWAN ABERDEEN DISTRICT.

STANLEY

DISTRICT.

DISTRICT.

TOTAL.

Land

Population.

Boat

Population.

Land

Population.

Boat

Population.

Land

Population.

Boat

Population.

Land

Population.

Boat

Population.

Under 1

Month.

Over 1 & under 12 Months.

Over 1 & under

5 Years.

Over 5 & under 15. Years.

Over 15 & un-

der 45 Years.

Over 45

Years.

Age Un-

known.

:

126

66

51

41

27

28

3

15

1

11

14

3

1

1

:

64

129

3

1

131

7

11

༤ལ

116

648

310

1,271

12

111

22

170

3

1

41

46

Ι

1

3

4

1

18

:

698

266

280

33

2

14

27

24

24

19

467

45

15

2

:

:

:

:

2268*

29

419

3598*

23

1,329

1

43

943

66

219

2

8

:

1

47

6

65

27

:

:.

2-28

:

:

12

12

6

4

5

:

1

1

52

12

12

14

29

1

23

24

19

2

9

4

1

:

:

:

:.

:

:

:

:

:

:.

:

:

:

1

1

1

10

24

:

:

1

2

:

2

1

:

:

:.

:

:

4

:

:

1

:

5

:.

:.

10

5

26

26

1

1

7

33

66

18

6

79

68

270

90

40

14

11

54

30

2

241

333

53

80 20

3

833

492

523

219 1,514 | 1,007 9

4,597

2

1

2

296 209 111 84

5

113

60

1

4

3

1

I

:::

3

4

TH

3

2

...

15

15

1

4

49

86

46

111

1

1

::

I CO

70

ཨརྒྱུུའ

2

12

5

366

3

3

...

1

1

1

4

2

8

1

10

14

100

64

189

1

16

7

4

1

18

3

co co

9

27 19

268

107

420

101

41

177

:

:

:

::

:

:

:

:

:

57

26

83

1

:

:

::

:

:

::

::

1

N

:

:

:

:

1

Ι

1

:

1

6

co

10

5

1

10

11

41

31

:

1

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

126

66

51

41

27

28

7

2

4 64 129

116

648

310

:

1,271

186

RETURN SHOWING THE NUMBER OF DEATHS REGISTERED DURING THE

BRITISH

AND

FOREIGN COMMUNITY.

CHINESE COMMUNITY.

VICTORIA DISTRICT.

DIVISION.

CAUSES.

Bowrington.

Wantsai.

Civil.

Army.

Navy.

Sokonpo.

Brought forward,... 37 10 2 18

General Diseases,~- Contd.

B.-Diseases dependent on Specific External Agents.

(1.)-Parasites.

Worms,

Thrush,

1

Sheungwan.

Chungwan.

Táip'ingshan.

Saiyingpun.

Shektongtsui.

town,

Kennedy-

Harbour.

Hawan.

1 · 12 120

12

82 518

76

1

:

1

:

1

1

1

3

(2.)-Effects of Poisons.

Vegetable-Opium,

Mineral-Arsenic,

Unknown-Neurotic and

Irritant,

(3.)-Effects of Injuries.

Lightning-stroke,

Heat-stroke,

(a.) Sun-stroke,

(b.) Heat-apoplexy, ·

Fractures and Contusions,... Wounds-Accidental, Sui- cidal, Homicidal, and Murderous,

Asphyxia, (Drowning),

(Hanging),

(4.)-Dietetic Diseases.

Alcoholism,.....

12:

12:

...

2

3

1

::

1

1

::

1

:

10

:

1

7

2

:

47

257

::

:

:

:

:

:

10

5

9

25

25

++

:

:

∞ ::

8

:.

:

25

Total Group B,... 12 7 7 2

C.-Developmental

Diseases.

Immaturity at Birth,

Debility,

Old Age,

Total Group C,..

D.-Miscellaneous.

Carcinoma of Stomach, Sarcoma of Lower Jaw,

Cancer,

Scrofula,

Anæmia,

Tumours,

NN:

4

THINN

1

2

:

4

12

1

:

:

:

1

:

:

10

5

2

wi

::

1961

:

...

1

199

66

11

21

1

1

1

:

:

:

I

2

4

~+:

121

:

1

1

1

3

10

2

7

:

Carried forward,...] 59

18 9

20

1

21

121

13

E

159 531 101

Total Group D,... 6

:

:

1

:

10

5

10

5

33

F

:

:

140

95

60

45

:

155 :

28

:

:

11

11

14

1

:

:

G

2:

3

15

H

:..

-::

3

co::

:

:

∞ ~

00

8

1

3

3

:

:

1

:

لسم

12

29

10

2

8

75

141

131

767

377

6

1,505

3

7

4

-

N

:

:

:

:

co:

-

:

:

:

:

:

::

:.

:.

:

:

:

2

:

10

12:

N

-

:

A:.

:

:

:

:

11

111

-::

41

88889:

: ::

18

38

46

N

2

:

:.

YEAR ENDED THE 31ST DAY OF DECEMBER, 1889, AND THEIR CAUSES,—Continued.

187

TOTAL AT THE DIFFERENT AGE PERIODS.

KAULUNG

SHAUKIWAN

ABERDEEN

STANLEY

DISTRICT.

DISTRICT.

DISTRICT.

DISTRICT.

126

66

41

27

N

88

N

4

64

129

116

648

310

Land

Population.

Boat

Population.

Land

Population.

Boat

Population.

Land

Population.

Boat

Population.

Land

Population.

Boat

Population.

Under 1

Month.

Over 1 & under 12 Months.

Over 1 & under

5 Years.

Over 5 & under

15 Years.

Over 15 & un-

der 45 Years.]

Over 45

Years.

:

:

:

431

:

:

:

∞ 22

లు

:

:

:.

8

6

1

5

170

2

13

:

:

12

085

6

6

:

:

1 N

دن

: :

8

1

4

19

Unknown.

Age

1,271

GRAND

TOTAL.

188

CAUSES.

RETURN SHOWING THE NUMBER OF DEATHS REGISTERED DURING THE

BRITISH

AND

FOREIGN COMMUNITY.

CHINESE COMMUNITY.

VICTORIA DISTRICT.

DIVISION,

Civil.

Army.

Navy.

Brought forward,... 59

II.-Local Diseases.

The Nervous System.

Cerebral Hæmorrhage,

**

Effusion,

""

""

Embolism,

Inflammation of the Brain,..

Softening of Brain,

Apoplexy,

Paralysis,

Infantile Convulsions,

Spasm of Muscle,

Paralysis, Agitans,.

Trismus,

Insanity,

Sokonpo.

Bowrington.

Wantsai.

18

9 20

1

Hawan.

Sheungwan.

Chungwan.

Táip'ingshan.

Saiyingpun.

Shektongtsui.

Kennedy-

town.

Harbour.

21 121

13 159

531 101

1

1

10

2

1

1

1

1

~

10

5

65

Mania,

2

Total Nervous System,... 21

The Circulatory System.

:

2

2

14

6

:

Aneurysm,

Heart Disease,

cr:

5

Total Circulatory System,...

5

1

The Respiratory System.

Laryngitis, (Acute),

1

Bronchitis,

3

Asthma,

Congestion of the Lungs,

Hæmoptysis, .

Pneumonia,

Phthisis,

Lung Disease,..

: Bari Hi

5

12

::

Total Respiratory System,... 22

The Digestive System.

-:

1

10

5

1

10

5

8333

1

4

2

1

1

CO

6

97

211

66

3

3

24

1

...

4

$33

2

307

17

10

1

20

::

::

11 400

15

1

15

7

Dentition,

1

Quinsy,

1

Enteritis,

1

Intestinal Obstruction,

Diarrhoea,

9

Colic,

Hepatitis,

1

Cirrhosis of Liver,

2

Abscess of Liver,

4

Ascites,

Peritonitis,

2

Acute Throat Disease,

Stomach,

Malignant Disease of the

Total Digestive System,... 22 2

1

2

:.

:

2

co :

3

3

00

:

8

407

253

80

:.

...

:..

1

9

5

6

9

5

7

...

...

10

5

3

25

:

T:

3

3

...

...

43

49

13

100

360

82

2

3333

43

49

13 100

360

83

4

2

88888

58

58

:

:

1

1

2

1

3

29

23

9

1

:

3

31

Carried forward,...129 22 12 52

14

78

604

:

:

2

:

1

:..

10

5

25

13

35 680 1,174 284

...

...

...

...

:

5

...

10

15

10 124

YEAR ENDED THE 31ST DAY OF DECEMBER, 1889, AND THEIR CAUSES,-Continued.

CHINESE COMMUNITY.

TOTAL AT THE DIFFERENT AGE PERIODS.

KAULUNG SHAUKIWAN ABERDEEN STANLEY

DISTRICT.

DISTRICT.

DISTRICT.

DISTRICT.

189

140

95

60

45

28

29

10

2

со

75

141

131

767

377

6

1,505

Land

Population.

Boat

Population.

Land

Population.

Boat

Population.

Land

Population.

Boat

Population.

Land

Population.

Boat

Population.

Under 1

Month.

Over 1 & under 12 Months.

Over 1 & under

5 Years.

Over 5 & under] 15 Years.

Over 15 & un-

der 45 Years.

Over 45

Age

Years.

Unknown.

GRAND TOTAL.

37

10

10

10

2

47

:6

6

2

6

12

12

6

:-

3

1

1

8

00

5

:

1

1

1

1

6

10

16

3

6

259 280

31

571

1

1

:

1

697

6

703

17

I

100

3

20

2

10

5

698

266 280

33

29

23

1,329

:

:

:

:

10:

18

1 x

21

1 42

2

19 21

1

43

:

1

2

1

3

·

1

1

1

1

1

1

4

10

21 2

7

12

65

52

11

12

14

29

1.

11

24

18

450 414

917

65

52

12

12

14

29

1

14

24

19

467

419

943

...

25

22

3

1

1

1

1

1

1

24

19

2

8

4

1

2

22

41

13

48

64

190

1

1

1

1

3

3

1

4

1

1

2

2

1

1

1

1

:.

:

:

:

:..

:

:

27

23

24

19

2

9

4

1

4

27

45

15

62 66

219

2

285 183 109

82

49

75

20

3 710 382 190 200

1,344 906

-.]

7

4,039

190

RETURN SHOWING THE NUMBER OF DEATHS REGISTERED DURING THE

BRITISH

AND

FOREIGN COMMUNITY.

CHINESE COMMUNITY.

VICTORIA DISTRICT.

DIVISION.

CAUSES.

Civil.

Army.

Navy.

Brought forward,... 129 22 12

Local Diseases,--Contd.

The Urinary System.

Nephritis,

Bright's Disease,

...

2

Uræmia,

2

Surgical Kidney,

1

Diabetes,

Calculus,

Total Urinary System,...

6

Sokonpo.

Bowrington.

Wantsai.

52

Hawan.

Sheungwan.

Chungwan.

Táip'ingshan.

Saiyingpun.

Shektongtsui.

Kennedytown.

Harbour.

14

78 604

35 680 1,174 284 15

10 124

:.

:

:

Affections connected with Pregnancy.

Abortion,......

Affections connected with Parturition.

Obstructed Labour,

Affections consequent on Parturition.

Unknown-Died within a

month after delivery,

:

:

:

:

:

The Skin.

Herpes, Ulcer,

Total Skin,...

III.-Morbid States and Processes.

General Atrophy, (Maras-

mus),

Dropsy,

Total Class III,...

::

IV.-Ill-defined & Unknown.

:

:

:

:

:

:

1

::

:

:

:.

1

:

:

1

1

1

2:

2

1:

2

1

2

:

2

:

:.

:

9

:

or:

5

10

5

...

1

...

:

2

1

3

4

3

::

::

:

::

:

::

:

112

or:

5

6

18

107

9

:-

10

5

6 130

107

9

1

10

10

5

Brain Disease,.

Ι

Disease of Spinal Cord,....

1

...

Abscess,

1

1

Disease of Bones and Joints,.

1

Unknown,

20

1

9

2

16

2

65

11

62

7

Total Class IV,...| 20 1

9

2

16

2

1

68

12

62

:

7

TOTAL,155

23 12 64

16

96 613

42

896 ́ ́ 1,296

362

16

10

140

Registrar General's Office, Hongkong, 14th April, 1890.

YEAR ENDED THE 31ST DAY OF DECEMBER, 1889, AND THEIR CAUSES-Continued.

191

CHINESE COMMUNITY.

TOTAL AT THE DIFFERENT AGE PERIODS.

KAULUNG SHAUKIWAN ABERDEEN STANLEY DISTRICT. DISTRICT. DISTRICT.

DISTRICT.

GRAND TOTAL.

382

490

200

1,344

906

7

4,039

Land

Population.

Boat

Population.

Land

Population.

Boat

Population.

Land

Population.

Boat

Population.

Land

Population.

Boat

Population.

Under 1

Month.

Over 1 & under 12 Months.

Over 1 & under

5 Years.

Over 5 & under 15 Years.

Over 15 & un-

der 45 Years.

Over 45

Years.

Age Un-

known.

285

183

109

82

:

:

49

125

75

20

3 710

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

1

1

1

2

1

1

...

1

2

4

++

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

1

1

1

F:

:

:

:

:

:

::

:

2

1

4:

:

:

::

2

2

1

1

::

:

~

1221-

:

:

:

5

:

00

26

1

5

: H

1

4

1

:

4

·1

1

1

:

26

:

1

6

7

33

64

15

2

co

3

6

79

33

66

18

6

Co

79

212

68

218

68

:

112 158

270

1

1

:

1

1

1

1

2

1

1

1

3

90

40

14

8

53

27

2

234

90

40

14

11

54

30

2

241

:

:

N. G. MITCHELL-INNES,

Acting Registrar General,

296

209

111

81

53

80

20

3

833

492 523

219

1,514 1,007 9

4,597

9

23

2

10

24

N

1

2

:

192

DEATHS RATES IN DIFFERENT GROUPS OF AGES FOR THE YEAR 1889.

AGES.

BRITISH AND Foreign.

CHINESE.

Deaths.

Per cent. of whole.

Deaths.

Per cent. of whole.

Under 1 month..

6

3.16

827

18.77

Over 1 and under 12 months,

15

7.89

477

10.82

Over 1 year and under 5 years,

12

6.32

511

11.59

Over 5 and under 15 years,

4

2.10

215

4.88

Over 15 and under 45 years,

107

56.32

1,407

31.93

Over 45 years,

Unknown,

43

22.63

964

21.87

3

1.58

6

14

{

Total,.........

Registrar General's Office, Hongkong, 4th March, 1890.

190

100.00

4,407

100.00

N. G. MITCHELL-INNES,

Acting Registrar General.

MORTALITY STATISTICS,

FOR THE YEAR 1889.

193

BRITISH AND FOREIGN COMMUNITY.

The whole Colony, Death Rate,-Civil Population,................

23.7 per 1,000 per annum.

CHINESE COMMUNITY.

Victoria Registration District, Death Rate,-Land Population,

27.3

per 1,000 per annum.

Boat

6.8

""

""

Kaulung

Land

23.2

"

>>

21

""

Boat

41.8

""

23

""

Sháukiwán

Land

23.0

""

>>

;)

""

Boat

21.0

""

>>

"

#!

Aberdeen

Land

20.8

29

>>

""

Boat

23.0

>>

""

23

""

Stanley

Land

20.0

A

">

>>

>>

Boat

3.0

""

""

""

*

;;

The whole Colony,

Land

26.7

11

Boat

15.1

"

;">

";

19

:

""

2

Land and Boat Population, 24.5

""

HUGH MCCALLUM, Secretary.

SANITARY BOARD ROOM,

HONGKONG, 1st March, 1890.

NOTE.-There is a slight difference between the death-rate shown in this summary, and that given in the Mortality Statistics issued by the Registrar-General for the estimated population of the Colony. The difference arises from the cir- cumstance that the estimated population for the Kan-lung district is given at 2,000 more than the Registrar- General's estimate. The reason for adding the 2,000 is given in a report on the sanitary condition of Kau-lung made in the early part of 1885.

194

A SUMMARY OF DEATHS AND THEIR CAUSES SHOWN IN THE ATTACHED RETURN AS HAVING BEEN REGISTERED DURING THE YEAR 1889.

DISEASE.

EUROPEAN AND

FOREIGN

COMMUNITY.

Civil. | Army. Navy.

VICTORIA DISTRICT.-DIVISION.

CHINESE COMMUNITY.

Estimated

Population.

Estimated

Strength.

Estimated

Strength.

Sokonpo.

Bowrington.

Wantsai.

Hawan.

Sheungwan.

Chungwan.

Taipingshan.

Saiyingpun.

Shektongtsui.

Kennedytown. Harbour Esti- mated Popu-

lation.

6,465

Estimated Population,

124,600

Kanlung

District.

Sháukiwán

District.

Aberdeen

District.

Stanley

District.

Estimated

Population.

Estimated

Population.

Estimated

Population.

Estimated

Population.

Land. Boat. | Land. | Boat. Land. Boat. Land. Boat.

20,652 12,775 5,000 4,785 4,000 2,500 3,500 1,000 1,000

TOTAL.

GRAND

TOTAL.

3 3

24 37

1

10

4

:

: N

:

+9

10

10

6

1

2

1

2

N

3

:

10

4

:

:.

2

1

571

1,274

703

11

11

:

:

2

8885

58

65

10 18

52

333

1

11

12

13:

14

29

2:3

17

946

1

929

10

5

65 6 97

211

66

CO

2

:

4333 2

307

17 10

1

...

1

1

2

1

...

...

7

43 49 13 100

...

...

:

:

1

360

82

F.

3

2

3

29

2

3

20

I

2 23 9

1

10

139

10

...

AGN

2

8

1

389

25

22

24

19

2

8

4

1

190

1

6

189

:

...

:

:

1

1

00 10

2 9

4

:::

1

1101

:

:

42131

12

1 33

112

9

27 2

316

2:

20

:

6 9

2 2

2

:

:

2

o co A

4

3

4

5

113

60

40

31

9

...

1

⠀⠀⠀ a

4

10

4

12

15

60

3 27 17 13 206 209 123 3

686

12383

33

34

57

12

6

A:

:

:

GO H

:

3

186

4

1

413

1

364

ལྷནྡྷུ ུ༠༠

2

982

3

12

2

112

10

7

co

:

:

993

881

Infantile

Convulsions,

7

Convulsive

Discases,

Trismus Nascentium,

Throat

Acute,

Affections,

Chronic,

: 09

3

:

::

Chest

Acute,

Affections,

Chronic,

9

12

+ :

1

15

5:

Cholera,

Vomiting & Purging,

1

Bowel

Cholera Infantum,

Complaints, Diarrhoea,

Dysentery,

Colic,

IOS:

1

ཝཱ

1

I

Malarial,

Remittent, Intermittent,

17

1

7

Puerperal Fever,

1

....

Fevers, Simple Continued,

2

Typhoid,

1

Exanthe-

Measles,

3

1

matous,

Small-pox,

Marasmus,

F:

:

Other Causes,

81

11

10 21

TOTAL...

153

25

12

49

Sanitary Board Room, Hongkong, 1st March, 1890.

64 16 96 613 42 | 896 1,296 362 | 16 10 140 296 209 110 84

323

52

80

20

3 4,595

4,595

HUGH MCCALLUM, Secretary.

MONTH.

1885.

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT FOR THE LAST FIVE YEARS.-(EUROPEAN COMMUNITY, CIVIL).

Convulsions.

Throat Affections. Chest Affections. Bowel Complaints. I

Fevers.

January,

February,

March,.

April,

1

2

May,

June,

1

July,

2

2

Co

:

T:

:

:

August,

Co

September,

2

نات

3

1

2

:

:

October,.....

1 1

November,....

1 1

1 1

December,.

1

1

2

:

:

Total,.

612 11

I-

1

...

2

:

:

:

Other Causes.

Total Deaths.

Death-rate per 1,000

per

Annum.

1888.

1889.

2

1

1 24

2

9 12

8 13 11

40

13 15.4 25.1 20.9 74.8 23.9

3

3

7 6

12

11

12

12

15

15 21.3 23.2 22.8 28.0 27.6

4

ON

:

:

:

2

1

2

1

2

1

6

1

2

2

5

3 16

22664

3

6

3

1

9

6

1

1

2 1

1

4

2

3

2 31

1

1

2

1

10

O

1

3

4

1

2

1

1

2

3

3 4

3

3

3

2

1

2 22

12

12

5

8

19

14

16

15

6

2

13

12

12

11

11 7

4

9

11

18 15

13

210 6

12

9

5

18

17 26

29

10

Jauni

40

:

2

1

1 4

2

++

10

4

ลง

5 10

2 4 12

00

8

6 10

9

7

26

14

30

23

10

7

9

16

19

14

16

2

~

4

00

8

10

11

16 13

16

12 36.7 27.1 30.4 28.0 22.0 9 25.1 23.2 22.7 20.5 16.5 14 21.3 36.7 28.4 24.2 25.6 9 34.8 32.949.153.9 16.5 19 50.3 27.1 56.6 42.7 | 35.3 17 31.0 36.7 26.4 29.7 | 31.0 10 21.3 31.0 24.5 29.6 18.2

:

N

LO

A

4

12

5

17

16

13

14

14 32.9 30.9 24.4 25.9 | 25.5

6

7

15

2

9

13

20

8

4 17.4 25.2 37.5 14.8

7.3

9

:

6

2 16 5

11

15

9

32

10

17 29.0 17.4 60.0 18.4 30.8

34 31 25 21

:

101545 | 19

30 47 49 22

93107 80

81174 173|214 | 210 153 28.0 28.0 33.7 32.3 | 23.0

195

Convulsions.

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT FOR THE LAST FIVE YEARS.-(CHINESE COMMUNITY.)

Throat Affections.

Chest Affections.

Bowel Complaints.

Fevers.

Other Causes.

Total Deaths.

196

Death-Rate per 1,000

per Annum.

1885.

1886.

1887.

1888.

1889.

1885.

1886.

1887.

1888.

May,

January,

February,

March,

April,..

Unknown.

39 41 138 67

888

10

50 89 76

87 73 87

48

56

60

76

55

Unknown.

42

15

26

97

35

}

50 1

N

1889.

1885.

1886.

1887.

1888.

1889.

1885.

1886.

1887.

1888.

1889.

1885.

1886.

1887.

1888.

1889.

1885.

1886.

1887.

1888.

1889.

1885.

1886.

1887.

1888.

1889.

1885.

1886.

1887.

1888.

1889.

93 90 86 81

16 27 28 25

61

971

74

:

~

393

Unknown.

77 70

81

70 82 78

87 66

82 68

Unknown.

28 22 17 18

20 16 28 19

25 15 34 17

Unknown.

33333

52 406 61

65 59 180 46|

921

731 61 54

73

87

58 62

Unknown.

입양

50

81 86 62 262 301 291 745 296 19.0 21.2 20,1| 50.3| 19.5

72 92 59 291 304 277 457 269 21.0 21 4 19.1 30.7 17.7

791

43

89 52 53 324 354 335 298 292 23.4 24.9 23.1| 20.8 19.2 70 70 74 305] 323 314 300 319 22.0 22.7 21.6 20.1 20.9

June,

July,

85

78 110 95 133

63 87 146 118 126 25 43 4 1

:

117

83

57 65 115

56 120 82 46 1 1 1 102

33333

83 81 103 71

49 29 77 22

81 79

78 88

78

86 72

91 83243 63 53145 42129 107] 111

82 93 93 315 419 382 446 407 22.8 29.3 26.2 29.9 26.7 74 130 85155 56 47311 40 95 110 118 122105 81 51 103121 88 536 430 492 803| 444 38.7 30.1| 33.7 53.9 29.0 88 108 89 97 112 57100, 702 464 464 573 454 50.7 32.4 31.7 38.4 30.3

August,

48

September,

45

89 155

68 113 144 121 56 78 1

:

103]

77

63 114 139 119 59 52||| 1

2

:

115

92

225

79

821

October,

61

November,.... 39 67

888

....

December, 46 41 147

71 105 125 130 90 62 1

80 93 107 46 53 2

87 84 57 22 1

1

1

85 102 881

2 104 113 105

1 2 85 91 119

75 58124 53 52 54 49121| 111| 160| 95 93 85102 115115 75 537 489 520 483 396 38.8 34.0 35.4 32.2 25.8 86 73 95 48 47 55 33 85 133] 134 89 89 72 66 70101 54 471 454 446 472 368 34.0 31.6 30.3 31.4 23.9 99 77 51 43 34 44 34116 139 125 108 78 74 92 71112 93 477 509 424 489, 413 34.5 35.4 28.8 32.4 26.8 94 90 50 65 46 38 42 94 139 172 69 109 58 82 95 89 87 391 519 500 383 437 28.3| 36.0| 33,9| 25.4 28.3 82 90 42 26 30 25 27 89 83 219 72 54 59 78 110 69 53 377 341 626, 336 310 27.2 23.6 42.3 22.2 20.0

Month.

Total,...! 7431,184 1,212| 1,267|

...

:

524 12 12 8

12

:

1,085 1,000 1,087,924

492418856|368|

1,194 1,389 1,426 947

869 1,070 1,057|891 4,9884,907, 5,071] 5,785) 4,405| 29.4 28.3) 30.5 32.7 24.5

Table showing the total deaths for each month in the years 1885 to 1889 inclusive and the death-rate for estimated population (army and navy excluded).

Estimated Population,.

174,000 178,000 182,500 | 187,000 | 192,000

DEATH-RATE PER 1,000 PER ANNUM.

REMARKS.

Year,

1885.

1886. 1887. 1888.

1889.

1885. 1886. 1887.

1888.

1889.

1886.

1887.

1888.

1889.

January,

270

· 314

302

785

309

18.6

21.1

19.9

50.4

19.3

Deaths from causes other

than small-pox and cho-

February,

302

316

289

472

284

20.8

21.2

19.0

30.3

17.8

leraic complaints,..

5,014

5,020

5,233

4,548

March,..

343

368

351

313

304

23.6

24.8

23.1

20.1

19.0

Deaths from small-pox aud

choleraic complaints,

66

265

762

11

April,

318

335

326

311

328

21.9

22.6

21.4

20.0

20.5

May,

326

437

397

459

421

22.4

29.9

26.1

29.4

26.3

June,

554

447

518

832

453

38.2

30.1

34.1

53.5

28.3

July,

728

478

494

596

473

50.2

32.2

32.5

38.2

29.6

7

August,

553

508

534

499

413

38.1

34.2

35.1

82.0

25.9

September,

482

470

459

488

379

33.2

31.7

30.2

31.3

23.6

October,....

494

525

437

503

427

34.0

35.4

28.7

82.3

26.7

November,

400

532

520

391

441

27.6

35.9

34.1

25.1

27.6

December,

392

350

658

346

327

26.5

23.6

48.3

22.2

20.4

HUGII MCCALLUM, Secretary.

Total,.

5,162 5,080 5,285 5,995

4,559

29.7

28.5

29.0

32.1

23.7

Total,.

5,080

5,285

5,995

4,559

SANITARY BOARD ROOM, HONGKONG, 1st March, 1890.

197

7

353

No. 18

16

90,

HONGKONG.

REPORT ON THE BLUE BOOK AND DEPARTMENTAL REPORTS FOR 1889.

Laid before the Legislative Council, by Command of His Excellency

the Officer Administering the Government.

1.-TAXATION.

There have been no changes under this head.

2.-REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE.

The Revenue amounted to $1,978,274.73, or excluding premiums from Land Sales to $1,823,549.13; and the Expenditure amounted to $1,833,718.79, including Extraordinary Works; excluding these, to $1,459,167.16.

The Revenue and Expenditure for the past five years have been:—

Year.

Revenue.

1885,.........$1,251,889.70

1886,....................... 1,367,977.74

1887,. ..... 1,427,485.79

1888,..

1,557,300.03

1889,......... 1,823,549.13

Ordinary

Expenditure.

Extraordinary

Expenditure, including

Premiums from Land.

Defensive Works.

$ 66,658.50

$1,146,103.15

$475,147.24

34,731.59

1,195,236.81

825,624.84

155,238.02

1,278,181.68

744,820.38

160,688.64

1,461,459.64

530,870.03

154.725.60

1,459,167.16

374,551.63

3.-LOCAL REVENUES.

The Chinese inhabitants contributed in 1889, by voluntary assessment among them-

selves, to the pay of the District Watchmen,

and received from the Government for the same object a grant-in-aid of

4.-ASSETS AND LIABILITIES.

.$7,350.13 2,084.00

On the 31st December, 1889, the assets of the Colony exceeded its liabilities by...$505,109.87 (a) The surplus assets in:-

1884, were 1885,

""

In 1886, the liabilities exceeded the assets by In 1887, the surplus assets were............

1888,

Do.

..$.729,562.02 427,692.42

..$ 191,512.29

$ 631,374.08 (b) ..$ 360,649.76

5.-PUBLIC DEBT.

No new loan has been raised.

Amount of present Loan, £200,000. Amount of Sinking Fund, £17,680.

6.-MILITARY EXPENDITURE,

The Military Expenditure (inclusive of the Volunteer Corps) defrayed by the Colony during the last six years has been as follows:-

1884,

1885,

1886,

1887,

1888,

1889,

Military Contribution, exclusive of

Defensive Works, and inclusive of Volunteer Corps.

Defensive Works.

Defensive Works.

$114,498.78

$ 3,464.64

£

$117,337.00

$ 68,153.45

650. 0.4 £12,576.10.2

.$124,561.68

.$128,815.63

.$134,594.68

$217,901.45 $258,444.28 $ 62,115.90

£39,230. 0.0

£43,710. 7.6

.$134,261.12

$ 63,753.73

£10,036. 4.0 £9,678.14.5

(a.) This included a sum of $50,000 debited to the Post Office, it has been ascertained that this sum has been embezzled by the Superin- tendent of the Money Order Office.

(3.) A loan of £200,000 having been raised during 1887 to be paid off on the 1st of March, 1907.

#

354

!

7.-GOVERNMENT BUILDINGS.

Government House.

Government House was maintained in repair, and the Sanitary arrangements were satisfactory.

8.-PUBLIC WORKS.

The expenditure under this head was $57,180.66 for ordinary repairs to buildings, $59,371.72 for upkeep of the roads and streets; $70,038.00 for storm damages; and $63,753.73 for Defensive Works.

9.-LEGISLATION.

The following Ordinances were passed during the year:-

No. 1.-An Ordinance entitled The Chinese Emigration Consolidation Ordinance, 1889.

No. 2.-An Ordinance entitled The Evidence Consolidation Ordinance, 1889.

No. 3.-An Ordinance entitled The Compensation to Families Ordinance, 1889.

No. 4.-An Ordinance to amend Ordinance 6 of 1887.

No. 5.-An Ordinance for the naturalization of TsÜ TAK-PIU otherwise CHING Ú.

No. 6.-An Ordinance entitled The Statute Law Preservation Ordinance, 1886, Amendment

Ordinance, 1889.

No. 7.-An Ordinance entitled The Coroner's Abolition Ordinance Supplemental Ordinance,

1889.

No. 8.-An Ordinance to amend the Powers of Police Magistrates.

No. 9.-An Ordinance to amend The Cattle Diseases, Slaughter-Houses, and Markets Or-

dinance, 1887.

No. 10.-An Ordinance to amend The Reformatory Schools Ordinance, 1886.

No. 11. An Ordinance entitled The Stone Cutters' Island Ordinance, 1889.

No. 12.-An Ordinance for the Incorporation of the Director, in Hongkong, of the Berlin

Ladies' Mission for China.

No. 13.-An Ordinance entitled The Prison amendment Ordinance, 1889.

No. 14.- An Ordinance entitled The Arms Ordinance, 1889.

No. 15.--An Ordinance entitled The Buildings Ordinance, 1889.

No. 16. An Ordinance entitled The Praya Reclamation Ordinance, 1889.

No. 17.-An Ordinance to repeal Ordinance No. 6 of 1889, and to amend the Statute Law

Preservation Ordinance, 1886.

No. 18. An Ordinance entitled The Passengers Relief Ordinance, 1889.

www.

No. 19.-An Ordinance entitled The Protection of Women and Girls Ordinance, 1889.

No. 20.—An Ordinance for the naturalization of LI MAN HI otherwise РOKSHAN.

No. 21.-An Ordinance to amend Ordinance No. 17 of 1887.

No. 22.-An Ordinance to amend The Post Office Ordinance, 1887.

No. 23.-An Ordinance entitled The Crown Lands Resumption Ordinance, 1889.

No. 24.-An Ordinance to amend The Merchant Shipping Consolidation Ordinance, 1879. No. 25.-An Ordinance to amend the Chinese Emigration Consolidation Ordinance, 1889,

and to make provision against certain emigration abuses.

No. 26.—An Ordinance entitled The Chinese Extradition Ordinance, 1889.

No. 27.-An Ordinance entitled The French Mail Steamers Ordinance continuation Ordi-

nance, 1889.

No. 28.-An Ordinance entitled The German Mail Steamers Ordinance continuation Ordi-

nance, 1889.

No. 29.-An Ordinance to amend The Hongkong and Shanghai Bank Ordinance.

No. 30.-An Ordinance to provide for certain expenses of trial &c., of Criminal Lunatics. No. 31.-An Ordinance for the naturalization of LEUNG SHÜ otherwise LEUNG ÜN or LEUNG

YUK or YUK SHANG.

No. 32.-An Ordinance to amend Ordinance 14 of 1862. (Patents.)

No. 33.-An Ordinance to authorise the Appropriation of a Supplementary Sum of Two hundred and Ninety-five thousand and Eighty-seven Dollars and Ninety- nine Cents to defray the Charges of the Year 1888.

No. 34.--An Ordinance to apply a sum not exceeding One Million Three hundred and Three thousand, and Seventy-seven Dollars to the Public Service of the Year 1890. No. 35.-An Ordinance to amend The Merchant Shipping Consolidation Ordinance, 1879.

355

10.-COUNCIL AND ASSEMBLIES.

Executive Council.-His Excellency Major-General BEVAN EDWARDS, R.E., C.B., the Senior Military Officer was admitted a Member of the Executive Council. Honourable J. M. PRICE vacated his seat on his retirement from the service.

Legislative Council.-The Honourable A. J. LEACH, Acting Attorney General, the Honourable S. BROWN, Surveyor General, the Honourable J. H. STEWART LOCKHART, Registrar General, and the Honourable J. J. KESWICK were admitted Members of the Legislative Council. Honourable H. E. WODEHOUSE Vacated his seat on the Honourable A. LISTER resuming the duties of Colonial Treasurer. The Honourable A. P. MACEWEN resumed his seat as Member nominated by the Chamber of Commerce on his return to the Colony. Honourable J. M. PRICE vacated his seat on his retirement from the service.

Sanitary Board.-The Surveyor General and the Captain Superintendent of Police were appointed President and Vice-President respectively.

Board of Examiners.—Mr. F. H. MAY was appointed Honorary Secretary to the Board.

11.-CIVIL EStablishments.

Sir G. WILLIAM DES VEUX was absent from the Colony, by permission, from the 30th August to 23rd September. Mr. FREDERICK STEWART, the Colonial Secretary, administered the Government.

Mr. J. M. PRICE, Surveyor General, retired on pension through ill health on the 23rd March, and was succeeded by Mr. SAMUEL BROWN.

Mr. FREDERICK STEWART, Colonial Secretary, died on the 29th September and was succeeded by Mr. FRANCIS FLEMING, C.M.G.

Temporary Changes occurred in various Departments owing to Officers going on or returning from leave.

12.-OFFICERS WHO HAVE GIVEN SECURITY FOR THE DISCHARGE OF THEIR DUTIES. The validity of the sureties of the various Officers was duly enquired into at the end of every quarter, and found to be satisfactory.

13.

PENSIONS.

The following Officers retired on pension during the year:—

J. M. PRICE, Surveyor General.

7 European Police Constables.

17 Indian Police Constables.

14.-EXPENDITURE OF THE DEPARTMENTS.

The amounts paid during the year on account of the Departments were:-

Payments in Great Britain in Sterling money,

Payments in the Colony in Local Currency,

15.-FOREIGN CONSULS.

No new Consulates were established in the Colony during 1889.

16.-POPULATION.

.£20,447. 38. 10d.

$826,048.48.

The estimated population on the 31st December, 1889, was as follows:-

Males, Females,

.138,033 56,449

194,482

which is 21,318 less than the estimated population at the end of 1888.

The last census was taken in 1881, the population being then returned as 160,402, of which

115,369 were males, and 45,033 females.

The following is the mean estimated population for the last 8

years:-

Years.

Males.

Females.

Total.

1882,

119,704

46,729

166,433

1883,

124,768

48,707

173,475

1884,

.130,560

50,969

181,529

1885,

137,079

53,515

190,594

1886,

.144,550

56,440

200,990

1887,

152,427

60,524

212,951

1888,

..154,500

61,300

215,800

1889,

.138,033

56,449

194,482

:

2

356

The births and deaths for the last 5 years were as follows:-

Per 1,000 of mean Population.

Years.

Births.

Deaths.

Births.

Deaths.

1885,

.1,555

5,192

8.16

27.24

1886,

...

1,557

5,100

7.74

25.37

1887.

1,705

5,317

8.01

24.97

1888,

1,662

6,034

7.70

27.96

1889,

..1,683

4,597

8.65

23.64

17.-ECCLESIASTICAL ESTABLISHMENTS.

There were no changes in these Establishments, as compared with previous years.

18.-EDUCATION.

The total number of Schools subject to supervision by the Government amounted, in 1889, to 99, as compared with 97 in 1888 and 94 in 1887.

The total number of Scholars subject to Government supervision in the Government and Grant- in-aid Schools during the last 5 years was as follows:-

1

Years.

1885,

1886,

1887.

1888, 1889,

Govt.

}

Grant-in-aid.

Total.

.1,803

4,041

5,844

..1,893

3,951

5,844

.1,814

4,160

5,974

.1,933

4,325

6,258

...2,388

4,814

7,202

The total expenditure for these Schools for the last 5 years was as follows:-

1885, (after deducting School fees),

.$36,085.27

1886, (

"}

29.

);

43,085.50

1887, (

22

),

43,070.91

1888, ( 1889, (

9.9

**

),

>>

},

... 45,518.93 44,321.98

19.-EXCHANGE, MONEY, WEIGHTS AND MEASURES.

Exchange.

The rate of Exchange on 4 months' Bills on London was on 2nd January, 1889, 3/14, it fell to 3/0 on the 6th March, and rose to 3/33 on 27th November, and was at the end of the year 3/21.

Currency.

The law affecting currency has remained unchanged.

Bank Notes.

The Bank Notes in circulation in Hongkong during the last 5 years, as furnished by the Managers of the respective Banks, were as follows:-

Average Amount. ..$4,080,071

Years.

1885,.

1886,.

4,368,705

1887,

5,052,473

1888,...

5,759,875

1889,.

6,034,984

Money Circulation.

Specie in Reserve.

$2,000,833

2,138,333

2,362,833

2,660,000

2,552,500

The approximate amount of Coin put into circulation up to 31st December, 1889, was as follows:-

Hongkong Dollars and half Dollars struck at the Hongkong Mint,..........$1,421,487 Hongkong Silver and Copper Subsidiary Coins (20, 10, and 5 cent

pieces; and 1 Cent and Mil pieces during 1889),

The importation of Copper Coin has been discontinued.

Weights and Measures.

.$1,040,000

The Weights and Measures in use in the Colony are regulated by Ordinance 8 of 1885.

20.-IMPORTS AND EXPORTS.

357

There being no Custom House, it is not possible to furnish an account of all Imports and Exports but a record of Raw Opium imported and exported during 1889 has been kept, and is as follows:-

Imported, Exported,

The fractions are explained by the fact that broached chests

21.-SHIPPING.

Arrivals exclusive of Junks.

.67,4292 21 chests. ..61,8082 27

were landed here and were exported.

The total arrivals, exclusive of Junks, during the year 1889, amounted to 3,820 vessels and 4,518,614 tons, being 17,828 tons under the arrivals in 1888.

Junks.

22,926 Junks measuring 1,716,922 tons arrived in the Colony in 1889, as against 23,958 Junks and 1,863,968 tons in 1888, showing a decrease of 1,032 Junks and 147,046 tons.

The total arrivals for the last 5 years were:-

EXCLUSIVE of Junks.

JUNKS.

Years. Number of Vessels.

1885,

3,428

3,866,709

GRAND TOTAL. Tons. Number of Vessels. Tons. Number of Vessels.

23,674 1,797,222 27,102 5,663,931

Tons.

1886,...

4,251

4,571,296

22,971

1,752,868

27,222

6,324,164

1887,....

4,078

4,607,914

23,521

1,793,923

27,599

6,401,837

1888,...... 3,821

4,536,442

23,958 1,863,968

27,779

6,400,410

1889,...... 3,820

4,518,614 22,926 1,716,922

26,746

6,235,536

Immigration and Emigration.

The following will show the number of Chinese who arrived in, and the number who departed from the Colony during the last 5 years:-

Years.

1885,

1886,

1887,

1888,

1889,

Arrived.

Departed.

80,773

57,517

88,704

64,522

92,375

82,897

98,800

96,195

99,315

47,849

22.-AGRICULTURE.

The lands of the Colony being limited and not favourable for agricultural purposes, there is no inducement for this industry here. The produce is quite nominal, and is for local consumption only.

23.-MANUFACTURES, &C. Manufactories.

No new Manufactories have been added to those already in existence.

Steam-Launches.

The total number of Steam-Launches built in the Colony in 1889, was 26, with a total tonnage of 1,172.58, as against 24 with a total tonnage of 1,655 in 1888. The total number of licensed Steam-Launches of all descriptions, in the Colony, in 1889, were:-

Licensed to carry passengers,

Private Launches,.....

Colonial Goverment Launches.

War Department Launches,..

50

41

10

6

107

24.-GRANTS OF LAND.

The sales of land on lease during the last 5 years were:-

Years.

Total No. of Sales.

Total No. of Acres sold.

A,

R.

P.

1885,

145

1886,

88

1887,

187

28. 0. 142

82. 2. 312

76. 0. 8

1888,

202

104. 0. 41

1889,

65

88. 1. 15

t

358

25.-GAOLS AND PRISONERS.

On the 1st January, 1889, there were 503 prisoners in Victoria Gaol; 3,705 were admitted during the

year, and 3,608 discharged; the total number of prisoners on the 31st December, 1889, was 600, of whom 39 were Europeans.

The daily average of prisoners was 581, as against 531 in the previous year.

The number of prisoners admitted into Gaol during the last five years was as follows:-

YEARS.

Men.

NO. OF PRISONERS.

TOTAL.

Women.

Juveniles.

DAILY AVERAGE NUMBER IN PRISON.

1885,

3,327

147

136

3,610

530.00

1886,

4,278

173

149

4,600

674.00

1887,

4,012

149

147

4,308

584,00

1888,

3,390

98

139

3,627

531.00

1889,

3,453

.. 131

121

3,705

581.00

26.-CRIMINAL STATISTICS.

Supreme Court.

The following is a Return of cases tried at the Supreme Court during the last five years:—

CHARGES ABANDONED.

POSTPONED.

Number Number

YEARS.

of Cases.

of

Convicted. Acquitted.

Persons.

Number of Number of No. of

Cases. Persons. Cases.

No. of Persons.

1885,

1886,

22

1887,

1888,

1889,

91

147

103

22

16

75

107

59

20

16

27

1

1

94

155

82

36

17

26

1

8

101

186

99

47

28

40

92

143

64

41

24

37

22295

Total,...

453

738

407

166

101

152

2

9

Average of last 5 years,

90%

1473

813

331

20층

30/1

&

Do.

ending 1884,

95%

1453

98

313

8#

15

34

Grou

CHRO

1#

1

Police Magistrates' Court.

The Cases before the Police Magistrates during the last 5 years were as follows:-

CASES HOW DISPOSED OF.

Total No. Total No.

YEARS.

of Cases.

of Prisoners.

Convicted and Punished.

Dis- charged.

Committed Committed

for

pending Trial. Orders.

Ordered

to Find Security.

Punished

for False Tes- timony.

Un-

decided.

1885,

10,281

11,901

1886,

14,611

16,647

8,800 12,923 2,388

2,446

161

14

456

6

18.

159

5

969

35

168

1887,

12,015

14,182

10,679 2,779

167

32

463

14

48

1888,

11,647

13,309

9,932 2,849

174

109

192

3

50

1889,

8,670

10,033

6,894 2,497

167

54

337

17

67

Total,.........

Average of last 5 years,

Do.

ending 1884,

13,214.4

57,224 66,072 49,228 12,959

11,444.8

828

214

2,417

75

351

9,845.6 2,591.8

165.6

42.8

483.4

15

70.2

9,517.2 11,221.4

8,320.4 2,259.8

189.0

26.8

309.2

24.6

91.6

K

Marine Magistrates' Court.

The Cases before the Marine Magistrate's Court during the last 5 years were as follows:-

DEFENDANTS HOW DISPOSED OF.

359

Number

Number of

Forfei-

To be dis-

Com-

YEARS.

of

Cases.

Defend- Impri- ants. soned.

ture

Fined.

of

Repri- manded.

Sent back to

charged

Dis-

mitted

from

missed. for

Duty.

Pay.

Ship.

Trial.

1885,

111

221

136

47

14

1886,

58

87

43

24

1887, 1888, 1889,

90

152

47

37

....

70

167

66

38

4662

1

21

2

1

11

21

15

3

23

2

53

1

5

53

107

54

25

15

13

Total,...

382

734

346

171

28

27

85

4

73

Average of last 5 years,

76.4

146.8

69.2

34.2

5.6

5.4

17.0

0.8

14.6

Do.

ending 1884,... 72.4

140.0

55.6

26.4

10.4

2.6

18.4

1.8

24.4

:

Police.

The Cases brought under the notice of the Police during the last 5 years were as follows:--

SERIOUS Offences.

MINOR OFFENCES.

YEARS.

Number of

Convicted.

Cases.

Discharged.

Number of Cases.

Convicted.

Discharged.

1885,

1886,

1887,

1888,

1889,

2,466

1,298

561

4,309

3,707

757

2,500

1,389

472.

6,336

6,457

672

2,577

1,234

565

5,904

6,310

1,21,4

2,436

1,116

556

5,678

5,772

1,105

2,893

1,409

618

4,568

4,529

1,131

Total,.......

12,872

6,446

2,772

26,795

26,775

4,879

Average of last 5 years,

2,874.4

1,289.2

554.4

5,359.0

5,355.0

975.8

Do. ending 1884,

2,410.2

1,295.6

488.4

5,055.0

4,073.2

909.8

27.-HOSPITALS, &C.

Civil Hospital.

The admissions to the Government Civil Hospital during the year were as follows, as compared with 1888.

· 1888.

1889.

Police,

657

590

Board of Trade,

153

135

Private paying Patients,

313

402

Government Servants,

159

135

Police Cases,

242

252

Destitutes,

248

279

Total,.............

1,772

1,793

The total admissions to the Hospital and Deaths during the last 5 years were as follows:-

Years.

Admissions.

Deaths.

1885,

1,510

76

1886,

1,623

79

1887,

1,656

89

1888,

1,772

80

1889,

1,793

77

Total,......

8,354

401

Average,

1,670.8-

80.2

.

;

نہ

360

The admissions from the Police Force and the number of Deaths for the past five years were as follows:-

Years.

1885,

1886,

1887,

1888,

1889,

Admissions.

Deaths.

495

· 9 (a.)

602

14 (b.)

619

9

657

15

590

14

Total,............... 2,963

61

Average,

592.6

12.2

The admissions of Europeans were, in 1888, 147, as compared with 166 in 1889; the Chinese were 231, in 1888, as compared with 194 in 1889; and the Indians were 279 in 1888, as compared with 230 in 1889.

Military Hospital.

The admissions from among the troops during the past five years were as follows:---

Years.

Admissions.

Deaths.

1885,

1,090

24 (c.)

1886,

1,607

9

1887,

1,749

14

1888,

1,485

21

1889,

1,732

16

Total,.........................

7,663

84

Average,

1,532.6

16.8

Small-Pox Hospital.

The admissions during the past five years were as follows:-

Years.

Admissions.

1885,

14

1886,

11

1887,

65

1888,

99

1889,

19

Total,.

208

Average,

41.6

Inquests.

The inquests held during the past five years were as follows:-

1885,

1886,

1887,

"

1888, 1889,

100

... 120

115

63

76

By Ordinance 17 of 1888, the Office of Coroner is abolished, and the duties thereof transferred to the Police Magistrates.

28.-CHARITABLE AND LITERARY INSTITUTIONS.

No fresh Institution was formed.

29.-RELIGIOUS INSTITUTIONS.

No fresh Institution was formed.

W. M. DEANE,

Acting Colonial Secretary.

COLONIAL SECRETARY'S OFFICE,

HONGKONG, 24th July, 1890.

(a.) Only 5 of these died in Hospital, 1 died at his own residence, and 3 died whilst on leave.

(b.) In Hospital.

(c.) 12 died of Cholera.

+

i

173

5

No. 90.

HONGKONG.

REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF THE BOTANICAL AND AFFORESTATION

DEPARTMENT FOR 1889.

Presented to the Legislative Council, by Command of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government.

1

No. 5.

BOTANICAL AND AFFORESTATION DEPARTMENT,

HONGKONG, 22nd February, 1890.

SIR, I have the honour to submit the Annual Departmental Report for 1889.

2. The routine work of the department occupies a very great deal of time in supervision and the past year has not shown any diminution of demands in this respect, the character of the raw Chinese recruits, as well as even the older hands, has, as usual, required the expenditure of much time in organisation, and development and maintenance of method and order in their work. The increase in the vote for the Gardens has permitted various improvements to be made in general appearance. Greater neatness in walks and lawns has largely contributed to the general effect. The Gardens have been extensively used by the Chinese especially, but there is some difficulty in inducing a large number of them to observe rules which should regulate the conduct of visitors. The summer storms have been again numerous and every one of them has caused more or less damage from the effects of either wind or excessive moisture in the soil. Many pot plants especially suffer from the drowned condition to which their roots are subjected during the heavy rains.

3. The terrible Rain Storm which began on the 29th of May and continued during the following day perfectly flooded the level and moderately level parts of the Gardens, and even on the portions with steep gradients the rainfall presented the appearance of cascades, the drains and channels being inadequate to carry off the immense volumes of water. Soil in open beds and borders and gravel on walks were swept away to a great extent. A portion of retaining wall 40 feet long by 10 feet high collapsed, and four landslips, besides the catastrophe in Glenealy Ravine, were caused. The bursting of the culvert in Glenealy Ravine within the New Gardens completely obliterated the lower portions of the grounds which I laid out and planted about seventeen years ago. Soil was washed away, together with trees and shrubs, to a depth of 10 or 12 feet in some parts and landslips on the preci- pitous heights around were large and numerous carrying away portions of the gallery walk and parapets together with vegetation which had grown and hidden the ugliness of the once bare staring faces of the fresh cuttings. The Public Works Department having replaced the soil carried away by the storm waters this department has now in hand ground work which will, I trust, be relaid out and planted in a short time. The excessive force of the downfall of the rain was exhibited after the storm by the appearance of vegetation of different kinds. The leaves of some trees were completely torn off, others had the leaves browned and blackened, while on some with leaves of a softer and more succulent character, but where the plants were somewhat sheltered from the full force of the rain, the leaves after being pounded by the rain hung in a decomposing state before the rains completely ceased. Small and tender seedlings were completely destroyed in many instances.

4. All landslips which occurred within the Gardens were removed, débris collected and carried away, walks repaired, and beds and borders put straight again in sixteen days after the storm, at which time the staff resumed their ordinary work. The mains, through which the Gardens' supply of water was conveyed having been carried away by the storm a great portion of the water needed for the Gardens had to be carried from the nullah until the end of October when connections were made which placed us again in a better position. The total cost of repairs to storm damages within the Gardens, exclusive of the work now going on in Glenealy Ravine, was $618.66. The estimate and vote was $800.

5. Landslips were numerous on the hills throughout the island, but they seem more plentiful on the northern slopes than elsewhere, probably owing to the greater steepness of the hills there.

A con- siderable number of trees of all sizes were carried away by these slips. It seems probable that landslips may be partly prevented by the roots of the trees which strike deep into loose soil. In this manner plantations may perhaps be of service in assisting to keep roads clear by preventing landslips. Some of the most unsightly yellow earth exposed by landslips in plantations have been roughly turfed. In the tree nurseries, which, as a rule, are lands alternately used as paddy fields, a very large number of small seedling pine trees were completely destroyed by water or by their being covered with deposits of soil; these losses have greatly diminished the number of trees available for planting during the present season.

174

NEW BUILDINGS.

6. The new departmental buildings, in place of the present dilapidated structure, for which the money was voted in 1888, have not yet been commenced, but I trust that it may be found convenient for a beginning to be made with them during the current year.

BOTANIC GARDENS.

Plant Houses.

7. The wooden supports of the tables of the north house having been ant-eaten or rotten the tables have all been built up solid with brickwork. The roof has also been renewed and the wooden supports have been replaced with light iron work.

8. Similar work has also been effected in the central Fern-house.

9. The roofs and side sun screens have also to a great extent been replaced with new material which the Superintendent of the Gaol has kindly had made by the prisoners. This is a valuable service rendered by the Gaol Department, a service which it is difficult to get done elsewhere at a reasonable cost.

10. The glass roof of the old plant-house has been removed, in consequence of its decayed con- dition, and replaced with sun screens only.

11. Our minimum temperature in December, January and February is too cold for many plants which are attractively ornamental, but with a suitable glass-house, with the help of a little artificial heat, many interesting plants of this kind might be added to our collections.

12. An additional plant shed 30 feet by 9 feet has been erected in the nursery for the cultivation of sale plants.

13. The glass-house erected in the nursery two years ago has been of the greatest service in affording protection to a large number of plants propagated for sale to the public and for use for filling beds in the Gardens. Another house the same size as this one could be very well utilized now for the growth and protection in inclement weather of maiden-hair ferns and other decorative plants for which there is a considerable steady demand by the public, and which would in all likelihood be increased if the plants could be maintained in a little better condition than the provisional structures now permit. The structures in the nursery need many improvements and additions, but, pending the erection of the new offices, the improved nursery arrangements which may be considerably effected by the work must remain in abeyance.

Walks, Drains, and Channels.

14. The special vote which was liberally granted towards the end of the year enabled me to put the walks throughout the Gardens in a thorough state of good repair by laying down four inches of lime concrete on all the chief walks which, by reason of their gradients, were subject to continual scouring away, during rains, of the decomposed rock with which they were previously made. This condition of the walks will now prevent a great deal of the disorder of walks which has always inevitably prevailed until repairs could be effected after every moderately heavy rain. The total length of walks, varying from five feet to ten feet in width, which were concreted was 3,794 feet in the Botanic Gardens, and 569 feet in Government House grounds.

15. The brick channels on the sides of most of the walks in the Gardens have been put in a good state by repointing and relaying in places, where necessary.

16. A quantity of underground drains have also been attended to by cleaning them out and relaying, and improving sand pits which had been originally faulty in construction, or which had become so in some instances since they were made thirty years ago.

Water Service.

17. I have to thank the Public Works Department for a much improved service of water obtained from the Tytam Water Works and laid on to ten tanks distributed throughout the Old Gardens. To some of these hydrants are placed so that hoses can be fixed for irrigation work. I have also to acknowledge ready and kind assistance from the Fire Brigade Department in the arrangements of fittings for hoses which are now in good working order. What has been accomplished is of great service, but when a suitable opportunity presents itself I trust that the supply will be laid on to various other parts of the Gardens where water is needed but where at present there is none.

Flower Beds and Rockeries.

18. The flower beds have been, as usual, twice filled in most cases, and oftener in a few. The winter plants consist chiefly of annuals, which are planted in November and December and flower from January to April. The Chinese New Year flower, Narcissus Tazetta, is also used for beds and it flowers in January and February, the planting being done at different times in order to preserve a succession of flowers. In the winter months we have now an additional difficulty to contend with which is becoming more pronounced every year, I allude to the great increase of small birds which about the month of December and January, after the bedding plants have attained moderate dimensions, make continuous onslaughts on them, and unless the beds are netted over the birds denude the plants of all their leaves, consuming them for food. These netted beds have an unsightly appearance, but

:

175

the objectionable feature must be borne until the period when the birds are most ravenous is tided The Ordinance which specially provides for the preservation of small birds does not allow their destruction even when the birds have become so numerous in places and seasons as to be a nuisance.

over.

19. The increase of birds which has succeeded the passing of the Birds Preservation Ordinance more than twenty years ago is an advantage in some ways and a pleasant change from the cheerless aspect of the Colony at that time when scarcely a bird could be seen, but the increase is not without its disadvantages.

20. After the annuals are over the beds are again filled for the summer season with flowering plants to a small extent, but chiefly with plants with coloured or ornamental foliage.

21. These arrangements demand and receive a great deal of attention. The summer arrange- ments of the past year were the best, probably, that have yet been accomplished.

22. The plants in the recently made rockeries at the north-east entrance have made good progress and the whole now presents a fairly attractive appearance.

Labelling.

23. Constant attention has been given in adding to the number of those labels put down as well as to the replacement of decayed labels or obliterated names. A little more requires to be done in perfecting the system, but, on the whole, this work may now be considered in good order.

Aviaries.

24. These are in good condition, but a few more birds are desirable, these I trust will be added during the course of this year. Birds and animals are a great attraction to visitors, especially to Chinese and children, but as it is not expedient to attempt a collection of animals in these Gardens the few we have will not be increased by the acceptance of further donations. On the other hand, however, I think a little extension of aviaries might be an advantage.

Summer Storms.

25. The very frequent storms and threatening storms during the rain season absorb a good deal of time in preparations to meet them so that possible damages should be prevented as much as can be. The preparations consist chiefly in removing plants in pots, from exposed places to sheltered positions, and in securing sun screens with which the roofs of plant houses are covered.

These arrangements employ the greater part of the staff for a considerable time before, and after storms.

Collecting.

26. The administration and working of the departiment has absorbed the whole of my time and left none in which I could, without detriment to the department, absent myself for any purpose, there- fore what collecting has been done has been accomplished by sending natives on short excursions to islands and the mainland within easy access from Hongkong. The results of these journeys have added plants of much interest to our collections of both living and dried plants, but excursions near home and when undertaken by natives are much less fruitful and unsatisfactory than expeditions made under European leadership, but in the absence of the latter native agency is better than none.

GOVERNMENT HOUSE AND MOUNTAIN LODGE GROUNDS.

27. The grounds on the plateau on the northern side of Government House which needed im- provement were relaid out in the early part of the year. This involved a change in the levels, raising a considerable portion, the taking up and relaying of all the turf, the making of new beds and borders, the introduction of a new system of underground and surface drainage, removal and replanting of shrubs, &c., and the formation of new walks with cut granite edging stones as far as possible.

28. At Mountain Lodge the tennis lawn was extended sufficiently to allow of three courts being used at one time instead of two as before.

DISTRIBUTION AND INTERCHANGE OF PLANTS AND SEEDS.

29. Plants and seeds to the extent of 197 boxes, bags, and packets, weighing 16lbs., 459 specimens of dried plants, and 801 living plants were received in exchange. The following were the principal

donors:-

Ashton, Captain, Formosa.

Barton, J.

Botanic Gardens, British Guiana.

""

""

Saharanpur.

Singapore.

Botanical Department, Jamaica. Braga, F. X., Kobe, Japan. Bunting, J., Yokohama, Japan. Burnie, Captain Cooke, Mrs.

Dammann & Co., Messrs., Italy. Faber, Rev. E., Shanghai. Forest Department, Penang. Layton, Hon. B.

Legge, Mrs. Leigh, R. K. Ming Lee Tsan. Poesnecker, Mrs. Poli, M. de, Paris.

Royal Botanic Gardens, Ceylon.

>>

Kew, London. Mauritius.

""

>>

Trinidad.

";

17

Royal Palm Nurseries, U.S.A.

Siemssen, G., Foochow.

Smith, Mrs. A.

Thomson, Captain, S.S. Nanzing. Veitch & Sons, Messrs. J., London.

176

30. In exchange and in donations there were distributed 111 boxes, bags, and packets of seeds weighing 78lbs., and 1,933 plants. The principal recipients were:---

Agri: Horticultural Society, Madras. Arthur, H., Formosa.

Bain, Mrs. M.

Barton, J.

Botanic Gardens, Bombay.

British Guiana,

""

Natal.

>>

"}

2)

Saharanpur.

Saigon.

Singapore.

""

Italian Convent.

Kirkwood, M., Yokohama, Japan. Legge, Mrs.

Martin, G. P., England.

Olifent, Captain

Piercy, G.

Police Station, Hunghòm.

Queensland Acclimatisation Society, Brisbane. Romano, A. G.

Royal Botanic Gardens, Calcutta.

19

Botanical Department, Jamaica. Bunting, J., Yokohama, Japan. Burnie, Captain Cook, Mrs.

Dammann & Co., Messrs., Italy. Forest Department, Malacca.

>>

Penang.

French Convent.

Gardner, Captain

Thomson, St. Helens, Liverpool.

K

Hodgins, A. E.

Henderson, F.

Humphreys, J. D.

29

1)

"}

??

22

"

Kew, London. Mauritius.

Royal Engineers Department.

Seth, Mrs.

Smith, K.C.M.G., H.E. Sir C. C., Singapore. Storer, R. E., Colonel

Thomson, Captain, S.S. Nanzing.

Thurston, K.C.M.G., H.E. Sir J. B., Fiji. Travers, A. K.

Veitch & Sons, Messrs. J., London.

Wilkinson, R. E., Major

Yeatherd, Mrs.

SALE OF PLANTS AND TREES.

31. The sales have been continued to about the same extent as last year. The sum of $343.38 was received for 3,143 plants and trees which were supplied to about 100 separate orders.

HERBARIUM.

32. The work of the year has consisted chiefly in preparing, mounting, and incorporating. The incorporation of specimens has not advanced, for want of time, so rapidly as could have been desired, but 705 specimens were placed in their final positions in the cabinets.

33. To Mr. W. T. THISELTON DYER, Director of the Royal Gardens, Kew, Monsieur DE POLI, Paris, and the Rev. ERNST FABER, Shanghai, thanks are due for contributions of valuable and interesting specimens.

34. Several collections of dried plants have been sent to the Royal Gardens, Kew, in exchange, and that institution has also again rendered most valuable service in the identification of a considerable number of specimens submitted to it for comparison and determination.

35. I may here mention that the elaboration at Kew of the Index Flora Sinensis has been steadily pushed forward; the work has been completed to the Nat. Ord. Loganiaceæ.

36. The parts as published are put on record here and are available for reference to any one who desires to make use of them.

LIBRARY.

37. I have to thank various Botanical and Forestry establishments for Reports and Contributions received. The following are the chief contributions :— Amaryllideæ, Baker. Purchased. Botanical Magazine, 1889. Do.

Bulletin (Kew) of Mis. Information, presented

by Director, Royal Gardens, Kew, 1889. Bulletin Nos. 10 and 11 Royal Botanic Gardens,

Trinidad.

Classified Catalogue of the Library of the Royal

Botanic Gardens, Ceylon.

Fern Allies. Baker. Purchased.

Flora of British India Part XV., presented by the

Royal Gardens, Kew.

Gardeners' Chronicle, 1889. Purchased. Hooker's Icones Plantarum, Vol. IX., presented

by the Bentham Trustees.

Index to the Streets, Houses and Leased Lots of the City of Victoria, Hongkong. Purchased.

Journal of Botany, 1889. Purchased.

Plantæ Davidianæ ex sinarum Imperio. Pur-

chased.

Proceedings of the Committee of Agri: Horticul-

tural Society of Madras.

Proceedings of the Central Agricultural Board

of Trinidad in its Inauguration.

Report, Acclimatisation Society of Queensland

for 1888.

""

Botanic Gardens, Adelaide, 1888.

""

>>

""

29

3

>>

""

""

Ceylon, 1888.

Natal, 1888.

Saharanpur and Mus-

soorie, 1888. Singapore, 1888.

:

177

Report on the Public Gardens and Plantations,

33

Jamaica, 1888.

on the Department of Agricultural, Cape-

town, 1888-89.

Indian Forest Reports.

Forest Administration in Assam, 1887-88.

""

""

""

of the Agricultural Adviser, London,

1887 and 1888.

**

of the Cinchona Plantation and Factory

in Bengal, 1887-88.

""

""

"

""

""

""

>>

in Ajmere-Merwara, 1887-

88.

in the Andamans, 1887-

88.

in the Central Provinces,

1887-88.

in Hyderabad, 1887-88 &

1888-89.

in Madras, 1887–88.

""

""

on the Destruction of Cocoa-nut Palms by Beetles, from Director Botanic Gardens, Singapore.

on the Forest Department, Singapore,

Penang and Malacca, 1888.

Royal Botanic Gardens, Calcutta, 1887-

88.

Royal Botanic Gardens, Trinidad, 1888. Transactions of the Hongkong Medical Society.

Purchased.

""

""

in the North West Pro-

""

vinces, 1887-88.

On the Course of Instruction at the Forest School,

Dehra Dun, 1887-88.

FORESTRY.

38. The planting operations have been, as customary, distributed over the greater portion of the Colony exclusive of the Cape D'Aguilar and Stanley peninsulas. The operations of preparing lands for the reception of seeds and trees began in August of 1888 and the last tree was planted on June 20th, 1889. There is no interval between the end of one planting season and the beginning of the next, as the selection of lands and making of contracts for the next season's work begins immediately that tree planting is finished. Actual planting began on November 14th, 1888 and, as stated above, was finished on June 20th, 1889, i.e., it extended through a period of about six months, during which planting was done on 126 days. During the whole of the season the greatest care and foresight has to be constantly exercised in selecting suitable conditions of weather for insuring success in transplant- ing operations. The absence of rainfall and of water in streams on the hills at the time of year when trees are in the best condition for transplanting renders it necessary to distribute the planting over wide areas and in localities at great distances apart, so that trees may be planted at convenient dis- tances for artificial watering from such scanty sources as may be available. This, and the fact that the very small bits of land suitable for nurseries are also scattered all over the island compels a system of desultory planting involving the expenditure of much time in superintendence and management which is not felt where natural conditions permit operations to be carried out on more circumscribed and concentrated plans. The yearly extension of lands brought within forestry management and the greater distances of works from head quarters does not diminish the strain experienced in maintaining or developing efficiency in all branches.

39. The work during the year under review has been very heavy and the staff generally has given much satisfaction in so far as their abilities and power went, but there is an insufficiency of educated and experienced assistance at my disposal for carrying out directions and plans of the extent and in the manner which is desirable. The Head Forester, Lo AQWAI, has applied himself with diligence, faithfulness, and intelligence to the work, and he has given much satisfaction generally.

40. Owing to the Contractor who engaged to rear and supply pine trees having failed to produce the full number agreed upon it was not possible to plant so extensively as had been arranged for. The failure was apparently owing to the Contractor's ignorance of methods of cultivation, or careless- ness of management. He failed to supply about two-thirds of the number stipulated for.

Pines Reared in situ.

41. A contract was made for 450,000 trees to be reared in situ, and of that number, the Contractor handed over a year after sowing, 429,238. He reported that soon after sowing the seeds small birds attacked and devoured them to a large extent. This seems to be the first year that birds have been noticed to do injury here to forest seeds or trees. At the end of the first year the seedling trees have attained a size varying from three to six inches in height, and from one to about a dozen seedlings in each site, the size and number being influenced by the quality of soil or exposure to wind, or to water collected on the hills in heavy rains and rushing over the sites; these agents being to a considerable extent the cause of many entire failures. The loss from these entire failures however is borne by the Contractor who is paid at the end of the first year for healthy trees only, the price paid being only about a fourth the cost of planting trees. After the in situ trees are taken over from the Contractor a small portion for a year or two will continue to die leaving the strongest to survive in the fittest places. Even with these losses the method has much to recommend it, in economy, over planting. To complete the plantations the gaps are filled up after the trees which have succeeded have grown and shown themselves sufficiently distinct from their surroundings, which is in about two or three years after the seeds were sown. The trees which are used for filling up vacancies are trans-

178

planted from nurseries in which they have been reared. Under the most favourable conditions plan- tations raised by sowing in situ are perfect, some of the older ones being without a break in their uniformity and never having been filled up.

Cryptomeria japonica.

42. About fourteen thousand of these were procured from Japan for planting in the catchwater area of the Pokfulam Reservoir. This was done, with the approval of the Sanitary Board, in order to vary the uniform gramineous vegetation of the hills for aesthetic effect, the Cryptomeria on account of its persistent leaves being considered the least likely to pollute the water with decaying vegetation. Many of the trees, some months after they were planted, were attacked and killed by white ants which completely destroyed the bark of the stems below ground. The same thing occurred to a few hundred trees planted for experiment in another locality near Aberdeen. The trees which were not attacked by termetes have established themselves and grown well. This is a tree which should in common with most trees be planted before its annual growth begins, but which is unfortunately, also like other trees, in the dry season before the rains are of much benefit to them, and consequently the difficulty of planting the tree extensively is great by reason of scarcity of accessible water for artificial watering.

Camphors.

43. An experiment was tried of planting seedlings five months old when they were about four to six inches high so that they could be planted during June in the rain season and so diminish the cost of planting which attends older trees. The planting would be successful if the continuance of rain at short intervals for a month were assured, but the irregularity of showers leaves intervals of too much dryness which is prejudicial to tender seedlings where they cannot be artificially supplied with water. Of those, however, which were well established, a large number were attacked with Cassytha filiformis, a lauraceous parasite in the form of long thread-like stems which infests and lives upon living grass and other vegetation. In places, especially on the southern side of the island with dry, poor soil and hot aspects the parasite is very abundant amongst grass. It attached itself to the deli- cate stems of the camphors and extracted all the plants' juices for its own nutriment, the camphors having had to succumb to its oppressive neighbour.

44. The camphor in good soil, which however is a very rare commodity here, will thrive well in moderately sheltered situations up to an altitude of about 500 feet. The degree of altitude in this, as in some other cases in Hongkong, at which trees discontinue to thrive is not regulated by temperature (as might be supposed by the reference to altitude) as by exposure to concentrated and accumulated winds, decreased fertility and depth of soil, and diminution of water in suspension in the soil.

Tristanea conferta.

45. About seventeen thousand were reared from seeds in pots and planted out in the Western District. They were planted at a higher elevation than the older trees which have done so well on lands bordering the eastern end of the city. The higher elevation will probably not be so favourable to growth as the lower one, but during the past year the trees have averaged about 2 feet in new vertical growth, lateral branches having also been developed to a small extent. The tree, like its congener the Eucalyptus, both natives of Australia, has a habit of unusually great vertical development, but its aspect is more pleasing and its foliage, denser than the

gum trees.

The older trees have again yielded a good supply of seeds, which have been sown and have produced 25,000 seedlings.

Road Planting.

46. As soon as the formation of Lower Richmond Road was sufficiently advanced it was planted along its whole length with trees on one side, the road not being wide enough to permit of two rows being planted. Upper Richmond Road was planted in 1888. The planting of these two new roads has completed the planting of all the roads in that locality which are suitable for the introduction of trees.

47. Steps have also been taken for the planting of such of the new roads at Kowloon as it was considered advisable should be done this year.

48. Kowloon is now provided fairly well with trees, taking into consideration those in private grounds, those in Robinson Road-which I hope may be completed as soon as there is an opportunity -and those which this department has planted on the lands south and north of the rifle butts, and which have with their development so greatly changed the once sterile and treeless aspect of the hills to a scene of greater verdant beauty.

49. As a rule the older roads and streets of the Colony in or immediately adjacent to the city were not, apparently, laid out with consideration being given to the requirements of trees which were subsequently introduced when the inhabitants found how intolerable was the absence of trees in our

!

179

hot glaring tropical summers. The trees which were planted and maintained at great cost and with much care have developed in spite of the disadvantages of crippled space for growth of head and roots into objects of beauty which cast agreeable shade affording relief from the burning sun and intense glare and heat which was experienced before the introduction of trees. Many trees have yearly to be sacri- ficed to make room for extensions of buildings which, however, in many cases, provide in themselves a partial substitute for the trees. It is only necessary to picture what some streets and roads without trees would be to insure the most careful guardianship of what has been attained in spite of considerable difficulties. There may be some disadvantages which follow in the wake of trees, but the immense advantages will be generally considered to far outweigh them.

50. In places where land may not be too valuable for such a purpose it would be very desirable for the sake of further extension of tree planting in roads if it were possible that future new ones could be made of sufficient width to allow the possibility of a moderate regular development of the heads of the trees on all sides, instead of, as at present, extension on the side next buildings being so much restricted. The result of this one sidedness is that as trees develop chiefly on one side they are gradually dragged down by the weight of the head from an upright position to one inclining over the roadway, the incline in time becoming so great that for safety limbs have to be cut off and ultimately, in many cases, entire trees have to be removed.

Nurseries.

51. The Government possesses land for only one tree nursery in Hongkong. The many nurseries throughout the island in which trees for the Government are annually reared by contract are obtained by the Contractor from squatters on payment of rent for the one year during which the trees are grown in the nurseries. After the trees are taken from the nurseries the squatters resume the cultivation of rice and vegetables in the ground. Although this alternation of crops restores fertility to the soil, it only does so to a partial extent, never apparently returning all which the trees have taken out of the soil. The very limited amount of cultivable land, and the still smaller portions which squatters are willing to let to the Contractor has rendered it necessary to use the same ground over and over again during some years, this continual cropping with trees, and the somewhat meagre fertilizing agents used by the squatters in the intervals, have begun to affect the quality of nursery trees. It is difficult to remedy this under existing arrangements whereby the Government holds so little cultivable land of its own.

52. The rearing of certain trees in pots has necessitated the use, in addition to the one Government nursery, being made, for nursery purposes, of a portion of the Bowrington plantation, marked on maps as "Public Gardens." This name, adopted twenty years ago, is misleading, as the land was never a public garden in any sense, but in the first instance was thickly planted with forest trees only and to within the last few years it has been nothing but a plantation.

Planting Statistics.

53. The numbers and kinds of trees planted, and the localities in which they were placed are given in the appendix and on the accompanying map. The numbers and localities have been given in former reports, but the map is furnished this year in addition in order to show approximately the positions of the plantations in compliance with instructions recently received. In the absence of suitable maps of the Colony and of facilities for laying down precise areas, which I have explained in another place, only roughly approximate indications on the map are practicable. The plots referred to are coloured vermillion and each one is marked with a letter of the alphabet, and the numbers of trees planted are marked by its side, corresponding letters and detailed figures being given in the table of statistics. This, although not so perfect as I could desire, will, I trust, meet that which is required. The statistics include trees planted in November and December, 1888, this being properly the beginning of the planting season of 1889.

Thinning Plantations and removal of Brushwood.

54. The thinning of plantations was confined to the few first months of the year, the usual work of the latter end of the season having been postponed to this year, therefore, the number of trees thin- ned was relatively small. At the present time something like 40,000 trees require removal for the benefit of the permanent ones.

55. Removal of brushwood or undergrowth has, as usual, been conducted throughout the year, this work now giving almost continuous employment to a gang of men.

The work is generally per- formed not only at no expense to the Government but a small income is obtained derived from the sale of the brushwood. There are some exceptions to this such as where the undergrowth is not large enough to be of saleable value, in which cases the work is performed by the forestry staff in the inter- vals between other more important work.

56. Some alarm, which, from my experience, I cannot but regard as unnecessary, seems to have been allowed to have had some disturbing influence in some quarters in regard to what is called under- growth. The origin of the alarm may have been associated with dense undergrowth which exists in other countries under conditions widely differing from those prevailing in Hongkong, what little there

* Not printed.

180

is of undergrowth here being connected with attendant evil effects of that of some other countries without making due allowances for circumstances here which counteract or reduce to a harmless mini- mum results injurious to health which are attendant on excessive vegetation under some certain conditions.

57. In tropical places where vegetation is extremely luxuriant and where the land on which it grows is comparatively flat and fertile there is often a mass of decaying vegetation which is undoubtedly injurious to animal life. In Hongkong, however, the soil is, as a rule, comparatively, and much of it excessively, sterile, and the configuration of the island is such that the excessive summer rainfall washes away most of the vegetable matter which has been separated by natural decay from shrubs or trees, and which therefore has no opportunity to lodge on the ground and in the process of decay produce an unhealthy atmosphere.

58. The vegetation of this region being of such a character that but little is shed periodically, and the hills of the island being so steep, there is rarely much accumulation of leafy matter which reaches the stage of unhealthy decay. The existence of healthy living trees, undergrowth, or scrub in them- selves, will not, on due consideration being given to the subject, be blamed, when the chemical action of the leaves of plants is considered, for imparting an unhealthy character to a neighbourhood, but, so long as there is no undue accumulation of decaying vegetation, an abundance of trees and shrubs should be beneficial to the inhabitants so long as due circulation of air and admission of light is not impeded by them.

Ferneries.

59. The ferneries and rockeries which are maintained by the Government-there are some which were constructed at Government expense, but which are not maintained by them-have been kept in good order, but the great storm of May swept part of them away, these are being reconstructed and will be planted again this year. Their maintenance has been rather difficult on account of damages done by stray animals and passing traffic, in addition to which there have been many thefts to plants; it is impossible, on account of petty thefts to grow anything except the commonest of plants in the rockeries.

Protective Service.

60. The small band of Forest Guards has done its work fairly well, and damage and destruction of trees has been confined within narrow limits. Out of 47 cases brought before the Magistrates 40 convictions were obtained.

61. The raising of the rates of the Little Hongkong villagers, in consequence of the continued damage to trees immediately around the old village, has had a marked good effect, proving that the villagers possess the power, which they have been interested in exercising last year for the first time, of guarding the trees.

62. In January convictions for grass cutting ceased, and afterwards no arrests were made. This was in consequence of the presiding Magistrate in the last case having decided that there was no Ordinance under which punishments could be legally inflicted. Since that time grass cutters have been increasingly resuming their old practices, and besides the injury done by removal of

grass where it was desirable it should remain, the excuse of being engaged in the avocation of grass cutting gives the people so employed the opportunity of cutting trees at the same time, and thus the work of pro- tection is rendered more difficult and somewhat less perfect.

Grass Fires.

63. Throughout the dry season at the beginning and end of the year fires were numerous, there having been 15 in all. Six of these fires destroyed trees to the number of about 30,000 as near as could be ascertained. The largest quantity of trees destroyed was near Tytam Tuk where the destruc- tion amounted to 16,000 and another one near Pokfulam killed 9,000. Of the 15 fires 9 did no damage to planted trees. The fire barriers-cleared tracks-again did great service in checking the

fires.

64. The extinction of fires has given some arduous work to the staff which is always despatched when needed at any time of the day or night to extinguish them.

65. The Police have again rendered very valuable service in reporting, by telegraph, fires to me, and also in despatching their own staff with hired coolies to check the fires. Of the 15 fires 9 were reported by the Police, forest guards having also reported some of them. The Stanley and the Shau- kiwan Stations had in their districts the greatest number of fires, the west and northern parts of the island, having been nearly exempt, but the West Point and Aberdeen Police have rendered good service also. The out-stations have been kept supplied by this department with the requisites for fire extinc- tion, and the remuneration to coolies employed has also been paid from the forestry funds.

Fire Barriers.

66. The barriers cleared in previous years were, before the beginning of the dry season, all inspected and recleared where necessary, and new ones made where required. The clearing was done by contract At the present time the total length of barriers in use is about forty miles.

181

Services ex Departmental.

67. A contract was made on behalf of the Royal Engineers' Department for rearing and supplying plants of certain kinds required for various fortifications of the Colony. The contract extends over nearly two years, and this department undertook to organize the arrangements and supervise the Con- tractor during the period of the contract.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

THE COLONIAL SECRETARY,

The Honourable

&c.,

&c.,

&c.

CHARLES FORD, Superintendent,

Botanical and Afforestation Department.

Appendix.

STATISTICS OF PLANTING OPERATIONS.

DESCRIPTION AND NUMBER OF TREES AND AREA IN ACRES.

Localities Marked

LOCALITY.

on

Map.

Pinus sinensis.

Crypto- Cunning-

Camphor. meria hamia Bamboos.

japonica. sinensis.

Tristanea conferta.

Area.

Grand Total of Trees.

...

1,279

62 acres.

17,161

283

""

:

:

:

:

:

:

Pokfulam,

A

8,202

West Point,

B

15,035

Pokfulam,...

C

Mount Kellet,

D

31,089

...

:

:

:

:

2,436

11,520

E

3,381

Aberdeen,

LL

1,989

11,390

590

Sokunpo Hills,

G

14,107

Quarry Bay,

H

38,862 5,364

371,908

Taitam,

J

44,556

K

12,774

Hunghòm,

Government Civil Hospital,

Bowen Road,

Bowrington,

.....

Albert Road,................

West Point,

L

8,931

:

:

Peak Road,

:

:

:.

:.

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

...

:

:

:

:.

:.

101

254

39

23,,

11/2

13

112

""

362,,

3093

37

...

101

:

7호

:

:.

:

:.

:.

:

:

:

:

:

:.

547,453 20,135 14,546

67

76

307

147

32

8

00

:

:.

:.

:.

::

:

"

:

:

1,279 637 17,161 4994 acres.

601,211

Area of New Plantations,......

Area within Old Plantations which have been filled up,

450 acres.

50

23

CHARLES FORD,

Superintendent,

Botanical and Afforestation Department.

184

RETURN SHOWING THE NUMBER OF DEATHS REGISTERED DURING THE

CAUSES.

BRITISH

AND

FOREIGN COMMUNITY.

CHINESE COMMUNITY.

VICTORIA DISTRICT.

DIVISION.

I.-General Diseases.

Group A.,

B.,

C.,

D.,

Civil.

Army.

Navy.

Sokonpo.

Bowrington.

Wantsai.

12

5246

37 10

18

1

2

29

12

Hawan.

Sheungwan,

Chungwan.

Táip'ingshan.

Saiyingpun.

Shektongtsui.

town.

Kennedy-

Harbour.

120 12

1

1

:

=-80

82 518

76

5

66

11

21

1

4

10

2

10

Q

:

14

11

400

00

407

253

1

3

9

5

1 15

52:

43

49

13

100

360

3

31

1

5

25

888

80

10

25

7

3

83

4

2

58

13

2

:.

:

:

:.

:

:.

:

:

:

-

1

1

2

:

:

1

2

✪ 10

9

3

4

5

:

:

:

::

:

5

1

3

II.-Local Diseases.

The Nervous System, The Circulatory System, The Respiratory System, The Digestive System, The Urinary System,...

Affections connected with

Pregnancy,

Affections connected with

Parturition,

Affections consequent on

Parturition,.....

The Skin,

III.-Morbid States and Pro-

cesses,

21

5

2220

:

:.

.

:

:

:

IV.-Ill-defined & Unknown,. 20

1

TOTAL, ALL CAUSES,... 155 23

I.-General Diseases.

A.-Specific Febrile

Diseases.

KO

:

16

130

107

1

68

12

62

1

:

:

:.

12 64

16

96

613 42

896 1,296

362

16

10

140

Exanthemata.

Small-Pox,

Measles,

3

1

1

Whooping Cough,

Simple Continued Fever,

3

2

1

101

1

32

Enteric Fever,

Sporadic Cholera,

1

Vomiting and Purging,

Dysentery,

Fever, Intermittent,

""

Remittent,

Beri-Beri,

Septic.

Puerperal Pyæmia,.

**

Malarial.

1

7

පාප:

19

i ai

24

1

::

3

5

IF 30

4

8

10001

5

50: 8:

NO

:

Fever,

"

Venereal.

Syphilis,

Zoogenous.

Hydrophobia,

Total Group A,... 37

:.

:

:

10 2 18

:

:

1

12

:

:

:

120 12

1

1

82

:

:

:

1

518 76

:

:

3

2

10

139 10

TH 2 10

2

5

11

291

316

20

9

27

44

27*

1

5N: ON:

*

6

9

2

5

...

2

6

♡ I ∞

:

:

10

5

:

:

10

:

5

25

པ་

}

No.

6

90.

HONGKONG.

RETURNS OF BIRTHS AND DEATHS FOR THE YEAR 1889.

Presented to the Legislative Council, by Command of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government. RETURNS OF BIRTHS AND DEATHS FOR THE YEAR 1889.

DISTRICTS.

BRITISH AND FOREIGN COMMUNITY.

CHINESE.

GRAND TOTAL.

Victoria,.......

Kaulung,

Shaukiwán,

Aberdeen,

Stanley,

TOTAL,...

DEATHS.

BRITISH & FOREIGN COMMUNITY.

BIRTHS.

DEATHS.

BIRTHS.

DEATHS.

BIRTHS.

DEATHS.

Sex

Boys.

Girls.

Total. Males. Females. Total. Boys.

Girls. Total. Males. Females.

Total.

Unknown.

89

888

177

132

54

186

681

596

1,277

2,068 1,481

3,551

1,454

3,737

2

2

4

1

1

47

22

69

299

203

505

73

506

1

1

57

45

102

120

75

195

102

196

...

:.

:

1

1

2

19

15

34

80

53

133

34

135

:

:

9

11

20

9

14

23

...

:

:

20

23

91

90

181

135

55

123

DEATHS IN PUBLIC INSTITUTIONS.

190

813

689

1,502

2,576

1,826

ESTIMATED POPULATION.

4,407

1,683

4,597

Annual Birth-Rate Annual Death-Rate

pr 1,000 for the Year.

per 1,000

for the Year.

Europeans, exclusive of Portuguese,... 57

Of the Deaths in Victoria, Males. Females. Total. there were in the―

British and Foreign Community,

10,832

16.71

17.54

Portuguese,

36

Italian Convent,

140

369

509

Indians, &c.,

41

Asile de la Ste. Enfance,...]

204

341

545

Chinese,.

.183,650

8.18

24.00

Non-Residents,

56

Tung Wa Hospital,..

797

197

994

Alice Memorial Hospital,...

21

29

Whole Population,

194,482

8.65

23.64

TOTAL,.

190

ΤΟΤΑΙ,

1,162

915

2,077

Registrar General's Office, Hongkong, 4th March, 1890.

N. G. MITCHELL-INNES, Acting Registrar General.

183

.

207

No. 8

90.

HONGKONG.

RETURN OF SUPERIOR AND SUBORDINATE COURTS FOR 1889.

Presented to the Legislative Council, by Command of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government.

No. 257.

REGISTRY SUPREME COURT,

HONGKONG, 7th January, 1890.

SIR,-I have the honour to transmit herewith:-

1. Return of Criminal Statistics for the year 1889.

The total number of prisoners tried was

Of which were-Convicted

Acquitted Charged abandoned.

The corresponding figures for last year were-Total

Convicted Acquitted Abandoned....

....

143

64

41

38

143

186

99

47

40

186

2. Return of all monies received in the Registry during the year for Fees of Office, Fines and Interest on surplus cash.

The total amouut received during last year under these headings was...$36,985.01 Amount received in 1888,

Difference in favour of 1889,

25,545.42

.$11,439.59

The increase in Court Fees has been $3,827.44; caused by a larger number of Suits having been entered in 1889.

The figures are--Suits in Original Jurisdiction in 1889

115

in 1888

57

Suits in Summary Jurisdiction in 1889.....

in 1888....

.1,611

..1,311

Under the heading of Registrar of Companies there has been and increase of $3,985.56. In 1889, 35 New Companies with a Capital of $12,332,600.73 were registered.

The fees received by the Official Trustee during the year amounted to $1,993.03 against $173.38

received in 1888.

Two new Estates of the value of about $160,000 were transferred to the Official Trustee in 1889, the fees on these were the cause of the increase,

The other figures call for no special remark.

Besides the total sum of $36,985.01 received for fees-a sum of $9,198.05 was paid over to the Treasury being the amount to the credit of certain estates or trusts which had remained unclaimed in the Registry for many years and which were dealt with by Ordinance No. 11 of 1888.

To the Honourable

THE ACTING COLONIAL SECRETARY,

&c.,

&c.,

&c.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

EDW. J. ACKROYD.

Registrar.

208

RETURN of CRIMINAL CASES that have been brought under the COGNIZANCE of the SUPREME COURT,

during the last Ten Years.

97

Charges Abandoned.

Postponed.

Number

Number

YEAR.

of

Cases.

of Convicted. Acquitted. Persous.

No. of Cases.

No. of Persons.

No. of Cases.

No. of Persons.

1880,

91

160

120

34

6

6

1881,

105

154

111

39

1

4

(c.) 1882,

124

187

124

38

15

21

1

3

(d.) 1883,

91

126

70

26

14

28d

2

2

1884,

68

101

65

20

8

16

Total,......

479

728

490

157

44

75

3

10

5

1885,

91

147

103

22

16

22

(e.) 1886,

75

107

59

20

16

27e

1

(f) 1887,

94

155

82

36

17

26

1

8

1888,

101

186

99

47

28

40

:

(g.) 1889,

92

143

64

41

24

37

Total,......

453

738

407

166

101

152

2

9

Average of 1st

Period,

953

14533

98

31%

83

15

تهران

Ι

Average of 2nd

Period,......

90€

1473

813

331

201

30%

allo

1

(c.) In one case the recognizance estreated, this case is included in the total, but not in any other of the above headings. (d.) In one case the recognizance estreated, and one prisoner committed suicide in the Gaol.

(e.) In one case the recognizance estreated.

(f.) In three cases the recognizances were estreated.

(g.) In one case the recognizance estreated, this case is included in the total, but not in any other of the above headings.

Registry Supreme Court, Hongkong, 7th January, 1890.

EDW. J. ACKROYD, Registrar.

INDICTMENTS and INFORMATIONS in the SUPREME COURT of HONGKONG, for the Year 1889.

Including Attempts and Conspiracies to commit the several offences.

Showing how the cases tried in the

Superior Courts ended.

(Each prisoner tried, counted as a separate case; where a large number of Prisoners have been convicted together, the fact is mentioned in a note.)

:

1

1

:

4:5

:

:

:

Judgment for the Crown,

64

2

Judgment for the Prisoner,.........

41

4

Prisoner found Insane,

Cases which fell through for

want of prosecution or absence

of accused, and cases thrown

38

888

1

out by the Grand Jury (Attor- ney General),.

:

:

:

:

:

:.

:

2

:

1

:

:

:

8

-]

12

4

:

:

40

2016

16

6

Co

...

1

11

:

:

10a 11

:

223

:

1

1

24

:

:

66

20

a. In one case 6 men were convicted. In one case Defendant did not appear his recognizance was estreated.

Registry Supreme Court, Hongkong, 7th January, 1890.

EDW. J. ACKROYD, Registrar.

Cases postponed,....

143

7

:

Number of Cases tried.

Number of Persons tried.

ti i

RETURN of CRIMINAL CASES tried in the SUPREME COURT of HONGKONG during the Year 1889.

SENTENCE.

209-

CHARGES ABAN-

CASES

POST-

DONED.

PONED.

CRIMES.

Convicted.

Acquitted.

Death.

Arson,

Assaulting,

Attempting to procure a woman to have illicit carnal

connection,

Being a member of the Triad Society,

Buggery,

Burglary,

Demanding money by means of a forged instrument... Demanding money with menaces,.

Embezzlement,

Escape,

Feloniously assaulting with intent to rob,

Feloniously wounding with intent to do grievous bo-

dily harm,

Feloniously administering a certain stupefying drug,... Feloniously forging a certain cheque with intent to

defraud,

Feloniously obtaining goods by virtue of a certain

forged intrument,

Feloniously shooting with intent to murder,

Feloniously and by force taking away a child under

the age of 14 years,

72216 N

2

2

Feloniously breaking and entering a dwelling house

and committing a felony therein,

2

Found equipped for the purpose of piracy and carry-

ing arms without a licence,

1

2

22

1

1

2

1

2

4

1

1

House breaking and Larceny,

Kidnapping,

3

4

Larceny,

Larceny and previous conviction,

4

Larceny by a servant,

Larceny from the person,

3

a3

1

31

1

N:

Death Recorded.

over one Year.

Hard Labour

Hard Labour one Year and under.

Number of Persons. Solitary Confinement,

Number of Persons. Privately Flogged,

No. of Cases.

No. of Persons,

No. of Cases.

No. of Persons.

pr

:

N

1.

⠀⠀

::

12

:::* :** :* :* :*:*:

2 FQHHHN: NNP: ww

Larceny from a godown,.

Larceny in a dwelling house with menaces,

Larceny from a ship,

Libel.

Murder.

Obtaining money under false pretences,

Piracy,.

Rape,

Receiving stolen goods,

Returning from deportation,

Robbery from the person,

Robbery from the person with violence,

Robbery from the person and feloniously wounding,

Robbery from the person on board a British ship,

Stealing in a dwelling house with menaces,

Taking away from the Colony for the purpose of

prostitution,

12

19

1

pai bi si⠀⠀

::

:

:

2

::

::

::

:

::

:

3

:

2

3

1

...

:

2

1

1211

::

I 2

1 1

:

...

:

:

...

1 8

3

5

1

1

...

...

:

:

...

1

2

c3

4

:

:

...

::

:

55

9

13

1

4

Unlawfully being in possession of counterfeit coin

with intent to utter same,

3

1

3

1

1

Unlawfully causing to be forged a certain trade mark

with intent to defraud,..

1

1

1

Unlawfully purchasing a certain woman for the pur-

pose of prostitution,

1

1

1

1

Unlawfully attempting to bribe a Police Constable, Wounding with intent to do grievous bodily harm,

-::

68 106

6.4

41

Of 106 Persons only

1 Recognizance estreated,

.105 were tried. | Defendant's Recognizance estreated...

1

106 Persons.

Convicted, Acquitted,

Charges abandoned,

Total,...

a. In two cases 2 men were convicted for manslaughter.

1

1

:

21

37

:

1 Person.

.64

.41

105 Persons.

37

143 Persons.

b. The prisoner being called on his Recognizance and not answering, his Recognizance ordered to be estreated ($800 paid into Court).

e. In one case the Prosecutor not appearing the Court ordered that his Recognizance be estreated (The Prosecutor not to be found).

EDW. J. ACKROYD, Registrar.

Registry Supreme Court, Hongkong, 7th January, 1890.

210

COMPARATIVE TABLE showing the NUMBER of OFFENCES, APPREHENSIONS, CONVICTIONS and ACQUITTALS for the last Four Years.

The Number of Convictions in the Superior Courts,-

1. For Offences against the Person, 2. For Offences against Property,. 3. For other Offences,

The Nunber of Persons Acquitted,-

2. In the Superior Courts,

Registry Supreme Court, Hongkong, 7th January, 1890.

1886.

1887. 1888.

1889.

16

34

12

18

42

37

57

40

1

11

30

6

20

36

47

41

EDW. J. ACKROYD,

Registrar.

RETURN of all sums received as REVENUE in the Registry of the Supreme Court during the Year 1889.

Original Jurisdiction,

Summary Jurisdiction,

Bankruptcy Jurisdiction,

Probate Jurisdiction......

Official Administrator's Commission,

Official Assignee's Commission,

Official Trustee's Commission,.

Appraiser's Fees,

Sheriff's Fees,

Bailiff's Fees,.

Interest on Deposit of surplus cash,

Fees on Distraints,

Registrar of Companies,

Fine and Forfeitures,.

Land Office Fees,

Registry Supreme Court, Hongkong, 7th January, 1890.

.$ 4,127.63

5,537.70

948.69

777.98

921.30

2,737.84

1,993.03

12.00 224.50

1,436.50

4,299.47

1,594.75

6,370.62

800.00

$31,782.01 5,203.00

$36,985.01

EDW. J. ACKROYD, Registrar.

RETURN of all SUMS COLLECTED in the Registry of the Supreme Court for the Year 1889, and paid into the Treasury.

1888.

REGISTRAR.-Court Fees paid by Stamps,

$ 9,159.31

OFFICIAL ASSIGNEE.-5 per cent. on amounts encashed paid into the Treasury, OFFICIAL ADMINISTRATOR,

1,568.53

1,543.43

1889.

$12,986.75

2,737.84

921.30

OFFICIAL TRUSTEE.-2 per cent. on amount of Trust on taking over up to $10,000 above $10,000 commission 1 per cent. on further amount, 1 per cent. commission on income,

173.38

1,993.03

APPRAISER OF INTESTATE ESTATES.-2 per cent. on Houses, Land, Goods,

Furniture, &c., 1 per cent. on Cash, Banking Account or Shares,........

40.97

BAILIFF,

SHERIFF,

REGISTRAR OF COMPANIES, ............

INTEREST on Registrar's Balance at the Bank,

1,038.00

12.00 1,436.50

158.50

2,385.06

224.50 6,370.62

4,190.24

4,299.47

FINE AND FORFEITURES,

800.00

LAND OFFICE FEES,

$20,257.42 5,288.00

$25,545.42

$31,782.01

5,203.00

$36,985.01

DEPOSITS UNAVAILABLE.-Intestate Estates not claimed,.

$

99.54

UNCLAIMED BALANCE.-Under Ordinance 11 of 1888,.........................

$9,198.05

SUNDRY ESTATES.-Paid into the Treasury as Revenue of the Colony,.......................

2,236.48

EDW. J. ACKROYD, Registrar.

Registry Supreme Court, Hongkong, 7th January, 1890.

211

No. 368.

REGISTRY SUPREME COURT,

Hongkong, 26th March, 1890.

SIR,-I have the honour to forward herewith the following returns :

1. Civil Cases commenced and tried in 1889.

(a.) In Original Jurisdiction. (b.) In Summary Jurisdiction. 2. Appeals commenced and tried.

3. Distraints for 1888 and 1889. 4. Bankruptcy.

5. Probate and Administration.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your obedient Servant,

EDW. J. ACKROYD,

Registrar.

To Honourable W. M. DEANE,

Acting Colonial Secretary,

&c.,

&c.,

&c.

1889.

CASES COMMENCED.

JUDGMENT.

Settled or

No.

Jurisdiction.

of Cases.

Debt and Damages.

withdrawn

before

Plaintiff.

Trial.

Defend- ant.

Non- Suit.

Struck out, Dismissed

and Lapsed Writs.

In Dependency.

TOTAL CASES Tried.

Cases.

Debt and Damages recovered.

Original,

115

$597,230.43

11

20

2

82

Summary,

1,612 $278,269.03

531

716

51

12

246

8888

20

$67,608.01

56 779 $144,280.29

1889.

CASES TRIED..

JUDGMENT.

EDW. J. ACKROYD, Registrar.

Jurisdiction.

No. of Cases.

Debt and Damages.

Plaintiff. Defendant.

Non-Suit.

Struck out, Dismissed or

Debt and Damages.

Lapsed Writs.

Original,

Summary,

1,0536

37a $153,425.18

$190,665.45

32

10

:

733

53

13

254

$ 82,158.83

$147,928.50

a. 17 of these cases were pending on 31st December, 1888. b. 44 of these cases were pending on 31st December, 1888.

1889.

APPEALS COMMENCED.

No. of Cases.

Appellant.

Eow. J. ACKROYD, Registrar.

JUDGMENT.

Respondent.

Pending.

5

2

2

1

`EDW. J. ACKROYD,

Registrar.

212

No. of Cases.

4

1889.

APPEALS TRIED.

Appellant.

Number of Distraints.

1888.

RETURN OF DISTRAINTS.

Amount Claimed.

402

350

$20,441.57

1889.

$19,055.37

JUDGMENT.

Respondent.

2

EDW. J. ACKROYD, Registrar.

Amount Realised.

$9,423.11

$12,200.08

EDW. J. ACKROYD, Registrar.

RETURN of all BANKRUPTCIES filed in the Supreme Court of Hongkong during the Year 1889.

Official

Name.

Date of Adjudication.

or

Petitioner.

Creditor's Assignee.

Debts in Schedule.

Assets.

Amount received by Official Assignee.

Total amount of debts proved.

REMARKS.

$

$

$

Henrique Joaquim Rodrigues,

Sham Kai,

11th Jan., 1889. Bankrupt Official

Creditor

8,272.40

2,085.90

Liu Ying,

7th Feb., 1889.

Choong E Sam,.

7th

1889.

721.05 2.347.46

"

Sit Him Kook,

Chan Wai Kong,

11th April, 1889. Bankrupt Creditors 24th 1889.

53,756.88 45.968.83

Withdrawn.

3,622.10 | No Schedule filed. 30,727.06 No Schedule filed. 52,248.95

"1

31

65,803.20 83,077.85

4,144.25

34,766.48

Chan Choi Wai alias Chan Tsoi

Fai,

Lo Fook Tin,.

Che Mau Hin,

Chan Yan Po,

4th May, 1889.

8th 15th 25th

""

""

Lu Ting alias Lu Yuk Hin,

Eduardo Barros,

Shaik Haleem,

Au Kwok alias Au Kiang Tsun... Wong A Chiu,

Chau Fat alias Chau Chak Ting. Mok Yeung Shan and Hu Hin

Shan.

17th June, 1889.

Bankrupt

Official

Creditor Official

1889.

Creditor 1889. Bankrupt 1889. 1889. 4th June, 1889. 12th

Official

2,208.69 19,600.32

501.60

401.60

2,098.69

"

19,699.90

356.36

9,623.31

""

6,585.00 11,479.66

2,200.00

...

97

"1

10,823.47

4.275.12

46

3,909.79

2,273.00

1.544.37

1,107.00

414.00

40.40

17

11

Creditors Bankrupt Official

Creditor

2,090.00 3,885.50

28th June, 1889.

35,883.30 14,856.10 11,814.91

8th July, 1889.

Kwan Tat Ting,

Chui Lai Shang.

Flavia Dometilla Prestage..

James Joseph McBreen,

Chü Shiu Chung alias Jaffer,

8th Aug., 1889.

13th Aug., 1889. 23rd

1889.

Official

Bankrupt

Official

863.29 1,673.55 3.822.62

132.00

660.00 Petition dismissed.

4,210.12

1,591.32 Not proceeded with. 57,356.81

4,648.24 No Schedule filed.

25,784.70 No Schedule filed.

Not proceeded with.

Not proceeded with.

;

**

Tang Ng Kiu,

Lo To Shang and Ho Yuk Cho,... 24th Aug., 1889. | Bankrupts

Official

Li Kang,

Creditor

Chan Ut Nam,

24th Aug., 1889.

Official

*

100.00 100.00

9,920.39 9,290.06 1,480.45

13,432.76

100.00

Chan Sung Tack Tong alias Chan

Kwan Ting,

Lo Lin,

Charles Mooney,

11

Mahomed Saduck,

Cheong Hoi Cheung alias Cheong

Bankrupt 23rd Sept., 1889. Bankrupt Official 23rd 1889. 23rd 1889.

4,052.72

Not proceeded with. 10,013.82

Petition dismissed. 22,375.43 No Schedule filed.

Not proceeded with.

"

:)

1,135.40 72,858.17

*1

1,723.05

43.50 60,988.23 732.62

361.07

10,178.78

17

Shun Kai alias Cheong Hoi,

Chan Wong,

Un Lai King alias Un U Shang,.

7th 7th

**

1st Oct., 1889. Creditor 1889. Bankrupt

Official

19

6,855.68

3,050.60

17

Cheung Sing Pok,

14th

"

Fung Chec alias Fung Wun, 14th Phineas Thomas Francis Grimble.

1889. 1889. 1889.

!!

75,835.63

3,483.23

1,201.03 1,922.39 200.00

12,988.61 No Schedule filed.

7,889.79 4,580.93

6,000.00

7,450.00

"

173.97

"}

"

14th

??

Yau Wan Chi,

23rd

1889. 1889.

Creditor

45.00

4,020.51

"

Adolf Stern,

Ng Sheung Po,

Sorabjee Rustomjee,

23rd 23rd 28th

2:

1889. Bankrupt 1889. Creditor Creditors 1889.

Official

1,876.04 338.00

58,315.26 No Schedule filed. 47,199.31 No Schedule filed.

29.60

"}

99,744.41

214.57 3,515.20

50,531.25 No Schedule filed. 76,029.46

Cheong Chung,

Rozelinda J. Fonseca,

Bankrupt

142.00

Petition dismissed.

·

1,388.00

Kwan Tat Chiu,

59,526.54

50.00 19,625,23

Petition dismissed.

Petition dismissed.

Chan Tat Cheong,

Flora Huntington, Lo Tsun Hing, Lo Leung Hing,

28th Oct., 1889. 11th Nov., 1889. 26th 1889.

Official

3.170.82

4,680.95

"

"

2,977.78

600.00

Creditors

24,226.08

22,310.49

305.75 303.35 1,000.00 28,960.25

25

Total,.

12,623.00 31,382.00

597,232.66 350,163.06| 47,278.61566,951.98

EDW. J. ACKROYD, Registrar.

Petition dismissed.

213

CALENDAR of PROBATES and ADMINISTRATIONS granted by the SUPREME COURT of HONGKONG during the Year 1889.

Date of

Grant.

Name of Testator or Intestate.

Time and Place of Death.

Probate, Administration with Will annexed, or Administration.

Name and Description of the Executor or Administrator.

Value of

Effects as set forth in the Commis-

sion of Ap- praisement.

Jan. 16 Kwok A-tsing,

H'kong,

11

16 Ng Shek Wan,..

H'kong,

5th Dec., 1888,

19th Dec., 1888,

11

28 Pascoal Pereira,

H'kong,

3rd Jan., 1889,

Administration,

Do., Probate,

28

Kwok Kam Chuen, otherwise | H'kong,

5th Jan., 1889,

Do.,

Leung Fa and Pang Chi, daughter-in-

law and grandson, Chun Sai Kum, first lawful wife,...

Reverend Giuseppe Burghignoli and Ber-

nardo Vigano, executors, Pow Shi, executrix,

2,000.00 250.00

5,500.00

11,000.00

Kwok Wai Chuen,

""

28 Rujubally,

H'kong,

25th Nov., 1888, | Administration,

Alfred Gascoyne Wise, Official Adminis-

trator,

100.00

Feb. 11

Henry Smith Bidwell,

H'kong,

12th Jan., 1889,

Do..

Alfred Gascoyne Wise, Official Adminis-

trator,

50.00

11

"

Mau Shui,

H'kong,

20th Jan., 1889,

Do.,

Cheung Mun, first lawful wife,

500.00

""

18 Alexandrino Antonio de Mello,

Marseilles, 21st May, 1877,

Do.,

Carlota Josefa Botelho Mello, Viscountess

de Cercal,

1,500.00

(Viscount de Cercal),

??

26 Francisco de Sá,

Canton, River,

Do.,

Alfred Gascoyne Wise, Official Adminis-

""

12 Lai Kwan,

"J

26 Su Chuen,

26 George Bache Emory,

Mar. 8 Lydia Francisca Danenberg,

12 Chan A-king,

12 Tso Tuen Show,

12 Ip Fu alias Ip Mung Mui,

H'kong,

17th Feb., 1889, | Administration, H'kong, 23rd Jan., 1889,

H'kong, 15th Feb., 1889, | Administration, Wenchow, China,

Do.,

4th Feb., 1889, Pik Kong, in Shun Tak

trator,

2,000.00

Do.,

Su Ü Shi, widow,

500,00

District, China,

18th Oct., 1887,

Canandaigne, New York,

Do.,

8th Sept., 1887,

Alfred Parker Stokes, as attorney for

Matilda W. Emory,

14,700.00

Macao,

1st Oct., 1888,

Probate,

Vicente Victor Rodrigues, executor,

2,100.00

Chan Iu Fai, elder brother,

150.00

Probate,

Tso Cheung, brother,

20,000.00

Lau Tsoi, first lawful wife,

300.00

Ip Ling Mui, brother,

8,000.00

17th Sept., 1881,

دو

20 Wong Tat Cheong,

Shau Ki Wan,

Probate,

Wong Wa Yau, only son and executor,

200.00

H'kong, 31st Dec., 1888,

>>

25 Elliot Chester Douglas,.

H'kong,

"

25 Chinaman, (name unknown),

At Sea,

No. 45,

"

"

222 223

27 Wong Shi Tai otherwise Hiu

Canton,

Chün,

29

H'kong, Ramtoola Devjee, otherwise

Rahimtulla Devjee,

5th Feb., 1889, | Administration,

27th Feb., 1889,

16th Jan., 1889,

24th Mar., 1889,

Alfred Gascoyne Wise, Official Adminis-

trator,

250.00

Do.,

Probate,

Do.,

Alfred Gascoyne Wise, Official Adminis-

trator,

210.00

Wong Ping Lam and Wong Tat Kwan,

executors, Hajee Mahomed Sadick Hajee Ismail, Allarakhia Jahn Mahomed, and Ma- homed Fakeeranee,

118,000.00

13,000.00

"

29 Leung Cheuk,

Honam, Canton,

Do.,

Apr. 2 Sung Ching Chuen,

H'kong,

8 Cheng Ki alias Cheng Kok Cho,. H'kong,

12th Dec., 1888,

19th Jan., 1888, Adm. with Will

annexed, 26th Dec., 1888, Probate,

Leung Kwo Shang, Leung Man Shi, and Lenng Li Shi, the three surviving executors,

6,000.00

Sung Yau Shi, widow and sole executrix,.

50,000.00

Cheng Hu Shi and Wei Yuk, executrix

and executor,

3,000.00

""

8 R. W. Lowndes,

11 Tang Mun,

12 J. Jewell,

12 Belmira Kellar,

H'kong,

H'kong,

H'kong,

H'kong,

2nd Sept., 1888, Administration,

17th Feb., 1889, | Adm. with Will

annexed, 3rd Mar., 1889, | Administration,

8th Mar., 1889,

Alfred Gascoyne Wisc, Official Adminis-

trator,

100.00

Tang Ki, only son and next of kin,.

3,200.00

Alfred Gascoyne Wise, Official Adminis-

trator,

100.00

Do.,

Alfred Gascoyne Wise, Official Adminis-

trator,

620.00

May

8 Chan Mi,

H'kong,

26th Mar., 1889,

Do.,

Chan A-Ut, sister,

5.000.00

33

10 Rustomjee Sorabjee Woonwalla, Bombay, 25th Apr., 1887,

Do..

Shapurjee Framjee Tumbolee, the duly

appointed attorney of Jerbai, the

widow,

1,500.00

""

13 Ip Chan Shi,

17 Juan Antonio Barretto,.

H'kong,

23rd Jan., 1889,

Balintagag, Luzon,

Do.,

Chan A-yee, guardian, during the minor-

ity of Ip Kam Ying,

3,000.00

Probate,

Don Juan Antonio Barretto, eldest son,

29

13 James Leslie,

17 Yeong Sui alias Yeong Pik Yim,.

19

17 Meherwanjee Hormusjee Mehta,

Sun Ning, China,

22nd Oct., 1888, Canton River,

1st May, 1889, H'kong, 5th Mar., 1889,

Calcutta, 15th Sept., 1884,

31 Carl Bercovitz,

June 13 A. M. Augusto de Vasconcellos,.

13 Yu Lok alias Yn Woon Tong, ...

H'kong, Lisbon,

21st Nov., 1881,

9th Apr., 1889, Administration. 25th June, 1888, | Adm. with Will

annexed, Probate,

Administration,

Probate,

Adm. with Will annexed,

Yu Pui Wan and Yu Ip Chung, executors,

William Huddleston Leslie, brother,

Yeong Pak alias Yeong Hing Hi, sole

executor,.........

Hormusjee Meherwanjee Mehta, the duly appointed attorney of Dhunjeebhoy Meherwanjee. Power being reserved of granting Probate to Soonah Bye and Cowasjee Kharsetjee Mehta. Jehangerjee Pestonjee Khrass, the exe-

cutor, Bruce Shepherd, Official Administrator,... Bruce Shepherd, Official Administrator,.. Bruce Shepherd, Official Administrator.... Bruce Shepherd, Official Administrator,.. Wong Sing Nam, executor,

1,325.00

24 Waldemar Harold Henriques, H'kong,

11

24 Virginia Francisca das Chagas,...

H'kong,

21

24 Charles Edward Bonney,

H'kong,

24 Lai Mui Shan,

Canton,

"?

July 11

Baron von Frank,

11 Wong Hok Ting,

19 Ninian Robert Stanford Craw- H'kong,

19 Thomas Middleton Leather-

ford,

barrow,

19 Peter Wilhelm Vorrath...

Aug. 1 Mathew Taylor Falconer,

H'kong, Tung Koon, China,

24th May, 1889,

12th May, 1889, 19th Apr., 1889. 11th Sept., 1888, 4th July, 1889,

29th Jan., 1889, 25th Jan., 1889,

H'kong, 10th July, 1889,

Missing from board his ship in the waters of Singapore,

Yokohama, 17th Sept., 1888,,

Probate,

Administration, Do., Do., Do., Probate,

Administration.

2,000.00

400.00

250.00

300.00

1,200.00

10,000.00

Probate,

Administration,

Henry Crawford, the duly appointed

attorney of Ninian Crawford, Archibald Baird and George Lomer Tom-

lim, executors,

31,500,00

19,400.00

Ludwig Wilhelm Schrameier. His Impe-

rial Germanic Majesty's Vice-Consul, Hongkong,

1,700.00

Do..

William Powell, as attorney for Louisa

Falconer, the widow and relict,

4,300.00

(Double Probate),

2,000.00

Bruce Shepherd, Official Administrator,. Oscar Marques, (by consent),

800.00

5,800.00

189,000.00

250.00

51,300.00

214

Aug. 1 Hurry Bhanjee,

9 William Henderson,

Bayswater in the county of Middlesex, 12th June, 1886,

"

29

23 Kwok Ngan alias Kwok Ngam.. 30 Antonio dos Remedios,

H'kong,

H'kong,

annexed,

Adm. with Expl. of the Will annexed,

14th June, 1889, Probate, 18th Aug., 1889, | Administration,

Sept. 9 Chiu Tin,

Oct.

Leung Sze,

H'kong, H'kong,

18th Aug., 1889, 17th June, 1889,

CALENDAR of PROBATES and ADMINISTRATIONS,—Continued.

Date of Grant.

Name of Testator or Intestate.

Time and Place of Death.

Probate, Administration with Will annexed, or Administration.

Bombay, 29th Dec., 1884, Adm. with Will

Name and Description of the Executor or Administrator.

Jacob Silas Moses, the duly appointed of

Keshowjee Hunsraz and Dewkurn Kaya, executors, Thomas Edmund Davies, as attorney for John Paton Watson, Mary Mackenzie, and William Henderson, executors and executrix,

Cheang Fuk Ming, sole executor, Sylvia Vandenberg dos Remedios and

Antonio Hugo dos Remedios, widow and son,

Value of Effects as set forth in the Commis- sion of Ap- praisement.

$

600.00

100,000.00

4,500.00

15,000.00

Do., Probate,

Chow Yik, widow and relict,

2,300.00

11

1 Alexander Myburgh,

Margate, England,

30th July, 1889,

17

Bedell Lee Yuen,

Canton,

Nov. Frederick Stewart,

H'kong,

22

1 João Baptista Gomes,..

Macao,

21st July, 1889, 29th Sept., 1889, 2nd Sept., 1889,

Adm. with Expl. of the Will annexed, Administration, Probate, Do.,

Li Tak Shing, trader, Li A-ching, widow, Li A-sai, widow, and Li Kwan, trader, executor and executrixes, Victor Hobart Deacon, one of the attor

nies of Charles Dowdall.....

Bruce Shepherd, Official Administrator.... José Maria Gutierrez, sole executor, Francisco d'Assis Gomes. João Baptista

2,500.00

13,300.00

Gomes, José Miguel Victor de Figuei- redo, and Augusto José Gomes, execu- tors. Power being reserved of grant- ing like Probate to Antonio Simplicio Gomes, the other executor named in the Will,.......

Robert Berwick, executor,

100.00 10,000.00

143,000.00

Ching A-tak, one of the executrixes. Power being reserved of making the like grant to Cheung A-kai, the other executrix,

"

5 John Charles Kay,

6 Sarah Ann Stainfield,.

7 Jean Pierre Carrique.....

H'kong,

27th Oct., 1889, H'kong, 7th Oct., 1889, Arcachon in France,

21st Oct., 1888,

Do., Do.,

500.00

Adm. with Expl. of the Will annexed,

Edward Langham Stainfield, executor, Alfred Parker Stokes, the duly appointed attorney of Honorine Denis Devan- ceaux,

3,500.00

8,500.00

"

8 William Thompson,

H'kong,

""

8 Pang Yuk Yan,

Kwong Hoi, China,

115

8 Wong Tai Ngan,

Canton,

7th Apr., 1889, 5th Sept., 1889,

8th Oct., 1889, Adm. with Will

annexed, Do.,

Probate,

Bruce Shepherd, Official Administrator.....

1,000.00

Pang Yuk Cheung, elder brother,

8,000.00

35

8 George McCall,

H'kong,

8

Henry Manskey, ........

H'kong,

26th July, 1889, 14th Oct., 1889,

??

8 George Bayne.....

H'kong,

9th July, 1889,

Administration, Do., Do.,

99

8 John Joseph Chapman,

H'kong.

2nd Oct., 1889,

Do..

>>

8 William McCall,

H'kong,

10th July, 1889,

Do.,

8 James Grant

9

8 Louis H. D'Egville,

8 Maria Antonia Pereira,

Ow Kan Tung......

9 James Brown McCulloch.

H'kong, H'kong,

H'kong, 20th July, 1889, H'kong, 24th June, 1889,

Do..

Do.,

16th Oct., 1889, 15th Oct., 1889,

6,500.00

100.00

100.00

3,000.00

100.00

100.00

100.00

200.00

1,500.00

10,000,00

Bothwell, Scotland,

16 Ong Chong Chew,

30th Oct., 1887,

Probate, Do., Adm. with Will

or General Disp. and Settle- ment annexed,

Singapore, 5th June, 1888, | Adm. with Expl.

24

16

Ng Guak Kee,

Dec.

2

Ernst Carl Ludwig Reuter,

Swatow, At Sea,

30th Jan., 1888, 22nd July, 1889,

2 Henry Robert Bentley,

Whitechapel,

23rd Aug., 1889,

of the Will annexed, Administration, Adm. with Will annexed,

Adm. with Expl.

of the Will annexed,

Bruce Shepherd, Official Administrator,. Bruce Shepherd, Official Administrator,. Bruce Shepherd, Official Administrator,. Bruce Shepherd, Official Administrator,. Bruce Shepherd, Official Administrator.. Bruce Shepherd, Official Administrator.. Bruce Shepherd. Official Administrator,. Clara Maria Pereira, sole executrix, Ow Sui Kay, eldest son, James Johnstone Keswick, as attorney for Jane Brown or McCulloch, and until she shall duly apply for and obtain Probate,

Bruce Shepherd, Official Administrator,...

Bruce Shepherd, Official Administrator,... Gustav Adolph Wieler, the duly appoint-

ed attorney of Friedrich Reuter for the use and benefit of the said Frie- drich Reuter and until he shall duly apply for Probate of the Will to be granted to him,..

Alfred Parker Stokes, the duly appointed attorney of William Cotter, for the use and benefit of the said William Cotter and until he shall duly apply for Probate of the Will, Cheung Yeong Shi, the sole executrix,. Wong A-kum, widow and sole executrix,. Ip Pak Kit, Ip Chung Kan, and Ip Shuk

8,100.00 500.00

100.00

22,300.00

2 Li Huk Mui,..

""

39

2 Wong A-chuen,

H'kong, H'kong,

19

2 Ip Ching Chuen,

Fatshan,

27th Sept., 1889, 7th Oct., 1889, 9th Aug., 1889,

Probate,

6,000.00 8,000.00

Do.,

3,000.00

Do.,

""

A

""

2 Chow Hok, otherwise Chun Hau, otherwise Mui Chun,

2 Ng A-heep alias Ng Yung Ng,.... H'kong,

14th Oct., 1889,

DO.,

H'kong,

7th Nov., 1887,

Do..

2 Leong Wing Chuen,

Tan-cho, Nam Hoi District,

Do.,

Tsit, the sons and executors, Mok Koon Yuk, sole executor, Chow Hung Tsang, Chow Hung Ki, and Chow Hung Tsün, sons and executors.. Leong Lo Shi, sole executrix,

208,100.00

22,000.00

37,000.00

19,300.00

R

"}

2 Leung Kam, otherwise Leung H'kong,

15th Oct., 1889, 19th Oct., 1889,

Administration,

Chan Wan Ching, widow,

400.00

Yau Shan,

2 Alexander Levy,

"

2 Lo Ü..

**

19 See Yau alias Sang Kai,

23 Duncan McDonald,

H'kong,

11

"

31 William Homfray Fuller Darby,. H'kong,

1st Oct., 1889, 26th Sept., 1889, 11th Dec., 1889,

H'kong, H'kong, Honam, Canton,

30th Oct., 1889, Probate,

4th May, 1889, | Administration,

Adm. with Will annexed, Do.. Probate,

99

31 Cheong Chee Him,

Tientsin,

4th Dec., 1888,

Do.,

Alice Levy, executrix. Tsu A-fook, widow,. See Kok Shan, nephew..............

Sarah McDonald, the widow and relict.... Bendyshe Layton, one of the executors named in the Will. Power being re- served to grant the like Probate to William Henry Homfray, the other executor named in the said Will, Wong Shee, the widow and sole executrix,.

200.00 52,500.00

600.00

10,000.00 3,500.00

EDW. J. ACKROYD,

Registrar.

1,000.00

Registry Supreme Court, Hongkong, 26th March, 1890.

;

TOTAL.

:

ABSTRACT of CASES under Cognizance of the POLICE MAGISTRATES' COURT during the Year 1889.

CASES, HOW DISPOSED OF, ANd the Number of Male and FEMALE PRISONERS UNDER EACH HEAD. Ordered to find Security." *

WRITS ISSUED BY THE POLICE MAGISTRATES DURING THE YEAR 1889.

Warrants.

8,670

10,033 | 6,626

M. F. M. F. M. F. 268 2,319 178 157 10

M. F.

44 10

M. F.

150 25

M.

144

F. M. F. M.

F.

M. F.

8

2

1

7

17

TOTAL MALES AND FEMALES,

M. F. M.

64 3 9,530 503

.10,033

F.

1,659

201

17

147

4

976

156

TOTAL

NUMBER

TOTAL

NUMBER

OF

CASES.

OF PRISON-

ERS.

Consisting of Offenders not sentenced to Imprisonment.

3,160

215

216

OFFENCE.

THE CASES CONSISTED OF :-

No. of

NO. OF CASES.

PRI- SONERS.

OFFENCE.

No. of

No. of

PRI-

CASES.

SONERS.

19

Animals-Cruelty to,.

Arms-Carrying without reasonable excuse, -Removing without permission,.

Arson.

Assault-Causing grievous bodily harm,.

-Common,

13

13

Brought forward,..

104

1

4

4

662

897

"

-Indecent,

::

On Females, and Boys under 14 years of age,

1

1

""

-On Police in the Execution of their Duty, and

76

94

::

obstructing and resisting Police,

-With intent to rob,

.2

3

་་

Arms-Neglecting to furnish monthly return of,

1

Banishment-Returning after,

23

23

Births & Deaths-Breach of Ordinance for Registration of,

5

5

*

Breach of the Peace.

Boats-Refusing to accept Hire when unemployed,

Bribery, or attempting to bribe,

Buildings-Breach of Ordinance for,

Burglary,..

Boats neglecting to carry Licence No. on the bow of,

Defacing number of,.......

Cargo Boats-Breach of Ordinance for,

Cattle-Slaughtering in a place other than one set apart!

14

14

104 Night-Found at, armed with Dangerous and Offensive Weapons, with Intent to break into Dwelling Houses,

Night-Found in Dwelling Houses by-with Intent to

commit Felony therein,

Nuisances-Allowing Dirt and Filth to remain on Pre-

mises or in immediate Vicinity thereof, -Blasting Stones to the danger of Persons

and Property,

-Exposing Night-soil in the Streets in uncovered Buckets, and in open Boats along the Praya,

-Hanging wet Clothes, &c., to dry over

Public Ways...

4,350 5,491

2

21

21

5

5

10

10

7

25

25

25

16

42

21

26

ANASON

2

>>

-Neglecting to clean out Dust Bins, and

throwing Rubbish, &c., into the Streets. ---Obeying Calls of Nature in the Streets. -Throwing Rubbish into the Harbour or on

114

114

87

87

70

70

the Beach,

-Beating drums, &c.,

11

11

-Exploding Dynamite to the danger of

1

1

2

person and property,

for the purpose,..

Irrigation,

3

3

Child Stealing,

13

14

Obstruction of Navigation...

261

261

Chinese Territory-Crimes and Offences committed in,...

2

Coin-Offences relating to,

of Roads and Streets, &c., by Hawkers, Chair Coolies and Shopkeepers,..

569

616

Conditional Pardon-Breach of.

of Wharves by Boat People,

91

91

Conspiracy to commit Felony,

Contagious Diseases' Ordinance-Offences against

43

43

Contempt of Court,

Opium-Breach of Ordinance for Preparation and Sale

of prepared,

Crime Ordinance-Breach of,

Cutting and Wounding with intent, &c.,

28

31

Dangerous Goods Ordinance-Breach of,

6

Licence,

Decoying Persons into or away from the Colony,

49

49

Desertion from Foreign Ships,

24

24

""

H. M.'s Army and Navy,

38

38

Pawning-Illegally,

""

""

British Merchant Ships,

12

12

Piracy,

Disorderly Behaviour-Drunkenness, Fighting, &c.,...

650

1,166

Offensive Weapons-Having Possession of,

Passage-Obtaining surepticiously a...

Passengers-Carrying in Excess of that allowed by

Passes-Chinese out at Night without,

Pawnbrokers-Breach of Ordinance for,.

Police Constables-Rescuing Prisoners from Custody of,

1

1

1,079 1,132

5

59

59

6

3

Dogs-Allowing unmuzzled ferocious, to be at large, &c.,

16

16

-Misconduct as,

2

Domestic Servants-Misconduct as,...

27

27

Public Garden's Regulation-Breach of.

2

Drugs-Administering,

1

2

Rape.......

2

Domestic Animals, Malicious killing,

2

2

Receiving Stolen Goods,

36

46

Desertion from H. M.'s Naval Yard,

1

1

Recognisances-Breach of,.

24

Embezzlement,

4

Roads and Streets-Injury to,..

Embracery,

2

Robbery From the Person,.

9

20

Escape of Prisoners from Chain Gang,

1

1

Excise Officer, Personating,

1

False Charge-Preferring or giving wilful false evidence,

18

18

Imprisonment,

4

4

-From the Person with Wounding or Violence, -On the Highways with Arms or with Violence, Rogues & Vagabonds-As Street Gamblers and Watch-

men to Gamblers,

14

2

46

""

Pretences-obtaining Goods and Money by,

Felony-Attempting to commit,

Fire Arms-Discharging,

Forgery,

Furious Driving,

28

39

::

-As suspicious Characters,.

77

43

46

11

>>

As Vagrants,

27

27

1

1

*,

-Wandering abroad and lodging

9

9

in the open air,

8

13

30

Rating Ordinance-Breach of,

7

Fire-works-Discharging without permit,

Fugitive Offenders Act, Offences against,

293

293

Sanitary Regulations-Breach of,

2

23

Public Ways,..............

Gaols-Breach of Ordinance for,

Gambling-Breach of Ordinance for Suppression of,..

-in the Streets, treated as Obstruction ofl

Harbour Dredging at Anchorage for Ships of War in the,

75

188

259

259

Ships, &c.-Neglecting to have a riding light on board.......... Shooting with intent to do Grievous Bodily Harm, Spirituous and fermented Liquors-Breach of Ordinance

96

17

IINNN****** * ** * ~ *co # 00

24

3

23

46

77

7

3

96

4

18

for retail of,

4

14

14

Stones and other Missiles-Discharging and rolling to

Danger of Persons and Property,

5

LO

Regulations--Breach of,..

16

16

Streams-Defiling,

22

22

House Breaking...

11

Streets-Noises by Hawkers,

123

123

Householders and Servants-Breach of Ordinance, for

Registration of,....

I

Ships, &c. Leaving Harbour during prohibited hours, Steam-Launch Ordinance-Breach of,

1

1

Indecent Exposure of Person by Bathing or otherwise,

and Lewdness,..

Larceny as a Bailee,

14

14

Stone Cutters' Island,-Landing, &c.,

Trade Marks and Labels--Fraudulently using false,

-Common,

??

-from Ships or Boats in the Harbour,.

;"

-from the Person,

ཀཝཾ ཡདྡྷི

1

1

Trees, &c.—Cutting and destroying,

102

102

1,048 | 1,163

Trespass on Crown Land,....

322

322

22

Threatening Letter-Sending a,

3

3

109 117

Triad Society-Being a Member of, &c.,

3

3

-in a Dwelling House,

22

37

Unlawful Possession of Property,

289

326

19

**

-of Beasts or Birds, not the subject of Larceny

of Trees, Shrubs, &c.,

22

22

13

15

at Common Law,

Unlicensed-Hawkers,

320

320

"

of Vegetables and Fruits from Gardens and

7

8.

*

-Passage Broker,

4

enclosed places,

-Plying of Boats for Hire,

29

29

Libel,

2

Unnatural Offence......

1

Lights-Chinese not carrying at night,

1

Unwholesome Provisions-Exposing for Sale, or bring-

Malicious Injury to Property,

28

28

ing into the Colony,

8

8

Manslaughter,

5

19

Vehicles and Chairs-Offences against Public,

60

60

Market-Selling or exposing for sale articles of food

Verandah erected on Crown Land enclosing, &c.,

13

13

162

162

for man elsewhere than in Public,

Vaccination Ordinance-Breach of,

1

1

Menaces-Demanding Money by,.

25

34

Watchmen-Misconduct as Private,

4

4

Mendicancy,

159

159

ད་

Misdemeanor-Aiding and Abetting in,

-Attempting to commit,

2

2

Weights and Measures-Breach of Ordinance for, Women and Female Children-Breach of Ordinance for

120

120

33 51

17

17

protection of,.......

Murder,

4

1

Workmen-Intimidating...

6

35

Malicious Injury to Electric Magnetic Telegraph,

37

37

Carried forward........

4,350 5,491

}

TOTAL......

8,670 10,033

Magistracy, Hongkong, 10th January, 1890.

H. E. WODEHOUSE,

Police Magistrate,

for the Police Magistrates.

217

ABSTRACT of CASES brought under COGNIZANCE at the POLICE MAGISTRATES' COURT during a period of Ten Years, from 1st January, 1880, to 31st December, 1889, inclusive.

CASES, HOW DISPOSED OF, AND THE NUMBER OF MALE AND FEMALE PRISONERS UNDER EACH HEAD.

Total Number

Years.

of Cases.

Convicted and Punished.

Committed for Trial at

Committed to Prison

Ordered to find Security.

Punished for Preferring

Total

or detained

Discharged.

Supreme Court.

pending Orders of To keep the Peace,

False Charge Undecided.

Number

His Excellency

to be of Good Beha-

the Governor.

viour, and to answer

any charge.

or giving False Testimony.

of Defendants.

2

3

10

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F

M.

F.

M.

F.

M. F.

M. F.

M.

F.

1880,

7,098

5,892

252

1,775

187

170

27

15

1881.

8,203 7,049 333

1,678

173

192

48

1882,

7,567

6,049 394

1,922 255

259

36

1883.

19,653 8,127 670

*2,398

349

121

8

37

1884,

14.065 11.748 1,088

2,294

268

101

35

1885,

10.281 7,951

849

2,188 258

159

11

PTOMOT

204

48

37

15

33

4

369

65

34

53

263

100

13

80

154

62

6

160

11

228

53

6

2

105

357

99

18

1886,

14,611 12,081

842

2,198 190

157

5

869

100

32

168

1887.

1888.

1889,

12,015 11.647 9,700 232 8,670 6,626 268

10,354 325

2,620 159

158

28

4

411

52

14

48

2,704 145 2,319

168

98

11

177

15

3

48

NOTE ~

8,126 531 9,379 630 8,622 780 11,003 1,101

2

14,517 1,418

10,690 | 1,211

178

157

10

44

10

303

34

17

64

15,510 1,137

13,633 549 12,898 411 9,530 503

Grand Total for

the 10 Years,

104,810 85,577 5,253 | 22,096 | 2,162

1,642

131

313

85

3,335

628

168 30 777

32 113,908 | 8,271

Average per

Year,

10,481.0 8,557.7 | 525.32,209 6216.2

164.2

13.1

31.3

3.5

333.5

62.8

16.8

38

3.0

|77.7

3.2

11,390.8 827.1

Total of 1st 5 Years,

47,586 | 38,865 |2,737 | 10,067 | 1,232

843

102

127

7

1,218

328 96 27

431

27

51,647 4,460

Average of

1st. l'eriod,

9,517.27,773.0 547.4 2.013.4 246.4

168 6

20.4

25.4

1.4

243.6

65.6

19.2 5.4

86.2

5.4

10,329.4 892.0

Total of 2nd

Period of 5

Years,

57,224 46.7 2 2,516 | 12,029

980

799

29

186

28

2,117

300 72

3

346

5

62,261 | 3,811

Average of 2nd 11,444.8 | 9,342.4 |503.2 | 2,405.8 186.0

period,...

159 8

5.8

37.2

5.6

423.4

60.0 14.4

0.6

69.2

1.0

|12,452.2 | 762.2

}

Magistracy, Hongkong, 10th Januáry, 1890.

MAGISTERIAL ENQUIRIES INTO DEATHS.

H. E. WODEHouse, Police Magistrate,

for the Police Magistrates.

TABLE A.-RETURN OF ALL DEATHS REPORTED DURING THE YEAR 1889.

NATIONALITY.

Men.

Formal Enquiries held.

Buried without Formal Enquiries.

Very much

Women. Boys. Girls. Total. Men. Women. Boys. Girls. decomposed, Total.

sex not

ascertainable.

Europeans and Americans, ...

9

Japanese,...

1

Indians and Malays,......................

Chinese,......

Total,

Total for 1888,

5

43

58

52

:

:

N

1

10

ة

10

1

:

:

:

:

:

10

5

5

60

107

16

635

65

:

:

:སྐྱ

62

:

:

4

3

10

5

255

7

6

10

5

76 114

16

65

62

10

5

262

00

3

5

3

63

93

32

137

109

11

382

218

TABLE B.-Return of FormMAL ENQUIRIES DURING THE YEAR 1889.

FINDING.

Europeans and Americans.

Indi- ans &

Malays.

Ja- [panese.]

Chinese.

Total.

Wo-

Men. Boys. Men.

Men. Men. Men.

Boys. Girls.

men.

3

2

*~ :

3

1

11:

19

3

1

2

33

3

:

:

1

1

2

:: -

1

1: a

:

:

...

...

1

1

:-

1

:

:

1

2

21

I

:

:

:

Accidental death,

Accidental death by drowning,

Death from acute bronchitis,

Death from injuries received from an earth fall while engaged in earth digging above Bonham Road and

Victoria Gap in Hongkong,

Death from Syncope,.

Death from the effect of a bullet wound,

Death from hemorrhage occasioned by a wound in the

right arm,

Death resulted from the blow of a stone on the head thrown at the deceased while engaging in arresting a prisoner,

Death resulted from a collapse of the cook house of each floor of house Nos. 23 and 24 Upper Station Street,

Death from the falling of a crane iron, Death from hemorrhage on the brain, Drowning,

Death occasioned by an explosion of a cartridge while in the act of ramming it into the bore, the probable cause of the explosion being the unextinguished charred remains of the cartridge previously fired from the same gun,

Felo de Se,

Found drowned,

Killed by a fall from the top of a house while engaged Į

in hoisting up stone,

Manslaughter,..

Natural causes,.............. Suicide (in Gaol),

Suicide while in a state of unsound mind,

That the deceased died from the effects of neurotic and irritant poison or poisons self administered while in an unsound state of mind,. That the deceased came to his death by being crushed beneath a quantity of iron that came down with him from the cockloft of the ground floor of the house, No. 26 Wing Wo Street,

That the deceased met with his death by being crushed beneath a shear piece falling upon him,...... That the deceased met his death by falling through an open hatch hway on board the S.S. Honam at the time lying at Victoria Harbour,

Wilful murder by person or persons unknown, Wilful murder,

1

:

:

-:

:

:

2

1

3

:

:

:

:

1

::

:

: ~1

2

4

растить при ракотов

:.

:

:

:

:.

::

:

:

:

:

:

1

2

1

1

1

:

:

:.

-

9

5

...

1

1

1

1

:

1

1

1

:

1

01 30

2

6

1

1

6

1

1

1

:

:

4:

::

10

:

:

::

43

7

1

1

1

1

1

5

5

76

TABLE C-RETURN OF BURIALS WITHOUT FORMAL ENQUIRIES DURING THE YEAR 1889.

Reason why no Formal Enquiry was held.

Total,....

Europeans and Americans.

Chinese.

Indians.

and Malays.

Very much

Found on

Found in

de-

Land,

Harbour.

composed; Total.

sex not

Women. Boys. Girls. Women. ascertain-

able.

Known.

Un-

known.

Knowp.

Un.

known.

Men. Women. Men.

No suspicious circumstances......

2

No evidence and/or decomposed

state of Body,

Post Mortem satisfactory,

2

Total,.........

:

:

97

16

18

16

3

152

113

6

24

7

47

45

5

104

53

:

47

3

:

:

:.

1

:

:

1

1

:

107

16

65

62

3

Magistracy, Hongkong, 31st January, 1890.

10

5

262

121

60

25

56

H. E. WODEHOUSE,

Police Magistrate.

2

No. 68.

387

No.

23:

90.

HONGKONG.

DEFALCATIONS OF Z. M. BARRADAS.

Laid before the Legislative Council, by Command of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government.

5 enclosures.

SIR,

GENERAL POST OFFICE, HONGKONG, 15th September, 1890.

I have the honour to transmit herewith the undermentioned enclosures :-

(a.) Statement of amount of defalcations by Z. M. BARRADAS.

(b.) Balance Sheets, Imperial Money Orders, for the 1st and 2nd Quarters

of 1890.

(c.) Balance Sheets, Local Money Orders, for the 1st and 2nd Quarters

of 1890.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your obedient Servant,

ARTHUR K. TRAVERS, Acting Postmaster General.

The Honourable

W. M. DEANE, C.M.G.,

&c.,

&c.,

&C..

Acting Colonial Secretary.

MONEY ORDER OFFICE.

STATEMENT (B.) of Amount OF DEFALCATIONS BY Z. M. Barradas.

ASSETS.

AMOUNT.

LIABILITIES.

AMOUNT.

To Cash in hand, .

""

Cash balance left out of transfer of $2,500 for paying outstanding Imperial

11,201.49 By Payment into Treasury on account of

Postal Notes sold in January, February and March, 1890,.

7,886.38

Money Orders,

""

Total Deficit,

389.83

Payment of Imperial Money Orders sold "" between 19th and 22nd March, 1890.

618.07

7,821.76

""

Cash transferred to Local Cash Book,..

197.04

""

Cash transferred to Imperial Cash Book,

2,500.00

""

Payment into Treasury on 11th July, 1890, on account of London Remittance of £218.9.11 of 5th March, 1890, not made,

1,271.26

Deficit on Local Money Order Account,

6,940.33

19,413.08

19,413.08

ARTHUR K. TRAVERS,

Acting Postmaster General.

388

First Quarter, 1890.

MONEY ORDER OFFICE.

BALANCE SHEET, Imperial MONEY ORDERS, 22ND MARCH, 1890.

ASSETS.

AMOUNT.

LIABILITIES.

AMOUNT.

Transferred from Cash Balance left,

2,500.00 || By Unpaid Orders,...

Balance,.........

2,174.68

325.32

Second Quarter, 1890.

Cash in hand,

2,500.00

2,500.00

ARTHUR K. TRAVERS,

Acting Postmaster General.

MONEY ORDER OFFICE.

BALANCE SHEET, Imperial Money Orders, 30TH JUNE, 1890.

ASSETS.

First Quarter, 1890.

ASSETS.

AMOUNT.

LIABILITIES.

AMOUNT.

942.60 By Unpaid Orders,.......................

552.77

Balance,......

389.83

942.60

(C.)

942.60

ARTHUR K. TRAVERS,

Acting Postmaster General.

MONEY ORDER OFFICE.-(LOCAL.)

BALANCE SHEET, 22ND MARCH, 1890.

AMOUNT.

LIABILITIES.

AMOUNT.

Due by New South Wales, £ 434 4 11

Due to Japan,

1,438.00

Victoria,

39 610

"}

""

1289,

1,241.66

""

Queensland,

252 6 9

*

29

North Borneo,............

48.71

Western Australia,

36 12 2

"

""

South Australia,.

62 211

""

Shanghai,..

Ceylon,.........

5.06

2.82

Tasmania,

307 4 3

""

1889,

357.03

£1,131 17 10 @ 3/0%

7,391.94

India,

2,724.37

Singapore,

298.25

"1

1889,

4,747.67

1289,

*

"

696.35 By Unpaid Orders, 1887-88,

53.17

1889-90,

5,421.83

""

Bangkok,

226.04

**

"

1839,

290.37

"

Cash in hand,

197.04

Balance,

6,940.33

16,040.32

ARTHUR K. TRAVERS,

16,040.32

Acting Postmaster General.

:

Second Quarter, 1890.

MONEY ORDER OFFICE.—(LOCAL.)

ASSETS.

BALANCE SHEET, 30TH JUNE, 1890.

AMOUNT.

LIABILITIES.

389

AMOUNT.

Balance due Hongkong £476 5 2

from Victoria,.

New South Wales,...

71 11 4

"?

South Australia,

49 11 1

Western Australia,.

44 4 2

Tasmania,

237 17 5

"

Balance due Queensland, £11 12 3 @ 3/4§..........

68.60

Colombo, Rs. 312.66 @Rs.221

per $100,

141.19

India, Rs. 22,301 11/1 @ Rs.

221 per $100,.....

10,068.48

Japan,

1,417.66

Cash due Shanghai,

261.66

Unpaid Orders 1887-88,

53.17

£879 9 2 @ 3/4§

5,195.57

"

1889-90,

1,253.61

""

Singapore 1890,

446.82

""

1890,

451.07

on Lists of 2nd Quarter, 1890, received at Hongkong after 30th June, 1890,

3,599.91

"

Bangkok 1890, ...

264.94

2

Advance from Government,..

5,000.00

""

">

1890,

371.33

,,North Borneo,...................

236.26

""

Shanghai,

13.08

Cash due from Shanghai,

374.06

Draft from Queensland, £100 @ 3/7,

558.14

Cash in hand,

6,986.79

Balance,........

6,966.22

21,864.28

21,864.28

ARTHUR K. TRAVERS,

Acting Postmaster General.

MEMORANDUM ON DEFALCATIONS OF Z. M. BARRADAS, LATE SUPERINTENDENT OF THE MONEY

ORDER OFFICE.

When the frauds were first discovered in March last the late Mr. LISTER was at some pains to prepare a statement in order to arrive approximately at the sum missing. The conclusion 'he arrived at was that about $46,000 represented the

loss.

In making up this statement Mr. LISTER had not sufficient data to go upon owing to the books of the Money Order Department being so much in arrear, and it was only by a careful detailed examination of the accounts and by obtaining information from other Colonies that the sum total of the defalcations could be arrived at. This examination has now been made and corrected accounts with each Colony prepared and the appended statements are the result.

In the statement prepared by Mr. LISTER the amount shewn as being short paid to the Treasury to meet advices to the Crown Agents was $46,466.82. Sub- sequent examination of the accounts has shewn the sum to be $50,681.06. The difference arose from the fact that up to 31st December, 1889, the statements of payments to the Treasury was made up from records in the Audit Office and the statement from January, 1890, to the date of BARRADAS' flight was prepared in the Post Office and included three sums amounting to $5,771.05 paid in in December, 1889. There was no time to check the accounts and so this double credit was overlooked till after the original statement was made and the accounts were

390

examined in detail. Further discrepancies were also found by letters received as late as July from the General Post Office London pointing out errors in the accounts of BARRADAS.

As regards the Local Accounts, no real idea of their state could be formed. The Cash Book was not written up from November, 1889, and the Ledger was only posted to December, 1888. The lists of orders received from other places had not the dates of payment of orders set off on them and it was impossible to say even approximately what the amount of unpaid orders was. Mr. LISTER estimated them at $1,000 and the unpaid local orders have since proved to be $5,275.

Owing also to the Ledger not being posted Mr. LISTER had no means of know- ing that the accounts with India, Ceylon, Singapore and Bangkok had not been settled up for the fourth quarter of 1889.

At the time of BARRADAS' flight it was necessary to carry on the work of the Money Order Department without causing inconvenience to the Public and the staff at the disposal of Mr. LISTER was hardly sufficient to do this and much loss to make up correct statements of the wilfully complicated accounts of BARRAdas. To make the appended statements clear to anyone who has not carefully examined the accounts complicated as they were made by the way in which BARRADAS kept his books and also owing to the further complications due to the constant varying rates of exchange the following explanations may be of use.

In statement A which shews the sums short paid to the Treasury to meet advices to Crown Agents in the amount shewn for 1890 an arbitrary rate of 3/2 has been adopted for the advices. It was necessary to do this as the system of dealing with the Crown Agents' accounts, is, at the end of the year, to take the average rate at which bills have been sold in London for the year and adopt this as the rate for all Crown Agents' transactions. The average rate owing to the rise in the price of the dollar will no doubt be in excess of 3/2 but this cannot be de- termined till the end of the year.

In statement B which shews the position of the Money Order Office apart from the sums short paid to the Treasury to cover advices to the Crown Agents it will be seen that BARRADAS left cash in hand to the extent of $11,201.49.

In the confusion caused by his flight the amount was at once appropriated as follows:-

To meet Postal Notes sold and not accounted for, ...$7,886.38

""

""

Money Orders sold and not accounted for,

,, carry on payments for Local Orders,

11

""

51

")

""

Imperial Orders,

618.07

197.04 2,500.00

It was subsequently found that a sum of £246.9.1, had not been advised to the Crown Agents and also that an error of £28 had been made by BARRADAS in a previous advice and $1,271.26 or £218.9.11 was paid to the Treasury and advised to the Crown Agents on 11th July, 1890, and therefore figures as a liability of BARRADAS.

Of the $2,500 appropriated for payments on account of Imperial Orders it was found that a balance of $325.32 was left, that is that the outstanding Imperial Orders were only $2,174.68. Owing to fluctuations in the rate of exchange it was found when finally settling up the Imperial accounts that a balance of $389.83 was available and BARRADAS has been given credit for that sum instead of for the $325.32. The deficit on the Local Order account sufficiently explains itself.

All the accounts have been subjected to a very strict and searching examination and it is not apprehended that any further discrepancies will come to light, but it will be observed in statement C that there were orders unpaid for 1887 and 1888 found and it is possible though very unlikely that there may still be some old

J

:

391

pay

orders unpaid as BARRADAS ommitted in many cases to mark off the dates of ment and in many cases set off wrong dates. It seems probable, however, that enquiries about any orders issued prior to 1887 and 1888 and not paid would have been made by the Public ere now.

I may add that a statement shewing the position of the Money Order Office on 30th June last has been prepared and carefully checked and it only differs by $25.89 from the statements now annexed and this difference is fully accounted for by the loss on exchange with the Australian and other Colonies and will be dealt with at the end of the year when the Money Order accounts are closed.

18th September, 1890.

HILGROVE C. NICOLLE,

Auditor,

STATEMENT (A.) shewing sums short paid to Treasury to meet advices to Crown Agents on account of Money Orders and Postal Notes by Z. M. BARRADAS.

PAID BY CROWN AGENTS,

PAID INTO TREASURY.

£

S

d

C.

CR

£

$

d

c.

1884,

1885,

4,233 9 9

10,838 16 4

22,896 61

60,849 50 1835,

1884,

5,648

I

30,840 08

8,252

12 6

46,994 93

1886,

11,209

13 10

68,982 72 1886,

13,106 7

10

79,264 46

1887,

11,396

2 10

.71,975 62 1887,

10,915

15

68,724 29

1888,

11,698

7

76,920 91 1888,

9,292

12 6

61,135 79

1889,

11,958

78,359 81 1889,

8,050

3

52,795 59

1890,

3,259 16

20,588 39 1890,

1,592 18 4

10,137 36

64,594

7 9

400,573 56

:

:

Balance due,...]

58,858 15 11

11 7,735

349,892 50

10

50,681 6

64,594 7

9

400,573 56

64,594 7 9

400,573 56

HONGKONG.

STATEMENT shewing defulcations of Z. M. BARRADAS as Superintendent of the

Money Order Office.

ASSETS.

Balance of Liabilities over Assets,

AMOUNT.

LIABILITIES.

AMOUNT.

$

58,502.82

Amount short paid to Treasury to meet Į advices to Crown Agents. Statement 4,

50,681.06

Deficit in books of Money Order Depart- ment found after flight of BARRADAS. Statement B,

7,821.76

58,502,82

58,502.82

:

REPORT

ON THE

255

No. 128.

90.

DRAINAGE OF THE LOWER WESTERN AND CENTRAL DISTRICT OF VICTORIA,

=

SIR,

The area the drainage of which, I now propose to discuss, is the zone between the Harbour and Caine Road, bounded to the west by Slaughter-house Point, and to the east by the Cricket Ground. It includes

District No. 1 Shektongtsui

27

No. 2 Sei Ying Poon

No. 3 Taipingshan

No. 4 Cheung Wan

No. 5 Choon Wan.

It therefore contains the bulk of the Chinese population.

2. In a previous report, it was recommended that the sewerage-system of the High-level District should be completely distinct from that of the lower districts.

The problem now to be solved is :----

(a.) The removal of the sewage from the lower zone, with the rain which

falls upon it; to the sea.

(b.) The conveyance of storm-waters from the hill-sides above, through

the district, to the sea.

3. The present arrangements for the sewage and storm-water of this district are practically those described in my report of 1882.

Briefly, the practice has been to cover in natural storm-water channels and connect to them branch-drains, conveying both sewage and storm-water. In many cases both main and lateral drains are in very bad condition.

4. In the report on the sewerage of the high level district the objections to the use of storm-water channels for the conveyance of sewage, were fully set forth. These objections apply with even greater force in the case of the low-level district, where, in many places, the storm-water channels are nearly level and accumulate, not only sewer-tainted air, but also sewage deposit.

5. The methods for the improvement of the drainage of this; and other districts, suggested in my report of 1882, have not been tried. This is fortunate, for my subsequent experience leads to the conclusion that they would not have remedied, completely, the evils which existed then; and which exist still.

6. As regards the construction of the branch-sewers no appreciable improvement has taken place. With a few exceptions, any extensions that have been carried out, have been made upon no definite principle. It will now be necessary to re-sewer the whole district with earthenware pipes; and to divert the sewage proper, or dry- weather-flow of the sewers from the storm-water channels, which are not; and cannot be made suitable for its reception. The existing stone-channels therefore, should revert to their legitimate use, the conveyance of storm-water from the surface of the district, and from the hills above it.

7. The first question that must be discussed is the number and position of the sewer out-falls. Now the sea must be the ultimate receptacle for the sewage of Victoria. When the system of self-cleansing sewers is complete, the sewage will be delivered into the harbour fresh, before putrifaction has commenced, assuming always that the house-drains are in order. In this condition, sewage is com- paratively inoffensive, and is readily consumed by marine organisms, great and small.

:

".

256

8. The following are the leading considerations, which rule the selection of position for sewer out-falls. The sewage should be delivered into water, not less than six feet deep, at extreme low water, and at point where there is an uninter- rupted flow of tide; so that the effluent may be removed and diluted, as quickly as possible. For this reason, salient angles are preferable to re-entering as the position of out-falls.

9. The existing Praya affords a very considerable range of choice, as to the position of out-falls. When the new reclamations are complete and the extraordina- ry irregularities in alignment, which disfigure the existing Praya, have disappeared; one position will be very nearly as good as another. Therefore there will be no necessity for constructing costly intercepting-sewers, to conduct the sewage to one or two great out-falls. Indeed, unless the sewage is wholly intercepted and carried, say, to an out-fall to Sulphur Channel, opposite Green Island, or to North Point; no appreciable benefit will result from its concentration, to any one out-fall. Such complete interception cannot be effected, unless a considerable portion of the sewage is pumped; for the strip of land, between the Queen's Road and the Praya, is practically level; and no sewer, having a gradient sufficient to establish a self- cleansing velocity, could be constructed so as to convey the whole sewage, by gravity, to such a distant out-fall.

10. The complete interception of the sewage, from the harbour-frontage, would be exceedingly expensive, both as to first cost and maintenance. It would not effect any appreciable improvement in the sanitary condition of the city; nor, considering the mass of vessels which frequent the Praya, and the garbage which they throw overboard, would the amenity of the place be increased. The Praya is not a pro- menade; nor is Victoria a bathing place. The cost of complete interception cannot, therefore, be justified by any corresponding advantage, and should not, therefore, be incurred; until, at least, experience has demonstrated the inaccuracy of this conclusion.

11. Were the existing Praya the permanent sea-frontage of the city, it would be necessary to carry out the sewage out-falls by means of iron pipes, laid at the bottom of the sea into deep water, and to a distance of from 50 to 100 yards from the shore, so as to be clear of tiers of vessels which throng the wharf; and check the flow of the tide. But it has been decided that the Praya is to be advanced by about 280 feet, and the rubble-bank on which the new wall will stand will be in 15 to 30 feet of water. It is also intended that the wall itself shall be carried down, vertically, to a depth of about three feet below low-water-mark spring-tides. The rubble-bank will always be covered with water. The increased depth, the improved alignment of the new wall, together with the constriction of the water- way,

caused by the advance of the Praya, will most probably produce an improve- ment in the tidal current, along its front. When the new works are complete, it will be sufficient to carry the out-fall, to the edge of the berin of rubble, on which the wall is founded, or so far beyond it as to reach a depth of six feet at low-water spring-tides. By using cast-iron pipes with ball-and-socket joints, a further extension may at any time be made.

12. During the progress of the Reclamation Works, the sewage should be carried out to the new line of sea-wall, by means of temporary wooden shoots, supported on piles. In arranging the levels of the sewers, the position of the out- fall; and the level of the sewers, has been selected, in accordance with the proposed alignment of sea-wall.

13. The Harbour being accepted as the destination of the sewage, the only reasons, for limiting the number of out-falls, are to save cost in their construction; and to make sure that sufficient sewage will flow through each, to keep it clear of deposit.

14. The invert of the main-sewers should be laid not lower than 2.75 feet above Ordnance-Datum, at the point where the sewer passes through the new Praya- wall. Now mean-sea-level is 3.69 feet above Ordnance-Datum; so that the invert of the sewer will be 0.94 below mean-sea-level. As the out-fall sewers will be not less than 1' 6" in diameter; when the water in the harbour stands at mean-sea- level the middle of the sewer-pipe will be only about two inches under water. Now mean-sea-level means the average level of the sea, as obtained by adding together the height thereof recorded, every hour, for a whole year or more, and dividing by the number of observation. By thus fixing the centre-line of the main-sewer, at or near to mean-sea-level, it is certain that the pipe will be free from sea-water, for nearly one-half of every day, month or year, and that the sewage will flow freely through the sewer, and cleanse it from deposit.

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15. It has to be remembered that the normal dry-weather flow of sewage, will only fill the sewer to a depth of perhaps one-fourth or one-third of its diameter. At high water, the sea rises above the top of the sewer, and fills it completely. The stream of sewage then occupies the whole area of the sewer, and its velocity is reduced; so that deposit may take place. If the sewer were laid lower, say at low-water spring-tides then it would only be free from sea-water, and thus in a position to establish a proper velocity, for a few hours each month; and thus the probability of deposit would be much greater.

16. A good example of the manner in which in the absence of special flushing arrangement, deposit accumulates in a channel, to which the tide has access, may be seen at the mouth of the Albany Nullah. This nullah, above the tidal action, keeps itself quite free from deposit, the stream, running down its centre, having ample velocity. But in the part to which the tide has access, this velocity is checked, when the tide is high, and deposit takes place, which the stream cannot remove, when the tide falls. Had the invert of this nullah been made higher, as it might have been; this deposit would not have taken place.

17. The centre-line of the main-sewer at the face of the Praya-wall should, therefore, be at or near mean-sea-level. From the wall, the sewage should be carried out, to deep water, by a cast-iron pipe, of smaller size than the sewer; the diameter of this pipe should be so calculated, that the ordinary dry-weather-flow of sewage will establish a sufficient current in it, to keep it clear of deposit. This pipe may be prolonged, to any desired distance, into the harbour. At the Praya-wall, a storm- overflow will be provided, which will allow the sewage to escape direct, in rainy weather, when the sewer brings down more water than the iron outlet-pipe can carry. When this takes place, the sewage will be so diluted with rain-water, that the direct escape will cause no inconvenience.

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18. The level of the outlet, thus fixed, determines the distance at which the out-falls must be placed from each other. The main sewers must have a certain fall; and their upper extremities must be at a sufficient depth below the ground, to allow the house-drains to discharge into them.

19. It is further desirable that the sewage out-falls should not be in the im mediate vicinity of the main storm-water outlets; especially those that discharge storm-water, from the hills, above the city. The silt which these storm-water channels bring down, will, in time, form deltas at their mouths, which will have to be removed by dredging. The cast-iron outlet-pipes will impede this operation; or be liable to injury in its execution. It is desirable also to keep the delta of silt and sand, free from sewage contamination.

20. In accordance with these principles, six out-falls have been selected, in the following positions:-

1. Opposite Queen Victoria Street,

2.

3.

ai as ti

4.

5.

"}

""

Hillier Street,

Wing Lok Street,

Eastern Street,

Western Street,

6. at Slaughter-house Point.

21. In the present condition of the Praya, the position of the out-fall opposite Hillier Street, in a bay, is not all that could be desired. The Praya Reclamation will, however, remedy any defect in this respect; and after careful examination, it has been found impracticable to drain the whole of the flat district, near Bonham Strand, to the Wing Lok Street out-fall, without the use of gradients so flat as to endanger the self-cleansing properties of the main sewer; and thus give rise to evils far greater than any that can be caused by the out-fall, even were it to remain as it is at present.

22. The area draining to the several out-falls is shewn by the coloured lines on the plan. In the arrangement of the tributary-sewers, care has been taken to concentrate the sewage flow of each district, in the upper ends of the intercepting sewers, along the Praya, which have, necessarily, flat gradients; compared with those in the upper parts of the town. This will ensure a sufficient flow through them, whenever the tide is down, to set up a self-cleansing velocity through them and thus obviate, to a great extent, if not altogether, the necessity for artificial flushing.

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23. The sewers, even in the level parts, will have gradients sufficient to establish self-cleansing velocities, with the normal flow of sewage that may fairly be counted upon. The dry-weather flow of the nullahs which traverse the town may be used to augment the volume of the sewage. It may therefore be anticipated that very little artificial flushing will be required, though provision for so doing, if necessary, will be made.

24. The natural gradients of the tributary-sewers are, in almost every case, more than sufficient to establish self-cleansing velocities; with the normal flow of sewage. To ensure proper cleansing, however, it will be well to establish, at the heads of some of the branch-sewers, where the flow of sewage is small, automatic flush-tanks. These consist of a tank, containing from 30 to 100 gallons, according to circumstances; and provided with a specially-constructed syphon, which, when the contents of the tank reaches a certain level, comes into action, and discharges the same, in a sudden rush. These automatic flush-tanks may be conveniently erected, in connection with the public fountains, receiving the waste-water and slops from them. In this way, water, that would otherwise be wasted, will be used to cleanse the branch-sewers, without any additional demand on the water- works.

25. The size of the main sewers is sufficient to discharge about one inch rain in 24 hours, falling on the district, which drains to each.

26. With the exception of a few short branches, the minimum size of street sewer will be nine inches. As regards the conveyance of sewage only, a much smaller diameter would suffice. Experience has shewn, however, that long street- sewers, less than 9" in diameter, are inconveniently liable to casual obstruction. Moreover the rain-water from back-yards, and in some cases from the roofs of houses, must be admitted to house-drains, and thence to the branch-sewers. The excessive capacity which the use of 9" branch-sewers affords, will allow them to carry off the rain-fall, which must be admitted to the house-drains. But, at or near the points where the branch-sewers join the principal collecting sewers, storm- overflows will be provided, by which any water brought down by the branches, over and above the quantity which the collectors can carry, will escape to the storm-water channel. So, when the secondary collectors join the main-sewers, other storm-overflows will be provided. By these means, the main trunk may have a carrying capacity much less than the sum of those of the branches, and the evils attending large sewers may be avoided. In short, the system at its commencement, will be "combined," receiving both rain water and sewage, in the course of the collecting and out-fall sewers, more and more of the rain-water will escape by storm-overflows; till the iron outlet-pipe will

till the iron outlet-pipe will carry the dry-weather sewage only.

27. The sewers will be provided with man-holes, at all junctions and changes of direction; so that there will be complete access to the sewer, for the purpose of inspection; and for the removal of casual obstructions.

28. In a report on the sewerage of the High-level District the principles of sewer-ventilation have been fully discussed. The same principles apply to the lower district also. Whenever practicable, it will be well to carry up ventilating pipes, above the roofs of the houses, care being taken that these elevated ventilators are as inconspicuous as possible. It must always be remembered that the real remedy for stenches from ventilating openings consists in self-cleansing sewers, good house-drainage, properly used, with a liberal water-supply; and not any elaborate or complicated system of ventilation.

29. The existing storm-water channels should be utilised, to the fullest extent, for carrying off rain-water. It is probable that the greater number of these will require little more than the usual repairs.

30. In the lower parts of the town, however, the storm-water channels will, in many cases, require renewal; on account of the new Praya works. When this is the case, care must be taken to raise the invert of the channel to the highest practicable level, consistent with sufficient discharging capacity. The object of raising the invert is two-fold: firstly to give a good gradient across the new recla- mation, and secondly to make the outlet as high as possible, so that the storm-water channel may be free from tide-water, for as long a daily period as possible. This is desirable, for the reasons set forth, when discussing the questions of sewer-outlets. An elevated invert also facilitates construction, at it increases the time that the foundation is uncovered by the tide. To give the necessary

To give the necessary sectional area, to the

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259

storm-water channels, they should be made wider and shallower than has, hitherto, been usual. To this end also, the covering of the channel will be most conveniently made flat, of concrete supported on iron girders; or iron or steel trough-plates; the concrete forming the road-way.

31. A storm-water channel, on this principle, is now under construction in Jubilee Street, the covering being carried on old rails, returned from Tytam Works. The reconstruction of this channel was undertaken, because the old one ran under the site of the Central Market.

32. It will be well, in order to save expense, to reduce the number of storm- water channels, which cross the reclamation, to the minimum, consistent with sufficient discharging-capacity. The construction of the proposed sewers will allow of the abandonment of many of the minor outlets, which now exist along the Praya; and which serve as out-falls, for both sewage and rain-water. The sewage will be intercepted by the proposed sewer, which will have sufficient capacity to carry the rain-water, to the nearest storm-overflow, where it will escape to the storm-water channel.

33. It will be well to keep the cost of altering or reconstructing the storm- water drains separate from that of the sewerage-system proper. Minor alterations and repairs may be, legitimately, charged to the usual vote-Main Drainage and Sanitary; whilst alterations, on account of the new Praya Reclamation, will be properly charged to that undertaking.

1

34. Inasmuch as dirty water is often thrown into the side-channels of the streets; and the rain-water which flows down them, at the commencement of showers, is little better than sewage, trapped gulleys should be provided in them, in connection with the sewers, in addition to the ordinary gulleys, communicating with the storm-water channels.

35. When the proposed works are complete, there will be no objection to the use of water-closets, by those who desire to do so: provided always, that proper appliances for flushing are used in connection with them. The introduction of water-closets will be a great boon to the European community; for, as the prosperity of the community increases, there will be more and more difficulty in having hand- removal properly carried out.

36. I do not contemplate the introduction of the water-carriage system, universally, as I do not consider that the population generally is ready for it; notwithstanding its superiority to any other. In Hongkong, moreover, the falicities for complete and efficient hand-removal, which exist in China, do not exist; as there is no extensive area of agricultural land, in the vicinity of the town. If water-closets are largely introduced in European houses, their use may spread to the Chinese also. If such a tendency does shews itself, it should not be resisted.

37. Were this the case, complete diversion of the sewage might perhaps become desirable. In the preparation of the present project, regard has been had to the possibility of meeting such a demand. The proposed arrangements are such, that this could be effected, without material alteration of the general project.

38. It is unnecessary to go into the details of the arrangements, for complete interception. The most convenient and economical means of doing this will be to lay a cast-iron pipe along Queen's Road and Praya, working under pressure; with branches, carried up the side-streets, to intercept the sewage, at sufficient elevation to carry it, by gravity, to the desired out-fall. The sewage of the district below, this elevation, must be pumped into this main. The pumping could be effected by hydraulic motors, established at the proposed out-falls, worked by water from the water-works, or by water under still higher pressure, supplied from some central pumping station, and which would also be available for working Hydraulic cranes. «

39. The estimated cost of the sewerage of the district, now under considera- tion, is as follows:-

31,454 yards of sewer varying from 21' to 6" diameter

principally 9",

Man-holes, ventilators, street gulleys; and syphons

for crossing the storm-water channels,

Flushing tanks, &c.,

Out-falls,..

....

Total,........

$105,094.65

32,012.00

5,000.00

3,000.00

$145,106.65

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40. This sum does not include the cost of making connections to house- drains; as this is, for the present, done by the house-holders. It is most desirable that the actual connection should be made, and the trap fixed, by the Drainage Department. The discussion of this question, however, involves the consideration of the whole subject of House-drainage, which is so important that it will be dealt with in a separate report.

41. The works described in this report may be completed in three years, from date of order to commence. Pipes, etc. are in stock, to the value of about $50,000, which will be available for the work.

I have the honour to be,

To

Sir,

Your obedient Servant,

The Honourable W. M. DEANE, C.M.G.,

Acting Colonial Secretary.

OSBERT CHADWICK.

.

219

No.

9

90.

HONGKONG.

ANNUAL REPORT OF THE HEAD MASTER OF THE VICTORIA COLLEGE FOR 1889.

Presented to the Legislative Council, by Command of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government.

No. 4.

VICTORIA COLLEGE,

10th January, 1890.

SIR, I have the honour to forward the Annual Report on this College for 1889.

1. The total number of boys on the Roll during the past year was 919. The number of School- days, 233, is still below the average, though better than the previous year. The College was closed on the four following extraordinary occasions, two days during the storm in May, one day on the transfer from the Central School, and one day for a Public Funeral.

2. To illustrate the condition of the Schools during the last five years the following table is annexed:-

1885,

1886, 1887. 1888, 1889,

1885,

1886,

1887,

1888,

1889,

YEAR.

Total Number of Scholars.

Number of

Monthly Enrolment.

Average

School Days.

Daily Attendance.

Maximum.

Minimum.

596

238

499

382

437

610

238

507

419

446

601

234

525

417

449

634

229

536

384

467

919

233

789

466

597

Average

Number

of

Percentage

School

Actual Nett

YEAR.

of

School Boys Examined.

Fees.

Passes.

Expenditure.

$3

Expense of each Scholar per Average Daily Attendance.

412

95.38

5,273

12,885.00

29.45

405

94.81

5,422

11,680.41

26.17

384

97.65

5,547

11,872.70

26.40

445

94.15

6,899

12,384.14

26.48

676

95.41

9,338

15,018.20

25.11

3. Victoria College was occupied 10th July, 1889, the foundation stone having been laid by Sir GEORGE BOWEN 26th April, 1884, on a site selected by a Commission some fourteen years ago. The College is undoubtedly a fine spacious building occupying a good central position, and is sufficiently elevated to ensure a free admission of light, and of whatever cool breezes may be expected in the summer weather. The class rooms are arranged with the strictest economy of space and easily provide accommodation for 960 boys. Besides its annual use for the prize distribution, the hall is of great service in the monthly collection of fees, and is absolutely indispensable for the midsummer and annual examinations, when 132 boys can be examined at one time, while ample space is provided as a pre- caution against the possibility of copying or any communication whatever. The large covered play- ground in the basement is an incomparable boon during the rainy and hot seasons.

4. The erection of Victoria College is entirely due to the foresight and unremitting zeal of the late Dr. STEWART, who by a sad fatality can scarcely be said to have seen the fruition of his labours, as he was removed by death before the College was in full working order. The extent to which he bore up against the depressing effect of delay and opposition may be conceived when we read the following passage from his Report so far back as '77; "As a remedy for all this (stationary condition) cannot be far distant now, although it cannot arrive in time to affect the current year, further notice of the School, its working, its aim, and its success, may therefore be deferred until the new building is occu- pied." Dr. STEWART will ever be famous as the Founder of Education in the Colony. Apart too from

220

enjoying an immortality in the hearts of his scholars in all parts of China, I might say the world, his memory will be kept green in Victoria College by the scholarship founded in his honour by old scholars in 1884. I believe too that the Memorial Committee appointed since his death contemplate applying to the Government for permission to affix some permanent memorial in the College Hall.

5. It was originally proposed that Victoria College should furnish accommodation for 770 boys, a number which was supposed by some to be extravagantly large. By the simple expedient of dividing all the desks into six instead of five parts, seats have been provided for 960 boys (including the Pupil Teachers' room) affording each boy a space, that compares favourably with what is required in England; while future undue crowding, an evil long felt at the Central School is rendered impossible by each boy's space being defined by his desk-lid. In addition to the manifest saving of expense in providing education for 924 boys by the same staff as was allotted to 770, there are great advantages derived from the assembling of a larger number of boys in one building; these are--one continuous system of education, as the larger number of boys to be promoted from lower classes will gradually lessen the number of admissions into higher classes from other schools,--a prolongation of the course, which will delay the undue promotion of backward boys which has long been to their detriment, and to the dis- credit of the upper classes-and the more effective shading off of degrees of knowledge so that too great a stride in education will no longer follow on promotion. There were 800 boys on the Roll in September, and there is every reason to believe that the College will be full in a year or two, if not

next month.

6. During the past year there were on the Roll 790 Chinese and Eurasians, 23 English, 4 Germans, 8 Hebrews, 1 Hindu, 10 Japanese, 36 Mohammedans, 1 Parsee and 46 Portuguese. This college can therefore in a marked degree lay claim to a cosmopolitan character.

7. Chinese boys, as a rule, are very intelligent, docile and painstaking. That they are intelligent is established by the large number of boys, that in the short period of five or six years have advanced from the alphabet to a knowledge of English sufficient to do a creditable paper on a play of Shakespeare. Their docility proverbially arouses the admiration of every new master from England. Painstaking- ness is a national characteristic sometimes provoking to the more impetuous European. It might be thought that with these admirable traits the work of teaching in this College would be an easy task and the results should be even higher than they are. There would be grounds for this supposition, if there were not serious compensating drawbacks such as the following. Stolidity and absence of facial expression render it next to impossible for a teacher to gather how much of what he says is understood by the class; he has not the satisfaction of seeing perplexed ignorance dissolve into triumphant know- ledge, for difficulties do not pucker the brow, nor does success kindle the eye of the Chinese student. This difficulty is increased tenfold by the fact that all instruction is given in English, thus there is not merely the doubt whether a boy understands the subject itself, but a fear that he does not grasp the phrase in which it is conveyed. Again the Chinese answer in English with a single word after the genius of their own language leaving a great deal to the imagination; such a habit is hard to break, and very tantalising to the teacher, as the embryo answer may contain a corret idea or the reverse. Further where an English boy would answer to the best of his ability, even running the risk of a mistake, or would ask the master for assistance or explanation, a Chinese is deterred by a nervous fear of the ridicule of his comrades. Once again, though keen in detecting the shades of their dozen native tones, Chinese ears are remarkably dull in detecting the difference in English vowel sounds, and between sharp and flat consonants; the result of all which is impossible mistakes in Dictation and Reading. It might be thought too, that the inherited power of memory in the Chinese race, of which one hears so much would prove a considerable factor in their progress, but this is far from being the case. It would certainly be so in Examinations if special care were not taken in framing the questions to avoid putting them in such a form as would allow of an answer being previously committed to memory. But as a matter of fact, in daily school life there would appear to be a sad lack of an in- telligent memory, the master cannot rely on the work done in the previous year as a foundation on which to raise a higher superstructure. I have dwelt at this length on the characteristics of Chinese boys, because only those daily engaged in the task of teaching know exactly where the difficulties lie, and because some explanation is thus afforded of the necessity of the slow progress that has been made in the past, and may be expected for some time in the future.

8. To impart the principles of a sound education in English is the main object of this Government Institution. In the distribution of work to each class this is steadily aimed at, and strict injunctions are given to employ the English language alone in all instruction, except of course in the Translation Lessons and when occasionally in the Junior Classes difficulties require to be explained in Chinese. The natural consequence of this is that the boys become very apt at understanding what is said to them in English. The great problem is how to get boys to speak English before they leave school. Ex- perience has shown that, within a few months after obtaining a situation, our Chinese boys, with their store of grammatical rules and knowledge of composition, develop the power of speaking English very creditably; but, as a rule, only Pupil Teachers and Monitors really speak English well before leaving school. This would seem to point clearly to a want of self-confidence, and to the absence of the spur of necessity. Special attention will in the future be paid to this in Junior classes. The work of the upper classes is at present regulated by the requirements of the Oxford Senior Local Examination,

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221

As I believe a mistaken impression prevails that Latin was on this account added to the curriculum, I will take this opportunity of ventilating the purpose with which it was introduced. BACON and MILTON, the fathers of English Prose Composition, teem with Latinisms, nor are these entirely absent from the modern standard of ADDISON. It is only quite recently that English composition has become a separate study in England. Formerly a good classical education was supposed sufficient to enable an English author to write correctly in his mother tongue. It is therefore reasonable to suppose that a foreigner must be assisted in the acquisition of English rules of composition by the study of that language, on which its choicest models are framed. In Latin the observance of concord and regimen is rendered conspicuous by inflection, the intelligent translation therefore of a simple Latin author should explain the reason of many English rules. Moreover immense assistance in understand- ing and distinguishing the meanings of English words, and often in spelling them, is manifestly afford- ed by even a restricted Latin vocabulary. In the First Class, Latin, Chemistry, Drawing, Book- keeping, Mensuration, and Trigonometry will for the future be optional, and not included in class subjects.

9. In India it has been found necessary to prepare special school text-books for English education. The demand in Hongkong is too slight to offer much encouragement to a similar enterprise, but the want makes itself felt. As an effort in this direction I published a few years ago a School Arithmetic specially intended to explain difficulties to our boys. Much could be done in the way of explaining eccentricities of English Idiom and Spelling, to say nothing of the urgent need of a cheap text-book of the Geography of the Chinese Empire. Something too is needed to supplement the School Committee's series of books in Chinese, which provide practice for Translation into English. The late Mr. FALCONER edited a very useful book, but the very classical Chinese can only be adequately translated into very classical English. I have therefore just recently compiled a collection of cuttings from Chinese news- papers, which will, it is to be hoped, familiarise the boys with everyday ideas and expressions.

10. In the confined area of the old Central School nothing could be done to provide the boys with the necessary opportunity for developing their physique. Simple gymnastic appliances will shortly be erected in the covered play ground; if properly availed of, this should counteract the cramped attitudes generally associated with study.

11. The fees have been raised in Class I to $36 per annum and in Classes II and III to $24, as the Upper School derives the chief benefit from the heavy expense of the salaries of English Masters, and of costly school material. Chinese parents should reflect that they have now a good English education brought to their doors, and that their sons can pass an examination held in England without the outlay attendant upon sending them thither for five or six years. It is much to be desired that parents, who can afford it, as many of them well can, should not take their sons away immediately upon their pro- motion to the First Class, but allow them to stay a year or two at the top of the School to really complete their education more thoroughly.

12. The staff consists of twenty-nine in all; viz.: nine English Masters (four of whom are gra- duates), ten Chinese Assistants, three Pupil Teachers and three Monitors; and in Chinese School four Chinese Graduates, (Sau Tsoi). This is an increase of ten masters on the staff formerly at the Central School. Four new English Masters arrived in April and May last, Messrs. BARLOW, M.A., BOOTH, HASELDEN, B.A., and BOARDS; of these, three were extra, and one was to supply the vacancy caused by the appointment of Mr. MAY to be second master on the death of Mr. FALCONER. The six new Chinese Assistants were provided by six Pupil Teachers articled three years ago, and who during the last five months have given evidence of their ability to discharge their duties very satisfactorily. With the exception of Translation from Chinese in the two head classes the Head Master no longer takes a position on the teaching staff; his time being fully occupied in organisation and supervision, fortnightly inspections of each class, half-yearly and annual examinations with other multifarious duties. It is noteworthy that of the staff of eighteen, English and Chinese, I found on my arrival eight years ago, only two remain. As only two have been removed by death it is inanifest that the remainder are those who have left in search of higher salaries elsewhere, some on promotion in the Colonial Service.

13. A normal class and a special Examination Paper on Education and School Discipline for Pupil Teachers and Monitors are a new feature this year. Mr. BOARDS, who has been in charge of these junior assistants in front of the Preparatory Class, is on the whole able to give me only a moderate Report though he speaks highly of one or two Pupil Teachers. I trust that next year some marked improvement will be observed.

14. With the necessarily increased staff for 21 classes, instead of 12, it could only reasonably be expected that the expenses would be increased, but it is satisfactory to observe that the average expense of each scholar calculated on the average daily attendance is lower than it has been for years. When it is remembered that for three months the expense of three extra English Masters was borne by the smaller number of boys at the Central School, it may reasonably be supposed that this figure will not be exceeded next year. An average cost of $25 may be called £3 18s. per head, which sounds a large sum, but is far exceeded by our namesake in Australia where the cost per head is £4 15s.

222

15 The result of the examination just held by me for prize purposes, and on which suitable pro- motions can be made next month, appears to me very satisfactory, 645 boys out of 676 examined, or 95 per cent. having passed. I did not expect so good a result, as the transfer of the school in the middle of the summer upset all the arrangements for the year, and 494 boys, i.e., all below Class IVA. were examined on barely a half-year's work in the classes to which they were allotted. But masters and boys were determined not to bring discredit on the College and they deserve much credit for their success. Though not wishing to intrench on the province of the Inspector of Schools, I cannot refrain from pointing out that the great weakness in the Lower School betrayed in Arithmetic is compensated by the unusually good results in English Grammar. In the Upper School (6 sections) remarkably good work was done, though IIIB. is only moderate in its tone. Classes IVA. and VB. are conspicuous for high class work in the 9 sections of the Lower School, and Class VIIA. of the 5 sections of the Preparatory School deserves special mention.

16. Last July we sent up ten boys. Of these eight passed, three as Seniors and being under nineteen years of age were declared Associates in Arts, while five passed the Junior Examination.

17. The following Table gives some idea of the manner in which the teaching of English subjects has been extended in the school, together with the introduction of higher subjects in the Upper Classes. The figures are the total number of boys examined in each subject in the following years.

1881.

1885.

1839.

Trans. E to C,....

C to E,

19

Grammar,

301

379

676

301

379

676

172

312

547

Geography,

144

253

477

Composition,

83

127

360

History,

30

75

143

Euclid,

75

143

...

Algebra,

75

143

...

Mensuration,

25

...

Latin,

General Intelligence,.

...

Shakespeare,..

Trigonometry,.

...

117

...

83

24

17

...

མཎྜ

24

18. That this College supplies a large demand for clerks in this Colony is sufficiently attested by the following facts culled from the Annual Summary of the past six years; 32 appointments have been obtained in the Colonial Service, 150 boys have been engaged by European professional and mercantile firms in the Colony, besides many clerks engaged by Hongkong firms for Japan, Shanghai and the Coast Ports. The Chinese Government too has in this period employed from this School 80 boys in its Customs, Medical, Diplomatic and Telegraph services.

19. I will conclude by expressing the gratitude of the masters and boys to the many friends of this College who continue year after year, so generously to provide prizes for the encouragement of our young students. The Government Grant on this head, liberal as it is, would go but a small way in providing rewards for 21 English and 12 Chinese classes. But these donations coming, as they do, from all nationalities and all classes should be viewed in a further light, as an expression of public interest in the work done in these walls, and as a vote of public confidence in the manner in which that work is performed.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

GEO. H. BATESON WRIGHT, M.A., Oxon.,

Head Master.

Honourable A. LISTER,

Acting Colonial Secretary.

January, February, March,

April,

May, June,

July,

August,

September,

October,...

November,....

December,

1889.

VICTORIA COLLEGE.

Number

Month.

of Scholars.

Number of Attendances.

Number of School Days.

Total,...

Average Daily Attendance.

466

9,939

22

451.77

538

1,601

3

533.66

540

12,741

25

509.64

536

6.993

14

499.50

525

11,796

24

491.50

520

11,210

23

487.39

733

15,909

26

611-88

712

5,480

8

685.00

789

11,318

15

754:53

788

18,442

25

737-68

766

18,482

26

710.85

723

15,149

22

688.59

......

139,060

233

Total Number of ATTENDANCES during 1889, Number of SCHOOL DAYS during 1889,

Average DAILY ATTENDANCE during 1889,

Total Number of SCHOLARS at this School during 1889,......

139,060

233

596.824

919

GEO. H. BATESON WRIGHT, M.A.,

Head Master.

AVERAGE EXPENSES of each SCHOLAR at Victoria College during 1889.

Expenditure,

Deduct School Fees,

""

Sale of Books,

Total Expenses of the College,..........

Average Expenses of each Scholar per Number on Roll,

"

99

per Average Daily Attendance,

$24,369.00

$9,338.00

12.80

9,350.80

.$15,018.20

$16.34

25.11

GEO. II. BATESON WRIGHT, M.A., Head Master.

223

275

No. 14

90.

HONGKONG.

THE EDUCATIONAL REPORT FOR 1889.

Presented to the Legislative Council, by Command of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government.

No. 63.

EDUCATION Department,

HONGKONG, 27th May, 1890.

SIR, I have the honour to forward to you the Annual Report on Education for the year 1889. 2. GENERAL EDUCATIONAL STATISTICS.-The total number of Educational Institutions of all descriptions, known to have been at work in the Colony of Hongkong during the year 1889, amounts to 211 Schools with a grand total of 9,681 scholars under instruction during the year. More than three-fourths of the whole number of scholars, that is to say 7,659 scholars, attended Schools (106 in number) subject to Government supervision and either established or aided by the Government in some form or other. The remainder, viz. 107 Schools with 2,022 scholars, are Private Institutions, entirely independent of Government supervision and receiving no aid from public funds, unless it be that they are exempt from payment of rates and taxes.

3. GENERAL STATISTICS OF SCHOOLS UNDER THE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT.-Apart from the Police School, with 477 scholars and the Roman Catholic Reformatory with 75 scholars, both of which Schools are exempt from the control of the Education Department, the total number of Schools subject to direct supervision and annual examination by the Inspector of Schools, amounted, in the year 1889, to 104, as compared with 50 in 1879, and 19 in 1869. The total number of scholars, enrolled in this same class of Schools during the year 1889, amounted to 7,107 as compared with 3,460 scholars in the year 1879 and 942 scholars in the year 1869. In other words, there has been an increase of 31 Schools and 2,518 scholars during the ten years from 1869 to 1879, and an increase of 54 Schools and 3,647 scholars during the ten years from 1879 to 1889. This increase is satisfactory on the face of it, but the rate of increase, like all educational statistics, can be valued only by comparison with the statistics of population: Unfortunately we have no population statistics of equal accuracy, but approximately estimating the annual increase of population, we may say the population of the Colony amounted in 1869 to about 120,000 people, in 1879 to about 155,000 and in 1889 to about 220,000 people, thus shewing an increase of about 34,000 people, to be compared with an increase of 31 Schools and 2,518 scholars, during the first decade, and an increase of about 65,000 people, to be compared with an increase, of 54 Schools and 3,647 scholars during the second decade. It would seem therefore that the decennial increase of Schools and scholars during the last twenty years has, though somewhat lagging behind, shewn a tendency to keep up with the progressive increase of population, and is, on the whole, satisfactory.

4. PROGRESS DURING THE LAST THREE YEARS.-Comparing the statistics of individual years, I find the number of Schools under supervision and examination by the Inspector of Schools rose from 94 Schools in 1887, and 97 Schools in 1888, to 104 Schools in 1889, whilst the number of scholars under instruction in these same Schools rose from 5,974 scholars in 1887, and 6,258 scholars in 1888, to 7,107 scholars in 1889. There is therefore clearly a steady annual increase observable during the last three years, progressing from an increase of 284 scholars in 1888 to an increase of 849 scholars in 1889.

5. COMPARATIVE STATISTICS OF GOVERNMENT SCHOOLS AND VOLUNTARY SCHOOLS.-The Schools under the general supervision of the Education Department may be divided into Government Schools and Voluntary Schools. Under the term Government Schools are included all the Schools established by the Government in the town and villages independently or in concert with village communities and supported by the Government by means of fixed monthly payments independent of any results ascertained by examination. Under the term Voluntary Schools I include all those Public Schools under private management, which have been voluntarily placed by their Managers under the provisions of the Grant-in-Aid Code and consequently under general supervision and examination by the Inspector of Schools and which, whilst providing their own expenses, receive from the Government an annual Grant-in-Aid, the amount of which depends, in the case of each School, on the definitive results ascertained at the annual examination of each individual scholar. These two classes of Schools are further characterized by the fact that the Government Schools, as afore defined, are virtually secular Schools, whilst the afore mentioned Voluntary Schools are all Christian Schools (Protestant or Roman Catholic). Referring now to the 7,107 scholars who, as above mentioned, attended, during the year 1889, Schools under the supervision of the Education Department, there were as many as 4,814 of these scholars attending Voluntary Schools where they received a Christian education, whilst 2,293 scholars attended Government Schools, receiving a secular education. The secular

276

Government Schools are as a rule better provided for, than the Voluntary religious Schools, as regards money matters, house accommodation, school materials, staff, organisation and discipline, and, where charging fees, keep their fees far below the rate charged in Voluntary Schools of a corresponding class. Nevertheless the Voluntary Schools, which freely teach Christianity without the restraint of any con- science clause whatsoever, and are in every respect conducted as denominational Mission Schools, receive from the public double the amount of patronage bestowed on Government Schools.

This clearly shews that parents of children, in Hongkong as in Europe, prefer on the whole religious to secular education, even when the latter is cheaper. I subjoin a table shewing the comparative growth of secular Government Schools and religious Voluntary Schools since the time (1873) when the Grant-in-Aid Scheme was introduced in the Colony. In explanation of the changes revealed by the subjoined Table, I have to state that from 1845 to 1865 all the Government Schools in the Colony were worked under a Committee or Board in which Protestant Missionaries had a paramount influence, as strictly Christian Schools, the Bible being, during those twenty, years. a reading book of all Government Schools. Shortly after the abrogation of the Board of Education and the consequent establishment of the Education Department (in 1865), all Christian teaching was excluded from the Government Schools, the Government confining itself to promote purely secular education (though Confucianism, Tanism and Buddhism could not be eliminated from the Chinese School-books) and giving no aid whatever to Christian Mission Schools, down to the year 1872. Even when the Government at last, stimulated by Forster's Education Act of 1870, offered Grants-in-Aid to Christian Mission Schools. the Grants were limited to payments for results ascertained in purely secular and elementary subjects. Voluntary Schools thus began in 1873 to come under the supervision of the Education Department, but their numbers and attendances were very small. In 1879, however, the Revised Grant-in-Aid Scheme came into force, giving the Voluntary Schools absolute liberty to give religious teaching in every school-hour and extending its provisions to Secondary as well as to Primary Schools, and from that year the proportion of scholars attending Government Schools and Voluntary Schools became gradually reversed. With these prefatory remarks I leave the subjoined comparative Table to speak for itself.

COMPARATIVE STATISTICS OF Religious aND SECULAR SCHOOLS.

Religious

Secular

Grant-in-Aid Schools.

Government Schools.

Year.

Schools.

Scholars.

Schools.

Scholars.

1873,

6

442

30

1,838

1874,

9

632

30

1,931

1875,

9

679

30

1,927

1876,

11

751

30

2,171

1877,

14

996

30

2,148

1878,

17

1,021

30

2,101

1879,

19

1,417

31

2,043

1880,

27

1,808

36

2,078

1881.

37

2,237

35-

1,986

1882,

41

3,068

39

2,114

1883,

48

3,517

39

2,080

1884,

55

3,907

35

1,978

1885, 1886,

55

4,041

35

1,803

56

3,951

34

1,893

1887,

61

4,360

33

1,814

1888,

63

4,325

34

1,933

1889,

69

4,814

35

2,293

6. EDUCATIONAL EXPENDITURE OF THE GOVERNMENT.-The expenses incurred by the Govern- ment during the year 1889, on account of education in general, amounted (including the expenses connected with two Government Scholarships, but excluding the cost of new School buildings) to a total of $53,901.86 (as compared with $45,518.93 in the year 1888) or $6.58 per scholar (as com- pared with $7.27 per scholar in 1888). These expenses were distributed as follows. The Govern- ment Victoria College (the former Central School) with 919 scholars cost the Government (apart from cost of Building which amounted to an aggregate of over a quarter of a million dollars) $15,018.20 or $16.34 per scholar enrolled. The expenses of the other Government Schools (including the Aided Village Schools), attended by 1,374 scholars, amounted in the year 1889 to $10,566.66 or $7.69 per scholar. On the Voluntary Schools, with 4,814 scholars, the Government spent, in the year 1889, under the provisions of the Grant-in-Aid Scheme, the sum of $18,737.12 or $3 89 per scholar. This com- parison, however, is only based on the financial status which each kind of Schools occupies, and indicates therefore no more but that a development of the Grant-in-Aid Scheme rather than a multiplication of Government Schools should be looked to for meeting the annually increasing demands made upon the financial resources of the Government to supply an annually increasing population with Schools. Comparing, however, the cost of education in Schools giving the same education, say in the case of Schools giving a European education in a European (English or Portuguese) language, the result is as follows:-the cost of education, so far as the Government was concerned, was, in the Victoria College

277

$16.34 per scholar; in six Government Anglo-Chinese Schools (charging no fees) $4.71 and in 14 Grant-in-Aid Schools (in Class IV) $5.16 per scholar. To bring the comparison home more closely, and to compare only Schools which give exactly the same kind of teaching and charge fees, I subjoin a Table shewing in the case of the five principal Schools in Hongkong which give a secondary educa- tion in English, the nationality of scholars, the staff, the subjects taught in the highest classes, the number of scholars enrolled, the total cost to Government per School, and the cost to Government per scholar enrolled in 1889.

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF SECONDARY SCHOOLS IN HONGKONG, IN 1889.

บา

No.

Name of School.

Nationality of Scholars.

Staff.

Subjects taught in the Highest Classes of the School.

Number of Scholars Enrolled in 1889.

Cost to Government

Cost to Govern-

in 1889.

Total.

ment per Scholar enrolled.

1

Victoria College, ......

Mostly Chinese or Eu- rasian, few Portu- guese, very few Eu- ropeans.

9 Europeans, 14 Chinese.

2 St. Joseph's College,

Diocesan Home and Or-

phanage School.

Mostly Portuguese,

few Chinese, very few Europeans.

10 Europeans,

2 Chinese.

Mostly Eurasian, few Europeans and Chi-

3 Europeans, 1 Chinese.

nese.

4 Hongkong Public School, Nearly all Europeans,

very few Portu- guese, no Chinese.

5

Victoria English Schools, Nearly all Portuguese,

few Europeans and

3 Europeans, I Chinese.

Chinese.

Shakespeare, Mensuration, Trigo- nometry, Latin. History, Alge- bra, Euclid (I & II), Grammar, Geography, Arithmetic, Chinese.

Shakespeare, Mensuration, Trigo- nometry, French, History, Ani- mal Physiology, Algebra, Eu- clid (I to VI), Grammar, Book- keeping, Physical Geography.

English Composition, Arithmetic, Grammar, Geography, History, Physical Geography, AnimaÏ Physiology, Book-keeping, Eu- clid (I & II), Algebra, Chinese.

2 Europeans. English Composition, Arithmetic, Grammar, Geography, History, Physical Geography, Euclid (I & II), Algebra, Latin, French.

English Composition, Arithmetic, Geography, History, Physical Geography, Euclid (I & II), Algebra, Book-keeping, French.

919

$15,018.20 (exclusive of

$16.34

cost of Buildings and repairs).

409

$1,816.47

$4.41

143

$788.04

$5.51

58

$341.01

$5.10

182

$652.83

$3.58

7. NATURE OF THE EDUCATION GIVEN.-As to the nature of the education given in the Schools under the supervision of the Education Department, no material change has taken place in the year 1889. In the purely Chinese Schools there is now a general tendency to add Arithmetic as an extra subject, as well as Geography, to the ordinary pensum of these Schools and ere long we shall find the standard of education given in these Schools, the vast majority of which are Christian Schools under Missionary agency, considerably raised above the type of an ordinary Chinese Village School, which was their former character. In the semi-Chinese Schools, giving a European education in the Chinese language, the use of the Romanized system is gradually becoming confined to the lower classes, and the teaching of classical Chinese is making a steady advance from year to year.

In the Anglo-Chinese and purely English Schools the demand for a higher, secondary, English education has continued to increase in 1889, and manifested itself in a larger proportion of scholars taking up the special subjects of the Grant-in-Aid Scheme. There is a general desire in these secondary Schools to have a seventh Standard added to the Grant-in-Aid Scheme, as the highest class in each of these Schools is now quite beyond the reach of the Scheme. This question will be taken up on the occasion of the next revision of the Scheme. Among the 104 Schools with a total of 7,107 scholars under the supervision of the Education Department, the proportion of Schools giving a Chinese, semi- Chinese, Portuguese, Anglo-Chinese, or English education in 1889 was as follows:--giving a Chinese education in the Chinese language, 80 Schools with 4,148 scholars, as compared with 77 Schools and 3,986 scholars in 1888; giving a European education in the Chinese language, 3 Schools with 160 scholars, as compared with 2 Schools and 110 scholars in 1888; giving a European education in the Portuguese language, 4 Schools with 236 scholars, as compared with 3 Schools and 211 scholars in 1888; giving an Anglo-Chinese education in the English language, with Chinese teaching in addition, 10 Schools with 1,834 scholars, as compared with 8 Schools and 1,158 scholars in 1888; giving an English education, exclusively in English, 7 Schools with 729 scholars as compared with 7 Schools and 793 scholars in 1888. The increase that has taken place in 1889 amounts therefore to 3 Chinese Schools with 162 scholars, 1 semi-Chinese School with 50 scholars, 1 Portuguese School with 25 scholars, and 2 Anglo-Chinese Schools, with 676 scholars; but against the increase of Anglo-Chinese scholars there appears to be a set-off in form of a decrease of 64 scholars under purely English instruc- tion.

The Portuguese Schools, of which there are now four at work, are making steady progress and bring now children into the higher standards. But the use of the Macao colloquial, with its slovenly habit of substituting in Chinese fashion adverbial phrases for the several tenses and moods of verbs, and in other ways turning the Portuguese language into a Chinese-like patois, causes the

:

:

.

:

:

-

278

children great trouble when they reach the higher standards and have to do parsing and analysis according to the rules of the Portuguese Grammar. There is altogether great need for a reform in the vernacular teaching of these Schools, because a slovenly colloquial form of speech, deficient in accidence and syntax, habituates the mind to slovenly thought and deteriorates force of character. If it is ne- cessary for Portuguese children, as I am convinced it is, that they should first learn to express their thoughts in their own language before they commence the study of English, they surely ought to be taught, both in school and at home, to express their thoughts in a grammatically correct form of Portuguese, though it need not be the classical language of CAMÕENS.

8. FEMALE EDUCATION.-Female education, though still in a backward condition, continues to extend in scope and to improve as regards the quality of the education given. Among the 2,293 scholars under instruction in Government Schools, during the year 1889, there were indeed only 141 girls as compared with 129 in the year 1888, but in the Grant-in-Aid Schools there were, in 1889, among a total of 4,814 scholars as many as 1,975 girls as compared with 1,787 girls in 1888. There is evidently a steady improvement in the proportion of girls and boys under instruction, but there is yet a great deal to be done before a normal state of things is reached. There are yet vast numbers of girls in the Colony, who do not come under instruction at present, not on account of any deficiency in our educational system, but on account of the usefulness of the children for domestic service. The greatest defaulters in the matter of school attendance are those Chinese girls who are purchased servants, owned by Chinese families and employed within the family as nursery maids. I have in former Reports repeatedly suggested, as the only remedy I can think of, registration of these purchased servant girls, coupled with a regulation that girls so registered should be sent to school for a certain number of years (say as half-timers). But legislation concerning family life is always a delicate and risky matter; moreover class legislation, as this would be, is objectionable as a matter of policy; and to apply the principle of compulsory school attendance, even in this limited form, before we have schools enough to accommodate such girls is evidently premature. But if it were possible to do anything by way of legislation, in some unobjectionable form, say in the direction of applying the root principle of the English Factory Acts to all the various forms of utilizing child labour, rampant in the Colony whether in domestic or extra-mural employment, and without regard to any particular nationality, a most powerful stimulus would be provided to increase school attendance especially among the girls of the Colony. Such a law need not interfere with the rights of parents, but it should limit the rights of the owners of purchased children (without specially mentioning them) by regulat- ing the rights of employers of child labour. The labour of children has, of late, repeatedly been made the subject of legislative enactment in England, by a series of statutes eventually consolidated in the Factory and Workshops Act (1878), ensuring the attendance at school of children employed in factories and workshops, and legislation as to the employment of stage children is at present under public consideration in England. The recognition of the right of the State entirely to prohibit the labour of children under a certain age (now fixed at 10 years) and to regulate the hours and conditions of their employment up to a certain further age (now 14 to 16 years), and the recognition of the duty of the nation to secure at least the rudiments of education to every child subject of the Crown, constitutes the basis of the Factory and Workshops Acts and of the Education Acts. I do not advocate the introduction in this Colony of a compulsory education law. There is no need for it. But the employ- ment of purchased children in domestic service, and the employment of children in carrying building materials up the hill, and in other forms of public labour, seems to me to call for legislation such as would naturally stimulate the school attendance of children who at present receive no education at all and notably of the female bond-servants permanently sold or temporarily pledged as security for money lent.

9. SCHOOL ATTENDANCE.-The question how to stimulate school attendance generally, so as to reduce the number of children remaining uneducated in the Colony, occupied a good deal of the time and attention of the Government during the year 1889. Apart from the consideration given to the above mentioned question of legislation, arrangements were made by the Registrar General's Department to arouse, through the mediation of the District Watchmen, the attention of Chinese parents to the necessity of school attendance, and to urge them to send all their children to school. This measure has already caused a considerable increase of attendance, but the fruits of this movement cannot actually be measured until the close of next year. Further also arrangements were made to convert, in the course of next year, all the Aided Schools in the Villages into free Government Schools. These elementary Chinese Village Schools were hitherto aided by the Government by a fixed monthly grant of five dollars, and the villagers were supposed to provide a school house and to supplement the teacher's salary by a monthly payment (in kind) amounting in value to another five dollars. In reality, however, the villagers, in most cases, mulcted the teacher to the extent of one dollar a month as compensation for house rent and threw the remainder of their obligation on the parents of children attending school, who used to pay school fees at the rate of three cents and three catties of rice a month and to provide the school furniture. The consequence was that the inhabitants of the smaller villages, comparatively the poorest class in the Colony, had to pay heavily for elementary Chinese education, whilst in the town and in four of the larger villages elementary Chinese and elementary English education is offered free of any charge, both by Government Schools and by Grant-in-Aid Schools. Arrangements have now been made to give henceforth in all the Village

}

!

279 Schools gratuitous elementary instruction, and this measure will no doubt, to a small extent, serve to increase school attendance. The fact that all elementary education will henceforth be given gratis all over the Colony is in itself a step in the right direction and a great gain.

10. RESULTS OF ANNUAL EXAMINATION. The results of the annual examinations of the Schools under the supervision of the Education Department will be found detailed, as usual, in the Tables (X to XV) appended to this Report, and, as far as the Victoria College is concerned, in the Report of the Headmaster which has been published in the local newspapers in January, 1890. A few supplementary and statistical details, together with some general observations, regarding points brought out by the examination of the various classes of Schools in the Colony, may, however, be of interest.

11. VICTORIA COLLEGE. In the case of the Victoria College (which name has now been officially substituted for the former Government Central School), the result of the year's work has been tested as usual by a joint examination conducted by the Headmaster and myself. The exam- inations were conducted by myself only in the case of the Chinese and Anglo-Chinese classes, of English reading, and English and Chinese composition. As regards other subjects and classes, the examination was conducted by printed papers set by the Headmaster and approved by myself. I confined myself to see that the question papers proposed by the Headmaster were of a sufficiently searching character and not entirely confined to the groove in which the teaching had run, also that the standard of proficiency expected of the several classes of the College should not be allowed to fall below that of former years nor below that attained to in similar Schools in the Colony which compete with the Victoria College. The examination was, however, in this case conducted under exceptional circumstances. The transfer of the School in the middle of summer, from the cramped locality of the Old Central School to the new Victoria College Buildings, affording so much larger accommodation, upset all the arrangements of the year and required a new distribution of the scholars among different classes. The consequence was that, at the close of the school year when the examinations were held, about one half of the whole number of scholars in the College were examined on barely half a year's work in the classes to which they were allotted. In view of this circumstance I consented to a slight reduction of the standard applied to the examinations for the year 1889. Owing to this exceptional irregularity, the result, though creditable as a whole, does not admit of a close comparison with the result of former years. This irregularity is not likely to recur in future years. It would also be desirable in future years to bring the examination rules of Victoria College into harmony with those in force in other similar Institutions in the Colony. The printed rules of Victoria College say, "100 marks maximum for each subject; less than 50 fails; a boy who fails in more than half subjects is a total failure." The examination rules for all the other similar Schools in the Colony are more liberal in that they put down a scholar as having failed if he has less than 66 marks (two-thirds), but they are more severe in that they declare a scholar a total failure if he fails in one or two subjects out of five or six. The consequence of this disparity is that it is very difficult to compare the examination results obtained at Victoria College with those obtained at similar secondary Schools under the Grant-in-Aid System. Uniformity of the test applied to the examination of all Schools under Government supervision is manifestly desirable.

.

The general value of the work done in the year 1889 in the Victoria College, as ascertained by this examination, will be found summarized in the Headmaster's separate Report, but I subjoin the usual Statistical Tables which indicate, in detail, the progress made in the year 1889 by the several divisions and classes of the College. These Tables speak for themselves. The following points require however special mention. The English composition papers in Classes I, IIA, and IIIB, and especially the papers on Shakespeare and English history in Class I were remarkably good, considering that the vast majority of the scholars in these Classes are boys who never hear English spoken out of school hours. But the examination in English dictation, which is of nearly equal importance, gave unsatisfactory results in Classes I and II, as in Class I half and in Class II one-third of the boys failed in this subject. Classes IIB and IVA deserve special praise for their translation papers (English into Chinese), and Class IIA for the solid attainments exhibited in Arithmetic, Algebra and Grammar. In the latter subject Classes VIA and VIIA did very fair work, and the whole of Class VIII in Arithmetic. The teaching in the Anglo-Chinese Classes of the College has shown considerable improvement as compared with former years, but the examination of the Chinese Classes throughout the College continues from year to year to show poor results. In the three highest Classes of the College, attendance at Chinese lessons has been dispensed with several years ago, under the supposition that the boys will continue to keep up their Chinese knowledge by private study. But the translation papers of these Classes appear to me to indicate that most of the boys neglect their Chinese studies entirely, as they exhibit a lament- able amount of retrogression. I am in doubt, however, if it would be wise to interfere in this matter by demanding some proof of the continuation of Chinese studies, as I fear it would lead to over-pressure. The introduction of Shakespeare, Trigonometry and Mensuration, in addition to the ordinary school pensum of Class I, and Latin in Classes I, II and III, is in itself sufficient to cause over-pressure, with the attendant increase of home-work. It is always difficult to determine the limit between an admis- sible amount of work and work necessarily implying over-pressure, and it is highly desirable to err rather on the safe side of the problem, as, under the trying influence of a Hongkong climate, school- life anyhow exercises a visibly weakening effect.

.

:.

CLASS.

Total Number

CLASS.

280

VICTORIA COLLEGE.-NUMBER OF BOYS PASSED IN EACH SUBJECT, IN 1889.

45

B.,

33

32

C.,

28

I....

24

23

23 12

II.A.,

29

29

28 19

B.,

30

28

30 18

III.A.,

B.,

IV.A.,

34

33

34 30

8 No 10 26

20

28

22 22

19

11

21 21

19 26 25

228

21 18

30

888

29

21

28

31

26

NO & HA 10

NO CO HA NO

25

25 18 17 16

45 44 41 34 42

23

2 + 2 0

* 19 * 13

31 30

19 20

37 41

29 32

20

225

28

25

24

23 19

21

:

:

:

:

28

25

32 31

==

45

+

40 43

23

29

~ N N

22

23

24

16

24

25

34

33

33

* ~ * 26

20

24

8 19 7

2

28 20

19 25 13

24

14

22 20

21

28

28

27 28 27 16

24

25

22 23

29 21

21 23

21

V.A.,

49

41 49 34

19

38

43

33

B.,

31

31 30

C.,

31

30

VI.A.,

57

57

88888

27 29

31

20 26

30

28 24

30

21

23

56

48 29

45

54

56

* 10 20 2

20

40

27

23

28

14

2 2 8 12

32

30

15

46

35

B.,

28

C.,

2

32

VII.A.,.

30

∞ co no

27

28 19 12

25

25

22

31 31 18 11

28

24 23

17 28 31 24 25

2272 223

...

30

29

28

27

27 27 30

B..........

C..........

51

2005

43

VIII.A.,

34

34

.....

B.,

30

28

C.,

54

51

O N & HA

48

33

27

52

: 2 2 2 2

...

32

41

30

33 27

23 29

52

48

to No No c

31

39

29

26

22

:

43

47

:

:

:

:

:

:.

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

...

Writ-

ing.

34

30

:

52

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:.

:.

:.

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:.

Total,...... 676

645

657 567 489 537

563 457 383 251 292 100 122 117 106

57

༢| ;

8

00

19

t-

Examined.

Total per Cent.

Passed.

Reading.

Dictation.

Arithmetic.

Chinese into

English.

English into

Chinese.

Grammar.

VICTORIA COLLEGE. PERCENTAGE OF PASSES IN EACH SUBJECT, IN 1889.

Geography.

Map.

Composition.

History.

Euclid,

Algebra.

I.,

II.A.,

B., III.A.,

30

34

B.,

26

IV.A.,

B.,

C., V.A.,

B.,

C., VI.A.,

57

B.,

28

C.,

32

VII.A.,

30

100.00 98.20 | 84.21 50.90 78.96 94.73 98.24 80.71 61.40 96.44 100.00 | 67.85 42.85 89,28 78.57 85,71 82.14 | 78,57 96.87 96.87 56.25 34.37 53.12 87.50 |100.00 | 96.66| 93.33| 90.00 | 90.00 | 90.00|100.00

24 95.83 95.83 50.00 83.33| 79.17| 45.83 87.49 87.49

29 100.00 96.55 65.54 96.55 75.88 65.54 89.65 86.21 70.00| 60,00| 96.66 70,00 83.33

93.33 100.00 | 60.00 97.05 100.00 | 88.23 96.15 96.15| 69.32| 65.47 | 61,62 | 88.46| 73.07 76,91

88.23 82.35 | 91.17| 91.17 88.24

100.00 95.83 79.17 87.49 $3.33 100.00 33.33 79.17 41.17) 4.166

96.55 | 75.88| 79,3282,76 96,55| 68.98 83.33 53.33 80.00 63.33 83.33| 43.33 $5.29 73.52 100.00 97.05 97.05 92.30 54.84 84.60 76,91

45 100.00 97.77 91.11 75.56 93.33 100.00 82.22 91.11 88.88 95.55 33 96.96 96.96 93.93 63.63 84.84 84.84 87.87 96.96 87.87 63.63 28 96.44 100.00 96.44 57.14 85.71 | 89.28|71.4275.00 82.14) 75.00

31

49 83.67 100.00| 69.38 38.77 77.55 87.75 67.34 | 40.81 81,63 65.30 100.00 96.77| 87.09| 93.53 100,00 64.51 83.87 87,0974.19 96,77 31 96.77 96.77| 90.32| 77,42 96.77 67.73 74.19 90.3145.16 48.39

3.448

3.333

2.941

3.846

2.222

3.030

3.571

2.040

3.225

3.225

1.754

3.571

96.87|75.00 | 78.12

3.125

3.333

B.,

C.,

51

84.31

VIII.A.,. 34

B.,. 30 C.,. 54

94.11 62.74 80.39 60.77| 76.46| 78.43 100.00 | 97.05| 88.24 | 97.05 79.41 | 85.29 93.33 90.00| 76.66| 96.66| 86.66| 73.33 94.44 96.29 | 96,29 88.88.79.68 87.03

Writing.

1.960

100.00

2.941

$100.00

3.333

96.29

1,851

Total,... 676 95.41

98.66 83.87 72.64 79.49 83.28 81,89 80.2975.15 81.11 69.93 91.60 | 81.81 90.59 68.67

.1479

Latin.

ligence.

Mensuration.

General Intel-

Shakespeare.

Trigonometry.

Failure.

1 per Cent.

I.,

II.,

III.,

IV.,

•❞

VICTORIA COLLEGE.-CHINESE EXAMINATIONS. PERCENTAGE OF PASSES IN EACH SUBJECT, IN 1889.

Anglo-Chinese Class.

281

Division.

Total No. Copy Examined.

Writing.

Reading.

Dictation. Characters.

Transla- tion.

Total Percentage Passed.

18

100

100

61

94

83

100

13

100

92

77

46

100

100

15

73

93

66

86

100

12

100

75

75

91

100

VICTORIA COLLEGE.-Chinese School.

Total No.

Class.

Essay.

Letter.

Prosody.

Tui-tui.

Examined.

Total Percentage Passed.

I.,

II.,

영영

50

100

98

72

88.

100

60

92

95

90

93

III.,

57

94

79

65

79

IV.,

55

84

73

82

38383

76

ར..

52

50

28

77

71

92

84

59

883

:

:

:

86

90

71

88

:

62

88

56

88

VI.,

VII.,

VIII.,

Mr.

Whilst on the whole fully recognizing the excellency of the organisation, method and dis- cipline of the Victoria College, and without wishing to find fault with the College on either of these points, I would draw the attention of the Authorities of the College to a matter of some importance, viz. to the monitorial and pupil-teacher system adopted in this School. In his Report for 1889, the Headmaster makes the following remarks. "A Normal Class and a special examination paper on education and school discipline for pupil teachers and monitors are a new feature of this year. BOARDS, who has been in charge of these junior assistants in front of the Preparatory Class, is on the whole able to give me only a moderate report, though he speaks highly of one or two pupil teachers. I trust that next year some marked improvement will be observed." Considering that these monitors and pupil teachers received no special teaching with the exception of two hours a week, I considered their examination papers on the whole satisfactory. But the facts I would draw attention to are these. This pupil-teacher system has taken the place of the former Government Normal School. The latter was condemned in the year 1882 for the expressed reasons that "a separate Normal School is not required" and that "when the Central School has been put on a proper footing, the Headmaster will be able to make all necessary arrangements for the training of the limited number of teachers required for the various Schools in the Colony.' Evidently the authors of these arguments fully re- cognized the need of trained teachers. Eight years have passed and the question now is, where and how teachers are at present trained in the Colony. In 1885 the Secretary of State approved of a scheme for articling six pupil teachers for a period of three years, to provide efficient Chinese assistant teachers for the Victoria College. In 1887 five Chinese monitors were articled, that is to say, monitors previously drawing pay at the rate of $5 a month, were appointed and did duty as pupil teachers, drawing in the first year $10 and in the second and third years $15 a month, and were then appointed assistant masters at $25 a month, with prospect of eventual further increase up to $50 or $60 a month. They received no special teaching nor training. Before the three years were quite over, five other Chinese monitors were appointed at the same rates of salary, two of them were shortly afterwards promoted to act as assistant masters at $25 a month, one was dismissed for misconduct, and two now remain drawing $15 a month, doing duty as pupil teachers and receiving two hours a week special teaching. The first point, therefore, to which I wish to draw the attention of the Authorities of the College is this, that this system appears to need a radical reform, if it is to produce trained teachers for the use of the College, for at present it appears to be simply a scheme for the gradation of the salaries of the Chinese masters employed in the College. The second point for consideration is this. The pupil teachers are practically recruited from the staff of monitors. To illustrate the working of the monitorial system, I will mention a typical case such as actually occurred and frequently recurs. A boy one year comes out first in Class I.B. At the beginning of the next school year he is

"

282

promoted with the other boys of his Class to Class I.A. but he, being at the head of his Class, is offered a monitorship at $5 a month. Tempted by the money which to him is a great deal, he accepts the post, and has now to devote part of his time to the teaching and supervision of the lower Classes of the College, part to the ordinary lessons of his own Class, and (since 1889) for two hours a week he receives special lessons in the science and art of teaching. As a natural consequence, when the examinations come round at the end of the year, he now takes the lowest place in his class (unless he has been driven to over-pressure to maintain a middling place), and at the next public competitive examination for employment in the Government Service or in the Chinese Customs, he fails. He then offers himself to be articled as pupil teacher and if accepted proceeds as above and is employed as teacher in the three divisions of the Preparatory Class of the College. Now the defects of the system are these. The pupil teacher is a Chinese boy, who never hears English spoken out of school hours, and is naturally deficient as regards English pronunciation and idiom. Moreover his proficiency in the subjects taught in the higher Classes of the College has been impaired by his monitorial duties. But he is set to teach the rudiments of English pronunciation and idiom in the Lower Division of the College. The consequence is first, that the parents of children in the Lower School of the College complain that they have to pay high school fees for a low quality of teaching, and secondly the English Masters in the Upper School of the College complain that they are hampered in their teaching by having to teach the A B C over again. There is, however, a third point for consideration. What Chinese parents, appreciating an English education, are most anxious for, is that their children should be taught English by Englishmen. For such teaching, if combined with proper method and discipline such as they do. get at Victoria College, they are willing to pay the full value. But this present monitorial and pupil- teacher system of the Victoria College puts Chinese into places in the Government Service which ought to be filled by Englishmen or by sons of local English residents, be they non-English Europeans or Portuguese or Indians or Chinese whose mother tongue is English. I do not advocate the exclusion of Chinese from employment in the English Schools of the Colony. On the contrary, I am convinced that, if the promotion of English teaching in the Colony is to depend exclusively on the costly impor- tation of trained teachers from England, unsupplemented by the assistance of trained native (Chinese) teachers of English, it will never expand its sphere of influence so as to reach classes of the population hitherto not leavened with English knowledge. But I think there are places in the Education Depart- ment where none but Englishmen, and others where none but Chinamen, are properly employed. In all secondary. English Schools, and especially in a model School such as the Victoria College has ever been and shall ever continue to be, English ought to be taught by Englishmen, and what explanations are required to be given in Chinese can be given by the Chinese teachers with whom every English Master is supplied at Government expense until he has himself mastered Chinese colloquial. But in all elementary English Schools which offer an English or Anglo-Chinese education gratis, charging no fees, English should be taught (if possible under the supervision of an English-born Headmaster) by the cheaper agency of Chinese teachers of English. But these Chinese teachers of elementary English or Anglo-Chinese Schools require training as much, or rather more so, than English-born teachers of secondary English Schools. The sum and substance, therefore, of my suggestion is that the Autho- rities of the Victoria College might profitably reconsider the pupil-teacher system now attached to the College, with a view to re-model it so as in the first instance to hold out an inducement to English speaking sons of local European or Indian residents to qualify themselves for eventual employment as English masters (at the present salary of $150 a month or say $120 a month which would be a sufficient inducement) in the Victoria College or elsewhere, and in the second instance to provide trained Chinese-born masters for the elementary English and Anglo-Chinese Government Schools or Grant-in-Aid Schools of the Colony. If anything further were needed to recommend the above scheme, I would solicit attention to the following considerations. I am fully aware that as a matter of policy it is desirable to keep up the connection between this Colony and the home country by filling the higher offices of the local Government Service with men selected in England. But I contend that the sound reasons underlying this policy do not apply to the filling up of any post below that of the Headmaster. It might indeed be said that the above scheme will not supply the Colony with English-born masters at a much cheaper rate. To this argument I would reply that under the present system masters are procured from England under engagements for three years, receiving a free passage out and at the end of the three years a free passage back. Not only will the above scheme remove payments of passages, but it will obviate the frequent complaints of masters engaged in England that they had been misled as to the value of the dollar, cost of living and prospects of advancement in the Colony.

12. GOVERNMENT SCHOOLS OUTSIDE VICTORIA COLLEGE.-The Anglo-Chinese Government Schools in town and in the four larger villages (Wongnaichung, Stanley, Shaukiwán and Yaumáti) call this year for no special remark. They are, with the exception of Shaukiwán, filled with scholars to overflowing and call urgently for the new buildings the erection of which has been sanctioned twelve years ago, but has not been commenced yet. The two Schools in town, most especially, are besieged at the beginning of every school year with numbers of applicants who have to be turned away for want of accommodation. The most crying needs of these Government Schools, which give a gratuitous elementary English or Anglo-Chinese education, are larger and better accommodation and a staff of trained native teachers.

283

Those Government Schools, in town and in the villages, which give an elementary Chinese education gratis, and the Aided Village Schools, which give the same education charging fees, have continued, during the year 1889, teaching also Arithmetic and Geography, in addition to their classical Chinese lore. As regards those Aided Village Schools, arrangements have been male, as above mentioned, to convert them into Government Schools. That is to say, while hitherto the Govern- ment and the respective Village Communities nominally shared between them the expenses of each School, the Government, seeing that the villagers have habitually been evading their share in the compact and thrown the burden of school fees entirely upon the individual scholars, have resolved henceforth to provide the whole of the expenses of these elementary Schools. This measure will not only have the effect of making elementary education throughout the Colony free of charges to the parents of children, but, by giving the selection of the teachers to the Government, this measure will enable the Government to substitute in course of time a better class of teachers and thus improve the standard of elementary Chinese teaching given in these Schools.

13. GRANT-IN-AID SCHOOLS.-Those Grant-in-Aid Schools which give an elementary Chinese education in the Chinese language continue to increase in number from year to year. In location also they follow the expansion of the town, sharing in the movement of the population from the more crowded centres to quarters in the suburbs where rows of new houses have lately been erected, and penetrating also to the larger villages. Their standard of teaching improves sensibly, and there is now a general demand for Arithmetic to be added as a special subject to the ordinary routine teaching of these Schools, and in the Girls Schools, there is a general call for a seventh standard to be included in the list of standards at the next revision of the Grant-in-Aid Scheme. This general advance in the standard of education given in these Mission Schools is very encouraging. Among the Missionary Societies, all of which deserve the thauks of the Government for their efforts made in 1889 to extend the sphere of this elementary Chinese education, offered in all cases free of charge and open to all comers, special mention must be made of the efforts of the Basel Mission (Rev. G. REUSCH) and the Female Education Society (Miss JOHNSTONE) to start new Schools in the villages, an i of the Roman Catholic Mission which is making rapid strides in extending educational facilities among the Chinese Catholics as well as among the Portuguese (to whom their energies were hitherto almost exclusively devoted).

The number of Schools giving a European education in the Chinese language (with or without the use of the Romanized system), which had remained stationary (at two Schools, the Berlin and the Basel Mission Schools) for more than ten years, has now been increased by the addition of the Victoria Home and Orphanage School (Mrs. OST). When application was made for the transfer of this School from Class I (giving a Chinese education in the Chinese language) to Class III (giving a European education in the Chinese language), the late Dr. STEWART, as Colonial Secretary, recommended the application to the Governor by the brief minute "This is a step in the right direction." It is highly desirable that this movement, which is a specially apt method of raising the standard of education now offered in the Colony to Chinese girls, be followed up by other Managers.

The Grant-in-Aid Schools in Class IV, giving a European education, whether elementary or secondary, in a European language, continued in 1889 the previous line of progress. The elementary Portuguese Schools are gradually improving as regards the quality of the teaching given by them. But there is a great need for some stimulus to be applied to these Schools, as above mentioned, to purify the language used in these Schools from its local deformities. If an Officer of the Education Department could be induced to study the local Portuguese dialect and to qualify himself, by a short stay at Lisbon, to act as an Assistant Examiner for the benefit of these and similar Schools, a beneficial reform might soon be looked for.

As to the elementary English Schools in the Colony, the opening of a free English School in the centre of T'áip'ingshán, by the Rev. J. B. OST, was a noteworthy.event. The fact that this School, situated among the veriest slums of the town, gained at once, and maintained even after the opening of the new Victoria College, an attendance of 113 Chinese boys, bringing 96 boys under examination, shews clearly that a demand for elementary English teaching is now springing up in the Colony among classes hitherto not appreciating the value of an English education. Moreover, good results were obtained at the examination of this School, even in Algebra.

The secondary English Schools of the Colony have, in almost every case, increased their staff in 1889, and continued to give the same increased attention, to which I had occasion to refer in my last Report, to the higher subjects of an English education. These secondary Schools keep up a close neck-to-neck race with the Victoria College. Every improvement the latter makes, is at once followed by a similar effort on the part of the other Schools. Thus a healthy emulation has arisen between these Schools, and while the Victoria College now hardly manages to keep ahead of the others in spite of its superior advantages, there is on all sides great need of circumspection lest this healthful compe- tition be continued to the detriment of physical health through causing over-pressure on the part of the scholars.

The needlework examination has been conducted on the same lines as before. The need of substituting for the present undefined standard of attainments a graduated scale, such as has been

:

284

adopted by the Ceylon Code, requiring each scholar to proceed from year to year to higher grades of plain needlework, has become strongly felt. It is the intention of the Department to introduce in the next revision of the Grant-in-Aid Scheme some provision of this sort.

66

14. OBITUARY.--The Education Department, more than any other branch of the Civil Service of this Colony, suffered, in 1889, by the great loss which the Colony sustained by the death of the Hon. F. STEWART, LL.D. Having served as Headmaster of the Government Central School and as Inspector of Schools for fully sixteen years (1862 to 1878), and then held several other offices, as Police Magis- trate, Registrar General and Colonial Secretary, the late Dr. STEWART continued, until his death, to be the chief adviser of the Government in all educational matters. This continuous and intimate con- nection with the educational Institutions of the Colony for a period of twenty-eight years, gives special value to the following verdict which Dr. STEWART lately pronounced on the educational system now in force in the Colony. "The advance in education is one of the most gratifying features in the progress of the Colony. There is yet much to be done and female education is only in its infancy; "but the lines on which the system is moving seem to be correct and time alone is required to reclaim "those portions of the field which remain untouched." These words, penned by Dr. STEWART but a few days before his death, illustrate most forcibly the unbiassed judgment and honest truthfulness which characterized him throughout his life. For the system, the lines of which he thus generously approved in 1889, is the very system against the initiation of which he waged a desperate war in 1878 and 1879. The position Dr. STEWART occupies in the educational history of the Colony is easily understood. From the year 1847, when the system of State-aided and Government Schools was inaugurated in Hongkong by the Rev. V. STANTON, and down to the year 1865 when the Education Department was established with Dr. STEWART as its Head, the educational policy of the Government had a strict- ly religious character. The leading Missionaries of the Colony, first in time the Rev. V. STANTON, the founder of St. Paul's College, first in power the Rev. Dr. LEGGE, the founder of the Anglo-Chinese College, together with Bishops SMITH and ALFORD, controlled the educational movement of the Colony for eighteen years, under the full sanction of the Government. During this time the Bible was a text- book in nearly all the Schools of Hongkong. The Government Schools were managed as feeders of St. Paul's College and at the annual prize-giving of the Government Schools the Protestant Bishop of Hongkong presided. Dr. STEWART chafed for three years under this system, as Headmaster of the Central School, established by Dr. LEGGE in 1862. But in the year 1865 all this was changed. Dr. STEWART, as Head of the new Education Department, now introduced the reign of an absolutely secular system and admitted, in 1872, Mission Schools to Government Aid on the principle of pay- ment for results ascertained by examination in purely secular subjects. It was actually proposed at a public meeting (25 June, 1872) to make St. Paul's College a feeder of the Government Central School. The Missionaries now chafed under the yoke of the secular and elementary Grant-in-Aid Scheme until the year 1878, when the Catholic and Protestant educationists of the Colony succeeded in obtain- ing from the Government an entire change of policy, which was effected in 1879 by confining the secular system to the Government Schools and by abolishing the secular and elementary limitations of the Grant-in-Aid Scheme. This measure, offering State-aid for the encouragement of religious education, both elementary and secondary, caused the education of the Colony to advance at a tre- mendous bound. In 1878, Dr. STEWART reported 45 Schools with 3,144 scholars as under Govern- ment supervision, and four years afterwards the undersigned, as his successor, had to report 80 Schools with 5,182 scholars as under examination by the Inspector of Schools. When this combination of the secular and religious systems of education was inaugurated in the Colony, the late Dr. STEWART at first strongly protested and fought against it for two years. But as soon as he saw what a happy solution of the educational problem this revised Scheme practically proved itself amid the peculiar difficulties of the Colony, Dr. STEWART withdrew his objections and nothing redounds more to his credit as an educationist than the hearty support he thenceforth gave to the system he had once opposed.

15. I enclose the usual Tables (I to XVI), containing the Educational Statistics for the year 1889, which to some extent have been analysed in the above paragraphs.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

E. J. EITEL, M.A., PH. D., (Tubing.),

Inspector of Schools.

The Hon. W. M. DEANE, C.M.G.,

Acting Colonial Secretary.

ریایم

No.

TABLE I.-NUMBER of SCHOLARS attending School subject to Government Supervision during 1889.

Native Native Grant-in- School School Aid (Govt.)

(Aided.) School.

Name of School.

Victoria College.

285

Total.

10

11

12

13

14

1.5

16

17

18

"

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

""

28

"

29

30

31

32

33

34

35

36

37

38

39

40

>>

41

"1

42

43

44

45

"

46

American Board Mission, Bridges Street (Boys),

"

""

""

:)

*

*

>>

Aplichau,

Station Terrace (Boys), Hinglung Lane (Boys), Queen's Road West (Boys), Háwán (Girls),

Basel Mission, High Street (Girls),

Shamshuipò (Boys),

Shaukiwán (Boys)..............

Berlin Mission (Girls),.

C. M. S., St. Stephen's I Division (Boys),

11

*

II

";

(Boys),

Lyndhurst Terrace (Boys),

Pottinger Street (Boys),

Saiyingp'ún (Boys),

St. Stephen's Baxter Memorial (Girls),

Lyndhurst Terrace (Girls),

Third Street (Girls),..

Yaumáti (Mixed),

Hunghom (Boys),

(Girls),.

Victoria Home and Orphanage (Girls),

St. Stephen's T'aip'ingshán Anglo-Chinese (Boys),

Diocesan Home and Orphanage (Mixed),

F. E. S., Bonham Road (Girls),.

Hoktsui,

Hokün,

High Street (Girls),

Queen's Road (Girls), Hollywood Road (Girls), Pottinger Street (Girls),

Stanley School (Girls),.. Shaukiwán (Girls),

Tókwáwán (Girls),

Hollywood Road' Anglo-Chinese (Girls), Hongkong Public School (Boys), Hunghom,

Little Hongkong,

L. M. S., Hollywood Road (Boys),

Wántsai (Boys),

Yaumáti (Boys),

Shekt'ongtsui (Boys),

Saiyingp'un I Division (Boys),

II

Hunghòm (Boys),

Hospital Chapel (Boys),

(Boys),

47

??

48

**

Shekt'ongtsui (Girls),

Saiyingpún (Girls),

49

50

";

51

++

52

32

Ui-hing Lane (Girls),

53

37

54

55

56

57

J:

58

"

59

Kau-ü-fong (Girls),

Ship Street (Girls),

Lower Lascar Row (Girls),

Tanglungchau (Girls),

Táipingshán Chapel (Girls),

Aberdeen Street (Girls),

Wántsai (Girls),...

Staunton Street (Girls),

Saiyingp'un, Second Street East (Girls),

Mát'auch'ung,

60

Mát'auts'ün,

61

Mongkok,

62

New Girls School,..

63

New Village (Little Hongkong),

64

65

66

67

68

11

69

17

70

1

71

1

""

72

"

Pokfulam,

R. C. M., Cathedral School (Boys)..

Bridges Street Chinese School (Girls),.. Hollywood Road Charitable School (Girls),. St. Joseph's College Chinese Division (Boys),.

"

"

Italian Convent, English Division (Girls),

Bridges Street Portugnese School (Mixed),

European

Portuguese

""

(Boys),.

(Girls),

73

St. Francis

17

31

>>

(Mixed).

74

Victoria

"

"

(Mixed),

75

"?

17

English

??

(Boys),

76

""

""

"

(Girls),

77

Saiyingp'ún (English),.

78

>>

(Punti),.

79

"

(Hakka),

80

Shaiwán,

81

82

Sheko,

83

84

85

86

87

Taihang,

88

Táit'ámtuk,

89

Shaukiwán (Anglo-Chinese),

Shéungwán (Boys),

(Girls),

St. Paul's College, Anglo-Chinese (Boys),

Stanley (Anglo-Chinese),.

Táiwongkung,

90 Tanglungchau (Hakka),

91

92 T'òkwáwán (Eastern Village,)

(Punti),...

93

"7

(Western Village),

94

Ts'attszemui,

95

Victoria College,

96

Wántsai (English),

97

(Chinese),

98

Wesleyan Mission, Spring Gardens (Boys),.

99

Wellington Street (Boys),.

100

"

(Girls),

*101

Wongkoktsui,

102

Wongmákok,

103

Wongnaich'ung, Anglo-Chinese,.

104

Yaumáti, Anglo-Chinese,...

93

93

46

46

89

89

53

53

38

38

51

51

89

26

26

31

31

25

26

116

146

48

48

104

104

59

59

94

94

66

66

51

51

61

61

39

39

28

28

31

31

46

46

213

213

143

143

32

32

41

41

45

45

10

11

21

27

152

116

RE:** : 89

28

28

35

35

41

41

37

37

26

26

10

11

18

18

58

58

21

27

152

116

72

72

89

89

71

71

106

106.

73

73

88

88

37

37

65

65

102

102

52

52

38

38

37

37

70

70

87

87

70

70

90

90

50.

50

39

39

18

18

58

88

21

21

22

22

58

10

10

13

13

59

59

62

62

60

60

87

87

205

205

179

179

25

- 25

129

129

52

52

30

30

138

138

44

44

95

96

96

:

96

96

12

12

58

58

27

27

64

64

83

83

56

58

58

19

19

9

9

88

88

58

58

57

57

35

35

25

25

15

15

919

919..

203 196

203

82

82

90

90

...

32

32

12

12

9

9

*

55

55

33

33

...

919

1,034

340

4,811

7,107

286

TABLE II.—PROPORTION of SCHOLARS to POPULATION in the CITY of VICTORIA and in the VILLAGESs in 1889.

CITY AND HARBOUR OF VICTORIA. Population as per Census of 1881.

CHILDREN IN SCHOOLS UNder GovernMENT SUPERVISION,

IN THE CITY OF VICTORIA.

VILLAGES.

Population, including Boat Population, as per Census of 1881,

CHILDREN IN SCHOOLS Under GoverNMENT SUPERVISION,

No. of Scholars.

51

26

31

28

31

39

37

41

26

10

11

21

27

73

$9

37

70 72

18

21

22

10

13

12

58

27

58

19

9

58

57

35

25

15

12

9

55

33

TOTAL,..

..1,286

IN VILLAGES.

No. of Scholars.

1. American Board Mission, Bridges Street (Boys).

93

1. Aplichau.

2.

Station Terrace (Boys),

46

3.

Hinglung Lane, (Boys),

89

3.

..

4.

+

>

9.

10.

#

11.

12.

5.

6. Basel Mission, High Street (Girls),

7. Berlin Mission, (Girls),

8. C. M. S., St. Stephen's I Division (Boys),

15

II

Lyndhurst Terrace (Boys',

Pottinger Street (Boys),

Saiyingp'ún (Boys),.

Queen's Road West (Boys), Háwán (Girls),

53

38

5.

*

89

6.

25

146

8.

::

(Boys),

48

9.

104

2. Basel Mission, Shamshuipò (Boys),

4. C. M. S., Hunghòm (Boys),.

1

(Girls), Yaumáti (Mixed),

7. F. E. S., Shaukiwán (Girls),

10. Hoktsui,

Stanley (Girls),..

T'òkwáwán (Girls),

Shaukiwán (Boys),

59

11. Hokün,

94

12. Hunghom,

13.

*

St. Stephen's Baxter Memorial (Girls),

66

13. Little Hongkong,

14.

Lyndhurst Terrace (Girls),

51

14. L. M. S., Hunghòm (Boys),

15.

Third Street (Girls),

61

15.

::

16.

Victoria Home and Orphanage (Girls)...

46

16.

::

17.

St. Stephen's Taip ́ingshan Anglo-Chinese (Boys), 213

17.

18. Diocesan Home and Orphanage (Mixed),.

143

18.

19. F. E. S., Bonham Road (Girls),.

32

19. Mát'auch'ung,

20.

High Street, (Girls),

41

20. Matauts'ün,

21.

Queen's Road (Girls),

45

21. Mongkok,

22.

Hollywood Road (Girls),

28

Shekt'ongtsui (Boys), (Girls), Tanglungchau (Girls), Yaumáti (Boys),

22. New Village (Little Hongkong),

23.

་་

Pottinger Street (Girls),

35

23. Pokfulam,

24. Hollywood Road Anglo-Chinese (Girls), 25. Hongkong Public School (Boys),

18

24. Shaiwán,.

58

25. Shaukiwán (Anglo-Chinese),

26. L. M. S., Hollywood Road (Boys)..

152

26. Sheku,

27.

Wántsai (Boys),

116

27. Stanley (Anglo-Chinese),

28.

Saiyingp'ún, I Division (Boys),

71

28. Taihang,

29.

II

(Boys),

106

29. Táit'ámtuk,

30.

Hospital Chapel (Boys),

88

30. Tanglungchau (Hakka),

31.

Saiyingp'un (Girls),

65

31.

(Punti)....

32.

Kau-ü-fong (Girls),

102

32. Tòkwáwán (Eastern Village),

33.

Ship Street (Girls),

52

33.

(Western Village),

34.

Lower Lascar Row (Girls),

38

34. Ts'attszemúi,

1

35.

Ui-hing Lane (Girls),.....

35. Wongkoktsui,

36.

!!

T'aip'ingshán Chapel (Girls),

87

36. Wongmakok,

37.

Aberdeen Street (Girls),

70

#

38.

Wántsai (Girls).

90

37. Wongnaich'ung (Anglo-Chinese),

38. Yaumáti (Anglo-Chinese),

39.

Staunton Street (Girls),

50

40.

Saiyingp'ún, Second Street East (Girls),

39

41. New Girls School,

58

43.

44.

45.

""

46.

47.

"

48.

"

49.

50.

51.

??

52.

19

>>

53.

>

42. R. C. M., Cathedral School (Boys),

Bridges Street, Chinese School (Girls), Hollywood Road, Charitable School (Girls), St. Joseph's College, Chinese Division (Boys),

.

Italian Convent. English Division (Girls),......!

Portuguese Division (Girls), Bridges Street, Portuguese School (Mixed), St. Francis, Portuguese School (Mixed), Victoria, Portuguese School (Mixed),

English School (Boys),

54. Saiyingp'ún (English),.

59

62

60

87

European

(Boys),

205

204

129

52

30

138

**

(Girls),

44

96

58.

""

55.

""

(Punti),

56.

>>

(Hakka),

(Girls),

96

57. Shéungwán (Boys),

59. St. Paul's College, Anglo-Chinese (Boys),

60. Táiwongkung,

64

83

56

88

61. Victoria College,

919

62. Wántsai (English),

203

63.

"

(Chinese),

64. Wesleyan Mission, Spring Gardens (Boys),..

82

65.

66.

Wellington Street (Boys)..

90

"

་་

(Girls)..

32

TOTAL..

5,821

TABLE III.-NUMBER of SCHOLARS at the GOVERNMENT SCHOOLS during 1889, and EXPENSES of each SCHOOL.

No.

Name of School.

Boys. Girls. Total.

Expense. No.

Name of School.

Boys. Girls.

Total. Expense.

1

Aplichau,

51

51

$ 108.00

Brought forward,.

557 58

615

3,069.22

2 Hoktsui..

10

10

60.00 19

3 Hokün,.

11

11

60.00 20

Hunghom.......

21

21

60.00 21

Taihang,

Little Hongkong,

27

27

60.00 22

Mát'auch'ung,

18

18

51.95 23

Mat'auts'iin,

21

8 Mongkok,

22

9 New Girls School,

10

New Village (Little Hongkong)

10

11

Pokfulam,

-13

12 Saiyingp'ún (English),,

95

13

(Punti),

(96)

14

(Hakka),.

96

15

Shaiwán.

12

16

Shaukiwáu (Anglo-Chinese)..

58

17

Shekò,

27

18

Sheungwán (Boys).

.......

64

*200* * *NKNO

21

50.00 24

Shéungwán (Girls),

Stanley (Anglo-Chinese),

Táit'amtuk,

Taiwongkung,

Tanglungchau (Hakka),

83

670.50

58

58

352.67

19

19

60.00

9

58.33

88

352.00

58

58

180.00

22

58

10

60.00 | 25 653.04 26 60.00 27

"

(Punti),

57

57

180.48

T'òkwawán (Eastern Village),.

35

35

60.00

"

(Western Village).

25

25

60.00

13

72.00 28

Ts'attszemúi,

15

15

60.00

96

511.49 29 159.00 30

Victoria College,

919

919

15,018.20

Wantsai (English),

203

507.00

96

203

269.00 31

1:

(Chinese),

(196)

307.00

12

58

27

64

60.00 32 285.74 33 120.00 34 369.00

Wongkoktsui,

12

Wongmákok,

9

Wongnaich'ung (Anglo-Chinese),..

55

55

35

Yaumáti (Anglo-Chinese),

33

33

20183

72.00

9

66.00

315.67 403.79

Carried forward........

557

58

615

3,069.22

TOTAL,..

2,152

141

2.293

$21,792.86

1

287

TABLE IV.-AVERAGE EXPENSES of each SCHOLAR or STUDENT at the Government Schools during the Year 1889.

VICTORIA COLLEGE.

;

Expenditure,

Expenditure,

Add Inspector's Salary,

Chinese Writer's Salary,

Teacher's Salary,

""

Travelling Expenses,

No.

.$15,018.20

GOVERNMENT SCHOOLS AND AIDED SCHOOLS.

.$ 6,774.66

.$3,000

384

120

288

3,792.00

$25,584.86

Total Expenditure for the year :-

Victoria College,

Government Schools and Aided Schools,

A.

Average Expenses calculated by the Enrolment.

1. Average Expense of each Scholar at Victoria College,......

Aais

2.

""

>>

""

""

at other Government Schools,

3.

99

.

"

at Government Aided Schools,

B.

.$15,018.20 ..$10,566.66

- ci câ

Average Expenses calculated by the average Daily Attendance.

Average Expense of each Scholar at Victoria College,.....

2.

""

19

3.

""

""

2

"

at other Government Schools,. at Government Aided Schools,

.$16.34

5.51

3.35

$25.11

9.58

4.93

TABLE V.-AVERAGE MONTHLY ENROLMENT and DAILY ATTENDANCE at the Government Schools for 1889.

Name of School.

Average Monthly Enrolment.

Average Daily Attendance.

454 0 10 H

1

2

Aplichau, Hoktsui, Hokün,

Hunghôm,

Little Hongkong,

Mát'auch'ung,

34.83

29.44

9.42

8.77

7.75

7.33

12.92

10.62

22.75

22.21

16.73

14.69

Mát‘auts'ün,

18.42

17.80

Mongkok,

16.43

15.17

9

New Girls School,

47.75

37.50

10

New Village (Little Hongkong),

6.33

5.91

11

Pokfúlam,

9.25

8.33

12

Saiyingp'ún, (English), ..........

70.00

66.69

13

(Punti),

34.92

32.30

14

وو

(Hakka),

67.58

62.43

15

Shaiwán,

9.67

6.91

16

17

Shekò,

18

Shaukiwán (Anglo-Chinese),..........

Shéungwán (Boys),...

31.00

25.77

19.82

13.34

40.33

35.79

19

"9

(Girls),

32.92

29.25

20

Stanley (Anglo-Chinese),

42.83

39.80

21

22

23

24

Taihang,

Táit'ámtuk,

Táiwongkung,

Tanglungchau (Hakka),.

16.08

15.45

7.89

6.08

51.50

43.66

36.42

33.22

25

"

(Punti),

37.59

30.83

26

T'okwáwán (Eastern Village),

22.92

20.20

27

(Western Village),

17.08

15.00

28

Ts'attszemúi,

10.33

9.89

29

Victoria College,...

636,33

596.82

30

Wántsai, (English),

130.00

117.36

31

(Chinese),

126.83

110.69

32

Wongkoktsui,

11.33

10.02

33

Wongmákok,

8.45

6.86

34

Wongnaich'ung (Anglo-Chinese),

42.83

38.42

35

Yaumáti (Anglo-Chinese),...

22.66

20.58

1,729.89

1,565.13

288

TABLE VI.-MAXIMUM and MINIMUM ENROLMENT and DAILY ATTENDANCE at the Government Schools during 1889.

;

No.

Name of School.

Maximum Monthly Enrolment.

Minimum Monthly Enrolment.

Maximum Daily

Minimum Daily

Attendance

Attendance

(Monthly average). (Monthly average.)

123 O

Aplichau,

2

Hoktsui,

51

12

10

Hokün, Hunghôm,

Little Hongkong,

Mát'auch'ung,

Mát❜auts'ün,

8

15

26

20

18

12

20

12

8

Mongkok,

18

10

NOTONO

48.25

12.00

9

10.00

8.00

7

8.00

6.80

8

14.00

7.00

24.90

20.00

16.67

12.00

22.44

12.00

18.00

10.00

9

New Girls School,

56

34

47.62

27.24

10

New Village (Little Hongkong),

7

5

7,00

4.46

11

Pokfúlam,

13

8

11.05

6.57

12

Saiyingp'ún (English),

78

57

76.30

56.58

13

"

(Punti),

71

21

41.40

21.00

14

"

(Hakka),

80

40

77.38

38.95

15

Shaiwán,

11

9

9.00

4.30

16

Shaukiwán (Anglo-Chinese),

39

12

34.33

12.00

17

Shekò,..

25

22.00

8.96

18

Sheungwán (Boys),

49

30

43.34

27.57

19

"

(Girls),

44

20

40.33

18.33

20

Stanley (Anglo-Chinese),

49

32

45.13

31.66

21

Taihang,

22

9

20.00

9.00

22

Táit'ámtuk,...

9

6

7.04

4.59

23

Táiwongkung,

73

22

60.68

20.50

24 Tanglungchau (Hakka),

46

27

41.92

19.00

:

25

""

(Punti),

39

16

38.00

12.86

26

T'òkwáwán (Eastern Village),

29

17

25.32

15.38

27

,

(Western Village),

19

13

18.58

10.36

28

Ts'attszemúi,

11

7

11.00

6.90

29

Victoria College,.

789

466

754.53

451.77

30

Wántsai (English),

160

91

156.27

86.34

31

وو

(Chinese),

158

88

153.00

82.18

32

Wongkoktsni,

12

8

11.62

7.43

33

Wongmákok,

9

5

8.26

3.32

34

Wongnaich'ung (Anglo-Chinese),

47

28

44.00

27.19

35

Yaumáti (Anglo-Chinese),

26

18

24.75

14.43

1

2,137

1,190

1,992.11

1,118.67

123 10 3 N∞O

No.

Name of School.

Aplichau,

TABLE VII.-NUMBER of DAYS on which the GOVERNMENT SCHOOLS were taught during 1889.

School Days. No.

252

19

Hoktsui,

Hokün,... Hunghòm,

Little Hongkong,

Mát'auch'ung,

252

20

251

21

252

22

Name of School.

Shéungwán (Girls),

Stanley (Anglo-Chinese),

Taibang,

Táit'ámtuk,

School Days.

240

229

249

200

250

23

Táiwongkung,

243

230

24

Tanglungchau (Hakka),.

242

Mát'auts'ün,

230

25

(Punti),

264

Mongkok,

253

26

Tòkwáwán (Eastern Village),

252

9

New Girls School,

238

27

(Western Village),

251

10

New Village (Little Hongkong),

249

28

Ts'attszemúi,

252

11

Pokfúlam,

245

29

Victoria College,.

233

12

Saiyingp'ún (English),

242

30

Wántsai (English),

240

13

(Punti),

240

31

""

(Chinese),.

240

14

(Hakka),

248

32

Wongkoktsui,

249

15

Shaiwán,

251

33

Wongmákok,

229

16

Shaukiwán (Anglo-Chinese),

244

34

Wongnaich'ung (Anglo-Chinese),.

232

17

Shekò,

236

35

Yaumáti (Anglo-Chinese),.

245

18

Shéungwán (Boys),

242

:

289

TABLE VIII-SUMMARY of ENROLMENT and ATTENDANCE at the GOVERNMENT SCHOOLS for the last Twenty-five Years

Years.

Minimum Daily Attendance

Maximum Daily

Total Enrolment

Attendance

for the Year.

Minimum Monthly Enrolment.

(Monthly Average).

(Monthly Average).

1865, 1866,

597

535

418

330

623

572

435

337

1867,

700

610

533

408

1868,

916

664

572

460

1869,

942

748

627

504

1870,

1,302

950

683

556

1871,

1.292

937

741

571

1872,

1,480

1,157

837

665

1873,

1,838

1,326

852

760

1874,

1,932

1,271

974

836

1875,

1,927

1,312

988

863

1876,

2,171

1,383

1,057

925

1877,

2,148

1,446

1,212

1,035

1878,

2,101

1,324

1,100

936

1879,

2,043

1,356

1,027

904

1880,

2,078

1,468

1,082

937

1881,

1,986

1,384

1,093

956

1882,

2,114

1,444

1,062

988

1883,

2,080

1,414

1,138

990

1884,

1,978

1,420

1,066

941

1885,

1,988

1,424

1,061

926

1886,

1,893

1,544

1,040

886

1887, 1888, 1889,

1,814

1,552

1,126

1,000

1,933

1,653

1,139

1,040

2,293

1,992

1,190

1,118

January,

February,

March,

April,..

May, June, July,

August,

C

September,

October,

November,

December,

TABLE IX.-ENROLMENT and ATTENDANCE at the VICTORIA COLLEGE during 1889.

Month.

7

Number of Scholars.

Number of Attendances.

Number of School Days.

Average Daily Attendance.

466

9,939

22

451.77

<

538

1,601

3

533.60

540

12,741

25

509.64

536

6,993

14

499.50

525

11,796

24

491.50

520

11,210

23

487.39

733

15,909

26

611.88

712

5,480

8

685,00

789

11,318

15

754.53

788

18,442

25

737.68

766

18,482

26

710.85

723

15,149

22

688.59

-1

Total Number of ATTENDANCES during 1889, Number of SCHOOL DAYS during 1889,

Average DAILY ATTENDANCE during 1889,

Total Number of SCHOLARS at this School during 1889,...

139,060

233

596.824

919

TABLE X.-GOVERNMENT SCHOOLS (VICTORIA COLLEGE excepted) arranged in the order of their efficiency.

Rank I.

Saiyingp'ún, English School. Girls' School, No. 2 Chinese. Wántsai, Chinese School.

Rank II.

Wongnaichung, Anglo-Chinese School. Wántsai, English School. Stanley, Anglo-Chinese School. Yaumáti, Auglo-Chinese School. Shaukiwán, Anglo-Chinese School. Sheungwán, Chinese Boys School. Taiwongkung, Chinese School.

Rank II,-Continued.

Tanglungchau, Chinese Punti School. Tanglungchau, Chinese Hakka School. Shekò, Chinese School. Shaiwán, Chinese School. Little Hongkong, Chinese School.

Rank III.

Sheungwán, Chinese Girls' School. Saiyingp'ún, Chinese Hakka School. Saiyingp'ún, Chinese Punti School. New Village (Little Hongkong)

Chinese School.

Rank III,-Continued.

Aplichan, Chinese School. Mongkok, Chinese School. Mát auts'ün, Chinese School. Wongkoktsui, Chinese School. Ts'attszemúi, Chinese School. Hoktsui, Chinese School. Mát'auch'ung, Chinese School. T'òkwáwán (East) Chinese School. Tòkwáwán (West) Chinese School. Wongmákok, Chinese School.

Hckün, Chinese School.

Pokfulam, Chinese School. Huughòm, Chinese School. Taihang, Chinese School.

290

TABLE XI-NUMBER of SCHOLARS attending Schools receiving GRANTS-IN-AID (under the Provisions of the Scheme of 1883), Expenses incurred and amount of Grant gained by each, in 1889.

Class of School.

Expenses

Name of School.

Boys. Girls. Total. incurred in

1889.

Amount of Grant gained for 1889.

$ c.

$ c.

I.

American Board Mission, Bridges Street (Boys),

19

""

"

Station Terrace (Boys),

""

Higlung Lane (Boys),

""

""

"

""

3

""

Basel Mission, Shamshuipó (Boys),..

Queen's Road, West (Boys), Háwán (Girls),

3988

93

318.00

334.02

46

46

212.00

172.56

89

...

294.00

316.94

53

53

295.20

233.06

38

38

187.60

129.73

26

26

111.78

67.81

93

II.

""

"

""

"

"

""

""

""

Third Street (Girls), .

"

"

Yaumáti (Mixed),

99

"

""

19

59

"

99

""

""

39

Shaukiwán (Boys),

C. M. S., St. Stephen's I. Division (Boys),

99

"

Lyndhurst Terrace (Boys),.

Pottinger Street (Boys),

Saiyingp'ún (Boys),

St. Stephen's Baxter Memorial (Girls),

Lyndhurst Terrace (Girls),

31

31

117.85

53.63

146

.146

603.58

358.91

(Boys),

48

48

264.73

49.57

104

104

389.75

212.00

59

59

...

328.96

200.19

94

...

94

271.88

233.78

66

66

223.24

135.63

51

51

321.66

162.04

61

61

207.97

244.95

"

"

"

29

Wántsai (Boys),..

""

Yaumáti (Boys),

"

"

""

""

Hunghòm (Boys), (Girls),

F. E. S., Bonham Road (Girls),

High Street (Girls), Queen's Road (Girls), Hollywood Road, (Girls), Pottinger Street (Girls), Stanley School (Girls), Shaukiwán (Girls), T'ókwáwán (Girls),

23

L. M. S., Hollywood Road (Boys),

Shekt'ongtsui (Boys),

Saiyingp'ún I. Division (Boys),.

388

30

9

39

199.85

156.03

28

28

144.34

60.84

31

31

148.53

55.89

32

32

131.21

214.84

41

41

72.62

70.10

45

45

153.96

179.50

28

28

80.30

69.59

35

35

149.34

145.84

41

41

196.06

118.65

37

37

111.96

141.56

26

...

26

100.26

152

152

789.55

462.52

116

116

756.03

350.81

72

72

451.33

224.85

89

89

571.28

262.41

71

71

891.09

333.48

II.

99

""

(Boys),.

106

106

692.63

330.30

99

"

Hunghòm (Boys),

73

73

384.75

165.83

"9

""

Hospital Chapel (Boys),

88

88

591.48

270.70

39

22

Shekt'ongtsui (Girls),

37

37

178.18

110.37

19

"

Saiying pún (Girls),

65

65

332.21

212.39

"9

""

Kau-ü-fong (Girls),

102

102

746.69

422.94

);

Ship Street (Girls),

52

52

348.36

157.83

37

""

Lower Lascar Row (Girls),

38

38

366.21

86.22

59

""

Ui-hing Lane (Girls),

37

37

.....

195.14

""

""

27

Aberdeen Street (Girls),.

19

Wántsai (Girls),

99

""

""

""

""

"

(Girls),

"

III. Basel Mission, High Street (Girls),..

29

99.

IV.

""

Tanglungchau (Girls),

T'áip'ingshán Chapel (Girls),

Staunton Street (Girls),

Saiyingp'ún Second Street East (Girls),

R. C. M., Cathedral School (Boys),

Bridges Street Chinese School (Girls), Hollywood Road Charitable School (Girls), Wesleyan Mission, Spring Gardens (Boys),

29

""

Wellington Street (Boys),

25

""

70

70

336.53

179.32

87

87

376.23

185.06

70

70

490.16

199.26

90

90

555.78

386.93

888888

50

50

543.62

306.56

39

39

46.38

59

59

225.20

67.17

62

60

889

62

604.30

372.98

60

,་

530.86

342.86

82

82

223.00

187.04

· 90

90

420.00

239.05

...

32

32

224.00

130.95

89

89

801.19

680.83

""

""

""

>>

"9

European

12

"

St. Francis

""

29

""

""

English

"J

Berlin Mission (Girls),

C. M. S., Victoria Home and Orphanage (Girls),

St. Stephen's Táip'ingshán Anglo-Chinese (Boys),

Diocesan Home and Orphanage (Mixed),

St. Paul's College Anglo-Chinese (Boys),

Hongkong Public School (Boys),

Hollywood Road Anglo-Chinese (Girls),

R. C. M., St. Joseph's College, Chinese Division (Boys),

""

Italian Convent English (Girls),

Portuguese School (Girls),. Bridges Street Portuguese School (Mixed),

Victoria, Portuguese School (Mixed),.

213 123

56

25

25

995.15

216.07

46

46

4,058.90

284.83

...

213

691.76

20

143

10,651.11

788.04

...

56

773.61

313.21

58

58

5,622.64

341.01

18

18

36.78

87

8711

419.95

(Boys),

205

5,235.50

205

1,396.52

204

204

3,885.56

1,274.07

75

50

129

1,035.40

832.25

99

(Mixed),

20

32

52

527.73

179.18

15

15

30

873.50

182.52

"

(Boys),

138

138

369.82

"

(Girls),

5.655.00

44

14

283.01

2,839 1,975 4,814 $57,281.13 $18,737.12

1

J

TABLE XII.-ENROLMENT, Attendance and NUMBER of SCHOOL DAYS at the GRANT-IN-AID SCHOOLS during 1889.

Average Average Daily Number Monthly Attend-

Maxi-

mum

Mini-

Average Average Maxi- Mini-

mum

of

mum

mum

No.

Name of School.

Monthly Monthly Enrol- Enrol-

ment.

ment.

Daily Daily Attend- Attend-

Enrol-

ance

School

ment.

for the

Days.

ance.

ance.

Year.

1234

American Board Mission, Bridges Street (Boys),

Station Terrace (Boys),

وو

Hinglung Lane (Boys),

21

Queen's Road, West

"

(Boys), Háwán (Girls),

6

8

9

""

10

""

Basel Mission, Shamshuipò (Boys),

C. M. S., St. Stephen's I Division (Boys),

Lyndhurst Terrace (Boys),

Shaukiwán (Boys),

132

II

(Boys),

༞༞མས་ྲག

☺ co co ∞

82

88.61 65.86

89.91

82.71

248

37

40.73

32.33

40.81

38.22

251

31

81.80

28.77

82.90

74.68

254

53

52.14

42.54 53.00

50.10

240

9

24.00

9.00 17.83

16.99

276

24

19

20.30

12.30

20.54 17.60

255

12

22.62

4.54

21.81

16.63

261

24

121.12

23.57

96.25 91.00

277

42

13

35.52

11.52

23.18 20.34

245

74

48

72.27

46.70

59.83.

57.87

267

11

>>

Pottinger Street (Boys),

59

30

52.83

24.30

51.54

45.39

261

12

>>

Saiyingp'ún (Boys),

77

35

73.03

33.28 60.25

56.86

267

13

St. Stephen's Baxter Memorial (Girls),

57

21

50.64

21.00

41.00

37.72

280

14

"

Lyndhurst Terrace (Girls),

38

16

37.84

13.86

32.33

31.11

273

15

39

Third Street (Girls),

55

22

47.95

21.57

44.66

40.16

267

16

17

18

19

20

21

A A A A A

Yaumáti (Mixed),

39

24

36.92

21.39 33.08

29.76

277

Hunghòm (Boys), (Girls),

20

11

18.87

9.66 18.25 16.25

259

26

16

23.74

14.66 23.08

19.52

266

F. E. S., Bonham Road (Girls),

28

21

26.84

20.33

25.54

24.86

242

High Street (Girls),

22

12

19.00

9.08

16.50

14.52

261

Queen's Road (Girls),

38

21

36.26

20.36 32.91

31.50

277

22

33

Hollywood Road (Girls),

25

10

21.88

9.40 20.90

18.48

260

23

Pottinger Street (Girls),

35

27

33.60

18.92

31.45

28.00

245

24

Stanley School (Girls),

32

24

31.88 20.04 30.09

26.29

258

25

Shaukiwán (Girls),

37

4

34.88

4.00

31.75

29.98

265

26

T'ókwáwán (Girls),

25

18

23.38

17.19

23.90

20.87

249

27

28

39

29

30

"

L. M. S., Hollywood Road (Boys),

Yaumáti (Boys),

Shekt'ongtsui (Boys),

126

63

111.60

59.62

100.25

94.41

248

Wántsai (Boys),

87

62

80.23

60.57

75.41

70.44

256

72

47

67.59

37.92 63.36

55.43

251

65

45

64.04

37.00 57.00

55.10

261

31

>>

Saiyingp'ún I Division (Boys),

71

57

67.64

41.75 69.36

64.14

261

32

II

(Boys).

79

54

69.24

43.40 72.58

62.79

267

>>

33

33

23

Hunghòm (Boys),

50

30

45.23

25.33 41.58

39.11

247

34

Hospital Chapel (Boys),

83

54

76.12

50.65 69.63

63.85

240

35

33

Shekt'ongtsui (Girls),

23

18

22.08

15.83 21.58

20.05

276

36

>>

Saiyingp'ún (Girls),

47

25

43.46

20.16 40.41

37.78

265

37

38

39

40

41

42

""

""

**

Kau-ü-fong (Girls),

76

50

71.60

47.55 69.83

66.11

272

""

Ship Street (Girls),

36

22

32.96 16.92 32.83

29.16

284

Lower Lascar Row (Girls),

28

17

27.53

14.07 20.58

19.55

282

""

Ui-hing Lane (Girls),

36

26

34.29

19.22 33.40

30.56

259

Tanglungchau (Girls),

55

31

51.76

30.50 45.25

44.36

272

92

T'áip'ingshán Chapel (Girls),.

61

43

51.81

32.19 51.83

44.42

270

43

Aberdeen Street (Girls),

45

30

42.57 24.60 38.16

37.41

274

""

44

>>

Wántsai (Girls),

69

57

61.24 50.04 63.50

56.58

278

45

Staunton Street (Girls),

50

31

48.86

30.47 46.45 45.22

265

""

46

"

Saiyingp'ún, Second Street, East

(Girls),

23

16

19.46 15.57 18.73

17.45

268

}

47

R. C. M., Cathedral School (Boys),

44

30

40.81

25.90 36.58

32.93

270

48

>>

49

Bridges Street, Chinese School (Girls), Hollywood Road, Charitable School)

(Girls)....

62

48

58.53

46.36 58.50 53.85

270

60

23

49.81

20.50 49.75

45.05

263

50

Wesleyan Mission, Spring Gardens (Boys),.

60

37

53.74

31.75 51.33 45.51

265

51

Wellington Street (Boys),

90

50

81.56

46.58 69.63 64.43

250

"

52

"

33

(Girls),

31

20

29.36

15.33 25.81 23.28

253

53

Basel Mission, High Street (Girls),

83

63

80.15

54.94 76.75 73.43

265

54

Berlin Mission (Girls),

25

23

25.00

22.59 23.85 23.66

254

55

Church Mission, Victoria Home and Orphanage

41

26

39.88

25.12 36.58 35.27

261

(Girls),

56

Church Mission, St. Stephen's Anglo-Chinese

173

105

145.96

91.95 132.00 114.47

248

(Boys),

57

Diocesan Home and Orphanage (Mixed),

112

73

96.52

68.20 97.08 88.64

249

58

St. Paul's College, Anglo-Chinese (Boys),

48

28

59 Hongkong Public School (Boys),

52

41

61

*** 8 28

60 Hollywood Road Anglo-Chinese (Girls),

R. C. M., St. Joseph's College, Chinese Divi-

sion (Boys),

15

4

65

30

62.56

47.30 26.77 41.75 40.74 50.71 41.00 46.18 10.66 3.50

25.28 54.50 53.45

245

45.10

242

9.11

7.67

162

215

62.

St. Joseph's College, European Divi-

sion (Boys),

205

179

191.63

155.10 194.08 176.68

225

63

"

Italian Convent English Division (Girls),

177

165

166.23

150.51

171.27 160.38

230

64

"

""

Portuguese (Girls),

""

65

??

Bridges Street Portuguese School

(Mixed),

129

112

117.50

77.80

121.00 103.33

254

85889

66

"

67

68

69

* * *

>>

St. Francis Portuguese School (Mixed), Victoria Portuguese School (Mixed),

34

26

28

20

English

59

39

"

(Boys), ...

92

51

99

""

"

(Girls),

31

19

28.80 23.74 15.27 24.66 20.74 80.47 50.00 73.50 67.52 29.23 18.00 26.41 24.35

19.77 31.58 26.21

247

264

260

262

291

292

NAME OF SCHOOL.

Class of School.

No. of Scholars Pre-

sented.

No. of Scholars Exam-

ined.

Standard I.

Standard II.

Standard III.

Standard IV.

Standard V.

Standard VI.

Standard I.

Standard II.

Standard III.

Standard IV.

Standard V.

Standard VI.

Total Passed.

Total Failed.

Passed.

ance during School Year.

Average Daily Attend-

Standard I.

Standard III.

Standard II.

TABLE XIII-RESULTS of the EXAMINATION of the GRANT-IN-AID SCHOOLS in 1889, under the provisions of the Scheme of 15th September, 1883.

Number of Scholars who

No. of Scholars who Failed.

1.- American Board Mission, Bridges Street (Boys),

82

81

2

45

13

1

*-*

爷爷

3.-

4.-

+

5.—

Station Terrace, (Boys),

36

86

6. 24

6

"

11

11

Hinglung Lane, (Boys),.

67

65

2 | 48

14

Queen's Road West, (Boys), Háwán, (Girls),

53

51

5

33

14

14

1

2

5

8 8

6.-Basel Mission, Shia:ushuipo, (Boys),

21

8.-C. M. S., St. Stephen's I Division, (Boys),

20

19

4 4

3

Shaukiwán. (Boys),

14

13

5

6

70

87

46

9.

II

11

*

(Boys),

10

10

2

7

10

11

Lyndhurst Terrace, (Boys)...

47

47

9 19

0

11.-

19

Pottinger Street, (Boys),

45

45

9

25

4

::: Ni Nain0

2

8

6

61

20

2

2

12.-

""

Saiyingp'ún (Boys),

46

45

10 16

15

13.---

带着

St. Stephen's Baxter Memorial, (Girls),

26

26

12 9 2

Ci NAi Ai wimi:

:::::::

82.71

4 180

36

38.22

12

59

6

74.68

4 172

17

4

50.10 10

132

14

16.99

2

8

12

7

17.60

12

1

16 63

10

62

5

91.00

184

9

1

20.34

4

39

8

57.87 18

41

4

45.39 18 100

48

2

56.86

20

23

3

37.72 24

14.-

Lyndhurst Terrace. (Girls),

27

26

9

6

24

2

31.11

18

15.-

-31

Third Street, (Girls),..

36

36

8

14

32

40.16

12

16.-

**

Yaumáti, (Mixed),

28

24

15

22

29.76

17.

37

22. 23.- 24.--

20. 21.-

17

"

"

12

25.-

12

26.-

"

18.

"

Hunghòm, (Boys),

(Girls),

19.-F. E. S., Bonham Road, (Girls),.

High Street, (Girls),......... Queen's Road, (Girls), Hollywood Road, (Girls), Pottinger Street (Girls), Stanley School, (Girls),. Shaukiwán, (Girls)... Tokwáwán, (Girls),

27.-L. M. S., Hollywood Road (Boys),..

13

11

1

7

11

16.25

2

16

14

8

4

12

19.52 16

19

19

1

6

10

24.86

11

10

3

3

10

14.52

6

28

23

6

13

4

24

31.50

12

14

13

9

2

12

18.48

22

22

7

7

21

28.00

25

24

3

11

18

26.29

31

30

18

7

1

3

26

4

29.98

19

19

8

10

79

76

7

22

34

28.-

+3

Wántsai, (Boys),

70

65

4

25 24

29. 30.-

"

Yaumáti, (Boys).

56

51

23

12

"

Shekt'ongtsui (Boys),

52

47

4

17

23

31.-

12.

Saíyingp'ún I Division, (Boys),

68

67

6

28 23

I

30.-

37.

多多

35.-

33

*

19

38.-

+

39.-- 40.-

19

"

41.- 42.- 43.- 44.- 40.-

"

"+

46.-

32.-

33.-

34.-

19

II

"

(Boys),

67

65

3

27 26

Hunghom, (Boys).

36

32

3 17

9

Hospital Chapel, (Boys),

53

11 60

15

18

Shekt'ongtsui, (Girls),

19

18

3

10

5

Saiyingp'ún (Girls),

36

36

14

11 G

Kau-ü-fong, (Girls),.

Ship Street, (Girls),

Lower Lascar Row, (Girls),

Ci-hing Lane, (Girls),

Tanglungchau (Girls),

T'aipingshan Chapel, (Girls),

Aberdeen Street, (Girls),

Wántsai, (Girls),

Staunton Street, (Girls).

47.-R. C. Mission, Cathedral School (Boys),

69

66

13

20

19

34

27

4

9

6

3

17

17

6

5

2

31

30

15

12

37

35

4

19

5

43

43

22

10

4

35

33

10

13

4

58

57

12

:2

4

45

44

17

12

Saiyingp'ún Second Street East, (Girls),

17

16

G

4

17

17

12

48.

49.-

Bridges Street 'hinese School, (Girls), Hollywood Road, Charitable School, (Girls)..

57

57

18

14

17

49

49

16

2 15

50,-Wesleyan Mission, Spring Gardens, (Boys),

43

43

4

19

10

:་སལ་

12

4

51.-

"

Wellington Street (Boys).

51

46

5

17

13

4

52..-

(Girls),

33.-Basel Mission, High Street (Girls),

56.

" St. Stephen's Anglo-Chinese, (Boys),

64,- 65. 66.- 67.- 68.-

69,-

*

62.-

63.-

"

"

#

"

带索

"

54.-Berlin Mission (Girls),

55.-C. M. S. Victoria Home and Orphanage, (Girls),

57,--Diocesan Home and Orphanage, (Mixed), 58.-St. Paul's College Anglo-Chinese, (Boys), 59.-Hongkong Public School, (Boys), 60.-Hollywood Road Anglo-Chinese, (Girls),

61.-R. C. M., St. Joseph's College, Chinese Division, (Boys),

Italian Convent, English Division,

Bridges Street, Portuguese School, (Mixed),

St. Francis Chapel, Portuguese School, (Mixed),

Victoria, Portuguese School, (Mixed),.

European

"

(Boys),

Portuguese Division,

English

1

(Boys),

"

(Girls),

-EEE 2 2 2 2 BE E E ERER 2 2

22

21

1

14

3

III

67

67

18

15 15

12

III

24

22

++

1

III

30

30

[0

3 5

IV 97

96 58 18

10

19** *

3

3

8

:::::。i ALi WAT IN: NH: ::: AN: acomi

EN: N 2000: No com

18

74

59

41

10

15

2

::::::::::::::::::::::::

59

18

30

48

18

33

€2

22

13

27

28

37

30

52

37

15

15

58

49

31

39

18

67

2 20

Ni wasi meva i NNONEGUT

1

20.87

2

94.41

6

70.44

55.43

2 55.10

8

61.14

7

62.79

2

30.11

2

63.85

20.05

37.78

66.11

5

29.16

4

19.55

3 30.56

46.36

44.42

37.41

56.58

45.22

17.45

32.03

24

53.85

36

45.05

32

45.51

64.43

10

23.28

3

9

+

:

IV

IV

IV

IV

IV

IV

116

IV

IV 25

IV

IV.

IV

IV

55 3 28** *

57

39

37 36

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20∞o 20 o er

55 7

13

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2 2

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1 6 12

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1

1

1 4

2

1

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18

14

17

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89

25

81

23

17

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*-*-2 -

33 21

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7

7

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19

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87

9

52

3

88.64

42

36

I

40.74

102

28

8

45.10

8

30 7.67

49

4

53.45

98

18 176.68 54 184

87

2

160.38

198

168

3

42

73

103.33

138

104

15

2 26.21

1

20.74

30

δ

67,52

54

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17

24.35

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***************** :**2* :******

26

8

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73.43 108 105 120

348 114.47

128

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144

* * **** *

48 120

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24

24

32

8

24

16

16

32

20

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::::::::: E:::::::

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82

12

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BABESH: : HSCE:::::::::::

82.71

#52.71

18,60

334.02

83.50

250.52

38.22

182.22

9.66

172.56

43.14

120.42

74.68

534.68 17.74

79.23 816.94

237.71

50.10

246.10 13.04

58,26 233.06

174.80

20

6.00

16.99

136.09

7.26 129.73

82.43

97.30

17.60

71.40

3.79

67,81

16.95 50.86

16.63

56.63

3.00

53.83

13.41 4:1.22

91.00

379.00

20,09

358.81

80.73 269.18

20.34

52.34

2.77

49.57 12.30 37.18

57.87

223 87

11,87

212.00 53.00

159.00

45.39

211.39

11.20

200.19 50.05 150.14

20.86 246.86

13.08

233.78

58.44 175.51

12

13.50

37.72 143.22

7.59

135.63

33.91 101.72

18 15,00

31.11

171.11

9.07

40.51 162.04

121.53

22,50

40.16 258.66

13.71

61.24 244.95

183.71

14

15 00

29.76

164.76

8.73 156.03

39.01

117.02

16.25

64.25

3.41

15.21 60.84

45.63

1,50

19.52

59.02

3.13 55.89 13.97

41.92

3.00

24.86

226.86 12.02

214.84

53.71

161.13

4.50

14.52 74.02

#.92

70.10

17.52

52.58

9.00

9.00

18,00

6.00

13

26 19,50

10 15.00

::344

31.50 18.48 28.00 154.00

189,50 10,00 73.48

179.50 44.87

134.63

3.89 8.16 145.84

69.59

17.40

#2,19

36.46

109.38

26.29

125.29 6.64

118.65 29.66

29.98

149.48

20.87

105.87

88.99 7.92 141,56 35.39 106.17 5.61 100.26 25.06

204

88

91.41

100

144

48

8

68.

138

8

168

16

108 156

16

8

108

32

2

10.30

16

88 22.50

114

56

30

10 34,50

30

24

8 10.50

15

12 13.50

8

31.50

108 30

50

198 ::::28

30

12:::::::*2:

4

12.00 13

2 12.00 17

16 33.00

34

51.00

36 37,50

2

13.50

Grastontona::::::::

488.41 25.89

462,52 115.63

75.20 346.89

70.44

870.44 19.63 350.81

87.70 263.11

55.43

237.43 12.58

224.85 56.21 168.64

55.10

277.10 14.69

64.14

352.14

62.79

30.11

262.41 65.60 196.81 18.66 333.48 83.37 250.11 348.79 18.49 830.30 82.57 247.73 175.11 9.28 165.83

124.37 41.46

63.85

285.85

15.15

270,70 67.67 208.03

8

20.05

116,55

6.18

110.37 27.59 82.78

37.78

224.28 11.89

212.39 53.10 159.29

66:11

446.61

23.67

422.94 105.73

317.21.

29.16

166.66

8.83

157.83 39.46

118.37

19.55 91.05

4.83

86.22 21.55

64.67

30.56

206.06

10.02 195.14 48.78 146.36

46.36

189.36

10.01

179.32 44.83 134.49

44.42

195.42

10.36

46.26 185.06

138.80

37.41

210.41

11.15 199.26 49.81

149.45

56.58

408.58

21.65

386.93 96.73

290.20

45.22

823.72 17.16 306.56 76.64

229.92

17.45

48.98ti 2.60 46.38 11.59 34.79

32.93

70.93

114

53.85

393.85

3.76 20.87

372.98

8 24.00 19

45.05

362.05

67.17 16.79 93.24 19.19 342.86 85.71

50.38

279 74

257.15

45.51

197.51

10.47

187.04

46.76 140.28

64 43

252.43

13.38

239.05 59.76 179.29

26

12.00

23,28

138,28

7.33

104

22.50

73.43

718.93

38.10

130,95 680.83

32.74 98.21

170.21 510.62

34

7,50

23.66

228.16

12,09 216.07

22 22.50

35.27 300.77 15,94 284.83

54.02 162.05 71,21 213.62

4*

114,47 730.47 38.71 691.76 172.94 518.82

112

32

4.50

82*

88.64

87*

32*

40.74

14

16

2*

45.10

19.09

9*

16*

16

7.67

832.14 44.30 788.04 197.01 330.74 17.53 313.21 360.10

341.01 38.841

36.78 2.06

591.03 78.30 234.91.

53.45 443.45

336

84

176

34* 48* 172*

176.68 1,474.68

85.25 255.76 9.19 27.50 23.50 419.95 104.99 314.96 78.16 1,396.52 849.13 1,047.89

120 130

216

64

84

158

16*

9,00

160,881,345.38

71.31

1,274.07 318.52

955.55

50

92

25.50

16

24

9.00

24

103.33 26.21 20.74 102.74

878.83 189.21

46.58 10.03 10.22

832.25 208.06

179.18 182.52

624.19 44.79 124.39

45.63 136.89

28

64

30

8*

3* 28*

112

30

4.50

48*

:

67.52 390,52 20,70 369.82 02.45 277.37 24.35 298.85

2,709

* Extra subject. Reduction of 50 per cent. See C.S.O. 1895 of 1889. Reduction of 50 per cent. See C.S.O. 203 of 1890.

TOTAL,

15.84 283.01 70.75 212.26

.$19,785.72 1,018,60 18,737.12 4,684.18 14,052.9 1

Standard V.

Sums to which the School is entitled.

Needle Work.

Standard V1.

Very

Good.

Good.

es Fair.

Capitation Grant.

Total Grant earned in

1889.

Amount of Reduction.

Amount Payable.

Amount due to

Teacher.

Amount due to

Manager.

No.

TABLE XIV. PERCENTAGE of SCHOLARS, who passed in the GRANT-IN-AID SCHOOLS during the last two Years.

293

Name of School.

1889.

1888.

Increase.

Decrease.

1 American Board Mission, Bridges Street (Boys),

75.30

90.00

14.70

2

"

""

Station Terrace (Boys),.

100.00

87.00

13.00

3

Hinglung Lane (Boys),

80.76

94.34

13.58

""

Queen's Road West (Boys),

92.15

82.05

10.10

.་

6

7

8

9

10

دو

"

2)

""

Basel Mission, Shamshuipò (Boys),

C. M. S., St. Stephen's I Division (Boys),

""

Lyndhurst Terrace (Boys),

Háwán (Girls),

100.00

78.26

21.74

63.15

57.89

5.26

Shaukiwán (Boys),

92.30

85.71

6.59

92.53

98.08

5.55

II

(Boys),.

90.00

61.53

28.47

85.10

88.67

3.57

11

>

Pottinger Street (Boys),

91.02

80.48

10.54

12

""

Saiyingp'ún (Boys),

95.55

95.00

0.55

13

St. Stephen's Baxter Memorial (Girls),

100.00

95.45

4.55

14

Lyndhurst Terrace (Girls),

92.30

65.00

27.30

15

Third Street (Girls),

88.88

90.47

1.59

16

*

Yaumáti (Mixed),

91.66

93.55

1.89

17

18

>>

Hunghòm (Boys),

19 F. E. S., Bouham Road (Girls),

100.00

90.00

10.00

(Girls),

85.71

100.00

14.29

100.00

70.59

29.41

20

37

High Street (Girls),

100.00

55.55

44.45

21

>

Queen's Road (Girls)...

85.71

100.00

14.29

22

""

Hollywood Road (Girls),

92.30

99.99

7.69

23

""

Pottinger Street (Girls),

95.45

100.00

4.55

24

>>

Stanley School (Girls),

75.00

96.30

21.30

25

"

Shaukiwán (Girls),.

86.66

91.30

4.64

26

Tòkwáwán (Girls),

94.73

27 L. M. S., Hollywood Road (Boys),

97.36

96.25

1.11

28

""

Wántsai (Boys),

90.76

92.95

2.19

29

"

Yaumáti (Boys),

80.39

90.00

9.61

30

""

Shekt'ongtsui (Boys),

95.74

85.18

10.56

31

"J

Saiyingp'ún I Division (Boys),..

88.05

93.29

5.24

32

II

(Boys),..

89.23

98.21

8.98

33

Huughòm (Boys),

93.75

100.00

6.25

34

"

Hospital Chapel (Boys),

96.00

90.00

6.00

35

27

Shekt'ongtsui (Girls),..

100.00

100,00

36

"

37

""

38

*

Saiyingp'ún (Girls),

Kau-ü-fong (Girls),

Ship Street (Girls),

91.66

97.00

...

5.34

93.93

81.03

12.90

81.48

94.00

12.52

39

""

Lower Lascar Row (Girls),

76.47

53.33

23.14

40

"

Ui-hing Lane (Girls),..

90.00

41

""

Tanglungchau (Girls),

80.00

85,00

5.00

42

"

Táip'ingshán Chapel (Girls),

86.04

73.70

12.34

43

Aberdeen Street (Girls),

90.90

100.00

9.10

44

Wántsai (Girls),

91.22

90.90

0.32

45

19

Staunton Street (Girls),.............

84.09

90.10

6.01

46

""

Saiyingp'ún Second Street East (Girls),

93.75

47 R. C. M., Cathedral School (Boys),

88.23

72.41

15.82

48

49

""

Bridges Street, Chinese School (Girls), Hollywood Road, Charitable School (Girls), 50 Wesleyan Mission, Spring Gardens (Boys),..

92.98

83.78

9.20

100.00

97.06

2.94

79.06

86.50

7.44

""

""

54 Berlin Mission (Girls),

51

52

""

53 Basel Mission, High Street (Girls),

55 C. M. S., Victoria Home and Orphanage (Girls),

Wellington Street (Boys),.

84.79

91.48

6.69 ..

(Girls),.

85.71

100.00

14.29

100.00

100.00

90.90

81.48

9.42

96.66

100.00

3.34

56

""

St. Stephen's Táip'ingshán Anglo-Chinese (Boys),

90.62

57 Diocesan Home and Orphanage (Mixed),

94.54

90.00

4.54

58 St. Paul's College, Anglo-Chinese (Boys), 59 Hongkong Public School (Boys),

97.29

92.10

5.19

77.77

72.72

5.05

60 Hollywood Road Anglo-Chinese (Girls),...

100.00

61 R. C. M., St. Joseph's College, Chinese Division (Boys),

92.45

92.59

0.14

62

15

63

""

64

"7

""

65

.67

8898

66

"

Italian Convent, English Division (Girls),

Bridges Street, Portuguese School (Mixed), St. Francis, Portuguese School (Mixed), Victoria, Portuguese School (Mixed),

European

""

(Boys);.

84.48

99.09

14.61

97.75

93.61

4.14

Portuguese

"2

(Girls),

88.00

90.12

91.04

0.92

88.23

100.00

11.77

95.24

95.55

.......

0.31

68

"

English

69

29

>>

(Boys), (Girls),

85.71

83.33

94.44

75.00

2.38 19.44

1

:

294

Table XV.—PERCENTAGE of PASSES in the various subjects in which the GRANT-IN-AID SCHOOLS

were examined in 1889.

Class of

School.

Name of School.

Writing Reading. or Com- position.

Arith- Gram- Geogra- metic. mar. phy.

History.

Repeti- Expla- Compo- tion. nation. sition.

I.

American Board Mission, Bridges Street (Boys),.

87.65 51.85

20.00

100.00 88.00 20.00

"

**

*

"

"

"

>>

"}

"

33

Station Terrace (Boys), Hing-lung Lane (Boys), Queen's Road West (Boys). Háwán (Girls),

100.00 77.77

100.00 100.00

.A.

86.15 86.15

96.92

98.04

70.58

100.00

100.00

100.00

100.00

100.00

100.00

100.00

>

""

་་

爷爷

37

Basel Mission, Shamshuipò (Boys),

C. M. S., St. Stephen's I Division (Boys),

Lyndhurst Terrace (Boys),

90.00

84.21

100.00

100.00

100.00

50.00

Shaukiwán (Boys),

100.00 70.00

100.00

100.00

100.00

100.00 44.44

98.30 100.00

100.00

II

(Boys),

100.00 80.00

100.00

100.00 82.97

60.00

100.00

33.33

13

Pottinger Street (Boys),

100.00

89.13

60.00

100.00 100.00

100.00

39

*

Saiyingp'un (Boys).

100.00

93.33

100.00

100.00 100.00 100.00

""

"

St. Stephen's Baxter Memorial (Girls)..

100.00

92.30

100.00

100.00 100.00

77

>;

Lyndhurst Terrace (Girls).

100.00 73.07

100.00

100.00

100.00

**

"

53

Third Street (Girls),

100.00

80.55

100.00

100.00

100.00

"

>>

"

""

"

Yaumáti (Mixed),

Hunghòm (Boys),

(Girls),

F. E. S., Bonham Road (Girls),

96.00

62.50

100.00

87.50

100.00 81.81

100.00 100.00

100.00

78.57

100.00 100.00

100.00

94.72

100.00

100.00 100.00 100.00

"J

""

High Street (Girls),

100.00 100.00

100.00 100.00

Queen's Road (Girls).

100.00

78.57

100.00

??

1:

33

"

Hollywood Road (Girls),

100.00

92.30

100.00 100.00 100.00

100.00

""

"

Pottinger Street (Girls),.

100.00

90.90

100.00

100.00 100.00

11

**

Stanley School (Girls),

91.66 54.16

66.66

100.00 100.00

Shaukiwán (Girls),

96.66 83.33

***

100.00

100.00

...

19

T'òkwáwán (Girls),

100.00 89.47

100.00

"

"

"9

"

""

CJ

""

"

L. M. S., Hollywood Road (Boys),

Wántsai (Boys),

Yaumáti (Boys),

Shekt'ongtsui (Boys).

Saiyingpun I Division (Boys),

100.00 98.68

100.00

100.00

100.00 91.66

98.46 76.92

100.00

100.00

96.07

72.54

33.33

98.03

100.00 100.00

95.85

93.61

100.00

100.00

100.00 100.00

97.01

91.01

60.00

98.50

100.00 80.00

II

"

3

>>

(Boys),

100.00

78.46

100.00

100.00

100.00

53

*

Hunghom (Boys).

96.87

20.00

100.00

100.00

100.00

100.00

-99

39

Hospital Chapel (Boys),

100.00

98.00

100.00

100.00 100.00

66.66

>>

*

Shekt'ongtsui (Girls),

100.00 88.88

100.00 100.00

**

**

Saiyingp'ún (Girls), ·

100.00

83.33

100.00

100.00 100.00

.,

""

Kan-ü-fong (Girls),

98.55

97.10

91.66

100.00

100.00

""

33

Ship Street (Girls),

88.88 85.18

75.00

.100.00

100.00

Lower Lascar Row (Girls),

100.00 76.47

100.00

100.00

100.00

3.

"

"

Ui-hing Lane (Girls),

96.66 83.33

93.33 100.00

...

35

33

Tanglungchau (Girls),

91.42

80.00

Failed

100.00

100.00

T'aipingshan Chapel (Girls).

100.00

74.41

100.00

100.00

90.90 100.00

19

Aberdeen Street (Girls),

100.00 87.87

100.00

100.00

100.00

Wántsai (Girls),.

100.00 71.92

100.00

100.00

95.45

++

Staunton Street, (Girls),

100.00

61.36

100.00

100.00

100.00

""

Saiyingp'un, Second Street East (Giris),

93.75

100.00

100.00

100.00

100.00

"

R. C. M., Cathedral School (Boys).................

100.00

52.35

100.00

100.00 100.00

Failed

"

"

>>

፡፡

>>

29

"

(Girls),

!

IV.

""

99

A

-19

St. Paul's College Anglo-Chinese (Boys), Hongkong Public School (Boys).

Bridges Street, Chinese School (Girls),... Hollywood Road, Charitable School (Girls), Wesleyan Mission, Spring Gardens (Boys),

Wellington Street (Boys),

"

III. Basel Mission, High Street (Girls),

Berlin Mission (Girls),

C. M. S., Victoria Home and Orphanage (Girls),

St. Stephen's T'aip'ingshán Ang.-Ch. (Boys),

Diocesan Home and Orphanage (Mixed),

∙ 100.00

100.00 89.09 100.00 83.78 97.30 85.71 71.42

100.00

93.00

100.00

100.00 100.00

100.00

100.00

100.00

100.00

100.00

88.37

69.76

66.66

100.00 100.00 66.66

93.47

82.60

100.00

100.00

80.95

57.14

100.00

100.00 100.00

87.50

100.00 100.00

100.00

100.00

97.65 100.00

100.00

87.47

77.27

100.00

100.00 100.00

100.00 100.00

96.66

100.00

100.00

100.00

95.83

88.54

100.00

100.00

100.00

100.00 100,00 100.00

90.90

100.00 83.36 63.88

71.42 75.00 100.00

13

""

Hollywood Road, Anglo-Chinese (Girls), R.C.M., St. Joseph's College Chinese Division (Boys),

100.00

98.11

100.00 100.00

79.24 100.00 88.88

"

**

European

(Boys),

100.00

"

>:

Italian Convent, English Division (Girls),

100.00

.་

::

Portuguese Division (Girls),

Bridges Street, Portuguese School (Mixed), St. Francis' Portuguese School (Mixed).

Victoria, Portuguese School (Mixed),

100.00

::

>:

35

>>

English School (Boys),

#

(Girls),

100.00 100.00

100.00 81.48

100.00 100.00

93.10 96:20 92.00 100.00 100.00 88.88

100.00 100.00 76.47 90.47 85.71 86.66 100.00 88.88 88.00 .100.00

93.96 100.00 84.90 100.00 94.38 100.00 100.00 88.00 100.00 100.00 82.22 100.00 66.66 100.00 50.00

92.00

100.00

100.00

100.00

100.00

100.00

97.50

TABLE XVI.-NUMBER ́ of UNEDUCATED CHILDREN in the Colony in 1889.

Number of Scholars of local school-age (6 to 16 years) in the Colony in 1889, (about 9 per cent.

of the population roughly estimated at 220,000), say,

Number of Scholars attending Public Schools under Government in 1889, Number of Scholars attending Private Schools in 1889,

19,800

7,659 2,022

9,681

10,119

Number of Uneducated Children in the Colony in 1889, about......

E. J. EITEL, M.A., Ph. D., Inspector of Schools,

1

251

No.

12

90.

HONGKONG.

DESPATCH RESPECTNG ESTIMATES OF REVENUE AND

EXPENDITURE FOR 1890.

Presented to the Legislative Council, by Command of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government.

HONG KONG.

SIR,

No. 67.

DOWNING STREET,

18 April, 1890.

I have had under consideration the Estimates of the Revenue and Expenditure of Hong Kong for 1890 which accompanied Sir GEORGE DES VEUX's despatch No. 391 of the 24th of December last.

2. Subject to the reservations contained in the following remarks, I approve of the proposed expenditure.

3. In his Despatch No. 326 of the 21st of November 1888, Sir GEORGE DES Vœux enclosed a scheme by the Head Master of the Central School according to which considerable additions would be made to the salaries of his staff. Sir GEORGE DES Vœux stated that he was not prepared to adopt this scheme without consulting me, and added that he hesitated to put' the salaries at the figures suggested. In reply I requested him to make recommendations on the subject after consultation with the Executive Council. It now appears that Mr. WRIGHT'S scheme has been practically adopted en bloc. In the absence of any explanation, I can only conclude that after due deliberation and consultation with the Executive Council, Sir GEORGE DES VEUX's hesitation as to adopting Mr. WRIGHT's scheme was removed, and that the salaries now proposed are not considered more than sufficient for securing the services of competent masters. On that understanding I approve of these increases. The salaries affected will of course be thus removed from the operation of any general scheme of increase which may be adopted on account of a rise in the cost of living in the Colony.

4. Under the Head of Works and Buildings, I observe an increase of the vote for Repairs from $21,000 to $25,000. This I presume is in consequence of the damage done by the great rain-storm. But whatever the cause may be it should have been stated in the notes, the increase being a considerable one. The increases for maintenance of water works" and for "Miscellaneous Works" are even greater in proportion to the total amount and deserve some words of explanation.

5. The preceding remark applies equally to the increase of the item for "Local Police Telegraph services" under the head "Miscellaneous" and to that for "Printing Forms and Documents for all Departments."

6. A very large proportion of the total proposed increase of ordinary expen- diture, (indeed nearly one half), is under the Surveyor General's Department. SIR GEORGE DES VEUX appears to have practically embodied in the Estimates the staff proposed in his Despatch No. 234 of the 27th of July last. This would account for something like $16,000 or $17,000 out of the total increase of $24,482.

The Officer Administering the Government of

HONGKONG.

:

252

The remainder consists apparently of increases to subordinate officers, such as overseers and clerks, and the creation of new offices of like nature. In regard to these latter offices, I have no alternative to accepting the Surveyor General's re- commendations as endorsed by the Governor in Council. But with respect to the offices which formed the subject of Sir GEORGE DES VEUX's Despatch No. 234 of 27 July 1889, and my reply No. 243 of 28 December, I reserve approval of the present Estimates pending the consideration of the further Report on the subject from Mr. BROWN, which in the last mentioned Despatch I requested Sir GEORGE DES Vœux to procure.

7. With regard to Mr. BROWN's own salary, I notice that Sir GEORGE DES Vœux considers that in the present circumstances of the Department a salary of £1,000 by which I presume is meant $6,660 is sufficient for the Surveyor General, and he only recommends a salary of $7,992 in consideration of Mr. BROWN having been led to expect a salary of £1,200 before he left Cyprus. With respect to this consideration I have only to refer to the last paragraph of my Despatch No. 170 of the 30th of August last, and looking to the fact that $6,660 will, even if the rate of exchange does not rise, be an increase of more than £200 on the rate of salary paid to Mr. BROWN in Cyprus, subsequently to his appointment there being changed from a temporary to a pensionable one, I am not prepared to sanction a larger salary than this amount.

8. Turning to the Estimates of Expenditure on extraordinary works, I am somewhat at a loss, owing to the absence of information and the existence of some apparent discrepancies between the statement furnished by the Acting Auditor General, and the corresponding statement by the Auditor General in connection with the Estimates for last year. The works which appeared in the last named statement are now omitted, viz. the Slaughter House Sulphur Channel estimated to cost $50,000 of which according to the Surveyor General's statement $500 has probably been spent, and the Police Buildings extension, estimated to cost $135,000 of which $42,188 had been spent up to 31st December 1887.

9. It is not stated whether the one new District School and the two Public Latrines now estimated for, are to take the place of the 5 Schools and 12 Latrines put down in last Estimates. If the Colony is committed to building the larger number, they should have appeared in the Statement although only the cost of those which could be built within the year would be included in the Votes. Again the Estimate for the Cattle Market Extension and new sheep and pig market, is $20,000 and a vote for the whole of this is taken, although $1,530 is said to have been spent before the 31st December 1888. Similarly the entire estimate for the Filter bed at Pokfoolum, viz., $35,500 is inserted although $4,000 were spent in 1889.

10. I notice a large increase in some of the Estimates of the total cost of works-that for the new Central Market was raised and more than doubled before Mr. BROWN's appointment, but he has revised and increased those for Hospital quarters from $43,000 to $75,000, Laundries from $20,000 to $25,000, Police Station Aberdeen from $20,000 to $25,000, The Epidemic Hospital Hulk from $30,000 to $50,000.

On the other hand there is no vote for a new Gaol, the necessity of which has been repeatedly impressed upon the Hong Kong Government.

11. I do not wish to imply any doubt that the Colony, provided the Revenue continues to remain expansive, can afford to construct in a substantial way many public works of which there is pressing necessity, but the way in which the Esti- mates have been framed of late years seems to indicate a tendency to initiate numerous works on a perhaps unnecessarily liberal scale, without due regard to the capabilities of the Public Works Department, the relative importance of the works, and the possibility of defraying the total expenditure to which the Colony will thus be ultimately committed.

253

12. I shall be glad to receive at an early date an accurate statement showing all the public works which are in contemplation with the estimated cost of each, the amount spent on each up to the 31st of December last, and the amount which it may reasonably be expected that the Public Works Department will be able to spend on each during the year. I need scarcely point to the futility of placing on the Estimates sums largely in excess of the powers of that Department to make use of. The statement requested should include details and explanations of the item. for "Sanitary Works" which was originally $1,500,000 (of which about $500,000 has been spent), and as to which no information has ever reached me.

The public works to which the Colony is actually committed should be distinguished, and a statement made as to the comparative urgency of all. It seems that even if funds are forthcoming it will take many years to carry out the programme now contein- plated, and unless some works are altogether postponed others of pressing necessity must be delayed.

13. Pending the receipt of the information above asked for, I limit my appro- val to those works to which the Colony is already committed, and to those which are deemed to be of urgent necessity.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient

humble Servant,

KNUTSFORD.

P.S.-I have to add that if it should be decided that any general increase of salaries should be given in Hong Kong and the rate of exchange for drawing salaries on leave and pensions in this country be lowered as a condition of the increased salary, (as has been proposed in similar circumstances at the Straits Settlements), the same condition will be applied to the increases of salary to the Schoolmasters and the Surveyor General sanctioned in the present Despatch.

No. 1.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 15th January, 1890.

93

C.S.0.

PRESENT :

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (A. LISTER), Chairman. the Acting Attorney General, (ANDREW JOHN Leach).

2987 of 1889.

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the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (HENRY ERNEST WODEHOUSE, C.M.G.). the Captain Superintendent of Police, (WALTER MEREDITH DEANE). the Surveyor General, (SAMUEL Brown).

PHINEAS RYRIE.

WONG SHING.

ALEXANDER PALMER MACEWEN.

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK, (vice the Honourable JOHN BELL-IRVING).

The Committee meet at the invitation of the Acting Colonial Secretary.

(1.) Read the following Minute by His Excellency the Governor :-

G. WILLIAM DES VOUX.

The Governor recommends the Council to re-vote the sum of Two thousand one hundred 82,187, and Eighty-seven Dollars, being the balance remaining on the vote of 1889 for Roads in

Kowloon.

C.S.O.

500 of 1880.

Government House, Hongkong, 3rd January, 1890.

After explanation by the Surveyor General, the Committee recommend that the amount be voted.

(2.) Read the following Minute by His Excellency the Governor :~~~ G. WILLIAM DES VŒUX.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote the sum of Two hundred and Fifty Dollars, $60. being a grant to Mr. BRUCE SHEPHERD for the compilation and printing of an Index to Streets

numbers of Houses and Description of Leased Lots of the City of Victoria.

Government House, Hongkong, 3rd January, 1890.

After explanation by the Acting Colonial Secretary, deliberation ensues, when Mr. RYRIE proposes and Mr. MACEWEN seconds, that in addition to the above vote a gratuity of Two hundred and Fifty Dollars be recommended for Mr. BRUCE SHEPHERD for this extra work.

The Committee unanimously recommend accordingly.

The Committee is then adjourned sine die.

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 12th February, 1890.

Read and confirmed on the 12th February, 1890.

ARATHOON SETH,

Clerk of Councils.

F. FLEMING,

Chairman.

-5

No. 2.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 12th February, 1890.

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (FRANCIS FLEMING, C.M.G.), Chairman.

the Acting Attorney General, (ANDREW JOHN LEACH).

>>

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the Captain Superintendent of Police, (WALTER MEREDITH DEANE). the Surveyor General, (SAMUEL BROWN).

95

C.S.O.

""

PHINEAS RYRIE.

WONG SHING.

ALEXANDER PALMER MACEWEN.

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

ABSENT:

The Honourable the Colonial Treasurer, (ALFRED LISTER).

2433 of 1889.

$766.

C.S.O.

370 of 1890.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK, (vice the Honourable JOHN BELL-IRVING).

The Committee meet at the request of the Colonial Secretary.

The Minutes of the last Mecting, held on the 15th ultimo, having been taken as read, are confirmed.

(1.) Read the following Minute by His Excellency the Governor :-

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

(1.)

The Governor recommends the Council to vote the sum of Seven hundred and Sixty-six Dollars for general overhaul and repairs to Health Officer's Steam-launch Blanche, and addi- tional repairs to boiler, and providing a launch while the repairs are being executed.

Government House, Hongkong, 3rd February, 1890.

After explanation by the Colonial Secretary, the Committee recommend that the amount be voted.

(2.) Read the following Minute by His Excellency the Governor :-

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

(2.)

The Governor recommends the Council to vote the sum of Twenty-seven thousand Dollars $27,000. for supplying the Peak District with water, viz.:-Laying pipes, Steam engine, Hydraulic

Motor and Pumps, Buildings, &c.

Government House, Hongkong, 12th February, 1890.

After explanation by Mr. OSBERT CHADWICK, C.M.G., who is present by special invitation, the Committee recommend that the amount be voted.

(3.) Read the following Minute by His Excellency the Governor :—

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

(3.)

C. O. Desp. General

1889.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote the sum of Twelve thousand Dollars 25th Nov for illuminating the Public buildings, arranging for the visit to Canton, entertainment at

$12,000. Government House, and other incidental expenses connected with the visit to the Colony of

Their Royal Highnesses THE DUKE AND DUCHESS OF ConnaughT.

Government House, Hongkong, 12th February, 1890.

After explanation by the Colonial Secretary, the Committee recommend that the amount be voted.

96

C.S.O.

2463 of 1889,

(4.) Read the following Minute by His Excellency the Governor :-

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

(4.)

The Governor recommends the Council to vote the sum of Thirty-seven thousand Two $37,275.48. hundred and Seventy-five Dollars, and Forty-eight cents for the purchase of twelve Maxim

Nordenfeldt Guns, and Ammunition, for the Volunteers.

Government House, Hongkong, 12th February, 1890.

After explanation by the Captain Superintendent of Police, the Committee recommend that the amount be voted.

The Committee is then adjourned sine die.

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 5th March, 1890.

Read and confirmed on the 5th March, 1890.

ARATHOON SETH,

Clerk of Councils.

W. M. DEANE,

Chairman.

No. 3.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 5th March, 1890.

97

Mis. Serv.

$209. C.S.O.

363 of 1890.

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (WALTER MEREDIth Deane).

the Acting Attorney General, (ANDREW JOHN Leach).

22

")

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the Surveyor General, (SAMUEL Brown).

the Acting Registrar General, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES, vice the

Honourable WALTER MEREDITH DEANE).

ALEXANDER PALMER MACEWEN.

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK, (vice the Honourable JOHN BELL-IRVING). HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

ABSENT:

The Honourable the Colonial Treasurer, (ALFRED LISTER).

";

PHINEAS RYRIE.

The Committee meet at the request of the Acting Colonial Secretary.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 12th ultimo, having been taken as read, are confirmed.

(1.) Read the following Minute by His Excellency the Officer Administering the Govern-

ment:

F. FLEMING.

(1.)

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote the sum of Two hundred and Nine Dollars, as a gratuity to the daughter of the late Mr. J. CARNEIRO, in consideration of his 15 years' good service as Wardmaster in the Civil and Small-pox Hospitals. Mr. CARNEIRO was invalided and applied for pension, but did not live to enjoy it, as he died a few days after it was sanctioned.

The above sum is equivalent to One year's pension of the deceased.

Government House, Hongkong, 25th February, 1890.

After explanation by the Acting Colonial Secretary, the Committee recommend that the amount be voted.

(2.) Read the following Minute by His Excellency the Officer Administering the Govern-

ment:

F. FLEMING.

(2.)

Mis. Serv.

C.S.O.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote the sum of 459 of 1890. Fifty Pounds Sterling as remuneration to Colonel BEAUMONT for his report on the proposed

removal of the Bokhara rocks,

£50.

also

$100. One hundred dollars for the cost of his stay in Hongkong.

Government House, Hongkong, 26th February, 1890.

After deliberation, the Committee recommend that the papers be circulated for the perusal of Honourable Members.

The Committee is then adjourned sine die.

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 12th March, 1890.

Read and confirmed on the 12th March, 1890.

ARATHOON SETH,

Clerk of Councils.

W. M. DEANE,

Chairman.

:

No. 4.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 12th March, 1890.

99

C.S.O.

342 of 1890.

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (WALTER MEREDITH DEANE), Chairman. the Acting Attorney General, (ANDREW JOHN LEACH).

,

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>>

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the Colonial Treasurer, (ALFRED LISTER).

the Surveyor General, (SAMUEL BROWN).

the Acting Registrar General, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES, vice the

Honourable WALTER MEREDITH DEANE).

PHINEAS RYRIE.

ALEXANDER PALMER MACEWEN.

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK, (vice the Honourable JOHN BELL-IRVING). Ho KAI, M.B., C.M.

The Committee meet at the request of the Acting Colonial Secretary.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 5th instant, having been taken as read, are confirmed.

Read the following Minutes by His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government :-

F. FLEMING.

(1.)

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote the sum of $90. Ninety Dollars, as an allowance for a Chinese teacher to the Head Mistress of the Central

School for Girls at $10 per month from 1st April to 31st December, 1890.

Government House, Hongkong, 11th March, 1890.

C. O. Desp. 2 of 1890.

F. FLEMING.

(2.)

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote the sum of $3,000. Three thousand Dollars, being an increase to the salary of the Attorney General, from $4,800 to $7,800 per annum, who will not be allowed private practice or receive fees in connection with the Registration of Trade Marks or fees for any other service, these fees will revert to the Treasury.

C.S.O.

295 of 1890.

$735.

Government House, Hongkong, 11th March, 1890.

F. FLEMING.

(3.)

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote the sum of Seven hundred and Thirty-five Dollars, for the employment of an Inspector of Nuisances for Kowloon district. From 1st April to 31st December, 1890, viz. :-

Salary at $60 per month,

Lodging allowance at $15 per month,

Chair Coolies at $12 per month, for 5 months in summer,

Government House, Hongkong, 11th March, 1890.

$ 540.00

135.00

60.00

$

735.00

After explanation by the Acting Colonial Secretary, the Committee recommend that the amounts be voted.

The Committee is then adjourned sine die.

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 19th March, 1890.

Read and confirmed on the 19th March, 1890.

F. A. HAZELAND, Acting Clerk of Councils.

W. M. DEANE,

Chairman.

+

No. 5.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 19th March, 1890.

101

C.S.O.

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (WALTER MEREDITH DEANE), Chairman.

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

519 of 1889.

C.O. Desp. 744 of 1888, and

226 of 1889.

Mis. Serv.

C.S.0.

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALFred Lister.)

""

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the Surveyor General, (SAMUEL BROWN).

""

27

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the Acting Registrar General, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES, vice the

Honourable WALTER MEREDITH DEANE).

PHINEAS RYRIE.

ALEXANDER PALMER MACEWEN.

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK, (vice the Honourable JOHN BELL-Irving).

Ho KAI, M.B., C.M.

The Committee meet at the request of the Acting Colonial Secretary.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 12th instant, having been taken as read, are confirmed.

(1.) Read the following Minute by His Excellency the Officer Administering the Govern-

ment:

F. FLEMING.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote the sum of Eight thousand and Five hundred Dollars to complete the sum of $58,500, the cost of building an Epidemic Hospital Hulk.

Amount of Contract.

Voted as Extraordinary Expenditure for 1890,

To be voted,..

.$58,500 50,000

$ 8,500

Government House, Hongkong, 13th March, 1890. After explanation by the Acting Colonial Secretary, the Committee recommend that the amount be voted.

ment

(2) Read the following Minute by His Excellency the Officer Administering the Govern-

F. FLEMING.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote the sum of Seven hundred and Twenty Dollars being additional Salary to the Assistant Harbour Master, from $1,920 to $2,640, who will not draw any pay as Collector of Light Dues, while any fees for examination of Masters and Mates in the Mercantile Marine, will be paid into the Treasury.

Government House, Hongkong, 19th March, 1890.

After deliberation, the Committee recommend that the amount be voted.

(3.) Read the following Minute by His Excellency the Officer Administering the Govern-

ment :-

F. FLEMING.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote the sum of 452 of 1890. Fifty Pounds Sterling as remuneration to Colonel BEAUMONT for his report on the proposed

removal of the Bokhara rocks,

£50.

also

$100. One hundred dollars for the cost of his stay in Hongkong.

Government House, Hongkong, 26th February, 1890.

After deliberation the Committee recommend that the amount be voted.

102

C.S.O.

19 of 1890.

(4.) Read the following Minute by His Excellency the Officer Administering the Govern-

ment :-

F. FLEMING.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote the sum of Thirty-four thousand Dollars for the purchase of Inland Lot No. 598 with the premises erected thereon, for use as a Police Station in lieu of No. 8 Station at Taipingshan.

Government House, Hongkong, 10th March, 1890.

After deliberation the Committee recommend that the papers be circulated for the perusal of Honourable Members.

The Committee is then adjourned sine die.

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 26th March, 1890.

Read and confirmed on the 9th April, 1890.

F. A. HAZELAND, Acting Clerk of Councils.

W. M. DEANE,

Chairman.

No. 6.

103

C.S.0.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

5

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 9th April, 1890.

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (WALTER MEREDITH DEANE), Chairman.

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

""

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the Colonial Treasurer, (ALFred Lister.)

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25

A

""

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the Surveyor General, (SAMUEL Brown).

the Acting Registrar General, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES, vice the

Honourable WALTER MEREDITH DEANE).

ALEXANDER PALMER MACEWEN.

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK, (vice the Honourable JOHN BELL-IRVing). Ho KAI, M.B., C.M.

The Honourable PHINEAS RYRIE.

294 of 1890.

C.S.O.

611 of 1890.

ABSENT:

The Committee meet at the request of the Acting Colonial Secretary.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 19th March, were read and confirmed.

Read the following Minutes by His Excellency the Officer Administering the Govern-

ment:

F. FLEMING.

(1.)

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote the sum of Nine hundred and Ninety-one Dollars, and Fifty-seven Cents ($991.57) being cost of repairing the Telegraph Cable between North Point and Kowloon-damaged by some vessel's anchor dragging various cables together and entangling them.

Government House, Hongkong, 28th March, 1890.

F. FLEMING.

(2.)

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote the sum of One thousand Nine hundred and Two Dollars, and Twenty-seven Cents ($1,902.27) to enable the Sanitary Board to pay the expenses incurred in suppressing the recent Cattle Epidemic.

The sum asked for is thus made up :-

Compensation for Cattle and Fodder destroyed,

Slaughtering and disposal of carcasses,

Disinfecting and cleansing sheds,

.$1,820.50

51.77 30.00

$1,902.27

Government House, Hongkong, 8th April, 1890.

F. FLEMING.

C.S.O. 19 of 1890.

(3.)

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote the sum of Thirty-four thousand Dollars ($34,000) for the purchase of Inland Lot No. 598 with the premises erected thereon, for use as a Police Station in lieu of No. 8 Station at Taipingshan.

Government House, Hongkong, 10th March, 1890.

After explanation by the Acting Colonial Secretary, the Committee recommend that the amounts be voted, and the purchase money in the Minute No. 3 be defrayed from premia on

land sales.

The Committee is then adjourned sine die.

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 29th April, 1890.

Read and confirmed on the 29th April, 1890.

F. A. HAZELAND,

Acting Clerk of Councils.

W. M. DEANE,

Chairman.

No. 7.

105

C.S.O.

628 of 1890.

C. O. Desp.

38 of 1890.

649 of 1897,

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 29th April, 1890.

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (WALTER MEREDITH DEANE), Chairman.

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

22

""

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALFRED LISTER).

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the Surveyor General, (SAMUEL Brown).

""

"

the Acting Registrar General, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES). ALEXANDER PALMER MACEWEN.

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK, (vice the Honourable JOHN BELL-IRVING). Ho KAI, M.B., C.M.

The Honourable PHINEAS RYRIE.

ABSENT:

The Committee meet at the request of the Acting Colonial Secretary.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 9th April, were read and confirmed. Read the following Minutes by His Excellency the Officer Administering the Govern-

ment:

F. FLEMING.

(1.)

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote the sum of Two hundred Dollars, ($200), for an additional Clerk, and Interpreter of Indian and Malay languages, at the Harbour Department, from 1st May next, at a salary of $25 per month.

Government House, Hongkong, 14th April, 1890.

F. FLEMING.

(2.)

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote the sum of One hundred and Twenty Dollars, ($120), for House Allowance to the Compradore of the General Post Office.

Government House, Hongkong, 14th April, 1890.

F. FLEMING.

!

(3.)

C.S.0. The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote the sum of Twenty-one Dollars and Seventy Cents, ($21.70), for the refund of the overcharged Municipal Rates at the erroneous valuation on two Tenements, Nos. 69 and 70, in the Village of Hok-Ün, in the Kaulung Peninsula.

C.S.O.

878 of 1890.

C.S.O. 654 of 1890.

Government House, Hongkong, 11th April, 1890.

F. FLEMING.

(4.)

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote the sum of One hundred and Sixty Dollars, ($160), for the salary of a Shroff in the Money Order Office, from 1st of May, at $20 per month.

Government House, Hongkong; 14th April, 1890.

F. FLEMING.

(5.)

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote the sum of Two hundred and Twenty-eight Dollars, ($228), as a gratuity to the Children of the late SOOPPRAMANI SOONDERAM, in consideration of his 25 years' service as Police Officer, Clerk and Interpreter in the Harbour Office.

Government House, Hongkong, 18th April, 1890.

106

(6.)

C.S.O.

969 of 1890.

F. FLEMING.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote the sum of One thousand Three hundred and Twenty-nine Dollars and Seventy-three Cents ($1,329.73) for new Moorings of the Bokhara Buoy, to be supplied from the stores of the Royal Naval Yard, (£205 @ 3/1=$1,329.73).

Government House, Hongkong, 24th April, 1890.

After explanation by the Acting Colonial Secretary, the Committee recommend that the amounts in Minutes Nos. 1, 3, 4, 5 and 6 be voted, and that the consideration of Minute No. 2 be adjourned.

The Committee is then adjourned sine die.

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 9th May, 1890.

Read and confirmed on the 9th May, 1890.

F. A. HAZELAND, Acting Clerk of Councils.

W. M. DEANE,

Chairman.

No. 9.

}

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 16th May, 1890.

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (WALTER MEREDITH DEANE), Chairman.

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

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"

the Surveyor General, (SAMUEL BROWN).

}}

""

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""

the Acting Registrar General, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES). PHINEAS RYRIE.

ALEXANDER PALMER MACEWEN.

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

JAMES JOHNStone Keswick.

""

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HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

ABSENT:

109

C.S.O. 589 of 1890.

The Honourable the Colonial Treasurer, (ALFRED LISTER).

The Committee meet at the request of the Acting Colonial Secretary.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 9th May, were read and confirmed.

Read the following Minute by His Excellency the Officer Administering the Govern-

ment:

F. FLEMING.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote the sum of Two thousand Three hundred and Thirty-four Dollars and One Cent, ($2,334.01), as an addi- tional sum to the vote of $12,000 passed by the Council on the 12th March, last, to meet expenses connected with the visit to the Colony of Their Royal Highnesses THE DUKE AND DUCHESS OF CONNAUGHT.

Government House, Hongkong, 9th May, 1890.

After explanation by the Acting Colonial Secretary, the Committee recommend that the amount in the above Minute be voted.

The Committee is then adjourned sine die.

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 30th May, 1890.

Read and confirmed on the 30th May, 1890.

F. A. HAZELAND, Acting Clerk of Councils.

W. M. DEANE,

Chairman.

:

No. 10.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG, On the 30th May, 1890.

111

C.S.O.

476 of 1890.

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (WALTER MEREDITH DEANE), Chairman.

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

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the Colonial Treasurer, (ALFRED LISTER).

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the Surveyor General, (SAMUEL BROWN).

">

3

the Acting Registrar General, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES). PHINEAS RYRIE.

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

ABSENT:

The Honourable ALEXANDER PALMER MACEWEN.

"

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

The Committee meet at the request of the Acting Colonial Secretary.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 16th May, having been taken as read are confirmed.

Read the following Minutes by His Excellency the Officer Administering the Govern-

ment:

F. FLEMING.

(1.)

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote the sum of Eight thousand Dollars, ($8,000), for works in the Wongneichung Valley, inside the Race Course.

Government House, Hongkong, 20th May, 1890.

F. FLEMING.

(2.)

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote the sum of Five hundred and Thirty-four Dollars, ($534), being additional sum required to defray the salaries and rations of Nursing Staff for the Civil Hospital, for six months of 1890, viz. :-

Additional Salaries:-

1 Head Nurse, 6 months,

5 Nurses, (one new), 6 months,

$

60.00

360.00

1 Amah, 6 months,

24.00

$ 444.00

Rations for one more Nurse, 6 months,.

90.00

534.00

Government House, Hongkong, 20th May, 1890.

F. FLEMING.

(3.)

C.S.O.

1833 of 1889.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote the sum of Two hundred and Thirty Dollars, and Eighty Cents, ($230.80), being expenses incurred in carrying out an experiment as to the possibility of successfully and economically cultivating in the Colony bovine vaccine lymph.

Government House, Hongkong, 21st May, 1890.

112

C.S.O.

986 of 1890.

F. FLEMING.

(4.)

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote the sum of Eight hundred and Seventy-five Dollars, ($875), for a compassionate allowance to Mrs. MAC- BEAN, widow of the late Bailiff and Hindustani Interpreter in the Supreme Court, being the equivalent of 7 months' salary of her late husband, who was in the service of the Colony for Twenty-three years, and gave great satisfaction in the discharge of his duties.

Government House, Hongkong, 27th May, 1890.

After explanation by the Acting Colonial Secretary, the Committee recommend that the amounts be voted.

The Committee is then adjourned sine die.

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 9th June, 1890.

Read and confirmed on the 9th June, 1890.

F. A. HAZELAND, Acting Clerk of Councils.

W. M. DEANE,

Chairman.

}

t

No. 11.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 9th June, 1890.

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (WALTER MEREDITH DEANE), Chairman.

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

23

""

the Surveyor General, (SAMUEL BROWN).

;;

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the Acting Registrar General, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES). PHINEAS RYRIE.

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

"}

Ho KAI, M.B., C.M.

ABSENT:

113

The Honourable the Colonial Treasurer, (ALFRED LISTER).

">

ALEXANDER PALMER MACEWEN.

The Committee meet at the request of the Acting Colonial Secretary.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 30th May, having been taken as read are confirmed.

Read the following Minutes by His Excellency the Officer Administering the Govern-

ment:

(1.)

C.S.O.

1247 of 1890.

F. FLEMING.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Four hundred and Twenty Dollars and Sixty-seven cents, ($420.67), for the salary of Musketry Instructor and Storekeeper of Police.

Half pay during the voyage, and full pay from the date of his arrival at $60 per month. From 10th April to 22nd May half pay.

From 23rd May to end of the year full pay.

Government House, Hongkong, 28th May, 1890.

F. FLEMING.

(2.)

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Five hundred dollars, ($500), for improving the drainage of Italian Convent.

Government House, Hongkong, 31st May, 1890.

F. FLEMING.

(3.)

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Sixty-three Dollars, ($63), as a compassionate allowance to the mother of the late Chinese Police Constable No. 265, KEUNG TIM, who served in the Police Force for upwards of 14 years.

The allowance to be equal to one month's pay for every three years of service. Government House, Hongkong, 4th June, 1890.

114

F. FLEMING.

(4.)

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Sixty Dollars, ($60), being additional salary to First Wardmaster in the Government Civil Hospital at $10 per month, for Six months of 1890.

The agreement being $70 per month for the first year, $80 per month for the second year, and $90 per month for the third year.

Government House, Hongkong, 5th June, 1890.

After explanation by the Acting Colonial Secretary, the Committee recommend that the amounts be voted.

The Committee is then adjourned sine die.

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 16th June, 1890.

Read and confirmed on the 16th June, 1890.

F. A. HAZELAND, Acting Clerk of Councils.

W. M. DEANE,

Chairman.

No. 12.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 16th June, 1890.

115

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (WALTER MEREDITH DEANE), Chairman.

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

"2

"}

""

the Surveyor General, (SAMUEL BROWN).

the Acting Registrar General, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES). PHINEAS RYRIE.

ALEXANDER PALMER MACEWEN.

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

ABSENT:

The Honourable the Colonial Treasurer, (ALFred Lister).

""

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

The Committee meet at the request of the Acting Colonial Secretary.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 9th June, having been taken as read are confirmed.

Read the following Minutes by His Excellency the Officer Administering the Govern-

ment:

(1.)

C. (). Desp. 31 of 1890.

C.S.O.

3306 of 1890.

F. FLEMING.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Three thousand Dollars, ($3,000), to cover the probable expenses of this year in connection with the proposed trigonometrical survey of Hongkong by Officers of the Royal Engineers.

The total probable cost will be about £3,000.

Government House, Hongkong, 7th June, 1890.

F. FLEMING.

(2.)

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Three thousand Dollars, ($3,000), being amount required to be expended in this year for the printing and binding of 200 copies of the new edition of Ordinances of Hongkong.

The total cost will be about $6,000.

Government House, Hongkong, 9th June, 1890.

After explanation by the Acting Colonial Secretary, the Committee recommend that the amounts be voted.

The Committee is then adjourned sine die.

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 23rd June, 1890.

Read and confirmed on the 23rd June, 1890.

F. A. HAZELAND, Acting Clerk of Councils.

W. M. DEANE,

Chairman.

No. 13.

117

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG;

On the 23rd June, 1890.

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (WALTER MEREDITH DEANE, C.M.G.), Chairman.

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM Meigh GOODMAN).

the Acting Registrar General, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES). PHINEAS RYRIE.

""

"

"}

the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (HENRY ERNEST WODEHOUSE, C.M.G.). the Surveyor General, (SAMUEL BROWN).

""

""

""

""

>>

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

ALEXANDER PALMER MACEWEN

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

ABSENT :

The Honourable CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

The Committee meet at the request of the Acting Colonial Secretary.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 16th June, having been taken as read are confirmed.

1

Read the following Minutes by His Excellency the Officer Administering the Govern-

ment:

F. FLEMING.

(1.)

C.S.O.

1366 and 173

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of of 1890. Five thousand Eight hundred and Forty-four Dollars and Twelve Cents, ($5,844.12), for the construction of a telegraph line between the Observatory at Kowloon and the Office of the Telegraph Company at Hongkong.

Also a separate line from Victoria Peak to Central Police Station to transmit meteoro- logical telegrams six times a day.

Cost of line, including submarine cable to Kowloon, (£900), Cost of Instruments for Kowloon,

Line from Peak to Police Station,.

$5,383.18 260.94

$ 5,644.12 200.00

$5,844.12

C.S.O.

1165 of 1890.

Government House, Hongkong, 14th June, 1890.

F. FLEMING.

(2.)

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Eighty-two Dollars and Sixty-six cents, ($82.66), for rent of 1st floor of a Chinese house occupied by Scavengers of the Central Market.

From 23rd March to 30th November, 1890, at $10 per month.

Government House, Hongkong, 19th June, 1890.

After explanation by the Acting Colonial Secretary, the Committee recommend that the amounts be voted.

The Committee is then adjourned sine die.

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 30th June, 1890.

Read and confirmed on the 30th June, 1890.

F. A. HAZELAND,

Acting Clerk of Councils.

W. M. DEANE,

Chairman.

י

}

No. 14.

C.S.O. 1511 of 1890.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 30th June, 1890.

119

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (WALTER MEREDITH DEANE, C.M.G.), Chairman.

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

>?

*2

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the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (HENRY ERNEST WODEHOUSE, C.M.G.). the Surveyor General, (SAMUEL BROWN).

the Acting Registrar General, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES). ALEXANDER PALMER MACEWEN.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

*

""

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

ABSENT:

The Honourable PHINEAS RYRIE.

The Committee meet at the request of the Acting Colonial Secretary.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 23rd June, having been taken as read are confirmed.

Read the following Minutes by His Excellency the Officer Administering the Govern-

ment:

(1.)

F. FLEMING.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Three thousand Three hundred and Forty-five Dollars and sixty cents, ($3,345.60), being amount required to pay the balance of a claim, and Court fees, in connection with Mr. M. J. STEPHENS' claim against the Government for compensation and damages for loss of area in respect of Marine Lot 184, $5,000.

Amount Deposited in Court in December, 1888,

Balance now claimed,

Fees of Court,

.$1,700.00

3,300.00

$5,000.00

45.60

$5,045.60

Government House, Hongkong, 23rd June, 1890.

F. FLEMING.

(2.)

C.S.O.

1513 of 1890.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Twenty-six thousand Six hundred and Sixty-four Dollars, and Forty-nine cents, ($26,664.49), to defray the Salaries, Allowances and Office Contingencies of the Water and Drainage Depart- ment for the current year. Out of this amount, the sum of $7,868 is a re-vote, as it is included in the Estimates under Surveyor General's Establishment, and since transferred to the Water and Drainage Department.

Establishment of W. & D. Department,

Transferred from Surveyor General's Department,

Government House, Hongkong, 26th June, 1890.

$26,664.49 7,868.00

$18,796.49

120

C.S.O.

1513 of 1890.

C.S.O.

1513 of 1890.

C.S.O. 2935 of 1889.

F. FLEMING.

(3.)

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Nine hundred and Fifty Dollars, ($950), being amount expended for the Kowloon well.

Government House, Hongkong, 26th June, 1890.

F. FLEMING.

(4.)

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to re-vote the sum of Forty-four thousand One hundred and Seventeen Dollars, and Sixty-seven cents, ($44,117.67), being the unexpended balance of the vote for New Water Mains in 1889.

Government House, Hongkong, 26th June, 1890.

F. FLEMING.

(5.)

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of One thousand Nine hundred and Seventy-six Dollars, and Forty-three cents, ($1,976.43), being amount due on some outstanding accounts in connection with the construction of Victoria. College.

Government House, Hongkong, 24th June, 1890.

After explanation by the Acting Colonial Secretary, the Committee recommend that the amounts in Minutes Nos. 1, 2, 3 and 4 be voted, and that the papers in connection with Minute No. 5 be circulated.

The Committee is then adjourned sine die.

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 7th July, 1890.

Read and confirmed on the 7th July, 1890.

F. A. HAZELAND, Acting Clerk of Councile.

H. E. WODEHOUSE,

Chairman.

.

No. 15.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 7th July, 1890.

121

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (HENRY ERNEST WODEHOUSE, C.M.G.), Chairman.

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

the Surveyor General, (SAMUEL BROWN).

the Acting Registrar General, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES).

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

Ho KAI, M.B., C.M.

ABSENT:

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (WALTER MEREDITH DEANE, C.M.G.).

C.$.0.

1879 of 1890.

PHINEAS RYRIE.

ALEXANDER PALMER MACEWEN.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

The Committee meet at the request of the Acting Colonial Treasurer.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 30th June, having been taken as read are confirmed.

Read the following Minute by His Excellency the Officer Administering the Govern-

ment:

F. FLEMING.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a Nine hundred Dollars, ($900), for the purchase of 200 Brass Padlocks from CHUBB & SONS for Victoria Gaol.

Government House, Hongkong, 3rd July, 1890.

After explanation by the Acting Colonial Treasurer, the Committee recommend that the amount be voted.

The Committee is then adjourned sine die.

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 14th July, 1890.

Read and confirmed on the 14th July, 1890.

F. A. HAZELAND, Acting Clerk of Councils.

W. M. DEANE,

Chairman.

No. 16.

123

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS.

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG, On the 14th July, 1890.

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (Walter MEREDITH DEANE, C.M.G.), Chairman.

the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (HENRY ERNEST WODEHOUSE, C.M.G.).

""

**

the Acting Attorney General, (EDWARD JAMES ACKROYD).

the Surveyor General, (SAMUEL BROWN).

the Acting Registrar General, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES). ALEXANDER PALMER MACEWEN.

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

27

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>>

""

**

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

ABSENT:

The Honourable PHINEAS RYRIE.

The Committee meet at the request of the Acting Colonial Secretary.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 7th July, having been taken as read are confirmed.

Read the following Minutes by His Excellency the Officer Administering the Govern-

ment:

(1.)

C.S.O.

1592 of 1890.

F. FLEMING.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of One hundred and Seven thousand One hundred and Eighty-six Dollars, and Seventy-four Cents, ($107,186.74), for repairs to damages caused by the Rain-storm of 29th and 30th May,

1889.

Amount paid in 1889,

Do.

in 1890,

$ 70,038.00 37,148.74

$107,186.74

To be charged to Extraordinary Public Works. Government House, Hongkong, 4th July, 1890.

F. FLEMING.

(2.)

C.S.O.

1499 of 1890.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Twenty-four Dollars, ($24), as a compassionate allowance to the widow of IM CHAN, late Head Messenger at the Magistracy.

Government House, Hongkong, 8th July, 1890.

After explanation by the Acting Colonial Secretary, the Committee recommend that the amounts be voted.

The Committee is then adjourned sine die.

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 21st July, 1890.

Read and confirmed on the 21st July, 1890.

F. A. HAZELAND, Acting Clerk of Councils.

W. M. DEANE,

Chairman.

1

No. 17.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG, On the 21st July, 1890.

125

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (WALTER MEREDITH DEANE, C.M.G.), Chairman.

the Acting Attorney General, (Edward James ACKROYD.)

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the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (HENRY ERNEST WODEHOUSE, C.M.G.).

the Surveyor General, (SAMUEL BROWN).

the Acting Registrar General, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES). ALEXANDER PALMER MACEWEN.

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

"

Ho KAI, M.B., C.M.

ABSENT:

C.S.0.

2171 of 1889.

C.S.O.

2171 of 1889.

C.S.O.

1602 of 1890.

C.S.0.

445 of 1890.

The Honourable PHINEAS RYRIE.

The Committee meet at the request of the Acting Colonial Secretary.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 14th July, having been taken as read are confirmed.

Read the following Minutes by His Excellency the Officer Administering the Govern-

ment:

F. FLEMING.

(1.)

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Two hundred and Forty Dollars, ($240), to Mr. SYDNEY HAYWARD, who was appointed Student Interpreter, under Section II of the Scheme published in Government Notification No. 209 of the 4th May, 1889.

Government House, Hongkong, 12th June, 1890.

F. FLEMING.

(2.)

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Four hundred and Eighty Dollars, ($480), to Mr. HENRY G. WAGGOTT, who was appointed Student Interpreter, under Section II of the Scheme published in Government Notification No. 209 of the 4th May, 1889.

Government House, Hongkong, 12th June, 1890.

F. FLEMING.

(3.)

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Three hundred and Sixty Dollars, ($360), being half salary for the Acting Chief Inspector of Police.

$60 per month for 6 months.

Government House, Hongkong, 11th July, 1890.

F. FLEMING.

(4.)

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Fifteen thousand Dollars, ($15,000), being amount required to be expended in this year, as part of $38,000 estimated, for training Albany and adjoining Nullahs, and opening up the land now available as building sites between the Bowen and Kennedy Roads.

Government House, Hongkong, 12th July, 1890.

F. FLEMING.

(5.)

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Two hundred Dollars, ($200), for publishing in a separate volume the proceedings of the Legislative Council during one year.

Government House, Hongkong, 15th July, 1890.

126

(6.)

C.5.0.

1617 of 1890.

C.S.O.

11 of 1890.

C. O). Desp. 97 of 1890.

F. FLEMING.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Two hundred Dollars, ($200), for making a new set of storm signals, iron frame and lanterns to signal at night, for the use of the Observatory.

Government House, Hongkong, 15th July, 1890.

F. FLEMING.

(7.)

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of One hundred and Seventy-eight Dollars and Fifty Cents, ($178.50), being the taxed costs of the Hongkong and China Gas Company, Limited, of their appeal under The Rating Ordinance, 1888.

Government House, Hongkong, 15th July, 1890.

F. FLEMING.

(8.)

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Seven hundred and Twenty Dollars, ($720), for additional Staff in the Observatory, viz. :-

Additional salary to the 2nd Assistant, as Telegraphist, at $20 per month....$ 240.00 2 Telegraph Clerks, at $20 per month, each,

Government House, Hongkong, 18th July, 1890.

F. FLEMING.

(9.)

480.00

$ 720.00

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of One hundred and Four Dollars and Eighty-four Cents, ($104.84), being half pay of the First Assistant at the Observatory, from 1st June to 19th July, inclusive, to be given to the Substi- tute, during Mr. FIGG's vacation leave on full pay. (Sanctioned by the Secretary of State.)

Government House, Hongkong, 18th July, 1890.

After explanation by the Acting Colonial Secretary, the Committee recommend that the amounts be voted.

The Committee is then adjourned sine die.

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 21st July, 1890.

Read and confirmed on the 6th October, 1890.

F. A. HAZELAND, Acting Clerk of Councils.

W. M. DEANE,

Chairman.

No. 18.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG, On the 6th October, 1890.

127

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (WALTER MEREDITH DEANE, C.M.G.), Chairman.

the Acting Attorney General, (EDWARD JAMES ACKROYD.)

""

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the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (HENRY ERNEST WODEHOUSE, C.M.G.). the Surveyor General, (SAMUEL BROWN).

"1

""

>>

""

""

""

the Acting Registrar General, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES). PHINEAS RYRIE.

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

JAMES JOHNStone Keswick.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

The Committee meet at the request of the Acting Colonial Secretary.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 21st July, having been taken as read are confirmed.

Read the following Minutes by His Excellency the Officer Administering the Govern-

ment:

F. FLEMING.

0

(1.)

C. O. Desp. 43 of 17th

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of March, 1890. Three hundred and Fifty-five Dollars, ($355), being a Building-grant to the Diocesan Home

and Orphanage, to defray half the cost of an improvement in the building.

Government House, Hongkong, 10th September, 1890.

C.S.O.

1915 of 1890.

C.S.O.

1751 of 1890.

F. FLEMING.

(2.)

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Thirty Dollars, ($30), as a Supplementary Vote for Office Contingencies of the Attorney General.

Government House, Hongkong, 10th September, 1890.

F. FLEMING.

(3.)

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Fifty-six Dollars and Forty-five Cents, ($56.45), being an stipulated increment to the salary of the Veterinary Surgeon, viz. :-$2,400 on appointment, $2,700 after 3 years, and $3,000 after 6 years.

Increase from the 24th October to the end of the

year,

Government House, Hongkong, 10th September, 1890.

..$ 56.45

F. FLEMING.

(4.)

C.S.O.

1513 & 2030

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of of 1890. Ninety-four Dollars and Seventy-two Cents, ($94.72), being amount required to complete the

sum due for Kowloon well.

Amount expended,

Vote of 7th July, 1890,

Government House, Hongkong, 10th September, 1890.

$1,044.72 950.00

94.72

128

(5.)

C.S.O.

2060 of 1890.

C.S.O.

1308 of 1890.

C.S.O.

1061 of 1890.

C.S.O. 1983 of 1890.

F. FLEMING.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of One hundred and Fifty Dollars, ($150), as a supplementary vote for Office Contingencies for

the Magistracy.

Government House, Hongkong, 10th September, 1890.

F. FLEMING.

(6.)

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Nine hundred and Sixty-three Dollars, and Twenty-five Cents, ($963.25), being the amount of the judgment debt and costs, in the matter of a Writ of Execution issued by A-TACK against A. G. APCAR, misappropriated by a Bailiff of Supreme Court.

Government House, Hongkong, 10th September, 1890.

F. FLEMING.

(7.)

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Three hundred and Thirteen Dollars, and Seventy-five Cents, ($313.75), being amount of prisoners' property embezzled by Turnkey Ng' KAM-FUK, employed as Receiving Officer in Victoria Gaol.

Government House, Hongkong, 10th September, 1890.

F. FLEMING.

(8.)

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of One thousand and Seven hundred Dollars, ($1,700), as supplementary Vote for Police exclu- sive of Establishments, viz. :

Oil and Gas for Barracks,.

Incidental expenses,

Government House, Hongkong, 10th September, 1890.

F. FLEMING.

(9.)

.$

900.00

800.00

$1,700.00

C.S.O.

2229 of 1890,

The Officer Administering the Government recommends, the Council to vote a sum of Two hundred and Fifty Dollars, ($250), as a Supplementary Vote for Office Contingencies of the Treasury, to cover expenses in collecting Village Rates.

Government House, Hongkong, 2nd October, 1890.

After explanation by the Acting Colonial Secretary, the Committee recommend that the amounts be voted.

The Committee is then adjourned sine die.

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 20th October, 1890.

Read and confirmed on the 20th October, 1890.

F. A. HAZELAND, Acting Clerk of Councils.

W. M. DEANE,

Chairman.

No. 19.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

.*

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 20th October, 1890.

129

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (WALTER MEREDITH DEANE, C.M.G.), Chairman.

the Acting Attorney General, (EDWARD JAMES ACKROYD).

C. U. Desp. 175 of 1890,

C.S.O. 1383 & 2397

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"}

""

the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (HENRY ERNEST WODEHOUSE, C.M.G.). the Surveyor General, (SAMUEL BROWN).

"

27

""

"

""

the Acting Registrar General, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNEs). PHINEAS RYRIE.

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

The Committee meet at the request of the Acting Colonial Secretary.

The Minutes of the Meeting held on the 6th October were confirmed on the 13th instant. Read the following Minutes by His Excellency the Officer Administering the Govern-

ment:

F. FLEMING.

(1.)

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of One thousand Eight hundred and Seventy-eight Dollars, ($1,878), being the equivalent of £313 at the exchange of 3/4 per Dollar, as an excess over the amount estimated for 12 Maxim Guns and Ammunition about to be supplied. The excess is due to the additions made on the recommendation of General BEVAN EDWARDS, R.E., and Major CLARK, R.E.

Government House, Hongkong, 11th October, 1890.

F. FLEMING.

(2.)

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of of 1890. Six thousand Three hundred and Twenty-eight Dollars, ($6,328), for the re-construction of

the landing Pier at Stone Cutters' Island.

C.5.0.

1957 of 1890.

Government House, Hongkong, 11th October, 1890.

F. FLEMING.

(3.)

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Sixty Dollars, ($60), as an allowance to the Hospital Steward for collecting Hospital bills, at the rate of $20 per month, for October, November and December of the present year.

This work was formerly performed by one of the Treasury Shroffs who received $10 per month, so there will be a saving of $30 in the Treasury.

Government House, Hongkong, 14th October, 1890.

After explanation by the Acting Colonial Secretary, the Committee recommend that the amounts be voted.

The Acting Colonial Secretary laid on the table a copy of a Despatch from the Secretary of State on the proposed reduction of postage.

After discussion it was agreed that the matter should be referred to the Chamber of Commerce for their observations.

The Committee is then adjourned sine die.

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 27th October, 1890.

Read and confirmed on the 27th October, 1890.

F. A. HAZELAND, Acting Clerk of Councils.

W. M. DEANE,

Chairman.

:

No. 20.

131

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG, On the 27th October, 1890,

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (WALTER MEREDITH DEANE, C.M.G.), Chairman.

the Acting Attorney General, (Edward JAMES ACKROYD).

""

"}

""

}}

"!

the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (HENRY ERNEST WODEHOUSE, C.M.G.). the Surveyor General, (SAMUEL BROWN).

the Acting Registrar General, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INnes). PHINEAS RYRIE.

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

The Committee meet at the request of the Acting Colonial Secretary.

The Minutes of the Meeting held on the 20th October having been taken as read are confirmed. SUPPLEMENTARY ESTIMATES.-The Committee consider the Bill entitled An Ordinance to authorise the Appropriation of a Supplementary Sum of Three hundred and Forty-nine thousand Seven hundred and Twenty Dollars and Eighty-five Cents to defray the Charges of the Year 1889.

The Committee recommend that the Bill be reported without amendment.

ESTIMATES, 1891.-Laid before the Committee the Bill entitled An Ordinance to apply a sum not exceeding One Million Six hundred and Seventy-four thousand Seven hundred and Eighty Dollars to the Public Service of Year 1891.

Items 1, 2, 3, agreed to.

Honourable J. J. KESWICK moved the following resolution:-

"That the Government lay on the table a list of those Officers who have not received an 'increase under the new scale of pay and at the same time state the grounds of refusal "in the case of those Officers who are not satisfied."

Honourable Ho KAI seconded.

Discussion followed.

Honourable C. P. CHATER moved the adjournment of the Committee.

Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD seconded.

Discussion followed.

Honourable C. P. CHATER withdrew his amendment.

The Chairman moved as an amendment that this Committee do now adjourn and that the Legislative Council be reformed so that this question may be considered in Council and not in Finance Committee.

Honourable the Acting Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question put.

Committee divided.

For.

Honourable Surveyor General.

Honourable Acting Colonial Treasurer.

Honourable Acting Attorney General.

Against.

Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD.

Honourable Ho KAI.

Honourable J. J. KESWICK.

Honourable C. P. CHATER.

Honourable Acting Colonial Secretary.

Honourable Acting Registrar General did not vote. Motion lost by a majority of one.

The original resolution was then put and carried. The Committee is then adjourned sine die.

Honourable P. RYRIE.

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 3rd November, 1890.

Read and confirmed on the 3rd November, 1890.

F. A. HAZELAND, Acting Clerk of Councils.

:

W. M. DEANE, Chairman.

N. 22.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 8th November, 1890.

135

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (WALTER MEREDITH DEANE, C.M.G.), Chairman.

27

""

""

步步

""

??

the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (HENRY ERNEST WODEHOUSE, C.M.G.). the Surveyor General, (SAMUEL Brown).

the Acting Registrar General, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES). PHINEAS RYRIE.

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

Ho KAI, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

ABSENT:

The Honourable the Acting Attorney General, (EDWARD JAMES ACKROYD).

""

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

The Committee met at the request of the Acting Colonial Secretary.

The Minutes of the Meeting held on the 3rd November were read and confirmed.

The Committee were proceeding to consider the Appropriation Bill, 1891, when the Honourable P. RYRIE moved the following resolution:-

That the Un-Official Members be appointed to consider the Estimates as has been done in Singapore.

The Chairman ruled that the motion was out of order.

Honourable P. KYRIE moved that this Committee be adjourned until after the Meeting of the Legislative Council to be held on the 10th instant.

Motion put and agreed to without a division.

The Committee is then adjourned until Monday, the 10th instant, at 2.30 P.M.

;

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 10th November, 1890.

Read and confirmed on the 24th November, 1890.

F. A. HAZELAND, Acting Clerk of Councils.

W. M. DEANE,

Chairman.

No. 23.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 24th November, 1890.

137

C. O). Desp. 218 of 1890.

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (WALTER MEREDITH DEANE, C.M.G.), Chairman.

the Acting Attorney General, (Edward James ACKROYD).

the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (HENRY ERNEST WODEHOUSE, C.M.G.).

>>

""

the Surveyor General, (SAMUEL BROWN).

A

PHINEAS RYRIE.

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

""

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

""

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

ABSENT:

The Honourable the Acting Registrar General, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES).

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

**

The Committee meet at the request of the Acting Colonial Secretary.

The Minutes of the Meeting held on the 8th November were read and confirmed on the 10th November.

Read the following Minute under the hand of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government :-

F. FLEMING.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Four hundred Dollars, ($400), for the salaries of two new Cadets to arrive from England, at the rate of $1,500 per annum each.

Government House, Hongkong, 15th November, 1890.

After explanation by the Acting Colonial Secretary, the Committee recommend that the amount be voted.

The Committee is then adjourned sine die.

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 8th December, 1890.

Read and confirmed on the 5th December, 1890.

F. A. HAZELAND, Acting Clerk of Councils.

W. M. DEANE.

Chairman.

!

No. 24.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 8th December, 1890.

139

C. O. Desp. 212 of 1890,

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (WALTER MEREDITH DEANE, C.M.G.), Chairman.

the Acting Attorney General, (EDWARD JAMES ACKROYD).

"}

""

>>

""

the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (HENRY ERNEST WODEHOUSE, C.M.G.). the Surveyor General, (SAMUEL BROWN).

the Acting Registrar General, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-Innes). CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

The Honourable PHINEAS RYRIE.

ABSENT

The Committee meet at the request of the Acting Colonial Secretary.

The Minutes of the last Meeting held on the 24th November were read and confirmed. Read the following Minute under the band of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government:

F. FLEMING.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Two thousand Eight hundred and Eighty Dollars, ($2,880), as a compassionate allowance for the benefit of the children of the late Colonial Treasurer and Postmaster General, Mr. ALfred LISTER.

Government House, Hongkong, 27th November, 1890.

After explanation by the Acting Colonial Secretary, the Committee recommend that the amount be voted.

The Committee is then adjourned to Thursday, 11th December.

W. M. DEANE,

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 15th December, 1890.

Read and confirmed on the 15th December, 1890.

F. A. HAZELAND, Acting Clerk of Councils.

Chairman.

¿

No. 24a.

REPORT OF

OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT MEETINGS HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 5th and 11th December, 1890.

141

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (WALTER MEREDITH DEANE, C.M.G.), Chairman.

the Acting Attorney General, (EDWARD JAMES ACKROYD).

""

"}

the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (HENRY ERNEST WODEHOUSE, C.M.G.). the Surveyor General, (SAMUEL BROWN).

>>

";

""

the Acting Registrar General, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES). PHINEAS RYRIE.

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

""

"

Ho KAI, M.B., C.M.

""

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

The Committee meet at the request of the Acting Colonial Secretary.

The Chairman informed the Committee that a telegram had been received from the Right Honour- able the Secretary of State urging the adoption early next January of a reduced rate of postage, and stated that the matter would be brought forward for consideration at the Meeting of Legislative Council to be held on Monday, 15th instant.

ESTIMATES, 1891.-Item No. 29. Public Works Extraordinary.-Considered and agreed to with the exception that sub-item 9, Gaol Extensions, was disallowed by a majority of one; and sub-item 29, Government Offices Extension and New Law Courts, was not considered as no vote was asked for.

Sub-items 32 to 38 being postponed.

The Committee is then adjourned to Monday, 15th December, 1890.

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 22nd December, 1890.

Read and confirmed on the 20th December, 1890.

F. A. HAZELAND, Acting Clerk of Councils.

W. M. DEANE,

Chairman.

і

=

No. 246.

REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

FINANCE COMMITTEE,

AT A MEETING HELD IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, HONGKONG,

On the 16th December, 1890.

143

PRESENT:

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (WALTER MEREDITH DEANE, C.M.G.), Chairman.

}}

"1

>>

>>

the Acting Attorney General, (EDWARD JAMES ACKROYD).

the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (HENRY ERNEST WODEHOUSE, C.M.G.). the Surveyor General, (SAMUEL BROWN).

the Acting Registrar General, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES). PHINEAS RYRIE.

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

""

Ho KAI, M.B., C.M.

""

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

The Committee meet at the request of the Acting Colonial Secretary.

The Committee unanimously recommend the adoption of a reduced rate of postage and that the amount be fixed at 7 cents per half ounce for the present.

ESTIMATES 1891.-Item 29. Public Works Extraordinary.-Sub-items 32 to 38 were considered and agreed to unanimously.

The Committee is then adjourned sine die.

Laid before the Legislative Council on the 22nd December, 1890.

Read and confirmed on the 20th December, 1890.

F. A. HAZELAND, Acting Clerk of Councils.

W. M. DEANE, Chairman.

į

:

199

No.

90.

HONGKONG.

REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF FIRE BRIGADE FOR 1889.

Presented to the Legislative Council, by Command of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government.

No. 7.

FIRE BRIGADE DEPARTMENT, HONGKONG, 28th February, 1890.

SIR-I have the honour to report that during the year ending 31st December, 1889, there were twenty-one fires at which the service of the Brigade were required in which fifteen houses were totally destroyed and thirteen houses partially damaged.

2. The value of the property destroyed calculated on the amount of insurance effected and a view of the premises subsequent to the fires is estimated at $98,200.

3. The return shows a considerable decrease in the number of fires as compared with that of the years 1887 and 1888, the number for those years respectively being thirty-five and forty-five, the diminution being possibly due to the proceedings under the Fire Enquiry Ordinance and to greater

caution in the issue of Fire Policies.

4. Of the fires that took place seventeen formed the subject of official enquiry under the Ordinance, with the result, generally speaking, that there were either gravely suspicious circumstances brought to light or no satisfactory explanation of the cause of fire was forthcoming. As a rule the suspicious circumstances were too negative in character to warrant a prosecution, and during the year only one such

prosecution was ordered, and even this went no further than a committal for trial and terminated in a nolle prosequi.

5. Whatever may be the moral effect of these enquiries of which one can only judge hypotheti- cally, by comparing the number of fires before and after the institution of them, I am strongly of opinion that they are most necessary, and that they supply a want which had long been felt.

6. Where the fire is accidental it must be gratifying to the owner of the premises that its accidental origin should be officially recorded, and where it is the result of a crime it is important in the interests of the public that the matter should be exhaustively sifted.

7. As to whether or not the Ordinance requires improvement I do not wish to speak positively. I certainly think that a grave obstacle is placed in the way of effectual prosecutions by the inability to use in a prosecution the depositions that have been taken in an enquiry, and one also feels the want of some kind of provision by which upon a formal finding on the part of the Magistrate that the circumstances are gravely suspicious, the Insurance Companies should be thereby prohibited from satisfying claims until they have been made good to the satisfaction of a Court after consideration of the facts adduced at the enquiry.

8. These, however, are matters requiring a good deal of consideration, and I merely refer to them as the impressions which the enquiries leave upon me when conducting them.

9. The year 1889 has been notable as the year in which the Volunteer Brigade was disbanded. In existence before the establishment of the Government Brigade in 1868, they have for many years afforded valuable and willing aid at the numerous fires at which they have been present and they have contained in their ranks the flower of the youth and activity of the Colony.

10. Their disbandment led to an increase in the European element of the Government Brigade, consisting partly of Police and partly of Soldiers recruited from the regiment, and at the same time the Chinese force whose numbers were unnecessarily large was considerably reduced.

11. In other respects the Brigade has been conducted on the same lines as heretofore. There is the same Central Station, the same system of alarms and the same general orders with regard to attendance at fires. Such improvements as have been made, have been made in the matter of appliances and in the provision beforehand of every thing likely to be required at a fire, together with rules for their disposition and for the prevention of any interruption in the operations such as by the bursting of hose, the breakdown of an engine, or other ways known to those who have to deal with fires.

200

12. Although the alarm bell is sounded when assistance is required at Wanchai an arrangement has been made by which only a certain number of the Fire Brigade, who are told off month by month for the purpose, are allowed to go, as it is not desirable that the whole of the Brigade should be absent from the central part of the Town unless absolutely necessary. The alarms continue to be as heretofore one bell for the Eastern District from Wanchai to the Murray Barracks, two bells for the Central District from Murray Barracks to the Harbour Office, and three bells for the Western District.

13. While satisfied that the present system of centralisation of engines and men at the Central Fire Station is necessary under existing circumstances where the men are drawn from the Police Force at the Central Police Station, and have their quarters either there or at the Fire Brigade Station, I am of opinion that the completion of the distribution of water will necessitate a radical reconstruction of the Brigade, and that the proper method for the suppression of fires will be found to lie in a number of small stations placed at a convenient distance apart with hose and other articles ready for immediate use at the outset, steam-engines falling into the background and occupying a subordinate position in the Brigade.

14. I have already had made as an experiment anticipatory to this change of system what is known as "The Fire Despatch-box," the points of which are that it can be worked by one man, and contains all the necessary appliances for dealing with a fire at the outset including three hundred feet of hose, and I anticipate that it or some other contrivance will be spread all over the Town and worked by a system which has yet to be devised when the water works are completed.

15. I have much pleasure in stating that the behaviour of the men at fires has been good, and their attendance regular, and that Mr. CAMPBELL, who fills the important post of Assistant Engineer and is responsible for the proper keeping of the appliances and the general efficiency of the Brigade, carries out his duties conscientiously and with satisfaction.

16. Since the commencement of this year the Brigade has lost the services of Mr. BREWER Who I regret to say after a long illness has succumbed to it. He was a very zealous and efficient Officer, and during the absence on leave of the Superintendent in 1886, received a special letter of thanks from the Government for the manner in which he had acted as Superintendent. His place has been filled by Mr. WAGNER subject to the approval of Her Majesty's Secretary of State for the Colonies.

17. I enclose copy of Mr. WAGNER's report on the state of the engines and also a return of fires and alarms of fires during the

year 1889.

I have the honour to be,

The Honourable W. M. DEANE, M.A.,

Acting Colonial Secretary.

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

H. E. WODEHOUSE,

Supt., Fire Brigade.

I

201

Copy.

GOVERNMENT FIRE BRIGADE DEPARTMENT,

2nd January, 1890.

SIR,I have the honour to submit herewith my report on the state of the Government Fire- engines for the year ended 31st December, 1889.

Steamer No. 1 (Floating engine), by Messrs. Merryweather & Co., has been 22 years in service. In December last, the launch was docked for repairs, and the Fire and Screw engines received a thorough overhaul. The water tanks were taken out of launch, scraped, painted and repaired. They have now been in long use, and are considerably corroded and pitted on the insides, so much so, that I would recommend new ones to be fitted during the early part of next year.

During the year, the engine has not been disabled at any fire, and is now in good working order. Steamer No. 2, by Messrs. Merryweather & Co., has been 21 years in service. In August last it received a thorough overhaul. During the year it has not been disabled at any fire, but on two periodical trials it was completely disabled, on one occasion, by the bursting of one of the boiler tubes, and on the other, by the failure of one of the cylinder covers.

This engine is of obsolete type for land purposes, being complicated in design, cumbersome to transport owing to its great size and weight and slow to generate steam. The increase of the areas of the steam pistons over that of the plungers is so small that with the present boiler pressure, the maximum water pressure that can be attained is 55 lbs. per square inch. A pressure, which, when it is considered the increase of buildings of an inflammable nature on levels with Lyndhurst Terrace and Wellington Street, and the increased height of new buildings on the lower levels renders the engine absolutely worthless for any other purpose than that of feeding. Its upkeep and consumption of fuel are very expensive compared with the modern and more powerful engines. In my last year's report I recommended a new fire-box to be fitted to the boiler. This expenditure was not sanctioned. I consider the engine not worth the outlay now, and would recommend that it be disposed of by tender, and the proceeds go towards the purchase of an engine of modern type, similar to No. 5. The engine is in good working order compatible with its age and worn out condition.

Steamer No. 3, by Shand & Mason, has been 10 years in service, and the boiler 2 the year it has not been disabled at any fire, and is now in good working order.

years. During

Steamer No. 4, by Shand & Mason, has been 7 years in service. In March last it received a thorough overhaul. It has not been disabled at any fire, and is in good working order and a most efficient engine.

Steamer No. 5, by Shand & Mason, has been 3 years in service. In November last it received a thorough overhaul. It has not been disabled at any fire. It is in good working order and a most efficient engine.

Volunteer Engine, by Shand & Mason, has been 9 years in the service of the Volunteer Brigade, and 1 year in the Government. It has not been disabled at any fire, and is in good working order.

The Assistant Engineer and Engine drivers have attended regularly and promptly to all calls made on the Brigade, and have performed their respective duties in a most satisfactory and creditable

manner.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

The Honourable H. E. WODEHOUSE, C.M.G.,

Supt., Government Fire Brigade.

ARTHUR WAGNER, Engineer, Government Fire Brigade.

No.

DATE.

TIME.

FIRES AND ALARMS DURING THE YEAR 1889.

No. of

BUILDING

SITUATION OF FIRE.

DESTROYED.

DAMAGE.

CAUSE.

Wholly. Partly.

1 Jan.

3, 11.15 p.m.

House No. 1, Rozario Street,

ลง

23 4

""

6,

Midnight.

Matshed at Belchers Bay,

6,

29

7,

103

8,

6

12,

""

~

17,

8

""

18,

h

9

19,

""

20,

5.10 p.m.

11.15 p.m.

4 p.m.

Daylight.

3 a.m.

3.20 p.m.

4 a.m.

8 p.m.

House No. 197, Queen's Road West,

Grass on hillside above No. 1 Tank, House No. 73, Queen's Road East,....

House No. 159, Queen's Road West,. House No. 279, Queen's Road West,

House No. 75, Queen's Road East,.

Chimney of House No. 28, Stanley Street,

I

;

:

REMARKS.

202

Do.

Do.,

Do.

Unknown,

:.

Do.

Do.

Trifling

1

1

$20,000

Unknown,

Trifling

Do.

Do.

Do.

...

Do.

Do.,

None

Do.

Trifling

Do.,

...

2

1

$1,000

Falling of a kerosine lamp,

Trifling

Unknown.

None

Do.

1

$2,000

Do.,

...

Trifling

None

Do.,

Incendiarism,

Incendiarism,.

Bursting of a kerosine lamp. Accidental.

Insured in the China Fire Insurance Com- pany for $1,000.

Insured in Messrs. Siemsson & Co. for $2,600.

Some young trees destroyed.

A bundle of rags saturated with kerosine gunpowder and matches were found in the house.

The staircase was saturated with kerosine oil.

False alarm.

Old rags saturated with kerosine oil were thrown into the house.

Insured in Messrs. Russell & Co. for $15,000.

Extinguished by Police.

A number of young trees destroyed.

Do.

Do.

Unknown

Do.

...

$12

Do.

...

$240

Do.,

...

Trifling

Do.,

Do.

Do.,

$10

Trifling

...

Do.

Do.

$20

Careless use of lighted candles.

Unknown,

22 pigs destroyed.

Insured in the Northern Assurance Com-

pany for $5,500.

Insured in Messrs. Pustau & Co. for $4,500.

Extinguished by Police.

Carelessness while boiling oil,... Insured in Messrs. Siemssen & Co. for

$2,200.

None.

Unknown.

1

$300

Do.,

Insured in Messrs. Scheele & Co. for $4,000.

Trifling

Falling of a kerosine lamp.

10

11

Feb. 4,

2 p.m.

12

6,

9.45 p.m.

House No. 92, Wing Lok Street,

House No. 198, Hollywood Road, House No. 44, East Street,

=

13

11,

4.30 p.m.

"

14

12, 10.10 p.m.

15,

6 p.m.

17,

8.20 p.m.

""

9.35 a.m.

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

>>

وو

""

""

19,

21,

24,

24,

March 2,

,,

>>

6,

13,

7.30 p.m.

9.45 p.m.

A stack of grass at the "Basel Mission" Garden, House No. 36, Third Street,

Grass on the hillside near Tai Tam Tuk, Chimney of House No. 35, Wellington Street, Grass on hillside above Richmond Terrace, Grass on hillside near Magazine Gap,

S. S. Benlawers,

7.30 p.m.

Matshed at Yaumati,

1 a.m.

Matshed at Coffee Plantation,..........

2,

7.30 p.m.

House No. 5, Wing Wo Street,

House No. 337, Queen's Road Central,

11 a.m.

House No. 81, Station Street, Yaumati,

""

25

14,

>>

6.30 p.m.

Grass on hillside above Sai Wan,

26 April

5,

27

12,

8.54 a.m.

Grass on hillside above Little Hongkong, House No. 292, Queen's Road West,

28

8888888

17,

9.20 a.m.

>>

29 May

5,

7.20 p.m.

30

>>

7,

10 p.m.

House No. 145, Bonham Strand Central, House No. 307, Queen's Road West,

Chimney of House No. 155, Queen's Road West,

No. DATE.

TIME.

31 May

FIRES AND ALARMS DURING THE YEAR 1889,- Continued.

No. of

BUILDING

SITUATION OF FIRE.

DESTROYED.

ᎠᎪᎷᎪᏩᎬ .

CAUSE.

Wholly. Partly.

1

$10,000

Incendiarism,

9,

4.35 a.m.

House No. 10, Wilmer Street,

:.

REMARKS.

...

Trifling

Do.

Accidental,

:

::

$20

Trifling

$860

Carelessness while burning joss paper.

Careless use of lights while cat-

ching bugs.

Unknown.

It is supposed that some thieves entered by the sky-light and set fires to the stores. Insured in Messrs. Siemssen & Co. for $15,000.

Careless use of fire for boiling A number of pigs destroyed.

pig's food,

Some straw and oil were found burning in the house.

$20

Accidental.

$50

Incendiarism,..

None

Unknown.

Do.

Falling of a kerosine lamp.

Do.

Unknown.

Trifling

Do.

2

$3,000

Incendiarism,...................

None

-::

Do.

$1,300

Unknown.

Bursting of a kerosine lamp.

The master of this shop was charged with arson but was discharged at the Su- preme Court.

Careless use of fire for drying Insured in Messrs. Norton & Co. for $1,300.

cakes,

None

Bursting of a kerosine lamp.

Do.

Unknown,

No trees destroyed.

Trifling

Do.

None

Do.

...

Do.

Do.

...

Do.

32

12,

""

33

13,

9 p.m.

4 p.m.

A house in Un Fuk Lane,

>>

34

35

36

""

19

14,

11.30 a.m.

16,

1.45 a.m.

17,

5 p.m.

37

17,

9 p.m.

House No. 20, Gilman Street,.

House No. 32, Ship Street,

House No. 1, Pokfulam Road,...

Matshed at Skew Bridge, Shaukiwan Road,..

House No. 36, First Street,.

"

38

21,

Midnight.

House No. 41, Shamshuipo,

39 June 16,

2.30 a.m.

House No. 115, Third Street,

40

24,

2.45 a.m.

"

41

25,

9.30 p.m.

">

42

26,

43

28,

"

44

29,

45

July

1,

4 p.m.

7 p.m.

4.30 p.m.

9.50 p.m.

House No. 113, Queen's Road West, House No. 252, Queen's Road Central, Chimney of the Hongkong Dispensary, House No. 242, Queen's Road West,

Chimney of House No. 2, Stanley Street, House No. 87, First Street,.

46

4,

4.20 a.m.

House No. 227, Queen's Road West,

""

47

11,

2 a.m.

House No. 193, Queen's Road West,

""

48

11,

Grass on hillside,

""

49

11,

50

16,

5 p.m.

51

16,

10.45 p.m.

""

52

17,

1 a.m.

53

29,

39

54 Aug. 10,

45

5.10 p.m.

10.30 p.m.

8.45 p.m.

55

11,

""

56

12,

57

24,

3.20 a.m.

Grass in a house at Mong Kok Tsui, Chimney of house No. 12, Market Street, House No. 5, Mercer Street,

House No. 90, Queen's Road East,. Matshed on the hill near Victoria Fort, Chimney of house No. 72, Jardine's Bazaar,

Grass on hillside near Kai Lung Wan, House No. 14, Sholley Street,...........

House No. 95, Hollywood Road,

:

:

Incendiarism,...

$300 Carelessness while burning joss

paper.

Unknown.

An empty paint tin containing kerosine oil was found burning on the staircase.

None

:::

Do.

Do.

Do.

Incendiarism,....

1

$400

Unknown,

A lighted paper torch saturated with ke- rosine was thrown into one of the rooms. Insured in Messrs. Melchers & Co. for $700.

203

FIRES AND ALARMS DURING THE YEAR 1889,—Continued.

No. of

204

25,

2 a.m.

""

67

29,

وو

68

Oct.

7.30 p.m.

69

6,

11.30 p.m.

70

9,

""

4 p.m.

71

10,

4.30 a.m.

72

12,

11.15 p.m.

73

13,

8.40 a.m.

House No. 6, Tung Shing Lane,

BUILDING

No.

DATE.

TIME.

SITUATION OF FIRE.

DESTROYED.

DAMAGE.

CAUSE.

Wholly. Partly.

1

58 Aug. 26, 59 Sept. 14,

4 a.m.

House No. 174, Third Street,

$1,500

5 p.m.

Grass on Mount Parker,

60

16,

""

9.45 p.m.

House No. 203, Queen's Road Central,

I

None

$2,000

Accidental,

Unknown.

Bursting of a kerosine lamp,

1

61

21,

""

7 p.m.

House No. 1, Wing Wo Street,

$1,200

62

21,

9.55 p.m.

63

21,

10 p.m.

House No. 112, Queen's Road Central, House No. 9, Graham Street,

1

1

$4,000

None

Do.

64

65

66

23,

>>

"3

24,

2 p.m.

5.30 a.m.

6.45 p.m.

S. S. Japan,

House No. 220, Queen's Road Central, . Chimney of House No. 9, Hillier Street,

House No. 85, Wellington Street, House No. 4, Graham Street,

House No. 117, Shaukiwan,

House No. 42, Battery Street, Yaumati,

House No. 3, Fuk Luk Lane,

House No. 210, Queen's Road West,

Incendiarism,..

Upsetting of a kerosine lamp,

Upsetting of a kerosine lamp, . Bursting of a kerosine lamp. Accidental.

The contents were not insured.

Insured in the North German Iusurance Company for $12,000 and in the North- ern Assurance Company for $22,000. A woman and a child lost their lives during the fire.

Insured in Messrs. Naudin & Co. for $10,000.

Some chests of Opium were stolen and the cargo was set on fire.

Careless use of lighted candles,... Insured in Messrs. Norton & Co. for $5,000. Unknown.

REMARKS.

""

74

75

+1

14,

House No. 52, Square Street,

$3.50

None

Slight

Bursting of a kerosine lamp.

False alarm.

$4

Unknown.

$1,500

Falling of a kerosine lamp.

None

Do.

Slight

>>

30,

2.10 a.m.

House No. 154, Queen's Road Central,

-:

1

1

$8,000

">

76

30,

6.30 p.m.

A boiler-maker's shop in Battery Street, Yaumati,

$50

Do.

1

$1,000

78

177 Nov. 4,

""

9.30 p.m.

House No. 7, Nullah Lane,

7.30 a.m.

House No. 55, Queen's Road West,

1

$16,000

Capsizing of a kerosine lamp, Unknown,

Unknown.

Carelessness while worshipping

joss.

Careless use of a lighted lamp. Unknown,

Insured in Messrs. Edward Schellhass & Co. for $10,000. Five inmates lost their lives.

An old woman lost her life. Not insured. Insured in Messrs. Dunn Melbye & Co. for $8,000 and in Messrs. Turner & Co. for $6,200.

79

12,

""

80

14,

17

81

$2

83

""

>>

14,

17,

2447

Chimney of house No. 10, Cochrane Street,

None

Do.

Do.

7 p.m.

House No. 43, West Street,

2 p.m.

Grass on hillside near Stanley,

Trifling

House No. 258, Queen's Road Central,

19,

""

2 p.m.

84

22.

1.40 a.m.

85

26,

12.30 p.m.

86 Dec.

3,

10 p.m.

87

7,

""

88

1 a.m.

House No. 34, East Street,

House No. 25, Yee Wo Street, Matshed near Richmond Terrace, Matshed at Quarry Bay,

House No. 121, Jervois Street,

Grass on hillside of Mountain Lodge,

None

...

Do.

Slight

$70

Breaking of a kerosine lamp. Unknown.

Incendiarism,...

Careless use of fire. Unknown.

Carclessness while smoking.

Unknown,

Paper saturated with oil was found on the staircaso.

Two coolies lost their lives.

:

Slight

None

Accidental.

Unknown.

""

:

No.

DATE.

TIME.

FIRES AND ALARMS DURING THE YEAR 1889,-Continued.

SITUATION OF FIRE.

NO. OF

BUILDING

DESTROYED.

DAMAGE.

CAUSE.

REMARKS.

Wholly. Partly.

None

Unknown.

Slight

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

$10

Accidental.

Accidental while worshipping

joss.

Burning of joss stick and paper. Unknown.

$5,000

Do.,

4

None

$20,000

Accidental.

Unknown,

None

:.

Breaking of a kerosine lamp.

Insured in Messrs. Siemssen & Co. for $6,000.

Insured in the Northern Insurance Com- pany for $20,000.

89 Dec. 17,

8.20 p.m.

Chimney of house No. 10, Wyndham Street,

90

18,

12 noon

Grass on hillside near Stanley,

""

91

20,

>>

1.15 p.m.

House No. 312, Queen's Road West,

92

20,

1 p.m.

House No. 27, New Street,.

93

21,

10 a.m.

94

21,

7.20 p.m.

"

95

23,

A

5.30 p.m.

House No. 122, Queen's Road West, House No. 37, Station Street, Yaumati, House No. 334, Queen's Road Central,

1

96

""

24, 5 a.m.

97

30,

">

98

""

15

30,

5.45 p.m.

3.25 a.m.

House No. 16, Jervois Street,. House No. 17, Bonham Strand Central,

House No. 365, Queen's Road West,

...

Fire Brigade Department, Hongkong, 28th February, 1890.

H. E. WODEHOUSE, Superintendent, Fire Brigade.

205

HONGKONG.

REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF VICTORIA GAOL FOR 1889.

155

No.

90.

Presented to the Legislative Council, by Command of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government.

No. 7.

GAOL SUPERINTENDENT'S OFFICE,

HONGKONG, 15th January, 1890.

:

COLONIAL SECRETARY,

I beg to forward herewith Annual Statistical Return of Victoria Gaol for the year 1889. 2. During eight months of the year I was detached from Gaol duty Major DEMPSTER acting as Superintendent for the time and carrying out the discipline of the Gaol on the same lines as hitherto.

3. There has been a small increase in the average number of Prisoners during the year, and a large proportionate increase in the number of Prison Offences, but the latter increase is due entirely to petty offences of which talking and short oakum picking are the principal. The number of violent and serious Prison Offences has continued to steadily decrease.

Subordinate Officers.

4. The conduct of the Subordinate Staff during the year has been very satisfactory. These Officers have generally been zealous and painstaking and judicious in their intercourse with Prisoners The frequent changes which hitherto occurred in the personnel of the Staff have diminished since the late increase of pay.

Prison Buildings.

5. These remain without change as formerly reported on. I can only repeat what I have fre- quently urged that in my opinion the introduction of the separate system is (especially in this Colony) essential to proper prison discipline. The ordinary Chinese Prisoner better fed, housed and clothed, with far less hard labour to do than an ordinary coolie finds nothing deterrent in our Prisons as long as he lives in association with companions day and night but I believe that under the separate system the Chinese Criminal classes would prefer even the hardships and cruelties of a Chinese prison to the long isolation of this system and that its introduction would be speedily followed by a considerable diminution in the number of Prisoners.

Prisoners and their Discipline.

6. During the year there have been 6,196 Prison Offences to an average of 581, giving a little over 10 offences for each Prisoner. The great proportion of Prison Offences are committed by short sentence Prisoners. Prisoners entitled to earn remission are generally careful to avoid Prison Offences. On the last day of the year of 292 Prisoners sentenced to 6 months' imprisonment or over, 90 have been clear of punishment for more than three months and of these 35 had been clear for upwards of a

year.

7. I append as usual Returns showing the number of the most common offences committed by Prisoners, similar Returns for the last three years being shown alongside for the sake of comparison.

Industrial Labour.

8. There has been an increase in the industrial earnings during the year and also an increase in the number of Prisoners taught trades but industrial work is greatly hampered by absolute want of space. The usual Returns are appended.

A. GORDON, Superintendent.

156

MONTH.

(A.)

VICTORIA GAOL.

Return of Reports for talking, &c., in the years 1886, 1887, 1888 and 1889.

1886.

Daily average number Daily average number

in Prison, 674.

1887.

in Prison, 584.

1888.

Daily average number

in Prison, 531.

1889.

Daily average number in Prison, 581.

January,.. February, March,

119

146

355

105

· 135

75

320

150

248

97

362

132

April,

330

..408

380

142

May,

197

963

402

278

June,

298

918

296

205

July,

297

500

258

220

August,

232

530

225

167

September,

318

558

220

219

October,

209

429

222

130

November,

183

184

328

118

December,

93

113 ·

277

220

Total,.....

2,659

4,921

3,645

2,086

A. GORDON,

Superintendent.

(B.)

Return of Offences reported of Prisoners fighting with or assaulting each other, or Officers,

for the years 1886, 1887, 1888 and 1889.

MONTH.

1886.

1887.

1888.

Daily average number Daily average number Daily average numb

in Prison, 674.

in Prison, 584.

in Prison, 531.

1889.

Daily average number in Prison, 581.

January,.

February,

March,

14 15

17

227

21

14

1

20

21

10

11

19

11

April, May, June,

July,

August,

32

29

11

6

31

41

27

5

19

33

19

12

13

31

11

5

13

39

8

13

8

17

9

September,

October,

November,

December,

Total,.....

195

306

185

26

18

27

13

5

18

5

5

10

19

12

92

A. GORDON,

Superintendent.

:

157

(C.)

Return of Offences of Prisoners having Tobacco, for the years 1886, 1887, 1888 and 1889.

1886.

1887.

Daily average number Daily average number

in Prison, 674.

in Prison, 584,

1888.

1889.

Daily average number | Daily average number

in Prison, 531.

in Prison, 581.

MONTH.

January,..

February,

March,

April,

May,

June,

July,

August,

September,

October,

November,

December,

28

14

74

32

16

10

35

50

14

20

48

55

11

27

25

21

7

39

61

45

15

34

27

33

9

57

34

24

11

40

22

35

31

58

30

51

17

71

35

30

32

34

67 15

23

33

17

59

Total,............

212

435

442

487

A. GORDON,

Superintendent.

(D.)

Comparative Return of Prisoners confined in Victoria Gaol on 31st December, 1886, 31st December, 1887, 31st December, 1888 and 31st December, 1889.

CONVICTION.

1886.

1887.

1888.

1889.

1st,

414

436

367

466

2nd,

62

30

43

59

+

3rd,

35

34

35

22

4th,

27

15

!

5th,

24.

6th,

18

15

7th,

15

10

8th,

10

10

9th,

1

10th,

11th,

co co

3

3

42220-32

13

14

16

16

13

8

4

2

8

9

121

1

1

1

12th,

1.

13th,

1

*

Total,..

600

612

576

503

A. GORDON,

Superintendent.

(E)

ABSTRACT OF ACCOUNT OF INDUSTRIAL LABOUR, VICTORIA GAOL, FOR THE YEAR 1889.

Dr.

OAKUM.

Cr.

1889.

To Stock on hand, 1st January, 1889,. $ 187.41 1889.

Cost of Paper Stuff purchased

1,619.27

By Oakum sold during the year,

$2,189.42

29

""

Oakum issued for Gaol Hospital use, Stock on hand 31st December,

1889,-

7.50

Profit,

897.59

Paper Stuff, 10,082bs. $ 362.95 Oakum,

Total,................................$

2,704.27

2,880,,

Total,.......

144.40

507.35

2,704.27

158

Dr.

COIR YARN.

1889.

To Stock on hand, 1st January, 1889,. $ 347.24

1889.

By Matting sold during the year,

""

Cost of Material purchased during

987.58

the year,......

Profit,.....

""

792.07

""

Issue for Prison use during the

year,

Stock on hand 31st December,

1889,-

Manufactured, ....$191.38 Material,

Total,...........$

2,126.89

RATTAN WORK.

1888.

To Stock on hand, 1st January, 1889,. $ 101.45 1889.

Cost of Material purchased during

306.19

the year,..............

Profit,

69.00

Total,.............................

476.64

NET-MAKING.

Cr.

$1,420.33

65.18

450.00

641.38

Total,............$

2,126.89

By Chairs, Fenders, &c., sold during Į

the year,..

وو

Articles made for Gaol use,

Stock on hand, 31st December,

1889,-

Manufactured Articles, $120.75 Material,....

1889.

To Stock on hand, 1st January, 1889, $ 10.00

Cost of Material purchased during

1889.

219.45

""

the year,..

122.85

Profit,

Total,...$

352.30

$ 306.71

10.73

38.45

159.20.

Total,....... ...$

476.64

By Nets sold during the year,...

Nets made for Gaol use, (value),... Stock on hand, 31st December,

1889,-

Manufacturer,....

GRASS MATTING.

1889.

""

To Stock on hand, 1st January, 1889,.

Cost of Material purchased during

12.37

137.25

1889.

23

the year,.

Profit,

""

21.43

Total,

..$

171.05

WASHING.

$ 215.20 98.10

39.00

Total,

352.30

By Issue for Prison use during the year,.

Matting sold during the year, Stock on hand, 31st December,

1889,-

Manufactured, .......$9.26 Material,

1889.

To Stock on hand, 1st January, 1889,.

6.40 1889.

""

Cost of Material purchased during

the year,..

Profit,

438.55

"

986.57

""

Total,..

1,431.52

3.10 149.94

8.75

18.01

Total,...... .$

171.05

By Value of Washing done during the year, Prison Clothing at one cent a piece,........ Cash received for Clothes washed,.. Stock on hand, 31st December,

Total,...

$1,392.75

28.77

10.00

1,431.52

159

Cr.

Dr.

SHOE-MAKING.

1889.

To Stock on hand, 1st January, 1889, $ 42.30 1889.

Cost of Material purchased during

658.80

By Estimated value of shoes to Pri-

soners, and Repairs,

$ 170.98

the year..

Profit,

??

278.22

Two Issues Summer and Winter Uniform Shoes, to Prison Offi-

cers,

226.00

""

Sale to Prison Officers, &c........................ Stock on hand, 31st December,

1889,-

510.93

Material,

.$50.41

Value of New Shoes, 21.00

71.41

Total,......

979.32

Total............$

979.32

1889.

To Stock on hand, 1st January, 1889,. $ 25.00

Cost of Material purchased during

the year,..

1889.

160.37

PRINTING ANG BOOK-BINDING.

By Estimated value of Printing done)

for Public Offices during the year, (105,159 forms),

$ 564.89

Estimated value of Books bound

19

2.84

Profit,

670.11

for Prison use,.

"}

J

Cash received for Books bound,. Cash received for Printing done,... Stock on hand, 31st December,

1889,-

236.90

21.53

Total,

855.48

Book-binding Material, &c.,

Total,..........$

1889.

To Stock on hand, 1st January, 1889,. $975.54 1889.

55

Cost of Material purchased during

1,378.29

the year,

Profit,....

134.33

TAILORS' SHOP.

By Estimated value of Prisoners'

Clothing made during the year, f Work done for Officers, Police,

&c., and charged for,... Stock on hand, 31st December,

15

">

1889,-

Flannel, Serge, Can-

vas, &c.,

{$169.85

Total,

2,488.16

CARPENTERS' SHOP.

Manufactured Articles, 296.47

Total,

29.32

855.48

$1,733.04

288.80

466.32

2,488.16

1889.

To Value of Stock on hand, 1st Ja-

1889.

15.74

nuary, 1889,

By Value of Articles made for Gaol use during the year,..........

$ 156.51

ور

Cost of Material purchased during

Work done for Officers and

203.44

59.48

the year,.

charged for,

>>

Stock on hand, 31st December,

Profit,...

24.76

1889,-

Total,

243.94

Material, Wood, &c.,... $ 7.65 Manufactured Articles,

20.30

27.95

Total,.........$

243.94

TIN-SMITH'S SHOP.

1889.

To Value of Stock on hand, 1st Ja- Į

1889.

$3 2.22

33

26.93

29.94

nuary, 1889,

Cost of Material purchased during

the year,.......

Profit,

Total,

..$

59.09

By Estimated value of Articles made Į for Gaol use during the year,. } Sale of Articles to Prison Officers, Stock on hand, 31st December,

1889,-

*3

Value of Manufactured

Articles,....

Total,

$

10.97

6.18

11.94

59.09

.

.

160

Dr.

RECAPITULATION.

Cr.

1889.

Oakum,...

Coir Yarn,

Net-making,

897.59 792.07

1889. By Surplus,

$4,026.87

122.85

Rattan Work,

69.00

Grass Matting,.

21.43

Washing,

986.57

Shoe-making,_.....

278.22

Printing and Book-binding,

670.11

Tailoring,.

134.33

Carpentering,

24.76

Tin Work,

29.94

Total,...$

4,026.87

To Profit,

$4,026.87

Victoria Gaol Office, Hongkong, 15th January, 1890.

4

Total,............$ 4,026.87

A. GORDON,

Superintendent.

227

No. 11

90.

HONGKONG.

THE HARBOUR MASTER'S REPORT FOR 1889.

Presented to the Legislative Council, by Command of His Excellency

the Officer Administering the Government.

No. 106.

HARBOUR DEpartment, HONGKONG, 8th March, 1890.-

SIR, I have the honour to forward the following Annual Returns for this Department for the year ending 31st December, 1889.

I. Number, Tonnage and Crews of Vessels entered. II. Number, Tonnage and Crews of Vessels cleared.

III. Number, Tonnage and Crews of Vessels of each Nation entered. IV. Number, Tonnage and Crews of Vessels of each Nation cleared.

V. Total Number, Tonnage and Crews of Vessels entered at each Port. VI. Total Number, Tonnage and Crews of Vessels cleared at each Port. VII. Return of Junks entered from Macao.

VIII. Return of Junks cleared for Macao.

IX. Return of Junks entered at each Port from China and Formosa.

X. Return of Junks cleared at each Port for China and Forinosa.

XI. Gross Total Number of Junks entered at each Port.

XII. Gross Total Number of Junks cleared at each Port.

XIII. Return of Junks (Local Trade) entered.

XIV. Return of Junks (Local Trade) cleared.

XV. Summary of Arrivals and Departures of all Vessels, and of all Chinese Passengers. XVI. Return of Vessels registered.

XVII. Return of Vessels struck off the Register.

XVIII. Amount of Fees received under Section 3 of Ordinance 8 of 1879.

XIX. Return of Chinese Passenger Ships cleared by the Emigration Officer.

XX. Return of Vessels bringing Chinese Passengers to Hongkong from Places out of

China.

XXI. Return of Marine cases tried.

XXII. Diagram of Tonnage of Vessels entered.

XXIII. Return of the work performed by the Government Marine Surveyor.

XXIV. Return from Imports and Exports (Opium) Office.

SHIPPING.

2. The Shipping Returns show 30,777 Arrivals with a tonnage of 6,371,087 tons, and 30,611 Departures of C.301,604 tons, making a grand total of 61,388 vessels and 12,672,691 tons.

3. The following statement shows how this amount of shipping is apportioned:-

Ships.

Tonnage.

British, Foreign,

5,212

6,500,869

2,376

2,471,121

Junks in Foreign Trade,.

45,568

3,417,331

53,156

12,389,321

Junks in Local Trade,.

8,232

283,370

Grand Total,

61,388

12,672,691

4. Compared with 1888, there has been an increase of British tonnage amounting to 26,526 tons, and a decrease of foreign tonnage of 61,213 tons. There has also been a decrease in the Junk trade of 289,018 tons.

228

5. Compared with the average of the past 3 years, there is a decrease under the British flag of 416 ships and 167,053 tons, of Foreign ships, there is an increase of 53,510 tons.

6. The general trade as represented by the amount of shipping from and to the various countries does not show on the whole any very marked alteration. Cochin-China, Siam, and the Gulf of Tonquin show a falling off while the Coast of China and Formosa (in British Ships) and India and Singapore show the chief increase. There is however a considerable falling off in the Junk trade between Hong- kong and Coast of China and Formosa.

7. The trade with Great Britain and Continent of Europe does not differ materially from that of 1888.

8. 3,669 steamers, 151 sailing vessels and 26,957 Junks arrived during the year, giving an average of over 84 vessels daily arriving in the Waters of the Colony. Of the steamers, over 69 per cent. were British and of these, more than 50 per cent. were "Ocean going."

STEAM-LAUNCHES.

9. On the 31st December, there were 101 Steam-launches in the Harbour, of these, 50 were licensed for the conveyance of passengers, 41 were privately owned, 10 were the property of the Colonial Government. There were, in addition, 6 launches, the property of the War Department.

EMIGRATION.

10. There has been a falling off in the number of Chinese leaving the Colony for Ports other than those in China or Japan. One cause of this falling off is said to be a reduction in the rate of wages paid to coolies in the Straits Settlements. I am inclined to the belief, however, that the principal cause is that the Coolie Brokers or "Catchers" who go into the interior to procure emigrants, are not just now as successful as they have been hitherto in securing clients. The fact of fraudulent practices on the part of these "Catchers" has become known in the interior, and the Mandarins have consequently put a check on the people, who are already rather chary of placing themselves in the hands of the "Catchers." This is not an unmixed benefit. On the one hand, the number of coolies who are cajoled into emigrating is reduced, but on the other hand, those on whom no deception is being practised are distrustful and thus deterred from going.

11. In my Annual Report for 1888 I alluded to the abuses connected with Chinese Emigration, I have since had no cause to alter the opinion which I then expressed. An abuse which I did not therein refer to was that of "impersonation" at the examination before the Emigration Officer.

This is some- times detected at the final examination on board, when the coolie, having plucked up courage, declares that he does not want to go, and it is then discovered that although he has a "contract ticket" which has been passed by the Emigration Officer, he himself has never been subject to examination. It also frequently occurs that coolies are found on board the vessel with tickets similar in all respects to those issued by the Passenger Broker, but which have not received the Emigration Officer's stamp, thus shewing that the holders of these tickets have never been examined as to their willingness to emigrate. Enquiry as to the origin of these tickets is always unsuccessful, the coolie has always received it from "a friend" who, he cannot or will not give up.

12. During 1889, direct emigration to Deli (or Medan) in Sumatra was introduced, previous to this, it used to be done through Singapore. The first ship that left here direct was the China with 272 emigrants. When somewhere near Singapore, there was a revolt of the coolies and the Captain was forced to take the vessel into Singapore. The reason given for the outbreak was that, the coolies were told at Hongkong that they were going to Singapore, and they did not want to go any where else. A similar incident occurred on board the S.S. Kiel later on in the year, and there has been one more case reported in 1890. These "outbreaks" are to my mind easily accounted for, I am of opinion that they are brought about by the Chinese Brokers at Singapore, who desire to re-establish what was to them a lucrative business, and in order to accomplish this they endeavour to bring direct emigration into disrepute. They have their emissaries on board the ship, and these succeed in stiring up the coolies to revolt by telling them that they are being deceived.

13. Whatever safeguards are adopted for the protection of the emigrating Chinese coolies, it will I think always be possible for them to be to some extent circumvented by the wily and unscrupulous Chinese Brokers. I think, however, that if the proposed system of Licensed Boarding Houses, and an Emigration Wharf is established, a severe blow will be dealt to these rascals, and I have hope that when the system is adopted, we shall hear little about real Emigration abuses.

REGISTRY OF SHIPPING.

14. During the year, six vessels of 1,694 tons were registered under the provisions of The Merchant Shipping Act, 1854, and seven Certificates of Registry were cancelled. Return No. XVIII shows the remainder of the work done in this Branch.

MARINE MAGISTRATE'S Court.

15. Fifty-three cases were heard in this Court during the year. (11) were the principal offences in the case of ships, and Throwing Leaving without Clearance (6) in the case of Junks,

Refusal of duty (17), and Assault Ballast into the Harbour (9), and

229

EXAMINATIONS FOR THE POST OF MASTERS, MATES AND ENGINEERS UNDER SECTION 15 OF ORDINANCE No. 8 OF 1879.

16. The following table will shew the number of candidates examined for Certificates of Com- petency, distinguishing those who were successful, and those who failed:-

Masters,

First Mates,

Only Mates,

Second Mates,

GRADE.

First Class Engineers,

Second Class Engineers,

PASSED.

FAILED.

25

1

29

1

2

1

1

SERS

57

3

11

28

; **

39

3

3

MARINE COURTS UNDER SECTION 13 OF ORDINANCE No. 8 of 1879.

17. The following Courts having been held during the year:-

1. On the 5th February, 1889, a Marine Court sitting as a Court of survey to inquire into the seaworthiness or otherwise of the British Steamship Pasig, Official No. 58,335 of Hongkong. The. vessel was found to be seaworthy.

2. On the 26th April, 1889. Inquiry as to the stranding of the British Steamship Afghan, Official No. 78,572 of Rochester, on N.E. Head of Lema Island, on the morning of 12th April, 1889. The Master's (THOMAS GOLDING) Certificate of Competency was returned to him.

3 On the 18th June, 1889. Inquiry respecting certain charges of misconduct brought against DAVID LONGWILL, First Mate of the British Barque Sir William Wallace, Official No. 53,245 of Newcastle, N.S.W., by TIMOTHY RICHARD BROWN, Master of the said ship. The First Mate's Certificate of Competency was returned to him. 4. On the 15th August, 1889. Inquiry as to the loss of the British Steamship Altnacraig, Official No. 84,361 of Aberdeen, on a reef off Paragua, on the morning of the 14th July, 1889. The Master's (WILLIAM BUYERS) Certificate of Competency was returned to him.

5. On the 9th September, 1889. Inquiry respecting certain charges of misconduct brought against ALEXANDER Cox, First Mate of the British Barque Mauna Loa, Official Ño. 72,640 of Maitland, Nova Scotia, by LEWIS ELLIS, able seaman of the said ship. The First Mate's Certificate of Competency was suspended for two years.

6. On the 16th September, 1889. Inquiry respecting certain charges of misconduct brought against CLEMENT YOUNG, First Mate of the British Barque Omega, Official No. 63,881 of Shanghai, by ARTHUR VERE BROWN, Master of the said ship. The First Mate's Certificate of Competency was returned to him.

7. On the 12th November, 1889. Inquiry as to the loss of the British Barque Hattie E. Tapley, Official No. 83,663 of Sydney, N.S.W., on the N.E. extreme of Chek Wan in the Samoun Group, on the night of the 1st November, 1889. The Master's (ROBERT S. MALCOM) Certificate of Competency was returned to him.

8. On the 14th December, 1889. Inquiry as to the loss of the British Ship Nylghau, Official No. 80,617 of Yarmouth, Nova Scotia, on the Pratas Shoal, on the evening of the 25th November, 1889. The Master's (WATSON BAKER BUTLER) Certificate of Competency was returned to him.

SEAMEN.

18. 9,822 seamen were shipped and 10,069 were discharged at the Shipping Office and on board · ships during the year.

19. 238 distressed seamen were received during the year. Of these, 44 were sent to United Kingdom, 21 were sent elsewhere and 173 obtained employment. $4,390.40 were expended by the Board of Trade in the relief of these men and $223.13 by this Colony.

MARINE SURVEYOR'S SUB-DEPARTMENT.

20. Return No. XXIII shews a continued increase in the work of this Dapartment. 1,127 visits were made by the Government Marine Surveyor to vessels under survey.

LIGHTHOUSES.

21. The three Lighthouse Stations have been maintained as usual during the year.

In May, an alteration was made in the nature of the Green Island Light, the red shades were dispensed with, and a bright light is now exhibited all round except over the Kellett's Bank. A light vessel has also been kept up on Kellett's Bank to mark the spot where eight Junks laden with stones have been sunk as an experiment with the object of finding out if the obstruction thus caused will result in a "silting up on the Bank. I do not anticipate much result from the experiment.

""

230

A

22. Some little difficulty has been experienced with the Chinese Staff of the Lighthouses. After being trained to their work of watch-keeping in the lantern, they frequently find the duty too irksome and laborious, and leave, with or without permission, as most convenient to themselves. new man has then to be obtained and his training taken in hand, and with a temperature in the lantern of 83° as it often is in the Summer nights the duty of training these men, which falls on the European Light-keeper, is a very trying one, seeing that he has his own watch to keep besides. Notwithstand- ing this, the lights have been efficiently maintained. I propose, however, recommending that a better class of Chinese shall in future be obtained for the posts of Light-keepers, these to receive higher rates of wages than at present, and to give security for the proper performance of their duty, and entering into an agreement to serve for a certain length of time.

BOKHARA ROCKS.

23. During the past year, experiments have been made by the Royal Engineers, with the object of determining the practicability or otherwise of blasting a portion of the Bokhara Rocks, so as to obtain a minimum depth over the Rocks of 5 fathoms. These experiments have shewn that without special appliances the operation cannot be successfully carried out. The matter is, however, still receiving attention.

GOVERNMENT GUNPOWDER DEPÔT.

24. During the year there has been stored in the Government Magazine at Stone Cutters' Island.

No. of Cases, &c.

Approximate Weight,

Gunpowder, Privately owned,

Government owned,

Cartridges, Privately owned,

""

Government owned,

Explosive Privately owned,. Compounds f

་་

Government owned,

Total,......

Ibs.

18,200

449,370

632

63,200

499

106,232

138

15,130

1,830

90,941

9

750

21,308

725,623

On the 31st December, 1889, there remained as under :--

No. of Cases, &c.

Approximate Weight,

lbs.

Gunpowder, Privately owned,

4,849

98,810

Government owned,

632

63,200

Cartridges, Privately owned,

299

35,739

Government owned,

116

17,000

Explosive

Compounds Privately owned,.

707

36,832

Government owned,............

9

750

Total,.....

6,612

252,331

25. The condition of the Magazine is not such as might be desired. For several years, white-ants have been at work in the rafters of the roof, and although their depredations have from time to time been restored the pests themselves have not been got rid of. The eastern outer wall is cracked owing apparently to the subsidence of the foundation. The wharf also is in a state bordering on the "unsafe."

The subject also of excluding the public from the precints of the Magazine is one which, I submit, should receive consideration. At present, this is the only portion of Stone Cutters' Island where the public can land without special "Permit" and when it is considered with what care such like premises are generally guarded, the omission in this case seems to call for remark.

IMPORTS AND EXPORTS (OPIUM) OFFICE.

26. The Return shows that during the year the amount of opium reported was as follows:--

Imported,

Exported,

Through cargo reported but not landed,

67,42932 chests. ...61,8083 27 .....12,306

40 ""

29

19,327 Permits were issued and a daily memo. of exports was sent to the Kowloon Customs Office.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

R. MURRAY RUMSEY, Ret. Com., R.N.,

Harbour Master, &c.

The Honourable W. M. DEANE,

Acting Colonial Secretary, &C.,

&C.,

&c.

I.-NUMBER, TONNAGE, and CREWS of Vessels ENTERED at Ports in the Colony of Hongkong from each Country in the Year 1889.

FOREIGN.

TOTAL.

BRITISH.

COUNTRIES WHENCE ARRIVED.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels.

Tons. rews. Vessels.

Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tons. Crews, Vessels. Tons.

'rews. Vessels.

Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tons.

rews. Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Australia and New Zealand,

57

British Columbia,....................

19

64,470| 2,401] 1 1,856 50 36,501 1,232

58

66,326 2,451 17

17,783 306

1,540 24} 18

19

:

36,361 1,232

British North Borneo,................................................

111

8,385 3511

11 8,385| 351

2,204 33

Cape of Good Hoop,

1

223

Coast of China and Formosa.......

Cochin-China,

Continent of Europe,

Great Britain,

India and Singapore,

pelago,

Japan,

Java and other Islands in the Indian Archi-

Macao, ....

Mauritius,

North Pacific,

Philippine Islands,

Ports in Hainan and Gulf of Tonquin,

Russia in Asia,.

Sandwich Islands,..

Siam,

United States of America,

1,287|1,697,011| 59,940] 60,325|| 1,844} 17.518 361 199|| 308,469 10,465| 128 164,378 8,422) 145 229,139 9,770)

...

16 15,710 487

52]

[1]

1,077 25

1,071 18 881 78,017 2,401

***

480 14

14 19,511| 687

14

437 408,485 16,739)

487

11] 17,518 361 190 308,469 10,465|| 128 164,378 8,422 146 229,619 9,784 19,511| 687

408,485| 16,739|

82 160,960 7,480]

42

12

61 8,049

162

59 58,302 1,888, 143 218,440 7,557

81

:

:

3,204

112

63

143

7,521 220

1,628

41

1,303 1,712,721 60,427 13,369 1,456,429 183,876 9,294 611,034 106,192 22,663 2,067,463 290.068 14,656 3,153,440 243,816 9,310 53 61,402 1,869 87 76,946 2,383

139 137,271 4,227

93 178,478 7,791) 196 316,518 10,627] 187 222,680 10,310} 288|||447,579 17,327 27,032 9071

223 626,744 106,679 23,966 3,780,184 350,495 2,148 43 141 139,419 4,270 42! 12

19,323 3301 74 19 2,204 33 13 223

82,253|| 2,707}| 2 3,396 36,361 1,232} 10,589 384

74 761

85,649 2,781

19

36,361 1,232

131

10,589 384

9

1

2231

2]

83 161,002 7,442

f

8,049 162

61,506 2,000

218,440 7,557||

3,204 112 480 14

94 178,520 7,803 196 316,518 10,627 191 225,884 10,422 289

448,059 17,341

10 9,149 261

22

1,628 41. 24

28,660 948

619

96,315 15,849

86

11,825 1,149

705|| 108,140| 16,998 1,056 504,800| 32,588]

86

11,825 1,149 1,142

516,625| 33,737

:

1 1,387] 32]

75 50,384 3,177 37 13,331 1,075 6,666 131

1,364 391

83,741 3,210]

1

1,387 32

1

871 27

871

27

...

2,258] 591

22

1,889

62

1,776] 52

77

52,273 3,239

39

19

29,872 1,492 15,107 1,127, 236 121,740 5,039]

407

56

3

463

27

407

19

56

8

49

3,959

140

54

33,831 1,632

124

80,256 4,669)

5,848

2021

131

236

121,740 5,089

273

135,071 6,114]

1,776

52

4

6,666| 131

3 3,917 110

828

25

4,745 135

7

10,583 241

828

25

:

1,364 39

3,283 87

3,283 87

9

4,647 1261

2,258 59

463

27

86,104 4,871 275 136,847 6,166 81 11,411 266

9 4,647 126

881

32]

72,038) 2,436

TOTAL,....

2,591 3,242,963 122,314

23

22,788 690

32

83,741 3,210) 17 14,336 447 72,038 2,438 27 54,309 2,089

17

14,336 447

105

98,077 3,657

105

2,691]

29

57,000 2,130

59 126,347 4,527]

2,691

41

61

98,077 3,657 129,038) 4,568

2,614 3,265,751| 123,004 14,733 2,331,684 229,014 9,399 - 638,101 107,771 24,132 2,969,785 336,785 17,324|5,574,647 351,328 9,422 660,889 108,461 26,746 6,235,586 459,789

231

II-NUMBER, TONNAGE, and CREWS of Vessels CLEARED at Ports in the Colony of Hongkong for each Country in the Year 1889.

232

BRITISH.

COUNTRIES TO WHICH DEPARTED.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL

WITH CARGOES,

FOREIGN.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tons. Crews. Vessels.

'Tons.

Crews Vessels.

Tons. Crews. vessels.

Tons.

Crews.Vessels.

Tons.

rews. Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Australia and New Zealand,

British Columbia,.

British North America,

27

37,190 1,558)

27

37,190 1,558

27

37,190 1,558,

271

37,190 1,558

...

...

2,884

107

2,884

107

2,884

107

2,884

107

1

British North Borneo,

Coast of China and Formosa,

Cochin-China,

495 16 18! 17,063) 9351 1,511 1,955,915 72,034)

1

495

16

495

16

19 17,558 951

382

13

21

2,017 49

3 2,399 62

11,064

371

19 21,342 688

31

35,082 1,049

1,524 1,966,979 72,405|| 15,334 1,681,915 212,939 7,070 50 56,424 1,737

60 51,295 1,616|

31

91

Continent of Europe,

Great Britain,

61

9,293 207

9,293 207

43 101,693 5,704|

39

78,187 4,844

India and Singapore,

Japan,

Java & other Islds. in the Indian Archipelago,

Macao,

North Pacific,

Philippine Islands,

Ports in Hainan and Gulf of Tonquin,

136 225,581 9,729)

435 411,404| 16,387;

...

18.469 1,084)

28,692 1,480

192 283,827 10,989)|

3,230 $8

39 78,187 4,844

198

3

3,528

57

3

3,528 57

287,057) 11,077 |

79 109,236 8,550)

5,523 111

84

114,759 3,661

495 163 19 17,445 948 386,649 75,560 22,404 2,068,564 288,499 16,845 8,637,830 284,973 7,083 24,789 801 791

76,084 2,417| 62

72,637 2,304] 43 101,693 5,704 49 110,986 5.911| 42 81,715 4,901) 271| 398,063) 14,539}

1

495

16

3

2,512 65 19,957 1,013

22 397,713 75,931 23,928 4,035,543 360,904 59,871 1,850 141] 132,508 4,154

49 110,986 5,911

42

81,715) 4,901

11

26]

2

3,897

1351

36,570 873

5,781

126)

162 262,151|10,602| 9,678 261

80 144,028 5,983

85

118,496 3,664

165

262,524 9,647

216

369,609 15,712)|

111

8,753 1991 155,066| 4,537]

282

401,816 14,738

327

524,675 20,249

1

637

12

2,042 56

1

2,679 68

31

4,534) 1471

7,823

182

11

12,357

329

435

411,404 16,387 |

6C0|| 100,388 16,265|

47

5,792

7181

707

106,180 16,983

1,095

511,792 32,652||

47

5,792

718 1,142

517,584 33,370

Russia in Asia,........

Sandwich Islands,

Siam,....

35

:

South America,

United States of America,.

26

50

4 1,844

56

21

19,669) 704

2

761

24

10

11,287

178

1,289 35

10,187

1,289 35

106

12

1061 12

190

35

28,656 1,274

22

12,683 573

0,473

144}

29

19,156 717

48

106

31,152 1,657

12

1,289

35)

3

1,395] 4.7

16,660

3341

64

47,812 1,991

978 37

51

29,665 1,517

232

120,336 5,033]

871

28

233

121,209 5,061

282

149.030 6,513)

1,844

65]

284) 150,874|| 6,578

2,348

85

42

10

2,390

95

4

2,348

851

42

10

5 2,390 95

:

1,844

56

1,176] 291

2

1.081]

22

20,750

737

4,263 138

3,113 781 10

968

16

1,729 40

598

11

11

11,885

189

23

2,735 52

26,109 436

23

1,176 29 7,376 216 2,735 52 26,109 43C

27

3,0:0 85 23,932) 842

6 3,020 85

4,194

1111

321 28.126

953

61 3,496 331 37,396 614

76

968

16

7)

598

18

341

4,464

37,994

92

*625

TOTAL,.

2,499 3,124,916 121,018||

99 119,202 2,952 2,598 3,235,118 124,000 16,556|2,362,860| 252,497|| 7,256|| 555,807 81,219 28,8122,918,667 333,716 19,055 5,487,776 373,545] 7,355 666,009 84,171 26,410,6,153,785 457,716

233

III.-NUMBER, TONNAGE and CREWS of Vessels of each Nation ENTERED at Ports in the Colony of Hongkong,

in the Year 1889.

ENTERED.

NATIONALITY

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

OF

VESSELS.

Vessels. Tons.

Crews. Vessels.

Tons.

Crews. Vessels.

Tons.

Crews.

American,

54

82,488

Austrian,

12

23,630

2,587 648

6

6,190

105

60

88,678

2,692

12

---

23,630

648

British,

2,591

3,242,963 | 122,314

23

22,788

690

2,614 | 3,265,751 | 123,004

Chinese,

134

171,998 6,984

6

5,151

248

140

177,149 7,232

Chinese Junks,

13,589

1,124,701

181,978

9,337

592,221

106,192

22,926

1,716,922

288,170

Danish,

74

29,606

1,825

3

975

49

77

30,581

1,874

Dutch,

2

2,053

80

2

2,053

80

French,

72

138,651

8,614

1

183

18

73

138,834

8,632

German,

668

600,448

20,644

44

33,206

1,127

712

633,654

21,771

Hawaiian,

3

1,975

46

3

1,975

46

Italian,

14

20,234

739

14

20,234

739

Japanese,

66

97,474

3,205

66

97,474

3,205

Norwegian,

14

13,454

349

14

13,454

349

Peruvian,

1

245

12

1

245

12

Russian,

6

10,332

365

1

42

12

Siamese,

4

1,925

81

:

Spanish,

20

12,470

857

1

133

20

286

10,374

377

4

1,925

81

21

12,603

877

TOTAL,...

17,324 5,574,647 351,328 9,422 660,889 108,461 26,746 6,235,536 459,789

IV.-NUMBER, TONNAGE and CREWS of Vessels of each Nation CLEARED at Ports in the Colony of Hongkong,

NATIONALITY

OF

VESSELS.

in the Year 1889.

CLEARED.

TOTAL.

IN BALLAST.

WITH CARGOES.

Vessels.

اث

Tons. Crews. Vessels. Tons.

Crews. Vessels.

Tons.

Crews.

American,

43

Austrian,

12

68,547, 2,405 23,630

7

8,050

124

50

76,597

2,529

730

12

23,630

730.

British,

2,499

3,124,916

121,048

99

110,202

Chinese,

132

170,886

6,644

1

Chinese Junks,

15,548

1,323,393

209,793

7,094

392 377,016 | 75,751

2,952 23

2,598 133 22,642

3,235,118

124,000

-171,278 6,667

1,700,409 | 285,544

Danish,

71

28,115

1,646

71

28,115

1,646

Dutch, French,

1

1,164

56

1

889

21

2

2,053

77

....

60

128,813

8,382

13

9,084

260

73

137,897

8,642

German,

637

565,593

20,255

67

58,798

1,822

704

624,391

22,077

Hawaiian,

3

1,975

43

3

1,975

43

Italian,

12

17,988

888

12

17,988

888

Japanese,

3,795

148

Norwegian,

7

6,787

177

कुछ

64

96,064

3,054

67

99,859

3,202

6

4,806

120

13

11,593

297

Peruvian,

1

245

12

1

245

12

Russian,

9,250

441

42

10

6

9,292

451

Siamese,

4

1,925

82

4

1,925

82

Spanish,

17

10,754

795

666

34

19

11,420

829

TOTAL, 19,055.

19,055 5,487,776 373,545

7,355

666,009

84,171

26,410 6,153,785 | 457,716

V. TOTAL NUMBER, TONNAGE AND CREWS OF VESSELS ENTERED AT EACH PORT IN THE COLONY OF HONGKONG, IN THE YEAR 1889.

TOTAL.

234

BRITISH.

FOREIGN.

NAMES

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

OF PORTS.

Vls.

Tons.

Crews.

Vls.

Tons.

Crews. Vls. Tons. Crews.

Vis. Tons. Crews. VIs. Tons. Crews. Vls.

Tons. Crews. Vls.

Aberdeen,

597

24,274 6,212 645

Hunghom,

Shaukiwán,.

Stanley,

Victoria,

Yaumáti,

Total,..... 2,591 3,242,963 122,314

23 22,788

:

2,591 3,242,963|122,314||

14,724 1,845|| 815 3331 12,766 2,872| 945 333 16,425 3,869| 103 23 22,788 690 2,614 3,265,751 123,004 12,326 2,138,062 202,359 4,667 890 125,433 11,857 2,224

254

28,975 8,653 1,242 41,400 8,096 1,069 57,889| 9,120 1,278 3,224 931 436 362,377 53,196 16,993 144,236 27,775 3,114

:

53,249 14,865 597 56,124 9,941] 254 70,655 11,992] 333 19,649 4,800 333 2,500,439 255,555 14,917 269,669 39,632 890

,684|229,01 690 2,614 3,265,751 123,004 14,733 2,331,684 229,014 9,399 638,101 107,771 24,132 2,969,785 326,785 17,324 5,574,647 351,328 9,422 660,889 108,461 26,746 6,235,536 459,789

Tons. Crews. Vls. 24,274 6,212| 645 28,975 8,653 1,242 14,724 1,845| 815 41,400 8,096 1,069 12,766 2,872] 945 57,889 9,120 1,278] 103

16,425 3.869 3,224 931 430 5,381,025 324,673 4,690 385,165 53,886 19,607 5,766.190 378,559 125,433 11,857 2,224 144,23627,775| 3,114 269,669 39,632

Tons. Crews. Vis.

Tons. Crews.

53,249 14,865 56,124 9,941 70,655|11,992 19,649 4,800

VI.-TOTAL NUMBER, TONNAGE AND CREWS OF VESSELS CLEARED AT EACH PORT IN THE COLONY OF HONGKONG, IN THE YEAR 1889:

BRITISH.

FOREIGN.

NAMRS

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

OF PORTS.

Vis. Tons. Crews. Vls.

Tons. Crews. Vis. Tons. Crews. Vis.

Tons. Crews. Vis.

Aberdeen,

Hunghom,

...

...

...

Shaukiwán,..

Stanley,

***

...

***

...

Victoria,

2,499 3,124,916|121,048||

Yaumáti,.

...

10,229| 2,305| 929 31,426 3,501| 594 50,568 6,332| 492 12,480 2,079 210] 99 110,202 2,952 2,598 3,235,118 124,000||13,447 2,127,418 222,211 3,322 1,352 130,744 16,069 1,709

313

456|

762

2261

Total,..

་་་

2,499 3,124,916 121,048

99 110,202 2,952 2,598 3,235,118 124,000

Tons. Crews. Vls.

43,020|12,560 1,242 24,192| 6,314| 1,050 19,325 5,439 1,254 7,169 2,721] 436 325,396 31,304 16,769 136,705 22,881 3,061

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOES.

TOTAL.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Tons. Crews. Vis.

Tons. Crews.

53,249| 14,965 55,618 9,815 69,893 11,771

Tons. Crews. Vls. Tons. Crews. Vls. 53,249|14,865| 313 10,229||2,305| 929 55,618| 9,815] 450 31,426 3,501| 594 69,893 11,771} 762 50,568 6,332 492 19,649 1,830) 226 12,480 2,079| 210 2,452,809 253,515 15,946 5,252,329 343,259 3,421 267,449|38,950|| 1,352|| 130,744 16,069 1,709

43,020|12,560| 1,242| 24,192 6,314| 1,050| 19,325 5,439 1,254| 7,169 2,721 436 19,649 4,800 435,598 34,256 19,367 5,687,927 377,515 136,705 22,881 3,061| 267,449 38,950

5,118 124,000 16,556 2,862,860 262,497 7,256 555,807 81,219 23,812 2,918,667 583,71619,055 6,487,776 378,545 7,355 006,000 84,171 26,410 6,153,785 457,716-

:

VII.—Total Number, Tonnage,Crews and Passengers of Junks ENTERED from Macao, during the Year ending 31st December, 1889.

235

CARGO.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Passen- gers.

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Passen-

gers.

l'asseu-

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

gers.

Victoria,

612 93,260

15,710

289

80

8,544 1,015

20

692 101,804 16,725

309

Total.... 612

93,260 15,710

289

80

8,544

1,015

20

20

692 101,804 16,725

309

VIII.-Total Number, Tonnage, Crews and Passengers of Junks CLEARED for Macao, during the Year

ending 31st December, 1889.

CARGO.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels. Tons. Crews..

Passen-

gers.

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Passen- gers.

Vessels.

Tous.

Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Victoria,

657 98,397 16,195

581

46

5,400

695 1,047

703

103,797 16,890

1,628

Total,... 657

98,397 16,195

581

46

5,400

695 1,047

703

103,797 16,890 1,628

IX.—Total Number, Tonnage, Crews and Passengers of Junks ENTERED at each Port in the Colony of Hongkong, from Ports on the Coast of China and Formosa, during the Year ending 31st December, 1889.

CARGO,

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Passen- gers.

Vessels. 'T'ons. Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Aberdeen,

597 24,274 6,212

137

645

28,975 8,653

40

1,242

53,249 14,865

177

Hunghòm,

254

14,724 1,845

65

815

41,400

8,096

36

1,069

56,124 9,941

101

Shaukiwán,.

333

12,766

2,872

62

945

57,889

9,120

119

1,278

70,655

11,992

181

Stanley,

333

16,425

3,869

101

103

3,224

931

18

436

19,649

4,800

119

Victoria,

10,570

Yaumáti,.

890

837,819 125,433

139,613 | 115,781

11,857

4,525

307,953

50,602

102

2,224

144,236 27,775

43,299 95

Total,... 12,977 | 1,031,441 166,268 116,248

9,257

583,677 |105,177

15,095 3,114

197

43,607 | 22,234 | 1,615,118 |271,445 | 159,855

1,145,772 || 190,215 | 159,080

269,669 39,632

X.-Total Number, Tonnage, Crews and Passengers of Junks CLEARED at each Port in the Colony of Hongkong, for Ports on the Coast of China und Formosu, during the Year ending 31st December, 1889.

Cargo.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Passen- gers.

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Aberdeen,

Hunghom,

Shaukiwán,..

313

10,229 2,305 456

3,501 31,426 762 50,568 6,332

44

62

167

929 43,020 12,560 594 24,192 6,314 *492

19,325 5,439

49 1,242 7 1,050

53,249 14,865

93

55,618 9,815

69

79

1,254

69,893 11,771.

246

Stanley,.

Victoria,

226 11,782

86

210

1,352

224 1,709

Yaumáti,.

12,480 2,079 989,549 163,312 | 132,571 3,114 130,744 16,069

Total,... 14,891 | 1,224,996193,598 |133,154 7,048

371,616 75,056 18,091 21,939 1,596,612 268,654 | 151,245

7,169 2,721

7

111,205

25,141 16,553 136,705 22,881 1,396

436 14,896

19,649 4,800

93

3,061

1,130,754 188,453 | 149,124 267,449 38,950 1,620

236

XI.-Grand Total Number, Tonnage, Crews and Passengers of Junks ENTERED at each Port in the Colony of Hongkong (exclusive of Local Trade), during the Year ending 31st December, 1889.

CARGO.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Passen- gers.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

l'asseu-

gers.

Aberdeen,

597

24,274 6,212

137

645

28,975 8,653

40 1,242

53,249 14,865

177

Hunghôm, ...

254

14,724

1,845

65

815

41,400

8,096

36

1,069

56,124 9,941

101

Shaukiwán,.

333

12,766

2,872

62

945

57,889

9,120

119

1,278

70,655 11,992

181

Stanley,

333

16,425 3,869

101

103

3,224

931

18

436

Victoria,

11,182

931,079 155,323 |116,070

4,605

316,497

51,617

Yaumáti,

890

125,433 11,857

102

2,224

144,236 27,775

43,319 95

19,649 15,787 1,247,576|| 206,940 3,114 269,669 39,632

4,800

119

159,389

197

Total,...

13,589

1,124,701 181,978 |116,537

9,337

592,221 106,192 43,627

22,926 1,716,922 | 288,170

160,164

XII.-Grand Total Number, Tonnage, Crews and Passengers of Junks CLEARED at each Port in the Colony of Hongkong (exclusive of Local Trade), during the Year ending 31st December, 1889.

CARGO.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Passen- gers.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Aberdeen,

313

10,229 2,305

44

929

43,020 12,560

49 1.242

53,249 14,865

93

Hunghòm, .

456

31,426

3,501

62

594

24,192

6,314

7

1,050

55,618

9,815

69

Shaukiwán,...

762

50,568

6,332

167

492

19,325

5,439

79

1,254

69,893

11,771

246

Stanley,

226

12,480

2,079

86

210

7,169

2,721

7

436

19,649

4,800

93

Victoria,

12,439

1,087,946 179,507 133,152

3,160

146,605

25,836

17,600

15,599

1,234,551

205,343

150,752

Yaumáti,.

1,352

Total,...

130,744 16,069

15,548 1,323,393 209,793 |133,735

224

1,709

136,705 22,881

1,396

3,061

267,449 38,950

1,620

7,094

377,016 | 75,751 19,138 22,642 1,700,409 285,544 152,873

XIII.-Return of Junks ( Local Trade) ENTERED at the Port of Victoria from the Out-stations of the Island and the Villages in British Kaulung, during the Year ending 31st December, 1889.

CARGO.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Vessels. Tons. Grews.

Passen- gers.

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Passen- gers.

Victoria,...... 2,836 97,309 33,314 2,802

1,195

38,242 11,656 3,231 4,031 135,551 44,970 6,033

Total,...

2,836

97,309 33,314 2,802 1,195 38,242 11,656 3,231 4,031

135,551 44,970

6,033

XIV.-Return of Junks ( Local Trade) CLEARED from the Port of Victoria for the Out-stations of the Island and the Villages in British Kaulung, during the Year ending 31st December, 1889.

CARGO.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Passen- gers.

Passen-

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

gers.

Victoria,......

1,725

49,441 15,472

4,701 2,476 98,378

30,887 1,185 4,201

147,819 46,359

5,886

Total,... 1,725 49,411 15,472 4,701

2,476

98,378 30,887 1,185 4,201

147,819 46,359

5,886

.

237

XV.-SUMMARY,

FOREIGN TRADE.

No. of VESSELS.

TONS.

CREWS.

British Vessels entered with Cargoes,..

Do.

do.

in Ballast,

2,591

23

3,242,963

122,314

22,788

690

Total,.......

2,614

3,265,751

123,004

British Vessels cleared with Cargoes,

2,499

3,124,916

121,048

Do.

do. in Ballast,

99

110,202

2,952

Total,....

2,598

3,235,118

124,000

Total of all British Vessels entered and cleared,

5,212

6,500,869

247,004

Foreign Vessels entered with Cargoes,

14,733

2,331,684

229,014

Do.

do.

in Ballast,

9,399

638,101

107,771

Total,.

24,132

2,959,785

336,785

Foreign Vessels cleared with Cargoes,..

16,556

2,362,860

252,497

Do.

do. in Ballast,

7,256

555,807

81.219

Total,.......

23,812

2,918,667

333,716

Total of all Foreign Vessels entered and cleared,.................

47,944

5,888,452

670,501

Total of all Vessels entered with Cargoes,

17,324

5,574,647

351,328

Do.

do.

in Ballast,

9,422

660,889

108,461

Total of all Vessels entered,

26,746

6,235,536

459,789

Total of all Vessels cleared with Cargoes,

19,055

5,487,776

373,545

Do.

do. in Ballast,

Total of all Vessels cleared,

7,355

666,009

84,171

26,410

6,153,785

457,716

Do.

do.

Total of all Vessels entered and cleared with Cargoes,

Total of all Vessels engaged in Foreign Trade only, entered and cleared,

36,379

11,062,423

724,873

do. in Ballast,

16,777

1,326,898

192,632

....

53,156

12,389,321

917,505

TRADE LOCAL.

Total of all Vessels entered,

4,031

135,551

44,970

Do.

cleared,

4,201

147,819

46,359

Total of all Vessels engaged in Local Trade only, entered and cleared,..

8,232

283,370

91,329

Total of all Vessels engaged in Foreign Trade only, entered and cleared,

Do.

do. in Local Trade only,

53,156

12,389,321

917,505

do.

8,232

283,370

:

91,329

Grand Total of all Vessels entered and cleared,

61,388

12,672,691

1,008,834

SUMMARY OF ALL CHINESE PASSENGERS.

NAMES OF PLACES.

From Ports other than in China or Japan,.

Do.

in China and Japan,

Do.

in Macao,

Do.

in Villages of the Colony,

99,315

581,898

60,896

6,033

Total Arrivals,

748,142

Left for Ports other than in China or Japan,

47,849

Do.

in China and Japan,

622,876

Do.

in Macao,

58,102

Do.

in Villages of the Colony,

5,886

Total Departures,

731,713

Excess of Arrivals over Departures,..

13,429

Grand Total of Arrivals and Departures,.....

1,482,855

·"

238

XVI.-RETURN of VESSELS REGISTERED at the Port of Hongkong, during the Year 1889.

Name of Vessel.

Official Number.

Regis- tered Tonnage.

Horse Power.

Rig.

Built of

Where built and when.

Remarks, &c.

Nagasaki, str.,

Samtor, str.,

Goodluck, str., 88,850 81.34 28

Lady Harewood,... 60,867 381.85

Sanitwongse, str.,. 95,851 71.75 24

95,852 10.29 6

95,853 68.59 28

Ardgay, str.,.

88,869 1,080.92 160 Schooner Steel Low Walker on Tyne, 1886.

Since transferred to New Westminster, Brit. Columbia.

XVII.-RETURN of REGISTRIES of VESSELS cancelled at the Port of Hongkong, during the Year 1889.

Schooner Wood Hongkong, 1888.

Barque Wood Plymouth, County of

Devon, 1868. Schooner Wood Hongkong, 1889.

None Wood Hongkong, 1889.

Schooner Wood Hongkong, 1889.

Since transferred to Penang.

Since transferred to Penang.

Name of Vessel.

Regis- tered Tonnage.

Rig.

Built of

Where built and when.

Reason of Cancellation.

10.29

Esmeralda, str.,. 70,438 395.22 1876 100 Brigantine | Iron Aberdeen, 1874.

Wandering Min- strel,

65,363

Carisbrooke, str, 65,463

Seagull, str., 63,876

Goodluck, str.,.. 88,850

Sanitwongse, str., 95,851

Nagasaki, str.,... 95,852

361.71 1885 Barque Wood Peterhead, 1875.

973.07 1886 140 Schooner 1ron Sunderland, Durham,

1873. 17.37 1888 25 Schooner Iron Rutherglen, Scotland,

1872. 81.34 1889 28 Schooner Wood Hongkong, 1888.

71.75 1889 24 Schooner Wood Hongkong, 1889.

1889 6 None Wood Hongkong, 1889.

Sold to Foreigners at Yoko-

hama, Japan.

Stranded at Midway Island,

North Pacific.

Sold to Foreigners at Hiogo,

Japan.

Transferred to Shanghai.

Transferred to Penang.

Transferred to Penang.

Transferred to New West- minster, British Columbia.

XVIII.—AMOUNT of FEES received under the Merchant Shipping Act, 1855, and Section III. of Ordinance No. 8

of 1879 in the Harbour Department, during the Year 1889.

Matter or Duty in respect of which Fee taken.

Number.

Fee.

Amount.

Remarks, &c.

Certifying Desertion,

Declaration of Ownership,

Endorsement of change of Master,

Endorsement of change of Ownership,

Granting Certificate of Imperial Registry,..

Inspection of Registry,........

70

1

10

2

1 20

70

20

29

1

29

2.

2

4

CO

6

15

90

2

1

2

Recording Mortgage of Ship,

Recording Discharge of Mortgage,

3

5

15

3

5

15

Recording Sale of Ship,

6

10

5

30

Registering Certificate of Sale,

2

2

4

Total,......

279

XIX. RETURN of CHINESE PASSENGER SHIPS cleared by the Emigration Officer, Hongkong, during the Year ending the 31st day of December, 1889.

239

No.

DATE CLEARED.

SHIP'S NAME.

TONS.

NATION- ALITY

ADULTS.

CHILDREN.

MASTER'S NAME.

WHITHER BOUND.

TOTAL.

OF SHIP.

M.

F.

M.

F.

12345&

1 January 2

Peshawur, str.

""

2

Tetartos, str....

""

5

Ulysses, str.

15

7

Japan, str.

32

12

Poseidon, str.

15

Wing Sang, str.

2,158 British 1,578 Germau 1,526 British 1,865 2,510 Austrian 1,517 British

L. H. Moule

Straits Settlements

210

210

J. Petersen

$661

366

""

S. H. Butler

313

31

11

355

T. S. Gardner

190

77

8

284

""

27

S. Mersa

542

135

13

16

706

92

d'A. de Ste. Croix

552

93

271

680

,1

15

Bormida, str.

""

8

16

Sutlej. str.

1,499 Italian 2,144 British

E. De Negri

312

19

333

37

W. D. Worcester

72

9

18 Independent, str..

871 German

W. J. Schafer

262

10

27

10

22

Devonhurst, str.

11

""

23

Stentor, str.

1,164 Dutch 1,307 British

P. Hauthoff

200

24

""

S. Milligan

301

:

:

72 275

229

50

,,

12

23

Arratoon Apcar, str.

1,392

J. G. Olifent

119

13

137

13

وو

وو

25

Deuteros, str.

14 February 9

Camorta, str.

1,198 German 1,355 British

L. Iwersen

121

8

134

5

A. Fyfe

211

Q

72

""

15

13

Maria Teresa, str.

2,011 Austrian

F. Kossovich

16

117

22

16

"1

15

Airlie, str.

17

27

22

Japan, str.

1,492 British 1,865

W. Ellis

43.

72

T. S. Gardner

393

29

18

25 Tetartos, str.

19

""

27 Shannon, str.

1,578 German 2,049 British

J. Petersen

710

21

C R. Edwards.

2021

""

20

"

28 Menelaus, str.

1,300

R. Nelson

2021 12

"

""

21

March

4 Kashgar, str.

1,555

C. Gadd

710

"

22

""

6

Wing Sang, str.

1,517

d'A. de Ste. Croix]

428

"

22

23

""

7

Parthia, str..

2,035

F. H. Wallace

""

Vancouver, B.C.

65

:

8 225

4410

52

428

739

202

:

218

13

724

67

24

19

7 Gwalior, str..

1,602

W. J. Nantes

Straits Settlements

195

9

25

""

8

Bormida, str.

26

27

28

29

30

31

37

""

11

Amphitrite, str.

11

""

""

13

Pekin, str.

16

Apenrade, str.

12

21

Glenlyon, str.

"

22

China, str.

32

""

23

Oceanic, str..

33

""

23 Tai Sang, str.

34

"

27 Kaisar-i-Hind, str.

Arratoon Apcar, str.

1,499 Italian 2,486 Austrian 1,392 British 2,133

1,476 German 1,410 British

648 German 2,440 British 1,505 2,385

E. De Negri L. Lemesich

J. G. Olifent P. Harris J. Hohlmann J. Sommer

J. F. Möller J. Metcalfe

233

201

249

14

132225

9

513

70

206

258

267

""

212

212

210

210

"

570

201

591

2311

231

Deli in Sumatra

272

272

San Francisco

98!

104

W. H. Jackson

Straits Settlements

724

71

810

>>

R. F. Briscol

233

233

21

35

""

30 Benledi, str.

1,453

J. H. Clark

817

38

2

36

25

30

Almora, str.

1,719

A. Hay

5641

""

"

37

April

2 Nestor, str.

1,269

"

J. S. Thompson

197

""

38

4 Abyssinia, str.

2,346

G. A. Lee

Vancouver, B.C.

147

21

39

6 Kashgar, str.

1,555

C. Gadd

Straits Settlements

311

12

35

28225

865

609

199

150

329

40

"

9

Gaelic, str.

2,691

W. G. Pearne

San Francisco

25

27

:

41

"1

9

Bisagno, str.

1,499 Italiau

42

43

44

45

46

47

48

""

>>

11

Japan, str.

11

Pandora, str.

25

11

Ganges, str.

93

12

Falkenburg, str.

12

Hector, str.

29

15

Camorta, str.

"1

""

16

City of New York, str.

49

"

17

Titan, str.............

1,554 British

50

وو

17 Wing Sang, str.

1,517

""

51

24 Nizam, str.

1,615

52

وو

24 Belgic, str.

2,695

1,865 British 1,781 Austrian 2,111 British

988 German 1,589 British 1,355 1,964 American

99

A. Toquasso T. S. Gardner G. Costanzo T. J. Alderton

H. G. Weber H. Batt A. Fyfe R. R. Searle R. J. Brown d'A. de Ste. Croix T. F. Creery W. H. Walker

Straits Settlements

417

27

449

211

41

262

27

175

551

246

""

170

170

""

Deli in Sumatra

86

86

Straits Settlements

106

106

2021

27

10

327

San Francisco

30

30

Straits Settlements

3321

339

629

51

10

13

703

""

""

156

156

Honolulu

203

11:

246

San Francisco

31

53

24 China, str.

54

29

24 Independent, str..

648 German

871

J. F. Möller

Deli in Sumatra

301

30

W. J. Schafer

Singapore

19

199

Mauritius

168

55

56

57

24 Apenrade, str.

25 Jacob Christensen, str.

26 Arratoon Apear, str.

1,476

J. Hohlmann

Straits Settlements

654

39

58

"

27 Batavia, str.

59 May

1 Palamed, str.

60

2

Moray, str.

61

رو

3

Teheran, str.

62

23

4

Clyde, str....

63

8

Bormida, str.

64

10

Palinurus, str.

65

11 Arabic, str.

66

23

14 Thibet, str.

67

""

15 Medea, str.

68

""

18 Peshawur, str....

69

""

70

22

20 Propontis, str.

71

20 Tetartos, str....

""

72

""

22 Japan, str.

18 City of Sydney, str.

""

""

1,499 Italian 1,536 British 2,788 1,671 1,215 Austrian 2,158 British 1,966 American 1,387 British 1,578 German 1,865 British

J. G. Olifent H. W. Auld C. Jackson W. S. Duncan C. D. Sams J. L. Parfitt

1,108 Norwegian 1,392 British

H. Waage

632

23

567

-888

10

7

768

673

13

673

1,652

Vancouver, B.C.

52

£3

21

1,536

Straits Settlements

238

244

1,411

398

1,670

6801

""

""

2,198

141

23

485

00

584

141

""

E. De Negri T. S. Jackson W. M. Smith C. F. Preston E. Ratzmann L. H. Moule D. E. Friele G. Heasley

5201

12

594

"

274

17

299

San Francisco

621

(2

:

Straits Settlements

457

11

520

372

75

16

471

"

206

206

San Francisco

32!

82

Straits Settlements

443

20

470

*

J. Petersen

267

16

289

T. S. Gardner

37

39

316

86

15

429

73

""

23 Parthia, str..

2,035

F. H. Wallace

Vancouver, B.C.

117

118

74

37

31 Wing Sang, str.

1,517

d'A. de Ste. Croix

Straits Settlements

637

121

22

801

"

75 June

1 Agamemnon, str..

1,523

"1

J. Wilding

293

18

317

21

76

5 Camorta, str.

1,355

""

A. Fyfe

172

الالا

201

27

77

27

6 Bisagno, str...

78

27

6 Port Fairy, str.

79

39

8 Apenrade, str.

80

21

11 Arratoon Apcar, str.

1,499 Italian 1,645 British 1,476 German 1,392 British

81

14 Gaelic, str.

2,691

""

82

83

18 Moray, str.

20 Abyssinia, str.

84

22 City of New York, str.

85

22

22 Elektra, str..

86

""

24 Khiva, str.

1,411 2,346 1,964 American 2,095 Austrian 1,452 British

""

G. A. Valle J. Clark J. Hohlmann J. G. Olifent W. G. Pearne W. S. Duncan G. A. Lee R. R. Searle A. Lussich

177

44

236

19

Vancouver, B.C.

49

:

61

Straits Settlements

771

9

180

3261

761

415

25

San Francisco Straits Settlements

67

6551

71 746

Vancouver, B.C. San Francisco

82

:

82

18!

21

Straits Settlements

318

6

10

14

402

E. Crewe

495

501

11

562

Carried forward,.....

144,064

Carried forward,.............. 24,281 2,117

292

334 27,024

240

RETURN of CHINESE PASSENGER SHIPS cleared by the Emigration Officer, Hongkong,-(Continued).

No.

DATE CLEARED.

SHIP'S NAME.

TONS.

NATION-

ALITY OF SHIP.

ADULTS.

CHILDREN.

MASTER'S NAME.

WHITHER FOUND.

TOTAL.

M.

F. M.

F.

5886688328538

87 June

Brought forward,. 25 | Goalpara, str.

144,064

28 Tetartos, str.

>>

1,355 British 1,578 German

E. C. Russell J. Petersen

Brought forward, |24,281| 2,117|| Straits Settlements

292 3341

27,024

247

18

271

421

47

482

"

89

29

Belgic, str.

2,695 British

90 July

1

Kashgar, str.

91

""

2

Japan, str.

1,555 1,865

W. H. Walker C. Gadd

San Francisco

34

8

44

"5

Straits Settlements

164

19.

#

188

G. B. Pallett

266

71

11

353

91

92

4

Batavia, str..

1,662

"

J. C. Williamson

| Vancouver, B.C.

64

64

93

4

Bormida, str.

94

""

8

Glenfruin, str...

95

9

City of Peking, str.

1,499 Italian 1,936 British 3,129 American

E. De Negri

Straits Settlements

2-5

349

96

10

Berenice, str.

1,707 Austrian

97

13

Deuteros, str.

""

98

13

Wing Sang, str..

1,198 German 1,517 British

E. Norman

J. M. Cavarley A. Trobitz L. Iwersen

218

246

San Francisco

98

106

Straits Settlements

207

75

15

308

177

16

197

d'A. de Ste. Croix

25

27

391

35

7

437

99

16 Arabic, str.

2,788

W. M. Smith

San Francisco

50

2

60

100

18 Port Augusta, str.

1,856

""

H. E. Draper

Vancouver, B.C.

700

70

:

101

20 Deucalion, str.

1,374

W. Asquith

Straits Settlements

92

15

111

102

"

20 | Camorta, str.

1,355

>>

A. Fyfe

132

201

1

157

>>

103

""

20 Flintshire, str.

1,017

""

C. J. C. Habekost

123

6

131

""

104

>>

22 Glaucus, str.

1,381

W. J. Hannah

London

88

88

105

106

107

108 August 109 110

""

24

Arrátoon Apear, str.

1,392

J. G. Olifent

27

25

City of Sydney, str..

1,966 American

D. E. Friele

Straits Settlements San Francisco

125

611

""

25

Teheran, str.

1

Parthia, str...

22

1

Dresden, str.

27

2

Moray, str.

111

3 Oceanic, str.

وو

112

22

8 Bisagno, str.

113

8 Menelaus, str.

114

10

27

Orion, str....

115

""

13

City of Rio de Janeiro, str.

116

29

14

Japan, str.

""

1,670 | British 2,035 3,110 German 1,411 British 2,440 1,499 Italian 1,300 British

1,833 Austrian

2,275 American 1,865 British

C. D. Sams F. H. Wallace W. Schuckmann W. S. Duncan C. H. Kempson G. F. Valle R. Nelson

B. Vidos

W. Ward

Straits Settlements Vancouver, B.C. Straits Settlements

243

81

73

242

::

72

5

207

70

27

282

::

81

73

275

San Francisco

46

17

Straits Settlements

116

10

127

11

201

San Francisco

44

T. S. Gardner

Straits Settlements

192

117

15

"3

Port Fairy, str.

1,645

J. Clark

97

Vancouver, B.C.

63

118

""

20

Thibet, str.

1,671

C. F. Preston

Straits Settlements

213

119

20

Goalpara, str.

1,355

E. C. Russell

202

"

**

120

26

Gaelic, str.

""

2,691

W. G. Pearne

San Francisco

109

23

121

""

28 Wing Sang, str.

1,517

29

d'A. de Ste. Croix

122

:"

29

Abyssinia, str.

2,346

""

G. A. Lee

123

29 Telamon, str.

125

126

127

"

11

Belgic, str.

128

12

Batavia, sir..

""

129

12 Gwalior, str...

""

130

دو

18 Moray, str.

124 Sept.

6 Bormida, str.

6 Arratoon Apear, str.

10 Melpomene, str.

1,555 1,499 Italian

1,392 British 1,943 Austrian 2,095 British

M. H. F. Jackson E. De Negri J. G. Olifent E. Perini W. H. Walker J. C. Williamson W. J. Nantes W. S. Duncan

1:

Straits Settlements Vancouver. B.C. Straits Settlements

6141

96

SEUR SHAREER

72

364

67

24

45

186

128

162

256

16

39

:

:

64

235

63

65

10

55

10]

74

G

:

:

289

217

136

728

75

352

58

420

373

58

442

21

??

434

52

503

2441 27

274

1,662 1,602

""

San Francisco Vancouver, B.C. Straits Settlements

145

14

161

37

37

149

13

167

1,411

295

50

131

"

19 | City of Peking, str.

3,129 American

J. M. Cavarley

Honolulu

831

San Francisco

25

132

"

19 Nestor, str.

1,269 British

133

21

Nizam, str.

134

29

23

Camorta, str.

1,615 1,355

"

W. Elder T. F. Creery

Straits Settlements

298

19

186

""

A. Fyfe

266

1876076

12

361

141

312

3

208

283

"

135

""

27

Port Augusta, str.

1,856

""

J. Hogg

Vancouver, B.C.

65

:

65

136

"J

28

Arabic, str.

2,788

W. M. Smith

""

San Francisco

50

201

80

138

139

**

140

""

141

""

142

??

11

143

*

11

144

""

12 | Fidelio, str.

145

19

17 Wing Sang, str.

137 October 1 Japan, str.

2 Cyclops, str.

8 Bisagno, str.

8 Amigo, str.

10 Maria Teresa, str.

Parthia, str.

City of Sydney, str.

1,865 1,403 1,499 Italian

771 German 2,011 Austrian 2,035. British 1,966 American

T. S. Gardner

H. Nish G. F. Valle

J. A. Bruhn

R. Depens F. W. Wallace D. E. Friele B. Brorsen d'A. de Ste. Croix

""

Straits Settlements

456

61

529

274

261

303

326

10

341

Singapore

56

224

Mauritius

156

:

Straits Settlements

171

45

5

226

853 German 1,517 British

146

"

18 | Oceanic, str.

2,440

"

C. H. Kempson

Vancouver, B.C. San Francisco Medan in Deli, S. Straits Settlements San Francisco

46

47

43

105

Co

:

51

105

:

505

75

76

147

"7

19 | Khiva, str.

1,452

E. Crewe

""

Straits Settlements

216

148

21

Arratoon Apear, str.

1,392

J. G. Olifent

229

23

"

149

23 Peshawur, str.

2,158

L. H. Moule

149

"J

""

:

Co

:

595

88

:

241

260

149

150

23 Diamond, str.

1,030

J. T. Wilson

75

21

151

30

Port Fairy, str.

1,645

J. Clark

502

31

"

99

152 Nov.

2

Kashgar, str.

1,555

W. L. Brown

145

21

G

276

82

544

174

>>

"

153

5 Kong Beng, str.

154

""

6 Gaelic, str.

155 ""

6 Bormida, str.

156

""

8 Camorta, str.

157

"

158

29

159

"1

11

Fidelio, str.

160

"J

14 China, str.

161

""

15 Japan, str.

162

"

20 Coromandel, str.

163

"

22 | Agamemnon, str.

164

22

23 | Belgic, str.

165

"

23 Velox, str.

166

37

29 Choysang, str.

9 Melpomene, str.

9 Moray, str.

1,499 Italian 1,355 British 1,943 Austrian 1,411 British

853 German 2,401 British 1,865 2,383

753 German 1,194 British

R. Jones

W. G. Pearne E. De Negri A. Fyfe E. Perini W. S. Duncan H. Brorsen W. B. Seabury T. S. Gardner J. Reeves

J. Wilding

W. H. Walker

862

""

Bangkok

147

:

:

147

2,691

San Francisco Straits Settlements

46

57

254

401

303

89

107

"

89

25

120

146

59

211

""

12

Medan in Deli, S. San Francisco Straits Settlements

272

272

.

24

291

ད་ལམ

7

31

84

389

1,523

76 255

29

2,695

San Francisco

46

H. Johannsen

Medan in Deli, S.

214

23

:

22

75 283

52

214

W. E. Sawer

Straits Settlements

70

167

30 Wing Sang, str.

1,517

""

d'A. de Ste. Croix

324

**

8

81

73

411

168 Dec.

4 Kaisar-i-Hind, str.

2,385

G. W. Atkinson

46

46

**

169

4 Telemachus, str.

1,421

H. Jones

142

142

""

>>

170

4 Kiel, str.

171

Bisagno, str......

172

7 Gwalior, str....

173

""

10

City of Peking, str..

174

27

10

Elektra, str.

851

1,499 Italian 1,602 British 3,129 American 2,095 Austrian

German

M. H. Krutzfeldt | Medan in Deli, S.

272

272

G. F. Valle

Straits Settlements

248

31

W. J. Nantes

91

12

دو

J. M. Cavarley A. Lussich

San Francisco

66

51

Straits Settlements

166

37

* 1 1 CO

31210

286

105

3

74 211

Carried forward,.

298,842

Carried forward,

40,166 4,186

553

580

45,485

:

?

RETURN of CHINESE PASSENGER SHIPS cleared by the Emigration Officer, Hongkong,-( Continued).

CHILDREN.

241

No.

DATE CLEARED.

SHIP'S NAME.

TONS.

NATION-

ALITY OF SHIF.

ADULTS.

MASTER'S NAME.

WHITHER BOUND.

TOTAL.

M. F.

M.

F.

Brought forward,..

298,842

175

Dec. 11

Patroclus, str.

176

""

12

Arratoon Apcar, str.

1,386 British 1,392

19

177

13

Ashington, str..

809 German

J. Pulford J. G. Olifent C. Zindel

Brought forward,.40,166 4,186

Straits Settlements

553 58 45,485

130

130

140

58

207

92

Medan in Deli, S.

211

211

178

91

14

Parthia, str.

2,035 British

179

16

Port Augusta, str.

1,856

""

2

F. W. Wallace J. Hogg

Vancouver, B.C. Straits Settlements

68

68

302

17

180

5

23

Khiva, str.

1,452

181

"

23

Moray, str.

1,411

""

182

"3

23

Velox, str.

753

German

183

28

Oceanic, str......

2,440

British

184

31

Deucalion str.

1,374

""

185

"

31

Japan, str.

1,865

E. Crewe

W. S. Duncan H. Johannsen W. M. Smith W. Asquith T. S. Gardner

209

27

250

855

325

241

56

316

Medan in Deli, S.

165

:

San Francisco

78

16

Straits Settlements

160!

41

318

62

345

81000

165

98

210 393

"

""

TOTAL TONS,

315,615

TOTAL PASSENGERS,

42,1974,463

589

600 47,849

To Bangkok, Siam,..

Honolulu, Sandwich Islands,

""

""

London,

Mauritius,

23

12

San Francisco, U.S.A.,..

93

Medan in Deli, Sumatra,

Straits Settlements,

Vancouver, British Columbia,.

SUMMARY,

TOTAL PASSENGERS,

147 286

147

323

...(Hired),.. 88

88

324

343

1,627

1,627

1,403 191

17

89

1,650

37,242 4,243

536

556

42,577

1,080)

14

1,094

42,197 4,463 589

600

47,849

242

XX.—RETURN of VESSELS bringing CHINESE PASSENGERS to the Port of Victoria, Hongkong, from Places out of the Chinese Empire, during the Year ending the 31st day of December, 1889.

No.

DATE ARRIVED.

SHIP'S NAME.

TONS.

NATION- ALITY OF SHIP.

ADULTS.

CHILDREN.

MASTER'S NAME.

WHERE FROM.

TOTAL.

M.

F.

M.

F.

1 January 2

Japan, str.

1,865 British

2

3

4

6

7

">

2

Glucksburg, str.

816 German

Gardner Schultz

Straits Settlements

511

18

531

4801

480

27

""

4

Bormida, str.

1,499 Italian

De Negri

157

157

4

Thibet, str.

1,671 British

Case

62

62

**

4 Stentor, str.

1,307

Milligan

150

150

19

4

Glenavon, str...

1,936

Jacobs

144

144

**

Albany, str.

1,489

Porter

8

7

Phra Chom Klao, str.

1,012

Watton

""

Vancouver, B.C. Bangkok

110

110

63

63

9

7 Benlawers, str.

1,513

Webster

Straits Settlements

248

218

10

8 Namkiang, str.

999

McKechine

518

513

11

8 Poseidon, str.

2,510 Austrian

Mersa

197

197

12

9 Wing Sang, str.

1,517 British

Ste. Croix

355

355

*7

13

14

15

"

16

#

17

""

9 Bengal, str.

9 City of Rio de Janeiro, str.

10 | Phra Chula Chom Klao, s

11 Diamond, str.

12 Hesperia, str.

1,012 British

2,377

Barnett

160

160

2,275 American

Ward

San Francisco

264

N

272

Benson

Bangkok

65

65

1,030

Gordon

Straits Settlements

427

**

1,136 German

Madsen

100

427

100

Port Darwin

59

Townsville

26!

18

12 Tsinan, str.

1,460 British

Allison

Brisbane

17

280

Sydney

93

Melbourne

85

19

20

14 Propontis, str...

">

15 | Glaucus, str.

1,387 1,382

Heasley

Straits Settlements

302

310

"1

Hannah

274

271

"

་་

21

45

16 Gaelic, str.

2,691

Pearne

San Francisco

245

9

255

22

**

17 Aglaia, str.

1,666 German

Christiansen

Straits Settlements

247 11

10

270

23

>>

17

Arratoon Apcar, str.

1,392 British

Olifent

613

21

638

24

25

26

17 Kashgar, str.

17 Patroclus, str.

19 Almora, str.

1,555 1,386

Gadd

175

175

"

>>

Pulford

45

45

"

1,719

Hay

54

54

29

27

21

Escort,

28

21 | Picciola, str.

637 American 875 German

Waterhouse

Honolulu

109

109

Nissen

Straits Settlements

130

130

29

21 Peninsular, str.

2,712 British

Wyatt

114

114

30

21 Glenroy, str.

1,411

Webster

280

280

"

31

21 Moyune, str.

1.714

::

Hogg

260

260

**

32

21 Mongkut, str.

859

Anderson

""

Bangkok

250

264

Port Darwin

25

Cooktown

S!

Cairns

12

33

#

Catterthun, str.

1,406

Darke

Townsville

142

>>

Rockhampton Sydney

39

21

Melbourne

31

34

23

31

35

36

..

37

38

Deucalion, str.

24 | Batavia, str.

25 Falkenburg, str...

26 Devawongse. str.

28 Brunschweig, str.

1,374 1,662

988 German 1,057 British

Asquith Auld Weber

Straits Settlements

427

427

Vancouver. B.C.

56

56

Straits Settlements

140

110

Loff

Bangkok

63

63

2,150 German

Rodeker

Straits Settlements

239

14

259

39

28 Jason. str.

1.412 British

Milligan

70

70

40

29 Decima, str.

965 German

Breilung

77

77

41

30 | Tai Sang, str.

1,505 British

Jackson

350

350

42

43 Feb.

44

45

30 City of New York, str.

Belgic, str.

Bisaguo, str.

2 Gwalior, str.

1,964 American

Searle

San Francisco

149

160

2,695 British

Walker

68

72

1,499 Italian

Toquasso

Straits Settlements

2001

200

1,629 British

Nantes

!!

1961

196

46

2 Dardanus, str....

1,536

Purdy

150

150

47

4

Oanfa, str.

1,970

Thomson

80

80

ܝ܂

"

48

4 Pakshan, str.

835

Young

264

264

49

6 Airlic, str.

1,492

Ellis

Sydney

17

36

"

Melbourne

19

Port Darwin

+

Cooktown

3

Townsville

50

8 Changsha, str.

1,403

Williams

59

Brisbane

13

Sydney

131

Melbourne

19

51

11 Maria Teresa, str.

་་

2,011 Austrian

Kessovich

Straits Settlements

204

204

52

11 Menelaus, str.

1,300 British

53

13 Antenor, str.

54

15 City of Peking, str.

55

16 Khiva, str.

**

1,376 3,129 American 1,452 British

56

18 Highfield, str.....

1,665

**

57

18 Japan, str.

1,865

Nelson Grier Cavarley Crewe Simpson Gardner

81

81

140

140

San Francisco

46

46

Straits Settlements

147

147

132

132

*

562

13

575

::

#

58

19 Prometheus, str....

1,537

::

**

59

19 Diamond. str.

??

1,030

Webster Gordon

250

250

"

630

630

27

60

??

20 Benledi, str.

1,498

Clark

#

">

3001

300

61

20 | Pekin, str.

2,134

**

62

21 Arabic, str.

2,788

Harris Smith

40

40

San Francisco

69

3

72

"

63

21 Mongkut, str.

859

Anderson

Bangkok

45

45

64

22 Sachsen, str.

65

22 Electra, str.

66

67

25 Devawongse, str.

25 Glucksburg, str.

2.874 German 1,162

1,057 British

Loff

Goessel

Straits Settlements

324

332

Möller

120

120

::

Bangkok

67

67

68

""

26 Glengarry, str.

916 German 1,956 British

Schultz

Straits Settlements

469

469

Gedye

642

650

:

69

27 Taichiow. str.

862

Morris

211

211

"J

70

"

27 Wing Sang, str.

1,517

71

"

72 March 2❘ Flintshire, str.

73

28 Chow Fa, str.

1,055

1,871

Ste. Croix Phillips Dwyer

475

Bangkok Straits Settlements

46

227

4 Bormida, str.

74

"

4 Glenfinlas, str.

1,499 Italian 1,409 British

De Negri Jones

སེ;ཝསྐ

20

500

46

12

4

251

257

12

272

240

7

247

Carried forward........... 115,234

Carried forward...

15,879 168 53

25

16,125

RETURN of VESSELS bringing CHINESE PASSENGERS to the Port of Victoria, Hongkong,~(Continued).

ADULTS. CHILDREN.

243

No.

DATE ARRIVED.

SHIP'S NAME.

TONS.

NATION- ALITY OF SHIP.

MASTER'S NAME.

WHERE FROM.

TOTAL.

M. F. V. F.

Brought forward..

115,234

Brought forward... 15,879|| 168 53 Port Darwin

25 $16,125

Townsville

75 March 4 Chingtu, str.

1,459 British

Hunt

Brisbane

27

Sydney

10

Melbourne

76

82

83

SERP8X

5 Cheang Chew, str.

1,213

Webb

Straits Settlements

516

77

6 Telamon, str.

1,555

Jackson

#!

236

78

7 Hector, str.

1,590

Batt

95

222

29

553

242

108

"

"

79

7 Amphitrite, str.

......

2,486 Austrian

Lemisich

71

71

""

80

39

7 Frigga, str.

81

7

Arratoon Apcar, str.

1,400 German 1,392 British

Nagel

227

8

244

Olifent

499

20

10

11

540

7

City of Sydney, str.

11

Phra Chom Khao, str.

1,966 American 1,012 British

Friele

San Francisco

561

3

60

Watton

Bangkok

100

100

Port Darwin

Cooktown

8

84

11 Guthrie, str.

1,494

Craig

Rockhampton

10

51

Sydney

28

Adelaide

85

12 Moray, str.

1,411

"

86

"

12 Deccan, str..

2,022

Duncan Cole

Straits Settlements

140

10

150

118

118

87

13 Tai Sang, str.

1,505

Jackson

562

7

574

88

13 Oceanic, str.

2,440

Metcalfe

San Francisco

81

89

"

89

14{Phra Chula Chom Klao, 8.

1,012

Benson

>:

Bangkok

62

62

90

15 Titan, str.

1,554

Brown

Straits Settlements

345

360

#

91

15 Benarty, str.

1,111

Boutillier

153

160

27

92

16 Glengyle, str.

2,244

Gasson

285

300

93

"

18 Memnon, str.

825

Dorff

66.

72

""

"

94

18 Ningchow, str.

1,735

Durdin

1251

150

22

95

19 Abyssinia, str.

96

21 Glamorganshire, str.

2,346 1,843

Lee

Vancouver, B.C.

34

35

""

Davies

Straits Settlements

310

320

"

97

22 Preussen, str.

39

2,880 German

Poble

2451

249

98

JJ

23

Independent, str.

871

Schafer

110

114

99

100

101

102

103

104

23 Picciola, str.

875

Nissen

3001

300

**

"1

25

Flintshire, str.

1,017 British

Habekost

336

356

""

25

Lydia, str.

1,170 German

Petersen

152

157

"

";

25

Bellerophon, str...

1,356 British

Guthrie

224

241

91

25

Mongkut, str.

859

Anderson

Bangkok

120

120

:)

25

City of Rio de Janeiro, str.

2,275 American

Ward

San Francisco

561

57

105

26

Teheran, str.

"

1,670 British

Sams

Straits Settlements

208:

208

:

106

;}

27

Devawongse, str.

1,057

Loff

22

Bangkok

66

66

107

"

28

Cyclops, str.

1,363

Nist

Straits Settlements

272

20

296

108

30

Chow Fa, str.

1.055

Phillips

Bangkok.

52

52

109 April

1 Kaisow, str...

1.934

Castle

Straits Settlements

484

500

17

110

"

1 Bisagno, str.

1.499 Italian

Toquasso

290

12

310

11

111

1 Diamond, str.

1.030 British

Gordon

642 21

10

681

112

*

1 Gaelic, str.

2.691

Pearne

San Francisco

237 10

266

T

113

">

2 Nizam, str.

1,615

Creery

Straits Settlements

32

32

114

3 Japan, str.

1,865

Gardner

422

51

18

494

""

*

115

5 Laertes, str.

1,351

Scale

185

190

·

116

6 Palinurus, str..

1,536

Jackson

91

104

!་

117

8 Camorta, str.

""

1,355

Fyfe

"

27

""

641

66

118

8

Niole, str.

1,666 German

Pfaff

99

100

119

8 Pandora, str.

1,781 Austrian

120

8 Chowchowfoo, str.

"

121

9 Glenshiel, str.

796 German 2,240 British

Costanzo Wendt

167

25

10

15

217

"t

Medan in Deli, Sumatra

45

45

Donaldson

Straits Settlements

184

209

122

J.

9 Namchow, str.

1.109

Wilkins

308

315

"}

123

17

10 Mogul, str.

1,827

Johnson

40

40

*

124

10 Thibet, str.

1,671

Preston

67

78

"

་་

125

"}

10 | Phra Chula Chom Klao,s.

1,012

Benson

"

Bangkok

102

102

:

126

"

11 Palamed, str.

1.489

Jackson

Straits Settlements

101

105

127

12 Wing Sang, str.

1,517

128

13 City of New York, str.

#

1,964 American

Ste. Croix Searle

307

54

12

285

San Francisco

49

97

Port Darwin

27

Thursday Island

2

Cooktown

7:

129

15 Catterthun, str.

1,406 British

Townsville

19

Darke

181

Brisbane

18

Sydney

73

Melbourne

Adelaide

Honolulu

130

16 | Kalakaua

"

131

""

16 Benalder, str.

132

17

17 Goalpara, str.

382 Hawaiian 1,288 British 1,355

Duncan

43

Thomson

Straits Settlements

370

133

11

18

Bayern, str..

2,877 German

Russell Mergell

60

250

293

:)

134

18

Breconshire, str...

1,648 British

Dancaster

187

5

200

21

""

135

??

18 Belgic, str.

2,695

Walker

San Francisco

133

+

1

138

"

136

20

Orestes, str.....

*)

1,279

137

"

29 Kong Beng, str.

862

Hutchinson Jones

Straits Settlements

250 18

10

284

"

Bangkok

141

141

Port Darwin

2:

.

Cooktown

Cairns

16

138

20 Tsinan, str.

· 1,460

Allison

146

Brisbane

14:

Sydney

65

Melbourne

42

139

ད་

23 Gwalior, str.

1,629

Nantes

Straits Settlements

101

101

>>

140

17

23 Arratoon Apcar, str.

1,395

Olifent

300:

25

325

#1

141

"

23 Glenartney, str.

1,400

""

Murray

125

126

"

142

23 Cheang Hye Teng, str.

923

Scott

340 12

352

19

27

143

23

23 Fidelio, str.

852 German

Brorsen

192 8

200

27

114

""

23 Bellona, str...

1,722

12

Haesloop

130

130

Carried forward..

222,418

Carried forward..

29,014 732

245

165

30,156

244

RETURN of VESSELS bringing CHINESE PASSENGERS to the Port of Victoria, Hongkong,—( Continued).

No.

DATE ARRIVED.

SHIP'S NAME.

TONS,

NATION- ALITY OF SHIP.

ADULTS.

CHILDREN.

MASTER'S NAME.

WHERE FROM.

ΤΟΤΑΙ.

M.

F M. F.

Brought forward

222,418

145 April 23 | Ajax, str.

146 147

""

23 Memnon, str.

1,477 British

825

Riley

Brought forward... 29,014 732 Straits Settlements

245

165

30,156

142

+

3

1

150

Dorff

69

3

72

19

"

23

35

Batavia, str.

1,662

Auld

"

Vancouver, B.C.

29

30

148

99

24

Picciola, str.

149

19

24

City of Peking, str.

150

151

31

152

153

99

154

"

39

26 Flintshire, str.

27 Diamond, str.

27 Mongkut, str. 29 Bormida, str.

29

Menmuir, str.

875 German

3,129 American

1,017 British

Nissen

Straits Settlements

130

130

Cavarley

San Francisco

27

32

Habekost

Straits Settlements

324

326

1,030 859

Wilson

510

19

529

""

"!

Anderson

11

Bangkok

122

1,499 Italian

De Negri

Straits Settlements

191

1,287 British

Helms

169

7

:1

155

"

29 Tartar, str.

1,568

Bailey

308

10

10

46

3

135

200

180

330

156

1

"

29 Peshawur, str.....

2,136

Moule

42

42

157

??

29 Devawongse, str.

1,057

Loff

??

Bangkok

184

184

158

"

29

Arabic, str.

2,788

Smith

San Francisco

106

13

126

"

Port Darwin

22

Townsville

9

159 May

1 Tai Yuan, str...

1,459

Nelson

Brisbane

47

Sydney

1

Melbourne

14

160

1

19

Chow Fa, str.

1,055

"

Phillips

Bangkok

86

86

161

1 Anchises, str.

1,264

""

Lapage

Straits Settlements

287

287

162

19

3 Tai Sang, str.

1,505

Jackson

575

25

600

""

#

163

3 Glenogle, str.

2,000

Duke

3201

??

164

6 Agamemnon, str.

1,453

"3

Wilding

110)

165

6 Oopack, str...

1,730

">

Jaques

148

"

166

11

7 Khiva, str.

1,452

Crewe

107

3143

330

115

156

114

??

"

167

8 Cambodia, str.

1,969

Wildgoose

77

84

""

168

9 Nam Chow, str.

1,109

Wilkins

727

2

740

"}

169

11

10 | Phra Chula Chom Klao, S.

1,012

Benson

"

Bangkok

97

97

170

"

11

Medea, str.

1,215 Austrian

Ratzmann

Straits Settlements

180

80

20

20

300

171

"

11

Almora, str..

172

"

13

Sutlej, str.

173

"}

13

Apenrade, str..

174

175

"

13

Parthia, str.....

*

13

City of Sydney, str.

176

16

**

Chowchowfoo, str.

1,719 British

2,103

""

1,476 German

2,035 British

1,965 American

796 German

Friele

Hay

92

2

96

Worcester

110

18

132

Hohlmann

36

1

37

>>

Wallace

Vancouver, B.C.

47

47

San Francisco

112

112

Wendt

Straits Settlements

95

3

100

177

"

17 Neckar, str..

1,870

Supmer

200

9

3

220

178

18 Japan, str.

1,865 British

Gardner

290 30

10

330

25

179

97

18 Daphne, str.

1,395 German

Voss

258

4

262

Port Darwin

Thursday Island

18

· 180

"

18 Changsha, str..

1,463 British

Williams

Brisbane

50

Sydney

9

Melbourne

13

181

18 | Phra Chom Klao, str.

1,012

Watton

Bangkok

171

171

182

15

18 Oceanic, str.

2,440

Metcalfe

San Francisco

121

121

183

20 Kong Beng, str.

862

Jones

Bangkok

95

95

184

20 Stentor, str..

1,267

Milligau

Straits Settlements

597

600

185

??

21 Camorta, str.

1,355

Fyfe

149

156

186

"

21 Kashgar, str.

1,555

Gadd

84

91

187

**

21 | Velocity

491

Martin

Honolulu

54

10

10

$2

188

""

23 Diamond, str.

1,030

Wilson

Straits Settlements

668

21

10

12

711

189

"

25 Sikh, str.

1,736

"!

Rowley

140

150

32

190

25 Telemachus, str..

1,381

Jones

236

17

12

267

""

"

191

25 Glenfalloch, str.

""

1,434

Cormack

61

2

66

17

192

"

25 Brindisi, str.

2.355

Tocque

114

6

3

124

"

193

25

Wing Sang, str.

1,517

Ste. Croix

251

10

271

步豐

194

99

25

Cheang Hye Teng, str....

923

Scott

391

6

10

409

19

195

""

29

Bisagno, str.

1,499 Italian

Valle

136

25

5

175

196

30 Fidelio, str.

197

30 Glenorchy, str.

198

30 Taichiow, str.

862

199

31 Memnon, str.

825

"

200

"

31 Benvenue, str..

1,448

852 German

1,822 British

Brorsen Ferguson Morris Dorff Thomson

58

2

60

220

12

232

"

209

4

10

227

871

87

58

62

"

201

"

31

Devawongse, str.

1,057

Loff

>>

Bangkok

174

20

200

202 June

1

City of Rio de Janeiro, str.

2,275 American

Ward

San Francisco

75

1

76

203

"

3 Patroclus, str.

1,386 British

Pulford

Straits Settlements

245

7

252

204

3 Gaelic, str.

2,691

Pearne

San Francisco

120

7

"

205

3 Chow Fa, str.

1,055

??

206

""

4 Arratoon Apcar, str.

1,392

Phillips Olifent

Bangkok

93

Straits Settlements

289

14

LO

132

93

312

207

"

4 Ching Wo, str.

1,556

"

208

7 Nam Chow, str.

1,109

MacHugh Wilkins

313

7

>

:

320

Port Darwin

731 30 10

16

780

1

209

>3

8 Guthrie, str.

1,494

Green

Thursday Island Cooktown

34

""

Townsville

Sydney

10

210

8 Iton

542 French

་་

Reginer

Honolulu

72

2

79

Port Darwin

241

Thursday Island

Cooktown

211

11 Airlie, str.

1,492 British

Townsville

Ellis

129

Brisbane

Sydney

25

Co

Melbourne

:

Adelaide

212

11 Goalpara, str.

213

11 Coromandel, str..

1,355 2,383

Russell

Straits Settlements

57

2

60

""

Reeves

76

76

"?

21

214

11 Abyssinia, str..

2,346

Lee

**

215

11 | Phra Chula Chom Klao, S.

1,012

Benson

Vancouver, B.C. Bangkok

36

2

38

92

4

4

102

Carried forward..

327,348

Carried forward..

41,848 1,209 184 263

43,804

RETURN of VESSELS bringing CHINESE PASSENGERS to the Port of Victoria, Hongkong,-(Continued).

CHILDREN.

245

No.

DATE ARRIVED.

SHIP'S NAME.

TONS.

NATION- ALITY OF SHIP.

ADULTS.

MASTER'S NAME.

WHERE FROM.

TOTAL.

M. F

M. F.

Brought forward...... 327,348

Brought forward... 41,848| 1,209

484 263

43,804

Port Darwin

51

Cooktown

8

Cairns

8

216 June

11 Chingtu, str.

1,459 British

Hunt

146

Townsville

Sydney

10

Melbourne

63

217

12 Glenearn, str.

1,410

Ross

Straits Settlements

401

11

8

420

218

""

12 Aglaia, str.

1,666 German

Christiansen

32

32

219

+

11

220

221

222

23

223

""

224

**

13 Moray, str.

13 Sachsen, str.

15 Merionethshire, str.

15 City of New York, str.

17 | Phra Chom Klao, str..

18 Belgic, str.

1,411 British

2,874 German 1,245 British 1,964 American

1,012 British

Gaessel

Duncan

345 20

6

375

130 15

10

155

Dawling

76

1

2

· 80

"

Searle

San Francisco

36

:

36

Watton

Bangkok

103

103

2,695

Walker

San Francisco

123 12

6

141

225

""

18

Ulysses, str.

1,473

Butler

Straits Settlements

340

6

1

347

"

226

18

Namkiang, str.

999

McKechine

268 $

276

1:

>>

227

19

Elektra, str.

2,095 Austrian

Lussick

152

8

166

"

;)

228

19 Deucalion, str.

1,334 British

Asquith

68

72

19

229

19 Diamond, str.

1,030

Wilson

708

30

6

6

750

230

231

232

20 Kong Beng, str.

233

"

19 Teheran, str.

19 Glucksburg, str.

22 Glenavon, str...

1,670

Sams

94

99

12

916 German

Schultz

183

4

3

194

""

862 British

Jones

Bangkok

72

72

1,936

Jacobs

Straits Settlements

275

10

234

25 | Almora, str....

1,719

"

Hay

146

2

235

"

25 Ghazee, str.

1,764

Scotland

145

3

236

::

237

ད་

27

238

239

""

28

241

??

242

240 July

26 Batavia, str.

Bormida, str.

27 Dardanus, str.

Japan, str.

2 Iphigenia, str..

2 Independent, str.

3 Taichiow, str.

1,661

Williamson

Vancouver, B.C.

271

1

་་

1,499 Italian

De Negri

Straits Settlements

701

9

1,491 British

Purdy

261

5

"

1,865

Pallett

465

20

1,059 German

Voltmer

240

10

"

871

Schaefer

Straits Settlements Mauritius

138

4

123

3

90224 TH 10 10 M 1-

5

298

154

150

30

83

270

490

260

283

862 British

Morris

Straits Settlements

249

250

243

3 Glaucus, str.

1,344

Hannah

219

10

2

236

**

་་

244

4 Memnon, str.

825

Dorf

55

63

245

5 Berenice, str.

246

247

5

5 Namchow, str.

Arabic, str.

248

99

5

City of Peking, str.

249

6

Venetia, str.

1,707 Austrian

1,109 British 2,788

3,129 American

1,551 British

Smith

Trobitz

157

20

202

Wilkins

567 18

595

San Francisco

171

8

183

Cavarley

244

11

263

12

Haselwood

Straits Settlements

131

4

138

*

250

6

Jason, str.

1,411

+1

Milligan

57

63

39

251

8 Wing Sang, str.

1,517

Ste. Croix

2831

25

7

320

"

252

8 Menelaus, str.

1,263

Nelson

121

122

99

253

8

Pekin, str.

2,133

Harris

291

29

"7

254

8 Mongkut, str.

859

Fowler

Bangkok Port Darwin

150

10

174

27

Thursday Island

6

Cooktown

13

Townsville

3

255

"

11 Catterthun, str.

1,406

Darke

128

Brisbane

Sydney

256

""

12 Chow Fa, str.

1,055

Phillips

Adelaide

Melbourne

Bangkok

27

187

187

257

12 Dresden, str.

3,110 German

Schuckmann Straits Settlements

395

Co

258

12 Carmarthenshire, str..

1,776 British

Clark

60

259

13 Thibet, str.

1,671

Preston

86

12

**

260

15 Tannadice, str.

1,408

**

Craig

Sydney

Melbourne

12 6

22

12

2

3

415

60

22

23

102

24

261

>"

15 Hongkong, str.

2,045

Walkins

Straits Settlements

166

::

166

262

11

15

Cheang Hye Teng, str.

-923

263

15

"

Camorta, str.

1,355

"

Grenfell Fyfe

170

"}

120

"

264

15 Achilles, str.

1,461

Anderson

93 14

265

17 City of Sydney, str.

1,966 American

Friele

San Francisco

67

6443

2

178

125

112

3

73

266

17 Phra Chula Chom Klao, s.

1,012 British

Benson

Bangkok

40

40

267

""

18 Bengloe, str.

1,158

Farquhar

Straits Settlements

138

10

150

268

"

19 Arratoon Apcar, str.

1,392

Olifent

581

32

10

269

17

22 Electra, str...

1,162 German

Möller

252

270

22 Nanshan, str.

805 British

Young

249

0001-

631

262

259

271

"

22 Thames, str.

2,101

Seaton

272

"

22 Prometheus, str..

1,492

Webster

"

""

*

133!

:

133

189!

200

273

尊重

22 | Glucksburg, str.

916 German

Schultz

212

10

224

274

21

23 Parthia, str...

2,036 British

Wallace

Vancouver, B.C.

72

72

i

275

19

23 Kong Beng, str.

862

Jones

"

Bangkok

120

120

276

59

25 Oceanic, str.

2,440

**

Kempson

San Francisco

204

3

277

"

25 Moray, str.

1,411

"J

278

29 Gwalior, str.

1,603

Duncan Nantes

Straits Settlements

498

40

10

""

137;

""

279

""

29 Glenlyon, str.

280

29 Telamon, str.

281

39

30 Frigga, str.

282

""

30 | Phra Chom Klao, str..

1,410 1,555 1,400 German 1,012 British

Sommer

376 10

10

19

"

Jackson

265

19

Nagel

167

NOKOKN

209

12

500

3

140

400

295

175

Watton

"7

Bangkok

119

119

283 August 1 Bisagno, str.

1,499 Italian

284

1 Tetartos, str.

19

285

""

I Albany, str......

1,578 German 1,489 British

Valle Petersen Porter

Straits Settlements

145

145

116

00

134

31

124

124

286

2 Namchow, str.

287

3 Flintshire, str.

288

">

3 City of Rio de Janeiro, str.

1,109 1,871 2,275 American

Coloma

634

20

10

>>

Derier

200

සෆ

664

3

211

""

19

Ward

San Francisco

$2

83

Carried forward..

439,590

Carried forward..

55,989 1,737

747 371

58,841

246

RETURN of VESSELS bringing CHINESE PASSENGERS to the Port of Victoria, Hongkong,—( Continued).

No.

DATE ARRIVED.

SHIP'S NAME.

TONS.

NATION-

ALITY OF SHIP.

ADULTS.

CHILDREN.

MASTER'S NAME.

WHERE FROM.

TOTAL.

M.

F

M.

F.

Brought forward...... 439,590

Brought forward... 55,989 1,737 Port Darwin

717

371

58,844

44

Thursday Island

1

289 Aug.

6 Menmuir, str.

1,287 British

Cooktown

10

Helms

98

Townsville

Brisbane

12

Sydney

22

290

6 Orion, str.

1,833 Austrian

Vidos

Straits Settlements

185

291

6 Gleneagles, str.

1,837 British

Parks

100

"}

292

6 Taichiow, str.

862

Morris

200

"}

:)

293

7 Goalpara, str.

1,355

Russell

42

294

8 Diomed, str.

1,432

Bartlett

147

多多

11

295

8 Preussen, str.

2,880 German

Poble

195

296

9

Japan, str.

1,865 British

Gardner

339

297

12 Diamond, str.

1,030

Wilson

5021

12

to so on

Hi N

"

298

12

13

Nizam, str.

1,615

Creery

101

**

299

19

12

Chow Fa, str.

1,055

Phillips

Bangkok

128

300

301

302

13

Gaelic, str.

2,691

Pearne

San Francisco

183

185

100

200

42

147

208

350

521

105

130

191

27

""

";

13

Bellerophon, str.

1,356

Guthrie

Straits Settlements

951

*

";

14

Cheang Hye Teng, str.

923

Scott

510

18

10

50

107 558

>>

303

""

14

Derawongse, str.

1,057

Loff

""

Bangkok

30

301

16

Hesperia, str.

1,136 German

Hadsen

Straits Settlements

240

305

""

16

Nestor, str.

1,269 British

Elders

2801

**

306

19

Shanghai, str..

2,044

Tillard

591

t

**

"

307

19

33

Rohilla, str.....

2,175

De Horne

46

"

**

308

20

Hector, str.

1,590

**

$9

Thompson

217

!?

:

309

"

22

Wing Sang, str.

1,517

Ste. Croix

398

**

310

22 Glenfinlas, str.

1,409

Jones

172

""

311

24 Ningchow, str.

1,735

Durdin

270

30

240

280

61

46

217

32

11

10

451.

180

270

19

312

"

24 Cyclops, str.

1,363

Nish

135

147

31

Port Darwin

22

Thursday Island

Cooktown

16

313

26 Changsha, str..

1,463

Williams

Townsville

333993

65

Brisbane

3

Sydney

12

314

27 Chingtu, str.

1,459

Hunt

Sydney

101

69

"

Melbourne

57

Port Darwin

Thursday Island

Brisbane

11

315

27 Airlie, str.

1,492

Ellis

70

""

Sydney

Adelaide

3

Melbourne

31

30

316

28 Bormida, str.

1,499

"

De Negri

Straits Settlements

181

14

339

201

317

29 Belgic, str.

2,695

29

318

30 Glengyle, str.

2,244

Walker Gasson

San Francisco

281

8

291

Straits Settlements

2701 22

300

+

319

30

Lydia, str.

1,170 German

Peterson

102

10

120

320

31

Titan, str.

1,510 British

Brown

91

91

+1

321 Sept.

2

Arratoon Apcar, str.

1,392

Olifent

275

20

300

**

322

2

Gaw Quan Sia, str.

1,607

Harris

148

150

"

""

323

2 Namchow, str.

1,109

Coloma

740 26

:ལྤ

12

2

780

:1

2:

324

"

4 Melpomene, str.

1,943 Austrian

325

"

4 Bayern, str.

2,877 German

326

"

5 | Pha Chom Klao, str.

1,012 British

Periui Mergell Guldberg

149

149

308

12

3

330

Bangkok

125

125

327

6 Batavia, str.

328

9 Khiva, str.

329

330

39

331

"J

332

"

9 Diamond, str.

9 City of Peking, str.

10 Cardiganshire, str..

12 Laertes, str.....

1,662 1,452 1,030

Williamson

93

Vancouver, B.C.

73

74

99

Crewe Wilson

Straits Settlements

146

2

156

240

240

"

3,129 American

Cavarley

San Francisco

60

60

1,623 British 1,351

Rickards

Straits Settlements

2301

230

333

12 Niobe, str.

- 1,666 German

Scale Pfaff

70

70

*

247

250

334

13 Moray, str.

1,411 British

335

;)

13 Cheang Chew, str.

1,213

97

336

13 Claymore, str...

1,658

""

337

14 Devawongse, str.

1,057

Duncan Webb Felgate Loff

217

771

10

500

8

225

793

212

4

216

:)

>>

Bangkok

130

338

16 Camorta, str.

1,355

Fyfe

Straits Settlements

100

::

130

100

339

16 Yuen Sang, str.

1,105

46

340

*

16 Taichiow, str.

862

Slessar Morris

193

195

70

70

"

341

16

Chow Fa, str.

1,055

"

**

Phillips

Bangkok

401

40

342

16 Lady Harewood..

382

Williams

Honolulu

61

61

Cooktown

Cairns

12

343

17 Catterthun, str.

1,406

Darke

Rockhampton

12

65

Sydney

2

Melbourne

38

344

17 Arabic, str.

2,788

Smith

San Francisco

246

"1

""

345

17 Bombay, str.

.....

2,047

Bason

Straits Settlements

46

!!

"}

346

17 Sutlej, str.

2,103

Worcester

32

"

#1

347

17 Palamed, str.

1,489

Jackson

87

19

斧斧

348

18 China, str.

648 German

349

""

19 Moyune, str.

1,714 British

350

"

20 Glengarry, str.

1,956

Bruhn Hogg Gedye

Medan, Sumatra

861

:

Straits Settlements

282

131

"

351

23 Palinurus, str...

1,536

""

352

23 | Phra Chula Chom Klao, s.

1,012

Jackson Benson

176

"

"

Bangkok

91

255

71

37

97

86

282

5

142

176

91

Port Darwin

31

Thursday Island *

3

Townsville

12

353

23 Tsinan, str.

1,460

Allison

""

Brisbane

80

2

Sydney

22

Melbourne

10

Carried forward.

540,548

Carried forward.......................

67,710 2,032

863

436

71,041

RETURN of VESSELS bringing CHINESE PASSENGERS to the Port of Victoria, Hongkong,-( Continued).

247

No.

DATE ARRIVED.

SHIP'S NAME.

TONS.

NATION- ALITY OF SHIP.

ADULTS.

CHILDREN.

MASTER'S NAME.

WHERE FROM.

TOTAL.

M.

F.

M.

F.

Brought forward......

540,548

354 Sept. 24

Port Augusta, str.

1,856 British

355

19

24

Japan, str.

1,865

Hogg Gardner

Brought forward..... 67,710| 2,032 Vancouver, B.C.

863 436

71,041

61

61

Straits Settlements

215 22

246

19

356

24 Bellona, str.

1,722 German

Haesloop

145

10

160

357

25 Kashgar, str.

1,555 British

Brown

210

210

*>

358

26 Ajax, str.

1,477

Riley

97

3

100

35

359

""

27

City of Sydney, str.

1,965 American

Friele

San Francisco

118

2

2

2

124

360

27

Kong Beng, str.

862 British

Jones

Bangkok

30

30

361

""

30

Fidelio, str.

853 | German

Brorsen

Medan, Sumatra

200

::

200

362

"}

30 Sarpedon, str.

1,495 British

Barwise

Straits Settlements

240

10

5

2

247

363

October 1 Peshawur, str..

2,137

364

1 Namchow, str.

1,109

365

"3

1

Bisagno, str.

1,499 Italian

366

3 Durburg, str....

367

31

4

Neckar, str....

368

5

Parthia. str..

369

7

12

Maria Teresa, str.

370

7

Orestes. str..

921 German

1,870

2,035 British

2,011 Austrian 1,279 British

Moule Coloma Valle Bertelsen Supmer Wallace

73

73

>"

712 50

17

14

793

"

105

105

??

200

""

324

215

:

200

20

10

379

??

Vancouver. B.C.

113

113

Deperis

Straits Settlements

405

405

Hutchinson

171

171

371

39

8 | Phra Chom Klao, str.

372

9

Wing Sang, str.

373

99

10 Oceanic, str..

1,012 1,517 2,440

Watton

""

Bangkok"

142

142

Ste. Croix

Straits Settlements

442

35

6

་་

"

374

11 Namkiang, str.

999

""

375

14 Agamemnon, str.

1,453

376

""

14 Pathan, str.

1,762

Kempson Hamlin Wilding Roy

San Francisco

7731 18

13

67

489

811

Straits Settlements

520 17

543

107

115

">

370 20

"

377

14 Arratoon Apcar, str.

1,392

Olifent

199

20

">

378

13 Cheang Chew, str.

1,213

Webb

376

22"

400

227

1

I

380

379

18

Port Fairy, str.

1,645

Clark

Vancouver, B.C.

157

157

380

""

18

City of Rio de Janeiro, str.

2,275 American

Ward

San Francisco

165

381

19

Stentor, str.

""

1,267 British

Milligan

Straits Settlements

336

382

383

:

21

Cheang Hye Teng, str.

933

Scott

360

845

84

187

350

368

3:

21

"

Brindisi, str.

2,129

Street

165

165

19

""

384

*21

>>>

Chow Fa, str.

1,055

*1

Phillips

Bangkok

64

64

385

22 | Almora, str....

1,719

Hay

Straits Settlements

71

71

386

>>

23 Daphne, str.

1,395 German

Voss

300

300

""

387

24 Oopack, str....

1,730 British

388

"

24 | Phra Chula Chom Klao, s.

1,012

Kemp Benson

375

14

4

400

17

"

Bangkok

781

78

Straits Settlements

121

389

25 Tannadice, str.

1,408

Shannon

Port Darwin

131

"2

Sydney

51

390

28 Picciola, str.

391

28 Bormida, str.

392

""

29 Telemachus, str.

875 German 1,499 Italian 1,381 British

Nissen De Negri Jones

Medan, Sumatra

101

Straits Settlements

196

4 5

9

110

200

250

15

3

268

Port Darwin

50

Thursday Island

2

Cooktown

Townsville

21

393

29 Tai Yuan, str.....

1,459

Nelson

31

188

Brisbane

Sydney

72

Adelaide

41

Melbourne

261

394

30 Whampoa, str.

395

"

30 Gaelic. str.

1,109 2,691

:2

Hughes

Wellington, N.Z.

148

148

l'earne

San Francisco

671)

10

3

691

"7

396

30 Kong Beng, str.

862

Jones

Bangkok

96

96

397

30 Glucksburg, str.

398

399

31 Namchow, str. 31 Abyssinia, str.

916 German 1,109 British 2,346

Schultz

Straits Settlements

231

231

Coloma

536 16

"

Lee

1;

Vancouver, B.C.

2451

1

to a

72

6

565

250

Cooktown

5

Cairns

17

400

31 Airlie, str.

1,492

Ellis

"

Sydney

26

89

Adelaide Melbourne

14

26

401 Nov.

1 Sachsen, str.

402

2 Camorta, str.

2,874 German 1,355 British

Gaessel Fyfe

Straits Settlements

229

12

16

261

30

30

»

403

5 Glenfallock, str.

1,434

Cormack

148

>>

}

404

5 Moray, str.

1,411

Duncan

350

22

150

369

*

405

**

5 Gwalior, str.

1,602

Nantes

129

131

»

406

"

5 Anchises, str.

1,264

12

Lapage

95

95

>>

407

5 Melpomene, str.

1,943

Perini

1837

137

33

408

5 Phra Chom Klao, str.

1,012

Watton

Bangkok

.57

57

409

8 Benledi, str.

1,454

Clark

Straits Settlements

80!

80

410

1

9 Patroclus, str.

1,350

Pulford

30

11

411

9 Aron..

634 Norwegian

Christensen

Honolulu

157

C Ha

10 14

45

165

Port Darwin

12

Timor

2

412

""

11 Menmuir, str.

1,287 British

Green

28

Townsville

12

Sydney

1

413

";

11 Japan, str.

414

19

11 Polyhymnia, str.

415

"

11 Kaisar-i-Hind, str.

1,865 1,053 German 2,386 British

**

Gardner Behrens

Straits Settlements

422

17

450

65

65

""

Atkinson

27

27

416

11

12 Glenogle, str.

417

12 Ulysses, str....

418

22

13 Pembrokeshire, str.

2,000 1,473 1,717

Duke

260

45

21

Butler

69

::

25

17

13

315

69

>>

19

Dancaster

70

70

"";

31

419

13

Pakshan, str.

835

Stovell

*

12

420

13 Belgic, str.

2,695

Walker

San Francisco

188 664

12

9

19

421

"

15 Diamond, str.

1,030

Wilson

Straits Settlements

642 18

""

422

18 Cheang Hock Kian, str..

956

Grenfell

497 18

"

">

423

*)

18 Mongkut, str.

859

,,

424

21

19 Teresa, str.

753

多多

425

""

19 Aglaia, str.

1,666 German

Fowler Slaker

Bangkok

105) 12

Straits Settlements

57

Christiansen

358

13

11

426

"

20 Nizam, str.

1,615 British

427

"

21 Ching Wo, str.

1,556

Creery Machugh

91

8

10 00

21291

205

675

673

520

117

57

385

106

7"

241

3

244

"

Carried forward...

651,223

Carried forward...

| 84,238 2,525 | 1,072

563 88,398

.

248

RETURN of VESSELS bringing CHINESE PASSENGERS to the Port of Victoria, Hongkong,~(Continued).

No.

DATE ARRIVED.

SHIP'S NAME.

TONS.

NATION- ALITY OF SHIP.

ADULTS. CHILDREN.

MASTER'S NAME.

WHERE FROM.

TOTAL.

M.

M. F

Brought forward...... 651,223

Brought forward... 84.238 2,525 1,072 563

88,398

428 Nov. 21

Sara Mercedes,

245 Peruvian

429

21

""

Devawongse, str.

1,057 British

430

431

""

22

Cheang Chew, str.

1,213

Muniatequi Loff Webb

Honolulu Bangkok

129

3

3

142

85

Straits Settlements

$31 13

344

23

25

Wing Sang, str.

1,517

Ste. Croix

41

21

4

450

"

432

""

25 Glenorchy, str.

433

25 Dardanus. str...

1,822 1.491

!!

Fergusson

210

"

"}

434

25

City of Peking, str.

3,129 American

Purdy Cavarley

145

San Francisco

336

100 CD 10

8

9

3

230

2

157

5

2

347

Port Darwin

20

Thursday Island

3

435

25 Chingtu, str.

1,459 British

Hunt

Cairns

23

109

Townsville

20

Sydney

40

436 437

26

Kong Beng, str.

26

Thames, str.

862 2,101

Jones

19

Bangkok

69

Seaton

Straits Settlements

43

438

439

440

26 Cassandra, str.

27 Cheang Hye Teng, str.

29 Preussen, str.

1,097 German

Thomsen

47

4

"

923 British

Wilkins

308

+1

2,879 German

Pohle

230

30

19

"

441

19

30 Bisagno, str.

442

30

Picciola, str.

443 Dec.

2

Jason, str.

444 445

2 Nanshan, str.

805

ラウ

1,499 Italian

875 German

1,411 British

Valle Nissen Milligan

Young

98

2794

:::

69

43

18

+48 2

53 322

297

110

""

96

27

29

་་

2 Namchow, str.

1,109

Coloma

375

17

-

10

102

27

29

403

""

Port Darwin

15

Thursday Island

1

Cooktown

16

446

2 Guthrie, str.

1,494

"

Craig

Townsville

96

Rockhampton

16

Sydney

7

Melbourne

33

447

3 Venetia, str.

448

4 Benvenue, str..

1,551 1,448

Haselwood

Straits Settlements

143

2

150

"

Thomson

75

75

21

449

"

4 Glucksburg, str.

916 German

Schultz

140

140

"

450

":

4

Chow Fa, str.

1,055 British

Phillips

Bangkok

70

70

451

"!

452

""

453

"

454

1.

455

"7

456

""

457

J:

4 Arabic, str.

5 Glaucus, str.

6 | Hong Kong, str.

6 Port Augusta, str.

7 Elektra, str

9 Arratoon Apcar, str.

9 Velocity,

2,095 Austrian

1,392 British

491

2,788

Smith

San Francisco

725

18

748

1,344

Hannah

Straits Settlements

83

1

91

""

2,045

Watkins

115

115

29

!!

1,856

Hogg

Vancouver, B.C.

-397

397

Lussich

Straits Settlements

280

12

299

Olifent

256

10

267

"

Martin

Honolulu

148

3

156

"

458

9

Phía Chom Klao, str.

1,012

Watton

Bangkok

63

63

459

10 Coloma,

814 American

Noyes

Honolulu

189

189

31

460

""

10 Parthia, str.......

2,035 British

Wallace

Vancouver, B.C.

120

120

461

10 Achilles. str.

1.461

Anderson

Straits Settlements

71

71

""

462

11 Diamond, str.

""

1,030

Wilson

65%

11

5

679

"

463

"

11

Glenearn, str.

1.410

Murray

185

192

464

14

Glenshiel, str.

"3

2,240

Donaldson

33

51

*

465

16

Khiva, str.

1,452

466

16

Oceanic, str.

2,440

14

467

"

17 Mongkut, str.

859

468

17 Sikh, str.

1,735

::

Crewe Kempson Fowler Rowley

68

3

68

San Francisco

417

423

Bangkok

98

98

Straits Settlements

135

S

co

4

3

150

19

Port Darwin

13

Thursday Island

Townsville

c

469

59

17 Tsinan, str.

1,460

Allison

87

Brisbane

Sydney

18

Melbourne

45

Port Darwin

10

Cooktown

$

470

18 | Catterthun, str.

1,406

Darke

Cairns

Townsville

37

Brisbane Adelaide

Melbourne

471

19 Moray, str.

1,411

472

21 Prometheus, str..

1,492

Duncan Webster

Straits Settlements

40

40

263

2

2

2

269

"

473

::

23 Derawongse, str.

1,057

Loff

Bangkok

70

70

474

27 Japan, str.

1,865

Gardner

Straits Settlements

38

17

4

3

406

475

91

27 | Telamon, str.

1,555

Jackson

4.

40

476

27 Oriental, str.

2,711

Stewart

41

::

41

477

27 Benalder, str.

1,289

Thomson

1841

8

2

1

195

478

27 Kong Beng, str.

862

Jones

步步

Bangkok

30

30

479

27 Electra, str...

1,162 German

Möller

Straits Settlements

19:

2

197

480

27 Bayern, str.

2.877

Mergell

458

4

470

""

481

"

27 Cheang Hock Kian, str....

956 British

Grenfell

520 30

550

21

482

28 Batavia, str...

1,662

"

483

30 Cheang Chew, str.

1,213

484

30 Bormida, str.

485

30 | Fbra Chula Chom Klao, s.

1,499 Italian 1,012 British

TOTAL TONS...........

737,169

Williamson Webb De Negri Benson

Straits Settlements

TOTAL PASSENGERS

Vancouver, B.C.

116

116

136

2

4

142

12

123

"

Bangkok"

77

...

77

94,683 2,808 1,187

637

99,315

1869.

1870.

1871.

1872.

1873.

1874.

1875.

BLUE LINE represents Junk Tonnage only.

RED LINE represents Foreign Shipping Tonnage only.

"XII.-DIAGRAM of Tonnage entered at Hongkong, from 1867 to 1889, inclusive,

THICK BLACK LINE represents entire Trade in Foreign Ships and Junks.,

1879.

1880.

1881.

1882.

1883.

1884.

1885.

*

1886.

1887.

1888.

6,400,000

6,300,000

6,200,000

6,100,000

6,000,000

5,900,000

5,800,000

5,700,000

5,600,000

5,500,000

5,400,000

5,300,000

5,200,000

5,100,000

5,000,000

4,900,000

1889.

6,500,000

TONS.

A

6,200,000

6,100,000

6,000,000

:

5,900,000

5,800,000

5,700,000

5,600,000

5,500,000

5,400,000

5,300,000

5,200,000

5,100,000

5,000,000

4,900,000

4,800,000

4,700,000

4,600,000

4,500,000

4,400,000

4,300,000

4,200,000

4,100,000

4,000,000

3,900,000

3,800,000

3,700,000

3,600,000

· 3,500,000

3,500,000

? 400,000

3,500,000

3,200,000

3,100,000

3,000,000

2,900,000

2,800,000

2,700,000

2,600,000

2,500,000

2,400,000

2,300,000

2,200,000

2,100,000

2,000,000

1,900,000

1,800,000

1,700,000

1,600,000

1,500,000

1,400,000

1,300,000

1,200,000

1,100,000

1,000,000

6,400,000

6,300,000

6,200,000

6,100,000

6,000,000

5,900,000

5,800,000

5,700,000

5,600,000

5,500,000

5,400,000

5,300,000

5,200,000

5,100,000

5,000,000

4,900,000

4,800,000

6,500,000

TONS.

1867.

1868.

1869.

1870.

1871.

1872.

1873.

1874.

1875.

1876.

1877.

XXII.-DIAGRAM of Tonnage entered at IIongkong, from 1867 to 1889, inci

BLUE LINE represents Junk Tonnage only.

RED LINE represents Foreign Shipping Tonnage only.

THICK BLACK LINE represents entire Trade in Foreign Ships and Junks.

1878.

1879.

1880.

1881.

1882.

1883.

1884.

1885.

1886.

པག་གཟ

4,800,000

4,700,000

4,600,000

4,500,000

4,400,000

4,300,000

4,200,000

4,100,000

4,000,000

3,900,000

3,800,000

3,700,000

3,600,000

3,500,000

3,400,000

3,300,000

3,200,000

3,100,000

3,000,000

2,900,000

2,800,000

2,700,000

2,600,000

2,500,000

2,400,000

2,300,000

2,200,000

2,100,000

2,000,000

3,300,000

3,200,000

3,100,000

3,000,000

V

2,900,000

2,800,000

2,700,000

2,600,000

2,500,000

2,400,000

2,300,000

2,200,000

2,100,000

2,000,000

1,900,000

1,800,000

1,700,000

1,600,000

1,500,000

1,400,000

1,300,000

1,200,000

1,100,000

1,000,000

RETURN of VESSELS bringing CHINESE PASSENGERS to the Port of Victoria, Hongkong,-(Continued). 249

VALUE

SUMMARY.

From Adelaide, South Australia,

"

Bangkok, Siam,

37

Cairns, Queensland,

::

Brisbane, Queensland,

Cooktown, Queensland,

>>

Honolulu, Sandwich Islands,

"

*

>.

""

"

19

"

99

>>

""

.

Mauritius,

Medan, Sumatra,

Melbourne,.

Port Darwin, South Australia,

Rockhampton, Queensland, San Francisco, U.S.A.,.

Straits Settlements,

Sydney,

Syday Island, Queensland,

Timor Island............

Townsville, Queensland,

Vancouver, British Columbia,

Wellington, New Zealand,

Value of Treasure imported from Australian Ports,

ADULTS. CHILDREN.

TOTAL.

M. F.

M. F.

OF TREASURE BROUGHT,

35

35

...

4,825

45

40

16 4,926

125

126

97

97

:

125

125

962

20

25

19

123

432

668

509

wowow

3

сл

01 CO

1,026

5

138

441

5

679

511

77

77

...

7,586 241 101

46

7,974 $10,138,188

76,382 2,472

993

538

80,385

673

Co

6

12

6

697

34

34

2

2

187

1

188

1,693 148

7

4

2

:.

1,706 148

881,533

TOTAL PASSENGERS,

94,683 2,808 1,187 637 99,315 $11,019,721

XXI.—RETURN of MARINE CASES tried at the MARINE MAGISTRrate's Court, during the Year 1889.

DEFENDANTS, HOW DISPOSED OF

1

NATURE OF CHARGE.

No. of Cases.

No. of Defend- ants.

Imprisoned

with Hard

Labour.

Imprisoned

in default

of Fine.

Fined.

Sent back to

Dis-

missed.

Duty.

FINES.

AMOUNT OF

**

Assault,

11

11

1

2

00

8

10

Broaching Cargo &c.,

1

3

3

:

:

Found stowed away,

3

5

5

:

:

Harbour Regulations. Breach of,

I

2

Leaving without Clearance, (Junk),

6

6

Obstruction of Fairways,

1

1

2

1

4

1

:

:

:

:

4:.

4

1

14

2

Refusal of Duty,........

17

49

31

15

3

Throwing Ballast, &c., into the Harbour, ....

9

25

7

2

16

74

Wilfully remaining behind,

5

++

:

:

1

Years.

9 months in

TOTAL,......

53

107

51

3

25

15

13

$ 104

XXIII.--RETURN of Work performed by the Government Marine Surveyor's Department.

Passenger

Certificate

and Bottom.

Emigration.

Tonnage for

Registration.

1881,..

95

1882,..

154

67

127

10

5

3

1883,..

144

102

00

10

5

1884,..

200

141

10

9

7

1885,....

153

113

CO

6

5

1886,.

149

76

1

11

1887,

153

101

6

9

1888,..

161

97

9

1

7

1889,....

130

73

4

3

2 4 2 6 8 8 N 8 8

LO

5

Co

Estimated total

number of visits in

connection with

foregoing Inspection."

10

4

15

20

:

6

:

6

26

60

333333

6

69

16

9

72

15

14

80

1

6

42

80

1

139513 8 8 7 8

1

284

46

472

57

1

461

55

699

50

29

737

36

16

870

42

31

930

36

1,042

39

36

1,127

250

XXIV-IMPORTS AND EXPORTS OF OPIUM DURING 1889.

IMPORTS.

MALWA, Chests. 17,4601

ΡΑΤΝΑ. Chests.

BENARES,

PERSIAN.

Chests.

Chests.

TURKISH.

Chests.

TOTAL. Chests.

27,21033

16,86428

5,7981

96

67,4292 21

EXPORTS.

MALWA.

PATNA.

BENARES.

PERSIAN.

TURKISH.

TOTAL.

Chests.

Chests.

Chests.

16,702

23,90133

16,0942

Chests. 4,982

Chests.

128

Chests. 61,808227

Through Cargo reported in manifests but not landed,

NUMBER OF PERMITS, &c. ISSUED DURING 1889.

.12,306 chests.

Landing Permits,..

Removal Permits,

Export Permits,

Permits to Chinese Customs' Hulk,

Memo. of Exports sent to the Commissioner of Chinese Customs, Kowloon,

SUMMARY OF EXPORTS, 1889.

237

10,456 8,115

519

467

Malwa Chests.

Patna Chests.

Benares Persian Chests. Chests.

Turkish

Total

Total in

Chests.

Chests.

Piculs.

By Steamers to Amoy,

590

36

4,056

7731/0

British Columbia,

443

14

Bushire,

4

Bunder Abbas,...

1

Canton,

2,073

5,763

2,85635

:

Chefco,

12

1

3

Cochin China,

1

1

68938

Foochow,

2,701

1,465

470

5121

Formosa,

530

3,428

:

Hankow,

206

39

:

Hoihow,

10

615

79

Macau,

3,903

316

Pakhoi,.

Philippine Isles,

Rhio,

Sandakau,

San Francisco,......

52

790

:

:

379

29

:

:

:

:.

180

:

:

:

:.

:.

:

:

:

:

5,456

6,293.7375

457

545.95

4

4.1

1

1.025

10,693 28 12,417.84

16

40

16.8

691 38

5,1482

830.17

5,548.55625

3,9581/

4,150.2125

245

252.8

704

842.8

126

4,345

5,188.8

842

1,010.4

408

489.6

180

216.

:.

64

Shanghai,

8,130

7,178

4,651

82

38

:

:

:.

:

4

4.8

64

65.6

20,041

22,408.85

Singapore,

1

40

37

1

79

94.425

Smyrna,

:..

2

2

2.

Suez,

6

6

6.15

Swatow,

2,753/ 2,184

1,312

91

6,3401

7,041.975

By Junks to various adjacent

Ports in China,

.....

224

1,802

91

5

:

2,122

2,500.725

TOTAL,..

16,702

23,90123

16,09434

4,9824

128

61,80827 69,933.31625

The information in column 7 above is on the following assumption :----

Patua and Benares per chest, Malwa and Turkish per chest,

Persian per chest........

..1.20 piculs.

..1.00 95

..1.025 "2

(Copy.)

HONGKONG.

No. 164.

395

No. 90.

25

HONGKONG.

DESPATCH APPROVING OF THE NEW STANDING RULES AND ORDERS.

Laid before the Legislative Council, by Command of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government.

SIR,

DOWNING STREET,

12th August, 1890.

I have the honour to acknowledge the receipt of your Despatch, No. 214, of the 1st ultimo, enclosing a copy of Standing Rules and Orders lately passed by the Legislative Council and I have to convey to you my approval of them.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient humble Servant,

(Sd.) KNUTSFORD.

The Officer Administering the Government of

HONGKONG.

**

}

1

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 1.

WEDNESDAY, 15TH JANUARY, 1890.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR (SIR G. WILLIAM DES VEUX, K.C.M.G.).

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (A. LISTER).

""

"}

""

"}

the Acting Attorney General, (ANDREW JOHN LEACH).

the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (HENRY ERNEST WODEHOUSE, C.M.G.). the Captain Superintendent of Police, (WALTER MEREDITH DEANE).

the Surveyor General, (SAMUEL Brown).

PHINEAS RYRIE.

WONG SHING.

ALEXANDER PALMER MACEWEN.

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK, (vice the Honourable JOHN BELL-IRVING).

The Council met pursuant to notice.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 18th ultimo, were read and confirmed.

VOTES REFERRED TO THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-Read the following Minutes by His Excellency the Governor :-

C.S.O.

2937 of 18S9.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

(1.)

The Governor recommends the Council to re-vote the sum of Two thousand one hundred' $2,187. and Eighty-seven Dollars, being the balance remaining on the vote of 1889 for. Roads in

Kowloon.

C.S.O.

500 of 1889. $250.

Government House, Hongkong, 3rd January, 1890..

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

(2.)

The Governor recommends the Council to vote the sum of Two hundred and Fifty Dollars, being a grant to Mr. BRUCE SHEPHERD for the compilation and printing of an Index to Streets numbers of Houses and Description of Leased Lots of the City of Victoria.

Government House, Hongkong, 3rd January, 1890.

The Acting Colonial Secretary moved that these Votes be referred to the Finance Committee. The Acting Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and passed.

OBSERVATORY.-Mr. MACEWEN, pursuant to notice, asked the following question:-

When is it the intention of the Government to appoint a Commission to enquire into the working

of the Observatory.

The Governor replied.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO APPOINT AN ADDITIONAL MEMBER ON THE SANITARY BOARD.- The Acting Attorney General moved the first reading of this Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a first time.

The Standing Orders being suspended, the Acting Attorney General moved that the bill be read a second time.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a second time.

The Council then went into Committee on the bill.

Bill reported without amendment.

The Acting Attorney General then moved that the bill be read a third time.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

f

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this bill do pass.

Bill passed, and numbered as Ordinance 1 of 1890.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE FOR THE INCORPORATION OF THE PROCUREUR GÉNÉRAL, in Hong- KONG, OF THE SOCIETY OF THE MISSIONS ETRANGÈRES.-The Acting Attorney General moved the first reading of this Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE PROTECTION OF WOMEN AND GIRLS ORDINANCE, 1889.-The Acting Attorney General moved the first reading of this Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a first time.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Governor then adjourned the Council sine die.

;

Read and confirmed, this 12th day of February, 1890.

ARATHOON SETH,

Clerk of Councils.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX,

Governor.

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 2.

WEDNESDAY, 12TH FEBRUARY, 1890.

3

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR (SIR G. WILLIAM DES VEUX, K.C.M.G.).

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (FRANCIS FLEMING, C.M.G.).

the Acting Attorney General, (Andrew John Leach).

>"

>>

};

the Captain Superintendent of Police, (WALTER MEREDITH DEANE). the Surveyor General, (SAMUEL BROWN).

PHINEAS RYRIE.

WONG SHING.

ALEXANDER PALMER MACEWEN.

""

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

27

ABSENT:

The Honourable the Colonial Treasurer, (ALFRED LISTER).

""

. JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK, (vice the Honourable JOHN BELL-IRVING).

The Council met pursuant to notice.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 15th ultimo, were read and confirmed.

NEW MEMBER.-Mr. FRANCIS FLEMING, C.M.G., was sworn in and took his seat as Colonial Secretary.

VOTES REFERRED TO THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-Read the following Minutes by His Excellency the Governor :-

C.S.O.

2433 of 1889.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

(1.)

The Governor recommends the Council to vote the sum of Seven hundred and Sixty-six $766. Dollars for general overhaul and repairs to Health Officer's Steam-launch Blanche, and addi-

tional repairs to boiler, and providing a launch while the repairs are being executed.

Government House, Hongkong, 3rd February, 1890.

C.S.O. 370 of 1890.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

(2.)

The Governor recommends the Council to vote the sum of Twenty-seven thousand Dollars $27,000 for supplying the Peak District with water, viz.:-Laying pipes, Steam engine, Hydraulic

Motor and Pumps, Buildings, &c.

C. O. Desp. General

1889.

Government House, Hongkong, 12th February, 1890.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

(3.)

The Governor recommends the Council to vote the sum of Twelve thousand Dollars 25th Nov for illuminating the Public buildings, arranging for the visit to Canton, entertainment at $12,000. Government House, and other incidental expenses connected with the visit to the Colony of

Their Royal Highnesses THE DUKE AND DUCHESS of Connaught.

Government House, Hongkong, 12th February, 1890.

C.S.O.

2463 of 189.

G. WILLIAM DES VEUX.

(4.)

The Governor recommends the Council to vote the sum of Thirty-seven thousand Two $37,275.48. hundred and Seventy-five Dollars, and Forty-eight cents for the purchase of twelve Maxim

Nordenfeldt Guns, and Ammunition, for the Volunteers.

Government House, Hongkong, 12th February, 1890.

The Colonial Secretary moved that these Votes be referred to the Finance Committee. The Captain Superintendent of Police seconded.

Question-put and passed.

:

VOTES PASSED BY THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Colonial Secretary, by direction of His Excel- lency the Governor, laid on the table the Report of the Finance Committee, dated the 15th ultimo, (No. 1), and moved that the following Votes referred to therein be passed, viz.:—

C.S.O.

288 7 of 1889. $2,187.

C.S.O.

500 of 1889. $500.

Balance remaining on the vote of 1889 for Roads in Kowloon,

$ 2,187.00

To Mr. BRUCE SHEPHERD for compiling and printing Index to Streets,

.$

500.00

The Captain Superintendent of Police seconded.

The Governor addressed the Council on the additional sum of $250 suggested by the Finance Committee to be paid to Mr. BRUCE SHEPHERD.

Question--put and passed.

GAP ROCK LIGHTHOUSE.--Mr. MACEWEN, pursuant to notice, asked:-

What progress is being made with the Gap Rock Lighthouse?

The Surveyor General replied.

NEW CENTRAL MARKET.-Mr. MACEWEN, pursuant to notice, asked :-

When will the work connected with the New Central Market be commenced?

The Surveyor General replied.

The Governor addressed the Council.

EXTENSION OF THE RECREATION GROUND AT THE HAPPY VALLEY.-Mr. MACEWEN, pursuant to notice, moved the following resolution, and addressed the Council:-

That in view of the increased popularity of the Race Course for the purposes of recreation and the limited space that is available, the Government take into consideration the desirability of further extension, by removing the trees and turfing the piece of ground now known as the Public Gardens and lying immediately to the north of the road from the monument to the Gardeners' Cottage.

Mr. CHATER Seconded, and addressed the Council.

Mr. RYRIE addressed the Council in support of the motion.

The Governor addressed the Council.

The Surveyor General addressed the Council.

Question-put and passed.

BILL ENTITLED THE MAGISTRATES' ORDINANCE, 1890.-The Acting Attorney General moved the first reading of this Bill.

The Captain Superintendent of Police seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED An Ordinance for the INCORPORATION OF THE PROCUREUR GÉNÉral, in Hong- KONG, OF THE SOCIETY OF THE MISSIONS ETRANGÈRES.-The Acting Attorney General moved the second reading of this Bill.

The Captain Superintendent of Police seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a second time.

The Council then went into Committee on the Bill.

Bill reported without amendment.

The Acting Attorney General then moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Captain Superintendent of Police seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed, and numbered as Ordinance 2 of 1890.

APPROACHING DEPARTURE OF THE GOVERNOR.-Mr. RYRIE addressed the Governor at length on His Excellency's departure, expressing the extreme regret of the Un-official Members that His Excel- ency's health compels him to leave the Colony for a time.

His Excellency replied.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Governor then adjourned the Council sine die.

Read and confirmed, this 5th day of March, 1890.

ARATHOON SETH,

Clerk of Councils.

F. FLEMING, Administering the Government.

{

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 3.

WEDNESDAY, 24TH FEBRUARY, 1890.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE OFFICER ADMINISTERING THE GOVERNMENT

The Honourable FRANCIS FLEMING, C.M.G.)

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (WALTER MEREDITH DEANE).

""

the Acting Attorney General, (ANDREW JOHN LEACH).

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALFRED LISTER).

PHINEAS RYRIE.

""

WONG SHING.

""

5

";

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

The Council met pursuant to notice.

JURY LIST, 1890.-There being no strangers present, the Council proceeded to consider the Jury List for 1890.

The List was duly revised, corrected, and Special Jurors designated in terms of Section 8 of Ordinance 18 of 1887.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned to Wednesday, the 5th proximo, at 3 P.M.

F. FLEMING, Administering the Government.

Read and confirmed, this 5th day of March, 1890.

ARATHOON SETH,

Clerk of Councils.

7

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 4.

WEDNESDAY, 5TH MARCH, 1890.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE OFFICER ADMINISTERING THE GOVERNMENT

(The Honourable FRANCIS FLEMING, C.M.G.).

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (WALTER MEREDITH DEANE).

the Acting Attorney General, (ANDREW JOHN LEACH).

""

>>

""

>>

""

the Surveyor General, (SAMUEL BROWN).

the Acting Registrar General, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES, vice the

Honourable Walter MEREDITH Deane).

PHINEAS RYRIE.

ALEXANDER PALMER MACEWEN.

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK, (vice the Honourable JOHN BELL-IRVING). HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

ABSENT:

The Honourable the Colonial Treasurer, (ALFRED LISTER).

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the Meetings, held on the 12th and 24th ultimo, respectively, were read and confirmed.

NEW MEMBERS.-His Excellency addressed the Council respecting the appointment of the follow- ing gentlemen, who were duly sworn in and took their respective seats, viz. :-

Mr. N. G. MITCHELL-INNES, Acting Registrar General, vice Mr. W. M. DEANE, appointed

Acting Colonial Secretary.

Mr. P. RYRIE, on the expiration of 6 years for which his former seat was retained. Dr. Ho KAI, on the expiration of 6 years for which Mr. WONG SHING held his seat. VOTES REFERRED TO THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-Read the following Minutes by His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government :-

Mis. Serv. $209.

C.S.O.

333 of

F. FLEMING.

(1.)

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote the sum of 3681890. Two hundred and Nine Dollars, as a gratuity to the daughter of the late Mr. J. CARNEIRO, in consideration of his 15 years' good service as Wardmaster in the Civil and Small-pox Hospitals. Mr. CARNEIRO was invalided and applied for pension, but did not live to enjoy it, as he died a few days after it was sanctioned.

The above sum is equivalent to One year's pension of the deceased. Government House, Hongkong, 25th February, 1890.

The Acting Colonial Secretary moved that this Vote be referred to the Finance Committee. The Acting Attorney General seconded.

Question--put and passed.

(2.)

Read the following Minute by His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government :—

F. FLEMING.

Mis. Serv.

C.S.O.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote the sum of 453 of 1890. Fifty Pounds Sterling as remuneration to Colonel BEAUMONT for his report on the proposed

removal of the Bokhara rocks,

£50.

also

$100. One hundred dollars for the cost of his stay in Hongkong.

Government House, Hongkong, 26th February, 1890.

The Acting Colonial Secretary moved that this vote be referred to the Finance Committee. The Acting Attorney General seconded.

His Excellency addressed the Council.

Question-put and passed.

BALL ROOM, &C., GOVERNMENT HOUSE.-His Excellency, referring to the vote for $25,000 which appears on the Estimates for this year, informed the Council that plans and estimates had been received for this service, showing the total cost to be $40,000, but that the current year's expenditure on this account is not likely to exceed the amount already voted.

00

VOTES PASSED BY THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.--The Acting Colonial Secretary, by direction of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government, laid on the table the Report of the Finance Committee, dated the 12th ultimo, (No. 2), and moved that the following Votes referred to therein be passed, viz.:-

C.S.O.

2433 of 1889.

C.S.O.

270 of 1890.

C. O. Desp. General,

Corp

25th Nov.,

1889.

C.S.O.

(1.) General overhaul, &c. to Health Officer's Steam-launch Blanche,

..$ 766.00

(2.) Laying pipes, Steam Engine, &c., for supplying the Peak District with water, $27,000.00

(3.) Illuminations, &c. on the approaching arrival of the Duke and Duchess of

Connaught,

..$12,000.00

24631889. (4.) Purchase of 12 Maxim Nordenfeldt Guns and Ammunition for Volunteers,...$37,275.98

The Acting Attorney General seconded. Question-put and passed.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE FOR THE NATURALIZATION OF LAM LEUNG SING otherwise LAM YUK PAU.-The Acting Attorney General moved the first reading of this Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE PUBLIC HEALTH ORDINANCE, 1887.-The Acting Attorney General moved the first reading of this Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED THE MAGISTRATES' ORDINANCE, 1890.-The Acting Attorney General moved the second reading of this Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a second time.

The Acting Attorney General then moved that the Bill be referred to a Special Committee con- sisting of the

ACTING COLONIAL SECRETARY,

ATTORNEY GENERAL, and Dr. Ho KAI.

Question--put and passed.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned till Wednesday, the 12th instant, at 3 P.M.

F. FLEMING,

Read and confirmed, this 12th day of March, 1890.

ARATHOON SETH,

Clerk of Councils.

Administering the Government.

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 5.

WEDNESDAY, 12TH MARCH, 1890.

9

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE OFFICER ADMINISTERING THE GOVERNMENT (The Honourable FRANCIS FLEMING, C.M.G.).

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (WALTER MEREDITH Deane).

the Acting Attorney General, (ANDREW JOHN LEACH).

25

"1

>>

**

""

""

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALFRed Lister).

the Surveyor General, (SAMUEL BROWN).

the Acting Registrar General, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES, vice the

Honourable WALTER MEREDITH DEANE).

PHINEAS RYRIE.

ALEXANDER PALMER MACEWEN.

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK, (vice the Honourable JOHN BELL-IRVING).

Ho KAI, M.B., C.M.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 5th instant, were read and confirmed.

VOTES REFERRED TO THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-Read the following Minutes by His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government :---

F. FLEMING.

C.S.O. 342 of 1890. $90.

C. O. Desp. 2 of 1890.

(1.)

.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote the sum of Ninety Dollars, as an allowance for a Chinese teacher to the Head Mistress of the Central School for Girls at $10 per month from 1st April to 31st December, 1890.

Government House, Hongkong, 11th March, 1890.

F. FLEMING.

(2.)

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote the sum of $3,000. Three thousand Dollars, being an increase to the salary of the Attorney General, from $4,800 to $7,800 per annum, who will not be allowed private practice or receive fees in connection with the Registration of Trade Marks or fees for any other service, these fees will revert to the Treasury.

C.S.O.

295 of 1890.

Government House, Hongkong, 11th March, 1890.

F. FLEMING.

(3.)

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote the sum of $735. Seven hundred and Thirty-five Dollars, for the employment of an Inspector of Nuisances for

Kowloon district. From 1st April to 31st December, 1890, viz. :-

Salary at $60 per month,

Lodging allowance at $15 per month,

Chair Coolies at $12 per month, for 5 months in summer,

.$ 540.00

135.00

60.00

735.00

Government House, Hongkong, 11th March, 1890.

The Acting Colonial Secretary moved that these Votes be referred to the Finance Committee. The Treasurer seconded.

His Excellency addressed the Council on the vote for the increase to the Attorney General's salary. Question--put and passed.

VOTES PASSED BY THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.--The Acting Colonial Secretary, by direction of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government, laid on the table the Report of the Finance Committee, dated the 5th instant, (No. 3), and moved that the following vote referred to therein be passed, viz. :-

Mis Serv Gratuity to the daughter of the late Mr. J. CARNEIRO, Wardmaster in the Civil and

C.S.O. 363 of 1890.

Small-pox Hospitals,..

The Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and passed.

209.00

10

49 of 1899.

Eastern DEFENCES.-The Officer Administering the Government laid on the table a despatch from the Right Honourable the Secretary of State for the Colonies on the question of the contemplated demand on the Colony for an increased Military Contribution; and addressed the Council.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE FOR THE NATURALIZATION OF LAM LEUNG SING otherwise LAM Y.UK PAU.--The Acting Attorney General moved the second reading of this Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a second time.

The Council then went into Committee on the Bill.

Bill reported with a verbal amendment.

The Acting Attorney General then moved that the Bill be read a third time.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE PUBLIC HEALTH ORDINANCE, 1887.-The Acting Attorney General moved the second reading of this Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a second time.

The Council then went into Committee on the Bill.

Bill reported without amendment.

The Acting Attorney General then moved that the Bill be read a third time.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

The Honourable Mr. MACEWEN moved that the third reading be postponed, which was agreed to. ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned till Wednesday, the 19th instant, at 3 P.M.

F. FLEMING,

Administering the Government.

Read and confirmed, this 19th day of March, 1890.

F. A. HAZELAND, Acting Clerk of Councils.

>

>

{

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 6.

WEDNESDAY, 19TH MARCH, 1890.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE OFFICER ADMINISTERING THE GOVERNMENT

(The Honourable FRANCIS FLEMING, C.M.G.).

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (WALTER MEREDIth Deane).

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALFRED LISTER).

""

""

the Surveyor General, (SAMUEL Brown).

""

""

""

""

""

]]

the Acting Registrar General, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES, vice the

Honourable WALTER MEREDITH DEANE).

PHINEAS RYRIE.

ALEXANDER PALMER MACEWEN.

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK, (vice the Honourable JOHN BELL-IRVING). HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 12th instant, were read and confirmed.

VOTES REFERRED TO THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-Read the following Minutes by His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government :-

C.S.O. 519 of 1889.

C.S.O.

19 of 1890.

C. O. Desp. 144 of 1888, and

226 of 1889.

F. FLEMING.

(1.)

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote the sum of Eight thousand and Five hundred Dollars to complete the sum of $58,500, the cost of building an Epidemic Hospital Hulk.

Amount of Contract,

.....

Voted as Extraordinary Expenditure for 1890,

To be voted,...

Governinent House, Hongkong, 13th March, 1890.

F. FLEMING.

(2.)

.$58,500

50,000

$ 8,500

The Officer Administering the Government_recommends the Council to vote the sum of Thirty-four thousand Dollars for the purchase of Inland Lot No. 598 with the premises erected thereon, for use as a Police Station in lieu of No. 8 Station at Taipingshan.

Government House, Hongkong, 10th March, 1890.

F. FLEMING.

(3.)

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote the sum of Seven hundred and Twenty Dollars being additional Salary to the Assistant Harbour Master, from $1,920 to $2,640, who will not draw any pay as Collector of Light Dues, while any fees for examination of Masters and Mates in the Mercantile Marine, will be paid into the Treasury.

Government House, Hongkong, 19th March, 1890.

The Acting Colonial Secretary moved that these Votes be referred to the Finance Committee. The Treasurer seconded.

His Excellency addressed the Council on the votes for the purchase of Inland Lot No. 598, and the increase to the salary of the Assistant Harbour Master.

Question-put and passed.

VOTES PASSED BY THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Acting Colonial Secretary, by direction of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government, laid on the table the Report of the Finance Committee, dated the 12th instant, (No. 4), and moved that the following Votes referred to therein be passed, viz.:-

542 of 1890.

(1.)

C.S.O. Allowance for a Chinese teacher to the Head Mistress of the Central School for

Girls at $10 per month from 1st April to 31st December, 1890,

$ 90.00

1

12

(2.)

G. O. Deep. Increase to the salary of the Attorney General, from $4,800 to $7,800 per annum,...$3,000.00

of 1890.

C.S.0. 295 of 1890.

(3.)

Employment of an Inspector of Nuisances for Kowloon district. From 1st April

to 31st December, 1890, viz. :-

Salary at $60 per month,

Lodging allowance at $15 per month,

Chair Coolies at $12 per month, for 5 months in summer,

$

540.00

135.00

60.00

735.00

The Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and passed.

REPORT. The Acting Colonial Secretary laid on the table the Acting Postmaster General's Report

for 1889.

NEW MEMBER.Mr. WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN having been appointed Attorney General was duly sworn and took his seat as a Member of the Council,

His Excellency addressed the Council expressing his acknowledgment for the services rendered to the Council by Mr. A. J. LEACH the late Acting Attorney General.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE LAW RELATING TO INFANT VACCINATION AND TO PROVIDE FOR THE REGISTRATION OF ALL PERSONS VACCINATED BY A PUBLIC VACCINATOR.-The Acting Colonial Secretary moved the first reading of this Bill.

The Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED THE MAGISTRATES' ORDINANCE, 1890.-The Acting Colonial Secretary moved that as the Special Committee had not completed their labours, the consideration of this Bill be postponed which was agreed to.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE PUBLIC HEALTH ORDINANCE, 1887.-The Acting Colonial Secretary moved the third reading of this Bill.

The Treasurer seconded.

The Honourable Dr. Ho KAI addressed the Council.

The Acting Colonial Secretary moved that the third reading be postponed which was agreed to. His Excellency addressed the Council and stated that at the next meeting, the Council would be moved to vote the increased military contribution as proposed by the Secretary of State. His Excel- lency further informed the Council that at the next meeting, the Council would be moved to agree to the appointment of a Special Committee to frame New Standing Orders and Rules under the present Royal Instructions.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned till Wednesday, the 26th instant, at 3 P.M.

Read and confirmed, this 26th day of March, 1890.

F. A. HAZELAND,

Acting Clerk of Councils.

F. FLEMING, Administering the Government.

:

1

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No.

WEDNESDAY, 26TH MARCH, 1890.

PRESENT:

13

7.

HIS EXCELLENCY THE OFFICER ADMINISTERING THE GOVERNMENT

The Honourable FRANCIS FLEMING, C.M.G.)

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (WALTER MEREDITH Deane).

""

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27

""

""

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALFREd Lister).

the Surveyor General, (SAMUEL BROWN).

the Acting Registrar General, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES, vice the

Honourable WALTER MEREDITH DEANE).

PHINEAS RYRIE.

ALEXANDER PALMER MACEWEN.

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK, (vice the Honourable JOHN BELL-IRVING). HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 19th instant, were read and confirmed.

The Queen's Warrant for the appointment of the Honourable SAMUEL BROWN, Surveyor General, to be an Official Member of the Legislative Council having been received, he was duly sworn and took his seat as a Member of the Council.

VOTES PASSED BY THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Acting Colonial Secretary, by direction of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government, laid on the table the Report of the Finance Committee, dated the 19th instant, (No. 5), and moved that the following vote referred to therein be passed, viz. :-

C.S.O.

519 of 1889.

144 of 1888,

and

226 of 1889.

:

To complete the cost of building an Epidemic Hospital Hulk,..

De Additional Salary to the Assistant Harbour Master, from $1,920 to $2,640, who will not draw any pay as Collector of Light Dues, while any fees for examina- tion of Masters and Mates in the Mercantile Marine, wlll be paid into the Treasury,

Mis. Serv. Remuneration to Colonel BEAUMONT for his report on the proposed removal of the

C.S.O. 453 of 1890.

£50.

$100.

Bokhara rocks,

For the cost of his stay in Hongkong,

The Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

also,

The Acting Colonial Secretary then moved the following :---

$ 8.500:00

$ 720.00

..£50. 0. 0

$

100.00

That a Special Committee of this Council be appointed for the purpose of framing new Standing Rules and Orders for the regulation of the Council's Proceedings in pursuance of Article XIX. of the Royal Instructions of the 19th of January, 1888.

The Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and motion agreed to.

The Acting Colonial Secretary moved that the following Members form the Special Committee to frame the new Standing Rules and Orders, viz. :—

The Treasurer seconded.

Hon. Attorney General.

Hon. N. G. MITCHELL-INNES. Hon. A. P. MACEWEN.

Hon. Dr. Ho KAI.

Question-put and motion agreed to.

14

The Acting Colonial Secretary moved the following:

That the Revenue of the Colony shall be charged in respect of the year 1890, with the equivalent of £40,000 or $266,666, including the sum of £20,000 or $133,333 voted in the Appropriation Ordinance, No. 34 of 1889, in order to meet the claims of Her Majesty's Government for Military Contribution.

The Surveyor General seconded.

Honourable P. RYRIE addressed the Council.

Question-put and motion agreed to.

The Acting Colonial Secretary moved that the Standing Rules and Orders be suspended. The Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and motion agreed to.

The Honourable P. RYRIE then moved the following resolutions :—

1.-That this Council, while recognising the justice and fairness of the demand made upon the Colony for an addition to the Military Contribution, desires to place upon record the fact that the vote authorising the additional payment has been passed by the unanimous voice of the Members, Official and Un-Official, in the belief that the proposed increase in the strength of the troops stationed here is essentially necessary for the safety of the Colony and with the full assurance that the force mentioned in the appendix to the Secretary of State's despatch of the 20th January, 1890, 3,018 men of all ranks, of whom 2,525 are to be Europeans, will be present in the Colony within the year, and will be retained here.

2. It is the unanimous hope of this Council that as the additional moneys voted have been asked for and granted as the Colony's contribution to an increased garrison and princi- pally, if not entirely because of the proposed increase, no demand will be made by the Imperial Government for the payment thereof until the strength of the garrison has actually been raised to the full extent of the figures in the Secretary of State's despatch, and that, if any additional payment is demanded before that point has been reached, it should be proportional to such increase as shall from time to time be made in the force stationed in the Colony.

3. That in the opinion of this Council the attention of the Secretary of State should be directed to the fact to which no reference is made in Lord KNUTSFORD's despatch of the 20th January, 1890, that the Military Departments are in the occupation of rather more than 337 acres of land in this Colony, of which 84 acres are in the City of Victoria; that these 84 acres are situate in the very centre of the town and are, at the very lowest, of the value of Three millions of Dollars representing a revenue in the shape of Crown Rents and Taxes of $50,000 a year lost to the Colony, and that this being so it is earnestly hoped that no further demand will be made on the Colony in respect of Barrack Expenditure, referred to in paras. 20, 21 and 22 of the despatch above-mentioned, at all events unless the land in the centre of the town be given up by the Military Authorities, as has been suggested, in exchange for other sites nearer the batteries.

4.-That His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government be requested to forward a copy of these Resolutions to the Secretary of State with a view to their being laid before Her Majesty's Government.

The Honourable A. P. MACEWEN seconded.

The following Members addressed the Council:-Honourable P. RYRIE, Honourable A. P. MACEWEN, and the Treasurer.

His Excellency addressed the Council.

Question-put and resolutions agreed to.

BILL ENTITLED THE HONGKONG LAND INVESTMENT AND AGENCY COMPANY LIMITED ORDINANCE 1890.-Honourable C. P. CHATER moved the first reading of the Bill.

Honourable A. P. MACEWEN seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE LAW RELATING TO INFANT VACCINATION AND TO PROVIDE FOR THE REGISTRATION OF ALL PERSONS VACCINATED BY A PUBLIC VACCINATOR.—The Acting Colonial Secretary moved the second reading of this Bill.

The Treasurer seconded.

Question--put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

BILL ENTITLED THE MAGISTRATES' ORDINANCE, 1890.-The Acting Colonial Secretary moved that the consideration of this Bill be adjourned which was agreed to.

15

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE PUBLIC HEALTH ORDINANCE, 1887.-The Acting Colonial Secretary moved the third reading of this Bill.

Honourable Dr. Ho KAI addressed the Council.

The Attorney General moved that the Bill be re-committed.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Council in Committee accordingly.

After discussion debate adjourned.

Council resumed.

ADJOURNMENT.The Council then adjourned till Wednesday, the 9th April, at 3 P.M.

Read and confirmed, this 9th day of April, 1890.

F. A. HAZELAND, Acting Clerk of Councils.

F. FLEMING,

Officer Administering the Government.

;

4

*

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 8.

WEDNESDAY, 9TH APRIL, 1890.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE OFFICER ADMINISTERING THE GOVERNMENT

(The Honourable FRANCIS FLEMING, C.M.G.).

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (WAlter Meredith Deane).

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

"

""

.

""

"

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALFRED LISTER).

the Surveyor General, (SAMUEL BROWN).

17

the Acting Registrar General, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES, vice the

Honourable WALTER MEREDITH Deane).

ALEXANDER PALMER MACEWEN.

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK, (vice the Honourable JOHN BELL-IRVING). Ho KAI, M.B., C.M.

The Honourable PHINEAS RYRIE.

ABSENT:

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 26th March, were read and confirmed.

His Excellency informed the Council that His Royal Highness the DUKE OF CONNAUGHT desired him to inform the Council and the public generally that he and Her Royal Highness the DUCHESS OF CONNAUGHT were both much gratified with the kind welcome accorded to them during their late visit to the Colony.

REPORTS.-The Acting Colonial Secretary laid on the table the report of the Superintendent of the Gaol for 1889, and a Statement of Treasury receipts and payments for 1889.

VOTES REFERRED TO THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-Read the following Minutes by His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government :-

C.S.O. 294 of 1890.

C.S.O.

611 of 1890.

F. FLEMING.

(1.)

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote the sum of Nine hundred and Ninety-one Dollars, and Fifty-seven Cents ($991.57) being cost of repairing the Telegraph Cable between North Point and Kowloon-damaged by some vessel's anchor dragging various cables together and entangling them.

Government House, Hongkong, 28th March, 1890..

F. FLEMING.

(2.)

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote the sum of One thousand Nine hundred and Two Dollars, and Twenty-seven Cents ($1,902.27) to enable the Sanitary Board to pay the expenses incurred in suppressing the recent Cattle Epidemic.

The sum asked for is thus made up :-

Compensation for Cattle and Fodder destroyed,.

Slaughtering and disposal of carcasses,

Disinfecting and cleansing sheds,

.$1,820.50 51.77 30.00

Government House, Hongkong, 8th April, 1890.

$1,902.27

The Acting Colonial Secretary moved that these Votes be referred to the Finance Committee. The Treasurer seconded.

His Excellency addressed the Council on the vote for compensation in connection with the recent Cattle Epidemic.

Question-put and passed.

18

BILL ENTITLED THE HONGKONG LAND INVESTMENT AND AGENCY COMPANY LIMITED ORDINANCE, 1890.-Honourable J. J. KESWICK moved the second reading of the Bill.

Honourable C. P. CHATER seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

The Council then went into Committee on the Bill.

Bill reported with verbal amendments.

Council resumed.

Honourable J. J. KESWICK moved the third reading of the Bill.

Honourable C. P. CHATER seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill passed.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE LAW RELATING TO INFANT VACCINATION AND TO PROVIDE FOR THE REGISTRATION OF ALL PERSONS VACCINATED BY A PUBLIC VACCINATOR.-The Attorney General moved that the consideration of this Bill be postponed which was agreed to.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE PUBLIC HEALTH ORDINANCE, 1887.-Council in Committee on the Bill.

Bill reported with amendments.

BILL ENTITLED THE MAGISTRATES' ORDINANCE, 1890.-The report of the Select Committee to report on the Bill was read.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Progress reported.

Council resumed.

His Excellency addressed the Council and referred to the Letters Patent and Royal Instructions of the 19th January, 1888, and stated that a copy of the Clause of the Royal Instructions enabling the Council to make Standing Rules and Orders would be sent to each member of the Select Committee appointed for that purpose.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned till Wednesday, the 16th instant, at 2 P.M.

Read and confirmed, this 16th day of April, 1890,

F. A. HAZELAND,

Acting Clerk of Councils.

F. FLEMING,

Officer Administering the Government.

>

19

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 9.

WEDNESDAY, 16TH APRIL, 1890.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE OFFICER ADMINISTERING THE GOVERNMENT (The Honourable FRANCIS FLEMING, C.M.G.)

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (WALTER MEREDITH DEANE).

>>>

>>

""

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALFRED LISTER).

the Surveyor General, (SAMUEL BROWN).

the Acting Registrar General, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES, vice the

Honourable WALTER MEREDITH DEANE).

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

ABSENT:

The Honourable PHINEAS RYRIE, (on sick leave).

>>

";

""

ALEXANDER PALMER MACEWEN.

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK, (vice the Honourable JOHN BELL-IRVING).

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 9th April, were read and confirmed.

His Excellency informed the Council that he desired to correct a statement which he made at the last Meeting with reference to the publication of the Letters Patent of the 19th January, 1888, inasmuch as these will be found to have been published in the Government Gazette of the 5th May,

1888.

BILL ENTITLED THE MAGISTRATES' ORDINANCE, 1890.-Council in Committee on the Bill. Progress reported.

Council resumed.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned till Wednesday, the 23rd instant, at 3 P.M.

Read and confirmed, this 29th day of April, 1890.

F. A. HAZELAND,

Acting Clerk of Councils.

F. FLEMING,

Officer Administering the Government.

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 10.

TUESDAY, 29TH APRIL, 1890.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE OFFICER ADMINISTERING THE GOVERNMENT

(The Honourable FRANCIS FLEMING, C.M.G.).

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (WALTER MEREDITH DEANE).

""

""

*AAA

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALFRED LISTER).

the Surveyor General, (SAMUEL Brown).

21

the Acting Registrar General, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES, vice the

Honourable WALTER MEREDITH DEANE).

ALEXANDER PALMER MACEWEN.

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK, (vice the Honourable JOHN BELL-IRVING). HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

ABSENT:

The Honourable PHINEAS RYRIE, (on account of sickness).

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 16th instant, were read and confirmed.

The QUEEN's Warrant for the appointment of the Honourable N. G. MITCHELL-INNES to be a Member of the Legislative Council so long as he performs the duties of Registrar General in this Colony having been received, he was duly sworn and took his seat as a Member of the Council.

REPORTS.-The Acting Colonial Secretary laid on the table the Blue Book for 1889, the Police Report for 1889, the Report of the Botanical and Afforestation Department for 1889, Registrar General's Returns of Births and Deaths for 1889, Mortality Statistics for 1889, Report of the Superin- tendent of the Fire Brigade for 1889, and also the Report of the Observatory Commission.

VOTES REFERRED TO THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-Read the following Minutes by His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government :-

C.S.O. 628 of 1890.

C. O. Desp.

38 of 1890.

C.S.0.

649 of 1890.

C.S.0.

878 of 1890.

F. FLEMING.

(1.)

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote the sum of Two hundred Dollars, ($200), for an additional Clerk, and Interpreter of Indian and Malay languages, at the Harbour Department, from 1st May next, at a salary of $25 per month.

Government House, Hongkong, 14th April, 1890.

F. FLEMING.

(2.)

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote the sum of One hundred and Twenty Dollars, ($120), for House Allowance to the Compradore of the General Post Office.

Government House, Hongkong, 14th April, 1890.

F. FLEMING.

(3.)

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote the sum of Twenty-one Dollars and Seventy Cents, ($21.70), for the refund of the overcharged Municipal Rates at the erroneous valuation on two Tenements, Nos. 69 and 70, in the Village of Hok-Ün, in the Kaulung Peninsula.

Government House, Hongkong, 11th April, 1890.

F. FLEMING.

(4.)

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote the sum of One hundred and Sixty Dollars, ($160), for the salary of a Shroff in the Money Order Office, from 1st of May, at $20 per month.

Government House, Hongkong, 14th April, 1890.

22

C.S.O.

654 of 1890.

C.S.O.

969 of 1890.

F. FLEMING.

(5.)

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote the sum of Two hundred and Twenty-eight Dollars, ($228), as a gratuity to the Children of the late SOOPPRAMANI SOONDERAM, in consideration of his 25 years' service as Police Officer, Clerk and Interpreter in the Harbour Office.

Government House, Hongkong, 18th April, 1890.

F. FLEMING.

(6.)

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote the sum of One thousand Three hundred and Twenty-nine Dollars and Seventy-three Cents ($1,329.73) for new Moorings of the Bokhara Buoy, to be supplied from the stores of the Royal Naval Yard, (£205 @3/1=$1,329.73).

Government House, Hongkong, 24th April, 1890.

The Acting Colonial Secretary moved that these Votes be referred to the Finance Committee. The Treasurer seconded.

Question--put and agreed to.

VOTES PASSED BY THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Acting Colonial Secretary, by direction of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government, laid on the table the Report of the Finance Committee, dated the 9th instant, (Ño. 6), and moved that the following Votes referred to therein be passed, viz. :-

C.S.O. Cost of repairing the Telegraph Cable between North Point and Kowloon-damaged

294 of 1890.

by some vessel's anchor dragging various cables together and entangling them,...$ 991.57

611 of 1890. Expenses and compensation incurred in suppressing the recent Cattle Epidemic, ....$1,902.27

of

19 1990. Purchase of Inland Lot No. 598 with the premises erected thereon, for use as a Police Station in lieu of No. 8 Station at Taipingshan, the purchase money to be defrayed from premia on land sales,.....

The Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

$34,000.00

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE HONGKONG CODE OF CIVIL PROCEDURE.-The Attorney General moved the first reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE PUBLIC HEALTH ORDINANCE, 1887.-The Attorney General moved that the Bill be read a third time.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE LAW RELATING TO INFANT VACCINATION AND TO. PROVIDE FOR THE REGISTRATION OF ALL PERSONS VACCINATED BY A PUBLIC VACCINATOR.-Council in Committee on the Bill. The several clauses of the Bill having been considered and agreed to.

Bill reported with amendments.

Council resumed.

His Excellency informed the Council that he proposed for the present to have two meetings of the Council a week, one meeting entirely reserved for the consideration of the Magistrates' Bill, and the other meeting for such other business as may come before the Council. His Excellency further stated that meetings would be held on Mondays to consider the Magistrates' Bill and that the Council would deal with the other business on such other day of the week as will be most convenient having regard to the departure of the Mail.

ADJOURNMENT.—The Council then adjourned till Monday, the 5th May, 1890, at 2 P.M.

F. FLEMING,

Officer Administering the Government.

Read and confirmed, this 5th day of May, 1890.

F. A. HAZELAND,

Acting Clerk of Councils.

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 11.

MONDAY, 5TH MAY, 1890.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE OFFICER ADMINISTERING THE GOVERNMENT (The Honourable FRANCIS FLEMING, C.M.G.)

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (WALTER MEREDITH DEANE).

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

""

the Surveyor General, (SAMUEL BROWN).

""

the Acting Registrar General, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES). HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

">

ABSENT:

The Honourable the Colonial Treasurer, (ALFRED LISTER).

>"

27

PHINEAS RYRIE.

ALEXANDER PALMER MACEWEN.

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

>>

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

""

23

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 29th April, were read and confirmed. BILL ENTITLED THE MAGISTRATES' ORDINANCE, 1890.-Council in Committee on the Bill. Progress reported.

Council resumed.

ADJOURNMENT.The Council then adjourned till Friday, the 9th instant, at 3 P.M.

Read and confirmed, this 9th day of May, 1890.

F. A. HAZELAND, Acting Clerk of Councils.

F. FLEMING,

Officer Administering the Government.

3

25

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 12.

FRIDAY, 9TH MAY, 1890.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE OFFICER ADMINISTERING THE GOVERNMENT (The Honourable FRANCIS FLEMING, C.M.G.)

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (WALTER MEREDITH Deane).

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

>>

""

>>

";

""

the Surveyor General, (SAMUEL BROWN).

the Acting Registrar General, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES). PHINEAS RYRIE.

ALEXANDER PALMER MACEWEN.

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

ABSENT:

The Honourable the Colonial Treasurer, (ALFRED LISTER), on account of sickness.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 5th instant, were read and confirmed.

NEW MEMBER.-His Excellency addressed the Council respecting the appointment of Mr. J. J. KESWICK as a Member of the Council in the place of Mr. JOHN BELL-IRVING who has resigned his seat. Mr. J. J. KESWICK was then duly sworn in and took his seat as a Member of the Council.

REPORTS.-The Acting Colonial Secretary laid on the table the following reports:-Return of Superior and Subordinate Courts for 1889, and Annual Report of the Head Master of the Victoria College for 1889.

Read the following Minutes under the hand of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government :-

C.S.0.

29 59 of 1889.

C. O. Desp.

5 of 1890.

C.S.O.

2935 of 1889.

C.S.O.

580 of 1800.

F. FLEMING.

(1.)

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote the sum of Six thousand Dollars, ($6,000) for the improvement of the piece of land known as the "Chinese Recreation Ground," Possession Point, viz. :—

For the clearing, levelling and surfacing of the ground, and constructing stalls

and side channels.

Government House, Hongkong, 1st May, 1890.

F. FLEMING.

(2.)

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote the sum of Three hundred Dollars, ($300), to provide, for furniture and fittings for the Local delivery branch of the General Post Office.

Government House, Hongkong, 8th May, 1890.

F. FLEMING.

(3.)

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote the sum of Three thousand Six hundred and Seventy Dollars, ($3,670) for relaying of the lead roof over the Central Hall, and the two staircases of Victoria College, which was found in a very bad state, and constantly leaking in several places.

Government House, Hongkong, 8th May, 1890.

F. FLEMING.

(4.)

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote the sum of Two thousand Three hundred and Thirty-four Dollars and One Cent, ($2,334.01), as an addi- tional sum to the vote of $12,000 passed by the Council on the 12th March, last, to meet expenses connected with the visit to the Colony of Their Royal Highnesses THE DUKe and DUCHESS OF Connaught.

Government House, Hongkong, 9th May, 1890.

26

The Acting Colonial Secretary moved that these Minutes, with the exception of the Minute recommending that an additional sum be voted in connection with the visit of Their Royal Highnesses THE DUKE AND DUCHESS OF CONNAUGHT, which was allowed to stand over for further considera- tion, be referred to the Finance Committee.

The Attorney General seconded.

His Excellency addressed the Council in connection with the votes for improvement of the Chinese Recreation Ground, and for the new lead roof over the Central Hall of the Victoria College.

Question-put and agreed to.

VOTES PASSED BY THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Acting Colonial Secretary, by direction of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government, laid on the table the Report of the Finance Committee, dated the 29th ultimo, (No. 7), and moved that the following Votes referred to therein be passed, viz. :-

628 of 1890. Additional Clerk and Interpreter of Indian and Malay languages, at the Harbour

Department, from 1st May next, at a salary of $25 per month,

C.S.O.

649 of 1890.

C.S.O.

878 of 1890.

$ 200.00

Refund of the overcharged Municipal Rates at the erroneous valuation on two Tene-

ments, Nos. 69 and 70, in the Village of Hok-Ün, in the Kaulung Peninsula,.....$

Salary of a Shroff in the Money Order Office, from 1st of May, at $20 per month, $

65 of 1990. Gratuity to the Children of the late SOOPPRAMANI SOONDERAM, in consideration of his 25 years' service as Police Officer, Clerk and Interpreter in the Harbour Office,.

C.S.O.

969 of 1890.

New Mooring of the Bokhara Buoy, to be supplied from the stores of the Royal

Naval Yard, (£205 @ 3/1),

The Attorney General seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

21.70

160.00

228.00

..$ 1,329.73

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO REPEAL ORDINANCE No. 32 of 1889 AND AMEND ORDINANCE No. 14 OF 1862, ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE FOR GRANTING PATENTS FOR INVENTIONS WITHIN THIS COLONY.-The Attorney General moved the first reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE LAW WITH REFERENCE TO THE FALSIFICATION OF ACCOUNTS.-The Attorney General moved the first reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND "THE HONGKONG CODE OF CIVIL PROCEDURE.' Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question--put and agreed to.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Bill reported without amendment.

Council resumed.

""

The

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE LAW RELATING TO INFANT VACCINATION AND TO PROVIDE FOR THE REGISTRATION OF PERSONS VACCINATED IN THE COLONY.-The Attorney General moved that the Bill be read a third time.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

BILL ENTITLED THE MAGISTRATES' ORDINANCE, 1890.--Council in Committee on the Bill.

Progress reported.

Council resumed.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned till Monday, the 12th instant, at 2 P.M.

Read and confirmed, this 16th day of May, 1890.

F. A. HAZELAnd,

Acting Clerk of Councils.

F. FLEMING, Officer Administering the Government.

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 13.

FRIDAY, 16TH MAY, 1890.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE OFFICER ADMINISTERING THE GOVERNMENT

(The Honourable FRANCIS FLEMING, C.M.G.).

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (WALTER MEREDITH Deane).

25

>>

**

""

>"

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

the Surveyor General, (SAMUEL Brown).

the Acting Registrar General, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES). PHINEAS RYRIE.

ALEXANDER PALMER MACEWEN.

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

""

""

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

ABSENT:

27

The Honourable the Colonial Treasurer, (ALFRED LISTER), on account of sickness.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 9th instant, were read and confirmed.

The Acting Colonial Secretary laid on the table a copy of a letter from Her Britannic Majesty's Minister at Peking to His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government in reply to a telegram sent by His Excellency expressing regret at the news of the death of the Marquis TSENG.

Read the following Minute under the hand of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government:-

C.S.O.

589 of 1890.

F. FLEMING.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote the sum of Two thousand Three hundred and Thirty-four Dollars and One Cent, ($2,334.01), as an addi- tional sum to the vote of $12,000 passed by the Council on the 12th March, last, to meet expenses connected with the visit to the Colony of Their Royal Highnesses THE Duke and DUCHESS OF CONNAUGHT.

Government House, Hongkong, 9th May, 1890.

The Acting Colonial Secretary moved that this Minute be referred to the Finance Committee. The Attorney General seconded.

His Excellency addressed the Council.

Question--put and agreed to.

His Excellency informed the Council that he had given instructions that in future, except in cases of emergency, a copy of every financial minute should be supplied to all Members of Council three days previous to the vote being asked for in order that they may have a reasonable opportunity of knowing the circumstances under which they are asked to vote the money.

VOTES PASSED BY THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Acting Colonial Secretary, by direction of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government, laid on the table the Report of the Finance Committee, dated the 9th instant, (No. 8), and moved that the following Votes referred to therein be passed, viz. :-

C.S.O.

2959 of 1889.

For the improvement of the piece of land known as the "Chinese Recreation Ground," Possession Point, viz. :-For the clearing, levelling and surfacing of the ground, and constructing stalls and side channels,

$ 6,000.00

C. O. Desp. Furniture and fittings for the Local delivery branch of the General Post Office,....$

5 of 1890.

C.S.O.

2935 of 1889.

Relaying of the lead roof over the Central Hall, and the two staircases of Victoria College, which was found in a very bad state, and constantly leaking in several places,

CO. Desp. Allowance for House Rent to the Compradore of the General Post Office,.......

38 of 1890.

The Attorney General seconded.

300.00

$ 3,670.00

.$ 120.00

His Excellency addressed the Council in connection with the vote for the new lead roof over the Central Hall of the Victoria College.

Question-put and agreed to.

28

The Honourable the Attorney General laid on the table the report of the Special Committee appointed to frame New Standing Rules and Orders, and gave notice that at the next meeting of the Council he would move the adoption of the report.

Honourable P. RYRIE gave notice that at the next meeting he would ask the following questions

(1.) If the Executive will furnish the Council with any information in regard to the reported

defalcation in the Money Order Department of the Colony.

(2.) If it is the intention of Government to take any steps in regard to the celebration of the

Jubilee Day of the foundation of the Colony.

His Excellency stated, in reference to the question of the defalcation in the Money Order Office, that enquiries were being made and he hoped that by the next meeting he would be in possession of such facts as would enable him to answer the question which would then be put.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO REPEAL ORDINANCE No. 32 OF 1889 AND AMEND ORDINANCE No. 14 of 1862, ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE FOR GRANTING PATENTS FOR INVENTIONS WITHIN THIS COLONY.-The Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Bill reported without amendment.

Council resumed.

The Attorney General moved that the Bill be read a third time.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE LAW WITH REFERENCE TO THE FALSIFICATION OF ACCOUNTS.-The Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Bill reported without amendment.

Council resumed.

The Attorney General moved that the Bill be read a third time.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND "THE HONGKONG CODE OF CIVIL PROCEDURE."-The Attorney General moved that the Bill be read a third time.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

BILL ENTITLED THE MAGISTRATES' ORDINANCE, 1890.-Council in Committee on the Bill.

Progress reported.

Council resumed.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned till Friday, the 23rd instant, at 3 P.M.

Read and confirmed, this 30th day of May, 1890.

F. A. HAZELAND, Acting Clerk of Councils.

F. FLEMING,

Officer Administering the Government.

:

3

"

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 14.

FRIDAY, 30TH MAY, 1890.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE OFFICER ADMINISTERING THE GOVERNMENT (The Honourable FRANCIS FLEMING, C.M.G.)

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (Walter Meredith Deane).

""

""

""

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALFRED LISTER).

the Surveyor General, (SAMUEL BROWN).

the Acting Registrar General, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES). PHINEAS RYRIE.

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

>>

""

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

ABSENT:

29

The Honourable ALEXANDER PALMER MACEWEN.

"}

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

'The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 16th instant, were read and confirmed.

Her Majesty's approval of the appointment of the Honourable P. RYRIE and the Honourable Ho KAI as Un-official Members of the Council having been received, they were duly sworn and took their seats as Members of the Council.

REPORTS.-The Acting Colonial Secretary laid on the table the Harbour Master's Report for 1889 and Reports by Honourable O. CHADWICK on the Water supply of Kowloon, the Sewerage of the Hill District, and the proposed distributary system of the water supply for the city of Victoria.

Read the following Minutes under the hand of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government:-

F. FLEMING.

(1.)

476 of 1890.

C.S.O. The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote the sum of

Eight thousand Dollars, ($8,000), for works in the Wongneichung Valley, inside the Race Course.

Government House, Hongkong, 20th May, 1890.

F. FLEMING.

(2.)

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote the sum of Five hundred and Thirty-four Dollars, ($534), being additional sum required to defray the salaries and rations of Nursing Staff for the Civil Hospital, for six months of 1890, viz. :--

Additional Salaries:-

1 Head Nurse, 6 months,

5 Nurses, (one new), 6 months,

..$

60.00

360.00

1 Amah, 6 months,

24.00

$

444.00

Rations for one more Nurse, 6 months,...

90.00

534.00

C.S.O.

1833 of 1889.

Government House, Hongkong, 20th May, 1890.

F. FLEMING.

(3.)

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote the sum of Two hundred and Thirty Dollars, and Eighty Cents, ($230.80), being expenses incurred in carrying out an experiment as to the possibility of successfully and economically cultivating in the Colony bovine vaccine lymph.

Government House, Hongkong, 21st May, 1890.

30

C.S.O.

986 of 1890.

F. FLEMING.

(4.)

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote the sum of Eight hundred and Seventy-five Dollars, ($875), for a compassionate allowance to Mrs. MAC- BEAN, widow of the late Bailiff and Hindustani Interpreter in the Supreme Court, being the equivalent of 7 months' salary of her late husband, who was in the service of the Colony for Twenty-three years, and gave great satisfaction in the discharge of his duties.

Government House, Hongkong, 27th May, 1890.

The Acting Colonial Secretary moved that these Minutes, be referred to the Finance Committee. The Treasurer seconded.

His Excellency addressed the Council on the Minutes in connection with the works in the Wong- neichung Valley, the Nursing Staff for the Civil Hospital, and the cultivation of vaccine lymph.

Question-put and agreed to.

VOTES PASSED BY THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Acting Colonial Secretary, by direction of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government, laid on the table the Report of the Finance Committee, dated the 16th instant, (No. 9), and moved that the following Vote referred to therein be passed, viz. :-

C.S.O. 589 of 1890.

Additional sum to the vote of $12,000 passed by the Council on the 12th March, last, to meet expenses connected with the visit to the Colony of Their Royal Highnesses THE DUKE AND DUCHESS OF COnnaught,

The Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

.$ 2,334.01

The Council then went into Committee to consider the Report of the Special Committee to frame New Standing Rules and Orders.

The Attorney General moved and the Acting Colonial Secretary seconded that the word "Wednesday" be struck out of Clause I and "Monday" be inserted in lieu thereof.

Question--put and agreed to.

Honourable P. RYRIE moved and the Honourable C. P. CHATER seconded that the following words be added to Rule 28:- Provided that if a Bill has been considered and reported on by a Special Committee it shall suffice if instead of reading the whole of each clause the marginal notes alone be read by the Clerk in Committee of the whole Council."

After some discussion the Honourable P. RYRIE withdrew his amendment.

The Attorney General moved that at the end of Section 28 the following be added "Provided that if a Bill has been considered and reported on by a Standing Committee it shall, with the assent of the President, suffice if instead of reading the whole of each clause, the marginal notes alone be read by the Clerk in Committee of the whole Council."

After discussion it was agreed to postpone the matter to allow the Attorney General to frame a clause on this principle. After further discussion it was agreed that Section 53 be amended by insert- ing after word" Colony" in the 4th line the words "and in one Chinese Newspaper."

The Council then resumed.

Honourable P. RYRIE, pursuant to notice, asked the following question :-

If the Executive will furnish the Council with any information in regard to the reported defalca-

tion in the Money Order Department of the Colony.

His Excellency replied-Honourable Members are aware, as indeed we are all aware, that an official connected with the Post Office Department named BARRADAS disappeared from the Colony some time since. Shortly after he left I considered it my duty to cause an enquiry to be made into the alleged defalcations. Such enquiry has been made, and from the report that I received up to the present time, I regret to say that these defalcations do amount approximately to the sum that has been mentioned in the local newspapers, about $46,000. Steps were taken to arrest Mr. BARRADAS and he has actually been arrested, and I trust that before long he will be brought back to this Colony. In these circumstances, I feel sure that Honourable Members will not expect me now to enter into details connected with this matter. It would not be fair towards one who, if he comes back here, will in all probability be proceeded against for a criminal offence. I may say this, however, that those whom I appointed to enquire into this matter have made certain suggestions in regard to the Post Office which will have my most careful consideration. So soon as I am able to arrive at a conclusion as to what should be done in connection with this matter, and I am at liberty to make further statements, I shall be happy to answer any further questions that may be put.

+

31.

Honourable P. RYRIE, pursuant to notice, asked the following question :-

If it is the intention of the Government to take any steps in regard to the celebration of the Jubilee

Day of the foundation of the Colony.

His Excellency replied-In answer to this question I may say that the Government consider that if

any celebration takes place in this Colony in connection with its Jubilee that such should take place next year. There can be no doubt that this Colony became a British possession in 1841. In the year 1842 a treaty was passed which confirmed what had previously taken place, and in the year 1843 a charter was granted establishing this possession as a British Colony, but there can be no doubt that this Colony really became English territory when it was taken, in 1841. Now as regards the question whether any celebration should take place, I consider myself that it is not one with regard to which suggestions should come from the Government. If the public in this Colony consider that the occasion is one upon which any festivities should take place, I am quite sure that the Government would be only too happy to receive any suggestions that may be made in that direction. We know perfectly well that for all such festivities a great deal of public money is necessarily expended, and it is rather for the public to move that such expenditure should take place than for the Government to propose it. If any Honourable Member can ascertain what are the wishes of the public in this matter and forwards any conclusion he may arrive at to the Government, I am quite sure that the Government will be most happy to consider any suggestion that may be made on the part of those through whose enterprise and industry the Colony has become as prosperous as it is to-day.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned till Monday, the 9th June, at 3 P.M.

Read and confirmed, this 9th day of June, 1890.

F. A. HAZELAND, Acting Clerk of Councils.

+

F. FLEMING,

Officer Administering the Government.

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 15.

MONDAY, 9TH JUNE, 1890.

33

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE OFFICER ADMINISTERING THE GOVERNMENT

(The Honourable FRANCIS FLEMING, C.M.G.).

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (WALTER MEREDIth Deane).

>1

>>

"}

>>

>>

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

the Surveyor General, (SAMUEL BROWN).

the Acting Registrar General, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES). PHINEAS RYRIE.

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK. Ho KAI, M.B., C.M.

ABSENT:

The Honourable the Colonial Treasurer, (ALFRED LISTER), on account of sickness.

ALEXANDER PALMER MACEWEN.

>>

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 30th May, were read and confirmed.

His Excellency addressed the Council and stated that he had received a letter from certain merchants in the Colony drawing his attention to the fact that the Viceroy of Canton contemplated raising the duty on opiun contrary to what was considered the terms of the Chefoo Convention. Mr. ALABASTER, the Consul at Canton, had been communicated with and he had done everything in his power in connection with the subject. His Excellency further stated that he had telegraphel to Her Majesty's Minister at Peking on the subject. The reply which had been received was to the effect that representations had been made to the Chinese Government on the subject of the contemplate l increased duties and that information had been received through the Yamên that the project had been abandoned. The Acting Colonial Secretary laid on the table a despatch from the Secretary of State regarding the Estimates for 1890.

Read the following Minutes under the hand of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government :-

i

F. FLEMING.

(1.)

C.S.O.

1247 of 1890.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Four hundred and Twenty Dollars and Sixty-seven cents, ($420.67), for the salary of Musketry Instructor and Storekeeper of Police.

Half pay during the voyage, and full pay from the date of his arrival at $60 per month. From 10th April to 22nd May half pay.

From 23rd May to end of the year full pay.

Government House, Hongkong, 28th May, 1890.

F. FLEMING.

(2.)

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Five hundred dollars, ($500), for improving the drainage of Italian Convent.

Government House, Hongkong, 31st May, 1890.

F. FLEMING.

(3.)

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Sixty-three Dollars, ($63), as a compassionate allowance to the mother of the late Chinese Police Constable No. 265, KEUNG TIM, who served in the Police Force for upwards of 14 years.

The allowance to be equal to one month's pay for every three years of service. Government House, Hongkong, 4th June, 1890.

34

(4.)

F. FLEMING.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Sixty Dollars, ($60), being additional salary to First Wardmaster in the Government Civil Hospital at $10 per month, for Six months of 1890.

The agreement being $70 per month for the first year, $80 per month for the second year, and $90 per month for the third year.

Government House, Hongkong, 5th June, 1890.

The Acting Colonial Secretary moved that these Minutes be referred to the Finance Committee. The Attorney General seconded.

His Excellency addressed the Council on the Minutes in connection with the salary of the Musketry Instructor and Storekeeper of Police, the drainage of the Italian Convent, and the additional salary to the First Wardmaster to the Government Civil Hospital.

Question--put and agreed to.

VOTES PASSED BY THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Acting Colonial Secretary, by direction of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government, laid on the table the Report of the Finance Committee, dated the 30th ultimo, (No. 10), and moved that the following Votes referred to therein be passed, viz. :--

C.S.O. Works in the Wongneichung Valley, inside the Race Course,

476 of 1890.

Additional sum required to defray the salaries and rations of Nursing Staff for the

Civil Hospital, for six months of 1890, viz. :---

Additional Salaries :-

1 Head Nurse, 6 months,

5 Nurses, (one new), 6 months,

1 Amah, 6 months,

$ 8,000.00

60.00 360.00

24.00

$

444.00

Rations for one more Nurse, 6 months,.

90.00

$9

534.00

C.S.O.

1838 of 1889. Expenses incurred in carrying out an experiment as to the possibility of success-

fully and economically cultivating in the Colony bovine vaccine lymph, ...........

$

230.80

988 of 1890. Compassionate allowance to Mrs. MACBEAN, widow of the late Bailiff and Hindus- tani Interpreter in the Supreme Court, being the equivalent of 7 months' salary of her late husband, who was in the service of the Colony for Twenty-three years, and gave great satisfaction in the discharge of his duties,

The Attorney General seconded. Question-put and agreed to.

..$ 875.00

The Council then went into Committee to consider the Report of the Special Committee to frame New Standing Rules and Orders.

The Attorney General moved and the Acting Colonial Secretary seconded that the four last paragraphs in Rule 28 be struck out.

Question-put and agreed to.

The Attorney General moved and the Acting Colonial Secretary seconded that at the end of Rule 40 the following words be added:-"unless at this stage of the proceedings the Bill be referred to a Special or Standing Committee."

Question-put and agreed to.

The Attorney General moved and the Acting Colonial Secretary seconded that the following additional Rule be inserted after Rule 40:-

"When a Bill shall have been referred to, and reported on by, one of the Standing Com- mittees appointed under Rule 48, and it shall be certified by the Chairman of such Standing Committee that such Bill has been considered clause by clause in the presence of all the Members of such Standing Committee at least and that, in the opinion of the Committee, such Bill may be dealt with by the Council in the same manner as a Bill reported on by a Committee of the whole Council, such Bill may be dealt with accordingly if no Member object, but if any Member object the Bill shall be dealt with in the same manner as a Bill reported on by a Special Committee."

Question-put and agreed to.

The Council then resumed.

35

The Attorney General moved and the Acting Colonial Secretary seconded that the report of the Special Committee appointed to frame New Standing Rules and Orders as amended be adopted.

Question-put and agreed to.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO PROVIDE FOR AND REGULATE THE SUPPLY OF WATER IN THE COLONY OF HONGKONG AND FOR THE MAINTENANCE AND REPAIR OF THE WORKS IN CONNECTION THERE- WITH.-The Attorney General moved the first reading of this Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND ORDINANCE No. 4 of 1865 RELATING TO OFFENCES AGAINST THE PERSON.-The Attorney General moved the first reading of this Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED THE MAGISTRATES' ORDINANCE, 1890.--Council in Committee on the Bill.

Progress reported.

Council resumed.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned till Monday, the 16th instant, at 3 P.M.

Read and confirmed, this 16th day of June, 1890.

F. A. HAZELAND, Acting Clerk of Councils.

F. FLEMING,

Officer Administering the Government.

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 16.

MONDAY, 16TH JUNE, 1890.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE OFFICER ADMINISTERING THE GOVERNMENT (The Honourable FRANCIS FLEMING, C.M.G.)

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (WALTER MEREDITH DEANE).

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

"5

the Surveyor General, (SAMUEL BROWN).

the Acting Registrar General, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES). PHINEAS RYRIE.

ALEXANDER PALMER MACEWEN.

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

ABSENT:

The Honourable the Colonial Treasurer, (ALFRED ĻISTER), on account of sickness.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 9th June, were read and confirmed.

37

Read the following Minutes under the hand of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government:-

F. FLEMING.

(1.)

C. O. Desp.

31 of 1890.

C.$.0.

1306 of 1890.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Three thousand Dollars, ($3,000), to cover the probable expenses of this year in connection with the proposed trigonometrical survey of Hongkong by Officers of the Royal Engineers.

The total probable cost will be about £3,000.

Government House, Hongkong, 7th June, 1890.

F. FLEMING.

(2.)

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Three thousand Dollars, ($3,000), being amount required to be expended in this year for the printing and binding of 200 copies of the new edition of Ordinances of Hongkong.

The total cost will be about $6,000.

Government House, Hongkong, 9th June, 1890.

The Acting Colonial Secretary moved that these Minutes, be referred to the Finance Committee. The Attorney General seconded.

His Excellency addressed the Council on the Minute in connection with the proposed trigonome- trical survey of the Colony.

Question-put and agreed to.

VOTES PASSED BY THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Acting Colonial Secretary, by direction of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government, laid on the table the Report of the Finance Committee, dated the 9th June, (No. 11), and moved that the following Votes referred to therein be passed, viz. :-

C.S.O. 1247 of 1890.

For the salary of Musketry Instructor and Storekeeper of Police,

..................$ 420.67

Half pay during the voyage, and full pay from the date of his arrival at $60 per month. From 10th April to 22nd May half pay.

From 23rd May to end of the year full pay.

Improving the drainage of the Italian Convent,.

$ 500.00

Compassionate allowance to the mother of the late Chinese Police Constable No. 265,

KEUNG TIM,.

63.00

Additional salary to First Wardmaster in the Government Civil Hospital at $10 per

month, for Six months of 1890,

.$

60.00

The Attorney General seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

38

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND AND CONSOLIDATE THE LAW RELATING TO THE PROTEC- TION OF WOMEN AND GIRLS.-The Attorney General moved the first reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO PROVIDE FOR AND REGULATE THE SUPPLY OF WATER IN THE COLONY OF Hongkong and foR THE MAINTENANCE AND REPAIR OF THE WORKS IN CONNECTION THERE- WITH.-The Attorney General moved the second reading of this Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

The Attorney General moved that the Council resolve itself into Committee to consider the Bill. The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Honourable C. P. CHATER moved as an amendment, that the Bill be referred to a Special Committee which was agreed to without a division.

The Attorney Generel moved that the following Members form the Special Committee :---

THE ATTORNEY GENERAL.

THE COLONIAL TREASURER.

THE ACTING REGISTRAR General.

Hon. A. P. MACEWEN.

Hon. C. P. CHATER.

Hon. Ho KAI.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND ORDINANCE No. 4 OF 1865 RELATING TO OFFENCES AGAINST THE PERSON.-The Attorney General moved the second reading of this Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Bill reported without amendment.

Council resumed.

The Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

BILL ENTITLED THE MAGISTRATES' ORDINANCE, 1890.-Council in Committee on the Bill. Progress reported.

Council resumed.

Honourable P. RYRIE gave notice that at the next Meeting of the Council he would move for the following:-

(a.) A return of the cost of the completed Lighthouses of the Colony.

(b.) The yearly expenditure for upkeep, wages and material, from the date of their completion to

the 31st December, 1889.

(c.) A return showing the receipts, yearly, from “ Light dues" from the time of their imposition

to the 31st December, 1889.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned till Monday, the 23rd instant, at 3 P.M.

Read and confirmed, this 23rd day of June, 1890.

F. A. HAZELAND, Acting Clerk of Councils.

F. FLEMING,

Officer Administering the Government.

:

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 17.

MONDAY, 23RD JUNE, 1890.

39

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE OFFICER ADMINISTERING THE GOVERNMENT

(The Honourable FRANCIS FLEMING, C.M.G.).

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (WALTER MEREDITH DEANE, C.M.G.). the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

i,

""

15

the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (HENRY ERNEST WODEHOUSE, C.M.G.). the Surveyor General, (SAMUEL BROWN).

the Acting Registrar General, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES). PHINEAS RYRIE.

ALEXANDER PALMER MACEWEN.

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 16th June, were read and confirmed.

Hon. HENRY ERNEST WODEHOUSE, C.M.G., having been appointed Acting Colonial Treasurer during the absence on sick leave of the Hon. A. LISTER, took the usual oath and his seat as a Member of the Council.

PAPERS LAID ON THE TABLE.-The Acting Colonial Secretary laid on the table the report of the Director of the Observatory for 1889 and a report by the Hon. O. CHADWICK on the drainage of the Lower Western and Central District of Victoria.

Read the following Minutes under the hand of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government:

C.S.O.

1366 and 173

F. FLEMING.

(1.)

The Officer Administering the Governinent recommends the Council to vote a sum of of 1890. Five thousand Eight hundred and Forty-four Dollars and Twelve Cents, ($5,844.12), for the construction of a telegraph line between the Observatory at Kowloon and the Office of the Telegraph Company at Hongkong.

Also a separate line from Victoria Peak to Central Police Station to transmit meteoro- logical telegrams six times a day.

Cost of line, including submarine cable to Kowloon, (£900),

Cost of Instruments for Kowloon,.

Line from Peak to Police Station,.

$ 5,383.18

260.94

$ 5,644.12

200.00

1

Government House, Hongkong, 14th June, 1890.

F. FLEMING.

(2.)

$5,844.12

C.S.O.

1165 of 1890.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Eighty-two Dollars and Sixty-six cents, ($82.66), for rent of 1st floor of a Chinese house occupied by Scavengers of the Central Market.

From 23rd March to 30th November, 1890, at $10 per month.

Government House, Hongkong, 19th June, 1890.

The Acting Colonial Secretary moved that these Minutes be referred to the Finance Committee. The Acting Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question--put and agreed to.

:..

:

40

VOTES PASSED BY THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Acting Colonial Secretary, by direction of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government, laid on the table the Report of the Finance Committee, dated the 16th June, (No. 12), and moved that the following Votes referred to therein be passed, viz. :—

CD

31 of 1890.

C.S.O.

1306 of 1890.

Probable expenses of this year in connection with the proposed trigonometrical

survey of Hongkong by Officers of the Royal Engineers,

Amount required to be expended in this year for the printing and binding of 200

copies of the new edition of Ordinances of Hongkong,

The Acting Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Hon. P. RYRIE, pursuant to notice, moved for the following:-

(a.) A return of the cost of the completed Lighthouses of the Colony.

.$ 3,000.00

.$ 3,000.00

(b.) The yearly expenditure for upkeep, wages and material, from the date of their completion to

the 31st December, 1889.

(c.) A return showing the receipts, yearly, from "Light dues" from the time of their imposition

to the 31st December, 1889.

Hon. A. P. MACEWEN seconded.

His Excellency addressed the Council.

The Acting Colonial Secretary then laid on the table returns giving the required information.

BILL ENTITLED THE MAGISTRATES' ORDINANCE, 1890.-Council in Committee on the Bill.

Bill reported with amendments.

Council resumed.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND AND CONSOLIDATE THE LAW RELATING TO THE PROTEC- TION OF WOMEN AND GIRLS.-The Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill.

$

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

After debate, question put.

Council divided.

Ayes.

Hon. J. J. Keswick,

Hon. C. P. CHATER.

Hon. THE ACTING REGISTRAR GENERAL. Hon. THE SURVEYOR GENERAL. Hon. THE ACTING COLONIAL TREASURER. Hon. THE ATTORNEY GENERAL.

Hon. THE ACTING COLONIAL SECRETARY.

Motion carried by a majority of four.

Bill read a second time.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Noes.

Hon. Ho KAI.

Hon. A. P. MACEWEN. Hon. P. RYRIE.

Progress reported.

Council resumed.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned till Monday, the 30th instant, at 3 P.M.

F. FLEMING,

Read and confirmed, this 30th day of June, 1890.

F. A. HAZELAND, Acting Clerk of Councils.

Officer Administering the Government.

2

7

2

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL,

COUNCIL, No. 18.

MONDAY, 30TH JUNE, 1890.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE OFFICER ADMINISTERING THE GOVERNMENT (The Honourable FRANCIS FLEMING, C.M.G.)

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (WALTER MEREDITH DEANE, C.M.G.).

the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

>>

";

""

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the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (HENRY ERNEST WODEHOUSE, C.M.G.). the Surveyor General, (SAMUEL BROWN).

the Acting Registrar General, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES). ALEXANDER PALMER MACEWEN.

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK. Ho KAI, M.B., C.M.

The Honourable PHINEAS RYRIE.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

ABSENT:

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 23rd June, were read and confirmed.

41

PAPERS LAID ON THE TABLE.-The Acting Colonial Secretary laid on the table the Educational report for 1889.

Read the following Minutes under the hand of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government:-

C.S.O.

1511 of 1890.

F. FLEMING.

(1.)

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Three thousand Three hundred and Forty-five Dollars and sixty cents, ($3,345.60), being amount required to pay the balance of a claim, and Court fees, in connection with Mr. M. J. STEPHENS' claim against the Government for compensation and damages for loss of area in respect of Marine Lot 184, $5,000.

Amount Deposited in Court in December, 1888,

Balance now claimed,

.$1,700.00 3,300.00

Fees of Court,

Government House, Hongkong, 23rd June, 1890.

F. FLEMING.

(2.)

$5,000.00

45.60

$5,045.60

C.S.O.

1513 of 1890.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Twenty-six thousand Six hundred and Sixty-four Dollars, and Forty-nine cents, ($26,664.49), to defray the Salaries, Allowances and Office Contingencies of the Water and Drainage Depart- ment for the current year. Out of this amount, the sum of $7,868 is a-re-vote, as it is included in the Estimates under Surveyor General's Establishment, and since transferred to the Water and Drainage Department.

....

Establishment of W. & D. Department, Transferred from Surveyor General's Department,.

Government House, Hongkong, 26th June, 1890.

.$26,664.49 7,868.00

$18,796.49

C.S.O. 1513 of 1890.

F. FLEMING.

(3.)

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Nine hundred and Fifty Dollars, ($950), being amount expended for the Kowloon well.

Government House, Hongkong, 26th June, 1890.

42

(4.)

C.3.0.

1513 of 1890.

C.S.O.

2935 of 1889.

F. FLEMING.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to re-vote the sum of Forty-four thousand One hundred and Seventeen Dollars, and Sixty-seven cents, ($44,117.67), being the unexpended balance of the vote for New Water Mains in 1889.

Government House, Hongkong, 26th June, 1890.

F. FLEMING.

(5.)

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of One thousand Nine hundred and Seventy-six Dollars, and Forty-three cents, ($1,976.43), being amount due on some outstanding accounts in connection with the construction of Victoria College.

Government House, Hongkong, 24th June, 1890.

The Acting Colonial Secretary moved that these Minutes be referred to the Finance Committee. The Acting Colonial Treasurer seconded.

His Excellency addressed the Council.

Question-put and agreed to.

VOTES PASSED BY THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Acting Colonial Secretary, by direction of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government, laid on the table the Report of the Finance Committee, dated the 23rd June, (No. 13), and moved that the following Votes referred to therein be passed, viz. :-

C.S.O. 1366 and 173 of 1890.

C.S.0.

1165 of 1890.

Construction of a telegraph line between the Observatory at Kowloon and the Office of the

Telegraph Company at Hongkong.

Also a separate line from Victoria Peak to Central Police Station to trans- init meteorological telegrams,

.$5,844.12

Rent of 1st floor of a Chinese house occupied by Scavengers of the Central Market, $ 82.66

The Acting Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE CATTLE DISEASES, SLAUGHTER-HOUSES, AND MARKETS ORDINANCE OF 1887."-The Attorney General moved the first reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED "THE MAGISTRATES' ORDINANCE, 1890."-The Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO PROVIDE FOR AND REGULATE THE SUPPLY OF WATER IN THE COLONY OF HONGKONG AND FOR THE MAINTENANCE AND REPAIR OF THE WORKS IN CONNECTION THERE- WITH.--The Attorney General moved that the Council resolve itself into Committee.

The Honourable A. P. MACEWEN moved and the Honourable J. J. KESWICK seconded that the consideration of this Bill be adjourned, which was agreed to.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND AND CONSOLIDATE THE LAW RELATING TO THE PROTEC- TION OF WOMEN AND GIRLS.-Council in Committee on the Bill.

Bill reported with amendments.

Council resumed.

ADJOURNMENT.—The Council then adjourned till Monday, the 7th July, at 3 P.M.

Read and confirmed, this 7th day of July, 1890.

F. A. HAZELAND,

Acting Clerk of Councils.

F. FLEMING,

Officer Administering the Government.

}

į

}

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 19.

MONDAY, 7TH JULY, 1890.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE OFFICER ADMINISTERING THE GOVERNMENT

(The Honourable FRANCIS FLEMING, C.M.G.).

The Honourable the Attorney General, (WILLIAM MEIGH GOODMAN).

>>

27

་་

>>

the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (HENRY ERNEST WODEHOUSE, C.M.G.). the Surveyor General, (SAMUEL BROWN).

the Acting Registrar General, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES). ALEXANDER PALMER MACEWEN.

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

ABSENT:

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (WALTER MEREDITH DEANE, C.M.G.).

PHINEAS RYRIE.

"}

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

"

43

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 30th June, were read and confirmed.

Read the following Minute under the hand of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government:

C.5.0. 1579 of 1890.

F. FLEMING.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Nine hundred Dollars, ($900), for the purchase of 200 Brass Padlocks from CHUBB & SONS for Victoria Gaol.

Government House, Hongkong, 3rd July, 1890.

The Acting Colonial Treasurer moved that this Minute be referred to the Finance Committee. The Attorney General seconded.

Question--put and agreed to.

VOTES PASSED BY THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Acting Colonial Treasurer, by direction of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government, laid on the table the Report of the Finance Committee, dated the 30th June, (No. 14), and moved that the following Votes referred to therein be passed, viz. :---

C.S.0. 1511 of 1890.

Amount required to pay the balance of a claim, and Court fees, in connection with Mr. M. J. STEPHENS' claim against the Government for compensation and damages for loss of area in respect of Marine Lot 184, $5,000.

Amount Deposited in Court in December, 1888,

Balance now claimed,

.$1,700.00 ̄ ̄ 3,300.00

Fees of Court,

$5,000.00

45.60

C.S.O.

1513 of 1890.

C.S.O.

$5.045.60

To defray the Salaries, Allowances and Office Contingencies of the Water and Drainage Department for the current year. Out of this amount, the sun of $7,868 is a re-vote, as it is included in the Estimates under Surveyor General's Establishment, and since transferred to the Water and Drainage Department, $26,664.49

1513 of 1890. Amount expended for the Kowloon well.

C.S.O.

1513 of 1890. Unexpended balance of the vote for New Water Mains in 1889.....

The Attorney General seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

.$ 950.00

$44,117.67

44

The Acting Colonial Treasurer moved as follows:-

“The Council, having considered the following statement from the Superintendent of the Botanical and Afforestation Department concerning the planting and rearing of trees in the years 1891 and 1892, resolves that it is expedient that the liability for this work be incurred.” Statement of works which it is necessary that contracts should now be made for :-

1. For planting, during the year 1891, trees which are now being reared under

contract No. 4, 1889,

2. For seeds to be collected during the present year and supplied in January,

1891,

$1,600

200

To be disbursed in 1891,

3. For rearing trees which it may be desirable to plant in 1892,

$1,800

$1,400

....

4. If the above named work (No. 3) be now contracted for it will involve the making of contracts next year for getting the trees planted when ready in 1892; this would cost

To be disbursed in 1892..

2,400

.$3,800

5. The quantity of trees which may be reared and planted under Nos. 3 and 4 is roughly estimated on the assumption that not less than $6,000 or $7,000 will be voted next year for forestry works in 1892. The annual vote is now $10,000.

€. The execution of the proposed contracts would extend from the date of order in the case of the two first until the early part of next year, and in the two latter until the middle of the year 1892.

C. FORD, Superintendent,

Botanical and Afforestation Department.

26th June, 1890.

The Attorney General seconded.

His Excellency addressed the Council.

Question-put and agreed to.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE LAW RELATING TO THE OFFICIAL ADMINIS- TRATOR.”—The Attorney General moved the first reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND ORDINANCE No. 16 OF 1886, ENTITLED THE STAMP ORDINANCE."-The Attorney General moved the first reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE LAW RELATING TO FRAUDULENT MARKS ON MERCHANDISE."-The Attorney General moved that the Standing Rules and Orders be suspended in order that the Bill might be read a first time the same not having been inserted in the Orders of the Day.

The Acting Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

The Attorney General moved the first reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND AND CONSOLIDATE THE LAW RELATING TO THE PROTEC- TION OF WOMEN AND GIRLS.-The Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

"

7

45

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO PROVIDE FOR AND REGULATE THE SUPPLY OF WATER IN THE COLONY OF HONGKONG AND FOR THE MAINTENANCE AND REPAIR OF THE WORKS IN CONNECTION THERE- WITH.-Council in Committee on the Bill.

Progress reported.

Council resumed.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE CATTLE DISEASES, SLAUGHTER-HOUSES. AND MARKETS ORDINANCE OF 1887."-The Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Bill reported without amendments.

Council resumed.

The Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

ADJOURNMENT.—The Council then adjourned till Monday, the 14th July, at 3 P.M.

Read and confirmed, this 14th day of July, 1890.

F. A. HAZELAND, Acting Clerk of Councils.

F. FLEMING,

Officer Administering the Government.

:

7

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 20.

MONDAY, 14TH JULY, 1890.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE OFFICER ADMINISTERING THE GOVERNMENT (The Honourable FRANCIS FLEMING, C.M.G.)

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (WALTER MEREDITH DEANE, C.M.G.).

the Acting Attorney General, (Edward James ACKROYD).

"?

the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (HENRY ERNEST WODEHOUSE, C.M.G.). the Surveyor General, (SAMUEL Brown).

""

"}

the Acting Registrar General, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES).

47

"

>>

""

""

ALEXANDER PALMER MACEWEN.

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK. HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

The Honourable PHINEAS RYRIE.

ABSENT:

The Council met pursuant to adjournment..

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 7th July, were read and confirmed.

NEW MEMBER.-Honourable EDWARD JAMES ACKROYD having been appointed Acting Attorney General during the absence on leave of the Honourable W. M. GOODMAN took the usual oath and his seat as a Member of the Council.

Read the following Minutes under the hand of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government:-

F. FLEMING.

(1.)

C.S.O. 1592 of 1890.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of One hundred and Seven thousand One hundred and Eighty-six Dollars, and Seventy-four Cents, ($107,186.74), for repairs to damages caused by the Rain-storm of 29th and 30th May,

1889.

Amount paid in 1889,

Do.

in 1890,

$ 70,038.00 37,148.74

$107,186.74

To be charged to Extraordinary Public Works.

C.S.O.

1499 of 1890,

Government House, Hongkong, 4th July, 1890.

F. FLEMING.

(2.)

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Twenty-four Dollars, ($24), as a compassionate allowance to the widow of IM CHAN, late Head Messenger at the Magistracy.

Government House, Hongkong, 8th July, 1890.

The Acting Colonial Secretary moved that these Minutes be referred to the Finance Committee. The Acting Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

VOTE PASSED BY THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Acting Colonial Secretary, by direction of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government, laid on the table the Report of the Finance Committee, dated the 7th July, (No. 15), and moved that the following Vote referred to therein be passed, viz. :-

C.5.0. Purchase of 200 Brass Padlocks from CHUBB & SONS for Victoria Gaol,

1579 of 1890.

The Acting Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

900.00

+

48

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE LAW RELATING TO THE OFFICIAL ADMINIS- TRATOR."-The Acting Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Bill reported without amendment.

Council resumed.

The Acting Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

BILL ENTITLED " AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND ORDINANCE No. 16 OF 1886, ENTITLED THE STAMP ORDINANCE."-The Acting Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Bill reported without amendment.

Council resumed.

The Acting Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE LAW RELATING TO FRAUDULENT MARKS ON MERCHANDISE."-The Acting Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Bill reported with verbal amendments.

Council resumed.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO PROVIDE FOR AND REGULATE THE SUPPLY OF WATER IN THE COLONY OF HONGKONG AND FOR THE MAINTENANCE AND REPAIR OF THE WORKS IN CONNECTION THERE- WITH.-Council in Committee on the Bill.

Bill reported with amendments.

Council resumed.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned till Monday, the 21st July, at 2.30 P.M.

Read and confirmed, this 21st day of July, 1890.

F. A. HAZELAND, Acting Clerk of Councils.

F. FLEMING,

Officer Administering the Government.

1

;

|

49

A

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 21.

MONDAY, 21ST JULY, 1890.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE OFFICER ADMINISTERING THE GOVERNMENT (The Honourable FRANCIS FLEMING, C.M.G.).

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (WALTER MEREDITH DEANE, C.M.G.).

the Acting Attorney General, (Edward James ACKROYD).

19

"}

>>

"1

";

>>

>>

the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (HENRY ERNEST WODEHOUSE, C.M.G.).

the Surveyor General, (SAMUEL BROWN).

the Acting Registrar General, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES). ALEXANDER PALMER MACEWEN.

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK. HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

The Honourable PHINEAS RYRIE.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

ABSENT:

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 14th July, were read and confirmed. The confirmation by Her Majesty of the appointment of the Honourable J. J. KESWICK as a Member of the Council having been received he was duly sworn and took his seat.

His Excellency informed the Council that he thought it would only be in accordance with the wishes of the Members that they should record their regret at the death of the late Postmaster General and Colonial Treasurer. There were few public servants who worked with so much zeal as Mr. LISTER. His varied experience of this Colony and his intimate knowledge of all matters connected with it were of very considerable use to any one connected with the service.

PAPERS.-The_Acting Colonial Secretary laid on the table a Report on Public Works by the Surveyor General, Despatches respecting the Adjutancy of the Police Force, and the Report of the Colonial Surgeon for 1889.

Read the following Minutes under the hand of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government :-

C.5.0.

2171 of 1889.

C.S.O.

2171 of 1889.

C.S.O.

1802 of 1890,

C.S.O.

445 of 1890.

F. FLEMING.

(1.)

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Two hundred and Forty Dollars, ($240), to Mr. SYDNEY HAYWARD, who was appointed Student Interpreter, under Section II of the Scheme published in Government Notification No. 209 of the 4th May, 1889.

Government House, Hongkong, 12th June, 1890.

F. FLEMING.

(2.)

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Four hundred and Eighty Dollars, ($480), to Mr. HENRY G. WAGGOTT, who was appointed Student Interpreter, under Section II of the Scheme published in Government Notification No. 209 of the 4th May, 1889.

Government House, Hongkong, 12th June, 1890.

F. FLEMING.

(3.)

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Three hundred and Sixty Dollars, ($360), being half salary for the Acting Chief Inspector of Police.

$60 per month for 6 months.

Government House, Hongkong, 11th July, 1890.

F. FLEMING.

(4.)

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Fifteen thousand Dollars, ($15,000), being amount required to be expended in this year, as part of $38,000 estimated, for training Albany and adjoining Nullahs, and opening up the land now available as building sites between the Bowen and Kennedy Roads.

Government House, Hongkong, 12th July, 1890.

50

(5.)

C.S.O.

1617 of 1890.

C.S.O.

11 of 1890.

F. FLEMING.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Two hundred Dollars, ($200), for publishing in a separate volume the proceedings of the Legislative Council during one year.

Government House, Hongkong, 15th July, 1890.

F. FLEMING.

(6.)

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Two hundred Dollars, ($200), for making a new set of storm signals, iron frame and lanterns to signal at night, for the use of the Observatory.

Government House, Hongkong, 15th July, 1890.

F. FLEMING.

(7.)

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of One hundred and Seventy-eight Dollars and Fifty Cents, ($178.50), being the taxed costs of the Hongkong and China Gas Company, Limited, of their appeal under The Rating Ordinance,

1888.

Government House, Hongkong, 15th July, 1890.

F. FLEMING.

(8.)

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Seven hundred and Twenty Dollars, ($720), for additional Staff in the Observatory, viz.

Additional salary to the 2nd Assistant, as Telegraphist, at $20 per month,...$ 240.00 2 Telegraph Clerks, at $20 per month, each,

Government House, Hongkong, 18th July, 1890.

480.00

$ 720.00

F. FLEMING.

(9.)

C. (). Desp.

97 of 1890.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of One hundred and Four Dollars and Eighty-four Cents, ($104.84), being half pay of the First Assistant at the Observatory, from 1st June to 19th July, inclusive, to be given to the Substi- tute, during Mr. FIGG's vacation leave on full pay. (Sanctioned by the Secretary of State. )

Government House, Hongkong, 18th July, 1890.

The Acting Colonial Secretary moved that these Minutes be referred to the Finance Committee. The Acting Colonial Treasurer seconded.

His Excellency addressed the Council on the Minutes in connection with the salary of the Acting Chief Inspector, the training of the Albany Nullah, the new set of storm signals, the publication of the proceedings of the Legislative Council and the Staff at the Hongkong Observatory.

Question-put and agreed to.

VOTES PASSED BY THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Acting Colonial Secretary, by direction of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government, laid on the table the Report of the Finance Committee, dated the 14th July, (No. 16), and moved that the following Votes referred to therein be passed, viz. :-

C.S.O.

(1.)

15921890. Repairs to damages caused by the Rain-storm of 29th and 30th May, 1889.—

of

Amount paid in 1889,

Do. in 1890,

C.S.O.

To be charged to Extraordinary Public Works.

(2.)

1499 of 1890. Compassionate allowance to the widow of Im CHAN, late Head Messenger at the

Magistracy,

The Acting Colonial Treasurer seconded. Question-put and agreed to.

$ 70,038.00 37,148.74

$107,186.74

.$

24.00

A

51

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE LAW IN RESPECT OF THE SALE OF SHARES IN COMPANIES REGISTERED UNDER THE COMPANIES ORDINANCES 1865 to 1886 and IN OTHER JOINT STOCK COMPANIES."-The Acting Attorney General moved that the Standing Rules and Orders be suspended in order that this Bill might be read a first time the same not having been inserted in the Orders of the Day.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Honourable J. J. KESWICK addressed the Council and moved the first reading of the Bill.

Honourable C. P. CHATER seconded.

Honourable the Acting Attorney General addressed the Council.

His Excellency addressed the Council.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE LAW RELATING TO FRAUDULENT MARKS ON MERCHANDISE."-The Acting Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

BILL ENTITLED

“AN ORDINANCE TO PROVIDE FOR AND REGULATE THE SUPPLY OF WATER in the COLONY OF HONGKONG AND FOR THE MAINTENANCE AND REPAIR OF THE WORKS IN CONNECTION THERE- WITH."-The Acting Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

The Council then resolved itself into a meeting of the Finance Committee to consider the Financial Minutes which had been referred for its consideration.

On the Council resuming, the Acting Colonial Secretary moved that the following votes which had been considered by the Finance Committee be passed, viz.:-

G.S.O.

2171 of 1889.

C.S.O.

2171 of 1889.

C.S.O.

1602 of 1890.

C.S.O.

445 of 1890.

To Mr. SYDNEY HAYWARD, who was appointed Student Interpreter, under Section II of the Scheme published in Government Notification No. 209 of the 4th May, 1889,........

To Mr. HENRY G. WAGGOTT, who was appointed Student Interpreter, under Section II of the Scheme published in Government Notification No. 209 of the 4th May, 1889,....

$

240.00

.$

480.00

360.00

Half salary for the Acting Chief Inspector of Police, for 6 months at $60 per month, $

Amount required to be expended in this year, as part of $38,000 estimated, for training Albany and adjoining Nullahs, and opening up the land now available as building sites between the Bowen and Kennedy Roads,

Publishing in a separate volume the proceedings of the Legislative Council during

one year,

$15,000.00

.$ 200.00

C.S.O.

1617 of 1890.

New set of storm signals, iron frame and lanterns to signal at night, for the use of

the Observatory,

$

200.00

Taxed costs of the Hongkong and China Gas Company, Limited, of their appeal

under The Rating Ordinance, 1888,

$

178.50

C.S.O.

11 of 1890.

Additional Staff in the Observatory, viz.:-

Additional salary to the 2nd Assistant, as Telegraphist, at $20 per month, $ 2 Telegraph Clerks, at $20 per month, each,

240.00

480.00

$

720.00

97 of 1890.

GO. Dep. Half pay of the First Assistant at the Observatory, from 1st June to 19th July, inclusive, to be given to the Substitute, during Mr. FIGG's vacation leave on full pay. (Sanctioned by the Secretary of State),

$

104.84

The Acting Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

52

His Excellency then addressed the Council as follows:-

HONOURABLE GENTLEMEN,

Before we adjourn to indulge in a short recess from our Legislative duties it may be of interest to have brought before you a short retrospect of the work we have accomplished during the last few months and to be informed, in so far as I can inform you, of the position of the Colony at the present time.

It was with regret that we learnt from Sir WILLIAM DES VEUX, towards the beginning of this year, that ill-health compelled him to leave us for a while, but we trust that when he returns in December next he will do so with renewed vigour so that he may be enabled to take in the future that same active interest in the welfare of this Colony as he has taken in the past.

A few months ago we welcomed in our midst a Son and a Daughter-in-law of Our Gracious Sovereign, and we have the gratification of feeling that Their Royal Highnesses The Duke and Duchess of Connaught were well pleased with the brief visit they paid to this the most Eastern Point of Her Majesty's Colonial Empire.

The number of Ordinances which we have passed during the present session has not been very great and I was in hopes that we might have been able to deal with several other matters, more or less ripe for our consideration.

We have, however, enacted some laws of importance. I may refer to "The Magistrates' Ordinance "-a very lengthy measure; "The Waterworks Ordinance;" "The Vaccination Ordinance;" "An Ordinance relating to the Falsification of Accounts;" besides others of less significance.

There are several matters which I trust will engage our attention when we meet again- such as a new law on Bankruptcy, the modification of our Emigration laws, the amendment of our laws concerning Opium, &c.

But the enacting of Ordinances is not the only work we have got through. We have adopted a new Code of Standing Rules and Orders for the regulation of our proceedings, more in accordance with the procedure we now follow and more in conformity with the Royal Instructions under which this Council is constituted.

The Finance Committee have had under their consideration many matters of importance to carry out which it was necessary to apply for public moneys. It will always be my endeavour to consult this Council previous to undertaking measures which involve that cost which it is necessary for this Council to sanction. I do not hesitate to say that there are few Colonies in which Members of the Legislature are prepared to vote moneys so readily as here for what they consider essential in the public interest. But the more the Members of a Legislative body put trust in the proposals made for public expenditure, the less they regard with suspicion suggestions made in this direction, the more careful should a Govern- ment be in bringing such proposals before them and the more anxious should it be to see that the money is legitimately expended towards the purpose for which it was asked.

In addition to such questions as have actually been submitted to you, many matters have occupied my attention.

I am very desirous that the many Chinese who must necessarily die during the course of the year in this Colony should be buried elsewhere than in the limited area we possess. I feel confident that if burials continue to take place as they do now the time will come when we shall have cause to regret it. I have been in communication with Her Majesty's Consul at Canton on the subject and although the Chinese authorities are not prepared to meet the suggestions I made, I have not abandoned hopes of being able to carry out in some way what I venture to think would tend towards the sanitary condition of this Island, while, I believe it would be more in harmony with the feelings and wishes of the Chinese themselves.

Another matter of almost equal importance which has attracted my notice is the system of squatting which has long existed here and in regard to which several recommendations were made in the report of the Land Commission which was appointed to enquire into this and other kindred questions in the year 1886. I am about to appoint a Commission to deal with this particular subject, and although there are no doubt many difficult and complicated points involved in it, I trust that those who have expressed their readiness to serve on the Commission will be able to surmount them.

ment.

I am desirous, Gentlemen, of seeing the profession of Brokers in this Colony placed on a better footing than it stands to-day, but I would much prefer that any steps in this direction should come from the Members of that body themselves rather than be taken by the Govern- I may state that on one or two occasions I have received deputations with whom I have discussed the question and who have mentioned to me proposals worthy of careful con- sideration. I trust that at the end of this year, if not before, circumstances will allow of those, who I believe are anxious to move in the matter, to follow up these proposals. If, however, such is not the case it will become necessary for the Government to seriously con- sider whether it should not take the initiative.

A

:

;

!

53

The Secretary of State, Gentlemen, has drawn my attention to the absence of any vote in the Estimates for this year for the erection of a New Gaol and it cannot be doubted that the present prison accommodation is insufficient for the numbers confined. The question of constructing a New Gaol is one that has been mooted for some years past and a site has been selected and reserved for such a building. But, bearing in mind the many important works now on hand and the considerable expenditure that will be incurred thereon, I am not disposed to commence a new prison, the estimated cost of which is between $400,000 and $500,000 if such can be avoided. But recognizing, as I do, the strong necessity of further prison accommodation I have lately been considering a scheme by which I trust this may be obtained without having recourse to a new and costly construction.

Some time since we were called upon by the Imperial Government to increase our Military Contribution from £20,000 to £40,000 a year on the understanding that our garrison would be increased. This Council, on the ground that it begrudged not the expenditure of money for an efficient defence of the Colony, voted, without opposition, the amount asked for while stating what it expected as a return for the additional cost involved. I forwarded the conclusions at which the Council arrived, together with a copy of the Resolutions it passed, to the Secretary of State. I have not yet received a reply from him, but when I do so I trust there will be no objection to my laying on this table a copy of the despatch I wrote so that Honourable Members may see the views I expressed.

I may add, concerning certain rumours that have been lately afloat, that no intimation has been made to me in regard to the organization of any Chinese troops in this Colony, nor have I any reason to believe that there is any foundation for the reports to which I have alluded.

There is no Department, Gentlemen, which the people in this Colony naturally take a deeper interest in, nor which is of greater importance than that of the Public Works.

I consequently requested the Surveyor General to prepare, so that I might lay the same before you, a Memorandum of such public works as had been proceeded with this year, or were in course of construction. This he has done and the report has been submitted to you. It is gratifying to find that the work connected with the Gap Rock Lighthouse is proceeding so satisfactorily, also that a real commencement has been made in the work of the long talked of Central Market and in that of the Lunatic Asylum for Chinese. A new Pier has been opened at Kowloon Point and orders have been given that the District School, for which provision was made in the Estimates for this year, should be proceeded with as soon as possible. A site at Kennedytown has been selected for a new Slaughter-House and Depôt for pigs and sheep. It has been decided to commence, without further delay, the erection of new Police Stations at Aberdeen and Quarry Bay. The additions to Government House are being rapidly gone on with, while plans are nearly completed for a new house, offices, &c. for the Superintendent of the Botanical and Afforestation Department. The Council is aware that during the course of last year an agreement was entered into for lighting the City of Victoria with electric light, and I trust that in a short time hence we shall see this work com- pleted. It may hereafter be found possible to extend this system of lighting to another and more lofty part of this Island which is daily becoming more popular and more populated.

Instructions have lately been given to carry out some of the recommendations made by those Gentlemen who were appointed to enquire into the working of the Observatory and when the Estimates for next year are submitted to you proposals will be made for some addition to the staff of that Department. I am far from wishing to suggest increased expenditure, but if such an institution as an Observatory is to be of any real good it must be efficiently maintained, or it would be sounder economy to do away with it altogether.

Much good work has of late been done, under the supervision of Mr. CHADWICK, in connection with our drainage and waterworks. It is to be hoped that these important undertakings on which much money has been, and has still to be, expended, will prove satisfactory to the community.

There is nothing more necessary than from time to time to ascertain the financial condition of a country, and I will inform you, Gentlemen, in so far as I can, what the finan- cial condition of this Colony was on the 30th of June last.

The balance of assets in hand on 1st January, 1890, was $505,109, and the Revenue at the end of June was $1,073,079, making a total at end of June of $1,578,188.

The expenditure in the Colony up to the end of June was $720,658. The actual expenditure in England up to end of May, and that estimated for June, amounted to $254,619. To this must be added a sum of $34,127 for premia on Land Sales, making a total (partly estimated) expenditure for the first six months of the year, of $1,009,404 and shewing a probable balance of assets on 30th June of $568,784.

Within the last twelve months, Gentlemen, there have been many changes among the Members of this Council. Most of these have fortunately been caused through the necessity of making temporary arrangements. But there have been a few of a permanent nature.

54

In October last death prematurely and unexpectedly deprived this Colony of the services of the late Colonial Secretary, Mr. STEWART. I had not the advantage of personal acquaint- ance with this officer, but no one could be long in this Island without hearing how much he was respected and of the great good he rendered to this country, more especially in the all-important cause of Education. Another who was but a short time since among us we shall see no more. I refer to Mr. LISTER, our late Postmaster General and Colonial Treasurer, who during a quarter of a century begrudged neither time nor labour in the performance of his duties and whose reluctance to take rest when rest was needed may have gone far to hasten his end.

I am happy to say that among the un-official Members only one change has occurred during the time I have alluded to. I refer to Mr. WONG SHING, whose period of service expired during the present year, and who desired, by reason of advancing age and the neces- sity of attending to business elsewhere, to be relieved from further duty at this Board. I recommended for Her Majesty's approval as his successor Dr. Ho KAI of whom we have already seen sufficient to know the deep concern he takes in the work brought before us and to feel how efficiently he will strive for the welfare of those whose interests he is here to represent.

I have endeavoured, Gentlemen, to lay before you such information as I considered might interest you at the present moment. It will not be very long before we meet again when we shall take up as it were the threads of the work we are quitting for a while to-day.

In conclusion let me thank you for the consideration you have shown me since I have been presiding over this Council, let me wish you a pleasant recess, and let me express the hope that we may all join once more in working, with increased strength, for the benefit of a Colony to which many have been indebted for good fortune in the past and to which may many be indebted for success and happiness in the future.

ADJOURNMENT.—The Council then adjourned till Monday, the 6th October, at 3 P.M.

Read and confirmed, this 6th day of October, 1890.

F. FLEMING,

Officer Administering the Government.

F. A. HAZELAND, Acting Clerk of Councils.

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55

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 22.

MONDAY, 6TH OCTOBER, 1890.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE OFFICER ADMINISTERING THE GOVERNMENT

(The Honourable FRANCIS FLEMING, C.M.G.).

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (WALTER MEREDITH DEANE, C.M.G.).

the Acting Attorney General, (EDWARD JAMES ACKROYD).

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the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (HENRY ERNEST WODEHOUSE, C.M.G.). the Surveyor General, (SAMUEL BROWN).

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the Acting Registrar General, (Norman GILBERT MITCHELL-INNEs). PHINEAS RYRIE.

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON Whitehead.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

His Excellency then addressed the Council as follows:-

HONOURABLE GENTLEMEN,

pro-

In meeting again together for the resumption of our Legislative duties I believe I may congratulate you on the satisfactory condition, on the whole, of the Colony at the present time. I am willing to admit that those clouds of depression which have for some time past been hanging over it have not altogether passed away, but I think there are reasonable spects of their doing so and I sincerely hope that a no distant future has in store times as prosperous as have been witnessed in the past. The health of the Island during that portion of the year which has now elapsed has been exceptionally good and we have happily escaped visitations from any epidemic or other serious malady.

As regards our finances the following is their present condition in so far as I am able to inform you.

The balance of assets on the 1st of January this year was, as I have previously stated, $505,109, but from this sum I regret to say that a no less amount than $58,502 must be deducted for the unfortunate defalcations which have taken place in connection with the Post Office Department, papers on which subject will be laid before you.

The local revenue received up to the 30th of September was $1,415,894. The amount received in England as far as can be estimated, (the Crown Agents' accounts having been received up to the 31st of July only) was $1,798.

The premiums on land sales amounted to $12,463 making a total up to the 30th September of $1,876,762.

The Ordinary Expenditure for the first nine months of the year was $865,467. The approximate expenditure in England was $116,369, making a total of $981,836.

The Extraordinary Local Expenditure during the same period was $215,695; the extraordinary expenses in England were about $100,000, making a total of $315,695.

A sum of $34,226 was expended on the purchase of Baxter House for the purpose of a Police Station.

This total expenditure therefore amounts to $1,331,757, leaving an approximate balance on the 30th September of $545,005.

The Estimates for the coming year have been prepared and will be laid before you without delay.

The Estimated Revenue up to the end of the present year is $1,884.943; to this may be added the balance of assets at the beginning of this year-less the amount to be deducted for the defalcations I have mentioned-which is therefore $446,607 and $50,000 may be put down as a possible sum to be realized on land sales before the year comes to a close. The total revenue therefore amounts to $2,381,550.

The Estimated Ordinary Expenditure is $1,470,221; the extraordinary expenditure $449,700, making a total of $1,919,921. The probable balance on hand therefore on the 31st of December next, presuming all the amount estimated for extraordinary expenditure to be spent which is somewhat improbable, will be $461,629.

56

The Estimated Revenue for 1891, is $1,952,093 while the premiums on land sales can be put down at $100,000 making a total of $2,513,727.

The Estimated Ordinary Expenditure is $1,663,420, Extraordinary $804,279 leaving

a probable balance on hand on the 31st of December, 1891, of $46,028.

Among the principal items causing further expenditure for next year I may mention the increased Military Contribution from £20,000 to £40,000, which taking the dollar as representing 3/6d. would amount to $228,572.

The additions to salaries authorized by the Secretary of State amounting to about $47,000.

The increased cost entailed by the new system of Audit which will involve a yearly increase of about $7,500.

The introduction of the Electric Light causing an increase of $13,500.

The most serious addition, however, to Extraordinary Expenditure results from the amount estimated as necessary for Public Works. We know how essential it is, Gentlemen, that such public works as are in course of construction should be completed without delay and that such others as may be really needful should be commenced, while the water and drainage system, which the Colony has undertaken, cannot be allowed to stand still. But I do think that it is a question for serious consideration whether it is just towards the present tax-payers that the entire cost of such works as are destined for the good of future generations should entirely fall upon us.

It seems to me that the comparatively small debt of £200,000, which is gradually becoming less every year, might fairly be added to so as to enable the Colony to construct such works as are absolutely necessary without undue pressure on its finances or over- taxation of its people.

Several Ordinances are in course of preparation and many are ready for your immediate consideration.

Among them is an Ordinance to amend the Laws relating to the Police Force which is rendered desirable in consequence of certain changes that have lately taken place among the Officers of that Department and which I have already had occasion to explain to you.

The Secretary of State has made it a condition, as regards many of those who will under the proposed scheme for the re-adjustment of salaries receive additional pay, that they should join a Widows' and Orphans' Pension Fund. A similar measure to that proposed some months back, but which was not then proceeded with, will therefore be submitted to you. I may state that such a law exists in many other Colonies, and although it is impossible to say how far the measure will prove a success in a Colony where the number of Civil Servants is comparatively small, it must be admitted that its object, in providing for those who may otherwise be left in want and destitution, is a good one.

The Squatters' Ordinance has been drafted with the view of giving the necessary powers to those who have been already appointed to consider how the irregular occupation of Crown lands in this Colony can be discontinued.

An Ordinance to give further powers to Companies with respect to the alteration of their Memoranda of Association will be submitted to you.

Honourable Members will recollect that during the course of the present year a Private Bill was introduced with the object of enabling the Hongkong Land Investment Company to transact business elsewhere than in this Colony, and to extend its powers of investments which under its present Articles of Association it is unable to do. The Ordinance passed through its different stages, but before my assent was given to it objections were raised against it and I was requested to submit the matter for the decision of the Secretary of State. This I did and the Secretary of State in reply forwarded copy of a Public Bill which was then passing through the Imperial Parliament on the subject, stating that he had no objection to a similar measure being passed here. The Ordinance which will be laid before you is therefore mutatis mutandis a copy of the English Act.

Bills to amend the Public Health Ordinance of 1887; to consolidate and amend the Laws relating to Merchant Shipping, &c.; to amend the Opium Ordinances; to consolidate the Law relating to Chinese Passenger Ships and the conveyance of Chinese emigrants; to amend the Law relating to Bankruptcy; to amend our Laws in regard to Gambling and to provide against the Adulteration of Food are all in course of preparation and will be brought before you very shortly.

It will be remembered that at our last meeting previous to the recess a Bill was intro- duced by an Honourable Member to amend the Law respecting the sale of Shares in

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57

Companies registered under the Companies Ordinances. This measure is undoubtedly one of considerable importance and in order to save time it was proposed that I should, during the recess, send a copy of it to the Secretary of State for his consideration. I did so and so soon as I receive a reply I will inform the Council accordingly.

I have already mentioned to you, Gentlemen, my desire to find further space than exists in this Island for the interment of such Chinese who die here and whose relatives are not in a position to remove their remains for burial elsewhere. This, as is the case with most questions of difficulty and importance, requires some time for solution, but I have good reason to hope, although my original idea may not be carried out, that I shall soon be able to attain in some way the object I have in view.

The question of Gaol extension has not ceased to occupy my attention since we last met as I am fully convinced of the necessity of providing in some way or another, further prison accommodation. I have addressed the Secretary of State on the subject and although there are no doubt arguments in favour of building a new Prison which it would not have been right of me to have concealed from him I have expressed an opinion, in order to avoid so large an expenditure as would be involved in the erection of a new building, that the existing Gaol should be added to on its present site by the Magistracy being removed to a piece of ground which I believe has long been lying idle in the vicinity of the quarters occupied by the Captain Superintendent and Police Inspectors.

Until I hear what the Secretary of State's views are in the matter the question cannot be definitely settled. But in the meantime such a sum has been inserted in the Estimates as is likely to be required next year either for one work or the other. If the present Gaol is enlarged in the manner I have suggested, the cost, including the erection of a new Magistracy, &c., is estimated at $170,000.

The correspondence which has taken place between the Secretary of State and myself respecting the increase of our Military Contribution will be laid on the table. To comment on it is unnecessary on my part. Honourable Members will see the views I expressed and the replies that have been received and they can judge for themselves in the matter.

The question of the Naval and Military Establishments being removed from the Town of Victoria is engaging the consideration of the home Authorities and I believe that before very long it will be ripe for a decision.

I may inform the Council that Lord KNUTSFORD has approved of the formation in this Colony of a Volunteer Machine Gun Corps and a Volunteer Mounted Rifle Corps as recom- mended by the Committee appointed to consider this question in 1859, and that the Maxim guns, the cost of which was voted in March last, have been ordered.

My attention was drawn some time ago to the fact that a certain amount of over-pressure existed in the Schools of this Island more especially as regards Chinese children. Honour- able Members will have observed that enquiry is now being made into this point. Whether over-pressure exists in the Schools or not the result of the investigation will probably show, but I may inform the Council that I discovered that the number of attendances required in the Aided Schools here was greater than that demanded in other Colonies. For this I could see no sufficient reason and I recommended to the Colonial Authorities that it should be reduced. To this proposal the Secretary of State has acceded and the same number of attendances will hereafter be required here as are required at the Schools in the Straits Settlements.

Papers will be submitted to you respecting a proposed reduction in Postage Rates with a view of obtaining a uniform postage for all the different Colonies and thus to do away with certain anomalies which now exist. The estimated loss to the Imperial Revenue, should the scheme be carried out, is about £105,000 a year and Her Majesty's Government desire to know whether the various Colonies are disposed to contribute towards reducing this amount. In the interests of the world generally the idea is no doubt a good one and one to which I feel sure this Council will give every consideration. But it will be seen from the Report of the Acting Assistant Postmaster General that the Colony will lose a no inconsiderable sum by the scheme being adopted and I am therefore desirous of taking the sense of the Council on the question before sending a reply.

A short time ago

I had the satisfaction of taking part, in what I may allude to as the gratifying function of laying the foundation stone of the Gap Rock Lighthouse. To join in the erection of a beacon, the object of which is to save from danger and to guide through difficulties, must at all times be a pleasurable duty, but I venture to say that there are few spots where the existence of a lighthouse will prove of more true value to navigation than that from which this light will shine over many a distant mile.

I may mention, in connection with this subject that I have lately enquired what steps are being taken to place a lighthouse on Waglan Island in lieu of that on Cape D'Aguilar

58

and I am glad to be able to inform you that the Chinese Authorities are at the present moment seriously considering this question and that engineers and others are about to be sent, if they have not left already, to make all necessary arrangements for carrying out the work.

The Secretary of State's Despatch regarding the Increase of Salaries to Civil Servants and the conditions under which such are to be granted will be laid on this table. It will be seen that Lord KNUTSFORD has felt unable to consent to the scheme proposed by Sir WILLIAM DES Vœux that salaries should be paid at stirling rate, but he has sanctioned an increase, with certain exceptions, on the conditions however that those who accept the increases proposed shall forego the privilege of sending money home in the shape of family remittances as heretofore; that when on leave they shall be paid at the rate of 4/- the dollar and that their pensions shall be at the rate of 3/8d. only.

Since we last met, Gentlemen, the services of one who had been a Member of this Council for some years past have not only been lost to us but to this Colony generally.

There is no one who took a deeper interest in his work as a Member of the Legislature; who without speaking for display or for any factious object was nevertheless prepared to take such action and to ask for such information as he considered the public interest demanded- than Mr. MACEWEN. His absence from this Board will necessarily be felt, but I am sure that the one who has been selected to replace him will do all in his power to make up for the loss we have sustained.

In conclusion, Gentlemen, let me ask of you to join your efforts in working for the future welfare of a Colony which by reason of increased facilities in communication is yearly becoming of more importance in a political and Imperial point of view while I trust of more value to those whose interests are interwoven with its interests and whose fortunes and whose happiness may be said to be proportionate to its success and its prosperity.

At an early period of the coming year the Colony will be celebrating its fiftieth anni- versary as a possession of the British Crown, and it is an interesting coincidence that in 1891 it will witness the same span of life as will the Heir to the English Throne.

That Hongkong may advance and prosper during the fifty years that are next to come as it has advanced and prospered during the fifty years that are about to pass away is I am sure the earnest wish of one and all of us.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 21st July, were read and confirmed.

NEW MEMBER. Mr. THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD who had been appointed, provisionally and subject to Her Majesty's confirmation, an Un-official Member of the Legislative Council on the nomi- nation of the Chamber of Commerce was duly sworn and took his seat.

PAPERS.-The Acting Colonial Secretary laid on the table the following papers :-Acting Colonial Secretary's Report on the Blue Book for 1589; Assessor's Report on the Assessment for 1890 and 1891; Despatches respecting the increased Military Contribution; Papers respecting the Defalcations of Z. M. BARRADAS; Despatch respecting increase of salaries of Public Officers; Despatch approving of the new Standing Rules and Orders; and Despatch in connection with Companies altering their Memoranda of Association.

Read the following Minutes under the hand of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government:-

F. FLEMING.

(1.)

C. O. Desp. 43 of 7th

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of March, 1890. Three hundred and Fifty-five Dollars, ($355), being a Building-grant to the Diocesan Home

and Orphanage, to defray half the cost of an improvement in the building.

C.S.O.

1915 of 1890.

Government House, Hongkong, 10th September, 1890.

F. FLEMING.

(2.)

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Thirty Dollars, ($30), as a Supplementary Vote for Office Contingencies of the Attorney General.

Government House, Hongkong, 10th September, 1890.

(3.)

59

C.S.O.

1751 of 1890.

C.S.O.

1513 & 2030

F. FLEMING.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Fifty-six Dollars and Forty-five Cents, ($56.45), being an stipulated increment to the salary of the Veterinary Surgeon, viz. :-$2,400 on appointment, $2,700 after 3 years, and $3,000 after 6 years.

Increase from the 24th October to the end of the year,.........

Government House, Hongkong, 10th September, 1890.

F. FLEMING.

(4.)

56.45

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of of 1890. Ninety-four Dollars and Seventy-two Cents, ($94.72), being amount required to complete the

sum due for Kowloon well.

Amount expended,

Vote of 7th July, 1890,

$1.044.72

950.00

$

04.72

C.S.O.

2060 of 1890.

C.S.O.

130s of 1890.

C.S.O.

1061 of 1890.

.C.SO.

1983 of 1890.

Government House, Hongkong, 10th September, 1890.

F. FLEMING.

(5.)

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of One hundred and Fifty Dollars, ($150), as a supplementary vote for Office Contingencies for the Magistracy.

Government House, Hongkong, 10th September, 1890.

F. FLEMING.

(6.)

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Nine hundred and Sixty-three Dollars, and Twenty-five Cents, ($963.25), being the amount of the judgment debt and costs, in the matter of a Writ of Execution issued by A-TACK against A. G. APCAR, misappropriated by a Bailiff of Supreme Court.

Government House, Hongkong, 10th September, 1890.

F. FLEMING.

(7.)

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Three hundred and Thirteen Dollars, and Seventy-five Cents, ($313.75), being amount of prisoners' property embezzled by Turnkey Ng KAM-FUK, employed as Receiving Officer in Victoria Gaol.

Government House, Hongkong, 10th September, 1890.

F. FLEMING.

(8.)

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of One thousand and Seven hundred Dollars, ($1,700), as supplementary Vote for Police exclu- sive of Establishments, viz. :—

Oil and Gas for Barracks,. Incidental expenses,

Government House, Hongkong, 10th September, 1890.

900.00 800.00

$1,700.00

F. FLEMING.

(9.)

C.S.O.

3229 of 1890.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Two hundred and Fifty Dollars, ($250), as a Supplementary Vote for Office Contingencies of the Treasury, to cover expenses in collecting Village Rates.

Government House, Hongkong, 2nd October, 1899.

The Acting Colonial Secretary moved that these Minutes be referred to the Finance Committee. The Acting Colonial Treasurer seconded.

His Excellency addressed the Council on the Minutes in connection with the Kowloon well, and the amount misappropriated by a Bailiff of the Supreme Court.

Question--put and agreed to.

60

His Excellency informed the Council that by Clause 48 of the Standing Rules and Orders it is provided that at the first Meeting of the Council after the 1st of October the President might appoint the following Committees:-Finance Committee. Law Committee. and Public Works Committee. He would at this sitting appoint the Finance Committee and would consider between this and the next Meeting who should be appointed on the other two Committees.

His Excellency then appointed all the Members of the Council except the Governor as the Finance Committee, the Colonial Secretary to be Chairman.

Honourable Ho KAI gave notice that at the next Meeting of Council he would ask the following

question

What steps have been or are to be taken by the Government

1. To suppress or diminish public gambling in the Colony.

2. To regulate, register or suppress the hundreds of gambling clubs that have sprung into

existence during the last few years.

His Excellency informed the Council that it was the intention of Government to introduce a Bill as soon as possible in connection with the suppression of gambling. His Excellency further informed the Council that if in any way the question of the Honourable Member could be answered at the next Meeting he would be happy to do so.

BILL ENTITLED

"AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND ORDINANCE No. 8 OF 1873, ENTITLED THE Dangerous GOODS ORDINANCE, 1873."-The Acting Attorney General moved the first reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED " AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND ORDINANCE No. 15 OF 1888 ENTITLED THE RATING Ordinance, 1888."-The Acting Attorney General moved the first reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED " AN ORDINANCE TO REPEAL ORDINANCE No. 29 OF 1888 AND TO AMEND ORDINANCE No. 15 of 1886 ESTILLED THE PEACE PRESERVATION ORDINANCE, 1886."-The Acting Attorney General moved the first reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE POLICE FORCE CONSOLIDATION ORDINANCE, 1887.”—The Acting Attorney General moved the first reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED

AN ORDINANCE TO PROVIDE FOR AND REGULATE A PENSION FUND FOR WIDOWS AND CHILDREN OF PUBLIC OFFICERS OF THE COLONY."-The Acting Attorney General moved the first reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED “THE SQUATTERS' ORDINANCE, 1890."-The Acting Attorney General moved the first reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED " AN ORDINANCE TO GIVE FURTHER POWERS TO COMPANIES WITH RESPECT TO THE ALTERATION OF THEIR MEMORANDA OF ASSOCIATION."-The Acting Attorney General moved the first reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

ADJOURNMENT. The Council then adjourned till Monday, the 13th October, at 3 P.M.

Read and confirmed, this 13th day of October, 1890.

F. A. HAZELAND, Acting Clerk of Council«.

F. FLEMING,

Officer Administering the Government.

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LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 23.

MONDAY, 13TH OCTOBER, 1890.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE OFFICER ADMINISTERING THE GOVERNMENT (The Honourable FRANCIS FLEMING, C.M.G.).

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (WALTER MEREDITH DEANE, C.M.G.).

the Acting Attorney General, (EDWARD JAMES ACKROYD).

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the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (HENRY ERNEST WODEHOUSE, C.M.G.).

the Surveyor General, (SAMUEL BROWN).

the Acting Registrar General, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES). PHINEAS RYRIE.

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

JAMES JOHNstone KeswiCK.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

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The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 6th October, 1890, were read and confirmed. His Excellency appointed the following Members under Section 48 of the Standing Rules and Orders as the Law and the Public Works Committees

Law Committee.-Attorney General, Chairman.

Colonial Secretary.

Honourable N. G. MITCHEll-Innes. Honourable J. J. KESWICK.

Honourable Ho KAI.

Public Works Committee.-Surveyor General, Chairman.

Colonial, Secretary.

Honourable C. P. CHATER. Honourable J. J. KESWICK. Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD.

PAPERS.-The Acting Colonial Secretary laid on the table the papers respecting the proposed reduction of postage and gave notice that at the next Meeting of Council he would lay on the table the papers relating to the Estimates for the year 1891, and would move that they be considered that day week.

Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD addressed the Council and gave notice that at the next Meeting he would move the following resolution :--

That the Government be requested to formulate and lay before the Council proposals for defraying

the extraordinary expenditure on Public Works by means of a loan.

Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD further gave notice that at the next Meeting he would also put the following question :-

Have the Government received a report from the Honourable E. J. Ackroyd and Mr. Nicolle on the recent defalcations in the Money Order Office and on the causes which led to them, if so, will they lay it on the table, together with a statement of the measures which have been taken to prevent such defalcations in future?

His Excellency addressed the Council and stated that in connection with the resolution of the Honourable Member he would desire to consult the Executive Council between this and the next meeting when the resolution would be brought forward. As to the question in connection with the defalcations in the Money Order Department, a report had been received regarding the proposed amendments of keeping the accounts. He had not had an opportunity of looking through the report, but would shortly do so, and as soon as all the papers in connection with the matter could possibly be laid on the table, he would certainly lay them. His Excellency further stated that he had replied to the Despatch the Secretary of State wrote in answer to his first despatch in connection with the increased Military Contribution. There had however not yet been time to receive a reply. When the despatch was answered and he was in a position to know what the Secretary of State said it would be his desire to give the fullest information in regard to the matter to this Council and to the public generally.

Honourable Ho KAI, pursuant to notice, asked the following question

What steps have been or are to be taken by the Government

1. To suppress or diminish public gambling in the Colony.

2. To regulate, register or suppress the hundreds of gambling clubs that have sprung into

existence during the last few years.

The Acting Attorney General stated in reply that a draft Ordinance dealing with the question of gambling has been prepared and is at present under the consideration of the Government, and that the question of the so called Clubs has not been lost sight of.

62

BILL ENTITLED 66

AN ORDINANCE to amend Ordinance No. 8 of 1873, ENTITLed The DangeROUS GOODS ORDINANCE, 1873.”—The Acting Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

BILL ENTITLED " AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND ORDINANCE No. 15 of 1888 ENTITLED THE RATING Ordinance, 1888."--The Acting Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Bill reported with amendments.

Council resumed.

BILL ENTITLED “AN ORDINANCE TO REPEAL Ordinance No. 29 of 1888 AND TO AMEND ORDINANCE No. 15 OF 1886 ENTITLED THE PEACE PRESERVATION ORDINANCE, 1886."-The Acting Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Bill reported without amendments.

Council resumed.

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE POLICE FORCE CONSOLIDATION ORDINANCE, 1887."-The Acting Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

BILL ENTITLED

AN ORDINANCE TO PROVIDE FOR AND REGULATE A PENSION FUND FOR WIDOWS AND CHILDREN OF PUBLIC OFFICERS OF THE COLONY."-The Acting Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

BILL ENTITLED "THE SQUATTERS' ORDINANCE, 1890."-The Acting Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

BILL ENTITLED ፡፡ AN ORDINANCE TO GIVE FURTHER POWERS TO COMPANIES WITH RESPECT TO THE ALTERATION OF THEIR MEMORANDA OF ASSOCIATION."-The Acting Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

The Acting Colonial Secretary moved that certain bye-laws made by the Sanitary Board under sub-section 1 of section 13 of Ordinance No. 24 of 1887 (Public Health) and which have been sub- mitted to His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government be approved by the Council.

The Acting Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

ADJOURNMENT.—The Council then adjourned till Monday, the 20th October, at 3 P.M.

Read and confirmed, this 20th day of October, 1890.

F. A. HAZELAND, Acting Clerk of Councils.

F. FLEMING,

Officer Administering the Government.

Y

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LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 24.

MONDAY, 20TH OCTOBER, 1890.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE OFFICER ADMINISTERING THE GOVERNMENT

(The Honourable FRANCIS FLEMING, C.M.G.).

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (WALTER MEREDITH DEANE, C.M.G.).

the Acting Attorney General, (EDWARD JAMES ACKROYD).

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the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (HENRY ERNEST WODEHOUSE, C.M.G.). the Surveyor General, (SAMUEL BROWN).

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the Acting Registrar General, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES). PHINEAS RYRIE.

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63

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CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

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Ho KAI, M.B., C.M.

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THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 13th October, 1890, were read and confirmed.

His Excellency addressed the Council and stated that, with respect to the Bill which has been read a first time in connection with the sale of shares in Companies registered under the Companies' Ordinance, a telegram had been received from the Secretary of State to the effect that he had no objection to the Bill being proceeded with if the Un-Official Members agree. His Excellency further stated that he would therefore leave it to the Honourable Member who introduced the Bill to take such further steps in connection with it as he might deem desirable.

Read the following Minutes under the hand of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government:-

F. FLEMING.

(1.)

C. O). Desp. 175 of 1890.

C.S.O. 1383 & 2397

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of One thousand Eight hundred and Seventy-eight Dollars, ($1,878), being the equivalent of £313 at the exchange of 3/4 per Dollar, as an excess over the amount estimated for 12 Maxim Guns and Ammunition about to be supplied. The excess is due to the additions made on the recommendation of General BEVAN EDWARDS, R.E., and Major Clark, R.E.

Government House, Hongkong, 11th October, 1890.

F. FLEMING.

(2.)

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of of 1890. Six thousand Three hundred and Twenty-eight Dollars, ($6,328), for the re-construction of

the landing Pier at Stone Cutters' Island.

C.S.O.

1957 of 1890.

Government House, Hongkong, 11th October, 1890.

F. FLEMING.

(3.)

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Sixty Dollars, ($60), as an allowance to the Hospital Steward for collecting Hospital bills, at the rate of $20 per month, for October, November and December of the present year.

This work was formerly performed by one of the Treasury Shroffs who received $10 per month, so there will be a saving of $30 in the Treasury.

Government House, Hongkong, 14th October, 1890.

The Acting Colonial Secretary moved that these Minutes be referred to the Finance Committee. The Acting Colonial Treasurer seconded.

His Excellency addressed the Council in connection with the increased costs of the Maxim Guns and the Pier at Stone Cutters' Island.

Question--put and agreed to.

64

Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD addressed the Council, and, pursuant to notice, moved,

That the Government be requested to formulate and lay before the Council proposals for defraying

the extraordinary expenditure on Public Works by means of a loan.

Honourable P. RYRIE addressed the Council and seconded the resolution.

Honourable J. J. KESWICK addressed the Council.

His Excellency addressed the Council.

Question-put and agreed to.

Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD, pursuant to notice, asked the following:-

Have the Government received a report from the Honourable E. J. Ackroyd and Mr. Nicolle on

the recent defalcations in the Money Order Office and on the causes which led to them, if· so, will they lay it on the table, together with a statement of the measures which have been taken to prevent such defalcations in future?

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary replied.

VOTES PASSED BY THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Acting Colonial Secretary, by direction of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government, laid on the table the Report of the Finance Committee of the 6th instant, (No. 18), and moved that the following Votes referred to therein be passed, viz. :-

(1.)

C. Des Building-grant to the Diocesan Home and Orphanage, to defray half the cost of an

improvement in the building,.

43 of 17th March, 1890.

(2.)

1915 of 1890. Supplementary Vote for Office Contingencies of the Attorney General,.

C.S.0.

(3.)

1751 of 1890. Stipulated increment to the salary of the Veterinary Surgeon, Increase from the

24th October to the end of the year,

C.§.0. 1513 & 2030 of 1890.

(4.)

Amount required to complete the sum due for Kowloon well,

(5.)

1080 of 1880. Supplementary vote for Office Contingencies for the Magistracy,

C.5.0. 2060

C.5.0.

1308 of 1890.

C.S.O.

of

(6.)

Amount of the judgment debt and costs, in the matter of a Writ of Execution issued by A-TACK against A. G. APCAR, misappropriated by a Bailiff of Supreme Court,.

(7.)

10611890. Amount of prisoners' property embezzled by Turnkey NG' KAM-FUK, employed as

Receiving Officer in Victoria Gaol,

C.S.O.

(8.)

1988 of 1890. Supplementary Vote for Police exclusive of Establishments,

C.S.O.

(9.)

222-51890. Supplementary Vote for Office Contingencies of the Treasury, to cover expenses

in collecting Village Rates,

$

355.00

$

30.00

.$

56.45

$

94.72

$

150.00

-$ 963.25

.$ 313.75

.$ 1,700.00

$

250.00

The Acting Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

BILL ENTITLED " AN ORDINANCE TO AUTHORISE THE APPROPRIATION OF A SUPPLEMENTARY SUM OF THREE HUNDRED AND FORTY-NINE THOUSAND SEVEN HUNDRED AND TWENty Dollars and SEVENTY- NINE CENTS TO DEFRAY THE CHARGES OF THE YEAR 1889."-The Acting Colonial Secretary moved the first reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

a

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BILL ENTITLED << AN ORDINANCE TO APPLY A SUM NOT exceeding ONE MILLION SIX HUNDRED AND SEVENTY-FOUR THOUSAND SEVEN HUNDRED AND EIGHTY DOLLARS TO THE PUBLIC SERVICE OF THE YEAR 1891." The Acting Colonial Secretary moved the First Reading of the Bill and laid on the table the Estimates for 1891.

The Acting Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

The Acting Colonial Secretary laid on the table the following Minute by His Excellency with reference to the Estimates for 1891:-

The Officer Administering the Government has the honour to submit for the consider- ation of the Legislative Council the Estimated Revenue and Expenditure of the Colony for the year 1891.

The

2. The Estimates have been carefully prepared by the Acting Colonial Secretary. work connected with them has been rendered more onerous than usual this year by reason of the re-adjustments of salaries in accordance with the Secretary of State's instructions. Every endeavour has been made to carry out the principles enunciated in the Despatch on the subject which has already been laid before this Council. In a matter of this kind, where certain exceptions have been made to the increases proposed, it is impossible that every one concerned should be perfectly satisfied. If, however, in some cases the intentions of the Secretary of State have not been carried out, or if there are others which would seem to deserve more indulgence than has been granted to them it will doubtless be competent to effect rectifications hereafter.

3. The Estimated Revenue for 1891 exclusive of any balance on hand at the end of this year, and exclusive of premiums on Land Sales, is $1,952,098.

The Estimated Revenue for this year was $1,884,943. The amount estimated for 1891. therefore exceeds this by $67,155. But it should be borne in mind that the estimated amount to be realized from Land Sales next year has been put down as only $100,000 whereas that for this year was mentioned as $300,000. The commercial depression which has existed for some time past has necessarily affected the sale of Government property, and it would have been undesirable to have sold at a time when, as a matter of certainty, but poor prices would have been obtained. The amount realized by the sale of lands this year instead of exceeding $300,000 will, in all probability, not amount to $50,000. It is to be hoped, however, that an improved condition of affairs will enable the Estimate under this head to be reached during 1891.

4. The Officer Administering the Government informed the Council a short time since that the probable balance on hand at the end of this year would be $461,629, but since this announcement was made the Colony has been called upon to pay a larger amount than was anticipated as representing the sum of £116,000 voted for Defence Works. About $20,000 will therefore have to be deducted from the $461,629. But on the other hand the impro- bability of all the amount estimated for Extraordinary Expenditure being spent will more than likely make up for this deficiency.

5 The Council is aware that one of our principal items of Revenue arises from the Opium Monopoly which according to present arrangements is to produce $477,600 a year. But an item of this nature being actually realized must necessarily depend upon certain contingencies and it is therefore our duty not to rely too implicitly upon such a source of income.

6. The estimated increases and decreases on the different items of revenue for next year are principally the following.

There is an estimated increase in assessed taxes of $50,000 due to the increase in rateable tenements and to the gross receipt being estimated for 1891 without deduction for unoccupied houses, but this deduction has to be made good from expenditure.

There is also an estimated increase of $1,000 on carriage and chair licences an amount of over $10,000 having been received on this account during the first half of this year.

There is an increase of $3,000 estimated for spirit licences. The sum estimated under this heading last year was $41,000 whereas that obtained was $48,794.

There is also an estimated increase of $4,000 of fees from scholars at the Victoria College -the amount estimated last year under this head having been $10,000.

An increase from $65,000 to $75,000 is also contemplated for rents derived from market stalls and shops.

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The estimated decreases are chiefly in the following items:-Boat licences from $5,700 to $5,000; Cargo boat licences from $7,500 to $7,200; Fines from $16,000 to $14,500; Hawkers' licences from $5,300 to $5,000; Emigration, which is on the decrease owing to the unwillingness of certain countries to receive Chinese, from $18,000 to $15,000; Lands other than those leased, but including Stone Quarries, from $30,000 to $28,000.

7. The revised estimated ordinary expenditure for 1891 is $1,674,780. The estimated extraordinary expenditure $920,279 instead of $804,279 as stated by the Officer Administer- ing the Government a short time ago, some omissions having been made in the draft estimates as originally prepared. This makes a total expenditure of $2,595,059 instead therefore of having a balance of $46,000 on hand at the end of 1891 there is an estimated deficit of about $100,000.

The Council has already been informed that the principal causes of additional ordinary expenditure are the increased Military Contribution from £20,000 to £40,000 a year, the additions to salaries amounting to about $47,000, the introduction of the Electric Light and the changes effected in the Audit Department.

Provision has been made for a Chief Assistant to the Observatory at a salary of $1,800 in accordance with the recommendation of the Commission.

A sum of $2,000 has been provided for the upkeep of the Epidemic Hulk now in coursè of construction.

The expenses of the Police Department have been somewhat increased in consequence of the recent changes which have been made in connection with it, while some additional cost has been proposed for the Gaol Department with a view of obtaining men from England to do duty as Turnkeys.

But the greatest increase on expenditure is caused by that estimated as necessary for Public Works.

As a proof of the continued increase of expenditure under this head it is worthy of remark that in the year 1875 the amount expended on the Surveyor General's Department, on Public Works and Buildings, Roads, Streets and Bridges amounted to $169,642 whereas for 1891 the estimated sum for the Surveyor General's, the Water and Drainage and the Sanitary Departments amounts to no less than $920,279 while the total amount estimated for the construction of such Public Buildings as have actually been commenced or are in contemplation is $2,540,237, which will have to be further increased should a new gaol be constructed.

8. The Officer Administering the Government is fully sensible of effecting economy in so far as is possible. It is at all times difficult to lay down any hard-and-fast line as to how this is to be done, but there are many little ways in which those who are entrusted with the expenditure of public moneys can guard against needless expenditure.

The financial condition of the Colony may be regarded on the whole as satisfactory, the revenue being quite sufficient to meet any ordinary expenditure but while this is so and while not begrudging what is necessary for its development and general good the Officer Administering the Government entirely concurs that every prudence should be exercised in dealing with public moneys.

Government House, Hongkong, 20th October, 1890.

F. FLEMING, Officer Administering the Government.

BILL ENTITLED " AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND ORDINANCE No. 8 OF 1873, ENTITLED THE Dangerous GOODS ORDINANCE, 1873."-Council in Committee on the Bill.

Bill reported with amendments.

Council resumed.

BILL ENTITLED (4

AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND ORDINANCE No. 15 of 1888 ENTITLED THE RATING ORDINANCE, 1888."-The Acting Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

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67

BILL ENTITLED

AN ORDINANCE TO REPEAL ORDINANCE No. 29 OF 1888 AND TO AMEND ORDINANCE No. 15 OF 1886 ENTITLED THE PEACE PRESERVATION ORDINANCE, 1886."-The Acting Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded. Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put--that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE POLICE FORCE CONSOLIDATION ORDINANCE, 1887."--Council in Committee on the Bill.

Bill reported with amendment.

Council resumed.

ADJOURNMENT.—The Council then adjourned till Monday, the 27th October, at 3 P.M.

Read and confirmed, this 27th day of October, 1890.

F. A. HAZELAND, Acting Clerk of Councils.

F. FLEMING,

Officer Administering the Government.

3

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 25.

MONDAY, 27TH OCTOBER, 1890.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE OFFICER ADMINISTERING THE GOVERNMENT (The Honourable FRANCIS FLEMING, C.M.G.).

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (WALTER MEREDITH DEANE, C.M.G.).

the Acting Attorney General, (EDWARD JAMES ACKROYD).

the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (HENRY ERNEST WODEHOUSE, C.M.G.). the Surveyor General, (SAMUEL BROWN).

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the Acting Registrar General, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNEs). PHINEAS RYRIE.

69

* * * *

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 20th October, 1890, were read and confirmed. Read the following Minute under the hand of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government:-

F. FLEMING.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Four hundred and Eighty Dollars, ($480), as a Gratuity to the Widow of Mr. ARTHUR WAGNER, late Assistant Marine Surveyor, and Assistant Superintendent and Engineer of the Fire Brigade, in consideration of her husband's service.

Government House, Hongkong, 18th October, 1890.

The Acting Colonial Secretary moved that this Minute be referred to the Finance Committee. The Acting Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

VOTES PASSED BY THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Acting Colonial Secretary, by direction of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government, laid on the table the Report of the Finance Committee, dated the 20th October, (No. 19), and moved that the following Votes referred to therein be passed, viz. :—

175 of 1890.

(1.)

C. O. Desp. Excess over the amount estimated for 12 Maxim Guns and Ammunition about to be supplied. The excess is due to the additions made on the recommendation of General BEVAN Edwards, R.E., and Major CLARK, R.E.,

C.S.O. 1383 & 2397 of 1890.

C.S.O.

1957 of

(2.)

Re-construction of the landing Pier at Stone Cutters' Island,.

(3.)

198.00. Allowance to the Hospital Steward for collecting Hospital bills, at the rate of $20

per month, for October, November and December of the present year,

..$ 1,878.00

$ 6,828.00

60.00

The Acting Colonial Secretary moved that the recommendation of the Finance Committee that the question of the proposed reduction of postage be referred to the Chamber of Commerce be carried into effect.

The Acting Colonial Treasurer seconded. Question-put and agreed to.

Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD gave notice that at the next Meeting he would move the following resolution :--

That the Government lay upon the table a complete and detailed statement shewing,—

1.—The total amount in dollars received by this Colony on account of the loan for £200,000. 2.-The total amount of interest paid, principal and rate to be mentioned, on the loan annually from the date of borrowing until nów, or to 30th June last, or any more convenient date of this year.

70

3.-The total amount of commission paid to the Crown Agents or others in connection with

the loan.

4.- The total amount of charges, advertising, and all others incurred and paid in respect of

the loan.

5.-The profit or loss in exchange on each of the amounts of the loan repaid annually. 6.—The rate per cent, per annum the loan has cost annually-the rate to include interest, commission, and all other charges from date of borrowing up to the most convenient date of this year.

7.—The amounts to be stated in Pounds Sterling as well as in dollars, also the rate or rates

of exchange at which each conversion has been made.

Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD also gave notice of the following motion for the next meeting,—

That the Council postpone consideration of the Estimates for 1891 for Public Works Extraor- dinary No. 29 on the Abstract List-in so far as regards the following numbers under that heading-Nos. 1, 8, 9, 11, 13, 15, 16, 18, 21, 25, 29, 32, 34, 35, 36 and 37, until Government lay on the table detailed and complete statements of the proposed works shew- ing what is to be done in each case and the necessity for the works, together with estimates and plans, including a definite statement of their intentions with reference to Drainage and Water-works, so that the Council and the Public may know precisely what it is the Council are asked to sanction and for what purposes the money to be voted is to be used. Further, that the Government lay on the table a copy of the Despatch and Statement sent to Lord Knutsford in reply to his Despatch of 18th April last, also a fresh report from the Surveyor General as to what works he can now reasonably undertake to do during the ensuing year, and also a report detailing the Public Works to which the Colony is already actually committed.

Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD, pursuant to notice, asked the following questions:-

1. Will the Government lay on the table, before proceeding with the Estimates for 1891, the Sanitary Board's letter of the 11th August, 1890, containing certain recommendations on the subject of the Water and Drainage Works?

2. Will the Government, before proceeding with the Estimates for 1891, lay upon the table detailed and complete statements of the proposed Works not already sanctioned by the Legislative Council together with plans and estimates in detail including a complete statement of the new drainage scheme and of the arrangements proposed by Government for carrying it out promptly and effectively?

The Acting Colonial Secretary replied.

BILL ENTITLED (6

AN ORDINANCE TO AUTHORISE THE APPROPRIATION OF A SUPPLEMENTARY SUM OF THREE HUNdred and ForTY-NINE THOUSAND SEVEN HUNDRED AND TWENTY DOLLARS And Seventy- NINE CENTS TO DEFRAY THE CHARGES OF THE YEAR 1889."-The Acting Colonial Secretary moved the second reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

The Acting Colonial Secretary moved that this Bill be referred to the Finance Committee. The Acting Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

BILL ENTITLED

AN ORDINANCE TO APPLY A SUM NOT EXCEEDING ONE MILLION SIX HUNDRED AND SEVENTY-FOUR THOUSAND SEVEN HUNDRED AND EIGHTY DOLLARS TO THE PUBLIC SERVICE OF THE YEAR 1891."-The Acting Colonial Secretary moved the second reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

The Acting Colonial Secretary moved that the Bill be referred to the Finance Committee. The Acting Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND Ordinance No. 8 OF 1873, ENTITLED THE Dangerous GOODS ORDINANCE, 1873."-The Acting Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

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BILL ENTITLED

"AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE POLICE FORCE CONSOLIDATION ORdinance, 1887."--The Acting Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

BILL ENTITLED 66

AN ORDINANCE TO PROVIDE FOR AND REGULATE A PENSION FUND FOR WIDOWS AND CHILDREN OF PUBLIC OFFICERS OF THE COLONY."-The Acting Attorney General moved that this Bill be referred to the Law Committee.

Honourable P. RYRIE addressed the Council.

Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD addressed the Council. His Excellency addressed the Council.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded the motion.

Question-put and agreed to.

The Council then resolved itself into a meeting of the Finance Committee.

On the Council resuming the Acting Colonial Secretary laid on the table the following resolution passed by the Finance Committee:-

"That the Government do lay on the table a list of those officers who have not received an increase under the new scale of pay and at the same time state the grounds on which these officers are not satisfied."

The adoption of this resolution was moved by the Honourable J. J. KESWICK and seconded by the Honourable P. RYRIE.

The Acting Colonial Secretary moved that the consideration of the above resolution be adjourned. for a week.

The Acting Attorney General seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

BILL ENTITLED "THE SQUATTERS' Ordinance, 1890."-Council in Committee on the Bill.

Progress reported.

Council resumed.

BILL ENTITLED แ

AN ORDINANCE TO GIVE FURTHER POWERS TO COMPANIES WITH RESPECT TO THE ALTERATION OF THEIR MEMORANDA OF ASSOCIATION."-Council in Committee on the Bill.

Bill reported without amendment.

Council resumed.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned till Monday, the 3rd November, at 2.30 P.M.

Read and confirmed, this 3rd day of November, 1890.

F. A. HAZELAND,

Acting Clerk of Councils.

F. FLEMING,

Officer Administering the Government.

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LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 26.

MONDAY, 3RD NOVEMBER, 1890.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE OFFICER ADMINISTERING THE GOVERNMENT

(The Honourable FRANCIS FLEMING, C.M.G.).

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (WALTER MEREDITH DEANE, C.M.G.).

the Acting Attorney General, (EDWARD JAMES ACKROYD).

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the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (HENRY ERNEST WODEHOUSE, C.M.G.). the Surveyor General, (SAMUEL BROWN).

the Acting Registrar General, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES). PHINEAS RYRIE.

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

ABSENT:

The Honourable JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 27th October, 1890, were read and confirmed.

His Excellency informed the Council that the Secretary of State had made some changes in regard to the appointments of Postmaster General and Colonial Treasurer. The present Assistant Postmaster General has been appointed Postmaster General at a salary of $3,600 a year besides which he is to have free quarters, and Mr. MITCHELL-INNES has been appointed Colonial Treasurer and Collector of Stamp Revenue at a salary of $4,800 a year.

The Acting Colonial Secretary laid on the table a letter from the Sanitary Board in connection with Main Sewerage.

The Acting Colonial Secretary also laid on the table the Minutes of a meeting of the Finance Committee held on the 27th October, 1890:

Honourable C. P. CHATER, in the absence of the Honourable J. J. KESWICK, supported the follow- ing resolution which was contained in a report of the Finance Committee, and which had been proposed and seconded at the last meeting of the Council:-

That the Government lay on the table a list of those Officers who have not received an increase under the new scale of pay and at the same time state the grounds of refusal in the case of those Officers who are not satisfied.

The Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD spoke in favour of the motion.

The Acting Colonial Secretary addressed the Council and by direction of His Excellency laid on the table a list of Offices in regard to which applications had been made for a reconsideration of salaries and also the reasons why some among such applications had not been acceded to by the Government.

His Excellency addressed the Council.

Honourable P. RYRIE addressed the Council.

After some discussion it was agreed, on the proposal of the Acting Colonial Secretary, that the non-contentious work should be proceeded with by the Finance Committee.

Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD addressed the Council and moved the following resolution :-

That the Government lay upon the table a complete and detailed statement shewing,-

1.-The total amount in dollars received by this Colony on account of the loan for £200,000. 2.-The total amount of interest paid, principal and rate to be mentioned, on the loan annually from the date of borrowing until now, or to 30th June last, or any more convenient date of this year.

3.—The total amount of commission paid to the Crown Agents or others in connection with

the loan.

4.-The total amount of charges, advertising, and all others incurred and paid in respect of

the loan.

5.-The profit or loss in exchange on each of the amounts of the loan repaid annually. 6.—The rate per cent. per annum the loan has cost annually-the rate to include interest, commission, and all other charges from date of borrowing up to the most convenient date of this year.

7.—The amounts to be stated in Pounds Sterling as well as in dollars, also the rate or rates

of exchange at which each conversion has been made. Honourable P. RYRIE seconded.

The Acting Colonial Secretary addressed the Council. His Excellency addressed the Council.

The motion was agreed to.

74

Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD addressed the Council and moved,

That the Council postpone consideration of the Estimates for 1891 for Public Works Extraor- dinary No. 29 on the Abstract List-in so far as regards the following numbers under that heading-Nos. 1, 8, 9, 11, 13, 15, 16, 18, 21, 25, 29, 32, 34, 35, 36 and 37, until Government lay on the table detailed and complete statements of the proposed works shew- ing what is to be done in each case and the necessity for the works, together with estimates and plans, including a definite statement of their intentions with reference to Drainage and Water-works, so that the Council and the Public may know precisely what it is the Council are asked to sanction and for what purposes the money to be voted is to be used. Further, that the Government lay on the table a copy of the Despatch and Statement sent to Lord Knutsford in reply to his Despatch of 18th April last, also a fresh report from the Surveyor General as to what works he can now reasonably undertake to do during the ensuing year, and also a report detailing the Public Works to which the Colony is already actually committed.

Honourable P. RYRIE seconded.

The Acting Colonial Secretary addressed the Council.

His Excellency addressed the Council.

After discussion the Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD, on the suggestion of the Acting Attorney General, agreed to substitute the following motion in lieu of that originally proposed by him:-

That the Council postpone consideration of the Estimates for 1891 for Public Works Extraordi- ▲

nary No. 29 on the Abstract List-in so far as regards the following numbers under that heading-Nos. 1, 8, 9, 11, 13, 15, 16, 18, 21, 25, 29, 32, 34, 35, 36, and 37. until Government lay on the table a general statement of the proposed works, including a definite statement of their intentions with reference to Drainage and Water-works, so that the Council and the Public may know precisely what it is the Council are asked to sanction and for what purposes the money to be voted is to be used. Further, that the Government lay on the table a copy of the Despatch and Statement sent to Lord Knutsford in reply to his Despatch of 18th April last, also a fresh report from the Surveyor General as to what works he can now reasonably undertake to do during the ensuing year, and also a report detailing the Public Works to which the Colony is already actually committed.

After discussion the amended motion was put and agreed to.

The Council then resolved itself into a meeting of the Finance Committee. On the Council resuming, the Acting Colonial Secretary reported progress.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned till Monday, the 10th November, at 2.30 P.M.

Read and confirmed, this 10th day of November, 1890.

F. A. HAZELAND, Acting Clerk of Councils.

F. FLEMING,

Officer Administering the Government.

T

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2

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 27.

MONDAY, 10TH NOVEMBER, 1890.

PRESENT:

C

HIS EXCELLENCY THE OFFICER ADMINISTERING THE GOVERNMENT (The Honourable FRANCIS FLEMING, C.M.G.).

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (WALTER MEREDITH DEANE, C.M.G.).

the Acting Attorney General, (EDWARD JAMES ACKROYD).

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the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (HENRY ERNEST WODEHOUSE, C.M.G.). the Surveyor General, (SAMUEL Brown).

""

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"}

"1

the Acting Registrar General, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES). PHINEAS RYRIE.

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

ABSENT:

The Honourable JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 3rd November, 1890, were read and confirmed.

PAPERS.-The Acting Colonial Secretary, by direction of His Excellency the Officer Administer- ing the Government, laid on the table Reports respecting Public Works Estimates for 1890 and state- ments concerning the Government Loan of £200,000.

The Acting Colonial Secretary also laid on the table the Reports of the Finance Committee held respectively on the 3rd and 8th days of November, 1890, and moved that the following Vote referred to in the Report of the 3rd November be passed, viz. :-

tion:-

Gratuity to the Widow of Mr. ARTHUR WAGNER, late Assistant Marine Surveyor, and Assistant Superintendent and Engineer of the Fire Brigade, in considera- tion of her husband's service,

The Acting Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

$ 480.00

Honourable P. RYRIE gave notice that at the next Meeting he would move the following resolu-

That a

special committee, consisting of the un-official members and the Colonial Secretary, be appointed to examine into the details of the Estimates for next year, mainly with a view to a full consideration of the salaries question, the public works, and the military contribution, with full powers to call for papers and information, and to furnish the Council with a report. Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD gave notice that at the next Meeting of Council he would ask the following question :-

Will the Government lay on the table a full report of the proceedings of the Law Revision Commission appointed on 12th August, 1882,-"to prepare and report upon Drafts for a "revised edition of the Ordinances, and for amendments of the same, incorporating the "results of such recent Imperial legislation as appears applicable to the circumstances "of the Colony, and providing for improved procedure in the administration of Justice," and a statement shewing the total cost of the Commission since the date of its appointment until the present time, how and in what way the money has been spent, the work accomplished, and about the time when the edition of the Ordinances now being printed will be published, also the cost of the edition being printed.

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE CATTLE DISEASES, SLAUGHTER-HOUSES, AND MARKETS ORDINANCE, 1887."-The Acting Attorney General moved the first reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

76

BILL ENTITLED “AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE CHINESE EMIGRATION CONSOLIDATION ORDINANCE, 1889."--The Acting Attorney General moved the first reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE PUBLIC HEALTH ORDINANCE OF 1887."-The Acting Attorney General moved the first reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE ARMS ORDINANCE OF 1889."-The Acting Attorney General moved the first reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED เ AN ORDINANCE TO GIVE FURTHER POWERS TO COMPANIES WITH RESPECT TO THE ALTERATION OF THEIR MEMORANDA OF ASSOCIATION."--The Acting Attorney General moved that the consideration of this Bill be adjourned until Monday, the 17th instant, which was agreed to.

BILL ENTITLED

AN ORDINANCE TO AUTHORISE THE APPROPRIATION OF A SUPPLEMENTARY SUM OF THREE Hundred and ForTY-NINE THOUSAND SEVEN Hundred and TWENTY DOLLARS AND EIGHTY- FIVE CENTS TO DEFRAY THE CHARGES OF THE YEAR 1889."-Council in Committee on the Bill.

Bill reported without amendment.

Council resumed.

66

BILL ENTITLED

AN ORDINANCE TO APPLY A SUM NOT EXCEEDING ONE MILLION SIX Hundred AND SEVENTY-FOUR THOUSAND SEVEN HUNDRED AND EIGHTY DOLLARS TO THE PUBLIC SERVICE OF THE YEAR 1891."-The Acting Colonial Secretary moved that the consideration of this Bill be adjourned, which was agreed to.

BILL ENTITLED "THE SQUATTERS' ORDINANCE, 1890."-The Acting Attorney General moved that the consideration of this Bill be adjourned until the 17th instant which was agreed to.

ADJOURNMENT.—The Council then adjourned till Thursday, the 13th November, at 3.30 P.M.

Read and confirmed, this 13th day of November, 1890.

F. A. HAZELAND, Acting Clerk of Councils.

F. FLEMING,

Officer Administering the Government.

:

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 28.

THURSDAY, 13TH NOVEMBER, 1890.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE OFFICER ADMINISTERING THE GOVERNMENT

(The Honourable FRANCIS FLEMING, C.M.G.).

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (WALTER MEREDITH DEANE, C.M.G.).

the Acting Attorney General, (EDWARD JAMES ACKROYD).

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the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (HENRY ERNEST WODEHOUSE, C.M.G.).

the Surveyor General, (SAMUEL BROWN).

the Acting Registrar General, (Norman Gilbert MITCHELL-INNES). PHINEAS RYRIE.

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

ABSENT:

The Honourable JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

77

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 10th November, 1890, were read and confirmed. Honourable P. RYRIE moved the following amended resolution in lieu of the one in the Orders of the Day :-

That a special committee, consisting of the un-official members, the Colonial Secretary, the Colonial Treasurer, and the Surveyor General be appointed to examine into the details of the Estimates for next year, with a view to a consideration of the salaries question, the public works, and the military contribution.

Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD addressed the Council and seconded the motion. His Excellency addressed the Council.

Question-put and agreed to.

Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD, pursuant to notice, asked the following question:-

Will the Government lay on the table a full report of the proceedings of the Law Revision Com- mission appointed on 12th August, 1882,-" to prepare and report upon Drafts for a "revised edition of the Ordinances, and for amendments of the same, incorporating the "results of such recent Imperial legislation as appears applicable to the circumstances of the "Colony, and providing for improved procedure in the administration of Justice," and a statement showing the total cost of the Commission since the date of its appointment until the present time, how and in what way the money has been spent, the work accomplished, and about the time when the edition of the Ordinances now being printed will be published, also the cost of the edition being printed.

The Honourable Acting Attorney General and Honourable Acting Colonial Secretary replied. BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE CATTLE DISEASES, Slaughter-HOUSES, AND MARKETS ORDINANCE, 1887."-The Acting Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

BILL ENTITLED " AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE CHINESE EMIGRATION CONSOLIDATION ORDINANCE, 1889.”—The Acting Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE PUBLIC HEALTH ORDINANCE OF 1887."-The Acting Attorney General moved the second reading of the B.ll.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE ARMS ORDINANCE OF 1889."-The Acting ▾ Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

78

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE TO AUTHORISE THE APPROPRIATION OF A SUPPLEMENTARY SUM OF THREE HUNDRED AND FORTY-NINE THOUSAND SEVEN HUNDRED AND TWENTY DOLLARS A EIGHTY- FIVE CENTS TO DEFRAY THE CHARGES OF THE YEAR 1889."-The Acting Colonial Secretary moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

ADJOURNMENT.—The Council then adjourned till Monday, the 17th November, at 2.30 P.M.

Read and confirmed, this 17th day of November, 1890.

F. A. HAZELAND, Acting Clerk of Councils.

F. FLEMING,

Officer Administering the Government.

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 29.

MONDAY, 17TH NOVEMBER, 1890.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE OFFICER ADMINISTERING THE GOVERNMENT (The Honourable FRANCIS FLEMING, C.M.G.).

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (WALTER MEREDITH DEANE, C.M.G.).

the Acting Attorney General, (Edward James ACKROYD).

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"

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}}

the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (HENRY ERNEST WODEHOUSE, C.M.G.). the Surveyor General, (SAMUEL Brown).

the Acting Registrar General, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES). PHINEAS RYRIE.

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

ABSENT:

79

The Honourable JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 13th November, 1890, were read and confirmed.

PAPERS.-The Acting Colonial Secretary, by direction of His Excellency the Officer Administer- ing the Government, laid on the table a statement concerning cost of Law Revision Commission, and cost of the new edition of the Hongkong Ordinances.

Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD gave notice that at the next Meeting of Council he would ask the following questions:-

1. Is the Government aware that the water supply to the Robinson Road district was cut off

for several days last week, and that no notice whatever was given of the fact so as to allow the inhabitants to make provision to obtain water from some other source? Will the Govern- ment issue the necessary instructions so that the public may have some notice in future of when and for how long it is proposed to cut off the water supply?

2. Is the Government aware that there is a very great scarcity of water in the Western district at the Peak, and will the Government state what measures they are taking, or propose to take, to meet the emergency?

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE CATTLE DISEASES, SLAUGHTER-HOUSES, AND MARKETS ORDINANCE, 1887.”—Council in Committee on the Bill.

Bill reported with amendments.

Council resumed.

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE CHINESE EMIGRATION CONSOLIDATION ORDINANCE, - 1889."-Council in Committee on the Bill.

Bill reported without amendment.

Council resumed.

The Acting Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE PUBLIC HEALTH ORDINANCE OF 1887.". Council in Committee on the Bill.

Bill reported with amendment. Council resumed.

80

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE TO

"AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE ARMS ORDINANCE OF 1889."--Council in Committee on the Bill.

Bill reported with amendment.

Council resumed.

BILL ENTITLED (6 AN ORDINANCE to give furTHER POWERS TO COMPANIES WITH RESPECT TO THE ALTERATION OF THEIR MEMORANDA OF ASSOCIATION."-The Acting Attorney General moved that the consideration of this Bill be adjourned until Monday, the 24th instant, which was agreed to.

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE TO APPLY A SUM NOT EXCEEDING ONE MILLION SIX HUNDRED AND SEVENTY-FOUR THOUSAND Seven Hundred and EigGHTY DOLLARS TO THE PUBLIC Service of THE YEAR 1891."-The Acting Colonial Secretary moved that the consideration of this Bill be adjourned, which was agreed to.

ENTITLED

BILL Entitled “THE SQUATTERS' ORDINANCE, 1890."-The Acting Attorney General moved that the consideration of this Bill be adjourned until the 24th instant which was agreed to.

ADJOURNMENT.—The Council then adjourned till Monday, the 24th November, at 3 P.M.

Read and confirmed, this 24th day of November, 1890.

F. A. HAZELAND, Acting Clerk of Councils.

F. FLEMING,

Officer Administering the Government.

81

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 30.

MONDAY, 24TH NOVEMBER, 1890.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE OFFICER ADMINISTERING THE GOVERNMENT

(The Honourable FRANCIS FLEMING, C.M.G.).

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (WALTER MEREDITH DEANE, C.M.G.).

the Acting Attorney General, (Edward James ACKROYD).

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the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (HENRY ERNEST WODEHOUSE, C.M.G.). the Surveyor General, (SAMUEL BROWN).

PHINEAS RYRIE.

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

ABSENT:

The Honourable the Acting Registrar General, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES).

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 17th November, 1890, were read and confirmed. Read the following Minute under the hand of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government:-

C. 0. Desp. 213 of 1890.

F. FLEMING.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Four hundred Dollars, ($400), for the salaries of two new Cadets to arrive from England, at the rate of $1,500 per annum each.

Government House, Hongkong, 15th November, 1890.

The Acting Colonial Secretary moved that this Minute be referred to the Finance Committee. The Acting Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question--put and agreed to.

Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD, pursuant to notice, asked the following questions

1. Is the Government aware that the water supply to the Robinson Road district was cut off

for several days last week, and that no notice whatever was given of the fact so as to allow the inhabitants to make provision to obtain water from some other source? Will the Govern- ment issue the necessary instructions so that the public may have some notice in future when and for how long it is proposed to cut off the water supply?

2. Is the Government aware that there is a very great scarcity of water in the Western district at the Peak, and will the Government state what measures they are taking, or propose to take, to meet the emergency?

Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary replied.

BILL ENTITLED " AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE LAW RELATING TO BANKRUPTCY."--The Acting Attorney General moved the first reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE CATTLE DISEASES, SLAUGHTER-Houses, and MARKETS ORDINANCE, 1887."-The Acting Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE PUBLIC HEALTH ORDINANCE OF 1887."-The Acting Attorney General moved that the Bill be recommitted.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Bill reported with amendments. Council resumed.

:

7

82

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE ARMS ORDINANCE OF 1889."-The Acting Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded. Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

The Acting Colonial Secretary moved that the consideration of the following Bills, viz.:--

(6

THE APPROPRIATION BILL, 1891,"

"THE SQUATTERS' ORDINANCE, 1890," and

(C AN ORDINANCE TO GIVE FURTHER POWERS TO COMPANIES WITH RESPECT TO THE ALTERA-

TION OF THEIR MEMORANDA OF ASSOCIATION

be adjourned until this day week.

Question-put and agreed to.

>>

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned till Monday, the 1st December, at 3 P.M.

`ead and confirmed, this 1st day of December, 1890.

A. M. THOMSON,

for Acting Clerk of Councils.

F. FLEMING,

Officer Administering the Government.

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 31.

MONDAY, 1ST DECEMBER, 1890.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE OFFICER ADMINISTERING THE GOVERNMENT (The Honourable FRANCIS FLEMING, C.M.G.).

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (WALTER MEREDITH DEANE, C.M.G.).

the Acting Attorney General, (Edward James ACKROYD).

29

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the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (HENRY ERNEST WODEHOUSE, C.M.G.). the Surveyor General, (SAMUEL BROWN).

the Acting Registrar General, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES). PHINEAS RYRIE.

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

Ho KAI, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENderson WHITEHEAD.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 24th November, 1890, were read and confirmed.

83

PAPERS.-The Acting Colonial Secretary, by direction of His Excellency the Officer Administer- ing the Government, laid on the table the Report of the Select Committee appointed to examine into the details of the Estimates for 1891; with addenda by the Un-Official Members.

Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD, pursuant to notice, moved the following resolutions:

1. That in re-adjusting the salaries of Government officials in Hongkong, all personal allowances, special grants, fees of office and other payments of a like nature should be abolished, and the salary in local currency of each officer be a fixed sum to include, where possible, all allowances. 2. That with a view to get rid entirely of personal allowances for length of service or special merit,

there should be for each office a minimum and maximum salary with a periodical rate of increase, and that no more than the maximum salary should under any circumstances be paid.

3. That within the limits so fixed the salaries of the present occupants of the various appointments be settled by the Committee of Council, with regard to length of service and personal merits of the officers, subject of course to the approval of the Secretary of State.

4. That to prevent the evil effects constantly arising in certain departments from frequent changes of officers, it be laid down as the rule that, unless under very exceptional circumstances, "the occupants of the undermentioned offices are not entitled to and are not to look for any pro- motion, acting or permanent, out of their own departments. The offices are: Registrar and Deputy Registrars Supreme Court, the Police Magistrates, the Land Officer, and the Chief Clerk at the Magistracy; the occupants of these offices to be legally qualified when fresh appointments are made to them in the future, the Interpreters of the Supreme Court, and the Clerk of Councils and Chief Clerk in the Colonial Secretary's Office.

5. That in fixing the maximum salary for the offices above mentioned the rule of irremoveability be borne in mind and the maximum salary made equivalent to any promotion the occupant of the office might reasonably hope to obtain, if the rule had not been made.

The Honourable P. RYRIE seconded.

His Excellency having addressed the Council, the motion was withdrawn.

BILL ENTITLED “THE GAMBLING ORDINANCE, 1890."-The Acting Attorney General moved the first reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

The Acting Colonial Secretary moved that the consideration of the following Bills, viz.:-

AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE LAW RELATING to Bankruptcy,

AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE PUBLIC HEALTH ORDINANCE OF 1887,

be postponed until next Meeting of Council.

Question-put and agreed to.

:

84

The Acting Colonial Secretary moved the discharge of the Order that the Appropriation Bill, 1891, be referred to the Finance Committee.

The Acting Attorney General seconded. Question-put and agreed to.

Order discharged.

THE APPROPRIATION BILL, 1891.-Council in Committee on the Bill.

On the vote of $10,000 for the Audit Department, Item No. 5, Honourable P. RYRIE moved as an amendment that the amount be struck out on the ground that it is inexpedient to have one side of the accounts audited in England and the other side in the Colony.

Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD seconded.

A division was taken when there voted :-

For the Amendment.

Hon. T. H. WHITEHEAD.

35

J J. KESWICK.

HO KAI

C. P. CHATER.

P. RYRIE.

>"

Against the Amendment.

Hon. Acting Registrar General.

Surveyor General.

Attorney General.

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35

Acting Colonial Treasurer.

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Colonial Secretary.

His Excellency the Officer Administering the

Government.

Amendment lost.

Vote-put and agreed to.

On the vote of $233,572 for Military Expenditure, Item No. 27, Hon. C. P. CHATER moved as an amendment that the vote be reduced to £20,000 on the ground that the War Department had not fulfilled the promise to increase the garrison.

Honourable P. RYRIE seconded.

A division was taken when there voted :-

For the Amendment.

Hon. T. H. WHITEHEAD.

HO KAI.

J. J. KESWICK,

""

C. P. CHATER.

""

P. RYRIE.

15

Amendment lost.

Vote-put and agreed to.

The Bill was reported with amendments.

Council resumed.

Against the Amendment. Hon. Acting Registrar General.

Surveyor General.

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Acting Colonial Treasurer.

Acting Attorney General.

Acting Colonial Secretary.

His Excellency the Officer Administering the

Government.

The Acting Colonial Secretary moved the discharge of the Order appointing the Select Committee to examine into the details of the Estimates for 1891, and that the expenditure connected with the Public Works be considered by the Finance Committee.

Question-put and agreed to..

BILL ENTITLED "THE SQUATTERS' ORDINANCE, 1890."-Council in Committee on the Bill. Bill reported with amendments.

Council resumed.

BILL ENTITLED (4 AN ORDINANCE TO GIVE FURTHER POWERS TO COMPANIES WITH RESPECT TO THE ALTERATION OF THEIR MEMORANDA OF ASSOCIATION."-The Acting Attorney General moved that the Bill be recommitted.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Bill reported with amendments.

Council resumed.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned till Monday, the 8th December, at 3 P.M.

Read and confirmed, this 8th day of December, 1890.

F. A. HAZELAND,

Acting Clerk of Councils.

F. FLEMING,

Officer Administering the Government.

.

1

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 32.

MONDAY, 8TH DECEMBER, 1890.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE OFFICER ADMINISTERING THE GOVERNMENT

(The Honourable FRANCIS FLEMING, C.M.G.).

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (WALTER MEREDITH DEANE, C.M.G.).

the Acting Attorney General, (EDWARD JAMES ACKROYD).

"?

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the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (HENRY ERNEST WODEHOUSE, C.M.G.). the Surveyor General, (SAMUEL BROWN).

the Acting Registrar General, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES). PHINEAS RYRIE.

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

85

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 1st December, 1890, were read and confirmed. Read the following Minute under the hand of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government:

C. O. Desp.

212 of 1890.

F. FLEMING.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote a sum of Two thousand Eight hundred and Eighty Dollars, ($2,880), as a compassionate allowance for the benefit of the children of the late Colonial Treasurer and Postmaster General, Mr. Alfred LISTER.

Government House, Hongkong, 27th November, 1890.

The Acting Colonial Secretary moved that this Minute be referred to the Finance Committee. The Acting Colonial Treasurer seconded.

His Excellency addressed the Council.

Question--put and agreed to.

15

VOTES PASSED BY THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Acting Colonial Secretary, by direction of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government, laid on the table the Report of the Finance Committee, dated the 24th November, (No. 23), and moved that the following Vote referred to therein be passed, viz. :-

C. O. Desp. Salaries of two new Cadets, at the rate of $1,500 per annum each,.........

213 of 1800.

The Acting Colonial Treasurer seconded. Question-put and agreed to.

.$ 400.00

Honourable P. RYRIE gave notice that at the next Meeting of Council he would ask the following question :-

In view of the danger to life caused by small vessels carrying in outside waters large number of passengers whether it is the intention of the Government to apply to steam-launches and small vessels of under 50 tons, truding between Hongkong and Canton and/or Macao, the same rules and regulations as govern the ordinary river steamers, and if so, when?

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE TO REPEAL ORDINANCE No. 13 OF 1860, FOR THE ESTABLISHMENT OF A CIVIL LIST."-The Acting Attorney General moved the first reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED "THE GAMBLING ORDINANCE, 1890."-The Acting Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

BILL ENTITLED " AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE LAW RELATING TO BANKRUPTCY."-The Acting Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded..

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

86

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE PUBLIC HEALTH ORDINANCE OF 1887."-The Acting Attorney General moved that the consideration of this Bill be adjourned until this day week, which was agreed to.

THE APPROPRIATION BILL, 1891.-The Acting Colonial Secretary moved that the Bill be recommitted.

The Acting Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Bill reported with amendment.

Council resumed.

The Acting Colonial Secretary moved that the Bill be read a third time.

The Acting Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

BILL ENTITLED "THE SQUATTERS' ORDINANCE, 1890."-The Acting Attorney General moved that the Bill be read a third time.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

BILL ENTITLED

"AN ORDINANCE TO GIVE FURTHER POWERS TO COMPANIES WITH RESPECT TO THE ALTERATION OF THEIR MEMORANDA OF ASSOCIATION."-The Acting Attorney General moved that the Bill be read a third time.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put--that this Bill do pass. Bill passed.

ADJOURNMENT.—The Council then adjourned till Monday, the 15th December, at 3 P.M.

Read and confirmed, this 15th day of December, 1890.

F. A. HAZELAND, Acting Clerk of Councils.

F. FLEMING,

Officer Administering the Government.

7

87

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 33.

MONDAY, 15TH DECEMBER, 1890.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE OFFICER ADMINISTERING THE GOVERNMENT (The Honourable FRANCIS FLEMING, C.M.G.).

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (WALTER MEREDITH DEANE, C.M.G.).

the Acting Attorney General, (Edward James ACKROYD).

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the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (HENRY ERNEST WODEHOUSE, C.M.G.). the Surveyor General, (SAMUEL BROWN).

the Acting Registrar General, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES). PHINEAS RYRIE.

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

Ho KAI, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 8th December, 1890, were read and confirmed. PAPERS.-The Acting Colonial Secretary laid on the table further despatches respecting the increased Military Contribution.

The confirmation by Her Majesty of the appointment of the Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD as a Member of the Council having been received he was duly sworn and took his seat.

VOTES PASSED BY THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Acting Colonial Secretary, by direction of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government, laid on the table the Report of the Finance Committee, dated the 8th December, (No. 24), and moved that the following vote referred to therein be passed, viz. :—

212 of 10. Compassionate allowance for the benefit of the children of the late Colonial Trea-

surer and Postmaster General, Mr. ALFRED LISTER,.............

The Acting Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Honourable P. RYRIE, pursuant to notice, asked the following question :-

$ 2,880.00

In view of the danger to life caused by small vessels carrying in outside waters large number of

passengers whether it is the intention of the Government to apply to steam-launches and small vessels of under 50 tons, trading between Hongkong and Canton and/or Macao, the same rules and regulations as govern the ordinary river steamers, and if so, when?

The Acting Attorney General replied.

Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD, pursuant to notice, asked the following questions:-

1. Will the Government lay on the table a statement shewing how the Superannuation Fund which existed in the Colony previous and up to 1857 was disposed of, what was the total amount to credit of the Fund at the time of its suppression. Why and by whose order was it put an end to, and how much of the fund was repaid to the Subscribers of it.

2. Will the Government lay on the table a statement shewing the cost in Hongkong Currency Dollars of all articles, goods, and stores purchased and forwarded to Hongkong by the Crown Agents for use in connection with the various Public Works during 1890, "the cost laid down here to include all commissions shipping and other charges.

The Acting Colonial Secretary replied.

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE FOR THE NATURALIZATION OF LAI SIU TONG."-The Acting Attorney General moved the first reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE FOR THE NATURALIZATION OF CHOI WAI OTHERWISE CHOI TSUN."-The Acting Attorney General moved the first reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a first time.

7

88

BILL ENTITLED (6

AN ORDINANCE TO REPEAL ORDINANCE No. 13 of 1860, FOR THE ESTABLISHMENT of a CIVIL LIST."--The Acting Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill.

A

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

Council in Committee on the Bill.

Bill reported with amendments.

Council resumed.

The Acting Attorney General moved that the consideration of the "THE GAMBLIng Ordinance, 1890" and "AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE LAW RELATING TO BANKRUPTCY" be postponed which was agreed to.

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE PUBLIC HEALTH ORDINANCE OF 1887."-The Acting Attorney General moved that the Bill be read a third time.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

ADJOURNMENT.—The Council then adjourned till Saturday, the 20th December, at 11 A.M.

Read and confirmed, this 20th day of December, 1890.

F. FLEMING,

Officer Administering the Government.

:

F. A. HAZELAND,

Acting Clerk of Councils.

89

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 34.

SATURDAY, 20TH DECEMBER, 1890.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE OFFICER ADMINISTERING THE GOVERNMENT (The Honourable FRANCIS FLEMING, C.M.G.).

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (WALTER MEREDITH DEANE, C.M.G.).

the Acting Attorney General, (EDWARD JAMES ACKROYD).

the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (HENRY ERNEST WODEHOUSE, C.M.G.).

the Surveyor General, (SAMUEL BROWN).

21

""

the Acting Registrar General, (NORMAN GILBERT MITCHELL-INNES). PHINEAS RYRIE.

""

";

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

>>

"}

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

"}

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 15th December, 1890, were read and confirmed.

The Acting Colonial Secretary laid on the table the Reports of the Finance Committee held on the 5th, 11th and 16th days of December, 1890.

Honourable C. P. CHATER moved that an addendum drawn up by the un-official members of the Council be added to the said Reports.

After discussion it was decided that the reports be referred back to the Finance Committee.

The Acting Attorney General laid on the table the Report of the Law Committee on AN ORDI- NANCE TO PROvide for and regulate a PENSION FUND FOR WIDOWS AND CHILDREN OF PUBLIC OFFI- CERS OF THE COLONY.

Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD pursuant to notice asked the following question

Will the Government lay on the table a statement shewing the aggregate amount of Light Dues collected from 1st January to 31st March last, both days inclusive, and from 1st April to 30th November last, also both days inclusive.

The Acting Colonial Secretary replied.

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE FOR THE NATURALIZATION OF LAI SIU TONG."-The Acting Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE FOR THE NATURALIZATION OF CHOI WAI OTHERWISE CHOI TSUN."-The Acting Attorney General moved the second reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a second time.

BILL ENTITLED "AN ORDINANCE TO REPEAL ORDINANCE No. 13 OF 1860, FOR THE ESTABLISHMENT OF A CIVIL LIST."-The Acting Attorney General moved the third reading of the Bill.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

The Acting Attorney General moved that the consideration of the "THE GAMBLING ORDINANCE, 1890" and "AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE LAW RELATING TO BANKRUPTCY" be postponed which was agreed to.

1.

90

BILL ENTITLED << AN ORDINANCE TO PROVIDE FOR AND REGULATE A PENSION FUND FOR WIDOWS AND CHILDREN OF PUBLIC OFFICERS OF THE COLONY."-The Acting Attorney General moved that the Bill be read a third time.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned till Monday, the 22nd December, at 11 A.M.

Read and confirmed, this 22nd day of December, 1890.

F. A. HAZELAND,

Acting Clerk of Councils.

F. FLEMING,

Officer Administering the Government.

}

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, No. 35.

MONDAY, 22ND DECEMBER, 1890.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE OFFICER ADMINISTERING THE GOVERNMENT

(The Honourable FRANCIS FLEMING, C.M.G.).

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (WALTER MEREDITH DEANE, C.M.G.).

the Acting Attorney General, (EDWARD JAMES ACKROYD).

""

11

""

19

""

""

""

91

the Acting Colonial Treasurer, (HENRY ERNEST WODEHOUSE, C.M.G.).

the Acting Registrar General, (Norman Gilbert MITCHELL-INNES). PHINEAS RYRIE.

CATCHICK PAUL CHATER.

JAMES JOHNSTONE KESWICK.

HO KAI, M.B., C.M.

THOMAS HENDERSON WHITEHEAD.

ABSENT:

The Honourable the Surveyor General, (SAMUEL BROWN).

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 20th December, 1890, were read and confirmed. Honourable P. RYRIE laid on the table a memorandum by the Un-official Members relating to the Estimates for Public Works for 1891 and asked that it might be forwarded to the Secretary of State.

The Acting Colonial Secretary moved the discharge of the order referring back to the Finance Committee the Reports of that Committee dated the 5th, 11th and 16th days of December, 1890.

The Acting Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question--put and agreed to.

The Acting Colonial Secretary moved that the following report of the Finance Committee be adopted :-

ESTIMATES, 1891.-Item No. 29. Public Works Extraordinary. Considered and agreed to with the exception that sub-item 9, Gaol Extensions, was disallowed by a majority of one; and sub-item 29, Government Offices Extension and New Law Courts, was not considered as no vote was asked for.

Sub-items 32 to 38 were considered and agreed to unanimously. Honourable T. H. WHITEHEAD asked the following question:-

Will Government state the reasons for the apparent delay in the despatch of Her Majesty's Gun-

boat from Hongkong to search for the "Namoa" pirates?

His Excellency replied.

The Acting Attorney General moved that the consideration of the following Ordinances be ad- journed, viz.:-

AN ORDINANCE FOR THE NATURALIZATION OF LAI SIU TONG.

AN ORDINANCE FOR THE NATURALIZATION OF CHOI WAI OTHERWISE CHOI TSUN. The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and agreed to.

Honourable P. RYRIE addressed the Council and referred to the able manner in which His Excellency had presided over them; and, on behalf of the Members, begged to thank him for the very kind consideration which he had always shown.

His Excellency, in reply, thanked the lionourable Member for the kind words he had spoken in his regard and also the Members of Council for their kindness and co-operation while he presided over this Board. He would further desire to publicly express his appreciation of the assistance rendered to him by the Members of the Civil Service. His Excellency then referred to the very valuable inform- ation he had at all times received from the Major-General Commanding.

ADJOURNMENT.—The Council then adjourned until Monday, the 5th January, 1891, at 3 P.M.

F. FLEMING, President.

Read and confirmed, this 30th day of January, 1891.

A. M. THOMSON,

Acting Clerk of Councils.

N

I

:

.

:

:

419

29 No. 90.

HONGKONG.

STATEMENTS CONCERNING GOVERNMENT LOAN OF £200,000.

Laid before the Legislative Council, by Command of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government.

SIR,

The Crown Agents for the Colonies to the Acting Colonial Secretary.

DOWNING STREET, LONDON, 15th April, 1887.

With reference to my letter of the 1st instant confirming a telegram relative to the Hongkong Government Loan of £200,000, despatched to you on that date, I have the honour to state for the information of the Governor, that in response to the invitation contained in our advertisement, of which a copy is enclosed, tenders were opened on the 1st instant. The tenders amounted to £737,400, and the prices tendered ranged from the minimum £98 to £100.17.6 per cent., the average price realized being £100.14.9 per cent.

*A Schedule of the tenders is enclosed.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your obedient Servant,

The Honourable

THE COLONIAL SECRETARY,

&c.,

&c., Hongkong.

&c.,

W. C. SARGEAUNT.

Enclosure.

HONGKONG GOVERNMENT 4 PER CENT. LOAN.

£200,000.

Authorised by Ordinance No. 11 of 1886.

THE Crown Agents for the Colonies, on behalf of the Government of Hongkong, hereby invite Tenders for the above Loan of £200,000.

The Loan is secured on the General Revenues and Assets of the Government of Hongkong, and will be raised on Debentures representing £100 each, bearing interest from the 1st March, 1887, at the rate of 4 per cent. per annum, payable half-yearly on the 1st March and 1st September in each year. Interest and Principal will be payable at the Offices of the Crown Agents for the Colonies, Downing Street, London.

In order to provide for the repayment of the Principal at the expiration of 20 years-if not previously redeemed-a compound Sinking Fund will be formed by an investment half-yearly of three thousand five hundred and thirty-six pounds, commencing on the 1st September next.

* Not printed.

}

420

The Government of Hongkong reserves to itself the right to pay off the Prin- cipal, or a part thereof, any time after the expiration of five years from the date of the Debentures, upon giving, by advertisement in "The Times " newspaper,

six months' notice, dating from a day when a dividend is due, of its intention to do so; from and after the day so appointed for repayment of any Debenture all claim to interest on the Principal secured thereby shall cease. The Debentures if so redeemed will be taken in rotation, commencing with No. 1, or the lowest number outstanding.

The proceeds of the Loan will be expended in the completion of the fortifica- tions required for the defence of Hongkong as a Coaling Station, of the Water Works, and other Public Works upon the construction of which during the last four years the accumulated surplus balances of previous years have been expended.

Tenders will be received at the Offices of the Crown Agents for the Colonies in Downing Street until One p.m. on Friday, the 1st April, and will be opened in the presence of such applicants as may attend.

The Debentures will be allotted to the highest bidders, provided the rates offered are not below £98 in money for every £100 in Debentures, and in the event of the receipt of tenders for a larger amount of Debentures than that proposed to be issued at or above the minimum price, the Tenders at the lowest price accepted will be subjected to a pro ratâ diminution.

If no allotment be made, the amount forwarded with the Tender will be re- turned in full, and if a portion only of the amount applied for be allotted, the surplus will be appropriated towards the payment on Allotment.

Tenders at a fraction of a shilling other than sixpence, will not be preferentially accepted.

The purchase money will be required as follows:

£5 per cent. on application, and so much on the 7th April, 1887, as will

leave £75 per cent. payable as under:

£35 per cent. on the 5th May, 1887, and

£40 per cent. on the 6th June, 1887.

The first payment must accompany the Tender, and the subsequent payments are to be made at the Bank of England not later than the dates above named.

Payments may be made in full on the 7th April, or on any subsequent date prior to the 6th June, 1887, under discount at the rate of 3 per cent. per annum.

After payment by the Allottees of the instalment due on Allotment, they will receive at the Chief Cashier's Office, Bank of England, in exchange for the Banker's receipts, Scrip Certificates representing the Debentures to which they will become entitled, which will be ready for delivery on and after the 6th June, 1887.

Forms of Tenders, and a Statistical Statement relative to the Revenue and expenditure and Shipping of the Colony from 1877 to 1886 inclusive, may be obtained by applying at the Offices of the Crown Agents for the Colonies, Downing Street, S.W., and No. 1, Tokenhouse Buildings, E.C.; at those of Messrs. MULLENS, MARSHALL, and Co., 4, Lombard Street, E.C.; and those of Messrs. J. and A. SCRIMGEOUR, 18, Old Broad Street, E.C.; and a copy of the Ordinance may be seen on application at the Offices of the Crown Agents in Downing Street.

OFFICES OF THE CROWN AGENTS FOR THE COLONIES,

DOWNING STREET, LONDON,

26th March, 1887.

421

STATEMENT SHEWING THE DISPOSAL OF £200,000, HONGKONG GOVERNMENT 4 PER CENT.

DEBENTURES AUTHORIZED BY ORDINANCE No. 11 of 1886.

No.

To whom allotted.

Amount allotted.

Rate Per cent.

Amount.

£

£ s. d.

1 William Westgarth,

45,000

100.17.6

£

45,393.15.0

s. d.

2

Linton Clarke & Co.,

45,000

100.17.6

45,393.15.0

3

J. & A. Scrimgeour,

500

100.13.6

503. 7.6

4

Do.,

89,400

100.12.6

89,958.15.0

5

Do.,

11,200

100.12.6

11,270. 0.0

6

Do.,

6,700

100.12.6

6,741.17.6

7

Do.,

2,200

100.12.6

2,213.15.0

£

200,000

201,475. 5.0 ·

Highest Tender,

Lowest (Minimum),

Average price obtained,.....................

Total number of Tenders-87.

..£100.17.6 per cent.

98. 0.0

100.14.9

LONDON, 15th April, 1887.

(Signed),

W. C. SARGEAUNT, Crown Agent

for the Colonies.

STATEMENT OF RECEIPTS AND PAYMENTS IN CONNECTION WITH THE LOAN OF £200,000.

422

RECEIPTS.

Amounts

in

Sterling.

Rate

Hongkong

Amounts

in

Rate

per

per

$.

Currency.

PAYMENTS.

Sterling.

$

Hongkong

Currency.

£

S.

d.

£

C.

s. d.

C.

1887

Debentures at 4 per cent interest to be paid off on the 1st March, 1907,

1887

200,000. 0. 0

3/2

Premia-on debentures,..

1,475. 5. 0

1,263,157.90

9,317.37

Commission and Brokerage to Crown Agents,... Stamping Scrip Certificates, .

1,000. 0. 0

Advertising,

Interest on amount overdue,

3.16. 9

24.24

,,

Forms,

8. 6. 8

199. 4. 6

13.13. 0

Stamping Debentures,

250. 0. 0

201,479. 1. 9 |

Bank of England for receiving instalments,

100. 0. 0

Printing Bonds, &c.,

152. 4.10

Supervising printing of Bonds, &c.,..........

19. 6. 0

Register of Debenture,

4.19. 6

1,272,499.51

Discount on payment in full,.

337.12. 3

2,085. 6. 9

3/2

13,170.55

Balance,.

1,259,328.96

$

1,272,499.51

INTEREST ON LOAN OF £200,000 AT 4 PER CENT. PER ANNUM.

Sterling.

423

Rate per Hongkong Dollar. Currency.

PAID RY CROWN AGENTS.

£

s. d.

$

C.

1887

Interest due on 1st September,

4,000. 0. 0

3/2

25,263.16

Commission on payment of interest,

20. 0. 0

126.31

""

1888

Interest due on 1st March and 1st September,

8,000. 0. 0

"J

50,526.32

Commission and Advertising,

40.15. 0

257.37

1889

Interest due on 1st March and 1st September,

7,976. 0. 0

50,374.73

Commission and Advertising,

40.15. 0

1890

Interest due on 1st September, 1889,

24. 0. 0

257.37

151.59

Interest due on 1st March,

.....

4,000. 0. 0

""

25,263.16

Commission,

40. 0. 0

36

25.26

Interest on Debentures to June, 1890,

152,245.27

SIR MONTAGUE OMMANNEY, AND ERNEST BLAKE, ESQ., AS TRUSTEES, IN ACCOUNT WITH THE GOVERNMENT OF HONGKONG, IN RESPECT OF A SINKING FUND FOR THE REDEMPTION OF £200,000, 4 PER CENT. DEBENtures.

>

TO BE PAID OFF ON THE 1ST MARCH 1907 (IF NOT PREVIOUSLY REDEEMED) BY HALF-YEARLY INVESTMENTS.

Victoria,

4%

Canada,

3%

N. S. Wales

3/1/20

Total Cost.

Dividends

less

Income Tax,

Half-Yearly Contribution.

Payment in Dollars

@ 3,2.

424

£

s. d.

£

s. d.

1887.

September,

3,312. 8. 3

:

1888.

March,

August,

September,

3,273. 0. 4

116. 6. 5

3,203.12. 0

...

{

October,

1889.

January,

171.19. 1

March,

July,

September,

1890.

3,741.15. 6

262. 7. 2

...

3,449.14. 7

s. d.

£

s. d.

£

s. d.

£

s. d.

1887.

3,536. 0. 0

September,

3,536. 0. 0

22,332.63

1888.

3,600. 6. 4

128. 8. 4

Stamps.

3,536. 0. 0

0. 2. 3

193. 0.10

3,536. 0. 0 251. 4. 8

3,536. 0. 0

March,

July,

September,

64. 6. 4

3,536. 0. 0

22,332.63

128. 8. 4

3,536. 0. 0

22,332.63

1889.

January,

March,

193. 3. 1

3,536. 0. 0

22,332.63

July,

251. 4. 8

September,

3,536. 0. 0

22,332.63

1890.

January,

March,

April,

244.18.10

3,416. 8. 0

62.17. 9

255. 1. 5

3,536. 0. 0

63. 0.10

January,

March,

April,

255. 1. 5

3,536. 0. 0

22,332.63

63. 0.10

10,077. 6. 1

4,004. 2. 8

7,173.19. 2

22,171. 4. 8

AMOUNT PAID up to June, 1890,

955. 4. 8

21,216. 0. 0

$

133,995.78

[

:

No. 219.

Marked A.

Enclosure B.

..

397

No. 26

90.

HONGKONG.

CORRESPONDENCE RESPECTING MAIN SEWERAGE.

Laid before the Legislative Council, by Command of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government.

Secretary, Sanitary Board to Acting Colonial Secretary.

SANITARY BOARD ROOM,

HONGKONG, 11th August, 1890.

SIR,I have the honour to transmit you the enclosed extract from the minutes of the proceedings of the Board at a meeting held on the 8th instant, and also a copy of the letter referred to in the extract in question.

The Honourable W. M. DEANE, C.M.G.,

Acting Colonial Secretary.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

HUGH MCCALLUM,

Secretary.

ן.

A.

Extract from the Minutes of the Proceedings of the Sanitary Board at a Meeting held on the 8th day of August, 1890.

Main Sewerage. The reports on this subject by the Honourable O. CHADWICK, C.M.G.-copies of which had been in the hands of Members for some- time were again considered.

Mr. FRANCIS addressed the Board and moved that a reply he had drafted and which he real be sent to the Honourable Colonial Secretary's letter transmitting the reports to the Board.

Mr. EDE addressed the Board and seconded Mr. FRANCIS' motion.

The President addressed the Board pointing out that there was a good deal in

the draft letter he could not assent to.

A discussion ensued.

The mover and seconder of the motion agreed to an amendment of the last paragraph of the draft letter.

Motion put.

The Board divided:---

For.

Mr. EDE.

Mr. FRANCIS.

Mr. WONG SHING.

Hon. O. CHADWICK.

Motion carried.

Against. THE PRESIDENT.

The President wished it to be recorded that although he voted against the motion as a whole yet he cordially agreed with that part of the letter which dealt with the engineering project put forward by Mr. CHADWICK.

True Extract.

11th August, 1890.

HUGH MCCALLUM,

Secretary.

:

398

Enclosure B.

SANITARY BOARD ROOM,

HONGKONG, 8th August, 1890.

SIR,The Board approves of the proposals of the Honourable O. CHADWICK for the drainage of the city of Victoria. In the adaptation of the separate system to the requirements of Victoria proper allowance seems to be made for the position of the town on a slope, and for the admission into the sewers of a portion of the rainfall. The objectionable intercepting sewers and pumping stations are got rid of and the scheme recommends itself to the common sense of the community.

2. The Board desires, however, to point out that no detailed provision seems to be made for the drainage of the new reclamation. There are suggestions on the subject, but it does not seem to have been fully considered and worked out.

3. The Board concurs in Mr. CHADWICK's recommendation that the work should be undertaken by sections each to be finished and completed before another is taken in hand. The Boar urges upon the Governinent the importance of proceeding with this main-drainage work promptly, effectively, and continuously, and recommend

(1.) That Mr. CHADWICK'S proposals and plans be sanctioned and approved by Resolution of the Legislative Council, before Mr. CHADWICK leaves the Colony, so as to obviate the risk, with a change of officers, of changes in and departures from these plans. (2.) That the whole of the money for the work be at once appropriated by Resolution of the Legislative Council, or by an Appropriation Ordinance and provision made, by Ordinance, for raising the necessary funds by loan or otherwise, if it may at any time become inconvenient to provide the money out of current revenue.

(3.) That an adequate staff of qualified assistants and overseers be at once provided. The Board do not think the department is by any means sufficiently manned to perform efficiently the double work of the water and drainage, and on constant and skilled supervision of the work in detail its success as a whole depends. (4.) That the Sanitary Board be at once constituted the supervising authority under an amended constitution over the water supply, and over drainage, public and private alike.

True copy of draft letter read at a Meeting of the Board held on the 8th August, 1890.

11.8.90.

Honourable W. M. DEANE, C.M.G.,

Acting Colonial Secretary.

HUGH MCCALLUM,

Secretary.

(Copy.)

HONGKONG.

225

No. 10

90.

CORRESPONDENCE RESPECTING THE DEATH OF THE MARQUIS TSENG.

Presented to the Legislative Council, by Command of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government.

II. B. M.'s Minister, Peking, to H. E. the Officer Administering the Government of Hongkong.

PEKING, April 26th, 1890.

SIR,

I have the honour to acknowledge the receipt of Your Excellency's telegram of the 14th instant in which you inform me that the community at Hongkong had heard with great regret the news of the death of the Marquis Tseng. On the 20th instant the Tsung-li Yamên communicated to me officially a copy of the Imperial Decree issued on the subject of His Excellency's death, and in acknowledging the Yamên's note two days later I took occasion to convey to the Prince and Ministers the expression of regret which Your Excellency had telegraphed on behalf of the British Colony.

I feel sure that this mark of sympathy will be appreciated no less highly by the Imperial Government than by the family of the deceased Statesman.

1

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your Excellency's most obedient humble servant,

The Officer Administering the Government of

HONGKONG.

JOHN WALSHAM,

Her Majesty's Minister in China.

His Excellency

305

HONGKONG.

THE COLONIAL SURGEON'S REPORT FOR 1889.

No.

Laid before the Legislative Council, by Command of His Excellency

the Officer Administering the Government.

17

90.

GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL,

HONGKONG, 27th June, 1890.

SIR, I have the honour to forward my Annual Report for the year 1889 together with the Tables shewing the work done in the Medical Department under my supervision also Reports from the Superintendent of the Government Civil Hospital, the Medical Officer of the Gaol, and the Government Analyst.

POLICE.

The admissions to Hospital shew a considerable decrease being 590, as compared with 657 in 1888. This is the more satisfactory as the strength of the Force has been increased this year by 73 men being 758 as compared with 685 in 1888. Five Europeans, three Indians and two Chinese died in the Government Civil Hospital. The admissions to Hospital from the various sections of the Police Force for the last nine years are given in the following table.

Admissions to Hospital, 1881,

Indians.

Chinese.

Europeans.

88....

212....

.198

Do.,

1882,..

92....

.230.....

.227

Do.,

1883,.

...113..

246.....

..........239

Do.,

1884,

87.....

.224.....

...175

Do.,

1885,

124....

...208.....

....163

.་

Do.,

1886,.

.138..

.243..

.221

Do.,

1887

..139.....

Do.,

Do.,

1888, 1889,.

.147. ....166....

293... .279.

.187

...231

.230...............194

}

.....

By this it will be seen that there was an increase in admissions from the European portion of the Force, but a considerable decrease among the Indians and Chinese. The Europeans being the greatest sufferers in proportion to their strength, next the Indians and the Chinese. Amongst the latter the amount of sickness is very small see Table I.

The following Table gives the admissions to Hospital and deaths in the Force for the last ten years:

1880, 1881,

1882,

1883,

1884,

1885,

1886,

1887,

1888,

1889,

Admissions.

Deaths.

.588...

..13

..498...

...10

...549.

8

.599.....

..10

.... 486.....

7

9

.602.

.14

619.

9

....657.

....590.

...15 .........10

TROOPS.

There is an increase of admissions to Hospital among the Troops this year as compared with 1888, but there has also been a considerable increase in their strength. There is a decrease in the number of deaths, but both the sickness and mortality have been considerably above the average of the last ten years as is shewn in the following table :-

1880,

1881,

1882,

1883,

1884,

1885,

1886,

1887,

1888,

1889,

Admissions. .1,075.

1,116..

1,019.

Deaths.

..13

4

9

...10

..12

....

24

9

.....

.1,105. .1,097...

1,190.... 1,607.... .1,749..... .1,485. .1,732.

..14

.21

.16

306

1

GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL.

The quarters for the Medical Staff and the European and Chinese Nursing Staffs are still in course of construction.

The new Hospital Mortuary has been finished and is now most conveniently situated. It can no longer be a cause of annoyance to the inmates of the Hospital as it always had been previously from its position on the grounds.

There is now an additional Medical Officer to the Staff which materially relieved the Superin- tendent.

There are also a Senior and two Assistant Wardmasters all trained men who have given great satisfaction in the performance of their duties.

I regret that the Nursing Staff of Sisters has not been so successful. They have found the work beyond their strength being delicately nurtured women also they are not permitted by the rules of their order to do much that is required in an institution of this kind so that a new staff of trained European Nurses has been sanctioned to take their place, and will shortly arrive I hope.

Mr. ROGERS, the Steward, has returned to duty much benefited by his well earned leave and an additional clerk has been appointed to help in the clerical work which increases yearly.

We have lost two old and valued officers in Mr. CARNEIRO and CHAN A Lock; the former died a few days after being pensioned of heart disease. CHAN A LOCK after nearly thirty years' service retires on pension. Both these men were trained in this Hospital and more willing, kinder hearted, energetic and competent officers in the performance of their duties are not to be found. As a patient in the Hospital I had a good experience of their way of working and they were equally good to the poorest destitute as I have had many opportunities of observing.

Mr. LUCAS who takes the place of Mr. WATSON, the late assistant Apothecary, has arrived but there will have to be some changes in this Department as I have already reported. Mr. CROW will have enough analytical work to take up nearly all his time if he has to do the work connected with the new Health Ordinance.

The admissions to this Hospital shew a slight increase this year while the number of deaths shew a slight decrease. The largest increase has been among the private patients.

There were no admissions this year of a choleraic type.

The following table shews the number and classification of those brought to Hospital for the last

nine years :-

1882. 1883.

1884.

1885.

1886. 1887. 1888.

1889.

Police,

.549

599

486

495

602

619

657

590

Board of Trade,

.116

110

60

100

132

103

153

135

Private paying Patients,.

.268

260

259

283

381

324

313

402

Government Servants,

88

105

96

124

144

147

159

135

Police Cases,

.207

227

231

238

142

208

242

252

Destitutes,

.230 201

222

270

222

255

248

279

1,458 1,502 1,354 1,510

1,510 1,623 1,656 1,772 1,793

Tables V a to g shew the characters of the diseases admitted to Hospital.

Table VII gives the admissions into and deaths in this Hospital of the different classes during

the years and for each month of the year.

The following table gives the admissions and deaths in this Hospital for the last ten years:-

1880,

1881,

1882,

1883,

1884,

1885,

1886,

1887,

1888,

1889,

Admissions.

1,055...... .1,236..

Deaths.

....44

...49

1,458.....

68

1,502...

.70

.1,354.

..50

1,510...

..76

..1,623..

.79

1,656....

....89

..1,772.

.1.793..

...80 ..........77

The percentage of deaths to total admissions (4·29) is much below the average of the last ten years, see Table VI.

The total amount of fees received from paying patients during the year was $11,444.49-the largest amount received in any one year.

307

In the Superintendent's Report will be found some very interesting remarks on Fever Cases and gun-shot wounds admitted to the Hospital.

Some of his recommendations as regards increased accommodation for the Hospital are already being attended to and I can fully endorse all he has said in his Report concerning the Staff, Hospital Accommodation, &c. He is a most able and energetic Officer and has thoroughly earned the respect, confidence and good will of every one he has had to deal with in the performance of his duties.

SMALL-POX HOSPITAL.

There were sixteen cases of Small-pox admitted to this Hospital this year all of a mild type. Three other cases of infectious disease were admitted; there were no deaths. A good supply of calf lymph has been served out to all the vaccine stations which has been procured from Japan and has been most satisfactory. Next year I hope to report that calf lymph produced in the Colony is equally good. Dr. ATKINSON, the Superintendent of the Government Civil Hospital, and Mr. LADDS have made a series of experiments with this object which have been very satisfactory, so it has been decided by Government to establish a calf lymph station in this Colony.

PUBLIC MORTUARY.

Table VIII shews the number of bodies brought to the Mortuary for examination and the cause of death. This year 161 bodies were brought in Europeans 4, Chinese 152, other nationalities 5. Of the Chinese 15 were children.

48 were found to have died of disease, 84 were accidental deaths, 19 suicidal and 10 homicidal.

VICTORIA GAOL.

The following table gives the number of admissions to the Gaol and the daily average number of prisoners for the past ten years :—

1880,

1881,

1882.

1883,

1884,

1885,

1886,

1887,

1888,

1889,

Total No. admitted

to Gaol.

.3,530.....

4,150.....

.3,498.

Daily average No.

of Prisoners.

.575.25

666.00

622.00

.3,486..

..542.15

4,023.

552.00

3,610.....

530.00

4,600....

674.00

...4,302.

584.00

531.00

...581.00

..3,627

3,705....

The daily average has increased by 50 as compared with last year a very large number admitted now belong to the mendicant class and petty offences. I have drawn attention to this, as many as thirty mendicants have been admitted in one week sentenced to from 7 to 14 days none of whom were fit to perform hard labour many of them being put on the sick list being either deformed, blind, or having hedious sores which they expose to excite charity. They come from the mainland to make a harvest in this Colony. Imprisonment is no punishment to them as in any case they are better clothed and fed in Gaol than outside. They cost the Government 10 cents a day besides greatly adding to the over-crowding of the Gaol. Short sentences of one to three days, short commons and deporta- tion, or the latter only would cost the Colony much less. A very large percentage of the Chinese population of this Colony belong to this class and greatly add to the over-crowding of the City. This class of immigrants should be discouraged in every possible way; they are a burden to the Colony; are of no possible service and only add to the filth and disease.

Table IX shews the number of prisoners admitted to Hospital, the cause and deaths.

Table XI shews the rate of sickness and mortality among the prisoners. There were 244 admissions to Hospital as compared with 306 in 1888, and only 4 deaths.

Table XIb shews the number of opium smokers admitted to the Gaol, as usual the habit has been ignored. Only eight needed to be taken into Hospital suffering from General Debility. There were no deaths amongst this class of prisoners. There are no particular cases worthy of note. Of 3,705 prisoners admitted to Gaol a class of society generally supposed to be addicted to most vicious habits and are mostly not in want of funds to indulge in them only 49 acknowledge themselves to be addicted to this habit. Yet opium can be procured better and cheaper in this Colony than in their own country. This does not go to show the prevalence of this habit even in moderation. Could any gaol in Europe show so small a percentage I don't say of those who habitually use spirits but of habitual drunkards.

cases.

LUNATIC ASYLUM.

There were eight admissions into the Asylum and one death. Some of them were very bad

The majority caused by the habitual use of intoxicants to excess.

308

TUNG-WA HOSPITAL.

The number of cases admitted to this Hospital during the year was 2,050 or nearly 250 less than were admitted last year, of these 1,011 died. In 1888 there were 2,298 of whom 1,428 died.

Of the 2,050 cases admitted this year 306 were moribund. As I have before remarked a Chinaman can seldom be induced to go into Hospital until he is in the last extremity or is absolutely destitute.

Four cases were admitted into the Small-pox Ward, of these 2 died.

tion.

2,494 vaccinations were performed successfully by the Public Vaccinator attached to this institu-

The number of out-patients treated was 144,864.

LOCK HOSPITAL.

This establishment is still in the same two houses, pending the building now in progress to accommodate the Hospital Staff.

The attendance of the women at the Hospital is the same as last year, the number who voluntarily submitted to examination and the number of examinations made are the same as last year.

The compulsory examination ceased September 1st, 1887.

The following table gives the number of examinations made in the past five years and the amount of disease found.

1889,

1888,

1887*,

1886,

1885,

YEAR.

No. OF WOMEN ON REGISTER.

No. of

No. of EXAMINATIONS.

DEFECT

EXAMINATIONS EVERY WOMAN

IN

MADE.

ATTENDING

ONCE A WEEK.

ATTENDANCE.

DISEASE

FOUND AND

HEALED.

269

10,924

13,988

3,064

83

269

10,924

13,988

3,064

66

272

12,223

14,344

1,765

143

272

13,425

14,344

919

414

272

13,532

14,344

812

416

This table shews there was a great deficit in the examinations in 1887 the last four months' attendance being voluntary.

In the next two years the deficit in attendance is nearly doubled.

There were a few more that stayed in Hospital this year and there were not many refusals of those who submitted and were found diseased. It must be remembered that for some days every month a woman is not in condition to be examined. In the compulsory lines a mark was placed against her name on the Board hung up in the house she belonged to till that condition was removed. Hence there must always be a deficit in the number of examinations calculated by the week and those that can be made. The deficit used to be within bound in hundreds; now it is thousands.

Still' even under these conditions something is done, but of course it is not the same as under compulsion. These figures speak for themselves.

There is an increase of disease all round.

Military Hospital an increase of 51 admissions compared with last year.

Naval Hospital an increase of 105.

Police Hospital an increase of 19.

Civil Hospital an increase of 64.

Table E gives the numbers of these different Hospitals for the last four years for comparison. Out of the 452 Military cases 72 contracted constitutional disease. See Table E 3.

Out of the 349 Naval cases only 10 contracted constitutional disease in Hongkong and 20 else- where. See Table E 2.

Though still comparatively low the disease for which compulsory examination was employed with a view of stumping it out is slowly and surely increasing both in numbers and severity.

ever.

Every encouragement is given to the women to come to the Hospital and no compulsion what- If I were permitted to give certificates to the women who are clean I think more would come but this also is forbidden. Many come because I give them prescriptions as out-patients or orders for admission to the Civil Hospital for other disease not connected for venereal diseases, and some attend as out-patients for venereal disease.

HEALTH OF THE COLONY.

The number of deaths and percentage among the Foreign Residents of Hongkong is the lowest for the last six years.

* September 1st, 1887-The compulsory attendance was abolished.

309

There has been no epidemic even the influenza has only appeared in the ordinary form we have seen every year.

DEATHS AMONG EUROPEANS (BRITISH AND FOREIGN).

FEVERS.

VOMITING

YEARS.

DIARRHEA. Cholera. AND

TOTAL.

Enteric.

Simple Continued.

PURGING.

Typhus.

1873,

6

2

17

25

1874,

1

4

17

26

1875,

1

18

24

.....

1876,

9

14

24

1877,

5

8

4

10

27

1878,

3

15

2

9

29

1879,

3

21

14

38

1880,

1

12

1

10

24

1881,

1882,

1883,

1884,

1885,

1886,

1887,

1888,

1889,

2017T6752

17

10

29

13

1

13

37

...

9

9

4

12

...

11

8

9

5

10

6

16

10

:::::

19

23

19

46

18

2

25

25

30

16

4 3

The deaths from the above classes of disease for seventeen years among Foreign Residents shew a considerable diminution and is the lowest number in any of these year.

DEATHS AMONG CHINESE.

FEVERS.

VOMITING

YEARS.

DIARRHEA. CHOLERA. AND

TOTAL.

PURGING.

Enteric.

Simple Continued.

Typhus.

1873,

12

96

16

1874,

125

46

1875,

31

291

1876,

94

343

1877,

145

370

1878,

89

481

33

1879,

116

733

21

1880,

309

373

1881,

438

168

38

1882,

679

71

1883,

262

571

1884,

132

600

1885,

105

755

1886,

9

772

9

441

2

299

363

0:~:00 ~ :* :~~:22:

195

319

231

402

2

288

612

259

696

8

311

834

701

1,304

608

...

1,478

348

...

1,030

435

1,079

465

:

1,215

3

660

1,496

301

1,035

561

7

176

1,604

10

326

19

1,136

25

276

13

764

361

17

236

917

180

7

551

1887,

1888, 1889,

Among the Chinese the deaths from the above causes are the smallest number for the last sixteen years. The diminution is most noticeable in the bowel complaints.

I regret that I have not been able to send in this report before this but a great deal of trouble has been in making up the Tables, and the clerks had to stop work while making duplicate bills for past months by Government order.

I have the honour to be,

Sir, Your obedient Servant,

PH. B. C. AYRES, Colonial Surgeon.

The Honourable W. M. DEANE, C.M.G.,

Acting Colonial Secretary.

310

POLICE.

I. TABLE shewing the ADMISSIONS into and DEATHS in the GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL

during each Month of the Year 1889.

EUROPEANS.

INDIANS.

MONTHS.

Admissions.

Deaths. Admissions. Deaths. Admissions.

CHINESE.

TOTAL Admissions. Deaths.

TOTAL

Deaths.

Remaining on the 1st Jan.,j

1889,.

4

6

4

14

January,..

15

15

39

February,

13

18

39

...

March,

9

10

5

24

April,

9

11

1

18

1

38

2

May, June,

12

19

17

14

30

22

66

July, August,

· 12

23

1

21

56

1

**15

2

28

1

22

65

3

September,.

14

1

20

13

47

1

October,

16

25

11

52

November,

21

18

21

60

December,

12

23

1

42

1

Total,......

166

5

230

Co

3

194

2

590

10

J. M. ATKINSON, Superintendent.

II. TABLE shening the RATE of SICKNESS and MORTALITY in the POLICE FORCE during the Year 1889.

AVERAGE STRENGTH.

TOTAL SICKNESS.

TOTAL DEATHS. RATE OF SICKNESS. RATE OF MORTALITY.

European. Indian. Chinese.

Total. European. Indian.

Chinese. European. Indian.

Chinese.

European. Indian.

Chinese.

European. Indian.

Chinese.

124

227 407 758 166 230 194

5

4

5

133.86 101.32| 47.66

4.03 1.73

1.22

J. M. ATKINSON, Superintendent.

Months.

III. POLICE RETURN of ADMISSIONS to HOSPITAL from each District during the Year 1889.

CENTRAL

GOVERNMENT

No. 5

8

53

HOUSE No. 2

No. 1 STONE CUTTERS'

">

9

3

23

ISLAND.

GAP No. 6 MOUNTAIN

LODGE.

WATER POLICE STATIONS TSIMSHATSUI,

WHITFEILD.

SHAUKIWAN. POKFULAM.

European.

Indian.

Chinese.

European.

Indian.

Chinese.

European.

Indian.

Chinese.

European.

Indian.

Chinese.

European.

Remaining on 1st Jan., 1889, January, February, March,

April,

May,

June,

July,.

August,

September,

October,

1 3

7 10

6

12

5 6

3 5

7 7

20

4

19

8

15

8

8

4 10

November, . 10 7

December,.

2 4

Total,

74 126

38

4

16

co

6

:::

::

:

:

:

4

Indian,

STANLEY

ABERDEEN.

YAUMATI,

AND

No. 7.

HUNGHOM.

TAITAMTUK,

13

13

15

CA CO CT ∞ er ev er 00 ON CG CG SA IA

15

Chinese..

European.

Indian.

Chinese.

:::::

European.

Indian.

2

3

లు.

Chinese.

European.

Indian.

Chinese.

European.

:00 1

2 15

12

7

38

7 112

2 19 2

3

4 $

10

6

Indian.

Chinese.

European.

Indian.

Chinese.

European.

Indian.

Chinese.

1 2 3 -

: : : : : :~~~;H::

TOTAL

14

2

:::::::::~::

39

1

39

24

38

48

66

56

65

47

2

52

60

42

3 590

26 11 19 12

J. M. ATKINSON,

Superintendent.

IV.-TABLE shewing the RATE of SICKNESS and MORTALITY of the TROOPS serving in HONGKONG

during the Year 1889..

311

AVERAGE STRENGTH.

ADMISSIONS INTO HOSPITAL.

DEATHS,

AVERAGE DAILY RATE OF SICKNESS.

|RATE OF MORTAL- ITY PER 1,000 OF THE STRENGTH.

White. Black. Total. White. Black. Total. White. Black.

Total.

White, Black. White. Black.

1,432 178 1,610 1,535 197 1,732

9

7

16

76.44 6.13

6.28

39.32

DISEASES.

V.—TABLE shewing the ADMISSIONS and MORTALITY in the GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL during the Year 1889.

ADMISSIONS.

DEATHS.

I.-General Diseases.

A. Diseases dependent on Morbid Poisons,-

Sub-Group 1,

"}

2,

3,

"

""

4, 5,

Europeans.

Indians.

Chinese.

Total.

Europeans.

Indians.

W. S. PATERSON,

Deputy Surgeon General, Principal Medical Officer, China & Hongkong.

Chinese.

71

46

16

133

5

3

174

97

194

465

v:

2

1

སྒྱུ

4

7

NM 1

2

10

3

144

31

31

206

¿

1

1

:-

O21:1

B. Diseases dependent on external agents other than Morbid

Poisons,-

Sub-Group 1,

""

""

99

2,

3, 4,

C. Developmental Diseases,

D. Not classified,

88NNO

2

36

3

5

7∞ :∞∞

23

...

8

12

6

6

2

1

1

47

3

3

8

33

20

11

64

2

1

3

II.-Local Diseases.

1

Nervous System,

19

2

Eye,

14

3

Ear,

3

4

Nose,

Circulatory System,

10

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

Diseases of the

Respiratory,

32

32

Digestive, Lymphatic,

59

35

Thyroid Body,

Supra Renal Capsules,

Urinary System,...

7

Generative System,.

16

13

Female Breast,

...

14

Male

15

Organs of Locomotion,

14

·

16

Connective Tissue,....

13

17

Skin,....

21

III.

Poisons,*

IV.

Injuries,

47

V.

Surgical Operations,t.

Under Observation,

4

5: Two wow & HA

13

36

2

3

17

38

1

5

1

4

18

3

3

23

87

6

2

12

30

124

5

2

6

2

12

16

41

...

...

1

...

7

26

...

4

20

13

17

51

32

235

314

2

14

16

16

26

46

+

Total,

*B Sub-Group 2. † Table Va.

741

372

680

1,793

25

16

3686

J. M. ATKINSON, Superintendent.

77

Total.

312

Va.-TABLE shewing the ADMISSIONS and MORTALITY in the GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL during the Year 1889.

ADMISSIONS.

DEATHS.

SURGICAL OPERATIONS. -

Removal of Tumours from Parts,-

Enchondroma of Testis, (Excision), Epithelioma of Tongue, (Excision),

Removal of Foreign Bodies,-

Gun-shot Wound of Thigh, (Bullet),

of Back, (Bullet),

""

""

""

""

of Arm,

(Bullet),

19

""

of Orbit, (Bullet),

""

"

of Leg,

(Bullet),

Opening of Abscess,-

Abdominal Abscess, (? Perinephritic), Aspiration, Abscess of neck, (Incision),

Hepatic Abscess, Aspiration, (Dr. Manson's Aspirator),. Incision, (Dr. Manson's Aspirator),. Aspiration, and subsequent Incision, Incision,

""

""

""

"

Scrotal Mamma Mastoid

"

"

of, Incision,

"

Incision,

1

-:

Europeans.

...

Operations on the Eye and its Appendages,-

For Pterygium,

""

Lachrymal obstruction,

Iridectomy,

Excision of the Eyeball,

Operations on the Nose,-

Plugging Nares for Epistaxis,

Operations on other Parts of the Head and Face, including the

Mouth,

Trephming,....

Raising Depressed Bone,

For Ranula,

29

Harelip,

+

Operations on the Respiratory Organs,—

Paracentesis of Pleura, effusion, (Aspiration), Tracheotomy,

Operations on the Digestive Organs,-

Application of the Stomach-pump,

P

For Abdominal Fistula, (Injury),

"

""

Hernia inguinal, (Reduction by Taxis), Fistula in Ano,

Hæmorrhoids, (Ligature, Abscision),

Paracentesis of Abdomen for Ascites,

Removal of Urethral Calculi,

Operations on the Urinary Organs,-

For Stricture of Urethra,

By Forcible Dilatation, (Holts),

Perineal Section (External Urethrotomy),

Operations on the Generative Organs,-

I.-MALE. Penis.

For Phimosis,..

99

Paraphimosis,

For Hydrocele, Castration,

Scrotum and Testis.

Indians.

1

::

1

1

-:

Chinese.

Total.

Europeans.

Indians.

1

1

...

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

...

1

1

1

1

1

3

:27:

2

1

1

2

:

...

::

:

1

1

Chinese.

Total.

...

1

...

1 1

...

...

:

:

...

1

1

...

1

4

1

1

2

1

1

:..

::

::

...

::

4

...

3

1

1

2

HCO LO CD 1

...

3

1

...

...

5

...

3

...

1

...

...

1

1

***

2

1

3

1

1

4

1

: co

3

N W

3

10

2

3

::

::

...

...

...

::

23

"

1

24

::

...

...

...

Carried forward,.......

24

13 38 75

2

1

1

4

Va.-TABLE shewing the ADMISSIONS and MORTALITY in the GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL during the Year 1889,-Continued.

313

SURGICAL OPERATIONS.

ADMISSIONS.

Europeans.

Indians.

Chinese.

Total.

Deaths.

Europeans.

Indians.

Chinese.

Total.

Brought forward,...

24

13

38

75

2

1

1

4

II.-FEMALE.

Obstetric Operations,-

Application of Forceps,

Version,

Craniotomy,

Operations on the Organs of Locomotion,-

On Bones.

Removal of Sequestra,

On Joints.

Shoulder, Reduction of Dislocation,.... Knee, Reduction of Compound Dislocation, Excision of the Hip,

On Limbs as a whole.-Amputations.

Flap.-Arm, (Disease of Elbow Joint), Flap.-Forearm, (Injury),

Flap.-Fingers, (Injury),

Flap.-Thigh, (Disease of Knee Joint), Flap.-Leg, (Injury),

Operations on the Skin,-

Cupping,

Skin Grafting,

Operations not Classified,-

Resuscitation of Drowned Persons,

Treatment of Cases of Poisoning,

1

පය

2

1

1

1

1

2.

2

:

2

1

1

1

1

::

1

1

1

1

1

wo co

3

:

:

1

1

:

::

2

1

3

: -

:~

2

co:

3

Total,....

35

16

58

109

3

1

4

8

J. M. ATKINSON,

Superintendent.

314

Vb.-TABLE shewing the ADMISSIONS and MORTALITY in the GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL during the Year 1889.

ADMISSIONS.

DEATHS.

GENERAL DISEASES.

Group A.-Sub-Group 1.

1. Small-Pox, (transferred to Small-Pox Hospital),

2. Cow-Pox,..

3. Chicken-Pox,

4. Measles,

5. Epidemic Rose-rash, (Rotheln),........

6. Scarlet Fever,

7. Dengue,

8. Typhus,

9. Plague,

10. Relapsing Fever,

11. Enfluenza,

1

Euro-

peans.

Indians.

1

1

Chinese.

1

~

Total.

Euro-

peans.

Indians.

Chinese.

12. Whooping Cough,

13. Mumps,

14. Diphtheria,

..

15. Cerebro-spinal Fever,

16. Simple-continued Fever,.

2

3

17. Enteric Fever, Synonyms, Typhoid Fever, (Typhomalarial

Fever),

.1

1

1

3

1

1

18. Cholera, Synonyms, Asiatic Cholera, Epidemic Cholera, 19. Sporadic Cholera, Synonyms, Simple Cholera, Cholera Nostras, 20. Epidemic Diarrhoea,

21. Dysentery,

.66

44

14

124

5

2

2

9

Total,....

71

46

16

133

5

3

2

10

J. M. ATKINSON, Superintendent.

Vc.—TABLE shewing the ADMISSIONS and MORTALITY in the GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL during the Year 1889.

GENERAL DISEASES.

ADMISSIONS.

Group A.-Sub-Group 2.

1. Malarial Fever,—

a. Intermittent, Synonyms, Ague,

142

b. Remittent,

c. Malarial Cachexia,

926

91151

384

20

4

13

1

00 10

2. Beri-Beri,

6

1 25

ཚུལ ཨྰཿ

MONTHS.

Monthly Table of Malarial Fever Cases.

INTERMITTENT.

REMITTENT.

Europeans.

Indians.

Chinese.

Deaths.

Europeans.

Indians.

Chinese.

Deaths.

Total Number of Cases.

Total Number of

Deaths.

11

2

1 28

January, February, March, April,

10

5

1

5

....

May,

2

3

June,

11.

13

19478+

4531

July, August, September, October,

14 8 14

29 9 16

15 13 12

16 20 16 30 10 24 4 2 16

62101 A

1

:

-

221

1

19

8

14

15

47

2

41

2

61

1

42

53

67

26

1

DEATHS.

1

1 9

1

32

1

1

412

November,

December,

2

NN

Total,...

142

91 151

20

4 13

9 421

9

174 97 194 | 465 | 8 1

3

12

J. M. ATKINSON,

Superintendent.

Total.

10

15

20

25

30

35

40

45

50

55

60

65

70

75

:

80

Red Wave,......

Blue

""

85

90

!

100

95

No. of Cases.

January.

February.

Vd.-DIAGRAM shewing NUMBER of CASES of MALARIAL FEVER admitted in each Month of the Year 1889.

Intermittent Fever.

.Remittent

22

March.

April.

May.

J. M. ATKINSON,

Superintendent.

June.

July.

August.

September.

October.

November.

December.

315

2. Erysipelas,

3. Pyœmia,

DISEASES.

316

Ve.-TABLE shewing the ADMISSIONS and MORTALITY in the GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL during the Year 1889.

ADMISSIONS.

DEATHS.

1. Phagedona,

Group A.-Sub-Group 3.

4. Septicemia,

DISEASES.

Europeans.

2

1

Indians.

- wi

16:4

Chinese.

Total.

Total,.......

2

1

4

7

Vf.-TABLE shewing the ADMISSIONS and MORTALITY in the GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL during the Year 1889.

ADMISSIONS.

DEATHS.

Group A.-Sub-Group 4.

1. Syphilis Synonyms-pox,---

a. Primary, including chancres molles,

b. Secondary,

2. Gonorrhoea,

DISEASES.

45

17

82

82583

Europeans.

Indians.

Total,....

144

31

31

206

Chinese.

10

5

12

36

26

16

226

62

3

20

124

Total.

Vg.--TABLE shewing the ADMISSIONS and MORTALITY in the GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL during the Year 1889.

ADMISSIONS.

DEATHS.

1. Hydrophobia,

2. Glanders,

3. Horse-pox,

4. Splenic Fever,

Group A.- Sub-Group 5.

Total,...................

:

:

Europeans.

Indians.

1

1

1

:

Chinese.

1

:

Total.

Europeans.

Indians.

1

1

J. M. ATKINSON, Superintendent.

Chinese.

1

:

Europeans.

Indians.

J. M. ATKINSON, Superintendent.

Total.

:::

:

Chinese.

Europeans.

Indians.

1

1

J. M. ATKINSON, Superintendent.

Total.

Chinese.

Total.

317

VI.-TABLE shewing the RATE of MORTALITY in the GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL during the last 10 Years.

Rate to Total Number of

Admissions.

Rate to Number of Europeans Rate to Number of Coloured Rate to Number of Chinese

Admitted.

Persons Admitted.

Admitted.

1880,

Per cent.

4.17

Per cent.

Per cent.

Per cent.

1880,

3.73

1880,

2.66

1880,

5.80

1881,

3.96

1881,

3.87

1881,

3.09

1881,

4.80

1882.

4.66 1882,

4.35

1882.

4.38

1882,

5.24

1883,

4.66

1883,

4.37

1883

3.01

1883.

6.08

1884,

3.69

1884,

3.15

1884,

1.24 1884,

6.08

1885,

5.03

1885,

4.65

1885,

3.06

1885,

7.01

1886,

4.86 1886,

4.25

1886,

4.66

1886,

5.73

1887,

5.37 1887,

4.50

1887,

4.56

1887,

6.96

1888,

4.51 1888,

3.96

1888,

4.70

1888,

4.98

1889,.

4.29

1889,

3.37 1889,

4.13

1889,

5.41

J. M. ATKINSON,

Superintendent.

VII.—TABLE shewing the ADMISSIONS into and DEATHS in the GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL

during each Month of the Year 1889.

MONTHS.

EUROPEANS.

COLOURED.

CHINESE.

Admissions. Deaths. Admissions. Deaths. Admissions. Deaths.

Total

Total

Admissions. Deaths.

Remaining on the 1st

January, 1889,.

26

January,

52

12

11

33

20

47

119

February,

25

27

30

March,

33

April,.

41

May,

50

June,.

93

July,

79

August,

91

September,

October, November,

60

67

77

December,.

47

CO.

18+ 20 10 00 19

18

1

42

20

3

47

32

63

58

32

54

45

3

63

34

2

53

CIŁO CO A CO CO CO 2 ·

298

70

93

108

145

189

165

199

147

42

1

50

159

40

1

58

175

13

1

82

142

13

0000 1000~7X~NOQ∞ 1-

9

2

3

Total,

741

25

372

16

680

36

1,793

MyMy

J. M. ATKINSON, Superintendent.

!.

318

VIIa.-TABLE of ADMISSIONS into and DEATHS in SMALL-POX HOSPITAL, 1889.

No.

Sex.

Nationality. Age.

Date of Admission.

Date of Discharge.

No. of Days in Hospital.

Description of Patient.

Result.

1

Male

Indian

23

5th January

22nd January

17

Private Paying

Recovered.

English 27

15th

24th

9

"

""

>>

Danish

33

28th

18th February

21

"

99

"

""

English

13

30th

6th March

35

Destitute

""

Female

11

11th February

2nd

19

29

"

""

Male

11th

6th

23

,,

"

وو

""

"2"

12th

2nd

18

39

>>

"J

39

8

Female

6

14th

2nd

16

22

"

9

Male

Chinese

24

1st April

15th April

14

10

Maltese

24

3rd

12th July

100

11

Malay

27

4th

وو

5th May

31

>>

P.C. No. 157 Destitute

35

""

99

21

"

12

Indian

36

6th

22

15th April

9

P.C. No. 695

""

13

Japanese 25

27th

".

8th May

11

Destitute

""

14

German

35

3rd May

13th July

71

Private Paying

""

15

Indian

18

7th

17th June

41

"

"

16

17

18

""

Spanish 20 Belgian 34 English

6th June

27th

21

35

99

31

15th August 22nd Sept.

2nd Sept. 30th October

18

The Board of Trade

"

19

37

22nd

30th

888888

38

دو

"

"3

38

>>

>>

"

""

""

""

J. M. ATKINson, Superintendent.

VII¿.—MONTHLY AGGREGATE NUMBER of PATIENTS visited in the HOSPITAL daily for 1889, 1888, and 1887.

Months.

1889.

1888.

1887.

January, February, March, April,

2,260

1,799

1,629

1,983

1,614

1,413

2,103

1,763

1,495

2,114

1,674

1,448

May,

June,

July,

August,

September,

2,356

1,880

1,681

2,617

2,258

1,847

2,720

2,125

1,787

2,866

2,025

1,908

2,338

2,243

1,987

October,

2,354

1,911

2,024

November,

2,344

1,983

1,879

December,

2,402

2,194

2,570

Total,...

28,457

23,469

21,668

J. M. ATKINSON, Superintendent.

VIII.—RETURN of DEAD BODIES brought by the POLICE to the PUBLIC MORTUARY during each Month of the Year 1889.

EUROPEANS AND AMERICANS.

OTHER NATIONAL-

CHINESE.

ITIES.

CAUSE OF DEATH REPORTED PROBABLE OR ASCERTAINED BY EXAMINATION.

ACCIDENTAL.

SUICIDAL.

HOMICIDAL.

Adults.

MONTHS.

January,

Female.

From Disease.

Drowning.

Cerebral and spi-

nal concussion.

Fracture of skull.

Burning.

Scalding.

Rupture of Viscera.

Asphyxia caused by land-

slips, fall of buildings, and by fire.

Lightning Stroke.

Strangulation.

Opium poisoning.

Arsenic poisoning.

Chloroform poisoning.|

Wounds produced by fire-arms. Hæmorrhage from

Incised Wounds.

Contused wounds. Drowning.

Hanging.

TOTAL.

Children. Adults. Children. Adults. Children.

:

Male.

:

Female.

Male.

Male.

Female.

February,

1

March,

April,

May,

June,

July,

August,

September,

October,

November,

December,

Female.

Male.

Female.

Male.

6

7

1

6

...

4 1

24

2

11

Female.

Male.

:

:

1

:

:

:

:

:

:.

1

3

1

1

...

:

:

:

10

:

:

:

2

:

:

1

:

:

:

:.

:

:

:

:

...

:

:

:

:

:

...

N

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

...

:

:

:

:

:

:

F

:

:

:

1

:

:

:

1

1

1

2

2

...

1

1

:

:

2

2

2

1

:

7

4

N

5

3

3

4

:

:

T

5

5

10

2

3

1

:

:

...

:

3

6

2 2

4

3

1

...

N

6

6

2

2

6 3

:.

:

:

:.

:

:

...

:

:

:.

:..

...

:

:

:

:

:.

:

:

:

1

:..

:

Total,.........

4

13

Q

2

10

1

15

1

1

2

120 17

4

11

:.

:

...

:

10

:

:

...

:

1

4

1

:

:

10

CO

6

:

3

48 37 1 11 6

4 13 10

:

CO

1

7

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:.

:

:

:.

:.

:

10

6

6

27

15

1

13

་་

1

1

15

12

...

:

18

1

2

:

:

.:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:.

:

:.

:

1

:

:..

:

1

:

10

117

Q

2

10

161

L. P. MARQUES,

Medical Officer in Charge of Post Mortem Examinations.

319

320

IX.-K.— TABLE shewing the ADMISSIONS into VICTORIA GAOL HOSPITAL and MORTALITY during the Year 1889.

DISEASES.

January.

February.

March.

April.

May.

June.

Admissions.-Europeans,

Chinese,

1

4

11

15

21

17

16

24

22

16

Other Nationalities,

: Nor

July.

August.

September.

October.

November.

December.

TOTAL.

4

32

14

21

24

210

2

Total Admissions,.............

12

16

22

18

18

28 27

22

18

25

28

10

244

Remained,-Europeans,

1

1

Chinese,..

Other Nationalities,

Total Remained,

10

15:

1

1

2

1

1

1

6

: :

10

19

11

10

12

10

11

19

10

11

7

7

.7

11

19.

12

12 : 13

11

12

Deaths,-Europeans,

Chinese,

Other Nationalities,

Febricula,

Total Deaths,

1

Intermittent Fever,

Remittent

་་

""

and Dysentery,

and Aortic Patency,

and Acute Pernicious Anæmia,

Hæmoptysis,

Phthisis Pulmonalis,

Catarrhal Bronchitis,

Plastic

Pleuro-pneumonia,

Pleurisy,

Aortic Patency,

Hypertrophy of Heart,

General Debility,

and Oedema of Legs,

>>

of Foot,

"

19

}

>>

(Old Age).

19

(Opium smoker),

Anæmia,

Scurvy,

Dyspepsia,

Jaundice,

Albumenuria,

Acute Bright's Disease,.

Chronic

>>

Cirrhosis of Liver,

Dropsy,..

Diarrhoea,

"

Dysentery,

Colic,

";

and Oedema of Foot,

and Intermittent Fever,

Hæmorrhoids,

Lumbrici,

Epileptiform Fits.

Delirium Tremens,.. Unsound Mind,

Carbuncle,

Erysipelas,

.......

and Abscess of Scrotum,

Scalds of Foot,

Conjunctivitis,

Sclerotitis,

and Ulcers of Cornea,

Hypertrophy of Lymphatic Glands of Neck,

Right Side,

Fracture and Abscess of Right Ulna,.

Dislocation of the Jaw,

Abscess of the Scalp,

Alveolar Abscess,

Abscess of Neck,.

of Arm,

39

of Knee,.

13

of Leg,

** of Foot,

"

Anal Fistula.

Stricture of Urethra and Hæmaturia,

Paraphimosis,

Orchitis,

"

and Abscess of Scrotum,

Soft Sore and Bubo,

Ecthyma (Secondary Syphilis),

Bruise of Knee-joint,..

Sprain of Right Ankle-joint,

Chronic Ulceration of Foot,...

:

::

1

1

1

1

1

1

:

323

:

1

1*

1*

1

1*

1*

1

1

1

3

3

2

1

1

Foot,

1

3

Deep Incised Wound of Right Arm,

Contused Wound of Left Thumb,

"

from Flogging,

Abscess from Flogging,.. Observation,

* Died.

1

2

1

-

4

4

5

8

16

3

6

3

28

1

: :

1

1

1

1

1

11

12

1

2

2

1

10

1

1

1

1

1

...

1

2

1

1

1

1

2

1

6

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

Ι

2

1

1

33

12

HI322

1

1

L. P.

MARQUES,

Medical Officer in Charge of Gaol Hospital.

:

Total Number of Prisoners

admitted to Gaol.

Sick in Hospital.

*

IXa.-L.-TABLE shewing the NUMBER of PRISONERS ADMITTED into VICTORIA GAOL HOSPITAL, on the First

Examination by the MEDICAL OFFICER, during the Year 1889.

Europeans.

Indians.

Chinese.

Total.

3,705

32

2

210

244

DISEASES.

GO

3

Europeans.

Admitted to Hospital on First Medical Examination.

Percentage of Hospital cases on

First Medical Examination.

Indians.

Chinese.

Total.

admissions.

To total Gaol

To total Hospital

cases.

Percentage of Hospital cases on First Medical Ex.

Europeans.

Chinese.

To total European

Hospital cases.

To total Chinese

Hospital cases.

25

28

0.755

11.40

9.687

11.90

X.-M.-TABLE shewing CASES not ADMITTED to HOSPITAL, treated by the MEDICAL OFFICER, during the Year 1889.

Hysteria and General Debility,

I.

Scurvy,

II.

Condylomata,....

III.

IV.

VIII.

Diarrhoea,

IX & X.

XI.

Mitral Regurgitation,

Prolapsus Uteri,

Synovitis of Left Knee-joint, Abscess of Left Knee-joint,

of Right Foot,

:

1

L. P. MARQUES.

Coloured

Europeans.

Chinese.

TOTAL.

Persons.

:

:

:

:

:

:

2

2

2

2

1

1

1

1.

1

1

1

121

1

2

2

"1

XII.

Whitlow,

Eczema,

Scabies,

1

2

77

77

127

Wounds and Injuries,—

Contused. Wound of Head,

1

1

-:

1

123

124

""

>>

from Flogging,.

1

1

215

217

TOTAL,........

L. P. MARQUES.

321

322

+

XI.-N.—TABLE shewing the RATE of SICKNESS and MORTALITY in VICTORIA GAOL, during the Year 1889.

Rate of Mortality.

Total No. of Prisoners admitted to Gaol.

Daily Average

Total Total

Sick

number of Prisoners.

in

Hospital.

Sick, Total Trifling Deaths. Sickness to

Cases.

Fercentagge of Serious

Total Sick.

Rate of Sickness

To Total No. of Admissions to Gaol.

To Daily Average.

To Total No. of Admissions to Gaol.

To Daily Average.

3,705

581

244

217

4

0.157

8.037

3.586

0.107

0.688

L. P. MARQUES.

XIa.-O.-CASES admitted to VICTORIA GAOL HOSPITAL at the first MEDICAL EXAMINATION by the MEDICAL OFFICER

during the Year 1889.

SENTENCE.

No.

DISEASES.

Years. M'ths. Days.

1 2 3 4 5 6

10

General Debility,

7

""

""

3

>

""

Fracture and Abscess of Right Ulna,

Chronic Ulceration of Left Foot,

Diarrhoea,

DATE OF ADMISSION.

DATE OF DISCHARGE.

REMARKS.

23rd Jan. 30th

5th Feb. 12th 11th Mar. 11th

30th Jan. 4th Feb.

"

11th 18th

""

"2

وو

20th April

42

19th Mar.

7

10

Bronchitis,

8

4

Sprain of Left Foot,.

>>

6th April 13th June

15th April

26th June

9

Observation,

10

21

Dropsy,

26th 29th

"3

"

11

14

General Debility, (Opium Smoker),

2nd July

12

35

Diarrhoea,

2nd

1st July 18th 12th "" 26th

On Remand.

""

""

""

13

2

General Debility, (Opium Smoker),

9th

10th

""

""

14

42

Cirrhosis of Liver,

15th

""

24th Aug.

15

35

Incised Wound of Left Foot,

18th

""

23rd July

16

42

General Debility, (Old Age),

17

9

Intermittent Fèver,

19th 24th

24th ""

29th

18

Delirium Tremens,

19

4

Plastic Bronchitis,

20

5

General Debility,

27th Aug. 28th

3rd Sept.

31st Aug.

Debtor.

22nd Oct.

""

6th Sept.

21

3

Chronic Bright's Disease,

14th

28th Oct.

""

22

14

General Debility,

23

24

Deep Incised Wound of Right Arm, Unsound Mind,..

4th Oct. 5th

12th

15th

""

25

21

26

21

Anæmia,

27

28

+

General Debility, (Opium Smoker),

General Debility, (Old Age),

Contused Wound of Left Thumb,

23rd

"

6th Nov.

""

7th Nov. 23rd Oct. 29th

""

14th Nov.

On Remand.

""

12th

""

3rd Dec.

10th Dec.

31st ">

L. P. MARQUES.

...

323

XIb.-P.-TABLE shewing the WEIGHTS of Prisoners (OPIUM SMOKERS), for the First Four Weeks' Confinement in VICTORIA GAOL, during the Year 1889.

LENGTH OF

No.

AGE. TIME OPIUM

CONSUMPTION

SMOKER.

per diem.

WEIGHT WHEN ADMITTED.

WEIGHT FIRST FOUR WEEKS.

REMARKS.

1st Week. 2nd Week. 3rd Week.| 4thWeek.

1234 10 6

29

36

26

60

22

JIA CAN

2 Years.

11 Mace.

100

lbs.

97

97

95

98

4

109

>>

25

111

110

108

109

5

1

102

100

98

99

100

"

27

"

4

1

110

106

104

103

102

""

29

1

1

75

73

73

78

79

""

41

10

96

90

87

86

86

""

47

20

>>

8

31

10

"

9

30

12

21 2

A

+

100

99

98

96

108

107

110 110

108

91

119

120

123

123

120

"

10

62

7

97

97

96

96

""

11

60

15

2

91

88

84

86

1

وو

87

12

44

20

115

115

114

113

110

""

39

13

32

4

"

1 1/

102

102

102

100

99

"

14

15

33

16

881

48

7

124

122

121

124

124

""

95

""

10

""

461

116

112

110

112

دو

60

20

109

106

104

103

103

"

15

17

38

10

2

97

A

93

94

94

93

""

18

22

6

11

90

>?

88

85

88

19

52

30

103

100

98

96

97

"9

""

20

43

20

1

90

99

97

""

""

91

92

21

48

30

100

99

29

A

100

104

108

22

40

20

""

AA

109

107

106

104

102

23

52

10

115

""

A

113 115 114

24

45

18

110

101

99

102

100

""

"

25

28

12

2

96

96

97

96

""

""

وو

26

32

10

94

93

93

92

""

"2

27

38

20

11

110

109

106

وو

109

""

""

28

25

5

115

113

114

110 110

23

29

24

8

92

97

96

94

92

30

42

20

91

97

96

94

""

31

54

20

80

82

87

88

87

""

""

32

43

20

""

33

29

10

""

***

135

132

""

134 132

130

98

98

96

96

"

34

38

20

1

103

100

101

104

103

>>

"

*

""

35

62

30

105

""

"

"

*

104

102 101

102

36

68

30

98

95

95

96

96

""

""

37

52

25

116

33

39

">

117

115

114

115

38

40

10

""

12

94

95

97

97

97

A

39

31

10

1

102

>>

103

102

103 104

وو

99

40

26

3

1

95

93

100

""

""

41

30

8

وو

1/1/

90

دو

وو

100 101

88

87 87

42

45

12

2

117

116

115

119

121

""

""

93

43

47

15

""

1 1/

94

93

92

96

100

""

""

44

31

10

1

90

93

93

93

94

و,

55

22

45

40

15

46

40

18

1

"2

47

36

16

59

Hamama

113

110

110

108

112

29

""

75

74

75

74

78

23

>>

107

107

106

104

""

48

27

1

1

100

99

101

""

>2

"

49

48

10

1호

91

""

☺ ☺

102 102

89

89

94

985

95

XIC.-TABLE shewing OPIUM SMOKERS admitted into HOSPITAL and treated by the MEDICAL OFFICER,

during the Year 1889.

DISEASE.

Remaining under treatment 1st January, 1889,......

General Debility, Opium Smoker,

TOTAL,........

ADMISSION.

Coloured

Europeans.

Chinese.

Total.

Persons.

:

8

ос

00

8

00

8

324

XId.-TABLE shewing the NUMBER and DESCRIPTION of PATIENTS treated in the GOVERNMENT LUNATIC ASYLUM,

during the Year 1889.

No.

Native of

Sex. Age.

Disease.

1234

5678

Date of Admission.

Date of Discharge.

No. of Days in Asylum.

Description of Patients.

Barbadoes,

Ireland,

Finland,

Sweden,

China,

Macao, Ireland,. England,

M. 22

M.

EEEE EEEE

M. 31

M.

M.

M.

F.

M.

2*** 23a :

Mania,

1st Jan.

31st Dec.

365

34

Dementia,

"

**

2nd April.

92

42

Imbecility,

17th June.

167

The Board of Trade. Private Paying.

Destitute.

*

**

46

General Paralysis of the

Insane,

19th Feb.

23rd July.

154

Private Paying.

31

Mania,

1st Jan.

31st Dec.

365

Destitute.

40

Dementia,

8th April.

16th April.

8

Destitute.

Mania,

17th Oct.

31st Dec.

76

Private Paying.

Monomania,

13th Dec.

31st

19

Private Paying.

* Died in the Asylum.

PH. B. C. AYRES, Colonial Surgeon.

XII. TABLE of STATISTICS relating to the TUNG WA HOSPITAL, during the Year 1889.

Remaining in Hospital 31st Dec., 1888.

Admitted during the year 1889.

No. of Cases Treated in the

Hospital, 1889.

No. of Patients Discharged during the year 1889.

Male.

Female.

72

Total.

*a[GIR

Female,

Died during 1889.

No. of Out-Patients Treated during 1889.

Moribund Cases,

1889.

Remaining in Hospital

31st Dec.,

1889.

Female.

Total.

Male.

Female.

16

88

1,748

302 2,050 1,748

302 2,050 930 112 1,042

807

204 1,011 103,617

40,864 144,481

218

$8

1890].

306

80 5 85

J. J. CLERIHEW,

Inspector of Nuisance,

Western Health District.

XIII.-CASES of SMALL-POX treated at the TUNG WA HOSPITAL, during the Year 1889.

Remaining in Hospital

31st December, 1888.

Admitted during 1889.

Discharged 1889.

Died 1889.

Remaining in Hospital 31st December, 1889.

Male. Female. Total. Male. Female. Total. Male. Female. Total. Male. Female. Total. Male. Female. Total.

:

2

d

:

2

2

:

J. J. CLERIHEW,

Inspector of Nuisance,

Western Health District.

XIV.—VACCINATION performed during the Year 1889 by TRAVELLING VACCINATORS of the TUNG WA HOSPITAL.

In the City of Victoria.

In Out-District.

Total.

2,376

118

2,494

J. J. CLERIHEW,

Inspector of Nuisance,

Western Health District.

:

XV.-LOCK HOSPITAL.

TABLE A

SHEWING the ADMISSIONS into the GOVERNMENT LOCK HOSPITAL, during the 32 Years of its Existence, with the Number of DIETS issued and the AVERage Length of TREATMENT.

ADMISSIONS.

NUMBER OF DIETS ISSUED.

AVERAGE Number of Days Treated.

1858,

124

1858,

4,797

1858,

43.8

1859,

162

1859,

5,389

1859,

30.8

1860,

361

1860.

9,107

1860,

23.7

1861,

442

1861,

10,778

1861

23.4

1862,

485

1862,

12,193 1862.

22.0

1863,

420

1863,.

11,707

1863..

23.7

1864,

442 1864,.

11,940

1864,

27.0

1865,

390

1865,

11,303

1865,

28.0

1866,

406 1866.

13,060

1866,

28.6

1867,

434

1867

13,120

· 1867,

25.5

1868,

579

1868,

16,462

1868,

23.6

1869,

546

1869.

16,779

1869,.

24 8

1870,

722

1870,

18,382

1870,

23.1

1871,

593

1871,.

12,308

1871..

185

1872,

656

1872,

15,103

1872,

20.9

1873,

500

1873,

11,219

1873,

19.5

1874,

345

1874,

6,814

1874.

18.6

1875,

134

1875,

2,916

1875,

18.7

1876,

168

1876,

2,730

1876,

14.3

1877,

177

1877,

3,069

1877.

16.6

1878,

105

1878,.

2,242

1878,.

190

1879,

129 1879.

2,199

1879,

13.6

1880,

57

1880,

1,300

1880,

14.7

1881,

44

1881,

1,330

1881.

21.7

1882,

99

1882,

1,881

1882,

15,5

1883,

278

1883,..

3.451

1883,

12.0

1884,

325

1884,.

5,174

1884,.

13.1

1885,

411

1885,

6,161

1885.

15.6

1886,

401

1886.

4,837

1885,

12.2

1887,

144

1887

2,014

1887,

13.9

66

1888,..

1,616

1888,..

24.4

1889,

84

1889,....

1,540

1889,..

18.3

Number of Beds in

Lock Hospital.

Number admitted

to Hospital

on Certificates of Visiting Surgeon.

32

84

Number

who submitted voluntarily.

269

Daily Average, 4.21. Longest stay 60 days.

PH. B. C. AYRES, Colonial Surgeon.

TABLE B.

CONTAGIOUS DISEASES.

KETURN of the NUMBER of PROSTITUTES during the Year 1889.

Total Number brought under the Provisions of the Ordinance.

Total Number of Examinations made during the Year.

Total Number of Examinations made when no Disease was found.

-

NUMBER DISCHARGED FROM HOSPITAL.

No. discharged free from Disease who still follow their former Pursuits.

Number who have returned to their Friends or Emigrated.

Total Number Discharged.

269

10,924

TABLE C.

10,837

CONTAGIOUS DISEASES RETURN for the Year 1889.

of Females

Total No.

admitted

into Lock Military Naval Police Civil Hospital. Hospital. Hospital. Hospital. Hospital.

| TOTAL NUMBER OF MEN DISEASED

ADMITTED INTO

Total No. of Men Diseased.

AVERAGE NUMBER OF MEN IN Garrison and PORT (per month).

Mer- Soldiers. Seamen. Police. ❘ chant

Average No. of Men in Garrison and Port Seamen. (per month).

Every day, Sundays and Government holidays excepted.

Average Percentage of Men Diseased (per month).

84

452

349

65

132

998

1,596

1,328 758

13,433 17,115

0.485

83

---

83

PH. B. C. AYRES, Colonial Surgeon.

REMARKS.

TABLE D.

PH. В. C. AYRES, Colonial Surgeon.

RETURN of WOMEN examined and treated in the GOVERNMENT LOCK HOSPITAL during the Year 1889.

EXAMINATION.

HOSPITAL.

DISCHARGED.

10,924

84

10,837

DISEASES.

No. remaining in

Hospital, 31st

December, 1888.

Admitted.

Total Treated.

Cured.

No. remaining in

Hospital, 31st December, 1889.

Primary Syphilis, uncomplicated, Gonorrhoea,

do..

Do., and Primary Syphilis, combined, Leucorrhoea and Cystitis,

Warts,........

1

67

68

11

12

2*

822

67

12

1

1

1

1

1

1

TOTAL...

2

82

84

82

1

* One died of Remittent Fever.

PH. B. C. AYRES, Colonial Surgeon.

325

326

TABLE E.

CONTAGIOUS DISEASES RETURN for the Year 1889.

DISEASES.

Primary Syphilis, uncomplicated,

Gonorrhoea, uncomplicated,

Do.,

Gonorrhoea and

and Primary Syphilis, combined,

do.,

do.,

Primary and Secondary Syphilis, combined,

Primary and Secondary Syphilis and Gonorrhoea,

Gleet,

Military Hospital.

Naval Hospital.

Police Hospital.

Civil Hospital.

*222

139

+22

48

139

146

39

15

81 3

72

30

19

6

13

† 3

...

TOTAL,...

.1889,......

452

349

65

132

TOTAL,

.1888,.....

401

244

46

68

TOTAL,..

..1887,......

222

268

70

54

TOTAL,.

...1886,..............

216

235

25

65

* 172 Cases Ulcer of Penis included in Admission for Primary Syphilis. † 2 Cases contracted in Glasgow.

Pн. B. C. AYRES, Colonial Surgeon.

TABLE E 2.

CONTAGIOUS DISEASES ORDINANCE.

TABLE shewing the number of NAVAL MEN admitted into NAVAL HOSPITAL, during the Year 1889.

SECONDARY SYPHILIS.

January, February, March, April, May, June,.

July,

........

August,.

September,

October,

November,

December,

Months.

Contracted in Hongkong.

Contracted Elsewhere.

Total.

1

6

1

1

1

2

...

1

2

...

Total Number,......

TABLE E 3.

6

1

18- 2212 :-40

1

4

10

10

30

CONTAGIOUS DISEASES ORDINANCE.

TABLE shewing the number of MILITARY MEN admitted into MILITARY HOSPITAL, during the Year 1889.

SECONDARY SYPHILIS.

January,. February, March,

Months.

Contracted in Hongkong.

Contracted Elsewhere.

Total.

4

5

9

April,

May,

June,

July,

3

1

August,..

19

September,

8

October,

November,

December,

2

.....

3

4

5

9

8

7

3

1

19

8

2

3 3

Total Number,.......

72

327

XVI.—TABLE shewing the rate of MORTALITY among the FOREIGN RESIDENTS in Hongkong during the last 10 Years.

Years.

Number of European and American Residents.

Deaths.

Percentage of Deaths to Number of Residents.

1880,

1881,

1882,

1883,

1884,

1885,

1886,

1887,

1888,

1889,

2,767

69

2.49

3,040

64

2.10

3,040

55

1.80

3,040

81

2.06

3,040

94

3.09

3,040

99

3.25

3,040

103

3.38

3,040

108

3.55

3,040

122

4.01

3,040

93

3.06

Average of 10 Years,.

30.127

88.8

28:79

Enclosure 1.

Report from the Superintendent of the Civil Hospital.

GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL,

HONGKONG, 19th April, 1890.

SIR,-I have the honour to forward the Annual Report for the year 1889 with the Hospital Statistics.

I. THE HOSPITAL BUILDINGS.

1. The main building of the Hospital has remained unaltered.

2. The new wing consisting of four public wards providing accommodation for 56 patients and two private wards providing accommodation for 4 patients has now been completed, making in all a total accommodation for 130 patients within the Hospital buildings.

There is also provision for two European Wardmasters in this wing which is in many respects better suited for the purpose than the old Male Lock Hospital now occupied by the French Sisters the lavatory and bathing accommodation is however insufficient.

3. The Male Lock Hospital has been considerably altered in order to provide temporary accom- modation for the Female Nursing Staff pending the completion of the New Block now under con-

struction.

4. The new Mortuary situated between the Porter's Lodge and the main building has been completed during the past year, this additional and improved accommodation cannot be without bene- fit to the Institution.

5. The foundations of the new Barracks situated to the west of the main block for the Chinese Nursing Staff are now being prepared. This building when completed will supply a much needed want, as the present accommodation for the Chinese Nurses is both very inadequate and insanitary.

6. Adverting to the insufficient bathing and lavatory accommodation in the new wing I would suggest that the open space to the east be utilised for providing suitable lavatories and that hot water be laid on to both floors and the baths themselves replaced by others similar to those in use in the main building.

7. Referring to the recommendations contained in my report of last year I regret to say that as yet there are no signs of providing a suitable laundry, increased office, store accommodation, and better facilities for the distribution of hot water, the need of which is yearly becoming more evident with the increased number of patients and amount of work done as will be seen from Table VII 6 in the Appendix.

8. Further extension is required for private patients :-

If this Institution is to continue to meet the public requirements in this respect early steps should be taken to provide accommodation for patients of this class. In view of the increase that has taken place during the last two years it appears that additional accommodation should be provided for 6 first class and 8 second class patients. During the past year I have been unable on many occasions to provide private patients with the accommodation requested.

328

The following figures will shew the increase in the first and second class private patients during the past year.

First Class patients,

Second Class patients,

1888.

1889.

6

17

12

32

9. I have also to call attention to the increased traffic along Hospital Road which is detrimental to the rest of the patients, especially in the early hours of the morning, and would suggest that the road be closed as a thoroughfare between the hours of 8 P.M. and 8 A.M.

10. The improvements recently carried out in the buildings in this neighbourhood have, I regret to say, led to the property being used as Chinese Boarding Houses the result being that the quiet pre- viously enjoyed by the patients is no longer obtainable hence the importance of the Government as far as it is feasible doing all in its power to prevent innovations of this kind.

II.--SMALL-POX HOSPITAL.

11. The temporary small-pox buildings remain as before.

12. After careful consideration the construction of a hospital ship for the reception of all cases of infectious disease has been decided upon, and no time should be lost in completing and placing it at the disposal of this Department.

13. I recommend that the present premises after a little alteration be used as Reception Wards where all suspected cases of infectious disease should be retained for observation before removal to the Hulk.

III.-ADDITIONAL OFFICERS' QUARTERS.

14. This building situated at the corner of High Street and Eastern Street is not yet completed but it is to be hoped that it will be finished ready for occupation before the end of this year.

IV.-HOSPITAL PREMISES.

15. Flower beds have been laid down in the recreation grounds but from the nature of the soil improvements of this nature have been found difficult, but with the kind assistance of Mr. FORD their present condition is a marked improvement on that previously existing. The present staff consisting of one gardener is insufficient to keep the gardens as they ought to be kept. I therefore submit that in framing the Estimates for next year an assistant should be allowed for this purpose.

16. The suggestions contained in my report of last year have not yet been carried out viz.:-

1st. The substitution of a low parapet wall surmounted by a substantial open iron railing in place of the present high wall along the Hospital Road frontage of the premises adjoining the main building.

2nd. The substitution of an iron railing instead of the present temporary bamboo fence along the High Street frontage of the grounds adjoining the Superintendent's house and used as a recrea- tion ground for the convalescent patients.

17. The insecurity of the Hospital premises on the north side also requires attention.

V.-THE HOSPITAL STAFF.

18. An Assistant Medical Superintendent, a long needed want in this Institution, was appointed by the Secretary of State and Dr. TOOGOOD assumed the duties of this office on the 28th July though unfortunately he resigned his appointment on the 10th September, but I am pleased to say the vacancy was filled by the appointment of Dr Lowson on the 1st of November.

19. Mr. CROW on the arrival of the Sanitary Superintendent returned to devote the whole of his time to the duties of Government Analyst and Senior Apothecary.

20. Mr. WATSON resigning his appointment of Assistant Apothecary, on 31st May we were de- prived of the services of this officer. I take this opportunity of bearing testimony to the able and conscientious way in which he always performed his duties and regret very much to have lost his

services.

21. Mr. ROGERS, the steward, left on the 10th January on a twelve months' leave of absence-a rest well deserved by this hard working and conscientious officer. Arrangements were made so that Mr. WATSON should fulfil this officer's duties. On Mr. WATSON's resignation Mr. WYLIE, the Ward- master in charge of the Lunatic Asylum, was appointed acting steward.

22. The two Chinese Apothecaries' assistants Mr. U I KAI and Mr. CHAU KAM-TSÜN have performed their duties to my entire satisfaction.

1

329

23. The clerical department has been increased by the appointment of Mr. LEUNG FU-CHU which was necessitated by the additional work caused by the increase in the number of the patients. I take this opportunity of thanking the Government for the additional assistance granted me.

VI. NURSING STAFF.

24. During the year this has been considerably improved by the appointment of two Army Medi- cal Staff Corps men as European Wardmasters a recommendation made by me last year and based on my previous experience of such officers at the Kensington Infirmary.

25. Wardınaster CHAPMAN arrived in the Colony on 17th January and forthwith commenced his duties; he has had seven years' experience in the Army Medical Staff Corps and is in every way a typical man for the post he now fills. I cannot speak too highly of the way in which he has always carried out his duties.

26. It is with much regret that I have to report the resignation of Wardmaster CARNEIRO in charge of the Small-pox Hospital owing to failing health. This officer had, I am given to understand, faithfully served the Government for upwards of thirteen years and had on several occasions es- pecially during the small-pox epidemic of 1887-88 performed arduous duties to my entire satisfaction, and I know his attention to patients generally has been very paiseworthy. He was laid up for the last two months of the year with bronchitis and cardiac disease he improved very much towards the end of December and much against my wish left the Hospital on the 31st of that month, he unfor- tunately had a relapse two weeks later and medical assistance was sent for but too late to be of any service.

VII. CHINESE NURSING STAFF.

27. CHAN A-LOK, the Chinese Wardmaster, resigned on the 13th July after twenty-five years' service. This officer has always shewn great interest in his work and I am sorry to lose his services.

28. I have again to report a considerable amount of sickness amongst the Nursing Staff, out of 63 officers 23 were warded during the year 11 of these were cases of malarial fever, mostly of a mild type. No officer died during the year. When the Chinese barracks are finished I hope to find a considerable diminution in this respect.

VIII.-WORK DONE DURING THE YEAR.

29. Attached to this report are the following Tables :--

I.-Shewing the admissions into and deaths in the Government Civil Hospital during each month of the year, of the Police.

II.--Shewing the rate of sickness and mortality in the Police Force during the year.

III.-Police return of admissions to Hospital from each district during the year.

V.-General Return of the Sick treated in the Hospital.

Va.-Surgical operations performed during the year.

Vb.-Zymotic Diseases, sub-group 1.

Vc.-

""

""

""

2.

Vd.-Diagram shewing number of cases of Malarial Fever admitted in each month of the year. Ve.-Zymotic Diseases, sub-group 3.

Vf.- Vg.-

""

,,

""

>>

4.

5.

VI. Shewing the rate of mortality in the Government Civil Hospital during the last 10 years. VII. Shewing the admissions into and deaths in the Government Civil Hospital during each month of last year.

VIIa.-Table of admissions into and deaths in the Small-pox Hospital.

VIIb. The aggregate monthly number of patients visited in the Hospital daily for the last three This last table is a better criterion of the work done as it shews the number of in-patients visited per day for the whole year.

years.

30. From the foregoing it will be seen :-

(1.) That the number of patients under treatment in the Hospital during the year was 1,793 an increase of 21 as compared with the previous year, the total number of deaths was 79, thus giving a percentage of deaths 4·29, as against 4.51 of 1888 and 5·37 of 1887. Of these 79 deaths, 36 occurred within forty-eight hours after admission.

330

(2.) In addition to this there were 5,264 out-patients attended to during the year, this includes the minor surgery cases treated in the Receiving Ward; these were principally scalp wounds, lacerated and contused wounds, dog bites, &c.

(3.) Out of the total number of in-patients 89 were females an increase of 21 as compared with last year, 5 of these were difficult obstetric cases all requiring instrumental assistance. It is to be re- gretted that the Chinese women do not seek assistance earlier, when they do come it is simply as a last resource. Now that we have a competent Chinese amah in charge of the native female ward—a nurse who was well trained at Dr. KERR's hospital in Canton-I should not be surprised if more Chinese women avail themselves of the advantages of skilled hospital treatment.

(4.) There were 67 less Police admitted than during the previous year further on examining the different nationalities it will be seen there was an increase of 19 European, a diminution of 49 Indian and of 37 Chinese Police.

I regret to have to record the deaths of 5 European Police from remittent fever of a par- ticularly malignant type.

During the past year there has been a greater prevalence of malarial cases no doubt a result of the severe rain-storms of last May.

The enormous down-pour of rain washed down great quantities of alluvial soil from the many landslips which occurred on the hillsides, this being deposited on the lower levels with the high tem- perature and the excessive humidity gives all the conditions necessary for the evolution of malaria.

(5.) There has been a remarkable immunity from cholera, and epidemic diarrhoea.

(6.) Dysentery contributed 124 cases, more than twice as many as in the previous year, with 9 deaths giving a mortality of 7-25 per cent. as against 9-26 last year. There is no doubt that dysentery and malarial fever are intimately connectel as to their causation, the increase during the past year being coincident with the increase in malarial fever cases bears this out.

(7.) Malarial fever contributed 423 cases as against 371 last year with 10 deaths giving a mortality of 2.36 per cent. This disease was much more fatal this year, the remittent cases being of a parti- cularly malignant type.

By far the greater majority of these cases were of the intermittent type viz.: 384 out of 423. I classify all those as interinittent in which with an initial high temperature often as high as 105° F. or 106° F. the temperature falls on the next morning to 99° F. or just above normal. In our treatment of these cases we have found the best result from the administration during the stage of fever of antipyrin in 10-grain doses repeated every hour until the temperature falls to within a degree of normal; this result is generally obtained after four or five doses, if the bowels have not been open in the previous twenty-four hours before giving the antipyrin one of Livingstone's powders containing 4 grains of calomel, 5 grains of quinine and 20 grains of compound Jalap powder is administered. As soon as the temperature has fallen quinine is administered in 5-grain doses every hour the result generally being that the temperature does not rise so high by 2 or 3 degrees as in the initial paroxysm of fever.

If we find the temperature is not kept down to this extent by these doses of quinine, after again giving the antipyrin as before, on the following morning after the fall has occurred quinine is given in 10-grain doses every hour and there are very few cases in which the fever does not succumb to this treatment and in from five to six days the patient is practically convalescent.

We have not lost one case of intermittent fever during the year.

Antipyrin certainly seems very efficacious in these cases, it promotes free perspiration and under its administration the temperature falls much quicker than when diaphoretics or other antipyretics are given.

In many mild cases in which the temperature only rises to say 102° or 103° F. in the initial stage a combination of antipyrin and quinine in the proportion of 8 grains of the former to 5 grains of the latter given every 4 hours is all that is necessary, the fever often succumbing to this treatment in three or four days.

Notwithstanding the large doses of quinine, in many cases as much as 2 drachms being given in the twenty-four hours, very few bad effects are produced and then only in a few cases tinnitus or slight deafness.

In the remittent type the patient is always much more prostrate, there is generally bilious vomiting present and the temperature does not fall more than a couple of degrees notwithstanding the hourly administration of antipyrin.

These cases during the past year have been of a peculiarly malignant type the nervous symptoms were much more marked and the temperature rapidly rose to as high as 107° F. or even 108° F., and in some cases 108.6° F. was registered, urgent measures are then required. As a rule when this occurs the stomach will reject everything.

331

I have tried antipyrin injected subcutaneously, aconite and large doses of quinine all without avail and now when such rise has taken place our sheet anchor is "ice-packing." by this I mean that, the patient is placed on a mackintosh sheet covered with a sheet dipped in ice cold water and exposed to any breeze that may be present, ice being placed all over the patient and an ice bag to the head.

Generally in less than half an hour the temperature will fall as much as nine or ten degrees. The patient has to be carefully watched as collapse may set in, if it does this is combatted by enemata of brandy and beef tea or injections (hypodermic) of brandy.

When the temperature has fallen the patient is placed in a fresh bed and hot baths applied to the feet, the hypodermic solution of the neutral hydrobromate of quinine in 10-grain doses is then in- jected this is repeated in an hour and again in another hour. In many cases such energetic treatment will only be once necessary as the temperature does not rise so high at the next paroxysm and the patient gradually improves. In the interval champagne and soda water, Brand's essence of beef, ice and iced milk are administered in small doses repeated frequently. No ill results in the way of pneumonia, &c. have followed such treatment and by its means many of the severer cases have recovered. See Appendix (medical cases).

In some of the worst cases the temperature notwithstanding this will rise again as high as in the initial paroxysm then nothing appears to be of any avail death rapidly ensuing the patient's temper- ature frequently rising as high as 110° F. or 110.4° F.

The Table of malarial fever cases shews plainly the rise which occurs during the hot rainy season (June-September), the rise in November was probably caused by the fact that the hot weather con- tinued later on in October this year than is usual, the first spell of cold weather brought about a recrudescence of the disease in those who had been previously attacked the greater majority of these cases giving a history of a previous attack of malarial fever.

(8.) There were 32 cases of beri-beri under treatment, with 2 deaths as against 16 in the pre- vious year. Two of these were of the acute variety (Beri-beri hydrops) one recovering, the remainder were of the chronic variety (Beri-beri atrophia) one death occurring.

(9.) VENEREAL DISEASES.-There has been a marked increase in this class of diseases the numbers being 206 as against 118 in the previous year. Although many of these cases have been introduced into the Colony from other ports, I have no reason to believe that this has been more so than in the previous year. It therefore appears evident that the propagation of this class of disease within the limits of the Colony has increased, the greater majority are those suffering from Chancres Molles and Gonorrhea; the resulting buboes have been of a particularly indolent type many taking weeks to heal and then only after incision and the free use of Volkmann's spoon, this is no doubt accounted for by the fact that many of these cases occur in patients debilitated by previous attacks of malaria and alcholism.

(10.) There was one case of hydrophobia during the year, a Chinese boy at. 16 who had been bitten by a mad dog in Canton two months before his adinission who was violently convulsed when admitted, hypodermic injections of Curari (-grain doses) were administered every half hour for three hours and although the paroxysms were lessened the improvement was only temporary. Chloro- form was then administered for some 1 hours, during its influence the paroxysms again abated, but it had to be discontinued owing to weakness of the pulse. The paroxysms again recurred and he died nine hours after admission.

(11.) SURGICAL OPERATIONS.-During the year there have been 109 operations performed. There were five cases of gun-shot wounds admitted during the year the notes of three of which are given in the Appendix as being of some surgical interest.

HEPATIC ABSCESS.-There were three cases during the year all of which were operated on; two of which died. Post Mortem Examination shewed that these were post dysenteric and multilocular, in one case as many as fourteen abscesses were present. Although a large abscess had been opened in each case causing a temporary improvement, during treatment lasting in one for some weeks, an exacerbation set in and a fatal result ensued.

The third case was operated on in December last and improved very much after operation so much so that the fever entirely subsided and the patient was able to get up and walk about. The improvement continued the patient increasing in weight so that we had great hopes that this was a unilocular abscess, unfortunately the temperature arose on 23rd January he became much worse and died on 29th of that month. Post mortem examination shewed that the cause of this was the formation of three more abscesses, one about the size of an orange situated in the posterior part of the right lobe, the others being smaller. The original abscess which had been opened in November had healed up.

There is no doubt that dysentery was the cause of these abscesses as in each case there were well marked signs of previous ulceration in the colon.

MAJOR AMPUTATIONS.-There were four cases during the year, one of the arm and one of the thigh for extensive disease of the elbow and knee joint respectively, and one of the fore-arm and one of the leg for severe injury, all of these were attended with satisfactory results.

:

332

Amongst the other operations may be mentioned one of successful trephining for compound depressed fracture of the frontal bone, and one of excision of the hip-joint for advanced strumous disease. The notes of these cases were read before the Hongkong Medical Society the patients being present, the latter being also successful.

FRACTURES AND DISLOCATIONS.-In addition to the surgical operations the following cases of fracture and dislocation were successfully treated during the year :-

Compound Fracture of femur

fibula

>>

"}

""

tibia and fibula

""

>>

29

>>

""

Fracture of humerus

25

olecranon

ulna

""

femur

tibia

""

19

""

""

""

ankle joint

.....

tibia and fibula

clavicle

Compound dislocation of knee joint

Dislocation of shoulder (Subcoracoid)

""

olecranon

.1

1

..1

.1

2

.1

1

2

.1

.2

1

2

..2

1

In two of these cases the union was somewhat delayed--in one there was a compound fracture of right tibia and fibula and a comminuted fracture of left tibia and fibula these bones however ul- timately became firmly united,

(12.) Alcoholism contributed 44 cases of which 5 proved fatal, in three of the cases the patient was suffering from other diseases.

(13.) There were twelve cases of poisoning under treatment, ten of which were from opium of which six arrived too late for treatment; of the remaining two in one the poisonous agent was arsenic, and in the other stramonium.

Added to this Report are the notes of some cases of Surgical and Medical interest.

I also include a report of the cases treated in the Temporary Small-pox Hospital.

31. During the year thirty Post Mortem Examinations have been made.

32. The various appendices are as follows:-

Appendix A.-Notes of Medical Cases.

B.-Notes of Surgical Cases.

C.-Report of Small-pox Hospital.

D.-Some observations on the blood, &c. of patients suffering from Malarial Fever. 33. The total amount of fees received from patients during the year was $11,444.49 of this the Board of Trade paid $2,163.00 and the Police $1,068.62. This is by far the largest amount yet re- ceived in any one year and shows an increase of $1,639.34 on that of the previous year deducting the fees received from the small-pox patients during the last two years the increase is $2,539.47.

This sum corresponding to over $200 a month was received from the increased number of private patients treated during the year, as the Board of Trade and Police paid slightly less than in

year 1888.

the

34. I wish to thank the Naval and Military Surgeons and the Civil Doctors for their able assistance frequently rendered, particularly at operations.

GIFTS OF FLOWERS, NEWSPAPERS, &c.

I take this opportunity of thanking many residents of the Colony for numerous presents of newspapers, books, &c., and particularly several ladies for their visits and gifts of flowers to the pa-

tients.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your obedient Servant,

J. MITFORD ATKINSON, M.B., (Lond.),

Superintendent of the Government

Civil Hospital.

}

.

333

Appendix A.

CASE OF MALARIAL FEVER.

I.—MIXED INTERMITTENT AND REMITTENT. HIGH TEMPERATURE. RECOVERY.

Admitted August 5th, 1889, 10.45 A.M.

A. W. ct. 22, sailor,

On admission patient stated that he had been feeling unwell for the last two days, his temperature was: 103:2° F. the following was prescribed:

Re Tr. Aconit m iv.

dm

Mist. Diaphoret 3i. 4 horis sam.

Low diet, milk and soda water was ordered; his temperature rose that evening to 105.6° F. the medicine was continued every four hours, during the night profuse perspiration set in and the next morning (the 6th) at 6 A.M. his temperature had fallen to 984°, a 5-grain dose of quinine was then administered, at 9 A.M. his temperature was 98:50, ten grains of quinine were now ordered every two hours and his temperature that day rose only to 99° F. (8 P.M.).

The next morning his temperature rose to 99.6° F. and in the evening at. 8 P.M. was 101° F. The quinine was now discontinued and the aconite mixture given every 4 hours-the next morning the temperature fell to 99° F. the quinine was again given every two hours in 10-grain doses-that evening the temperature rose to 100° F. the next morning (8th) it was down to 97.8° the quinine was given as before, a mutton chop was ordered and the highest temperature recorded that day was 98.5° F. the following day it was normal and as the patient felt quite well-at his own request he was discharged from the Hospital.

Temperature chart (No. 1.) Appended.

This patient was re-admitted on August 28th at 7.50 A.M. with a temperature of 105° F. he said he had been well since his discharge from the Hospital until the previous day when the fever came on again. The following prescription was ordered as his skin was very dry.

R. Antipyrin, grs. XV.

Tr. Jaborandi m., xxx. Mist. Diaphoret ad., zi.

2 horis sdm.

with low diet, milk and soda water, 8 P.M. his temperature had fallen to 101-6, 12 midnight tem perature 102°; 29th August 6.30 A.M. temperature 102.8° as his bowels had not been opened for the previous 24 hours the following powder was ordered.

R. Calomel, gr. IV.

e

Quinine, gr. v.

Pulv. Rhei Co. ad grs. xv.

st. sdm. medicine as before.

midday temperature 105° F. 2.15 p.m. temperature 106.2° patient now vomited everything, so the medicine was discontinued; at 3 P.M. his temperature was 108° F. and at 3.45 P.M. it had risen to 108.2°.

As patient was now comatose and skin very dry, ice packing was at once commenced he being placed on a mackintosh sheet covered with a sheet dipped in ice-cold water which was changed every few minutes and ice packed all over his body-at 4.15 his temperature had fallen to 104.2° 20 minims of the neutral hydrobromate solution of quinine (1 in 6) was now injected hypodermically, ice packing being continued, for the next few hours his temperature was as follows:-

4.50 P.M. 5.15 5.45 6.30

""

>>

....103° F. ...102° F.

..........100° F.

99° F.

The ice packing was now discontinued and as he was slightly collapsed hot water bottles were applied and brandy administered internally. At 6.45 P.M. his temperature was 98.2°. Ten grains of quinine were now ordered every two hours which was retained, at 9 P.M. temperature 101-4°. 30th 6.45 A.M. temperature 101.6°; 9 A.M. temperature 102.4°.

R. Antipyrin, grs. XV.

Aq. ad. zi.

2 horis sdm.

That evening it rose to 102.8° and fell during the night to 100-8°.

31st. Temperature in morning 102-6° and at 8 P.M. 103° F. during the night it fell to 100. Grains viii of quinine were now given every 2 hours in place of the antipyrin, as temperature rose next morning (1st September) to 103° the antipyrin was substituted that evening temperature fell to 101° F. and registered 100-4° at 8 A.M. on the 2nd only rising to 101.4° this day, two doses of anti- pyrin were given, and it again fell. One pint of chicken broth was now added to his diet.

334

The after course of the case will be seen from the chart (No. 2.) by the 10th the temperature had fallen to normal, and fish diet was now given, it took the patient some time to regain his strength. On the 12th full diet and the following medicine was prescribed.

R. Eastonii Syrupi, 3ss. Aq. ad zi. tdsdm.

He was discharged cured on the 20th September.

REMARKS.-The first attack was evidently one of intermittent fever, the second being of the remittent type. In these severe cases I am firmly of opinion that the only way to combat the fever is by the application of external cold and administering quinine hypodermically as soon as the tem- perature falls, it being useless to give it by the mouth as the stomach will not retain anything.

II.-CASE OF REMITTENT FEVER. HIGH TEMPERATURE. DEATH.

H. P. æt. 23, Scotch, Police Constable.

Admitted to Hospital at 8 P.M. 11th August, 1889. Temperature on admission 102-8° F., the following medicine was ordered :-

R. Antipyrin, grs. x.

Aq. ad. 3i. 2 horis sdm.

Temperature fell during the night and at 8 A.M. on the 12th was 99.8°, 5 grains of quinine were now ordered every hour, at midday the temperature was 100-2° F. One dose of antipyrin was substituted for the quinine and at 2 PM. the temperature was 99°, in the afternoon the temperature had risen to 99.4°, and at 8 P.M. it was 102° F., at 9 P.M. it had risen to 106 2° F., notwithstanding the adminis- tration of antipyrin, Dr. TooGOOD now saw the patient and ordered the following medicine :—

e

R. Antipyrin, grs. xx.

Tr. Jaborandi m. xxx. Mist. Diaphoret ad. ži.

to be given at once and another dose in an hour's time as the skin was very dry and hot, at 9.45 P.M. the temperature had risen to 107.6° he was now placed in a bath temperature 98° F. this was cooled down by ice to 76° F. in 10 minutes his pulse began to intermit and became weaker in strength, he was removed from the bath and 3i. brandy was given; his temperature was now 101·4° F.

At 11 P.M. it had risen to 105·6°, at 11.30 P.M. it was 106° F., at 12.25 A.M. (13th) 107·4° and at 12.45 A.M. 108.6° F. ice-packing was at once cominenced; at 1 A.M. temperature was 107 6° twenty grains of quinine were now given. At 1.23 A.M. it was 107°, as the temperature did not seem to fall notwithstanding the wet-packing another twelve grains of quinine were given. At 1.33 A.M. tem- perature was 105.2° F. at 2.15 A.M. 104.8°, at 3.05 A.M. 101-4° F. and at 3.35 A.M. it registered 100.8° all during this time the pulse was quick and weak, small doses of iced champagne were frequently administered. Ice-packing was now discontinued; at 3.45 A.M. after he had been placed in bed sixty minims of the hydrobromate solution of quinine were injected hypodermically and 5 grains of quinine were ordered every hour in the form of a pill. At 5 A.M. it had however risen to 101.7° half an ounce of Warburg's Tincture was now given, at 6.30 A.M. it had risen to 104.2° F. and at 7 a.m. 105°. At 7.45 A.M. 105.8° F. was registered-wet packing was again commenced and con- tinued to 10 A.M. when it was 102.2° this was now discontinued ten minims of the hypodermic solution of quinine were administered, the temperature however steadily rose again and at 4.45 P.M. was 106.6° F., wet packing was again used and continued to 7.30 P.M. when the temperature had fallen to 99.8° F. Quinine was given as before, but notwithstanding that this was persevered with every hour the temperature steadily arose again and at 4 A.M. on the 14th registered 108° F. Recourse was again had to wet packing and the temperature by this means was lowered seven degrees by 7 A.M.

As will be seem from the chart (No. 3.) the temperature rose twice again that day to over 105° F. when the same treatment was used, this last time at 12 midnight the temperature fell in half an hour three-and-a-half degrees. It arose again steadily that day (15th) until 6.45 A.M. when it was 105.2° F. wet packing was again commenced, and continued until 8.45 A.M. when temperature was 100·6° F.

In the evening (7.30 P.M.) as the temperature had again risen to 105.8° and the skin was very dry two- thirds of a grain of pilocarpin was injected hypodermically and although in few minutes it produced profuse perspiration this was only temporary. The temperature fell in 20 minutes to 105 4° the skin how- ever soon became dry again and at 9.55 P.M. registered 108° F., wet packing was again commenced and notwithstanding this at 10.10 P.M., the temperature was 108.8°, at 10.25 P.M. it had fallen to 106·8°, as he was now in a state of collapse, pulse almost imperceptible, he was placed back in bed a hypodermic of brandy was now given, his temperature soon rose again, at 11.20 P.M. it was 108° and at 11.35 P.M. the patient died, shortly after death the temperature (per rectum) was 110° F.

REMARKS. This was one of those peculiarly malignant cases of remittent fever in which qui- nine seems to have no effect.

335

III. CASE OF INTERMITTENT FEVER. RECOVERY.

LUI A-KAN, œt 18, Coolie.

Admitted 10 A.M. 1st September, 1889.

On admission he stated that he had felt unwell the previous day; his temperature was 100-4° skin very dry and complaining of pains in his limbs, headache and general feeling of "malaise ”—at 11 A.M. his temperature had risen to 104° F., the following medicine was now given:-

Re Tr. Jaborandi m. xx. Antipyrin, gr. xx. Mist. Diaphoret ad zi.

2 horis sdm.

At 11.30 A.M. his temperature had risen to 104.8° and at 12 noon to 106.6° F. As the medicine did not appear to have any effect and the temperature was steadily rising it was thought advisable to ice pack him; this was accordingly done in the manner already described in the previous case and in two hours his temperature by this means was reduced to 99.6°, the various observations during that time being as follows:-

12.15 P.M. 12.30

12.45

"

1.00

""

1.15

>>

1.30

>>

1.45

"}

2.00 2.15

""

.105.6°

...105°

...104.2°

..103.8°

..103.2°

.102.8°

.102°

..101°

99.6°

""

As he was now somewhat collapsed he was replaced in bed between blankets and heat applied externally, ten grains of quinine being given by the mouth and repeated every two hours, his diet being milk and congee.

At 8 P.M. his temperature had risen to 102° F. and at 10 P.M. to 103·2°, the following medicine was now given.

Re Antipyrin, grs. xx.

Aq. Camph. 3i. o horâ sdm.

and the result observed, at 11 P.M. his temperature had fallen to 102·8°, at 1 A.M. (2nd September) it was 102°, at 3 A.M. 101°, and at 6 A.M., it had fallen to 98.6° the antipyrin was now discontinued quinine given as before; that evening it rose again to 104-2° F. (8 P.M.) the antipyrin was now substituted and it rapidly fell, after 4 doses the temperature had fallen to 99.6° midnight, the quinine was again ordered and this time it was given in 10-grain doses every hour during the day, the temperature that evening did not rise above normal. As the temperature was normal on the morning of the 3rd 10- grain doses of quinine three times a day were ordered, a pint of beef tea being added to his diet with one pound of rice.

On the fourth the quinine was reduced to 5-grain doses thrice daily-and he was discharged cured on the 7th.

REMARKS. This was a case of intermittent fever with the paroxysm more marked than is usually the case, during the year we have had many such cases, as a rule however the temperature does not rise above 105° F. when if antipyrin be administered it almost immediately begins to fall profuse perspiration setting in-if we find antipyrin has not this effect we invariably now ice-pack

these cases.

This patient had no return of the fever; I have been able to keep him under observation since that time, as he was soon after engaged as a Hospital servant.

Temperature chart (No. 4.) appended.

Appendix B.

I.-GUN-SHOT WOUND OF THE LEG AND THIGH.

WONG SAI SU, æt. 12, Chinese girl, admitted in the Hospital 27th January, 1889, at 4.15 A.M. suffering from gun-shot wound of right lower extremity.

On admission :-There was an abrasion of the skin on the contiguous sides of the great toe and the second toe of the right foot, a round wound about the size of a five cent piece with clean cut edges on the inner part of the right leg three inches below the knee, and another wound on the inner surface of the lower third of the right thigh some 2" above the knee-this being much larger than the wound in the leg, the edges were not so clearly defined and more irregular.

Connecting these two wounds was a sinus running along under the skin.

The treatment consisted in syringing out the sinus with carbolic lotion, inserting a drainage tube between the two wounds and placing the limb on a macintyre splint; on the third day the temperature rose to 100.2° and there was evidence of " cellulitis." Warm lead and opium fomentations were applied.

336

February 10th Temperature again rose to 100:20, an abscess formed in the inner side of the upper third of the leg behind the sinus, this was opened; another incision had to be made on the 16th February..

During the whole of this time there was a free discharge of slightly offensive shreddy pus from the original sinus.

The inflamation now subsided. On the 4th of March the drainage tube was removed as the dis- charge was very slight.

The sinus slowly healed up and on 14th March the limb was taken out of the splint, passive motion was commenced and continued with, and the patient was discharged cured on 28th April, she had then free use of her knee joint and could walk well with the aid of a stick.

REMARKS.-The wounds were caused by a bullet from a Martini Henry Rifle, the bullet evidently having passed between the great and second toes of the right foot then entered the leg three inches below the knee grazing the tibia and emerging on the inner surface of the thigh some 24 inches above the knee.

The girl at the time she was shot was lying in a sampan evidently with her leg somewhat flexed on the thigh.

II. GUN-SHOT WOUND OF BACK.

YEE ON, œt. 26, chinaman, admitted 4.20 P.M. 7th April, 1889, suffering from a gun-shot wound of back situated 1" below the angle of the scapula and 11" to left of the middle line. He was in a state of collapse having lost a considerable quantity of blood.

The patient was anæsthetised and the wound examined; after enlarging the orifice of inlet and carefully probing the wound the bullet was at last found lodged in the arch of the eighth dorsal vertebra, the angle of the ninth rib having been grazed by the bullet, considerable difficulty was ex- perienced in finding it the patient being very muscular and the bullet being lodged pretty deeply some 4" from the surface thus necessitating great care in exploration.

It was firmly logded in the vertebra so much so that after seizing the bullet with the forceps considerable traction had to be used before it was dislodged.

The wound was plugged with lint saturated in carbolic oil, a small vessel being tied, and half grain of morphia, was injected subcutaneously.

He slept well that night. On the evening of the 9th his temperature rose to 101-8°, on the morning of the 10th it was normal, 5 grains of quinine were given every four hours, temperature rose to 100-4° in evening of 10th, wound was doing well it having been dressed and syr